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Full text of "Longstone records, Derbyshire .."

m 









THE LIBRARY 

OF 

THE UNIVERSITY 

OF CALIFORNIA 

LOS ANGELES 



LONGSTONE RECORDS. 



Xongetonc IRecorbs, 

Dedicated by permission to 
THE RT. HON. 

VICTOR CHRISTIAN WILLIAM CAVENDISH, P.C, M.P., 

BY ' 

G. T. WRIGHT, J. P. 



What a delightful treasure house we find in the records of the past. 

Thos. Brushfield, J. p. 

Ashford, 1864. 



BAKEWELL : 

BENJAMIN GKATTON, PRINTEE, ETC. 

190(i. 



*m 



J95 



i.ti^t}'' 



PROLOGUE. 



I\ the Preface, reasons are given for publishing these Records, 
but nothing can more faithfully convey the Author's feelings on 
the subject than the following lines from the pen of Mr. William 
Beresford, published in the ^^ Antiquary " Jul}^ 1863. " We who 
are now treading the stage of life, often love to wander back 
in imagination through the dark periods of antiquity, and to recall 
to life, as it were, the venerable forms and hoary sages of a 
vanished race. Related to them as we are, by anticipation of the 
same future, and frequently by connection with the same place, 
we love to trace their footsteps on the grass grown road, to mark 
their hands on the crumbling ruin, and to catch a glimpse of their 
superstitions in the mysterious legends they have left us. And 
though it be the onerous task of the historian to record the full 
story of their lives and deeds it is that of the antiquary to gather 
up the fragments of the records which remain and to hand them 
down as special relics to posterity. In the shape of traditions 

they aje" — 

" Ever drifting, drifting, drifting 

On the shifting 
Currents of the restless heart ! 

TUl at length in books recorded. 

They, like hoarded 
Household words — no more depart." 



Prologue. 

It was (the Author believes) Mr. Thomas Brushfield, J.P., in 
one of his many interesting effusions, who said — "It is a pleasant 
thought that probably there is no human being whose welfare 
would not be of interest to some one else. The feeling may be 
greater or less according to circumstances, and families no less 
than individuals are subject to it." Annals of towns and villages 
also supply the present inhabitants with pictures of old-world life 
and customs, as well as the rise and decay of families, sufficient 
for much sober thought. " Monuments and tombstones perish, 
but a truthful record of the past is a memoiial more lasting than 
brass." [W. P. W. Phillimore.] 

Animated by such feelings, the author, who has compiled most 
of these records in extreme old age and through a painful illness 
away from his home and publisher, ventures to ask the kind 
indulgence of posterity for the many faults of omission and 
commission. 






PREFACE. 

Although these " Longstone liecords" have been stning 
together in homely fashion and chiefly for home use, they are 
none the less reHahle, great care having been exercised to secure 
accuracy. As distinguished from a historical work most of the 
documents are given in their integrity or in careful nbstracts and 
translations. The reproductions of the more importaut ancient 
charters have been revised by that learned and experienced expert 
the Rev. R. A. Wilson whose contributions from the Wilson 
Collection at Bolsterstone, are gratefully acknowledged. 

As several other townships are introduced, a first glance at 
these pages may perhaps suggest a more comprehensive title. 
These townships, however, are not tieated directly and ex- 
haustively, and (excepting Ashford) are only brought in to 
illustrate various points connected with the Wright family 
Estates or some event in village history. If the Author had 
been a younger man or at least not an invalid, he would have 
attempted, with possibly the aid of his friend the Rev. J. R. 
Luxmoore, the more ambitious task of the Records of Ashford of 
which Great Longstone is manorially a part, and with which in 
olden days his family were very closely connected. There is 
another reason for the Title : Longsdon i.e. Longstone was the 
name of the Wrights as well as of the township long before the 
family assumed the distinctive name of Wright. Whilst formerly 
the family had Estates in Ashford, Great Longstone, Little 
Longstone, Brushfield, Foolow, Wardlow, Eyam, and Kniveton, 
the present Estate is confined almost entirely to Great Longstone. 

As it is, this work is not a history of Longstone as some readers 
may expect. It is a serious attempt to collect interesting and 
useful local data of past and present events, and, at the same 



Preface. 

time, to preserve if not the charters and deeds themselves, at least 
their essence and intention. Many of these are perishing from 
decay and becoming, like old parish registers, more and more 
difficult to deciplier. Tliese documents are so numerous that it 
has been necessary to make a selection. They will be more or 
less interesting according to the stand point of the individual 
investigator. The Autlior's first intention was to print this 
collection for family use and reference, leaving the question of 
publication open for future decision, but the contents being largely 
public property he decided to publish them at once. It may be 
contended that it was unnecessary to give this or that item of 
iufoniiation, but it should be remembered that these records are 
chielly intended for our successors — the Lougstonians of tlio 
future, who are unlikely to make any complaint on that score. 
For the most pari tlie author has left facts to speak for 
tliouiselves without comment except by way of explanation. 
Availing himself of family and other documents and information 
derived from friends he has also, by permission, appended copious 
extracts from various wi iters on Longstone — Dr. J. Charles Cox, 
Mr. J. I'ym Yeatman, Mr. J. B. Firth, Messrs. Kelly & Co., — 
to all of whom he tenders his best thanks. He has not confined 
himself rigidly to Longstone or even to Ashford but there is very 
little that is not, at least indirectly, connected with tbe locality. 
It is to be hoped that the neighbouring townshii^s will also 
publish their records. The much desired history of Bakewell 
would thus be greatly facilitated. 

The classification of documents and subjects is less perfect than 
could be wished, as some of the materials were not available until 
the book was partly through the press. Reference to the Index 
will generally enable the reader to find the subject required. 

Encouraged by Archreological and other Societies, there can be 
no doubt that there has been a great awakening as to the value 



Preface. 

of ancient manuscripts of all kinds especially old Charters, Wills, 
Parish Eegisters, &c. Many Societies have been formed for the 
purpose of printing Parisli and other records. Legislation for 
the better custody of public records is another sign of their 
appreciation. In the course of centuries much has been lost. 
Bonfires have been made of old documents from sheer ignorance 
of their value but the days of indifference and neglect are happily 
past and it may be hoped that individuals as well as Societies will 
give a helping hand in the good cause of the preservation of 
public records. It is a lamentable fact that in " the good old 
days" our Parish Eegisters, Vestry Minutes, Churchwardens and 
Overseers Accounts were not better cared for. With a few 
notable exceptions, there comes the same cry of Parish books 
mutilated and left to haphazai'd custody without a serious thought 
of their future use and value. For this state of things the Clergy 
were chiefly to blame. Tlie}' not infrequently did registration 
by proxy and gave little thought to the care of the Eegisters 
until compelled to do so by legislation. Even in the present day 
Parish books are sometimes discovered in old and mouldy 
surroundings, owing to remissness on the part of their rightful 
custodians. The author has had to gather his material from 
meagre and often distant sources. In the numerous lists of old 
Longstone residents it is interesting to note how many of the 
names remain to this time, but of these there are none with such 
an unbroken record of lauded proprietorship as those of the 
Wrights and Longsdons of the present day. 

The author is very grateful to the many kind friends who have 
helped to bring the work to a completion — amongst whom are 
the following — 

The Rev. Gr. Andrew. 

Mr. H. P. Bagshawe. 

Messrs. J, & I. Bennett. 



Preface. 

Mr. J. E. Blackwall. 

The Clerk of the Peace. 

Mr. V. R. Cockerton. 

Mr. S. Dore. 

Mr. A. W. J. Eyre. 

Dr. Fentem. 

The Rev. J. M. J. Fletcher. 

Mr. B. Gratton. 

Mr. A. Hawes. 

Mr. G. Holmes. 

Mr. E. M. Longsdon. 

The Rev. J. R. Luxmoore. 

The Rev. J. S. Luxmoore. 

Mr. Gilson Martin. 

Mr. G. Morton. 

Mr. F. NuttaU. 

The Police Authorities. 

Mr. I. B. Shimwell. 

Mr. H. A. Spanton. 

Mr. A. G. Taylor. 

Mr. F. J. Taylor. 

Mr. H. B. Taylor. 

Mr. J. W. Thornhill. 

Mr. J. T. Trickett. 

The Rev. R. A. Wilson, and others. 
The last named gentleman, besides contributing many Long- 
stone items from ancient charters in his family collection at 
Bolsterstone, has enabled the author to give some of the old Latin 
Charters with their interesting contrnetions and abbreviations in 
fao simile, and translations. To Inm the author is indeLled for 
abstracts, transcripts and translations of some almost illegible 
deeds of which, however, he has been prevented, by great 
suffering, from taking full advantage. 

G. T. WRIGHT, 

Llandudno, :go6. 



PRINCIPAL CONTENTS. 



Ancient Deeds. 

Appendices. 

Ashford Court Rolls, &c., &c. 

Associations and Clubs. 

Barmasters. 

Bishops of the Diocese and Vicars of Bakewell. 

Chronological Events from 1256. 

Church and its restoration. 

Church Officials. 

Churchwardens from 1636. 

Constables and Police. 

Curious Old Latin Will of Joan Wright 1471, with translation. 

Endowments of Church and School. 

Fac simile of old Latin Charters with their abbreviations and 
contractions, followed by English translations. 

Gilder Quarry Arbitration. 

Hullah Singing Classes— 1871-3. 

" |n Memoriam" Notices. 
Incumbents of Longstone Church. 
Interesting Map of Little Longstone, 1611. 

Longstone Charities. 

„ Parish Council. 

„ Parish Boundaries — with and without Holme. 

„ Property Owners. 

„ School. 



Longstone Records. 

Maoistrates resident in and about Longstone for 250 years. 

Manor of Ashford. 

Manor of Little Lonj<stone. 

Marriages at Longstone Church for LSO years. 

Mines and Mining. 

Overseers of the Poor from 1694. 

Patronage of the Living. 

Pedigree of the Wrights. 

Pedigree of the Longsdons, Reference to. 

Preface. 

Quaint E.\tracts and Memoranda of general interest. 

Residents of Great and Little Longstone, Wardlow, Rowland and 
Hassop. 

Stewards of the Manor of Ashford. 

Wright Estate in 1720 and 1770. 



Appendices — 

1 . Dr. Co.x, from Churches of Derbyshire. 

2. Mr. J. B. Firth, from Highways and Byways in Derbyshire. 

3. Mr. Pym Yeatman's Feudal History of Derbyshire. 

4. Messrs. Kelly & Co's description of Longstone. 

5. Charity Commissioners on Longstone Charities, 1827. 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Village Cross 

Longstone Church, 1873 — after restoration 
„ „ 1872 — before restoration 

„ „ 1873 — with open seats 

Glebe Land Map, 1893 

Canon Andrew, Memorial Brass ■ 

The Village Blacksmith 

Great Longstone Views 

School Children 

Map of Bakewell including Holme 
Little Longstone — The Stocks 

„ „ — The Manor House 

—The Village 
Map of Wright Estate 1770, in Sections 
Map of Little Longstone, 1611, in Sections 
Monsal Dale about 1860 
Commons Inclosure Award Map Extract 
Tithe Map Extract ... ... 

Longstone Hall Views 
Ej'am Hall Views 



Pases. 

Frontispiece. 

1 

6 

7 

42 

110 

162 

187 
198 

221 

281 

290 

361 
368 
388 
392 



INDEX 



Ancient Deeds ... 



Andrew. The Rev. Canon 
Andrew (Vicar) Rev. Giles 



Andrew. Mrs. 

Abraham. Bishop 

Adam son of Peter de Longsdon ... 

Almsgiving, 1639 ... 

Amusing Appeal to the Congregation 

Archery 

Ashford Bridge 

Ashford Charters 

Ashford Courts Baion 

Ashford Court Rolls 

Ashford in the Water 

Ashford Manor 

Ashford Manor, Lords of 

Ashford Parish Register 

Associations, Clubs, &c. 

BailifTs Account Roll, 1347 ... 

Bakewell. Vicars of 

Balston. Archdeacon 

Baptistery & Cemetery 

Barmasters for the Mines 

Barmote Courts 

Bleaklow 

Briefs, 1653, &c. 

Brown & Co. (Contractors) ... 



PAGE. 
BOOK. APPENDI.X. 

283 

299 

326 C. 266 

110 

62 
126 
148 
126 

17 
329 
235 

88 
125 
237 



216 

247 

204 
204 

113 

334 

61 

17 

51 

99 

208 

230 

236 

21 



C. 248 

C. 278 
C. 239 



C. 295 



Index. 



XV. 



Burial Fees, 1700 

Burial in Woollen Shrouds ... 

Buxton. Dr. Edward ... 

Cavendish. Rt. Hon. Victor 

n >i " 

Chapelry of Longstone (Dr. Cox) 
Charities ... 
Chronological Events 
Churchwardens 

„ Addenda 

Churchwardens' Accounts, 1694 & 1695 ... 
Churchyard 

„ 
Clergy Lists 
Clerk of the Peace 
Clerks to the Guardians 
Clubs, &c. ... 

Coat Armour of the Wrights & Longsdons 
Commons Inclosure. Before the ... 
Commons Inclosure Act, 1810 
Commons Inclosure Award 
" Compleat Mineral Laws of Derbyshire," 
Constables. Parish 
Constabulary Force. Modern... 
Contributors to the Work 
County Assessment, 1645, &c. ... 

Court Rolls of Ashford 

Cox. Dr., Chapelry of Longstone... 

Cressbrook 

Cricket 

Cross. The Village 

Crossley. Mrs. 

,, ,, ••• ••• 

Curious old Will of Joan Wright, 1471 



PAGE. 
BOOK. APPENDIX. 
236 
110 

59 



Title Page 
282 



152 

129 

65 

xxiii 

319 

2 

51 

79 

60 

238 
93 

113 

199 

381 

203 

342 

95 

97 

Preface 

224 



1734 



126 
198 
127 
388 
315 



A. 
E. 



97 



C. 383 



C. 
B. 
D. 



278 



XVI. 



Lcngstone Records. 



Dean and Chapter Lands, 1415, Rental of. 
De Hiithrickfield 
Derbyshire Dialect ... 

II ■ • • * * • 

Derbyshire Royal Inlirniary ... 
Derbyshire Times, 1873 
Devonshire. Duke of 



Domesday Book 

Ely Cathedral ... 

,, ... ... ... 

Exchange of lands, 1604 

Eyani Assessment, 1535 

Eyres of Hassop 

"Eyre & My Lady of Devon", 1629 

Faculty for the Church Restoration 

Felons. Association for prosecution of 

Firth. J. B. — Highways & Bj'ways in Derbyshire 

Flint. William, " Barr-master of Longstone'' ... 

Football 

Frankpledge. View of ... 

" Freeholders and iMyners Case" 

Furness. George — In Memoriam ... 

Gerard, son of Adam to Robert le Wright, 1330 
Gifts to the Church 



Gilder Quarry Case 
Giles. Saint 



PAGE. 
BOOK. APPENDIX. 

52 
190 
111 
190 
387 

23 

30 

53 
159 
204 

2 

24 

291 

225 

4 

228 



11 
113 

343 
126 
205 
349 
77 

331 

38 

42 

85 

352 

196 



B. 



Index. 



xvii. 



Gisborne Charity... 

Great Court Baron 

Great Longstone Manorial Survey 

Griffin Cliarter to Adam, son of Peter, 1252 

Griffin Pedigree ... 

Hassop Charity 

Hassop Estate ... 

Hassop Estate Claimant 

Headboroughs Accounts, 1719 — 1721 

Hedge-wood stealing ... 

Highway Surveyors 

Highways & Byways in Derbyshire. J. B. Firth 

Hodgkynson of Wardlow, 1482 

Holme Meal Charity ... 

Hullah Singing Classes, 1871—3 

In Memoriam, George Furness family 

„ Rev. R. Lomas 

„ Rev. Bache ThornhiU 

Inclosure Act. Commons 
Inclosure Award. Commons 
Inscriptions on lead roof of Church 
Inkerman Lodge of Oddfellows 

Jurors' names (mining) Eyam, Stony Middleton, 
&c. 



PAGE. 
BOOK. APPENDIX. 
160 
204 

214 
327 



160 
1 

322 

191 

98 

223 
159 
100 

77 
104 
108 
203 
203 

78 
124 

345 



Kelly's Directory for Longstone Townships 
King Charles's letter to the Earle of Devonshire, 

1666 ... ... ... 225 



C. 253 



B. 320 



B. 



D. 



Lady Manners School ... 
Lead Mining 



243 
339 



XVllI. 



Longstone Records. 



License for Divine Service in Schoolroom 

Lichfield. Bishops of 

Lichfield. Dean & Chapter of 
,, ,, 

Little Barmote Courts... 

Little Longstone Assessment, 1736 

Little Longstone Deeds, &c. 

Little Longstone Manor 

Lomas. Rev. Robert, In Memoriam 

Longsdon & Wright Families 

Longsdon (Longstone) Charters ... 

Longsdon Charity ... 

Longsdon Estate Accounts, 1817 ... 

Longsdon Pedigree. Reference to 

Longstone Charities 

Longstone Church 

,, „ Bellringers 

„ „ Bells 

„ „ Choristers 

,, „ Endowment 

„ „ Endowment 

„ „ Endowment 

,, „ Furniture. Gifts of 

„ ,, In Memoriam notice . 



PAGE. 
BOOK. APPENDIX. 

15 

60 

52 

53 
210 
294 
'2.91 
221 
104 
388 



162 
... 295 

... 152 

1 

74 

73 

70 

49 

... 159 

167 

85 

59 

... 104 

„ ... 108 

... 110 

Memorial stained-glass East 

window ... ... 4 

Memorial stained-glass windows 76 
Memorial Tablet ... 4 

Memorial Tablet ... 59 



C. 266 



C. 
E. 



385 



Index. 



XIX. 



Longstone Church, Memorial Tablet 



Incumbents 

Inventory, 1887 

Music 

Officials ... 

Officiating Clergy 

Organists... 

Patronage 

Rates, 1778 

Restoration 

Restoration Accounts 

Restoration, Special Gifts.. 



Restoration Subscribers 
Roof Inscriptions 
Sidesmen 

Longstone Edge 

Longstone Parish Registers ... 

Longstone Townships (Kelly's Directory) 

Longstone and Berewites of Ashford. The 

Longstonian. The 

Lot and Cope... 



PAGE. 
BOOK. APPENDIX. 

77 
104 

62 

57 

69 

72 

63 

70 

43 

244 

5 

25 

38 

42 

85 

30 

78 

69 



388 
341 



385 



B. 
C. 
D. 
C. 300 



Magistrates .. ... ... 94 

Map of Little Longstone, 1611 ... ... 290 

Marriages at Longstone Church ... 80 

„ „ ,, Addenda xxiii 

Milnes Charity ... ... ... 160 

Milnes Charters ... ... C. 269 

Mines and Miners ... ... ... 343 

Miscellaneous. Church Rates, 1778 ... 338 
„ CuriousCustomatGreatLongstone 231 

„ Derbyshire Bet ... 246 



XX. 



Longstone Records. 



Miscellaneous. Derbyshire Royal Infirmary 
„ Modern election expenses 

„ Wright Exhibition 

Missing Registers 

Monyash. In Memoriam. Rev. R. Lomas 

Music in Longstone Church, 1825... 

Newburgh. Claimant to Earldom of ... 

Overseers of tlie Poor ... 
Overseers. Assistant 

Paley, Rev. John 

Parish Accounts, Specimens of 

Parish boundaries 

Parish Constables 

Parish Council 

Parliamentary Election Expenses in 1906 

Peak. The 

Pedigree of the Longsdons, Reference to 

Pedigree of the Wrights 

Petty Sessions 

Peveril of the Peak 

Pinfold, The 

Poor Law Settlement, 1715 

Poultry Society ... 

Powis, Princes of 

Presentations & Votes of thanks 

Property Owners 

Public Officers ... 

Quarry Arbitration. Gilder 

Residents of Great Longstone, &c. 

Riders Charity 

Rowland 



PAGE 


. 




BOOK. 


APPENDIX. 


387 






282 






394 








B. 


320 


104 






86 








B. 


319 


89 






93 






21 






319 






175 






95 






171 






282 








C. 


240 




C. 


385 




C. 


323 


240 








C. 


240 


199 






325 






126 








C. 


252 


103 






172 






98 






352 






142 






162 


E. 


11 


128 


D. 


5 



Index. 



XXI. 



School 

Schoolmaster in request 

Schoolmasters and Mistresses 

Sellers, Benjamin, Geologist... 

Shaw, R. Norman, R.A. 

Sheldon Manorial Survey 

Shepherds Lodge, The Ancient Order of 

Sidesmen 

Smithers, Edward (Churchwarden) 

,, )» i» 

Societies 

Southwell, Bishops of 
Specimen Overseers' Account, 1737 
Specimen Wright Charters 



Station Masters 

Stewards, Manor of Ashford... 

Stocks, The 

Stoke Flat Water Scheme ... 

Subsidy Rolls 

Sunday School ... 

Survey of Ashford Manor 

The Good Doctor 

Thirteen Shillings and Fourpence ... 

Thornhill, Rev. Bache. In Memoriam 

Tideswell 

Tithe Rolls... 

Transcripts of Ancient Deeds 

Twenty Club 

Two Longstones. The 



152 
211 



163 

108 

110 & 240 



•si /L^.^'Kj,/"-^- 



PAGE. 
BOOK. APPENDIX. 
146 

24.5 
141 
238 
4 
213 
123 

69 

23 

78 
126 

6) 
323 
327 
329 
331 
333 

94 

99 
198 
192 



C. 274 



B. 318 



270 



283 

127 
388 



XXll. 



Longstone Records. 



Urhan Powers re Great Longstone 

Vestry Minutes, 1639 

Vicarage, The 

Votes of thanks and Presentations 

Waites, The 

Wardlow 

Wardlow Manorial Survey 

Wardlow Sunday School 

Watson. White, on Bakewell 

Willof Joan Wright, 1471 ... 

William de Den son of Robert son of Adam 

de Longsdon 
Wilson Collection, Ancient Deeds ... 
Wright & Longsdon, Coat Armour 
Wright & Longsdon Families 
Wright Charity, Henry 
„ Thomas 
„ William 

Estate, 1720 . 

Estate, 1770 

Estate Map, 1770 

family, " Master Wright" 

Motto 

Pedigree .. 

Pedigree Griffin Charters. Transcript 

»» ,» ,, 

Wright versus Eyre. 1630 
Wynstay M.S.S. (Sir Watkin Wynn's)... 

Yeatman. Pym, Ashford in the Water 
York's History. PhiUp 



326 
390 
232 



D. 



PAGE. 
BOOK. APPENDIX. 

195 



235 

80 

103 

196 
128 
215 
152 
241 
315 

333 
283 

388 
1.57 
156 
154 
250 
266 
281 
392 



C. 383 



C. 385 
C. 323 



C. 261 

C. 

C. 262 



Addenda. xxiii. 



PAGE. 



OFFICIATING CLERGY. 
63 Cowan, D. 

Dorritz, — 
Jones, F. Hodgson. 
Neate, I. B. 
Steele, — 

CHURCHWARDENS. 

65 1603 Thomas Sellars and Robert Haslam, 

(Names found in an Old Deed.) 
68 1906 W. R. Pitt Dixon and E. M. Longsdon. 

BELLRINGER. 
74 & 1873 The name of the original Bellringer was James 
144 Bettney who afterwards assumed the name of 

Nadin. 

MARRIAGES. 
1905 McCrindle— Smedley. 
Blackwell — Springall. 
Bean— Hill. 
McChesney — Johnson. 

CERTIFICATE. 
110 Date of the Certificate— Oct. 18, 1731. 

CHRONOLOGICAL EVENTS. 
129 1900 Little Longstone Sewerage completed. 
1903 Dedication of Cressbrook Church. 
1903 Stoke Flat Water Scheme for Ashford, Caiver, part 
of Eyam, Froggatt, Hassop, Great and Little 
Longstone, Rowland and Stony Middleton — 
completed. 



XXIV. 



Longstone Records, 



ERRATA. 



PAGE. LINE. 

54 11 For sell read sett as in page 168, line 10. 

39 27 For nonogenarian read nonagenarian. 

143 ) v These two page numiicrs are repeated. The latter 

144 ij } must be read as 143a and 144a. 

203 The iast_ For Board of Agriculture read ClerU of the Peace. 

300 For page 030 read page 300. 



314 



APPENDIX B. 

Introduction. 
2 For e.xtraci read extract. 



266 



APPENDIX C. 

For Longsdon Charters read Long.stone Charter?. 




Longstone Church from the K.E. 
1S13. 

AFTER RESTORATION. 




Longstone Church from the S.E. 
1873. 



LONGSTONE RECORDS. 



/THREAT LOXGSTOXE Church, dedicated to St. Giles, is 
^ \y of considerable antiquity, and is possessed of a very fine 
15th Century roof. Of beautiful proportions, it comprises 
internall)', nave, side aisles, south porch, chancel with north vestry, 
and tower at the west end. Six narrow pointed arches on each 
side of the nave divide it from the side aisles, and form a striking 
feature in so small a building. The dimensions of the ground area 
are: — nave, 56 by 18 feet ; aisles, 56ft. by 6ft. 6in. ; chancel, 26 by 
14 feet. The basement windows, of irregular design, are filled 
with stained glass, with the exception of two in the Hassop Chantry 
and one in the Vestry. The Church is well lit by clerestory 
windows. The stone font has lately been remodelled, and some 
excellent carving introduced on the panels. It has been removed 
from the entrance porch door to the west end, and a handsome 
carved oak cover has been placed over it. The pulpit is marble 
on a stone base on the north side of the chancel arch. The 
organ is in the chancel. The east end of the south aisle is shut 
off by an oak screen (supposed to be the old rood screen) and 
forms the family pew of the Hassop Estate belonging to Charles 
Stephen Leslie, who is a Roman Catholic and non-resident. All 
the other sittings are free and unappropriated, and, like the seats 
in the chancel for clergy and choir, are of modern oak, having 
replaced for the most part long and square high deal pews, which 
extended into the chancel almost to the Altar rail, and were 
appropriated by the principal inhabitants. Particulars of the 
Church fixtures, memorial and other gifts will be found in a 
later portion of this section. The exterior of the Church is 
equally pleasing. The low-pitched lead roofs of the Nave and 
Chancel are visible but do not obtrude themselves unduly. The 
walls are of limestone finished with gritstone coping. The tower 
is turreted and furnished with vane, lightning conductor, frame 



2 Longstone Records. 

and pole for Ha)^. and a clocli with a face to both sontli and cast. 
The Churchyard requires eniari>enient and tlie question is Luider 
consideration. 

The exact date when Christianity was preaciied in the Peak 
district may not he known, hut it is certain that it was quickly 
followed by the erection, throughout the land, and the endowment 
by private benevolence, of Churches like our own which, in course 
of time, became dilapidated, and were restored, or rebuilt on 
lari>er lines, at dates loni; before the House of Commons was in 
its infancy and when Dissent was non-existent. Our great 
Cathedrals, and other Churches such as Ashbourne, Hartington, 
Tideswell, Youlgrave, and others in this Count}', bear witness to 
the truth of this assertion. Many years ago (1873) the writer 
had the privilege of attending the I'iOOth anniversary of the 
foundation of Ely Cathedral, by Etheldreda, queen of a small 
principality of Britain. As the Bishop of the Diocese, the late 
Dr. Harold Browne, remarked in his sermon " There was no 
English kingdom nor nation " when Ely was made the site of a 
great Christian Church by "the pious Christian princess." In 
connection with this festival, a quotation is given from the 
speech of the late Mr. Beresford Hope, M.P., at the Corn 
Exchange, Ely, in responding to the toast of the House of 
Commons — "The House of Commons was comparatively a young 
" institution — (some 600 years old) — to those who celebrated a 
"foundation 1200 years of age! He asked them to think what 
" this country and what Ely was when Etheldreda built her Church 
" upon that hill — the island to whose shores the northern hordes 
" had crowded — the great land and people of England. The 
" people had been Christianised, but there was no sovereign over 
"all the land; no united Legislature; our institutions were being 
" moulded ; our parishes were being formed ; yet there existed 
" the Church of England— the Church of Christ, the oldest of 
"our institutions bound up with all the affections of the people, 
" with the highest hopes, with our joys, our troubles, our cares 
" and duties in this world. The Church was a greater power 
" than even the House of Commons ; it was a power in the 
"kingdom of older origin and greater importance than any other. 



The Church. 3 

"The Church of England had been criticised, attacked and 
"obituarised, but woe to the Ministry and woe to the House 
"of Commons that from any supposed poHtical exigency endorsed 
"any scheme for its destruction." There is food for much 
thought in these words, mingled with admiration for an age 
that produced such enduring monuments of industry, skill and 
beauty, as to serve as models for future generations of architects. 

Longstone Church was probably re-built on the site of a smaller 
one by Wenuwyn, one of the Welsh Princes, nearly 700 years ago. 
His son, Griffin, in 1262, founded and endowed a Chantry in the 
Church. The endowment has been lost sight of, but the Chantry 
can be no other than that now called the Hassop Chantry or Pew. 
These Princes were for a certain period Lords of the Manor of 
Ashford which includes Great Longstone. A few years earlier, 
Griffin founded and endowed a Chantry in Ashford Church and 
with the same result. 

There have been several so called restorations of our Church 
fabric, notably in the 17th century when the roof was newly 
covered with lead, and other repairs were carried out, but there 
is no summary left to us of the actual work done. 

In 1827, the Rev. R. Rawlins writes— " The pews are irregular, 
and very old. Against the walls are the achievements of Eyre of 
Hassop and Wright of Longstone. On the pulpit and reading 
desk, with a large family seat, and on some of the pews are 

ancient carvings." (Dr. Cox's Churches of Derbyshire.) 

Less than a century ago, most of the old oak seats were removed 
to make way for unsightly, if comfortable, high deal pews in which 
the proprietors (many with their dogs) could make their devotions 
very much at their ease. 

In 1872, the necessity for preserving the Church structure from 
imminent ruin was brought home to the inhabitants, by the 
erection of a scaffold pole in front of the pulpit, by the advice 
of experts: and the Restoration to something like its primitive 
beauty was the result. As details of this Work will occupy a large 
part of this section, it is unnecessary to enlarge upon them here. 



4 Longstone Records. 

THK HAST WINDOW AND MEMORIAL TABLETS. 



In his Work -'-The Churches of Derbyshire" (1876) after truly 
stating that " there is no ancient coloured glass left in Longstone 
Chiuxh," Dr. Cox goes on to say that " the East Window formerly 
served as a memorial window to the first of the Eyres who resided 
at Hassop." This might have been so at the Visitation of 1611, 
but in 1872 there was not the vestige of a memorial window 
throughout the Church. Many generations of the Wright family 
were laid to rest within the Church, but neither window nor tablet 
to their memory remains except those of modern date. The same 
reign of Puritanical Vandalism that defaced and removed the Eyre 
Memorial Plate was responsible probably for the destruction of 
this and other memorial windows and tablets. This window is said 
to have had at its base the fatal inscription which the bigots would 
not tolerate — "Orate pro bono statu Stephi Eyre et Katherime 
uxoris ejus." The compiler of these " Records" was himself the 
discoverer and preserver of the Eyre copper Memorial tablet and 
had it mounted and fixed in the Hassop Chantry (a transcript is 
given below.) The Churchwardens with their eminent adviser, 
Mr. Norman Shaw, were careful to preserve good work of every 
age, even where it was out of reach of the public eye. For 
example, the Crest of the Eyre family on the lead roof over their 
pew was preserved; and an inscription in lead giving the names or 
initials of the Curate and Churchwardens in 1636 was cut out and 
afterwards re-placed on the new lead of the Nave, by the side of an 
inscription dated 1873 giving the names of the Officials at the later 
date. 



Fifiures of a man and ivoman kneelitig face to face at desks. 
A ci'ucifix has been oblitevatcd. 
" Here lyeth Rowland Eyre of Hassope Esquire and Gartrede his wife one 
of the daughters, and coheiresse of Humfrey Stafford of Eyme Esquire, by 
whoe hee had twelve children, eight sonnes and fower daughters, whoe 
hathe given unto the Chappel of Create Longsden for the maintenance of 
Divine Service there XXs yerely, and to the Chappel of Baslowe for the 
maintenance of Divine Service there Xls yerely, to be paid by equall 



The Church Restoration, 5 

portions at the Feasts of the Annuntiation of the Blessed Virgin S. Marie 
and St. Michaell ye archangel, and also hath given unto the poore of the 
towne of Create Longsden XXs yerelv, and to the poore of Hassope and 
Rowland XXs yerely, and to the poore of Calver XXs yerely to be paid 
tliree da\-s before Christmas and three days before Easter for ever. All 
which said several sumes are to bee paied by Thomas Eyre, his sonne and 
heire apparent and his heiress for ever. To whom I have given all my 
landes and rents in Tadington and Create Longsden for ever for ye true 
payment and parformence of ye same, 

Soe leavinge the miseries and troubles of this world with desire that all 
may cease, 1 desire that all good Christians that read this will pray . . . 

(obliterated). 

"Anno Dom., 1624." 



RESTORATION OF 
LONGSTONE CHURCH, 

DERBYSHIRE. 

(1871 . An Appeal for Subscriptions.) 

THIS is a work which is about to be undertaken on the ground 
of urgency and necessity, to preserve a fine specimen of a 
Village Church, and restore it to its primitive beauty. 

The Church is of considerable antiquity, and possesses a v-ery 
fine 15th Century roof, similar in character — as also in its worst 
symptoms of danger before restoration — to that of Youlgreave in 
this County. 

The work has been intrusted to Mr. Norman Shaw, of London, 
who was so successful at Youlgreave, and whose character and 
experience inspire complete confidence. If his plans be completely 
carried out, they will preserve every good feature of the old work, 
and thus make the Church beautiful without destroying its historJ^ 

Besides the roof, it is intended to put the walls and windows into 
repair, to warm the Church thoroughly, to do away with the pew 
system and re-seat the whole building with open sittings which will 
considerably increase the accommodation. A small vestry is also 
contemplated, there being none at present. 



6 Longstone Records, 

The estimate for this and other works is £1545, but it does not 
include an Orjjan, a new Cloci<, repairs in belfry, nor restoration of 
the Churchyard, which are only second in need to the church itself. 

Such an undertaking tasks the powers of a small parish to the 
utmost, and moreover compels it, with considerable reluctance, to 
look outside its strict boundaries for contributors, the whole sum 
having to be raised by voluntary contributions. 

FIRST LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS. 

His Grace the Duke of Devonshire, K.G. 

His Grace the Duke of Rutland, K.G 

Lord George Cavendish, M.P. ... 

A. P. Arkwright, Rsq., M.P 

Mr. Wright (Churchwarden), and Miss Wright, Long- 
stone Hall 

The Rev. John Paley, Longstone Vicarage 

William Longsdon, Esq., Little Longstone 

Captain Smithers (Churchwarden), and Mrs. Smithers, 
Little Longstone 

.lohn Sleigh, Esq., Highgate, London ... 

John Wright, Esq., Eyam Hall ... 

W. T. Carlisle, Esq., New Square, Lincoln's Inn, 
London 

R. Norman, Shaw, Esq., A.R.A., London 

The Rev. Dr. Balston, Bakewell Vicarage 

Edmund Haworth, Esq., Churchdale ... 

William Bradshaw, Esq., Thornbridge Cottage, Long- 
stone ... ... ... ... 

W. Pole Thornhill, Esq., Stanton 



^c^'^KSX^ 



£ 


s. 


d. 


400 








50 








25 








20 








100 








50 








35 








50 








25 








10 








10 








10 








50 








50 








25 








30 










'-n 






to 




BEFORE RESTORATION. 




Loiigstonc Cluinli, 




'^'^'%t^ 



^^^^S3£ 



t-- 



or. 



Oc -. 







LONGSTON E RECORDS. 



^itatioix 

Affixed at the Porch Entrance of Longstone Church, 
May, 1872. 

JAMES THOMAS LAW, Clerk, Master of Arts, Vicar General 
of The Right Reverend Father in God, George Augustus by Divine 
permission Lord Bishop of Lichfield and Official Principal of his 
Episcopal Consistory Court of Lichfield lawfully constituted. To 
all and singular Clerks and literate persons whomsoever in and 
throughout the whole Diocese of Lichfield, Greeting : — 

^Bercaa it hath been represented unto us on the part and 
behalf of the Reverend John Palev, Clerk, Master of Arts, the 
Vicar of the Vicarage of the Parish Church of Saint Giles, 
Longstone, in the County of Derby, and Diocese of Lichfield, 
and George Thomas Wright and Edward Smithers the Church- 
wardens of the same parish. That the Parish Church of Saint 
Giles, Longstone aforesaid, is in great need of restoration and 
repair, that the pews, seats, and sitting-places in the said Church 
are inconveniently arranged, ill-adapted for the purposes of Public 
Worship, and insufficient for the accommodation of the parishioners 
and inhabitants of the said parish, and that it is very desirable 
that the said pews, seats, and sitting-places should be entirely 
taken down and removed, and open seats erected in lieu thereof. 
That the said Parish Church has been suiveyed by a competent 
Architect, and that plans have been prepared by him by which 
it is proposed to thoroughly restore the said Parish Church both 
externally and internally, and also to take down and remove the 
whole of the pews, seats, and sitting-places on the ground floor 
and in the Chancel of the said Church, and to erect open seats 
in lieu thereof upon an uniform and more convenient plan capable 



8 Lon^stone Records, 



to' 



of affording .increased accominodatioii, to the extent of about forty 
sittinj^s, for tlie parishioners, and affording greater facilities for 
the due observance of Public Worship in the said Parish Church, 

Tiub uiBcrects it hath been further represented unto us that 
at a meeting of the parishioners and inhabitants of the said parish 
of Longstone in vestry assembled (pursuant to public notice duly 
given) on Saturday, the Sixth day of April now last past, it nas 
unanimously resolved that the plan prepared by R. N'orman Shaw, 
of No. 30, Argyll Street, Regent Street, in the City of London, 
Architect, for the restoration of the ChLu-ch, should be adopted, 
and that application he made to the Consistory Court of the 
Lord Bishop of Lichfield for a Licence or Faculty to authorize the 
restoration of the said Parish Church being carried out in 
accordance with the said plan, 

Iln^ loliex-ortVi the said The Reverend John Paley, ClerU, 
Master of Arts, the Vicar, and George Thomas Wright and Edward 
Smithers, the Churchwardens of the parish of Longstone afoicsaid, 
have by their Proctor prayed our License or Faculty to authorize 
and empower them to restore the said Parish Clunch of Saint 
Giles, Longstone aforesaid, both externally and internally in 
accordance with the plan submitted to the Vestry meeting above 
referred to and now annexed to these presents, to thoroughly 
restore and repair the roofs of the said Church, to take out the 
present east window and two south windows in the Chancel of 
the said Church, and two of the Clerestory Windows, and to put 
in new windows in lieu thereof, to take down and remove the 
gallery at present blocking up the Towei arch and a portion of the 
west end of the Church, and to opea out the said Tower arch, to 
take down and remove the present pews and sittings on the ground 
floor and in the Chancel of the said Parish Church, and erect open 
seats in lieu thereof as shewn in the annexed plan, to build a 
vestry at the north-cast end of the Church as shewn in the said 
plan, there being no vestry at present in the said Church, to 
remove the I'ont, Pulpit, and Reading Desk from their present 
positions and to replace the same in the positions shewn in the 
said plan, and generally to do all such acts, matters, and things 
as may be necessary to be done in carrying out the restoration 



The Church Restoration. g 

of the said Parish Church in accordance with the plans and 
specifications above referred to, — 

■SfU' f ficx-cfoi-c, being desirous to comply with the reasonable 
request of the said The Reverend John Paley, Clerk, the Vicar, and 
George Thomas Wright and Edward Smithers, the Churchwardens 
of the parish of Saint Giles, Longstone aforesaid, have decreed this 
our Citation with Intimation to be issued requiring you or any of 
you to cite or cause to be cited all and singular the parishioners 
and mhabitants of the said parish of Longstone in special, and all 
other persons whomsoever in general having or pretending to have 
any right title or interest in the said parish or Parish Church of 
Saint Giles, Longstone aforesaid, or in the Chancel of the said 
Parish Church, by affixing on the outer door of the said Church 
for some time these presents, and by leaving there affixed a true 
copy hereof, — To appear before us, our Surrogate, or some other 
competent Judge in this behalf, in the Lord Bishop's Consistory 
Court of Lichfield and place of judicature there, on Tuesday, the 
Seventh day of May now next ensuing at the usual and accustomed 
time of hearing causes and doing justice there, then and thereto 
shew good and sufficient cause, if any of them have or know any, 
why our Licence or Faculty should not be granted to the said The 
Reverend John Paley, Clerk, Master of Arts, the Vicar of the 
parish of Longstone aforesaid, and George Thomas Wright and 
Edward Smithers, the Churchwardens of the said parish, as hath 
already been petitioned for on their part and behalf, and further to 
do and receive as unto law and justice shall appertain. Intimating 
further unto all and singular the parishioners and inhabitants of 
the said parish of Longstone aforesaid in special, and unto all other 
persons whomsoever in general having or pretending to have any 
right, title, or interest in the premises, to whom it is hereby 
intimated that if they or some or one of them do not appear at the 
time and place aforesaid, or appearing do not shew good and 
sufficient cause concludent in law to the contrary, we (or our 
Surrogate) do intend to proceed and will proceed to grant our 
Licence or Faculty to the effect and in manner hereinbefore 
prayed. It being understood that the expenses of such restoration 
and alterations are to be entirely defrayed by voluntary contri- 



to Longstone Records, 

luitions, And if it shall be necessary in making any of the 
alterations and improvements as aforesaid, or in erecting the 
Vestry of the said Parish Church as shewn in the plan hereunto 
annexed, to remove or disturb any vaults, graves, tombstones, or 
monuments, due care shall be had thereof, and any bodies or 
remains there may be found shall he decently re-interred within 
the Churchyard of the said parish, and the tombstones or monu- 
ments replaced in a suitable position. And what you shall do in 
the premises you are duly to certify to us or our said Surrogate 
together with these presents. 

Dated at Lichfield under the seal of our office this Third day 
of May, in the year of our Lord One thousand eight hundred 
and Seventy Two. 

WILLIAM FELL, Registrar. 
Extracted by 

HUBERT COURTNEY HODSON, 
Proctor, Lichfield. 



LONGSTONE RECORDS. 
'@£)e @l)ui*cl). 



Jracufh? 



FOR 

ALTERATIONS IN THE PARISH CHURCH AND FOR 
THE ERECTION OF A NEW VESTRY. 



^0 all Cbristiaii |lcoplc to Inborn tbcsc |lif5eiits sballrome 

WE 

JAMES THOMAS LAW, Clerk, Master of Arts, Vicar General 
of The Right Reverend Father in God, George Augustus, by 
Divine permission Lord Bishop of Lichfield, and Official 
Principal of His Episcopal Consistory Court of Lichfield lawfully 
constituted, and more especially To all and singular Clerks and 
literate persons whomsoever in and throughout the whole Diocese 
of Lichfield, Greeting : — 

;^^crcas it hath been represented unto us on the part and 
behalf of The Reverend John Paley, Clerk, Master of Arts, the 
Vicar of the Vicarage of the Parish Church of Saint Giles, 
Longstone, in the County of Derby and Diocese of Lichfield, and 
George Thomas Wright and Edward S.mithers the Church- 
wardens of the same parish. That the Parish Church of Saint 
Giles, Longstone aforesaid, is in great need of restoration and 
repair, that the pews, seats, and sitting-places in the said Church 
are inconveniently arranged, ill-adapted for the purposes of Public 
Worship, and insufficient for the accommodation of the parishioners 
and inhabitants of the said parish, and that it is very desirable that 
the said pews, seats, and sitting-places should be entirely taken 
down and removed, and open seats erected in lieu thereof. That 
the said Parish Church has been surveyed by a competent 
Architect, and that plans have been prepared by him by which it is 



12 Longstone Records. 

proposed to tliorouf>hly restoiv the said Parish Church both 
externally and internally, and also to take down and remove the 
whole of the pews, seats, and sittinj^-places on the ground floor 
and in the Chancel of the said Church, and to erect open seats in 
lieu thereof upon an uniform and more convenient plan, capable of 
affordinj5 increased accommodation to the extent of about Forty 
Sittings for the parishioners, and affording greater facilities for the 
due observance of Public Worship in the said Parish Chm-cb 

Tl^^ tuljei-oin-. it liath been further represented unto us that 
at a meeting of the parishionei-s and inhabitants of the said parish 
of Longstone in vestry assembled (pursuant to public notice duly 
given) on Saturday, the Sixth day of April now last past, It was 
unanimously resolved that the plan prepared by R. Norman Shaw, 
of No. 30, Argyll Street, Regent Street, in the City of London, 
Architect, for the restoration of the Church, should be adopted, 
and that application be made to the Consistory Court of the Lord 
Bishop of Lichfield for a Licence or Faculty to authorise the 
restoration of the said Parish Church being carried out in 
accordance with the said plan 

Tln^ ipl>cveai-. the said The Reverend John Paley, Clerk, 
.Master of Arts, the Vicar, and George Thomas Wright and 
Edward Smithers, the Churchwardens of the parish of Longstone 
aforesaid, have by their Proctor prayed our Licence or Faculty to 
authorise and empower them to restore the said Parish Church of 
Saint Giles, Longstone aforesaid, both externally and internally 
in accordance with the plan submitted to the Vestry Meeting above 
referred to and now annexed to these presents, to thoroughly 
restore and repair the roofs of the said Church, to take out the 
present east window and two south windows in the chancel of the 
said Church and two of the clerestory windows, and to put in new 
windows in lieu thereof, to take down and remove the gallery at 
present blocking up the tower arch and a portion of the west end 
of the Church, and to open out the said tower arch ; to take down 
and remove the present pews and sittings on the ground floor and 
in the chancel of the said Parish Church, and erect open seats in 
lieu thereof as shown in the annexed plan ; to build a vestry at the 
north-east end of the Church as shown in the said plan, there being 



The Church Restoration. 13 

no vestry at present in the said Church; to remove the font, pulpit, 
and reading desk from their present positions, and to replace the 
same in the positions shown in the said plan ; and generally to do 
all such acts, matters, and things as may be necessary to be 
done in carrying out the restoration of the said Parish Church in 
accordance with the plans and specifications above tcferred to. 

-"lanow no now fBci-cfox-c that we being desirous to comply 
with the reasonable request of the said The Reverend John Paley, 
Clerk, the \'icar, and George Thomas Wright and Edward 
Smithers, the Churchwardens of the parish of Saint Giles, 
Longstone aforesaid (the due forms and orders of law in this case 
requisite having first been had and observed) Do commit and 
grant this our Licence or Faculty to the said The Reverend 
John Paley, Clerk, Master of Arts, the Vicar, and George Thomas 
Wright and Edward Smithers, the Churchwardens, of the parish 
of Longstone aforesaid, to authorize and empower them to restore 
the said Parish Church of Saint Giles, Longstone aforesaid both 
externally and internall)' in accordance with the plan submitted to 
the Vestry meeting above referred to and now annexed to these 
presents, to thoroughly restore and repair the roofs of the said 
Church, to take out the present east window and two south 
windows in the chancel of the said Church and two of the 
clerestory windows, and to put in new windows in lieu thereof; 
to take down and remove the gallery at present blocking up the 
tower arch and a portion of the west-end of the Church, and to 
open out the said tower arch ; to take down and remove the 
present pews and sittings on the ground floor and in the chancel 
of the said Parish Church, and erect open seats in lieu thereof as 
shewn in the annexed plan : to build a vestry at the north-east 
end of the Church as shown in the said plan, there being no vestry 
at present in the said Church, to remove the font, pulpit, and 
reading desk from their present positions and to replace the same 
in the positions shown in the said plan ; and generally to do all 
such acts, matters, and things as may be necessarj' to be done 
in carrying out the restoration of the said Parish Church in 
accordance with the plans and specifications above referred to 
■^rc>t>i&o6 nci'icvtBefcso that if it. shall be necessary in altering 



14 Longstone Records. 

the chancel of the said Church to remove the monument erected 
to the memory of the late Major Carleill and his family, such 
monument shall he replaced within the said chancel. That the 
slab over the vault in the Churchyard on the north side of the 
chancel in which one of Major Carleill's children is buried shall 
form part of the floorins* of the new vestry as shown on the said 
plan, and that the other slab shall be placed between the new- 
vestry and the north aisle lengthways from north to south as 
shown on the said plan so as to admit of the interment of one 
other member of the said Major Carleill's family. . . . 

And if it shall be necessary in makino any of the alterations 
and improvements as aforesaid or in erecting the vestry of the 
said Parish Church as shown in the plan hereunto annexed, to 
remove or disturb any vaults, graves, tombstones or monuments, 
due care shall he had thereof, and any bodies or remains there 
may be found shall be decently re-interred within the Churchyard 
of the said parish, and the tombstones or niouLiments re-placed 
in a suitable position. 

pit tcstimoun uificrcof we have caused the Seal of our office 
to be hereunto affixed this Twentieth day of July, in the year of 
our Lord One thousand eight hundred and Seventy-two. 

\VILLL4M FELL, Registrar. 
Extracted by 

HUBERT COURTNEY HODSON, 

Proctor, Lichfield. 




LONGSTONE RECORDS. 
WBe $cboor=room. 



licence 

FOK ALL Offices of Divine Service I^^ the School-room, 
Great Longstone, during the Chcrch restoration. 




^• 



^^. 



d:5covgc Augustus, by 

Divine permission Lord Bishop of 
Lichfield, To all Christian people 
to whom these Presents shall 
Greeting. 



come, 



WHEREAS The Reverend Nathaniel Armstrong Wells, B.A., 
Vicar Elect of Longstone, in the County of Derby and Diocese of 
Lichfield, and George Thomas Wright and Edward Smithers, 
Churchwardens there, have by petition under their hands certified 



i6 



Longstone Records. 



to us that the l^arish Chiii-ch is closed for the purpose of restoration 
and that there is a School Room situate in the Parish of Longstone 
aforesaid, already in use for Sunday afternoon Service, during the 
Restoration of the Parish Church, and that it would be a great 
convenience to the Parishioners if we would grant our Licence for 
the performance of all Offices of Divine Service, including the Holy 
Sacraments, in the said School Room during the time the Parish 
Church is so closed as aforesaid, and that it is a fit and proper 
place in which Divine Service may be performed — Now know ye 
that we the said George Augustus, Lord Bishop of Lichfield, 
taking the premises into oiu' serious consideration, Have tlnought 
fit to grant, and by these Presents, by virtue of our power Ordinary 
and Episcopal, as far as by Law we may or can. Do hereby give 
and grant (for the period stated in the petition) our full Leave, 
Licence, and Authority unto Nathaniel Armstrong Wells, and to 
his Curate or Curates lawfully appointed and licensed, to perfcrm 
the several Offices of Divine Service including the Holy Sacraments 
in the said School Room, according to the Rubrick of the Church 
of Kngland, and not otherwise or in any other manner. Saving 
alwavs to ourselves and our Successors our Episcopal rights and 
the dignity and honour of our Cathedral Cluirch of Lichfield, and 
also saving and reserving to the Vicar of Longstone aforesaid and 
his successors, all rights, profits, and perquisites heretofore due 
and belonging to him and them. IN TESTIMONY whereof we 
have caused Our Seal (which in this behalf Wc use) to be hereunto 
affixed. D.4TED this Fourth day of March, in the' Year of our 
Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Seventy-three, imd of our 
Translati(Mi, the Sixth. 



/iex^-uf-6e>cecC cU- %<^. 




'yyi 



Oi^^^^yn^ 




^ i^CLyC<3 ^^^^ 



The Church Restoration. 



17 



THE PARISH CHURCH OF 

DERBYSHIRE, 
WILL BE RE-OPENED, AFTER RESTORATION, 

BY THE 

RIGHT REV. BISHOP ABRAHAM, 

COADJDTOR TO THE LoRD BlSHOP OF THE DiOCESE. 

#rticr of §crbires. 

Morning Prayer to third Collect at 11 a.m. followed by the 
Celebration of Holy Communion. 

SERMON BY THE BISHOP. 

Offertory in aid 0/ the Restoration Fund. 



Evening Prayer at 3 p.m. 

SERMOxN BY THE VEN. E. BALSTON, D.D., 
Archdeacon of Derby. 

Offertory in aid of the Restoration Fund. 

The Hymn Book in use is "Ancient and Modern." Nos. 164 and 

320 will be sung at Morning Prayer. Hymn 385, to 

Sidlivait's Music: 306, 145, and 335 at Evening Prayer. 



i8 



Longstone Records, 



The following clergy are expected, many of whom will take 
part in the Services : — 

The Right Rev. Bishop Abraham. 
Ven. Archdeacon of Derby. 

Rev. H. J. Peach, Vicar of Tiitbury, Staffordshire, and 
Rural Dean. 

S. Andrew, Vicar of Tideswell and Rural Dean. 
George Tooth, formerly Vicar of Longstone. 
Urban S.mith, Vicar of Stoney Middleton. 
J. Green, Rector of Eyam. 
J. Stockdale, Vicar of Baslow. 
R. C. Rov, Vicar of Youlgreave. 
„ E. EvERED, Vicar of South Darley. 
J. Bl'llivant, Curate of Bakewell. 
W. B. Money, Curate of Bakewell. 
R. S. RouTH, Curate of Ashford. 
Edmund T. Chipp, Esq., Mus. Doc. Cantab, Organist of 
Ely Cathedral, will preside at the Organ. 



The Church Restoration. ig 



His Grace the Duke of Devonshire and a number of other 
Subscribers — amongst them the Architect, R. Norman Shaw, 
Esq., A.R.A., have kindly promised to attend. 

It may interest our friends to know that the day will be 
observed as a general holiday as far as possible. The 

parishioners are invited to throw open their houses to friends 
and visitors from a distance, as on account of the lateness of 
the season a tent or other temporary erection is thought 
unadvisable. The children of the parish, the Choir, and some 
others, will be provided with a substantial tea in the School- 
room at 5 p.m. 

A sale of work for the benefit of the funds will take 

place at Longstone Hall after the Services, about £300 being 

still required to complete the work and provide the necessary 

fittings. 

NATHANIEL A. WELLS, 

Vicar of Longstone. 



20 Longstone Records. 



REPORT, BALANCE SHEET, &c. 



TO THE 
SUBSCRIBERS. 



Lords, Ladies, and Gentlemen, 

We beg to place in your hands the following statement 
of receipts and expenditure, contributors of money and other gifts, 
together with a few incidental remarks (addressed to the parish- 
ioners) as a souvenir of the work on which you have already 
bestowed, and we believe will continue to bestow much thought 
and care. To your children and those who come after you, this 
record of your care for the sacred structure, may serve both as an 
incentive to do likewise, and as a warning that without periodical 
attention and repair, large dilapidations will ensue. 

The Church was closed and placed in the Contractors' charge 
July 8th, 1872, and was re-opened Sept. 22nd, 1873. In the 
interval, Divine Service was held in the School-room. The new 
Pulpit was first used Sep. 13, 1874, by which date also the Organ 
case was completed. The Lighting of the Church by means of 
Duplex Lamps on coronse and brackets was accomplished in 
October, 1875; the final compromise with the Contractors' 
representatives took place in July, 1876; and the latest accounts 
were only settled in the present year. The other dates of interest, 
after Mr. Paley's resignation, to which allusion is made elsewhere 
in this report, are the 16th March, 1873, when Mr. Wells was 
instituted to the Living; the 10th May, 1874, when Mr. Sweet was 
instituted ; and the 5th inst., when Mr. Bullivant was instituted. 



The Church Restoration. ii 

Whilst congratulating you very heartily on the Restoration, and 
the several additions to and improvements in your Church — such 
as the Vestry, the Organ, the stained-glass Windows, the Pulpit, 
and the Lighting, we neither attempt to conceal the fact of many 
short-comings in the work, nor desire to unduly obtrude the diffi- 
culties and obstacles in our way from the first application for the 
faculty — which was opposed, to the final compromise with the 
contractors' representatives, in bankruptcy. Amongst the former 
may be mentioned defective workmanship in laying the lead of the 
roof and clerestory window-sills : also a mistake by the contractors' 
foreman, too late for rectification before the Re-opening, and 
without tangible redress; — the stonework supporting the oak stalls 
in the Chancel was worked seven inches higher than shewn in the 
working drawing of the Architect, thus interfering with the due 
proportion of the Chancel and dwarfing the Altar steps and fittings. 
This mistake is remediable in two ways ; — one by lowering the 
stonework to the level required, but injury to the tiles and organ 
would have to be carefully guarded against; — the other, a much 
larger undertaking, which may be fairly left to the judgment of a 
future generation, by lengthening the Chancel some six feet, adding 
a step, and increasing the space within the Altar rail. Amongst 
the latter may be mentioned the unsuccessful attempt, at the vei-y 
outset, to throw discredit on the reports, by professional men, of 
the dangerous state of the old roof, thus narrowing the grounds 
of our public appeal for subscriptions; and the attempt was 
doubtless not without some effect on our finances. 

The resignation of Mr. Paley, the Vicar, through whose 
perseverance and energy the Restoration was brought about, 
threw a great deal of extra work and responsibility on ourselves. 
His successors in the living have in turn done good service in 
subsidiary work, and his predecessor also gave us substantial 
support, and our thanks are justly due to them all, but it is never- 
theless a fact that the main burden of the work of Restoration was 
carried out under the disadvantage of the practical voidance of the 
Living. 

The failure of Messrs. Brown & Co. to fulfil their con- 
tracts, not only threw much of their work on us, the Church- 



22 Longstone Records. 

wardens, but opened the door to unnecessary complications of 
Account, and most unreasonable demands on the part of their 
representatives, in opposition to the plain ruling of the Architect. 
Unable to come to anything; like terms with Messrs. Brown & Co.'s 
Creditors, through the liquidator in bankruptcy, we called in the 
professional assistance of Mr. John Taylor, of Bakewell, in whose 
hands the case was placed in August, 1875, and who, after many 
difficulties, eventually settled all claims against us by a compromise 
of £350 on a nett claim of £469 by the other side, against an 
admitted debt of £271. No other course was open to him except to 
defend an action at law for the whole amount claimed — a course by 
which we could have gained little, and might have lost much. 
The amount (£350) has been duly paid and an indemnity taken 
against further claims by the creditors. There are now no 
unsettled accounts of any kind. 

We are persuaded that, but for these and other causes that 
might be stated, there would not have been the comparatively 
small adverse balance of £275. Moreover, it should not be over- 
looked that a considerable sum for external and internal work and 
fittings — most desirable additions, but strictly speaking not restor- 
ation work, besides that for legal expenses, is included in our 
expenditure — sufficient indeed to account for the adverse balance, 
irrespective of the surcharge by the Contractors' representatives. 

With regard to the work itself, we repeat our congratulations to 
the Parish and all subscribers on having carried out successfully 
what may be called, in something more than a local sense, a great 
undertaking. That, notwithstanding many drawbacks and dis- 
advantages, so large a sum as £2500 and upwards should have 
been subscribed, and spent in a way to gain the approval of 
professional men and others well qualified to judge, is surely a 
matter for just pride. For this our thanks are chiefly due to Mr. 
Norman Shaw, and, indirectly, to .Mr. John Sleigh and Mr. John 
Wright (of Eyam), for their recommendation of that eminent 
Architect. We may here perhaps be excused for quoting from .Mr. 
Cox's recent work, the " Churches of Derbyshire," in which, after 
devoting about eight pages to this ancient Chapelry, he says— "We 
omitted to mention, when describing Longstone, that this was also 



The Church Restoration. 



23 



the work of Mr. Norman Shaw. The genuine spirit of conservative 
restoration has been duly observed in both these Churches. 
Youlgreave and Longstone have been more carefully and artistically 
treated than any other Churches in the County, and are models of 
what restoration should be." 

It is a matter for thanivfulness that the Restoration has led to 
much goodwill and many acts of kindness, special gifts to the 
Church, bazaars and other sales of work ; also to the abolition of 
seat appropriation, and to the institution of the weekly offertory. 

It only remains for us to express our regret for many short- 
comings, sincere thanks for the support we received from all 
classes, during the progress of the work, and our readiness to give 
a copy of this report and further details of the work and the 
accounts to every applicant. 



GEORGE THOMAS WRIGHT, 

EDWARD SMITHERS, 

August, 1877. 



Churchwardens. 
f during the Restoration. 



From the " Derbyshire Times" of Saturday, September 27th, 1873. 



This event which has been looked forward to with something 
more than usual interest, took place on Monday, the 22nd 
inst., under the most favourable conditions of weather, 
company and management. 

Whilst some twelve months ago the subscription list testi- 
fied to a wide interest in the proposed work of restoration by 
friends far and near, the approving presence of such large 
congregations as those of Monday last stamps the work as a 
great success. We do not know of a considerable work of 
tljis kind which has been carried out with better taste or with 
more unanimity than this, involving as it has a laree ex- 
penditure of money, some additions to the structure, changes 
in the customary occupation of the church, and tiie order of 
services. Perhaps one reason for this is, that the Longstone 
people being well advised in the choice of their architect 
Mr. Norman Shaw — a genuine lover of our old churches, 
wisely pursued a policy of non-interference, and patienllv 
awaited the result. 



The day was kept as a day of rejoicing. The new bells 
rang out in merry (leals by the liakewell ringers, the new- 
clock with its quarter chimes, the new organ presided over 
for the day by a great musician, contributed in no small 
degree to charm the ear, whilst the old church renovated 
inside and out, restored probably to something like its pristine 
be,-\uty, rich in stained glass windows, oak seats, and chancel 
stalls, and embellished with appropriate floral decorations, 
impressed us deeply ; and doubtless the great work for good, 
that day accomplished, will long be remembered. A parish' 
committee decorated the church approaches with arches and 
festoons of evergreens and flowers. .^ large festoon erected 
by Mr. George Eyre, reached across the village road opposite 
tlie Crispin Inn, bearing the inscriptions " God bless the Duke." 
and "Church and State." ,\l the close of the services, the 
connuittee provided a substantial tea in the large School- 
room, (which was tastefully decorated), for all the children, 
the choir, the aged, and widowed. There tlie Vicar addressed 



24 



Longstone Records. 



M)iiir npiifopriiile rcin.iilu to Ihc cliildmi and presented every 
cliild with a new prayer bi.iol!, bearing on the cover a short 
printed reference to the dav's event. The visitors were 
numerous. His Graie the Duke of Devonshire and Ladv 
Louisa Kf-ertun accepted Miss Wright's liospitalities at Long. 
stone Hall, which was thrown open for the dav to a large 
conip.nny, and where a bazaar of work was well' patronised, 
*""" .f 35 l>einE added to the organ fund. The Vicar enter- 
taine.1 llishop Abraliam, theclerg)',"and others at the Vicarage. 

1 he devices both morning and afternoon were choral, and 
commenced with processional liynins. prior to which volunta- 
ries on the organ were plaved bv Dr. Chipp. The choir, 
shghtly strenglhenerHor the day, led the singing with spirit 
and decision. The Vicar intone<l, a.ssisted in the afternoon 
by the Hev. R. Roy. The other clergv who took part in the 
services were Bishop .Abraham and the Archdeacon of Dcrbv 
(who preached the sermons), the Kev. J. Slockdale (Daslowj, 
and the Rev. S. Andrew (Tideswcll), who read the morning 
lessons, the Hev. M. Routli (Ashford). and the Rev. II. J. 
Peach (Tulburyl. who read the afternoon lessons respccti\elv. 
The other surplice<l clergy were the Rev. J. Bullivant (Daki- 
welll.aiid the Rev. C. Thomewill (Burton.on-Trent : and we 
also noticed among those present the Rev. J. Hall (Edensor), 
the Rev. I. Clreen (Eyain), and the Rev. H. Scultlion>e (Beeley) . 

Amongst the laity present at the sersices were the Duke of 
IVvonshire and Lady Louisa Egertoii, Lonl and Lady George 
C avendish and party. Lord Deninan. .Mr. Nes/ield, Mr! Taylor- 
W liitehead and party, Mr. Longs<len. Captain and Mrs.Smithers, 
Mr. and Mrs. Cottmgham, .Mrs. Colonel Wright, Miss Wright 
Mr. and .Mrs. ( , Wnghl and fan ily. Dr. Chipp, Mr. Alfred 
Bury. Mr and Mrs. Norman Shaw, Mrs. and Miss McConnell, 
... ™'^''' ^''- F- "arker, Mrs. Edward Barker, Miss H. 
B.-irker,Mr. John Wright lEjain Hall) and family, Mr. Edmund 
.^shton, Mrs. lialslon. Mr. and Mrs. Brailsliaw ind partv, Mr 
Robert Thonihill. Mr. Scott, .Mrs. Knox and partv, of Bake- 
well ; .Mrs. Archer. Meadow Place, and numerous others. 

I he coUeilions (or the Restoiation Fund were fft-; ys old 
Ml the morning, and jCiS ^s. in the afternoon. Besides this 
some iiS w»» 'a""" ••>' M'ss Wright's bazaar, and A received 
IromMr.Wnght, of Eyam in aid of the Organ Fund, thus 
adding oyer f< =5 to the funds. We understand thai a balance 
sheet will shortly be issued. The subscription list is too 
lengthy to print here, but we append a list of special gifts 
which, w'^^th the exception of the Uctem and one window 
are already in the church. 

SPECIAL GIFTS. 

Slaiiwd glass east window, in chancel. Miss Wright Lom;- 
stone Hall: stained glass two-light south window, in chancel, 
widow of Rev. Chas. Cornish formerly vicar of Great Lone- 
stone ; st.-iine.l ghass two-light north window, in chancel 
Capt. biiiithers. Little Longstone ; stained glass two-liirlit 
window, in north aisle. Miss Hill, Great Lon|stone; stained 
glass single-light window in north aisle, J. Scott, Great Lone- 
V""'i'«-"'c" f'^'* *'"RI'-''BI" window, north aisle, Messrs 
in "no'lrh ;m "'li '"'"S^'O"'^ • ^'-V""' Sisss single-light window 
in "°rt'' »'^l'^ Mf^- I''"",', •••nd 'amilv. forinerTy ofLngstone ; 
rhon :^ ," ^ t «■ ^' ^ -.^"8'"' Longstone Hall ; quarte 
chiine. to clock, Messrs. Adams, Hodgfcinson, and Hkwley 
Ureal Longstone ; Communicants' kneeling mat, the Misses 
laley. Notting llill. London: oak I.eclerS, Mr. E. ..\sh^ 
Manchrsler; h.is,socks, Mrs. G. T. Wright, Longstone Ihll 
umbrella holde^, Mr G. T. Wright, ^LongsZ^ Hall IM 
sus|,enders, Mr. G. T. Wrighl, „( Longstone Hall. 

The fabric dales from early in the 13th century, though it 
has at a subsequent period undergone such very mallrial 
alterations that in the main it may be said to be k rjth <Sn 



tury church. It consists of a nave of six bavs, with small 
west tower, very narrow north and south aisles, well developed 
though narrow chancel, and south porch. To these have been 
added on north side of chancel a vestry and recess for organ. 

Through years of neglect the whole of the roof had been 
allowed to get into the most terrible state of dilapidation; 
the rain had penetrated at innumerable places, and rotted the 
fine old timber to an alarming extent. .At a very early stage 
in the work it was determined to retain these fine' old roofs at 
the expenditure of any amount of care and trouble, and it is 
satisfactory to think that they are now in such a state 
of complete repair, that posterity- centuries hence— mav see 
and enjoy the work done by their predecessors in the 'isth 
century. It would have been an easy task to hay e swept them 
away bodily and substituted new roofs (perhaps of deal ') but 
in Ihat ca,se Longstone could no longer have boasted of its 
fine old roof, and a serious deprivation would have been in- 
nicled on all who had known the church in its better state 
The levels of floor throughout have been re-arranged, the 
church seated with oi)cn oak seats, rich stalls placed in the 
chancel, ami this part divided from the nave bv a low stone 
screen of simple character. 

The general appearance of the organ, (although without its 
case) is very pleasing and the design novel, in thr fact of its 
overhanging the player, as in Ely Cathedral triforium, the 
Idea of which was taken from that of Strasburg.- The actual 
space occupied by the instniment, considering its power and 
capabilities, is thus reduced to a minimum. 

The new organ has two complete manuals extending from 

l^.C. to G. 56 notes. It has been erected by the firm of 

Messrs. Chappell and Co., London, from a specil^calion pre- 

(jared by Dr. Chipp, the talented organist of Ely Cathedral 

and ably carried out by Mr. Gildersleeve, of lixeter-street, 

Kentish Town London who has had great exj.erience, and 

done much work in the factories of Messrs. Gray and Davison, 

Messrs. Bishop, Messrs. Walker, and Messrs. Cramer, Wood & 

Co.^d has un<lertaken the execution and responsibility of 

all organs supplied by .Messrs. Chapel and Co., whose nam'e is 

a guarantee for good work and materials. Perhaps his great 

s!'Z,? ?k" ™'"'«"7 '°' instance the Bourdon in this in- 

aiS he l?'!.'," ''"' °' •?"'' '''"'°'' '■'J""' '° «" "P<^" pipe, 
and the great organ open diapason is very sonorous. The en- 

^ora'rfrv'lT' n Ti' ^'•^"'^'^ '" "-^ requirements of a 
m^rS o^ .^ ,),■ ■ ^^'f "P«^<! in ^'^ng terms his a,l- 

miralion of the organ, which was generally responded to by 

We append a short specification for the information of our 
sonTcirrab'enk «'f' C^'f" CC. to G. Feet 8 open dlar"" 
son, 8 clarabe la. 8 stopped diapason, 8 dulciano, 4 flute har- 
hoT ; P ' °'f ". -7^ ^^^''^ 8 Lieblich Gedkct. 4 Gems- 
horn, . Picco o. Pedal Organ :_Grand Bourdon ,6 fe'et tone, 
pedals ^ "• Couplers :-Swell to great, great to 

BroTy';ran°d"co"°?,'°' ""^ J"'""''™ «''"= ^'-^^^^s. Joseph 
mown and Co. Tlie work has been nearly ,, months in 

was we hear fe 1 V °^ ^t"'"^ 8°°'' '''^'^y ""A-ien 

was »e hear the cause of much de ay. The stained >rlas« 

by Mr ?milh -.rvi^K* %?^^ ^^' '^°'^ '''^ ^"Ppl"-<i 
v^.her.^tr^'fi^^Mr:^auK;^'S»S;;^. ^^ 



The Church Restoration. 



25 



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26 Longstone Records, 

Qt. GENERAL 

^ s. d. £ 3. d. 

To Subscriptions and other Receipts, as 

published Oct., 1873, (Appx. A)... 1840 3 
Ditto do. since that date, (Appx. B.) 69 16 6 



1909 16 9 

Value of old Lead 190 

Bank Interest 24 9 6 



2124 6 3 



Subscriptions on account of Clock, 
as published Oct., 1873, (Appx.A) 32 18 



2157 4 3 



Due to Treasurers 275 



£2432 4 3 



The Church Restoration. 27 



FUND. Cx. 

i s. d. £ s. d. 

By Messrs. Brown & Co., the Contractors 1427 4 3 
Ditto, Cash paid on their Account ... 68 17 2 

Ditto, their Representatives ... 350 

1846 1 5 



Miscellaneous payments in Wages, 

and small Accounts 67 16 

Contract and other work, Internal 
Fittings, &c. — 

Derwent Foundry — Heating 

Apparatus 

Simpson and Co., — Chancel 

Tiles, &c 

Knox — Oak Stalls in Chancel 
Leaver — Altar Rail, Door 

Hinges, &c 

Helbronner — Altar Hangings, 

&c 

Twigg — Altar Slab, and other 

Marble Work 

Eyre — Various Work 

Faulkner — Lightning. Conductor and 

Weathercock 

Smith— Clock 

Cartage 

Architect's Commission and E.xpenses 

Legal Expenses — Faculty 

Defence of Faculty 

Effecting compromise with 
• Messrs. Brown's liquidator 10 6 

40 17 6 



35 











38 17 











60 











22 14 











7 18 


10 








10 8 


9 








43 18 


11 












238 

15 


17 




6 











47 












51 


9 


4 






125 


2 


6 


13 10 











17 1 


6 









£2432 4 3 



±S Longstone Records. 



ORGAN 



Dr. 

£ s. d. £ s d. 
To Suhscriptions, &c., as published 

October, 1873, (Appx. A) 233 5 6 

Receipts since that date, (Appx. B).. 29 5 

262 10 6 



Bank Interest 5 1 



£267 12 2 



PULPIT 

To Subscriptions by Mr. Joseph Scott, 

(Appx. B) 34 6 

Other Receipts, (Appx. B) 24 17 4 

58 17 10 

Balance from Organ Fund 6 2 2 

£65 



LIGHTING 

To Subscriptions, &c., (Appx. B) 64 9 2 



£64 9 2 



The Church Restoration. 29 

FUND. 

Cr. 

£ s. d. £ s. d. 
By Messrs. Chappell and Co., London, 

Organ 210 15 

Mr. Gildersleeve, London, Organ Case, 

Tuning, &c 44 11 1 

Midland Railway 6 3 11 

261 10 

Balance carried to Pulpit Account 6 2 2 



£267 12 2 



FUND. 

By Mr. Twigg, Ashford, the Pulpit as per 

Contract 65 



£65 



FUND. 

By Mr. Leaver, Coronse and Brackets .. 32 15 

Mr. Honey, Lamps, &c 28 12 

Carriage, fixing, &c 3 2 2 

£64 9 2 



30 



Longstone Records. 



APPENDIX A. 



Hfstoratioii of St. iilfs's C|urc|, 



LONGSTONE, DERBYSHIRE. 



List of poNTP^iBUTORS, 



General Fund. 
£ s. d. 
His Grace the Duke of Devonshire, E.G. 400 
,, „ (second donation) '250 

Ilis Grace the DuUe of Rutland, E.G. ... 50 

Lord George Cavendish, M.P. 25 

A. P. Arkwright, Esq., M.P 20 



A Cottager Friend 

A Debt repaid 

A Friend 

A Friend, Little Longstone 

A Poor Parishioner 

A Well-wisher 

A Widow's Mite 

An Old Choir Boy 

Anonymous, September 28, 1873 

Anonymous, ,, 

Another Friend, Little Longstone 

Adams,* Mr. it Mrs. Joseph, Longstone 

Apperley, Mrs. H. G., Hereford 

Ashton, Mr. George, Longstone 

Ashton, Mr. Thomas, Rowland 

Asliton, Mr. William, Iiongstone 











2 G 






5 





2 





2 





10 





3 


3 


8 



2 

3 
10 



Organ. 

£ s. d. 



10 



10 



Clock. 
£ s. d. 



5 



2 6 



Also the contx'ibutor of a Special Gift. 



The Church Restoration, 



31 



General Fund 
^e s. d. 

Bagshawe, Mr. H. P., Rowdale House, 

Bakewell 10 

Bagshawe, Mrs. ,, ,, 5 

Balston, The Venerable Archdeacon, The 

Vicarage, Bakewell 50 

Balston, Mr. William, EastLodge, Bakewell 21 

Barker, Mrs. Kowsley 

Barker, Miss Ann, Bakewell ... 

Barker, Mrs. E. & Miss H. 

Barker, Mr. Frank, ,, 

Barnard, Mrs. Peuge, near London 

Bennett, Mr. .James, Longstone 

Bennett, Mr. William 

Bennett, Mr. Isaac ,, 

Bennett, Mr. George ,, 

Bettney, Mrs. and Mr. Joshua,, 

Blackwell, Mr. William ,, 

Blake, Miss, Ashford Hall 

Bland, Mr. William, Eyam 

Bottom, Mr. Jacob, Longstone 

Bottom, Mr. Joseph ,, 

Bradshaw, Mr. William, Thornbridge 
Cottage, Longstone 

Bromehead, Rev. A. C, Newbold, Ches- 
terfield 

Brooks, Mr. and Mrs. Richard, Longstone 

Broomhead, Mrs., Baslow 

Broomhead, Miss ,, 

Browne, Mr. Octavius, Courtlands, Devon 

Bury, Mr. and Mrs. George, Whetstone, 
near London 

Bury, Mr. and Mrs. Fleetwood, New Bar- 
net, near London 

Bury, Mrs. J. Fuller, London 

Bury, Mr. Alfred S., Science and Art 

Department, London 

Bury, Mr. W. Fuller, Census OfiBce, London 



Organ. 
£ s. d. 



10 



1 














2 














5 























6 








10 











2 























3 





2 


5 














2 


6 

















2 


6 


8 


3 














5 











1 














25 








10 








1 

















2 


6 

















10 














10 






5 



2 2 



10 

1 1 



Clock. 
£ s. d. 



2 6 



Carlisle, Mr. W. T., New Square, Lincoln's 

Inn, Loudon 10 



22 Longstone Records. 



General Pxind. Organ. Clock. 

£ s. d. £ 3. d. £ s d. 
Collection, March 10, 1873, on the occasion 

of the Vicar's Institution G 10 

Collections, September 22, 1873, on the 

occasion of the Re-opening of the 

Church 86 7 

CoUis, Miss F. Dawlish, Devon 2 

Cottingham, Mr. J. G., Edensor 5 

Covin, Miss M., Longstone- Hall 5 

Craven.Mr. &Mrs.,Thornbridge, Ashford 20 

Craven, Mrs., „ „ 10 

Curlier, The Kev. W. H. and Mrs., late 

of Lympstone, Devon 10 

Edgell, Miss Wyatt, Lympstone, Devon 5 

Evans, Mr. T.\V.,Allestree Hall, Derby... 5 

Evans, Mr. Samuel, Darley Abbey, Derby 5 

Ewiugs, Mr. Joseph, Burre House, Bake- 
well 10 

Eyre, Mr. and Mrs. G., and Wm. Eyre, 

Longstone 5 

Eyre, Mr. .John, Longstone 4 

Evre, Mr. Edward, 2 

Eyre,Mr.Thomas,Sen., „ 5 

Fairbairn, Mr. John, Mayor of Sheffield 10 

Fidler, Mr., Rowland 

Fiil!er,Mr. Thomas, Elm Cottage, Rowland 

Follftt, Rev. W.W., Christ Church, Oxford 1 1 

Follelt, Mr. Charles J., Mayor of Exeter 1 

Foster, Mr. George, Aldern House, 

Bakewell 3 

Fox, Mr. John M., Cockermouth 5 

Fiuness, Messrs. J. and J., Longstone ... 20 

Fnrness, Mr. George, Willesden.nr. London 10 

Fiirniss, Mr. Lawrence, Birchhill Farm, 

near Bakewell H 3 

Fnrniss, Messrs. A. and W., Longstone... 2 

B'uruiss, Mr. Thomas, ,, ... 2 fi 

Furniss, Mr. William J., ,, ... 5 

Furniss, Mrs. William J., ,, 5 








5 







1 






















• • . • 





The Church Restoration. 



33 



2 



2 6 













General Fund. Organ. Clock. 

d£ s. d. £ s. d. £ a. d. 

Gascoyne, Mr. William, Hassop 

Gascoyne, Mr. George, H;issop — 

Gisborne,Mr.Frank, Holme Hall,Bakewell 10 

Goodwin, Mrs., Bakewell 110 — 

Goodwin, Miss, Monmouth 1 

Gould, Miss H., Lougstone 5 

Grant, Mr. J., flassop 1 

Greaves, Mr. William, Bakewell 10 

Guy, Dr. and Mrs., Gordon Street, London 

Haldred, Mrs., Asbford Hall 

Hallowes, The late Mr. Anthony, Longstone 5 

Hancock, Mr. Kichard, ,, 2 

Hardy, Miss, The Mount, Bakewell ... 2 
,, ,, ('2ud donation) 5 

Hawley,* Mr. and Mrs. E., Longstone ... 2 10 

Haworth, Mr. Edmund, Churchdale, 

Ashford 50 

Hayward, Mr. Francis, Longstone 

Hay w-ard, Mr. James, ,, 

Hayward, Mr. George, Ashford 

Hewett, Mr. James, Longstone 2 

Hill, Mr. Thomas „ 2 2 6 

Hill, Mr. Eichard „ .... 2 C 

Hill, Mr. William, Little Longstone ... 2 6 

Hodgkinson,''- Mr. and Mrs. John, Long- 
stone 2 2 

Hodson,Mr.Hubert,C.,TheClose, Lichfield 5 5 

Hollingworth, Mr. Joseph, Monsal Dale, 

Longstone 10 2 

Holmes, The late Mrs. Martha, Headstones, 

Longstone 10 

Hope, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas. Longstone 10 .... 

Horner, Mrs., Everton, Beds 5 

Hulley, Mr. William, Ashford 2 2 



5 



2 6 



Incorporated Society for promoting the 
Building of Churches, 7, Whitehall, 
London 25 







i 



34 



Longstone Records. 



Johnson, Mr. Joseph, Lonsstone J 

Jones, The iMisses J. and M., Agnew, 

Twvfnrd, llant-i 

Joues, Miss Maria, Twyford, Hants 

Jones, Miss H., Longstone Hall 

Jones, Miss F., North Street, Exetpr ... 

Kay, Miss M. A., Longstone Hall 

Knight, Mrs., Heytesbury, Wilts ... '... 

Lee, Miss,& Miss Pennell, Ebford, Devon 2 
Leslie, Mr. Charles Stephen, Hassop Hall 

{for Hassup Chantry fi7 

Longsdon, Mr. William, Longstone ... 35 
Lougsdou, Miss, Longstone (Sale of Work) 



General Fund. 

£ a. d. 
.500 







Longsdon, Mr. James, Longstone 

Lowe, Miss Edith, ,, 

Lowe, Mr. William, Ashford Lane 

Lowe, Miss Mary, ,, 

Margerison, Mrs., (per Mr. Thos. Eyre)... 

McConnell, Mrs., Cressbrook 

McConnell, Miss ,, 

Morewood, Mrs. Alfred, Thornbridge, 

Leamington 

Morewood, Mr. Edmund, (per Mrs. Perrin), 

Lllangennech, S. Wales 

Morse, Miss, Exmouth, Devon 

Morton, Mr. George, Longstone 

Morton, Mr. James, The Mires, Longstone 

Morton, Mrs. James, ,, 

Morton, Mr. Jonathan, ,, 

Morton, Miss Mary, ,, 

Morton, Miss Annie, ,, 

Morton, Miss Jane, ,, 

Morton, Mr. James, Jun., 

Morton, Mr. Samuel, 

Morton, Mr. and Mrs. William, 

Muriel, Mrs., Ely 



5 



5 



10 



10 






10 


1 








10 


1 





2 








2 



Organ. 
£ a. d. 



15 

1 
10 
5 










5 
6 



10 
5 









10 



5 



5 






6 



Clock. 
£ s. • d. 








1 





1 













5 5 



1 1 



The Church Restoration. 



35 



General Fund. 
£ s. d. 

Naylor, Miss C, Loiigstone Hall 

Needham,Mr.S.,Rnslnip,Chapel-ei!-le-F'tli 5 
Nesfield,.\Ir.R.W.M., Castle Hill, Bakewell 5 



Organ. 
.£ 3. d 
10 







Clock. 
£ a. d. 



Oliver, Mr. and Mrs. 


Joseph, 


Longstone 


1 


10 











Oliver, Miss Alice, 








■ • • 







5 





Oliver, Miss Sarah, 




If 











2 


6 


Opeushaw, The late Mr. J. 


., Bakewell 


10 














Orr, 


The late Mr. Thomas G., 


Longstone 


20 














Orr, 


Mrs., 












5 








Orr, 


Miss, 






2 


10 











Orr, 


Mr. James, 
















5 





Orr, 


Miss Alice, 















5 





Orr, 


Miss Ellen, 















5 






Paley, The Rev. John, late Vicar of Long- 
stone, Mrs. Paley, and Friends, 
}^ottmgm\\,LonAon {Chancel Stalls) 61 2 

Paley,* Miss, ,, 

,, (Sale of Work) 



Paley,* Miss Annie,, 

(Sale of Work) 

Paley, Mr. Frederick W 

Paley, Mr. Walter 

Parkin, Mr. Thomas, Longstone 

Perrin, Mrs., ,, 

Perry, Mr. Edwin, 

Peters, Mr.W.H., Harefield House, Exeter 

Pitt, Mrs., Lympstone, Devon 

Postage Stamps — small sums 

Pritchard, Major General, Madras Army 

Reward, on finding keys 

Ridley, Miss, Hexlmm, Northumberland 

Rose, Mr. Richard, Bakewell 

Roy, Rev. Richard C, Youlgreave Vicarage 

Sale of Wood 

,, Iron 



10 
10 
2 



5 





2 










1 













16 







1 













10 





































5 












. 




1 


1 










3 


G 




2 


10 










2 


(i 




1 










1 










1 













2 


6 




1 


8 






10 
10 



o6 Longstone Records. 

General Fund. 
£ s. d. 

Sale of Iron 

„ Do 

Scott,* Mr. Joseph, Longstone 10 

Shaw, Mr. Francis, Western Bank, Derby 5 

Shaw, Miss, ,, 

Shaw,Mr.R. Norman. Argyll Street.Londou 10 

Shaw, Mr. Robert, Monsal Dale, Longstone 5 
Shaw, Mr. Cieorge, „ „ 2 

Shaw, Miss Mary, ,, ,, 

Shimwell, Mr. Isaac, Longstone 10 

Shimwell, Mr. Thomas, „ 10 

Simpson, Mrs. George, London 

Skidmore, Mr. Richard, Longstone ... 2 

Skidmore. Mrs. Richard, ,, 

(Sale of Work) 

I, 'I " 

Skidmore, Mr. Robert, Longstone 5 

Sleigh, Mr. .lohu, Highgate, London ... 25 

Smith, Mrs., Westbourne Road, Victoria 

Park, Sheffield 

Smith, Mr. .Joseph, Headstones, Longstone 

Smith, Miss Martha, 

Smithers,* Captain (Churchwarden), and 

Mrs. Smithers, Little Longstone 50 

Sorby, Mrs. The Rookery, Ashford, ... 5 

(2nd donation) -10 

Sterndale, Mrs., The Cottage, Longstone 5 

Stone, Miss M., Longstone Hall 

Surplus of Festivity Fund, Sept. 22, 1873 B 



Organ. 

£ 3. d. 

10 
5 



1 



1 



1 
4 
16 



1 1 



3 



Clock. 
£ s. d. 



5 



Taylor, Mr. Cornelius, Longstone ... 

Taylor, Mr. George, ,, 

Taylor, Mr. and Mrs. George, Hassop 

Taylor, Mr. James, Longstone 

Taylor, Mr. and Mrs. John, Longstone 

Taylor, The late Mr. Thomas 

Taylor and Redfern, Messrs., Bakewell 

Thornhill, Mr. Robert, Longstone 

Thornhill, Mr. W. Pole, Stauton-in-Peak 30 

Timm, Miss Jane, Longstone 



2 











10 





1 


10 








10 





2 


2 





20 








30 









6 



2 

1 10 



1 



The Church Restoration. 37 

General Fund. Organ. Clock. 

£ s. d. i s. d. £ s. A. 

Tobin, Mrs., Exmouth, Devon 10 

Tooth, Eev. G. C, aud Mrs., Codsall 

Vicarage, Staffordsliive 10 

Turner, Mrs., Rnsliolme, Manchester ... 1 

Tymms, Miss H., Longstone 6 

Wager, Mrs., Longstone 5 

Wager, Mr. Jasper, 25 

Wager, Mr. Albert, ,, 5 

Wallwin, Mr. Josiab, Churchdale Farm, 

near Longstone 2 

Walsh, Mrs., Winchester 5 

Ward, Mr. Joseph, Longstone 2 6 

Wells, Rev. Nathaniel, A., Vicar of Long- 
stone, and Friends (Swell Organ) 50 

Whalle.y, Mr. John, Headstones, Longstone 2 6 

WilcocUson, Mrs., Low Pavement, Ches- 
terfield 10 

Wilson, Mr. John, London 110 

Wilson, Mr. Edward, Brunswick House, 

Sheffield Moor 1 1 

Wolrige, Mrs., Exmouth, Devon 10 

Whitehead, Mr. S. Taylor, Burton Closes, 

Bakewell 10 

Wright,- Mr. G. T. (Churchwarden), and 

Wright,- Miss, Longstone Hall 100 

Wright, Mr.s., „ 10 1 

(Sale of Work) 18 6 

1 

Wright, Miss, (Sale of Work) 1872 3 8 

Jan., 1873 2 

April, 1873 8 

Sept., 1873 37 6 G 

Wright, Mr. G. T., (Christmas Concert 

Receipts, 1871) 5 5 

10 5 5 

Wright,* Mrs. G. T., „ 5 2 10 1 

Wright, Miss Gertrude „ 6 

Wright, Miss Laura ,, 4 

Wright, Miss Florence ,, 2 

Wright, Master Herbert ,, 2 



og Longstone Records. 

General Fund. Organ. 

X s. d. £ 8. d. 

Wright, The late Colouel, Royal Artilloi-y 5 

Wri-hl, Miss, Exmoutb, Devon o U 

Wright, Mr. & Mrs. William.Trincbinopoly, 

Madras 7 ? n 

Wright, Captain Heiu-y, Madras Staff Corps 1 1 ^ 

Wright, Mrs. Henry „ ,, 2 4 G 

Wright, Captain and Mrs. Walter, Madras 

Stall' Corps 1 ^ 

Wright, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick, Oom- 

rovvtee. East Indies 10 

Wright, Mr. John, Eyam Hall 10 5 

Wright, Miss Mary, The Firs, Eyam ... T. 

Young, Mr. Charles, Ewe Close Farm, 

iiakewell 10 

£1840 3 233 5 



Total Contributions in Money, exclusive of 
Special Gifts and the Pulpit Fund 



Clock. 
£ a. d. 



G 32 18 



£'2106 3 9 



i-^Sisi^ 



.si&.'i'.-^ 



i^Z5?SlLJ 



SPECIAL GIFTS. 



Stained Glass, East Window in Chancel — 
Miss Wkight, Longstone Hall. 

Stained Glass, Two-Light South Window in Chancel — 
Widow of THK Rev. ('harles Cornish, formerly Vicar of Lonostone. 

Stained Ghiss, Two-Light North Window in Chancel — 
Captain Smitherk, Little Longstone. 

Stained Glass, Two-Light Window in North Aisle. 
Miss Hill, Great Longstone. 



The Church Restoration. 3^ 

Stained Glass, Single Light Window in North Aisle- - 
Mr. Joseph Scott, Great Longstone. 

Stained Glass, Single Light Window in North Aisle 

Messrs. Joseph and William Scott. 

Stained Glass, Single Light Window in North Aisle 

Widow and Family of the Kev. G. B. Brown, formerly of 
Great Longstone. 

Peal of Five Bells— 
Mr. G. T. Wright, Longstone Hall. 

Quarter Chimes of Clock — 
Messrs. Adams, Hodgkinson, and Hawley, Great Longstone. 

Communicants' Kneeling Mat, &c. — 
The Misses Paley, Notting Hill, London. 

Oak Lectern — 
Mr. Edward Ashton, Eose Hill, Cheetham, Manchester. 

Hat and Umbrella Holders, and Hassocks— 
.Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Wright, Longstone Hall. 

pulpit- 
Mr. Joseph Scott, with the help of his Pupils and other Friends, has 
raised a considerable sum towards providing a Handsome Pulpit. 

CARTAGE, LABOUR, &c. 

The Churchwardens acknowledge, with thanks to the donors, free Cartage, 
from Messrs. J. Hodgkinson, W. J. Fdrniss, J. Bettney, A. & W. Furniss ; 
Spar gravel from Mr. W. Froggatt ; and general assistance from Messrs. 
R. Thornhill, J. Orr, Adams, J. Hodgkinson. Johnsons', G. Eyre, E. 
Perry, Ac. ; also help from Mrs. Richard Skidmore, Mrs. James Furness, 
Mrs. W. J. FoRNiss, Mr. Adams, and others, in connection with the Sales 
of Work, &c. To Mr. W. J. Fdrniss especial thanks are due, for the use of 
Land and Buildings without charge of an^ kind. 

Longstone, October, 1873. 



40 



Longstone Records. 



APPENDIX B. 

£ s. <1. 
General Fund Additional Rkceipts. 

Atkius, Mr. P. (Proceeds of Euter- 

taiumeiit,) Jan. 13, 1870 .... 452 

lluttoii, Mr. (per the Rev. L.E. Sweet) 5 

LichlieldDioc.Cluirch Extension Society 25 
Skidniore, Mrs. Richard, (Part Proceeds 

of Bazaar, Feb. 9, 1875 .... 20 11 4 

Wright, Miss, Sales of Work ... 15 



Organ Fund Additional Receipts. 

Longsdon, the late Miss, Sale of Work by 
Wright, Miss, Sales of Work 

Pulpit Fund Subscription Ijist. 



Annibal, Mr. James 

Aruher, Mr. John 

Archer, Mr. Samuel 

Archer, Mrs 

.\shton. Mr. Thomas 
Bagshawe, Mr. U. P. .. 
Bagsliawe, Mr. Francis .. 
Bradbury, Mr. Jordan 
Bradbury, Mr. Joseph 
BroKTi, .Mr. W. Lax 
Brown, Mr. Compton F. 

Coates, Mr. J. B 

Dakin, Mr. B. Edward . 
Eyre, Mr. William ... 

Ejrre, Mr. Herbert 

Eyre, Mr. Albert ... . 

Flewitt, Mr. John 

Hill, Mr. William ... . 
Hill, Mr, Matthew ... . 
Hutchinson, Mr. Joseph. 
Ingleby, Mr. Eichard... 



d. 



£ 


s. 


d. 


U 


1(1 





1 


1 





1 


1 





u 


10 








10 





1 











10 





1 


1 





1 
1 


1 
I 






1 


1 








10 








.", 





1 











10 








10 








10 





1 


u 


u 


1 











10 





1 


13 


4 





WJ X 


i_r 


\J 


Work by 15 








... 28 










29 


6 







£ 


s. 


d. 


Ingleby, Mr. Constantiue 1 


13 


4 


Ingleby, Mr. Joseph 


. 1 


13 


4 


Ingleby, Mr. John ... 


. 


6 





Laidlaw, Messrs 


. 


10 





Lees, Mr. William ... . 


. 


10 





Lees, Mr. Francis ... 


. 


10 





Outi-am. Mr. John ... 


. 


10 





Piillinger, Mr. William . 


.. 1 


1 





Shaw, Mr. George ... 


. 


10 





Sleigh. Mr, Jervase... 


.. 


5 





Taylor, Mr. Benjamin . 


.. 1 


1 





Thompson, Mr. George . 


. 


10 





Thompson, Mr. J. W. . 


.. 


10 





Tunstill, Mr John ... . 


.. 


10 





Wager, Mr. Andrew 


.. 3 


3 





Wager, Mr. T.T 


.. 3 


3 





Wardley, Mr. Charles . 


.. 


5 





Widdop, Mr. Tom ... 


.. 


•5 





Wright, Mr, Frank... . 


.. 


10 





A mount 2>er Mr. Hcott. 


.£34 





6 



The Church Restoration. 

Pulpit Fund Subscription List (Continued). 

Brought forward 

Collections, Opening of New Pulpit, Sept. 

13, 1874 10 15 

Kingscote, Mrs. Gardiner 10 G 

Wrench, Mr. E .M., (Proceed.s of Lecture 

Nov. 27, 187a.) 3 10 

Wright, Miss, Mr. Wright and Family 10 1 10 



4' 

£ s. d. 
31 G 



Lighting Fund Subscription List. 



A Friend 
A Friend 



£ s. d. 
5 
2 



Bazaar, Feb. 9, 1875, Part 

Proceeds of 2(i 2 5 

Bazaar, Sale of Work after 

the 12 

Collection — Harvest 

Thanksgiving, Sept. 22 

1874, 2 15 7 

Collections — Chi-istmas 

Day, 1871, 3 13 3i 

Furness, Collected by the 

Misses M. and S. ... 8 7 
Furniss, Mr. W 6 

Gorringe, The Rev. P. K. 1 
Johnson, Mrs. 5 



MoConnel, Mrs. 

Meire, Mrs 

Oliver, Mrs. J 

Price, Miss 

Sale of Articles, April 15 

1875, 

Sale of the old Lamps .. 
Skidmore, Mrs. Eichard 

Ditto 

Slater, the Eev. L 

Sleigh, Mr. John 

Sweet, The Eev. Laxon E 

Thoruhill, Mrs. John 
Thornhill, Mr. Robert 

Wells, Mrs 

Wrench, Mr. E. M. 
Wri-ht, Miss. Mr- & family 
Collected by the Uev. L. E. 
Sweet 



24 17 


4 


£58 17 


10 


£ s. 
... 1 


d. 





10 



5 



10 



.. 1 


6 





.. 1 


16 








5 





. 1 


2 





. 2 








.. 


5 





:. 6 


13 


7 


2 








. 1 








. 


10 





. 


5 





ly 8 


12 


8,i 


..£61 


9 


2 



42 Longstone Records. 

ADDITIONAL SPECIAL GIFTS. 

TIki ri'tl (or '■ l>iil<(!fi") Marblii (or llu' |)illiir dfliooli rest, in tlii' I'lilpil — 

Ills (llUeK IIIK I'l'KK (IF |)lCVl)NSIIIUK. 

Slaiiind (lliiHS, Two l.iL;lil Sniiili WiihIdw in ('Imuccl - 

Mh. lioMKin' rilOUMIlM., (illlCAl llONdSTONE. 

Stiiincd (iliiss, Sinj,'l(i liifjilit, Window in Bolfrv 

W'moW it UkIMIKSICNI'ATIVICS of Mu. (IiCOUOK. I'lYltl',, OUHAT IjONOSTDNK. 

Sorvico of C'ouiniuMion I'liito — 

'I'lIK lixKOUTOKS OK TUB JjATH Mil. WiM.lAM liONllHDON. 



For S|ui('iul Sorvic(<s, siiico the Ho-opoiiinfj; of tlu> Cluircli, oiir tlmnks 
lU'ii lioiirtily ttmili'i'cd to -'rmc \\k\. L. I''i. Swioet, late Vicar, in 
coimootiou willi llu' liififlitinjj of tlio t'liiui'li, iiud Lifjhtinj; I'lnui. 

M««. Jamks FuiiNKss, Tuii .MissKs Oku, nnd ,Miis. liunMii) Skiomoiie — 
'I'lio Hii/iiiir, lu'h. il, 1875. 

iMii. .losKi'li Scorr, I'lniicliwiirdoM, iis I'lonioliT, luid ColltH'tor of 
nioro tli.'in Imlf, of tiio I'liipit l''un(l. 

Mil. K. M. Wiacsiu, his Jii'rUuo, Nov. '27. lS7rt. 

•Mu. K. .Vi'KiN.s, his Kntertiiinnu'iil, .hin. i;!, lS7(i. 



^xe.^K.^^^- 



LONGSTONE GLEBE, 1893 




-Scale :- 6 Inches to 1 Mile 



J.Shaw Be. So/v. 

Surveyors. 

OEPBy 



Church Endowments, Patronage, &c. 43 



'®£)e "gj-^atroitagc. 



At long and distant intervals of time the right of presentation to 
the Living of Longstone was the source of discussion and even 
litigation, with the result that it was found to be vested in the 
Vicar of Bakewell who has exercised that right since 1680. Prior 
to that date there is no record of any such right. On the contrai-}-, 
the following interesting documents seem to indicate that, at an 
earlier period, the Wright family and the inhabitants of Longstone 
made the appointment. 

The Griffin endowment of 1262, which is given at length in these 
Records, expressly stipulates " that there was to be no interference 
by the .Mother Church of Lichfield nor by the Ordinaries of the 
Church of Bakewell." This condition was probably on the lines of 
the main endowment to which this was a supplement. The land 
was given " to the Parishioners or to anj' person whom they shall 
entrust" for the augmentation of the Chaplain's maintenance. 
It may reasonably be assumed that this supplemental endowment 
was entrusted to those who alreadj- possessed the patronage 
probably the very trustees mentioned by name in the Griffin 
Charter. 



CHANCERY SUIT. 

1669. In a Suite then in Chancery brought by the then 

Earls of Devonshire against .Mr. Wright the now 

(present) .Mr. Wright's Grandfather about the lands 

belonging to Great Longstone Chappell And the 

way and manner of electing a Curate to serve 
at that Parochiall Chappell. 



44 Longstone Records. 

Anthony Mellar, Gierke, then Curate of the Parochiall Chappell 
of Taddington. 

Reginald Pinder, Gent., then Register (5(V) to the Deane & Chapter 
of Litchfield for their exempt jurisdiction of Bakewell. 
Robert Jenkinson. 
Francis Needham. 

George Tomlinson. / 

William Naylor. 
Dorothy Needham. 
Grace Barton. 
Richard Wright & 
Henry Mellor. 

All substantial! persons, did depose that it had been 
for forty years then past the use for choosing of a 
Curate there, for him that was to be elected to 
preach there one or two Lord's days And upon the 
approbation of the greater part of the Inhabitants of 
the said Chapellry such person was chosen by the 
then Mr. Wright's Grandfather and other the 
Inhabitants of Great Longson And such person was 
confirmed in the said place by the said Deane & 
Chapter or such as had their Authority And none of 
them know of any Curate that had Officiated there 
that had been otherwise chosen than by the greater 
number of the Cheefe of the Inhabitants there. 



ALIENATION OF RIGHT OF PRESENTATION. 

Enclosure 2, of Mr. Mott's letter infra, but placed here in 
ehronological order. 

Be it remembered that since Mr. Monk now Vicar of Bakewell, 
at my instance and request, hath nominated Edward Middleton, 
Clerk, to succeed Mr. Mills as Curate of the Chapel of Longston 
within the Vicarage of Bakewell, I do hereby acknowledge and 



Church Endowments, Patronage, &c. 45 

declare that I do conceive and agree that the right of nomination 
ot a Curate thereof doth belong unto and is in the said Mr. Monk 
as Vicar of Bakewell and in his successors.* 

Witness my hand 22nd day of December, 1713. 

^^'*^"^^^ THOS. WRIGHT 

THOS. BAGSHAW, vkiuhi. 

of Bakewell, Esq. 

WM. GROSVENOR, 

of Chatsworth, Esq. 

Letter from Mr. Vernon to his Nephew Mr. Wright, 
of Longstone Hall. 

Bloomsblry [London] 
Dear Nephew, J"'^ 7- '759- 

ru u r\ ^^11 ?''* "''*•' ^" °''^ Register which formerly belonged to 
r Church of Litchfield. It chiefly relates to y Parishes of Blackwell and 
Hope w.th their Chappels w'h has thrown much light upon our Peak 
enqumes. And in regard to Longsdon I find that ye Inhabitants obtained 
from Gryfin son of Wenuwyn Lord of ye Manr of Ashford and lived there 

I 7f^^- , ^?'r'" ^"8"^^"*^*;°" of ye Chaplain's maintenance who 
should officiate (at) Longsdon. The tradition is that this was entirely 
called Church land as set forth in ye Depositions in ye vexatious Case 
brought by ye Cavendish family relating to these ven' Lands. The other 
Bovate with ye Lands at Brushfield I presume were given by vour family 
as th^yJiay^lways_nominatec^^_Curate sometimes with, at "other limes 
without, ye consent of ye Inhabitants. This Chapel was built and endowed 
by private persons and not by ye Church of Litchfield. The right of 
Nomination will of course belong to ye Founders-that is the origin of all 
Patronages, by w i. we shall get clear of ye Deane & Chapter, and as ye Vicar 
of Bakewell as Vicar is not bound to any Duty at Longston Chapel he will 
be out of ye Question.! I shall draw up all these things in ample form 
with ye Vouchers anne.xed for your and ye young Squire's benefit There 
IS one thing weh our friend Mr. Fletcher will not be pleased to hear that 
ye Uean & Chapter covenant and agree with ye Inhabitants of Longsdon 
and those within that Chapelrv that nothing shall be taken for Probales of 
their Wills or for the granting of Letters of Administration. [What follows 
altho irrelevant to the subject, is amusing,] 

° .Mr. Wright had no legal right to do this for all time, 
t Mr. Vernon was evidently ignorant of Mr. Wright's deed of 1713. 



46 Longstone Records. 

We are here highly elated on the News of Admiral Rodney having 
destroyed so many flat bottomed Boats and other Vessels at Havre. This 
will . . . that the scheme of a descent here is ridiculous. 1 am 
persuaded that we are as safe here as you are in Derbyshire. Forget not to 
ask yf Duke of Devonshire's Architect if he could take y"" several elevations 
of Haddon with y Ichnography and what it would cost. I have His Grace 
of Rutland's leave for the purpose. 

Your affectionate Uncle, 

ED. (?) VERNON. 



Copy of a letter from Colonel John Thomas Wright, 
to his tenant at Longstone Hall, Major Carleill. 

Exeter, 5TH March, 1812. 

Dear Sir, 

On my return home last evening 1 found your letter of the ist 
instant, but not in time to search my papers and give you an answer by 
return of post as requested. I have employed the whole of this day for 
that purpose and after the most minute search, have found the enclosed 
letter from Mr. Vernon to Mr. Wright of Longstone relative to the right of 
nominating the Curate, and which is the only document of the kind that I 
have been able to meet with. As I cannot make any extract from it that 
would prove satisfactory, I send it as it is, trusting you will take rare of it 
until 1 have the pleasure to see you 

It appears that there must be in the proper Office at Lichfield some 
document which ascertains the right of the Patronage, and I shall 
recommend an application to some Proctor there to ascertain in what 
manner the late Mr. Walthal was appointed. If I were at Longstone it 
would be my wish to concur with the Parishioners in the nomination of a 
respectable and efficient Clergyman with a stipulation to have the service 
twice on every Sunday, and I hope and trust that they will resist any 
attempt of the Vicar of Bakewell to appoint a Curate until they shall be 
legally advised that he has the right to do it, and which I do not think 
can be the case from the tenor of the inclosed. 

I have never seen any Deed concerning the Curacy amongst my Papers 
and I suppose that Mr. Robert Thornhill* (seeing the endorsement in my 

* Agent to the Longstone Hall Estate. 



I 



Church Endowments, Patronage, &c, 47 

father's writing on the inclosed when he assisted me in packing up) must 
have taken that paper for the Deed itself. 

There are amongst the Deeds some very old ones relating to the Manor 
of Ashford, but as they are in the old Law Latin of the times to which 
they belong I cannot of myself make out whether they relate in any shape 
to the Chapel, but 1 expect Mi. Jones my Attorney will be home tomorrow, 
when I shall submit them to his inspection, and if any thing is discovered 
in them you shall undoubtedly hear from me immediately. If it proves 
that they are not relevant, 1 will not put you to the e.xpense of postage. 

Mrs. Wright unites in compliments to Mrs. Carliel and I remain 

Dear Sir, 
Your most obedient Servant, 

J. T. WRIGHT. 
.Major Carliel. 



Letter to Colonel yolin Thomas Wright, Exeter, {of Longstone Hall), 
from Major William Carleill, sometime tenant of the same. 

Longstone Hali,, March 15, 1812. 
Dear Sir, 

I laid your letter with its inclosure before a Vestrj' Meeting last 
Sunday since which Mr. Wolley of Matlock has been consulted on the part 
of the Parishioners. Mr. Wolley wrote to Mr. Mott one of the Proctors at 
Lichfield and the Register [sic], and obtained an answer, a copy of which I 
send you on the other side andalsoa copy of an instrument from Mr. Wright 
(1713) to Mr. Monk, [see ante.) You will probably know whether Mr. Wright 
had the power of alienating the Curacy from the Estate in the manner which 
he appears to have exercised. The Mr. Thornhill mentioned in Mr Mott's 
letter is son to Mr. Thornhill of Stanton. Another Vestry .Meeting is 
appointed to be held on Thursday the 26th inst. before which I hope you 
will favour me with an answer to this, as the inhabitants are desirous of 
knowing whether you would wish the business to be investigated any 
further, or rest as it is. 

I remain, Dear Sir, 

Yours sincerely. 

W. CARLEILL. 



48 Longstone Records. 

Enclosure A'o. /, referred to in the above letter. 

Dear Sir, 

Longstone Cur. 
7th May, 1763. Peter Walthall, Clerk, was nominated to the Chapel or 

Perpetual Curacy of Longstone by Thos. Grove, Clerk, Vicar of 

Bakewell, void by the resignation of said Thos. Grove, Clerk. 
;tli May, 1726. Thos. Grove, Clerk, A.M., was nominated to Longstone by 

Jonathan Birch, Clerk, Vicar of Bakewell, on the death of Edward 

Middleton, Clerk. 
13th May, 1 71 7. Edward Middleton, Clerk, was nominated to Longstone 

by Gorstelowe Monck, Clerk, Vicar of Bakewell. 

30th December, 1713. Edward Middleton, Clerk, was nominated to 
Longstone by Gorstelowe Monck. Clerk, Vicar of Bakewell, on the 
death of Samuel Mills, Clerk. 

17th March, 1680. Jos. Fearne, Clerk, A.M., was nominated to Longstone 
by Thos. Wilson, Clerk, Vicar of Bakewell, on the death of 
Richard Jepson, Clerk. 

31st Oct., 1680. Richard Jepson, Clerk, was nominated to Longstone by 
Thos. Wilson, Clerk, Vicar of Bakewell, on the death of Richard 
Spencer, Clerk. 

I find a letter from W. Earl of Devonshire i8th March, 1680, in 
which he says the Chapel was endowed by his Grandfather but he 
does not insist upon any right but recommends Mr. Feme, and 
requests NJr. Brown the Archdeacon to use his influence with Mr. 
Wilson and the Dean and Chapter in favour of Mr. Feme. 

Mr. Thornhill is Licensed to Longston on the nomination of the 
Vicar of Bakewell. 

There is no doubt but the right is in the Vicar of Bakewell. 

The charge of this search is 6s. 8d. each, total ^200 

I do not find any suit about the right of nominaiion to the 
Chapel. 

I am. Dear Sir, 

Yours truly, 

Adam Wolley, Esq., WM. MOTT, 

Matlock. Lichfield Close, 12th March, 1812, 



Church Endowments, Patronage, &c. 40 
LONGSTONE CHANTRY. 

THE FOUNDATION DEED, A.D. 1262. 



From the Magnum RrciiisTituM Aliium of the Dkan 

AND ChaI'TKR of LlCllKIKI.D. 

Fol. 271. b.] 

De Caiitaria Perpetua iip'i Lougedon in pochia de Baukewell. 

Fol. 272. a.] 

Anno ab incarnacoiie iliii m. cc. sexagesiiiio scdo covenit, inr 
Griffyiiu HI' Wennwen' ex parto una. et cms pochns ad capella Sri 
Egidii de magna Longdou spn^itites. c^d' dciis Griffyn' concessit ^. 
se & hered' snis ippetnu dci.s pouftis. duas bovatas terre cu omibj 
ptinent' suis in villa et in titorio de magna Longdun in auxiliu 
snsteiitacois nui' Capellani divina in eade Capella celubianti, videtj 
illas duas bovatas he cu ptin' que extvaote erant de bovat' Inmiagii 
dci Griifyni de magna Lougdon et que p'us assignate er.mt p ilcos 
pochds ad illud idem Srviciu sii.'-tiiied'. Hend' & tenend' de dco 
Griffyno & hered' suis dcis poonib v'l cnicuq' v'l quibjcuq' de 
dca pocliia eas t"der volueiint ad illud idem sviciu sustined liBe 
q'ete bS & in pace Ippetuu salva tS dco Griffyno & hered' suis 
multura de bladis sr dictas duas bovatas terre cresieutib5 ad 
I'cesimum vas. Sciend' tame g, si ita ptig'it g. cauonici mat'cis eccio 
Lich v'l ordinarii eecie de Bauqwell se de dcis duab3 bovatis iPre 
apii'aie volueriut ca uni' capellani divina in eadi/m capella celebrant' 
Ippetuii snstinend' v'l (j, si dci pucfii dcas duas bovatas alicui vendere 
v'l Mliqo alio m° alienare voluerint bn licebit dco Gritt'yno & hered' 
suis dcus duas liova'as 'tre in miinus suas seysi? & voluutatem suam 
hicuti de suo diiio ex eis fa8e sine aliquo ipedimento v'l pMcone 
dco;:;: poiti v'l alicui' pnchi do dca puctiia. Ad liaoc autem pvencom 
fir^' & sine fraude ippetnu tenund diet' Giiffiu' p sc & hered' suis. 
Thorn le Lewyd de pva Longesdon. Elias fil' Witli de ead'. Ric' 
fir Ade de Magna Longesdon. Wills ctic' de ead'. 'I'ho le Bond de 
ead'. Phe dil Hul de ead. & hered' eoz; p tuta poch atturnuti 
costituti manu ceperunt & sigilla sua ultnati in testio ii psenti 
scripto in mod' cirograffi cofecto apposuerunt. P hac autem 
cocessiono dederuiit dci pocfii dco Griffinn septem marc' in ger.suma 
p niauib3. Hiis testib3 Wirtu Wyne. WiHo de Esseburne. Jofie 
de Holewell. Eouo de Schehidon. WiHo de Eeyndoii. Jolie le 
Wyne. Niclio de Wynnefcld. Kicn de Ilokelowe ctico & aliis. 



/ 



50 Longstone Records, 

ITranslation.'] 



Concerning a Perpetual Chantry at Longedon, in the 
Parish of Bakewell. 



In the year 1262, it was agreed between Griffyn son of Wennwen 
of the one part and all the Parishioners belonging to the Chapel of 
S. Giles of Great Longdon that the said Griffin granted for himself 
and his heirs for ever to the said Parishioners two bovates of land 
with all their appurtenances in the town and territory of Great 
Longdon in aid of the maintenance of a Chaplain to celebrate 
divine service in the same Chapel, that is to say those two bovates 
of land with all their appurtenances which were taken from the 
bovates of the homage of the said Griffyn of Great Longdon and 
which were before assigned by the said Parishioners for the 
maintenance of that same service. To have and to hold of the 
said Griffyn and his heirs to the said Parishioners or to any person 
or persons of the said Parish to whom they shall entrust them for 
the maintenance of that same service freely quietly well and in 
peace for ever, saving however to the said Griffyn and his heirs 
multure of the corn growing on the said two bovates to the extent 
of one vessel in thirty. Be it known however that if it so happen 
that the Canons of the mother Church of Lichfield or the ordinaries 
of the Church of Bakewell shall appropriate to themselves the said 
two bovates of land and the maintenance of a Chaplain to celebrate 
divine service in the same Chapel for ever, or if the said 
Parishioners shall sell to anyone or in any other way alienate the 
said two bovates, then it shall be lawful to the said Griffyn and his 
heirs to seize into their own hands the said two bovates and do 
their will of them just as of their own lordship without any 
impediment or contradiction of the said Parishioners or of any 
Pai-ishioner of the said Parish. And that this agreement may be 
kept firmly and without fraud for ever, the said Griffyn, for himself 
and his heirs, Thomas le Lewyd of Little Longesdon, Elias son of 
William of the same, Richard son of Adam of Great Longesdon, 



Church Endowments, Patronage, &c. 51 

William Clerk of the same, Thomas le Bond of the same, Phelip 
dil Hul of the same, and their heirs, being constituted representa- 
tives of the whole Parish, bound themselves and affixed their seals 
alternately for a testimony to this present writing drawn up in the 
manner of an instrument. And for this grant the said Parishioners 
gave to the said GrifPyn seven marks as a fine. Witnesses, 
William Wyne, William de Esseburne, John de Hollewell, Roger 
de Scheladon, William de Reyndon, John le Wyne, Nicholas de 
Wynnefeld, Richard de Hokelowe, Clerk, and others. 



" When Archbishop Peckkam made his Metropolitan visitation in 
1280, it was arranged that the stipend of the Minister of Longstone 
should for the future be at least five marks, half being paid by the 
parishioners, and half by the Dean and Chapter." '"But in 1315, a 
different arrangement was made by which the Dean and Chapter 
were only to be called upon to supply six marks to the five 
Chapelries of Baslow, Longstone, Taddington, Monyash and 
Beeley. Of this sum, fifteen shillings was set apart for the 
Minister of Longstone, the Dean and Chapter granting remission 
of charges for testaments and administrations." Dr. Cox. 



GRANT OF BAPTISTERY AND CEMETERY. 
A.D. 140L 



From the Lichfield Chaptei: Act Rooks Vol. I., Foi.. .57. b. 

Isto XV die Ap'l concess' fuit prochianis de I^unge-scioii in p"^co 
(^ heant baptisHii & sepulfam t^ecu ibni sin piudico mat'cis ecciie 
(le Bak' & coposico est in Tliesanr 

[^Translation.'] 

On the 1.5th of April [1401] it was granted to the PMrishioners 
of Longstone in the Peak that they may have Baptisms and Burial" 
there, without prejudice of the mother Chuich of Bakewell ; and 
the composition is in the Treasurer's hands. 



r2 Longstone Records. 

A RENTAL OF DEAN AND CHAPTER LANDS 

A.D. 1415. 



Thk part concerning HASSor, Longstone, and xdoNSAi 
Extracted from the Lichfield Chapter Act Books. Vol. I., Fol. 89 

Baquell. 
Item eodem die [viz. : xx die Marcii Anno m.cccc.xv] dns Jotiis 
Dean Yicarius de Hope libeiavit & tradidit Decaiio & C;ipto unfi 
Rentale ft-a^ & tenemento^ dnicaliii ipoz? decani & capti in food' 
de B;ikquell Holme & divsis locis de Anno dni mittio cccc"'" xv"'" 
in hec vba que sequif. 

Hassop. If in Hassop v ao? Pre que quonda Gervasius de Hassop 
Yicar eccie do Baquell tenuit & r p a . . iijs. iiijd. " 

Itin in Longesdon j acf fre qua quond' Witt in le Roose 
tenuit niic iacet in deches' quond' f p a niodo onatm in 
Pdditu de iucremento que f solebat vjd 

[in margin] lucido dimitti'' p vijd 
Itm in Mernugale j cnrtila^ & j acf tie iitcunt' ad fine ville 
ppinquiof Fyndou f p a . . . . . ijs 

[ Translation.] 
Bake WELL. 
The same day [viz.: Marcli 20th, 1415] Mr. John Dean, Vicar 
of Hope, delivered and gave to the Dean and Chapter a Kental 
of the lands and tenements of the Dean and Chapter in the fee 
of Bakeweli, Holme, and divei.se places, of the year 1415, in the 
following words : 

Hassop. Itf-m in Hassop, five acres of land which Gervase de Hassop, 
Vicar of the Church of Bakeweli, sometime held, and the 
rent per annum is . . . . . .3s. 4d. 

Item in Longstone, one acre of land which '\^'llliam in 
le Eoose sometime held. Now it lies iu decay. The rent 
per annum used to he 6d. Now it is burdened with an 
increase, and is let for . . . . . . 7d. 

Item in Monsal, one curtilage and one aero of land lying 
at the end of the tuwu nearer Fiudon. The rent j'er 
annum is .... . . . . 2.-*. Od. 



Church Endowments, Patronage, &c. 53 

RECORDS OF THE DEAN AND CHAPTER 
OF LICHFIELD. 



B. 27. [Note. — Much damaged by damp and in many places 

illegible.] 

This indenture made the... [illegible] ...November, in the yeeres 
of the raigne of our soverai«ne Lord James by the grace of God 
... [illegible] ...Scotland, Fraunce, and Ireland, defender of the 
faith, <&c., that is to say of England, Fraunce, and... [illegible] ... 
both Seaventeenth, and of Scotland the two and Fifteeth ? between 
the right hono'^''' William Earl of Devonshire of the one pte and 
Anthony Longston of... [illegible] . in the County of Derby gent 

[illegible] Willm Wright and Thomas White of Great 

Longston in the said County of Derby Gentlemen of the other 
parte. Witnesseth that the said Earl for divers good causes and 
considerations him hereunto especially moving hathe granted 
bargayned sold aliened enfeoffed and confirmed and dothe bj' the 
... [illegible] . and absolutely grante bargayne sell alien enfeoffe & 
confirme unto the said Anthony Longston Willm... [illegible] ... 
Willm Wright & Thomas White All those twoe Oxgangs of Land 
with th appurtenance scituate lyinge & beinge in greate Longisdon 
abovesaid or within the Townes feildes or Territories thereof w^*' 
now are or heretofore were knowne reputed or taken to be the 
Church Land in great Longisdon aforesaid. And also one cottage 
thereupon builded w'*' a Crofte? thereunto adjoyninge in Great 
Longsdon beforesaid All w*^*" premises now are or late were in the 
tenure or occupation of Willm . . . Willm . . . and 

Thomas White their or assignes undertenant 

or undertenants with all comons or comon of pasture thereunto 
belonging & therewith heretofore comonly used or occupied in 
any groundes or comonable places within the the mannour of 
Asheford except in grounds w'^'' are now inclosed and except in 
a certayne ground comonly called Blackloe. Together with all 



54 Longstone Records. 

. . pei-tincnts pcoHtcs li coinodities thereuntil belongini; or 
appertej'ning To have & to holde the said Twoe Oxgangs of land 
& Cottage & Crofte & all & singular other the premises w"' their 

and purtenants unto the said Anthony Longston 

Willm Laute [?] Willm Wright & Thomas White their heirs and 
assigns for ever To the only proper use & behoof of the said 
Anthony Longston Willm Laute Willm Wright & Thomas Whi 
assignes for ever On Trust neverthelesse That they the said 
Anthony Longston Willm L . . Thomas White \' the survivour 
of them and their heirs and the heirs of the survivour of them 

shall sell lett & dispose of 

the premises to the best yeerely value they can get or raise 

thereof And to dispose and profites 

thereof for or towardes the maintenannce or findinge of the Curate 
of great Longsdon aforesaid for the tyme beinge & his successors 
for ever. Provided yet neverthelesse that if the said Curate or 
Curates or any of them shall at any tyme or tymes hereafter be 
absent from the said Church upon the Sabbothe day & not finding 
another sufficient person to supply y cure for y'' tyme of his 
absence. That then for every such tyme of his absence not 
finding a sufficient person to supply y'' cure as aforesaid the 
said Feoffees & their heirs or the survivour of them shall give & 
pay out of the rents yssues & profitts thereof unto y'' Church- 
wardens of Greet Longsdon aforesaid for y tyme being the 
some of Five shillings of lawful money of England to be by them 
distributed amongst y'= poor of y said towne or hamlet of Great 
Longsdon aforesaid according to their discretions Yieidinge and 
paying therefore yeerely unto the said Earle his heirs or assigns 
for ever the yeerely rent or some of Twoe Shillings & Tenpence of 
lawful money of England att the feast daies of thannunciacon 
of our blessed Lady y Virgin Mary & St. Michaell tharchangell 
by even porcons. And if it shall happen y'^ said yeerely rent or 
some of twoe shillings .\d. or any part or parcell thereof to be 
behinde & not paid by the space of Fourteen daies ne.xt after 
eyther of y^ feast daies or tymes at or in w'' y^ same ought to 
be paid by the true intent and meaning of theis presents that 
then & from thenceforth at all tymes after it shall and may be 



Church Endowments, Patronage, &c. 



OJ 



lawfull to & for y' said Earle his heirs or assignees into the said 
twoe Oxgangs of land and premisses or into any parte or pcell 
thereof to enter & distreyne & the distresses then and their founde 
to take lead drive chase carry away & ympound & y'' same in 
pound to deteyne & keep untill he or they shall be of the said 
rent or rents with thapperages thereof (if any such shall happen 
to be) fully contented satisfied and paid. And the said Earle 
and his heirs the said twoe Oxgangs of land and premises & 
premisses w"' thappurtennants unto them the said Anthony . . 
.... Willm Laute Willm Wright & Thomas White their 
heirs and assigns for the use aforesaid against him y"^ said Earle 
& his heires & against all and any other pson or persons lawfully 
clayming by from or under him or any of his ancestors .... 
. . . . shall and will warrant & for ever defend by theis p'sents. 
And the said Earle for himself his heirs executors and adminis- 
trators & for every one of them doth covenant promise & graunt 
to & with y"^ said Anthony Longston Willm Laute Willm Wright 
& Thomas White for and notwithstanding any acte or thing had 
made done or sufPred by him the said Earle or any of his ancestors 
& under y"? yeerly rent above reserved shall and may peacably & 
quietly have hold occupy possesse and enjoy the said twoe 
Oxgangs of land Cottage premisses w"' thappurtennts & every 
parte & parcell thereof w">out any manner of lett suits .... 

eviction of him the said Earle his heires 

or assigneis or of any other person or persons lawfully clayming 
from by or under him or any of his ancestors or by any other 
person or persons lawfully clayming by from or under him them 
or any of them. In witness whereof the parties first above- 
named to theis present indentures interchangeably have set their 
hands & seals the daie & yeere first above written. 

W. Devonshire. 



[The endorsement is illegible for the most part] 

. . . and delivered in . . presence of us whose 
. . . . Tho : Purslow. 



k6 Longstone Records. 

[There is also a Memorandum which is also illegible save a word 

here and there.] Md. qd XXV. [day of] . . . . 

Liary in the year of the Kaigne of . . . James, . . . 1620. 



"The Parliamentary Commissioners of 1650, report of Great 
Longstone, that it is fitt to be made a Parish Chm-ch, and to have 
united to it Little Longstone, Hassop, Rowland, and Monsaldale. 
There is granted by the Commissioners of plundered Ministers, an 
Augmentation of £43 12. 8. unto Minister of Great Longstone, 
.Mr. Robert Craven, an able honest man." Dr. Cox. 



Whereas there was formerly given to the Chappell of Great 
Longston, in the County of Derby, Thirteen shillings and sixpence 
yearly ai'ising oLit of y"" lands and tenements late the Estate of 
Christopher Jenldnson of Longston aforesaid And also one rood of 
land lying in Longston fields, and one Cottage with a garden 
adjoining to the Curat's house, for y'' use the Lord's Table for the 
buying of Bread and Wyne for the Lord's Supper, Itt is therefore 
agreed between Samuell Mills .perpetual Curat and the Chappell- 
Wardens and others of the cheif inhabitants there (so farr as in 
them lyeth) That the said Sam" Mills shall enjoy the said house, 
garden, and rood of land, and also yearly and every year receive 
the said sum of 13" : 4'' ; he the said Sam" providing sufficient 
allowance for y Lord's Table at all such tymes as shall be 
convenient for the receiving the blessed Sacrament ; and at least 
as often as the 21st Canon injoynes relation being thereunto had 
may more at large appeare. And if itt happen the said Sam" doo 
not at all tymes make such sufficient provision then this to be voyd 
and of no effect. 

Witness our hands this fourth day of March, 1699. 

THO: WRIGHT. 
HENRY SCAMARDINE. 



Church Endowments, Patronage, &c. S7 

" 1835. At a Vestry Meeting held on Thursday, June 15th, it \vas 
agreed that Mr. Malkin Mills (i.e. the Perpetual Curate) should 
receive the rent for the land lying in Longstone fields and also 
the 13^:4 1 charged upon the Longstone dale estate for the 
purpose of providing Bread and Wine for the Sacrament " 



1893. 

The Gross Income of the Living was - £218 9 6 

and the Nett Income - - . . £172 3 o 



Jill ?nt>cnfox*n 

Of tin- contents of the Inv, Chest in the Vestry of Longstone 
Chnrch, taken by ./. H. Biilllrnnt, (Vicar), Mav 16, 1HS7. 



1. Register of Baptisms, Burials and Marriages ? 1630 to -1690. 

The first legible date is 1635. 

2. Register of Baptisms, Burials and Marriages from March 

29, 1691, to May 10, 1738. The last page contains an entry 
of a ^L^niage, May 21, 1765, and there are four detached 
leaves containing .Marriages only, from Sept. 7, 1755, to 
March 19, 1765. This Register is in very bad condition. 

3. Register of Baptisms and Burials from April 19, 1765, to 

Dec. 25, 1812, and at the other end of the same Register, 
Marriages from June 24, 1766, to Sep. 21, 1812. On the 
page next to the last entry of a Marriage is an entry of a 
publication of Banns of Marriage published on the 2nd, 9th, 
and 16th of November, 1817, and below on the same page is 
the following note—" The three old Register books were 

■ Oiil) part of 1690. 



58 Longstone Records. 

brought to the Parsonage house by John Thornhill, Clerk, 
May 20th, 1831, to be deposited in the Chest. 

M. MILLS, Incumbent." 

" (N.B.) The above three Register Books are wholly 
imperfect." 

4. Register of Baptisms— Feb. 21, 1813, to May 29, 1842. 

5. Register of Burials— Jan. 6, 1813, to Jan. 16, 1856. 

6. Register of Marriages— Oct. 14, 1817, to April 8, 1837. 

7. Register of Baptisms— May 29, 1842, to Dec. 3, 1882. 

8. Register of Marriages and Duplicate, Oct. 2, 1837, to the 

present time (1887) and still in use. 

9. Register of Burials— Jan. 30, 1856 

10. Register of Baptisms— Feb. 11, 1883 „ 

The Tithe Commutation Deed, Schedule and Map of Apportion- 
ments for the Township of Brushfield. 

Two Awards of Exchange between the Vicar of Longstone and the 
Duke of Devonshire, and between the Vicar of Longstone 
and William Bradshaw, Esq. 

A Mortgage Deed for securing £330 with interest, from Rev. J. 
Paley to the Governors of Queen Anne's Bounty. 

A Copy of the Longstone School Scheme. 



Memorial Tablet, 59 

Infeirsliiig 19th Cfiitiiry Miinorial Tablet in Loui;stonc Cluirdi. 



The Inhabitants of Longstone 

And its neighbourhood 

B)- a subscription 

Caused this tablet to be erected 

To perpetuate the memory of 

Edward Buxton, 

Of this place, surgeon and apothecary, 

Formerly practicing at Bakewell ; 

His professional abilities, ever ready 

To assist the poor and the needy, 

Shone particularly conspicuous 

During a long epidemical contagion 

Which in the year MDCCCXX 

Afflicted this village ; 

When 

His gratuitously administering relief, 

To soothe and subdue the existing woe. 

Strongly testified his goodness of heart. 

He was born at Bakewell 

The XXII Day of June MDCCXIA'II 

And here closed his useful life 

On the XVII Day of January MDCCCXXII 

Aged LXXIV years. 

Watson. 

With regard to the "epidemical contagion" referred to in this 
mural tablet, — Mr. George Morton, of Great Longstone, informed 
me in August, 1904, on the authority of his Mother, a nonogenarian, 
that " the epidemic was tj'phus fever, which visited every house in 
"the village except that of the Woodhouse's who lived next to the 
"present (1904) Post Office. They were shoemakers and carried 
" on their trade as usual, but escaped the fever. 

" The remedy prescribed for the fever by Dr. Bu.xton was ' wort,' 
" that is, new beer on the work in the vat; and for the purpose of 
" providing this, beer was brewed daily at the Church Lane Farm, 
" then occupied by Mr. Gregory. 

" Not a single death occurred in the village, but two deaths from 
" the epidemic took place at Bleak Low Farm. 

N.B. Dr. Buxton married a daughter of Francis White and 
lived for many years in the house on the Green built by the latter 
and bearing his initials, between the Hall garden and the entrance 
to Fearnyhough Yard. 



6o Longstone Records. 

SUCCHSSION OF THE BISHOPS OF LICHFIELD. 



The Diocese 0} 


Lichfield iticl 


tided Derbyshire up tu 1SS4. 






Accession. 1 


Accession. 


Peter (Removed tli'- See to Cliesti-r) 1072 [ 


Rowland Lee 


.. 1534 


= rRobert de Limesey 


... 1086 


Richard Sampson 


.. 1543 


c 


Robert Peche 


... 1121 


Ralph Bayne 


.. 1554 




Roger de Clinton 


... 1129 


Thomas Bentham 


.. 1560 


!i - 


Walter Durdent 


... 114il 


William Overton 


.. 1580 


C 


Richard Peche 


... 1161 


George Abbot 


.. 1609 


1 


Gerard la Pucelle 


... 1183 


Richard Neile ... 


.. 1610 


Hugh Nonant ... 


... 118S 


John Overall 


.. 1614 


GeoCfrey Muschamp 


... 1198 


Thomas Morton ... 


.. 1619 


William Cornhill 


... 1215 


Robert Wright ... 


.. 1632 


Alexander Stavenby 


... 1224. 


Accepted Frewen 


.. 1644 


Hugh PateshuU... 


... 1240 


John Hackett ... 


.. 1661 


Eoger Weseham . . . 


... 124.5 


Thomas Wood ... 


.. 1671 


Roger Longespee 


... 1258 


William Lloyd ... 


.. 1692 


Walter de Langton 


... 1296 


John Hough 


.. 1699 


Koger Northburgh 


... 1322 


Edward Chandler 


... 1717 


Robert Stretton ... 


... 1360 


Ricliard Smallbrooke 


... 1731 


Walter Scirlaw ... 


... 1386 


Frederick Cornwallis 


... 1750 


Richard Scroope 


... 1386 


John Egerton ... 


... 1768 


John Burghill ... 


... 1398 


Brownlow North 


... 1771 


John Catterick ... 


... 1415 


Richard Hurd ... 


... 1775 


William Heyworth 


... 1420 


James Cornwallis 


... 1781 


William Booth ... 


... 1447 


Henry Eider 


... 1824 


Nicholas Close ... 


... 1452 


\ Samuel Butler ... 


... 1836 


Reginald Boulers 


... 1453 


James Bowstead 


... 1840 


John Hales 


... 1450 


John Lonsdale ... 


... 1S43 


William Smith ... 


... 1493 


George Augustus Selwyn 


... 1868 


John Arundel ... 


... 1496 


Wm. Dairy mple Maclagan 


... 1878 


Geoffrey Blyth ... 


... 1.W3 






THE 


DIOCESE 


OF SOUTHWELL. 




G 


eorge Ridding 


... 1884 






Edwyn Hoskyns 


... 1904 





Vicars of Bake well. 



6i 



VICARS OF BAKE WELL. 



Henry de Lexington 

(Rector) 1253 

Peter 1254 

Eobert (Vicar).. 1272 

John da Osmundeston 1286—1323 

Robert Bernard 1327—1331 

Walter de Newton 1331 

Grervase de Hassop 1333—1343 

William deSnell — 

William de Kyrtelington 1349—1365 

Roger de Tibshelf 1383—1405 

John de Burton 1409—1413 

John Huckyns 1424 

Thomas Staundon 1428 

William Brome 1435—1439 

Richard Crichelowe ... 1457 — 1469 
Thomas Crichelowe ... 1474 

Thomas Hey ward 1481—1493 

Thomas Porte (Bishop 
of Aghadoe Bp. Suf- 
fragan of Lichfield) 1493-1494 
William Massey (Vicar) 1494 

John Wilcock 1511—1512 

Richard Hoton 1512 — 1533 

Richard G went 1 533— 1 537 

Prepared by the late Mr. W. A. Carrington, 



Edmund Webster 1537 

Ralph Clayton 1569 — 1605 

Edmund Clayton 1605 

Hamlet Charlton 1609— 1G14 

John Rowlandson 1615 — li)49 

John Rowlandson, jun. 16.iO — 1662 

John Beardmoore 1662 — 1668 

Christopher Lawson ... 1668 — 1H72 

Edward Smith 1672—1673 

Thomas Wilson 1673 — 1703 

Gorstelowe M onck 1708 — 1 724 

Jonathan Birch 1724 — 1735 

Thomas Grove 1735—1769 

Richard Weston 1769 

Richard Chapman 1769— 1S16 

Francis Hodgson (Pro- 
vost of Eton College, 
Archdeacon of Derby; 1816—1840 
Hubert Kestell Cornish 1840—1869 
Edward Balston (Arch- 
deacon of Derby, Fel- 
low of Eton College) 1869-1891 
Charles F. Thornewill 1892—1894 
Edward T. Billings ... 1894—1697 
Charles T. Abraham ... 1897 

Extracted from Bakewell Parish Magazine. 



62 



Longstone Records, 



INCUMBENTS AND CURATES 



LONGSTONE CHURCH. 



112-t 


Roger de Spofford 


1761 


Adam Needham 


1636 


" IVL Cur" (inscribed in lead 


1763 


Peter Walthall 




on roof of Church) 


1S05 


George Berkeley 


1639 


Robert Craven 


1812 


Baohe Thornhill 


1656 


Henry Marshall 


1815 


John Browne, T. B. Lucas, 


1658 


Joseph Ludlam 




and Thos. Webster 


1680 


Richard Spencer 


1828 


Malkin Mills 


1680 


Richard Jepsoh 


1841 


Charles Lewis Cornish* 


1633 


Joseph Fearne 


1845 


George Best Brown* 


1688 


Henry Tomlinson 


1847 


James Stephen Hodson 


1691 


Samuel Mills 


18551 


George Chinnery Tooth 


1714 


Edward Middleton 


1868 


John Paley 


1726 


Thomas Grove 


1873 


Nathaniel Armstrong Wells 


1735 


Joseph Meller 


1874 


Laxon Edward Sweet 


1739 


John Swift 


1877 


John Henry Bullivant 


1748 


M. Hudson 


1892 


Henry James Kelsall 


1753 


Thomas Nadauld 


1893 


Giles Andrew 



® Memorial Window. 
■f Since tins iliite tlie Incumbent lias been styletl ^'icar. 



Officiating Clergy. 



63 



Other Clergymen who have taken duty in Longstone Church during the 

last 100 years. There must be tnany omissions inasmuch as no Sunday 

Registers were kept. 



Abraham, Charles John, Bishop 
Abraham, Charles T., Canon 
Allen, J. 
Andrew, Samuel, Canon 

Bagshawe, A. Drake 

Balston, Edward, Archdeacon of 

Derby, and Vicar of Bakewell 
Barker, A. Auriol 
Barker, F. E. 
Barker, John 
Bateman, Stafford 
Bates, Thomas 
Begbie, A. G. 
Bell, W. K. 
Bird, G. 

Block, Charles E. 
Boyd, W. P. 
Brandreth, J. P. 
BuUivant, Henry 
Bullivant, Henry Everard 
Burrow, James 

Campbell, Daniel 
Chalmers, J. A. 
Chapman, Richard 
ChurchiU, F. 
Coates, James 
Coke, J. H. 
Coombe, Walter 
Crane, Canon 
Cornish, Hubert Kestell 
Cursham, F. L. 

Davies, T. C. 



Dawson, G. A. 
Disney, William 
Dixon, R. 
Downman, F. 
Drinkwater, John 

Eaj-rs, J. 
Eckersley, J. 
Evered, E. 

Faber, H. M. 
Fletcher, J. M. J. 
Flood, Samuel 
Ford, W. H. 
Foster, Charles 
Foster, W. H. 
Fox, A. C. 
Freeman, H. J. 
Fuller, Richard H. 

Gaorlick, A. 
Giles, William G. 
Given, J. 
Grace, T. S. 
Graham, C. E. 
Green, J. 

Greenshields, L. W. 
Grifan, H. J. 

HaU, J. 
Hamlyn, J. F. 
Hargrave, C. 
Harvey, Reginald 
Hetherington, W. 
Hinckley, Thos. 



64 



Longstone Records. 



Hirst, Thomas 

Hobhouse, Edmund, formerly Bishop 

of Nelson, N.Z. 
Hobson, .Tos. Charles 
Hone, E. J. 
Hone, C. R. 
Hope, William 
Hughes, James 

JacKson, C. B. 
Jagger, J. E. 
Jones, John 

Kelly, F. F. 
Kewley, J. W. 

Lambrick, C. M. 
Longsdon, Henry John 
Luxmoore, John Reddaway 

Marshall, E. 
Martin, Sydney E. 
Moberley, George H. 
Money, W. B. 
Monro, Edward 
Morris, Ernest E. 

Nixon, W. H. 
Norburn, Henry 

Parker, W. J. 
Parmenter, E. C. 
Patterson, Wm. George 
Peach, H. J. 
Pitt, Lonsdale 

Eawdon, J H , Canon 
Eiddlesden, J. B. 
Eidsdale, Charles H. 
Rigaud, S. I. 
Rogers, John, Canon 



Rogers, Saltren 
Routh, Robert S. 
Roy, R. C. 
RudcUe, T. D. 
Rusby, W. H. L. 

Samples, Albert 

Scotter, W. H. 

Sergeant, Horace 

Soulthorpe, H. C. 

Sharland, G. T. 

Shaw, Francis L. 

Sheppard, Edgar, minor Canon of St. 

George's, Windsor 
Slater, Leonard 
Smith, Richard 
Smith, Urban 
Spurrell, Richard 
Stamper, W. P. 
Stockdale, Jeremiah 
Stuart, J. Kilbee 
Swainson. A. 

Theodosius, J. H. 
Thornewill, Charles F. 
Thorold, Charles 
Tooth, W. A. 

Ward, Jos. P. 

Watkins, George Edwin 

Wawn, John D. 

Webb, H. M. 

Webster, Thomas 

Were, Edward Ash, Bishop of Derby 

Willis, Henry de L. 

Wingfield, W. F. 

Wright, Harrington Stafford 

Wright, Walter Reurinald 



Church Officials. 
CHURCHWARDEN'S.* 



65 



1636 "W. WRl" (WilUam Wright) and 
" I.Pni" (;- Flint) " CHVW " 

{Engraved on lead roof of the Nave \ 

1639 John Andrew and Richard White. 
16-tO Thomas Willyamson and Sydney Mellor 

1653 Thomas Hasselam and Francis Lowe. 

1657 William Hallowes k William Bramhall 

1660 William Winscombe and Edward Peake 

1669 Francis Needham and Francis Howe, 

of Little Longson 

1670 James Scamadine and John Buxton 

167-1 Ellis Eaworth and John Heyward 

1676 Thomas Hodgkinson & Richard Keyton 

1677 William Naylor and Richard Keyton 

1680 James Gooddey and 

1681 Christopher Jenkinson and John 

Tomlinson, senr. 

1682 George Eaworth and 

1683 ThomasBlackwell and Francis Bramwell 
1684- William Heathcote & Thomas Jackson 

1686 Robert Huslour and Stephen Marshall 

or John Fro=t 

1687 William Wright and Thomas Holme 
1688 George Flint and William Raworth 

1689 Christopher Jenkinson and WilliamLowe 

1690 William Lowe and Ellis Lowe 

1691 William Lowe and Ellis Lowe 

1692 Wiliam Lowe and Anthony Barton 
16!)3 Benjamin Hallowes and Thomas Norrys 

1694 Thomas Jackson and Guliel* Fynney 

1695 Richard White and Thomas Jackson 



1696 Thomas Hodgkinson and Richard 

Keyton 

1697 William Lowe and John Marchington 

1698 Cornelius Dickens and Samuel Bradwell 

1699 Henry Scamadine and Thomas Johnson 

1700 Samuel Scamadine and John Xorrys ■ 
17U1 William Hudgkinson of y<^ Cross and 

Thomas Gregory of Wardlow 

1702 William Hodgkinson & Thomas Gregory 

1703 Hem-y Hancock and Godfrey Holme of 

Wardlow 
1701- John Tomlinson and Thomas Longsdon 

1705 John SeUars and Thomas Bradbury of 

Brushfield 

1706 John Tomlinson and William Lowe 

1 707 Mr.Carolus Bagshawe and William Lowe 

1708 Charles Bagshawe and Edward Frost 

1 709 Anthony Clayton and Thomas Bramwell 

1710 Anthony Clayton and Samuel Skidmore 

1711 William Frost and Richard Turner 

1712 William Frost and William Fynney 

1713 Joseph Furnice and William Raworth 

1714 George Dale and George Wilde 

1715 Henry Hodgkinson and William or 

Anthony Pidcock 

1 716 William Hodgkinson de fold and Radul- 

phus Bagshawe 

1717 William Hodgkinson defold and George 

Cowper 

1718 Sampson Hodgkinson and Thomas 

Marshall 

1719 Sampson Hodgkinson and John March. 

ington 

1720 Sampson Hodgkinson and Michael 

White 



I olden times the Cliurchwardenswere slylfd .4idiles, Custodes and Cliaf flwardenf:. 



66 



Lon^stone Records. 



1721 Robert Hiisloi' and Richard Brassing- 

ton 

1722 Anthony Torr and Edward Frost 

1723 Anthony Torr and Samuel Johnson 
172-1- Davenport Blackwell and John Royley 

1725 Davenport Blackwell and George Shaw 

1726 Davenport Blackwell and James Frost 

1727 Daniel Frost and Francis Martin 

1728 Daniel Frost and William Cooper 

1729 Daniel Frost and Francis HuUey 

1730 Richard Frost and James Frost 

1731 Richard Frost and Thomas Tomlinson 

1732 Richard Frost and Original Turner 

1733 James Gregory and Thomas Gregory 
173-1 James Gregory and Jos. Thornhill 

1735 Michael Buxton and William Lowe 

1736 Michael Buxton and WUliam Holme 

1737 Thomas Oldfield and George Hancock 
173s Thomas Oldfield and David Feepound 

1739 Richard Bettney and Anthony Hodg- 

kinson 

1740 Richard Bettney and John Boden 

1741 Richard Bettney and William Lowe 

1742 Robert Hodgkinson and Ralph James 

1743 Robert Hodgkinson and Joseph Beebee 

1744 Francis Hodgkinson and Thomas White 

1745 Francis Hodgkinson and Adam Wilson 
174fi Joshua Flint and Francis Morten 

1747 Joshua Flint and Thomas Longsdon 

1748 John Frost and Ralph Bagshawe 

1749 John Frost and James Rushen 

1750 John Hewaid and Thomas Morton 

1751 John Heward and Joseph Skidmore 

1752 William Goodwin and William Holme 

1753 William Goodwin and James Bland 

1754 Cornelius Bettney and James Bland 

1755 Cornelius Bettney and Isaac Broome 
17oli William Fiirnice and George Dickens 



1757 Francis White and Isaac Broome 

1758 Joseph Beebee and Cain Cottrell 

1759 Joseph Beebee and Anthony Pidcock 

1760 Joseph Beebee and John Boden 

1761 Luke Hodgkinson and James Beebee 
17(>2 Luke Hodgkinson and Jarvis Thorn- 
hill 

1763 George Flint and Ellis Dickens 

1764 George Flint and Thomas White 

1765 Thomas Gregory and William Goodwin 

1766 Thomas Gregory and John Thornhill or 

Daniel Sellers 

1767 Francis Coates and William Pidcock 

1768 Francis Coates and George Hancock 

1769 Lawrance Wain and Edward Shaw 

1770 Lawrance Wain and John Thornhill 

1771 Francis Furniss and William Low 

1772 Francis Furniss and Ralph Bagshawe 

1773 John Flint and Charles Shaw 

1774 John Flint and Christopher Howe 

1775 Thomas Wager and Thomas Tomblison 

1776 Thomas Wager and William Holme 

1777 William Wager and Adam Willson 

1778 William Wager and Jarvis Thornhill 

1779 William Gregory, junr., and George 

Tomblison 

1780 William Gregory and George Dickens 
17S1 William Hadfield and James Longsdon 

1782 William Hadfield and John Allsop 

1783 Josiah Blackwell and Benjamin Skid- 

more 

1784 Josiah Blackwell and John Boden or 

Charles Shaw 

1785 Martin Furniss and William Pidcock 

junr. 

1786 Martin Furniss and Jarvis Thornhill 

1787 Thomas Hill and Robert Shaw 

1788 Thomas Hill and Michael White 



Church Officials. 



67 



1789 Sampson Hodgkinson and Martin Fiir- 

niss 

1790 Sampson Hodgkinson and Jonathan 

Bamford 

1791 Francis White and William Low 

1792 Francis White and George Hancock 

1793 Richard Skidmore and William Good- 

win 
1791 Richard Skidmore and James New- 
bovild 

1795 Moses Taylor and John Longsdon 

1796 Moses Taylor and Robert Bagshaw 

1797 George Flint and William Pidcock 

1798 George Flint and John Thornhill 

1799 Richard Bettney and Charles Shaw 

1800 Richard Bettney and Peter Holme 
* 1801 James Gregory and George Wilson 

1802 James Gregory and Ralph Frost 

1803 Joseph Morton and James Longsdon 

1804 Joseph Morton and Thomas White 

1805 Robert Thornhill and George Tonilin- 

son 

1806 Robert Thornhill and Christopher 

James 

1807 John Eyre and John Longsdon 

1808 John Eyre and Thomas White 

1809 Matthew Fumiss and Benjamin 

Skidmore 
IHIO Matthew Fumiss and John Allsop 

1811 Charles Shaw and William Pidcock 

1812 Charles Shaw and Peter Ashmore 

1813 William Wager and Robert Shaw 

1814 William Wager and Robert Shaw 

1815 William Carleill and John Longsdon 

1816 William Carleill and John Longsdon 

1817 John Thornhill and Martin Furniss 

1818 John Thornhill and Robert Robinson 

1819 William Gregory and George Ashton 

1820 William Gregory and George Ashton 



1821 Joseph Buxton and Robert Bagsliaw 

1822 Josepli Buxton and John Bamford 

1823 James Gregory and William Hallows 

1824 James Gregory and Peter Holme 

1825 James Gregory and James Longsdon 

1826 James Gregory and James Longsdon 

1827 James Gregory and Charles Shaw 

1828 Joseph Morton and Reginald Dicken 

1829 Joseph Morton and Joseph Timm 

1830 Sampson Wager and Benjamin Elliott 

1831 Sampson Wager and William Hulley 

1832 Francis Furniss and Henry White 

1833 Joseph Skidmore and James Longsdon 

1834 Joseph Skidmore and Joseph Skidmoie 

of Wardlow 

1835 Matthew Furniss and William Wilson 

1836 Thomas Gregory Orri^- Robert Bagshaw 

1837 Thomas Gregory Orr and John Bridge 

1838 William Wager and John Allsop 
lh39 William Wager and George Ashton 

1840 Robert Thornhill and Robert Holme 

1841 Robert Thornhill and William Longsdon 

1842 John Lowe and Robert Elliott 

1843 John Lowe and Anthony Hallows 

1844 Richard Bettney and Matthew Holme 

1845 Richard Bettney and Charles Shaw 

1846 Joseph Skidmore and Francis Robinson 

1847 Joseph Skidmore and William Wilson 
184S John Furniss and Robert Bagshaw 

1849 John Fiu-niss and George Ashton 

1850 John Furniss and Matthew Ashmore 

1851 John Furniss and Anthony Hallows 

1852 Richard Bettney and Antliony Hallows 

1853 Richard Bettney and William Wilson 

1854 John Furniss and Francis Robinson 

1855 William Wager and Anthony Hallows 

1856 William Wager and Anthony Hallows 

1857 Robert Thornhill and Robert Shaw 



68 



Longstone Records. 



1H58 Robert Tliornli ill iiml Kobert Shaw 

1859 James Furniss and Thomas Parkin 

1860 James Furniss and Thomas Parkin 

1861 James Furniss and Thomas Parkin 

1862 James Furniss and George Ashton 
1S63 James Furniss and George Asliton 
186 1 James Furniss and George Ashton 

1865 Jaraes Furniss and Anthony HaUows 

1866 James Furniss and Anthony Hallows 

1867 James Furniss and Robert Shaw 

1868 Thomas Gregory Orr and Thomas Parkin 
1809 Edward Levett and Thomas Parkin 

1870 John Thornhill and George Shaw 

1871 George Thomas Wright and John 

Thornhill 

1872 George Thomas Wright and Edward 

Smithers 

1873 George Thomas Wright and Edward 

Smithers 

1874 Joseph Scott and James Orr 

1875 Joseph Scott and James Orr 

1876 Joseph Scott and James Furniss, junr. 

1877 Joseph Scott and James Furniss, „ 

1878 Joseph Scott and Richard Skidmore 

1879 Joseph Scott and Richard Skidmore 

1880 Joseph Scott and Edward Smithers 

1881 Joseph Scott and Edward Smithers 

1882 Joseph Scott and Edward Smithers 

1883 Joseph Scott and Edward Smithers 

1884 Joseph Scott and Edward Smithers 
1835 Joseph Scott and Edward Smithers 
1886 Joseph Scott and Edward Smithers 



18h7 Edward Smithers and William Pitt 
Dixon 

1888 Edward Smithers and William Pitt 

Dixon 

1 889 William Pitt Dixon and William Longs- 

don Shaw 

1890 William Pitt Dixon and William Longs- 

don Shaw 

1891 William Pitt Dixon and William Ashton 

1892 William Pitt Dixon and William Ashton 
1898 William Pitt Dixon and William Ashton 

1894 William Pitt Dixon and George Thomas 

Wright 

1895 Charles Frederick Williams and George 

Thomas Wright 
1^96 Charles Frederick Williams and George 

Thomas Wright 
1S97 William Rogers Pitt Dixon and William 

Longsdon Shaw 

1898 William Rogers Pitt Dixon and William 

Longsdon Shaw 

1899 William Rogers Pitt Dixon and Walter 

Herbert Wright 

1900 William Rogers Pitt Dixon and Walter 

Herbert Wright 

1901 William Rogers Pitt Dixon and Walter 

Herbert Wright 

1902 William Rogers Pitt Dixon and Walter 

Herbert Wright 

1903 William Rogers Pitt Dixon and Ernest 

Morewood Longsdon 
1901 William Rogers Pitt Dixon and John 

William Thornhill 
1905 William Rogers Pitt Dixon and John 

William Thornhill 



Church Officials. 



69 



SlDIiSMHX. 



Bagshaw, F. 

Bates, Arthur 

Black well, John 

Carson, Charles 

Coe, Richard 

Edwards, Hugh 

Eyre, Arthur Wm. Joseph 

Eyre, William (Sexton) 

Grant, Theodore 



Nadin, James 

Nadin, William 

Orrell, T. M. 

Slack, William 

Spanton, Henry Arthm- 

Spencer, James 

Taylor, H. T. 

Triokett, James Tissington 

Ward, Arthur 



In 1896 Sidesmen were appointed to assist, or act in the absence of, the Cl.nrchwar.Iens. Fx-Church- 
wardens, and others elected at the Annual Vestrj' Meeting, are Sidesmen. 



CHURCH MUSIC. 



As to the conduct of the Music, during many centuries there is 
nothing but tradition to help us. Like other village Churches, the 
Choir composed of both sexes was usually led by Flute and Fiddle 
and supported by Clarinet, Oboe, Bassoon, and Double Bass. 
Harmoniums and Organs were not in general use until the Nine- 
teenth Century. Here in Longstone the following is probably a 
correct list of the last "Members of the Band" as they were 
formerly styled — 



William Wilson' ... 
Richard Heathcote 
Jonathan Hulley ... 
Thomas Hill 
Joseph Morton 
James Morton 
William Eyre 
and (later) 
Joseph Scott 

« Mr. Scott's Flute is still treasured by his daughter, Mrs. Hill, of Market Dravton. 



Flute. 

Fiddle. 

Oboe. 

Clarinet. 

Bassoon. 

Violoncello. 



) Conductor and Leader 
J with Flute.* 



70 



Longstone Records. 



1868 we find at the Harmonium — 

Mrs. Paley 

and 
Miss Annie Paley 



Wife and daughter 
of the Vicar. 



ORGANISTS. 



1873 at the Organ- 
Miss Price 
Miss Jess 
Mr. F. Burgiss 
Mr. A. P. Fewkes 
Mr. >1. A. Piggott 
Mr. L. Galaud 
Mr. W. Sumner 
Mr. W. K. Bateson .. 
Mr. H. A. Spanton .. 
Miss L. A. F. Wright 
Miss F. H. Wright . 
Mr. H. A. Spanton . 



1874 
1876 

1879 
1881 
1883 
1887 
1894 
1900 
1904 



The Vicarage. 
! Bakevvell. 



School House. 



The Hall. 



.. |~ School House. 



Organ Blower- -John Turner. 



CHORISTERS AND ASSISTANT CHORISTERS. 



Since 1873. 



Andrew, George 
.'Vtlierton, Ernest 

Bacon, Tlionias 
Bates, .Arthur 
Bennett, Isaac 
Bennett, Joseph 
Blackwell, George 
Blackwell, Thomas 
Blagden, Charles 
Bottom, Albert 
Braddock, AiUiui 
Btadwell, Lutl.tT 
Briilgc, jolin 
I'righlnjore, Charles 
Brigtmore, Thomas 
Buzzard, Charles Herbert 



Carson, George 
Carson, Matthew 
Co opei .Theodore 

Davies, Thomas 

Di.Non, William Rogers Pitt 

Elliott, George 

Elliott, Herbert 

Evre, Arthur 

Eyre, Arthur William Joseph 

Eyre, William 

FitzGeorge, Robert 
Franks, George 
Franks, Reginald 
Furniss, Antliony 
Furniss, George 
Furniss, William 



Church Officials. 



71 



Gregory, William A. 
Grant, James 
Grant, Theodore 
Green, James 

Hanibleton, Benjamin 
Hambleton, Bernard 
Hambleton, George 
Hambleton, Joseph 
Hamilton, Joseph 
Hewitt, Arthur 
Hewitt, William 

Johnson, Samuel 
Jupp, Jesse 
Jupp, William 
Jupp, Henry 

Lea, Charles 
Lock, Alfred 
Lomas, George 



Morris, 

Morton, 

Morton, 

Morton, 

Morton 

Morton 

Morton 

Morton 

Morton 



James W. 
, Arthur 
, Charles 
Charles 
, George 
, James 
, Matthew 
, William 
, Samuel 



Nadin, Ernest 
Nadin, Jesse 
Nadin, William 
N'uttall, Frederick H. 
Nuttall, Henry 

Oldfield, John Thomas 
Old field, Walter 

Parkin, James 
Parkin, Thomas 
Parkin, William 
Percival, Matthew Spencer 
Percival, Joseph 
Porter, Thomas 

Rodley, Thomas 

Sharpies, William 
Skidmore, Albert 
Slack, Harry 
Slingsbv. Samuel 
Solly, Charles 



Taylor, Charles 
Taylor, George 

Timm, Percy 
Timm, William 

Waddell, Malcolm 
Wager, Albert 
Wager, Clement 
Ward, Arthur 
Ward, Christopher 
Ward, George 
Ward, George 
Ward, Victor 
Watts, John 
Whibberley, Cyril 
Wood, Joseph 
Wright, Henry Charles 
Wright, George Darling 
Wright, George Thomas 

Bates, Lin a 

Carson, Mary Ann 

Eyre, Beatrice 

FitzGeorge, Eliza 

Gould, Harriet 
Green, Florence 

Hewitt, Mary Jane 
Haywood, Ann 
Higton, Daisy 

Jones, Harriet 

Kay, Mary Ann 

Lankester, Edith 

Morton, Sarah 

Naylor, Caroline 

Oliver, Alice 
Oliver, Sarah Ann 

Southgate, S. 
Southern, Gertrude 

Turner, Kate M. 
Walker, Mrs. (Schoolmistress) 
Wells, Ada 
Wright, Ena Mabel 
Wright, Florence Helena 
Wright, Lilian Margaret 
Wright, Margaret Jean 
Wright, Myra 



72 



Longstone Records. 
CLERKS. 



1692 
1791 


Hem-icus Dooley 
John Thornhill 


1829 
1847 


John Thornhill 
Robert Thornhill 




Edward (iai-liek 
James Ward 
William Ward 
William Ashton 
William Ward 


SEXTONS. 




1755 
181-1 
1847 
1855 
1805 




1.S70 

1877 
1892 


William Ashton and Tliomas 

Eyre 
Thomas Eyre 
William Eyre 




CHURCH CLEANERS. 



1829 Ann Ward 
1847 Martha Hill 



Goodice Blagden 
Christina Blagden 



CLOCK WINDERS. 



ISOS John Thornhill 

1839 James Ward 

1847 William AVard 

1855 William Asliton 



1865 William Ward 

1870 William Ashton and Thomas 

Eyre 
1873 Edwin Perry 



CLOCK REPAIRERS. 



1799 Charles Sliaw 

1809 John Thornhill 

1812 Richard Warhurst 

1815 . . . Prinney 

1818 . . . Foulks 



1831 
1847 
1858 
1871 
1873 



Thomas Plant 
.lames Carson 
Joseph Carson 
John Carson 
John Smith 



Church Bells. 



73 



CHURCH HELLS. 



There were formerly four Bells in the Belfry besides the Sanctus 
Bell over the E. end of the Nave. Of these, three only remained 
for a long period of time — 

1st Bell — missing. 

2nd Bell inscribed — "Ellis Dickens, Geo. Flint, Chappelhvardens. 
Thomas Hedderley, Foimder, 1763." 

3rd Bell " God save His Church, 1618," and the bell-mark of 
" George Oldfield." 

4th Bell "Go. Al-glory bee to God on high, 1674," and the 
bell-mark of " George Oldfield." 

It does not appear what became of the 1st Bell, but the Sanctus 
Bell, which also bears the date of 1763, was removed to the School. 

1873. 
The following is the weight of the present Bells : — 
Key of A. Major. 



1st Bell ... 
2nd Bell... 
3rd Bell... 
4th Bell... 
5th Bell ... 


c. 
4 

5 

5 

7 

9 


2 

1 
2 
1 
2 


LBS 

7 
23 

5 
2 


"*' Inscribed — 
y G. T. Wright. Don. 
John Taylor & Co., 

Loughborough 




32 


1 


9 



At the Dedication Service, the five Bells were rung by Messrs. 
Smith, Rodgers, Rowland, Needham and Brunt, of Bakewell. 

• The usual invocative inscriptions were inadvertently omitted. 



74 



Longstone Records, 
BELL RINGERS. 



1873 



Edwin Perry 
Isaac Bennett 
Alfred Lock 
James Nadin 
Joseph Bennett 



Before the Church Restoration of 
1872. 

(No earlier record.) 

Thomas Eyre 
John Eyre 
William Ashton 
Since tJie Restoration of 
1873- 

1874 & after Thomas Hihbert 
William Morton 
James W. Morris 
Theodore Grant 
William Nadin 
George Ward 
George Penley 



LONGSTONE 



BELFRY COMPANY, 

1873. 



St. Giles's Church, Great Longstone, Derbyshire. 



PEAL OF FIVE BELLS. 

(By Taylor & Co., Bell Founders, Loughborough. J 



The following rules are agreed to by the T' 



There sliall br five principal ringers who shall be 
responsible for the rare and proper ringing of the Bells on all 
occasions, excepting those when the Sexton takes the duty. 
The Sexton may or may n(»t be a Member of the Company. 



There may also be five Assistant Ringers, who, after 
approval by the Vicar and Cliurchi,\ardens, shall be allowed 
to practice occasionally under the superintendence of one of 
the principal ringers. 

3- 

The .Assistant Ringers, when qualified, may act as sub- 
stitutes for the principal ringers, and be promoted to 
vacancies when they occur. 



ChurcJiivardens, and Ringers, January, 18^4. 



Ringersmust be in the belfry three quarters of an hour 
before the Ser\ices on Sundays, and on the Great Holy Days. 



Ringing for Divine Service shall be arranged to suit 
the capabilities of the least practised ringer, whether prin- 
cipal or assistant, who happens to be engaged at the time. 

6. 

Ringers are Officers of the Church, and as such agree 
to attend Divine Service as fiequently as possible. 



After ringing or chiming for Service, the disengaged 



Church Bells. 



75 



ringers will at once take their places in the Church, the 
tenor bell being rung for five n;inutes. 



Failure in complying with the rules will be visited 
with fines, which shall be handed to the Churchwardens, for 
belfry repairs. 

9- 

The ringers shall appoint one of their Con*pany as 
foreman. He shall be the medium of coniinunicatioii with 
the Vicar, &c., and it shall be his duty to give the other 
ringers due notice of any extra ringing, or the reverse, to 
ring the call-bell, to open and close the Church, and light 
the belfry at the appointed hours, and to collect and keep an 
account of all fines and fees in a book provided for the 
purpose. 

lO. 

The ringers shall appoint either the same or another mem- 
ber of their Company as conductor of the ringing. Silence 
must be strictly observed by the other ringers whilst the bells 
are in motion. 

1 1. 

Bell practice shall take place, if possible, once a week, 
between the hours of 6 p.m. and g p.m. Ringers must be in 
the belfrv fifteen minutes after the Call-bell is sounded. 



The feelings of the sick and bereaved shall be con- 
sidered in arranging for, or abstaining from bell-practice. 



The bells shall not be rung to serve any political 
purpose or party, nor without the Vicar's permission. 



No persons other than Officers of the Church, shall be 
present at bell-practice, except by special permission. 

15- 
Xo persons other than the ringers shall handle the 
bells without special permission. 

i6. 

The bells must always be tolled or chimed by the 
wheel, as in ringing, and not "clocked" or "clappered." 

J7- 
Besides the Old and New Year nmfRed and unmuffled 
peals, the bells shall be rung at 8 a.m. on Christmas Day, 
New Year's Day, Easter Day. and the Queen's birthday. 



1 8. 

The ringers are not debarred from accenting remu- 
neration through the Church Authorities, but no house to 
house collection by the ringers can be allowed. In the case 
of Church Wedding f'eals, fees as hereinafter mentioned may 
be asked; but payment shall he optional, unless the foreman 
has had an understanding with the parties beforehand. Ap- 
plication for payment of fees shall be made by the foreman 
alone. 

19. 

Should a ringer be guilty of bad languaee or un- 
seemly conduct, or fall back in his practices and attendances, 
he shall be liable to be superseded. 



Eating, drinking, and smoking within the sacred 
precincts, are of course distinctly prohibited, water alone 
being excepted. 

31. 

If any dispute arise among the ringers which they 
cannot settle themselves, it shall be the dutv of the foreman 
to refer the same to the Vicar and Churchwardens. 



Fine, for breaking anv rule not expressly referred 

to '. 3d. 

Ditto Rule 4. Under 15 miuutes late id. 

Ditto Rule 4. Absent without a substitute ... 6d. 

Ditto Rule n. Over fifteen minutes late td. 

Ditto Ruleri. Absent without notice, and 

without a substitute 3d. 

Ditto Rule 19. If first offence is. 

Fine for breaking a Stay 6d. 

23- 

Fees for Wedding Peals, &c., One hour los. 

„ One hour and half 153. 

,. Two hours and upwards,.. 353. 

Payment will be made for special peals ordered by the 
Vicar and Churchwardens, and a minimum annual payment 
of 10s. will be made to each principal ringer, by the Church- 
wardens. 

24. 

Each ringer is required to approve and sign these rules 
before admission to the Company. 



N.B. These rales were duly agreed to and signed but were never enforced and became a dead letter. 



76 Longstone Records. 

CHURCH STAIN ED-GLASS WINDOWS. 



East 
South 



CHANCEL. 

Subject, 
The CfLicifixion. 

Abfaham offering Isaac. 
The Woman of Samaria. 



3 South 



4 North 



r Christ giving the Keys to y Widow of Rev. 
J. St. Peter. [ Charles Lewis 

' Raising of Jairus' daughter ) Cornish 



Donor. Date. 

Emma E. Wright. 1873. 

Robert ThornhiU. 1873. 



1873. 
1874. 



5 


North West 


6 


North 


7 


North 


8 


North East 


9 


West D 



1873. 



Adoration of the Magi. Edward Smithers 

NORTH AISLE. 

Presentation in the Temple. Ann Hill. 

St. Giles. Joseph Scott. 1873. 

St. Paul. Joseph& William Scott. 1873. 

( Widow of Rev. G. 

JB. Brown. 1873. 

BELFRY. 

David and his harp. Widow of George Eyre. 1875. 

SOUTH AISLE. 



St. Peter. 



10 South West 



( Christ blessing little | Friends of late 



I 



children. 



Joseph Scott. 1887. 



U South Naomi, Ruth, Lydia & Dorcas] ^^/,^^ , °"^^® 

■' I Wright 1897. 

N.B. — All the Windows were designed and executed by Messrs. 
Heaton, Butler & Bayne, of London, under the supervision of Mr. 
R. Norman Shaw, R.A., excepting No. 3 supplied by Messrs. 
Hardman of Birmingham, and No. 9 and No. 10, which are also 
said to have been made by Messrs. Heaton & Co. 



In Memoriam. 77 

MURAL TABLET IX THE CHURCH XAVE. 



In Loving Memory of 
GEORGE FURNESS, C.E., 

Chevalier of the Crown of Italy. 

Born in this Parish, October 31, 1820, 

Died at Roindwood Holse, Willesden, 

Middlesex, Jamarv 9, 1900. 

George Furness was a younger brother of the well-known and 
greatly respected Longstone residents, James and John Furness. 
He was a man of great enterprise and business qualifications which 
he brought to bear on Engineering Works chiefly on the Continent, 
by which he acquired wealth, being confessedly a self-made man of 
which he was justly proud. Living with his family chieflv in 
London, he frequently visited his birth-place where he had a 
comfortable residence, now the property of his eldest and only 
surviving son, Mr. George James Furness, of Roundwood House, 
Willesden. 

In 1902, rather more than two vears after his death, a deplorable 
and fatal event happened to three members of this family whilst on 
a boating excursion at Killarnev bv which Mr. G. J. Furness lost in 
one dav, mother, elder sister and brother. There is at this date no 
Memorial record of the event on the Willesden familv tomb, but 
the following tribute to the memorv of the victims appeared in the 
Parish Magazine, June, 1902 : — 

" With great regret we record the removal by a sad accident of three 
friends well-known to all in Longstone. Mrs. George Furness, Miss Marv 
Furness, and Mr. M. T. Bladen Furness weie amongst the victims of the 
boating disaster on the Lakes of Killarney in which thirteen lives were lost. 
The funeral of Mrs. Furness took place at Willesden, on Tuesday, May 27th. 
Every sympathy is felt for the relatives who have to sustain an unexpected 
and grievous loss. That loss is felt also at Longstone, where their presence 
was always welcome. They were fond of their Longstone home and were 
endeared to their friends by their kind-hearted and amiable dispositions and 
benevolent characters. In their deaths, not divided, may they have found 
eternal rest, and may those who loved them find help to endure this 
overwhelming blow." 



78 



Longstone Records. 

Inscriptions on the lead roof of the Nave. 







1636 






C V 






1. V L 




W. WRI 


IF III* 


C H V W 


P 


F. S H 



R M 

I W 

I I or H as filial letter. 



Restored 

1873 

N. A. WELLS, Vicar. 

G. T. WRIGHTi 



■ C. H. Wardens. 



E. SMITHERS I 
R. N. SHAW, ArchI 



The Churchyard. yg 



With, and even without, an increase in the population, it has 
been found difficult and sometimes impossible to provide decent 
and undisturbed resting places for the dead from generation to 
generation. And this is especially true of the "Churchyard" 
proper as distinguished from public cemeteries where strict rules 
exist to prevent the disturbance of the remains of the dead In 
most of our old Churchyards it is impossible to prepare a grave 
without such gruesome practice, and Longstone is no exception 
Attention has been called again and again to the fact that new 
ground IS necessary, but nothing practical has been accomplished 
for reasons that cannot be discussed here. There is no doubt that 
those who are in possession of family burial ground do not feel called 
upon to take up the question, and it would seem as if nothing short 
of closing the ground, except for very special cases, will bring home 
to people's minds the urgency of the case. It has been well said 
that for the efficient sanitary disposal of the dead. Cremation 
should be encouraged. The cost of transit— not the Crematorium 
fee— is at present the drawback from an economical point of view, 
but motor conveyance may shortly be expected to overcome this 
difficulty. Interments within the Church have been very properly 
abolished. A remark in 1708 by the Rev. N. Boothouse, Vicar of 
Ashbourne, will at this date be generally approved— that "Churches 
and Chancels are too good to lay dead bodies in." It may be 
safely predicted that before the present century expires, sanitaiy 
laws will prohibit the interment in our Churchyards of anything 
except the ashes of the departed. In 1843, through the gift of 
Mr. Wright, a small addition was made to the Churchyard on 
the North side. 



8o 



Longstone Records, 



THE VICARAGE. 



Longstone Vicarage was formerly the White Lion Inn, last kept 
hy one Christopher James. The Rev. Malkin Mills was the first 
Incumbent to reside there after the removal of the business of the 
Inn to the present site in the Village. The house was a very 
small one and has been twice enlarged, once by the Rev. Dr. 
Hodson who took pupils* and again by the Rev. John Paley. 
There is a tradition that in the days of the "White Lion," a certain 
k'lergyman was wont to take "a refresher" there whilst robing 
during Hymn singing before the Sermon. The Vicarage garden 
was also enlarged on the South side, in Mr. Paley's time. 



.MARRIAGES. 



Thi.s list from the Parish Registers is of course confined to marriages 
celebrated in Longstone Chnrch. 

L Siffiiijies Marriage by License. 



175.5 Gvll married a Needham 





Mornsal! 




Haberjam 


1758 


Bland 




Dicken 




Shaw 




Sharp 


17.59 


Pidcock 




Holm 




Broom 




Needham 


1760 


Chajipell 


L 


Prime 


1761 


Denman 


L 


Fynney 


1762 


Gregory 


L 


Smith 



1763 



1764 



1765 



1766 



Wardle 




Cocks 


Bolsover 


L 


Bolsover 

(not signed) 


Wilson 




Bolsover 


Etches 




Frost 


Garlick 




Redfearn 


Furniss 


L 


Hudson 


Hodgkinson 




Steel 


Hodgli inson 




Fnrniss 



' One of these, whom I met in after life in Switzerland, informed nie that it was tie wlio sent 
a bullet through the sign-board of the "Bull's Head Inn" at Headslonps. 

t This gentleman, whose weakness had bc'come an open secret with his congregation, advised 
them that thev must do as he itnid and not as he did. 



Marriages. 



8i 



1767 


Elley 


Heathcote 


1787 


Walker 


L 


Prime 




Tomlinson 


Walton 




Bagshaw 


L 


Eyley 


1768 


Eamsbotam 


L Tine 


1788 


Sheldon 




Buckley 


1769 


Heathcote 


Taylor 




Shaw 




Hall 




Bland 


Beeby 




Morewood 


L 


Needham 




Ashton 


Boote 


1789 


Dawson 


L 


Wright 


1770 


Blaokwell 


L Dawson 




Bettney 




Kent 




HiiUey 


L Hodgkinson 




Morton 




Wager 


1771 


Croop 


Heathcote 




Skidmore 




Gregory 


1773 


Furniss 


L Beeby 




Allcard 




Bettney 


1776 


Wayne 


Hodgkinson 




Taylor 




Turner 




Barton 


Dooley 




Tomlinson 




Wibberley 


1777 


Hulley 


WUson 


1791 


Marsden 


L Willson 




Margeroson 


L Furness 


1794 


Shaw 




Thornhill 


177!S 


Brunt 


Garlick 


1795 


Porter 


L 


Furniss 




Hayward 


Downs 




Gregory 




Marsden 




Hudson 


L Longsdon 




Bettney 




Blackwell 


1780 


Ashton 


Garlick 


1796 


Hancock 




Garrot 




Bettney 


Morten 




Holme 




Ashton 




Crooks 


Gregoi'y 


1797 


Waine 




Bark 




Holme 


Willson 




Smith 




Buckley 


1781 


ThornhUl 


L Hadfield 


179S 


Fletcher 




Furniss 




Cresswell 


L Needham 


1799 


Eadford 


L 


Blackwell 


1782 


Mortin 


Drable 


1802 


Middleton 




Hodgskinson 




Botham 


L Garrot 




Taylor 




Wager 


1783 


Willson 


Tomlinson 


18U3 


Orr 


L 


Gregory 




Bennet 


Hunt 




Dunkerley 


L 


Shaw 




Garlick 


Heathcoat 


1805 


Ward 




(xarrott 




HoUeley 


Taylor 


1806 


Ward 




Hudson 




Furniss 


L Barton 


1807 


Furniss 




Hambleton or 




Gregory 


Eobison 








Hamilton 


.1784 


Hodgskinson Hall 




Hodgskinson 


Youle 


1785 


Taylor 


Bettney 


1808 


Dak in 




Bramwell 




Swift 


Pidcock 


1810 


Eyre 




Flint 




Shaw 


Hancock 


1812 


Eyre 




Smith 




Higinbothani Hill 


1S17 


Sellers 




Skidmore 




Holme 


Hodgskinson 




Gregory 




Shaw 




Mottram 


Radford 




Snllurs 




Skidmore 



82 



Longstone Records. 



1818 


Hallows 


Piu-sglove 




Hawley 


Hodgkinson 


1823 


Abbott 


Hill 


1850 


Taylor 


Vickars 


1824. 


Bottom 


Heathcote 


1851 


Eyre 


Johnson 


1826 


Alsop 


Smith 




Puncliaby 


Hibbert 




Garrat 


Gregory 




Peniston 


Robinson 


ISL'7 


Barns 


Fletcher 


1852 


Young 


Taylor 




Skidmore 


L Hill 




Oliver 


Bettney 


1828 


Hancock 


Ward 




Furniss 


Hill 




Ashton 


Burze 


1853 


Taylor 


Hey ward 




Wager 


Bentley 


1854 


Green 


Taylor 


1829 


Hurst 


Robinson 




Marples 


Ward 




Hill 


Taylor 


1855 


Berresford 


Garlick 




Gould 


Sellors 


1856 


Hallows 


Damms 


18:i() 


Bottom 


Birch 


1858 


Wager 


He J ward 




Peirce 


Charlesworth 




Shaw 


L Longsdon 


1831 


Bark 


Lees 




Sygrave 


L Hodgkinson 




Bennett 


Taylor 


1859 


Carson 


Baines 


1832 


Skidmore 


Wilson 


1860 


Taylor 


Hewitt 




Garlick 


Beresford 




Clark 


Hill 


183i 


Ward 


Hibbert 




Furniss 


Tagg 




Goodwin 


McVey 




Bradwell 


Heathcote 


183() 


Townsend 


Skidmore 


1801 


Crawshaw 


Timm 




Hutchinson 


L Barker 




Hill 


Hodgkinson 


1837 


Green 


L Barker 




Shaw 


L Hallows 




Wager 


Fletcher 


1862 


Stalham 


Massey 




Ball 


L Wilson 




Bunker 


Taylor 




Brookes 


Owens 




Jones 


Rawnsley 




Fletcher 


Skidmore 




Hudson 


Plachett 


1838 


Gibbon 


HiU 




Hall 


Heyward 




Hope 


Woodhouse 


1863 


Bennett 


Milward 




Heeley :-' Eeley Ileward 


1864 


Hill 


Scott 






? Hayward 


1865 


Paling 


Pidcock 


1840 


Bown 


Mawrey 




Butterworth 


McKenzie 


1813 


Watts 


Taylor 




Lees 


Lees 




( 'i-aven 


Thornhill 




Grange 


Eyre 




Hibbert 


Garlick 


1866 


Whittaker 


Randall 


1846 


Slack 


Sellers 




Oliver 


Gregory 


18i8 


Smith 
Johnson 


Furniss 
Bland 




Blackwell 


Fox 



Marriages. 



83 



1S67 



1809 
1870 
1871 



1872 

1874 



187.T 



1876 



1877 



1878 



1879 



Wood 

Peters 

Tomkinson 

Bagshawe 

Grladwin 

Racon 

Hampshire 

Parsons 

Henshall 

Fiirniss 

Bagshaw 

Hope 

Shimwell 

Winson 

Eyre 

Fox 

Sanders 

Carson 

Oldfield 

Ainsworth 

Desforges 

Orr 

Arnold 

Goodwin 

Clai'ke 

Eeley 

Piirsglove 

Hancock 

Sellers 

Ward 

Nadin 

Morton 

Leyland 

Heath 

Black well 

Robinson 

Walton, 

Greatorex 

Bryan 



Eyre 

Barke 

Hollingworth 

Marsden 

HuUey 
Bradbury 

Eyre 

Hodgson 

H i ggott 
L Thornhill 
L Orr 

Hill 
L Marsden 
L Skidmore 

Tnnstall 
L Stone 

Gould 

Hill 

Randell 
L M'Connel 

Blaekwell 
L Wager 
L Shaw 

Bloore 

Shawe 

Furniss 

Wild 

Furness 

Robinson 

Turner 

Gould 

Bland 

A shton 

Stone 

Eyre 
L Priestley 

• Jarlick 
L Froggatt 
L Bryan 



1881 



1882 
1883 



18S4 



1885 

1886 
1887 

1888 

1889 
189U 



1891 



1 s9l' 



Broughton 

Hamilton 

Brough L 

Hopkinson 

EUwood 

Holmes 

Cockayne L 

Woodroffe 

WooUey 

Robinson 

Capper 

Brocklehurst 

Kenyon 

Kenworthy L 

Owen 

Scott 

Redfearn 

Glossop 

Carson 

Crane 

Waddell 

Morgan 

Morton 

Slade 

Pickthall 

Lee L 

Taylor 

Trickett L 

Ferrall 

Watkins 

Morton 

Lujjtu)! 

Helliwell 

Brown 

Carlisle L 

Shaw 

Dale 

Dawson I. 

Clabrough 



Morton 

Mycock 

Young 

Orr 

Fiu'niss 

Bottoms 

Foster 

Bridge 

Morton 

Robinson 

AUsop 

Furniss 

Haddock 

Southgate 

Bacon 

Shaw 

Bennett 

Taylor 

Wager 

AUsop 

Johnson 

Bennett 

Ward 

Hodgkinson 

Lewis 

Linacre 

Robinson 

Wager 

Shaw 

Bradbury 

Wlialley 

Whalley 

Robinson 

Eyi-e 

Lowe 

Dixon 

Bilham 

Kobinson 

Southgate 



84 



Longstone Records. 





Cooke 




HajT\'ard 




Eyre 


Heathcote 


1893 


Wood 




Taylor 




Hill 


L Eowe 




Blagden 




Elliott 


1900 


Wearn 


Green 


1894 


Bacon 




Hodgkinson 




Flint 


Furniss 




Kobinson 


L 


Bramwell 




Turner 


Tiu-ner 




Needham 


L 


Hallows 




Lxipton 


Kobinson 




Grant 


L 


Beaton 




Twinn 


Eyre 




Hudson 




Lowe 




Birley 


Skidmore 




Ashton 




Timm 




Eodley 


Eyre 


1895 


Bennett 




Carrington 


1901 


Cox- 


Taylor 




Walker 




Marsden 




Shimwell 


L WUson 




Hollingworth 


Wall 




Turner 


Sellers 


1896 


Skidmore 




Parsons 




Poole 


Waddell 




Turner 




EUiott 




Cheney 


Draycott 




Hadfield 




Parkin 




Cooper 


Ward 




Barnby 


L 


Hancock 


1902 


Harrington 


Furniss 




Timnicliffe 




Wildgoose 




Redfearn 


Bingham 


1897 


Hollingwor 


th 


CoUis 




Birkhead 


Bridge 




Horobin 




Hewitt 




McConnel 


Wright 




Ward 




Bacon 




Parsons 


Coe 




Dawson 




Middleton 


1903 


Bell 


Hewitt 




Cocker 




Blackwell 




Hutchinson 


Orr 




Elliott 




Elliott 


1904 


Sebright 


Bridge 


1898 


Slack 




Watts 




James 


Wright 




Marshall 


I 


Wager 




McGibbon 


Hall 




Turner 




Lee 


1905 


Sheldon 


Tiu-ner 


1899 


Harrop 
Harrison 




SeUers 
Phillips 




Biu-nand 


Carson 



Church Furniture, &c. 



8s 



1892 
1894 
1896 

1897 



1900 
1901 
1902 



1903 



GIFTS 01- CHURCH FURNITURE, &c., 
since 1891- 



In Memoriarn. Brass Eagle Lectern... 
Oak Chest for Altar Frontals 
Black Marble Plinth for the Altar Cross 
Brass Suspension Lamps for the Church Nave 
Brass Book-rest for the Altar, with the Com- 1 

munion Service Book ... ... ...) 

In Memoriam. Restoration of the Church-] 

yard Cross ) 

Large Flag for the Church Tower 

Flag Staff for the Church Tower 

Set of fine Altar Linen ... 

In Memoriam. Brass Alms Dish & Alms Bags 

In Memoriam. The Panel Carving of the old | 

Stone Font, also Worked Kneelers ... 1 

In Memoriam. Oak Sedilia in Chancel 



Oak frame with iron supports for the Flag- 
staff on the Church Tower ... 
Silver Casket for Communion Bread 

Violet Altar Frontal 

Churchyard Lamp, &c.... 

New Stop for Organ ... 

Set of fine Altar Linen and a Violet Marker 

Fine linen Clotli for Credence Table 

New Reredos Curtains in the Chancel, and 

Red Silk Frontal 

Organette for Choir practice 



Miss F. Broomhead. 
Mr. G. T. Wright. 
Mr.W. R. P. Dixon. 
Mr. G. J. Marples. 

Two Parishioners. 

Rev. Canon Cornish 
and brothers. 

Jubilee Fund. 

Mr. A. W. J. Eyre. 
Miss F.H.Wright. 
Mrs. W. P. Dixon. 

Mrs. Hall. 

Family of the late 
Rev. J. H. Longsdon. 

I Mr. G. T. Wright. 

Miss F. H. Wright. 
~N Longstone Branch, 
C Girls' Friendly 

J Society. 

Miss K. M. Turner. 

Miss L. A. F.Wright. 

Mrs. Andrew. 

Mrs. Longsdon. 

Miss F. H. Wrights 

Sale of Work. 
MissF. Broomhead. 



86 Longstone Records. 

GREAT LONGSTONE, LITTl.E LONGSTONE, 
AND WARDLOW 



Will be preached f(ir the above Charitable Instituticm, 

On Sunday, September 18th inst., 1825' 

IN ST. GILES' CHURCH, LONGSTONE, 

P.I' Till- 

REV. G. TREVOR SPENCER, A.M. 

BUXTON. 

Service to begin at 3 o'clock. 

In the course of the Service will be performed a 

SELECTION OF 

SACRED MUSIC, 

From the Works of Handel, Green, etc., 

Aided by the Choirs of Barlow, Tideswell, Eyam, Norton, 

and other eminent performers. 

OVERTURE— MESSIAH. 

Recit " Comfort ye my people" Handel. 

Air " Every Valley" do. 

Chorus "And the Glorv of the Lord" do. 



Sacred Music. 87 

Before the First Lesson. 

Regit "Thus saith the Lord of Hosts" do. 

Air " But who may abide" do. 

Chorus "And he shall purify them" do. 

After the First Lesson. 

"Magnificat" Gettrix. 

After the Second Lesson 

" He was despised and rejected" Handel. 

After the 3RD Collect. 

Anthem from the 46th Psalm... "God is our hope and strength" Green. 

Before the Sermon. 

Recit "Behold a Virgin shall conceive" Handel. 

Air "O thou that tellest good tidings" do. 

Chorus " Do." do. 

After the Sermon. 

Recit " Behold I tell you a Mystery" do. 

Air "Tlie trumpet shall sound" do. 

Chorus " Hallelujah" do. 

I^g° /( IS requested that nothing less than silver may be given at the Doors. 



Nall, Printer, Bakewell. 



The almost illegible endorsement of this Service list appears to be as 
follows : — 

"1825 — 9 — 18." £ s. D. 

Collected for the within Charitable Institution at) ^ 

Longstone Church, etc / '*' ^ 

Rev. Mr. Browne o 10 o 

£15 5 6 
Matt^^ Hill o I o 

C. Shaw 050 

£15 II 6 



88 Longstone Records. 

The following amusing appeal , alfho' ivithout date or signature, is too 
good to be omitted. It seems to refer to the foregoing Musical Service. 



TO THE CONGREGATION OF LONGSTONE. 

Harmony is fled. A total cessation of singing has taken place, the 
Demon hovers his wings over the singing Gallery. No Choral Symphonies 
are heard, nothing to be seen amongst the Choristers but the sullen gloom 
of discontent. 

What is the cause of this extraordinary occurrence ? The ingratitude, 
yes, I repeat it, the abominable ingratitude of the congregation. The 
Choristers (for the last two years especially) have attended the services of 
the Church with a regularity deserving the highest commendation They 
have sacrificed their time, expended their money, and exerted their talents 
to discharge the duties of their station in a satisfactory manner. What is 
the result ? or rather their reward ? Derision and contempt, Insult and 
Degradation. 

A horde of wild rustics emerging from their gloomy Caverns on the 
banks of the Wye has by one single performance effaced all remembrance 
of the old Choir's past services. 

Deluded by innovation and novelty you rewarded the Rustics in a very 
liberal manner, but at the same time excluded your own singers from any 
benefit in the donation ! By such unwarrantable behaviour you have 
stung their pride, awakened their jealousy, and likewise awakened their 
senses ; for from henceforward they will not depend on the caprice of 
Individuals for a supply of Books, Musical Instruments, &c, but are resolved 
ere they resume their respective functions, to have an annual stipend or 
Salary for their Services. The Revd. Pastor, who mounts the Rostrum to 
teach us our duty, and honestly to reprove, exhort, and admonish : to 
expound the Scriptures, and point the way to Heaven ; even he, amidst all 
his anxiety for our spiritual interests has still an eye to his own temporal 
benefit : and can prove, with great force of reason and strengtli of argument, 
that the Labourer is worthy of his hire. The Singers are Labourers ; they 
perform a part of the Divine Service, and therefore deserve a remuneration 
for their Labour. It may perhaps be observed that they make a collection 
every Christmas to defray the expenses of the Society ; but this is optional 
and precarious. Therefore, O, ye Choristers, be firm, be unanimous, keep 
possession of the singing Gallery ; reject, and repel every individual 
intruder that would invade your rights. By perseverance you will attain 
your object : even our good Minister himself, from the fatigue he must 
necessarily endure, will be induced to plead on your behalf, an<l by so 
doing he will advocate the cause of reason and Justice. 



Parish Officers. 
()\'HRSEERS OF THE POOR. 



89 



1698 
1699 
1700 
1701 
1702 
1703 



1694 William Wright and George Flint 

1695 William Naylor and Robert Hodg- 

kinson 

1696 John Tomlinson and HenryScamadine 

1697 John Frost and Richard Hodgkinson 

Thomas Jackson and John Beard 

Samuel Scamadine & Henry Hancock 

Robert Huslor & Thomas Hodgkinson 

William Naylor and John Sellars 

Cornelius Dickens and John Dooley 

Cornelius Bettney and William Hodg- 
kinson 

1704 Benjamin Hallowes and William 

Clowes 

1705 William Hodgkinson and Thomas 

White 

1706 George Sikes and Robert Bell 

1707 Francis Fearnehough and Francis 

Wardlow 

170S John Hayward and Joseph Furnice 
I 709 Joseph Scamadine and Joseph Jackson 

1710 George Flint and George Hancock 

17 1 1 Richard Hodgkinson and Sampson 

Hodgkinson 

1712 Daniel Frost and William Hodg- 

kinson de ffold 

1713 Anthony Clayton and William Frost 

1714 Robert Husler and William Harris 

1715 Cornelius Bettney and Thomas Hodg- 

kinson 



Thomas Jackson and William Garret 

Francis Taylor and James Bettney 

Michael Buxton and John Clowes 

Henry Hodgkinson and Anthony Torr 

William Hodgkinson y Cross and 
Michael Noton 

Davenport Blackwell and David 
Warrington 

Matthew Bioome and Robert Hodg- 
kinson 

Thomas White and Michael Noton 

Joseph Jackson and Lawrence Tom- 
linson 

William Flint (or his Mother) and 
James Gregory 

William Fearnehough and Joseph 
Jackson 

1727 William Flint and George Flint 

1728 John Heyward and John Warrington 

1729 Joseph Furnice and William Hodg- 

kinson 

1730 Daniel Frost and Richard Naylor 

1731 Robert Hodgkinson and Michael 

Noton of Holme 

1732 Robert Husler and Richard Bettnej' 

1733 Thomas Hodgkinson and William 

Hodgkinson de Cross 

1734 Thomas White and Michael Noton 

1735 Joshua Flint and Jonathan Shackerley 

1736 *Richard Frost and Joseph Hodgkinson 



1716 
1717 
1718 
1719 
1720 

1721 



1723 
1724 

1725 
1726 



* Derbyshire to Wit 

Att ye General Quarter Sessions of y Peace of our Sovereign y King his County of Derby 
held at Derby in and for y said County on Tuesday in the first week after the Close of Easter 
to wit y fourth day of May, in y Ninth year of y Keign of our Sovereign Jjord George 
ye Second now King over Great Britain, and so forth. And in the year of our Lord Christ 
1730. Before Sir Tho-- Abney K"'- Samuel Saunders, Rowland Cotton, German Pole, Robert 
Willmott Henery, Esq'f. John Gisborn and Tho- Gishorn. Esq^f and other their Associates 
Justices and so forth 

Ordered by this Court y' it be reserved to His Majesties' Justices of the Peace for ye 
Hundred of High Peak of this County att their next Publick Meeting for yt Hundred 
to consider of proper persons to serve as Overseers of y i:ioor for ye Hamldet of Great Long- 
stone in this County for this present year Notwithstanding Richard Frost and Joseph 
Hodgskinson. 



go 



Longstone Records. 



1737 Davenport Hlackwcll and Lawrence 

Wain 

1738 Thomas Old field and Matthew Broom 

1739 Michael Buxton and Robert Hodg- 

kinson 

1740 James Gregory and William Fearn- 

chough 

1 74 1 F.manuel Cooper and Henry Scama- 

dine 

1742 George Flint and William Gregory 

1743 Richard Bettney and Joseph Furniss 

1744 William Hodgkinson and W'illiam 

Flint 

1745 John Heward and John Frost 

1746 Henry Hodgskin and William Hodg- 

skin 

1747 Thomas White and Martin Furnice 

1748 William Oxley and Joshua Flint 

1749 Joseph Beebee and Joshua Flint 

1750 Joseph Hodgkinson and John Heath- 

cotc 

1 75 1 Francis Coates and Lawrence Wain 

1752 Charles Hall and W^illiam Heward 

1753 James Gregory, William Heward, 

Charles Hall and William Fearn- 
chough 

1754 William Fearnehough and William 

Goodwin 

1755 Michael Noton (or tenant) and Joseph 

Furnice 

1756 Cornelius Bettney and George Flint 

1757 William Furnice & William Gregory 
175S John Frost and Charles Hall 

1759 Joli'i Heward, Henry Hodgkinson, 

Wm. Hodgkinson, and Frederick 
White 

1760 Francis White, Thos. Hill, Martin 

Furnice, and John Flint 

1 761 Martin Furnice, John Flint, James 

Gregory, and Sampson Hodgkinson 

1762 Joshua Flint, William Thornhill, and 

William Naylor 

1763 Thomas Gregory and William Navlor 



1764 

1765 
1766 
1767 

1768 

1769 
1770 
1771 
1772 
1773 
1774 
1775 
1776 

1777 

1778 
1779 

1780 
1781 
17S2 

1783 
17S4 

1785 

1786 
1787 

1 7 88 
1789 
1790 
1791 
1792 



Thomas Wager and John Heathcote 

Francis Coates & Joseph Hodgkinson 

Lawrence Wain and Francis Furniss 

Luke Hodgskinson and Thomas 
Blackwell 

William Gregory and Cornelius 
Bettney 

William Furniss and John Heward 

John Heward and Josiah Blackwell 

Josiah Blackwell and Charles Hall 

Henry Hodgkinson and Charles Hall 

John Wright and Moses Taylor 

Thomas Gregory and Francis White 

William Hadfield and Francis White 

Francis White and Thomas Hill 

Martin Furniss, junr., and Thomas 

Hill 
Thomas Hill and Martin Furniss, senr. 

Martin Furniss, senr., and Cornelius 

Flint 
William Wager and Cornelius Flint 
Cornelius Flint and Robert Thornhill 

William Gregory, junr., and William 
Naylor 

Thomas Gregory, Richard Skidmore, 
and William Ashton 

Richard Skidmore, William Ashton, 
William Naylor, and Thomas 
Wager, senr., " some two of them" 

George Flint, William Naylor, and 
Thomas Wager, junr. 

George Flint and Thomas Wager, senr. 

Francis Coates and John Heathcote, 
junr. 

Lawrance Wayne and Fiarcis Furniss 
Francis Furniss 
William Gregory 
Thomas Gregory 

Samuel Furniss and Sampson Hodg- 
kinson 



1793 Samuel Furniss and John Eyre 



Overseers of the Poor. 



91 



1794 John Eyre and Joseph Morton 

1795 Joseph Morton and Thomas Hill, junr. 

1796 John Hodgkinson and Thomas Hill, 

junr. 

1797* John Hayward and Thomas Hill, junr. 

1798 Thomas Hill, junr. and John Heath- 

cote, junr. 

1799 Moses Taylor and William Hadfield 

1800 William Hadfield and I'.dward Buxton 

1801 John Heathcote and William Wager 

1802 Isaac Bloore and Thomas Hill 

1803 John Heathcote and George Flint 

1804 Robert Thornhill and Richard Skid- 

more 

1505 Richard Skidmore & Sampson Wager 

1806 Matthew Furniss and William Carliel 

1807 Sampson Wager and Richard Bettney 

1808 Sampson Wager and Richard Bettney 

1809 Thomas Hill, junr. and William 

Gregory 

1810 William Gregory and-Sampson Hodg- 

kinson 

1811 John Thornhill and James Gregory 

i8i2 James Giegory and Sampson Hodg- 
kinson 

1813 James Gregory and Sampson Hodg- 

kinson 

1814 Sampson Hodgkinson and Joseph 

Morton 

1815 Joseph Mcrton and Arnold Hodg- 

kinson 

1816 William Wager and William Hadfield 

1817 James Longsdon and Moses Taylor 



1S18 William Hadfield and John Heath- 
cote (at a salary of £5 for the future) 

1819 John Heathcote and R. Thornhill 

1820 Robert Thornhill and Richard Skid- 

more 

i8ii Joseph Skidmore and George Gates 

1822 George Gates and Matthew Furniss 

1823 Matthew Furniss and Sampson Wager 

1824 Sampson Wager and Richard Bettney 

1825 Joseph Buxton and Richard Bettnev 

1826 Richard Bettney and William Gregory 

1827 William Gregory and John Thornhill 

1828 James Gregory and John Thornhill 

1829 James Gregory and John Thornhill 

1830 Robert Birch and John Robinson were 

superseded by W. Wager and J. 
Thornhill 

1831 Robert Birch and Hannah Marsden 

were superseded by Joseph Morton 
and John Thornhill 

1832 John Thornhill and Anthony Wood- 

house 

1833 Joseph Morton and Anthony Furniss 

1834 William Wager and John Thornhill 

1535 George Hill and William Riley 

1536 William Riley and Joseph Skidmore 

1837 Joseph Skidmore and Joseph Buxton 

1838 Joseph Buxton and Joseph Gregory 

and Robert Thornhill, acting Over- 
seer at a Salary of £12. 

1839 Joseph Gregory and John Gregory 

1840 John Gregory and Thomas G. Orr 

1841 Thomas Gregory Orr and John Orr 



* " 1797. April 21. At a Meeting of His Majesty's Justices of the Peace for the said County, 
Hoklen at Tideswell, in tlie said County, before Joseph Denman, M.D., Kobert Wright and 
Bache Thornhill Esquires — 

Ordered that there shall be two Overseers of the Poor appointed for each Hamlet, 
Township, Liberty or place within the Hirndred of High Peake in the said County." 

" In consequence of which Order, John Heyward and Thomas Hill, junr. were appointed 
Overseers of the Poor for the Hamlet of Great Longstone & Holme for the year ensuing." 

N.B. Two Overseers having been annually appointed in the past, the necessity for 
this Order for Longstone does not appear. 



92 



Longstone Records. 



1842 John Orr and Robert Furniss 

1843 Robert Furniss and William Wager 

1844 William Wager and Sampson Hodg- 

kinson 

1845 Sampson Hodgkinson Joseph Johnson, 

James Furniss and Jonathan Morton 

1846 Josepli Johnson 

1847 Calton Marples, J<j1ui Furniss,Thomas 

Hope and Richard Bettany 
1S48 Thomas Hope, Anthony Furniss, Jon- 
athan Morton & Anthony Wood- 
house 

1849 Thomas Hope 

1850 Thomas Gregoiy Orr, John Gregory, 

James Furniss cS: Robert Thornhill 

1851 John Lowe, Frederick Buxton, Joseph 

Oliver and Anthony Furniss 

1852 William Wager, James Furniss, Joseph 

Bottoms and Thomas Gregory Orr 

1853 John Furniss and Thomas Hope 

1854 Robert Furniss. Thomas Hope, 

William Pidcock & Joseph Oliver 

1855 Thomas Gregory Orr, Joseph Oliver, 

Anthony VVoodhouse and John 
Hodgkinson 

1856 Joseph Johnson, Martin Furniss, 

Richard Bettney & Anthony Wood- 
house 

1857 Martin Furniss and Anthony Wood- 

house 

1858 Martin Furniss and Anthony Wood- 

house 
r859 James Furniss and Joseph Johnson 

1560 Joseph Johnson and John Hodgkinson 

1561 Joseph Johnson and Thomas Gregory 

Orr 

1862 Martin Furniss and John Gregory 

1863 Martin Furniss and Emanuel Hawley 

1864 Emanuel Hawley and Anthony Wood- 

house 

1865 Emanuel Hawley anil Anthony Wood- 

house 

1866 Emanuel Hawley and John Furniss 

1867 John Furniss and John Thornhill 

1868 John Thornhill and William Furniss 

1869 John Thornhill and William Furniss 
1S70 John Thornhill and William Furniss 
1871 John Thornhill and William Fuiniss 
1S72 John Thornhill and John Furniss 



1 886 

1887 

1 888 

1889 

1890 

1S91 

1892 

1893 

1894 
189 ■; 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 



John Thornhill and John Furniss 
John Thornhill and Emanuel Hawley 

, No record, but the same Overseers 
probably held office. 

John Thornhill and Emanuel Hawley 
John Thornhill and Emanuel Hawley 
John Thornhill and Emanuel Hawley 
John Thornhill and Emanuel Hawley 
James Orr and Joseph Bottom 
James Orr and Joseph Bottom 
James Orr and Arthur William Joseph 

Eyre 
James Orr and .Arthur \\'illiani Joseph 

Eyre 
James Orr and Arthur William Joseph 

Eyre 

Arthur William Joseph Eyre and John 
William Thornhill 

Arthur William Joseph Eyre and John 
William Thornhill 

Arthur William Joseph Eyre and 
William .Asliton 

Arthur William Joseph Eyre and 
William Ashton 

Arthur William Joseph Eyre and 

William Ashton 
William James Furniss and Joseph 

Joseph Johnson 
Joseph Johnson and Isaac Bennett 
Joseph Johnson and Isaac Bennett 
Joseph Johnson and Isaac Bennett 
Joseph Johnson and Isaac Bennett 
James Spencer and Charles Johnson 
James Orr and George Ward 
James Orr and Henry Arthur Spanton 
Henry Arthur Spanton and Arthur 

William Joseph Eyre 
Henry Arthur Spanton and .Albert 

Jackson Skidmore 

Henry Arthur Spanton and .Albert 
Jackson Skidmore 

Henry Arthur Spanton and .Albert 
Jackson Skidmore 



Henry Arthur Spanton 
Jackson Skidmore 



and Albert 



Officials. 

CLERKS TO THE GUARDIAXS, 
BAKEWELL UNION. 



d3 



1838. 



1895. 



John Baxter. 

Robinson. 
Francis Roe. 
Thomas Fidler. 
George Leigh. 
Alfred Hawes. 



ASSISTANT OVERSEERS EOK THE 
OE GREAT LOXGSTONE. 



PARISH 



Thoruhill, Robert from year 1836. 


bkidmore, Ricliard from year 


Gregory, Joseph 


1839- 


Daubney, Thomas 


Orr, 


Thomas Gregory 


1844, 


Shimwell, Thomas „ 


Bettney, Richard 


18-17 


Buzzard, Charles Herbert „ 


Hawley, William 


1848. 


Shimwell, Isaac Benjamin., 


Taylor, George 


1849. 






Henricns Dooley 


SCHOOLS 


MASTERS. 


1676. 




1831. Joseph Scott. 


1801. 


James Waterall. 




1877. L. Gaiaud. 




Tissingtoi 


1. 


1880. W. Sumner. 


1822. 


John Hill. 




1883. W. K. Bateson. 


1828. 


George Taylor. 




1887. Henry Arthur Spanton 




Walker. 


SCHOOLMl 


STRESSES. 






Ada Bagshaw. 




Sarah Parkin. 




Susan Mary Holland. 




Wilkinson 




Ella Southgate. 



1883. 
1884. 
1898. 
1899. 



WARDLOW. 



1897. 



Davis. 



Mrs. Bi-amwell. 



94 



Longstone Records. 



MIDLAXD RAILWAY STATION MASTERS. 



1S63. Joseph Bell. 
1868. Richard Bell. 
1873. Richard Coe. 

Mr. I(. Coe, tlie i>resciit poimlar Station Ma-ster, came to Moiisaldale from Bugsworth in iSt>8. 



MA(;iSTRATHS CLOSELY CONXECTEH WITH 
THE DISTRICT. 



1649 John Wright, Longstone Hall 

1G89 Thomas Wright, 

1712 Thomas Wright, 

1714 John Wright, „ 

1748 Thomas Wright, 

1756 Thomas Wright, Eyam Hall 

1776 Robert Wright, Longstone Hall. 

William Bullock Bakewell, M.D., Ash- 
ford 
Joseph Denman, M.D., Stony Middleton 
Richard Wright, M.D., Tideswell 
Bache Thornhill, Stanton-in-the-Peak 
John Wright, Longstone Hall 
John Wright, Eyam Hall 

1793 John Thomas Wright,* Longstone Hall 

1823 William Ashby Ashhy, Ashford Hall 

1S27 Francis Eyre, Earl of Xewbiirgh, 

Hassop Hall 

1.S36 George Henry Cavendish, Lord, Asliford 

HaU 



1846 Joseph Hodgson, Holme Hall 

1849 William Longsdon. Little Longstone 

1853 Sydney Smithers, Chiirchdale 

1854 Charles Leslie, Hassop Hall 

1867 James Charles Cavendish, Ashford Hall 

„ Robert Needham, Thombridge 

1869 John Sleigh, Thombridge 

1875 Henry Francis Gisborne, Holme Hall 

Edward Cavendish, Lord, Ashford Hall 

1877 Edward Smithers, Little Longstone 

1881 Frederick Craven, Thombridge 

1885 William Fenton, D.L., Churchdale 

1891 Richard Clifford Smith, Ashford Hall 

1899 John Hamilton Openshaw, Burre 

House, Holme 

George Thomas Wright, Longstone 

Hall 
1901 George Jobson Marples, Thombridge 

Hall 

N.li. Frederick Brooke Craven was nominated in 189.^ 
but never quali6e(). 



•"' The Wright's being resident in Devonsliire for many years, were not represented nn the 
Derbyshire Commission of the Peace from the death of J. T. Wright in 1838 until 1S99. 



Officials. 



95 



THE NIGHT WATCH. 



\'illages were guarJed at night by two Watchmen. The Watch 
was commenced bv the man living at the top of the \'illage, and 
the man living at the bottom, and taken in successi(jn, till thev 
met in the centre of the \'illage. Every fit male householder, in 
succession, was bound by Law, to parade the Village, from nine 
o'clock at night to six the next morning. To call the assistance of 
his fellow watchman, he had a large rattle which he sprung, 
mentioned in song; "And the Watchman sprung his rattle," and 
for protection, a large wooden staff or " Watch-bill." When going 
off watch in the morning t4ie Watchman shouted the hour and 
state of the weather, " Six o'clock and a cloudv morn." He then 
reared the " \\'atch-biU " at the door of his neighbour, if a male, 
who would succeed him in the " Watch." On Baslow Bridge there 
is a stone watch box, where the man sheltered. Large villages had 
a pair of gates at each entrance. — Par. Mag., Aug., 7895. 



PARISH CONSTABLES OR HEADBOROUCxHS. 



1837 Robert Thornhill 

1838 Robert Thornhill 
183U Joseph Gregory 



184-0 John Gregory 

1841 Thomas Gregory Orr 



HIGH CONSTABLE. 



1818. Eoljert Thornliill was appointed the last High Constable 
prior to the Police Act. 



96 



Longstone Records. 



LIST OF PARISH CONSTABLES. 

rKiiidly contributed by H. Brooke Taylor, Esq.) 



ASHFORD. 


DATE. 


LONGSTONE. 


Robert Furniss, Farmer. 


1857 


William Bennett, 


Blacksmith. 


Anthony Gyte, Carpenter. 




Richard Skidmore, 


Farmer. 


James Stone, Labourer. 


1858 


William Bennett, 


Blacksmith. 


Robert Thorpe, Farmer. 




John Gregory, 


Butcher. 


Daniel Oldfield, Mason. 


1859 


William Bennett, 


Blacksmith. 


Samuel Whibberley, Labourer. 




John Gregory, Farmer & Butcher 


William Mottram, Cai-penter. 


186U 


William Bennett, 


Blacksmith. 


Matthew Thorpe, Mason. . 




John Gregory, 


F'armer & Butcher 


William Mottram, Carpenter. 


18B1 


Martin Oliver, 


Miner 


Edward Smith, Marble Mason. 




Reuben Morton 


Mason 


Matthew Thorpe, Mason, 




Emanuel Hawley, 


Shopkeeper. 


James Cox Wilson, Carpenter. 




James Morton, 


Mason. 


John Keeling, Laboxirer. 


1862 


George Eyre, 


Joiner. 


William Mottram, Carpenter. 




Aaron Taylor, 


Miner. 


James Stone, Labourer. 




Frederick Buxton 


Farmer. 


Samuel Whibberley, „ 








William Mottram, Carpenter. 


1863 


George Eyre, 


Joiner. 


James Stone, Labourer. 




Anthony Furniss, 


Farmer. 


James Stone, „ 


1864 


George Eyre, 


Joiner. 


Robert Thorpe, 




Joseph Bottom, 


Skip-maker. 


James Stone, „ 


1865 


William Ashton, 


Labourer. 


Robert Thoi-pe, „ 




James Morton, 


Mason. 


James Stone, „ 


1866 


William Bennett, 


Blacksmith. 


Robert Thorpe, 




Samuel Morton, 


Farmer & Mason. 


William Needham, 


1867 


Samuel Morton, 


„ 


James Stone, „ 




Francis Heyward, 


Farmer 


WUliam Needliam, „ 


1868 


Francis Heyward, 


„ 


James Stone, „ 




Dermis Alsop, 


Miner. 


William Needham, „ 


1869 


Francis Heyward, 


Parmer. 


James Stone, „ 




John Taylor, 


Shopkeeper. 


Creorge Pursglove, „ 


1870 


; Francis Heyward, 


Fanner. 


James Stone, „ 




Samuel Morton, 


Farmer k Mason 


Joseph Holmes, Farmer. 


1871 


1 Robert Furniss, 


Coal Agent. 


James Stone, Labourer. 




1 James Morton, 


Mason. 


William Xeedham, 


1872 


John Taylor, 


Shopkeeper. 


Edward Smith, Marble Mason. 


1 


Aaron Taylor, 


Miner. 



Constabulary. 

Captain the Hon. C. G. LEGGE, 
Inspector, Northern Division of England. 



97 



DERBYSHIRE CO.XSTABLM.ARY FORCE. 



CHIEF CONSTABLES. 



1857 Mr. W. G. Fox 
1873 Captain F. J. Parry 



1892 Major G. A. Godfrey 
1897 Captain H. C. Holland 



1873 John Anson 

1875 William Taylor 

1878 William Worsley 

1886 WiUiam Handley 

1887 Patrick MitcheU 
1890 Denis Clarke 
1895 A. J. Wonford 



1886 
1893 

N.n. 



John Diirkan 
Thomas Bennett 



SUPERINTENDENTS. 

Bake^vell Division. 



1873 Thomas Williams 
1S7G Charles Barker 
1886 WiUiam HamUey 



1892 William Lytle 
1899 Adam Savory 
190-4. Alfred Lakin 



POLICE CONSTABLES. 



Ashford and Longstone. 

1881 John AUcock 
1885 John Ponsford 
1885 Jolm Clark 



Ashford. 

1896 
1897 
1901 
1903 



George Poyser 
John Cosgrove 
Joseph Sheppard 
George WiUiam White 

Longstone. 

j 1902 James CampbeU 
I 1904 Thomas Gotheridge 



III i886, during the resiilfnce in Great Longstone of Captain tlie Hon. C. G. Legge. H. M 
Inspector of Constabularj- for the Northern Division, Mr. John Durkan (afterwards Insiiertor) was 
appointed the first resident Police Constable in Longstone. 



98 



Longstone Records. 
PUBLIC OFFICERS. 



Clerk of the Peace 

Representative on the County Council. ... 

Clerk to the Guardians and to the Rural District"] 
Council, Superintendent Registrar, &c. ...J 

Registrar of Births and Deaths ... 

Poor Law Guardian ... 

Relieving Officer and School Attendance Officer 

District P.ior Law Meilical Officer and Medical"] 
Officer of Health J 

Sanitary Inspector ... 

rC'ounty Council ... 
Surveyor of Highways ,'t^- . ■ ^ 

LRural District 

Surveyor of Taxes ... 

Collector of Taxes 

Collector of Rates 

Postmistress ... 

Station Master 

Church* Lamp Lighters 



Mr. N. J. Huohes-Hallett. 
Mr. a. Payne-Gallwet. 

Mr. Alfred Hawes. 

Mr. H. E. Sprigq. 

Mr. S. DoRE. 

Mr. \Vm. Bennett. 

Dr. Fentem. 

Mr. Thomas Hawley. 
Mr. John E. Blackwall. 
Mr. Albert Toft. 
Mr. Percival Suqoett. 
Mr. George Furniss. 
Mr. I. B. Shimwell. 
Mrs. Annie Green. 
Mk. R. Coe. 
Messrs. J. Nadin and 
J. Turner. 



SIRVHYORS OF THF HIGHWAY. 



GREAT LONGSTONE AND HOLME. 

(.Appointed by the Parish.) 



1836 Mr. Joseph Buxton. 

1837 Mr. Robert Thornhill. 

1843 Mr. John Orr. 

1844 Mr. Thomas Gregory Orr 



1848 Mr. WiUiam Hawley. 

1849 Mr. George Taylor. 
1S65 Mr. Richard Heyward. 



THE EDENSOR & BUXTON TURNPIKE TRUST. 

(Appointed by the Bakewell Board of Guardians.) 

1873 Mr. J. Bamett. , 18S0 Mr. Daniel Roberts. 

Mr. Charles Scott. 1880 Mr. William Clark. 

Mr. Joseph Anthony. 



' Inadvertently omitted under Churrh OfTirials. 



Public Officers. 

BAKEWELL HIGHWAY BOARD. 

(under the Local Gov. Board.) 

1883 Mr. Daniel Roberts. 



99 



BAKEWELL MAIN ROAD DISTRICT. 

funder the Countv Council ) 
1890 Mr. Daniel Roberts. | xsgs Mr. John Eaton Black^-aU. 



BAKEWELL RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL 
1880 Mr. William Clark. 1397 Mr. Thomas Hawley 

1883 Mr. A. Toft. I 1904 Mr. Albert Toft. 



STEWARDS OF THE .MANOR OF ASHFORI). 

Contributed by F. J. Taylor, Esq. 

The existing Court Rolls commence in i6oS. The name of the Steward does not appear unl.l ,673. 



1673 


WUliam Nicholson. 


1773 


Anthony Lax. 


1«75 


Thomas Bagshawe. 


1774 


Alexander Bossley. 


1711 


Charles Bagshawe. 


1827 


John Charge. 


1720 


Robert Sherrard. 


1S49 


John Barker. 


1748 


Thomas Barker. 


1854 


John Taylor. 


1750 


Godfrey Heathoote. 


1890 


Francis James Taj'lor 



BARMASTERS AND 

Contributed by 

1729 William Flint. 

1771 John Roberts. 

1775 Thomas Roberts. 

1793 Matthew lYost. 

1809 Jonathan Howe. 

1818 Benjamin M'yaft. 

1819 Matthew Frost. 
1824 Richard Heyward. 
1832 Matthew Frost. 
1832 George Wagstaffe. 
1835 Matthew Frost, jxinr. 

N.B. — Those in Italics 



DEPUTY BARMASTERS. 

A. G. Taylor, Esq. 

1843 John Wagstaffe. 

1846 Matthew Frost, junr. 

1847 James Longsdon. 
1850 James Longsdon. 
1850 Jonathan Howe. 
1865 Robert Howe. 
1868 Isaac Shimwell. 
1S74 Isaac Shimwell. 
1890 Thomas Shimwell. 
1901 -Arthur George Taylor. 

were Deputy Barmasters. 



100 



Longstone Records. 
HULLAH CLASSES. 



Singing Classes on tlie System practised by Mr. Joint HiiUali. 

"JnCUNDI ACTI LABORE8." 

These Classes were held in the Schoolroom in 1871, 1872, and 1873, 
and were conducted by Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Wright, former pupils 
of Mr. Hullah's London Classes. There were separate Classes for 
juveniles and adults (male and female) in the elementary stage ; 
and the most promising and advanced pupils of both sexes formed 
the singing class. \'erv few were rejected for want of ability. Mr. 
Hullah said that only about one in a thousand of his. pupils failed 
to acquire the power of reading vocal music on his system 
— which included the ordinary notation and the use of the " Do, Re, 
Mi, Fa," the right hand being always used by every pupil during 
the elementary exercises to mark and keep time with the Teacher. 
By Christmas, 1871, the advanced Hullah pupils were able to take 
a successful part in a Concert of which the Programme is given 
below. On this occasion the words of all the solos, part songs, and 
choruses were printed in full and added greatly to the enjoyment 
of the \'illagers, but they occupy too much space to be reprinted 
here. 

* Mr. Wright went through Classes held by Mr. May. Mr. W. M. >h^nk. Mr. Banister, Mr. Montem 
Sinitti, and. lastly, Mr. Hullah himself, the dearest and best of .Masters. St. Martin's Hall, Longacre, was 
his Head Quarters, and his Concerts took place there. The old Sacred Harmonic Society was chiefly 
recruited from this source. 



Ashton, David. 
Ashton, Elizabeth. 
Bell, Alice 
Bennett, Alexander 
Bennett, Isaac 
Bennett, Joseph 
Bennett, William 



HULLAH CLASS PUPH^S. 

Blackwell, Francis 
Blackwcll, William 
Blagden, Elizabeth 
Bottom, Eliza 
Bottom, Joseph 
Bottom, Selina 
I Bradwell, Charlotte 



Hullah Class Pupils. 



lOI 



Bradwell, John 

Bradwell, Luther 

Dunn, George 

Dunn, John 

Eyre, Ai-thur William Joseph 

Eyre, Edward 

EjTe, Eliza 

Eyre, Thomas 

Ford. Mary Ann 

Freeman, Elizabeth 

Furness, Mary 

Furness, Sarah 

Furniss, George 

Fumiss, Jane 

Fiu-niss, Mary Ellen 

Furniss, William 

Gould, Harriet 

Hancock, Richard 

Heyward, Francis 

Heyward, James 

Heyward, William 

Hill, Fanny 
Hill, Harriet 
Hill, Jane 
HOI, Richard 
Hodgkinson, Elizabeth 
Hodgkinson, George 
Jephson, Alice 
Jephson, Edith 
Jones, Harriet 
Kay, Mary Ann 
Longsdon, Emily 
Lowe, Edith 
Lowe. Mary 
Morton, George 
Morton, Jane 
Morton, Jonathan 



Morton, Matthew 

Morton, Sarah 

Morton, William 

Naylor, Caroline 

NuttaU, Mary Ann 

Oliver, Alice 

Oliver, Sarah Ann 

Orr, Alice 

Orr, Ellen 

Orr, James 

Paley, Annie 

Paky. Elsie 

Perry, Edwin 

Shaw, Mary Jane 

Skidmore, Emily 

Skidniore, Harriet 

Skidmore, Herbert 

Skidmore, Sarah Jane 

Skidmore, Thomas 

Smith, Joseph 

Smith, Martha 

Sterndale, Ethel 

Sterndale, Henry Percy 
Taylor, Charles 
Taylor, Evelyn 
Taylor, James 
Taylor, Mosea 
Taylor, Samxiel 
Taylor, Thomas 
Timni, Jane 
Wager, Jane 
Whalley, Annie 
Whalley, William 
Wright, K. Gertrude 
Wright, Laura A. F. 
Young, Charles 
Young, Millicent 



£02 Lon^stone Records, 

HULL AH CLASS COXCHRT. 



ijOnsrca-STOisrE scHzoonij k.ooi^ 

mmwm mimm, 

t-viSan, gctcmbcr 2ntl), 1871, 

AT SEVEN O'CLOCK. 
Admhiion, inctiuliiig a Copy of the Words, Threepence. Front Seats and Non- 
parishioners, Ont Shilling. 
The proceeds will be i(iven for a New Harmonium or an Origan, under the 
" LoNGSTONE Church Restoration Fund." 
Song " GOD BLESS THE PRL\CE OF WALES." Brinley Richards. 

SACRED. 

Solo "O, thou that tellest good tidings to Zion" Handel. 

Anthem " Lord for Thv tender mercies' sake" Farrant. 

Song with Chorus *" Children's voices" Claribel. 

Solo " Waft her Angels" Handel. 

Song with Chorus...*" Hark! the \esper Hymn is stealing" Stevenson. 

Duet " Children pray this love to cherish" Spohr. 

Christmas Carol *" Bethlehem" Gounod. 

Quartett and Chorus *" .Judge me, O Lord'" Mosart. 

SECULAR. 

Four-part Song *"The hardy Norseman" Pearsall. 

Song "The Man of War' Romer. 

Four-part Song "Goldilocks" _._ Rev. O.Tudor. 

Song " Home they brought her warrior dead" Miss Lindsay. 

Four-part Song " Softly fall the shades of evening" Hatton. 

Duet " Brothers in Arms" Linhy. 

Madrigal *" In going to my dreary bed" Edwardes. 

Romance "Alice, where art thou" Ascher. 

Madrigal " Down in a flow'ry vale" Festa. 

Glee... "The Lullaby" Storace. 

Trio with Chorus.. .*"A health to the outward bound" Mrs. Norton. 

Four-part Song "From Oberon in fairyland" Stevens. 

Glee "The Fisherman's ' Good" Night'" Bishop. 

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN 

* Pieces in which members of »he Hullah Class will take part. 
N.B.— In consequence of the length of the programme, no "encore" can 

be accepted. Young Children cannot be admitted. 

Rehearsal at 2 p.m. on Thursday, ivhen vwmhei-s nj the Hullah Classes and 

aged persons will be admitted. 



Votes of Thanks and Presentations. 103 






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104 Longstone Records. 

IN MEMORIAM. 



Tlie death of the Rev. Robert Lomas, Incumbent of Monyasli, 1776. 
THE PARSON'S TORR. 



The following admirable ballad, the production of the Rev. 
W. R. Bell, formerly Curate of Bakewell, is founded partly on facts 
and partly on local traditi<Mis. The unfortunate hero of the story 
was the Rev. Robert Lomas, Incumbent of Monvash, who was 
found dead, as described in the ballad, on the 12th of October, 1776. 
The scene of the ballad comprises the towns of Bakewell and 
Monvash, and the nKiuntaminis countrv between them, the western 
part of which — that bordering on Lathkiln and Hurlow Dales — 
being one of the most romantic districts of the Peak. The ballad 
first appeared in the Reltqiiary in 1864. 

Tilt' Parson of Monyash, late on eve. 

Sat in his old oak arm-chair ; 
And a playful flaiue in the low turf tire 

Oft-times shewed him sitting there. 

What was it that made that kind-hearted man 

Sit pensively there alone ? 
Did other men's sorrows make sad his lu'art ? 

Or, say — a glimi)se of his own ? 

Black dark was that night and stormy witlial 

It rained as 'twould rain a sea ; 
And roiind and within the old Parsonage house 

The wind moaned piteously. 

Still sat he deep musing till midnight hour. 

And then in a waking dream — 
He quailed to hear mid the temjiest a crash. 

And eke a wild jiicrcing scream. 

O mercy 1 cried he, with faltering breath, 

What sounds are those which I hear? 
May evil be far from both me and mine 1 

Good Lord, be Thou to us near 1 



In Memoriam, io= 

No longer sat he in that okl arm-chair, 

But prayed and lay down in bed ; 
And strove hard to sleep, and not hear the storm 

That scowled and raged o'er his head. 

But sleep seldom comes when 'tis most desired. 

And least to a troubled mind ; 
And the Parson lay awake long time, I ween. 

Ere soft repose he could find. 

As the dark hovirs of night passed slowly on. 

He slept as weary man will ; 
But light was his sleep, and broken his rest. 

And sad his fore-dread of ill. 

Thus restless he lay, and at early dawn 

He dream'd that he fell amain, 
Down, down an abyss of fathomless depth. 

Loud shrieking for help in vain. 

He woke up at once with a sudden shock, 

And threw out his arms wide-spread ; 
" Good heavens ! " he gasped, " what ill omen is this y 

" Where am I — with quick or dead ?" 

Eight well was he pleased to find 'twas a di'eam — 

That still he was safe and sound : 
With the last shades of night, fear passed away. 

And joy once again came round. 

The morning was calm, and the storm was liushed. 

Nor wind nor rain swept the sky ; 
And betimes he arose, for bound was he 

To Bakewell that day to hie. 

Old Hugh brought his horse to the garden gate. 

And saw him all safe astride. 
" Good-bye," quoth the Parson; quuth Hugh, "Good-bye ! 

I wish you a pleasant ride ! " 

Forth rode he across the lone trackless moor. 

His thoughts on his errand bent, 
And hoped he right soon to come back again 

The very same way he went. 

The journey to Bakewell he safely made 

A little before mid-day : 
But Vicar and peojile were all at church,* 

Where they were often wont to pray. 

*At the Friday morning service. 



io6 Longstone Records. 

" I'll put up my beast," qviotli tlie Parsou, " here 

At the White Horse hostoh-y ;* 
And go up to Church, that when prayers are clone. 

The Vicar I there may see " 

But ere he could reach the Old Newark door.t 

Both Priest and people were gone ; 
And the Vicar to soothe a dying man. 

To Over-Haddon sped on. 

'Twas three past noon when the Vicar came back. 

The Parson he asked to dine, 
And time stole a march on the heedless guest. 

Six struck as he sat at wine. 

Up rose he from table and took his leave, 

Quite startled to find it late ; 
He called for his horse at the hostelry. 

And homeward was' soon agate. 

As he rode up the hill, past All Saints' Church, 

The moon just one glance bestowed. 
And the weird-like form of the old Stone Cross, 

In the Church-yard, dimly shewed. 

Still higher and higher he climbed the hill. 

Yet more and more dark it grew ; 
The drizzling rain became sleet as he climbed. 

And the wind more keenly blew. 

Ah ! thick was the mist on the moor that night, 

Poor wight, he had lost his way I 
The North-east wind blowing strong on his right. 

To the left had made him stray. 

And now he was close to lone Haddon Grove, 

Bewildered upon the moor ; 
Slow leading his horse that followed behind. 

Himself groping on before. 

Still onward and leeward, at last he came 

To the edge of Harlow Dale ; 
From his cave:t the Lathkil a warning roared, 

But louder then howled the gale. 

On the brink of Fox Torr the doomed man stood, 

And tugged the bridle in vain ; 
His horse would not move — then quick started back, 
.^ And snap went each bridle-rein ; 

* Now called tlic Rutland Anns 
t The door in the south tcansept, locally called the Newark door. 
X The river Lathkil issues from a cavern in the limestone rock, directly opposite the I'arson's Torr. 



In Memoriam, 107 

Then headlong fell he o'er the lofty cliff. 

He shrieked and sank in the gloom ; 
Down— down to the bottom he swiftly sped, 

And death was his dreadful doom. 

The dead man lay told on the blood-stained rocks— 

The darkness did him enshroud; — 
And the owls high up in the ivy-clad Torr, 

Bewailed him all night full loud. 

little thought they in the old thatched cot. 
Hard by the Parsonage gate ; 

Their master they never again should see ! 
Nor ope to him soon or late : 

" This night is no better than last," quoth Hugh, 
" And master has not come back ; 

1 hope he is hale and safe housed with friends. 

And has of good cheer no lack." 

Quoth Betty, " I liked not his morning ride — 

I fear he's in evil plight — 
A Friday's venture's, no luck ! I've heard say, 

God help him if out this night." 

At dawn of next day, old Betty went forth 

To milk the cow in the shed; — 
And saw him sitting upon a large stone. 

All pale and mute— with bare head. 

But a moment she tiu-ned her eyes away, 

A fall she heard and a groan ; 
She looked again, but no Parson was there. 

He'd vanished from off the stone. 

Soon spread the di-ead tale through Monyash town. 

They made a great hue and cry ; 
And some off to this place, and some to that. 

To seek the lost man did hie. 

Bad tidings from Bakewell — no Parson there — 

No parson could else be found ; 
'Twas noon, yet no tidings — they still searclied on. 

And missed they no likely gi-ound. 

At last the searchers went into the Dale, 

And there at the foot of Fox's Torr — 
They found the Parson, all cold and dead, 

'Mong the rocks all stained with gore. 



io8 Longstone Records. 

They took up his corae — and six stalwart men, 

Slowly bore it along the Dale ; 
And they laid the dead in his house tliat night, 

And many did him bewail. 

When time liad passed over — a day or twain. 

They Ijuried him in tlie grave ; 
And his bones now rest in the lone Chiu'chyard, 

Till doomsday them thence shall crave. 

O dread was the death of that luckless man — 

Not soon will it be forgot ; 
The dismal story — for ages to come — 

Will often be told, I wot. 

You may not now see in Monyash town 
The deadman's sear txift of grass ; 

But still it is there in memory stored. 
And thence it never shall pass. 

You may not now find Fox Torr by that name. 
The swain thus knows it no more ; 

But pointing thereat from the LathUil grot. 
He'll show you the Parson's Torr. 

From " Derbyshire ballads," 1867. 



IN MKMOUIAM. 



The Rev. Bache Thoniliill. ]\I.A. (Per pet mil Cnrate of Whiter, 
Ashfovd, and Loni^stuiic, 1 827.) 



This good man's mtmory deserves to he held in affectionate 
respect : The verses below, unpoetical as thev are, breathe the 
spirit of loyaltx and lo\e for the dear departed Pastor — which 
pervaded the whole district. 

Mr. Thornhill, was son of Baciie Thornhill, Ksquire, of Stanton 
in the Peak. He was a man of refined tastes, fond of antiquarian 
pursuits, and was highly esteemed in the County of Derby. He 
was M.A. of St. John's College, Cambridge, where he was a fellow 



In Memoriam. log 

student with Sir Robert Peel, with whom to the period of his 
death he kept up an intimate friendship. On the 13th of December, 
1827, Mr. Thornhill was accidentally shot bv the discharge of 
the fowling piece of a friend. He lingered until the 27th, when 
he died, at the age of forty t\xo. He was buried at Youlgreave, 
the coffin bearing the inscription—" Rev. Bache Thornhill, Vicar of 
Winster, and \'ice-\-icar of Ashford and Longstone, died the 
27th day of December, 1827 ; aged fortv two." 

The writer of these verses was Mr. John Brimlow of \\-inster. 
Brimlow had been a soldier in Colonel Thornhill's regiment, under 
which gallant officer he served in Egypt. He afterwards suffered 
from opthalmia, became blind, and got a precarious livelihood bv 
rambling about the country with a basket, gathering " rags and 



bones." 



As I sat musing by the fire, 
I heard some people say, 
A dreadful accident has befel 
A worthy man this day. 

Then I got up, went out of door 
For to see, and likewise hear ; 
On every tongue enquiry sat, 
And in many an eye, a tear. 

Saying our worthy Pastor he has fall'n. 
Oh ! how hard has been his lot. 
By accident a gun went off. 
And this good man was shot. 

The rich, the poor, in groups they meet. 
Their sorrow for to express, 

Saying if fifty come there will lie none like Bache 
To those that are in distress. 

For he was a friend to everyone. 
To all alike was kind. 
He was the same to rich and poor. 
Likewise sick, lame, or blind. 

Oh ! cruel Fate, what have we done. 
That this good man should fall, 
But the die was cast, and the thing is past. 
And there must be an end to all. 



no Longstone Records. 

But, hark ! a messenger )ias just ari-ived, 

Glad tidings doth he bring 

Tliis good man he is still alive, 

Oh ! let us praise the King of kings. 

Rejoice, my friends, he better gets. 

For the Lord has heard our prayer, 

And He has promised when a few does meet 

That He always will be there. 

But adieu, vain hope, thou art for ever fled. 
For this good man is no more. 
For he is now numbered amongst the dead, 
So adieu, adieu, farewell for evermore. 

JOHN BRIMLOW, Winster. 

I'roni ■• Di-rhysliire Uall.ids," 1867. 



BURIAL l.\ WOOLLEN SHROUDS. 



When the Woollen Trade of Hnj^land was in a state of depression, 
an Act of Parliament was passed in the reign of Charles II. that 
no one must be buried in anything but a WV)ol Shroud, that 
employment might be formd in making Shrouds. A certificate to 
that effect was necessary. 

Mary Wild maUeth Oath that Edward Frost of Wardlow in the 
Parish of BaUewell and County of Dcrbe, lately dec' was not buried 
in any material biit what was made of sheep's wool only. 

Sworn before me 
Test'' John Goddaru, 

Mary Goddard. Curate of Wormhill. 

Strellay Morksly. 

An Actress wishing to be buried in a satin shroud, £3 was paid 
by the relatives as a fine. 




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Canon ^nbrcto. 



Not Tideswcll only but the Peak District generally seemed to be 
the poorer when this good man passed away. For several decades, 
his unsclfisli life, his zeal, energy and devotion as pastor and friend, 
gave him a charm and an influence over the Peak villages and 
more or less over the whole County, probably unsurpassed by a 
country clergyman. In Longstone, Wardlow and Cressbrook he 
was greatly beloved. His life and good works at Tideswell and the 
neighbourhood, and especially in his own, the Parish Church of 
which he was justly proud, will not easily be forgotten. Happily 
for Tideswell he was succeeded by a most sympathetic and large 
hearted man — the Rev. J. M. J. Fletcher who has more than 
carried out all that the good Canon could have aspired to. 

Floreat Tideswell. 



Derbyshire Dialect, 1 1 1 

A VILLAGE SKETCH, AT ASHFORD-IN-THE-WATER, IX 
ILLUSTRATION OF THE DERBYSHIRE DIALECT. 

BY THOMAS BRLSHFIELD, ESQ. 

" Oi'll dowt ; yoi, oi'll dowt ; oi tell thee that, an oi wull, thah mey depend 
on't." These words I heard spoken by a voice which I thought was familiar 
to me. I turned to find whence they came, and to my surprise saw my old 
schoolfellow, John Baggalley — who was quite blind — in company with another 
man, an old pedlar, well known in the village, who was also blind, and was led 
about the country by a little dog. They passed by me down the street. I 
heard no more words : hut anxious to know how this stiange couple had met, 
and what was the piu-pose of their meetinii-, I followed them into the parlour 
of a beer shop, and ordering a glass of ale, sat down to observe their move- 
ments, and find out why they were thus together. I soon made the discovery. 
" Hast quoit made up thee moind t' gu weh me ? " asked the old man. " Yoi, 
oi hav," said poor John. " Wehl then, here^ luck, lad, en mey we dow wehl ! 
— oi think we sholl ; oi'll show thee how t' luanige, en oi know thahl soun 
dowt es wehl, or bettur nor oi con misell." "Thank thee, Ned, oist troy ; 
en'll dow aw e' con t' get a livin wi' thee ; bur moind one thing, oi'll do owt 
sowner than hing ony lunger o" Mary ; hough dows her Ijest t' mak me happy 
loik, bur oi tell the what, lad, ows starvin hersell t' dowt ; aw hojgh arns is 
bey seaming towthrie stockins — a poor trade ! oi conna think o' hinging on her 
onny lunger, fur oi know if oi dow oist be th' deeth on hur, en then what am oi t' 
dow ? oi conna bear t' think on't, lad ! en su oi'll gu weh theh ony whear, en 
dow owt thah loiks — yoi, owt .' sowner nor dow poor Mary onny hurt 1 " 
" Thart a rair chap ! " said the old man, " en desarves good luck, en oi'm sure 
thahl hav it — yoi, quite sartiu on't I Cum di-ink, lad, en lets be off afore thy 
sister misses thee." " Aw, reight, reight," said John ; " en su hehrs luck, en 
off wehl gu.'' At that moment, as poor John was drinking his ale, hurried 
footsteps were heard, the door of the apartment was opened very quickly, and 
in walked poor John's sister. " Jack ! " she exclaimed, with trembling 
vehemence, " what art thah dowin hehr? thah's now bisness hehr drinkin 
with that owd feller I cum thee wey whoam ; ciun, theers a gud lad — cum I 
wutna ? " " Nough, oi ^^unna ; oi shonna gu to that whoam onny muir ; oi 
bin theer tow lung ; oist gu wi' owd Ned, en get a livin by sellin things, es 
hey dows — hahaver, oist try ; oi bin a trouble en a birdin on thee lung inuf — 
tow lung — en oUl ti-y en na trouble thee ony muir ; su dunna try t' persuade 
me ! oist gu, oive made mj' mind up t' gu '. " " Jack ! " said his sister, " oh ! 
Jack, thah surely wunna gu en leave me ! No ! no ! havn't I work't neight an 
dey ommust t' mak thee comfortable an content ? " '■ True ! thah has ! thah 
has '. " said Jack ; " the thowt on't it is maks me want f get awey ; keepin 
me oi know s'f mitch for thee — oi know it — en thah knows it tow, voi, thart 



112 Longstone Records. 

" starviu thysen ta deeth t' kcop me, en for moy sake : bur it slionna be — 
oist gu, en oist try t' dow suiumut loik owd Ned dows, en oi'll uphold thee, 
manage f get a crust somehow ; bur oi mean t' cum tow thee sumtimes, Mary, 
her oist feel happier if oi get a livin for mysel, oi sholl 1 " " Oh, Jack ' dunna 
talk su ! dunna, dunna 1 " said Mary; "stop wi me — dow, | rithee dow! it'll 
kill me t' part wi thee, thah knows it wuH ! If thah leaves me oi sholl niver 
have a dey's comfort agen ; dunna, Jack, prythee dunna leave me ! have'na oi 
down aw oi cud to keep thy sperits up and mak thee happy ? Thah knows oi 
hav — ay, and wull agen. yoi, as long as God spares me — so dvinna, dunna leave 
me I prythee dunna '. theers a gud lad ! cum thy wey whoam agen, oh I dow, 
moi dear brother, dow I " She took hold of her brother's shoulders, entreated 
him not to go and leave her, kissed him very warmly, and burst into tears. 
Her brother — poor blind John — cried too ; for a few moments tears were the 
only language in that rnom. The landlord of the house, transfixed, stood 
looking on the touching scene, and as he placed on the table the second glass 
of ale, I saw him raise his arm and dry his cheek with the sleeve of his shirt ; 
he then spoke, and in a warm but trembling voice, said, " oi tell thee what. 
Jack, if thah can find i' thee heart t' leyve sich a sister as Mary, oist ne'er 
loik th' seight on thee ony muir ; nowt et's owt el cum tow thee, thah '11 
desarve ivrythin es is bad. Oh ! ber thah conna dowt — thah wunna leave her, 
wut y" " Yo mythern me." said Jolin ; " Mary, let me gu en troy, theers a 
gud wench, yoi, let me troy what oi can dow ; oi know owd Ned ell tak care o' 
me, wut na Ned ? Oist sown ciim agen tow thee, shonna oi, Ned ? Whoy dust 
na speyk, Ned ?■ tell Mary thah'U tak care o' me, en bring me safe back agen. 
Ned. whoy dust na speyk?" ".lack," said Ned, "by guy, 1 conna tak thee 
awey fro sich a wench es thoi sister ; nough, nough, oi conna dow that, after 
aw! Oi onct had a sister — a very kind un, tow — it pleysed God t' tak her 
from me, en oive fun th' want on her ; ah, lad, oi dunna think oi should iver 
dow well agen, if after what oive lieerd, I did owt t' part thee and thoy sister." 
" Uust think su, Ned? then Mary, wench, wipe thee eyes, en lowk up agen ; 
oi'll stey wi thee, Mary, en nowt bur deth shall part us — come, kiss me ; en 
now we'll gu whoam agen wei thee ! " 

After some hearty hand shaking, John and his sister left the " Miner's 
Arms" for their humble home; and poor old Ned took his departure, under 
the guidance of his old faithful dog, to tread the old paths, through the 
old neighboxu'hoods, to seek a pi-ecarious means of existence from the sale of 
his small haberdashery, without the hoped-for companionship of John 
Baggallej'. — " Reliquary," January, 1S71. 



Associations, Clubs, &c. 113 



LONGSTONH ASSOCIATION FOR THH PROSECUTION 

OF FELONS. 



FOUNDED - - 1836. 

DISSOLVED - - 1901. 



Articles of Agreement made concluded and fully agreed upon 
the fifteenth day of March in the year of Our Lord one thousand 
eight hundred and thirty six Between us whose hands are hereunto 
severally set and subscrihed being inhabitants of the Chapelry of 
Great Longstone and Holme with Little Longstone Monsal dale 
Brushfield and part of Wardlow, and of individuals holding lands 
within the said Chapelry in the C(junty of Derby for the intents 
and purposes hereinafter expressed 

Whereas divers felonies trespasses and other misdemeanours are 
frequently committed by evil disposed persons to the great 
grievance and injury of the public in general and to the suffering 
individual in particular and the oftener so by occasion of the 
offender or offenders escaping the hand of justice on account of 
the great hardship and inconvenience arising from a prosecution 
at the sole expense of the injured party And Whereas for dis- 
covering and preventing such offences as far as in us lie it hath 
been agreed by and between us Inhabitants of the said Townships 
Hamlets and Vills whose hands are hereunto subscribed to be 
vigilant in discovering all persons in like cases offending against 
the persons family or property of any of the parties hereto 
subscribed and such persons when discovered to prosecute as the 
Law directs But in order that no prosecution may be commenced 
and carried on to serve private pique or malice and without 
sufficient offence being committed deserving to be prosecuted by 



114 Longstone Records. 

the Association ami fair and reasonable expectations of convictin,^ 
the offender it has been also agreed that no prosecution shall be 
commenced or carried on under this agreement but by and with 
the approbation of a majority of the acting Committee which 
Committee shall consist of five persons to be chosen by a majority 
of the subscribers assembled at a public meeting duly convened by 
the Treasurer and any three of the said Committee to be a quorum 
and act for the transaction of business 

Now for carrying the said agreement and the intentions thereof 
into due execution and effect whenever circumstances may require 
We vi'hose hands are hereunto subscribed and set and v^ho have 
alreadj- paid down and respectively advanced the sum of two 
shillings and sixpence each by way of making a Fund foi- dis- 
charging any expenses preparatory to completing this Association 
Do and each and every of us Doth hereby for himself and herself 
promise and agree to and with each other in manner following that 
is to say that when and so often as there shall happen to be any 
felony trespass or other misdemeanour committed against the 
person or family of any of us parties hereto at any place within 
the said County of Derby or against the property of any of us 
parties hereto upon premises contributing their quota to the fund 
of this Association or upon property within the limits allowed by 
this Association either by this Article or any Bye Law or nde 
hereafter to be made or against our property which may he in a 
state of removal from place to place at the time of such felony 
trespass or misdemeanour shall happen the same being within the 
County of Derby Then such injured person shall as soon as 
conveniently may be in duty to the puiilic in general and to the 
suffering individual in particular make the same known to the 
Treasurer of this Association who shall thereupon call the 
Committee together and the said Committee shall immediately 
proceed to find out such offender or offenders by such ways and 
means as their discretion may point out and the Laws and rules of 



Associations, Clubs, &c, 115 

this Association allow and such offender or offenders when found 
out to be prosecuted under the approbation and management of 
the aforesaid Committee The expenses of all which proceedings it 
is hereby expressly agreed by and between all the parties signing 
these presents shall be borne and defrayed by and out of the Fund 
of this Association Or in case the then Fund of this Association 
shall be insufficient for such purpose then by us parties hereto 
in proportion to the houses lands and tenements by us respectively 
occupied and which shall have been given in and identified as 
premises within the protection and relief of this Association by an 
equal pound rate on all such Houses Lands and tenements and to 
be correspondent with the poor assessment affecting such premises 
and when such subscribers rate shall not amount to Twenty 
Pounds then the said subscriber to be assessed at Twenty 
Pounds And it is hereby further agreed and declared by and 
between all of us parties hereto that in case any member of this 
Association shall refuse or neglect to pay his or her proportion or 
quota under the terms aforesaid by the space of thirty days next 
after being called upon by the authority of the Committee for the 
time being, he shall from that time be struck out of this Association 
and forfeit and lose all claim benefit and advantage to or from the 
same or any fund belonging thereto and it is also agreed that the 
parties to this Association executing these presents and every of 
them shall be and continue an Association from the date hereof 
for one year at least and so from year to year until he or she who 
shall be included to go out shall have signified in writing to the 
Treasurer three months at least pievious to going out of the same 
and that whenever such going out shall happen it shall be done 
and considered a relinquishment of all future advantages or 
interests in or to the Fund of this Association which is meant and 
intended to continue an Association upon the aforesaid Terms by 
all such who shall not have gone out in manner above mentioned 
And it is hereby further agreed by and between all parties hereto 



ii6 Longstone Records. 

that the Members of this Association shall have power to make 
such Bye Laws as may be found necessary for the good order and 
government of this Association And which bye Laws shall be voted 
for and made by a majority in number of subscribers to these 
Articles at a public General Meeting to be called by the Treasurer 
for that purpose and thereupon become binding upon all parties 
signing these Articles as fully and effectively to all intents and 
purposes as if already inserted and specified in these present 
Articles which bye Laws shall afterwards be fairly written in a 
Book to be provided for that purpose and also further Books shall 
be provided for the purpose of recording the proceedings of this 
Association and for keeping the accounts thereof And lastly it is 
agreed by and between all and every the parties signing these 
presents that at a General Meeting to be called for that purpose 
by the Treasurer the Members or Subscribers to this Association 
or a majority of them assembled at such a meeting shall (if they 
think proper) by any bye law or rule alter vary or change the 
limits hereinbefore mentioned allowed to be protected by this 
Association and make any further order herein as to them may 
seem proper In witness our hands the day and year first above 
written 

Names of Members. Property identified. 



VV. CarleiU House Buildings Land in Gt 

Longstone 
M. Mills — withdrawn 

Wm. Wager House buildings and land in Gt and 

Little Longstone and Wardlow 

W'm. Longsdon House buildings and land in Little 

Longstone 

T. G. Orr House buildings and land in Gt 

and Little Longstone and Ashford 

Matthew Furness House buildings and land in Gt 

Longstone and Middleton 



Associations, Clubs, &c. . 117 

Names of Members. Property identified. 

James Longsdon (withdrawn) House buildings and land in Great 

Longstone 

House buildings and land in Gt and 
Little Longstone 

House buildings and land in Gt and 
Little Longstone and Brushfield 

House buildings and land in Gt 
Longstone 

House buildings and land in Gt and 
Little Longstone 

House buildings and land in Gt and 
Little Longstone and Ashford 

House buildings and land in Little 
Longstone 

House buildings and land in Little 
Longstone and Brushfield 

House buildings and land in Gt 
Longstone 

House buildings and land in Gt 
Longstone 

House buildings anil land in Gt 
Longstone 

House buildings and land in Gt and 
Little Longstone and Sheldon 

House buildings and land in Gt and 
Little Longstone 

House buildings and land in Gt 
Longstone 

House buildings and land in Gt 
Longstone and Ashford 



Wm. Wilson 
Charles Shaw 
Anne Gates 
McConnel Bros 
Joseph Buxton 
Joseph Timm 
John Bridge 
Sampson Hoskinson 
Joseph Morton 
Joseph Bottom 
Joseph Skidmore 
Robert Furness 
Robert Thornhill 
Saml Holtman 
John Orr 



House buildings and land in Gt and 
Little Longstone and Litton 

May 16 — Joseph Gregory (withdrawn) 

John Gregory House buildings and land in Gt 

Longstone 



ii8 Loiigstone Records. 

Names of Mii.MUKRS. Pkopektv idkn tii-ii;!). 



Samuel Thornhill Holiso bLiildin^s and land in Waixl- 

Jany 1840 low in the Parishes of Hope and 

BaUewell — and Longstonc 

Will Harris jr Jany 1841 l-or Biiildin«s ani.1 land 

Geor.t>e Ashton byNN'.Lon.^sdon f'oi- Huildinj^s and land in (}t 

Longstone, Little Longstone and 
Ashford 

Anthony Woodhouse by R.T. for Buildin<;s and land in Gt 

Lonostone and Ashfoixl 

James Morton HoLise buildinijs and land in Gt 

Longstone 

Geo. B. Brown House buildinjis and land in Gt 

Longstone and Stoney iMiddleton 

Eliza Gates i.^- Caroline Gates For buildings and land in Gt 

Longstone 
Eliz"' Carleill For buildings and land in Gt 

Longstone 

James & Jno Furness House buildings and land and 

property in trade 

Henry Bagshaw For house lands in Rowland and 

Hassop and buildings. 

FredericU Buxton House buildings and land in Gt 

Longstone 
Joseph Seott • House and land in Gt Longstone 

Robert Shaw House building and land in Gt 

l-ongstone. Little Longstone rnd 
Brushtteld 

lidward Gascoyne House Buildings and land in Hassop 

James S. Hodson House Buildings and land in Gt 

Longstone 

George Eyre House Gardens Stock and Timber 

Gt Longstone 

William Clayton House buildings and garden, Litton 

Joseph Oliver House builtlings and land Gt 

Longstone 



Associations, Clubs, &c. 



iig 



Names of Members. 



Property identified. 



Charles Young 
George C. Tooth, Clerk 

Joseph Bottom 

his X mark 

Witness G. C. Tooth 

John Sleigh 

George Taylor 
Benjamin Bland 

Thomas Fidler 

Thomas Ashton 

Thomas B. Hope 
Edward Smithers 

Thomas Gregory 



John Thornhill 
John Paley 
John Outran! 

G. T. Wright 
Tho. Hope 

Joseph Adams 

Laxon H. Sweet 



House buildings and land in Holme 

For House buildings and garden Gt 
Longstone 

for house buildings and land in 
Gt Longstone Little Longstone and 
Holme 

Hou.ses buildings gardens and lands 
in Ashford and Gt Longstone 

Building and land in Gt Longstone 

House buildings garden and land 
in Rowland 

House garden buildings and land in 
Rowland and Hassop 

House buildings garden and land in 
Rowland and Gt Longstone 

Buildings land in Gt Longstone 

House buildings and land in Gt and 
Little Longstone 

House and land in Gt Longstone 
Henry P. Bagshawe in lieu of the late Henry Bagshawe for the 
same occupation 

Joseph Buxton in lieu of the late Fred Buxton for the same 
occupation 

House land and buildings &c &c 

Gt Longstone 

House land and buildings in Gt 

Longstone 

House land and buildings in Ward- 
low — Land in Longstone Gt and 
Little 

Land, Great Longstone 
House buildings and land in Gi'eat 
Longstone 

House Buildings and land in Great 
and Little Longstone and Ashford 
House land and Buildings in Gix-at 
Longstone 



t20 



Longstone Records. 



RULES OF THE ASSOCIATION. 



RULE I. 

Tins Association is open to individuals residing within the chapelry 

of Great Longstoiie, and to other individuals who may occupy Land 

situated within the said chapelry, though not residents thereof: or to 

individuals who may be specially admitted by a Bye Law for that purpose. 



RULE II. 
The members of this Association agree to protect one another's persons 
and property against the following depredations, and offer the following 
rewards for the apprehension and conviction of offenders ; — 

For Murder, Burglary, Highway or Foot-pad Robbery ;\ /-■ ''• 
stealing or maiming any Horse, Mare, Gelding, Bull, 
Cow, or Sheep ; or wilfully setting fire to any Dwelling- 500 
house, Warehouse, Shop, Barn, Stable, or other Buildings, 
stack or rick of Corn or Grain, or Hay, or other property,) 
For stealing any Goods out of any House, Warehouse, Store- 1 
house, Shop, Building, or other place : or any Corn or | 
Grain, thrashed or unthrashed, or Hay, or Straw out of - j o o 
any Barn or Hovel, Rick-yard, or other place, or fori 
knowingly receiving any stolen Goods 

For stealing or maiming any Lambs, Calves, Pig 



'\ 



Poultrj' ; or stealing any Door, Window, Gate, Stile, Pen, 
Fleaks, Pales, Posts, Rails, or Iron Work, or any Wood, 
growing or fallen ; or robbing any Orchard or Garden, or 
destroying Frames, Glass or Glasses therein : cropping, 
breaking down, barking, or otherwise damaging any 
Timber, fruit or other Trees; pulling down or damaging 
any Hedge, Wall, or other Fence, or stealing or damaging 
any lock upon any held gate, 



Associations, Clubs, &c. 121 

For stealing any Corn, Grain, Grass, Clover, or Hay, 
growing or in shock or cock in the field ; stealing or 
damaging any Cart or other Implement of Husbandry;, 
for breaking down, injuring, or destroying any Trough, ,^100 
Meer Head, or Dam of Water ; stealing Coals, Turnips, I 

Potatoes, or Cabbage, if in the night, / 

Or, if in the day-time, o 10 6 

And the committee shall use their discretion when and on what occasions 
rewards shall be offered. 

RULE 111. 
This Association shall not prosecute for the offences of Forgery, 
Swindling, gaining mone}' under false pretences, or passing off bad or 
base coin, or bad local or other notes. 

RULE IV. 
A Committee and Treasurer shall be appointed at the general annual 
meeting, by a majority of the members then assembled. 

RULE V. 
An Annual .Meeting of the members of the Association shall be held on 
the first Wednesday after the 25th of March, at six o'clock in the evening, 
at such place as the committee shall appoint by public notice, for the 
purpose of auditing the accounts, electing fresh officers, and for the tran- 
saction of general business. .\t this annual meeting the members shall sup 
together; the charge for supper not to exceed one shilling and six pence 
each. Every member neglecting to attend the supper shall forfeit one 
shilling and six pence, and this fine shall become due and payable after 
seven o'clock on that evening. 

RULE VI. 
The committee for tlie time being shall, when they think proper, cause 
a rate to be made upon the several members of tfiis Association, by an 
equal pound rate, on all houses, lands, and tenements ; but no member 
shall be charged or rated upon a less assessment than twenty pounds. If 
any member shall neglect or refuse to pay his or her rate, for thirty days 
after receiving notice thereof from the Treasurer, he or she shall be struck 
out of the list of members of the Association, and forfeit all claim, benefit, 
and protection to tlie fund thereof, or from the said -Association. The 



122 Longstone Records. 

committee are authorised to defray any necessary or unavoidable expense 
tliat may be incurred by their meetings on the business of the Association. 

RULE VII. 

The committee may, througli their Chairman, at any time call a general 

meeting of the Association by advertisements posted in the usual public 

places, giving four days notice thereof. And it shall be incumbent on the 

committee, through their Chairman, on the requisition of any seven 

members, to call a [jublic meeting of the Association, at any time in the 

wav before stated. 

RULE VIII. 

All orders, rules, or regulations, adopted at any general meeting shall be 

entered in the Order Book of the Association, and become binding on the 

members. The accounts of the .Association sliall be kept by the Treasurer, 

and all moneys be collected and paid through him. 

RULE IX. 

.Ml information respecting offences or injuries done, to be forwarded to 
the Chairman of the Committee, who in such cases shall, in conjunction 
with his colleagues, adopt such measures as to them may seem most 
reasonable and proper for finding out and punishing the offender or 
offenders, in conformity with the Rules of the Association. 

RULE X. 

Any member of this Association may withdraw from it, by giving three 
months' notice in writing, of his or her intention, to the Treasurer ; and 
paying up all arrears, or rates, or forfeits then due. 

RULE XL 
•A. person may be admitted a member of this Association by a 
special Bye Law for the purpose, such Bye Law shall be entered in the 
Order Book. 

April i6, 1836. 
At a General Meeting of the Association, held in the School Room 
at Great Longstone this day, the foregoing Rules having been read, and 
afterwards proposed to be taken as and for the Rules of the said Association ; 
the same were approved and adopted as such. 

By order of the Meeting, 

T. G. ORR, 

Clniiniiaiu 



Associations, Clubs, &c. 



1^3 



So far as the prosecution and conviction of felons went, this 
Association appears to have been an utter failure. Socially it may 
have been a bond of fellowship between the members who hailed 
from different townships. But even that did not prevent several 
attempts to wind it up and divide the proceeds. Unfortunately 
the RliIcs did not provide for dissolution, and the money contributed 
by scores of members for many years — instead of being given to, 
say, the Derbyshire Infirmary — was at the absolute disposal of the 
dozen surviving members who in 1901 by a large majority decided 
to dissolve and share the balance which amoiuited to £4 10s. Od. 
each. The following are the names :— 



Mr. H. V. Bagshawe. 

Mr. S. Dore. 

Mr. A. \V. J. Eyre. 

Mr. B. Gratton. 

Mr. C. Johnson. 

Mr. P. MurDhv. 



Mr. W . Outrani. 
Mr. K. Shaw. 
.\.'r. J. \V. Thornhill. 
Mr. J. T. Trickett. 
Mr. A. Walker. 



THK AXCIHNT ORDHR OF SIlKl'lll-KDS' I.ODCH. 



The Ancient Order of Shepherds' Lodge was established at 
Longstone in the year 1837, and the Feast was held on the 24th 
June, at the same time as Tideswell Wakes, the Church there 
being dedicated to St. John the Baptist. The .Members of the 
Order when parading wore each an apron made from the skin of 
one lamb, and carried a Shepherd's Crook, the staff of which was 
painted green, and the crook red. The flag was an ordinary one 
.with a blue silk ground. As the number of new Members from 
Cressbrook and Litton increased, it was desirable to remove the 
Lodge from the "White Lion Inn," Longstone, to tiic " Red Lion 
Inn," Litton, where it is ncjw held. — Fid-. Ma:^'., ,hnu\ IS95. 



124 Longstone Records. 

INKHRMAN ODDFHI.LOWS FRIENDLY SOCIETY. 

OTHERWISE CALLED 

THE INKEMAN LODGE OF ODD FELL0W8. 

(Kindly coiifribiifed by Mi-. H. A. Spiuiton.J 



On November 10th, 1855, Twenty-eight young men of Longstone 
formed themselves into an Oddfellows Lodge in connection with 
the Grand United Order of Oddfellows — sometimes known as the 
Leeds Unity. The news of the great victory at Inkerman on the 
5th of the month had just reached this country, and the name of 
the ' Inkerman ' Lodge was given to the newly formed Club. 

The first President was Mr. Joseph Scott, who was also the 
Treasurer. Mr. Charles Morton was the first Secretary. 

The lodge contmued to be an integral part of the Grand United 
Order till 1894, when by a special vote of the members it seceded 
from the Order and from the Baslow District, becoming an 
independent order of Oddfellows. 

At the same time it took in the members of the Perseverance 
Lodge of Taddington, which, owing to various causes, had 
exhausted all its funds. 

In the fifty years of its existence the club has increased to 
about 150 members, and its funds amount to nearly .£1,400. 
There have been three Secretaries, viz. — 
Mr. Charles Morton (1855). 
Mr. Thomas Shim well (1870). 
Mr. Joseph Wood (1900). 
There have also been three Treasurers, viz. — 
Mr. Joseph Scott (1855). 
Mr. William Taylor ( 1887). 
Mr. H. A. Spanton (1899). 



AssociationSy Clubs, ^c, i?5 

In connection with tiie Lodj^e there are the foil(j\ving benefits — 

{a) In time of sicliness each member receives free medical 
attendance, and 10,'- per week, for the first twelve weeks of sick- 
ness, and 5/- per week for the rest of sickness. This latter really 
is a pension for those old men who are too infirm to work. 

[b) At the death of a member £10 is paid to his family ; on the 
death of a member's wife he receives £5. 

(t) Three months after the death of a member, his widow 
receives £3 ; and in addition she receives £1 a year for every child 
under 12 years of age. 

(d) In times of special distress — such as loss of work, or the 
illness of a wife or child — a member can receive aid from the 
" special distress" fund of the lodge. 

For these benefits a contribution of l/9d. per month is paid. 

In 1902 a Juvenile branch was started in connection with the 
lodge, and now numbers about 30 members. 

This Branch provides funeral benefits varying from £2 to .£5, 
free medical attendance, and weekly payments in time of sickness 
for boys from the age of 5 to the age of 17. 

As an example of the great use of such a society, it may be 
pointed out that in 1893 no less a sLim than .£200 was expended in 
sick and funeral benefits. 



ARCHERY. 



The Butts field. Great Longstone, occupying an area of 8 acres, 
is supposed to have been used for the practice of Archery. The 
English Archers were famous from 1189 to 1377- Robin Hood 
was born in the early part of this period at Chellaston Manor 
House, Derbyshire, and his companion. Little John, is buried in 
Hathersage Churchyard. The bows were 6ft. to 7ft. long, made of 
yew, peeled and polished, tipped with deer's horn, and horn was 
ingeniously inserted into the slit of the Arrow. They were strung 
with gut.— Par. Mag., July, 1895. 



126 Longstone Records, 

*CR1("KET. 



The present Cricket Club dates from 1885, and the Secretary is 
Mr. William Nadin, whose predecessors were respectively Messrs. 
.John Davis, Geori^e Ward, and Tliomas Davis. About 23 years 
before that date a club was formed under the Secretaryship of 
Mr. George Ward, but after some years it became extinct. 

M"()OTHAIJ. 



.A Football Club has been in existence since 1892, having had for 
its Secretaries Messrs. C. Bcizzard, W. Nadin, H. B. Dixon, W. 
Maltby, and William Morton. 



•POULTRY SOCIHTY. 



This Society was formed in 1901, with Mr. W. R. Pitt Dixon as 
President and Messrs. Wood & Oldfield as Secretaries. 

Annual Shows are held and so far have been a success in creating 
an interest in improved poultry rearing. The first tw-o Shows were 

held in the Schoolroom, and subse(.|uent ones under canvas. 



r. E. T. S. AND G. F. S. 



Several organisations for the recreation and benefit of the Parish 
have been initiated or promoted by the Vicar and .Mrs. Andrew, 
such as — 

Branch of the Church of Kngland Temperance Society. 

Branch of the Girls Fi-iendly Society of which Mrs. Andrew is 
Secretary. 

Band of Hope. 

Lending Library. 

* Piom iiifoniialiuii iuppliej by Mi. H. A. Spanton. 



Associations, Clubs, &c. 



127 



Working Party. 

Clothing Club. 

Social Evenings. 

Debating Society. 

Mutual Improvement Society. 



THE TWENTY CLUH. 



This Association was formed in 1896 by Mr. Arthur Bates of 
Manchester, a gentleman of great experience and ability, who during 
his residence in Longstone was ever ready to devote time and 
money to the improvement, well being, and recreation of the 
mhabitants. A lover of music, he assisted in most of the village 
Concerts and Entertainments, and was greatly appreciated in the 
Church Choir. His departure was a distinct loss to the Village 
and he has not been replaced. 

When the Club was named, the idea was that about twenty 
persons only would become members, but more than twice that 
number joined besides honorary members. Newspapers were 
liberally supplied, and vari.nis games were played so far as the 
limited space of a single room permitted. It was hoped that this 
effort to provide amusement for the men, especially the young men 
of Longstone, might be the nucleus and pave the way for a^more 
ambitious scheme. 

The Club existed six years hut was never self supporting. 
Several attempts to place it on a permanent footing failed, and it 
was dissolved after payment of its liabilities by the Committee of 
the Club. 

It may here be put on record that a splendid opportunity of 
founding a Village Club and Institute through the munificent 
offer of Mrs. Crossley, of the Outrake, Little Longstone, was lost. 
Great efforts were made by the leading residents to induce the 



128 Longstone Records. 

villagers to take up the offer, for besides £400 by Mrs. Crossley ; 
the late Mrs. Worthington, Miss Broomhead and others promised 
liberal subscriptions. Parish meetings were held and an attempt 
by Mr. E. M. Longsdon to form a limited liability Company, to 
promote the object, failed to receive the necessary support to 
secure success. Consequently the scheme was reluctantly given 
up — altho' the need of such an Institution, especially in winter, 
was and is still greatly felt. Hut alas ! such an offer does not 
often recur ! 



PAROCHIAL XOTHS. 



ROWLAND. 

The village of Rowland is said to have derived its name from tlie 
family of Rouland or Roland, who had a house and lands in Longstone 
in the fourteenth century, wliich passed by marriage to the Staffords of 
Eyam. Godfrey Rowland, who styles himself Esquyer, appealed to 
Parliament against Sir Thomas Wendesley, John Dean, and others who 
are stated to have come to the petitioner's house at Longsden, with force 
and arms, to have carried off goods and stock to the value of jno marks, or 
£'133 6 S, to have made the petitioner prisoner, and carried him to the 
Castle of the High Peak at Castleton, where he was kept in custody six 
days without food or drink. Par. Magazine, 1894. 



WARDLOW. 

.\ school was erected at Wardlow on the site where the Cliurch now 
stands, in 1835, and used on a Sunday. Ralph Hancock, of Great Longstone, 
taught over 20 years, missing only once during that time. He died Sunday 
July 15, 1855, and on the Sunday previous to his death he taught as usual. 
His son Christopher succeeded him, and taught for several years. The 
scholars assembled morning and afternoon. From 1835 to 1868, when the 
Rev. M. Mills, C. L. Cornish, J. S. Hodson, and G. C.Tooth were respectively 
Vicars of Longstone, they conducted a Sunday Evening Service at Wardlow 
during the Summer months, and occasionally in Winter After which the 
Rev. Canon .\iidrew. Vicar of Tideswell, took charge of Wardlow and the 
present remarkable Church was built adjoining the School. The Church 
was erected in the year 1S73 by voluntary subscription at a cost of nearly 
£1000, and is dedicated to the Good Shepherd. The site of the building 
and the burial ground were the gift of Mr. John Outram, Lord Denman, 
and the Duke of Devonshire. Par. Magazine, 1895. 



Chronological Events. 129 

SOME EVENTS IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER. 



1256-^ Griffin, son of Wenunwyn, a Welsh Prince, founded a Chantry in 

1262J the Churches of Ashford and Longstone respectively. 

1280 It was arranged at Archbishop Peckham's Visitation that the stipend 
of the Minister of Longstone should for the future be at least five 
marks, half paid by the parishioners and half by the Dean and 
Chapter of Lichfield. 

1315 But at this date by a different arrangement, fifteen shillings only 
was set apart for the Minister of Longstone, the Dean and Chapter 
granting "remission of charges for testaments and administrations." 

'474 The Shakerley family —probably Robert Shakerley, a younger 
branch of the Cheshire family— bought the Manor of Little Longstone 
and held it for several generations. They sold it to the Countess of 
Shrewsbury in the Reign of Elizabeth. 

1490 Probate Register of Wills at Lichfield to 1650. 

1538 Parochial Registers were first ordered to be kept. Those of Thorpe 
by Ashbourne and others commence at this date. Darley Dale in 
'539- Youlgrave, the most interesting probably in the Count}-, in 
'558. 

1550 The Shakerley family were resident in Gieat Longstone in the house 
still standing in a ruinous condition to the South West of the 
Church — the property of Miss Hall, now Mrs. McGibbon. 

1563 Heralds' Visitations to Derbyshire took place between this date and 
1664. 

1614 The year of " the greatest snow which ever fell uppon the earth 
within man's memorye." 

1615 The Summer was a very dry one. 

1624 In London upwards of 35,000 persons perished of Plague. 
1636 Restoration of the roof of Longstone Church, as shewn by the 
inscription in lead. 

Note. Chronology. Until 1754, there were two methods of reckoning tiire— the cit'iV and the 
higtorical year. The former began on 25th March, the latter on 1st January. Hence the days between 
31st December and 25th March were in two years. Thus 25th February 1730 in modern style, is 25th 
Februarv, 1749 — jo in the old. In Parish Registers, the year was reckoned usually according to the 
ritil style, a circumstance which must be remembered when consulting those recorils. 

Sf^nal Years. For many legal purposes time was computed hv the vear of the Sovereign's reign. 
In old deeds and law proceedings this custom was very conmton. 



130 Longstone Records, 

1649 From this date to 1659 during the Cromwellian era, great havoc 
was done to Church monuments, &c. 

1650 Wardlowe was united to Great Longstone by the Parliameiitar)' 
Commissioners, (see 1S82.) 

1656 Foundation of the William Wright Charity. 

1660 Parish Registers or Bishops' Transcripts were begun, and Marriage 
Licence Registers were kept in the Diocese of Lichfield. 

1665 The terrible Plague at Eyam. 

1667 Act compelling burial in woollen. 

1680 .\t this period there was a Lych Gate at the Churchyard, a charge of 
3/6 being made for repairs and lock by James Gooddey, Church- 
warden, and again in 1690. 

1696 Overseers of the Poor lists begin. 

1709 Notice as to stealing wood for Bonfires on the 5th Xovember. 

1713 Samuel Mills, Cura de Magna Longston, was buried. 

1718 Jonathanus Shackerley fadult) de Magna Longston, was baptised. 

1732 Henricus Dooley, Schoolmaster 56 and Clerk 40 years, was buried 
in Longstone Churchyard. 

1739 " There was no recognizable Nonconformity in Eyam" at this date. 
So wrote the Rev. J. Green, Rector in 1873. 

1741 Price of beef for the Poorhouse was ijd. per lb. 

1753 Derby Probate Registrar's earliest record. 

1790 The Church received great damage from storm or earthquake, and 
a portion of the Nave had to be rebuilt. 

" That in the night of the 22nd December the Church had a Volant 
shake so that a great part of the Middle Isle fell in and shooke the 
whole of it so much that three of the Pi Hers which supported 
the uppermost roof with the wall was obliged to be took down 
and rebuilt." 

About ;f35 is charged for repairs in the Churchwardens' Account 
1791 — 2. And "spent when the Roof was propped, laying the 
" foundations of the Pillows, putting the Crown piece into the 
Commandments, &c., 7s./8d." 
1797 Baptism of Elizabeth daughter of John and Elizabeth MacDougall, 
a Corporal in " the Roxburgh Light Dragoons now quartered at 
Great Longstone." 



Chronological Events. 1 3 1 

1797 Sale at Eyam of Farms of Longstone Hall Estate in Eyam and 
Foolow. 

1804 Sale by private contract of Eyam Hall to his uncle James Farewell 
Wright by Colonel John Thomas Wright of Longstone Hall. 

John Nuttall of Matlock was Agent for the Longstone Hall Estate 
for some years. 

|8io Date of the Inclosure Act for Great and Little Longstone and 
Wardlow. 

;8i5 An Iron Chest purchased for the Parish Registers costing £^ lo od. 
Sale at Bakewell of Farms of the Longstone Hall Estate in Great 
and Little Longstone and .Ashford. 

1817 The following Committee was appointed " to assist the Overseers in 
case of emergency and to e.xamine the Accounts the last Sunday m 
every month in the Vestry immediately after afternoon Service." 

" James Gregory, Robert Thornhill, William Wager, John Gregory, 
Joseph Morton, John Thornhill, Richard Skidmore." 

N.B. — These and other Meetings must have been held in the 
Church (as there was no \'estry at that date) or more probably at 
the White Lion Inn which then occupied the site of the present 
Vicarage and was utilized as a Vestry. 

1818 The sum of £^ was allowed the Overseer for his trouble. 
i8ig Sunday School was begun in Longstone. 

1822 A new Communion Ser\'ice was purchased at the cost of £g 2s. 6d. 
the old Service having been stolen. 

1824. At a Vestry Meeting held by the principal inhabitants of the 
Chapelry of Longstone it was agreed " that there shall be a footpath 
made across Fearnyhough Yard from the small gate adjoining the 
Churchyard to the gate or door leading into Mr. Buxton's Yard, and 
that Mr. James Gregory- the Churchwarden is requested to get it 
done immediately and to charge the expenses in his Accounts." 
Date of the Inclosure Award for Longstone and Wardlow. 
The Ratepayers of Longstone Chapelry at a Vestry Meeting resolved 
to oppose a Bill in Parliament for rebuilding Bakewell Church. 

1825 For making a road [footpath] across Fearnyhough Yard Robert 
Furniss was paid £2 13 od. 



132 Longstone Records. 

1829 A resolution of an influential Meeting in the Chapel of Great 
Longstone to stop the footpath across the Churchyard, " except on 
Sundays, Funerals, and Marriages," was carried by a large majority 
but no action appears to have been taken. Particulars are given 
elsewhere in these Records. 

1830 .4t a Meeting of the Ratepayers of the Chapelry of Longstone held 
this day in the Schoolroom in Great Longstone (Due Notice having 
been given) To take into consideration the propriety of making a 
road or causeway from the lower Light [ ? Lych] Gate to the Church 
and for other purposes : It was agreed by the undersigned persons 
That the Chapelwardens do make a Pav'd Road from the Lower 
gate until it meet the principle road leading to the Church Porch, of 
the width of 5 feet. 

It was likewise agreed that the Wall leading from Fearneyhough 
Yard Gate to the gate leading down to the Parsonage House be 
taken down and rebuilt. 

1831 At a Meeting of the Ratepayers of the Chapelry of Longstone held 
this day in the Schoolroom in Great Longstone (Due Notice having 
been given) To take into consideration the propriety of putting down 
new Stoops or Posts at the lower Light [ ? Lych] Gate and for other 
purposes relating to the Chapel. It is agreed That the Chapel- 
wardens do provide new Stoops and Gate according to the plan 
produced, the Gate to be made of good Oak, and it is likewise 
agreed that there shall be a Stile at the side of the said Gate. 

1833 At a Vestry Meeting, &c., &c.. 

It was likewise agreed that a new gate be provided of oak for the 
lower end of Fearnyhough Yard to replace the old door and a new 
Stoop or Stoops provided if necessary. 

1833 " It was agreed that the Clock and Dial should be put in good 
repair." About £^ was spent on the Clock through a Tideswell 
maker. 

" It was also agreed that additional Charity Tablets should he 
provided." 

Ten per cent, was allowed the Churchwardens for collecting the 
Church Rates. 



Chronological Events. 133 

1834 The absence of the Curate from the Vestry Meetings since 1753 is 
remarkable. 

1834 For leading gravel 2| days for Fearnyhough Yard 12/6 was paid, and 
for repairing the road there 7/6 was paid to Edward Garlick, and 
for stone stoops 2/6 to Mr. Hill. Again (in 1S40) James Ward was 
paid 4 - for two days labour in making a sough in Fearnyhough 
Yard. 

1835 A. Committee was appointed to re-pew the Church. 

An iron Safe was purchased for the Registers at a cost of £^ 10 6. 
(This entry seems to imply that the Iron Safe purchased 20 years 
earlier contained, and was stolen along with, the Communion Service 
and the Registers. The latter may have been returned but there is 
a hiatus at this date). 

Sunday School at Wardlow was begun. Ralph Hancock of Great 
Longstone was a teacher there for over 20 years, and his son 
Christopher Hancock succeeded him. 
The site of the School was that of the present Church. 

1835 " It was agreed that Mr. Mills (perpetual curate) should receive the 
rent for the land lying in Longstone fields and also the i3s/4d. 
charged upon the Longstone Dale Estate for the purpose of providing 
bread and wine for the Sacrament." 

1836 "It was ordered that the 15s/- allowed to the Ringers on November 
5th, Christmas and New Year's Day be done away with." 

1837 Mr. Robert Thornhill succeeded his Father, Mr. John Thornhill, as 
Agent for the Longstone Hall Estate. 

1838 Mr. Robert Thornhill was appointed Acting (or Assistant) Overseer 
of the Poor, at a salary of £i2 a year. 

1840 The Church floor was re-paved. 

1843 It was resolved " t<j adopt some new plan of heating the Chapel." 

Small e.xtension of the Churchyard on the North side, the land 

having been given by Mr. Wriglit. 

Death of Major Carleill, tenant of Longstone Hall for many years. 

The Rev. George B. Brown (the Minister) carried an amendment in 

favour of a vote of £2 2s. od. for a dinner (presumably the Annual 

Vestry dinner) in opposition to the Rev. C. L. Coinish (Perpetual 

Curate) who moved a resolution to abolish it. 

1846 Mr. John Lowe was appointed first Postmaster of Longstone. 

1847 It was resolved " to repair the Schoolroom." 



134 Longstone Records. 

1848 It was resolved " to repair the Church in and out." 

It was resolved that the Churchwardens inquire into the legality of 
"Visitation Fees," the charge of 6s. 8d. for " Rent" July, 1847, and 
the charge for " Pension," October, 1846 and 7. 

i860 Mr. Gregory, of Sheffield, became tenant of Longstone Hall, in 
succession to Miss Carleill. 

1870 During Major Levett's occupation of Longstone Hall, much damage 
to two rooms was caused by a Fire. 

1871 Funeral at Bakewell Cemetery of Mr. Henry McConnell, who built 

and was first resident of Cressbrook Hall. 

The Vicarage garden was enlarged on the South side by means of an 

arrangement between the Vicar, Mr. Bradshaw, and Mr. Wright. 

A scaffold pole was fixed in the Church close to the pulpit to support 

the roof which was reported to be iu a dangerous state. 

A large Parish Meeting decided to restore the Church, with Mr. 

Norman Shaw as Architect, Mr William Longsdon and Mr. John 

Thornhill being the only opponents. 

Singing Classes on the Hullah System were commenced by Mr. and 

Mrs. Wright at the Schoolroom. 

The Duke of Devonshire and his brother, Lord George Cavendish, of 

Ashford Hall, visited Longstone Church. Mr. Wright placed the 

" Restoration Fund" book in the hands of the Duke, requesting him 

to open the subscription list. The Duke gave £400 and later on he 

gave another £250. 

1872 A visit to Mr. and Mrs. Charles Leslie at Hassop Hall resulted in a 
subscription to the " Restoration Fund" of £(<7 4s. 3d., to be devoted 
to the Hassop Chantry. 

To the great regret of the Churchwardens, the Vicar (June 29) 
informed them that he had taken steps to resign the Living of 
Longstone. 

The Tender of Messrs. Brown & Co., of Matlock Bridge, for the 
Restoration of Longstone Church, under Mr. Norman Shaw, was 
accepted. 

The last Service in the unrestored Church this evening (Julv 7), the 
Rev. John Paley, Vicar, officiating, for the last time in Longstone 
After this date Divine Service was held in the Schoolroom on Sunday 



Chronological Events. i ^5 

afternoons, generally by the Rev. J. R. Luxmoore, Vicar of Ashford. 
On only one Sunday was there no Service when the Rev. J. Hall of 
Edensor, was prevented by illness from taking it as he had intended 
The foundation stone of the new Chancel Arch was laid by 
W. Herbert Wright, son of G. T. Wright, of Longstone Hall, Church- 
warden, and who, 28 years later, served that office himself for three 
consecutive years. 

Iron girders were raised and fixed in place on the Church roof where 
required by the Architect. 

Dec. 21. Distribution of the G.sborne and Wnght Charities by Mr- 
Wright's family, after Morning Service by tlie ^•ica^ of Ashford the 
Rev. J. R. Luxmoore. 

1873 The Schoolroom was licensed (March 4) for all Offices of Divine 
Service including the Holy Sacraments during the Restoration of 
the Parish Church. 

The new Vicar, the Rev. N. A. Wells arrived (March 15) at 
Rowdale. and spent the afternoon at the Hall, after which lie 
attended Choir practice and arranged the Schoolroom for Sundav 
Service. 

The new Vicar was instituted to the Benefice (March 16) by Bishop 
Hobhouse, acting for Bishop Selwyn. The Rev. J. R Luxmoore 
Vicar of Ashford, kindly assisted at both Morning and Afternoori 
Services 

The three old Bells were chimed on this occasion. ^ 

June 30 Wardlow Church Opening Service. 

Aug ig. A new Vane and Weathercock and Lightning Conductor 

were fixed on the Church Tower. 

Aug. 30. The new Church Bells [5] were brought to Longstone. 

Sept. I. The Organ was delivered at the Church. The Oak 

Chancel Seats were delivered at the Church. 

Sep. 10. A short Dedication Service of the new Bells, (cast and 

hung by Messrs. Taylor, of Loughborough) was held bv the Vicar 

Bakewell Ringers, led by Mr. Smith, attended to tr^' the Bells in 

anticipation of the Re-opening of the Church on the 22nd inst. 

Sept. 12. The new Clock was fixed in place by Mr. John Smith of 

Derby. 

Sept. 13. The first Choir practice in the restored Church. 



136 Longstone Records. 

Sept. 22, Monday. The J'arisli Church was re-opened and dedicated 

for Divine Service after restoration. 

The Duke of Devonshire with Lady Louisa Egerton and many of the 

laity were afterwards entertained at tlie Hall for luncheon, whilst 

the Clergy were entertained at the Vicarage. 

The day was kept as a general holiday. 

The Village was en fete, and the poor were not forgotten. The 

Church approaches were decorated with arches and festoons. 

After the Services a Sale of Work for the benefit of the Organ Fund 

was held at the Hall by Miss Wright and realised over ^37. 

The Collections for the day were as follows : — 

Morning Service ... ... ... ... 67 7 o^ 

Afternoon Service ... ... ••■ 18 4 " 

After Gifts o 16 o S6 7 oj 

Miss Wright's Sale 37 ('• ^ 

Mr John Wright, Eyam, (2nd Subscription)- 500 .42 6 6 

i:i28 13 6 J 



Sept. 26. Mr. Smitli of Bakewell began to teach Bellringing to 

five new Ringers, the three old Ringers having resigned. 

Sept. 28. The Sunday and other Services were resumed in the 

Restored Church after an interval of nearly fifteen months. The 

seats were free and unappropriated. Weekly Offertories were 

commenced, £2 its. 6d. being collected. " Hymns Ancient and 

Modern" were introduced and the Psalms were chanted. 

Oct. 5. The first Baptismal Service in the Restored Church took 

place, when Lilian Margaret Wright was admitted into the Church 

after private baptism at Longstone Hall on March 31. 

Oct. 17. Mr. Wright attended the 1200"' Anniversary Festival of 

Ely Cathedral to which allusion is made on page 2. 

Nov. 16. A new Oak Lectern was placed in the Church. This was 

removed in 1892, when the present handsome Lectern was given by 

Miss Mary Broomhead in memory of the late Captain and Mrs. 

Smithers, of Little Longstone. 

Dec. 16. During a heavy gale, a large Elm Tree was blown down 

towards the Church at the North West corner of the Cliurchyard. 

The damage was considerable, although not as great as might have 



Chronological Events. 137 

been expected, the wire guards having saved the new stained glass 
windovi'S in the North aisle. The roof of this aisle was forced in, 
clerestory window glass broken, and the stonework slightly damaged : 
also a few headstones and some railings were injured. 
Dec. 31. The new Ringers, trained by Mr. Smith, of Bakewell, 
were quite at home in handling the Bells and in ringing a muffled 
peal for the Old year. 

1874 June 23. Two large Elm Trees in the Village were cut down to within 
a few feet of the ground close to Mr. John Furness's house, now the 
property of Miss Hall (Mrs. McGibbon), as they were considered 
dangerous. 

March i. Mr. H. P. Bagshawe bought some cottages and land from 

the Longstone Hall Estate in order to build a house for himself. 

This house was afterwards occupied by Mr. John Thornhill and Miss 

Hall. 

March 7. The Rev. N. .4. Wells (A'icar) and Mr. Wright planted 

two Yew trees in the N. W. corner of the Churchyard where a large 

Elm tree lately stood. 

March 19. The order to proceed with the New Pulpit was given to 

Messrs. Twigg, of the Ashford Marble Works. 

April 7. By reason of his approaching departure from Longstone, 

Mr. Wright resigned the Office of Chuichwarden which he had filled 

for 3 years. 

April 8. The new stained glass window on the North side of the 

Chancel, given by Captain E. Smithers, was fixed in its place. 

.April 8. The Rev. N. A. Wells resigned the Living of Longstone. 

May 10. The Rev. Laxon E. Sweet was instituted to the Living of 

Longstone. 

Sept r3. The New Pulpit was first used. 

Sept. 16 A very gay Wedding was celebrated in Longstone Church, 

Miss McConnell,' of Cressbrook, with Mr. David Ainsworth, of the 

Flosh, Cleator, Cumberland. The Church was beautifully decorated 

and the Service was taken by Archdeacon Balston and tlie \'icar. 

1875 Mrs. I-Jichard Skidmore's Bazaar at the Schoolroom in liquidation of 
the "Longstone Church Restoration Fund" debt realized over £^48. 
Aug. 19. The Churchwardens decided to place the disputed Church 
Restoration Accounts for final settlement in the hands of Mr. John 
John Taylor, Solicitor, Bakewell. 



138 Longstone Records. 

1876 At this date the Little Longstone Yearly Tithe Commutation Rent 
Charge of ^48 value was annexed to the Living of Great Longstone 
by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners in lieu of a yearly stipend of 
15s. heretofore payable by them to the Incumbent. 

Jan. 18. Marriage of the Vicar, the Rev. L. E. Sweet. 

March 4. Death of Mr. William Longsdon, J. P., of the Manor House, 

Little Longstone. 

June 30. Agreed with the liquidators of Messrs. Brown & Go's 

Estate to pay £350 in settlement of all claims for the Church 

Restoration Contracts. 

Sept. 21. The Foundation Stone of the Infant Schoolroom was laid 

by Miss Wright, Longstone Hall. 

Oct. Presentation of Communion Service to the Church by the 

Rev. H. J. Longsdon and Captain Smithers, in memory of their 

uncle, Mr. William Longsdon. 

1877 Aug. 5. The Rev. John Henry Bullivant was instituted to the 
Living of Longstone by Archdeacon Balston. 

Sept. 8. The Church Restoration Accounts were published, and 
copies were placed in the Church shewing balance due to the Bank 
of .f 275. 
i878 Oct. 16. Mr. Wright paid £219 6s. 3d. to the Sheffield &- Rotherham 
Bank, Bakewell, as a donation in liquidation of the remaining debt 
on the Restoration at this date. 

1879 Death of Mr. Edmund Haworth, of Churchdale, a liberal supporter 
of the Church Restoration. 

1880 Death of Mr. Robert Thornhill, the valued Agent of the Longstone 
Hall Estate, and the holder of many public offices. 

1S81 Death of Mr. John Wright, of Eyam Hall, a liberal supporter of the 
Church Restoration. 

Miss Wright, of Longstone Hall, was married to the Rev. J. H. 
Bullivant, Vicar of Longstone. 

1882 In the Ordnance Survey Area book, there is a note that the township 
of Wardlow has been amalgamated with the Township of Great 
Longstone by the " Divided Parishes and Poor Law Amendment 
Act." (see 1650.) 

1883 Wire gates were fixed at the Church doors. 



Chronological Events. 139 

1886 The hot-air apparatus of the Church was overhauled by the Derwent 
Foundry Co. 

1892 The Rev. H. J. Kelsall (and Mrs. KelsallJ came to reside in 
Longstone as Curate-in-charge. 

1893 Feb. 28. Death of the Rev. J. H. Bullivant. Vicar of Longstone. 
Aug. 18. The Rev. Giles Andrews was instituted to the living of 
Longstone. 

Oct. 15. Surplices were first worn by the Church Choir boys. 

1894 Jan. I. The Parish Magazine was first issued. 
May 3. Confirmation in Longstone Church. 

July 21. Death of Mrs. J. H. Bullii'ant (nee Wright.) 

Church of England Temperance Society branch formed. 

Band of Hope formed in Longstone, with a senior and junior 

division. 

A Clothing Club and a Lending Library formed. 

The first Parish Council elected. 

Sept. 24. The Annual Choir trip was to Liverpool. 

1895 Dr. P. S. Fentem began a Course of Ambulance Lectures at the 
Schoolroom. 

Sept. 21. The Annual Choir trip was to Blackpool. 

1896 The interior walls and roof of the Church were cleaned, the walls 
painted, and the Oak seats renovated. 

As the result of a Poll, the adoption of the Lighting Act for 
Longstone was negatived, although 54 were in favour to 39 against. 
Sept. 21. The Annual Choir trip was to Liverpool. 

1897 The Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria was celebrated with great 
rejoicing. 

Sept. 12. Surplices were first worn by the Church Choirmen. 

Oct. 20. Mr. Victor Cavendish, M.P. addressed his constituents in 

the Schoolroom. 

The William Wright Charity Scheme was sealed by the Charity 

Commission. 

Sept. 20. The Annual Choir trip was to Blackpool. 

Death of Mr. F. D. Crossley, of Manchester and Little Longstone— 

an ardent philanthropist. 

1898 Death of Mrs. Morewood, of Lytham, formerly of Little Longstone. 
The Gildlow Ouarry Award in favor of the Parish. 



140 Longstone Records. 

Sept. 26. The Annual Choir trip was to Liverpool 
Postal Wall Letter-boxes were fixed at Little Longstone and Wardlow. 
The New Scheme for the Thomas Wright Charity came into force. 
Mr. G. T. Wright received his Nomination as Justice of the Peace. 

1899 June. The Longstone Church Choir took part in the Diocesan 
Choral Festival Service in Southwell Cathedral. 

Sept. 25. The Annual Choir trip was to Liverpool. 

Death of the Rev. H. J. Li^ngsdon, who throughout his life was 

intimately connected with and took great interest in the two 

Longstones. 

1900 May 15. A Confirmation was held in Longstone Church by the 
Bishop of Derby. 

The first Exhibition, under the new Scheme of the William Wright 

Charity, was awarded to Jesse Nadin, giving free education at Lady 

Manners Scliool, Bakewell. 

Sept 24. The Annual Choir trip was to Liverpool. 

Deaths of Mr. George Furness (of Willesden), Mr. Thomas Shim\yell, 

Assistant Overseer, Barmaster, &c., Mr. John Thornhill, Guardian 

of the Pooi^ and Mr. W. Pitt Dixon, late Churchwarden and 

Manager of the School. 

1901 Death of H.M. Queen Victoria. 

Death of the Rev. Canon Samuel Andrew, Vicar of Tideswell. 

A Ladies College, transferred from Chesterfield, was opened in Great 

Longstone by Miss K. M. Turner. 

March 9. The first Longstone Poultry Show. 

July 8. The Annual Choir trip was to Blackpool. 

igo2 Conclusion of Peace in South Africa. 

Death of Mr. James Orr, Farmer, Trustee of the Longstone Charities, 

an ex-Churchwarden, a Parish Councillor, and a Member of the 

School Committee. 

July 7. Tlie Annual Choir trip was to Liverpool. 

Aug. 9. Coronation of the King and Queen. — Great festivities. 

Sept. 16. The marriage of Mr. F. R. McConnell and Miss E. G. 

Wright, of Longstone Hall. 



Chronological Events. 



141 



1003 



KJ04 



1905 



April 20. Tlie marriage in London of Mr. Walter Herbert Wright 
and Miss Grace Jackson. 

The William Wright Exhibition was awarded to Theodore Cooper. 
Sept. 5. The .Annual Choir trip was to Blackpool. 

June 2. The marriage of .Mr. T. R. James and Miss L. A. F. 

Wright, of Longstone Hall. 

Sept. 3. The Annual Choir trip was to Blackpool. 

April I. The Christening at Longstone Church of John Stafford 

Wright, grandson of Mr. Wright, of Longstone Hall. 

Aug. 17. The Annual Choir trip was to Blackpool. 

Aug. 23. Death at Bakewell of Mr. Robert William Mills Nesfield, 

J.P., late .Agent to the Duke of Rutland. 

The William Wright Exhibition was awarded to George Franks. 



At page 93 imperfect lists of the Longstone Schoolmasters and 
Schoolmistresses were given. The following are revised and more 
complete lists : — 

SCHOOLMASTERS. 



1676 


Henricua Dooley 


1837 


Joseph Scott 


1801 


Jamea WateraU 


1877 


L. Galaud 




James Tissington 


1880 


W. Sumner 


1822 


John Hill 


1883 


W. K. Bateson 


1828 


George Taylor 


1887 


Hemy Arthur Spanton 


1832 


Eoe or Eowe 







SCHOOLMISTRESSES. 



1878 Miss M. Whitehead 

1879 Miss M. Newcome 

1880 Miss M. E. Wallier 

1881 Mrs. Sarah Parkin 



1894 Miss H. Wilkinson 

189.5 Miss Ada Bagshaw 

1901 Miss S. M. Holland 

1905 Miss Ella Southgate 



At page 74, James Bettney should have been included in the 
Bellringers list for 1874. 



142 



Longstone Records. 



GREAT LONGSTONE. 



LIST OF RESIDENTS AND THEIR OCCUPATIONS. 



/'Kindly contributed by Mr. I. B. 
Names. Occupations. 

AUsop, Thomas Farmer, Castcliff 

Andrew, Giles Clerk in Holy Orders 

Armitage, Cecil H. Gentleman 
Bennett, Christopher Labourer 
Bennett, Joseph Blacksmith 

Bennett, Joseph, jr. Labourer 
Bennett, Isaac Blacksmith 

Bent, F. J. Station Master, Hassop 

Beresford, John Joiner 

Birley, George Farmer, Wardlow 

Blackwell, William Labourer 
Blagden, Charles Labourer 

Blagden.Goodis (Mrs.) 
Booth, Charles Joiner, Housley 

Booth, James .'\ndrew Joiner, Housley 

Bradwell, Joseph Coal Agent (retired) 

Bradwell, Joseph, jr. Coal Agent 

Bradwell, Reuben Labourer 

Bridge, John Farmer 

Brightmore, Charles Stone Mason 

Brightmore, Eliza (Mrs.) 

Brightmore, Thomas Stone Mason 

Brooks, Joseph Labourer 

Brown, John Carter 

Butcher, Alfred Gamekeeper 

Carr, Eliza (Mrs.) 

Carson, Charles Signalman 

Carson, Reuben Infirm 

Cocker, Elizabeth (Miss) 

Coe, Richard Station Master 



Sliimwell, Assistant Overseer.) 

Names. Occupations. 

Cooke, Thomas Gardener 

Cooper, Henry Electrician 

Cooper, Henry Labourer 

Cra.\ton, Sydney Labourer, Rowdale 

Dakin, George Farmer 

Darwent, Annie (Mrs.) 
Dixon, Martha Fletcher (Mrs.) 
Dixon, William Rogers 

Pitt Gentleman 

Doddemeade, James Farmer 
Dore, George Farmer, Castle Gate 

Dore, Samuel Farmer, Ewe Close 

Dore, Samuel, jr. Farmer, Castle Gate 

Draycott, Thomas Retired 
Eeley, Norah (Miss) 
Edwards, Hugh Retired 

Elliott, William Labourer 

Elliott, John Labourer 

Evans, William Labourer 

Eyre, Ann (Mrs.) 

Eyre, Arthur William 

Joseph Builder 

Eyre, William Joseph Builder 

Eyre, William Sexton 

Flint, Arthur Labourer 

Franks, Arthur W. Innkeeper 

Franks, Kate (Mrs.) Innkeeper 

Furness, .Ann Whiting 
(Mrs.) 

Furness, George James Gentleman 



Residents. 



143 



Names. Occupations. 

Fiirniss, Ann (Mrs.) 
Furniss, Anthony Carter 

Furniss, Ellen (Miss) 
Furniss, Ellen, jr. (Miss) 
Furniss, Godfrey Farmer. Bleaklow 

Furniss, Lucy (Miss) 

Furniss, Peter Farmer, Bleal<low 

Furniss, William Carter 

Garlick, John Hawker 

Garratt, Frank Labourer 

Garratt, Henry Farmer 

Gillott, George Miner, Housley 

Gotheridge, Thomas Police Constable 
Green, Annie (Mrs.) Grocer & Post Mistress 

Gieen, Thomas Oliver Photographer 

Hallows, Samuel Labourer 

Hambleton, Benjamin Railway Porter 

Hambleton, Bernard Labourer 

Hambleton, George Shoemaker 

Hambleton, Joseph Gardener 

Hamilton, Albert Labourer 

Hamilton, Daniel Stone Mason 

Heath, James Tilbrook Gamekeeper, Cracken 

Dale 

Hewitt, James Platelayer 

Hibbert, Elizabeth (Mrs.) 

Hibbert, Thomas Platelayer 

Hill, Fanny (Miss) 

Hill, George Basket Maker 

Hill, Sarah (Mrs.) 

Hodgkinson, William Labourer 

Hollingworth, George Garde-cr 

Holmes, Anthony 

William Cab Proprietor 

Holmes, Harriet (Mrs.) 

Johnson, Hannah (Miss) 



Names. 
Johnson, Jasper 
Johnson, Joseph 
Johnson, Robert 
Johnson, Samuel 
Jones, Arthur 
Jupp, Emma (Mrs.) 
Jupp, William 
King, Francis 
Lambert, Alfred 
Lomas, John 
Lowe, Edith E. (Miss) Grocer 
Lowe, Sarah (Mrs.) Grocer 
Mellers, George 
Mellor, William 
Morton, Ann (Mrs.) 
Morton, George 
Morton, Jane (Miss) 
Morton, Jonathan 
Morton, Matthew 
Morton Sarah (Miss) 
Morton, Thomas 
Morton, William 
Morton, William, jr 
Mosley, Henry 
Nadin, Edith (Miss) 
Nadin, James 
Nadin, Jesse 
Nadin, William 
Oliver, Elizabeth (Mrs.) 
Oliver, Sarah Ann (Miss) 
Orr, Elizabeth (Miss) 
Orr, Elizabeth, jr. (Miss) 
drr, Ellen (Miss) 
Orr, Hannah (Mrs.) 
Orr, Sarah (Miss) 
Orr, Thomas Gregor)- Farmer 



Occupations. 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Labourer 
Farmer 
Innkeeper 



Shoemaker 
Stone Mason 
Signalman 
Carter 



Farmer 
Farmer, Housley 

(Nonagenarian) 
Clerk 

Stone Mason 
Stone Mason 

Gardener 

Labourer 

Clerk 

Farmer, Hassop 

Railwav Porter 

Clerk 

Clerk 



144 



Longstone Records. 



Names. Occupations. 

Orr, William Farmer 

Palfreyman, Samuel Labourer 
Perry, Edwin Gardener 

Phillips, Jane (Miss) 
Pick.Thomas William Signalmen 
Redfern, Edith (Miss) 
Rodley, Thomas E. Joiner 
Sellers, Eliza (Miss) 
Sheldon, William Labourer 
Sheldon, William Labourer 
Shimwell, James Gardener 

Skidmore, .■Albert 

Jackson Farmer 

Skidmore, Harriet (Miss) 
Skidmore, Robert Labourer 
Slack, William Blacksmith 

Slater, Frank Labourer 

Smedley, G. Henry Innkeeper 
Southgate, Ella (Miss) School Teacher 
Southgate, Mary (Mrs.) 
Spantnn, Henry ."Arthur School Master 
Spanton, M. A. E (Miss) 
Swann, Annie (Miss) 
Swann, Jane (Miss) 
Swann, Thomas 



Swann, William 
Swift, Philemon 
Taylor, Aaron 
Taylor, Ann (Miss) 
Taylor, Maria (Mrs.) 



Engineer 
Gentleman 
Miner 
Farmer 



Names. 
Taylor, Mary (Mrs.) 
Thorrihill, John 

William 
Thorp, Ernest 
Turner, Horace 
Turner, John 
Vernon, John 
Wager, Albert James 
Wager, .Albert, jr. 
Wager, Clement 
Wager, Jasper 
Wager, Joseph 
Wager, Thomas 
Wager, William 
Wain, Ernest 
Ward, Alfred 
Ward, Arthur Watson 
Ward, Christopher 
Ward, George 
Ward, George, jr. 
Ward, Herbert 
Ward, Thomas 
Ward, William 
Ward, William 
Watts, Thomas 
Webster, William 
White, Frank 
Wild, John Robert 
Wriglit, George 

Thomas 



Occupations. 



Farmer 

Stone Mason 

Platelayer 

PLatelavei 

Clerk 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Ga mekeeper 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Insurance Agent 

Labourer 

Joiner 

Gardener 

Farmer 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Painter 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Butler 

Gardener 

Ge.itleman 



Residents. 
LITTLE L()X(;STOM-:. 



UJA 



f Kindly contributed h\ 
Names Occupations. 

Anthonx-, Joseph 

Skidmore Cattle Dealer 
Ariiing, Charles H. Gentleman 
Bagshaw, Ellen (Miss) 
Bagshaw, Francis 

Baker Gentleman 

Bridge, Francis Farmer, Monsal Dale 

Bridge, Richard Farmer, iMonsal Dale 

Claik; Tliomns Bricklayer 

Cox, Henry Signalman 

Essex, James Signalman 

Hewitt, Alfred Gamekeeper 

Hewitt, Ethel (Miss) 
Hodgkinson, Ellen (Mrs.) 
Hollingvvorth, Francis Labourer 
HoUingworth, John Platelayer 
Hough, Frederick Foreman at Cotton 

Mill 
Jackson, Samuel Labourer 

Jepson, Arthur Station Master, Monsal 

Dale 
Longsdon, Ernest 

Morewood Architect & Surveyor 
Lupton, David Retired 

Lupton, William Gamekeeper 

McCrinrile, B. (Miss) 
McCrindle, Ellen M. 
(Miss) 
McCrindle, George Gamekeeper 
McCrindle, John Gamekeeper 

Maltby, Jane (Miss) 
Maltby, Mary Hannah 

■ (Mrs.) 
Maltby, William Joiner 

Morris, James William Coachman 
Nuttall, Frederick H. Clerk 



Mr. I. B. Shimw'ell.J 

Names. Occupations. 

Nuttall, Henry Basket Maker 

Nuttall, Joseph Joiner 

Nuttall, Maggie (iMiss) 
Oldfield, Frederick Farmer 
Oldfield, John Thomas Gardener 
Oldfield, Sarah (Miss) 
Parry, Thcmas Stone Mason 

Ponsonby, Francis Labourer, Monsal Dale 
Randall, Martha (Miss) 
Richardson, Albert Gardener 
Seabright, .Alexander Signalman, Monsal 

Dale 
Shimwell, Elizabeth (Mrs.) 
Shimwell Elizabeth, jr., 
(Mrs) 
Shimwell, Isaac B. Farmer 
Slack, Joseph Road Man R. D. C. 

Shimwell, Mary 

Elizabeth (Miss) 
Smedley, Florence (Miss) 
Smedley, Henry Retireii 

Smedley, Maurice Innkeeper 
Taylor, George Farmer 

Taylor, Mary (Miss) Innkeeper 
Timm, Fanny (Mrs.) 
Timm, Henry Nuttall Labourer 
Timm, William Joseph Labourer 
Turner, Kate Milner Proprietoress of Ladies 
(Miss) School 

Turner, Rose (Mrs.) 
Turner, Samuel I'latelayei 

Wise, Alfred Coachman 

Wood, Joseph Basket Maker and 

Farmer 
Wornes, John Farmer, Mmisal Dale 



'44a 



NAMtS. 

Allsop, John 

AIlsop, John 
Allsop, Thomas 
Allsop, William 
Ashtoi:, William 
Birley, William 
Birley, George 
Bramwell, George 
Bramwell, William 

Cooper, John 
Cooper, George 
Davis, George 
Elliott, James 
Elliott, Martha(Wi(l 
Furness, George 
Furness, James 
Furness, Petei John 
Furness, Thomas 



Longstone Records. 
WARDLOW. 



('Kindly coiitrihiifed 

OcCUI'ATlONS. 1 

Farmer &• Pig Dealer I 

Farmer & Road Man 

Farmer & Pig Dealer. 

Pig Dealer. 

Farming Man 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer and Dealer 

Farmer and Cattle 

Dealer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Labourer 
Retired Farmer 
n\\) Cottager 
Labourer 
Farmer 
Publican 

Farmer and Innkeeper, 
Mires 



by Mr. S. Pore.) 

Na.mes. Occupations. 

Gregory, Alexander Farmer and Waller, 

Mires 
Gregory, George Farmer 

Haslam, Stephen Labourer 

Littlcwood, Benjamin Farmer, Mires 
Outram, Robert Farm Labourer 



Robinson, Janes 
Robinson, Samuel 
Sellors, Alfred 
Sellors, Frederick 
Simpson, Joseph 
Turner, Jolin 
Turner, John 
Turner, Leonanl 
Turner, Samuel 
Turner, William 



Farmer 

Farmer and Dealer 

Farmer and Sexton 

Farmer, &c. 

Farmer and Dealer 

Farmer and Miner 

Farmer 

Miner 

Miner and Farmer 

Labourer 



Waterhouse, Benjamin Farmer 



ROWLAND. 



(Kindly contributed by Mr. J. T. Trirkett ) 



Names. Occupations. 

Bacon, Joshua Stonebreaker 

Bennett, Joseph, senr. Cottager 
Bennett, William Relieving Officer 



Blackwell, John 
Broome, George 
Cocker, Frederick 
Cossrrove, John 



Shoemaker 

Farmer 
Road Mender 
Police Pensioner 



Names. 
Higton, Benjamin 
Murpliy, Patrick 
Needham, Herbert 
Neill, .In drew 
Poyser, Mrs. 
Trickett, James T. 



Occupations. 
Stonebreaker 
Farmer 
Stonebreaker 
Gentleman 
Widow 
Farmer 



Residents. 
HASSOP, 



HS 



f Kindly confn'huted by Mr. J. T. Ti-ickett.J 



Names. Occupations. 

AUsop, Frank Farmer 

Ashton, Mrs. Postmistress 

Bark, Mrs. Widow, Birchill 

Cottages 

Bennett, Joseph, jr Gardener 
Blagden, — Labourer, Brightside 

Dykes, Miss Schoolmistress 

Flanagan, Miss Cottager 

Froggatt, — Labourer, Birchill 

Cottages 
Hobson, Rev. I'ather, Priest 
Kenworthy, William, Farmer 



Names. Occupations. 

Kenworthy, Frederick, Gamekeeper 



Mackintosh, Mr. 
Parker, Mrs 
Peaison, C. 
Salway, - - 
Smith, — 

Walker, Jarue^s 

Wilson, Mrs. James 
Turner, Mrs. 



Land Agent 
Farmer, Torrs Farm 
Publican 

Gardener 
Gamekeeper, Birchill 

Cottages 
Bank Clerk, Birchill 
Farm 
Farmer 
Widow, Birchill 

Cottages 



BASIS OR STA.XDARl) OF COUNTY RATE, 1904. 

{Derbysliiye County Council.) 



Union Assessment G.E.R 

County Net Annual Value 

Net Annual Value, Agric. Land. 

,, Buildings, itc, not I 
.Agric. Land f 

County Assessable Value, being i 
half Agric. Land addetl to ■ 
Buildings, &c., as above ) 

Population — 1903 ...., 

Area in Acres 













Total for 












Bakewell 










^ 


>'. Rural Dist. 


Longstoiie, Cit. 


Lonjistont. Lt. 


Uowlaiid. 


Hassop. 


Wardlow". 


61 Parishes. 


743" 


5264 


1 1 36 


1674 


696 


258290 


6245 


4224 


942 


1517 


637 


227519 


2or4 


K09 


315 


843 


414 


72S60 


4231 


34'5 


627 


674 


223 


1 54^59 


.5238 


3S20 


7S5 


1095 


430 


19 1087 


466 


145 


52 


104 


112 


10935 


3027 


1037 


302 


920 


-37 


47866 



146 Longstone Records. 

LONGSTONH SCHOOL. 

Regulations by the Trustees, July 2, 1832. 



1\1. Mills, Perpetual Curate. 
Major Carleill. 
Mr. James Gregory. 
Mr. William Longsdon. 
Mr. James Longsdon. 
Mr. John Thornhill. 
Mr. William Wager. 
Mr. Roe (or Rowe) appointed Master of the above Sehocjl. That 
the hours of School he from nine in the Morning till four in the 
Afternoon from Mich until Ladyday, and from half-past eight 
in the Morning till four in the Afternoon from Ladjday Luitil Mich'"- 
except Saturday which shall be a whole holiday. 

Twenty hiur Children taught free, 16 from Gt. Longstone and 
8 from Little Longstone. 

Trustees to meet the first Monday in every Quarter for the 
pLirpose of admitting free Children. 

The Ti-ustees to visit the School alternately once in the week at 
least for the purpose of examining the free Children as to their 
progress, &c. 

Vacations — Three Weeks at Midsimimer, and one Week at 
Christmas. 

No Scholar to be admitted or dismissed except by the authoi'ity 
of the Trustees of the respective townships. 

The Master's house and the School-room to be put in proper 
repair, the expense of which the Trustees agreed to defray. 
The Master to keep the School and School-house in repair. 
The Salary of the Master, to include attendance at Sunday 
School, to be £24 pei' annum. 



The School. 147 

In 1834 the number of free Children was reduced to 20; 14 for 
Gt. Longstone and 6 from Little Longstone. 

In 1837, Mr. Roe resigned and Mr. Scott was appointed Master 
in his place. 

The limit of age for free scholars to be 13 j'ears. 

The privilege of free scholars to be limited to Reading and 
Writing. A weekly sum to be paid for further instruction. 



\ 



a. 
re 



Great Longstone, March 31st, 1846. 

At a Public Meeting of the Trustees of the School lands held 
this day in the School room for the purpose of appointing Trustees 
in lieu of those deceased — we the Lindersigned surviving Trustees 
do nominate and appoint — 

The Earl of Burlington in place of William Carleill, Esq. 

John Thomas Wright, junr. ,, J(jhn Thomas Wright, 

The Earl of Newburgh ,, Francis Eyre, Esq. 

William Longsdon, Esq. ,, James Longsdon, Esq. '. g 

Thomas Gregory Orr ,, James Gregory. re 

William Wilson „ John Longsdon, Esq., jr 

Robert Thornhill ,, John Thornhill 

and it is agreed that Mr. John Barker of Bakewell Solicitor be 

instructed to prepare a new Ti-ust Deed for that purpose. 

Sidney Smithers as Agent for the Duke 
of Devonshire. 

Wm. Wager. 



At a Quarterly Meeting of the TrListees of the School Lands — 
July 1, 1848— 

It was ordered that the cost of the new Trust Deed £4 3 2 be 
deducted from the accruing rent and the balance of rent to be paid 

to the Scho(3lmaster. 



148 Longstone Records. 

LONGSTOXE SCHOOL, I'.io:). 

fk'iiiiflr coiitrihiitecl by the Rev. Giles Aih/n-tv, Vicar. J 



The present Elementary School with its buildings represents an 
old foundation which at first was apparently carried on as a free 
School. It still retains its old endowments. During the Master- 
ship of Mr. Scott the School was attended by a number of pupils 
from places around Longstone who paid special fees and were 
retained by Mr. Scott as his private pupils after his official 
connection with the School had terminated. 

School buildings and house for Schoolmaster are said to have 
been erected about 1787 ; the School part was rebuilt in 1832, and 
again in 1862 a new School was built on the same site as the 
former but it was extended at the western end on some land 
belonging to the Glebe which was given by Mr. Mills the Vicar at 
that time, a portion of Glebe also being conveyed by Mr. Tooth, 
Vicar, in 1863. 

After the passing of the Education Act in 1870 the question of 
providing accommodation for 148 children, according to the 
requirements of the Education department having arisen, it was 
decided that if Hassop School were reoper.ed, accommodation for 
115 children at Longstone woul.l be sufficient. After long 
consideration an application was made by the School Trustees to 
the Charity Commission for a Scheme so that the School might 
be conducted as a Public Elementary School (N.'ay 3, 1876) and 
accordingly such a Scheme was sealed by the Charity Commission 
on September 21, 1876. In that year Subscriptions were asked 
for the building of an Infant Schjol, the proposal for obtaining 
the money by a voluntary rate being rejected. i\.r. J. Thornhill 
acted as Treasurer of the Fund. 

The amount raised by Subscription was £399 8 0. The Infant 
School wa* built on land kindly given by tl.e Duke of Devonshire 



The School. j^g 

(letter of March 2(S. 1876) and afterwards conveyed by His Grace 
by Deed enrolled Nov. 24, 1882, in trust to the Vicar and Church- 
wardens for the erection of a School in which the religious 
instruction shall be in accordance with the principles and doctrines 
of the Church of England. The rules and regulations of the 
Scheme of the Charity Commissioners' order of 1876 were adopted 
and embodied. 

The present Infant School was "completed and opened in 1877. 
There is now accommodation in the two School buildings for 110 
to 115 children. 

The mixed School building ^vould be much improved by the 
addition of a class room, a suggestion made by Mr. Paley so far 
back as 1870. 

By the Education Act of 1902 the repair and alteration of and 
any addition to the existing buildings falls upon the Managers of 
the School, who can use for that purpose the rent of the School 
house. 

A letter from the Secretary of the Derbyshire Education 
Committee, dated July 26, 1905, to the Managers of Longstone 
School expresses the consent of the Committee to this appropi iation 
of the School endowments and the income of the School charity 
lands. By the same Act the expenses of can ying on the School 
are met as to the greater portion by Government Grants, and partly 
by a County rate. 

Elementary education is now free and compulsory. 



ENDOWMENT. 

As the subject of the Endowment of Longstone School will be 
treated in speaking of the parochial charities it needs only to state 
that the net income at present is £5 11 6 which arises from a parcel 
of land in the Mires containing about 22 perches and from land 



150 Longstone Records. 

containing 14 acres 1 rood on Great and Little Longstone 
Commons. Tiiere is also tiie annual Rent of the Master's house, 
the old School house at the end of the present School building, 
amounting to five pounds. 



MANAGEMENT. 

When the new Scheme for the future regulation of the School 
came into operation in 1876, Longstone Free School became a 
public Elementary School for Cireat and Little Longstone and for 
Hassop and Rowland if accommodation permitted ; the religious 
instruction was to be in accordance with the principles of the 
Christian faith, the property was vested in the official Trustee of 
Charity lands, and a Committee of Seven Managers was appointed, 
the Minister of the Chapclry of Longstone (or his licensed Curate 
if appointed by hlni) being an ex-officio member. The non-official 
Managers must be contributors of 5/- annually to the funds of the 
School, and be elected for three years by contributors of 
5/- to the funds of the School ; they were eligible for re-election. 

Under the Act of 1902 the Management of the School is entrusted 
to a body of Six Managers, of whom four are foundation and two 
representative Managers. 

The qualification of the Foundation Managers is a subscription 
of 2/6 a year to the funds of the School ; and the same qualification 
for those who elect the Managers. 1 he duties of Managers are 
ilefined bv Acts of Parliament, but two in particular may be 
mentioned (i) to appoint Teachers and (2) to provide School 
buildings suitable for the purpose. 

The Act of igo2 provides a single Local Authorit\ for both 
Elementary and Secondary Education for England and Wales. 
The Education Committee of the Derbyshire Comity Council has 
now the oversight of the Secular Education of the County : the 
County Council has the power to levy a Rate and the sole power 
of spending it. 



The School. 151 

The present Managers are (1905) 
FoH«rf(j^/ow— Rev. G.Andrew, Vicar, Mr. James T.Trickett (Rowland), 

Mr. W. R. Pitt Dixon, Mr. t:rnest M. Longsdon. 
Representative — Mr. John W. Thornhill, Parish Council. 

Mr. Cecil H. Armitage, County Council. 



MANAGERS since 1876. 
1877 Rev. L. E. Sweet, -Mr. John Thornhill, Mr. Robert Thornhill, 

Mr. Joseph Johnson, of Great Longstone ; Mr. Robert 

Shaw, of Little Longstone ; Mr. George Taylor, of Hassop ; 

and Mr. Thomas Ashton, of Rowland. 
1879 Rev. J. H, Hullivant, Mr. Robert Thornhill, .Mr. John 

Thornhill, Mr. Robert Shaw, Mr. (ieorge Tavlor, Mr. 

Thomas Ashton, Captain Smithers. 
1888 Rev. J. H. Bullivant, Mr. John Thornhill, Mr. Thomas Ashton, 

Mr. George Taylor, Mr. James Orr, Mr. \\'. Pitt Dixon. 

1891 Rev. H. J. Longsdon, in place of Capt. Smithers. 

1892 Mr. Trickett, in place of Mr. Thomas Ashton. 

1894 Rev. G. Andrew, in place of Rev. J. H. Bullivant (dec' ) 
1900 Rev. G. Andrew, Mr. James Orr, Mr. Trickett, Mr. W. R. 

Pitt Dixon, Mr. E. M. Longsdon, Mr. G. J. Marples, Mr. W. 

H. Wright. 
1903 Same as before except Mr. J. Orr (deceased), Mr. \\. H.Wright 

for the Parish Council, and Mr. G. J. Marples for the 

County Council 
1905 Rev. G. Andrew, Mr. Trickett, Mr. W. R. Pitt Dixon, Mr. E. 

M. Longsdon. Foii)idntionMa.ns.geT%. Mr. J. W. Thornhill 

Parish Council representative, and Mr. C. H. .^rmitage 

County Council representative. 



WILLIAM WRIGHT EXHIBITION. 
An E.xhibition, called the Wright Exhibition, enables a pupil of 
Longstone School to proceed to Lady Manners School, Bakewell, 



152 Longstone Records. 

or (ither place nf higher education, for a course of two years. 
(See Loui^stone Charities.) ' Tiie old scheme of education 
comprised instruction in the three R's (sometimes only two !) : 
for this E.xhibition the educational qualification is attainment of 
the Sixth Standard ; the other qualifications being residence in 
the Township of Great Longstone and attendance 'at a Public 
Elementary School for not less than six years. The Exhibition 
is awarded as the result of examination, the subjects of which 
are Arithmetic, English Composition, Dictation, English History, 
Geography, and Essay Writing. 



LOMiSTONE SUNDAY SCHOOL. 

A meeting was held Jany. 17, 1819, at which it was agreed to 
establish a Sunday School and a sum of £.35 i o was subscribed 
to defray e.xpenses. The Sunda\' School has coiitinuctl regidarly 
from that time. 



WARDLOW SUNDAY SCHOOL. 

A School was built at Wardlow in 1835. A Sunday School was 
taught there for oyer 20 years by Ralph Hancock of (jreat 
Longstone : and also by his son Christopher Hancock for seyeral 
years. Eor some years a Sunday eyening service was conducted at 
Wardlow during the summer months and occasionally in \\'inter. 
A Sunday School, morning and afternoon, is regularU held now 
in connection with the Church services. 



LONGSTONE CHARLFH^S. 



The parish of Longstone possesses a number of excellent 
Charities, the origin of which is due to \arious Benefactors. 
Three benefactions were given by members of the ancient family 
of Wright ; one by Rowland Eyre of Hassop ; one bv the Rev. 
Francis Gisborne ; and one termed the Holme Meal Charity, by 
the Duke of Devonshire. Longstone School has t^yo Charities, 



Charities. 153 

thj School Chcirity and the Longstone School Allotments Charitv. 
More recently, in 1872, a small Charitv was left to (Jreat and 
Little Longstcme by William Milnes, of Hassop. 

In Little Longstone there are three Charities, one called Ryder's 
Charitv ; another under tlie Will of John Longsdon — termed the 
Longsdon Charity, and another called Shaw's Charitx. 

Little Longstone and Wardlow share also in the ^Villiam 
Wright Charitv. 

The Duke of Dexonshire pays a small sum yearly to the Church- 
wardens for Sacramental Wine. 

A Record of the Charities is contained on Boards placed in 
Longstone Church, and a \ery full account is given in the Further 
(Parliamentary) report of the Charitv Commissioners published in 
1827. [Afp. E.J The various schemes of the Charity Commissioners 
dealing with some of the Charities supply information as to their 
management and character. An account compiled from the sources 
indicated of the origin, history, and present position of the 
parochial Charities may be of interest and of permanent value. 

Before describing them in detail, two points mav here be noted. 
The management of the Wright Charities has been simplified 
so that the same Trustees administer the three Charities. In a 
letter from the Secretary of the Charitv Commission, Januarx' 20, 
1868, he says ' As far as possible it is desirable to have one body of 
Trustees to administer the Charities of a parish, and if the Trustees 
or Administrators of the xarious Charities in Great and Little 
Longstone will apply for that purpose, and all parties are agreed, 
the object mav be effected.' Another point is that the original 
intention of the founders has been adhered to ; an apparent 
exception 1 c'ng that the sum of Forty Shillings of the William 
Wright Charity is given in kind, articles of feed or clothing, instead 
of in monev : this has been done by order of the Charitv Com- 
missioners in the new scheme of the Charity, in accordance with 
their powers, and in their interpretation (by what is called in law 



154 Longstone Records. 



tlic cv-nrrs doctrine) of the intention .Iml will of the Founder. 
In reviewinji the history of Chtirities it has been fountl that 
difficulties sometimes arose because the appointment of new 
Trustees had to be done by Deed, and Sf) uncertainty in the admin- 
istration of Charities and expense often resulted ; and sometimes a 
Charity was in danger of extinction. These things cannot occur 
under the method of administration by Schemes of the Charity 
Commissi(mers. 



WILLIAM WRIGHT CHAK1T^■. 
The oldest Charity is that of William Wright, who, by \\"\\\ of 
August 1st, 1656, charged his lands at Wardlow with the payment 
of £.10 yearly, of which £5 was to be paid on S. Thomas' Day to 
ten of the poorest male children in Cireat Longstone, to every one 
of them ten shillings to pay f<ir learning and educating them in the 
(Iranimar School where they shall like best to be taught and 
educated ; thirty shillings for Divine Service on S. Thomas' Day ; 
forty shillings to 40 of the poorest people living in Great Longstone 
for ever to be paid on S. Thomas' Da\' ; ten shillings to the poor of 
Little Longstone, ten shillings to the" poor of Wardlow, and ten 
shillings to the poor of Ashford. 

Extract from the Will of WilUain Wright, 1656, as to the 
Wardlorr Ch/irities : — 

" Whereas I have reser\ed ten poinids a year for ever out of my 
lands in Wardlow lately settled upon my eldest grandson William 
Wright, which ten pounds yearly 1 did reserve to be bestowetl anil 
given to charitable uses, I give the same as foUoweth: — 

I give forty shillings thereof yearly for ever to forty of the poorest 
people living in Great Longstone, to be paid inito them every year 
upon S. Thomas' Day before Xmas. 

I give five pounds thereof yearly for ever to be paid upi n the 
same day to ten of the poorest men children lixin;,' In (iri-at Long- 



Charities. j - - 



stone aforesaid, to ever* one of them ten shillings to pay for 
learnmg and educating tfiem in the Grammar School where" thev 
shall like best to be taught and educated. 

I give thirty shillings yearly towards the maintenance of Divine 
Serv.ee to be celebrated within the Chapelry of Longstone aforesaid 
for ever upon the day aforesaid. 

I give ten shillings to the poor of Ashford for ever to be paid 
yearly upon the said day. 

I give ten shillings yearly to the poor of VVardlow for ever to be 
paid upon the said day. 

I give ten shillings to the poor of Little Longstone yearly for 
ever to be paid upon the said day. 

And my mind and Will is that my Heirs with the assistance of 
some of the ablest neighbours in Great Longstone, Ashford, and 
Wardiow shall see the same paid and disbursed according to the 
true intent and meaning of this mv last Will and Testament." 

The owner of the estate at Wardlow always paid the above sums, 
but when the Free Education Act was passed (1891) the pavment of 
five pounds for education of ten free scholars was in abeyance till 
the Charity Commissioners dealt with the matter in their Scheme 
for the management of the Charity, for which an application was 
made March 21, 1895, '^y the Rev. G. Andrew, George Thomas 
Wright, John Thornhill, W. Pitt Dixon, and James Orr, and 
which was sanctioned by the Commissioners, Aug. 19, 1896. 

By this Scheme any freehold .,r leasehold lands are vested in the 
I' Official Trustee of Charity Lands" ; all sums of cash are invested 
in the name of the " Official Trustees of Charitable Funds." 

The Trustees are to consist of Five persons, Two ex-officio, 
viz., the \'icar of Longstone and the owner of Longstone Hall if a 
descendant of the Founder ; Two representative Trustees appointed 
by the Parish Council of Great Longstcne for four years ; One 
co-optative Trustee elected for five years. 

The Income of Forty shillings maybe expended in Clothes, Linen, 



I s6 Longstone Records, 

Bedding, Fuel, Tixils, Medical nr nthur'aitl in Sickness, Food iir 
or other articles in kind. 

The income of one-half of the Charity £.5 together with the 
interest on the accumulation for some years of the educational part 
of the Charity which amounted to about £50, is directed to be 
applied in the maintenance of an Exhibition tenable at any place 
of education higher than Elementary or of Technical, Professional, 
or Industrial instruction apprci\ed by the Trustees, and to be 
awarded to deserying boys, bona-fide resident in the Township of 
Great Longstone, who in eyery case haye attended a Public 
Elementary Schuol for not less than six years, and haye reached a 
standard higher than the standard for total exemption from School 
attendance fixed by the bye-laAys in force for the time being in the 
School district in which such children are respectiyely resident. 

The exhibitions shall be awarded and held under such regu- 
lations and conditions and im the result nf such examination 
as the Trustees think fit. 

The Trustees shall at their discretion apply eyery sum awarded 
under the foregoing provision in or towards paving the Tuition fees 
of the boy or otherwise for his maintenance and benefit, or they 
shall deposit the same in a Sayings Bank, or otherwise accumulate 
the same for his benefit. 



THOMAS WRIGHT CHARITY. 

Tlnnnas Wright of Great Longstone, Esquire, left the interest of 
£22 10 o to be given as a dole to the poor of Great Longstone and 
Holme, on the Purification of the Blessed Virgin. The sum was 
lent on the security of the Turnpike Road from Chesterfield to 
Hernstone Lane Head at 5 per cent. : the interest was £1 2 6 
distributed on Candlemas Day. On the application of James Orr 
and Henry Arthur Spant(.n made Dec. 15, 1896, a scheme of the 
Adminlstrati<m of this Charity was sanctioned by the Charity 
Commissioners November 22, 1897, under which the Trustees 



Chanties. icj 

are to he the same as administer the William Wright Charity 
appointed by the Scheme of Aug. 19 1896, and the Income applied 
m accordance with Clause 23 of that said Scheme. The amount 
invested in Consols is £19 15 n and the annual Income is £0 10 8. 

CAPTAIX HENRY WRIGHT CHARITY. 

Captain Henry Wright of Ballyhough Bridge in the County of 
Dublin by Will dated September ist, 1762, and pr.-v.d in" the 
Prerogative Court at Dublin in 1766, after giving to his nephew 
Thomas Wright of Longstone, Derbyshire, and if he should die 
before the age of 21 or should have no children, to the voungest son 
of his good friend George \'enables Lord ^•ernon allhis bills and 
bonds, subject to the payment of his debts, funeral expenses and 
legacies bequeathed as follows — 

" It is my desire that a sufficient sum be taken out of mv fortune 
as will clothe three Poor old Men and three Poor old Women of 
the parish of Longstone, Derbyshire, with shirts, shoes and stockings 
coat and waistcoat, hat, breeches, with a shilling, and great coat 
facing them, of different colour to each of them, on the 29th Sep- 
tember for ever. 

I also give Twelve Sixpenny Loaves and Sixpence in .Money to 
Twelve old Housekeepers, Inhabitants of Longstone for ever, with 
two pounds of beef to each on the first of Jany. for ever ; and that 
these poor may not be injured but punctually Paid the day fixed 
after my death It is my positive order that a sum of money 
sufficient to buy land that will clothe and provide for the Poor, as 
on the other side, be taken out of the Principal to purchase the 
said land sufficient for ever which land 1 desire may be bought 
immediately : and till a purchase is made the poor shall have what 
interest shall arise as an immediate maintenance f(5r them ; and I 
appoint Lord \'ernon and Godfrey Clark the Guardian and Director 
of this Will and Testament with joint power tt) call in what cash 
shall be due on the Bimd and cash due on my half pav as Captain 



158 Longstone Records. 

in iirtlcr that they may coniply with my desire : antl likewise if they 
will not act, shall haye power to choose t>yo honest gentlemen till 
my nephew comes of a/^e or one of the family enjoys the estate at 
Longstone who n^ust be always one guardian of the ahoye poor. 

A sum of £.500 was set aside and was for many years in the hands 
of Lord ^V'rnon by whom complete suits of clothing were proyided 
for three men and three women of Great I^ongstone but it does not 
appear that the other directions were complied with. About the 
year 1810 a copy of the donor's Will was obtained from Ireland and 
applications were made to Lord ^'ernon and to his brother the 
Archbishop of ^'ork ; and the Archbishop \yho had become the 
residuary legatee under the Will was desirous of fulfilling the 
donor's intentions and of applying £500 in the purchase of lands 
secured to the Charity, liltlmately by Indenture June 7, 1824, a 
farm at Aston Edge in the parish of Hope was conyeyed to John 
Thomas Wright of Lympstone in Deyonshire and James Longsdon 
of Little Longstone and their heirs for the sum of £725, of which 
sum £500 and interest thereon was paid by the Archbishop and the 
remainder £151 10 ll was gradually paid f>ff out of the rents of 
the estate, and in the meantime the charity was confined to two 
men and two women. In 1826 there was no distribution at all as 
the funds were insufficient. 

The farm consisted of 44 acres antl produced a rent of £30. The 
acreage now is 42a. or. i8p. and the rent £32 a vear. 

The Trust was administered by a body of Trustees enrfilled under 
Deed. 

Quotation from letter of Secretary of Charity Commission jfaii. 20, 
7868 ;— 

" In the latter Deed a prin'ision is contained for the appointment 
of new Trustees by the Minister, Chapel warden and Oyerseers of 
the Township or, in case of their neglecting so to do the Suryiying 
Trustee for the time being or the Kxecutors or Administrators of 
the last suryiying Trustee should fortiiwith appoint another Trustee, 



Charities. 159 

regard being had to the directions contained in the Will of Captain 
Wright that the member of the family who should enjoy the estate 
at Longstone should be always one guardian of the poor." 

In order to bring the administration of this Charity into line with 
that of the other Wright Charities application was made Jany. ij, 

1903 by the Rev. Giles Andrew, and George Thomas Wright, 
Esquire to the Charity Commission who by Scheme dated July 12, 

1904 appointed the same Trustees as for the William Wright Charity 
with special directions for the management of the Real property of 
the Charity : and the Income is applied according to the Will of 
Captain Henry Wright to deserving, necessitous and aged persons 
bona-fide resident in Great Longstone. 

Distribution of Clothes is to be made at Michaelmas to three men 
and three women ; and of food about New Year's dav to twelve 
deserving, necessitous and aged persons. 



DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE CHARITIES. 

The Duke of Devonshire makes a payment to the Vicar and 
Churchwardens of Longstone of 13/4* yearly for Sacramental Wine. 

A Charity called the Holme Meal Charity is shared with Bakewell. 
Originally given in oatmeal weekly, an annual payment was 
made by the Agent of the Duke of Devonshire to the Overseers 
of the Poor and laid out in the purchase of oatmeal and distributed 
in January and February. The sum varies with the price of 
oatineal but averages about £7 los., and distribution is now made 
b}' the Parish Council. The Charity board in the Church does not 
throw much light on the actual reason why meal was selected as the 
dole in the Holme Meal Charity. It speaks of the sale of the property 
of John Archer, Esq., (of Holme House) at Buxton in 1803, the land 
sold in lots, being subject to the payment of 5 pecks and \ of oatmeal 
to be given weekly to the poor of Great Longstone and Bakewell in 
equal proportions. So the Charity must be considerably older. It 
\vas altered to an annual payment, now received from the Agent to 
the Duke who must have acquired the property subject to this charge. 

*ThJs singular figure of thirteen shillings and fourpence had lung been a puzzle to the Author until he 
deciphered an old Deed which is given in exten<;n as well as in short abstract at |tage 163. See also 1835 
in Clironological Kvents, page 133. 



i6o Longstone Records. 

GISBORNE CKARITY. 

Longstone parish shares, with various other parishes, in the 
Gisborne Charity, the sum of £6 12 ii being now annually received 
and paid out by the Incumbent in woollen cloth and flannel for 
distribution to the poor. 

HASSOP CHARITY. 
Rowland Eyre, Esq., of Hassop, as an inscription in Longstone 
Church states, left twenty shillings to the poor of Longstone, and 
twenty shillings to the Minister, to be paid before Christmas. 
These sums are received now from the Hassop Estate, and the 
twenty shillings for the poor is distributed in money by the 
Overseers. 

MILNES CHARITY- 
A sum of £50 was left on deposit at the Bakewell Savings Bank 
in 1872 by William Milnes, the interest of which, £.1 5 o a year, 
is distributed to deser\-ing persons of Great and Little Longstone 
by the Incumbent of Longstone about Christmas. 



LONGSTONE SCHOOL ALLOTMENTS CHARITY. 

On the enclosure of lands by Act of Parliament of 1810, the 
Commissioners were required to allot so much of the Wastes in 
Great and Little Longstone as in their judgment should be equal 
to the clear yearly value of £10, which allotments should vest in 
The Most Noble William Duke of Devonshire, The Most Honourable 
William Marquis of Hartington, John Thomas Wright, Francis 
Eyre, and James Longsdon, Esquires, James Gregory, William 
Wager, John Longsdon, and Robert Thornhill, and the Curate for 
the time being of Great Longstone, on trust to apply the rents for 
the benefit of a Schoolmaster within the Townships of Great and 
Little Longstone. The Commissioners, by their award in 1824, 
allotted to the Trustees on Great Longstone Common 11 a. 3r. of 
land, and 2a. 2r. on Little Longstone Common, which were let for £9 
a year. They also allotted in respect of the School 22 perches of 
land which was let for 13 shillings a year. 



Charities. , 5 , 

Quotation from the Act: — 

" To apply the Rents and Profits thereof from time to time, as 
the same shall become due and payable unto and for the benefit of 
a Schoolmaster within the said Townships or Hamlets of Great 
and Little Longstone, or for such other charitable purposes within 
the said Townships or Hamlets of Great Longstone and Little 
Longstone as the said Trustees and their successors or the major 
part of them or their known Agents or Attornies or Persons to be 
appomted for that purpose, by writing under their respective hands 
at a public meeting, of which meeting such notice shall be given as 
is hereinbefore directed with respect to other notices under this 
Act, shall in their discretion think proper, and bv anv writing or 
writmgs under their hands from time to time direct and appoint." 

The Trustees paid the rents to the Schoolmaster who was 
appomted by them in 1832. The Schoolmaster received £5 from 
the William Wright Charity ; and £5 as a voluntarv gift from the 
Duke of Devonshire, and 20 children were taught free, the number 
being increased to 25 as the income from the Allotments increased, 
and they were taught Reading, Writing, and Arithmetic. 

Application was made on October 31, 1878, to the Charity 
Commissioners by the Duke of Devonshire, the Rev. J. H. Bullivant 
Robert Thornhill, and John Thomas Wright, Trustees of the 
Charity under deed of August 4, 1846, and order was made 
discharging John Thomas Wright at his own request from being 
Trustee, and the following were appointed Trustees :— William 
Duke of Devonshire, The Rev. J. H. Bullivant, and his successors in 
office. Incumbents of Longstone, for the time being, Robert Thornhill, 
Edward Smithers, James Furness, James Furness (junr.), James Orr,' 
Jasper Wager, and John Thornhill. 

The Trustees in 1879 applied to the Charity Commissioners for 
directions as to the application of the Income— then £10 7 o 
per annum-and the suggestion in reply was made that the income 
might be applied in creating a number of small Prizes for the 
children for meritorious conduct and proficiency, but this suggestion 
does not appear to have been acted upon ! 



1 62 Longstone Records, 

LONGSTONE SCHOOL CHARITY. 

On May 3, 1876, application was made to the Charity Com- 
missioners by the Rev. George C. Tooth (a former Vicar), James 
Furniss, George Ashton, Emanuel Hawley, and Joseph Timm, 
Trustees, to be discharged of the Trust ; the application was 
granted, and a new scheme was approved for the future regulation 
of the said Charity. 

The property now invested in the official Trustee of Charity lands 
consists of the land on which the Schoolroom and Master's house 
formerlv stood, containing 7 perches, and a parcel of land adjoining 
the same containing 328^ square yards, and another parcel of land 
situate in Great Longstone containing about 22 perches. (See 
Longstone School Allotments Charity.) 

The present Income arising from the School property is £10 i is. 6d. 
and is used for the repair &c., of School liuildings. 



LITTLE LONGSTONE CHARITIES. 

Rider's Charity. 
Ralph Rider by Will, 1709, left income of land at Monvash, one 
moiety, to the poor of Monyash, and one moiety to the poor of 
Little Longstone ; the amount for Little Longstone is distributed in 
small sums on Candlemas Day (Feb. 2.) 



LONGSDON CHARITY. 

John Longsdon, of Little Longstone, left by Will of April 5th, 
1827, the sum of £.50 on deposit in Bakewell Savings Bank, the 
interest to be distributed bv the Churchwardens and Overseers on 
January 6th, to the most needy and most deserving poor in Little 
Longstone for ever. 

SHAW'S CHARITY. 
Robert Shaw, of Monsal Dale, by Will dated 2nd July, 1819, 
left ten pounds for the poor of Little Longstone, and the interest 

arising from the same to be distributed bv the overseers vearlv 
for ever. 



THE VILLAGE BLACKSMITH. 



U.VDER a spreadina chestnut tree 

The village smithy stands; 
The smith, a mighty man is he, 

With large and sinewy hands ; 
And the muscles of his brawny arms 

Are strong as iron bands. 

His hair is crisp, and black, and long, 

His face is like the tan ; 
His brow is wet with honest sweat, 

He earns whate'er he can. 
And looks the whole world in the face. 

For he owes not any man. 

Week in, week out, from morn till night. 

You can hear his bellows blow; 
You can hear him swing his heavy sledge, 

With measured beat and slow, 
Like a se.xton ringing the village bell, 

When the evening sun is low. 

And children coming home from school 

Look in at the open door ; 
They love to see the flaming forge. 

And hear the bellows roar. 
And catch the burning sparks that fly 

Like chaff from a threshing-floor. 

Longfellow. 




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Thirteen Shillings and Fourpence. 163 



AWARD. 1603. 



TO all people to whome this p'nt Indenture of Awarde made 
betwine Thomas Sellars and Robert Haslam, Yeomen, Church- 
wardens of y" Churche or Chappell of Great Longsdon in y^ Countie 
of Derby on y= one partie and Chro'pher Jenkins of Great Longsdon 
aforesaid in y^ same Countie Yeomen on y other partie Raphe 
White George Harries Robt Wood and Richard James, Yeomen, 
send greting in our Lord god everlasting. KNOWE yee and this 
p'nt Indenture beareth witnesse THAT whereas before this tyme 
there hath beene diverse controversies variances debts and demands 
touching and concirninge one yearly rent charge of twentie shillings 
yssuinge and to be had and procured of all y lands and tenements 
of William y^ sonne of Richard Woodward in y towne and feilds 
of Great Longsdon aforesaid (which lands are now in the tenure 
houldinge and occupacon of y" said Chr'ofor Jenkins or his assignes) 
paiable at Feasts usuall fore dales as by a deed thereof made to 
certaine p'sons and theire heires upon Mondaie next after y* feast 
of y An'nciac'on of our Lady S. Marye in y ^ thirtieth yeare of 
y Rayne of kinge Edward y third (after y" conquest more fullie 
expressed) the which said Rent as it seemeth after y^ grauntinge 
thereof has he beene paid theise yeares accordinge to y^ said 
deed yet of late detained or withholden for or about these fortye 
yeares now last past FOR y recoverie and obtaininge of wh said 
rent and y' arrearayes of y same to and for the necessarie repaire 
of y'= said Church or Chappell relief of y^ poore people within 
y"^ same Chappelry amending of high waies there great troubles and 

^ This inteiPsting old Deed of Award (if it dees not go to tie fui:nda1inn of tl:e endowment) 
pxpiain* the peculiarity of the present amount, nan ely j/3rds of that claimed by the Churchwardens 
under the original endowment. 



ir)4 Longstone Records. 

suites have been com'enced growne aiul contynued betwine y^ said 
parties in y-^ Consistory court or y Chapter house at Lichfield and 
elsewhere and sentence therein given for and with y' said Thomas 
and Robt of late tyme whereon the other parte by advise of learned 
counsell supposinge himselfe to be injured there'n appealed 
WHEREUPON FOR the avoidinge of fines and controversies 
paieinge of charges and expenses in lawe and otherwise p'servinge 
of amitie and charitie amongst y^ neighbours of y" said Chappelry 
■ and to y' end y' said annuall rent should not be extincte y= said 
parties by theire mutuall assent consent and agreemente and with 
the free will and good likinge of the most and best parte of 
y« inhabitants of and within y"^ said Chappelry have submitted 
compromissed and put themselves and y said cause to y' 
arbitrem' order awarde rule judgment and determination of y= said 
Raphe White George Harries Robt Wood and Richard James with 
the umpire of the right worshipful William Cavendishe Esquire to 
arbitrate award order doome and judge between them for and 
concernynge all y^ said purposes and negotiation arbitrem' award 
order rule and judgm' wh y= said Raphe George Rob' and Richard 
. with y' companie of the said William doe pronounce publicly and 
make use in and concernynge there premises y' said Thomas 
Sellars Rob' Haslam and Chr'ofor Jenkins and every of them 
theire and every of theire heires executors and administrators and 
every of them well and truelie for his and their partes doe covenante 
and promise to and with y= other his and theire heires executors 
and administrators and every of them well and faithfully for his 
and theire partes to performe act and execute THEREFORE 
y"- said umpire and wee y said arbitrators takinge upon us y' charge 
of y said Awarde and calling before us y^ said parties and diligently 
hearinge delicatly examininge and perfectly uuderstandinge all 
y= said matter cause and controversie thereof doe thereupon award 
rule order doome and judge in manerand forme foUowinge FIRSTE 
that y' said p'ties shall from henceforth bee and contyneue lovinge 



Thirteen Shillings and Four pence. 165 

friends and that all suites accons and appeaies dependinge betwine 
them or anie of them shall stale and be no further prosequted and 
further y^ said umpire and we y"^ said arbitrators doe awarde order 
dome rule and judge that y'= said Chr'ophor his heires executors 
and assignes and every of them shal be acquitted discharged 
forgiven and pardoned as well all y'= said arrerays alreadie past as 
also spared and freed of and from y' paim' of y"" said yearly rent 
of twentie shillings so long tyme as the same Chr'opher his heires 
execntors or assignes or anie of them shall and will well and truely 
paie or cause to be payd unto y'' said Thomas [Sellars] and Rob' 
Haslame Churchwardines there aforesaid or to one of them their 
successors churchwardynes there for y^ tyme beinge or to anye one 
of them from henceforth y'= yearly some or paym' of THIRTINE 
SHILLINGS POWER PENCE of lawfull englishe monie at in 
and upon y feaste Dayes of y"" Annunciacon of our ladie and 
S. Michaell y"= Archangle by even porcons immediately after divine 
Service ended in y" same churche upon every of y"' feast dales or 
dales or paym' thereof and if it fortune at anie tyme that no 
service be theare said then upon every suche daie of paym' at or in 
y southe poarche of y"^ said churche or chappell y<= said paymt or 
paym'" to be made, and supplied and used by y"^ said churchwardines 
and their successors for y' tyme beinge with y= consent of y= most 
and best parte of y*^ inhabitants within y'' said chappelry for and 
towards y' Repare of y said churche Relief of y pore aged people 
within y^ same chappelry Amendlnge of y high waies there and 
such other like godley and lawfull uses and purposes accordlnge to 
y true meaninge thereofe IN WITNES whereofe y" said William 
Cavendysh as umpire and we y'" said Raphe Whltt George Haryes 
Rob' Wood and Richard James y'' other parte of this our p'nt 
wrltinge and Indenture of Awarde have putt our hands and seals 
y tenth dai of March in y*" yeare of our Lord god 1603 and in y« 
first yeare of y Raigne of our Soveralgne Lord James by y' grace 



1 66 Longstone Records. 

of god of England France and Ireland Knigt (King) Defendor of 
y' faithe and of Scotland y' Seaven and thirtieth. 

Signed W. Cavendyshe, Rop. Whyt, G. H., Robert Wodde, 
Richard James' marke. 

Indenture written on parchment (15i by 11 inches) scalloped 
at the top and five seal tabs without the seals at the bottom. 



SHORT ABSTRACT OF THE ABOVE AWARD. 
Arbitration Award by four yeomen assisted by William 
Cavendish, Esquire, as umpire, in a suit between the Church- 
wardens and Christopher Jenkins, of Great Longstone, as to a rent 
charge of 20 shillings on land, &c., occupied by the latter in Great 
Longstone, and claimed by the former under a Deed 30 Edward III 
for the repair of the Church and other purposes, which rent had 
been w'ithholden about 40 years. After suits for its recovery in 
Lichfield and elsewhere in favour of the Churchwardens and an 
appeal — arbitration was mutually agreed to with the result that 
Christopher Jenkins and his heirs were ordered to pay 13 4 a year 
for ever to the Churchwardens for the time being, and to be 
released from all other claims. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Will Miles de Longsdon was summoned as a Juror, 1638. 

J. Cent. Deybys. Annals. 

Quarter Sessions were held at Bakewell 1584 — 1796. 
Riots which included Castleton, Longstone, Eyam and Baslow, 
broke out, and these Sessions ceased to be held there. 

Fyom f Centuries Derbysh. Annals. 



Church Endowment. 167 

THE DEED 17. JAMES 1 (Page 53) REPEATED, 
1619—20. 



This Indenture made y twenty third day of November in y' year of 
y- Reigne of our Sovereign Lord James by y"^ grace of God King of 
England Scotland France and Ireland Defender of the faith &c. : 
That is to sale of England France and Ireland the seventeenth and 
of Scotland the three and Fiftieth Between the Right Honorable 
William Earl of Devonshire of y one part and Anthony Longsdon 
William of Little Longston in y County of Derby Gent", William 
Lant Wright and Thomas White of Great Longston in y'' said County 
of Derby Gent" of the other part Witnesseth that the said Earl for 
divers good causes and considerations him thereunto especially 
moving hath granted bargained sold aliened enfeoffed and confirmed 
and doth by these presents freely and absolutely grant bargain sell 
alien enfeoff and confirm unto y" s'* Anthony Longsdon Will'" Lant 
W"' Wright and Thomas White all those two Oxgangs of Land 
with the appurtinances situate lying and being in Great Longston 
aforesaid or within the townes fields or territories thereof which 
now are or heretofore were iinown reputed or taken to be the 
Churchland in Great Longston aforesaid and also one Cottage 
thereupon builded with Croft thereunto adjoyning in Great 
Longston aforesaid all which premisses now are or late were in 
y<- tenure or occupation of W"" Lant W"' Wright and Thomas 
White their or some of their assign or assigns und' tennant or 
undertenants with all Comon or Comon of pasture thereunto 
belonging or therewithal! heretofore commonly used or occupied 
in any grounds or Comonable places within the mann' of Ashford 
except in grounds which are now inclos'^ (and except in a certain 



1 68 Longstone Records. 

ground comonly call' blackloe) Together with all dues payments 
proffitts and comodities thereunto belonging or appertaining To 
have and to hold the said two oxgangs of land Cottage and Croft 
and all and singulor other the premisses with their and every of 
their appurtinances unto the said Anthony Longsdon Will'" Lant 
Will'" Wright and Thomas White their heirs and assigns for ever 
In Trust neverthelesse that they the said Anthony Longsdon 
W"' Lant W'" Wright and Thomas White and the survivour of 
them and their heirs and the Heirs of the survivour of them shall 
from time to time for ever hereafter sett lett and dispose of the 
premisses to the best yearly value they can gett or raise thereof 
and to dispose of the rents issues and proffitts thereof for or 
towards the maintenance or finding of the Curate of Great 
Longston aforesaid for the time being and his successors for ever 
Provided yet neverthelesse that if the said Curat or Curats or any 
of them shall at any time or times hereafter be absent from the 
said Church upon y= Sabboth day and not finding another sufficient 
person to supply the cure for that time of his absence that then 
for every such time of his absence not finding a sufficient person to 
supply the cure as aforesaid the said Feoffees and their heirs 
and the heirs of the survivoui' of them shall give and pay out 
of the rents issues and proffitts thereof unto the Churchwardens 
of Great Longston aforesaid for the time being the sume of five 
shillings of Lawfull money of England to be by them distributed 
amongst the poor of the said town or hamblett of Great Longston 
aforesaid according to their directions Yielding and paying therefore 
yearly unto the said Earl his heirs or assigns for ever the yearly 
rent or sume of Two shillings and tenpence of Lawfull money of 
England at y' feast days of the annuntiation of our blessed Lady 
the Virgin Mary and St. Michael the archangell by even porcons 



Church Endowment. 169 

and if it shall happen the yearly Rent or sume of two shillings and 
tenpence or any part thereof or parcell thereof to be behind and 
unpaid by the space of fourteen days next after either of the 
feast days or times at or in which the same ought to be 
paid by that true intent and meaning of these presents That 
then and from thenceforth and at all times after it shall and 
may be Lawfull to and for y*^ s"* Earle his heirs or assigns into 
the said two oxgangs of Land and premisses and or into any 
part or parcell thereof to Enter and distrain and y"^ Distress 
or Distresses then and there found to take lead drive Choose 
carry away and Impound and the same in pound to detain 
and keep until he or they shall pay of the said Rent or Rents with 
the arrears thereof if any such shall happen to be fully contented 
satisfied and paid and the said Earle and his heirs the said two ox- 
gangs of land and premisses with the appurtinances unto them the 
said Anthony Longsdon W"^ Lant W"' Wright and Thomas White 
their heirs and assigns to y' use aforesaid against him y'' said Earle 
and his heirs and against all and every other person and persons 
lawfully claiming by from or under him or any of his ancestors shall 
and will warrant and for ever defend by these presents And the said 
Earle for himself his heirs Executors and Administrators and for 
every of them doth Covenant promise and grant to and with the 
said Anthony Longsdon W"' Lant VV Wright and Thomas White 
their heirs and assigns and every of them by these presents that 
they the said Anthony Longsdon \V"' Lant W'" Wright and 
Thomas White for and notwithstanding any act or thing had made 
done or suffered by him the said Earle or any of his ancestors and 
under the yearly Rent above Reserved shall and may peacably and 
quietly have hold occupy possess and enjoy the said Two oxgangs 
of Land Cottage and premisses with all the appurtinances and every 



170 Longstone Records. 

part and parcell thereof without any Manner of Lett suit trouble 
molestation interruption or Eviction of him the said Earle his heires 
or assigns or of any other person or persons Lawfully claiming from 
by or under him or any of his ancestors or by any other person or 
persons Lawfully claiming from or under him them or any of them 
In Witnesse whereof the parties first above named to the present 
Indentures Interchangably have set their hands and seals the day 
and year first above written 

W: Devonshire 
Sealed and deliver'd 
in tlic presence of us whose 
names are here underwritten 

Tho. Burslon. 
Rich. Brey. 

Endorsed as follows — 
A Coppy of y"' Deed for y' two oxgangs of Land given by 
y Earle of Devonshire y" original taken to Litchfield by Dean 
Crooks in y" year 1711 or 1712. 

N.B. This Deed appears at page 53, but the present copy given 
me by Mr. Longsdon, is more complete. The spelling of the first 
is more reliable. Ed. L. R. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Between 1660 anil 7685. 
Persons fitted to lend the King Money — 
Will. Wright, of Longstone, 500 li : p. ann. and in stock 2000 li : 

Will. Bagshawc, of Litton, in land 500 li : p. ann. a very 
disaffected pson and worth in money 5000 li. 

From State Papers of Cliarles II. 



Parish Council. 171 



THE PARISH COUNCH. 

(The Author is indebted to Mr. Spanton for the names, dates, 
and much of the folIoivi)ig information.) 



The Parish Councils Act of 1894 aroused much interest and 
excitement in Great Longstone. There were t\\o grounds for this — 
one clasG of the inhabitants looked forward to the social and moral 
improvement of the village by a good water supply, drainage, 
lighting, and general sanitary work, whilst another class feared the 
prospect of a considerable addition to the rates. Consequently 
there ■was a great and (as events proved) on the whole a successful 
effort to elect on the Council a majority of persons who were 
opposed to any undertakings that v ould involve expenditure. It 
is not surprising therefore that the net result of ten years has been 
very small, and the benefit to the Parish imperceptible The Rural 
District Council's 8cheme for a Water Supply was carried out quite 
independently of the Parish Council and has been generally appre- 
ciated. The chief work has been in connection with sanitary 
improvements of cottages, with the parochial charities and the Gilder 
quarry arbitration. Water supply, sewerage and sewage disposal, 
and lighting were either vetoed or allowed to drift. Since the 
first two Elections no interest has been taken in the doings of the 
Council, and according to Mr. Spanton, the Vice-Chairman 
throughout, there has been considerable difficulty in getting 
enough Parishioners together to elect the Council from time to 
time. Until 1901 elections were held annually : since that date 
triennially. The number of Councillors, which was six at first, 
was reduced to five in 1904. 

The first Parish Council included the following members : — 
*Mr. Arthur Bates, Chairman (1894-6.) 
Mr. Henry Arthur Spanton, Vice-Chairman. 
Mr. C. H. Buzzard. *Mr. Samuel Johnson (1898-1901.) 

*Mr. James Orr (1896-8) Mr. Charles Johnson. 

Mr. Thomas Shiniwell, Secretary. 



172 



Lon^stone Records, 



The other members who liave served on the Council are 

Mr. Joseph Johnson. *The Kev. G. Andrew (1901-5) 

Mr. A. W. J. Eyre. *\h. W. R. P. Dixon (1905) 

Mr. J. Wood. Mr. J. W. Thornhill. 

Mr. P. Furniss. Mr. G. Ward. 
Mr. R. Coe. 

Alt asterisk denotes those who have been Chainiieii, together 'with 



the date. 

Mr. Thomas 



Shi 



.-11 the first Clerk to the Parish Council 
retired in 1S97 in order to represent the Parish on the Board of 
Guardians. He was succeeded for a fe^v months hv Mr. C. H. 
Buzzard who then left the village — when the present Clerk, Mr. 
Isaac B. Shimwell, was elected to that Office. 

N.B. " In 1904 tlie Flection was concKictf^ii by an assembly of two electors and two dogs." 



PROPKRTY OWNERS, 

GREAT LONGSTONE. 

(Coiitrihiiteit by .'/''. /■ B. Sliimwell.J 





Land. 


Houses 




A. R. P 


No. 


Allsop, Thomas 


18 I 6 


... I 


Bradshaw, J. D., Trustees of .. 


3 I 4 


... I 


Brampton Brewery Co 


3 I 2 


... 4 


Bennett, Jos. & I 




... I 


Bowman, Chas. 




... I 


Bradwell, Jos., senr 




... 1 


Brown, Mrs. John 




... I 


Daubney, Mary A 




... 2 


Dora, Samuel 


94 2 


... 4 


Duke of Devonshire 


939 I 5 


... 6 


Dust, Wm 


11 17 




Edwards, Hugh 




... I 



Property Owners. 173 



Eyre, A. W. J 

Eyre, Wm. J 

Fumess, Ann W 

Fumess, E., Trustees of ... 

Furness, Geo. J 

Furniss, Samuel 

Gratton, Elizabeth 

Hawley, E., Trustees of ... . 

Hills Brewery Co 

Holmes, Harriett 

Hutchinson, Sarah 

Jepson, Thomas 

Johnson, Hannah 

Johnson, Alice 

Johnson, Samuel 

Leslie Trustees ly o 23 

Leyland, Robert 

Longsdon, Hy. Crofts 23 3 8 

Lowe, Edith 

Lowe, Sarah 

McGibbon, Isabella 

Marples, Geo. J 

Marsden, L. F 

Midland Ry. Co . 

Morton, Geo 

Morton, Jonathan 

Morton, Jane 

Oliver, Elizabeth 

Orr, Hannah 

Outram, Mrs 

Overseers of the Poor 

Redfern, T 

Robinson, James 

School Trustees 

Shim well, Elizabeth, junr. 



Land. 


Houses, 


A. R. P. 


No. 




... 13 


I 1 22 




15 36 




12 7 




27 I 21 


... 6 


201 I 5 


... I 


6 2 6 






... 3 




... I 


5 I 17 


... 8 


10 I 




3 2 16 




2 38 






... 1 
2 









■■ 4 
I 


II 


I 


14 • 


2 


57 


1 


34 • 


.. I 

•• 4 


16 


3 


10 . 


.. 2 


2 





16 




2 


I 





I 


136 


2 


39 • 


.. 14 


3 


2 


35 




2 


I 


17 


• 4 


5 


I 


20 




II 


3 


4 •• 


,. I 


11 


I 


6 





'74 



Longstone Records, 



Land. 
A. R. p. 



Shimwell, Mrs. James 

Skidmore, Sarah Jane & Harriet 

Skidiiiore, Thomas 

Taylor, Aaron 

Taylor, Ann 

Taylor, J., Trustees of 

Thornhill, .1. Wm 

Thornliill, R., Trustees of 

Trickett, J. T 

Trickett, Mrs 

^'icar of Bakewell 

Vicar of Longstone 

Wager, Andrew 

Wager, Albert 

Wright Estate, Trustees of 
Do. do. 



57 

3 

6 

1 1 

46 

99 

22 

15 

765 
34 



3 19 
I 15 
3 6 
I 6 



2 30 

3 25 

ig 

1 4 
3 32 
o 29 



Houses. 

No. 

I 



LITTLE 



LONGSTONE. 

Land. 



.'Mlsop, Thomas 

R. C. Bishop of Nottingham 

Bowman, Charles 

Daubney, Mary A 

Duke of Devonsliire. . . . 

Hadfield, Thos 

Holmes, Harriett .. 

Hulley. R.D 

Hulley, Mrs. Wm 

Longsden, Hy. Crofts 
Longstone School Trustees 
Midland Railway Co. 
Nuttall, Joseph Holme ... 
Orr, Hannah 



A. R. p. 

II o 27 
6 2 26 

15 3 37 
I o 2'^ 

2 ly 



626 



171 
2 
19 

3 
43 



3 S 

2 o 

3 24 

1 3 

2 26 



Houses. 
No. 



Property Owners. 



175 



Poole, Lucy 

Reeves, Stafford 

Rural District Council of 
Bakewell 

Shaw, Wm. L 

Shimwell, Elizabeth, junr. 
Shimwell, Elizabeth, senr. 

Shimwell, Isaac B 

Taylor, Aaron 

Taylor, Mary 

Vicar of Bakewell 

Wright Estate, Trustees of . 



Land. 


Houses 


A. R. P. 


No. 


I I 4 




26 I 53 




100 




20 16 


... 2 


9 3 16 


... 1 




... I 


I 15 




304 






I 


630 




30 I ig 





PARISH BOUNDARIES. 



Great Longstone is bounded on the East by a small brook 
running behind Hassop Station, the boundary being also marked by 
a small stone on Holme Bridge over the Wve at Bakewell : it is 
hounded on the West by a small stream near Cressbrook Mill, on 
the North by a wall between Wardlow and \\'ardlow Miers, half of 
Wardlow Village being in the Parish of Longstone ; it is bounded 
on the South by a brook near Longstone Station. — Parish Magazine, 
1895. 



PETITION AGAINST PROPOSED ALTERATION. 

In 1894 the following protest and petition against a proposed 
transfer of Holme from Great Longstone to Bakewell, signed by 
130 Ratepayers, was sent to the County Council. In that year, 
however, a partial transfer was made. 
To the County Council of Derbyshire. 

We, the undersigned, being Owners and Ratepayers in 
the Parish of Great Longstone and Holme, desire to protest 
most emphatically against the Proposal of the Bakewell Urban 



176 



Longstone Records. 



Sanitary Authority. " That the whole of the Hamlet of Holme be 
" transferred from the Township of Great Longstone and the 
" Bakewell Rural Sanitary District, and be united to the Township 
" and Urban Sanitary District of Bakewell." We are of opinion 
that the Proposal will be highly detrimental to the best interests 
of the Parish of Great Longstone and the Rural Sanitary Authority, 
and will tend to cripple any effort that mav be made for the 
benefit of the Parish and the District, and we consider that a gross 
injustice will be done if it is acceded to. 

We therefore pray that the County Council of Derbyshire 
will not grant the request, nor alienate any part of the Hamlet 
of Holme. 

Name. Residence. Condition. 

G. T. Wright, Longitone Hall, Trustee to the Longstone. 

Hall Estate. 

Gt. Longstone Vicarage, Vicar of Longstone. 

Holly Bank, Great Longstone. 

Ivy Cottage 

Beech House. 

Laburnum Cottage. 

Gt. Longstone, 

Longstone, 

Longstone, 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Hassop, 

The Cottage, Longstone, 
Dale Farm, 
Mill Lane, 
Mill Lane, 
Ward low, 
Wardlow, 
Castlegate, 
Monsal Dale, 
Ashford Lane, 



G. Andrew, 
John Thornhill, 
Ann W. Furness, 
A. Thornhill, 
M. Thorp, 
Joseph Johnson, 
Wm. Millington, 
Wm. Morton, junr., 
Charles Carson, 
Elizabeth Hill, 
William Eyre, 
Jasper Johnson, 
Arthur Bates, 
John Bridge, 
Joseph Timm, 
Sarah Morton, 
William Outram, 
Samuel Robinson, 
Peter John Furness, 
R. Bridge, 
Peter Furniss, 



Farmer. 

Chert Quarryman. 

Labourer. 

Signalman. 

Labourer. 

Farmer. 

Merchant. 

Farmer. 

Farmer. 

Spinster. 

Farmer. 

Farmer. 

Farmer. 

Farmer. 

Farmer. 



Parish Boundaries. 



177 



Name. 
Charles Johnson, 
Peter Furness, 
G. S. Mitchell, 



Residemce. 
Little Longstone, 
Bleaklow, 
Hermitage, 



A. E. Valentine Eyre, West Cottage, 
S. A. Mead, The Grange, 

Richard Coe, Longstone Station, 

James Doddemeade, Dwelling House, 



Jesse Jupp, 
Thos. Ward, 
M. E. Southgate, 
William Redfearn, 
F. Williams, 
W. B. Pryor, 
Jasper Wager, 
James Orr, 
James W. Morris, 
S. Lowe, 
A. Furness, 



Dwelling House. 
Dwelling House, 
Dwelling House, 
Dwelling House. 
Home Lea, 
Clifton House, 
Manor House. 
Great Longstone, 
Great Longstone, 
Great Longstone, 
Great Longstone, 
Henry Arthur Spanton, School House, Longstone. 
Elizabeth H. Carrington, 
Sarah Taylor, Dwelling House, 

Charles H. Buzzard, White Lion Inn. 
Matthew Morton, Great Longstone, 
Horace Turner, Great Longstone, 

A. Wm. J. Eyre, Great Longstone, 

Elizabeth Oliver, Great Longstone. 
John H. Beresford, Great Longstone, 
John H. Furness, Tideswell, 



Roger Evans, 
John Allsop, 
William B. Mellor, 
James T. Trickett, 
Ann Taylor, 
Grace Watts, 
Elizabeth Hibbert, 



Tideswell, 
Wardlow, 
Blagden, 
Rowland, 
The Willows, 
Gt. Longstone, 
Gt. Longstone, 



Condition. 
Farmer. 
Farmer. 
Gentleman. 
Professor of Music. 
Silk Merchant. 
Station Master. 

Butcher. 

Boot & Shoe Maker. 

Quarryman. 

Laundress. 

Painter. 

Gentleman. 

Gentleman. 

Farmer. 
Gardener. 
Post Mistress. 
Laundress. 
Schoolmaster. 
Farmer & Grocer. 



Stone Mason. 

Platelayer. 

Builder & Contractor. 

Carpenter. 

Landowner, Inn Keeper, 

and Ratepayer. 

Landowner, Hotel Keeper 

Pig Dealer. 

Farmer. 

Landowner & Farmer. 

Spinster. 

Widow. 

Widow. 



178 


Longstone Records. 


Name. 


Residence 


Condition. 


Isaac Bennett, 


Gt. Longstone, 


Blacksmith. 


Joseph Bennett, 


Gt. Longstone, 


Blacksmith. 


Ann Eyre, 


Gt. Longstone, 


Widow. 


Alfred Atherton, 


Gt. Longstone, 


Tailor. 


Eliza Sellars, 


Gt. Longstone, 


Widow. 


Joseph Bradwell, 


Do. 


Coal Agent. 


Sarah Morton, 


Gt. Longstone, 


Widow. 


W Pitt Dixon, 


Do, 


Vicar's Warden. 


John Bacon, 


Do. 


Labourer. 


A. Wm. Goodwin, 


Rowdale Bar, 


Shop Keeper 


Thos. Peel 


Hassop Station, 


The Master. 


Rachel Ewings, 


Burre House. 




Geo. Leigh, 


Underwood House, 


Clerk to the Guardians. 


D. Roberts, 


Woodland View, 


District Surveyor. 


S. E. Wardley, 


Woodland View, 




J. Derbyshire, 


Summerfield Cottages, 


Blacksmith. 


S. Dora, 


Ewe Close, 


Farmer. 


J. Wheeldon, 


Hassop Station, 


Inn Keeper. 


J. T. Heath, 


Cracknell House, 


Gamekeeper. 


John Morton, 


Gt. Longstone, 


Mason. 


R. Skidmore, 


Gt. Longstone, 


Farmer. 


Wm. Newton, 


Summerfield, 


Labourer. 


Joseph Wood, 


Rose Cottage, L. Longstone, Hamper and Skip 

Manufacturer. 


Rachel Brooks, 


Gt. Longstone. 




Sarah Hill, 


Do. 




George Bonsall, 


Do. 


Labourer. 


James Nadin, 


Do. 


Porter. 


Ellen Eyre, 


Do. 




William Blackwell, 


Do 


Labourer. 


Reuben Carson, 


Do. 




Ann Morton, 


Do. 




John Brightmore, 


Do. 


Stone Mason. 


Sarah Phillips, 


Do. 




William Morton, senr., Do. 




Ellen On. 


The Hollies, 


Spinster. 



Parish Boundaries. 



179 



Name. 


Residence. 


Condition. 


S. B. Orr, 


Do. 


Spinster. 


G. Elliott, 


Birchill, 


Farmer. 


John Sellers, 


Wardlow, 


Do. 


Joseph Thornhill, 


Wardlow, 


Do. 


George Gregory, 


Wardlow, 


Do. 


James Robinson, 


Wardlow, 


Do. 


William Turner, 




Do. 


Joseph Garlick, 




Do. 


William Taylor, 


Little Longstone, 


Do. 


Hannah Johnson, 


Little Longstone, 




Godfrey J. Furness, 


Bleaklow, 


Farmer. 


Joseph Eeley, 


Gt. Longstone, 


Labourer. 


James Hewitt, 


Gt. Longstone, 


Platelayer. 


Daniel Hamilton, 


Great Longstone, 


Labourer. 


T. O. Green, 


Great Longstone. 


Photographer. 


J. B. Green, 


Great Longstone. 




William Furniss, 


Great Longstone, 


Farmer. 


G. H. Bonsall, 


Great Longstone, 


Labourer. 


H. C. Bolton, 


Great Longstone, 


Commercial Traveller. 


George Hambleton, 


Great Longstone, 


Cordwainer. 


James A. Booth, 


Great Longstone. 


Joiner. 


C. R. Pell, 


Great Longstone, 


Signalman. 


Maria Taylor, 


Householder, 


Widow. 


Samuel Johnson, 


Great Longstone, 


Farmer. 


Albert Johnson. 


Great Longstone, 


Inn Keeper. 


C. Hancock, 


Do. 




C. Ellwood, 


Great Longstone, 


Watchman. 


Thos. Hibbert, 


Gt. Longstone, 


Platelayer. 


C. Blagden, 


Gt. Longstone, 


Gardener. 


Thos. Cook, 


Gt. Longstone. 




John Turner, 


Great Longstone, 


Platelayer. 


I. Gilbert, 


Great Longstone, 


Platelayer. 


W. Ashton, 


Great Longstone, 


Farmer. 


Mr. Wheatley. 






E. James Hawley, 


Vine Green, 


Farmer. 


Aaron Taylor, 




Farmer. 


Thomas Shimwell, 


Little Longstone, 


Assistant Overseer. 


Thos. Somerset, 


Ashford. 





i8o Longstone Records. 

PETITION IN FAVOR OF COMPLETE SEVERANCE. 

We, the undersigned, Owners and Occupiers in the portion of the 
Township of Great Longstone. which is proposed to be transferred 
to the Urban District of Bakewell, do hereby petition the County 
Council of Derbyshire to accede to that proposal upon the following 
grounds : — 

1. Rates are levied upon our area for the sanitary expenses of 

Great Longstone, a distant village with which we have no 
connection or interest. Longstone residents alone benefit 
from our rates, and our area costs Longstone nothing. 

2. If our rates were spent upon sanitary works in Bakewell we 

should directly benefit in return for what we pay. 

3. Upon Bakewell we are dependent for every sanitary advantage 

we possess. The burden which is put upon certain streets 
and roads in Bakewell bv the traffic in stone between the 
Ouarry and the Station and in heavy Factory goods between 
Lumford Mills and the Station is very considerable indeed. 
We are supplied from Bakewell with ^\'ater and Gas ; the 
roads, as far as our area on both sides, are lighted with the 
Bakewell public lamps ; and we benefit generally from the 
expenditure of Bakew-ell LIrban District Council. 

4. It will not be practicable to dispose of the sewage of the said 
area without its being joined to Bakewell. 

5. The local authority for Longstone is now constructing works 

for the supply of Water to that village, and to other 
contributory places. If the area in question remains with 
Great Longstone, it will be charged with the Longstone 
special sanitary \vater rate, despite the fact that it is 
dependent on Bakewell for its Water supply. Similarly the 
Longstone authority will shortly find necessarv for that 
village, works of sewerage and sewage disposal, to which our 
portion of Holme would be requireil to contribute, as it 



Parish Boundaries. i8i 

would also have to contribute for any other Longstone public 
improvement, the benefit of which it would be impossible for 
us to share. 



The Common Seal of the D.P. Battery Co. Ltd., 

■was affixed hereto in the presence of 

W. p. Claude Johnson,] 

J. M. GoRHAM, .Directors. 




A. C. Read, Secretary. 



Signed also by — 
Thos. Allsop, 
R. Orme & Co. 



CLAIM FOR COMPENSATION BY GREAT LONGSTONE. 

In 1903, when the remaining area was transferred to Bakewell, 
the following unsuccessful claims for compensation were made 
by the Overseers of Great Longstone, and the Parish Council, 
against the Urban District Council, for loss of Rateable \'alue 
consequent on the alteration of the Parish Boundary. 



Appro-ximate claim of the Overseers of the Poor of the Parish 
of Great Longstone, against the Bakewell Urban District Council, 
for loss of Rateable \'alue, subsequent on the alteration of the 
Parish Boundarv. 

Rateable Value of area proposed to be taken away from Great 
Longstone, £886. 

The expenditure of the Overseers of the Poor on establishment 
charges, including Salarv of Assistant Overseer, during the 5 \ears 
ended ^'ichaelmas, 1902, and the Rateable \ alue of the parish in 
each of such vears were as follows : — 



1 82 Longstone Records, 



Years 


Expenditure. 


Rateable 


Value, 




£ s. 


d. 


£ 


s. 


d. 


1898 


35 9 


5 


7235 








1899 


31 10 


7 


7034 








1900 


31 4 





7002 








1901 


32 4 


61 


7055 








1902 


31 16 


4 


7038 








5) 


£162 11 


lOJ 


£35364 








Average 


£32 10 


4 


£7073 









The average annual expenditure was spread over an average 
rateable value of £7073. 

If this rateable value is reduced by £886, it follows that the 
ratepayers in the portion left will have to make up the pro- 
portionate amount represented by the £886 rateable value w^hich 
is £4 IS. 5d. 

It is unfair and unjust that this additional burden should be 
thrown upon the ratepayers of Great Longstone, and the Overseers 
of the parish contend that this amount of £4 is. 5d. should be paid 
to them annually by the Bakewell Urban District Council (subject 
to an annual adjustment) and they hereby claim such sum on the 
grounds that it is an equitable adjustment of a liabilitv. 

In view of Arbitration proceedings this claim is forwarded to the 
County Council without prejudice. 

Dated this 14th day of January, 1903. 

(Signed) Henry Arthur Spanton, j Overseers of the Poor 

; of the Parish of Great 
Albert Jackson Skidmore, ) Longstone. 



Approximate claim of the Great Longstone Parish Council 
against the Bakewell UrVian District Council for loss of Rate- 
able V'alue consequent on alteration of Parish Boundary. 

Rateable Value of area proposed to be taken away from Great 
Longstone, £886. 



Parish Boundaries. 183 

The Parish Council of Great Longstone, with the consent of 
the Parish Meeting, have power to levy an annual precept equal 
to six pence in the £ on the Rateable Value of the Parish, 
and consequently they may possibly, at any time, and in any 
one year, sustain a cash loss of £22 3s. od. 

The actual sums raised by precept by the Parish Council, and 
the amount of Rateable Value each year since its formation are : — 
Years. Amounts of Precept. Rateable \^alue. 

£ s. d. 

1895 15 7399 

1896 

1897 30 7253 

1898 10 7235 



£ 


s. 


d 


15 

















30 








10 








5 








5 

















6 








£71 









1899 5 7034 

1900 5 7002 

1901 

1902 6 7038 



£42961 



£1 9s. 3d. will represent the average annual loss to the Parish 
in consequence of the transfer. 

Therefore it is just and equitable that the Bakcwell Urban 
District Council should pay to the Great Longstone Parish 
Council the said sum of £1 9s. 3d. in perpetuity, subject to an 
annual adjustment. 

And such sum is herbey claimed by the said Parish Council of 
Great Longstone. 

In view of arbitration proceedings, this claim is furnished to 
the Derbyshire County Council without prejudice. 

Dated this 14th da}' of January, 1903. 

(Signed) G. Andrew, Chairman. 
Isaac Shimwell, Clerk. 



184 Longstone Records. 

The hrook hehincl Hassop Station still forms part of the East 
boundary, and the Parish is further bounded on the East by a wall 
leading from the Bakewell and Longstone Road (at the point where 
the road divides, leading to Birchills from Bakewell) across land 
owned by the Duke of Devonshire, to the Mill Dam which supplies 
Holme Factory. — Mr. I. Shimwell, 1905. 



A full description of and the reasons for the alteration of the 
Parish boundaries are given at length in the following papers kindly 
contributed by Mr. V. R. Cockerton, Clerk to the Urban District 
Council of Bakewell. 



The boundary between the Hamlet of Holme (a detached portion 
of Great Longstone Parish) and the Parish of Bakewell was formerly 
along the middle of the River Wve, past Lumford Mill and Holme 
Hall, extending easterly until the river is joined near Castle Hill by 
a stream, the boundary having followed this stream across the 
highway at Burre House gates, then through the Workhouse 
garden, and up the small valley lying between the turnpike road 
and the railway, as far as the point of the present boundary at 
Pineapple railwaj' bridge. 

In 1894 the Derbyshire County Council made an order, which 
was confirmed by the Local Government Board, transferring from 
Holme to Bakewell an area of 68 acres 2 roods and 2 perches, 
containing a population of 60 souls, and having a rateable value 
of £340 6s, od., a value which has since largely increased. 

In 1903 a further extension of the Bakewell boundary was effected. 
The grounds for the extension and particulars of the interests 
affected are contained in the papers following. 

Altogether Longstone lost by these alterations an area of 
III acres i rood and 34 perches, and a rateable value of 
£1150 3s. gd., for which they un fortunately were unable to obtain 
any compensation. 



Parish Boundaries. 185 

THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACTS, 1888 & 1894. 
The Administrative County of Derhv. The Bakewell Union and 
Rural District and the Bakewell Urban District. 



Alteration of Bov.ndarv. Alteration Proposed. 



The proposal of the Urban District Council is as follows : — 
Alteration That the portion of the Hamlet of Holme as 
Proposed. delineated bv dotted lines on the accompanying plan 
shall be transferred from the Township of Great 
Longstone and the Bakewell Rural District and be 
united to the Township and Urban District of 
Bakewell. 
Districts The Districts affected by the proposal are : — 
Affected. — The Bakewell Urban District, 

— The Bakewell Rural District and its contributory 
Township of Great Longstone, 
Grounds of The grounds upon which the proposal is made are as 
Proposal. follows : — 

The Hamlet of H<ilme is a detached portion of the 
Township of Great Longstone from which it is separated by the 
intervening Townships of Hassop, Rowland, and Ashford. The 
area proposed to be transferred is a narrow strip situated at the 
Southern point of Holme and bounded on all sides but the North 
bv the Urban District of Bakewell into which the Hamlet extends 
in the form of a wedge. This area at its nearest point to the Town 
of Bakewell, is 500 yards from the Town Hall. From Great 
Longstone village it is nearly two miles distant. The piece of 
ground in question lies within the radius of the Town of Bakewell 
and within the same hills and valley, and mostly upon the same 
plane as Bakewell. Immediately behind it, a considerable table 
land rises away from Bakewell to an elevation of about 250 feet 
above the Town. The area proposed to be transferred is completely 
isolated from Longstone and is naturally and topographically part 
of Bakewell. 



Parish Boundaries. 187 

The area aforesaid contains a large Electrical Factory and several 
dwellinghoiises and cottages, and also a Chert Quarry. All these 
are dependent on the Bakewell Urban District for both Water and 
Gas with which they are supplied. The traffic to and from the 
Factory is considerable, and from the Quarry it is very heavy, and 
between there and the Bakewell Railway Station — this traffic must 
pass over certain roads and streets in the town of Bakewell, and 
between there and the Station, which are kept in repair by the 
ratepayers of Bakew^ell. The Bakewell street- lamps light the road 
close up to the said area on the East side, and on the South the 
road is lighted as far as the Factory. Holme benefits almost if not 
quite equally with the ratepayers of Bakewell in the public works 
and expenditure of the Urban District Council. 

The Bakewell Urban District Council is powerless to prevent 
nuisances within the portion of Holme referred to. In the 
administration of the Factory Act and the Sanitary Acts the 
Council has no control whatever, although the operatives and 
workpeople there employed live and associate together as one 
community with Bakewell. The area in question is not subject to 
any byelaws as to new buildings. Dwelling-houses mav be erected 
and at the present time are in course of construction, which are 
unrestricted by any byelaws or supervision. Matters such as these 
are of importance in the interests of the public health of Bakewell, 
but they do not affect Great Longstone, and the sanitary supervision 
and control is therefore not vested in the authority most concerned. 
The said Factory and Dwelling-houses all discharge their sewage 
either directly or in the direction of the River Wye which lies 
within the Urban District of Bakewell. Any efficient system of 
sewerage for this area must be joined with that for Bakewell, and 
the sewage conveyed to the other side of the Town. 
Dated this 5th day of February, 1902. 
(Signed) 

V. R. COCKERTON, 
Clerk to Bakewell Urban District Council. 



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Parish Boundaries. 



189 



Population : — Bakewell Urban District,... 

Great Longstone Township 

Area: — Bakewell Urban District... 

Great Longstone Township 

Do. proposed transfer 

Rateable V^alue : — Bakewell Urban District 

(New Valuation made Nov., 1902) 

Great Longstone Township 

Assessable Value : — Bakewell Urban District 

Great Longstone To\vnship 

Rateable Value Proposed I Part of the Hamlet of 
TO BE Transferred : — ) Holme to Bakewell 

Assessable Value: — ditto 



Poor Rate : — Great Longstone, 1901 

Bakewell, 1901 & 1902 

General District Rate 

in Bakewell Urban District (1901-2) 

Ditto in 1903 will be i/jth less than in 

1902 owing to Re-valuation of 
Bakewell (dated Oct., 1902) which 
increases the Valuation i/jth 
namely from £18155 to £21124 — 

4d. in £ 

Duties imposed on Bakewell by Alteration :- 
Scavenging, costs in the £ 4d. ... 
Sewerage, annual repayment of principal 
and interest on £600 estimated cost, 
£41 equals on rateable value of Holme 
transferred, 



2,850 

478 

Acres 2,923 

2,879 

43 

£21,124 

£6971 
£19,220 

£5'96o 
£810 

£785 



d. 
6in£ 



4a. 



IQO Longstone Records. 

Expenses already borne : — 

Highways (exclusive of County Roads) in £ loj 

Public Lighting ... ... ... ... 43- 

Traffic on Roads : — To and from Lumford Factory, 

year igoi... ... ... ... tons 4,000 

Chert from Smith's Quarry, 1899 — 1438 tons 
1900—1249 tons, 1901 — 1845 tons, average 
per annum ... ... ... ... ... tons 1133 

Coal — 140 tons Broken Stone — 150 tons ... tons 290 

Total Tonnage per annum ... 5'433 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

"John de Brithrickfield Clerk witness to a Longstone deed. 
17 Ed. II." 1323. 

" Nich^ Martyn and Tho^ de Brightrighleild release to John 
Stafford the custody of Margaret d. & h. of Roger Rowland and the 
Manor of Rowland. 10 H. IV." 1408. Hurl. M.S. 1093. From 
Add. M.S. 28. J 10 fol. 47. 

" Henricus de Brythrechfold Arm' was returned amongst the names 
of the Gentry of the County of Derbyshire by the Commissioners. 
12. H.VI." 1433. Fuller's Worthier of England 1662. 



DERBYSHIRE DIALECT. 

T'CRISMAS PUDDIN. 
If you wisli ta ma'e a puddhi e which ivvery won delights, 
Ov a duzzen new leyd eggs, vo mim ta'e th' yokes an whites ; 
Beat em well up in a bason till thay thororly comboine, 
An shred an chop sum suit up parlickelarly foine. 

Ta'e a paand a well stoaned reasins, an a paand a currans dried, 
A paand a paanded sugar, an a paand a peel beside ; 
Stir em aw well up together, wi a paand a wheafen flaar. 
An let em stond ta sattle fur a quarter ov an haar. 

Then tee t'puddin in a cloth, an put it intu't 'pot — 
Sum foaks loike t'watter cowd, an sum prefer it hot- - 
Bur tho ah dunno which a thcese tow methods a shud preise, 
Ah know it owt to boil an haar fur ivvery paand it weighs. 

Wen t'puddins ta'eii aat at pot, an put on ter a dish, caw t'childer, an let 
em march befoar it az its carried intu't sittin rowm, wi little flags e tlier 
bonds, to stick intow it wen its placed on't table. Yo might larn em ta 
haat a at t'loines, or to sing em. — Antiquary, January, 1871 . 



Population. 



igr 



In 1851, the parish of Longstone had 184 houses and 909 
Inhabitants, of whom 457 were males and 452 females ; the rateable 
value was £5097 2s. 3d; Great Longstone had 120 houses and 
504 inhabitants ; its rateable value was £3980 5s. 4d. Little 
Longstone had 29 houses and 154 inhabitants, its rateable value 
was £630. Wardlow had 35 houses and 191 inhabitants, its 
rateable value was £486 16s. lid. Holme was rated at 

£1000 15s. lOd. 

No. of 
Pop. Children School 

'®73' 3 to 13. .Accoiiimod.ition 

93 
33 

1079 821 726 126 





Pop. 


Pop. 




i86r. 


1871. 


Great Longstone & Holme... 




515 


Little Longstone 




134 


Rowland 




67 


Hassop 




105 



16 I 
15 I 



Comparing the Census of 1891 and three previous ones : 





1S31. 


1851. 


1891. 


1901 


Great Longstone 


.. 566 


564 


635 


478 


Little Longstone 


.. 146 


154 


145 


145 


Wardlow 


.. 149 


191 


140 


119 


Brushfield ... 


34 


28 


26 


19 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

November 5th, 1709. 
We the Inhabitants of Longston whose names are here unto 
subscribed do consent and agree that whosoever is taken stealing 
any hedge wood or bringing home any such wood who have none 
of their own or felloniously taking away any goods of any persons 
within the said liberty, that the persons so taken shall be prosecuted 
at a public charge and the said charge to be payd by the Head 
boroughs of the said Town of Longston. Witness our hands 



Rob. Wright. 
Sam Mills. 
Robert Huslor. 
Anthony Clayton. 
Joseph Scamadine. 
John . . . His Mork. 
Tho. White. 
John Tomlinson. 



Richaid Hodgkinson 
George Flint. 
Will. Hodgkinson. 
Joseph Jackson. 
Tho. Hodgkinson. 
William Hodgkinson. 
Samson Hodgkinson. 
Joseph Furnice. 
John Heaward. 



ig2 Longstone Records, 

STOKE FLAT WATER SCHEME. 

In 1895 the Parish Council wrote to Dr. Fentem, the Medical 
Officer of Health, complaining of the condition of the drainage and 
water supply of the township. 

In 1896, Dr. Fentem, in his Report to the Rural District Council, 
drew attention to numerous urgent appeals that were made to him 
on the subject of the want of water. 

In 1897, the Rural District Council appointed a Sanitary Com- 
mittee to prepare Schemes for all Parishes requiring water, with 
Messrs. Sterling & Swann of Chapel-en-le-Frith as advisory 
Engineers. 

The Engineers were instructed to report on the best means of 
supplying water to groups of Parishes in the northern part of the 
district. 

In 1898, The Engineers submitted their reports and estimates, 
including the Scheme No. 1, known as the Stoke Flat Water 
Scheme. 

This Scheme embraced the following Parishes or parts of Parishes: 
Froggatt, Calver, Stoney Middleton, Part of Eyam, Hassop, 
Rowland, Great Longstone, Little Longstone, and Ashford, having 
a total population of 2,514, a rateable value of £26,948, and an 
assessable value of £13,625, 

The source of the supply is Stoke Flat, i^ery generally referred to 
as Froggatt Edge. The land is the property of the Duke of Rutland 
and situate in the parish of Baslow and Bubnell. 

The average summer yield was estimated at 72,126 gallons in 24 
hours, and the altitude of the site is 830 feet. 

The Total cost was estimated at £17,000. The apportionments 
of the cost between the contributary places and other particulars 
are given in the following table. 

In accordance with this Scheme, Reservoirs were constructed at 
Rowland and Headstones, and the townships were supplied witn 
water in 1903. 



stoke Flat Water Scheme. 193 

BAKEWELL RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL. 



Stoke Flat Water Scheme [Continued page 194.) 



Parish. 


.S 


cS 
S 

£ 


(Estimated) Assessable Value 
^ for Special Sanitary Purijoses. 


a 
00 
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a 

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1 

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Existing Debt. 


to Apportionment. 


Amount. 
£ s. d. 


Purpose. 


PROGGATT 

CALVER 

STONET MIDDLETON 

A 1* 1 Es^'"'^^*^<^ Population &Number i 
E YAM 1 _^j ^j^^^^^ j^ ^^ supplied <■ i 

HASSOP 

ROWLAND 

GREAT LONGSTONE ... ... 

LITTLE LONGSTONE 

ASHPORD 


420 

70S 

1169 

2300 

1129 
278 
2879 
1030 
2509 


335 

1405 
1737 

437G 

1543 

932 

7034 

4284 
5302 


158 

898 

1057 

2687 

791 

311 

3491 

1409 

2825 


83 
371 
423 

( {996) 
I". 29 

110 
57 
535 
145 
661 


21 
90 
83 

22 
11 

132 
29 

155 


1226 6 
514 3 

995 13 4 


Drainage 
Ditto. 

Drainage 


283 6 8 

1204 3 4 

860 

556 13 4 

13*5 16 8 
566 13 4 
5950 
1700 
4533 6 8 


Totals 


12,422 


26,948 


13,625 


2,514 


568 


2736 2 4 




17,000 



* A Separate Scheme is in course of preparation for the upper portion of Eyam. 

Prepared by Order of the Sanitary Committee. 

Union Offices, Baljewell, 
September, 1900. 



ALFRED HAWES, 

Clerk to the Baiiewell Rural District Council 



194 Longstone Records. 

BAKEWELL RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL. 



Stoke Flat Water Scheme (Continued.) 



Parish. 


■4^ 

m 

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O 

3l 



^ 1 


Average Annual Re- 
f Loan and Interest 
over a period of 30 




Average Rate in £ 
ment of Loan and 
aloulated on a basis 
irs not deducting 

Kent Receipts. 


Average Annual Re- 
f Loan and Interest 
over a period of 50 




Average Rate in £ 
nent of Loan and 
alculated on a basis 
irs not deducting 
.• Rent Eeeeipts. 




"3 


13 O 




'73 ^ O CU t! 


■a a 




imated 
repayi 

Brest c; 
M yei 
Watei 




imate 
ment 
pread 




imate 
repa 
Brest 
30 y 
Wate 


imate 
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pread 








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£ s. 


d. 


s. d. 


£ s. 


d. 


s. d. 


PROGGATT 


l/tJOtlis 


14. 3 


8 


1 10 


10 11 


9 


1 4 


CALVER 


4i/G0ths 


60 7 


4 


1 4 


44 


7 


1 


STONEY MIDDLETON 


3/60"'= 


43 3 


7 


10 


31 9 


5 


7i 


T\r ( Estimated PopulationG-Number "^ 

llj Y AM ^ , ,, , ,- ,* I 

(^ oi nouses to be supplied* ) 
















2/60ths 


27 17 


9 


*2i 


20 6 


lU 


*1% 


HASSOP 


if/eoihs 


67 9 


1 


1 81 


49 4 


4 


1 3 


ROWLAND 


2/60ths 


28 8 


4 


1 10 


20 15 


2 


1 4 


GREAT LONGSTONE 


21/60ths 


298 4 


10 


1 81 


217 12 


8 


1 3 


LITTLE LONGSTONE 


6/60ths 


85 4 


3 


1 2J 


62 3 


9 


101 


ASHFORD 


16/60ths 


227 4 


3 


1 7i 


165 15 


9 


I 2 










Average for 






Average for 










District. 






District. 


Totals 


60 


852 3 


1 


1 4i 


622 


3 


1 



* A Separate Scheme is in course of preparation for the upper portion of Eyam. 
Prepared by Order of the Sanitary Committee. 



Union Offices, Bakeweli, 
September, 1900. 



ALFRED HAWES, 
Clerk to the Bakeweli Rural District Council. 



Urban Powers. 195 

URBAN POWERS FOR THE R. I). C, 

Re GREAT LONGSTONE. 



Investing Rural District Council with Urban Powers : Determining 
Special Expenses.— BAKEWELL RURAL DISTRICT.- 
Great Longstone Contributory Place. 
TO THE RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL OF BAKEWELL; 
and to all others whom it may concern. 



WE, THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT BOARD, having received 
and duly considered an application from the Rural District Council 
of Bakewell under Section 276 of the Public Health Act, 1875, for 
the issue of an ORDER putting in force in the contributory place 
of Great Longstone, in their district, certain provisions of that Act 
as herein-after mentioned, do hereby Declare and order as 
follows: — 

Article I.— Until We, by Order otherwise direct, the pro- 
visions of Section 45 of the Public Health Act, 1875, shall be 
in force in the said contributory place, and the said Rural 
District Council shall accordingly be invested with all the 
powers, rights, duties, capacities, liabilities, and obligations of 
an Urban District Council, under those provisions, in the said 
contributory place. 

Article 11. — The expenses incurred or payable by the said 
Rural District Council in the execution of the powers conferred 
upon them by Article I. of this Order, except so far as those 
expenses may relate to their Establishment and Officers, shall 
be deemed to be Special Expenses within the meaning of the 
Public Health Act, 1875, chargeable upon the said contributory 
place. 



io6 Longstone Records. 

Article III. — This Order shall come into operation on tlie 
Eighteenth day of December, One thousand nine hundred and 
five, and the said Rural District Council shall cause it to he 
published once in ^ome newspaper circulated within their 
District before that date. 

Given under the Seal of Office of the Local Government Board, 
this Twenty-first day of November, in the year One thousand nine 
hundred and five. 

G. VV. BALFOUR, 
(l.s.) President. 

NOEL T. KERSHAW, 

Assistant Secretary. 

Urban powers of a similar character to the above had been 
obtained in respect of other parishes in the district, and recently 
Great Longstone found it necessary to obtain similar (delegated) 
powers from the Rural District Council. The Rural District have 
powers under the Public Health Act to undertalie public scavenging, 
and this Order enables them to provide public "tips" for the deposit 
of dry rubbish and refuse. 



SAIXT GILES AND THH WAKES. 



The annual festival of the Wakes was originally appointed to 
celebrate the consecration of the Village Church. In early times 
the people assembled in the Church on the Vigil or Eve of the day 
of Dedication and carried lights with them. It was this waking or 
watching at night which gave the name of wake to these festivals. 
The feast was at first celebrated on the very day of the Dedication 



St. Giles and the Wakes. 197 

and continued for a whole week. Afterwards it was transferred to 
the nearest Sundaj', as a day better suited for the attendance of the 
people at the public services of the Church. Our Wakes are kept 
according to the old style of the Calendar which is eleven days 
later than the new style. The new style was adopted in England 
in the year 1751, and eleven days were struck out of the Calendar 
by order of Parliament. What was the eleventh of September 
then became the first, and if we refer to the Calendar we shall find 
the first of September is St. Giles's day, the Saint to whom our 
Church is dedicated. He is the patron Saint of the Woodland, of 
lepers and of those struck by some sudden misery and driven into 
solitude like the wounded hart. The following is his legend : he was 
an Athenian of Royal blood and his miraculous powers of healing 
the sick attracting the veneration of the people. St. Giles fled from 
his country and turned hermit, dwelling in a cave and living upon 
the fruits of the forest and the milk of a favorite hind. Once when 
the King of France was hunting, the hind pursued by hounds and 
wounded by an arrow, took refuge in the cave, and the hunters who 
followed finding an aged man praying and the hind crouching at 
his side, asked forgiveness. The Saint died in his cave, A.D. 541. 
On the site was built the Abbey of Saint Giles, one of the greatest 
of the Benedictine communities of the City of St. Giles with its 
magnificent Churches. The Saint has been venerated in England 
and Scotland. In 1117 Matilda, wife of Henry I. founded St. Giles 
Hospital for Lepers, which has given its name to a parish outside 
London. The Parish Church, Edinburgh, 1359, was dedicated to 
the Haint. After the Reformation, St. Giles was retained in the 
Calendar, September 1st. The patron Saint of those driven into 
solitude is represented on one of our Church windows — an aged man 
in the dress of a Benedictin'e Monk, an arrow in his bosom, and the 
hind fawning at his feet. Par : Mag : 



IgS Longstone Records. 

THE CROSS. THE STOCKS, AND THE ITXFOLD. 

The Village Cross on the Green is of great antiquity, quite plain 
in character and very similar in appearance to the Churchyard 
Cross before the restoration of the latter in 1897 the actual Cross 
being absent from the Shaft head The Shaft rests on an octagonal 
base and is approached by 5 steps. 

The Stocks of Great Longstone were fixed in the most public 
spot near the foot of the steps to the Cross. Less than 50 years 
ago, when these steps were repaired, the Stocks were removed to 
the regret of the old .inhabitants. Sales of cattle took place here 
twice a year. A Meeting was held annually to show and compare 
every man's mark or brand for cattle, sheep, &c. Travelling 
hawkers were allowed to sell their wares there. 

The Stocks were a common mode of ptuiishmcnt in almost every 
Parish for drunkenness and resisting the Constable or other Parish 
officials. Village Stocks were usually placed near the Church. 
The Bell-ringers' rules at Hathersage about 1650 conclude with the 
following lines: — 

" But whoso doth these orders disobey, 
Unto the Stocks \vc will take him straightway. 
There to remain until he he willing 
To pay his foifeit and the Clerk a shilling." 
In Little Longstone there are still the remains of the Stocks in 
good preservation. 

In these days, such a rough and ready mode of punishment would 
be considered barbarous and demoralising, but doubtless for many 
centuries it was found useful and efficacious and was rigorously 
enforced without Judge or Jury. At a Great Court Barrmote for 
the Soak and Wapentake of Wlrksworth, Oct. 10, 1665, the follow- 
ing Article or Law was passed : — " We say that every Barr-master 
or his Deputy ought to have a pair of Stocks, at some convenient 
place within this Division, the same to he built at the charges of 
the Lord of the Field or Farmer, by the benefit arising out of the 



I 

en 

H 
O 

o 

X 



H 

r 



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z 




The Cross, the Stocks, and the Pinfold, 199 

Fines, and such persons as swear, curse or commit any otiier mis- 
demeanor, on the iMine, fit to be punished in the Stocks; the Barr- 
master shall punish such offenders any time, under the space of 
twelve hours, as the offence shall require." 

The most ancient of the old-time punishments is the pillory, which 
existed in England before the Conquest. The pillory was a machine 
made of wood, consisting of a post and frame fixed on a platform 
and raised several feet from the ground. The culprit stood behind 
it with his hands and feet thrust through holes, so as to be exposed 
in the front of it. The Whipping post, another form of punishment, 
has also become obsolete. 

The Pinfold of Great Longstone is at the bottom of Church lane 
en the East side. It has been in disuse for many years and has 
become dilapidated and an eyesore. The last "Pinner" was Mr. 
Matthew Hill. 

The Pinfold of Little Longstone is on the West of the Village to 
the left hand on tiie road to Headstones. It too has long been in 
disuse. 

According to the " Survey of Little Longson and .Mornsodale 
belonginge to y right Honorable William L. Cavendish, taken by 
William Senior 1611," the site of the Pinfold was at that date on 
the South side of the road as you enter the Village from Great 
Longstone not far from and nearly opposite to the Stocks. Never- 
theless "the oldest inhabitant" does not quite believe the fact. 



HHFOKH THH COMMONS IXCLOSURE ACT, 18.0. 

About 1764. 

Case of the proprietors of Estates in Great Longston and 

Wardlow within the Manor of Ashford with respect to the 

intended Inclosure of the Commons and Wasts within the 

said Manor and the Manor of .\'onyash. 

That within the said Manor of Ashford there are four townships 

or Vills called Ashford, Sheldon, Great Longstone, and Wardlow, 

and two large Commons one called Ashford Common and the other 



200 Longstone Records. 

called Lonuston Common each nearly of the same extent and the 
Land in each nearly equal in value except that part of Longston 
Common called the Edge which is more rocky and barren than any 
part of the Ashford Common. 

That the several proprietors of Estates in Ashford and Sheldon 
and their tenants have for many years past if not immemorially 
taken and enjoyed the pasturage and benefit of Ashford Common 
exclusive of the proprietors of Estates in Longston and Wardlow 
and their tenants and the proprietors of Estates in Longston and 
Wardlow and their tenants for all the same time in like manner 
have enjoyed Longston Common distinct and separate nor have any 
proprietors of Estates in Ashford t>r Sheldon pretended to inter- 
common with them. 

That a considerable part of Longston Common is very mountain- 
ous and rocky and utterly incapable of improvement and other parts 
where Lead Mines have been carried on and covered with large 
heaps of rubbish called hillocks which renders those parts not 
capable of improvement but at such an extravagant expente that 
it would not answer in point of profit to improve them. 

Therefore considering those disadvantages and the expense which 
will be incurred in obtaining an Act of Parliament and in surveying 
and dividing the said Common and which afterwards must ensure 
in inclosing the same it is apprehended that no advantage would 
arrive to the proprietors of Estates in Longston and Wardlow from 
the intended inclosure whether Longston Common is to be allotted 
to them only or whether they are to partake promiscuously with 
the proprietors of Estates in Ashford and Sheldon in the division 
and allotment of both Commons but that it would be more for the 
interest of the proprietors of Estates in Longston and Wardlow to 
enjoy Longston Common in the manner it is now used separate and 
distinct from Ashford and Sheldon especially if the Duke of 
Devonshire is to be allowed a'' 14th share thereof in respect of his 

° One eighteenth part or share was aUotted to the Dills'^ -•! I ).\ ..nsliire as LortI of the Manors 
ot Asliford and Edensor by tlie Act ^o George III. 



Before the Commons Inclosure Act, loi 

Royalty which appears to them to be an unreasonable share as by 
an Act 1763 passed the last Sessions of Parliament for inclosin<4 the 
Manor of Litton which adjoins to Longston Common and the land 
much of the same nature and value no more than an 18th share 
was allowed to the Lord of that Manor in respect of his Royalty. 

That if the proprietors of Estates in Ashford and Sheldon should 
join with the proprietors of Estates in Monyash in an application 
to Parliament for an Act for inclosing all the Commons generally 
within the Manors of Ashford and Monyash the proprietors of 
Estates in Longstone and Wardlow are desirous that the same may 
not extend to Longston Common they being willing to consent if 
necessary to be excluded by any Act for that purpose from any 
share of Ashford Common provided that Longston Common may 
re -.lain uninclosed and that there may be a clause inserted in such 
Act to exclude the proprietors of Estates in Ashford and Sheldon 
and their tenants from any Common Right in or upon Longston 
Common. 

But if contrary to the inclinations of the proprietors of Estates 
in Longston and Wardlow an Act should pass for inclosing all the 
Commons within the Manor of Ashford so as to include Longston 
Common then it is desired by the said proprietors of Estates m 
Longstone and Wardlow that Longston Common may be allotted 
distinctly to and amongst the said proprietors and that Ashford 
Common may also be separately and distinctly allotted to and 
amongst the proprietors of Estates in Ashford and that the said 
two Commons may not be confounded together as has been proposed. 
That one Mr. John Longston who has not more than 15 acres of 
land in Longston aforesaid claims a right to 200 sheep gates on 
Longston Common and as is pretended derives such claim under a 
Grant from a Countess of Shrewsbury formerly Lady of the Manor 
of Ashford and under whom it is presumed the Duke of Devonshne 
claims the said Manor of Ashford which claim if allowed and if 
Mr. Longston in respect thereof should be allotted a share of 
Longston Common in proportion as 200 gates is to the whole nuni- 



202 Longstone Records. 

ber of sheep usually kept on the said Common or which the same 
can maintain it is apprehended that his share would amount to near 
a tenth part of the whole which would greatly injure the proprietors 
of Estates in Longston and Wardlow by reducing their shares of 
the said Common unless the land to be allotted to the said IMr_ 
Longston was to be deducted out of the Lord's share which appears 
but reasonable in case the priviledge claimed was granted to him by 
a former Lord or Lady of the said Manor whose rights ought not to 
affect the said proprietors or prejudice them in their Right of 
Common unless those under whom they claim joined in such grant 
as the Bit of Month or pasturage of the said Common in Longston 
immemorially belonged to the proprietors of Estates in Longston and 
Wardlow in respect of such their Estates. 

That the nature of this claim and the consequences thereof if 
allowed seem to be subjects too important and difficult for the 
decision of a lot of Commissioners who are only Surveyors and 
Valuers of land, as possibly in the discussion of such claim and in 
considering the effects resulting from them, in case it should be 
allowed, many nice questions and doubts may arise not unworthy of 
the determination of Parliament. 

These proposals for the Inclosure of the said Commons which 
have been offered to the proprietors of Estates within the said 
Manor of Ashford mention that one Commissioner is already named 
and two other persons to be Commissioners are to be named by the 
Duke of Devonshire and the other by the land owners. The Com- 
missioner already named is supposed to have been named by the 
Lord of the Manor of Monyash. 

As the Lord of each Manor will have the nomination of a Com- 
missioner, the landowners in Longston and Wardlow think it 
reasonable, if the intended Act is to include Longston Common, 
that they should have the nomination of one Commissioner without 
any connection with the landowners in Ashford, Sheldon, or Mony- 
ash and are willing that such landowners may have the nomination 
of a Commissioner or Commissioners if they think fit. 



Before the Commons Inclosure Act. 203 

UNSIGNED PETITION. 

To the Right Honorable the Lord Vernon of Sedbury in the 
County of Derby. 

We the Freeholders, Coypholders and other Tenants and 
Occupiers of Lands in Great Longston and Wardlow most Humbly 
Beg leave to represent to your Lordship, the Hardship that will be 
imposed upon the proprietors of Estates, in the above Hamblets, if 
the Commons be Inclosed upon the Terms now proposed, in par- 
ticular in Relation To a share thereof claimed by Mr. Thomas 
Longston of Two Hundred Sheep Gates, which he says was granted 
to his Family by the Countess of Shrewsbury, which upon a 
moderate Computation will amount to near a Tenth of the said 
Commons as they are now ; and as the proposals include Ashford, 
Holm &c all to have shares according to their Lands, and His 
Grace the Duke of Devonshire a Fourteenth share for his Royalty, 
and the above Claim of Mr. Longsdon who has but fifteen Acres of 
Land within the Liberty, if it be put in Execution, there will be very 
small share to the real owners of Lands, We therefore Humbly 
Hope that your Lordship will please either put a stop to any Divis- 
ion, or Cause Inquiry to be made How such Claims are made, which 
if just, we hope should be deducted out of His Grace's Royalty, and 
not out of the Real property of other persons who are entirely 
Ignorant of such Grant, and would hurt and in a great measure 
Ruin the General pait of the Inhabitants, We most Hiunbly leave 
the whole to your Lordship and are 

Your Lordship's &c. 

Will be signed if required by a Hundred. 



THE INCLOSURE ACT AND AWARD. 

It is only necessary to add tbat the date of the Commons Inclosure Act, 
is 1810, and that of the Commons Inclosure Award 1824. The Act is 
entitled : — 

"An Act for inclosing Lands in the Townships of Great Longstone, Little 
Longstone, and Wardlow, in the County of Derby, gth June, 1810." 

In the Act the acreage is given as 1500 acres or thereabouts. In the 
Award it is given as 1742 acres, 

The Inclosure Award is in duplicate. One cop}' was kept for many years 
at Longstone Hall until claimed by the Parish Council. The other copy 
is in the custody of the Board of Agriculture. 



204 



Longstone Records. 



DOMESDAY BOOK. 

Sec. I. p. 30. 
The Manor of Aisseford with the Berewires'Ralunt. 



Langesdune. 

Hetescope. 

Caloure. 

Basselau. 

Bubenenli. 

Berceles. 

Scelhadun. 

Tadintune. 

Flagun. 

Prestecliue. 

Blacheuuelle. 



Longstone. 

Hassop. 

Calver. 

Baslow 

Buhnell. 

Birchill. 

Sheldon. 

Taddington. 

Flagg. 

Priestcliff. 

Blackwell. 



MANOR OF ASHFORD. 



GREAT COURT B.\RON. 



The Manor of Ashford includes the present Poor Law parishes 
of Ashford, Great Longstone, Sheldon, and Wardlow. 

His Grace the Duiie of Devonshire, Lord of the Manor. 

Steward, Mr. F. J. Taylor. 
The Manorial Rights have been held nearlv as follows, 
Before the Conquest. Colne. 



At the Survey. 

1 199. 

1250. 

1319- 

1350. (circa.) 



1408. 
1550. 
1673. 
1675. 



De Ferrars, Earl of Derby. 
Wenunwyn, Lord of Powisland. 
Griffin, son of Wenunwvn. 
Edmund Plantagenet, Earl of Kent. 
Sir Thomas Holland. 
Joan, Fair Maid of Kent. 
John Neville, Earl of Westmoreland. 
Sir William Cavendish. 



Christiana, Countess of Devon. 
William, Earl of Devon. 
Duke of Devonshire. 



Cavendish 
Family. 



Ms.nor of Ash ford. 



205 



The Dukes of Devonshire were Lords of Ashford 1731 — 84. 
Philip Gell was Lord of the Manor of Bakewell and Longstone* 
1781. Co'x's Calendar, p. 320 — 321. 



TO Wit 



View of Frankpledge and Great Court Baron deal with 
Copyhold matters. 
(Kiiiiily contributed by Mr. F. J. Taylor.) 
E.vtract from Court Rolls, shewing the Customs of the Manor witli 
respect to the tenure of the Estates therein. 27th Jidy, J 767. 

The Manor j The Great Court Baron of the Most Noble 

OF Ashford \ William Duke of Devonshire specially holden 
I at Ashford in and for the Manor aforesaid the 
Twenty-seventh day of July, in the seventh 
year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord George 
the third, by the Grace of God King of Great 
Britain &c., and in the year of our Lord One 
thousand seven hundred and sixty-seven. 
Before Godfrey Heathcote, Gentleman. 
Steward there. 
Thomas Longsdon George Heyward Thomas Hill 
John Harris Charles Hall Joshua Robinson 

Robert Wright William Low John Nailer 

John Smith 
Fransis Coates 
Fransis White 
William Nailer 
Lawrance Wain 



The Names 

OF THE 

Homagers 

TO 
ENQCIRE AT. 



Samuel White 
William Oldfield 
Thomas Green 
Thomas Finney 
Joseph Baggaley 



Joseph Blackden 
Anthony Frost 
John Robinson 
Samuel Feepound 
Jonathan James 



Which said Homagers being duly sworn and charged to declare upon 
their oaths the customs of the said Manor with respect to the Tenure of the 
estates thereon Do say as follow- - 

I. That all the several Messuages, Lands, Tenements, and Hereditaments 
lying within the said Manor (exclusive of such as are the proper estate and 
inheritance of the Lord of the said Manor) are in part of a Freehold Tenure 
and the rest of a Copyhold or Customary Tenure. 

* Tlie above requires explanation, seeing that Great Longstone is in the Manor of Ashford, 



2o6 Longstone Records. 

2. That every freeholder within the said Manor ought to make his 
appearance at the Lords Great Court Baron holden twice in every year, the 
one at or near about Easter the other at or near about Michaelmas, 
otherwise without lawful excuse to be amerced, and that every customary 
Tenant ought also to make his peisotial appearance at the said two Courts, 
and also at evcr>' other Court Baron which the Lord may hold, one in every 
three weeks if he so please, or in default of such appearance (if duly 
summoned) without lawful excuse to be amerced. 

3. That all the Copyholders or customary estates witliin this Manor are 
held of the Lord of the said Manor by Copy of Court Roll under payment 
of certain yearlv rents and performances of the customary duties and 
services of the said Manor, in respect of such estates, that the yearly rents 
of t'le said Copyhold Estates are as follow, viz., within tlie several vills 
of Ashford and Great Longstoce eightpence for every messuage, fourpence 
for everv cottage, and eightpence for every customary acre of land as the 
same hath antiently been held, meared, or baulked out, be the same more 
or less, and within the several vills of Sheldon and Wardlow four pence for 
everv messuage, two pence for every cottage, and four pence for every 
customary acre of land as the same hath anciently been held, meared, or 
baulked out, be the same more or less, and for every Beastgate within 
Sheldon pasture, being fifty-one in number, or for the lands set apart in lieu 
thereof, one shilling and seven pence. 

4. That the said Copyhold estates are demisable in fee, fee Tail, for life, 
or for years, and that on the admittance of every tenant a certain fine 
becomes due and payable to the Lord of the Manor, that is to say, one 
year's customary rent of the premises to which the Tenant shall be so 
admitted, except for the Eeastgates in Sheldon Pasture, for which no fine 
either on death or alienation is due. 

5. That an estate tail of and in such customary lands and tenements 
and all remainders expectant thereon have at all times been and by the 
custom of this Manor may be barred, docked, and destroyed by the surrender 
or forfeiture of the tenant in tail, and that such surrender or forfeiture is as 
effectual for those purposes as a fine and recovery w<iuld be of a freehold 
estate at the common law. 

6. That there are upon the Court Rolls many instances of estates tail 
created both by surrenders and Wilis, some with Rem'* over to strangers, 
and others with remainder to the Surrenderor or Devisor in fee, and all 



Manor of Ashford. 207 



barred by surrender of the tenant in tail, and that the person to whose 
use such surrender has been passed hath quietly enjoyed against the heirs in 
tail and person in remainder or reversion. 

7. That in the Court Rolls of this Manor which have been carefully 
examined, there are no instances of a recovery suffered of any copyhold 
or customary estates within the Manor save one recovery only by Thomas 
Goodwin which was suffered within the memor>- of several of the Homagers 
aforesaid by the inattention of the then Steward and in prejudice of and 
deviation from the custom of this Manor respecting Intails of Customary 
estates within the said Manor. 

8. That a widow is dowable by custom in one third part of her 
husband's customary estate of inheritance within this Manor in like manner 
as she would become dowable of one third part of his freehold estate of 
inheritance by the common law. 

9. That a husband of a Feme Covert tenant in possession of a customary 
estate of inheritance within this Manor if he has issue of her body born 
alive and happen to survive her is by the custom of this Manor entitled to 
hold all such customary estate during his life as by the curtesy of England 
and may demand admittance accordingly. 

10. That all the occupiers of lands and tenements within this Manor as 
well freehold as customary or copyhold ought to grind all their Corn and 
grain at the Mill of and belonging to the Lord of the said Manor so as the 
Miller in the same use them honestly. 

11. That no Herriots become due to the Lorfi of the said Manor upon 
the death of the said tenant. 

12. That if any Copyholder or customary tenant of this Manor shall 
demise or let his copyhold estate or any part thereof to any person whatso- 
ever for a longer time than one year otherwise than by surrender or licence 
had at the Lords Court, he thereby incurs a forfeiture of his copyhold estate 
within this Manor. 

13. That every Copyholder within this Manor is intitled to cut down, 
take and dispose of any timber, trees, wood, and underwood growing upon 
the same, so always that a sufficient quantit}' be left for the repairs of the 
buildings thereon. 

14. That all the tenants within this Manor as well freehold as customary 
are by immemorial custom bound at their own expense to clean the Mill 
Dam or watercourse leading to the Lords Mill, and also repair the Wear of 

N 



2o8 Longstone Records. 

the said Dam between a Toftstead whereon a cottage lately stood, then 
inhabited by John Heyward, and which Toftstead is now in the possession 
of Mr. John Creswell, and to the shuttle in the Wear of the said Dam, 
containing in length fifty-seven yards or thereabouts, and that the inhabi- 
tants of Ashford ought to repair twenty-two yards of the said Wear at the 
West end thereof, and the inhabitants of SheUlon thirteen yards from thence 
eastwardly, the inhabitants of Great Longstone twelve yards further east- 
wardly, and the inhabitants of Wardlow ten yards the remainder of the 
said Wear and Watercourse which goes down to the said shuttle. 



BARMOTE COURT. 

(KiniUy confrihufeii by Mr. F. J. Taylor.) 



By Act of Parliament (1852) the Manors or Liberties of Ashford, 
Tideswell, Peak Forest, and Hartington were united for Barmote 
Court purposes. Before the Act, a separate Barmote Court was 
held for each of these Manors. The Duke of Devonshire was Lord 
of the separate Manors of Ashford, Tideswell, and Hartington. 
Peak Forest was a separate Mining Liberty, but it is doubtful if it 
aspired to the dignity of a Manor, and probably it was part of 
another Manor. The Court Baron in these Manors had no 
jurisdiction in mineral matters. Before the Act of 1852 each 
Manor had its own Barmote Court, over which a Steward (not 
necessarily the Steward of the Court Baron) presided. These 
Barmote Courts are probably older than the feudal system. There 
were antl still are Copyholds in each of the three Manors, Tideswell, 
Ashford, and Hartington. 

Little Longstone is a separate Manor or Liberty. 

Litton is a separate Manor or Liberty, of which Lord Scarsdale 
is the Lord. 

A typical Manor was an area of land granted by the King to one 
of his subjects, in consideration of which the tenant undertook 



Manor of Ashford. 209 

certain services. To serve as a Knight in the King's wars and to 
bring with him a certain number of armed men was the usual 
service. The tenant then proceeded to divide his Manor into three 
parts. The pick of the land he kept in his own hands, and it was 
called the Lord's demesne, and the rest he divided between his 
freeholders and his copyholders. The freeholders performed some 
service, sometimes they did Knight's service and sometimes they 
were yeomen. They had a Court of their own. The usual name 
for it was the Court Leet. At these Courts, although the Lord of 
the Manor (or his steward) presided, the Jury of freeholders were 
the judges. The service of freeholders is now represented by the 
small quit rents which are sometimes still paid. The service 
rendered by the copyholders for their land was to cultivate the 
Lord's demesnes, each had to do so many days a year, and they 
were not free men. They could not leave the Manor without the 
permission of the Lord of the Manor. The copyhold service is now 
represented by the small copyhold rent payable. The copyholders' 
Court has survived the freeholders' Court and all transactions 
in copyhold property still take place in the Copyholders' Court. 
In that Court the powers of the Steward were much greater than 
in the freehold Court. For a long time (until the reign of Edward 
I.) not only did the King grant Manors, hut his tenants granted 
sub-Manors, and so on ad infinitum, until it was put a stop to by 
Act of Parliament. In this way a great many small Manors, may 
have come into existence, which were not large enough to admit 
of either freehold or copyhold tenants. This seems very simple, 
but, when things are looked into, very few Manors are found true 
to type. There must have been some sort of a feudal system 
in England before the conquest, but certainly the Manors were 
anything but typical. As an illustration of what is meant by 
Manors not being true to type, there is good reason to believe 
that the copyholds of the Manor of Ashford were really not 
copyholds but customary freeholds. The copyholders may have 



2IO Longstone Records. 

been as free as the freeholders, for although they held their estates 
by copy of Court Roll they never held them " by the will of the 
Lord," which a true copyholder always did. 

The Courts Baron were called " Great " probably to give them im- 
portance. But there is a real distinction between the Great and 
Little Barmote Courts. The former was held at regular intervals 
once or twice a year, and the Grand Jury was and still is appointed. 
The Grand Jury had important duties to perform throughout the 
year, and two of them had to be present to give sanction to most of 
the official acts of the Barmaster. The Small Bai'mote Courts 
were held to try actions brought to settle disputes between miners, 
and might be held as often as the actions pending required. 

A Manor may be sold just like any other estate. The Lord of 
the Manor is the absolute owner of the area subject to the rights of 
others. These rights usually leave the Lord of the Manor very 
little : a right to a few pence from each of the freeholders (which 
is not worth collecting) a right to a few pence from each of the 
copyholders which the Steward of the Manor collects to prevent 
him from losing sight of the copyhold property which is transferred 
in his Court or by his agency out of Court ; the appointment of the 
Steward which is worth something as the Steward is entitled by 
custom to fees; the minerals under the copyhold property and 
under the waste lands and the surface of the waste lands subject 
to the common rights. This and the Lord's demesne is about all 
that is left to the Lord or absolute owner of the Manor when 
the rights of others established by custom have been deducted. 

As to our mining customs there are probably Judges on the 
Bench who do not know that they exist, and it is doubtful if any 
man living has a really good knowledge of them. 



Manor of Ashford. 



211 



A Breefe of the Survey of the Mannor of Asheford Belonging to 
the right honorable William Lord Cavendishe taken by William 
Senior, Anno 1616. 



Imprimis the Ashford demeasnes — viz. 7 Asheford acres 1 
iu Bakewell meadows ; 571 acres, 3 roods, 39 perches ' 

Tenements & Cottages — 

Raphe Atkinson's tenement ... ... . . 

William Smith's tenement 

John Harrice tenement 

Thomas Brownell's tenement 

Robert Vicars tenement 

William Milnes tenement 

William Hey wards tenement 

Widd : Milnes tenement 

William Goodwin tenement 

Robert Greaves tenement 

Wm. Wright & Uxor Eaton tenement 

Thomas Heyward 

Robert Lowe 

Henry Brownell 

Henry Matthew 

John RoUand 

Rise and Vallents 

Uxor Milnes 

Godfrey White 

John White 

John White 

John Thorpe 

Stone house 

Bramwell's house 

Masland's house 

Uxor Holland's house ... 

Uxor Hyde's house 

Vicar's house, yard and churchyard 

Me : that the totall of the foresaid demeasnes. Tenements ^ 
and Cottages in Asheford are ... J 



571 3 39 



49 


2 


20 


39 


I 


27 


43 


2 


00 


39 


2 


16 


37 





05 


32 


3 


25 


32 


2 


3c 


15 


2 


15 


08 


I 


00 


09 


2 


00 


08 





00 


20 


2 


36 


01 


2 


00 


24 


3 


30 


14 


I 


20 


06 


3 


10 


06 


3 


10 


02 





30 


02 





30 


00 


2 


30 


00 


2 


30 


06 





16 


00 





20 


00 





20 


00 





20 


00 





20 


00 


I 


14 


00 


2 


00 


976 


2 


03 



212 Longstone Records. 

Next follo^v the Coppie and freehoukls within the 
Lordship of Asheford, viz : — 
Imprimis -Mr. Gelle the holme bank, Marshe and Luniford ... 
Item — Roger Newton the Holme hall and lands thereto"] 
belonging ... ... ... J 

Item Winland in Asheford in 29 parcells 

Robert Vicars 

Thomas Thorpe 

George Heyward 

William Twigg 

Thomas Goodwin 

George Johnson 

William Platts 

William Milnes 

Nicholas Dale 

Robert Wragg 

John Wright 

Edward Heyward 

Henry Heyward 

William Wright 

Robert Lowe 

William Heyward th' eld"^ & yourtger 

John Greaves 

Leonard Sheldon 

Raphe and John White 

Mr. Darling in 3 parcells 

Richard Harrice 

Michael Stone 2 houses, etc. 

Bramwell's house and yard 

Brownell's cottage and yard 

Two Crawroide 

Me: that the Totall of these Coppie-holds and freehold lands are 

910* acres 2 roods 9 perches. 
The Totall of Asheford demeasnes, ut supra ... ... 571 3 39 

The Totall of the Tenements there ... ... ... 404 2 o.j 

The Totall of the Free and Coppie-hold ut supra* ... 912 o 29 



A. 


R. 


p. 


122 





00 


93 


3 


17 


52 


2 


12 


02 


3 


to 


57 


2 


2 


57 





18 


19 


3 


28 


43 


2 


20 


42 


3 


8 


42 


2 


14 


47 


2 


I 


40 


3 


3" 


27 


2 


14 


40 


3 


20 


33 


2 


11 


33 


3 


22 


30 


3 


15 


32 





21 


28 





28 


27 


I 


20 


15 


2 


10 


09 


3 


7 


01 








02 


I 


15 


00 





16 


00 





20 


00 





20 


2 


I 


10 



1S88 2 32 
* TIlis discrepancy occurs in tlir originnl. 



Manor of Ashford. 2x3 

A Breefe of the Survey of Sheldon part of the Manner of Asheford 

belonging to the said Lord. Cavendishe, taken by William Senior 

in the year 1617. a. r. p. 

Imprimis, the great farme now in the holding of 5I , 

severall tenants ... ... ... ...J ^-^ 

Abraham Smith's tenement ... ... 23 o 10 

The tenement late Raphe White ... ... ... 21 o 30 

Rolland Farme ... ... ... ... 20 o 5 

Shacklowe, the woody part ^ These held by f 160 o o 

„ the playne part J Darling and others (^ 12 o o 

John White Porter, Esq. ... ... ... 3 i 10 

Robert Vicars Porter, Esq. ... ... ... 020 

Raphe Atkinson, Harper Yard ... ... ... 1 2 00 



Toto. these ... 398 



The Coppie houlde foUowe — viz : 
Abraham Cooper 
Roger Dickens 
Roger Dale 
John Bower 
Thomas White 
George Burrowes 
Richard Atkinson 
John Sheldon 
Henry Sheldon 
Arthur Sheldon 
Henry & Peter White ... 
George Frost 
Francis White 
Henry Harrison 
Richard Sheldon 
Richard Robbinson 
William Greaves 
Raphe Sheldon 
John White 

John Cooper, house & garden 
George Barker, House cS: garden 



31 


2 


35 


29 


I 


15 


25 


3 


00 


15 


I 


00 


19 


2 


5 


10 


3 


24 


17 


I 


28 


II 


I 


35 


II 





00 


09 


3 


00 


09 


I 


00 


09 








10 


I 





7 


2 





6 


3 


32 


5 


2 


00 


4 


3 





3 





20 


8 


2 


20 








24 








20 



214 



Longstone Records. 



Yet Coppie houlde. 
Roger Frost, house and garden 
The Common pasture ... 
The meane topp of Shacklow 
The tenements 
The Coppie-hold & Common pasture 

besides Moore & Wastes. 









A. R. P. 






... 


20 








127 








06 3 20 


398 





08 




376 


I 


19 




724 


I 


-7 





A Breefe of the Survey of Great Longson part of the 
Mannor of Asheford taken as aforesaid hy Mr. Senior, 
viz : 

Tenements. 

U.vor Wragg 
William Hadfield 
William Lawnte 
Richard Naylor 
. . . Harrison 
Robert Haslam 
Robert Hey ward 
Thomas Booth 
Grace Sellers 
Raphe Mathew 
Henry Hancock 
John Swinden 
Thomas Kaye 

Coppie and Freehold. 
The Countess of Shrewsbury 
Mr. William Wright ... 
Thomas White 
William Lawnte 
Christopher Jenkins 
Richard Tattersall 
William Mornso 



A[foresaid] 


Anno 


16 


17. 


A. 


R. 


p. 


24 





08 


22 


I 


20 


20 


I 


17 


15 


2 


10 


19 





27 


14 





24 


II 


3 


33 


09 





oc 


10 


I 


3 


8 


3 


5 


5 





3 


4 


I 


6 


2 


2 





12 


. 


20 


117 


3 


10 


94 


3 


29 


58 


2 


5 


43 


3 


35 


4^ 





14 


34 


2 


25 



Manor of Ashford. 



215 



Yet Coppie and Freehot.d. 

John Tomlinson 

Mr. Sleighe 

Mr. Longson 

Rowland Tomlinson 

William Winchcombe 

Mr. Eyre 
Toto The Tenements in gr. Longson as aforesaid 
Toto The Free and Coppiehol-i as aforesaid 

Toto great Longson 

besides Commons and Wastes of about 8S7 acres 



A. R. 









33 





30 








23 


2 


20 








21 


2 


10 








16 


I 


20 








9 





30 








18 





H 


.67 


2 











526 


2 


22 








694 





22 









A Breefe of the Survey of Wardlowe, another part of the said 
Manner of Asheford, taken by Mr. Senior, 1617. 

Tenements, etc., belonging to the Lord of the Mannor, vrz : 



Nicholas Redferne 
John Ellis 
Thomas Hibbert 
Edward Longdon 
Edward James 
George Tomlinson 
Anne Hodgkinson 
Richard Hunt 
William Ratcliffe 
Edmond Gundy 
William Boore 
John Tompson 
Phillip Raworth 
Widd : Cheshire 
Foredole Croft 



A. 


R. 


p. 


37 


I 


00 


23 


I 


19 


18 


I 


29 


13 


3 


27 


01 


3 


25 


10 


I 


34 


10 





05 


09 


2 


00 


09 





30 


07 


2 


38 


05 


2 


4 


05 





34 


04 





20 


01 





00 


08 





00 



Toto 



166 2 



2l6 



Longstone Records. 



CoppiE AND Freehold in Wardlowe, viz 



Raphe James 
Richard James 
Thomas Bennett 
Nicholas Hill 
Edmond James 
Mr. Eyre 
Mr. Longson 
Thomas Fritli 
Raphe Cresswell 
Edward White 



Toto 



A. 


R. 


I". 


• 76 


2 


16 


• 43 





5 


20 


3 


27 


• 19 


2 


5 


14 


2 


15 


10 





27 


4 


I 


16 


6 





24 








20 





3 


30 


196 


I 


25 



Toto. Tenements & Cottages belonging to the Lord i55 2 25 
Toto. the Free and Coppic as above said ... ig6 i 25 

Toto. Wardlow ... ... ... 363 4 10 

besides tlie Common & Wastes. 

Toto. the inclosure and feild Lands of Asheford Lordship"! qqq 

with the demeasnes as aforesaid .. ...J ' 

Item in Sheldon as aforesaid .. ... 0724 i 27 

Item in Great Longson ut supra .. ... 0694 ° 22 

Item in Wardlow as above ,. .. 0363 4 10 

The Commons and waste grounds not reckoned in these quantities, being 

of very large e.vtent, belonging to the Manner of Aslieford. Besides Tythes 

Mills and lot of Cope, etc. 



ASHFORD. Little Court Baron of the most noble Christiana 

Countess of Devon held there- 14th Nov. 25th 

Chas. IL 1673. 

To this court came William Allen and Mary his Avife (she having 

been first examined alone and secretly) in person and surrendered in 

the same Court into the hands of the Ladv of the Manor an acre of 

land lying in a close called Wall hill Close Ihetween] the land of 



Manor of Ashford. 217 

Wm. Wright, gent., on N. and of \Vm. Lowe on S. ; half an acre of 
land lying upon Ca^vd^vall hill [between] the land of the Lady of 
the Manor on N. and of Wm. Lowe on S. ; and half an acre of land 
lying in the aforesaid close [between] the land of the Lady of the 
Manor on N. and the land lately Thos. Thorpe's on S. to the use 
and behoof of George Birdes, gent., his heirs and assigns for ever. 
To which George the Lady by her Steward granted the premisses 
aforesaid and seisin thereupon by a staff according to the custom of 
the manor aforesaid. To have and to hold the aforesaid premises 
to the aforesaid George Birdes his heirs and assigns for ever accord- 
ing to the custom of the aforesaid Manor for the rent and services 
thence afore due and of right accustomed. And he gave to the Lady 
as a fine i6d. and did fealty, and was admitted tenant thereupon. 
Extracted by Wm. Nicholson, 

Steward there. 

ASHFORD. Great Court Baron of the most noble William 

Earl of Devon held there May ist. 27th Charles 

II, 1675, before Thos. Bagshawe, gent., Steward 

there. 

To this Court came George Birds in person and surrendered in 

the same Court into the hands of the Lord of the Manor aforesaid 

I acre in a close called Wall hill Close [between] the land of Wm. 

Wright gent., on N. and of Wm. Lowe on S. ; and \ acre lying 

upon Cawdall hill [between] the land of the Lord of the Manor on 

N. and of Wm. Lowe on S. ; and ^ acre lying in the aforesaid close 

[between] the land of the Lord of the Manor on N. and the land 

lately Thos. Thorpe's on S. To the use and behoof of Wm. Allen 

and Mary his wife, their heirs and assigns for ever. Wm. and Mary 

admitted [in saine terms as in No. i.] Fine i6d. 

Extracted by Thos. Bagshawe, Steward there. 

ASHFORD. Little Court Baron of Wm. Earl of Devon, held 

20 May. 28th Charles II. 1676, before Thos. 
Bagshawe, gent., Steward there. 



2i8 Longstone Records. 

John Greaves in person surrendered into the hands of the Lord hj' 
a staff according to the custom or the Manor half a rood of land 
called " Four Swathes of land " lying in a place called Sweete 
bailees [between] the land of the Lord of the Manor on N. and S. to 
the use of Robert Holme his heirs and assigns. Robert admitted in 
similar terms. Fine id. 

E.x. by Thos. Bagshawe, Steward there. 

ASHFORD. Little Court Baron of same, 29 Dec. 29th Charles 

IL 1677, before Thos. Bagshawe, Steward. 
Mary Street, spinster, in person surrendered . . . the Western part 
of a Messuage and Cottage in Longson Magna in the possession of 
Thos. Alleyn and a piece of land there containing 9 rods of land in 
length and 4 in breadth in Longson Magna and the reversion and 
reversions of the same, to the use of Wm. Alleyn. Wm. admitted. 
Fine 2d. 

Thos. Bagshawe, Steward. 

ASHFORD. Little Court Baron of same, held at Holme Bank 
13 Oct. 32 Chas. II. 1680, before Thos. Bagshawe. 

W'm. Alleyne in person surrendered i acre (more or less) in Long- 
ston Magna lying in and upon the Wall hill [between] the land of 
Penelope Wright, Wido\v, on N. and of Wm. Lowe on S. ; i ac. ir. 
in Longston Magna, lying in and upon Cawdale hill, [between] the 
land of the Lord of the Manor on N. and of Wm. Lowe on S., to the 
use of Wm. Jackson his heirs and assigns. Wm. Jackson admitted. 
Fine 1/6. 

Thos. Bagshawe, Steward. 

ASHFORD. Little Court Baron of same, held 14 Jan., 1681. 

Robt. Holme in person surrendered ^ r. of land (more or less) 
called Foure Swaths \as above] to the use of Wm. Alleyne, his heirs 
and assigns. Wm. Alleyne admitted. Fine id. 

Thos. Bagshawe, Steward. 



Manor of Ashford. 219 

ASHFORD. Little Court Baron of same, held 13 Jun., 1685. 

Wm. Heathcote and Elizabeth his wife, Edward Harrison and 
Emma his wife, Thos Heald and Ellen his wife, surrendered a 
cottage and Croft adjoining in Ashford, known as the Sudden Flatt, 
containing 6 r. (more or less) to the use of Thos. Wright, Esq., his 
heirs and assigns. Thos. Wright admitted. Fine i/-. 

Thos. Bagshawe, Steward. 

ASHFORD. View of Frank-pledge and Great Court Baron of 
same, held 23 Apr., 1686, before Thos. Bagshaw, 
gent.. Steward there. 

Joshuah White, Wm. Alleyne, and Catherine White, widow, in 
person, surrendered 3 Cottages or tenements and a little building 
called a Cowhouse and a garden belonging, in Monsall Dale in 
Great Longstone, containing 21 virgates, [between] the land of Thos. 
Wright, esq. on E. and W., and k ac. in the upper Cowdale hill, 
[between] the land of the Lord of the Manor on N. and S., i r. in 
Pennyunke Bushes [between] the land of the Lord of the Manor on 
both sides, i r. in Littlefield [between] the land of the Lord of the 
Manor on both sides, i r. in Bamfurlong [between] the land of 
Christopher Jenkinson on N. and the King's high way on S., i r. in 
Wall hill Close [between] the land of S'' Thos. Wright on N. and of 
Wm. Lowe on S., i ac. in Nether Cowdale hill [between] the land 
of the Lord of the Manor on N. and of Wm. Lowe on S., I r. in 
Sweet balke [between the land of the Lord of the Manor on N. and 
W., in Ashford, to the use of Penelope Wright, Spinster, her heirs 
and assigns. Penelope Wright admitted. Fine 3/5. 

Thos. Bagshaw, Steward. 

ASHFORD. Little Court Baron of same Wm. E. of Devon, 

held at Great Longson, Sep. 4, 1686. 

Penelope Wright surrended the same lauds <f-c. as in last, [except 
that the spelling of one parcell is " Pennybucke bushes "] to the use 
of Thos. Wright his heirs and assigns. Thos. Wright admitted. 

Fine 'xl^* 

^^ Thos. Bagshaw, Steward. 



220 Longstone Records. 

ASHFORD. Little Court Baron of same, held 7 Apr., 1688, 

before Thos. Bagshaw, gent., Steward. 

Wm. Milnes, junr., in person, surrendered 4^ acres (more or less) 
in the Field of Ashford, commonlv called " the F"urther edge," 2 ac. 
in a close called "the Bitchstones," 3 r. in a Juger of land called 
" Kve Roods " [between] the land of Robt. Moore, gent., on N. and 
S., I r. upon the same Juger [between] the land of the lord of the 
Manor on S. and of Robt. Moore on N., i r. upon the same Juger 
[between] the land of the Lord of the Manor on N. and of Wm. 
Finney on S., i r. upon a place called " Oare pitts " [between] the 
land of the Lord of the Manor on N. and of John Greatbatch on 
S., 3 r. upon a place called Castlewayside with the King's high 
way on W., i r. upon Castleway aforesaid [between] the land of 
the Lord of the Manor on E. and of Elizabeth Milnes on W., i r. 
upon the same Juger [between] the land of the Lord of the Manor 
on both sides, 3 r. upon a place called Finndale [between the land 
of the Lord of the \Lanor on N. and of Wm. Milnes, senr., on S., 
6 r. in a close called "the upper Broad Lea Close" [between] the 
land of the Lord of the Manor on both sides, i r. of land being in 
English a " Headland " to a Juger called " the Side," and i r. in 
a close called " the Wash " with its purtinences in Ashford afore- 
said. To the use of Thos. Wright, gent., his heirs and assigns. 

Thos. Wright admitted. Fine 7/10. 

Thos. Bagshaw, Steward. 

ASHFORD. Little Court Baron of same, held 5 Aug., 1695. 

Matilda Balam, bv Wm. Wright her attorney, (in \irtue of a 

power of attorney to him and Wm. Lowe, which was produced and 

allowed, bearing date 16 Jun., last) surrendered all that messuage 

or tenement in Longson now or late in the occupation of Edward 

Heathcotte, 3 ac. (more or less) upon Cawdehill in the tenure of 

Nicholas Blackwell, i ac. upon ^^'all hill in the tenure of Henry 

Scamadine, ^ ac. in Highlow meadow in the tenure of Wm. Low, 

I r. in Benning-balke in Longson. To the use of Thos. Wright, 

esq., his heirs and assigns. Thos. Wright admitted. [Fine not 

ailed in.] 

Thos. Bagshaw, Steward. 




MAM)H HOL'SI-;, l.iiil.i-, l.oNGSTONh 




THE VILLAGE, Lll'lLli LUNt.b 1 OMi. 



Manor of Little Longstone, 221 

ASHFOHD. Little Court Baron of William Duke of Devon, 

held at Holme stone within the Manor aforesaid, 

2 April, 1711. 

Thos. White and Ann his wife, James Milnes, and John Tomlin- 

son, in person, surrendered a Close called the Coumbs Close, 

containing 3 ac. (more or less) in Longson, to the use of Thos. 

Wright, esq., his heirs and assigns. Thos. Wright admitted. Fine 

2/- 

Charles Bagshaw, Steward. 



THE MANOR OF LITTLE LOXGSTON'E. 



The Manorial Rights have been held nearly as follows : — 
1086 De Ferrars, Earl of Derby. 

Robert Fitz Waltheof. 
Mountjoy. 
Sir John Blount. 
Edensor. 

Sir Thurston Bouer. 
1474 Robert or Richard Shakerley. 

1580 (circa) Bess of Hardwicke, Countess of Shrewsburv. 
There is some reason* to think that the de Longsdons had 
Manorial Rights — probablv a Sub-Manor — at a very early period. 
It is possible that Ashford and Little Longstone maj' have been 
practically one Manor at that time. 

* («) Robert FitzWaltheof who succeeded De Ferrars, Earl of Derby (Lord 
of both Manors) " gave lands to Matthew de Longsdon" : 
{b) " There was a Moiety of this Manor held by the Longsdons in the 12th 

Century" : 
(c) " It is asserted that the Longsdons had a Charter of Free Warren 
between Matlock and Mam Tor from the Conqueror." 

[b and c are ex. from " Old Halls and Manors of Derbyshire J.T."] 
(e/) John Longston claimed rights on Longston Common under a Grant from 
the Countess of Shrewsbury. [Exd. from case of Proprietors of 
Estates within the Manor of Ashford, ISth Century.' 



22 2 Longstone Records. 

The following remarks refer to the querj' — Who is the present 
Lord ? 

" The legal theory (the Common Law) is that the Owner of all 
land is tenant to some Lord, and, where no other person can prove 
title to the lordship, it is presumed to be in the King; but from 
what 1 have read, 1 think that plenty of land has always been held 
upon tenures older than the feudal system and never did form part 
of a feudal manor." 

" The Statute followed the Common Law." 

" When it is remembered that England was first conquered by 
the Celts, then by Romans, then by the Saxons or Angles and 
more or less by the Danes and finally by the Normans, is it likely 
that the feudal system or any other system was ever universal ? 
Strong men did as they liked and as their ancestors had done 
before them whatever theories might prevail at Westminster Hall. 
Is it to be supposed that conquered Saxon freemen ever became 
serfs to a Norman Baron, and yet many of them may have held 
their lands by Copy of Court Roll ? " — J. F. Taylor. 

" All land which cannot be shewn to be held of any Lord is, by 
the effect of the Statute of ' Quia emptores,' as well as by the 
ancient Common Law, vested in the Crown, with the diiect 
consequence that if a landowner dies without heirs and without 
having disposed of his land by Will or Deed, it will go to the 
Crown — other land escheats to the Lord. From the date of the 
Statute, 18 Edward I, no new Manors could be created, even 
tho' it was attempted. The Manorial rights of Little Longstone 
are directly in the Crown, the holders are •■sokemen." — See p. 329, 
Ycatinans Ft-ndal Histary of Derbyshire, Sec. 8. 

® Sokemen or Sockmen (socmniini. Old Latin! were tenants who held by no servile tenure hut 
paid rent as a soke or sign of Freedom. 



Thomas Hodgkynson of Wardlow, M82, 223 



TESTIMONY. 
1482. 



Testimony as to the claim of Thomas Hogkynson, of Wardlow, 
to right of entry upon certain Lands in Great Longstone, belonging 
to Henry Whyte, in event of his being disturbed in the possession 
of certain lands in Wardlow, which his father, Richard Hogkynson, 
bought of the said Henry Whyte. Dated Aug. 12, 1482, 



For as muche hit is nedefull and meratorie to every trewe cristen 
men to record and testyfye the trothe of maters dowtefull and in 
speciall that'' that longgs to monnus eneritans the wyche for lacke 
of goode knolage mony mon is hurt thereby. Knowe ye us Robert 
Schagurley gentilman, Rob. Longsdon of littull Longsdon yoman, 
Joh. Wright, Henr. North of grete longsdon, Roger tomlynson. 
Job. Platts, Henr. Wright the younger, Thomas mornesale, Roger 
Rutter, Will. James, Bartholomewe Wild, and Roger loo of the same 
toun knowe for trothe that there is a dede endendid made and a 
bill endendit anext there to the wyche dede bereth date the sext 
day of August xxij yere of King Edwaid the forth and as hit 
schowthe in the sayd wrytyng that yf so be that Thomas Hogkynson 
of Wardelowe the yonger injoy not for evermor a meyse and viii 
acur of lond in Wardelow the wyche Ric. Hogkynson fader of the 
forsaid Thomas boght of Henr. Wyte in the said dede named, and 
for the suerte of the sayd land the said Thomas hathe made the 
for said dede and a byll anext there to, to that intente that yf aney 
man trobullud the said Thomas in the said messe and viii acur land 
in Wardelowe that then the sayd Thomas scholde entur in too 
messus and too oxgange land in myche longsdon of the sayd 
Henr. Whyte as in the sayd wrytyng more playne apereth, now be 
hit wee testyfye for trothe and afore god and man woll abyde by 
that the said Henr. W'hyte nor no man in his name never delyverd 
lyvere nor seson therapon to the said Thomas Hogkynson nor to 
o 

• i.e. which belongs to man's inheritance. 



2 24 Longstone Records. 

no noder person of no land in myche longsdon nor yet the said 
Henr. was never wyllyng as wee knowe and have harde liym say to 
non syche intente as the said dede and byll abofe rehersyt maketh 
mencion but wee knowe for certen that the sayd Henr. Whyte 
hath made be his goode well a sufficient astate of all his lands in 
myche longsdon to Henr. Vernon squyer & to no person ellus. 
in wyttenes where of that this ys gode and trewe wee have set to 
oure seyllus wrytton at longsdon the xij day of August xxij yere of 
Kyng Edward the forth. [1482] .—(From the Longsdon M.S.S.) 



COUNTY ASSESSMENT. 
1645. 



Derb. Particuler Enstrucons for ye Commissioners 

of ye sayd County touching weekely and 
monethly Assessments. 
By an ordinance of ye 12th of August, 1645, for 
rayseing monyes for reduceing Newark, 159/. 12^. 
Od. 
To enquire who were Tresurers and Collectors for ye sayd 
taxes and 10th money any of them have in theire hands 
other than pochiall collectors. 

The names of Treasurers and Collectors 
for ye English Armyes. 
for ye first 10 

Monethes, 1644 — Charles Bennett... 

for 6 mo., 1645 — the whole County in Arreare... 

for 4 mo., 1646 — ye whole County in Arreare... 

for 6 mo., 1048 — Henry Buxton... 

for 3 mo., 1652 — the same .. 

for 12 months, 16.59 — Samuel Doughtye 

[Indorsed] 

Peake hundred. 



/. 


5. 


d. 


5074 








3096 








2064 








0038 








0086 









Eyam Assessment, 1535. 225 

EYUM. 
26 Hen. VIII., 1535, Exchequer Lay Subsidies, Derby, ^'^ 
Assessment of the first payment of the Subsidy, granted 26 
Henry VIII., on the inhabitants within the wapentake of High 
Peake, in the county of Derby. 

Etum. _ __ 

Georgij Barlay qui het terras t tent anni valori xxiijfi. .....ivi*. 

Hufrid Stafford qui het bona ad vales xxiijZ'. is , xj». ixif. 

Xpofer Eyre qui het^ bona ad vales xUi....^ XM. 

Willmo Roland qui het bona ad vales xxjK... «. vjrf. 

NichoUei Charma qui het bona ad vales xx/V x». 

NichoUei Wodroyfe qui het bona ad vales xx?i x«. 

This Roll is signed at the foot with the names of the King's 
Commissiouers appointed for the levying of the above, the persons 
being ; — _ 

Fr. Talbott [miles, dno Talbott]. 

GODFRIDUS FOULJAMBE. 

Franc Ckayn [Cockayn]. 
Edwaede Eyre. 
JoHES Leeke. 



COUNTY ASSESSMENT. 



CHARLES REX. 1666. 

Letter from the King to the Earle of Devonshire, 
1665—6. 

Endorsed — " King Charles to y' Lord Leicieten' for payment 
of Taxe laid by Parliam' ' 

Right trusty and Right wellbeloved Cousin, wee greet you well, 
wee cannot doubt but all o' good subiects may easily observe how- 
much the safety of o' Government & y wellfare of every particular 
man is struck at in this commixture of affaires by a confederacy of 
o' enemys on ail hands & therefore cannot but make it o' utmost 
care y' y^ best use bee made of all those meanes [that] may 



226 Longstone Records. 

conduce to y' preserving y peace and welfare of y nation from 
y' Imminent dangers w'' now threaten it, for o"^ better enabling 
whereunto y'' Pari™' did in y"" last Session grant unto us an ayd 
of twelve Hundred & fifty thousand Pounds to bee levied in two 
years tyme but withall foreseeing y' wee should have occasion for 
y"^ said moneys sooner than in course they would come in, did 
further in y^ said Act invite and encourage y' bringing in of moneys 
by way of Loane upon y*^ Credit thereof for y' end, & provided 
therein a flrme & regular security for y<^ repay'"' thereof with 
Interest & upon w'^*' considerable sumes have already been 
advanced unto us Wee have thought fit hereby heartily to 
recomend it to yo' utmost care to promote subscriptions and 
payi"'s into o"^ exchequer of fiu-ther Loanes of money within 
o' County of Derbyshire upon y'' Credit of y'" s"* Act assuring 
you y' wee shall looke upon y^ same as a very acceptable 
& seasonable service to us And wee doe hereby give o"^ Royall 
word y' all things shal be punctually & exactly performed to such 
as lend for their repay'"' both of Principall & Interest according to 
to y"^ rules of y'^ s'' Act, soe recommending this matter to you & 
your best management in such manner as you shall think most 
conduceable to y' s"" end wee bid you farewell. Given at o' Court 
at Whitehall the 19th day of February, 1665 — 6 in y 18"' yeare of 
o' Raigne. 

By his Ma'y'- Comand 



Arlington. 



To o' Right trusty & right wellbeloved Cousin 
Wm Earlof Devonshire o' Lieftenant of o' 
County of Derbyshire & in his absence to 
y' Deputy Lieftenants of o' said County. 



County Assessment, 1666. 227 

The Earle of Devonshire to the Deputy Lieutenants. 
Gentlemen, 

I send you here inclosed y« coppy of a letter from his 
Ma'> directed to mee, or in my absence to y' Deputy Lief'" It was 
long in coming into my hands, & after some tyme spent in 
considering of it, I could think of noe way soe fit for y' promoting 
of y service required by it as to recommend it to you desiring you 
to use y best endeavours for y= advancing of it or Lending of 
moneys upon y security of y= Act of Pari"" for twelve Hundred 
& fifty thousand Pounds for his Ma'>5 further supply; & to the 
end this may speedily be done as y" necessity of his Ma'>" affaires 
require I think fit that there bee a Generall meeting of yo' 
& such others as you judge to bee able & willing to give furtherance 
to the business whom you may make acquainted with his Ma*''^ . . 
and desires which meeting 1 desire nwybeeaty' George in Derby 
upon Wednesday in Easter week being the 18th of this Instant April 
that the business may be taken into consideration and his Ma'>'* 
expectation may bee answered. 1 doubt not but every one of you 
will have soe much support to his Ma'>^ letter, and the great 
Importance of the business, as to meet at the tyme and place 
mentioned, & lend or advance as your ability will admit soe with 
my best respects I remaj'ne 

Yo' affect friend 

to serve you 
Hard. Ap. G'h 66. W. DEVONSHIRE. 

I desire everyone who receives this letter to send it immediately 
to the next hand expressing the tyme of receaveing it and sending 
it away, that soe it may speedily pass to all within yo' Hundred 
yt are concerned in it, the other Hundreds being sent to the same 
purpose. — [From the Wright M.S.S.) 



228 Longstone Records. 

EVRE & MY LADY OF DEVON. 

Dispute. 

The original endorsement of this curious old document (1629y 

is as follows: — " A note of misdemeanor committed by Thornell 

and others." It is supplemented by the words (written about 1800) 

" .Mr. William Eyre with Nicholas Thornhill his ser\'ant man." 

Informacons ag*' Mr. Eyre and his servants. 
1629. 

November 17. M' W'"- Eyre accompanied with Nich' Thornell 
his faithful servant and John Steades of Rowland his faithful 
tenant all three came to y' grove in controversie (where there was 
one W"' Telear in quiett possession for my la[dy] of Devon her 
right). M' W"' Eyre bid y"^ s'' Telear come from y"" grove or else 
would draive nim by force, and soe by violence heled [held] him 
away and carried him to Haddon being foroe miles distant from 
y"^ place without any pretext or warrant at all and [conducting 
him] before M"" Manners had nothinge to alleage ag' him, hut 
desired M' Manners to send him to y' house of correction : but 
did this of purpose to have my la [dj'J loose her possession. 

Ed. Braddock and Roger Sellors being bothe M'- Eyre's house- 
hould servants were there the next day after. 

IS'*" Daye. At night one John beeinge M"^- Eyre's servant a 
millner at Calver miUne with a sword and a longe staffe and one 
Greene with a long staffe came and were there all nj'ght. 

19"' Hugge Manifould and A. Sheldon & man. 

20''' Tho*- Yonge M'- Eyre's household servant and \V"-- Brass- 
ington his shepparde man. 

21'*' Tho* Poyser and James Beck of Calver. 

22"'i beinge Sunday Robert Merrell and Chro. Merrell M' Eyre's 
tenants were there and came out early out of y*^ same. 

23"' W"'- Harrison of Calucr and James Beck of Caluer. 

24"' Rob' Gregorie and John Furnes of Caluer. 

25"' Tho' Poyser and a beggar. 



Eyre and my Lady of Devon. 229 

December 22. Nich" Thornell was served with y^ Informacon 
and had a copie of y^ same, and John Morten, R. Merrell, and 
Chro. Merrell. 

December last Nich. Thornell came to y grove and had like 
to have thrattled W"' Monro. 

James Ferond, John Morten and Adam Williamson came and 
would neede work by force. 

After Morten beeinge served hee strove between W""- Monro 
and W"- Singleton. 

One Thomas Andrewe was next in M' Eyre's house and came 
everie daye to peer .... to y- same grove on Blacklowe. 

.About 20 Janu. I sett y^ ground on beacon sjde in possa (?). 

About y^ 30"> of Januarie M"^- Eyre sent John Bradburie and 
Nich Thornell and John Morten his servants; John Telear, 
Rob' Gregorie, Thomas Ragge and Peter Heaton to a grove on 
beacon syde parcell of and belongings to Bl-icklowe within y .M. 
of A. whoe stroke and misused William Singleton being there 
keepinge possession for mee, and toke up Rich Hardie nij' servant 
from workinge and broke and pulled my tymber all to pieces, and 
in y*^ afternoon of y' same daye came Mr. Tho Eyre himself 
accompanied by John Bradburie & Rob. Yorke whoe drove mj- 
servant Richard Hardie and He' Platts from y<= same worke pulled 
in y" grove, tooke and carried away my Tymber by force, M'^ E. 
himself raylinge and threateninge me withe force with manie 
reproachful words said hee would burne mj' Tymber before my face, 
if 1 were there, but further said y'' Jury would not looke at them for 
where I had one lipp alredie he would make me too, and strike 
at my servants with a staffe also. 

This ground (?) Mr. Full came & certified what y servant men 
affirmed. 

About y^ beginninge of March W"' Brassington, M' E's sheppard, 
brought yi" s'' Mr. E's sheepe uppon y'' ground in question (and 

about y= Doole Dike wh is within y'= mannor of Ashford) so Mr. 



230 Lotigstone Records. 

Browne who was hired by Pa. A.'' to looke to y' Blacklowe came to 
him to put them back and y'' s'' Brassington did strike y"^ s'' browne 
with a staffe, and y* next [day] y Instrucion of y'^ Co : of Wards 
was read to him Notwithstandinge threateninge, afterwards the said 
Brassington and Frances Bagshawe and y"^ sheppard of y= said 
Mr. E. did bringe them upon y'" farme ground againe. 

(From the Wright M.S.S.) 

•■• Parisli of Ashfiird. 



BLEAKLOW. 



Blake Low in the Liberty of Great Longston & Manor of 
Ashford has ahvays been deemed Demaine Land, as antient Rentals 
testify — was an antient and main pasture, one half the property of 
His Grace the Duke of Devonshire, the other the property of Mr. 
Wright of Great Longston. About twenty years ago the proprietors 
agreed to divide and inclose it. The Duke's part till within about 
four years ago has been pastured, since which time a part has been 
ploughed and sowed with oats. The first year the Tithe-man 
demanded and took one-tenth. The second crop the same demand 
was made but the Tenant having received information fi'om various 
people that it was Demaine land and only liable to pay one-thirtieth 
refused the tenth. After several conferences it was agreed to refer 
the matter to Mr. Heaton, and to have one-tenth of the crop valued 
and the Tithe-man to be paid his due (whether more or less) in 
money, provided it should be determined and ascertained before the 
usual time of collecting their Tythe rents from those Tenants who 
paid their Tithes in Silver, if not, the value of one-tenth was to be 
paid, the Tithe-man covenanting and agreeing to return the surplus 
if any, whenever it was ascertained what was his due, and gave a 
pi'omissory note for that purpose. The third crop the same demand 
was made, but more than one-30th was refused. An eligible person 
was chose by the Tenant to set apart two-thirtieths of the crop 
which were carried and set in the Tenant's Yard in one stack, and 



Bleaklow. 231 

one other 30th set apart and left in the fielu for the Tithe-man, 
which he took away, and afterwards hy force took out of the yard 
the- other two 30ths, set and intended to stand apart there tiU it 
shoLikl be determined whose right it appeared to be. 

There is a great deal of land within the Manor of Ashford 
called Demaine Land, part belonging to the Duke of Devonshire 
and parts to several Freeholders which all pay "i/Srds of the Tithe 
of Hay and Corn, Wool and Lamb to His Grace, and one-third of 
the Hay and Corn to the Duke of Rutland, and one-third of the 
Wool and Lamb to the Dean and Chapter. 

Finn, a main and undivided pasture in the same Manor, stinted 
and stocked by Gates, appears to have been similarly circumstanced 
with the Blakelow, it is called and allowed to be Demaine Land, 
some parts of it belonging to the Lord of the Manor, and other 
parts to sundry Freeholders. Upon Finn being enclosed and the 
pasture allotted, several persons ploughed up their shares of it. 
The Duke of Devonshire and Tithe-man took two-thirds of the 
Tythe of the Crops in kind, and the Duke of Rutland one-third 
as above. — (From the Wright M.S S.) 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



"Curious Custom at Great Longstone." 
" It is an ancient custom here on the Eve of Shrove Tuesday, 
for boys to collect the Villagers' carts, wraiths, shelvings, barrows, 
barrels, or anything that lies handy— even wrenching the gates 
from off their hinges — and to place them all in a circle around the 
village cross, whence the owners may fetch them the next morning. 
Can any of your readers assign a reason for this, and say whether 
it be commonly done in other Derbyshire villages ?" 

"ESLIGH." 
" Reliquary, April, 1870." 
[I know nothing of the Custom. — Ed. L.R.] 



232 Longstone Records. 



WRIGHT VERSUS EYRE. 
1630. 



In the Court of Wardes 31 Jan., 1630. Verdict for Wright 
concerning Tythe Hay. 

Brief for Wright containing a copy of Judge Croke's Certificate 
of the Trial before him for a writ of prohibition with his opinion 
for the Jury, and their Verdict, to which is added a copy of the 
proofs given on the part of Wright. 

JUDGE CROKE. 

Att Lent Assises last at Derby there was a Tryall before me in 
a Prohibycon Betwi.xte William Wright p'' and Thomas Eyre esqi 
Defend' wherein y'" p'' prescribed That all y'^ possessors of all 
Lands and Meadowes in Longson were accustomed to paye sixe 
shillings yearely at the Feast of S' Michaell or after upon 
Demaned in liewe of all Tithe haye arisinge within y' sayd Village 
Upon which prescripcon yssue was ioyned And it appeared upon 
evidence That there is anncyent meadow ground in y sayd Village 
And that the Tythe haye for w'' y' defend' sued did growe upon 
grounde wi" was lately converted from Arable to Meadowe and had 
not been formerly Meadowe ground whereupon I declared my 
opinyon to the Jurye That 1 conceaved that y'^ precripcon might 
bee good for y"^ anncyent Meadowe (if y Jurye doe fynd it to be 
true) But that y'' same could not extend to y" newe Meadowe 
ground if they conceaved the same to be new converted ground 
from Arable to Meadowe, And not to have been formerly Meadowe 
ground Notwithstandinge y= Jury found for the p'* 

GEO. CROKE, 
Vera copia. 31 Janu., 1630. 

A. CHAMBERL.^YNE. 

Endorsed " Judge Crooke certificate for Exhibition into y' Court 
of Wardes, 31 Janu. 1630." 

Also later " Wright ag' Eyre. Verdict for Wright concerning 
Tythe Hay." 



Wright versus Eyre. 



233 



COUNSEL'S BRIEF. 

TYTHE OF HAVE. 
Inter Wright que' et) 

Eyre Defend' j 

Proffes on the parte and behalfe of the plaintiff. 
To prove that Great Longson is an ancient Village) To prove this all 
and hath beene tjane out of mjnd. J yc Witnesses. 

The possessors and occupiers of the landes meadowel 

and grounds of the said Village have tyme out of CbristophcrMillnes 

. Geo. Rawerthe 

mynd used to paye to the farmer or proprietor or -wm Tatters^ll 

the tvth haye of the said village and the tythable I Rsad Tho. Keyc. 
■' -^ ex p te qiirr *Int. 

places of it yearlie at michaellmas or after upon I 3, 4, 5 

request the some of sixe shillings in full discharge I ^°"^ Greaves Int. 

I 3' 4' 5" 

and payement of all tyth haye within the said village 1 WmShitellworth 

and of the tythable places thereof and that the 

farmers or proprietors thereof have accepted that 

money in full satisfacccon. J 

That the newe close is about 4 acres and is part" 
of the towne feilds of Great Longson and the wrm Tattersall 
tythable places thereof, and was inclosed about John Finney 

20 yeares since, and that divers landes or p" J.Jermon Tomlinson 

Tho* Ke\-e ex p'te 
quer Int. g'h. 



ex p'te defend Int. 6 

Tho. Sanderson 

Int. 6. 



thereof before it was soe inclosed was sometymes 
meadowe and some tymes corne and when it was 
layed for meadowe, p'' not anie tyth haye in kinde. 



Chr. Millnes 

read Tho. Keye 

ex p'te quer Intr 6th 



That the ancient medowe or board medowe in~| 

great Longson is not above 4 or 5 acres and is 

wett and plashie ground, the tythe whereof is not J- 

worth in the best yeare abo\e iij* and some yeare | EijjsMeiier Intr 6th 

not worth the getheringe. J 

That the rent of 6s. hath been tendered divers 

yeares and refused by the defendant. 

° i.e. Interrogatory. 



234 



Longstone Records. 



If it be objected that the Inhabitants pay 2' qr for~| 
the tithe haye of every oxgange (intendinge the board 
meadowe), answer that every inhabitant payes 
equallie 2' qr for every oxgang, and yet some of 
the inhabitants have much more board meadowe 
belonginge to their oxgange, then others have 
and some little or none at all, and therefore noe 
reason why the [y] should paye equallie but the 
p" proves that this ij'^ qr is paid for the tythe haye 
in generall. 

If it be objected that ij'' qr an oxgange is morel 
than 6 shillings, answer the overplus was given to 
him that gathered it 

That within the fields of great Longson there [ 
hathe (and soe continewed) landes beene converted 
from arable to meadowe and soe used for a tyme 
and then plowed againe, and when the [yj were 
meadowe never paid any tythe haye in kind. J 



Read Rob' 
Greane 
exam, ex parte 
Defend' 
Inter. 6th. 



Endorsed. Respecting the Tithe of Hay in Great L 
which after a long litigation Mr. Wright obtained a ver 
Mr. Eyre of Hassop. 



Christopher 

Mill lies 

William 

Tatersall 

Tho. Keye 

Int 9<i'- 

Ellis Mellor 

Int gth- 

ongston on 
■diet against 



On the bach of this Brief are several rough notes apparently added 
by Counsel — so badly written as to be almost illegible — referring to 
several Leases of the tithes of turbary, haj' and corn, granted by 
the Dean and Chapter of Lichfield, extending over the years 1478 
to 1592, some of them seem to be as follows — 

1478. Sale of turbary and hay. Longstone Manor this year 
to Stephen Ayre* £5 6. 8. 

* This was Stephen Eyre of H&ssop who was Bailiff of Ashford. He was succeeded by his son Roland. 
The Linhfield Tithe Rolls shew that Stephen bought the tithes of sheaves of Longstone in 1473. 



Extracts from Vestry Minutes. 235 

1522. Roll of Receipts of the Churches of Bakewell c<: Tydswell. 
Longston Manor, the Vicar- of Tidswell & Roland Eyre 110^ 

1523. Dean & Chapter & Shatterleyt 

15 Sep. 34 H. VIII. [1542]. Lease of tithes of corn .^- hay in 
these & other places belonging to the Dean & Chapter £10, & for 
tithe of corn & hay £7. 

1 July, 34 Eliz. [1592] Dean & Chapter lease to Rowland Eyre. 
Recited former lease of 6 April, 3 Edward VI [1549] to Gell of 
corn & hay in L. M. & other places for 90 . . . 

" Edmund Eyre, who, with his brother Roland. leased in 1516 the fee-faim of Litton with the tithes of 
com & hay of Hassop, Great Longstone, Wardlow, & Roland for 5 years at a rental of £n o 8. - 
Dean t^ Chapter MecoriU^ D, 16. 

t Probably Robert Shakerley, Baililf of Ashford, 1501 & h. 



EXTRACTS FROM VESTRY MINUTES. 



Feb. 5, 1639. 

Memorand'" the day above said there was paid by . . Tattersall 
in the Church Porch the just summe of Thirty Pounds of 
lawful English money unto Ralph Jenkinson of Great Longsdon to 
and for the pre-e.xpressed former gift And . . . some in the 
presence of Mr. Rob' Craven, Curate, Will"! Wright, sen., Gentle- 
December 25, 1639. 

Memoranda the day above said being Christmasse day, there 
was paid upon the Communion Table the just & first sum of Si.\ 
Pounds of lawfull English money by Rob' Hasslam, Great 
Longsdon unto Will'" Wright, junr., of the same Gentleman and 
for the use of the poorest people of Great Longsdon and ... of 
the said Six Pounds to be given and dealt at same time in the year 
for ever to wit at Easter and Christmasse And the money aforesaid 
was the gift of Widow White & Stephen . . of Great Longsdon 
deceased And there were present at the aforesaid payment 
Rob' Craven, Curate, Richard White then Churchwarden, Anthony 
Longsdon, Thomas Hasslam of Great Longsdon and others. 



236 Longstone Records. 

1700, April y 2"'^ 

It is this day agreed by the Inhabitants of the Chappelry of 

Longstone whose names are hereunto subscribed that the Clarke 

should have makynge of a grave for the burial of any dead within 

this Chappelry aforesaid the sum of 4^' And for Kinginge the 

passinge bell 2'' & for his Clark ffees 2'' which is in the whole S"* 

As witness our hands 

Cornelius Dickens Thomas Jackson his mark 

William Naylor Robert Husler his mark 

John Tomlinson Thomas T. H. Hodgkinson 

William Lowe 

August the Third, 1729. 

There being publick Notice given in y'' Chappel for calling a 
Vestry we whose names are hereunder written being y' Minister, 
Churchwardens & principal Inhabitants approving & considering 
the prejudice y' y'' Chapel lies under by People burying in it by 
breaking up y*^ Favours We therefore y'' Minister & Chappel- 
wardens afors'^ do order that no one break any Pavem' either in 
Church or Chancel without first paying into y' Chappel-wardens 
hands y' sum of ten shillings and sixpence. According to w'' 
agreement we have hereunto set our hands. 

Tho^ Grove, Curate 

Dan' Frost ^ William Hodgskinson 

r^ ■ u 11 ,■ Chappellwardens ,-,1 ^ u 1 

Francis Hully I ^^ Robert Huslor 

John Heyward Thomas Tomlinson 

Joseph Beeby Henry Scammadine 

SUNDRY BRIEFS. 

August 7, 1653. 

Collected then for the Inhabitants of Marlborough the somme of 

of nine shillings and one pennie wee say. 

Rob' Craven, Minister. 

Thom : Hasselam I 

[^ • T Churchwardens, 

rrancis Lowe j 



Ashford Bridge, 237 

Sept. 4, 1657. 
Collected then foi- the Inhabitants of Desford in y County of 
Leicester y'^ sume of five shillings and sixpence by the Church- 
wardens. 

Will Hallowes. 
Will Bramhall. 

Feb. 7, 1660. 
Collected then in y*^ Church of Great Longstone for Tho"' . . . 
of Horncastle in the County of Lincolne, Gent., the sum of ten 
shillings by J. Hill. 

William Winscombe 
Edward Peake. 

Churchwardens. 



ASHFORD BRIDGE. 

August 26, 1743. 

Then Received of y*" Township of Longston y= sum of Five 

Pounds as a free gift towards building a Bridge at Ashford ; and 

we do likewise promise y' y" same shall not hereafter become 

chargeable to y' said Hamblet of Longston. 

as witness our hands, 

Samuel White. 
William Fynney. 

The County of Derby, 

To Joseph Morton, Dr. 

To repairs of a part of one side of the Battlements of Ashford 
Bridge. 

1821. 
Jan. 10. Stone, Lime & Labour £4 18. 0. 



238 Longstone Records, 

BENJAMIN SELLERS. 



Site of Ashford the Crater of a Volcano ! 
According to one Benjamin Sellers, a self-taught geologist of 
wide reputation, the valley of the Wye from Cresshrook to Ashford 
had, at some remote period, been a succession of marshy lakes ; 
the existing mounds of tufa at various points on each side of the 
present course of the river, furnished him with what he deemed 
unmistakeable evidence of the fact. He considered that the site of 
Ashford was originally the crater of a volcano, from which the 
igneous mass, called toadstones, had proceeded. He came to this 
conclusion, principally, from finding that the measures in the strata 
of the surrounding hills, sink abruptly in the direction of the village ; 
the best illustration of which fact, and what he very frequently 
pointed out, is the great fault to be seen on the Arrack, where a 
sudden break and sinking of the measures, to the extent of forty or 
fifty yards, is very evident .... Mr. Sellers had frequent 
visits from those whom the world claims as among the most learned 
in geology — Professors Hopkinson and Phillips; and the late 
Thomas Bateman, of .Middleton, visited him many times. 

Thomas Brushfield, J. P. 
Reliqiiiiiy, October, ifi6;f. 

THE CLERK OF THE PEACE. 

In his correspondence with the Clerk of the Peace the Author 
had the opportunity of copying the following titles of various old 
documents — knowledge of which may prove useful toother writers :-- 

Calendar of Deeds from 1583 (Cox's Records of Derbyshire.) 

Enclosure Award 67. Longstone & Wardlow 1825. Book E. p. 1. 
No plan ! (The plan was added in 1826.) 

Liber Pacis. Calendars of Justices, 1690 to 1870. 

1711. The four Houses of Correction (Masters) were Derby, 
W'irksworth, Chesterfield and Tideswell, and in 1728 Ashbourne. 

In 1760 the Calendar of Justices concludes with 3 Doctors of 
Physic and 2 Clerks in Holy Orders. 



Clerk of the Peace. 239 

HIGHWAYS AND FOOTPATHS. 
PORTFOLIOS D. E. & F. 



120. Longstone. Order for diverting a foot-road leading from 
Great Longstone to Birchill through the lands of Thomas Eyre, 
Esq., of Hassop, 1780. 

121. Longstone. Order for diverting a foot-path between 
a turnpike road leading from Bakewell to Hassop to the turnpike 
leading from Edensor to Ashford. 1816. 

22. Longstone. Order for diverting footpath leading from the 
turnpike road from Edensor to Ashford to a field in the occupation 
of the Hon. Francis Eyre, in the township of Great Longstone. 
1817. 



118. Litton. Order for diverting highway between Litton and 
Ashford. 

124. Longstone. Order for diversion of roads under the Mid- 
land Railway, Rowsley and Buxton Act. 1861. 

124" Longstone. Order for diversion of Highway leading from 
Bakewell Union Workhouse to Holme Bridge. 1864. 

PORTFOLIO E. 
(each with a Plan.) 



120 


Longstone 


1780 


121 


Longstone 


1816 


122 


Longstone 


1817 


122^ 


Longstone 


1818 


123 


Longstone 


1819 


124 


Longstone 


1861 


124» 


Longstone 


1864 


p 







240 Longstone Records. 

CLERK OF THE PEACE. 



From Calendar of Bridges and Culverts not repaired hy tiie 
County. 

Higii Peak Hundred. 

Longstone (Litttle Litton) 

Monsal Dale Bridge, River Wye, repaired by Township. 



CONSTABULARY. 
Box XV. 



5. Sessional List of Constables supplied by the High Constable 
of High Peak. 1634 to 1044. 

10. Presentment of Petty Constables of the Hundred of High 
Peak. 1668. 



PETTY SESSIONS. 

" Sessions were formei-ly held at Bakewell but owing to the 
disturbance in 1795-6 on account of raising the supplementary 
Militia, and the want of accommodation, they were removed." 

Glover, 1831. 

"Petty Sessions are held on the 1st and 3rd Friday of every 
month by the Magistrates in the neighbourhood." 

Glover, 1833. 

It may be assumed therefore, that from 1795-6 until 1831 or 
later. Petty Sessions were held at Tideswell instead of at Bakewell, 
as there are records within that period of the Justices' Meetings 
and a House of Correction in that town — and that soon after the 
Ifittcr date, they were again held in Bakewell. 



Jottings —chiefly District, 24 1 

Extracts from Cox's Three Centuries of Derbyshire History — 
Vol. 1. 

"The Restoration of the Monarchy in 1660 was accompanied by 
the restoration of the previous ecclesiastical constitution of the 
Realm as a matter of course." p. 314. 

Longstone 1689. John Jackson. O. (Quaker) House licensed 
and registered at Derby O.S. as a Meeting House, p. 368. 

Towards the close of the 17th Century there were at Eyam, 526 
Conformists, 3 Papists and 3 Nonconformists. 

Hassop Chapel was erected in 1818, prior to which. Service took 
place in the private Chapel of Hassop Hall. p. 314. 



WHITE WATSON OX BAKEWELL. 



Part of the following memoranda from a Common Place Book, of 
Mr. White Watson, of Bakewell, were published in the "Derbyshire 
Archreological Journal," Vol. XL, 1889. 

On 31st Mav, 1774, I came from my father's at Baslow, to live 
with my Uncle and Aunt Watson, Statuary, at Bakewell, at my 
aunt's particular request (who was mv Godmother), where I found 
the Rev. Richard Chapman, the vicar of the Church, the Rev. Moses 
Hudson, the master of the Free School, who had generally fifty 
scholars, and was much esteemed as a master. Mr. Samuel Rol, 
Sexton and Clerk of the Parish Church, was master of the Free 
English School, endowed by Mrs. Mary Hague, as by her will, dated 
November 20th, 1715 : Having a many friends in this town every- 
thing was so pleasant. On Sundays all went to church, no dis- 
senting voice in the town, all praying to one God and Lord Jesus 
Christ, and drank in social parties success to the Church and King. 
Mr. Watson was an overseer of the poor in partnership with Jno. 
Redfearn. Thev had nine assessments, each amounting to 



242 Longstone Records. 

£18 OS. 8|cl., with a jumbling from the inhabitants. (N.B. — In 
1677 the yearly expense of the poor of Bakewell was £22 13s. : 
the greatest allowance was 2s. per week.) 

In 1774, J no. Twigge, Esq., occupied Holme Hall, Jno. Barker, 
Esq., was agent to His Grace the Duke of Rutland, when, if any of 
the principal inhabitants wanted a dish of fish for a particular 
occasion, by applying to Wm. Smith, the overlooker of the river, 
they never were denied paying 6d. per pound. The Post Office was 
kept by Mr. and Mrs. Pidcock, and Gge. Staniforth rode post, who 
went to Chesterfield three times a week, when the London letters 
came in at 4d. each. Hannah Hancock delivered the letters out 
at a half-penny each. (It appears this custom of giving a half- 
penny for the delivery of each letter originated in a poor person, 
whom, out of delicacy, they could not relieve by assessment ; but 
modestly gave him this subsistence.) 

There was a respectable Card Club for the principal inhabitants, 
who paid 6d. each for liquor, and for Welsh Rabbits 3d. They 
met joyouslv, smoking their pipes, conversing freely, lovingly (?), 
a card-table for those that choose. 

But there must be no interruption of conversation bv the card- 
party. Anv member might introduce a stranger. The Revd. Peter 
Walthall was chairman and president on the breaking up of the 
club, when they had a good supper and dinner, plenty of fish from 
the river. The last entered member was the treasurer for the 
ensuing year. The club commenced on the first Thursday in 
September, and ended the first Thursday in May. I think there was 
sometimes a club in the summer also. There were three sister clubs 
during the season, which were paid for, as the cards, by the 
forfeitures for non-attendance on the club-night Thursday. 

I recollect something of a Batchelors' Club, where ^.'r. Samuel 
Roe presided, generally as chairman (a very jollv meeting, and 
always a private meeting at Mr. Roe's house). In 1774 butcher's 
meat was not to be had at any part of the week in Bakewell, but 
onlv on certain davs, and beef onlv at certain times at Christmas. 



White Watson on Bakewell. 243 

The custom of interment in wooden coffins (wooden Josephs) was 
on the Rev. Mr. Monks coming to reside here (1678.) A corps from 
Sheldon was brought in swaddling clothes (which was abolished 
in 1797) and was detained in the church until a coffin was made, 
and the wife then took off the flannel for her own use. 

On the prayer days, Wednesdays and Fridays, the good mothers 
attended with their daughters on divine service without delay. 

N.B. — Lady Grace Manners buried in Bakewell Church in 1651. 

The Free School endowed bv Grace Lady Manners, as by Deed 
dated 12th of May, 1637 (12th of King Charles.) See copv of the 
deed in the possession of Robert \\'right, Esq., of Great Longstone, 
a copy of which is in Mr. Bayley's hands. 

Post Office N.B. — In 1780 the amount of letters for the bye and 
cross posts at Bakewell per year was £24 on an average, and in 
1792 £,200 on an average. The London letters bear the same 
proportion, G. Staniforth, Postmaster. In 1830 about £500 a vear 
clear to the King. 

Mem. — The field Mr. Bossley's house stands in was formerly 
called Warden's Close, which Mr. \Voodwaid bought in 1650 at 
£15 per acre. The field above it is Garlands Close. The field 
opposite Mr. Bossley's, as still, Courtyard. Mr. Gardom's House 
was built in Cowley's Close, where the entrenchments are near 
Holme called the Nordens. 

N.B. — Mr. Bossley's brick house was cornered with blue slate 
by Jno. Richardson, slater, in 1785. ^'r. Bossley's brick house was 
built by agreement for £31 los., in 1783, by Joseph Brook, who 
engaged that no chimney should smoke which none of them did 
to his death. 

About 1777, Samuel Smith, breeches-maker, was the first Dissenter 
here (Mr. Carrington was a Presbyterian) who followed Westley. 
After him Jno. Tarrant's wife became a Methodist when the fervor 
began. In 1777 the Cotton Mill was begun, when wages were 
raised immediately, and hands came from Manchester, introducing 



244 Longstone Records, 

good-natureJ girls here, to whdiii the town was a stranger. In 1774 
Mr. Bosslev's and Mr. Gould's shops, nor ^'r. Carrington's had no 
glass windows ; but only wooden shutters. A.'r. Carringtrn's then 
the principal grocer's shop in the town. 

Exd. "Hiirh Peak News," Nov. 16, 1901. 



CHURCH RATES. 

Derbyhire. 

Whereas complaint upon oath hath been made unto us 
Joseph Denman M.D. and John Barker, Esq., two of His Majesty's 
Justices of the Peace for the said County, by Adam Wilson, 
Churchwarden of Longstone, in the said County, that James 
Bowman, of the Liberty of Hrushfield, in the said County, being a 
person commonly called a Quaker, hath refused and still refuses to 
paj- unto him, the said Adam Wilson, the Church Rates due to the 
Church of Longstone aforesaid, we therefore the said Justices, 
having dul)' summoned the said James Bowman to appear before 
us but hath refused to appear before us as aforesaid, and having 
duly examined into the truth and matter of the said complaint, do 
find that there is due from the said James Bowman to the said 
Adam Wilson, for Church Rates as aforesaid, the sum of eighteen 
shillings and one penny. We do therefore adjudge and order the 
said James Bowman to pay or cause to be paid unto the said Adam 
Wilson, the aforesaid sum of eighteen shillings and one penny, and 
also the sum of ten shillings for the costs and charges of the said 
Adam Wilson in prosecuting the said James Bowman, for the 
recovery of the said Church Rate. Given under our Hands and 
Seals, at Tideswell, in the said County, the second day of May, 1778. 

Jos. Denman, (Seal.) 
John Barker, (Seal.) 
Parish Magazine, April 1902. 



The Schoolmaster in request. 



245 



January 16, 1801. We whose 
this to be our Desire & wish that 
scoolmaster at Great Longstone 
children, &c., &c. 
Tested, 

W. Wager 
Solomon Eyre 
Richard Hill 
Richard Skidmore 
Joseph Holme 
Sam" Wager 
Mare lucas 
Elizabeth furnas 
Pceter bootom 
Haron taylor 
Thos Eyre 
Moses Taylor 
William Fletcher 
Ann Garrat 
Richard betney 
Joseph holme 
Ann holme 
Elizabeth taylor 
Joseph brunt 
John Eyre 
Ralph Hancock 
William Hadfield 
Joseph Morton 
Richard Heathcote 
Tho« Wager 
Charles Shaw 
Robert Thornhill 
Tho- hill 
Tho^ hill 



names are Under set to sertyfy 
Mr. James Waterall Bee apointed 
Scool for the Instruction of our 



Will Burch 
Sampson Hodgkinson 
William Skidmoor 
Sarnuel Furnis 
Joseph Ward 
Joseph Bothams 
Eliz. Wain 
Richard Skidmore 
William Gregory, junr. 
James furniss 
Edwd Fletcher 
John Wardlow 
Edward garlick 
William Gairat 
Matthew Hill 
Martin Gregoiy 
John Wardlow, juiii. 
George Birch 
John Heathcote 
I. Pendleton 
Joseph Drabble 
William nalor 
John wayn 
Joseph Garrat 
Willni Gregory 
Ed. Woodhouse 
Robert Holme 
George Betteney 
Matthew Furness 



246 Longstone Records. 

Jany 25"> 1801. At a Publick Meeting this day held by the 
principle Inhabitants of Great Longstone It is agreed that M"^ James 
Waterall shall teach two children free and pay one shilling yearly 
to the Overseers of the poor of Great Longstone for the rent of the 
said School. And 1 do hereby Agree that I will at any time Quit 
the said School and House belonging the same when the Inhabi- 
tants of Great Longstone or the Major part of them shall be 
disatisfied with my Conduct as a Schoolmaster as Witness my 
Hand 

James Waterall. 
Names of the persons 

who attended the Meeting. 

William Wager Richard Petteiiev, 

James Gregory Churchwarden. 

Robt Thrrnhill William Hadfield, 

Samp" Hodgskinson Overseer of the Poor. 

William Gregory 

Joseph Morton 

Moses Taylor 

Charles Shaw 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

" A Derbyshire Bet." 
" Apropos of Mr. Sleigh's Glossary, the dry humour of one 
Thomas Ashton, of Longsdon Parva, who, though beyond the 
allotted span of threescore years and ten, has not yet shaken off 
this mortal coil, may be thought worthy of entombment in the 
' Reliquary.' His better half chanced to have an interesting cast 
of the eye, of which taking unworthy advantage, he one day, while 
working at a distance from home, made a bet with his chums, of a 
quart of ale, that he knew what his Nance was doing at that 
particulai' moment. And when all had expressed their disbelief in 
his spiritualistic powers, he enlightened them with the self-evident 
fact, " Whoy hoo's skeHiii>i<(, beloike ! what besoides'?" 

' Reliquary,' October, 1865, 



Abstracts of Old Deeds. 247 

Quit claim. 

Thomas, son of Nicholas de Rydware to Godfrey Foljaumbe 
of all right and claim in all messuages, lands, and tenements 
which the said Godfrey has of the grant of Joan de Rydware, 
mother of the said Thomas, in Great Longesdon. Dated Baukewell, 
Thursday, Corpus Christi, 20th Edward III. [June 15th, 1346.] 

Note. The piece of parchment used for the seal tab is the beginn- 
ing of a grant from Johanna de Rydeioarc to Godfrey Foljaumbe 
of all her tenements in Great Longesdon. 



Thonias W'hyte the elder of Great Longson, co. Derbv, ^ oman, 
for considerations specified in an indenture made bet'tt'een him & 
William Wright of the same, yoman, bearing date the same, 
confirms to the said Wm. Wright all those messuages, tofts, crofts, 
orchards, gardens, closes, enclosures, lands, tenements, meadows, 
pastures, w^oods, underwoods, rents, reversions, services, profits, 
'commons, and hereditaments in the town, fields, limits & territories 
of Great Longson, in the several occupations of grantor (the said 
Thos. Whyte), Rich. Hodgkinson, John Petty, Mathew Mynte, 
Peter Moseley, & Rich. Shakersky, to be held of the chief lords at 
the rent and services afore due. Dated, 26th April 21st & 56th 
James, 1623. 

Endorsed : Seisin, &c. delivered bv Thos Whvte to Wm. Wright 
in a close called Berley Ley, in name of all the rest of the 
within-named premises, in the presence of William Humie [?Hume] 
Minister, Wm. Hodgkinson, Wm. Mornsall, & Henry Cowpe. 



ASHFORD MANOR. 

ABSTRACTS OF COURT ROLLS. 

AsHFOKD. Great Court -of Charles Cavendyshe, Kt., & Wm. 

Cavendyshe, esq., held ther 24th Dec, 30th Eliz. [1587]. Presented 

by the homage that Robert Whyte, customary tenant of the manor, 

died siezed of two messuages, two bovates of land, meadow, and 



248 Longstone Records. 

pasture, & one rood of land & 3 cottages, in Great Longesdon, which 
the said Robert had of the sunender of Lawrence M'hyte at the 
Court held 9 June, 17th Eliz. [1575] ; which two messuages, &c., 
are held of the k)rds bv a rent of 20s. 8d. per annum, & suit ot 
Court. And that Thomas Whyte is son & heir of Robert. Which 
Thomas came & sought to be admitted. The lords, by their 
Steward, granted him seizin by a rod. He paid a fine of 20s. 8d. 
into the Court, and was admitted, but his fealty was deferred 
because he was under the age of one & twenty years. 

EDMUND STEPHENSON, Steward. 

AsHFORU. Court Baron of Henry Cavendish, esq., held 13th Oct. 
loth & 46th James. [1612.] 

VVm. Launte in person surrendered a rood of land in a place 
called ' le Coumbes', between the land of Thomas White on both 
East & West, a rood lying upon a juger called ' le Kirkesey' between 
the land of Thomas White on both East and West, a rood lying 
upon a juger, anglice 'a furlonge,' called ' le Cowsey' between 
the land of Thomas White on the East and of Christopher Jenkins 
and Richard Tattersall cm the West, with their pertinence, to the 
use of Thomas \\'hite. The lord, by his Steward, granted the said 
parcells to Thomas, & delivered seizin by a rod according to the 
custom of the manor, to be held bv the accustomed rent & services. 
Fine 6d. He did fealty & was admitted. 

EDW : DEANE, Steward. 

AsHFORD. View of Frank-pledge and Court Baron of Elizabeth, 
countess Dowager of Salop, held 13th April, 2nd and 37th James 
[1604]. Richard Tattersall in person surrendered a rood of land in 
a furlong (stadium) in the fields of Great Longsdon, called 
Faverlonge, between the land of Thomas White on the East and 
of Thomas Tomlinson on the West ; a rood of land in another 
furlong overthwart Middle hill between the land of Thomas \\hite 
on the South and of Thos. Tomlinson on the North ; a rood in 



Abstracts of Court Rolls. 249 

anotlier furlung, ciUe.l HeniiJ butts, between the land of Thos. 

White on both East and West ; and another rood of the same 

furlong between the land of the lady of the manor on the East and 

of Thos. Tomlinson on the West, to the use of Thos. White. 

Thomas White was admitted, and seisin given by a rod. Fine 6d. 

He did fealty. 

GODFREY ROLLER, Deputy-Steward. 



AsHFORDE. Court Baron of Elizabeth, Countess of Salop, held 
ist March 2nd and 38th James [1605]. 

Thomas Sellers in person surrendered all those parcells of land in 
the fields of Great Longsdon; viz. half an acre of a furlong (stddimu) 
called Longe man furlonge, between the land of Rowland Tomlins 
on the East and of Thomas White on the West ; half an acre of 
another furlong called Grysedale, between the land of the said Thos. 
White on the East and of the lady of the manor on the West ; a rood 
of land of Middle hill toungs, between the land of Thos. White on 
both East and West ; another rood of land of le Cley Pitts, between 
the land of the ladv of the manor on the West and of Thos. White 
on the East ; another rood of land of the Henne butts, between 
the land of the ladv of the manor on the West and of Thos. 
Tomlinson on the East, to the use of Thomas White. Thomas 
White was admitted, and did fealty. Fine i4d. 

GODFREY BOLLER, Deputy of Geo. 



Chaworthe, esq.. Steward. 

AsHl'ORD. Court Baron of William, earl of Devon, held 10th 
July, 19th and 55th James [1621]. 

Wm. Hadfeld, Tho. Hadfeld, and Edward Hadfeld, in person, 
surrendered a messuage or tenement in Great Longson and a bovate, 
by estimation, of land, meadow, and pasture, thereto belonging 
or hitherto held therewith, all which premises were in the several 
tenures of Henrv Cowper and Thos. Mosley, to the use of Jervase 
Sleigh ; who was admitted. Fine lis. 4d. He did fealty. 

EDW. DEANE, Steward. 



250 Longstone Records. 

A RENTAL OF MR. WRIGHT'S ESTATE. 1720. 



An examination of this record reveals some striking features : 
the land is di\idetl into a very large number of small portions, and 
the holding of each tenant is made up of portions, not contiguous, 
but scattered over the whole township. It will also be observed 
that the only portions oi any considerable size are freehold.* 

A consideration of the main outlines of the feudal system of land 
tenure would lead us to expect such a state of affairs at a time prior 
to the obliteration of the remnants of it by Enclosure Acts.^ This 
system has been unravelled by Seebohm, and verv fully explained 
in his English Village Coiniitunity. 

The land of the Manor, consisting of Arable, Meadow, and 
Pasture, was divided into the Demesne (the lord's freehold) and the 
common land (called afterwards ' Copyhold,' from the fact that the 
holder's title deed was a copy of the record in the Court Roll of his 
admission as tenant.) The demesne w-as either kept in the lord's 
hands or let to free tenants •,\ the common land was held in 
villenage, i.e., the holders were tied to the land, and had to render 
\arious services to the lord for their holdings, such as working so 
many days for him. These ser\ices — with the exception of suit of 
Court (attendance at the Manor Courts) — came in time to be 
commuted for fixed payments, in the form of annual rent and a 
fine on entry. 

^ The area of tlie estate in Great Longstone, held by tenants, was just over 300 acres. This was 
divided into 234 portions, of which it5 were freehold and 119 Copyliold, but the acreage of the freehold 
was rather more than double that of the cop> hold. .Among the portions oi freehold, one was over 30 
acres, three more than 10 acres, nine over 5 acres, and eleven over 2 acres, whereas no portion of copyhold 
was over 3i acres, and only nine as much as 2 acres. The most usual units were one and two roods. 

t During the years 1 760 to r844 there were 3867 Enclosure Acts passed. There had been others before. 

\ These were not yVefAo/dfrx in the modern sense : (hey diil not oaH the land ; but their tenure was 
voluntary, in contrast to that of the tenants in villenage. In later times the teTiants in villenage often 
held freehold land as well. 



Wright Estate, 1720. 251 

Rental &c. 

The Arable land was divided into three ' Fields.'' Each field 
■was a gain divided into 'Furlongs.'- In each furlong were a number 
of narrow strips or ' selions,'3 lying side by side and separated 
from each other by narrow balks of unploughed turf. The selions 
ran the whole length of the furlong, so that each would contain a 
rood, half an acre, or an acre, according as they were one, two, or 
four rods wide.' If there was not a common field-wav along the 
end of the furlong, there would be a headland to give room for 
turning the plough.^ 

The holding of a tenant consisted of a number of these selions, 
not more than one in each furlong, and an equal quantity in each 
field.6 When a field was fallow the tenants enjoyed rights of 
pasture on it proportionate to their holdings ; but if, as sometimes 
happened in later times, the tenant fenced in his portion he was 
limited to his own holding.' 

The meadow (hav land) was similarly apportioned with similar 
rights of pasture after the hay was got, and in the Pasture each 
tenant had rights proportionate to his holding. 

This system of scattered holdings would be most incrnvenient 
under modern conditions, but it should be remembered that the 
tenants all lived in the town or village, when each had his messuage, 
and under no other svstem could they all be equidistant from their 
work ; and also that there was a very complete system of co- 
operation amongst them. 

1. The size of the Field depended on the size of the Manor. The number of fields was son^elimes only 
two, but three was more usual, as it allowed of each being fallow every third year. 

2. Furlong is not the only name ured tor this division of land, but it is convenient, as indicating that 
the normal dimension along one side was a furlong. 

3. These strips had other names also, as well as those taien from their area, as 'acre' or 'rood,' or 
from their shape, as 'gores' or 'tongues.' 

4. Hence it comes that the latin roda is used indifferently of a rod (lineal) rnd a rood Isquare measure), 
i. When the selions of one furlong were perpendirular to a seliin of the next furloi g. tl ey were said to 

■ abutt ■ on it. and were called ' butts.' In this case the selion on which they abutted was .onetin-es used 
as a headland for them 

5 When a holding is given in detail in an ancient deed, each portion is descnbed as "betwienthe 
land of k. B. on one side and of C. D. on the other " The adjoining tenants are sometimes the same 
throughout almost the whole of the holding. 

7. This points to the origin of ' Closes ' in the Fields. 



25: 



Longstone Records. 



Tlie above is onlv a bare outline of the ancient system, but it 
may serve to make the following ' Rental ' more interesting and 
intellegible to those who have not been fortunate enough to come 
across Mr. Seebohm's book. 



1720 



A Rental of the Estate of Thomas Wright, Esq., deceased, 
for the vear 1720 ; King in Great Longson, Little 
Longson, .\shford, VVardlow, &c., containing the names 
of the Tenants and Lands as now occupied, the rent, 
the quantity of the said Lands by estimation Of survey, 
the value, and the tenure. 



S - Denotes— Survey. 



E— KstiniHte. 



Freeholil. 


C- 


Copvhold. 

Value 


A. R. 


P. 


.C 5. i 



Mr. Mich. Buxton — 

Yearly Rent, £^2 o o. 
The Hous, Out housing, Orchards, 
Gardin, Courts, Foulds, & Gardin 



Croft 




S 


2 


2 29 


5 








F 


The Cow pasture or Backside 


S 


14 





14 








F 


Long Croft Clos 




E 


4 


2 


4 








F 


Austen Well Close ... 




S 


I 


3 7 


I 


10 





F 


Gilldale Close 




E 


2 


ID 


I 


10 





F 


Church Crofts 




E 


10 





10 








F 


Gilldale botham Close 




S 


2 


^ 3« 


2 








F 


The two outreak Closes 




S 


5 


2 18 


4 








F 


Haggway Foots Clos 




S 


12 


3 13 


9 








F 


Greenhill Clos below the 


Rake 


S 


3 


2 35 


3 








F 


The Great Corahs Clos 




E 


S 





7 





c 


F 


Middle Combs Clos... 




E 


4 





3 


10 





F 


Little Combs Clos ... 




E 


3 





3 








C 


Barly Croft 




S 




3 S 




17 


6 


F 


The 2 Andleburrow Closes 


S 


5 


10 


3 


10 





F 


Rannell-liead Pasture 




s 


7 


I 10 


4 


10 





F 


High-middlehill peice in 


the 
















Field 




s 


3 


3 


2 


10 





F 


For-furlong Clos 




s 


5 


21 


3 


10 





F 


Doles in the Pitts ... 


... 


E 


2 


3 




12 





F 



Wright Est9,te, 1720. 
Rental, &c. 



253 



Value. 

£ s. (I. IVnure. 



Wm. Frost— 

Yearly Rent, ^30 7 o. 

House, Barn, Orchard, &c. 

Berly Lays Close 

Killn-Crofts Closes ... 

Begger-way Closes ... 

Long Croft Peice ... 

Austin wall peice ... 

Greenhill peice 

Stancer Dale ... 

Upper Flaxdale 

Orethwart Middlehill 

Lower Flaxdale 

Armamedowe 

Cross Flatt 

Hen Butts 

Beast Grasses in the Hay, 6) 
assessed for 
The Blackloe, jointly and equally belonging to the Duke of Devonshire 

and Mr. Wright, being pasturiog for each 500 sheep is now occupied 

by Mr. Michael Buxton and Tho. Jackson, Tenants to the Den.'aine. 

Tho. Jackson- 





E 


5 


3 





6 


lO 





F 




S 


7 





3 


7 


12 





C 




S 


3 


I 


39 


3 


10 





C 




E 


I 


I 





2 


10 





F 




E 


I 


I 





I 








C 




E 


I 


2 





r 


10 





C 




E 


I 










12 





F 




E 




3 







15 





C 




E 


I 


2 





I 


5 





F 




E 




2 







8 





F 




E 




I 







5 





F 




E 


2 


2 





2 


10 





F 




E 


I 










10 





F 


n' 




6 








I 


10 





F 



Yearly Rent, ;£'26 o o. 
Hous, Barn, Stable, Garden, &c. 



A. R. P. 



The oxpasture & Stoney 


Loe 


S 


34 


3 


31 


iS 








F 


Long bamfurlong 


Clos 




E 


II 


3 





f> 


:o 





F 


Perrell seat Close 






E 


2 


2 





I 


10 





F 


UTH GaRRAT - 






















Yearly Rent, 
Costeads 


£2 10 0. 
by Balk or 


E 




2 







7 


6 


C 


Beacon Flatt ... 






E 




2 







6 





C 


Greenhill Topp 






E 




I 







2 


6 


C 


Upper Standhill 






E 




2 







7 





c 


Pitts Sides 






E 




2 







5 





c 


Hen Butts 






E 




2 







5 





c 


Stoney Loe 






E 




I 







2 


6 


c 


Andlebarr ... - 


... 




E 




I 







3 





c 


Ranhill 






E 




I 







3 





c 



254 



Longstone Records. 













Value. 












A. R. 


p. 


£ =• 


d. Te 


nure. 


Beggerway 




E 


I 





3 





c 


Costloe Botham 




E 


I 





2 





c 


Beast grass in the Hay, i 










4 





c 


Samson Hodskinson — 
















Yearly Rent, £6 9 


6. 














The Dwelling house, Barn, 


and 












Cowhouse 














c 


Croft Ends 




E 


I 


c 


12 





F 


Long Greave 




E 


2 





8 





F 


Upper Costloe botham 




E 


I 





II 





F 


Great Gapp ... 




E 


I 





2 


6 


F 


Backside the House ... 




E 


2 





7 


6 


c 


Half the Mill Lane Clos 




S 


I I 


10 


■5 





c 


Shaly Butts 




E 


I 





2 





C 


The Pitts 




E 


I 





I 





C 


Open Wallhill 




E 


I 





13 





C 


Armameadow... 




E 


I 





2 


6 


C 


Birchhill way 




E 


I 





2 


6 


C 


Cross Flatt 




E 


.3 





:o 


6 


C 


Lower Coseloe botham 




E 


I 





2 


6 


C 


Wheel 




E 


I 





I 


6 


C 


Rannell 




E 


I 





10 





C 


Rannell head 




E 


I 





2 


6 


C 


Womfurlong 




E 


2 





5 





C 


Parrel 1 seat 




E 


2 





4 


f) 


C 


Overthwart Middlehill 




E 


I 





3" 





c 


Middle Flaxdale 




E 


I 





u 





c 


Half a Beast grass in the 


Hay 








2 





c 


ThO : HODSKINSON — 
















Yearly Rent, ^4 3 


6 














Hous, Barn, Cowhous, &c. 














Backside the House ... 




E 


2 





7 


6 


c 


Halt the Mill Lane end Close 


S 


I [ 


10 


15 





c 


Highlow Meadow . . 




E 


2 





5 





c 


South Furlong 


... 


E 


2 





4 





c 


Cross Flatt 




E 


I 





3 


6 


c 


Birchhill way 




E 


2 





6 





c 



Wright Estate, 1720. 
Rental, &c. 



255 



Tho : HoDSKiNSON — Continued. 

Long greave... ... ... E 

Costloe-botham ... ... E 

Lower Flaxdale E 

Beggerway ... ... ... E 

Short brod ... ... E 

High Middlehill E 

Greenhill Topp ... ... E 

Great Gapp ... ... ... F 

Pitts Doles E 

Half a Beast grass in the Hay 

Wm. Brown — 

Yearly Rent, £i 17 5. 

Barn and Garden .. ... E 

Little Park Clos E 

Highloe Meadow ... ... E 

Red Weed ... E 

Mary Wright— 

Yearly Rent, £1 10 o. 
Croft ends ... ... ... E 

Davenpt. Blackwill — 

Yearly Rent, £0 5 o. 
Upon an exchange between 2 
Roods of his lieing in John Hea- 
ward's Caudale-hill Close and an 
Acre of Mr. Wright's in the said 
Blackwill's Wall-hill Clos under 
yc north hedge ... ... E 

Mr. Middleton, Clerk — 

Yearly Rent, £0 10 o 
For exchange between Land belong- 
ing to the Church and Mr, Wright's 
Bamfurlong Clos which Mr.Middle- 
ton holds ... ... ... E 



A. R. P. 



I I 

2 
2 
1 
I 
2 
I 
I 
I 



2 o 
o o 

2 O 



Value. 
£ s. d. Tenure. 



15 

2 

8 
2 
3 
6 
I 
I 
I 
2 



6 
6 
o 
6 
o 
o 
6 
6 
o 
o 



C 
C 
C 
C 
C 
C 
C 
C 
C 



120 F 

17 6 F 

80 F 



JO 



256 



Longstone Records. 



WlI.LM. HoDSKINSON DE AsH^ 

Yearly Rent, £"900 
The house, shop, and other out- 
housing belonging to the farm 
formerly Daniel Frost's ... E 
The Hous, Barn, Cowhouse, Garden 
Croft, . &-C., formerly occupied by 



Value. 
£ s. il. Tenure 



15 o 



Wni. Hodskinson, senr. 


E 


I 





10 





C 


The Backside Close 


E 


I 





15 





C 


Croft ends 


E 


2 





5 





c 


Elder Stubb 


E 








4 


6 


c 


Mill Lane end 


E 


2 





4 


6 


c 


Great Pitt Heads 


E 


1 





2 


6 


c 


Thornbridge 


E 


3 





10 





c 


Shaley Butts 


E 


2 





6 





c 


Pitts Doles 


E 


I 





I 





c 


Fore Doles 


E 


I 





I 





c 


Armameadow 


E 


I 





2 


6 


c 


Cross Flatt 


E 


2 





7 





c 


Costloe-botham 


E 


2 





5 


6 


c 


Beggerway 


E 


I 





2 


6 


c 


Bamfurlong 


E 








5 


6 


c 


Rannhill 


E 


I I 





14 





c 


Rannhill-botham 


E 


I 





II 





c 


Rannhill-head 


E 


I 





2 





c 


Costids 


E 


I 





2 


6 


c 


Womfurlong 


E 


2 





4 


6 


c 


Beacon Flatt 


E 


3 





7 


6 


c 


Upper Flaxdale 


E 


2 





6 





c 


Austinwall 


E 


I 





2 


6 


c 


Short-Bamfurlong 


E 


I 





2 


6 


c 


Oremark 


E 


1 





3 





c 


Gilldale topp ... 


E 


I 





I 


6 


c 


Between Pitts 


E 


2 





6 





F 


Armameadow end 


E 


2 





f. 





F 


Short broad 


E 


I 





I 


6 


F 


Beast gntcs in tl e Hay, 3 ... 








12 








Wright Estate, 1720. 
Rental, &c. 



257 



Antho. Torr — 

Yearly Rent, £34 2 o. 

House, Barn, Cowhouse, Garden, 

&c., formerly Tho. Hodskinson's 

deceased 

Stone bridge Clos 

Armameadow ... 

Costlowe botham 

Stancer Dale ... 

High Mid.llehiU 

Rannell-head Clos 

Grisdale 3 Closes 

Oremark 

Cowstie 

Mill Lane End 

Pitts Doles 

Fore Doles 

Beast gate in the Hay, i ... 
Anth. Torr, Shackerly's Farm, in lease 

with the above mentioned ... 

Armameadow Clos ... 

Green hill Topp 

Wheel 

Elder Stubb 

Shaley Butts ... 

Beast gate in the Hay, i ... 
Anth Torr, Jo. Beard's Farme 

Mires Close 

Red Weed 

Anth. Torr, a piece more on Cowstie 
Antho. Torr, Jo. Whiat's Farme 

Orthwart Thornbridg Clos ... 

Mill Lane End 

Cross Flatt Pingle 

Upper Standhill 

Austinwall or Short Bamfurlong 



Valut. 
£ s. d. Tenure. 



E 


2 


I 





2 








F 


E 


2 








1 


10 





F 


E 


I 










15 





F 


E 




2 







6 





F 


E 


I 










iS 





F 


E 


2 


2 





I 


15 





F 


E 


I 


2 





1 


12 





F 


E 




I 







3 





F 


E 


I 


I 







17 


6 


F 


E 




I 







I 


6 


F 


E 




I 







I 





F 


E 

se 






20 




4 


6 



F 


S 


2 





17 


I 


17 


6 


C 


E 




3 







12 





c 


E 




2 







5 





c 


E 




2 







8 





c 


E 




I 







2 

4 






c 
c 


E 


2 








I 


10 





c 


E 


1 


3 





I 


5 





c 


e 


1 








I 


7 


6 


c 


S 




3. 


20 


I 








c 


E 




2 







5 





c 


E 




2 







15 





c 


E 


2 








I 


10 





c 


E 


I 










14 





c 



258 



Longstone Records. 



Value. 
£ s. d. Tenure. 



Anth. Torr, his Farme at Church-dale- 
head in Ashford 

Dwelling House, Barn, Stable, Yard &c 2 30 

Backhouse Close E 200 

Crimboe Close S ' o 35 

Brown's Clos or Mills's Clos E i i o 

Great Brunt Clos ... ... S 4 o 10 

Little Brunt Close S t i 30 

Thorney side Close E i i o 

A Dole in a Mean Close ... E 125 
Prime's Close exchanged for 

Batche's Clos E iio 

Four Beast grasses on Finn 

RiCHD. Bettany — 

Yearly Rent, £7 o o. 

House, Barns, Garden, &c. ... 

Croft on the backside the House i 

South Furlong E 2 

Mires Clos ... ... ... E 10 

Red Weed E 10 

Pitts Doles E i 

Armameadow ... ... ... E 2 

Birch ill way ... ... ... E 2 

Henn Butts ... ... ... E 2 

Costloe... ... ... ... E 2 

Costloe Botbam ... ... E i 

Cross Flatt E i 

Costidds ... ... ... E 2 

Womfurlong ... ... ... E 2 

Womfurlong Clos • ... ... E 22 

Oremark ... E 2 

Greenhill .. ... E 2 
Beast gates in the Hay i 





10 





C 


I 


10 





C 


I 








C 




18 


6 


c 


3 








c 


I 


I 





c 


I 








c 


I 








c 


I 








c 


I 


4 








5 





C 


5 


6 


C 


15 





c 


12 





c 


I 





c 


7 


6 


c 


8 





c 


4 





c 


7 





c 


3 


6 


c 


3 


6 


c 


6 





c 


6 





c 


16 





c 


8 





c 


8 





c 


4 








Wright Estate, 
Rental, &c. 



1720. 



259 



Mary Flint — 




A. U. 


1>. 


Value. 
£ s. d. 


reiuire 


Yearly Rent, £'4 














Mill Lane Close 


.. E 


I 





18 





F 


Womfurlong Closes ... 


. E 


2 2 





I 18 





F 


Costide in the Fields 


. E 


2 





6 





F 


Pitts Doles and Fore Doles. 


. E 


I 20 




2 





F 


Beasts gates in the Hay, 4 . 








16 







WiLLM. HODSKINSON DE CrOSS -- 














Yearly Rent, /'8 j 














Small meadow Closes 


. E 


5 





4 " 





F 


Croft ends 


. E 


2 





6 





F 


Bretner Hedg 


E 


I 2 





I 2 


6 


F 


Middle hill Tongs 


E 


I 2 





'9 





F 


High Middle hill 


E 


I 





18 





F 


Greenhill in 2 places 


E 


2 





4 





F 


Gildale Topp 


E 


1 





I 


6 


F 


Beast gates in the Hay, 3 . 








12 







RoBT. HODSKINSON - 














Yearly Rent, £2 12 














Thornbridg in the Fields 


.. E 







2 


6 


F 


South Furlong 


. E 







2 





F 


Wall hill 


. E 







7 


6 


F 


Armameadowe 


E 







3 





F 


Long Greave ... 


E 







3 


6 


F 


Upper Standhill 


. E 







2 


6 


F 


Cross Flatt 


. E 







2 


6 


F 


Beggerway 


. E 







2 





F 


Middlehill Tongue ... 


. E 







2 





F 


Orethwart Middlehill 


. E 







3 





F 


Andlebarr 


. E 







2 


6 


F 


Short Banifurlong 


E 







2 


6 


F 


Beacon Flatt 


E 







2 


6 


F 


Gieenhill topp 


E 







2 


6 


F 


Oremark 


E 







3 





F 


Shoart broad 


E 







I 


6 


F 


Armaireadowe, more 


. E 







3 





F 


Beast-grass in the Hay, 1 . 








4 








26o 



Longstone Records. 



A. R. P. 



Value. 
{ s. d Tenure. 



Rich : Hodskinson'— 














Yearly Rent, £'6 14 














Hous Stead, Shopp &c. 














Coastlowe Close 


E 


2 





I 16 





F 


Mires Close 


E 








10 





F 


Highloe Meadow 


E 


I 





4 





F 


Shaly butts 


E 


2 





7 





F 


Pitts sides 


E 


I 





3 





F 


Long Greave 


E 


I 





4 


6 


F 


Wheel 


E 


2 





3 


6 


F 


Standhill 


E 


2 





I 16 





F 


Rannhill 


E 


I 





16 





F 


Rannhill botham 


E 


2 





7 





F 


Oremark 


E 


2 





7 





F 


Fran : Taylor — 














Yearly Rent, £4 














House, Garden, Barn, &c. ... 














Thorn bridg in the Field 


E 


I 





4 


6 


F 


Shaley butts 


E 


I 





4 





F 


Red Weed 


E 


2 





9 





F 


South furlong 


E 


I 





A 





F 


Long Greave 


E 


I 





1 





F 


Middlehill Tongues 


E 


3 





13 


6 


F 


Flaxdale botham 


E 


2 





10 





F 


Short bamfurlong 


E 


I 





4 





F 


Overthwart Middlehill 


E 


3 





1 1 





F 


Hen : Dooley — 














Yearly Rent, £"250 














House and Garden 














Highlow Meadow in the Field 


E 


2 





10 





F 


Shaley Butts 


E 


I 





4 





F 


Cowsty 


E 


2 





9 





F 


Armameadow 


E 


I 





4 





F 


Birchillway 


E 


2 





9 


6 


F 


Andlebarr 


E 


I 





2 


6 


F 


Beacon Flatt 


E 


I 





2 


6 


F 


Brettner Hedg 


E 


I 





3 





F 



Wright Estate, 1720. 
Rental, &c. 



261 



Marv Fernehough — 

Yearly Rent, £'14 o o 
House, Barn, Shopp, Garden, &c... 
The 2 Mill Lane Closes 
Croft joyning to the Church 
Beacon Flatt in the Fields 
Stanserdale 
In Jos : Furnice's Aiidlebarr Clos E 

High Middlehill 

Rannhill 

Middlehill Tongues ... 

Wheel 

Coastlow botham 
Cross Flatt 
Armameadow... 
Armameadow, more... 
Grisedale 

Wall hill 

Cowsty... 
Between the Pitts 
Highlow IMeadow 
Overthwart Middlehill 
Hilow Meadow Close 

Pitts Doles 

Beast gates in the Hay, 6 .. 

WiLLM. Drable & Jo: Heawards 
Yearly Rent £S o o 
Thornhridge Close ... 
Highlow Meadow in the Field 

Shaly Butts 

Wall-hill 

Cawdalehill Clos within 
Ashford ... 
Note. There is one half acre m 



\'aiue. 
s. d. Tenure 



s 


3 





8 


2 10 





F 


E 


I 


I 





18 





F 


E 




2 





7 


6 


F 


E 




2 





6 


6 


F 


E 




1 





3 


6 


F 


E 




I 





4 





F 


E 


I 








15 





F 


E 


I 








14 





F 


E 




2 





5 





F 


E 




2 





7 





F 


E 




2 





9 





F 


E 


I 








14 


6 


F 


E 




2 





6 





F 


E 










7 





F 


E 




2 





7 





F 


E 




T 





3 





F 


E 




2 





8 





F 


E 




2 





6 





F 


E 




I 





3 


6 


F 


E 


5 








3 





F 


E 




I 





I 
I 4 


6 



F 


E 


3 








3 18 





C 


E 




2 





8 





C 


E 




2 





8 





C 


E 




2 





TO 





F 



2 i6 o 



re in the last mentioned close belonging 
to Davenport Blackwell f r which he hatli an acre of Mr. Wright's in his 
Willi hill Close, .nnd gives Mr. Wright 5s. per annum 

The Beast Grasses in the Hay Pasture belonging to the Town of Great 
Longstone and in Number £9, and 34 cf thfm Iclrnp to Mr. Wright's 
estate being juineil to the several Tenements as before mentioned. 



s 


I 





6 


2 








F 


s 


5 


3 


33 


4 


10 





F 


s 


5 





23 


4 








F 


s 


24 


I 


8 


12 


10 





F 


s 
















s 


12 





22 


10 








F 


s 


2 





8 


I 


12 





F 


s 
















s 




2 


18 




S 





F 


s 


7 


I 


26 


5 


10 





F 


s 


I 


I 


1 1 


I 








F 


s 


3 





37 


2 
I 


10 







F 



262 Longstone Records. 

LITTLE LONGSON, BY SURVEY, AS FOLLOWETH : 

Value. 
A. R. P. £ s. d. Tenure. 

Mr. Wm. Fynney— 

Yearly Rent, ^^45 o o 
House, Barn, Stable, Garden, 

Yard, Fold, &c 

The Backside Close... 

Hill Close 

The 3 layes Closes 

Outreake Close and Smithy 

field, now lay'd together 

The Bitch-stone Dole 

Another Dole there in Ashford 

Liberty... 

The 3 Coedoe hill Closes 

Nether new Land Clos 

The New Clos in the Field ... 

In Little Longstone Hay, 5 Gates 

John Marchinton and Jo : Timm — 
Yearly Rent, ^16 o o 
House, Barn, Yard, Garden, 
and the lower Dale Clos 
The Upper Dale Close 

Little Breach Close 

Barren Castle Close ... 

Meadow Close 

Cow-hay-stile Clos ... 

Upper New Land Close 

Beast Gates in the said Hay 

Pasture, 4 ... ... ... 16 o 

Joseph Beebey — 

Yearly Rent, ;f8 15 o. 

The 2 Whiteles Closes ... S 5 i 23 2 10 o F 

Shifting Meadow ...... S 108 9 o F 

Longstone Dale Close... ... S 501 280 F 

In the Mire Whabs, Lord's Land, 

east and west in both places... S i 1 20 no F 

In Blackleas Close, j places ... S 4 3 35 2 y o F 

Two Beast Gates in the Hay, 2 80 



s 


2 


2 26 


2 





F 


s 


5 


7 


3 15 





F 


s 


6 


34 


4 10 





F 


s 




I 36 


7 





F 


s 




3 39 


H 





F 


s 


4 


35 


3 





F 


s 


I 


1 15 


iS 





F 



Wright, Estate, 
Rental, &c. 



1720. 



263 



4 3 29 



I 8 



2 28 



s. d. Tenure 



s 




I 20 


15 





F 


s 


2 


I 10 


I 5 





F 


s 


4 


2 20 


2 





F 



3 10 



s 


2 





20 


I 


7 


6 


F 


s 


2 


2 


18 


r 


16 





F 


s 


I 


I 


4 




17 





F 


s 


I 


I 







17 





F 


s 


I 





^7 




9 





F 



ThO : TOMLINSON — 

Yearly Rent, £^ o o. 
House, Barn, Croft, Garden, &c 
The Mayer-Hedg. Close 
2 Scratter Closes 

John Tomlinson — 

Yearly Rent, £2 10 o. 
The New Close betwixt the 
Towns ... ... 

Thos : White — 

Yearly Rent, _£'7 4 o 
Little Cock Flatt Close 
New Close 
Dagnall Clos 
Meadow Clos 
Leays-head Clos 
A Dole in Gt. Breach, Lord's 
East Lan : We : 
Another Dole ditto Lords' 

East & West 

Beast Grasses in the Hay, 2 

Wm. Pidcock — 

Yearly Rent, i^o 11 6 
In his Annisseds Close amongst the 
Lords' Land E 20 11 6 F 

Mary Flint — 

Yearly Rent, £g o o. 
For Tythe Hay and Corn ... .. 9 o o F 

Wm. Ranworth — 

Yearly Rent, £i^ o o. 
For Tythe, Hay & Corn in the 

Mornsall Dale 400 1'' 

In the Hay Pasture belonging to Little Longson are 13 Beast Gates 

belonging to Mr. Wright's estate in Little Lorgstone aforesaid, and joined 

to the several tenements as above. 

Wardlowe 



S 6 



o 
o 



264 Longstone Records. 

Value. 
A. R. P. £ !. d. Tenure. 

Mr. Stephen Whitby — 

Yearly Rent, £S 4 o. 
.'\n Housstead and Barn in Hugh 
Bradwell's Fould. 

Fore Doles Close E i i o i 5 o F 

Step-heads Close E 110 150 F 

Crimens Close E i i o i 5 o F 

Mean Crimens E 210 2 o o F 

Hard Aunter E 20 8 6 F 

Lane End E 20 8 6 F 

Beast Gates in Wardlow Hay, 2 80 

Beast Gates in Gt. Longstone 

Hay, 6 140 

Tho : Bramwell — 

Yearly Rent, £1 o o. 
House, Fould, & Croft ... S 332 16 o F 

One Beast Grass in Wardlow Hay 4 o 

Hugh Brad well — 

Yearly Rent, £7 10 o. 

His House & Yard to the Lane S 3 35 

Upper Croft S j 2 30 

Stoney-loe S i i 29 

Mean Crimens ... ... ... E 120 

In the Field More E 20 

Stepp-heads Close E 100 

Beast Grasses in the Wardlow 

Hay, 2 8 o 

There is 5 Beast-gates in Wardlow Hay Pasture belonging to the several 

tenements. 

Underwood — Jos. Millington ... 11 o o F 

Note. In John Millington tenure 
the House and Outhouses, with Orchard 
and Garden, valued per annum £2. 

The Hoodfield, now divided into 
two parts, the one 2 acres, and the 
other 10 acres, at 15s. per acre, £g. 



I 5 





F 


2 10 





F 


I 2 


6 


F 


I 3 


6 


F 


7 





F 


H 





F 



Wright, Estate, 1720. 
Rental, &c. 



26= 



Robt. Barber the money formerly 

paid by Pallfreman ... 

Chief Rents 

Mr. Thos : Longsden... 

Wm. Clou{;hs ... 

Mr. Ed Middleton 

Hen : Hodgkinson 

Jo: Cloves 

Cottages in Great Longsto.n'e : 
Mary Jackson, late Wm. Smith 
The : Thornhill 

Fran : Crowder 

Humph: Foulowe 

Tho: Foulowe... 

Wm. Cockin, late Wm. Wright 

Wm. Bland 

Katharine Mornsall 

Jo : Garlick 
Rebec: Hallowes 

Thurstan Wright 

James Haberjam 

Emanll. Cooper 

Caleb Wayne 

Robt. Garratt 

Jonath : Shackerly 

Dorothy Bon; ford 
Elizab : Foulowe 

Richd Crowder 

Jo: Sellers 

Wm. Hodskinson, late Tho : AUin 

Hen : Heathcoat 

Rowland Heathcoat 

Margaret Jackson 
Jo : Smith 
Ed : Terr 

Mrs. Ann Mills 

Margaret Sellers 
Emanll. Sellers 



Value. 
£ s. d. 







2 6 






I 4 






4 






4 






2 


s. 


d. 




6 





Paid by the 


5 





Overseers. 


10 







5 







10 







12 







6 







iS 


4 




10 







12 







6 


8 




10 







10 







10 







10 







5 







6 







6 





Paid by the 


12 





Overseers 


5 







5 







10 







10 







5 







6 





Paid by the 


15 





Overseers 


5 







10 







10 





Paid by the 
Overseers 



266 



Longstone Records. 



YEARLY OUT-GOINGS, OUT OF MR. WRIGHT'S ESTATE 

1770. 



To the Duke of Devonshire, Chief and Pasture Rent 

for Lands in Gt. Longstone 
for Lands in Foolow 
for Lands in Gt Longstone , 9"'" '' '"j vP^Tn' °' 

" i One pound Nine shillings 

for Freehold Lands in Wardlovv ( & sixpence has not been 

) paid for Lands tor which 

for CopV-hoid Lands in Ashford \ an equal Quantity was 

* -^ , o J- ' allotted to the Duke in 

for Hay-grass — late Scammodines ' Augt:i77o 
To the Overseer of the poor of Longstone for a piece] 
of Land taken from the Common, and Inclos'd — [ 

call'd Gildo I 

To Robt : Thornhill for teaching poor Children to read 
To the Curate of Longstone for preaching an Annual i 

Sermon 
To the poor of Great Longstone 
of Little Longstone 
of Ashford ... 
of Wardlow... 
of Kniveton ... 



£ 


s. 


d. 


5 


3 


lU 





4 


H 


1 


9 


6 





1 


4 





10 


8 





2 






7 6 

5 

1 10 

2 
10 
10 

10 

1 

T8^19 3i 



To the Minister of Longstone for Glebe Lands lying 
within Mr. Wright's, for which there were Lands 
given to the Church in exchange, in Augt : 1770 
therefore 'twas agreed between The rev : Mr. 
Walthal and Stephen Jones (agent to Coll. Wright) 
that the usual payment of one pound and three 
shillings be discontinued at Lady Day, 1771 

To .Mrs. Ridgway and Mr. Goodwin Do. Do. 

To Edwd. Noton for the Duke <jf Devonshire Do. 



1 3 



14 

7 








Wright Estate, 1770. 



267 




lUi/e^^j. 



■icitaiu, rjAu:^Aya > c/, riar/ (bi/.afn, ana 



''el{/^ 




//I. 




t'^^'n^t-rba- ^a 



<^/0 




o 



ua/ii, WM. 



J 



JU. en ///^ /^ ^. ^c//. 



[Facsimile of Title Page, B.G.] 



268 



Longstone Records. 



Survey of Lands. 

Letter. No. Occupiers and Grounds. 

ASHTON. SAMUEL. 
A 2 Black Lowpiece ... 

BLACKWELL, THO. 
A 4 Black Low 3/7ths... 

6 Common piece 3'7ths 

14 Ox pasture 

15 Do. 

21 Barrel Sheath 

22 Bam Furlong 

23 Do. 

24 Do. 

C 12 Stack Yard 

13 House and Garden 

48 Pool House with far pool, &c. 

51 Near pool piece 

D 29 Between Towns 



BETTANY, CORNE 

10 Womb Furlong 

11 Do. 

12 Stoney Furlong ... 

13 Cross Heads 

27 Beggar way 

28 Do. 

8 Barn 

17 Small Building & yard 

20 End of a Barn ... 

21 Homestead, Garden, &c. 
30 Included in No. 56 



Contents. 
A. R. P. 



19 



78 


1 


36 


5 


jy 


13 


19 


fi 


») 


12 


,, 


32 


3 


1 


26 


4 


3 


24 


7 


1 


21 


5 


1 


32 


»1 


M 


12 


»I 


It 


08 


1 


3 


02 


2 


,^ 


16 


4 


1 


11 


144 


»t 


33 


1 


2 


32 


1 


1 


21 





3 


13 


3 


3 


38 


1 


3 


15 


1 


2 


29 



05 



16 



Wright Estate, 1770. 



26q 



Survey of Lands. 

Letter. No. Occupiers and Grounds. 

BETTANY, CORNE^—Cou filmed. 
41 Course Low 
43 Cross Flatt 

55 

56 & 30 Building and Croft 

Seven Beast Gates in^ 
Great Longstone Hay J 



Contents. 



6 


»» 


03 


3 


1 


33 


y, 


1 


01 


yt 


2 


32 


»» 


»» 


»» 


21 


3 


38 





BLACKWELL, JOSIAH. 








C 47 


Rood Furlong 

BEEBY, JAS. 


•• »» 


1 


01 


D 1 


White Cliff 


3 


1 


34 


8 


Mackleys in two parts 


5 


2 


08 


24 


Longstone Dale ... 


5 


jj 


)» 


34 


Shifting Meadow 


1 


J, 


06 


39 


Mire whobs 


1 


1 


08 




Two Beast Gates in" 
Little Longstone Hay 


)» 


5» 


»» 




16 


1 


6 



BRAMWELL, JOHN 

15 Grace yard, &c. 

2/3rds of a Beast Gate") 
in Wardlow Hay J 



„ 3 09 



»l l» )» 



„ 3 09 



DOOLY JOHN. 
C 15 Small House & Garden 



„ , 04 



270 



Longstone Records. 



Survey of Lands, 

Letter. No. Occupiers and Grounds. 

FLINT, JOSHUA. 
A 7 Common piece 

8 Moor side close 

9 Do. 

B 2 Big Cow Holmes 

3 Little Do. 

C 10 House and small Garden 

19 Pt. of a Barn 

29 House and Garden 

40 Stand Hill 

57 Yard Croft 

65 Thornhridge 

Four Beast Gates in^ 
Great Longstone Hay J 



FURNACE, WM. 
16 Barrel Sheath 
18 Rannel Head 

25 Rannel 

26 Rannel 

11 Two Building.s and Yard... 

24 Pt. of a House and Garden 

25 Pt. of a Barn 

28 A Barn and Yard 

37 Cross Flatt 

38 Do. 

49 Wall Hill ... 
49a South Furlong- 
60 Wall Hill ... 
64 Croft 

63 Mill Lane End 
70 South Furlong 

Four Beast Gates in 
Great Longstone Hay 





Contents. 


A. 


R. 


p. 


7 


3 


08 


2 


3 


39 


2 


1 


17 


9 


») 


)> 


8 


1 


8 


>» 




>» 
»» 


,, 


t) 


11 


3 


2 


30 


1 


2 


32 


3 


1 


27 



»» »» »» 



39 


1 


12 


M 


2 


35 


1 


1 


18 


3 


2 


33 


3 


n 


08 


M 


1 


> 1 


M 


»» 


06 


n 


>i 


)> 


>» 


n 


06 


1 


3 


32 


1 


2 


10 


2 


2 


07 


3 


1 


11 


2 


, , 


08 


2 


1 


■ ) 


1 


3 


35 


1 


3 


16 


?) 


a 


1 » 



26 i 26 



Wright Estate, 1770. 



271 



Survey of Lands. 



Letter. No. 


Occupier and Grounds. 




FURNACE, MARTIN 


B 4 

5 
C 7 


Hagway Foot 

Hagway Foot ... 

House Garden's Barn, &c. 


33 
34 
35 


Lower Barley Lays 
Over Barley Lays 
A House and Garden 


53 


Kiln Croft 



.^. 


R 


p. 


6 


2 


09 


4 


3 


22 


M 


1 


24 


2 


3 


06 


2 


3 


24 



14 
03 







FURNACE, MATW. 


25 


2 


22 










E 


23 


Homestead, &c. 


» » 


J ) 


38 


34 
35 
66 


-Cops 


- fl 

.. - 1 

2 


1 

It 


19 
36 
03 


A 


19 
20 


GREGORY, THO. 
Horsepasture 
Rannel 


i 

7 
7 


3 

3 

1 


16 

24 
05 


B 


1 


Dross Dale 


2 


2 


05 




7 


Out Free Close 


5 


2 


) ) 




8 


Ore Mark 


7 


2 


16 




9 


Greenhill Top 


8 


1 


24 




13 


Greenhill ... 


. 20 


3 


33 




16 


Gild Low ... 


3 


3 


11 




17 


Gild Low Bottom... 


i 


2 


11 


C 


4 


A Garden ... 


M 


M 


10 




14 


Building and Backside ... 


»» 


t t 


13 




16 


A Small House and Garden 


» ) 


1 » 


06 




31 


House and Garden 


M 


M 


20 






One Beast Gate in 
Great Longstone Hay ... 


)> 


>» 


., 



65 3 18 



27^ 



Longstone Records. 
Survey of Lands. 



Lettpr. No. 


Occupier and Grounds. 


( 

A. 


Contents. 
R. P. 




GOODWYN, WM. 








A 29 


Beggarway Close 


2 


1 ) 


05 


C 1 


A Barn 


»» 


n 


»» 


62 


Mill Lane Close ... 


2 


) > 


37 


D 2 


New Land 


1 


1 


05 


6 


Castle way 


»» 


2 


l» 


9 


Dale close 


2 


1 


27 


10 


Do. 


3 


3 


18 


11 


Do. 


1 


2 


36 


12 


Homestead &c., with little Croft.. 


M 


3 


It 


13 


Breech in two parts 


6 


) » 


08 


28 


Between Towns ... 
Four Beastgates in Great 


4 


1 


26 




Longstone Hay 


M 


M 


»» 




Three Beastgates in Little 










Longstone Hay 


»l 


M 


n 




25 


1 


02 



GARLICK, SARAH. 
C 3 House and Small Garden. 



»> »» n 



GARROT, SAML. 
C IS House and Garden 



„ „ 08 



GARROT, ANDW. 

C l7a House and small Garden. 



Wright Estate, 1770. 



273 



Survey of Lands. 



Leltei 


r. No. 


Occupier and Grouiuis. 

HODGKINSON, 


LUKE. 


Contents. 
A. R. P. 


A 


17 


Rannel Head 




2 2 29 


C 


2 


A Barn 


... 


> t M »> 




2a 


Lower Paddock . . . 




,, 1 32 




9 


House, Garden, &c. 




„ „ 19 




44 


Arma Meadow ... 




1 3 08 




46 


Do. 




1 2 „ 




58 


Mill Lane Close ... 




1 3 24 




59 


Do. 




1 1 13 




66 


Shaley Ford 




1 2 29 




67 


High Low Meadow 




5 2 11 




69 


Shaly Butts 




6 2 12 






.Six Beastgates in Great 








Longstone Hay 
HODGSKINSON^ 


, HEN. 


M »» >> 




23 2 17 






B 


10 


High Middle Hill ... 




3 „ 05 




11 


Do. 




3 3 12 




l-z 


Do. 




1 2 06 




12a Middle Hill Tongue 




1 2 „ 


D 


43 


Small Meadow's ... 
Three Beastgates in 
Longstone Hay . . . 


Great 


4 1 24 




14 1 07 



23 



HAYWARD, MARTHA. 
House and Garden 



24 



274 Longstone Records. 

Survey of Lands, 



Letter. No 


Occupier ami GrouiuK. 

HODGSKINSON, WM. 


Contents. 
.\. R. P. 


C 24 


Part of a House and Garden 


. „ „ 06 


26 


Part of a Barn ... 


M M n 


27 


A Rick Yard ' 


„ „ 04 


39 


Course Low 


2 1 17 


45 


Arma Meadow ... 


3 3 05 


61 


Mill Lane close ... 


2 2 16 




8 3 08 



HEATHCOTE, JOHN. 
C 32 Small Building and Garden ... ,, n 06 

HODGSKINSON, RICHD. 

C 68 Park 

D 44 Caldwell Hill Close 

45 Bit on the other side ye lane 



HOLMES, GEO. 

C 72 Cold Stile 

73 Emanuel Pingle 

74 Stone Bridge 

75 Queen Meadow ... 

76 Crowder Close 

77 Cranbury 

78 Homestead, Orchard, &c. 

79 Mills Close 

80 Great Brount 

81 Little Do. 

82 Nether Main close 

83 Turnip close 

84 Over Main close ... 
D 46 Fin Pasture 



1 ) 


» y 


24 


y y 


1 


01 


M 


M 


03 


l> 


1 


28 


4 


3 


24 


,, 


2 


20 


2 


2 


06 


1 


y y 


37 


1 


2 


22 


1 


1 


33 


y y 


2 


22 


1 


y y 


38 


4 


1 


27 


1 


1 


08 


1 


1 


16 


1 


1 


33 


1 


3 


11 


5 


••i 


12 


30 


1 


29 



Wright Estate, 1770. 



275 



Survey of Lands, 



Lettei 


. No. 


Orcupier and Grounds. 

HAWKSWORTH. JOHN. 


.\ 


Contents. 
R. P. 


E 


1 


Stoney Low 


1 y 


3 25 




2 


Do. 


»i 


2 38 




7 


A Dole in Crymans 


1 


3 ?2 




9 


Step Heads 


1 


„ 24 




10 


Do. 


)} 


1 19 




11 


Do. 


»> 


„ 24 




12 


Short Butts 


»» 


1 25 




16 


Homestead, &c. ... 


M 


1 13 




171 




/- 


2 11 




18 
19 


-Pieces on the back of Homestead - 


1 

1 


2 16 
2 36 




20 


1 and J Beastgates in 


^ ») 


1 10 






Wardlow Hay ... 


>) 


>» M 





LONGSDON, MR 


3 


New 


Land 


7 


Little 


Meadow 


16 


Lays 




18 


Do. 




19 


Do. 




20 


Do. 




21 


Do. 




22 


Do. 




23 


Hill 


close 


25 


Back 


side 


26 


Homestead, &c. ... 



31 Caldwell Hil 



9 


M 


33 


1 


M 


29 


3 


J , 


27 


7 


3 


05 


2 


1 


>> 


4 


2 


)f 


1 


3 


28 


2 


3 


25 


5 


2 


25 


5 


2 


25 


5 


3 


04 


) » 


3 


32 


2 


2 


16 



276 



Longstone Records. 



Letter. No. 



Survey of Lands, 



Occupier and Grounds. 



LONGSDON, mR.— Continued 

32 Do. 

33 Do. 

37 Bitchstones 

38 Smithy Field 

48 Bitchstones next the S. wall 

5 Beast Gates in Little 

Longstone Hay ... 

One Do. in Great Longstone Hay 



( 


Contents. 


k. 


R. 


p. 


1 


2 


32 


3 


»i 


21 


2 


»» 


28 


2 


' ) 


22 




2 


31 



l» »» »» 



M »» »» 



64 „ 30 



MARSDEN, GODY. 

3 Black Low piece 

NAILOR, WM. 

4 Breech 

5 Do. 

17 ... 

30 New close 

35 Meadow ... 

40 Cock Flat 

42 Dragon Dale 



NEWTON, JOHN. 

21 A Dole in the Breech ... 

22 Hawking Meadow 

24 Homestead, &c. 

25 Far Yd. with House in 2 Dwellings 

26 Piece Head 



29 2 



3 


3 


23 


3 


1 


27 


1 


1 


19 


2 


3 


22 


M 


3 


24 


1 


3 


24 


1 


1 


14 


[5 


2 


33 


1 


) ) 


04 


1 


M 


27 


» t 


1 


14 


, , 


3 


11 


1 


3 


16 



Wright Estate, 1770. 



277 



Survey of Lands. 



No 


Occupier and Grounds. 






Contents. 
A. R. P. 




NEWTON, JOHN- 


-Continued. 




27 


Piece 






6 3 9 


28 


and 29 Pingles ... 






„ 3 32 


30 


Nether Edge 






7 „ „ 


31 


Mid. Do. 






7 „ 04 


32 


Over Do. 






3 „ 16 


33 


Barn close, with Barn 






7 „ 19 




37 „ 32 



c 

A 



OVERSEER of the Poor. 

5 A Butcher's Shop ... 

PITCOCK, WM. 

In Anniseeds 

SCAMWARDINE, HANH. 

6 A Cottage ... 

TAILOR, lOHN. 
1 Black Harry House 



TAILOR, MOSES. 
C 22 Part of a Barn 

THORNHILL, ROBT. 
C 60 Far Furlong 

TOMBLINSON, THO 
D 14 Scratter Close 
15 Lower Do. 
27 Homestead, &c. 
36 Meer Edge 



IJ M )) 



14 1 24 

it M jf 

5 ,, 08' 

2 3 24 

1 2 16 
M 1 22 

2 ,, 08 



6 .3 30 



278 



Longstone Records. 



Survey of Lands, 



Letter. No. 



Occupier and Grounds. 



THORNHILL, JERVIS. 
3 and 4 Far Dole close 

5 Step Heads 

6 Crymans close 

8 A Dole in Great Crymans 

13 Short Butts in ye Main Field) 

14 Hardonter 

6 Beast Gates in Great 

Longstone Hay ... 

2 Do. in Wardlow Hay ... 





Contents. 


A 


R. P. 


1 


3 08 


1 


3 „ 


2 


„ 22 


3 


M 16 


. . . , , 


2 22 




2 04 



WRIGHT, ROBT., ESQ. 

4 4/7ths of Black Low 

5 Plantation on do 

6 Common piece, 4/7ths ... 

18 Old Backside 

19 Plantation in do. ... 

20 Church Crofts 

21 Paddock and walk 

22 Homestead, Gardens, Barns, &c. 
6 Ash plantation 

14 Plantation on the west side of 

Greenhill 

15 Do. on the bottom of Gild Low... 



M »» yf 



» > » » n 



9 


3 


32 


104 


2 


20 


17 


3 


02 


6 


3 


4 


14 


2 


32 


1 


M 


) » 


11 


1 


) » 


1 


»» 


16 


3 


2 


24 


4 


y 1 


24 


» ) 


1 


39 


> » 


2 


.'ir, 


166 


•' 


37 



Wright Estate, 1770. 



279 



Survey of Lands. 



Letter. No. 


Occupier and Grounds. 

WAGER, THO. 


Couteiits. 
A. R. P. 


C 36 


House, Garden and Barn 


... „ „ 20 


42 


Park 


... „ 1 32 


52 


Mire pingle 


)> ^ if 


71 


Coldstile Furlong 


5 1 30 





6 


1 


08 


WOOD, HANNAH. 

1 Oat Field 

2 Pasture 

3 New piece 

4 Homestead, &c. , with Barnyard 


2 
7 
1 
1 


1 

3 

1 


16 

37 
21 




12 


2 


34 



TOTALS. 

Ashton, Samuel 
Blackwell, Thomas 
Bettany, Cornelius 
Blackwell, Josua 
Beeby, James 
Bramwell, John 
Dooley, John 
Flint, Joshua 
Furnace, William ... 
Furnace, Martin 
Furnace, Matthew ... 
Gregory, Thomas ... 
Goodwyn, William 
Garlick, Sarah 



9 


M 


19 


144 


)} 


33 


21 


3 


38 


M 


1 


01 


16 


1 


16 


»> 


3 


09 


) > 


»» 


04 


39 


1 


12 


26 


2 


25 


25 


2 


22 


4 


3 


16 


65 


3 


18 


25 


1 


02 



28o 



Longstone Records, 



Survey of Lands. 
TOTALS— Continued. 

Names. 

Garrott, Samuel 
Garrott, Andrew 
Hodgskinson, Luke 
Hodgskinson, Henry 
Hay ward, Martha ... 
Hodgskinson, \\'^illiam 
Heathcote, John 
Hodgskinson, Richard 
Holmes, George 
Hawksworth, John 
Longsdon, Mr. 
Marsden, Godfrey ... 
Naylor, William 
Newton, John 
Overseers of the poor 
Pitcock, William 
Scamwardine, Hannah 
Taylor, John 
Taylor, Moses 
Thornhill, Robert ... 
Tomblinson, Thomas 
Thornhill, Jervis 
Wright, Robert, Esq. 
Wager, Thomas 
Wood, Hannah 

Total ... 



A. 


R. 


p. 


M 


»> 


08 


M 


) ) 


l> 


23 


2 


17 


U 


1 


07 


M 


M 


24 


8 


3 


08 


J y 


»» 


06 


)» 


1 


28 


30 


1 


29 


9 


I 1 


33 


64 


y t 


30 


29 


2 


y 1 


15 


2 


33 


37 


f 1 


32 



3 „ 



M » » yy 



14 1 24 



5 


» y 


08 


6 


3 


30 


9 


3 


32 


166 


M 


37 


6 


1 


08 


12 


2 


34 


836 


1 


03 



28 1 




. m^^ 



'^ 




Loadstone Records, 



LONGSTONE. 




Wright Estate, 1770. 



^^^^''' 






,^ . .-.lii/^^^ 










G/2£^T LONCSTONE. 



B 



«ti^^*^ 



«rii9" 



9:8 






Longstone Records, 



C 



GREAT LONGSTONE. 



\i 200^ 



'^ i ^^^- 4-0 \ 

J^-il *rj"'' Stanamil ^_^ 

"HJr 3 -2 -30 ^,V^-\ 
-fc. - Ml - .«- 

«<i?a "^;= Courfe Low ^ 

.-'^ -' " "H. ^' 6003 ^ 

•£- Courfe Lew ^ ^''^~ ^^"^ 

'^' 2-1-17 ^jst-' -*?1'^ ^-^ 



_-* 



^"=«_-^ 



HI' ^38 -*? 1-3 ^-a 

^^^ ^ ^ CiDfts Bats ^^ %:\ 



*u 









Wright Estate, 1770. 



C 



GREAT LONGSTONE. 



-t^ 





^^ 60 ^ 

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a.<^^~ 









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^ ^. 















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, Small :^ea(I^ 













Longstone Records. 



t^H 



iiff"\ 



'Sri T ! ^ \ 



GREAT LONGSTONE. 













?^^^ % 







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CO o o 



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Wright Estate, 1770. 



GREAT LONGSTONE. 



iP^'^^i 






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J^t 






A" 







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C 



Longstone Records. 



Viright Estate, 1770. 



GREAT LONGSTONE. 












,-*•'" 















Black Harry Houfe 
»^-AS-:t 5.*" * ^ "^ -- ^ 



^ 
•^-- 



3 



Black Low Piece 

29 3 00 



?^ Black LowHece % 

% S0]8 3 









jt « a i«*if* * 



^ 



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Wright Estate, 1770. 






A 



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5 =>— .=^ -c ^ 






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Lon^stone Records, 



It 



;r 






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Wright Estate, 1770. 













// 


t¥ 










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Longstone Records, 






GREAT LONGSTONE. 



at'i' 



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Wright Estate, 1770. 



GREAT LONGSTONE. 













A. 
•* 



>«•«■<* 

























Longstone Records, 




LITTLE LONGSTONE. 



_^ Lay's J 

■ ''S'-r^-. -5,.- - r --■ita 

A- -a 

4? -a 



D 




AT 



19 

Lays 

t-- £ 00 



20 1 






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4i 






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I'a/s'\,.^^La}^i 



5 -2 25 






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.2 3 251 















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5-2 25 












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ia.«.' 



a. 



A. 

J. 



25 

^. Backfide \ 
• 3 04. 1 






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127\1 



Wright Estate, 1770, 



GREAT LONGSTONE. 



D 



i>.^' 









V^^C^' ' ff '^ i; ^' 






y*. S ^if- o « -> 



*W< CO ^ri 



Longstone Records. 



LITTLE LONGSTONE. 









'u. 









D 



i 



CO a> ° 



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4«^ 



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Wright Estate, 1770. 






% 






LITTLE LONGSTONE. 



Cliff 



* *?- 









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I 









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-« 

-« 
■« 
■* 
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D 






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^ 






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Lon^stone Records. 



LITTLE LONGSTONE. 



,, 5 






A 



«""« 
> \ 






N, y a ^/ 









CB «( 



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Wright Estate, 1770. 









H'^. \p \ LITTLE LONGSTONE. 



ti^ 






£7 » ^c^-. 






",*'; 









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el 






1i '' .4 



4" 



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4 



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1l 



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Longstone Records. 



FOOLOW, 




E 




y^ona 



Wright Estate, 1770. 



FOOLOW. 



9,; 



¥ 









E 



Piece 




I 



I 



03 



,a^a^» 



a 



*i^ 



^Plece Headf 
E- 1-3 -16 








^«^ 




*«^i 


c 




1 












\ 


%. 


33 


\ 


1 


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Qofe ^ 
4 


1 


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. 







s 



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t 3 

1 ^ 



I 



V*. 



Longstone Records, 




Wright Estate, 1770. 



F 




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^ 



282 Longstone Records. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 



ELECTION NOTICES. 

COUNTY OP DERBY. 

WESTERN DIVISION. 
PARLIAMENTARY ELECTION, 19UC. 
The followinj^ is a Summary of tlu; Rotiini respectiiij; ELECTION 
EXPENSES of the Candidates at the abov(^ Election, as to lit. Hon. 
VICTOR CHRISTIAN WILLIAM CAVENDISH, P.C., M.P., rocoivod 
tho lytli day of i'ebruary, 19Jlj, from U. brooko Taylor, Election 
Agent; and as to EDWARD HINMERS, Esq., received the 14th day of 
February, 1906, from C. H. Cowlishaw, Election Agent. 

Cavendish. Hinmbes. 

.£ s. D. £ a. D. 

Returning Officers Charges 289 7 7 ... 289 7 7 

Candidates' Personal Expenses 76 10 U ... 90 5 8 

Election Agents' Remvmeration Nil. ... 15u 

Sub-Agents, Polling Agents, Clerks, and 

Messengers OH 2 6 ... 327 15 5 

Printing, Advertising, Publishing, and 

Stationery 444. 10 ,.. ;i64 3 3 

Hire of Rooms for Public Meetings 31 17 4 ... 38 18 7 

Hire of Committee Rooms 86 17 9 ... il 4 6 

Postage, Telegrams, and Miscellaneous 133 8 2 ... 313 11 7 



.£1603 4 2 dei63) 6 7 



And I GIVE NOTICE that any Voter is permitted to inspect the 
ItetiU'ns and accompanying Declarations and Documents, on payment of 
;i fee of One Shilling, at the undermentioned Office, at any time during 
Office hours within two years next after the date of the receipt of same 
by me. 

Dated the 22nd day of February, 1906. 

REGINALD WALKELYNE CHANDOS POLE, Colonel, 
Sheriff and Returning Officer. 
Office of the Sheriff of Derbyshire, 
20, Corn Market, Derby. 

COUNTY OF DERBY. 

HIGH PEAK DIVISION. 
PARLIAMENTARY ELECTION, 1906. 
The following is a Summary of the Return respecting ELECTION 
EXPENSES of the Candidates at the above Election, as to OSWALD 
PARTINGTON, Esq., M.P., received the 28th February, 19U6, from 
R. H. Douse, Election Agent; and as to A. P. A. PROFUMO, Esq., 
received the 26th day of February, 1901), from J. Sumner Pollitt, 
Election Agent : 

Partington. Profumo. 
£ s. r>. i s. D. 

Returning Officer's Charges 302 3 8 ... 302 3 8 

Candidates' Personal Expenses 39 ... 35 O 

Election Agents' Remuneration 100 ... 168 

Sub-Agents, Polling Agents, (Klerks, and 

Messengers 301 5 6 ... 321 12 2 

Printing, Advertising, Publishing, and 

Stationery 522 18 10 ... 543 1.8 

Hire q^f Room for Public Meetings 34 17 8 ... 23 13 3 

Hire of Committee Rooms 56 9 ... 41 12 5 

Postages, Telegrams, and Miscellaneous ... 148 9 5 ... 150 1 5 

^£1504 15 10 £1585 4 7 



And I GIVE NOTICE that any Voter is permitted to inspect the 
Returns and accomijanying Declai-ations and Documents, on payment of 
a fee of One Shilling at the undermentioned Office, at any time during 
Office hours within two years next after the date, of the receipt of same 
by me. 

Dated the 28th day of February, 1906. 

REGINALD WALKELYNE CHANDOS POLE, .Colonel, 
Sheriff and Returning Officer. 
Office of the Sheriff of Derbyshire, 
20, Corn Market, Derby. 



Transcripts of Ancient Deeds. 283 

Little Longstone.* 

Sciant p'sentes & fnPi. Quod Ego Thomas fit Rici Senescalli 
de Pecco Dedi . Coiicessi . & hac p'senti Carta raea confirmavi Mathi) 
de Langisdon & h'edib] suis duas Culturas p'ti & sepat pasture in 
campo de Parva longisdo st longsilowe iacetes de dominico q vocanP 
Cotemedeusz en una acra t're arrabit ext^s' verso via de crosuey 
& cu qMam Bercaria ptiuete dimid' ac*m t're sb' monte dco de 
Longsilowe cu oib3 ptinentiis suis libtatib3 . eisianietis ad dnicu 
ptinetib3. Q°s culfas tenui separalit" p escauibio septe acrai? t're 
de dnico in Campo de Hassoppe on pertinet' . Iib'tatib3 suis. Tened' 
& habend' ipi Mattio & h'edib3 suis de me & h'edibj meis I feodo 
& h'editate . lib'e . solute . q'ete • bn • & in pace • jure h'editar. Ita 
qd' p'dcs Maths de Longisdo & h'edes sui reddit' p fra eschambiata 
in campo de Hassoppe penit' aqetabiit. & Ego p'dcus Thorn & h'edes 
fai reddit' dno ipius feodi de -Pva Longisdo p t'ra eschambiai in 
campo de Pva Longisdon eod' mode annuati psolvemus. Si Eeddit' 
annual phis dcs p ira I Longisdon retineal:' scil' .ix. den ad festu 
sci martini Dist'cto fiat p Math' v'l h'ed ipi' sup t'raw dcam in 
Hassoppe ad dci Reddit' soloem. Et Sic e covso ex alira pte de 
t'b3 Den reddit' annuat p t'ra i eschambio data 1 Hassoppe ad 
AsBupoom be Marie pacand'. p oib3 §viciis ex utq3 pte. Et Ego 
p'dcs Thorn & h'ed' mei p'dco Math'o & h'edibj suis p'nominat' 
p*tn & sepal' pastam. & tram arrabil' una cu Bercaria dca cuiusdam 
mise eschambiat p tra r Hassoppe eu oibj ptin' suis . lib'tatibj . 
esiamtis . sicut aliq' ?ra . v'l p^'tu . v'l sepal' pasPa Ifra t'ram & 
ext" meli' v'l libi' potut teni . pt* omes gentes I ppetnu warantizabi' . 
Semp Defendem' . & ubiqj aqetabi'. Et ut h' Donaco hiu' eschambii . 
Concessiu . & hiu' carte pf'maco Rata & stabil' pmaneant p'sente 
cartam sigilli mei ipressione corroboravi. Hiis Testibj. Serlone 
milite de Beyley. Adam de Herthulle milite. Rubo psona de 
Hope Rico fit Thoiii ps aie de Bauquett. Matho psona. & aliis. 
— [_Not dated. About the time of King JbAn.] 

[English Abstract.'] 
Thomas, son of Richard, steward of the Peak, grants to Matthew 
de Langisdon and his heirs two cultures of meadow and .'eparate 

* From the CoUectiuu of MSS. made by John Wilson, of Broomhead, co. 
York. 



284 Longstone Records. 

pasture in the field of Little Longstone under LongBilowe, called 
Cotemcdeusz, with an acre of arable land extending towards the waj' 
from Crosuey, and a sheepfuld containing half an acre under the hill 
called Longsilowo — which cultures he held separately — in exchange 
for seven acres of land in the field of Hassop. Matthew and his heirs 
are to pay the quit rent for the exchanged land in Hassop. Thomas 
and his heirs are to pay the rent to the Lord for the land in Little 
Longstone, which is ninepence at Martmmas ; and, if it be withheld, 
Matthew and his heirs shall distrain on the land in Hassop for its 
payment. And so, conversely, concerning the rent of threepence 
at the Assumption for the exchanged land in Hassop. Witnesses : — 
Scrlo, Knight, of Beyley ; Adam de HerthuUe, Knight: Eobert, 
parson of Hope ; Richard, son of Thomas, parson of Bauquell * 
[Bakewell]; Mathew, parson, and others. 

♦ Clerical celibacy was not universally enforced in England before the 
thirteenth century. 



Transcripts of Ancient Deeds. 285 

Little Longstonr 

Sciant p'sentes & futi quod ego Lescia quondam uxor Eofeti 
filii Walthef de pva Longisdon in mea viduilate & in ligia potestate 
mea . concessi <fe vendidi & he psenti mea Carta conf rmavi . & qetii 
clamavi Mitlio filio Thome de Bauquell. Tresdecim denariatos 
Eedditns in villa de pva Longisdon annuatim pcijiiendas de Ki&irdu 
tilio Eicardi de Edinsoue Et de filiab3 liicardi filii Leuenad Et de 
Henrico Clodhomir & Alicia uxors sua. Et de Matild' Juliana 
ifc Matilda wnoiihj . quos ni' solve psuevant post ohitfi Rob'ti filii 
Walthef quoii. 1:1111 viri mei . sine aliq° retenemeto. Tenend' & 
habend' ipi Mutho & heredibj suis vt suis inde assignatis & 609 
lieredib3 Q'et'S de me & successoribj meis inppetuu. Eeildendo 
inde annual I m' qm diu vixc-ro ille & heredes sui vt sui assignati 
nnii par albaru cirotecarfl ad pascha . p omib3 reb3 & demandis . 
|) hac aute Concessione & qeta clamatone . dcs Maths m' Octn solid 
argenti in Gersuiii donavit. Et ego Lesoia qm diu vixeio p'dcos 
Tiesdeci denariatos Eedditns cu oniib3 ptin suis p oins liomines 
warantizabo. in liiu' v Concessic ni^ & Q'ete chiniaconis testiiuouiu 
psente C'artani sigilli mei inrp>sicaie Curoboiavi. Hiis testib3. Eob'to 
de Trouwell Eob'to de Stanton. El>a de Bamfoide Pet" de Hurst 
Ada f pet' de Langisdon Stepfio de Eoiond. Henf de Offtoti Jofie 
de Bauquell ct cu & aliis. — [ Wilson Collection. — Not dated. About the 
middle of the thirteenth century.\ 

^English Abstract.'] 
Lescia, widow of Eobeit .-on of Walthef of Little Longstone, 
giants to Matthew, son of Thomas de Bauquell [Bakcwell], a rent 
of thirteenpeiice from Richard son of Richard de Edinsouere, the 
daughters of Eichard son of Leuenad, Henry Clodhomir and Alice 
his wife, Matilda, Juliana, and Matilda, sisters, which they have 
paid to the said Lescia since her husband'.-? death. Matthew is to 
pay therefore, in lieu of all demands, a pair of white gloves at 
Easter annually, and he has paid a fine of eight shillings. Witnesses: 
— Robert de Tiuuwell, Eobert de Stanton, Elias de Bamforde, Peter 
de Hurst, Adaiu son of Peter de L ngisdou, Stephen de Roloml, 
Henry de Ofiei tun, John de Bauquell, clerk, and others. 



286 Longstone Records, 

Little Longstone. 

Sciant p'sentes & fuPi quod ego Thomas filius Robti de pva 
Longisdon Dedi & concessi & hac p'senti mea carta confinnavi 
Matho filio Thorn de Bauqnett p honiagio & s'vicio buo homagiu 
& ?vioiu cu TresdecT denariatos Reddit'. que EiCdus fit EiCJi de 
edinsoQe Henric' Clodhomir & Alicia uxor sua. MMtilda . Juliana 
& Matilda sorores michi faSe psuevant aimuati p una bovata Pre 
& p uno crofto in villa & in fitorio de pva Loiigisdou q"iii de me 
tenuerut en oinib3 ptinentiis suis Tenend & hnd' ipi Matho & 
h'eJib3 suis v'l Cuicuqj assignare volu'it & fo^ h'edib3 de me 
& h'edib? meis In feodo & hereditate libe solute . q'ete pacifice & 
integre plenarie & bene . Jure & hereditarii . I'eddemlo iude 
annuati michi & lieredib3 meis ille & heredes v'l sui as.siguati & 
eor). heredes unii denariu ad anuciaconem be Marie in martio p 
ofQib3 reb3 & demandis m & h'edib3 meis spectantib3 . scit p . 
Wardis . releviis . & eschaetis & p omimodis sectis Et ego iam dos 
Thoiii & heredes mei dcos homagios de hominib3 & feminab3 & 
eoi; heredib3 cu Wardis releviis & eschaetis & en omib3 sectis 
ptinentiis & liBtatib3 suis . sepedco Matfio & h'edib3 8ui.s v'l Cuiciiq3 
assignavit & eoif. heredib3 p offis homines &oms feminas warantizabim' 
& ubiq3 semp defendem'. Et ut h mea donato & cocessio & carte 
hui' oof rraatio rata & stabilis pmaneat . psente Cartam sigilli mei 
Imp'ssione coroboravi. Hiis te8tib3 dno Thorn de Edinsoue Ada 
de edinsoue Luca de Beyl. Rotto de Stanto. And? de Deyrt. Pet' 
de Stanton. Willo Wine de Bauquett Matfio de Raindon Henf 
de Calvoiie & aliis. — [Wilson Collection. — Not dated. About the 
middle of the thirteenth century.'] 

[English Abstract."] 
Thomas, son of Robert of Little Longisdon, grants to Matthew, 
son of Thomas de Bauquell, for Ms homage and service, the homage 
and service with thirtfon pence rent which Richard, son of Richard 
de Edinsouere, Henry Clodhomir and Alice liis wife, Matilda, Juliana, 
and Matilda, sisters,* pay for a bovate of land and a croft in Little 
Longstone which they held of him, at a rent of one penny at the 
Annunciation of the Blessed Mary, in lieu of all wards, reliefs, 
escheats, and suits belonging to grantor and his heirs. Witnesses : — 
Sir Thomas de Edinsouere, Adam de Edinsouere, Luke de Beyley, 
Robert de Stanton, Andrew de Doyrley, Peter de Stanton, William 
Wine of Bauquell, Mathew de Raindon, Henry de Cal voure, and others. 
* Presumably sisters of Biohaid, son of Biohard. 



Transcripts of Ancient Deeds, 287 

Great Longstone. 

Sciant peentes & fuPi c^ Ego Thomas ad capud velle de magna 
Langisdo dedi eoncessi & hac psenti carta mea inppetuu cofivmavi 
& q'etu clamavi Kicardo forestario de magna Laugisdo & h'edil)3 
suis seu assigiiai p me & hedib3 meis & assignat & pro quadaiii 
snma p'cunie qm m p'dcs Rics pmanib3 donavit scilicet totu jus 
lueu & clamiu cj, habui v'l c^ habere potui in una bovata t're mee cu 
imo Tofto aiacent inP ^dcm Ricard & Gardiiiu pdam WiHi de 
Langisdo ifl villa & in campo & in fitorio de magna Langisdo sicut 
jacet latitudle & longitudie & est ilia bovata t're qm Viabui ex 
heditate patris mei Henrici ad capd velle de magna Langisdo & cQ 
omib3 Edificiis sup pdcm Toftu astantib3 Tenend & haliend dco 
Eico forestaf & hedib3 suis sive assigna? p me & heilibj meis & 
assignat libe . qete . integre . iure hedita? bii in pace cu umibj 
libtatib3 assiament nbiq3 ad p'dcam bovata t're ptii'Gtibj (acieiulo 
inde anuatim sviciu drliitii & cosuetii g, ptinet capital! duo feodi p 
tanta t'ra Et Ego dcs Thomas & heles mei & assignati tota p'dcaiu 
bovata t're cfl ptinetiis ut pdcm est dco Eicu forestar & hudili5 
suis seu assignal cont" oms homines & f'eminas waiautizabim' 
adqetabim' & ubiq3 scmp defendem' inppetuu . & " ut hec mea 
donate conoessio & qeta mea clamato rata & stabit pmanead 
inppetuii . huic Carte mee sigillii meii apposui Iliis Testibj. 
Hugone Capello de Lanisdo. Martino Capetto de ead' Tetro du 
Eolond. Witto fillo Thonia de Langesdo Witto de Wardrlowe. 
Simone de Croford. NicoUo de Croford & aliis. Dat apud Langsdo 
die See Augnet V'ginis & martiris anno regiii Reg uri E fill Ri-g 
Sri Henf vicesimo qnto. — [Wilson Collection.] 

[English Abstract.] 
Thomas ad capnd velle,* of Great Longstone, quit claims to 
Richard Forester, of Great Longstone, for a certain sum nf money, 
all his right and claim in a bovate of land with a tuft adj ining, 
with the buildings thereon, between the land of the siid Iticliard 
and a garden sometime William de Langisdon's in Great Lougsioui'. 
which bovate he inherited from his father Henry ad capud velle. 
Richard to do the due and accustomed services to the chief lord. 
Witnesses: — Hugh, chajdain of Longstone; JIartiu, chaplain, of the 
same; Peter de Rolond ; William, son of Th nuis de Langesdon ; 
William de Wardelowo; Simon de Cronjford; Nii hulas de Croinfor.l. 
and others. Dated, Longstone, the day of S. Agnes Virgin and 
Martyr, the 25th year of Edward son of Henry [i.e. Jan. 21, 1297]. 

♦ lownsUcad (?> 



288 Longstone Records, 

Offerton. 

In tte year of Henry, son of John. Agreement between 

Matthew de LongisJun aud Cecilia, widow of Jurdan de OfEitim, 
at Chi'istiuas. Cecilia giants all the land which Juidan and 
Heveiard formerly held in Offirton, except six acres at Sturd, to 
Matthew for twelve yenis, and if she is not able to dig the said 
six acres they shall on every occasion remain to the said Matthew 
during the said term. Matthew to pay a rent of five shillings 
to the chief Lord in lieu of all service aud secular exaction and 
'lemands, saving the foreign* service of the King. Witnesses; — 
Luke de Beileie, Robert de Stantun, Peter his brother, Jurdan de 
Koulisleie, Nicholas de Stanclive, William de Challiswoi the, Elias 
de Thornhul, Elias de Bamforde, Peter de Hurst, William de 
Ileiloiie, Nicholas de Paddele e, Adam de Lau-isilun, and many 
others. — [Wilson Collection. — About the middle of the thirteenth centurn.'j 

Parwich. 

Margery, widow of William son of Matthew de Longesdon, 
grants to Richard her son three messuages, and a ferlingate'f of 
land, and a rent of twelvepence in Peverwych [Parwich], and three 
acres and half a rood of hind in the same, of which messuages two 
lie together under le Clef between the messuages which Sir Eoger 
de Bradeburn held and the messunge which Robert de Gratton held, 
and one messuage lies under Leuliuesclif within the same town 
near the high way and was sometime held by Eoger Eliot. The 
ferlingate and three acres and half rood were held by Roger Eliot 
and Thomas de Aula. The twelvepence rent is from a messuage 
in Peverwych held by Thomas, son of John, lying between the 
messuage held by Roger, sou of Simon, aud the livulet. Witnesses: 
— Roger de la Dale of Peverwych, Robert his son, Henry son of 
John of the same, Rol ert <le Gratton iu the 8ame, John son of 
Thomas of the same, and others. Dated, Peverwych, Monday after 
holy Sunday in the bounds of Easter, | the 10th year of Edward, 
ton of Edward [1317]. — [Wilson Collection.^ 

Wardlow. 

Robert, son of John h- clerk of Wudelowe, grants to Thomas, son 
of John Martyn dtl Qucsion [Whebtun], a messuage with buildings 

* "foreign," not nac searily outside England. f = 'en acies. 

t 1 the second Monday aft er Easter. 



Abstracts of Ancient Deeds. 289 

thereon and bcven acres of land in le OMeWd and another plot 
adjoining in Wardelowe, which formerly were William Eaynald's. 
Witnesses : — Eoger le Qwiyteof Wardelowe, John Carles of the same, 
William de Hassop of Baukewell, and others. Dated, Wardelowe, 
Thursday after the Translation of S. Thomas the Martyr, 7th 
Hichard n. [1383].— [irastm Collection.] 



Eyam. 

Rotert Bate and Alice his wife grant to William, son of Roger 
de Milln of Eyoni, and the lawful heirs of his body, all the lands, 
&c., in Eyoni which lately belonged to John Dome, chaplain, au4 
which Alice inherited on his death as his niece (nepos) and heir ; 
remainder to the riglit heirs of William. Witnesses : — John Stafford, 
John de Hill, John de Leghiim, Kogcr de H;i.sulford, William Mercll, 
and others. Dated, Eyom, 4th September, 2nd Henry VI. [1423]. — 
[ Wilson Collection.] 

Sheldon. 

Geoffry Bagshawe, Vicar of the church of Glossop, grants to Ralph 
de Scheledon, all lands, &c., in Scheledon which he lattly had of the 
gift of the said Ralph — except a messuage and 26 acros of land 
in Scheledon, which Roger, son of the said Ralph, and Matilda, 
[??(,'i/e] of Richard Bonne, lately had of Geoffry 's gift by deed — to 
the said Ralph for life, and after his death to Roger, son of the said 
li'alph; remainder to the heirs of the said Ralph Witnesses : — John 

Whyte of Great Longesdon, Hi-nry Wryglit, and :.dehyne, 

and others. Dated, Scheledon, on Snndaj' alter the feast of S. 
Clement, Pope, 21st j-ear of.... — [Wilson Cnlhclion. — This deed is 
in had condition and defective. If the himj is Henry VI., as is likely, 
the date would be November 1442.] 



2go 

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Exchange of Land, about 160i, 291 

From the Longsdon Collection. 
Articles touchyng exchange of Land betwixt the right Ho : Ladye 
the Countesse of Shrewesbury and Steven Longesden and Anthony 
Longesden of Little Longesden in the Countye of Derby, Gent., as 
followeth — 

1. First it was covenanted and agreed that they y" said Steven 
Longesden and Anthony Longesden & their Heirs & Assignes 
should be free and have lawfull libertye and full auctorytie in & 
throughout all hyghwayes foot pathes or other wayes to have, use, 
& occupye from tyme to tyme & at all tynies without the let, 
vexacon or disturbance (as in tymes past they of right have bynne 
accustomed) in & throughout the sayd herbage, Common or pasture 
they are to exchange with the sayd ho : Ladye any thing in the 
sayd exchange to the contrarj'e notwitstanding. 

2. Also that the sayd Steven and Anthony Longesden theyr 
Heirs & Assignes shall be free from tyme to tyme and at 
all tymes in & throughout all Woodes Underwoods & Waters, to 
have use and occupye as in tymes past they have bj'nne accustomed, 
the foresayd Woods to fell, cut downe, & carrye away to his or 
theyr owne proper use for ev"^ throughout the foresayde Herbage 
Common or pasture any thinge in the sayd exchange conteyned to 
the contrarye notwithstanding. 

3. These are the names of the Bowndaryes of the Herbage 
pasture and Common w<^i' the sayd Steven and Anthonye Longesden 
ar to exchange with the sayd right Ho : Ladye the Countesse of 
Shrewsberrye, fyrst the Herbage of pasture for Beasts or Cattell 
commonly called Beast Gates in a pasture or parcell of Grounde 
called Little Longesden Hay, abuttyng upon Torspytt Spoute 
upon the North parte and upon a litle Brooke comonly called 
Chresbrooke on the West parte and upon Horseleas on the South. 

4. Also one parcell of Comon called Skrathayre buttyng upon 
the North parte of Crosway and upon the Hall breach head upon 
the Southe. 

T 



292 Longstcne Records. 

5. Also one other parcell of Conion called little more buttjmg 
upon . . . stone on the North and upon the ould Close head 
on the Southe adjoyning upon litle Longesden hay on the West, 
and Ouldersley h . . . upon the backsyde of the ould Close 
buttyng upon the ould Loe on the North, & upon the Goswell 
Bower & Sharpedge on the Southe. 

6. Also another parcell of Ground or Common called White clj-ff 
Terrs lyeng on the East syde of the Ri^■er of wee, and upon the 
West syde of the Closes of White clyf buttyng on Sharpedge upon 
the Northe and upon the Greensyde on the South parte. 

7. Also one other parcel of Comon called the Nabbes lyeng 
upon the East parte of the Myln damme in Mornsall dale. 

8. And it was agreed that the Conveyances or Assurances to be 
made of the sayd parcells of Herbage pasture or Comon from the 
saj'd Steven & Anthonj-e Longesden to the sayd Right Ho : Ladye 
should nor hurte or damage or impeache the Tytle or Estate that 
they y"= said Steven & Anthony have resers-ed to themselves of theyr 
other Lands out of the Exchange or anj- parte or parcell thereof. 

9. Also it was agreed that the savd Steven and Anthonye 
Longesden should gy\'e in Exchange unto her the savd right 
Ho : Ladye her HejTS & Assignes for ever all that theyr right title 
Clayme and Intrest of in out or to one parcell of Ground called 
little Longesden Leas {reser\'inge all Wayes to themselves & to 
theyr Heyrs for ever) one little Close called Longesden dale which 
was no parte of the Leas at the tyme of the Exchange (save only 
y' it lyeth on the East syde of the sayd Leas & joyneth upon the 
Lp : of Ashford). 

10. Item for exchange hereof the sayd Steven and Anthony 
Longesden are to have for theyr Leas one parcell of Grounde called 
the HvU from the nearmost Corner of a Close called Broome 
Bawcke eastward agavnst the north . . . Corner of John 
Hancock's Hvll Close & so downe to the savd corner of the same 



Exchange of Land, about 160i. 293 

Close. And for theyr Comon or pasture they the sayd Steven & 
Anthonye are to have xij acres lyeng between the sayd parcetl of 
Grouride and the Hyghway called Cross\vay. And allso the over 
whart Close with good and sufficient assurance to them and theyf 
Heyrs for ever of the promises & every parte and parcell thereof 
from the sayd right Ho: Ladye theCountes Shrewesbury with 
warrantye of the same to them the sayd Steven & Anthony 
Longesden & theyr Heyrs for ever from & agaynst all manner of 
Person or Persons, and for want of peaceable possession and quyet 
injoyeng of every parte & parcell thereof they the sayd Steven & 
Anthony & theyr Heyrs to reenter & have theyr ow-n agayne as in 
theyr former estates any thing in this exchange to the contrarj' 
notwitstandj'ng. 

M'' that Broome Baw&e & the Hill Close are parcell of the 
foresayd xij acres to be exchanged. 

Moreover it is agreed that the sayd Steven & Anthonye Longesden 
& theyr Heyrs shall have free Comons for tenn score sheepe upon 
Great Longesden Moor with free leave and lawful auctorvtie to 
passe, repasse fetch and drive the savd sheepe by and through the 
Highwaj' from Little Longesden to- the same Moor without 
disturbance or contradiction. 

Also that this Exchange or &rty thlhge therein contevned shall 
not be prejudiciall or any way irripeache hurt or hynder any of the 
other Lands of them the sayd Steven or Anthony Longesden reserved 
out of this exchange, neyther shall this exchange abridge them or 
theyr Hejri of any Priviledges Rialtyes or .other Libertyes of or 
belonginge to any parte of the other Lands not exchanged, but 
that they may have the same as also the Lands which they have in 
exchange from the sayd Countesse in as ample maner as they had 
theyr owne before this exchange. 

Exd. CHAWORTHE. 



294 



Lon^stone Records. 



From the Lofzgsdon Collection. 
An Assess"" made y 21^' day of May, 1786, for y= Hamblett of 
Little Longston and Morusodail, Charged upon laud two shillings in 
y^ pound for his Majestie's use. 

y= first quarter. 

Thomas Johnson 

Emanuell Cooper 

Thomas Broom 

Isaak Broom 

Samuel Skidmore 

John Shaw 

George Hancock 

Kobt. Shaw 

Joseph Beebee ... 

Francis HuUey . . . 

William Mellor 

Ellen Bragington 

Mary Pym and Thomas Gregory 

Thomas Longsdon 

John Pidcock ... 

Anthony Pidcock 

Mr. Wilham Finney 

William Low ... 

Anthony Hodgkinson 

Thomas Tomlinson 

Mr. Mich. Buxton 

Richard Hodgkinson 

Widd^^ Flint ... 

Thomas White... 

Richard Nailor ... 

Tho. Longsdon his part of tith hay and corn 

Jos. Flint for his part of tith hay and corn ... 

George Shaw for his part of tith hay and corn 

Mr. Fletcher or his tennant for tith wool & lamb 



Sum Totall 
Joseph Beebee, Assess'' 
Anthony Hodgkinson, Collect' 
The payments as foUoweth — 
30 day of June, 1736. 
6 of October 

29 of December 

30 of March, 1737. 



£ 


a. 


d. 


05 


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00 


8 


1 


00 


8 


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02 


3 


2 


08 


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01 


7 


1 


00 


2 


3 


02 





8 


01 


5 


3* 


01 


3 


OJ 


00 


4 


0* 


02 


6 


1 


08 


8 


2 


01 


3 


Oi 


02 


4 


84 


06 


7 


8 


04 


5 


2i 


02 


11 


3 


03 


8 





00 


8 


1 


00 


6 


2 


01 


4 





01 


3 


04 


04 


5 


^ 


02 


3 





02 


8 





01 








02 


3 






3 14 2 



Claim of Land and Houses. 



295 



21st June, 1817. Copy delivered to the Commissioners at Edensor. 
Land and Houses claimed by Jas. Longsdon, and situated in Little 



Longsdou. 

One Messuage House with all Outbuildings and Gardens) 
thereunto belonging, containing about ... . ) 

One Toftstead adjoining the Hay barn and occupied by | 
the late Catherine Gregory ... ... ... ... ) 

Pasture containing about 

Dale Close ... 

Upper and Lower Briery Dale and Pingle 

Scratter Close 

Upper and Lower Eioths 

One Dwelling-house, Garden, &c., inhabited by Jos.) 

Higginbottom ... ... ... t 

One do. do. John Gregory' 

Outbuildings, Croft and Stackyards adjoining 

Far Pasture 

Lays in 6 Fields... .. 

Newlands in 2 Fields ... 

One Toftstead & Croft occupied by the late Thos. Tomlinson 

One Croft, Jackson's Yard 

One Toftstead in do. occupied by the late John Bradbury 



do. 



do. 



do. 



Ann Jeffries 



Marg' Stone/ 



One do. 
One House 

One Croft (Gregory Croft) 

Cock Close ... ... 

Bandlands 
Meadow Close ... 
Jones Close and Plantation 
6 Beast Gates in Little Longstone Hay Pasture 
Field occupied by Wm. Hallas 
Broad Green do. 

One House, Garden and Croft, occupied by Rich. Skidmore 




11 

25 
5 



B. 





2 

2 





27 








2 








13 








3 


1 





17 









10 



12 



2 



1 



296 



Longstone Records, 



One do. -with Garden & Outbuildiugs, Wm. Tomlinson 
One do. Geo. HiiUey, juiir. 

One Toftstead occupied by the late Eobt. Hallas 
One House and Garden Richd. 8baw 

One do. do. Mattbw. Gregory 

One Garden Mary Tomlinson 

IN MONSALDALE. 
One Dwelling-bouse with Outbuildiugs and Garden and 
old Millstead 

4 Fields by- the River side 

1 Field called Doctor occupied by John Ashmore 

5 Beast Gates in Little Longsdon Hay Pasture 
occupied by Jobn Asbmore. 

IN GREAT LONGSDON. 

Flaxdale bottom ... 

One House andGardttn occupied by F. Holland ... > 

One'^ do. do. with premises adjoining, by Wm. Potts 
One do. and Slioj^ occupied by Tbos. Eyre 
One do. Jos. Drabble 

One do. Ralp Hancock- 

One do. Jos. Bottom 

One do. Jobn Bennett 

Croft and Factory adjoining 
And 200 Sheep Gates upon Great Longsdon Common 

IN WARDLOW. 
One House with Outbuildings and Crofts 

Several pieces of uninclosed Lands occupied by ■ 
Jas. Heeley ... ... ... -.• ... ' 

One piece of land occupied by Christr. James 



To the Gentlemen^Commissiouers 

for Great Longsdon, Little 

Longstoue and Wardlow 

Inclosure. 

Longsdon, 20th June, 1817. 
Error.s excepted. 



10 



10 



12 



141 1 30 



7 3 



2 



1 



8 


2 





1 








2 


2 








1 





3 


3 






Parish Accounts. 



297 



From the Longsdon Collection. 



SPECIMEN OF OVERSEER OF THE POOR AND 
HEADBOROUG.H FOR LITTLE LONGSTONE— 1768— 1769. 
The Disburstments of Richard Bland Overseer of the Poor and 
Headborough for the Liberty of Little Longstone since October 
the 29th'h 1768 till October the 29"' 1769. 



Paid at Edensor Court for my Oath 4'^- Charges S''- 

Paid for a Warrant of Nomination 

Paid to the Constable the Militia Money... 

Paid to the Constable, 11 Lays 

Paid for Catching the Moles 

Paid Widdow Brassington 52 weeks at 2/6 

Paid for a pair of Stockings for her 

Paid for a jacket for widdow Brassington 

Paid when I went to widdow Brassington three times j 

at the too! bar ... j 

Paid Anthony Hodgkinson 52 weeks at 9'^- a week. 
Paid Widdow Swindil 52 weeks at B"^- a week 
Paid Widdow Johnson 52 weeks at 6''- a week 

Paid Sarah Jackson House Rent 

Paid to Anthony Swindil when his hand was sore . 

Paid Anthony Swindil House Rent 

Paid this year to make up the Land tax 

Paid for making the Assessments of the poor — Land &) 

Windows J 

Paid for the examinations of Henry & Sarah Tattershai's 

Paid for repairing the Pinfold door 

Paid for repairing the bridge 

Paid two men one day for repairing Puthill road 

Spent when the Highways was repaired 

Paid for two Baskets for the Highways 

Spent when I went with a list of the names for the Turnpike 



£ 


s. 


d. 





1 








3 





4 


4 





3 


6 





2 


8 





6 


10 











6 





3 


6 








3 


1 


19 





1 


19 





1 


6 








12 








2 


6 





10 








3 


4 





1 


6 





2 








2 








3 


6 





2 








6 











7 





1 






298 



Longstone Records. 



Paid Thomas Hill Bill for the Bridge 

Paid W™' Goodwin, Overseer, short of his Accompts 

Paid for Malt 8 pecks, 8-- for Hops 1* lO^ 

Paid for two berleymens Oaths at Edensor Court ... 
Paid to a man that came with a pass 2'^- To another that 

came with a pass G^" 

Paid to two women that came with each a pass 

Paid to a man that came with a pass 

Paid for an acquitance for the palfrey Silver 4''- for 

Charges 4"' ... 

Paid for a Cheese 2^ 6'i Bread 2^ 

Paid for my Accompts keeping ]^- 6' for Papers 3'^ 



Received this year 80 lays and one half ... 

Received for Tithes 

Received of Abraham Broom for old gate stoop 



£ 


s. d. 


. 


3 11 


. 


9 8 


. 


9 10 


. 


8 





8 


. 


4 


. 


3 



8 








Disburst 


25 18 


11 





£ s. 

25 4 

1 

1 


d. 

8 



fed in all 


26 5 


8 


Disburst 


25 18 


11 


Due 


6 


9 



Paid to the succeeding Officer Adam Wilson 
Seen and allowed by us 
Thos. Longsdon 
Adam Wilson 
William Low 
Anthony Pidcock 
Benj : Skidmore 
William Naylor 
Will Goodwin 
Iseeck Broom 
Thomas Longsdon 



6 9 



Edward Shaw 
Charles Shaw 
James Beeby 
Thos : Tomlinson 
Charles Shaw 
George Flint 
Abraham Broom 
Wm. Pidcock 
Edward Shaw 



Abstracts of Deeds, &c. 299 

FROM THE LONGSDON COLLECTION. 



ABSTRACTS OF DEEDS, &c., FROM MSS. IN THE 
BRITISH MUSEUM. 



It would appear that the originals of the documents here 
represented were, for the most part, formerly (a.d. 1792) in the 
possession of Mr. James Longsdon, of Little Longstone, and were 
perused and copied by Dr. Edward V'ernon,* Rector of S. 
George's, Bloomsbury, from 1731 to 1761, whose MS. passed 
through the hands of Thomas Astle, F.S.A. , Keeper of the 
Records, to the British Museum. 

The abstracts have been made from a copy of Mr. Carrington's 
copies of the MS. in the Museum. 

In the copy used the Reference Number is given as Add. MSS., 
6667, p. 154, &c. , but in one place Hart MSS. 568 is added. 

I. 

Griffin son of Wenuwin of Kevelock grants to Mathew son of 
Thomas, clerk, of Bakewell, his heirs and assigns, for his homage 
and service, that oxgang of land in the township and territory of 
Great Longisdon, with a toft and croft, which Thomas, father of 
the said Mathew, and his ancestors formerly held of the feoffment 
of the King and beside of the confirmation of grantor's father, 
with all appertinences, liberties, easements, commons, &c., with 
turf to be digged and furze to be plucked up as in the moor of 
Longsilow and in the other moors of Great Longisdon, and to be 
carried to the mansion of the said Mathew in Little Longisdon. 
Rent 15 pence per annum, payable at Michaelmas 7id., and at 
the -Annunciation 7id., in lieu of all services, suit of court, mill, &c. 
Witnesses : — Sir Thomas de Edinsoure, Sir .Adam de Herthull, 
Luke de Beiley, Robert de Staunton, Robert son of Ingram oj 
Notingham, Mathew de Reyndon, Nicholas de Overhaddon, 
Henry de Hotot, and others. — No date. Seal defaced. Wrote 
in a very neat and plain character. 

*A Bubseguen^ peruser notes that Dr. Vernon has spoilt seTeral of '.he deed' 
by trjdng to ' revive ' the writing. 



030 Loadstone Records. 

[Tliis abstract is derived from copies or extracts of MSS. in the 
British Museum : viz. : two copies of original deeds (add. 
MSS., 6667, pp. 161 and 162, and 6674, p. 188), and 
sixteenth centurj' translations of the same (add. MSS. 6667, 
pp. 154 and 160). The two deeds are not identical, but the 
variations are so slight that it seems sufficient to signify by 
italics what appears in the deed of pp. 160, 162 (and 188), but 
not in that of pp. 161 and 154.] 



Notes from a MS. of Dr. Vernon's penes Tho. Astle, Esq. 

Anno 1768. Harl. MSS., No. 568. 6667, p. 158. 
References to Griffin son of Wennuwin from various sources. 
23rd. Henry III., a Baron — Rymer's Foedcra. Lord of Ashford 

manor. 
Among the pyersons to whom a mandate was directed to prepare for 

the subduing of Lewellin, then in arms. — Rym. Feed. 
1262. The King, on receiving news of Lewellin's death, directs a 
letter to the Earl of Hereford, Roger Mortimer, and Griffin, 
to take care of his interests, 
ist Edward I. Griffin held, at the day of his death, in chief of the 
I-iing the manor of Pole as a barony of the march doing 
therefor service to the King in his Army of ^^'ales for 40 days 
at his own charges. — Harl. MSS., 708. 



From the Registers of the Church of Lichfield (Harl. MSS., 

4799)- 

1262. The inhabitants of Longsdon gave two bovates of land to 

support a chaplain to officiate in the chajjel of S. Giles in 

Great Longsdon. 

Confirmation by Griffin. The parishioners shall hold of him the 

said two bovates ' in auxilium sestentationis capellani' on condition 

that the corn grown on them be ground at the lord's mill, that 



Abstracts of Deeds, &c. 301 

neither the Canons of Lichfield nor the Ordinary of the Church of 
Bakewell shall appropriate them, and that the parishioners shall 
not alienate them : in either of these events they shall revert to 
Griffin and his heirs. The inhabitants paid Griffin 7 marks for this 
grant. 

Note. — It is probable that there was some provision before this, 

witness the language of deed, and the fact that there is 

now [in Dr. Vernon's time?] another bovate of land in 

Longsdon. 

Archbishop Peckham ordered that the Church of Lichfield, as 

they received all tithes and profits from the inhabitants, should 

contribute 2\ marks, and the Parish should raise the same sum. 

He also fixed the charge of repairs, books, ornaments, &c. 

2. 

Robert son of \\'althew of Mornissale grants to Matthew 
son of Thomas, clerk, of Bakewell and his heirs for his homage 
and service a culture of land called Coc, of his demesne land, for 
making tofts, in the township of Little Longisdon, which extends 
from the west way from Egiston to the bottom of marsh meadow 
and to the toft of the daughter of Agnes of Little Longisdon with 
its dykes and pertinences, so that there be no common way at any 
time of the year upon the said culture nor between the said toft 
and it at the head on the east side; which culture Mathew's 
ancestors held of grantor's ancestors without any way. 
Witnesses : — Serlo de Beyley, Robert de Staunton, Robert de 
Calvor, Peter son of Mathew, Peter son of William, William de 
Pecco, Robert Loterele, Robert son of Alexander, and others. — 
No date. Seal broke away. [British Museum, Add. MSS. , 6667, 
p. 162.] 

3- 

Robert son of Walthew of Mornissale grants and quit- 
claims to Mathew son of Thomas of Bakewell, dwelling 
in Little Longisdon, and his heirs for his homage and service 



302, Loadstone Records, 

two cultures of meadow and separate pasture beneath Longsilowe, 
of his demesne, on the side of Olde lowe in the field of Little 
Long-isdon, called le Cotemedensf, with a sheepfold containing- 
half an acre under the said hill, and an acre of arable extending 
towards a way called Crossuey ; which cultures grantor's ances- 
tors held separately ; also all those lands with pertinences and 
curtilages which Mathew obtained from grantor's free tenants in 
his fee of Little Longisdon, with a curtilage extending from the 
head of the upper bridge to the wall of the, house in which Robert 
son of Alexander dwells, and to a cliff (?) called Ceoffe. 
Witnesses : — Sir Adam de Herthulle, Sir Richard de Edinsour, 
Luke de Beyley, Robert de Staunton, Jurdan de Roulisley, Mathew 
de Reyndon, Peter de Langisdon, and others. — No date. Seal 
f^recmaax, about lUn. diameter. Device an eagle {or bird) 
displayed. Circumscription illegible. [British Museum, Add. 
MSS. 6667, p. 1 63. J 

4- 
Serlo son of Ralph de Mounjoy, lord of Yeldrisley, 
grants and quit-claims to Mathew of Little Langisdon all 
manner of ingress and egress of way between a culture 
of land called Coc and a toft which was Matilda's daughter of 
Agnes of Little Longisdon, wrongfully held by use in respect of 
inheritance, without licence and by sufference of the neighbours, 
and especially all ways either to the head from the east side of the 
said culture, which are not common ways at any time of the year, 
or in the fields, meadows, and other necessary places, as settled, 
for the avoidance of discord, after consideration by honest and 
lawful men ; because there is no common cart-way entering or 
issuing from Little Longisdon on the south in or from the 
meadows and fields except by the way extending to the hill by the 
mansion of Robert I^oterel of Little Longisdon. Witnesses : — 
Richard de Edinsoure, Adam de Herthulle, Robert de Staunton, 
William Daniel of Tidisuelle, Henry Puerelle of Hassoppe, 



Abstracts of Deeds, &c. 303 

Robert de Calvor, Eustace de Mornissale, and others. — No date. 
Seal similar to 10. 163. Rpl. IValtheoj, D.m. No. 3. [British 
Museum, Add. MSS. 6667, pp. 163, and 159.] 

5- 

Serlo de Munjoy of Yhildrisleye grants to Mathew son 
of Thomas de Bakewell for his homage and service a 
moiety of the toft which Mathew son of Hyzilie ? of Little 
Longisdon sometime held in the township of Little Longisdon 
adjoining the toft of the said Mathew de Bakewell on the east side. 
Witnesses : — Sir Richard de Herthull, Luke de Beyley, Adam de 
Edinsoure, Robert de Herthull, William le Wyne, John Clerk, and 
others. — Without date. Seal broke away. [British Museum, 
Add. MSS. 6667, p. 164.] 

6. 

Serlo son of Ralph de Mounjoy lord of Yeldrisley 
grants and quit-claims to Mathew de Langisdon son of 
Thomas Clerk of Bakewell a moiety of toft with its 
dykes on the [south ?] and north sides, which Mathew son of 
Hizyle ? of Little Longisdon sometime held, adjoining the toft of 
the said Mathew on the east side; also four oxgangs of arable 
land of grantors domain in Little Longisdon and Britrichisfeld 
with crofts and tofts and five roods of meadow under le Medigtails 
in the valle by a certain dune on the south side, with all pertinences 
sheepfolds, buildings, Sec, and minerals to be got and carried 
without lot both in grantor's waste and in the arable land of the 
said Mathew. Witnesses :— Sir Richard de Herthull, Luke de 
Beyley, Adam de Edinsoure, William Daniel of Tideswelle, Peter 
de Rowlisley, William son of Elyas of Langisdon, and others. — 
Without date. Same seal as next deed. [British Museum, Add. 
MSS. 6667, p. 165. J 

7- 

Sir Serlo son of Ralph de Munjoye grants and quit- 
claims to Mathew de Longisdon and his heirs, cVc, all 



304 Longstone Records. 

suits of court and mill for the land which he holds of grantor 
within the township of Little Longisdon and Britrichisfeld and 
without; also lot of mine upon his land if minerals be found 
therein. Witnesses : — Sir William de Vernun, Jordan de 
Snitterton, Tiiomas de Edinsoure, Adam de Edinsoure, Robert de 
Staunton, Luke de Beley, and others. — Without date. Seal green 
wax, oval, about lUn. long. Device a fleur de lys. Circumscrip- 
tion SiGiLLVM. S.D. M.V. [British Museum, Add. MSS. 6667, 

p. 164.] 

8. 

Ralph son of Ralph de Monjoye of Yhildresley grants 
to John son of William de Aula of Little Longisdon, 
and the heirs of his body, a messuage and croft and two- oxgangs 
of land with a plot containing (?) four acres of land called le Hild, 
which Richard Bate sometime held, and four acres of waste in 
Archurlowe, in Little Longisdon ; with remainder in tail succes- 
sively to Richard, Agnes, Emma, Maud, and Ellen, the brother 
and sisters of the said John, with remainder in like manner to 
Ralph de Fairfeld, with remainder in fee to grantor. Witnesses : — 
Philip de Stredley, Roger Folejambe of Longcsdon, Stephen de 
Rolond, John de Brithrichefeld, clerk, Geoffry de Brithrichfeld, 
Richard de la Pole, William Rotour, clerk, and others. Dated 
Little Longesdon, the Sunday after S. Martin the Bishop, 17th 
year of Edward II. — Seal broke away. [British Museum, Add. 
MSS. 6667, p. 166.1 

By another deed indented of the same date and sealed before 
the same witnesses the said John dc Aula grants to the said Ralph 
son of Ralph de Monjoye two tofts, one croft, and 16 acres of 
land in Brithrichfeld in exchange for the lands, &'c. , granted by 
Ralph to him by the foregoing deed. — [British Museum, Add. 
MSS. 6667, p. 167.1 

9- 

Elyas son of William of Little Longisdon binds himself 
to William son of Mathew of Little Longisdon to pay a rent of 



Abstracts of Deeds, &c. 305 

7jd. .and Jd. of the same rent, the portion of three sisters of a 
rent of 13d. to the lord for tliree parts of a bovate and toft 
in the township and (ields of Little Longisdon, which Richard son 
of Richard de Edynsouer, Lecia daughter of Richard son of 
Leuenat of Langisdun and his wife Agnes, Henry Clothomer and 
Alice his wife formerly held ; payable at Matinmas. Witnesses : — 
Richard le Ragged, Henry de Calvor, William le Wyne, Robert 
de Derley, Nicholas de Vynnefeld, Robert de Reyndon, and others. 
— JVithout date. A small circtilar seal of green wax : device a 
quatre foil. [B. M., Add. MSS. 6667, p. 167.] 

N.B. — 'This deed is very badly transcribed. It evidently refers 

to same Rent as Wilson IMSS. 30719 Co. Derby, Nos. 2 

and 4, which see. 

ID. 

Matlida daughter of Richard son of Leuenad of Longisdon 
grants and quit-claims to Mathew de Longisdon son of 
Thomas Clerk of Bakewell a toft and croft with 3ac. ir. of 
land in or outside the township of Little Longisdon, and a ditch 
extending from the common street of the said town to the marsh 
of the meadow by the toft of Juliana her sister, which toft and 
land Tliomas Scalenis formerly held of grantor. Witnesses :• — 
Robert de Stanton, Rol>ert de Calvor, Peter de Roland, Adam 
son of Peter, Mathew de Reyndon, Robert son of Alexander, 
Launcelin de Stokes, William de Heielowe, Thomas de Offerton, 
William Pyncerna of Banquell, and others. — Wtthottt date. Seal, 
oval, green wax ; device a hush; circumscription Sigill. Matild. 
FiL. RiCARD. [B. M., 6667 p.] 

II. 

The same Matlida (described as ' Maud daughter of 
Agnes of Little Longsdon')* grants to the same Mathew 
the lands mentioned in the last deed and other small parcells of 
land in Little Longisdon. Witnesses: — Sir Adam de Herthulle ; 
Luke de Beyeleye; Robert de Stanton; Peter his brother; Jurdan 
* Agn^S8 da/jghter o£ Kichxrd de Edinsour married Ricliard son of Leuenad. 
See p.p. ? 



3o6 Longstone Records. 

de Roulisleye ; Mathew de Reindon ; Adam son of Peter de 
Lans,nsd()n ; Willoc de Langisdon ; Nicholas de Overhaddon ; John 
de Aston; John, Clerk, tlie writer hereof, and otliers.^ — [B. M., 
6667, p. 179.] 

12. 

Agreement made on the feast of S. Edmund the Arch- 
bishop 23rd Edward I. [Nov. i6th 1294.] between William son 
of Mathew of Little Longisdon and Thomas son of Robert de 
Lyttun, whereby William leased to Thomas all that land which 
John the clerk, then serving at Hope, sometime held^ for ten 
years at a rent of half a mark. Witnesses : — Peter de Rolond, 
Richard de Langisdon, Adam son of John super montem of the 
same, Thomas son of Ralph de Mornyssale, and others. Dated 
Bauquell, Monday the Vigil of S. Thomas the Apostle, 23rd 
Edward II. — A large seal uj ycUo-w wax, defaced before 1792. 
[R. M., 6667.] 

13- 
Alice daughter of William de Pecco grants to Robert 
son of William Tirri of Longeford a bovate of land with 
a toft and croft in Great Longisdon, adjoining the southermost 
of two borates which grantor's faiUer sometime held. Wit- 
nesses : — Sir Richard de Herthull, .\dam de Stanton, Mathew de 
Langisdon, Adam son of Peter, W'illiam son of Elyas, William le 
Wine, Peter de Lascy, Nicholas de Wynnefeld, Richard de Herri, 
John de Bauquell clerk, and others. — ll'ithont date. [B. M. 6667, 
p. 1 70. J 

14. 
Henry de Longesdon by deed poll dated the eve of the 
.Assumption nth Henry I\'. [1410], granted to Agnes his wife 
and the heirs male of her body an oxgang of land with two houses 
thereon in the town of Great Longesdon, which he inherited from 
his father.— -JVitnesses' names illegible. [B. M., 6667, p. 171.] 



Abstracts of Deeds, &c. 307 

Grant, referred to in the above deed, by which John 
Andrew, chajjlain, enfeoffs the above Ralph, John, and 
Robert, and William Woderowe, in the lands of Henry de Longes- 
don as above. Witnesses : — John Shacresley, John Nog-g-s, 
Robert Clementson, and otliers. Dated Longesdon, S. Mathlas 
the A{x>stle, 6th Henry VI. [1428]. — Seal green wax with the letter 
R upon it. [B. M. , 6667, p. 171.] 

Note. — From another deed of the same date, declaring the same 

trust, it appears that the name of Henry de Longesdon's 

then wife was Maud. 

16. 

Ralph Leche, esq., John Columbell of Stanclyf, and 
Robert Woderowe of Wormehill grant the hereditary lands 
of Henry de Longesdon in Little Longesdon, Wardlowe and 
Mornesale, which the said Henry had granted to John Andrewe, 
chaplain, and the said John had granted to them, to Richard de 
Longesdon son of the said Henry and the heirs male of his body. 
Remainder to Ellen, Cecilia, and Joan, daughters of the said 
Henry and the heirs male of their bodies. Remainder to the right 
heirs of the said Henry. Witnesses : — 'John Schakeresley, John 
Whyte, and Richard Litton. ^ — Dated Little Longesdon, Monday 
after Pentecost, 8th Henry VI. [1430]. [B. M., 6667, p. 170.] 

17- 

Award made the translation of S. Thomas 22nd Henn- 
VII. [7th July, 1507] between Robert Shakely, gent., of the one 
part and Ames, late wife of Henry Longsdon, and Robert 
Longsdon, son and heir of the said Amnes and Harry, of the 
other part, by Roger Levett, William Woley, Thomas Helds and 
Thomas Dinik. (line Award of the Arbitrators directs the mutual 
conveyances of several small parcells of land in Longesdon to be 
made when the said Robert attains his full age of 21 years. 



3o8 Longstone Records. 

Mention is made in describing- the premises of land in Longsdon 
belonging- to ' my lord of Shrewisberye'). — [B. M., 6667, p. 171.] 

18. 

Bond, dated 29 Dec. nth Eliz. [1568], from Philip Shakersley 

of Little Longsdon, gent., to Robert Longsdon and Anthony 

Longsdon of Little Longsdon, gents., for performance of 

covenants contained in an indenture of that date. — [B. M. , 6667, 

p. 172.] 

19. 

Warrant of Richard St. George, Norroy King of Arms, 

to Stephen Longsdon of Longsdon to bear and use such arms and 

crests as his ancestors have done before him and to bear the name, 

title, and dignity of a Gentleman — ^Mr. Longsdon having appeared 

at the visitation and disclaimed the title of a gentleman, not 

knowing how he might justify the same, although his ancestors 

had of long time been reputed gentlemen. 20th Nov. 9th James 

L [1611.] 

I. 23 Henry IIL 1239. 
.A.nd of the lands which the Barons of the said Lord the King 
Griffin son of Wenunwin and other Baron and other Barons. 
2. I Edd. I. 1272. 
Griffin son of W^enunwin held on the day of his death of the 
King the Manor of Pole with its appertincnces as Baron of the 
Marche making therefore services to the Lord the King in his 
Army in Wales for forty days at his own proper costs. 

3- 
Know all men present and to come that I Griflfin son of 
Wenunwin have given granted and by this my present Charter 
have confirmed to Matthew son of Thomas de Bauquell and his 
heirs or to whom he may assign the same and their heirs for his 
homage and service one bovate of land in the Vil and Teritory of 
Great Longstone that is to say that bovate of Land and croft which 



Abstracts of Deeds, &c. 309 

Tom Father of the before said Matthew formerly held of me with 
all its appertenences and liberties and easements in the Vil of 
Great Longstone and with turfs to be dug- and heath to be cut in 
the moor of Lonsilowe and in all other moors belonging to the Vil 
of Great Longstone and to the mansion of the aforesaid Matthew 
or of his heirs in Little Longstone sufficiently to be carried to have 
and to hold to him and his heirs or his assigns or their heirs of 
me: and my heirs in fee and heirship. These being witnesses :— 
Sir Thomas de Ednisoure, Sir Adam de Herthull, Luca de Beiley, 
Robert de Staunton, Robert Son of Ingram de Nottingham, 
Matthew de Reyndon, Nicholas de Over Haddon, Henry de Hotot, 
and many others. [Without date.] 

4- 

Know all men present and to come that I Griflfin son of 
Wenunvvin de Kevelock have given granted and by this my 
present Charter have confirmed to Matthew son of Thomas de 
Bauquell and his heirs or to whom he may assign the same for his 
homage one bovate of land in the Vil and Teritory of Great Longs- 
don namely that bovate of land with toft and Croft which Thomas 
Father of the aforesaid Matthew and his .\ncestors formerly of 
the feoffment of the Lord the King and afterwards of the confirma- 
tion of my Father held with all his appertenences liberties and 
commons in the \'il of Great Longstone and with all turfs to be 
dug and heath to be cut in the moor of Longislowe and any other 
moors and place in the Vil of Great Longstone and the mansion 
of the aforesaid Matthew or of his heirs in Little Longstone to be 
sufficiently required. To have and to hold to the aforesaid 
Matthew and his heirs or Assignes with him and my heirs etc. 
These being witnesses :— Sir Thomas de Ednisoure, Adam de 
Herthull, Luca de Beiley, Robert de Staunton, Robert Son of 
Ingram, De Nottingham, Matthew de Reyndon, Nicholas de Over 
Haddon, Henry de Hotot, and many others. 



3IO Longstone Records. 

5- 

Know all both present and to come that I Robert Son of 
Walchevi de Mornissala have given granted and by this my 
present Charter have confirmed to Matthew son of Thomas Clerk 
de Baukwell and his heirs for his homage and service certain 
culture of land which is called Coc of my demesne standing alone 
in tlie Vil of Parva Longisdon which extends from the way on the 
West of Egiston as far as the ground of a marsh meadow and at 
the toft of the son of Agnes of Little Longstone fully with its 
ditches and appertenences so that no path or way upon the said 
culture nor between the said toft at the head on the East no time 
of the year, 

6. 
Know all present and to come that I Sulo de Mungay de 
Yhildrisleye have given and granted and by this my Charter have 
confirmed to Matthew Son of Thomas de Baukwell for his homage 
and service half of the whole toft which Matthew son of Hyzilie 
of Little Longisdon once held in the Vil of Little Longisdon 
lying near to a toft of the said Matthew de Baukwell on the East 
part to have and to hold to him the said Matthew and his heirs 
of me and my heirs in fee and heirship, etc. These being wit- 
nesses : — Sir Robert de HerthuU, Luca de Beyley, Adam de 
Ednisoure, Robert de HerthuU, William Ic Wyne, Tohn Clark, 
and others. [Without date.] 

7- 

Know all men both present and to come to whom about to see 
or hear this present writing. Serlow Son of Ralph de Munjoye 
sends greeting in the Lord. Know you all that I have given and 
altogether quit claim of me and my heirs or assignes to Matthew 
de Longisdon and his heirs and assignes all my right and claim 
which 1 had or could have in all suits nf my Court and mill to me 
and my heirs pertaining for the land which he holds of me in the 



Abstracts of Deeds, &c. 311 

\il of Little Longisdon and Britrichisfcid and with all its apper- 
tenences and moreover the lot of the mine upon his land if a mine 
may be found. These beingf witnesses : — Sir William de Vernon, 
Jordon de Snitterton, Tom de Ednisoure, Adam de Ednisoure, 
Robert de Staunton, Luca de Baley, and others. 

II. 17 Edward II. 1324. 
Know all present and to conie that I Ralph son of Ralph de 
Monjoye de Yhildreley have given granted and by this my present 
Charter have confirmed to John Son of Will de .Aula of 
Longisdon one messuage and croft and two bovates of land with 
one place of land which is called Le Hild which Richard Bate 
fornierly held and four acres of land of tile Waste in Archurlowe 
Iluryne w'ith its appertenences in Little Longisdon tO' have and 
to hold to the said |olin and his heirs and tlie heirs of his body of 
the before named Ralpli and his heirs for ever. 

12. 
To all the faithful of Christ about to see or hear tliis present 
Charter. Adam Son of Robert Lord of Ednisoure greeting, let 
it be know to you all that 1 have given and altogether quit claim 
of me and my heirs to Matthew Son of Tom Parson de Baukwell 
and his heirs or Assignes of customs and serv-ices to me and my 
heirs or Assignes due for all the land w ith its appertenences in the 
Vil and field of Little Longisdon which the aforesaid Matthew 
bought off Matilda daughter of Levenad of Little Longisdon etc. 
These being witnesses: — Jordan de Snitt(;rton, Tom de 
Ednisoure, Robert de Staunton, Luca de Bayley, Matthew de 
Reyndon, and many others. 

15. 2T, Edward I. 1294. 
This Agreement is made on the Feast of Saint Edmund Arch- 
bishop in the 23rd year of the reign of King lulward si>n of King 
Henry King nf England between William Son of Matthew de 
Langisdon Juni of th(! one part and Thomas Son of Pole de Lytton 



312 Longstone Records. 

of the otlier part namely thai the aforesaid " Will has leased and 
to farm has delivered to the said Tom all that land in Britychefeld 
which John Clerk then sei-vant [? serving] at Hope once held with 
its appertenences to have and to hold to the said Tom freely, holy 
[? wholly], quietly, well and in peace for the term of ten years 
rendering therefore annualy to the said William half a mark of 
silver on two terms of the year etc. Tliese being witnesses : — 
Peter de Roland, Richard de Longisdon, Adam son of John upon 
the mountain of the same, Thomas son of Ralph de Mornysale 
dated at Bakewell on Monday in the vigU of Saint Thomas the 
Apostle in the 23rd year of the reign of K.ing Edward. 

16. 

Know all present and to come that I Alice Son of Will de 
Pecco have given etc. of Robert Son of Will Tirri of Longford one 
bovate of land with toft and croft with all its appertcnces in the 
Vil and Territory of Great Longisdon namely that bovate of land 
lying near the land the soil of two bovates of land which Will de 
Pecco my Father once held to have and to hold to the said Robert 
and his heirs etc. These being witnesses : — Sir Robert de 
Herthull, Adam de Stanton, Matthew de Longisdon, Adam Son of 
Peter, William son of Elias, William le Eyne, I^eter de Lasdy, 
Nicholas de Wynnefeld, Richard de Hinz, John de Baukwell Clerk 
and others. (Without date. J 

17. 8 Henry 6. 1430. 

To all the faithful of Christ to. whom this present 
writing tripartite may come Ralph Leche Esq. ,John Columbell de 
Stanclyf, and Robert Woderowe of Wormhill, eternal health in 
the Lord. Whereas Henry de Longisdon gave and granted by 
his Charter to John Ajidrew Chaplain of his lands and tenements 
with their appertenences in Little Longisdon and Wardlow and 
Momesale which descended to him by hereditary right to have and 
to hold the aforesaid lands tenements with their appertenences to 
the aforesaid John and his assignes of the chief Lords of those 



Abstracts of Deeds, &c. 313 

fees by the services therefore due and all right accustomed for 
ever which said John afterwards gave granted and by his Charter 
confirmed to the aforesaid Ralph John Columbell and Robert of 
the aforesaid lands and tenements with their appertenences to 
have and to hold all the aforesaid lands and tenements with their 
appertenences to the before named Ralph John Columbell and 
Robert and their Assignes for ever of the chief Lords of those fees 
by the service tlierefore due and by right accustomed for ever. 
Know you the aforesaid Ralph John Columbell and Robert have 
delivered demised and by this present writing tripartite have 
confirmed to Robert de Longisdon son of the said Henry of the 
aforesaid lands and tenements with their appertenences to have 
and to hold of the aforesaid lands and tenements with their apper- 
tenences to the before named Richard and the heirs of the male 
of the issue of his body on the services therefore due and by right 
accustomed and if it happened that the aforesaid Robert die 
without an heir male of his body begotton then we will grant that 
all the aforesaid lands and tenements with their appertenences shall 
remain to Elena Cicilia and Johanna daughters of the said Henry 
de Longisdon and their heirs and assignes male for ever and if it 
happened the before named Elena Cicilia and Johanna die without 
heirs male of the said Elena Cicilia and Johanna in that time we 
will and grant that all the aforesaid lands and tenements with 
their appertenences shall remain to the right heirs of the said 
Henry de Longisdon for ever. Witnesses : — John Schakersley, 
John Whyte and Richard Litton and many others. Dated at 
Little Longstone on Monday next after the Feast of Penticost in 
the eighth year of the reign of King Henry 6. 

18. 6 Henry 6. 1427. 

Know all present and future that I John Andrew Chaplain 

have given etc. to Jonh Columbell le Stancliff, Ralph Leche, 

William Wodrow and Robert Wodrow all the lands and tenements 

which I had of the gift of feoffment of Henry Longisdon de 



314 Longstone Records. 

Longisdon lying in Longisdon, Wardlow and Mornsaw to have 
and to hold etc. Witness : — John Shacresley, John Noggs, 
Robert Clementson and others. Dated at Longstone in the 
Feast of St. Mathew the Apostle in the sixth year of the reign 
of King Henry 6 after the conquest. 

19. 

Know ye all present and to come that I Griffin Son of 
Wenunwin le Vavelock have given granted and by this my present 
Charter have confirmed to Matthew son of Thomas Clerk de 
Baukwell and his heirs or tO' whom he may wish to assign the 
same for his homage one bovate of land in the Vil and Teritory of 
Great Longisdon namely a bovate of land with toft and croft 
which Thomas Father of the aforesaid Matthew and his ancestors 
formerly held and the feoffment of the Lord the King and after 
that by confirmation of my Father with all its appertenences 
liberties., easements and commons in the Vil of Great Longstone 
with turf and heather. 

14. 

Know all present and to come that I Matilda daughter of 
Richard son of Levend de Longsidon have given remised sold and 
quit claimed etc. to Matthew de Longisdon Son of Thomas Clark de 
Baukwell and his heirs or assigneds a certain toft croft with three 
acres of land and one rood with all its appertenences within and 
without the \'il of Little Longstone with a certain foss of mine 
stretching fully from the common straight with the said Vil to a 
marsh meadow near the toft of Juliamia my Sisters that is to say 
that kind aforesaid which Thomas Scalenus once held of me so 
that neither I Matilda etc. etc. etc. These being witness : — 
Robert de Stanton, Robert de Calvour, Peter de Rowland, Adam 
son of Peter, Matthew de Rayndon, Robert son of Alexandra, 
Launcelin de Stokes, \M11 de Heieclowe, Tom de Offerton, 
William Pynccr dc Baukwell and others. 



Will of Joan Wright, 1471. 315 



WILL OF JOAN WEIGHT. 
1471. 

In flei roie Anie Anno dui m" cccc"" lxxi° In die saboti an festu 
sci mchaelis arcliageU ego Joliana wrjiilit nup ux8 hanrici wiyght 
copos nietf <iTiaiiis e^ I coipe codo testametu raeu I hue modu In 
])'mis lego aninia mea dec oipoteti & see marie & oTh^ scis Ite lego 
corp' a^ meu ad sepuliedu i ecctia sei egedij de longesdnn ItfTi lego 
p mortuario nieo meu opt'" animal ut mos e Itm lego i oblacoibj p 
salute anime mee snfficief Itm lego in cera ad comtiure'l^ circa corp' 
meii sufficieP Itm lego ecce de longustn duas oues matrices Itai 
lego alicie plattf mea optlam toga & una boneta rubia Itm lego 
t'b5 felijs wytti plattf ciiilib3 eoru ai;nu Itiii lego ii^abelle qwytbv 
vna toga elbida & vua te^nica blodia' & vnu capiciii riibiii Itm lego 
Matillide b u una toga & una tunica rubia Itin lego Johani loloiid 
duos modnlos- auene & uuu modulu- ordij Itiii lego alicie leii unu 
lichetu^ & duos porcellos Itiii lego eid, alicie & wytto qwythe unu 
piTcii Itin lego duabj filijs J^ his wryght cuilibj ea^ agnii Itin 
lego agnete leii unii vilulii & una ove mat'ce & unu agnii Itiii lego 
alicie leu dua lincheaniia^ & una ludice^ & una t-upellectile*^ Itin 
lego Jacobo wryght duos arietes Itin lego Johi tus'n unu batfr 
avene ItiTi lego Johi leii una ove & unu batii avene Itiii lego alicie 
leii una pva ollfi erria Itiii lego agnete leu una pva patella Itiii 
lego fraf staflxirt q''tuor denarios Itiii lego see maiie covet* q*tuor 
denarios Itin lego sco cedde* q^tuor denarios Itm lego ecctie de 



' blodius may mean either 'blue' or •blood-colour.' 
- modulus = modiua ; equivalent, a 'peck.' 

' lidieliim, i.e. lcc\ tlinm f Gk. \riicu8os), ' an oil flask ' : used for the widow'a 
cruee in the Vulgate. 8ei- III. IJcg. xvii. 12. 

* lincheiinna, i.e. liciuiii (Gk. Ai/x'-fioy), ' candleBticks.' 

• lodioem, an error for boilicem. 



3i6 Lon£stone Records. 



TEANSLATION. 

In the name of God, Amen. In the \ear of Our Lord 1471 on 
Saturday before the feast of S. Michael the Anliaiigel I Joan 
Wryght, late wife of Henry Wryght, sound in miii 1 though sick in 
body, make my will in this manner: Firstly, I leave my soul to 
Almighty God and S. ]\Iary and all the Saints. Item I leave my 
body to be buried in the church of S. Giles of Longesdon. Item I 
leave for my mortuary mj' best beast, as is customary. Item I leave 
in oblations for the health of my soul, sufiBcient. Item I leave in 
wax to be burnt about my body, sufficient. Item I leave to the 
church of Longuston two ewes. Item I leave to Alice Platts my 
best gown and a red bonnet. Item I leave to the three sons of 
William Platts to each of them a lamb. Item I leave to Isabel 
Qwythe [White] a russet gown and a blue^ petticoat and a red hood. 
Item I leave to Matilda Leu' a gown and a red petticoat. Item I 
leave to John Rolond two measures^ of oats and one mea'-ure^ of 
barley. Item I leave to Alice Leu' a cruse ^ and two little pigs. 
Item I leave to the s ime .\lice and William Qwythe a hog. Item 
I leave to the two daughters of John Wryght to each of them a 
lamb. Item I leave to Agnes Leu' a calf, an owe, and a lamb. Item 
I leave to Alice Leu' two catidlesticks,'' a bodice,^ and a cloak. ^ Item 
1 leave to James Wryght two rams. Item I leave to John Tuson a 
bath' of oats. Itc:ii I leave to John Leu' n sheep aiid a bath' of 
oats. Item I leave to Alice Leu' ;i little brasen pot. Item I leave 
to Agnes Leu' a little di>h. It. m I leave to brother Staffort four 
pence. Item I leave to S. Maiy of Coventry* four pence. Item I 
leave to S. Chad" four pence. Item I leave to the church of Baslaw 



* iupeUeetilem, i.e. superpellectile, ' over the pelisse.' ' Surplice ' is derived 
from it. 

' balum. Tlie Hebrew 'bitli' contained about nine >;allons. A 'busliel' 
would be the Engl s".i equivaU'nt 

« S. Mary of Coventry and 5. Cliad (of Lielifiiddj, the two cutljedrala of the 
dioceae. 



Will of Joan Wright, 1471. 317 



Will of Joan Wright, 1471 — continued. 

Duslavv xij deuarios Itm lego diio lloliavto more' xij doiiarios Itm 
lego Johi wryglit filio ineo uua iiiunca'" ad sustet.icniii obiti'imei 
& inariti iiiei Muuuatl Itin lego eid^ Johi wryulit par p . . .12 05 
gaudijs argeteis Itin lego Reeardo filio meo unu apiu ad sustetacoin 

ficiete(?)*' ad cumbuied cora se])ulc° i tepe debito HesudiTi 

oium bono9 meo:^ supi' no legatoz; do p salute :inime niee & niaiiti 
mei Itin costituo & ordino meos bonos & fideles executores Johane 
wryght filiu meu & Recardu wryght filiii meu \it disjionat oia bona 
mea p salute anime mee ut respodeat in die Judicij cora inagno 
Judice dat i die & anno sup^dicto cu hijs testibj JoHes plattf 
Eoger' bulyns cu iatis alijs 

in dorso 

Pbatii approbatu consuraatu cora nobis coinissf juf 

ecce de BaM[qiie]ll I ecca pnoR de Tyddeswell xvij"° die inesfi* 

8. . . .em. . anno diii iii coco Ixxxij" coinissa. . .adiuisfco bonorii 

executoribj infrasc'ptf in forma iuris iuratf 

hec sut debita que m debenf In p'mis 

Jolies rol(jnd — xxd, .... 

Itiii Kecard' duncancele — xvijd^ 

Itin Robart' northe — xxd 

. . . .Amiid' beytfi viijd 

wryght ppf dt uni' vacce 



' Rohert More, thr priest of Longstone. 
'° juvfncam most probiiUly. 
" ohit, a raiiss on the imiiiversajy of death. 

'- Pater Ar.gf.r. 'Jlic ' p' iilone ia clearly legible, but there is little doubt about 
tlio meaning (see Du Gauge's Glossary, under ' gaudium '), ' a rosary with silver 



2i8 Longstone Records. 



Translation — con tinued. 

twelve pence. Item I leave to Sir Robert More' twelve pence. 
Item I leave to John Wryght my son a heifer (?)!'' for the keeping 
up of my ohitii and my husband's yearly. Item I leave to the same 
John Wiy,L;ht a pair of Pater No>trr (?)i- with silver •;auds. Item 
I leave to Richard my son a hive of bees for tlio keeping up of 
sufficient wax (?y^ to burn before my tomb at the proper time. The 
residue of all my goods not above bequeathed I give for the health 
of my soul iind my husban I's. Item I constitute and ordain as my 
good and faithful executors John VVryghr my son and Richard 
Wryght my son, to dispose of all my goods for the health of my soul, 
as they shall answer in the day of Judgment before the great Judge. 
Dated the day and year above-said, with these witnesses :— John 
Platts, Eoger Bulyns (?), and many others. 

Endorsements. 

Proved before us the commissary of the jurisdiction of the 
church of Bauquell in the parish church of Tyddeswell the IT"" of 
September (?),'■' 1472; and administration of the goods committed 
to the executors within-written, who were dulj' sworn. 

These are the debts due to me: John Rilond — 20d. ; Richard 
Duncaucele (?) — lid.; Robert Northe — 20(1; Edmund Hey tun — 8<i. ; 
. . . Wryght for dt (?) of a cow. 



gauds.' The gauds were the beads at which an ' Ave' was said, a ' Pater Koster' 
being said at the rest. 

" Two words alninst illegible. Tliu second seims to be • .-ujicitnt.' The sense 
evidently rtqiiires someihing in the nature of candles. 

" Name of moutL almost illtgible. It ma^ bo September. 



Parish Accounts, 319 

SPECIMEN OF A CHURCHWARDEN'S ACCOUNTS, 

1694 and 1695. 



The severall Accounts of Thomas Jackson, Chapellwarden of Gt 
Longstone, beginning April ye 14th, 1694. 

£ s. d. 

Impf* Spent when I was elected 2 6 

Ap. 15th Spent upon Mr. Hunt 2 6 

„ 28th. At ye Visitason Court 3 2 

June 24. Given to John Boar to a Letter of 

Request 2 

„ ffor Bell Ropes 11 

Aug. 12. Spent upon Mr. Williams 3 

Sept. 9. Spent upon Mr. Hunt, of Eayme ... 2 6 

„ 25. Spent at ye Visitason Court 6 10 

Oct. 9. Spent at ye first meeting about ye clock 2 

„ 26. Spent when it was brought 2 

Candles, nayles&oyi, Hemp'edBeesomsO 3 6 

Nov. 5. Given to ye Ringers 5 

Dec. 25. ffor wine 6 8 

fforaLanthorn 3 

To ye Ringers on Christmas Day ... 2 

ffor Whit- Leather 2 3 

Feb. 5. Pd. to SI. Philip Goll 3 

„ 8. ffor a Spade to ye Church 2 

Mar. 7. Given to ye Ringers at ye Queen's buriall 1 

ffor Lead to make weights for ye clock 9 

ffor wine at Easter 15 6 

Spent upon Easter Tuesday 3 6 

N.B. — Many of these Accounts seem to be hopelessly incorrect. 



320 Longstone Records. 

£ s. d. 

April 7. Spent upon Mr. Dan 2 6 

Paid to Benjamin Hallovves, the late 

ChapelKvarden 1 3 8 

Paydto Xtop. Jenkinson, the Chapell- 

warden ffor ye 1689 4 13 8 



1 12 9 



The Total is 7 10 1 
His Receits 

Reed, of John Blackwell 2 6 

Reed, of Xtopher Jenkinson 13 4 

The Assessmt charged at 5 2 08 

)o( . 



A Continuation of the Accounts of Tlios. Jackson, Chapellwarden 
of Gt. Longstone, fur ye year of our Lord God 1695 are as 
followeth : — 

Spent at ye first Visitason 

Given to Thos. Sellars of Calver, 
to a Letter of Request 

Bell Ringers 

Spent upon Mr. Hunt 

Spent at ye next Visitason Crt. 

ffor oyl, candles, Hempe, Nayles ... 
Nov. 5 To ye Ringers 

For Wine at Xmas e Bread 

To ye Ringers 

Feh. 14 ffor parchment to write a Coppy of 

ye Register to ye Crt 

Spent at ye Crt 

Spent upon Easter Tuesday 

Spent at ye last Visitason Crt 



April 


1 29. 


May 


13. 


)» 


22. 


Aug. 


5. 


Oct. 


5. 



£ 


s. 


d. 





12 


8 





1 








11 








1 








8 








2 


4 





5 








11 


4 





2 








1 








6 








2 


6 





2 






Parish Accounts. 321 

£ s. d. 

Given for writing mine Assessmt 

ed Accounts 10 



The sum is. ..3 6 10 
The preceding years...? 11 1 



The totall is. ..10 16 11 

£ s. d. 

Reed, of John Blackwell 2 6 

Reed, of Xtopher Jenkinson 13 4 

ffor Lay stall 3 4 



1 15 

5 4 



The whole Reed. is. ..6 19 
The whole disburst is...lO 16 11 



due to me.. .3 17 11 
Thos. Jackson hath received of the Chappeliry 

in ye years 1694 e 1695 6 19 



And he hath disbursed 10 16 11 



So there remains due to Thos. Jackson 3 17 11 



And William Howe hath payd him towards 

the same 12 6 

So that at the Syninge these Accounts their 

remains due to Thos. Jackson 2 15 5 

Seen e allowed by us Richard Turner 

Sam. Mills, Curate. Nicholas Blackwell 

Thomas Hodgkinson ffransis ffermehough 

his mark 
Richard R. Keiton 



322 



Longstotie Records, 



£ 


s. 


d. 


1 


15 


9 





9 





2 


8 


3 




8 


4 



SPECIMEN OF HEADBOROUGH'S ACCOUNTS, 
1719-1721. 
The accounts of Edward Ton- Headbourow, of Great Longstone, 

fforeyear 1719 & 1720. 

I m pu- 
ffer a Warrant in December 
ffor a Warrant in Aprill 

ffor a Warrant in July 

ffor a Warrant in September... . 

ffor my Oath 

Paid to 2 disbanded Soulders, John Perch | 

& John Mortin ' 

Paid for a warrant about Thos. White &, 

Streets 

Spent with going with Thos. White before a i 

Justice about same matter ) 

Spent about Mary Street when she went to ) 

ye House of Correction ; 

Paid ffor a wath ('watch) Bill 

ffor makeing my asessment & signing it 



1 



2 



2 



4 4 



5 14 9i 
The accounts of Ed. Torr headbourrow of Great Longstone ffor 
ye year 1720 & 1721. 
Imprs. 

ffor a Warrant in January 2 

ffor a warrant in Aprill "• 8 6 

ffor a warrant in July 2 10 10^ 

ffor a warrant in Sept 

Spent when Charles Street was taken about 

ye oathe 

ffor warrants and servinge of Streets &] 
what I spent j 



12 
8 



3 



Headbo rough's Accounts. 323 



Spent when I went to Bakewell about Sam 1 
Street & Charles when the went to ye goale .. t 

ffor serving Anth : Tor Cha : Street 8 

ffor making my asesments & signinge .. 1 



U 



SPECIMEN OF OVERSEERS' ACCOUNTS, 1737. 
The Accounts of Davenport Blackwall 0\erseer of the poore 
for the year 1737. 
Pade Ann Scamardine 8 weeks .. 

„ Marget Garratt 8 weeks 

„ Ann Sellers 8 weeks 

,, Elizabeth Shaw 8 weeks 

„ Ann fowiow 8 weeks 

„ Elizabeth Dowley 8 weeks 

„ John White 8 weeks 

., Robert Garratt 8 weeks 

„ Edward Brewell 8 weeks 

„ William Boothrey 8 weeks 

„ James Haburgum 8 weeks 

,, Josheway Sllors Child 8 weeks 

„ Widdow Burrs 8 weeks 

Spent on Easter Tusdey 

,, Whetsen Tusdey 

Pade for Stuf for a gown & cote for Ann Backstor 

,, an apron and a pare of Bodess 

„ furehire and making them 

Spent when wee went with her to Wm. Shors 

„ when wee went to agree with him for her 

„ when 1 went with Ann Browell to Brushfield ... 

,, at the sineng my sesment 

„ att Sesons att Bakewell 

„ when wee went with her to Shors ye last time 

„ when I went to pay him the money 

pade for soleing Ann Brewell shews 

V 



1 


1 

-t 








8 








16 








8 





1 


4 


(1 





16 


4 





16 





1 


4 





2 











16 





3 


4 





1 


13 





1 


12 








2 


6 





5 








7 


6i 





1 


8 





1 


10 





2 


8 





2 


7 








6 





1 








3 


6 








4 





1 











6 



324 Longstone Records, 



May y^ 6 gave Jacob Warinton 

„ y' 13 gave Jacob Warinton 

pade James Scamadine for a seff for him 

July y" 4 gave Jacob Warinton 

July y 4 gave Will'" Gotten 

July y"= 11 gave Will"" Gotten 

July y 18 gave Will"' Gotten 

pade for Rose Huslor shews soleng 

gave Ales Ward P and pade for a pare of shews for her 

pade for hay ground for Joseph Ward 

pade for Jacob warinton coffen 

Spent att a meeten att torrs 

pade Benn Ward 

Spent at Rich : frostes when we went to spake to ') 
John Wardlo j 

pade house rent to Mr. Wright 

pade Mr. Grove 

pade Robert Huslur 

pade Richard Nalor 

pade Thomas White 

for weddow Bures Sessment 



£ 


s. 


d. 





1 








1 








4 








1 








2 








1 


6 





1 


9 








10 





3 


6 





11 








5 








2 


6 





2 








1 





1 


6 


6 





3 


1* 





3 


6 





8 


lOi 





4 











4 



21 16 4| 



Edward Brewell 1 load of Gols 2 2 

Widow Jackson 1 load of Cols 1 1 

Rose Huslor 1 load of Gols Oil 

Elizabeth Dowley 1 load of Gols 1 

Ales Ward 1 load of Goles 1 

Benjamin Ward 1 load of Goles 1 

Em. Scamadine 1 load of Goles 1 

Barnet Backster 1 load of Goles 1 

for making 2 Sesments pen Ink and paper] 

and keeping my accounts and drawing my [ 2 6 

accounts ) 

12 3 

21 16 4^ 

22 8 7J 



Poor Law Settlement. 325 

POOR LAW SETTLEMENT CERTIFICATE. 
1715. 

To the Churchwardens & Overseers of the town of Steton or 
other the Inhabitants thereof in y« said town and County of York 
or to any or either of the Churchwardens & Overseers of y^ Poor 
in the Liberty to whome these shall come greeting. Whereas 
Mary Jackson of Great Longston, and Olive Jackson her daughter 
in y= Parish of Bakeweli, in y« County of Derby, for their better 
way of living are mindful to remove themselves to y= said town of 
Steton or to some other place w"i an intent there to inhabit, but 
having not Qualified themselves as y'' Law requires in y^ case We 
therefore y'' Chapelwardens & Overseers of y poor of Great 
Longston do hereby for ourselves & our successors promise to 
y= s'' Churchwardens & Overseers of y* poor of Steton in y« parish 
of Kildwick or any other Officers to whom these shall come y' if 
y<= said Mary Jackson and Olive her s'' daughter shall at any time 
become chargeable to y" s ''town of Steton or to any other Parish 
or Liberty whatsoever we will receive them back into our s'' Town 
of Great Longston unless they shall in the meantime acquire some 
other place of Settlement. 

In Witness whereof we have hereunto sett our hands & Seals 
y' twentyninth day of Aprill in y= first year of ye Reign of Sovereign 
Lord George by ye grace of God of Great Brittaine France & 
Ireland, King, Defender of y ffaith &c., Annoque Dom. 1715. 

Attested by 

ffrance ffearnehough 
Hen : Dooley. 

We whose names are hereuntoi The Justices signatures 
subscribed Justices of y' Peace of y= have been cut out. 
County aforesaid doe allow of y'' Cer- \ 
tiflcate above written dated y' Twenty- 1 
ninth day of April Annoq : Dom. 1715. / 



3-6 



Longstone Records. 



Tin- Charter of Griffin fil Wtinra'vn, tn Adam fil Peter, the Ancestor of the Wrif^hts, of Longstone 

1252. 



Hall. 



•a£^ 













T 



^ 4, 











.-i:^ 



















^ 










^t-iff'-^M?iBiaiiii^iifa-aiirrtr'^ :&-..;...^^ 



specimen Wright Charters. 327 

GRIFFIN TO ADAM 
Son of Peter-the Ancestor of the Wrights of Longstone Hall, 

1252. 



CTyaiislation of the foregoing Charter.) 
This is an agreement made between the Lord Griffin son of 
Wenuwin of the one part and Adam son of Peter de Langesdon 
of the other part, in the 37tii j-ear of the reign of King Henry 
son of King John namely that the said Lord Griffin remitted 
and quit claimed to the said Adam son of Peter de Langesdon 
and his heirs or assigns all secular customs and all manner of 
services which issue from the fee of the said Adam in Langesdon 
and in Wardlowe or in any case can issue ; saving the due 
services which the ancestors of the said Adam were accustomed 
to do from year to year to the said Lord Griffin and his ances- 
tors for their tenement of Langesdon and Wardlow; namely— 13 
shillings a year to be paid at two terms of the year to wit at 
the feast of B. Mary in March six shillings and six pence and at 
the feast of S. Michael six shillings and six pence ; saving three 
days ploughing and 3 days ditching of the said Adam and his 
men to be done for the Lord Griffen up to dinner time twice a 
year, and suit of the Mill of Ashford of the said Adam and his 
men and their help at the pool of the said mill and other things 
belonging to the said mill when repairs are necessary; and saving 
suit of the Court of Ashford by the said Adam and his heirs fo^i- 
themselves and for their tenants of Langesdon and Wardlowe, 
similar to the suit rendered liy, or required from other freemen 
of the Manor of Ashford ; and when the King taxes his demesne 
the said Adam for himself and his fee shall be taxed, and that 
this agreement made between them may remain sure and stable 
Each of them alternately affixed his seal after the manner of a 
cyrograph. Witnesses :— Sir Richard de Vernon, Sir Richard de 
Herthull, Richard Daniel of Tydeswell, William de Langesdon, 
Matthew de Langesdon, Thomas de Langesdon, and many others. 



328 Longstom Records, 

Adam to Henry, Sou of Williiun dr Loiigsdoii. 







^j<5ait:^'. ftiUu>WM^«» 



I ^^lAJ-dr-^ 



[ 



) 






^lib .^T-j^ :13a i-i1^*V tuft, Y Ja^m Tcmm ff ujn. a- 








specimen Wright Charters. 3^9 



ADAM TO HENRY 
Son of William de Longsdon. 



(Translation of the foregoing Charter.) 
Know all men as well present as future, that I Adam son of 
PetSr de Longsdon have given granted and by this my present 
charter have confirmed to Henry son of William de Longsdon 
for his homage and services one bovate of land with toft and 
croft and with all its appurtenances in the ville and territory of 
Longstone namely that bovate which Henry son of Emma form- 
erly held To have and to hold to the said Henry and to his heirs 
or assigns of me or my heirs in fee and inheritance freely separately 
wholly and peacefully with all liberties free customs and case- 
ments belonging to the same ville of Longstone and without 
paying for the same annually to me and my heirs by him and 
his heirs or assigns two shillings of silver at two terms annually 
that is at the feast of S. Michael twelve pence and at the 
Annunciation of the Blessed Mary twelve pence for all services 
customs demands and exactions saving forensic service and I 
Adam and my heirs will warrant the said land with all its appur- 
tenances to the said Henry and his heirs and assigns This my 
donation concession and confirmation I have strengthened by the 
impression of my seal to this Charter these witnesses Robert de 
Stanton, Matthew de Longsdon, William son of Elias, Robert 
Lacey, Hugh Pekoe, Richard son of Simon, John Bulaxe, Robert 
Cemetarius, John Cleric of Bakewell, and others. 
Seal. '• S. Ade fil Petri." 



33^ 



Longstone Records. 



Release by Gerard, son of Adam of Bakeucll, to Robert le Wright 
of Great Longstone. 1330. 









6 



cS 



l1 UJ%'I^_ 

rumM 



«- 










Xif 



i 



Mil 



C2 



4 5? 











specimen Wright Charters. 331 



GERARD Son of Adam to ROBERT le WRIGHT 
of Great Longstone, 1330. 



(Tyanslation of the foregoing- Charter.) 
To all the faithful in Christ to whom these presents shall come 
Gerard son of Adam of Bakewell greeting in the Lord. Know 
ye that I have remised, released and quit claimed for myself 
and heirs to Robert le Wright of Great Longstone total right 
and claim at law which I have, have had, or in any way could 
have in a Messuge and with its appurtenances in Great Longstone 
which descended to me after the decease of Adam of Bakewell 
my father, to have and to hold the same aforesaid messuage with 
its appurtenances to the said Robert his heirs and assigns from 
the chief lords of the fee by the services due and customary 
right. So that neither I the said Gerard nor my heirs nor any- 
one in my name can have any claim in the said messuage with 
its appurtenances nor can sell it in the future. And I the 
aforesaid Gerard and my heirs warrant, acquit and defend for 
ever the said Messuage with its appurtenances to the said Robert 
his heirs and assigns against all men. 

These Witnesses Tho. Hyblyn of Bakewell, Robert de Walley, 
John at the Hall of Longsdon, John de Wodeward, William de 
Rouland and others. Given at Great Longstone Sunday next 
after the festival of the translation of St Thomas the Martyr in 
the fourth year of King Edward the third after the Conquest. 

In testimony of which matter to this present quitclaim I affix 
my seal. 



332 Longstone Records. 

William de Den to Robert, Son of Adam of Longston 




h 1 ^ U 





±^ 



specimen Wright Charters. ^t,^ 



WILLIAM DE DEN Son of ROBERT Son of ADAM 
of Longstone. 



(Translation of the foregoing Charter) 
This Convention was made Sunday next after the feast of 
S. Michael the Archangel between Wilham de Den of Great 
Longstone, of one half acre of land lying in the Crofts head in the 
field of Longstone, and Robert son of Adam de Longsdon, of one 
acre of land lying in the field of \\'ardlow, of which one rood lying 
at Pig Tor and one rood lying at Midul Hall and one rood lying 
upon Logradus and one half lying upon the Hen-butts, so that by 
common assent and consent were exchanged without change of 
rent and so that neither of them shall have account or demand 
against the other, but if either of them shall claim against the 
other any right or claim not in this writing he shall pay forty 
shillings, to be paid without any deduction. 

Witnesses, Alan de Roland, \^'illiam Vicar, Richard son of 
William son of Adam, John son of Adam, and others. No further 
date. 



334 



Longstone Records, 



BAILIl-T'S ACCOUNT ROLL. 

ABOUT THE YEAR 1347. 



From the Dean and Chapter of Lichfiei-d Muniments, No. G. 6. 



[er 







LONCj' 


M INOR. 






Henr' en le Dale 








6t 


vij 


o 


Petr' Baiard 








jd 


"j 




Ricns le VVodward 








j'l 


iz 


fetjd 


WiH.s R.,se 








jd 


V 


htjd 


Witis de Ycl.uruue 








titjd 


V 


ijd 


Margc'r f Rici 








o 


▼ 


6t jd 


Rog's Foliambe 








jd 


"ij 


jpett[?] 


Witts en le Dale 











ij 


jd 


Jotis Rose 






J 


htja 5 


j 


jdo 


Jobs Bate 

xii 


ii.i 




J 


tit iijd 


j 


htjd 






Long' 


maior. 






Hug' Scrokegoie 








jd 


ij 




•asure] ux Rngi [?] Scrokegore 


) 


jilo cii Ian. 






Rot)s Hni 






j 


tit jd 


ij 


ijd 


RoBsle Rot'[?] 








ijd 


V 


htijd 


Joh fil Kiri 






j 




• • 


jd 


Thorn Payii 








jd 


j 


jd 


Thoni \Veb>P 








yd 


ij 




Henr' Louet 






j 


ijd 


iiij 


htjd 


Jo!i Rose [stiiii k ou 


,t] 












Alan de Sallnwo 










>ij 


htjd 


Witts fil Rici 






j 


ht [ille-il.le] 


iiij 




Letic' le nioyr 








Jd 


j 




Rot>ts clit'us 










'i'j 




Hem' HiTi 






j 


hijd 


j 


jd 


Witts de Rolond 






ij 


ht ijd 


vij 




Alan de KiJond 






ij 


ijd 


is. 





Thoiu fil Ade 








jdo 


j 


ht jd 


Jofi Peuerel 






• 

J 





ij 


jd o 


Joh de Scheladon 














[blank] r Ade de Mabam [?] 




jd 


mj 


[?]d 


Witts fil Ade 






ij 


tit ijd 


ij 





Bailiff's Accovnt Roll. 



335 



Eicus fil Willi 


ij 


ijd 


viij 


htr, 


AVitts Victor [?] 


J 





X 


jd 


Job Waueu 




ijd 


ij 


htjd 


Rics fil The 


J 


ht 


iij 




Eofs en le uiuire 


ij 




ij 




Ada Bonde 








ijd 


Allied [struck out] 










Wills del Dene 






■^j 




Ric' Bate 




j-l 


j 




Ad Vcaf 




jd 






Rob cissor 









ijd 


Hie' Captts [mi dec[?] struck out] 




ij 


jd 


xviij 


ROLOND. 








Witts Lerayng 


j 


htjd 


j 


jd 


Riciis Dykon 


iij 




^•j 


jd 


Symon Fox 


ij 


ht jd 


ij 


ht 


XJ 


Hassop. 








Witts fil Eogi 


ij 




Jij 


jdo 


RoBts fil Rici 


ij 


ht jd 


iij 


ht jd 


Adam Badde 


j 


ht ijd 


j 


.. 


Ricus Palm 


j 


ht ijd 


j 


ht jd 


Diia 


ii'j [?] 




xiiij 


htjd 


Witts Ca(,etts 






iij 


htjd 


Isabell ancitt dne 






»j 




Witts fil RoBti 






j 


tit 5 


Ricus P'lioit' 






^j 




Witts Pete 


iij 


ht jd 


▼ij 




Witts le Siaiint 




ht jd 


j 


ht jd 5 


Ricus millet 




j<l 


V 


ht ijd 


Henr' Suie.s Rainil|ifi 




id 


iiij 




Gervas Vicar' 










Pttr' de WakHLriigh 










Annabell 








jdS 


Hug' Fox 








jd 


HiuMs Bear 




ijd 






Witts fil Rici P'lioiti 










Plius Bcaf 




jd 


j 




Witts Underegge 




iijd 




ijdS 


Hisur' Bear 




iijd 


j 





XXJ 



336 Longstone Records. 

Birch. 
„ Rofs Peuerell [?] iijd j 

„ Joh Surd vj jd o xij 

,, Hug' de Birch vj fit ijd xxiij 

, Eots fil Hug' j fit o iij 

„ Kofts fil Witti ij ht o T 

„ Jofi Jirat 
„ Rogs fil Johis 

„ Henr[?] fil Hug' j fit ijd ij 

„ Eics foliambe ij 

xviij 

Sm' agn in isto itii^e Ixxviij 

[?] P reef vjs iiijil Sm" reconpns [?"j iiijs iijd 

[?] in itinere vj garc' iiij ed[ A iiij"'' garc'. . 

[in dorso :] 

ASSHFORD. 

„ Ux' Eofi Bourn j 

„ Jofi de Wardelowe [?] j fit jd o iij 

„ David de [?] 

„ Witts Plabar [?] j ijd iij 
„ Witts Williuiot 

,, Marger' f Henr' j 

„ Ad ad fine pontis ij ijd v 

„ Bogs fil Walti j iij 
„ Symo le Walker 

„ Jofi le Mason j fit jd j 

„ Thorn Cissor de Hubit' [?] j 

„ Witts Coterel xvij 

„ [blank] r Henr' di^ B'lc^v ill j fit jd j 

„ Witts le Hai taou [?] j fit o j 

„ Eofis Carpittaf iiij ijd xij 

„ Witts fil RofJti ij ij 

„ Jofi del Hall j o ij 

„ EoBt Marge iij y 

„ Petr' Fab j fit jd ij 

„ Letic' en le Gienes vj fit jd o xj 

„ Jofi fil Witti ij jd iiij 

n 

„ Eobs fil Jofiis Si:iunt ij jd iij 

o 

„ Jofi le biauut vij fit ijd xij 

„ Peti-' Pfiibaf [slriK-k ..ntl 

,, Eicus A^ser iiij ijd o viij 

„ Henr' le Hawaid 



Jd 
j P^'H 



ht ijd 



jd 



iijd (' 
o 



jd 
fit o 



fit o 

fit jd 
o 



fit jd o 
jd o 



Bailiff's Account Roll. 



337 



Henr' de Hupe 


J 




j 


jd[?] 


Rads Bca? 




jd 




ij'i 


Eobs le Eo 










Kdfs Scweyn 


J 


lit jd 


ij 


htjd 


Eotis Bagole 









jd 


Alan de Schefeid 




jd o 




ijd 


[blank] r Eobti (b-1 Hall 


iij 


nt 


ii'j 




llenr' Dobeloue [?] 




j<l 




jd 


Rics Shefeld 




ii jil 






Witts de Mornash 


j 


jd 


j 


jd 


Witts Palmer bu...['] 




jd 




jd 


xlvj 










Baucql'ki.l 


AND Holm 


AND Burton. 




Godfrid Foliambb 






V \ i i i 


[?]j peH 


Eobs de Bui ton 


V 




\'ij 


ijd 


Thoin de Smerlitill 


'ii 


titjd 


iii.i 




Ad Bear 


y 


ht o 


•'.'i 


fit jd o 


Wills Cotiler 


ij 




ii'j 


fitj.l 


Joh de Eltnn 






viij 




Stephs Fulianibe 






ij 




Rics Louet 






^j 


ijd 


Tbom Hubelin 


X 




xij 




Joh le Eof 


"j 








Eads de Casfne 




iii d 


ij 


fit ijd 


Joh le Carf 




tt 


j 





Huf le Surreis 




fit ijd 


ij 


fits 


Eobs le CarP 




fit ijd 


ij 


fit ijd 


Eog's de Baiicq 






XXV 




Phus de Tiunnll 


xxj 


\ xlij ve 


tt que coti 


let \ j peti> 






llm xvj 


vellor quab 


uiTies lanas 








execf debnt 


Hug de Gunston 


xviij 


ijd 


xxxviij 




Henf l>caf de Holm 


j 





ij 




Geivasf vicaf 


X 




xxxiij 




Jotis Fluuribell [?] 


j 


fit jd 


j 




Hen? de Thorne [?] 


iiij 




iiij 




Henf Wal...[?]Captts 






vj 




Hen? de Paddet 






■^j 




Petr' de uge 






iiijd 


fit ijd 



luj <fc uj agn 



338 Longstone Records. 

XX 

Sm* agn in ista via ix & iij 

Argent' recepP iiijs sma recompns ijs vd 

Eodem die vij garc' ad agn iiij"' e4 & iiij"" garc' ad Ian 

Sm" Toti' rec' ad agn & Ian Iiijs xjd 

Sm» recompns ad agn & Ian xls xjd 

Sm» omnium agnoz; in tota jufdictione de Baucq viij & xlv 

D quibj comp liB Nicho CuPel & I'uientib3 suis v 

Et in veiidicoe xij et capit[?] vd et in mori. a iiij et viij & xxiiiv 

distribut inf dnos & sic equa 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



This is a copy of an old document which may be of interest to 
preserve, for its reference to this Parish. The original is in 
possession of Mr. Hambleton, who has allowed it to be copied : 

" Derbyshire. Whereas complaint upon oath hath been made 
unto us Joseph Denman, M.D., and John Barker, Esqre., two of 
His Majesty's Justices of the Peace for the said County, that James 
Bowman, of the Liberty of Brushfield, in the said County, being a 
person commonly called a Quaker, hath refused and still refuses to 
pay unto him, the said Adam Wilson, the Church Rates due to the 
Church of Longstone aforesaid, we, therefore, the said Justices, 
having duly summoned the said James Bowman to appear before 
us but hath refused to appear before us as aforesaid, and having 
duly examined into the truth and matter of the said Complaint, do 
find that there is due from the said James Bowman to the said 
Adam \\'ilscn for Church Rates as aforesaid the sum of eighteen 
shillings and one penny. We do therefore adjudge and order the 
said James Bowman to pay or cause to be paid unto the said Adam 
Wilson the aforesaid sum of eighteen shillings and one penny, and 
also the sum of ten shillings for the costs and charges of the said 
Adam Wilson in prosecuting the said James Bowman for the 
recovery of the said Church Rate. Given under our Hands and 
Seals at Tideswell in the said County, the Second day of May, 1778. 

JOS. DENMAX, (Seal). 

JOHN BARKER, (Seal)." 
[Par. Mag. 1902.) 



Lead Mining, 339 

" Quam midta injusia ac prava fiiint moribus." 



Lead Mining has been the source of innumerable disputes and 
lawsuits. The obnoxious and cruel Mining laws of the High Peak 
Hundred are responsible for the spoliation of vast quantities of 
pasture and arable land by giving to all subjects of this Realm the 
free and exclusive use of private property for mining purposes 
without one farthing compensation to the Owner, unless he be 
Lord of the Manor. In effect, " The Alpha and Omega" of these 
laws seems to be a device for either ignoring or penalising the 
agricultural interest in the following ways — 

(7. by giving the land to the Miner so long as he cares to work it. 

b. by spoiling it for future cultivation. 

c. by " belland" poisoning of the surrounding pasture. 

d. by making footpaths, bridle paths, and cart roads. 

e. by imperfect fencing of innumerable pits and shafts. 

/. by allowing the Miner to desert his mine when no longer 
profitable, and to leave the Owner of the soil liable for 
accidents to man or beast for ever after. 

These are some of the drawbacks to agricultural improvement in 
the High Peak district ! How then is it possible for Owners of 
Estates thus handicapped to build up-to-date farm homesteads, 
labourers' cottages, &c., saddled as they and their tenants are 
with the ever increasing burden of the rates ? 

Rational legislation should take care that they only should be 
liable who share the profits* whether iMiners or Lords of the 
Manor — and that the legal maxim, "Cujus est solum ejus atque ad 
coelum " should apply " usque ad infernum !" 

Here are some Clauses of the Act of 1851 for defining and 
amending the Mineral Customs of certain parts of the Hundred of 
High Peak. It is a refreshing novelty to find the recognition of 
such persons as Owners and Occupiers of the soil ! 

* Dr. Cox says that " it was the wealth of Derbysiiire Mines and the fertility of Derbyshire pastures 
which materially helped to raise that majestic pile" (Lincoln Cathedral). 

W 



340 



Longstone Records. 



First Schedule, Clause 4. The Baininster, 
together with two of the Grand Jury, shall 
provide the Miners a Way, either for Foot 
Passengers or Carts as ,may be required, 
from the nearest Highway to the Mine, and 
also from the Mine to the nearest running 
Stream, Spring, or natural Pond of Water, 
such Ways to be set out in as short a Course 
as may be practicable and reasonable. No 
compensation is to be claimed by the 
Occupier or Landowner for such Ways, but 
such Ways aye not to be considered public and 
the Use thereof is to be limited to Persons 
and Purposes connected witli the Mine, and 
all Rights of Way aye to cease when the Mine 
shall be no longer worked. The Parties enti- 
tled to use the Way may make sufficient 
Ways for Use, and keep the same in repair, 
and may also use for Mining purposes the 
Water from the nearest running Stream, 
Spring, or Natural Pond. 

Clause 5. Every Miner shall, so long as 
his Mine shall be worked, be entitled, with- 
out making any payment for the same, to 
the exclusive Use of so much Surface Land 
as shall be thought necessary by the Bar- 
master and two of the Grand Jury and be 
set out by them for the purpose of laying 
rubbish, dressing his Ore, briddling, making 
Meers or Ponds and conveying water thereto. 
and any other Mining Purposes. The Miner 
shall in all Cases, before he commences any 
search or uses any Land, make Fences suffici- 
ent for the Protection of Cattle from any 
Injury which might arise from his Opera- 
tions, and keep such Fences in sufficient 
Repair. 



What wonderful consideration, what 
beneficent legislation ! When the Miner 
has either " made his pile " or can no 
longer work his Mine at a profit, the 
poor landowner is no longer a tres- 
spasser on his own property and he 
may cultivate it again provided no one 
else steps into his place ! Moreover 
all Rights of Way are to cease when 
the Mine shall be no longer worlted. 



Are our legislators innocent enough 
to believe that footpaths, &c., in use for 
a generation or two will be readily 
given up ? Is it not a fact that Miners 
living widely apart will take the shortest 
cut from the Mine to their homes, and 
that such footpaths are even more 
difficult to close than the Barmaster's 
recognised paths ? The nuisance (to 
the Farmer) of the short cut often 
survives, and all attempts to close it 
are barred by that useful defender of 
public rights — the memory of the oldest 
inhabitant ! 



Lead Mining. 



341 



Clause 9. Lot and Cope. 

The Duties called the Duties of Lot and 
Cope are and shall be payable to Her 
Majesty and Her Successors or to Her or 
Their Lessee for the time being. The Duty 
called Lot is and shall be One Thirteenth 
Part of all Ore raised within the Jurisdiction 
of the Barmote Courts, and the Duty called 
Cope is and shall be the sum of Fourpence 
for every Load of Ore measured at any Mine 
within the Jurisdiction aforesaid, the Measure 
of such Load sufficient to hold Fifteen pints 
of Water. 



Observe again how the landowner is 
ignored ! 



" By custom old in Wirksworth Wapentake, 
If any of this nation find a Rake, 
Or Sign, or leading to the same ; may set 
In any ground, and there Lead-ore may get : 
They may make crosses, holes, and set their stowes. 
Sink shafts, build lodges, cottages or coes. 

****** 

" The vulgar term is setting for a mine, 
, For th' grace o' God, and that I there can find ; 
And then at him some other miners take, 
And gain possession in the self-same Rake. 

"Water holes, wind holes, veynes, coe shafts & Woughs, 
♦Main Rakes, Cross Rakes, Brown Henns, Budles & Soughs, 
Break offs, and Buckers, Random of the Rake, 
Freeing and chasing of the Stole to th' Stake." 

Antiquary, October 1863. 
^ " Main Rakes would be synonymous with Great Rakes." 



342 Lon£stone Records. 

TITLE PAGE OF 

'THE COMPLEAT MINERAL LAWS OF DERBYSHIRE." 
" Taken from the Originals." 



"I. The High Peak Laws, with their Customs. 

IL Stony Middleton and Eame, with a new Article made 1733. 
HI. The Laws of the Manour of Ashforth-'i'th'-water. 

IV. The Low Peak Articles, with their Laws and Customs. 

V. The Customs and Laws of the Liberty of Litton. 
VI. The Laws of the Lordship of Tideswell." 

"And all their Bills of Plaint, Customs, Cross-Bills, Arrests' 
Plaintiff's Case, or Brief; with all other Forms necessary for all 
Miners and Maintainers of Mines, within each Manour, Lordship, 
or Wapentake." 

" Quod dulcius Hoininnm generi a Natiira datum est, qnam sni 
cuique liberi."* 

"LONDON:" 

" Printed by Henry Woodfall ; and sold by Richard Williamson, 
at Grays Inn Gate in Holborn ; John Haxby, Bookseller in 
Sheffield ; and by John Bradley, Bookseller in Chesterfield, 1734." 

"(Price in sheets 2s. bound 2s 6d)." 



The book was dedicated " to the Most Noble Prince William 
His Grace the Duke of Devonshire; Lord Steward of His Majesty's 
Houshold, and Knight of the Most Noble Order of the Garter." 
with an " Address to the Reader." Written on the fly leaf are the 
words — " Compiled by George Steer." 

It begins with the Articles and Customs of the Mines within 
the Hundred of the High Peak, and the Liberties of the 

*' The point of tliis quotation, as applied to Miners, is obscure. 



Mines and Miners. 



343 



King's field in Derbyshire. These are so lengthy and numerous 
that space does not permit of their being included, but the names 
of jurors with the dates are given as most interesting. 

" Ashford fT Cur' Magn" Barmot' pra; nobilis Will' i Comitis 
Devon' tent' ib' undecimo die Octobris Anno Regni Domini nostri 
Caroli Dei Gratia Angiioe Scotioe, Francioe & Hibernioe Regis, 
Secundo, Fidei Defensoris, &c. 1626. 

George Frost 
The. Holme 
John Andrew 



Edward Vallour 
Tho. Ball 
Geo. Crawshaw 
Fra. Robinson 
Thomas Sheppard 
Godfr. Barker 
Oliver Barton 
Godfr. Bolar 
Thomas Hiblyn 



Wm. Hodgkinson 
John Biston 
Reginald Grunday 
Richard Milner 
William Yorksley 
Walter Bramall 
Alex. Gill 
John Frost 
Richard Clowes 
George Bretnor 
Wm. Glasbrooke 
Richard Storkey 
JURORS" 
"To Mr. William Flint, Barr-master of Longstone, in the .Manour 
of Ashford. 

For the Plaintiffs, the Arrest 29 Oct. 1729. 

You are desired to arrest the 4th and fifth, and all other 
Taker Meares of Ground (all but a 48th part) at Buxton and 
Robinson's Founder, alias Barks Grove or Founder, being on 
Wardlow Moor, in the said Manour ; the said Taker Meares lying 
South Eastwardly from the said Founder, at the suit of Leonard 
Stona, John Nedder, John Steer, Thomas Cawthorne and Robert 
Clay, and their Grove-fellows, Plaintiffs, against Francis Morton, 
John Buxton, Samuel Blackwell, Richard Frost, and David 
Feepound, and all other Person or Persons whatsoever Partners 
or reputed such, at the said Buxton, Robinson, alias Barks Grove, 
or Founder, or any claiming under them, or any of them, 
Defendants, in an Action of Title. 



344 



Longstone Records, 



"PLAINTIFFS' TITLE." 

" They say, John Boden was possessed, and died in lawful and 
mineral possession of the very Meares of Ground in Question 2nd 
January 1727; that by his death they descended and came to 
William Boden, his only Brother and Heir ; of whom and under 
whose 1 itie, the Plaintiffs purchased. Richard Frost and David 
Feepound discovered the Ore under William Boden's Possessions ; 
and Feepound went to Boden, then living in another County, 
secretly, to purchase of him his rich Grove, for a Trifle : but not 
coming at his purpose, then told Boden, he would buy a 48th part, 
and would honestly account to him for all the rest of the 
Profits of the Mine, called by the name of the Whomes ; but 
instead of doing so, he confederated with Frost, and they changed 
the name of the Mine to Kacklemacle," to keep it unknown to 
Boden, who lived remote. The Mine proving rich, they sold some 
parts, and gave others to defend it in Law-suits ; and at last these 
Confederates agree with an Ancient Mine, called Barks, and had 
two sham Trials, and by Barkes's Title: a bad Jury, and wicked 
Evidences, they jostled Boden, and the Claimers under him, out 
of their just Right ; and soon after their Ore went out." 

"The first 24 in the Articles of the Mine, in the Liberties of 
Eyam and Stony Middleton." 



' Peter Hawkesworth 
Thomas Rowland 
George Skidmore 
Robert Hawksworth 
Thomas Sydall 
Philip Mossley 
Robert Masland 
Richard Bland 
Joseph Hallam 
Roger Sellers 
George Hallam 
Ralph Lingard 



Thomas Mossley 
George Flint 
William Charlesworth 
Thomas Garrell 
Michael Newton 
Hugh Daniel 
Godfiey Rowland 
Robert Hill 
Robert Boar 
Peter Bagshaw 
John Oliver 
John Barber." 



* Cackleniacle is the name of an enriosun- on lliu W ri^lit hi-tatf 



Mines and Miners. 



345 



Then follow 40 Articles without a break with the 
JURY'S NAMES 



' George Eales 
Francis White 
Godfrey Tor 
James Mower 
Thomas Mossley 
Dennis Ragg 
Holm Torr 
Thomas Joyle 
William Needham 
Anthony Sorsby 
Joseph Hallam 
John Wilde 



Roger Sellers 
Thomas Outram 
Robert Townend 
Christopher Chapman 
John Swindell 
John Wardell 
Ralph White 
Robert Townend, junr. 
Robert Wood 
Ralph Barber 
George Coats 
Thomas Garrat" 



'We do find all these aforesaid Articles to be good, and do allow 
the same." 



' Thomas White 
Nicholas Daniel 
George Swift 
John Barber 
Thomas Frittle 
Thomas Rowland 
Thomas Mossley 
Robert Shale 
Thomas Chapman 
Thomas Gregory 
Edmund Groudey 
Richard Brushfield 



John Brittlebank 
Nicholas Hill 
James Sorsby 
John Mossley 
John Swindell 
John Lee 
William Sellers 
John Daniel 
Nicholas Deplege 
George Coats 
George Sydall 
Robert Johnson" 



Then follow two more Articles which are copied chiefly for the 

sake of the dates — 

"Art. XLI." 

" We the Jury aforesaid at the great Court Barmote holden for 
the Manour of Eyam and Middleton on the first day of May 1652, 
for the Lords of the Manours ?lforesaid, do find all these aforesaid 
Articles to be good, and do allow and confirm the same, April 20, 
1654." 



346 



Longstone Records. 



"Art. XLIl." 

" Item, That no Person shall fire at any place of the Mine where 
their neighbours are in danger thereby, nor before four a-Clock in 
the Evening, excepting Saturdays, without lawful Warning, in pain 
to forfeit to the Lord five shillings. October 19, 1654." 



"Francis Stephen 
Francis Needham 
Bougham Poynton 
William Sydall 
John Swindell 
William Allen 
John Jackson 
Mart. Needham 
Robert Fo.'c 
William Mossley 
Godfrey Foolow 
George Garlick 



"JURY." 

John Hadfield 
Nicholas Daniel 
Hugh Bramall 
Thomas Chapman 
Peter Wilde 
Francis Drabble 
Robert Shrowsby 
Richard Davison 
Thomas Sellers 
William Rowley 
John Daniel 
Thomas Wilde" 



" Francis Garrat 
Dennis Ragg 
Francis Cheshire 
Robert Sellers 
William Wilde 
Thomas Barbei 
Wm. Ainswortli 
Robert Fox 
Robert Oliver 
William Crane 
Roger Gregory 
Robert Vox 



" Art. XLIV." 

"JURY" 

I Francis Wilde 
Francis Hallam 

I Richard Davison 
Francis Oliver 
John Daniel 
Thomas Yellot 
Robert Sellers 
Arthur Skidmore 
John Somers 
Nicholas Daniel 
Thomas Berry 
Thomas Heald " 



Mines and Miners. 



347 



"Art. XLV, XLVI & XLVII." 



' Thomas Drabble 
Joseph Burrows 
Francis Sharpe 
William Oldfield 
John Hallfield 
Thomas Frogget 
John Sellers 
John Bagshaw 
John Skidmore 
Paul Fletcher 
William Bradwell 
Francis Mossley 



"JURY." 



Thomas Clayton 
George Sydall 
Joseph Mossley 
Hugh Bagshaw 
William Clarke 
Edward Barton 
Isaac Hambleton 
William Bramall 
Joseph Sheldon 
John Bocking 
David Bright 
Samuel Skidmore ' 



'The Liberty of Stony Middieton & Eyam, Oct. 1, 1733. 

"JURORS NAMES." 



' Robert Drabble 
Isaac Wilde 
Franc. Taylor 
Benj Hathway 
Wm. Bomford 
John Soresby 
William How 
Joseph Young 
Franc. Drabble 
John Middieton 
Samuel Skidmoor 
George Bland 



Henry Merrill 
Rowd Platts 
James Bland 
George Eyre 
Franc. Barker 
James Betney 
David Broadhurst 
Thomas Novell 
Will. Barber 
Henry Fletcher 
Henry Dowley 
Paul Fletcher" 



348 



Longstone Records. 



■The Articles and Customs of the Miners, within the Lordship 



of Litten, 1711." 

" Richard Clark- 
Robert Clark 
William Low 
Klias Bramell 
Robert Tiniperley 
Richard Morttin 
George Chapman 
Ralph Hill 
Edward Timperley, 
William Hill 
Robert Hadg 
Elias Oldfield 



'THE TWENTY-FOUR." 



junr. 



Francis Bramwall 
Hurn Swindell 
William Oldfield 
William Townsend 
William James 
Adam Oldfield 
William Blackhouse 
Wm. Bramweall 
Thomas Hall 
Richard Oldfield 
Adam Law 
George Eloy " 



"Tidswall ff. Magna Curia Barmote" 



(without date) 
"NOM. JUR." 



' Robert Durham 
Thomas Swindell 
Thomas Lodgbinson 
Richard Hill 
Edward Hall 
Wm. Hill Dowelstone 
Roger Bray 
Edward Oldfield 
Edward Hill 
Ralph Stavely 
Adam Townsend 
Adam Low 



Robt. Clayton 
Robt Lowe 
Arthur Hill 
Robt Clarke 
Richard Clarke 
Tho. Wood 
Richard Townsend 
Thomas Bramwall 
Robert Barton 
William Fox 
Samuel Eyer 
Godfrey Townsend ' 



Then follow Twenty Articles. 

" Tidswall ff. Magna Curia." 

" NOM. JUR " 



' Wm. Bramwall 
Thomas Marshall, junr. 
Humphry Eyer 
Eliz. Oldfield 
John Rigley 
Richard Clark 
Richard Townsend 
Robt. Oldfield 
Samuel Eyer 
Richard Shake 
Thomas Simpson 
Wm. Willson 



Thomas Hodgkinson 
Anthony Marshall 
Frances Eyre 
John Beard 
George Swindell 
Ralph Stavely 
Adam Low 
Robert Barton 
Tho. Hunston, junr 
George Eyre 
Edward Hill 
Richard Hill" • 



Mines and Miners. 349 

The Freeholders are Pis. ' The Case between v"^ ffreeholders & 

t ■' 

The Myners are Defendts. ' Myners in Relation to certain pretended 

Customes called the Customes of y^ 

Lead Mynes within the Mann' of 

Eyme Com Derb. 

The Lands within the said Mannor are known and distinguished 
some by the name of ancient ffreehold Lands, others the Demeasnes 
(being such as were within memory sold by y^ Lords of the said 
Mannor and reputed parcell of the Demeasne) and others the 
Wasts or Commons and every of these are known separately and 
distinctly from the other. The P"=^ are seized of diverse Antient 
ffreehold Lands within the said Mannor and in particular 
of certain Closes wherein is a Vein or Myne of Lead Oare vv'' the 
Defend'* first discovered first in some of their owne Lands next 
adjoyning to the P''* said Closes and perceiving the same to range 
towards and into the P'''* said Closes they thereupon Gott 
Possessions for the s'' Lead Myne in the P''^ said Closes and pretend 
to have a right to Digg and Subvert the P"* ground at their pleasure 
w"'out making any manner of satisfaccon for y^ same, And for 
y" ground and foundation of such their pretended claime they insist 
that there is a Custome within the said Mannor That anj' person 
whomsoever (a subject of England) may become a Myner in all 
places within y*" said Manno' where Lead Oare is to be found & digg 
and search for & gett and take y'" Lead Oare to their own use in 
any person's Lands where the same can be found within the said 
Manno' without the leave or permission of y^" Owner of such Lands 
or making him any satisfaccon or Recompense for the doing thereof 
the Myner only paying and delivering a certain part or share of 
such Lead Oare to the Lord of y"^ s'' Manno' (which is called the 
Lord's Duties — these Duties are by the Myners called Lott and 
Cope) and observing certain By laws which are called y'^ Laws or 
Customs of ye Lead Mynes, And when the Myner hath possesst 
any Lead Myne according to their pretended Custome (tho' in an 



350 Longstone Records. 

other person's Lands) he pretends to claim an Inheritance in such 
Lead Myne descendable from Ancesto' to heir separate & distinct 
from y<^ Owner of y"^ Land or his Inheritance therein; such is the 
unreasonable Custome (with severall other By Laws or branches 
thereof) claimed by y'^ Myners (the Defend'^) in the P'"^ Antient 
ffreehold Lands. 

The P"" insist that their said Antient ffreehold Lands witiiin 
y Mann' are not subject to any such Custome of Myning, digging 
and working therein at pleasure and as before Sett forth, and 
refuse to Admitt y Defend'^ to work and carry on y"" said new 
discovered Vein into y s"^ Antient (freehold Lands of y"= P"% or to 
suffer them to digg & gett Lead Oare thereout; from whence this 
Suite & Controversie arises between the ffreehold'^ and Myners. 

Note. There may be such little Customes in the Lands called 
y"' Demeasnes and in the Wasts or Comons of y'' s'' Manni^ w"^'' 
probably might first be grounded on y"" Lords permission for 
y Advantage and promoting of his Duties, for the more Lead (^are 
was gott y larger were his Duties, and he might suffer what 
Customes he pleased in his own Lands, and by long Tract of time 
such his connivance or permission might be brought into an 
Establish' Custome, But in the Antient ffreehold Lands the Rule is 
otherwise, for altho' when the ffreehold'^ have thought fitt to gett 
the Lead Oare within their own Lands or to give leave to others to 
work and Myne there, the Lords Duty may have been paid thereout. 
Yet innumerable instances will be proved (as far as the memory of 
man can reach) as also Written Evidences produced. Whereby it 
will appear that y ffreeholders have always asserted their Right 
ag' such pretended Custome of Myneing without leave ; And that 
whenever any Myners have attempted to Myne in Antient ffreehold 
Lands, under such pretended Custome without leave of the Owner, 
they have always been interrupted therein, and have been obliged 
either to quitt their iMyns, or to compound or make such agreement 
for leave to work and myne as the ffreeholders pleased to prescribe. 



Mines and Miners, 351 

Proofes of this will sufficiently evince the weakness and invalidity 
of the Myners pretended Custome, and more especially since such 
Custome is ag' y= Comon Right of the Kingdome, nf)r can it be 
sufficient to overthrow such proofes supported by Comon Right and 
to introduce a strange and unreasonable Custome ag' them if the 
Defend'" should be able to prove some few Instances (for there are 
but very few) of Myners working without leave in some Antient 
fTreehold Lands ; ffor proofes to support such a Custome ought to 
be that the same is and hath been immemorially an Uninterrupted 
Custome ? 

The Tryall is appointed y^ 20th of May next and the Issues to 
be Tryed are to y Effect following ; 

pt. Whethf the P"'' said Lands are Antient ffreehold Lands 
or not. 

2ndiy. Whether the said Customes Sett forth & claimed by the 
Defend'* (the Myners) extend into the P"* said Lands. 

Endorsed 

The Case of ffree and Myne. 



352 



Longstone Records. 



CLAIM FOR RIGHT TO A QUARRY AT 

C.RKAT LONC.STONE. 
IMPORTANT AND IXTERKSTING CASE. 



Reprinted from " The High Peak News," 
Saturday, April 23rd, 1898. 



Fcr about seven hours Judge Smyly, Q.C., 
was engaged on Tuesday in a case which had 
aroused very great interest throughout the 
Bakewell and Great Longstone district. The 
claim was brought by the Great Longstone 
Parish Council, who claimed that Gilder 
Quarry, Great Longstone, belonged to the 
parish. The quarry is on what Mr. George 
Thomas Wright, of Longstone Hall, claims tn 
be his estate. Mr. Muir Wilson, Sheffield, 
appeared for the Parish Council, and Mr. 
Etherington Smith, barrister-at-Iaw (instructed 
by Messrs. F. and J. Taylor), appeared for 
Mr. Wright. Prior to the case being opened 
the Judge, who sat specially as arbitrator in 
this case, and counsel drove over and 
inspected the site where the quarry is situate. 

Mr. Wilson, in opening the case for the 
Parish Council, said he did not propose to 
trouble the Judge with many remarks, because 
the different documents which would be 
before him would resolve it into a mvch 
easier form than his wasting much time. 
There were two points he wished to take. 
The first claim he should set up was this — 
under the Act of Parliament authorising the 
enclosure to be made, and the award itself — 
that was under the Act George IIL, an Act 
fcr enclosing, in the townships of Great and 
Little Longstone, certain land. 

The Judge; What year? 



What are seven hours' investigation 
(which includcti a visit to the Quarry) 
after several years of preparation of 
documents ! 



But he did ! As to the documents, they 
were far too numerous to be examined and 
compared at a single sitting. 



The Claim set up by the Parish Council 
under the Act was all against them. Their 
" sheet anchor" was user and certain 
payments of a late date extorted from Mr. 



The Gilder Quarry. 



353 



Mr. \\ ilson : '50, George III. The award 
was made in pursuance of that Act. I shall 
claim, supposing I do not sufficiently satisfy 
the court as to that, under Statute William 
IV., chap. 71. 

The Judge : That is the Description Act? 

Mr. Wilson : Yes. Thirty years. He thought 
he could carry it further than that. For a 
period of 60 years Ihev had enjoyed the right, 
privileee, or benefit of taking stone from this 
quarry. As to 30 years' user he could show, 
beyond question, that there had been no inter- 
ruption ; that it had not been by license or 
perm:ssion of the owner of the freehold. His 
right arose by 30 years' user. Under the Act 
the Commissioners were authorised to allot 
one or more pieces of ground, including the 
present quarry called Gilderstone Quarry, 
and they were not to exceed six acres in the 
whole. When the evidence of Mr. Shimwell, 
the Parish Clerk, was laid before the court. 
His Honour would get that clearly on his 
notes. On page 8 of the Act he would find 
these words, " Gilderstone Quarry," and it 
appeared as if an interpretation was given to 
the meaning of these words, " part of the 
waste moors, commons, and lands, hereby 
allotted and enclosed." That would seem to 
imply that Gilderstone was not the prop:rty 
of any particular person at that time, cr had 
been closed land, but on the first blush it 
would seem, from the view they had had that 
morning, that it would scarcely apply to the 
so-called Gilderstone Quarry to-day. Going 
up the road on the right hand side, his con- 
tention was that the quarry on the east was 
Gilderstone Quarry, not the one on the left — 
that was Outrake. He had in mind the land 
belonging to W. H. Wright, Esq., in Great 



Bullivant and paid " for the sake of peace" 
in direct opposition to tiie advice of Mr. 
Wrigiit the sole Trustee of the Estate, 
and therefore illegal. Such payments 
ought to have been ruled " out of Court." 



Certainly there was permission. 



He should have said that oh page 6 of the 
Act he would find these words — " That the 
Commissioners shall set out and appoint one 
or more piece or pieces of ground including 
the present Quarry called Gilder Stone 
Quarry (part of the Wastes, Moors, Com- 
)uons and uninclosed Lands hereby intended 
to be divided, allotted and inclosed ) in such 
convenient situation as they shall think 
proper, S-c, not exceeding six acres in the 
■whole. The Award itself mentions the site 
as Great Longstone Oltrake. 

Here Is an admission that at a particular 
date there were two quarries. But as usual 



354 



Longstone Records, 



I.iuiijsloiie, l.itlle 1-ongstoiie, and Ashfuril, 
dated May 17th, 18^7, ci iSjg, and in the 
writing of Kobl. Thornliill, the then steward 
of Mr. Wright, at the bottom of the second 
page (book produced) they came to a descrip 
tion, the name of the tenant, Joseph Morton, 
and the name of the field. Mill l.ane Close. 
Then came the important part, " fiildlow 
Bottom, la. 2t. 7p. ; ditto, dildlow Top, 4a. 
ir. 2p. ; Upper Ucggarway, la. ar. 38p." 
There was no mention there, as there should 
havo been, if it were so, of Cildlow or C.ilder, 
or deldlow, or whatevtr name really was the 
stone quarry. There was a lead ptncil copy 
of a letter by some gentleman 

Mr. Smith : By old John, the father of 
Robert. 

Mr. Wilson : Hy old John, the father of 
Robert— still the steward. This was a letter 
remitting to his employer the money, 15s., 
which he says is two years' rent for Cilder- 
slone Quarry. 

The Judge : I thought you said it was 
common. 

Mr. Wilson : There is only Gilderstone. 

Mr. Smith : Vou must not assume that. 1 
say there are two. 

The Judge: VVho was that 15s. p.iid to? 

Mr. Wilson ; The Overseers of (-reat Long- 
stone, with respect to herbage growing on 
the quarry. 

Mr. Smith looked at the letter, and said ii 
di 1 not expressly say it was paid to the Over- 
seers. 

Mr. Wilson: (^)uite right. The date w :s 
July 11, 1S2S. He had an account of the 
rents due to Mr. Wright, l.ady Day, 182S, 
in John Thornhill's writing, and they had his 
deduction, " 15s. two years" Gilder rent." 



there is a misquotation — It shoiiki be 
(jiiderstone Qiian-y iiereby intended to he 
divided, allotted und enclosed— wWkU as 
applied ti) Mr. Wright's laiiil was im- 
possible. 

There was no necessity to mention a 
quarry — any moie than :i mere, inchided 
ill the rentul. There was and is othei' huid 
let hy Mr. W'rii^lu containing a quarry and 
a meie hut neither happen to he mentioned. 
But wlien the Ouan-y hec;utie considerable 
it was lie bcliexes never omitted. 



Ves, rent for a piece of land called 
Gilderstone Quarry in the Outrake 
(meanint; part of tlie Wastes). 



Here is Mr. Wilson saying there is only 
one Gilderstone (Juarry, or. at the very 
least, denyinj^ the existence of the Gilder- 
tone Quarry in tiie Outrake mentioned in 
the Act. 

Here neither iMr. Wilson nor Mr. Smith 
seemed to realise that the 15s. was really 
p:iid to the Overseers, and th:it it w:is paid 
for land (including the true Gilder Ouarry) 
on the left side of the road. 



The Gilder Quarry. 



355 



Then in the following year 7s. 6d., Gilderstone 
pit rent. Then the next year Gildtr rent 7s. 
6d., and so on forward. There was no trace 
of it in the account of the Overseers until 
1881. There appeared to have been a little 
irregularity about this rent. He did not know 
whether the custom was peculiar to Derby- 
shire or not, but after the meeting of the 
Council it appears an adjournment was taken 
to one of the four public-houses in the village, 
and His Honour would hear that the Gilder 
rent was thought to be a proper subject to 
provide its refreshment — light refreshment. 
(I^aughter.) Not until an old man who joined 
the Board — he did not know whether his con- 
science pricked him or not, but he thought 
it was time the rent was brought into the 
accounts, and it was duly brought in. It 
was paid by Mr. Wright's predecessors in 
title, which he admitted, under protest. In 
the dole book for Clreat l.ongstone and 
Holme, it was paid in 1826 and 1827 — 7s. 6d. 
was paid, and it went on till 1829, and then 
there was a jump to 1835, when it appeared 
again. It went then to 1838. It came into 
their r.ccounts in 1881. 

The Judge : From 1838 to 1881 there is no 
trace of it? 

Mr. Wilson ; Ves sir, except by the evidence 
of the witnesses. 

The Judge : You mean to say that is the 
time it went for refreshments? 

Mr. Wilson : Yes, sir, and then from 1881 
it appears regularly in the accounts of Mr. 
Bullivant, who was plaintiff's predecessor in 
title. Then I have a valuation list, which 
goes back to 1818. On page 11 it is referred 
to again. The stone quarry piece is estimated 
at three roods, gross estimated rental, 8s. 
The rent had been increased from 7s. 6d. to 
8s. 

The Judge : Been paid by the predecessors 
of Mr. Wright, or by whom? 

Mr. Wilson : No, sir, he has only paid 
twice. It can't be used against him ; it was 



Otiite true. 



What an evasive reply! Surely he 
meant No ! 

Both the Arl)itrator and Mr. Wilson 
aj^ree that there is no trace of payment 
from 1838 to 1881. Why was there no 
payment ? Simply because .Mr. Wrij>ht 
ceased to rent that bit of land in the 
Outrake. The Arbitrator if he had had 
time would have seen that the modern 
attempt to resuscitate a rent that had not 
been paid for so many years, was a swindle. 
Here lies the solution of this part of the 
claim. 

Mr. Bullivant never had an approach to 
a Title. 



356 



Longstone Records. 



under protest. If the property was Mr. 
Wright's there had been such interrupted user 
by the inhabitants as to give them the right 
to take stone from this quarry for the purpose 
of building or repairing, building or walls, 
without let or hindrance by Mr. Wright, and 
if the Judge was driven to the conclusion that 
the field was still Mr. Wright's, the claimants 
would be entitled, without let or hindrance 
from Mr. Wright, to exercise that which they 
had exercised for so many years past, viz., 
the right to get this stone. 

John Thornhill was the first witness for 
the claimants. He said he was 85 and was 
born at Great Longstone. He lived there 
until he was 14, and then left, and returned 
about thirty years ago. He had been overseer 
for five or six years. He knew Miss Wright 
who married the Rev. Mr. Bullivant. She 
lived at the Hall, and she paid rent for this 
quarry about six years, 7s. 6d. a year. It was 
on the right hand side of the road going up ; 
the other one belonged to the Duke of Devon- 
shire. It was used by the parishioners to get 
stone, and it continued to be used until the 
advent of Mr. Wright. Witness received the 
rent about six years. It always went to the 
poor people in the parish. 

It did not get to the public-house when 
the committee went there? I don't know that 
it ever went to anything else but the poor 
people. I think what money was spent at 
the public-house came out of my own pocket. 
(Laughter.) 

Cross-examined : I was overseer when I 
came back after being away 30 years. I have 
been back in Derbyshire about 30 years. It 
might be 1880 when he was made overseer. 
.\t the beginning of the six years he made 
application to Mrs. Bullivant to pay, and it 
always went amongst the poor people. 



Mr. Wright did not dispute the right by 
user to take stone but he denied the Parish 
Council any freehold in the land. 



If the Judge as arbitrator had suggested 
that, as a settlement, it would probably 
have satisfied all parties. 



Not true. The Duke does not claim it, 
but it adjoins his land. 



When Mr. Wright resided at the Hall 
from 1870 to 1874, during his absence and 
again on his return, there was no change. 
But for the claim to the Freehold of the 
first Parish Council, there would have 
been no dispute. 



The Gilder Quarry. 



357 



_ When you made application for the rent 
did you say it was due because it was a quarry 
under the Enclosure Award? It was given 
to the parish a great number of years before 
Mrs. Bullivant came. He did not know what 
was meant by the Enclosure Award. It 
always belonged to the parish ever since he 
was a little boy. His memory was not now 
as good as it was. When asked, she paid with 
pleasure. The Outrake belonged to the 
parish. He did not know how that came to 
be so. It was private property, and a rough 
place it was. That on the opposite side 
belonged to the Duke of Devonshire. 

Is that the Outrake? That belongs to the 
parish now. 

Mr. Smith said he could not pursue it with 
the witness (who was deaf). 

Mr. Wilson: I will not trouble you any 
further. 

Robert Oliver, 79 years of age, said he was 
born at Great Longstone. He knew the Gil- 
derstone Quarry ; it was the one on the right 
hand side of the road. He could remember 
fencing it off. He went with his father, who 
got a square of five or six yards of stone for 
James Gregory, Church Lane Farm. The 
stone was for fencing. He was 7 or 8 when 
he first went to the quarry. He was 30 or 
more when his father died. His father never 
paid anything for getting the stone or asked 
permission. Trees were planted on the east 
side, but he could not say whether it was 
Robert Furniss, Wm. Furniss, or a man 
named Eyre who planted them. There was a 
wall beyond the plantaticn. Witness helped 
his father to open the Outrake Quarry on 
the left-hand side of the read. Witness would 
be 19. It was open to the road then, 3a. or 
4a. without fencing round. Three brothers 



The ignorance of the man ! 

But he was not so ignorant after all, as 
he quoted the Award as his right to 
payment of rent from Mrs. Bullivant. 

This is " confusion worse confounded." 



Here is the Outrake quarry again truly 
described as on the left-hand side of the 
road — that is the Gilderstone Quarry in 
the Outrake awarded to the Parish by the 
Act. 



35« 



Longstone Records. 



named Tay.or got stone frcm the Gilder 
Quarry. They got the b'-ock out square, and 
then cam,' into the Outrake, which was better 
stone. 

Cross-examined : Witness said it was 
called Artrake. No one worked in the Art- 
rake before his father. It had not been 
worked at all ; the highway went up the side. 
Other people worked it after that for walling 
and that. The lane down towards Hassop 
Station was made by subscription, but he was 
not sure. Mr. Gregory was owner of a lot 
of property then, and farmed 1,000 acres. He 
occupied some of Mr. Wright's land, the 
Duke's, and other people's. When the trees 
were planted he was 9 or 10 years old. The 
wall his uncle built was built before the 
planting. 

By the Judge : The wall was bui'.t because 
they could get no more stone. He heard 
old 'uns say it was planted because they could 
not bare it back — to stop them. 

Mr. Smith : Did anyone pay the Furniss's 
for planting the trees? I expect the Wrights 
paid them. 

Mr. Smith : I expect so, too. 

Aaron Taylor, 66 years of age, said he could 
remember the quarry 52 or 53 years. He 
went there when he was 10 years old with his 
father, getting stone. His brother, James, 
built a house with stone from Gilder Quarry. 
No one's permission was asked, and from that 
period right u{ito when Mr. Wright came into 
possession, the stone had been freely got by 
the parishioners. 

Cross-examined : He had seen people from 
Great and Little Longstone, but not from 
W^ardlow, getting stone, and some had gone to 
Thornbridge. It was 30 or 40 years since his 
father and brothers built the houses. He 



He was too young, however, to have 
helped to open the Quarry. 



iMr. Wright is in possession of letters 
shewing that his ancestors planted the 
trees. 



Little Longstone had its "own quarry 
allotted to it and could not take stone 
from the Great Longstone^ Parish quarry, 
but they were free to take it from the 
private quarry of the Wright Estate. 



The Gilder Quarry. 359 



nev£r get any jtone out of the Outrake 
Quarry, but had seen others. 

William Taylor, 62, said he got stone there 
with the intention of building a house, and 
it lay in the quarry a considerab'.e time. He 
got stone over a period of five years. He had 
known the inhabitants get stone as long as 
he could remember, without being inter- 
rupted. 

Cross-examined : He had got stone for 
building and for fencing for the farmers, and 
for the Duke of Devonshire, out of Gilder 
Quarry. 

Richard Skidmore, 70 years of age, gave 
similar evidence as to stone getting without 
permission from anyone. He became assist- 
ant overseer 16 or 17 years ago He never 
received rent for this quarry. 

What do you say was done with the rent? 
It used to be spent. I objected to it, and said 
it was illegal, and if they did not give it up 
I should report it to the auditors, so it was 
stopped. The next half-year it came into the 
account. Before then it was spent at a 
public -house. They had a dole, and to make 
the dole lift out it was spent. It was duly 
paid into the proper account when he became 
assistant overseer, and entered in the book. 

Cross-examined : The rate book produced 
he had had ever since. 

Is it (the book) in your writing? I don't 
think it is. 

Mr. H. P. Bagshaw : It is mine. 

Cross-examination continued : Mr. John 
Thornhill was one overseer at the time, and 
Mr. Emanuel Hawley the other. The money 
spent at the public-house was rent of the 
quarry, 8s. He used to go to the meetings 
50 years before. 

Did all the people who went to the meet- 



360 



Longstone Records. 



ings share in the drinking of the rent? Ever 
since I can remember. There was 8s. col- 
lected. He did not think that was entered 
in any book. There was no other sum 
treated in the same way. 

The Judge ; Does the Gilder Quarry appear 
in that book? 

Mr. Smith: Undei the head of Hill 
Thomas, occupier, land, 3 roods, rental 8s., 
rateable value 8s. That is the land I suggest 
is the Outrake. 

Henry Parker Bagshaw, 62 years of age, 
said he had known Gilder Quarry 50 years. In 
1874 he built a house, and he got part of the 
stone out of it, part from Beeton, and part 
out of the Outrake. He asked no one's per- 
mission, nor did he pay anything. He had 
known the inhabitants take the stone for 50 
years, and without interruption ; and he had 
never heard it questioned. The rate book 
produced was in his handwriting. 

Cross-examined : He came to Longstone 
after he had built the house. He was living 
now at Taddington. He lived before at Row- 
land, but attended Longstone Church. He 
employed Thomas Hampson, of Rowland, to 
build the house. A Longstone man got the 
stone. He told the man he was to get it from 
Gilder. Another man got it from Outrake, 
and a third from Beeton. 

William Morton said he was 43 in July. 

Mr. Smith : We are getting to mere babies 
now. 

Witness said he had known the quarry 32 
years. Had worked there getting stone for 
himself and other people. No one had for- 
bidden him ; not until Mr. Wright sent cir- 
culars out. 

Cross-examined : He was a roadman 
employed by the County Council. He had 



Another proof in favor of Mr. Wright — 
Thomas Hill whom the present Mr. Wright 
knew well, occupied the very land which 
Mr. Wright's ancestors vacated. 



So here is an admission that the Gilder- 
stone Stone Quarry in the Outrake was 
in use in 1874. 



Mr. Wright did not forbid him. 



EXTRACT FROM THE 
COMMONS INCLOSURE AWARD MAP. 







Reference to the original Map 7vill sheti' that numbers 14^, 150, 
and 151 were part of the wastes — coloured differently from Old 
Inclosure. I4g was awarded to J. T. Wright and 150 and iji to 
the Parish. 



The Gilder Quarry. 



361 



got stone for the County Council without ask 
ing anybody's leave. When he had nothing 
to do he used to get stone and let it lie there 
until it was wanted, and then he sold it at 
8d. per load. The County Council paid him 
for all he could bring. 

By Mr. Wilson : No one came to stop me. 

Thomas Shimwell, 55 years of age, said he 
was assistant overseer, and clerk to the Parish 
Council. He produced data from the custody 
of the Council of Great Longstone and the 
Wardlow Enclosure Award. The data was 
October i, 1824. He produced the Queen's 
printers' copy of the Act, 50, George III. 

The Judge : Have you got the award map? 
Yes, sir. 

Witness: No. 140 contained 2 roods; 124, 
3a. 3r. 8p. ; No. 150, 2r. 32p. 150 was 
bounded northerly and easterly by the road, 
and westerly by the old enclosure. No. 5a 
was a public watering-place. 

The Judge : It will be 6 acres? 

Mr. Smith : Exactly. 

Mr. Wilson said it made 5 acres. 

Witness had known Gilder Quarry for 40 
years, and had not known it by any other 
name. In one or two of the old valuation 
lists it was called Gildlow. It had always 
been treated as a parish quarry. He was 
appointed assistant overseer in 18S4, and had 
held the office ever since. He had received 
rent for this quarry from the tenants who 
occupied the land, and also from Mrs. Bul- 
livant. He had received it up to the last two 
years. Mrs. Bullivant died July 21, 1894. In 
1886 there was a change made in the amount 
of the rent. David Ashton was then the 
tenant. 

By the Judge : I mean the rent of the Gilder 
Quarry. 



Here is the Inclosure Award produced ! 
For what purpose except as evidence ? 
And yet this Witness said he did not oppose 
Mr. Wright's Claim to the Quarry under 
the Award. 

Here is the Outrake Quarry and no 
mistake. The numbers on the Map and 
the acreage agree in every particular. 
Observe " bounded northerly and easterly 
by the road." 



All this wrangle is about the rent 
demanded only too successfully by the 
Overseer from Mrs. Bullivant. 



362 Longstone Records. 

By Mr. Wilson : It had been 8s. In that 
year it was divided into one portion of 5s., 
to be paid by Mrs. Bullivant, and 3s. to be 
paid by D. Ashton. At a meeting on April 
9, 1886, of the parishioners, summoned for 
letting the herbage, it was decided to consider 
the offer of Mrs. Bullivant, and the present 
tenant agreed to pay the difference. 

The Judge: Prior to 1884 Mrs. Bullivant 
paid the whole 8s.? It was the custom for 
the tenant to pay it. 

The Judge : The tenant paid it? Yes, pre- 
ceding 1884 — the person who grazed it. The 
acreage south of the quarry was la. ij^r. It 
was then. 

By Mr. Wilson : So long as he could remem- 
ber the division wall had a gate in it. Ai a 
vestry meeting on March 28, 1889, on the 
motion of Mr. Furniss, it was decided to 
provide a new gate to Gilder Quarry, to pro- 
tect cattle from danger. A new gate was put 
there, and the wall was repaired at the same 
time. It was done at the expense of the 
parishioners. When he applied for the rent 
for the herbage of Gilder Quarry, Mr. Wright 
said it was his own property. In June, 1897, 
a notice was issued that permission to get 
stone must be obtained from the owner. Any- 
one getting stone would be summoned. Wit- 

„„„ J J 1. 1 1. »i_ . . No one disputes payments at that date 

ness produced a book showing that two years ' ' ^ 

rent was paid prior to 1837, and he produced f"'" ''^"^ "^ *'""-' Cilderstone Quarry in the 
the dole book containing entries from 1826. Outrake. Why try to confound them with 
There were the entries : " 1827-28-29. the modern swindle ? 
reecived from J. T. Wright, Esq., Gilder 
Quarry, 7s. 6d." That was for four years. 
Then there were blanks, and it began again 
in February, 1835. He produced an account 
dated May 17th, 1837. 

The Judge : Hew will the areas agree — are „, , , , ,, •,, , 

they sufficient to allow of the qu-rries to b. """^ '''■'^S'= ^^''s, " How will the areas 

included? aaree ? " 



The Gilder Quarry. 



363 



Mr. Wilson : I think so. There was a 
valuation book (produced) giving Morton as 
occupier and W. H. Wright as owner. There 
was Mill Lane Close, Gildlow Top, Gildlow 
Stone Quarry Piece. On the duplicate (pro- 
duced) was written in the handwriting of the 
steward, " not W. H. Wright's." 

Cross-examined : Mr. George Taylor, the 
assistant-overseer, died November 12th, 18S0. 

The Judge : When did Mrs. Bullivant come 
into possession? 

Mr. Smith, May i6th, 1867, her predecessor 
died. W. H. Wright, who died 1867, and was 
tenant under the settlement — he took his 
niece. Miss Wright, in fee. Miss Wright 
made a settlement on her marriage with Mr. 
Bullivant in favour of her brother, the pre- 
sent owner of the property, George Thomas 
Wright, who succeeded on her death. 

Witness did not oppose the claim of the 
right to the quarry under the Enclosure 
Award. He did not put that before Mrs. 
Bullivant as the ground of claim. 

How have the parish come into possession 
of it? That is not known. He had in a 
book an entry dated April 15th, 1878. 

Mr. Smith said the matter was not stirred 
until 30 years ago, and by the time this was 
made they had looked into the award and 
made up their mind that this property was 
not the property of Mr. Wright, but of the 
parish. 

Mr. Wilson: Give us an explanation. 

Witness : About 30 years ago. Little Long- 
stone parishioners wanted to get clay. This 
was rejected bv Great Longstone parishioners, 
and in order to settle the matter they got the 
award and found out how these quarries were 
set out. I can only think that seeing this in 
the award it means that it includes Gilder. 



Mr. Wilson replies — " I think so." 
Why did not Mr. Wilson pick out a 
tenancy agreement which has a very small 
bearing on this litigation — and try to make 
Mr. Thornhill, the Steward, appear to 
mean the exact contrary of the truth. He 
meant that the rent of 7/6 a year was not 
rent for Wright's Quarry. 

Why did not Mr. Wilson go at once to 
the fountain head — the Award? Simply 
because the truth would have come out ! 



But John Thornhill did— And he (Mr. 
Shimwell) did so in the case of Mr. Wright. 



What a confession from the principal 
witness ! Here he admits that he appeals 
to the Award. 



364 



Longstone Records, 



By Mr. Smith : He believed it appeared in 
the tithes of 1848 as Mr. Wright's. 

The measurements of the different pieces of 
land were discussed at great length, Mr. 
Smith stating that they madeexactly 6 acres. 

The Judge said that after the award Gilder- 
stone was not mentioned. 

Mr. Smith : That is common ground. 

The Judge : That is odd, because 150 seems 
to have been known by the name of Outrake. 
Is there a number upon the plan of what is 
known now as Gilder Quarry? 

Mr. Smith : No, sir. It is part of llie 
Green Lane, which is already enclosed. Out- 
rake is the part to the west. 

Cross-examination continued : There was 
a change made in 1886, and Mrs. Bullivant's 
offer was accepted. At that time she had 
objected to pay 8s. She thought it was not 
worth it. She paid 5s. up to her death. 

This concluded the evidence for the claim- 
ants, and, 

Mr. Etherington Smith then opened his case 
for Mr. Wright. He said he might put it 
shortly in this way. That in 1810 the Enclo- 
sure Commissioners were directed to set up 
certain land for the benefit of the inhabitants 
of Great and Little Longstone and Wardlow, 
not exceeding in the whole six acres, and 
they were to include in that Gilderstone 
Quarry. It went without any further com- 
ment that the Enclosure .A.ct was to deal with 
the unenclosed land, and that they could not 
touch the enclosed land. It had struck him 
tliat this strip, which was set up as a stone 
quarry was in the middle — it was separated 
by a field of considerable size from the lane 
— in the middle of property in the posses- 
sion of Mr. Wright. If it had been in the 
power of the Commissioners to take it out 



Of course it did, and in every other 
pnblic and private document. 



No doubt it was very odd ! No. 150, the 
true Gilderstone Quarry in the Outrake was 
awarded to the Parish, and there is no 
escape from the fact, that is on the West 
or left hand in going North. 

This is only a repetition of the swindle 
and is referred to elsewhere. 



The Gilder Quarry. 



365 



of the enclosed land it would have been 
necessary for them to have described it more 
accurately, both in the award and in the map. 
The Act was passed in 1810, and the award 
was not carried out until 1S24. Directly the 
award was made it described the old Gilder- 
stone Quarry as " a " quarry, as if that quarry 
. was opened for the first time. It was actually 
allotted in 1824 as a quarry. Gildlow fields 
belonged to Mr. Wright. He could go back 
to 1770, when they had a plan showing 
Gildlow Bottom and Gildlow Close as part 
of the Wright property. The particular piece 
awarded must be awarded by a particular 
number, by a description, or by a map. It 
said, "not exceeding six acres in the whole." 
This was to prevent the possibility of making 
any mistake, and give the parish six acres in 
addition to the quarry called Gilderstone 
Quarry. Mr. Smith then dealt with the ques- 
tion of right by user, and said the evidence of 
the witness who cut stone and left it there 
was strongly illustrative of the sort of user 
there had been. These people never went 
to ask anybody's leave. It would be no doubt 
in the first instance just the thing a property 
owner would do, to carry out the scheme 
under this Enclosure Award by having good 
roads made, and the stone would be taken for 
the purpose. Prior to 1810, the owner of 
the Wright estate would occupy any parts of 
the waste which he conveniently got access 
to by that land up which they went that 
morning. He suggested that what was meant 
by the words being put " not Wright's," 
showed that what was being paid at that time 
in the way of rental for herbage was not 
Wright's quarry at all, but may have been 
the Overseers' quarry or someone else's, and 
therefore it was deducted. There was a dis- 



When the Gilder Quarry was not in 
existence. 

This Gilderstone Quarry in the Outrake 
was then [1824] first allotted to the Parish 
although it had long been used as such. 

AH the allotments were so described. 
Why should this Quarry be an exception ? 
As a fact, it was exactly described in the 
Award and Map but you must look in the 
Outrake for it. 



The words scribbled in pencil " Not 
Wright's Quarry" meant that it (the rent) 
had nothing to do with Wright's Quarry. 



366 



Longstone Records. 



pute with Little Longstone, the award was 
turned up, and they said Gilderstone Quarry 
was something that belonged to them, and 
they put it in the valuation book. The 
Wright family ought to have some credit for 
having allowed all this time the free use of 
this quarry, and they ought not to come here 
and use it against them, and the property 
treated as if it belonged to someone else on 
account of their good nature and for having 
been good enough to help their tenants in 
that way. 

William Ashton was the first witness called 
for Mr. Wright. He said he was 78 years of 
age and had lived at Great Longstone all his 
life. The Gilderstone Quarry had always 
been fenced in, top, bottom, and ends as well. 
Cattle could get into it when he first remem- 
bered it. They went from the top into the 
bottom. There was only water at one end. 
They got in under the cliff. There were 
about six holes in the quarry. It is 40 years 
since I built the fence. It was to prevent 
cattle getting into the holes. He built the 
wall. People often came into the quarry. 
He was not aware that they paid anything. 
Robert Thornhill, who died i8 years ago, paid 
him for the walling. He heard no complaint 
about the ownership of the quarry until lie 
was overseer. 

Cross-examined : As long as he could 
remember the inhabitants had fetched stone 
whenever they liked. Robert Thornhill set 
him to build the wall. Gilder Quarry alway-s 
had four walls round it, before he built tne 
wall spoken of. The v/all was built where 
the excavation was, to keep cattle from falling 
down. It was built from west to east. 

The Judge : That would be on the south ? 



By the way, I believe no one asked the 
Parish Council " which was Wright's 
Quarry?"!! That would have been a 
puzzler ! 

It is true Mr. \\'right has other Quarries 
at a distance, but not even iMr. Wilson 
could have brought them into the con- 
troversy. 



The Gilder Quarry, 367 



By Mr. Smith : Robert Thornhill paid h'm 
for building the wall. He did not know out 
of whose money it came. 

Mr. Geo. Thomas Wright said he was the 
owner of this estate at Great Longstone. 

Mr. Smith : Mr. W. Wright was owner 
of the estate in the last century, and by his 
will in 1770 he left it to Robert, as tenant 
for life, and John Thomas as tenant intail. 
Then Robert and John Thomas, in 1784. made 
a settlement, and under that John Thcma> 
Wright became tenant for life, and his son, 
William Henry Wright, became tenant intaii, 
and that William Henry Wright was the gen- 
tleman who died in 1867, and devised the 
estates to his niece, Miss Wright, in fee. On 
December 17th, 1880, Miss Wright made a 
settlement, upon her marriage with Mr. Bul- 
livant, by which she instituted herself tena.ii 
for life, and upon her death, in July, 1894, 
you succeeded? 

Witness : Yes. Mr. Bullivant died Feb- 
ruary 28th, 1893. In March of the present 
year he let Gildlow Top and Gildlow Bottom, 
and the disputed property to John Bridge. 
Mr. Richard Bridge was tenant before. His 
predecessor was Mr. L. Shaw, in i88g ; and 
his in 1886 Mr. David Ashton ; and his pre- 
decessor, in 1880, was T. Daubeney. 

Witness produced a map and plcn of the 
estate in the time of W. Wright, in 1770, and 
a book of reference. This part was marked 
B. Under B. 14 was a plantation, on the 
west side of Greenhill, la. 39p. ; and 15 waii 
ditto, plantation, ar. 36p. Witness described 
the sizes of the several pieces on the map. 

Mr. Smith handed in a memo, of 1771, 
shovdng the list of payments yearly going out 
of Mr. Wright's estate, and one was "to the 
Overseers of the Poor of Longstone for a 



368 



Longstone Records. 



piece of land taken from the common and 
enclosed, &c., 7s. 6d." In 1815 the estate 
was offered for sale, and in the descriptions 
the name of the occupier of Gildlow was 
Joseph Morton, la. 2r. igp. 

After a long legal argument, 

The Judge said there was a quarry in 1815. 
All the witnesses spoke to that. 

Mr. Smith : What witnesses? 

The Judge : The first one. 

Witness said he first heard of any dispute 
in 1881. He was in Switzerland, and he 
received a letter from his sister, Mrs. Bul- 
livant, enclosing a copy of an account from 
the Overseer, " Six years' rent for herbage of 
Gilderstone Quarry, at 7s. 6d., £2 5s." It 
was signed J. Thornhill. He wrote and told 
her not to pay it, but when he came home 
he found she had paid it, for peace and 
quietness. 

Mr. Wilson : She paid the six years, and 
right up to her death? Oh, no. 

By the Judge : There was no steward at that 
time. Robert Thornhill was just dead, and 
Mr. BuUivant undertook the management. 1 
was never more astounded in my life. It was 
sprung upon us. These six years were as far 
back as they could go. 

Mr. Wilson : I don't ask you any questions, 
sir, thank you. 

Thomas Daubeney said he was tenant in 
1881 of Gildlow Lane, after Samuel Morton, 
who died in 1880. He paid rent for the 
quarry oftce, 8s., and Shimwell applied for it. 

Mr. Smith said this land was exactly oppo- 
site Gilder Bottom. He lost a cow worth 
;fi4, that got killed. When they came for 
the tithe rent he did not pay any more. He 
gave it up. 

Cross-examined : He did not pay any more, 
as the land was unsafe. 



It is uncertain in what year a Quarry 
wasopenedon Mr. Wright's Gildlow Estate. 



Remember this was an Arbitration case 
— ^h•. Wilson was afraid. 



" When they came for the tithe rent." 
Who paid the tithe ? Not the Overseer 
hut .\h-. Wrioht. 



PART OF THE WRIGHT ESTATE &c. CONTAINING THE DISPUTED 
QUARRY AND THE REAL OLD GILDER QUARRY. 



The dotted lines on the roadside from N. to S. she70 the waste lands outside " old enclosure.'' The 
dotted line in " old enclosure " 2/(5 shews the extent of the Gildlow disputed quarry as in the Tithe Map. 
By the arbitration, the Parish Council also claimed, and secured 275. All the numbers are those of the 
Tithe Map. 



WHEREAS by an Aj^reement datL-d the fcmrteenth day of March, 
One thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight, Between The Parish 
Council of Great Longstone, in the County of Derby, of the one 
part, and George Thomas Wright, Esquire, of Great Longstone 
aforesaid of the other part, it was agreed between the parties hereto 
that it be referred to me, William Cecil Smyly, one of Her Majesty's 
Council and Judge of County Courts, to award and determine the 
rights of the said parties in regard to a piece of land coloured green 
on the plan annexed to the said Agreement, which said piece of 
land contains a quarry known as Gildlow or Gildale or Gilder. 
NOW I the said William Cecil Smyly having taken upon myself 
the burden of the said reference and having entered upon the said 
reference on the Nineteenth day of April, One thousand eight 
hundred and ninety eight, and having heard the witnesses tendered 
by the respective parties, and having duly considered the same and 
the documents submitted to mo, do hereby make and publish 
my award. I AW.'VRD and determine that the piece of land coloured 
green on the plan annexed to the said Agreement and which piece 
of land contains the saitl quarrv known as Gildlow or Gildale or 
Gilder belongs to and is owned and held by the said Parish Council 
of Great Longstone, upon the same title and for the same uses and 
purposes as the other piece or pieces of land set out and appointed 
by the Commissioners appointed for carrying into execution a 
certain Act passed in the Fiftieth year of the reign of His late 
Majestv King George the Third and called An Act for inclosing 
lands in the Townships of Great Longstone, Little Longstone and 
Wardlovv in the County of Derby. AND I do further a\\ ard that 
said George Thomas Wright do pay to the said Parish Council of 
Great Longstone their costs, to be taxed, of and incidental to the 
reference and to this my award and do bear his own costs of the 
same IN WITNESS whereof I do hereunto set my hand this Tenth 
day of May One thousand eight hundred and ninety eight. 
Signed and published by the above-' 
named William Cecil Smyly on 
the day and j'ear aforesaid in the 
presence of 

W. BEADON WOODFORDE, 

Solicitor, 

Derby. 



I WILLI AM CECIL SMYLY. 



The Gilder Quarry. 



369 



Mr. Smith addressed His Honour, who 
asked : How do you say he (Mr. Wright) is 
in possession? 

Mr. Smith : Because he has continuously 
let this land to his tenants. 

The Judge : How do you get over the pay- 
ment ot rent for so many years? 

Mr. Smith : Those are payments which are 
made and are attributable to this particular 
part. 

The Judge : From 1880 to 1893 ^^^s. BuUi- 
vant paid the rent. If anyone is in posses- 
sion I should say it is the people who get 
the rent. What act of ownership has been 
exercised over it? 

Mr. Smith : He has had a wall built. 

The Judge : It was built 40 years ago. 

Mr. Wright : I repaired it. 

The Judge : What is the act of possession 
that you rely upon? 

Mr. Smith : He has rebuilt that wall. 

The Judge : When did he rebuild the wall? 

Mr. Smith : The other day. 

The Judge : But that is since the question 
has been raised. What evidence is there of 
possession before the question was raised? 

Mr. Smith : As far as paper right is con- 
cerned I have it under my title deeds. I have 
not been ousted. 

The Judge : Your predecessor has paid 
rent? 

Mr. Smith : That is in acknowledgment 
to someone else's title. 

The Judge: What is the effect in law? Is 
it an acknowledgment or is it payment by 
Mrs. Bullivant? If it went on long enough 
it would give the parish the property. 

Mr. Smith : If there was any actual pos- 
sesson. I rely most strongly upon the fact 
that this has been a thing which has been 



The old fent was paid for land rented on 
the opposite side to Gildlow. The later 
so-called rents were a swindle. 



If the Judge had had time, every possible 
evidence was to be found in the papers — 
wall building, tree planting, letting the 
ground, &c. 



370 



Longstone Records. 



mooted of late years only, and I should ask 
you to disregard the suggestion of continuous 
payments which it was said they went and 
spent at public-houses. Any user that has 
been made has been user by permission, sub- 
ject always to the paramount rights of the 
owner of the property. 

Mr. Wilson then replied. In iSio there 
was a Gilderstone Quarry. Where was it 
now? The Act of Parliament said, on page 
8 of the Queen's Printers Copy, "including the 
present quarry called Gilderstone Quarry." 
The Judge had it clearly before him that 
there was a Gilderstone Quarry. What hid 
become of it? The Gilderstone Quarry of 
1810 was the Gilderstone Quarry they were 
claiming to-day. There was corroboration o' 
that. There was Gildlow, a piece of lanj 
which in 1771 the predecessor of Mr. Wright 
paid 7s. 6d. for, and in 1828 they had got 
the Wright's paying 7s. 6d. still, and then in 
1835-6 7-8, and he suggested this was Gildlow 
Quarry. He asked the Judge to presume the 
continuous payment of 7s. 6d. 

The Judge : What do you say is the value 
of the quarry? 7s. 6d., capitalised on 25 
years, would be about ^^lo. I should think 
that would be about it. 

Mr. Wilson : I am told ;f 10 would be a good 
figure. 

The case then concluded, and Ilis Honour 
reserved judgment. 



What had become of it ? What a 
question ! The whole contention admits 
two Quarries — One on the right and the 
other on the left of the road. One of the 
two belonged to the Parish the other to 
Mr. Wright. 

The Gilderstone in the Outrake was 
awarded to the Parish in 1824 and no 
other. The attack on Mr. Wright's Quarry, 
should have failed : The decision was 
against the evidence except that of User, 
but Mr. Wright was advised not to appeal. 

Mr. Wright's ancestor never paid a half- 
penny for rent of Gildlow. 



The Gilder Quarry. 



371 



GREAT LONGSTOXE PARISH COUN- 
CIL'S CLAIM TO GILDER QUARRY. 
JUDGE SMYLYS AWARD : THE PARISH 
COUNXIL WIN. 



Reprinted from " The High Peak Newe,' 
Saturday, May 21s(, 1898. 



The arbitration proceedings between the 
Great Longstone Parish Council and Mr. 
George Thomas Wright, of Longstone Hall, 
have resulted in a victory for the Parish 
CounciL The parties fell out over the right 
to work a certain quarry, known as the Gilder 
Stone Quarry, the Council on behalf of the 
inhabitants claiming ownership, or in the 
alternative that the inhabitants had had the 
right from time immemorial to take stone 
from the quarry for the purpose of building 
or repairing houses within the parish, or con- 
structing or repairing roads. Mr. Wright 
claimed the ownership of the quarry subject 
to no reservations. The case was taken to 
the County Court, and was first heard by 
His Honour Judge Smyly at Bakewell, on 
April 19th, Mr. A. Muir Wilson, solicitor, of 
Sheffield, appearing on behalf of the Council, 
and Mr. Etherington Smith, barrister, 
instructed by Messrs. F. and H. Taylor, of 
Bakewell, representing Mr. Wright. His 
Honour agreed to sit specially as Arbitrator, 
and not as Judge of the County Court. The 
evidence adduced for the Parish Council 
showed that in the year 1810 an Act of Par- 
liament was passed for enclosing lands in the 
township of Great Longstone, and in such Act 
a Gilder Stone Quarry is mentioned as being 
allotted to the inhabitants. The quarry was 

T 



Mr. Wright claimed the freehold of the 
Quarry but he allowed stone to be taken 
as before. All he aimed at was the 
preser\'ation of the freehold of a small 
piece of land well inside his ring fence. 



37^ 



Longstone Records. 



definitely awarded to the parish by the Enclo- 
sure Commissioners in 1824 in pursuance of 
the Act. It was proved that from the year 
1777 up to the death of the late tenant in 1894 
rent had been received by the overseers from 
the Wright family in respect of a Gilder Stone 
Quarry. Entries of such payments appeared 
in the parish books up to the year 1838, from 
which time until 1881 they cease. A number 
of the oldest inhabitants were called, several 
of them being octogenarians, who stated that 
for as long as they could remember the 
inhabitants of Great Longstone had taken 
stone from this quarry for the purposes 
already mentioned. The explanation of the 
cessation of entries of the receipt of the 
annual 7s. 6d. a year as rent from the Wright 
family was that it became the custom to 
spend the money when received in refresh- 
ments at the four inns of the village, but when 
the new overseer was appointed in 1881 he 
objected to the money being thus disposed of, 
and it was then brought into account again. 
It transpired that the present dispute arose 
in July, iSpi. when the present Mr. Wright 
came into possession of the Great Longstone 
estates, on the death of his sister, Mrs. Bul- 
livant, widow of the late vicar of the parish. 
On behalf of Mr. Wright a number of 
documents of title, dating back to 1720, were 
produced, and it was alleged that the owner- 
ship of the quarry had always been in the 
Wright family. In addition a valuation, 
dated 1840, made by the then overseers, was 
produced, in which the owner of the quarry 
was described as Mr. Wright. It was further 
alleged that in the tithe commutation deeds 
the quarry was treated as being the property 
of the Wright family. 



How entirely this agrees with Mr. 
Wright's contention that the land rented 
from the Overseers between 1824 and 1838 
was given up. 



What is the use of Title Deeds and 
Maps, Tithe Commutation Deeds and 
Maps, and a host of other documents 
including the Act of Parliament and the 
Commons award and Map if they are 
treated as waste paper, and the memory 
of the old inhabitants in regard to User 
should wrest the freehold from the lawful 
owner ! 



The Gilder Quarry. 373 

His Honour visited the property, after 

which he heard the evidence and arguments 

of the advocates, occupying several hours, 

and then postponed giving judgment until 

the following month. 
His Honour's award is dated May loth, and 

a copy was received by Mr. A. Muir Wilson, 

as representing the Parish Council, and Mr. 

F. J. Taylor (Messrs. F. and H. Taylor, 

Bakewell), who appeared for Mr. Wright. 

His Honour has determined that the quarry 

which was the subject of the litigation, 
belongs to, is owned, and held by the parish 
of Great Longstone for the same purposes as 
the other pieces of land set out and appointed 
by the Enclosure Commissioners' award in 
1824. The effect of this judgment is to 
declare that the parishioners of Great Long- 
stone are entitled to the quarry in question, 
and may at any time take such stone from it 

h" ?T J"' w ''r'"- ''''' ^""^^ ''" ^^'- W'-'ght paid all expenses and not a 

directed Mr. \\nght to pay certain of the part onl 
costs of the litigation. 

The news of His Honour's award was made 
known at Great Longstone on Saturday, by a 
telegram which was received by the Clerk to 
the Parish Council. 



374 Longstone Records. 

THE GILDER QUARRY. 



" Audi alteram partem. 



Mr. Wright has thought it a dut)' to the memory of his 
ancestors, to the trustees of the Estate and to the Parishioners 
to set out in detail the history of the Quarry litigation. He 
desires to shew that first as trustee and afterwards as owner of 
the Estate, he did his best to keep it intact, and farther he 
hopes to clear away some aspersions of " land grabbing " that 
were thrown broadcast over the parish by one or two persons 
before the Arbitration and whilst the case was sub jiidice. Mr. 
Etherington Smith, K.C. thoroughly examined Mr. Wright's Title 
and had no hesitation in supporting Messrs. F. & H. Taylor, 
Solicitors of Bakewell in their opinion that his Title was sound 
and unimpeachable and therefore a fair case for a friendly arbi- 
tration. Distasteful as it is to him to appeal to anything but 
hard facts, he would like to ask whether, after reading the follow- 
ing pages, there is anyone who will believe that the family 
who have again and again given land for parish improvements, 
benefactions for the poor and donations in money and kind 
including the outstanding debt on the Church restoration, &c., 
&c., would lay claim to a small piece of land of no earthly value 
except its position within the ring fence of the Estate — and which 
moreover they were willing to preserve for parish use ! Apart 
however from all probabilities and improbabilities, there is 
absolute proof in the following historical facts that the Quarry 
always belonged to the Wright Estate until the Arbitration Award 
in 1898. 

As a present day grievance it is evident that for want of proper 
supervision, the face of the quarry is being improperly encroached 
on and the plantation that was made for the protection of the 
tenant's cattle almost destroyed. 



The Gilder Quarry, 375 

Mr. Wright, who has studied the case from e»ery point of view, 
suggests that the claim of the Parish to the Quarry came about 
in this way. Air. William Longsdon, J. P., a shrewd and pains- 
taking man, was examining the Act of Parliament 50 George 1 1 1 and 
the Inclosure Award with regard to the rights of Little Longstone 
to get stone in Gilder Quarry, when he came across the now oft- 
quoted Clause 10. Putting two and two together he arrived at 
the not unnatural conclusion that the Quarry on the Wright 
Estate must he the original Gilder Stone Quarry in the Outrake. 
It was close to the Outrake, it was called Gilder by the inhabit- 
ants and it was freely used by them. Here appeared to be the 
necessary elements upon which to foimd a Title. 

One day when Mr. Wright was talking with the late Mr. James 
Orr, the latter remarked in rather a mysterious way that if he 
would come inside he would shew him the Act of Parliament in 
which Mr. Longsdon had "discovered" — that is, after about 70 
years!— that the Quarry on the Wright Estate was awarded to 
the Parish. This was the first time that Mr. Wright's attention 
had been drawn to the Act and from that time he began to give 
serious investigation to the claim. Before that he had never 
heard of any documentary evidence being forthcoming in behalf 
of the Parish. He knew that Mr. Robert Thornhill, the Agent 
of the Estate for so many years and up to the date of his decease, 
was convinced that it was not Parish property, as it was let by 
him to the holder of the Gildlow tenancy. 

After a thorough investigation Mr. Wright was able to see very 
clearly how the mistake came about, but the ball having been 
set rolling he could not overtake it. 

If the old Overseer's books are preserved there is evidence in 
them alone sufficient to establish Mr. Wright's Title. One of 
these books had been clumsily tampered with, and the Quarry in 
dispute was made to appear as belonging to the Parish. It was 
easy to see by the handwriting who had tampered with the entry 
but " de mortuis nil nisi bonum." 



376 Longstone Records. 

THE GILDER QUARRY. 

(The case stated in the form of question and answer) 

Before the Award. 

Inclosure Act, 1810. 
Inclosure Award, 1824. 



1. — Were the Commissioners for the Great Longstone, Little 
Longstone, and Wardlow Inclosure Award ordered by the Act to 
deal with " Old Inclosure " or with uninclosed land ? 
With uninclosed lands only. 
2. — How did the Commissioners distinguish between " Old 
inclosure and uninclosed land " ? 

By a carefully prepared Reference Map which showed the 
two classes of land in different colours, and when the Awards 
were made by identical numbers on the Award and the Map. 

3. — Was that part of the Wright Estate in which the disputed 
Quarry lies " old enclosure " ? 

From the earliest records it was always enclosed land passing 
with the surrountling land under the name of Gildlow and being 
well within the Ring Fence of the Wright Estate. 

4. — What amount of uninclosed land was the subject of the 
whole Award ? 

One thousand seven hundred and forty two acres, a larger 
area than the original estimate of fifteen hundred acres mentioned 
in the Act. 

5. — Did the Commissioners award six acres of land to Great 
Longstone, Little Longstone and Wardlow as ordered ? 

Their award was six acres exactly to Great Longstone and 
Wardlow and half an acre to Little Longstone. 

N B. — The Commissioners appear to Iiave acted arbilr.irilv and illegally in depriving Little 
Longstone of its right to share in the awards which make up the six acres, as the Act makes no 
distinction between the three townships. The half acre award to Little Longstone was also unauthor- 
ised bv the Act. 



The Gilder Quarry. 377 

6. — Excluding for the moment Gilder and Gildlow Quarries, 
what acreage was awarded to Great Longstone and Wardlow ? 
Exactly five acres one rood and eight perches. 
7. — What is the acreage of the Quarry awarded to Great 
Longstone and Wardlow ? 

Two roods and thirty two perches. 
8. — Which of the two Quarries corresponds with this area ? 
The Quarry numbered 150 in the Award and in the Award 
Map, and situated on the left in ascending Hillside road and 
described as on Great Longstone Outrake — the acreage being 
exactly 2 roods 32 perches. 

9. — What is the acreage of the Quarry on the land called 
Gildlow in the Wright Estate ? 

In the old Estate Map the site formed part of the field 
called Gildlow top and the area was of course included in the 
acreage of that field. In the modern map schedule the acreage 
is given as one acre fifteen perches whilst in the Valuation list 
it is given as la. 2r. 17p. In neither case does the acreage agree 
with the area awarded to Great Longstone and Wardlow. 

10. — Give a list of the Awards to the Surveyor of Highways for 
Great Longstone and Wardlow. a. r. p. 

Stone Quarry No. 140 

Clay an^ Gravel Pit No. 124 ... 
Public Watering Place No. 5a. ... 
Stone Quarry No. 150 

11. — So that if the acreage of the Quarry claimed by the Wright 
Estate as Gildlow and by the Parish Council as Gilder were added, 
the Commissioners would have exceeded the maximum limit — 
"not exceeding 6 acres in the whole" by at least One acre and 
fifteen perches ? 
Yes. 

* This allotment on Longstone Mnor was ovidei.t'.y mer.suieJ cut to nial e i:p ll.e exaci bal.-.ixe of 
acreage prcscribeJ by the Act. 






2 


3 


3 8- 


1 








2 32 


6 






378 Longstone Records. 

12. — Is not the Gilder Stone Quarry mentioned by name in both 
the Act and in the pirninbh to the Award. 

Yes — but not in the clause declaring the actual Award. The 
Commissioners doubtless thought that having defined the site so 
exactly as No. 150 in Great Longstone Outrake there could he no 
mistake, the quarry on the Wright Estate at that date being non- 
existent. 

13. — Does the Act state that the Gilder Stone Quarry was part 
of the Wastes, Moors, Commons, &c. ? 

Yes, it states so most emphatically by means of a parenthesis. 
Therefore there is no possibility of bringing it under the category 
of " old inclosure" even if the acreage were reconcileable with that 
theory. 

14. — Is it contended by the Parish Council that the distinct and 
definite order of the Act of Parliament was omitted to be carried 
out in the Award, although the Commissioners placed it first in 
their preamble of the Act ? 
It would seem so. 

15. — Is there anything to be said as to the similarity of names? 
Gilder is probably a corruption of Gildlow and Gild, the name 
of the land on the Wright Estate in the immediate neighbourhood. 
There are many cases in Longstone in which the land gives the 
name to the adjacent highway — for examples, Ranhill and 
Begganvay. 



THE GILDLOW ALIAS GILDER QUARRY, 
(after the Award.) 
" A bolt from the blue " could scarcely have been more of a 
surprise than the receipt by Mr. Wright of the Award in this 
Arbitration case (1898). And yet, on after consideration of all 
the attendant circumstances, what else could have been expected ? 
Contrary to the explicit statement of Mr. Thomas Shimwell who 
represented the Parish Council and who had many interviews with 



The Gilder Quarry. 379 

Mr. Wright before reference to arbitration was suggested, the Case 
was tried and the Quarry was practically claimed on the plea and 
ground of User. Again and again Mr. Shimweil and others had 
claimed the Quarry on the strength of the Inclosure Award and 
had supported the claim by certain payments made latterly by 
the late Mrs. BuUivant for the sake of peace, but without the 
authority of Mr. Wright, then trustee of the Estate, and 
resident abroad— who repudiated such payments. Mr. Shimweil 
assured Mr. Wright that there was no intention of claiming the 
Quarry on the ground of User. " If (said Mr. Shimweil) you were 
ever the Owner of the Quarry there is no wish to deprive you of 
your rights," thus showing that the Parish Council were then 
perfectly satisfied with their claim under the Commons Inclosure 
Act. These repeated assurances quite satisfied and disarmed 
Mr. Wright who felt perfectly safe if the Title were thoroughly 
investigated. It was quite another thing when it came to Mr. Muir 
Wilson, who saw at once the flimsiness of their title. He relied on 
User and practically brushed on one side all attempts to try the 
Case on the question of Title. It would have taken at least 
another day for the Arbitrator to have gone thoroughly into the 
Title but it was quite easy to prove User — " the memory of the 
oldest inhabitant " being well represented by many witnesses and 
not contradicted by Mr. \\'right himself. Where " the memory of 
the oldest inhabitant " was defective was in respect to any other 
Quarry than the Gildlow Quarry. If the Parish Council had said 
at once that they claimed the Quarry on the ground of User Mr. 
Wright would not have contested the case, as he did not deny 
that plea. 

The so called Arbitration resolved itself into an ordinary County 
Court trial at Bakewell with open doors for the public, reporters, &c. 
and in no respect a friendly arbitration or round table conference 
to investigate the Title. An adjournment took place for a visit to 
the Quarry at Longstone. At the trial, the proofs of Mr. Wright's 



380 Longstone Records, 

Title to the Quarry were so overwhelming that Mr. Muir Wilson 
cleverly avoided them as far as possible whilst he kept the 
Arbitrator's attention engaged on one point, bringing witnesses to 
testify to a fact which was not disputed — that the parishioners had 
for a very long period used the quarry without hindrance by Mr. 
Wright and his predecessors in the Estate, and that therefore the 
Quarry must be the old Parish Quarry. So strong were the proofs 
of Ownership by Mr. Wright and so entirely wanting were any by 
the Parish that Mr. Wilson laboured the case for the Parish almost 
entirely on the ground of User. So much so that when Mr. Wright 
(who had never opened his mouth) appeared in the witness box, 
there was no attempt at cross-examination of his evidence in chief 
— to elucidate facts connected with the Title. " I have no 
questions to ask Mr. Wright" was Mr. Wilson's remark. Another 
advantage taken of the Arbitration was the claim to a much larger 
area of land than the actual site of the quarry. This area was set 
out by Mr. Shimwell on behalf of the Parish Council and too 
readily assented to by Mr. Wright who relied entirely on his legal 
right to the Title, believing that no Arbitrator would take away 
land that had nothing to do with the right claimed to use the 
Quarry. How could certain parishioners' use of the quarry 
establish a title to other land outside the quarry — practically 
interfering with Mr. Wright's tenant's approach to his tenancy? 
There was no pretence that the land claimed was defined by the 
Commons Inclosure Act and the subsequent Award. Clause X of 
the Act is as follows :— 

THE MEMORY OF THE OLDEST INHABITANT. 

Much ignorance is displayed and many mistakes are made (although seldom exposed) on the authority 
ol the memory of the " oldest inhabitant." 

The oldest inhabitants of Little Longstone had never heard of any other than the present Pinfold in 
tlieir village just as some of tiie oldest inhabitants of Great Longstone appear never to have heard of 
the old Parish Quarry in the Outrake— disused as a quarry but used as a rubbish tip. And yet the 
Survey map made for the Duke of Devonshire by William Senior in 161 1 shews the Pinfold very clearly 
at the Great Longstone end of the vilKige! In the one case the probable cause of the change of site was 
tfiat cattle were found generally to stray from the uninclosed Common and waste lands and seldom from 
Great Longstone which had its own pinfold : and in the other the Estate Map and other proofs shew 



The Gilder Quarry, 38 1 

THE COMMONS INCLOSURE ACT. 1810. 
Clause 10. 

Allotment for \ And be it further enacted, That the said 

Public Watering r Commissioners shall and they are hereby re- 
Places, &c. quired to set out and appoint One or more Piece 
or Pieces of Ground, including the present Quarry called 
Gilder Stone Quarry {Part of the Wastes, Moors, Commons, 
and uninclosed Lands hereby inteyided to he inclosed) in such 
convenient situation or situations as they shall think proper 
within the said Townships or Hamlets of Great Longstone, 
Little Longstone and Wardlow, not exceeding Six Acres in the 
Whole, to be used for the purposes of puhlick Watering Places 
for Cattle, and for getting and burning Limestone, and also for 
getting Stone, Gravel, Sand, Clay and other Materials &c., &c. 



that there was rooW ^Horry a^ a?? on the Wright land at the date of the Act. The old Gilder Stone 
Quarry became useless from bad quarrying— not really exhausted, and Mr. Wright's quarry was alone 
resorted to for that part of the village oi by those previously using the former quarry. The two Quarries 
being close together, altho' on opposite sides of Hillside road, what more natural in another gener- 
ation or two than forgetfulness of the old, and recognition (»f the one quarrj* in general use as the Parish 
Quarr\'. Even Mr. Muir Wilson was led on to say, If this Quarry is not the Parish Quarry, what has 
become of it ? 

Again, "the oldest inhabitant" of Tidoswell appears to have no recollection nor even traditional 
knowledge of Justices Petty Sessions liaving been held there. And yet proofs of the same are given 
below — 

" 1797. April 21. .^t a Meeting of His Majesty's Justices of the Peace for the said County, Holden at 
Tideswell, in the said County, before Joseph Denman. M.D., Robert Wright, & Bache Thomhill, Fsquires, 
—Ordered &c. {See page 91.) .Another case- Whereas complaint made upon oath hath been made unto 
us Joseph Denman M.D. & John Barker Esquire, two of His Majesty's Justices of the Peace, &c., &c. We 
do therefore adjudge £- order &c. &c. 

Given under our hands and seals at Tideswell in the said County, the second day of May, 1778. 

JOS. DENMAX. 
JOHN BARKER. 

Again, to quote from the Rev. J. M. J. Fletcher's Historical Notes, the case of the foundation of the 
" Tideswell Society on June 18, 1777 called the Friendly C- Charitable Society of Tradesmen and others— 
which was examined and approved by R. Wright presumably a Magistrate, on January 9. 1797 & 
sanctioned (probably on behalf of the Sessions Court) by the Clerk of the Peace, A. L. Maynard on the 
following day" is further evidence of the fact when supported by the foregoing Justices' Orders. 



382 Longstone Records. 

THE COMMONS INCLOSURE AWARD, 1824. 

The [nclosure Award, 14 years later than the Act of Parliament, 
after r.'citing at great length the orders of the Act and especially 
the order to set out and appoint one or more Piece or Pieces of 
Ground including the present Quarry called Gilder Stone Quarry 
(Part of the Wastes, Moors, Commons, and uninclosed Lands 
hereby intended to be inclosed) in such convenient situation or 
situations as they shall think proper &c. — and after allotting two 
other parcels of Land to the Surveyor of Highways, goes on to the 
allotment No. L^O which, for want of repetition of the words "the 
present Quarry called Gilder Stone Quarry (Part of the Wastes)" 
&c. which they had already recited in the preamble as above, has 
been the fruitful source of all the misunderstanding — in these 
words — 

Stone Quarry . And also one other parcel of Land on Great 
No.150 Oa. 2r. 32p. ) Longstone Outrake No. 150 containing two 
roods and thirty two perches bounded Northerly and Easterly by 
Hillside Road and Southerly by an allotment to Bache Thornhill 
Clerk (as Curate of Great Longstone) and westerly by old 
I nclosure. 

It should be noticed in the very full pLinctuation of the Clause 
of the Act, that Gilder Stone Quarry has no comma after it, but 
(as if to prevent the possibility of any misunderstanding) a special 
parenthesis stating as plainly as the English language can convey 
its meaning that Gilder Stone Quarry was " Part of the Wastes, 
Moors, Commons, and uninclosed Lands hereby intended to be 
divided, allotted, and inclosed." 

This passage alone ought to have settled the question in favour 
of Mr. Wright and to have shewn the Parish Council that they 
had no sort of claim to a quarry on " Old Inclosure '' except on the 
ground of use which Mr. Wright and his predecessors did not 
dispute or desire to interfere with. It should also have convinced 



The Gilder Quarry. 383 

them that the Quarry No. 150 part of the Wastes in Great Long- 
stone Outrake was the original Gilder Quarry intended to be 
awarded to the Parish both by the Act of Parliament and by the 
Award itself. 

It should also be noted that the Commissioners expressly state 
that they have allotted the said lands intended to be dealt with — 
all which are marked and described in the Map hereunto annexed. 
Let any one look at the Map along with the Act of Parliament 
and the Award and then say whether the Parish can have the 
shadow of a Title to the Quarry except from long use of it. 

The land (nearly 3 roods) of which the true Gilder Quarry — the 
present rubbish tip — is part, has been let of late years to .Mr. 
Charles Carson and previously to i\h'. Thomas Hill. Earlier again 
it was rented by the Wright Estate from or about the date of the 
Inclosure Award. Prior to that it was part of the Wastes or 
Common Right of the Parish. The question is easily answered — 

Why should a large landed proprietor rent such a small piece 
of Parish land? In the first place it was most conveniently 
situated alongside some other waste land allotted at the same time 
to Mr. Wright : in the second place it kept off a possible unde- 
sirable neighbour whose cattle would have been free to stray over 
Mr. Wright's land then uninclosed but since inclosed and occupied by 
Mr. William Furniss and his predecessors, some of whose land under 
the Wright Estate still bears the name of Outrake. It is more than 
probable too that the nominal rent of 7/6 psr annum for this piece 
of Parish land was fix?d in consideration of the enclosure walls 
being built by Mr. Wright, the Surveyor of the Highway (to whom 
the Parish land was allotted) having no funds for the purpose. 
But the best reason and explanation is that there was a con- 
siderable area of waste land in the Outrake, besides that which 
was allotted to the Parish and the Curate which was allotted to 
Mr. Wright. All this waste land was uninclosed except by two 
gates, one by Lees lane at the lower end and the other at the upper 



384 Longstone Records. 

end of the Outrake where the Duke of Devonshire's plantation now 
begins. Until therefore these waste pieces were walled in after 
allotment, a single tenant was almost a necessity of the situation. 
So that instead of its being a strange arrangement for Mr. Wright 
to rent the small piece of waste land in which was the Gilder 
Quarry allotted to the Parish, it was the most natural and con- 
venient for all parties. Be this as it may, this land was so held 
for many years. The following is an extract from 'Mv. John 
Thornhill's Account, July 12, 1828, and relates to this — the true 
Parish Quarry — 

"Rent of Gilder Stonepit Common, 2 years \5!^- ." When the 
Wright Estate had no further need of this land it passed to Mr 
Hill as the next tenant, and the Overseers received no more rent 
from Mr. Wright in respect to that land. 

After the lapse of a generation or more when the old Parish 
Quarry was disused and almost forgotten, and the newer Quarry 
of Mr. Wright's was in regular request, some wiseacre " discovered " 
that formerly the Wright Estate paid this rent for the herbage near 
the Parish Quarry, then he made up his mind that the Quarry in 
current use must be the same, and that somehow the Overseers had 
a claim in perpetuity on Mr. Wright for herbage rent, ignoring the 
fact that another tenant was actually in possession of and paying 
rent for the Parish Quarry land ! 

A claim for Quarry herbage rent being made by Mr. John 
Thornhill,* the Overseer, supported by a quotation from the 
Commons Award, certain payments were made under protest by 
Mrs. Bullivant, and " for the sake of peace." The case thus became 
complicated. These payments and the free use of the Quarry by 
the parishioners for so many years gave strength to the prevailing 
belief that the Quarry in question was the old Gilder Stone Quarry 
mentioned in the Act and the Award. 

° This John Thorahilt applied for the Agency of the Wright Estate on the death of his brother Robert 
and was refused on tlie ground of incapacity, and the Rev. J. H. Bullivant, brother-in-law of the Trustee, 
undertook the office. 



The Gilder Quarry. 385 

The Wright Estate Map in use at the date of the Act of Parlia- 
ment shews no Quarry inclosure on Mr. Wright's land which con- 
sisted of Top Gildlow and bottom Gildlow only. The Maps of the 
Duke of Devonshire (kindly lent to Mr. Wright) the Tithe Commu- 
tation Map and Award and the Inclosure Award Map all support 
Mr. Wright's Title. 

Only in 1830, 6 years after the Award, when stone was in great 
demand for the inclosures, was it necessary to build a wall on the 
upper side of the Quarry to protect the cattle of Joseph Morton the 
tenant. How then could this new Quarry have been the old Gilder 
Stone Quarry (of 1810) in the Outrake ? 

Directly bearing on this point is the following extract from a 
letter from Colonel William Wright, Cutthorpe Hall, Chesterfield, 
dated January 15th, 1830, to his brother Colonel John Thomas 
Wright, the owner of the Longstone Estate, then living in Exeter — 
" You will recollect the situation of the Stone Quarry in Gueldag, 
(Gildlow) from the quantity of stone got by the Parish. The face 
is now (that is after 6 years quarrying) become so steep (shewing it 
was a new quarry) as to be very dangerous without a fence at the top. 
Joseph Morton the tenant has no objection to give up a few yards 
all along the length, if a fence is made so that a little Plantation 
might be made thereon which would be an ornament and be a great 
shelter to the field from the West wind. I have taken upon me to 
order a fence of 5 Quarters high to be made and will plant it with 
Larch at Spring which I think you will say I have done right in." 

In reply, Colonel J. T. Wright, wrote — " I think the fencing and 
planting the top of the Stone Quarry will be a good thing." 

Could all this have been done if it had been Parish property? ! ! 

Again, Colonel William Wright, wrote in January 14th, 1834, 
"Joseph Morton says he should like to have the little Plantation 
brought forward in the Gildlo-w, down to the Fir Plantation — that 
he will do the walling if you will plant." The reply — " I approve 
very much of the Plantatation being brought forward down to the 
Fir Plantation, Morton making the wall as he proposes." 



386 Longstone Records, 

Does this look like Parish property? 

There are certain references from time to time to the Wright 
Ouarry both before and after the Title was claimed by the Parish — 
which are worth recording. 

An account in the hand-writing of Mr. John Thornhill, (Father of 
Robert and John Thornhill, lately deceased) addressed to W. Wright 
and headed " Land belonging to J. T. Wright, Esq., in Great 
Longstone," has the following entry : — 

" Morton, Joseph ... Old Land ... loa. ir. 26p." 

This tenancy included the Quarry in dispute. 

In 1856 Mr. Robert Thornhill, the Agent of the Estate wrote to 
W. H. Wright, Esq., in Devonshire : — 

"The Gilder rent I have not paid of three years as I could not be 
satisfied by what authority the Overseers claimed it. / have asked 
nil people likely to knoiv and can find no document that relates to it. 
It is a Stone Quarry on your property in land occupied bv Jonathan 
Morton. I have had it fenced off and a gate hung, and allow a man 
the privilege of getting Stone to look after the tonnage of all taken 
awav. The tonnage is not much nor do I expect to realise much 
profit." 

In 1858, two years later, Emanuel Hawlev paid Mr. Robert 
Thornhill, Mr. Wright's Agent, j/jd. for "tonnage of stone from 
Gilder Quarry." Here was recognition of Ownership. This does 
not look like Parish property ! Is it conceivable that all this could 
go on without the slightest protest by the parishioners if Mr. 
Wright were not the Owner. 

Mr. Muir Wilson in summing up his case for the Parish Council 
had his doubts how it would result, for he concluded with these 
words — " If the Judge was driven to the conclusion that the field 
was still (sic) Mr. Wright's, the claimants would be entitled without 
let or hindrance from Mr. Wright to exercise that which they had 
exercised for so many years past, viz., the right to get stone." 
If the Judge had acted on this opportunity for a compromise, he 
would have satisfied all parties. "The right to get stone" was the 



The Gilder Quarry, 387 

maximum nine Arbitrators out of ten would have awarded. 
But the freehold to the Parish of the Quarry and other land outside it 
(without the shadow of a title to it) must have taken Mr. Wilson's 
breath away ! ! Well might Mr. Wright's friends say that the 
Quarry had been stolen from him. It was certainly one of the most 
extraordinary Awards in the face of the evidence that can well be 
conceived ! But Mr. Wright was persuaded for the sake of peace 
not to carry the Case to a Higher Court. 

Magna est Vkritas. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

November, 1900 



SPECIAL APPEAL FOR THE MAINTENANCE FUND OF THE 
DERBYSHIRE ROYAL INFIRMARY, DERBY. 

LoNGSTONE Centre. 

District. I 

Ashford & Sheldon "^ 

Miss L. Fenton J 

Cressbrook ) 

Mr. T. H. Savage J 

Hassop & Rowland 1 

Rev. W. J. BaigentJ 

Holme & Wardlow ^ 

Miss Frith J 

Longstone, Gt. & Little 
Miss Wright 



G. T. WRIGHT, 

President of the Local Committee . 

N.B. — This Appeal might well be repeated from time to time. 



ubscriptions. 


Donations. 


Total. 


Nil. 


10 








10 





2 12 6 


1 


14 


9* 


4 


7 3i 


10 6 


3 


16 





4 


6 6 


Nil. 


1 


8 


8 


1 


8 8 


4 4 


7 


1 


04 


11 
£31 


5 Oh 


£7 7 


£24 





6 


7 6 



38y Lon^stone Records, 

THE LONGSTOXIAN. 



One, if not the chief, characteristic of the Longstonian is his want 
of enterprise and initiative — he offers ' passive resistance ' to ahnost 
everything new. This vis iiiertice requires considerable tact and 
energy to move, but, that done, he is a good and trustworthy helper, 
as for example in the restoration of the Parish Church. 

The question of a Water Supply taken up by the Parish Council 
and a few residents nianv vears ago was allowed to drift until the 
costlv Scheme of the Rural District Council forced itself to the front, 
and any other Scheme became hopeless. The drainage of Great 
Longstone — (Little Longstone has now both water and drainage) — 
will doubtless follow on the same compulsory lines. Lighting with 
lamps and cleaning the Village and its bye-ways by means of a 
Dust and Refuse collecting cart are further examples of this laissez- 
aller characteristic, but perhaps the most flagrant and regrettable 
one is that of the lapse of the beneficent scheme of that true 
philanthropist, Mrs. Crosslev, for a Village Institute, referred to at 
page 127. 



THE TWO LONGSTONES AND THE FAMILIES 
OF WRIGHT AND LONGSDON. 



Great Longstone (Longstone Magna or Longstone Major) in the 
Manor of Ashford, and Little Longstone (Mykel Longstone, 
Longstone Parva or Longstone Minor) a separate Manor, — have 
been the homes of the Wright and Longsdon families from time 
immemorial. From Domesday down to recent times Longstone 
has been designated as Langesdune, Longesdon, Longson, and bv 
at least a dozen other variations of spelling but not with the letter 
"t" until modern times. 




LOXGSTONE HALL. 



^r^m 




o 




LONGSTONE HALL — S.E. VIEW. 




LO.NGSTONE HALL SHEWINO REMNANT OF OLDHK HALL. 




LONGSTONF, HAI.I. l-RO.M THE WEST. 





i 


1 




mmm 


m^m 


m^ 


~ ' ' ^H * * * ii 






- '- b' - 


-3 


-J. .. 




^^^^?^^" 




A->^ . 


■ -.-fe^-fj; 


3'-' " 






1 


1 


Ik 


1 


1 


i^^^^iJir ■ 


g^HH 



LONGSTONE HALL AN OLD BAK.\. 



The Two Longstones. 389 

Of old Longstone families many still survive, but none appear to 
have kept their status and abode so completely as the Wrights and 
Longsdons. The Wrights formerly de Longsdons have owned and 
occupied their estate in Great Longstone and have generally 
resided there from and even before* the Conquest. Appendix C. 
contains the Wright pedigree as compiled (in its earlier part) by 
Mr. Pym Yeatman in his Feudal History of Derbyshire. The Wrights 
held estate in Ashford, Great and Little Longstone under the stvle of 
de Longsdon, and they were fgiven or adopted the name of Wright 
at a later period, probablj' about 1300, when we find Robert de 
Longesdon identical with Robert le Wright of Longsdon Magna. 

The present Hall was built in 1747. There is an interesting relic 
of the older Hall in the shape of a panelled oak room with the 
family Arms of that date. Evam Hall, the residence of a branch of 
the same familv, was built by Thomas Wright, of Unthank, in the 
latter half of the 17th Century. 

The pedigree of the Longsdons ot Little Longstone, compiled by 
Mr. John Sleigh and published in the Antiquary in 1868, traces the 
family back to one Serlo de Longesdon who distinguished himself 
at the Battle of Hastings. From that time to the present the 
Longsdons have been represented at Little Longstone, and they 
have also had estate in Great Longstone. 

^ A Menioranduin taken more than loo years ago (roni an Ashford Court Roll speal<s of tfie family 
as before the Conquest, 975. 

t The Motto " ToLitjOLirs Droit," in old Norman spelling, may have been given to Robert le Wright 
in connection with the adoption of the name of Wright. 



390 Lcngstone Records. 



THE WRIGHT PEDIGREE. 

TRANSCRIPT OF GRIFFIN CHARTER. 



Hec est pvencio fca iuP Dnm Griffinu filiii Wenuwini ex una 
pte. Et Adam filiu Pef de Langesdoii ex altera. Anno Regni 
Regis Henf filii Regis Jofiis .xxxvij". videlicet c^ dciis dns Griffin' 
remisit & quief clamavit pdco . Ade Hlio I'ef de Langesd & 
heredibj suis vt assignatis suis oms psuetudies sclares & oimod.i 
Ivicia que de feudo pfati .A. in Langesd & in Wardlowe exeunt 
vt ali^ casi: ptinge'e exire poteiut. salvia debitis ^viciis que 
ancessores dci .A. pdco dSu .Grift', (t aficessoril)3 suis de anno in 
annu faceri' p nevimt p tenemeto suo de Lang it de Wardt. videl3 
.xiij. sot p anuii. solvend ad duns anni tenninos. scilicet ad festu 
be Ma? in ra'cio .vj. sol. & .vj. dena?. Et ad festu sci michael 
.vj. sol. & vj. d. salvo [erasure] t'bus en uris <fe t'l)5 Seuris de pfato 
.A. & hominibj suis pdco dSo G facndis. bis nd tibii p annu. Et 
secta molndini de Esfurd. de pdc') .A. & hoiuinilij suis & auxilio 
809 *•! stagnu dci molndini & alia q ad dcin moliidinu ptinet cu 
necesso tuit reficienda. Et s:ilva secta Cur de Esfurd. de pfato .A. 
& Jieilil)3 .suis j) se & p tenetib5 suis de Lang & de Wardt. sicut 
cePi lifii holes de mafiio de Esford scquuf vt seq tenet^ Et cum 
Dns Rex dnica sua talliavif. pdcus .A. p se & p feudo suo talliat'. 
Et 5j hec pvGcio inp illiis lea rata & stabilis i postum pinaiieat. 
uP(j illo9 iilfnatim sigttm suu ad modii Cyrog"|'lii appone fecit. 
Hiis te-tibus. Diio . Ricardo de Vernu. Dno Ricardo de Herthull. 
Kic'do Daniel de Tydeswell. Witto de Langesd. Matlio de 
Langesd. Thoin de Langesd. Et mltis Aliis. 



The Wright Pedigree. 39I 

THE WRIGHT PEDIGREE. 

TRANSLATION OF GRIFFIN CHARTER. 



This is an :igreement made between the Lord GriflBn, son of 
Wenuwyn,* of tlio one part, and Adam, son of Peter de Langesdon, 
iif the other pait, in the thirtj'-seventh year of the reign of King 
Henry, son of King .John [12.j3] — namely, that the said Lord 
Grifh'ii remised and leliased to the said Adam, son of Peter de 
Langisdoii, and his heirs or assigns, all secular customs and all 
manner of services uhieh issue from the fee of the said Adam in 
LMBgesdon ami in Wardlowe, or in any case can issue, saving the 
due services which the ancestors of the said Adam were accus- 
tomed to give hum year to year to the said Lord Griifin, or his 
ancestors, for the same — namely, thirteen shillings a year to be 
pai ! at two terms, to wit, ;it the fea^t of the Bles.-ed Mar3- in 
March six shillings and sixpi nce, and at the feast of St. Michael 
six shillings and sixpence ; saving . . . three days' ploughing and 
three daj-s' ditcliing of the >ai'l Adam and his men to be done for 
ihe said Lord Griffin up to dinner-time twice a year, ami suit f (jf 
the Mill of A-hford of the said Adam and his men, and their lielji 
at the piiol of the said Mill and other things belonging to the said 
Mill when repairs are necessary; and saving suit of the Court of 
Ash ford of the said Adam and his heirs for themselves and for 
their tenants at Langesdon and Wardl.iwe, si 1 ilar to the suit 
rendered by or required from other fieemen of the Manor of Ashford. 
And when the King taxes his demesnes the said Adam for himself 
and his fee shiiU be taxed. And that this tigreement made between 
them maj- remain sure and stable, each of them in turn affixed his 
seal after the manner of a cyrograph. 

Witnesses — Sip. Eichard de Vernon, Matthew de Laxgesiion, 

Sir Richard de Herphull, Thomas de Langesdon, 
Richard Daniel de Tydeswell, and many others. 
WiLi lAJi DE Langesdon, 



* WfDUwyn, rrihce of Powis, obtained a grant uf the Manor of Ashford in 
1 king Johu (1109). 
t Attendance at. 



39^ Longstone Records. 

WRIGHT FAMILY. 



AMUSING LETTERS. 

Extrazts from Letters of the Rev. Peter Cunningham {Curate of 

Eyam) to the Rev. Thomas Seward, Prebendary of Lichfield (From 

Nichols' Illustrations of the Literary History of the Eighteenth 

Century.) 

Eyam, Dkc. 21, 1775. 

A few ii;ivs ago 1 was at Longsdon and received every possible 

mark i>f attention and affectionate respect that could possibly be 

paid to tlie man vou have delighted to honour. Master Wright 

was mv guide over the moors, and I am truly rejoiced to think that 

this voung gentleman, who bids fair to be a most amiable as well 

as a shining p.iember of societv, is likely in some future day to have 

it in his power, by the exercise of so fine a fortune, to give a free 

scooe to the exercise of the noblest virtues that adorn the man 

possessed of affluence and independence. I deem it not the least of 

mv felicities that my situation aflords me in some measure to testify 

my grateful sense of the numberless civilities and demonstrations of 

kindness I continue to receive from every member of Major Wright's 

familv, with whom 1 am particularlv acquainted. I have had dadv 

opportunities, since vour departure, to confirm the truth of vour 

observations, in Master Wright's genius and understanding. In the 

instructions that he has occasionallv received from me in the 

Latin and French languages, in history, composition, geographv, 

chronology, etc., I have been very agreeably surprised to find his 

comprehension, discernment, memory and abilities in general, much 

superior to his age and my sanguine expectations, and yftt I must 

do him the justice to say that I have the strongest reason to believe 

his heart is bv no means inferior to the goodness of his mind. 

I sliall extremely regret it, if such distinguished talents do not 

receive every possible and advantageous cultivation, the more 

especially as in this circumstance will depend much of the intrinsic 

lustre with which he will be enabled to distinguish himself in his 

future sphere of life. 




EYAM HALL. 




1^. 






EYAM HALL. 





EVAM HALL. 





EYAM HALL. 



"Master Wright." 393 

March 25, 1776. 
The Rev. Peter Cunningham speaks of an invitation he had 
received to go to Almondbury in Yorkshire — his previous Curacy, 
and goes on to say that " the Squire of Longston, by whom I have 
" been received Avith particular marks of respect and regard, expects 
" that I should accompany his grandson .... some part of 
" the season I have mentioned as I have no time to spare for other 
" excursions." Then he goes on to repeat the eulogv of his earlier 
letters on "Master Wright's" attainments, mentioning a Mrs. 
Trafford, apparently a married daughter of the Squire. He also 
adds — " The Major has been at great expense in altering and 
" decorating my salon a manger ; and now, in consequence of his 
"compliment, the prettiest room in Eyam. Nor has this been all : 
" I am indebted to the care Major Wright has taken to prepare a 
" very cordial reception for me at Hassop, for all the civilities and 
" politeness I have received from Mr. Evre." 



" Master Wright" of 1775 was the future Colonel John Thomas 
Wright, of Exeter and Lympstone, Co. Devon, and Longstone Hall, 
Co. Derby, eldest son and heir of Capt. Robert Wright, of Great 
Longstone. His grandfather, John Wright, of Eyam Hall and 
afterwards of Longstone Hall, was then occupying the 
latter, whilst his Uncle, Major John Wright (Aide-de-Camp to 
General Burgoyne, Commander of the British Forces in America) 
resided at Eyam. 

" Master Wright's" early education was at Eyam, and whilst there 
he lived with his Uncle, his Father being in the Army, and his 
grandfather resident at Longstone. Colonel J. T. W'right was a 
conspicuous figure in Devonshire. He was a Justice of the Peace, 
more than once Mayor of Exeter where he was instrumental in 
raising a Regiment of Volunteers of which he was Colonel — and 
which was afterwards enrolled of the Line. He and his eldest son, 
W. H. Wright of the 4th Light Dragoons — a Peninsular Officer 
with six clasps, each received the Freedom of the City of Exeter. 
Colonel J. T. Wright married Catherine Jane, the eldest daughter 
of Sir Stafford Northcote, of Pynes, Co. Devon, Bju-onet, by whom 
he had a large family. At this time Longstone Hall was rented by 
a Major Carleill. 



394 Longstone Records, 

MISCELLANEOUS. 



WRIGHT EXHIBITIONS. 

In connection with the Day Schools the following extract from 
the " High Peak Nhvvs" is of interest, as it gives the result of the 
examination and competition for the first Wright Exhibition : — 

"The first examination for an exhibition giving free education at 
Lady Manners' School, BaUewell, to a boy resident in Great 
Longstone, was held at the schoolroom on the 30th ulto. The 
papers were set by Mr. Caldecott, of Tideswell, and the examination 
was held in the presence of the Rev. G. Andrew (Vicar), and 
Mr. Wright, J. P., two of the Trustees of the Charity, of which a 
moiety of the income with some accumulations will in future be set 
apart, in accordance with a scheme of the Charity Commissioners, 
for the purposes of this exhibition. There were three candidates — 
strange to say, all members of the Church Choir. At the close of 
the examination, their papers, numerically marked, were sent 
anonymously to Mr. Caldecott for adjudication. His decision, 
given in detail, was in favour of the papers marked No. 2, which 
proved to be those of Jesse Nadin, and the Trustees have awarded 
the exhibition to Jesse Nadin accordingly. The good reputation of 
the Nadin family in Great Longstone is a guarantee that he will 
justify the award, as well as do credit to his native village. 
It is an interesting fact that the foundation of this educational 
charity (1656) is nearly coeval with that of Lady Manners' School ; 
from which it may be inferred that the need of education was 
greatly felt by our Derbyshire ancestry of that day. For nearly 
250 years this charity has been privately administered by the 
Wright family of Longstone and Eyam." 



LONGSTONE RECORDS. 



APPENDICES. 



These Appendices greatly enhance the value of 
the Work, inasmuch as they bring into it everything 
that has been written about Longstone by such 
Authors as Dr. Cox, Mr. J. B. Firth, Mr, Pym 
Yeatman, Messrs. Kelly & Co., &c., so that those 
readers who are unacquainted with or do not 
possess their Works, will find them quoted verbatim. 



BAKEWELL: 

B. ORATTON, PRINTER, STATIONER, ETC., MATLOCK STREET. 



APPENDIX A. 



From '■ Tlie C/uirc/tes of Derbyshire," \'o!. II, hv the Rev. J. Cliarles 
Cox, by ivhose kind permission this e.xtriict lias been made. — page 97. 



THE CHAPELKY OF LONCtSTONE. 



LoNGSTo.vE, usually termed Great Longstone, to distinguish 
it from the adjacent manor of Little Longstone, was one of the 
numerous ancient chapelries of Bakewell. The time when it was 
originally founded is not known, but we believe it to have been 
extant at the time when King John bestowed the church of 
Bakewell, with its chapelries, on the Dean and Chapter of 
Lichfield. When Archbishop Peckham made his metropolitan 
visitation in 1280, it was arranged that the stipend of the minister 
of Longstone should for the future be at least five marks, half 
being paid by the parishioners, and half by the Dean and Chapter.* 
But in 1315., a different arrangement was made, by which the 
Dean and Chapter were only to be called upon to supply six 
marks to the five chapelries of Baslow, Longstone, Taddington, 
Monyash, and Beeley. Of this sum fifteen shillings was set apart 
for the minister of Longstone. t 

In our description of the adjacent chapelry of Ashford, we gave 
particulars relative to the establishment of a chantry there by 
Griffin, son of Wenunwyn, and various details relative to the family 
of the founder, and their position in this county. Five years 
subsequent to the foundation of the Ashford chantry, viz,, in 1262, 
Griffin, founded a chantry in the chapel of St. Giles of Great 
Longstone, and endowed it with two bovates (or oxgangs) of land 
situate in that township, /or ever. But the same fate that attended 
the chantry at Ashford seems to have befallen this later endow- 

* Dugdale's MoiKittiron, vul. lii. ;>. jjj. el,-. 
t Add .MSS. m^jH 



98 



I.ONGSTOXK. 



nient, as no mention is made of any chantry property at Lon^stone 
in the roll compiled in the 37th year of Henry VIII.- 

It is, however, rather curious to note that land to the same 
amount as Griffin's endowment of the 13th century, was again 
bestowed upon this chapel four centuries later. In the 17th year 
of , lames I., the Earl of Devonshire gave two oxgangs of land at 
Great Longstone, and the common rights pertaining to the curate 
for the time being of that chapelry. The deed, in order to insure 
the attendance of the minister, provided that the curate, if he 
was absent on the Sabbatii day, and neglected to find an efficient 
substitute, should pay five shillings to the chapel wardens for 
the poor. ! 

The Parliamentary Commissioners of 1650, report of Great 
Longstone, that it " Is fitt to be made a parish church, and to have 
united to it Little Longstone, Hassop, Rowland, and Monsaldale. 
There is granted in' the Commissioners of plundered Ministers, an 
Augmentation of £43 12s. 8d. unto minister of Great Longstone, 
Mr. Robert Craven, an able honest man."' 

The ciun-cli, which is dedicated to St. Giles, consists of nave 
with side aisles, south porch, chancel with north vestry, and tower 
at the west end. There is no trace of Norman work in the 
present building, but there is considerable evidence of. there having 
been a church, of much the same dimensions as the present one, 
in the middle of the thirteenth century when the Early English 
style prevailed. To this period belong the single-light pointed 
windows in the east and north walls of the north aisle, the base- 
ment of the tower, the buttress with a single set-off to the left 
hand of the porch, and probably the pointeil doorway with the 
plain hood-mould within the porch. The church recently under- 
went a complete but most careful restoration, being re-opened in 
1873, and the stonework of the windows of the north aisle is now- 
new, but we were given to understand that they exactly follow the 
( old design. The church that was erected here in the thirteenth 

century was probably built by GrifHn, the foundei' of the chantry, in 
f\\ succession to a smaller one of Norman workmanship. 

But the next century, when the Decorated style prevailed, also 
witnessed a considerable alteration in this church. The six 
nariowpointed arches on each side of the nave dividing it fiom 

A.Iil MSS. rnpt^. t. 43 Harl. MSS. 479.^*. 
t .Sdd MS.S tit>7, r. 1. 
X Lambeth MSS. ; Parliaqientary Survey of Livings, vol. vi., f. 419. 



i.ONGSTONE. i;(; 

the side aisles, with their supporting pillars of octagon design, 
belong to the Decorated period, as well as the south porch, and the 
priests' door on the south side of the chancel. 

The chancel windows, however, are of the Perpendicular style of 
the fifteenth century. It is lighted on the south by two two-light 
square-headed windows, and one of the same design on the north 
side. The east window, which was new at the restoration, is of a 
five-light obtusely-pointed design, usualh' attributed to the reign of 
Henry VII. 

The most striking feature of this church — the fine old roofs of 
chancel, nave and aisles — must also be attributed to the Perpen- 
dicular period, and were probably erected at the same time when 
the chancel was rebuilt or restored. The roofs of the aisles are of 
the lean-to description, but of moderate slope, and those of the 
nave and chancel are of so low a pitch as to be nearly flat. 
These roofs have throughout been wrought with extreme care, all 
the purlins and rafters being well moulded, the cornices embattled, 
and the bosses at the intersection of the beams carved with well 
executed designs. The wall-pieces running down from the tie 
beams of the nave and chancel are supported by plain stone 
brackets. Many of the bosses are carved into the usual patterns 
of foliage and flowers, and others have armorial bearings, but 
there are one or two of eccentric design, the most remarkable of 
which is one towards the west end of the nave. It seems to 
represent a man stripped to the waist, holding up in his left hand a 
round cover, apparently taken from off the top of a tall churn-like 
tub on his right ; above is a strange figure, perhaps a devil, that 
looks as if it had escaped from the tub. Does this represent any 
i ncident in hagiology ? One or two suggestions have been offered 
to us, but we have failed to reconcile them with any known legend. 
The armorial bearings are, in the chancel, a frett, — a plain Greek 
cross, — on a chevron three annulets, — and arg., on a chevron, gii., 
between three bundles of rushes, vert, banded or, a mullet of the 
last (ShaUerley, the tinctures supplied); in the nave, two chevrons, 
— one chevron, — a frett, — on a chevron three annulets, — and 
arg., a fess embattled, counter-embattled, between three leopards' 
faces, sab., (Levett. the tinctures supplied) : and in the north aisle. 
a cross patee voided, — a bend, — a saltire, — and a chevron. 

It would be idle to attempt to assign most of these coats to any 
particular family, as they are not now coloured, and might belong 



loo 



I.ONCiSTdNF. 



to SO many different persons ; but the two eoats that we have 
identified, Shaiierley and Levett, help us to give the date of these 
roofs with more precision. The history of the descent of the 
manors of both Great and Little Longstone is somewhat involved, 
and it would be out of place to go into that subject at any length 
in these pages, but we know that Walter Blount, Lord Mountjoy, 
died seized of the manor of Little Longstone in 1474. '■■ Soon after 
that, probably, immediately on his death, this manor was purchased 
by Robert ShaUerley, of a yoLinger branch of the Cheshire family 
of that name. 

Robert Shakerley married .Margaret, daughter and heiress of 
Roger Levett. His son, Robert, married firstly, Anna, daughter 
of Thomas Balguy, and secondly, Alice daughter of Nicholas 
Bagshaw. By his first wife, he had with other issue, Thomas 
ShaUerley, of Little Longstone, who married Jane, daughter of 
Hugh Revel, of Higham ; and one of the children by the second 
wife, Grace,! became the wife of Francis, Lord Shrewsbury. On 
the death of Thomas Shakerley, his eldest son, Leonard, sold the 
manor, in the reign of Elizabeth, to the Countess of Shrewsbury. 
The ancient residence of the Shakerleys still exists, though in a 
rapidly decaying condition, to the south-west of the church of 
Great Longstone. 

At the time when these roofs were added, tine walls of the aisles 
were raised (as is now shown in the masonry), and also the walls of 
the clerestory; but the clerestory windows, five of two lights on each 
side, as well as the windows of the south aisle, are of much later 
date, being destitute of all tracery, and may probably be assigned to 
the seventeenth century. The tower also (though the basement 
stage, with its single-light west window, and possibly other parts of 
the masonry, are of early English date), shows, by the square- 
headed belfry opening, and by the battlements and pinnacles, that 
it has been considerably interfered with in the days of debased 
architecture. The west belfry window is a modern insertion. 

The tower now contains five modern bells, the gift of G. T. 
Wright, Esq. The three which were here before the recent resto- 
ration are thus ineribed : — 

I. "EUiss Dickens, Geo. Flint, Chappell Wardens, 1763. Thomas 
Hedderley, Founder." 

' !iu]. po?.t. Mort. 14 Kiiw.ird 1\'.. No. 24. 

t Uiirl. MSS. 38)9, f. 17. Possibly it was Itubert Slmkcrley the yuuiiKr. wIki b<iii[ilit the iiianur, Init, if 
su, bis lather, who iiiarrie.l tlie heiress uf Levett, must have liclj it uiuler tlie Uluuiits, as be is described 
in the pedigree as " de Luiig^t,m parva." 



I.ONGSTONE. lOI 

II. "God save His Church, 1658," and the bell mark of George 
Oldfield." 

III. '* Al glory bee to God on high," and the bell mark of George 
Oldfield." 

Of details of interest in the interior of the church may be re- 
marked, the small piscina in a pointed niche in the south wall of 
the chancel, an almery on the opposite side, and the remains of 
the upper part of another small piscina niche at the east end of 
the south aisle. The font is of a good octagon design, with four 
uncharged shields on the alternate panels. 

There is no ancient coloured glass left in this church ; but the 
east window, which is now filled with a beautiful modern design to 
the Wright family, formerly served as a memorial window (see foot 
note) to the first of the Eyres who resided at Hassop. According 
to the Visitation of 1611 there were two shields of arms in this 
window — Eyre and Eyre impaling Everingham {sab., a chevron 
between three estoiles, (i>'g-) — and at the base the following 
inscription : — " Orate pro bono statu Stephi Eyre et Katherin;e 
uxoris ejus."* Stephen Eyre of Hassop was the eleventh son of 
Robert Eyre and Joan Padley ; he married Katherine Dymoke, 
of Kyme, Lincolnshire, and died in 1488. Their eldest son, 
Rowland, married a daughter of Henry Everingham, of Stain- 
borough, Yorks ; and Rowland's eldest son, Stephen, married for 
his second wife the heiress of Blackwall of Shirley. Stephen, in 
his turn, was succeeded by a second Rowland, who mai-ried 
Gertrude, daughter and co-heiress of Humphrey Stafford, of Eyam.i 

The east end of the south aisle is shut off by an old oak screen 
so as to form a family pew. It has a finely-carved cornice, and 
on the north side has the arms of Eyre impaling Stafford {or, a 
chevron gii., between three martlets, sab.), and over the door which 
forms the west entrance to the screen is the well-known crest of 
the Eyre family — an armed leg. Within this screen, against the 
wall, is a finely-engraved plate of coppei- fastened to a slab of black 
marble. On it are represented the figures of a man and woman 
kneeling face to face at desks. Between them there has been a 
large crucifix, but that has been carefully obliterated, though the 
skull and cross-bones at its base remain. The man is represented 
with a pointed moustache and beard, and wears a long robe with 

• Marl. MSS. k)*j3 f. 72. Tlie same occurs in Marl. MSS. 148b. f. 31 the only ilistinctu.n beiiif; that ttic 
Kyre shields a crescent for differemT and in Marl, MSS. _58t)9. f. 33. 

t Tlie other co-heiresses of lluniplirey Stafloril married Sav.ige of Castlelon, Ilrailsliaw and.Morewocd. 

N'.B. There was no trace of a Memori.-il Window at tl'e Restoration of 1R72 »hcn Mr. Norman ^■haw 
designed the present one. Kd. I..K. See aho page 4, L.I?. 



T02 lONOSTONr. 

lace ruffles at the wrists. In his hands, that rest on the desk, is a 
rosary. The woman has a ruff round her neck, and a long falling 
veil from the back of the head ; she also holds a rosary. They 
are supposed to be kneeling in a chapel, and there is a pointed 
Gothic window on each side. The intervention of the Renaissance 
style is to be found in the two cherubs floating in clouds over their 
heads, each bearing a crown or chaplet, from the front of which 
rises a cross. Below the figures is a shield with the Eyre crest on 
a helmet, and below this again is a long inscription in Roman 
capitals. The latter part of the last line of this epitaph has been 
scratched out. There can be no doubt that it contained a prayer 
for the souls of Rowland and Gertrude, and that it was obliterated 
at the same time as the crucifix, through Protestant zeal. The 
Eyres of Hassop, as well as most of the other branches of the 
wide-spreading family of Eyre, appear to have always remained 
true to the ancient Catholic faith. It is rather singular that a 
monument of so essentially a Catholic description should have been 
admitted in post-Reformation days. Perhaps the great influence 
of the Eyres as large local landholders secured the requisite per- 
mission, and the monument was probably not defaced till the days 
of the Commonwealth. 

The following is the inscription : — 

" HtTclvetti Rowland Eyre of I lassope Ksq., .ind Gartrede liii> wide, one of ttie daugfiters and colieire%se 
of Humphrey Stafforc! of tyine Esq., by whoe hee had twelve children, eight sonnes and fower daughters 
who hathe given unto the Cliappel of Cireatc Longsdcn for the maintenance of Divine Service there XKs 
yerely, and to the cliappel of Baslowe for the maintenance of Divine SerA'ice there xls yerely, to be paid 
by equall portions at the feasts of the .Annuntiation of the Blessed Virgin S. Marie and St. Micliaell ye 
archangel, and also hath given unto the poore of ttie towne of Create Longsden xxs yerely and to poore 
of llassopc and Rowland xxs yerely, and to the poore of Calver xxs yerely to be paied three days before 
Christmas and three days before Easter for ever. .Ml which said several sumes are to bee paied by 
1 homas Eyre, his Sonne and heire apparent, and his heiress for ever. To whom I have given all my 
landes and rents in Tadington and Create Longsdon for ever for ye true payment and patfomiance of 
ye same. 
See leavinge the miseries and troubles of thi-. world with desire tliat all may cease. 1 desire that all good 

Christians that read this will pray 

".\nno Doni., 1624." 

Of the twelve children mentioned on this monument we are able, 
after comparing numerous pedigrees, to give the names of ten ; the 
other two probably died in their infancy. Thomas Eyre the eldest 
son, married Prudence, daughter of Nicholas Blackwell, of Ridware, 
Stafl^ordshire ; (2) Gervase, of Horsley Gate, died 1619, s.p., and 
is buried at Dronfield ; (3) Adam, of Bradway, married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Thomas Barley, died 1634, and is buried at Norton ; 



I.ONGSTONE. 103 

(4) Robert who died young; (5) Rowland, who married Hester 
Hackett, of London ; (6) Roger, of Rowtor, who married .... 
GosHng, of Attercliff; (7) George, of Holdworth, near Bradfield, 
who married .... Bright, and had two daughters ; (8) Peter 
who died young. Of the four daughters we can only ascertain the 
names of two — Jane, who was married to Christopher Pegge, of 
Yeldersley ; and Frances, who died a spinster.* 

When this church was visited by the Rev. R. R. Rawlings, in 
1827, this copper plate was "in a wooden frame against a pillar 
between the nave and north aisle." Of the interior fittings of the 
church, which have now been removed, he says: — "The pews are 
irregular, of oak, and very olu. Against the walls are the achieve- 
ments of Eyre of Hassop, and Wright of Longstone. On the 
pulpit and reading desk, with a large family seat, and on some of 
the pews are ancient carvings." He also gives the following as the 
dimensions of the area of the church : — Chancel, 26 feet by 14 ; 
nave, 56 feet by 18; north aisle, 56 feet by 6 feet 3 inches; and 
south aisle, 56 feet by 7. 

Within the porch, against the east wall, is affixed a narrow 
oblong stone, on which is incised — " A. H. 1079." Lest, however, 
this should deceive anyone as to the date of the church, it may 
be remarked that the character of both letters and figures prove 
that the inscription is many centuries later than the date it purports 
to give. It should read 1679, the upper part of the 6 having been 
worn away, and has originally served as a foot-stone to a grave, of 
which there are other similar samples <jf the same century in the 
churchyard. 

Against the west wall of the vestry, which was added to the 
church at the recent restoration, is built in an effectively carved 
Latin cross, about 30 inches by 24, which is supposed to have 
formerly served as the gable-cross on the chancel. There used also 
to be a cote for a sanctus bell on the east gable of the nave. 

To the south of the chancel is the old churchyard cross. On 
a pediment of three square steps rests a large base stone, from 
which rises the tapering octagonal shaft six feet high. It is 
perfect with the exception of the head, which probably disappeared 
at the Reformation. 

• Karl. MSS. 1537, f. b : 5104, f. 84 ; I48t>, f. 53 ; Egerton MSS. 996, f. 31 ; an<l Dugdale's \'isitation, 
1662-3 ; etc.. etc. For furtliT partit-ulars relalivp to tlif Eyre family, see tlir accounl-. of thf churches of 
Mathersage and Hope. 



I04 



I.ONGSTONE. 



\ 



Mr. Sleigh gave a short account of the registers of Great 
Longstone in an early volume of the Reliquary:''' He describes 
them as being in good preservation with the exception of one or two 
pages rendered illegible by damp. There are not many entries o* 
interest. A memorandum states "that Griffin Higgs, Doctor of 
Divinity and Deane of the Cathedral! Church of Litchfield, in his 
Primarie and Triennial Visitation, celebrated in the Jurisdiction of 
Bakewell, the xiii and xv of Oct., 1639, did Injoyne the Church- 
wardens, John Andrew, and Richard White to Repayre the Church 
house, in all and every place where it was one wliit ruinated ; And 
it was executed and donne hy Thomas Williamson and Henry 
Mellor, the next Churchwardens, and was certefyed to the Dean 
and Chapter succeeding that it was done, by me Robert Craven, 
Curate, and AVilHam Wright, Gentleman, and others." 

After this follows a doleful ditty from the pen of an evidently 
illused Clerk : — 

" Remember well and Bear in mind 
What you liave here to doo 
By never payinf; to ye Clerk 
What unto him was due, 
Your Congsliance it will you jmrsue 
And trouble niurh your mind. 
There is a day will Quickly come 
All hidden things will find, 
Yet you are not still satisfied 
But more you will transgress, 
By wronging of ye widdow, allso ye fatherless. 
The things which 1 before have set — 
It is most certain true- - 
Before it hath been worse for us 
t lereafter worse for you ! " 

W^e may find place for the three following entries: — 

'* 1651, July 9. Robertus Craven, minist"^ de Longsdon et Eliza- 
betha Winscombe de eadem nupti fuerunt. 

'* 1656, Feb. II. Rowland, ye sonne of Thos. Eyre esquire of 
Hassope, was buried in templo.1 

" 1680, Augt. 9. iMr. Richard Spencer, minister of this Towne, 
was buried." 

• Seliquary, vol. ii, 155. 

t Thomas Eyre, mentioned on his father's monument, died in if»37. Rowland, his eldest son, 
obtained great celebrity by raising a regiment of foot for Charles. 1., whicli he commanded in [lersfin and 
maintained at his own cost. When F'arlianient triumphed this gallant cavalier had to pav the then 
enormous sum of jfii.ooo, as conipositi»m for his estates. But this Rowland lost his life at the sipgr of 
Scwark Castle in 164^. and the one whose burial is here recorded was a younger brother of the same 
uame. 



APPENDIX B. 



From "Highways <&° Byn'ays in Devbysiiire" bv J. B. Firth, Esq., by 
whose kind permission f/iis exfnici /ins been made. — page ^14. 



A ROADSIDE AVENUE. 

From Baslow it is a pleasant afternoon's ramble to visit the 
familiar landmark of Longstone Edge, which stretches across 
from the Wye, near Cresshrook Dale, to the Derwent at 
Calver, some five miles in length and rising to nearlv thirteen 
hundred feet at its highest point. It has no outstanding 

feature, no masses of picturesque stone on the skvlwie ; 
Longstone Edge is set simply, vet with imposing dignity, as the 
northern boundary of the valley which is at its broadest towards 
Ashford, and narrows towards Longstone and Hassop. We cross 
the Derwent at Baslow Bridge and turn to the right along the road 
that leads past the weir. In a few hundred vards we come to 
Bubnell Grange, an old twin-gahled house of the ordinarv Derbv- 
shire pattern, and then, on the left hand, reach a retired dough or 
coomb, more like a fold in the Susse.x Downs, which bears the 
name of Bramwell Dale from the farm house lying ahead of us. 
The further slope and crest of its neat pastures are covered with a 
delightful wood, that fits like a saddle to its side. Through this 
wood runs a lane, over which the trees interlace their branches 
and afford cool shade even in the hottest of summer suns, ere it 
emerges into another narrow vallev, with Calver a short mile away 
on the right, and Froggatt Edge high above it on the other side of 
Derwent. Across this vallev rises Longstone Edge, and the old road 
from Bakewell to Sheffield, through Hassop, Calver and Grindleford 



V5 



AN OLD MII.KSTONE. 



Bridge, runs at its foot, lined on either side by trees which form 
an exquisite avenue. 1 could find no one who knew when or hy 
whom these trees were planted. Yet the man who had the thought 
and the will to set such gracious trees to transform a hare 
road into a thing of beauty deserves the kindliest remembrance. 
Nowadays trees are rarelv planted — they are not utilitarian ; they 
have a trick of throwing dow n the stone walls with their roots. 
But the difference ! 

Let us cross the road to a gate opposite and mount upwards along 
a rough cart track, first by the side of a plantation, then out in the 
open again, keeping throughout by the wall side. Soon we begin 
to get a noble view, which gives us the valleys of Wye and Derwent 
together, and enables us to combine in the same fair landscape both 
Hakcwell and Chatsworth, the top of whose great conservatory 
glows and glances like a mirror. Yonder is the spire of Edensor 
and the village of Filsley, which looks so important and obvious 
as soon as one gets up among the hills, but hides itself S(.) effectively 
when one is down in the plain. On the right we have Bakewell 
and its spire, and below us the dark green woods of Hassop. Our 
way lies towards the clump of trees on the summit, but before we 
reach it we turn through a gate on the left hand along a wider 
track. One of the stone posts of this gate is an old road stone. 
Tidswall Road is the legend on one side, with the date 1737 below 
it ; aiu! on the other three sides are to be read Sheffield I-{oad, 
Chesterfield koad, and Ashbourne Road. It has suffered much 
ill-usage. The iron catch for the gate has been driven ruthlessly 
into it ; it has been roughly gashed on the top, and alien letters 
have been deeply incised — capital letters designed to serve as parish 
boundary marks. It is a pity, for these stones can never be re- 
placed. What would not antiquaries give for a complete set of 
milestones from one of the Roman roads? As it is, only one or 
two survive in fragments. But on many English high roads even 
the milestones of the coaching days have vanished in recent years, 
for no reason save that of wanton destruction. If the authorities 
must put up their iron monstrosities, they might at least leave 
the ancient stones to the slow process of senile decay. This stone 
is not in f.itii, for there never was a main road over this hillside, 
and the mention of distant Ashbourne is also curious, unless it be 
that in 1737 .\shbourne was a sort of synonym in North Derbyshire 
for London and the south. Possibly it originally stood at the 



I.ONGSTOM- EDGE. 



3i« 



cross roads at Calver or Barbrook Mill, and the Ashbourne 
direction was taken to include the direction to Bakewell. 

Below the clump rtf trees, where the path bejjins to dip, turn 
up the hillside again bv a cart track, leading past a disused lime- 
kiln, towards Bleaklow Farm — the only human habitation on the 
edge. At the back of the farm a track winds among the unsightly 
heaps of tailings from the disused lead mines which coyer the entire 
face of this rising ground. Here 1 fell in with an old man, busy 
repairing a stone wall, who told me that he was one of the last 
suryivors of the lead miners in the district. Eighteen shillings a 
week, he said, had been the most he had eyer earned in a lead 
mine — three shillings a day was the regular wage, and the men 
worked in shifts of eight hours each. That was at the Lady Wash 
mine aboye Eyam, where expensi\e machinery had been put down, 
and this was among the last to relinquish the struggle against the in- 
flux of cheap Spanish ore. The chimney towards which he pointed 
across the yalley is still a prominent lanilniark for miles around. 
He considered eighteen shillings a week a good wage, though he 
had earned as much as forty-fiye in a colliery, and he regretted 
the extinction of Derbyshire's staple industry. For extinct it 

practically is, except for the one great mine in Darley Dale and 
yer\' few others, and no man now brings up his son to be a lead- 
miner. As for the limestone tailings which litter the ground, it 
only remains for them to be carted away and shipped to America 
and elsewhere, to be used in the process of the mysterious manu- 
facture which is keeping so many horses and carts and eyen motor 
■wagons busy on the roads to the Derbyshire railway stations with 
their loads of what once was useless \yaste. 

As you thread your way through the mounds look out for a 
little cairn of stones — in a field on your right hand — which marks 
the highest point hereabouts. The yiew it affords is totally 
different from that which we haye had towards the south. Here 
we look oyer an undulating plateau, covered with heather and 
gorse but quite without trees and shade, save the woods above 
Eyam, and one or two little oases of dark green which mark the 
hamlets of Foolow and Wardlow. We look, indeed, straight across 
Middleton Dale to Evam Edge and Hucklow Edge. The white- 
washed house standing almost solitary midway along the ridge is 
the tiny alehouse at Bretton. Tideswell we cannot see, it is hidden 
in its hollow to the left ; but on the right the church tower of 



■,lj GREAT I.ONGSTONK. 

Evam is visilile ami the deep cleft of Stony Midtileton. It is a 
thoroughly Derbyshire prospect, which makes us appreciate the more 
the softer scene which dischises itself as wc? resume our way and 
find the edge dipping before us, when again we face towards the 
south. Here we command the Longstone valley, with Great 
LoTigstone in the centre and Little Longstone and Headstones 
Head a mile to the right. Just beyond Headstones Head, where 
we can see the cleft which we know to mark the course of the Wye, 
Fin Cop rises out of the plain, more like a promontory of the sea 
than an inland hill. For it ascends field by field in the regular 
smooth ascent of an inclined plane and then suddenly breaks short 
in curving outline at the edge. .\Ionsal Dale lies below that 
graceful bend. 

We join a road which has come over the moor from Wardlow 
and Foolow. For half-a-mile this runs along the side of the edge, 
gently dropping all the way, and giving us the continued pleasure 
of a noble view. Then it suddenly turns at right angles and 
tumbles headlong down to (ireat Longstone. 

This is a straggling place, of no particular distinction, whose 
chief attraction is a row of magnificent elms reaching from the 
corner of the village green to the gates of Longstone Hall, where 
thev join a short avenue of approach to the fine red brick house, 
covered with ivv and creepers. The Hall, which is about a century 
and a half old, was built to take the place of an older house 
which, save that it was rather larger, was a replica of Eyam Hall. 
Indeed, both houses belonged to the Wrights of Longstone, one of 
the oldest of Derbyshire families, who, as the Court Rolls of the 
Manor of .\shford testify, were resident in the district as far back 
as the tenth century, and were probably the parent stock of the 
many well-known branches of the Wrights which ha^e obtained 
distinction in the Midland counties. They have their memorials 
in the church close by, and if other tablets show that Longstone 
Hall was associated for a time with alien names, that is because 
for half a century the Wrights migrated to Devfinshire and the 
Hall was let. They returned in 1870 to their ancient hearth. 

Longstone Church, which lies close to the Hall, was restored 
thirty years ago with a praiseworthy determination to retain all that 
was worth retention. So the old oak beams of the roof in the 
nave and aisles have been suffered to remain as thev were, and 
have not been improved away. In the nave is a tablet to the 



THE GOOD DOCTOR. -J18 

memory of Dr. Ldward Buxton, who died in 1822 at the age of 
seventy-five. He had been in practice in Bakewell hut had retired 
to Longstone. Then in 1820 " a long and epidemical contagion" 
broke out. The old Doctor did not sit at home with folded hands. 
He girded on his harness once more, and put himself and his 
talents at the service of the suffering without asking a fee. Let 
me quote from the tablet. " His professional abilities, ever readv 
to assist the poor and the needy, showed particularly conspicuous 
during a long epidemical contagion which in the year 1820 afflicted 
this village, when his gratuitously administering relief to soothe 
and subdue the existing woe stronglv testified his goodness of 
heart." The contagion in question was tvphus fever, which visited 
every house in Great Longstone except the bootmaker's ne.xt to the 
present Post Office. Not a single person died in the village itself, 
though there were two deaths up at Bleaklow Farm on the edge, 
where one would have thought the air too pure for the tvphus 
germs to exist. Dr. Buxton's remedy was a curious one, for he 
prescribed not physic but " wort " — that is to sav, new beer before 
the processes of fermentation are complete — and to obtain this in 
sufficient quantities beer was brewed every day at the Church Lane 
Farm, then occupied by a Mr. Gregory. In 1904 there was still 
living in Great Longstone a nonagenarian survivor o{ the 
" epidemical contagion" of 1820, active and well enough to live by 
herself and tend to her own wants. 

At the east end of the south aisle is a black oak parclose con- 
taining several memorials bearing the names of the Eyres of Hassop. 
The best is a fine brass, dated 1624, showing Rowland Evre and 
Gartrede, his wife, kneeling in prayer at two separate desks. The 
parclose has two doors with wooden locks, and the carvinsj shows 
the familiar leg and spur of the Eyre crest. According to the story, 
an ancestor of the Eyres fought by the side of William the 
Conqueror at Hastings and opened the visor of the Norman's helmet 
at an opportune moment, when he was gasping for breath. The 
Duke asked him his name and was told that it was " Truelove," 
to which he made reply, "Truelove thou hast shown me, but hence- 
forth thy name shall be E\re, for thou hast given me air." Later 
in the day on inquiring for his new friend he found that he had 
lost a leg, and promptly gave him the missing limb for his crest 
with the promise of many manors. It sounds a more than usuallv 
sillv stor\-, but It seems to possess the sanction of great antiquity. 



319 



THE EVRES OF HASSOP. 



The Evres, whose memiirials adorn Longstone Church, dwelt at 
the neighhouring hall of Hassop, set in a charming park along the 
road from Longstone to Baslow. This Hassop estate belonged 
originally to the Foljamhes — whom we met at Tideswell — was 
then carried by marriage into the Plumpton family, and sold in 
1498 to Catherine, widow of Stephen Eyre of Hassop, a younger 
son of the Eyres of Padlev. It remained in the possession of the 
Evres down to the death of the Countess of Newburgh — a Countess 
stio jure — in 1853. Much romance and mystery attach to the 
Karldom of Newburgh, and much litigation has arisen out of the 
Hassop estate. It would require a yolume to tell the story in full ; 
here we will be content with a few of the salient points. The 
actual connection between Hassop and the Earldom of Newburgh 
did not begin until 1814, when Mr. Francis Eyre of Hassop assumed 
the title as the sixth Earl of Newburgh, through his mother, Lady 
Mary Kadclyffe. She was the younger daughter of the third 
Countess (siio jure) who had married en secondes iioces Charles 
Radclvffe, second son of an Earl of Derwentwater. Ardent 
Jacobites, both father and son fought at the battle of Preston in 
1715 and were taken prisoners. The father was executed, the son 
managed to escape to the Continent, where in 1731, on the death 
of his nephew, he assumed the title, though it had been declared 
attainted. In 1745 he was caught in a ship off D<iyer while bound 
for Scotland — eyidently to join Prince Charlie — and was executed 
in the Tower in 1746 on the death sentence \yhich had been passed 
upon him in absence thirty years before. His son, the fourth Earl, 
saw all his estates confiscated in fayour of Greenwich Hospital and 
the fifth Earl died without heir in 18 14. 

The Earldom of Newburgh reyerted, therefore, to the descendants 
of Lady Ann Clifford, daughter of the third Countess by her first 
marriage. She was indisputably represented by an Italian, Prince 
Giustiniani, who, being an alien, could not assume the title. Con- 
sequently, it was taken for granted that the succession deyolved 
upon the representatiyes of the daughter of the third Countess by 
her second marriage, that is to say, upon the own sister of the fourth 
Earl. This was Lady Mary Kadclyffe, who had married Francis 
Eyre of Hassop, and their son succeeded to the title and estates, 
without challenge. He styled himself the sixth Earl and was 
succeeded by his son, the seyenth Earl, who died s.p. in 1833. 
The eighth Earl, his younger brother, succeeded and died unmarried 



MISSING REGISTERS. ^20 

in 1852, and his sister then became Countess in her own right. 
She had married, in 1836, Colonel Charles Leslie, and died 
childless in 1S53. This Colonel Leslie was an old Peninsular 
veteran, who carried to his grave a huUet in the leg which he got 
at the Battle of Alhuera, and inherited under his wife's will 
the whole of the Hassop estates, which are still in the possession of 
the familv. To the earldom, of course, he had no claim whatever. 
The will was made bv the Countess when she was on her deathbed, 
\vhen, in fact, she was almost moribund. A mounted messenger 
had been sent off in hot haste in the earlv hours of the morning to 
fetch the doctor from Baslow, and the Countess was sinking when 
he arrived. When thev told him that a solicitor was on the way 
down from London to make the will, he warned them that, if thev 
waited, the Countess would probablv be dead before he came. 
So the will was hurriedlv drawn up — leaving the estate to her 
husband, with special remainder to her stepson and his second son 
— and the dving Countess had but just sufficient strength to sign. 
It was a verv close thing for Colonel Leslie ! 

The principal claimant tf) the Earldom of Xewburgh was a 
Mr. Cadman, of Sheffield, who declared that he was descended from 
the Hon. Charlotte Radclvffe and a certain George Goodwin, whom 
she married at Hope in 1747. But the registers at Hope have been 
niLitilated, and the pages containing the entries between September 
1745 and .\ugust 1748 are missing. These registers, at the 
beginning of the nineteenth centurv, were in the custody of a 
parish clerk, who kept a public house, and was always ready to 
produce them for the inspection of any inquisitive stranger. It is 
practically certain that the registers were not tampered with until 
the line of the N'ewburghs looked like failing, and it is more than 
a curious coincidence that there are niutilatii>ns in the registers at 
Loimstone, Hathersage, Eastwell, Banburv, \\ irksworth, and 
Lichfield covering the years in which it is known that there were 
entries relating to the E\res! Consequently, strong suspicions were 
current in Derbyshire half a centur\- ago that someone had not 
been playing the game. 

A second claimant — this time to the Hassop estates, not to the 
earldom — was Mr. Gladwin Cloxes Cave, w lio, in the earU 'eighties, 
came over from Australia and flustered quiet little Hassop by taking 
forcible possession of the Hall. He claimed that the will made by 
Dorothy Leslie, nee Eyre, in 1853 was invalid, because her brother, 



3-' 



UNSltCESSFlI, CLAIMANTS. 



the fiylitli Karl nf Ncwhurj^h wlimn she had succeeded, had settled 
the estates in favour of his mother's sisters, nees Gladwin, from 
whom Mr. Cave was descended. But this deed of settlement was 
nc\er forthcoming, and judgment in the Courts went against the 
claimant, who was by special injunction restrained from further 
trespass on the Hassop estates. It has also been held that the 
assumption of the Plarldom of Newburgh by Thomas Eyre and 
I'Vancis Evre between 1827 and 1852 was entirely without warrant. 
In 1857 Maria Bandini Giustiniani was naturalised in Great Britain, 
and her claim to be Countess of Newburgh was allowed in 1858. 
At her death in 1877 she was succeeded by her son as eighth Earl, 
who was created Prince Giustiniani by Pio Nono. 

We have spoken of the unfortunate Earls of Derwentwater who 
suffered in the Stuart cause ; part of the red baize from the scaffold 
of the second Earl Is still preserved at Hassop Hall, and faded 
crimson stains tell of the purpose for which it served. Not only the 
Radclvffes but also the Evres were staunch for the Stuarts. The 
latter were up to the eves in the rebellion of the '45, and a century 
before in the Civil War Hassop Hall had been garrisoned for the 
King. Its owner. Colonel Thomas Eyre, raised a troop in 1642, 
fought in hand-to-hand encounter with Cromwell at Edgehill, 
distinguished himself at Welbeck and the siege of Newark, and, 
after Naseby, was taken prisoner near Derby and thrown into 
Derby gaol, where he died in 1645 of wounds and neglect. 



APPENDIX C. 




THE SEAT OF GEORGE THO.MAS WRIGHT, ESQ., J. P. 
OF GREAT I^ONGSTON. 






■<< 



»q 










•^^ 




|?i f rfr til 






- ^-1 









^.-<i^ 
^^1 



^39 



APPENDIX C. 



By the kind permission of Mr. Pym Yeafman, the Ed. L. R. has, at the 
risk of repetition, appended the whole Chapter (No. XX, Section VIII of the 
Feudal History of Derbyshire) on Ashford in the Water, rather than 
attempt to make extracts — as it contains so much matter of value and 
interest to Longstone and the other tovinships concerned.. The paging is 
that of the F. H. D. The Ed. L. R. is of course -not responsible for mistakes. 



ASHFORD IN THE WATER. 

From Domesday we learn that Ashford (Aisseford) was of the 
King's demesne, and had the following Berewites — Ralunt, Langes- 
dune, Hedeshope, Calvoure, Bassilau, Bubenelli, Berceles, Scalhadun, 
Tadington, Flagun, Prestclive and Blackeuelle. King Edward had 
therein 22 car or land hidable and one car not hidahle. King 
William had then in demesne there four ploughs and 18 villeins, who 
had five ploughs and land for 22 ploughs, one mill worth 12 pence, 
and the site of one mill and one lead work, and 40 acres of meadow, 
wood, not pasturable, two miles in length and two miles in breadth. 

The history of this place, which is now generally termed Ashford 
in the Water, is involved in much obscurity, because with other 
Manors, if not the whole of the Wapentake of Peak, it was at the 
time of Domesday, a- part of the King's ancient demesne, and the 
King himself had no right to wrest it from the Crown. Ashford 
was, probably, the caput of the hundred, because, as vfe. learn from 
Domesday, the Crown, both then and in the time of Edward, held it 
in demesne, and here, probably, was the Royal residence when the 
King hunted in the forest. 

A 



i^O ASHIOUI) IN THK WAThk. 

D,)mesJav itself gives but a poor account of the Peak. It is still 
given as part of the ancient demesne, but William Peveril is said to 
have held parts of it " for the King." It is not even stated directly 
that he so held Peak Castle, but it may be so inferred, because two 
tenants are recorded to have held the land of the Castle of Peak, of 
William Peveril, so that, practically, he must have been lord of it. 
Several other tenants are mentioned whose names indicate that they 
were English or, perhaps, British, and who were probably kinsmen 
of King Griffith, whose relation, William Peveril — certainly not of 
Norman blood — held other portions of it. 

William Peveril may have been under age at the time, so that he 
could not legally be in possession, but this is unlikely looking at his 
Nottinghamshire, and even at his Scarsdale holdings ; the probability 
is that the King's judges in their Domesday assize, did not know how 
to deal with this infraction of the national rights, and so returned it 
in this unsatisfactory manner. 

A tenant of the King's demesne was a mere farmer, who was not 
possessed of lordlv rights ; but this was not the position of William 
Peveril, for we find him dealing with these Manors, and with the 
churches upon them, in his foundation of Lenton Priorv, as if he 
were, in truth, the sovereign lord ; and this occurred within 20 years 
of the completion of Domesday. It is said, indeed, that Henry the 
1st gave him another grant of these Manors, and this w'ould be the 
legal course to pursue, as the King's farms, granted out of his 
demesne, expired with him, and it was then open to his successor to 
make a fresh grant if he pleased. The historv of Ashford, therefore, 
is of importance to show that the King governed by the ancient law 
of the land, and did not promulgate new laws ; that he, in fact, 
broke those laws to suit his convenience is clear ; but his judges 
endeavoured to uphold them, and this was much to their honour 
when dealing with this great tiyTant. 

That King Henrv 1. swept awa\ \\ illiam Peveril's descendant 
towards the close of his reign, and formally forfeited his possessions 
again, proves that the Conqueror had actually wrested them from 
the Crown demesnes, and granted them as an inheritable fief to 
William Peveril and his heirs. His successor. King Henrv II, whilst 
in exile, again granted them in fee to another subject, the Earl of 
Chester. This Charter, at page 229 of the present Vol., is erroneously 



ASHIOKl) IN THK WATKU. 24I 

cited as of the reign of Henrv I. ; it was probably made by both 
these Kings, the Earl did not, howeyer, appear to have obtained them. 
Henrv II. appears to have kept the Honour of Peveril, as it was 
called, in hand, as an escheat, and not as demesne lands, and so did 
Richard the First, and both monarchs retained the Castle of Peak 
for themselves, and practically the lordship of the Wapentake, 
though they from time to time granted portions of it to several 
persons, and sometimes farmed it out. On the forfeiture of the last 
William Peveril, his title and estates should have fallen to the Earl 
of Derby, Robert Ferrars, but he was also in disgrace the greater 
part of the reigns of Henry I. and II., and although he assumed 
the title of the Earl of Nottingham, no doubt given to him by 
King Stephen, there appears to be no proof that it was ever legally 
recognised by King Henry II., and the pipe Rolls of both Henry II. 
and Richard show clearly that the Peveril estates were kept in the 
royal hands as an escheat. This especially appears to be the case 
in Henrv II. 's Domesday, called the Red Book of the Exchequer, 
although the Earl de P'errars, as he was then called, yvas commanded 
bv the King to make a return of the knight's fees held under him 
in the time or Henry I, and then so held, he made no pretence 
of returning any Peveril's fees. 

The first notice that we have that any Earl de Ferrars held the 
Honour of William Peveril occurs in the Testa de Nevil, in the 
Feodary of the second year of King Henry III, where it is stated 
that " The Castle of High Peak is an escheat of the Honour of 
Peveril, and the Earl of Ferrars holds it, with the whole of the 
Forest, so that the servants of the Forest are answerable to the Earl 
himself, as they were before responsible to the King " (page 408, 
Vol. I., Section II.); and it proceeds, "The Church of the High 
Peak is in the gift of the King, and William de Furnel had it of the 
gift of King John ; the Vill of Bakewell is in the gift of the King, 
and Ralf Gernon had it of the gift of King Richard. The Earl 
of Ferrars had the Manor of Worksop of the gift of King John, 
for which he paid £124 rent." 

It is to be observed that no rent is charged to the Earl for the 
Castle and Forest, but it is stated that he held it as the King had 
held it. Now the Pipe Rolls for the whole of the reign of King 
John do not show that the Earl ever fined for this Honour or paid 



2.^2 ASHFOHl) IN THK WATKR. 

any rent for it, Init tlicv do show (as do the Pipe Rolls for the 
reijjn of Henrv 111.) that the tenants of the Honour of Peveril still 
remained answerahle to the King, and not to the Earl. The 
explanation would seem to be that the shadowy rights of the Welsh 
Princes were respected, and although thev periodically revolted, 
and fought with and against the King, vet their estates were not 
treated as escheats until Henrv III. gave them to his daughter-in 
law, not as an escheat of the Princes of Powis, but as that of 
William Peveril. 

There is no evidence that the Earl of Ferrars exercised anv 
rights as lord of .\shford. 

There is an entry in the 17th vear of King Henrv II. that the 
Earl F"errars owed £50 for his relief for having married one of the 
co-heiresses of the Earl of Chester. If the grant of King Henrv 
to Ranulf, Earl of Chester, which during the reign of Stephen was 
alternatelv confirmed h\ hcjth himself and Henrv II., had taken 
effect, this would have given Earl Ferrars a legal right to the enjoy- 
ment of Peveril's Honour ; but it would seem that Stephen's con- 
firmation of it had had no effect, and that his revolution had swept 
away the Earl of Chester's rights, and certainlv thev were never 
afterwards recognised bv Henrv 11. 

In the Survey of the Honour of Peveril of the 34th Henrv III. 
given by the Rev. Charles Kerry, it appears that Richard de Ashford 
held the Manor for £30 per annum and 12s. for the Sheriff's aid. 
Who he was, does not appear, nor is his family known. In the time 
of Henry IV. there was a Christopher Ashford at Fairfield and one 
William Ashford at the same place in 10 Edward IV. ; the name 
IS unknown. He was probably a Welshman assuming a territorial 
designation. 

In 28 Edward I. Thomas de Macclesfield paid £300 for the farm 
of Ashford in Derbyshire, Macclesfield in Cheshire, and Cuton 
in Flint ; this name is also unknown in Derbvshire records, but 
in 43 Henry III., in the Scutage of Wales, Henry de Macclesfield 
paid for one fee of the Honour of Peveril, and again for same 
Scutage in 7 Edward I. 

In 27 Edward I. Thomas de Macclesfield paid £30 for the 
marriage of Roger, son of Galf de Chedle (Chedlei). 



ASHFORD IN THK WATER. 



^43 



In i8 Edward II. the King granted Ashford to Edmund, his 
brother, Earl of Kent, whose daughter Joan, the Fair Maid of 
Kent (by Margaret, daughter of John, Lord \\'ake), took it to her 
second husband, Sir Thomas Holland, K.G., Lord Holland, whose 
daughter, Elizabeth, took it in marriage to Jo., Lord Neville, whose 
descendant; Henry Neville; Earl of Westmoreland, sold it to 
Sir William Cavendish in 1549, and it is still the property of the 
Dukes of Devonshire. 

The question of the tenure of Ashford and its rights and privileges 
was fully considered in the 3rd of Edward I., when perhaps for 
reasons of fear, the jury complaisantly found (Hundred Rolls, 
Vol. II.; page 40) " That there was not in the Peak any ancient 
demesne of the Crown, neither free, soke, or bond, nor was it sold 
at any time by bailiffs, or by tenants." What would have happened, 
if the jury had found the truth by their oaths according to the 
testimony of the Exchequer books, it is impossible to determine, 
for whilst it was true that neither bailiffs nor tenants had sold it, 
it was clear that the Crown itself had disposed of the Wapentake, 
and that the Lady Eleanor, wife of the King, then held it by virtue 
of a grant made to her in the latter part of his reign by King 
Henry III. Eleanor, Queen of Edward the ist, was the daughter 
of Ferdinand, King of Castile, who was married in 1254, and who 
died the 28th Nov., 1290. The date of the grant is unknown, but 
it was probably made upon her marriage, at a time probably when 
Griffin was in rebellion. He subsequently did homage to the Crown 
for his other lands, but apparently not for Ashford, which remained 
in Royal hands. 

The same jury made several other findings not exactly consonant 
with the facts, but quite agreeable to the King and his Consort. 
They found that there are not any demesne manors in the Peak 
of the ancient demesne of the Crown, nor of purchases, but King 
Edw»rd has there certain Castles, with Honours and appurtenances; 
that is to say, the Vills of Castleton, Bradwell, the third part of 
Hope, Tadington, Prestclive, and the third part of Hoy Haddon, 
which are now in the hands of King Edward as an escheat of 
William Peveril, which fell to the Lord King Henry the elder 
(.•' the second) on account of felonies done against this King. 

That this finding is false has already been shown (see page 229 



2.1 ASHIOKI) IN THK WATKR. 

of the prcSL-nt \nl.), where the- Charters of the two Kings Henry 
disposing of all William I'everil's estate to Ranulf, Karl of Chester 
are given. Tiiis had occurred many years before Edward I., and 
no doubt much of it had been set aside by King Stephen, though 
he pretended to confirm it. 

Tfie jury made a further presentment, still more puzzling. They 
said that the Manor of Holm was in King John's hands, together 
with its appurtenances ; that was to say, Esseford and Great 
Longsden, and they were given by King John to Wenuwyn for the 
service of one sore hawk, and it descended to Griffin, his son, who 
held it until King Henrv gave that Manor to the Lady Eleanor the 
younger, the Oueen who now holds it. There were several other 
findings of value to this enquiry. John de Fleckham was the 
Queen's Bailiff for Ashford and Bancwell. John Noveray held two 
Bovats in Magna Langsdon. The Vill of Scheladon was member 
of Ashford, and Griffin fil Wenuwyn sold it and gave it to Galf 
Pickford, with i8 marcs, to be received annually from the Mill of 
Ashford, and it was alienated in the time of Henry III. It is not 
clear who this Geoffry Pickford was, or what was the derivation 
of his name. It is tempting to suggest that he may have taken 
it from the ford on the Peak now Ford Hall, near Chapel in the 
Frith. 

There was a Ralph Pickford who held half a fee of the old feoffment 
in Sutton, who may be of the same family, and the name long 
remained in the Peak, but Griffins feoffee was probably a Welshman, 
without a surname of his own. 

The jury were still more uncertain about the privileges of the Lords 
of Peak. They found that they had pleas for unlawful distress, for 
recent violence and return of w-rits, and so held from King to King, 
from the time of William Peveril and before that, and then it had the 
same customs and liberties, of the origin of which they knew nothing. 
It was not, of course, politic to prove how those liberties and customs 
had been abused and usurped. The jury also found that Eyam, 
Nether Haddon, Ashford and Tideswell had assize of bread and ale, 
but they knew not by w-hat authority. 

The Abbot of Basingwerk had the same assize of bread and ale, 
.md (fallows, in the F'orest of Peak, at Glossop, but they knew not 



ASHFORD IN THK WATKR. 245 

by what warrant. Ashford, Bakewell and Nether Haddon claimed 
to have free warren, but they knew not, etc. This did not show 
very much research on the part of the King's officers, for Griffin had 
a right of free warren granted to him only a few years previously ; but 
the fact was that the least research into the exchequer documents 
would have shown the unconstitutional and illegal dealing with the 
Wapentake. 

It is no doubt owing to William Briwere the inscrutable and dis- 
honest judge (one of the Regents of Richard I.), that so many of the 
Peverils returned to Derbyshire. Nothing is positively known of his 
history ; the author endeavoured to trace it in his " History of the 
House of Arundel " (p. 247). Even the name of his father is 
unknown, and his enemies declared that he was a gipsy and obtained 
his name of Briwere because he was born upon a heath (Camdens 
Britannia), but the better opinion is that the name was originally 
Britwer or Britower, which would indicate a Welsh or Breton origin, 
very probably the latter, and unquestionably he was very closely 
allied by many marriages, if not by blood, with the Griffins and 
Peverils and especially with their relations, the Earls of Devon. His 
mother was apparently the daughter of Geoffry de Albemarle, 
brother of Reginald de Albemarle, of Woodbury, to whose estate of 
Grindals in Devonshire, William Briwere, it is said, succeeded by 
inheritance. The Albemarles were tenants of the Peverils, at an 
earlier date, and so continued. William, Earl of Albemarle, built 
the Castle of Clifford before Domesday, which would appear to give 
Briwere a Welsh descent. There was a Henry Briwere, of Isleham, 
in Devonshire, who is stated by certain genealogists, with some 
show of probability, to have been his father ; he attested a charter of 
Robert Fitz William de Cardinan to St. Austel, 1169, and in all 
probability Beatrice de Valle, his daughter (^\'illiam Briwere's wife), 
was so called from that foundation. This lady had previously been 
the concubine of Reginald, Earl of Cornwall, son of Henry I., 
by Sibil Corbet, and his half-brother (that is, son of the same King 
by Nesta, Princess of Powis) was Robert, Earl of Gloucester, whose 
issue are closely intermixed in these marriages, and from whom the 
Earls of Devon and the Arundels of Cornwall were legitimately 
descended. 

Richard de Redvers, Earl of Devon, married Dionisia, daughter 



2if, ASHIORD IN THK WATKR. 

of RcfjiivilJ, Karl of Cornwall, his tlau^'liter Alice married Robert, 
Karl of ("ilouoester, and her sister Isabella was first wife of King John, 
although that conscientious monarch got rid of her by some pretext 
of kinship. Through this rather complicated relationship, William 
Briwere stood in some sort of relationship to the Crown. The early 
Plantagenets had so many irregular relationships of their own that 
they, of course, respected those of Henry I. Mathew Paris boldly 
calls William Briwere King John's " uncle," and as he found him a 
convenience, as a kind of uncle, in judicially obtaining other 
people's property, John fully acknowledged his relationship. 

It was no doubt chiefly owing to his connection with the Earls of 
Devon that William Briwere replanted the Peveril family in Derby- 
shire — for Richard, the liarl, for one of his wives, married Adeliza, 
daughterof William Peveril, of Nottingham (seeMonteburg Caitulary, 
where this is clearlv stated). This lady gave the Manor of Overlais, 
in the Diocese of Salisbury, to Monteburg, expressly stating that it 
was given to Richard de Redvers, her husband, by William Peveril, 
her father. William de Vernon, Lord of Devon, son of Richard and 
presumably her son also, confirmed the grant of Wulvel, in Berkshire, 
which the Lady Adeliza also made to Monteburg. Her daughter, 
Johanna, married William, son of \\'illiam Briwere, whilst Margaret, 
another daughter, married Henry Pomeroy, also a Peveril, and who, 
according to the Testa de N'e\il, descended from Roger, son of 
William Peveril, of Nottingham, but little is known of his relationship. 
Nor was this the only connection between the Briweres and the 
Peverils, for Isabella Briwere (another daughter), married Hugh de 
Dover, and Alice (another daughter), for one of her husbands 
married Roger de Poles, who was a Peveril, who held half Roger 
Arundel's Dorset Barony, and a sister of William Briwere married 
Ralf Gernon son of Mathew the Judge, who was son of Robert 
Gernon, or the bearded one, who at the time of Domesday held 
several Manors in moiety (Welsh fashion) with Ranulf Peveril. Our 
complaisant heralds, supposing this Welshman to be a Norman, made 
him the head of the English family of Cavendish, who wanted 
no borrowed ancestors, having a great English pedigree of their own. 

King John himself had an interest in the Princes of Powis since 
Prince Llewellyn had married one of his illegitimate daughters ; some 
historians allege that Llewellyn was a brother of Wenuwyn, and this 



ASHFORD IN THK WATER. 247 

is most likelv, because they were generally at war together. The 
important question how and when thev obtained their Derbyshire 
estates is absolutely unknown ; only this is clear, Prince Wenuwyn 
obtained the Manor of Ashford in the time of King Richard I, and 
we can only guess from what happened with regard to other portions 
of the Peyeril inheritance, that this occurred in the third year of 
King Richard, and that he obtained it through the crooked ways of 
King John and William Briwere. 

Throughout the reign of Henry II. that monarch had kept the 
Peyeril inheritance intact, and in his own hands it was a most 
delightful hunting estate and property. It formed part of the King's 
ancient demesne, although for some reason it was not restored to 
that status, nor is there any reason to suppose that Richard I. had 
any intention to giye it away. The first intimation that any dealing 
had changed the character of this property is in the Pipe Roll of 
6 Richard I., when that unscrupulous judge, the Lord William 
Briwere, is found in personal possession of it, though, of course, 
merely as a farmer. Ralf Murdock, whose history is unknown (he 
was certainly not a Derbyshire man), was Sheriff for the County for 
half of this year ; but he did not account for the Peak. William 
Briwere accounted for the farm of it for the whole year, £.232 12s., 
which included the fees for both Counties and for the sale of pro- 
yisions in Nottingham Castles. Up to this date, during the whole of 
the reign of Henry II., the Sheriffs, Rainulf fil Ingram, Robert his son, 
and William fil Ralf, had duly accounted for it for the King. Now 
the Sheriff had deputed the management to William Briwere, who 
was then a great man and one of the King's Regents — the friend and 
adviser, or perhaps only the subseryient minister, of the Earl of 
Mortain. 

If we could get at the Pipe Rolls for the first fiye years of Richard's 
reign, we should learn the whole story, but they haye curiously and, 
perhaps, conveniently for the wrong doers, disappeared. It is obvious 
that this was done purposely to hide the Earl of Mortain's infrintre 
ments on Crown rights in this district. His conduct had been, in 
fact, of too regal a character, but we are not without some indication 
of what happened from contemporary documents. The Earl of 
Mortain seems to have played the King a little iilegallv durin-T his 
brother's captivity ; he, no doubt, trusted and believed, as he well 



2^g ASHFORD CHARTERS. 

might that with his own assistance, it wdukl he of a more permanent 
character. 

John was not a particuhirly pious man, but in the 3rtl year of his 
brother's reign (in 1192) he gave Tideswell, probably as a kind of sop 
or sohuium, to the Bishop of Coventry, at that time the head of the 
See of Lichfield, the Charter of which Wm. Briwere attested. He 
also, probablv at the same time, gave Bakewell to Ralf Gernon. 

Hassop (another Peveril estate) he gave to the Laseys, who in fact 
were Devonshire Peverils, who had assumed that name from having 
held fees of the Lacy inheritance in Cornwall, Robert Heriz, 
grandson of Robert, a Knight of William Peveril, who aided in 
the fountlation of Lenton, also obtaining, with Robert til William 
de Alfreton, several Peveril Manors at the same period. 

Ivo Heriz, son of Robert, with Ralf Gernon, are both mentioned 
with Wenuwvn in the same Roll of i John, when the King, at the 
commencement of his reign, honestly confirmed the Charters which 
he had improperlv granted whilst regent. The Patent Rolls, 11 John, 
\o. 5, show that Wenuwvn submitted to King John at Shrewsburv, in 
the previous vear. It is quite clear, whatever his title, that Wenuwvn 
was Lord of Ashford at an earlier date, for his name is found in the 
list of arrears of the 2nd scutage of Richard L, which was made in 
the 8th vear of his reign when he was captive, in the Charter of 26 
Henry 111, Xo. 5, permitting Griffin fil Wenuwvn to endower Havise, 
his wife, who was the daughter of John Lestrange, with the Manor of 
Ashford for her life if she survived Griffin, and in a Charter of 
Griffin fil Wenuwvn, bv which Ciriffin is described as son of \\'enuwvn 
of Kevilock, he confirmed to Mathew, son of Thomas Cleric of 
Bakewell, the grant of land in Great Longsden, which Thomas, 
father of Mathew, and his ancestors had formerly held of the King's 
feoffment, and which he subsequently held by the ccjnfirmation of 
Wenuwvn (Griffvn's father). 

In a copy of this document in Dr. Vernon's collection, made by 
John Revell, there is an additional confirmation of the said Mathew's 
right-of-way from the town of Great Longsden to his mansion in 
Little Longsden (see as to this the Charter of Serin fil Ralf de 
Montjoie). 

Griffin fil Wenuwvn granted to John de Holwell land in Hulme, 



ASHFORD CHARTERS. 349 

T. William le Wvne, Mathew de Andckin (? Antekel or Alkedcwell), 
William de ead, Adam fil Port, Robert de Fetchine, Serjeant of 
Henry fil Fris (?), with a fine seal of Prince Griffin.— (Haddon 
Hall Charter). 

The Patent Rolls, 35 Henry III., show that there was an assize 
between William Gernon and Griffin fil W'enuwvn concerning 
Bakewell, and also with William Cleric, of Esseburn (this William, 
the Clerk of Ashbourne, was also called William le Wine, the 
Pincerna, le Boteler, etc. He was a married man, and was probably 
not a priest but a lawyer). 

In the year 1257, Griffin fil Wenuwyn granted (probably only 
confirmed the previous grants) the Chapelries of Ashford, Tideswell, 
and Bakewell to Lichfield, part of which William Peveril had 
granted to Lenton. 

In the same year Prince Griffin founded a Chantry in Ashford. 
See the Great Register of Lichfield (Harl, 4799 Additional MSS. 
1666, fo. 37). 

Henry III. ga\e Ashford to Eleanor, daughter of Ferdinand III., 
King of Castile, probably in 1254, on her marriage with his son. 

In 1272, on the accession of Edward I., an enquiry was made, and 
Alan de Pickworth and William Propositus of Bakewell, and the jury 
found that the Countess, the wife of the King, held 105 acres of land 
and a capital mansion in Bakewell, of which place the Prior of Lenton 
received two parts of the tithes. 

In Ashford, Elias de Holand, Henry de la Grene, Henry de la 
Hall, Robert Bevage, and William fil Walter, the jurors, said that the 
Countess held a house and five carncates of land ; there Elias de 
Holand held one bovate Nicolas de Winefield the same, Richard de 
la Dale, Wm. Miller, Roger le Wite and Wm. del Hill, each held 
half a bovate, and the Lord de Pickford had a water mill. 

In 12 Edward I, the King granted to John of Eltham and 
Alianore his sister, certain liberties with the Castle and Honour of 
Peak. 

Ese 26, Ed. 3, Xo. 54. Inq. p.m., John, Earl of Kent, held inter 
alia Chesterfield in cap ; he also held in his demesne, as of fee tail 
to himself and to the heirs of his body by the Charter of the King, 
the Manors of Ashford, with the Hamlets of Magna Longsdon, 
Shelandon, Wardelowe, and Hulme, in cap by knight service, in which 



2-0 ASHFORl) CHARTERS. 

sakl Manor is a certain chapel aiui messuage worth nothing per 
annum beyond expenses. 

And there are two plough hinds in demesne, whereof two parts are 
worth annually 46s. and the third value nothing, and twenty acres of 
mead, worth yearly for mowing (tempe falcocois) 80s. ; and several 
woods called Chacklawe, with pasture worth 26s., and underwood of 
no value ; another wood called Churchedale and pasture value 20s., 
and underwood nothing, and two mills, one water and the other a 
Fuller's ; and there are certain profits of lead mines, which are 
usually worth £20 per annum, and now stand still for want of work- 
men, but are worth this year 20s. 

And there is in the hamlets rents of Assize of F"reemen and customs 
vearlv £24 and pleas and perquisites of court, then yearly worth 40s. 

Johanna ux Thomas de Holland knight, was his sister and heir. 

East, 30 Edward III. It was found not to the King's Dam that 
Thos. de Holland and Johanna should grant the Manors of Chester- 
field and .\shford and the advn. of the Hospital of St. Leonard's of 
Chesterfield, to Otto de Holland for life, to be held by the 
accustomed services as of the fee of Peveril. The Manor of Ashfi^rd 
was held by the service of one knight's fee and value per annum, 32m. 
Chesterfield valued 20m. and the hospital nil. 

23 Nov., 32 Edward 111. Otto de Holland, Lord of Ashford, 
granted to (lodfrey Foljambe and his tenants of Hassop, common of 
pasture for 1,000 sheep and 600 oxen and cattle, on the More of 
Longlove within the Lordship of .\shford. Seal, seme of fleur-de-lis 
or a lion rampant, guardant. Or a plume of feathers issuing out of 
a ducal coronet. Hassop was a member of Ashford. 

2 Jan., 34 Edward III, No. 37. Inq., p.m. Otto de Htilland died 
holding above, Robert de Holland next heir, aged 50 and upwards. 

I Feb. 35 Edward 111. Inq., p.m. of Thomas de Holland, Earl 
of Kent, who died the 18 Dec. ult. Thomas, his son, his next heir ;et 
10. 

9 Richard II. Fest Exalt S. Crucis, No. 54. 

Inq., p.m. Johanna, Princess of \\'ales, died. Seized of Manor 
of Chesterfield and Wap. of Scaisdale . . . and of the Manor 
of Ashford. . . . Thomas de Holland Earl of Kent, s. and h. :i;t30. 

5 Henry IV. St. Luke Evan, No. 38. 

Inq., p.m. Thomas Earl of Kent, held Manor of Ashford in tail, 



ASHFORU CHARTKKS. 25I 

which exteiided into the Towns of Ashford, Longford (? Longston), 
Mag, Skelmordene, Wardlow, Holme, value £60. Thos. Beaufort took 
the profits to i July, 4 Henry IV., when the King gave it to 
Edward, Earl of Kent, brother of Thos., who died Epiph., i 
Henry IV. Edward, his brother and heir aet 31 Jan., ult. 

22 September, 2 Henry VI., No. 45. 

Inq., p.m., Elizabeth, widow of John de Neville, held the Manor of 
Ashford, and a pasture called Holmfield, a meadow called Woodland 
Mead, Over Quene, Nether Ouene, Hill Meadow, Hall Meadow, Wel- 
cliff Meadow, Little Welcliff, Myre Meadow, Church Dale, Lanchwell, 
Pancake Chadow, Red Meadow, Barley Croft, and a water corn 
mill, £3 ; and a mead in Bakewell, the rent of divers free tenants 
£16 los. 6d., and subject to a rent of 4 marcs, granted to Sir Robert 
Vernon, one of 7 marcs 2s. and lod. to William Nichols for his life ; 
59s. 4d. to John de Werk and Johanna his wife, whose identity is not 
yet clearly established, but in all probability he was John Browne de 
Werk, father of Sir John Browne, Lord Mayor of London, 21 Edvyard 
I\ ., (see page 35 of this volume, and his pedigree, page 54). 

Elizabeth Neville died the 3rd June ult. Ralf, her son and heir, 
■was 16 years old. 

10 Henry VI. Ralf, Earl of Westmoreland, paid scutage for 
Ashford Manor, William Plumpton had soc in it. 

18 January; 2 Richard III., No 14. 

Inq., p.m. Ralf Neville ; he held the Manor of Ashford in cap for 
' of a fee ; he died 3 November ult. Ralf Neville, son of John, 
brother of Ralph, his heir ;et 28. 

29 April, 15 Henry \'II., No. 88. Inq., p.m. 

Ralf, Earl of Westmoreland, died 10 Sept., 13 Henry MI. Ralf 
Neville, his son and heir, aged one year. 

See Pedigree of the family of Neville, WA. II, p. 204, and this 
Vol., p. 36, where the Black Prince is erroneously given as father 
instead of the brother of Richard II. and John of Gaunt. 

In 3 Edward \'I., Henry, Earl of Westmoreland, had license to 
^IJenate the Manor of Ashford to the ancestor of the Dukes of 
Devonshire, in whose descendants it has since remained. 



THE PRINCES OF POWIS. 

(The following pedigrees were prepared by the author for an 
article on the Princes of Powis, which was published in the 
Archaologia Cambrensis, written with the view, if possible, to 
extract from Welshmen an explanation of the difficulties and 
apparent incongruities in which it is enveloped, and through the 
courtesy of the Editor of that work, he is enabled to give them 
in this.) 

A glance at the Griffin pedigrees here given will show' the 
close relationship of the Peverils to King Griffith of South Wales, 
which assists to prove the authors' contention that the Fitzalans, 
the direct heirs of King Griffith and the co-heirs of his wife, 
the English Countess, were the feudal lords of the Peverils. 
At the time when Section VII was written, the author was un- 
acquainted with the Peveril genealogy. That great scholar Charles 
Kerry-, does not attempt to trace it higher than Ranulf. The guide 
to whom the author had submitted himself was Peter Ellis, who was 
evidently unaware of it, for on so important a point he necessarily 
would have given full particulars, and it is distressing, though not 
surprising, to find that the authorities upon whom Peter Ellis 
founded his magnificent work were also equally ignorant, and differ 
in certain portions. This is not so extraordinary, perhaps, once 
this truth is established, that there are no original authorities in 



THE GRIFFIN PEDIGREES. 253 

Welsh MSS., and the best that can be said of them is that, althoguh 
produced separately, they are nearly always truthful, for they com- 
paratively rarely conflict ; but that, although each author was writing 
from memory, that is, from the unwritten traditions of the bards, 
handed down to him orally, which was a matter of religion, and 
they would not set them out in writing because they had been so 
handed down to them from countless generations of bards and seers, 
and no one was to be gratified by them. It was not probably until 
after the plebian family of the Tudors came to the throne that the 
Welshmen reduced their pedigrees to writing. The Tudors were 
a family of no known history. Henry VII. luckily had obtained in 
marriage a colour of royalty by the hand of the descendant 
of a bastard of the grand old John of Gaunt, by a lady who had 
been the governess of his children by his first wife. The issue of 
this lady were made legitimate when it could be legally accom- 
plished by the corrupt Parliament of King Richard II., probably 
through the influence of their legitimate brother, Henry IV.. who 
usurped the Crown for himself, and who is said to have been much 
attached to his late governess. There is a pretence, amongst Welsh 
heralds, to give an early origin for their pedigrees, but it may safely 
be dismissed as, at best, only poetical, inasmuch as it is utterly 
inconsistent with Welsh traditions and customs. It is stated that 
" Griffith ap Cynan, Rys ap Tewdyr, and Bleddyn ap Cynfyn collected 
the arms, ensigns and pedigrees of their ancestors, and ordained 
five Royal Tribes (there being only three before) and 15 Special 
Tribes, of whom the gentry of North Wales are for the most part 
descended" (Philip York, of Erdigg's "Tracts of Powis," the Druid 
Press, Wrexham, 1795). 

It is not at all likely, even if the question of dates could be 
overcome, that these three Royal personages were ever so friendly 
as to devise and carry out such a valuable work for posterity 
especially for the landed gentry of 1795, and certainly there is no 
evidence except that of very much later date, that the tribes and 
Kings of Wales possessed either arms or ensigns, or recorded 
pedigrees; they possessed arms which they used as valiant soldiers — 
but, alas ! we have little and but uncertain traces of their court 
armour. Unfortunately the only foundation for .Mr. York's histories 
(jf the tribes is to be collected piecemeal from various MSS. of a 
much later date, which probably only saw the light m the 16th century. 



THK GRIFFIN PEDIGREES. 

PEDIGREE OF HOWELL DDA 

[Chiefl;/ frum Aihl. 0. -Vo. 177 ('/( the Bodteinn Libmnj. 

HoweU Dda, King of All Wales, t 948-T 



Owen ap: 

Holl. 



Angharad, a 
Llw. ap 
Mer. 



Run. 

Einon. 

Mdd. 



Roderch. 

Dyfnwell. 

Edwn. 



Angharad.: 



Tudor 
Trevor, 
t 948. 



Mdd, t 99S, 

K. of All 

Wales. 



Einon. 

Lowarch. 

Grono. 



Jestin. 
Cadw'r. 



Luddic, ^ 
t 1037 



Angharad.= Lll. ap Sitsilt, =Cynfyn ap Gwerston. 
I t 1023. 



Lowarch Gam.= 



Griffith, =Editha, or Agatha, fil. Algar, 



King of 

N. Wales, 

t 1061. 



Earl of Mercia. She re- 
married King Harold of 
England, 1061-6. 



Bleddyn,= 
t 1073. 



Rivallon, 
t 1068. 



Nesta, d. and- 

h. ; slain 

1045-6. 



Flaald, born 1020 
(son of Banco, 
who was slain 
1045), m. 1045. 



Gladus, ux. The 
Lord Rhes. 



Jonet.= Ednofed. 



I 



Alan, fil. Flaald, or 
Fleance, born 
1045-6, Senescal of 
the Lord of Mon- 
mouth. 



Rhys Sais, Lord of=Eva, v. Gr. ap; 



Whittington, 

Oswestry, d. t 1070 

12 Wm. ]. 



Gr. ap The 
Lord Rhes. 



Gladus, V. 

Sitsilt ap 

Gwrge. 



I 
Elida. 



I I 
Bleddr. 
Fvchan. 



I 
Iddon. 



Evered, ux. 
Ednowen 
ap Ithel. 

Eva. 



Tudor ap Bhys= 
Sais at Domes- 
day held a com- 
mot under the 
Earl Roger 
Montgomery, 
for which he 
paid .£4 bs. rent 



(Wrenoc) Banulph Pever ap Tudor, of Salop, temye Domesday.: 



I 
Genevy, ux. 
Ednoen ap. 
Ithel. 



I 
Wm. Peverel of Nottn.,^. 
tempe Domesday. y 



Wm. of Hamon of High Pagan, of Brun. 
Dover. Ereal. 



THE GRIFFIN PEDIGREES. 



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258 THK GRIFFIN PF.DIGREES. 

So many impudent forgeries (incluclint< Henry VII. 'sown pedigree) 
were foisted upon the country, that probably in disgust the Bards 
gave us the priceless boon of their traditions, but except in a general 
consensus there is absolutely no uniformity and no authority for 
their works. Perhaps this is better than any so-called perfect work, 
because there is less chance of complicity and fraud, and each one 
for himself may work out his own traditions. To an honest enquirer 
the result is very satisfactory ; the best of the modern writers openly 
acknowledged their authorities; but, probably, there are none who 
have been so honest, as he has been in giving his originals, as Peter 
Ellis, of Wrexham. 

The author has attempted in "The Archaelogia Cambrensis," of 
Dec, 1900, and of April, 1901, to give the results of his own investi- 
gations, and especially to give what he could find respecting the per- 
sonal history of this Peter Ellis; fortunately this has since been 
done much better by Mr. A. N. Palmer, in his invaluable book, "The 
History of Wrexham," to which the learned reader must be referred 
for further information on the subject. Mr. Palmer does not enter 
into the question from whence Peter Ellis obtained his knowledge, 
and the author's views.can here only be given shortly. It appears 
to him that from the mass of authorities cited by Peter Ellis, he 
founded his work chiefly upon that of Mr. Edwards, of Chirk, with 
whom he was connected by marriage, and that his work was mainly 
founded on the great works of Griffith Hierathoc, Symwnt Vaughan, 
and Guthen Owen (the latter Ellis obtained from a transcript of 
Richard Mathews). There is also evidence of collation and corrob- 
oration from the works of Edward Puleston, Griffith Vaughan, 
Edward ap Robert, Edward Mostyn, Jo Edwards of Stansty, Richard 
Langford of Alington, and from many other writers, such an array, 
in fact, that the genuineness of Peter Ellis's work is amply assured ; 
but this cluster of writers only covered a portion of the Principality, 
and none of them appear to throw any light upon the history of the 
Peverils or of the Fitzalans. Possibly it may be that as both of 
them held property under, and gave allegiance to the hated Norman 
Kings, their Welsh brethren discarded them from any participation, 
even in the glories of the fifteen tribes. It is perhaps proof of the 
isolation of the group of writers of the Peter Ellis camp and their 
entire independence of other writers that we are not indebted to 
them, but to the once-famous library of Sir Watkin Williams Wynn, 



THK GRIFFIN PEDIGREES. 259 

at Wynstay, for a clear account of their history, showing that both 
the Fitzalans and the Peverils had in fact a just right to a share in 
the glorious traditions of the 15, and this, at present, is the only 
proof known to the author. Since writing the VII. section, the 
author is indebted to Sir \V. \V. Wynn, for giving him full access 
to the remains of his library, and here he discovered the proof, if it 
can be relied upon, of the paternity of Wrenoc or Rhys. As it is so 
delightful to an author, he was permitted to search the MSB. for 
himself, and not in piecemeal (having a single MS. handed out to 
him by perhaps a not very sympathetic or well-informed assistant), 
so that the progress of investigation was not only very swift but 
very satisfactory. In a few hours, through Sir Watkin's generous 
treatment, he was able to select and to collate for himself the very 
paragraphs he sought for. 

Although Sir Watkin's fine library has practically perished, only a 
few half-burnt fragments of the ancient papers remaining, amongst 
which .MSS. there are but few parchments and certainly, it may be 
hazarded, no ancient ones, so that the mystery surrounding them is 
not justified, and at Wynstay there are now only copies of the former 
collection, but they are good copies, and to a lawyer, as in the 
absence of the original one copy is regarded as good as another, 
they are everything that is desired. The Wynstay present MSS. 
(and they are very numerous) appear chiefly to be the work of one 
man, Joseph Morris, of Shrewsbury, a well-known authoritj', who 
wrote in the early part of last century. The gem of this collection 
is the Salusburie Pedigrees in two volumes, compiled by Owen 
Salusburie of Riig and John Salusburie of Erbstock, between 1630 
and 1677, That is of a later date than the works of Peter Ellis, 
who indeed died in the year 1637. This was transcribed by Joseph 
Morris in 1832, and he writes in its pages, "The only MSS. of the 
Salusburie's perished in the fire at Wynstay, 1858, and this is the 
only copy in existence. — J.M." He adds that Symwnt Vaughan's 
book in 1832 was in John Vaughan's hands, of Shrewsbury and of 
Chilton Grove. 

At pages 394-5 is given the pedigree of Tudor Trevor and of his 
wife Anghared, vch Howell Dda, King of all Wales, from Grono the 
eldest son, who was Earl of Hereford, according to Welsh records 
(a fact unknown to English historians), by his wife Tangwistle v 
Dyfryval ap Edward came Reingar, who married Kyhflyn vch Ivor 



26o I'll' liHHMN I'l llKiKl-.KS. 

and \v;is mother of Klyston Glodiaid, who is said to liave borne the 
same title: from the younger son, Luddiek by Anghared vch Inge 
ap Idwall ap Meiric, Prince of North Wales from whom came 
Llowarch Gam who by Leika v Gwerystan ap Gwarthwood Vawr 
was father of Ednoved, who by Jonett v Rivallan apCynfyn, Prince 
of North Wales came Ryhs Sais or the Englishman, "who 12 
William 1. was Lordof Whittington, Maelor, and Oswestry, which he 
divided amongst his sons in 1070." These facts are distinctly stated ; 
down to this point the pedigree seems not only possible but probable, 
and it is strongly confirmed by other writers, but from this period 
the pedigree given seems to belong to a different man and in no way 
to concern the Peverils. That Rhys Sais was Lord of Whittington, 
Ma:lor and Oswestry is clear beyond all doubt, and proven by the 
record of 12 William 1. (by which it is probably intended to designate 
Domesday) is equally clear. We are in this dilemma, either we must 
dimidiate the pedigree and accept it to this date, 1070, and reject it 
in the later portion, or, if it must be, repudiate it altogether — which 
after discovering so much would be sad indeed. There is this 
dreadful difficulty, that as we have the pedigree six generations are 
crowded into the reign of the Conqueror, which is manifestly absurd. 

But is it necessary to reject it ? According to English records 
Rhys Sais had not only Whittington, Maelor, and Oswestry, as well 
as other manors, some in Essex and Herts, held by William, his son, 
Welsh fashion, with Robert Gernon (or the Bearded One), the 
ancestor of the lords of Bakewell, who was probably another son, 
and other lands in Norfolk, Salop, and other counties, and all these 
estates are known to have descended to his issue, said to be his by 
an English lady (a daughter of one Ingelric), who is said to have 
been the mistress of William the Conqueror, and by him, mother 
of William Peveril, of Nottingham. By Wrenoc she is said to have 
had two other sons named William — one of Dover and one of 
London (possibly the same person), one other son, named Pagan, 
Lord of Brun (who was Standard-bearer of Curthose, an historical 
character, another descended in some way from the Earls of Mercia, 
who also held Whittington, Maelor, and Oswestry), and another, 
Hamo, Lord of High Ercal ; and by her, or probably by another 
wife. Ranulf had at least two sons, named Roger and Jonas. 

All this is very clear and explicit, and can be proved by indis- 
putable evidence, but the Salusburie MSS. gives no tidings of any 



THK WVNSTAV MSS. 



261 



of them. It gives this Rhys a couple of wives, both of whom were 
Welsh ladies ; bj' the first wife Eva v Griffith ap Griff, ap yr Argehvd 
(the noble) Rhys, Lord of Cassillon; by her he had issue (1) Blyddyn 
Vychan, (2) Idden, (3) Rledir, who was the father of Madoc, who 
had Sutton, from whom descended, in the fourth degree, another 
Madoc, who was Lord of Acton. By another wife, Gladus v Sitsilt 
ap Gwirge, Wchelwe he had a son named Tudyr. 

To proceed by steps, 1070, the date given for the division by Rhys 
Sais of his estates amongst his sons, will not fit in with the 12th 
William I., which would be 1078, nor with Domesday, which is 
popularly supposed to have been composed in a jifTy, in 1086, 
because (perhaps) Ordericus gave that year as its finish. (He would 
certainly know better than to suppose that the work of a good 
20 years could be completed in one). So that possibly Rhys may 
have divided his estates in his life-time, for he was certainly alive 
many years after the date of his part of Domesday, assuming that 
these inquests had different dates. 

The Wynstay MSS. seems to he the best account, although 
nothing very positive can be alleged. One of our English (Irish) 
Judges, before whom a law of Howell Dda was cited, said, " I don't 
believe there ever was such a mon." Nor is it possible to reconcile 
fairly well known dates with regard to the lady stated to be the 
mother of Rhys Sais. Ednoved, his alleged father, is said to have 
married Jonett, daughter and heiress of Rivallon ap Cynfyn, Prince 
of North Wales. Here Peter Ellis can be cited in confirmation. At 
page 33 he gives the parentage of Tudor Trevor, as the son of Yngr, 
by Reingar, daughter and heiress of Lyddic ap Cai-adoc Vreichfras. 

Tudor's wife he gives as Angherad verch Howell Dda, who died 
948. Grono his eldest son (E.R. Edward ap Robert 270), he married 
to. . . . Dyneval ap Enwyd, by whom he had Reingar who married 
Rhy flyn ap Invor, and was mother of Elyston Glodrud, agreeing 
entirely with Salusburie's MS., and from Ludvic, aj'ounger son, who 
married Angherad vch lago (Yngr. in the others) ap Idwall ap Meirig 
(Anno 1037) Prince of North Wales came Lowarch gam, who 
married Lecke v Gueristan ap Gwarthwood, and was father of 
Ednyvett, who married Jenett v Rivallon ap Cynvyn, Ao. 1151, and 
there he ends without giving any issue of this marriage. This is 
absolutely, allowing for the difTerences in spelling, identically the 
same pedigree as that given by the Salusburie's. Then Peter Ellis 



252 I'UH.U' VOKK S HISTORY. 

gives as a brother of Edivett, not as a son, one Rhys Sais, who 
marries Eva v Griffith Hir ap Gr ap the Arglevvyd Rhys, who had 
issue practically the same as the issue given to Rhys Sais of 
Whittington. 

It should be noted that Peter Ellis cites no authorities in support 
of his pedigree, which is so unlike his habit, that it may fairly be 
assumed that he did not vouch facts ; his dates again do not tend to 
coniirm him; he gives 948 for the death of Howell Dda, 1037 for the 
reign of his grandson as Prince of North Wales, 1080 as the date of 
the marriage of his son Lowarch, and 1151 for his son, that is over 
200 years for five generations, about the proper amount taking the 
first date for a death. On the question of dates, Rhys Sais of 
Whittington, 1070, may well have been descended from Howell Dda, 
in the 5th degree. 

The point which ultimately must decide this controversy is not so 
much a question of pedigree as of the devolution of the estates. If 
Rhys Sais did not obtain these estates of Whittington, Mselor, and 
Oswestry, from his mother, how else did he acquire them ? That 
they were originally the property of the Lady Anghared v Mdd ap 
Owen cannot be disputed and that she brought them to her two sons. 
King Griffith and King Bleddyn in succession, is clear beyond all 
dispute, so it is clear that the sons of Cynvyn divided them between 
them. Rivallon had power to give his gavelied half to his daughter 
and her son, iience Rhys Sais' title, but that this superior Lordship 
remained in Bleddyn's successors is again a matter of history. So it 
is that the heir of King Griffith, Alan fil Fleance remained, perhaps 
only in right, the Paramount Lord over the sons of Cynvyn, and this 
consideration exactly agrees with the conclusions of Chapter XIX., 
which were arrived at by a full consideration of the history of the 
territory apart from the question of pedigree, which however, being 
fully established, confirms and cements it. 

In order to understand fully the position of Wynnuwyn and his 
son as Lords of Ashford it may be as well to give something of 
their history, which can be abstracted from Philip York's History. 
He was an Englishman, a great-nephew of the first Lord Hardwick, 
so must be accepted as impartial, and he no doubt had studied 
their history from Welsh accounts. He writes, under the 3rd Royal 
Tribe :— 

Bleddyn had a clear title to Powls from his great-grandmother 
Angharad, grand-daughter and heiress of .Merfvn, in whose favour 



PHILIP York's history. 263 

it was gavelled off by her father, Roderic, in common with his 
brother, Rhiwallin, who fell four years after in the battle of Mechan, 
from his father, Cynfyn ap Gwerystan, he had no claim by his 
mother, Angharad, daughter and heiress of Mdd ap Owain. Prince 
of South Wales, he was uterine brother of Griffith ap Llewellin, 
the preceding Prince of North Wales. 

Bleddyn divided Powis between his sons Mdd and Cadwgan. 
Madog, the son of Hired, the fifth son of Bleddyn ap Cynfyn, 
murdered his Uncle Cadwgan, and Mdd destroyed the sons of 
Cadwgan. These were the ordinary precautions of the Welsh (who 
disliked the Roman law of gavel-kind) in order to obviate its con- 
sequences. Mj'dd ap Bleddin died 1 133, when deserted by Gryfiyth ap 
Cynan, Prince of North Wales. He had bravely opposed Henry 1. 

He married, first, Hanydel, daughter of Eunydd ap Gwernwy, 
founder of the Tribe of Dyffryn Clwyd, by whom he had several 
children. By his second wife, Eva, daughter of Blettews ap 
Ednowain and grand-daughter of Ednowain Bendriss, he had a son, 
Jorwarth Goch, or the Red Edward, who married Maud, daughter 
of Roger de Manley, of Manley, by whom he was father to Sir 
Griffith Vychan, Lords of Crigion, ancestor of the Kynastons. 

Madog ap Mdd died at Winchester, 1160, and was buried at 
Mersod, near Mathrasail. He married the daughter of Griffith ap 
Cynan, Prince of North Wales, 'founder of the First Royal Tribe, 
and had issue Marred, wife of Jorwarth Drwyndwyn, eldest son of 
Owain Gwynedd, and mother of the great Lin. He built the Castle 
of Oswestry ■' and Caerenion, and probably Overton. 

Madog ap Mdd divided half Powis between his sons Gryffred 
Mailor, Owain ap Hadog, Elise Owain Broggutyn ap Cynfeigevele, 
and Eeinon Evell ; the three last were illegitimate, but it was not 
unusual to put such when eminent in an equal succession, the 
mere stain of an illegitimacy was not considered as of very great 
importance by the Welsh Princes. 

Gryffredd Mfelor succeeded as Lord of Bromfield 1191, he was 
buried at Merfod, by his wife Anghared, daughter of Owain 
Gwynedde, he had one son, Madog, who had the rare felicity of 
inheriting his estates entire. He served under King John, and 
reduced Lin, his son-in-law, who renounced the paramountship of 
Powys. 

" Oswestry is in Welsh M;elor, so called, it is said, from Mailor apGwran ap Cuiiedda. \\'Iedic, to 
whom this district fell on the general division of N'orth Wales amongst the sons and grandsons of 
Cunedda in the 6th century. 



264 



I'HILII' YORK S HISTORY. 



In the following year Lin Madog and his cousin, Wenuwyn, were 
reconciled, and took all the Rnglish garrisons in North Wales, and 
were dispensed by Pope Innocent III. from their oaths of allegiance 
to John, then under an interdict, a dispensation, therefore, which 
was unnecessary though if wanted could hardly have been required 
by such good Catholics, who dispensed themselves so frequently as 
these Welsh Princes. 

Madog built, probably only refounded, the Abbey of Vale Crucis 
and was buried there 1236 by his wife, Gladys, daughter of Ithel ap 
Rhes ap Morgan, of Ewyas. He had one son Gr., who killed 
himself by a fall, trying to escape from the Tower of London. 

Lin his son succeeded ; he submitted and w^as restored to his 
estates. He died at Dinas Beaor, 1170. 

He married Emma, daughter of James Lord Audeley, and had 
four sons — .Madog of Bromfield, Lin of Chirk, Nantheudy, and 
Griffin Glyndwedwy, ancestor of Owen Glendower. 

The other division, Bleddyn gavelled Powis between his sons Mdd 
and Cadwgan. Mdd acquired the whole by family slaughter ; he 
divided it between his son, Madog, and grandson, Owain, Cyfeilwg, 
whose son, Gwenwynwyn, or Wenuvvyn, gave name to this moiety. 

Griffith, second son of Mdd, married Gwerful, daughter of Gwer- 
genen ap Howell ap Jevef ap Cadwgan ap Eliston Glodrud, founder 
of the fourth tribe and died 1128. 

His son, Cyferling, attended the Parliament of Henry II. at 
Oxford, and, according to Welsh precedents, he plundered Jorworth 
Goch (his father's half-brother) of his estates in Powys. He was 
driven into England by Owen Gwyned, Prince of North Wales, and 
Rhys of the South, but the English helped to restore him to part of 
his possessions. 

He married Gwenlian, daughter of Owain Gwynedd, by whom he 
had one son, Gwynwynwyn, who had all the estates but a small part, 
which Caswallan, his bastard brother, enjoyed. 

Cyfeelwgdied 1197. 

Wenuwyn, with Caswallon, his brother, plundered the Castle of 
Carreg Hwfa, and put to death their father's first cousin, an old 
man, Owane Fychan ; he recovered his Castle of Powys again through 
.Archbishop Hubert Walter, who then commanded the armies of 
Richard K, which caused him to be respected by King John, 



PHILIP VORk's history. 265 

whom he assisted to surprise and imprison his elder brother. 
Gryffyd, Prince of South Wales, and this person being delivered to 
the charge of Gwenwynwyn, he gave him up to his inveterate 
enemies, the English. Two years after he conceived a great design 
to emancipate and extend his country to its ancient limits, and he 
attacked Win. de Breos. He was defeated and lost 3,000 men, and 
he himself was captured; he was detained a prisoner at Shrewsbury, 
but was liberated by John after three years, who also assisted him 
again to regain his possessions and he attended John on an 
expedition into Wales the year following. 

1211. He fought against John and drove him out of Wales; 
he kept faith with Lin five years and then deserted to John again. 

In 17 John and 1 Henry III., the Sheriff paid £10 for the rents 
of Gwenwynwyn, in Derbyshire. 

It was not known when he died, certainly before 13 Henry 111., 
for a Pipe Roll of that year shows that his widow owed .£30 for the 
farm of two parts of the Manor of Ashford ; he married Margaret 
daughter of Rhys ap Tudyr, Prince of South Wales, and left an only 
son, Griffith, who 25 Henry III. fined £300 for his father's lands, 
saving rights und liberties, and in the 26 Henry III., he was allowed 
to endower his wife Havis, daughter of John le Strange, and on the 
35 Henry 111., Griffin obtained a Charter of free warren for Ashford ; 
the date of his death is unknown: according to the Welsh accounts 
by Margaret his wife, daughter of Hywell y Pedolan, he had six sons, 
Owain, Lord of Arwysly, Lin (2), (3), Jo (4), Caer Enion; 

(5) Wm. of Mauddy, (6) Griff Fechin ; he did not appear to have 
had any issue by Havis le Strange. Edward 1. decided that Havis 
Gadarn, the daughter of his eldest son, should succeed to his estates; 
and if her uncles (who had litigated) should leave no issue, their 
lands should become her's. The King found her a husband in John 
de Cherlton. a gentleman of his bedchamber (whom he made his 
Chamberlain), and although the other sons of Griffith left issue, who 
ought to have succeeded to Ashfonl, the King gave it away to his 
own wife. In 1623 (Patent Roll, 2nd part), there is an exemplification 
of partition of Welsh Manors between Owen fil Griffin ap Wenuwyn 
and Griffin his brother. 



366 



CHAI^TBR XXII. 



THE LONGSDON CHARTERS. 

The following Charters, though chiefly relating to Ashford and 
Longsdon, were made under the powers of and at the Courts of 
Ashford. They are all in the possession of G. T. Wright, Esq., of 
Longstone Hall. 

4 Edward II. Clement de la Ford, Bailiff of Ashford, attested 
a Charter of John iil Rich, the Forester of Great Longsdon, to Rich, 
his father. T. Peter de Rowland, Thomas fli John, Elias de Longsdon, 
Ricli fil Win.fil Matthew de Longsdon, Jo. Martin, Nic de Crumford, 
Hy. in the Dale of Wardelow. Wm. Roter Ciic. 

4 Edward III. Henry fil Rohert le Wright, of Ashford, to Rich 
le Smith, of Great Longsdon. 

24 Edward 111. Thomas fil Robert le Wright, of Ashford, to 
Henry Selwyn, a house and one bov. in Longston, which he had of 
the gift of Robert, his father. 

East, same year. Henry Selwyn, gt. to Rich le Smith, of Great 
Longsdon, a house called the Tighebern, which he had of the gift 
of Thos. fil Robert le Wright, of Ashford. T. John Foljambe, 
of Longsdon, Wm. atte Aula, Rich. Iveson, of Mornesale, Robt. 
Hervy, of Longsdon. 

41 Edward 111. Ante fest Nativ, Jo. the Baptist, Felicia, daughter 
of John le Clerk, of Longsdon, to Godfr. de Roland land which 
belonged to her late father, in Ashford, Great Longsdon. Mornsale 
and Roland, T. Hy de la Pole. Seal on a chief, 3 crosses (?) and 
3 trees (qy., a convent seal). 

4 Henry IV. John Wright, of Ashford, with Roger Leech, Hy. 
de Longston, William fil Clement de Longston, John del Dean, 
and Wm. Leech, of Longston, attested a Charter of Thos. de 



THE LONGSDON CHARTERS. 267 

Bently and Johanna, his wife, of land in Rowland, Calver, and Eyum, 
which descended to her after the death of Nicholas Marten Cap. 

16 August, 6 Edward IV. At a Court held at Ashford for Richard, 
Earl of Warwick, Johanna, widow of Henry Wright, surrendered 
a messuage, ad fine, viU de Mag, Longsdon, in which his son John 
then dwelt, to Richard, her son, in tail. 

6 Aug., •22 Edward IV. Thomas Hodgkinson, of Wardelow, the 
younger, granted a messuage and eight acres of land in Wardelow, 
which Richard Hodgkinson, father of Thomas, bought of Henry 
White. 

By a deed of the 12th August, same year. Amongst the witnesses 
were Robert Longsdon, of Little Longsdon, yeoman, John Wright 
"and Henry Wright, the younger. 

29 Aug., 29 Edward IV. Ambrose Dedick, of Bakewell, appointed 
Nic Eyre his attorney ; to deliver seizen at the Court at Ashford, 
of a cottage to Stephen Eyre. 

2nd October, 2 Richard 111. William Brokesham surrendered 
land in Ashford to Stephen Eyre. 

24 April, 3 Henry VII. Roland fil Stephen Eyre, of Hassop, 
surrendered lands there. 

4 Jan., 3 Henry VII. Stephen Eyre, of Hassop, granted land in 
Ashford to Robert Eyre, the younger. 

20 Aug., 11 Henry VII. Richard Wright, of Great Longston, 
surrendered a messuage and a bovate in Ashford, to the use of 
Richard, his son, and Agnes, his daughter. 

6 Nov., 17, Henry VII. The same surrendered land to John, his 
son, and Elizabeth, his wife. 

11 June, 21 Henry VII. Inq., John Dale was found fatuus and 
his land was seized in the Lordship of Ashford. 

2 Dec, 8 Henry VI II. Rowland Eyre, of Hassop, attended the 
Court at Ashford. 

20 Henry VIII. Jo Hodgkinson, of Scarcliff, granted to Richard 
Smyth, of Bakewell, a messuage and land in Wardlow and Ashford. 
T. Ralf Deane, Thomas Garlond, Thurston Falys, Hy. Smyth and 
Oliver Dale, cap. 

11 Aug., 31 Henry VIII. Elizabeth, widow of John Wright, 
surrendered a bovate of land to William, her son. 



268 THE I.OXGSDON CHARTERS. 

20 July. 1 Edward VI. Roger Smyth, of Bakewell, granted to 
Henry James of Wardlow, land in Wardelow and Ashford ; William 
Wright, of Longsdon and William Donne, of Holme, Notts, attorneys 
to deliver seizen. 

24 Feb., 4 Edward VI. No. 31, part 1. Inq., p.m. of Ralf Leech, 
died St. Luke, Evang. ult. His daughters and heirs, Johanna xt 7, 
Elizabeth :et 16, Margaret set 15. 

14 Oct., 4 and 5, P. and M. Wm. Cavendish, knight, died, 
holding land, late of the Priory of Tutbury, Lord of Ashford. 

7, Elizabeth. George Vernon, knight, died, holding land in 
Ashford. Margaret ux Thomas Stanley xt 26, and Dorothy ux Jo 
Manners, set 21, his co-heirs. 

16 Jan., 12 Elizabeth. Wm. Wright, described as the elder, 
surrenders the said bovate to Wm., his son, in fee. 

20 Oct., 1603. Wm. Wright, the elder, of Gt. Longston, sur- 
rendered to Wm. Wright, his only son, all his lands within the 
Lordship of Ashford. 

24 Oct., 16 James. John Wright, son and heir of William Wright, 
deceased, and Elizabeth, his wife, surrendered land in Ashford to 
the us^ of Nicholas Dale. 

The following relate to the family of Milnes, Lord Houghton. 

1272. William le Milner held half a bov of land in Ashford, of 
the Cathedral of Lichfield, at whose mill the inhabitants of Longsdon 
and other hamlets were bound to grind their corn. — Harl MS., 4797, 
fo. 55. 

1339. Agnes, wife of Thomas le Milner, of Ashford, died 29 
Edward 111. Nicolas le Miller, of Hassiford, and Cessley his wife 
granted land in Froggat to Ralf Tibbeson, of Baslowe, to which 
Ralf Giles Rich and Geoffrey le Leech were witnesses. 

1358. In the accounts of John Cokayne, Procurator of Lichfield 
Mortuary gift Wm. Milner. 

42 Edward III. John le .Milner attested a Charter of the Martins 
of Chatsworth, with Ralf and Robert Leech. 

4 Richard II. Simon Miller and his wife, and John, their son, 
were of Ashford. The Milnes of Wakefield, Lord Houghton's 
family, claim descent from the Milnes of Ashford in the Water, and 
they bear the sails of a Windmill on their coat. 



THE MILNES CHARTERS. 269 

From Messrs. Taylor and Go's Office, Ashford : — 
1651. Richard Milnes and Margaret his wife held one bay 
of a barn. 

1652-4. \Vm. .Milnes and Elizabeth his wife. 

1658. Wm. Milnes the elder surrendered to the use of William 
Milnes his eldest son. 

Jone Milnes died. Mary ux Frances Rugg, cousin and ne.xt heir. 
Edward Glossop had land from Edward Dickens, Godfrey Ash, 
and Jone his wife. 

1659. Thomas Bagshaw held half an o.xgang. 

28th Sept., 1735. Sir Jo. Gilbert for £1,350. Conveyed chief 
rents in Ashford, for £11 12s. 9id., to Edward Cheney. 

2nd and 3rd June, 1736. Hy. Bourne, of Spital, and Sarah his 
wife, co-heiress of Gladwin, conveyed to same two-thirds of manor. 



270 



CHAPTER XXIII. 



TITHE ROLLS. 

The following Tithe Rolls are taken from the Lichfield Records, 
and as it will be seen, they relate to other parishes besides Ashford, 
in fact, to the whole of the Forest surrounding it. It was thought 
best to include them once for all, as the different families and 
parishes will he placed separately in the Index; they are of great 
value for pedigree purposes as they are nearly all dated, and are 
only second in value to the Subsidy Rolls which follow. 

E I. Tithes, 1254. 

Bakewell. bl. W'm. de Longsdon, Mathew Mercator. 

Ralund. bl. Math de Langsdon. 

Wardlow. Thos., Cap of Longsdon. 

Hucklow. Robt. le Archer. 

Dadley. Galf le Archer. 

Abany. Rob de Abney. 

E 3. 1273. 

Bakewell. Thos. Foljambe, Burton. 
Hugo de Longsdon. 

E. 6. s. d., c Edward II. 

Tithes of the Forestry and Middle Canel. 

Barthw. Rich. Foljambe, Adam Forester, Adam de Aula, 
Alan del Hill. 

Pva. Hocklow. John Larcher, Wm. Rankelli, Alan Archer, 
\Vm. Bate. 

Abbeney. Robt,, Rich., and Jo. .\rcher. 
Shatton. Peter de Shatton, Wm. fil Edy (?). 
Highlow. Thos. Archer, Wm., his brother. 
Hocklow. Rd. Archer, 40 -. 



TITHI-; ROLLS. IJl 

F 1. s. d. Tithe Roll, c Hdward II. 

Ashford. Thos. de Maclesfield (28 Edward I. he had Ashford 
in farm from the King). 

Longsdon. bl. Wm. frat Ranulf. 

Hocklow Mag. Rich. Archer. 
F 2. 

Bakewell. Felicia Cress, of Ashford. Dna Dionisia le M'le. 
heirs W'm. Allej'n, of Monyash. 
F 5. 1339. 

Bakewell. Matilde de Shalcross. 
Mortuary List, s. d. 

Ralf de Sheladon Tydd. 

Rog. de Sheladon. 
E 11. 1336. 

Wormhill. Thos. fli Alan, Ad. Forester, Rich. Foljambe. 

Wheston. Jo. and Rog. Browne. 

Tydele. Jo. de Hethcote. 

Hocklow Maga. Rd. Jo. and Thos. Archer, Wm. Mainwaring. 

Hocklow. Alan Larcher, Wm. Bate, Jo. Renkelli. Roht. and Wm. 

Abbeny. Hy (Yateheir and E. Larcher) Ad le Rede, Thos. 
Howe Rich del Clough, Thos. and Robert and Robert de 
Bagshaw, John de Heghlow, Ric. de Gretrakes, Wm. 
Larcher, Vincent Plere. 

Burgh. Wm. de Hadfield. 

Aysh (ford). John Cele, Roger and Rd. Sharp, Nic. and 
Gerv. Woodword, Nicolas de Bagshaw, Wm. Trickett, 
Robt. le Hope, Hugo de Birches, Roger Dege, Juliana 
le Eyr, Elias Hacke, Jo. Colong, Alan Cap, Rad Lodes. 
E 14. 1340. 

Robt. Clic, Longsdon. 

Wm. fil Jo. Larcher, Cordeburg. 

Godfr Foljambe, Weston. 

Barth Foljambe, in Forestrj- and Herverwal. 

Nic de Stretlley, Albeny. 

Wm. Hethcote, Hocklow Major. 

John le Wine, Hope. 
E 15. 1340. Mortuary. 

Wm. de Meyr, Longsdon. 

Beatrice Ficher, of Ashford. 



2_2 rniiK uoi.i.s. 

MatiUic I'evcril, of Bircliele. 
Rich. Kl Hy. de Sheladcn. 
Roger LeeUe sold to Roger, his son. 
E 17. 1342. 1323-47. Arrears of Tithes. 
Rich. Archer, Hocklow. 
Philip Leche, Baslow. 

1335. Rich. Foljambe, Meedlecanel. 
1338. Oodfrey Foljambe, Weston. 

hrs. of Thos. Basset, Haddon. 

1340. \Vm. fil Jo. Archer. 

1341. Thos. Archer. 

1336. Mortuary. 

Win. Archer, Baslow. 
1338. Nic til Hugo de Bagshaw. 
Thos. and \Vm. Bagshaw. 
1341. Tideswell. Roht. de Hethcote. 

Robt. Forrester, Robt. Foljambe. 
Alice del Slac. 
. 1344. Roger Peveril died. (Mortuary Roll.) 
E 18. 1345. Cordebury. Wm. Larcher. 

E 19. 1.346. Burton. Godfrey de Foljambe. (Mortuary Roll.) 
Longsdon. Roger Foljambe. 
Longsdon .Mmor. Jo. Peveril died. 
K.K. 1347. Tithe Roll. 

Ashford. Alan de Shefield, Jo. de Waldlowe, William Torold, 
Rog. Rede, Thos. Trot, Tho. Capella. 
E 20. 1347. Tithe Roll. 

Longston Minor. Hy. in le Dale, Wm. de Aula, Wm. Rose, 
Peter Bayant, Wm. de Yolgrave, Jo. Rose, Jo. Mandeville, 
Marg. Rich. Thoas, Roger Foljambe, Wm. Fenal, Jo. Bate. 
Longston Magn. John del Dene, John Foljambe, Hugo Stree- 
isegere, Robt. Hay, John de Sheladon, Hy. Huy, Robt. le 
Roter, John Peveril, Jo. Wanter, Wm. Vignore, Wm. del 
Dene, Alan in le Muyce, Marg. Payne, John Cleric. 
E 24. 1351. 

Longsdon Tithes. Sold to Robt. Hervy, Wm. Eliot, Robt. Pye. 
E 28. c Edward 111. Arrears of Tithes. 
Robt. de Baggeshaw, Albeny. 
Rog. Foljambe de Longston, i mill of Mornesale, £4 15s. 



TITHK ROr.l.S. 



^73 



E 26. Mortuary list, 13 Richard 11. 

Matilde ux John fil Thos. de Sheladon. 
27. John Gaudul de Longsdoii. 14 Richard II. 
Alec Cres, of Ashfcjrd. 
Wm. Elys, of Moneyash. 
Ux Peter Dabb, of Longsdon. 
U.\ Jo. Rug, of Ashford. 
Alice Rode, of Ashford. 
Rich. Foljambe, of Longsdon Mag. 
Daniel Hubelin, of Ashford. 
Robert de Baggeshaw, Albeny. 

John de Aula, Roger Foljambe, of Longsdon Minor. 
Rich. Foljambe^ Ashford. 
E 27. 14 R 2. 

Rich, fil Rd. Foljambe, Wheston. 
Robt. Foljambe, Forester and Tunsted. 
Jo. Foljambe, Tydd. 
Names of debtors 
Robt. fil Rich Foljambe, 1 vac. 10s. 
Robt. Bagshaw gave bail. 
F 8. 1400. Tithes sold. 
Longsdon, Jo. Stafford. 
Mortuary Roll. Hugo de Mellor. 
F 9. 1403. Farm of Tithes. 

Ashford. Thos. Palmer, Jo. in the Dale, Wm. in the Green, 

Hy. le Hayward. 
Chapel en le Frith. Hugo Hally and Wm. Bradshaw. 
Forestry. Jo. Lavok, Jo. Smith, of Tideswell. 
E 33 4 April, 1404. Roll of Tithes, quitances. 
T. Palmer, Ashford. 
Wm. White, Sheladon. 
Ad. Redysh, Longsdon. 
T. fil Jo. de Brightrichfield. 
R. Leche, Longsdon. 
W. Leche, Chatsworth. 
E. 36. 1471. Garbs Sold. 
Ashford. Rd. Blakewell. 
Brushfield. Stephen Eyre. 
Pva Longsdon. Edward Bagshaw. 



,-, Sl'HSIDV ROLLS. 

-/4 

Lonosiloii. StcplKMi Hyrc. 
I.ongsdon. (jcnifrcy Fdl.jamhc. 
F. 11. 1515. 

Longsdon. Uxor. Hy. Bagshiuvc, ami Edward .Alley n. 
Hope. Win. Bagshaw, Vicar. 
Ilulcotes and Riddiiii<s. Ralf SlacU. 



SUBSIDY ROLLS. 



The names recoverable from the Subsidy Rolls aix- very few, 
except from the Roll of 4 Richard 11., which is remarkably full and 
valuable. That of 1 Edward HI. is in a deplorable state : much 
of it has perished, and very much of the Roll is deficient in the 
all important respect of localities. Only 15 parishes are certainly 
named out of 25 partly recovered; something like 90 is a full com- 
plement, but unfortunately there are no perfect Rolls of a later date 
with which to compare it. 

The name of .Ashford is wantuiii, but there is a portion of a Roll 
of which the two first letters are preserved — "As," which is pre- 
sumably Ashford, but the Roll itself only contains the surnames of 
Bowring Mason and Hertingdon, William fil Agnes, Richard Agard 
and Robert de Longston. This name is suggestive that we here 
obtain one of the family, of Wright, of Longstone. There is no proof 
that Robert Wright, of Great Longstone, who was presumably the 
ancestor of the WVights, ever resided at Ashford, but one of their 
earliest Charters (4 Edward HI.) located, apparently, a Robert le 
Wright at Great Longstone. His son, apparently, Henry le Wright, 
was of Ashford at this date (4 Edward III.) and Thomas fil Robert 
le Wright was of that place in 24 Edward HI. Fortunately the 
Subsidy Roll of 1 Edward HI. for Great Longstone is perfect, but 
it does not contain the name of Wright. It gives the names of 
Henry and Nicolas de Wardlow, Thomas fil William, John fil 
Nicolas, William atte Vicars, Richard fil William, Alan and Wm. 
de Roland. There are no subsidies for Little Longstone, or for 
Wardlow; perhaps the latter is inekided in Great Longstone. The 
conclusion, therefore, seems to he that Robert de Longston, of 
Ashford, was in fact Robert Wright of Great Longstone, but this is 
admittedly a guess. 



blliSIDV ROLLS. 



= /D 



The Poll Tax of 4 Richard II, is very t'lill of names, but un- 
fortunateij' it only relates to 14 parishes; perhaps some others are 
included under these names. It will be seen that of the five sur- 
names in the Subsidy of 1 Edward III. sugs^ested to be that for 
Ashford, the name of Wright is absent ; so also are the names of 
Mason, Hertington, and Agard, but the name of Bowring is found 
in it, so too the names of Wardlow and Roland are included, 
making it probable that part of the Longstones were assessed 
with it; but certainly not the whole, since the names of Wright 
and Longsdon are omitted. Unfortunately, at this date surnames 
were evidently not in common use in this Welsh district of England, 
which probably indicates the presence of many Welsh descendants 
of the Peverils, and of the early English inhabitants, who would 
naturally follow Welsh customs under Welsh chief lords, and, as 
it will be found presently, many Poles, Peverils, Lascys, and other 
Welsh families were still resident in Derbyshire at this date. 

The names of Henry Wright, Johanna, and Agneta de Longsdon 
are found in the Yolgreve Pole Tax, and John Wright and wife and 
Clement and James Longsdon are found in the Tideswell Roll, 
from which it may be inferred that the heading of these Rolls is 
imperfect, and probably Longston is contained in that of Tideswell, 
for most certainly Clement and James Longsdon, of that place, 
were living at that date, as well as John Wright. 

4 Richard II. 242 10. Asscheford. Wm. Ledebeter and wife, 
Rah his son, Roger in the Dale and wife, John in the Dale and wife, 
John in the Grene, Jo. servant of John in the Dale, Agnes his maid- 
servant, Roger Asser and his wife, W'm. in the Grene and his wife, 
Richard Walker and his wife, Thos. Legge, Alice daughter of Rich. 
Walker, Alice daughter of the same, John fil Robert and wife, Wm. 
his son and wife. Rich. Taylor Artific, Henry le Brogh and wife, 
Roger de Bounke and wife, Hy. de Thornlegh and wife, Simon 
.Milknave (Mill Boy) and wife, Wm. Tinker and wife, Mag. his 
daughter, Jo. Cawe his servant, John Smith Artif and wife, Margt. 
his daughter, Jo. Beyssley, John Ragg and John Schagh, .4dam Tailei- 
(Artifie) and wife, Wm. fil Susan, John .Melot and wife, Alice wife of 
Mat , .^gneta servant m xid of Li-tic Mat, Diohes Schagh, Jo. de 
Morley, Adam de Radryeh, Johnde Prasse and wife, Robt. Horeand 
wife, John de Derram and Agn de Waller, Sum n Milhr and 'c.'ife, 
y ). his svi. Hy. le Waller an.l wife, John Colby and wife, Roht. 



•■1<^ 



sriiMiiv uoi.i.s. 



Thaver anJ wife, Nicli Soulcr and wife, Letice his daughter, Hy. in 
the Green and wife, Nich Daneknave and wife, Roger his servant, 
Ager Burgeys, Wm. Aleyn his servant, Robert Lax and wife, Robt. 
Hauward and wife, Hy. fil John, Margaret his servant, Jo. Alotson and 
wife, Rog. fil .!(). and wife, John his son; AHce widow of Wm. Carter, 
Wm. fil Rog. and wife, Nich. his son, John de Wardelow and wife, 
Adam servant of Thos. Wardelow, Elena his servant, Hy. de 
Wardelow^ and \\ ife. Rich, de Bouke and wife, John fil Stephen ser- 
vant, Robt. fil John and wife, Henry Hanckson and wife, Nich. 
Daniel servant, John in the Dale and wife, Margt. his daughter, Ricli. 
Bnu'ring and wife. Rich. Bowring junior and wife. Rich. Wychul and 
wife, Thos. fil Robt., John fil Thos., Rich, fil Robt. and wife, Rog. 
fil i-Jobt., Thos. fil Simon and wife, Matilde wife of Wm. Simons, 
Rich. Powke servant, Wm. White and wife, Wm. fil Rich, and wife, 
Rich, his son, Thos. in tlie Dale and wife, John fil Hy. and wife, 
Wm. Ely and wife, Roger his servant. Rich. Ellis and wife, Hy. 
Clarkson, John his son, John Bateman and wife, Jo. de Botedon, 
John de Hunsyingdon and wife, Wm. Smith and wife, John Smithson, 
William Tayler and wife, Ager Machen, Agnes and Alice her 
daughters, Sunon de Cruesby and wife, Robert Abel and wife, Wm. 
Bigg and wife, Wm. Maryot and wife, Henry Bowemon and wife, 
John Lowecock and wife, Anest wife of William, Anest wife of Ad. 
Brych, IMagot her servant, Hy. Rayner and wife, John Cheseman and 
wife, Wm. Machin and wife, John Ely and wife, Roger Loucok, Rich. 
Smith and wife, John Freerson, and wife, yohn Foljainhc and wife, 
K'obt. Hendemon and wife, Simon Aldport and wife, John his son, 
Alice de Lynt his servant, Robert Souter and wife, Nich. Boiler and 
wife, Nich. Webster and wife, Wm. Ely and wife, John Balume and 
wife, John Reyner servant, Hugo Peynter and wife, Jo. Machen and 
wife, Hy. his son, John his brother. Rich. Flescher and wife, Jo. 
Machen and wife, John Kach servant, Jo. de Cowelow and wife, 
Agnes his daughter, Henry Wered and wife, Henry Malle, and wife, 
Jo. Troche, and wife, Thos. his son, Henry Bayard and wife, John fil 
Wm. and wife, Wm. Ricard, Richard Bigge and wife, Thos. Chesemon, 
EmI. Box his son, Alice his daughter, Alice .Mall servant, John 
Cressibroc, John Broklehurst and wife, Jud. .Amot and wife, Cecelia 
le .Mon, John de Hope and wife, Jo. fil Hemyand wife, Hy. his ser- 
vant. Rich le .Mon and wife, Jo. le Mon. and wife, Wm. Elys and 
wife, John and Henry his sons, God. and Agnes his servant, God. 



sriisim liiiLi.s. 277 

his servant and Agnes, John, fil Nich. and wife, John his son, Agnes 
Mower, Rich, in the Dale and wife, Hy. his servant, Henry Atomer 
and wife, Agn. Atomer, Alice her daughter. Rich. Carder servant, 
Thos. de Standon, Ad. serv., Hy. Mer, John de Cleton, Alice servant, 
of Rich. Elys, Thos. Sinylt and wife, Wm. in the Dene and wife, 
Thos. Reynold, Wm. North and wife, John Aylesle and wife, Alice 
Wo, Stephen Brown, John fil Ralf and wife. Rich, his son, Margt. his 
daughter, Roger White and wife, Nich. de Walton, Thos. fil Jo., fil 
Rad, Rosa Martyn, Jo., fil Rose, Robt. de Wardelow and wife, Jo. 
fil Eline and wife. Rich. Souter, Roger fil Hug, Wm. fil Hug, Hugo 
Frost, Henry fil Nich. and wife, Peter Dabbe and wife, Simon his 
son, Wm. Mayr and wife, Wm. fil Thomas and wife, John fil Wm., 
John de Boland, Cecil Walnete, Wm. de Bernys and wife, Cecil, wife 
of Thomas, Alan Tayler and his wife, Robt. his son, Elena his wife, 
Rich, fil Wm. and his wife, John fil William, Thos. Walnet, Henry de 
Arderne, Matilde his son, Wm. Lemyg and wife, Alex, in the Dale 
and wife, Wm. de Locke, Hy. Tayler, Wm. fil Rich., Mariot servant 
of Emma, Jo. in the Dene and wife, Jo. in the Dene junior, Jo. fil 
Hugo, Thos. Perton and wife. Matilde in the Dale, Hy. fil Simon and 
wife, Isabel Fox, Rich, de Prestclive, Thos. de Blackwell and wife, 
John of the County of Cheshire, Matilde his servant, Robt. Boloure, 
and wife, Roger Smith and wife, Isabel de Rouland, Wm. fil Peter, 
Rog. Godfre, John Fox with him. Robt. Shepherd and wife, Elena 
Meyr senior. 347s. 

Very few names can be taken from the Tudor and Stewart 

Subsidies: — 

15 Henry VIII., for Ashford. Hugh Sheldon, Wm. Dowen, 
William Bown, and Henry Whelow. 

9M1. 26 Henry VIII., for same. Thomas Sheldon, Henry 
Wright, Richard Hele, and Alex Gudhyn. 

92/166. 37 Henry Vlll. Edward Brownhill, John Borres, John 
Wright, John Ragg, Wm. Thorpe, Robert Jackson. 

No Subsidies for Edward VI. or Queen Mary. 

92/229. 14 Elizabeth. Thomas White, Henry James, Wm. 
Wright, Wm. Bourne, Thomas and Hugh Sheldon, Edward 
Harrison, and James Yate. 

99 983. 39 Elizabeth. Hugh Sheldon, Wm. Wright, James and 
Ralf Harrison, Hugo Eylye, Ralf and Thomas White, Richard 
James, Geo. Harry. 



2^8 COURT KOI.I.>> OF ASHFORD. 

93/350. 21 lames I. William Milnes. 

93/35 J ■ Car. I. i4ili April, 1626. \Vm. Wright, gentleman, 

50s. land; William Milnes goods, ^£4; Henry and Arthur Slieldon, 

John Iley, I.eonaid P'lost, Ralf White, William I'aitcrsalj, Elizabeth 

Jenkinson, Widow Robert Dore. 

93/362. 4 Car. I. William Milnes, ^4 go >ds. 



COURT ROLLS OF ASHFORD. 

Haddon Charters. 21 Henry VL Longsdon View of Frankpledge. 
William Gladwin Derley. 

Hy. de Buckstones (near Chapel in the Frith, place gone). 
Johanna Bagshawe (place gone). 

Thomas Heathcote, John, David, and Thomas Medow fined. 
William .\Iiliie, Richard Cobyn, Wm. 'J'aillow, Jo. Marlyn. 
John Troute, John Haseler. 
The King's jurors (?). 

William Glossop, John Hethiote. 
F. of All Saints. Ao. ^^ (.lo knu, ? Henry VL), Ashfurd Comt 
Roll. 

R.nil Leche, Wm. Milne, Jo. Buxton, of Chelmorden. 
4 Kdward IV John Prynce, John Heathcole, and Thomas 
Taylor, S. Mary the Virgin 

6 Ivlw.nd IV. William ll.Tirison v. Roger Uright and .Margaret 
his wife. 

13 Kdward IV. Richard C.ilton, William Peek, of Chesterfield, 
Henry Iladdeficid, John Decon 

nth May, 15 Kdward IV. John Milne, Thomas Decon, Jo. 
Soresby, Henry North, Roger Eyre, Rich Eyre, Philip Leche, Ralf 
Kyre, John Kingshire, John Barley, Thomas Calton, Rad Leech, 
John Cook, lead makers, John Decon and Emma his wife. 

15 Edward IV. St. Katherine the Virgin, the heirs of Jo. Mjlne. 

I'alm Sunday, 16 Edward IV. 

Roger Milne sued Johanna White in a plea of trespass for that 
she killed one sheep with her dogs to the d.Tin.nge of 2s. 

Chrmophcr Boden, W,,,. Decon, J.,hn Bielon, Jo Hurle, Rich, 
and Root. Legg, llci.iy Canlrei. 



COUKl HOLLS 01- ASHFOI;D. 279 

Feast of Sr. Giles. 

John Milne owed suit of court and was in default. 

John Jackson of Winstar. 

John Uene Wheler sued Roger Mihie, Jo. Turner, and John 

Wiight. 
Ralf Slieldon sued Wm. Decon. 
Hugo Skot and 'I hunias Dale surrendered a |)lace called 

Gladwin Yard to Robert Nicholson, John Greenhalge. 
Heniy 111 Kobert Wright sought admission to his father's lands. 

15 Edward IV. Stephen Eyre, baliff, Wil iam Decon, his deputy, 
John Soresby lly Canlrel, John Moscly. 

16 Edward IV. Kad. Leeclie, of Barleghes, Rich. Cobyn v 
Roger Milne, Nicholas E)!c, of Holm, Roger Bailey v Richard 
Oruie, John Wright v. Rogei .Milne. 

2 Henry Vll. Roger Stathan, Hy. North, Robt. Eyre and Roger 
Nicholas, and Ralf Eyre. 

:G August, 5 Henry VU. Richard Uecon, Henry Moseley of 
Tatlington. Roger Milne, of Ashford, surrendered into the hands of 
the Lord, a loft and croft lying in Ashford, in the tenure of 'I'homas 
Cortys, to the use of Henry Foljanibe, who came by John Arkralt, his 
attorney, and took the said loft according to the customs of the said 
Manor at the services due, and p n i 4d for ingress and was admitted. 
William Decon. 

6 Heniy Vir. William Decon 

Rich Orme de Long sued Roger Mylnes, of A.shford. 
2 Oct. John Decon, Richard and Wm. Decon, Hugh Reveli, 
Thomas Dale, William Breton, Roger Decon. 

7 Henry VIL Thomas Dawkin, of Chehnoiden, Rnhert Rcvell. 
23 July, 7 lleniy VH. Richard lleiithcote, of Chesteifield, sued 

Thomas Roland, of Ash, ami Nicholas Wilson of the same was bail 
for the said 'Thomas, 2s. 1 id. debt. Henry Gladwyn, of .Mosborough, 
V. Thomas North. Henry Marshall, of Haddon, Rich. Decon, to 
distrain Roger .Mi'nz for debt of William Shaw, of Bakewell. 

8 Henry VH. Rich. Decon on jury, Hugo Revel. 

20 April. Rich. Orme, Richard Hethcote, Roger Milnes. 

9 Henry VH. Richard Eyre, of Eyam, son and heir of Richard 
Eyre, lately deceased, Roger and Richard Decon, Robt. Borough. 

10 Heniy \' [I. Roger Myliiei, Richard Decon de Ashford. 



ago COURT KOLl.S OK ASHFOKD. 

St. Michael, ii Henry VI. Roger Milne, Wni. Reresby, Wm. Breton, 
Hugo Revell. 

12 Henry VH. Roger Decon and Roger Milnes 

Thomas fil and heir, Roger R utter, of Longsdon. 
I 3 Henry VH. Roger Decon on jury, Robert Stone. 
St. Michael Richard Decon, Frankpledge. 
Roger Breton, William Hethcote, of Chelmorden. 
Richard Wilson, Richard Lacy. 
Philip Eyre, of Holm, John Milnes. 
William Milnes, William Boden, of Holm. 
Edward Breton, son and heir of William Breton, deceased, took 
his lands, Robt. Johnson v. Wm. Mylne, of Ashford. 
s. d Rol)ert MiJdleton v. Nic. Eyre, William Bagshaw, Thomas 
and [ohn .\Iosley, Hugo Bigshaw, Thomas Dacon, Elene Eyre, 
Tliurston Eyre v. William Middleton. 

31 Jan., 15 Henry VII. Robert Calton, of Ensor, v. Roger 
Milnes, of Ashford, Rich. Lacy of Longsdon, Thos. fil and heir Ralf 
Mansfield, Johann.i Breton, of Longsdon. 

Roger Mylne, of Eynm? v. Robert Eyre, of Hurst. 
7 Oct., 16 Henry VII. Robert Stone, Roger Breton, Elias Peck 

19 Henry VII. Roger Decon, William Heathcote, of Chelmorden, 
Oeorge Leche, son and heir of John l.eche of Ch.ntsworlh, admitted 
by R'jbert Middleton and William Glossop, of Chatsworth, his 
aiturnies. 

William Decon Wm. Milnes sued Ciiristopher Bosnall. 
William Buxton, of Chelmorden. 
22 Henry VII. Wm. Buxton, of Chelmorden, Wm. Decon, 
Roger Decon, Wm. Milne and Alice, his mother. 

20 Oct., 23 Henry VII Humphrey Gudhyn de Whcldon 
(? Sheldon), son and heir of William Gudhyn, surrendered his land 
lo William Decon. 

A SiHVKY OF THE Ma.vok OF .\sHFORi) of Wm. Lord Cavendish, 

bv Wm. Senior, 1616. 

Ashford Demesnes, with 7 -Ashford acres in Bakewell, 571a.3r.39p. 

Tenements and Cottages (acres onlv given, roods and perches 

omitted.) Ralf Atkinson 49, Wm. Smith 39, Jo. Harris 43, Thos. 

Brownelle 39, Robert Vicars 37, Wm. Milnes 32, Wm. Hevward 32, 

Widow Milnes 15, Wm. Goodwin 8, Robt. Greaves 9, Wm. Wright 

and u.xor. Eason 28, Thos. Heyward 20, Robt. Lowe i, Henry 



COL'KT ROLLS 01- ASHFORl). 281 

Brownell 24, Hv. Mather 14, J'o. Rolland 6, Rise and \'allents 6, 

uxor Milnes 2, Godfrey White 2, Jo. White ',, ditto \, Thorpe 6, 

Stonehouse 2op., Bramwells, ?>Iasland and uxor. Holland ux(5r, Hvde 

each 2op., \ icar's house, yard and churchyard ^. Total, 976a. 2r. 3p. 

Copyholds and freeholds. 

Mr. Gell, the Holme bank, marsh and Lumford ... 122 

Roger Newton, the Holme hall and lands ... ... 93 

Winland in Ashford (in 29 parcels) ... ... 55 

Robt. \'icars 2, Thos. Thorpe 57, Geo. Hewvard 57, William 

T\yij^g 19a. 3r. 28p., Thos. Good\yin 43, George Johnson 42, \\ m. 

Platts 42, Wm. Milnes 47, Xic. Dale 40, Robt. Ragg 27, Jo. Wright 

40, Edwd. Hey\yard 33, Hy. Heyward 33, Wm. Wright 30, Robt. 

Lo\ye 32, Wm. Heyvyard the elder and yr, 28, Jo. Greayes 27, 

Leonard Sheldon 15, Ralf and Jo. White 9, Mr. Darling (in three 

parcels) i, Rd. Harrice 2, Michael Stones 2 houses, BramwcU and 

Brownell. 

Total ... 910a. 2r. 9p.* 



A. 


R 


p. 


Total Demesnes ... 571 


3 


j9 


,, Tenements 404 


2 


4 


., Free and Copy 912 





29* 



i,88S 2 32, besides the commons .tnd uas'.cs. 
Sheldon part of Ashford, 161 7. 

The Great Farm (several tenants) 106. the Lite Ra'f White 2 r, 
Shacklone, liie woody part, held by Darling and others 160, the 
phiyne part 1 2, Jo. White, Purtesley 3, Robt Vicai s id. h, Ralf 
Atkinson, in Harper Yard i. 

Copyholders. Abraham Cooper 31, Roger Dickons 29, Ro^er 
Dale 25. Jo. Rower 15, Tlios. White 14, Geo. Burnnves 10, Rich. 
Atkinson 17, Jo. Sheld'jn ir. Arthur Sheldon 9. Hy. and Peter 
White 9, Geo. Frost 9, Francis White 10, Hy. Harrison 7, Ricliard 
Sheldon 6, Richard Robinson 5, Wjn. Greaves 4. Ralf Slieldon 3, 
John White 8, Jo. Cooper, Geoige Barker, Roger Frost, The Common 
Pasture 127, the meane top of 1 h:>klcn 6. 

A. p. p. 

Total — The Tenements 348 o 8 

Copyh. & Common 376 1 ig 



724 I 27. besides moor and wastes. 

* Ttiis discrei.aiK-y appears in tlie MS. 



,g, COtTKT KOLIS OF AbUFOUD. 

Great Longson Tenements. 

Uxor. Rag>4 24, Win. Hadfie'd 22, Wm. Lavvnt 20, Rd. Nayles 15, 
— Harrison 19, Kobt. Haslani 14, Rt. Hayward 11, 'I'hos. Booth 9 
Grace Sellers 10, R-ilf Mather 8, Ily. Hancock 5, Jo Swinden 4, 
Thos. Kaye 2. 

Copy and Freeliolds. Tlie Countess of Shrewslury 12, Mr. Wm. 
Wright 117a. 3r. lop., 'I'hos. White 94. Wm. Lawnt 58, Christr. 
Jenkins 43, Rd. 'raltersall 42, Wm iM.jinb0 34, Jo. TomhUson 33, 
Mr. Sleifrh 23, Mr. Longson 21, Rowland Tomlinson 16, Wm. 
Winclicombe 9, Mr. Eyre 18. 

A. r.. r. 

Total — The Tenements ... 167 2 o 

Free and Copy ... 526 2 22 



694 o 22 
Besides commons and wastes of about 8874. 
Wardlowe Tenements. 

Nic. Redferne 37, Jo. Ellis 23, Thos. Hibiins 18, Kdw^ l.ongsdon 1 3, 
luhvard James i, Geo. Tomlinson 10, Ann Hodkinson 10, Rich. 
Hunt 9, Wm. Ratcliff 9, lidm. Gundy 7, Wm. Uoore 5. Jo. 
Tompson 5, Philip Raworih 4, Widow Cheshire i, Fore Doles, 
common wastes, open 8 

Copy and Free. Kalf James 76, Rich, fames 43, 'J'hos Rennelt 20, 
Nich. Hill 19, Edmund James 4, Wm. Eyre 10, Mr. Longson 4, 
Thos. Frith 6, Ralf Croswell 2op., Edward White 3r. 

A. R. p. 

Total — The Lord's Ten. 166 2 25 
Fiee and Copy 196 i 25 



363 o 10, besides commons. 

A. R. p. 

Total of the Enclosures of Ashford ... i,SS8 2 32 

I, „ Sheldon ... 724 1 27 

I, ,1 Great Longsdon 694 o 22 

„ ,, Wardlowe ... 3(13 o 10 

Commons of very large extent, besides tithes, mills, and lot of cope. 



COURT ROLI.b OK ^SHKOUD. 2S3 

(i) 4 Dec, 30 Eiy. Robert While died, seized of two bovates of 
land in Great Longsdon, Thomas his son and heir did fealty. 
Court Rolls of Ashford of f'enry Cavendish, Esq. ii Aug, 
6 James. Wm. Wright, senr, died holding two messuages and 
two bova!es. IVm. IV'ight, his son and heir, set 18 years, who 
did homage and gave 23/2 fine. 
(2) 13 April, 2 James Richard Tattersall surrendered F.Tveriong 
to Thos. Wiiiie, in fee, and same Couit Thos. Sellars sur- 
rendered land to him. 
(L) Mar., 1608. \Vm. Wright surrendered half an acre on Ilagwiy 
foot, between the hands of Wm, Mornsal, as well on the East as 
on the West, another acre between the lands of the Lord on the 
East and of Wm. Mornsal on the West, lialf an acre on Feales 
Head, between the lands of the Lord, East and West, one rood 
between land of Wm. Mornsale on the West and land of Rich. 
Ragg on the East, half an acre on Womfurlong, between land 
of Wm. Mornsale, North and South, one rood lying near a certain 
way, called Deggar Way, between land of Wm, Mornsale on 
the North and South, half an acre on Stourbridge, between land 
one rood on Cousty, between land of Anthony Loiigson on the 
East and Win. Mornsale, West, twelve acres on Duinsoone, 
between land of the Lord, Souih, and Wm, Mornsale, North, 
to the use of the said IVin. Mornsale for ever, who w.is 
admitted and paid 2/6 fine. 
(5) At tlie same Court. Wm. Mornsale surrendered half an acre 
on Stanterdale, between land of liie I.orJ, North, and of 
Wm. Wright, South, a rood on the Hagway foot, between land 
of the Lord, West, and land of Win. Mornsale, l^ast, anotlur 
rood between land of Thos. Tomlinson, deceased, on (he West, 
and lands of the said Lord, F.ast, half an acre on Gild.ile 'I'opp, 
between land of Wm. Mornsale, I-last, and land of Rich Rag'.', 
West, half an acre on ihe Long Croft, between land of Win. 
Wright. Knst and West, half an acre nn Rancll Head, between 
land of Wm. Wright, North and South, another rood on 
Ranell Head, between land of Wm. Launt, North, and of the 
Lord, South, half an acre on Ormond Meadow, between land 
of the Lord and W. Wright, West, a wood on Cowstile, be- 
tween land of W. Wright, West, and Wm. Mornsale, East, 
one rood on Dunnstone, between land of the Lord, South, and 



j84 court roils of ashfokd. 

■l^hc. Tomliiison, deceased, North, lo the int of Win. Wright for 
ever, who did fealty. Fine, 2/6. 

(2) 4 Oct., 8 James. William Wright surrendered land in Mill 
Lane, near Wm. Lawnt, Cowstye near Rowland Hatfield, 
Orniond Meadow, Birchill Way near Christopher Jenkinson, 
Birchill Ranel near Thos. White, Overwart Middle Hill, 
Beighton Flatt, near Thos. Wliite, Middle Fu long, Beggarway 
near Rich. Tattersall, to the use of I/airy Hanauke, who paid 
fine 2/1. 

(7) The said Mr. Wright also surrendered land on a furlong called 
Wall Hill, Ormond Meadow, Dunnstone, near Jo. Tomlinson, 
(iroom Flat, Costlow Botham, Costlow Hill, near Wm. Wins- 
combe, Costlow Middle Shutt, Longman Furlough, Womfurlong, 
Ondleburr, near lands of the Earl of Salop, Higli Middle Hill, 
Overthwart Middle Hill, Short Bomfurlong, Middle Furlong, 
the Pitt Deles, to the use of Wm. Hodgkinson Jot ever, who 
fined 3/8. 

/4) 10 Oct., 9 James. Wm. Mornsale, senr., surrendered a cot- 
tage called the Shoppe, to Wm. Mornsale, the younger. 

(S) Same Court. Wm. Wright surrendered a house in the tenure 
of Edward Haslam, and a piece of land at the end of a 
place called Greaves Yard, adjoining the highway and land of 
Thos. White, to the use of Edward Haslam and Elizabeth, his 
wife, and Edward, t/teir son, lor their lives, and the longer liver 
paying 2d. yearly. 4d. fine. 

(10) 13 Oct., 10 James. Wm. Lawnt surrendered one rood in the 
Coombes to Thos. White. Same Court. '1 he said Wm. 
Wright surrendered half an acre on Greenhill Top, between the 
lands of Thurston Wright, North and South, half an acre on 
Wall Hill, land of Wm. White and Wm. Winscombe, North, 
to the use of Win. Winscombe and Elz , his wife, for ever, who 
fined 8d. At the same Court, Wm. Winscombe and Elz., his 
wife, surrendered half an acre on Kiikstye, hen butt, to the use 
oj Thos. White, who gave 5d. fine. At the same Court, Thos 
White surrendered half an acre on Wall Hill, near land of 
Wm. Wright, a pilt dole, superior four parcels, called Fiit 
Doles, half rood, fo /.*« use of William Winscombe who pnid 
5d. fine. At t)if same Court, W^m. Winscombe and Elz., liis 



COURT KOLLS OF ASHFORD. 285 

wife, surrendered a rod in Hagwayfot and Ansenwall to the use 
of Wm. Wriglit for ever, who gave 8d. fine. 

(5) 3 April, 14 James. Wra. Mornsale, senr., surrendered the cottage 
called the Shop[)e, to John, his son, in fee. 

(16) A great Court Baron of Wm. Earl of Devon. 2nd April, 
17 James I. Wm. Wright surrendered one rood in Cross 
Flatte, Shelway, Costlowbotham, to the use of Wm. Lawnt for 
ever, 8d. At the same Court, Wm. Lawnt surrendered half an 
acre in Dale Mouth, 2 roods in Long Rood, near land of Jo. 
'J'omlinson and Thos. Eyre, half an acre in High Middle Hill, 
near land of Wm. Wright and Christr. Jenkinson, Raneli, 
Querasenwall, to the use of Wm. Wright for ever. 2/- fine. 

(6) 2 Mar., 17 James. Rich. Tattershall surrendered half an acre 
at the Croft, one acre at the Dale mouth, one rood in Gris- 
dale, one rood Costlowbotham, one rood Arsendell, to the use 
of William Wright for ever. i4d. fine. 

(19) 5 April, 19 James. Wm. Lawnt surrendered four messuages 
in Longsdon Magna and three bovates and one acre land, 
meadow and pasture, to the use of himself and Johanna his 
wife, and the longer liver in tail ; remainder to the ne.\i heirs 
of the said William. Fine, 23s. rid. 

(20) 10 July, 19 James. Wm. Hadfield, Thos. and Edward H., 
surrendered one messuage and one bovaie in Groai Longsdon 
to Jervase Sleigh in fee. 

(21) 3 .Aug, 19 James. Thomas White surrendered a messuage 
and two bovates of land and all his other land in Great Longs- 
don to the use of Wm. Wright and Wm. Milnes, their heirs, 
etc., for ever. jos. Sd. 

(22) 5 April, 20 James. Thos. White surrendered a messuage and 
two bovates of land, meadow and pasture, etc., in Great 
Longsdon, to the use of the same. Same fine. 

(23) 30 April, 21 James. Wm. Wright and Wm. Mylnes surren- 
dered same messuages, etc., to the use of said Thomas White, 
who paid fine, 20s. 8d., after the said Thos. White and Jana 
his wife surrendered the messuage, two bovates and one rood 
and a cottage in Great Longsdon to the use of Wm. Wright 
for ever, who paid 20s. 8d. 



286 CdUKT KllI.LS OF VSHFOKU. 

(24) 2 Car. William Winscoiiilit; surrendeied hind to John 
Mornsale. 

(25) Court of Christine, Countess o( Devon, 30 Mar., 1630. Wm. 
Wright and Anne his wife surrendered the Kannel Close, 
with a lane adjoining land of Wm. Lawnt, West, and oulbarr, 
containing 5 acres and i rood, in Middlehill, and half an 
acre called Parcel Seats, between land of Wm. Wright and 
Rich. Ragg, in Gt. Longsdon, to the use of Wm. Mornsale, who 
paid 3s. lod. /// the same Court. Wm. Mornsale and Eliz. 
his wife surrendered Hagway foot Close, containing 4 acres and 
3 roods, between land of the heirs of Rich Ragg and Wm 
Wriglit, in Little Longston .VIoore, and half an acre in tenure 
of Robt. Haslam, called Gildale Head Close, between hind 
of Thos. Eyre and Wm. Lawut, to the use of Wm. Wright, 
sen. Fine 3s. lod. 

(9) View of Fr. PI of Christine, Countess of Devon. 7 April, 8 
Car. I. Wm, Lawnt, of Weiton, Staff., by Wm. 'lattersall and 
Wm. Mornsale, his attorneys, surrendered that messuage, cot- 
tage, etc , in Miktl Longsdon, to the use of Wni Lawnt, jun., 
his nephew, and Wm. Lawnt, son and heir of the said Wm 
Lawnt, ji;nr., his heirs, etc , after the death of the said W^m. 
Lawnt, the elder, and Joane, his wife 36/3. 

(2S) 24 June, 9 Car. I. Wm. Milnes and Maria, his wife, who A'as 
a co-heir of Rich. Kagg, late of Great Longsdon, deceased, 
surrendered a third part of the land of the said R. ilngg to 
the use of Wm. Wright, of Great Longsdon, senr , efo. Fine 
3/10 and one-third of a penny. 

(29) 5 Aug., 10 Car. L Wm. Lawnt, of Wetton, junr., by Wm, 
Milnes and Rich. Atkinson, surrendered his rights, etc . in land, 
etc., in Great Longsdon, within the jurisdiction of Ihe ■VLinor 
of .'\shford, and then in the tenure of Robt. White, Kdward 
Spencer, Wm. Thorpe, and Jas. Spencer, to the use of the said 
Christine, Countess of Devon. 

'10) 16 Dec , 10 Car. L Wm Lawnt. of Wetton, junr., surrendered aii 
lands, etc., in the tenure > f Ed\»aid Has'.am, Anthony 1 Lincock, 
John Sleigh, J(>. Sunon, Tlios White, Wm. Steward, also Boore, 
Marie Higgin, Samuel Scain.'iiutne, and Thos Watt, to the 
use of Wm. Wright, of Great Longsdon, senr, for ever. Fine 
16/3. 



COURT ROLLS OF ASH FORD. 287 

(31) 2 Mar., 10 Car. The Countess Dowager (if Devfin, by Win. 
Milnes and Geo. Brewill surrendered the messuages, etc , 
whicli Win. Lawnt, of Wetton, recently surrendered to her, in 
the tenure of Robt. White, Edward Spencer, Wni Ihorpe, and 
Jas. Spencer, to the use of \Vm. \\'right, senr., of Great 
Longsdon, fine 20s. At the same Court, the said Wm. Wriglit 
surrendered a parcel of land, 1 1 virgates long and 6 virg wide, 
in the East part of an orchard of Jo. Mornsale, to his use, at 
id. rent and id. fine. 

(11) 6 Oct., 12 Car. I. Wm. Wright, senr., surrendered a messuage 
cottoge, land and holdings in Great Longsdon, whicli lie lately 
boUi^lit of the said C^iuntess of Devon, Wm Lawnt, of Wetton, 
Wm. Milnes and .Maria, to the use of his Will.- Fine, 40s. 
and ^d. 

(34) 10 Nov, 14 Car. Win. Milnes, of .\shford, senr, Thos 
Dakyn and Eliz., Wm. Nayler and Sitha (?) his wife, sur- 
rendered llieir right to a close called iviliiecroft, and one 
clo5e adjoining, called Meies Close Head, half a close abutting 
on Sionebridge, East, and land of the Church, North, one rood 
in Costlowbotham, near land of Wm. Wright, West, and Wm. 
Winscombe, East, and a close called W.ill Hill Close, to tl;e 
use of Wm. ^^'right, senr. Fine, 233. 

(35) 24 Oct., 1637. \Vm. Cowp surrendered Biown Close to 
George Co«p. 

(36) 4 Jan , 1638. Win Nayler surrendered one rood, called Eley 
Meadow, near Hy. Scammardine, to Ike use of JV/u IVri^/it, senr. 
Fine, 2d. Christr, James and Eliz. his wife, one of tlie co- 
heii esses of Rich Ragg, surrendered a messuage, one bay of 
orchard, one garden anj rickstead and ladderstead, and their 
interest in one-third of a bovate except one acre previously 
suirendeieJ of Hy. Scamardine, in Great Longsdon, lale in 
tenure of Christr. James and Eliz his wife, Elizabeth Ragg, 
John Tayler, Nich. Garlick, to the use 0/ Wm. Wright, senr. 
Fine, 3=. 1 i 1. 

(37) The same Court. Wm. Wright surrendered the same tene- 
ments and other land in Great Longsdon surrendered to Wm 
Wright by Thos. Dakyn and Eliz his wife, Wm. Nayler and 
Sitha his wife, to the use of his Will. Fine, 5s. Jd. 



,gS COURT ROLLS OF ASllKOIiD. 

(12) 2 2 Oc;l., 1639. John Greaves, of Aslifoid, and Anna his wife 
surrendered land in Tiiornyside, in the tenure of George Cowp 
to his use. 

(38) 6 Jan., 1639. Thos. Dakin, by Wni. Mornsale, surrendered 
two parts of a cottage at Great Longsdon, in the tenure of 
KHz. Hill, Wo., and li rood in Bamfurlong, adjoining land 
of Win. Nayler and Wm. Wright, to the use of Wm. Wright, 
Fine, 4d. 

(13) I July, 1641. Wm. Milnes, senr., of Ashford, Anna Heyward, 
Widow, Wm. Nayler and Sitha his wife surrendered Costed Close, 
containing 4^ acres, late the inheritance of Wm. Tattersal, to 
the use of Wm. Wright, senr. 3s. fine. Wm. Wright sur- 
rendered to the use of his Will. Fine, 3s. 

(13) 29 Aug., 1641. Wm. Wright, junr,, of Great Longsdon, and 
Margaret, his wife, surrendered five messuages and five bovates 
of land, and one close, called Hagvvay foot, lately surrendered 
to Wm. Wright and Wm. Mornsale, to the use of Wm. 
Wright, the elder, gentleman, father of the said Wm. Wright, the 
younger, who fined ^£2 15s. 2d. 

(i.| 25 Jan., 17 Car. Roland Piatt surrendered Womfurlong close, 
one acre in Dunnstone, two acres and three parcels of one rood 
in Wall Hill, a close, called Mire Sitch Botham, one and a half 
acies in Cowstye, and three roods in Hughlow Meadow, to the 
use of IViu. Mornsale. Fine 6s. id. ob. 

(43. .14') 18 Aug., 1642. Duplicate copies. J^o. Mornsale sur- 
rendered a cottage, with an orchard adjoining, containing two 
bays of building and half a curtilege, in his own occupation, to 
ilie use of Wm. Wright, of Great Longsdon, wlio paid 6d. fine. 

Us) 25 Oct., 1642. Wm. Wright surrendered three acres in Cow- 
stye, High Middlehill and Flaxdale, to George Cowp, on lease 
for ten years. 
46) 20 April, 1643. Wm. Wright surrendered half an acre in 
Standhill, near land of Francis Welsh, at Gildale Head, three 
roods, to the use of Richard Wright for ever, rod. fine, and 
a! Ilie saiiii Cotirl, Richard IVright (duplicates of R. Wright's), 
half an acre of land on Longman F'urlong, and 3 roods on 
Stonylowe, in Ox Pasture, to Wm. Wright, lod. fine. At the 
same Court. Win. W'inscomhe surrendered one acre in Beggar 
Way, and one parcel at Great Pitt Sales to the use of Wm. 



COURT ROLLS OF ASH FORD. 289 

Wright for ever, and gave 4d. ob , and William Wright sur- 
rendered half an acre on Rannell, land of Wni. Winscombe 
and Roland Eyre, and a parcel of land in Mill Lane Close, 
containing seven virg. in length and eleven virg. in breadth, to 
the use of Wm. Winscombe. Fine, 4d. ob. 

(52) 12 Aug., 1643, Wm Milnes, senr., surrendered half an acre 
in Abhford, on the Broad Lea, to Wm. Dale. 

(53) 20 April, 1643. Hy. Tomlinson surrendered half an acre on 
Buck Home, in Standbridge, to Rich. Green, and Wm. Milnes 
surrendered five acres in Ashford, to Wm. Wright, at same 
Court. 

(15) 7 Oct., 1645. Wm. Dale, who held a messuage, two bovates 
and five rods of land in Ashford, died since last Court, the 3rd 
day of Aug. last, Sarah, wife of Hy. Smith, of Derby, gent., his 
sister and heir, and is 19 years old, fine 163 lod. At the same 
Court, Wm. Wright surrendered a parcel of land and a cottage, 
in which Wm. Clowes lived near Robt. Slack's, to the use of 
Wm. Clowes. Fine, id. 

([6) Ult. Oct., 21 Car. Henry Smith and Sarah his wife sur- 
rendered a messuage, two bovates, and five roods of land in 
Ashford (Walter Dale's land) to the use of Wm Wright, 
gentleman. Fine, i6d. and rod. 

(5S) iS April, 1646. Wm. Wright surrendered two closes in Long- 
greavc, containing two roods and half an acre, in Standham, 
near Rd. Wright's, and half an acre at the Great Pitt Head to 
the use of Rich. Wright, the younger, who gave i2d. fine, and 
Rich. Wright, the younger, surrendered half a close, called 
Little Stronglow, containing three roods and half an acre, in 
Longman Furlong, and one rood in the parcel waste land of 
Anthony Longson, gentleman, to the use of the said Wm. 
Wright, who gave i2d. fine. 

(17) 3 June, 1646. Wm. Mornsale and Eliz. his wife surrendered 
half an acre of land in Eyley Meadow, and one rood to Wm. 
Wright, gentleman, who paid 6d. fine. (Duplicate of this.) 

(60) 4 Oct, 1647. Henry Smith and Sarah his wife surrendered 
a messuage, two bovates and five roods in Ashford (late Dale's) 
to the use of Wm. Wright, who paid i6s. lod. fine. 

(61) The said Wm. Wright surrendered two cottages and two Crofts 
in Ashford, at the Hall end, in the tenure of Thos. Clegg and 



IQO COURT ROLLS OF ASHFORD. 

Thos. barker, and a close, in the tenure of Hy. Greenfield, to 
the use of \Vm. Milnes, senr., for ever, who paid i8d. fine. 
(iS) 30 Mar, 24 Car., 1648 Wm. Milnes surrendered five roods 
in Caldwell to the use of Wm. Wright for ever, who gave 
lod. fine. 

(63) Same Court. John Andrew and Alice his wife, and Fredk 
Jackson and J.ine his wife, surrendered a messuage in Ashford 
to William Wright. 

(64) 7 April, 1649. Wm. Wright surrendered a messuage, two 
bov.ites, and five roods of land in Ashford, ihree cottages, one 
orchard, one apple garden, with divers land in .Sheldon, and 
another messuage, orchard and garden, and six roods of land to 
the use of Wm. Wright (maximi iialu nepolis), tlie grandchild 
of him, Wm. Wright, senior, for his life; remainder to 
Manners Savile and her assigns for her jointure, and after her 
demise to the use of Wm. Wright, the younger, for ever. Fme, 
20s. 8d. At the same Court, William Wright, the elder, sur- 
rendered five messuages, five bovates of land, three cottages, 
and 12 acres in Great Longsdon, to the use of himself for 
life; remainder to Wm. Wright, his grandson. Fine, 
£2 155. 2d. 

(19) Aug., 1650. Richard Green and Eliz , his wife, surrendered 
land in Standbridge, to Wm. Wright. 

(67) 17 May, 1654. Wm. Mornsale, the elder, surrendered a close, 
called Womfurlong, containing three acres one rood, to the use 
of Wm. Wright, gent , for nine years, after the expiration of a 
lease of twenty-one years, made to George Torre. Fine, 2s. 
and 2d. 

(68) 20 Oct. 1655. Wm Mornsale, the elder, surrendered an acre 
of land on Cowstye, to Wm Wiight, the younger, for ever. 
Fine, 8d. 

(69) 14 April, 1657. Wm. Mornsale surrendered a close in Wom- 
furlong, three acres one rood, with three beast grasses, in a 
pasture, called the Hey, to the use of William Wright, gent., 
for ever. Fine, 2s. 2d. 

(20) 22 .\pril, 1658. Wm. Winscorabe, Joseph Ludlam, clerk, and 
Eliz., his wife, surrendered half an acre in Hey Close, half an 
acre in Upper Nutt, adjoining the Chunches land West, one 
acre and one rood, and half an acre on Cowstye, one acre 



COURT ROLLS OF ASHFOKD. 29' 

0:1 Rannill, to the use of VVm. Wright for ten years. Fine, 
2S. 8d IV/'i. IViight sutreiideted ^\\o roods in Costlowe, one 
acre on Wall Hill, one rood, two roods, on Middle Furlong, 
and one rood and one rood, to the use of Wm. Winscombe, 
Joseph Ludlam,derk, and Eliz.his wife, for ten years. Fine, 2S. 2d. 
(72) 9 June, 1659. Wm. Wright surrendered half of a messuage, 
with an entry fur dore to open two bays of a barn and half an 
Gxgang of land, and halt a beast gale on Longsdon Way, to the 
use of Bernard White for twenty-one years, at the rent of 
£i, I2S. 6d, fine, 6s. lod. Wm. Wiixht smrendaed half of a 
messuage, two bays of a barn, and halt an oxgang of land, and 
half a beast gate, in Longsdon, to the use of Thos. Hodgkinson, 
for twenty-one years, rent, £\ 12s. 6d. fine, 6s. lod. The 
said IVin rf;;V/;/ surrendered a messuage, a barn, half an ox- 
gang (if land, and one beast gate in Longsdon to the use of 
Wm. Bramall and Bernard Spencer, (or twenty-one years. 
5s. 8d., rent, £s 6s. 8d., and a messuage and half an ox- 
gang of land to Thomas Bagshaw, for same term on same fine, 
rent, £a I OS. 
(21) Wm. Wright also surrendered one quaiter of an oxgang, and 
one beast gate, in Longsdon. to Wm. Uakin, for same term, at 
a rent of £2 6s, fine, 2S loJ., and a/so one quarter of an ox- 
gang and one beast gate to Nathl. Barton, for same term, rent 
£2 3s. Fine, 2/6 Win. Monisale, the elder, surrendered a 
close, called Rannill, containing five acres, with a lane, and 
half an acre in Feales Head, to the use of Wm Wiight for ever. 

Fine, 3s. 8d. 
(79) 23 Oct., 12 Car. II. Wm. Mornsale, senr., surrendered six 

roods of land on the Croft End to the use of Wm. N\ right, for 

twenty five years after llie decease of the said Wm. Mornsale. 

IS. fine. 
(231 25 March, 15 Car. II. John Rowbotham surrendered Ranell 

Head Close, containing five acres, to the use of Wm. Wright 

for fourteen years. Fine, 3s. 4d. 
(81) 26 March, 15 Car. II. Rich. Green and Eliz, his wife, George 

Cowper and I'.aibara, his wife, surrendered the Little Brown 

Close in .Asliford, and the New Close, containing eleven roods 

and bix rooOs, called 'I'hornybide, to the use of Wm. Wright 

forever. 2s. lod. fine.. 



202 COURT ROLLS OF ASHFORD. 

(82) George Cowp and Barbara, his wife, surrendered the Tudden 
Flat Close, containing one acre, lo the use of William Wright 
for ever. Fine, Sd. 

(8j) U'illiam Wri-hl siurendeied ilic Little Brown Close, New Close, 
containing eleven roods and six roods, called Ihornyside, to 
the use of George Cowp for twenty-one years. Fine, 3s. 6d. 

(84) George Cow^ surrendered one rood on Lambourn, near land of 
Kichard Green, one acre on Burnside, and half an acre, and 
half an acre by Wm. Milnes, to Wm. Wright for twenty-one 
years. Fine, 2s. 2d. 

(Note on margin — This surrender is only to secure the rent of 
the former surrender.) 

(85) 29 .Xpril, isCar. II. Wm. Mornsale and Bennett Street, Wc, 
surrendered a cottage in tenure of Bennett Street, and an 
orchard adjoining, containing three baiars of building and a 
toft called the Backside, containing six roods, with rights of way, 
to the use of Wm. Wright for ever. Fine, i6d. 

(24) I May, 15 Car. II. George Cowp surrendered a messuage, 
two orchards, a stable, and garden at Church Dale Head, one 
rood at Lambercase, near lands of Richard Green, one acre 
at Burnside, one rood ped. Jerger, three acres in the Great 
Brame Close, to the use of himself for life; remainder to 
William Cowp, his son and heir. Fine, 4s. 2d. 

(25) 6 April, 1664. Hy. Scammardine, senr.,and "Hy. Scammardine, 
junr.," surrendered a messuage and stable, two baiars of orchard, 
two gardens, and two parts of a fold, in the tenure of Eliz. 
Swindell, Wo., except an acre surrendered to Wm. Wright, 
and one rood, called the Fall Furlong, to the use of the said 
Wm. Wright. Fine, 6s. io|d. 

(89) At the same Court Wm. Wright surrendered an orchard, con- 
taining two baiars of building, one virgate in breadth, two 
parts of the fold, and a swinehouse adjoining the cottage of 
Jas. Scammardine, to his use. Fine, 2d. 

(go) Wm. Wright also surte.ndered a cottage and two orchards and 
one-third of a bovate in the tenure of Hy. Scammardine, senr., 
and two cottages in the tenure of Rich. Scammardine and Ann 
Ausebrook, to the use of the said Hy. Scammardine for his life; 
remainder to his son Henry for ever. Fine, 3s. i^d. 



COURT KOLLS OF ASIIFOI-D. 293 

(26) 24 Oct, 1665. Wm. Cowp surrendered a messuage, two 
orchards, and a stable and garden at Church Dale Head, one 
rood on Lambcrease, one rood on Burnsides. and half an acre, 
one rood, iialf an acre, half an acre, one rood, three acres in 
Great Brame, to the use of Wm. Wright after the decease of 
Geo. Con'p. Fine, 4s. 2d. 

(92) 3 April, 1 666 (duplicate). Rich. Wright surrendered half an acre 
in Highlou- .Mead, near land of Thomas Longson, gentleman, 
and Jo. Tonilinson, iialf an acre and one Cowstye to the use 
of Wm Wright for ever. Fine. 8d. Rich. Wright also sin- 
reiiJeie.i to Wm. Wright three roods in the Gildale Close 
after the decease of Fras. Flint, Wo. Fine, 6d. 

(27) 10 Oct, 1668. Wm. Wright surreiideyed a messuage and 
lands in Ashford called the Dale's Farm, in the tenure of 
George Riddeard, and half an acre in Betchstones, in the 
tenure of Jas. Finney, to the Lise of himself for life; remainder 
to Penelope his wife ; remainder to his issue male in tail on 
the body of said Penelope ; remainder to his own right heirs. 
Fine, 17s. lod. // Zt'(7.f//«t;/'/'<'(f that Wm. Wright, gentleman, 
who held five messuages, 10 cottages, 4J bovates in Great 
Longsdon, was dead, and that Wm. Wright is his grandson 
and heir and of full age. Fine, £^2 8s §d. 

(28) 9 May, 1671. Wm. Wjight surrendered all the lands, etc., 
which he had from his grandfather, Wm. Wright, and which he 
bought from the Countess of Devon, Wm. I.awnt, of Wetton, 
Wm Milnes, and Maria, his wife, to the use of George and 
Wm. Savile. Fine, 40s. Jd. Win. Wright (duplicate)^ also 
surrendered a close, called Kilne Croft, and the Mires Close, 
half an acre on Ston bridge, one rood in Costlowbotham, one 
third rood of Wall Hill Close to the use of the same, who paid 
23d. tine. He also (duplicates) surrendered one rood in Eley 
Mead to the same. Fine, 2d. And alse a messuage, one baiar 
of orchard, one garden, one rickstead and ladderstead, one- 
third of a bovate, between land of Christr. James and Eliz., his 
wife. And also the land surrendered to his grandfather by Thos. 
Daken and Eliz., his wife, William Nayler and Sitha, his wife, 
to the same use. Fine, 5s. ^d. Also a close, called Costidde 
containing four and a half acres, formerly the inheritance of 
Wm. lattersall. Fine, 3s. Also five messuages and five borates 



COUKT ROLLS OF ASHFOKD. 

of land, three cottages, and one rood in Great Longsdon, to 
the same use. Fine, ^2 iss. 2d. And also messuages, etc., at 
Church Dale, Ashford, called Cowp's Farm. Fine, 7s. 8d. 

(30) And same Court. Wm. Wright surrendered a close on Ston- 
bridge to Geo. and \Vm. Savile (duplicates of this). 

(.04) I4.^ug., 1671. The said Geo. and \Vm. Savile, surrendered 
the five messuages and five bovates, to Wm. Wright. Fine, 
^2 15s. 2d. 

(105) 10 Feb., 1 67 1. The said Geo. and Wm. Savile surrendered 
the lands bought of the Countess of Devon, Wm Lawnt, 
Lawnt, and Wm. Milnes and xMaria, his wife, to the said Wm. 
Wii-ht. Fine, 40-. Jd. 

(106) Also a close, called Kilncroft Close, one called Meres Close Head, 
land at Stunebridge one rood in Costlowbotham, one-third of a 
rod in Wall Hill Close. Fine, 23d. 

(107) Also Ehy Mead, one rood. Fine, 2d. 

(108) Also land, between land of James' and Uaken's. Fine, 

(109) Also Costidd Close, etc., of Wm. 'i'altershall. Fme, 3s. 

(110) Also land in Church Dale Head. Fine, 7s. 8d. 

(32) 4 Mar., 1672. Wm. Wiightand Penelope, his wife, surrendered 
Liitle Caldwell Hill, Ashford and Great Caldwell Hill, 
Hylots Meeihead, land at Stanbridge, one rood at Rye 
Wood, half a rood iMunilees Gare I'lit, to the use of Jas. 
Scaniniardine. 

(112) II April, 1673. The same, a messuage etc , in Ashford, in the 
tenure of George Reddeard to Wm. Green. Fine. 12J. 

(113) Lit'id'm Ashford, called Ntiher Greeves. to Rich Johnson. 

(114) Olln-r land to Wm. I'.rewell and .MicC: his wife, to Wm. Lowe, 
to Hy. Fallowes, Edward Jackson, some to himself, other to 
Jo. Oxspring. 

(116) 24 .May, 1673. Anna Andrews, Wo., surrendered a cottage 
to Thos. Heald and Eleanor ux., in Sudden Flat, and same 
Court land to Edward Harrison and Emma. 

(34) 6 Aug., 1673 William Wright and Penelope his wife sur- 
rendered one acre in Ashford to Jo. Headen. 

(35) 2^ J^'y- '674. The same four Closes in Ashford, at Finney 
Leas, and U.jle's half close, called Broadwood, between land 
of Samuel Wright, to George Brewell. 



ASHFORD PARISH REGISTtR. 295 

(120) ist May, 1675. Wm. Wright and Rd. Wright on jury. Death 
of Win. Wright, grandson of Wm. Wright, presented Tiiomas 
Wright, son and heir, aet. 13 years, in the custody of Penelope, 
his mother. Fine, 40s. ^d. Seven other presentments of his 
property. 

(36) 1 May. Geo. Birds surrendered Wall Hill Close to Wra. 
Athen and Marie his wife. 

(1231 20 May, 1676. Thomis Bagshaw Steward. John Greaves 
surrendered one rood, called Four Sw.ithes, in Sweet Balkes 
Land, to Robt. Holme. 

(38) 29 Oec, 1677 M.-irii Street, spr., surrendered a messuage in 
the tenure of Wm. .AUeyn, to his use. 

(39) 13 Oct., 1680. Wm. AUeyn surrendered same to Wm 
Jackson. 

(126) 14 Jan, 16S1. Robt. Milnes surrendered half a rod to Wm. 
Alleyn 

(127) 13 June, 1685. Wm. Heathcote and Eliz. his wife, Edwd. 
Harrison and Emma his wife, Thos. Neald and Eleanor his 
wife, surrendered a cottage and a croft in Ashford, in the 
Sudden Flat, to Thomas Wright, Esq 

(40) 23 April, 1686. Joshua White, Wm. .Alleyn, and Cathe. White, 
surrendered a cottage, etc., in Mjnale Dale to Penelope 
Wright, spr. 

(129) 4Sept., 1686. Penelope surrendered same to Thos. Wright Esq 

7 April, i688. Wm Milnes, junr., surrendered 4J acres in 

Ashford, and other land, to Thos. Wright. 
('3') 5 Aug., 1695. Matilde Balam surrendered a messuage, in 

Longsdon, in tenure of Edwaid Heathcote, to Thos. Wright. 
(42) 2 April, 171 1. Thos. White and .\un\, ux., Jas. Milnes, and 

John Tomlinson, surrendered Coombe's Close, cont.dning 

three acres, to said Thos. Wright. 



ASHFORD PARISH REGISTER. 

1674. Jan.. 28. Anthony Ward, of Brownside, buried. 

1675. July I. Anna fil Rd. Whitbey and Margt. ux. bap. 

1676. Mr. William Wiiite Minister m. Mrs. Francis Browne, both ot 

this parish. 



jg6 ASHFOUD PARISH KEGISTEU. 

1677. Oct. 8. Mary, dau of George Warbuiion and Elizabelli ux, 

bap. 
1677. Nov. 22. Muriel, dau. of Thomas Browne and Sarah, his 

wife, of Marsh Mill, bap. 
1688-9. Jan. 17. Ellen fil Roger and .Anna Buxton, bap. 
1690. July 10. Margt. fil R. and Margt. Whitbey, bap. 
.Sept. 2r. lona ux "Wm. Greaves, Ini. 
Oct. 7. Josephus fil Wm. and Anna Langford, bap. 
Dec. 23. Ralf. fil Wm. Green, bap. 

1692. Mar. 30. Eliz. ux Ralf. Langford, bu. 

1693. May 15. Ralf. Langford, bu. 

Aug. 19. Rich, fil Rich. Wliiibey, bap. and bu., '95. 
1695-6. Mar 8. Margt. ux. Rd. Whitbey, bu. 
1696 June 28. EUena Langford, bu. 

Nov. 15. Thos. Langford, bu. 
1696. July 5. Wm. fil William Green, bap. 

Nov. 13. Wm. fil Jo. Harris, hu. 
1699-1700. Jan. 28. Joseph fil Jo. Harris, bu. 

1702. Wm.nl bap. 
I 701. Oct. 5. Steph. Green, bu. 

1 702. Dec. 20. Anna ux Roger Buxton, bu. 

1703. May 8. Alice Greaves, bu. 

May 25 Rd. Green and Francis Whitby. 
1703-4 Feb. 12. Robert Buxton, of Cartlidge Dronfield, bu. 

1704. Mar. 28 Wm. fil Rd. Green, bap. 
Mar. 25. Anna ux Wm. Langford, bu. 

1706 April 8. Eliz fil Rd. Green. 
Nov. 6. Anna Harris, bu. 

1707. Oct. 26. Wm. fil Wm. and Anna Langford, bu. 

1707-8. Mar. 7. Wm. Langford and Margt. Cook, both of Ashford, m 

1708. July . Rd. fil Rd. and Frances Green, bap. 

1710. Thos. fil Rd. Green, bap., Margt , bap , 17 14/5, Jo. '15, Mar 

1716/7, bap. 

1711. Aug. 19 Thomasine Green, bu. 
Sept. 15. Geo fil Jo. Han is, bu. 

1 7 14. Oct. 24. Anna fil Jo. and Ann Eyley, of Sheldon, bap. 

1 7 14-5. July 9 ISLiry ux Thos Langford, bap. 

1717. July 17. Jo. Harris, bu. 

Nov. 3. Ralf. fil Wm. and Lydia Green, bap. 



ASHFORD PAPISH REGISTER. 897 

1720 I. Mar. 10. Wni. Green, bu. 
1/2 1. Sept. 5. Roger Buxton, bu. 

Mar. 4. Thos. Greaves, bu. 
1722-3 Jan. 5. Rd. fil Wm. and Rachel Green, bu. 26 Nov, 1731. 

Rachel, bap. 29 Nov., 1726. 
1722-3. Mar. 8. Jo., son of Jo. and Eliz. Harris, bap. 
1723. Dec. 10. Geo. fil Joseph and Dorothy Harris, bap. 

Wm., bap. 16 Nov., 1726. Joseph, bap. 30 Aug., 1729. 
Ann, bap. 1732. 
1726. July 12. Wm. Langford, bu. 
1726-7. Mar. 13. Ann ux. Jo. Greaves, bu. 
1727-8. Jan. 17. Rd Langford, bu. 

1728. April 13. Geo. Harris, of Birchill, bu. 

1729. Oct. 9. Wm., of same, bu. 

1730. May 30. Mary ditto 

1729. July 15. Margt Langford, Wo., bu. 
1731-2. Mar. 23 Mr. Richard Whitbey, bu. 

'735- Aug. 15. Margt, daughter of Jo. Glossop and Mary, of 
Ashford, bap. 
Sept. 28 Eliz , daugliter of Wm. Green and Mary, bap. 
1751. May 26 ALirgt., daughter of David Price, bap. 
Aug. 20 Lydia, daughter of Thos. Green, bap. 
Dec. 25. Benj., son of Benj. Farmer, bap. Wm., bap. 22 
Ju., 1754. 
1 752. July 5. Alex , son of Wm. Cockin, bap. 

Molly, bap 1757 and bu., and Fanny, bu. ; Eras., son, bap. 
5 Jan., 1760; Josei)h, bap. 31 Jan., 1762; Jo., son of W. 
and Mary, bap. 26 April, 1766, and bu. 
1753. June 6. Wm , son of Jo. Harris, junr., and Cathe., bap. 

and bu. 
1753. Dec. 4. Wm. Harris, bu. 
'754-5- J^n- 5- Thos, son of Thos Green, bap. 
'755- Js"- 25. Dorothy ux Joseph Harris, senr., bu. 
1756. Oct. 2. 'I'hos , son of Wm. Greaves, bu. 
I 757. Oct. 24. Wm. Copestake, of Osmosney, and Hannah Whitbey, 

of Ashford. 
175S. J.i.n. 8. Thos. Greaves, of Sheldon, bu. 

. June 9. Ellen ux Thos. Greaves, of Sheldon, bu. 
1761. Mar. 4. Wm. Green, bu. 



,gg ASHFOKD PAKIbH REGISIEK. 

April 23. \Vm. Green, junr , bu. 
1761. June 21;. Ralf. Townsend and Alice Green, both of I'ad- 

dington, bu 
1764. Nov. 3. U'm Green, from Darley, bu. 
1767. Jan. 28. Mrs. Jane Buxton, Longestone, bu. 
1767. Dec. 27. Frances, daughter of Wni. and Mary Cockayne, 

bap. She died 1784. 

1769, Thos. bap., Geo. and Eliz , 6 Jan., 1773, bap., Wni 

bnp 2 Mar., i 776. 
1773 Eliz, daughter of Jo. Green. 
1774. Mar. 30. Sarah Drinkwater, bu. 

1785 Mar. II. Thos., son of Jolui and Eliz. Drinkwater. 

1778 Dec. 25. Mary, daughter of Francis and Ruth Cockayne 

bap., bu , 7 Oct., 1781. Joseph bap. 16 June, 1781. 
1771;. Aug 19. Phanny, dau. of Tiios and Phanny Beighton, bap 
1 7S0 Dec. 25. Hannah, daughter of Alex, and Eliz. Cockine, bap. 

Betty, bap. 4 Aug., 17S2; Fras., 8 June, 1784; Jo., 21 

May, 1786. 
1782. [une 20. Ann, daughter of George and Ann Williams, of 

London, bu. 
I 784. Dec 1 2. Mary ux. Wm. Cockayne, junr., bu. 
17S6. -Mny 21. Jo., son of Jas. and Sarah Green, bu. 

July 15. Mr. Richard Naduld, bu. 
1780 Mrs Margare Naduld, bu. 

1786 (let 26. Mr. Hy. \Yatson, from Bakewell, bu. 

I 787. June 3. Eliz , daughter of Joseph and Sarah Cockayne, bap. 

Frances, daughter, bap. 20 May, 1789, bu. 20 May, 1789. 
1 788. Oct 23. Wm. Cockayne, bu. 
17S9. June 21. Elen, daughter of Alex, and Eliz. Cockayne, bap., 

bu. 19 Nov., 1791, 26 Aug, 1797. 
1791. June 19. Joseph, son of Joseph and Hannah (bu. 1810) 
Cockayne, bap. 
George fil bap. 15 May, 1794. 
1794. Aug. 19. Mr. George Cockayne, bu. 

Oct. 2. Thos. Green, bu. 
1794. 27 Oct. Miss Eliz. Naudauld. 
1J07 The Rev. Thos. Naudauld. 

1812. Sept. 20. Rd. and Peter, sons of Wm. and Hannah Nau 
dauld, of Lond., St. Aldgafe Parish. Richard, bu. 



ASHFORD PARISH REGISTER. 299 

1801. April 5. Eliza \V.nrburton, daughter of 1 hos. and Jane (bu. 

12 May, 1801) Cockayne. 
1803. Junes- Wm fil \Vm. and .Ann Cockayne (bu. 17 Sept , 1806), 

bap , and Jo , 8 Sept., same year. 
1818. May 6 Mary, daughter of Wni. and Mary Cockayne, bap , 

and Benjamin same time, Charles, 10 Nov., 1811. 
May 27. Hannah ux Joseph Cockayne, bu. 
Supplied by Mr. Jo. Luxmore. 
1739. Sept. 27. Edward Barker, of Youlgrave, and Margt. Nadauld 

of Ash ford. 
[740. Oct. 20. Eliz, daughter of Mr. J\d. Fuiney of Ashford, bap 
1743. May 3. Margt., daughter of same. 
1752. May 25. Margaret, daugl-.ter of Rd. Finney and Margt. ux 

bap. 
1756. Feb. 20. Mr. Rd. Finni'y, of Ashford, bu at Stony .Middleton. 

From Transcripts. 
1756. April 6. Mr. Hy. Watson and Miss Mary Bullock, m. 
1778 April 23 John Wild and Eliz. Harris, of Ashford, m. 
1794. May 4. Geo. Shepley, of Chesterfield, and Ann Farmer, 

of Ashford, m. by Peter Walthal, curate. 
From Sheldon Registry. 
I 782. Sept. 5. Rich. Rue, of Bake\vell, widower, and Ann Creswcll, 

of Tideswell, spr., m. 
Rich. Chapman, Curate of Sheldon. 
1751. May 6. Rich Finney and Mrs. Margaret Peplow, both of 

Ashford, m. 
1735. June 6 and 7. Rich Fynney, of Longstone, bro. and heir 

of AVni Fynney, late of Stony Middleton of one part, gave 

land in Middieton, in which Mary Fynney, Wo., then 

dwelt. 
1754. July 2. Will of Rich. Fynney gave land in Ashford to wife, 

Margaret, and Jo. Beech, of Tideswell ; also to his 

daughters, Eliz. (afterwards wife of Joseph Denman), and 

Margaret. Remainder to James Longsdon, son of Thos., 

of Little Longstone, and Wm., son of Jo Beech. Fawney 

and Thos., ch. of Thomas and Jane l'"ynny, of Ashford. 

Wm son of Jo and Mary Peploe, of llebnale. Staff., ;^2oo. 

Geo. and Ann, children of Geo. and Martha Brownhill, 

of Bake well, ^100. 



30d 



CHAPTER XXIV. 



THE LONGSTONES AND BEREWIl ES OF ASHFORD. 

Longesdiine was waste at Domesday. Coin had three carucates 
of land, hidable, value 30s., T. R. E., land for three ploughs, six 
acres meadow, underwood two miles in length, one broad. 

Great Longstone Chapelry (copying from the Directory) includes 
Holm Township, Little Longstone, Roland, and part of Wardlowe, 
which were all Berewites of Ashford, of the King's ancient demesne at 
Domesday. 

The Longstone Charters here given are inextricably confused, they 
relate to all these hamlets, which are now united probably only for 
parochial convenience, and they are given together, chiefly arranged 
with reference to the different families resident in them. The history 
of these places is very obscure, and can only be partly guessed at, 
and that of the two Longstones is more especially difficult to trace, 
because two distinct families, originally of tbe same name — those 
of Wright of Great Longstone and Longsdon of Little Longstone — 
have been seated here apparently for 700 years, and certainly in tlie 
time of Griffin fil Wenuwyn, that is in Henry III., the latter family 
had obtained possession of part of their estate direct from the grant 
of the King, before the date that Wenuwyn obtained his grant ot 
Ashford ; when the Wrights obtained theirs is not so clear. Although 
both these families seem to have used this territorial designation 
(which the latter family retains, except with regard to the spelling 
of the name, which is immaterial), there does not appear to be any 
direct proof that they were akin, though frequently attesting each 
other's charters. This possibly may have arisen from thtir being 
near neighbours and both of them being Freemen of the King's 
ancient demesne, and it would seem probable from Thomas the Clerk 
not having had a territorial name, that his son took it from the family 
of Great Longsdon. 



THE LONGSTONES AND EERF.WITES OF ASHFORD. 3OI 

The following Charter, or Convention, made between Griffin fil 
Wenuwyn and Adam fil Peter de Longsdon (the ancestor of the 
Wrights), refers to the ancient customs (consuetudines seculares) 
under which the estate was held. This Charter is still in the 
possession of George Thomas Wright, Esq., of Longstone Hall, the 
present holder of the property. It is as follows : — 

This is the Convention made between the Lord Griffin fil Wenuwyn 
on the one part and Adam fil Peter de Longsdon on the other part, in 
the 37th year of the reign of King Henry fil King John, that is to say, 
the said Lord Griffin remised and quitclaimed to the said Adam fil Peter 
de Longsdon and his heirs or assigns all customs of ancient demesne 
(constitudines s'c'lares) and every kind of service (om'i'ada svicia) 
which are due (exeunt) from the said fee (feudo) in Longsdon and 
in Wardlow or could become due in any event saving the services 
due which the ancestors of tlie said Adam to the said Lord Griffin 
and his ancestors, and which they were accustomed to make yearly for 
tliese tenements in Longsdon and Wardlow, that was to sa)', r3s. 
payable annually at two terms — at the feast of the Blessed Mary the 
Virgin 6s. and 6d , and at the feast of St. Michael 6s and 6d , 
keeping these services, three days' ploughing and sowing, to be done 
by the said Adam and his men for the said Lord Griffin twice a year 
for their meat (ad cibuni) and suit at the mill at Asliford of the 
said Adam and his men, and their aid (auxilium) at the millpool 
and whatever else pertained to the said mill when there was necsssity 
for repairing it, and keeping suit at the Court of Ashford by the said 
Adam and his heirs for themselves and their tenants in Longsdon 
ai:d Wardlow, as the other freemen of the Manor of Ashford 
followed, and when the Lord King should lax. his demesne (Dnica 
sua taliavit) the said Adam should be ta.xed for himself and his fee, 
and so that this agreement should be firm and stable each affixed 
his seal according to the manner of making cyrographs. These 
witnesses, Sir Richard de Vernon, Sir Richard de Herthill, Richard 
Daniel of Tideswell, William de Longsdon, Mathew de Longsdon, 
I'iiom.is de Longsdon. This Convention is a clear admission that 
Ad.im fil Peter was one of the king's free men doing suit at his court 
at Ashford. 

This Chaiter at once introduces the Little Longsdon family and 
raises serious difficulties The first three witnesses are well kn'jvvn, 
Sir Richard Vcinon was Lord of Haddon, the last of his race. 



^02 



THE LONGSTONES MiD BEREWITES OF ASHFORD. 



unless the wife of Gilbert le Francis (a Cumberland man), who 
obtained that lordship in the troublous time of Henry III., was his 
daughter, and as her issue assumed the name of Vernon, it is 
probable. Sir Richard Hertili was the son of Sir Adam de ilertill, 
tempe John, who married Mamie, daughter of William de Vernon, 
of Haddon, father of Richard, wiio married Johanna, daughter 
of Thomas de Edensor. Apparently he had an interest in Little 
Longsdon, through his great nephew, Richard de Edensor, having 
married a daughter of Richard fil Levened, of that village, and Richard 
Daniel, of 'I'ideswell, was the ancestor of the family of Pincerna, or 
Boteler, from whom the Foljambes of that place derived their 
property in Little Longsdon, part of which they long retained. 
The three last witnesses, William, Mathew, and Thomas de Longsdon, 
constitute the puzzle. Who were they ? Why were they interested 
in this Great Longsdon property ? Mathew Longsdon held the 
ebt.rle of Little Longsdon, with a bovate in Adam fil Peter's fee, 
at that period, and undoubtedly he had a son William, who succeeded 
him Mr Sleigh (probably writing fiom an Inquisition) states in the 
Relitiuary thai he had brothers named William and Thomas living 
in 3 Edward I., who may be the witnesses to this Charter. We know 
that Thomas was called Lord of Longsdon in one charter, but we 
do not know who he was, and the curious thing is this: we can 
trace the pedigree of .Adam fil Peter of 37 Henry III., wlio was 
clearly the Lord of the fee of Great Longsdon, and we can painfully, 
but tolerably surely, work out his pedigree u[nvnrds for two or three 
generations, and we have proof that he had several sons, Thomas, 
Kobcrt, Richard, and Nichola5,that he had a great-uncle namedWilliaui 
and an uncle of that name, brother of his father (if he is not the 
same person), who also had several sons, I'^lias, Simon, William Peter, 
and probably Richard; but not one (>f them, apparently, produced 
a Thoniar., who was Lord of Longstone in 3 Edward L, and who 
ceitain'y acted uiih a William de Longston as jurymen on an im- 
portant inquest. Will am may ha\e been the uncle ol Adam fii 
Peter, or his son, or the son of Matthew. 

Now to this Charier of Adam fil Peter, a leading witness was one 
Mathew de Longsdon, who held a bovate out of the fee of Adam 
fil Peter, which Griffin fil Wenuwyn conlirmed as that of a grant by 
the King (probably intending a grant of the Lord of the fee, Adam, 
01 his ancestor, with the King's assent). We are able to trace the 



iHK LONGSTONES AND BKREWITES CiF ASHFOHD 303 

pedigree of Matliew only one degree higher, to Ins father Thomas, 
who was a clerk, lawyer, or parson, of Bakewell, and we have clear 
proof that Thomas hiid a brother Robert ; but there is no proof that 
Mathew had brothers or sisters, and we only know positively that 
he had two sons, named Maihew and William. The latter possibly 
may be the juryman of 3 Edward I. for Matliew ilie elder seems 
to have died before 40 — i IJenry III,, when William had grant of 
the homage and rents of the daughters of Richard fil Levened, or 
Levenet, probably for the bovate granted to his father or grandfather 
by Grififin fil Wenuwyn. This William seems to have died before 
25 Edward I., for Margerie, his widow, in that year gave certain 
property to Richard, her son, without referring to his paternity, from 
which it may be inferred that he was not \V'illiam's son. 

Contemporary with these two families at Great and Little Longstone 
there was a family at Tunsted of the name of Longsdon, who were 
dealing with them. Ralf, fil and heir of Henry de Longsdon, 
granted land to Elias, Cleric of Bakewell, who was apparently 
son of William, of Great Longstone. This Tunsted family 
remained there for many generations, and like the family of 
Great Longstone assumed the name of Wiight — a little indi- 
cation of relationship and of common origin. We have no direct 
evidence of the Wrights holding the Great Longstone fee of Adam 
fil Peter higher than the 4th of King Edward IIL, when Robert 
Wright held it, a good generation later than the period when we 
have any account of the families of Thomas the Clerk and Adam 
fil Peter, and this gap it will be attempted to fill up. That the 
Longsdons of Little Longstone and the Wrights severally represent 
the two older families there is no doubt ; they each possess not only 
the lands, but their Charters. 

Assuming that the Wrights are descended from these ancient 
ancestors of Great Longstone, using the term ancestor as progenitor, 
their pedigree can be carried clearly back to Elias, the Clerk, of 
Longstone, who was certainly the ancestor, if not the progenitor, of 
•Thomas the Clerk, that is, of his bovate in Great Longstone, and 
who no doubt held that property in the reign of Henry II , that is, 
prior to the grant to Wenuwyn, but whatever may be the relationship of 
Thomas the Clerk, Elias was clearly the grandfather of Peter, whose 
son Adam obtained the grant from Grififin fil Wenuwyn in 37 Henry 
III. Elias was apparently tho son of another William de Longsdon, 



^04 THE LONGSiONES AND BERtWlTES OF ASHTORD. 

SO that this pedigree clearly goes back to Hcniy II., or Stephen. 
The question arises, hov/ came these men to be be called clerics, 
and yet to continue the estates in their families ? And a very curious 
and interesting solution of the problem is at hand. They were 
clerics because they were parsons, and so not necessarily in priests' 
oiders, and a parson or rector might legally marry. In the 
time of King John, or earlier, probably, the holder of Longstone was 
a Levened, and the last we know of that name was Richaid fil 
Levened, whose daughter Matilde gave land in Great Longstone to 
Mathew fil Thomas, the Clerk. Very possibly then Levened's 
were identical with the ancestors of Adam fil Peter, and that 
land which Maud gave to Mathew was the subject of Griffin's 
Chatter to him. It has been (apparently) hr.stily assumed, and 
even by so great an archaeologist as Mr. John Sleigh, who in 
tracing the pedigree of the Longsdons of Little Longstone, states 
that I'homas the Clerk was brothtr of this Richard fil Levened; 
but Mr. Sleigh has failed to produce any evidence in support. Even 
if a deed could be produced, stating that Mathew w.is " nepos " o( 
Richard fil Levened, it would be no proof, for that word is used 
comprehensively, to describe a nephew or a grandson, or indeed any 
one of kin, and it may be assumed fairly enough that Richard fil 
Levened was the heir at one time of the two Longstones, and that he 
left no male issue. He was very possibly a son of Elias, the Clerk, 
and he may also have been the brother of Thomas ; but at present 
the only certain brother of Thomas who is known was one Robert, 
who was probably identical with one Robert fil Levened of Ash- 
bourne, also called Faber. This, however, does not positively prove 
any exact relationship to Richard, because Levened was, in fact, 
a surname, highly honoured, no doubt, because it was a great Domes- 
day name, and in the next generation was held by one Levenet, the 
Chancellor of King Henry I. 

It may be objected that Dugdale, and all who have written on the 
early Chancellors, give no note of Chancellor Levenet, and of course 
Lord Campbell was ignorant even of the name, but this is not sur- 
prising, for Campbell was a mere copyist, and was guiltless of original 
research. Alas I the good old man was guilty of prigging the works 
of others without acknowledgment, and it was one of the jokes of 
the Bar in his day, to see him scuffle off the Bench in terror of a 
great authoress (Miss Agnes Strickland) who came down daily to 



THE LONGSTONES AND BEREWIIES OF ASIIFORD. 30^ 

address him, he liaving appropriated no less than 200 of her pages 
for his own great works without the slightest acknowledgment. 
But happily the identity of Levenet (Henry's Chancellor) is positively 
affirmed by an Inquest in 3 Edward I., in which two of his de- 
scendants were on the jury, Thomas and William (probably the 
individuals whom Mr. Sleigli gives as brethren), an account of which 
is given in Vol. II., page 37, of this work. Amongst the jury, besides 
Thomas and William de Longsdon, were Robert Bozon, Robt. le 
Wine, Peter de Roland, and Robert Albeny, all of whom had a 
direct interest in that parish. Probably this is the record which 
Mr. Sleigh used to prove that Thomas and William were brothers ot 
Mathew ; unfortunately, it is no proof. The jury found that King 
Henry, the elder (antiquior), gave the Church of Bakewell, wiih its 
Chapels (which included Longstone) to Levenet, his Chancellor at 
that time, and that it descended to Mathew, his eldest son, and so 
from heir to heir till the time of the King's father (Henry III.), 
when the same Church was appropriated to Lichfield; but by what 
warrant the Canons of Lichfield hold it, the jury know not ; and 
they said that the Church of Tideswell was also formerly in the 
hands of King Henry, the elder, and was then in the hands of the 
Canons of Lichfield, but by what authority they know not. 

R.C.R.,No. 36, 9 Edward I. The King v. Dean and Chapter of Lich- 
field concerning the church of Bakewell, the King said that his 
Proavus presented Levenet ; this would make the date to be 
Henry II., but this word is used loosely, and in a document of this 
kind, when the evidence was only traditional, it is not to be strictly 
relied on. 

Of course King Henry the elder, must have been Henry the First, 
because if Mathew fil Levened was ancestor of Elias, the Clerk, 
as well as of Thomas, the Clerk, there could have been no room for 
the intervening descendants, and the jury were in error (quite natur- 
ally in the absence of proofs) of the date when Lichfield obtained 
the appropriation of Bakewell. Happily this is clear from the 
Register of Lichfield, now apparently in the British Museum, probably 
annexed by Peter le Neve (Rouge Croix). From fo. 5, it appears 
that John, Earl of Morton, granted the Church of Bakewell to 
Lichfield, in the third year of King Richard, when that King was 
safely out of the way — a most valuable date, since it probably gives 
the date of \hz other transfers of other people's property, as well as 



/ 



3o6 THE LONGSIONES AND DK.KEWITES OF ASHFORD. 

ihat of the Crown to Prince Wenuwyn, and to the Pevcrils of Hassop, 
VVynfield, and other places, all so important to the determination of 
the history of the Peak. 

The date shows that Ellas, the clerk, must have been prior to the 
reign of Richard I , for at that period Thomas, the Clerk, held a 
bovate of the fee of the Lords of Longstone by the grant of the King, 
which then Wenuwyn confirmed to him. 

The finding of the inquest disposes of the whole difificuUy, for these 
grantees were in one sense hereditary Deans, or Deacons (Parsons) 
of Bakewell. Of course under this jurisdiction Bakewell was a 
Peculiar, and so it remained, even after the Earl of Morion's appro- 
priation. But from that date it was no longer held by any lay 
parsons, and Thomas is the last heard of in that capacity. It does 
not follow that either Elias or Thomas represented the eldest son of 
Mathew's successor of Levened, but Thomas gives his eldest son that 
honoured name and this would seem to follow, but the person in 
pobsebsion might appoint any son or any person he pleased, and he 
might be bound to appoint a younger son, or even a cousin, if the 
elder (as in Richard's case) had no male issue, or if such heir was an 
infant at the time. It seems hopeless to expect to find any charters 
relating to this estate or of the family, earlier than those of the 
daughter of Rich. Levened, presently cited, because from the time of 
King Henry I. there would be no neces^ily for them, the estate 
devolving regularly from father to son. But the pedigree of the 
family from his date to that of Richard I., whether from King Henry 
i or II., is abundantly proved, and tlie two families of Wright and 
Longsdon of the present day may fairly claim the proud distinction 
(so rare in Derbyshire history) of a clear Domesday pedigree and of 
a grant of their property from the Crown in the time of Henry L 
The date of this grant is probably late in his reign, for in the first 
year of it he confirmed all the Conqueror's grants to William 
Peveril, which clearly included Bakewell, and it was probably only 
wlien this son or j^randson of Peveril fell into disgrace, that the King 
gave this slice of it to his Chancellor. But if we find no Longstone 
Charters of this period fortunately there are many charters available 
from which much information may be obtained relative to the 
I.eveneds, chiefly from other places, for it would appear that they 
iield property in Duckmanton, Kniveton, Yolgrave, Hokenaston, 
Padlield, Bakewell, Ashbourne, Parwich, Baledon, and probably in 



TIIK LONGSTONKS AND BEKh.WITES OF ASHFORD 307 

several other Derbyshire Manors ; at Docmanton, which was in 
Hubeit fitz Ralf's Barony, Levenot had been the chief tenant, 
T.R.E., and he was a great personage and had held much land, some 
of which, especially the mining districts of Parwich, Henry Ferrars 
afterwards obtained, and Levenot, with Chetel, had held Edensor; 
he also at the time of Domesday held Mars (probably marsh) in 
the Peak, as one of the King's tlianes, proof that the freemen of 
Ashford were of noble descent at the tim.- of the Conquest. 

The first proofs of the great jiedigree, of course, come from 
Domesday, and it produces surprising results. At Dumesday Coin 
held Longston, and this Coin was an important personage, evidently 
like the Ferrars being a great worker in mines. His chiei holding was 
at Parwich, and there we shall find abundant proof of the I.s\ c:;ed.s 
holding land at a much later period, and there also the Longsdons 
eventually succeeded them. 

Peverwick, or Parwich, was a great mining district, a trade in which 
Henry F'errars himself was deeply interested ; nor was he ashamed 
of it, for his family bore three horseshoes on their arms in honour 
of it, proof that a wright was an honourable craft at that time. 

Coin held Peverwick and its three berewites, Elleshope, Hanzcdene, 
and Eitun, which may or may not be identical with Alsop, Hanson, 
and Eaton, though the claim is plausible, the difficulty is that 
these places were waste at Domesday. In T.R.E., with Derby, 
Metesford, Worksworth, and Ashbourne, they rendered ;£i2 and 
six sectaries and a half of honey, then 40 pounds of white silver, 
a very high rental, showing the great value of this mineral distiici. 
Who Coin was, and whether the Leveneds who succeeded him 
derived from him in blood is at present unknown — they certainly 
succeeded to his property, and many tenants, named Coll, or Cowley, 
or Colly, remained on the spot. 

The name of Levenot is frequently found in Domesday under the 
forms of Levenot, Levine, Lewen, etc., with which it is tempting to 
include Le Wine. Amongst the King's thanes were both Le Wine and 
Levenot. The latter is only mentioned as then holding Mars In 
Winstanstone also Levine had a small holding, value ss., otherways 
they seem to have been set aside for the new Norman lords and, 
their followers. 

Henry Ferrars had many manors which had been in the tenure of 
Levenot, Leuric, Levenot Ster (the younger), and Lewen, chiefly 



308 THE I.ONGSTONKS AM) DKK KWITES OF ASH FORD. 

mining properties; but not one of them held under liim, and the 
probabilities seem to point to the fact that Levenet, the Chancellor, 
succeeded to Coin, who may or may not have been a relation. 
He was, m all probability, descended from one of the Levenets 
of the time of Domesday. King Henry I. was particularly anxious 
to keep down his Norman tenants by elevating the Welsh and the 
English, and no doubt he would regard Robert Ferrars with jealousy. 
To the old English, in all probability, the early tenants of Longstone 
belonged. They were King's thanes, and grantees directly from the 
King, but as their holdings were of the ancient demesne, they were 
never strictly lords of manors, although termed lords of the fee. 

A strongly confirmatory piece of evidence that the Wrights and the 
I.ongsdons were the descendants of Levenet is to be found in the 
fact that in many of their charters there is to be found the names of 
Deacon and Dean, evidently derived from their ancient tenure of 
the parishes of Hakewell, and it is probably to this family that the 
Dakeynes of Darley owed their origin, and not to any imaginary 
descent from the De Akenys, of which, wiih all their industry and 
ability and opportunities, the Dakeynes of Holt were never able to 
show a shadow of proof. 

But if in the earlier history of these families there is a great want 
of direct evidence of relationship, further complications arise in 
both of them from the fact that no continuous history is obtainable 
after the 13th century Mr. John Sleigh has given the history of the 
Longsdon pedigree in Vol. IX of the Reliquary, but only in a 
fragmentary form. That of ihe Wright family has never been given 
in any work known to the author, and therefore, in deference to the 
learned author of the history of 1 eek, the greatest caution must be 
used in adding to the account, although Mr. Sleigh at the time 
when he wrote his description, w.is the owner of Thornbridge Hall 
(now the seat of G. J. Marples, Esq., J. P.), fhe house and a large 
portion of the park adjoining having been purchased from the 
Longsdon family, so that Mr. Sleigh should have had the fullest 
opportunity of consulting the family records. 

Mr. Sleigh's account of the pedigree is, in fact, composed of three 
distinct or rather disunited families, first, that of Levened of Longsdon, 
whom he makes the progenitor of Richard Levened de Longsdon, 
whose daughters and co-heirs sold some property, both in Great and 
Little Longstone, to Mathew, the son of Thomas, cleric of Bakewell j 



THE LONGSTONES AND BEREWITES OF ASHFORD 30y 

secondly, the pedigree of this Thomas which he deduces only to his 
sons Thomas, William, and Mathew, though he makes Thomas him- 
self brother of Richard fil Levened, and thirdly, he starts again with 
the pedigree of Henry de Longsdon, nearly a century later, from whom 
he gives a continuous account to the present time. 

Lysons and other historians content themselves with the unsatis- 
factory statement that the Wrights have held their estates at Great 
Longsdon since the time of King Edward III, and the Longsdons 
of Little Longstone from an earlier period. 

Mr. Sleigh, possibly, had not access to the muniments of the 
Wright family, who, at that period, were chiefly resident in Devonshire 
through the marriage of the then head of the house with a member 
of the Northcote family of Pynes. 

The author has been favoured with access to the muniments of 
both families, which are unusually numerous, and they both commence 
about the same period and show that they were both indebted to 
grants from Griffin fil Wenuwyn whose original charters are to be 
found in the repository of each family at the present day. 

Mr. Wright, of Longstone Hall, still possesses the charter of 
Griffin fil Wenuwyn, of Ashford, of the date of 37 Henry IIL, to his 
ancestor, Adam fil Peter of Longsdon, photograph of which is here 
given, which proves that Adam fil Peter was then Lord of the Fee of 
Longstone and Wardlow, but how and by what charter, or whether by 
descent, he obtained such rights is not mentioned, it only releases him 
from all the ancient customs (those of the ancient demesne of the 
Crown) and all kinds ot services which the ancestors of the said 
Adam made yearly to the ancestors of the said Lord Grififin, except 
a payment of 13 shillings rent, certain services of ploughing and 
sowing, and in reparation of the Mill Pool and keeping suit at the 
Mill and at the Court at .-Xshford, in fact maintaining his services as 
a King's free man to the Royal Court of Ashford. Mathew fil I'homas 
also had a confirmation from Griffin fil Wenuwyn, but only of a 
bovate out of this fee in Great Longstone, which Thomas, his father, 
had previously held of Wenuwyn (Grififin's father), at a rent of 7d. 
and one silver obol (halfpenny). Mr. Longsdon still possesses three 
original charters from Prince Griffin, and a paper copy of one of them, 
relating to this bovate and the rights-of-way to it, rather a complicated 
matter, which fortunately prove that Mathew's ancestor had held the 
bovate of the Longsdons of Great Longstone apparently under gram 



MO IHK I.ONGSTONKS AND BERKWUXS OF ASHFOUD. 

of ihe King, prior to the King's grant to Prince Wenuwyn, which was 
probably in the third year of Richard I. 

No doubt, although holding this bovate in Adam fil Peter's fee 
of the King, it was intermediately held under Adam fil Peter, because 
it appears from a charter made by Elias fil William of Parva Longs- 
don, at a later date, to William fil Mathew, of the same, which was 
made before Richard de Ragged (Bailiff of Peak in the year 41-2 
Henry III.), by which Klias assigned to William the homage and rent 
of yd. and one silver obol, which was due to the co-heirs of Richard 
fil I. evened, for probably the same bovate held by the ancestor of 
Thom.is, the clerk, of Bakewell, in the time of Henry II., though it 
is described as in Little and not in Great Longstone. But this is a 
natural error, for the (Jreat Longstone bovate adjoined the property of 
'1 lioiuas, the clerk, in Little Longstone, and in time may have become 
confused with it. ili.Tt ihj Crc.it Longstone family were Lords of 
Thomas, the clerk, is a[)parent from several charters in Rufford 
Chartulary, where Maihew fil Thomas takes tlie position of one next 
interested 'I'his is so important that these R afford Charters are at 
once given 

The original Chartulary of Rufford is still in the possession of 
Lord Savile, at Rufford Abbey. Through the kindness of the late 
Mr. Aiic.ustus Saville, the author had full access to his muniments, 
of which he h.id a splendid collection. A good copy of this im- 
portant Chartulary is to be found in the British Museum. At folio 
126 is given a Charter from Thomas fil Robert de Longsdone. 
granting land to \Villiam fil William de Longsdon in Bricrichfeld, 
which was attested by Sir Richard de Herthill, Kt., Henry de Calver, 
Thomas Foljambe, Robert de Derley, Helias de Longsdon, Peter 
de Venella de Muscamp, Robert de Mornesale. This Charter was 
probably made about the date of ihe previous Charter of Griffin fil 
Wenuwyn, or a little later. This Thomas fil Robert de Longsdon 
was, in fact, the grandson of Waltheof de Mornesale, who made 
a grant of half the village of Bricrichfeld to Rufford at an earlier 
date, which Robert, his son, who married a daughter of Rich, fil 
Levened, confirmed. Subsequently Thomas fil Robert fil Waltheof 
de Mornesale also gave, or perhaps only confirmed the previous 
grant of half the village of Bricrichfeld, to the Abbey. This 
Charter was attested by Adam de Edensor, Mathew de Longsdon, 
J,)hn de Tadington, Henry his son, Adam de Longsdon, Robert 



THE LONGSTONES AND BE;;EWITES OF ASHFORD. 311 

Albini, William de Longsdon, Eustace de Mornesale, and William 
his son. The date of this Charter is certainly before 41 Henry III., 
since both Adam de Longsdon and Mathew de Longsdon were dead 
before that year. 

Robert le Yrys, who had married Lecia, a daughter of Waltheof 
de Mornesale, also gave half the village of Bricrichfeld and land 
at Prittiwell Hill, which he had of the gift of Waltheof and Robert, 
his son, to the Abbey, probably at the same date as the last Charter, 
since it was attested by the same witnesses. 

The last Charter, though probably made earlier than the others 
relating to this property, was made by William de Longsdon and 
Basilia, his wife, confirming the Charter of Waltheof, which was 
attested by Thomas de Longsdon and Mathew de Longsdon, Henry 
de Tadington, William fii Eustace de Mornesale, John de Tadington, 
Robert de Abney, William in the Hewelline The Thomas de 
Longsdon of this Charter was possibly Thomas fil Robert fil Waltheof, 
and this raises a difficulty whether he was not the juryman named 
Thomas de Longsdon in 3 Edward L 

In 13 Edward I. the Abbot of Rufford had a grant of free warren 
in Brampton Abbey and Briclcesfield and in other places in Notts and 
York. 

Sewell fil Fulcher confirmed the convention between the Abbey of 
Rufford and Waltheof de Mornesale of the land of Bricrichfeld, 
paying one marc to Sewell. 

T., Asketello Sac. Matilde fil Sewell, Robt. fil Orm, Robert fil 
Choi, Mos. Bas, W. de Mungei, Henry fil Fulcher, and Fulcher his 
brother, Serlo de Grendon, Wm. le Burgundian. (Woolley's original 
Charters. IX., No. 3.) 

Robert fil Waltheof (Walchevi, of Mornesale) granted to Mathew 
fil Thomas of Bakewell, dwelling in Little Longstone, two cultures of 
mead and pastures under Longslowe, of his demesne, next Oldelow, 
at the head of the Common of Longsdon, called the Coce Meadow, 
with a bercaria containing half an acre, under the same hill, with an 
acre of arable land extending to the cross way, which his ancestors 
always held separate. He also confirmed the grants of land pur- 
chased by Mathew from the free tenants in perpetuity, and lands 
going towards the upper bridge, for farming purposes, from the house 
of Robert fil Alexander, to a certain cliff, called Ceoffe. 
I • T., Adam de Herthill, Kt., Rich, de Ensor, Kt., Luca de Beleg, 



312 THE LONGSTONES AND BEREWITES OF ASHFORD. 

Robert de Staunton, Jordan de Roulesly, Mathew de Reyndon, 
Peter de Longsdon. (Mr. Longsdon's Charters). 

The same Robert granted to the same Mathew, son of Thomas, 
the Clerk, the land, called Coce, of his demesne, witli a right of 
way for himself to the toft going towards Little Loiigston, by the 
west of Egstowe, to the end of the Marsh Meadow, and to the toft 
of the daughter of Agnes of Little Longston. 

T., Serlo de Beleg. Robt. de Stanton, Robt. de Calver, Peter fil 
Mathew, Peter fil Wm., Wm. de Pecco, Robt. Luterel, Robt. fil 
Alexander. (Mr. Longsdon's Charters.) 

It is not clear, from want of a surname, who the witness Peter fil 
Mathew was. The Peter fil William was no doubt the father of 
Adam, of 37 Henry IIL 

Lescia, Wo. of Rich, fil Waltheof of Little Longsdon, released 
to Mathew fil Thos. de Bancwell her rights in 13d. rent in Little 
Longsdon, from Rd. fil Rd. de Edensor and fri>m the daughter of 
Rich., son of Levened, and from Henry Clodhoure and Alice, his 
wife, and from Matilde Juliana and .Matilde's sisters rent, a pair of 
white gloves at Easter. Fine, is. 

T., Robert de Tronwell ; Robert de Stanton ; Elgar de Ranesford ; 
Peter de H urst ; Adam, son of Peter de Lonrcsiion ; Stephen de Roland ; 
Hy. de OfTerton ; John de Bancwell, clic. (Mr. Wright's Charters ) 

Redes, widow of William de Mornesale, gave land in Bricriclifeld 
to Rufford, according to the Charter of Serlo fil Fulcher, her lord. 
(Ruffoid Chartulary.) 

Matilde fil Richard de Levened, of Longsdon, granted to Mathew 
fil Thos. Clic, of Bakewell, a toft and one rood of land in Little 
Longsdon, and a foss going to the marsh of Juliana, her sister, which 
Robert Fealing formerly held of her — another copy states that the 
toft had been formerly held by Thomas Scalever. 

T., Robert de Stanton, Rd. de Calver, Peter de Rouland, Adam fil 
Peter, Mut 1. de Reyndon, Robert fil Alexander, Launcelin de Stokes, 
Wm. de Herelowe, Thos. de Offerton, Wm. Pincerna of Bakewell. 
Seal not heraldic (Mr. Longsdon's Charters) and Woolly. MSS. 

Adam fil Richard, Lord of Ensor, granted and released to Malhew 
fil Thomas, Parson of Bakewell, a release of all services for the land 
in the Vill. and plain of Parva Longsdon, which the said Mathew 
bought of Matilde fil Richard de Levened, of Parva Longsdon. 

T., Jordan de Snitterton, Thos. de Ensor, Robert de Stanton, Luca 



THE LONGSTONES AND BEKEWITES OF ASHFORD. 3 13 

de Beleye, Mathew de Reyndon. Seal, a fleur-de-lys. Legend, 
. . . de Edensore (Mr. Longsdon's Charters). 

(See Burton's Mon. Ebor, p. 320, for grant of Adam to Roche 
Abbey). 

p. 179. Maud Levined, daughter of Agnes de Little Longsden, 
granted to the said Mathew, the land mentioned in Maiilde fil Rd. 
Levened's Charter, and several other small parcels of land. 

T., Sir .\dam de Herthill, Luca de Beleye, Robert de Stanton, Peter 
his son, Jordan de Rowlesly, Math, de Reyndon, Adam fil Peter de 
Longsdon, Willoc de Longsdon, Nick, or Ov. Haddon, John de Aston, 
Jo. Clic scriptor. 

She would appear to have been Maud, a sister of Matilde Levened, 
■ but little is known of her. She is mentioned simply as .Agnes de 
Longsdon in a roll of 20 Edward L, which records the death of 
Richard de Edensor, and in 45 Edward UL, there is mention of a 
Margaret Decon (probably identical with Margaret de Longsdon), who 
was the widow of William fil Mathew de I^oiigsdon, and who would 
seem to have remarried one Decon or Dean. In 45 Edward III., 
this lady granted a bovate of land to Robert Dccon, son of Agnes de 
Longsdon. 

Rich, de Herthill bond IV m. fil Elie die of Purva Longston and 
Basilea, his wife. 

T., Rad. de Cubberly, Rad. Bugg, \Vm. le Wine, Wm de Esseburn, 
Mathew de Longsdon, Hy. de Calvour, Adam fil Peter de Longsdon, 
John de Holwell, John Clic. Seal, a stag. 

A fine of Easter, 9 Henry \\\ Thomas de Edensor released to 
Richard de Edensor (his great nephew), who married Letice, daughter 
of Richard fil Levened, certain land in Pillesly, and a rent of one 
marc annually out of lands in Longsdon and Bricrichfeld, paying two- 
pence rent in exchange for lands in Chelmorden, the dowry of Avice, 
widow of Ralf fil Nicolas. 

Elias fil William, of Little Longsdon, granted to William fil Mathew, 
of Little Longsdon, the homage and rent of yd., which was the 
portion of three sisters of 13d. rent divided between five sisters issuing 
out of land in Little Longsdon to be received by the chief Lord of 
the fee, of which Richard fil Richard de Edensor had of the part of 
Lecic fil Ricliard fil Levened, of Longston, and which Agnes Lowe 
and Henry Clothoure and Alice, his wife, held as sisters. 

T., Richard le Ragged, Hy. de Calvour, Wm. le Wyne, Robert de 



314 IHF. LONGSTONES AND BEREWITES OF ASHFORD. 

Derley, Nic. de Winfield and Robert de Reyndon. Seal a quatre 
foil. (Mr. Longsdon's Charters.) 

23 Edward I. William fil Mathew, of Little Longston granted to 
Thomas fil Pole, of Dytton (? Lyiton), a lease for 10 years of land in 
Bricrichfeld, which John Clicus, then Sergeant of Hope, formerly 
held (probably this John, the Clerk, was son of Nicolas, of Bakewell, 
proof that he was a lawyer and not a parson). 

T., Peter de Roland, Rich, de Longsdon, Adam fil John, super 
Montem of the same, Thomas fil Ralf de Mornesale. 

St. Agnes, v. and m. 25 Edward I. 

Thomas ad Capud Vill de Magna Langesdon released to Richard 
Forester, of Magna Longsdon, i bov. and i toft, lying between the 
lands of the said Rich., and the garden formerly of William de 
Langesdon, in Great Longstone, which grantor inherited from his 
father Henry ad Capud Vill de Magna Longsdon. ( Henry had a grant 
from Adam fil Peter de Longsdon, the land released by Griffin 
fil Wenuwyn in 37 Hemy HL There was one, Henry, son of William 
de Longsdon, who attested Griffin's Charter. 

T., Hugh, Chaplain of Longsdon; Martin, Chaplain of Langdesdon : 
Peter de Roland ; \Vm., son of Thomas de Longsdon ; Wm. de 
Wardlow ; Simon de Croraford and Nicolas de Cromford (Mr. 
Wright's Charter) 

It is doubtful whether this Thomas de Longsdon was of the family 
of U'altheof or of Adam fil Peter. 

The family of Waltheof, of Mornesale, is a very interesting one, 
and possibly it is of very grave impoitince to this enquiry, not only 
because his grandson, Thomas, adopted the surname of de Longsdon, 
but because these Charters give a clue to the early history of 
Longstone. There is a great want of evidence respecting the family 
of WaUheof. and it is extremely difficult to determine which of the 
ihirlcrs attributed to Thomas de Longsdon are of the making of the 
grandson of Waltheof and which are the acts of the descendants of 
.'\d.im fil Peter. It is possible, indeed, and this view should not be 
lost sight of that originally they were of the same family, and obtained 
their jiropeity by descent It is quite certain that the Leveneds were 
connected with them, although this may have arisen from locality. 
There was a Waltheof fil Swain, in all probability the same person 
who gave the church of St. James, in Derby, before 1140, to the 



THE LONGSTONES AND BEREWIIES OF ASHFORO. 315 

Cluniac Priory of St James, attached to Bermondsey — which held 
property in the Peak. 

Of the earlier history of Swain in connection with the Peak, there 
are several traces. Sweyn held Collei at Domesday under Henry 
Ferrars, and his descendants, under the name of Cola, Colley, and 
Cowley, are still to be found in the iron districts, and some 
of Colley's lands came to the Leveneds ; indeed, at Domesday, 
Leving, and Cola, the man of Henry Ferrars held land in Winster, 
and Colne had held Longston, and at the same time Swain and Swane 
Cilt, held much land under Walter Demcourts, and it is probably 
under him that Waltheof fil Swain held the church of St. James, or 
possibly under Ralf Fitz Hubert. Domesday records that both these 
great lords had churches in Derby, and their connection will be seen 
at a glance at page ii6 of vol. HI. of this work, through the author's 
discovery (for which the late Mr. Chester Waters gave him full credit) 
of the second marriage of Ralf, son of Walter Deincourt, with 
Matilde, daughter of Ralf fitz Hubert. 

Hubert fitz Ralf, her son (by her first husband, the Lord of Tatter- 
sall, from whom doubtless the family of Tattersall of Longston are 
descended) gave lands to Geoffry fil Swain, in Plaistow (p. 123 of 
Vol. in.), which Robert Deincourt, son of Matilde, attested ; this 
Robert was half-brother of the Lord Walter Deincourt, of the time 
of the Red Book, and his Charter to his brother, giving to him 
Holmsfield and the other Derbyshire estates of the family, which 
were held by the Swains at Domesday, was attested by Roger fil 
Swain. The same Robert Deincourt granted land at Crich to Swain 
fil Ozini (who was probably of the same family) and which again had 
been a Manor of the Levenets (great tenants of Ralf fitz Hubert's 
Manors). 

It does not appear that there was any family seated in the Peak 
who were called de Mornesale, except this family who would appear 
to have simply adopted the name from that place, and but few 
chaiters (if any) are known except those now in the possession of the 
Wrights and Longsdons, and these extracted from the RufTord Car- 
tulary which is indeed a mine of wealth to the Derbyshire historian. 

Happily the original charter (i.\-.. No. 3), now in the Woolly 
Collection at the British Museum, dates the grant of Waltheof de 
Mornesale as certainly of the date of Henry II. ; but it does more, 
it discovers a most important fact, that the family of de Mornesale 



31 6 TllK LOXGSTONES AND BEREWITES OF ASHFORD. 

held their properly in Longsdon, Mornesale, and Bricrichfcid, 
under the Monjoies and througli tliem under the great family 
of Sewell fil Fulcher, chief tenant of Henry Ferrars, of whom so little 
is known, and it is to be hoped that these Longsdon Charters will 
contribute in no slight degree to making up the missing history. For 
these charters bring out the fact, apparently, that the Ferrar's family 
had seizen of this district as well as of the Wapentake of Wiiksworth 
prior to the date of 5 John, for it is expressly stated in a grant of 
William, Earl Ferrars, made after that date, that Rad. de Monjoie held 
land in Hundeswood, when he "recovered" the Wapentake. This 
possibly may only refer to a possession in the time of King Henry I. 
and King Stephen ; but it is proof that the Earl reclaimed this as of 
right. In the Pipe Roll of that King, Robert Ferrars, Earl of Derby, 
paid ^80 for the farm of Wirksworth. 

One of the earliest fines, that of 13 John, show that this Ralf de 
Monjoie or Mungay was then alive and that he was the son of Sewell 
de Monjoie, who must have died many years previously, probably in 
the time of Heniy H , because his widow, A vice, was at that date the 
mother of Philip de Ulecotes, who was then of full age. 

This Sewell or Serlo appears to have been the son of an earlier 
Ralf de Monjoie, who most probably was a tenant of Robert Ferrars, 
of the time of Henry I., when Wirksworth was farmed by them. 'I'he 
following charters appear to be his. 

Rad. de Mungay attested a charter of Wm. Ferrars, Earl of Derby, 
to Wm. de Grendon, of land in Bercinton, Wm. de Ridware, senescal. 

Wm. de Ferrars, com. Derby, granted to Rad. de Monjoie, land 
in Hundeswood in Ashbourne, which he held when he received the 
Wap of Wirksworth, 5 John. 

T., Wm. de Ridware, then senescal (of the Ferrars), Robt. fil 
Walkelin, Jordan Touk, Herbert de Mle, Robt. de Bellalide, Thos.' 
dc i^dcnsor, Robt. de Aldethley (ix., No. 5, Woolly's orig. Ch.). 

Wm. Com. de Fetrars granted to Wm. de Monjoie, one-third of a 
lead mine in Winester. T. Sewell fil Hy., Nicol fil Levened, Ralf de 
Seile, constable, Nic. fil Pagan, then Dapifer; Jo. de Monjoie. 

Fine Hilary, 13 John, No. 46. 

Philip de IJlcote and Joan, his wife, released to Ralf de Monjoie 
and Avice, his mother, one-third of the Vill. of Gelderley and 
Winster, hei dower on her marriage with Sewell de Monjoie, her 
former husband, and in lieu for 15 m. ; he granted four acres of land 



IHE LONGSrONKb AMI BEKEWITEb O. ASHtORD. 317 

in Kineton, in a field called Winerdon, near lands of WilHam de 
Grendon. 

The probabilities are that the Monjoies did not hold these estates 
directly under the Earl, but under tlie Sewells (their chief tenants) and 
this appears as well from the Charters of the iVIornesales. And 
the Ruffoni Cartulary gives evidence that Red is, widow of William 
Mornesale, held her estates under Serlo fil Fulk, her Lord; who this 
lady was and who her husband was is at present unknown; the 
Woolly Charter before cited confirms this. 

Sewell fil Fulk gave tlie church of Etington to Warwick, which Henry 
fil Sewell confirmed. This was surely Hy. fil Fulk, mentioned in the 
Red Book, who was dead at that time, and Sewell, the son, Fulk his 
brother, was his heir. Henry fil Fulk and Fulk, his son, were fined 
very heavily in a Forest Inquisition of 22 Henry H , which gives an 
approximate date (ot the Rufford Charter. 

In the time of R. Epis Worcester, Sewell fil Fulk confirmed the 
grant of Etingdon to Kenilwcrth, which Charter William de 
Monjoie and Serlo de Grendon attested, and this Serlo de Grendon 
was Sheriff, 246 Henry 11., which is the approximate date for this 
Charter. 

There is a later Charter, probably of the time of King John, of 
Hugo fil Ralf to William de Mungay, his brother, of a release of 
rights in land of Yeldersley, which were held of Sewell fil Fulcher, in 
exchange for his rights in the Mill of Alreton, which was ratified by 
William Hugh, his son, and Serlo de Munjoy, his grandson (nepos), 
T., William Com de Ferr, Wm. fil Walkclin (a grantor of the second 
year of King John), Fulcher fil Henry, Sewell fil Henri', Peter fil 
Walkelin, Jordan deCol.,Wni. Mange, Adam de Hidesover. (PEdensor.) 

The constant recurrence of the names of Sewell, Fulk and Henry in 
the Shirley pedigree, without dates to fix them, make it very dangerous 
to attempt to make a pedigree, but it is to be lioped that with the aid of 
the Chaiters now brought forward, a commencement of the task may 
be made. 

Serlo de Monjoie attested a Charter of Lowanus fil ,'\dam de 
Wodensly to Robert de Wodensly, and then we come to the Charters 
of Serlo fil Ralf, and of Ralf fil Serlo, now at Longsdon, which con- 
tinue the pedigree with something like certainty. 

1230. Grant from Nicholas Prior, of Tutbury, to Serlo de Munjoy 
of ten acres land and wood in Yeldersly, for which Serlo made a 



3lS THE LONGSTONKS AND BEREWITES OF ASHFORD. 

ditch six feet broad between the woods of Ethediston and Bradly 
Brock, in W) Uelesich. 

T., Robt. de Esseburn, Sewell fil Hy. (Orig. Charter, Woolly), 
Robert fil Toli (or Choi), to Sewell de Mungei, land in Winnedona, 
which his father and Serlo, his brother, senior, held of me from the 
division of Serlo de Grendon to the land of Stephen de Longlega. 

T., Roger Putrel (died 4 John), Galf de Esseburn, Rad. fil Jordan, 
Hy. fil Sewell, Rich, de Pec, Game! de Alsop, Ralf de Peverwyc, 
Rad. de Mung., William his brotlier, Rd. de Cunaiton, Henry fil 
Ailson, Simon Propositus, Adam fil Galfred, Robt. Torp, Nic. de 
Mapelton and Galfrey, his brother, Herbert de Tissington, Hy. de 
Mating, Swano de Ildresly, Robt., his brother (ix.. No, 2, Woolly 
Original Charter). 

Serlo de Grendon granted to Serlo fil Ralf de Moiijoie land in 
Bradley, near Ycldersly, T. Henry fil Sewell, Robt. Eretton, Hy. de 
Bradford, Leodgade Dive, William de Middleton, Walter de Mont- 
gomery, Ralf de Bakepuz, G.ilf de Archesia, John Irrcon, William le 
Burgundia, Robert de Morin (c. Henry II.; 

Rad. de Monjoie, Clio, attested \Vm Montgomery's Charter. 

Robert fil Col to \Vm. .Mun ^aie, his farm at Winster, 20s. rent, and 
a rich hawk land, which his father held. 

'1'., Sewell fil Fulcher and Fulcher, his brother, Serlo de Grendon 
(Sheriff, 24-6 Henry II.) and Jordan, his son, Oimund de Birchover 
and Roger, his son, Adam de Ridell, Robt. Clic, Hy. Sac, Roger 
Clic (ix.. No. I, Woolly Original Charter). 

Serlo de Monjoie attested Charter of Robt. fil Tholi de Kineston 
to Huys fil Tholi le, his brother, two bovates in Kineston. 

T., Jordan de Snitterion, Robt. de Esseborn, Robt. de Thorpe, 
Wra. de Lee, Robt. de Aldwerc, John de Offidecote. 

Serlo fil Ralf de Monjoie, Lord of Yeldersly, granted to Mathew, 
of Little l^ongsdon (the younger ?), a right-of-way from the cult 
called Coc, and a toft of Matilde fil Agneti de Parva Longsdon, in 
which rights-of-way he had unlawfully used by the license and 
sufferance of the neighbourhood, especially on the east side of the 
close called Coxe by the mansion of Robt. Luteral. 

T.. Rich, de Edensor, Ad de Herthill, Robt. Stanton, Wm. Daniel 
of Tideswell (28 Henry III ), Henry Peveril of Hassop, Robt. de 
Calvore, Eustace de Mornesale. Seal, fleur-de-lys (Mr. Longsdon's 
Charleis.) 



THE LONGSTONES AND BEREWITES OF ASHFORD. 319 

Several of these witnesses attested the Charter of Robert fil 
Waltheof to Mathew fil Thomas. 

The said Serlo granted to the same a toft which Mathew fil Hyzele, 
of Little Longsdon, formerly held there, which adjoins the toft of 
Mathew de Bakewell, on the East, at 6d. rent. (This name Hyzele is 
equally unknown to Derbyshire history as that of Ozini, perhaps they 
are identical.) 

T., Rich, de Herthill, I.ucade Beley, Adam de Edensor, Robt de 
Herthili, W'ni. le Wine, John Cleric. (Mr. Longsdon's Charters.) 

The said Serlo also released to Mathew his rights of Suit of Court 
and Mill for the land he held of him in Little Longston and Bric- 
richfeld, and in respect of all mines. 

T, William de Vernon, Joidan de Sniltei ton, Thomas de Edensor, 
.Adam de Edensor, Robert de Stanton, Luca de Beley. Seal, a fleur- 
de-lis or three stalks of rye? Se.il of S. de Monjoie. 

'I'here is a further grant between the snme parties of Mathew fil 
Hyzele's land in Little Longston, and of four bovates of land of the 
fee of Little Longston, of Bricrichfeld, to which Richard de Herthill, 
l.uca de Beley, Adam de Edensor, William Daniel of Tideswcll (8- 
28 Henry IIL), Peter de Roulesley, W'm fil Elias of Longsdon, were 
witnesses 

A William de Monjoie attested Earl William Feirars' Charter 
(i 162-6). Vol. I, p. 289 

Serlo de Monjoie attested a Charter of Hugo de Okover, and as 
Sewell de Mungey in 9 Richard I , he attested the great Charier 
made before William Briwere at Nottingham, dividing the 
Bubendon Inheritance between the Longfords and the Sacheverels 
(^Longford Charters). 

Reading these Charters with those of Robert fil Waltheof, it would 
appear that Mathew fil Thomas only obtained lands in Litt'e Longs- 
don, which were of their Lordship, and being seated there he (or his 
father probably) obtained the bovale in Great Longsdon from Eiias, 
the ancestor of Adam fil Peter, vvhicli seems to suggest that there 
may have been no family relationship between tiiem. 

The .Monjoies may have been descendants of Serlo fil Fulk, for they 
held under the Shirleys. Lysons atseits that Cole held Veldersly at 
Domesday, under Ferrars, and that his son Robert conveyed it to 
Sewel de .Monjoie, but he gives no proofs of It, and it would seem to 
be a mere "uess 



320 THE LONGSTONES AND UliREWITKS OF ASHFORD. 

Ralf fil Ralf de Monjoie gave lands in Bricrichfeld to Robt. fil 
Pole of I-itton. 

6. 23 Edward I. Ralf de Monjoij had a grant of free warren in 
Spondon, Little Longstone, Mornesale, and Brushfield (Bricrich- 
feld), so had the Abbot of Rufford. 

17 Kdward II. Ralf fil Ralf de Monjoie, of Yeldersly, granted to 
John fil William de Aula de Parva Longston, two bovates called Ic 
Hild, wliich Richard Bate formerly held, and four acres waste in 
Archunlowe Churgan, in Little Longston, with remainder in tail 
successively to Richard, Agnes, Emma, Maud, and Ellen, brother and 
sisters of said John, remainder to Ralf de Fairfield. 

T., Philip de Strelly, Roger Foljambe de Longsdon, Stephen de 
Roland, John de Bricrichfeld, Cleric, Galf de Bricrichfeld, Richard 
de la Pole, William Rotur, Clerk (Mr. Longsdon's Charters). 

Same date. Agreement between the same parties. John de Aula 
held of Ralf a messuage and four bovates, in Little Longston, and 
Bricrichfeld, with services of 3s. per annum, and John granted to 
Ralf a toft and croft and sixteen acres of land in Bricrichfeld in 
exchange for one messuage, two bovates, and four acres of pasture in 
the waste of Longsdon, as the said John held it of Serlo de Monjoie, 
with remainder if John died, s.p. to Richard, his brother, and to 
Agnes, Emma, Matilde, and Elena, their sisters, in succession ; 
remainder to Ralf dcFerfield, with remainder to Ralf fil Ralf de Monjoie. 

T., Roger Foljambe de Longston, Stephen de Roland, John de 
Bricrichfield Clic, Galf of the same. Rich, de la Pole, William Clic. 
(Mr. Longsdon's Charters.) 

At the Quo Warranto Inquest of 4 Edward III. Robert Hibernia 
and Isolda, his wife claimed free warren in Yeldersly and Spondon, 
as the heir of Serlo de Monjoie, son of Ralf, to whom King Edward I. 
had granted it in the thirty-fourth year of his reign. This Robert de 
Ireland was probably son of Ralf fil Robert le Irish or de Ireland, 
who married Lescia, daughter of Waltheof fil Swaine. 

1252. Sir Ralf de Monjoie attested a Charter of \Vm. Earl F"errars 
to Tuthury. 

S3 Henry III. Ralf de Munmeye and Wm. Cobelegh disseized 
Nicolas le Clerk of Mackworth, of land in Clifton. 

9 Edward I. Assiw if Robert de Monjoie and Margaret, his 
wife, disseized Thomas le (airzon in Twiford. 

1282. Sir Ralf attested a Ch;indos Chaiter. 



THE LONGSTONES AND BEREWllES OF ASHFORD. 32 1 

12 Eduard I. Sir Ralf de Moiijoie and Isolda, his wife, bought a 
messuage in Spondon. 

13 Edward I. He attested a Charter of Ralf Shirly. 

14 Edward I. Sir Ralf attested a Charter of Edmund, brother of 
the King ; he also attested a Charter of James fil Sewell de Shirly. 

14 Edward I Ralf de Monjoie to John le Blunt, of Murcaston. 

29 Edward I. Ralf fil Ralf attested a Charter which Robert, his 
son, manens in Twiford, made to Robert de Eerbras and Isolda, his 
daughter, in tail, of a messuage in Stangeston and Twiford, which 
Isolda, widow of Ralf de Monjoie, confirmed to the same, as Robert 
Ferbras, of Williuijlon, and Isolda, his wife. 

6 Edward II. Serlo de Monjoie, son of Ralf, attested a Kniveton 
and a Bradley Charter. 

II Edward II. Margaret, widow of Serlo de Monjoie, released 
her dower in Yeldersly and Wiliwyk, to Robert de Ireland. 

There was a Ralf de Monjoie, a cleric, but he cannot be identified, 
and also a Robert, who was chaplain of the Earl Ferrars. 

The heir of Ralf de Monjoie according to the Inquisition of 4 
Edward III., was one Isolda, who married Robert de Hibernia; same 
date, a fine between Robert de Ireland, who, with Isolda, his wife, 
granted lands to Nicolas de Grendon for life, remainder to Robert fil 
Robert de Ireland, remainder to Jolin, his brother, and of one-third the 
Manor of Yeldersly which IMargaret ux Serlo de Monjoie held in 
dower of the inheritance of the said Nicolas. Serlo fil Ralf de 
Monjoie was Sheriff of Lancashire in 13 16. 

The history of the family of Hibernia or Ireland is unknown. They 
were very early seated in Briciichfeld, for Lescia (daughter?) of 
Waltheof of Mornesale, obtained a grant from Waltheof, of half that 
Vill., which seems to have descended to her son Robert, who was 
succeeded by his son, Ralf fil Robert de Ireland, who gave land to the 
Guild of the Blessed Mary the Virgin, of St. Michael's, Chesterfield, 
before 13 18 (see Vol. 2, p. 230) Avena, daughter and heir of Sir 
Thomas Ireland, is said to have been the second wife of Sir Godfrey 
Foljambe, of Darley. 

14 Edward IV., No. 24. Walter Blount, Lord Montjoie, died, 
seized of three messuages, a bovate of land, and twe've acres of 
meadow in Longsdon, and half the Manor of Bricrichfeld, held of 
the King of his Castle of High Peak, by fealty, and worth yearly 
five marcs and one ob. Edward Blount, son and heir, of William, 
son and heir, of Walter, cousin and heir. 



■,Z2 lilt l.ONGSTONES AND IlEKb.\vnES OF ASHFORD. 

Adam le Wiiie (or l.ewin), of Wirksworlli, graiUed land in VVirks- 
worth (temi)e William Karl Feriars) to William de Mungei, one-third 
of which was in Winsler. Nicolas fil Levened attested this Charter. 

The Charters of the Wright family, though numerous and extending 
back to an early period, do not give a satisfactory account of the 
devolution of the property during several important periods, and this 
is not very much to be wondered at, since it was held in socage and 
not by Knight service, so that there would be no Inquisitions post mortem 
They were Thanes or King's Freemen from the earliest period, and, 
as such, they not only paid the dues and customs as tenants of 
ancient demesne, but they did suit of service at the King's Court of 
Ashford, and at the Royal Mill, and the estate would descend from 
heir to heir, as a matter of law, without any succeeding Charters. ■ 

Griffin fil Wenuwyn evidently attempted to exercise rights of Lord- 
ship over these deme.sne tenants as he attempted to exercise it over 
his own relatives, the Gernons of Bakewell, and his Charier to Adam 
fil Peter, of Magna Longsdon, was evidently an attempt to convert 
these free tenants into feudal tenants of his own so that he m'ght 
exercise over them powers of wardship, relief, etc., to wliich he had 
no right. His affectation to release them from these liabilities as 
tenants of the King's demesnes, rould have no operation, since the 
King alone could deal with those matters and even he was legally 
powerless to alter the tenure of ancient demesne. Whatever inten- 
tion Prince Griffin enteitained iiad veiy little effect, for his tenure as 
feudal Lord was so precarious and intermittent, lasting but 
a short time, and the Wright family fell again as free tenants 
immediately under the Crown, a".d so leiiiained independent 
of any intermediate Lord except the Royal family and their 
successors. " Adam fil Peter de Longsdon was a man of some 
position, seeing that he was upon the Jury in the great 
Forest Inquest of 36 Henry' III. That he was son of Peter is 
established by the convention of Prince Griffin fil Wenuwyn, who so 
describes him, and the fact that Peter was son of U'lUiain fil Elias, the 
Clerk of Longsdon, is proven by his attestation of the Charter ot 
Richard de Edensor (who married the daugliter of Richard fil 
Levened) to Peter de Roland, and it is clearly established by several 
Charters in the Foljumbe collection, which are of the date of King 
Ji'hn HI very early in the reign of King Heniy III. 



Pf DIGREE OF THE \VK1GHT5 OF LONGSTONE HALL. 



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330 THE LONGSTONES AND UEREWITES OF ASHFORD. 

In order fully to ascertain tlie relalionsliip between Thomas, the 
Clerk, and the Leveneds of Longstone, it is important to consider 
their Charters, which, in any event, would necessarily be considered 
in Derbyshire history, but which, if Mr. Sleigh is correct in his 
assumption of the immediate relationship, becomes of supreme impor- 
tance to this parish and to the family of the Longsdons. 

The Leveneds, like the Lonj^sdons, had extensive interests in the 
same parishes in which the latter were interested, and we find them 
locued in Parwich, Ashbourne, Hognaston, Winston, Wirksworth, 
Yolgrave, and elsewhere, where the Longsdons were interested. 

Ail plnces, more or less connected with mining, we find them, 
especially granting property to a family named Faber (which is only 
the Latin form of the word Wriglit), and this so persistently that it is 
impossible to avoid the conclusion that these Fabers were members 
of the family of Great Longston, who took this sobriquet as a surname. 

Moreover the Fabers were equally concerned with the families 
called Yolgrave, who were clearly members of the Longsdons, some 
of whom also took the surname of Kniveton (parcel of Ashbourne), 
from which the Kniveton family took their name : from the fact that 
nothing is known of the history of this family prior to the time of 
Henry III , and when first they are heard of they appear to be allied 
to the f.uiiily of Levened (who were firmly seated in Ashbourne), as 
well, as to the family of Lewine, of the same place, who were also 
interested in Abhford and Longstone, it is indicative of a common origin, 
for it may well be that the Knivetons also derive their origin from the 
Longstone family. 

Fortunately for Derbyshire County History, an immense collection 
of Kniveton Chatters was made in the thirteenth century which is 
now deposited in the library of the Dean and Chapter of Lirxoln, 
who very kindly permitted the author to make a copy of it; it is 
compiled with very little order and intelligence, and a searching en- 
quiry and consideration of these Charters, consisting of over 500, 
has failed to elict any evidence much earlier than the latter part of 
Henry HI., when Mathewfil Mathew first began to acquire property — 
he was dead in 14 Edward L This Mathew iiad a brother, William, 
and sons named also William, Henry, Richard, Robeit, and Mathew, 
all common names certainly, but precisely the names used by the 
Longsdon family, and the dominant name being that of ^Lathew, 
which was also the leading name in the family of Longsdon. 



THE LONGStONES AND BEREWITES OF ASHKORD 33 1 

The earliest Charter yet found, in which the I.ongsdons are 
mentioned, is one of Geoffrey Ridel, probably from its being attested 
by his relations, Ralf and William Basset, of the latter part of the 
reign of Henry II. The tirst notice of William Basset, in Derbyshire 
history, is the fifieeath jear of that King. Geoffry Ridel himself 
answered for one fee under Ferrars, at the time of the Red Book (1166) 

By this Charter, Ge.'fTry Ridei released to Gervase fil Richard (de 
Wiverton), who was living in 3 Henry III ) his inheritance in Duck- 
mauton and Colston, WiHiani, brotlitr of Gervase, son of Richard 
to have Duckmanton 

T,, Ralf, Prior of I.ondon, Ralf Bassett and William Dassint, Thos. 
de Sais, Bozon of Sutton, llelias Cleric, Unfred Pulton, Robt. de 
Wollied, \Vm. de Coleston, William fil Hugo, and Robi. fil Lewine. 

There can be very little doubt that this Charter was made within 
the date of Elias de Longslon, and that he is the Helias Cleric there 
indicated. The connection between Duckminton and Longston 
arose through the family of Pec, or Peak, who had land in both 
place.-;, and through them probably Richard de Longsdon, son of 
Adam, mentioned in a Woolly Charter, held land in Duckmanton, 
including the services of Rich fil Helewise ; the Charter is attested 
by Peter de Hareston, who is mentioned in a Pipe Roll of 43 
Henry III. That Adam fil Peter had a son named Richard, is clear 
from other records ; he attested the Charter of (iriflin fil Wenuwyn 
when founding his cantaria in 1262, whilst it is equally clear tiiat 
Nicolas til Adam, and brother of Richard, married Sarra, daughter of 
Ihomas de Pec, as will presently appear. 

4 John, Pipe Roll. One William fil Levened was amerced with 
one riamed Levingus 

Tliere is a Charter in Tlios. Brailsford's MSS., copied by Bassano 
(Vol. li., fo. 257, Dakeyne), in which /-i-/^/- dc LonguioiL attested a 
Charter of Hy Peveril, of Hassop, who granted land to Jordan 
Carpenter, of Hathersage, in the field of Hassop. Teste William 
de Vernon, Wm. Basset, Thomas de Edensor, Richard de Edenes- 
houer, Peter de Acland (? Roland), Thomas de Offerton, Peter de 
Hurst, Piter dc Lciigesuon, Rich de (?fil) Jordan 

This Charter is no doubt of the reign of King John 01 very early 
in Heniy III., and it is of value to show that the father of Peter was 
then dead, as the Charters of .Xdani, his son, to llenty fil William de 
i.ongsdon seem to indicate. 



332 



THE LONGSTONES AND liERUWITES OF ASHFORD. 



Another Charter in which the name of Peter de Longsdon occurs, 
is to be found in extracts. 

From Francis Eyre's Charters of Hassop (5 Dakeyne, p. 183): 
(This Richard de Edensor was a great-nephew of Sir Thomas 

Ensor, of Ensor, and in some way exercised a great influence in 

the Longsdon family, greater than would appear to follow from his 

marriage with a co-heir of Richard fil Levened, unless, indeed, he 

was an elder brother of Thomas, the Clerk.) 

Richard de Gort granted to Richard de Edensor five bovates of 
land in Roland, and three acres of land in Ris cran Toft, i.e., two 
bovates which Thurstand held, and a bovate which Hy. Pilleparius 
(Peveril) held, and two bovates in his own demesne, one of which 
Baldwin, of Hassop, and the other William fil VVymund held, 20s 
rent, and yd., for which he gave six marks. 

T., Serlo de Bele)', Adam de Heithill, \Vm. Basset, Wni. Vernon, 
■|"hos. de Edensor, Jordan de Sniiteiton, Robt. de Calhoure, Robt. de 
Stanton, Wm. de Perleia, Thos. de Derleia, Henry Peveril, Osbert de 
Chesterfield, Lancilin de Stok, Wm. de Pec, Mathew de Lo.'igsdeii, 
Matiin fil Roger. 

Richard de Edensor, with the consent of his heir, gave to Peter fil 
Wyimiiui de Rowland the whole land which Richard de Gort gave 
to him in Roland, 20s and yd lent. 

T., Serlo de Beley, Thos. de Edenshouer, Robt. de Stanton, Ad. de 
Herthill, Wm. de Derleia, Thos. de I^erleia, Robt. de Calvohoiier, 
Osbert de Chesterfield, Robt., his son, Henry Peveril, Peter de Bank, 
Ptfei- de LongsJen, Adam Turneat, Thos. de Hassop, Martin fil Roger, 
Wm. de Ruteler, Wm. de St. John, Robt. fil Stephen, Galf le 
Aparrileur. As some test of date the last witness, Geoffrey Lapparillas 
(as he was then termed) with Sigereth, his wife, in St. Giles, 14 
Henry HI., released to Peter de Roland, land in Chesterfield, Middle- 
ton, Eyum Newhagh, and nine acres in .'Xshfoid, and in 9, John Galf 
had been amerced by H. Bass, Justice. Several of the above 
witnesses were living in the time of King Jolin, which is the probable 
date of this Charter of Richard de Edensor. 

No. 181. William fil Walden de Longsdon to Thomas fil Richard 
de Pec granted lands in Longsdon. 

T., Serlo de Beleia, Peter de Hathorpe, William de Luton, Wm.fil 
llelie de Langsdon, Fcler, his son, RLithew Cleric, Win. de Laiigsdon, 
William de Derleia Adam de Stanton, John Perceio, Ralf, his 
brother. (Foljamhe Charters.) 



THE LONGSTONES AND BKRKWITES OF ASHFORD. 333 

This Thomas fil Richard de Pec, would appear lo have becri the 
father of Sarra de Meridene, who married first William Pincerna or 
le Botiler, of Bakewell, and secondly, Nicolas, the Clerk of Bakewell, 
son of Adam fil Peter, fil William fil Helie de Longsdon. This lady 
figured in many Charters, and is sometimes called Chelmeredene, 
which appears to be identical with Chelmorton. 

Robt. Luttrel to Thomas fil Richard fil Wm. de Pec, land iti Little 
Longsdon. 

T., Rich, de Herthill, Serlo de Beley, Adam de Herthill, Thomas de 
Edensor, William fil Helie de La?igsdo>i, Pder, his son, William fil 
Robert de Dene, Ralf de Heric, Robt. fil Alex de Mornesale, Rich. 
de Winst (? Clio). (Foljambe Charters.) 

In a Charter of Ralf fil William Gernon, now at Belvoir, Rich, de 
Vernon, William, Bailiff of William de Longsdon and Thomas de 
Longsdon, ivere loitnesses. 

33 Henry IIL Jurdon de Roiilesly obtained a lease of lands there, 
fioni Richard fil William de Vernon, to which WiHiam de Longsdon 
was a witness. (Belvoir Cliarter.) 

In another Charter in the same collection, concerning lands at 
Nether Iladdon, between Peter fil Robert Basset and Hugo, his 
brother, and Ricliard Vernon, Adam de Longsdon was a witness. 

Alice fil William de Pecco granted to Robert fil William Tirri, of 
Longford, a bovate in Great Longsdon, near two bovates, which 
William, her father, formerly held at one penny rent and fifteen pence 
rent at two terms. 

T., Richard de Herthill, Adam de Stanton, Mathew de Longsdon, 
Adam fil Peter, William fil Elie, William le Wine, Peter de Lascy, 
Nicolas de Winfield, Richard le Heir, John de Bankwell. (Mr. 
Longsdon's Charters.) 

Adam fil Ptlcr de Longsdon, granted to Henry fil William de 
Longsdun, a bovate in Longsdon, which Hem y fil Emma formerly held. 

T., Robert de Stanton, Mathew de Longsdon, William fil Elias, 
Robert Lascy, Hugo Pekoe, Richard fil Siramonir, Jo. Bulaxe, Robert 
Cemetarius, John Cleric. (Mr. Wright's Charters). 

The concurrence of William fil Elias is curious; Peter, his son, had 
apparently died whilst Adam, his grandson, had been let into the estates. 

Robert Lascy, the witness of this Charter, was Robert Peveril, of 
Hassop, called de Lascy because 12 10-12 (see Pipe Rolls), he held 
9 fees of the Barony of Lascy, in Cornwall. 



334 IHE LONGSTONES AND BEREWITES OF ASHFORD. 

riie s.ime Ad.iiii fil Peter de Longsdon granted to Henry fil 
William de Longsdon, land in Longsdon and Wardlow, which William, 
f.uher of the said Henry, formerly held of him. 

1'., Mathew de Longsdon, William fil Elias, Thomas fil Robert, 
William le Wine, Nicolas de Winfield, Peter de Lascy, William fil 
Eustace de .Mornesale, John de Banc well, Cleric. (Mr. Wright's 
Charters). Photograph of this important Charter is here given. 

Peter de Lascy was also de Peveril, son of Robert of the last 
Charter. See Vol. 3 (Section 5) of this work, page r88. Nicolas de 
Winfield was also a Peveril, or Paville as that branch called them- 
selves These two last. Charters were only duplicates of the leases of 
these places, granted by that family, which are still in the possession 
of Mr. Wright, of Longston Hall. 

RLathew de Longsdon and William de Longsdon attested a Charter 
of Peter Peveril, of Hassop, to Eustace de Stafford. 

One of the earliest notices of the Faber family is in an action (R. 
C.R. of 6 Henry HI , No. 15) in which William de Ferrars, Earl of 
Derby, the chief of the ironworkers, sues, amongst others, Richaid 
Faber, concerning tolls levied in the V^ill of Clifton, part of the 
.Manor of I'^sseburn. Quite possibly this was Richard fil Levened, of 
Longsdon. 

Two brothers, Thomas and Richard Levened, of Ashbourne. 
probably the last-mentioned Richard Faber, possessed rights in 
Osmondeston, Edelmeston and Clifton, which they both released to 
'I'utbury (see No. 153 of that chartulary), in all probability they were 
identical with the Longsdon family, many members of which had 
property in Yolgrave, and Ashbourne. If this were so, this Thomas 
may be identical with Thomas, the Clerk of Bakewcll; in all prob- 
ability they were the brothers of Robert fil Levened, and certainly 
Thomas, the Clerk, had a brother named Robert, and it seems 
that they were again identical with a family of Esseburn, who 
assumed the name of Faber (or Wright), which afterwards the Long- 
ston family assumed ; and in both cases it was handed down as a 
surname. 

Roger fil Levened, of Parwich, temp. Henry IL, or early in John, 
gave two bovates in Kniveton to Geoffry Faber, of Esseburn, which 
Suanus Gesel formerly held, T. Galfridus de Esseburn, Christopher 
of the same, Henry P'fott, of the same, Hugo Acover, William de 
Grendon, Robl. de Grendon, Herbert de Tissington, Rich, dc Pecco, 









../] 




tss-J.' 



Charter of Adam fil Peter de Loiifjsclon to Henry fil Wirium de Longsdon a toft in 
Longstone which William, father of the said llmry, formerly held. No 
date, probably early Henry III. (Mr. Wright's Charters.) 



THE LONGSTONES AND BERI.WITES OF ASHFORD 335 

Roger fil Toll, Roger Poutrel, Maurice de Snelston, Robert fil Toli 
(Kniveton Leiger). 

Roger Poutrel died ante 3 John (see Staffs. Plea Rolls), when he 
was sued by the Acovers respecting Snelston. 

It is curious that oneSwanus was thefather of Waltheof, of Mornesale, 
who was closely allied to the fitz Leveneds, and in all probability they 
were descended from him. 

Richard fil Robt. fil Toli, of Kniveton, granted to Mathew fil 
Humphery de Kniveton two bovates, which Geoffry Faber held, and 
the wood which Coll held, by way of augmentation of the bovate, it is 
again singular that we find the Leveneds in the vicinity of the 
Domesday holder of Longston, Kniveton and Parwich ; surely there 
must be a strong reason for this. 

Roger fil Levened had a son, Henry, as appears from Charter No. 307 
of the Kniveton Leiger. This Henry was living in 25 Edward I. 
when (Charter No, 136) he is found attesting a Charter of Margeria, 
wid^nv of Robert fil Robert, of the Hill of Parwich, who was then 
dealing with her dower. He appears to be dead in 32 Edward I., 
for on the feast of the Blessed Virgin Mary in that year, the land 
which was his was given to Nicolas fil Richard Faber, of Chedel, and 
other part to Robert de la Hill, in Bradley. 

It is very singular that we find the widow of Robert Hill dealing 
with the Parwich property as if indeed it was her own, and this would 
induce the belief that she had previously been the wife of William fil 
Mathew de Longston. 

John Faber attested Charter of Maihew fil Mathew de Kniveton to 
Henry, his son. John Faber, of Bradley, attested Rob. de la Hill's 
Charter, and in 19 Edward I. attested Charters of Hugo fil Jo. 
Forthanon, of Bradley, and Philip Stote, and in 13 Edward I. held 
land of Kniveton, at it/6 rent. 

25 Edward I. Margetia Wo. Robt. fil Robt. de la Hill to Henry 
Kniveton. Hy. Faber a witness. 

32 Edward I. Nicolas fil Robt. Faber, of Chedle lease of a toft 
croft and one bov, in Bradley, which Hy. F'aber held and 7/4 rent 
bail, Thos. le Swan, of Bradley, and Nic. fil Orme, of Corniley. 

32 Edward I. Other land of Hy. Faber leased to Robt. de la Hill 

Rd. fil Robt. Toti confirmed to Math, fil Humph, de Kniveton two 
bov., -d'hif.h Gal/. Faber held, in Kniveton, and the wood which Coil 



336 THE LOXGSrONES AND fiKKEWlTES OF ASHFORD. 

held byway of augmentation of that bov.and 8d. rent, for which Math. 

gave 30/- for ingiess. 'J'he names Toll and Coil are probably identical. 

■J-., Wm. and Robert Caps, Robert Clic, of Esseburn, Roger fil Joce, 

William le Lea, Rad. de Aldwerc, Gilbert and Ralf fii Ailse, Aoc. de 

Leic and F.'yon. 

Roger fil Levciwl, of Penwiz, gave to Galf Fabtr de Asseburn two 
bov. in Kniveton, which Swanus Gesel 2od. rent, for which Galf. gave 
one beautiful (pulcram) vaccam with her calf, and 2/- to Robert fii 

'I'oli to confirm. 

T.,Galf de Ksseburn Christopher and Hy. Pfott, of the same, Hugo 
de Acour, Wm de Grcndon, Robt. de Rad, Hbert. de Tissington, 
Rd. de Pecco, Roger fil Toll, Rog. Poutrel, Maurice de Snelston. 

Roger fil Levenod de Purwich (spelt Levenardus) with the consent 
of his heir, confirmed to Ralf Cleric fil Gamel, of Parwich, 2a. of land 
under his garden called le Flat. 

T., Ran de Freegll, Ralf fil suo, Galf fil Omaii, Henry fil suo, Wm. 
fil Gundred, Rich, fil suo, Ometo de Stanley, Adam fil. This was 
followed by a Charter of Roger de Balinden, who had exchanged 
his land in le Fl.it with Felicia, his wife's sister. 

Roger de Balinden, with the assent of lolante, his wife, confirmed to 
Malhew de Kniveton her rights in the land called the Flat in Pever- 
wich, which Felicia, sister of his wife, lolante, exchanged with him for 
his part in that land. 

Haddon Charters. Henry fil Robt. fil Ralf, Adam fil Robt. fil 
Gilbert and Robt. Faber, of Witksworth, grant to Robt. le Wyne 
rights of way. T , Thos de Hopton, Hamon Clic, John de Caldlowe, 
Wm. Suries, Rich. Clic, Robt. fil W'lnet, Nic de Crumford. 

Robert Faber, of Esseburn, Henry fil Quenilde, had one acre in 
Kniveton, near (aur) le long KnoUis de Cope, of which iialf an acre 
lies near the half-acre which Robt. held of Wm. fil Wm. de Yolgrave, 
towards Wiggelrige, between land of Robl, Aldewerk and John Clic 
fil Wm. Robert gave him one rod in Kniveton, between land 
of Henry Quenilda and Simon P'lis, near Robt. Esseburn's assart. 

Wm. de Kniveton fil Wm. de Yolgrave grant Rob. one acre sur le 
long, next Henry Quenilde's. 

Simon Pines and Wm. his son grant to Robt. of land near those 
held of John Clic, 

Roger fil Robert fil Faber granted to Mathew Kniveton three 
acres of land called Cope. 



THE LON'GSTONES AND RKK EWI I ES OF ASHFORU. 337 

Heirs of Henry fil Quenilde held four bovates in Knivetoa for 
7s each 

Heniy Kniveton attd. Charter of Robt. Esseburn to Robt Miller, 
of Kniveton, of two bovates of Rd. fil Toll, Rob. de Aldwerk a witness ; 
he also attd. Charter of Robt. fil Robt. Toli, of four bovates held by 
Eiins fil Rich., and Charter of Dionesia, Wo. Robt. fii Toli to 
Robt. her son, dower of Elias fii Rd. ; he also attd. Wm. de 
Kniveton fil Wm. de Yolgrave's grant of half an acre sur le long, 
and of land to Rd de Attelow fil Simon of Calton. 

Wm fil Ralf de Kniveton confirmed to Rd. fil Simon de Calton 
half an acre. 

Henry fil Quenild de Kniveton, confirmed to Robert Faber, of 
Esseburn, tlie homage of one acre in Kniveton, sur le long Knollern 
de Cope, of which one half acre lies near the half acre which the 
same Robert held of William fil Wm. de Yolgreve, half an acre upon 
the same Knoll of Cope, towards Wiggelerege, between lands of 
Robt. de Aldwerk and John Clic, at 2d. rent. 

T,, Gilbert fil Ailsi, Mathcw fil Mathew, John Clic, Wm. fil Ralf, 
Peter fil Aldus, Henry le Churchman, Wm Clic. 

John Cleric, of Kniveton (21 Edward I.), granted to Robt. Faber, 
of Esseburn, one rood in Kniveton, sur le Knoll, between the lands 
of Hy. fil Quenilde and that of Simon P'us. one rood upon Shert- 
cope, extending upon the assart of Robt de Esseburn. 

T., Henry fil Quenilde, Hy le Churchman, Gilbt. fil Ailsi, Simon 
P'us, Wm. fil Aldus, Hy., his brother, William Cleric. 

The following are probably Levenots : 

William fil Rog. de Hokenaston granted to Mathew de Kniveton 
the homage of Warin fil Robt. 

T.,\V\\\'\d,m?i\Y)tCAn\, Rich. Jil Levering, yohn Levering, Gilbert 

fil Margerie. 

(p. 1268.) Wm. fil Robert fil Leverick de Hokenaston to Peter fil 
Ralf de Gretton, half a bovate which Eugenulf fil Robt. de 
Cornbridge. 

Wm. fil Ralf Carpenter, of Hokenaston, granted to Ralf, his son of 
Cromford, \ bov., which Wm. Decanus held for service of one arrow. 

T., Wm. Decanus, John fil Adam and Jo. le Eyre, of the same. 

Roger fil Robt. Faber de Ashbourne granted to Mathew Kniveton 
3a. land in Kniveton, lying in the field called Cope. T., Hy. de 
Alsop, Jo. de Offidecote, Hugo de Bently, Hy. le Brasene, Alex. 



33^ THE LONGSTONES AND DEREWlltS UK ASHFOKD. 

Aleicater, Walter de Kniveton, Hy. de Mapletoii, Rd., liis brother, Jo. 
Cleric. 

Win. de Kniveton fil Wm. de Yolgrave (? Wm. fil Wm. de Longsdon) 
grant to Robert Faber, of Esseburn, |a. in Kniveton, sur. le long 
Knollis de Cope, between the land which Peter held, and that which 
Henry Quenilde held, to hold to him and Iggreda, his wife. 

'1'., Mathew de Kniveton, Hy. fil Quenilde, Rado Clic, Hy. le 
Churchman, Gilbert de Kniveton, Wm. and Jo. Clerics. (Kniveton 
Ch.utulary.) 

(Next Deed in the Kniveton Chartulary.) William de Yolgreie 
granted to Rich, de Attelow fil Simon de Calton 3a in Kniveton and 
^a. in the Long Wete, wliich lies between the land of Rad Presbiter 
and Hy. lil Quenilde, and an \x at the Rowlowe, between their 
lands and ia. at Sheretmenehill, by Appelowsich, and an ia. at 
Slo[)eretowe and Greenlowe, at the Flaghatoy, near Hy. fil Quenilde's 
lands. 
'1'., Hy. fil Qiienelde, of Kniveton, Mathew fil Mathew, of the same, 
tJilbert, of the same, Robt de Pecco, and Wm. Clic. 

William fil Lewin, of B.-ikewell, granted land to William de Esse- 
burn. 

Wm. r.ercar, of Kniveton, confirmed to Henry fil Mathew de 
Kniveton in fee 10 selions of arable land in Kniveton, which Win. de 
Yolgreve formerly held, between land of Henry Hevedman and Wm 
de Thorpe, abutting upon the Cliff. 

T., Roger de Bradborn, Step de Ireton, Robt. Gilbert, Mathew 
fil Mathew de Kniveton, Wm. de Thorpe. 

Math, de Longsdon attested Charter of Wm., Earl of Derby, to 
.^dam le Wine, land in Bracington and Hopton, with Galf de Greslc 
Senescal, Thos. de Ensor, Jord. de Snilterton, Robt. de Acour, 
Roger de Wodensly, Robt. de Aldwerk, Ran of Ibul. 

Math, and Wm. de Longsdon attested Charter of Robt. fil Ad.im 
le Wine, of Wirksworth, with Sampson the Vicar, Ad. de Cestevin, 
of the same, ^Vm. le Wine, Hy. de (iratton, Hugo de Wormansworth, 
and lands of the Lord Robt. of Staimton. 

Early Deed — 

Adam fil Marieth de Cra de Wiggerwall release to Adam Lewine 
de Wirksworth his rights in lands in Wigswall for five maiks. 

T., Matliew de Longsdon, Robert de Nottingham, Hy. de Optoii, 
Gaufrido de HybuU, Robert fil Thos de Opton, Robert fil Jo. 



THE LONGSTONES AND EKREWITES OF ASHFOHD. 339 

Tulbury Register, No. 153. Thos. fil Lerenald, of Esseburn, 
released his rights to the pasture of Edehnestoii and Osmondeston, 
pertaining to land in Clifton. 

No. 229, Ri hard fil Leveinildi, 0/ Essebiii >i. released his claim in 
certain pastures ol Edchiieston and Osmondeston, pertaining to lands 
in Clifton. 

Rich, fii Levened attested a Charter of Simon Blund land in 
Campedenstreet. 

Fine, ante 26 Henry III. Robert de Levened Pit. and Letice, Cecil, 
and Sarah with \Vm. fil Levened (William Cokayne)? fined for five 
tofts in Ashbourne, and 15/6 rents. 

26-7 Henry III. (Rot. Cur. Regis. No. 55.) Henry de Mappleton 
and Letice, his wife, Wm. Cokayne and Cecil, his wife, and Riciiaid 
de Mappleton and Sarra, his wife, sued William fii Roger, in which 
action the last-mentioned fine was recorded. 

36 Henry III. Henry Dean, of Lincoln, Parson of Ashford, fined 
with the same three co-heirs for the said five tofts and rent. 

William Cokayne is called Coquain or Cook, and this is the 
probable origin of the name. His grand-daughter, Margeria, daughter 
of Roger, his son, who was Propositus of Esseburn, married VVilliani 
til Mathew de Longsdon. 

The Deans of Lincoln's Chartulary gives evidence of the presence 
of the family of Ashbourne in dealing with the properly of the 
Cokayne of that place. William fil Roger, Propositus of Esseburn, 
and Peter, his brother, released to Herbert, of Nottingham, iheir father's 
rights in the land of the church, near Thos. de Staynlow's toft, 19/6. 

T., Robert de Levenad, Wm. de Mappleton, Hy. de Cruce, Roger 
de Derb, Peter fil Ulf, Rich fil Levenad, ^Valter fil 'I'egtoris, Hugo de 
Bently, Wm. Piston 

Hbertus de Nottingham to Henry Cap. de Bradly, release of his 
rights he bought in the land of Roger Pps , near Thos. de Stanton. 

T., Thomas fil Levenad and Rich, (brothers), Hy. de Cruce, Magr. 
Alexander, John, brother of the Parson, Thos. de Stanton, 
Robert Mercator, Wm. Clic, his son. 

Waller fil Wm. Cap le Scekcndon release to Hy. Cap. de Benedly 
his rights in same land. 

T , Hy. de Cruce, Thos. fil Levenad and Rich., brothers, Magister 
A'e.x. lly. de Machellield, Wm. Spend-.lowe, Hy , his son, Thos. de 
Stanton. 



340 THE LONGSTONES AND HEKEWITES OK ASHFORD. 

Mr. I.ongsdon, of Little Longston, possesses three original Charters 
and one paper copy of grants from Griffin fil Wonuwyn to Mathew 
fil Thomas, Cleric of Bakewell, all attested before the same wit- 
nesses, the Lord Thomas of Ensor, the Lord Adam de Herthill, Luke 
de Beley, Robert of Stanton, Robert fil Ingram, NLithew de Reyndon, 
Nicolas, of Over Haddon and Henry de Hotot. 

The first Charter, which has a fine seal, is of Griffin fil Wenuwyn, 
of Kevelock, to NIatliew fil Cleric, of Bakewell, of a bovate in Great 
Longston, which Thomas, father of the said NLathew, held by feoff- 
ment of the King and which Wenuwyn, his father, confiimed, with 
turf in the Moor of Longston, and other Mores in Great Longsdon, 
belonging to the said Mathew in Little Longsdon. The third Charter 
stated that Mathew held them at yd. rent and service at his Mill, and 
the paper copy states that the turbaries were to be delved and the 
farres to be plocked in the said Mores. 

There can be little doubt but that this bovate in Great Longston 
was the same which Adam fil Peter confirmed to \Vm. fil Mathew, 
out of his fee, but it is difficult to understand why there were so many 
Charters respecting it and why they all remained in the hands of the 
Longsdons. Possibly it was that Griffin found that he was, in fact, 
trenching upon the powers of others, and that as the lands were of 
ancient demesne his lordly Charters were inoperative. 

Griftin fil Wenuwyn granted to John de Holwell land in Hulme 
and Crakelow Botham and Hallesworth, next lands of William Rufus, 
at 6d. rent. 

T., William le Wine, Mathew de Longsdon, William de Longsdon, 
Laurence fil Peter de Rydon, Robert de Fetcham, then Sergeant, 
Henry fil Richard and John de Bancwell. Seal, a lion rampant (the 
seal of the Princes of Powis and Kings of South Wales), legend S, 
Griffini fil Wenuwyn. (Duke of Rutland's Charter.) 

Wm. de Esseburn, manens in Bancwell, granted to Roger, his 
eldest son, one bov. of land he bought of Robeit fil Lewiiie, and half 
the land of Fossington, Helday, Aylgard and Hulm, which he bought 
of Ralf Gernon (he died 1247), la. in Catclive which he bought of 
Wm. le Messenger, and la. in Alsyknol. 

T., Ralf le Wine, Roger de Sceladin, Mathew Mercator, Robt. 
Reindon, Elias Tinctor, Jo. le Wyne, Rich, de Keliston Clic. (Bel- 
voir Chs.) 

This grantor was no doubt ^Vm. Coka)ne. 



tllE LONGSTONES AND BE;;EWITES OF ASHFORLi. 341 

Win. Aveiial de Haddon (AdJii) Avenal, his father, Avicie, his 
mother, the Bircheria, which Runs de Pec nepos me (nephew or 
grandson) then held. 

T., \Vm. de Starclive, Hugo Cap., Ricus Clic, Wulstanham 
Gervase Avenel, Serlo de Pleslie, Wm. Wautre, Willo fil Herbert, 
Ric/i. fil Daniel de Edenstowe, and because I have not a seal I use 
that of Rich. Renald Cap, Wm. de Hester, Alan de Ruston, Robert 
fil Widon. 

c. John or early Henry III. Hugo de Pec, of Chesterfield, fil 
John fil Richard. 

Robert de Pecco released to Mathew de Kniveton his righis in a 
croft lying between the croft of Ralf Caps and John Clic on the south, 
and the toft of William de Yolgreve on the noith for his life. 

T., Henry de Esseburn, Stephen de Iriton, Rad de Kniveton, 
Rector of Brailsford, William Clic. (Kniveton Leiger ) 

Luca de Beely granted to Ranulf de Wakebridge in free marriage 
with Sarra fil Thomas de Pecco, one bovate in Chelmorden. 

T., Jord de Snitterton, Thos. de Ensor, Robert de Stanton, Ad. de 
Edensor, Nic. de Ov. Haddon, Nic. de Wancliff, Mathew, of the 
same, John de Banewell. 

Luca de Beely was dead in 36 Henry IH. 

Nicolas, son of Adam, married Sarra, the widow of William Pincerna 
or le Wine, of Bakewell, and the following Charters coupled in the 
Belvoir Collection give evidence that Thomas, the Clerk, of Bakewell 
had a brother Robert, of whom, unless he vi-as identical with Robert 
Faber, nothing is known. 

Sarra de Meredine, widow of Wm. Pincerna, granted to Lord Ralf 
Cubberle, Rector of Eyum, one acre in Esford. 

T., Willo le Wine, Wm. Clic, Wm de Es^eburn, Mathew Mercator, 
Robt. Child, John de Holwell, Robt. de Reyndon, John le Brun, Hy. 
fil Hubert, John Clic. 

Attached to this Charter is another by Robl. /rater Thomas Clic, of 
Bakewell, to Robert Child, a culture near the Bridge of Esford. 

T, Wm. Pincerne, Mathew de Reyndon, Hubert Mercaior, Wm. 
Cleric, Roger Castrei, Rich de Syaledune (? Sheldon), Hy. Burgorn, 
Math. Cap, Thos. fil Letice, Roger Tinctor (this Charter seems to be 
a generation earlier than the other). 

29 Sept.— 13 Oct. 20 Henry HL Wm. Parson, of Esseburn Pit, 
Luke de Donstable and Lettice, ux., and Wm. fil Roger, of Esseburn, 



342 THt LONGSTONtS AND IJKREWITES OF ASHFORa 

a tofi, fifty two acres of land and two acres mead in Peverwych, and 
ten and a half acres of land in Ksscljurn. 

Maiilde dc Rulington claimed one and a quarter of toft in Esscljum. 

Hast, 1243, 27 Henry III. Agnes, daugliter of Ni--, Plaintiff, and 
Ak'x dc RsschiirP, and Lettice ux. messuage, and 50a. of land in 

Alsoppe 

Sarra de Meredine, widow of William le Botiler, 10 Robt. fil 
Matbcw de Reyndon. T., John de Bakewell, Clic. (Haddon 
Charter.) 

Ilcnry fil John de Heyham (of Sarra le Wine, begotten), grant of 
the land which he had of the grant of Galf de (Alkanga) Akally and 
Rich., his brother. 

T., Robt. de Reyndon, Wm Clic, Roger de Essebuni, Philip 
I'extor, Gcrvase de Nottingham Elias Clic. (Haddon Charter.) 

This Sarra de Meredine was evidently the wife successively of 
William Pincerna or liotiler and of Nicolas fil Adam, of Bakcwell, 
but it is not clear that she was the mother of his son John, the Clerk, 
and probably not, for the property of Nicolas descended to his 
daughter, and his wife had several sons, and this property evidently 
went to Agnes her daughter. 

John Clic fil Nic de Bakewell to Robert de Reydon, half an acre 
which Mathew Mercator held, lying under Condey, near laud of Ralf 
le Wyne, in Bakewell, and i6d. rent, which Elie Carpenter, and Hy. 
le Roter paid. 

T,, Ralf le Wine, Robt., his brother, Wm. de Esseburn, Alan de Pick- 
worth, Roger de Sheldon, Hy. Borton, John le Wyne. (Haddon 
Charter.) 

c. Henry III. Ivo Mercenarius de Bakewell fil Henry de Bor- 
ton to Hugo diet Martin, of Tidesweil, land held of Wm. le Wyne, 
beyond Herwycweye, between lands of Mathew Mercator and Jo. 
Bissop, land near Wytenwall ; Robt. Flindhurst, near land of John 
Cleric fil Nic de Bankwell, Emma fil Alexandre Eustace fil Sacerdote, 
Randel Vereding, Haredale, between lands of Edusa de Dagenhale 
and Will, de Haledrin, and land of Sir Richard Vernon (attainted). 

T., Sir Robt. de Hertil, Hy. de Taddington, Thos. Foljambe, Rad. 
le Wyne, John de Holwell, Wm de Esseburn, Elias Tinctor, Mathew 
Mercator, Gervase de Nottingham, Hugh de Chesterfield Clic. 

John Clic fil Nic de Bakewell granted to Loid Ralf de Cubbale 
land on Odlam Hill and Wythorm Endecliff " for which I bought" of 




lip t 'I' 2:4.1 




vj' 







.It'* ■ 



I 




Charter of William de Den. of Giva* Longstone, of half an acre of Land lying in the 
Crofteshead. in the field of Lon^tsdon, to Robert fil Adam de Longsdon of 
one acre of Land in the field nf Wardelow, one rood of Land lying at Pigtor, 
one rood lying on Jliddlehill, and one rood on the Logradus, and one half acre 
lying at the head of the Till., and one half acre lying on the Henbutts. No 
date. (Mr. Wright's Charters.) 

Note. — As all these places remain in the possession of Mr Wright of I ongstone, 
there can be little doubt that Robert fil Adam was identical with Robert le 
Wright. 



THE LONGSTONES AND BEP.EWITES OF ASHFORD. 343 

Henry Auketel, one rood on Alkedewell and Shoorlbrode, and land 
of Peier de Foston. 

'1'., \Vm. le Wyiie, Win. de Esseburn, Mathew Mercator, Jo. de 
Holewell, Robt. de Reyndon, Robeit Cliild, Henry fil Hubert, Elia 
de Pontefract, Roger Tinctor. (Haddon Charters ) 

(Ralf Cubbcle attd. Chaiicr ul Alice, d. of Peter Roland, to Wm. 

de Verncn, 19-21 Henry HI., three deeds of John fil Nicolas were 

sealed with a gritifin. Peter fil Wm. de Foston, rele. to same land 

near Stocking. Same witnesses. Mathew, called Mercenarius, not 

Mercator). 

44 Edivaid Hi. .Ante fest Nativ. Jo. the Baptist Felicia, dau. of 

Jo. le Cleik, of Longsdon, granted to Godfr. de Roland land which be- 
longed to John, her father, of Ashford, Great Longston, and Mornesale, 
and Roland T., Henry de la Pole, William di Aldredly, John de 
i^hirley, Radulf de Baystowe. Seal, on a chief three crosses, (?) the 
middle one, and three trees, (?) (?) a religious seal. 

3 Edward II. Cecelia, Wo. of Nic Fever il, of llassop, release of 
dower to Jo. de Calver. 

Peter fil Robt. de Hassop (Peveri!) last witness to Charter of Nic 
Peveril of Hassop to John de Calver. (Bel voir Charters ) 

Exchange of land between Wilii.^m de Den, of Longsdon, and 
Robert fil Adam, of Longsdon, of land at Crofteshed, in Longsdon, 
for land in Wardlow, of which one rood lies at Pigtor (the Pe.Tk 
mountain), one rood at Middlehill, one rood on the lowegrades, 
half a rood at the head of the village, and one rood at Henbutts. 

T., Alan de Roland, William Vicar, Richard fil William, William 
fil Adam, and Thomas fil Adam. (Photograph is here given.) 

This Charter may be dated about the latter part of Edward IL, in 
the 17th year, William Rotur, clerk (no doubt William Vicar of 
that Charter) was a witness. (Mr. Wright's Charters.) 

Nic fil Adam de Smerill to Wm. fil Milo de Gratton, land which 
Calf de Milo formerly held. T., Rd. de Herthill, Henry de Hottot, 
Robt. de Duckenfield, Wm. Avenel, Adam fil Milo. (Pegg MS. at 
Heralds' College.) 

Margaret fil Hubert de Yolgrave to John de Smerill, four acres in 
Smerill. T , Adam de Herthill, Nicolas de Smerill, Hy. de Hottot, 
William de Longsdon, Fulcher de Ireton, William de Hulton Clic. 
(Belvoir Charters.) 

Robt. fil Robt. Coker, of Smerill, granted to John fil Gilbert de 



344 ■'"'■- LONGSTONES AND BEREWITES OF ASHFOKD. 

ead land there. T., Thomas fil Robt. Foljambe, Henry de Hottot, 
Wm. de Lo/igsdo/i, Nicolas de Smerill, William fil Milo de Middleton 
(Avenel) John fil Adam de Smerill, Robt. de Tideswell Clic. (Bel- 
voir Charters.) 

33-5 Henry III. Ralf fil Ralf Bugg to Wm. fil Ulpy, land in 
Bakewell. '1'., Wm. de Longsdon. 

37 Henry HI. L?scia, fila Henry de Pavely, Wo. of Wm. de 
Fotslow, granted to John Clic, of Bakewell, fil Nic, land on the 
banks of the Wye, at End Cliff. T., Wm. le Wine, Rad Bugg, Wm. 
Clic, Wm. de Esseburn. 

Henry Pavely was Henry Peveril, who, apparently, had married 
a lady having an interest in that property. 

10 Edward I. Math fil Robt. dc Preston to Thos. Foljambe, land 
in Bakewell. T., Ralf le Wine, Robt., his brother, Gal. Alkanger, 
Hy. le Wine. 

John le Wine attd. Charter of Ivo Mercator. He was probably 
ilie son of Sarra and the Clic. (Belvoir Charters.) 

42 Henry HI. John Clic attd. Charter of Roger fil Wm. de 
Ksseburn. 

44 Henry HI. Wm. le Wine. (Belvoir Charters.) 

John le Wine and Jo. Clic attd. Charter of Robt. fil Alan, of 
B.ikewell. (Belvoir Charters). 

Wm. le Wine attd. Charter of Grififin fil Wenuwyn, with Mathew 
Aukedon. (Belvoir Charters ) 

Wm. Pincerna, Wm. le Wine, Wm Clic, Wm. de Esseburn, all 
attd. the same Charter. (Belvoir Charters.) 

It may be a mere coincidence, but it is curious to find that a family 
named Levinge, or Levened, bought Parwich from one of the 
Cokaynes about the latter end of the reign of Elizabeth, or in 
James I., probably they were descendants of the Leveneds. 

13th Sept, 1611. Richard St. George certified that Thomas 
Levinge was entitled to bear, as his ancestors had done. Vert a chevron 
or, and in chief a three escallops argent, and he obtained for his 
crest an escallop argent, and these were also granted to Francis, 
Timothy, and William, his brothers, which are very much like the 
old Wright arms, and would seem to be derived from them, or from 
a common ancestor. 

This family followed the old cleikly profession of their ancestors, 
if indeed they descend from them, and they were very distinguished 



THE LONGSTONES AND BER(iWITES OF ASHFORD. 345 

lawyers, one of them, Sir Richaid Levinge, Bait, Speaker of the 
House of Commons, in England, and Lord Chief Justice of the 
King's Bench in Ireland. Timothy Levinge, Lord of the Manor of 
Parwich, great-great-grandfather of the Speaker, was Member for the 
County and Recorder of Derby. Little seems known of their origin. 
Nicolas and Robert Levin were assessed at Halhersage 6 and 13 
Henry VHL Timothy was the son of Thomas, who married 
Margaret, daughter of William Freeman, of Boile Hall, Warwick, who 
was the son of Walter Levinge by Margaret Longshaw, of Lancaster. 

43 Eliz. John Leving was Rector of Loughborough, having been 
presented by the Earl of Huntingdon (see page 19 of this volume). 

1625. Thomas Leving, of Parwich, attd. the Will of Edward 
Browne, of Sturson (see page 97 of this volume). 

Theophilus Browne, of Derby (see chap. ii. of this volume), married 
the great grand-daughter of Thomas Levinge, of the Inner Temple, 
just mentioned. 

Philippa fil Win. de Yolgrave confirmed to Henry fil Mathew 4d. 
and one obole rent in Kniveton, 2d of which Mathew the Church- 
man paid for land held of him, id. by Henry de Mapelton and id. 
and one obole by Gilbert the Miller. 

T., Roger de Bradburn, Henry and Ran. de Alsop, Roger de 
Peverwiz and also one acre in Kniveton, and half an acre lying on the 
Winnedon, between lands of Robert fil Robert and Henry Heordman, 
abutting on the Ridgway, the other half on Grenewyndon. 

T., Henry de Mapelton, Malhew fil Henry, Henry Heordman, 
Robert fil Robert de Kniveton, Robert de Tideswell. (Kniveton 
Leiger.) 

— Year of Henry fil John. Agreement between Mathe.v de 
Longesdon and Cecilia, Wo. of Jurdan de Offerton. 

Cecilia confirmed to Mathew the land which Jurdan and Heverard 
formerly held in Offerton (Overton), except six acres at Stord (?), 
for 12 years, and if she is unable to dig, the six acres thereof bhall 
remain to the said Mathew for the aforesaid term. Rent, 5s a )car 
to the Chief Lord. 

T., Luca de Beleg (dead 36 Henry III ), Robert de Stanton, Peter 
his brother, Jurdan de Rowleslie, Nic de Stanclive, William de 
Chattesworth, Elias de Thornhill, Elias de Bamford, Peter de Hurst, 
William de Heilow, Nic de Paddelie, Adam de Longesdon. (Mr. 
Wright's Charters.) 



3Jl'i THE I.ONGSTONES AND REREWITES OF ASHFORD. 

Staff, and Derby. No. i (c. John). Thomas, son of Richard, 
Senescal of Peak (? Pec), (who was tliis, Peak records do not 
mention him), grant to Mathew de l.ongsdon, two cults of mead in 
the field of Little Longstone, under Longeslowe, in the Lordship of 
Cote Medensz (wliere is this ?), with an acre of arable land, stretching 
to the road from Crosvey (?), wiih a sheep-fold of half an acre under 
the said hill of Longeslowe, in exchange for seven acres in the field 
of Hassop. Rent of Longstone land, gd. at St. Martin, to be paid 
by Thomas; rent of Hassop land, 3d. at Assumption, /o be paid by 
Mathew. T., Serlo de ]3eleg, Kt. (10-18 John), Adam de Ilerthill 
(attd. a Calver Charter, 16 Jol)n), Robl. Parson of Hope, Robt. de 
Hope (attd. a Brampton Charter with Serlo de Beleg, sd.), Rich., 
son of Thomas Parson, of Bakewell, Math. Parson. (Mr. Wright's 
Charters.) 

Woolly, 6667, page 120, and Mr. Longsdon's Charters. 

Alice fil William de Pecco granted to Robert fil William Tirri de 
Longford a bovate of land in Great Longstone, near two bovates 
which her father held. id. rent, and i5d., at two terms. 

T., Richard de Herthili, Kt, Ad. de Stanton, Mathew de Longsdon, 
Adam fil Peter, Wm. fil Elie, Wm. le Wine, Peter de Lascy, Nic de 
Winfield, Rich, de lleiiz, Jo. de Bancwell. 

Thomas, son of Robert of Little Longstone, granted to Mathew, 
son of Thomas de Bancwell, horn, and serv and 13d. rent of 
Richard, son of Richard de Edensor, and of Henry Clodhour 
(? Clothoman) and Alice his wife; also of Matilde Juliana and 
(?j Lescie (sisters) paid for one bovate and one croft in 
Little Longestone, which they held of him. Rent, id. (?) If they 
were Matilde Juliana and Lescie, daughters of Agnes, daughter 
of Thos. de Ensor. 

T , Sir Thos. de Edensor, Adam de Edensor, Luca de Beleg (dead 
36 Henry IH.), Robt. de Stanton, Andrew de Derley (escheat No. 61, 
II Henry III), Peter de Stanton, Wm. Wine de Bank well, Mathew 
de Raindon (attd. Gr. fil W.'s Charter to Mathew fil Thos.), Henry 
de Calvoiir. (Mr. Wright's Charters.) Photograph is here given. 

This Cliaiter is also a great puzzle. Was this Thomas de Longesdon 
identical with the Thomas of 3 Edward I. and of the Calver Charter, 
or with either of them ? and was he the grandson of Wallheof ? If so, 
it would seem to prove that the Waltheof family were overlords of the 
Longsdons and of the Leveneds. The description of ad capud ville 



THE LONGSTONES AND BEREWITES or ASHFORD. 347 

de Longesdon is curious. Henry, father of Tliomas, must have been 
the grantee of Adam fil Peter de Longsdon, wliich was clearly of a 
very early date, because Robert Lascy (or Pevcril) was a witness 
to the first charter, and Peter, his son, to the second, so that the 
William de Longsdon, father of this Henry, must have been of the 
time of King John, and was probably the son of Elias. 

William, son of Thomas de Longsdon, was doubtless son of the 
grantor, and he may have been the progenitor of the Wright family, 
as he seems to have been their ancestor, for this smaller property at 
the head of the village would seem to be identical with the estate 
at the end of the village mentioned in the Charter of Elizabeth, 
widow of John Wright, who died 17 Henry VIL, and in other 
charters of the family, and is very possibly the estate surrendered to 
Richard, their son, by Johanna, the widow of Henry Wright, in 
6 Edward IV., in which her eldest son, John, who no doubt then 
came into possession of the chief properly, h.id been residing, and 
which was probably the estate granted to John by his father and 
mother in 34 Henry VL 

The following Charter establishes the fact that at the date of it 
a Ihomas de l,ongsdon was then in existence, the grantor, 'I'homas 
fil Thomas Foljimbe, was Bailiff of Peak iS I'.dward L, and his 
nephews, Thomas the Clerk, of Gratton, William, and Henry, the 
sons of his brother Roger, were all Hving in the time of Edward L, 
so that it may safely be attributed to the latter part of Henry UL, 
though certainly after the 36th of th.it King. 

Thomas fil Thomas Foljambe, with the consent of Catherine, his 
wife, confirmed to Thomas fil John Fo'.jambe a messuage in Wormhill 
which Hugo Mockings held (this was Hugo de Morhagh, who was 
living in 36 Henry HI, so that the Charter is after this date), and 
which Thomas Foljambe had with his wife in free marriage. 

T., Wm. de Morton, Gervase de Bernak (Bailiff of Peak 40 Henry 
in.), John Daniel, William Hally, William Foljambe, Thomas de 
Longsdon, Peter de Roland, Thomas fil Roger Foljambe, Heniy and 
William his brothers, Hugo Mason, John and William his brothers, 
William de Stockport, it would seem that if this Thomas de Longsdon 
was not the son of Adam, he must have been Thomas fil Robert 
de Mornesale. 

There is but little evidence respecting Thomas de Longsdon, 
Cleric, of Bakewell, excepting that possibly he attested various 



34^ 'J'HE I.ONGSTOXF.S AND nEUEWIIES Ol" ASHl'oKD. 

Chailcis, which lie would Jo if he were a clerk or a lawyer. Of his 
tenure of land there is but little proof, excepting that his son had 
held a bovatc of land in Great Longstone of the fee of Adam fil 
Peter, which had descended to his son when Grififin fil Wenuwyn 
ccnfirnied his rights therein. This would seem to have been a very 
ancient tenure, since Gritifin admits that the ancestors of Mathew 
held it of his own ancestors, and before that date of the King, this may 
mean that those ancestors were the ancestors of Adam fil Peter, 
unless there were two Mathews and two Thomases in the line of 
succession. Thomas the Clerk seems to have been a Verderer, or 
Forester, of Peak, for in 36 Henry III Mathew is fined for not 
producing the Roll of his father (see Vol III., page 235, of this 
work). But there ajjpears to be no evidence that he ever acted in 
that capacity, and it would rather seem that Gerard fil Adam was 
the Forester of that date who made a grant to Robert le Wright. 
Of Maihew liimself there are but few Charters, the most important 
of those which he attested was the Charter of William, Earl of 
Derby, to Adam I.ewine, and another of Robert, son of this 
Adam, and again to that of Adam fil Mareath, of Cra de Wig- 
wall, to Adam Lewine, of Wirksworth, which would seem to 
identify the family of Lewin (or Levenet) with that of Le Wine, of 
.■\shbourne, who are also known under the names of Pincerna and 
Botiler. Thomas the Clerk died ante 36 Henry III., and Mathew 
fil Thomas was dead before 42 Henry III., when William, his son, 
had succeeded him. 

There seems to be great confusion between the Longsdons of the 
name of William about this period The grandfather of Adam fil 
Peter was of the name, and there was a William fil William, who 
resided chiefly at Volgrave, who was probably a son of William, the 
grandfather of Adam, by Basilia, his wife, who seems to have been 
a relation of the Herthill family, or possibly of the family of Avenel, 
of Middleton, a younger branch of the Avenels of Haddon, whom 
William Briwere had evicted for the Vernons and Bassets. 

William, the son of Elias (the grandfather of Adam fil Peter), had 
a grant, probably in free marriage, from Wm. Avenel, of Middleton, 
of one-quarter the rents of the -Mill of Alport, to which Mathew de 
Longsdon and .Adam fil Peter were witnesses, and he seems to have 
had a son and heir named Elias, who granted l.ind to Wm fil 
Mathew, the homage and rent of yd., which was the portion of three 



THE LONGSTONES AND BEREWITES OF ASHFOKD. 349 

fisters, of r3d. rent divided between five sisters, who were, in fact, 
tlie daughters and coheiresses of Richard fil Levened, one of whom 
was the wife of Rich fil Rich, de Ensor. (Mr. Longsdon's Cliarters.) 

This Charter is most important, since it proves that this William 
fil El ins was the head of the family, and the only explanation appears 
to be that he and his wife Basilia had retired to the Abbey of Rufford 
when they confirmed Waltheof's Charter, and that he was still 
living, although he had given up his property to his son, Peter, and 
his grandson, Adam. As Richard le Ragged was the first witness 
of this Charter, it was probably of the 41st of Henry III., when he 
was bailiff. 

The grants of land made to William fil Elias are generally undated, 
but one is dated 29 Henry III., which was attested by iMathew de 
Longsdon. These Charters show that Elias had sons named John 
and Richard, as well as William, or it may be that they were grand- 
sons, for it is clear that William fil Elias had also other sons besides 
Peter, his heir; in fact, there were so many younger sons that it 
is most difificult and dangerous to attempt to affiliate them, and the 
difficulty is greatly increased by some of them taking local names, as 
de Yolgrave, de Knyveton, de Hognaston, and probably other names. 
'I'hey seem to have discarded the name of I^evenet, which appears 
to have belonged to them and to have adopted their local residences. 
It is very difficult, without further evidence, to suggest the name of 
tlie father of Robert Wright the first of the Longsdons who bore 
that soubriquet, although it seems to have been borne by several 
of the family settled at Ashbourne, Parwich, and other places. 
We know positively that this Robert Wright had sons, named Henry 
and Thomas, the latter of whom probably succeeded to the inheritance. 
Their Charters, dated 4 and 24 Edward III. respectively, described 
their father, apparently, or it might have been, themselves, as of 
Ashford, but we know from these Charters that the Longstone land 
they disposed of came to them by inheritance from Robert, their 
father, and the Charter of Gerard fil Robert of the same date, the 
4th Edward III, shows that Robert le Wright then resided at 
Longstone. But the Subsidy Rolls of only three years earlier give 
no Wright of Great Longstone, although the Ashford Subsidies 
include the name of Robert de Longsdon, who no doubt was this 
Robert le Wright. 

We know but little of the sons of Ad.im fil Peter except their 



350 THE LONGSTONES AND BEKEWllEs OF ASHFORD. 

names, Robert. Richard, and Nicolas, and it may be that Robert le 
Wright was one or he may have been tlie son of one of them, 
but as he had sons of full age in 4 Edward III , it is probable 
tiiat he was himself the son of Adam, who was presumably only a 
young man in 40-2 Henry III. We have no proof of his living 
more than twelve years previously. .All that can be positively 
asseited is that Robert le Wright is found in the family inheritance 
when we first hear of him, and that the collection of charters which 
his descendants still possess do not show any evidence of his position, 
nor would any be expected if, as is most probable, he obtained 
possession by right of inheritance. Of Nicolas, brother of Robert 
fil .■\dam, we know something. He married a lady, Sarra le Wine, 
the widow of William de Ashbourne, who certainly left a son, John, 
by her first husband, anu others by her third husband, who was a 
cleric and their issue, therefore, illegitimate. From the tine cited in 
the action of 36 Henry HI., it would appear that she was a relation 
of Robeit Levened 

The fact that there was a Thomas, Lord of I.ongstone, in the reign 
of Henry III. is clear from a Charter still in the muniment room 
of .Mr. Wright, of I.ongstone Hall, whirh is undated, but which 
must have been made after the 40th Henry III., because Adam and 
Mathew de Longsdun were then dead, and Richard fil Adam and 
William fil Mathew were attesting witnesses. It is a Charter of Ralf 
de Calver, confirming to Robert de Uarley, then dwelling in the 
village of Great Longstone, certain property ; it was attested by 
Thomas, Lord (Dominus) of Longstone, Richard fil Adam de 
Longsdon, John de la Hall, Hugo Ingram, Wm. fil Eustace de 
Mornesale, and Wm. fil Mathew de Longsdon, which would give it 
a rather late date. The position of Thomas de Longsdon is most 
impoTt*nt. He takes precedence of the sons of Adam and Mathew, 
an<J he may have signed as Lord of the place to distinguish himself 
from that other Thomas de Longsdon, descended from Waltheof, who 
was about that time resident in the village. (Photograph is here given.) 
It is better to consider the terms of this Charter. It was a sale 
for money of a messuage in the village of Great Longstone, adjoining 
the messuage of John de la Hall on the West, against the highway 
going towards Ashford, containing nine rods and three feet in length, 
and three rods and two feet in breadth, on the North, and two rods 
and thirteen feet on the South, to hold to him and to whoever 
he may let or sell it, of the grantor, at a rent of two silver pennies. 




Charter of Gerard til Adam, of Bakewell, to Robert le Wright, of Great Longstone, 
of a Messuage in Great Longstone. Dated Sunday next after the Feast of 
the Translation of St. Thomas, the Martyr, the 4tli year of King Edward HI. 
(Mr. Wright's Charters.) 



THE LONGSTONES AND BKREWITES OF ASHFORU 35 I 

The Calvers were great people in Nottinghamshire as well as in 
Derbysiiire, and there is a Charter in the Haddon collection of 
Nicolas fil Adam de Longsdon and Sarra !e Wine, his wife, to 
John fil Ralf de Calver. They were settled in Bakewell at this 
period, and this may probably account for their presence as land- 
owners in Longsdon. Their holding was again evidently of an 
unimportant character. The date of it must have been prior to 
25 Ed. I , since Nicolas de Longsdon was then dead. The probabilities 
seem to be that Thomas de Longsdon, the juror of 3 Edward L and 
the witness of the Calver deed (which was much later in date) was 
an elder brother of Nicholas, who signs directly after him, and in all 
probability the brother or the father of Robert Ic Wright, of Long- 
stone, of a generation later. 

There is a Charter of Margeria fil Roger Cockayne, of the 34th 
Edward I., to Thomas fil Adam de Esseburn. who with Godfrey til 
Robert had deseized John Cokayne This was probably Thomas, 
Lord of Longstone, who at that time was perhaps resident in .Ash- 
bourne, as well as at Longstone. The Lady Margeria married Wni. 
fil Mathew de Longstone, and she appears to have disposed of certain 
property in Parwich in favour of her own son, Richard. This lady 
seems to have been identical with Margaret, widow of AVm de Pec, 
who obtained a grant of rents sub le Mountain of Parwich from 
John fil Matilde de Parwich, which was attested by Roger de Dale, 
Robert of the same, Robert de (Gretton), Win de Lee, Thomas 
de Aula. This Charter still remains amongst tiie muniments of the 
Longsdons, at Little Longstone. 

The following Charter is a great puzzle, though it evidently 
emanates from the same parties Margaret, daughter of Roger 
Cokayne, who was apparently a grand-daughter of Sarra le Wine, 
who married Nicolas de Bancwell, would seem to have been 
succeeded by another Nicolas de Bancwell Clic, possibly hei son. 

29 Edward L Margaret le Wine, Wo Nic de Bancwell Clic, 
grant to Thomas fil Jo. de Bilston Clic land in Bakewell. called 
Leche Croft, near Baslow Warre. T., Hugo ds Calfour, Ralf 
Bercario de Bakewell, Gerard Forrester, Roger Moke, Robt. de 
Walley, AVm. le Grey. Thos. Fuller. 

The most interesting part in this Charter is the attesting witness, 
Gerard the Forrester, who was probably son of Adam fil Peter, who 
made a grant to Robert le Wright. 

u 



352 THK LONGSTONES AND IJEKKWITES OF ASHFORD. 

There is anotlier Charter by the same lady in the collection oi 
charters of the Duke of Rutland, at Haddon Hall, which are in- 
valuable in the elucidation of Derbyshire County History, but they 
are in such confusion that it is very difficult to utilize them, and it 
is much to be wished that the Derbyshire Charters should be 
separated from the rest and properly calendered and arranged. 
This Charter, No. 386 in the author's collection, is by Sarra de 
Meredine, widow of Wm Pincerna, to Lord Ralf de Cubberly, 
Rector of Eyam, and it was attested by Richard de Vernon, Sir 
Richard de Herthilt, Wm. le Wyne, Mathew de Longsdon, Ralf 
"Bugg, Wm. do Esseburn, John de Hollewell, Robert Child, John 
Cleric. 

It is difficult to date this Charter; John Cleric, who attested, was 
probably only a lawyer, and his date covers part of Henry 111. 
and the whole of Edward I., unless there were two clerks of that 
name, and this seems probable, John of Longstone was in all 
probability son of Nicolas fil Adam (who married Sarra le Wine), of 
Longstone. It appears certain that he was the son of Nicolas, of 
Bakewell, for by Charter (Belvoir, No. 585) Peter fil Wm. de Fotslon 
granted him a meadow near land of Mathew le Sureis, to which 
Win. le Wine, Ralf Bugij, Wm. Cleric, Wm. de Esseburn, Mathew 
Mercenarius, Jo. de HoUvell, John de Brana, Tinctor attested. He 
attested a Charter of Wm. fil Robert of Leverich (no doubt another' 
form of Levened) of Hognaston, to Peter fil Ralf de Gretton of half 
a bovate which was Engenulf's (fil Robert de Combridge). He was 
much mixed up with the Fabers — he himself granted land to 
Robert Faber, of F^sseburn (255 Kniveton Leiger), in the time of 
Sir Robert de Esseburn (c. 33 Henry III ), and he attested Roger 
fil Robert Faber's Charter to Matthew de Kniveton (No. 238 in 
their Leiger), and he also attested a Charter (No. 244 in same) by 
Wm. de Kniveton (who was son of Wm. de Yolgrave — in other 
words, a member of the Longsdon family) of some lands, and later 
he attested a Charter of Henry fil Quenilde (or Gunilde) respecting 
some lands, and he himself held lands of William de Yolgrave 
(Longsdon). 

The last date we have is 44 Edward III., when Felicia, daughter 
of John le Clerk, of Longstone, granted land to Godfrey de Roland 
which belonged to John, her father, in Ashford, Great Longstone, 
Mornesaie; and Roland, in some way. This Chattel seems to relate 



IHE l.ONGbTONES AND BEREWlTtS OF ASHFORD. 353 

to a couple of Charters of this Godfrey de Roland, one of 2 Ed. III. 
being a grant from John de Longsdon, Parson of Alta Rothing, to 
him of an annuity of ^20 out of Roland, which was attested by 
Sir Godfrey Foljambe and Godfrey his son, and the other dated 19 
Richard II., by which Godfrey de Roland granted to Roger, his son, 
his lands in Longstone, Roland, and Mornesale, with a rent of ^20, 
wliich he had of the gift of John de Longsdon. 

It is most probable that John the Clerk fil Nicholas of Bakewell 
r>nd Robert Faber were both members of the Longsdon family, and 
it is tempting to identify Robert Faber with the brother of Thomas 
the Clerk from his constant intermeddling with Longstone Charters, 
and especially when it is found that the Longsdons themselves adopted 
this surname of Faber, or Wright. It would seem that this is the 
most probable theory to be adopted. It therefore becomes imperative 
to consider the charters we possess in the name of Faber. It is 
curious that this name is rarely found in legal records, chiefly, pre- 
sumably, because it is the name of a trade, and a common trade, 
and therefore easily developed into a surname. 

Margery, widow of William, son of Mathew de Longsdon, grants 
to Richard, her son and heir, three messuages and one ferlingate of 
land and tad. rent in I'everwych, and three acres and half a rood in 
same, of which two messuages lie together, below le clif, between the 
messuages which Sir Roger de Bredburn held, a messuage which 
Robert de G'^etton held, and one messuage lies below Healmesclif, in 
same village, next the highway, Roger Elliot formerly held it of 
grantor. The Ferlingate and three acres and half a rood the said 
Roger Elliot and Thomas de Aula formerly held of grantor. The 
I 2d. rent Thomas, son of John, used to pay for the messuage which 
he held of grantor in Peverwych, which messuage lies between 
messuages which Roger fil Savon held and the rivulet. T., Roger 
de la Dale de Peverwych, Robt , his son, Henry, son of John, 
of same, Robt. de Gretton, of same, John fil Thomas, of same. 
(Mr. Wilson's Charters.) 

The following Charter, among Mr. Longsdon's Charters, evidently 
relates to the same lady. John fil Matilde ae Parwich granted to 
Margeria, widow of Wm. de Pecco, rents of her messuages under 
the cliff. T , Roger de Dale, Robert of the same Robert, Wm. de 
Lee, Thomas de Aula, of the same. • 



354 ""^ LOiSGSTONES ANU liEUKWlTBS Ul' ASIUOKD. 

20 Ileiiiy III Kicli. ("lie, of InglclDii, nnd Isabella, liis wife, to 
Will fil Elie de Pva. Longsdon, of land in Mid lleton. 

S:r Barth. Cap. de Yolgrave, 'I'hos de Edensor, Jiirdan de Snitter- 
ton, I.ucas de Beleg, Robt. de Stanton, Mat/i. de Longsdon, Her.ry 
de Hotot, Adam de Edensor, Simon fil Dean, Jolm de Gratton 
Jolin de Bancwell. (Hardwick Charters ) 

Wm. Avenel, of Middleton, grant to \Vm fil Klias Clic, of Pva. 
Longstone, rent for one quarter of the Mill of Alport. '1'., Wm. de 
Hotot, Wm. le Wine, Rad. Bugge, Mal/iew de Lonqsdoii, Adam fi 
Pettr de Livii^sdoii, Thos. fil Robt. (? Mornesale), John de Holwell. 
(Hardwick Charters.) 

Robt. fil and heir Adam de Stanton granted to Thomas Foljambe, 
of Gratlon, land m Stanion. '1'., IVm. de Longsdon de Yo/grare, 
John fil Elie. (Hardwick Charters.) 

IVm. fil Robt. Avenel, of Middleton, granted to Robt. de Yolgrave 
one quarter of the village of (Alport), held by Heniy de Hotot, with 
the services of Elias fil Wm. de Longsdon. T., Wm. Green, Vicar 
of Yolgrave. (Haddon Charters.) 

36 Henry III. A fine. Wni. fil Elias, o( Little Longstone, bought 
from llavise de Huston and Matilde his wife a toft and 2 id. rent in 
.\ldethorpe and Yolgrave. 

335 Henry IH. IVni. de Longsdon attested Ciiarter of Alan de 
rochay to Rad. Bugg, rent and hom. of Jourdan de fCowIesley. 
(lielvoir Charters.) 

IVilliam de I^ongsdon in Yolgrave to Rd. de Winfield, land in 
Stanton, near Matilde de Esseburn's, and Rd. Dokenfield. T., Henty 
de Otot de Yolgrave, Rd. de Dokenfield, Wm. fil Wm. de Esseburn, 
Simon Sele, of Alport, Henry fil Robt. de Alport. (Belvoir Charters ) 

Johanna, widow of Robt. de Grym, rele. to Rich, de Ridware, of 
Middleton, her rights of dower in Yolgrave, in land which her 
husband had of the gift of Wm. Grym, his father. T., Thos. de 
Gretton Clic, Richard, Lord of Smerili, Wm. de Longsdon de Yolgrave, 
Henry de Hotot de ead, Thos. de Smerell, Simon Seel, Robert Clic. 
(No. 865, Belvoir Charters.) 

Robt. Grym, of Yolgrave, granted to Rich, de Ridware three acres 
in Yolgrave. T., Thomas Foljambe, of Gratton, Henry de Hotot, 
Willo. de I^ongsdon, John Elyes, Rich. Clic. (Belvoir Charters.) 

Half fil and heir of Henry de Longsdon, of Tunsted, to Elias Clic, 
of Bakewell. T., Hugo de Wimpton, Roger de Pickworth, of Bake- 



TUF T.OXGSTONF.S AND BEIJtWITES OV ASHFORP. 355 

well. (Valuable proof that the Wrights of Tunsted were also of 
Longstone.) 

.^o Edward I. A'd. dc Longadon, of Volgrave, attd. Charter of Wm 
fil Milo, of Middleton. (Belvoir Charters.) 

Rich, fil William de Longsdon in Volgrave, granted to Robt. Wardlow 
land ill Stanton. Seal, a stag's head, with horns. (Belvoir Charters.) 
Robert fil Adam de Stanton lo Adam, his son, land which Walter 
de Bosio, formerly held in Stanton. - 

T., Rd. de Vernon, Wm. de Mortain, Roger de Ayncourt, Ed. de 
Hei thill, Robert de Rsseburn, Kt., Wm. de Hotoft, JV///. de Longs lur... 
Peter de Stanton. (Original Charier, II., No. 3, Woolley.) 

12 Edward I. Wm. de l.ongsdon attested Charter of Rich, de 
Bingham, Kt., Robt. de Waddcley, Ranulf de ^Vinshe, Henry dc 
Hoto. 

s. d. Wra. de Longsdon, of Volgrave, and Thos. de Longsdon 
attested Charter of Robert fil Adam de Waddesley to Thos. fil Henij 
de Stanton Leys land which Simon de Crumford and Wm. de 
Esseburn held. 

The same Wm. de Longsdon, of Volgrave, attested Charier of 
Henry fil and heir Wm. le Carpenter, of Birchover, to Thos fil 
Henry de Stanton Lees. 

2 Edward I. Agnes fil Wm. de Longsdon, widow, granted to 
Simon de Hopton. 

Robt. de Volgrave Clio to Wm. fil Wm. de Longsdon, his interest 
in the land of Wm. Avenel of Middleton, the dower of Dionisia, 
mother of Wm., the services of Elias fil Wm. de Longsdon and of 
all natives, and the tenement bought of Beatrice de M'btun, with 
the services of Wm., father of Elias de Longsdon. 

17 Edward L Wm. fil Wm. de Longsdon to Richard de Ridware, 
of Middleton. T., Robert Clic, of Volgrave. 

22 Edward I. Nic. Peveril of Hassop, to Roger, his son, attd. by 
Rich. Foljambe, then Lord of Bercheles, Wm. de Wardlow and 
Nic, his brother, Robt. de Wardlow. 

Beatrice fil Rd de M'ton to Robt de Volgrave Clic. Temp. 
Wm..\venel, services of Wm. fil Elie.of ParvaLongstone, in Volgrave. 
Wm. and Thos de Longsdon attd. Charter of Robt. de Reyndon, 
of Bakewell, to Rd. fil Thomas Folj.imbe land in Holm, in Bakewell. 
Elyas fil Wm de Longsdon granted to Wm. de Longsdon land in 
Volgrave. 



3S6 IHK I.ONGSIONES AND liEREWITliS OF ASHFORD 

Kobt. fil Alan de Longsdou granted to Magr. Rolieit Avenel and 
Dionisia, his mother, remainder to Wm., her son, remainder to Nic, his 
brother, remainder Henry, brother of Robt , remainder to Rd. fil 
Robert de Ridware. 

■i I Edward I. Robert, Vicar of Yolgrave, to Richard fil Wm. de 
Loiii(sdon, formerly dwelling in Yolgrave, and Alice, his wife, a 
ir.cssuage in Yolgrave, which Wm., his father, formerly held, and 
ten acies in Herthill, lands in Staunton and Middleton. T., Wm. 
Foljambe, of Gratton. (Belvoir Charters.) 

Rich, fil Wm. de Longsdon granted some land to Simon, son of 

said Wm. 

Gilbert de Longsdon uttd. a Charter of Henry de Hottot to John 
de Ikadburn, in free m. with Alice, his daughter. 

Wm. de Longsdon and Adam fil Peter, of Pva Roulesly, attested 
Charter of Robt. fil Wm., of Stanton Leys to Rich, de Vernon. 

30 Henry HL. atld. Charter of Rich. Vernon and Jurdan de 

Roulesley with Henry de Derley. 
335 Henry HI., attd. Charter of Thos. Abbot, of Chester, to 

Itad fil Rad Bugg. of Nottingham. 
With Mathew and Adam attd. Charter of Wm. Gernon to 
Rd. Vernon. 
Math, dc Longsdon attd. (.'barter of Math, de Reyndon to Robt, 
his son, and Wm., his son. 

Peter fil Robt. de Lasey, of Hassop, to Eustace de Stafford. 
And one to Roger fil Rd. de Stafford. 
Mile de Warwick to John de Smerhill, half house and 10 acres of 
land in Smerell, of which he was enfeoffed by Robt Bober. 

T., Wm. Longford, Adam Herthill, Henry de Hotot, William d( 
Longsdon, of Smerell, Wm. Coiborn, cap. (Belvoir Charters.) 

Rich. jU Wm. de Longsdon (? son of Wm. fil Math.) and Margaret 
(see Mr. Wilson's deed), to Richard, then Vicar of Yolgrave, his 
messuage in Yolgrave and in the field of Herthill, which Henry 
Coiborn formerly held. 

T., Thomas Eoljambe de Gratton, Henry le Hotot, Jo. fil Elie 
DE Longsdon, Nic. de Snicrill, Rit h. Ridware. (Belvoir Chaiters.) 
19 Edward L Heniy de Hotot, manens in Yolgrave, granted to 
Richard de IJidware, manens m Middleton, two tofts in Yolgrave, 
which Hubert formerly held. 

T., Richard, N'icar of Yolgrave, /'<>. fil Elie de Longsdon, Rich. 



THE LONGSTONES AND BEREWITES OF ASHFORD. 357 

fil Wm. de Longsdon, Kich. fil Adam de Stanton, Robert Clic 
(Bel voir Charters.) 

Lichfield Record, 12 Edward III. Longdon Major, Richard 
Faber. 

20 Edward III. Thos. fil Nich. de Ridware released to Godfr. 
Foljambe the lands which he had of the gift of Johanna de Ridware, 
his mother, in Great Longstone. 

2 Richard II yohn fil 'jFohn del Dene de Longsdon released to 
Rd. Buderth, of Bakewell. 

10 Richard II. denies de Longsdon and Johanna his wife granted 
to Gilbert de Walsh, at Roulesley, toft there. 

T., Jo. fil Wm. de Roulesley, Thos. de Colley, Rich, fil Philip, 
Richard Burgone, Rad de Barston. (Belvoir Charters.) 

Clement de Longsdon is given in the Pole Tax for 4 Richard II. 
for the parish of Tideswell. He was no doubt the ancestor of the 
present family of Longsdon, of Little Longstone. 

S.d. Ralf de Calvoure, dwelling in Wardlow, confirmed to Robert 
de Darley, dwelling in Great Longstone, a messuage in Longstone, 
adjoining the mansion of John de la Hall on the East, adjoining the 
highway to Ashford, containing nine roods and three perches (pedes) 
in length and three roods and two perches in breadth on the North, 
and two roods and thirteen perches on the West, in fee, at two silver 
pennies rent. 

T., Thomas, Dominus de Longsdon, Richard fil Adam de Longsdon, 
John de la Halle, Hugo Ingram, Wm. fil Eustace de Mornesale, 
Wm. fil Mathew de Longsdon. (Mr. Wright's Charters.) 

28th Nov., 12 Edward II. The Lord Martin de Wirksworth, 
Chaplain, granted and confirmed to John fil Alan de Roland a 
messuage which he had of the gift of Agneta de Derley, in fee, at 
twopence rent. 

T., Richard Forester, of Great Longstone, Richard Foljambe, of 
Little Longstone, John fil William de Aula, of the same, Henry de 
Roland, Wm. de Roland, Juhn de Wynchfield (?) Clic, Robert in 
the Dale Clic. (Mr. Wright's Charters.) 

Subsidy for Longstone, i Edward III., contains only the names of 
Hugh Wardlowe, Thomas fil Wm , John fil Nicolas, Wm. atte Vicars, 
Philip fil Wm., Alan de Rowland, and Wm. de Rowland. 

Easter, 24 Edward III. Henry Selveyn (Savage, or Forester), of 
Great Longstone, granted and confirmed to Richard Smyth, of Great 



35^ TIIK LONGbXfJM'.S AND UliRtWIlKS tl ASIK'OKH 

Longstone, a house in Longstone called the 'leighharn, which he 
had of the grant of riiomas fil Robert le Wjjght, of Ashford. 

v., John Foljaiiibe. of Longstone, Wm. alte Hall, Rich. Iveson de 
.\[orneshale, Robert Hervy of Longstone. (Mr. Wright's Charters.) 

33 Edward lU. Thomas de Barwas and Agnes, daughter of Wm. 
Wright, confirm to Henry fil Raif de Tideswell, a messuage there. 
T., Jo. Foljambe, Robert de Htthcoie, and others. 
Fine, 3 Richard II. Jolui ie Smyth, of Tydcswell, Cap, and Nic. 
Martin, Cap., for loo marcs, granted to John le Wright, of Kyam, 
and Johanna, his wife, a messuage and one bovate of land in Eyani. 
The following extracts are from the Peak Hundred Rolls : — 
13 Edward I. 'I'lios fil Nic, of Moneyash. 

Wm. le Wynn, of Afo/ityas/i, Court held at Ashford, was fined, 
bail, Wm. de Hall. 
• Hassoi). Wm. I'ck. 
Henry IV. Ashford. Rich. Dicken. 

Tunsted. Jo. Wright 
?o Henry VI. Edensor and Pillesley. Jo. M'puU, fr. pi., Galf 
Hayward, Wm., Hekedon, Roger Cok presented Rog 
EUeson, Robt. Slater, Jo. Cook. 
Longstone and Litton. Roger Burton, Robert Kinder, Jo. 
Russheton, and Rich. Moinesale, fr. pi. 
Jurors at Court held at Longstone. Rich. Longsdon, Rd. Sterndale, 
Robt. \\ allowe, Wm. Hethcote, of Sterndale, Roger Dale, Jo. Aleyn, 
Jo. Selwyn, Thomas Asheton, Wm. Wilcoxson, Wm. Lye.=, Kobert 
Gregory, Wm. Natham. 

23 Henry VI. A Wapentake held at Longstone. Wm. Shawe, 
Koger Howe, took land ; Jo. Heydcn, Deputy for Wm. de la Pole, 
Kail of Suffolk, and Thos. Tudenham, Kt., Chief Senescals for the 
Duchy. 
30 Henry VI. Ensor and Pillesley. Jo. Penistone, Rich. 
Skingleshurst, Roger Holmes, and John Merepull, fr pi. 
Longstone and Litton. Robt. Kynder, Jo. Barton, Robt. 
Waterhouse, and Robt. Torre. 
10 Edward IV. For Litton, Longstone, and Mornesale. Jo. 
Barton, Nich. Chan, Henry Dean, Edmund Heton, were frank pledges ; 
they presented Jo Standon for an affray on Jo. Tattersall, Wm. 
Milne, and Wni. Hetherley, fr. pi. 

12 Edward IV. Litton, Longstone, and Mornesale. Present, 



THE I.ONGSTONFS AND liEULWlIRS OF ASHl'OKD. 359 

Phil. Leech, lisq., Jo. Tonsted, Ralf Quarrier, Robt. Litton, the 

heirs of Thos. Litton, Robt. and Jo. Blackwell, junr , 'I'hos. Redeman. 

At Rowland. The Lady Margaret Staftbrd, free tenant. 

23 Henry VIL Rd. ^L1rple fined for enclosing ground at Tolshill : 
he was also presented for default of Court. 

4 Henry IV. Bill in Chancery. Godfrey Rowland, " a poor and 
simple esquire," complained that Sir Thos. de Wednesley, John Dene, 
Vicar of Hope, with John Shaw, Rich. Hunt, Reynold Wombwell, 
John de Swinscoe, and Jo., his son, with many others, armed for 
war, on Monday, the day before the Feast of the Translation of Sir 
John de Beverley, on the 23rd Richard 11., came like felons to the 
house of complainant in Little Longstone and broke (debruserent) 
the said house, with force and arms, and spoiled his goods and 
chattels, living and dead, of the value of 200 marcs, taken and 
carried away, etc., and imprisoned him, the said Godfrey Roland. 

There appears to be no Longstone (!harters after that of the 
24111 Edward HL until one of the date of 3 Henty VL, and there 
would be no information respecting this period were it not fur the 
Rolls of Agincourt (Vol. H., p. 141), which show that John Wright 
was then in the retinue of Philip Leech. He was possibly identical 
with the Bailiff of Bakewell who attested Henry Wright's Charter. 

7 Henry VI. John Wright attested a Haddon Charter, and is 
mentioned as Bailiff of Bakewell in i and 9 Henry \T. (Haddon 
Charters.) 

Henry Wright held a tenement in Bakewell in 17 ilcniy VL, and- 
was Bailiff there 19 Henry VL 

14 Edward IV. Roger was son and heir of J-). Wright, of liake- 
well (Haddon Charters). He was probably a cousin of Heniy Wright, 
or it may be that the Bakcw.U Bailiff was another branch of ihe 
family. In the absence of Bakewell Rolls it is very diftic uU and 
fjven dangerous to speculate. 

6 Henry VI. Henry LoiigsJo/i, of Longstone, granted to William 
Woodrove, of Hope, his lands in Tideswell of the inheritance of Eliz 
fil and heiress of Henry Dawson, of Tideswell, and certain rights in 
lands which he had recovered, with William del Hall, Dionisia, his 
wife, Beatrice Eyre, \\m. Plumley, Agnes, widow Thos. Dycher, Wm. 
Pigott, Thos. Jardanthorpe, Agnes ux. Robt. Bower, and Jo. Bowcr. 
T., John Schackerly. 

1 2th Aug., 22 Edward IV. Robt. Schagwrley, gentleman, Robert 



•^60 THE LONGSTONES AND BERFWITES OF ASHFORD. 

Longsdon, of Little I.ongstone, Yoinaii, John Wright, Henry North, 
of Great Longstone, Roger Tomlinsoii, Jo. Plait, Henry Wright ye 
younger, Thos. Mornesale, Roger Rutler, Wm. James, Barthw, Child, 
and Roger Lee, of the town. 

6th Aug , 2 2 Edward IV. Deed of Thos. Hodkinson, of Wardlow, 
the younger, a messuage and eight acres of land in Wardlow which 
Richard Hodgkinson, father of the said Thomas, bought of Henry 
White. 

Copy ot Charters from the Woolly Collection. Additional MS., 
6673 and 6697, original lost. 

3 Henry VL Henry and Johanna Wright, of Great Longstone, 
gave to Elizabeth de Trafford (? Stafford) and Edmund de Trafford, 
son of Elizabeth, all their lands and tenements in Great Longstone 
for their lives, with remainder to the right heirs of William Dean, 
of Great Longstone. 

T., Roger de Spofford Capel, John Wright, Bailiff of Bakewell, 
Henry de Longsdon. 

This Charter is unfortunately lost, and it is difficult to understand 
the meaning of it. It was evidently a family arrangement. Johanna 
Wright, from her Will, was probably a Stafford, for she calls Richard 
Stafford her brother. It is probable that the WooUys, who apparently 
read old charters very carelessly, made a mistake in naming the 
grantees of the deed of 3 Henry VI. as Traffords. Why Wm. de 
Dean should ultimately succeed to the inheritance is also a puzzle. 
He was probably allied to the Wrights through Wm. de Dean, who 
conveyed property to them a hundred years previously. This name, 
Dean, or Deacon, being probably borne by some members of the 
family through their connection with the Deanery of Bakewell. 
John Wright, the Bailiff of Bakewell, who attested this Charter, was 
probably the father of Henry, so that the property then held by 
Henry was probably of a small amount. The next deed, dated the 
6th Aug, 34 Henry VI., was doubtless made of the property which 
had by that time descended to him, and which would be settled in 
due course upon his son and heir. 

By this Charter Henry Wright, of Great Longstone, and Jonett 
his wife gave to John, their son, all the lands and tenements which 
they possessed to remain to him in tail. 

T., Geoffry Bagshaw, Vicar of Glossop, Raufe Sheldon, Richard 
Longsdon, Hud. Gybornson, John Woodroff. 



THE LONGSTONES AND BEREWITES OF ASIIFORD. jd I 

Henry Wright died at or before the 6th Edward IV., for on 
the Saturday next after the Feast of the Assumption in that year, 
lohanna, his widow, surrendered a messuage at the end (ad fine') 
of the village of Great Longstone (in which John, her son, then 
dwelt), with an orchard and one bovate of land adjoining, called 
Grene Sert, to Richard, her son, in tail. 

There appears to be no explanation of the Charter of the 3rd Henry 
VI. to Klizabeth de Trafford. By that deed the Wrights appear to dis- 
possess themselves of all their property, yet presumably they are the 
parties to the deed of the 34th Henry VI., when they entail all their 
estates upon their eldest son and heir, John. It is possible, of course, 
that the first deed was only a blind, to prevent a forfeiture, since, as they 
were archers, they must have been involved in some of the troubles 
of that period; or they may have subsequently come into other 
property through Johanna Stafford. This is further complicated by 
the fact that Thomas fil John Wright was the holder of the estates 
according to the Duchy rental (see page 334 of Vol. III., Sec. 6). 
This roll may be safely dated as between the 6th and the loth 
Henry VI., by the entry in the first roll, which is not clearly dated. 
At page 491 (Vol. I., Sec. 2), Edward Foljiam is given as holding 
the Manor of Elton, in the Peak, for half a fee, and at page 501, 
which was clearly an Inquest of Knight's Fees of the loth Henry VI., 
Roger Foljambe, son of Sir Edward, then held Elton. There appears 
to be no Inquisition, p.m., of Edward Foljambe, who was a dis- 
tinguished man, a knight who fought at Agincourt with John Wright. 

In 3 Henry Vf., Sir Edward Foljambe released to John Wright 
his rights in land in Bakewell, formerly John Hanser's and Alice his 
wife's, and which he had of the feoffment of Henry de Bothe and 
William Pyrton (Belvoir Charters, No. 573), absolute proof that 
John was then living, and this roll shows that in 6 Henry VI., he was 
then dead, and that Thomas Wright, his son, was then living at 
Longstone. Thomas Wright was probably brother and heir of Roger, 
of 19 Edward IV. 

Woolly Charters give the following— the originals are still at Little 

Longstone. 

In 6 Henry VI., Feast of St. Matthew the Apostle, John Andrew 
Capel granted to John Columbel, of Stancliff, Rad Leech, Wm. 
Woodrove, and Robert Woodrove, land which he had of the grant 
of Henry Longsdon, of Longstone. 



362 THE LONOSTONES AND liRRKWdES OF ASHFORD. 

T., John Scharesly, John (?) Ragg, and John Clementson. 

8 Henry VI. Ralf Leech, Rsq , John CoUimbel. of Stancliff, 
and Robert Woodrove, of Woriuhill, reciting the last deed, granted 
the lands to Richard, son of the said [lenry Longsdon. 

These deeds were seen by Mr. John Sleigh, and are the conv 
niencement of his pedigree in ihu Keliqnary. I'hey are still in 
Mr. I.ongsdon's possession. 

10 Henry VI. Richard Longsdon was assessed for Subsidy for 
Little Longstone. 

11 Henry VL Henry de Longsdon granted land in Great Long 
stone to .^gnes his wife which descended to him from his father (not 
named). 

21 Henry VI. Richard Longsdon. (fJelvoir Charters ) 

The Poll Tax of 4 Ricard II. (1381) does not take in Longstone, 
unless, as it is most probable, it comes in under lideswell. In that 
assessment there is the name of John Wright and his wife, and also 
of Clement Longsdon, who was clearly the owner at that period of 
Little Longstone. It was in 1351 that the last notice of Thomas, 
son of Jo. Wright, appears. He may have been the father of John 
Wright of 1381, who, if he was then only a young man, might have 
fought at Agincourt, or there may have been an intervening John 
Wright. 

']"he year 3 Henry VL, in which John Wright obtained a release 
from Edward Foljambe, is the very year in wliich Henry Wright 
conveyed his land to the Tra