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Full text of "Land and water use in Lost River-Butte Valley hydrographic unit"

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
DAVIS 



state of California 
THE RESOURCES AGENCY 

Department of Water Resources 



BULLETIN No. 94-9 

LAND AND WATER USE IN 

LOST RIVER-BUTTE VALLEY 

HYDROGRAPHIC UNIT 



Preliminary Edition 



JULY 1965 



HUGO FISHER EDMUND G. BROWN WILLIAM E. WARNE 

Adminisfraior Governor Director 

The Resources Agency State of California Department of Water Resources 



LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNlif 



FOREWORD 



This bulletin is one of the No. 9^ series which present 
land and water use data for all watersheds of California. With 
the publication of this bulletin, these data become available 
for the entire North Coastal area. 

Preparation of these bulletins is a fundamental step 
toward the full development of the State's water resources. This 
series of bulletins comprises the first phase of the Department's 
Statewide Planning Program, and will form a valuable reference 
for land and water use data throughout California. The second 
phase of this planning program uses these data in the determination 
of future water requirements of the various watersheds. 

Much of the Lost River-Butte Valley Hydrographic Unit is 
a rocky volcanic plateau where the shallow soils provide a meager 
growth of timber and range. There are, in contrast, some valley 
areas of good deep soils with intensive agricultural development. 

The siorveys reported herein were initiated in 1958 
with the location and inspection of surface water diversion 
systems which divert 10 acre-feet or more per year. The status 
of land use in the unit was mapped in 1959. In 19^0, a siirvey 
of lands suitable for recreational development was also made. 

Water from 148 of the l60 diversion systems described 
in the report was used for irrigation. A total of 131,800 acres, 
about 9 percent of the total area, was under irrigation; and 
40,100 acres were dry-farmed in 1959. Outside the Lava Beds 
National Monument the unit includes about 1,600 acres which are 
well suited to development for recreation. 

Future development of the waters of this unit for 
irrigation is limited by terms of the Klamath River Compact. 
This does not, however, preclude import from other basins, and 
the total futxire water requirements of this, as well as other 
areas of the State, must be determined in long-range water plan- 
ning. The land and water use data in this series of reports 
will provide an essential basis in the determination of amounts 
of water which can be beneficially used in the various watersheds. 
•niese future water requirements will be compared with the local 
supplies available to define the areas of surplus or deficiency 
and thus indicate the projects which will most effectively develop 
the State's total water resources. 

The bulletins of this series, besides serving this 

vital role in o\jr Statewide Planning Program, are of great value 

in many local investigations both within the Department and by 

various other agencies. 



Director of V^ater Resources 



TABLE OF CCWTENTS 



Page 



WATER RESOURCES 



CALIFORNU WATER COMMISSIOH 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT 

Page 



CHAPTER I. INTRODUCTION 



Need and Authorization for the 
Investigation 



Scope of the Investigation . . . 
General Description of the Area 



CHAPTER II. WATER USE ... 

Surface Water Diversions . 

Methods and Procedures 

Location System . . . 



Descriptions of Surface Water 
Diversions 



Diversion Measurements 

Imports and Exports 

Index to Surface Water Diversions 
Water Service Agencies 



CHAPTER in. LAND USE 

Historical Land Use 

Present Land Use 

Methods and Procedures 

Irrigated Lands 

Naturally High Water Table Lands 

Dry-fanned Lands 

Urban Lands 

Recreational Lands 

Native Vegetation 



Scope of the Survey . . 
Methods and Procedures . 
Recreational Land Classes 



Areas of Subunlts 



iversions 



Index to Surface Water 

Land Use, 1959 

Irrigated Lands, 1959 

Standards for Classification 

of Recreational Lands 

Classification of Recreational Lands 



ILLUSTRATIONS 



Illustration No. 



APPENDIXES 



Appendix 



Legal Considerati 



Area of Investigation 



Land and Water Use and Classification 
of Recreational Lands 



Water Service Areas 



Page 
h 



CHAPTER V. SUMMARY 



state of California 

The Resources Agency 

DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 



EDMUND G. BROWN, Governor, State of California 

HUGO FISHER, Administrator, The Resources Agency 

WILLIAM E. WARNE, Director, Department of Water Resources 

ALFRED R. GOLZE ' , Chief Engineer 

JOHN M. HALEY, Acting Assistant Chief Engineer 



NORTHERN BRANCH 

Gordon W, Dukleth Acting Branch Chief 

This report was prepared 
under the direction of 

Robert E, Foley Chief, Special Investigations Section 

by 

C. Wesley York Senior Engineer 

Assisted by 

George K, Sato Assistant Land and Water Use Analyst 

Price J. Schreiner Water Resources Technician I 



Statewide Aspects of the 

Coo2?dinated Statewide Planning Program 

are coordinated under the direction of the 

Division of Resources Planning 

Wesley E. Steiner Acting Division Engineer 

Meyer Kramsky Chief, Statewide Investigations Branch 

Ralph G. Allison , Acting Chief, Planning Investigations Section 



vi 



CALIFORNIA WATER COMMISSION 

RALPH M. BRODY, Chairman, Fresno 
WILLIAM H. JENNINGS, Vice Chairman, La Mesa 

JOM W. BRYANT, Riverside JOHN P. BUNKER, Gustine 

IRA J. CHRISMAN, Visalia EDWIN KOSTER, Grass Valley 

JOHN J. KING, Petaluma NORRIS POULSON, ^a Jolla 

MARION R. WALKER, Ventura 



WILLIAM M. CARAH 
Executive Secretary 



Orville L. Abbott 
Engineer 



vii 



ACKNOVTLEDGMENT 

The Department of Water Resoiarces gratefully acknowl- 
edges the information fxirnished and the time and effort willingly 
expended by the various water users and residents of the Lost 
River-Butte Valley P^drographic Unit and by agencies of the 
federal, state and local governments. 

Particularly helpful was the assistance of Messrs. Ken 
Baghott, Sedgley Nelson and Cecil Pierce, Farm Advisors for 
Modoc and Siskiyou Coiinties, in arranging and conducting meetings 
for the review of certain data included herein. 



CHAPTER I. INTRODUCTION 

This bulletin presents data on land and water use in 
the Lost Rlver-Butte Valley Hydrographlc Unit. This hydrographlc 
unit encompasses 2,315 square miles in Modoc and Siskiyou 
Counties. It comprises the California portion of the Upper 
Klamath River Basin, a seraiclosed watershed lying to the east 
of the main Klamath River drainage area. The unit is bounded 
on the north by Oregon and on the south and east by the McCloud 
and Pit River watersheds of the Sacramento River Basin. 

In addition to land and water use, this report includes 
data on lands suitable for water-using recreational developments. 
These data were gathered during the years from 1958 through i960. 

Need and Authorization for the Investigation 
California, due to its rapid urban and agricultural 
expansion in areas of limited water resources and to its seasonal 
and long-term fluctuations of streamflow, is faced with a growing 
need for projects to store large quantities of water and to trans- 
port them over long distances to areas of deficiency. In planning 
the projects necessary to accomplish these objectives, without 
depriving the areas of origin of water needed therein, the future 
water requirements of all areas of the State must be predicted as 
accurately as possible. 

In Bulletin No. 2, "Water Utilization and Requirements 
of California", June 1955, the State Water Resources Board pub- 
lished estimates of the future water needs of the State. Those 

-1- 



estimates, however, are now obsolescent and not sufficiently 
detailed for the current planning program. 

Recognizing that additional information was necessary 
to protect the needs of areas of origin in large-scale water 
development projects, the 1956 Legislature authorized an inves- 
tigation to determine the water resources and water requirements 
of the respective watersheds in the State. This legislation, 
under which these data have been prepared, is as follows: 

"232. The Legislature finds and declares that 
in providing for the full development and utilization 
of the water resources of this State it is necessary 
to obtain for consideration by the Legislature and the 
people, information as to the water which can be made 
available for exportation from the watersheds in which 
it originates without depriving those watersheds of 
water necessary for beneficial uses therein. To this 
end, the Department is authorized and directed to 
conduct investigations and hearings and to prepare 
findings therefrom and to report thereon to the Legis- 
lature at the earliest possible date with respect to 
the following matters: 

(a) The boundaries of the respective watersheds 
of the State and the quantities of water originating 
therein; 

(b) The quantities of water reasonably required 
for ultimate beneficial use in the respective 
watersheds; 

(c) The quantities of water, if any, available 
for export from the respective watersheds; 

(d) The areas which can be served by the water 
available for export from each watershed; and 

(e) The present use of water within each water- 
shed together with the apparent claims of water right 
attaching thereto, excluding individual uses of water 
involving diversions of small quantities which, in 
the judgment of the Director of Water Resources, are 
insufficient in the aggregate to materially affect the 
quantitative determinations included in the report. 



-2- 



"Before adopting any findings which are reported 
to the Legislature, the Department shall hold public 
hearings after reasonable notice, at which all 
interested persons may be heard. 



(Added by Stats. I956 (Ex. Sess.), Ch. 6I; amended 
by Stats. 1959, Ch. 2025.) 

This report is one of a series being prepared pursuant 
to this legislation. The series, vftien completed for the whole 
State, will be of great value to local, state, and federal agencies 
for studies of many types relating to the utilization of land and 
water. 

In this program, the Department not only develops the 
basic data as presented in this report, but utilizes these data 
in preparing the best possible current estimates of future water 
requirements to supersede those of Bulletin No. 2 and other earlier 
studies. These projections, together with hydrologic and water 
quality data on local water supplies, and estimates of the resulting 
excesses or deficiencies, will be published in a second series of 
bulletins, designated as the Bulletin No. l42 series. 

For purposes of this investigation the State has been 
divided into twelve major hydrographic areas or provinces, which 
are shown on Plate 1. These areas, in turn, have been divided 
into hydrK)graphic units. Each hydrographic unit comprises the 
watershed of an individual river or other workable subdivision 
of a hydrographic area. Each bulletin of the No. 9^ series 
reports the land and water use for one hydrographic unit. In 
Southern California, however, the report areas are based on 
counties or other political units in many cases. A list of 



-3- 



reports on land and water use, both completed and in preparation, j 
Is included with Plate 1. 

Scope of Investigation 
The Lost Rlver-Butte Valley Hydrographic Unit has been 
divided into seven hydrographic subunits according to its 
drainage pattern. These subunits are shown on Plate 1, and their 
areas listed in Table 1. The data collected in this investigation 
are tabulated by these subunits. 

TABLE 1 

AREAS OF SUBUNITS 







In Acres 




In Square Miles 


Subunit 


: Modoc : 
: Coimty: 


Siskiyou : 
County : 


Total 


Modoc 
County 


Siskiyou : 
County : 


Total 


Antelope Creek 





67,726 


67,726 





106 


106 


Boles 


281,393 





281,393 


kho 





W) 


Butte Creek 





110,731 


110,731 





173 


173 


Butte Valley 





212,958 


212,958 





333 


333 


Clear Lake 


299,555 





299,555 


k68 





k6Q 


Moiint Dome 





230,538 


230,538 





360 


360 


Tule Lake 


172,117 


106,608 


278,72^ 


26^ 


166 


435 


TOTAL 


753,065 


728,561 


1,1*81,626 


1,177 


1,138 


2,315 



For the Bulletin No. 9^ series of reports, three field 
surveys are normally made in each hydrographic unit: water use, 
land use, and land classification. In the water use survey, 
surface water diversion systems are located and data pertaining 
to ownership, histories, water rights, pur^ioses, and extent of 



-4- 



use are collected. The land use survey consists of mapping the 
existing developments or uses on the land as of a certain year. 
In the laind classification survey, the lands are mapped as to 
their suitability for irrigated agriculture and for water-using 
recreational development. 

In the Lost River-Butte Valley Hydrographic Unit, the 
surveys of water use and land use were conducted as of 1959. 
Descriptions of these two surveys, together with the data obtained, 
are presented in Chapters II and III, respectively. In i960 a 
land classification survey was made, but it included only the 
recreational lands, as described in Chapter IV. 

A significant difference between this bulletin and 
earlier ones of the No. 9^ series is that the presentation has 
been simplified by reducing the introductory information and 
explanation to a minimum. 

The tables of data presented in Chapters II, III, and 
IV constitute the main substance of the report. Appendixes A 
and B and Plates 2 and 3 are added for amplification. Appendix 
A contains a brief, nontechnical explanation of the various 
types of water rights and a list of the appropriative rights to 
waters of the unit on file with the State Water Rights Board. 
Appendix B describes a particular land and water use practice 
which prevails within the area of Modoc National Forest. Plate 2 
consists of maps covering the unit and showing the water use, 
land use, and recreational land classification. Plate 3 shows 
the major water service areas of the unit. Plate 4 illustrates 
the special land and water use practice described in Appendix B. 

-5- 



The data were reviewed in preliminary form by individual 
water users emd representatives of water agencies in the \init. 
Information provided by those parties has been incorporated with 
the original field data. 

General Description of the Area 

Topographically^ the Lost River-Butte Valley Hydrographic 
Unit is a plateau area, lying almost entirely between 4,000 and 
6,000 feet in elevation. The area in general slopes northward, with 
the elevations down to about 4,000 feet being along the Oregon 
state line. The elevations above 6,000 feet are located in the 
southwestern portion and include several scattered peaks, with 
some along the unit boundary as high as 8,000 to 8,500 feet. 

The divide along the western edge of the iinit is formed 
by a chain of volcanic peaks and cones of the Cascade range extending, 
northward from Mt. Shasta. The rest of the unit, as part of the 
Modoc Lava Plateau, is largely an area of basaltic lava flows — 
rough, rocky, and relatively barren. In contrast with this 
general picture are the basins of Tule Lake, Lower Klamath Lake, 
and Butte Valley, the first two of which extend northward into 
Oregon. These three virtually closed basins, with their smooth- 
lying and generally good soils, contain the bulk of the unit's 
farmland . 

Precipitation in the \init is closely related to elevation. 
At the lower elevations in the three valley areas mentioned above 
the average annual rainfall is less than 10 inches. At the 
intermediate elevations comprising most of the unit the average 
rainfall is between 10 and 20 inches. Heavier precipitation 



occurs along the unit's western and southwestern rim, with the 
higher elevations receiving up to 50 inches. About 80 percent of 
all precipitation below 4,900 feet occurs as snow, with the amount 
and percentage of snow increasing sharply above this elevation. 
The snowline on April 1 is normally at about this elevation. The 
average frost-free period, defined as the period between the last 
spring day and first fall day with minimum temperatures below 
32°P,, is 110 days in the vicinity of Tule Lake, 

The earliest significant explorations in the Lost River- 
Butte Valley area were made by General John C. Fremont in 1843 and 
1846. Without direct benefit from the mining boom to the west and 
south, the unit's development was negligible until about I865, and 
remained slow until 190O. Since that time a pattern of alternate 
booms and slumps has persisted. The \init's population dropped 
from nearly 5,600 in 1950 to about 5,000 in i960. 

From the early years, agriculture has remained the major 
industry. The dollar value of agricultural production in I961 was 
about 11.4 million for crops, mostly hay, barley, wheat, potatoes, 
and irrigated pasture; and 3.5 million from livestock, mainly beef 
cattle. 

The second largest industry in the unit is timber pro- 
duction. From 1950 to 1960 the unit produced about 67 million 
board feet of timber per year. Most of the timber harvested in 
the unit is milled at points in the surrounding area. This fact 
limits to a considerable extent the resulting benefit to the 
unit's economy, since most of the labor required in the lumber 
industry is employed in milling and processing. 



-7- 



The only other significant source of income to the \init 
is recreation, based principally on hunting. Waterfowl shooting, 
which is permitted on portions of the several national wildlife 
refuges in the area, provides about 35,000 hunter-days each year. 
Deer hunting, particularly for the large mule species, also draws 
thousands of sportsmen to the unit. A scenic attraction which 
draws many visitors is the Lava Beds National Monument. In 
addition to lava formations, caves, and related volcanic features, 
this 72-square-mile area contains battlefields of the Modoc Indian 
War and archeologically significajit petroglyphs of an unknown age. 

The water resources of the unit are rather limited, 
consisting principally of Lost River and a number of creeks. 
Antelope and Butte Creeks and Lost River are the only gauged 
streams. Their average annual flows, as measured, are: Lost River, 
119,000 acre-feet; Antelope Creek, 26,800 acre-feet; and Butte Creekj 
18,500 acre-feet. 



-8- 



CHAPTER II. WATER USE 

This chapter presents the results of the survey made 
in 1958 and 1959 of surface water diversions and their use in 
the Lost River-Butte Valley Hydrographic Unit. A total of I60 
diversion systems were located in this survey. Detailed infor- 
mation concerning these diversions and their use is presented 
in Table 2. 

The location of water wells and the measurement of 
their production are not within the scope of this investigation. 
Table 6, in Chapter III, however, lists the areas of all irri- 
gated lands according to v;ater source -- surface water diver- 
sions, ground water supply, or combinations of the two. V/ithin 
the major portion of Tule Lake Irrigation District individual 
parcels of land were not identified with their sources of water. 
The primary source of v;ater for this district is the Klamath 
Basin Project of the U. S. Bureau of Reclamation. Outside this 
district about 90 percent of the irrigated lands were served 
from surface water sources, and 10 percent from ground water. 

Surface Water Diversion s 
In order to report the "present use of water" in the 
unit, as directed by the Legislature, it was first necessary 
to locate the surface water diversions. Those systems were 
located which apparently divert about 10 acre-feet or more of 
water per year. This minimum was adopted, in compliance with 
Paragraph (e) on Page 2, because it is the approximate amount 



-9- 



of water normally used to Irrigate three acres j the smallest 
parcel which could be mapped and processed by the methods used. 

Methods and Procedures 

Aerial photographs covering the entire unit and showing 
irrigated lands, reservoirs, etc., were the principal means of 
locating diversions. A list of the appropriative water rights 
on file with the State Water Rights Board was also helpful. In 
the field, the investigation of various water-using activities 
and visible clues, such as powerlines and conduits, and the can- 
vassing of residents, were also the means of locating some diver- 
sions. Data such as descriptions of the systems, uses served, 
water rights, histories, etc., were obtained through on-the-spot 
inspections and through interviews with the owners, operators, 
or other persons familiar with the various diversions. Some 
data thus obtained, particularly statements with regard to 
histories, were not verified since a search of title records 
and similar sources was not deemed to be within the scope of 
this investigation. 

As each diversion was located in the field, the loca- 
tion was identified and marked on the aerial photograph covering 
the particular area. From the photograph the location was 
plotted on the corresponding U. S. Geological Survey quadrangle 
map. These plotted locations were then used to assign identi- 
fying location numbers to all diversions as explained in the 
following section. For systems which import water, the location 
indicated is that of the point of entry into the unit. 



■10- 



Systems which merely store water, as well as those 
which actually divert it from its natural course, were located. 
Those currently in use or under construction, and also those 
used within the previous five years, unless definitely abandoned, 
were included. Reservoirs located along and operated in con- 
junction with ditches and pipelines, although shown on Plate 2 
were not considered as separate systems, and do not have location 
numbers assigned to them. Similarly, points at which diversion 
conduits intercepted minor intermittent streams, and apparently 
recel^Ed less than 10 acre-feet of water in addition to the pri- 
mary supply, were not considered as separate diversions. 

A system by which field runoff and/or spill from a 
diverter's own operation was collected was not considered a 
diversion nor assigned a location n\imber. Systems which re- 
diverted return flow from another water user's operation, 
however, were delineated and assigned location numbers. 

To relate areas served to the respective individual 
diversions, the land use was delineated on the same photographs 
as the diversions. This association made possible determination 
of the acreages of irrigated lands as reported in Table 6. The 
diversion points, as well as the main conduits to the land 
served, are shown on Plate 2. 

Location System 

For purposes of identification, each surface water 
diversion is assigned a diversion location number by translating 
Its plotted position on the aerial photograph to the U. S. 
Geological Survey quadrangle map of the area. Each location 

-11- 



number Includes the numbers of the township, range, and section 
in the federal land survey system where the diversion is 
situated. The sections are subdivided into 40-acre plots 
(quarter-quarter sections), and these are indicated in each 
location number by a letter following the section number, as 
illustrated in the legend of Plate 2. For example, diversion 
D-44N/2W-24N1, shown on Sheet 17 of Plate 2 labeled "24n1", is 
in the southwest quarter of the southwest quarter of Section 24, 
Township 44 North, Range 2 West, Mt. Diablo Base and Meridian 
(MDB&M). Additional diversions in a 40-acre plot are distin- 
guished by replacing the final n\imber "l " with "2", "3", etc., 
as for diversion D-44N/2W-24N2, etc. 

Descriptions of Surface Water Diversions 

The physical descriptions, histories, water rights, 
and other information relating to surface water diversions are 
given in Table 2. Data in the table are arranged by the order 
of the location numbers within the respective subunits. Each 
location nvimber is followed by the name of the diversion and/or 
owner; the source; the purposes served; the quantity of water 
diverted during 1959^ if measured; and the extent of use, such 
as the nijmber of acres irrigated, etc. If a diversion did not 
serve its usual purpose in the year of survey, this fact is 
noted in the "Remarks" column. The extent of domestic use is 
specified only when five or more connections are served. Stock- 
watering of less than 10 head of livestock is classified under 
domestic use. The extent of irrigation use is based on the 
1959 land use survey described in Chapter III. 



-12- 



The nature and extent of existing rights pertaining 
to the water supply of an area are necessary in the determina- 
tion of the total water requirements of the area. Table 2, 
therefore. Includes information concerning the water rights on 
which the diversions are based. The type, quantity, and refer- 
ence to official record, if known, are reported in the "Apparent 
Water Right" column. Most of the diversions in the unit are 
based on riparian rights; a smaller number divert under appro - 
priative rights. A brief, nontechnical explanation of these 
and other types of water rights is given in Appendix A, together 
with a list of appropriative rights on file with the State Water 
Rights Board. 

The determination of water rights under which the 
various diversions are made is based upon the best Information 
available from the party interviewed, from files of the State 
Water Rights Board, and from other official records or sources 
available. Although this information meets the requirements for 
"apparent claims of water right" for the purposes of this investi- 
gation, its publication herein shall not be construed as evidence 
in confirmation of those claims. It should not, therefore, be 
used in the legal determination of water rights. 

Detailed descriptions of the diversion systems, 

including dams, pumps, and main conduits, as well as any special 

features, are given in the "Description of System" column. The 

diversions are classified as gravity, pump, or storage, according 

to the following definitions: 

Gravity diversion - A system by which water is 
taken from its natural course at a diversion structure 
and conveyed by gravity through a canal or pipeline to 
the area of use. Such a diversion may have a reservoir 

-13- 













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-28- 



on the stream but the capacity Is small compared 
with the amount of water diverted and provides no 
significant carryover seasonal storage. 

Pump diversion - A system by which water Is 
pumped from Its natural course through a pipeline 
to the area of use or to a gravity conduit located 
at a higher elevation. 

Storage diversion - A system consisting of or 
Including a surface reservoir having significant 
carryover storage within each season or from season 
to season. 

Systems not exclusively of one of these basic types are listed 

as combinations of those types which best describe them. 

The "Remarks" column contains such Information as the 

names of former owners, known changes of ownership after the year 

of study, and further details explaining entries In the other 

columns. 

Diversion Measurements 

Quantities of water diverted were measured, where 
feasible, to provide additional basic data concerning water use 
which will be helpful In determining water requirements of the 
unit. These measurements were made on Jh of the l60 diversions 
described In Table 2. 

The measured quantities do not necessarily represent 
average annual quantities, since during any single year the 
quantity diverted Is Influenced by precipitation during the 
growing season and the available streamflow. Causes other than 
weather and available water supply, such as economic factors, 
may also affect the degree to which any diversion record Is 
typical of normal operating conditions. Assessment of these 
factors Is outside the scope of this report. The diversion 



•29- 



quantities reported herein generally represent the actual amount 
of water taken from the respective sources ^ and therefore include 
recoverable and irrecoverable losses incidental to the intended 
use. 

Records of Surface Water Diversions . Detailed results 
of the measurement program are reported in Table 3. For each 
diversion measured, this table gives the purposes served, the 
point and method measurement, and the monthly and annual quantities 
diverted. Notations in the "Use" column regarding the irrigation 
period indicate the overall period of irrigation, but not neces- 
sarily that daily or continuous irrigation was practiced through- 
out the period. Where monthly data were sufficiently reliable, 
the quantities are shown. When the quantity diverted during a 
month is known to have been zero, it is so indicated. The 
measurements are designated as estimates when only incomplete or 
somewhat uncertain data could be obtained. 

Imports and Exports 

Among the diversion systems reported, three are for 
export of water from the unit. Two of these are privately owned, 
and the other is Clear Lake Reservoir, the largest storage unit 
of the U. S. Bureau of Reclamation's Klamath Project which pro- 
vides water for use in both Oregon and California. In 1959 j 
release from this reservoir totaled 58,860 acre-feet. 

Two private systems for import are also listed, one a 
ditch from a privately owned diversion and one which imports water 
purchased from the U. S. Bureau of Reclamation. The Klamath 
Project also delivers large quantities of water across the state 

-30- 







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III 



-36- 



line into California for irpip;ation in the Tulelake Irrigation 
District and for maintenance of waterfowl habitat in the Tule 
Lake ^.nd Lower Klamath Lake National Wildlife Refuses. In 19^9, 
the Tiilelake Irrio^ation District purchased 173»210 acre-feet for 
distrioution to users within its borders. 

Index to Surface i/ater Diversions 



An alphabetical index to diversion nar-ies and owners is 
provided in Table [|. at the end of this chapter. This table gives 
the location nixmber, the subunit, and the county of each diver- 
sion. To assist in finding diversion data, the table also lists 
TDS'^es of text and the sheet number of Plate 2 pertinent to each 
diversion. 

¥ ater Service Agencies 
There are three areas within the unit in which sizeable 
acreages are irrigated "ith sur'f'^ce water provided by public 
agencies. These are the service areas of Butte Valley and 
Tula lake Irrigation Districts and Lower Klamath Lake National 
"•/ildlife Refuge. The boundaries of these service areas are shown 
on Plate 3» 

Other public water agencies in the unit include: 
Butte Valley Soil Conservation District 
City of Dorris '/ater Department 

^iskiyou Co-unty "^lood Control and Water Conservation District 
Tennant Services District 
City of Tulelake ''.'ater Department 

-37- 



TABLE 4 
INDEX TO SURFACE WATER DIVERSIONS 



Diversion name 
or owner 


Diversion locolion 


Subunit and County 


References 


Plate 
Sheet 


2 1 text and appendix 
No. 1 page numbers 


Allen, J. G., Sr . 


D-U8N/1E-25L1 
-35H1 


Mt. Dome 
Mt. Dome 
Siskiyou 


1 
1 


27, 58 
27, 58 




Avanzino Reservoir 

Rouse, C?rlton 0. & Ethyl A. 


D-i*6N/lOE-35Nl 


Boles 
Modoc 


12 


16, 31, S3, 


88 


Baseball Reservoir 

Modoc National Forest 


D-U7H/1OE-I3MI 


Boles 
Modoc 


8 


17, 5U 




Bidart Brothers, Inc. 


D-J+7H/1LE-20J1 Boles 

-20J2 Boles 

D-lt8N/lOE-34Dl Boles 

Modoc 
See also: 

Dry Valley Reservoir 

Janes Reservoir 

Weed Valley Reservoir 


8 
8 
h 


17, 31, 5U 

17, 31, 5h 

18, 31, 5U 




Big Johnson Dam 
Johnson, Stanley 


D-lt7N/7E-6Fl 


Clear Lake 

Modoc 


1 


2k, 88 




Bishop, Ken 


See: Ken Del Ranch 








Blue Mountain Meadows Stock Tank 
Modoc National Forest 


d-46n/ioe-i6ki 


Boles 
Modoc 


12 


15 




Boyes Ranch Ditch 

Butte Valley Irrigation District 


D-I+5N/2W-12H2 


Butte Valley 
Siskiyou 


13 


22, 3li, 56, 


8U, 63 


Bray House Ditch 

Walton, Beatrice L. & 
Robinson, Rose L. 


D-1*1+n/1W-22E1 


Butte Creek 
Siskiyou 


17 


21, 33, 55 




Buchanan Flat Reservoir 
Modoc National Forest 


d-48w/ioe-28ni 


Boles 
Modoc 


It 


18, 5U 




Butte Valley Irrigation District 


See: Boyes Ranch Ditch & 
High-line Canal 








Clear Lake Reservoir 

U. S. Department of Interior, 
Bureau of Reclamation 


D-47N/8E-6K1 


Clear Lake 
Modoc 


7 


2U, 3U 




Cross, Charles E. & Lucinda 


D-47N/1E-2A1 

-ail 

D-U8N/1E-25N1 
-25N2 
-36FI 


Mt. Dome 
Mt. Dome 
Mt. Dome 
Mt. Dome 
Mt. Dome 
Siskiyou 


5 
5 
1 
1 
1 


25, 57 
25, 57 
27, 58 
27, 58 
27, 36 




Dalton, W. C, Company 


See: Steele Swamp Ranch 








Davis, Orlo 


D-45N/2W-20M1 Butte Creek 
-20M2 Butte Creek 
Siskiyou 
See also: 

Davis Cabin Ditch 


13 
13 


22, 33, 55 
22, 55 




Davis Cabin Ditch 
Davis, Orlo 


D-1*5N/3W-25H1 


Butte Creek 
Siskiyou 


13 


22, 33, 55 





-38^ 



TABLE 4 (Continued) 
INDEX TO SURFACE WATER DIVERSIONS 



Diversion name 
or owner 


Diversion locotion 


Subunit and County 


«.,...,... 1 


Plote 
Sheet 


2 1 Text ond appendix 
No, 1 page numbers 


Dead Horse Flat Reservoir 
Modoc National Forest 


D-ltl+N/9E-5Pl 


Clear Lake 
Modoc 


20 


2h, 56 


Double Spring Ditch 
Louie, Ellis J. 


D-li3N/2W-10Gl 


Butte Creek 
Siskiyou 


21 


19, 32, bk 


Dry Valley Reservoir 
Bidart Brothers, Inc. 


D-U6N/1IE-7M1 


Boles 
Modoc 


12 


16, 53, 08 


Everly, Irwin C, et al 


D-1*TN/12E-15N1 


Boles 
Modoc 


8 


18, 88 


Fayne, Michael H. & Mary L. 


D-UTN/6E-27L1 


Tula Lake 
Modoc 


7 


28 


Fogle, Leo 


D-U7N/2E-17P1 

D-I+8N/IE-35J1 

-35R1 


Mt. Dome 
Mt. Dome 
Mt. Dome 
Siskiyou 


6 

1 
1 


26, 35, 57 

27, 58 
27, 58 


Four Mile Reservoir 

Modoc National Forest 


D-1»8n/9E-26fi 


Boles 
Modoc 


i+ 


18 


Garden Stock Tank 

Modoc National Forest 


D-U6N/10E-33B1 


Boles 
Modoc 


12 


16 


Grohs, Neva. & Sons 


See: Gwen Springs 
Warm Springs 
Wilson Ranch 






Gwen Springs Ditch 
Grohs, Neva, & Sons 


D-48N/9E-20B1 


Clear Lake 
Modoc 


1+ 


25, 3U, 57 


Hackamore Reservoir 
Modoc National Forest 


D-1*3N/7E-23D1 


Clear Lake 
Modoc 


23 


2a 


Hager Basin Reservoir 

Rouse, Carlton 0. & Ethyl A. 


D-45N/10E-IB1 


Boles 
Modoc 


16 


15, 53 


Hammond Ranch 


D-i*6N/2E-9Ql 
-15L1 
-22G1 
-2TA1 


Mt. Dome 
Mt. Dome 
Mt. Dome 
Mt. Dome 
Siskiyou 


10 
10 
10 
10 


25, 35, 57 
25, 57 
25, 35, 57 
25, 35, 57 


Happy Valley Reservoir 
Modoc National Forest 


D-1+8N/10E-21H1 


Boles 
Modoc 


h 


18, 5U 


Hart, Gladys 


D-i»2N/lW-15Al 
-18E1 
-19C1 


Butte Creek 

Butte Creek 

Butte Creek 

Siskiyou 


25 

25 
25 


18, Sh 
18, 5U 
18, 5U 


Heightman, G. W. 


D-47N/2E-20C1 


Mt. Dome 
Siskiyou 


6 


37, 36, 57 


High-line Canal 

Butte Valley Irrigation 
District 


D-45N/2W-12H1 


Butte Valley 
Siskiyou 


13 


22, 3U, 56, 88 


Hills Brothers 


D-1+7N/LE-3L1 


Mt. Dome 
Siskiyou 


5 


26, 35, 57 



-39- 



TABLE 4 (Continued) 
NDEX TO SURFACE WATER DIVERSIONS 











References 


Diversion nome 
or owner 


Diversion location 


Subunit and County 






Plate 2 


1 Text ond appendix 








Stieef No. 1 page numbers | 


Huffman Reservoir 


D-i+TM/lOE-l'tPl 


Boles 


8 


17, 5U 


Modoc National Forest 




Modoc 






International Paper Company 


D-it3N/lW-lQl 


Antelope Creek 


21 


lU, 31, 53 




-13D1 


Antelope Creek 


21 


lU, 31, S3 




D-It5N/2W-29Dl 


Butte Creek 
Siskiyou 


13 


22, 33, 55 


Jacks Butte Stock Tank 


D-it3W/lOE-5Ql 


Boles 


2k 


lU, 53 


Weyj.er, Dave 




Modoc 






Janes Reservoir 


D-ltTW/lOE-25Rl 


Boles 


8 


17, 31, 5U, 88 


Bidart Brothers, Inc. 




Modoc 






Jessup, Roger, Farms Company 


See: Pease Flat 


Reservoir 






J-.ilinson, Eric R. 


D-li4N/lW-19Nl 


Butte Creek 


IT 


20, 33, 55 




-19N2 


Butte Creek 
Siskiyou 


IT 


21, 33, 55 


Johnson, Stanley 


See: Big Johnson Dam 






Juanita Lake 


D-1*6n/2W-20E1 


Butte Valley 


9 


23, 56 


Meiss Ranch 




Siskiyou 






Ken-Del Ranch 


D-li3N/lW-23Hl 


Antelope Creek 
Siskiyou 


21 


lU, 31, 53 


Langer, Perry A 


D-itTH/lE-lPl 


Mt. Dome 


5 


25, 35, 57 




-12R1 


Mt. Dome 


5 


26, 35, 57 




D-1+7IJ/2E-18L2 


Mt. Dome 
Siskiyou 


6 


26, 35, 57 


Lavender, John Wilson, Sr. 


D-44N/IE-7C1 


Antelope Creek 
Siskiyou 


IT 


lU, 31, 55, 88 


Lost Valley Reservoir 


D-1+UN/9E-21G1 


Clear Lake 


20 


2h, 56 


Weyler, Dave 




Modoc 






Louie, Ellis J. 


D-U3N/2W-10B1 


Butte Creek 


21 


19, 32, 5ii 




-lOFl 


Butte Creek 


21 


19, 32, 5U 




-15B1 


Butte Creek 


21 


19, 32, 5U 




-22C1 


Butte Creek 


21 


19, 32, 5U 




-22G1 


Butte Creek 


21 


19, 32, 5E 




-26L1 


Butte Creek 


21 


19, 32, 55 




-26L2 


Butte Creek 


21 


19, 32, 55 




-26^a 


Butte Creek 


21 


20, 32, 55 




-27A1 


Butte Creek 


21 


20, 32, 55 




-27K1 


Butte Creek 


21 


20, 32, 55 




-3to 


Butte Creek 


21 


20, 32, 55 




-3to 


Butte Creek 
Siskiyou 


21 


20, 32, 55 




See also: 










Double Spring Ditch 








Rose Spring 


Ditch 






Loveness, Loyal H. & Vinton H. 


D-U8W/6E-20H1 


Tule Lake 


3 


28, 58, 88 






Modoc 




Lutz, Ralph 


D-it5N/lW-19Hl 


Butte Valley 
Siskiyou 


13 


22, 3U, 56 



■Uo- 



TABLE 4 (Continued) 
INDEX TO SURFACE WATER DIVERSIONS 



or owner 


Diversion location 


Subunit and County 


References | 


Plate 2 
St>eet No 


1 Text end appendix 
1 page numbers 


McKay, John 


D-48N/IE-25G1 
-25K1 
-25L2 

D-1i8n/2E-31M1 
-31N1 

-31N2 


Mt. Dome 
Mt. Dome 
Mt. Dome 
Mt. Dome 
Mt. Dome 
Mt. Dome 
Siskiyou 


1 
1 
1 

2 
2 


27, 58 
27, 58 

27, 58 

28, 36, 58 
28, 36, 58 
28, 36, 58 


Meiss Ranch 


D-46N/2W-i*El Butte Valley 
-5D1 Butte Valley 
-5N1 Butte Valley 
-8F1 Butte Valley 
-9R1 Butte Valley 
-12H1 Butte Valley 
-I3AI Butte Valley 

D-ltTW/2W-26El Butte Valley 
Siskiyou 

See also: 

Juanita Lake 


9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
5 


23, 56 

23, 3U, 56 
23, 3U, 56 
23, 3U, 56 
23, 3U, 56 
23, 3U, 56 
23, 56 
23, 3U, 56 


Mills, Maybelle B. 


D-1.3M/1W-9K1 


Butte Creek 
Siskiyou 


21 


18, 32, 5U 


Modoc National Forest 


See: U.S. Department of Agriculture 




Hicholson, Ines 


D-47W/2E-1TG1 


Mt. Dome 
Siskiyou 


6 


26, 35, 57 


O'Keefe, Dan 


D-lt71J/2E-19Jl 
-I9RI 


Mt. Dome 
Mt. Dome 
Siskiyou 


6 
6 


26, 35, 57 

27, 35, 57 


Orr Brothers, Inc. 


D-I4I+N/IW-2OBI Butte Creek 

-20B2 Butte Creek 

-20C1 Butte Creek 

-20D1 Butte Creek 

Siskiyou 

See also: 

Orr Lower Ditch 


IT 
17 
IT 
17 


21, 33, 55 
21, 33, 55 
21, 33, 55 
21, 33, 55 


Orr Lower Ditch 
Orr Brothers, Inc. 


D-l*i*N/lW-l4Rl 


Butte Creek 
Siskiyou 


IT 


20, 32, 55 


Pease Flat Reservoir 

Jessup, Roger, Farms Co. 


D-it7N/l2E-28Gl 


Boles 
Modoc 


8 


18, 5U 


Picnic Grove Reservoir 
Modoc National Forest 


D-lt7N/lOE-l6El 


Boles 
Modoc 


8 


17, 51* 


Porterfield, Mary 


D-ltTH/lE-23Gl Mt. Dome 

-23H1 Mt. Dome 

D-J*7M/2E-8Q1 Mt. Dome 

-9N1 Mt. Dome 

Siskiyou 
See also: 

Porterfield Reservoir 


5 
5 
6 
6 


26, 35, 57 
26, 35, 57 
26, 57 
26, 35, 57 


pjrterfield Reservoir 
Porterfield, Mary 


B-hJN/lE-ZhFl 


Mt. Dome 
Siskiyou 


5 


26, 35, 57 


Reservoir "F" 
Weyler, Dave 


D-I43N/9E-I2HI 


Boles 
Modoc 


21. 


lU, 31, 53 



•Ul- 



TABLE 4 (Continued) 
INDEX TO SURFACE WATER DIVERSIONS 











Refer 


1 


Diversion name 
or owner 


Diversion location 


Subunit and County 










Plote 


2 Te 


Kt and appendix | 








Stieet 


No. 


page 


numbers 


Reservoir "G" 


D-U5N/10E-27D1 


Boles 


16 


15, 


53 




Rouse, Carlton 0. & Ethyl A. 




Modoc 










Reservoir "M" 


D-it4w/9E-l3Al 


Boles 


20 


Hi, 


53 




Weyler, Dave 




Modoc 










Reservoir "N" 


D-l*ltW/9E-25Pl 


Boles 


20 


m. 


53 




Weyler, Dave 




Modoc 










Reynolds, Del 


See: Bray House 


Ditch 










Kuuisjn, Waiter 


D-45N/2W-5M1 


Butte Valley 


13 


22, 


3U, 


56 




-5P1 


Butte Valley 
Siskiyou 


13 


22, 


56 




Rose Spring Ditch 


D-it3N/2W-3Ql 


Butte Creek 


21 


19, 


32, 


5U 


Louie, Ellis J. 




Siskiyou 










Round Willow Reservoir 


D-lt7H/llE-12Ml 


Boles 


8 


17 






Modoc National Forest 




Modoc 










Rouse, Carlton 0. & Ethyl A. 


D-lt5N/lOE-3Kl 


Boles 


16 


IS, 


53 






-3R1 


Boles 


16 


15, 


31, 


53 




-IIEI 


Boles 


16 


15, 


53 






-1IE2 


Boles 


16 


15, 


53 






D-lt6N/lOE-25Cl 


Boles 


12 


16, 


53 






-36A1 


Boles 


12 


16 








-36J1 


Boles 
Modoc 


12 


16 








See also: 














Avanzino Reservoir 












Hager Basin Reservoir 












Reservoir 


"G" 










Shasta Cattle Company 


See: Meiss Ranc 


h & Juanita Lake 










Soule, Ray 


D-l4ltw/2W-2UNl 


Butte Creek 


17 


21, 


33, 


55 




-2iH!J5 


Butte Creek 


17 


21, 


33, 


55 




-2I*N6 


Butte Creek 
Siskiyou 


17 


21, 


33, 


55 




See also: 














Soule Lower North Ditch 












Soule Middle Ditch 












Soule South Ditch 












Soule Uppe 


r N^rth Ditch 










Soule Lower Worth Ditch 


D-i*ltN/2W-2itPl 


Butte Creek 


17 


22, 


33 




Soule, Ray 




Siskiyou 










Soule Middle Ditch 


D-l,UN/2W-2l*N3 


Butte Creek 


17 


21, 


33, 


55 


Soule, Ray 




Siskiyou 










Soule South Ditch 


D-l*ftW/2W-2ltN2 


Butte Creek 


17 


21, 


33, 


55 


Soule, Ray 




Siskiyou 










Soule Upper North Ditch 


Tl-khN/2\l-2hNh 


Butte Creek 


17 


21, 


33, 


55 


Soule, Ray 




Siskiyou 










South Mountain Reservoir 


D-)t6N/lIE-25Al 


Boles 


12 


16 






Modoc National Forest 




Modoc 











.li2. 



TABLE 4 (Continued) 
INDEX TO SURFACE WATER DIVERSIONS 











Reference 


s 




Diversion nome 


Diversion locolion 


Subunit and Counfy 










Plate 


2 1 Te.t on 


d appe 


idix 








Sheet 


No 1 page 


numbe 


s 


Southern Pacific Railroad Co. 


D-U1(N/1W-5B1 


Butte Creek 


17 


20, 32, 


55 






-5H1 


Butte Creek 


17 


20, 32, 


55 






-5H2 


Butte Creek 


17 


20, 55 








-5H3 


Butte Creek 
Siskiyou 


17 


20, 55 






Spaulding Reservoir 


D-42N/7E-2G1 


Clear Lake 


23 


2U, 56 






Modoc National Forest 




Modoc 










Spencer, Martin E. 


D-U8N/2W-18C1 


Butte Valley 


1 


23 








-18D1 


Butte Valley 
Siskiyou 


1 


23, 56 






Steele Swamp Ranch 


D-47N/9E-20R1 


Boles 


8 


16, 31, 


53 






-29Q1 


Boles 


8 


16, 31, 


53 






-31A.1 


Boles 
Modoc 


8 


17, 31, 


53 




Sullivan, Frank J., Jr. 


d-48n/6e-26mi 


Tule Lake 


3 


2b, 58, 


88 






-26Q1 


Tule Lake 


3 


28, 53, 


88 






-35B1 


Tule Lake 


3 


28, 58, 


88 








Modoc 








Telephone Flat Reservoir 


D-U5N/11E-3B1 


Boles 


16 


15 






Modoc National Forest 




Modoc 










Thackara, John 


D-lt7H/2E-l8Ll 


Mt. Dome 
Siskiyou 


6 


26, 35, 


57 




Timbered Ridge Reservoir 


D-it6K/9E-25Jl 


Boles 


12 


15, 53 






Modoc National Forest 




Modoc 










U.S. Department of Agriculture 


D-1.3N/7E-35D1 


Clear Lake 


23 


2U, 56 






Forest Service 


-35L1 


Clear Lake 


23 


2U, 56 






Modoc National Forest 




Modoc 












D-1)6n/10E-27E1 


Boles 


12 


16 








D-it7N/llE-5Al 


Boles 


8 


17, 5U 








-23K1 


Boles 

Modoc 


8 


17, 5U 








See also: 














Baseball Reservoir 












Blue Mountain Meadows 












Stock Tank 












Buchatian Flat Reservoir 












Dead Horse 


Flat Reservoir 












Four Mile 


Reservoir 












Garden Stock Tank 












Hackamore 


Reservoir 












Happy Valley Reservoir 












Huffman Re 


servo ir 












Picnic Grove Reservoir 












Round Willow Reservoir 












South Mountain Reservoir 












Spaulding 


Reservoir 












Telephone Flat Reservoir 












Timbered Ridge Reservoir 












West Black Rock Reservoir 












Wild Horse 


Reservoir 










U. S. Department of the Interior 


See: Clear Lake Reservoir 










Bureau of Reclamation 















-U3- 



TABLE 4 (Continued) 
INDEX TO SURFACE WATER DIVERSIONS 



References 



Van Bremmer Ditch 

Van Bremmer Ditch Company 



D-ltSN/SE-UMl Tu].e Lake 

Siskiyou 



28, 58 



Vian, Williaip 



5 . & Beverly , 



Walton, Beatrice L. 



Weed Valley Beservoir 
Bidart Brothers, Inc. 



West Black Rock Beservoir 
Modoc National Forest 



D-it8w/7E-21Al 
-21J1 
-22C1 




Clear Lake 

Clear Lake 

Clear Lake 

Modoc 


3 
3 
3 


2U, 
2U, 
2U, 


56 
56 
56 


See: Bray House 


Ditch 








D-48N/9E-33G1 




Boles 
Modoc 


h 


18, 


31, 


d-1i8m/ioe-33L1 




Boles 
Modoc 


h 


18, 


5U 


D-i;5N/lOE-24Ql 




Boles 
Modoc 


16 


15 




D-44N/1CE-8G1 Boles 

Modoc 
See also: 

Jack's Butte Stock Tank 

Lost Valley Reservoir 

Reservoir "F" 

Reservoir "M" 

Reservoir "K" 


20 


lU, 


53 


D-li7W/lOE-6Gl 




Boles 
Modoc 


8 


17, 


5U 


D-U8N/8E-23R1 
-23R2 
-26Q1 




Clear Lake 

Clear Lake 

Clear Lake 

Modoc 


3 

3 


25, 
25, 
25, 


57 
57 
57 



■Uh- 



CHAPTER III. LAND USE 

This chapter presents a brief discussion of the proced- 
ures, standards, and results of a survey of land use conducted in 
the Lost River-Butte Valley Hydrographic Unit in 1959. The re- 
sults of this survey are given in Tables 5 and 6. The following 
short account of historical land use in the unit is presented as 
a background to the survey data. 

Historical Land Use 

As previously mentioned in Chapter I, development of 
the unit began later than that in the surrounding areas. The 
Indian Treaty of l864 opened the land to some degree, but no sig- 
nificant development began until the end of the Modoc Indian War 
in 1873. Even after this, development continued at a slow pace 
until after 19OO. With Tule Lake still receiving its natural 
inflow and covering its full natural bed, the unit's principal 
development was virtually limited to the Butte Valley and 
Oklahoma Plat areas farther west. 

Authorization for the Klamath Project of the U. S. 
Bureau of Reclamation in I905 marked the beginning of a new era 
in the unit. Completion of Clear Lake Dam in I9IO was the first 
major step toward transforming the area's lake beds and marshes 
into productive farmlands. The key flood control and water 
storage units of the project are Clear Lake Reservoir in California 
and Gerber Reservoir in Oregon. These two reservoirs provide a 
total storage capacity of over 620,000 acre-feet. The entire 



project, with most of the water coming from the Klamath River, 
Irrigates about 220,000 acres In the two-state service area. 
The fertile Tule Lake area, with water from this project, has 
become the largest and most diversified Irrigated area In 
California north of the Sacramento Valley. 

The development of lands for urban use has likewise 
been slow. Dorrls, the only town listed In the unit's census 
data prior to 19^0, has had a fairly steady growth. Its popula- 
tion passed the 5OO mark In the 1920' s, and by 196O was nearly 
1,000. The unit's second town, Tulelake, grew rapidly between 
1930 and 1950 to over 1,000 residents, but the 196O census 
showed only 95O. Though these towns are essentially residential 
and commercial centers serving the surrounding agricultural areas, 
Dorrls Is also the site of a lumber mill. In addition to these 
two towns, small urban developments are also located at MacDoel 
and Tennant where sawmills have operated at times. 

Present Land Use 

According to the land use survey made in 1959 for this 
investigation, the majority of the developed lands within the 
unit are used for agricultural purposes. The additional developed 
acreage, which is utilized for urban and recreational purposes, 
totals only l/lO of one percent of the areac Essentially unde- 
veloped lands receiving no applied water, even though they provide 
recreation, timber, and range, are not segregated for the purpose 
of this report. 

The land uses mapped in this survey fall into four major 
categories — irrigated lands, dry-farmed lands, urban lands, and 

-46- 



recreational lands; and one minor category -- naturally hiprh water 
table lands, such as meadowlands and marshes. Lands not included 
in any of these five catep;ories were mapped as "native veo;etation" , 
The location and extent of the lands m.apped in each catef^ory are 
indicated bv color on Plate 2. The acreages of the various land 
uses within each subunit are presented in Table 5. The figures 
represent gross ecrea^es, and include those nonwpter-service are^s 
vjhich were individually too small to be delineated. Among these 
are roads, ditches, farmisteads, and miscellaneous rip;hts-of-way. 

Me thods and Procedures 

The D.gnd use survey was accomplished by an intensive 
field inspection of the unit, using aerial photographs -- the 
sar.e ones used earlier in locating surface water diversions. 
The hydrographic unit was traversed bv automobile as com.pletely 
as roads and terrain v;ould riermit. Inspection of areas inacces- 
sible by automobile was made, where necessary, on foot. 

The particular use or type of development on each 
senarate parcel of land was determined b?/ on-the-spot observation. 
The corresponding- area v/as then identified and delineated on the 
photogranh on which it appeared. Stereoscopes to bring out relief 
were of great assistance in this orocess. The individTial parcels 
were then labeled showing major use categories and suecific uses 
of each. The major use categories (irrigated, dry-farmed, urban, 
etc.) are described in the following sections. 



-[|.7- 



Agricultural lands were surveyed to determine which 
parcels were Irrigated and what crops were raised. This infor- 
mation was then annotated on the photographs. The crops ob- 
served were identified by general crop groups as well as the 
specific crops present. 

The general groups of crops and the specific crops 
comprising each group are listed below with crops in production 
in 1959 underscored: 

G - Grain and hay crops 

Wheat , barley, oats, miscellaneous . 

P - Field crops 

Cotton, saf flower, flax, hops, sugar beets, 
corn , grain sorghums, castor beans, 
miscellaneous . 

P - Pasture 

Alfalfa, clover, mixed , native, induced high - 
water table native, sudan . 

T - Truck 

Artichokes, asparagus, beans, cole crops, 
carrots, celery, lettuce, melons, squash, 
cucumbers, onions and garlic, peas, potatoes , 
sweet potatoes, spinach, tomatoes, flowers 
and nursery, bushberries, strawberries, 
p eppers, miscellaneous . 

D - Deciduous fruits and nuts 

^ples, apricots, cherries, peaches, nectarines, 
pears, plums, prunes, figs, almonds, walnuts, 
miscellaneous . 

A sample aerial photograph with land use data delin- 
eated on it is shown in Illustration 1 on Page 50 . 

After completion of the field mapping, the data de- 
lineated on the photographs were transferred to copies of 
U. S. Geological Survey quadrangle maps reproduced at a scale 

-48- 



of 1:24,000. This procedure was necessary to bring the delin- 
eated areas to a common scale for accurate determination of 
acreages, since there was much variation in the scale in the 
aerial photographs. A series of these maps showing the loca- 
tion of all diversion systems and colored according to the land 
use categories was reviewed by local parties at meetings held 
in the unit in February 1964. These maps became the basis for 
Plate 2. 

Another series of these maps was used in computing 
the acreages of the land uses. Each delineated area on these 
maps was manually cut out and was carefully weighed on an ana- 
lytical balance. The weights were converted to acreages, using 
the ratios of weight to acreage determined for the individual 
mapso This method has proven to be a very expedient and accu- 
rate means of area determination where many small parcels are 
involved. 

Irrigated Lands 

Irrigated lands, as designated in this report, include 
all agricultural lands which receive water artificially. These 
lands, when noted in the field survey, were identified as such 
by the symbol "i" on the aerial photograph, as in the sample on 
Page 50. The fields normally irrigated, whether or not irrigated 
in the year of survey, were identified with their respective 
water sources. Idle irrigated lands are defined as lands which 
were not irrigated in the year of the survey, but had irrigation 
facilities and had been irrigated within the preceding three years, 
Fallow irrigated lands are those cultivated lands which have 
facilities for irrigation and may be Irrigated during the year of 

-49- 




Illustration 1. Example of Land Use Delineated on Aerial Photograph. 
Symbols Used on This Photograph 





IRRIGATED LANDS 




DRY-FARMED LANDS 


URBAN LANDS 


iPl - 


Alfalfa 


nGl 


- Barley 


UC5 - Institutions 


iP2 - 


Clover 


nG6 


- Miscellaneous hay 


UI2 - Extractive industry 


iP2S- 


Clover, for seed 




ajid grain 


U - Combined urban uses 


iP3 - 


Mixed pasture 


nGP 


- Grain, fallow 




iGl - 


Barley- 


nPl 


- Alfalfa 




iG2 - 


Wheat 


nP2 


- Clover 




iT12- 


Potatoes 


nP3 


- Mixed pasture 


MISCELLANEOUS LANDS 


ill - 


Lands cropped within nil 


- Lands cropped within 






past three years 




past three years 


nSl - Farmsteads 




but not tilled at 




but not tilled at 


nS2 - Feed lots 




time of survey 




time of survey 


NR2 - Native meadowlands 


iI2 - 


New lands being 
prepared 






NV - Native vegetp+-'on 



•50- 



O O O O O VO J-CN*^i) 



O CO ^ c^ oo J- 



3 



r 



o o o o o ooo o. 



o o o o o o ooo oo 



ir\ o so o o o ooo o^ 



J- oo 



•? O J3- 



§§ 



O 3 



11 



s 5- 

I § 






§ 






If 






3 c o o 
" o 3 ^ 

J o i: 3 



5 13 



C O -H 

3 S wi 



•51- 



survey, but at the actual date of survey were only tilled and not 
planted to a crop. This survey revealed 131,79^ acres of irri- 
gated lands in the Lost River-Butte Valley Hydrographic Unit, or 
about 9 percent of the unit's area. Approximate percentages in 
the general crop types were: grain, 53 percent; pasture type 
(including seed), 32 percent; truck, 11 percent; and field, 1 
percent. The remaining 3 percent were idle or fallow. 

The irrigated lands within the various subunits are 
reported in Table 6 according to their source of water. For each 
water source, the acreage of crop group is tabulated, as well as 
that of land usually irrigated but not cropped in 1959. The water 
source breakdown is made by the individual surface water diver- 
sions, by combinations of these diversions, and by ground water 
supply. For lands which receive both surface and ground water, 
this fact is also noted. The specific source of water is not 
identified for lands within and served by the Butte Valley and 
Tulelake Irrigation Districts, 

Naturally High-Water Table Lands 

In addition to the irrigated lands described above, 
there are lands supporting vegetation which utilize water from a 
naturally high-water table, such as mountain meadows and certain 
lands adjacent to lakes and streams. These lands are divided into 
two groups: "meadowlands" where the water table is normally below 
the surface, and "marsh" which is under water much of the year. 
These two groups are designated "naturally irrigated meadowlands" 
and "marsh or swamp" on Plate 2. 



•52- 



o 


«S-|2S 1 «"S - ^"S8"is 


ill 


1 ° ° ^ 


11 


«S2^SS S 3^3 - f"s8£8R 


1 


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1 


i 
1 
1 


|o o 




|o o 


1 


|o o 


« 


1 o o 


-A 


i 

5 




5 


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1 
1 


? 


i ^ ^$. t i 


1 3 - § ^ R ?a g 8 S § g 


1 o o 


ll 


1 O O 


1 


a 1 a a 


G2 


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1 


1 o o 


~3 


|o o 


1 

If 


5 


International Paper Co 

International Paper Co 

Ken-Del Ranch 

Surface Water Supply 

Subunit 
(all In Siskiyou Co.) 

Reservoir T" 

Jacks Butte Stock Tank 

Reservoir "K" 

Dave Weyler 

Hager Basin Reservoir 

Carlton 0. and Ethyl 

Availino Reservoir 

Carlton 0. and Ethyl 

A. Rouse 
Carlton 0. and Ethyl 

Cariton"o! and Ethyl 

Reservoir "0" 

Timbered Ridge 
Reservoir 

Carlton 0. and Ethyl 
A. Rouse 

Modoc National Forest 

Carlton 0. and Ethyl 
A. Rouse 

Dry Valley Reservoir 

Steele Svamp Ranch 
Steele Svamp Ranch 
Steele Svamp Ranch 


65 


3 g a ^ illl s a g 1 g ! ! 1 7 1 la p gfl 

I ? -? "v « is^n. i J, J, s i s s ^ t ci J. i ^ "v&a 
: 1 1 K Pll 1 1 1 1 1 If II 1 1 1 1 pi 

^ i i i i i A i i i A i i i i i 



-53- 



1 


-3~-S"-^s-ssS|S| 2s-|fe J 


£2"- 


U ^ 




^^SS-S-S^gSSSSIII 2S<^|!. 5 


1 


1 ° 1° 


1 


i 
1 

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1 ° 1° 




1 ° 1° 


1 


1 ° 1° 


II 


1 ° 1° 


is 


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1 


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1 


1= 1= 1 




1 


n 
jl 

1 


1 


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2 


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11 


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It 

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I. 
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1 


wild Horse Beservoir 
Baseball Beservoir 
Huffman Beservoir 

Janes Beservoir 

Modoc National Forest 

Bldart Brothers, Inc. 
Bldart Brothers, Inc. 

Modoc National Forest 

Pease Flat Reservoir 

Warm Springs Ditch 

Happy Valley Reservoir 

Buchanan Flat Beservol! 

Weed VuUey Reservoir 
Bldart Brothers, Inc. 

Surface Water Supply 

Subunlt 

(all In Modoc Co.) 

Gladys Hart 
Gladys Hart 
Gladys Hart 
Maybelle B. Mills 
Rose Spring Ditch 
Double Spring Ditch 

Ellis j! Lo^le 
Ellis J. Louie 
Ellis J. Louie 


11 
1^ 




1 11 1 H i| 1 fi M li i E 1 s g J! if!! 
i II II III II ^ 1 1 if ^ II 1 i ill 1111 



-5U- 



- ?1 

I CO 

c Z v 

5 < "- 



q: 



1 


«S H|Pg gS S? --S|g 


111 


S If 


if 


-& s ^ s p g g s s ^ - - ^11 


1 


1° 


1 
1 


1 

1 


1° 


Ii 


1° 


1 


1 ° 


it 


o 


L^ 


1 
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1 

5 
i 


1 ° 


5 


- 1 s 


1 


n 


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; 


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l| 


1° 


1 


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;1 


r 


1 


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s 1 s 


ii 
II 

ii 


It 

1 ° 

1 


Ellis J. Louie 
Ellis J. Louie 

Ellis J. Louie 
Ellis J. Louie 

Ellis j'. Loliie 

EUls J. Louie 

John Wilson Lavender 

Orr Lover Ditch 

Southern Pacific R.R. 
Southern Pacific R.R. 
Southern Pacific R.R. 

Eric R. Johnson 

Orr Brothero Inc. 
Orr Brothers Inc. 
Orr Brothers Inc. 
Orr Brothers Inc. 

Bray House Ditch 

Ray Soule 
Soule South Ditch 
Soule Middle Ditch 
Soule^U^r NO. Ditch 

Bay Soule 

Soule Lower No. Ditch 

Orlo Davis 

International Paper Co 

Davis Cabin Ditch 

Surface Hater Supply 
(All in Siskiyou 
County) 

No lands irrigated by 
ground water. 


II 

-J 


: ff l?ff > Isl < §111 §1 <iii > Miiiii §1 1 > s 

a fi Siii S 35" 3 ^iAi 3i ^iii i Siiiiii Si S S 

xii i i- i i i i i i i i i 



-55- 



^ 


1 1 1 1 % '^ ^ 1 :| 3 1 - - s s 8 " - - 


III 


S S t 1 ss a| g " - 




^ s % \ \ \ 1 ^1 1 -- - - S s 1 - 


1 


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1 


1 
1 


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(S 

If 


1 o, .| ^ 


1 


^' 11 ^1! 




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is 




1 °S oi s 


1 


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1 1 '^ ^"^ 1 1- ^-1 ^i 




1 
1 


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= = . s 1 




si 1 S- §1 3 


11 


r^ °i s 


s 


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li 


661" 

661 
1,1.62 


1 


1°. .,. 




\ 3 % 1 °g g 1 s 


i| 
if 

|S 
5" 


li 


Ralph Lutz 

Halter Boblaon 
Walter Bobison 

High-Line Canal 
Boyes Banch Ditch 

Meiss Ranch 
Meiss Ranch 

Meiss Ranch 
Juanita Lake 

^teiss Ranch 

Meiss Ranch 

Martin E. Spencer 

Surface Water Supply 
Ground Hater Supply 

Combined Surface and 
Ground Hater 

Subunlt (All in 
Siskiyou Co.) 

Spauldlng Reservoir 
Modoc Nat. Forest 
Modoc Nat. Forest 
Dead Horse Flat Res. 
Lost Valley Reservoir 
William S. and 

William 3. and 
Beverly A. Vlan 

Wllliajn S. and 
Beverly A. Vian 


1 ° 





-56- 



CD < 



s 




5g 


^ "1 fc 


s_ 


s g 5 S £ § 3 s c s 3 


III 






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1 






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si 






1 ° 


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5 


Raramond Ranch 
Hammond Ranch 
Hammond Ranch 
Hamond Ranch 

Perry A. Langer 

Perry A. Langer 

Luclnda'cross 

Mary Porterfleld 
Mary Porterfleld 
Porterfleld Reservoir 

Mary Porterfleld 
Mary Porterfleld 

Ines Nicholson 

Leo Fogle 

John Thackara 

Dan O'Keefe 

G. w. Helghtman 


.5 ° 




.1 


5 B .. 




l!!!f!!lllfl!l!llll!l 

i i i i i i i i i i i 



■57- 



1 


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11 




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3 


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11 




1 m s 




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P 
II 

P 


1 1 

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1 ° 
1 


John McKay 

John McKay 
John McKay 
John McKay 
John McKay 

J. 0. Allen, Sr. 
Charles E. and 

Leo Fogle 
Leo Fogle 

Induced high water^ 


Lover Klamath Wild- 
life Refuge 

Surface Water Supply 
Oround Water Supply 

Subunlt (all In 
Siskiyou County) 


s 1 

s ^ « 

1 1"^ 


444 ll 
III ^1 

III Si 


11 
1^ 


I 


.gSISs .R hI .R h«."| 

mm li p p i!i; 


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.58- 



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1 




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1 

5- 


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g" -1 s S s 


P 


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1 ! ! 1 ! ^ !■ 


p 




F °i g f f 


5 
S 




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i, 
5 




oc o| o o o 


° 




„ . . — — - 


1 
1 


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1 




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8 


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o o o go o . 


el 

u 




S° °| IS ° !ft 


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■|, a s R a •" s 


1 




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I 


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1 1 « 1 1 ^ 1 


li 




r 1 ^ S s 


§ 


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K ° R ^ ° ° ^ 


xi 


i 

i 

J 

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g^ °| s 1 g 


1 


= 1 


K ^ s S ^ ° « 


I 

5 


g^ 1 f S s 
i 1 s s? a 


S 
1 S 




« £ 1 ^ £ S § 


1 


fi 

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1 


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s 




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1 




I"" 1 1 ! ^ 


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IS 




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I 
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1" 1 ! ! 1 


1 


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If 


ii 
1 ° 

5. 




Surface Water Supply 
Oround Water Supply 
Conblned surface and 
ground water 

Subunlt 

Kodoc County 

SlBklyou County 


1 
1 

1 
1 


1 
1 
II 


Surface Water Supply 

Oround Hater Supply 

Total 

VALLEY HYOTOORAFRIC Tmn 
Surface Water Supply 

Oround Water Supply 

Combined Surface and 
Oround Water Supply 

Total 


II 




1 


1 




i i 
i i 



-59- 



Dry-farmed Lands 

Dry-farmed lands are those lands normally in crop but 
which do not receive applied water. This includes all lands so 
farmed whether or not a crop is produced in the year of survey. 
These lands are called "idle" if entirely uncultivated in the 
year of survey, and "fallow" if tilled but without a crop at the 
time of survey. Lands which appeared to have been idle for more 
than 3 years and have reverted to native vegetation were so mapped 

It should be noted that the term "dry-farmed" as used 
herein refers to the farming practice of these lands and not to 
a lack of soil moisture. 

Urban Lands 

Urban lands include the total areas of towns, small 
communities, and industrial plots which are large enough to be 
delineated. Also included are parks, golf courses, racetracks, 
and cemeteries within or near urban areas. The reported acre- 
ages of urban land use represent gross delineations, including 
streets and vacant lots, and are therefore not necessarily fully 
developed at the present time. In this survey the boundaries of 
urban communities were delineated to include all lands with a 
density of one house or more per 2 acres. 

Recreational Lands 

Recreational lands were mapped on aerial photographs 
in the field in four categories: (l) residential, (2) commer- 
cial, (3) camp and trailer sites, and (4) parks. Recreational 
"residential" lands include permanent and summer home tracts 



-60- 



within primarily recreational areas. The estimated density of 
homes per acre was also indicated in the course of the survey. 
Recreational "commercial" lands include those containing motels, 
resorts, hotels, stores, restaurants, and similar commercial 
establishments in primarily recreational areas. Lands mapped in 
the "camp and trailer sites" category include those areas so used 
within primarily recreational areas but outside the boundaries of 
public parks. The entire areas within the designated boundaries 
of public park-type areas such as Lava Beds National Monument were 
included in the "parks" category. 

Obviously, nearly all of the mountainous, seashore, and 
water surface areas are suitable for some recreational use such 
as hunting, fishing, hiking, and picnicking. For the purpose 
of this land use survey, however, except for "parks", a recrea- 
tional use was reported only on those lands where some fairly 
intensive development requiring water service was located. 

The recreational lands are tabulated in Table 5 by the 
above categories, but no lands in the "commercial" category were 
present. All the 1959 recreational land use (categories 1, 3» and 
4) are the same color on Plate 2. 

Native Vegetation 

Lands which are essentially in a native state, and not 
included in any of the above categories, as well as scattered 
residences and other isolated uses too small to be delineated, 
were mapped as "native vegetation". However, in addition to the 
lands so mapped, the total acreage reported in this native vege- 
tation category includes lands which were mapped as water surface 

-61- 



and farm building areas, including dairies, feed lots, etc. The 
total of all these lands was some 1,247,580 acres or about 8[^ 
percent of the Lost River-Butte Valley Hydrographic Unit. Most 
of these lands, even in their native state, are used for commer- 
cial timber production, livestock range, and/or recreational 
activities such as fishing, hunting, hiking, and picnicking. 



■62- 



CHAPTER IV. CLASSIFICATION OF RECREATIONAL LANDS 

This chapter reports the procedures and results of a 
survey of the Lost Rlver-Butte Valley Hydrographlc Unit In which 
the lands of the unit were classified as to suitability for 
recreational use. In this survey, two general groups of recrea- 
tional lands were mapped: (1) those already developed or desig- 
nated for recreational use, as mapped In the land use survey, 
and (2) those which were found to be well suited for future 
recreational uses requiring water service. 

Scope of the Survey 

In most areas, the land classification surveys for 
Series No. 9^ bulletins are concerned primarily with the irri- 
gable classes and secondarily with the recreational classes. 
In the Lost Rlver-Butte Valley Hydrographlc Unit, the irrigable 
lands were mapped in 1953 in connection with formulation of the 
Klamath River Compact, but recreational lands were not mapped 
at that time. For this report, therefore, the irrigable lands 
were not resurveyedj but, to make the whole survey conparable 
to that in other units, the survey of recreational lands was 
performed in i960, and is the subject of this chapter. 

The Klamath River Contact, as approved, specifies that 
after its adoption in April 1957* water for irrigation of no 
more than 100,000 acres may be appropriated in the unit. This 
limitation definitely eliminated the need for a new survey of 
irrigable lands under this investigation. Results of the 1953 



■63- 



survey were published in Bulletin No. 58, "Northeastern Counties 
Investigation", June i960, and in Bulletin No. 83, "Klamath River 
Investigation", July 1964. 

Methods and Procedures 
The mapping procedure in this survey was similar in most 
respects to that described in Chapter III for land use. All parts 
of the unit were examined to locate those parcels meeting the 
standards for the various classes described in Table 7. On-the- 
spot identification and delineation of the selected land areas 
were made on aerial photographs. In this process, plans of the 
U. S. Forest Service were also considered. The procedure for acre- 
age determinations employed for this survey was also the same as de- 
scribed in Chapter III for land use. 

TABLE 7 
STANDARDS FOR CLASSIFICATION OF RECREATIONAL LANDS 



Land Class : 

Symbol ; Characteristics 



RR - Existing suad potential permanent smd summer home tracts 
vithin a primarily recreational area. The estimated 
number of houses per acre, under conditions of full 
development, is indicated by a number in the symbol, 
e.g., RR-3 is suitable for three houses per acre. 

RC - Ebci sting and potential commercial areas which occiir 

within a primarily recreational area and which include 
motels, resorts, hotels, stores, etc. 

RT - Existing and potential camp and trailer sites within a 
primarily recreational area. 

PP* - Existing racetracks, fairgrounds, and private, city, 
county, state, and federal parks and monuments. 



* In this unit, this category includes only the area encompassed by Lava 
Beds National Monimient. 

-64- 



Recreational Land Classes 

Present trends Indicate an expanding rate of use and 
demand for recreational facilities throughout the State. In 
view of these trends and the ever-increasing population, it is 
recognized that there will be a demand for substantial land 
areas for recreational purposes. This is particularly true of 
the mountains and undeveloped regions where recreational use is 
expanding rapidly at the present time. 

Generally speaking, all mountainous and timbered lands 
are suitable for some recreational use such as hunting, fishing, 
and similar outdoor activities. For purposes of this survey, 
however, lands classified for recreational use are limited to 
those which are now, or may be in the future, used Intensively 
for permanent and summer home tracts, camp and trailer sites, 
and areas designated as parks outside of urban areas. These are 
lands requiring significant water service, except for areas pre- 
served essentially in their historical state as "Parks". 

Primary considerations for classification of home 
tracts and camp aj:id trailer sites were (1) such physical factors 
as soil depth, slope, and rockiness; (2) such aesthetic values 
as view, nearness to lakes, streams, or seashore, or density and 
type of forest canopy suitable for the respective uses; and 
(3) the plans of federal and state officials. The availability 
of a water supply was an important factor in the selection of 
potential camp and trailer sites, but remoteness from roads did 
not Influence site selection. 

The "Parks" category Includes the total areas of 
existing federal and state parks and monuments, rather than the 

-65- 



specific areas of intensive development therein. For other 
parks — county, city, etc. — only the areas presently devel- 
oped to intensive recreational use were delineated. 

The acreages of the various recreational classes are 
reported in Table 8. On Plate 2, which shows the 1959 land use, 
the undeveloped but potential recreational lands mapped in this 
survey are also indicated. 



-66- 



TABLE 8 
CLASSIFICATION OF RECREATIONAL LANDS 

(In Acres) 



Subunit and 
County 


RR 


RT 


RC 


pp 


Total 


Antelope Creek 
Siskiyou 


300 


210 








510 


Boles 
Modoc 


20 


180 








200 


Butte Creek 
Siskiyou 


220 


8U0 








1,060 


Butte Valley 
Siskiyou 





70 


10 





80 


Clear Lake 
Modoc 





10 








10 


Mount Dome 
Siskiyou 





20 





8,970 


8,990 


Tule Lake 
Modoc 
Siskiyou 

Subunit Total 











SUMMARY 








2,850 
3U,630 
37,U80 


2,850 
3U,630 
37,U80 


Modoc County 


20 


190 





2,850 


3,060 


Siskiyou County 


520 


1,1U0 


10 


U3,600 


U5,270 


Hydro graphic IMit 
Total 


5Uo 


1,330 


10 


U6,U50 


U8,330 



.67- 



CHAPTER V. SUMMARY 

This bulletin presents the results of three surveys — 
water use, land use, and recreational land classification — 
conducted in 1958 through i960 in the Lost River-Butte Valley 
Hydrographic Unit. The report is one of a series which present 
similar data for the whole State. When completed, the data pre- 
sented in this series will be an essential basis for determination 
of future water requirements of the various watersheds of the 
State. A second series of bulletins will present these require- 
ments and, by relating them to the local water resources, will 
report the amount of water surplus or deficiency in each area. 

The water use survey consisted of obtaining data about 
diversion systems in the unit which normally divert 10 acre-feet 
or more of surface water per year. A total of I60 systems were 
located, with past and present ownership, water use, water rights, 
and other pertinent data obtained for each. The numbers of diver- 
sions serving various purposes were as follows: 

Major Purposes Served Number 

Irrigation l48 

Stockwaterlng 8 

Ground Water Recharge 1 

Export from Unit 3 

Most diversions for irrigation also serve for stockwaterlng, and 

a few for domestic uses. 



The lands irrigated in 1959 were mapped in the land 
use survey, and their sources of water identified. Of 127,200 

acres irrigated in the unit in 1959, 1;0,700 acres received 
surface water only, 11,000 received ground water only, and 
7,900 received surface and ground water combined. The remaining 
67,600 acres, within Tulelake Irrifi;pition District, received 
principally surface water, but ground water was also applied 
in some localities which were not identified in this survey. 
An additional [|.,600 acres usually irrigated were idle or fallow 
in 1959. The total 131,800 acres subject to irrigation represents 
8.9 percent of the unit. 

Other data from the land use survey are summarized in 
the following acreages of various crops and uses: 

Irrigated Lands 



Grain 

Alfalfa 

Clover 

Mixed Pasture 

Native Pasture 

(direct irrigation) 

Native Pasture 21,890 I6.6 

(induced high-water table) 



Acres 


Percent of Lands 
Irrigated 


69,580 


52.8 


10,560 


8.0 


4,030 


3.1 


5,210 


3.9 


7I1-O 


0.6 



Field Crops 




970 


0.7 


Potatoes 




13, 060 


9.9 


Other Truck C3?ops, etc. 




1,170 


0.9 


Idle or Fallow 




4,590 


3.5 


Total under Irrigation 


-70- 


131,800 


100.0 



other Uses 

Acres 

Dry-farmed Lands 40, 100 

Urban Lands 1^570 

Recreational Lands 

Lava Beds National Monument 46,330 

Other 105 

The classification of recreational lands was conducted 
in i960 in a manner similar to the land use survey. Outside the 
Lava Beds National Monument, 1,575 acres were found to be well 
suited to recreational uses which would require water service. 



■71- 



APPENDIX A 
LEGAL CONSIDERATIONS 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

California Water Rights 77 

Riparian Rights 78 

Overlying Rights 79 

Appropriative Rights 80 

Prescriptive Rights 83 

Determination of Rights 85 

Litigation Concerning Local Water Rights 85 

Churchill vs. Louie 86 

Butte Valley Irrigation District vs. Bray, et al. . 86 

Applications to Appropriate Water 87 

TABLES 

Table No . 

A-1 Applications to Appropriate Water in 

Lost River-Butte Valley Hydrographic 

Unit 88 



■75- 



APPENDIX A 
LEGAL CONSIDERATIONS 

The following paragraphs present brief explanations of 
California water rights law. They supplement and provide a back- 
ground for the information on water rights contained in Chapter II. 
Also included is a tabulation of active applications to appro- 
priate water within Lost River-Butte Valley Hydrographic Unit 
filed with the State Water Rights Board, as of January 25, 1965. 

California Water Rights 

In California, water rights convey only the right to 
use water. Until absolute possession of water is acquired by 
some artificial means, no one owns water. However, the owner of 
v;ater rights is entitled to enjoy them without interference by 
other users who have rights which are inferior to his. 

Five kinds of water rights are recognized in California. 
These are riparian, overlying, appropriative, prescriptive, and 
pueblo. Riparian rights attach to surface water and water flow- 
ing in known and definite subterranean channels, while overlying 
rights attach only to underground water. Appropriative and pre- 
scriptive rights may be acquired in either surface or underground 
waters. Pueblo rights are now exercised in California only by 
the cities of Los Angeles and San Diego, each of which has a 
paramount right to satisfy its full needs from the stream system 



•77- 



of waters flowing by the former Mexican pueblo from which each 
sprang. 

All water rights, both to surface and to underground 
water, are subject to the doctrine of reasonable beneficial use 
expressed In Section 3 of Article 14 of the California 
Constitution, and Water Code Sections 100 and 101. This doc- 
trine limits water rights to the quantity of water reasonably 
required for beneficial use and prohibits waste, unreasonable 
use, and unreasonable methods of use or diversion. 

Riparian Rights 

A riparian right entitles the owner of lands which 
border or front on a watercourse to take water therefrom for 
use on such lands within the same watershed. However, the rights 
of the owner of riparian land are limited to the reasonable 
beneficial use of the natural flow of water which passes his 
land. Riparian rights pass with the title to the land, unless 
expressly reserved or excepted from the interests transferred, 
and are not gained by use or lost by mere nonuse. Although the 
land must be contiguous to the watercourse, the length of the 
frontage is not determinative of the rights; a large tract with 
a small frontage on a stream may be riparian to the stream. 
But the original grant determines the character of the land, and 
only the smallest contiguous tract held under a single title 
retains riparian rights. 

A riparian owner has no right to any specified amount 
of the water of a stream as against other riparian owners. He 



■78- 



has rights only to a reasonable share from the stream — a 
correlative right which he shares mutually with other riparian 
owners. In the event of insufficient water for all, the avail- 
able supply must be apportioned, except that an upper riparian 
owner may take the whole supply if necessary for domestic use. 
As against appropriators, the riparian owner has the paramount 
right to all the water of the stream which he can put to reason- 
able beneficial use, but that is the extent of his rights, and 
the appropriator can take the surplus. 

Riparian rights do not authorize use of water on non- 
riparian land, nor do they permit the seasonal storage of water. 
Neither do they prevent temporary appropriation by others of 
water not presently needed for use on riparian land. 

A parcel of land becomes nonriparian when severed from 
land bordering the stream, unless the riparian rights are re- 
served for the severed parcel by the grantor. Riparian rights 
may be destroyed when purportedly transferred apart from the land 
by grant, contract, or condemnation, and may be impaired or lost 
through prescription. 

Overlying Rights 

Owners of lands overlying a common underground water 
supply have the right to withdraw water for reasonable beneficial 
use on their overlying lands. Such overlying rights are analogous 
to riparian rights, in that both are based on ownership of land 
contiguous to the supply and the rights of each overlying or 
riparian owner are mutual and correlative to the rights of all 



-79- 



other owners of lands similarly related to the supply. In the 
case of insufficient water to fully supply the requirements of 
all, the available supply must be equitably apportioned. 

Overlying rights do not include use of water on non- 
overlying land. However, surplus water not presently required 
for beneficial use on overlying land, and which may be withdrawn 
without creating an overdraft on the ground water supply, may be 
appropriated for use on nonoverlying land. But the overlying 
rights are paramount and all appropriative rights are subject to 
the future requirements of overlying land. 

Appropriative Rights 

An appropriation of water is any taking of water for 
use without riparian or overlying rights thereto, whether such 
taking is from the underground by wells or from surface streams 
by direct diversion or storage. An appropriator, in the legal 
sense, is one who takes water without possessing rights which are 
based on the ownership of land. As between appropriator s, the 
one first in time is first in right. A prior appropriator may 
take all the water he needs up to the full amount to which he is 
entitled before a later appropriator may take any. 

Normally, appropriative rights are inferior to riparian 
rights. An exception to this is the case of an appropriation of 
water diverted from streams flowing through vacant public lands 
before the riparian lands were withdrawn from the domain of the 
United States. The appropriative diversions or the lands they 
serve may be either upstream or downstream from the riparian lands, 



-80- 



Any water not needed for the reasonable beneficial uses under 
prior rights to a supply may properly be appropriated. The 
priority of an appropriative right, as against another appropria- 
tor, is related back to the first substantial act toward putting 
the water to use or to the date of application. Sections 1410 
through 1422 of the Civil Code, enacted in 1872, established, as 
the first statutory regulation, a permissive procedure for per- 
fecting an appropriation of surface water. Provision was made 
for posting a notice of appropriation at the proposed point of 
diversion and recording a copy with the county recorder. If the 
statutory procedure were followed and the appropriation completed 
with due diligence, priority related back to the date of posting; 
otherwise, priority was established only when the water was put 
to beneficial use. 

Since the effective date of the VJater Commission Act 
of 1913, December 19, 1914, appropriation of surface water and 
v/ater in subterranean streams flowing in known and definite 
channels has been by compliance with required statutory procedure. 
An appropriation of such water now can be made in accordance with 
the provisions of Part 2, Division 2 of the VJater Code (V-Jater Code 
Sections 1200 to 1801) . An application to appropriate unappropri- 
ated water must be filed with the State Water Rights Board. If 
the application is approved, a permit is issued authorizing the 
appropriation. When the appropriation has been completed, an 
inspection is made and a license is issued, to the extent of bene- 
ficial use, provided the terms and conditions of the permit have 



■81- 



been fulfilled. The priority of a permit or license relates back 
to the date of the application. 

A right to appropriate water may be lost either by 
abandonment or by continuous nonuse. To constitute abandonment, 
there must be concurrence of act and intent, wherein possession 
is relinquished with no intent to resume it for a beneficial use. 
Abandonment is, therefore, always voluntary and factual. In the 
case of an appropriation initiated prior to 1914, continuous non- 
use for a period of five years results in the loss of appropria- 
tive water rights. In the case of appropriative rights acquired 
pursuant to the Water Commission Act or the Water Code, continu- 
ous nonuse for a period of only three years may result in loss of 
such rights. 

Where ground water and surface water are interconnected, 
one acting as a tributary to the other, both are treated as part 
of a common supply and users of water from either source are 
entitled to protection from substantial injury as a result of use 
by others of water from the other source. Thus, an owner of land 
riparian to a stream may have his right to the use of water pro- 
tected against impairment by an appropriator of percolating ground 
water tributary to the stream and required for the maintenance and 
support of its flow. Likewise, where water from, a stream perco- 
lates to a ground water basin or stratum, the owner of land over- < 
lying the ground water supply may be protected from an appropria- 
tion of water from the stream if this causes a substantial impair- 
ment of the ground water supply. As between riparian use of 



•82- 



surface water and overlying use of ground water tributary to the 
stream, a sharing of the available water supply on the basis of 
reasonable beneficial use should be made. 

Surplus ground water not flowing in known and definite 
subterranean channels is still present in many areas of the State, 
Such surplus water may be appropriated for use on nonoverlying 
lands simply by extracting it and putting it to beneficial use. 
In Southern California, adjudication of some basins prohibits 
further appropriation of ground water therefrom. In Los Angeles, 
Riverside, San Bernardino and Ventura Counties, reporting of 
ground water pumped is required under certain conditions. 

Prescriptive Rights 

It is possible to appropriate surface or ground water 
which is presently needed by others to satisfy riparian, over- 
lying, or prior appropriative rights. Such appropriations may 
ripen into prescriptive rights where the use is actual, open and 
notorious, hostile and adverse to the original owners, continuous 
and uninterrupted for the statutory period of five years, made 
under claim of right, and with payment of taxes v;henever such 
have been levied on the water rights. Absence of any of these 
essentials precludes the acquisition of prescriptive water rights. 

Prescription thus requires that, for a period of five 
years, the rightful owner either knows or should know of the 
adverse taking, and fails to take any physical or legal steps 
to interrupt such taking. Irrespective of the needs or demands 
of the riparian, overlying, or prior appropriative user, an 



-83- 



absolute right to only a fixed amount of water may be acquired 
by prescription. The quantity of such a right is determined by 
beneficial use. However, present use is the measure of the pre- 
scriptive right, and future needs cannot be included. 

Mparlan rights, overlying rights, appropriative rights, 
and prescriptive rights may be lost or diminished by prescription. 
While there is sufficient water flowing in a stream to supply the 
wants of all parties, the use of the water by anyone does not 
deprive the others of their water supply. Such use is not an 
invasion of their rights and cannot, therefore, be a basis for a 
prescriptive right. The same principle applies to a downstream 
diversion of water as against the rights of an upstream riparian 
landowner or prior appropriator. At times when the safe yield 
of a ground water basin exceeds the needs of overlying landowners 
and apyx-opriators, their prior rights are not invaded by a later 
appropriative taking of water from the underground supply. The 
later appropriation becomes adverse only when the g3?ound water 
basin is overdrawn; that is, when the annual draft exceeds the 
safe annual yield. Although neither an overlying owner nor a 
prior appropriator may prevent a taking of surplus water, either 
the owner or the appropriator may institute legal proceedings to 
safeguard the supply once a surplus ceases to exist, and may 
enjoin any additional use beyond the point of safe yield. Since 
prescriptive rights can only be acquired to nonsurplus water, 
these rights cannot ordinarily be acquired against the future 
needs of riparian or overlying owners. 

The prior appropriator, lower riparian, or overlying 
owner may protect his rights for his present needs against an 

-84- 



adverse approprlator by actually taking the needed water before 
the five-year period has run, or by the aid of the courts In the 
form of a declaratory judgment or Injunction within the five-year 
period. 

Determination of V/ater Rights 

Under provisions of the Water Code, actions brought 
before either state or federal courts which involve determination 
of rights to the use of water may, at the court's discretion, be 
referred to the State Water Rights Board. Under provisions of 
Water Code Section 2000, the court may appoint the Board to 
referee "any or all issues Involved in the suit", or under Section 
2001, it may limit the reference to "investigations of and report 
upon any or all physical facts Involved". This reference pro- 
cedure may be followed in suits involving either surface or 
ground waters, or both. 

An alternative procedure for adjudication of rights to 
the use of water of streams, lakes, and other bodies of water, is 
available upon petition to the State Water Rights Board, but the 
method excludes the determination of rights to take water from an 
\inderground supply other than from a subterranean stream flowing 
thi»ough known and definite channels. Water Code Sections 2500 
to 2900, inclusive, authorize the initiation of such proceedings. 

Litigation Concerning Local Water Rights 
There have been no major adjudications of water rights 
In the Lost Rlver-Butte Valley Hydrographlc Unit. However, the 



-85- 



waters of Butte Creek have been the subject of litigation on 
two occasions. 

Churchill vs. Louie 

On January 5^ 1905* the Superior Court of Siskiyou 
County decreed that the defendant is "prohibited from diverting 
any of the waters of said Butte Creek from their natural channel, 
or from in any manner interfering with the natural flow thereof 
when there is not to exceed one thousand Inches of water, 
measured under a four inch pressure, flowing down said Butte 
Creek to ... the 'Boyes Ranch', or from doing any act or thing 
that will cause any amount of water less than one thousand Inches, 
measured under a four inch pressure, of the waters of Butte Creek 
to flow down to said premises ....". 

Butte Valley Irrigation District vs. Bray, et al . 

This case was entered in the Superior Court of Siskiyou 
County in July 1924. The court Issued a temporary injunction in 
favor of the plaintiff restricting the defendants to the use of 
specified amounts of water from Butte Creek. This injunction was 
in effect until the end of the 1925 irrigation season. 

An "Order of Reference", Issued on September 30, 1926, 
and amended the following June, requested a study and report 
be made by the State Division of Water Rights. An investigation 
of physical facts was conducted from April through August, 1927. 
By agreement of the parties to the case, the entire Butte Creek 
watershed was included in the Investigation so that it might be 
fully adjudicated. 



■86- 



The Division's report, filed in August 1929* described 
40 diversions from Butte Creek and its tributaries in operation 
at that time of the survey. This report, or Court Reference, 
included estimates of the water required for the service area of 
each diversion. Many of the same diversions were located in 
1959 for this investigation and are described herein. 

The Court Reference also compared the total water re- 
quirements along the creek with the normal full natural flow. 
The general conclusion of the report was that the water use 
practices in the Butte Creek watershed were not unreasonable or 
excessive. The final outcome of the suit was an out-of-court 
settlement without a decree adjudicating the stream. 
Applications to Appropriate Water 
Applications to appropriate water within the Lost Rlver- 
Butte Valley Hydrographlc Unit, filed with the State since 19l4 and 
active on January 20, 1965;. are summarized in Table A-1. For each 
application relative to a diversion reported in Chapter II the 
diversion location is Included in the table. The status of each 
application as to the granting of a permit or license is also shown 
in the Table. 



-87- 























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tional, Plre protection 

Stockwatering, Recrea- 
tional, Fire protection 

Stockwatering, Recrea- 
tional, Fire protection 

Stockwatering, Recrea- 
tional, Plre protection 

Stockwatering, Recrea- 
tional, Fire protection 

Stockwatering, Recrea- 
tional, Plre protection 

Stockwatering, Recrea- 
tional, Plre protection 

Stockwatering, Recrea- 
tional, Fire protection 

Stockwatering, Recrea- 
tional, Fire protection 

Stockwatering, Recrea- 
tional, Fire protection 

Stockwatering, Recrea- 
tional, Fire protection 

Stockwatering, Recrea- 
tional, Plre protection 

Stockwatering, Recrea- 
tional, Plre protection 

Stockwatering, Recrea- 
tional, Fire protection 

Stockwatering, Recrea- 
tional, Fire protection 

Stockwatering, Recrea- 
tional, Fire protection 

Stockwatering, Recrea- 
tional, Fire protection 

Stockwatering, Recrea- 
tional, Fire protection 

Stockwatering, Recrea- 
tional, Fire protection 

Stockwatering, Recrea- 
tional, Fire protection 

Stockwatering, Recrea- 
tional, Fire protection 

Stockwatering, Recrea- 
tional, Fire protection 

Stockwatering, Recrea- 
tional, Fire protection 

Stockwatering, Recrea- 
tional, Fire protection 

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15- Apr. 
15- Apr 
15- Apr 
15- Apr 
15- Apr 
15- Apr 
15- Apr 
15- Apr 
15- Apr 
15- Apr 
15- Apr 
15- Apr 

15- Apr 
15- Apr 
15- Apr 
15- Apr 
15- Apr 
15- Apr 
15- Apr 
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TIONS TO APPROP 

R -BUTTE VALLEY H 
tote Water Rights Boord 


1 


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Stoekvaterlng, Recrea- 
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Stoekvaterlng, Recrea- 
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Stoekvaterlng, Recrea- 
tional, Fire protection 

Stoekvaterlng, Recrea- 
tional, Fire protection 

Stoekvaterlng, Recrea- 
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•91- 



APPENDIX B 

LAND AND WATER USE IN MODOC NATIONAL FOREST 



APPENDIX B 
LAND AND WATER USE IN MODOC NATIONAL FOREST 

The land and water use practices on the portion of the 
hydrographlc unit lying within the limits of the Modoc National 
Forest are sufficiently unique to warrant special mention. A 
large section of this area is known as the "Devil's Garden" be- 
cause of its rocky, semibarren nature. The principal use of most 
of this area is not timber production, but livestock range. This 
is due to the fact that the timber native to this region consists 
largely of a sparse or scattered stand of juniper of negligible 
commercial value. 

Briefly, the pattern of land and water use in this area 
consists of building dams on intermittent streams and pasturing 
livestock on the surrounding natural forage. In the natural 
state, water for livestock is so scarce in this area during the 
dry summer season that relatively few stock can be kept on the 
range. By storing water during the winter and spring, it is made 
available throughout the year. Many reservoirs have been built 
within this area, some quite small and called "stock ponds", 
others somewhat larger, and some covering hundreds of acres. 

Several such reservoirs have been built on the private 
lands within the area In addition to those on the National Forest 
Itself, Some of the better reservoir sites and lands around them 
have been privately owned for many years. Some of these "island" 
areas are the headquarters of large ranch operations. 

-95- 



within the Modoc National Forest most of the Devil's 
Garden District and much of the Double Head District to the west 
are similar and are administered mainly for range purposes. 
These districts are divided into a number of "allotments" which 
are leased to one or more ranchers called "permittees". A permit 
is issued annually, on a bid basis, for the use of each "allot- 
ment". The permits specify the kind and number of stock, the 
payment per head, period of use, etc. Maintenance of the water 
developments within the allotments is the responsibility of the 
respective permittees. A list of the allotments on the National 
Forest land is given in Table B-1 with certain data about each. 
Plate 3 shows the areas covered by the various allotments. 

In addition to providing stockwater during the dry 
season, many of these reservoirs, especially the larger ones, 
also serve to increase the available forage. Within the reser- 
voir areas, in and near the edge of the water, a lush growth of 
native water-suited plants is often produced. These plants, 
though not the best of pasture, do appreciably augment the natural 
forage in this region. As the warm dry season progresses, the 
water recedes, and the belt of water plants moves down with it. 
The reservoirs in this area are mostly shallow due to the flat 
terrain and, over a season, several hundred acres may be so 
affected. This type of pasture is included in the term "induced 
high water table native pasture" in Table 6, "Irrigated Lands, 
1959". Some 7,500 acres of this type of pasture are located in 
the Boles and Clear Lake Subunlts. 



■96- 



TABLE B-1 



RANG 


E ALLGTMa^TS 


IN MODOC NATIONAL FOREST 
(1959) 




: Location 
: (center) 


1 Stock pastured 


Permittees 


Allotment 


:Town- 
:ship 


; Range 


: Cattle 
:and horses 


: Sheep 
•and goats 




Bam Top 


TU7N 


R3E 




1,250 


D. O'Keefe 


Beaver Dam 


TU8N 


RllE 




3,000 


LaFranchi 


Big Sage 


TIM 


RIOE 


831 







Blue Motintain 


Tli7N 


RIOE 


500 




Bidart Brothers 


Boles 


TU6N 


R9E 


1,100 







Boles Spring 


TU5N 


R8E 




1,000 


R. Anchordoguy 


Brown's Well 


TiiitN 


R8e 




1,000 


R, Anchordoguy 


Casuse 


TU5N 


R$E 




1,100 


D. O'Keefe 


Clear Lake 


TU7N 


R7E 


Uoo 




Stanley Johnson 


Coyote Butte 


TU6N 


R6E 




1,100 


D. O'Keefe 


Creiims Lake 


TU6N 


R3E 




1,250 


J. Singleton 


Deep Lake 


TU6N 


R3E 




1,250 


D. O'Keefe 


Double Head 


TU5N 


R7E 




1,250 


O'Connor Livestock Co. 


Dry Creek 


TI48N 


R12E 


150 




Point Ranch 


Dry Lake 


TUI4N 


R6E 


300 




W. C. Dalton 


East Grizzlie 


TU7N 


R12E 


Uoo 







Fleener 


tU6n 


R3E 




300 


P. Lynch 


Glass Mountain 


TUi^N 


r5e 




1,150 


O'Connor Livestock Co. 


Hackanore 


TU3N 


R7E 




1,000 


S. Beeson 


Happy Camp 


TU2N 


R8e 


72U 







Homestead 


TU5N 


R7E 




1,250 


O'Connor Livestock Co. 


Howard's Gulch* 


TU3N 


R9E 


U66 




— 



-97- 



TABLE B-1 (Cont'd.) 





: Location 
: (center) 


i Stock pastTjred 


Permittees 


Allotment 


iTown- 
:ship 


: 
•.Range 


: Cattle 
:and horses 


: Sheep 
:and goats 


: 


Lava Beds 


TU6N 


R5E 




1,250 


O'Connor Livestock Cc 


Lost River 


TU8N 


R8e 


350 




Stanley Johnson 


Mammoth Springs 


TU7N 


R8E 




1,000 


J, Singleton 


Mount Dome 


TU$N 


R3E 


100 




R. C. Laird 


Mowitz 


TUiiN 


R8E 




900 


R. Anchordoguy 


Mud Lake* 


TU3N 


R6E 


220 




N. Quigley 


Nigger Bend 


TU6N 


R8E 




1,000 


O'Connor Livestock C< 


North Springs 


TU3N 


R8E 




1,000 


J. Espil 


Pine Springs 


TU5N 


R12E 


500 




Jessup 


Pinnacle Lake 


TI45N 


R8E 




900 


O'Connor Livestock C( 


Potter's Pasture 


TUliN 


R7E 


500 




B. Stevens 


Quaking Aspen* 


TU3N 


R5E 




1,250 


O'Connor Livestock C< 


Rimrock 


Th^N 


R7E 




1,000 


O'Connor Livestock C< 


Sardine Flat 


TU7N 


R3E 




1,250 


O'Connor Livestock C< 


Surveyor's Valley- 


TU5N 


R9E 


300 




A. Pillissa 


Timber Mountain 


TUiN 


R6E 




1,000 


O'Connor Livestock C( 


Timbered Mountain 


TU6N 


RIIF, 


1,135 




G. B. Dorris 


Tucker 


TU6N 


R6E 


715 




W. C. Dalton 


Warm Springs 


TU8N 


R9E 


200 




Neva Grohs and Sons 


West Grizzlie 


TU7N 


R12E 


220 




J. Rice 


Whitney Butte 


TU5N 


R3E 




1,250 


P. Lynch 



* Partially outside Lost River-Butte Valley Hydrographic Unit. 



Biolleti 



9h- 

9k- 

9k- 

9k 

9k 

9k- 

9k- 

9k- 

9k- 

9k- 

9k- 

9k 

9k 

9k- 

9k- 

9k- 

9k- 

9k- 



Bulleti: 



70 

71 
101 
102 
103 

2U-50 

121 
122 




3 CENTRSL COASTAL 

COASTAL 
5 CENTRAL VALLEY 

A SACRAMENTO RIVER BASIN 
B SAN JOAQUIN RIVER BASIN 
C TULARE LAKE BASIN 
6N NORTH LAHONTAN 
LAHONTAN 

7 COLORADO DESERT 

8 SANTA ANA 

9 SAN DIEGO 



LAND AND WATER USE 
LOST RIVER-BUTTE VALLEY HYOROGRAPHIC UNIT 



AREA OF INVESTIGATION 
1965 



25 Sheets PL0TE2 













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DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 

LAND AND WATER USE 

LOST RIVER BUTTE VALLEY 

HYDROGRAPHIC UNIT 

LAND AND WATER USE 
CLASSIFICATION OF RECREATIONAL LANDS 

T 48 N, R 3 W-IE, MOBSM 

1959 



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LOST RIVER BUTTE VALLEY 

HYDROGRAPHIC UNIT 

LAND AND WATER USE 




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LAND AND WATER USE 

LOST RIVER BUTTE VALLEY 

HYOROGRAPHIC UNIT 

LAND AND WATER USE 

CLASSIFICATION OF RECREATIONAL LANDS 






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LOST RIVER BUTTE VALLEY 

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LAND AND WATER USE 

LOST RIVER BUTTE VALLEY 

HYDROGRAPHIC UNIT 

LAND AND WATER USE 

CLASSIFICATION OF RECREATIONAL LANDS 

1959 




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LAND AND WATER USE 

LOST RIVER BUTTE VALLEY 

HYDROGRAPHIC UNIT 

LAND AND WATER USE 
CLASSIFICATION OF RECREATIONAL LANDS 

T 46 N, R3 W-IE, MOBSM 
1959 










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DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 

LAND AND WATER USE 

LOST RIVER BUTTE VALLEY 

HYDROGRAPHIC UNIT 

LAND AND WATER USE 
CLASSIFICATION OF RECREATIONAL LANDS 

T 46 N, R2-4E. MDBSM 

1959 



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LOST RIVER BUTTE VALLEY 

HYDROGRAPHIC UNIT 

LAND AND WATER USE 
CLASSIFICATION OF RECREATIONAL LANDS 




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LAND AND WATER USE 

LOST RIVER BUTTE VALLEY 

HYDROGHAPHIC UNIT 

LAND AND WATER USE 



CLASSIFICATION OF RECREATIONAL LANDS 

T46N, R9-I2E. MOSSM 
1959 




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LAND AND WATER USE 

LOST RIVER BUTTE VALLEY 

HYOROGRAPHIC UNIT 

LAND AND WATER USE 

AND 

CLASSIFICATION OF RECREATIONAL LANDS 
1959 



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LOST RIVER BUTTE VALLEY 

HYDROGRAPHIC UNIT 

LAND AND WATER USE 
CLASSIFICATION OF RECREATIONAL LANDS 

T 45 N. R5-8E. MDBaM 
1959 



Sheel 16 o< 25 Sheets PLATE Z 










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DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 

NORTHERN BRANCH 

LAND AND WATER USE 

LOST RIVER BUTTE VALLEY 

HYDROGRAPHIC UNIT 

LAND AND WATER USE 
CLASSIFICATION OF RECREATIONAL LANDS 

T 45 N. R 9-12 E, MDBSM 

1959 





INDEX TO SHEETS 



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DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 
NORTHERN BRANCH 

LAND AND WATER USE 

LOST RIVER BUTTE VALLEY 

HYDROGRAPHIC UNIT 

LAND AND WATER USE 
CLASSIFICATION OF RECREATIONAL LANDS 

T 44 N. R3W-IE, MDBaM 

1959 




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THE RESOURCES AGENCY OF C«LIF0HN1« 
DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 

LAND AND WATER USE 

LOST RIVER BUTTE VALLEY 

HYDROGRAPHIC UNIT 

LAND AND WATER USE 

AND 

CLASSIFICATION OF RECREATIONAL LANDS 

T 44 N, R2-4E, MDBSM 

1959 



Sheet 19 of 25 Sheets PLATE 













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THE RESOURCES AGENCY OF CALIFORNIA 
DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 

NORTHERN BRANCH 

LAND AND WATER USE 

LOST RIVER BUTTE VALLEY 

HYDROGRAPHIC UNIT 

LAND AND WATER USE 
CLASSIFICATION OF RECREATIONAL LANDS 

T 44 N, R5-7E, MDBSM 

1959 



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LOST RIVER BUTTE VALLEY 

HYDROGRAPHIC UNIT 

LAND AND WATER USE 

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CLASSIFICATION OF RECREATIONAL LANDS 

T 44 N, R8-I0E, MOBaM 
1959 





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NORTHEHtJ BRANCH 

LAND AND WATER USE 

LOST RIVER BUTTE VALLEY 

HYDROGRAPHIC UNIT 

LAND AND WATER USE 

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CLASSIFICATION OF RECREATIONAL LANDS 




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LAND AND WATER USE 

LOST RIVER BUTTE VALLEY 

HYDROGRAPHIC UNIT 

LAND AND^ATER USE 

AND 

CLASSIFICATION OF RECREATIONAL LANDS 

T 43 N, R2-4E, MDBBM 

1959 




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LOST RIVER BUTTE VALLEY 

HYDROGRAPHIC UNIT 

LAND AND WATER USE 

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CLASSIFICATION OF RECREATIONAL LANDS 



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CLASSIFICATION OF RECREATIONAL I 



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LOST RIVER-eUTTE VALLEY 

HYOROGRAPHIC UNIT 

WATER "^FRVITF AREAS 


























1959 


1 




INDEX TO SHEETS 




STREAM GAGING STATION 
HYDROGflAPHIC UNIT 
SUBUNIT BOUNDARY 



LEGEND 

^^^^1 LANDS RECEIVING fULL IRRIGATION 
I ■ ■ I LANDS RECEIVING PARTIAL IRRIGATION 

LANDS USUALLY IRRIGATED BUT IDLE OR FALLOW IN 1959 

LANDS IRRIGATED BY GROUND WATER 
nriTTTj LANDS IRRIGATED BY SURFACE AND GROUND WATER 

MEADOWLANDS 

UARSM LANDS 

DRY-FARMED LANDS 

URBAN LANDS 

nr:0EAT10NAL LANDS 



iiiii! 



RECREATIONAL LANDS 



[RING SYSTEM 



ED BY 
SUBDIVISION OF 
2W-22GI 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA 

THE RESOURCES AGENCY OF CALIFORNIA 

DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 

NORTHERN BRANCH 

LAND AND WATER USE 

LOST RIVER BUTTE VALLEY 

HYDROGRAPHIC UNIT 

LAND AND WATER USE 

AND 

CLASSIFICATION OF RECREATIONAL LANDS 

T 48 N, R 3 W-IE, MOBSM 

1959 



THIS BOOK IS DUE ON THE LAST DATE 
STAMPED BELOW 



RENEWED BOOKS ARE SUBJECT TO IMMEDIATE 
RECALL 



jCD LIbKARr 
'^UFSEP 2 9 )971 

MAY 3 ROTO 
MAY 3 ROrO 



LIBRARY, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS 

Book Slip-70m-9.'65(F7151s4)458 



N2 421084 




California. Dept, 
of Water Resources. 
Bulletin. 


TC82U 
C2 
A2 
no,9ii:9 


PHYSICAL 


^ 


sctaicts 




LIBRAITY 




LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 

DAMS