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Full text of "The Loyolan"

Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2011 witin funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/loyolan1928unse 




LOYO LA 





COPYRIGHT, 1928. BY 
JAMES C. O'CONNOR 
MORGAN T. HEALY 




LAN 



PUBLISHEID BY 
THEl STUDELNTS OF 
LOVOLA UNIVELRSITV 
CHICAGO 





DEDICATION 



To the Very Reverend Robert M. Kelley, S.J., fifth presi- 
dent of Loyola University, the staff of the Nineteen 
Twenty-Eight Loyolan and the student body offer this 
year-book, as a tribute to his courage, neal, and foresight 
in past achievements and as a token of welcome and of 
hearty cooperation in the enterprises and problems which 
face Loyola. 



IFo reword 



The Nineteen Twenty-Eight Loyolan, in its attempt 
to mirror the history and achievements of another year 
at Loyola, has taken for its inspiration the atmosphere and 
environment of the man to whom our university owes her 
name and her existence — St. Ignatius of Loyola. 



Sta 



./^ ./^ 



James C. O'Connor, Editor-in-Chiej 

Willis M. Carpenter, Managing Editor 

Morgan T. Healy, Business Manager 

Joseph W. Grady, Photography Editor 

James X. Bremner, Senior Editor 
William H. Conley, Literary Editor 



Books 



Boo\ One LOYOLA 

Boo\ Two ADMINISTRATION 

Book Three CLASSES 

Book Four LOYOLA LIFE 

Boo'k Five ACTIVITIES 

Book Si-v ATHLETICS 

Book Seven FRATERNITIES 

Book Fight SATIRE 



LOYOLA 




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THE PRESIDENT'S GREETINGS 



The editing of a Yearbook of the size and quaHty of 
the Loyolan is a large and significant task. Its publication 
gives unusual opportunities to our student body in an 
administrative, artistic and literary way. Its worthy and 
successful accomplishment on the part of an editorial and 
managing staff gives almost sure promise that members 
of the staff have learned to attack and solve a diiBcult 
problem. For this reason I congratulate the staff on their 
notable achievement and thank cordially all who have 
cooperated in making this book worthy of its predecessors 
and setting a standard for its successors. 





^^ 



Page twenty-five 



m 



William H. Agnew, S.J. 

Vresidenl of Loyola University 

1921-1927 



1^ 




Page twenty six 



1X0 



A FAREWELL 

To One Who Has Served Loyola Well 

For the past six years the chair of president of Loyola university was held by the 
Very Reverend William H. Agnew, S.J. Any record of the events of the year would 
be incomplete without a last recognition of his service to the university. 

Coming to Loyola during the period when it was beginning its march into promi- 
nence, Father Agnew guided it to its present position as one of America's great 
Catholic colleges. One of the first efforts of Father Agnew 's was the bringing of the 
Arts and Science college to its present location on the Lake Shore Campus. Follow- 
ing this improvement each campus of the university received its share of considera- 
tion. The School of Medicine was enlarged, more modern equipment was installed 
and the building was remodeled. The School of Commerce was founded and, with 
the School of Law, and the School of Sociology, was moved from the Ashland Block 
into a new building known as the Downtown college. Three Training Schools for 
Nurses were established while another important department. The Graduate School, 
was founded. Overshadowing many other achievements was that of taking over the 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery as a part of Loyola. 

The achievements of Father Agnew will make him remembered as one of the out- 
standing factors in the success of Loyola. His alertness to the needs of any depart- 
ment no matter, how small they might be and the manner in which he dealt withi all 
the problems presented to him made him loved and respected by everyone connected 
with Loyola. 



Pdge twenty-seven 



^s^ 




Robert M. Kelley, S.J. 

Founder of the Uniuersitv Senate 



THE UNIVERSITY SENATE AND THE TRUSTEES 

With the coming of the new administration there was inaugurated a University 
Senate to serve as a board of advisors to the president. Father Kelley, who intro' 
duced the new system of administration, is president of the senate and calls a meet- 
ing the iirst Tuesday of each month. The deans of all departments and the regents 
are members and present problems connected with their departments. 

The purpose of the senate is not only to advise the president but also to help in 
welding together the schools of the university. This latter function has been notice- 
able during the past few months and promises to show increased results in the future. 

The senate is composed of the Very Reverend Robert M. Kelley, President; Rev. 
Joseph Reiner, S.J., Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences; Rev. Frederic Seiden- 
burg, S.J., Dean of the School of Sociology and Regent of the School of Law; Rev. 
Austin Schmidt, S.J., Dean of the Graduate School; Dr. L. D. Moorhead, Dean of 
the School of Medicine; Mr. Thomas J. Reedy, Dean of the School of Commerce; 
Mr. John V. McCormick, Dean of the School of Law; Dr. William H. G. Logan, 
Dean of the Dental College; the Rev. Patrick J. Mahan, S.J., Regent of the School 
of Medicine, and Miss Marie Sheahan, head of the Home-Study Department. 

The foundation of the senate marks a distinct forward step in the matter of uni- 
versity administration. It enables the president to keep in close touch with the needs 

Page tu'CJitv-eight 



.^a€5 




D. F. Bremner 



E. I. CuDAHY 



W. H. Sexton 



of all the schools and give personal consideration to all the problems. It gives an 
opportunity for the deans of other departments to acquaint themselves with the diffi- 
culties and their solutions of other departments. By getting the advice of this large 
number of educators the matters considered are settled very satisfactorily. 

While the advice and decisions of the senate can be overruled by the president they 
are usually accepted and have been more than important in the solution of problems. 

In addition to the council of deans there exists an advisory board of laymen which 
is called together at intervals determined at the discretion of the president. This 
board gives the educators an opportunity to discover the attitude of some of the promi- 
nent business and professional men of the city on university problems. They have 
given invaluable advice on financial and business matters. The influence which these 
men have in the business world adds considerably to the prestige of the university. 

The board at the present time is composed of David F. Bremner, Edward I. Cudahy, 
William H. Sexton, Charles T. Byrne, F. J. Lewis, Eugene McVoy, S. J. Morarid, 
Joseph Rand, Otto J. Schmidt, John A. Shannon, Thomas H. Smyth, and C. G. 
Steger. 



Page twenty-nine 



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Joseph S. Reiner, S.J., Dean 

THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: LAKE SHORE 
CAMPUS 

The regular work of instruction by professors in the class room and out of it, must, 
of course, remain the supreme fact and factor in the life of a college. That does not 
prevent other facts and factors from standing out more prominently. 

Bearing in mind the reservation just made, I vs/ould single out as the most signifi- 
cant events and developments in the historyi of our college since the appearance of 
the last annual, the following three : The Student Conference on Religious Activities, 
the firm establishment of instrumental and vocal music as an integral part of college 
and university life and the development of the student association with its many 
implications. 

The Student Conference on Religious Activities held under the auspices of the 
Sodality has assumed national signiiicance because it became, admittedly, the fore- 
runner, the inspiration and the type for the Sodality schools which have been held at 
various points throughout our country. 

This year the Loyola University Band, the Loyola University Glee Club and the 
Loyola University Choral Society became fully and definitely organized and achieved 
successes which foreshadow a glorious future at Loyola for "the most spiritual, the 
purest, the most refined and the most elevating in the whole sisterhood of arts." 

These increases in the immaterial endowment of our College, brought about by the 
devotedness and cooperation of faculty and student body, represent a gain for which 
we cannot be too thankful. 



.^-Jl^^^^C wt.^^vr^/L^4^- 



Page thirty 



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1 




















Bertram [. Stecgert, A.M., Registrar 



FACULTY 



Joseph S. Reiner, S.J., Dean 
Terence H. Ahern, S.J. 
George J. Brunner, S.J. 
Edward J. Calhoun, S.J. 
Charles S. Costello, Ph.B. 
Ormund p. D'Haene, S.J. 
Howard E. Egan, A.M. 
Hugh F. Field, Ph.D. 
Philip W. Froebes, S.J. 
Julius V. Kuhinka, A.M. 
Michael D. Linehan, B.S. 
George H. Mahowald, S.J., Ph.D. 
Robert F. McCormick, A.M. 
William G. McGucken, S.J., Ph.D. 



Robert W. McNulty, A.B., D.D.S. 
John Melchiors, A.M. 
James J. Mertz, S.J. 
Paul Muehlman, S.J. 
Bartholomew J. Quinn, S.J. 
Graciano Salvador, A.B., LL.B. 
George M. Schmeing, A.M., M.S. 
Charles J. Scott, S.J. 
Bertram J. Steggert, A.M. 
Peter T. Swanish, M.B.A. 
Joseph M. Synnerdahl, M.S. 
Samuel K. Wilson, S.J., Ph.D. 
Morton D. Zabel, A.M. 



Page thtrtyone 



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Frederic Siedenburc;, S.J., Dean 

THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: DOWNTOWN 
COLLEGE— THE SCHOOL OF SOCIOLOGY 

On the first of February, 1928, the Downtown College, together with the School 
of Sociology, celebrated its first anniversary in its own building at Franklin and Wash- 
ington Streets. Naturally it was a time of casting up accounts and of inquiring 
whether the new building and the new location had measured up to expectations. 
The consensus of opinion was that expectations were more than realized. 

There was a steady increase in the number of students, who greatly appreciated 
the new and better accommodations and who found the new location at least as 
convenient as the old. With regard to the classrooms, library and social facilities, 
these of course are far superior to those of the Ashland Block. 

The Summer School from June 30th to August 5 th was the largest in the, history 
of the university with a little more than 800 students in attendance. Of that num- 
ber, approximately half were from out of town. At the convocation following the 
Summer School and held in the club room of the Downtown College, 28 candidates 
received their degrees. 

In the autumn of 1927, the school year was reorganized on the Quarter system. 
The change from the semester to the quarter system was welcomed by the students, 
realizing they shared with the school itself the mutual advantages already recognized 
and enjoyed by the other downtown colleges in the Loop where the Quarter system- 
has for years been the accepted plan. 



^U^^Jv^ Am^jL^ 



Page thirty-two 





Agnes Van Driel, A.M., Secretary 



FACULTY 



Frederic Siedenberg, S.J., Dean 
Agnes Van Driel, A.M., Secretary 
Terence H. Ahern, S.J. 
Sr. Arnoldina Mertens, A.m. 
Emile Audet, A.m., LL.B. 
Henry J. Bitterman, A.M. 
Francis T. Boylan, A.B. 
Howard G. Brownson, Ph.D. 
George J. Brunner, S.J. 
Frank Bung.art, S.J. 
Edw.ard J. Calhoun, S.J. 
Robert E. Cummings, B.S., M.D. 
Michael D'Argonne, A.B. 
J. William Davis, B.S., M.D. 
Ignatius J. Davlin, S.J. 
Edward H. Enright, U. S. Naval 

Acad., J.D. 
Howard E. Egan, A.B. 
Helen M. Ganey, A.M. 
Francis J. Gerty, B.S., M.D. 
Eneas B. Goodwin, Ph.D. 
Ellamay Horan, A.m. 
William H. Johnson, Ph.D. 
Julius V. Kuhinka, A.M. 
Michael D. Linehan, B.S. 
Edward F. Maher, S.J. 
George H. Mahowald, S.J. 
P. H. Matimore, D.D. 



Florence M. McIntosh, A.M. 

James J. Mertz, S.J. 

Bakewell Morrison, S.J. 

Paul Muehlman, S.J. 

James J. O'Regan, S.J. 

Claude J. Pernin, S.J. 

G. C. Phipps, A.m. 

Paul Pierce, A.M. 

Bartholomew J. Quinn, S.J. 

Bro. Lewis Richard, F.S.C.M., A.M. 

Miriam L. Rooney, Ph.D. 

Joseph Roubik, S.J. 

M. Lillian Ryan 

Graciano Salvador, AB., LL.B. 

George M. Schmeing, M.S. 

Bern.ard p. Sellmeyer, S.J. 

Joseph B. Shine, A.M. 

Mary Stanton, Ph.B. 

Catherine Starbeck, A.M. 

Sherman Steele, Litt.B., LL.B. 

Francis D. Stephenson, S.J. 

William R. Tydeman, M.S. 

John V. Usher, S.J. 

James F. Walsh, S.J. 

Margaret V. Walsh, A.M. 

John F. Wcislo, A.B. 

Morton D. Zabel, A.M. 

Edith Zahringer, A.B. 

Page thirty-three 



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John V. McOmMir.K, A.B,, J.D . Daan 



THE SCHOOL OF LAW 

The Law School is looking forward to the close of another successful school year. 
Both faculty and students have become accustomed to their new quarters in the Down- 
town College building. The faculty is gratified with the development of a more 
studious attitude prevailing in the student body and its members feel that the school 
is continuing to attract a desirable type of student and one which will make its impres- 
sion felt upon the Bar of Illinois. 

Beginning with the second semester of this year the enrollment in the Law School 
was two hundred. 



^^//f-I^S-..^ 



Pagt t)iirt_v-four 




Francis J. Ro(1ney, A.M , LL.B , Secretary 



FACULTY 



John V. McOirmick, A.B., J.D., Dean 
Irving W. Baker, A.B., LL.B. 
Jacob J. Becker, J.D., Ph.D. 
James J. Cahill, Ph.B., LL.B. 
Aloysius R. Cawley, A.M., J.U.D. 
Leo Donahoe, A.B., LL.B. 
Goodwin L. Dosland, J.D. 
Joseph Elward, A.B., LL.B. 
William Fortune, A.B., LL.B. 
William Friedman, Ph.B., LL.B. 
Joseph F. Geary, LL.B. 
Raymond J. Goss, LL.B. 
Joseph A. Graber, A.M., LL.B. 
John W. Kearns, B.S.E., LL.B. 
Hayes Kennedy, Ph.B., J.D. 
Urban A. Lwery, A.B., T,D. 



William A. Love, B.S., LL.B. 
Stephen Love, LL.B. 
Balys F. Mastauskas, LL.B. 
Walter W. L. Meyer, LL.B. 
Cornelius R. Palmer, A.B., LL.B. 
Herman Reiling, LL.B. 
O. John Rogge, A.B., LL.B. 
Francis J. Rooney, A.M., LL.B. 
Judge Wm. C. Scherw.AlT, LL.B. 
Vincent Sheridan, A.B., A.M., LL.D., 

J.D. 
Lawrence Spulier, A.B., LL.M., J.D. 
Sherman Steele, Litt.B., LL.B. 
Payton J. Tuohy, A.m., LL.B. 
Louis J. Victor, Ph.B., LL.B. 



^^A 



ge thirty-five 



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Louis D. MooRHEAD, A.M., M.D., LL.D., F.A.C.S., Dean 

THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

At the end of each year we look back on certain achievements with pride and satis- 
faction. The past year at the School of Medicine has been one series of events of 
which everyone connected with Loyola can be proud. 

Senior students look forward each year to the awarding of places as the result of 
competitive examination for internship in Cook County Hospital. This year more 
than ever before were awarded places, which is an enviable record for any medical 
school. Both the increased development of facilities for teaching contagious diseases 
and the development of St. Bernard's Hospital as a teaching unit are outstanding. 

In student activities the Medical students have been very prominent and interested 
and are beyond a doubt playing more than their share in the building up of activities 
shared in by the entire University. The spirit which exists among the students is one 
of the highest caliber and this is in many ways responsible for the splendid scholarship 
displayed at every opportunity. Outside activities have been indulged in, not at the 
expense of scholarship, but rather in cooperation with it. 

The general growth and prosperity of the School of Medicine has been one of the 
most satisfying features of the University's life. During the ten years of its existence 
as such it has come through a most trying period in the history of medical schools in 
general, when all outside forces were against its very existence, and it has slowly, but 
surely, and mainly by the constructive scholarship of its students, the splendid careers 
of its graduates and the excellent effort of its faculty risen to a position of honor and 
respect in the great field of medical education. 




^^-^t-JLt^-^K^ 



Page thirty-six 



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Patrick J. Mahan, S.J., Regent 



FACULTY 



Patrick J. Mahan, S.J., Regent 

Louis D. Moorhead, Dean. A.M., M.S., 

M.D., F.A.C.S. 
Ulysses Joshua Grim, M.D., F.A.C.S. 
Henry Schmitz, M.D., A.M., LL.D., 

F.A.C.S., F.A.C.R. 
Frederick Mueller, M.D. 
Benjamin H. Orndoff, Ph.G., M.D., A.M., 

F.A.C.R., F.A.C.P. . 
Robert A. Black, M.D. .F.A.C.P. 
Reuben Myron Strong, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 
Bertha Van Hoosen, A.B., M.D., A.M. 
George W. Mahoney, M.D., F.A.C.S. 
Samuel A. Mathews, M.D. 
Charles Louis Mix, A.B.. A.M., M.D., 

LL.D. 
Edward Louts Moorhead, A.M., M.D., 

LL.D., F.A.C.S. (Deceased). 
Benjamin Parker Beeson, M.D. 
William C. Austin, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 
Charles F. Read, B.S., M.D. 
William' E. Morgan, M.D., LL.D. 
Isadore M. Trace, M.D. 
Philip H. Kreuscher. M.D. 
Charles F. Sawyer, M.D. 
John Ferdinand Golden, M.D. 
Milton Mandel, M.D. 
Stephen Roman Pietrowicz. A.B., M.D. 
Richard J. Tivnen, M.D., LL.D. 



Charles P. Caldwell, M.D. 

Frank E. Pierce, B.S., M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Thesle T. Job, A.B., M.S., Ph.D. 

Daniel A. Orth, M.D., F.A.C.S. 

George Mueller, M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Joseph P. Smyth, M.D. 

William Sheridan Hector, M.D. 

J. William Davis, M.D. 

Samuel Salinger, A.B., M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Jacob Carl Krafft, A. B., M.D., F.A.C.P 

George T. Jordan, B.S., M.D. 

John M. Lilly, A.B., M.D. 

A. CosMAS Garvy, A.B., M.D. 

Irving H. Eddy, M.D. 

Paul E. Grabow, M.D. 

Michael McGuire, A.B., MB., 

B.A.O. 
Robert Emmett Flannary, M.D 
Benjamin E. Elliott, B.S., M.D. 
William J. Swift, M.D.. F.A.C.S. 
Theodore E. Boyd, B.S., Ph.D. 
Thomas E. Meany, M.D. 
Robert S. Berchoff, M.D. 
Italo F. Volini, B.S., M.D. 
Francis J. Gerty, B.S., M.D. 
George Leonard Apfelbach, A.B., M.S., 

M.D. 
John Benjamin Haeberlin, M.D. 
Bertram Charles Cushway, D.D.S., M.D. 

Page thirty-seven 



BCh., 
. F.A.C.S. 




William H. G. Logan, M.D., D.D.S., LL.D., F.A.C.S., F.A.C.D., Dean 



THE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

The ChicH,L,'o College of Dental Surgery was founded forty-six years ago by Dr. 
Truman W. Brophy and a few associates. It was the pioneer in dental schools oi 
the west. In 189,^ it was moved from its locatioa in the business section of Chicago 
to the West Side Medical Centre, where it is now located. 

The; five story building now occupied was built for the school and every provision 
was made to care for the advancing requirements of dental education. The first and 
second floors are devoted to the dental clinic with its correlated departments and 
offices. There are four science and four technical laboratories with three amphi- 
theatres, located on the three upper floors. 

The institution has been most fortunate in attracting a type of student whose sub- 
sequent career has reacted to the greater renown of the school. Of over four thous- 
and seven hundred alumni, nine are or have, been deans of dental colleges, and many 
are recognized as authorities in the fields of dental education and practice. 

The dental department offers two courses of instruction, each of which has differ- 
ent matriculation requirements. For matriculation into the four-year dental course 
the requirements are graduation from a four-year, fifteen unit, general course of an 
accredited high school and in addition the successful completion of thirty semester 
hours of recognised college study, including English, Biology, Chemistry and Physics. 

The preliminary educational requirements for entrance into the three-year dental 
course are in addition to high school graduation, the completion of at least si.xty 
semester hours of recognized college study, including the same specified subiects as 
of the four-year course and also Organic Chemistry. 



Page thirty-eight 



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Charles N. Johnson, A.M.. L.D.S., D.D.S., M.D.S., F.A.C.D., LL.D. 
Dean of Meji 



FACULTY 



Trum.an W. Brophy, M.D., D.D.S., 

Sc.D., LL.D., F.A.C.S., F.AC.D., 

O. L (France) (Deceased), President, 

Dean Emeritus. 
William H. G. Locian, M.D., D.D.S., 

LL.D., F.A.C.S., F.A.C.D., Dean of 

the Faculty. 
Charles N. Johnson, M.A., L.D.S., 

D.D.S., M.D.S., F.A.C.D., LL.D. 
John P. Buckley, Ph.G., D.D.S., 

F.AC.D. 
Pliny G. Puterbaugh, M.D., D.D.S., 

F.A.C.D. 
Robert E. M.acBoyle, D.D.S. 
Thomas L. Grisamore, PhG., D.D.S., 

F.A.C.D. 
Rupert E. Hall, D.D.S. 
John L. Kend.all, B.S., Ph.G., M.D 
William D. Zoethout, PhD. 
Emanuel B. Fink, Ph.D., M.D. 
Thesle T, Job, A.B., M.S., Ph.D. 
Julius V. Kuhinka, Ph.B., A.M. 
William L McNeill, D.D.S. 
B. Orban, B.S., M.D. 
Edgar David Coolidge, B.S., D.D.S. 
Karl A. Meyer, M.D. 



John R. W.^tt, D.D.S. 

Augustus H. Mueller, B.S., D.D.S. 

Lewis A. Platts, M.S., D.D.S. 

B. Adelbert Morris, D.D.S. 

E.ARL P. Boulger, D.D.S., L.D.S. 

Ralph H. Fouser, D.D.S., B.S. 

Elbert C. Pendleton, D.D.S. 

LoziER D. Warner, B.A. 

Harold W. Office, D.D.S. 

LeGrand M. Cox, M.D., D.D.S. 

Harry Bowman Pinney, D.D.S. 

Gail Martin Hambleton, B.S., D.D.S. 

Earl E. Graham, D.D.S. 

Wegor E. M.athison 

Irwin G. Jirka, D.D.S. 

George C. Pike, D.D.S. 

Henry Glupker, D.D.S. 

Howard Michener, D.D.S. 

James M. Mishler, D.D.S., B.S. 

Otto E. Kieling, B.S., D.D.S. 

Warren P. Willman, D.D.S., B.S. 

Leonard Boke, D.D.S. 

R. Harold Johnson, D.D.S. 

Robert C. Walker, D.D.S. 

Fred Kosche, D.D.S. 

■ Page thirty-nine 



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Truman W. Brophy, M.D., D.D.S., Sc.D., F.A.C.S., F.A.C.D., O.I. (France) 



Jn ilrmnnam 

The past year has marked the passing of one of the pioneers and peers of dental 
education — Dr. Truman W. Brophy. The career of Dr. Brophy is so well known 
that no brief review can do it justice. 

As founder and dean of the Chicago College of Dental Surgery, which became a 
part of Loyola in 192'', Dean Brophy distinguished himself as one of the foremost 
of dental educators. His sterling character and integrity, his untiring work and world- 
acknowledged accomplishments for science and humanity, his never failing courtesy 
and his boundless enthusiasm were a pillar of strength in the work of dental educa- 
tion and his loss to the University and the nation is irreparable. 



Page forty 




Marie Sheahan, Ph.B., Director 

THE DEPARTMENT OF HOME STUDY 

The Home- Study Department of Loyola University seems to have the proper 
dimensions of any "prize" child of its age. Its growth has been consistently healthy; 
its scope constantly widened. Each year its catalog contains additional courses, all 
of high school and university grade, and its work continues to be limited to arts and 
science, according to the standards of the best universities. 

Democracy flourishes in the department. It has pupils ranging from seventeen 
years to fifty-seven years of age; it has students of widely diiferent races and colors; 
it has the young convent novice as well as the hank president in its roster. The 
United States, Canada, Porto Rico and India in its campus. Most of its courses are 
offered in the English language but a few are offered exclusively in French, Spanish, 
and German, where the mother tongue is forbidden. 

The "personal contact" is the pitch of education today. This seemingly appears 
to be absent in a department conducted by mail. But a weekly paper from a student 
to a teacher, with the personal annotations that generally accompany the student's 
efforts, and the corresponding comments and confidences of the instructor, frequently 
strike up an intensely intimate relationship between the two. An instructor, called 
upon to explain a delay in the grading and return of the student's papers, occa- 
sionally informs the student of personal illness or illness in the family. The response 
is generally an immediate promise of prayers, coming from all ends of the home-study 
range. Queen Victoria, coming to the end of her reign with a promise of prayers 
from all boundaries of her realm, probably received actually less, and from no 
greater distances, than does the comparatively unknown instructor in the Home-Study 
Department. 

^X7 • y/ y ^ 



17U 



u^ty 




forty-one 



,3^g^ 



Ti 



■jmmmmm§; 




Thomas J. Reepy, A.M., LL.B., C.P.A., Dean 

THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 

The School of Commerce is completing its fourth year with a registration of 
approximately two hundred and fifty students. During the past year evening classes 
were oifered in accounting, auditing, business law, business mathematics, English, 
economics, advertising, salesmanship, history, political science, philosophy and Spanish. 
Next year these classes will be repeated, advanced classes in the subjects listed will 
be added and new classes will be offered in business organization, banking and cor- 
poration finance. 

Last September the enrollment doubled that of the previous year, the increase 
being principally attributable to the efforts of our students. This year the students 
are organizing in a manner that suggests the possibility of again doubling the enroll- 
ment, or at least, commencing next September with four hundred students. 

Eleven students of this department are receiving either diplomas or certificates 
this year. These men are the first to complete our regular four-year Commerce 
course. They are the survivors of a class of sixty-five who commenced in 1924, some 
of whom transferred to the Law School upon obtaining the required number of pre- 
legal credits. This class of eleven, individually and collectively, has at all times been 
willing to assist in obtaining new students, in organizing the Commerce Club and 
in promoting other student activities. They have been good sons of Loyola and I 
wish them success and happiness in their future undertakings. 

I wish at this time, also, to thank the faculty for their hearty co-operation. 




Piige [ortytvoo 



J^, 




George A Lane, A.B., J.D., Secretary 



FACULTY 



Thomas J. Reedy, A.M., LL.B., C.P.A., 

Dean. 
George A. Lane, A.B., J.D. 
Thomas Quinn Beesley, A.M.,Litt.B. 
Francis T. Boylan, A.B. 
Howard E. Egan, A.M. 
Matt. Egan, B.C.S., J.D. 
Edw.ard H. Enright, U. S. Nav. Acad., 

J.D. 
Hugh F. Field, Ph.D. 
Eugene B. Harks, A.B., J.D. 
James M. Hayden, A.B., C.P.A. 
Granville B. Jacobs, A.M. 
Daniel J. Kelly, C.P.A. 
Harold F. Keen, Ph.D., C.P.A. 
Julius V. Kuhink.\ A.M. 



F. P. Liddil, A.B. 

Perry D. Lipscomb, B.S., C.P.A. 

John B. Mannion, A.B. 

I. Richard Montgomery, B.C.S., 

C.P.A. 
Walter O'Meara, A.B. 
Cornelius P. Palmer, A.B., LL.B. 
Elmer P. Schaffer, Ph.B., J.D. 
Lawrence W. Spuller, A.B., J.D. 
Peter T. Swanish, M.B.A. 
Theodore Wagenknecht, B.S. 
James F. Walsh, S.J. 
L'vwrence Wallace, Ph.B. 
John A. Zvetina, A.B., J.D. 
Jeannette M. Smith, Ph.B. 



Page fortythree 



^^jg^g gggM^^i^i^^^^^^^igfe^^^^ i ^ 




Austin G. Schmidt, S.J., Ph.D., Dean 
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

The present year has been one of marked success for the Graduate School. The 
total number of students enrolled, including the summer session of 1927, was one 
hundred and seventy-two. Adhering to the constructive policy adopted two years 
ago, the Graduate School has accepted candidates in only five departments — biology, 
education, law, psychology, and sociology. The resulting concentration of students 
in a few departments has made it possible to oifer far more courses of an advanced 
type than would otherwise have been possible. 

The convocations, although fewer in number than last year, were gratifying because 
of the improved mastery of the technic of research shown by the students who re- 
ported. The pieces of original research described at the convocations were as follows: 
non-verbal tests of intelligence, by Joseph C. Thompson; the effect of comprehension 
on memory, by Margaret E. Magrady; the art interests of children, by Mother Mar^' 
Agnes Garvey; and the effect of encouragement and discouragement on learning, by 
Elizabeth D. Keslin. All of these reports, because of both their mastery of the extant 
literature of the subject and the originality, thoroughness, and precision with 
which the student had carried through his own experiment, were fully up to the 
standard of graduate work of the highest type. 

Although it is too early at the present writing to state how many students will 
receive degrees at the 1928 commencement, it is expected that a larger number of 
candidates will be presented than in 1927. 

The faculty of the Department of Education, by founding in February, 1928, the 
Loyola Educational Index, did much to extend the reputation of the University in 
scientific circles. 

In September, 1928, Mr. Howard E. Egan will join the faculty as Professor of 
Education and Director of Educational Research. This strengthening of the faculty 
is another gratifying step in the direction of perfectly organized graduate work of 
high quality. 



Page fortyfour 



»-^nr*.A-^cvtov^'^- j<^^w^-„^J^.oU: ^^=^^4-. 



:mm^immmm 



ms^ 



M^ wm^mB: : 




Florence Macintosh, A.M., Secretary 



FACULTY 



Austin G. Schmidt, S.J., Ph.D., Dean 

Terrence Ahearn, S.J. 

William C. Austin, Ph.D. 

Earl Patrick Boulger, D.D.S., L.D.S. 

T. B. Boyd, Ph.D. 

George J. Brunner, S.J. 

Francis Peter Bungart, S.J. 

Edward J. Calhoun, S.J. 

Lisi Cipriani, Ph.D. 

Edgar D. Coolidge, S.B., D.D.S. 

J. William Davis, M.D. 

Hugh Forsaith Field, Ph.D. 

Emmanuel Bernard Fink, Ph.D., M.D. 

Philip W. Froebes, S.J. 

Francis J. Gerty, S.B., M.D. 

Thomas L. Grisamore, Ph.G., D.D.S. 

Thesle T. Job, Ph.D. 

William H. Johnson, Ph.D. 

William H. G. Logan, M.D., D.D.S. 

George H. Mahowald, S.J., Ph.D. 

Samuel A. Matthew, M.D. 

John V. McC(mMiCK, A.B., J.D. 



William J. McGucken, S.J., Ph.D. 
Florence H. Macintosh, A.M. 
Frank A. McJunkin, A.M., M.D. 
James J. Mertz, S.J. 
B. Orban, S.B., M.D. 
Cl.'vude J. Pernin, S.J. 
George Phipps, A.M. 
Pliny G. Puterbaugh, M.D., D.D.S. 
Charles F. Read, S.B., M.D. 
Francis J. Rooney, A.M., LL.B. 
Miriam L. Rooney, Ph.D. 
George M. Schmeing, S.M. 
Frederic Siedenburg, S.J. 
Henry S. Spalding, S.J. 
Sherman Steele, Litt.B., LL.B. 
Ruben Myron Strong, Ph.D. 
Peter T. Swanish, M.B.A. 
Agnes Van Drill, A.M. 
James F. Walsh, S.J. 
Samuel K. Wilson, S.J., Ph.D. 
Morton D. Zabel, A.M. 
William D. Zoethout, Ph.D. 



Page forty-five 



■^v> 




Philip W. Froebes, S.J. 
Chairman of the Library Board 

LOYOLA UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 

The main division of the Loyola University Library is located in the Administration 
Building on the Lake Shore Campus. The increasing attendance each month bears 
testimony to the fact that the library is regarded as a necessary factor in the process 
of achieving an education. Nearly fourteen hundred books have been added during 
the past year, among which are numbered over two hundred bound magazines and 
the following new editions of important reference sets, selected to replace previous 
editions of the same works: Warner's Library of the World's Best Literature, ?0 
volumes; The Encyclopedia Brittanica, 32 volumes, 1926; The Larned Library of 
Ready Reference, 12 volumes, 1922; Library of Modern Eloquence, 1 ^ volumes, 1928. 

Among the recent acquisitions are numbered many works m the French by the 
standard authors in that language. The Chemistry reference collection has been 
enlarged by the transfer from the Chemistry Department to the library of such valu- 
able references as Mellor's, "A Comprehensive Treatise on Inorganic and Theoretical 
Chemistry", 8 volumes; "Thorpe's Dictionary of Chemistry", 7 volumes: and many 
other worthwhile treatises in this field of science. 

The library receives regularly over 160 magazines and newspapers, presenting a 
representative and selective list of periodicals. 

The University library, open on all school days from eight-thirty o'clock A. M. to 
five o'clock P. M., is prim.arily for the use of the students and faculty. It may also 
be consulted by any responsible person upon application to the librarian, and often 
helps in answering general questions relative to Catholic literature and doctrine. 

Page forty-six 



'??<^5S^*?srT^?JE9?!^'^!E'TPff 



.(^ 



m.. 



'mrnm^ 




M. Lillian Ryan 
Librarian 

In addition to this library the School of Law has a noteworthy collection which 
serves as the Law Library. Any collection of books on law may be called a law 
library, but it is only the collection which is interesting and contains not only very 
old editions but very new editions as well which is worthy of being designated as a 
law library. Loyola has such a collection. 

Inasmuch as such a collection of books must be kept up to the minute with advance 
reports and opinions, recent editions are perhaps neither unusual nor unexpected. The 
possession of old prints is, however, something of which to be proud. For the use 
of the law students the library has available several old black letter books dating back 
to the seventeenth century. Among these are "Reports of Edward Bulstrode of late 
resolutions and judgments given in the Court of King's Bench in the time of the Late 
Reign of King James". This was published at London — Fleet Street — in 1657. An- 
other interesting set is that in two volumes of the first American edition of "The 
Spirit of Laws", edited in Philadelphia in 1802. 

In addition to these departments of the library each of the schools has a separate 
library concerned exclusively with the work taken up and so are not as well known 
as the main and the law libraries. 



^. &.^£z^ 



fortys 



A Corner of the Campus 




Page forty-eight 



GRADUATES 




Page forty-nine 



Raymond Leo Abraham 
Bachelor of Arts. 

St. Ignatius High School. 
Inter - Fraternity C o m - 
mittee. Chairman Student- 
Faculty Banquet 4, Chair- 
man of Eucharistic Section 
of Sodality 4, Glee Cluh. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Marvin William Adams 
Bachelor of Laws. 
St. Philip High School, 
Monogram Club, 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Class President I, Senior 
Delegate Student Council 
(Law), President Mono- 
gram Club, 1, 2, 3. 4, 
Baseball, 1, Football, 1. 
2. 3, 4. 
Clinton, Iowa. 

Fernando I. Acuila, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
Lewis Institute, De Paul 
University, Far Eastern 
College, Manila High 
School Cuyapo, N. E.. 
Philippine Islands. 



Thomas Francis Ah earn 
Bachelor of Science. 
4>1IX Seminar 
St. Ignatius High School 
Class Vice - President, 3 
Class Editor, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Janet Ahern 

Bachelor of Laws. 
Northwestern University. 
Menominee High School. 
Class Secretary, 2, Clas.^ 
Editor, 3, Student Coun- 
cil, 3. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Ben Francis Aicher 
Bachelor o) Laws. 
*MX, i;N<(> 
Oconto High School. 
Oak Park, Illinois. 





David Alswang 
Bachelor of Laws. 
Crane University of Iowa, 
Lake View High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Edward Leonard 

Arensdorf. B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
<i>X 

Columbia College, Colum- 
bia Academy. 
Dubuque, Iowa. 



Natalie Adele 
Ashmenckas, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 

X2*. AP. Seminar 

Washington University 

DuBois High School. 

Class Secretary, 4, Tivnen 

Ophthalmological Society. 

St. Louis, Missouri. 



Leon Baisier 

Bachelor of Arts. 
C r e 1 g h t o n Uni' 
Quincy College. 
President of French Club. 
St. Amand les Eaux, 
France. 



versity. 



William Andrew Barr 
B.S., M.S. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

AP 

St. Bonaventure College. 

St. Bonaventure High 

School. 

Class Vice-President, 4. 

President Senior Class, 4, 

Tivnen Ophthalmological 

Society. 

Buffalo, New York. 

Charles R. Barrett 
Bachelor of Laws. 
St. Mary of the Lake Uni- 
versity, Quigley Prepara- 
tory Seminary. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Page fifty 



Anthony Beckett, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
Lewis Institute. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Anthony John Bell 
Bachelor of Science. 
Seminar. 

Waller High School, 
Class President, 4, Intra- 
mural Basket-ball, 1, 2, 3. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Lawrence Benjamin, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
University of Illinois, Val- 
paraiso University, Uni- 
versity of Chicago. Mo- 
mence High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Charles IgnatiusBertrand 
Bachelor of Arts. 
Quigley Preparatory Semi- 
nary. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Arthur Lawrence Boberc: 
Bachelor of Laivs. 
Loyola Academy. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Harvey Conrad Bodmer, 
B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
*X, AP 

Western State Normal. 
Gihhons Hall, Tirnen 
Ophthalmological Society. 
Kalamazoo, Michigan. 




Francls Thomas Boylan, 
A.B. 

Master of Arts. 

Holy Cross College. 

Newport, Rhode Island. 



Aloysius Thomas Breen 
Bachelor of Arts. 
AAT 

St. Ignatius High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Dorothy Elizabeth 

Bresnahan, B.S. 
Master of Arts. 
Harvard University. Sar- 
gent College of Physical 
Education. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Helen Mary Brindl 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal College, 
Josephinum Academy. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Margaret A. Briody 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal College, 
St. James Academy. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Charles Casimir 
Buczynski, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

Polish National Alliance 

College. 

Chicago. Illinois. 




Page fifty-one 



Ethel Lois Butler, B.A. 
Master of Arts. 
Roger Williams College, 
Roger Williams High 
School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Francis Ign.\tius Butler 
Bachelor of Arts. 
AAr 

St. Ignatius High School. 
Class President, 4, Sodal- 
ity, 1, 2, 3, 4, Football, 1, 
Track, 2, Ice Skating, 2, 3. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



David Francis Byrnes 
Diploma in Commerce. 
2AB 

St. Rita High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Patrick Joseph Cahill, 
B.S., J.D. 
Master of Laivs. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Anne Gertrude Caine 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal, Nova 
Scotia High School. 
Annapolis, Nova Scotia. 



William Joseph Campbell, 
LL.B. 

Master of Laws. 
AO* 

St. Rita High School 
Class President, 4 Chair 
man Student Council, 4, 
Loyolan Staff, 2, %. 4 
Quarterly Staff, 2, i 4 
Loyola News, 3, 4 Sccie 
tary Junior Law. 3. 
Chicago, Illinois. 




Francis Patrick Caxary 
Bachelor of Arts. 

AAI' 

Loyola Academy. 
Class Vice-President, 3, So- 
dality, 1,2, 3. 4, Debating, 
3. Glee Club, 4, Philos- 
ophy Club, Booster Club. 
Chicago. Illinois. 

Neil J. Cannon, A.B. 

Doctor of Law. 

Campion College, Campion 

Academy. 

Superior, Wisconsin. 



Carlotta Teresa Cardona 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
DePaul University, Mc- 
Kinley High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Margaret Carmody 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Mt. Sterling High School 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Willis Matthew 

Carpenter 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 
IIAA, Bn, Blue Key 
St. Joseph's Preparatory 
College, Kirkwood, Mo. 
Debating, 1, 4, N. C. B 
B. Tournament, 1, 2. 3. 4 
Sodality, 1, 2, 3. 4, Con 
suitor, 3, Mission Commit 
tee, 4, Loyola Literary 
Academy, 1, Pageant of 
Peace, 1. Loyola News. 2. 
Social Chairman Senior 
Class, 4, Loyolan, 2, 3, 4, 
Organizations Editor, 2 
Photographic Editor, 3 
Managing Editor. 4. Loy 
ola Quarterly, 2, 3, 4 
Feature Editor, 3. Editor 
in-Chief, 4. 

.Anne Francis Carroll 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 



Chicago, Illinois. 



rf^ 



Page fifty-two 



Melbourne A. Chapp 
Bachelor of Laws. 
University of Chicago, Til- 
den High School. 
Class Treasurer, 4, Foot- 
ball, 2. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Genivieve C. Cleary 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal, St. Mary's 
High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



John Joseph Coffey 
Bachelor of Laws. 
2X*, Blue Key. 
Northwestern University, 
St. Patrick's Academy. 
Class Vice-President, 3, 4, 
Law Debating Society, 
Loyola News Tennis Tour- 
nament, 3, 4, Winner Car- 
ter Harrison Oratorical 
Medal, 3. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

William Edward Colgin, 
B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Margaret Mary Collins 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal College. 
Chicago, lUinois. 



William Joseph Colohan 
Bachelor of Arts. 

aaf 

St. Ignatius High School. 
Class Vice-President, 2, 4, 
Loyolan Staff, 3, 4, Minor 
Sports Editor, 3, Athletic 
Editor, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 




Florence Collette 
Conerty 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 

Chicago Normal College. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Edward Joseph Cooney 
Diploma in Commerce. 
2AB 

St. Ignatius High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Charles Stephen 
COSTELLO, Ph.B. 

Master of Arts. 

Creighton University. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Maurice John Costello 
Bachelor of Laws. 

AO* 

St. Mels High School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Mary Theresa Coulehan 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Minoo\a High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Edna Blanche Cullen 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal College, 
Bowen High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



4'" 



Page fifty-three 



Helen J. Culliton 
Bache]or of Philosophy. 
Our Lady of Lourdes High 
School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



John Anthony Dayton 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
St. Patrick Academy, Cen- 
tral Y. M. C. A. College. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Marian Agnes Delaney 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal College, 
St. Gabriel's High School 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Leo Mark Deplewski, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
Crane Junior College, Til- 
den High School, Tivnen 
Ophthalmological Society. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Thies DeYoung, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
Michigan State College. 
Grand Rapids, Michigan. 



Marie M. Doherty 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago, Illinois. 




Daniel Johx Donahue 
Bachelor of Science. 
AaT, Blue Key 
St. Ignatius High School. 
Class President, 2. Class 
Vice-President, 1, 4, Stu- 
dent Council, 2, 4, Vice- 
President, 4, Sodality, 4, 
Sock and Buskin, 3, Phi- 
losophy Club 4, Football, 
2. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Thomas Russell Dorgan, 
A.B. 

Doctor of Laws. 

Campion College, Campion 

Academy. 

Sock and Buskin Club, 

Carter Harrison Oratorical 

Medal, 3. 

Chicago, Illinois. 

Marie Agnes Doyle 
Bachelor of Laws. 

KBn 

University of Chicago, St. 
Xavier Academy. 
Class Secretary, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

William James Drennan 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Notre Dame University, 
Parker High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Richard Joseph Drever 
Doctor of Medicine. 
St. Ignatius High School. 
Tivnen Ophthalmological 
Society. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Vaclav George Dvorak, 

B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
Crane Junior College. Har- 
rison Technical High 
School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 




Page jiffy-four 



John Joseph Dwyer 
Bachelor of Science. 
St. Ignatius High School. 
Class President, 3. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Cecille Hyson Egan. 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Ho\v.\RD EsTON Egan, M.A. 
Doctor of Philosophy. 
University of Minnesota. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



William Bernard Egan, 

B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
Ghouls. 

Crane Technical High 
School. 

Class Treasurer, 2, Base- 
ball, 1, 2, Chairman Pro- 
gram Committee. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Louis Abelo Eisenberg.B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
University of Wisconsin, 
Marquette University, 
South Division High 
School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



William E. Fanning 
Bachelor of Laws. 
Creighton University, 
Dixon High School. 
Dixon, Illinois. 




Joseph A. Fenton 
Bachelor of Laws. 
DePaul University, Creigh- 
ton High School. 
Omaha, Nebraska. 



Edmund Anthony 
FitzGerald 

Diplovia in Commerce. 

St. Ignatius High School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



William Desmond 
Fitzgerald, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

*X, nKE, Ghouls. 

St. Philips High School. 

Class President, 3. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Geoffrey B. Fleming 
Bachelor of Laws. 
Northwestern University, 
St. Mels High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Venancio a. Frando 
Bachelor of Laivs. 
Chicago Law School, 
Omaha University, Drake 
University High School. 
Philippine Islands. 



Charles Joseph 

Gallagher, A.B., M.A. 
Doctor of Law. 
St. Ignatius High School, 
University of Chicago. 
President Student Council, 
3, 4. Loyolan Editor, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 




Page fifty-five 



Mary Agnes Gallagher 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Winifred Agnes 
Gallagher 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 

Chicago Normal College, 

St. Elizabeth High School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Joseph Hiram Gamet, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 

Englewood High School, 
Tivnen Ophthalmological 
Society. 
Chicago, Ilhnois. 



Roman Gerlach, LL.D. 
Master of Arts. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Reuben M. Gillman 
Bachelor of Science. 
Crane Junior College, Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, Lane 
Technical High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Francis X. Gilmore 
Bachelor of Laws. 
St. Patrick's Academy. 
Class President, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 




Edward James Ginnan, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
Litchfield High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Theodore S. Goldberg, 
A.S., B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

Crane College, Harrison 

Technical High School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Maurice Goodman. B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
<!>AK, Seminar. 
Crane College, Harrison 
Technical High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Flora Fagan Grace 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
University of Chicago. Me- 
dill High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



James Nicholas Grace 
Bachelor of Laws. 
St. Mary's College, St. Rita 
High. 

Class Treasurer, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Joseph William Grady 
Bachelor of Arts. 
Bn, Blue Key. 
St. Ignatius High School. 
Intra-Mural Basketball, 1, 
2, 3. 4, Loyola News Edi- 
tor, 3, Photographic Edi- 
tor Loyolan, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



)S,l: 



fifty-six 



John Joseph Gregory 
Bachelor of Science. 
■JiJIX, AP, Seminar. 
Englewood High School. 
Class Treasurer, 4. 
Chicago, Ilhnois. 



Frank Hillis Griffin, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
College of Puget Sound. 
Lewis Institute, Pacific 
High School, Stadium 
High School. 
Pacific, Washington. 



Joseph Grimm, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
University of Wisconsin, 
Riverside High School. 
South Milwaukee, Wiscon- 



Walter Aloysius Guse, 
B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
University of Chicago, 
Lewis Institute, Chicago 
Normal College, Waller 
High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Francis George Haley 
Bachelor of Arts. 
Crane College, Mt. Carmel 
High School. 

Debating Club, 3, 4, So- 
dality, 3, 4, Philosophy 
Club, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Julia O'Connor Hanna 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
St. James High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 




Floyd Evans Harding 
Doctor of Medicine. 

nKE 

University of Iowa, Sum- 
ner High School. 
Tivnen Ophthalmological 
Society. 
Sumner, Iowa. 



Etfiyl Keevan Harrington 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal College, 
St. James High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Edward Francis Healy 
Bachelor of Laivs. 
St. Patrick's Academy. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Raymond Augustus 
Hebfnstreit 
Diploma in Commerce. 
2AB 

Routt College Academy. 
Treasurer, 3. 
Ramsey, Illinois. 



Leslie Joseph Heintz, B.S- 
Doctor of Medicine. 
Joliet Junior College, Joliet 
Township High. 
Joliet, Illinois. 



Edwi.n Leroy Hendricks 
Bachelor of Laws. 
AKT, Ae* 

St. Ignatius High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 






Z^^- 



Page fifty-seven 



Donald Anton Hirsh 
Doctor of Medicine. 
Crane Junior College, Lake 
View High School. 
Intra-Mural Basketball, 3, 
4. Student Faculty Banquet 
Committee, 3, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Gerald Edward Horwidge 
Bachelor oj Laws. 
St. Michael's College, St. 
Michael's Preparatory High 
School. 
Birmington, Vermont. 



Michael Indovina, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
IM2, nKE, Seminar. 
Lewis Institute. 
Class Vice-President, 2. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Yasuyo Inouye, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 

St. Scholastica Colic 
Jaski Gakun. 
Tokyo, Japan. 



Paul Raymond Irey 
Doctor of Medicine. 
University of Michigan 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Anna Dolorous Johnson 
Bachelor of Laivs. 

KBn 

Chicago Normal College, 
Class Secretary, 1, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 




Amil John Johnson, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
AP 

University of Nebraska. 
Class Editor, 3, 
Marquette, Nebraska, 



Walter August Johnson 
Diploma in Commerce. 
ZAIi 

St. Ignatius High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Elizabeth D. Kane, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 

Xi;* 

Goncher College, Cornell 

University. 

Kane, Pennsylvania. 



James Francis Kearney. 
B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

<J>MX, AP 

St. Ignatius High School. 

Sock and Buskin "Club, 

Football, 1. 

Chicago, Illinois, 



Arthur James Keate, A.B 
Master of Arts. 
AKT 

St. Ignatius High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Edward Cornelius Keatinc 
Bachelor of Arts. 
Columbia College. 
Sodality, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Mb 



Page fifty-eight 



Ambrose Bernard Kelly 
Bachelor of Arts. 
Blue Key, BR 
Loyola Academy. 
Sock and Buskin Club, 1 
2, 3, 4, Debating Club, 1 

2, Tennis Manager, 3, 4 
Loyola News, Business 
Manager, 1, 2, Editor-in 
Chief, 3, 4, Loyola Quar 
terly, L 

Chicago, Illinois. 

James Joseph Kelly, LL.B. 
Master of Laws. 
AG* 

St. Mel's High School. 
Intra-Mural Basketball, 2, 

3, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Raymond Whipple 

Kervvin, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
<I>MX, <S>Bn, nKE. Ghouls, 
Seminar, Blue Key. 
St. Ignatius High School. 
Chairman Dance Commit- 
tee, 2, President Sock and 
Buskin Club, 4, Tivnen 
Ophthalmological Society, 
Glee Club. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

John M. Kiely 
Bachelor of Laws. 

St. Patrick's High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Raymond Thomas 
Kilbride 

Diploma in Commerce. 

SAB 

St. Ignatius High School. 

Class Vice-President, 3, 

Commerce Club, 3, 4, 

Commerce Basketball, 3. 

Chicago, Illinois. 

Elizabeth Roberta King 
Bachelor of Laws. 

KBn 

St. Joseph Academy, Des 
Moines, Iowa. 
Representative on Student 
Council, 4, Class Secre- 
tary, 3. 
Chicago, Illinois. 




Sheldon Edmund 
Kirchman 

Bachelor of Laws. 

St. Mel's High School. 

Oak Park, Illinois. 



August George 

Klawikoske 

Bachelor of Arts. 
St. Ignatius High School. 
Sodahty. 1, 2, 3, 4, Philos- 
ophy Club, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Adrian David Kraus, 
Ph.B., B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

*Bn, IIKE, Ghouls. 

University of Chicago. 

Tivnen Ophthalmological 

Society, Commencement 

Committee, 3. 

Chicago, Illinois. 

Olca Mary Latka, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 

Crane Junior College. 
Class Secretary, 1, 3, Re- 
search in Bacteriology. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



George A. Lane, Jr., A.B. 
Doctor of Law. 
St. Ignatius High School. 
Secretary of Alumni. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Marie Pauline Leach 
Bachelor of Philo.sophy. 
St. Gabriel High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Page fifty-nine 



NORBERT MlCHEAL LaTZ 
Bachelor of Science. 

Conception College. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Robert Edward Lee. B.S. 
Master of Science. 

*Aix, *x, Bn-AP-nKE, 

Blue Key, Seminar. 
Campion Academy. 
Class President, 1, Tivnen 
Ophthalmological Society, 
Luyolan Staff, 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Chicago. Illinois. 

Harold Simon Lederer 
Bachelor of Laws. 
St. John's Military Acad- 
emy, Class Vice-President, 
1. Monogram Club, 1, 2, 
3, 4, Football, 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Swimming Team, 2, Junior 
Prom Committee, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Leo M. Lederer 
Bachelor of Laws. 
St. John's Military Acad- 
emy. Basketball. 2, 3, 4, 
Swimming, 1. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



George Jacob Leibold 
Bachelor of Science. 
Loyola Academy. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Harry Ma.x Levy, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
•fiAK, Seminar. 
Crane Junior College. 
Class Vice - President, 3, 
Commencement Commit- 
tee, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 




John Anthony Loef 
Bachelor of Medicine. 
St. Ignatius High School. 
Class Treasurer, 1. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Marcella Helen Loef 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal College. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



George Aleck Lofdahl. 
B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

*Bn 

Joliet Junior College. 
Joliet, Illinois. 



\ViLLL\M Pall Lowrey 
Bachelor of Pliilosophy. 
IIAA 

De La Salle High School, 
Joliet. 

Class Secretary, 2. 
Joliet, Illinois. 



Theodore Daniel Lucas 
Bachelor of Arts. 
Portage High School. 
Portage, Wisconsin. 



Lynn James Lull, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
Western State Normal Col- 
lege. 
Benton Harbor, Michigan. 



Page sixty 



Leonard Anthony 
Macaluso, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

IMS 

Crane Junior College. 

Class President, 4. Intra- 

Mural Basketball, 1. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Deborah G. MacDonald 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Edward Patrick Madden, 
B.S. 

Master of Science. 

4>X, Seminar. 

Salida High School. 

History of Medicine Club, 

Cosmas and Damien Guild. 

Salida, Colorado. 



Joseph Michael Mahoney 
Bachelor of Science. 
*X 

St. Ignatius High School. 
Class President, 1. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Joseph A. Maloney 
Bachelor of Laws. 
St. Ignatius High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



John Anthony 
Marszalek, B.S., Ph.D. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

Seminar. 

University of Cracov. 

Chicago, Illinois. 




Mary Margaret McCahey 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Catherine Anna McDade 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Mercy High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Lucy C. McGivern 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal College. 
Oak Park, Illinois. 



Bartholomew Eugene 
McGonigle, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

^X, AP, Seminar. 

Lewis Institute. 

Student Representative, 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Helen Esther McGovern, 
B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

Xi:*, AP 

Marywood and Women's 

Medical College. 

Class Secretary, 4, Tivnen 

Ophthalmological Society, 

Secretary. 

Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania. 

Harold Francis McGrath 
Bachelor of Science. 
Mt. Carmel High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



4v.-~^^, 



Page sixty-one 



George Alfred 

McGuiNNESS 

Doctor of Medicine. 

University of West Vii 

ginia. 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 



Agnes Leone McGuire 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Francis Henry McGuire, 
B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

St. Ignatius High School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



WlLLL-KM W. McKeNNA 
Bachelor of Laws. 
Ae<J> 

De La Salic High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



John Daniel McNlslty, 
B.S. 

Doctor of Law. 

St. Philip's High Schoi 

Class Treasurer, 3. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Michael Anthony 
Melynchuk, B.A., B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 

University of Alberta, LTni 
versity of Dubuque. 
Saskatoon, Canada. 




Nestor A. Michelena, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
"t>X. Seminar. 

Universidad de San Marcos 
Lima, Peru. 



Lawrence James Miller, 
LL.B. 

Master of Law. 

Af)* 

St. Ignatius High SchooL 

Basketball, 1, 2, 3. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



James Leopold Milos 
Bachelor of Science. 
Royal Reel Gymnasium. 
Catholic Medical Guild. 
Lutek, Jugoslavia. 



Henry Joseph Mokate 
Bachelor of Laws. 
St. Patrick's Commercial 
Academy. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



James P. Montague 
Bachelor of Arts. 
St. Marie's College, Rug- 
by, College of Propagation 
of the Faith. 
Galesburg, Illinois. 



Tho.mas Moore 
Bachelor of Laws. 
Campion College. 
Class Treasurer, 1. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Paee sixtytivo 






Hannah Mary Mullane 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal College. 
Maywood, Illinois. 



George Trevor Mulligan 
Bachelor of Laws. 

University of Chicago. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Michael John Murphy 
Doctor of Medicine. 
*Bn, Seminar. 
Lewis Institute, Northwest- 
ern University. 
Class Treasurer, 1, 2. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Charles Muzzicato 
Doctor of Medicine. 
IJI2 

Alfred College. 
New York, N. Y. 



Philip Norris Nabbe, 
A.A., B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

University of Chicago. 

Lewis Institute, Lane Tech- 
nical High School. 

Class Sergeant-at-arms. 4. 

Social Committee, 2, 3, 4. 

Class Play. 1, 2, 3. 

Chicago, Illinois. 

Pastor P. Nagar, A. A. 
Bachelor of Science. 
Crane Junior College, 
Lewis Institute. 
Loyolan Staff. Associate 
Art Editor, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 




James A. Neary 

Diploma in Commerce. 
i;AB, Blue Key, BH 
Loyola Academy, Loyola 
Commerce Club. 
Treasurer, 3, President, 4, 
Class President, 3, Inter- 
departmental Committee. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Lionel H. Neff 
Doctor of Medicine. 

St. Thomas College, 
Viator Academy. 
Kankakee, Illinois. 



Thomas James Nolan 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
University of Illinois, Chi- 
cago Normal College, Mor- 
ns High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

James Collins O'Brien, |r. 
Bachelor of Arts. 
A.vr, Blue Key. 
Loyola Academy. 
Class President, 3, Supper 
Dance Committee, 2. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Patrick Henry 0"Connel, 
B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

Siminar. 

Georgetown College. 

Norwich, Connecticut. 

James Charles O'Connor 
Bachelor of Arts. 
IIAA, Blue Key, Bn 
Loyola Academy. 
Class Secretary, 3, Sodal- 
ity, 1, 2. 3, 4, Consultor, 

1, 2. Eucharistic Commit- 
tee, 3, Debating Club, 1, 

2. 3, 4, President, 4, 
Treasurer, 3. Sock and 
Buskin Club, 1, 3, 4, Loy- 
ola Literary Academy. 1, 
Pageant of Peace, 1, N. C. 
B.T., 1, 2, 3, 4, Loyolan 
Staff. 2, 3, 4, Literary 
Editor. 2. Managing Edi- 
tor. 3, Editor-in-Chief, 4, 
Loyola News Stall, 2, 3, 
B. T.. 1, 2, 3, 4, Loyola 
Quarterly, 2, 3, Chronicle 
Editor. 2, Naughton Dc 
bate Finals, 1, 3, Varsity 
Debate Team, 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 






Page sixty-three 



Hugh Augustine 0"Hare 

B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
*X, Blue Key, Bn, AT 
Seminar, Ghouls. 
Mount St. Mary's, Em 
metsburg, Md., St. ]<: 
seph's, Philadelphia, Pa. 
St. Joseph's Academy, Ti 
tiisville. Pa. 

Class Editor, 1, 2, 3, Tiv 
nen Ophthalmological So 
ciety, Catholic' Medical 
Guild of Chicago, Loyola 
News Staff, 2, 3, Loyolan 
Staff, 2, 3, 4. 
Titusville, Pennsylvania. 

Arthur Peter O'Mara, 
A.B. 

Master of Arts. 

Valparaiso University. 

Piper City, Illinois. 

Gerald George O'Neill, 

A.B. 

Doctor of Law. 
St. Mary's College, St. Ig- 
natius High School. 
'Varsity Baseball, 1, 2, 3, 
4, Varsity Basketball. 1, 2, 
3, Monogram Club, 4, 5. 
6, 7, Glee Club. Student 
Council. 
Chicago, Illinois, 

John Joseph O'Neill 
Diploma in Commerce. 
St. Mel High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Thomas William 
O'Shaughnessy 

Bachelor of Laws. 

AG* 

Notre Dame University, 

Austin High School. 

Chicago,^.Ilj.inois. 



Anthony Joseph Pace, B.S 
Doctor of Medicine. 
I5I2, nKE 

Lewis Institute, Tuley High 
School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



^ 




Emil Albert Patka 
Bachelor of Laws. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



CoLLis Alli.5 Pearson 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Loyola Acadamy. 
Glee Club, 4, Commerce 
Club. 1. 2, 3, Philosophy 
Club. 4, Booster Club. 2. 
Intramural Basketball, In- 
tramural Handball, N. C. 
B. T., 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Richard Aloysius 

Perritt. A.A., B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
4iBn, Seminar. 
Lewis Institute, La Salle 
Academy, New York, De 
Witt Clinton High School, 
New York. 

Class Vice-President. 1. 
Student Assistant m Em- 
bryology and Neurology. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Chester Alexander 
PlASECKI, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

St. John's College, St. 

John's High School. 

Intra-Mural Basketball. 1, 

2, Research Assistant in 

Bacteriology. 1, 2. 

Chicago, Illinois. 

Boleslaus Stanley 

PlERZYNSKI, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
St. Ignatius High School, 
Catholic Medical Guild. 
Chicago. Illinois. 



Peter George Pitchios, 
B.S. 

Doctor of Medici)ie. 

University of Utah, Baylor 

Medical College, Jordan 

High School. 

Sparta, Greece. 



iiS*.^ 



Page sixty-four 



iM^sijifciir 



Herbert J. Pfeifer 
DiploTJia in Commerce. 
SAB 

St. Mel High School, Com- 
merce Club. 
Class Secretary, 4. 
Oak Park, IHinois. 



Frank Edward Pokorney, 
A.B. 

Doctor of Law. 

Campion College. 
Riverside, Illinois. 



Michael Joseph Pistory, 
B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 

*X 

Allegheny College, En 

Central High School. 

Erie, Pennsylvania. 



Ellen Prendergast 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal College, 
North Division High 
School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Frank Lo Presto 
Doctor of Medicine. 
University of Mississippi. 
De Witt Clinton High 
School. 
New York, N. Y. 



Warren Edward Pugh, 
B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

*Bn 

University of Minnesota, 
Hamline University, Uni- 
versity of Chicago, Duluth 
Central High School. 
Duluth, Minnesota. 




William Edward Rafferty 
Bachelor of Arts. 

nAA, Bn 

Bowen High School. 
Sodality, Prefect, 4, Loy- 
ola Quarterly, Managing 
Editor, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Thomas Edward Redden 
Bachelor of Science. 
Santa Clara University, 
Lewiston, Idaho, High 
School. 
San Jose, California. 



James Emmet Regan 
Bachelor of Laws. 
Crane High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



William J. Remus 
BaclieJor of Laws. 
St. Stanislaus High School. 
Student Council President, 
3. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Walter Joseph Reuter. 
B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

AP 

Creighton University, St. 

Ignatius High School, 

Catholic Medical Guild of 

Chicago. 

Chicago, Illinois. 

Francis Raymond Reynolds 
Bachelor of Laws. 
St. Patrick's Academy. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



^f 



Page sixty-five 



Edward B. Rhomberg, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
♦X, AP 

Notre Dame University, 
Tivnen Ophthalmological 
Society, Columbia College, 
Columbia Academy. 
Dubuque, Iowa. 



J. H. Richmond, LL.B., 
LL.M. 

Bachekir of Philosophy. 
De Paul University. 
Elgin, Illinois. 



Stanley Wilberforce 

Robinson 

Bachelor of Science. 
Hegworth School, Liver- 
pool, England. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Edwin Keith Roche 
Bachelor of Laws. 
Notre Dame University. 
Delaian High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Geor.ge Thomas Rowe, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
*X 

University of Alabama, 
Wenstonco High School. 
Tivnen Ophthalmological 
Society. 
Houston, Alabama. 



Lawrence A. Russell 
Bachelor of Science. 
St. Ignatius High School. 
Cicero, Illinois. 




John R. Ryan 
Bachelor of Laws. 
Michigan College of Mines. 
Sacred Heart High School. 
Calumet, Michigan. 



Thomas Francis Ryan 
Bachelor of Laws. 

St. Mary's University. 
Sock and Buskin Club. In- 
tramural Basketball. 1, 2, 3. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Frank John Saletta 
Bachelor of Science. 
IME 

Lindbluom High School, 
Catholic Medical Guild. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Hymen Israel Sapo^nik, 

B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
IIAK 

Crane Junior College, Mur- 
ray Tuley High School. 
Chicauo. Illinois. 



^awrence Alton 
Savarese, B.S. 
Doctor of Mediane. 
Columbia University. Man- 
ual Training High School. 
Brooklyn, New York. 



Frances Mary Schaefer 
Bdchelor of Pliilosopliv. 
Chicago Normal College. 
St. Mary's High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



_#• 



fr 




Page sixty-six 



Carl Francis Schaub, 
A.B., B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

*Bn 

Campion College. 

Tivnen Ophthalmological 

Society, President, 3, 4, 

Intramural Basketball, 2, 

3. 

Hammond, Indiana. 

Julia Magdalene Schwarz 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal College. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Robert Barry Scott 
Diploma in Commerce. 

St. Ignatius High School. 
Commerce Club. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Hyman Shanok, LL.B. 
Master of Laws. 
John Marshall Law School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Edward Joseph Shea 
Bachelor of Arts. 

AAr 

St. Ignatius High School. 
Sodality, 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Cicero, Illinois. 



Leola C. Shonts 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Houen High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 




Frank Zycmundt 

SiDOROWICZ 

Doctor of Medicine 
Crane Junior College. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Frank Charles 
Slincerland 

Diploma in Commerce. 

SAB 

St. Patrick's High School. 

Commerce Club. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



William Stadler Smith 
Bachelor of Science 

AAr 

Loyola Academy. 
Varsity Basketball, 3, 4, 
Intramural Basketball, 1. 
2, Sodality. Inter-Frater- 
nity Council, Monogram 
Club. 
Chicago. Illinois. 

Charles Spirrison, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
<i>K 

Crane Junior College, Me- 
dill High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



)SEPH F. SOKOLOWSKI, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
Crane Junior College, Lane 
Technical High School. 
Intramural Basketball, 1, 
2. Annual Representative, 



Chicago, Illinois. 



William Leo Stanton 
Bachelor of Laws. 
AKT, , SN* 
Lake View High School. 
Commerce Club. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Page sixty-seven 



ZiTA J. Stone 

Bachelor of Laws. 

Kim 

Midland College, Fremont 
High School. 
Secretary of Class, 2. 
Fremont, Nebraska. 



E. Jones Stroud, B.S. 
■ Doctor of Medicine. 
University of Chicago, 
Crane College. 
Fredsma, Kansas. 



Fred Joseph Stucker, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
■f-X, Blue Key. 
University of Chicago, 
Englewood High School. 
Tivnen Ophthalmological 
Society, Sock and Buskin 
Cluh, I, 2, 3, Medical 
Guild, Class President, 2. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Loretta Helen Sullivan 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal College, 
Providence Academy. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Donald Arthur 

Sutherland 

Bachelor of Comryiercial 
Science. 

St. Rita High School. 
Junior Manager, 3, Senior 
Manager, 4, Class Secre- 
tary, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Richard Thomas Tobin, 
A B 

Doctor of Law. 

St. Ignatius High School 
President of Junior and 
Senior Class, Student 
Council, Interdepartmental 
Committee. 
Chicago, Illinois. 




Joseph John Tovarek 
Bachelor of Science. 
Morton High School. 
Student Representative, 2. 
Berwyn, Illinois. 



Leslie Daniel Urban, B.S- 
Doctor of Medicine. 
<i>Bn, nKE, Blue Key, 
Seminar. 

University of Notre Dame, 
St. Viator's Academy. 
Tivnen Ophthalmological 
Society. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Francesca Lighter 
Urbancek. Ph.B. 

Master of Arts. 

Chicago Normal College. 

Evanston, Illinois. 



Vasile Onisim Vasu 
Doctor of Medicine. 
University of Michigan, 
Union Christian Academy. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Harrv Charles YanPelt 

Diploma in Commerce 

2AB 

St. Ignatius High School. 

Treasurer of Commerce 

Club. 3, 4. 

Chicago. Illinois. 



Ioseph Edward \'erhaag, 
B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

Crane Junior College. 

Lewis Institute, Lane Tech- 
nical High School. 

Tivnen Ophthalmological 

Society. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Page .sixtv-eig/it 




Emil James Viskocil, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
•i>X, Ghouls. 
Lockport High School. 
Tivnen Ophthalmological 
Society, Medical Guild. 
Lockport, Illinois. 



Harriet Edmunda Wall 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Normal College, Calumet 
High School. 



John A. Waldron 
Bachelor of Arts. 
AAT. Bn, Blue Key. 
St. Ignatius High School. 
Editor Student Handbook, 
4, President Student Asso- 
ciation, 4, Treasurer Stu- 
dent Association. 3, Liter- 
ary Editor Quarterly, 3, 4, 
First Prefect Sodality, 4, 
Press Club, 4, Loyola 
News, 1, Intercollegiate 
English Medal, 2, Rosary 
Dance Committee, 3, 4, 
Chairman Student Faculty 
Banquet, 3. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Claude A. Walkowiak 
Bachelor of Laws. 
University of Chicago, La 
Grange High School. 
Varsity Football. 
Argo, Illinois. 

John Francis Wcislo, A.B. 
Master of Arts. 
St. Ignatius High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Edward Patrick Whelan 
Bachelor of Laws. 
St. Patrick's High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 




Edward Joseph West 
Bachelor of Arts. 
St. Mary's College, Quig- 
ley Preparatory Seminary. 
Varsity Football, 3, 4, Var- 
sity Basketball, 3, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



LaRoy Walter Wilkins 
Bachelor of Arts. 
A\V 

Loyola Academy. 
Glee Club, Sodality, Tour- 
nament, Intramural basket- 
ball. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



George Augustine 
Wiltrakis, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

<t>X, ITKE, Seminar. 

St. Ignatius High School. 

Medical Guild, Tivnen 

Ophthalmological Society. 

Chicago. Illinois. 



Francis Louis Wiza, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
St. Ignatius High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Doris Dorinda Wright 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
DcKalb Normal College. 



Clarence Jacob Zurfli 
Bachelor of Science. 

•ten 

Lake View High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Page sixty-nine 



MERCY HOSPITAL 

Catherine Frances Ahern 
Registered 7'lurse. 
Centra! High School. 



Madi: 



Wi- 



Evelyn Elizabeth Amos 
Registered AJurse. 
Aberdeen Central High 
School. 
Aberdeen, South Dakota. 



Kay Barry 

Registered Afur.se. 
Belmand High School. 
Belmand, Iowa. 



Cecelia Marie Billerback 
Registered Tvjiirse. 
Holy Family High School. 
Lindsay, Nebraska. 



Minnie Marie Bosie 
Registered J^urse. 
Hopkins Township High 
School. 
Granville, Illinois. 



Helen Gertrude Connor 
Registered J<[urse. 
Donavon Memorial School. 
Rantoul, Illinois. 





Marguerite Mary Crosby 
Registered J^urse. 
St. Mary's High School, 
Sacred Heart Academy. 
Hartford, Michigan. 



Marie Agnes Daggett 
Registered T^urse. 
Providence High School. 
Joliet, Illinois. 



Mary Guiry Donoghue 
Registered AJurse. 
St. Peter's High School. 
Peterborough, Ontario, 
Canada. 



Genevieve Duffy 
Registered ?Sjurse. 
Pontiac High School. 
Pontiac. Illinois. 



Gertrude Katherine 

DURKIX 

Registered ^urse. 

St. Xavier's Academy. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Catherine Fealy 
Registered J^urse. 
Lindblom High School, 
Dc Paul University. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Helen Claire Finnegan 
Registered ?S[urse. 
St. Peter's High School. 
Class President, 3. 
Keokuk, Iowa. 



Catherine C. Fullan 
Registered J^urse. 
San Pierre High School. 
San Pierre, Indiana. 



Dorothy Mary Calvin 
Registered ?S(urse. 
Loretto Academy. 
Hamilton. Ontario, Canada 



Mary Georgina Heeb 
Registered Kiurse. 
Visitation Academy. 
Dubuque, Iowa. 



Jean Ann Hess 
Registered T^urse. 
Joliet Junior College. 
Joliet, Illinois. 



Geraldine Ursula 
Kennedy 

Registered 7\(urse. 

Immaculate Conception 

Academy. 

Ludington, Michigan. 




Evelyn Lucille Kleihauer 
Registered T^urse. 
Fenger High. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Mary Mae Knapstein 
Registered 7s(;irse. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Marie A. Korchak 
Registered ?^urse. 
Marinette High School. 
Marinette, Wisconsin. 



Frances Marion Kotze 
Registered ?\Jurse. 
Valparaiso University 
High School. 
Eveleth, Minnesota. 



Rachel Monica Langan 
Registered T^urse. 
Odell High School. 
Odell, Illinois. 



Bernice Mae Larson 
Registered 7s[urse. 
Lake View High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



"^^B^ 



i 



1^ 



seuenty-OTie 



Maria Rosalia Lynch 
Registered Jsiursc. 
St. Xavier's Academy. 
Ransom, Illinois. 



Margaret Mary Madden 
Registered !N(iir,se. 
Mcndota Township High 
School. 
Mendota, Illinois. 



Mary Catherine Maloney 
Registered T^urse. 
Elgin Academy. 
Elgin, Illinois. 



La Verne J. Matthews 
Registered J^urse. 
Yankton High School. 
Yankton, South Dakota. 



Martha Enid Mawhinney 
Registered l\[urse. 
St. Thomas High School. 
Zanesville, Ohio. 



Ruth Elizabeth May 
Registered ?\lurse. 
Mineral Point High School. 
Mineral Point, Wisconsin. 




Mae McCormick 
Registered Tvjiirse. 
Mount St. Bernard Col- 
lege. 

Halifax, Nova Scotia, 
Canada. 



Irene Josephine Xorton 
Regi,<;tered Jsjurse. 
St. Joseph Academy. 
Antigo, Wisconsin. 



Evelyn C. Pascoe 
Registered Jvjiirse. 
Manistique High School. 
Manistique, Michigan. 



ISOBEL PuRCELL 
Registered T^iurse. 
Holy Angels Convent. 
Sydney, Nova Scotia, 
Canada. 



Leona Sebat 

Registered T^urse. 
Danville High School. 
Danville, Illinois. 



Mary I. Sullivan 
Registered Jsjiirse. 
St. Mary of the Woods 
Academy. 
Wanatak, Indiana. 



t^. 



. %.. 



Page seventy-two 



Mary Ruth Tanko 
Registered 7\(urse. 
Gilbert High School. 
Gilbert, Minnesota. 




Irene Elizabeth Venette 
Registered l''lurse. 
La Crosse Central High 
School. 
La Crosse, Wisconsin. 



Genevieve Mary Taphorn 
Registered T^urse. 
Immaculate Conception 
Academy. 
Effingham, Indiana. 




Edna Harriet Volland 
Registered !N(urse. 
Shawano High School. 
Shawano, Wisconsin. 



Marguerite Genevieve 
Tarpey 

Registered T^urse. 

St. Xavier's Academy. 

Chicago, lUinois. 




Joan Y. Ziano 
Registered T^urse. 
Hopkins Township High 
School. 

Class Secretary, and 
Treasurer. 
Granville, Illinois. 



Catherine J. Trudelle 
Registered 7s(urse. 
Notre Dame High School 
Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin 




Page seventv-three 



ST. BERNARD'S 
HOSPITAL 

Lucille Virginia Bane 
Registered T^urse. 
Englewood High School. 
Class Treasurer, 4. 
East Chicago, Indiana. 




Margaret Grace Farley 
Registered 7'{urse. 
Hyde Park High School. 
Chicago. Illinois, 



Frances Theresa Buck 
Registered T^urse. 
St. Lawrence High School. 
Pcnlield. Illinois. 




RosiNA Marie Grouette 
Registered 7S{urse. 
Kenora High School. 
Fort Francis. Ontario, 
Canada. 



Esther Mary Buck 
Registered J^urse. 
Penfield High School. 
Class Vice-President, 
Penfield, Illinois. 




Nellie Therese Harris 
Registered T^urse. 
Aquinas High School. 
Class Secretary, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Mary Rose Dowling 
Registered T^urse. 
Visitation High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 




Anne Mary Hopkins 
Registered T^urse. 
Tamworth High School, 
Ennsville, Ontario, Canada 






Page seventyfour 



Helen Cecelia Keane 
Registered J^urse. 
Cass Technical High 
School, Detroit, Michigan. 
Chicago, Illinois. 




Geraldine Elizabeth 
QuiNN 

Registered Tvjiirse. 

Academy of Our 

Longwood. 

Class President, 4. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Lady, 



Norma Virginia King 
Registered T'^urse. 
St. Leo's High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 




Mary Loretta Ryan 
Registered !N[urse. 
St. Xavier High School, 
Mercy High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Mary Josephine McGowan 
Registered J^urse. 
Convent of Mercy. 
Castlebar, Mayo, Ireland. 




Stephanie Mary 
Stojkowski 

Registered Tsiurse. 

Lucy Flower High School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Mary Ellen Moloney 
Registered T^urse. 
St. Mary's High School. 



Enn 
ada. 



nore, Ontario, Can- 




Kathleen Patritia Walsh 
Registered Tsiurse. 
St. Joseph's Academy, 
Rathfarmin, Ireland. 
Chicago, Illinois. 




Page seDenty-/ii;e 



Commencement 




Page seventy-six 



ARTS AND SCIENCES 




Page seventyseven 



-^ 




John A. Waldron 

THE STUDENT COUNCIL 

John A. Waldron, President 

Daniel J. Donahue, Vice-President 

G. Michael Jordan, Secretary 

Martin J. Griffin, Treasurer 



MEMBERS 



CLASS REPRESENTATIVES 
Francis I. Butler, Senior 
Charles E. Stimming, Junior 
William Lynch, Sophomore 
Robert Healy, Freshman 



ACTIVITY REPRESENTATIVES 
Ambrose B. Kelly, Blue Key 
J. Francis Walsh, Loyola Tsjews 
William E. Rafferty, Sodality 
Donald Sutherland, Athletics 






Donahue 

Page seventy-eight 



Griffin 



Jordan 



m^ 




A Meeting of the Counxil 
THE STUDENT COUNCIL 

Student government at Loyola has taken a very significant step in the last year. 
The students have been invested with a greater degree of trust; they have taken more 
of their government into their own hands both in disciplinary matters and in recom' 
mendation for revision of scholastic regulation. The reaction that has occurred as a 
result of this increased responsibility is to be noted in the attitude that our admin- 
istrators have adopted towards student effort to regulate and direct the aifairs of 
school life. 

Much of the success in this new move is accounted for by the new constitution 
which was drawn up under the direction of last year's Student Council and adopted 
by the students. The old method of nomination and election was completely abol- 
ished by it and a new one, free from discouraging defects, came into use. 

The meetings of the Student Association, until just this year a very mediocre 
medium for the interchange of student opinion, have taken on an aspect of serious- 
ness that indicates very clearly a rejuvenated interest on the part of the student 
body. Addresses by prominent men in the various walks of life have done much to 
make the meetings attractive enough to keep the attendance at the pleasing level noted 
this year. It is a rare assembly now at which one does not find three or four motions 
of striking tenor passed after much lively discussion. 

The reception of the new freshman' cap policy, the Student-Faculty Banquet this 
year, the Rosary dance and the numerous other activities of the Student Council of 
this year are the most eloquent monuments that one could find in looking for a suit- 
able expression by which to remember the men who composed that body. By their 
work, and especially this year, by their unceasing efforts to keep the student body 
informed of the work of the Council they have fulfilled beyond hope the trust that 
was placed in them at their election. May the work of this year continue! 

John A. W.aldron. 



eventv^nme 



^f)ph 



mi^^^^^: 



^^ 



3f^ 




Francis I. Butler 



THE CLASS OF 1928— LAKE SHORE CAMPUS 

Francis I. Butler, President 

William J. Colohan, Vice-President 

Donald A. Sutherland, Secretary 

Edward J. Shea, Treasurer 






Shea 



Sutherland 



Colohan 



Page eighty 



,,.5iMieiJ%.- - 



^9^ 



2^ 




THE SENIOR ARTS AND SCIENCE CLASS 

Top Row — Smith, Wilkins, West, Keating, O'Connor. 

Third Row — CoLOHAN, Waldron, Shea, Lowrey, Rafferty, Butler. 

Second Roiv — Grady, Lucas, Kelly, Haley, Carpenter, Donohue. 

Bottom Row — Pearson, O'Brien, Redden, Abraham, Canary, Klawikoske, 
Breen. 



Pdge eighty-one 




Charles E. Stimming 



THE CLASS OF 1929 

Charles E. Stimming, President 

Matthew G. Sanders, Vice-President 

James X. Bremner, Secretary-Treasurer 





Bremner 



Sanders 



Page eighty-two 



g) \'I^K\ 




THE JUNIOR ARTS CLASS 
Top Row — KuNKA, Ford, Ennis, Tomaso, J. F. Walsh. 
Second Row — Garthe, Hennessy, Keating, Cullinan, Brady. 
Bottom Row — Whealan, Stimming, Scott, Lietz, J. Mayer, Ray. 




THE JUNIOR SCIENCE AND COMMERCE CLASS 

Top Row — Sweitzer, Doheny, Behmiller, Houda, F. J. Walsh, Fulton, 
Carmody. 

Third Row; — M. Sanders, Weinrich, R. T. O'Connor, Addeo, Cutrera, Schnei- 
der, MiRONlS. 

Second Row — Hazard, Curley, Moustakis, Prendercast, Ohlheiser, Gormican, 
Shurr. 

Bottom Row — J. G. O'Brien, J. X. Bremner, Davis, Bryant, Healy, Blondin. 



i^^^mm 



Page eighty-three 



45?^ 



(ehl^. 



w\ 



(?o)] 




William J. Lyn'ch 



THE CLASS OF 1930 

William J. Lynch, President 
Daniel Buckley, Vice-President 
John Sears, Secretary-Treasurer 




Buckley 



Sears 



Page eighty-four 



€ 



^ 




THE SOPHOMORE ARTS CLASS 

Top Row — Berens, Jasionek, Frett, Emill, Spelman, Connelly, Grant. 

Third Row — Carrdll, Gcirman, McGavick, Moroney, Shanahan, Marzano, 
White. 

Second Row — Melody, Primeau, Henehan, Kearns, Horne, Powers. 

Bottom Row—R. LuDwiG, Condon, F. Conley, Manning, J. Collins, Klest. 



■ Page eighty-five 



iB ^mi^m^^^mKwm m' 



/-'-aTX, 




THE SOPHOMORE COMMERCE CLASS 

Toj;^ Row — Gorman, Buckhoeltz, T. Smith, Stauder, Buckley, Burns, F. Mur- 
phy, Crowley. 

Third Row — Kiley, Caldwell, Huppert, Rogers, G. Ludwig, Conley, Lear, 
Kearney. 

Second Row — McAuLLiFE, T. MuRPHY, O'Brien, Sullivan, Lynch, Ryan, 
Hackett, J. Sanders. 

Bottom Row — Ball, Devine, Rosich, McEvoy, Hecht, Geiger, Schommer. 




THE SOPHOMORE SCIENCE AND PHILOSOPHY CLASS 

Top Row — Fazio, Smith, D'Esposito, B.arry. 

Third Row — J. Tracey, J. Diggles, McCabe, J. V. Bremner. 

Second Row — BOYLE, P. BaRRY, THOMSON, R. O'CONNOR. 

Bottom Row — CoRBOY, DowLiNG, Meagher, Corsiglia, Bartlett, P. E. Reed. 



Page eighty six 



@fc. 




THE SOPHOMORE PRE-MEDIC CLASS— GROUP A 

Top Row — Deane, Hajduk, Gryzbowski, Garvy, Berry, Lowerey. 
Second Row — Garrison, Krueger, Gualano, Jordan, M. Kennedy. 
Bottom Row — Glavin, Doherty, Crowley, Canning, Chu, Colangelo. 



^^^^Hf '^H 


RUH 


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THE SOPHOMORE PRE-MEDIC CLASS—GROUP B 
Top Roit' — O'Connell, Wroblewski, Sheehan, Wilson. 
Second Roiv — Urban, Vincenti, Keehan, Mij, J. J. Walsh, Ratajczak. 
Third Row — VoLiNi, SowKA, Whitfield, Major, J. Sullivan, F. Young. 
Bottom Row — Morton, Meany, Plunkett, Wall, Steinle, Yamane. 

'Page eighty- 



-l /^S^ 



i ^mi^i^mm^mKm^.^^^m 



^mmsm- 




Robert Healy 



THE CLASS OF 1931 

Robert Healy, President 

Robert Murphy, Vice-President 

Walter Durkin, Secretary-Treasurer 




DURKIN 



Murphy 



Q Ji^m 



fe^i^MBm sM^'i^^^i^ii&i^ 





THE FRESHMAN ARTS CLASS 
Top Row — J. P. Murphy, S. Murphy, O'Grady, Greenwald, Devlin. 
Third Row — DeFrancesco, Lisle, Hallinan, Kuenhle, Graham. 
Second Row — Brisch, R. Healy, Scott, J. M. O'Brien. 
Bottom Row — Allegretti, Lannon, Santino, Tomczak, D. Murphy. 




THE FRESHMAN SCIENCE AND PHILOSOPHY CLASS 
Top Row — DiNA, Lonergan, Barsell, Reagan, Kurlsnd. 

Third Row — Keevins, Roach, Jennings, Lutzenkirchen, O'Brien, P. Cre.agh. 
Second Row — Peters, Mueller, Nellican, McGivern, Baumbich, Dick. 
Bottom Row — Murphy, D. J. Fogarty, R. Rafferty, Salerno, Sanfilippo, Frizol, 



Holmes. 



eighty-nine 



'--mmmmmmmrnmMm^^ 



^v>^ 



m^mmsmm^Mm^ - 



^^y^^ 




THE FRESHMAN COMMERCE CLASS— GROUP A 

Ti)fi Ruw — LUMPKIK, DOOLEY, KuKULSKI, LuKITSCH, KeEHAX, DaTIN. 

Second Row — Linklater, Humphrey, C. Cuny, Cullen, Lickus. 
Bottom Row — Hkjgins, R. Lupton, Lyng, Sweeney, G. Cuny, Kenefick. 




THE FRESHMAN COMMERCE CLASS— GROUP B 
Top Row — C. Powers, Waesco, McNeil, J. Smith, Weber, Miller. 
Third Row — O'Leary, Mullaney, Mitchell, Wilkinson, Herman, Gilbert, 

Steinbrecher, Nolan. 
Second Row — Poppelreiter, Strobel, McCormick, Padol, McCourt. McHugh, 

Workman. 
Bottom Roiv — ViviRiTo, Shields, P. O'Connor, Size, Roszkowski. 

Page iiinety 



@s^g: 






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« 


^^^^Br^ ■ y '^oJllBp^i^B*'*^ ^^^^^^^^■HmMM^^Br^y'- -^^ ^ll^^H-tfV ^^^^^^1 


^ 






j^lllHJttlBLy** "^^^m W^ ^^.ml/^^'^^^!^^ 'jmKs IHIp^**4II^K^ ,«^^BI^S^3^^^^^^^^^H 


L2^^' -^'^-^H^W # ^^ #■ 


i. ^:1> 


LjiyL liii ' iMIHI 






PHH 


|^HB^^K^.v J^^^^H 



THE FRESHMAN PRE-MEDIC CLASS— GROUP A 
Top Row — Clifford, Dillon, W. Fitzgerald, Bianco, J. H(1rvath, F. Fitzgerald, 

COPIA, DURBURG. 

Third Row — Carney, Potzo, Keeley, Flynn, I. Pratt, Fellicelli. 
Second Row — Garrity, Armington, Bruun, Diblick, Kotas, J. Burke. 
Bottom Row — T. Healy, Kowalewski, G. Hillenbrand, D. Jordan, Krupa, 
J. Dunn. 




THE FRESHMAN PRE-MEDIC CLASS— GROUP B 
Top Row — Young, Luzzo, McGuire, Radakovich, Pohelski, McCarron. 
Fourth Row — E. Zaug, J. Zaug, Smyth, Lewis, Raines. 
Third Row — Mayer, Sharkey, Madaj, Palonka, Mennite. 
Second Row — Wajay, Ringa, Quinn, T. Murphy, Wybraniec. 
Bottom Row — W. Scott, J. P. Walsh, Neri, Laskowski, Trizna, Vaile. 

Page ninety-one 







Paul R. Martin 



THE CLASS OF 1928— DOWNTOWN COLLEGE 

Paul R. Martin, President 
Cecille H. Egan, Vice-President 
Catherine McDade, Secretary 

Julia Schwarz, Inasviyer 
Helen Brindl, Social Chairman 




McDade 



L^mm^^i^mms^^m^mm^mmm-: 




THE SENIOR DOWNTOWN CLASS— GROUP A 
Top Row — Bertrand, Nolan, Richmond, McMahon, Baisier. 

Second Row — LOEF, DOHERTY, HARRINGTON, MacDoNALD. 

Bottom Row — Brindi,, Schwarz, Egan, Martin, McDade, Grace. 




THE SENIOR DOWNTOWN CLASS— GROUP B 

Top Row — Harrington, MacDonald, Wright, Collins, Deegan, Wall, Van 

Etten, Kanouff, Butler. 
Second Row — Carmody, Culliton, Schaeffer, Conerty, Byrne, Cardona, 

Gallagher, Sullivan, Shea. 
Bottom Row — Caine, Sr. Valeria, Sr. Celestine, Sr. Jarrell, Sr. Roberta, 

Sr. Brendan, Hanna, Henneboy. 



■Page ninety-three 



I m^^Mm^M^mmMMW^^m^m^mmmmmmm' 



Michael Cudahy Hall 




Page ninety-four 



MEDICINE 




Page ninety-five 



%CX 



m^iimm^mm^^m!f^^^mm ' 



.mmm^Mmmmmmmm 



^v^^ 




Leoxard a. Macallso 
THE CLASS OF 1928 

Leonard A. Macaluso, President /first and Secotid Quarters) 

William A. Barr, President (Third Quarter) 

Helen E. McGovern, Secretiarv 

John J. Gregory, Treasurer 

Joseph Verhaag, Student Representative 

Joseph Sokolowski, Annual Representative 

J. A. Johnson, Class Editor 

Philip M. Nabbe, Sereeant-at-Arms 




McGovern 

Page -ninety-six 



Gregory 



>(E; %^BB;^M^SW^^^M'^ 



Verhaag 



itg^^mBMEMEmi 




William A. Barr 



The fact that Leonard Macaluso, president of the Senior class, finished his course 
in March, gave the Class of 1928 the distinction of having two presidents. Both men 
were enthusiastic and able in the performance of their duties, Mr. Macaluso playing 
a great part in the Medical support of the all-university student-faculty-alumni ban- 
quet in honor of Father Kelley, and Mr. Barr contributing his share to the promotion 
of the Medical student-faculty banquet in the spring and also taking a leading share 
in the management of the third all-university Senior Ball on May 11th. 

The Class of 1928 leaves Loyola with an honorable record for scholarship, activities 
and good fellowship' which its successors will find hard to surpass. Its members have 
made an enviable record in the securing of interneships, and in this, as in all other 
considerations, can justly feel that they have done their best to bring credit and 
honor to their university. 




SOKOLOWSKI 



Johnson 



Nabbe 



^ 



m^^mmnmi^m^mm^mm^mmfm^ 



Page ninety-seven 



'Q;>A 



i^mmmsmsmm^v 



"^mmmmsmmsmmm^^M^ Y^\ 




A. Pace Edwards 



THE CLASS OF 1929 

A. Pace Edwards, President 

Aaron Fagelson, ViLe-Pres!de?it 

Amedeo M. Pecararo, Secretary-Treasurer 

Francis W. Dwyer, Student Representative 




Fagelson 

Page ninetyei%h.t 



Dwyer 



Pecararo 



,:^^;tM$^fr;^Mi?^M@fr^g-^>^M^ ^^ 




THE JUNIOR MEDICAL CLASS— GROUP A 

Top Row — DvvYER, Greenblrg. Bristol, Evans, Koneski, Crane, Moleski, Haraburda, 
KiLciALLEN, Walsh, Kullman, Evans, Gross, Turner, Gladen. 

Fourth Row — Crown, Modzikowski, Gleason, Gaefney. Lloyu, Caulfield, Donovan, Loss- 
man, ASHMENCKAS. 

Third Row — Burianek, Greteman, Lund<;oot, Contl Catanl\, Lat;, Santora, Graff, 
Will, Luehrsman, Carrol. 

Second Row — Hawkins, Driscoll, McCorry, Dotherway, Raimond, Brown. Valenta, 
Minardi, Jakopich, Hogan. 

Bottom Row — Castro, Keeley, Coyle, Murphy, Sandorf. Flynn, Neff, Larrivee, Nigro. 




THE JUNIOR MEDICAL CLASS— GROUP B 

Top Row — Fouser. Stengel, Marquis, Zimmerman, Guerrero, Bristol, Conway, Tehinski, 

Gilmore, McLaughlin, Jonas. 
Third Row — CoNTi, McCormick, Catania, Samonte, Fagelson, Pink, Haver, Ludwig. 
Second Row — Karr, Pritikin, Grigsby, Pavletic, Mitchell, Haraburde, Schwartz. 
Bottom Row — Stanul, Fonancier, Kapuska, Jordan, Leter, Elrich. 



Page ninetynine 



%/^^M 



l^ 



v'M. 



t^!Mm^i^Tii^ ^f^ ^:^mmm m^mp^jm^^^ ?^^ 



M^. 



pj^)' 




Anthony ,Bell 



THE CLASS OF 1930 

Anthony J. Bell, PresideiTt 
Thomas Pekin, Vice-Preside77t 

Mary Marzano, ?>ecyetayy 
Peter J. Timmons, l^rcaimer 




TiMMONS 



%k 



Page 07ie huTidred 




THE SOPHOMORE MEDICAL CLASS— GROUP A 

Top Row — SwiONTKOwsKi, Metro, Rivera, Gillig, Paradise, Barrionuevo, Rob- 
inson, RooNEY, Williams. 

Third Row — Steinbrecker, Barruso, Foley, Tracht, Doty, DiLeo, Leahy, Ross, 
Joseph, Pekin, Hauser, Saletta, Reilley. 

Second Row — Beardsley, Menella, Wall, Chwosgewicz, Pimental, Samlow, 
O'Connor, Dillman, Jonas, Albi. 

Bottom Row — Streysman, Sarmas, Dwyer, Larenzana, M. Marzano, Tarbow, 
Chun, Kasiovv'Ski, Hall. 




THE SOPHOMORE MEDICAL CLASS— GROUP B 

Top Row — Gibney, Hottinger, Hermandez del Valle, Jonas, Paradise, Bar- 

BERio, M. Marzano, Flaxman, Mammoser, Pauli, Tovarek, Dillman. 
Third Row — TiMMONS, Ballinger, Cambridge, Steinbrecker, Diehl, C. Carey, 

Matsui, McGinnis, Albi, Bellini, Crasseros, Cada, Petrone, Simonaitis. 
Second Row — ZuRFiL, Caliendo, Kukuk, J. Marzano, McGrath, Loef, Liebold, 

MiLos, Hauser, Fredberg. 
Bottom Row — Latz, Robinson, Mahoney, Ahearn, Saletta, Bell, Rooney, 

Rand, Joseph, Hartman. „ , , , 

rdge one hundred one 



^^ 



'B ^im^^i^m^^mM^ms'Mm^i^m: '^mmm 




Thomas B. Carney 



THE CLASS OF 1931 

Thomas B. Carney, President 

Nicholas Casciato, Secretary 

Thomas Hickey, Treasurer 

John P. Mullen, Student Ref^resentative 




Hickey 

Page one hundred two 



Mullen 



Casciato 



B^\m$Tm^^0^^M^mm^\ 





Tor Rou'—Petcofi. HI 

Ryan. 
Fourth Rou' — Hipp. Ka 



THE FRESHMAN MEDICAL CLASS— GROUP A 

;tko. Glynn, JuUano, Konopa, Huba, Zelazny, Walsh. Kohn 

Drabanbki. A. Maj 
DeV 



:ewick. Kramps, Sankstone, E. J. Kellev, 
ell. Castaldo. i". McGuire. Forbrich. 
Third Rozf — Regan. Flanagan. Lukats. Johnston, Hoeltgen. Huepl 
SccokJ i?otL— Werlhman. Lynn. Twohey. Prendergast. Ibelli. P 

Dayid. Furth, Fulco. Piscitelli. 
Bottom i?ou'— Datta. Tabaka, Canicam. Ohta, DeFeo, Keehan. Luk; 
Fitzgerald. 



, Wynekoop, Smalley, Luka 
ferro, Jennings. Keegan. Koinasinsl 



ski. Mulle 




THE FRESHMAN MEDICAL CLASS— GROUP B 

enny, Witkiewicz. Gawne. Radzy 



Top Ro-cv — Robillotti, Muzzicato, Tousey, 

Gura, Czaja, Molengraft, iVlcSweeney. 
Fourth Rou^Button, Gonzalez, Tompkins, Kuchta, Wei: 

Haller, Hickey. Spangler, Zeincka, Heckenaible, Bel 

Twohey. 
Third i?o7£'— Hueske. Marq 

Armington. 
Second Rou—Bo\an, Hausi 

Kallal, Hamilton. 
Botto. 



iless, Zielinski, IVIarciniak, Waters, 
nonte, Carney, Kelsey, Weigel, Jorda 



Ro 



sty. 



, Edelstein, Renkoff, Anderman. Perzia, G. J. Gallaghc 
J. Leahy. Trapp. Strmic, Scheribel. Wilson, Collins, 
wski, Bica, Burke, Russell, Ignofto, Schwarcz, Levy, 



Furlong, Pa 



one' hundred thr 



The Medical School 




Page one hundred fou 



L AW 




Page one hundred five 



fO- 



^c^ 



'^^^m 



J^v 



-^Mmmmm Mmmm^m% Y^ 




William Remus 



THE DAY LAW STUDENT COUNCIL 

WiLLLAM Remus, Presideitt 

Janet Ahern, Vxce-Vmidcm 

John Toomey, Secretary 

John O'Malley, Treasurer 

Francis X. Gilmore, Seiiior RefireseiTtatire 

Thomas McCabe, ]umor Refiresejuatife 

Marshal McMahon, Vymhrnan Representatii'e 






Ahern 

Page one hundred s\x 



Toomey 



O'Malley 



^^^^^}^ 



THE STUDENT COUNCIL OF THE DAY LAW SCHOOL 

The Student Council of the School of Law has been in existence for three years. 
In the beginning it was made up of representatives from both the day school and the 
night school. This arrangement was soon found to be unsatisfactory, as the problems 
of the two schools differed widely. After the first year two separate councils were 
established, so the history of the council of the day school had its beginning two years 
ago. 

Considering the length of time the organization has been functioning that which it 
has accomplished is remarkable. Considerable of the discipline of the school is in the 
hands of the council and the cooperation of the student body has made possible an 
increase in the powers of the council. The organization acts as a board of arbitration 
before which any difficulties arising between student and faculty are brought. The 
student before he presents his differences to the dean must appear before the council, 
and if, after deliberation, the council decides he has a just claim, it will present his 
position to the faculty and defend his right. While the students of the School of 
Law have not had many differences with the faculty, the few that have arisen have 
been settled in a manner agreeable to both parties concerned. This function of the 
council is outstanding and creates interest in and respect for the council. 

Members of the council are elected by the classes. The president of the council is 
elected by the members of the entire school. The president of each class serves on the 
council and each class is allowed one additional representative. The organization is 
thus democratic, giving all classes equal opportunity. 

Because of the success of student government so far the future for its advancement 
is very bright. The cooperation of the student body and the encouragement of the 
faculty have gone a long way toward setting it on a firm basis. Continued success 
can be expected so that the entire discipline of the school can soon be taken over by 
the students themselves. 

William Remus 






GiLMORE 



McCabe 



McMahon 

Page one hundred severi 



^mmmE^m ^^mm^i^i^^^^^M 




Francis X. Gilmore 



THE CLASS OF 1928 

Francis X. Gilmore, President 

Marie Doyle, Secretary 
Melborne Chapp, Treasurer 




Chap? 

Page one hundred eight 



Doyle 



Si^ggESM^E 



mm 




THE SENIOR DAY LAW CLASS 

Top Row — Hendricks, Adams, Ryan, Lederer, Alswang, Chapp, Walkowiak, 
Johnson. 

Second Row — O'Shaughnessy, Mulligan, Aicher, Whelan, Lederer, Lane, 
Downs, Johnson. 

Bottom Row — Kirchman, Stanton, Gilmore, Doyle, Ahern, Peace, Remus. 



Page on.e hundred nine 



^^ 



^nr.. ' ^0mm-. 







Thomas R. McCabe 



THE CLASS OF 1929 

Thomas R. McCabe, President 
Raymond F. Hayes, Vice-President 
Eleanor R. Borgemeier, Secretary 

Joseph E. Hammer, Treasurer 




Hamkier 

Page one hundred ten 



Borc;emeier 



Haves 




THE JUNIOR DAY LAW CLASS 
Top Row — Smeltzer, McCarthy, Schram, Witry, Henry, Sweeney. 
Bottom Row — Hammer, Hayes, McCabe, Toomey, Borgemeier, Murphy. 



one hundred eleven 



B^mm^^Mmmmimmmmi^mmmm^ L 



^^^mm^m^M^m^ ^^ m^mm^mmmm^mmm^^, r @ 




rw^: 



Marshal I. McMahon 



THE CLASS OF 1930 

Marshal I. McMahcin. President 

Helen Newman, Vice-President 

Maurice Walsh, Secretary 

OHN O'Mallev, Student Re^reseyitative 




Walsh 

Pave mif bundrtd twt-lve 



Newman 



i ^P ^i^ 



O'Malley 



r^ 



/. 




THE FRESHMAN DAY LAW CLASS 

Top Row — MoRAN, Pauly, Sejud, McGlhre, Clontza, Kochanski, Math, 
Jones, Weideman, Roszkowski. 

Second Row — P. A. Reed, O'Malley, Hart, Ragen, Robinson, Galoger, Klimas- 
ZEwsKi, O'Dowd, McDonald. 

Bottom Row — O'RouRKE, McGrath, Ronan, Bishop, Newman, McMahon, 
Walsh, Santucci, Bowe. 



Page one hundred thirteer. 



m^ 



^m^m mm^^ mmmmmi^^mmm^^i&^i^ ^: 




Charles J. Gallacher 



THE EVENING LAW STUDENT COUNCIL 

Charles J. Gallagher, President 
Lawrence Marino, VicePresident Thomas W. Crane, Junior 

John J. Kelly, Secretary Howard Schlacks, Sophomore 

Jeanette Smith, Treasurer Edward Dreis, Freshman 

Elizabeth King, Richard Tobin, Semor 




'^^mmmmm^iMj^^ 



?ii^a^BME^SM|^\^ 





■:-iittl;:^' ■■■■■■ 


•^1 


L' 













Tojj Row — Dreis, Kelly, Marino. 

Bottom Row — Crane, Schlacks, King, Gallagher. 

THE STUDENT COUNCIL OF THE EVENING LAW SCHOOL 

Although student government is a comparatively new feature of the School of Law 
it has proved to be one of the most interesting of activities. Naturally potential law- 
yers have the ability to accomplish things in the way of government. While the 
movement not only serves to enforce discipline which the administration would not 
thmk of attempting, it has a great educational value, especially to law students. 

One of the greatest problems the council has attempted to solve is that of coopera- 
tion amorig the governing bodies of the Downtown college. It would seem that the 
question of overlapping authority would be the greatest difficulty to encounter when 
there are distinct governing bodies in the same building, but just the opposite is the ■ 
case. In this matter of securing greater cooperation among these bodies the council 
of the night School of Law has led the way. 

Whatever the all-university effort might be, whether Homecoming, an important 
question before the university, or the Junior Prom, it has received consideration by 
the council. In attempting to weld together the various departments into a body 
with a central governing unit the Law council has also been active. 

Much credit and thanks are due Mr. Rooney, the secretary of the School of Law, 
whose vibrant personality and ever ready aid has meant much to the foundation of 
student government, and to Dean McCormick, who has been both scholastically and 
personally a friend and adviser to the council. 

Ch.arles J. Gallagher. 



one hundred fifteen 



\ m^Mmmm^mmi^m^ ^ ^im:mm^m t^imm: 



||^is^l^MtfS^^^^smi^ ^^^ ^^p^ a^ 




Richard T. Tobix 



THE CLASS OF 1928 

Richard T. Tobin, President 

John J. Coffey, Jr., Vice-President 

Anna D. Johnson, Secretary 

James N. Grace, Treasurer 




Johnson 



Coffey 



Grace 



Page ime hundred sixtee 



'^^;^^m^^mM^^m^^^^m:^i^mMmim^^m} .^: 




THE SENIOR EVENING LAW CLASS 

Top Row — Reynolds, Boberg, Pokorney, Mokate, Drennan, Regan, Faulkner, 
McKenna, Cannon, Fleming. 

Second Row — Costello, Barrett, Roche, King, Johnson, Stone, Coffey, Dor- 
GAN, McNulty, Renton, Maloney. 

Bottom Row — Healy, Dayton, Fanning, Grace, Tobin, Denvir, Moore, O'Neill, 
Gallagher. 



Page one hundred seventeen 



m 



,ft 



msm^^Mm^^mm^: 



m/m^mmmmmmsMmMm^\ 




Thoma? W. Crane 



THE CLASS OF 1929 

Thomas W. Crane, President 

Joseph McGonagle, VieePresident 

Thomas Harrikoton, Secretarx-Treasurer 




McGonagle 



Harrington 



Paf^e one hundred eighteen 



tp 






THE JUNIOR EVENING LAW CLASS 

Top Row — Phelan, Plunkett, McNally, Cassidy, Threedy, Sheehe, Hagstrom, 
Marino. 

Second Row — McGoNiGLE, Piggott, Pokorny, Glynn, Morrissey, Keough, 
Russell. 

Bottom Row — Egan, Cannon, Dunne, Crane, Yellowcin, Metcalfe, Lamb. 



Page 07ie hundred niy^eteen 



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'^^ 



^- 



^\mwiMi^Mmm^mkw^im: ':-. ^^ ■mmmmmmm&m^mf ^ 




Howard F. Schlacks 



THE CLASS OF 1930 

Howard F. Schlacks, President 
Joseph B. Byrnes, Vice-Presidejit 
Edna Devlin, Secretarv-Trea^urer 




Byrnes 

Pagf inu' liundrfd Ucfiilv 



^1 



Devlin 



ii^^^^^ 







THE SOPHOMORE EVENING LAW CLASS 

Top Row — Crowe, Dailey, Haley, McGee, Barron. 
Second Row — O'Reilly, McCarthy, Buckley, Burke. 
Bottom Row — Kelly, Schlacks, Devlin, Byrnes. 



Page one hundred twenty-one 



^5^^ 



^ '^ 




Edward A. Dreis 



THE CLASS OF 1931 

Edward A. Dreis, President 

Carl J. Schuetze, Vice-President 

Jeannette M. Smith, Secretary 

Ray H. Hartkett, Treasurer 




Schuetze 



Smith 



Hartnett 



Pdge one hundred tU't'iUv-tico 



fflX£ 



i^ 



/<SV^ 



isi:^- 




THE FRESHMAN EVENING LAW CLASS 
Top Row — Butcher, Michuda, Simoxich, Secord, Reed, Robinson. 
Second Row — Albachiara, Farrell, Blake, Lewis, Donahue, Lonergan. 
Bottom Row — BiNKLEY, Curry, Dreis, Bishop, O'Connor, Huck. 



one hundred twenty-thr 



_;;]^^^__ 



Twenty-eight Horth Franklin Street 




Page one hundred twenty-four 



COMMERCE 




Page one hundred twenty-five 



M 



f ©)\J I^E^^^^'S?'i?^^?S'^^?^o^5J? 



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tmmmmm^ii ^^f ^ 




J.Wlh^ A. NhARY 



THE COMMERCE CLUB 

James A. Neary, President 

William F. Norkett, Vice-President 

Joseph Osten, Secretary 

H.ARRY Van Pelt, Treasurer 




Norkett 

Page cnie hundred twenty-six 



OsTEN 



Van Pelt 




Top Row — Slingerland, Doyle, Norkett, Hammond, Crowley, O'Connor, 
Pfiefer, Zincum, Sweetman, Wojtelevicz, Habenstreit. 

Third Row — Wajkowoski, Scott, Rooney, Wirth, Sweeney, Fitzgerald, Kil- 
bride, Cooney, Ferrari, Ryan, Farley. 

Second Row — Hogan, O'Sullivak, Hershorn, J. Neary, Byrnes, H. Neary, 
Doyle, Dailey, Fulton. 

Bottom Row — Cart, Wright, Boyle, Pauls, Quitriana, Osten, Van Pelt, 
Culinski, Hart. 

THE COMMERCE CLUB 

The true test of any organization is displayed in its ability to remain intact after 
the glitter of experiment has become a dull reality. The Commerce Club, the only 
universal organization of the Commerce school, has more than successfully weathered 
this stage. 

The original requirements are still in vogue, viz., for membership, the successful 
completion of one semester's work at Loyola University, and for eligibility for an 
office, it is necessary to have completed twenty-four hours of Commerce work. The 
faculty and student body meet on an equal plane when any misunderstandings are 
adjusted. 

To fulfill one of the purposes of organization, pleasure, the Student Faculty ban- 
quet was arranged for February 18th. Despite the inclement weather many of the 
students journeyed to the portals of the staid and select Hamilton Club to have the 
pleasure of meeting our new President, Father Kelley, and Dean Reedy and the rest 
of the faculty. 

The Club inaugurated something new and novel in the line of collegiate diversions. 
The "Roundup" was staged at the downtown school Friday evening, April 27. The 
program was headed by Judge Allegretti. One of the features of the evening was 
a si.x-round boxing match. Then to insure satisfaction to all there was strains of 
John Martino's Blue Birds, who furnished the dance music. 

The success of the second year of the Commerce Club was due to the tireless efforts 
of William Norkett, vice-president, Harry "Van Pelt, treasurer, and Joseph Osten, 
secretary. The club was afforded great assistance from all the class officers. 

James A. Neary 

Page 011C hundred twentvseven 



'm^m^.'^^3mp^ ^^^^^mmmm^^i^^!,^m f% 




^ 



Robert Scott 



THE CLASS OF 1928 

Robert Scott, President 

David Byrnes, Vice-President 

Frank Slingerland, Secretary 

David Byrnes, Treasurer 






Byrnes 

Pdfic diu" liiDulred tiventyeight 



Slingerland 



Pfeifer 




THE SENIOR EVENING COMMERCE CLASS 

Top Row — CooNEY, Kilbride, Scott, Byrnes. 

Bottom Row — Fitzgerald, Habenstreit, Neary, Slingerland, Pfeifer, Van Pelt. 



one hundred twentynine 




Charles J. LaFond 



THE CLASS OF 1929 

Charles J. LaFond, President 
Joseph F. Osten, Vice-President 
WlLLL^M D. SwEETMAN, Secretary 

Gerald A. Rooney, Treasurer 




ROONEY 

Page one hundred thirty 




SwEETMAN 



OsTEN 



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yt 









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KT 


Stv 


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rl 


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, ^f ^ ^ 


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f .' 



THE JUNIOR EVENING COMMERCE CLASS 

lop Row — O'SuLLivAN, Wallace, Lewis, Sweetman, Clark, O'Donnel, 
La Fond. 

Middle Row — Sullivan, Hershorn, Sweeney, Doyle, Norkett, Osten. 

Bottom RoR' — FERR.ARI, Gawn, Hammond, Crowley, O'Connor, Chisholm, 

WiRTH, ROONEY. 



Page one hundred thirty-one 



'sa^K^^r.. 



m 



m 




John Sweetman 



THE CLASS OF 1930 

John Sweetman, President 

Robert McGurn, Vice-President 

Frances Carson, S>tcrttayy 

Walter Young, l^-(e.asv.ye.r 

James Corrigan, Sergeant-at-Ar>ns 




McGuRN Carson 

one (lundred thirtv-fifo 



Young 



Corrigan 



£i{r(|>SM{86g);aM^^fe^^ 



W^ 




THE SOPHOMORE EVENING COMMERCE CLASS 
Top Row — Unger, Carey, Dailey, Wojtelevicz, H. Neary, Culinski. 
Second Row — Daley, Nash, Farrell, Hart, McTigue, Boyle. 
Bottom Row — CzESLAWSKi, Barron, Walsh, Quitrl\na, O'Leary. 



ge one hundred thirty-three 



'Q;^- 



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4mmmm>.: 




Ben Regan 



THE CLASS OF 1931 

Ben Recan. President 

Francis OToole, Vice-President 

Katherine Madlinger, Secretary 

Thomas McGurn, Treasurer 

Thomas Cole, Jr., Sergeant-at-Arms 




OToole Madlinger 

Page one hundred thirty-four 



McGurn 



Cole 



S5iS^ 



m^M 



■m 




THE FRESHMAN EVENING COMMERCE CLASS 

Tots Row — Young, Ferris, Burke, Pallosck, Norris, Kochler, Baste, Keeler. 
Second Row — GusHMAN, Fitzgerald, Roach, Lardner, Hinchey, Ryan, Sirvilis, 

McGoVERN, HOCAN. 

Bottom Row — Hart, Kearns, Gibbons, McGurn, Cole, Smith, Garska, Regan, 
Gould. 



Page one hundred thirty-five 



The Downtown Building 




ge one hundred thirtysix 



DENTISTRY 




ge one htmdred thirty-seven 



\\?\ 




p. W. SVVANSON 



THE CLASS OF 1928 

P. W. SwANSON, President 

Arthur Rolander, Vice-President 

George Lamphier, Second Vice-President 

L. W. Raymond, Secretary 

H. F. Parker, Treasurer 




Lamphier Raymond 



Parker 



Rolander 



Page one hundred tlnrtyeight 



m^^^^^m^. 



^ /?=^ 



^9^ 




Harrison and Wood Streets 



Page one hundred thirty-nine 



mmm, 



'tsm^B^^^m i^^^mM. 




Ted Clark 



THE CLASS OF 1929 

Ted Clark, President 

E. J. MoRAN, Vice-President 

F. J. Barker, Secretary 

E. S. Weyer. Treasurer 




MoRAN 



Weyer 



^1 




THE JUNIOR DENTAL CLASS 



Pdge one hutxirei. fortyone 



Qji ^^^^ m^^mmMM Amm^^mf^; mm^m^mM^ m^ 



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mfti-^'^^:ti^, i iL^.iMiMmyjv^ r p^r \ uti^^ 






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R. E. Todd 



THE CLASS OF 1930 

R. E. Todd, President 

Nathan Grevior, Vice-President 

George Lauber, Secretary-Treasurer 




Lauber 

Page one hundred jortytwo 



Grevior 



m? 



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MfB 




THE SOPHOMORE DENTAL CLASS 



one /lundred forty-three 






^' 



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LsjdiSSh 



"^^ 




Fred Scambler 



THE CLASS OF 1931 

Fred Scambler, President 
R. H. Norton, Vice-President 
Thomas DeSchone, Secretary 

Wilbur Sadler, Treasurer 




DeSchone 

Page one hundred forty-four 




Sadler 




Norton 



/.ES^F^aSH 



^ii^^^^^fe^>^igm^^j^)Sts^^ , vg^ 



il^[g^M^i^M EMgll^aMm'^ i^ 




THE FRESHMAN DENTAL CLASS 



Page one hundred fortv-fiv 



^m, . ;^^^^^: 



so>^ 




Wallace Fanning 



THE CLASS OF 1932 

Wallace Fanning, President 

O. E. Smith, VKe-President 

E. J. Cutter, Secreiary-Treasurer 





Smith 

Page oiif liiiiidred forty six 



Cutter 



|\IEM^ 




THE PRE-DENTAL CLASS 



Page one hundred forty-seven 



[^^^^mm^^^^i^^^^^^^- 



The Dental School 




Page one hundred forty-eight 



NURSING 




one hundred forty-nine 



^m^ 



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Mercy Hospital 



FAIRY STORY OF A NURSE 

In the late days of Chicago's early Spring, when snow and wind almost dishearten 
you and the thought of Spring seems most remote, you must find beauty in the land- 
scape or the beholder. 

With the thought of beauty — my mind reverts back to the days of Mercy Hospital, 
days of joy and retrospection. Life is full of complexities and we, the humans, must 
fill them out. 

The author was right when he said: "Life's a funny proposition after all," it takes 
a lot of humor to get the fun and yet we must blend the sunshine with the storm — 
a lot of wind makes the wind-mill go round. 

Time goes on — years come and go — we must weave as the shuttle threads and, so 
the story goes: — 

Once upon a time there lived a nurse— -full of beauty and willing to behold it. A 
bold interne came past and s,iid, "Life is what you make it — prepare me a saline — 
I want the salt of life." The nurse got rocky and froze him and so goes the story 
of "Life IS what you make it," you may freeze, you may heat, but a nurse goes on 
forever. 

There's one reason why one must find beauty in the landscape or the beholder, and, 
the whole sum and substance is the landscape — "Mercy" and the beholder. "We 
who have Icived — trained and worked there — our Alma Mater — Vota Vita Mea." 

Helen Cl.aire Finig.^n. 



one hundred fifty 



^ 





1^1 IL N'lRsl s H(i\.Il 

THE GRADUATES 



DOROTHY CALVIN 


—"He 


r s 


Ollg « 


ashes 


away 


from 


the soul the 


di 


St of 


eve 


ryday 


life." 




MARY 


HEEB— "A 


te 


ase ar 


d a 


pest. 


and a 


I the 


re^t 


ve recomme 


id 


Mary 


as 


our b 


est." 




HELEN 


FINIGAN- 


— ' 


A me 


rry 


heart 


doeth 


good 



like 



I 

all be 



MARIE DAGGETT— "Neither too young to be 

wise nor too old to be careful." 
ISABELLE PURCELL— "I count only the happy 

hours." 
CATHERINE FEALEY— "A lot of splendid vir- 



all girl.' 



FRANCES KOTZE- 

guess. They' 
RUTH MAY- 

things, they 

ROSE MURRAY— "A sm 

languages." 
CECELIA BILLERBECK 

good's sake, and seeks 

ward." 



Does she like 
avorite fruit, 
brown eyes a 
les keep one 



tes, well, I 
; confess." 
dangerous 
om getting 



'"She does good for 



JEAN HESS— "A blu 


sh is be 


autiful— 


but 


ften 


LEONA SEBAT— "Happy-go-lu 


cky, fair 


and 


ree. 


nothing is there that 


bothers 


me." 






GENEVIEVE DUFFY 


—"Be thou fair 


man 


kind 


adores thee, smile a 


nd the 


vorld is 


weak 


be- 


fore thee." 










KATHLEEN BARR\ 


—"Oh! 


those 


wink 


able. 


blinkable, merry twi 


ikable. 


imply u 


nthinl, 


able 


EVELYN PASCOE— ■ 


She wo 


rks for 


what 


she 


■gets — and she gets w 


hat she 


wants." 






MARIE LYNCH— "Her quiet. 


reserved 


and 


Tiod- 


est manner has wo 


1 for h 


r a pla 


ce in 


the 



vho kn 
MARY TANKO— "Pretty eyes, pretty hair, pretty 

smile you always wear. All these things we 

plainly see when we look at Mary." 
EDNA VOLLAND— "A girl who always smiles 

and whose virtues shine for miles. Just as sure 

as she is tall, she's a real girl all in all." 
LA VERNE MATTHEWS— "May care be a 

stranger to her heart." 
MINNIE BOSIE— "Some that smile have in their 

hearts, I fear, lots of mischief." 
JOAN ZIANO— "She has a head to contrive, a 

tongue to persuade, and a hand to execute." 



BERNICE LARSON— "I 
I want it." 



what I want when 
ipeaks, thinks and 



MARY KNAPSTEIN— "She 

acts just as she ought." 
HELEN COi^NORS— "To giggle is her delight, 
spite of all this, your 



to 



CATHERINE FULLAN— "S 

where the brook is deep." 

MARGARET MADDEN 



oth 



the water 



rful 



"A 



GERTRUDE DURKIN— "The world's no better 
if we worry, life's no longer if we hurry." 

RACHEL LANGAN— "Loved by many, but chiefly 
by one. ' 

MARGUERITE TARPEY— "It's nice to be nat- 
ural when you're so naturally nice." 

CATHERINE AHERN— "She has a quiet nature 
but mischief lurks beneath." 

MARIE KORCHAK— "A true friend to the true." 

MARY CRONIN— "An earnest girl, who suc- 
ceeds whatever she undertakes." 

GERALDINE KENNED Y— "New ideas, bril- 
liancy, abundance of pep — when Gerry's near 
best watch your step." 

MARY CATHERINE MALONEY— "Perpetual 
personified motion." 

MAE McCORMICK— "Talks little but says 
much." 

IRENE NORTON— "Quiet, faithful, unassuming, 
all who know her love her." 

LUCILLE McCAULEY— "I'll do something sen- 
sational yet." 

GENEVIEVE TAPHORN— "Just a happy-go- 
lucky girl, who is always ready for fun. 
Friendly to all those about her and loved by 
everyone." 

MARY SULLIVAN— "Enjoy life ere it's fied, 
when you die you're a long time dead." 

MARY DONOGHUE— "Here's to the girl with 
the heart and smile, who makes this bubble of 
life worth while." 

EVELYN KLEIHAUER— "She is a winsome, wee 
thing." 

KATHERINE TRUDELLE— "When fun and 
duty clash, let duty go to smash." 

EVELYN AMOS— "Good natured and witty as 
the day is long." 

MARGUERITE CROSBY— "Blessed with a sweet 
nper " 



one hundred fiftyone 



^.0 



w^mmmm^m^^^t^^^^im^^ 




Helen Finnegan 



THE CLASS OF 1928 

Helen Finnegan, President 

Rachel Langan, Vice-President and Secretary 

Joan Y. Ziano, Treasurer 




Langan 

one hundred fiftytwo 



Zl'^no 



M^ 




THE SENIOR MERCY NURSES 

Top Row — BiLLERBECK, MaY, TaPHORN, NnRTON, VOLLAND, CrOSBY. 

Second Row — Vennette, Purcell, Sebat, Langan, RdZiE, Mawhinney, Lynch, 
Pascoe. 

Bottom Row — Duffy, Matthews, Barry, Hess, Cronin, Tanko. 



Prtge one hinidred (iflv-llircf 



^.^..-. ..--^mm^mm.- . , ,., 



^ 



■ ? -ii 



;(i \l|^g^S^i^ijg ^gifeS^ 




Essie Anglum 



THE CLASS OF 1929 

Essie Akx.LUM, President 

Lucille Clearv, Vice-Pj-esident and Secretay^_ 

Helena Burke, I'reasurer 




Burke 

Page one liundred fijiyjour 



L. Clearv 






^..^^^^^klLl^g^g^^gM^^M^^^igr^tgfe^^ 



i^m^^m^^m^^^mmm'M^ ^^^^mi^-^^Mm^mf ^ 




THE JUNIOR MERCY NURSES 

Top Row — L. Cleary, C. Cleary, Sharrett, O'Connell, Naber, Scullion, 
Dooly. 

Fourth Row — Amos, Rokusek, Brady, Takes, Andruska, Hansen, Weber. 

Sitting — Behrens, Schneller. 

Second Row — Hauser, Radek, Mahan, Goodreau, Kruslak, Doherty, Clark, 

CONLIN. 

Bottom Row — Fealey, Werner, Jurgenson, Burke, LaViolette, G. Cleary, 
Frank, O'Donnell. 



Page one hundred fifty-five 



msmmmmmmmmm 



((g \il^^i^;^^(^j^^gfe:s^^.^g:^ 




Cecelia Ohnesorg 



THE CLASS OF 1930 

Cecelia Ohnesorg, President 

RosANNE Rowan, Vice-President 

Celeste Kirn, Secretary 

Louise Takes, Treasurer 




".^fe^^^^...._ 



.^^f^^^^^^g^^^^gagv^jgM?^^ 




THE FRESHMAN MERCY NURSES 

Top Row — KXOTT, KUBECK, VOGEL, SCHROEDER, McGoVERN, McInTYRE, DaN- 

MEYER, Barry. 

Fourth Row — Carroll, Shaunnessy, Powen, O'Brien, LaP.ado, Legris, Dunn. 

Third Row — Lingford, Kirn, Conner, Miller, Heiser, KLane, Holmquist. 

Sitting — Shiner, McGarry, Doubeck, Niggeman. 

Bottom Row — Ohnesorg, Becker, Schilling, Matthews, Fitzpatrick, Rooney, 
Fenton. 



Page (Hie /iimdrcd fifly-seven 



^^^m^^^^^j^mmmm^^mm^m.--^ 



^ 



^( ^m^mmm^^^^^^mmm^, .... ..^jmmmmmmmmm^mf ^ 



The Hospital Building 

ST. BERNARD'S HOSPITAL 

FAREWELL 

To you, our graduates of the class of 1928, the Sisters of St. Bernard's Hospital 
e.xtend a message of deep appreciation and affection. It seems only a day since your 
class, eager and full of enthusiasm, entered the portals of St. Bernard's, with, but one 
thought m mind, that of becoming true nurses in word and in deed. And now as you 
stand on the threshold of the accomplishment ot your first ambition, your Alma 
Mater re)oices with you that you have reached the goal of your endeavor. 

May the Christ-like spirit of charity and kindness, which has distinguished you 
during your days with us, continue. May you be true, loyal nurses with a sublime 
trust in God and in Mary your Mother. May you live to see the fulfillment of 
your sincerest and noblest aspirations, and may your light shine forth in the splendor 
of good example, so that the world may see that you are better and nobler women 
for having sacrificed so many hours of pleasure in order to prepare to give to Christ's 
suffering ones a most perfect service. 

My Graduation day wish? 
Nay, rather a prayer: 
God guide thy footsteps everywhere; 
Bless the work of thy hands for Him; 
Grant that thy fair light may never dim; 
And set on thy forehead His seal divine. 
That the world may read His life in thine. 
And thou, in the peace earth cannot give 
Or take away, may thou forever live. 

Sister Helen J.arrell, B.S., R.N., 
Dean of St. Bernard's Schoo] of ?<lursing. 

Page one hundred fifty-eight 



'i:^. 



^ B^^^-^..,,^^;gp?^|g>sa|^^^t;a^gag^^ 



,^ 



.J^mM^jSiimm 




Breaking Ground and Dedication 



THE NEW NURSES^ HOME 

The Nurses' new home of St. Bernard Sehool of Nursing, now under eonstruction 
at 6?? 8 Harvard Avenue, Chicago, in conneetion with St. Bernard hospital, bids fair 
to be an architectural masterpiece of beauty and efficiency. 

Of gray Bedford stone with cream color pressed brick ends, enjoying a 100-foot 
frontage and 186-foot depth, it will offer training facilities and provide living quar- 
ters for two hundred student nurses. 

A stately patio, adorned with statues of St. Joseph and Jean Mance, will center the 
structure, while iron gates, uniquely wrought, will guard the entrance. 

The English basement will include dinmg rooms; rest, lockers, store and maids' rooms; ' 
fully equipped kitchen and laundry. 

On the main floor will be the administration desk; offices of the Dean and her assist- 
ant; reception rooms; and a postoffice with individual mail boxes. 

The second floor will include demonstration rooms, laboratories, diet kitchen and 
large auditorium with adjoining dressing room. 

The remaining five floors will be given over to living quarters, each student being 
provided with an artistically and comfortably furnished private room. A living room, 
sun parlor and general utility room will be included on each floor. 

With the dedication of the building on November 21, St. Bernard School of Nurs- 
ing will be equipped to ofl^er the highest type of training and living facilities to pros- 
pective students; and through its affiliation with Loyola university, will be unsurpassed 
among the institutions of the country for providing the three-year university training 
course for nurses. 

Page one hundred fifty-nine 



^^^Mmmm^m^Mtmm^mm^mmm; 



'■^m^M^^mm^m. 



\^^ 



mi 




Geraldine Elizabeth Quinn 



THE CLASS OF 1928 

Geraldine Elizabeth Qltxx, President 
Esther Mary Buck, Vice-President 
Nellie Therese Harris, Secretary 
Lucille Virginia Bane, Treasurer 




Harris 



Bane 



Buck 



Page one hundred stxt^i 



m Emm^mmmm^^mm wm^. 



n^^^^^m^ 




Seniors in An Anxious Moment 



THE GRADUATES 



Mar\ Therese Ryan 

Like nppling water, cheerful and gay. 

She likes to work as well as to play. 
Mary Josephine McGowan 

The true personification of a sweet 

"Irish Rose." 
K-athleen Patricia Walsh 

She has a lilting brogue, and a sweet 
smile, 

Ever endearing, constantly cheering. 
Margaret Grace Farley 

She's a comrade and a pal — 

Stalwart, staunch, and true. 
Esther Mary Buck 

A tall, serious girl to the casual 
view — 

But a very close glance shows she has 
a merry side, too. 
Frances Therese Buck 

Eyes of piercing brown, they laugh at 
you. 

And can scold, too, before you turn 
around. 
Geraldine Elizabeth Quinn 

One sees not half the charms 

Her downcast modesty conceals. 
Stephanie Mary Stojkowski 

Very, very small, it is true — 

But not in mentality — as her class- 
mates know. 



Lucille Virginia Bane 

A cheerful composition of humor, 
good nature, and ability to keep 
smiling. 
Helen Cecelia Keane 

"She's different, yes," — you seem to 

say. 
That's why she makes a pal for sun or 
shady day. 
Nellie Therese Harris 

Like a deep lake — as you're wont to 

find- 
In the deepest depths a true blue 
shines. 
Rosina Marie Grouette 

A very good nurse, a fine artist, too — 
As her painting and fancy work prove 
to you. 
Mary Ellen Moloney 

Saying little; thinking much. 
Mary Rose Dowling 

A witty, petite, curly-headed blonde, 
With a host of friends from her en- 
trance day on. 
NoRVA Virginia King 

Our one and only Titian in a Class 
numbering sixteen. 
Anne Mary Hopkins 

A quiet, ever-ready, diligent friend 
and nurse. 



Page one hundred sixty-one 



^^^mM^^mMmmmmmmmmmm: 



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Martha Mary Cassidy 



THE CLASS OF 1929 

Martha Mary Cassidy, President 

Eleanor Anne Bussan, Vice-President 

Bess Ethel Kelley, Sucmary 

Emily Anne Deksnis, Treasurer 




Kelley 



Bussan 



Deksnis 



Inindrcd stxt\-two 



S4k 



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Top Roi 



THE JUNIOR ST. BERNARD'S NURSES 
-Lamphear, Bussan, Schaefer, Deksnis. 



Bottom Row — Birch, Dore, Hennessy, Reading, Kelley, Neu, Quinn, Wolff, 
Donegan, Henry, Peski, Dunning, Fenton, Oldham, Cassidy. 



Page one hundred sixty-three 



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.-.^ 



S: 



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^EME«I^^^^ 




Alice Ruth McAllister 



THE CLASS OF 1930 

Alice Ruth McAllister, President 
Helen Virginia Lampke, Vice-President 
Gertrude Celeste Stanton, Secretary 

Mary Agatha Schwartz, Treasurer 




Schwartz 
Page one hundred sixty-four 



Stanton 



Lampke 



^ ^ m^^^^^^mBi^mmmm^w ^''^^^':^ ''^mmmmm^ ^ 




THE FRESHMAN ST. BERNARD'S NURSES 

Top Row — HiLSABECH, Sarossy, Lehmann, Corkery. 

Third Row — Gurrister, Lampke, Evans, Gilsinc;er, McAllister, Kelly, Harri- 
son, Dickinson. 

Second Row — RussELL, Miller, Lynch, McGovern, Anderson, Dudech, Shimy, 

GUTTMAN. 

Bottom Row — DeGuide, Schwartz, Stanton, Kennedy, Rivord, Flynn, 

SCHROEDER. 



Pdj^e (me hundred sixty-fiue 



mMmm ^mm^mm^^mm^ m 




^tsmmmmmmmmmmmY ^ 




Daniel A. Laughlin, President 
LOYOLA UNIVERSITY ALUMNI 

The Loyola University Alumni Association has completed another successful year. 
The activity indicates clearly that the graduates have continued to take a keen inter- 
est in the progress, expansion and development of their Alma Mater. 

More members of the organization were kept constantly informed of the affairs of 
Loyola through the medium of the Loyola J^ews. The result has been great coopera- 
tion for everything the alumni have undertaken. 

The Homecoming, which is always one of the big events for the old grads, was the 
occasion of a large turnout. The game which was played between Loyola and DePaul 
at the Cubs park opened the celebration and then a large number of members of the 
association joined in the Homecoming dance held in the evening. Each year Loyola's 
Homecoming is coming to mean more and more. With the continued efforts of the 
association the time may not be far distant when Loyola will have the kind of Home- 
coming characteristic of a university of its size. 

This year offered an, especially good opportunity for the alumni to aid the univer- 
sity through supporting the testimonial banquet given in honor of Father Kelley. The 
affair drew a large number of graduates who aided materially in making the evening 
a success. 

The officers of the alumni arc Daniel A. Laughlin, president: James R. Bremner, first 
vice-president; Malachy Foley, second vice-president; and George A. Lane, secretary. 




Bremner 

Pa^e one hundred sixty-six 



Foley 



Lane 




Helen Ganey, Presidfiu 

LOYOLA UNIVERSITY ALUMNAE 

The story of the Alumnae finds its beginning in the founding of the School of Sociol- 
ogy by Father Siedenburg in 1914. The iirst class of this school organised in October, 
1915, the Loyola University Alumnae Association. From this small nucleus has grown 
the large organization of the present day, including in its membership the women from 
the various departments of the university. 

The activities of the association began last May when the annual card party was 
held in the Congress hotel. The proceeds were used to establish the seventh scholar- 
ship for the training of social workers in the School of Sociology. 

One of the outstanding activities in which the Alumnae Association participated 
was the testimonial banquet held in honor of Father Kelley, at which time he made 
his inaugural address to the entire university. A large number of the members of the 
association were present as a mark of respect to the new president and to show their 
interest in the activities of the university. 

Each year new activities are undertaken by the association. In the short time it has 
been in existence it has become a valuable asset to the university and has given finan- 
cial aid to many projects as well as it has supported whatever has been undertaken. 
As the number of women graduates increase each year so, too, does the Alumnae Asso- 
ciation increase. 




Mary Kelly 



Marie Kelly 

Page one hundred sixty-seven 



'^^^^^msiM 



The Garden at Mero 




Pdgc one hundred sixty eight 




First Place on our own Chronology oj Events goes lo the intrepid Seniors of '27. clambering 
m !ate to Friday Chapel. Then. Father Mertz saying fareiiieli to them on Senior Day at the 
?\[orth Campus. All this happened in the Spring oj '27, shortlv after the Flood. And then we 
have Mr. Steggert as the central figure, in the very select company of Father Seidenherg, Mr. 
McCormich and others. 



Page 



'iiindred sixtvnine 




up in seventh heaven we have the eminent Fran\ Lodse/^i a'isfiiiig the new Student Council 
good hicl{. To his left the Sodality Conference is iii session. Then, centralis', are our wander- 
ing debaters, giuing the air a rest and looking over Cincinnati in the corapanv of Father Meehan. 
Eddie Gilmore is leading the Idst Senior parade out of Chapel. Then, beloic, oiir ou'n Pii:.;,le 
Commencement Picture. Trv and find your friend in the rn-ob. 

Page one hundred seventy 




Came Vacation, and. One: Some oj the boys out of class drop into Tia ]uana. Two: A bunch 
of the elite about to go into solution. Three: The same thing all over again, with a rear view 
of the editor of this volume. Matt Sanders tastes the wide open spaces in number Four. Five: 
Agricultural student u'ith fine specimen. Six: Bill, Len and Fran\: the Traction Trio. 



Page one hundred seventy-one 




Registration day, which was good and warm, is heautijuUy personified all over this page. 
Weinrich is holding on and we thin\ Doheny is writing to Rosary. The wide e\<ed frosh is in 
the throes of an initial interi'ieu' with the Dean, while Bertram and Susie chec\ the lads in. 
The football squad in tlieir Coopers express tlie lieat. as does Preston in liis plus eights. 'The 
exodus from the gym too\ place on Freshman Day. 

Page one hundred seve7it_v-tuio 




T^umber one presents Loyolans au naturel, in the first pep meeting oj the year The intimate 
snap centrally located turns out to he nothing m.ore sophisticated than the cross country team in 
its first meet. The first outdoor orgy of the Loyola Band occupies the lower outlay of in\, 
Maestro Graciano at baton. 



Page one hundred seventwthree 




The Sodality School brought the faU inrush of femininity to the Cdjnpus. These girls used to 
he strangers. Then, the first appearance of the Class of '28 in caps and gowns. In the loicer 
part are a few late comers to the Retreat, covertly watching for the Registrar. 



Page one hundred seventyfour 







With the opening of the footbal! season St. Lows U brought its band as our guests, h loo\ed 
good. There's a difference between Soldier's Field and our Pine Boiul. as the pictures show, 
but football is the same game everywhere. And then assembiies began their regular wee\ly 
occurrence. 

Page one hundred seventy-five 




\Mnk 




Approaching exams mean crowded laboratories, and a heavy rush to the Ubrary. .\o, the boys 
are not catching tip on lost sleep right now. Beloic, just after the carnage of quizzes. Fees 
for re'examinations are piled in sac\s in the corner. 



Page one hundred seventy-six 




Billious Bill Rafferty, Judge Jim Uctavius O Connor and "Sport" Carpenter furnish the 
comic relief in the T'exthoo\ Trial after exams. The two. pic\eting personages are all het up 
over a restaurant's indiscretion and use the center of the page to tell a gaping world about it. 
Below, the Tournament. A few boys from out of totun, wide-eyed at the sights. And this 
closes our chronology. 

Page one hundred seventy-seven 




uppermost we have preliminary flourishes to an Irish di^erence of opinion, in two piles. 
Summer Time, and a duet of 'M.orth Campusites u'ith vagabonding ivays collecting pemiants 
enough for a forty acre campus. Studies in facial expression (from life) show in this case that 
hut two out of five have it. 



Page one hundred seventy-eigfrt 







Another lab scene. Leo \new the photographer, so he's way out in front. Assembly again, 
all over the center. Spring term; spring fever; young men's fancy decidedly not on spea\er of 
the day. The bored equine below all this is carting a few of the other intelligentsia of the 
Medical School up and down Lincoln Street. 



Page one hundred seven-- 




A: Happy days at Brown's Lal{e. B; Rege. Kay and Rene giving passers by a break,- 
C: Two vitamized young things out on a tear. D: Ed Curley and Petos\ey's delegate to 
Atlantic City. E: Larry and Fran\ 171 purloined garments, acti7ig demagogic. F: Ada May 
helping Rosary to l{eep its place in the sun. G: Jo/in s)iou'i7ig Red hoii' it's done. H: Evi- 
dently the water is cold. Harry. I: Thirty, Lotie. 

Page 07ie hundred eighty 






F: Summer. Swan at Sunrise. Terpsichore. Anything. O: Bill and doggy outlay of cilia. 
B: Fair thing smiling for you, dear readers, all for subscription price. C: The old stalled car 
gag again. O: Tom, A!. Jim and Co. on location. D; The Boxer Rebellion, in pictures. 
R: Father Scott chec\s in. F: Cos, Ken and Bill shiver for Alma Mater. D: Father Reiner 
has the last word. 

Page one hundred eighty-one 








I: Fran}[ Hdley, ladies and gent/cmen.' II: Do 
burg has something to fall back, on. IV : Coyne 
and Paul blinking serenely. VI: Dave gives lis 
cla.'.ses. Vlll: Collis. all set for an iniemotioiidi 
for our cameraman. 

Page one hundred eig/ity-ttuo 



n't believe the sign; tliev wor\ here. Ill: Dur- 
Auto School. Demonstration Class. V; Paul 
the once over. VII: Father Scott, betu'een 
date. IX: Miss Ryan very generously poses 



■"'<•.«-» ijnjLM 




First: Alice irt- Wonderland — pardon; the Library. Jvjext; Larry, editor of these notes, gives 
himself a hrea\, and jerry harangues about the injustice. Centrally: Doheny about to abscond. 
Weinrich and Schurr upholding public improvements and Walsh giving a cold shoulder. Below: 
V\/il\ins poses nicely, as does Sextro. but Father Ahearn is too busy with paramoecium to bother. 



Page one hundred eighty-three 



The Lake Shore Campus 




Page one hundred eightyfour 



PUBLICATIONS 




Page one hundred eighty five 



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Morton Dauwen Zabel 
Moderdtor of Pubhcatioiis 



Page one fiundred eighty-six 



©■ 



j^fflBmgsmB 




A WORD FROM THE MODERATOR 

As the college's magazine looks forward to the maturing and richer development of 
student observation and expression, and as its newspaper is concerned with the present 
record, so the year-book looks backward. It sees the year's work and diversion already 
surrounded by a glamor whose charm or significance' deepens with time. The staff of 
the present Loyolan may look back, not only with sympathy and delight, but with 
relief to difficulties overcome and a labor completed; not only to their own industiy 
but to the industry of predecessors whoi in five years have made of The Loyolan — as 
well as of J<iews and §jiarterly — a strong factor in a school's development, a lasting 
testimony to student ambition and enthusiasm, and a certain index to the serious pur- 
pose which must support an academic tradition and a university's name. Upon such 
zeal has gone into the building of these publications the hope of future editors and 
staffs must depend; theirs will be no longer a problem, wholly, of greater expansion 
and advances, but of living up to standards already secured and honored. 




m 



Page one hundred eighty-seven 



=SS 



,s^ 



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- :wm^mmmmmmm^km Y^: 




James C. O'Connor 
Editor-in-Chief 

THE LOYOLAN 

The 7'^i-neteen Twenty-Eight Loyolan marks the fifth volume of the book and in 
offering it to the readers the staff feel that they have to some extent profited by the 
experience of their predecessors, but realize that while the pioneering days of the 
book are over, still the accomplishments of the past are only the first milestones which 
indicate the road to the Loyolan of their dreams. 

The first two Loyolans owed their existence almost entirely to the efforts of the able 
faculty moderator, Mr. Zabel. It was not until the production of the 1926 volume 




CARPENTER He.^LY 

Page cue hundred t'ightv-ei;j,ht 



Bremner 



Gr.-\dy 



m. 



m^m . 



.aM^M 




that student initiative became evident in the production of the book. The staff that 
year, under the inspiration of Aloysius Bremner, worked to estabhsh the book on a 
sound basis, with a view toward building up an experienced and dependable staff. 
The fourth volume, edited by Thomas Byrne, built upon that foundation and the 
results were manifested by the increased size of the book, as well as by a greater per- 
fection in practically every department. The present staff, including many men 
trained by previous editors, has endeavored to carry on this work in a modest way, 
and still further to build for the future. 




Reed 



CONLEY 



Neary Bryant 

Page one hundred eighty-nine 



'^mmmmmmm 



l \m\%:^^^miM!m^M^^m^ME: 




STAFF OF THE H^HETEEH TWEHTT-EIGHT LOTOLAH 
Top Ron.) — Brady, Conley, Lee, McGuire, Bryant. 
Second Row — Ford, O'Hare, R. O'Connor, Reed, Mitsunaga. 
Bottom Row — Thomson, Carpenter, Zabel, J. O'Connor, Healy, Lietz. 

The mechanical improvements in this volume are evident at a glance. The intro- 
duction of color and the revision of the snapshot pages should meet with the hearty 
approval of all, while the index should prove a great convenience to the readers. The 
development of musical activities this year made possible the adding of a section de- 
voted to this phase of extra-curricular work. 

The members of the staff, a staff v^'hich the editor sincerely believes to be the best 
which ever graced Room 323, showed their merit by standing the test of a real blow. 
Morgan Healy, managing editor, after two brilliant years of service on the staff, was 
compelled to leave the Arts and Science department in February. The loss of Morg 
was a real challenge to the staff to uncover new men capable of filling his heavy duties 
and the way the staff responded showed their caliber. 

The loss was filled through the efforts of Willis Carpenter, who, although already 
heavily overburdened with work, took over the managing editor's duties and discharged 
them perfectly, while Morgan retained the functions of business manager. The filling 
of the hole left by Will's promotion from senior editor called for the real discovery 
of the season when Jimmy Bremner showed that basketball is by no means the only 
thing he can do and do well. 

Joe Grady as photography editor and John Bryant as fraternity editor, both men 
new to the stafl^ and both confronted with disagreeable tasks, discharged them so excel- 
lently as to merit the commendation and the thanks of the entire student body. The 
work of James Neary of the Commerce department is deserving of special mention. 
From the sophomore class, in many respects the backbone of the staff, came four splen- 
did workers. William Conley proved himself outstanding in this field, as in his many 
other lines of endeavor. Robert Thomson, Richard O'Connor and Paul E. Reed may 
well look forward to a great future on Loyola's publications, if this year's work is any 
indication of their quality. To all the rest of the staff, too numerous to mention indi- 
vidually, and especially to ever-ready freshman assistants, the editor extends his hearty 
thanks and appreciation for their self-sacrificing efforts. 

James C. O'Connor. 

Page one hundred iiinetji 



mm^m^mi 



^j^i 



mP^ 



':mmm^. 




In Room 32? 

STAFF OF THE NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT LOYOLAN 

James C. O'Connor Editor-in-Chief 

Willis M. Carpenter Managing Editor 

Morgan T. Healy Business Manager 

Joseph W. Grady Photography Editor 

James X. Bremner Senior Editor 

Paul Lietz, Pastor P. Nagar Art Editors 

SECTION EDITORS 

William H. Conley Administration, Forensics, Religious 

John J. Bryant Fraternities 

Richard O'Connor Dramatics 

Paul E. Reed Society 

William J. Colohan Athletics 

Neal McAuliffe Football 

Robert Thomson Basketball 

Joseph Kearney Minor Sports 

George Ohlheiser Musical Activities 

Robert E. Lee Satire 

Lawrence Crowley Loyola Life 

David Mitsunaga Snapshots 

DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES 

Hugh A. O'Hare Medicine 

Edward McGuire Day Law 

John J. Coffey Everiing Laiv 

James A. Neary Commerce 

FRESHMAN ASSISTANTS 
Charles Brady Paul Diggles Frank Quinn 

John Brunn John Lannon Robert Rafferty 

Charles Cuny Paul O'Connor Anthony Tomczak 

Page one hundred ninety-one 



^[i^^^'^Eim^^s^^ss^^mj :^ ^^^^^^ 




Willis M. Carpenter 

Ednor-in-Chief 

THE LOYOLA QUARTERLY 

June hniught to a close Volume XXV of the Loxola ^narteri\, and spelled finale 
to the attempts of several students to write without splitting' their infinitives. The 
Quarterly is the one publication at Loyola which admits of some sort of leisurely 
writing, and if one were to judge by the tardiness with which some contributions are 
submitted we would say far too leisurely. Despite this handicap the Quarterly 
rounded out a year of some achievement — which alleviates the feeling of regret one 
experiences upon contemplating the crushed hopes and ambitions with which one 
sets out upon a new undertaking. 




R.AFFERTY 

Page (Die hundred ninfty-two 



Ke.xting 



R.\Y 



((0?yBBigg ai«s«ifc 




^^'^ 



»^' 



.^»*'; 




The Quarterly inaugurated its "27-'28 career with a new color combination which 
apparently met the approval of all — none registering a contrary vote. Long before 
the iirst issue made its appearance, announcement had been made that a new depart- 
ment would be a feature of this year's literary magazine. Due to this startling proc- 
lamation the editors were forced to rack their brows for something more or less novel, 
and as a result of their profound meditations the Coffee-House, a section composed 
of short informal essays, found room in the pages of the §j.Mrterly. 

The other sections of the magazine, articles, books, dramatics, and exchanges were 
handled with customary skill and zeal. William Rafferty, managing editor, George 
Ray, business manager, John Keating, exchange editor, John Waldron, literary editor, 
Charles Stimming and Harold Hillenbrand, dramatic editors and William Conley, 
secretarial assistant, ever presented themselves as willing and anxious to sacrifice per- 
sonal convenience for the general welfare of the book. To them the editor of this 
year's Quarterly owes a debt of gratitude, and he, for one, deeply appreciates their 
work. Any success the Quarterly may have enjoyed in the year just passed is in no 
small measure due to the splendid cooperation, ability, and interest of the faculty 
moderator, Mr. Zabel. The editor and the staif unite in expressing their sincere grati- 
tude for and appreciation of his labors. Willis M. Carpenter.' 






Conley 



Waldron 



Stimming 

Page one hundred ninety-three 



-^ 



m^mm^mm^mmmmm '' 



w^ 



mmmmmm>mr% 




Ambrose B. Kelly 
Editor-m-Chief (First Semester) 

THE LOYOLA NEWS 

The year 1927-1928 has seen a new era of development for the Loyola Klews. 
Under the direction of faculty moderator, Mr. Zabel, and editors Ambrose Kelly and 
J. Francis Walsh, the J\[ews rose to a position of esteem and envy among the Catholic 
publications of the country. There has been an admirable increase in features, adver- 
tising, and circulation. 

One of the greatest achievements of the paper during the past year was the ad- 
vancement of co-operation and familiarity between the departments, scattered in the 
various parts of the city. The news has become more generalized than has previ- 




White 

one hundred ninetyfour 



F. Con LEY 



Crowley 



(le; 




J. Francis Walsh 
Editor-in-Chief (Second Semester) 

ously been the case, and as a result more student readers have been enhsted from the 
many sections. The increase of departmental mterest was made possible mainly 
through the establishment of branch executive offices in the different schools. 

The Loyola J^ews has not been inactive in promoting activities other than those of 
an editorial character. The Fall Frolic at the Drake Hotel opened the social season 
in October, and served as a whirlwind usher. This event is an annual one and is 
sponsored each year by the Loyola 7\[eu',s; plans are already being laid for another 
Frolic next October. 

In the original platform of the Tsjews was embodied the aim of promoting ind 




W. CONLEY 



SCHOEN 



Hillenbrand 

Page one hundred ninety-five 



@ \lll^^i 



::mmms- 




Tup Row — Weinrich, Schurr, O'Brihn, Bruun, Doheny, J. Mlrphy, Spelmax, 

F. J. Walsh, Hillenbrand. 
Second Row — D. Murphy, Quinn, R. O'CoNXdR, Rafferty, Powers, Brady, 

Collins, Conley, Garrity, Mitsunaga. 
Bottom Rou; — Melody, White, J. F, Walsh, Zabel, Kelly, Stimming, Dina. 

encouraging athletics at Loyola. It was recognized that only a small number of the 
students were able to engage in the major sports due to lack of ability, spare time, or 
physical capability. In order that a greater number might enjoy and benefit by par- 
ticipation in athletics, the Tsjeios promoted a tennis tournament which was open to 
players from all sections. Last October the second annual tourney was held: Michael 
Pauly of the Law School and Paul Liets of the Lake Shore Campus were brought 
together in the final round after a number of rounds m which considerable material 
was unearthed for the varsity net squad. Pauly was the victor in the final battle and 
was awarded the trophy, a silver loving cup. 

Another tourney, one of a unique nature, was conceived and managed by the enter- 
prising managing editor, Frank) Conley, acting for the J\[ews. The Horseshoe tourna- 
ment was the sensation of the Lake Shore Campus, surprising the students with its 
novelty and simplicity. It drew over eighty entrants, a number exceeding the antici- 
pated list by approximately thirty-five men. At the conclusion the champion was 
awarded a gold watch fob as a trophy; the runner-up and winner of the consolation 
round were likewise granted rewards. 

Another item worthy of commendation was the Ho-Hurn book, published by Wil- 
liam Schoen, the entertaining promoter of the humor column in the TSfeirs. The 
book contained the best contributions of the year; it was the second issue of the pub- 
lication. The original Ho-Hum book, which appeared in 1927, was the first book of 
this character ever pubhshed by a college newspaper. 

Though this is but a short survey of the work accomplished by the l^ews during 

the past year, it may provide an insight into the progressive policies of the paper. The 

last of the original staff, — the band of men who brought the J^ews from a mimio- 

graphed sheet to its present size, — has turned over the paper to his successor. The 

present staff is well trained in editorial principles and is qualified to make the -Nen's 

what it deserves and is destined to be,- -the foremost Cathohc College weekly in 

America. , t? ^t r 

J. Francis Walsh. 

Page one hundred ninetysix 



{{''- 



:^^^mrii) 




Friday Afternoon 

STAFF 

J. Francis Walsh Editor-in-Chief 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 

Frank Conley Managing Editor 

Francis Melody Assistant Managing Editor 

Lawrence Crowley Sports Editor 

James Collins Assistant Sports Editor 

John Bruun Assistant Sports Editor 

Isobel Summers Sociology 

Harold Hilenbrand, Paul Topel, Robert Lee, 

Leo Latz West Campus 

James A. Neary, John Cavanauch, Harry Van 

Pelt Doivntown College 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

John White Business Manager 

Frank Doheny Advertising Manager 

G. Weinrich Assistant Advertising Manager 

John O'Brien Circulation Manager 

FEATURES 

HO'HuM William Schoen 

Inquiring Reporter Paul O'Connor 

Exchanges Howard Shurr 

Editorial Chairman WiHiam H. Conley 

REPORTERS 
Harold Gilbert, Edward Sheehan, George Hilen- 
brand, Daniel Murphy, Richard O'Connor, Frank 
Quinn, Robert Rafferty, Richard Shanahan, 
John Powers, Thomas Spelman, Anthony 
Tomczak, Robert Curley, Edward Dowling, 
Frank Walsh, William Conley. 



hundred ninety-seven 



f ^mmM^mm ^^^Mi^mm. 




OTHER PUBLICATIONS 

Besides the three major pubhcations of the university, there are a number of others 
of varying types. Of these the most important are Delia Strada, the Students' Hand- 
hoo\, the Bur, the Dentos, the Ho Hum Boo\, the Loyola Educational Digest and the 
Loyola Educational Index. 

Delia Strada is a monthly newspaper pubHshed by Father Mertz, in the interests of 
the chapel drive. It gives information about the progress of the work, the schedule 
of future events, and every issue contains a message from Father Mertz in his inimit- 
able style. It is circulated among all friends and patrons of the Madonna Delia Strada 
Chapel. 

The Students' Handboo\, edited by John Waldron, made its first appearance at the 
Arts and Science department last September. It contains the features of a guidebook 
with an instruction manual for the new student, giving information about the college, 
its traditions, etc., and also giving all the necessary information about scholastic and 
disciplinary regulations. It appeared under the auspices of the Student Association, 





Page one hundred ninety-eight 






m^^- 



(^ 




and was circulated around many different universities of the country. At this time 
over three hundred and fifty complimentary notices have been received regarding it. 

The Ho Hum Boo\ appeared last spring, under the auspices of the Loyola 'H.ews, 
edited by William Schoen, "Will" of his famous column "Ho Hum," in the 'hlews. 
It consists of a compendium of the best contributions which appear in his column dur- 
ing the course of the yeai. 

The Dentos is the yearbook of the Dental department. It antedates the Loyolan 
by many years, though considerably smaller in size, and for a long time has been the 
medium by which the junior class essays to record the doings of a year at Harrison 
street. The Bur is the organ of the Dental alumni, published thrice yearly. It reflects 
the happenings among both alumni and students of the department. 

The Loyola Educational Digest and its younger brother, the Loyola Educational 
Index, are both edited by Dean Schmidt of the Graduate school. They give a resume 
of the educational periodicals of the current period. 





Page one hundred ninetynine 



l^^m 



The Cradle of Publications 




Page two liU7idred 



FORENSICS 




Page two hundred one 






j(r^\ \ fffh^hMiili\\li^y^f^s\>^ffJ<^i:^j^^ 



^ ^^mm^mm c^l 



m^^^\ 




L.^ 



Charles S. Costello 
Coach 0/ DAaU, Director of Dramaucs 



Page two hundred tu'o 



n, ^^ 



d^ 



A WORD FROM THE COACH 

It has been my pleasure and pride the past two years to have been associated with 
two of Loyola's distinctive activities, debating and dramatics. I am happy that this 
opportunity is given me to express myself in the Loyolan that I may tell the student 
body why I think the Loyola Debating Club and the Sock and Buskin Club have been 
successful organisations. 

When I came to Loyola in 1926, I found two unique groups of students; each 
group possessing intelligence, ambition, character, loyalty, the firm desire to improve 
themselves and to serve their university. I found in these groups students who were 
reliable, honest, sincere and anxious for betterment. With beginning, they w/ere ever 
ready and eager to go forward. They responded wonderfully to suggestions, were not 
only willing, but anxious to assume responsibilities and carry them through. Their 
ideals have been high, the spirit of self-sacrifice permeated each group. Success for 
them has not been measured by the number of decisions won in- their debates, nor 
the kind nor the bigness of the parts assigned to them in their plays, but by the man- 
ner and spirit in which these things were done. This is why I think the Loyola Debat- 
ing Club and the Sock and Buskin Club have been successful. I am proud to say 
that the students, members of these organisations, have done this work themselves; 
they have led the way to victory, making wholesome contributions to the good name 
of their university and in return receiving in experience incomparable service for 
themselves. 



Page two hundred three 



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James C. 0"C(innor 
President 

THE LOYOLA UNIVERSITY DEBATING CLUB 

A record'breaking intercollegiate schedule, a four thousand mile trip through the 
West, the spreading of the name of Loyola throughout the city by means of the semi- 
public debates, and greatest of all, the fact that every man who stuck to his work at 
debating got practical experience in speaking before public audiences: those are the 
reasons why the Loyola Debating Club points to the season of 1927-28 as unques- 
tionably its greatest. 

The Loyola Debating Club is the oldest active organization on the campus, although 
it has completed but two years in its present efficient form. In the days of St. Ignatius 
college on the West Side, when it was known as the Chrysostonian Society, it flour- 
ished for a period almost as old as the college's existence. Later on, under such 
names as the Loyola Oratorical Association, or the Debating Society, it kept up a 
rather half-hearted existence during that period when forensic activities seemed 
doomed to utter extinction. 

The turning of the tide occurred in September, 1926, when, with the brilliant Robert 
Hartnett as president, and the new coach, Charles S. Costello, first taking command, 
the club was completely reorganized, a written constitution put into effect, the present 
name adopted, a workable financing plan approved, and the student officers given 
complete control. With this foundation, the debaters of '27 started the great work 




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James M. Cullinan 
Manager of Debates 

which the present administration has sincerely tried to carry on. Adoption of expert 
critic judging, expansion of the intercollegiate schedule, and the starting of the splendid 
work of the semi-public debates were the greatest accomplishments of the first year of 
the club's new life. 

The loyal cooperation of the officers and the coach was unquestionably the greatest 
factor in the success of this year. Frank Doheny as secretary and John Keating as 
treasurer both fulfilled their duties to the last minute detail, while Frank Haley, vice- 
president, was ever ready to lend his aid when needed. James Cullinan's work as 
manager is readily seen in the intercollegiate schedule, while Richard Ford, holding the 
thankless position of program chairman, did his work so splendidly that he was the 
overwhelming choice of the members to be their president for next year. So much has 
been said before in praise of Mr. Costello, that the writer feels helpless in attempting 
to add anything to it; all he hopes is that at some other time in his life it will be his 
privilege again to be as closely associated with this talented coach, and better yet, this 
inspiring leader who, more than anyone else, has made Loyola debating a success. 

James C. O'Connor. 




Top Row — Reed, Conley, Crowley, P. O'Connor, Walsh. 
Second Row — Grant, Spelman, Bruun, Quinn, Boyle. 
Third Row — Ray, Doheny, J. O'Connor, Keating, Ford. 



Page two hundred five 



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J. O'Connor 



Ford 



Ray 



Con LEY 



THE SEASON 



In order that members of the debating squad might concentrate their efforts it was 
decided at the beginning of the season that the national Pi Kappa Delta question 
would be used exclusively in intercollegiate debates. The question selected this year 
was "Resolved, That the United States Cease to Protect by Armed Force the Capital 
of Its Citizens Invested in Foreign Countries Except After a Formal Declaration of 
War''. As soon as the question was decided upon all members of the club who wished 
to try out for places on the team held a contest at which time they were called to 
speak on either the affirmative or the negative of the question. The men who partici- 
pated in this work and comprised the squad for the season were James C. O'Connor, 
George K. Ray, Richard Ford, William H. Conley, John Keating, Charles Boyle, 
Gerald Grant, Wilhs Carpenter, and Paul E. Reed. 

The iirst intercollegiate debate of the season was held on February 16th, Loyola 
upholding the affirmative against the University of Detroit. The contest was a no- 
decision debate and George Ray and William Conley represented Loyola. The next 
encounter, on March 6th, was with Northwestern university, in which James O'Con- 
nor and William Conley upheld the affirmative. This was officially a no-decision 
debate but the audience was unanimous in favoring the Loyola men. On March 8th 
George Ray and John Keating took the negative against Northwestern in a debate 
broadcast over Radio Station WIBO. 

The old forensic rival, St. Xavier, met the Loyola men on March 9th. This was 
the first decision debate of the year. William Conley, Richard Ford and James O'Con- 
nor upheld the affirmative. Professor Castille of Northwestern judged the contest 
and, after commenting that the decision v.'as exceptionally close, awarded it to the 
Cincinnati speakers. 



While 



section of the western trip was in progress the Lhiiversity of Buffalo 



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DOHENY 



Boyle 



engaged Loyola on March 16th in the third home debate. John Keating and WiUiam 
Conley, speaking for Loyola, defended the negative and were awarded the decision. 
Shortly after this debate the second squad left on the southwestern trip. In spite of 
the shortage of regular men in Chicago two home debates were held during this 
week, one with St. Louis university on March 20th and one with McMurray college 
of Abilene, Texas, on March 22nd. In the St. Louis debate Gerard Grant and Charles 
Boyle in upholding the affirmative before the Optimists' Club were defeated on an 
audience decision. The debate with McMurray college was a no-decision contest 
held before the Rogers Park Kiwanis Club, in which Frank Doheny and Paul E. Reed 
represented Loyola. 

The last home debate of the season was held with St. Viator's college on March 29th 
and was given before the students of Rosary college. George Ray, William Conley, 
and James O'Connor defending the negative won a critical decision which was given 
by Professor Castille of the School of Speech of Northwestern university. The same 
evening Charles Boyle and Paul E. Reed went to Bourbonais and lost the affirmative 
against St. Viators. 

A survey of the season substantiates the claim that Loyola had one of the most 
successful teams in its forensic career. Of particular interest is the fact that the ad- 
ministration took a definite step toward the policy of non-decision debates, which were 
found to be perfectly satisfactory to all parties concerned and which aided greatly in 
promoting friendly relations between the schools. The dropping of the old policy of 
asking and paying honoraria made possible the expansion of the schedule and the con- 
sequent opening of relations with many hitherto utterly foreign schools. 

Whether there was a decision or not, and regardless of how it was rendered, the 
Loyola speakers always won the admiration and applause of all concerned for their 
skill in speech and their conduct on and off the platform. The university has received 
many letters from schools which they visited mentioning this fact, a circumstance 
which bears vivid testimony to the training and influence of Coach Costello. 



Page two hundred seven 



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Farthest West — Idaho Sprikcs, Colorado 
THE WESTERN TRIP 

The clim.ix (if the greatest forensic season Loyola has ever known was the 4,000- 
mile trip through the West, made by six members of the Loyola Debating Club be- 
tween March 12 and 26th. It was the first time in Loyola history that a trip even 
approaching this in extent had, been made and its successful consummation aroused 
interest in debating among the students to a new high level. 

The trip was divided into two sections, James O'Connor, George Ray, and Manager 
James Cullinan, who arranged the trips, leaving Chicago on the evening of March 
12th. The Pi Kappa Delta question, or a variation thereof, was used in all the con- 
tests, the home team being allowed choice of sides. 

Sioux City, Iowa, was the first stop on the itinerary, Morningside college provid- 
ing the opposition on March 13th. The following day the Loyola men journeyed to 
Fremont, Nebraska, and were very hospitably entertained by Midland college. After 
an afternoon debate and a reception, the debating Ramblers boarded the Columbine 
that evening and at noon on March Hth arrived at Denver. 

Denver proved the high-water mark of the trip, both from a forensic and from a 
social viewpoint. The Lhiiversity of Denver chapter of Phi Kappa fraternity took 
the Loyolans as their guests and did not allow them an idle moment during their 
three-day stay. Drives through the mountains, a reception by a local Catholic high 
school and a St. Patrick's Day dance were among the forms of entertainment pro- 
vided by the hosts, with the enthusiastic assistance of Father O'Heron of St. Francis 
de Sales church. 

On March 15th, the first debate on the split-team plan was held with the L'niver- 
sity of Denver at Manual high school. Under this plan, O'Connor and Ray, wnth 
partners from Denver, were pitted against each other. So well was the debate received 
that the Loyola men were asked to repeat the following night, and appeared before 
East Denver high school. The following evening, Saturday, March 17th, occurred 
the most unique event of the season — a quadrangular debate. 

Oregon State college, Marquette university, the University of Denver and Loyola 
participated in this debate, one speaker representing each school. For Loyola, O'Con- 
nor teamed with Avin Sable of Marquette on the affirmative. The debate was held 
in the centrallv-Iocated Women's Club of Denver and was attended by a very large 



Page two hundred nylit 



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LOYOLA VERSUS ST. XAVIER 
O'Connor Ford Conley Cullinan Quill McGrath Doyle 

audience, which tciok an active part in the open-forum discussion which followed. 
Before the debate the Denver chapter of Tau Kappa Alpha Debating Fraternity ten- 
dered the four teams a banquet at which fellowship of the highest order predominated. 

After a rousing farewell breakfast by their splendid hosts, and a visit of good will 
to Regis college, the Loyola debaters regretfully left Denver the following noon and 
arrived, at Omaha on March 19th. After spending the day in recreation, they met 
Creighton university that evening before Thomas Jefferson high school in Council 
Bluifs, and the following morning again boarded the Columbine, arriving home that 
evening. 

The second section of the trip began on March 18th when William Conley, Richard 
Ford, and John Keating left Chicago on the Missionary Limited for Wichita, Kansas. 
The following evening Messrs. Keating and Ford upheld the negative of the Pi Kappa 
Delta question, which was the question debated on every occasion. The debate was 
held with Friends university and the critical decision of Professor HefFelfinger was 
awarded to Friends. The following afternoon Conley and Ford encountered South- 
western college m a no-decision contest. After an evening spent with the debaters 
from Southwestern the Loyola squad boarded a midnight train for Kansas City. 

On Wednesday afternoon Conley and Ford met the University of Kansas in the 
Xavier auditorium at St. Mary's college, Leavenworth, by invitation of the latter insti- 
tution. Loyola defended the negative and was a unanimous decision by the three 
judges. The debate was enthusiastically received by a large audience composed of 
the students of St. Marys, the bishop of Leavenworth, a large number of priests from 
surrounding towns, and many residents of Leavenworth. Following the debate the 
senior girls entertained the debaters from both institutions. Both squads then returned 
to Lawrence, from where the Loyola men left on the following morning for St. Louis 
via St. Mary's college near Topeka. 

The last debate was held in St. Louis, on Saturday, March 24, in the auditorium 
of the St. Louis university school of law. Keating and Conley upheld the negative 
and were awarded the decision of the judges. On Monday morning, after having 
spent Sunday in getting acquainted with life at Florissant, the squad optimistically 
entered the club car of the Alton Limited and arrived home that evening. 

Page ti'jo hundred nine 



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Haley 



LrETZ 



Carpenter 



THE SEMI-PUBLIC DEBATES 

For the past two years a number of debates have been presented before the various 
Knights of Columbus Councils and Holy Name societies of the city. These debates 
have been known as semi-publics and have proved to be very popular. Through this 
means the Debating Club has not only become one of the best known forensic or- 
ganizations in the city but the honoraria received from these exhibition contests have 
aided materially in financing the club. A new type of audience listened to the semi- 
public encounters during the past year. On several occasions contests were held 
before the weekly luncheons of the Kiwanis and Lion Clubs. The members of these 
organisations have been very interested in the economic discussions presented by the 
debaters and the continuance of debating before these men will open a new and 
large field for the club in the coming year. 

The semi-public season was opened this year with a debate on the Mexican situa- 
tion held before the Holy Name Society of St. Thomas the Apostle parish. Richard 
Ford and William Conley opposed the present attitude of the United States govern- 
ment in dealing with Mexico while John Keating and Frank Doheny defended the 
administration. This was only one of many successful debates of the Mexican ques- 
tion. Similar debates were given before the LaFayette Council of the Knights of 
Columbus, and before the Glenola club of St. Ignatius Parish, the first women's club 
to entertain the Loyola debaters. 

In addition to the Mexican debate several other questions were otfercd to societies 
desiring entertainment. Probably the most popular question presented to Catholic 
audiences was whether or not Al Smith should be elected president. In these de- 
bates one team would bring up the usual stock objections to the popular New York 
governor while those men who were upholding him would attempt to answer them 
and at the same time give evidence to show Smith's ability to hold the office. James 
O'Connor, William Conley, Richard Ford, Willis Carpenter, Charles Boyle. Frank 
Haley, Paul Reed, and Paul Liet; were all active in discussing this question. One 

Ptigf two hundred ten 



^^ 




QUINN 



Bruun 



p. O'Connor 



of the largest audiences which ever hstened to a Loyola debate witnessed the Al 
Smith debate held before the Holy Name Society of Visitation parish. Other large 
audiences attended debates on the same question when it was presented before St. 
Jerome's and St. Columbanus's Holy Name Societies and before Father Setter's Coun- 
cil of the Knights of Columbus. Indications show that should Smith receive the 
nomination the Debating Club will be called upon for a number of discussions of the 
question, especially before Holy Name Societies and Councils of the Knights of 
Columbus. 

In addition to these two questions several debates were held on the Pi Kappa Delta 
question, which was used consistently in all inter-collegiate debates. This question 
was debated by varsity squad members before the Holy Name Societies of St. Bene- 
dict's and St. Maurice's parishes and was welcomed by the Kiwanians and Lions, 
for it dealt with present economic problems and brought before them reasons for 
and against the protection of property in foreign countries. 

The semi-public debates were presented before and after the inter-collegiate season 
by members of the regular teams. During the heavy season when the regulars were 
busy encountering other universities the reserves were given a chance to prove them- 
selves in these semi-publics. Through these contests much goodi material for the team 
was discovered. 

In addition to offering an opportunity to the reserves to get practical experience 
several freshmen were allowed to go out on semi-publics. Each year a problem comes 
up as to what the status of freshmen will be. The situation was solved to the satis- 
faction of all those interested this year when it was decided that freshmen must 
serve a period of probation for one semester before being admitted to the privileges 
of membership. At the beginning of the second semester in February three freshmen 
who had proved themselves faithful and earnest workers were admitted to the club. 
The men accepted were John Bruun, Paul O'Connor, and Frank Quinn. Following 
their admission these men were sent into a number of semi-public debates on the Al 
Smith question to give them experience and a chance to show their ability. 



Page two hundred ele 



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O'Connor Hartnett 



DOHENY 



Ray 



Naphix 



THE NAGHTEN DEBATE 

The debating season each year is brought to a close uath a contest to determine the 
outstanding member of the squad. All members of the Debating Club are eligible to 
enter the preliminary contest from which four men are chosen for the finals. The de- 
bater exhibiting the greatest forensic skill and ability is awarded a gold medal which 
is presented each year by Mr. John Naghten. 

Last year's Naghten debate was a fitting climax for the triumphant season of the 
cluh. The question, which was widely discussed at that time, was, "Resolved, That 
There Should be Compulsory Automobile Insurance in the State." The affirmative 
was upheld by Robert C. Hartnett and James C. O'Connor, while George K. Ray 
and Francis J. Naphm presented the case for the negative. Since all four men were 
widely experienced and possessed exceptional ability as orators the contest was a 
model debate. 

A large audience was present at St. Ignatius" Auditorium to witness the encoun- 
ter. Professor Berohheimer, Coach of Debate at Northwestern University, gave a 
critical decision of the debate in which he pointed out both the weaknesses and the 
strong points of each speaker. After carefully balancing these ■ points he decided 
that the affirmative had won the debate; and that Mr. Hartnett deserved the distinc- 
tion of receiving the coveted pri;e and the title of the champion debater of a champion 
te.un. 

Mr. Hartnett, the president of the club last year, was one of the dominant reasons 
for the success of debating at Loyola. Throughout his four years he had been active 
as a varsity debater and through his ability and leadership many contests were won 
from strong opposing teams. In being presented with the Naghten Medal he was 
given only the recognition he well deserved. 



two hundred ticelt' 



:^^^\S) 




William H. Conley 



THE HARRISON ORATORICAL CONTEST 

For many years past the Honorable Carter H. Harrison has awarded a gold medal 
to the champion orator of Loyola University. To determine the winner of the prize 
elimination contests are held in all the departments and the finalists compete in the 
Alumni Gynnasium before the North Campus students. 

The finals of the contest this year were held on March 7. Edward Ott, Charles 
Boyle, Gerard Grant, William Conley, and George Ray were the participants. The 
orations according to the instructions were to be on The Constitution. Father Henry, 
S.J., of Santa Clara University, judged the contest and awarded the Harrison medal 
to William H. Conley and second consideration to George K. Ray. 

Mr. Conley is a sophomore in the College of Arts and Sciences and is prominent 
in all the e.xtra-curricular activities of the North Campus and is outstanding in the 
forensic field. As a freshman last year he was a finalist in the freshman debates and 
also won a place on the varsity squad at the end of the year. This year he was 
one of the men composing the nucleus of the debating squad and made the south- 
western trip. Before coming to Loyola he was distinguished as a high school orator, 
having won the Wisconsin state championship and the Olbrich Medal four times. 

The winning oration pointed out the necessity of a constitution and showed that 
even though many oppose our fundamental law on the grounds that it is aniquated 
it is modern because the principles it guarantees are the same as they were from the 
beginning of time. In conclusion Mr. Conley made an eloquent appeal to increase 
love for and devotion to the constitution. 



^^^^^mEmmm^^m^i- 



two hundred thirteen 



Summer on the Campus 




two hundred fourteen 



DRAMATICS 




Page two hundred fifteen 







Raymond W. Kerwin, President 

THE SOCK AND BUSKIN CLUB 

Three years ago several energetie students of Loyola university deeided to have a 
play. They went up and down the halls gathering any reeruits who would take part 
m producing it. Barely enough people were found to do the necessary work; but 
enthusiasm was strong, everyone did his part, and the play was a decided success. 
From this encouragement, the ambitious little group recognized the possibility of reviv- 
ing one of Loyola's first outside activities, the Sock and Buskin Club. The name was 
derived from the characteristic costume of Athenian actors who fostered the drama 
in its infancy. The comedians were known by their high socks and the tragedians by 
their half sh<ies, or buskins. With such an appropriate name and so successful a pro- 
duction, the club quickly regained a foothold among the activities of Loyola. 

Early in October, at the first meeting of the Sock and Buskin Club for the scho- 
lastic year 1927-28, it was discovered that the membership had been sadly diminished, 
chiefly by graduation, and that the club was without a leader. Its existence seemed 
to waver until Ambrose Kelly was appointed temporary chairman. Mr. Kelly, in his 
usual vigorous manner, quickly renewed the spirit of the dejected group and the ideals 
and ambitions of the Sock and Buskin Club became once more the uppermost thought 
in the minds of its members. 

A short time later Raymond Kerwin, a senior medical student and an actor of no 
small talent, was elected president. An admirable combination was formed when Paul 
Lietz, of the Arts and Sciences department, was elected business manager of the Club. 
These two, each working to his own capacity, but both with perfect cooperation, 
proved to be the backbone of the club. Miss Alice McAuliff, as corresponding secre- 
tary, and Miss Virginia Barker, as recording secretary, were valuable oificers, the 
former in keeping the members from the various department in touch with the activi- 
ties of the club, and the latter in keeping a permanent record of the progress of the 
club and of the difHcultics encountered, as well as the method in which they were 
overcome. 

But the real life of the club is found m the little incidents which occur frequently 
Page tire liiiiidrcd .si.vteeii 



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Barker 



LlETZ 



McAuLIFF 



throughout the year. Perhaps the most outstanding worries and laughs occurred at 
Rosary college when the club produced "Captain Applejack." During the first act 
when the audience breathed in silent anxiety, awaiting every slow word that added 
to the mystery of the night, the hall was suddenly shaken, by a pistol shot from back- 
stage. The actors calmly went on as if they had not leaped from their socks. The 
policeman in the play, George Ray, had been examining his unloaded revolver when 
it accidentally went off, and incidentally gave him a bad powder burn. But in true 
Spartan fashion he appeared on the stage when his cue was called. Again, during 
the second act, as the wild pirate, Captain Applejack, threw his would-be assassin on 
the table to stab him, the table collapsed, much to the amusement of the Rosary girls. 
Then again, in the third act, during one of the spectacular fights, part of the scenery 
threatened to lie down and quit; but plucky stage hands talked it into finishing the 
evening in an upright position. Considering that the performance was gratis, not one 
could say that it was not worth the money, and everyone, including the actors and 
managing staff, enjoyed the "added attraction" that went with each act. Those were 
merely some of the things that make college life worth, remembering. The more con- 
venient equipment of the Goodman theatre prevented any such accidents when the 
finished production was given there on February 19th. 

The last play of the year, "Minick," was produced at the Goodman theatre on 
May 6th, too late to be recorded in this book. 

The club owes much of its success to the practical but artistically faultless direction 
of its coach and faculty advisor, Mr. Charles S. Costello. Mr. Costello's ability as 
a director of plays is well recognized throughout Chicago and the fact that he is the 
director of a play is a drawing card in itself. His popularity among Loyola students 
enables him to get the best possible results from them. 

RiCH.\RD O'Connor. 



Page two hundred seventeen 



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THE SOCK AND BUSKIN CLUB 

Tof> Row — Crowley, McGuire, Costello, Miller, P. O'Connor. O'Meara. 
Second Row — Bremner, Ford, R. O'Connor, Spelman, Kelly, Doheny. 
Bottom Row — Murphy, Barry, McAuliff, Kerwin, Fitzgerald, Hayde, Barker. 

ACTIVITIES OF THE SOCK AND BUSKIN CLUB 

One of the must entertainmL; customs ot the Club is that of securing dramatists 
and actors of note to speak, either before a private group or a public gathering. It 
is frequently most difficult to convince busy people that they will have an audience 
large enough and interested enough to make their time well spent. Yet every person 
approached has willingly agreed to grant the Sock and Buskin Club's wishes and the 
Club has thereby been able to offer some interesting and educational talks. 

The first talk of the year was that of Mr. Clayton Hamilton, playwright and dra- 
matic critic, before the regular assembly of the Arts and Sciences department in 
October. Mr. Hamilton is not an unfamiliar figure on the Lake Shore Campus, as he 
has frequently talked to groups in the past. His excellent description of dramatic 
personages and his clever explanation of some of the less obvious stage tricks and tactics 
were more than entertaining for everyone present. The enthusiasm with which his 
talk was discussed after the meeting was evidence of his popularity with the students. 

A few weeks later Mr. Thomas Stevens, manager of the Goodman Memorial Theatre, 
talked to the members of the Club at one of the meetings at the Downtown College. 
Mr. Stevens gave a brief resume of the history of the drama, explained many technical 
points of modern play production, and offered several suggestions which were later 
adopted by the Club. The talk was entirely informal throughout and consisted, at 
times, of actual conversation, in which many eager questions were asked. 

Shortly before the presentation of "Captain Applejack"". President Kerwin and Mr. 



Pd,'.je two i}uy\dred eighte 




THE HITCHCOCK TEA 

Left to Right — Raymond Kerwin, Kathryn Burnside, Charles S. Costello, 
Raymond Hitchcock, Alice McAuliff. 



Costello succeeded in arranging a tea at the City Club at which Raymond Hitch- 
cock and Kathryn Burnside, both of the cast of "Just Fancy," which was playing in 
the city at the time, were to be present. This gathering, too, was strictly informal. 
The two professionals talked freely, and the amateurs were wide-eyed and admiring. 
Before the afternoon was over, first names were being used and everyone was feeling 
very much at home. Mr. Hitchcock proved to be as amusing off the stage as on, and 
told a number of humorous stories concerning the actors with whom he had asso- 
ciated and the audiences he had entertained. Miss Burnside divulged her secret 
methods of getting a laugh out of a dry audience, and with such an accomplice asi 
Mr. Hitchcock one might well believe them unfailing. 

Another of the ideals of the Club wtis reached to some e.xtent this year when talks 
were given by members. Ambrose Kelly, who as a result of extended study and inves- 
tigation has, perhaps, a larger volume of information concerning the theatres of Chi- 
cago's Near North Side than any other student in the University, gave an interesting 
talk concerning them. He discussed each of the better known theatres, exposing the 
good and bad qualities individually. Mr. James C. O'Connor also delivered an enlight- 
ening talk on the community theatre. Mr. O'Connor is closely connected with the 
Loyola Community Theatre, as well as the Sock and Buskin Club. In his talk he 
told of his experiences and observations as a promoter of the Little Theatre Move- 
ment and the possibilities which are inherent in such a movement. 

The two talks were well received by the Club members and had the idea been intro- 
duced earlier in the year a great deal more might have been done along this line. 
The talks offer entertainment as well as education during the periods when plays are 
not being prepared and will undoubtedly be given more frequently next year. 

Page two hundred nineteen 



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:mm^:m^mmim^mmm:3M Y^} 




"Thursday Evening" 
THE ONE' ACT PLAYS 

An innovation was brought into the line of activities of The Sock and Buskin Club 
this year in the form of one-act plays. It has been the custom in former years to give 
only three-act dramas, but in view of the fact that there were so many new members 
who were inexperienced it was decided to give two one-act plays. In this type of 
play no one would be burdened with the heavy parts which are necessary to every 
longer drama, and the plays in themselves are of a hghter nature. The plays were 
directed by students who proved themselves oustanding actors last year. Thus, while 
the younger members were breaking into the work, the more mature were likwise 
developing themselves in another field. 

St. Ignatius Auditorium was the scene of the "Evening of Drama", as the atfair was 
called. The cooperation of the Glee Club was an added attraction. It appeared first 
with several popular numbers. With the assistance of "Tweet" Hogan's orchestra, a 
dance was held in another part of the auditorium as a conclusion to the program. 

The clever plot of "Thursday Evening" was carefully brought out by the able 
direction of Miss Theresa Stocker. A young married couple, Mr. and Mrs. Gordon 
Johns (Edward Garrity and Ruth Tcnnes), were just discovering the personality 
conflicts which are so common to married life. Mr. could not endure the way Mrs. 
let the cook be so careless and extravagant. Mrs. could not understand why Mr. 
would not cherish and worship the cup from which Junior had recently taken his 
first little drink. We wondered what student would take the part of Junior but it so 
happened that Junior was upstairs asleep while the action took place so we were 
disappointed. The husband and wife were beginning to get terribly unfriendly with 
one another when the wife's mother and the husband's father heard about it. They 



Page two hundred twenty 



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"Thank You, Doctor" 

determined to end the trouble by fighting between themselves, each in defense of his 
own child, and thereby reconcile them. After the play it was heard said that "those 
two old people (Wallace Anderson and Marie Tagney) sure had a swell scrap." 
We thought so too. Anyway, they succeeded in bringing the children back into each 
other's arms; all lived happily ever after, and Junior grew up and (we suppose) went 
to Loyola. 

Since "Thank You, Doctor," was somewhat more difScult to produce, two directors. 
Miss Virginia Barker and Norton O'Meara, were assigned to it. James P. Murphy 
was the M. D., a nerve specialist, supposedly having any number of maniacs hang- 
ing around his oiRce. A lady (Agnes Fitzgerald) came to see him about her brother 
who had a habit of talking about pearls someone had stolen from him and of accus- 
ing everyone of the theft. Before the consultation was completed, the doctor was 
called out of the room by the nurse (Margaret Hayde) . During the interval, a 
salesman (Aloysius Bremner) came into the ofiice with some pearls said to be ordered 
by the doctor's daughter. The lady immediately informed him that she was the 
doctor's daughter and took the pearls. A few mmutes later when the doctor returned, 
she introduced the salesman as her brother. Sensing trouble, the salesman quickly 
declared that he was not her brother and demanded the pearls. The doctor recog- 
nized the little mental defect displaying itself in the lady's "brother" and treated 
him as an insane man. Incidentally, the salesman was fearfully afraid of insane 
people. And one came in. It was incredible that a sane, serious minded, student 
hke Richard Ford could make such a perfect idiot of himself. However, when "Doc" 
Murphy was tying the salesman down, believing him insane, and letting his "sister" 
go out the door with the pearls, the insane man announced himself a detective in 
disguise and hauled the lady trickster off to the hoos-gow. 



Page two hundred twenty-one 



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"CAPTAIN APPLEJACK"' 

"Captain Applejack," the most difficult play the Sock and Buskin Club has ever 
undertaken to produce, was given at the Goodman Memorial Theatre on Sunday 
evening, February nineteenth, nineteen twenty-eight. The management of affairs 
was in the hands of a harassed few, the cast had but a short period in which to train, 
and the week of the play was crowded with other social events. Yet, withal, "Captain 
Applejack" was a success both dramatically and financially! 

On the Wednesday evening preceding the public performance, the play was enacted 
at Rosary College, River Forest, for the entertainment of the girls. Staging condi- 
tions made it difficult to produce this play on other than a well equipped stage and 
many of the effects were necessarily omitted. But the girls enjoyed the show and 
the members of the cast were grateful to Rosary College for permitting and encour- 
aging the performance. 

Sunday night, at the Goodman Theatre, the Sock and Buskin Club rendered a play 
of which it may well be proud. Norton O'Meara, as Ambrose Applejohn, alias Cap- 
tain Applejack, was a serene, elderly gentleman who felt that he had not had enough 
adventure and romance in his life. He had no sooner asserted his desires late one 
evening than, after a fashion of the devil, adventure and romance appeared. 

A vivacious Russian dancer, Anna Valeska, played by Margaret Hayde, sought 
shelter in his house from a mean Russian spy, Borolsky, played by Frank Doheny, 
who had followed her from Russia to England and intended to take her back. 
Ambrose succeeded in hiding her temporarily but Borolsky threatened to return and 
continue the search. Another pair of visitors, Mr. and Mrs. Pengard (Aloysius 
Bremner and Alice McAuliff) sought refuge from a motor accident that same night. 
They appeared quite friendly and Ambrose tried to sell them the house. He did not 
see them unlock the living room window. But soon their car was repaired and they 
left — to return when the family had retired. Ambrose was not so desirous of adven- 
ture as he had been earlier in the evening. Nervous Aunt Agatha (Mary Wingfield) 
merely got on his nerves. Lush, the butler (Edward McGuirc) almost lost his peace 
of mind trying to satisfy the old man. Only Poppy Faire, his ward (Virginia Barker) 

Page two hundred twenty-two 



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was there to comfort him. But in spite of the excitement, Ambrose fell asleep in 
his chair and what he dreamed we saw in the second act. 

He was now Ambrose Applejack, captain of a wild pirate ship. Poppy Faire was 
a cabin boy. Borolsky was a jealous, mutinous sailor. Anna Valeska was a prisoner, 
captured m a recent attack. Pengard was a squinty eyed, murderous Chinaman, 
and Captain Applejack was lord over them all. The crew wanted mutiny and Borol- 
sky led them to it. The Captain, crafty and domineering, quelled every attempt. 
He was in the midst of the romance and adventure that he wanted so much. But 
he awakened to find himself back in his home in England. 

As the hour had become late, he immediately prepared to retire. As he left the 
living room, the window opened. Through it stealthily crept Mr. and Mrs. Pengard. 
They planned to steal a treasure, unknown to the Applejohn family, but hidden 
somewhere in the house. With them they brought Dennet (George Ray) dressed 
as a policeman to offset suspicion. But Anna Valeska and Borolsky had also heard 
of a hidden treasure. When the two groups met at the scene of the robbery they 
got into an argument and Ambrose heard them. He held them at the point of a 
revolver with a bravery which surprised even himself. But he was helpless for the 
telephone wires had been cut. But suddenly the telephone rang! It had been re- 
paired! The thieves fled. 

Richard Ford, as Johnny Jason, a real estate salesman, arrived and explained every- 
thing. He had heard an old story about the house containing a hidden treasure and 
used It as a scheme to sell the place. Just to satisfy their curiosity the characters 
looked for the place where the treasure was supposed to be hidden. There they found 
a hidden cupboard — and in it a real treasure! And Ambrose proved that he was just 
as crafty and adventurous as he wanted to be, for he drew from the drawer a small 
alarm clock, by the ringing of which he had caused the thieves to believe the tele- 
phone repaired, and to flee. 

The wild and murderous pirate crew, which the audience enjoyed so much in the 
second act, was made up of Wallace Anderson, Charles Brady, Lawrence Crowley, 
Edward Garrity, Frank Quinn, Loren Miller, Paul O'Connor, Thomas Spelman, and 
Clifford Steinle. 



two hundred twenty-three 



Across the Campus 




Page two hundred twenty four 



MUSICAL 
ACTIVITIES 




Page two hundred twenty-five 



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Gracian(i Salvador 
Director of Music 



Page tiiio /uDidred tiventviix 



A WORD FROM THE DIRECTOR 

The past year has witnessed an encouraging interest and revival in musical activities 
at Loyola university. The large number of students who signified their wiUingness 
to participate in both the glee club and the band at the very beginning of the school 
year seemed to presage a successful future; and no one can deny that the accom- 
phshments of these two musical endeavors were more than gratifying. The band, 
recruited in an incredibly short time, distinguished itself at all of Loyola's home foot- 
ball games, during the National Catholic basketball tournament, and at other various 
student meetings. The glee club, which at times with the assistance of the co-eds 
from the School of Sociology became the Choral Society, gave two public concerts, and 
in conjunction with the girls from Rosary collage presented a Sacred Cantata on Palm 
Sunday. The glee club, moreover, were heard any number of times over the largest 
radio broadcasting stations in Chicago; they were in demand at university banquets 
and at the student assemblies. 

As successful as the year just completed proved to be, this was only made possible 
with the altruistic spirit of cooperation that each and every member brought to the 
undertakings. Their self-sacrificing attitude which was reflected in numerous and 
trying rehearsals received its only reward in a feeling of satisfaction at work well 
done. With such an auspicious start musical activities can look forward to a future 
of promise and success. 




4 



Page two hundred twenty-seven 



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Walter A. Buckmann, President 

THE LOYOLA UNIVERSITY BAND 

Like all live, robust organisations, the youthful Loyola University band is a monu- 
ment to Its founder, for each blare of its horns, every beat of its drums is a eulog>', a 
song both of praise and of gratitude to him who labored for four years to overcome the 
checkmate of insufficient talent, who, on September 29, 1927 — a date which will be 
memorable to the chroniclers of our Greater Loyola — founded the band, who showered 
upon it in its infancy that encouragement and support for which it hungered and 
without which it could not have survived, and who has thoroughly merited his title of 
honorary president. Dean Joseph S. Reiner, S.J. 

Dean Reiner's courage is vividly reflected in the fact that the Arts college volun- 
teers who were the nucleus of the band numbered only thirteen, at least two of whom 
could not play an instrument. It was evident that stick-to-it-iveness was to be their 
paramount attribute, and the Dean's first address to them was on the topic. He 
strove to fortify them against discouragement, picturing it as the common lot of pio- 
neers; but while the pioneer truly has the hardest task, yet to him is given in fullest 
measure the thrill of achievement. And so the Dean exhorted that meager group to 
attain success through the happy vision of a good job well done. He closed his talk 




Latz 



McCabe 



CORBOY 



two hundred twenty-eight 



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with the remark that they were volunteers and that if they failed the disgrace would 
be, not Loyola's, but theirs. And these lads, serious of mind and firm of purpose, 
accepted the challenge and bade welcome to all of their ilk. 

The band was immediately augmented by a few more Arts students, a Medical 
student and a dozen Dental students. W. A. Buckmann of the latter department was 
elected president, Philip Corboy business manager, and Norbert Latz librarian. And 
on the thirty-first day of the Band's existence a hitherto musicless university beheld, 
on Homecoming Day at Cubs' Park, the glorious spectacle of Loyola's Own, thirty- 
one strong, smartly attired and well drilled, swinging across the field in martial cadence 
and trumpeting its gladsome song. 

Mr. Parker, of the Conn Chicago Company, had been in charge of the first rehears- 
als, but early in October Professor Graciano Salvador, of the university faculty, was 
appointed director, and it is due to his capable and generously given efforts that the 
Band's numerous public appearances have been successful. 

The Band has had a busy schedule. It played at two football games, at most of 
the basketball games, nightly at the National Catholic Basketball Tournament, at the 
Tournament's banquet, at the Faculty-Alumni banquet, at the Dental Alumni ban- 
quet, at the Schubert Concert in conjunction with the University's Choral Society and 
at Commencement. 

As a token of their appreciation the trustees of the university have awarded the 
band's charter members sweaters and major letters. 

The band is grateful to the Dental college for its contingent of members. But it 
feels that the musically inchned Medical and Law students have been too bashful and 
it herewith serves notice on them that it intends to ferret them out next September 
so that they too may revel in stirring strains and may partake of that ambrosial re- 
freshment which is the especial boon of the muse of Melody. 

DouGL.^s McC.ABE, Secretarv. 





The Band in "L" Furm.miun at Homecoming 

ge two hundred tit'enty-nine 



CHi 



@ -mmm. 




Richard F. Ford 
President 

THE GLEE CLUB 

Ever since the establishment of the Lake Shore Campus/ the students, as well as the 
administration, have felt that one great field of school work had been left undeveloped 
at Loyola. There has never been a permanent organisation in which a student might 
secure a true appreciation of music. Last September a determined effort was made 
to revive musical activities at Ltiyola and as a result we now have an organization that 
promises to be, in the near future, one of Loyola's most valuable assets — the Glee Club. 

Many things made the Glee Club the success we justly feel it is today. From the 
very first meeting until the last performance of the year there has existed that spirit 
of willingness and genuine co-operation sought by so many clubs but realized in so 
few. But co-operation of the members cannot alone spell success. Were it not for 
the work of organization so ably done by Mr. Steggert, our careful and skilled train- 
ing by Mr. Salvador, and the co-operation of the faculty through Father Reiner, it is 
extremely doubtful if the Glee Club would be in existence today. Father Reiner was 
ever present with new ideas, suggestions, and privileges; Mr. Salvador always eager 
to do more than his share and the members ready to give their whole-hearted support 
to every plan. 

Mr. Steggert after the first few weeks was so pressed by outside work that he found 
it impossible to give time enough to the Glee Club and was forced to resign. Mr. G. 
Salvador was then appointed director. It was indeed a piece of good fortune that 
such a talented and experienced man was available. Ever since his youth he has been 
accompanying and directing choirs in Italy, Spain and in this country. His son Mario, 
reflecting the true genius of his father, is the club's regular organist. 

The first public appearance of the Glee Club was in December, when we presented 
a joint program with the Sock and Buskin Club at St. Ignatius auditorium. The enter- 
tainment consisted of two one-act plays, the musical program and dancing. Our pro- 
gram for that evening was composed principally of semi-classical music — "Winter 
Song", "Anvil Chorus", "O Shining Night" and "Kentucky Babe". Most of the 
numbers proved so popular that they were used throughout the year. Shortly after 
this we gave our initial radio concert over station WIBO. This and subsequent 
radio programs were composed of about the same numbers that were used in our first 
concert. The one that always was the most popular, as judged by the flood of corre- 
spondence received at the stations, was the Loyola Victory March. 

A Christmas program was our next offering, first presented at the student assembly 

Page two hundred Ourty 



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Stauder 



Shanahan 



McCabe 



and later at several Knights of Columbus councils. "Adeste Fidelis", "Unfold, Ye 
Portals'", "Bethlehem" and many other popular Christmas pieces were sung. This 
program was also presented "over the air." 

Since the beginning of the year Mr. Salvador had sensed the need for expansion 
and to make this idea a reality he enlisted the services of the girls of the Sociology 
department and welded the girls' unit with the Glee Club under the name of the 
Loyola University Choral Society. Besides doubling the membership of the club and 
enabling us to produce larger and better concerts, this union has still another effect, 
that is, it more closely unites the Lake Shore campus with the Downtown school, 
makes each group aware of the other's problems and feel a part, not of the Sociology 
or Arts school but of Loyola university. 

With our numbers thus enlarged, in February we began practice for the biggest 
undertaking of the year, the Cantata. (Needless to say, the rehearsals were now 
much better attended and more popular than before.) 

On Palm Sunday night, April 1, at Kimball Hall, after many weeks of intensive 
practice, the Choral Society presented Maunder's Cantata, "Olivet to Calvary" — by 
far the most beautiful thing wc had ever attempted. The Cantata recalls simply and 
reverently the scenes which mark the last few days of the Saviour's life on earth, and 
some of the reflections suggested thereby. The rejoicing of the multitude with hosannas 
and palms, the view of Jerusalem from the steep of Olivet, the lament over the beau- 
tiful city, the scene in the Temple, and the lonely walk back over the Mount at night, 
form the chief features of the iirst part. 

Part II opens with the Supper of the Passover, at which Jesus washes His disciples' 
feet, and gives to His friends the new commandment of love for one another as the 
sign of true discipleship. From this the scene passes to the infinite pathos of the 
Garden of Gethsemane, the sudden appearance of the hostile crowd, Jesus forsaken 
by His disciples. His utter loneliness among ruthless foes, the tumult before Pilate in 
the Judgment Hall, the Passage of the Cross, the tragedy and triumph of Calvary. 

The whole Cantata constituted the second half of the program, the first being made 
up of solos, organ and choir numbers of well known sacred music. From the very 
first notes of Parker's "Jerusalem" until the closing number of the Cantata, "Droop, 
Sacred Head," the capacity audience was thrilled not only by the magnificent choral 



Page two hundred thirty-one 




THE LOYOLA UNIVERSITY GLEE CLUB 
Top Row — Jasionek, Coyle, Sowka, P. Fazio, Steikle, Klest, Tomaso, Shurr. 

Second Row — Hackett, Weinrich, Dimitri, Keevixs, O'Brien, Healy, Tomczak, 
Sweeney. 

Bottom Row — Abraham, Baumbich, Reed, Cutrera, Ford, Shanahan, Herman, 
Stauder, McCabe. 



w«rk hut by the beautiful snlo numbers. The tenor parts were done exceptionally 
well by Mr. Edward Keevins, the bass by Mr. Harry Stauder. The beautiful soprano 
and contralto numbers were sung by the Misses Margaret McCoy, Victoria Welch 
and Helen Murray. Mario Salvador played the entire organ accompaniment, handling 
even the most difficult parts with apparent ease. 

The tremendous success that greeted the Cantata spurred the society on to another 
great undertaking. This year being the centennial of Franz Schubert, Father Reiner 
thought it most appropriate that we have a concert composed exclusively of Schubert 
music. Consequently, on Sunday afternoon. May 20, in St. Ignatius auditorium, the 
Loyola University Choral Society and the Loyola University Band united m giving 
a Popular Schubert Centennial Concert. For the first time this year the band and 
glee club appeared on the same program but from the quality of the performance it 
was evident that they should have done so months sooner, so much help was each 
group to the other. 

This program, like the Cantata, was composed of both group and solo numbers, 
most famous of which were Schubert's immortal "Ave Maria" and his "Serenade". 
Just as beautiful and far more magnificent since, they were sung by the whole chorus 
were "The Omnipotence" and "This Is the Day". The ever popular "Song of Love" 
and "Blossom Time" helped give the program the interesting and modern note that 
was prevalent throughout. Certainly no finer climax could have been had for the 
year's work than this Popular Schubert Concert. 

While every member of the Choral Society did all possible to make the year's work 

Pdge ttt'o hundrt'd thirty-two 



'4^: 



',li^ s^^^^ia^?t^^.^^^^^'a K (f^ 




The Choral Society at Kimball Hall 



a success, the officers of the club and the members of the committee on arrangements 
are to be especially commended for their efforts during the year. Mr. Howard Shurr 
and Mr. George Weinrich largely made possible our appearance at the radio stations 
during the winter months. Practically all the publicity work and ticket sales were in 
charge of Messrs. Stauder, Shurr and Weinrich for all the concerts of the year. 
Father Reiner and Mr. Salvador of course deserve the major part of the credit due 
for the success of all our undertakings, considering both the business and aesthetic 
standpoints. 

The Choral Society did not confine itself only to work during the past year but 
we may also look back upon a most successful social season. A few days after the 
formation af the Choral Society a "get together" party was held in the social rooms 
of the gymnasium. An orchestra composed of our own members furnished music 
that rivaled that of any large school dance of the year and the entertainment and 
refreshments far surpassed the average. Several smaller parties were held throughout 
the spring and to close the season another big dance was given in the gymnasium. 
This was truly the social success of the year and certainly entitled us to the name of 
a social organization. From nine until twelve there was almost continuous dancing 
in the brilliantly decorated west social room, the east room being set aside as a lounge. 
The refreshments served about midnight made the occasion seem more like a house 
party than an informal dance. Earlier in the evening, Mr. Salvador was presented 
with a handsome gold wrist watch as a slight token of our high esteem and appre- 
ciation of the work he did for us during the year. The whole evening certainly was 
one to be held in pleasant memory by everyone present. 

And so we feel that the Glee Club and the Choral Society have had in their first 
year a most successful beginning. To the new men and administration of next year 
as well as to our returning members we sincerely wish every success and we know 
that continued success will come if every member works, not for some set reward, but 
for a better knowledge, a sincere love and a true appreciation of music. 

Richard Ford. 



Page two himdred thin\-thr 



Administration Building 




Page two hundred thirty-four 



RELIGIOUS 
ACTIVITIES 




Page two hundred thirty-five 



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mmm^^mmm^m^mm^ - ,. ^..^ ^..^^^mmmmmsmm^^m^ ff^t 



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James J. Mertz, SJ. 
Spnxtual Director 



two hundred thirtysi 



mM^imm^^mi^WM^ }S) 



-'A?X 



A WORD FROM THE DIRECTOR 

A review of the work of the Sodahty, of the progress of the ehapel, and the spiritual 
activities as a whole for the past year is more than satisfactory. Beginning with the 
Sodality Convocation in May of 1927 Loyola assumed the leadership of the Sodality 
campaign for this section of the country. The work was continued by the Sodality 
School held under the direction of Father Lord in October and attracted representa- 
tives from practically every Catholic institution of higher learning in northern Illinois. 
Throughout! the year with the aid of the Delia Strada Club and personal representa- 
tives the Sodalities formed through the Loyola campaign have been aided in solving 
their problems and increasing their membership. 

Probably that which is nearest to the heart of every true Loyolan is the future chapel 
to be erected in honor of Our Lady of the Wayside. The past year has been marked 
with great strides toward accomplishing our purpose. The Aragon Party was not 
only the usual social success but also the financial success which we all so earnestly 
hoped for. This together with the aid from friends has made possible preliminary 
plans for the chapel and with continued success the long awaited day when the Delia 
Strada Chapel will be dedicated is not to be far distant. The desire of the students 
themselves for the chapel was manifest by the effort they made in conducting a student 
raffle. 

In keeping with the spirit of a Catholic university, religious activities have played 
an important part and have been held frequently during the past year. The weekly 
student Mass held in Saint Ignatius' Church has had its usual edifying effect. Of 
course ona of the outstanding activities each year is the annual student retreat. The 
retreat this year conducted by Father Pernin shortly after the beginning of the school 
year impressed upon the students their religious duties. In addition to this there have 
been the usual weekly meetings of the Sodality for the purpose of reciting the Office. 




Page two hundred thirty-seven 



€. 



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The Chapel As It Will Be 
THE MADONNA DELLA STRADA CHAPEL 

Ever since the Arts diid Science department (if Loyola has been moved to the 
Lake Shore Campus, it has been the cherished ambition and hope of the entire stu- 
dent body to have a chapel they could call distinctly their own. In these years 
religious activities had been confined to neighboring churches and the chapel in the 
Administration building. But as the enrollment increased so the accommodations 
decreased. Three years ago Father Mertz saw the crying need for the erection of a 
new, larger chapel and accordingly took steps in making preparations for it. Plans 
were made, funds were collected, hopes were kindled, until now the dream of the 
chapel is about to become a reality. 

The proposed Madonna Delia Strada Chapel on the Loyola university campus will 
be one of the most interesting architectural additions to the north side. The style 
will be basically Spanish, a development of the ecclesiastical architecture found in the 
northern provinces of Spain, where atmospheric and climatic conditions are not unlike 
ours in Chicago. 

The exterior material will probably be selected to harnionize with the present build- 
ings on the campus, though a soft colored stone may be used as more appropriate for 
a chapel, which is always a distinct entity in a group of college buildings. The in- 



•^ 



Page tiro hundred thirty-eight 



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my^ 



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The Site of the Chapel 



terior will have warm colored walls, while the ceiling will have the exposed beams 
characteristic of this Spanish style of architecture. A richer color will predominate 
in the apse in order to express its focal situation in the liturgy. 

In general, the note of chaste simplicity, usually found in better types of college 
chapels, will predominate. There are no transept or any of the similar features as- 
sociated with great parish churches in our cities. The nave will seat one thousand 
and a commodious sanctuary designed with an imposing baldachino in the center and 
flanked by two side altars will comfortably accommodate the clergy and their assis- 
tants at any of the ceremonies during the ecclesiastical year. On either side, there 
will be two chapels, dedicated, very likely, to Sts. Ignatius and Francis Xavier as 
representative of university men and to the North American martyrs, as memorials 
to the missionary spirit of the first Jesuits who gave their lives in the conversion of -the 
American Indians. The entire chapel will be a shrine to our Lady of the Wayside 
which will have the euphonic name of the Chapel of the Madonna Delia Strada. 

The site of the new chapel will he the ground just south of the Administration 
building, ideal m many respects. Easy access to it will be granted by appropriate 
walks and roads leading from the various buildings on the campus. Situated as it 
will be, in the very south east corner of the campus, it will lend an air of majesty 
to the grounds. It will appear as the commanding general standing ahead of and 
watching over its corps of buildings north and west of it. 

Particular credit and thanks for this chapel must necessarily go to Fr. James J. 
Mertz, S. J., Moderator of the Sodality, and the man who is in complete charge of 
the operations on the new structure. For the past few years he has given his time, 
energy and effort in this direction. The whole-hearted zeal he displayed in the mat- 
ter of furthering the progress of the chapel, by collecting funds, by making plans, 
etc., surely is deserving of much praise and thanks. 

Page- tivo hundred thin\-nim 



m 



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William E. Rafferty 

THE SODALITY OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY 

A more sincere Catholicism — a personal interest in the lay apostolate: these have 
been the aims and, to a slight extent at least, the realization of members of the Sodality 
and, indeed, of the whole student body during this past school year. Means to the 
first end have been provided by the Eucharistic section which has sponsored com- 
munion at the weekly Mass, the Mass itself, the Holy Hour in Holy Week: which has 
taken a monthly anonymous census on devotions, organized the '"Eour-minute Men" 
in behalf of visits to the chapel, put out a bulletin and put up signs. 

Activities towards lay interest in Church affairs, the second objective, have been 
divided among the three other sections as follows; The section on Catholic literature 
has taken over sales of the weekly review, America, and occasionally of Commonweal 
and The Queen's Wor\; put up Catholic papers and magazines on the bulletin-boards; 
posted short reviews of Catholic books, placed masterpieces representing the Blessed 
Virgin in the corridors and class-rooms; kept a "take-one" box filled; handled the retail- 
ing of 2,000 Christian Christmas cards. The Catholic mission section collected the 
students' contributions at the Friday services and disbursed them among the various 




is'H'.. 



Waldron 

Page two hundred forty 



Ray 



O'Brien 



/0^. 



^^^^ 




The L<3yola University Sodality 

foreign outposts, and posted letters and pictures sent by the missionaries whom the 
students have helped; it has circulated a list of mission magazines and even arranged 
displays of mission books opened out behind the glass door of a bulletin board. The 
Catholic Action section iinally, has conducted a Holy Name membership drive, cam- 
paigned to get out the vote in the public elections, sponsored the World Peace essay 
contest, and published regular monthly bulletins, each one developing two of the four- 
teen points on its prospectus. 

The Sodality as a whole has met regularly each week in the chapel to say the office 
of Our Lady, run a series of bulletins in the Loyola Jslews, installed thirty new mem- 
bers, conducted a raffle for the new chapel in 'which undertaking almost the entire 
student body very generously took part, stood host for the Chicago District Sodality 
School, and, as the Loyolan goes to press, is in the midst of plans for a second Stii- 
dents' Conference on Religious Activities which is scheduled for Ascension day. These 
conferences especially, the Sodality likes to think, have been influential in the direction 
of true and practical religion not only in the Arts college but in almost all Catholic 
schools in the Chicago area. Some friends, as a matter of fact, have been good enough 
to credit them with even national significance. 

The officers take this opportunity to thank the members for faithful attendance at 
the meetings and for indispensable cooperation generally. A word of particular 
appreciation is due to each of the four section chairmen — Mr. Abraham, Mr. Canary, 
Mr. Conley, and Mr. Keating — who, in more than one instance, have done the job 
at considerable sacrifice, without a word of complaint on their part or a word of 
thanks on the part of anybody else. Fr. Reiner and Fr. Mertz have our sincere grati- 
tude for constant encouragement, direction, and cooperation. 

William E. Rafferty. 



Page two hundred forty-one 



^-<7h 



i(r. 




THE SODALITY OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY 

ST. BERNARD^S HOSPITAL SCHOOL OF NURSING 
"Freely have ye received; freely give." 

The perfect fulfillment of this admonition is the daily ambition of the Sodalists 
of the Blessed Virgin Mary of St. Bernard's School of Nursing; thus their activities 
are not limited to attendance at a monthly meeting, or a casual monthly Communion, 
hut permeate and influence every phase of their life and work in the daily duties of 
the hospital. 

Frequent visits are made during the day by the Sodalists to the shrine of Our 
Blessed Mother. How these must please her is best illustrated by an old legend which 
has come down through the ages, teUing simply and sweetly of the gracious courtesy 
with which our Blessed Lady rewards the devotion of her courtiers. 

The devotional section of our Sodality is truly -ealous to increase Christ"* King- 
dom upon earth and His grace in the hearts of men. All Sodalists are also mem- 
bers of the Sacred Heart League and of St. Joseph's Pious Union for the Dying. Each 
class spends one hour, on every First Friday, in adoration before the Blessed Sacra- 
ment. All who can be spared from duty are present at Holy Hour and Benediction 
in the evening. 

The Sodalists have their own choir, organised under the protection of Mary Im- 
maculate. The Mass of the Angels as rendered by this choir, was one of the most 
beautiful ever sung in our chapel. After Midnight Mass on Christmas there is an 
annual procession of the nurses through the hospital corridors and wards, so touch- 
ingly beautiful as to bring a tear to the eye and to live long in memory. 

We owe a large debt for the success of our Sodality to our Director. Reverend 
Father Felician, C.P.P.S. He has aided and cheered us by his fatherly interest, coun- 
sel, and instruction. 

From our dear, devoted Directress, Sister Helen Jarrell, R.N., has come our great- 
est inspiration. She has encouraged us to aspire ever higher, teaching far more through 
example than by precept, for, in all she does. His light shines through, and those 
who see her, see Him, too. 

Pagf two hundred forty-two 



!^f)^ 




Ford 
Ray 



CciNLEY 

Walsh 



White 
Grant 



THE DELLA STRADA LECTURE CLUB 

The Delia Strada Lecture Club has been an active organization since plans were 
announced for the Lady of the Wayside Chapel. It was founded by Father James 
J. Mertz, S.J., about five years ago when he gathered a band of men around him who 
were interested and skilled in delivering talks on religious topics. The club is com- 
posed entirely of students attending the Lake Shore Campus of Loyola university; 
the membership has steadily increased until at present the number actively engaged 
includes fifteen lecturers. 

This year the members of the lecturing body were unusually active; talks were 
delivered to fifteen high schools, four colleges, and a number of women's clubs through- 
out the city. Among the prominent schools visited were Rosary college, Immaculata, 
St. Catherine, and Sacred Heart academies. An additional feature to the program 
of the club were the personal appearances of Fr. Mertz, a man who has achieved 
exceptional popularity as a lecturer. 

The members of the organization utilize slides which are imported from countries 
associated with the people or things on which they lecture. These slides are repro- 
ductions of actual photographs and have an historical as well as aesthetic value; they 
are especially well adapted to the illustration of the various phases of the talks. 

In keeping with the general spirit of Chapel support at Loyola, the men engaged 
in this work have subscribed their entire earnings to the fund which is being raised 
for the foundation of the Lady of the Wayside Chapel. Their contributions will 
probably be employed to furnish an altar which will be dedicated to them. This year 
a sum of approximately three hundred dollars was amassed through their activity; 
next year they hope to be of even greater service to their moderator, Fr. Mertz, and 
to his life's ambition, the completion of the Madonna Delia Strada Chapel. ' 

J. Francis Walsh, Manager. 

Page two hundred forty-three 



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|jJgIu5a?5HJyJ5!j;=5=ip5ini!(^nJ!3n]^^ 



- i^wmmm^mmmM 




The May C(1nference 
SODALITY CONFERENCES 

On Ascension Thursday, May 26, 1927, the Sodahty was pleased to welcome 97 
delegates from 22 Chicago Catholic high schools and colleges to a Student Conference 
on Religious Activities. The meeting was essentially "student": Loyola prefect, Mr. 
Robert C. Hartnett, was in the chair and directed the proceedings from the beginning 
to the close of the all day session. Students from Visitation High, Rosary, and Loyola 
opened the discussions with prepared talks on Eucharistic devotion. Catholic litera- 
ture, Catholic missions, and Catholic Action. The student audience took up each 
topic after its presentation and talked all its phases with contagious enthusiasm. Inter- 
est was most sincere and unabashed; ideas came thick and fast; participation became 
almost 100 per cent general; in every case the discussion had to be cut off so that the 
next matter might be taken up on the hour. Luncheon was served after the two morn- 
ing sessions; benediction followed the two in the afternoon. Fr. Lord later said that, 
had it not been for this event, h& should never have felt encouraged to go on with 
the great work he has been doing this year in conducting the Sodality Schools and 
establishing the Sodality Unions in all sections of the country. This May meeting 
certainly was significant in more ways than one. An article on the conference by 
Mr. Hartnett may be found in America for June 11, 1927. 

Straight from St. Louis, Fr. Lord came to Loyola in mid-October, 1927, to hold 
the second of the twelve-odd Sodality Schools which since have been held in as many 
parts of the United States. The Chicago School extended over Saturday and Sun- 
day, the 20th and 21st of the month. Attendance on both days was well over the 
200 mark; 28 institutions were represented. Through the official text. The A. B. C. 
oj Sodality Organization, and Fr. Lord's inimitable lectures, the delegates were instructed 
on the formation of a Students' Spiritual Council and its subordinate committees and 
on getting them to function. At the last session, the Chicago Districtl Sodality Union 
was formed with the Loyola prefect as chairman. Since that Sunday afternoon, inter- 
mittent letters have been sent out to member- Sodahties by the home ofiice. As this 
annual goes to press, the Union, through its chairman and local representatives, are 



Page two hundred jortyjour 



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The OcTdBER Conference 

making plans for a second annual Ascension Day Conference, at Lciyola, and for a big 
attendance of Chicago representatives at the national convention of Sodalities to be 
held m St. Louis in August. 

The national convention is the natural outgrowth of the movement started at Loyola 
a year ago. The two Loyola meetings proved that students of Catholic institutions 
of learning are intensely interested in Sodality work. It was because of the support 
given to local conventions that Father Lord felt justified in undertaking the plans for 
a nationwide meeting. This is the first attempt ever made to call together representa- 
tives of Catholic schools for the discussion of the methods used to promote interest in 
religious undertakings. The success of the conference is practically assured if the 
schools from other districts cooperate with those in charge of the arrangements as 
Chicago schools have cooperated with Loyola in making the Loyola conventions a 
success. 

A review of the conferences held at Loyola cannot be complete without paying some 
tribute to the Catholic schools of this district. It was due to their enthusiasm and 
the whole-hearted manner in which they supported the Loyola men in preparing for 
the conventions that the meetings were a success. 

William E. R.afferty. 



Page two hundred forty-five 



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^umfsm: '^rm^m':' ^'m^m^Ji^m:'^ mWf^ji^^^ T ^, 




Claude J. Pernin, S.J. 
STUDENT DEVOTIONS 

A Catholic university not only gives its students every opportunity for scholastic 
advancement but also for spiritual advancement. The feast days of the Church are 
all honored by dismissal of classes. These, however, are celebrated throughout the 
world and are not student devotions. Loyola has a spiritual calendar distinctly its 
own which is one of the prides of every Catholic student. 

The ecclesiastical school year is officially opened immediately after classes begin 
with a solemn High Mass in honor of the Holy Ghost. The Mass) this year was cele- 
brated by Father Robert M. Kelley, S.J., president of Loyola university. The entire 
student body sang the Mass. The Senior class, arrayed in cap and gown, added dig- 
nity to the occasion by receiving Holy Communion in a body. 

Li order to instill m the students a realization that their first concern in life is to 
be followers of Christ, an annual retreat is given for the College of Arts and Sciences 
shortly after the opening of the school year. 

The retre.it this year, which Listed for three days from October 4 to 7, was given 
by Rev. Claude J. Pernin, S.J., one of the most prominent members of the faculty 
of Loyola University. By his eloquence and personality Father Pernin held the inter- 
est of every student while his message rekindled in their hearts an ardent love of 
Christ the King. During the course of the exercises the Retreat Master viv-idly por- 
trayed the fundamental relations between God and man, between man and man, and 
of man and his last end. 

Four instructions were given each day and were preceded by devotions. The day 
was opened with Mass while the exercises later in the day would be opened by the 
Way of the Cross, the Rosar^', or Spiritual Reading. 

Page tii'o hinicircd fort_^-.si,\- 



m^ 




Friday M(irning 

The impressiveness of the services was greatly added to by the beauty of the sur- 
roundings. All the services of the Retreat were held in Saint Ignatius' church, which 
is known throughout the country for its architectural beauty. Thus the sense as well 
as the intellect was raised to the beauty of the spiritual. 

A solemn High Mass closed the Retreat on Friday morning. Every student joined 
in the general communion. Father Pernin preached a short sermon, encouraging the 
students to Hve up to the good resolutions they had made, after which he closed the 
retreat by imparting the Papal benediction. 

Each Friday morning throughout the school year the students assemble in Saint 
Ignatius church to attend Mass. After Mass a short instruction is usually given 
or a Sodality meeting is held. These Friday morning devotions are among the tradi- 
tions near to the heart of every Loyolan. 

At one of the weekly devotions each year honor is paid to Mr. Michael Cudahy, 
the donor of Cudahy Science Hall. On November 17th a solemn High Mass was 
offered for Mr. Cudahy while the day was devoted to honoring him. 

A new devotion was added to the spiritual calendar this year in celebrating the 
Feast of Christ the King. The Friday following the feast has been proclaimed as the 
day on which Loyolans shall pay homage to the King. Dean Reiner in a short address 
said he considered it one of the greatest feasts of the Church and after the Mass dis- 
missed classes for the day. 



two hundred forty-se 



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B 



The End of the TtmI 




Page two hundred forty-eight 



SOCIETY 




Page two hundred forty-nine 







Philip Cox ley, Chdirman 
THE SENIOR BALL 

It has often been said that at a Senior Ball a freshman feels juvenile, a sophomore 
feels awkward, a junior feels superior, and a senior feels and acts dignified. 

Whether this is true or not only, the statisticians can tell. But as far as the Senior 
Ball of 1927 is concerned it most assuredly is not true. Perhaps it was the last wild 
fling of a graduating class before assuming the sober mien of the graduation plat- 
form, or perhaps the' class of '27, was just a jolly bunch of good fellows. Be it as it 
may, the Senior Ball was a gay affair from any standpoint. Of course the seniors 
didn't go about pulling each other's bowi ties to see if they were hand tied or factory 
tied. No, much to the disgust of one or two observant freshmen, nothing so playful 
as that occurred. 

The "Ball" was held on May 26, 1927, at the Grand Ball Room of the Palmer 
House. The committee! couldn't have picked a more suitable ballroom than that one. 
It had just the right touch of eliteness necessary for an affair of the nature of a Senior 
Ball. Due to the fact that the editor of this section is not a woman (he hopes he 
isn't) he IS unable to describe accurately the draperies on the walls. Red seems to 
be the favorite color of the average ballroom manager. But thanks to some clever 
senior this particular ballroom was not draped in red. I suppose the color of the 
drapes was supposed to signify wisdom. 

Jack Higgins' orchestra furnished the music for the "Ball". Add up all the adjec- 
tives applicable to any orchestra and you have the one most applicable to Higgins' 
orchestra. In other words the music was good. 

Philip Conley and his fair escort led the Grand March. Mr, Conley also headed 
the dance committee. As a "grand marcher" and a chairman Philip is equally effective. 

Page two hundred ft^ty 



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Place — Palmer House 



Date— May 26, 1927 



The Committee was headed by Phihp Conley of Night Law, and included Maurice 
McCarthy of Arts and Sciences, Frank Sweeney of Day Law, Glen Powers of Medi- 
cine, James Neary of Commerce and Philip Harlin of Dentistry. 

The Senior Ball is one of the two traditional all-university formals, the other being 
the Junior Prom, which will be held this year on March 20, at the Bal Taberin, too 
late to appear in this year's Loyolan. Charles Stimming of the Arts and Sciences 
department will, be general chairman and will lead the Grand March. 

The Class of 1928 held its Senior Ball this year on May 11, too late to get into, 
this year's Loyolan. The gala affair was held in the Balloon Room of the Congress 
Hotel. For the first time in the history of such occasions the Ball was restricted and 
only seniors were permitted to attend. Such an arrangement brought much anguish 
to some of the self-confident under classmen who liked to consider themselves on a 
par with the dignified seniors for at least one night during the year. Notwithstanding 
the loss of the handsome sophomore patronage the dance was a financial as well as 
a social success and undoubtedly future Balls will be restricted. 

Frank Butler of the College of Arts and Science was general chairman of the com- 
mittee and also served as leader of the Grand March. This honor of the leadership 
alternates, going to the various schools of the university each year. The senior classes 
of all the schools were represented on the committee. The committee was composed 
of William Barr of the Medical School, James Neary of the School of Commerce, 
George Lane of the Day Law School, and Richard Tobin of the Night Law School. 



ge two hundred fifty-one 



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Place — Lake Shore Athletic Club 



THE SOPHOMORE SUPPER DANCE 

The Lake Shore Athletic Club, one of the most distinguished and beautiful homes 
of the exclusive Chicago Clubs, was the scene of the most ambitious atFair ever at- 
tempted by the Sophomore class of Loyola. 

Jack Higgins and his Campus orchestra supplied the most fascinating rhythm ever 
heard by any of those present. Taking into account the wild storm raging outside 
all night and morning, the number of those present was quite considerable. Exams 
over; wonderful companions; no worries — these were only a few of the reasons why 
the boys and girls enjoyed themselves. 

The entertainment committee, from all appearances, was not composed of Scotch- 
men. A "hoofer" extraordinary started the entertainment by a specialty dance. He 
was great. As the couples were in the mood for just this sort of relaxation, he was 
not allowed to consider himself finished until he had given several encores. Paul 
Small, one of Paul Ash's gang, arrived after show hours and proceeded to prove 
that everybody loves a fat man. You see Paul is anything but what his name implies. 
As a singer Paul may never get into Grand Opera, but as far as the Sophs are con- 
cerned he doesn't need to. 

Last but by not means least came the supper. After twelve the diners were served 
with deliciou3 food to the tune of yet more delicious music. This saying that a man 
is ruled by his stomach is all wrong. It did not take long before Jack's music made 
the males forget their stomach and concentrate on their feet. And oh. how they 
could concentrate. 

We must not forget the fact that the ladies were given the choice of either of two 
favors — a locket or a compact. 

Page two hundred fifty-two 




Place — Dilake Hotel 



Date— January 20, 192S 



THE FRESHMAN FROLIC 



The annual Freshman Dance for the class of "?1, in social language the Frosh 
Frolic, held on January 20 in the Main Dining Room of the Drake, brought to a close 
the first semester of what Dean Reiner terms "The most progressive Freshman class 
that ever entered Loyola." 

With Bobby Meeker furnishing the inducement, i. e., red-hot syncopation, over 
300 couples danced from 10 until ?, when poor Bobby signed off because of exhaus- 
tion. With all thoughts of the approaching exams swept temporarily from their 
minds the students (for the dance was splendidly supported by the school and out- 
siders) showed the residents of the Drake that Loyola is not in dire need of coeduca- 
tion! Preparations for a flashlight photo; the young ladies primped up, pretending 
to move away from the camera, at the same! time edging towards it; the young men 
trying to appear nonchalant; a flash, catching everybody wearing their worst expres- 
sions; and a short while later the affair was history. See Clair Marcelle's best effort 
at photographing the affair just above. 

Among those present were Immaculata and Rosary (speaking collectively). The 
Frosh were also honored by the presence of the cashier of the Granada, and about 
fifty couples from Senn High, together with the rest. Even Marks Bros, took the 
Frosh seriously, for once; viz., they let the cashier have the evening off! It was indeed 
lucky for the management that the "Collegiate Drag" was not in vogue at the time! 

The name "Murphy" predominated, there being about fifteen present, besides a 
number of young ladies whose names are unknown. There were the "Seven Mur- 
phys of '31" together with the rest. Lack of space prevents even the printing of 
their initials! Page Mr. Steggert or Mr. Linehan; they know "em by heart! And 
one (you know D. J., don't you?) had the nerve to bring a Murphy. 

"Oh!" wailed a member of the Frosh, "a buck and a half for flavored water, mis- 
named orange crush, and I left most of it in the glass in the form of ice\"' 'Nuff 
said; a paragraph in itself; "Live and learn" is a good motto. 

But every cloud has a silver lining (referring to. the last paragraph), and so it is 
learned that the affair was a complete financial as well as a social success. The Fresh- 
man class officers wish to thank everybody who helped to make the dance so success- 
ful, and to express their appreciation of the school's fine support. 

And President Bob Healy "stagged" the affair! Call out the reserves! 



Page two hundred fifty-three 



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'^MimmmMmm^M^ f^ 




Place — Illinois Women's Athletic Club 



Date — October 29, J 927 



HOMECOMING 

Are we down-hearted? No! Are we poor losers? Never! Such was the spirit 
that pervaded the mob of care-free students and their fair partners at the Homecoming 
Dance. And if you think this same care-free spirit was forced, you should have been 
there. Even the men on the team forgot their early errors of omission and commission 
and gave themselves over to the joy of the moment. - 

Early in the evening, the elevators in the Women's Athletic Club building began 
to climb skyward with their load of sleek haired Romeos and wavy haired Juliets. Up 
and up, and still up rose the elevators, to the fourteenth floor. There were feminine 
murmurs of "Oh, how cute" and worldly wise masculine replies of "This is only the 
wardrobe." These same fair damsels, shorn now of their concealing furs and wraps 
and revealed in all the glory of shimmering gowns, alighted on the twelfth floor. 

Here a series of rooms overhung with maroon and gold tapestries greeted their 
eyes. Enthroned in the center of this series of rooms sat Joe Rudolph and his orches- 
tra. Speaking of orchestras, Joe has a wonder. What is lacking in numbers is made 
up for in skill. All that Joe needs to make his orchestra famous is a good blues singer. 
Our own little Al Brown filled that role to perfection on this occasion. 

Just before the picture was snapped, Al led the crowd in a number of yells and 
school songs. The feminine voices certainly added volume and atmosphere to those 
cheers and songs. All of which goes to prove that Loyola needs co-education. The 
only fault we have to find with the I. W. A. C. building is that it hasn't enough tire 
escapes. You see, they are so convenient for those informal tete-a-tetes that youth 
will have. 



t.:' 



Page two hundred fifty-four 



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Place — Drake Hotel 



Date— October 14, 1927 



THE LOYOLA NEWS FALL FROLIC 

Under the able guidance of Chairman Frank Walsh, this year's social season was 
fittingly opened on October 14th by the Diyola News Fall Frolic. If, as they say, 
other Fall Frolics were successful, this year's dance was a social prodigy. 

In expectation of a large gathering the News secured the Main Dining Room of 
the Drake Hotel as the site of the evening's entertainment. A more beautiful ball- 
room could not have been found the city over. The huge dance floor, a sort of sunken 
garden affair, with marble pillars and velvet draperies, was a place of exotic beauty. 

Jack Chapman and his gang of syncopators furnished the music. Jack has a very 
delightful habit of playing a slow, dreamy dance for every other number. Judging 
from the expressions on the faces of the two hundred or so males assembled, it ' is a 
very agreeable sensation to glide over the waxed floors with a morsel from heaven in 
one's arms. The favorite tune of the evening seemed', to be "Sing Me a Baby Song". 
One reason for* this may have been the manner in which one of Jack's men sang this 
number. The orchestra would still be playing if the crowd hadn't been convinced 
that even musicians sometimes sleep. As it was, "King Dance" ruled till two in the 
morning. 

During; a lull in the music the Pullman Porters' Quartet went through their entire 
repertoire of southern tunes. They were announced as having gained fame through- 
out the city by their singing; and from the manner in which they held the audience 
spellbound for five minutes, this fame was not unwarranted. 

From every point of view this year's Fall Frolic was a success, and we sincerely hope 
that the Loyola News will offer many more such evenings of entertainment in years 
to come. We enjoy them. 

Page two hundred fifty-five 



^,c?\ 




Place — Aragon 



Date— April 9, 1928 



THE DELIA STRADA PARTY 

Easter Monday was the official "let-up day" tor Lent, as far as the students of 
Loyola were concerned. On that night. Father Mert; gave his annual Aragon party 
for the benefit of his chapel fund. We call it ""his"" chapel fund, because if there 
were no Father Mertz there would be no chapel fund. 

The largest and most beautiful ballroom in Chicago, the Aragon, was the scene of 
this year"s party. As large as it was, it was filled to the utmost by students of Loyola 
and friends of Father Mertz. 

This affair is called a party and not a dance for the simple reason that if any of 
the younger folk get tired of dancing they can go up on the balcony and show Mother 
and Father how bridge should be played. And vice versa; if any of the older folks 
get tired of playing bridge on the balcony, they can come down on the ballroom floor 
and show son and daughter how to dance. From the appearance of things it was 
Mother and Father who did most of the showing on that evening. More than one 
young gentleman was heard to mutter, "Now I know where Dad learned all the 
things he tells me not to d<i, he used to be young once himself." Had Dad heard the 
remark he might have said that he was still young. 

That is one of the beauties ot the Aragon party. It is the only dance of the year 
at which the old and young folks can intermingle without embarrassment. As many 
a man finds out sooner or later, Dad sometimes knows a few tricks that son don't 
know about. And in this day and age son needs all the tricks he can get hold of. 
Competition is so keen. 

One of the best features of the evening did not take place during the evening. I 
mean the announcement of the huge financial success of the party. In the near future 
Father Mertz hopes to be able to break ground for his chapel. And as far as Father 
and the students are concerned, it can't be too soon. 

Page two hundred fijty-f^ix 




Place — Rosary Collfc.e Date Jami\r\ (■>, 1928 

THE ROSARY-LOYOLA INTERCOLLEGIATE DANCE 

There is no social event of the year that causes more comment, before and after, 
than does the Rosary-Loyola Intercollegiate Dance. This year's affair was sponsored 
by the sophisticated gentlemen from Loyola. 

After signing his name on the dotted line, every male at Loyola began to spin 
visions of his blind date. For some she was a cute blond wath baby blue eyes and 
a come-hither smile. Some visioned dark haired beauties with that clinging melting 
look (College men know the type) : to some she was an aristocratic, cold society 
debutante, the colder the better; to each gentleman his particular kind of dream girl. 
But oh, the disillusionment! The cave man that wanted the cute blond got the cold 
debutante, and the good little boy who wanted the cold debutante got the clinging 
brunette. However, the disillusionment was far from one sided. Far be it from me 
to say that there are no answers to a maiden's prayer at this institution, but they 
are few and very, very far between. 

After getting his blind date at the foot of that fateful stairs each Loyolan escorted 
her into the regions of the dance, where he began to trip the ligh fantastic to the 
white heat of Kenny's Red Peppers. The heat of the music, combined with the heat 
of the radiators, soon caused the blood of the collegiate wrestlers to boil, and there 
is no telling what terrible catastrophe might have occurred if some far-sighted person 
hadn't opened the windows and let in some cool air. 

As the clock chimed twelve the drummer dropped his sticks in mid air and the 
saxophone player caught his breath before it reached the mouthpiece. It's a crime for 
a union musician to play a note after twelve, and from all appearances Kenny's men 
are far from being criminals. The big "He Men" from the North Side took the hint 
and began to make their departure. 

Many were the fervent hand clasps and tear dimmed eye as they watched their 
fair haired damsels ascend those golden stairs, never to descend again until 1929. 



Pdg(? tivo hundred fiftv-seven 



|'^vfc4iJ4i(i^.HL|fc 




Place — Hotel LaSalle 



Date- -December 16, 1927 



THE PI ALPHA LAMBDA PRE-CHRISTMAS INFORMAL 

Put a little red ring around December 16th m your diary, if you keep one of those 
things. If you went to the Pi Alpha Lambda Pre-Christmas Informal put the red 
circle there to remind you of the good time you had; if you weren't present, put the 
little red circle in your diary anyway. Put it there to remind you of one of those 
relapses into idiocy of which we all are capable at times. 

As tradition dictates, the "Pi Alphs" held their Informal just before Christmas in 
the Blue Room of the LaSalle Hotel. While this hotel is not usually so popular 
as a dance palace among the classes and fraternities, we maintain that the Blue Room 
is better suited for a dance of this character than any ballroom we have seen this year. 
It is a long, high arched ballroom without pillars of any kind. While pillars some- 
times add to the beauty of a ballroom, they are a bad thing to back your angelic 
partner into. And if you insist on being chivalrous, they are worse things to back 
into yourself. 

Those who came to be disappointed in Jack Higgins' orchestra were disappointed 
in not being disappointed. If that's a paradox make the most of it. Jack has a male 
quartet that can't be beat by any orchestral quartet in the country. Lest anyone get 
the mistaken idea that the Higgins Gang's ability was limited to singing, let us hasten 
to say that they made dance music that was dance music, and not some over-ambitious 
leader's conception of how an overture should be played. 

As the night wore on, the fun increased until it reached a climax about 12:?0 with 
popping of balloons and the throwing of confetti and paper snowballs. Strange to 
say the fair sex were the recipients of many of these flaky missiles. 

Yes, be sure to put a ring around December 16th. Don't you remember how, on 
the way home, she put her little hand into yours and said that you were a wonderful 
fellow to take her to such a wonderful dance; and — ^Yes, be doubly certain not to 
overlook the red mark under December 16th. 

Page two hundred fifty-eight 



:mmmms^m^ 







Place — Sovereign Hotel 



Date— April 29, 1927 



THE PHI MU CHI SPRING DANCE 

On the evening of April 29, 1927, Phi Mu Ch^ staged its annual Spring Dance at 
the Sovereign. The affair was so tepid that the little fishes cavorting about in the 
universal solution in the foyer fountain began to perspire most embarrassingly. And 
the celluloid collar of one hotel resident who came too close to the region of the dance 
was seen to burst out into flame. 

The crowd was conveniently large and just as conveniently chummy and thus 
everybody met everybody else and all agreed it was a beautiful evening and that the 
dance was wonderful and all of that. The place was one of those friendly ballrooms 
that are as rare as crinolines these days, neither so large that one felt like a gnat in 
the Grand Canyon, nor so small that the same person felt like the same gnat in a 
microscopic apartment for two. The oval expanse of wall was belabored with silk 
and its kindred materials, and the soft Hghts glowed on a most happy throng. Some 
would describe the throng as within the confines of tliese walls, but tO' do that would 
invite the adverse testimony as to the whereabouts of the revelers from the attendance 
on the west balcony, the fire-escapes, and other points of interest. 

Everybody agreed that it was something that could be remembered without the 
aid of a memory course. Everybody agreed that it satisfied like the merry old Lord 
Chesterfield. Everybody danced till they were all caught up on the subject. Every- 
body departed in smiles, and wished the dance were twins. Everybody was there, 
everybody was hot, everybody was happy. 



Page two hundred fifty-nine 



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Place — Palmer House 



Date — December 6, 1927 



THE STUDENT'FACULTY'ALUMNI BANQUET 

A milestone has been passed in the history of Loyola university. For the first 
time m the annals of the university the students and the faculty of all the depart- 
ments got together at a banquet. Perhaps, had it not been the occasion of our new 
President's inaugural address, a gathering of this kind might not have been possible. 
Nevertheless the fact is that the students, their parents, the professors and their families 
and friends assembled at the Palmer House on December 6th, one thousand strong. 

The evening began very auspiciously when Mr. Payton Touhy, the toast-master 
of the evening, introduced Rt. Rev. Bishop Hoban, an alumnus of St. Ignatius col- 
lege, later Loyola university. His Grace the Bishop extended formal welcome to Father 
Kelley and wished him success and happiness in his new position. 

Amid the sincere applause of the entire assemblage Father Kelley arose and deliv- 
ered his inaugural address. He said that he is aware of the responsibility that the 
position of President entails, but thatJ with the help of God he will bear that respon- 
sibility to the best of his ability. Father Kelley stated thati he is pleased to come to 
Chicago and take up the work where Father Agnew has left off; that he is happy 
to be connected with a university that has the traditions and history that Loyola has. 

The lighter touches of the evening were furnished by the numerous talented musi- 
cians and actors that are members of Loyola's student body. Miss Helen Howe, a 
talented soprano, sang three numbers, the new university band played and the students 
of the Medical school put on a little skit. Frank Lauranzano, the Al Jolson of the 
Medical school, gave several numbers in imitation of that comedian. Nehf sang 
enough to let his hearers know that Grand Opera will soon have a new tenor, and a 
string trio twanged quite merrily on their stringed instruments. 

The evening came to a close v»'ith the singing of the Star Spangled Banner by the 
students, the faculty, the Rev. President and His Grace the Bishop. 

Page IWK> liiouii-fd .(i.vtv 




Place — Auditorium Hotel 



Date— May 19, 1927 



THE MEDICAL STUDENT-FACULTY BANQUET 

Whether it is cutting up a cadaver or putting over a social affair the Medics are 
equally efficient. It is not often that a student faculty banquet takes on the air of 
a revue, a dance and a dinner combined. The Medics held a banquet that did have 
that air. From all reports neither the revue, the dance nor the dinner suffered from 
lack of perfection. The Medics themselves are wont to attribute Flo Ziegfield's ill- 
ness of last spring to professional jealousy. They do say that jealousy is a terrible 
disease. 

In regard to the revue, in which the nurses from St. Bernard's Hospital were such 
a potent factor, it is reported that several of the non-Medic men present moved heaven 
and earth to learn the names of some of the nurses in case of a future illness. In fact 
many of them seriously considered an immediate case of acute indigestion. 

An orchestra of future surgeons furnished the music for the evening. If they be- 
come as good doctors and surgeons as they are musicians, the Mayo Brothers will have 
to go back to school and get some more education. They will be needing it in a few 
years. Besides furnishing the music the orchestra also furnished some very good enter- 
tainers from among its numbers. Chief among these was Frank Lauranzano, of sing- 
ing fame. 

One good feature about all this entertainment was that it caused the professors 
and teachers to forget that they were associating with their pupils. The veil of dignity 
and sobriety dropped from them, and the result was that many of the Medics got 
an altogether different and better opinion of their professors. It is also to be hoped 
that the professors got a newer and better slant on their pupils. 







Page two hundred sixty-one 


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Place — Hamilton Clu) 



Date— February 18, 1828 



THE COMMERCE CLUB BANQUET 

The Commerce Club Banquet took place at the Hamilton Club on February eight- 
eenth. It was attended by about fifty students from the Downtown department, and 
all but a few of the professors. 

The guest of honor was the Very Reverend Robert M. Kelley, who spoke to the 
Commerce men, and complimented them upon the efforts they were putting forth to 
obtain a university education. He proclaimed his admiration of the serious purpose 
governing the management of the Commerce Club, under whose auspices the banquet 
was held. One of the chief assets of the commercial training, according to Father 
Kelley, was the ability to meet men, and talk to them in a straightforward, effective 
manner. 

Every one of the professors present was called upon for a few words to the assem- 
bled students. Each talk was in accordance with the cordiality and informality of 
the occasion, and pleasure at being enabled to meet the students in such a manner 
was expressed by all the teachers. The number of faculty speakers included Messrs. 
Palmer, Swanish and Liscomb. Father Walsh gave an interesting and lively talk 
about the general field of endeavor open to the Commerce student. Dean Reedy 
brought several important points before the students, laying special stress upon the 
necessity of enlarging the enrollment of the department by bringing in new students. 
J. Francis Walsh, editor-in-chief of the Loyola J^eius, was a guest of the Commerce 
Club, and encouraged the men of the Loop school to contribute freely to the J^ews 
and help to increase its all-university character. 



Page two hundred sixty-two 



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^^^^^i^i: 




Place — Elm Cafe 



Date— October 29, 1927 



THE JUNIOR EVENING LAW BANQUET 

The big night of the annual Hallowe'en banquet is now a thing of the past for the 
budding lawyers of the junior class. However, the majority of the class who were 
there will say that they had a wonderful time, just as wonderful as they had last 
year at the unforgetable banquet held at the LaSalle hotel. The promoters, Marino, 
Peace and Crane, did themselves proud. The genial host, Mr. Bonavetti, proprietor 
of the Elm cafe of 1148 N. Clark St., (no, we are not paid for this advertise- 
ment) anticipated every wish of the future attorney-generals and saw to it that every 
thing ran smoothly. Professor Steele was present and his remarks made in the course 
of the after dinner speaking' produced a lasting impression on all the intelligent gath- 
ering. Several of the fellows brought friends along and they immediately entered into 
the spirit of the affair. 

After the bus-boy had made certain that there was no crockery in the immediate 
vicinity, Doherty let loose the golden flood of oratory that was pent up in him. In 
the wild scramble that followed, several of the more important questions of the day 
were made clear to our hitherto befuddled brains. If after dinner speaking makes a 
successful attorney, it won't be many years before Doherty will be state's attorney 
of Cook County. 

Looking back on that evening we are now more impressed than ever by the genius 
and personality of our classmates. We v^ish to especially commend our golden tongued 
student, Bellamy, for being his usual sunny self; Cassidy for his dignity, McNally for 
his appetite. Shelly for his nerve, Glynn for his ability to consume ginger ale (pre- 
prohibition) , Daily for being the miracle man, Harrington for his modesty and Dunne 
for his ability to change tires. Thrown off guard by the hilarity of the evening Dunne 
unconsciously let slip the secret of his success. He owns a Ford. 

After the dinner broke up a number of the banqueteers enjoyed a couple of hours 
to the strains of Jack Chapman's orchestra at Homecoming. 



Page two hundred sixty-three 



The Shrine at Mercy 




Page two hundred sixty-four 




Lawrence — "Bud" — Gorman, captain and fullback of the 192'' Football team, men- 
tioned for all-American honors that year, died a hero's death in September, 1926, 
while attempting to save a girl from drowning. The tragedy stirred the school to the 
utmost, for Bud was unquestionably the greatest athletic idol Loyola had ever produced. 

To his memory the Monogram Club placed in June, 1927, a bronze memorial over 
the entrance to the Alumni Gymnasium. The funds for the project were raised by 
subscription among the entire student body, a-nd the placque itself, which is a striking 
likeness of Bud, was unveiled with simple ceremonies on Tune ?, 1927. 



m^M^mmm^. 



Page two hundred sixtvfive 




iARTHOLdMEW J. QuiNN, S.. 
Director of AthleUcs 



Page two hundred sixty-six 



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THE DIRECTOR 

Bartholomew J. Quinn, S.J., Director of Athletics at Loyola for two years, one of the 
best liked and most eiBcient members of Loyola's faculty, has advanced to a higher posi- 
tion, a position which he well deserves and which the students at Loyola feel certain he 
will handle with the greatest capability. While at Loyola Father Quinn spread Loyola's 
name throughout the entire country in connection with the National Catholic Basket- 
ball Tournament, of which he was director. He established Loyola's name as an 
athletic center; he rigorously insisted upon the adoption of rules best suited to the 
conditions at Loyola, among which was the freshman rule; he encouraged fairness and 
sportsmanship to an extent never before known. Father Quinn was heart and soul 
the director of athletics. Yet he was not too engrossed to talk to every man, whether 
an athlete of the highest standing, or a mere "also ran." 

While Loyola is sorry to lose Father Quinn, it is at the same time pleased to see 
him advance in the ranks of his profession. He now has the distinction of being the 
youngest Catholic college president, having been appointed to the presidency of Cam- 
pion college, Prairie Du Chien, Wisconsin, and his many friends at Loyola all lend 
their efforts to wishing him the best of success in his every undertaking. 



Page two hundred sixty-seven 



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O. p. D'Haene, SJ. 

Chairman of the Faculty Advmory Committee 

THE ATHLETIC ADMINISTRATION 

In order to promote further the proper balance ot athletics at Loyola, to assist the 
athletic board in its administration of all sports, intercollegiate or intramural, and to 
assist in the arranging of schedules there was established this past year a faculty ad' 
visory committee on athletics. The need of such an organization was apparent here 
at Loyola university; this need was soon perceived by, and shortly remedied through 
the untiring efforts of Father D'Haene, SJ. As a result of his work he v^as unquali- 
fiedly chosen to be the guiding force of the committee as its chairman, and his record 
throughout the year more than justified the choice. 

The influence of this committee made itself felt particularly during the football and 
basketball seasons. Since the faculty is primarily concerned with the scholastic aspect 
of the athletic situation, the schedules of both the football and basketball teams, while 
as complete and as far reaching as in other years, conflicted in the smallest possible 
manner with the scholastic duties of the members of the teams; this was in no little 
degree the work of the faculty advisory committee. 

In addition to the faculty committee and the coaching staff a number of the students 
themselves are actively engaged in promoting athletics. With this end in view there 
is chosen from the student body each year two representative men to serve in the 
capacity of managers. From the senior class one man is chosen to act as senior man- 
ager. The man to win that distinction was Donald Sutherland. From the under- 
classmen one man is selected to serve as junior manager. The sophomore class this 
year had the honor of having one of its members, James C. Ryan, chosen to fill the 
position. It is the duty of these men to aid the athletic department not only in man- 
aging the teams but also in promoting interest in the teams by the student body. Diffi- 
culties coming up between the team and the students are taken care' of by the student 
managers. 

Page two hundred .sixtv-eig/it 



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Sutherland 



Ryan 



Hillenbrand 



Whether or not the university is behind its teams is largely in the hands of the 
publicity manager. Unless students see their team written up in the daily papers and 
hear comments on it among their friends they are liable to underrate it and fail to 
show that backing which is so necessary to the success of athletic endeavors. For this 
reason the athletic department employs an athletic publicity manager whose duty it 
is to keep Loyola athletics before the attention of the public. The position during 
the past year has been filled by Harold Hillenbrand from the Dental School of Loyola. 
His p(isition is especially important in the success of such undertakings as the National 
Catholic Basketball Tournament, which owes much of its success this year to the efforts 
of Mr. Hillenbrand. In addition to the services in the tournament the publicity 
received this year by other athletics activities is in no small measure due to Mr. 
Hillenbrand. 

A hard-working person whom we see very little or hear of seldom is Robert 
Morris, the alumni athletic manager. Bob has aided the junior and senior managers 
a great deal during the football and basketball seasons, and his efforts are deserving 
of notice. He will also be remembered for his work on the Tournament, which he 
so successfully helped to conduct. It will be remembered that while in school he 
held the managership as a junior and senior, and is now the first man to be retained 
as alumni manager. 

There will be an innovation in the athletic administration ne.xt year. As Father 
Quinn, the athletic director, had been called away to become president of Campion 
college, Dan Lamont, captain of the 1926 varsity football team, assistant football 
coach and freshman basketball coach, was chosen to fill this position for the coming 
season. Coach Lamont has shown his devotion to his Alma Mater both as a player 
and as a coach, and there is no doubt that he will carry on his good work as director 
of athletics. 

Much credit for the ease and smoothness with which gymnasium activities were run 
off is due to Earl Kearns, the director of the gymnasium. Both the Tournament and 
the basketball games of the season were played under the beat possible conditions on 
account of his efficient management. 



SM^^H^E^^^^ 



Page two hundred sixty-nine 



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Ih'KTltlT^'lt. 




Al Brown, Cheer Leader 
The Varsity letter was awarded to the following men : 

FOOTBALL 

Captain Edmund Johnson Anthony Lawless 

Captain-elect Philip Brennan Emmet Etu 

Maurice Schell Robert Burke 

Hugh Burke Joseph Witry 

Morris Biederman Maurice Walsh 

Martin Griffin Fred Sextro 

John Downs Harold Ball 

Manager Donald Sutherland 



BASKETBALL 



Edward Morand 
Paul Noland 
Jerome Koslowski 
Arthur Murphy 
Joseph McGrath 
Cornelius Collins 



Captain Joseph Witry 
Captain-elect Anthony Lawless 
Captain-elect James Brcmner 
Fred Sextro 



Charles Murphy 
Edward West 
William Smith 
Joseph McGrath 



CROSSCOUNTRY 



Captain Joseph Kearney 
Theodore Controuhs 
John Lowerey 



Captain Edward Brcmner 

Paul Liets 

Harold Prendergast 



John Home 
Thomas Healy 
Lothar Nurnberger 



TENNIS— 1927 



Lars Lundgoot 
David Barry 
Herbert Kramps 



Manager Ambrose Kelly 



Page two hundred seventy 



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FOOTBALL LETTER MEN, 1927 

Top Row — Walsh, Sextro, Nolakd, Biederman, Sutherland. 
Third Row — KiLEY, KosLow'SKi, WiTRY, MoRAND, H. Burke, Lamont. 
Second Row — Ball, Schell, Etu, McGrath, Collins. 
Bottom Row — Brennan, Lawless, Johnson, Downs, R. Burke. 

THE MONOGRAM CLUB 

The Monogram Club is an organization composed exclusively of Letter men in the 
various sports. The membership is thus made an exclusive right to those men who 
have played varsity sports and have proven their mettle m their respective lines of 
athletic endeavor. 

This last year has seen a visible broadening of the organisation, both in scope and 
in activities. The Club has embraced most of the departments by this time and hence 
is typically an all-university organization. Its members include the football varsity 
men, the basketball varsity team, and the track team. 

Followers of the Maroon and Gold will recognize in the picture above men who 
last year piled up an enviable record for our Alma Mater on the field of football. 

The Monogram Club boasts many of the m.embers of this successful grid contingent. 

The Monogram Club the past year has concerned itself with the prospects of getting 
a suitable home for the athletes of the university. They plan on opening the fall term 
with adequate and luxurious quarters for those men returning to further their athletic 
success on the field of play. 



Page two hundred seventv-one 



The Alumni Gvmnasium 




Page two hundred seventy-two 



FOOTBALL 




two hundred seventy-three 




Roger J. Kiley 
Head Football Coach 



Page two hundred seventy-four 








THE COACH 

Ever since the first LoyoJaii came into being Coach Roger Kiley has been lauded to 
the skies, and it is the sincere hope of the staif that Mr. Kiley's picture will continue 
to grace its pages for a long time to come. It is impossible for one to think of 
Rambler football without Roge; he has built it up from nothing to its present sohd 
foundation, he has developed his players, his coaches, and next year even the director 
of athletics will be one of his own alumni. With such a record of molding not only 
winning teams and star players, but men and characters, it is no wonder that Loyola 
football has come to connote one idea above all others — Kiley. 

Roge's teams have been successful, more than that when one considers the difficulties 
under which he has labored. Next year, with the splendid freshman strength which 
has been uncovered, he should reach new heights in success and reap some of the 
acclaim which is due him from the world. But whether he does or not is after all 
immaterial. He has left his monument on the minds and souls of the men he has 
trained, on the students and upon Loyola. 



Page two hundred seventy-five 



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Assistant Coach Dan Lamont 



Freshman Coach Eddie Norton 



THE SEASON 



The call for football men this year was answered by some hundred men. The pros- 
pect for a successful team was not as promising as it could have been. A number 
of the best men Loyola had ever had on its varsity squad were lost by graduation and 
their places were not expected to be filled as well by men of less training. A few of 
the mainstays were back, but by their help alone a championship team could not be 
formed, and consequently the defeats which the team took this season must be credited 
to the large number of men playing their first games for the Maroon and Gold and 
to the appalling lack of reserve strength. The student body was behind them never- 
theless, and the best games were attended by the largest crowds with which the team 
had ever been supported. The presence of the band in their new uniforms helped 
the morale not a little and the pep meetings, and incidentally a holiday occasionally 
for the Arts and Science department, made a new and powerful spirit of support 
possible. This spirit, more prevalent this year than ever before, acclaims the support 
which gridders may expect from their Alma Mater in the' future. May it, with the 
blessings of all concerned, ever hold its sway and steadily increase. 

The first game of the season was with the squad from Crane. This was merely a 
practice game and as far as could be seen the boys really received a lot of practice in 
making first downs, end runs, line plunges and touchdowns. Crane could not get any- 
where as far as the line was concerned and our friend Joe Witry was one of the 
main reasons. The advantage in weight was with the opponents, but they were equally 
slow and the fast Rambler squad ran rings around them. There were few trick plays 
on the part of the Loyola squad. They resorted to straight football and continually 
were a menace to the Crane goal. Every one of the aspirants for the coveted "L" 





Captain Eddie Johnson 



Captain-elect Phil Brennan 



saw action in this contest. In addition to the usual stars of the old school, the most 
promising of the sophomores were Morand, Ball, Murphy, Bob Burke, Sextro, and 
Huppert. The final score was forty-five to nothing and the only criticism which could 
be made would be that better kicking by the Ramblers might have made the score 
more threatening for the coming opponents. 

The first official game of the season was played at St. Paul against the powerful 
St. Thomas college team. Arrangements were made so that as many rooters as had 
the time and money could accompany the team. Consequently a few of the lads 
were there. The squad itself was quite up in the air as to who would make the trip 
and possibly the only one sure of going was Coach Kiley. However, in time the news 
was given out and everybody was satisfied, excepting those that didn't make the jour- 
ney. From the opening of the game the outcome was never in doubt, the Rambler 
attack commencing to function early. After a short march through the cadet line. Jack 
Downs broke away, twisted, dodged and ran his way sixty yards for a touchdown. 
Early in the second quarter the Ramblers again got up steam and Tony Lawless 
scored the second touchdown. A little later in this same quarter the St. Thomas team 
had its real chance to score. Loyola had just received a punt in the shadow of its 
own goal and on the next play a bad pass from Biederman went over Tony Lawless' 
head. Tony recovered the ball but was downed on the one yard line. The Loyola 
line held, however, and the Minnesota team was unable to score. The Ramblers inter- 
spersed their running attack with many well-executed passes. The blocking of Law- 
less was a special feature of the Loyola defense, with Etu, Downs and Grifiin showing 
remarkable ground gaining ability. The work of the line was also worthy of com- 
mendation. Sextro played a fine game and Witry, Walsh and Biederman were others 
whose play was outstanding. 



Page two hundred seventy-seven 



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The next game on the schedule was that with St. 
Louis at Soldiers Field. Preceding the game on Friday a pep 
meeting was held and the spirit of the men was certainly- 
boosted a lot. That night from the Loyola News dance the 
cheers of hundreds of Loyolans were broadcast. The team 
which St. Louis sent against Loyola this year was probably the 
best team which the aforementioned institution has had for 
several years. The squad was fast, heavy (outweighing Loyola 
fifteen pounds to the man) and comprised men who had seen 
years of training and experience. Moreover, they were out to 
avenge the defeats which the Ramblers had given them in the 
past. They were successful in the second quarter when a long 
pass to Decker resulted in a touchdown. The second addition 
to the score came when a punt which Captain Johnson was 
allowing to cross the line suddenly bounded up and hit him. 
and the ball was recovered by a St. Louis man. Joyce plunged 
over for the points. With the breaks of the game decidedly 
against them the Ramblers started the fourth quarter fighting 
mad. Griffin advanced the ball twenty yards and was im- 
mediately followed by Burke with a gain of fifteen. In the 
meanwhile Lawless was helping with gains through the line. 
With the time growing short the Ramblers attempted a pass 
which went wide and was caught by Lintsnich, who ran, un- 
molested, for the touchdown. The final score was St. Louis 
19— Loyola 0. 

MiUikin was the next team on the schedule. This game was 
staged at the Pine Bowl. The downstate team had several of 
Its veterans on the squad again this year, but it was not suffi- 





Left jtiHN.M)N, Lawless, Downs. 
Bottom — WiTRY, Brennan, Griffin. 

Page two hundred seventy-eight 



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ciently strong to win. Before the opening period was five min- 
utes old Loyola had scored. Practically the same experience 
was repeated a few minutes later with Burke on the scornig 
end. Again in the same quarter the Maroon and Gold had 
circled the Millikin defense for another touchdown. This time 
Jack Downs took the ball for the points and Witry added the 
extra marker by a well placed kick. With the score now 
twenty to nothing in their favor Coach Kiley allowed the sub' 
stitutes to continue the battle, and the second period ended 
without any addition to the score. In the third quarter the ball 
rolled over the Millikin, goal and Brennan tackled the unlucky 
possessor and added two additional points to the score. This 
was the only exciting thing that happened in this quarter. 
The final period saw Millikin obtain its only points. A blocked 
Loyola pass nestled in the arms of Lee, a Millikin man, who 
ran thirty yards for a touchdown. With only a few minutes 
to go the Ramblers' scoring machine again started to function. 
A pass to McGrath netted thirty yards and placed the ball on 
the visitors' forty-five yard line. By straight line plunges the 
pigskin was advanced to within scoring distance and Unavitch 
carried it over for another six points. The final score was 
twenty-eight to seven. 

The next game of the season was with De Paul, with Cap- 
tain Johnson missing because of an injured shoulder received in 
the Millikin game. At the kickoff there were twelve thousand 
fans of both teams on hand to witness the contest, which was 
staged at the Cubs' park. Loyola took the ball into the enemy's 
territory early in the first period. However, a bad fumble 







Rtglu — R. Burke, Etu, H. Burke. 

Bottom — SCHELL, SeXTRO, M. W.^iLSH. 



Page two hundred seventy-nine 



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overthrew their hopes for a touchdown. The ball was now in 
De Paul's possession and a long pass from Hussey to GafFney 
brought the ball to Loyola's twenty yard line. Another pass 
put the ball just three yards from the Ramblers" Ime. On the 
next play Hussey went over for the points, but the try for the 
goal failed. Loyola now evened up the score. The Ramblers 
brought the ball down the field on straight line play. At the 
end of the quarter the ball was one yard from De PauFs goal. 
The next play saw Tony Lawless go over for six points but the 
kick was wide and Witry did not add to the score. De Paul 
now opened up with a passing game. Every second play was 
a pass and most of them were good. The second De Paul 
tduchdown was scored in the same manner as was the first. The 
kick again failed as the period ended. The next quarter the 
Ramblers advanced the ball down the field on straight football. 
However, after gaining thirty-five yards a pass went wild and 
after De Paul had completed two more passes it looked as if 
they would score again. Loyola's line held, however, and after 
an exchange of punts the game ended with the ball in the 
middle of the field. The final score was twelve: to six in favor 
of De Paul. The superior passing of De Paul may be credited 
for the victory. 

The next game of the season was the tilt with the University 
of Dayton at Soldiers Field. The lirst touchdown of this game 
was made when Dayton blocked a punt and the right end ran 
twenty yards for a touchdown. Most of this battle was a kick- 
ing duel and during the second quarter the ball seesawed up 
and down the field. Neither team could score through the line 






Left — F. Murphy, B.-\ll, Ross. 

Bottom — SC(5TT, BlEDERM.\N, MoR.\ND. 

Pane two hundred eighty 



^.(^ 



and passing was out of the question on account of the severe 
cold. As a consequence both teams kicked on third down and 
no great advantages were gained. At the start of the third 
quarter Loyola gained through the line but after several plays 
were penalized twenty-five yards. After a long punt Dayton 
began a march down the field. A long pass was incomplete, but 
a smashing plunge brought the pigskin to the fifteen yard line. 
On the next play the quarterback of the Dayton team resorted 
to a little strategy and called a pass play. It was good and 
netted the second touchdown of the game. The contest ended 
with the ball in mid-field. The final score was Dayton 12 — 
Loyola 0. 

The next game of the year was played in the south with the 
University of Mississippi on November 1 1th. This game marked 
the start of the two weeks' southern trip. The team first jour- 
neyed to Jackson, Mississippi, where the game was staged on 
Armistice Day as the climax of the Mississippi State Fair. The 
Ramblers were entertained by the local post of the American 
Legion, and were shown southern hospitality at its best. Per- 
haps this aided in the revival of the team. The game was a 
gruelling contest and the teams were evenly matched, but with 
Captain Johnson back in the hneup, the squad was full of fight. 
The Ramblers opened the game with a passing attack which 
the southerners were unable to fathom. Late in the first quarter 
Loyola took the ball for a ride down the field. With the aid 
of Johnson's clever piloting and a few completed passes, the 
ball finally rested on Mississippi's five yard line. Lawless 
plunged the five yards and Witry came through with a perfect 







Right Lulling, M( Gr.^th, Huppert. 
Bottom — F. Walsh, Koslowski, Workm.an. 




two hundred eighty-one 



ma^mm^^mM^m: 



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kick for the extra point. In the third quarter Ole Miss recov- 
ered a fumbled put in midfield and, thanks to the terrific plung- 
ing of Cohen and the sensational running of Tad Smith, the 
ball was carried to within two yards of Loyola's line. On the 
third play Woodruff went over for the six points. Encouraged 
by this success the southerners plunged the Ramblers' line with 
everything they had, but in spite of the sweltering heat, to which 
the Loyola team was unaccustomed, the line held and Missis- 
sippi was unable to score again. Morand, Witry, GrifEn and 
Johnson were the outstanding stars of the Ramblers, while 
Cohen and Smith upheld the glory of the Mississippi squad. 

After a week of glorious entertainment at Bay St. Louis as 
guests of St. Stanislaus college, the Ramblers traveled to New 
Orleans to meet the great Loyola Wolfpack. Playing the 
strongest opponent which they had encountered this year the 
Ramblers almost broke through to victory only to have the 
Wolves win out in the last quarter. The southern team had its 
full strength on the field for the first time this year, and drove 
through to score in the first quarter. Aubrey Budge carried 
the brunt of the attack for the opponents, and it was he who 
went over for the touchdown. Maitland missed the kick for 
goal. Loyola, stung by this disadvantage, marched down the 
field and finally Tony Lawless went over for six points for the 
Maroon and Gold. The kick for the goal was missed. In the 
second quarter the tables were turned and Maitland, the big 
fullback, crossed the line. He also kicked the goal, which left 
the score at the half 1.^-6 in favor of the opponents. In the 
third quarter the Loyola offense again functioned properly and 





Left h 
Bottom- 



I M I -I , Ry.\n, West. 
-BriSL.\ne, Un.witch, G(irm.-\n. 



Page two hundred eighty-tii\ 



^mc^' 



the result was another touchdown for the Ramblers. Lawless 
contributed these points but the kick was again missed. Then 
came the last drive of the Wolfpack for the final points of the 
game. They again scored and managed to hold oif the des- 
perate attack of the Ramblers until the game ended with the 
final score 19-12. 

The banquet for the football team was held early in the 
spring. By an overwhelming vote, Phil Brennan, the flashy 
end, was elected captain for the coming season. Brennan was 
one of the most dependable men on the Rambler squad. He 
proved to be a sure tackier and was almost always the first 
man down under punts. He will undoubtedly be a true leader 
and a fighting captain. Seldom were gains made around his 
end, and as captain, his work will undoubtedly be the more 
smooth and will be given greater momentum by the desire to 
lead his team to victory. 

Prospcts for next season seem to be unusually bright. Al- 
though a few veterans will be lost, an abundance of material 
will come up from the freshman squad. Captain Johnson, the 
spirited leader, has played his last game of football for Loyola 
and his shoes will be hard to fill. Joe Witry, H. Burke, Ed 
West and Maury Schell, all sterling linemen, are also lost to 
the team. By their consistent play all season they earned the 
respect and gratitude of the entire student body. It is with 
regret that we watch their passing. 

Ne.al I. McAuLIFFE. 







Right — CONNELLEY, FrETT, DoOLEY. 

Bottom — A. Murphy, B.arry, Copp. 




Page tti'O hundred eighty-three 



^7^ 



^ 



^^^m^^mm^mm( > 




THE VARSITY SQUAD 

Top Row — Coach Kiley, Morand, Brislane, Buckley, Sextro, West, Ryan, 
F. Walsh, M. Walsh, Biederman, Witry, Assistant Coach Lamont. 

Second Row — R. BuRKE, Ross, Workman, Copp, Lawless, Koslowski, Barry, 
Gorman, Frett, Brennan, Downs, F. Murphy. 

Bottom Row — Collins, McGrath, Ball, Unavitch, Huppert, Griffin, Captain 
Johnson, Dooley, Connelley, Scott, Schell, Etu. 



THE SEASON'S RECORD 



Loyola 45 

Loyola 14 

Loyola 

Loyola 28 

Loyola 6 

Loyola 

Loyola 7 

Loyola 12 



Crane College 

St. Thomas College 7 

St, Louis University 19 

James Milliken University 7 

De Paul University 12 

University of Dayton 12 

University of Mississippi 6 

Loyola University (New Orleans). 19 



Page two hundred eglityfour 



i>© 




THE FRESHMAN SQUAD 

Top Row — Bruun, Poppelreiter, Lutzenkirchen, Kuehnle, Ferlita, Baumbich, 

Nolan, Higgins, Jordan, Coach Norton. 
Second Row — O'Brien, Durburg, Malloy, Devlin, Brady, McNeill, Houren, 

Weber. 
Bottom Row — Gilbert, Captain Durkin, Buckholtz, Kaiser, Radzienda. 

THE FRESHMAN SQUAD 

The 1927 season proved a very successful one as far as the Freshman football squad 
was concerned. Under the able tutelage of Eddie Norton the squad proved to be 
a real football team,. The team was made up of many of the middle west's best prep 
material. There were Captain Durkin and Brady from Loyola Academy, Waesco and 
Nolan from Joliet, Maloney and Durburg from St. Ignatius, McNeil of St. Rita's, 
Weber and Kaiser from Englewood and Spalding Institute, Ferlita hails from Florida, 
Lutzenkirchen and Poppelreiter from Wheaton, Jordan from Quigley, Kuehnle from 
Lake View, and O'Brien and O'Reily from St. Louis U High, 

One of the innovations of the Freshman team this year was the scheduling of out- 
side games. Ordinarily the Frosh taught the varsity how to work against their coming 
opponents. 

On November 1 1 th the Frosh engaged the Lake Forest academy. The Academy had 
a 6-0 win over the Notre Dame Frosh and had played such teams as the Dartmouth 
and Yale Frosh. Loyola, however, held them to a scoreless tie. The game ended with 
the ball in Loyola's possession on their opponents' fifteen-yard line. The game was 
marked by great offensive play despite the fact that neither* team could put across the 
winning marker. 

The next game was the strong De Paul Frosh. This game also ended in a score- 
less tie. Although ground gaining was often and long neither team could gather the 
needed yardage when within scoring distance. 

James Walter Collins. 

Page two hundred eighty-five 



m^ 



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L 



y^^^Mm''^^^'^':^m f^: 




SoMh VltWS Ot IHh RAMBLhRS IN AcridX 
Page tivo hundred eighty-six 



.(^ 





^^1 'ijjjliff I I '^i 



' V VT1 




Ups and Downs of the Season 



ffc; two hundred eighty-seven 



Johnson and V/itry 




ge two htmdred eighty-eight 



BASKETBALL 




Page two hundred eightynirie 



--^ 



^i 



-^ 



.'^i^i^ ^ -^^^;^Mi^i^ 




Leonard D. Sachs 
Head Basfeetbdl! Coach 



tu'o Jiiiiidrcci ninety 



Ma^^ 



^IStatfiS^ii 



ST^^.v(^ 




THE COACH 

Leonard D. Sachs has by now proved himself unquestionably one of the greatest 
basketball mentors in the country. His work last year alone, when he turned, his 
apparently hopeless squad into the greatest team Loyola ever produced, would stamp 
him as this, but when we consider that he brought his squad to new heights this year, 
including clear-cut victories over some of the best basketball teams in the West, that 
he does the same thing year after year with his high school teams, which include every 
sport, we begin to have some idea of the greatness of Sachs. As an athlete there is 
no better all-around performer in local circles, perhaps there are others as great in 
mere feats, but there is no one who combines athletic skill with the ability and per- 
sonality to impart it to others as does Sachs. Loyola is proud of him and his teams, 
and looks forward to the future with supreme confidence. 



Page two hundred ninety-one 




Captain Joe Witry 



THE SEASON 

Living up to their record of last year the Ramblers played the stiffest schedule in 
their history and marked up sixteen wins out of twenty chances. At least half of 
these games were played on foreign floors, where three of the four defeats were 
suffered. These were in the course of strenuous trips, on which the Loyola squad 
played three or four games in as many nights. The one defeat at home showed not 
only the strong opposition which was met all through the season but the sterling basket- 
ball the varsity played and the wonderful coaching of Sachs. 

The "miracle team" of the previous year, which started with little material, the 
poorest prospects in history, and then swept through the season like wildiire, not 
losing a game on its own floor, and playing the hardest schedule in history uith a 
total squad of seven men, and with two men playing out of their natural positions, 
had aroused the university to such an extent that even greater things were expected 
this season. The rooters were not disappointed. 

The entire team of the previous year was back, and was strengthened by the addi- 
tion of a number of sophomore stars. Of these big Charley Murphy showed imme- 
diately that he was going to land a regular berth. He found it at center, where his 
great height gave the Ramblers a mortgage on the tipoff. This permitted Ed West 
to be moved back to guard, his natural position, where he played a phenomenally 
steady game. Jimmy Bremner, in turn, was moved to his real position at forward, 
from which position his under the basket shots proved real poison to the opponents. 
Tony Lawless was his usual invincible self at the other forward, while Captain Joe 
Witry, one of the greatest athletes Loyola has ever produced, now with the New York 
Giants, turned in his second year of brilliant leadership from the other guard position. 
Joe McGrath and Harry McDonough, forwards. Bill Smith, center, and Freddy Sextro, 

Page two hundred ninety-two 












■^ 



Loyola versus Butler 



guard, were always ready to give a good account of themselves when called upon, 
and their showing makes next year's prospects seem bright. 

Loyola started the season with a sweeping victory over Milwaukee State Normal. 
The final score was 48-21. The Ramblers' fast short passing game proved too much 
for the boys from Wisconsin. Normal got off to a fast start by making four baskets 
in the first few minutes of play while Coach Sachs' outfit could get only a free throw. 
Then the boys decided to play basketball. A free throw and two baskets by Lawless 
and a basket by West tied the score. They kept the fireworks going and finished the 
half 23-11. The second half saw no change in the scoring ability of Milwaukee or 
the letting up of Loyola's defense. The tally for that period was 2^-10. Murphy, 
Lawless, and Bremner starred for the varsity. 

In their first game on foreign ground the Ramblers descended like a landslide on 
the Golden Avalanche and came away winners to the tune of 20-9. Loyola got away 
to a slow start and did not score until eleven minutes of the half had passed. Both 
teams played a good defensive game, but Murphy was the difference between them. 
He scored half of Loyola's points — enough alone to beat Marquette. The hosts of 
the evening scored a long basket shortly after Bremner drew first blood and were then 
on even terms for the last time. 

On New Year's Eve Loyola tore t'hrough the Oregon Aggies and rang out 1927 in 
an impressive style as it crushed the 1927 Pacific Coast champions. The Ramblers' end 
zone style defense completely baffled the Aggies, so they tried man-to-man play. As 
a result the Varsity made some points on free throws. Torson started the scoring for 
the visitors with two impossible long shots and completed their quota for the first half. 
In the second half Burr starred for Oregon by making eleven points. The Ramblers 

Page two hundred ninety-three 



"^' 
^^^^*=^ 





Bremner 



West 



kept their lead established in the first period and finished at the long end of the score 
of 31-19. Lawless and Murphy starred for the home team. 

In their most overwhelming victory of the year Loyola next beat the Arkansas 
Aggies 44-1? in the Alumni gym. The shock' troops started and played a good game 
until Butler sank three long shots. Then the regulars went in. They all kept in con- 
tact with the basket and finished the half 22-7. The second half was a repetition of the 
first. The subs were put back in towards the end and showed the Arkansas boys that 
everyone on the Loyola squad could make baskets. Lawless with five baskets and four 
free throws and Murphy with five field goals and two foul shots starred for the Ram- 
blers. Butler did good work for the Aggies. 

The Varsty defeated Marquette in their second encounter by 27-12. It was by far 
the roughest game of the season and Loyola took advantage of it by making nine free 
throws out of seventeen tries. Marquette looked good at first but were considerably 
slowed down by the basket-shooting ability of Bremner and Lawless. At the half 
Loyola led 12-7. Marquette never classed with the Ramblers at all. All their points 
were made on long shots and they netted only five points in the second period. Brem- 
ner and Lawless split nineteen points as evenly as possible. 

At Galesburg, Lombard was the sixth victim of the Ramblers' shooting but put up 
a brave fight. Loyola's defense was slow in getting going so Lombard led at the half 
by two baskets. Then the varsity defense tightened and Bremner and Murphy made 
enough baskets to give Loyola a lead of three points, which the defense kept to the 
end of the game. The final score was 16-13. 

The following night the fans in St. Louis were given a real treat when the Billikens 



Page two hundred ninety-foui 



'm^^mmm^^ 



M^ 





Lawless 



Murphy 



played a tight game only to losd by three points. It was a long time before Loyola 
could get the ball but when they did they kept the basket hot. The last quarter saw 
the Ramblers make a marvelous rally to win, 26-21. 

Loyola took its first defeat at Bradley in a game in which they were completely out- 
classed. The famous Rambler defense was of no use at Peoria and Bremner and Law- 
less were too well guarded to get in any baskets. Murphy, too, was completely sur- 
rounded most of the time. There is no alibi for the 32-9 score, but it might he noted 
that it was the third game in four nights for the Varsity. 

A victory over Centre two days later was the result of the Rambler comeback. 
Bremner played an exceedingly fast game, sinking shots from all sections of the floor 
and ringing up seven baskets. Lawless played a sterling game defensively besides con- 
necting for two baskets and two free throws. Centre played a close defensive game 
but rarely opened up. When they did they were good. It is difficult to understand 
why they did not score more than 15 against Loyola's J8. 

Two nights later, after the hottest, fastest game of the season, Michigan State found 
itself at the wrong end of the score. Loyola felt its way slowly during the first half 
and did not play up to its usual standard. The Varsity led at the half by merely 
12-8. With the second period, the fireworks began and the final whistle found the 
score 19-19. In the second overtime period Michigan sank a basket. With a minute 
to go Lawless tied the score and a half minute later fighting Tony made it 23-21. 
Bremner and Lawless starred to win the game. 

The ne.xt night at Champaign, the Illinois Reserves proved an easy victory for the 



two hundred ninety-five 



iC9) ^l^& 




m^rm 





Mf'GRATH 



Smith 



fighting Varsity quintet. Lawless ripped their defense to shreds and received no httle 
help from Murphy. West and Witry kept the basket free of Illini shots and the subs 
did good work in adding to the score. The final whistle blew on a count of 27' 12, 
ending one of the most grueling stretches of play that any team ever essayed, six games 
in eight days, and four of them away from home. 

After a week's rest Captain Witry kept Loyola's end up in the second St. Louis 
game by contributing four baskets and a free throw. He was the only man who played 
in the usual Rambler style. St. Louis was strong and threatened to go away with 
the game. The lead shifted six times. West sank the winning basket with less than 
a minute to go. Oldfield and H. Strong starred for St., Louis. The score was 2J'22. 

It took Butler to administer the Varsity's first defeat on the home floor in three 
years. Their downfall was due to the brilliant playing by their opponents, coupled 
with the absence of their usual teamwork and basket-shooting accuracy. The first 
period was slow but Butler finished ahead, 9-8. The second half was better — for Butler. 
The score was 25-17 against Loyola, despite the good work of Bremner. 

On a short trip east St. Mary's fell before the brilliant passing attack of the Ram- 
blers and accurate shooting on the part of Murphy. The defense of Witry and West 
had the Orchard Lake boys guessing all during the game while Bremner and Lawless 
kept up with Murphy's pace. St. Mary's tried hard in the last half, and although they 
could not score they held the Ramblers to one field goal. The final score w^s 26-16. 

The Varsity apparently lost their basket eyes when they traveled to Detroit for 
they scored only eleven points to the home boys' thirteen. Murphy stayed in the 
game with an injured ankle. Although both teams passed well the game was listless. 
An apparent Loyola victory was turned into defeat when the referee decided that a 
basket made by Lawless as the whistle blew did not count. Detroit scored three points 
in the overtime period but Loyola failed to find the hoop. 






^^' V 






\i 



McDoNouGH Sextro 

The St. Xavier game, the third on the trip,, was hotly contested and the score of 
14-11 showed that while the Ramblers were not up to their usual game they were not 
asleep either. Witry and Murphy were outstanding for their guarding and passing 
but nevertheless Loyola was on the wrong end of the score. 

Back home again, Lombard went down in defeat before the Ramblers the second 
time this year. Murphy starred with seven baskets and was given good support by 
Lawless and Bremner. The game was marked by close guarding on both sides and by 
the accurate passing of Loyola. The Varsity was leading 13-7 at the half and raised 
the score to 27-18 before the whistle blew. 

In the St. Viator game Loyola hit its old stride. Everyone played perfectly. The 

passing was fast and accurate and the ball dropped through the net more easily. The 

defense was flawless. St. Viator scored only two field goals in each period. The 
final score was 37-9. 

The Ramblers were determined to avenge their defeat at the hands of St. Xavier's 
and they did. Joe Witry, playing his last game for Loyola before leaving to join 
the New York Giants, starred with Murphy and Bremner and the Musketeers were 
completely outclassed. Loyola led, 19-11, at the half. In the second period Xavier 
tried to come back but the Varsity made ten pomts before they could score and then 
added enough more to win, 40-19. 

In the* final game of the season another defeat was avenged when Detroit bowed 
before the onslaught of the Varsity to the tune of 26-21. The Ramblers were without 
Witry but Sextro played in a manner which boded well for next season. Both teams 
passed well and were able to find the basket but Loyola's defense was the better. The 
Titans never really threatened and were saved from more ignominious defeat by the 
whistle, which ended the game and Loyola's greatest basketball season. 

Robert Thomson. 

Page two hundred ninety-seven 



c^ 



^.> 




THE VARSITY SQUAD 
Top Row — West, Sextro, Sachs, Smith, Murphy. 
Bottom Row — Bremner, Lawless, Captain Witry, McGrath, McDonough. 



THE SEASON'S RECORD 



_48 

.20 



A4 

_27 



Loyola 

Loyola 

Loyola 

Loyola 

Loyola 

Loyola 16 

Loyola 26 

Loyola 9 

Loyola 38 

Loyola 23 

Loyola 27 

Loyola 23 

Loyola 17 

Loyola . 26 

Loyola 11 

Loyola 11 

Loyola 27 

Loyola 37 

Loyola 40 

Loyola 26 



Milwaukee Normal 21 

Marquette 9 

Oregon Aggies 19 

Arkansas Aggies 13 

Marquette 12 

L<_5mbard 13 

St. Louis 21 

Bradley 32 

Centre 15 

Michigan State 21 

Illinois Reserves 12 

St. Louis ^ 22 

Butler 27 

St. Mary 16 

University of Detroit 13 

St. Xavier 14 

Lombard 18 

St. Viator 9 

St. Xavier 19 

University of Detroit 21 



Page tii'o liiiiuircd iinu-tv-ciglit 



^^i^ 




THE FRESHMAN BASKETBALL TEAM 
Top Row — Roach, Fitzgerald, Coach Lamont, Waesco, Tracy. 
Bo:tom Row — Baumbich, Durkin, Smith, K.mser. 

THE FRESHMAN SQUAD 

The Freshman basketball squad, combining business with pleasure, succeeded in 
bringing a successful close to the season of '28. 

Last year the Freshman team was used to merely scrimmage the varsity and to 
initiate the system. However, the past season has told a somewhat different story. 
Besides playing the varsity the Freshman had a schedule of their own. Six games 
were listed — two with Fort Sheridan, two with St. Bede's, one with Lake Forest and 
one with Culver. 

The team was made up of some of the best high school stars in the country. Among 
these was John Waesco of De La Salle of Joliet, last year's Tournament winners. He 
was chosen a member of the all-Tournament team. Durburg, who played regularly 
at forward, came from St. Ignatius High. Tracey and Durkin both were from Loyola 
Academy. Tracey was the regular center while Durkin was a regular guard. Fits- 
gerald. Kaiser and Smith performed efficiently at guard. 

Fort Sheridan was the first victim of the Frosh. Loyola, after a comfortable margin 
at the half, let up in the second half and were almost overtaken. The team rallied, 
however, and won 15-14. Next on the schedule was St. Bede's. Waesco started the 
game with four baskets. At the half Loyola was ahead, 16-6. The second half was 
almost a reduplication of the first, making the final score 32-14. Things were reversed 
when the Frosh played at St. Bede's. At the half Bede's were ahead 12-7. Bede's 
gathered twelve more points in the second half while Loyola made fifteen, just two 
points shy of tying the score. 

One of the worst reverses was that suffered at the hands of Culver Military acad- 
emy. The score in this fatal event was 35-26. Fort Sheridan also had revenge by 
beating Loyola later in the season. Lake Forest also handed the Frosh a setback. 

Much credit must be given Dan Lamont, who relieved Coach Sachs of the job of 
coaching the Frosh. He has brought out some of the best talent that were in the men 
under his tutelage. 

James Walter Collins. 

two hundred ninety-nine 



^:^ 



TT^CTITJ^ITTtJiTrTICT: 



wm^^^^mfB 




Edward C. Krupka 
Executn'e Secretary 

THE FIFTH NATIONAL CATHOLIC INTERSCHOLASTIC 
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

The Fifth Annudl CathoHc Interscholastic Tournament opened this year in the 
evening of March 21. Again Loyola university was playing host to the cream of 
the country's athletes. Teams from thirty-two cities of twenty-five diiTerent states 
participated in the great meet. The entry list was made up of the winners of the 
various state and sectional tournaments of the Catholic schools of Ithe United States. 

The same competent staff that had functioned so smoothly the year before was 
again in charge. Father B. J. Quinn, S.J., v\as in full charge for the last time. 
Father Quinn has since left the university hut his tireless efforts and the remarkable 
successes he achieved will hardly be forgotten. Ed. Krupka and his aide-de-campe. 
Bob Morris, had been working all during the previous months lining up the entrants. 
The coaching staff under the direction of Roger Kiley and Len Sachs took care 
of the teams and their handlers after they arrived at the scene of actual play. 

Mr. John T. Dempsey headed the reception committee and supervised the quarter- 
ing of the visiting players in the Parkway, Webster and Belden Stratford hotels. 
In Its task of greeting the visitors, the reception committee enjoyed the co-operation 
of the Blue Key fraternity. This society in accordance with what is by now a time- 
honored tradition, extended to the strangers the hearty grip of friendship and the 
welcomes of Chicago and Loyola. The Blue Key had enlisted the services of the 
school at large in the work of meeting all incoming trains bearing tournament-bound 
teams. From' first to last things moved with flawless exactitude and the regularity of 



Page three hundred 




J(.)HN T. Dempsey, Jr. 
Cliairman of Housing Committee 

clockwork. From that brilliant first round when sixteen games had to be played m 
as many hours, down to the finals when 7,500 people stormed the Coliseum, there 
was not even a hint of confusion. 

That colorful first round saw many a good basketball team go wrong — frightened 
perhaps by the huge gym and the cheering crowds. It saw jnore than one heart- 
breaking defeat by one or two point margins. It saw as well the game in which St. 
Stanislaus piled up 46 points to win the high-point prize. By Friday morning the 
race was well under way and when the report of the timer's gun reechoed through 
the gym at 10 o'clock that night the field had narrowed to eight teams. The bitterly 
contested round had eliminated among others, both Chicago teams, St. Stanislaus of 
high point fame and the smoothly working aggregation from Elder High, Cincinnati. 

The eight survivors included Roman Catholic high of Philadelphia, heralded as 
probable winner of the Tournament, the close-guarding St. Louis outfit and the ever- 
dangerous quintet of St. Xavier's, Louisville, Ky. Leading these in popular interest 
and comment was De La Salle of Joliet, defending champions. By followers of the 
court game, dopesters, prophets, et. al., they were conceded only an outside chance 
of duplicating their performance of the year before. So pubhc sentiment ran : Joliet 
had a good team but so had the other seven schools and who ever heard of a national 
champion repeating? 

Saturday evening found the field reduced by half. Four teams had entered the 
semi-finals and the mammoth meet was nearing a spectacular finish. Joliet had 
earned its place in the semi-final :bracket by virtue of its decisive 21-12 victory over 
Cathedral high of Indianapolis. St. Patrick's of Pueblo had taken St. Mary's of 
Westfield and was at least sure of a place in the semi-finals. The consistent St. Louis 

Page three hundred one 



^^^m^c 



^?^ 




The Final Game at the Coliseum 



outfit had nosed out the famed Roman CathoHc high squad by two points and was 
eyeing the Cardinal's Cup with covetous eyes. The fighting Kentuckians had downed 
the boys from St. John's of Brooklyn and were themselves considering the probability 
of their capturing the national championship for the second time. 

The games on Saturday night determined the finalists. Joliet measured St. Pat- 
rick's to the tune of 28 to 18 and won the right to meet St. Louis m the finals 
when that team nosed out St. Xavier's by three points in one of the best of the 
tournament games. The boys from Illinois were no longer outsiders in the 
running. For the second time they were rapping at the portals of the Hall of Fame. 
They had rounded into a post-season form which coaches and the men who know 
athletes were unanimous in declaring remarkable. They were due to repeat — the 
best efforts of St. Louis high to the contrary. 

On Sunday night, greatly benefited by a full day's rest which finalists in preceding 
tournaments had not enjoyed, the seekers after national honors went into the last 
of the grueling battles. And there at the Coliseum before a crowd of seven thousand, 
five hundred people, the national championship was decided. 

From the start Joliet had the game well in hand. The De La Salle boys had 
limped through the Chicago League schedule minus two of their best men. . With 
the cripples once more in action the team gained confidence with each hard-earned 
victory and inspired to almost phenomenal playing by the hope of repeating the 
victory of the previous year and thereby accomplishing the impro'bable, they swept 
everything before them. 

The uncanny sharpshooting of McCarthy of De La Salle broke die hearts 
of the Mound City boys and their stout defense was perforated for si.xteen points. 

Pane three hundred two 



(^ 




The Prize of the Struggle — The New Cardinal Mundelein Cup 

In the third quarter the St. Louis team blanketed the elusive McCarthy, neglecting 
the four-ply combination of Colona, Kennedy, Furlong and Wolcott. These men 
working beautifully, took care of the scoring in the third period. The doughty Fur- 
long sank three in a row to make the titular contest a romp and when McCarthy's 
final basket made it fourteen points in a row for Joliet, the national championship 
was in the bag. The famous St. Louis defense with Hemp, a man of all-tournament 
caliber as a pivot, had been solved. 

St. Xavier bested St. Patrick to take third place. This game was played before 
the title contest. 

After the timer's guri had barked for the last time and the greatest of all tourna- 
ments had come to a close, the most impressive part of the whole proceedings, the 
m,aking of the awards, took place. The presentations were made before such not- 
ables as Bishop Hoban of Rockford, the Reverend Father Kelley, president of Loyola 
university, Hon. Wm. Hale Thompson, Mayor of Chicago, and the mayors of Joliet 
and St. Louis. 

As the weary athletes came forward to accept the prizes, cheering thousands 
rocked the historic old Coliseum, scene of many hard-fought battles, on its founda- 
tions. The Cardinal Mundelein trophy, the highest honor' of the tourney, that 
from which the meet derives the name: "The Cardinal's Cup Classic," went again 
this year to De La Salle of Joliet. This year the cup is newly designed and recast, 
all of which will make for pleasing variety in that well-filled trophy case down in 
Joliet. The Mayor's cup given by William Hale Thompson of Chicago, was added 
to Joliet's ever-growing list of prizes: this by virtue of the team's excellent showing 
in the tournament. 

The second, third and fourth team trophies, natural sized silver, gold-bronze and 

Page three hundred three 



cflIi£££tliliaE'.i 



BiS 






mmmmmm^ ^ 




DE LASALLE HIGH SCHOOL OF JOLIET, ILLINOIS 

T^ational Champions 

Top Row — Manager Feeley, Jackson, Harper, Schuster, DelRose, Coach 

Carroll. 
Bottom Row — Kennedy, Captain Colona, McCarthy, Wolcott, Furlong. 

bronze basketballs mounted cm baekbiiards were awarded to St. Louis, St. Patrick 
and St. Xavier. The individual members of the four finalist teams each received 
one of the highly prized watch charms, the usual gift to survivors of the quarter 
finals. 

St. Louis won another prize in the Edward F. Moore trophy for their efforts in 
overcoming the greatest handicap in the second half to win. That high-powered 
aggregation representing Roman Catholic high of Philadelphia, was given the call 
as the best coached team on the floor, a distinction which they have won for two 
years of tourney play. For this they received the Sears-Roebuck cup. 

That most singular honor, the winning of the sportsmanship trophy, regarded by 
many as second only to the winning of the Cardinal's cup, was conferred on the 
team from St. Mary's high of San Antonio, Texas. Out of some J^O athletes to 
bq declared the most sportsmanlike in conduct both on and off the floor, is one of 
the greatest distinctions that any team can earn. This prize donated by the Chicago 
Evening American, fosters that noble spirit of sportsmanship which Loyola loves so 
well and admires in its guests. Much could be said regarding the splendid spirit of 
the visitors. Under strange and sometimes adverse conditions these youths carrying 
on their shoulders the honor of their respective schools and cities, behaved admirably. 
The reception committee, the officials of the tournament, the members of the Blue 
Key, were one in pronouncing the athletes real men : of the type which Catholic 
education is seeking to develop throughout the country. 

Page three hundred four 



^S 



llii^);-:-jt^VH-t^'n^ - 




ST. LOUIS HIGH SCHOOL OF ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI 

Second Place Vi/inners 

Top Row — Manager W. Jenkins, Coach Stanton, Manager P. Jenkins. 

Second Row — Kern, Cullen, Shea, Lynch, Jecklin. 

Bottom Row — Daly, Bromschwig, Captain Hemp, Kennedy, Flannery. 

Before the curtain fell on the last act of this athletic drama, the officials of the 
tournament announceed the All-Tournament team. The followint; men were elected 
to this, the highest of individual honors: Evans of St. Xavier's, Louisville, Ky., 
and Wolcott of De La Salle, Joliet, forwards. The center position went' to'L. Tanser 
of Roman Catholic high of Philadelphia. Diamond of Holy Rosary, Syracuse, N. Y., 
and the hard-working Hemp of St. Louis, were named as guards on the mythical iive. 
This combination was popular with the spectators, which fact attested to the com- 
petence and ability of the staff of officials. Sabo, of the fast St. Patrick's quintet, 
was declared the player of most value to his team. This prize, awarded on the 
basis of unusual individual merit, was the Daniel A. Loughlin trophy. 

And so the 1928 National Catholic Interscholastic Tournament became history. 
This, the greatest of all tourneys, had realized the highest hopes of its instigator and 
first director, Mr. Joseph Thorning, S.J. It rewarded with remarkable success the 
efforts of Father Quinn, S.J., who was functioning for the last time in an official 
capacity for old Loyola. To the competing players it offered a great experience and 
a short acquaintance with our own university, the men she boasts of and the prin- 
ciples she reveres. The record-breaking attendance figures proved its popularity with 
Chicago's sport-loving public. A great university, sponsoring the greatest of meets 
which had risen in five years from the status of an invitational affair to a position 
it now occupies: nationally acclaimed as the meet which brings together for com- 
petition the country's finest. 

Francis J. Walsh. 

Page three hundred five 



l(K), 



The Bas\ethall Floor 







Page three hundred six 



MINOR SPORTS 




Page three hundred seven 



mf^3m:MM^mm;^mm,0tm^fsmMim^mm^. 





Coach Tigerman 
CROSS-COUNTRY 

Last Fall witnessed the successful start of cross-country running at Loyola, under 
the inspiration and encouragement of Joseph B. Tigerman, star performer of the Illi- 
nois Athletic Club. Sporadic attempts had been made to develop track athletics on 
a sound basis, but the cross-country team was the first really successful and solid 
accomplishment in this regard. 

The call for candidates brought out about a dozen runners, many of them greatly 
inexperienced, and all of them underclassmen. Working under great handicaps, they 
displayed splendid spirit and developed swiftly under the tutelage of their coach. He 
laid out a diificult course around the Lake Shore Campus grounds, about three and 
three-eighths miles in length, which proved very satisfactory for the home meets and 
for workouts. 

Four meets were held, three at home, and the Loyola harriers were victorious in 
three of them. Armour Tech provided the first opposition on October 22, between 
the halves of the football game wnth Millikin, and was defeated, 26 to 29. The fol- 




THE CRC^SS COUNTRY TEAM 

Standing — CoNTROuLis, Fit2(.;erald, Maher, Lowerey, Healy, Smith. 
Kneeling — Capt. Kearney. 

P(i,t;e tdrcf liioicired eig/it 



itaaaKfaiMa&li 




Low'EREY Wins! 

lowing week Lake Forest college invaded the campus and defeated the Ramblers, 25 
to 30. Next week, November 5, the Loyola men journeyed tO' Galesburg, Illinois, 
and, after a thrilling meet, nosed out Lombard college, 27 to 28. This was the only 
time during the season that Jack Lowerey failed to win the race. On November 10, 
the Ramblers closed the season with another one-point victory, this time over Wheaton 
college, at Loyola, the score again being 27 to 28. 

Jack Lowerey, holder of the national freshman collegiate record for the mile, was 
the greatest star of the team, losing first place only once during the season. Joe 
Kearney, formerly a Catholic League distance star at Loyola academy, captained the 
team. Other mainstays of the team were Ed Smith, Ted Controulis, Tom Healy, John 
Home and Lothar Nurnburger. 

With the approach of spring, the members of the squad, after working out most of 
the winter on the boards in the gymnasium, were out again, ready for another season, 
which is expected to be supplemented by regular track work, in addition to the long 
cross-country grind. Coach Tigerman and the members of the harrier squad have done 
wonders in the promotion of track athletics at Loyola and are deserving of the thanks 
of the entire student body for their efforts. 




Start of the Meet with Armour 



Page three hundred ni- 



o, 



;:^^^^ 




LuNDGOOT IN ACTION 



TENNIS 

The team that Loyola put on the courts during the 1927 season was the strongest 
that has represented Loyola for the past five years. With a squad headed by Lund- 
goot and with Liet;, Bremner, Prendergast and Ban-y taking up the attack, Loyola 
made an enviable reci)rd. De Paul, Wheaton, Lake Forest and Y. M. C. A. college 
were decisively beaten while matches were lost to Marquette and Notre Dame. 

In the majority of matches Lundgoot played first man with Liet2, Bremner, Pren- 
dergast and Barry playing in the order named. All showed a sterling consistent game, 
although special mention should be given to Lundgoot and Prendergast for their high 
percentage of victories. In the doubles Lietz and Bremner were the most sparkling 
performers with Lundgoot and Prendergast and Kramps and Barry as two other de- 
pendable combinations. At the close of the season letters were awarded to Lundgoot, 
Lietz, Bremner, Prendergast, Barry and Kramps. Ambrose Kelly managed the team 
and arranged the strong schedule that the team faced. 

In the first Loyola Js[ews Tennis Tournament, held m the Fall of 1926, there were 
appro.ximately forty contestants for the Loyola J^ews Trophy and the school champion- 
ship. Men from all departments took part and the Law, Medical and Arts schools 
were represented in the semi-finals. Emmet Hogan won the championship, defeating 
John Coffey of the Law School in straight sets. Previously Coffey had won from Lars 
Lundgoot wliile Hogan beat Frank Melody to enter the finals. The tournament un- 
covered a wealth of material that was a great help in making the 1927 season a 
success. 

The first event of the 1928 season was the annual Loyola 7s(eii's Tennis Tournament, 
described elsewhere m this edition of the Loyolan. It showed the great interest being 

Page three hundred ten 







--^1 



^-*-hJ 



Loyola versus Marquette, April 30, 1927 

taken in tennis, however, and brought a number of promising prospects to the atten- 
tion of the manager. Ambitious plans were laid for the spring and a number of 
matches with very strong teams were scheduled. Armour Tech and Crane college 
were added to the Varsity's opponents for the first time and matches were arranged 
with most of our old rivals. The longest trip of the team was to Milwaukee, where 
Marquette was to be played on the nineteenth of May. At the time the Loyohn goes 
to press these matches have yet to be played so it is impossible to give results. 

One match has been finished. Lake Forest being played at Loyola on May 5. It 
resulted in a tie, each team winning two singles and a doubles. Although the result 
was indecisive it showed that a successful season can be expected. 

The squad this year has been the victim of more than the usual number of unfortu- 
nate accidents. Mike Pauly, winner of the Loyolan J'lews Tournament, was forced to 
discontinue school this spring. Pressure of school and outside work also prevented 
Prendergast, Lundgoot, Kramps and Coffey from playing. This left Paul Lietz; as 
almost the only experienced player and made it necessary to build almost an entire new 
team. This has been done and a fair squad assembled. Frank Melody, Frank Walsh, 
Dick Shanahan, Dave Barry, Frank Butler and Joe Grady have stepped forward to take 
the places of the stars of former years. Lietz is the highest ranking playei* at present, 
with the others fighting strenuously for high rank. 

Ambrose B. Kelly. 



Pdge three hundred eleven 



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A Scene on the Courts 
LOYOLA NEWS ANNUAL TENNIS TOURNAMENT 

The second annu.il Loyola News Tennis Tournament was started on September 21, 
1927. After a week of play featured by close matches and many upsets, Mike Pauly 
ot the Law department defeated Paul Lietz of the Arts in the final game. By so 
doing, Mike merited the Loyola News silver loving cup, symbolic of the championship. 
The tournament was declared a complete success by the ofhcials in charge. Almost 
seventy-five aspirants started play in the first round, and from the opening contest it 
was apparent that the winner must play a surpassingly steady game. And this was 
exactly what he did. Mike Pauly was invincible. During the week of play he showed 
a marked superiority over more seasoned and higher ranked players. He was at the 
top of his form throughout his five matches. 

The tourney was originated by members of the Loyola News two years ago. From 
the start the students gave their hearty support, and incidentally, paid their twenty- 
five cents entry fee willingly. The sponsors of this fall tournament must be given 
due recognition and gratitude, for they gave to the school competitive intramural ath- 
letics, in which anyone who ever saw a tennis racquet might compete. Athletics in 
which the majority of the student body might compete was a sore need. The Loyola 
News annual Fall Tennis Tournament supplied that need, and the founders, sponsors 
and managers of the tourney merit the appreciation of the entire student body. 

Paul Lietz, who is in charge of the tennis courts, was appointed director of the 
tournament. He was assisted by Robert Murphy, Paul Diggles and Paul O'Connor. 
The committee started to work immediately. The courts must be put in shape, entries 
received, brackets drawn up and time assigned. Devoting all their spare time to the 

' hundred tivelve 



'$f^ 



^^ 




Pauly versus Coffey 

work the men had this tremendous task finished m a week. The courts were in perfect 
condition. No ahbis could be forthcoming from the contestants on the condition of 
the playing field. The brackets had been drawn up and everyone was assigned a part- 
ner. The seeded players were Lundgoot, Lietz, Pauly, Coffey, Shanahan, Barry, 
Melody and Walsh. All of these men were members of last year's tennis team. Play- 
ing time was assigned and the tourney had started. 

Almost every match was closely contested and there were remarkably few forfeits. 
The courts were jammed from morning till night. Manager Liet:; was everywhere, 
recording the results of the matches, getting new games started, handing out equip- 
ment, and only stopping long enough to wield the racquet himself. After almost a 
week of play the tourney was in the closing rounds. The favorites, with little excep- 
tion, had come through. And now it resolved itself into a duel between seeded men. 
Mike Pauly, in. the lower portion of the draw, had rambled through his first two 
matches with untried opponents. In the third round he faced Coffey, runner-up of last 
year. To the surprise of many Pauly vanquished him and advanced into the semi- 
finals. His opponent in this round was Lundgoot, number one of last year's, team and 
the outstanding favorite. A great crowd gathered to see, as they supposed, the favorite 
Lundgoot eliminate the comparatively untried Pauly. But little Mike had confidence 
in himself and his terrific forehand drive. After a heartbreaking five set battle, Pauly 
again left the courts in possession of a victory. Meanwhile, Paul Lietz had trampled 
over all the opposition in the upper half of the draw and was expected to have little 
trouble with Pauly. But Mike had acquired a habit of upsetting favorites, and besides, 
having once tasted victory he was in no mood to lose. All that need be said is that 
Mike took home the loving cup after a hard fought victory, 7-1, 6-4, 9-7. 

P.AUL L. O'Connor. 



Piigf three hundred thuteen 



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t 




Captain D'Esposito 



Sextro 



GOLF 

The status of golf as a varsity sport at Loyola has improved rapidly. From a 
small but determined beginning it has risen to a position at which a great many of the 
players at the university take the sport seriously, and thus Loyola has taken an active 
place in intercollegiate competition. In praising the team, therefore, we must give 
recognition to those who in former years started a golf team here in the face of dis- 
appointments and difficulties, and who laid the foundation on which the present suc- 
cess of the team is based. 

The first time the university was represented by a golf team was in the season of 
1925, when, despite general indifference toward, golf as a college sport, a rather hazy 
team was arranged and a, few matches played. The personnel of the team consisted 
of almost anyone who could be persuaded or bribed to swing a club and in conse- 
quence the results of the matches were none too flattering. But it was a beginning and 
the following year a permanent team was selected, letters were awarded to the men 
who played through the season and golf took a permanent place at Loyola. 

The team last year had a comparatively successful season, winning four out of six 
matches, being defeated once by Armour Tech and also by Notre Dame,' who, inciden- 
tally, were undefeated, reckoning such powerful teams as Northwestern among those 
vanquished. Loyola defeated Armour in another engagement, and this with two vic- 
tories over Marquette and one over Carroll college made up the schedule. As a climax 
to the season they journeyed as pioneers to Marquette's first Western Intercollegiate 
tournament and came home in second place. On the whole, considering such things as 
proverbially bad luck and inexperience, everything was satisfactory. The team was 
composed of Jerry O'Neill, captain; Morrisscy, Bradburn. D'Esposito and Shanahan. 

Page three hundred fourteen 



^^ 





LUDWIG 



Shanahan 



This year prospects are excellent for a successful team. Matches have been sched- 
uled with Armour, Marquette, De Paul and Drake universities. D'Esposito as the 
only remaining member of last year's team is captain and will lead such stars as 
Corrigan, Shanahan and Sextro as well as several from the other departments. All 
prospects point toward a' good season, with Marquette's tournament again the end of 
the trail, and we hope Loyola can improve her last year's position in the present tour- 
nament. 

To pick this year's team an open meet was held early in April with about twenty- 
five men competing. All of the veterans of last year turned out and while no new 
stars of startling skill were uncovered, still many prospects were unearthed, and there 
is every reason to believe that this and subsequent competitions will bring out some 
future Loyola stars. 

Loyola can expect to go forward rapidly in golf. This year we received recogni- 
tion and at least promises of future matches with several of the Big Ten schools, and 
it does not seem a matter of many years before Lyola's band of sportsmen and eager 
players will be contending with the best that the West and perhaps also the East can 
offer in golf. Loyola's motto of hard fighting, good losing, and frequent victory will 
always urge the continuance of golf in the spirit in which it stands today, and this 
spirit can do nothing more than improve. Loyola has never been known to fail in any 
of her numerous undertakings — there is no sign that golf will provide an exception to 
this proud record. 

Joshua D'Esposito. 



Page three hundred fifteen 



m^mE^mamm^^mM^^Mi^.^, 



A V\^inter's Afternoon 




Page three hundred sixteen 



r£-f^ 



FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES 

With Dates of EstahUshment at Loyola 

SOCIAL 

Phi Mu Chi 1922 

Iota Mu Sigma 1923 

Alpha Delta Gamma 1924 

Pi Alpha Lambda 192i 

Sigma Lambda Beta 1927 

PROFESSIONAL 

Phi Chi 1904 

Phi Beta Pi 1921 

Phi Lambda Kappa 1921 

Sigma Nu Phi 1924 

Delta Theta Phi 192^ 

SORORITIES 

Nu Sigma Phi 1921 

Kappa Beta Pi 1924 

Sigma Chi Mu 1926 

HONOR SOCIETIES 

Tivnen Ophthalmological Society 1922 

The Ghouls 1924 

Pi Kappa Epsilon 1924 

The Seminar 1924 

Lambda Rho 1925- 

Blue Key 1926 

Beta Pi 1926 

Alpha Kappa Delta 1928 

(Alpha Kappa Delta is a national honorary sociological 
fraternity, which was unfortunately installed too late to 
be represented in the 7s(rneteen Twenty- Eight Loyolan.) 



^^> 



Page three hundred seventeen 



^V>1 



ll^Hifi>MpJi:iA^AiJ,l^:t*==-Uil^ 



■:immMm5^. 




PHI MU CHI 

Beta Chapter BR 

1620 Morse Ave. 

Founded at the University of Chicago, 1921. Estabhshed at Loyola University, 1921 
Colors: Crimson and White. 



CHAPTER ROLL 



Alpha: University of Chicago 
Beta: Loyola Univer.sfty 
Gamma: AKimni of Chicago 



Delta: John Carroll University 
Epsilon: St. Thomas College 
Loyola Alumni Chapter 



OFFICERS IN UNIVERSITY 

WlLLI.AM S. CoNW.-w Worthv Master 

Frank P. Doheny Senior Warden 

Edwin Curley Junior Warden 

Neil J. Doherty Treasurer 

John T Tracy Master of Pledges 

Edward W. Kelly Scribe 

Paul J. Tambornino Sergeant-at-Arms 

Lawrence P. Crowley Publicity' 



Page three hundred cightee7i 



^ 



'"W^^W^^?^WW??^' 



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Top Row — Tambornino, Abraham, Stauder, Smith, O'Brien, Tracey, Wynk. 
Second Row — Grant, Garthe, Grant, Doherty, Hawkins, Crowley, Murphy. 
Bottom Row — Hillenbrand, Curley, Doheny, Conway, Kelly, Walsh, Coyle. 



G. a. Schmeincr, M.S. 



Raymond Abraham 



Joseph Coyle 
John Garthe 
Joseph Garthe 
Robert Hawkins 



Thomas Ahearn 
Gerard Grant 



Thomas B. Carney 
James E. Curry 



Charles Brady 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 
B. J. Stegaert, A M. 

MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 



H. E. Egan. Ph.D. 



Class of 1928 
Ben Aicher 

Class of 1929 

Thomas Kallal 
John Leahy 
Harry Stauder 



Class of 1930 

Hayes O'Brien 
Thomas P. Smith 

Cia^s of 1931 

George Hillenbrand 
Daniel Murphy 
Samuel Grant 

Pledged 
Edward Garnty 
Eugene Brady 



Raymond Kerwin 



Francis J. Walsh 
Gerald Wynn 
Edward Zimmerman 
Alphonse Tomaso 



Robert P. Wilson, Jr. 
Frank Young 



Wayne McSweeny 
Charles Weigel 



ird Shurr 



'^^^mt^^m^mmm^ 



Page three hundred nineteei] 



:^ 








IOTA MU SIGMA 

Established at Loyola University, 1923. 
Colors: Maroon and Gold. 



A. Mastri 
J. Guerra 
C. Champagne 
T. Oliveno 



ALUMNI CHAPTER 
Me?ribe)'s 
L. Cclla S. Guarino 

J. Rago P. Doretti 

R. Perritt R. Fusco 

J. Benedetto 



OFFICERS IN UNIVERSITY 

S. V.AINISI President 

T. Serio Wict-'Pi-esxAtnt 

C. GuLlO Trea.surer 

A. P.4CE Seo-etarv 

M. Indovin.A Sergeant-dt-Anns 

C. MuzziC.\TO Libranan 



Page tlirec /lundrfd ttcent^ 






"i=>=='.Siij;;>^ 




Top Row — BoRRLiso, BicA, Bellini, Polito, Fazio, Parenti, Allegretti. 

Second Row — Belm(inte, Petr(1NE, Robiletti, Barberio, Caliendo, Balsamo, 
J. Casciato. 

Bottom Row — N. Casciato, Castro, Ibelli, Pecoraro, Nicro, Marzano, Saletta, 
Mennella. 



Dr. I. Volini 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

Dr. J. Suldane Dr. A. Partipilo 



M. Indovina 
L. Macaluso 



MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 

Class of 1928 



A. Pace 



C. MuA2;icato 



C. Castro 
A. Catania 



Class 0/ 1929 
M. Pecoraro 



S. Nigro 



A. Bellini 
I. Caliendo 



Class of 192,0 

J. Casciato 
F. Saletta 



J. Mennella 
I. Mar:;ano 



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ALPHA DELTA GAMMA 

Founded at Loyola University, 1924. 
Colors: Maroon and Gold. 



OFFICERS IN UNIVERSITY 

WiLLi.AM S. Smith President 

Harold Prendergast First Vice-President 

Kenneth P. Furlong Secoiid Vice-President 

Francis Reed Secretary 

John Ennis Treasurer 

George Ohlheiser Historian 

Daniel Donohue Steward 

LaRoy Wilkins Sergea7U-at-Arms 



Page three hundred twenty-two 



,4^\S3<>sU 



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Top Row — Humphreys, Berry, Colohan, Shanahan, Condon. 

Second Row — Keeley, Mayer, Kennedy, O'Brien, Furlong. 

Bottom Row — LiNKLATER, Reed, Ennis, Smith, Prendergast, Gilbert. 

MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

Moderator — Paul Meuhlmann, S.J. 

Spiritual Advisor — Charles Meehan, S.J. 

MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 

Class of J 928 
Daniel Donohue 
James O'Brien 
Edward Shea 
William Colohan 

Class of 1929 
Kenneth Furlong 
Paul Early 
George Ohlheiser 



Aloysius Breen 
Francis Butler 
Francis Canary 



Stanley Blondin 
John Ennis 
Raymond Fulton 



Robert Berry 
David Condon 
Harold Frett 



Walter Durkin 
Frank Fitzgerald 



Anthony Allegretti 
Robert Early 
Robert Healy 
John McCormick 



Cla^s oj J 930 
William Hallissey 
Gerard Jordan 
Edward Kennedy 

Class of I93i 
William Linklater 
John Mayer 
Eugene Humphrey 
Pledged 
William McNeil 
Dominic Mullaney 
James Murphy 
John O'Brien 



William Smith 
John Waldron 
LaRoy Wilkins 



Harold Prendergast 
Walter Scott 
Charles Stimming 



Paul Plunkett 
Francis Reed 
Richard Shanahan 



Robert Keely 
John Wilkinson 



John O'Leary 
Frank Roach 
Harry Gilbert 
John Tracy 

Page three hundred twenty-three 



((- 



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PI ALPHA LAMBDA 

6801 Sheridan- Rnad 

Established at Loyola University, February 28, 1925. 
Colors: Blue and White. . 



OFFICERS IN UNIVERSITY 

Willis M, Carpenter President 

M.J,TTHEW S.AKDERS Vice-President 

RiCH.ARD Ford Corresponding Secretary 

Robert Ludwiu Recordvng Secretary 

J.AMES J. Hughes Tretwurer 

Robert Thomson Assistant to the Treasurer 

Linton Moust.akis FmcineiaJ Secretary 

John J. Bry.ant Master of Pledges 

D.AiNiEL Buckley Sergeant-at-Arms 

P.AUL S, LiETZ Steioard 

WiLLl.AM E. R,\FFERTY Historian 

Joseph D.alton Cliairman of Rtishees 

John D. White Chairman of Social Activities 



Pd^^c three Inindred twenty-four 



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■' 







Top Roii) — P. HiGGiNs, Garvy, R. Higgins, Cullixan, J. O'Connor, Conley, Ray, 

Dalton, Ford. 
Second Row — Strobel, Thomson, Ludwig, M. Sanders, Healy, Murphy, 

J. Sanders, Horne, Lowrey. 
Bottom Row — McAuLiFFE, Rafferty, MousTAKis, Carpenter, White, Buckley, 

Gormican, Lietz. 



James J. Mert;, S.J. 



WiIHs M. Carpenter 
William P. Lowrey 

James X. Bremner 
John J. Bryant 
James M. Cullinan 
Joseph A. Dalton 



Daniel J. Buckley 
William H. Conley 
Cosmas A. Garvy 
John N. Horne 

Russel G. Higgins 



Richard Bartlett 
Charles Cuny 
Robert Dooley 
William Fitzgerald 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

Roger J. Kiley, LL.B. George H. Mahowald, S.J. 

MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 
Class of 1928 



James C. O'Connor 

Class uf 1929 

Richard F. Ford 
Roger S. Gormican 
Preston A. Higgins 
Paul S. Liet: 

Class of 19 iO 
Robert E. Ludwig 
Neal J. McAuliife 
Frank R. Murphy 

Class of !93I 
Paul L. O'Connor 

Pledged 
Lothar Nurnburger 
Richard O'Connor 
Frank Quinn 



William E. RafFerty 



Linton G. Moustakis 
George K. Ray 
Matthew G. Sanders 
J. Francis Walsh 



John A. Sanders 
Robert D. Thompson 
John D. White 



John P. Strobel 



Robert Rafferty 
Anthony Tomzcak 
Christie Vivirito 

Pdgf three hundred twenty-five 



(T^^ 



<7}, 








SIGMA LAMBDA BETA 

Suite 1 1 8, Atlantic Hotel. 

Established February 1, 1927, at Loyola University. 
Colors: Maroon and Gold. 



OFFICERS IN UNIVERSITY 

H. V.AN Pelt President 

W. Johnson Vice-President 

R. Scott Steward 

H. Neary Secretary 

H. Pfeifer Treasurer 

M. FERR.ARI Scribe 



Page three hundred twentysix 




SIGMA LAMBDA BETA 

Top Row — CooNEY, Habenstreit, H. Neary, Crowley. 

Second Row — Ferrari, Hammond, Slingerland, Kilbride, Martino. 

Bottom Row — J. Neary, Johnson, Van Pelt, Cloonan, Pfeifer. 

MEMBERS IN FACULTY 
Thomas J. Reedy, A.M., LL.B., C.P.A. C. P. Palmer, A.B., LL ; 

MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 



H. Neary 
J. Hammond 



Class of 1930 
J. Crowley 



J. Martino 



M. Ferrari 



Class of 1929 
H. Wirth 



W. Norkett 



H. Van Pelt 
W. Johnson 
E. Cloonan 
J. Neary 



Class of 1 928 

E. Cooney 
R. Kilbride 
R. Scott 



F. Slingerland 

H. Pfeifer 

R. Habenstreit 



three }iundred twentx-seven 



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PHI CHI 

Phi Sigma Chapter 
282^ Prairie Ave. 



+ 



National Medical Fraternity. 

Fdunded at University of Vermont, March 31, 1889. 

Established at Loyola Unviersity, March 7, 1907. 

Colors: Green and White. 

CHAPTER ROLL 

University of Vermont Virginia Medical College Rush Medical College 

University of Louisville University of Alabama Cornell University 

University of Tennessee Georgetown University Emory University, Ga. 

University of Oregon Johns Hopkins University South Dakota University 

University of Maryland Northwestern University University of North Carolina 

McGill University (Can.) University of Kansas Leland Stanford University 

Boston University Creighton University Wisconsin University 

University of Colorado University of Michigan Toronto University 

Ohio State University University of Minnesota Cincinnati University 

Yale University University of Arkansas University of Illinois 

Tufts College, Medical Western Reserve University Nebraska University 

Detroit College, Medical Indiana University Pennsylvania University 

Washington University, Mo. Iowa University Columbia University 

Marquette University Baylor Medical College George Washington University 

University of Texas Tulane University St. Louis University 

Harvard University University of Oklahoma Loyola University 

Temple University Vanderbilt University Jefferson Medical 
University of Virginia 

OFFICERS IN UNIVERSITY 

Emil J. ViSKOCIL Presiding Stniur 

John Keeley Presiding ]umor 

Robert E. Lee Secretary 

Robert J. Hawkins Treasurer 

GOERGE WlLTR.AKlS Vint GniAe 

Hugh O'Hare Master of Cere??u)nies 

Edward P. Madden Almnni Seaetarx 



Page tfiree fiundred ttventji-eigfit 







MEMBERS IN FACULTY 



Dr. L. Arnold 
Dr. R. A. Black 
Dr. T. E. Boyd 
Dr. W. E. Coen 
Dr. F. M. Drennan 
Dr. H. W. Elghammer 
Dr. G. H. Ensminger 



Dr. W. G. Epstein 
Dr. F. J. Gerty 
Dr. P. E. Grabow 
Dr. U. J. Grimm 
Dr. A. E. Jones 
Dr. C. H. Johnson 



Dr. M. McGuire 
Dr. W. G. McGuire 
Dr. E. J. Meyer 
Dr. W. S. Hector 
Dr. M. C. Mullen 
Dr. G. W. Mahony 



MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 



E. Arensdorf 
H. Bodmer 
J. Cava 
R. Drever 



J. Coyle 
J. P. Evans 
V. Evans 
R. Gladen 
J. Keeley 



J. DeLeo 
C. Jonas 
G. Hall 



J. J. Fitzgerald 
R. E. DeVreis 
C. B. Gawne 
G. J. Kohne 
H. W. Kramps 
C. D. Klaus 



Class of 1928 
W. Fitzgerald M. Pistory 

R. E. Lee E. Rhomberg 

B. McGonigle F. Stacker 



R. Hawkins 
W. Jakopich 
L. Larrivee 
E. Madden 
J. Moleski 



Class of 1929 

J. Minardi 
L. Lundgoot 
E. Turner 
N. Marquis 
K. Grigsby 



Class of 1930 
R. Dillman J. O'Connor 

L. Mammoser T. Pauli 

V. Houser H. Hartman 



Class of 1931 



T. P. Hickey 
J. M. Leahy 
P. McGuire 
J. E. Petcoff 
J. Mullen 
C. J. Weigel 



J. Prendergast 

H. Trapp 

C. Miller 

P. Werthman 

B. C. Steinbreche 

R. Lindsay 



Dr. F. Mueller 
Dr. J. B. Nanninga 
Dr. J. J. Smith 
Dr. F. C. Valdez 
Dr. Vaughn 
Dr. M. A. Walker 



E. J. Viskocil 
G. Wiltrakis 
H. O'Hare 

N. Michelena 



F. Walsh 

P. Stanul 

E. Zimmerman 

N. Pavletic 

T. Modzikowski 



J. Garthe 

M. Kukuk 

S. H. Gallagher 

J. Whaley 

E. McCormick 

T. H. Will 

J. Mahoney 

E. Kleinwachter 

E. L: Spangler 

Page three hundred twentynine 



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PHI BETA PI 

Alpha Omega 

3729 Lake Park Ave. 

Founded at University of Pittsburg, 1891 

Established at Loyola University, 1921. 

Colors: Green and White. 



CHAPTER ROLL PHI BETA PI 



University of Pittsburgh 
University of Maryland 
Jefferson Medical College 
Virginia Medical College 
Georgetown University 
University of Virginia 
Harvard University 
Johns Hopkins University 
Pennsylvania University 
West Virginia University 
University of Utah 
So. California University 
Vanderhilt University 



Alabama University 
Tulane University 
University of Texas 
Oklahoma University 
Louisville University 
Baylor University 
Emory University 
Michigan University 
Rush Medical College 
Northwestern University 
University of Illinois 
Detroit College (Surgery) 
Indiana University 



Marquette University 
Wisconsin University 
Loyola University 
St. Louis University 
Washington University 
Minnesota University 
Iowa University 
Missouri University 
J. A. Creighton University 
Kansas University 
University of Kansas 
Colorado University 
Nebraska University 



OFFICERS 

L. Urban Archon 

A. Kraus Vice Archoji 

C. ScHAUB Secreta7-v 

L. Neff Treiisurer 

J. Caulfield Editor 

C. Carey Gnida 

E. DoNLAN Chaplain 

J. G.AMET WmxoTid Giidrdiaii 

R. W. Kerwin W'ort(i\ Counselor 



Page three liinicirfd t\nyt-^ 



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Henry Schmitz., A.M., 
M.D., F.A.C.S. 

E. L. Moorhead, A.M., 
M.D., F.A.C.S. 

L. D. Moorhead, M.S., 
M.D. 

I. F. Volini, B.S., M.D. 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

W. J. Swift, M.D., 

F.A.C.S. 
R. J. Tivnen, M.D., LL.D. 
W. J. Pickett, M.D. 
R. E. Dyer, B.S., M.D. 
I. L. Meyer, M.D. 
W. K. Hueper, M.D. 
R. M. Strong, A.B., AM 



S. A. Mathews, M.D. 
B. B. Beeson, M.D. 
H. J. Dooley, M.D. 
H. J. Dwyer, M.D. 

F. C. Leeming, M.D. 

G. D. I. Griffin, M.D.. 
F.C.A.A. 



MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 



J. H. Garnet 
R. W. Kerwin 
M. J. Murphy 



W. S. Conway 
J. D. Caulfield 
R. H. Fauser 
T. J. Greteman 



J. L. Amorose 
C. M. Carey 
E. V. Donlan 



R. W. AIbi 
J. Armington 
J. Collins'" 
P. Foley 



Class of 1928 
A. D. Kraus 
L. H. Neff 
M. A. Melynchuk 

Class of 1929 
W. J. Karr 
L. J. Latz 
T. J. Murphy 
H. J. Stengel 

Ci<iss of J 930 
N. M. Latz 
H. E. Graham 
T. J. Pekin 

Class of 193] 
E. Haggerty 
H. Heckenlaible 
G. E. Kenny 
C. J. Molengraft 



G. Lofdahl 
C. F. Schaub 
L. D. Urban 



A. Santoro 
F. J. Gleason 

B. Leuhrsman 
A. Conti 



F. E. Streysman 
P. J. Timmons 
C. J. Zurfli 



J. Reagan 
E. W.^Sachs 
N. S. Tousey 
H. R. Wilson 



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Page three hundred thirty-one 



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PHI LAMBDA KAPPA 

Gamma Chapter 
National Medical Fraternity. 



Founded at University of Pennsylvania, 1907. 

Established at Loyola University, in 1921. 

Colors: White and Blue. 



CHAPTER ROLL 



Alpha: University of Pennsylvania 

Alpha-Alpha: University of Illinois 

Beta: Jefferson 

Gamma: Loyola University 

Zeta: Physicians and Surgeons, Columhia 

University 
Eta: Bellvue 
Theta: Long Lsland 
Kappa: University of Buffalo 
Iota: Tufts 
Nu: Boston University 
Xi: University ot Maryland 



Omicron: Detroit College 
Pi: University of Michigan 
Rho: Georgetown University 
Sigma: Virginia Medical College 
Tau: St. Louis University 
Upsilon: University of Virginia 
Phi: Georgetown Medical College 
Chi: Albany Medical College 
Psi: Tulane University 
Epsilon: Northwestern University 
Delta: Rush Medical College 
Lambda: Universitv of Wisconsin 



OFFICERS IN UNIVERSITY 

H. Levy Worthy Superior 

I. LuDWiG Chancellor 

A. F.AGELSON Exchequer 

B. Greenberg Scribe 

I. Pritikin Corresponding Scribe 

N. Fl.axm.^N Seraeant-at-Arms 



Page three hundred thirty-two 



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PHI LAMBDA KAPPA 

Top Row — Rand, Lebowitz, Renkoff, Weinless, Anderman, Edelstein. 

Second Row — Levy, Schwartz, Goodman, Shapiro, Sapoznik. 

Bottoyn Row — Flaxman, Fagelson, Ludwig, Levy, Pritikin, Greenburg. 



Dr. B. Elliot 
Dr. A. Goldfine 
Dr. L. Brodv 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

Dr. J. J. Mendelsohn 
Dr. L. Singer 



Dr. A. Finkle 
Dr. A. Sandler 



MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 



H. Levy 



A. Fagelson 
I. Ludwig 



N. Flaxman 
B. Gordon 



Class of 1 928 
M. Goodman 

Class of 1929 

E. Crown 
I. Pritikm 

Class of 1930 



H. Shapiro 
L. Lebowit; 



H. Sapoznik 



N. Schwartz 
B. Greenburg 



G. Rand 



B. Schwarc: 
H. Levy 



Class of 1931 

H. Renkoif 
R. Adelstein 



D. Anderman 
S. Weinless 



1 iV ; /. 



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Page three hundred thirty-three 



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m^^i^fumj^m'mm' mm^ f ^) 



SIGMA NU PHI 

Stephen A. Douglas Chapter. 
National Legal Fraternity. 



Founded at Georgetown University, 1903. 

Established at Loyola University, Mareh 15, 1924. 

Colors: Purple and Gold. 



CHAPTER ROLL 



.Alpha: National University of Law, D. 
Beta: Georgetown University, D, C. 
Gamma: Detroit College of Law, Mich. 
Epsilon : University of So. California 
Zeca: University of Richmond, Va. 
Eta: Stetson University. Fla. 
Thcta: Washington College of Law 
lota : St. Louis University, Mo. 
Kappa: Marquette University, Wis. 



Lambda: Duke University (Law), N. 
Mu: Temple University, Pa. 
Nu: Northwestern College (Lav.). 
Xi: Loyola University, Chicago 
Omicron: Loyola University, La. 
Pi: Westminster Law School, Colo. 
Rho: Hastings College (Law), Calif. 
Sigma- Duquesne University, Pa. 
Tau: Detroit College of Law, Mich. 



ALUMNI CHAPTERS 



Detroit Alumni Chapter 
District of Columbia Chapter 
Richmond Alumni Chapter 
St. Louis Alumni Chapter 



Milwaukee Alumni Chapter 
Chicago Alumni Chapter 
Los Angeles Alumni Chapter 
Minneapolis Alumni Chapter 



OFFICERS IN UNIVERSITY 

Thom.AS Cr.^NE ChanceUor 

Kyran Phelan First Vice-chancellor 

Joseph Henry Seamd Vice-Chancellor 

William Bellamy Registrar of Exchequer 

John Lamb Master of Rolls 

Lawrence Marino Marshal 

Page three hundred thirty-four 



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SIGMA NU PHI 

Top Row — Stanton, Phares, Henry. 

Second Row — Crane, Marino, Lamb, Cannon. 

Bottom Row — Mulligan, Tobin, Coffey, Kiely, Aicher. 

MEMBER IN FACULTY 
Sherman A. Steele, Litt.B., LL.B. 
MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 



B. P. Aicher 
Richard Baskerville 
J. J. Coffey, Jr. 
R. T. Dorgan 



C. Cannon 
T. Crane 



Class of J 928 




J. T. Kieley 


F. E. Pokorney 


G. F. MuUigan 


R. T. Tobin 


E. A. Patka 


W. Stanton 


Class of 1929 




J. Lamb 


L. Marino 


K. Phelan 




Class of J 930 





W. Bellamy 



J. Henry 



gc tJirtff hundred thirty-five 




.^^ DELTA THETA PHI 

"^fflS* Joseph McKenna Senate. '^^j 

\^ National Legal Fraternity V^ 

-— ' "'" Founded at Chicago, Illinois, in 1913. 

\ Established at Loyola University, 1925. 

Colors: Green and White. 
CHAPTER ROLL 

Boston University University of Utah 

St. Louis University Washburn College School of Law 

Indiana University University of Memphis Law School 

University of North Carolina University of Richmond 

Washington University New York Law School 

University of Missouri Mercer University 

University of Kansas University of Chicago 

Creighton University ' Chattanooga College of Law 

Ohio State University Ohio Northern University 

University of Michigan University of Nebraska 

Drake University University of California 

Detroit College of Law Loyola University (Chicago) 

University of Illinois John Marshall School of Law (Cleveland) 

Western Reserve University University of Minnesota 

State University of Iowa New Jersey Law School 

John Marshall Law School St. Paul College of Law 

Columbia University Cleveland Law School 

Marquette University Leland Stanford University 

Loyola University (New Orleans) Kansas City Law School 

University of Southern California University of Washington 

Cornell University University of Maryland 

University of Colorado University of Pennsylvania 

Fordham University University of Indianapolis 

Llniversity of Pittsburg Detroit City Law School 

Brooklyn Law School De Paul University 

University of South Dakota Atlanta Law School 

University of Cincinnati Chicago-Kent College of Law 

Southern Methodist University Georgetown University 

Yale University Northwestern University . 

Dickinson College of Law Northwestern College of Law 

University of Detroit George Washington University 

Llniversity of Texas 

OFFICERS IN UNIVERSITY 

Howard Schlacks Dean 

Edwin Hendricks Vice-Dean 

Maurice Costello Cler\ of Excheqiter 

James A. Gillen Cler\ of Rolls 

Thomas Harrington Baili|f 

James Deegan Muster of Ritiu! 

Laurence Miller Tribune 

Pdgc three hundred thirty-six 



'^\i^^^f*^ 




Top Row — McGoNAGLE, Crowe, Ryan, Haley, Deegan, Costellh, McGuire. 
Third Row — O'Shaugnessy, Glynx, Barron, Kirchman, Burke, Kelly. 
Second Row — McKenna, Curry, Hendricks, Schlacks, Miller, Harrington, 

Brown. 
Bottom Row — Dreis, Klees, McCarthy. 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 



Dean John V. McCormick Stephen Love 
Walter L. Meyer 



James Kelly 



Thomas Ryan 
Thomas O'Shaughnessy 
Edwin Hendricks 



Clyde McGonagle 
Donald Webber 
Thomas Harrington 



Howard Schlacks 
Joseph Crowe 
John Buckley 
Alex. Brown, Jr. 



Edward Daly 



Payton Tuohy 
MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 
Post Graduate 
Wm. Campbell 

Class of 1928 

Maurice J. Costello 
Sheldon Kirchman 



William Fortune 
Fred. A. Gariepy 



Laurence Miller 



Edward Whelan 
William McKenna 



Class of 1929 

James Deegan 
Michael Glynn 

Class 0/ J 930 

Gerald Haley 
James Curry 
Arthur Burke 
James Klees 

Pledged 
Edward Cloonan 



Loyola Ryan 
John Toomey 



Nicholas Barron 
Daniel McCarthy 
Edward Dreis 



Francis Donohue 



^ :.ma^m^M ^m^ 



Page three hundred thirty-seven 



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NU SIGMA PHI 

Epsilon Chapter 
National Medical Sorority. 

Founded at University of Illinois, 1898. 

Established at Loyola University, April 20, 192C 

Colors: Green and White. 



CHAPTER ROLL 



Alpha: University of Illinois 

Beta: University of Chicago 

Gamma: University of Indiana 

Delta: University of Nebraska 

Epsilon: Loyola University 

Zeta: University of Southern California. 

Eta: University of Iowa 

Theta: Western Reserve University 



Iota: University of Boston 
Kappa: University of California 
Lambda: Washington University 
Mu: University of Buffalo 
Nu: Tufts College 
Xi: University of Colorado 
Pi: Northwestern University 
Omicron: Northwestern Lfniversity 



OFFICERS IN UNIVERSITY 

N.^T.ALIE ASHMENCK.AS PresldeiU 

Nellie M. Brown Vice-Presideiit 

Ell.\ Valenta Secretdi-v 

Helen E. McGovern l^naswer 



Page tliree hundred tliirty-eight 



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Top Row — Latka, Kane, Valenta, Jaeger. 
Bottom Roiu — McGovERN, Ashmenckas, Brown. 

MEMBER IN FACULTY 
Dr. Noreen Sullivan 

MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 



Natalie Ashmenckas 
Olsra Latka 



Class of 1 928 

Elizabeth Kane 
Helen E. McGovern 



Yasuyo Inouye 



Nellie M. Brown 



Class of J 929 
Ella Valenta 



Ruth Jaeger 



Class of 1930 
Lillian Tarlowe 



Class of 193) 



Helen Button 



Eleanor Kenney 



ge three hundred thirfj-nine 



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DR. RICHARD J. TIVNEN OPHTHALMOLOGICAL SOCIETY 

Honorary Medical Fraternity. 

Established at Loyola University, 1922. 

Honorary President — Dr. Rich.ard Tivkek 

Honorary Vice-President — Dr. George H. Ensm^'GER 

MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 

Class of 1928 

Helen E. McGovern Joseph Garnet George Wiltrakis 

Carl F. Schaub Harvey Bodmer Richard Drever 

William A. Barr Edward RJiomberg Fred Stucker 

Hugh O'Hare Joseph E. Verhaag Floyd Harding 

Leslie Urban George Rowe Leo Duplewski 

Raymond Kerwin Emil Viskocil Natalie Ashmenckas 
Adrian Krause 

CId.ss of 1929 

Nellie M. Brown Walter Karr Edward Zimmerman 

Catherine McCorry Joseph Coyle Robert Hawkins 

Ella Valenta John Gaffney John Caulfield 

John Keeley Peter Ashmenckas William Jakopich 

William Conway Edward Kaputska Theodore Greteman 

Ralph Fouscr 

OFFICERS IN UNIVERSITY 
Carl F. Sch.aub President 

William A. B.arr Vice-President 

Jd-SEPH H. G.AMET Treasurer 

Helen E. McGovern Secretarx 



Page three hundred forty 



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Top Row— -Kerwin, Hardini;, Viskocil, Wiltrakis,, Verhaag, Kraus. 

Second Row — Urban, O'Hare, Rhomberc, Drever, Bodmer, Gamet. 

Bottom Row — Stucker, Erickson, Ensminger, McGovern, Schaub, Tivnen, 
Ashmenckas. 




Dr. Ensminger 



Carl Schaub 



Dr. Tivnen 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MEMBERSHIP 

Admittance to membership is based on scholastic standing and personality. 



Pane three hundred forty-one 



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THE GHOULS 

Honorary Activities Fraternity. 
Establishe.d at Loyola University, 1924. 



OFFICERS IN UNIVERSITY 

R.^YMOND Kerwin President 

Leslie Urb.'\n Vice-Pre,side7U 

W. J. Eg.an Treasurer 

R. H. FouSER Secretary 

MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 





Class of 1928 




W. J. Eijan 


A. D. Krause 


E. J. Viskocil 


L. J. Fitzgerald 


R. E. Lee 


H. A. O-Hare 


J. H. Garnet 


F. J. Stueker 


C. S. Schaub 


R. W. Kerv^in 


L. J. Urban 

Class of 1929 




Ralph Gladen 


W. S. Conway 


J. T. Coyle 


E. F. Zimmerman 


R. J. Hawkins 


P. Kullman 


W. J. Karr 


B. F. Heskett 


R. H. Fouser 



Page three hundred jortytiro 



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^iV^) 




Top Rou' — VisKociL, Conway, Kullman, Kraus. 

Second Row — Zimmerman, O'Hare, Coyle. 

Bottom Row — ScHAUB, Stucker, Kerwin, KLarr, Gamet. 




Ray Ml )\ I) \\ Kerwin 
President 

Requirements for Membership: Nine men are elected each year from the freshman 
class. These men are chosen for scholastic standing and personality. 



Page three hundred forty-three 



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PI KAPPA EPSILON 

Delta Chapter 

National Honorary Medical Fraternity 

Founded at Northwestern University, March, 1916. 

Established at Loyola University in 1924. 

CHAPTER Rt^LL 

Alpha: Northwestern University Gamma: University of Illinois 

Beta: Chicago University Delta: Loyola University (Chicago) 

MEMBERS IN FACULTY 
Dr. T. E. Boyd Dr. I. F. Volini Dr. L. D. Moorehead 

MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 

Class o{ 1928 

William Fitzgerald R. W. Kerwin L. D. Urban 

F. E. Harding A D. Kraus G. A. Wiltrakis 

M. Indovina A. J. Pace 

Class of J 929 

C. Castro F. P. Gilmore J. L. Keeley 

William Conway R. J. Hawkins R. E. Lee 

R. H Fouser W. J. Karr S. J. Nigro 

OFFICERS IN UNIVERSITY 
Robert E. Lee President 

MiCH.'VEL InDOVIN.A Vice-PrfSlde)U 

Adri.an D. Kr,-\us Secretary-Treasurer 

Page three liiindreci forty-four 



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Top Row — Conway, Wiltrakis, Kerwin, Gilmore, Harding. 
Second Row — Pace, Hawkins, Karr, Keeley, Nk;ro. 
Bottom Row — Castro, Urban, Indovina, Kraus, Fouser. 




Robert E. Lee 
President 

Requirements for Membership: To be initiated into Pi Kappa Epsilon a student 
must be suitably proiieient in his studies, he must be interested in his class work and 
in his school, he must be active in the various student affairs, giving support to ath- 
letics and social functions as well as showing an interest in his fellow-workers. 

Page three hundred forty-five 



/ffB^ 




LAMBDA RHO 

Honorary Radiological Fraternity. 
Established at Loyola University, 1925. 

MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

Benjamin H. Orndorff, A.M., M.D., F.A.C.R Honorary President 

Henry Schmitz, A.M., M.D., F.A.C.R Honorary Vice-President 

Berth.\ V.ax Hoosen, A.B., A.M., M.D. 
RlCH.JiRD J. TlVNEN, M.D., LL.D. 

Joseph E. L.mbe, B.S., M.D. 
Irvin F. Hummon, Jr., B.S., M.D. 

MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 

Class of 1929 

Nellie M. Brown William Jakopich Neal Marquis 

Joseph Coyle Walter Karr Stanley Moleski 

Blanche Dotterway John Keeley Catherine McCorr>' 

Robert Hawkins Robert E. Lee Ella Valenta 

Class of 1928 

Natalie Ashmenckas Ami! Johnson Hugh O'Hare 

William Barr James Kearney Walter Reuter 

Harvey Bodmer Bartholomev>' McGonigle Edward Rhomberg 

John J, Gregory Helen E. McGovern George Wiltrakis 

Floyd Harding 

OFFICERS IN UNIVERSITY 

George A. Wiltr.akis President 

Hugh O'Hare Vice-PresideiTt 

Helen McGovern Secretary 

Robert E. Lee Tred,surer 



ge three hundred forty-six 



M 




Top Row — Harding, Reuter, McGonigle, Marquis, Bodmer, Johnson. 

Second Row — Dotterway, Kearney, Coyle, Karr, Gregory. 

Bottom Row — Ashmenckas, McGovern, Wiltrakis, O'Hare, Valenta, Brown. 




George A. Wiltrakis 
President 

Requirements for Membership: Member must be a Junior or Senior of good stand- 
ing, both socially and scholastically. 



three hundred forty-sev 



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BLUE KEY 

National Honor Fraternity. 

Loyola Booster Club Chapter 

Established at University of Florida, October, 1924. 

Established at Loyola University, February, 1926. 

CHARTER ROLL 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute University of North Dakota 

Colorado School of Mines Wittenberg College (Ohio) 

University of Florida Pacific University (Oregon) 

University of Georgia Willamette University (Oregon) 

Oglethorpe University University of Pennsylvania 

University of Idaho Temple University (Penna.) 

Butler University (Indiana) Wofford College (S. Car.) 
Wabash College (Indiana) . University of S. Sewanee (Tenn.) 

Lombard College (Illinois) University of Chattanooga (Tenn.) 

Loyola University (Illinois) Southwestern University (Texas) 

Michigan State College Trinity University (Texas) 

N. E. Missouri State Teachers College University of Utah 

Midland College Emory and Henry College (Va.) 

University of Nevada University of Wyoming 

MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 
Class of 1928 
Willis M. Carpenter Raymond W. Kerwin Hugh A. O'Hare 

John J. Coffey James A. Neary Frederick Stucker 

Daniel Donohue James C. O'Brien Leslie D. Urban 

Joseph W. Grady James C. O'Connor John Waldron 

Class of 1929 

Harold A. Hillenbrand Paul S. Liet: William P. Schoen 

John Kavanaugh William Norkett John A. Sweeney 

Robert E. Lee George K. Ray J. Francis Walsh 

Class of 19i0 
William H. Conley Paul Topel John D. White 

OFFICERS IN UNIVERSITY 

Ambrose B. Kelly President 

J. FR.JiNCi.s W.ALSH Secretary 

WiLLi.AM P. ScHOEN Treasure?' 

John A. Sweeney SergeaiU-at-Arn:s 



Page three hundred fortyeigltt 



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Top Roiy — NoRKETT, Kerwin, O'Connor, Lee. 

Second Row — Neary, O'Hare, Stucker, White. 

Bottom Row — Topel, Schoen, Kelly, Walsh, Carpenter. 



William H. Agnevv, S.J. 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 
Joseph Reiner, S.J. James J. Mert:, S.J. 

Roger J. Kiley, LL.B. 




Ambrose B. Kelly 
President 

Requirements for Membership: '"The test shall be that the students shall be rec- 
ognized as all-around men in scholarship, college activities, high moral standing and 
personality" — Constitution. A grade of C plus, or its equivalent, is required by the 
Loyola Booster Club Chapter. 



Page three hundred fortyniine 



m^ 



^immm^mMm^m'^f^^i^^^ : 



mmmmmmmmm^ f ^ 




BETA PI 

Honorary Publications Fraternity. 
Established at Loyola University, April ?, 1926 



Ho 



Willis M. Carpenter 
Joseph W. Grady 



Alexander Brown 
Morgan T. Healy 
Harold A. Hillenbrand 



James X. Bremner 
John J. Bryant 
Frank Conley 
William H. Conley 



rary President — Morton D. Zabel, A.M. 

MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 
Class of J 928 



Ambrose B. Kelly 
Robert E. Lee 
James C. O'Connor 

acuss of 1929 

George K. Ray 
Paul A. Reed 
William P. Schoen 
Paul S. Lietz 

Eligible 

Lawrence Crowley 
Frank Melody 
James A. Neary 
Richard O'Connor 
George Ohlheiser 



Hugh A. O'Hare 
John A. Waldron 



Charles E. Stimming 
J. Francis Walsh 
John A. Sweeney 



Wilham E, Rafferty 
Paul E. Reed 
Robert Thomson 
John White 



OFFICERS IN UNIVERSITY 

J.AMES C. O'Connor President 

Willis M. Carpenter Vice-President 

Ambrose B. Kelly Secretdrv-Tretisurer 



Page three hundred fifty 



>S^ 



Q 




Top Row — Ray, Lee, Grady, Lietz. 

Second Row — O'Hare, Stimming, Rafferty, Healy. 

Bottom Row — Kelly, Zabel, O'Connor, Carpenter. 




James C. O'Connor 
President 

Requirements: Keys are awarded to staff members of Loyola publications not 
earlier than the end of their sophomore year upon special recommendation of the 
editor of the publication. 



three hundred fifty-one 



Loo\ing East 




Page three hundred fiftytwo 



SATIIIR'E 




THE BINCHLEY ESTABLISHMENT 

Fourteenth at the Ld\e 




Fashion Park Clothes 
In the Latest and Best 
Woolens, Cottons and Hemps 
The Halfwit Model, a 
Snappy Prep Outfit. 
Longs or Shorts in 
Trousers, Sleeves, 
Vests and Change. 



The Bnarship Model 

This is the last word in 
formal attire. Complete with 
corsage, black and white 
suspenders, shin guards and 
Hypochondriac lapels. What a 
whale of a difference just a few 
cents make. 

Others sell Crash and Cotton. 
We specialize in Worsted. 

Buy here. You will get Worsted 
nowhere else. 




The Dundee Summer Formal 
Complete with Broom 
For those particular 
People whose social 
Obligations keep them 
On the road. Reversible 
For masquerade wear. 
Or can be worn for Boy 
Scout shorts by clipping 
Along dotted line, with 
Scissors supplied at small 
Extra charge. 



A Disreputable Establishment. 



@I ^m 



Page three hundred fifty-three 



-T^^fwmnn:^' 



i^m^m^immm^MS^^M^iY ci'i! 



BACKWARD TWIN SIX 

Ask the pour fellow who owns one. 

Models from S.M416 to $5942.07, F. O. B. Valhalla, Indiana 

The trend of the Finer cars will undoubtedly follow the whims of our body design- 
ers, all graduates of the Ephpheta School for the Blind. The charm of ancient Bur- 
gundy and comparatively old Pilsner are found in the Judkids models, all equipped 
with re-enforced concrete upholstery and brass windshields. Vibrationless beyond 
mischief. 

Come in at your earliest convenience. These two models shown at our spring Saloon 
of style. 




The Custom Victoria, $9.98 F. O. B. Factory. Tax and Scot free. Four or two 
wheels optional. Tires in color. Four speeds from you, two in reverse, three side- 
ways. One brake, cither foot, hand or anchor operated. Paralysed India Rubber 
pistons and demountable fenders place it far above competitors in the field of finer 
cars. 



The Country Club Coop. $78.19 m pennies. 
Twenty dollars in a pinch. East and West of 
the AUeghenies, add nine cents to cover mailing 
charges. Gas or Coal fuelled. Standard equip- 
ment now includes four wheels, radiator cap 
(radiator optional — $546 extra) automatic run- 
ning board. Half- Shot Bijur lubrication system, 
Alemite cigar lighter bearings under all seats. 
You will love it. Drop in and drive this marvel. 




When Better Backwards Arc Built, We Will Send the Kids to Vassar. 



Page till 



indred fifty-four 



1. 



^^v^ 



i^" 



PLAMONDON BY THE SEA 

An Hotel for the Better Class 

Transient and Guest Rooms at Half Price. Rooms with hot and cold, running and 
unrunning water at small extra cost. 

Guests the world over praise our cuisme. Our Chicken soup is unexcelled and 
uniform always. It should be, we have used the same chicken since the place opened. 
This is but onej example of our unsacrificing attempts to please our public. Drop in 
any convenient window the next time you are stranded in: 



BANGPORT— A GREAT CITY 





Our Venetian cut and bruised glass Pool is open to the 
clientele of the Plamondon. It is also known as Judkins Cor- 
ners. The happy couples shown here are outside their rooms 
at the Plamondon, the unquestioned hostelry of the elite, after 
the Ossinning Senior Formal Brawl at Maguire's Cafeteria. 
The handsome leader of the left wing is none other than Collis 
Carpentre, Yale, once removed. His taste is all in his mouth. 
He chose the Plamondon. 



Plamondon By the Sea. Stop Here on Your Next Honeymoon. 



Pdge three hundred pfty-five 



Ism^m . 



«^ 



^my^-j 



IN A PINCH USE ALLENZ PUT EEZE 



Have you that 
troublesome thing 
called charm? The 
fast life of today is 
nothing like the staid 
existence of the gay 
nineties. Dancing par- 
ties tire the feet more 
quickly than any other 
form of amusement. On 
the courts, in the jun- 
gles, in the office or the 
stable, anywhere where 
there is perspiration 



A 




you run the risk of 
bunions. Here are 
grim examples of neg- 
lected dogs. Known 
only as Hfers XY 123, 
456 and 789, respec- 
tively, these young men 
were stricken down in 
the prime of life by an 
overhanging branch. 
Call at your nearest 
Druggist, P 1 u m b i s t, 
Bakist or J e w e 1 i s t. 



They have 

ALLENZ 

No. 1 For Barking dogs that do not bite. 
No. 2 Although It is not a plumbers Journal. 

WHEN I SAT DOWN AT THE PIANO THEY ALL LAUGHED 



That, from one of our correspondents and customers by 
Frisbee, picture below by the great artist, Evangeline Booth, 
what a Bingham 
Walsh Course of Ap- 
plied Technique can do 
for anyone, college pro- 
fessors included. Sim- 
ple harmonic lessons; 
practice them on the 
way to work or to the 
classroom, according to 
easy direction pasted 
inside the can. Write, 
don't telegraph, for our 
handsome catalogue. 
Mr. Randolph Frisbce, who took our Player Piano Cour 
kellonge in a Marathon Walking Contest sponsored by the 
Club of Woonsocket. 

Bingham Walsh Institute 
Pucketts Corners 

What Cheer. Iowa 



the name of Randolph 
vi'ill serve to show you 





se, won the huge mus- 
Utopia Gnatt and Tatt 



Page three }]nndred fift\-six 



EVILOMLAP 

Keep the schoolgirl conipltjxi'o?! and it ivill \eep you. 



The natural charm that men admire is not beyond your 
reach. Keep your pores and eyes open these days. Oppor- 
tunity knocks but (ince, having tender knuckles. We have 
something which will save the surface, and incidentally, all. 
This is appealing to our Scotch clients. 




Have you the rosy bloom of girlhood? I guess not. It's all a matter of soaps. Get 
wise to the Armistice and enter our contest. A handsome Nineteen Eighteen Model 
Brush Automobile to the winner. Just tell us simply and legibly, WHAT EVILOMAP 
HAS DONE TO MY PORES. We have no doubt about the first. Do the second, 
without fail. Try the stuff for one week and if it doesn't put you in the movies, you 
have some deep seated organic disorder. 



thrse hundred fifty>;even 



''-r^, 



7f^ 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 

In presenting this volume of the Loyolan to the pubHc the editors feel that never 
in the history of the book has there been so hearty a spirit of cooperation manifest 
on all sides and that never did a staff enjoy such able and willing help from people 
in no way connected with the book. To all the class ofScers and especially to the 
many people not in immediate contact with the staff, they are very grateful for the 
willingness to help at any time and often upon short notice. 

Special thanks are due to Mr. Reedy of the Commerce school, Messrs. Rooney and 
McCormick of the Law school. Miss Dooley of the Medical school. Miss VanDriel of 
the Downtown college, and Sister Helen Jarrell of St. Bernard's Hospital and Sister 
Mary Lidwina of Mercy Hospital for their kind and ever ready assistance. On the 
Lake Shore campus the interest and friendly cooperation of Father Kelley, Father 
Reiner and Mr. Steggert is greatly appreciated. 

For the iirst time in the history of the hook, the staff feels that the business men 
connected with the Loyolan were without exception deserving of the deepest grati- 
tude for their efforts. Mr. Harry Lamberg of Clair Marcelle Studio, and his entire 
capable staff, were always ready to go far out of their way to help the staff, and 
Mr. L. M. Gooder and Mr. S. W. Curtis of D. F. Keller fe? Co. were equally efficient, 
friendly and helpful. And there is one man whom no editor can forget, that cheer- 
ful little engraver who signs himself C. A. Mathisson, but who is universally known 
by that shorter name — "Matty." 

And finally, in the spirit of "last the best," the staff wishes to express its thanks 
to Mr. Morton Zabel, its able moderator, for all his friendly advice, constant aid, and 
constructive suggestions. J. C. 0"C. 



Page three hundred fifty-eight 



€J\ 



^ 



OUR ADVERTISERS 

Patronize Them 



three hundred fifty-nine 






Loyola University 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

6,000 Students— Faculty of 350—20 Buildings 

CONDUCTED BY THE JESUITS 

ARTS and SCIENCES Acced.ted to the North Central 

Association or Colleges 
College courses leading to A. B., B. C. S.. Ph. B., and A. M. degrees. Pre-lledical and 
Scientific courses leading to B. S. and M. S. degrees. Open to graduates of accredited high 
schools 

Catalogue — Registrar, 6^25 Sheridan Road. Rogers Park 0620 

DOWNTOWN COLLEGE E.xtens.on classes for_ University 

Degrees and leachers rromotion • 
(Co-Educational) 

College Courses leading to A. B. and Ph. B. degrees. Pre-Medical and Scientific courses leading 
to B. S. degree Classes: late afternoon; evening; Saturday. 

Catalog — Registrar, 28 No. Franklin Street. Central 0640 

COA/flv/fFRCF (Co-Educational) Day School on Rogers Park Campus 

Evening School in the Loop 
Courses in Accounting, Economics. Business Administration, Commercial Law, Languages. Mathe- 
matics, leading to B. S. degree. 
EVENING COURSES 6 to 10. Saturday afternoon. 1 to 5. 



Catalog — Registrar, 28 No. Franklin Street. Central 0640 

F)F"Kn^mTR V (Chicago College of Dental Surgery) 'Established 1833 

J_yi.iM 1 lO 1 IX 1 Q^^^ ^ - gQQ Students. 50 Teachers. 5,000 Graduates 

Open to students who have completed one year of college. 

Catalog — Registrar, 1757 W, Harrison Street. Seeley 7172 

GRADUATE SCHOOL (Co-Educatmnal) 

the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the Department of Education and the degrees of 
Master of Science in the Departments of Biology. Psychology, and Sociology, 
idress Secretary of the Graduate School, 2S No. Franklin Street. 

HOME STUDY College Courses by Correspondence 

These courses may be begun at any time and are accepted toward bachelor degrees. 
Catalog— Registrar, 652 5 Sheridan Road. Rogers Park 0620 

T A W/ (Co-Educational) Member of Association of American Law Schools. 

On Approved List of American Bar Association 
DAY SCHOOL: Three-vear Course. Open to students who have completed two years of 
coUege; EVENING SCHOOL: Four Year Course. Open to students who have completed 
two years of college. 

Catalog — Registrar, 28 No. Franklin Street: Central 0640 

■Vyf-pT-NTpiT-KTp (Co-Educational) Rated Class A by Am. Med. Assn. Five Year 

iVliilJH^ii\r, (.^^jj.^g L^^j^^ j^ Combined B. S. and M. D. Degrees 

Open to stu.leiUs wli.i li.ive complete<l two years nf ]ire-medical work. 

Catalog— Registrar, 706 So. Lincoln Street. West 4002 

cr~\p'T/^T OOV (Co-Educational) Training tor Social Work, Extension Classes 

OKJK^lKJL.y<J^ I f^^ University Degrees and Teachers^ Promotion 

Courses in Sociology. Education. History. Philosophy. Literature, Languages. Mathematics, etc. 

Classes. 4 to b P. JL and 6:.i0 to S :.10 P. M. 

Catalog — Registrar. 28 No. Franklin Street. Central 0640 

HIGH SCHOOL 

ST. IGNATIUS HIGH SCHOOL LOYOLA ACADEMY 

1076 West Roosevelt Road 01-25 SHERIDAN ROAD 



Page th: 



s^.cai 



-c^ 



^IS^^^ME^MS. 



ifiE]iE(«:^iaiB 

Hemij CLijtton 8 Sons 



Broadway and Fifth — Gary 

Marion and Lake— Oak Park 



Orrington and Church — Evanston 
State and Jackson — Chicago 




The New, 6 Times Enlarged 

LYTTON COLLEGE SHOP 

The Style Center for College Men 

THE POPULARITY of this famous Shop has increased almost as 
decisively as it has expanded. For here are presented first in complete 
assortment the authentic style ideas in everything to wear for undergrads 
and younger alumni. And equally important are the economies made pos- 
sible by our tremendous buying power. 

SUITS . OVERCOATS . HATS . SHOES . SHIRTS 
HOSE . NECKWEAR . LEATHER COATS 



Page three hundred sixtvone 



.^.•Tv 



^mMim^Mm^Mi^mm :^- ;. ..^mmmmmm^mm^s^^f ^ 



=^!v_^=<5»j^ 



Joseph J. Duffy Randolph 7697 John P. Noonan 


DUFFY'NOONAN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY 


General Contractors 


MIDLAND BUILDING 


CHICAGO 


DEARBORN CHEMICAL CO. 


Chevrolet Sheldrake 7610 


310 SO. MICHIGAN AVE. 


KUSHLER CHEVROLET SALES 


CHICAGO 


Wm. J. Kushler 


Telephone Harrison 3926 


6317-6319 BROADWAY 




CHICAGO 


Compliyncnts of 


Phone Berkshire 4431 


MR. JOHN T. BENZ 


ELLIS STONE COMPANY 


Vice-President of 


Incorfoi-iUcd 


THE FIDELITY TRUST & SAVINGS BANK 


CUT STONE CONTRACTORS 


WILSON AVENUE AND BROADWAY 


■ 4837 GRAND AVENUE 


CHICAGO 


CHICAGO 



Page three hundred sixty-two 



T^) /^< 



,■s^^^ 



Tel. Long Beach 5876 

Rates, from $10 to $25 per wee\ 

HOTEL LAFAYETTE 

4606 No. Racine Ave. 
Under Management of 

SKOOGLUND'S CAFETERIA 

1138-40 WILSON AVE. 



Compliments of 

LOCAL CONSTRUCTION CO. 

General Contractors 

4337 MELROSE STREET 

CHICAGO 



Compliments of 



W. J. NEWMAN CO. 



A GRADUATE AND A POSITION 

What are you doing to prepare yourself for advancement? 

THE 
UPTOWN METROPOLITAN BUSINESS COLLEGE 

4750 SHERIDAN ROAD 

{America's Finest System of Commercial Schools) 

EstabHshed 1873 

Offers 

THOROUGH TRAINING 

in 

STENOGRAPHIC, SECRETARIAL and COMMERCIAL COURSES 

DAY AND EVENING CLASSES 
Call at Our Office or Telephone Sunny side 9425 



ge three hundred sixty-thr 



THE EDWIN CLAPP STORES 

IU6 S. DEARBORN STREET 
CHICAGO 

Superior Quality S/ioes 
for Men 




JOHN C. DILLON ii CO. 

Real Estate Investments 

Loans, Renting, Insurance 

Owner Forest Haven Estates. Lake Forest and 

Ashury Park, Evanston. where investments are 

guaranteed 

6616 SHERIDAN ROAD 

Phone Rogers Park 4") 01 
Established 16 Years CHICAGO 



FLAVIN i^ WISEMAN 

Contractors 

Plain and Ornamental Pl.istcrint; 

Metal Furring, Lathing and 

Light Iron Construction 

1^-7 EAST ONTARIO STREET 
CHICAGO 

Superior .^7^9-5325 



It your Church, your School, your Al- 
umni or your Club needs a permanent, 
definite fixed income, as well as an endow- 
ment, communicate with 

THE ROMAN CATHOLIC BEQUEST 
CAMPAIGN 

FRED W, BAILEY. Director 
Phone State 7761 11 S. LaSalle St. 



Co))ipJnj!e7its of 



CROWN STOVE W^ORKS 



46.M W. 12th Place 



Tel. Lawndale 0?11 



Pd.ne three liiiiidrt'd sixty-four 

.■ -'aiidjllJItl 



^ 



i8at^ tor our Gataloauc sbotrinci,Pimoiu? Dcsii^tti. 
8tock Form5 dirars on hmt^Fof opct a Quarter of 
a Qaxhirr u\- hatv sorcO Vc\c G|Ouuiliottal lutdituttons 
ofjgmaica. 

B.q.EisBrilGo- 

_io3- cinia:a0o - phone - 

NORTH CLABK ST CENtbal3965 


GRAF'S 

Cleaners and Dyers 

ALL PHONES— LINCOLN 6?20 

2I5-2I7-2I9 W. Division St. 

CHICAGO 


McCABE ^ HENGLE 

Insurance 

175 WEST JACKSON BLVD. 

CHICAGO 


Compliments of 
MORISON L^ WALLACE 

Architects and Eyigineers 

111 WEST ADAMS STREET 

CHICAGO 


LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 
GYM 

Equipped by the 

CHICAGO GYMNASIUM 

EQUIPMENT COMPANY 

1835 W. Lake St. Chicago 


PHILIP STATE BANK 
£^ TRUST CO. 

N. E. Corner Clark St. ^ Lunt Ave. 

Oldest and Largest Ban\ m 
Rogers Par\ 



Page t/ireif hiindred sixty-five 



-_^^ 



©i:^'^^ 



Phone State 7402 R, 1012, Conway Bldg. 


VAN ETTEN BROS. 




ALBERT O^ROURKE g^ CO. 


Builders Inc. 
11016-24 SO. MICHIGAN AVE. 




Real Estate Investments 


State Theatre Bldg. 
Pullman 596 




111 WEST WASHINGTON STREET 


CHICAGO, ILL. 




CHICAGO 






MATH. RAUEN COMPANY 






General Contractors 


Compliments of 




326 W. MADISON STREET 






CHICAGO 


P. J. c. 




Telephones 






Mam 3086-3087 







Page three hundred .^ixty 



i^. 






PHONE MAIN 1858 



M. J. TENNES 6? CO. 



REAL ESTATE 
INVESTMENTS 

Insurance 



SUITE 612 OTIS BUILDING 

10 SOUTH LA SALLE STREET 

CHICAGO 



Page three hundred sixty-seven 



■<^. 



- — i.Uili.JiiJ!iiji/(fJ!,;: - 



[m^^mf ^ 



MURPHY^S RESTAURANT 

6546 SHERIDAN ROAD 


FITZ SIMONS if CONNELL 
DREDGE AND DOCK COMPANY 


Upstairs — Nr. Loyola "L" 

"■Just Like Home — Folldw the Boys"" 

Luncheon 11 a.m. to ? p. m. — ^Oc 

Dinner *; to S p. m. — 90c 


Established 1872 

ENGINEERS 6? CONTRACTORS 

Dredging— Docking — Pile Driving — 
Foundations — Piers — Bridges, etc. 


Sunday Dinner 12 Noon to S P. M.-$L25 


Mam 1964 10 S. La Salle St. 


Phone Sheldrake 4 386 




NORTH SHORE 

AUTO SPRING y WHEEL CO. 


T. H. FLOOD c^ CO. 


WeWmg 


Lent' Boo\s — TSjeit' and Vied 


Body Builders and General Repairers 
Auto Springs, "Wheels, Fenders and Frames 


MAIN 1889 181 NO. CLARK ST. 


Springs and "Wheels in Stock 


CHICAGO 


Auto Blacksmithing 




6240 BROADWAY 




Floors and Wall Tiles Tile Mantels. Andiron; 
Ceramic, Mosaic Marble Electric and Gas Logs 


Telephone Capitol 204U 


BURKE TILING COMPANY 


KEYSTONE MILL WORK CO. 


"A Little Better" 


General 'Mi\\wor\ 


TILE, MOSAIC AND FIRE PLACES 


2304-06 NO. KNOX AVENUE 


Office and Show Rooms 

Ashland-63rd State Bank Building 

1536-38 WEST 63rd STREET 

Hemlock 2666 

Res. 6534 S- Bishop St. -Phone Prospect 1316 


at Belden Avenue 

CHICAGO 

Frame,; Interior Finish 

Sash — Doors Cabinet Work 


WM. J MAAS PHILIP F MAA.S 




MAAS BROS., HARDWARE 


J. G. STEINBACH 


Cutlery, Stoves, Furnaces 
Furnishmos, Shop "Work 


Ardutect a-nd Supermtendent 


1822-1824 W. VAN BUREN ST. 

Corner Ogden Avenue 

Telephone West 1005 CHICAGO 


Suite I602-.3, Ashland Block 
State 2803 
CHICAGO 



Pdgf three Inimlrcd M.vly-figlit 




The cover for 
this annual 
was created by 
The DAVID J. 
MOLLOY CO. 

2857 N. Western Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 

GiTTy Molloy MajU 



MAKERS OF 
LOYOLA BAND UNIFORMS 

also makers of 
ROBES, GOWNS AND CAPS 

CHICAGO 
UNIFORM & CAP CO. 

208 W. Monroe Street 
Tel. Franklin 0188-0189 



PATRONIZE YOUR 
NEIGHBORHOOD BANK 

JOHN BAIN, President 

Auburn Park Trust fe? Savings Bank 
79th and Halsted Streets 

Chatham State Bank 

78 "lO Cottage Grove Ave. 

Chicago Lawn State Bank 

63rd St. »■ S. Kediie Ave. 

Gage Park State Bank 

^ 59th St. 6? S. Kedzie Ave. 

Stony Island State Savings Bank 
68th St. y S. Stony Island Ave. 

West Englewood National Bank 
1610 \V. 63rd St. 

West Englewood Trust & Savings Bank 

1624 V. 63rd St. 

West Highland State Bank 
7900 S. Ashland Ave. 



SIXTY YEARS IN BUSINESS 

with thousands of satisfied customers on our books. Let us help 
you to solve your insurance problems whether they be Fire, 
Plate Glass, Automobile, Liability, Compensation, Steam Boiler 
Accident or any other form of insurance. We will give you 
the benefit of an experience acquired over many years devoted 
to the problems of insurance. A telephone call, letter or post 
card will bring our service to you. 

JOHN NAGHTEN & CO. 

{Estahhsbtd 1865) 

INSURANCE 

17i West Jackson Boulevard 

CHICAGO 

Telephone Wabash 1120 



Page three hundred sixtv-nme 



rr^X^ 



'"^^ W^iEi^§^^>: 



:mmm^ : 



THE CLOTHES SHOP OF 
PERSONAL SERVICE 

University 
men like our 

styles. 

Showing only 

the Finest 

Clothing 

Attractively 

Priced. 

/^ ' MOODY 
^ ' WEBER 
^' ' HALLBERG 

Two Sliofi-s 

17 WEST 

JACKSON 

BLVD. 

161 WEST 

RANDOLPH 

ST. 




Telephone Main 3315 

M. J. BRANSFIELD 

Municipdl Bonds and City Vouchers 

702 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BLDG. 
CHICAGO 



BARAT COLLEGE 

and 

Convent of the Sacred Heart 

LAKE FOREST ILLINOIS 

Conducted by 

The Religious of the Sacred Heart 

For Catalog, applv to Keverend Mol/ier Siiperioi 



Artist Material Dept. 

605 N. Michigan Blvd. 

Tel. Superuu- 8537 



BRANCH OFFICES 
307 N. Michigan Blvd. 

Tel. State 7046 

24 E. Van Buren St. 

334 S. Wabash Ave. 

Tel. Harrison 8597 

CROFOOT, NIELSEN & CO. 
Blue Printers 

BLUE PRINTING, BLACK PRINTING, BLUE LINE AND COLOR PRINTING 
ARTIST AND DRAWING MATERIALS 

Special Service. Always Speed and Results; Big Floor Space and Equipment for Rush Orders 

TELEPHONE STATE 2870 14 N. FRANKLIN STREET 



S. S. KIMBELL BRICK CO. 

Distributors 
FACE BRICK- MORTAR COLOR— HOLLOW" TILE 

7— CHICAGO YARDS— 7 

Main Office and Disfrlax Rooms 

228 NORTH LA SALLE STREET 

Builders Bldg. 



PHONE CENTRAL 6714 



CHICAGO 



Page (I. 



Iiuiid.-ca seventh 



7^^^^^(C% 



^^?^ 



CHR. PASCHEN CO. 


You will always find the 
WELCOME SIGN 


1545 CONWAY BUILDING 


on the 




DOOR MAT 




at the 


Binlding Cleaners — Tiic\ Pointers 


LOYOLA ' SHERIDAN 


Concrete Brea\ers 


RECREATION 




CENTER 


Phones Randolph 3280— Diversey 7800 


1227-31 Loyola Avenue 


THE NORTHWESTERN TERRA GOTTA COMPANY 


DENVER— CHICy 


\GO— ST. LOUIS 


WILLIAM J. QUIGLEY 


Try Our Superior 'Wor\ and Service 


6- COMPANY 


CROWN LAUNDRY CO. 


'Wor\shops 




ONE SEVENTEEN E. DELAWARE PLACE 


815 FORQUER ST. 


CHICAGO 


Phone Mon. 6646 



mm 



m£u 



Page three hundred seventy-one 



Covipliments of 



HOME FUEL AND SUPPLY COMPANY 

D^ S. WILLIS, President 

Retail Distribution of the 
FINEST QUALITY COAL AND COKE 

PHONE BITTERSWEET 6640 
OR STATE 7680 



The ATLAS certificate 
on Corrugated or 

Solid Fibre 

Shippmii Containers 

IS a Symbol of 

S}naUt\ 



ATLAS BOX COMPANY 

'.S5 N. BRANCH ST. CHICAGO 

rlumc LINcoln 9000 



NATIONAL BANK PROTECTION 
FOR YOUR SAVINGS 

BROADWAY NATIONAL 
BANK 

Broadwax at Devon 



BARRY BYRNE COMPANY 

Constructmg Architects 

SCHOOLS -CHURCHES— HOSPITALS 
RESIDENCES 

014 Sduth Michit:an Avenue 
CHICAGO 



Pdiie llnee hundred seventyti 



}B 



\'^^ 



w^> 



Coviplivients of 




CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



ST. BONIFACE CEMETERY 

482 5 N. Clark St. Edgewater 0027 

ST. JOSEPH CEMETERY 

River Grove, 111. Mernmac 903 3 

ST. MARY'S CEMETERY 

Evergreen Park, 111. Beverley 3778 

The net income of these cemeteries 

is used for the support of the 

Angel Guardian Orphanage 



LALLY COLUMN COMPANY 

OF CHICAGO- 
Steel Shell Concrete Filled Columns 

4001 Wentworth Ave. Chicago 

Phone Boulevard i\S7I 



TELEPHONE WABASH 1547 
TELEPHONE WABASH 1548 



RESIDENCE PHONE PROSPECT 9057 
RESIDENCE PHONE PROSPECT 9050 



McCALL CONSTRUCTION CO. 

MASONS AND GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

Licensed Boiler Setters — Fire Bric\ Construction 

Alterations of All Kinds 

BOILER SETTING, ENGINE FOUNDATIONS AND POWER PLANTS A SPECIALTY 

Suite 926 Webster Building 
?27 SOUTH LA SALLE ST. CHICAGO 



ST. CATHERINE HIGH 
SCHOOL 

(For Girls and Young Ladies) 

Washington Blvd. at Central Ave., Chicago 

Under the Direction of the Sisters of Mercy 

Accredited by the University of Illinois 
and Chicago Teachers' College 

Telephone Columbus 7576 



Compliments of 

THE 

GAERTNER 

SCIENTIFIC 

CORP. 

1201 Wrightwood 

Ave. 

Chicago, 111. 

manufacturer, of 

High Grade 

Astronomical, 

Astrophysical and 

Physical 

Instruments 




Page three hundred sevent\'-three 



Mk 



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PHONE YARDS 0768 

J. M. BRENNEN ^ CO. 

Painting and Decorating 
Coyitractors 

RESIDENCES CLUBS STORES FACTORIES 
OFFICES SCHOOLS APARTMENTS WAREHOUSES 
HOTELS CHURCHES THEATRES GARAGES 

We Arc in a Position to Operate Any Place m the Country 
651 WEST 43rd STREET 


E. L. ARCHIBALD CO. 

Genera] Contractors 

CONWAY BUILDING 

CHICAGO 


ANDERSEN'WITTE 
ENGRAVING CO. 

Engraved Stationery 

BUSINESS CARDS, WEDDING INVI- 
TATIONS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS 
LETTER HEADS ENVELOPES 
CHRISTMAS CARDS 

525 S. DEARBORN ST. 
Phone WABash 5751 


Telt-phnnc Sheldrake 8804 

ALBION SHORE HOTEL 

1217 ALBION AVENUE 

Exceptional Restaurant Facilities 

ROSE M. BURKE 



three hundred seventy-four 



mB 



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€^ 



-^J; 



THE MARYWOOD SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 



RESIDENT AND DAY STUDENTS 



Conducted bv 

SISTERS OF PROVIDENCE 

OF 

SAINT MARYOF'THEWOODS 



2128 Ridge Avenue 



Evanston, Illinois. 



A FEW OUTSTANDING 
INDUCEMENTS 

Two Eggs — 10c 

Two Wheat Cakes— 10c 

Sirloin Butt Steak — 3 5c 

Bacon and Eggs — 2 5c 
Edt Better, ^uic\er, Cheaper! 
Our Slogan 

MARQUIS COMPANY 

63 51 Broadway 45 39 Broadway 

47 56 Broadway 4004 Sheridan Road 

2652 Montrose Ave. 



EYES CAREFULLY EXAMINED 

Spectacles and Eyeglasses Made to Order 
KODAKS AND SUPPLIES 

Movies a Specialty 
CARL ZEISS MICROSCOPES 

WATRY & HEIDKAMP 

F..^T.\BLI.SIii:D ISS.i 

OPTOMETRISTS AND OPTICIANS 
17 W. RANDOLPH ST. 



TELEPHONE CANAL 6239 
Telephone Orders Promptly Attended to 

MODEL DAIRY COMPANY 

Deahrs in 
Dairy Products of Highest Grade 

2003-5-7-9 W. 18th PLACE 
CHICAGO 



JACKSON PARK COFFEE 



In one pound sealed packages 
only. Steel cut or whole bean. 

ASK YOUR 

NEIGHBORHOOD 

GROCER 



Distributed by 

FRANK C. WEBER & CO. 

Wcntworth 0180 6319 Lowe Ave 

CHICAGO 




Page three hundred seventy-five 



't ^m^m^&^^^mmm^^'A 



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ALL THE MEDICAL BOOKS 




used in 




The Medical Department of Loyola 


ROSSBACH a SONS, INC. 


University 


=; 12-20 So. Washtenaw Ave. 


can he ohtained at 




SPEAKMAN'S 




(Chicago Medical Book Co.) 


M/gs. of 


Cor. Congress ii Honore Sts. 


.STEEL SASH AND VENTILATORS 
FOR CHURCHES 


New and Second Hand Medical Books 




Full Line ot Stationery 




FOR BAZAARS, PICXICS. CARM\'ALS OR 




CARD PARTIES 




Headquarters for Reliable and Dependable 
Merchandise 


THE CUNARD LINE 


800PAGE CATALOG FREE 


TO 


to Clergy and Buying Committees 


EUROPE— MEDITERRANEAN- 


N. SHURE CO. 


WEST INDIES— AROUND 


Merchandise at Wholesale for 40 Years 


THE WORLD 


MADISON and FRANKLIN STS. 




CHICAGO, ILL. 


The large fleet of New Oil Burners from 
New York, Boston and Montreal, together 


ANDREW J. KANE FRANK J. O'CONNOR 


Formerly "ith Former DesiBner 


with the Cunard famous Cuisine and ser\"- 


HoBiin &L McDermott for Murphy Bros. 


ice affords the very best obtainable in all 


Let US show you our $6') Suits — Range of 


classes of Trans-Atlantic travel. 


Imported and Domestic Woolens 




Fit and Worl^i)iU7islii;i Guaranteed 


As\ Tour Local Agent or 


Special Prices to Clergy 


THE CUNARD LINE 


KANE L^ O'CONNOR 


.U(i N. Michigan Ave. Chicago, 111. 


Fine Ta.lonn.g 




iO] Union Bank Bldg. 




Telephone Dearb..rn 6II7S 2? N. Dearborn St 





Page three liioulred .seretitysi.v 




The Turning Point 

for a certain young business man 

— when his employer found that in addition to 
showing unmistakable executive capacity in his 
work, he was building up his bank account, his 
credit standing and his financial experience in coun- 
sel with the officers of the Union Trust Company. 

We are particularly glad when we 
can he helpful to young business men 




1869 



UNION TRUST 
COMPANY 

Madison and Dearborn Streets 
CHICAGO 

A THOROUGHLY SATISFACTORY BANKING HOME 



Page three hundred seventy-seven 



\^^M^^sE^m^^^smx^^^^m^mm?m^mm^ Qi 



'''i!;;/:''"K^""j'Ti;';';'!l^""-H'i;f^i: 




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LAW BOOKS 

Everything in Law Books. We special- 
ise in Students' Text and Case Books, new 
and second-hand. We buy for Cash. We 
trade for books in use. Dispose of your 
students' books now, while they have value. 
They are useless in practice. Large stock 
of USED books for next Semester on hand 
NOW. 

Any book you need in practice can be 
supplied by us, such as Reports, Statutes, 
General Text Books, etc. We list below 
a partial list for your examination, to-wit; 

llhnvis Supremt; Cvurt Reports, vols. 1 to 326, 
both inclu. Buckram. Like new $47'). 00 

ininoi.i Statutes Annotated. Jones &? Adding- 
ton, 6 vols, and 2 vols. Callaghan Supple- 
ment covering to the year 1920. Buckram. 
Fine shape $20.00 

Illinois Digest Annotated. 5 vols, and Callag- 
han's Supplement, 6 vols. Digesting Su- 
preme 1-318, Appellate 1-235. Buckram, 
line condition $5 5.0" 

IlUnois Revised Statutes. 1927. Cahill. 

NEW $15.00 

lihnoi.s Revised Statutes. 1927. Smith-Hurd. 
NEW $20.00 

Cyc. Vols. 1 to 40, 'both incl. Buckram. Firle 
condition -. $65.00- 

Greene's Municipal Court Practice. 1926.. $12. 00 

Gidlidm hutnictions to juries. NEW $15.0o 

Puterbau'^h's Common Law Pleading. 1926. 
NEW $17.50 

Puterhaugh's Chancery Pleading. 1916. 

NEW '. '. $8.50 

Let us have your inquiries as to anything de- 
sired. We assure you of our prompt attention. 



ILLINOIS BOOK EXCHANGE 

J. p. Gic.se, Prop. 

3. -^7 W. MADISON STREET 
Third Floor, Hunter Bldg. 

Opposite Hearst Bldg. 
Phone Frankhn 1059 



AFTER GRADUATION— WHAT' 

We have a few openings for young men of 
intelligence and not afraid of hard work. Such 
men will find in our business a real opportunity 
for success. 

We congratulate and welcome Loyola grad- 
uates. 

THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 
COMPANY OF NEW YORK- 

Samuel Heifetz, Manager 

657 Illinois Merchants Bank Building 
Central 4319 



V. MUELLER c^ CO. 

Surgeons' Ins'srttmeyits 

Hospital Equipment 

J<iurses' Supplies 

Ogden Ave., Van Buren cr Honore Sts 

CHICAGO 



HAMBURG-AMERICAN 
LINE 



GERMANY 

ENGLAND 



FRANCE 
IRELAND 



and other parts of the world hv 

LUXURIOUS MODERN PASSENGER 
LINERS 

E.vcellent Service and Cuisine 

Western Passenger OfEce 

177 No. Michigan Ave., Chicago 

or Local Agents 



Page three hundred seventy-eight 



gff 



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THE WORSHAM SCHOOL 



520 S. Li: 



In St. 



Ch 



nil 



icaeo, Illinois 



America's Leading Institution for 
Embalming and Funeral Directing 

Catalogue and Further Inforrnation 
Furnished Upon Application 

Tel. West. 3222 




Baggage To and From All Depots 

KASEN'S EXPRESS ii VAN CO. 

Moving, Packing, Shipping, Storage 

M^in Office 

Tel. West 1740 412 S. Wood St. 




YEOMANS BROTHERS COMPANY 

SEWAGE EJECTORS 

PUMPING MACHINERY 

Est. 1898 
14,^3 Dayton St. Chicago 



A Great Store in a Great City 

iLii 



State. Adams axti. Dearborn Streets 
53 Years of Faitbfu* Service-SS 




Everytliiiiq 
Mep Wear, 

(and Women too) 

"'hrchf it for less at 
TheTair*' 



ge three hundred seventynirxe 



""^^mTM^Y 



Eugene J. Sullivan 
Pres. 6? Treas. 



John E. Redmond 

Secretary 



SULLIVAN'KORBER CO. 

ORNAMENTAL IRON, BRONZE 6? BRASS 
Telephones Kedzie 3001-6484 



2910-16 Carroll Ave. 



Chicago 



YOUR STYLE CENTER 

Men — and women who buy for men in- 
variably turn to this store when they want 
men"s wear of the newest styles. Then, 
too, the service you receive here with our 
forty-four years of knowing how, accords 
you advice cheerfully on matters of apparel 
— the satisfaction you get from wearing the 
new things we offer. 

JOHN F. DENVIR ii SONS 

MEN'S CLOTHING, HATS, FURNISHINGS 
67-69 W. Jackson Boulevard 



Ha 



McCLINTIC ' MARSHALL COMPANY 

8J01 Stewart Avenue 

CHICAGO 

Fabricators of structural steel for all types 
of buildings or structures requiring steel work 

For Estimates on Large Construction Work — 
Phone Central 9348 

For Estimates on Smaller Work — 
Phone Vincennes 900'? 



Piige three hundred eiglity 



€ 



MUNGER'S 
WEST SIDE LAUNDRY 

14JM437-1439 Madison St. 

Telephones 
Monroe 0687— Euclid 8206 (Oak Park) 

The very best work at the right price 

All Services — Individual Finish, Family Fin- 
ish, Rough Dr>', Hydro and Wet Wash 



Compliments of 

JOSEPH L. GILL 

STATE REPRESENTATIVE 
31st SENATORIAL DISTRICT 



Telephone SUPerior 0900 for Superior Ser 



Established 1882 



JOSEPH H. BIGGS 
CATERER 

GOLD-GILT CHAIRS FOR RENT 

Estimates Furnished for Luncheons, Dinners, Weddings, Musicales, Receptions, 

Ball Suppers, Afternoon Teas and All Social Functions, Large or Small, 

Town or Country. Employ the Highest Class of Assistants in 

All Branches of My Business 

611-61.V61^ Cass Street CHICAGO 



ANDERSON ^ LIND MFG. CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF MILLWORK 

General Office and Factory 

2127-45 Iowa Street 

Phones Humboldt 0902-.V4-T 



Pdgt' three hundred eighty-one 



-^c^ 



/f^\ n ^M jj^llWmitWjJllJI^IjjiJi^^ | >^^uiM | Ijll )ljjn^] | - 



:^^ tfWllfe!WUkj I tfiiji^^_liii^i)^m i ^^MJ ' ^fimb i:m ^ ^<^^^^% 



THE YEAR ROUND FOOD 



A BLEND OF SWEET CREAM, SUGAR, 
EGGS AND CHOICE FRUITS 



GOLDENROD ICE CREAM 
COMPANY 

SI 7 West 21st St. Rciosevelt 2900 

CHICAGO 



See this wonderful 




Small 
S^ Payment 
fatlachmenti Uown 

^%f^fVyf f^^^ finest gitaranteed 

■ ■*'"• cleaner at the lowest 

BB price. Cleans thoroughly. 

*' Powerful suction. Ask for 

jree home demonstration. 

E COMMONWEALTH EDISON O 
LECTRIC SHOPk) 

72 W. Adams St. — and Branches 



HOOS ALBUMIN MILK 
ASK YOUR DOCTOR 



MATHEMATICS SIMPLIFIED 

5 SECONDS 

BRINGS SOLUTION 

Turn to the Card and 
There's 




Faster than / 
Figuring/ 

.Save half the time now spent on routine calculations 
— copy read\-made, pre-checked answers from the 
sturdy linen-hinged cards of this handy file of answers. 
Every card is tabbed, every tab visible — everything is 
done' but copying the results. Twice as fast as anv 
• ther method. 



Meilicke Sy 
Pay Roll 



elude 



Commercial 
Yard Goods 
Coal 
sis Discounts 

asis Price Checkers 

Vertical Catalog 
Phone Indexes 
The Dictaform 
Special-Built for Any Need 



MEILICKE SYSTEMS, INC. 



347'* North Clark Si. 






Time Saving Devices 



Pdiin tlirt-f hundred elgll tv-tll.i. 



®^ 



^^^ 



Phone Pensacola 6700-1-2 






E. R. NEUENFELDT 




LIVE FROGS— TURTLES— FROG LEGS 




62 ^ W. Randolph St. 




Telephone Monroe 0984 


JEFFERSON PARK 
MILLWORK CO. 

SASH, DOORS AND INTERIOR FINISH 
^"2 14-36 Milwaukee Ave. 




HERARD 

Storage 




Moving 




Packing 


Edward J. Vonesh 
6978 Owen Ave. 
KewcastleOni CHICAGO 


Shipping 
6327' 3 3 Broadway 




Phone Armitage 02S3 


RUDOLPH ANDRINGA 




Office Partitions and Railing Carried in 
Stock for Immediate Delivery 




2419 W. MONROE STREET 




Tel. Seeley 3024 


SLUPKOWSKI ii PIONTEK 




ARCHITECTS 

ROOM 71(1-712 PALATINE BLDG. 
Corner Milwaukee Ave. C? Paulina Street 

CHICAGO 


CHICAGO FENCE 
& WIRE COMPANY 

CHICAGO, ILL. 


Pah.-^ade 1283-4-'i 4400 Addi.'son Blvd. 




Page Copperweld Chain Link Fence 

Wrought Iron Fence 6? Wire Partitions 

DuBois Woven Wood Fence 




All Types of Fencing Erected bv Trained 
Crews When Desired 





m 



Page three hundred eighty-three 



--S> 



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Telephone Main 1365 



S. CLIFFORD a COMPANY 

BUILDERS 
BUILDINGS FINANCED 

111 W. Washington Street 
CHICAGO 



BEAUTY 

The exceeding care with ■which 
we conserve beauty and delicacy 
in dress is the pride of an insti- 
tution as eminent in its service 
as it is in its size. 






ORTHSIDE 
CLEANERS 

Sr DYERS COMPANY 

5427-31 BROADWAY, CHICAGO 
LONgbeach 1000 

EVANSTON SHOP: 504 MAIN STREET 

Suburban Phones 
GREENLEAF 1000 WINNETKA 1987 

HIGHLAND PARK :iilll MORTON C.RO\'E 14 

Chicago's Largest Cleaners 








Jiew De Paul Unu'crsilv BIdg. 
Holahird 6? Roche. Arjiitfct.s 



FLUSH VALVES 

Arc Being Installed in This New ""Loop"" 
Building 

Because the Watrous Flush Valve is efficient in 
operation and makes a big saving in water bills. 
It is particularly suited for Schools and Institu- 
tional Buildings. 

M,.dc Solely by 

THE IMPERIAL BRASS MFG. CO. 

1200 W. Harrison St. Chicago 



Pa.uf three hundred eightyjour 



Icn 



«% 




TELEPHONE SAGINAW 7362 



GATEWAY 



'CWITI 



COMPANY 



1661 East 79th Street 
CHICAGO 




INVESTMENT BONDS AND MORTGAGES 



Page three hundred eighty-five 



QM 



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"^^3135itSPP5^'^?HE 



?sR^^/?, H 







WE RENT OR SELL 


Phone Lawndale 4022 Established 1879 
Randolph 6807 




n^ 


Tuxedos, Full Dress, Cut- 




aways, Prince Albert 
For All Occasions 


JOHN GUNTERBERG <f SON 




m^ 


We Also Rent 

Masquerade 6? Theatrical 

Costumes 


TUCKPOINTERS 
Brick, Stone and Terra Cotta Building 




Gme Us a Trial — Our 


Cleaners and Jointers 






>~ 


tu 


Prices are Right 

SAM GINGISS & SON 

6 East Lake St. 


Cold Steam Cleaning — Sandblasting 
Concrete Breakers General Mason Repairs 

23.35 S Millard Avenue Chicago 






ABOVE EAT SHOP 


Tel. Ai-mitagc 3286 


BLOOM 


: ANTON A. TOCHA 


CHICAGO 


Architect ,ind Structural Engineer 


PHOTOGRAPHERS 


1064 Milwaukee Ave., near Noble St. 


190 N. STATE STREET 


CHICAGO 


TEL CENTRAL 58(i7 




ROBT. P. CARSEN 


Phone Armitage 4447 


Sct;nic Studio 


JOSEPH G- COMPANY 


Designers, Constructors and Painters of 
Theatrical Stage Settings, Specialising in 


Importers 


Equipping Colleges, Schools and Church 
Auditoriums. 


Wholesale 


"We also carry the largest stock of Scenery 


CHURCH GOODS 


and Drapery settings for Rental to Ama- 




teur and Professional productions. 


Religious Goods Picture Framing 


Theatrical Hardware and Supplies, Elec- 


We Specialise in Supplying Devotional 


trical equipment and Drapery settings. 


Articles to Be Sold at Missions 


1^-07 NO. CLARK ST. 




Chicago, 111. 


113.S Milwaukee Ave, 


Phone All Departments Delaware 692 2 




Office Superior IS '5 2 



Page three hundred eighty-six 



T^^K 




For twenty-seven years we have held 
the confidence and patronage of many 
of Chicago's most successful enterprises. 

We have shared in the creating and 
producing of printed -advertising that 
"sells". 

We always seek to adapt our organ' 
ization to the needs of those who 
employ us. 

We are glad for the opportunity of 
serving the Staff on this Issue of 
The Loyolan. • ■ ■ ' ■ • 

D F KELLER &? CO 

732 SHERMAN STREET 
CHICAGO 



c 



Page three hundred eighty-seven 



w 



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PERFECTO GARCIA 

SUPREME IN QUALITY 

Perfecto Garcia Cigars have for years represented the very finest in quahty and 
workmanship in Clear Havana Cigars. Their unvarying excellence have won un- 
challenged leadership wherever fine Cigars have been in demand. It doesn't matter 
whether it be the fine clubs, cafes, hotel-stands, restaurants or the plain every-day cigar 
merchant — PERFECTO GARCIA Cigars have been and continue to be a trade- 
winning and business-building commodity. 

OFFICE: 208 NO. WELLS ST., CHICAGO, ILL. 
FACTORIES: TAMPA, FLORIDA 



THE EDWARD J. HARGRAVE 



Secret Serv\ce 



Licensed 



Bonded 



' Thirty-eight years' experience in successful 
detective work. Civil, Criminal, Commercial, 
Store, Factory, Industrial and Technical Inves- 
tigations. Shadowing — Secretly obtaining in- 
formation for Court proceedings or Private use, 
using dictagraph and other modern detection 
methods. 



Edward J. Hargrave 

30J-306 Randolph BIdg 

Central 1500-01-0 
CHICAGO, ILL 



Geo. E. Hargrave 
H'J N. Clark St. 



720-721 Victoria Bldg. 
8th a Locust Sts. St. Louis, Mo. 



Phones Seeley 276';-66-67 

THE HAINES COMPANY 

BLAST HEATING H VENTIL.-\TING 
CONTRACTORS 

1929 - 1937 W. Lake Street 
CHICAGO 



Page three hundred eighty-eight 



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Page three hundred eighty-nine 



<:\ 



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Loyola University 

Medical School 

Hyland H Corse 

Architects 

DUVAL 
CONSTRUC- 
TION 
COMPANY 

General 
Contractors 

Chicago 

180 West 

Washington St. 

State 7970-7971 



Telephone Prospect 1220 

JOHN SLOVINEC 

ARCHITECT 

51?8 So. Artesian Ave. 
Chicago, 111. 



T. M. WHITE T. L. RUSSELL 

Res. Phone Res. Phone 

Austin 5386 Canal 1049 

T. M. WHITE CO. 

Excavating and Wrecking 

Steam Shovel Work a Specialty 

GENERAL TEAMING 

Office and Yard: 2314 South Robey Street 

Phones: Canal 1049: Canal 1449 

CHICAGO 

do 2 711(1 

Wc Make a Specialty of 

Rentinu Formal Dress 

Clothing 

BROADWAY 
DRESS SUIT CO. 

Room 2 30 
4 1^4 Broadway 
CHICAGO 
For Rent — 

Full Dress. Prince Albert, 
Tuxedos. Cutaways, Shoes, 
Striped Trousers, Silk Hats 
and Shirts. 

A Complete Line, of 
Furnishing' for Sale 
St Modeh -All Si-e.s' "Open Evenings 




ihn-c Inniclrcd iin.fty 



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Phone Sheldrake 8500-01-02 
Evanston Phone Greenleaf 4 H 1 

THE HOWARD LAUNDRY CO. 

7379-89 Rogers Avenue 
The House of iluality 



H. A. ANDERSON ^ CO. 

Architects 
Successors to 
C. A. ECKSTORM 
No. La Salle St. Phone Main 0798 



FARNEY ELECTRIC COMPANY 

Contractors and Engineers 

228 NORTH LA SALLE STREET 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



SOldDutc 

Cleanser 



Safeguards Your Home 
w^ith 




Ptige three hundred -nmetyone 






^ 



r. iJjjjwjityji'iiyiJi ; 




MARK 

— the plaintive wail of the 
pipes 

— the soft crooning of the 
violin 

— the majesty of the organ 

— the mighty rumbHng of 
the drxims 

— the color and warmth of 
the human voice 

as reproduced by the Howard All- 
Electric Radio Receiver, and you will 
not gainsay its position in the front 
rank of musical instruments of more 
than ordinary merit. 

HOWARD RADIO COMPANY 

4^-469 E. Ohio Street 
CHICAGO 



COSTUMES RENTED 
FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

Amateur or Professional Dress, Tuxedo and 
Dinner Suits, Theatrical Merchandise, Wigs. 
Masks, Tights, Opera Hose, Tinsel Cloths and 
Trimmings, Rhinestones and Rhinestone Setters. 

CHICAGO COSTUME WORKS, INC. 

^Manufacturers and Designers 
State 6780 174 W. Randolph St. 



THE DOLE REFRIGERATING 
MACHINE CO. 

1209 Washington Boulevard 
CHICAGO. ILLINOIS, U. S. A. 




CAFETERIAS 
FLORISTS 
DAIRIES 
CLUBS 
FURRIERS 



CAFES 

DELICATESSENS 
RESTAURANTS 

MEAT MARKETS 
GROCERIES 

DRUG STORES 

ICE CREAM PARLORS 

HOSPITALS HOX1ES. ETC. 

Made in various si:;es to suit requirements and 
til cover all types of refrigerators and cases. 

LOYOLA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

706 So. Lincoln St. 
USE OUR MACHINE 



Pa^e three hundred -lunety'two 



..^MhB 






Telephones West 2470-2471 

NAROWETZ HEATING 
& VENTILATING CO. 

1711-1717 Maypole Avenue 

Louis Narowetz, Jr., Secretary 

CHICAGO 



NATIONAL DISTRIBUTORS 

Founded lS7i" 




H. CHANNON COMPANY 

Complete Stoc^ of 

MILL, MINE, HARDWARE AND 
INDUSTRIAL SUPPLIES 

Over Fifty Years of continuous successful experi- 
ence backed by a large stock, which insures satisfac- 
tion tu our customers. 

Most modern facilities for giving prompt service. 
Shippmg department operating day and night. 



ACADEMY OF ST. SCHOLASTICA 
High School Department Day School 



Affiliations: 

Catholic University, University of Illinois 
and North Central Association 

GRAMMAR SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

Boarding and Day School 

Bus Service if desired 







Send for Catalogue to Principal of Department in which you are interested 

7416 RIDGE BOULEVARD 

CHICAGO 

Phone Rogers Park 3406 



Page three hundred innetythree 



^s^ 



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'-m&em»''im'0,'^- 



Superior 9044 Established 1890 




CARL JOHN STEIN CO. 




Plumbing and Heating 




Contractors 




166 East Grand Avenue 




CHICAGO 






Comt>l\mcnts of 
GORDON KEOGH 


lUniy \\. Giclju. lluiuy F. Grier. Frank H. (jrier. 


Prcs.-Trcas. Vtcc-Prcs. Secy. 




CENTRAL ASBESTOS AND 




MAGNESIA COMPANY 




Manufacturers, Contractors and Jobbers of In- 




sulating Products in All Its Branches 




214-216 W. Grand Avenue ChicaK<i 




Telephone Superior 3 53 3 








Lincoln S?n4 






HYDRAULIC-PRESS BRICK CO. 


ABLE TRANSFER COMPANY , 




Able to Transfer Anything i 


Md\erx and Distributors of 


Thos. C. Ryan, Pres. 


HY-TEX BRICK 


Machinery, Stacks, Boilers fe? Safes 


. Wm. P. Varney 


Moved and Erected 


Manager 


Structural Steel Hauling 




■ 900 Blackhawk St. 


1=;04 Builders Bldg. Franklin 0214 


Office, Warehouse and Garage 


CHICAGO 


1500'OcS Smith Ave. 





Page three hundred ninety-jou 



■' "' I"' mMM' u rmi} ' WJ . IJ i- "nr°n U^'^\, 



Eight Distinct Family Washing Services 




One for Tou 


NASH BROTHERS 


LINCOLN HAND LAUNDRY 


Engineering Contractors 


5439 Broadway Edge. 1662 


Otis Bldg., La Salle & Madison Sts. 


TRUCKS CALL DAILY 


CHICAGO 


Where Slualtty Predominates 




VARIETY FIRE DOOR COMPANY 


STEEL FIRE DOORS, HOLLOW METAL DOORS 


Rolling Steel Shutters, Tin Clad Fire Doors 


CROSS HORIZONTAL FOLDING DOORS 


Freight Elevator Doors, Saino Doors 


Underwriters Labelled Doors 


Carroll and Sacramento Aves. Phone Kedzie 3434 Chicago 


V.ctory 4510 


BURGMEIER BOOK BINDERY 


MURPHY PLUMBING CO. 


Incorporated 
High Grade Public, Private and Institutional 


PIiDTibing, Heating, Gas Fitting 

and Drainage 

1720 S. Michigan Avenue 

CHICAGO 


LIBRARY BINDING 

We make a specialty of binding the 
National Geographic Magazine 

Send for free illustrated booklet 


ROBERT E. MURPHY 
President and Treasurer 


Telephone Humboldt 0913 
185M861 Milwaukee Ave. Chicago 



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Phones Main 2010-2011 Experience 50 Years 




MEHRING a HANSON CO. 




HEATING. COOLING 6? VENTILATING 


MUELLER BROS. 

Incorporated 

200 SOUTH WABASH AVENUE 

COR. ADAMS ST. PHONE HARRISON 4384 


SY.STEMS 

POWER PLANTS— POWER PIPING 

GENERAL STEAM FITTING 




162-166 North Clinton Street 




CHICAGO 


Makers of Artistic 
Picture andMirror 
Frames. An Excellent 
Selection of Paintings 
and Prints Appropriate 
for the Home, School 






and Library. 


LET CERTIFIED CLEANING 




help you enjoy wearing your clothes 


Frames Refinished 




Oil Paintings Restored 


Call Lake View 8300 


A COMPLETE LINE OF WINDOW 
CORNICES FOR DRAPERIES 


COOK & McLAIN 

The Acme Cleaners & Dyers 




.3 830-42 No. Clark St. 




South Side Evanstcn Plioiie 




3937 Drexcl Blvd. Greenleaf 
Phone Drcxel 1349';0 100 




BRING YOUR DIPLOMA AND 
CLASS PICTURE TO US FOR 


Our Service Men are Courteous 


CORRECT FRAMING 


We Call and Deliver Everywhere 



Pane three hundred ninety-six 



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EDGAR M. SNOW 
ANDREW A. BROCK 
ADAM J LANG 



BOSTON CORRESPONDENTS 
JOHN JEFFRIES es? SONS 
Barristers Hall, Pemberton Square 



EDGAR M. SNOW ^ CO. 

(Established 1873) 

General Real Estate and Mortgage Brokers 

Appraisers of Real Estate 

NEGOTIATE LOANS, SELL MORTGAGES, COLLECT RENTS AND PAY TAXES 

REAL ESTATE BOUGHT, SOLD, LEASED AND MANAGED ON COTvIMISSION 

TITLE AND TRUST BUILDING 

69 West Washington Street 

PHONE CENTRAL 7474 MEMBERS OF 

PRIVATE EXCHANGE— ALL DEPARTMENTS THE CHICAGO REAL ESTATE BOARD 

THE CHICAGO ASSOCIATION OF COMMERCE 
THE CHICAGO BOARD OF UNDERWRITERS 
NATIONAL ASSN. REAL ESTATE BOARDS 
I'.riLDINC, MANAGERS ASSN. 



THE WARNER 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Established 188? Incorporated 1899 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

17.1 West Madison Street 

Telephones Dearborn 6807-8 

Chicago 



[LEE Bros. 

^%-COMPAK y 

Good Clothes 

Hats. Furnishinos 
men's Shoes 



Two Stores 

BELMONT & LINCOLN AVE. 
MILWAUKEE & ASHLAND AVE. 



"A VACUUM CLEANER (NON 

ELECTRIC) FOR EVERY 

HOME" 

Tour Rugs Wi!( Te!( Whv Marvels Sell 
-- ~h{o Tangled Cords — 7^0 Electricity 

No more back-breaking carpet sweeping. 
Every home can have a Vacuum Cleaner 
whether the home has electricity or not. 
And it is so reasonable in price that every- 
one can easily afford it — in fact your health 
will not permit you to be without it. 

Phone us today for free demonstration in 
your own home. 

THE MARVEL COMPANY 

?4^2 Archer Ave. Chicago, 111. 

Telephone Lafayette 1200 



ge three hundred ninety-se 



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ORNAMENTAL 

PLASTIC RELIEF 

DECORATION 



FURNITURE 

AND 
DRAPERIES 



REMODELING 

AND WOOD 

FINISHING 



SKETCHES 

AND ESTIMATES 

FURNISHED 



JOHN A. MALLIN CO. 

FRESCO ARTISTS 
INTERIOR ART DECORATIONS 

CHURCH DECORATIONS ECCLESIASTICAL PAINTINGS 

OIL PAINTINGS, STATUARY AND STATIONS RESTC^RED 

7?6 Fine Arts Buildini;, 410 South Michigan Boulevard 

CHICAGO, ILL. 
Harrison 18=;3 Sheldrake 1687 



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AMERICAN HEATING & PLUMBING CORPORATION 

189 N. Clark St. Tel. Central 5927-28 Chicago, 111. 

Branch Office: 3550 N. Clark St. Evanston Branch: 1622 Darrow Ave. 

Tel. Lake View 0459 Tel. University 978 

CONTRACTING ENGINEERS 



For Power Installation 
Sanitary Plumbing 



For Steam and Hot Water Heating 
Ventilation 



PARTIAL LIST OF RECENT INSTALLATIONS 

Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart Hospital — Heating and Plumbing 

2 548 Lakeview Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Columbus Memorial Hospital — Heating and Plumbing 

Racine Ave. 6? Gilpin Place, Chicago, 111. 

St. Anthony De Padua Hospital — Heating and Plumbing 

1 9th St. 6? Marshall Blvd., Chicago, III. 

Holy Family Academy — Plumbirtg 

1446 W. Division St., Chicago, III. 

North Park College — Heating 

Kedzie 6? Foster Aves., Chicago, 111. 

Orphans is' Old Peoples Home — Heating and Plumbing 

Bensenville, 111. 



STEVENS, MALONEY ^ CO. 



STATIONERS 



PRINTERS 



ENGRAVERS 



21 So. La Salle Street 
Chicago 



LOYOLA PHARMACY 

A. Ginsburg, R. Ph. 

PRESCRIPTION 

SPECIALISTS 

1230 Devon Ave., cor. Magnolia 

Phone Rogers Park 9498 

We Deliver 

Phone State 4177 

JOHN J. MORAN 

Incorporated 

Fashionable Furs 

Room 803 

58 East Washington Street 

Chicago 




YOU CAN AFFORD THEM 

Unsightly radiators are expensive — they black- 
en curtains, smudge walls, necessitate endless 
house-cleaning and increase doctor bills. It is 
simple economy to cover them with a 

Jiumi diaton 

*^!nm!i:num.i,Miiui^ 

A useful and beautiful addition to any room. 
Provides moist, warm air, eliminates dirt and 
dust. Saves fuel and promotes better health. 
Made in models and finishes to suit every taste. 
Send for booklet, etc. 

ART METAL PRODUCTS CO. 

514 So. Green St. 
Telephone Monroe 2726 



Page three hundred ninety-nine 



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SOMORE 

o\ McWAYNE CO. 

MANTELS, FIREPLACE FURNISH- 
INGS, FURNITURE ^ TILE WORK 

Superior 1508-1509 

639 NO. WELLS STREET 

As\ for Catalogue 



Food Shop 

1006-08-10 Davis St. 

Evanston, 111. 



Blackler Market 
Lake Forest, 111. 



P. G. RAPP COMPANY 

MARKET c£ GROCERY 

1449-^-1 Devon Ave. Ph. Sheldrake 0250 

CHICAGO 



Rapp Brothers 
Winnetka, 111. 



Rapp Brothers 
Highland Park, 111 



$ 


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m 


mp 



Write to 

WINCHESTER RADIATOR 
CABINET CO. 
55 1-5 57 West Monroe Street 
Chicago, Illinois 
for estimates on your requirements for ra- 
diator cabinets and covers, finished in six 
coats baked-on enamel to harmonize with 
any interiors. 

Telephone Haymarket 1800 

M. J. CORBOY COMPANY 

PLUMBING CONTRACTORS 
40 "f North Desplaines Street 

CHICAGO 



MOSER 

"The Business College with a 
University Atmosphere" 

Prepare for a business career at the only Business 
College in the West which requires every student 
to be at least a four-year High School graduate. 
Beginning on the first of April, July, October, and 
January, we conduct a special, complete, intensive, 
three-nnonths' course in stenography which is 
open to 

COLLEGE GRADUATES AND 
UNDERGRADUATES ONLY 

Enrollments for this course must be made before 
the opening day — preferably some time in ad- 
vance, to be sure of a place in the class. 
Stenography opens the way to independence, and 
is a very great help in any position in life. The 
ability to take shorthand notes of lectures, ser- 
mons, conversation, and in many other situations 
is a great asset. 

BULLETIN ON REQUEST 
No Solicitors Einp]o\ed 

PAUL MOSER, J. D. Ph.B., Pres^ent 

116 South Michigan Avenue 

Randolph 4J47 12th Floor Chicago, 111. 

In the Day School Girls Only are Enrolled 

(.M(14 B) 



Page four hundred 



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UNITED ELECTRICAL 
CONSTRUCTION COMPANY 

William McGuineas 

President 

Electrical Contracts on All Work on 

The New Builders Bldg. 

Wacker Drive 

110 South Dearix)rn Street 
Tel. State 7485 



PAINTING— DECORATING 
DRAPERIES 

H. H. STEPHENS CO. 

6615 Sheridan Road 
CHICAGO 

Phone Rogers Park 1097 



S. B. GEIGER & COMPANY 

WELL AND WATERWORKS 
CONTRACTORS 

Special Atteyition Given to Foundatioii Test 
Borings for Buildings 

Office: 14?=; Old Colony Building Chicago 

37 West Van Buren Street 

Telephones: Harrison 1.S76— Wabash lfJ8 




HURSEN UNDERTAKER, INC. 

1 820 South Michigan Avenue 

Calumet 4030 

2346 West Madison Street 

West 0100 

929 Belmont Avenue 

Welhngton 1725 

CHICAGO 



MAKE MORE 
MONEY! 

Loyolans over 25 years of age, am- 
bitious and willing to succeed, you 
can make the most of your education- 
al advantages in SALESMANSHIP. 
Connect with an old responsible iirm 
that has paved the way for you with 
uadespread GOOD-WILL. 

No experience necessary as I will 
train you and give personal help to 
beginners — full or part time. 

Earn While Ton Learn 

See R. J. McMASTER 

Room 602 Ran. 3750 

69 W. Washington St. 



Page four hundred one 



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COME OVER TO MY SHOP 
Open Evenings, Sundays Till 1 :00 P. M^ 

ALFRED de MERO 

Florist 

Flowers for All Occasions 

City Wide Delivery 

6312 N. WESTERN AVENUE 

Day and Night Phone — Rogers Park 4420 

We Telegraph Flowers the Wo7'ld Over 



JOHN E. MALONEY 



Undertaker 



Devon Ave. 

Phones: 

Rogers Park 

40i3'0079-0086 

Sheldrake 0002 

We are courte- 
ously attentive to 
the wants of 
those w h o em- 
ploy us. 



All our appointments are of the highest 
order and every member of our organisa- 
tion has been properly trained in his pro- 
fession. 




An Old Bank 

• in a J^ew Home 

The opening of our new home in the heart 
of Chicago's financial district marks an- 
other milestone in the progress of the State 
Bank of Chicago. 

The friendly service of this old bank (es- 
tabhshed 1879 by Haugan and Lindgren) 
will be continued with increased facilities 
in modern attractive surroundings. 

We cordially invite you to call. 

STATE BANK OF CHICAGO 

LA SALLE t^ MONROE STREETS 

CAPITAL, SURPLUS, AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS MORE THAN 

,$1.3,000,000.00 




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WORLD BOOK COMPANY 

Publishers of 

Hchool ^ex':hoo\s. Professional Boo}{s, 
Standardized Tests and School Records 

E. M. Briggs, Chicago Rep. 

2126 Prairie Ave. 

Phone Calumet 11?0 


Phone Boulevard 4070 

CORLEY'MESERVEY 
MARBLE CO. 

BUILDING MARBLE 

601 West vVd Street 
Chicago, 111. 


Compliments of 
HARMON ELECTRIC CO. 


SPINNER BROTHERS CO. 
Boo\ Binders 

7.^2 Sherman St. Phone Har. .^515 
CHICAGO 


JAMES T. IGOE COMPANY 

Printers — Offset Lithographers 

600-610 W. Van Buren St. 

Telephone Haymarket 8000 

When in the market for Direct Mail 
Printing and Advertising, come to 
Chicago's Most Progressive Printers 


BETHLEHEM ACADEMY 

SCHC>OL FOR GIRLS 

In the Beautiful Suburb of 
LA GRANGE, ILLINOIS 

Conducted by 
SISTERS OF ST. JOSEPH 

Telephone La Grange 4398 



Page four hundred three 



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Compliments of 

THE TRIPP LUMBER COMPANY 

MUNDELEIN, ILLINOIS 



Fly for Sport Fly for Business The World's Greatest Sport 




"LINCOLN'PAGE" 90 HORSEPOWER 

FOR SPORT AND COMMERCIAL— PRICE: $2985.00 

Snappiest — Speediest — Most Economical 

"PARASOL" SPORT PLANE $775.00 SPECIAL SPORT PLANE $2200.00 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN STUDENTS AND CLUBS 

LET US HELP YOU ORGANIZE 

COMMERCIAL AIRCRAFT SALES 

644 DIVERSEY PARKWAY BITTERSWEET 4058 



Page four hundred jour 



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BEO. U. S. PAT. OFFICE 

TAPESTRY ASPHALT SHINGLE 

Beauty — Hurobility — Economy 

Write us for Samples and Color Plates 

Manufactured Only By 

AMALGAMATED ROOFING 
COMPANY 

431 South Dearborn Street, Chicago 
Telephone Harrison 0798 



Dearborn 6175 



Randolph 3776 



DRESS SUIT RENTAL 
COMPANY 

FOR RENT— FULL DRESS, TUXEDOS, 

CUTAWAYS, SILK HATS, 

SHOES, SHIRTS 

FURNISHINGS FOR SALE 

310 Capitol Building 
159 North State Street 

COLLEGIATE MODELS 



POST ELECTRIC COMPANY 

Contractors and Engineers 

Builders Building 

228 North La Salle Street 
Chicago, 111. 

Phone Central 4818 



" Anything and Everything in MetaV 



THE GREENDUCK COMPANY 

V\/orld's Largest Manufacturers 
Advertising Buttons 

Advertising Buttons, Badges, Emblems, 
Name Plates, Coins and Medals 

We Ma\e Everything We Sell 

Phones Brunswick 7580-81-82 

1725-39 W. NORTH AVENUE 
CHICAGO 



Page four hundred five 



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PAUL H. EIDEN 




Pliimhing Contractor 




Jobbing a Specialty 




1280 ARDMORE AVENUE 


EAT AT 


EDGE WATER 8120 




CHICAGO 


WA G T A Y L E ' S 

OPEN ALL THE TIME 


Phone Diversey 6250 Established 1870 




Consistently' Good Food 


REMIEN DECORATING CO. 


Tear In and Tear Out! 


CONTRACTORS 




Painting and Decorating 




1512 N. Wells St. 




Chicago 




SHEAN STEEL WINDOW COMPANY 


.^444 GILES AVENUE 


DOUGLAS 4210-4211 


Manufacturers of 


SHEET METAL WORK'-SKYLIGHTS-HOLLOW METAL DOORS 



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INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 



A Page 

Able Transfer Company 394 

Academy of St. Scholastica 393 

Albion Shore Hotel 374 

Amalgamated Roofing Co 405 

American Heat. 6? Plumbing Co 399 

Anderson 6? Co., H. A 391 

Anderson fe? Lind Company 381 

Anderson-Witte Engraving Co 374 

Andringa, Rudolph 383 

Archibald Company, E. L 374 

Art Metal Products Co 399 

Atlas Box Company 372 



Bailey System 364 

Bain. John 369 

Barat College 370 

Barry Byrne Company 372 

Bartlett, Fred'k H., Co 401 

Benz, John T 362 

Bethlehem Academy 403 

Biggs, Joseph H 381 

Bloom Photographers 386 

Bransfield, M. J 370 

Srennan fe? Co., J. M 374 

Broadway Dress Suit Co 390 

Broadway National Bank 372 

Burgmeier Book Company 395 

Burke Tiling Co 368 



Carsen, Robert P 386 

Central Asbestos 6? Magnesia Co 394 

Channon Co., H 393 

Chicago Costume Works, Inc 392 

Chicago Fence 6? Wire Co 383 

Chicago Gym Equipment Co 365 

Chicago Uniform Co 369 

Chicago Medical Book Co 376 

Clapp Stores, The Edwin 364 

Clifford, S. y Company 384 

Commercial Aircraft Sales 404 

Commonwealth-Edison Co 382 

Cook & McLain 396 

Corboy Co., M. J 400 

Corley-Meservey Marble Co 403 

Crofoot, Nielsen ^ Co 370 

Crown Stove Works 364 

Crown Laundry Co 371 

Cudahy Packing Co 391 

Cunard Line, The 376 

D 

Dearborn Chemical Co 362 

DeMero, Alfred 402 

Denvir 6? Sons, fohn F 380 

Dillon y Co., John C 364 

Dole Refrigerating Co 392 

Dress Suit Rental 405 

Duffy & Noonan Construction Co 362 

Duval Construction Co 390 



E Page 

Eiden, Paul H 412 

Ellis Stone Company 362 

F 

Fair, The 379 

Farney Electric Co 391 

Fitz-Simons & Connell Dredging Co 368 

Flavin 6? Wiseman 364 

Flood, T. H., S" Co 368 

G 

Garcia, Perfccto e? Bros 388 

Gateway Securities 385 

Gingiss, Sam, 6? Son 386 

Golden Rod Ice Cream Co 382 

Gunterberg 6? Son 386 

Graf, Anton ^ Son 365 

Great American Casualty Co 373 

Geiger, S. B 401 

Gerther Scientific Co 373 

Gill, Joseph 1 381 

Green Duck Co 405 

H 

Haines Company, The 388 

Hamburg American Line 378 

Hargrave. Ed. J 388 

Harmon Company 403 

Hehard Warehouse, Inc 383 

Home Fuel & Supply Co 372 

Hoos, Louis 382 

Howard Laundry 391 

Howard Radio Co 392 

Hub, The 361 

Hursen Undertaker, Inc 401 

Hydraulic Pressed Brick Co 394 

I 

Igoe, James T. Company 403 

Illinois Book Exchange 378 

Imperial Brass Company 384 

J 

Jefferson Park Millwork Co 383 

Joseph & Company 386 

K 

Kane 6? O'Connor 376 

Kasen Express Co 379 

Kassell, B. C. Co 365 

Keller. D. F. ii Co 387 

Kcogh, Gordon 394 

Keystone Millwork Co 368 

Kimball Brick Co 370 

Klee Bros. Company 397 

Kushler Chevrolet Co 362 

L 

Lally Column Co 373 

Lincoln Hand Laundry 395 



Page four hundred seven 



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Page 

Local Construction Co 363 

Loyola Pharmacy 399 

Loyola-Sheridan Recreation 371 

M 

Maas Bros 368 

Mallin, John A 398 

Maloney, John E 402 

Marquis Company 375 

Marvel Company, The 397 

Marywood School 375 

Mehring & Hanson 396 

Meilicke System, Inc 382 

Metropolitan Business College (Up- 
town) 363 

Model Dairy 375 

Molloy Co., David J 369 

Moody, Weber & Hallberg 371 

Moran. John J 399 

Morison 6? Wallace 365 

Moser Business College 400 

Mueller Bros., Inc 396 

Mueller. V, y Company 378 

Mungcr's Laundry 381 

Murphy, Frank X 368 

Murphy Plumbing Co 39 5 

Mutual Life Insurance Co 378 

Mc 

McCabe & Hengle 365 

McCall Construction Co 373 

McClintic-Marshall Co 360 

McWayne Company 400 

N 

Naghten. John, &? Co 369 

Narowetz Heat. & Vent. Co 393 

Nash Bros 395 

Neuenfeldt, E. R 383 

Newman, W. J., Co 363 

North Side Cleaners & Dyers 384 

North Shore Auto Spring Co 368 

Northwestern Terra Cotta Co 371 

O 

O'Rourke, Albert 366 

P 

Paschen, Chr. Co 371 

Philip State Bank 365 

Post Electric Co 405 



Q Page 

Quigley. Wm. J. Co 371 

R 

Rapp, P. C, Co 400 

Rauen Co., Math 366 

Rossbach ^ Sons 376 

Remien Decorating Co 406 

S 

Schoulti, Friz., 6? Co 364 

Shean Steel Windows 406 

Shure Co., N 376 

Skoogland's Cafeteria 363 

Slovinec, John 390 

Slupkowski & Piontek 383 

Snow y Co., Edgar M 397 

Spinner Bros 403 

Standard Photo Engrav. Co 389 

State Bank of Chicago 402 

St. Boniface Cemetery 373 

St. Catherine High School 373 

Stein Co., Carl John 394 

Steinbach. J. G 368 

Stephens. H. H., Co 401 

Stevens, Maloney & Co 399 

St. Scholastica Academy 393 

Sullivan Korber Co 380 

T 

Tennes, M. J.. G? Co 367 

Tocha, Anton A 386 

Tripp Company, The 404 

U 

Union Trust Co 377 

United Electrical Constr. Co 401 

V 

Variety Fire Door Co 395 

Van Etten Bros 366 

W 

Wagtale's 406 

Warner Construction Co 397 

Watry ^ Heidkampf 365 

Weber, Frank C, Co 375 

White, T. M.. Co 390 

Winchester Radiator Co 400 

World Book Company 403 

Worsham School 379 

Y 
Yeomans Brothers 379 



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Abraham, Raymond L. : 50, 81, 

232, 319 
Adams, Marvin W.: 50, 109 
Addeo, L.: 83 
Agnew, William H.: 26 
Ahearn, Thomas F.; 50 
Ahern. Catherine; 70 
Ahern. Janet: 50, 106, 109 
Aicher, Ben F.; 50, 109, 335 
Alhaciara. Gennaro: 123 
Allegretti, Anthony; 86 
Alswang, David: 50, 109 
Amos, Evelyn E.; 70, 155 
Anderman, David: 333 
Anderson, H.; 165 
Andruska, B.; 155 
Anglum, E.; 154 
Aguila, Fernando; 50 
Arensdorf, Edward F.: 50 
Armington, R.: 91 
Ashmenckas, J. R.: 99 
Ashmenckas, Natalie A.; 50, 

339, 341, 347 



Baisier. Leon: 50 

Ball, Harold: 86, 280 

Bame. Lucille V.; 74, 160 

Barker, Virginia: 217, 218 

Barr, William A.; 50, 97 

Barry. David: 86, 283 

Barry, Dorothy: 157 

Barry. Katharine; 70. 153 

Barry, Margaret: 218 

Barry, P.; 86 

Barret, Charles R.: 50, 117 

Barron. Nicholas: 121 

Barsell. J.; 89 

Bartlett, Richard: 86 

Baumbich. J.: 89, 224. 287, 299 

Becker, Anne: 157 

Beckett, Anthony: 51 

Behmiller, J.: 83 

Behrens, Louise: 155 

Bell, Anthony J.: 51, 100 

Benjamin, Lawrence: 51 

Berry, Robert: 87, 32 3 

Bertrand, Charles L: 51 

Bianco, P.: 91 

Billerbeck, Cecelia: 70, 153 

Binkkv, John: 123 

Birch, B.: 163 

Bishop. Edward: 113, 123 

Biederman: 280 

Blake, Susan; 123 

Blondin, Stanley; 83 

Boberg, Arthur L.: 51, 117 

Bodmer, Harvev C; 51, 341, 

347 
Borgemeier, Eleanor R.; 110, 

111 
Bosie, Minnie M.; 70 
Bowe, J.; 113 



PERSONAL INDEX 

Boylan, Francis T.; 51 
Boyle. Charles; 86, 205, 207 
Brady. Charles; 287 
Brady, Eugene; 83 
Brady, Francis: 155 
Breen. Aloysius T.: 51, 81 
Brennan, Phil: 272, 278, 284 
Bremner, Aloysius: 218 
Bremner, James V.; 86 
Bremner, James X,; 82, 83, 294 
Bresnahan, Dorothy E.; 51 
Brindl, Helen M.; 51, 92 
Brody, Margaret A.; 51 
Brisch. T.: 89 
Bristol, L. L.; 99 
Bristone, C: 282 
Brophy. Truman W.; 40 
Brown. N.; 99, 339, 347 
Bruun, John; 91, 205, 287 
Buck, Esther Mary; 74, 160 
Bricklev, Daniel: 84, 86, 325 
Bryant. John; 83, 32 5 
Buckholt:, John, 287 
Buckley, D.; 282, 284, 325 
Buckley, John; 124 
Bucznski. Charles C; 51 
Burke, Arthur; 121. 337 
Burke, Helena; 154, 155 
Burke. H.: 279, 284 
Burke, R.; 279, 284 
Burke. J. v.: 91 
Burianek, J. F.; 99 
Bussan, E.: 163 
Butchen, Daniel: 123 
Butler, Ethel L.: 52 
Butler. Frank I.; 52, 80. 81 
Byrnes, David F.; 52, 128, 129 
Byrnes, Joseph; 120, 121 



Cahill, Patrick J.; 52 
Caine, Anne G.; 52 
Caldwell, W.; 86 
Caloger, C; 113 
Campbell, William J.: 52 
Canary, Francis P.; 52, 81 
Canfield, J. D.; 99 
Canning, J.; 87 

Cannon, Neil J.; 52. 117, 335 
Cardona, Carlotta T.: 52 
Carmody, Margaret: 52 
Carmody, Robert: 83 
Carney, James; 91 
Carney, Thomas B.: 102 
Carpenter, Willis M.: 52, 81, 

325, 349, 351 
Carroll, Anne F.; 52 
Carrol, J.: 99 
Carrol, Ruth: 157 
Carson, Frances: 132 
Casciato, Nicholas; 102 
Cassidy, M.; 163 
Castro, C: 99, 345 
Catania, A. N.; 99 



Chapp, Melbourne A.; 53, 108, 

109 
Chu, H.; 87 
Clark, Edith: 155 
Clark, Ted: 140 
Cleary, Genevieve C; 53 
Cleary. Gertrude: 155 
Cleary, Lucille: 154, 155 
Cleavy, Callistra: 155 
Clifford, David; 91 
Clontza, O.: 113 
Cloonan, Edward; 327 
Coffey, John J.; 53, 116. 117, 

176, 33 5 
Colangelo, A.: 87 
Colgin, William E.; 53 
Cole, Thomas; 134. 135 
Collins, C; 196, 281 
Collins, Margaret M.: 53 
Colohan, William J.; 53, 80, 

323 
Conerty, Florence C; 53 
Condon, David; 323 
Conley. Phillip; 2 50 
Conley, William H.; 86. 195, 

205, 206, 207, 209, 211, 243, 

325 
Conlin, Mary: I 5 5 
Connelly, J.; 283 
Conner, Alice; 1 57 
Connor. Helen G.: 70 
Conti, P.; 99 
Controuhs, T.: 308 
Conway, W. S.; 99, 319, 343, 

345 
Cooney, Edward: 53, 129, 327 
Copia, Paul: 91 
Copp, D.: 283 
Corboy, P.; 86, 228, 3 39 
Corkery, L.; 165 
Corrigan, A.; 132 
Corrigan, T.; 132 
Corsiglia, B.; 86 
Costello, Charles S.; 53, 202, 

205, 218, 219 
Costello, Maurice J.; 53, 117. 

337 
Coulehan. Mary T.; 53 
Coyle, Charles; 232 
Coyle, J. T.; 99, 319, 343, 347 
Crane. T. B.: 99, 335 
Creagh, Patrick; 89 
Cronin, Mae: 153 
Crosby, Marguerite; 70. 153 
Crowe, Joseph: 121, 3 37 
Crowley, J.; 327 
Crowley, Lawrence; 88. 196, 

205, 218, 319 
Crown, E.; 99 
Culiton, Helen J.; 54 
Cullen, Edna B.; 53 
Cullen, G.: 90 
Cullman, James M.: 83, 205, 

208, 209, 32 5 



Page four hundred nine 



^v>» 



^ mimmmMm^mm^mm 



^^^frnmrnmrnmrnm^ f g 



M^ 



Cuny, Charles; 90 
Cuny, G.; 90 
Curley, Edwin; 83, 319 
Curry, James; 123, 337 
Cutrera, Hugo; 83, 232 

D 
Dagget, Marie A.; 70 
Dailey, Edward; 69, 121 
Dalton, Joseph; 32 5 
Danmeyer, Alice; 157 
Datin, Louis; 90 
Davis, Emmet; 83 
Dayton, John A.; 54, 117 
Deane, Harry; 87 
Dcksnis, E.; 163 
D'Esposito, Joshua; 86, 314 
De Francisco, L.; 89 
De Guide, M.; 165 
Delaney, Marian; 54 
Denvir, P.; 117 
Deplewski, L. M.; 54 
Devine, William; 86 
Devlin, Edna; 120, 121 
Devlin, Robert; 287 
De Young, Theis; 54 
Dibhck, Alex; 91 
Dick, Alphonse; 89, 287 
Dickinson, M.; 165 
Diggles, Joseph; 86 
Dillon, E.; 91 
Dimitri, Dan; 232 
Dina, Louis; 89, 196 
Doheny, Frank P.; 83, 196, 204, 

205, 207, 210, 319 
Doherty, Loretta; 155 
Doherty, Mane M.; 54 
Doherty, Neil; 87, 319 
Donahue, Daniel; 54, 78, 81 
Donahue, John; 123 
Donegan, L; 163 
Donoghue, Mary G.; 70 
Donovan, R. R.; 99 
Dooley, Joseph, 283, 284 
Dooley, Robert; 90 
Dooly, Edna; 155 
Dore, J.; 163 

Dorgan, T. R.; 54, 117, 335 
Dotterway, B.; 99, 347 
Doubeck, Rose; 155 
Dowling, Edward; 86 
Dowling, Mary Rose; 74 
Downs, John; 109, 271, 218, 

284 
Doyle, Mane Agnes: 54, 108, 

109 
Drennan, W. J.: 54. 117 
Drever, Richard; 54, 341 
Driscoll, W. J.; 99 
Dudeck, M.; 165 
Dutfy, Genevieve; 70, 153 
Dunn, James; 91 
Dunne, Nora; 157 
Dunning, B.; 163 
Durburg, John; 81, 287 
Durkin, Gertrude K.; 70 



Durkin, Walter; 88, 90, 287 
Dvorak, V. G.; 54 
Dwyer, Francis W.; 98, 99 
Dwyer, John D.; 55 



Edelstem, R.; 333 
Edwards, A. Pace; 98 
Egan, Cecille H.; 55, 92, 93 
Egan, Howard E.; 5 5 
Eisenberg, Louis A.; 182 
Elrich, G. W.; 99 
Ennis, John; 83, 323 
Ensminger, George; 341 
Etu, Emmet; 279, 284 
Evans, P. J.; 99 
Evans, R.; 165 
Evans, T. L .; 99 



Fagelson, Aaron; 98, 99, 333 

Fanning, William E.; 55, 117 

Fanton, J.; 117 

Farley, Margaret G.; 74 

Farrell, James; 123 

Faulkner, E.; 117 

Fazio, Peter; 86, 232 

Fealy, Catherine; 70, 155 

Felicelli, N.; 91 

Fenton, C; 163 

Fenton, Emma; 157 

Fenton, Joseph A.; 55 

Ferlita, James; 287 

Ferrari, M.; 327 

Finnegan, Helen Claire; 71, 152 

Fitzgerald, A.; 218 

Fitzgerald, E.; 129 

Fit:gerald, Frank; 91, 299 

Fitzgerald, William; 91 

Fitzgerald, William D.; 5 5 

Fitzpatrick, Margaret; 157 

Flemmmg, Geoffrey B.; 55, 117 

Flynn, J.; 91 

Flynn. J. J.; 99 

Flynn, M.; 165 

Fogarty, T.; 89 

Foley, F.; 166 

Fonancien, M. S.; 99 

Ford, Richard; 83, 205, 209, 

218, 231, 232, 243, 325 
Fouser, R. H.; 99, 345 
Frando, Vanancia; 5 5 
Frank, Cecelia; 1 55 
Frett, Harold; 283 
Frizol, Sylvester; 89 
Froebes, Phillip W.; 46 
Fullan, Catherine C; 71 
Fulton, R.; 8 3 
Furlong, Kenneth; 46 



Gaffney, C.B.; 99 
Gallagher, C; 114, 116, 117 
Gallagher, Mary G.; 56 
Gallagher, Winifred A.; 56 



Galvin, Dorothy Mary; 71 

Garnet, Joseph H.; 56, 341, 343 

Ganey, Helen; 167 

Garrison, M.; 87 

Garrity, Edward; 91, 196. 220 

Garthe, John; 83, 319 

Garvey, Cosmas; 32 5 

Garvy, A.; 87 

Geiger. Edward; 86 

Gerlach, Roman; 56 

Giesenger, M.; 165 

Gilbert. Harry; 90. 287, 323 

Gillman, R. M.; 56 

Gilmore, F. P.; 99, 107, 345 

Gilmore, Francis X.; 56, 108, 

109 
Ginnan. Edward J.: 56 
Gladen, R. G.; 99 
Glavm, E.; 87 
Gleason, F. J.; "99 
Goldberg, Theodore; 56 
Goodman. Maurice; 56, 333 
Goodreau. M.: 155 
Gorman, Edmund; 282, 284 
Gormican, Roger; 83, 325 
Grace, Flora F.; 56 
Grace. James N.: 56. 116. 117 
Grady, Joseph W.; 56. 81, 351 
Graff, R. J.; 99 
Graham, C; 89 
Grant. Gerard; 205, 243, 319 
Grant, Samuel; 319 
Greenburg, B. J.; 96. 99 
Greenwald, Ben; 89 
Gregory. John J.; 57, 347 
Gretenian, T. J.; 99 
Griffin. Martin; 278. 284 
Griffin. Frank H.; 57 
Grigsby, K. R.; 99 
Grimm, Joseph; 57 
Groes, H. A.; 99 
Gronetti, Rosina M.; 74 
Grzybowski, J.; 87 
Gualano, C; 87 
Guerrero, S. R.; 99 
Gurrister, M.; 165 
Guttman, A.; 165 

H 
Habenstreit. Ravmond A.; 57, 

129. 327 
Haber. Doroth>': 155 
Hackett, J.; 86' 
Hackett, W.: 232 
Hajduk. J.: 87 

Haley, Francis G.: 57. 81. 204 
Haley. Gerard; 121, 3 37 
Hallinan. M.; 89 
Hammer, Joseph; 110. HI 
Hammond, J.; 327 
Hanna. Julia; 57 
Hansen. Ann; 1 55 
Haraburda, S. V.: 99 
Harding, Flovd E.; 57. 341. 

34T. 347 
Harrington. Ethvl K.; 57 



^iX'^^ four hundred ten 



^mh&' 



Harris, Nellie; 74, 160 
Harrison, T.; 165 
Hart, T.; 113 
Hartnett, Robert; 210 
Hartnett. Roy H.; 122 
Hauser, Madeline; 155 
Haver, H, T.; 99 
Hawkins, Robert J.; 99, 319, 

345 
Hayde, Margaret; 218 
Hayes, Raymond F.; 110, HI 
Hazard, J.; 83 
Healy, Edward F.; 57, 117, 195, 

325 
Healy, Morgan; 83, 189, 351 
Healy, R.; 88, 89, 232 
Healy, Thomas; 91, 308 
Hecht, S.; 86 
Heeh, Mary Georgina; 71 
Heintz, Leslie J.: 57 
Heiser, Vanita; 157 
Hendricks, Edwin L.; 57, 109, 

337 
Hennessey, R.; 163 
Hennessy, W,; 83 
Henry, Joseph; 111, 335 
Henry, M.; 163 
Herman, Leonard: 90, 2 32 
Hess. Jean Ann; 71, 153 
Hickey, Thomas; 111 
Higgins, Preston; 32 5 
Higgins, Russel; 90, 287, 325 
Hillenbrand, George; 91, 196, 

319 
Hilsabech, L. ; 165 
Hirsch, Donald; 58 
Hogan, C. L.; 99 
Holmes, J.; 89 
Hopkins, Anne M.; 74 
Home, John; 32 5 
Horvath, J.; 91 
Horwidge, George E.; 58 
Houda, Leo; 83 
Huck, James; 123 
Humphreys, Eugene; 90, 32 3 
Huppert. Jerome; 86, 281, 284 

I 
Indovina, M.; 58, 345 
Inonye, Yasuo; 58 
Irey, Paul R.; 58 

J 
Jaeger, R. E.; 339 
Jakopich, J. A.; 99 
Jasionek, John; 232 
Jennings, W.; 89 
Johnson, Amil J.; 58, 97 
Johnson, Anna D.; 58, 116, 117, 

176 
Johnson, Charles M.; 39 
Johnson, E.; 109 
Johnson, Edmund; 109, 228, 

277, 278, 284 
Johnson, J. A.; 347 
Johnson, Walter A.; 58, 327 
Jonas, W. P.; 99 



Jones, J.; 113 
Jordan, D.; 91 
Jordan. J. M.; 99 
Jordan. M.; 78, 87 
Jurgenson, C; 155 

K 
Kaiser, N.; 287, 299 
Kane, Elizabeth D.; 58, 3 39 
Kane, Mary C.; 114 
Kapuska, E. J.; 99 
Karr, W. J.; 99, 343, 345, 347 
Keane, Helen; 75 
Kearney, James F.; 58 
Kearney, Joseph; 86, 308, 347 
Keate, Arthur; 58 
Keating, Edward C; 58, 81 
Keating, John; 83, 204, 205, 

207 
Keehan, E.; 87, 90 
Keeley, J. L.; 99, 345 
Keeley, Robert; 91, 323 
Keevins, Edward; 89, 232 
Kelley, B.; 163 
Kelly, Ambrose; 59, 81. 194, 

196, 218, 251, 349 
Kelly, Edward; 319 
Kelly, James J.; 59, 337 
Kelly, John; 114, 115, 121 
Kelly. Mane; 167 
Kelly, Mary; 167 
Kelly, R.; 165 
Kenefick, W.; 90 
Kennedy, E.; 87, 323 
Kennedy, G.; 71 
Kennedy, M.; 165 
Kerwin, Raymond; 59, 216, 

218, 219, 341, 343, 345, 

349 
Kiely, John M.; 59; 335 
Kilbride, Raymond T.; 59, 129, 

327 
Kiley. Raymond; 86 
Kilgallen, J. J.; 99 
King, E.; 115, 117 
King, Norma Virginia; 75 
Kirchman, Sheldon E.: 59, 109, 

337 
Kirn, Celeste; 156. 157 
Klawikoshe, August; 59, 81 
Kleihauer, Evelyn L.; 71 
Klest, John; 232 
Klimaszewski, E.; 113 
Knapstein, Mary Mae; 71 
Knott, Virginia; 157 
Kochanski. B.; 113 
Koneski, C; 99 
Korchah. M. A.; 71 
Kotas. W.; 91 
Kotze, Frances M.; 71 
Kowslowski, J.; 91, 281, 284 
Kraus, Adrian; 59, 341, 343, 

345 
Krueger, F.; 87 
Krupa, B.; 91 
Krusiak, Dorothy; 155 



Kubeck. Magdalene; 157 
Kuehnle, J.; 89 
Kukulski, Casimir; 90 
Kullman, P. J.; 99, 343 
Kunka, A.; 83 



La Fond, Charles; 130. 131 

Lamb. J.; 335 

Lamkhe, V.; 165 

Lamont, Dan; 276. 284 

Lampheor, G.; 163 

Lane, George A.; 43, 59, 109, 

166 
Langan, Rochel; 152 
Lannon, John; 89 
La Pado, Longine; 157 
Larrivee, L. J.; 99 
Larson, Bernice Mae; 71 
Laskowski, J.; 91 
Latke. O. M.; 339 
Latz. L. J.; 99 
Latz. Norbert M.; 60, 228 
Laughlin, Daniel A.; 166 
La Violette, K.; 155 
Lawless, Anthony; 278. 284 
Leach, Mane P.; 59 
Lear, Matthew; 86 
Lebowltz, Louis; 333 
Lederer, Harold S.; 60, 109 
Lederer, Leo M.; 60. 109 
Lee, Robert E.; 60, 345, 349, 351 
Legris, Marie; 1 57 
Lehmann. B.; 165 
Leibold, George J.; 60 
Leter. L. F.; 99 
Levy, Harry M.; 60, 333 
Lewis, L.; 91 
Lewis. Virginia; 123 
Lickus, Stanley; 90 
Lietz, Paul; 83, 217, 325. 351 
Lingford, Rochel; 157 
Linklater, William; 90, 323 
Lisle, f.; 89 
Lloyd, C. v.: 99 
Loef, John A.: 60 
Loef, Marcella H,; 60 
Lofdahl. George A.; 60 
Logan, W. H. G.; 38 
Lonergan. D.; 89 
Lonergan, James; 123 
Lossman. R. T.; 99 
Lowerey, John; 87. 308, 87 
Lowerey, William P.; 60, 81. 

325 
Lucas, Theodore D.; 60, 81 
Luchrsonan. B. C; 99 
Ludwig, George; 86 
Ludwig, L L; 99 
Ludwig, Robert; 87. 315, 32 5 
Lukitsch, J.; 90 
Lull, Lyn J.; 60 
Lumpkin, Charles; 90 
Lundgoot, L, E.; 99 
Lupton, John; 90 
Lutzenkirchen, E.; 89, 287 



Page four hundred ehven 



^ff^ 



l'i^F^ ''ia^gitiK^i p^j|^f^^^ 



'^Mmmmm 



Luzzo. W.; 91 
Lynch, Marie: 72, 153 
Lynch, M.; 165 
Lynch, William; 84, 86 
Lyng, Robert; 90 

M 
Macaluso, Lenord A.; 61, 96 
MacDonald, Deborah G.; 61 
Macintosh, Florence; 41 
Madaj, B.: 91 
Madden, Edward P.: 61 
Madlinger, K.: 134 
Mahan, Clandine; 155 
Mahan, Patrick J.; 37 
Maher, Daniel; 308 
Mahoney, Joseph M.; 61 
Major. R.; 87 
Malloy, Leslie A.: 287 
Maloney, Joseph R.; 61, 117 
Maloney, Mary C; 72 
Marino, Lawrence; 114, 335 
Marquis, N. J.; 99, 347 
Marsalek, John A.; 61 
Martin, Paul R.; 92 
Martino, J.; 327 
Marzano, Mary; 100 
Math, F.; 113 
Matthews, LaVern; 72. 153 
Mawhinney. Martha; 72, 153 
May. Ruth; 72, 153 
Mayer, John; 91, 323 
Mayer, J. J.; 83 
Meagher, Emmet; 86 
Meller. Eleanor; 1 57 
Mclynchuk, Michael A.; 62 
Menny, J.; 87 
Menrite, N.; 91 
Mertz, James J.; 236 
Michelena, Nester A.; 62 
Michoda, Stephen; 123 
Miller, Lawrence J.; 62, 337 
Miller, Loren; 90, 218 
Miller, M.; 165 
Miles, J. L; 62 
Minardi, J. A.; 99 
Mironis, John; 83 
Mitchell, E.; 99 
Mitchell. W.; 90 
Mix, E.; 87 

Modzikowski, T. A.; 99 
Mokatc, Henry; 62, 117 
Moleski, S. J.; 99 
Moloney, Mary E.; 7 5 
Montagne, James P.; 62 
Moore, J. Thomas; 62 
Moran, E. J.; 140 
Moore, T. ; 117 
Moorhead, Louis D.; 36 
Moran, W.; 113 
Morand, J.; 280, 284 
Morton, H.; 87 
Moustakis. Linton G.; 83, 325 
Mueller, Peter; 89 
Mullane, Hannah M.; 63^ 
Mullaney, Dan; 90 



Mullen, John P.; 102 
Mulligan, George T.; 63, 109, 

335 
Murphy, A.; 283 
Murphy. Arthur; 1 1 1 
Murphy, Daniel J.; 196, 319 
Murphy, D. R.; 89 
Murphy, Frank; 280, 284. 325 
Murphy, James P.; 89. 196, 218 
Murphy, Michael J.; 63 
Murphy, Robert; 88 
Murphy, S.; 89 
Murphy, Thomas A.; 86, 91 
Murphy, T. J.; 99 
Muzzicato, Charles; 63 

Mc 
McAllister, A.; 165 
McAulliff, Alice; 217, 218 
McAulliffe. Ncal: 86. 32 5 
McAvoy, D.; 86 
McCabe, Douglas; 86. 228. 231. 

232 
McCabe. Thomas R.; 107. 110, 

111 
McCahey, Mary M; 61 
McCarron, C; 91 
McCarthy, Daniel; 121. 3 37 
McCarthy, Dennis; lU 
McCormick, E.; 99 
McCormick, John; 90 
McCormick, John V.; 34 
McCormick, Mae; 72 
McCorry, C. L.; 99 
McCourt. John; 90 
McDade, Catherine A.; 61, 92 
McDonald, E.; 113 
McGarry. Elizabeth, 157 
McGee. Frank; 121 
McGivern, Edward; 89 
McGivern. Lucy C; 61 
McGonigle, Bartholomew: 61, 

347 
McGovern, Anna; 157 
McGovern, Helen E.; 61, 96, 

339, 341, 347 
McGovern, M.; 165 
McGowan, Mary J.; 75 
McGrath, Harold; 61 
McGrath, J.; 113, 281 
McGuiness, George A.: 62 
McGuire, Agnes L.; 62 
McGuire. Edward; 113, 218. 

337 
McGuire. Francis H.: 62 
McGuire, P.; 91 
McGurn, R.; 132 
McGurn. T.; 134,1 35 
McHugh, James; 90 
Mclntvre, Catherine: 157 
McKcnna, William W.; 62, 117, 

337 
McLaughlin. D. D.: 99 
McMahon. Marshall: 113, 107 
McNeil, William: 90, 287 
McNulty. John D.: 62, 117 



N 
Nabbe, Philip N.; 63, 97 
Nagar, Paston 63 
Naphm, Francis P.; 210 
Nerry, Hubert: 13 3. 327 
Neary, James A.; 63, 129, 327, 

349 
Neff, J. G.; 99 
Neff, Lionel H.; 63 
Negro, S. J.: 99, 345 
Nelligan, J.: 89 
Neri, Michael: 81 
Neu, H.; 163 

Newman. Helen; 112, 113 
Niggeman, Margaret; 157 
Nolan. Raymond: 90, 287 
Nolan, Thomas J.: 63 
Norkett. William: 126, 131, 

349 
Norton, Edwin: 276. 284, 287 
Norton, Irene; 72, 153 

o 

O'Brien. H.; 86 

O'Brien, Hayes: 319 

O'Brien, James C: 63, 81, 323. 

240 
O'Brien. John; 83, 106, 232 
O'Brien. J. M.: 89 
O'Brien. Muriel; 89. 157 
O'Connel, Hazel: 155 
O'Connel, J. J.; 87 
O'Connel. Patrick H.: 63 
O'Connor, James C: 63, 81. 189. 

204, 205, 206. 208. 209. 210, 

32 5, 349, 351 
O'Connor, John: 123 
O'Connor, Paul L.: 90. 20 5, 

211, 218, 223. 325 
O'Connor. Richard; 86. 196, 

218 
O'Connor, Russel T.: 83 
O'Donnel, Helen; 155 
O'Dowd, J.: 113 
O'Grady. J.: 89 
O'Hare. Hugh A.: 64, 341. 343, 

347. 349. 351 
Ohlheiser. George; 83 
Ohnesong. Margaret: 157 
Oldhans. P.: 163 
O'Leary, John: 90 
O'Malley. John: 106. 112. 113 
O'Mara, Arthur P.; 64 
O'Meara. Norton; 218 
O'Neil, Gerald G.; 64. 117 
O'Neil. John J.: 64 
O'Reilly, E.; 89 
O'Reilly, Joseph: 121 
O'Rourke, J.; 113 
O'Shaughnessy. Thomas: 64, 

109, 3 37 
Osten, Joseph; 126. 130. 131 
O'Toole. Francis: 134 



Pace. Anthon\ 



Page four hundred twelve 



Padol, Walter S.; 90 

Palonka, Stanley; 91 

Pascoe. Evelyn; 72, 153 

Patka, Emil A.; 64 

Pauly, M.: 113 

Pavletic, N. B.; 99 

Peccararro, Amedo M.; 99 

Peace, J.; 109 

Pearson, Collis: 64, 81 

Pekin. Thomas; 100 

Pernin. Claude J.; 246 

Perrit, Richard A.; 64 

Peske, H.: 163 

Peter, A.: 89 

Pfeifer, Herbert; 6'i, 128, 129, 

327 
Phares, H.; 33? 
Piasecki, Chester A.; 64 
Pieriynski, Boleslaus S.; 64 
Pink. S.; 99 
Pistory. Michael J.: 65 
Pitchios, Peter S.; 64 
Plunkett, Paul; 87 
Pohelski, G.; 91 
Pokorney, Frank E.; 65, 117 
Poppelreiter, Christian J.; 90. 

287 
Powers, Cyril; 90, 106 
Prendergast. Ellen; 65 
Prendergast, Harold; 83. 323 
Presto, Frank L.; 65 
Pritikin, I.; 99, 333 
Pugh, Warren E.; 65 
Purcell, Isabel; 72, 153 

Q 

Quinn, B. J.; 266 
Quinn, Frank; 91. 196, 205. 211 
Quinn, Geraldine E.; 75, 160 
Quinn. M.; 163 

R 

Radakovitch, Dushan; 91 
Radek, A.: 155 
Raifertv, Robert; 89, 196 
Rafferty, William E.; 65. 81, 

240, 244. 325, 351 
Ragen, J.; 113 
Raimond. F.; 99 
Raines, Taft; 91 
Rand. George; 333 
Ratajczch, S.; 87 
Ray. George K.; 83. 205, 206, 

208, 210, 240, 243, 325. 351 
Reading, J.; 163 
Reagan. Frank; 89 
Redden. Thomas E.; 65, 81 
Reedy, Thomas J.; 42 
Reed, Francis; 323 
Reed, Paul A.; 113 
Reed. Paul E.; 205, 207, 230 
Regan, Ben; 134, 135 
Regan, James E.; 65, 117 
Remus. William J.; 65, 106, 109 
Renkoff, H.; 333 
Reuter, Walker J.; 65, 347 



Reynolds, Francis R.; 65, 117 

Richmond, J. H.; 66 

Ringa. Edward; 91 

Reiner, Joseph; 30 

Rivard, C; 165 

Roach. Frank; 89. 299 

Robinson, Crawford; 113, 123 

Robinson, Stanley W.; 66 

Roche, Edwin K.; 66 

Roche, K.; 117 

Rokusek. Catherine; 155 

Rodgers, G.; 86 

Rooney. A.; 130. 131 

Rooney. F. J.; 35 

Rooney, Mary; 1 57 

Rosich, E.; 86 

Roskowski, A.; 90 

Ross, Harry; 280 

Roszkonski. J.; 113 

Rowe, George T.; 66 

Rowan, Catherine; 156, 157 

Rozie. Minnie; 153 

Russel, C; 165 

Russel, Lawrence A.; 66 

Ryan, J.; 86, 282 

Ryan, John P.; 66, 109 

Ryan, Mary L.; 75 

Ryan, M. Lillian; 47 

Ryan. Thomas F.; 66, 337 



Salerno, George; 89 

Saletta, Frank J.; 66 

Salvador, Graciano, 226 

Samonte. D. T.; 99 

Sanders, John; 86, 325 

Sanders. Matthew; 82, 83, 325 

Sandorf, M. H.; 99 

Sanlilippo. J.; 89 

Santino, T.; 89 

Santora, A.; 99 

Santucci, J.; 173- 

Sapoznik, Hyman L; 66, 333 

Sarossy, L; 165 

Savarese, Lawrence A.; 66 

Schaefer, Frances M.; 66 

Schaefer. H.; 163 

Schaub, Carl F.; 67, 341, 343 

Schell, M.; 279 

Schilling, Mane; 157 

Schiner, Flora; 157 

Schlacks, Howard; 120, 121 

Schoen, William P.; 195, 349 

Schommer. J.; 86 

Schram, Walter; 111 

Schroeder, C; 165 

Schroeder, Dorothy; 157 

Schuetze. Carl J.; 122 

Schurz, T.; 230 

Schwartz, M.; 165 

Schwartz, N. F.; 99. 333 

Schwarz, Julia M.; 67, 92 

Scott, Robert; 67. 128, 129, 28C 

Scott, W.; 83 

Scott, William; 91 

Scullion, Dorothea; 155 



Schneider, Leo; 83 
Schneller, Mae; 1 5 5 
Schmidt, Austin G.; 44 
Sears, John; 84 
Sebat, Polly; 72, 153 
Secord, Richard, 123 
Sejud, T.; 113 
Sextro, Fred; 279, 314 
Shanahan, Richard; 223 230 

315, 323 
Shanok. Hyman; 67 
Shapiro, Herman; 333 
Sharkey, Roger; 91 
Shaunnessy, Catherine; 69 
Shea, Edward J.; 67, 80, 81 
Sheehan, Edward; 87 
Shields. Thomas; 90 
Shonts, Leola C; 67 
Shorrett. Genevieve; 155 
Sheahan, Marie; 41 
Sherry, M.; 165 
Shurr, Howard; 83, 196 
Sidorawicz, Frank; 67 
Siedenburg, Frederick; 32 
Simonich, Louis; 123 
Slingerland, Frank C; 67, 128 

129, 327 
Size, James; 90 
Smeltzer, William; 111 
Smith, Edward; 86, 308 
Smith, Jeanette; 114, 122 
Smith, S.; 90, 299 
Smith. Thomas; 319 
Smith. William S.; 67, 81 296 

323 
Smyth, Frank; 91 
Sokolowski, Joseph F.; 67, 97 
Sowka, Paul; 87, 230 
Spelman, Thomas L.; 196 205 

218 
Spirrison. Charles; 67 
Stanch, H. J.; 99 
Stanton. G.; 165 
Stanton, William L.; 67, 109 

355 
Stauder, Harry; 223, 225 230 

319 
Steggert, Bertram J.; 31 
Steinbrecher, Francis; 90 
Steinle, Clifford; 80 
Stengel, H. J.; 99 
Stimming, Charles; 82, 83, 196, 

351 
Stojkowski, Stephanie; 75 
Stone, Zita J.; 68, 117 
Strobel, John Philip; 90, 325 
Stroud, E. Jones; 68 
Stucker, Frederick; 68, 343, 

349. 341 
Sullivan, J. E.; 87 
Sullivan, Loretta H.; 68 
Sullivan, Mary L; 72 
Sullivan, Thomas; 86 
Sutherland, Donald A.; 68, 80 
Sweeny. J.; 131 
Sweeny. John; 1 1 1 



t. 



Page four hundred thirteen 



-^7^ 



-4=^ _ ^V,i='^3J5^ 



Sweeny, M.; 90, 230 
Sweetman, J.: 1 32 
Sweetman. William: 130, 131 
Sweitier, Robert; 83 



Tahes, Louise; 155, 156 
Tarabornino, Paul; 319 
Tanhes, Louise; 156 
Tanko, Mary; 73, 153 
Taphorn, Genevieve; 73, 153 
Tarpey, Marguerite S.; 73 
Tchinski, P.; 99 
Tennes, Ruth; 220 
Thomson, Robert; 86, 32 5 
Tigerman, J. B.; 308 
Timmons, Peter J.; 100 
Tivncn, R. J.; 341 
Tobm, Richard T.; 68. 116, 

117, 335 
Tomaso, Alphonse; 83, 2 30 
Tomczack, Anthony; 89, 230 
Toomey, John; 106. Ill 
Topel, Paul; 349 
Tovarek, J. J.; 68 
Tracey, J.; 319 
Tracey, J. T.; 86, 299 
Truna, J.; 91 
Trudelle, Catherine; 73 
Turner. B. E.; 99 



U 



282-284 



Unavitch, James; 
Urban, Frank; 87 
Urban, L. D.; 68, 341, 345 
Urbancek, Francesca; 68 



V 
Vaile, P.; 91 

Valenta, E. H.; 99, 339, 347 
Van Driel, Agnesi 3 3 
Van Pelt, Harry; 68, 129, 327 
Vasu, Vasilc O.; 68 
Vennette, Irene; 73, 153 
Verhaag, Joseph E.; 68, 96, 341 
Vinccnti, A.; 87 
Viskocil, Emil J.; 69, 341, 343 
Vivirito. Christie; 90 
Vogel, Leona; 157 
Volini, Camillo; 87 
Volland, Edna; 73, 153 

W 
Waesco, John; 90, 299 
Wajay, L; 91 
Waldron, John A.; 69. 78, 81, 

240 
Walkowiak, Claude A.; 69, 109 
Wall, F.; 87 
Wall, Harriet E.; 69 
Walsh, Francis J.; 195, 196. 

319 
Walsh, F. J.; 99. 196 
Walsh. J. Francis; 83, 195. 205, 

243, 281, 349 
Walsh, J. J.; 87 
Walsh, J. P.; 91 
Walsh, Kathleen P.; 75 
Walsh, Maurice; 112, 113, 279, 

284 
Weber, John; 90 
Weber, Kathenne; 155 
Weidman. J.; 113 
Weinless, Jack; 333 



Weinrich. George; 83, 196, 230 

Weislo, John F.; 69 

Werner, K.; 155 

West, Edward J.; 69. 81, 289 

Whealan, E.; 83 

Whelan, Edward P.; 69, 109 

White, John D.; 194, 196, 243. 

325, 349 
Whitfield, H. W.; 87 
Wilkins, La Roy W.; 69, 81 
Wilkinson, John; 90 
Will. T. H.; 99 
Wilson, Robert; 87 
Wiltrakis, George A.; 69. 341, 

345, 347 
Witry, Joseph; 111, 228, 278, 

284 
Wiza, Francis L.; 69 
Wolff, G.; 163 
Workman, J.; 90, 281 
Wright, Dons D.; 69 
Wroblewski, S. W.; 87 
Wybrariec, A.; 91 
Wynn, Gerald; 319 

Yamare, Richard; 87 
Young, F.; 87 
Young, W.; 91, 132 



Zabel. Morton; 186, 196, 351 

Zaug. Eugene; 91 

Zaug, James; 91 

Ziano, Joan Y.; 73, 152 

Zimmerman, E. F.; 99, 343 

Zurfli. Clarence; 69 



four hundred fourteen 






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