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Full text of "The Loyolan"

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COPYRIGHT 1926, BY 

ALOYSIUSJOHN BREMNER 

THOMAS JOSEPH BYRNE 

ICCJ<^aj|cirj«.ra3IICCS<-;^ICCJ«a3| 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

CARL!: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/loyolan1926unse 




WT"^ 



THE STAFF 

Aloysius J. Bremner, £ditor-hi-Chief 

■Thomas J. Byrne, Managing Editor 

James T. Barrett, Editor of Photography 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Harold A. Hillenbrand, Athletks 

Willis Carpenter, Organizations 

James C. O'Connor, Literary 

Marion G. Bremner, Society 

Paul A. Reed, Art 
William P. Schoen, Humor 
Morgan T. Healy, Secretarial 



DEPARTMENTAL EDITORS 
Arthur J. McDonough, Arts and Sciences 

Robert E. Lee, Medicine 

William J. Campbell, Law and Sociology 

John C. Bergmann, Dentistry 

William Sweetman, Commerce 

Morton Zabel, Facultv Moderator 




Patrick J. Mahan, S.J. 



DEDICATION 

To Reverend Patrick J. Mahan, S.J., Regent 
of the Loyola University School of Medicine, 
who having been appointed to a reorganization 
task of uncommon difficulty, has with quite un- 
common energy and skill during the brief period 
of nine years huilded a medical teaching organiza- 
tion which severely judged by the quality of the 
student product graduating from its tutelage and 
by the productive scholarship of its teaching 
members has won for itself first an unwilling 
recognition and finally an enthusiastic acceptance 
among the best of the medical world, this vol- 
ume of The Loyolan is dedicated by the Editors. 



ORDER OF BOOKS 

Book i Introductory 

Book ii Campus 

Book hi Administration 

Book iv University 

Graduates 

Arts and Sciences 

Mt'dlL-iHC 

Law 

Commerce 

Dentistry 

Book v Fraternities 

Social 

Professional 
Sororities 
Honor 

Book vi Activities 

Campus 

Publications 

Society 

Book vii Athletics 

Administration 

Football 

Basl{etball 

Book viii Humor 




FOREWORD 



The efforts and labors of another year have 
matcriali:ed in this third volume of the Loyolan. 
In this, we trust, are fittingly ehronieled the 
events of another page of Loyola's history. And 
if, in the years to eome, this book can recall 
happy memories of our Alm.i M,iter we shall 
consider our labors well spent. In the light of 
our work, to the editors of those preceding 
Loyolans we accord our sincere admiration and 
respect for the fortitude that had to be theirs in 
biasing the way. To the editors of future Loyol- 
ans we hope this work will prove an incentive 
toward the furthering and improvement of the 
splendid purpose underlying the Loyolan. • 



LoYOLA^s Victory Song 



Cheer for old Loyola, 

Fight for victory, 
Spread her fame 
And her fair name 

With constant loyalty. 
U! Rah! Rah! 

Cheer for Alma Mater, 
Laud her sons so true. 
Onward to victory, 
Loyola U. 

Alma Mater, U! Rah, rah, rah! 

U! Rah! Rah! 
Alma Mater, U! Rah, rah, rah! 

U! Rah! Rah! 
Hit 'em high, hit 'em low, 

Go, Loyola, Go! 





The Keystone 



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Acrosi the Caiiiptis 




The WalLs and Ways of Learning 



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To the Honor of tlic Game 



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ADMINISTRATION 

The President 

University Trustees 

Auxiliary Trustees 

The Deans and Faculties: 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

Medicine 

Law 

Commerce 

Dentistry 



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[Page 17] 




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William H. Agnew. S.J. 

President 
Loyola University 



[Page 18] 




THE PRESIDENT'S GREETINGS 

To the Editors of this issue of The 
Loyolan I am exceedingly grateful 
for the opportunity its publication af' 
fords of perpetuating a graphic sum' 
mary of the salient events of the 
most prosperous year the University 
has ever enjoyed. May its perusal 
serve, as without any doubt the per' 
usal of its predecessors served, to 
germinate new ideas which shall be 
the inspiration for achievements still 
nobler and more numerous. 

William H. Agnew, S.J. 




[Page 19] 



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[William H. Agnew, S.J., President} 

Board of Trustees 

OFFICERS 

William H. Agnew, S.J President 

Joseph Reiner, S.J Vice-President 

Francis J. Meyers, S.J Treasurer 

Frederic Siedenburg, S.J Secretary 

P.atrick J. Mahan, S.J. 






Fr. Reiner, S.J. 



Fr. Mahan, S.J. Fr. Siedenburg, S.J. 



[Page 20} 



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"TS-T/. C:;s: — - — fT' 



Auxiliary Board of Trustees 



David F. Bremner ■>^_. 

Charles T. Byrne 

Edward T. Cudahy §^'-% 

T7 T T &\ 

t. J. Lewis WM 

Eugene McVoy Ijj^ 

S. J. MORAND [^C^))\ 

Joseph Rand pU<!;| 

Otto J. Schmidt \^>^i.i 

William H. Sexton 'T"'''- 

John A. Shannon '{;'^l 

Thomas H. Smyth K'^'m 

Ih. 'J I 
C. G. Steger 



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[Page 21] 



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Joseph Reiner, S.J., Dean 

The College of Arts and Sciences 



[Page 22] 




The College of Arts and Sciences 



FACULTY 

William H. At;ncw, S.J., President 
Jciscph Reiner, S.J., Dean 



Terence H. Ahearn, S.J. 

S. A. Atkinson, Ph.D. 

Emile Audet, A.M. 

Roy W. Bi.vlev. A.M. 

Ernst R. Breslich, A.M. 

Dennis F. Burns, S.J. . 

Edward J. Calhoun, S.J. 

Mabel Daly, B.Mus. 

Guilio S. Dina, Ph.D. 

Henry Purmont Fames, LL.B., Mus.Doc. 

Howard Fgan, A.M. 

Hugh F. Field, Ph.D. 

Florence Foster, Ph.D. 

Philip W. Froebes, S.J. 

Roger Kiley, LL.B. 

Julius V. Kuhinka, A.M. 

Donald Lenihan, B.S. 

John V. McCormick, A.B., J.D. 

James J. Mertz, S.J. 

Paul Muehlman, S.J. 

Claude J. Pernin, S.J. 

Mary A. Riley, A.M. 



Francis Rivera, A.M. 
Francis J. Rooney, A.M., LL.B. 
Miriam L. Rooney, Ph.D. 
Graciano Salvadur, A.B. 
W. C. Sawyer, A.M. 
George M. Schmemt;, A.M. 
Austin G. Schmidt, S.J. 
Marie Sheahan, Ph.B. 
Joseph Scott, S.J. 
Frederic Siedenburg, S.J. 
Sherman Steele, Litt.B., LL.B. 
Bertram J. Stcggert, A.M. 
Peter T. Swanish. MBA. 
Joseph M. Synnerdahl, M.A. 
Agnes Van Dnel, A.M. 
Claude A. William.s, A.M. 
Samuel K. Wilson, S.J. 
Morton H. Zabel, A.M. 
James F. Walsh, S.J. 
Leonard Sachs 
M, Lillian Ryan, Librarian 



[Page 23] 



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Frederic Siedenburg, S.J., Dean 

The School of Sociology 
Regent, The School of Law 






[Page 24] 



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The School of Sociology 



Frederic 
Will D. Andersen, A.B. 
Terence H. Ahearn, S.J. 
S. A. Atkinson, Ph.D. 
Emile Audet, A.M. 
Remy J. Belleperche, S.J. 
Ernst R. Breslich, A.M. 
Francis Bungart, S.J. 
Edward J. Calhoun, S.J. 
Walter G. Cornell, S.J. 
Paul M. Cook, A.B. 
Mabel Daly, B.Mus. 
Joseph I. Donohue, S.J. 
Hugh F. Field, Ph.D. 
Gerald A. Fitzgibbons, S.J. 
Philip W. Froebes, S.J. 



FACULTY 

Siedenburg, S.J., Dean 

M. Donald Linehan. B.S. 
Daniel A. Lord, S.J. 
Jane McCutcheon, A.M. 
Edith McLaughlin 
James J. Mert;, S.J. 
Paul Muehlmann, S.J. 
James J. O'Regan, S.J. 
Claude J. Pernin, S.J. 
Mary A. Riley, A.M. 
Miriam L. Rooney, Ph.D. 
Joseph Roubik, S.J. 
Norbert L. Russell, LL.B. 
Graciano Salvador, A.B. 
George M. Schmeing, A.M. 
Joseph B. Shine, A.M. 



Helen M. Ganey, A.M. 


Austin G. Schmidt, S.J. 


Lois Sue Gordon 


Catherine Starbeck, A.B. 


William A. Corey, B.S.T. 


Agnes Van Driel, A.M. 


Mane A. Halhnan, A.M. 


James F. Walsh, S.J. 


J. Vincent Kelly, S.J. 


Morton Zabel, M.A. 






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[Page 25} 



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Louis D. Moorhead, M.D.. Dean 

The School of Medicme 



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[Page 26] 



The School of Medicine 

FACULTY 

Patrick J. Mahan, S.J., Regent 

Louis D. Moorhcad, A.M., MS, M.D., Dea7t 



Ulysses Joshua Grim, M.D., F.A.C.S. 
Henry Schmits, 

M.D., LL.B,, F.A.C.R., F.A.C.S. 
Bertha Van Hoosen, M.D., A.M. 
George W. Mahoney, M.D., F.A.C.S. 
Samuel A. Mathews, M.D. 
Charles Louis Mix, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 
Edward Louis Moorhead, 

A.M., M.D., LL.D. 
Lloyd Arnold, A.M., M.D. 
Bcniamin Barker Beeson, M.D. 

Benjamin E. Elliott 
Frederick Mueller, M.D. 
Benjamin H. Orndorff, 

M.D., Ph.G., F.A.C.P., A.M. 
Robert A. Black, M.D., F.A.C.P. 
Reuben Myron Strong, A.M., Ph.D. 
William C. Austin, A.M., Ph.D. 
William E. Morgan, M.D., LL.D. 
George de Tarnowski, M.D., F.A.C.S. 
Isadore M. Trace, M.D. 
Richard J. Tivnen, M.D. 
Charles P. Caldv/ell, M.D. 
Frank E. Pierce, M.D., F.A.C.S. 
Thesle T. Job, M.S., Ph.D. 
A. Cosmas Garvy, M.D. 
Arthur C. Kleutgen, M.D. 
Louis David Moorhead 

M.S., A.M., M.D., F.A.C.S. 
William J. Swift, M.D., F.A.C.S. 
Thomas P. Foley, M.D. 

Fred M. Drennan 



PhiHp H. Kreuscher, M.D. 
Charles F. Sawyer, M.D. 
John Ferdinand Golden, M.D. 
Milton Mandel, M.D. 
Stephen Roman Pietrowic;, M.D. 
J. William Davis, M.D, 
Samuel Salinger, M.D. 
Jacob Carl Krafft, M.D., F.A.C.P. 
George T. Jordan, M.D. 
John M. Lilly, M.D. 
Walter G. McGuire, M.B., L.R.O.P.S. 
M.D. 
Irving H. Eddy, M.D. 
PaufE. Grabow, M.D. 
Michael McGuire, M.B., B.Ch., B.A.O. 
Robert Emmett Flannery, 

M.D., F.A.C.S. 
Theodore E. Boyd, Ph.D. 
Thomas E. Meany, M.D. 
Robert S. Berghoff, M.D. 
Louis G. Hoffman, M.D. 
Italo F. Volini, M.D. 
Francis J. Gerty, M.D. 
Thomas F. Finegan, M.D. 
Emil Weiss, M.D. 
Robert M. Hill, M.S., Ph.D. 
Eric K. Bartholmevv, M.D. 
lohn I. Killeen, M.D. 
Michael C. Mullen. M.D. 
John Edward Kellcy, M.D. 
Harrv I. Dooley, M.D. 
M.S., M.D. 



John Anthony Suldane, M.D. 
William A. McGmre, A.M., M.D. 
Daniel F. Hayes, M.D. 
Edward F. Dombrowski, M.D. 



ASSOCIATES 

Maurice C. 0"Hern, M.D. 
H. William Elghammer, M.D. 
William J. Corcoran, M.S., M.D. 
Thomas ]. Sullivan, Jr., M.D. 



Ascher H. C. Goldfane, M.D. 




[Page 27] 



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John V. McCormick, A.B., J.D., Dean 

The School of Law 



[Page 28] 



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The School of La^v 

FACULTY 

Reverend Frederic Siedenburg, S.J., A.B., AM Regent, Prof, of Pure Juris. 

John V. McCormick, A.B., J.D Acting Dean and Secretary, Professor oi Law 



Francis J. Rooney, A.M., LL.B., 

Registrar, Prof, of Law 

Sherman Steele, Litt.B., LL.B., 

Professor of Law 

Arnold D. McMahon, A.M., LL.D., 
LL.B Professor of Law 

Dr. William C. Woodward, 

M.D., LL.M Professor of Law 

Joseph F. Elw.wd, A.B., LL.B., 

Professor of Law 

Payton J. TuoHY, A.M., LL.B., 

Professor of Law 

James F. Walsh, S.J., 

A.M Professor of Law 

Lawrence W. Spuller, 

A.B., J.D.,LL.M Prof, of Law 

Balys F. Mastauskas, LL.B., 

Professor of Law 

James J. Gaughan, A.M., LL.B., 

Assistant Professor of Law 

Joseph A. Graber, A.M., LL.B., 

Assistant Professor of Law 

Urban A. Lavery, A.B., J.D., 

Assistant Professor of Law 



Leo L. Donahoe, A.B., LL.B., 

Assistd?Tt Professor of Law 

Clement D. Cody, Ph.B., J.D., 

Instructor 

Fred A. G.ariepy, A.B., LL.B., 

Instructor 

William P. Fortune, A.B., LL.B., 

Instructor 

Stephen Love, LL.B histructor 

Vincent O'Brien, LL.B Instructor 

Hayes Kennedy, Ph.B., J. D.-I?istriictor 

Cornelius Palmer, A.B., LL.B., 

Instructor 

Walter W. L. Meyer, LL.B. .Lecturer 

Cassius a. Scranton, LL.B. .Lecturer 

William C. Sherwat, LL.B. .Lecturer 

Irving Wesley Baker, A.B., LL.B., 

Lecturer 

Francis W. McGuire, LL.B., 

Assistant Registrar 

Jeannette M. Smith, 

Assistant Registrar 

John R. Ryan Librarian 






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[Page 29] 



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Thomas J. Reedy, A.M., LL.B., C.P.A., Dean 

The School of Coynmi^rcc 



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[Page 30] 




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The School of Commerce 

FACULTY 

William H. Ac;new, S.J., President of the University 
Thomas J. Reedy, A.M., LL.B., C.P.A., Dean 

Peter T. Sw.mish, M.B.A. 

J. Richard Montgomery, B.C.S., C.P.A. 

Daniel J. Kelly, C.P.A. 

Carl W. Lut;, B.S., C.P.A. 

Casimer Pakstas, Ph.D. 

Agnes Van Driel, A.M. 

John Pierre Roche, A.B. 

John V. McCormick, A.B., J.D. 

Payton J. Tuohy, A.M., LL.B. 

Francis J. Rooney, A.M., LL.B. 

Sherman Steele, Litt.C, LL.B. 

Agnes B. Clohesy, Ph.D., LL.B. 

Paul Muehlmann, S.J. 

Walter Shea, A.M. 

Julius V. Kuhinka, A.M. 

Morton H. Zabel, A.M. 

Hugh F. Field, A.M., Ph.D. 

Gratiano Salvador, A.B. 

Benedict P. KiUacky, A.M. 



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William H. G. Logan, D.D.S., Dean 

The College of Dental Surgery 



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[Page 32] 



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The School of Dentistry 

(CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY) 
FACULTY 

Truman W. Brophy, M.D., D.D.S., Sc.D., L.L.D., F.A.C.S., F.A.C.D., O.I. 

William H. G. Locan, M.D., D.D.S., F.A.C.S., F.A.C.D. 

Charles N. Johnson, M.A., L D.S., D.D.S., M.D.S., F.A.C.D., LL.D. 



John P. Buckley, 

Ph.G., D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 
Finis E. Roach, D.D.S., F.A.C.D 
Phny G. Puterbauijh, 

M.D., D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 
Robert E. MacBoyle, D.D.S. 
Thomas L. Grisamore, 

Ph.G., D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 
Rupert E. Hall, D.D.S. 
John L. Kendall, B.S., Ph.G., M.D 
William D. Zoethout, Ph.D. 



PROFESSORS 

Emanuel B. Fmk, Ph.D., M.D. 
Thestle T. Job, A.B., M.S., Ph.D. 
Earle H. Thomas, M.D., D.D.S., LL.B. 
Juhus V. Kuhmka, Ph.B., A.M. 
Karl A. Meyer, M.D. 
John R. Watt, D.D.S. 
David N. Lewis, D.D.S. 
William I McNeil, D.D.S. 
Augustus H. Mueller, D.D.S. 
Lewis A. Platts, M.S., D.D.S. 
B. Adelbcrt Morns, D.D.S. 



Clyde S. Suddarth, B.S., D.D.S., M.D. Clarence Beldint:, D.D.S. 



A. Brom Allen, D.D.S. 
Irwin G. Jirka, D.D.S. 
Lester N. Roubert, D.D.S. 
George M. Watson, D.D.S. 



INSTRUCTORS 

Elbert C. Penleton, D.D.S. 

Myron J. Umbach; B.S., D.D.S. 

Samuel R. Kleiman. D.D.S. 

Charles M. Rile, D.D.S. 
Gail Martin Hambleton. B.S., D.D.S. Clarence J. Soper, D.D.S. 
William A. Gilruth, D.D.S. ErroU W. Rawson, B.S. 

Frederick Z. Radell, D.D.S. Joseph Meyer, A.B., M.D. 

Ralph H. Fouser, D.D.S. Elmer F. Grabow 

Lozier D. Warner, B.A. 



[Page ??} 



The Interdepartmental Committee 

JOSEPH S. REINER, S.J., Chairman 



ARTS AND SCIENCES 
Thomas J. Stamm Marshall McMahon 



James T. Barrett 



Daniel Donahue 



COMMERCE 

Thomas Reedy J. Clunen 

J. A. Neary 



DENTISTRY 



Robert W. McNulty 
G. M. Powell 



E. J. Norton 

C. LiSOWSKI 



LAW 

L. F. Carmody T. F. Wilhelmi 

W. J. Campbell A. M. Galvin 

J. J. Hartnett 

MEDICINE 

Lloyd Bell W. S. Conway 

W. G. Fitzoerald W. J. Hagstrom 

F. S. Walsh 



SOCIOLOGY 



E. M. Kelly 



S. D. Roche 



[Page ?4j 



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GRADUATES 



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Fernando I. Aquila 
B.S. in Med. 
Entered from Manila High 
School and Far Eastern College. 
Attended De Paul University, 
Lewis Institute, and the University 
of Wisconsin. Home town, 
Cuyapo, N. E., Philippine Islands. 



AvELiNo Enriques Ablaza 
M.D. 
Entered from the University of 
Michagan. Will interne at St. 
Fr.uicis Hospital, Blue Island, Il- 
linois. Home town, Manila, Phil- 
ippine Islands. 



William E. Anderson 
LL.M., LL.B. 
Entered from Webster College 
of Law and Crane Technical High 
School. Home town, Chicago. 



Ei)W.-\RD Leon.ard Arensdorf 
B.S. in Med. 
O.X. 
Entered from Columbia College 
Academy and Columbia College. 



Orrie HuiiH Ball 
B.S., M.D. 

(f.B n 

Entered from the Illinois Wes- 
Icyan University. Will interne at 
lK)me town m Dennis, Kansas. 



[Page 36} 




J^%^. 



William Andrew Barr 
B.S. in Med. 
Entered from St. Bonavcnture's 
High School and St. Bonaventure's 
College. 




James Thomas Barrett 
A.B. 

n.A.A., 15 W. Bhie VCey 
Entered from Loyola Academy. 
Class President '26; Secretary- 
Treasurer "25; Sodality '23, "24, 
'2T, '26; 2nd Assistant "26; Sec- 
retary '2'); Junior Prom "25; Cos- 
tume Chairman, Pageant of Peace; 
Photography Committee of "Loyo- 
lan"' "2i; Photography Editor "26; 
Student Council "26; Chairman, 
Senior Ball Committee "26. 

Lawrence Anthony Barrett 
LL.B. 
Entered from Campion High 
School. President of Rebels Club; 
Sergeant-at-Arms of Camera Club; 
track team "2 5; Interdepartmental 
baseball "2.^, "24, "2^, "26; Junior 
Prom "2 5. 

Howard Jerome Barry 
B.S. 
Entered from St. Ignatius High 
School, and Marquette University. 
Sodality "2 5, "26. Commencement 
Committee. 

Lloyd Lester Bell 
M.D. 

<i).B.n. 

Entered from the University of 
Illinois and Illinois Wesleyan Uni 
versity. Class representative "26 
Member of Tivnen Opthalmologi 
Society; secretary '25, "26 
Will interne at Mercy Hospital 
Chicago, Illinois. Home town 
Easton, Illinois. 




[Page 37] 










Lawrence Benjamin 
B.S. in Med. 
Entered from the University of 
Illinois, Valparaiso University and 
the University of Chicago. 

Edwin Jo.seph Berwick 
Ph.B. 

n.A.A., Blue Key 

Entered from Loyola Academy. 
Class President "23; Football "23, 
"25, "26; Athletic Manager "24; 
Swimming "24; Monogram Club 
"24, "2\^"26; Booster Club "25, 
"26; Glee Club "24, "25; Sodality 
"25, "26; N.C.B.B. Tournament, 
"25, "26; music and lighting com- 
mittee, Pageant of Youth. 

Herman Joseph Bittle 
LL.B. 

A.0.$. 
Member of Thirteen Club. 
Home town, Milwaukee, Wiscon- 
sin. 

John Earl Bl.ack 
B.S., M.D. 

<1).X. 

Entered from St. Ignatius Col- 
lege. Member of the Tivnen Op- 
thalmological Society. Will in- 
terne at St. Bernard's Hospital, 
Chicago, Illinois. Home town, 
Centralia, Illinois. 

Harvey C(1nrad Bodmer 
B.S. m Med. 
$.X. 
Entered from Gibbons Hall 
High School and Western State 
Normal. Home town, Kalamaroo, 
Michigan. 






[Page 38] 




Ethel Terhsa Boneihlu 
Ph.B. 
Attended St. J a m e s Hitjh 
School. Graduate of the Ameri- 
can College of Physical Education 
and the Chicago Normal College. 
Member of the Inter-departmental 
Society of the School of Sociology. 

Paul Joseph Borowinski 
B.S., M.D. 
Entered from Notre Dame Uni- 
versity and Lewis Institute. Home 
town, Chicago, Illinois. 

Patrick Boyle 
A.B. 
Entered from St. Ig!iatius High 
School. Class Vice-President, '2.^, 
'24; Sodality, "2?, '24, "2\ '26; 
Prefect '26; Debating Society, '2J, 
'24, '2'i, '26; President '26; Boost- 
ers Club; Junior Prom Committee: 
Lighting Committee, Pageant of 
Youth, Pageant of Peace. Com- 
mencement Committee '26. 

Aloysius Ji.iHN Bremner 
A.B. 
n.A.A., B.n., Blue Key 

Entered from De Paul Acad- 
emy. Debating Society, '23, '24; 
Sodality, '23, '24, '25, '26; Boost- 
ers Club, '2i, '26; 'Vice President 
'26; Photography Editor of "Loy- 
olan," '2i; Editor-in-Chief '26; 
N.C.B.B. Tourney; Seating Com- 
mittee, Pageant of Peace; Senior 
Jewelry Committee. 

Marion Gr.\ch Bremner 
LL.B. 

K.B.n. 

Entered from Sacred Heart 
Academy. Class Secretary and 
Treasurer, '23, '25; Social Editor 
of "Loyolan," '25, '26. 





[Page 39} 



^<% 



ii 



i 



ws 



'"I 
m 




k4 



John Douglas Brennan 
LL.B. 

A.G.<D. 
Entered from St. Mel's High 
School. Member of Thirteen 
Club. 



Brennecke 



Clement H. 
LL.B. 

Entered from Watertown High 
School, Watertown, Wisconsin. 

Erma Estal Britton 
M.D. 

N.:s.o. 

Entered from the University of 
Illinois and the University of Cin- 
cinnati. Class Secretary, '24, '2"), 
'26; member of Lambda Rho Hon- 
orary Radiological Fraternity; 
member of Tivnen Opthalmologi- 
cal Society; treasurer, '2 5, '26; 
Research in Bacteriology at Loyola, 
'2?, '24. Home town, Gibson 
City, Illinois. 

William Joseph Butt 
M.D." 
Entered from the University of 
Cincinnati. Research work on 
Anaenica at University of Cin- 
cinnati, '22. Will interne at the 
LIniversity Hospital, Chicago, I!- 
Hnois. Home town, Chicago, Illi- 
nois. 

Frank D. Byrne 

LL.M., LL.B. 
Entered from Chicago Law 
School and Lowell High School. 
Home town, Lowell, Mass. 



i 



m 



[Page 40} 



Joseph Bushe Byrnes 
A.B. 

n.A.A., B.n, 

Entered from St. Ignatius High 
School. SodaHty, '23, '24, '25; 
Booster Club '25; Sock and Bus- 
kin Club, '23; Editor-in-Chief of 
the "Loyola Quarterly," '24, '2T; 
Feature Editor of the "Loyolan", 
'25; Senior Privilege Committee; 
Commencement Committee. 

Frederick Di.az C.aldier.a 
B.S., M.D. 

(p.B.n. 
Entered from St. Marys Col- 
lege and Lewis Institute. Mem- 
ber of Lambda Rho Honorary 
Radiological Fraternity. Will in- 
terne at Maria Beard Deaconess 
Hospital, Spokane, Washington. 
Home town, Trinidad, British 
West Indies. 

William Joseph Campbell 
LL.B. 

A.e.<i)., B.n. 

Entered from St. Rita College. 
President Law Student Council 
'26; Claes President, '26; Secre- 
tary, '25; Law Editor of "Loyol- 
an", '26; Literary Editor, '25; 
Quarterly Staff, '25; Loyola News 
Staff, '25; member of the Thirteep 
Club. 

Louis Edw.ard C.-arofiglio 
A.B., M.D. 

I.M.2. 
Entered from Columbia Univer- 
sity where he received his Bache- 
lor of Arts degree. Will interne 
at St. Anne's Hospital, Chicago, 
Illinois. Home town. New York 
City. 

Joseph Fr.-\ncis C.av.a 
B.S. m Med. 
<I>.X. 




[Page 41} 




Leonard F. Carmody 
LL.B. 

s.N.o, B.n. 

Entered from Loyola Academy, 
University of Michigan and 
Northwestern University. Presi- 
dent of Senior Law Class; mem- 
ber of "Cerce Francais"; Student 
Council; Loyola News Staff, '2^, 
"26. 



Aloy< 



A.B. 



J.U.D. 



B. Cawley 
A.M., J.D., 
A.0.<1). 

Entered from St. Ignatius 
Academy, St. Ignatius College 
and Kent College of Law. 



Raymond Philip Cawley 
LL.B. 

A.0.<D. 

Entered from Cathedral and St. 
Viators. 



LoLis Edward Cella 
M.D. 

0.X.,I.M.2. 
Entered from Crane Junior Col- 
lege. Class treasurer, "22, '26; 
member of Lambda Rho Honor- 
ary Radiological Fraternity. Will 
interne at St. Anne's Hospital, 
Chicago, Ilhnois. Home town, 
Chicago, Illinois. 



LoRETTO G. Cle.-\ry 
Ph.B. 
Entered from St. Elizabeths 
High School, and Chicago Nor- 
mal College where she received 
her diploma. 



1 1 ■':: 



42} 



Arthur John Colby 
B.S. 
Entered from St. Mcls Hi>,'h 
School. Commerce Club; Secre- 
tary, '26; Sodality, '25, '26. 

Jerome Joseph Condon 
A.B. 
Entered from St. Ignatius AcaJ 
emy. Debating Society, ''22, '2,V 
Sodality, '22, '23, '24, '25; Base 
ball, '23; "Loyolan Staff", '2 4; 
Lighting Committee, Pageant oi 
Youth and Pageant of Peace. 
Commencement Committee. 



William J. Connell, Jr. 
LL.B. 

A.0.$. 
Entered from St. Patricks Hig!i 
School and DePaul University. 
Member of Thirteen Club. 



John Joseph Connelly 
A.B. 

n.A.A. 

Entered from St. Ignatui^ 
Academy. Class Treasurer, '2 4 ; 
Vice-president, '25; Football, "2'^ 
'24, '25, '26; Basketball, '24, '2^"; 
Student Council, Vice-president, 
'26; Monogram Club. 



J.'kmes M. Corcor,\n 
LL.B. 

2.N.<D. 

Entered from Loyola Academ\ 
Class President, '2 5; Studcn 
Council; representative, '26. 




.^.^»».^^^j,- 



[Pagc 43} 



^. 



rM. 






M 
& 



\{m\ 



m 





Patrick T- Cronin 
LL.B. 

A.e.'I'. 

Entered from Visitation High 
School. Class President, '25; 
member of the Thirteen Club, '23, 
'24, '2?, '26. 



Akgel.a M.arg.aret Cylkow'ski 
Ph.B. 
Entered from South Divisioa 
Hi<'h School. 



Chester John D.axkowski 
LL.B." 

Entered from St. Patrick': 
Academy. 



WiLLi.AM James Dempsey 
LL.B." 

A.0.<I>. 
Entered from De La Salle Insti- 
tute. Class Treasurer, '26; mem- 
ber of the Thirteen Club, '2.^, '24, 
'2\ '26. 



Leo Mark Deplewski 
B.S. in Med. 
Entered from Tilden Technical 
High School and Crane Junior 
College. Inter-departmental Bas' . 
kethaU, '25. '26. 



m 



[Page 44] 




[Page 45] 











Richard I. Drever 
B.S. in Med. 
Entered from St. Ignatius Acad' 
emy. Debating Society, "22; Glee 
Club, "2?; Sodality, '23; Dance 
Committee, "26. 

Thom.as Leo Dwyer 
B.S., M.D. 
Entered from St. Louis Univer- 
sity. Class Editor, "22; Vice-pres- 
ident, "26; Vice-president of 
Lambda Rho Honorary Radiolog- 
ical Fraternity; member of Tivnen 
Opthalmological Society; Ser- 
geant-at-Arms, "26; Assistant in 
Microscopical Anatomy at Loy- 
ola, "2.V Will interne at Mercy 
Hospital, Chicago, Illinois. Home 
town, Silex, Missouri. 

WiLLI.AM BeRN.ARD Eg.\N 

B.S. in Med. 
Entered from Crane Technical 
High School and Loyola Univer- 
sity. Class Treasurer, "24, '25; 
Baseball, '22, '23; member of the 
Ghouls. Home town, Chicago, 
Illinois. 

M.ATT C. Eg.an 
LL.B. 
Entered from St. Louis Univer- 
sity High School and St. Louis 
University where he received the 
degree of B.C.S. Member of Stu- 
dent Council, '26. 

WiLLI.AM WORCHESTER ElDRIDGE 

M.D. 

<I>.X. 

Entered from the University of 
Iowa. Heme town, Waverly, 
Iowa. 



J 






[Page 46] 



>-::.«c->^'-.^»K^^:--| 




[Page 47} 



i(iM 





Josephine Agnes Flannery 
Ph.B. 
Entered from St. Elizabeth's 
High School. 



Stasi.a Marie Furlong 

Ph.B. 

Entered from West Division 
Hitih School. 



Joseph H. Gamet 
B.S. m Med. 

<i).B.n. 



Angelo Samuel Ger.aci 
A.A., B.S., M.D. 
I.M.S. 
Entered from Lewis Institute, 
where he received his Associate 
of Arts degree. Class Treasurer, 
'24; President, '2";. Will interne 
,it Mercy Hospital, Chicago. 
Home town, Chicago, Illinois. 



|,\mes Aloysius Gillen 
LL.B. 
Entered from St. Ignatius Acad- 
emy. Debating Society; Vice- 
president, '26; Sixall Club; Sec- 
retary, "24, '2'i, "26; Camera Club; 
Treasurer, "2?. "24. "2^, "26; In- 
terdepartmental Baseball, "24. 



[Page 48] 



Irene Mary Glynn 
Ph.B. 
Entered from St. James High 
School. 



Newman B. Goldman 
LL.B. 
Entered from Crane Technical 
High School. Interdepartmental 
Basketball, '23, '24. 



Maurice Goodman 
B. S. in Med. 

<1>.A.K., Seminar 
Entered from Harrison Tech- 
nical High School and Crane Jun- 
ior College. Home town, Chicago, 
Illinois. 



Samuel Lentine Governale 
M.D. 

I.M.2. 
Entered from Lewis Institute. 
Will interne at St. Bernard's 
Hospital, Chicago, Illinois. Home 
town, Chicago, Illinois. 



Charles John Grablowski 
LL.B. 

i:.\.<I). 

Entered from the University of 
Illinois. 




^)l 






i 



1 



i 



[Page 49} 




John Joseph Gregory 
B.S. in Med. 

<I>.M.X., Seminar 
Entered from Englewood High 
School and Loyola University. 
Hiime town, Chicago, Illinois. 



John Joseph Grimm 
B.S. in Med. 
Entered from Riverside High 
School, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
and the University of Wisconsin. 
Inter-departmental basketball, '24, 
"2i. Home town, Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin 



Frank Hillis Griffin 
B.S. in Med. 
Entered from the Stadium High 
School, Tacoma, Washington, Pu- 
get Sound College, Tacoma, 
Washington, and Lewis Institute. 
Home town, Paciiic, Washington. 



M,\RY Eva Grimes 
Ph.B. 
Entered from St. 
Hitjh School 



Gabriel's 



George Frederick Guld.ager 
B.S., M.D. 

<D.X. 
Entered from the University of 
Oregon. Class President, '24; 
Class Play, "24; member of the 
Lambda Rho Radiological Frater- 
nity; member of Tivnen Opthal- 
mological Society: Inter-depart- 
mental Basketball, "22, "2?, "24. 
Home town, Eugene, Oregon. 






[Page 50] 




Walter Auiysius Guse 
B.S. in Med. 
Entered from the Robert W.il- 
ler High School, Lewis Institute, 
Chicago Normal School and the 
University of Chicago. Home 
town, Chicago, Illinois. 



Eugene B. H.arks 
J.D. 
Entered from St. Ignatius 
Academy and Loyola University 
where he received his Bachelor of 
Arts degree in 1920. President 
of the Camera Club; Inter-depart- 
mental Baseball, '24, '2=r. 



David L.awrence Hartigan 
LL.B. 
Entered from St. Ignatius High 
School. Class President, '23. 



Alice Genevieve Hayde 
Ph.B. 
Entered from St. James High 
School, and Chicago Normal Col- 
lege. 



John Herbert Hedley 
LL.M., LL.B. 
Entered from Chicago Law 
School and Queen Victoria High 
School. Home town. North 
Shields, England. 




[Page 51] 




Edward Joseph Hereley 
LL.B. 

A.0.<I). 

Entered from Quigley Prepara- 
tory Seminary. Member of the 
Thirteen Club, '23, '24, "2 5; mem- 
ber of Camera Club. 



Vern.\rd Stephen Higby 
LL.B. 

2.N.O. 



Donald Anton Hirsch 
B.S. in Med. 
Entered from Lake View High 
School, the University of Illinois 
and Crane College. Inter-depart- 
mental basketball, "25, "26. Home 
town, Chicago, Illinois. 



J. Lawrence Holleran 
LL.B. 

2.N.<1>. 

Class Vice-president, "2 5. Inter- 
departmental basketball, "23, "24, 

■2\ "2ri. 



Samuel Charles Holnitsky 
M.D. 

a>.A.K. 

Entered from Lane Technical 
High School, St. Ignatius College 
and Crane Junior College. Home 
town, Chicago, Illinois. 



[Page 52] 



Irvin Franklin Hummon, Jr 
B.S., M.D. 
Entered from the University of 
Chicago where he received his 
Bachelor of Science degree. Class 
Editor, '25, '26; Class Play, '24, 
'25; member of the Lambda Rho 
Honorary Radiological Fraternity; 
Research in Physiology at the 
University of Chicago, '24. Will 
interne at North Chicago Hos- 
pital. Home town, Berwyn, Illi- 
nois. 

Evangeline C. Hursen 
Ph.B., J.D. 

K.B.n. 

Entered from John Marshall 
High School, Chicago Normal 
College where she received her 
Bachelor of Philosophy degree. 
Class Secretary, '26; member of 
class social committee, '25; mem- 
ber of the Loyola News Staff. 

Michael Indovina 

B.S. in Med. 

LM.2. 

Entered from Harris High 
School and Lewis Institute. Home 
town, Chicago, Illinois. 

Yasuo Inouyo 
B.S. in Med. 
lEntered from Joshi Gakuin 
High School, Tokyo, Japan, St. 
Scholastica College, Duluth, Min- 
nesota and De Paul University. 

James M.anuel Johnson 
B.S. in Med. 

Seminar 
Entered from Tilden Technical 
High School and the University of 
Chicago. Home town, Chicago, 
Illinois. 




[Page 53} 



M:- 




]. Walter J(1hnson 
M.D. 

«D.X. 
Entered from the University of 
Michigan. Member of Lambda 
Rho Honorary Radiological Fra- 
ternity and the Tivnen Opthalmo- 
logical Society. Home town, La- 
fayettc, Indiana. 



Thiim.as Duane Jones 
A.B., B.S. inMed. 
<I>.X., Seminar 
Entered from Charleroi High 
School and the University of 
Michigan where he received his 
Bachelor of Arts degree. Inter- 
departmental basketball, '25, '26. 
Home town, Charleroi, Pennsyl- 
vania. 



George Leo Joyce 
B.S., M.b. 

(D.B.n. 

Entered from the University of 
Minnesota. Will interne at Mer- 
cy Hospital, Chicago, Illinois. 
Home town, Stewartville, Minne- 
sota. 



Joseph Charles Kanak 
LL.B. 
Entered from Lewis Institute. 



EnwARn Francis Kane 
LLB 

A.0.<D. 
Entered from St. Thomas Col- 
lege Academy. Class President, 
'2.^: Vice-president, '26; member 
of Thirteen Club; member of 
Camera Club, '2.^ '24; Inter-de- 
p.irtmental Baseball, "24, '2>, "26; 
Inter-departmental basketball, '26. 



[Page 54} 






IdHN Walter Keane 
B.S., M D. 

<I>.X. 
Entered from De Paul Univer 
sity. Member of Lambda Rho 
Honorary Radiological Fraternity; 
Research in Physiology at the 
University of Chicago, '24. Will 
interne at St. Anne's Hospital, 
Chicago, Illinois. Home town, 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Marie Helen Kelly 
Ph.B. 
Entered from St. Catherines 
High School and Notre Dame 
Convent, Bourbonnais, Illinois. A 
graduate of Columbia College of 
Expression, Chicago, Illinois. 

Sylvester Meehan Kelly 
B.S., M.D. 

<1).X. 
Entered from Creighton Uni- 
versity, Omaha, Nebraska. Mem- 
ber of the Lambda Rho Honorary 
Radiological Fraternity. Will in- 
terne at Oak Park Hospital, Oak 
Park, Illinois. Home town, Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 

James J. Kelly 
LL.B. 

A.0.<I). 

-Entered from St. Mel's Hitih 
School. Interdepartmental Bas- 
ketball, '2.1, '24, '2^~, '26; member 
of the Thirteen Club. 

Raymond Whipple Kerwin 
B.S. in Med. 

<I>.B.n.. (P.M.X. 
Entered from St. Ignatius 
Academy and Loyola University 
Member of the Ghouls; Secretary 
'2=;, '26; Sock and Buskin Club, 
'24, '2i; Merchant of Venice 
Cast; Research assistant in Bac- 
teriology. Home town, Chicago, 
Illinois. 




a 



[Page 55} 




Joseph Thomas King 
LL.B. 
Entered from St. Mels High 
School. 



Arthur Thom.as Koelle 
LL.B. 

A.G.I). 
Entered from Loyola Academy. 



Adri,\n D.avid Kr.^use 
B.S. in Med. 

o.B.n. 

Entered from Englewood High 
School and the University of Chi- 
cago where he received his Bache- 
lor of Philosophy degree. Mem- 
ber of the Ghouls; Freshman 
Dance Committee; Research assist- 
ant in Bacteriology. Home town, 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Christian George Krupp 
B.S., M.D. 
Entered from Alma College of 
Alma, Michigan. Member of the 
Lambda Rho Honorary Radio- 
logical Fraternity. Will interne at 
St. Mary's Hospital, Grand Rap- 
ids, Michigan. Home town, Smyr- 
na, Michigan. 



Isabelle a. Rafferty 
Ph.B. 



[Page 56} 



William J. Lancaster 
LL.M., LL.B. 
Entered from Crane Junior 
College. Home town, Chicago. 

Olga Mary Latka 
B.S. in Med. 

N.iL.<I). 

Entered from Carl Schurz High 
School and Crane Junior College. 
Class Secretary, '24, '25; Research 
assistant in Bacteriology. Home 
town, Chicago, Illinois. 

Robert Edward Lee 
B.S. in Med. 
<I>.X., O.M.X., B.n., Seminar 
Entered from Campion Acad- 
emy and Loyola University. Class 
President, '24, '25. Class Editor, 
'26; "Loyolan" Staff; Humor Edi- 
tor, '25; Loyola Quarterly, '22, 
'23, '24; Dance Committee, '2 5, 
'26; member of the Ghouls; Stu- 
dent assistant in Chemistry, '25, 
'26. Home town, Chicago, Illi- 



Harry Max Levy 
B.S. in Med. 

O.A.K., Seminar 
Entered from Lane Technical 
High School and Crane Junior 
College. Student assistant in Em- 
bryology, '25, '26. Home town, 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Ethel Louise Madigan 
Ph.B. 
Entered from St. Gabriel's 
High School. 




[Page 57] 



1 

m 

"si-' 

m. 

1- I 

^#! 

0) 



i 




f>-.: 





Leonard Francis Maher 
B.S. 

n.A.A. 

Entered from St. Ignatius Acad- 
emy. Boosters Club, "2i, "26: 
Sodality, "23, "24, "25, "26; Sock 
and Buskin Club; Secretary, "26; 
Pageant of Youth: Pageant of 
Peace; N. C. B. B. Tourney; Sen- 
ior Jewelry Committee. 

IlLIA HY,^CINTHUS MaLONEY 

Ph.B. 
Entered from Providence Acad- 
emy and the Chicago Normal 
Collcije. 



Iames Brennan Mariga 
LL.B. 

A.0.<D. 
Entered from St. Mels High 
School. Member of Thirteen 
Club, "2 3, "24, "2 "I; Inter-depart- 
mental Baseball, "24, "2% "26; In- 
terdepartmental basketball, "26. 



John William Maselter 
A.B. 
Entered from Loyola Academy; 
Football, "25; Sodality, "23, "24, 
'25, "26; Debating Society, "23, 
"24, "2\ "26. 



AijLiL Mastri 
B.S. in Med. 
I. M.S. 
Entered from the Institute High 
School and Crane Junior College. 
Home town, Chicago, Illinois. 



^ 



W^ 



M 



[Page 58] 



ft.?^ 



Mary Elizabeth McCabe 
Ph.B. 
Entered from St. Mary's Hit 
School. 



Catherine L. McCorry 



Arthur James McDonough 
A.B. " 

n.A.A., B.n. 

Entered from Loyola Academy 
and Georgetown University; 
Boosters' Club, '25, '26; Sodalitv, 
'26; Pageant of Peace; "Loyolan" 
Staff; Assistant Society Editor, 
'25; Senior Editor, '26; Senior 
Privilege Committee. 



Joseph Thomas McGarry 
B.S. 
Entered from St. Ignatius Acad- 
emy. Sodality, '25, '26; Com- 
.merce Club, '23, '24, '2 5, '26; 
Vice-president, '26; Senior Jewel- 
ry Committee. 



Elizabeth Lourdes McGrath 
Ph.B. 
Entered from St. Agnes High 
School. 




>i i i i 1!l!ii«r.<lijW|l " 



i 



[Page 59] 



rll 






m 







Leonard Albert McGraw 
B.S. 

n.A.A, 

Entered from Loyola Academy 
and the University of Illinois. 
Class Treasurer, '26; Student 
Council, "25; Secretary; Chair- 
man of the Student Council 
Dance Committee, "24; Baseball, 
'24; Basketball, '24, '2\ '26; 
Monogram Club; Sodality: Com- 
merce Club; Boosters Club; Sen- 
ior Ball Committee. 

Francis Henry McGuire 
B.S. in Med. 
Entered from St. Ignatius Acad- 
emy and Loyola University; Glee 
Club, '23. Home town, Chicago, 
Illinois. 

L L McLaughlan 
LL.B. 
Entered from St. Ignatius 
Academy. 

Daniel Jordan McMahon 
LL.B. 
Entered from St. Ignatius 
Academy. Class Vice-President, 
'26. 

John "Victor McMahon 
B.S., M.D. 

$.B.n. 

Entered from St. Gabriel's High 
School and De Paul University. 
Member of the Lambda Rho Hon- 
orary Radiological Fraternity and 
the Tivnen Opthalmological So- 
ciety; Football, "2.i; Monogram 
Club. Will interne at Mercy 
Hospital, Chicago, Illinois. Home 
town, Chicago, Illinois. 



m 



[Page 60] 



Michael Anton Melaychuk 
A.B., B.S. in Med. 
O.B.n. Seminar 
Entered from Saskataan Collegi- 
ate Institute, Saskataan, Canada, 
University of Alberta, Loyola 
University and Dubuque Univer- 
sity where he received his Bache- 
lor of Arts degree; Research As- 
sistant in Chemistry. Home 
town, Saskataan, Canada. 



Angel F. Mercado 
LL.M., LL.B. 
Entered from Chicago Kent 
College of Law and Notre Dame 
University. Home town, Indiana 
Harbor, Ind. 



Nestor Michelena 
B.S. in Med. 

^.X. Seminar 
Entered from Colegio de l,t 
Immaculada, Lima, Peru, Univer- 
sity of San Marcos, Lima, Peru, 
and Muhlenberg College, Penn 
sylvania. Home town, Lima, Peru. 



M.\RY Joan Morgan 

Entered from St. Mary's High 
School. 



Augustus Henry Mueller 
B.S., D.D.S. 
Entered from Manitowoc High 
School, Manitowoc, Wisconsin, 
where he was assistant professor 
of Operation Techniques. At- 
tached to the Dental Department 
of Loyola University. 




m 



[Page 61} 





"^ 




Walter Francis Mullady 
B.S. 

Blue Key 
Entered from Illiopolis High 
School, Illiopolis, Illinois. Base' 
hall, '23; Debating Society, '24, 
"2t, "26; Loyola Debating Team; 
Naghten Debate, '25, '26; Sodal- 
ity," '23, '24, '25, '26; Glee Club, 
"23, '24; Pageant of Youth; Seat- 
ing Committee; Pageant of Peace; 
Boosters Club, '25, '26; N. C. B. 
B. Tourney. 



Thomas Leonard Owens 
LL.B. 

A.e.$. 



Michael John Murphy 
B.S. in Med. 

Seminar 
Entered from Northwestern 
LTniversity and Lewis Institute. 
Class Treasurer, '2 5, '26. 



William T. Murphy 
LL.B. 

A.0.<1). 

Entered from Calumet High 
School, Chicago, Illinois. Mem- 
ber of the Thirteen Club, "2 3, '24, 
"2^; Inter-departmental Basketball 

"23, "24, "25. 



Charles Muzzicato 
B.S. in Med. 

I.M.S. 
Entered from Alfred University 
and Columbia University. 



m 



[Page 62] 




Peter Alfred Nelson 
Ph.B., M.D. 

<I>.X., n.K.E. 

Entered from Campion Colle^'c 
at Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin 
where he received his Bachelor of 
Philosophy degree. Member of 
Lambda Rho Honorary Radiolog- 
ical Fraternity and the Tivnen 
Opthalmological Society; Assistant 
in Anatomy at the Chicago Col- 
lege of Dental Surgery, '24. Will 
interne at Mercy Hospital, Chi- 
cago, Illinois. Home town, Lc- 
mont, Illinois. 

Lewis M. Nowl.an 
LL.B. 
Entered from Quincy College. 
Class Editor of the "Loyolan" '26. 

M,'\RjoRiE Helen O'Connell 
Ph.B. 
Entered from St. Mary's High 
School. 

P.'^TRiCK Henry O'Connell 
B.S. in Med. 

Seminar 
Entered from Norwich Free 
Academy, Norwich, Connecticut, 
and Georgetown University. 
Home town, Norwich, Connecti- 
cut. 

Hugh Augustine O'Hare IIL 
B.S. in Med. 
<J>.X., B.n., Seminar 
Entered from St. Joseph's Acad- 
emy, Titusville, Pennsylvania, Mt. 
St. Mary's College, Emmitsburg, 
Maryland, and St. Joseph's Col- 
lege, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
"Loyola News" Class Editor, '24, 
'25; "Loyolan" Staff, class editor, 
'2 5, '26; Sophomore Dance Com- 
mittee. Home town, Titusville, 
Pennsylvania. 




p^ 



[Page 6?] 




Anthony Joseph Pace 
B.S. in Med. 
I.M.2. 
Entered from Murray F. Tuley 
High School and Lewis Institute. 
Home town, Chicago, lUinois. 



Thom.as Anthony P.aulowski 
LL.B 
Entered from St. Bonaventures 
College and St. Louis University. 



Rir.H.ARD Aloysius Perritt 
A.A,, B.S. 

(K.B.n., LM.S. 

Entered from La Salle Academy, 
New York, N. Y., and Lewis In' 
stitute where he received his Asso' 
ciate of Arts degree. Class Vice- 
president, '25; Student assistant in 
Embryology. 

BoLESL.^us St.^nisl.^us Pierzyn- 

SKI. 

B.S. in Med. 
Entered from St. Ignatius 
Academy and Loyola University. 
Home town, Chicago, Illinois. 

M.ary Rozell.a Popp 
M.D. 
Entered from the University of 
Pittsburg, University of Michigan 
and the Woman's Medical Cob 
lege, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Member of the Lambda Rho Hon- 
orary Radiological Fraternity. 
Will interne at St. Anne's Hos- 
pital, Chicago, Illinois. Home 
town. New Castle, Pennsylvania. 



[Page 64] 



Thomas Marcellus Potasz 
B.S., M.D. 
Entered from the University of 
California and Lewis Institute 
where he received his Associate of 
Arts degree. Member of the 
Lambda Rho Honorary Fratern- 
ity. Will interne at San Diego 
County Hospital, San Diego, Cali- 
fornia. Home town, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 



Julius Prohovnik 
B.S. in Med. 

>I>.A.K., Seminar 
Entered from Crane Technical 
High School. 

Thomas P. Quinn 
LL.B. 

Entered from Crane Junior Col- 
lege. Member of the Thirteen 
Club of Loyola. Home town, 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Louis John Radest 
B.S., M.D. 

<I).A.K. 

Entered from Syracuse Univer- 
sity and the University of Mary- 
land Medical School. Will in- 
terne at King's County Hospital, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. Home town, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Paul Aloysius Repper 
M.D. 

$.X. 
Entered from Catholic Univer- 
sity, Washington, D. C. Member 
of Lambda Rho Radiological Fra- 
ternity. Home town, McKees- 
port, Pennsylvania. 




[Page 65} 




Edward Bideaux Rhomberg 
B.S. m Med. 
OX. 
Entered from Columbia Acad- 
emy, Columbia College and the 
University of Notre Dame. 

James Markham Ro.ach 

n.A.A., B.n., Blue Key 

Entered from Hyde Park Hi'^h 
School. Sodality, '23, "24, "25, 
"26; Glee Club, "2 3: Boosters 
Club, "2 5; "Loyolan"" Staff, '2\ 
"26; Loyola Quarterly, "25, "26; 
Managing Editor, "26; Pageant 
Committee, "25; Tournament 
Committee, "2 5, '26; Senior Jew- 
elry Committee. 



Fran'Cisco Maderu Robinett 
Ph.B. 
Entered from Livingston High 
School, Livingston, Texas, and 
Washington High School, Dallas, 
Texas, where he was instructor in 
Spanish. 

Charles J. Roubik 



Hubert Joseph Ryan 

b.s.,"m.d. 

o.x. 

Entered from Assumption Col- 
lege, Windsor, Ontario, and the 
University of Chicago. Member 
of Tivnen Opthalmological Soci- 
ety. Will interne at St. Bernards 
Hospital, Chicago, Illinois. Home 
town, Chicago, Illinois. 



[Page 66] 




Howard Frederick Schlacks 
A.B. 

Entered from Loyola Academv 
Class President, '24; Baseball, '2 3; 
Basketball, '23, '24, '25, '26; Cap 
tain, '26; Student Couneil, '24; 
Sodality, '23, '24, '25, '26; Mono- 
gram Club, '23, '24, '25, '26; 
Commencement Committee. 

John Emmet Schell 
A.B. 

n.A.A., Blue Key 
Student Board of Athletics, 
Junior, '25; Senior Manager, '26; 
Monogram Club; Baseball, '23; 
N.C.B'^B. Tourney, '25, '26; Pa- 
geant of Peace; Pageant of Youth; 
Sodality, '23, '24, ^^'25, '26; Boost- 
ers' Club; Loyola Quarterly, '25, 
'26; Glee Club, '25. 

Herbert Eugene Schmitz 
B.S., M.D. 

<I>.B.n. 

Entered from the University of 
Wisconsin. Class President, '26; 
Representative, '25; member of 
Lambda Rho Honorary Radiologi- 
cal Fraternity; Research work in 
Bacteriology at Loyola, '23, and in 
Physiology at the University of 
Chicago, in '24. Will interne at 
Mercy Hospital, Chicago, Illinois. 

Samuel Seltzer 
B.S., M.D. 
Entered from Crane Junior Col- 
lege. Home town, Chicago, Illi- 
nois. 

Thomas Joseph Senese 
B.S., M.D. 
Entered from St. Ignatius Acad- 
emy and St. Ignatius College. Will 
interne at Mercy Hospital, Chica- 
go, Illinois. Home town, Chicago, 
Illinois. 




[Page 67] 



<^> 




Austin Edward Ryan 
Ph.B. 
Entered from Austin High 
School. 



John Gregory Ryan 
LL.B. 

Entered from St. Ignatius 
Academy. 



Hyman Israel Sapoznik 
B.S. in Med. 

•D.A.K. 
Entered from Murray F. Tuley 
High School, and Crane Junior 
College. Home town, Chicago, 
IHinois. 



Ruth Gibson Saunders 
Ph.B. 
Entered from Le Mars High 
School, Le Mars, Iowa, Coe Col- 
lege and Iowa State Technical 
College. Member of Dramatic 
Clubf Athletic Club. 



Charles Francis Schaub 
A.B., B.S. in Med. 

o.B.n. 

Entered from Campion Acad- 
emy and Campion College where 
he received his Bachelor of Arts 
degree. Dance Committee, '25, 
'26; Inter-departmental Basketball, 
'25, '26. 



[Page 68] 



Arthur Clement Sequin 
B.S„ M.D. 

<I>.X. 

Entered from the University 
of Chicago. Member of Lamhd i 
Rho Honorary Radiological Fra- 
ternity. Will interne at Maria 
Beard Deaconess Hospital, Spo- 
kane, Washington. Home town, 
Ransom, Illinois. 



N.\THAN Sh.AVIN 

LL.B. 

Entered from John Marshall 
High School and De Paul Univer- 
sity. 

S.^MUEL SiLVERM.AN 

LL.B. 

Entered from Bowen High 
School. 



HOW.'VRD P.^RKS Slo.'vn 
B.S., M.D. 

<D.B.n.,n.K.E. 

Entered from the Virginia Mili 
tary Institute and the Universit}' 
of Illinois. Class Secretary, '22; 
Chairman of Class Entertainment 
Committee, '22, '24; Inter-dc- 
partmental Basketball, '22, '2V 
Dramatics, '22; member of Tivnen 
Opthalmological Society; Research 
assistant in Bacteriology, '2.i, '2 4. 
Home town, Bloomington, lUinoi.-;. 

Milton V. Smith 
LL.B. 
Entered from Crane Technical 
High School. 




[Page 69] 




f^^%^&. I j^. 



Wd 




Teresa Marie Stocker 
Ph.B., M.A. 
Entered from St. Mary's Acad- 
emy, Salt Lake, Utah and St. 
Mary's College, Notre Dame, In- 
diana, where she received her 
Bachelor of Philosophy degree. 



Elisha Jones Stroud 
B.S. in Med. 
Entered from Central Y.M.C.A. 
Preparatory School, University of 
Chicago and Crane College. Re- 
search Asistant in Anatomy, '25, 
'26. Home town, Chicago, Illinois. 



foHN George Sujack 
LL.B. 

2.N.a>. 

Entered from St. Ignatius Acad- 
emy. 



Helen Virginia Sweeney 
Ph.B. 
Entered from Loretto Academy. 



Francis Joseph Gariepy 
LL.B. 
Entered from St. Thomas High 
School, Ann Arbor, Michigan 
and the University of Michigan. 
Member of the Debating Society. 



[Page 70] 



i 

i 



Karl McCallion Smith 
LL.M. 



Joseph Francis Sokolowski 
B.S. in Med. 
Entered from Lane Technical 
High Schdol and Crane Junior 
College. Home town, Chicago, 
Illinois. 

Frank Alois Sommer 
M.D. 
Entered from the University dI 
Texas. Will interne at St. Ber 
nard's Hospital, Chicago, Illinois 
Home town, Wallis, Texas. 

William Somerville 
B.S., M.D. 

(i>.B.n. 

Entered from Loyola University 
where he received his Bachelc 
of Science degree. Member ol 
Lambda Rho Honorary Radiologi 
cal Fraternity and Tivnen Opthal 
mologieal Society; Assistant in 
Anatomy, 24. Will interne at 
Mercy Hospital, Chicago, Illinois 
Home town, Chicago, Illinois. 

Thomas James Stamm 
A.B." 
n.A.A., B.n., Blue Key 
Entered from Loyola Academ\' 
Class President, '2^; Student 
Council; President, '26; Glee 
Club; President, "25; Monogram 
Club; "Loyolan" Staff; Football 
Editor, '2i'; Loyola Quarterh-; 
Chronicle Editor, '2 5, '26; Gen 
eral Chairman of the Junior Prom. 
"2 5; Chairman of Committee nn 
Emblem Standardization, "26; 
Senior Jewelry Committee; Sen- 
ior Privilege Committee. 




[Page 71} 



^. 



('-- 



m 




m\ 



Martin William Tarpey 
A.B. 
Entered from St. Ignatius High 
School. Sodahty, '2.\ "26; De- 
bating Society, "23. 

Cyril W. Tierney 
A.B., J.D. 
Entered from St. Ignatius Acad- 
emy and Loyola University where 
he received his Bachelor of Arts 
degree. Baseball: Camera Club; 
member of Bara Dan. 

Walter Raymond Tobin 
M.D. 
Entered from Carnegie Insti- 
tute of Technology and the Uni- 
versity of Michigan. Home town, 
Chicago, Illihois. 

Jesse H.arold Turner 
B.S., M.D. 

<i).B.n. 

Entered from the University of 
Arizona and the University of Il- 
linois. Class President, '22; Re- 
search work in Endochrinology at 
Loyola, "24. Will interne at 
Seaside Hospital, Long Beach, Cal- 
ilornia. Home town. Temps, Ari- 
zona. 

Leslie Daniel Urban 
B.S. m Med. 

<I>.B.II., Seminar 
Entered from St. Viators Acad- 
emy and the University of Notre 
Dame. Member of the Ghouls; 
Vice-president of the Inter-Frater- 
nity Council; Research work in 
Physiology. Home town, Chicago, 
Illinois. 



n 



i 



[Page 72] 



Joseph Edward Verhaac 
B.S. in Med. 

Seminar 
Entered from Lane Technical 
High School, Lewis Institute and 
Crane Junior College. Student as- 
sistant in Embryology, '2^, '26. 
Home town, Chicago, Illinois. 



Wayne Rose Walker 
M.D. 

•D.BII. 

Entered from Northwestern 
University. Home town, Vienna, 
Illinois. 



John Cyril Vermeren 
B.S., M.D. 

ip.X. 
Entered from the University of 
Chicago where he received his 
Bachelor of Science degree. Home 
town, Evanston, Illinois. 



EmIL J. ViSKOCIL 

B.S. in Med. 
$.X. 
Member of the Ghoul; 



Leslie James Walsh 
Ph.B. 
Entered from De Paul Academy 
and De Paul University. Mem- 
ber of the Debating Society, '24, 
'2\ '26; Sodality, "^24, '25; Glee 
Club, '25; Sock and Buskin Club, 
24, "25; Boosters Club, '25; "Loy- 
olan" Staff, '24; Pageant of Peace; 
Senior Privilege Committee. 




{Page 73] 



^*'']i 




Richard Francis Ward 
A.B. 
Entered from Loyola Academy 
and Georgetown University. Sen- 
ior Privilege Committee. 



George Hanawalt Watters 
M.D. 

<i>.B n. 

Entered from the University of 
Wisconsin. Member of Tivnen 
Opthalmological Society; Presi- 
dent, '26. Will interne at the St. 
Louis General Hospital, St. Louis, 
Missouri. Home town, Des 
Moines, Iowa. 



John- Francis Wcislo 
A.B. 
Entered from St. Ignatius Acad- 
emy. Sodality, ■2.^ "24, ^2\ "26. 



Isabel Bernice Weir 
Ph.B. 
Entered from St. Mary's High 
School. 



foHN FlORIAN WlETRrVKOWSKI 

M.D. 

<I).X. 

Entered from Loyola Univer- 
sity. Member of Lambda Rho 
Honorary Radiological Fraternity; 
Art Editor of "Loyolan," '24. 
Will interne at Mercy Hospital, 
Chicago, Illinois. Home town, 
Lemont, Illinois. 



[Page 74} 



.-<^ 



Elvin James Wiley 
B.S., M.D. 

(D.B.n. 

Entered from the University of 
Illinois. Member of Tivnen 
Opthalmological Soeiety. Will 
interne at Oak Park Hospital, Oak 
Park, Illinois. Home town, Han- 
over, Illinois. 



George Augustine Wiltr.akis 
B.S. in Med. 

<I>.X., Seminar 
Entered from St. Ignatius Acad- 
emy and Loyola University. Stu- 
dent Assistant in Chemistry, '25, 
'26. Home town, Chicago, Illi- 
nois. 



Francis Louis Wiza 
B.S. in Med. 
Entered from St. Ignatius Acid 
emy and Loyola University. Home 
town, Chicago, Illinois. 

Alfred Wolfarth 
A.B., M.D. 

- Entered from Loyola Univer- 
sity. Home town, Chicago, Illi- 
nois. 



Ferdinand Peter York 
M.D. 

<i>.B.n. 

Entered from Detroit Collc^ 
and the University of Michigan 
Member of the Tivnen Opthalnn < 
logical Society; Vice-president, 
'26. Home town, Detroit, Michi 
gan. 




[Page 75} 



~^- 



v 



HW/ 










Leo Aktox Zelezinski 
M.D. 
Entered from St. Ignatius Col- 
lege. Will interne at St. Ber- 
nard's Hospital, Chicago, Illinois. 
Home town, Chicago, Illinois. 



Arnold P. Bond, Jr. 
LL.B. 
Entered from Central Prepara- 
tory Institute, De La Salle Insti- 
tute and De Paul University. 
Member of Debating Society. 



St.anley C. Buck 
LL.M., LL.B. 
Entered from Chicago Kent 
College of Law. Home town, 
Chicago, Illinois. 



R.aymond ].\ues Goss 
LL.B. " 

A.0.<D. 
Entered from Hyde Park High 
School. Member of Thirteen 
Club, "22, "2?, '24, '2i. 



EriW.^RD I. W.ARREN 

LL.M. 
Entered from Chicago Kent 
College of Law, "17, where he re- 
ceived his LL.B. 



;J 



[Page 76} 



a 



Graduates Whose Pictures 
Do Not Appear 



t^i 



Julia Cosgrovc, Ph.B. 
Winifred Pagan, Ph.B. 
Mary H. Fay, Ph.B. 
Frances G. Hanlon, Ph.B. 
A. Adele Harvey, Ph.B. 
Alice M. Kearns, Ph.B. 
Grace Lonergan, Ph.B. 



Arts and Sciences 
Dr. Rufus Lcc, A.B. 



Sociology 



Mathilda Matt::, Ph.B. 
Jane McCutchcon, Ph.B. 
Frances M Maloney, Ph.B. 
Winifred D. Muhs, Ph.B. 
Janet O'Brien, Ph.B. 
Elizabeth O'Loughlin, Ph.B. 
Elizabeth Scarry, Ph B. 






e*-;; 



Law 



Michael Artery. LL.B. 
Herbert Barries, LL.B. 
William Patrick Crowe, LL.M. 
Walter M. Finn, LL.M. 
John J. Flanagan, LL.M. 
E. L. Hartigan, J.U.D. 
Francis V. Healy, LL.M. 
Eugene Mark Hincs, LL.M. 
Harold C. Kalman, LL.M. 
T. M. Kavanaugh, LL.B. 



Raymond F. Kelly, J.U.D. 
PhiHp A. McGee, LL.B. 
Alice O'Kane McShanc, J.U.D. 
Clara Walsh Morris, LL.B. 
Michael F. Mulcahy. LL.M. 
John S. O'Donnell, LL.M. 
Sebastian Rivera, LL.B. 
Richard Franklin Shay, A.B., J.D. 
John F. Sheahan, LL.M. 



Medicine 



Eugene Regis Balthazar, M.D. 
Charles Casimir Buczynski, B.S. in Med. 
William Edward Colgin, B.S. in Med. 
James Henry Conforti, A. A., M.D. 
Samuel Dessen, B.S. in Med. 
Ben Peter Dorniak, B.S. in Med. 
Daniel Raymond Dwyer, B.S. in Med. 
Samuel Anthony Gcraci, A. A., B.S., 
M.D. 



Erwin Goldsmith, M.D. 
Malcolm Cauley Johnson, M.D. 
Joseph Kauter, B.S. in Med. 
John Anthony Marszalck, B.S. in Med 
Warren Edward Pugh, B.S. in Med. 
Raymond Joseph Smyth, B.S. in Med. 
Frederick Joseph Stucker, B.S. in Med. 
Rafael Limjuco Teopaco, A.B., B.S., 
M.D. 



m 

Vj), 

m 

m 

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i 



[Page 77] 



1 



Exodus 



Another year has gone again, 

Fleet time skips quickly by; 
Gnce more we leave the dear old school, 

But with youth's passing sigh. 
But there are some who ne'er again 

Shall pass through her bronze gate. 
For they are gone, forever proud. 

To follow beckoning Fate. 
And in four years that swiftly pass. 

We train in youth's bright school; 
Will we feel sad when we must go, 

Into Life's whirling pool? 



-Al 






Edmond R. Richer. 



[Page 78] 



j^^ 




.wj.-] 



ARTS AND SCIENCES 



<$% 



IS 

mi 



.i^r^A 



MM 



.. 'M 




Thomas J. Stamm, President 



The Student Council 

Thomas J. Stamm, President 

John J. Connellev, Vice-President 

Marshall I. McMahon, Secretary 

James T. Barrett, Semor 

Thomas J. Byrne, Junior 

Daniel J. Donahue, Sophomore 

Cornelius Collins, Freshman 



M 



% 



[Page 80} 



j5^„ 







i 



Connelly 



Mc.Mahon 



Student Government is a phase of colle;j;e lite which is often neglected and seldom 
considered in its proper sense. The complex character of college life and organization 
often leads to difficulties and tangles between students and between students and 
faculty which call for somebody whose primary purpose is to straighten them and to 
preserve amicable relations all around. Further, such an organization is needed to 
legislate concerning intra-mural affairs and to regulate such matters among the students 
as arise in their relations with each other. 

Such is the function of the Student Council. During the past year this body has 
striven earnestly to carry out its appointed tasks and has enjoyed a real measure of 
success. Probably its most miportant accomplishment has been the standardizing of 
the class rings for the entire University, as well as for each graduating class to come. 
In other matters it has always done its best to smooth out difficulties arising in the 
Arts and Sciences department and this year has enjoyed the confidence of the student 
body to a hitherto unprecedented extent. The success of the Student-Faculty Banquet 
and the strict obedience to the freshman cap rules have been outstanding examples 
of this latter. 

The Council at present consists of the four class presidents and of three officers, 
elected from the Junior and Senior classes by a general vote of the student body. 




Collins 



B.ARRETT 



Byrne 



DONAHL 1, 



[Page 81} 






Hi 



Banners 






I' i 



(CLASS OF -U) 

From near and jar, from tower and wall. 
From flaming bastion total gules. 
The banners lift and gently fall 
Li\c cradled dreams of sun-lit pools. 

The breath of Spring m green reborn 
Brings man icbirth of soul: once more 
Youth dreams his dreams in the crystal morn 
To laugh m the teeth of vaunting war. 

Drop of the draw with a bounding shoc\; 
Clangor of portal; a wind-snatched jest; 
Bitter plaint of splintered roc\ 
From driving hoofs, and Youth rides west, 

Full panoplied with crest and shield 
That spea\ in tongues of flame: in his ears 
The singing of the winds that yield 
Of high advertture and of tears. 



m 



i 



iWI 



From near and tar, from tower and wall. 
From flaming bastion total gules, 
The banners lift and gently fall 
Li\e cradled dreams of sun-lit pools. 



nORTOH F. OMEARA. 



[Page 82] 







fm^ 



SENIORS 






%m 



^m 



CLASS COMMITTEES 



m 



3 

'ill 






Joseph McGarry Aloysius J. Bremner 

James M. Roach Thomas J. Stamm Leonard F. Maher 



SENIOR PRIVILEGE 

Joseph B. Byrnes Thomas J. Stamm Arthur J. McDonough 

Leslie Walsh Richard Ward 



SENIOR BALL 

James T. Barrett Russell J. Dooley 

Leonard McGraw 



COMMENCEMENT 

Howard Schlacks Joseph Byrnes Patrick L Boyle 

Jerome Condon Howard Barry 






HI 



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fe^ 

f-^4 



F- ]i 



[Page 84] 



Ik 




[James Thomas Barrett, President] 

THE CLASS OF 1926 

OFFICERS 

James T. Barrett, President 

Russell J. Dooley, Vice-President 

J. Gordon Downey, Secretary 

Leonard A. McGraw, Treasurer 



i 




Dooley 



McGr^aw 



Downey 



[Page 85] 



Si^:3 



;^ .. feis.yg.o^ ' u g=- — I 



SENIORS 



mi 



James T, Barrett, 65 1 5 Greenwood Ave. 

Howard J. Barry, 722 S. Oak Park 
Ave., Oak Park, 111. 

Edwin J. Berwick, 1461 Foster Ave. 

Patrick J. Boyle, 8100 Throop St. 

Aloysius J. Bremner, 4728 N. Ashland 
Ave. 

Joseph B. Byrnes, 5826 Calumet Ave. 
Arthur J. Colby, 5 527 W. Monroe St. 
Jerome J. Condon, 5305 Quincy St. 
John J. Connelly, 6252 Winthrop Ave. 
Russell J. Dooley, 1430 Pratt Blvd. 
James Gordon Downey, 1765 Devon 
Ave. 

Rufus W. 
Ave. 

Arthur J. 
Ave. 

Leonard A 
Ave. 

Joseph Thomas McGarry, 12 54 W. 51st 
St. 

Leanord F. Maher, 707 Walden Road, 
Winnetka, Illinois. 

John W. Maselter, 2149 Leland Ave. 

Walter F. Mullady, 6514 Fairfield Ave. 

James M. Roach, 6729 Clyde Ave. 

John E. Schell, 2316 N. Sawyer Ave 

Howard F. Schlacks, 72 E. 48th St. 

Thomas J. Stamm, 45 Washington Blvd., 
Oak Park, 111. 

Martin W. Tarpey, 4341 Park Ave. 

Leslie J. Walsh, 6634 Newgard Ave. 

Richard F. Ward, 1218 Columbia Ave. 

John F. Wcislo, 462 3 Rockwell St. 



Lee, D.D.S., 1027 Wilson 

McDonough, 1327 Albion 

McGraw, 6728 Newgard 



M 



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[Page 86} 




JUNIORS 




=5 ^s 
^31 



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[Page 88] 




[Marshall I. Mc.Mahok, President] 



I 
i 

n 



Pi 



THE CLASS OF 1927 

OFFICERS 
Marshall I. McMahon, President 

Robert E. Morris. Vxce-President 

Maurice G. McCarthy, Secretaiy 

John G. Morris, Treasurer 







R. Morris 



McCarthy 



J. Morris 



[Page 89] 



J^_ 






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(I - 



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'S 



JUNIORS 

Sigismund L. Andryas;kiewicz, 2212 
W. 19th St. 

John F. Bowler, ??49 Harrison St. 

William E. Bresingham, 1717 W. 21st 
Place. 

Edward P. Byrne, 1446 N. Mansfield 
Ave. 

Thomas J. Byrne, 1225 Pratt Blvd. 

William P. Connelly, 208 N. LeClaire 
Ave. 

Zeno A. Czeslowski, 2891 Milwaukee 
Ave. 

Robert C. Hartnett, 64 'i') Lakewood 
Ave. 

Frank J. Lodeski, Jr., 212 S. Harvey 
Ave., Oak Park, Illinois. 

Maurice C. McCarthy, 5 508 W. Con- 
gress St. 

George McKeough, 5407 Michigan 
Ave. 

Edward G, McMahon, 6525 Sheridan 
Road. 

Marshall I. McMahon, 4859 Michigan 
Ave. 

John S. Morris, 6926 Sheridan Rd. 

Robert E. Morris, 6926 Sheridan Rd. 

Francis E. Mornssey, J 1 1 N. Waller 
Ave. 

John P. Mullen, 622. i Wentworth Ave. 

Francis J. Naphin, 1320 Farwell Ave. 

Thomas J. O'Malley, 4126 Wilco.x St. 

Norton F. O'Meara, 6541 Bosworth 
Ave. 

Joseph O'Reilly, 6437 So. Hermitage 
Ave. 

William J. Smeher, 2218 Washington 
Blvd. 

Charles J. Spinnad, 29 1^" W. 24th 
Blvd. 

Richard G. Zvetina, 1726 S. Racine 
Ave. 



II 



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[Page 90] 







SOPHOMORES 



fH 






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M 



Top Roiv: 
Second Row 
Third Row: 
Fourth Row: 
Bottom Row 






fl# 




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[Page 921 




[Daniel J. Donahue, President] 

THE CLASS OF 192 

OFFICERS 

- Daniel J. Donahue, President 

William J. Colohan, Vice-President 

William P. Lowrey, Secretary 

George A. Hatton, Treasurer 



1 




Colohan 



Hatton 



Lowrey 



[Page 93} 






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[Page 94} 



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[Page 95} 



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Interval 






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I fondly dream of tropic lands, 
Of azure s\ies and whitened sands. 
Of lightly swaying mangrove trees, 
And slowly pulsing emerald seas 
That gently lap those far-off strands. 

A virgin forest dar\ly stands. 
Unharmed, unchanged by human hands. 
Withstanding tempest gales with ease: 

I fondly dream. 

And if this restlessness expands 
The body may he stayed by hands; 
Yet swift, the mind its fancy frees 
To travel with some vagrant breeze. 
Until I'ecalled by life's demands 

I fondlv dream. 



J 



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[Page 96} 




FRESHMEN 



/C^y. 






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[Page 98] 



i 




[Cornelius J. Collins, President] 

THE CLASS OF 1929 

OFFICERS 

Cornelius J. Collins, President 

Thomas P. Hickey, Secretary 

Walter J. Scott, Secretary 

J. Edwin Dempsey, Treasurer 




m 



Hickey 



Scott 



Dempsey 



[Page 99] 



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[Page 100] 




[Page 101] 







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^he College 



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Across this ground Youth walked alert 
To find the hidden wealth of life. 
The heart and mind and soul assert 
The honor carried from that strife. 

Youth found at dawn a hope reyiewed 
And faced the day unspent, prepared; 
Let no unheeding feet intrude 
Upon that memory unimpaired. 

Youth grew to \now while growing old 

The price, the glory, the renown 

Of simple honor; and the gold 

Of \nowledge; and the poet's crotvn. 



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Touth huilt its palace without fear 
Until it reached unclouded s\%es 
Upon foundations moulded here 
Enclosing wisdom's treasuries. 



Frank Naphin. 



[Page 110} 



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SOCIOLOGY 



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Ix THE Sor,l(.)LOGY LIBRARY 

THE FOUNDER OF THE SCHOOL OF SOCIOLOGY 

The School of Sociology of Loyola University was founded by Frederic Siedenburg, 
whose activities with Loyola University date back to 1900 when as a scholastic, for 
three years he was on the staff of St. Ignatius College, teaching science and higher 
mathematics and in his spare time directing debates, plays and commencements. After 
his return from Europe in 1911 he was assigned to the north side campus as Head 
Master of the Academy which had been established a few years previous. In 1913 
he asked to be relieved of this work in order to give his time to organise a School 
of Training in Social Work, which would be coeducational and would appeal to the 
volunteer as well as to the professional student. He gave a series of lectures during 
that year which were so well received that it demonstrated the need of a permanent 
school. In September, 1914, the School of Sociology with Father Siedenburg as its 
Dean was formally established, and the school became an integral part of the Uni- 
versity, not only for the social service classes but for other collegiate courses leading 
towards degrees and teachers' promotion. Under the leadership of Father Sieden- 
burg its membership has grown from 212 in the first year to 2,000 or more. But the 
principal growth of the School has been chiefly in the scope of classes and in the de- 
velopment of the faculty and standards. 

From the beginning. Father Siedenburg has also been identiiied v>-ith the social and 
civic activities of the city and state, his influence reaching as well into many national 
fields. He has served on various boards and commissions, notably the Illinois Cen- 
tennial Commission, the City Motion Picture Commission, and more recently, on the 
Board of Directors of the Chicago Public Library. Among the national organi:ations. 






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[Page 112} 



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he has been an officer and a leading spirit in the National Conference of Social Work 
and the National Conference of Catholic Charities. When America entered the 
World War Father Siedenburg volunteered his services and was called upon to help 
in the marshalling and organizing of the social forces of the country. He was a tire- 
less worker in this field, lecturing, serving on committees and boards and throwing 
open the resources of the schtxil for the giving of Red Cross training courses and 
the like. 

In 1918 Father Siedenburg organized the Illinois Catholic Historical Society and 
for the last eight years he has been its main support. In July of 1919, at the invita- 
tion of Bishop Muldoon, he helped to draw up the program of the National Catholic 
Welfare Council and for six years was secretary and treasurer of its Bureau of Social 
Action. He is still its secretary. 

As a lecturer, it is literally true that Father Siedenburg is known in the United 
States and Canada from Montreal to Los Angeles, from Seattle to Miami. He has 
talked not alone to Catholic groups but to Protestant, Jewish and "mixed" audiences, 
on various social and religious topics. Illustrative of this distinction is the fact that 
he was the first Catholic priest to speak at Sinai Temple, the Garrett Biblical Institute 
and Medinah Temple. Articles from his pen have appeared in many magazines, such 
as American Journal of Sociology, The Catholic World, Catholic Charities Review 
as well as in the English Month and Irish Studies. 

The field of Father Siedenburg's spiritual activity has been so wide that his efforts 
have extended from the organizing and conducting of a Sunday School for Italian 
children during his early days in Chicago, to th?t of giving the clergy retreat in the 
Archdiocese of San Francisco, 

The chief contribution of Father Siedenburg to Loyola has been his work as an 
organizer. The School of Sociology in 1914 was the first of its kind in the United 
States and more important than its training of social workers and teachers, is the fact 
that it has always stressed the social as well as the Christian viewpoint with its thou- 
sands of students. 

In 1921 Father Siedenburg was appointed Regent of the School of Law which he 
reorganized on a coeducational basis, he added a morning school and secured for it 
admission into the Association of American Law Schools and the American Bar 
Association. The Home Study Department of the University was opened in the Ash- 
land Block in 1921 and offered its first courses under his direction. It was the first 
Catholic school giving college correspondence courses. In September, 1924, Father 
Siedenburg inaugurated the evening School of Commerce which with the Schools of 
Sociology and Law form the down-town school. 

The Alumnae Association which counts among its achievements, the establishment 
of six scholarships in the School of Sociology has always had Father Siedenburg as 
its faculty member and it was under his leadership that the Alumni and Alumnae 
conceived the idea to build the gymnasium on the campus. Father Siedenburg was 
one of the first members of the Medievalists; at the Hamilton Club he enjoys the dis- 
tinction of being the first priest to hold membership and of the newly organized Col- 
legiate Club he is a member of the board of governors. He is likewise a trustee of 
the Social Workers Club, a director of the Chicago Council of Social Agencies and 
of the Madonna Center, and a member of various civic and social organizations. 

The School of Sociology prepares students for social and administrative work 
through courses leading to a graduate certificate in Social Economy and to the Ph.B. 
degree. It is the down-town college of the College of Arts and Sciences with olfices 
and class-rooms in the Ashland Block. 






[Page 113] 






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Home Study Department 



"Are you ambitious?"" "Do you wish to succeed?"" and kindred captions have 
been familiar quotations to the magazine reader of the past half-century, for corre- 
spondence schools, which apparently appeal to the averatje reader, have been legion. 
Correspondence courses as an integral part of a university "s education program are of 
comparatively recent origin, but since courses are now given by many of the largest 
universities, both state and privately endowed, as well as by many of the smaller ones, 
their value has been successfully established. 

Loyola University was among the first of the Catholic colleges to give such courses 
and although the department is still young in comparison with that of the non-sec- 
tarian schools, it olfers seventy-five courses with a faculty membership of about thirty. 
Because the courses are a part of the University's curricula, the scope of the work is 
limited in character, and a uniform standard of admission is maintained. 

The Home-Study Department is a most democratic one. A student enrolled in a 
composition course, if asked to describe a surrounding scene, is as apt to describe a 
sluggish Indian village in New Me.xico as a busy street scene m Nev^ York, for students 
are drawn from every state in the union as well as from Canada and the Philippine 
Islands. The ages of the students range from nineteen to an admitted fifty-nine and 
Jew and Gentile are often in the same class of study, although one may be in Cali- 
fornia and the other in Maine. 

The largest percentage of the student body, however, is religious, for sisters, priests, 
and religious brothers, have found the work indispensable to their needs. The Uni- 
versity goes with them, when they leave its doors at the close of summer school, and 
follows them to some otherwise lonely mission in an isolated part of the country. 

While home-study students seldom meet any of their classmates (although it is 
not uncommon to have a number of the same community enrolled) , they get rather 
intimately acquainted with the instructor, who often is called upon to send letters 
of condolence or congratulations, depending upon the happening in the family of the 
student which has confidentially been inserted in the forthcoming lesson. It is per- 
haps this intimate personal touch which lightens the burdens of the instructor in this 
"inky road to knowledge."" 



IPage 115] 



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ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

William H. Agnew, S.J President of the University 

Joseph S. Reiner, S.J Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

Marie Sheahan, Ph.B Head of the Home Study Department 

FACULTY 

George Aka, Ph.D. Michael D. Lenehan, A.B. 

Elizabeth M. Blish, Ph.B. Florence M. Leininger, A.B. 

Clara M. Carmody, Ph.B. Vangie R. Morrisey, Ph.B. 

J. William Davis, B.S., M.D. Alice D. Saunders, A.B. 

Julia M. Doyle, A.M. Felix Saunders, B.S. 

John Bernard Fuller, A.M. George M. Schmeing, A.M. 

Helen M. Ganey, A.M. Mane Sheahan, Ph.B. 

Ella M. Garvey, Ph.B. J. Raymond Sheriff, A.B. 

Joseph F. Gonnelly, A.M. Vincent J. Sheridan, A.M. 

Domitilla Hunalt, A.M. Mme. Germaine Gallois Starrs, A.M. 

Florence M. Kane, Ph.B. Richard T. Tobin, Ph.B. 

Robert C. Keenan, A.B. Morton H. Zabcl, A.M. 
Frieda B. Zeeb, A.M. 



[Page 116] 




MEDICINE 



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[Herbert Schmitz, President] 

THE CLASS OF 1926 

OFFICERS 

Herbert Schmitz, President 

Thomas Dwyer, Vice-President 

EsTAL Britton, Secretary 

Sylvester Kelly, Sergeant-at-Arms 







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[Methodius F. Cikrit, Treasurer} 



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THE CLASS OF 1927 

OFFICERS 

Gerald Wood, President 

Methodius Cikrit, Treasurer 

Martha Gciltz, Secretary 

John Hanlon, Sergeant- at- Arms 

William Hagstrom, Student Representative 




Hanlon 



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[Frederick J. Stucker, President] 

THE CLASS OF 192 

OFFICERS 

Frederick Stucker, President 

Michael Indovina, Vice-President 

Natalie Ashmenckas, Secretary 

Richard J. Murphy, Treasurer 




ASHMEXCKAS 



Indovina 



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Mercy Hospital 



The School of Nurses 

THE CLASS OF 1926 
FOREWORD 

We have come to the end of our period of preparation and as we look back over 
the past few years they seem fruitful m many ways. We have not only been trained 
in our profession, but we have acquired other, perhaps more intangible, but neverthe- 
less, very valuable assets; our characters surely must be stronger and truer and 
greater after the discipline of the self-sacrilicing life of hospital routine. 

Before we leave a home that has become dear to us we wish to thank our benefactors. 
Our time here has been made pleasant, yes very pleasant through the efforts of our 
superintendent, Sister M. Thomasina, and our assistant superintendent, Sister M. 
Laurian. We also remember with gratitude. Sister M. Bertille. who was especially 
considerate of our likes and dislikes during our little jaunts to the infirmary. We 
will have interesting memories of our days in training and some day perhaps will 
look back with regret to think they have passed so swiftly by. 






[Page 128] 



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[Elise M. Gicuere, President] 

Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin 

Graduate of Notre Dame High School, Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin. President of 
Senior Class of Mercy Training School. 

"In joys, in griefs, in triumphs, in retreats 
Great always, without aiming to be great." 

TRIBUTE TO OUR SISTER SUPERINTENDENT 

To one who has ever been in the foreground of our life at Mercy we wish to leave 
some little thought, some little sign, some little indentation on the tablet of our 
memory lest we forget. 

She has been one of our inspirations through training; her nobihty of character 
has spurred us on when inclination would have allowed us to falter in our good 
resolutions. Her motherliness has warmed our hearts, her constant solicitude has 
caused us to feel as though we really had a friend to turn to in time of need. Many 
of us will roam far from Mercy but we will never think of these three years without 
some thought of our beloved superintendent. We will remember our first impression 
especially well, the ambition to do great things that she aroused in us, and the reso' 
lution we made to do only the big, the noble thing during our period of training. 

During our iirst year the most difficult things were made easier because of her 
leniency in dealing with us. During our second year she urged us on to greater 
things by her talks in our classes During our third year she repaid us for our struggle 
to become trustworthy by placing more confidence in us and by giving us greater 
responsibilities. In short, she has been the guiding light of our life as student nurses; 
she has been an influence that wc will all remember for many years. 



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Dorothy Harriet Armstrong 
Chicago, Illinois 
Graduate of the St. Xavier's 
Academy, Chicago, Illinois. 
"A boo\ that grows more 
Delightful at each reading." 



Elizabeth Rose Auginbaugh 
Marrill, Nebraska 
Graduate of St. Patrick's Acad' 
emy, Sidney, Nebraska. 
"Age cannot wither her nor 
Custom stale her infinite variety." 



Florence Jane Becker 
Hammond, Indiana 
Graduate of All Saints Acad- 
emy, Hammond, Indiana. Enter- 
tainment and Reception Commit- 
tee, 1926, 

"It is in her heart one finds the 
Gems she possesses.' 



Catherine Leona Bray 
Saginaw, Michigan 
Graduate of S. S. Peter and 
Paul High School, Saginaw, Mi- 
chigan. 

"Bashfulness is an ornament to 
Youth." 



Mildred Anne Butler 
Appleton, Wisconsin 
Graduate of Appleton High 
School, Appleton, Wisconsin. 
"A thrill to some is a thmg apart. 
But a thriU to Mil upsets her 
heart." 






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[Page 130] 



WiS 



Gladys Shirley Carroll 
Carth;ige, Illimns 
Graduate of Carthage College 
Aeademy, Carthage, Illinois. 
"She is both witty and wise." 



Martha Violet Connelly 
Oak Park, Illinois 
Graduate of Stella Niagara 
Seminary, New York. 
"Martha! Martha, thou art 
Troubled about manx things." 



Beatrice Cecell^ Cooney 
New London, Wiseonsin 
Graduate of New London High 
Sehool, New London, Wisconsin. 
"Grtice, beaiitv and elegance. 
With niaideiilv niodcstv fixed." 



Esther Elizabeth Doyle 
La Crosse, Wisconsin 
" Graduate of La Crosse Central 
High School, La Crosse, Wiscon- 
sin.. 

"And It IS said of the ladies. 
That the^i have not wit." 



Lucy Fellner 

"For she is ;ust the quiet i^ind, 
Whose natiu'e ?iei'er varies.' 




[Page 131] 



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Beryl Leah Flatley 

Oconto Falls, Wisconsin 
Graduate of Oconto Falls High 
School, Oconto Falls, Wisconsin. 
"Generally spea\ing, she is — Oh, 
Ge7ierall\ spea\ing." 



CORRINKE C. GiLSIXCER 
Pulaski, Ind. 
Graduate of Pulaski High 
School, Pulaski, Ind. 
"Ever true to her wor\, her word 
and her friends." 



Francis Virgina Goetzman 
Shawneetown, Illinois 
Graduate of University High 
School, Carbondale, Illinois. 
"Good things come in small 
Pac\ages." 



Alice Catherine Goggin 
Areola, Illinois 
Graduate of Areola Township 
High School, Areola, Illinois. 
"Laughter riding on a whirlwind." 



Mary Elizabeth Hansen 
Bloomington, Illinois 
Graduate of Bloomington High 
School, Bloomington, Illinois. 
"A sparkling spirit 
With a dream in her eves." 



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[Page 132] 



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Helen Sheridan Hartican 
Cherokee, Iowa 
Graduate of Wilson Hii;h 
School, Cherokee, Iowa. 
"If she will she unll and yuu may 
depend on't. 
If she won't she won't su there's 
an end on't." 



Margaret Anne Kennedy 
Green Bay, Wisconsin 
Graduate of West High School, 
Green Bay, Wisconsin. 
"Her eyes are the eyes of an angel. 
But the Lvm\ shows the mischiej 
within. " 



Mildred Hildegarde Maier 
Seneca, Illinois 
Graduate of Immaculate Con- 
ception Academy, Davenport, 
Iowa. 

"A tin%' posy from an old 
Fashioned bouquet." 



Monica Jean McCarthy 
Waukon, Iowa 
Graduate of De Sales Heights 
"High School, Dubuque, Iowa. 
"She's our wild Irish rose, 
The sweete.st flower that grows." 



Mildred Agnes McPartlin 
Joliet, Illinois 
Graduate of Providence High 
School, Joliet, Illinois. Secretary- 
Treasurer of Senior Class of 
Mercy Training School. 
"Just some fun at midnight. 
When the lights are low." 




[Page 133] 



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Angeline Milbauer 
Odell, Illinois 
Graduate of St. Paul's 
School, Odell, Illinois. 
"Haughty thoughts are far 


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E\'.\ Mae Morg.^n 

Aberdeen, South Dakota 
Graduate of Aberdeen Central 
High School, Aberdeen, South 
Dakota. 

"Should \ou requne a soothing 
friend, 
Forget me not." 



M.ARGARET Dorothy Nilles 
St. Paul, Minnesota 
Graduate of St. Joseph's Acad' 
emy, St. Paul, Minnesota. 
"She is all harmony, calm and 
qmet. 
Cheerful without mirth." 



Gertrude Rosem.ary Norris 
Chicago, Illinois 
Graduate of St. James High 
School, Chicago, Illinois. 
"Bashful and shy 
As the doctors pass bv." 



Ella Virginia O'Brien 
Chicago, Illinois 

"She \eeps the hall arolling, 
A jolly good sport is she. 
We could not do u'ithoiit he 
Irish Ginnx OB." 



{Page 134] 



^■ 



NoRiNE A. Oddon 

Fort Wayne, Indiana 
Graduate of St. Augustine 
Academy, Fort Wayne, Indiana. 
"She is an artist superfme, 
A girl li}{e her you seldom find." 



Eileen Gertrude Paten.\ude 
Green Bay, Wisconsin 
Graduate of West High School, 
Green Bay, Wisconsin. 
"A pensive flower, 
Gathered at midnight s magic 
hour." 



Ele.anor M. Polasik 



Lucy Nor.^ Russell 
Roberts, lUinois 
Graduate of Roberts' High 
School, Roberts, Ilhnois. 
"Love, sweetness, goodness. 
In her person shines." 



Genevieve Mary Saller 
Kendallville, Indiana 
Graduate of Kendallville High 
School, Kendallville, Indiana. 
"To those who }{now thee not 
7\(o words can paint. 
To those who \now thee. 
All u'ords are faint." 




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[Page 135] 



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Laura Marie Schuster 
Waterloo, Iowa 
Graduate of St. Mary's High 
School, Waterloo, Iowa. 
"Rare compound oddity, frolic 
and fun. 
Who relished a jo\e ay^d rejoiced 
ni a pun." 

Kathryk Helen Schutty 
Fort Madison, Iowa 
Graduate of St. Joseph's High 
School, Fort Madison, Iowa. 
"She spreads around her that 
silent spell. 
That ma\es all people love her 
well." 

Marguerite Sexton 
Chicago, Illinois 
Graduate of Loretto Academy, 
Chicago, Illinois. Vice-president 
of Senior Class of Mercy Train- 
ing School. 

"Full of fun and mischief too, 
_D(iing tilings she shouldn't do." 

Jessemae Sinclair 

Winner, South Dakota 
Graduate of Winner High 
School, Winner, South Dakota. 
"As brimful of mischief, wit and 
glee. 
As an\ lassie might ever he." 

Gertrude M. Stier 

Appleton, Wisconsin 
Graduate of Appleton High 
School, Appleton, Wisconsin. 
"A wor\er, a friend and a stu- 
dent, 
And each of these carefidly 
ivrought." 



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[Page 136} 



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Mary Tighe 

Omaha, Nebraska 
Graduate of Bancroft High 
School, Omaha, Nebraska. 
"Grace was in her steps, heaven 
in her eye, 
In every gesture dignity and 
love." 

Anna Bernice Walsh 
Rantoul, Ilh'nois 
Graduate of Donovan Memor- 
ial Hiijh Sch<iol, Rantoul, Illinois. 
"Her modest ]oo}{s the sic\ room 
might aduryi. 
Sweet as the primrose that peeps 
beneath the thorn." 

Hilda Marie Waterson 
Bloomington, Illinois 
Graduate of St. Clare Acad- 
emy, Sinsinawa, Wisconsin. 
"A smile, a song, a word of good 
cheer. 
And you may be sure that Hilda 
is near." 

Genevieve Marie Welch 
Oxford, Iowa 
Graduate of Immaculate Con- 
ception Academy, Davenport, 
Iowa. 

"A winning way. a pleasant smile, 
' A \indly word for all." 

FRANCE.S Teresa Welliver 
Strawn, Illinois 
Graduate of Longwood Acad- 
emy, Chicago, Illinois. 
"A woman's heart li\e the moon is 
ever changing. 
But there is always a man in it." 

Therese Marie Wurth 
Columbus Grove, Ohio 
Graduate of Ottoville High 
School, Columbus Grove, Ohio. 




[Page 137} 



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[Page 138} 



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[Page 139] 




THE BELLS 

Hear the ringing of the bells — midnight bells. 

What a lot of energy their repeated ding compels. 

In the darkness of the night, 

How we dread to make a light 

Perhaps to see an old man in a frame 

Some kiddies with sore throats — 

Or a patient taking notes on each pain. 

But the patients who cause panics 

Are the ones down in the annex, ail alone. 

They are calling, calling, calling 

On the south end telephone. 

'Tis for feedings they are calling 

Of the famous milk and cream. 

Be it either man or woman 

We will have to treat them human 

And be smiling quite beguiling to their calls. 

Just keep going, going, going 

'Til the cocks of morn start crowing 

Answering bells. 

Answering constant, ringing, dinging patients" bells. 

J. M. S. 



THE SODALITY 

During September of 1926, the Sodality of the Blessed Virgin was re-organized, 
and Esther Doyle was elected President, Gertrude Norris, Vice-President, and Althea 
Benning, Secretary and Treasurer. A Communion Sunday was appointed for each 
class, and monthly meetings were to be conducted by the President. 

Rev. Father Collins has given us monthly lectures on the leading problems of our 
profession. He has been an outstanding character throughout our training, and we 
wish to take this opportunity to express our sincere gratitude for his kindly interest 
in all the nurses of the Training School. He has always assisted us in the regaining 
of our spiritual balance, and acquiring a sane perspective for our personal and pro- 
fessional life. 



[Page 140} 




LAW 



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The Law School History 

i 

The School of Law of Loyola University was established in September, 1908, as 

, _ '/] the Lincoln College of Law. The Rev. Francis Cassily, S.J., was appointed by 

1^ " President Henry Dumbach, S.J., as Regent, and he, with Hon. Wm. Dillon, Hon. 

Marcus Kavanaugh, Hon. Patrick H. O'DonncU, and Arnold MacMahon, Esq., 

founded the School. Mr. Dillon, its first dean, was assisted by a faculty including 

Hon. Michael F. Girten, Hon. John P. McGoorty, Michael V. Kanally, Howard 

1-,^-il Sprogle, and Joseph Connell, with Hon. Edward F. Dunne, afterwards Governor of 

' '"''i Illinois, and Hon. Edward O. Brown, afterwards Chief Justice of the Appelate Court, 

among the special lecturers. 

Opening with an enrollment of thirty, the School held its classes on the tw-elfth 
floor of the Ashland Block, but the rapidly growing student body made a move 
into larger quarters on the sixth floor necessary in 1910, subsequently enlarged in 
I 1914. The succeeding Regent, Rev. Edward J. Gleason, S.J., introduced courses in 

I l''l Logic and Sociology, and he was succeeded in 1912 by the Rev. Frederic Siedenburg, 

S.J., who held the Regency until 1916 when he was followed by Rev. Patrick A. 
Mullens, S.J., as Regent and Professor of Legal Ethics. In 1921, Father Siedenburg 
was put at the head of the school and he introduced the morning school and made 
both sessions co-educational. In 1921, Mr. McMahon, who had been Secretary from 
the school's beginning and Acting Dean since 1916, was made Dean, and he held this 
office until he resigned in 1924, to be succeeded by Mr. McCormick, the present 
Acting Dean. Mr. Francis J. Rooney, M.A., LL.B,, became the Registrar at the 
same time. 

ii.-'"^jl ^'^ May, 192?, and again in May, 192'>, additional rooms were acquired until today 

i^^w '■'^^ school is equipped with five large class rooms, five executive offices, and a com- 

' pletely equipped library of seven thousand volumes. In December, 1924, the School 

J of Law became a member of the Association of American Law Schools, and in March, 

1925, was admitted to the approved classification of the American Bar Association. 

This gives the School the highest possible rating. In September, 1925, formal post 
t^^M graduate courses were given with such success that they will be continued. At present 

the faculty numbers thirty, and the student body 280, of which ^7 are in the day 

school. 



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[Page 142] 



Student Council of the Law School 




William J. Campbell, Pnsidunt 



MEMBERS 



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Mathew C. Ecan 
Lawrence A. Barrett 
Leonard Carmody 
Daniel J. McMahon, Jr. 
John J. Hartnett 
Thomas Murphy 
Anna Marie Galvin 



Aloysius Cronin 
Timothy D. Hurley 
Charles R. Barrett 
Edward J. Dunne 
John R. Lamb 
Marvin Adams 
George A. Lane, Tr. 



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[Page 14J] 






I 






■^\?^ 







[WiLLHM J. Campbell, President] 

THE CLASS OF 1926 

Evening 

William J. Campbell, President 

Edward F. Kane, Vice-President 

Evangeline C. Hursen, Secretary 

William J. Dempsey, Treasurer 



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Hursen 



Dempsey 



[Page 144} 




[Leonard F. Carmody, President] 

THE CLASS OF 1926 

Day 

Leonard F. Carmody, President 

Daniel J. McMahok, Jr., Vice-President 

Clara Morris, Secretary-Treasurer 

Marion G. Bremner, Class Editor 




McMahon 



Morris 



Bremner 



[Page 145} 



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[Page 146} 



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[John J. Hartnett, President} 



THE CLASS OF 1927 

Evening 

John J. Hartnett, President 

John T. Gallac.her, Vice-President 

Cornelius P. Ford, Secretary 

Patrick J. Cahill, Treasurer 



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Gallagher 



Ford 









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[Page 147} 



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[Page 148] 



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[Anna Marie Galvik, President] 

THE CLASS OF 1927 

Day 

Anna Marie Galvin, President 

Patric:ia Hayes, Vice-President 

Aloysius Cronin, Treasurer 

Joseph Bush, Treasurer 



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[Page 149] 



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[Page 1^-0] 




[TiMdTHY D. Hurley, President] 



THE CLASS OF 1928 

Evening 

TiMiiTHY D. Hurley, President 

Richard Tobin, Vice-President 

ZiTA Stone, Secretary 

John Coffey, Treasurer 




TOBlN 



Stone 



Coffey 



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[Page m] 




[Marvin Adams, President] 

THE CLASS OF 192 

Day *)■ 

OFFICERS 
Marvin Adams, President 'A^;' - ■ 
^ .Haruld Lede.ier, Vice-President • ■- 
Janet Ahearn, Secretary 
George Lane, Treasurer 



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[Page 153] 



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[Page \U] 




[Edward J. Dunne, President'] 

THE CLASS OF 1929 

Evening 

OFFICERS 

Edward J. Dunne President 

Mary Foster Vice-President 

Richard Lamij Treasurer 







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[Page 155] 



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[Page 157} 









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[Page 158} 




'>'r:-5'^ 



COMMERCE 



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Thomas J Reedy, LL.B., C.P.A., Dean 



FOREWORD 

The School of Commerce has grown, during the two years of its existence, into one 
of the most promismg and flourishing departments of the University. Those tradi- 
tions, clubs, and societies which were necessarily lacking during the early months of 
^\[ building, have gradually come to hold a part of the SchooFs life, and the future 

holds the assurance of an increasing student group and a constantly more animated 
( ] interest in the welfare of so vital a department. The results of the work, taken from 

a scholastic viewpoint, have been gratifying and the co-operation which has been ex- 
'^\\ pended upon the undertaking has called for the debt of gratitude from all interested 

in the department's welfare. 

The future is auspicious- it is the belief of the School that it is rendering a real 
service to the students and to the community. 



[Page 160} 




41' 

&v the Cotz2tu<s.t7ce. 
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[Page 161] 



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Peter T. Swanish, M.B.A. 
Adviser, Commerce Course, Arts and Science College 



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THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 

History 

In the summer of 1924 Father Frederic Siedcnburg, S.J., was commissioned by the 
President of the University, Father WiUiam H. Agnew, S.J., to organize a School of 
Commerce as a part of the down-town school. Mr. Thomas J. Reedy, A.M. (Creigh' 
ton), LL.B. (Loyola), C.P.A. (University of Illinois), was selected as the first Dean 
of the School. The first classes were held in the Ashland Block in September, 1924, 
the original enrollment numbering 8^, of whom 5'i were commerce, 20 pre-legal, and 
10 special students. 

The school is co-educational and fifteen of those originally enrolled were young 
ladies. The student body contains graduates from De La Salle Institute, St. Mel's, 
St. Patrick's, St. Phillip's, and many other Catholic high schools and also a repre- 
sentative number from the public and out-of-town schools. 

In the first year of the school's existence, classes were offered in Accounting, Busi- 
ness Law, Economics, and English. Pre-Legal students studied these subjects except 
Business Law, and also attended classes in American History and Political Science. In 
February twenty new students were enrolled and additional classes were offered in 
Accounting, Economic History and European History. Later classes in Business Ad- 
ministration, History and English were formed, and the school was prosperously 
continued through its first summer session. 

In September of the year just past classes even larger than the promising ones of 
the first year enrolled in the School of Commerce, the faculty was increased to handle 
the growth in numbers, and classes in Advanced Accounting, Cost Accounting, Ad- 
vanced Economics, Advertising and Credits were formed. Each year it is planned 
to offer additional classes until the end of the fourth year when complete courses in 
Commerce and Business Administration will have been covered. The administration 
of the School continues to be handled by Thomas J. Reedy, its dean, and Francis J. 
Rooney, A.M., LL.B., its Registrar. 



[Page 162] 



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Chicago College of Dentistry 

Dental Department of Loyola Umversny 

The Chicago College of Dental Surgery, which in 1924 became the dental de- 
partment of Loyola University, boasts the finest equipment obtainable for its essential 
work. The building, located in the heart of the medical center of Chicago, facing the 
Cook County Hospital and surrounded by other dental and medical schools, stands 
out among its fellows as the last word in what a dental building should be. Its five 
stories are thoroughly fireproof and modern in every respect. The first two floors 
are devoted to clinics, while the others contain the classrooms and eight laboratories. 
On the three top floors there are also three of the best amphitheatres known, seating 
one, two and three hundred students respectively. 



[Page 163] 



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C. N. Johnson 

Hean of Men. 



Truman W. Brophy 

Preside7it and Dean Emeritus 



DR. CHARLES N. JOHNSON, M.A., L.D.S., D.D.S., M.D.S., F.A.C.D. 

There perhaps is not a more eminent man in the Dental profession than Dr. C. N. 
Johnson. 

Dr. Johnson is a Canadian by birth and he was educated in Canadian Colleges and 
practiced a few years in Canada before he came to the United States. He graduated 
from the Royal College of Dental Surgeons in 1881 from which he received his L.D.S. 
degree. He came to Chicago and received his D.D.S. from the Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery in 1885. He later received his Master of Arts degree from Lake 
Forest University in 1896. 

Dr. Johnson has done work from the literary and educational standpoint of dentistr>' 
that will cause him to stand out like a Pike's Peak among the great men of the 
dental profession. No one in the history of dentistry has ever discussed as many 
papers as Dr. Johnson. A careful review of dental literature will show that he has 
opened the discussion of a large percentage of the papers that have been read before 
the old Chicago Odontographic Society, the Chicago Dental Society and the Illinois 
State Dental Society. 

Invariably, when some distinguished guest appeared before any of these societies, 
Dr. Johnson was delegated to open the discussion. This, in itself is quite significant 
in that the universal opinion of dentists in Chicago has always been that Dr. Johnson 
was pre-eminently qualified to represent the real progress of dentistry in the Middle 
West. He is recognized as a great author, educator and teacher. Dr. Johnson has 
written over 550 editorials and nearly 200 original articles. His book on Operative 
Dentistry will ever stand out as a monumental work for the profession and will cause 
his name to be recorded as one of the great operators in dental history. 






[Page 164} 




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[Page 165] 



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Loyola University Alumni 



PRESENT OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI 
ASSOCIATION 

Daniel A. Laughlin President 

James R. Bremner Vice-President 

M. Malachy Foley, Payton J. TouHY-Vjce-Preside?its 

f^^ ^B George A. Lane, Jr Secretary 

John A. Shannon Treasurer 

Rev. Frederic Siedenburg Faculty Member 

OFFICERS OF THE MAROON AND GOLD CLUB 

_^^__^ _ _ Joseph A. Gauer President 

Charles Gallagher Vice-President 

George Lane, Secretary George A. Lane, Jr Secretary-Treasurer 




BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



Morris Walsh, '21 
Edward Krupka, '24 
Dennis Morrissey, '24 
Bernard J. McDevitt, 



Dr, Ford (Dental College) 



Dr. Ernest Schniedwind, '09 
Thomas Reedy, '09 
Payton Touhy, '04 
Dr. Claw (Dental College) 



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The past year has been in every way a golden one for Loyola's Alumni. The mem- 
bers of the Alumni Association proper and those of the Maroon and Gold Club, 
the active athletic unit of the Alumni, who have been constant and enthusiastic sup- 
porters and promoters of the "Greater Loyola" ideal for many years, have this year 
seen their dreams come true. 

Homecoming was held on November 21st in connection with the John Carroll U 
football game, and, as a result of the gridiron victory and the splendid hospitality 
of the fraternities, and especially on account of the fine turnout of the Alumni, was 
a complete success. 

Probably the most momentous event of the year for the graduates was the Greater 
Loyola Banquet, which took place on February 10th in the Red Lacquer Room of the 
Palmer House. Over three hundred Alumni and Alumnae attended and with songs 
and speeches celebrated the arrival of Loyola into the domain of the truly great. 
President William H. Agnew, S.J., the Deans and representative groups from all of 
the departments of the University, joined with the "Grads" in this celebration. Hon. 
William E. Dever, Mayor of Chicago, and Mrs. J. Paul Goode, of the Illinois State 
Legislature, were the guests of honor, of the Alumni and Alumnae respectively, and 
were also the speakers of the evening. The entire program was broadcast to the 
nation through the courtesy of Radio Station WJJD. 



[Page 166] 



Loyola University Alumnae 



'^ 

P 

B. Elsie Drake President pr:^ 

Helen R. Orrell Vice-President 

Mary E. Kelly Secretary 

Irene McMahon Treasurer '(f''\ 

Nellie F. Ryan Delegate 

Af.ATHA Long Alternate 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Cclia M. Gilmore Margaret Madden Katherine MacMillan 

Ella R. Connell Agnes B. Clohesy Margaret O'Connor 

Marie Sheahan Irene Inderrieden 

Loyola University Alumnae is ten years young and not at all apologetic for its 
youth. The organization idea originated at an informal dinner, held at the Hotel 
LaSalle in June, 1915, and the following October a regular alumnae organization was 
perfected. While a purely social spirit prompted the iirst meeting, the members soon 
decided to undertake a serious work, namely, the establishment of a perpetual scholar- 
ship of fifteen hundred dollars. Four such scholarships, totaling an endowment of 
six thousand dollars, have been presented to the University, and so each year four 
worthy students receive the course in Social Service as the proteges of the Alumnae. 
One of these scholarships has been named the Elizabeth O'Dea Scholarship, in mem- 
ory of one who in life worked unselfishly for her Alma Mater. 

The Alumnae has been doing its part in procuring funds for the g>'mnasium located 
on the northside campus. To date, seven thousand dollars have been pledged and 
-additional pledges are coming in. 

On the Alumnae calendar several events of interest appear. A lecture with a mu- 
sicale is given each spring at some downtown theatre. Among the distinguished 
lecturers presented by the Alumnae have been Mary Boyle O'Reilly, Thomas A. Daly, 
Hilaire Belloc, Frederick Paulding and Bishop Francis Kelley of Oklahoma. Several 
teas, outings and luncheons take place throughout the year to enable present and 
past students to become better acquainted. 

At present there are approximately five hundred members in the organization. There 
are two classes of membership, active and associate. Any student who has completed 
nine majors in residence may become an active member. A student who has com- 
pleted one major may become an associate member. Only active members may hold 
office. The membership fee for both classes of membership is one dollar per year. 
Present and past students at the Schools of Sociology, Law and Commerce are cor- 
dially invited to join. 



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i 



[Page 167} 




Miss M. Lillian Ryan 
LOYOLA UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 

During the past year the Library has continued to increase its facihties and enlarge 
its service so that it is rapidly taking its place as a fully-equipped university library. 
The librarianship of Miss M. Lillian Ryan has continued to make itself felt in the 
manner in which both faculty and students have been obliged in the use of the books 
and in the general improvement of the department and its equipment. Miss Ryan 
has this year been ably assisted by Miss Mary Sweeny and Father Froebes has con- 
tinued in his position as the University's Librarian. 

The various departments of the University each have their branch departmental 
library, filled with books for the special uses and needs of professional research work. 
Among these, the library of the Law School has been notably enlarged and enriched 
during the past year. The number of students availing themselves of the North 
Campus Library facilities bears witness to the popularity and charm of the main Uni- 
versity library which is so much the center of any university's chief scholastic interests. 



[Page 168] 



^'^IV^ 



FRATERNITIES 



With Dates of Their Estdhhshment At Loyola 



i 



SOCIAL 

Phi Mu Chi 1922 

Alpha Delta Gamma 1924 

Pi Alpha Lambda 1925 

PROFESSIOHAL 

Phi Chi 1904 

Phi Beta Pi 1921 

Phi Lambda Kappa 1921 

Sigma Nu Phi 1924 

Delta Theta Phi 1925 

SORORITIES 

Nu Sk;ma Phi 1921 

KLappa Beta Pi 1924 

HONOR SOCIETIES 

TivNEN Ophthalmological Society 1922 

Iota Mu Sigma 1923 

The Ghouls 1924 

Pi Kappa Epsilon 1924 

The Seminar 1924 

Lambda Rho 1925 

The Blue Key 1926 

Beta Pi 1926 









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[Page 169} 



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[Page 170] 



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Phi Mu Chi 

Beta Chapter 

6219 Wmthrop Ave. 

Established at Loycila University, November 22, 1922 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 



Bertram J. Steccert, A.M. 



George M. Schmeinc; A.M. 



RdBERT R. Mustell, M.D. 

OFFICERS 

Fr.^nk J. LoDESKl President 

Lars Lundgoot Vice-President 

Thomas F. Ahearn Secretary 

Thomas F. Ahearn Treasurer 

Henry L. Rubsam Master of Pledges 

Charles Weigel Sergeant- at- Arms 

Frank Burke Md,5ter of Ceremonies 

MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 
Class of 1927 
Thomas B. Carney Louis J. Franey Arthur E. Murphy 

John Cullinan Frank J. Lodeski 

Class of 1928 
Thomas F. Ahearn Paul J. Gilson Charles Quinn 

Ben Aieher, Jr. Raymond W. Kerwin Fred Sehallenberger 

Franeis Cirrincione 

Class of 1929 

John F. Burke Joseph H. Garthe Harold Robinson 

William S. Conway Robert Hawkins Edward Wawr;niak 

Joseph Coyle Thomas Kallal Charles Weige! 

James Curry Walter J. Karr Edward Zimmerman 

Willis Fitzsimmons Lars Lundgoot 

' ■■. Pledged j 

Francis Doheny Carl Klein -'..- Alphonse Tomaso_- 



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[Page 171] 



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[Page 172} 




Alpha Delta Gamma 

Founded, 1924 

Director 

Reverend Charles A. Meehan, S.J. 

OFFICERS 

James O'Brien President 

EucENE McFawn Vice-President 

Frank P. Canary Secretary 

Peter Klapperich Treasurer 

George A. H.atton Pledge Master 

MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 
Alumni 
William Hallisey Donald La Fleur 

Class of 1927 
Thomas O'Malley 



Class of 1928 



George M. Wray 
Daniel J. Donahue 
■La Roy Wilkins 
Michael Pauly 



Stanley Blondin 
John Ennis 



Kenneth Furlong 
William Smith 
Frank Butler 
John Waldron 



John Toomey 



Class of 1929 



Walter Scott 
Charles Stimmins 






i 



Maurice Murphy 



[Page 173] 




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[Page 174} 




Pi Alpha Lambda 

6? 16 Kcnmore Ave. 
Established February 2(S, \92'i , at Loyola University 

MEMBERS IN FACULTY 
James J. Mertz, S.J. Roger J. Kiley, LL.B. 

OFFICERS 

Aloysius Bremner President 

THOM.^s Byrne Vice-President 

Leonard McGr.aw Master of Pledges 

Lee Jacobs Corresponding Secretary 

James O'Connor Recording Secretary 

James Barrett Treasurer 

Russell Dooley Sergeant-at-Arms 

Edwin Berwick Steward 

Joseph Byrnes Historian 

MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 
Class of 1926 

James Barrett Russell Dooley Leonard Maher 

Edwin Berwick Gordon Downey James Roach 

Aloysius Bremner Arthur McDonough John Schell 

Joseph Byrnes Leonard MdGraw Thomas Stamm 

Class of 1927 
Thomas Byrne Robert Hartnett Lee Jacobs 

Class of 1928 
John Bergmann Emmett Hogan James O'Connor 

Alexander Brown Edward Hurtubise Henry Remien 

Willis Carpenter William Lowrey John Remien 

Henry Fox James Nash 

Class of 1929 

James Bremner Morgan Healy James Hughes 

John Bryant Thomas Hickey Paul Leit: 

Edwin Dempsey Paul Holtorf Paul Reed 

Pledged 

Linten Moustakis Frank Naphin Matt Sanders 

Frank Farrell Frank Manley Cornelius Collins 

Richard Ford . Preston Higgins 



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[Page 175} 




[Page 176] 



1^. 




Phi Chi 



Dr. Arnold 
Dr. Berrey 
Dr. Black 
Dr. Boyd 
Dr. Compere 



Phi Sigma Chapter 

Loyola School of Medicine 

Founded, University of Vermont, March, 1889 

Established at Loyola University, March 7, 1907 

MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

Dr. Drennan Dr. Grimm Dr. Mahoney 

Dr. Elghammer Dr. A. E. Jones Dr. F. Mueller 

Dr. McGuire, M. Dr Valdez 

Dr. McGuire, W. Dr. Vaughn 



Dr. Paris 
Dr. Gerty 
Dr. Grabow 



OFFICERS 

George Guldager Presiding Seyiior Louis E. Cell.a Judge Advocate 

Edward McGowen Presiding Junior Edward Ducey Spectre 

James Callahan Treasurer Edward RHOMBERG_Ma.ster of Cereriionies 

Robert Lee Secretary John Hanlon Sentinel 

Emil Viskocil First Guide 



Black 
Cella 
Eldridge 
Guldager 

Clark 

Champagne 
Cikrit 
Diamond 

Fitzgerald 
Stucker 
Lee 
Bodmer 

Hawkins 
Turner 

Anderson 
Kullman 



MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 
Class of 1926 
Hummon Nelson 

M. C. Johnson Repper 



Keane 



Ryan 





Cl 


^ss 


OF 1927 


Ducey 






Leonard 


Callahan 






McGowan 


Fo.v 






Scroha 


Hanlon 






Stadelman 



Class of 1928 
O'Hare Rhomberg 

Viskocil Pistory 

A R. Johnson Wiltrakis 

Michelano Jones 

Class of 1929 

Zimm.erman 



Marquis 

DriscoU 
Mayer 



Pledges 
Evans 
Coyle 



Sequin 

Kelly 

J. W. Johnson 



Macksood 

O'Hearn 

Olney 



Aronsdorf 

Cava 

McGonigle 



Lundgoot 



Walsh 
Minardi 



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[Page 177} 



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[Page 178} 



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J§ty» NU^Sr 



Sigma Nu Phi 

Established at Loyola in 1924 

OFFICERS 

John J. Hartnett Chancellor 

John T. Gallagher 1st Vice-President 

John H. Mulligan 2nd Vice-President 

Richard Tobin Registrar 0/ Exchequer 

John M. Kiley Master of Rolls 



m) 



MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 



Leonard Carniody 
James M. Corcoran 
Chester Dankowski 
Clem. H Brennecke 
V. S. Higley 



Class of 1926 



Chas. J. Grablowski 
J. Lawrence Holleran 
John G. Sujack 
Raymond W. Foley 



Class of 1927 



Edward Enright 
Joseph J. Fylnn 
John T. Gallagher 
George A. Glowczewsky 
John J. Hartnett 
John M. Kiley 



John H. Mulligan 
Michael Mulcahy 
James E. Poling 
Charles J. Roubik, Jr. 
Don V. Steger 



John J. Coffey 
T. Russell Dorgan 
Timothy D. Hurley 
George T. Mulligan 



Class of 1928 



Thomas J Murphy 
Leonard C. Prendergast 
Richard Tobin 




Benjamin Aicher 
Frank Pokorney 



Class of 1929 



[Page 179] 



] E. Patka 
C. J Polake 



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[Page 180] 




Phi Beta Pi 

Alpha Omejja Chapter 
MEMBERS IN FACULTY 



B. B. Beeson 
E. L. Moorhead 
L. D. Moorhead 
R. M. Strong 
H. Schmitz 
R. J. Tivnen 

H. W. Erickson- 

J. H. Turner 

G. L. Joyce 

E. J. Wiley 

L. Bell 



R. R. Mustel 
I. F. Volini 
V. B. Bowler 
F. C. Leeming 
J. H. Harvey 



S. A. Matthews 
R. E. Dyer 
T. P. Foley 
H. J. Dooley 
W. I. Pickett 



J. L. Meyer 
G. D. Griffin 
H. J. Dwyer 
L. A. Halloran 
W. J. Swift 



OFFICERS 



Archon 

.Vice-Archon 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Steward 



O. H. Ball 
L. Bell 

F. D. Caldeira 
H. W. Erickson 

J. F. Barrett 
C. V. Crane 
J. E. Duffy 
W. J. Hagstrom 

R. W. Kerwin 
A. D. Krausc 
L. H. Neff 

R. H. Fouser 
W. J. Karr 

T. J. Greteman 



F. P. York Worthy Counselor 

MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 

Class of 1926 
G. L. Joyce William Somerville 

J. V. McMahon J. H. Turner 

H. E. Schmits G. H. Watters 

H. P. Sloan 

Class of 1927 
W. G. Hartnett J. G. Powers 

J. J. Madden C. K. Todd 

G. H. Marquardt E. A. Proby 



A. D. Krause Historian 

J. G. Powers Editor 

L. D Urban Guide 

L. H. Neff Hon. Guardian 

G. H. Watters Chaplain 



Class of 1928 
W. E. Pugh J. H. Garnet 

C. F. Schaub M. A. Melnicl 

L. D. Urban 

Class of 1929 
W. S. Conway S. W. Reagan 

J. D. Caulfield H. J. Stengle 



E. T. Wiley 

F. P. York 
W. R. Walker 



R. H. Ruhmkorff 
R. S. Westline 
R. A. Winters 



R. A. Perritt 
G. A. Lofdahl 



H. A. Gross 
C. L. Lloyd 



Pledged 



J. A. Gibney 



B. C. Luerhsman 



[Page 181] 




fPage 182] 




Phi Lambda Kappa 

G.imniii Chapter 

Founded at the University of Pennsylvania m 1907 

Installed at Loyola University in 1921 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

Dr. B. E. Elliot ■' Dr. H. Bau 

Dr. H. Buxbaum Dr. L. Brody 

e^FFICERS 

S. S. Fr.-\NKEL Worthy Suftcnor 

I. SoBEL Worthy Chancellor 

S. H(;LNITSKY Worthy Scribe 

H. Sapoznik Worthy Exchequer 

L. J. R.ADEST Sergeant-at-Arms 

MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 

Class of 1926 
S. Holnitsky L. J. Radcst 

Cl.ass of 1926-7 

S. S. Frankel L Slatowsky 

M J. Hoffman I. Sohel 

H. Simons B. Turman 

Class of 1927-S 
M. Goodman J. Frohovnik 

G. Green H. Sajxcnik 

H. Levy 

Class of 1928-9 

B. Greenberg A. Fagelsow 

P. Finkelstein I. Ludwig 

I. Pritikin F. Shapiro 

M. Fork.ish 



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[Page 183] 



Ms. 



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[Page 184] 



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Delta Theta Phi 

Joseph A. McKenna Senate 

OFFICERS 

Patrick J. Cronin Dean 

James J. Kelly Vice-Dean 

Raymond P. Cawley Cler\ of the Rolls 

James J. Goss Cler\ of the Exchequer 

Edward F. Kane Master of the Ritual 

James B. Mariga BaiUff 

William J. Campbell Tribune 



fe^ 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 
John V. McCormick, J.D., A.B. 







MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 


I- -■ : 


Herman J. Bittle William T. Murphy 


pk 


John D. Brennan Thomas Owens 
Wilham J. Connell James A. Penny 




William J. Dempsey Thomas P. Quinn 


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Edward J. Hereley Sebastian Rivera 


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[Page 185] 



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[Page 186] 




Nu Sigma Phi 

Medical Sorority, Epsilon Chapter 

FACULTY MEMBERS 
Noreen Sullivan 

OFFICERS 

Martha G(1lt2 President 

Mrs. L. Snow Vice-President 

Olga M. Latka Secretary 

Hattie Bonus Treasurer 

Natalie Ashmenckas Archive 



MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 

Class of 1926 
Estal Bntton 

Class of 1927 

Gertrude Engbring Francisca Luna 

Martha Golt; Hattie Bonus 

Class of 1928 
Olija M Latka Natalie Ashmenckas 



Nellie Brown 



Class of 1929 
Ella Valenta 



Ruth Joeger 



Interne 
Lillian A. Dobry 



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[Page 187] 



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Kappa Beta Pi 

Alpha Theta Chapter 

National Legal Sorority 

Founded in 1910 

OFFICERS 

Evangeline Hursen Dean 

Cecilia Gilmore Vice-Dean 

Marion Bremner Chancellor 

Camille Caravetta Registrar 

Marcaret Byrne Sergeant-at-Arms 

ALUMNAE 

Margaret Byrne Cecilia Gilmore 

Camille Caravetta Jessie McGeever 

MEMBERSHIP IN UNIVERSITY 

Class of 1926 
Marion Brcmncr Evangeline Hursen 

Class of 1927 

Anna Marie Galvin Mary Kelly 

Patricia Hayes Clara Morris 

Class of 1928 

Anna Johnson Elizabeth King 

Zita Stone 



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[Page 189} 



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[Page 190] 





Dr. Richard J. Tivnen 
Ophthalmological Society 

Founded in 1922 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

Richard J. Tivnen, M.D Honorary President 

George Ensminger, M.D Honorary Vice-President 

MEMBERS IN FACULTY 
William H. Agnew, S.J. Louis D. Moorhead, M.D. 

Patrick J. Mahan, S.J. Edward L. Moorhead, M.D. 

OFFICERS 

G. H. Watter,s President 

F. P. York Vice-President 

L. L. Bell Secretary 

E. E. Britton Treasurer 

MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 
Class of 1926 

jt- L. L. Bell J. V. McMahon 

I J. E. Black H. J. Ryan 

.;!.t-' E. E. Bntton H. P. Sloan- 

T. L. Dwycr W. Sumerville 

G. F. Guldager G. H. Watters 

J. W. Johnson E. J. Wiley 
F. P. Yorke 

Class of 1927 

E. F. Ducey J. G. Powers 

J. E. DufFy J. J. Prentergast 

G. M. Engbring E. A. Proby 

H. B. Fox R. L. Lallman 

R. S. Westline 



[Page 191] 



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[Page 192} 




Dr. Volini 



Iota Mu Sigma 

Founded, October, 192 J 
Honorary Faculty Members 
Dr. Partipilo 



Dr. Suldane 



OFFICERS 

R. Drago President 

S. GoVERN.ALE Vice-President 

S. Geraci Treasurer 

A. J. Pace Secretary 

C. MuzziCATO Librarian 

L. Carofiglio Sergeant-at'Arms 






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MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 



J. Conforti 
H. Fieri 
A. Geraci 



Abramo 
Castro 



C. Gullo 


A. Mastri 


M. Indovina 


T. Serio 


L. Macaluso 


S. Vainisi 


Pledged 




Catania 


Nigro 


Pecoraro 


Russo 



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[Page 193] 



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[Page 194] 




The Ghouls 

Established at Loyola University School of Medicine, March 17, 1924 
OFFICERS 

J. G. Powers President 

J. J. Madden Vice-President 

J. P. McGuiRE Treasurer 

W. J. Hagstrom Secretary 

H. B Fox Scribe 






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Class of 1927 



J. J. Madden 
J. G. Powers 
C. V. Crane 
H. B. Fox 
J. P. McGuire 
A, B. Traub 



W. J. Egan 
E. J. Viskocil 
R. E. Lee 
J. J. Fitzgerald 
L. J. Urban 



W. J. Hagstrom 

J. J. Hanlon 

J. J. Prendergast 

J. J. Duffy 

R. S. Westline 

G. H. Marquardt 



Class of 1928 



A. D. Krause 
L. J. Greenwood 
J. H. Garnet 
A. F. Kramps 
R. W. Kerwin 



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F. J. Stucker 



[Page 195] 



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[Page 196] 




Pi Kappa Epsilon 

Established at Loyola in 1924 

MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

L, D. Moorhead, A.M., M.S., M.D., T. E. Boyd, B.S., Ph.D. 

F.A.C.S. P. H. Kreuscher, M.D. 

A. B. Dawson, A.B., Ph.D. L F. Volini, B.S., M.D. 

OFFICERS 

H. P. Sloan, B.S President 

E. C. McGow.AN, B.S Vice-President 

J. P. McGuiRE, B.S Secretary-Treasurer 

INTERNES 

E. T. McEnery, B.S., M.S., M.D. E. F. King, B.S., M.D. 

C. E. Pechous, B.S., M.D. R. Robinson, B.S., M.D. 

Cl.ass of 1926 

H. W. Ericksen, B.S. P. A. Nelson, Ph.B. 

H. P. Sloan, B.S. R. C. Drago, A.B 

J. P. Boland, B.S. 

Cl.ass of 1927 

J. J. Prendergast, B.S. E. F. Ducey, B.S. 

R. S. Westhne, B.S. R. L. Tallman, B.S. 

J. G. Powers, A.B., B.S. J. P. McGuire, B.S. 

E. C. McGowan. B.S. 



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[Page 197} 




[Page 198} 



Loyola Honorary 
Medical Seminar 

Founded in 1924 

OFFICERS 

Robert E. Lee Chamna7\ 

Committee on Programs 
Raymond Kerwin Leslie Urban 



MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 



Natalie Ashmenckas 
Ben P. Dorniak 
William D. Fitzgerald 
Maurice Goodman 
John Gregory 
Walter A. Guse 
Michael Indovina 
James M. Johnson 
Thomas D. Jones 
Floyd Harding 
Harry Levy 



John A. Marszalek 
Bart E. McGonigle 
Michael A. Melnychuk 
Nestor Michelena 
Michael J. Murphy 
Patrick H. 0"ConneIl 
Hugh A. O'Hare 
Richard Perritt 
Julius Prohovnik 
Joseph E. Verhaag 
George A. Wiltrakis 



•-^- -^^-^'■■^-» 



[Page 199] 




[Page 200} 




Lambda Rho 

Honorary Radiological Fraternity 
Founded in 1921 

HONORARY OFFICERS 

Benjamin H. Orndoff, A.M., M.D., F.A.C.P Honorary President 

Henry Schmitz, A.M., LL.D., M.D Honorary Vice-President 

OFFICERS 

Irvin Fr.anklin Hummon, Jr President 

Thom.'XS Leo Dwyhr Vice-President 

Herbert E. Schmitz Secretarv 

John V. McMahon Treasurer 

Peter A. Nelson Sergeantat-Arms 

MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 

Erma E. Britton Sylvester M. Kelly 

William J. Butt Christian G. Krupp 

Frederick D. Caldiera John V. McMahon 

Louis E. Cella Peter A. Nelson 

Thomas L. Dwyer Thomas M. Potasz 

Angelo S. Geraci Mary R. Popp 

Sara L. Governale Paul A. Repper 

George F. Guldager Herbert E. Schmitz 

Irvin F. Hummon, Jr. Arthur C. Sequin 

J. Walter Johnson William Somerville 

John Keane John F. Wietryzkowski 






[Page 201] 




[Page 202] 




The Blue Key 

Founded, February, 1926 

OFFICERS 

Robert C. Hartnett President 

Aloysius J. Bremner VKe-President 

Thomas J. Byrne Treasurer 

James C. O'Brien Secretary 

Ambrose B. Kelly Sergeant-at-Arms 



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MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 



James T. Barrett 
Edwin J. Berwick 
Russel J. Dooley 
Harold A. Hillenbrand 
Franeis J. Lodeski 
Robert E. Morris 
Walter F. Mullady 
Francis J. Naphin 



James C. O'Connor 
Norton F. O'Meara 
Edmond R. Richer 
James M. Roach 
John E. Schell 
William P. Schoen 
Thomas J. Stamm 
John A. Sweeney 



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[Page 203] 



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Beta Pi 



Established at Loyola in 1926 

MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

Morton H. Zabel, A.M. 

OFFICERS 

Joseph B. Byrnes President 

Aloysius J. Bremner Vice-President 

John A. Sweeney Secretary 



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MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 
Class of 1926 



James T. Barrett 
Aloysius J. Brenincr 
Joseph B. Byrnes 
William J. Campbell 
Leonard F. Carmody 



Robert E. Lee 
Hugh A. O^Hare 
Arthur McDonough 
James M. Roach 
Thomas J. Stamm 



Class of 1927 



Thomas J. Byrne 



Norton F. O'Meara 



Frank P. Naphin 



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Class of 192S 



Willis M. Carpenter 
Harold A. Hillenbrand 
Ambrose Kelly 
James C. O'Connor 



Edmund Richer 
William Schoen 
John A. Sweeney 
John Waldron 



[Page 204] 



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CAMPUS ORGANIZATIONS 









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[Page 206] 




Patrick I. Boyle, President 
THE LOYOLA ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION 

OFFICERS 

Patrick I. Boyle President 

Robert C. Hartnett Vice-President 

J. Gordon Downey Secretary 

The iildest active organization on the Campus is the Debating Society, which has 
the traditions of fifty years of active service behind it. This year the Society suffered 
a terrific blow in the loss of its peerless moderator and guiding spirit, Father James J. 
Merts, S.J., who was unable to devote his tim; to the work, due to many other press- 
ing duties. After a brief period of inactivity, Mr. Joseph Synnerdahl, formerly a de- 
bating star in his college days, and now Instructor in Physics and Mathematics, took 
charge of the Society. Under his direction and thanks largely to his own self-sacri- 
ficing efi^orts, the Society prospered and, after a slow start, grew at almost every 
meeting. The debates this year have been on a very high plane and the interest taken 
by the members and the initiative shown by the majority of them has surpassed all 
other years. 



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Downey 






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THE DEBATES 

The debating season has not, up to the present, been a successful one in the matter 
of debates won, but in the matter of efforts, skill and sportsmanship displayed it has 
been more successful than any string of victories could make it. 

The team had a poor and late start due to the difficulty in finding a moderator and 
hence in drawing up a schedule. Lack of time for proper preparation handicapped 
our speakers on both occasions, and as a crowning calamity, Pat Boyle, winner of the 
Naghten Debating Medal, the crack senior of the squad, was unable to compete at 
all, due to an operation. With all these difficulties before them, the debaters deserve 
the highest praise for their efforts when they had every reason for discouragement. 

The first debate of the year was on February 19, with St. Louis University, home 
and home. The question was that of forming a unified department of defense, with 
an independent air force. The illness of Boyle completely upset the arrangements 




H.^RTNETT 



O'Connor 



[Page 208] 




Naphin 



Hartnett 



Kelly 



for the teams and new combinations had to be formed less than two weeks before the 
debates. Gordon Downey and Walter Mullady for the Affirmative and Robert Hart- 
nett and James O'Connor for the negative were the final choices. A misunderstand- 
ing in the negotiations caused Loyola to expect the St. Louis affirmative at Chicago, 
instead of the negative team, which arrived shortly before the time for the debate. 
Downey and Mullady were hastily summoned from their preparations for the trip 
and were rushed into the debate before the Assembly of the students, while O'Connor 
and Hartnett made what was probably the most sudden trip in either of their careers. 

At hcime Downey and Mullady based their arguments on the need for closer co- 
operation between the services and the necessity of aircraft development. St. Louis 
ably countered with arguments to show that this was not necessary and that the pro- 
posed plan was unsound. After an interesting debate St. Louis was given a two to 
one decision. 

At St. Louis, with the main arguments practically the same, only with the posi- 
tions reversed, St. Louis was also successful, gaining another two to one decision in a 
close and hotly contested debate 

The next debate took place vn March 11, at St. Ignatius Auditorium, with St. 
Xavier College of Cincinnati, the opponent. The question this time was the ratifi- 
cation of the Child Labor Amendment, with Loyola defending the admittedly weaker 
afiirmative. Again the hoodoo followed Loyola. O'Connor, Kelly and Hartnett were 
selected to represent Loyola, but less than a week from the debate, O'Connor was 
stricken, and Frank Naphin was hastily substituted. Naphin proved a real find, and 
more will undoubtedly be heard from him, but the period of preparation allowed was 
entirely too short, whereas the Xavier team was on a tour and had debated the ques- 
tion frequently. 

After an exhaustive debate, covering every phase of the question, and featured by 
real oratory on both sides-, the decision was awarded to St. Xavier. 

We congratulate Xavier on her debaters and hope that this will not be the last 
meeting with them. 



[Page 209} 



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THE SODALITY OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY 

OFFICERS 

Patrick I. Boyle Prefect 

James T. Barrett First Assistant 

Howard Schlacks Second Assistant 

In the spiritual life of the student there is no influence greater than that of the 
Sodality of the Immaculate Conception. Few are they who have regularly attended 
the meetings who will ever forget the wonderful influence exerted over us by the 
common recitation of the office and, even more so, the short heart-to-heart talks by 
our beloved moderator, Father Mert::. 

Meetings are held every Thursday during the noon hour and are very brief and 
to the point. That bugaboo of every student organisation, the difficulty in finding 
a proper time at which to assemble, at first confronted the Sodalists, but after diligent 
research and experiment the Thursday hour proved to be the most convenient for the 
majority of those desiring to attend. 

Besides the public prayer, the Sodality has sponsored other activities, especially the 
Self-denial collection for the Mis.sions and the Maria Delia Stada Chapel fund drive. 
In this last especially, while the Sodality as a unit has never taken an active part, yet 
every member has as an individual done all in his power to support this great under- 
taking which promises to give Loyola an object of unsurpassed beauty. If this cam- 
paign is successful, then we as Sodalists will feel that our labors and prayers have 
been rewarded. This drive, so dear to the heart of Father Mertz, will, if successful, 
be a glorious tribute to one who has labored unceasingly in our behalf and has won a 
place high in the esteem of everyone with whom he has ever been in contact. 



[Page 211} 








[Page 212] 




Maher 



Byrne 



Sweeney 



THE SOCK AND BUSKIN CLUB 

OFFICERS 

Th(1MAS J. Byrne President 

John Mullen Vice-President 

Leonard F. Maher Secretary 

John Sweeney Treasurer 

The Sock and Buskin Club, after a year of inactivity, found a capable and ener' 
getic moderator in Mr. Bertram J. Steggert, A.M., Registrar of the Arts and Sciences 
Department and launched itself into a real program for the coming year. After a 
considerable delay in starting, due to a fruitless attempt to interest students of the 
downtown departments in dramatic endeavor, the organization again limited itself to 
-Arts students and began its work in earnest. 

The call for members was surprismgly well answered by the students, but the find- 
ing of those with suiEcient free time to devote themselves to the intensive work of 
filling the parts in the plays was a different proposition. The securing of a suitable 
vehicle for the talents of the members was another of the problems which confronted 
Mr. Steggert. After long consideration, however, the play entitled "A Pair of 
Sixes" was selected. John Mullen and Edmond Richer were chosen for the leading 
male parts, and Miss Helen Byrne for the principal feminine role. 

The moderator and the officers felt that it was time for Loyola to break away from 
the confines of local theatres and to give the city a real demonstration of Loyola's 
ability in dramatic lines, as well as in an athletic way. Accordingly, they engaged 
the Goodman Memorial Theatre, in Grant Park, for the event, instead of holding; 



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[Page 213] 



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Bertram J. Stec;gert, A.M., 
Moderator The Soc}{ and Bus\in Club 



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it in the gymnasium or in St. Ignatius Auditorium, as had always been done in the 
past. May 4th was set as the date for this, Loyola's iirst real venture in public 
dramatics. 

For over six weeks the entire cast labored unceasingly on the artistic end of the 
production, with Mr. Steggert leading the van of effort. At the same time John 
Sweeney, Harold Hillenbrand and William Schoen took charge of the business side 
of the production and lent their labors as unceasingly as did anyone taking a dra- 
matic role. Thanks to their self-sacrificing work, the managerial functions were 
flawlessly executed, and every possible phase of the vitally necessary publicity was 
thoroughly covered. 

With the example of these efforts before them, the student body could not but be 
caught in the spirit of the play. An unexpectedly large number of patrons was ob- 
tained and the excellent ticket sale filled the entire house with a thoroughly appre- 
ciative audience. 

This artistic histrionic production proved that Loyola could present plays of varsity 
calibre and on a scale worthy of a great university. We feel that all the thanks that 
can be mustered are due Mr. Steggert, who through his own eiforts and initiative, 
raised the Sock and Buskin Club from the status of a mere nominal and inactive or- 
ganization to that of a genuine, vitally awake society. 



[Page 214] 






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-'A PAIR OF SIXES" 



As Presented By 

I SOCK AND BUSKIN CLUB '^- "'■ 

May 4 
GOODMAN MEMORIAL THEATRE 

CAST OF CHARACTERS 

George B Nettleton I j^^^^^^^^^^ Partners * ^ , \''^^ Mullen 

I . Boggs Johns I ( Edmond R. Richer 

Krome, their BooWeeper WilUam Schoen 

Miss Sally Parker, their stenographer Margaret Boland 

Thomas J. Vandcrholt, their lawyer Jack Remein 

Tony Toler, their salesman Henry Fox 

Mr. Applcgatc John A. Sweeney 

O&ce Boy Ambrose B. Kelly 

Shipping Clerk Thomas Carney 

Mrs. George B. Nettleton Helen Byrne 

Miss Florence Cole Marie Helen Kelly 

Coddles, All English maid of all wor}{ Teresa Stocker 

Synopsis of Scenes 
Act I. Offices of the Eureka Digestive Pill Co., in New York City. 
Act II. Home of Mr. George Nettleton. Two weeks later. 
Act III. The same as act Second. One week later. 

EXECUTIVE STAFF 

Business Manager Jack Sweeney 

Publicity Manager Harold Hillenbrand 

Advertising Manager William Schoen 

Property Manager Ambrose Kelly 



MUSICAL PROGRAM 
Loyola Orchestra 

Directed by "Jack" Higgins 

1. Medley of popular airs. 

2. Who? (From "Sunny") Gershwin 

3. Always Berlin 

4. Loyola University Song Berwick-Kov^'alski 

Piano E. BerVk'ick Cornet G. Hatton 

Violin L. Russel Drums M. Corns 

Saxophone W. Lowrey Saxophone M. Murphy 

Banjo J. Higgins 



[Page 215] 



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[Page 216} 




Stamm Adams 



THE MONOGRAM CLUB 



DtJOLEY 



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OFFICERS 

Marvin Adams President 

Lawrence Gorman Vice-President 

Thomas Stamm Secretary 

Russell Dooley Treasurer 

Aloysius Cronin Sergeant- at' Arms 

During the past year the Monogram Club has emerged from the rather obscure 
position which it has occupied in the affairs of the University, and gives promise of 
becommg, as it should, one of the most active organizations on the campus. 

One of the prime reasons for the delayed start was the absence of all Officers ex- 
cept the President, Marv Adams, who at the first meeting was re-elected unanimously. 
The same pep and leadership which won for him the captaincy of the 1924 football 
team are evident in the presidential chair. "Bud" Gorman was chosen to fill the 
office of Vice-President, Russ Dooley that of Treasurer, Tom Stamm that of Secre- 
tary, and Al Cronin that of Sergeant-at-Arms. 

By its very nature the Monogram Club is one of the most important organizations 
in a University, being in a special manner the guardian of the coveted L. Repre- 
sentative Loyola men who do not confine themselves to athletics alone, but who can 
be identified with every movement for the betterment of Loyola make up the Mono- 
gram Club. The diversified interests of the members have led some to investigate the 
mysteries of the soul, some the Arts and Sciences, some the business world, some the 
intricacies of Law. And in all their energies have been applied with the same vigor 
that has won for them the recognition on the athletic field. This ability which has 
existed individually in its members has been unified so that more may be accomplished 
and the true meaning and worth of a Loyola Monogram appreciated by all. 



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[Page 217} 



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[Page 218} 




Bremner Hartnett 

THE BOOSTER CLUB 



O'Brien 



OFFICERS 

Robert Hartnett President 

Aloysius Bremner Vice-President 

James C. O'Brien Secretary 

Thomas J. Byrne Treasurer 

Ambrose Kelly Sergeant-at-Arms 

The Booster Club was organized last year, under the guidance of the Student 
Council, and this year started its work with a good enrollment and a wonderful dis- 
play of spirit on all sides. Robert Hartnett, who had been appointed temporary 
chairman, continued in that capacity and was assisted by the Board of Control. 
Under this direction, the automobile parade to Milwaukee for the Marquette game 
was held and the members of the Club acted as ushers at all the football games and 
were responsible for much of the publicity work which preceded each game. 

In December the club took a momentous step when, in response to an invitation 
from the mother chapter, the members decided to accept a chapter of the National 
Booster Fraternity of the Blue Key. The Booster Club was by no means discon- 
tinued, but membership in the new and smaller organization was held out as a reward 
for those who had distinguished themselves by outstanding efforts for Loyola and her 
activities. 

The Charter members of the Blue Key were picked in the following manner: 
The membership committee first picked twelve men from the real Campus leaders. 
These men then picked ten more by election, and the twenty-two men thus chosen 
comprised the charter membership of the Loyola Booster Club chapter of the Blue Key. 
The men picked were all so outstanding in their support of Loyola that no fault 
could possibly have been found with the choice. Another election will be held before 
the close of the scholastic year, at which time freshmen will be eligible for mem- 
bership. 

The members of the Blue Key, aided by those of the Booster Club so distinguished 
themselves by their efforts during the National Catholic Interscholastic Basketball 
Tournament that there is now no doubt in the mind of the student body at large as 
their worth and merit to such an honor. 






[Page 219} 



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THE INK POTS 

OFFICERS 

Thomas J. Byrne Worthy Superior 

Norton F. O'Meara Master of Rolls 

Francis J. P. Naphin Master oj Exchequer 

Robert C. Hartnett Purveyor of Coinissary 

James C. O'Connor Lector 

The Ink Pots are a rather informal Hterary organization composed exclusively of 
Loyola University students. Regular meetings are held each week and are featured 
by discussions of various pieces of literature, modern authors alternating with those 
of classical distinction. Some excellent discussions have taken place during the year 
and opinions arc unanimous that the society has been a source of recreational and 
educational benefit to the members. In addition to the more formal activity of the 
organization there has been a great deal of social activity, and there has been 
manifest a spirit of friendliness among the members, which has constantly grown and 
will undoubtedly continue to thrive for years to come. But even if the pressure of 
external circumstances may cause separations, each one will continue to cherish pleas- 
ant memories of the gatherings of the Ink Pots. 



[Page 220} 




THE COMMERCE CLUB 

OFFICERS 

James Gordon Downey President 

Arthur Colby Vice-President 

Joseph McGarry Secretary 

Robert James Treasurer 

CoLLis Pearson Sergeant-at-Arms 

This club is composed of commerce students on the North Campus, and thanks 
to its moderator, Mr. Peter T. Swanish, M.B.A., Professor of Accounting and Eco- 
nomics, has enjoyed a very successful year. Its program of encouraging its members 
to take an active interest in the activities which will afteru'ards be their life's work 
has been followed and all the members have shown a real spirit of co-operation that 
is commensurate with the aim of the organization. 



[Page 221] 




James J. Mertz, SJ. 
Professor of the Classics 



We can spea\ of him no higher p7-dise than this: 
That he is loved b_v all of us. 



[Page 222} 




THE MARIA DELLA STRADA CHAPEL 



In surveying the needs of Loyola, one notices most strikingly the need for a chapel, 
a place of worship which every Loyolan can truly call his own. The chapel should 
be the center of the religious life of the students, the spot where the youth can seeik 
unrestrainedly the solace which he so often desires. It is further the place of common 
worship on the part of faculty and students, and as such is in every college a treas- 
ured institution. Clearly, then, a chapel is one of the prime requisites of every 
university, and especially of one conceived under the auspices of St. Ignatius of 
Loyola. 

But Loyola has no chapel which she can truly call her own. The student body has 
outgrown the faculty chapel and any arrangement for religious services other than in 
Loyola's own chapel is wholly unsatisfactory. Hence, there has grown a need for 
such a sacred edifice and with this need there has arisen a golden dream — the dream 
of the Maria Delia Strada Chapel. 

Before the glorious painting of Maria Delia Strada — Our Lady of the Wayside — 
St. Ignatius of Loyola often prayed. Her shrine is one of the most famous in a 
city of sacred associations. And so there arose in the mind of Rev. James J. Mertz, 
S.J., the determination that Loyola's own chapel should be fittingly called after her, 
the Maria Delia Strada Chapel. 

The chapel will be located on the North Campus and will be of the same Spanish 
Mission style as are the other buildings there. Its principal interior feature will be a 
reproduction of the original painting of the Maria Delia Strada, as pictured above, 
which will be the altar piece of the chapel. 

The burning question of funds has been so far the only obstacle. And so. Father 
Mertz, who is unquestionably the most beloved man on the campus, has turned his 
bottomless energy to this difficult assignment. Under his able direction, and in- 
spired by the very force of his wonderful personality the gathering of money has 
gone on with great success. The Maria Delia Strada Auxiliary has been organized 
and through the membership of this praiseworthy organization much has been done. 
The students have further shown themselves to be behind this work which means so 
much to them and have loyally supported every elfort made in their direction. 

Throughout the course of the year, Father Mertz, with the co-operation of the 



[Page 223} 



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Joan of Arc Club, h,ts given various lectures throughnut the city. The crowning 
effort of the year took place on May ?rd at Orchestra Hall when Father Mertz de- 
livered a lecture on the history of devotion to the Eucharist. The affair, backed by 
the students, the Maria Delia Strada Auxiliary and many public spirited Catholics, 
was a tremendous success in every way and the cause of the chapel was furthered 
immeasurably. 

Hence we may see that the time of the actual erection of the chapel is not far off, 
that soon will be realized the golden dream of our beloved professor, that soon the 
plans, drives and lectures will materialize into an eternal monument to the energy, 
personality and self-sacrificing devotion of our ovv'n Father Mertz. 






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[Page 224] 



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Hartnett 

THE JOAN OF ARC CLUB 

Under Rev. James J. Mertz, S.J., the Joan of Arc Club was revived during the past 
year. This organization has for its purpose the holding of lectures on the Maid of 
France in schools, convents and before societies which request Loyola University to 
furnish entertainment of this high nature for their meetings. 

During the season just passed the lecture was successfully put on at the House of 
the Good Shepherd and the Convent of the Cenacle. Much interest m the project 
was aroused, prophesying a busy year for the next two semesters for the students 
who take up this good and interesting work. 

Thomas J. Byrne, Frank Walsh, George Ray, Emmett Hogan and Robert C. 
Hartnett were the men who were engaged in the revival of the Joan of Arc Club, 
and it is to be hoped that their example will be emulated by others so that the other 
lectures which are ready can be offered to those who desire to present them to their 
schools and societies. 







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W.ALSH 



[Page 22^} 






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PUBLICATIONS 



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Morton H. Zabel, A.M. 
Faculty Moderator of Publications 



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[Page 228] 



The Moderator 



With the University's expansion and greater 
prominence in the public eye, a duty has de- 
volved upon the school publications to do their 
part in being worthy of the new University and 
to advance it in every way. That they have 
done so in the past is, in great part, due to the 
work of the present moderator, Mr. Zabel, who 
has spared no effort to bring them to the high- 
est possible standard. Upon his assuming the 
position three years ago, Mr. Zabel's only charge 
was the quarterly and this he has made into a 
magazine equal to the best and representative of 
the whole University. Before his first year was 
over the idea of the loyolan was broached and 
upon the moderator fell the greater part of see- 
ing this through the stages that preceded the 
tangible 1924 number. In the last two years he 
has played no inactive part in its production 
and many of the features that characterize this 
number are his in origin. Beginning with this 
year the loyola news has been added to his 
labors and here his supervision has been as in- 
valuable as in the other two publications. Truly 
all three of the school publications owe much 
to him, and in the future will, no doubt, greatly 
increase their debt. 



[Page 229} 





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[Page 230} 



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Aloysius J. Bremner, Eduor 'in-Chief 

THE LOYOLAN 

THE STAFF 

Aloysius J. Bremner Editor-in-Chief 

Thomas J. Byrne Managing Editor 

James T. Barrett Photographic Editor 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Arthur McDonough Arts and Sciences 

Robert E. Lee Medicine 

Hugh A. O'Hare Assistant 

Gertrude Stier T^urses 

William J. Campbell Lat^ 

John C. Bergmann Dentistry 

William Sweetman Commerce 

Harold A. Hillenbrand Athletics 

Willis Carpenter Orga7iizations 

James C. O'Connor Literary 

Francis J. Naphin Assistant 

Marion G. Bremner Society 

Morgan T. Healy Secretarial 

Paul A. Reed Art 

William Schoen Humor 

Morton H. Zabel, faculty Moderator 



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[Page 231] 



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Barrett 



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THE 1926 LOYOLAN 

With this. Its third appearance, the LOYOLAN now begins to be a regular school 
event in its annual appearance and is no longer regarded in the light of an experiment. 
Many of the difficulties that attended the two earlier numbers have largely disappeared 
but many still remain. Three years is hardly enough time to reduce the procedure 
of getting out a year-book into a settled routine, nor does it bequeath an awe-inspiring 
total of experience. Every year sees particular problems and these alone are enough 
to give occupation to a staff, without having added the necessity of trail-blazing. For 
these reasons the production of this book has not been an easy task; a tremendous 
amount of labor is here represented and, withal, imperfections which are the product 
of circumstance rather than of persons. So, therefore, it is hoped that the reader who 
sees the inevitable flaw will remember the youth of the LOYOLAN and make allow- 
ances for this book, for which, circumstances considered, no apology is necessary. 



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Reed 



Hillenbrand 



McDONOUGH 



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[Page 2.^2] 



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:^r^ 




SCHOEN 



Campbell 



Lee 



Bremner 



In the composition of this work many people have given to the uttermost, but in 
handing the palm to the Editor-in-Chief, Aloysius J. Bremner, no one need feel 
slighted or overlooked. Behind every work there usually stands an mdividual to 
whose efforts that work is a monument, and as such a monument to the work of its 
Editor, the 1926 LOYOLAN may well he considered. To his position he brought 
the greatest of enthusiasm and no mean technical knowledge and these he dedicated 
at a considerable expense of valuable time and energy to make this work a success. 

James Barrett as Photography Editor found an especially onerous task before him. 
The decided improvement in the selection and mounting of the pictures in the year's 
book are due entirely to the great amount of time and labor he has spent upon his 
work. 

Thomas J. Byrne, Managing Editor, Harold Hillenbrand, Athletic Editor, James 
O'Connor, Literary Editor, Willis Carpenter, Organizations Editor, Marion Bremner, 
Social Editor, William Schoen, Humor Editor, Paul Reed, Art Editor, Arthur 
McDonough, Arts and Science Editor, Robert Lee, Medical, and William Campbell 
Law, are all to be commended for their unsacniicing labors for the successful com- 
pletion of this work. 

•' -'.'■ ..■ ' IBB. 




Sweetman Carpenter O'Connor Bergmann 



[Page 233} 




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Joseph B. Byrnes, Editor 



THE LOYOLA QUARTERLY 

The Staff 

Joseph Byrnes Editor 

James M. Roach Managing Editor 

Thomas J. Byrne Exchange Editor 

John Schell ) ^ 7 * . r- ,. 

'. Athletic Editors 

Marshal I. McMahon \ 

Thomas T- Stamm ) „, . , „,. 

'- Unronicle taitors 

James O'Connor \ 

Norton F. O'Meara Literary Editor 

Harold Hillenbrand Dramatic Editor 

Morton H. Zabel, Faculty Moderator 



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[Page 235] 



Pi 







Roach 



Byrne 



THE LOYOLA QUARTERLY 

1 92 ^" — 1926 

The year has seen The LOYOLA QUARTERLY continue in its indispensable and 
valuable position of ministering to the cultural side of the University's activities. The 
QUARTERLY'S position has always been a unique, albeit acknowledged one: it is 
the one tangible, readable testimony of just what has been achieved in the classroom 
in matters of information and inspiration. It is the one outlet for the cultural ends 
which humanitarian and liberal arts training stand for. Changing from time to time 
in physical appearance, passing from hand to hand in the matter of editorship, altering 
its course as necessity demanded. The LOYOLA QUARTERLY has yet held to one 
fixed standard of dignity and serious import. The essays, special articles, short stories, 
playlets, poems, literary criticisms, and dramatic reviews have been the expressions of 
talent and judgment which, lacking altogether, would leave a wide and gaping breach 
in the fundamental alignment of academic features of which the University should 
boast. 

During the past two years the editorship has been in the ever reliable and pro- 
ductive hands of Joseph B. Byrnes, whose constant diligence, industry, and attention 
would, if missing, have left many an issue on the rocks of non-support. His constant 
presence and ready pen have been wielded, not only to write editorials and articles, 
but also to fill in the remaining spaces and to put into shape with moderator and 
printer the pages and leaves of copy. His leaving the school takes away by graduation 
one of its most trustworthy students, and his place would be hard to fill were it not 
logical to turn to his assistants, Norton O'Meara, the competent Literary Editor, 
Harold Hillenbrand, the Dramatic Editor constantly alert, and Thomas Byrne, the 
faithful Exchange Editor, who, in becoming upper classmen, remain to fill the im- 
portant positions next year in their customary and completely satisfying manner. 



[Page 236} 




SCHELL 



O'MliARA 



MacMahon 



James Roach, who has filled with gratifying faithfulness the role of Managing Editor, 
also leaves through graduation. Such chronicle features as the magazine still contains 
after having relinquished them in favor of The LOYOLA NEWS when it was es- 
tablished have been skillfully handled by Thomas Stamm and James O'Connor m the 
University department, and by Marshall McMahon and John Schell in the Athletics 
department. The contributors and representatives of the QUARTERLY from all 
departments of the University, and its large number of interested readers, remain to 
be thanked for having added the necessary encouragement which often stood needful 
to spurn even the warmest heart on its task of writing, compilation, and hurried 
editing. And so the conclusion to Volume XXIII may be written. 

M. Z. 



^^' 







Stamm 



Hillenbrand O'Connor 



[Page 237} 



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[Page 2 J 8] 



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Hillenbrand 



THE LOYOLA NEWS 

Staff 
John A. Sweeney. ...Managing Editor 

Edmond R. Richer Klews Ednor 

H. A. Hillenbrand Sports Editor 

Wm. p. Schoen Aduertising Mgr. 

Ambrose P. Kelly Business Mgr. 

Assistants 
Francis Naphin 
John Waldron 
James O'Connor 
Harold Simpson 
Robert Hartnett 

REPRESENTATIVES 
Laiv 
Evangeline Hl'rsen 
William McKenna 
James J. Metcalfe 
Charles Gallagher ■ 
Leonard Carmody 
M. Adrian Harty 

Medical 
Hu(;h B. Fox 
Robert Lee 
Ralph Gladen 
Denta! 
James Lane 
IMANK Wakerlin 
George Slad 
Frank Colletti 

Commerce 
James Neary 
William Sweetman 

Alumni 
George A. Lane. Jr. 

Morton H. Zabel. Moderator 




Schoen 



[Page 2J9] 



( m 










m 



THE LOYOLA NEWS 

192^~-1926 

Plans for progress and expansion adopted simultaneously following the establishment 
of the LOYOLA NEWS last year have been aceomplished in part, according to the 
opinion of its staff. The passing university term offered a few advantages and a few 
obstacles. In the student body, it is assumed that no disturbing element appeared in 
its attitude regarding; the newspaper. Unquestionably all departments of the Uni- 
versity and the members of the faculties appreciated its sheer journalistic merits. 

A further uniting of the departments by increased news lineage, the regularity of 
the weekly icsue, establishment of a more definite staff organisation with regard for 
efficient newspaper administration, adoption of definite editorial standards, compre- 
hensive and successful reporting of the major university functions and activities, and 
the somewhat spirited attempt to introduce prospective students to the various posi- 
tions, a constant and large exchange with important college publications throughout 
the country, the sponsoring and supporting of worthy scholastic and athletic projects, 
the initiative displayed in producing a genuinely enjoyable dance for the raising of 
funds in balancing the budget, and the incorporation of the modern and improved 
devices of journalism encompasses the essential results, professional and general, of 
the past year. 

The platform of the NEWS remains unchanged. It is as follows: 1. For a greater 
Loyola, 2. To unite the departments, 3. To further athletic endeavors, 4. To awaken 
a greater interest in Loyola's needs, and "i. To aid in perfecting the Alumni organiza- 
tion. 



[Page 240] 




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Lee 



Carmody 



O'Connor 



What energy was manifest in establishint; the LOYOLA NEWS in the previous 
school term was revived in September and mamtained substantially until the close, 
this June. The five men who founded the NEWS succeeded m the face of existing 
conditions to perfect a larger production and circulation on a routine basis. Due to 
the provident assistance rendered by the administrative officers of the university the 
subscription price was included in the student's activity fee in the Arts and Sciences 
and Medical departments. Feasibility of the same plan in the other departments is 
at present being considered. 

Of the divisions of the newspaper, the News department achieved the most pros- 
perous state. The purpose of the publication in being of a service to the students 
was therefore accomplished for the most part. It is readily granted, however, that 
the several reportorial handicaps and blunders aiiect in no small way the extravagance 
of such a statement. The isolated units of the University, the comparative newness 
of the paper, and the absence of a journalism department are unavoidable hindrances 
in the progress of the NEWS. 

We close with the hope that vac;uicies in the staff will be favorably disposed of in 
the next term by students adaptable for the daily grind in the issuing of a weekly 
newspaper. A. J. B. 




[Page 241] 



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[Page 242] 




SOCIETY 



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James T. Barrett, Chairman 






1 



The Senior Ball 

Faculty Adviser 

James T. Barrett 

Russell J. Dooley ) 

•^ [ Arts 

Leonard McGraw \ 

Herbert Schmitz 1 , , , . 

v Medic 

John McMahon J 

William Campbell ) 

- Law 

Leonard Carmody ) 

Marie Kelly Sociology 

Carl Hansen Dental 

Rev. Frederic Siedenburg, S.J. 



[Page 244] 




Mr- -V-^^^^' 



g^RRETT 



' L'LLlA^r St. 



■•\?VTON 



THE SENIOR BALL 



The balmy, starlight evening i)f May 22nd witnessed the greatest social function 
of Loyola's greatest social year — the Senior Ball. 

One after another the softly purring motors discharged their happy occupants, 
before the imposing Palmer House portal, the girls" beautiful gowns in striking con- 
trast to the somber formal attire of their escorts. 

The seniors, proud and dignified, in this, their supreme moment, escorted their 
partners up the majestic staircase to the festive gathering m the Grand Ball Room. 
Then, promptly at eleven, after an evening fraught with glee, the orchestra swung 
into the martial strains of Loyola's Victory Song and at the opposite end of the 
highly polished floor the Grand March took form, Down the long room the line 
of Loyolans promenaded, with Mr. James T. Barrett and Miss Lillian Stanton, the 
beautiful queen of the ball, in the lead and with Mr. Herbert Schmitz and his fair 
partner leading the left wing. 

The formal grandeur of the Palmer House Grand Ball Room gave a fitting setting 
to the stately Grand March. Back and forth the column wended, a scene of 
brilliance unsurpassed, finally to pause and sing with the true Loyola spirit the 
thrilling Victory Song, thus ending Loyola's most brilliant social function. 



M 






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[Page 245] 



.-^--^lU- 







Thomas O'Mallev, General Chanman 

The Junior Prom 

COMMITTEES 
Thomas O'Malley, General Chairman 



18 

m 






Arts and Sciences 



Thomas O'Malley 
Marshial McMahon 



John Mullen 
Laurence Flynn 



m 



Law 
John J. Hartnett 



E. J. Todd 



Medicine 



John Polack 



Sigismund Janowski 



mi 



Dentistry 
Max Powell 

P. T. Boyd, M.D., Faculty Dnector 



[Page 246] 







■^ Vl^ssHE^^^-' 



■glGA^V-E 



THE JUNIOR PROM 




RR/T 



The "Big L" which the three hundred and iifty couples formed on February 1 1 in 
the Main Ball Room of the Drake Hotel will be a jeweled memory to the Junior 
class and the strains of the Loyola Victory Song which was played as only Jinks 
Bryan and his Chicago Yacht Club Orchestra can play it will echo forever in the 
ears of those who were fortunate enough to possess an invitation to the Junior Prom. 

At eleven-thirty the Grand March started with the King and Queen, Mr. O. E. 
Sterrit and Miss Hertha Bigalke in the lead, followed by Mr. Thomas O'Malley and 
Miss May Collins, and the class officers from the various departments. As the line 
was formed each lady was presented with a souvenir bracelet of hammered silver. 
The long column circled the Ball Room and, forming a giant L, came to a sudden 
halt, where for one minute silence reigned. Then the orchestra again took up the 
Victory Song and the voices of the crowd broke out into the words. 

The Committee, headed by Thomas O'Malley and Student Director Dr. Boyd, 
were well repaid for their many and unceasing labors by the smiling faces of the 
three hundred and fifty joyous couples who gave living testimony that the class 
of '27 has established a tradition which its successors will find difficult to surpass. 



m 






[Page 247] 



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THE HOMECOMING DANCE 

November 21 marked the first real Homecoming in the history of Loyola University. 
To celebrate the day properly, m connection with the open house held by the fraterni- 
ties on the North Campus, a huge dance was held that evening in the Gymnasium. 
It was altogether fitting that this generous gift of the alumni should be the scene of 
the first real and successful dance held for the returning "Old Boys." A large crowd, 
with students of all departments and alumni about equally represented was on hand 
when the first strains of the enthralling dance music resounded throughout the building. 

It was indeed a strange experience for the gymnasium to feel the merry feet of the 
dancers coursing over the floor instead of the rushing thuds of the basketeers, to which 
it had grown accustomed; to echo with music instead of hoarse cheers. At eleven 
o'clock the grand march started and, to the thrilling strains of Loyola's new Victory 
Song, the couples wound their way around the massive hall. Then the melody boys 
again took up their dance-compelling work and the evening quickly sped itself. 



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THE LOYOLA NEWS FROLIC 

October 2 J, 192^ will be a date long remembered by the students of Loyola as a 
red letter day. It was the date of the Loyola News Frolic — the event which opened 
the social season of 1925-26. The Italian Room of the AUerton Club was originally 
engaged, but when it became evident how large the crowd would be, the committee 
was forced to arrange for the Sun Room and to get another orchestra. The "Bob-O- 
Links," who are managed by Dan Russo and Ted Fiorito, had been originally engaged 
and when demands for bids poured in, the committee engaged "The Whipporwills" — 
another Russo-Fiorito orchestra — also. After making these arrangements Jack Sweeney 
and his associates felt that they had provided for almost any contingency, but the 
crowd so far exceeded expectations that their provisions very nearly proved inadequate. 
In all, there were over four hundred and fifty couples present. Both orchestras proved 
to be superlative "wows" and many were the statements that the music was the best 
ever heard before the evening had advanced far. So perfect was the music and so well 
was every detail managed that although the dance was scheduled to end at twelve- 
thirty A. M., it was nearly one-thirty A. M. before the first couples sought their 
homes, reluctant to leave one of the finest dances ever put on by a Loyola organization. 



[Page 248] 



THE SOPHOMORE SUPPER DANCE P^] 

The Class of '28, temporarily desisting from their self-ordained task of impressing 
the freshmen with the fear of the Lord and the Green Circle, continued the precedent 
set by last years Sophomores by holding the annual Supper Dance on April 9th. The 
Bal Tabarin of the Hotel Sherman, one of the best-known places of that sort, was 
chosen for the occasion, and the spot and the cuisine certamly lived up to the predic- 
tions of the most rabid yearling. 

From nme P. M., when the first strains of the Jack Higgins" Orchestra sent the 
assembled crowd into an orgy of superlatives, until two A. M., when the strains of 
"Home, Sweet Home" dispersed the gay multitude, much against everyone's will, the 
dance was an ideal, one of those affairs which every committeeman dreams of, but 
rarely sees realized. Every detail was flawlessly perfect. At midnight, supper was 
served. This meal, featured by spring chicken, was all that one could possibly desire, 
but even this attraction could not hold the gay crowd at the tables whenever Higgins' 
boys burst into syncopation. Toward the close of the affair the famous Sophomore 
Triple Treat Trio, ably seconded by some other of their classmates added to the 
enjoyment of the evening by rendering some well received vocal selections. 

At the close of it all, after all had reluctantly wended their ways homeward, there 
was but one opinion common to ail: "The best Loyola Dance of the season." 



THE FRESHMAN HOP 

The social season of 1926 was formally inaugurated by the Freshman Class of the 
College of Arts and Sciences, who gave their annual Hop on Friday evening, January 
15th, at the Blackstone Hotel. The music was furnished by Russo and Fiorito's "Bob- 
O-Links" — the same orchestra which gained such a wide reputation by virtue of their 
playing at the News Frolic. Over three hundred couples were in attendance, attracted 
by the fame of the orchestra and memories of Freshman Hops of former years. The 
management of the affair was in the hands of Edward Dempsey, Secretary of the 
Class of 1929, who through the aid of his assistants was largely instrumental in making 
the dance one of the most colorful and entertaining of the year. The "Bob-O-Links" 
lived up to their advance reputation and as usual were the source of much merited 
praise and comment. The Freshman Class set an example to the other classes by 
appearing "en masse" with their president, CorneHus Collins, and bringing a goodly 
number of friends with them. The Sophomore, Junior, and Senior Classes were well 
represented as was the case at every university social event this year. The pleasing 
strains of the music continued until one A. M. when the couples began to disband. 
Opinions were universal that the Freshman Hop of 1926 would go down in history 
as one of the really outstanding social events of the school season. 



ii 



[Page 249] 






THE PHI MU CHI SPRING DANCE 

The Annual Spring Dance of Phi Mu Chi was one of the most popular affairs of 
the social year. On that evening of May Seventh all roads led to the Sovereign Hotel. 
Hardly had the orchestra warmed up to its peppy syncopation when the floor was 
thronged with dancers. 



/| Only those who attended the "Spring Annual"" realized the full significance of the 

' name. All the fresh, exuberant life of Spring was reflected in the dancing couples. 

i f I All the beauty of Spring found its counterpart in the soft harmonies of hght and 

' sound in the sunken ballroom. As the night went on, the Spirit of Carnival reigned 

I supreme and showered upon the joyous crowd a rain of streamers and confetti that 

under the play of colored lights became a weird and fantastic picture. 

P Ivl During the intermissions the merry-makers found their way to the luxurious lounges 

I of the Sovereign, the artistic furnishing and lighting of which caught the admiring eyes 

' I of all. 

As the last notes of the orchestra died away in the wee sma' hours, the happy 
crowd regretfully separated. With one accord, they greatly lauded the committee, 
for their efforts in this social success, and looked forward in pleasant anticipation to 
the next "Spring Annual." 



V THE NIGHT LAW FRESHMAN DINNER-DANCE 

Late in April, when Spring was first really beginning to show herself, the freshmen 
of the Night Law School held their dinner-dance at the Pershing Hotel. The room 

I and tables were beautifully decorated with marguerites and red roses, symbolical 

of the University colors, while the gold and maroon combination was more vividly 

I effected in the gay streamers adorning the chandeliers and walls. 

^ Among those present were Mr. McCormick, acting dean of the Law School, Mr. 

~ ' Rooney, Registrar, a number of professors, and the class officers, all of whom favored 

^AM the gathering with quips and puns, speeches, and even flights of oratorial eloquence. 

'\ " ^ I Social and scholastic activities of the past year were discussed and mention made of 

J plans for next year. 



JJ^ "^ i The banquet was most delicious, the music of the very best, and the frosh and their 

"ly companions quite outdid themselves in the art of dancing. It was the crowning event 

^ of the freshman social season and it is hoped that the first-year men of the future 

;^, will be as successful in their social activities. 

w ■ ■ 



[Page 250] 



m 



THE PI ALPHA LAMBDA PRE-CHRISTMAS INFORMAL 

On the top tliior n{ the AUerton Club of Chicat;i), tar .ib:ive and beyond the mad- 
ding crowd, IS situate an aesthetic treat in ballrooms. Hung about with myriad colorful 
draperies, it ravishes the beholder with its cozy beauty. Windows on four sides open 
up an imposing nocturnal panorama : to the south stands the brilliantly illuminated 
Wriglcy Building like a sentinel clothed in white, to the west a million twinkling 
points of light indicate where lies the sleeping city; Lake Shore Drive stretches its 
winding length to the north, while to the east one sees the swell of Lake Michigan 
and the harbor lights, now green, now white, now red. To this spot flocked the 
students for the annual Pre-Christmas Informal, sponsored by the Fraternity of Pi 
Alpha Lamhd.i. With dancing to the rhythmic cadence of Jinx Bryan's syncopators 
or sauntering thru the spacious halls of the Club, the evening progressed swiftly 
until, promptly at twelve o'clock, Santa Claus and his big brother appeared, greatly 
to the delight of all present. A Charleston exhibition and the singing of the school 
song completed the entertainment provided by the dance committee and as the evening 
waned and the tired but happy couples sought their waiting cars, many were the ex- 
pressions of enthusiasm and pride which proclaimed Pi Alph's annual classic a mighty 
success. 



THE ALPHA DELTA GAMMA DANCE 

On the night of January 29th in the magnificent Ball Room of the New Palmer 
House, the collegiately renowned Bobolinks opened the First Mid-Year Informal of 
Alpha Delta Gamma Fraternity. There was something unusual about this great social 
"function. It was the first dance held in the Ball Room of the Palmer House. The 
great interest which this aroused could be seen in the unusual attendance, three hun- 
dred couples crowded the floor before the evening was fairly begun. A number of 
famed artistic dancers secured at great expense added the final touch to the highly 
successful evening. The inspiring jazz of the "Bob-O-Links," the smooth, glistening 
floor of the beautifully decorated room reflecting the graceful movements of the 
dancing couples, would give a thrill of pride and joy to any Loyolan viewing the scene. 
The dance was marked with the characteristic eclat of every Loyola function and made 
it the great success that it was. This success which was made possible by the universal 
co-operation of all departments of the University marked the Alpha Delta Gamma 
Dance as one of the most memorable of the school year. The Fraternity wishes to 
express its appreciation for the hearty support they received. 



[Page 251} 




STUDENT-FACULTY BANQUETS 

Arts and Sciences 

Perhaps the most outstanding of a chain of very notable events for which the 
Student Council is responsible is the inauguration of the Student-Faculty Banquet. 
A double purpose was imparted to the affair, the honoring of the memory of Father 
Marquette the first white man to set foot on Chicago soil, by the selection of December 
7 as the date of the banquet. 

The committee composed of John Connelly, Marshall McMahon, James Barrett and 
Thomas Stamm, all members of the Student Council, worked untiringly on the plans 
and as a result the Rogers Park Hotel, no doubt, had never seen such an evening, or 
been taxed so near to capacity as on December 7. Every one was fairly bubbling 
over with amiability. Under the direction of Tom Byrne the Student Orchestra punc- 
tuated the semingly endless succession of courses with snappy music, which was added 
to by the singing of the faculty and students. 

The guest of honor. Doctor Derry, present Dean of the School of Sociology of 
Marquette University, delivered a most eloquent, interesting and scholarly oration 
charging college men with their duty in the world. Short speeches by President 
Agnew, Dean Reiner, Fathers Muehlman and Schmidt, further enhanced this aspect 
of the program. 

Law 

The outstanding social event of the legal calendar, the Annual Law Banquet, was 
held October 21, 192') at the Harvard- Yale-Princeton Club under the auspices of the 
President's Council of the School of Law. 

While the meal was in progress a very lively and pleasing entertainment was given 
by the Benson Quartette, interspersed occasionally by community singing. 

There were several brief and interesting speeches. Father Siedenburg and Dean 
McCormick gave talks describing the growth of the Law School and its increased 
advantages. Professor Tuohy delivered a snappy talk on School Loyalty, and other 
speeches were made by different members of the faculty. William J. Campbell, and 
Miss Evangeline C. Hursen spoke on behalf of the student body. Between the speeches 
vocal selections were given by different students and on the whole everyone spent 
an enjoyable evening. 

Medicine 

The annual migration of the Medics to the Auditorium Hotel, Thursday evening, 
April 29th, was attended with a measure of brilliance, not even dreamed of by the 
most ardent boosters of this affair. Since its inception, twelve years back, the Banquet 
has always ridden in on the high tide of Social calendar, and all things Medical during 
the year, have pointed to it, as THE event. 

The present year proved no different. The tables, every available one, were seized 
upon with avidity, and the opening strains of the orchestra found the Banquet hall 
filled to overflowing, with well over three hundred students, doctors and their friends. 

After and between numbers by the orchestra, and interspersed between the class 
performances, speeches from the honorable doctors present, served to round out a 
perfect evening, of which it has been said, no one leaves without a sincere wish that it 
would never end. 



[Page 252} 




Dennis F. Burns 
Director of Athletics 



FACULTY BOARD OF CONTROL 

Patrick J. Mahan, S.J. 

Frederic Siedenburg, S.J. 

Joseph Reiner, S.J. 
Dennis Burns, S.J. 



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[Page 254] 



COACH KILEY 

Coach Kiley holds a place at Loyola that is 
unique. In addition to being an expert coach, he 
has a place in the heart of every Loyola student. 
His influence is felt not only in things relating to 
the gridiron but in the every day life of Loyola 
students. His untiring efforts to give Loyola Uni- 
versity a football team that will rank at the top of 
the Middle West and even of the country have, 
in good measure, been rewarded this year. 

Coach Kiley before coming to Loyola as Head 
Coach set a high standard for himself at Notre 
Dame University where he was an Ail-American 
end on the football team, and captain of the baseball 
and basketball teams. His leadership at South Bend 
is reflected in his work at Loyola. More than a 
coach to his football team, he has acquired the con- 
fidence of his men, and this confidence has been 
reflected in their successes of last season. Loyola 
University congratulates Coach Kiley for his past 
successes, and is happy to contemplate the success 
which will surely be attached to every thing he 
undertakes. 



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[Page 255] 



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Leonard Sachs, Bas\ethall Coach 



THE BASKETBALL COACH 



Leonard Sachs, coach of University basketball, and high school football, basketball 
and track, has been repaid to some extent this season by the success which has come to 
his teams. This year his Varsity basketball team stood up with the rest of them by 
virtue of their defeats of Creighton University, St. Louis University, Marquette Uni- 
versity and a host of others. His high school team took the title in both basketball 
and football and should repeat in taking again the track championship. Coach Sachs 
is deserving of the success he has had in athletics at Loyola for his unselfish labors 
in putting athletics on their present high station here. He, himself, is one of the fore- 
most athletes of Chicago, and is recognised everywhere, not only a player of ability, 
but as a sportsman of the highest caliber. 

Besides having these various duties as a coach he is also conducting gymnasium 
classes, and taking an active part in the National Catholic Basketball Tournament. 
Leonard Sachs has been secretary of the Board of Instructors for the past three years 
and has made himself an essential part of the organization of the great "Cardinal Cup 
Classic." 

The entire student body of the University, and especially the various players who 
performed under his direction, take this means of wishing him more success in bringing 
victory to Loyola. Not victory at the cost of sportsmanship, but victory as he has 
won in his own games, and victory as he teaches Loyola players to win it ; victory 
by hard, clean playing at all times. 



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[Page 2 56] 



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William Cerney 
Assistant Coach 



THE ASSISTANT COACH 

Bill Cerney, who assisted Coach Roger Kiley, in turn- 
ing out his football machine, has more things than his fine 
record at Loyola University to distinguish him. Bill was 
formerly a student at Saint Ignatius High School, on the 
West Side, where he gathered quite a reputation as a 
football player. After graduating from High School, 
<^.. Cerney entered the University of Notre Dame where he 

1^ , ^^^ played on the Hall teams while in his freshman year. 

||h|^L^ ^S^'^^^^II '^'-"' '•^^ "^^^ '^'^ years Cerney was a member of the 
^^^^^HjH^^^^II regular squad, and in his senior year was an important 
^^^^^^^^^^^^^11 i'~> Notre Dame's national Champions. 

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^1 His duties consisted chiefly in drilling the backfield 
men, though he also coached the line at various times 
during the season. His thorough knowledge of the game 
from all angles, as well as his catching personality, made 
Bill a favorite with all the players. Since the football 
season Cerney became a married man, and all students of Loyola, as well as players, 
unite in wishing him as good luck in marriage as he enjoyed in football. 



THE PHYSICAL DIRECTOR 

At the beginning of the year a new physical director and gymnasium manager was 
appointed. Edward McMahon, who has come to be known for many likeable charac- 
teristics by most of the students of the school, was the one appointed. 

"Mac" came to Loyola with a lot of experience in 
all sorts of athletic contests, m addition to being quite 
an athlete himself. He is a graduate of Princeton, 
Illinois, high school, where he won the fifty yard, 
the hundred yard, and the two-twenty yard events 
in the country meet. In addition he played both 
football and baseball with various amateur leagues 
in his section of the state. 

One of the biggest things that Mac has to his credit 
for the first year at Loyola is the erection of the new 
indoor track in the Gymnasium. A good deal ot 
the credit for this belongs to McMahon, who, if his 

first year is any indication, will be one of the well Edw.ard McM.ahon 

knowns dear to the heart of the student body. Physical Director 




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[Page 257] 






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John E. Schell, Senior Manager 

STUDENT MANAGERS 

John E. Schell Senior Manager 

Marshall I. McMahon Junior Manager 

Robert E. Morris Assistant Manager 

Harold Hillenbrand Publicity Manager 

Stanley Walsh Tramer 

JOHN SCHELL— MANAGER 

John Schell — a hard worker, with all the qualities demanded of a good manager. 
As is indicated by his work as manager of the football team during the past year, 
John had them in the highest degree. Every minute of his time was spent in the 
service of the team and the school and, as a result, his personal influence was tre- 
mendous. It was largely through his efforts that the season ran off as smoothly and 
harmoniously as it did. The coach's burden was considerably lightened by the realiza- 
tion that John would carry out his part of the work to be done capably and efficiently. 
Moreover, John is a "regular fellow." The players regard him as one of themselves 
and the influence of their pleasant relations has had a beneficient effect on the morale 
of the team as a whole. 

Since his entrance into the managerial field three years ago the successes of the 
teams have increased by leaps and bounds. Much of the credit for this is due to 
Johnny and his corps of able assistants. Nor has his toil been restricted entirely to 
football. He was a prominent official of the National Catholic Tournament, and as 
in everything else, his work was done thoroughly. 

His graduation this year will leave a void in the athletic department which will be 
difficult to fill. It is with a genuine appreciation of your work that the coaches, ath- 
letes and students extend to you best wishes for coming years, John, and all hope 
that you will be as active and prominent an alumnus as you were a student. 

MARSHALL McMAHON— ASS'T MANAGER 

"Mush," a Junior in the Arts Department, was assistant manager of football and 



[Page 258} 



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McMahon 



Morris 



Hillenbrand 



manager of basketball. The success of the basketball team this year is a fitting tribute 
to his executive ability. He drew up, after much hard work, the hardest schedule for 
the basketball team in the history of the school. Several pleasant and enjoyable trips 
were arranged by him for the team, of which the members were deeply appreciative. 
In addition he was constantly at the service of the team and the coach and by his 
friendliness and ready wit aided largely in upholding spirit and enthusiasm among the 
team. And with everyone looking forward to next season, the knowledge that 
"Mush," as football manager, will aid in guiding Loyola's warriors through the 
schedule, will be a source of satisfaction and confidence to Loyola's many followers. 

HAROLD HILLENBRAND— PUBLICITY DIRECTOR 

Few members of the student body know much about Hilly's work in the athletic 
line. The publicity manager's job is a thankless one for the most part. But who 
was it that secured football and basketball writeups, for the Tournament publicity as 
well as that for the Loyola Relays? Who manages the athletic department of the 
LOYOLA NEWS? None other than Harold Hillenbrand! He probably spends more 
time on matter related to the athletic activities of the school than some of the athletes. 
During the Tournament he was Ed. Krupka's right hand man and on more than one 
occasion worked all night handling innumerable routine details. Few knew of this 
"work, but those who did appreciate it deeply. Over and above this, too, Harold 
is an outstanding student, one of the founders of the Loyola News, and Dramatic 
Editor of the Loyola Quarterly. There are few at Loyola who can boast of such a 
long list of activities. And when one realizes that he is one of the best known and 
popular men on the Campus, it is evident that he is one of the biggest of Loyola's 
boosters. 

ROBERT MORRIS— ASS'T MANAGER 

"Bob" is the "Old Faithful" of the managerial force. Ever since he accepted the 
position of assistant manager. Bob has proven himself to be an excellent worker and 
one of the most enthusiastic Boosters on the Campus. Bob's heart and soul were in 
his work and he was always on the job at much sacrifice of his own time and labor. 
And that his work had much to do with the success of the football team during the 
past season is a generally recognized fact on the Campus — witness the tributes paid 
him by Coach Kiley and the football letter men at the banquet. Every one without 
exception had a word of praise for "little Bob." His work in the management of 
the Basketball Tournament was also outstanding. It is indeed fortunate that he will 
be back next year with his ready smile and helping hand to contribute to Loyola's 
future victories. 



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THE CHEERLEADERS 

In the all-important matter of supporting the teams, the cheerleaders play per- 
haps the most important role. To draw the cheers from a crowd and to do it 
properly requires a personality and an amount of skill which the average person 
cannot possess. Loyola was exceedingly fortunate m having this year, not one, 
but three men who in every way lived up to the specifications. These men were 
selected for the first time after an open competition in which about eight aspirants 
were given an opportunity to show their worth and to try it out on the student body. 

EDDIE RICHER, Head Cheerlea4er 

Eddie, serving his second season with the megaphone, showed that practice makes 
perfect. He showed a constant improvement in every detail of the difficult work, 
and his efforts and enthusiasm inspired his colleagues constantly to better attempts. 

JIMMY HUGHES 

The clown of the yell staff. His antics won the shrciks of the crowds, but when 
he called for a double locomotive he got one which could be heard all over Chicago. 

AL BROWN 

Al's easy manner and open personality endeared him to the hearts of the rooters 
and the volume of the cheers he got confirmed this popularity. St. Louis is still 
talking about the hit he made there last f.ill. 



[Page 260} 




FOOTBALL 



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[Page 263} 



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The Men 



LAWRENCE GORMAN, CAPTAIN 

Captain Lawrence "Bud" Gorman, 
mentioned for All-American fullback by 
Rockne and Smith, proved to be every 
bit worthy of the honor by his play and 
leadership during the season of 1925. 
Bud started off the season with a ninety 
yard run against Marquette and kept 
up this spectacular playing all season. 
Loyola is proud of Gorman and his 
team, and she knows that Bud's splendid 
leadership was a most important factor 
in making the last Loyola's most suc' 
ccssful season. 



[Page 264] 



DANIEL LAMONT, END 

One of the best ends Loyola ever had. 
A statement which is borne out by every 
team Dan played against. The effect of 
Dan's ability and personality can be seen 
from the fact that he was chosen to lead 
the 1926 team. Our future All- Ameri- 
can. Junior. Chicajjo. 



HUGH BURKE, GUARD 

Hui^h took his place m Kilcy's ma- 
chine as though he had been a regular 
for two years. A versatile player who 
made a good deal of fame because of his 
fine showing against the Haskell Indians. 
Next year Hugh will be one of the head- 
liners on the squad. 



EDDIE NORTON, HALFBACK 

"Ma" was the sensation of the year. 
In every game Eddie took part he broke 
loose at least once for a good gain. Ed's 
two big days, besides all the others, were 
at his home town, Davenport, and at St. 
Louis. A whale around the ends. 
Sophomore. Davenport. 



LAWRENCE FLYNN, GUARD 

"Larry" again started at his old place 
in the line. His consistent playing and 
his knack of breaking through on punts 
again won for him the acclaim he has 
been greeted with for the past two years. 
One of Loyola's best bets. Junior. Chi- 
cago. 




L.AMONT 



Norton 



Burke 



Flynn 



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11 



[Page 265] 






EDWIN BERWICK, CENTER 

"Big Ed" surely ended his collegiate 
career in splendid fashion. An expert 
on the offense and defense, Berwick was 
the well known "brick wall" while in 
the game. Hit the high spots in the 
Marquette game. Ed's last year. Sen- 
ior. Chicago. 



ARTHUR MURPHY, CENTER 

Though Art was handicapped during 
the season by injuries, he managed to 
get in the St. Louis papers for the splen- 
did work he did against the Billikens. 
An expert passer, who saved more than 
one game by his sure-fire passing. Jun- 
ior. Chicago. 



JOSEPH WITRY, GUARD 

"Fighting Joe" merely took a regular 
place on the eleven this season, his sec- 
ond year with the squad. Joe's tend- 
ency to inject pep into the battle made 
him famous wherever he played. "Big" 
Joe did good work against the Indians. 
Sophomore. Chicago. 



FRANK GILMORE, TACKLE 

"Ham" was laid up for a good part 
of the season with an injured knee. 
"Pete's" bulk as well as his ability to 
snare the runner were qualities that 
made him unpopular with the opposi- 
tion. Due for a big season next year. 
Junior. Chicago. 




Berwick 



WiTRY 



Murphy 



GiLMORE 



[Page 266] 




;'.^?i^*3t.?fei^V7" ^ T'^^'^^-'^f^ 



ANTHONY LAWLESS, FULLBACK 

Tony was on the squad tor the first 
year and if he keeps up the work he 
displayed this year he should he a top 
noteher next year. Tony showed well 
in the games he played in. Against 
Carroll his plunging was a feature. A 
real prospect. Freshman. Peoria. 



MARVIN ADAMS, HALFBACK 

Marv again did his stuff at halfback 
and was one of the most dependable 
ground gainers on the squad. He was 
also one of the best bets when Kiley un- 
leashed his passing game. Marv is a 
h.ilthack with ability and nerve. Senior. 
Chicago. 



LARS LUNDGOOT, 
QUARTERBACK 

Loyola's old reliable. Lars alternated 
with Eddie Johnson at quarterback and 
was a highly polished signal barker. 
Lars is a brainy field general and his 
trained toe was an important factor in 
garnering the extra points. Junior. 
Chicago. 



AL CRONIN, FULLBACK 

At times Whitey took Gorman's place 
and he had to go some to replace Bud 
even for a time. Whitey "s list of good 
games is too long, so only a mere men- 
tion IS made of Haskell, St. Louis, and 
Dayton. Dayton knows he's good. 
Junior. Chicago. 




L-WVLESS 



LuNDGOOT 



Ad.^ms 



Cronin 



^■^■:. 






[Page 267] 




MARTIN GRIFFEN, HALFBACK 

No man playing his first year as a 
regular has ever made a better impres' 
sion than did Marty last year. His work 
at half was one of the outstanding 
events of the season. Marty scored the 
winning touchdown against the Indians 
besides figuring in the scoring in many 
other tilts. Will be a headliner. 



JOSEPH BUSH, END 

"Big" Joe lived up to the record he 
has made in previous years. Joe played 
almost a quarter against Carroll with a 
badly injured shoulder. One of the 
most aggressive men in Loyola mole- 
skins. Joe is now a married man, and 
we wish him the same success next year 
on the football field as he is having in 
married life. 



FRANK BUTLER, FULLBACK 

Though unable to crowd Gorman and 
Cronin out of the picture, Frank is sure 
to be heard from when the old boys 
leave. A sturdy half, with a knack for 
line plunging, as he hits the line low and 
hard. 



HAROLD LEDERER, GUARD 

"Harry" is one of the smiling kind 
who takes all the bumps on the field 
with a smile and then tackles a little 
bit harder in return. His weight and 
ability added much to the line when he 
was in the game. 









m 



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Bush 



Butler 



Lederer 



[Page 268] 



CLARENCE PARENT, 
QUARTERBACK 

"Clar" has proved to be a brainy 
field general in the workouts last fall. 
He is an adept at calling the proper play 
at the proper time and this quality will 
make him come to the front next year as 
a signal caller. 



HAMILTON GREEN, TACKLE 

"Babe" is one of the mainstays on the 
squad. In every tilt he played, Babe did 
something to make a hit with the 
crowd. Against St. Ambrose Babe 
played one of the best games of his 
career, and that is saying a lot when his 
work for past years is considered. 



PHIL BRENNAN, END 

As a recommendation Phil will not 
need any for those who saw him work 
in the game against Haskell. Stepping 
into the game at the last minutes, Bren- 
nan turned in such a finished perform- 
ance that he will see a lot of action at 
end next season. 



WILLIAM MEADE, TACKLE 

Bill put on several classy perform- 
ances at various times during the season. 
His work at tackle against the Haskell 
Indians was especially commendable. 
Meade will be one of the boys that will 
figure greatly in 1926. 




Parent 



Brenx.\x 



Green 



Me.^de 






[Page 269] 



nm 



DOUGLAS GOTT, TACKLE 

"Doug" was one of the best relief 
men on the squad. Several times when 
some of the regulars were injured Gott 
replaced them and turned in such fin- 
ished performances that everyone 
thought that the regular was in. A 
valuable man. 

THOMAS REEDY, TACKLE 

"Tom," in his first year on the squad, 
gave a lot of promise at tackle. In ad- 
dition to being a husky tackle on the 
"frosh" eleven, Tom is a member of the 
basketball team, having made himself 
one of the team's star guards. 



EMMETT ETU, HALFBACK 

Another of the first year men who 
will be fighting for the regular positions 
ne.xt year. "Em" is an aggressive player, 
with an especial liking for end runs. 
With another year Etu will be heard 
from at halfback. 

JACK DOWNS, HALFBACK 

Jack did some classy performing at 
half in some games. In the game against 
John Carroll Downs gained a lot of 
ground and proved himself especially as 
a defensive back. He is fast, has the 
weight and ability to make a back of 
the highest caliber. 






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Reedy 



Etu 



Downs 



[Page 270] 



o 



RYAN MULLEN, QUARTERBACK 

Against John Carmll, "Mu" led the 
boys at quarterback, calling the plays 
with a quick insight into the conditions. 
He brought the team into scoring dis- 
tance of the goal and helped put over 
the touchdown that was the winning 
marker. A player that knows football. 

ED. JOHNSON, QUARTERBACK 

"Ed" garnered fame this season for 
more reasons than one. Besides playing 
at quarter in most of the games and 
displaying a brainy knowledge of foot' 
ball, he was an expert in running back 
punts. "Johnny"' did some fine work 
against St. Louis. A real quarterback 
and a real fellow. 



THOMAS STAMM, 
QUARTERBACK 

"Tom's" last year on the team was a 
fitting close to his brilliant career both 
scholastically and athletically. Tom was 
one of the most likeable men on the 
squad, and had besides this a lot of 
knowledge about how the quarterback 
position should be played. A splendid 
wearer of the "L." 

JOHN MASELTER, GUARD 

John also played his last year on the 
squad. A rather late start in football 
kept him from being one of the head- 
liners. Against St. Bede, Jack was a 
bulwark of strength in the line. An- 
other year and Jack would be a regular. 



JOSEPH McGRATH, HALFBACK 

Mac is one of the players that con- 
sole a coach a bit when he thinks of the 
team that's coming up next year. Mac 
and Lawless are former team mates and 
they both display a powerful brand of 
football. 




Mullen 



McGr.ath 



St.^mm 



M.^SELTER 



m 



[Page 271} 



J^ 









NORTON, END 

"Young" Norton is a brother of '"Ed- 
die," the well'known halfback. Though 
he does not play at halfback as does his 
brother he bids fair to shine as much at 
end as his brother does in the backiield. 

WALKOVIAK, END 

With his splendid build "Wal" should 
be another good prospect for one of the 
wing positions. He has a lot of natural 
ability coupled with an abundance of 
speed and endurance. 



CHAPP, TACKLE 

"Chappie" did not get into many of 
the games due to the prevalence of sea' 
soned material for the tackle positions. 
His showing in the practice predicted a 
good season for this big boy next year. 

PAUL NOLAND, END 

Another of the group of men who are 
seeking the regular wing positions next 
year and the following year. Slender, 
fast and shifty, Paul has a good chance 
to take one of these places. 



GEORGE HATTON, HALFBACK 

"George" may be rather small for one 
of the backfield positions, but what he 
loses in height he makes ud witii his 
ferocity m plunging and running the 
end. George is slated for a good year 
next season. 



\W4 




Wi 



Norton Walkoviak Chapp Noland Hatton 



[Page 272] 



BIEDERMAN, CENTER 

In his first year on the squad, "Bead" 
made an impression as a sure-fire passer. 
He is also a defensive man of high cali' 
bre. Should b; useful next year at 
center. 

DANIEL DONOHUE, END 

An abundance of exceptionally clever 
ends kept Danny somewhat in the back- 
ground because of lack of experience. 
With a year of football under his wing, 
Danny ought to take a few falls out of 
the opposition next year. 



HILDON, CENTER 

Another of the men who is expected 
to give Art Murphy some help in hold- 
ing down center. Berwick's loss by 
graduation opens the place for someone 
and Hil has shown enough ability to 
do so. 

WALSH, TACKLE 

One of the big men on the freshman 
eleven. If his showing on that squad 
was any indication, he should prove to 
be a candidate for one of the regular 
positions, after his year's experience. 



NEAL RYAN, CENTER 

One of the best prospects Loyola has 
had in some years. Should be a big 
help next year. Neal made a big show- 
ing against Carroll and other schools 
he played against. 



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HiLDON 



W.^LSH 



Ry.^n 



[Page 273] 



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Bud Going Over 



THE GAMES 






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I 



THE MARQUETTE GAME 

The first game of the year on Septemher 26, gave many indications as to what the success of 
the team would he. Though the final scohe was 10-0 in favor of the Wisconsin university, the 
Loyola team played with such brilliance, that, had the game been played later in the season, 
the count would have been reversed. Five hundred Loyola rooters attended the game, which 
was played at the Marquette Stadium. 

Captain Gorman gave the fans one of the biggest thrills of the season when he took the 
first kick-off and ran through the entire Marquette team for a 90-yard run. Marquette was held 
scoreless for the first quarter, but near the end of the second period Bader drop kicked a goal 
for the first three points. At the end of the third period, after completing several forward passes. 
Marquette made its only touchdown of the game. 

The showing of the line was one of the big features. Berwick playing the entire first half 
with a painfully injured shoulder. The playing of Green and Lament against Dilweg, Mar- 
quette's All-Amencan end, predicted successful seasons for both of these men. Witry and 

Flynn, paired at the guards, worked to- 
gether with such precision and effect that 
they were kept together all season. Joe 
Bush, who played the ends with Danny 
Lamont, did effective work in stopping 
Demoling, the Hilltop star. 

THE MILLIKEN GAME 

The second game of the season was 
played at Loyola Field against James 
Milliken University of Decatur, Illinois. 
A chance to score in the first half was 
lost after a forward pass from Johnson 
was grounded and Gorman was forced to 




Loyola versus Milliken 



[Page 274] 




It's a Touchdown! 



Cnirlcsy St. Loins Clohc-Dc 



kick. In the third quarter Stuckey and Norton took the ball around the ends for a gain of 
thirty-five yards after Gorman had made two first downs through the line. Stuckey then carried 
the ball to the twenty-yard line and plunged for the first touchdown on the next play. In the 
same quarter. Green tossed Bishop, a Milliken back for a twenty-yard loss, and Loyola took the 
ball on downs. Ed Norton then galloped through the entire Milliken defense and scored the 
second touchdown of the period. Stuckey missed the goal and the final score was 12-0. 



THE ST. AMBROSE GAME 

At Davenport, on October 17, Loyola met St. Ambrose and defeated the Ambrosians by a 
14-0 score. The Davenport team was unable to pierce the Loyola defense as they gained but 
two first downs through the line and these resulted from penalties. Ed Norton ran left end 
for twenty-two yards and the first touchdown early in the game. Again he ran sixty-five 
yards for a touchdown, but this was discounted by the referee who claimed "backs in motion." 
Al Cronin scored the second touchdown in the most brilliant run ever seen on the Davenport 
field. He intercepted a St. Ambrose pass on his own three-yard line, and, with the line providing 
the interference, he ran ninety-seven yards for the second score. 

Danny Lamont and Joe Bush man- 
aged to keep busy by being on the re- 
ceiving end of seven of the nine passes 
tried. Gorman's kicking was again wor- 
thy of mention. 

THE DAYTON GAME 

One of the topnotch games of the sea- 
son was nearly spoiled by a day that al- 
most ruined every conceivable brand of 
football. This game with Dayton Uni- 
versity, October 24, at Soldier's Field, 
Grant Park Stadium, which had been ex- 
pected to draw a mammoth crowd, was 




Loyola versus John Carroll 



[Page 275} 



-T-r-ss- 



almost drowned out, but Loyola managed to eke out a 6-2 win. Loyola kicked off to the 
Dayton quarterback, who fumbled the slippery oval. Loyola recovered the ball on the Dayton 
22-yard-line. After several line plays Eddie Norton scampered through the mud for the neces- 
sary yardage and made the only touchdown of the game. 

Dayton's score came in the last minutes of the closing period, after they had completed 
their only pass of the game. Loyola took the ball on downs in the shadow of the goal posts 
and Gorman grounded the ball giving Dayton their only two points. 






THE LOMBARD GAME 

The Lombard game saw the upset of the dopesters for Loyola lost in a close game 13-7. 
Playing without Gorman, Gilmore and Berwick, the eleven scored in the second quarter and 
held the lead until the final minutes of play. Marty Griffen, the fleet halfback went around end 
for the score. Loyola seemed to have the game cinched but the Lombard collegians countered 
with a touchdown in the first part of the final period. They tailed to kick the goal. With but 
a few minutes remaining, the Lombard quarter threw a pass that bounded off the back of the 
Loyola defense man. Mosher, Lombard halfback, scooped up the oval and scampered for the 
winning touchdown. Art Murphy and Danny Lamont shone in the line, while Stuckey, Adams 
and Cronin worked hard in the backfield. 



-- 1 






WM 



THE ST. LOUIS GAME 

November 14 brought with it the annual hegira to St. Louis to engage the Billikens. This 
time, unlike former years, Loyola came home on the long end of the score. St. Louis scored 
first but both Ed Norton and Whitey Cronin countered with touchdowns. Murphy. Green 
and Bush shone in the line, breaking up the passing attack and stopping Ramaciotti, the 
Billiken star. 

Norton's end runs were responsible for both of the touchdowns. His running left St. 
Louis gasping as they had expected more of Loyola's passing attack. 

The only thing to mar the triumph was the injury to Bill Stuckey in the first quarter. 
Stuckey was carried off the field with an injured leg. After a long siege in Mercy Hospital, 
Chicago, Stuckey was able to he about on crutches. It is doubtful whether he will be able to 
fill his regular position this fall. 

THE JOHN CARROLL GAME 

Before the Homecoming crowd Coach Roger Kiley and his team displayed a brand of foot- 
ball that stood the Cleveland team on their heads. Kiley did not employ the first team for the 
better part of the game and the showing of the other men forebodes much evil for the teams 
on next year's schedule. Brcnnan, Griffen, Downs and Lawless divided the honors in this 
game. In the second quarter Gorman drove for a touchdown, while Carroll came back with 
one a few minutes later. Norton, the end run specialty man, again broke through for a touch- 
down. Both Bush and Murphy were injured in this game and were out of practice for a week. 

HASKELL GAME 

The last and most glorious game of the year. The Redskins primed with victories over some 
of the best teams in the country, went down in defeat before a large crowd at Soldier's Field, 
Grant Park Stadium. The final score was 6-0. In that game more real football was displayed 
than Chicago has seen in some time. Every man who got into the game had some special claim 
to fame for his work. Gorman because of his kicking and timely plunging; Norton for his end 
runs and for the passes he caught. Two men shone particularly brightly that day. Phil Brennan 
was called in at the last minute to substitute for Joe Bush who was injured. Phil's catching ol 
passes and the way in which hd broke up the Indians' plays foretold to Kiley that he would be 
well supplied with a good end for at least two more years. Eddie Johnson who was taken ill on 
the night before the game was replaced by Lars Lundgoot. Lars played one of the fastest games 
of his career, outsmarting the Indians all the way. Ed Berwick topped off his collegiate career 
with a wonderful game; Meade, Burke and Green took all the glory at the tackle positions and 
withstood the attacks of the savage redskins. Witry and Flynn got a big writeup from Walter 
Eckersall, of the Tribune, the next day for their work at guard. And the man responsible for the 
lone tally was none other than Marty Griffen, the diminutive halfback. Mart ran the ends and 
completely baffled the Haskell ends. After Norton, Gorman and Lundgoot had taken the ball 
down the field, Bud passed to Brennan for five yards. Marty then swept around left end, eluding 
the tackles, for the only score of the game. Truly a wonderful game to climax a wonderful season. 



[Page 276} 





SCH LACKS 



McGraw 



THE CAPTAINS 



Leonard McGraw and Howard Schlacks both had the honor of captaining the 
basketball five in 1925. Due to a deadlock which could not be broken both of these 
popular men were named captains and they alternated during the season. Howard 
Schlacks had been holding down his position at guard for the past three years and 
finished his collegiate basketball career with last season for he will be graduated in 
June. Schlacks has distinguished himself in all departments of the game. During 
the season Howie gave the forwards a run for the high point honors in scoring. His 
ability to break up the opposition's olfense was a big factor in Loyola's showing on 
the court this year. His qualities as a leader were of the highest grade and in the 
games in which he acted as captain, the team continued to be the smoothly working 
squad that it was all season. 

Lenny McGraw's absence next year will cause Coach Sachs more than one worry. 
McGraw has been an important factor in the basketball machine for the past three 
years. During this time he has held a regular forward position and led the squad in 
high point honors for two years. A shifty and finished floor man he gave the oppo- 
sition much to worry about in stopping him when going for the basket. Lenny made 
a splendid leader, and topped ofT a long record of service to Loyola on court and 
diamond, with the highest honors. 

Both Schlacks and McGraw will be lost to the squad next year. In addition both 
of these men were finished baseball players. They leave to the squads who will follow 
them a long record of clean and hard playing. Two years ago a rather unsuccessful 
season did not prevent them from giving their best, and with the high grade basket- 
ball team they led this year their long record of loyal service continued. 



i 



[Page 279] 







M\' 



ri 

H 



m 



McGraw 




SCHLACKS 



LEONARD McGRAW, FORWARD 

Lenny shared the captaincy with Howie Schlacks 
and together they turned in the most successful sea- 
son Loyola has had in some years. Lenny's play- 
ing at forward, his ability to ring up baskets, and 
his clean-cut playing will be missed next year when 
the team takes the floor. Muggsy's last year; he 
graduates from the Arts and Sciences Department 
in June. 



RUSSELL DOOLEY, 
GUARD AND CENTER 

Dooley, to show his versatility, 
alternated at center and guard 
through the season. Though han- 
dicapped by an injured leg, Russ 
managed to get in a good percent- 
age of the games and increased the 
enthusiasm the fans had for him. 
Dooley was a steady and reliable 
guard who played hard. Last year 
for R.USS. Another owner of an 
Arts diploma in June. 



Do«LEY 

HOWARD SCHLACKS, GUARD 

Howie was the other half ot the captaincy. 
Howie and Muggsy made a good pair in the 
games, too, for their ability to work together 
helped the team in its fine season. Howie is a guard 
of the first water. His work against Marquette 
and against Crcighton will long be remembered by 
fans who saw those games, Howie, too, will take 
his degree with him at the graduating exercises. 




[Page 280] 




TONY LAWLESS, FORWARD 

Tony simply kept on going where he left ofF when he 
led the Spalding team to the first National Catholic 
Championship. His work at forward was one of the big 
sensations of the year. Though rather small, he is com- 
pactly built and his chief pleasure was to fool the "big 
boys" by dribbling around them. Lawless is back again 
next year and the opposition had better watch him. 



JAMES BREMNER, CENTER 

"Red-headed" Jimmie managed to 
be the surprise of the season, even 
though it was his first year on the 
team. Jimmie's eye for the hoop was 
sharp all season, and he also had the 
estimable quality of coming through 
in the pinch. Jim has a couple of 
years to play yet, and you'll hear a 
whole lot from him before he gets 
his sheepskin. 



Bremner 



JOSEPH WITRY, GUARD 

"Big Joe" took one of the guard positions 
at the beginning of the season and held on 
to it. His aggressiveness was at its height 
when the team was trailing. At taking them 
off the backboard Joe gave space to no one 
and many forwards will testify that Joe was 
hard to get away from, because of his ability 
as a guard and because he is easy to like. 





L.\WLES.S 




^ 



i 

5*f 



P 
ffc- 



m 



WiTRY 



^J 



[Page 281] 









'M^ 



>41 







THOMAS REEDY, GUARD 

Tom was especially valuable for his 
ability to drop them in from the cor- 
ners of the court. As a guard Tom 
ranks with the best, as he is fast and 
shifty. Tom also has a couple of years 
left in which to give Loyola students 
soincthincr to talk about. 



JOSEPH McGRATH, FORWARD 

A teammate of Lawless' who began 
to make a name for himself in his iirst 
season. Though somewhat handicapped 
by a lack of brawn, Mac turned in 
some good games at forward. Mac is 
back again next year and should give 
a good account of himself. 




Reed\ 



McGr.ath 






LEE JACOBS, CENTER 

Lee took part for the first half of the season only but managed to break in the scor- 
ing column with frequency. His work in the Kent College game gave an indication 
of what Lee would do if he had stayed the whole season. 

TED VASKOWSKY, FORWARD 

Though Ted played but the last half of the season with the Varsity he showed that 
he will be a viluable man on the squad next year. In the games in which Vas took 
part his finished floor play and his accuracy on long shots gave the spectators a feel- 
ing oi satisfaction that Ted will be back next year. 

THOMAS HICKEY, FORWARD 

Tom nmc up from Loyola Academy. Though handicapped by si;e, Tom will 
develop into ^ clever basketball player, as he is fast, brainy and shifty. 

EDWARD JAMES, FORWARD 

Ineligibility caused Eddie to leave the basketball squad after he had gotten a good 
start Should develop into a valuable forward with another year of play. 

HENRY REMIEN, GUARD 

Though not breaking into the game very much Hank should, under Coach Sach's 
expert direction, develop into a formidable player. 

LEO LEDERER, FORWARD 

Lederer was kept in the background somewhat due to the presence of high class 
forward material. Leo will make himself valuable to the squad next year as he has 
the requisites for a good basketball player. Leo appeared for every practice and 
worked hard and earnestly. 



[Page 282} 



THE GAMES 

THE KENT GAME 

The first game of the year was won by Loyola with the decisive count of 28-6. Every 
man on the squad got into the game at some time. Although they displayed much power in 
scoring, Len Sachs saw much which had to be corrected before the next game. Lawless and 
McGraw, forwards; Bremner, center; Schlacks and Witry, guards, was the combination which 
seemed to go at highest speed. 

THE MERCER GAME 

New Year's Eve brought Mercer University, of Macon, Ga., to the gym. With Lawless, 
Schlacks and Lee Jacobs doing most of the heavy work, Loyola kept the lead until the final 
five minutes of play. The Southerners then evened the count and took the tilt 34-27. 

THE LOMBARD GAME 

The Christmas holidays were disastrous to the team, for with Schlacks and Lawless out of 
the lineup, Lombard handed the team a 40-11 drubbing. The Galesburg aggregation displayed 
a superb brand of basketball, with Murphy their high point man. 

THE LEWIS GAME 

The team that had given Chicago Univer.-^ity a tigiit game tell before the rejuvenated team 
21-18 in a close battle. Lawless was still out ol the game, but a new combination found the 
basket with comtorting regularity. Last minute baskets by Schlacks and McGraw won the 
game. 

THE ST. MARY GAME 

Playing with a brilliance that smothered the St. Mary, Winona, Minn., quintet, Loyola 
rode over them 21-9 on January 11. "Red" Bremner displayed a good bit of the talent that 
gave him his rep in the Catholic League. Schlacks and Witry featured at the guards. 

THE VALPARAISO GAME 

The third straight victory was won at the e.xpense of Valparaiso U., 32-21. Lawless, 
McGraw and Bremner took most of the honors in the first period, while Reedy. McGrath 
shone in the final period. 

THE ST. THOMAS GAME 

In a game that was more spirited than the score would indicate, Loyola took their fourth 
straight win from St. Thomas College, of St. Paul, Minn., 14-10. Dooley played brilliant 
ball in the first period. The second half was rather slow as Loyola could not count on their 
shots which were rolling off the rim. An off day for the boys. 

THE DEKALB GAME 

One of the most brilliant games of the season. Nip and tuck until the last gun with the 
score in favor of Loyola 26-25. With one team taking the lead and then the other, McGraw 
apparently had it all settled with two long baskets when the score was tied. Lawless, as usual, 
came through with the winning hoop. The fifth straight. 

THE CREIGHTON GAME 

The Creighton Bluejays, with wins over Minnesota and Kansas Aggies, made it six straight 
for the team. In another thriller which ended 22-21 it became generally known to the sport- 
ing world that Loyola had a six-cylinder machine. Creighton led at the half by two points, 
hut Jimmie Bremner inevitable short basket and Schlacks' two long ones gave Loyola their 
margin of victory. Witry's playing at guard stopped the Creightori offense at critical times. 

THE CARROLL GAME 

Seven spelled bad luck for the Maroon and Gold team. Carroll of Waukesha, came down 
from the Badger state and handed us a 3 2-19 trimming. Reedy and Dooley replaced Joe 
Witry who was on the sidelines with a charlcy horse. Carroll specialized in over-the-head 
shots. 

THE ST. LOUIS GAME AT ST. LOUIS 

Traveling and the well known "jinx" linked together to keep us in the slumps for St. 
Louis gave us a 32-17 defeat down in the Mound City. The Bradburn sharpshooters piled 
up the points for the Billikens, while McGrath and Lawless were Loyola's best bets. Dooley 
was injured in this game. 

THE VALPARAISO GAME 

Determined to start another string of victories the team tO(.ik a holiday on Lincoln's birth' 
day and handed Valpo their second defeat at our hands, 2 5-16. Exceptionally good passing 
with accuracy in shooting baskets obtained this victory. Lawless and Witry were stars. 



[Page 28.^] 



m 
m 



S 



m 






VIS' 



J 




The Championship Game 

THE NATIONAL CATHOLIC INTERSCHOLASTIC 
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

The great "Cardinal Cup Classic" was staged for the third time (m March 18, 19, 
20, and 21, 1926. This event has come to attract the best of the Catholic High School 
world to Loyola University, and the Tournament, in its third year, far exceeded 
expectations. Most of this, no doubt, is due to the earnest effort on the part of those 
who were connected with the National Catholic Interscholastic Basketball Tourna- 
ment. 

The founder of the Tournament, Mr. Joseph F. Thorning, S.J., left for St. Louis 
LIniversity to continue his studies. Reverend Dennis F. Burns, S.J., Athletic Director 
of the University, took charge of the tremendous task of organizing this gigantic 

enterprise. In order to lighten the burden of the 
mass of details, Edward Krupka, a Loyola Uni- 
versity graduate, was named Executive Secre- 
tary. Mr. Thomas Divine, S.J., who directed 
the publicity campaign the year previous, again 
took charge of this department this year. Roger 
Kilcy, Head Coach, acted as Director of the 
Tournament, while Leonard D. Sachs, basket- 
ball coach, was secretary of the Board of Direc- 
tors. Mr. Joseph A. Gauer, president of the 
Maroon and Gold Club, was elected Chairman 
of the Executive Committee. 

Lhider the guidance of these men the Tourna- 
ment assumed the national aspect which has 
Edward Krupka characterized it since its foundation. Requests 

Executive Secretary 




{Page 2S4] 




St. Xaviers of Louisville, Ky., The National Cath(ilic, Champions 

Front Row: Bro. Constant, Coach; T. Fitzgerald. T. Hendricks, J. Malone, Captain; 
Smith, J. Forsee. Bro. Sylvanus, Athletic Director 

Standing: F. Ryan, T. Board, L. Koertner, C. Spencer, E. Ober, D. Baird, Student Mgr. 

for information began to pour into the Tournament from all parts of the Union, show- 
int; how great the interest in the Classic really is. Mr. John T. Dempsey, Jr., Chair- 
man of the Reception Committee, again secured the Edgewater Beach Hotel as the 
headquarters for the National Catholic Basketball Tournament. Here the teams 
were to be quartered during their stay in Chicago. 

Eighteen states were represented this year. Maine and New Jersey were two distant 
states which, for the first time, sent their Catholic State Champions to the Meet. Be- 
cause of the closeness of the race for titular honors, in some states two teams were 
admitted. 

The first day's play was characterized by the usual number of so-called upsets. 
Teams playing every brand of basketball that is displayed in the nation clashed on the 
floor in the first round. The high calibre of teams entered into the Tournament can 
be judged from the fact that there were nine games which were won or lost by the 
narrow margin of five or six points. Great crowds stormed the gymnasium during 
every period of play and the tickets for the final night were gone before Friday 
morning. 



m 



[Page 285} 



M 



m 



<r ,\ 



& 



The teams that entered the semi-finals were Cathedral High School of Wichita, Kansas, 
Aquinas Institute, Rochester, N. Y.; St. Xavier High School, of Louisville, Kentucky, and 
Decatur Catholic High School, of Decatur, Indiana. These teams fought it out for the National 
Catholic Championship with the following result. The St. Xavier team of Louisville, won the 
title of National Catholic champs; Acquinas Institute, Rochester, N. Y., placed second. Third 
place went to Cathedral High School, Wichita, Kansas, while Decatur Catholic High School, 
Decatur, Indiana, completed the list of the place winners. 

The semi-finals were played Sunday afternoon before a crowd that packed the Gymnasium. 
Four teams, representing the East, the South, the West and the Mid-West, were fighting for the 
National Catholic honors. Cathedral High School, of Wichita Kansas, was defeated in a game 
that bristled with action and interest by the close margin of one point, 15-16. The winning point 
was scored on a free throw after the final whistle had blown. St. Xavier, the representative of 
Kentucky, defeated Catholic High School of Decatur, Indiana, the same afternoon, 18-14, thus 
earning the right to fight it out with Aquinas Institute for the title honors. 

The final evening of play was so replete with thrills and gala events that it is hard to record 
them on paper. The gymnasium was packed to the rafters with hundreds clamoring for admission. 
The rivalry between the rooters of the various teams was intense, the audience took sides with the 
various teams and added their din to the cheers of the fans. 

Then, in one of the best games of the Tournament, the St. Xavier team was crowned National 
Catholic Champions, by virtue of their 18-16 victory over Aquinas. Aquinas led at the half by 
one point, their short passing game giving them a slight edge over the small Louisville team. In 
the final period the lead was taken first by one team, and then by the other. Kennedy, all- 
Tournament forward, matched wits with Hendricks, all-Tournament guard, in a wonderful exhibi- 
tion of basketball. With but four minutes left to go Kennedy dropped a basket and his team 
took a two-point lead. The Southerners tied the score at sixteen-all with but two minutes left 
to play. From one end of the floor to the other, in a desperate effort to score, went the forwards 
of both teams. Smith, St, X. forward, set the crowd in a frenzy by making the winning basket 
and clinching the titular honors for his squad. 

Thus the third annual National Catholic Basketball Tournament passed into history amid the 
cheers of the spectators. Then came the awarding of the trophies for which they had been 
fighting for the past two days. 

The splendid Cardinal's Cup was awarded to the Louisville Champions, while the remainder of 
the trophies for first, second and third places were awarded to Aquinas Institute, Cathedral High 
School, and Decatur Catholic High School respectively. 

The Hon. William E. Dever Trophy for the Chicago team making the best showing in the 
Tournament was awarded to St. Mel High School, National Champs of 1925. The William H. 
Powell Cup for the team scoring the highest number of points in the first round was awarded to 
Decatur Catholic High School. The P. J. Carr Cup for the team overcoming the greatest handi- 
cap to win the second half was won by the National Champions. The Sears-Roebuck Trophy 
for best coached team went to Aquinas. The three trophies donated by the Chicago Evening 
American were awarded as follows: Best sportsmanship trophy won by Catholic Central High 
School, Fort Wayne, Indiana. Best appearing team won by Decatur Catholic High School. 
Trophy for team making highest average of free throws awarded Marquette University High 
School. Loyola News Trophy for team making the least number of fouls given to St. Mary High 
School, Van Buren, Me. For the player of most value to his team, the Jack Schaack Trophy was 
awarded to Hendricks, of Louisville. The Peter J. Angsten Gold Medals were awarded to the 
following five men who were named on the All-Tournament team: Left forward, Evard, of 
Catholic Central, Fort Wayne, Indiana; right forward, Kennedy, of Aquinas Institute, of 
Rochester, N. Y.; center. Strong, St. Louis University Hgih School; right guard, Hendricks, of 
St. Xavier, Louisville, and left guard, Campbell, of St. Viator High School, Bourbonais, 111. 



l^'J 



[Page 286] 



TOYOLA 

X^I'tNIVERSlTY 




CHICAGO ^^ M CONDUCTED BY THE JESUITS 



Standard Baccalaureate Degrees Cor\ferred in Six Colleges 
- - Faculty of ISO • • Campus of 20 Acres ' • 12 Buildings 



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(St. Ignatius College) 
Accredited to the North Central 
Association of Colleges 
College courses leading to A.B.. Ph.B.. 
and A.M. degrees. Pre-medical and 
Scientific courses leading to B.S. and 
M.S. degrees. Open to graduates of 
accredited high schools. 
Catalog N — Registrar, Loyola Avenue 
and Sheridan Road. Rogers Park 0620 



COMMERCE 

(Co-Educational) 
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Evening School in the Loop 
Courses in Accounting, Economics, Busi- 
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Saturday afternoon, 1:00 to 5:00. 
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Central J025 



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(Co-Educational) 
Training for Social Work, Extension 
Classes for University Degrees and 
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Courses in Sociology. Education, His- 
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Central 2883 



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(Co-Educational) 

Rated Class A bv Amer. Med. Assn. 

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Loyola Academy (High School) 



[Page 287} 



ROBBINS^ SCHOOL HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN 

PEOPLE 

By Charles L. Robbins, Ph.D., Professor of Education, State University of Iowa, 
in collaboration with Elmer Green. 

The underlying plan of School History of the American People is to set up 
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Note the following review from a recent issue of the Boston Transcript: 

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"A chapter is devoted to each epoch of United States progress, and each chapter is 
introduced by statements of the conditions of the time. The author introduces political 
and social topics of importance during the various epochs. He makes his book a history 
of national growth and progress, rather than a chronicle of wars. The more recent 
problems of our Nation are discussed and the increasing friendship of the United States 
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the health of your 
entire family will 
be benefited by a 
daily glass of 



6 



owman 

OAIR.V COMWVNV 

MilH/ 




[Page 288] 



^^k^ ^^ Headquarters for Students Supplies ^^^^^^fc 

Make it a rule to think of Horder's when you need Loose Leaf Memo^ 
Books, Composition Books, Drawing Instruments, Stationery, Fountain 
Pens or other school supplies. A complete stock of everything a student 
needs. 

''No Tear" Ring Book Sheets are especially fine for permanent note 
book work. Let us send you a "No Tear" sample. 

HORDER^S, INC., Chicago 

87 STORES ALL OVER THE LOOP Franklin 

Phones General Offices, Lake & Franklin Sts. 6760 

236 W. Lake 324 S. Dearborn 

1 54 W. Randolph 108N. LaSalle 228 W. Madison 60 E. Monroe 
124 W.Adams 148 N.Wabash 24 S. Dearborn 33 E. Lake 



Sixty Tears in Business 

with thousands of satisfied customers on our books. Let us 
help you to solve your insurance problems whether they be 
Fire, Plate Glass, Automobile, Liability, Compensation, Steam 
Boiler, Accident or any other form of insurance. We will 
give you the benefit of an experience acquired over many 
years devoted to the problems of insurance. A telephone call, 
letter or post card will bring our service to you. 

JOHN NAGHTEN & CO. 

{Estahlished 1863) 

INSURANCE 

175 W. Jackson Boulevard 

Chicago 

Telephone Wabash 1120 



[Page 289] 



Buy NOW in 



alon| 
wooc 
assurj 
crease, 

Willi 

makes! 
fort ai 

Mund^l 
village 
of watel 
gas, elel 

services.! 

Early in ■ 
from Mul 



, .....entetthebusme 






Out selling o'^SXekind ^elptu^ ^- - 

^Slnt"-S.* „,,„M„.ae.>..jf --r*'«;U. 



Lake 



o"'" ;;he vacation P'^' — 

.»»..!.•>»■ /vssociatiotv 

^^""*:";t. Chicago „ -T.t^e.cin ^^^ 



^^eSufet. Chicago •;,T,t?e.cin ■ 

,9 West Monroe^S»^^^^,.,.iUe^^ ^ ^ 



[Page 290] 




Photo by Roseofeld 



SET YOUR SAILS 

for more business by using finely made 
printing plates. The force of your 
advertising message is increased by 
pictures reproduced the Peerless way. 

'your Story in pidures lea\>es nothing untold 

PEERLESS 

ENGRAVING & COLORTYPE COMPANY 

223 WEST ERIE STREET 

CHICAGO 



[Page 291} 



Telephone Main 5296 



BONNER ^ MARSHALL BRICK CO. 



FACE BRICK 



ROOFING TILE 



General OfEces and Exhibit Rooms 
901-902 Chamber of Commerce Bldg. 

CHICAGO 



Buck may not be much of a swim- 
mer, but believe me pledge, he man- 
ages to paddle about some at our ini- 
tiations. 



The Young medic said : "Plenty of 
exercise will kill all germs, but how is 
one to get them to exercise." 



Are you smokin' again, Rastus? 
Say, gal, does I look like a case of 
spontaneous combustion' 



A bee may sting you but it's the E"s 
and F"s that really hurt. 



If your girl gives you a stony look 
when youVe trying to cement your 
friendship, don't go out and get rocky; 
just assert yourself, be a little boulder. 



The Bible has it that "Assyrinias rent 
his garments," for how else could a pur- 
veyor of Fine Tuxedoes make any 
shcckels? 



MUELLER BROS. 

Inco rpo ra ted 

200 SOUTH WADASH AVENUE 

THIRD FLOOR TEL. HARRISON 4184 

J^akers of^ Artistic Picture and Mirror 
Frames that reflect in every detail 
the work of the master - craftsman 
Dignified in character — superior 
in quality - and excellent in finish. 

I^eaildina done - Oil Paintings restored 

PRICES MODERATE 



[Page 292] 



PHONE CENTRAL 2719 



OPEN SUNDAYS 




Morrison Photographer - Chicago 

David E. Birkhoff, President Garnck Bldg., 64 W. Randolph St. 

Special Rates to IsAemhers of Family of Loyola Students 
OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER 

[Page 293} 



Compliments of 

MR. JOHN T. BENZ 

Vice-President 
of 

The Fidelity 

Trust & Savings 

Bank 

Wilson Avenue and Broadway 
Chicago 



Everything in 

LAW BOOKS 

Bought and Sold 

We buy second-hand students' law books and 
would welcome your list of such books should 
you have any to dispose of. By selling or trad- 
iiie your books when particular courses are fin- 
i shel for such as you need when a new term or 
semester begins, you can reduce your expenses 
while at law school. Students' books are of no 
use in practice. Write or phone us whenever 
you want to dispose of your books. 

Let us carry the risk of changes in books on 
account of new editions and the adoption of 
other books than you have on the part of the 
faculty. When you ffet stuck with a book out 
of use, it is your worry; when we get stuck, you 
should worry 1 Dispose of your books as the 
curses are finished. Don't wait until three years 
have passed. We can tell you why students' 

Tsjew Catalog on Request 

Illinois Book Exchange 

Room 310, 202 South Clark Street 
Phone Harrison 5406 



SERVEL AUTOMATIC ELECTRIC REFRIGERATION 

IS the ideal method of food preservation for your home 

The dry, clean, odorless, cold of SERVEL keeps fresh 
foods fresh for days and days. 

Dainty frozen desserts and clear, sparkling cubes of ice 
can be frozen in SERVEL. 

COMMONWEALTH EDISON ELECTRIC SHOPS 
Telephone Randolph 1280 72 W. Adams Street 

Local 1 5 ? for more information 




P. M. MURPHY, President 



R. E. MURPHY, Seeretarv 



/ MURPHY PLUMBING COMPANY 
PLUMBING 

Gas Fitting and Drainage 
Telephone Victory 431') 1720 So. Michigan Ave.. Chicago, 111. 



[Page 294] 



(■j 



Henry CL^tton 8 Sons 



State at Jackson — Chicago 




THE LYTTON COLLEGE SHOP 

The Style Center of 
Middle West University Men 

In this exclusive little shop, its prices made 
low by the tremendous buying power of the 
main store, you find the latest in College Styles 
—and you'll like the way in which the young 
men here seem to know just what you want. 

Visit the College Shop when you are in Chicago! 



[Page 295] 



The Loyola University Standard Ring 

Manufactured b)" 

L. G. Balfour Company 

Attleboro, Massachusetts 

IS an example of craftsmanship worthy of pride. It is made of the finest 
materials carefully fashioned by skilled artisans. View this new standard 
Ring at our Chicago Branch Office. If you are a Loyola University Grad- 
uate you should year this new Standard Ring. 

THE BALFOUR BLUE BOOK 

Complete Catalogue of Jewelry and Novelties will be sent if desired, as 
well as special information on 

FAVORS BADGES GIFTS 

DANCE PROGRAMS EMBOSSED STATIONERY 

PLAQUES BANNERS NOVELTIES 

CLUB AND SCHOOL PINS AND RINGS 

MEDALS TROPHIES 

LET THE BALFOUR SERVICE DEPARTMENT TAKE CARE OF YOUR 
REQUIREMENTS 

L. G. BALFOUR COMPANY 

ATTLEBORO, MASSACHUSETTS 

"OlJicidl jewders to the Leading Colleges, Schools and Fraternities" 

Middle Western Branch Office 

Suite 1680-82 Jewelers Building 

35 East Wacker Drive 

Chicago 



[P.igc 296] 



McCabe and Hengle 

mSVRAHCE 



175 West Jackson Blvd. 



CHICAGO 




IlKAXCIIICS— (' II I (■ A C I) 

■4744 Broadway E.lKCwaler 09bn 

HIGHLAND PARK Highlantl Park 313 

BRANCHES— W I N N E T K A 

578 Lincoln Avenue 

Winnetka— 727— Wilmette 

Al. Kaplan, Pres. John B. Nazarian, Treas. 

Main Office and Plant 
1019-21 CNIVERSITV PL., EVANSTOX, ILL. 
Phones: Ravenswood 3531: Greenleat 230-251-727 



Rogers Park lUSS 

JOS. S. HEFFERNAN 

PAINTING DECORATING 

GLAZING ESTIMATES GIVEN 

"No Job Too Large — 7^o Job Too Sinall" 

1219 LOYOLA AVE. 



Jdhn A. McGarry 



H. F.iwler 



JOHN A. McGARRY ^ CO. 

Paving Coyitractors 

1403 Security Bldg. 

Chicago 

Telephone Main 4914 



PFLICHT&CO. 

«_ RE ALTO PS ^ 



REAL ESTATE 

REHTIMG ■ IJiSURAHCE 
1401 MORSE AVENUE 

Under the "L" 

ROGERS PARK :300 



[Page 297] 



PHONE MAIN 1858 SUITE 612, OTIS BUILDING 

M. J. TENNES ^ CO. 

REAL ESTATE 
INVESTMENTS 

INSURANCE 



10 SOUTH LA SALLE STREET 
CHICAGO 



[Page 298] 



Catholic Motion Pictures 

Made in Chicago 

BY AN organi2,ation of Catholic cinema experts who spe- 
cialize in the production of theatrical program pictures, 
from one reel comedies, dramas and educationals to multi'reel 
features and superfeatures. 

All productions made on contract at most reasonable prices 
and most liberal terms. 

Write for particulars and let us show you how you can 
make handsome profits while, at the same time, aiding the 
Cause of Clean, Interesting, Entertaining and Edifying motion 
pictures. 

We also produce 'Specials" for all occasions and for all 
purposes at the lowest prices. 

Write, Wire or Visit our Studio and Laboratory. 

CATHEDRAL FILM COMPANY 

A. A. Rothtngass, Director General 

4043-45 Drexel Boulevard 

CHICAGO, U. S. A. 

Kenwood MOO 



A Good Place to Ban\ 

BROADWAY NATIONAL 
BANK 

Broadway at Devon 

Courteous — Convenient 
Dependable 



THE LE VAN SURGICAL SUPPLY CO. 

Successors to 

PHYSICIANS SUPPLY 6? DRUG CO. 

42 '1-427 S. Honore St., Chicago 

Surgical Instruments, Physicians', Hospital 
and Sick Room Supplies 

Trusses, Abdominal Supporters, 
Elastic Stockings 

We also rent invalid chairs — good parking 
facilities at all times. 



SIONST 

ROGERS PARK 3776 



COSTUMES 

SCHOOLPIAYS 




[Page 299} 



PHONE MAIN 1858 



SUITE 612, OTIS BUILDING 



M. J. TENNES 6? CO. 



REAL ESTATE 
INVESTMENTS 



ecutive capacity in his work, he was 
building up his bank account, his 
credit standing and his financial ex- 
perience in counsel with the officers 
of the Union Trust Company. 

We are particularly glad when we 
can be helpful to young business tnen 



1869 




1926 



UNION TRUST 

COMPANY 

Madison and Dearborn Streets 
CHICAGO 




[Page 300] 



Catholic Motion Pictures 

Made m Chicago 

BY AN organi2,ation of Catholic cinema experts who spe- 
cialize in the production of theatrical program pictures, 
from one reel comedies, dramas and educationals to multi'reel 
features and superfeatures. 

All productions made on contract at most reasonable prices 
and most liberal terms. 

Write for particulars and let us show you how you can 
make handsome profits while, at the same time, aiding the 
Cause of Clean, Interesting, Entertaining and Edifying motion 
pictures. 

We also produce 'Specials" for all occasions and for all 
purposes at the lowest prices. 

Write, Wire or Visit our Studio and Laboratory. 

CATHEDRAL FILM COMPANY 

A. A. Rc)the7it;a,s.s, Director General 

404 3 '4 5 Drexel Boulevard 
CHICAGO, U. S. A. 

Kenwood 3100 



Telephone Sheldrake 8804 

ALBION SHORE HOTEL 

1217 Albion Avenue 
CHICAGO 

Z. A. Brown, Mgr. Exceptional Restaurant Facilities 

Want Good Results? 

Try 
COOK & McLAIN 

THE ACME CLEANERS AND DYERS 
JS.'^O North Clark Street 

A 70 Tears' Reputation as Experts 
Phone Lake View 8300 

[Page 301] 



Compliments of- 




A. J. CERMAK 

President of County Boa 



^-^^"^; 


w 


•t, 


-^mi 


'«»**'- 


,l»v 


nf% 


««'«■' 


a-^ 


■JiM-M 


^ 


I ^•' 


11 


¥ 


i 


' 




P J CARR 

Cainitv T) td.sHu 



ROBERT M. SWEITZER 

Count>i CUr\ 



[Page 302] 



This Ban\ 

Backs the Business IsAan 

A good bank, such as this, with excellent deposit and loaning 
facilities is indispensable to a growing business. 

You need this strong Bank in your Business. 



Resources Over $4,000,000.00 



PHILLIP STATE BANK &? TRUST CO. 

N. E. cor. Clark St. and Lunt Ave. 
Under State and Clearing House Supervision 



THE MASS 

By Reu. Joseph A. Dunney 
A Book for Children, Adults and Clergy 
A copy should be in every home 
Every incident of the Mass is explained, its history traced, and its special signifi- 
cance emphasized. 

Numerous illustrations enhance the value of the book and many questions and 
suggestions for further study are added features. 

"Excellent in every way is The Mass by the Rev. Joseph Dunney" — American. 

GiftSook Edition, $2.50 
THE MacMILLAN COMPANY 



Prairie Ave. ^ 25th Street 



Chicago, Illinois 




Salesman Wanted jor 

POLYMETHYLENE 

THE MOTOR FUEL TREAT.MEXT 
Polymethylene removes carbon deposits, prevents carbon 
formation, keeps the motor clean, increases acceleration, gives 
pep, increases mileage and makes for easy starting in cold 
weather. ANTI-NOCK. BOYS! Here's an opportunity for 
prcifitahlc vacation work. 

LINTON GASOLINE PROCESS CO. 

1101 Security Bldg. Phone Main 2966 



[Page 303} 



Member Chicago and Oa\ Par\ Real Estate Boards 

JOHN I. SHEAR AN & CO. 

REALTORS 
Real Estate - Insurance ' Loans 



CHICAGO TEMPLE BUILDING 

77 W. Washington Street— State 7215 



Phone Yards 0768 



J. M. BRENNAN & CO. 

Painting and Decorating Contractors 



RESIDENCES CLUBS 

OFFICES SCHOOLS 

HOTELS CHURCHES 



STORES FACTORIES 

APARTMENTS WAREHOUSES 

THEATRES GARAGES 



We are in a Position to Operate A?t\' Place in the Country 
651 West 43rd Street 



[Page 304] 



"The Houst 
of Service" 




NEW YORK 
COSTUME CO. 

RENTERS OF 
Historical and Masquerade 

Costumes 

Costumers of the Pageant of Peace 

1?7 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago 

Central 1801 



MIDLAND 

TERRA COTTA 

COMPANY 



MANUFACTURERS 

OF HIGH GRADE 

ARCHITECTURAL 

TERRA COTTA 

105 West Monroe Street 
CHICAGO 



YOU WILL ALWAYS FIND 
The 

WELCOME SIGN 

on the 

DOOR MAT 

_ at the 

LOYOLA-SHERIDAN 

RECREATION 

CENTER 

1227-31 Loyola Avenue 



Walter Ford 

organizer of better Orchestras 
and producer of 

Entertainment Features 

Complete Guaranteed Service 



Walter Ford, Incorporated 

Central 4200 162 N. State St. 

CHICAGO 



[Page 305} 



HOME FUEL ^ SUPPLY COMPANY 

D. S. Willis, President 

FINE QUALITY COAL 
Chicago, Illinois 

Retail Wholesale 



THOMAS MOULDING BRICK COMPANY 

Phone Franklin 0486 

Our Service Means Satisfied Customers 

We Furnish Face Brick for All the Leading Churches 

We carry the following material in stock at all times: 

METAL LATH FIBRE 

PRESSED BRICK ROUND IRON 

ENAMELED BRICK CHANNEL IRON 

FIRE BRICK COAL 

PAVING BRICK CLAY TILE 

CEMENT (Portland) COPING 

CEMENT (Brixment for Mortar) FLUE LINING 

LIME WOOD LATH 

PLASTER MOULDSTONE (Exterior Stucco) 

STUCCO FURNACE CEMENT 

HAIR DAMPROOFING 

Six Warehouses Centrally Located 

41st Street and Normal Avenue Phone Yards 0726 

7^14 Racine Avenue Phone Stewart 7437 

Van Buren and Desplaines 

4617 Ravenswood Avenue Phone Lake View 1518 

4'ith Avenue and Belmont Avenue Phone Lake View 1518 

6617 Ridge Avenue Phone Rogers Park 1484 



PAUL J. KREZ COMPANY 

Pile and Boiler Coverings 

442-44 North La Salle Street 

Superior 13294 330 Chicago 

[Page ?06] 




The Little Giant is a mod' 
em hyj^ienic device that 
should be in every school. 
Put this accepted aristo- 
crat of blackboard eraser 
cleaners to uior\ in your 
school under our fjuar- 
antee of satisfaction. 



Put the Guaranteed 

LITTLE GIANT 

ELECTRIC ERASER CLEANER 

to V/or}{ in your School 

THE Little Giiint has been tested by continuous use 
in thousands of schools throughout the country, li 
has proved to be efficient in all respects, noiseless, dustless, 
simple and swift in its operation. It is guaranteed to 
clean blackboard erasers to your entire satisfaction — or 
your money will be refunded. 

The Little Giant is operated by a Universal motor, 
adapted to all electric currents; it is provided with nine 
feet of Underwriters' lamp cord with Universal plug 
ready to attach to any convenient lamp socket. Strongly 
made of malleable iron and aluminum, its weight is but 
eight pounds and can be shipped by parcel post. 

JAMES LYNN CO., 14 E. Jackson Blvd., Chicago. 



THE LITTLE GIANT ELECTRIC ERASER CLEANER 



Silent 



Swift 



Dustless 



Simple 



Inexjiiensive 



Phone Scelcy 0743 

SCIENTIFIC SUPPLY COMPANY 

Glassware, Chemicais. Laboratory 
and Hospital Supplies 

Chicago, Illinois 

1861 Ogden Ave. 428 Honore St. 



Buy your frames at the factory and save 
one-half. 

I. M. FRIEDMAN 

210-212 W. Lake St. 



FRAMES MADE TO ORDER 
ONE OR A MILLION 



ARTHUR MICHEL & CO. 

Real Estate — Subdividers 

IVOT Chicago Temple Building 

77 W. Washington St. 

Chicago 

Phone Dearborn 8860 



LOYOLA PHARMACY 

A. Ginsburg, R. Ph. 

PRESCRIPTION 
SPECIALISTS 

1230 Devon Ave., cor. Magnolia 
Phone Rogers Park 9498 

W£ DELIVER 



[Page 307] 



Cyclopedic Law Dictionary 


(Second Edition, 1922) 


Combines in a Single Volume 


1142 Pages 

Brief Encyclopedia 

Complete Glossary 

Translations, Definitions, Maxims 


Complete List of Abbreviations, Thumb Indexed 


One Large Volume, Si2,e IOI/4 in. High, 71/4 in. Wide, V/g in. Thick 


Price, $6.50 Delivered 


CALLAGHAN & COMPANY 


401-409 E. Ohio Street, Chicago 




Telephone Superior 2533 


MATH. RAUEN 
COMPANY 


SERVICE PLUMBING 
& HEATING CO. 


General Contractors 




326 W. Madison Street 
CHICAGO 


Flumhing Contractors 

Loyola Gymnasium 


Telephones Main 3086-326? 


HP E. Ontario Street 




CHICAGO 



[Page 308] 



Insist on the Best Ice Cream 

Traill & Cooling 
Ice Cream 

IS THE BEST 

20844 Madison Street 
OAK PARK, ILL. 



Phor 



(EUCLID 7200 
/AUSTIN 7200 



John J, O'Connor, President 



BOSTONIANS 

SHOES FOR MEN 
THE SHOES THAT 

appeal 

TO THE BEST DRESSERS 

on every campus 



H. A. MEYER SHOE CO. 

55 E. Monroe St. 79 W. Randolph St. 

103 S. Wabash Ave. 



T. M. WHITE CO. 

Excavating and Wrecking 

Steam Shovel 'Wor\ a Specialty 

GENERAL TEAMING 

Office and Yard: 2314 South Robey St., Chicago 
Phones: Canal 1049-1449 



Joseph J. DutFy 



Randolph 084?-2'680 



John P. Noonan 



DUFFY'NOONAN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY 

General Contractors 
Marquette Building 

Chicago 



[Page 309] 



All of the stone used in the Quigley Memorial Seminary, Chicago, is Hoosier Silver 
Gray Indiana Limestone from the quarries of 

INDIANA QUARRIES COMPANY 



Branch of the Cleveland Stvne Company 



General Offices 

112 West Adams St. 

Chicago, 111. 



Quarries and Mills 
Bedford, Indiana 



FRANK E. 
BOURGET 

Director 
Organization 

COLUMBIAN 

COUNTRY 

CLUB 

28 E. Jackson 
Blvd. 




Auto Service 



Lady Assistant 



FRANK J. BURKE 

Funeral Director 

6443 Sheridan Road 
Phone Sheldrake 0114 



Wholesale 



HOLLAND COAL CO. 

Main Office 
608 S. Dearborn St. 
Phone Wabash 9546 

Retail Yards 

1441 Fleetwood St. 
253 5 S. Parkway 



A Service for Every Family 
GET OUR PRICES 

EXCELSIOR LAUNDRY CO. 

2822 Wentworth Ave. 

4613 Kenmore Ave. 
64 and 66 E. 22nd St. 



MURPHY'S RESTAURANT 

6600 Sheridan Road 

"fust Li\e Home — 

— FoJlott' the Boys 



[Page 310] 



Lots and Homes 

Get my proposition on a home built to 
suit you. Your rent pays for it. 

BARTHOLOMEW OTOOLE 
8941 Loomis Street 


Sunnyside 1044 
"The place where things taste so good" 

SKOOGLUND'S CAFETERIA 
1 1 34-40 Wilson Avenue 


Phone Graccland 0718 

FRED SMOLIN 

Painting and Decorating 

Estimates Furnished Anywhere on 

Interior Decorating, Outside Painting, 

Floor and Wood Finishing, 

Paper Hanging for 

Apartments, Residences, Theatres, 

Hotels, Store, Offices, Churches, 

Hospitals 

1926 SCHOOL ST. 


E. J. McDONOUGH CO. 

Heating, Ventilating and 
PoR'er Piping 

Telephone Diversey 7124 
1402 N. Park Ave. 


Compliments of the 

MARQUETTE NATIONAL FIRE 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

and the 

PITTSBURGH FIRE INSURANCE 

COMPANY 

175 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago, 111. 


We mal{e the best and 

BIGGEST MALTED MILKS 

Try one now — at our friendly store 

Fountain Pens, Shaving Creams and 
Toilet Supplies at Lowest Prices 

E. BUSCH 

63 T 3 Broadway Sheldrake 4513 



[Page 311] 



ANTON GRAF ^ SON 

Cleaners and Dyers 

21 5-2 17-2 19 W. Division St. 

2670 N. Clark St.— Div. 2750 

4103 Broadway— Lake View 0069 

Main OSice Phone 
Diversey 0718 



h 



VALMAR 

"B\ the Lah.e" 

The NewCity of Summer Homes 

only 58 miles 

From the Heart of Chicago 

, ON PICTURESQUE 

^ CAMP LAKE, Wise. 




Terms if Desired 



Phone State 8806 






y 



30 N. Dearborn St. 
Wor^ your way through on our proposition 



Send for your copy 
of our catalog on — 



ART 



Our "Study Studio" method assures re' 
suits. Realize your dreams of a professional 
career in the field of art by studying — 

Adiiertising Art Drawing & Painting 

Illustration Fashion Illustration 

Lettering 6f Designing Interior Decoration 

at the 

American Academy of Art 

America's Most Practical Complete Art School 
306 South Wabash Avenue, Chicago 



Loyolan's friends will appreciate the 
wonderful food served m our 

TEA ROOM 

and wc will appreciate your loyal 
patronage. Meet at 

McGRAHAN'S 
1048 Wilson near Broadway 



Five Million People Have Wanted tl 

Authoritative, Educational, Clean, 

Popular Appeal Publication 



rybod\ 



eads the 



$2.00 Pavs 
Subscription 



all arts 



S2.00 Pays 
Subscriptio 



MAGAZINE 

A National Monthly Publication for 

the Home, Office and Studio 

Students ma\e inoney in spare time 

representing the All Arts 

306 SO. WABASH AVE. CHICAGO 



MAGUIRE"S 
IRISH CORN PLASTER 

takes the corn out by the root 

7\[o Pain — Green Envelopes 

l^c y 2Tc— SOLD EVERYWHERE 



[Page .^12} 



BEST BUY WE'VE OFFERED SINCE 
WE STARTED — 41 YEARS AGO 

Wc started yelling Real Estate in Chicago in December, 1844. In the 41 years that we 
have been in businss we have sold millions of dollars worth of Chicago property. Few if any 
of the people to whom we have sold property failed to make a splendid profit. We believe 
in the future growth of Chicago and the territory nearby because we have sold property on 
the outskirts of Chicago (more than an hour's ride from Chicago) which is now worth ten 
times the price paid. But in all our 41 years" experience, we believe that we have never 
offered for sale a piece of property that has the possibilities for future advancement that we 
now offer in our Western Slope Subdivision of 

BEAUTIFUL MUNDELEIN— THE ATHENS OF AMERICA 

Among the reasons why we believe Mundclein Property is the best buy wc have ever 
offered, we might mention the following: 

1. Great relipious, education, financial and transportation interests are determined to make 
Mundelein a clean, healthful, moral city of hundreds of thousands. 

2. Plans have been made for improvement to cost $32,000,000 to develop this locality. 

3. Madden Bros. Western Slope Subdivision is in the center of Mundelein. two blocks from 
the new $50,000 Terminal Station of the North Shore Line. Soo Line Depot. Bank. Post Office 
and the preat .St. Mary's of the Lake Seminary. 



MADDEN BROS 



140 S. Dearborn Street 



Phone Central 2858 



St. Mary's oj the La}{e Seminary iii Mundelein is to be (lit; scene 0/ the Great Procession. 
Eucharistic Congress. June 24, 1926. 



To the Studertts: You are very eare- 
ful when you take your examinations. 
Be more careful when you drive an au' 
tomobile. Over seven hundred people 
were killed last year in Cook County 
by automobiles. It is the young men 
that have the greater number of acci- 
dents. They usually drive with a lot of 
pep. 

BE CAREFUL! 



Compliments of 

OSCAR WOLFF 

Coroner of Coo\ County 

Republican Candidate for Member of 
the Board of Review 

Primary April 13th, 1926 



Phone Central 4674 

We Stamp Our Name on Every Alley 

We Pave Because We are 

Proud of Our Work 

METROPOLITAN 

IMPROVEMENT 

COMPANY 

Alley Pavements 

Burnham Bldg., 160 N. La Salle St. 
Chicago 



[Page in-] 



Compliments of 
ROBERT M. SWEITZER 

County Cler\ 
















Compliments of 
MRS. E. W. BEMIS 

County Commissioner 




Optical Instruments, Kodaks £=? Supplies 
Moi'ies a Specialty 

WATRY & HEIDKAMP 

Established 1883 

Optometrists and Opticians 
17 W. Randolph St. 

Tel, Central 3417 Chicago, 111. 
Eyes Carefully Fitted 

Spectacles and Eyeglasses made to order 


Chevrolet Sheldrake 7610 

KUSHLER CHEVROLET 
SALES 

Wm. J. Kushler 

6317-6319 Broadway 
Chicago 


Telephone Canal 62 39 
Telefihone Orders Promptly Atteniied to 

MODEL DAIRY COMPANY 

Dealers in 
Dairy Products of Highest Grade 

2003-5-7-9 W. 18th Street 
Chicago 


Visitors to the 
EUCHARISTIC CONGRESS 

ivxll find 

Pure, Clean, Wholesome Food, Home- 
like, prepared in the most sanitary 
Lunch Room in Chicago 

MARQUIS COMPANY 

4756-63 51 Broadway 
A few steps from Loyola University 



[Page 314] 



LOYOLA UHlVERSirr 
GTM 

Equipped by the 

Chicago Gymnasium 

Equipment Company 

1835 W. LAKE ST. CHICAGO 


JOHN A. BURCH 

Exclusive Distributors of 

KEEPER BAND INSTRUMENTS 

IN ILLINOIS, WISCONSIN 

AND INDIANA 

.339 South Wabash Avenue 
Chicago, IHinois 


FRANK J. MURNIGHAN 
& COMPANY 

Reaitv Investments 

6449 Sheridan Road 
Rogers Park 1614-1615 

23 58 Touhy Avenue 
Sheldr,ike 4412 


BARTH & BEHRENS CO., Inc. 

T. E. Sommer, Pres. 

PHYSICIANS- SUPPLIES 

Our Budget Plan will make the equipment 

of your office an easy matter. See it before 

placing your order. 

Phone Seeley 7427 

1865 S. Ogden Ave. Chicago 


WILKENS-ANDERSON CO. 

Scientijic and Industrial 

Laboratory 

Supplies and Chemicals 

Chicago 


Established Fifty Years 

NEWCOMB MACKLIN & CO. 

PICTURE FRAME MAKERS 

Distinguished Modern Hand Carved 

Designs 

Antique Reproductions 

Superior Tones and Finishes 

Extremely Moderate Prices 

ART GALLERY AND WORK SHOP 
State and Kinzic Sts. Chicago, 111. 



[Page 315} 



MARKS BROS. 


Dearborn 6175 Randolph 3776 




Dress Suit Rental 


GRANADA 


Company 


"The Theatre of Distinction" 






^m FOR RENT— FULL 


Watch for the opening date of Chicago's 


^^■^^ DRESS, TUXEDOS, 


Most Magnificent 


^^^^K^ CUTAWAYS, SILK 




^^„^Wp HATS, SHOES, 


PLAYHOUSE 


WtMm SHIRTS 


At Sheridan and Devon Ave. 


^H| FURNISHINGS 






VI FOR SALE 


Exclusive Motion Pictures and Gorgeous 




1 


Presentations will make the GRAN- 




■ 308 Capitol Bldg. 


ADA the city's amusement center. 


^■i 157 N. State Street 




ST. MARGARET'S 


O'BRIEN'S TIRE SHOP 


Registery for T^ttrses 




^j\ Male and Female 




^^\ GRADUATE 


6833 N. Clark Street, cor. Farwell 


/;^/\^ UNDERGRADUATE 
l'J a/ and 


Chicago 


Jfjri^ PRACTICAL NURSES 

^Ky \ Nurses supplied to 






\ \ Institutions, Hospitals 






\ and private work 


TIRES TUBES 


■ 1 ^ PHONES DOUGLAS 


VULCANIZING 


'tej^H^ 7793-6514 


Phone Sheldrake 4266 


Josephine P. Haverly 




Sepenntendcnt 




fSQ E. 34th St. 



[Page 316} 



CHICAGO, ILL. 

620 S. LINCOLN STREET 

THE WORSHAM SCHOOL 

America s Leading Institution for Embalming and Funeral Directing 
Catalogue and Further Information Furnished Upoyi Application 


"BROCHON^^ 

specialists to the College Trade 

Jewelry, Dance Programs, Engraved Invitations, Callings Cards, etc. 

Elegantly Engraved Copperplate and 100 Calling Cards, $2.95 

Send for samples of what you want 

BROCHON ENGRAVING CO. 

2.^"; E. Ontario Street, Chicago 


Telephone Buckingham liil 

THE GAERTNER SCIENTIFIC 
CORPORATION 

Successor to 

WM. GAERTNER & CO. 

Scientific Instruments 

1201 Wright wood Ave. 
Chicago 


Phones West 2390-6292 

Cigars Candv 

Cigarettes Ice Cream 

LINCOLN ITALIAN 
RESTAURANT 

F. H. Arrighi and S. Bercini 

1901 W. Harrison St. 

Chicago, 111. 


JOSEPH DUX 

Architectural Sculptor 
Stone and Wood Carving 
Designing and Modeling 

Ornamental Patterns 

211248 West Van Buren St. 


Compliments of 
MAHER t^ McGREW 



[Page 317} 



Welcome Members of 

INTERNATIONAL EUCHARISTIC 
CONGRESS 

JUNE 20th TO 24th 

Special Service on the Large Sight-Seeing Steel 

Passenger Ships 

FLORIDA and COLUMBIA 

These Ships have Broad Sheltered Decks, and all 

Conveniences to make travel Safe and Attractive. A 

Delijhtful Trip along the South Shore, in Sight of 

Land all the Way 
Sec CHICAGO, Ihc Wonder City, from these Slufs 

THE MUNICIPAL PIER, OUTER HARBOR, 
GRANT PARK, FIELD MUSEUM 
and STADIUM 
See Jackson Park Beach 

See the Fainous World's Fair Buildings 
Cahoki Court House (Built I71b) 

Wooded Island and Yacht Harbor 

25c— EACH WAY^n NOON TO 7 P. M.— 25c 

Nitrs, Sundays and Holidays — 50c one way, 75c R. T. 

DANCE BY MOONLIGHT EVERY NITE 
S.S. FLORIDA BALLROOM BOAT 

From Municipal Pier 8:45 P. M. 




S S. COLUMBIA 



From Jacks 



MOONLIGHT DANCING TRIPS 
1 Park 8-45 P. M — Dock 64th St. Pier, near Bathing Beach 
FOR INFORMATION CALL RANDOLPn 6800 



Keep up Your Youthful Vigor 

Drink J. M. Barron &? Sons' Safe-Purc-Clean- 

Rich Milk. We guarantee our milk as the 

richest milk ohtainahle. 

Keep Your Children Healthy 

Our Milk IS the host body builder and is the 
most perfect tood for the Children. 

J. M. BARRON e^ SONS 



5 54 Grant Place 
Lincoln 0636 



6149 Broadway 
Sheldrake 1777 



^y I A' I ' 12 happy weeks of practical 
/\rVi --in. -study advert.sin, 

P A Y ^ "" ""'*'"" '"'■■''''"■■■■'' "-"o""""- 

>^ -L^ >- '^ ^.jal art instructors. Day 

B I G and evening classes. 

Versatile School of Adv. Art 

?9 SOUTH STATE 




EVERY FRIDAY 

Fun and Souvenirs fo 

Everyone! 



ilo Cover charge 



[Page 318] 







E\'ERY Catholic in America wants one of these beau- 
tiful mementos of the iirst Euchanstic Congress ever 
held in America. This lovely memento, beautifully 
designed, engraved and plated, symbolizes the devout 
spirituality of the assembly; brings to your home the spirit 
of this wondrous occasion. 

SOMETHING YOU WILL ALWAYS VALUE 

Particularly will these impress the younger members of 
your family with the never-to-be-forgotten religious 
spirit surrounding this event. 

ORDER BY MAIL NOW 

I Whether or not you are attending the Congress, you will 

want one or more of these Mementos. It wdl be difficult 
to supply the tremendous demand. So clip the coupon 
now — print your name and address plainly. Be sure to 
state quantity and finish desired. Enclose check or money 
order. All orders filled promptK'. Postage prenaid by us. 

CHICAGO CONGRESS COMPANY 

CLIP THIS COUPON AND MAIL IT TODAY ' 

FOUR BEAUTIFUL FINISHES 
TO CHOOSE FROM 

n Satin Finish Brass 

each ^ .50 

□ Roman Bronze, each - - .75 

n Silver Plated, each - - 1.00 

3 Gold Plated, each - - 1.50 Print Your Name and Addn 



Gcnllemen: Enclosed please find ? 

vhirh send me. postpaid, the ErCUARISTIC 
GUESS MEMENTOS I have checked. 



Street or R. F. D. No 



[Page 319] 



LESTER Ltd. 

EXCLUSIVE CREATIONS 

Theatrical 

COSTUMES 

18 West Lake Street 
CHICAGO 



Try Our Service 

Weddings Dishes Silverware 

Banquets Tables Chairs 

Dinners Gold Gilt Chairs to Rent 

OLSEN. CATERER 

Bittersweet 3480 
3032-4-6 North Racine Avenue 



OWN YOUR OWN APARTMENT 

OH BEAUTIFUL IHDIAH BOHRDART PARK 
WESTERN NEAR LUNT AVENUE 

Surface car, Bus connects with Loyola "L" Station 

Near Rogers Park Station, C. N. W. Ry. 

AMERICA'S FINEST CO-OPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT 

4, 5 and 6 room apartment homes for less than your present rental money 

GUBBiNS, McDonnell & blietz 



Sheldrake 8300 



Builders of Better Buildings 
(At Loyola "L" Station) 



6505 Sheridan Road 



2nd MORTGAGES 



QUICK ACTION 



JOHN M. NAGHTEN £^ COMPANY 



PHONE DEARBORN 4406 



CONFIDENTIAL 



10 NO. CLARK ST. 



THE COLUMBUS LABORATORIES 

EstaWished 1893 

COMMERCIAL. FOOD AND MEDICAL 
ANALYSIS 

X-RAY IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 

Suite 1406-1500 Columbus Memorial Bldg. 

31 North State Street 

Chicago 

Telephones Central 2740-2741 



W. p. RONAN 

Dealer in Flour 



n South La Salle Street 
Tel. Harrison 7296 



[Page .-^20]