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Full text of "The Loyolan"

EX LIBRIS 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

CARL!: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/loyolan1929unse 



THE LOYOLAN 




Copyrighted, 1929, by 
William H. Conley 
Richard O'Connor 



THE 

NINETEEN TWENTY-NINE 

LOYOLAN 




Published by the Students of Loyola 
University, Chicago 




Early in Ufe. while still a student, Ozanam dedicated himself, as a layman, to the service 

of the Church. His object was to bring the principles and practice of his religion into 

the everyday life of the student. 





DEDICATION 



Loyola University honors this year Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Cudahy, through 
whose munificence a stately library structure is to rise on the campus within the near 
future. The building, described elsewhere in this issue of the Loyolan, will be 
known as the Mrs. Elizabeth M. Cudahy Memorial Library, and is being presented 
to the University by Mr. Cudahy in honor of his devoted wife, still Hving. In this 
generous deed Mr. Cudahy is establishing an enduring monument to the cause of 
education and to the traditions of his family already secure in the grateful memory 
of all Loyolans because of an earlier benefaction by Mr. and Mrs. Michael Cudahy. 
It is fitting, therefore, that this year'book be dedicated to Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. 
Cudahy whose names we are proud to inscribe high on the roll of Loyola's patrons. 




During the period of royal supremacy before the coming of the republic the pomp and 
ceremony of the court added dignity and charm to activities. 



FOREWORD 

The Loyolan, in its sixth volume, attempts to present the annals of the scholastic 
year 1928-29 at Loyola University. In fulfilling this task it has endeavored to meas- 
ure up to the standards of its predecessors and to the achievements which have made 
The Loyolan, in six years, an indispensable part of the University life. 

This year The Loyolan is built around a theme suggested by the hfe and times 
of Frederic Ozanam (1813-1853), an eminent and saintly Catholic layman, through 
whose work as a student, teacher, writer, and organizer the Church in France was 
greatly strengthened during a dark and painful transition period, and whose ideals of 
Catholic Action have become an inspiration throughout the modern world. 

Three years ago Loyola University started a revival of the student movement which 
had its beginning in the work of Ozanam. This activity, which is known as the Catholic 
Action movement, has now spread throughout the nation. Because it is an influence 
which dominates the life of every student, the Nineteen Twenty-Nine Loyolan 
has taken for its theme the activities and environment of the man who originated the 
movement in France a century ago — Frederic Ozanam. 




During the period of distress and transition in France many of the people depended for news 
and literary diversion upon the! town crier. It was a common custom in the outlying towns, 
especially near Ozanam's house, to gather at a certain time while the crier read his bulletins. 



THE STAFF 

William Henry Conley Editor-in-Chief 

Richard O'Connor Managing Editor 

Paul Lynch O'Connor Business Manager 

John Joseph Bryant Senior Editor 

Robert Thomson Athletic Editor 




When, Ozanam went to Paris to continue his studies he made his home uiith M. Ampere. 
the noted French scientist. Ampere was greatly interested in Ozanam and the two spent much 
time in Ampere's library wor\ing on scientific and philosophical treatises. 



LOYOLA 




Ozanam's ideal of carrying his religion beyond the doors of the church was one of the reasons 
for the revival of Catholicism among the students of his time. His ideal is the ideal instilled 
into the students of present-day Loyola. 



THE BOOKS 

Book One —LOYOLA 

Book Two —ADMINISTRATION 

Book Three —CLASSES 

Book Four —LOYOLA LIFE 

Book Five —ACTIVITIES 

Book Six —ATHLETICS 

Book Seven —FRATERNITIES 




The Administration Building 




Michael Cudahy Science Hall 




Henry Dumhach Hall 




The School of Medicine 




The Campus, Looking Toward the Laf{e 




\ 



The Dowyitown College 




The Gymnasium 



ADMINISTRATION 




One of the first activities of the student monement under Ozaiiam was the aid of the poor. 
Ozanam spent much of his time in the poorer districts of Paris administering to those in distress. 



THE PRESIDENT'S GREETINGS 

Loyola University is celebrating its twentieth birthday as a university in this year 
of grace nineteen hundred and twenty-nine. In reviewing the contents of this year 
book I am struck with the evidence of achievement recorded or implied for such a 
brief span of university life. I am more impressed when I recall what meager and 
insufficient material resources have gone to the founding and the developing of the 
University. It seems to me that the patrons of higher education, that the enlightened 
citizens who see the vital need of such institutions, that the devoted sons and daughters 
and friends of Loyola University should handle and read this year book with deep 
gratitude to God and to the men who are chiefly responsible for the establishment and 
development of this University. They should be elated with a sense of hope that 
what has been done is a secure promise of what will be accomplished. It is a great 
satisfaction to me to look into this carefully edited and artistically printed book and 
reflect on the swift and solid progress which has been made and to look forward to 
the carrying out of plans contemplating a growth which will be a living development 
of what has been so wisely planted and so faithfully watered and so lovingly culti- 
vated. May the future Loyolans mirror, as this book does, the ever growing and 
beneficient influence of Loyola University! 




Page twenty-five 




Robert M. Kelley, S.J. 
President of Loyola University 



Page twenty-six 



THE YEAR'S ACHIEVEMENTS 

The past scholastic year has been the second year of the administration of Father 
Robert M. Kelley, S.J. It is conservative to make the statement that the achiev;- 
ments of the past year surpass those of any previous year at Loyola. 

The donation of the Cudahy Memorial Library and the beginning of the construc- 
tion of the new athletic field and stadium were the outstanding material accompli.^h- 
ments. 

The achievements of a university, however, cannot be measured entirely by ma- 
terial progress. The increased scholastic prestige of the institution, the unification 
of the various schools, as well as the increased advantages given to the students must 
be considered as a part of the progress of the past year. 

The fame of Loyola as a center of learning grows from year to year as its 
graduates take their places all over the nation. The unification of the schools of the 
University has become a reality through the efforts of the council of Deans and 
Regents, founded last year and through the medium of the Loyola Union which is 
an achievement of this year. 

Advantages have been given to the students in the form of increased self govern- 
ment, in an opportunity to engage in a wide variety of extra curricular activities 
and in increased opportunities to receive a truly Catholic education. 



Page twenty-seven 




Standing — Steggert, McCormick, Reedy. 

Seated — Mahan, Moorehead, Schmidt, Kelley. Reiner, Logan, Siedenburg. 



THE COUNCIL OF DEANS AND REGENTS 

The purpose of the council of Deans and Regents, which was inaugurated in the 
beginning of the administration of President Robert M. Kelley, is to afford a con- 
venient time and place for the deans and regents of the schools and colleges of the 
university to present their common difficulties and adopt positive policies under the 
regulation of the president, and thus to form a more perfect unification of the univer- 
sity by greater coordination among its units. 

The place of meeting, formerly the University Club, has been changed to the 
Bismarck Hotel, where meetings are held regularly on the first Tuesday of each month. 
The procedure of the assembly consists of dinner at six thirty o'clock, after which the 
meeting proper takes place. 

The personnel of the council follows: Rev. Robert M. Kelly, S.J., President; Rev. 
Joseph S. Reiner, S.J., Dean of the College of Arts and Science; Rev. Frederic Sieden- 
burg, S.J., Dean of the School of Sociology and Regent of the School of Law; Rev. 
Austin G. Schmidt, S.J., Dean of the Graduate School; Rev. Patrick J. Mahan, S.J., 
Regent of the School of Medicine; Dr. William H. G. Logan, Dean of the Chicago 
College of Dental Surgery; Dr. L. D. Moorehead, Dean of the School of Medicine; 
Mr. John V. McCormick, Dean of the School of Law; Mr. Thomas J. Reedy, Dean 
of the School of Commerce, and Mr. Bertram J. Steggert, Registrar of the College 
of Arts and Sciences. 

A brief resume of the topics taken up follows: A definite terminology regarding 
divisions of the university was established; a university calendar was compiled and 
sent to those whom it concerned; the commencement of 1929 was planned in detail; 
a survey of the various schools and colleges of the university was presented by Dean 
Reiner; the strong and the weak points of the university organization was discussed 
by the council; committees made reports concerning the rankings of teachers through- 
out the university, also the securing of endowment for the university, health service 
for students, course numbers for the purpose of securing uniformity, degrees in general, 
and the requirements for baccalaureate degrees in particular. 



Page twentyeifiht 




Top Row — Stimming, Madden, Van Pelt. 
Bottnm Rou — Ncirkctt. Walsh, Neary, White. 

THE LOYOLA UNION 

The University Senate composed of the deans of the various schools was shown to 
be of such advantage in bringing about a unified spirit in the university that a similar 
organisation made up ot students from each department was recommended by the 
president of the University. LInder the direction of Father Schulte, dean of men of 
the college of Arts and Sciences, steps were made to organize the student bodies ot 
the various schools through representative students. 

Shortly after the Christmas recess Father Schulte appointed several representatives 
from each campus and asked them to come together and discuss the best plan of or- 
ganisation. The initial meeting was held at the City Club and definite plans were 
made. The group decided that it desired to be known as the Loyola Union, that 
each school should be represented by three students, that representation for the first 
year should be by appointment until such time as the students could arrange to hold 
elections and choo.se their representatives. 

The Loyola Union is purely an advisory board making recommendations to the 
schools of the University in regard to all university problems. The outstanding work 
of the Union during the past few months has been the aid given in social affairs. The 
Junior Prom which was backed by the organization was the most successful social', 
affair in the history of Loyola's all-university functions. The social committee, headed 
by Ambrose Kelly of the Night Law School, has already made plans for several of the 
University functions to take place during the coming year. Dates have been arranged 
and preliminary arrangements have been considered. 

The appointments to membership by Father Schulte include: Stimming, Walsh and 
White of the Arts College; Karr, Lee and Madden of the School of Medicine; Sweeney, 
O'Dowd and Buckley of the Day Law School; J. Kelly, A. Kelly and Kavanaugh of 
the Night Law School; Neary, Norkett and Van Pelt of the School of Commerce; 
Schoen, Topel and Hillenbrand of the Dental School; and Egan, Kain and Summers 
of the School of Sociology. 

The officers of the organization are: President, James A. Neary; Vice-President. 
Robert E. Lee; Secretary, John D. White; Treasurer, Paul Topel. 



Page tuifiity-nine 




Joseph S. Riinf.r, S.J,. De 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES: 
LAKE SHORE CAMPUS 

I believe that the past year marks another advance 
by the faculty in capitalizing the intellectual curiosity, 
the high idealism, the energy and enthusiasm of our 
students and in developing in them initiative, self- 
dependence, intellectual and moral power. 

Advance in the religious field is apparent, it seems 
to me, from the increased influence of religion on the 
character of the individual students and on the activi- 
ties of the group, from the increased attendance at the 
meetings of the sodality and a wider acceptance of its 
ideals, from the greater number of receiving Holy 
Communion at the Friday Mass, from the develop- 
ment of the Chicago Catholic Student Conference on 
Religious Activities and from the dominating influence 
exerted by Loyola students at the Student Leadership 
Convention, held at St. Louis, last summer. It is very 
significant that the offer of assistance to Loyola which 
eventually took the shape of the princely gift of our 
new library was made on the occasion of one of the 
student masses. 



Pane thirty 



,,JL^JLJc^C Wi^->x4A,^4^- 




Bertram J. Stegciert, A.M., 
Registrar 



FACULTY 



Robert M. Kelley, S.J. 
George J. Brunner, S.J. 
Ch.\rle,s S. Costello, A.M. 
Hugh F. Field, Ph.D. 
Philip W. Froebes, S.J. 
CoRNELIU.S S. H.agertv, B.S. 
Aloysius p. Hodapp, AM 
Rev. Conrad Hoffman, A.M. 
John W. Hudson, M.S. 
Julius V. Klthinka, A.M. 
George H. Mahowald. S.J., Ph.D. 
Robert W. McNulty, A.B., D.D.S. 
Peter T. Swanish, M.B.A, 
Joseph M. Synnerdahl, M.S. 



John M. Melchiors, A.M. 
James J. Mertz, S.J. 
Bernard J. Murray, S.J. 
Leonard H. Otting. S.J. 
Louis J. Plihl, S.J. 
Joseph S. Reiner, S.J. 
Graciano Salvador, A.B.. LLB. 
George M. Schmeing, M.S. 
George E. Schrader, S.J. 
Theodore J. Schulte, S.J. 
Joseph E. Semrad, Ph.B. 
Bertram J. Steggert, A.M. 
John F. Walsh, S.J. 
Morton D. Zabel. A.M. 



Page thirty-one 




Frederr: Siedenburg, S.J., Deem 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCE; 
DOWNTOWN COLLEGE: THE SCHOOL 
OF SOCIOLOGY 

Glancing over our year in retrospect, we can espe- 
cially record developing and strengthening the pro- 
gram for education in social work, due in part to a 
revision ot the curriculum. Work in social research 
has been added to the opportunities given social service 
students. 

We have initiated at the Downtown College a course 
ill the Theory of Occupational Therapy, meeting the 
demand for education in that relatively new iield. 
During the year new hospitals have been added to our 
list Vvfhere work towards university degrees is given to 
nurses. Such activities as the Maria Delia Strada So- 
dality, Alpha Kappa Delta, the national honor sociol- 
ogy fraternity, and the Loyola University Alumnae 
Association, have been fostered and developed as a 
regular part of the year's work in the school. Always 
an integral part of the community, this year the schools 
have had representation on the Illinois Conference of 
Public Welfare, the Advisory Committee of the Public 
Schools and the Committee of Fifteen. 



^M6>^ y^Je^/^ 



Page thirty-two 





Acnes Van Driel. A.M., Secretary 



FACULTY 



Henry Terence Ahearn. S.J. 
Gennaro Albachiara, D.Sc. 
Harold A. Bennett. S.J. 
Francis T. Boylan. A.B. 
George J. Brunner. S.J. 
James F. Butler. S.J. 
Robert E. Cummings. B.S., M.D. 
John William Davis, B.S., M.D. 
Claude De Crespigny, Ph.D. 
Nell I. Devine 
Harrison Dobbs, A.B. 
Gerard Donnelly. S.J. 
Howard Eston Egan. Ph.D. 
Gertrude M. Engbring, B.S., 
Hugh F. Field, Ph.D. 
Louis W. Forrey. S.J. 
Helen M. Ganey. A.M. 
Francis J. Gerty. B.S., M.D. 
Cecilia M. Gilmore. A.M.. 
Eneas B. Goodwin. S.T.B., J!D. 
Aloysius p. Hodapp, A.M. 
Ellamay Horan, Ph.D. 
William H. Johnson, Ph.D. 
John J. Keefe, S.J. 
Michael Kenny, S.J. 
Dorothy C. Kleespies. A.B. 
Julius V. Kuhinka, A.M. 
Helen M. Langer. Ph.D. 
Michael D. Linehan. B.S. 
John V. McCormick, A.B., J.D. 
Florence, H. McIntosh, A.M. 
Edward F. Maher. S.J. 
George H. Mahowald, S.I., Ph.D. 
Patrick H. Matimore, S.f .D. 



M.D. 



D. 



John M. Melchiors, A.M. 
Robert Bakewell Morrison. S.J. 
Paul Muehlmann. S.J. 
William J. Murphy, S.J. 
John P. Noonan. S.J. 
Leonard H. Otting. S.J. 
Clalde J. Pernin. S.J. 
George Phipps. A.M. 
Paul Pierce. A.M. 
Alice Quan Rood. AM 
Francis J. Rooney, A.M.. LLB. 
Joseph Roubik. S.J. 
. Graciano Salvador. A.B.. LL B. 
George M. Schmeing, M.S. 
Al'stin G. Schmidt. S.J. 
Charles E. Schrader. S.J. 
Joseph E. Semrad, Ph.B. 
Joseph B. Shine. A.M. 
Frederic Siedenburg. S.J. 
Henry S. Spalding. S.J. 
Catherine V. Starbeck. AM. 
Sherman Steele, Li'tt.B.. LLB. 
Joseph C. Thompson. A.M. 
Martin J. Thl;e, A.M. 
Richard T. Tobin. A.B.. J.D. 
Andrew J. Townsend. Ph.D. 
William R. Tydeman. A.M. 
Agnes Van Driel. A.M. 
Margaret B. Wall A.M. 
Gerald P. Walsh. S.J. 
Iames F. Walsh, S.J. 
John F. Walsh. S.L 
Margaret V. Walsh, A.M. 
Morton D. Zabel. A.M. 



Page thirty-three 




John V. McCormick. A.B., J.D. 
Dean 



THE LAW SCHOOL 



/" 



During the academic year 1927-28 the Law School 
increased in numbers. Our present registration is 
293, of which number 182 students are attending the 
Evening Division and 111 the Day Division 

A new member was added to the full-time faculty. 
Mr. John Gushing Fitzgerald of Cambridge, Mass., 
who has received an A. B. from Boston College and an 
LL.B. degree from Harvard University. 

Professor Sherman Steele during the last year pub- 
hshed his Case Book on Equity Jurisprudence which 
is being used in the Law School. It has had very 
favorable notices from the Reviewers of various Law 
Journals. 

The Student Council of the Day and Night school 
has been actively functioning and has demonstrated 
that the students can and will govern themselves if 
given the opportunity. 

We feel on looking back that the Law School has 
accomplished a great deal since we have been in our 
new home, the Downtown College Building, and it is 
the intention of the Law School to continue to advance 
the ideals of legal education. 



Page thirty-four 




Francis J. Rooney. A.M., LL.B. 
Secretary 



FACULTY 



John V. McCormick. A.B., J.D., Dean 
Irvinc W. Baker. A.B., LL.B. 
Jacob J. Becker, J.D.. Ph.D. 
James J. Cahill, Ph.B.. LL.B, 
Aloysius R. Cawley, A.M., J.U.D. 
Leo Donahoe, A.B., LL.B. 
Goodwin L. Dosland. J.D. 
Joseph Elward, A.B., LL.B. 
John Gushing Fitzgerald. A.B., LL.B. 
William Fortune, A.B., LL.B. 
William Friedman, Ph.B., LL.B, 
Joseph F. Geary, LL.B. 
Raymond J, Goss, LL.B, 
Joseph A, Graber, A.M., LL.B. 
John W. Kearns. B.S.E., LL.B. 
Hayes Kennedy, Ph.B., J.D. 



Urban A. Lavery. A.B., J.D. 
William A. Love. B.S., LL.B. 
Stephen Love. LL.B. 
Balys F. Mastauskas. LL.B, 
Walter W. L. Meyer. LL.B 
Cornelius R. Palmer. A.B., LL.B. 
Herman Reiling, LL.B. 
O. John Rogge. A.B., LL.B. 
Francis J. Rooney. A.M., LL.B. 
Jl'dge Wm. C. Scherwat. LL.B. 
Vincent Sheridan. A.B., A.M., LL.D, 
Lawrence Spulier. A.B., LL.M., J.D. 
Sherman Steele, Litt.B., LL.B. 
Payton J. TuoHY, A.M., LL.B. 
Louis J. Victor, Ph.B., LL.B. 



Page tliirt\'-/ii.'e 




Louis D. Moorhead, A.M., Is 
LL.D., F.A.C.S., Dean 



THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

The general growth and prosperity of the School of 
Medicine has been one of the most satisfying features 
of the University's life. During the eleven years of 
its existence it has slowly, but surely, and mainly, by 
the constructive scholarship of its students, the splen- 
did careers of its graduates, and the excellent effort of 
Its faculty, risen to a position of honor and respect in 
the great field of medical education. 

In student activities the Medical students have been 
prominent and are beyond a doubt playing their share 
m the building up of activities shared by the entire 
University. The spirit which exists among the students 
is one of the highest caliber and this is in many ways 
responsible for the splendid scholarship so frequently 
displayed. 




i*v,»-t-^Cit«-«V^ 



Page thirty-six 




Patrick J. Mahan. S.J., Regent 



FACULTY 



Patrick J. Mahax. S.]., Regent 

Louis D, Moorhead, Dean, A.M., M.S., 

M.D., F.A.C.S. 
Ulysses Joshua Grim. M.D., F.A.C.S. 
Henry Schmitz, M.D., A.M., LL.D., 

F.A.C.S., F.A.C.R. 
Frederick Mueller, M.D. 
Benjamin H. Orndoff, Ph.G., M.D., A.M., 

F.A.C.R., F.A.C.P. 
Robert A. Black. M.D., F.A.C.P. 
Reuben Myron Strong, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 
Bertha Van Hoosen. A.B., M.D.. A.M. 
George W. Mahoney. M.D., F.A.C.S. 
Samuel A. Mathews, M.D. 
Charles Louis Mix, A.B.. A.M., M.D.. 

LL.D. 
Edward Louis Moorehead, A,M., M.D., 

LL.D., F.A.C.S., (Deceased). 
Benjamin Parker Beeson, M.D. 
William C. Austin, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 
Charles F. Read, B.S., M.D. 
William E. Morgan, M.D., LL.D. 
IsADORE M. Trace, M.D. 
Philip H. Kreuscher. M.D. 
Charles F. Sawyer, M,D. 
John Ferdinand Golden, M.D. 
Milton Mandel. M.D. 
Stephen Roman Pietrowic:. A.B., M.D. 
Richard J, Tivnen, M,D., LL.D. 



Charles P. Caldwell. M.D. 

Frank E. Pierce. B.S., M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Thesle T. Job. A.B., M.S., Ph.D. 

Daniel A. Orth, M.D., F.A.C.S. 

George Mueller, M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Joseph P. Smyth. M.D. 

William Sheridan, Hector. M.D. 

J. William Davis, M.D. 

Samuel Salinger, A.B., M.D.. F.A.C.S. 

Jacob Carl Krafft. A.B., M.D., F.A.C.P. 

George T. Jordan. B.S., M.D. 

John M. Lilly, A.B.. M.D. 

A. CosMAS Garvy, A.B., M.D. 

Irving H. Eddy, M.D. 

Paul E. Grabow, M.D, 

Michael McGuire. A.B.. M B.. B.Ch.. 

B.A.O. 
Robert Emmett Flannary. M.D.. F.A.C.S 
Benjamin E. Elliott, B.S., M.D. 
William J. Swift, M.D.. F.A.C.S. 
Theodore E. Boyd. B.S., Ph.D. 
Thomas E. Meany. M.D. 
Robert S. Berghoff. M D. 
Italo F. Volini, B.S., M.D. 
Francis J. Gerty. B.S., M.D. 
George Leonard Apfelbach. A.B.. M.S.. 

M.D. 
John Benjamin Haeberlin, M.D. 
Bertram Charles Cushway. D.D.S.. M.D. 



Page thirt\-seven 




William H. G. Logan 

M.D., D.D.S., LLD., F.A.C.S., F.A.C.D. 

Dean 



THE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

During the forty-seven years of its existence the 
College of Dental Surgery has grown to become one 
of the outstanding institutions of its kind in the United 
States. The five story building now occupied was 
built for the school and every provision was made to 
care for the advancing requirements of dental educa- 
tion. The first and second floors are devoted to the 
dental clinic with its correlated departments and oifices. 
There are four science and four technical laboratories 
with three amphitheaters, located on the three upper 
floors. 

The institution has been most fortunate in attract- 
ing a type of student whose subsequent career has 
reacted to the greater renown of the school. Of over 
five thousand alumni, nine are or have been deans of 
dental colleges and many are recognised as authorities 
m the fields of dental education and practice. 



4p^.^, 



'O^lyL/', 



Pcge ihiny eight 




Charles N. Johnson 
A.M., L.D.S., D.D.S., M.D.S., F.A.C.D., 
Dean of Men 



LL.D, 



FACULTY 



William H. G. Logan, M.D., D.D.S., LL.D., 

F.A.C.S., F.A.C.D., Dean of the Faculty. 
Charles N. Johnson. A.M., L.D.S., D.D.S., 

M.D.S.. F.A.C.D., LL.D. 
John P. Buckley. Ph.C, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 
Pliny G. Puterbauch, M.D.. DD.S., 

F.A.C.D. 
Robert E. MacBoyle, D.D.S. 
Thomas L. Grisamore, Ph.G., D.D.S., 

F.A.C.D. 
'Rupert E. Hall. D.D.S. 
John L. Kendall, B.S.. Ph.G., M.D. 
William D. Zoethout. Ph.D. 
Emanuel B. Fink, Ph.D., M.D. 
Thesle T. Job, A.B., M.S., Ph.D. 
Julius V. Kuhinka, Ph.B., A.M. 
William L McNeill, D.D.S. 
B. Orban, B.S., M.D. 
Edgar David Coolidge, B,S., D.D.S. 
Karl A. Meyer, M.D. 
John R. Watt, D.D.S. 
Augustus H. Mueller. B.S., D.D.S. 
Lewis A. Platts, M.S., D.D.S. 



B. Adelbert Morris, D.D.S. 

Earl P. Boulger, D.D.S., L.D.S. 

Ralph H. Fouser, D.D.S.. B.S. 

Elbert C. Pendleton. D.D.S. 

LoziER D. Warner, B.A. 

Harold W. Oppice, D.D.S. 

LeGrand M. Cox. M.D., D.D.S. 

Harry Bowman Pinney. D.D.S. 

Gail Martin Hambleton. B.S,. D.D.S. 

Earl E. Graham, D.D.S. 

Wegor E. Mathison 

Irwin G. Jirka, D.D.S. 

George C. Pike. D.D.S. 

Henry Glupker. D.D.S. 

Howard Michener. D.D.S. 

James M. Mishler, D.D.S., B.S. 

Otto E. Kieling, B.S., D.D.S. 

Warren P. Willman, D.D.S., B.S. 

Leonard Boke, D.D.S. 

R. Harold Johnson. D.D.S, 

Robert C. Walker, D.D.S. 

Fred Kosche. D.D.S. 



Page thirty-nine 




Thomas J. Reedy, A.M., LL.B., C.P.A.. 
Dean 



THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 

The School of Commerce is completing its fifth year 
with the largest enrollment it has ever had. During 
the past year new courses, some quite advanced, were 
introduced to serve the needs of the increasing number 
of students and indicate the rapid development which 
the School of Commerce is undergoing. 

The Commerce Student Council, which evolved 
from the old Commerce Club, was placed upon a firm 
and practical basis during the past year and the 
students are organizing in such a manner and to such 
a degree that all indications point toward the time 
not far away when the School will have grown be- 
yond its proportions and will need again to remove 
into larger quarters. 



Page forty 




Georce a. Lane. A.B,, J.D.. 
Secretary 



FACULTY 



Thomas J. Reedy, A.M., LL.B.. C PA., 
Dean 

Georcie a. Lane. A.B., .|.D. 

Thomas Quinn Beesley. A.M., Litt.B. 

Francis T. Boylan. A.B. 

Howard E. Ei.an, Ph.D. 

Matt. Ec.an. B.C.S., J.D. 

Edward H. Enright. U. S. Nav. Acad.. 
JD. 

Hugh F. Field. Ph.D. 

Eugene B. Harks, A.B., J.D. 

James M. Hayden. A.B., C.P.A. 

Granville B. Jacobs, A.M. 

Daniel J. Kelly, C.P.A. 

Harold F. Keen. Ph.B., C.P.A. 



jiLius v. Ki hinka, .X.M. 
Perry D. Lipscomb B S.. C.P.A. 
John B. Mannion. A B. 
J. Richard Montgomery. B,C S,. C.P.A. 
Walter O'Meara. A.B. 
CoRNELiKS P. Palmer. .A.B., LL B. 
Elmer P. Schaffer, PhB., J.D. 
Lawrence W. Spllllr. A.B , J.D. 
Peter T. Swanish. MB. A. 
Theodore Wagenknkcht. B.S. 
James F. Walsh. S.J. 
Lawrence Wallace. Ph.B. 
John A. Zvetina. A.B.. J.D. 
Ieannette M. Smith Ph B. 



Page fortyone 




Austin G. Schmiot, S,J., Ph.D. 
Dean 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

For the first time in its history, Loyola University 
conferred the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at the 
commencement in June, 1928. The recipients were 
Brother Lewis Richard Steinbrink and Howard Eston 
Egan. Both of these students had done brilliant work 
in the Department of Education. 

The year just closing has been one of constant and 
substantial growth. There has been a total enrollment, 
including the summer session of 1928, of two hundred 
students. The caliber of the student body is constantly 
improving and theses submitted are reaching a higher 
level. 

The monthly convocations have been unusually well 
attended. Some of the outstanding features have been 
the addresses delivered by Dean Kent of Northwestern 
LIniversity, Dr. Job of the Loyola University School 
of Medicine, and Professor Otting, of the Department 
of Psychology. Contributions to the programs have 
been made by students of the Arts, Dental, Law and 
Medical Departments. 

Reports from the professional schools have been 
most gratifying. Between thirty and forty students 
are engaged in research problems in the Dental School 
and the Medical School. 



Pdj(e fortytwo 




Emile Audkt. A.m. 
William C. Austin, Ph.D. 
Earl P. Noulcer, D.D.S., L.D.S. 
Theodore E. Boyd, Ph.D. 
George J. Brunner. S.J. 
Simon B, Chandler, Ph.D., M.D. 
Edgar D. Coolidge, S.B,, D.D.S. 
LeGrand M. Cox, D.D.S., MB. 
Robert E. Cummings, S.B., M.D. 
John W. Davis. M.D. 
Gerald B. Donnelly. S.J. 
Howard E. Egan. Ph.D. 
Hugh F. Field. Ph.D. 
Emmanuel B. Fink, Ph.D., M.D. 

Louis W. FORREY, S.J. 

Ralph H. Fouser. SB., D.D.S. 
Helen M. Ganey, A.M. 
Francis J. Gerty, S.B., M.D. 
Eneas B. Goodwin, S.T.B., J.D. 
Thomas L. Grisamore. Ph.G.. D.D.S, 
Ellamy Horan, A.m. 

WiLHELM A. HUEPER. M.D. 

Thesle T, Job, Ph.D. 
William H. Johnson, Ph.D. 
John J. Keefe, S.J. 
Jerome G. Kerwin, Ph.D. 
Julius V, Kuhinka, A.M. 
William H. G. Logan. M.D., D.D.S. 
George H. Mahowald. S.J., Ph.D. 
Patrick H. Matimore. S.T.D. 
Samuel A. Matthews, M.D. 
John V. McCormick, A.B., J.D. 
Florence H. McIntosh. A.M. 
Frank A. McJunkin, A.M., M.D. 
Sister Arnoldina Mertens. S.C.C, 



FACULTY 

Jame 



Florence McIntosh, 
Secretary 



Mert:. S.J. 
Howard Michener. D.D.S. 
B. Adalbert Morris. D.D.S. 
Robert B. Morrison. S.J. 
William J. Murphy, S.J. 
John P. Noonan. S.J. 
Balint Orban. SB.. M.D. 
Claude J. Pernin. S.J. 
George Phipps. A.M. 
Paul Pierce. A.M. 
George C. Pike D D S. 
Harry B. Pinney. D.D.S. 
Pliny G. Puterbaugh, M.D . D.D 
Charles F. Read. S.B.. M D 
Francis J. Rooney A M . LL.B, 
Miriam L. Rooney, Ph.D. 
Joseph Roubik, S.J. 
Graciano Salvador. A B.. LL.B 
George M. Schmeing. S.M. 
Gordon H. Scott, Ph.D. 
Frederick Siedenburg. S.J. 
Catherine V. Starbeck, A.M. 
Brother L. R. Steinbrink F.S.C... 
Sherman Steele. Litt B.. LL.B. 
Reuben M. Strong. Ph D. 
Peter, T. Swanish. MB A. 
Wilbur R. Tweedy. Ph.D. 
Agnes Van Driel. A.M. 
Mal-rice a. Walker AM. 
Gerald P. Walsh. S.J. 
James F. Walsh S.J. 
Margaret Y. Walsh .^ M. 
Lozier D. Warner. A.B. 
Emil Weiss. M.D. 
Morton D. 2abel. A.M. 
William S. Zolthout, Ph.D. 



Page forty-three 




Marie Sheehax, Ph.B , Director 



THE HOME-STUDY DEPARTMENT 

The courses thus far have been strictly limited to 
academic work and no vocational courses have been 
offered. The work is primarily designed to help peo' 
pie, separated by distance from the University, com- 
plete their academic training but its influence extends 
to many who have no thought of degrees or teaching 
certificates. 

The instructors in a home-study department must 
have much general knowledge besides academic back- 
ground. They must be willing to give unselfishly of 
their time and energy (the remuneration is but slight) 
to maintain a high standard of education. Each stu- 
dent must be a fresh interest and only by striking a 
rather personal chord with the unseen student can such 
a department flourish. The fact that Loyola's courses 
now serve over a thousand students and stretch beyond 
the borders of the United States, testifies to the high 
character of teaching scholarship in this department. 



)/u 



U^r/ 



t^K^ru-i^i^Ay 



Pav.i fo 




May Kane A.s-.<istd7it 



FACULTY 



George Aka, Ph D. 
Kathryn Aschenbrexxer. a.. 
James R. Beck. A.B. 
NoRETTA Callahan. B.S. 
Clara M. Carmody. Ph.B. 
Amy E. Crisler, A.B. 
M. C. D'Argonne. Ph.D. 
j. William Davis. B.S.. M.D. 
Jllia M. Doyle. A.M. 
Helen M. Ganey. A.M. 
Ella M. Garvey, A.M. 
Frederick Gruhn, A.M. 
Harriett Hackler. A.M. 
Marsile J. Hughes, A.B. 

DoMITILLA HfNOLT. A.M. 



Florence M. Kane. Ph.B. 

Robert C. Keenax. A.B. 

Florence M. Leininger, A.B. 

Wilfred McPartlin. A.B. 

Charles W. Mulligan. A B. 

James J. Perry, S.J. 

Mary Ellen Reynolds. Ph.B. 

Felix Saunders. Ph.D. 

Maire Sheahan, Ph.B. 

J. Raymond Sheriff. A.B. 

Vincent J. Sheridan. A.M. 

Mme. Germaine Gallois Starrs. A.M. 

Richard T. Tobin, Ph.B. 

Morton D. Zabel. A.M. 

Frieda B. Zeeb. A.M. 



Page forty-five 




James F. Walsh, SJ. 
Dean of Men 



PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS. 

The office of Dean of Men in the Professional 
Schools has virtually been in existance since 192'i when 
the first retreat for the Professional students was held 
in the Sodality Hall on the west side. This year, how- 
ever, the position was placed upon an official basis by 
the president of the University. 

Regular days and office hours were provided in the 
various departments in order that all students would 
be given an opportunity to meet and consult the Dean. 
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday of each week were 
given over the Medical school while Thursday was de- 
voted to the Day Law students. Night Law students 
were given an opportunity on Thursday evenings and 
the Commerce men found it most convenient to meet 
on Fridays. 

A close affiliation with the Cosmas and Damian As- 
sociates, an organization of Catholic Physicians and 
with the newly organised Guild of St. Apollonia. an 
a.?sociation of Catholic Dentists makes it possible for 
the Dean of Men to keep in touch with the students 
not only during their training but also after they have 
graduated. 



ge forty-six 





Theodore Schulte, S.J., 
Dean of Men 



LAKE SHORE CAMPUS 

The year 1928-1929 had its accomphshments. The 
Loyola Union was organized, all representatives from 
the schools of the University chosen for the first year, 
and the selection approved by the President. This was 
done to have a congenial group to begin some real 
activity. 

The Social Committee of the Union has arranged 
the Program for the coming year, outstanding features 
to be the Loyola News Ball m late October, the Sopho- 
more Cotillion at the end of November, the Junior 
Prom before Lent, and the Senior Ball after Easter. 
The Junior Prom of this year, at The Knickerbocker, 
was pronounced "biggest and best ever." The Senior 
Ball, June 8th, will most likely even surpass this Prom. 
An outstanding feature of the early season was "The 
Jamboree," when a thousand Loyola Students saw the 
Basketball Team in action and then danced in glee till 
midnight. 




Page forty-seven 




Philip W. Froebes, S.J., 
Chairmari of Library Board 



LOYOLA UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 

Loyola University Library has substantially increased 
its service during the past year. A number of volumes 
have been added to the collection, and important sets 
of Reference books have been purchased, among which 
are: "The Columbia University Course in Literature"" 
in eighteen volumes; and "The Dictionary of American 
Biography," which when completed will comprise 
twenty volumes. The number of bound periodicals 
has been considerably augmented. Building for the 
future is constantly in mind in rounding out this part 
of the Reference collection. 

An impetus has been given to the possible scope of 
the Library work by the gift of Mr. Edward A. 
Cudahy to the University of a Memorial Library to 
be erected this year on the Lake Shore Campus. The 
Library as planned will be an architectural gem: also, 
from the librarian's viewpoint, a spacious and usable 
building. Ample space has been allotted to care for 



Page iorty eight 




the present and future student bfidy. Among the out- 
standing features are a beautiful Reading Room seat- 
ing two hundred; a Periodical Room, overlooking Lake 
Michigan, with seating capacity for over fifty; Study 
Rooms for the graduate and research students; a Lec- 
ture Room where the Librarian will instruct the 
students in the use of the Library; a Treasure Room, 
where rare editions will receive special attention; stack 
capacity for over 200,000 volumes. 

Upon completion of the new Library Building we 
hope the faculty and students from the various divi- 
sions of the University will make use of its facilities. 



M. Lillian Ryan, 



Piigc fortv-nnie 



"We have openly professed our own faith, refuted 
opposing doctrines, sought to do our duty as Christian 
professors and to serve God bv advancing true Science. 
But we have not sought to introduce into the Faculty of 
Paris a division which does not exist, to create two camps, 
to engage in battle. I thin\, moreover, that it is a matter 
of great importance to the young men, that that should 
not be done. Our lectures must not be regarded by our 
colleagues as provocative steps calling for a retort. If 
there are many strangers to our faith, the\ are not to be 
made enemies." 

OzANAM : Letters. 



Page fifty 



CLASSES 




The u-nstable condition of the French Government and the rise of the bourgeoisie brought an 
attempt to brea\ douin the lines of class distinction in France. Frequently all classes were put 
on the same footing and were sworn into the new governments as they were formed. 




GRADUATES 




Thomas Francis Ahearn 

B.S. 

Master of Science. 

*MX, HKE, The Seminar 

St. Ignatius High School. 
Chicago, 111. Class Vice- 
President, 3; Class Editor, 
4: Glee Club, 1. 



Morton Edwin Anderson 
LL.B. 

Master of Laws. 
Burnt Prairie, 111. 



I. Peter Ashmenckas 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

2Tn; eK4': The Seminar 

Tivnen Ophthalmological 
Society, Washington Univer- 
sity; St. Louis University; Du 
Bois High School, Du Bois, 
Pa.; Orchestra, 1, 2. 



Ann Lucille Behm 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 

2XJI 
Crane Junior College, 
Bovven High School. Chi- 
cago, 111. 



Thomas Stanley Blondin 
Bachelor of Science. 

AAr 
Loyola Academy. Chi- 
cago, 111. Philosophy Club. 



Lyle Lester Bristol 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

Crane Junior College, 
Bowen High School. Chi- 
cago, 111. 



Nellie Madeleine Brown 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
X2*, AP, Tivnen 

Ophthalmological Society 

Marywood College, Col- 
lege of Mt. St. Vincent, 
Marywood High School. 
Dunmore, Pa. 



John Joseph Bryant 
Bachelor of Philosophv. 

nAA. Bn 
St. Mary's High School, 
St. Viator Academy. Chi- 
cago, 111. 



Veronica Marie Bird 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal, St. Eliz- 
abeth's High School. Chi 
cago. 111. 



John Francis Burianek 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

St. Procopius College: 
Quigley Preparatory Semin- 
ary. Chicago, 111, 



Katharine Mary Burke 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal School, 
Providence Academy. Chi- 
cago, 111. 



Edward George Cada 
B.S.M. 

Master of Science in Med 
icine. 

The Seminar 
Lewis Institute; Morton 
High School. Berwyn, 111 



Page fifty two 



CuARLHS Bernard Cannon 
B.S. 

Bachelor of Laws. 
}2N<i", American Chemical 

Society. 
Campion College: Mar- 
quette University; Oshkosh 
High School. Superior, Wis. 



John Louis Carroll 
B.S.M. 
Doctor of Medicine. 

West Virginia University; 
Central High School. Wheel- 
ing, W. Va. 



CosiMO Castro 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine, 
IMS, nivE 

Crane College; Lewis In- 
stitute. Chicago, 111. 



Anthony M. Catania 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

IM2, The Seminar, AP 

Niagara University; West- 
field high School. Westfield, 

N. Y. 



John Dorsey Caulfield 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
*Bn, TOS 

De Paul University; Lewis 
Institute; De Paul Academy. 
Chicago, 111. 



Dewey Kalm Cesar 
Diploma in Commerce, 
Nicholas Senn High 
School. Chicago, 111. Com- 
merce Club. 



Joseph Angus Chishqlm 
Diploma in Commerce. 
St. Mel's High School. 

Chicago, 111. 



Frances Dolores 
Connerton 

Bachelor of Arts. 

Chicago Normal; Aquina 
High. Chicago, 111. 



Anthony Patrick Conti 
B.S.M. 
Doctor of Medicine. 

<i>Bn 

West Virginia University; 
South High School, Youngs- 
town, Ohio. Youngstown. 
Ohio. 



William Sylvester 
Conway 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

*MX, <i>Bn. nKE, 

Tivnen Ophthalmological 
Society, The Ghouls, 
The Seminar 
De Paul Academy. Chi- 
cago, 111. Class President, 
1925-6. 



Joseph Thomas Coyle 
B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine 
*JIX; *X; AP; TOS; IIKE 

St. Ignatius High School 
Chicago, 111. 



Thomas Patrick Crane 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
'i'MX. The Seminar 

St. Mel's High School. 

Chicago, 111. Orchestra; 
Glee Club. 




Page jiftythree 




Thomas William Crane 

B.B.A. 

Doctor of Jurisprudence, 
ZN*; AMA (BU) 

Boston University. Chi- 
CHgo, 111. Class President, 2, 
3. (Night Law.) 



Eliward a. Crown 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
*KA 

Crane College: Lane Tech- 
nical High School. Evans- 
ton, 111. 



James Murray Cullinan 
Bachelor of Arts. 

nAA 

Loyola Academy. Chicag 
111. 



Mae Lamb Cunningham 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal College; 

St. Mary's High School. 

Chicago, 111. 



Edwin Francis Curley 
Bachelor of Science. 

St. Joseph's College: St. 
Joseph's High School. Pe- 
toskey. Mich. Band: Glee 
Club: Sock and Buskin. 



Hugo T. Cl'trera 
Bachelor of Science. 
Northwestern Military and 
Naval Academy. Oak Park, 
111. Glee Club; Choral So- 
ciety: Band; Sodality; Intra- 
mural Basketball, 1. 



John Daly 

Bachelor of Laws. 

St. Philip's High School. 
Chicago, 111. Class President, 
4 (Evening Law). 



James S. Deegan 

Bachelor of Laws. 
AG* 

Chicago Normal; St. Ig- 
natius High School. Oak 
Park, 111. Class Treasurer, 1; 
Class President, 4: Basketball; 
Baseball. 



Frank Patrick Doheny 
Bachelor of Commercial 
Science. 

<J>MX; nB 
St. Mel's High School. 
Chicago, 111. Debating Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4, Sec. 3; Sock and 
Buskin, 2, 3, 4. Pres. 4; 
Loyola News, 3, 4, Advertis- 
ing Manager, 4; Sodality, 2, 
3, 4; 'Vice-President Press 
Club, 3. 

Robert Richard Donovan 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

Georgetown Univer- 
s i t y : Trinity Preparatory 
Academy. Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Blanche Elizabeth 
Dotterway 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
AP 

Carnegie Institute of Tech- 
nology (Woman's Medical 
College); Latrobe High. Lat- 
robe, Pa. 



John Michael Downs 

Bachelor of Laws. 

Dixon High School. Har- 
mon, 111. Football, 2, 3, 4. 



Page fifty-four 



Wentworth Vincent 
Driscoll 
B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine 
Colby — ■ Catholic Univer- 
sity; Bay Ridge High. Brook' 
Ivn. N. Y. 



NoRiNE P. Dunn 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
Chicago Normal; St. James' 

high. Chicago, 111. 



Francis William Dwyer 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

University of Detroit; An- 
nunciation High School. De- 
troit, Mich. Student Repre- 
sentative, "27. 



Alfred Pace Edwards 

A.B. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
2N; AKK 

Tivnen Ophthalmological 
Society, Oklahoma Univer- 
s i t y ; Maysville, Missouri, 
High School. Chicago, 111. 
Class President, 3. 



Gordon Frederick Elrick 
B.S.M. 

Bachelor of Science; Doc- 
tor of Medicine. 

e** 

Kenyon College; Lane 
Technical High School. Chi- 
cago, 111. 



John Emile Ennis 

Bachelor of Arts 
Air 

Loyola Academy. Chicago, 
111. Class President, 4 So- 
dality; Philosophy Club; 
Student Council. 



Vernon Lawrence Evans 

B.S.M. 

D(jct(jr of Medicine. 
<J>X; The Seminar 

Crane Junior College; .St. 
Ignatius High School. Chi- 
cago, III. 



Joseph Philip Evans 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
<I>X; The Seminar 

Campion College; Campion 
High School. Prairie du 
Chien, Wis. 



Aaron Facelson 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
*X; The Seminar 

Crane Junior College; Har- 
rison Tech. Class Vice- 
President, 3. Chicago, 111. 



Simeon B. Fernande: 
Bachelor of Laws 
Phihppine Islands. 



Lloyd Finley Peter 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine 
TKE; eiCA 

University o f Chicago; 
Green Valley High School. 
South Pekin, 111. Intramural 
Basketball. 



Therese Finley 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago, 111. 




Page fifty-five 




Agnes Rita Fitzgerald 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal; St. Mary's 

H.gh School. Chicago, 111. 

Sock and Buskin Club. 



loHN Joseph Flynn 
A.B. 
Doctor of Medicine. 

St, Francis College; St. 
Francis Prep. Brooklyn, N. 
Y. Class Treasurer, 3. 



Mauro Sebastian Fonacier 

A.B., B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

University of Philippines; 
Vigan High School, P. I. 
Claveria, Cagayan, P. I. 



Richard Francis Ford 

Bachelor of Arts. 
BAA 

Loyola Academy, Chi- 
cago, 111. Class Treasurer, 
4; Pres. Debating Society, 4; 
Pres. Glee Club. 3; Sodality, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Interfraternity 
Council, Winner Naghten 
Debate Medal, '29. 

Wesley Graham Forster 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

North Dakota U.: Hills- 
horo High School. Hills- 
boro. N. D. 



Ro.sA Mary Fortuny 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
St. Vincent's Hospital, St. 

Agnes High School. Los 

Angeles, California. 



Ray.mond T. Fulton 
Bachelor of Commercial 
Science. 

AAF 
Nicholas Senn High 
School. Chicago, 111. Phil- 
osophy Club. 



Charles Bernard Gaffney 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

University of Pittsburgh; 
University of Maryland; New 
Britain High School. New 
Britain, Conn. 



John James Gaffney 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
*P2; AP; T02 

Tivnen Ophthalmological 
Society 

Niagara University: Uni- 
versity of Buffalo; Danbury 
High School. Danbury, 
Conn. Director Commence- 
ment Orchestra, 1927-8. 



Margaret Mary 
Gallagher 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 

De Paul University; Chi- 
cago Normal; Providence 
Academy. Chicago, 111. 



Jack Joseph Garthe 
Bachelor of Arts. 

Loyola Academy. Evans- 
ton, 111. Sodality; Interfra- 
ternity Council; Intramural 
Basketball. 1. 



Francis Gorman Gleason 
Bachelor of Science. 

^BII, The Seminar 
De Paul University; De La 

Salle High School. Chicago, 

111. 



Page fifty-six 



Michael F. Glynn 

Bachelor of Laws. 
AS* 

National University of Ire- 
land; St. Joseph's College. 
Chicago, 111. 



J.^MES ROOER GORMICAN 
Bachelor of Commercial 
Science. 

nAA 
Fond du Lac High School. 
Fond du Lac, Wis. Sodal' 
ity, 2, 3, 4. 



Richard John Graff 
B.S.M. 
Doctor of Medicine. 

St. Thomas College; New 
Ulm High School. New 
Ulm, Minn. 



Ben Joseph Greenburg 

B.S.M. 

M.D. Certificate. 
*AK 

Lewis Institute; M e d i 1 I 
High School. Chicago, 111. 



Theodore Joseph 
Greteman 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
$811; Tivnen 

Ophthalmological Society. 

Campion College: Cam- 
pion Academy. St. Lucas, la. 



Kenneth Raymond Gricsby 
Doctor of Medicine. 
*X: The Seminar 
Crane College; Lewis In- 
stitute: Chicago University; 
Medicine Lodge High School. 
Medicine Lodge, Kan. 



Herman A. Gross 
B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
GK*; ^fin 

University of Illinois; Uni- 
versity of Chicago. Harvey, 
111. 



Severu Raval Culrrl'ro 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

Crane Junior College; Mc- 
Kinley High School. Laoag, 
Ilocos Norte, Philippine Is- 
lands. 



Charlotte Sheehan 
Hansen 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 

Northern Illinois Teacher's 
College; St. Joseph's Aca- 
demy. Chicago, Illinois. 



Stanley Vincent 
Haraburda 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

Crane Junior College; Mur- 
ray F. Tuley High. Chicago, 
III. 



Thomas G. HarMngton 

A.B. 

Doctor of Law. 
Ae* 

Sock and Buskin Cluh: 
Loyola News: Class Treas- 
urer, 4. Chicago, Illinois. 



Harry Theodore Haver 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
Seminar 

Crane Junior College; 
Crane Tech. Chicago, 111. 




•<-. ^f: ^SJK—Vi I 



Page fifty-seven 




Raymond F. Hayes 

Doctor of Laws. 

University of Illinois: St. 
Mel High School; Vice-Pres., 
3. Chicago, 111. 



Robert Joseph Hawkins 
B.S.M. 
Doctor of Medicine. 

•i-MX; *X; HKE; AP; 
Tivnen Ophthalmological 

Society 
St. Ignatius High. Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 



Jack Stafford Hazard 
Bachelor of Commercial 

Science. 
Loyola Academy. Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 



Kenneth Julian 
Hebenstreit 

Doctor of Medicine. 

ShuUsburg High. ShuUs- 
biirg, Wise. 



William Malachy 
Hennessy 

Bachelor of Arts. 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Phil- 
osophy Club, 3, 4; St. Ignat- 
ius High. Chicago, Illinois. 



Joseph Elmer Henry 
Bachelor of Laws 

::;.\'i' 

Providence College; Aqui- 
nas High: Class Vice-Pres., 
4. Chicago, Illinois. 



Preston Adrian Higgins 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 

HAA; TEr 
Nicholas Senn High 
School; Loyola News, 3; De- 
bating Club, 1; Sodality. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Cameron Leo Hogan 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

University of Chicago: 
Lewis Institute: Scandia, Kan- 
sas. High School; Y. M. C. 
A. Prep. Scandia, Kansas. 



Stanley Francis J.ablonski 

C.P.A. 

Bachelor of Commercial 
Science. 

Washington High; Univer- 
s i t y of Illinois. Indiana 
Harbor, Indiana. 



Carl C. Jackson 

A.B. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

University of Oklahoma. 
Chicago, Illinois, 



Ruth E. Jaeger 

A.B. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
NE* 

University of Wisconsin: 
Milwaukee High. Ixonia, 
Wis. 



William Francis Jakopich 
B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
<i>X; AP; Seminar; Tivnen 
Ophthalmological Society 
Crane Junior College; 

Lindblom High. Chicago, 

Illinois. 



Page fifty-eight 



Frank John Janssen 


John Edward Keating 


Doctor of Medicine. 


Bachelor of Arts. 


<i>Hn 


BII 


Wisconsin University. 


St. Rita High School; So- 


Green Bay, Wisconsin. 


dality, 2 5-29; Prefect, 29; 




Debating Club, 26-29; Treas., 




28; V.-Pres., 29; Quarterly, 




26-29; Editor, 29. Ottawa, 




Illinois. 


William Paul Jonas 


John Lemuel Keeley 


B.S.M. 


B.S.M. 


Doctor of Medicine. 


Certificate in Medicine. 


*Bn; AP 


•PX: HKE; Seminar; AP 


DePaul University. Chi- 


Michigan State College; 


cago, Illinois. 


Plainfield, III., High School; 




Pres. Tivnen Ophthalmolo- 




gical Society; Sophomore 




Class Pres., 27. St. Joseph, 




Michigan. 


Julian Marione Jordan 


. Edward William Kelly 


B.S.M. 


Bachelor of Philosophy. 


Doctor of Medicine 


*MX 


University of Chicago; 


John Carroll University 


Lewis Institute; Lane Tech. 


(Cleveland); St. Ignatius 


Chicago, Illinois. 


High School (Cleveland); 




Loyola News, 28-29. Chi- 




cago, Illinois. 


David To-shisuke Kaneko 


John Joseph Kilgallen 


A.B. 


A.B. 


Doctor of Medicine. 


Doctor of Medicine. 


University of Utah; East 


eKS!' 


High, Salt Lake City. Kobe, 


St. Francis College; St. 


Japan. 


Francis Prep., Brooklyn, N. 




Y.: Cosmos and Damian 




Medical Guild. Brooklyn. 




N. Y. 


Edward John Kapustka 


Chester Francfs Koneski 


B.S.M. 


B.S.M. 


Doctor of Medicine. 


Doctor of Medicine. 


. ^X; Tivnen 


St. Ignatius High. Chi- 


Ophthalmological Society 


cago, Illinois. 


Crane Junior College; Har- 




rison High; Y. M. C. A. 




Chirago, Illinois. 




Walter Joseph Karr 


Benjamin Bernard 


B.S.M. 


KOPSTEIN 


Doctor of Medicine. 


B.S.M. 


■i>JIX; ^BH; HKE; AP 


Doctor of Medicine. 


Tivnen Ophthalmological 


University o f Chicago: 


Society; Ghouls 


Sioux City High School. Du- 


Ohio State University; De 


luth, Minnesota. 


Paul Academy. Chicago, 111. 






Pdge fijty-nine 




Paul Joseph Kullman 

A.B., B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
HKE; Ghouls 

University of Michigan; 
Loyola Academy; Class Vice' 
Pres., 3. Chicago, Illinois. 



Anthony Joseph Kunka 

Bachelor of Arts. 

St. Ignatius High School 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Charles Joseph LaFond 
Diploma in Commerce. 

2AB 
St. Ignatius High School; 
Class President, 3; Intramur- 
al Basketball; Commerce 
CUib. Chicago, Illinois. 



John Richard Lamb 
Bachelor of Laws. 

St. Ignatius High School; 
Class Vice-Pres., 1, 4; Class 
Treasurer, 4; Loyola News. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Leo John Latz 
A.B., B.S.M. 
Doctor of Medicine. 

*Bn 

Conception College; Cath- 
olic Medical Guild; Loyola 
Orchestra, '24; Loyola Med- 
ical Historical Club; Editor- 
ial Staff, Loyola News, "27- 
"29; Debating Team, "24. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Robert Edward Lee 
B.S.M., M.S.M. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
*MX; *X; AP; BH; HKE; 

Blue Key; Tivnen 
Ophthalmological Society 
Campion Academy. Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 



George Jacob Leibold Tr 

B.S. 

Master of Science. 

Loyola Academy. C h i • 
cago, Illinois. 



Paul Stanton Lietz 

Bachelor of Arts. 
HAA; BH; Blue Key 

Lane Technical High 
School; Class Secretary, 4; 
Debating Society; Sodality; 
Glee Club; Sock and Buskin 
Club; Loyolan; Tennis Team, 
"26, "27; Captain, "28, "29. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Clarence Lee Lloyd 
Doctor of Medicine. 

*Bn 

Indiana State Normal 
School. Cayuga, Indiana. 



Florence Winifred Locke 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal; St. 

Xavier's Academy. Chicago, 

Illinois. 



Robert Theodore 
Lossmann 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
Seminar 

Crane Junior College; Aus- 
tin High School. Chicago, 
Illinois. 



Irving Incersoll Ludwig 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

"J'lIK; Seminar; Medical 
History Society 

Crane Junior College; Har- 
rison Technical High" School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Page sixty 



Bf;Rnard Charles 
luehrsmann 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
*BP 

University of Dayton; St. 
Xavier's High School. Dyers- 
ville, Iowa. 

Lars E. Lundgoot 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
({■MX <I>X; Tivnen 

Ophthalmological Society 

Carl Schurs High School; 
Football, 1, 2, 3, 4; Skating, 
1,- 2, 3; Baseball, 1; Track, 
1, 2: Tennis, 2, 3, 4. Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 



Thomas Raymond McCabe 

Bachelor of Laws. 

St. Patrick Academy; Class 
Secretary, 1; Class Pres., 3. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Francis Gerald McCarty 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

University of Buffalo; Can- 
isius College; University of 
Chicago; Niagara Falls High 
School. Niagara Falls, N. Y. 



Catherine Louise McCorry 

Ph.B. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
- AP; Tivnen 

Ophthalmological Society 

St. Xavier College; Provi- 
dence Academy; Class Pres., 
1. Chicago, Illinois. 



Eleanor C. McCourt 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal; St. 

Mary's High. Chicago, III. 



William Clark McFarlin 

Bachelor of Law. 

Joliet Junior College; Uni- 
versity of Illinois; Joliet High 
School. Johet, 111. 



Joseph Clyde McGonacle 

Bachelor of Laws. 
Ae* 

Vice-President, 3; Student 
Council, 4; Loyola News, 4; 
Providence College, Provi- 
dence, R. I.; St. Ignatius 
High School. Chicago, III. 



Daniel Dominic 
McLaughlin 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

Mt. St. Charles College, 
Helena, Mich.; Anaconda 
High School, Montana. An- 
aconda, Montana. 



Kathleen Elizabeth 
McNally 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 

Chicago Normal; Engle- 
wood High School. Chicago, 
111. 



Lawrence N. Marino 
Bachelor of Laws. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Thomas T. Martinez 

Bachelor of Laws. 

University of Philippines; 
Crane College; Northwestern 
University. Vigan, Philip- 
pine Islands. 




Page sixtv-07ie 




Nfal John Marquis 
Doctor of Medicine. 

*X: AP 
Honorary Society, "26; 
Mount Morris College; Mor- 
ton High School. Berwyn, 
111. 



John Ignatius Mayer 

Bachelor of Arts. 

St. Ignatius High School; 
Sodality, I, 2, 3, 4; Chairman 
of Mission Section; Philos- 
ophy Club, 4. Chicago, 111. 



Joseph Anthony Minardi 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
<J>X 

University of Florida; HiUs- 
boro High School. Tampa, 
Florida. 



Edward P. Mitchell 
B.S.M. 
Doctor of Medicine. 

University of Iowa. Graet- 
tinger, Iowa. 



Thaddeus Anthony 
modzikowski 

B.S.M. 

*X: AP 

Doctor of Medicine. 

Crane Junior College; 
Bowen High. Chicago, 111. 



Stanley Leopold Moleski 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine 
•i>X; AP 

Medical Guild; Seminar 

Grand Rapids Junior Col- 
lege; Catholic Central High. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 



George Clark Moriarty 
Bachelor of Commercial 

Science. 
Morton Junior College; 

Philosophy Club. Cicero, '111. 



Marie Catherine 
Morrissey 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 

St. James High School. 
Chicago, 111. 



Linton George Moustakis 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 

HAA 
Senn High School. Chi- 
cago, 111. 



Edna Maye Murphy 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Northern Illinois Teacher 

College. Chicago, 111. 



Vi'iLLiAM H. Murphy 

L.L.B. 

Master of Laws. 

University of Chicago: 
Evanston Academv. Chicago, 
111. 



Thomas Joseph Murphy 
B.S.M. 
Doctor of Medicine. 

Lewis Institute: Quigley 
Preparatory Seminary. Chi- 
cago, 111. 



Page sixtv-two 



Louis Anthony Naples 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
A*A 

University of West Vii 
ginia; Jeanette High Scliuo 
Jeanette, Pennsylvania. 



Nora Mary Nash 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal College; 
St. Patrick's Academy. Chi- 
cago, Ilhnois. 



James Gaylord Neff 
. B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

University of Nebraska. 
Lincoln, Nebraska. 



Salvatore Joseph Nii;ro 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
IMS; nivE 

Crane Junior College; 
St. Ignatius High School; 
Medical Guild; Medical Stu- 
dent-Faculty; Banquet, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



William F. Norkett 
Bachelor of Commercial 
Science. 

- ZAB; Blue Key 
St. Michael's High School; 
Commerce Club; Vice-Presi- 
dent, 3; President of Student 
Council, 4. Chicago, Illinois. 



Joseph John Noto 
Doctor of Medicine. 

OK* 
Louisiana 'State University; 
University of Mississippi; In- 
dependence High School. 
Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 



Joseph Michael O'Briix 
Doctor of Medicine. 

<i>Pi: 

University of Pittsburgh; 
Jetferson Medical College: 
Farrell High School. Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania. 



Thomas Russell O'Connor 
Bachelor of Science. 
St. Thomas University; St. 
Thomas Academy. Minnea- 
polis, Minnesota. 



George Rigney Ohlheiser 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 

AAT 
St. Viator Academy. Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 



Marie Anne Parent 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal College. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Nicholas Bartholomew 
Pavletic 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
■I-X 

Crane Junior College; 
Lindblom High School. Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 



Amedeo Michael Pecoraro 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
IMS 

Franklin and Marshall 
University; Chief Prepara- 
tory; Class Secretary-Treas- 
urer, 3; Chicago Catholic 
Medical Guild. New York 
City, New York. 




Page sixty-three 




Olive Frances Pence 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal College. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Edna G. Periaton 

Ph.B. 

Doctor of Jurisprudence. 

Alberta University. Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 



.Samuel Pink 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

University of California; 
Eureka High School. Eureka, 
California. 



Hugh Plunkett 

Bachelor of Laws. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Gertrude Marie Powers 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
St. Elizabeth's High School, 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Harold James Prendergast 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 

AAr 
St. Mel's High School; So- 
dality; Interfraternity Coun- 
cil; Tennis; Philosophy Cluh; 
Chairman, Student - Faculty 
Banquet, 4. Chicago, 111. 



Isadore Pritikin 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
*AK 

Crane College: Marshall 
High School. Chicago, 111. 



Stanley L. Pyzik 
Bachelor of Science. 
St. Mary's College. 

cago, Illinois, 



Chi 



Thomas Patrick Quinn 

LL.B. 

Master of Laws. 
AG* 

Crane Junior College; 
Crane High School; Chicago 
Bar Association. Chicago. 
Illinois. 



Florence Raimond 
Doctor of Medicine. 

Lewis Institute; Woman's 
Medical College of Pennsyl- 
vania; McKinley High School; 
Cosmos and Damien Club; 
Medical History Club: Italian 
Cultural Society. Chicago. 
Illinois. 

George Kevin Ray 

Bachelor of Arts. 
nAA; BH; Blue Key 

Loyola Academy; Class 
Secretary, 3; Sodality, 1, 2, 
3, 4; Debating. 1. 2, 3. 4; 
Secretary, 3; N. C. B. T.; 
Sock and Buskin Club, 1, 2, 
3; Pageant of Peace; Loyola 
Quarterly; Naghten Debate 
Finals, 1, 2. 3, 4; Harrison 
Oratorical Contest Finals, 3: 
'Winner, 4; Varsity Debate 
Team, 1, 2. 3, 4. Chicago. 
Illinois. 

LoTHAR Ernst 
Rauchschwalke 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

B*e 

University of Wisconsin: 
North Division High School. 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 



Page sixty-four 



GiiRALD Andrew Rooney 
Diploma in Commerce. 
SAB 

S t . Patrick's Academy; 
Class Secretary, 3; Coinmerce 
Club; Student Council; Intra- 
mural Basketball, 1, 2, 3. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Martin A. Rudolth 

LL.B. 

Master of Laws. 

Chicago Law School; 
Washburn Township High 
School. La Rose, Ilhnois. 



Damaso Tumaneng 
Samonte 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
Seminar 

Crane Junior College; 
Ilocos Norte High School 
Laoag, Ilocos Norte, Philip- 
pine Islands. 

Antonio Santoro 

A.B., B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
*BII; Seminar 

Holy Cross College; Cros- 
by High School; Cosmos and 
Damien Club; Vice - Pres., 
Medical History Club; Vice- 
Pres., Italian Cultural So- 
ciety; Chairman, Medical 
Student-Faculty Banquet, 2. 
W'aterbury, Connecticut. 

ISADORE SCHAPIRO 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
Iowa State College: Tuley 
High School. Chicago, 111. 



Walter Lee Schram 

Bachelor of Laws. 

Dickson Central High. 
Nashville, Tennessee. 



Nathan F. Schwartz 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
"tAK; Seminar 

Lewis Institute; Tuley High 
School. New York City. 
New York. 



Walter John Scott 

Bachelor of Arts. 
AAF 

St. Ignatius High School; 
Sodality, 1, 2, 3, 4; Philos- 
ophy Club: Varsitv Football, 
1, 2, 3, 4; N. C. B. T.; Re- 
ception Committee, 2, 3, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Jame.s Glenn Shehee 
Bachelor of Laws. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Louis Howard Shurr 
Bachelor of Commercial 
Science. 

*MX 
Loyola Academy; Glee 
Club, 3. 4; President Choral 
Society, 3, 4; Intramural 
Basketball, 2, 4: Intramural 
Bowling, 2: Press Club, 3; 
Commerce Club, 1 : Loyola 
News, 3, 4; Chairman Mara- 
thon Committee of Fall Frolic, 
4. Chicago, Illinois. 

William John Smelzer, Jr. 

Ph.B. 

Doctor of Jurisprudence. 

McKinlcy High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Henry Jesse Stengel 
B.S.M. 
Doctor of Medicine. 

*Bn 

Carthage College: Mount 
Morris High School. Mount 
Morris, Illinois. 




Page si.\'t\'-/ive 




Charles Edward Stimming 

Bachelor of Arts. 
AAF; BH: Blue Key 

Class President. 3; Presi- 
dent Student Association, 4: 
Dramatic Editor, Loyola 
Quarterly. 3, 4: Chairman, 
Junior Prom. Chicago, 111. 



Isabel R. Su.mmers 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal College; 
Providence High School. Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 



John Alexander Sweeney 

Bachelor of Laws. 
Bn, Blue Key 

Loyola Academy; Class 
President, 1: Founding Editor, 
Loyola News, 1, 2. Chicago, 
Illinois. 



Robert Martin Sweit^er, 
JR- 

Bachelor of Commercial 
Science. 

S t . Patrick's Academy; 
Vice-Pres., Student Council. 
3: Debating Club, 4; Sodality, 
3. Chicago, Illinois. 



Marie C. Tangney 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal College; 

Providence High School. 

Chicago, Illinois." 



Ale.xander Tarnavsky 
Bachelor of Science. 

Seminar 
University of Michigan; 
Lincoln High School. Chi- 
cago. Illinois. 



Adam Louis Tchinski 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

University of West Vir- 
ginia; Fairmont High School. 
Fairmont, West Virginia. 



Clarence E. Threedy 
Bachelor of Laws. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Alphonse Rocco Tomaso 

Bachelor of Arts. 
*MX 

St. Ignatius High School 
Glee Club, 3, 4; President 
4; Sodality, 1, 2, 3, 4; Chan 
man Eucharistic Section. ' 
Senior Consultor, 4, Ch 
cago, Illinois. 



John Edward Toomey 

Bachelor of Laws. 
AAF; ^e<s> 

St. Mel High School; Class 
Representative. 3; President 
Student Council. 4. Chicago. 



Robert R. Trecht 

B.S.M. 

Master of Science. 

Wittenberg College; Lewis 
Institute; East Tech. Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 



Baete Earl Turner 
Bachelor of Science. 

*X: AP 
University of Chicago; 

York High School. Moville. 

Iowa. 



Page sixtysix 



Ella Helen Valenta 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
Ni:*; AP; Tivncn 

Ophthalmological Society 

Crane Junior College; Har- 
rison Tech.; Class Secretary. 
2, 3. Cicero, Illinois. 



Leroy Joseph Wallace 
Diploma in Commerce. 
Oak Park, Illinois. 

JuHN J. VeRHALEN 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
St. Louis University. Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 

Reoina Weisenhorn 
Wachtel 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 

Columbia College of Ex- 
pression; Notre Dame High 
School. Quincy, Illinois. 

Francis J. Walsh 
B.S.M. 
Doctor of Medicine. 

*X 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Francis Joseph Walsh 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 

*MX 
St. Ambrose College; St. 
Mel's High School; Loyola 
News; Sodality. Chicago, Il- 
linois. 

J. Francis Walsh 

Bachelor of Arts. 
nAA; BH; Blue Key 

Loyola Academy; Varsity 
Tennis, 3; Intramural Bowl- 
ing, 2, 3; Founder, 2.; Delia 
Strada Lecture Club, 1, 2, 
3, 4; Mgr., 3. 4; Debating, 
1. 2, 3, 4; Varsity Squad. 2; 
Sock and Buskin Club, 1, 2, 
4; "The Confession," 4; So- 
dality, 1, 2, 3, 4; N. C. B. 
T., 1, 2, 3, 4; Loyolan Staff, 
2; Loyola News, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Literary Editor, 2, 3, 4; Mgn. 
Editor, 3; Editor-in-Chicf, 4; 
Philosophy Club, 4; Glee 
Club, 4; Student Council, 3, 
4; Press Club, 3; Student 
Handbook Business Manager, 
3; Choral Society. 4; Loyola 
University Union, 4. Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 



GnoRcE John Weinrich 
Bachelor of Commercial 

Science. 
St. Patrick Academy; 
Choral Society; Business 
Manager, 4; Glee Club; Vice- 
Pres. and Business Manager, 
4; Loyola News; Assistant 
Advertising Manager, 4. Ber- 
wyn, Illinois. 

Theodore Henry Will 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
*X 

Coldwatcr High School, 
Coldwater, Ohio. 



Joseph Edward Wiltrakis 
Bachelor of Science. 
St. Ignatius High School. 

Chicago. Illinois. 



Mary Caroline Wingfield 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal College; 
Immaculata High School; 
Sock and Buskin Club. Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 



Henry H. Wiora 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 

Almond High School. Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 



Edward F. Zimmerman 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 

*MX; *X: DKE; Tivncn 

Ophthalmological Society 
Ghouls 

St. Ignatius High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Alvik B. Zinkan 
Bachelor of Science. 
Washington High Scho 

Chicago, Illinois. 




Page sixty-seven 




Sylvia Altshul 

Registered Nurse. 

Oconomowoc High School. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



BeRNICE C.\TH.AR!NE 

Andruska 

Registered Nurse. 

Lindblom High School. 
Chicago, 111. 



Essie Anglum 
Registered Nurse. 
Chicago, 111. 



Margaret Helen 
Antonation 

Registered Nurse. 

Oakburn High 
Oakburn. Manitoba, 



School. 
Canada. 



Margaret Agnes Aultz 
Registered Nurse. 
Streator, 111. 



Winifred B. Beers 
Registered Nurse. 
Chicago, 111. 



Annabell Louise Behrens 

Registered Nurse. 

St. Mary's Academy. Ft. 
Madison, Iowa. 



Beatrice M. Bilek 

Registered Nurse. 

Hillsboro High School. 
Hillsboro, Wis. 



Barbara Marie Birich 
Registered Nurse. 
Youngstown, Ohio. 



Margaret Bogetto 

Registered Nurse. 

Negaunee High School. 
Negaunee, Mich. 



Frances Marcella Br.ady 

Registered Nurse. 

Amboy Township High 
School. Amboy, 111. 



Helen Veronica Burke 
Registered Nurse. 
Chicago, 111. 



Page six'tv-eig/it 



Eleanor Anna Bussan 
Registered Nurse. 
Galena, 111. 



Margaret Jane CAMPBtLL 

Registered Nurse. 

West High School. Green 
Bay, Wis. 



Helen Gratia Carroll 

Registered Nurse. 

Elvaston High School. 
Carthage, 111. 



Margaret Martha Cassidy 

Registered Nurse. 

St. Louis Academy. Chi- 
cago, III. 



Thecla R. Cierzan 
Registered Nurse. 
Chicago, 111. 



Edith Mary Clark 

Registered Nurse. 

St. Xavier"s Academy. Ot- 
tawa, 111. 



Calista Rose Cleary 
Registered Nurse. 
El Paso Township High 
School. El Paso, III. 



Gertruul Mary Cleary 

Registered Nurse. 

El Paso Township High 
School. El Paso, 111. 



Li;ciLLE M. Cleary 

Registered Nurse. 

St. Paul School. Ode 
111. 



Lorene Anne Classon 

Registered Nurse. 

Lindblom High School. 
O'Conto, Wis. 



Anne Elizabeth Courtney 

Registered Nurse. 

St. Bridget's High School. 
Chicago, in. 



Beatrice Bell Davis 

Registered Nurse. 

McGregor High School. 
Prairie du Chien, Wis. 








Page si.xtv-iiine 




Helen Cecelia DeHaas 
Registered Nurse. 
Chicago, 111. 



Emily Anna Deksnis 
Registered Nurse. 
Valparaiso University. 

Chicago, 111. 



LuRETTA Veronica 

DOHERTY 

Registered Nurse. 
Mercy High School, 
cago, 111. 



Chi 



Irene Genevieve Donegan 
Registered Nurse. 
Ch^ago, 111. 



Josephine Esther Dore 
Registered Nurse. 
Chicago, 111. 



Dorothy Irene Dow 
Registered Nurse. 
Chicago, 111. 



RosELLA Mary Duffy 

Registered Nurse. 

Pontiac High. Pontiac, 
111. 



Bernardine Margaret 
Dunning 

Registered Nurse. 

Chicago, 111. 



Evelyn Lavene England 

Registered Nurse. 

Belle Plaine High School. 
Belle Plaine, Iowa. 



Catherine Elizabeth 
Fenton 

Registered Nurse. 

Amboy Township High 
School. Amboy. 111. 



Angeline Edith Fierst 

Registered Nurse. 

Antigo High School. An- 
tigo. Wis. 



Cecelia C. Frank 

Registered Nurse. 

Notre Dame High School. 
Chippewa Falls. Wis. 



Page seventy 



Sylvia Elisabeth FRniBL:R(; 
Registered Nurse. 
Quincy, 111. 



Mrs. Helen Fry 
Registered Nurse. 
Galveston, Texas. 



Margaret Cecile 
goodreau 

Registered Nurse. 
Chassell High School 
Chassell, Mich; 



Mary Emma Grohorsky 
Registered Nurse. 
Terre Haute, Ind. 



Mercedes Ann Hayes 
Registered Nurse. 
Chicago, 111. 



Ursula M. Heles 

Registered Nurse. 

Notre Dame Academy. 
Mitchell, S. D. 



Mary Frances Hennes 
Registered Nurse. 
Chicago, 111. 



Maybelle Ella Henry 

Registered Nurse. 

Whiting High Scho 
Whiting, Ind. 



Veronica Marie Grlender Kathleen Higoins 



Registered Nurse. 
Glen Haven, Wis. 



Madeline Mary Hansen 

Registered Nurse. 

Hinsdale High School. 
Hinsdale, 111. 



Registered Nurse. 

Marygrove College: S t . 
Mary's Academy. Detroit, 
Mich. 



RiTH Geraldine Hoben 
Registered Nurse. 
Rock Rapids, Iowa. 




Page seventy-one 




Margaret Carolike 
hoerschgen- 

Registered Nurse. 

Washington, Mo. 



LoRETTA Clara Hoffman 
Registered Nurse. 
Dubuque, Iowa. 



Mildred Hoffman 
Registered Nurse. 
North Division H i 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



gh 



Mary Catherine Holinga 
Registered Nurse. 
Streator, 111. 



Lai'retta Frances Homan 
Registered Nurse. 
Washburn High School. 
Washburn, Wis. 



E. Gracyas 

Registered Nurse. 
Benton, 111. 



Angeline Barbara Janiak 
Registered Nurse. 
Chicago, 111. 



Colletta Delcena 
jurgensen 

Registered Nurse. 

Visitation High School. 

Chicago, 111. 



Mildred Ann Kaska 
Registered Nurse. 
Washington, Iowa. 



Bess Ethel Kelley 
Registered Nurse. 
Rockford, III. 



Mary Ida Ruggles Kent 
Registered Nurse. 
Berwyn, 111. 



Edna Martha Kinccaid 
Registered Nurse. 
Clinton, Iowa. 



Page seventy-two 



Regina Kirschner 
Registered Nurse. 
Olmstead, 111. 



Ida Mae Klein 

Registered Nurse. 

McMillan High School. 
Iron Mountain, Mich. 



Marie A. Kleve 
Registered Nurse. 
Mankato, Minn. 



Anastasia Kortas 
Registered Nurse. 
Chicago, 111. 



Florence Marie Kramer 

Registered Nurse. 

Michigan City Business 
College; Michigan City High 
School. Michigan City, Ind. 



Anna Marie Kuehn 
Registered Nurse. 
Chicago, 111. 



Mari;ueritr Mary Kozacik 
Registered Nurse. 
Washington High School. 
East Chicago, Ind. 



Katherine Mary 
LaViolette 

Registered Nurse. 

Milwaukee High School 
Appleton, Wis. 



Ll'cille Victoria Leveille 
Registered Nurse. 
Chicago, 111. 



Ann Marie Luhowa 

Registered Nurse. 

Oakburn High School. 
Oakburn, Man., Canada. 



Claudine Ma'han 

Registered Nurse. 

Immaculata Preparatory. 
Evanston, 111. 



Anna Johanna Marnul 
Registered Nurse. 
Clucago, 111. 




Pag 



entvthi 




Helen Catherine Martin 

Registered Nurse. 

Austin High School. Chi 
cago. 111. 



Cecilia Bernenedette 
McGuiRE 

Registered Nurse. 

Mercy High School. Chi- 
cago, 111. 



Ruth Hazel 
Messerschmidt 

Registered Nurse. 

St. Xavier Academy. Chi 
cage, 111. 



Wanda Jean Michalski 
Registered Nurse. 
Chicago, 111. 



Clara Catherine Mount 

Registered Nurse. 

St. Rose Academy. Vin- 
cennes, Ind. 



Dorothea Elizabeth 
Naber 

Registered Nurse. 

Visitation Academy, Du- 
huque. Iowa. New Vienna, 
Iowa. 



Helen Magdalen Neu 
Registered Nurse. 
Pocahontas, Iowa. 



Hazel Marie O'Connell 

Registered Nurse. 

St. Xavier Academy. Chi 
cago. 111. 



Helen O'Donnell 

Registered Nurse. 

Escanaba High School. 
Escanaba, Wis. 



Adeline Marcella 
Olender 

Registered Nurse. 

Chicago, 111. 



Emma Belle Overbeck 

Registered Nurse. 

Effingham High School. 
Effingham, HI. 



Helena Frances Peske 
Registered Nurse. 
Chicago, 111. 



Ptige seventy-four 



Rl^TH PlTTMAN 
Registered Nuis 
Evansville, Ind. 



Lucy Barbara Prusser 
Registered Nurse. 
Wheaton, III. 



Margaret Mary Quicley 

Registered Nurse. 

Mercy High School. Chi- 
cago, 111. 



Margaret Hamilton 

QUINN 

Registered Nurse. 

St. Augustine Academy, 
Fort Wayne, Ind. Milwau- 
kee, Wis. 



Mary Ellen Quinn 

Registered Nurse. 

Visitation High Schi; 
Chicago, 111. 



Antoinette Palbin Rajik. 

Registered Nurse. 

Teacher's Training School: 
Stevens Point State Normal. 
Merrill. Wis. 



Grace Dolores Reading 

Registered Nurse. 

Manchester High School. 
Chicago, 111. 



Loui.se Dorothy Ri;inhart 
Registered Nurse. 
Chicago, 111. 



Kathryn Cecelia Rokuslk 

Registered Nurse. 

Mount Marty Academy; 
Yankton, South Dakota. 
Lesterville, S. D. 



Mary Elizabeth Rosdeba 

Registered Nurse. 

St. John's Technical High 
School. Winnipeg, Mani- 
toba, Canada. 



Ha"el Mar(;aret Schaefer 

Registered -Nurse. 

Aquinas High School. 
Chicago, 111. 



Recixa Kathleen Scholl 

Registered Nurse. 

Waller High School. Chi- 
cagu. 111. 




I AC-^H ^Vl*^ 




ge scventyjivc 




Marcella Eugene 
schweickert 

Registered Nurse. 

Peru, 111. 



Dorothea Scullion 

Registered Nurse. 

Calumet High School 
Chicago, 111. 



Jean Clore Sharratt 

Registered Nurse. 

Nullsville High Schc 
Granton. Wis. 



Mar(;i=erite Elizabeth 
Stilwell 

Registered Nurse. 

Chicago, 111. 



Edith Mae Truog 
Registered Nurse. 
Arcadia, Wis. 



Hilda Wagner 
Registered Nurse. 
Bernard, Iowa. 



Alice Marion Walker 
Registered Nurse. 
Savannah, Ga. 



Kathryn Weber 
Registered Nurse. 
Visitation Acaden 

buque. Iowa. 



Margaret Cl.ara Werner 

Registered Nurse. 

Kenosha High School. 
Kenosha, Wis. 



Mary Margaret Zavisza 

Registered Nurse. 

Morris High School. Mor- 
ris. 111. 



Page siventvsix 



Hazel Irene Buece 
Registered Nurse. 
Racine, Wis. 



Martha Anne Byrne 
Baclielur of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal College 

Chicago, 111. 



Edna Chernikoff 
Registered Nurse. 
Chicago, III. 



Edward John Dunne 

Bachelor of Laws. 
AG* 

De La Salle Institute; 
Class President, '2 5. Chi- 
cago, 111. 



Mary Catherine Egan 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Northern Illinois School of 
Nursing: Elmhurst High 
School. Elmhurst. 111. 



Margaret E.mma Frl'ehe 

Registered Nurse. 

St. Michael's High School. 
Chicago, 111. 



Ann E. Garen 

Registered Nurse. 

Cleveland High Scho 
Cleveland, Ohio. ' 



Francis Pkti r Gil.more 

B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine. 
ITKE; AP; Tivnen 

Ophthalmological Society 

St. Ignatius High School; 
Class Vice-Pres.; Monogram 
Club; Football, 1, 2, i. 4. 
Chicago, 111. 



Christina Gro,ss 

Registered Nurse. 

St. Francis Academy, Col- 
umbus, Neb. Hammond. 
Ind. 



Joseph Gordon Hagstrom 

Bachelor of Laws. 

St. Joseph's College, Rens- 
selaer, Ind.; St. Mary's Col- 
lege, Cleveland, Ohio; Sac- 
red Heart Academy, Akron. 
Ohio. Chicago, III 



Florence Lillian 
Harrington 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 

Chicago Normal College; 
St. Mary's High; Choral So- 
ciety. Chicago, 111. 



Irene Victoria Hartel 
Registered Nurse. 
Beaver Dam, Wis. 




sevent\'severi 




Alice C. Hayde 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 

Chicago Normal College: 
St. Gabners High School. 
Chicago, 111. 



Loyola Hyland 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago, III. 



A(;XES Elizabeth Kehoe 
Registered Nurse. 
Chicago. 111. 



Bernadette Helen Kirby 

De Sale's Heights. Dubu- 
que, Iowa. Dubuque, Iowa. 



WiLLARD Collins Lewis 
Diploma in Commerce. 
Austin High School. Chi 

cago. 111. 



Theresa R. Lorge 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 
St. Mary's High School. 

Chicago, 111. 



Mary E. MacDonald 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal College. 

Chicago, 111. 



Bernice Elizabeth May 

Registered Nurse. 

Mineral Point High School. 
Mineral Point. Wis. 



Dennis F. McCarthy 

Bachelor of Laws. 

Parker High School; Treas. 
Senior Day Law. Chicago, 
111. 



Frances I. McFarland 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago, 111. 



Marie C. Ml'lcahy 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Chicago Normal; Parke 

High School. Chicago, 111. 



Raymond Harold 
Murnane 

Ph.B. 

Bachelor of Laws. 

Notre Dame University; 
St. Rita High School; Sec. 
Senior Law School. Chicago, 
111. 



Page seventyei^ht 



AnTENISEA AURELIA NaRDI 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Pedagogy Bologna, Italy; 
Chicago University. Chi- 
cago, 111. 



Madeline H. Parisi 
Registered Nurse. 
Centralia High Sc 

Centralia, 111. 



Aura Belle Pugh 

Registered Nurse. 

^^'aukesha High School. 
Waukesha, Wis. 



Marie Katherine Qualey 

Registered Nurse. 

Loretto Academy. Chi' 
cago, 111. 



Anna Mary Quan 
Bachelor of Science. 
Chicago Normal; St. 

Mary's" High. Chicago, 111. 



Helen E. Saylor 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 

Normal College; St. Mary"; 
High. Chicago, 111. 



Dorothy J. Schwidrrski 
Rcgi'.tcred Nuriic. 
Melrose Park, 111, 



Lillian M. Shannon 
Bachelor of Philosophy, 
Chicago Normal; St, Ga- 
briel's High School, Chicago, 
111, 



Anna Marie Stasch 
Registered Nurse, 
Nenzel, Nebr. 




1^'^ 


J, 




Mabel Bertha Stellern 

Registered Nurse. 

Central Catholic High 
School. Fort Madison, Iowa. 



William Danjel 
Sweetman, Jr. 

Diploma in Commerce. 

Loyola Academy: Class 
President, 2; Secretary, 3, 4; 
Student Council, Chicago, 
III. 



Tone E.mma Veeser 

Registered Nurse. 

Washington High School. 
Siou.x Falls, S. D." 



n A 




Page seventy-nine 




Anthony James 
Allegretti 

Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

Loyola University, Mc 
Kinley High. Chicago, 111. 



Joseph Louis Ambrose 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

*Bn 

Loyola University: Lewis 

Institute; Tivnen Ophthal 

mological Society. Chicago, 

111. 

Nicholas Joseph Balsamo 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

Loyola University; Austin 
High; Mgr. Bowling Team — 
Soph. Pre-Med. Chicago, 111. 



Angelo Albert Barberio 
Bachelor of Science in 

Medicine. 
TJMi;; Medical Seminar 
Loyola University; Ford' 
ham University. Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 



ROMULO B. Barrionuevo 
Bachelor of Science in 

Medicine. 
Loyola University, Villa 
Nova College; University of 
San Augustin; College of San 
Jose. Arequipa, Peru. 



John Richard Beardsly 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

2X 
University of Chicago; 
Morgan Park Academy. Chi- 
cago, 111. 



WiLLLAM Bollinger 

Bachelor of Science in 

Medicine. 
Columbus College; South 
Dakota University, Minne- 
sota University; Loyola Uni- 
versity. Bridgewater, South 
Dakota. 



Camillo Borruso 

Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

IMS 
Loyola University; Stuyves- 
ant High; Fordham Univer- 
sity. New York City. 



John Patrick Burke 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 
•i>X 
Loyola University; Loyola 
Academy. Chicago, 111. 



John EdwlARD Caliendo 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

IMS; nKE; Seminar 
Loyola University; St. Ig- 
natius High; Crane Junior 
College; Class Vice-President, 
'29. Chicago, 111. 

Harold William Carey 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

'i'Bn 

Notre Dame University; 
Argyle High; Tivnen Oph- 
thaimological Society. Argvle, 
Wis. 

Claire Martin Carey 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

•I'Bn; nKE 
Trinity College; De Paul 
University; Tivnen Ophthal- 
mological Society. Manson. 
111. 



Thomas Bernard Carney 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

*MX; *X 
Loyola University; Ke- 
wanee High; Pres. Frosh. 
Med. "28. Kewanee, 111. 



Nicholas Anthony 
Casciato 

Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

IMS 
Loyola University; Wm. 
McKinley High; Secy. -Editor. 
Freshman Class; Soph. Dance 
Comm. Chicago, 111. 



Page eighty 



Nicholas P. Chichkan 
Bachelor (if Science in 

Medicine. 
Teachers" Seminary, Rus- 
sia; Teachers" Institute, Rus- 
sia; University of Chicago, 
111. Chicago, 111. 

Richard K. N. Chun 
Bachelor of Science in 

Medicine. 
Dayton University: St. 
Louis High School, Hono- 
lulu. Honolulu, Hawaii. 



Herman F. De Teo 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

IMS 
McKinley High School. 
Chicago, 111. 

Joseph Anthoyn Di Leo 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

*X 
St. John"s College, Brook- 
lyn: St. John's High School, 
Glen Cove, L. I., N. Y. 



John Casimir Dubiel 
Bachelor of Science in 

Medicine. 
Medical Guild; Sodality, 

St. Ignatius High SchooL 

Chicago, 111. 



Rocco Fazio 

Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

im:: 

Lindblom High School; 
Freshman Dance Committee. 
Chicago, 111. 

Frederick William Gillig 
Bachelor of Science in 

Medicine. 
Heidelberg University, O.; 
Melmore High School, Tif- 
fin, Ohio. 



Bin Person Gordon 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

<{>AK 
Crane Jr. College: Marshall 
High School. Chicago. 111. 

Howard Edwin Graham, 
A.B. 

Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine, 

•i-Bn; Tivnen 

Ophthalmological Society 

Marquette University; St. 

Mary"s College, St. Mary"s, 

Kans.; St. Mary's High 

School, Galesburg, 111. 

Samuel Haik 

Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

Little Rock College; St. 
Louis High School, Constan- 
tinople. Constantinople. 

Vernon Francis Hauser 
Bachelor of Science in 

Medicine. 
*X; nKE; AP; Tivnen 
Ophthalmological Society; 

Seminar 
Michigan State College; 
Class President, 3. Benton 
Harbor, Mich, 

Thomas Philip Hickey 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

HAA; <S>X 
Loyola Academy: Class 
Vice-President, 1; Treasurer, 
3; President, 4; Basketball, 
"26-"27; Loyola News, "26- 
"27; Loyolan, "26-"27. Chi- 
cago, III, 

Amello Anthony Juliano 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine, 

*MX 
St, Viator High School; 
Medical Guild; Basketball 
Champs. Chicago, 111. 

Joseph William 
Kadzewich 

Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

Campion College; St. 
Thomas High. Chicago, 111. 




Page eighty-one 




Thomas Francis Kallal 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 
*MX 
Harrison Tech. H. S.; So- 
dality; Medical Guild: Basket- 
ball Champs (Capt.). Chi 
cago, 111. 



John Hagan Keehan 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

<I>X 

Mt. Carmel H. S. Ch 
cago, 111. 



William Joseph Kelly 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

*MX 
Batavia High School. Ba- 
tavia. 111. 



Earl Albert 
Kleinwachter 

Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 
■fX 
East Chicago High; Uni- 
versity of Chicago. East Chi- 
cago, Ind. 

Van Walter 
KoMASINSKI. A.B. 

Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

St. Mary's College; St. 
'Cyril's High School. Chi- 
cago, 111. 



Jack Francis Konopa 
Bachelor of Science in 

Medicine. 
St. Stanislaus; Intramural 
Basketball, 4; Medic Class 
Editor, 2; Loyola News 
Staff, 4. Chicago, 111. 



Herbert William Kramps 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 
*X 
St. Joseph's College; Var- 
sity Tennis, 2, 3, 4. Chi- 
cago, 111. 



Milton Russell Kukuk 

B.S. 

Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

#X; AP 

Toledo University; Scott 
High School; Class Treas- 
urer, 3; Roentgenological So- 
ciety; Tivnen Ophthalmolo- 
gical. Toledo, Ohio. 

Ronald James Lindsay 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 
•i-X 
University of Wisconsin: 
St. Mel High School: Dance 
Committee, 2. Oak Park, 111. 



Andrew James Maguire 

A.B. 

Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

Loyola Academy. Wil- 
mette. 111. 



Joseph M. Marzano 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

Lewis Institute; St. Via- 
tor's College. Chicago. lil. 



Takejiro Matsui 

Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

Seminar 
Central Y. M. C. A. 
School: Crane Junior Col- 
lege: Stanford University. 
Shiruoka, Japan. 

James Joseph O'Connor 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

*X; AP 
East Chicago liigh School; 
Northwestern University. 
East Chicago, Ind. 



Michael Joseph Parenti 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

IMS 
McKinlev High School. 
Chicago. 111. 



Page eighty-two 



Thomas Joseph Pekin 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 
AX; *Bn; *KE 
DePaul University: DePaul 
Academy. Chicago, 111. 



George Leonard Rand 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

<I>AK 
Crane Junior College; En- 
glewood High School. Chi- 
cago, 111. 



Paul Carl Rocco 

Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

McKinley High School. 
Chicago, 111. 



George E. Rooney 

Bachelor of Science in 

Medicine. 
Lewis Institute; Secretary 

of Junior Class. Chicago, 

111. 



Chester A. Samlow 
Bachelor of Science in 

Medicine. 
Lane Technical School 
Crane Junior College. Chi- 
cago, 111. 



Herman L. Shapiro. A.B. 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

<i>AK 
Hiram College. Chicago, 
111. 



Charles Joseph Smalley 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

De La Salle Institute. Chi- 
cago, 111. 



Edward Lewis Spangler 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

*X 
Toulon High School. Ke 
wance. 111. 



Ben Charles Stein- 

BRECHER, Jr. 

Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 
*X 
Harrison Technical High 
School; Crane Junior College. 
Chicago, 111. 



Lillian S. Tarlow 

Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

Tivnen Ophthalmological 
Society; Crane College. Chi- 
cago, 111. 



Harvey John Tompkins, Jr. 

Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

Mount C a r m e 1 High 
School. Chicago, 111. 



Charles J. Weigil 

Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

*MX; *X 
St. Ignatius High School. 
River Forest, 111. 



John Henry Whaley 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine. 

■J-MX; *X 

University of Wisconsin; 
Mount St. Charles High 
School, Helena, Montana; 
Broodwater County High 
School, Townsend, Montana. 
Townsend, Montana. 



John Francis Zielinski 
Bachelor of Science in 

Medicine. 
St. Bede College Academy 

Trenton, New Jersey. 




Page eiglity-three 



"One thing alone can stay our progress and undo 
our iuor\ and that is the falling awav from the spirit of 
our early days." 

OzANAM: Letters. 



Page eighty-four 




ARTS AND SCIENCES 




Charles Stimming 
President 

THE STUDENT COUNCIL 

Charles Stimming, President 
ROBERT M. Sw'EITZER, Vice-President 
Charles Boyle, Secretary 
Walter Durkik, Treasurer 



Membe 



Class Representatives 
John Ennis, Senior 
Joseph Kearney, Junior 
Daniel J. Murphy, Sophomore 
Martin Stadler, Freshman 



Aetivity Representatives 
J. Francis Walsh, Blue Ke^' 
Frank M. Conley, Loyola T^eius 
John Keating, Sodality 
James C. Ryan, Athletics 




Boyle 



SWEITZER 



Pd'zc eifihtv-six 




Top Row — Ryan, Kearney, Walsh, Murphy, Stadler 
Bottom Row — Conley, Ennis, Stimming, Sweitser. 



THE STUDENT COUNCIL OF THE ARTS DEPARTMENT 

No student council in any department of the University has ever been confronted 
with problems as great and as serious as has the Arts Student Council during the 
scholastic year 1928-29. While the difficulties which arose were not of a permanently 
serious nature, they were the kind which had to be dealt with in the midst of much 
tense feeling on the part of the student body. 

The faith and confidence on the part of the students and the faculty formed the 
foundation upon which a creative and effective administration were built. The gradual 
increment of a general knowledge of. the purpose and powers of the council on the 
part of the students has made possible steps which have made this Student Council 
one of the most outstanding of such groups in all American Colleges. 

The Council was represented by its president, Mr. Stimming, at the National Feder- 
ation of Student Councils which was held at the University of Missouri. It is the 
firm intention of the student body that it shall be represented in this manner by all 
succeeding presidents. 



Page eighty-seven 




John Ennis 
President 



THE CLASS OF 1929 

John Ennis, President 
John Bryant, Vice-President 
Paul Lietz Secretary 
Richard Ford, Treasurer 






Bryant 



Lietz 



Ford 



Page eijihtyeight 




8EM0RS 
Top Row — Garthe, Ford, Moustakis, Bryant, Higgins, Ray. 
foiinh Row- Olheiser, Walsh, Cutrera, Tomaso, Sweitser, Cullinan, Dohcny. 
Third Rou — Kunka. Shurr, Keating,' O'Connor, Hennessy, Weinrich. 
Second Row — Hazard, Gormican, Liet:;, Curley, Stimming, Mayer, Martinez, Wal.'ih. 
Front Row — Kelly. Fulton, Scott, Ennis, Garren, Prendergast, Moriarity. 



SENIOR CLASS HISTORY 

It is with a sense of pioneering pride that we can look back to our times at Loyola. 
For we can say that we were the last class of the good old days when there were real 
hardships to be encountered in going to school, when, for instance, we had to walk five 
blocks to church (there was no luxurious Chapel to step into then) and when brief 
cases always to be suspected as carrying some deadly engine of destruction — what with 
air these gang wars and such had always under pain of some dreadful punishment or 
other, to be left outside the library door. (In those days we called the basement of 
the faculty building "library") . Nor were we disturbed from the dull routine of 
class and sedate bachelor ways by any such distracting elements as high falsettc> 
laughter or flashing dress or idle chatter. (There were no "femmes" to violate the 
hallowed confines of our walks and lawns, where we once walked secure.) 

And so now when we go back to see the old place again, we rather feel the loss and 
feel it more keenly because it's all so changed now and because those who followed us 
have not had the advantages that we enjoyed. And we distinctly recall the thought 
that struck us, the first time we contemplated those airy things flitting about the cam- 
pus. "What will Father Reiner do now?" 

Paul S. Lietz. 



Ptige eight\-nine 




Joseph Kearney 
President 



THE CLASS OF 1930 

Joseph Kearney, President 
Emmet Meagher, V^ce-President 
Joshua D'Esposito, Secretary 
Matthew Lear. Treasurer 




Meagher 




JUNIOR A.B. 

Top Roil — White, Hcinie, Emill, Kilcy, Bcrcns. Klest, Kcarns, Ludwlg. 
Third Roic — Connolly, Barry, Shanahan, Spelinan, Marzano. 
Second Row — Collins, Gorman, McAuIiffc, Hcaly, Thompson. 
Front Row — Jasionek, Melody, Carroll, Conlcy, Manning, Dowling. 




JUNIOR B.S , B.C.S- 

Top Row — Sowka, Falk, Meyer, Lear, D'Esposito, Bartlett, Plunkett. 

Fourth Row — Burns, Koilowski, Rositch, Murphy, Staudcr, O'Rourkc, Conlcy, Reed. 

Third Row — Coccisano, Cassaretto, Meagher, Smith, Gualano, Kearney. 

Second Row — Hackett, Hecht, Huppert, Ryan, Sheehan, McEvoy. 

front Row — O'Connor, Vincenti, Boyle, 0"Bncn, Tracey, Clements, Schomer. 



Page ninety-one 



c^<5X>=~ 




Daniel R. Murphy 
President 



THE CLASS OF 1931 

Daniel R. Murphy, President 
Robert Healy, Vice-Presideyit 
Paul O'Connor, Secretary 
John Waesco, Treasurer 




Waesco 




THE SOPHOMORE ARTS CLASS 

Top Row — Quane, Burke, Bruiin, Kuehnle, Cooney, Lisle. 

Second Row — O'Grady, Finan, Allegretti, Tomczak, Healy, Mullaney, Corcoran. 

Bottom Ron — Miirphy, S. Graham, Digglcs, D. R. Murphy. R. Murphy, Lannon, Halhnan. 



THE SOPHOMORE CLASS 

To review the history of the class of 1931 at Loyola is to study an aggregation of 
students as liberal and yet as radically progressive, as Loyola has ever known. To 
begin with, it startled the collegiate world in general, and caused its own upperclassmen 
to shake their heads in disapproval and disappointment, when it announced very 
decidely that it would throw off all bonds of tradition and abolish the green cap rule! 

No doubt deceased alumni turned in their graves and contemporary grads wondered 
where the time-worn reputation of sophomoric paternalism and discipline in regard to 
the incoming freshmen had wandered. Fiery orations about ""tradition," and "'school 
spirit" by loyal upperclassmen and by several would-be conservative sophomores could 
not conciliate the men in charge to reconsider their decision. 

Consonant with this initial policy of indifference to the history of past classes, the 
'sophomores shut their eyes to the discouraging failure of their immediate predecessors' 
attempt at staging a social function, and ran, on December 21, the much advertised, 
but less attended, Sophomore Cotillion. It proved a noble social success, but a rather 
meagre financial failure. But the optimistic liberals were not of the nature to coun- 
tenance discouragement. They ran a raffle to make up for the deficit, and looked up 
again inquiring of each other, ""vw'hat else can we do to make our class the object of 
upperclassmens' attention?" 

Activity as an organization did by no means lessen participation of individuals in 
extra-class and curricular activity. Several sophomores could be found in every 
activity to which they were eligible. 

Most conspicuous of these are the numerous staff positions held on the publications; 
The Loyola News boasts of sophomores in each of these offices: Campus Editor, 
Assistant Campus Editor, two Assistant Sports Editors. Advertising Manager, As- 
sistant Advertising Manager, and Assistant Business Manager. Besides, there are 



Piige ninetv-three 




THE bOl'HOMORE PREMEDIC CLASS 

fifth Row — Felicelli, Young. Schollian, Wybraniec, Quinn, Carney. 
Fourth Roiu — Baker. McGuire, Zurawski, Milcwski, Copia, Mennite. 
Third Roiv — O'Reilly, Madaj. Dillon, Armington, Bartalucci, Durburg. 
Second Row — Kowaleski. Walsh, Kotas, Keeley, Snannon. 
Bottom Row) — Flynn, Neri. Radokovilch, Trizna, Reed, McCabe. 

seven in the ranks of reporters, and four who distinguished themselves weekly with 
their feature columns, vi-., Ciscora Notes, The Observer, The Inquiring Reporter, 
and a temporary handling of "Ho Hum" during its period of transition from Will 
to Larry. 

The staff of the 1929 Loyolan gleams brightly with the handsome names of seven 
sophomores. One has taken over the extremely responsible position of Business Man- 
ager, while another acted in the capacity of Literary Editor. Other departments, such 
as Administration, Society, Forensics, Dramatics, and Musical Activities, all fell 
under the management of sophomores. 

No less was the interest taken in dramatics and forensics, each having as its Busi- 
ness Manager a member of this singular class. In debating especially did a sophomore 
distinguish himself by managing the eastern tour of the club last March. 

But probably the greatest achievements the sophomores can boast of is their con- 
centrated activity in athletics. Five of the nine members of this year's glorious basket' 
ball team were second year men, while nine others brought fame to Loyola through 
varsity football. 

A sophomore is president of the Loyola University Band and secretary of the Glee 
Club, while several others are active members of either musical organization. 

One m.an in particular gained renown by taking complete charge of the Jamboree, 
held in the gym after the Bradley game on February ninth. It was the same man who 
conceived the idea of a Florseshoe tournament while still a freshman, and who man- 
aged to hold major positions on five activities this year. 

Thus the class of 1 93 1 has managed to complete the second lap of its prodigious 
climb to graduation, and stands on the proverbial threshold of junior year at college. 
Whether or not they will be consistent with their present policy of indifferentism to 
tradition, and abolish junior jackets, foster bigger and better term papers in philosophy, 
and advocate a chess and checker tournament, all remains to be seen. 

Anthony C. Tomc~.-\k. 



Page ninety-jour 




THE SOPHOMORE COMMERCE CLASS— GROUP A 

Top Row — Mitchell, Lutzenkirchen, Powers, Lukitsch, O'Connor, Sweeney. 

Third Rou'— Miller, Baunibich, McHugh, Vivirito. 

Second Row — Sanfilippo, Fogarty, Spalding, McNeil, Cullen. 

Bottom Row — D. J. Murphy, R. Higgins, Weber, Wilkinson, Waldvogel, Ratferty. 




THE SOPHOMORE COMMERCE CLASS— GROUP B 

Top Roii> — Dooley, Keenan, Cuny, Size, Smith, Poppelreiter. 
Third Row — Weimer, O'Callaghan, Egan, Waesco, Molloy. 
Second Row — Strobel, McCormack, McCourt, Roszowski, Huerta. 
Bottom Row — Frizol, Lupton, O'Brien, Reidy, Curtis. 



ge ninety-five 




Martin Stadler 
President 



THE CLASS OF 19J2 

Martin Stabler, President 
James Brennan, Vice-Prfsidei7t 
William Hannon, Secretary 
Frank Hogan, Treasurer 






Brennan 



Hannon 



Hogan 



Page n;ncty-s;x 




THE FRESHMAN ARTS CLASS 

Top Row — Cahill, Lenihan, Doherty, Hayes. Hannon. Calkins. 

Third Roto— Hines, McCormick, Mullaney, Vonesh, Knittcl, Stadler, Bell. 

Second Row — Dellers, Zwftkstra, Mataschefsky, Fitzgerald, Downey, McCahe, Daly, Girsch. 

Bottom Row — McVey, Bak, McDonald. Migely, Arado, Walsh, Brown, Mann. 

THE FRESHMAN CLASS 

Approximately one hundred and ninety-five freshmen entered in September, the 
largest enrollment ever made at this campus. Unfortunately, about twenty-five per 
cent fell along the wayside during the year, but the rest heeded timely advice of the 
Dean when he addressed the group of yearlings at the beginning of the semester. Nov^-, 
those who have remained staunch, are happy in the realization that they have over- 
come what is deemed by many to be the hardest year of college. 

Much to the disappointment of the upper classmen, the sophomores decided to 
abolish the rulmg that Freshmen wear green hats. The tradition was abandoned due 
to the law on hazing, and because it was .thought that Loyola should be among the first 
to abolish the custom which many leading universities have already abolished or intend 
to -abolish. 

A fine percentage of the first year students manifested their school spirit by joining 
the many and various activities which are vital to the best interests of education. 
Figures obtained show that si.xty-six percent were engaged or interested in the Sodality, 
forty-eight percent in Missions, thirty-nine percent in the Eucharistic Section, thirty- 
five percent in Catholic Literature, twenty-two percent in Basketball, fourteen percent 
in Catholic Social Action, twelve percent in Football, eight percent in Track, eight 
percent in the Loyola News, seven percent in Debating, six percent in the Glee Club, 
two percent in the Loyolan, two percent in Dramatics, and five-tenths percent in the 
Orchestra. The freshmen displayed great ability in all these activities and were, in a 
large measure, responsible for the success of these activities. They were especially 
commended for their work on the Loyola News, in the Sodality, in the Debating 
Society, and in the two major sports, football and basketball. 

The only social event the freshmen class sponsored was the Frosh Frolic. 



Page ninety-ieven 




THE FRESHMAN PREMEDIC CLASS— GROUP A 

Top Row — Stanton, Wall, Wagner, Sullivan, GrifEn, Kurzawa, McShane, Minnis, Pilut, 

Dougherty, Cidglia, Balsamo, Fahey, Meany, Kuckie, Conley. 
Third Row — Dwan, Brennan, Quinlan, Borelli, Leonard, Corley, Mehmert. 
Second Row — Potzo, Goder, Shrake, Baker, Porelli, Falory, Brennan, Lee. 
Bottom Roiv — Gutmann, Podwicka, Franscesco, Chwatal, Menconi, Landek, Giardina. Fleming 




THE FRESHMAN PRE-MEDIC CLASS— GROUP B 

Top Row — Scribano, McNichols, Fergeson, Reis, Karrish, Modica. 

Fourth Row — Fleming, Jans, Young, Fitzsimmons, O'Hare, Kerpec, Malanouski, Dalet. 

Third Row — Crimmon, Shruke, Kearns. Dalet. 

Second Row — Sheedy, Krasneweski, Cahill, Chatas, Cali, Branza, Dagley, Palerno. 

Bottom Row — Noto, McGorry, Regnier, Motier, Madden, Dimcelli, Dehnert, Mastrianni. 



Page ninetv-eig/it 




THE FRESHMAN SCIENCE CLASS 

Top Row — ^Kielas, Walsh, F. Hogan, Lannon, Strclka. 

Fourth Row — Schultz, Hanna, Oswaldowski, Hammer, Targos, D. Hogan, Sheriff. 

Third Row — McCracken, Vacy, Powers, Kelly, Poynton, Guerrini. 

Second Row — McCracken, Spackmann, Peterhans, Bristol, Kain, Vaughey. 

Bottom Row — Johnson, Dehnert, Ohlberg, Guido, Ahern, Feeley, DEsposito. 




THE FRESHMAN COMMERCE CLASS 

Top Row — Lambeck, Rowan, Lynch,- Adams, Hannon. McNaughton. 

Fourth Row — McGowan, Ohlheiscr, Laemmar, Twomey. 

Third Row — McCormick, Chesney, Landreth, Ludwig, Dolma, Berney, Jordan, Mitchel' 

Francisco. 
Second Row — Cavanaugh, Duffy, Brice, Mangold, Griffin, Rafferty, Crowley. 
Bottom Row — Schuman, Burns, Schuck, McGiIlan, Perciabosco, Griffin, Gibbons. 



Page ninety-nine 




Mary Wingfield, 
President 



CLASS OF 1929— DOWNTOWN COLLEGE 

Mary C. Wingfield, President 
Florence W. Locke, Vice-President 
Marie C. Tangney, Secretary 
Isabel Summers, Treasurer 
Mae Cunningham, Soaal Chairman 




Cunningham Tangney 

Page one /m7idreci 



Summers 



Locke 



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A GROUP OF DOWNTOWN SENIORS 

Top Row — Murphy, Bird, Lorge, Cunningham, Shannon, Powers. 

Second Row — Hansen, Saylor, Parent, Gallagher, Mulcahy. 

Bottom Row — Nardi, Locke, Wingfield, Summers, Tangney, Fortuny. 



The second organized class of the School of Sociology, Downtown College, has 
made its Senior year at Loyola University one to be remembered in future years. 

In the early part of the year the 1929 class held a meeting and elected ofllcers. The 
selection proved satisfactory as those honored with the positions are well known about 
the entire school. The ofHce of president was bestowed upon Mary C. Wingfield 
who had acted as chairman. Florence Locke was elected vice-president while the 
class money was entrusted to Isabel Summers, one of Loyola's busy coeds. Notices 
of our monthly meetings have been sent out promptly by the secretary, Marie Tangney. 

The Downtown Sociology Class has the distinction of being the first class at 
Loyola University to have all its officers members of the feminine sex. At least we 
are distinctive. 

Many pleasant social affairs have been enjoyed by the Seniors. To Mae Cunning- 
ham, the Social Chairman, we are grateful for a delightful bridge party and a gay 
St. Patrick's affair. These two occasions enabled most of the graduates to become 
better acquainted with their fellow students. 

As this goes to press before many of our activities have taken place we can only 
say we are eagerly anticipating our luncheon in May, the Senior Dance and Com- 
mencement Week in June. Other interesting features are being planned. 

The Seniors take this opportunity to thank the Dean, Father Siedenburg, and his 
associates for their interest in us. Also our good professors for their help and co- 
operation. Our work is completed but we leave Loyola University with many 
pleasant memories. 

M.^RY C. WlXGFIELD. 



Pdge one hundred one 



"As I grow in years, that faith has been better realized 
and has become proportionately dearer to me. I have 
found its worth in great sorrows and in times of public 
danger. I pity all the more those who do not \now it. 
In an unseen way, which stri\es me with wonder. Cod 
made me especially study Religion, Law, and Literature, 
that is, the three things most necessary to the accomplish- 
ment of my plan. I have been able to visit those scenes 
that could enlighten me. I have had the happiness of 
\nowing great Christians, men distinguished in Science 
and Religion, as well as those who unwittingly serve the 
cause of faith by the exactitude and soundness of their 
\nowledge. Life is, however, not standing still and I 
shall have to seize whatever little youth remains. It is 
full time to write and to \eep my eighteen-year-old prom- 
ise to Cod." 

OzANAM : Letters. 



Page one hundred two 




LAW 




John Toomey 
President 



THE DAY LAW STUDENT COUNCIL 

John Toomey President 

Francis J. Hogan Vice-President 

Thomas Hart Secretary 

John F. Sears Treasurer 



Page one hundred foil 




Top Row — Hart, Sears, Hogan. 

Bottom Row — O'Dowd, Toomey, Dcegan, Collins. 



THE STUDENT COUNCIL OF THE DAY LAW SCHOOL 

The third year of the existence of the Day Law Student Council has been more 
successful than either of the two preceding it. Problems which were new to the 
former officers were quickly cleared up by the council of this year because of the 
ever increasing acquaintance with the conditions and means of settling difficulties. 

Members of the Student Council are elected by the various classes. The president 
is elected by students of the entire Day Law Department. As each class is allowed 
one representative in addition to the president of the class who is automatically a 
member of the Council the organization is quite democratic, giving each class an equal 
opportunity. 

The purpose of the council is not to attempt to determine the method in which the 
school shall be managed and the system which shall be adopted but rather a means 
by which a student may make a suggestion or declare his rights in a sensible and 
effective manner. The Student Council represents the students as a body politic and 
by performing its duties in a fair and conscientious manner since its inauguration has 
won the support and confidence of the students as well as the faculty. 



Page 07ie hundred five 




James S. Deegan 
President 



THE CLASS OF 1929 

James S. Deegan, President 
Joseph E. Henry, Vice-President 
Raymond H. Murnane, Secretary 
Dennis McCarthy, Treasurer 




Murnane 



McCarthy 



Henry 



2e one nundred six 



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top B^ow — Hammer, Schram, Hayes, Sweeney, McCarthy, Murnane. 
bottom Roti) — McCabe, Smelzer, Deegan, Henry, Toomey, Hogan. 



THE LAW CLASS HISTORY^SENIORS 1929 

The class has always been a unified group, each member formed an integral part 
of the whole and action in all activities was ever supported with combined efforts. 
Dean McCormick, Mr. Rooney, Mr. Steele, have been among the foremost who have 
instructed our class and guided our uncertain footsteps in the legal pursuit. Their 
teachings, advice, and counsel, have been invaluable and we proceed forth into the 
professional world better men, by rieason of having come under* their influence. 

Attempting a brief resume of the class history, we can render but a superfiaal 
retrospect of a mighty group. The freshman year proceeded in regular fashion. 
However, we accomplished notable things. Joe Witry was furnished for the foot- 
ball team and elected to captain the basket-ball squad. The Student-Faculty Ban- 
quet, the "Bud" Gorman Memorial, and the Euchanstic Congress, were high-lights 
of that period and merited our support. During the second anno, there were the 
annual banquets, the Junior Prom, and the Senior Ball, which would fail at any 
university if not supported by the sophisticated Juniors. Witry was again loaned 
to Sachs that he might captain the squad and he brought his charges thru in great 
style. Then came the Senior Year, Jim Deegan was sent to Sachs that he might 
replace Witry, who had left to catch for the New York Giants, and the result was 
phenomenal. The basket-ball team finished the season without a defeat and in 
that we glory. Jack Toomey was elected President of the Student Council and 
Deegan given the honor of the Senior Class Presidency. Of course, we had the 
Student-Faculty Banquet, the Law Banquet, the Senior Ball, and all the affairs 
which needed executive ability and which must needs be chosen from senior talent. 

"There comes a time in the lives ' of all when friends must part," but we hope 
that our parting will not be a complete severance either with friends or our Alma 
Mater but an "au revoir." Loyola has ever been a real educational mother to us 
and we leave, with deep regret, but feeling confident the men of 1929 will ever be 
loyal to the faith she has reposed' within us and that our success in the legal pro- 
fession will result in glory to her name. Joseph Henry, V.P. 



Page one hundred sevtn 




James J. O'Dowd 
President 



THE CLASS OF 1930 
James J. O'Dowd, President 
Joseph B. Santucci. Vice-President 
Helek Newman, Secretary 
Joseph Weidemann, Treasurer 




Weidemann 

Page one hundred eight 



Newman 




f t f Ills 



THE JUNIOR DAY LAW CLASS 

Harmony and redolent friendship identified the Junior Day Law Class during 
the course of the closing university year. The Freshman and Senior years were 
lead to a great extent by the initiative of the Junior officers. 

James O'Dowd was the happy choice for president. Joseph Santucci, vice- 
president, Joseph Weidemann, treasurer, Helen Newman, secretary, and Thomas 
Hart, Student Council Delegate, constituted the remainder on the successful ballot. 
Through the agility of our president, the first major event of the Day Law 
calendar was properly staged at a west side Democratic organization headquarters. 
A concerted appeal was made to the other day classes. The response was quite 
favorable. The affair was largely in the nature of a gentleman's smoker and 
geniality glowed before the evening ended. Mr. Colager of the Juniors and a 
prominent Senior distinguished themselves repeatedly. 

Comparatively, the attendance of the class at the annual Law Student-Faculty 
■banquet was commendable. The addresses of Father Walsh and Judge Burke 
were warmly received. 

Representation in the newly formed Loyola Union was fully and consistently 
maintained by Mr. O'Dowd and Mr. Hart. The former faithfully performed the 
tasks assigned to him by virtue of his membership on the Junior Prom Com- 
mittee. 

In all the major interdepartmental affairs, such as the Junior Prom, Whopee 
Night, etc., a sizeable ratio of the class evidenced itself. In view of such a salutary 
class feature, a well-rounded year in the senior classification is confidently an- 
ticipated. 

As to the scholastic caliber or report of such, this brief narrative has inten- 
tionally avoided. Suffice it to say, we are as competent as the average class in 
that direction. Helen Newman. 



Page one fuiiidieci nine 



isns) 




Cornelius Collins 
President 



THE CLASS OF 1931 



Cornelius J. Collins, President 

Daniel J. Buckley, Vice-President 

Eleanor H. Waters, Secretary 

Paul A. Early, Treasurer 

John F. Sears, Student Council Representative 




Early 



Buckley 



Page one huridred ten 



THE FRESHMAN DAY LAW CLASS 

Under the wise guidance of President Cornelius J. Collins the Freshman Class 
of the Day Law School became one of the most ambitious groups in the entire 
school. This year the class is the largest Freshman class that has ever entered the 
Department. It is not fully represented in the above picture. 

Mr. Daniel J. Buckley, who received the high distinction of vice-president, took 
an active part in the meetings and did more than his share of inspiring the stu- 
dents to do bigger and better things. Much of his time was spent giving instruc- 
tions to the secretary of the class who, although she was anxious to do her bit 
toward the advancement of the class, never did what the vice-president wanted 
her to do. Had it not been for the amiable personality of Mr. Paul A. Early 
dissension might have arisen. However, all were sincere in their intentions and 
actions and the class, by cooperating closely with the officers made itself the most 
interesting group, both from the aspect of the outsider and the members of the 
group themselves, that the law department has known. In spite of their lightness 
of heart, the students are there to learn what is put before . them. The scholar- 
ship of the class is high. It is the belief of those who have considered the matter 
thoroughly, that this friendly feeling of cheer is necessary in every school and for 
that reason they have allowed it to prevail here. 



Page one hundred eleven 




John J. Kelley 
President 



THE EVENING LAW STUDENT COUNCIL 

John J. Kelly, President 
Clyde McGonagle, Vice-President John Daly, Senior 

Daniel J. McCarthy, Secretary Arthur Burke, Jimior 

Ambrose Kelly, Treasurer James Curry, Sophomore 

Charles Spin n ad, Freshman 





HI^P^^^I 



















A. Kelly 

Page one hundred twelve 



McGonagle 




THE EVENING LAW STUDENT COUNCIL 

In a department of a school such as the Downtown College of Loyola Uni- 
\ersity it is a serious and difficult problem to get the different groups united as 
one student txidy. Such a task is one which cannot be left to the faculty alone 
or to the students alone. There must be some sort of a union filled with the rest 
and enthusiasm of students and yet controlled by the judgment of a wase and 
cautious executive. 

No organization has been so efficient toward uniting the student body as has the 
Student council of the Evening Law School. Under the leadership of its presi' 
dent, John J. Kelly, a feeling of cooperation was not only made to exist but the 
Evening Law School, which had been considered not more than a group of clerks 
with no idea of College spirit, was put under a new light in the eyes of the 
student body in every department of the university. Far from being a seeker of 
personal advancement, Mr. Kelly was constantly on the alert, anxious to offer his 
assistance to every University function, and quick to arouse the students of the 
department which he represented to cooperate with the others in making Loyola 
enterprises the successes which they have been. 

Mr. Kelly did not have to work alone. He was enthusiastically aided by every 
other member of the council and by Dean MeCormick and Mr. Rooney, secretary 
of the School of Law. The two last mentioned have been ready at all times to 
grant whatever privileges and to offer whatever assistance has been necessary 
toward the successful functioning of the Student Council. It is due largely to 
them the thanks for the Student Council as it exists today. 



Page one hundred thirteen 




John Daly 
President 



THE CLASS OF 1929 

John Daly, President 

Joseph Shelly, Secretary 

John R. Lamb, Treasurer 

Clyde McGonagle, Student Representative 




McGoNAGLE 



Lamb 



Page one hundred fourteen 




Top Row — Hagstrom, Threedy, Cassidy, McFarlin, Shchec, Egan. 

Second Row — Pokorny, Plunkett, Morrisscy, Yclowcin, Metcalfe, McGonagle. 

Bottom Row — Crane, Cannon, Lamb, Glynn, Daly, Keough, Dunne. 

SENIOR NIGHT LAW 

The students of a night school are usually employed during the day, and their 
school work is more or less a matter of business. Ordinarily the members never get 
to know each other intimately, and they consequently have no spirit or sense of loyalty 
toward their class as a unit or toward their school. 

This important lack of spirit, always prevalent among students at night schools, 
was recognised by the present senior class in its sophomore year. Accordingly, we 
have each year had a series of banquets or get-together fests of various kinds. The 
purpose was to promote good-fellowship with the hope of creating enduring friend- 
ships which would be a benefit socially and perhaps in later years in a business way. 

Most of these affairs will long be remembered and the result has been gratifying. 
The class has a splendid spirit and the members really know each other. The spirit 
is not a selfish one, but on the contrary, it manifests itself just as concretely toward 
the university as a whole as it does toward a purely class benefit. 

I do not think that it is polite to indulge in personalities. I am confident, however, 
that the generous spirit of the class approves of giving credit to some of our acknowl- 
edged leaders. As early as our sophomore year, Tom Crane was discovered to be a 
natural leader. He has twice been class president and upon his refusal to accept the 
position this year he was elected representative on the student council. He has his 
own position in the business world; he has been our most active man in student affairs, 
giving unstintingly of his time and effort: and in addition he is a leader in scholarship. 
This brief resume would not be complete without some acknowledgment on the part 
of the class for his wise direction and for his unselfish labors. 

There are a great many others who have been outstanding, but to name all who 
have co-operated in every way and who have made our class better by their presence 
would be to call the roll. Suffice to say, that the senior night law class of 1929 is 
earnest in application to any problem, is unselfish in its loyalty, and is effervescing 
with good fellowship. 

J. D. Shelly. 



Page one hundred fifteen 




Arthur B. Burke 
President 



THE CLASS OF 1930 



Arthur B. Burke, President 
James R. O'Leary, Vice-President 
Edna Devlin, Secretary and Treasurer 
Dak'iel J. McCarthy, Student Represeiitath'e 




Devlin 



O'Leary 



Page one hi^ndred sixteen 



14M.it 



Top Row — Daley, Connery, Haley, Reed, Schlacks, O'Leary, Kelly. 

Second Row — Walsh, Barron, Carroll, Waters, Crowe, Byrnes, 

Third Roti'— Buckley, McCarthy, Devlin, Burke, Murphy, Curran. Horn. 



JUNIOR NIGHT LAW 

For some reason not clearly understood, unless it be the force of custom or the 
desire to indulge in the practical application of legal training, the first recorded act 
of the class was the election of officers. The tally showed the following clearly en- 
titled to pay one dollar for their pictures on this page: Arthur Burke, President; 
James O'Leary, vice-President; Edna Devlin, Secretary-Treasurer (the latter when, 
as, and if) ; Daniel McCarthy, Student Council Representative. To date the persons 
not elected to office number only your scribe and a fellow who speaks West Side 
English. Particular mention is due Mr. Burke, who shed luster upon the fair name 
of our class by tearing himself away from the Municipal Courts and leading the 
parade of beauty and fashion at the Junior Prom. 

Credit is due also to Mr. John J. Kelly of our class, he of the portly mien, whom an 
enraptured electorate swept into office as President of the Student Council. As 
president Mr. Kelly has distinguished himself by his organization of the Corridor 
Police and by his apt technique in turning out lights. 

There are many more about whom much could be said but that the exigencies of 
space forbid. To know these others look below; for further details, consult your 
neighborhood physiognomist. 

Joseph Bushe Burnes. 



Page one l^undred seventeen 




James Curry 
President 



THE CLASS OF 1931 

James Curry, President 

James Farrell, Vice-President 

Raymond Hartnett, Student Representative 



James Curry, president of the second year class of the Night Law School, is a true 
representative of the class. His activity in the past year has shown him to be worthy 
of his office. Curry completed his pre-legal work on the Lake Shore Campus of the 
University. While in the Arts College he was active in several activities including 
debating. After leaving the north side he immediately entered the Night Law School. 
He is a member of Delta Phi fraternity. 

Under the leadership of Curry the sophomore class has been one of the most active 
in the Downtown School. 



Page one hundred eightee 




THE SOPHOMORE EVENING LAW CLASS 

In keeping with the standard of nearly every other class of evei-y other depart- 
ment of Loyola University, the Sophomore Evening Law Class is larger than any 
of its predecessors. This group, which is not fully represented in the above pic- 
ture, has been one of the outstanding supporters of every all-university function 
that has taken place during the year. They are, by the very nature of the class, 
not in a position where they can offer the most enthusiastic support and the most 
beneficial help without, by so doing, greatly inconveniencing themselves. For 
that reason, it is fitting that this class be given a rising vote of thanks by the 
other departments of the University for the assistance its members have offered 
in spite of the means which it was necessary for them to take. 

The scholastic standing of the members of this class was beyond reproach. 
.While there were only a few who were outstanding in their class work, at the 
same time, there were practically none who fell below the average. The work 
covered was interesting and the entire class maintained constant alert attention. 
This was the result of the perfect presentation of the matter on the part of 
the professors and may be considered as the indirect cause of the feeling of 
fellowship and good v-all in the class. 



Page one hundred nineteen 




Charles J. Spinnad 
President 



THE CLASS OF 1932 

Charles J. Spiknad, President 
Genevieve K. Fox, Vice-President 
Helen L. Hughes, Secretary and Treasurer 
Ambrose B. Kelly, Student Representative 
James C. O'Connor, Class Editor 




Kelly 



O'Connor 



Page one hundred twenty 



^^■nsnuu y^iiH^H 


f f 


f 


»., Iff 

. 1 . 


1 
1 



Top Roiu — Early, Grady, Dickman, Byrne, Sanders, Johniiun, O Connor. 

Second Row — Ferrari, Murphy. Jones, Sullivan, Doyle, Reid, Kcllcy. 

Bottom Row — Kelly, Smith, Clark, Jordan, Pettinger, O'Leary, Kavanaugh, Massman. 



FRESHMAN NIGHT LAW 

A registration of lifty'mne pupils, out of which number fifteen hold college degrees, 
together with the more important fact that out of this registration, fourteen members 
received their preparatory legal training at Loyola Pre-Legal Evening school, constitute 
the bid of the class of 1932 for recognition. 

Late in September forty-three young men and three young women began the four 
year course which leads to the degree of Bachelor of Law. It is certainly very en- 
couraging to note that our number was increased by some thirteen members at the 
beginning of the second semester, out of which number fifty-iive pupils are in actual 
attendance. 

As to the class itself we have thirteen of our number registered from the School of 
Arts and Science and two from the School of Sociology. The freshmen class of the 
Evening Law School, therefore, is composed of fifty-nine members, about twenty-nine 
of whom are products of some department of Loyola university. 

The Freshman Night Law Class bids fair to being a credit to Loyola university and 
it is our ardent hope that three years from now a goodly number of our class will 
have survived the test. 

Leslie J. W.-\lsh. 



Page one hundred tu'enty-one 



"I do not repudiate any forms of government; I regard 
them as different instruments to make men better and 
happier. I believe in authority as a means, in liberty as a 
means, in charity as an end. 

Two \inds of government are based on two diametric- 
ally opposite principles. One is the exploitation of all 
for the advantage of one: that is the monarchy of J^ero, 
which I detest. The other is the sacrifice of one for the 
benefit of all: that is the monarchy of St. Louis, which I 
revere and love. One is the exploitation of all for the 
benefit of a faction: that is the Republic of the Terror, 
which I utterly condemn. The other is the sacrifice of 
each for the advantage of all: that is the Christian re- 
public of the primitive Church of Jerusalem. It is aha 
perhaps that of the end of all time, the last and the 
highest state to which humanity can aspire." 

OzANAM: Letters. 



Page one hundred twenty-two 




MEDICINE 




Wentworth v. Driscoll 
Prc:ident 

THE CLASS OF 1929 

Wentworth V. Drisc:(.)LL, President 
Thomas P. Crane, Vice-President 
IsADORE Pritikin, Secretary 
Francis J. Walsh, Treasurer 
James G. Neff, Sergeant-at-Arms 
Cameron L. Hogan, Student Representative 
John P. Ashmenkas, Literary Representative 




Crane 

Page one fimidreci twenty-four 



HOOAN 



Prittiken 




Neff 



AsHMENKAS 



Walsh 



THE SENIOR CLASS 

John Ashmenckas, Lyie Bristol, Nellie Brown, John Burianek, John Carroll, Cosimo 
Castro, Anthony Catania, John Cauliield, Anthony Conti, William Conway, Joseph 
Coyle, Thomas Crane, Edward Crown, Robert Donovan, Blanche Dotterway, Went- 
worth DriscoU, Francis Dwyer, Alfred Edwards, Gordon Elnck, Joseph Evans, Vernon 
Evans, Aaron Fagelson, John Flynn, Mauro Fonacier, Wesley Forster, Charles GalT- 
ney, John Gaffney, Francis Gilmore, Ralph Gladen, Francis Gleason, Theodore Gold- 
berg, Richard Graff, Ben Greenburg, Theodore Greteman, Kenneth Grisby, Herman 
Gross, Severo Guerrero, Stanley Haraburda, Harry Haver, Robert Hawkins, Kenneth 
Hebenstreit, Cameron Hogan, Yasuyo Inouye, Carl Jackson, Ruth Jaeger, Jakopitch, 
Frank Janssen, William Jonas, Julius Jordan, David Kaneko, Edward Kaputska, Walter 
Karr, John Keeley, John Kilgallen, Chester Koneski, Ben Kopstein, Paul Kullman, 
Leo Latz, Robert Lee, Clarence Lloyd, Robert Lossman, Irving Ludwig, Bernard 
Luehrsman, Lars Lundgoot, Neal Marquis, Francis McCarty, Edward McCormack, 
Catherine McCorry, Daniel McLaughlin, Joseph Minardi, Edward Mitchell, Thad- 
daeus Modzikowski, Stanley Moleski, Thomas Murphy, Louis Naples, James NefF, 
Salvatore Nigro, Joseph Noto, Joseph O'Brien, Nicholas Pavletic, Amadeo Pecararo, 
Samuel Pink, Isadore Pritikin, Florence Raimond, Lothar Rauschwalbe, Damaso 
Samonte, Marvin Sandorf, Antonio Santoro, Isadore Schapiro, Nathan Schwartz, 
Peter Stanul, Henry Stengel, Alexander Tarnavsky, Adam Tchinski, Lloyd Teter, 
Joseph Tobin, Beate Turner, Ella Valenta, John Verhalen, Francis Walsh, Theodore 
Will, Edward Zimmerman. 



Page one Iniiidred twenty-five 




Vernon F. Hauser 
President 



THE CLASS OF 1930 

Vernon F. Hauser, President 

Joseph E. Caliendo, Vice-President 

George E. Rooney, Secretary 

Milton R. Kukuk, Treasurer 

Henry A. Hartman, Class Representative 




Hartman Rooney 

Paga one hundred ttt'entv-six 



Caliendo 



Kukuk 




>iZ:i£M^iiS!^M^JSa^ili/£m 



JUNIORS 



Front Row — Kleinwachter, Morneau, O'Connor, Flaxman, Tarlow, Laurensana, Zurfli, Lats, 

Cambridge. 

Top Row — Kukuk, Hartman, Ouellette, Bulfer, Rooney, Doenngsfeld, Pauli, Murphy, Weir, 
Madden, Schneider, Shapiro, Di Leo, Hauser. 









i^^^^^lM. md^J^^^^ «H^^^^^H 


mi^Mi. 


■y^^^^w uL^^l"- Tj^H 




BBg -^ ^H ^^4 v^H^^B '^ '^^^^^^HM 


^IHi ' 


If^^h ^B'^eI^^^^HH 4 j^^^^^B 



JUNIORS 
Front Row — Sarmas, Saletta, Rivera, Haik, Samuels. 
Second Row — Borruso, Rooney, Marzano, Di Leo, Bulfe 
Top Row — (Madden, Morrissey, Tovarek, Cambridge. 



Page one hundred tit'eiitv-seven 




Thomas P. Hickey 
President 



THE CLASS OF 19? 1 

Thomas P. Hickey, President 

Jerome B. Marciniak, Vice-President 

Helen L. Button, Secretary 

Carl J. Scheribel, Treasurer 

John F. Konopa, Class Editor 

Albert A. Huba, Student Representative 




Marciniak Scheribel 

Page one hundred twenty-eight 



Konopa 



Button 




SUPHOMUREh 

front Row — Gura, Ohta, Huba, Zuley, Ignoffo, Twohey, Jordan, Belmunte, Pellettieri, Waters, 

Burke, Balsamo. 
Second Row — Rocco, Lavin, Tarlow. Camcam, Gonzales, Keehan, Hletko, Zencka, Witkiewicz, 

Rotondi, Radzyminski, Heupler, Shimamura, Glynn. 
Third Row — Kadzcwich, Klaus, Lindsay, Whaley, David, Sternasty, Muzzicato. Perzia, Gawye, 

Maguire, Flanagan, Dolan, Marquardt, McGuire. 
Top Row — Zielinski, Edelstein, Parenti, Tompkins, Werthman, Weigel, Polite, Juliano, Mor- 

risscy, Tabaka, Kallal, Kohne, Carney, Dubiel, Scheribel, Zelazny, Petcoff, Weinless, 
L. E. Leahy. 




SOPHOMORES 

Front Row — Kadzcwich, Kelly, Dubiel, Forbich, Gonzales, Castaldo, Waters, Casciato, Leahy, 

Robilotti. 
Second Row — Marciniak, Spangler. Z-ielinski, Sankstone, Hickcy, Hoeltgen, Parenti, Fazio, 

Juliano, Komasinski, Allegretti. 
Top Row — PetcofF, Kohne, Smalley, Kramps, Klaus, Tabaka, Gallagher, S. H., Zelazny, Molen- 

graft, Bunata, Drabanski, Konopa. 



Page one hmidred tirentv 



^^■"'^ 




Lawrence Crowley 
President 



THE CLASS OF 1932 

Lawrence Crowley, President 

WiLLLAM J. McCarthy, Vice-President 

Marie McVey, Secretary 

William Spiteri, Treasurer 

Philip Corboy, Class Editor 

Matt Sanders, Student Representative 




McVey 

one hundred thirty 



Spiteri 



Sanders 



McCarthy 




THE FRESHMAN CLASS ROSTER 



Abraham 


Fischer 


Major 


Schlcmmer 


Balletti 


Fitzmaunce 


Malstrom 


Schmidt 


Barone 


Miss Frankowski 


Manikas 


Serbst 


Baumann 


Garvey 


Manelli 


Serio 


Beemsterboer 


Gaz~niga 


Markey 


Sheehan 


Berry 


Gloss 


McCarthy 


Simone 


Bremner 


Goldberg 


McDougall 


Smullen 


Brescia 


Gorrell 


McNamara 


Smyth 


Brownstei 


Gough 


Miss McVey 


Solomon 


Buttice 


Grout 


Michcwich 


Spitreri 


Caday 


Guarnieri 


Miller 


Steffes 


Cafaro 


Guinan 


Mitchell 


Steinle 


Campbell 


Hajduk 


Mitsunaga 


Stepan 


Carlson 


Hetreed 


Monachino 


Stybel 


Miss Chambers 


Hofrichter 


Mondo 


Stewart 


Miss Chapman 


Hughes 


Mos;c;enski 


Sullivan 


Chryanowski 


Hydock 


Moxon 


Swastek 


Clarke 


lorio 


Mullen 


Towle 


Corboy 


Jackinowski 


Murphy 


Urban 


Coyle 


James 


Murtagh 


Urist 


Crowley 


Jelsomino 


Natale 


Vanecko 


Czyzewski 


Jesser 


Nigro 


Vincenti 


Deane 


Keating 


Piszczek 


■ Volini 


Doherty 


Kindar 


Powers 


Wall 


Doyle 


Kittelson 


Frock 


las. Walsh 


Eisenman 


Knstan 


Van Prohaska 


John Walsh 


Elnen 


Krashen 


Rau 


Wawszkowic: 


Engle 


Kroupa 


Miss Raymond 


Miss Wilson 


Espositio 


Krus;ka 


Reber 


Wisnefsky 


Ferrari 


Kuba 


Reider 


Wodek 


Fetcho 


Kuchynka 


Roberts 


Wojcik 


Fieramosco 


Lemre 


Miss Rodgers 


Yamane 


Fiore 


Lescher 


Miss Salvati 


Yonan 


Fiorito 


Ley 


Sanders 


Zia 



one hundred thirty-one 



"You in Lyons must understand that, political agita' 
tion, in which 1 have been too much engaged, has not 
tal{en me from my first love, research, that is to say from 
what can hasten the alliance of science and religion. Such 
reconciliation was never more needed than today, for 
peace will only come into our dealings with one another 
when it has been first established in our minds. What 
bitter passions! Vi/hat implacable resentment! Ah! It 
is full time that Cod let light into this chaos." 

OzANAM: Letters. 



Page one hundred thirty-two 



rt/y 



m<m^''' / 




COMMERCE 



^7?^ 




Wm. Norkett 
President 



COMMERCE STUDENT COUNCIL 

William Norkett, President 
Charles LaFond, Vice-President 
John Sweetman, Secretary 
Adam Norris, Treasurer 




LaFond 



Norris 



Sweetman 



Page one hundred thirty-four 



-m 




'Top Row — 'Cole, Nelson, Swectinan, Johnson, Neary, La Fond, Rooney. 

Second Row — McGovern, McGurn, Garrity, Hammond, Sweetman, Bernstein, McTigue. 

First Row — Norris, Glasser, Noikett, Murphy, Barron, Lardner, Kiley. 



THE COMMERCE STUDENT COUNCIL 

One of the most successful of Loyola's four student councils is that of the Com- 
merce Department. 

It is made up of an extraordinarily large group in an effort to make the student 
representation as equal and as fair as possible. All of the members meet regularly 
m the evening and since the Department is confined to that time for all of the classes 
there is practically no trouble in getting the Council together. 

■ This fact is an important reason for the success with which the group has met. A 
unified spirit prevails here as it does in the entire Commerce Department. There is 
that feeling of oneness that has proved itself a necessary element to the creating and 
maintaining of college spirit. 

The Commerce School, under the leadership of these men who comprise its student 
council, has grown high in the esteem of the rest of the students of the University. 
When all-University functions are looking for support they invariably find it here 
first. The Commerce Student Council has established itself, it has made itself ef- 
fective. Therefore the students of the entire university unite in wishing it con- 
tinued success. 



Page one liundred thirty-five 




Charles LaFond 
President 



THE CLASS OF 1929 

Charles LaFond, President 

Joseph Osten, Vice-President 

William Norkett, Student Representatwe 

William Sweetman, Secretary 

Gerald Rodney, Treasurer 




Norkett 

Page one hundred thirty-six 



OsTEN 



Sweetman 




LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 

SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 

SENIOR CLASS 

1929 

Entering the Commerce School during the first stages of its development, the class 
of 1929 has contributed much to the growth of this department. It was their duty 
to continue the work of the class of 1928, which task was taken up with enthusiasm 
and performed with satisfaction. Student activities, both of the University as a whole 
and the Commerce School particularly, were given the whole hearted support of each 
member of the class during his four years of attendance. 

Many true and lasting friendships have been formed as a result of our four years 
of association. As evidence of this fraternities have been organised, and will continue 
to flourish even after graduation, positively assuring the continuance of our friendship 
and class associations. The Student-Faculty Banquet held on December 31, at the 
City Club was a decided success and nearly every member of the class contributed his 
share, both by assistance in the arrangements and by attendance. 

The graduating class of this year provides quite a contrast to the one that started as 
freshman four years ago. Many have transferred to the law school, some have moved 
to another city on account of business relations, others have taken only special courses 
and then there are a few who have of necessity, discontinued the course. 

Thus we look back over four years at Loyola and review it with justifiable pride. 
May the Commerce School thrive and maintain the enviable position of respect it has 
acquired in the great commercial field, may the class of 1929 remain true sons of 
Loyola and may they, in all their undertakings keep in mind its motto — "Ad Majorem 
Dei Gloriam." 

CHARLES J. LaFOND. 



Page OJie hundred thirty-seven 




John Sweetman 
President 



THE CLASS OF 19?0 

John Sweetman, President 
Hubert Neary, Vice-President 
Alvin Zinkan, Secretary 
Robert Harvey, Treasurer 




Neary 

Page one hundred thirtx-eight 



^ 




Top Row — Haslcr, Schcidermann, Hilmert, Bessett, Pctcrka, Carlton. 
Second Row — Dickey, McGurn, Nash, Kirchenzaft, Bulfin, Arguelles. 
Bottom Row — O'Donncll. Smith, Kauh. Rcbmann, Blake. Snyder. 



THE JUNIOR COMMERCE CLASS 

For the past year the Junior Commerce Class has been advancing steadily both in 
determined effort and in producing results. The class, which is not fully represented 
in the picture above, is one of the largest Loyola has ever had. The Commerce depart- 
ment is one of the youngest and certainly the fastest growing department Loyola has 
at the present time. Each year the enrollment leaps out of bounds. It was only a 
couple of years ago that the introduction of the Commerce School necessitated the re- 
moval of the Downtown College to new and larger headquarters. It seems, judging 
from the rapid growth ot this class, that it will soon be necessary to move again into a 
still larger building. 

The group that comprises the Junior Class is made up of men and women who are 
employed during the day in all sorts of positions. Some are twenty-doUar-a-week 
clerks. Others are two hundred-dollar-a-week professional men and women. It is 
certain that no matter what they are they feel that their time at the evening classes 
is well spent. 

The Junior Commerce Class, in spite of the fact that other interests occupy most 
of its time, abounds in school spirit and is always first to respond to student activities. 
Its members have helped develop the Commerce Club into an admirable organi::ation 
and with the grit and determination displayed by the various people in the class it is 
sincerely believed that someday some of the leaders in the Commercial world will be 
able to say that they belonged to the class of '30. 



Page one hundred thirty-nine 




Adam Norris 
President 



THE CLASS OF 19? 1 

Adam Norris, President 
Thomas McGurn, Secretary 
Thomas F. Cole, Treasurer 




McGurn 

Page one hundred forty 



Cole 




Top Row — Cox, Jostes, Brennan, Hewitt, Wojtulewici, Mullins. 

Second Row — Dickey, Dillon, Guinn, Zinkan, Duke, Snyder. 

First Row — SufFel, Shipka, O'Flaherty, Blake, Rebmann, Peterka. Carlton. 



THE SOPHOMORE COMMERCE CLASS 

During the past year the Sophomore Commerce Class has excelled all former 
sophomore classes both in size and scholarship. It, like all other classes in the Com- 
merce department, has increased in size each year and no doubt the class next year 
will surpass this one. The class is not fully represented in the picture above. 

Coming as the students do from every walk of life, meeting each other three times 
a week, and exchanging interesting, if not diverging views and experiences on so many 
different subjects, the students receive a wealth of broadening information from 
each other and in many ways this association with ambitious and congenial com- 
panions, both men and women, has an educational value which comes close to rivaling 
that of the classes. Many a warm friendship has grown out of this class already even 
though it may seem at first sight to be merely a place of extra toil, to be taken as a 
necessary evil after a hard day at work. 

A fine spirit of cooperation has existed between the professors and the students, not 
to mention that which has made itself apparent among the students themselves. They 
have been loyal supporters of every activity in, the school and, though thanks cannot 
be received individually, it is the firm belief of every member of the class that the 
enjoyment gained from offering his support has been thanks enough. 



Page one hundred fortyone 



f^ 




John L. Murphy 
President 



THE CLASS OF 19?2 

John L. Murphy, President 
Edward J. Garrity, Vice-President 
Edward P. Connell, Secretary 
Chester Bernstein, Treasurer 





Bernstein 

one hundred forty-two 



Garrity 



*i7'^ 




McTlGUE 



Hammond 



THIRD YEAR PRE-LEGAL 

James Sweeney, President 

Walter Johnson, Vice-President 

James Hammond, Secretary and Treasurer 

SECOND YEAR PRE-LEGAL 

Maurice J. Barron, President 
Robert F. McGurn, Vice-President 
Thomas Nash, Secretary 
Francis McTigue, Treasurer 

FIRST YEAR PRE-LEGAL 

Daniel C. Howe, President 
Edward Glasser, Vice-President 
William J. Kiley, Secretary 
Everett Nelson, Treasurer 




Kiley 



Howe 



Glasser 

Page one hundred forty-three 



"I have believed, I still believe in the possibility of 
Christian democracy; indeed in politics I believe in noth- 
ing else. What I \now of history leads me to believe that 
democracy is the natural term of political progress and 
that God is leading the world to it." 

OzANAM : Letters. 



Page one hundred forty-four 




DENTISTRY 




E. S. Weyer 
President 



THE CLASS OF 1929 

E. S. Weyer, President 

M. M. Restell, Vice-President 

B. T. GoBZYNSKI, 2nd Vice-President 

D. H. PoKRASS, Secretary 

N. Macleod, Treasurer 




GoBZYNSKi Restell 

Page one hundred forty-six 



PoKRASS 



Macleod 




At Harrison and Wood Streets 



THE CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

The forty-fifth year of the Chicago College of Dental Surgery has been one of the 
most successful since the existence of the school. It is one of the newest departments 
of the University, having united with it in 1924, and, as such, Loyola is more than 
proud of its fast growth. 

Pre-dental work is oifered part in the dental building, located on the West Side in 
Chicago's great health service center and part in the Downtown College at 28 North 
Franklin Street. In this course the student is placed in immediate contact with medical 
and advanced dental students, sharing their interests and ambitions. 

Two regular courses are offered in the Dental School, one of three years' work and 
another of four. In addition, post-graduate courses are offered to- selected students. 

The Dental School, while a strictly collegiate atmosphere prevails, is a center of 
professional ambitions. Students of this department have selected their goal and work 
toward it with unfailing and determined interest. The standing which it has reached 
in the realm of dental education has made it an intellectual center for those of the 
profession. 



Page 07ie hundred forty-seven 




Floyd Adams 
President 



THE CLASS OF 1930 

Floyd Adams, President 
Carl Greenwald, Vice-President 
Paul Williams, Secretary 
George Lauber, Treasurer 




Lauber Greenwald 

Page one hundred forty-eight 



Williams 



, ■V-t'-f 'f-'f- 



THE JUNIOR CLASS 
Four-Year Men 




THE JUNIOR CLASS 
Three-Year Men 



Page one hundred forty-nine 




R. E. Groetzinger 
President 



THE CLASS OF 1931 

R. E. Groetzinger, President 
Sidney Pollack, Vice-President 
Jack C. Churchill, Secretary 
A. P. McVey, Treasurer 






Churchill 



McVey 



Pollack 



Page one hundred fifty 




THE SOl'HeiMORE CLASS 
Section A 



:? 5JU^. .l.U^'i^'^.. 9t « 1ft 



%# V ¥- *f' 



THE SOPHOMORE CLASS 
Section B 



Page one hundred fiftyone 




Harry Dan forth 
President 



THE CLASS OF 1932 

Harry Danforth, President 
James Barr, Vice-President 
George Lemire, Secretary 
Edward Glavin, Treasurer 




Glavin 

one hundred fifty-two 



Lemire 



A'Vit'?;' «• I t » If III »■ 



1 



!#• %^ 1/ %# Va 



THh hRhSHMAN ULAss 
Section A 





Mil 1 iTiTitay 


^/l-l?-t^: 1 f JMJIJ 


HKi'lK^HiSK^Hi^n^E^BiflP > "4 i2 M^ 


BHflJHHHlBflBl^flflfti 



THE FRESHMAN CLASS 
Section B 



Page one hundred jiftythree 




THE PRE-DENTAL CLASS 

Ray Olech, President 

George Fortelka, Vice-President 

Joseph Kearney, Secretary and Treasurer 




Fortelka 

Page one hundred jifcyjour 



Kearxey 



M^ 




THE PRE DENTAL CLASS 
Section A 




THE PRE'DENTAL CLASS 
Section B 



Page 07ie hundred fifty five 



"Tour St. Cecilia will remind us of what we owe to 
your friendship; the beautiful head on whose brow is 
the inartyr's crown, this patroness of Christian art will 
teach us that we must place at the service of Jesus Christ 
everything that could give joy to this earth. Let me tell 
you that you anticipated my sweetest thoughts in giving 
me the picture of a soul that I \now, a soul full of har- 
mony and love whom God has placed by my side to be 
the comforter of my life and the inspiration of my 
studies." 

OzANAM: Letters. 



Page one hundred pftysix 



^5.. 





J 




' y 



NURSING 



m 










The Nurses Home 
MERCY HOSPITAL 

THE GRADUATES 

B. Andruska — A full blown poppy. Dusk and Southern Seas. 

E. Anglum — The silvery trail of a falling star reflected in calm water. Memories of a dream 

of Midsummer Eve. 

F. Brady — Snow battle after the first blizzard — joy of basketball, dances. 
L. Behrens — Wind flower in a bed of Marguerites. 

H. Burke — Crinoline days — a modern Minerva. 

H. Carroll — A lonesome little girl swinging on a picket gate — a fall afternoon at three. 

L. Classon — A poster nurse — orchards at harvest time. 

C. Cleary — Peter Pan in the feminine gender — a nuricry rhyme come to life. 
E. Clark — An April day — Sudden showers, then 'he sun and a bird's song. 

G. Cleary — Goldilocks and the three bears — Miss Efficiency. 
L. Cleary — Laughter and tears of Irish eyes. 

L. Dougherty — Whitman's sampler — The Little Colonel. 
R. Duffy — A white camellia in an ebony vase. 

B. Davies — Deep shadows on velvet portieres — Play of sunbeams on autumn leaves, deep russet. 

E. England — Echo from the choir of a village church — calm of Sabbath afternoon in June. 
A. Fierst — The winter sports of St. Moritz. 

C. Frank — A New England Puritan with eyes of a sage. 
M. Goodreau — A lily pads on a mirrored pool. 

M. Hauser — Echo of "Let me live in a house by the side of the road and be a friend to man." 

U. Heles — Parthenon by moonlight — a Cally Lily. 

C. Jurgenson — Alcotts "Little Womcn"^ — a red geranium in a casement window. 

M. Kozacik — The Jello girl come to life — Strains of a jazz orchestra on a vine covered balcony. 

F. Kramer — "The Doll Dance" — "Miss Jenny Wren." 

K. LaViolette — Humoresque — The red glow and warmth of a steady flame. 

R. Messerschmidt — The faint echo of a love song from Juliet's balcony. 

C. Mount — "The Innocent Abroad" — The matter of thunder on a sunny afternoon. 

C. McGuire — The Jester — Four leaf clovers and the Blarney Stone. 

D. Nabor — A babbling brook — Sunlight playing on a grey wall. 

H. O'Connell — Milton's "L' Allegro" — Candle beams from a cottage window. 

E. Overbeck — Shadows of Oxford spires — Brown-eyed Susans in a clover field. 
M. Quigley — An Irish Colleen. A white thatched cottage near a waterfall. 

M. Quinn — Late afternoon in a dusky library — Date versus Havelock. 

K. Rokusek — Odors of spiced cake fresh from the oven. Varsity drag in gingham. 

A. Rajek — Clear blue lakes and fragrant pines of the north woods. 

M. Stillwell — Fragrances of apple blossoms after a spring shower — tennis on a shaded court. 

R. Scholl — Gypsy tambourines and Spanish Castanets. 

J. Sharrett — The golden glow and breathless calm of an Easter dawn. 

D. Scullion — A football game on a November afternoon — Holly wreathes and sparkle of new 

fallen snow. 
K. Nabor — Ruffled curtains at a casement window — Song of the lark at dawn. 
M. Werner — Library steps of a college campus at four. Echo of gay farewells in dormitory 

halls before vacation days. 
M. Zavisza — The patrician — an exclusive tea room at four. 

Pdge one hundred fifty-eight 



f^^^ 



Burke Anglum Cleary 



THE CLASS OF 1929 

Essie Anglum, President 

Lucille Cleary, Vice-President 

Helen V. Burke, Secretary and Treasurer 

'OUR PRESIDENT" 

Just as every famous edifice has a foundation on which it rests securely through 
Its existence, so has every class a foundation on which it can depend for the fulfill- 
ment of its expectations. This tribute the Class of 1929 appropriately extends to 
Miss Essie Anglum, its President. 

It was a master stroke of a group of probationers back in the September of '26 
that swayed the class to make Miss Anglum "Our President." With her and by 
her we have reached almost unforeseen goals, gained unprecedented achievements. 

During the three years that Miss Anglum has been the President of the Class of 
'29, the force of her character has become more evident to each one of us. By her 
best efforts she has transfused to us a spirit of loyalty and responsibility. Her intui- 
tion, her integrity, her amiable solicitude and her creative faculty have led us through 
the thick and thin of the battle of the past three years. 

With all due respect, the Class of '29 extends to Miss Anglum a rising vote of 
thanks and as we stand at the parting of our ways, we give her our wishes for con- 
tinued success. 

THE CLASS OF 1929. 

PiJge one hundred fifty-nine 




McIntyre 



VOGEL 



ROONEY 



THE CLASS OF 1930 

Mary Beatrice Rooney, President 
Leona Joanne Vogel, Vice-President 
JCathryn McIntyre, Secretar\ and Treasurer 




Top Row — Melvin, Kubeck, Dooley, Danmeyer, Mahan, Dunn. 
Third Row — Mulvey, Holmquist, Rooney, Lappin, Doubek, Fraziei", Kane. 
Second Row — Niggeman, Foley, Butler, Toth, Shroeder, FuUan, Shaughnessy. 
Bottom Row — Shiner, McGarry, Connor, Haas, Campion, Becker, Anderson. 



Page one hundred sixty 




MORAN 



Bennett 



Mullen 



THE CLASS OF 19? 1 

Betty Moran President 

Helen M. Bennett Vice-President 

Mary L. Mullen Secretary and Treasurer 




Top Rou)— Finkeldie, Wolfe. Yates, Gleason. 

Fourth Row — Nohava, Zeller, Moran, Harney. Murphy, Hemphill, Juska. 

Third Row — Racine, Green, Keenan, Boll, Hoyer, Pratt. 

Second Row; — Sitar, Sitar, Clark Ruddy. 

First Row — Ryan, Haas. Navitsky, Hart, Musman, Byrne, Hosa, Leseman. 



Page one hundred sixty-one 



-^&C><$X><t. 



^ 




The New Nurses" Home 



ST. BERNARD SCHOOL OF NURSING 
HISTORY OF THE CLASS OF 1929 

On September Hth, 1926, we entered the portals of St. Bernard's School of 
Nursing with a firm determination to win our way up to the ranks of Graduate 
Nurses and now, we are about to reach that achievement for which we have so 
hopefully looked forward to. 

During our stay here we have experienced many never-to-be-forgotten pleas- 
ures; have participated in the numerous activities that were made possible for us 
by the whole-hearted co-operation of our dear Directress, Sister Jarrell and wit- 
nessed the completion of the Nurses' New Home which was dedicated on Nov. 
21st, 1928, by His Eminence, George Cardinal Mundelein. 

We are now nearing the goal of our ambition and justly hope that we will 
continue to carry with us that which we have learned during our stay at St. 
Bernard's. However, we do not intend to leave our Alma Mater's sheltering 
arms for long, but plan to continue our further education through her time-hon- 
ored University — Loyola. 

To Reverend Mother Murray and all our dear devoted Sisters we bid adieu. 
Our life's work is just beginning and while our hearts beat high in loving grati- 
tude to God in allowing us to reach the long desired goal, still there is a tinge 
of sorrow at the thought of leaving our dear Alma Mater who has been a good 
kind mother to us and we will always cherish and strive to emulate the wonder- 
ful example of Christ-like charity and kindness of the Sisters of St. Bernard's. 

And to her, our cherished Directress, Sister Jarrell, she who has been our in- 
spiration, our friend and our counsellor, we shall never forget her kindness and 
solicitude for us at all times. She won us with her charming and gracious per- 
sonality on the eve of our entrance here and has endeared herself to us through- 
out these three years, and we regret leaving her mantle of protection; and greatly 
appreciate her untiring zeal — she who has instructed so many unto justice may 
she shine as the stars in the firmament 

Martha M. Cassidy, President. 



ge one hundred sixty-two 



N.'Tfl) 




Kelley 



Deksnis 



Cassidy 



BuSSAN 



THE CLASS OF 1929 

Margaret M. Cassidy, President 
Eleanor A. Bussan, Vice-President 
Elizabeth E. Kelley, Secretary 
Emily A. Deksnis, Treasurer 




Top Row — Neu, Schaefer, Peske, Oldham. 

Second Row — Birich, Fenton, Reading, Courtney, Henry, Donegan. 

Bottom Row — Dore. Kelley, Cassidy, Bussan, Deksnis. Hennessey. 



Page one hundred sixty-three 




McAllister 



Schwartz 



Stanton 



Lampke 



THE CLASS OF 1930 

Alice Ruth McAllister President 

Helen Virginia Lampke Vice-President 

Gertrude Celeste Stanton Secretarv 

Mary Agatha Schwart: Treasurer 




Top Row — Gutmann, Dickenson. Corkcry, Lehmann, Saaro-y, Gunester, Evans. 
Second Row — Miller, Flynn, Schroeder, Lynch. Kennedy, Russell, Kelly, Rivard. Conrad, Sheehan. 
Bottom Row — McGovern, Quinlan. Sherry, Stanton, Lampke, McAllister, Schwart;, Gilsingei, 
Dudeck, DeGuide, Anderson. 



Page one hundred sixty-four 




i 

Campbell Barrett Boverman Nolan 

CLASS OF 1931 

Mary Anna Nolan President 

Agnes Henrietta Campbell Vice-President 

Irene Helen Boverman Secretary 

Helen Marie Barrett Treasurer 




Top Row — Milord, Martin. MLBnde. Barry. Clark. Pavik. Cramer. Koziciynski. Xoethe, Rear- 
don, Stack, Donovan. 

SecoTid Row — Bromboz, Barrett, Gosgrove. McHugh. Neville. Murphy, Dargella, O'Neill, Sendek, 
Kelly, Barry. 

Bottom Row — Kellehe--, Vanruska. Vogel, Campbell, Nolan, Barrett, Boverman, Southerland, 
McGarr, Pilling. 



Page one hundred sixty-five 




The Entrance 



ST. ELIZABETH'S HOSPITAL SCHOOL FOR NURSES 

During the past year it became possible, with the raising of educational stand' 
ards, to make the St. Elisabeth Hospital School for Nurses an integral part of 
the Loyola University School of Medicine. By so doing, the educational rank of 
the Hospital becomes higher and the expanse of the Medical Department of the 
University becomes greater. 

The nurses in training are given the advantage of the professorship of men of 
more advanced training in the medical profession. At the same time, the young 
students of medicine are supplied with a hospital of high caliber in which to ob' 
serve cases. The union of the Hospital with the University is a distinct step for' 
ward for both institutions. 

This year a new group of young nurses will go forth into the field of duty 
carrying with them the knowledge and faith they have received during the past 
three years. They have been trained in the profession and in the faith. It is their 
duty to carry forth the ideals of the Hospital and the University. They may work 
always with the confidence that their Alma Mater is ever ready to support them 
in their actions. 



Page one hundred sixty-six 



^^p. 



KiRSCHNER ReINHARDT 

THE CLASS OF 1929 

Regina R. Kirschner, President 
Marie A. Kleve, Secretary 
Louise D. Reinhardt, Treasurer 



Kleve 




Top Row — Prosser, Holinga, Gruender, Kuehn, Kortas, Freiburg, Kingcaid, Wagner, Janiak, 

Kaska, Gracyas. 

Bottom Roti — ^Bilek, Schwieckert, Olender, Michalski, Kleve, Kirschner, Reinhart, DeHass, Ault;, 

Cierjan, Truog, Missing, Beers, Marnul, Dow. 



Page one hundred sixty-sever 



^ 




Massic 



Ver Cauteren 



Maresch 



THE CLASS OF 1930 

Irene Maresch, President 

Marie C. Ver Cauteren. Treasurer 

Mary C. Massic, Secretary 




Top Rou— -Lcusen. Miller. O.irt. Hin-cli, Kcs.ic:. Halligan, Gildea. Wendorf, Haas, Huss. Cook, 

Claygone, Armstrong. 
Bottom Row — Block, Nesler, Smarke, Nelson, Ver Cauteren, Massic. Maresch. Walters, Fliesc. 

Ver Cauteren. 



Page one hundred sixty-eig/it 



(9 ^ ^ 



Beffa Galatka 

THE CLASS OF 1931 

Helen Golatka, President 
Mary C. Christiaens, Secretary 
Mabel M. Beffa, Treasurer 



Christiaens 




To^ Row — Ver Cauteren. Wi-iDcu-ki. MacCJmn.iii.qhey. O'Neill, Gennrich, Kcnner, Thompson, 

Johnson, Behrendt, Hackctt, Smith, McVeigh. 

Bottom Ron' — Zalas, Losinski, Sarwin, Christiaens,' Golatka, Cavanaugh, Gregory, McCormick. 

Saho. Gallagher, Missing: Beffa, Schifar. 

Page one hundred sixty-nine 




The Old St. Anne's 



ST. ANNE'S HOSPITAL 

"Facta non Verba" — deeds not words. Such a .simple little sentence, but what a 
world of meaning. It was deeds not words that made possible, this beautiful new 
hospital of ours. 

Hard work for those sisters who came out into the "prairie," as this vicinity was 
known a quarter century ago, when ground was first broken for Saint Anne's Hospital 
— a struggle through the loneliness that must have been theirs during those iirst years, 
but a struggle that has been more than worth while, which has brought forth one of 
the most beautiful hospitals in the northwest. 

We, who trained in the "old Saint Anne's," loved it, and love it still, for its 
beauty, its peace — the dear old park with its lagoon and its grotto. But we, the class 
of 1929, the first to graduate from the new Saint Anne's, feel that we have as our 
Alma Mater, not only the old with its dear memories, but also the new, with its 
splendid promise of better things to come. 

Agnes Kehoe, Class of '29. 



Fage one hundred seventy 




Kehoe 



Veeser 



Stasch 



PUGH 



THE CLASS OF 1929 

Agnes E. Kehoe, President 
Aura B. Pugh, Vke-President 
lONE E. Veeser, Secretary 
Anne M. Stasch, Treasurer 




SENIOR CLASS 

Top Row — E. Lindsey, M. Stellern, I. Hartel, M. Fruehe, H. Buege, I. Veeser, A. Pugh. 
Front Row — A. Garen, D. Schwiderski, A. Stasch, C. Gross, A. Kehoe, A. Chernikoff, M. Parisi. 

B Kirby. 



ge one hundred serentv-one 




Eggstein 



Gilchrist 



CONOLE 



THE CLASS OF 1930 

Helen P. Gilchrist, President 

Julia Conole, Vice-Presideyit 

Helen M. Eggstein, Secretary and Treasurer 




Top Row — Tabaka, M. Dobesh, T. Lochner, M. Williams, B. Neuroth, H, Scholtz, H. Dixon, 

F, Mikulec, M. Hallisy, D. Mailloux, H, Wilson, E. Collins, I. Hendrickson, 

R. Haessig, J. Zaborski, N. Budreau. 

Front Row — M. Niccoli, M. Wnig, M. Hutten, H. Gilchrist, H. Twohcy. H. Eggstein. 
B. Dunning, J. Conole. 



hundred sevent\-two 



li^^^^ 



Sullivan 



SCHNAUBELT 



Strubbe 



Miller 



THE CLASS OF 1931 

Bertha Miller, President 
Esther Schaubelt, Vice-President 
Annabelle Sullivan, Secretary 
Catherine Strubbe, Treasurer 




Top Row — K. Strubbe, E. Koehler, C. Burns, A. Sullivan, J. King, E. Schnaubelt, M. Campbell, 
H. Sobie, M. Straik. E. Price, A. McDonnall. M. Henderson. R. Bernasek. 

Front Row — H. Murphy, A. Haltmeyer, A. Pilotte, A. Kundrot, T. Steve, B. Miller, E. Riley, 
A. Carufel, P. Jesky. 



Page one hundred seventythr 




OAK PARK HOSPITAL 
CLASS MATES— MEMBERS OF THE FACULTY 

It is with mingled feelings of joy and of regret that the class of 1929 approaches the 
day of days that fuliills the hopes of years. We can view the past with satisfaction 
reahsing the difficulties we have conquered, the victories we have won. The favored 
graduates have known the power of united effort, sensed the joy of lofty purpose, but 
above all during our course of training at Oak Park Hospital we have understood how 
blessed we were to receive our training in a Catholic institution under the efficient 
direction of the Sisters of Misericorde assisted by a stalf of doctors eminently qualiiied 
to fit us for our work in life. 

Often we spurred each other on by the thought, "We are nearing graduation," yet 
the parting from teachers and from one another seemed always in the dim future. Now 
as we sight the turn of the road and separate paths reach out before us we feel a "pang 
in our rejoicing," a reluctance to begin that fuller, freer life for which we have been 
preparing. On the morrow each alone must press forward. 

One of the chief tests by which the merit of an institution is measured is the loyalty 
of its graduates to the ideals set before them. 

To you, Mother Mary of Jesus, to you. Sister St. Vincent, our cherished Superin- 
tendent, to the teaching staff, to all at Oak Park Hospital who have labored unre- 
mittingly that we might be enriched with better gifts we owe a debt of gratitude that 
we can never hope to pay. 

One thank offering we make "the promise to live as worthy exponents of your teach- 
ing, remembering that our loyalty to all you have taught us to be will bring added 
glory to our beloved Alma Mater. 

Our farewell shall not sever the real bond of our union, the bond of trust and love. 
Let us pledge fidelity to prayer — prayer for one another that we remain true to the 
principles of Catholic womanhood, prayer for those whose abiding interest and foster- 
ing care have made possible this happy day of graduation. 

IC'\THLEEN HiGGINS. 



Page one hundred seventy-four 



mm^ 



Martin Klein Campbell 



THE CLASS OF 1929 

Margaret Campbell, President 

Ida Klein, Vice-President 

Helen Martin, Secretary and Treasurer 




Top Row — Doran, Pittman, Fry, L. HofFman, Rosdeha. 

Second Row — Grohowsky. Horaan, Higgins, Antonation, Altshul, Hoerschgen, M. Hoffman. 

Front Row — Luhowa, Hayes, Campbell, Klein, Martin, Walker, Kent. 



Page one hundred seventy-five 




De Vet 



TOUHY 



MULQUEEN 



THE CLASS OF 1930 

K-\THLEEN TouHY, President 

Imogene De Vet, Vice-President 

Mary Mulqueen, Secretary and Treasurer 




Top Row — Fallon, Hocrschgen, Keating, Alford, Quirici, Heffron. 
From Row — Madison, Mulqueen, Touhy, DeVet. 



one hundred seventy-six 




Fuller 



Herald 



HOMAN 



THE CLASS OF 1931 

Mabel Fuller, President 

Louise Homan, Vke-Presideyit 

Helen Herald, Secretary and Treasurer 



The freshman class of Oak Park Hospital is the largest first year class that ever 
enrolled at the nurses' training school of that hospital. Every year more and more 
high school graduates are taking up the nursing vocation in this institution. 

Oak Park is represented in the Loyolan this year for the first time. The Hospital 
is fully accredited to the University, as are the other four which are represented in the 
Nursing section of the book. The work done in the training schools of these hospitals 
may be applied toward a degree from Loyola University. A large percentac^e of the 
Registered Nurses make use of the opportunity and by attending the Downtown 
College are able to receive an academic degree in a short period. 

Page one hundred seventy-seven 



"We are too young to ta\e an active part in the so- 
cial struggle. Shall ive then remain inert in the midst 
of a world which is suffering and groaning? TSjo. A 
preparatory way is open to us. Before doing public good 
we can try to do good to a few: before regenerating 
France, we can relieve some of its poor. So I would li\e 
all the young people with head and heart to unite for 
some charitable ivor\ and to form throughout the coun- 
try a vast generous association for the relief of the peo- 
ple." 

OzANAM: Letters. 



Page one hundred seventy-eight 




ALUMNI 




James J. Mertz, SJ. 
Director 



ALUMNI 
Foreword 



The Alumni Association of Loyola University has completed another year of suc- 
cessful achievements, most important of which has been the renewed interest as mani- 
fested by the steps taken toward reorganizing it. 

On September 20, 1928, a meeting of a reorganizing committee appointed by the 
chairman in accordance with the wishes of an interesting group of Alumni was held 
at the Brevoort Hotel to consider the plans for the formation of a revived Loyola Uni- 
versity Alumni Association. 

Through the efforts of a sub-committee appointed at this meeting, a revision of 
the by-laws of the St. Ignatius Alumni Association in accordance with the principles 
developed by the evening's discussion was eifected. Soon this sub-committee drafted 
a constitution and the hope is expressed that with the coming years the Alumni Asso- 
ciation of the various colleges of Loyola will assume its full importance in the life of 
the university. 




Pdge OTie hundrt^d eighty 



HISTORY 

Fifty-nine years ago the Alumni Association of Loyola had its unofficial beginning. 
It was in that year that the first class was graduated from St. Ignatius College. For 
several years, because of the small number of members, the organization was relatively 
inactive. In 1S95 the Alumni Association was formally organized and has been a 
potent factor in the history of the University since that time. 

When the University became co-educational an Alumnae Association was formed. 
Although this group is not large it has been exceptionally active and has been a. 
great aid to the general Alumni Association. 

A year ago Reverend James J. Mertz, S.J., was appointed as the Director of the 
Alumni Association. The appointment was made in order that the organization 
might become more closely unified and more active. Under his direction and under 
the management of Robert Morris, the Alumni secretary, the Association has pro- 
gressed rapidly in the last year. 

Among the achievements ot the Alumni Association was the erection of the Alumni 
Gymnasium. The support oi the members in every activity of the University has 
been one of the most outstanding contributions made by any group. 



Page one hundred eighty-one 




RoBT. Morris 
Secretary 

THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The Alumni Association of Loyola University has grown to such large numbers in 
the past several years, that it was found necessary this year to found separate and 
distinct departments at each of the various colleges. The general association is formed 
by the representation of five members of each department to form a single body. The 
iirst meeting of the year was on September 20, 1928, when it was decided to adopt a 
constitution and draw a plan for the reorganisation of the body. The object of this 
and the several other meetings held during the year was to unite the Alumni at the 
various departments into a strong central organization. 

The annual homecoming celebration was staged with much success and more en' 
thusiasm. Then on December 20, 1928, the Athletic Banquet was tendered to the 
football players, while a general meeting and banquet is to be held during commence' 
ment week of this year. This has been the activity of the general Alumni group. 

The association of the Law school, has made real progress through the various meet' 
ings held during the year, and as a climax to the year's activities, staged the Law 
Alumni Banquet at the Midland Club in April, 1929. The Law graduates have 
been exceedingly generous in their support of the Alumni activities and promise well 
for further progress in the way of social functions. The officers of the Law group 
are as follows: President, Judge Phillip F. Sullivan; Vice-President, William Camp' 
bell; Secretary, George A. Lane, Jr.; Treasurer, Walter Butler; Chairman, Women's 
Committee, Mary V. Kelly. 

No less was the activity of the Dental Alumni. Various meetings were held, as 
was a banquet later in the year. The department is prospering well under the direc 
tion of the following list of officers: President, Dr. E. C. Pendleton; Vice-President, 
Dr. Ida W. Williams; Secretary, Dr. E. P. Bolger; Treasurer, Dr. Harold Penny; 
Editor, Dr. Robert W. McNulty; Board of Directors, Dr. Joseph Wiedder, Dr. 
Harold Olfice, Dr. Lester Clow. 

The Medical School has a very energetic organization as have the Commerce and 
the Arts groups. The Arts group, however, has been tardy in its reorganization, prob' 
ably due to the fact that it is so closely akin to the larger central association that the 
activity of one group blends itself into that of the other to such an extent that it is 

Page one hundred eighty-two 




D. A. Laughlin 
Alumni President 



Helen Ganey 

Alumnae President 



usually hard to define whether an activity of the Alumni is that of the central organ- 
ization or of the Arts Department. 

The Alumnae have done several notable things during the current year, n,ost im- 
portant of which was the Annual Home-Coming Luncheon. Saturday afternoon, 
April 20th, proved that the enthusiasm and loyalty of Loyola alumnae is no mere 
ephemeral thing, for if ever there was a day when the weather was at its worst, that 
day was the day set for the Annual Home-Coming Luncheon. But in spite of drench- 
ing rain, the alumnae came in by twos and threes and in crowds to the Lake Shore 
Athletic Club, literally carrying out the invitation to "come and bring your friends 
and meet your friends!" After the luncheon the program was begun. On the gen- 
eral theme of "Opportunities for Loyola Alumnae," three-minute talks were given by 
various alumnae, illustrating the special fields of endeavor into which the university's 
graduates have gone. Father Schmidt, Dean of the Graduate School, spoke of the 
growing influence of women in the work of the world and voiced a tribute to Father 
Siedenburg for his vision and courage in the founding and developing of the School 
of Sociology. 

Under the directorship of Father James J. Mertz, S.J., and the secretarial manage- 
ment of Mr. Robert Morris, the Alumni Association has become a valuable asset to 
-the university and has given financial aid to the numerous projects fostered by the 
university graduates. 



Page one hundred eighty-three 



""^ 




David F. Bremner, Mary Agnes Amberg, Honorable Thomas J. Walsh, 
President Robert M. Kelley. 



1928 COMMENCEMENT 

The fifty-eighth annual commencement of Loyola University was distinctly honored 
with the presence of Honorable Thomas J. Walsh, United States Senator from Mon- 
tana, who acted as speaker of the day. Mr. Walsh's topic was "The Outlawry of 
War Treaty," which proved such a masterpiece of oratory as well as a collection of 
educational data, that the speech was reproduced in whole in the Autumn issue of 
the Loyola Quarterly. 

The commencement itself included the presentation of some hundred and seventy 
academic degrees, one hundred twenty professional degrees, nine graduate, and four 
honorary degrees. The academic degrees were divided between those of Bachelor of 
Science in Medicine, and those conferred directly by the Arts and Science Depart- 
ment. Seventy-one graduates of the Medical School were made Doctors of Medicine, 
while an even fifty received either the Bachelor or the Doctor (J.D.) degree in Law. 
Three scholars of the Graduate department merited the Master of Arts degree, two 
were made Doctors of Philosophy, while four others distinguished themselves in the 
scientific professions sufficiently to receive the Master of Science degree either in 
Medicine or in Dentistry. 

The four individuals whom Loyola honored with the conferring of the degree of 
Doctor of Laws (LL.D.) were Mary Agnes Amberg, David F. Bremner, Honorable 
Thomas J. Walsh, and Rev. William M. Magee, S.J. 

For sixteen years Mary Amberg, as Head Resident of the Guardian Angels Center, 
has influenced the lives of thousands, and ten times that number have shared her 
charity and understanding. She has always put the concerns of Christ in the first 
place and so blended scientific technique with supernatural charity unto the product 
of a perfect work. Mary Amberg has added to a high heritage the consecration of a life 
in order to give a fuller life to the unprivileged of every race and creed and to give 



Page one hundred eighlyfoii 




to Church and State more worthy citizens. Loyola University felt that it honors itself 
when it honors this Samaritan of the twentieth century. 

David F. Bremner is a successful and high principled business man who for a quarter 
of a century has been identified with many notable endeavors to advance the causes of 
education, of charity and of community welfare. He has been a beneficiary and a 
patron of religious education as well as a benefactor and advisor of Loyola University. 
As an individual, a parent and a citizen, he has exemplified the qualities of leadership 
which Loyola University has ever sought to inspire. 

Honorable Thomas J. Walsh, in youth a successful and a distinguished member of 
the bar of the State of Wisconsin; elected to the Senate of the United States by the 
unanimous vote of Democrats and Republicans alike in both houses of the legislature 
of the State of Montana; as a senator, a champion of right and justice, a relentless 
enemy of corruption, the defender of the public lands of the nation; named by many 
as their choice for the Presidency of the United States and considered worthy of that 
dignity by all; his life, both private and public, above all reproach and consecrated to 
the service of his fellowman; an honor to his race, to his nation, and to his Church. 

■ Rev. William M. Magee, S.J., is a Jesuit educator and administrator, who has con- 
secrated his life to the cause of Catholic education and who, on account of his abilities 
and achievements has been entrusted with the destinies of an outstanding university 
of our country, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

The 1928 commencement, besides being notable for the large number of degrees con- 
ferred and for the distinct honor of featuring Mr. Walsh as the speaker, stands out 
also for two other factors, worthy at least of passing mention. For one, it was the 
first time in several years that the program was conducted in the Alumni Gymnasium 
rather than out on the campus as in previous years. The really significant innovation 
in the commencement was the formal pledge taken by all the candidates for degrees, 
which is in consonance with that supreme principle under which all true Loyolans 
have been trained, "All to the Greater Glory of God": "I solemnly pledge myself: 
To hold this degree as a sacred trust; to serve God and my fellow man; to keep my 
honor untarnished; to be loyal to my country and my flag; to be faithful to my Alma 
Mater until death." 



Page one hundred eig/ity-yire 




The C.udahv Mcni..ii,il Lihi.iiv 

THE CUDAHY MEMORIAL LIBRARY 

The Library building, Loyola University, is a gift of Mr. E. A. Cudahy, to be 
dedicated to his wife, Elizabeth M. Cudahy. 

The main reading room, 101 feet long by 44 feet wide and 40 feet high, will 
have a seating capacity of 200. The interior walls of this room will be faced with 
Mankato stone while the clear story windows, affording light from three sides, will 
be of leaded glass in soft color tones. 

A clear span ceiling, formed of monolithic reinforced concrete arch and cantilever 
construction, will be finished with ornamental concrete surfaces treated in a colorful 
design. Concealed lighting running around the inner rim of the cantilever portion 
of the ceiling will be arranged as a part of the general decorative scheme as well 
as a highly efficient and economical means of illumination. 

Stack space, with an ultimate capacity of 250,000 volumes, is provided by the plans, 
with the intention of housing approximately 150,000 volumes at this time. Each 
stack room level is arranged with a series of cubicles, with each window opening af- 
fording a place for study with access directly to the books. A periodical room faces 
the Lake at the east end of the building. 

Besides the practical working requirements of the building, there will be a treasure 
room for rare and precious volumes, ten study rooms, and a lecture or class room. 

The building will be thoroughly modern fireproof construction throughout. Ex- 
terior walls will be of limestone for all sides of the building, thus presenting a monu- 
mental appearance which will be a lasting tribute to the donor and a worthy con- 
tribution to the science and art of building construction. It was designed by A. N. 
Rebori, Architect, of the firm of Rebori, Wentworth, Dewey & McCormick, Inc. 



Page one hundred eighty-six 



THE DONOR OF THE LIBRARY 

Edward A. Cudahy 

Edward A. Cudahy was born in Milwaukee, Wis., on February 1, 1860. At the 
age of thirteen he left school and entered the employ of the John Plankinton Com- 
pany, one of the early Milwaukee packing concerns. Possessed of a physique and 
mentality beyond his years, young Cudahy quickly won a name for himself in the 
packing industry. In 1877 with his older brother Michael, he became associated with 
P. D. Armour in Chicago and ten years later was made a member of the firm of 
Armour &? Cudahy at South Omaha, Nebraska. Anxious to form a business of their 
own the Cudahys took over the Armour interests in 1890 and established The 
Cudahy Packing Company. Edward Cudahy became vice-president and general 
manager of the new firm, which position he filled until the death of his brother 
Michael in 1910, when he became president of his company. In January, 1926, he 
retired from the presidency in favor of his son, E. A. Cudahy, Jr., and was elected 
chairman of the board of directors. 

Mr. Cudahy 's biography is written in his achievements. By the force of his char- 
acter and his energy he has advanced from the humble surroundings of his early youth 
to an honored place as the leader of a great industry. In the business world he is 
respected for his integrity and his thorough knowledge of the calling to which his 
life has been devoted, and among the members of his own organisation he is held in 
high esteem for his fair dealing, his kindly nature, his ready sympathy and) his loyalty 
to the men who have worked with him in the building up of the establishment that 
bears his name. 

In 1884 Mr. Cudahy married Miss Elizabeth Murphy of Milwaukee. With their 
son, Mr. E. A. Cudahy, Jr., and their four daughters, Mrs. F. E. Wilhelm, Mrs. 
A. H. Niblack, Mrs. Vaughan Spalding, and Mrs. Alice Cudahy McCormick, Mr. 
and Mrs. Cudahy occupy a prominent place in the social and philanthropic life of 
Chicago, where they have resided for the past eighteen years. 



Page one liundred eighty-seven 



■^ 




ill 




THE MADONNA DELLA STRADA CHAPEL 

The above skcteh gives an idea how the interior of the Madonna Delia Strada 
Chapel will look after its completion. The chaste simplicity of the decorations, 
as well as the beautiful harmony of the constituent architectural embellishments 
are but suggested in this drawing, as the actual beauty of the proposed structure 
can only be imagined and not illustrated. 

The chapel will have seats for about one thousand students. This will obviate 
the present necessity of seeking neighboring churches on Friday mornings for 
student devotions, as well as eliminate the obstacle of insufficient room for all the 
students, a condition that now exists with the use of the present chapel in the 
Administration building. 

The main altar will be of the Baldachino, or canopy type. There will be five 
shrines on the sides of the chapel, A large one will be consecrated to the North 
American martyrs, while the four others will be dedicated as follows: one to St. 
Ignatius, another to St. Francis Xavier, still another to St. Therese, the Little Flower 
of Jesus, and the last one to the Three Youthful Saints. 

Mankato stone will make up the interior decoration of the walls and columns, 
while the ceiling will be constructed of chestnut wood in the pattern sketched 
above. 

In general, the architectural scheme will be closely akin to that of the proposed 
library, and in harmony with it will provide another augmentation of the existino- 
beauty of Loyola's Lake Shore Campus. 



Page one hundred eighty-eight 



THE MADONNA DELLA STRADA CHAI^EL 

Rev. James J. Mertz, S. J., promises that the long awaited, and much antici- 
pated chapel on the Lake Shore Campus will become a reality before two more 
years have passed. Ever since the Arts and Science department of Loyola Uni- 
versity was moved to the Lake Shore Campus, it has been the cherished ambition 
and hope of the entire student body to have a chaj>el which they might call 
distinctly their own. In those years religious activities had been confined to 
neighboring churches and the chapel in the Administration building. But as 
the enrollment increased, so the accommodations decreased. Three years ago 
Father Mertz saw the crying need for the erection of a new, larger chapel and 
accordingly took steps in making preparations for it. Plans were made, funds 
were collected, hopes were kindled, until now the dream of the chapel is soon to 
be realized. 

Almost simultaneous with the plans for the chapel came the announcement of 
the donation of $300,000 for the erection of a library on the Lake Shore Campus. 
Hopes for a Greater Loyola began to look brighter than ever. Two more build- 
ings added to those already on the Campus will soon make the Loyola Campus one 
of the most beautiful of any Catholic college in the Middle West. 

But the original chapel plans could not remain as they were. There was to be 
a distinctly novel architecture in the new library, one which, if placed near the 
chapel built as the original plans provided, would put the two buildings out of 
balance, and thus create a discord in the present harmony of architecture at Loyola. 
Something had to be done. At first it was tried to adapt the library to the 
chapel, but the efforts were futile, and the unproductive of any real architectural com- 
promise. 

Accordingly, the original plans for the chapel were changed to conform to the 
new idea to be applied in the library. In about two years from now one will be 
able to view from the outer drive the auspicious Administration building, flanked 
on either side by the chapel and the library. 

Father Mertz has been working hard on his coming chapel, yet funds are still 
inadequate with which to start building. The many generous people who have 
already contributed to the fund realize that things cannot be done or begun until 
enough money is in. Perhaps it is interesting to know that work on churches or 
chapels cannot be started until practically the entire cost of the construction is 
on hand. This ought to conciliate impatient students who complain that the 
chapel will be ready only for the fellows who come later. 

Particular credit and thanks for the untiring work involved in collecting funds for 
the erection of this edifice must of necessity go to Father Mertz, the man who is in 
complete charge of the operation of the new structure. For the past few years he 
has given his time, energy and effort in this direction. The whole-hearted zeal he 
displayed in the matter of furthering the progress of the chapel by collecting funds, 
by making plans, and adapting them to the new library, is certainly deserving of 
much praise and thanks. 



Pdge one hundred eighty-nine 



"Let me, however, say that there are but two schools. 
Philosophy and Religion. Philosophy has its inspirations. 
It \nows, but does not love, God. It has never caused 
a single one of those loving tears to {all, which come to 
the eye of a Catholic in Holy Communion, whose in- 
comparable sweetness and consolation is worth the sac- 
rifice of life. If I, poor and wea\ as I am, have \nown 
that sweetness, what will it be with you, whose character 
is so lofty and whose heart is so good. Tow would find 
in it the interior evidence before which all doubts flee. 
Faith is an act of virtue and therefore an act of the luill. 
We must ivill to believe, we must surrender our soul, 
and then God gives light superabundantly ." 

OzANAM : Letters. 



Page one hundred ninety 



LOYOLA LIFE 




The students of the University of Paris who had grouped themselves around Ozanatn gathered 
frequently. The social pleasures of the group cOTisisted chiefly in conversation and discussions. 
Ozanam lived for a time on the second floor of an humble rooming house. As he had only 
one chair his friends were often seen carrying their own chairs when coming to visit him. 



Top right — Drunk again? 
Lower right — Beauty. 
Center — Future Doc. 
Top left — Forced feeding. 
Lower left — Hot party on ice. 




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Page one hundred ninety-one 



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Top left — Innocence abroad. 
Lower icft — Courting again. 
Center — Perfect natural happiness. 
Oval — Action picture (Catholic). 
howiJ right — Paper, Mister? 







Page one hundred ninety-two 



Top right — Coniey looks things over. 
Lower right — How much do we owe? 
Center — Why New Rochelle won. 
Oval — Roman plumbing. 
Lower left — Shooting the time away. 




Page one hundred ninety-three 




upper Uft — Fran's he-man in Wisconsin. 
Lower left — Familiar smile. 
Center — It won't be long now. 
Oval — Kelly without his broom. 
Lotver right — Watcha link? 




Page one hundred ninety-four 



Up.fier right — Not the New Ford. 

Lower right and center — Can't something be done 

about these? 
Oval — Horseshoes! 
Lower left — Spring fever. 





Page one hundred ninety-Jive 




upper left — Three reasons why medicine isn't so bad. 

Lower left — The editor plays, too. 

Center — On board good ship Hortense. 

Oval — Preraeds. 

Lower right — Come on out and play. 




Page one hundred ninetysix 



upper right — Thanks for the buggy ride. 

Lower right — "Hole-in-one" Bryant. 

Center — Walsh — resting. 

Oval — Hair tonic on one. 

Lower left — Eyes front! Look at the hirdie 




Page one hundred ninety-sever 



upper left— Medical School from the air. 
Lower left — Paul, rolling on the tennis courts. 
Center — Golfers (?) 
Oval — Chef or sailor? 
Lower right — Taking the aii 




Page one hundred ninety-eight 



upper right — Before and after using. 

Lower right — Horticulture faculty. 

Center — Administration building as the hirdies see it 

Oval — A good racket. 

Lower left — Cadillac squad. 




Page one hiitidred ninetv-iiine 




Ufper left — Why we went to St. Louis. 

Lower left — Surprise. 

Center — Vocational education. 

Oval — Patterns by Clotilde. 

Lower right — Welcoming the dean home. 




Page two hundred 



upper right — Mayor and Jiis henchmen 

Lower right — Fish story. 

Center — Have you got a cigarette? 

Ova] — Two steins, Jake. 

Lower left — Waiting for a steamboat. 




Page two hundred one 




upper left — Why boys go to sodality conventions. 
Lower left — Weekly penance. 
Center — Loyola men have girls too. 
Oval — The Front Page. 
Lower right — The bread line. 




Page two hundred two 



upper right — One bird that didn't go south. 

Lower right — RN's at ease. 

Center — Where's Kay? 

Ova! — Soup's on. 

Lower left — Out of the ether. 





Page tiuo hu7idred three 



upper left — Aw Willie, you slay me! 

Lower left — Three cakes (y)east. 

Center — Frozen stare. 

Ova!— Stalling. 

Lower right — What was in the food? 




Page two Iiiindred four 



Ufifjer right — Between periods. 

Lower right — Watch out for the shrubbery. 

Center — Site of the chapel. 

Oval — Lucky patient. 

Lower left — Mr. Steggert poses, 





J . ^ - )^ 






Page two hundred five 



upper left — How affectionate. 

Lower left — Look at the birdie, Father. 

Center — Barnyard golf. 

Oval — Just Kelly and Tambornino again. 

Lower right — Hiding behind the bushes. 




Page two hundred six 



upper right — Behind the bars. 

Lower right — Remember boys, you have a pledge 

Center — Out for the air. 

Oval — Nurses after the state exams. 

Lower left — Father Lord and Sodalists. 




Page two hundred seven 



"Share that wealth of charity by offering up to Our 
Lord for me some of the blessed things that you have 
done. I \now that none of your suffering is lost, for you 
have plaited a crown with it for the Ufe to come. It is 
iyi that I should follow your example, for I do not yet 
\now how to suffer. Pray for me." 

OZANAM : Letters. 



Page two hundred eight 



ACTIVITIES 




't* >,. / 






<^.>^-f--;y<;: 



.:-^:^:- 













Ozanam. was interested in the revival of the great French dramatists. He was an admirer of 
Racine and other noted dramatists. The stage at this time was in a degraded condition and 
Ozanam ifas instrumental in an attemjDt to revive it. 




PUBLICATIONS 







Morton D. Zabel, A.M. 
Moderator 



PUBLICATIONS 

FOREWORD 

The present school-year has seen the student pubhcations of Loyola University con- 
tinuing in the traditions of the past. Those traditions now demand, for their adequate 
support, a great amount of hard physical labor on the part of the editorial staffs, a 
strong purpose, and a real idealism. In the complicated processes of writing, editing, com- 
posing, printing, and distributing, the services of many willing students are required. 
These services cannot be fitful and irregular: they must be steady, consistent, and 
loyal. Each of the three student publications has exacted the fullest quantity of such 
work: the Quarterly by maintaining its quahty and usefulness as an undergraduate 
literary organ; the 7<lews by becoming one of the largest and liveliest college weeklies; 
the LoYOL.AN by living up to the high standards set by its predecessors and by realiz- 
ing certain advances which, for former editorial boards, remained only unfulfilled 
dreams. No earnest student will regret the energy he has spent on this work. The 
practical literary training, the opportunity for independent judgment and construc- 
tive thinking, and the necessity of living up to a rigorous editorial program will stand 
among the best lessons he carries away from college. Work of this kind can never 
claim to supplant the class-room and lecture, but it supplements them in a way which 
becomes increasingly beneficial in the light of the practical demands of American life. 




Page two hundred ten 



-y^^j^^ 



HISTORY 

With the exception of the Loyola Quarterly, the puWications of the 
University are of recent origin. The Loyolan made its first appear- 
ance in 1924 as an historical chronicle of the University to that time, 
and gave a brief resume of the scholastic year 1923-24. Since that 
time the book has progressed to the position it now holds of one of 
the First Class yearbooks of the country. The rating has twice been 
won in the National Scholastic Press Association contest. 

The Loyola Quarterly was first issued in 1888 but that publication 
is now obscure. In 1901, a regular magazine known as The Collegian 
made its appearance. The publication was continued and became 
more and more interesting. In 1922 it was advanced to its present 
si:;e and the name was changed to The Loyola ^jxarterly. In quality 
and quantity of material the book took an unquestionable advance 
over its predecessors and today is not surpassed by any magazines 
reaching us from the older and larger universities. 

1925 saw the coming of another publication to the University, the 
Loyola Islews. For some time there had been a need of a weekly 
publication and this need was fulfilled with the coming of the 'N.ews. 
It made its first appearance as a mimeographed sheet and progressed 
through various stages until it is now being published as an eight 
column paper. 



Page two hundred eleven 




William Henry Conley, 
Editor-in-Chief 

THE LOYOLAN 

The Nineteen Twenty-nine Loyolan, the sixth volume in the history of the pub- 
lication, is an attempt to carry on the tradition of preceding volumes and to attain a 
greater degree of perfection from the literary and artistic viewpomt. While we have 
not yet reached the goal of the ideal annual the staff feels that the work of this year 
is another step toward the book which will some time be heralded as the peer of 
university year books. 

In an effort to continue the excellence attained by* the Nineteen Twenty-eight 




R. O'Connor Bryant 

Page two hundred twe]ve 



P. O'Connor 



Healy 




LoYOLAN considerable time has been given to perfecting the ideas incorporated in that 
volume and to improving, wherever possible, the format, the art, and the accounts of 
activities. Last year's book marked such an advance over preceding volumes that the 
present staff encountered difficulty in making as great a stride forward as last year's 
staff made. 

The theme of this volume and the art with which it is portrayed is the manner 



Top Row — Lannon, Lennihan, Arado, Calkins, Ludwig, Landreth. 

Second Row — Tomczak, Ryan, McAulliffe, Hincs, Sheehan, Quinn, Healy. 

Bottom Row — Bruun, O'Connor, P., O'Connor, R., M. D. Zabel, Conley, Bryant, Thomson. 

Page two hundred thirteen 




Thomson 



Ryan 



Bremner 



Neary 



employed by the present staff in surpassing the efforts of predecessors. The theme of 
the book, Frederic Osanam, has a special significance for Loyola. In addition to the 
fact that it is appropriate it also gives an opportunity for artistic treatment seldom 
found m a university annual. The etchings used to portray the theme in the opening 
section and on the division pages are entirely new for annuals and add prestige and 
dignity to the entire book. The artist, working with the staff, has tried to present a 
story of the outstanding events of the life of the great Catholic layman who is about 
to be recognized by the Church as a saint. 

A new staff policy was adopted this year in an effort to systematize the routine 
office work and to speed up the necessary details. While in other years a large staff 
has been called for work this year's staff was cut down to a minimum. By so doing 
it is possible to place responsibility for every detail and thus insure more careful work. 
The efficiency of the present plan has played a large part in the success of the book. 

The staff of the 1929 book is small but deserves the commendation of the entire 
student body. Richard O'Connor, the managing editor, has not only performed the 
duties of business manager but has taken charge of all photography, of the nursing 
section, and of the general details of the book. The position of Senior Editor has been 
admirably filled by John Bryant, a veteran of three years on the staff. In addition to 
his work with the seniors he has also supervised the Life section and has aided in 
developing new men on various sections. In the Junior class Bob Thomson and 
Courtney Ryan proved to be excellent material. Through their efforts the entire 
Athletic Section was sent to the press in record time. The Juniors also supplied the 
fraternity editor, Edward Healy, whose work was on a par with the other members of 
the class. The outstanding sophomore of the staff was Paul O'Connor. He served as 
general assistant to the editor and had charge of the freshman who were fighting for 
recognition on the staff. John Bruun and Anthony Tomczak also showed promise of 
a great future in Loyola's publications. To the other members of the staff and to those 
of other departments, especially to Jim Bremner of the Medical school and Jim Neary 
of the Commerce school the editor expresses his sincere thanks for the excellent work 
they have done and for the success of the book which, in no small measure, is due to 
their efforts. William H. Conley. 



Page two hundred fourteen 




BB»^- 



Every Afternoon 



THE STAFF OF THE NINETEEN TWENTY-NINE LOYOLAN 

William H. Conley Editor-in-Chief 

Richard O'Connor Managing Editor 

Paul L. O'Connor Business Manager 

John Bryant Senior Editor 

SECTION EDITORS 

Edward Healy Fraternities 

Francis Quinn Society 

John Bruun Foreixsics and Dramatics 

Robert Thomson Athletics 

James C. Ryan Associate in Athletics 

Leo Sheehan Snapshots 

John Lannon Administration 

Anthony Tomczak Literary Editor 

DEPARTMENT REPRESENTATIVES 

James X. Bremner, Robert Lee Medicine 

James Neary Commerce 

John Kelly Law 

Paul Topel Dentistry ' 

Mary Wingfield Sociology 



Page two liuiidred fifteen 




John Keating 



THE LOYOLA QUARTERLY 

One who attempts a summary of a year of activity on the Quarterly, is, by the nature 
of the case, somewhat at a loss. The purpose and achievements of a school, while 
they represent a definite part of the institution's program, are not easily reduced to 
exact terms. However, in an appraisal of the iluarterly at the end of another year, it 
may not be wholly beside the point merely to restate its general cause and ideals. 

The Quarterly has two aspects: it is a training field for the penman-to-be and it is 
a record, a depositary for the thought of the University. As a complement to the 
truism that "the only way to learn to write is to write" we may set the psychological 
fact that "the only real reason to write is for publication." A fascination and a com- 
mand there is in the printed page that invariably draws the very best out of the 




Ray 

two hundred sixteen 



Rafferty 



Stimming 



^-^^^^ 




amateur, and it is this essential factor in literary training that the magazine addresses 
itself. 

Not less important is the second function of college magazine, that of mirror and 
chronicle of the intellectual life of the school. A crystallization of ideas and ideals is 
essential to an intelligent student life, not only to clarify issues ■ for those concerned, 
but also to provide a background for the constant transition of college life. Such a 
background must include not only discussion of the particular problems of the period, 
but a definite measurement of achievements in the established forms of thought and 
writing as well. 

As part of these general purposes Volume Twenty-six must be considered. Of its 
particular characteristics we feel happiest in the emphasis that it has placed on a 
definitely Catholic thought and literary standard. John E. Ke.ating. 




Top Row — Diggles, Kunka, Ford, Lannon, Rafferty, Steinbrecher, Murphy. 
Bottom Row — Stimming, Zabel, Keating, Ray, Conley. 



Page two hundred seventeen 




Frank M. Con ley 



THE LOYOLA NEWS 



More complete and workable organisation is the outstanding achievement in the 
development of the Loyola 7s[ews during the year 1928-29. 

Under the three editors, J. Francis Walsh, Frank Conley and Francis Melody, the 
Loyola 7\[eu;s was able to assume with considerable confidence the title of "The World's 
Greatest Catholic College Newspaper." 




Melody Rafferty 

Page two hundred eighteen 



Bri;un 



Sheehan 







The News 

The increase in efficiency of the J<[ews staff was made possible by the estaWishment 
of a class in Journalism. Most of the staff members from the Lake Shore Campus 
student body were enrolled in the class, and their contributions formed the greater part 
of the material that made up the paper. Outside the Journalism class only freshman 




Top Row—D. R. Murphy, E. Kelly, Doheny, F. J. Walsh, McNeil, Calkins. 

Third Row — R. O'Connor, Poynton, Linehan, Van Pelt, Brunn. 

Second Row — Sheehan, Collins, Melody, F. Conley, J. F. Walsh, D. J. Murphy, Shurr. 

Front Row — Landreth, Knittle, Arado, McEvoy, Tomczak, McCabc. 



Page two hundred nineteen 




TOMCZAK 



Kelly 



Walsh 



DOHENY 



and upper classmen of exceptional ability were counted as staff members and allowed 
to participate in both the reportorial and business departments of the paper. 

During the year the paper changed printing presses, which resulted in an increase 
in the size from seven columns to the standard eight column daily newspaper size. 

In February the staff of the J^ews was changed when an editorial board was formed 
and a position of managing editor created. The managing editor's duties were the 
supervision of the activities of the campus editors. Francis Melody was the first Man' 
aging Editor. The editorial board, formed of five men, Frank Doheny, Francis J. 
Walsh, Edward Kelly, Francis Melody and Frank Conley, determined the editorial 
policy of the l<lews and planned many of the editorials that were widely reprinted in 
contemporary college newspapers. Francis Melody succeeded Frank Conley as editor 
in April. 

Aside from the routine work of news gathering, members of the staff were able to 
promote athletic events of intramural character. Perhaps the largest of these events 
to be staged was the intramural basketball tournament in which teams from nearly all 
departments of the university were entered. The basketball tourney was directed by 
John Bruun and Leo Sheehan. 

The Annual Tennis Tournament, sponsored by the Tsjeit's and directed by Francis 
Melody opened the sport year at Loyola while the Horseshoe tourney, also sponsored 
by the K[ews and directed by Leo Sheehan, completed the athletic calendar. 

In the future the J^ews can only continue in its progress. Unification of the 
departments of the university in its news columns has become a reality; talented men 
are on its list of feature writers; copy, advertising, and circulation have all increased 
so that a constant weeding of all three is necessary. The progress of the past points 
to the future of promise and still higher achievements for the K[eu's. 

Frank M. Conley. 



Page two hundred twenty 




Friday Aftc 



LOYOLA NEWS STAFF 

EDITORIAL 

Frank M. Conley Editor-in-Chief 

Frances Melody Managing Editor 

John Bruun La\e Shore Ca-mpus Editor 

Anthony Tomczak La\e Shore Campus Editor 

James Collins Sports Editor 

Frank Quinn Assistant Sports Editor 

Robert Rafferty Assistant Sports Editor 

Edward Carleton Downtown College Editor 

Joseph Henry Assistant Downtown College Editor 

Lawrence Crowley West Campus Editor 

Paul Topel Assistant West Campus Editor 

BUSINESS 

Leo Sheehan Business Manager 

Daniel J. Murphy Advertising Manager 

Thomas Pynton Assistant Advertising Manager 

Robert McCabe Circulation Manager 

Frank Arado Assistant Circulation Manager 

FEATURES 

Robert E. Lee Medical Matinee 

Paul O'Connor Inquiring Reporter 

Richard O'Connor Book. Hotes 

Roger Knittle Varsity Tiews 

Francis J. Walsh What-o/-It? 

Lawrence Crowley Ho Hum 



Page two fitmdred ticentv-oie 



^f?) 




OTHER PUBLICATIONS 

Besides the three major pubHcations of the university, there are a number of others 
of varying types. Of these the most important are Delia Strada, the Students' Hand- 
boo\, the Bur, the Denies, the Ho Hum Boo\, the Loyola Educational Digest and the 
Loyola Educational Index. 

Delia Strada is a monthly newspaper pubHshed by Father Mertz in the interests of 
the chapel drive. It gives information about the progress of the work, the schedule 
of future events, and every issue contains a message from Father Mertz in his inimit- 
able style. It is circulated among all friends and patrons of the Madonna Delia Strada 
Chapel. 

The Students' HandbooX made its first appearance at the Arts and Science depart- 
ment September, 1927. It contains the features of a guidebook with an instruction 
manual for the new student, giving information about the college, its traditions, etc., 
and also giving all the necessary information about scholastic and disciplinary regula- 





Piige two hundred tiventytwo 



ilji.'sJ 




tions. It appeared under the auspices of the Student Association, and was circulated 
around many diiTerent universities of the country. At this time over three hundred 
and fifty comphmentary notices have been received regarding it. 

The Ho Hum Boo\ appeared last spring, under the auspices of the Loyola T^ews, 
edited by William Schoen, "Will" of his famous column "Ho Hum," in the 7<[ews. 
It consists of a compendium of the best contributions which appear in his column dur' 
ing the course of the year. 

The Dentos is the yearbook of the Dental department. In antedates the Loyolan 
by many years, though considerably smaller in size, and for a long time has been the 
medium by which the junior class essays to record the doings of a year at Harrison 
street. The Bur is the organ of the Dental alumni, published thrice yearly. It reflects 
the happenings among both alumni and students of the department. 

The Loyola Educational Digest and its younger brother, the Loyola Educational 
Index, are both edited by Dean Schmidt of the Graduate school. They give a resume 
of the educational periodicals of the current period. 





Page two hundred twenty^three 



"if it be not given to us to see the solution, we shall 
at least have pointed out the goal to others ivho will read 
It." 

OzANAM: Letters. 



Page two hundred twenty-four 




FORENSICS 



f-ff?S 




Charles S. Costello 

Coach of Debate 

Coach of Dramatics 

FORENSICS 

The expected gesture of one in my position is a bow in the direction of the students, 
to compliment them highly for their forensic achievements, to say that they have yet 
to meet their peers in debating and dramatics. Then within the pages of this section 
they in turn are expected to bow back at me, point their words of praise to the coach 
and answer with laudations of him. But such a gesture has been outdone. I prefer 
instead to express my belief in the future of debating and dramatics at Loyola. As I 
see it the future depends as the past depended upon no one individual. It depends 
not upon Loyola alone; it depends not upon the students alone; it depends not upon 
the coach alone. Each has his limitation — the school in its financial and moral sup- 
port; the students in their talents, abilities, intelligence, enthusiasum, and energy; the 
coach in his ability to train, time to train, and intelligence to understand and direct 
his charges. None of these limitations have we as yet reached in full. Until such a 
time arrives when we give the last of our strength, great as the success of the past has 
been, we cannot say we are done with our best. True, as circumstances have allowed, 
we have gone as it seems to the limit, but in reality we are stopped where self-imposed 
obstacles hinder. Each must take to himself the task of giving his all, the University, 
the Students, and the Coach; each must shoulder his responsibilities to the end of his 
limitations; then, and only then, will greatness come to our endeavors. 

Pdf^e two hundred twentysix 



FORENSICS AND DRAMATICS 

The Loyola University Debating Club was organized when the school was located 
on the west side of Chicago and known as St. Ignatius College. The original name 
of the club was the Chrysostonian Society and it was under this name that it flourished 
for many years. After a number of years it was changed to the Loyola Oratorical 
Association and later to the Loyola University Debating Club. Due to a lack of 
interest in debating the club soon became inefficient and almost passed out of existence. 
When the College of Arts and Science was transferred to the Lake Shore Campus 
and the name changed to Loyola University, the debating club was completely re- 
modeled and took a decided step forward. Mr. Charles S. Costello was appointed 
moderator of the club and coach of debate. From that time on the club became one 
of the most active organizations in the University. The number of men engaged in 
the work of the club increased and the trips taken became more numerous and of 
greater length. From present indications the debating club will continue to prosper for 
many years to come. 

Like the debating club the Sock and Buskin Club was organized at St. Ignatius 
College, under its present name. It, too, enjoyed prosperity for several seasons but 
soon fell into a state of decay. Due to the efforts of a certain group of students, 
headed by Mr. Costello it was revived four years ago. Mr. Costello was appointed 
director of dramatics. Interest in dramatics flourished and several successful stage 
attractions were produced that year. It has now become the custom of the club to 
stage two major three-act plays and several one-act productions each year. They have 
also endeavored to make their meetings more entertaining by inviting some theatrical 
character to speak at each gathering. The outlook for the future of the Sock and 
Buskin Club at Loyola is more than promising. 



Page two hundred twentyseven 



^ 




William H. Conley 

THE NATIONAL INTERCOLLEGIATE 
ORATORICAL CONTEST 

Loyola has long been active in the field of oratory and public speaking. For a 
number of years all-university oratorical contests have been conducted the winner of 
which has received a gold medal known as the Carter Harrison Oratorical Contest 
Medal. Last year it was decided to enter the winner of the university contest in the 
national contest. Consequently, William H. Conley, winner of the Harrison contest, 
was entered in the field of national participants. 

The Loyola entry was sent to the state finals held at Northwestern university late 
in April. He was victorious over five other contestants, thereby winning the right to 
represent the state of Illinois in the contest to determine the best college orator in the 
North Central states. This regional contest was held at Ohio State university, Colum- 
bus, Ohio, late in May. Speaking against eight state finalists before a board of judges 
including justices of the supreme court of Ohio and professors of public speaking from 
several of the leading midwestern universities, the Loyola man was ranked first. A9 
winner of this contest Conley had the right to represent the region with six other 
regional winners in a contest to determine the national championship which was held in 
Los Angeles, California, on June 23rd. 

The national intercollegiate contest is held each year and is sponsored by the Better 
America Federation of California. This organi:;ation is composed of business and 
professional men of California who subscribe the funds necessary to meet the expenses 
of the elimination contests and the prizes. 

The subject of the orations given in the national contest are confined each year to 
six or seven topics concerning the Constitution of the United States. Conley's 
oration was entitled "The Constitution." It traced the history of the constitution, its 
importance in the progress of the nation and told what the national charter means to 
present day America. It ended with an emotional appeal which swept every audience 
who heard it with a thrill of devotion to the fundamental law. 

Pdge two hundred twenty-eight 




Bac}{ Row — Wenig, Lybarger, Conley. 
Frew, Albert, Glatfelter. 

The Los Angeles engagement ended the contest to determine the national champion. 
Seven regional representatives met in Bovard Auditorium on June 23. Several noted 
statesmen were expected to judge the contest including Herbert Hoover, Chief Justice 
Taft, and Charles Evans Hughes but unfortunately they were unable to arrive in 
Los Angeles on the day of the contest. As a result, a board of local judges had to 
award the decision. In the contest the New England states were represented by Paul 
Keyser of Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the north Atlantic states by Philip 
Glatfelter of Prmceton; the Central Atlantic by Lee Lybarger of Buchnell; 
the South by Allan Frew of Davidson College; the Central states by William H. 
Conley of Loyola; the West by Carl Alberts of Oklahoma University; and the far 
West by Herbert Wenig of Stanford University. The decision of the judges awarded 
first and second places to the two western men, first place going to Alberts and second 
place to Wenig. 

Following the contest the seven speakers were entertained for nearly two weeks by 
various organizations and individuals throughout California. Speaking engagements 
had been made in advance so that each of the contestants spoke at least once a day' 
to some gathering. The entertainment, however, did not consist solely of speaking 
to Rotarians and University Clubs. Tours were arranged through movie studios, 
dinner and theater parties were given, and the Californians showed the foreigners 
what is reputed to be such a marvellous state. 

The publicity given to the schools represented in the contest can not be estimated. 
In the West where people still enjoy such things as oratory, interest is immediately 
aroused in the minds of the people in the school sending regional champions to the 
coast. Schools unheard of in that section of the country spring into prominence as 
soon as their contestant is introduced while well known institutions are raised in the 
estimation of the people. 

While Loyola did not win the national championship it holds the championship of 
the Central states. The success of last year should be an inspiration to Loyolans to 
continue in the field of speech, the reputation which the university now holds. 



Page two hundred twenty-nine 




Keating 



O'Connor 



Ray 



CONLEY 



THE JOHN NAGHTEN DEBATE 

Each year at the end of the debating season a contest is held within the club to 
determine the champion debater of the club. All members of the Debating Club are 
eligible to enter the preliminary contest from which four are picked to take part in 
the final contest. The winner of the final contest is awarded the John Naghten Debate 
Medal which signifies the championship of Loyola University. 

The Naghten debate was a fitting climax to last year's successful season. As it 
happened the four men who had been the nucleus of the successful squad of last year 
won their way into the finals of the contest. The question which had been given to 
the four men to debate was, "Resolved, That Intercollegiate Athletics Should be 
Abolished." The affirmative was upheld by John E. Keating and James C. O'Connor 
while George K. Ray and William H. Conley presented the case for the negative. The 
four men who participated in the finals were widely experienced in the field of debating 
and oratory. The result was that the contest was a model debate. 

The debate was held in St. Ignatius Auditorium and was given before a large 
crowd. Professor Barolsheimer, Coach of Debate of Northwestern University, gave 
a critical decision of the debate and of each speaker. According to his decision the 
affirmative won the debate but Mr. Conley was the outstanding debater and therefore 
was awarded the Naghten medal and the championship of the University. 

Although Conley was only a sophomore he had distinguished himself in every 
forensic encounter during the year. Coming the week before his winning of the 
Central ' States oratorical championship the victory in this contest stamped Conley as 
the undisputed champion in the field of speech. 



Page ttoo hundred thirty 




::3ii ^' 




George K. Ray 



THE CARTER HARRISON ORATORICAL CONTEST 

With the increased interest in oratory and public speaking which has been so 
marked at Loyola during the past few years it is little wonder that the Carter 
Harrison oratorical contest this year created considerable interest throughout the 
entire University. The increased interest in the contest may have been caused 
also by the fact that representatives from the Law School and the School of 
Medicine were entered. 

A preliminary contest was held early in February to determine the six speakers 
who would enter the final contest. Twelve speakers entered the preliminary trial 
which was judged by Mr. Costello, Father Reiner, and Mr. Steggert. The judges 
decided that George Ray, Joseph Heniy, Charles Boyle, John O'Connor, Douglas 
McCabe and Richard Ford should have the right to enter into competition for the 
coveted Harrison medal. 

The finals of the contest came late in February. Although the contest showed 
the usual excellent talent the judges were satisfied that George K. Ray, of the 
College of Arts and Sciences, was easily the outstanding speaker of the group 
He was therefore judged the champion of Loyola. 

Mr. Ray is a senior in the college and is a veteran debater and orator. Through- 
out his college career he has distinguished himself as an exceptional speaker and 
as deserving of the championship. While a freshmen he was honored by being 
judged one of the winners of the freshmen debate. Since that time he has con- 
tinued to bring honor both to himself and to the University through his forensic 
endeavors. 



Page two hundred thirtyane 



^R> 




Richard F. Ford 
President 

THE LOYOLA UNIVERSITY DEBATING CLUB 

As an organization which is never satisfied, no matter how great previous achieve- 
ments have been, the Loyola university debating club set a record this year which 
surpassed the anticipation of the most optimistic supporter of the club. The club 
undertook a program which was the most pretentious in the history of forensics at 
Loyola and ended the season with a record of victories which challenges those institu- 
tions which claim championships. The eastern trip carried the name of Loyola into 
the forensic world as an outstanding contender for national honors. The semi-public 
debates before local organizations gave the people of Chicago an opportunity to 
witness an example of the training given by the university to any student who feels 
inclined to debate. 

Richard Ford was chosen president of the club for this year. His energetic work 
the preceding year as chairman of the program committee proved his ability to handle 
the position. His ceaseless activity in administrating the aifairs of the club was out- 
standing and through his efforts interest in the club was advanced to the utmost 

The success of the eastern tour is in no small manner due to the efforts of Paul 
O'Connor, the energetic manager of debate. He was successful in arranging debates 
with the foremost colleges and universities of the east. In addition to arranging the 




SwEITZER 
Page two hundred thirty-two 



Keating 



CONLEY 




Paul L. O'Connor 
Manager of Debates 

schedule he took charge of the team on the trip, taking care of all details of travelling. 

The office of vice president was filled by John Keating who has been an active 
member of the club for the past three years. Charles Boyle was secretary for the 
first semester but due to inability to attend meetings was replaced by Robert M. 
Sweitzer, Jr. William H. Conley was the treasurer of the club and financed the 
eastern trip. He took entire charge of the funds available and by careful planning 
made it possible to meet the expenses of the home schedule as well as those of the trip, 
leaving a surplus in the treasury at the end of the season. 

The cooperation of the members of the club with the coach and the officers made 
possible the great success of this year's activities. The material aid given by Knights 
of Columbus Councils and parish organizations made possible these activities. With 
the continued cooperation and interest shown in the club by under classmen the 
future of debating at Loyola seems secure. 




Top Rom — Murphy, Bruun, Walsh, Hines, Costello. 
Second Row — Reed, McCabe, Poynton, Ray, Downey, Lietz. 
Third Row — O'Connor, Keating, Ford, Sweit~er, Conley. 



Page tii'o hundred thirty-three 



^ 




Keating 



F(mD 



Ray 



CONLEY 



THE SEASON AT HOME 

One of the fullest years in the history of the Debating Soeiety has come to a close. 
Coupled with the long eastern trip was a strenuous home campaign against invading 
universities, most of which were met while the eastern trip was in progress. Add to 
this, then, the innumerable semi-public debates held before K. C. Councils and other 
parish organizations, and you will find that the year just closed is marked as one of 
the busiest in the history of the organization. 

While Ford, Keating, Ray O'Connor and Cnnley v^'cre making their victorious tour 
of foreign fields, the home fort was. being held down by Paul Reed, Robert Murphy 
and John Bruun. The brunt of the attack was shouldered by these three who met 
the best that half a dozen universities could send. The first college which sent its 
champions up against the Loyola boys was the University of Lawrence, Kansas. This 
debate was put on the air for the benefit of countless millions over Radio Station 
WCFL on March 6th. Robert Murphy and John Bruun, speaking in the first inter- 
collegiate debate of their careers turned in a remarkable performance for novices. 

In a three man debate held at St. Scholastica High School before an audience of 
girls, Paul Reed, Robert Murphy and John Bruun encountered the championship 
team from St. Thomas. This was a no-decision debate on the jury question. The. 
applause rendered was ample evidence of how well the debate was liked. It was for- 
tunate that it had been decided to make the debate a no-decision one, because if the 
vote had been left up to the girls they would probably have voted for the best looking 
debaters — and the Loyolans never did go in for beauty contests. Besides, having no 
decision debates, it was easy to keep a clean record. 

The next intercollegiate competition was with the University of Florida. This 
debate was held at the new Nurses' Home of St. Bernards. A large audience of, 
nurses heard the team of Murphy and Reed handle the situation in a convincing man- 
ner to outclass the Southerners. Although the debate was another no-decision affair, 
the concensus of opinion was that Loyola was the victor of the tilt. The nurses were 
warm in their appreciation of the debate and the dinner provided afterwards made 



Pdge two Jiundrcd thirtyfour 




O'Connor 



McCabe 



Murphy 



Reed 



the evening the most enjoyable of the whole debating season. It is hoped that more 
debates will be held at St. Bernards next year. 

St. Xavier was met in a three man debate held at St. Andrew's parish. Here again 
the competition was stiff, but Loyola was successful in downing them. The only, 
defeat of the season was administered at the hands of St. Viator from Bourbonnis, 
Illinois, at Rosary College. The three man teams provided an evening of action 
which held the interest of the Rosary girls from start to finish. The Viator's lads 
proved more convincing in the opinion of the audience and an overwhelming vote 
was cast in their favor. The entertainment provided afterwards was the most en- 
joyable part of the evening from the Loyola standpoint. 

At St. Francis Hospital, Western Reserve was met in a two man debate. This was 
also a no-decision debate which concluded the season at home. The home debate 
average was about 999 if you take the opinion of the debaters; as there are no other 
figures available, you might as well. The year was a decided success. 

To provide experience for the men who were not able to participate in the inter- 
collegiate debates, a great number of semi-public debates were held throughout the 
year. Not only did this benefit the debaters, but the honorariums which the parishes 
saw fit to give, enabled the debate manager to arrange for the long and expensive 
eastern trip. There was a debate at St. Maurice Parish on April 2nd. This was 
followed by a debate on April Sth, at St. Benedict parish hall. The LaFayette Council 
and St. Peter's Church both heard debates during April. Saint Augustine K. C. heard 
one and then a week or two later another one was put on in the parish for the benefit 
of the school students. The final debate of the year was held at Whiting, Indiana, 
before a K. C. Council. It closed the prolonged season on May 14th away from home. 

These debates were featured by the appearance of Freshmen debaters who gave 
great promise of a successful future. Among these were Robert McCabe, Thomas 
Downey, Edward Hines, Frank Arado, John Lenihan, Thomas Poynton, and Joseph 
Daly. The upperclassmen who took part included Frank Casseretto, Paul 
O'Connor, Robert Murphy, Paul Reed, George K. Ray, John Keating, Charles Boyle, 
Richard Ford, John Klest, William H. Conley and John K. Bruun. 



Page two hundred thirty-five 




Keating, O'Connor. Ford, Ray, Conley 



THE EASTERN TRIP 



On March 2nd five members of the Loyola University Debating club left on a 3000 
mile tour of the east. Richard Ford, William Conley, Paul O'Connor, John Keating 
and George Ray were the men who made the three weeks' trip. They participated 
in sixteen intercollegiate debates, winning six, losing two, while one was declared a 
draw. The remaining six were no decision contests. Decisions were gained over 
Boston College, Fordham, New York University, Hunter College, St. Viator and 
Western Reserve. The losses were sustained at the hands of St. Xavier and New 
Rochelle. 

The trip, one of the longest ever taken by a forensic team of any college in the 
country, started on March 4th with a debate against the University of Detroit at 
Detroit, Mich. Keating and Ford upheld the negative side of the question, "Resolved, 
that the jury system should be abolished in criminal cases." The vote of the audience 
showed an exact tie. Then Ford and Ray met two Ohio schools in no decision debates, 
Ohio Northern of Ada, and Heidelberg University of Tiffin. 

On March 7th Keating and Conley, arguing the affirmative side of the question, 
"Resolved, that the hydro-electric power of the country should be publicly owned and 
operated," gained a decisive victory over Western Reserve University of Cleveland. 
The audience vote stood 86-5 in favor of Loyola. 

March 11th Boston College was defeated by an affirmative team composed of Conley 
and Ray. The question was the abolition of the jury, and the decision was rendered 
by three judges. The next night O'Connor, the manager of debate, speaking for the 
first time on the trip, and Ray defeated Hunter College of New York, a girls' college, 
on the affirmative side of the question, "Resolved, that women are less intelligent than 
men." The decision was rendered by an audience composed almost entirely of women. 
On the same night Loyola sustained their first loss on the trip. Conley and Ford were 
defeated by the College of New Rochelle, another giris' college. 

Fordham University vv-as defeated the following night by a three judge decision. 



Page two hundred thirty-six 



m 




Standing — Ford, Ray, O'Connor, Keating. 
Seated — Conley 



Conley, Keating and Ray composed the Loyola team. On March 16th Conley and 
Ford were given an audience decision over New York University at New York, while 
Keating and Ray participated m a no decision debate with Catholic University at 
Washington. On March 17 Conley and Ford met Princeton in a no-decision contest 
before the International Club of New York City. George Washington University 
was met in a no-decision contest at Washington, March 18th. Ford and K'eating; 
represented Loyola. After making a hurried trip from Washington to Dayton, Con- 
ley, Keating and Ray debated the University of Dayton the following night. On 
March 20th two debates were held. St. Viator lost to Conley and Ray on a critic 
judge decision at Bourbonnais, while Keating and Ford lost to St. Xavier at Cin- 
cinnati. The trip was completed by a no-decision debate with Miami University at 
Harrison, Ohio. 

Besides being one of the longest ever attempted, the trip was by far the most suc- 
cessful ever taken by a Loyola team from the viewpoint of both victories and publicity. 
The year 1929 marks another great step forward taken by the Loyola University 
Debating Club, and the credit must go to the five Ramblers who spread the name of 
Loyola throughout the east. 



Page two hundred thirty-senen 



^ 




Frank Doheny 
President 



THE SOCK AND BUSKIN CLUB 



"Back in the days when our ancestors hved in trees and threw coconuts ." 

Well, that's the way all modern fables start, and if we were writing a fable we'd 
start that way too. But we're not. We're writing about the founders of the Sock 
and Buskin Club, and, if our authorities can be believed, it would be inaccurate to say 
that they lived in trees and threw coconuts, though who can tell; perhays they did. 

At any rate, irregardless of the habits of the inhabitants of Loyola back in 1925, 
legend tells us that there were a number of clever individuals who had brains, ability, 
industry and salesmanship; and the greatest of these was salesmanship. So they used 
their brains and decided that a university as large as Loyola should be represented by 
a dramatic organization. Then they showed their ability by choosing a play and 
securing a director. Thirdly, they became industrious and drew up great plans for 
the organization. But the next step was the hardest. To produce any play which 
would amount to the proverbial row of beans, it was necessary to have actors. And 
where were they to find them? So all these intelligent men became salesmen. Up and down 
the corridors of the departments they went, buttonholding everyone from janitors to 
deans, and they finally sold their idea to a sufficient number of equally intelligent 
prospective actors. The problem 'was solved. Practice for the law started, enthusiasm 
waxed high, the cast and the coach were most capable, and the result was that the 
Sock and Buskin Club was firmly entrenched in the activities of the university. 

Of course, organising such a club was not entirely a new idea. In fact, a dramatic 
organization was one of the earliest of Loyola's outside activities, but like so many of 
the brain children of our forefathers it had languished and died. So when the club 
was reorganized in '25, and reorganizers were casting about for a name, there waS' 
nothing more logical than to choose the very apt name of the dramatic organization 
of bygone days, the Sock and Buskin Club. There was a significance in the name and 
an indication that the fellow who made it up originally knew his history. The name 
was derived from the costumes of the old Athenian actors; from the dramatist and' 
the clown. It seems that it was the vogue at the time for the comedians to wear high 
socks in order that the 'oi polloi could tell them from the tragedians who were clad in 
half shoes, known as buskins. Since the Loyola drama society was to combine the 
humorous and the tragic, it was thought wise to adopt the names of the things which 
stood as symbols for them. Hence it became known as the Sock and Buskin Club. 

Page two hundred thirty-eight 



m 




Barker 



Spelman 



Ford 



Well, to get down to the year of our Lord, 1929, semesters one and two. At the 
beginning of the fall term, the club proved that a great deal of the brains of the 
founders of the club had been handed down to them when they decided to elect their 
officers. The president of the preceding year, Raymond Kerwin, had evacuated as 
seniors have a habit of doing, leaving a very important position to be filled. The 
members cast their eyes about the club; then all focused upon one individual. They 
knew who they wanted and they got him. Frank P. Doheny became the leader of 
the club during tv^'o of the most active semesters in its history. Virginia Barker was 
vice-president and Thomas Spelman secretary. 

Nev^- members joined the organization at once. Plans were immediately made to 
produce "The Confession" which was so successfully given at the Goodman on Febru' 
ary 17. Speakers were introduced in to the club. In short, the club became a vital 
being, a model of successful activity for the other university organisations. With Mr. 
Costello so ably directing its productions, the club gained new laurels and won greater 
and finer distinctions than ever before. May 5th saw the final play of the year and 
the last brilliant achievement of the club for the season of "29. A season truly suc- 
cessful in every way. 

John K. Bruun. 



Page tii'O hundred thirty-nine 




John Bruun 
Bimness Manager 



ACTIVITIES OF THE SOCK AND BUSKIN CLUB 

"Lets have a party." 

No sooner was the Sock and Buskin Ciub opened for business at the beginning of 
the year than certain individuals became imbued with a fraternal spirit and suggested 
a dance, with refreshments. Who ever heard of anyone turning a suggestion Hke 
that down? No one did then, either, and so a night was picked out on which all the 
members of the club would gather and bring their friends and dance and eat. That's 
exactly what happened. In one of the large rooms of the Downtown College, the' 
Blue Kittens, a famous campus orchestra led by Anthony Tomczak, furnished the 
music. From nine till midnight the musicians tooted. And from nine till midnight 
danced the Sock and Buskiners. Between dances they went to the floor below to 
demonstrate to Mr. Costello their acting ability in an attempt to win a part in "The 
Confession." It was not until a few days had elapsed that the selections were made 
so the party was spoiled for no one. The ice cream and cookies were a welcome gift 
of the management and were thoroughly enjoyed by the dancing actors. 

It seems that no organization can get along without a business manager. Richard 
O'Connor, having successfully piloted the club through a production the year before, 
found that he would not have time to keep the position. The problem came of 
choosing a new manager. After some deliberation Mr. Costello chose John K. 
Bruun, a new member of the club, to succeed O'Connor. And so the job of making 
the production, "The Confession," a financial success was in the hands of the capable 
president, Frank Doheny, and the new business manager. Due to their efforts the 
play was given before the largest crowd that has ever seen a Sock and Buskin play. 

Before presenting "The Confession" before the public at the Goodman Theatre, 
the Girls of Rosary College were treated to a Saturday matinee performance at their 
school in River Forest. The stage was a little small for the amount of scenery neces- 
sary to the successful production of the play and consequently the action was some- 
what hampered. Nevertheless the actors were very grateful for the opportunity of 
presenting the play, and from the reports which simmered back, the Rosarians were 
equally pleased with the opportunity of seeing the play. 

Several speakers were introduced to the club throughout the year. They gave 
several new and entertaining ideas to the club members which proved helpful when 



Page two hundred forty 




THE SOCK AND BUSKIN CLUB 

Top Row — McNeil, Maguire, J. Walsh, Calkins, Bruun. 

Second Row — F. Walsh, Sheehan, Collins, Lenihan, O'Connor. 

Bottom Row — Burns, Barry, Barker, Doheny, Wingfield, Fitzgerald, Fennell. 



the productions were staged. Mr. Lorren Watte, drama critic from a daily paper, 
gave a very instructive talk on proper staging of the drama. The countless ques' 
tions which the club members asked after the talk was indicative of the interest 
which had been aroused. A talk by one of the actors in a leading drama in the 
loop was also much enjoyed at one of the regular meetings. 

The second play of the year was given three times before varied audiences. The 
iirst time that "Thank You" was presented was May 4th, the day before the Good- 
man performance. A large group of nurses at St. Bernards Hotel Dieu School of 
Nursing sat for two hours in their own hall at the school listening to the interesting 
and remarkably well presented play which held them enthralled. 

On Sunday evening, May 5 th, the main performance was given at the Goodman 
Theatre where all the productions of the Sock and Buskin Club are presented. Be- 
fore a large and appreciative audience the play, which was probably the most suc- 
cessful of the club's oiferings, was presented. The applause rendered it was strong 
proof of the pleasure it had given the audience. 

The play was also presented the following Sunday evening before St. Augustine 
Holy Name Society and a parish crowd. This audience also showed a strong liking 
for the play. 

So came the end of the year and an end to the Sock and Buskin activities of the 
school term. The club had successfully given two major performances under the 
direction of Mr. Costello, who demonstrated again his ability to direct and guide 
a dramatic organization as active as the Sock and Buskin Club. His genius and 
personality were the deciding factors in the success which the plays enjoyed. His 
leadership was admired and respected. 



Page tu'O hundred forty-one 



^ 




THE CONFESSION 

The first play given by the Sock and Buskin Club this year was "The Confession." 
It was presented at the Goodman Theatre on a Sunday evening, February 17th, before 
the largest house that had even seen a Sock and Buskin Club play. The intense drama 
which marked the sequence of events had the audience spell-bound from start to finish. 

The play evolved around a murder which a man committed and then confessed to 
his parish priest. As things turned out, the brother of this priest was charged with 
the murder due to a convincing string of circumstantial evidence. With his brother 
on trial, and then convicted and sentenced to be hung, would the priest break the 
seal of Confession and tell? When it became evident that he would not, it seemed 
that there was little chance to save the inaocent man's life. 

The greatest drama and conflict of emotions came in the third act in the court room 
scene. Here the battle of wits between the lawyers as witness after witness was ex' 
amined held the audience enthralled. With one lawyer fighting to save the brother's 
life and the other lawyer fighting to destroy it, with the old mother of the seemingly 
doomed man weeping from a broken heart, with his sweetheart hoping and praying 
but able to do nothing, it is little wonder that the theatre was still and breathless. It 
was only in the final scene that true justice was achieved when the real murderer, now 
dying, confessed his crime just in time to save the life of the innocent man. 

The part of the priest was admirably played by Frank P. Doheny. It was a terrible 
battle that waged in his soul whether to tell the truth and save his brother's life, or to 
keep the seal of the confession intact, and see his brother hanged. So vividly did 
Doheny feel his part that the audience lived it with him, prayed with him, and for 
the time looked squarely into his soul, so torn and anguished. The end of the play 
and its justification of his belief in God seemed a personal triumph for all who were 
there. 

The part of the innocent brother about whom the storm raged was taken by Frank 
Arado. As the handsome, devil-may-care sweetheart of Rose Creighton (Theresa 
Finnell) he won the hearts of the audience from the start. Miss Finnell portrayed the 



Page two hundred forty-two 



f-^ 




part of sweetheart in a charming style. Her love and devotion for the unfortunate 
man seemed at times to be the only thing which kept him fighting. She was not only 
the hero's sweetheart, but also the sweetheart of the entire audience. 

The most diiScult part was that of Joseph Dumont, the real murderer. This part 
was taken by Richard Ford who became for the evening a wretched, miserable 
scoundrel, sly, tricky, but scared to death of giving away his secret, and scared, too, 
that the priest might tell what he knew. Ford undoubtedly gave as great an interpre- 
tation of his part as any of the club's actors has ever given. 

Agnes Fitzgerald, the old mother of the priest and Tom, excellently played a most 
difficult role. Heartbroken by the turn of events which led to her son's conviction, torn 
from him by officers of the law who knew no mercy, her misery and helplessness won 
her the audiences' tears. Her characterization was a brilliant piece of acting. 

Michael, as played by Ted Connelly, had the audience in gales of laughter after 
every sentence. Jerome Kozlowski, playing the part of Andrew Strong, proved to 
be an ideal officer. John Lennihan, playing the role of clerk of the court, had the 
audience roaring as he swore in each witness. Judge Peabody, the part taken by Frank 
J. Walsh, was well received, also. Walsh in his robes and white wig gave every. 
appearance of being a real judge and his dignity and excellent speaking voice made 
his characterization most real. The two attorneys were played by J. Francis Walsh 
and John K. Brunn. The ease with which Walsh handled his case despite the fact 
that he was hampered on every side, and the cocksureness of his opponent provided an 
ideal contrast for the vivid court scene. The staging of the play was taken care of by 
Paul O'Connor, stage manager. The cast as a whole presented the play in an excellent 
manner which won for it a great deal of praise from everyone who saw the show. 
Despite the heavy drama and the difficult parts, the action swung through swiftly 
and convincingly. 



Page two hundred forty-three 



"Let us occujpy ourselves with the people which has 
too ynany needs and not enough rights, which with reason 
claims a more complete share in public ajfairs and pro- 
tection for labor and against destitution, which indeed 
has bad leaders but only for lac\ of good ones." 

OzANAM : Letters. 



Page two hundred forty-four 




MUSIC 



<^ 




G. Salvador 
Director 

MUSICAL ACTIVITIES 

FOREWORD 

It has been my greatest pleasure in the past two years to head the two splendid 
Loyola Organizations, namely, the Loyola University Glee Club, and the Loyola 
University Choral Society. I say this because it would be hard, very hard indeed, 
for the head of any organization to have better people with whom to work. Her^ 
are two organizations which I do not for a moment hesitate to present as a model, 
a distinction merited entirely by the wonderful spirit of sacrifice and good fellowship 
expressed by the members. 

Without expectation of any reward whatever in view, but working only for the 
love of Art — for Art's sake — to attend each and every one of the very numerous re- 
hearsals held, and to do this under the most adverse and trying conditions of weather 
and distance — this much could be said to the credit of these two organizations. Only 
such spirit, only such splendid attitude could bring out such musical successes as 
were accomphshed in the past two years. 

Therefore, I take this opportunity to extend my sincere thanks and appreciation to 
the many members of either organization who have so generously given of their time 
and energy to this most worthy activity. It is my opinion that with a continuance 
of this iine spirit of cooperation, there is no reason why the Glee Club and the Choral 
Society should not eventually become the best and foremost organizations of their kind 
m the country. 




Page two hundred forty-six 



^^^1^^^ 



MUSICAL ACTIVITIES 

Musical activities at L<:)yola have so progressed and flourished 
within the last two years, that it is really remarkable to observe the 
growth of interest in music among the students at Loyola. 

Several desultory attempts were made in the past several years to 
develop musical activities at Loyola. However, the checkmate of 
insufficient talent prevented any real progress in these lines. A 
band was formed, but soon became inactive; an attempt at a glee 
club was even made, but it, too, met its sad fate. 

It was not until the opening of the 1927-28 school term that any 
real success attended the organization of musical activities On 
September 29, 1927 — a date which will be memorable to the chron 
iclers of our Greater Loyola — Rev. Joseph S. Reiner, S.J., founded 
the Loyola University Band, and showered upon it in its infancy 
that encouragement and support for which it hungered and without 
which it could not have survi\^ed. 

Almost simultaneous with the formation of the band, was the 
organization and active development of the Glee Club. Mr. Bert' 
ram J. Steggert, registrar at the Lake Shore Campus, was the 
founder and original director of this group, but due to lack of time, 
he relinquished his claims of directorship in favor of Mr. Graciano 
Salvador, who has acted as Director of Music at Loyola ever since. 

Later on in the year the assistance of the girls at the Sociology 
school was secured, and the Choral Society was formed. The nu- 
merous, and exceptionally successful presentations of this organiza- 
tion are so well known that the mention of even a few would be 
passing over other programs no less laudable. 

And now music has risen to the honor of being one of the major 
activities at Loyola. No longer is it an art gloried only in private 
reception rooms, at recitals, and at concerts; no longer is the band 
a collection of a few trumpets, clarinets and tubas. The students 
now take a serious interest in music and its relation to the develop- 
ment of Greater Loyola. 



Page two hundred forty-seven 



m^ 




Edward Keevins 



THE LOYOLA UNIVERSITY BAND 

The Loyola University Band can now look back upon another year of existence 
as one of the two major musical activities of the university. It has passed through 
the trying stages of organization and first year development, has proven its worth 
as an important factor at most school activities, and has finally come to the cuL 
mination of its second year. 

Many of the men who received sweaters and letters last year were back for 
practice last September. Very little of that zeal and spirit of sacrifice, so char- 
acteristic of all participants ni musical activities, was lacking at the opening of the 
season just gone by. 

Just as last's years progress was the direct result of the encouraging exhortations 
of Dean Joseph Reiner, S.J., the honorary president of the organization, so this 
year the band owes its success in large part to the untiring zeal and efforts of the 
director, Mr. Graciano Salvador, moderator of Musical Activities. His dynamic 
personality secured the support and cooperation of all the members of the band, 
and it was with hopeful anticipation for a year of success that the organization 
looked forward to the coming year. 

One of the first matters to be considered by the organization upon its return 
last fall was the election of oificers fcr the guidance and direction of the group 
through the ensuing season. As a result Edward Keevins was elected president. 
He is a trumpet player of no mean ability, having had about five years experience 



Page tivo hundred forty-eight 




in both classical and popular solo and orchestra work. Besides, he is a singer 
with a tenor voice such as would rival even the best of professional artists. 

Through the untiring efforts of the president and the endless help and encour- 
agement of the director, the band has been having regular weekly rehearsals, and 
has appeared at several occasions and festivities of the university. The dedication 
of St. Bernard's Hospital last fall as well as the various football games during the 
season all provided excellent channels for the dissemination of the musical knowl' 
edge acquired by the members during the process of their tutorage. 

When spring came, most of the home basketball games were supplied with highly 
spirited strains of rhythmic melody. The tournament, too, was supplemented by 
musical accompaniment between games. 

Again, as last year, the band is thankful to the Dental college for its contingent 
of members. And again, it gives warning that it will ferret out the musically 
inclined students of the Medical, Law, and even Arts, colleges who have thus far 
appeared either bashful or simply unwilling to join the ranks of the band, and to 
partake of that ambrosial refreshment which is the boon of the muse of melody. 



Page two hundred forty-nine 



^ 




Alphonse Tomaso, President 



THE GLEE CLUB 

Alphonse Tomaso President 

George Weinrich Vice-President 

Edward Keevins Secretary 

George Weinrich Business Manager 

Harry Stauder Trea^uj'er 

John Klest Librarian 




Top Row — J. F. Walsh, Baumbich, Raso, Sheehan, Roccisano, Kerpec. Crimmins. 
Second Row — J. P. Walsh, Cutrera, Hackett, Klest. Hccht, Keevins, Ford. 
Front Ron- — Vincenti, Shun, Weinrich, Tomaso, Stauder, Rosich, Modica. 



Page tu'o hundred fifty 




George Weinrich 
Biisiness Manager 



THE GLEE CLUB 



The Glee Club now has two candles in its cake. However they do not repre- 
sent the achievements which it has attained but merely the milestones of its exis- 
tence. It was but two short years ago that a determined effort was made to 
revive musical activities at Loyola and as a result we now have, today, an organ- 
ization that surpasses our fondest dreams. It has proved itself to be one of 
Loyola's most valuable assets. 

The spirit of cooperation and self sacrifice which flourished in the Club during 
the first season was no less vigorous or wanting in its second year of existence. 
The mere cooperation of the members, howeyer, cannot alone spell success. There- 
fore, let us not forget the unstinting efforts of the man to whom the Glee Club 
owes its organisation — Mr. Steggert. The Club received the cooperation of the 
faculty through Dean Reiner and Father Schulte who imparted to us much of 
their dynamic energy. 

- The man to whom the Glee Club owes its musical success is none other than 
our director, Mr. Salvador. He, through his undauntless efforts, has moulded 
from raw material an organi:;ation that is worthy of meriting the name of The 
Loyola University Glee Club. It was not only his spirit that permeated the Club 
but also his talent as a director and a musician for which he is noted not only in 
this country but also in Italy and Spain. His son, Mario, reflecting the true genius 
of his father, is our regular pianist. 

Alphonse R. ToM.^so. 



Page two hundred fifty-one 




Howard Shurr, President 



THE CHORAL SOCIETY 

The Choral Society which is built around the glee club has scored another successful 
year. On Sunday, December 16, the organisation presented Maunder's Cantata 
"Bethlehem" at St. Ignatius' Auditorium. The society presented an entertainment of 
an unusual character for a choral society by rendering a dramatized cantata. The 
cantata is of three acts and recalls simply and reverently the scenes which mark the 
event of our Savior's birth at Bethlehem. It was especially fitting for a musical club 
of a Catholic University to stage such a performance the week before Christmas. A 
special performance was given for the Sisters of the city on the afternoon previous to 
the public performance. 

A second appearance was made during the winter months when another of Maun- 
der's work, "Olivet to Calvary," was given at one of the city's oldest churches, the 
Church of Notre Dame. The club had given this work the year before at a public 
appearance with such success that the parishioners of the Notre Dame church asked 
for the opportunity to again hear the performance. A large number of people were 
present at the second triumph of the season. 

The year was closed with a popular concert given at St. Ignatius" Auditorium on 
Sunday, May 19. 



Page two hundred fiftytwo 




Top Rou'— Baumhich, Hackett, Cnmmins, Weinrich, Tomaso, Cutrera, J. P, W.iMi. J F, Walsh, 
Raso, Modica, Keevins, Roccisano, Klest. 

Second Row — Hecht, M. Fitzgerald, M. Kent, M. Powers, A. Powers, M. Dugan, C. Powers, 
L. Behm. A. Uling, E. Barrett, Connelly, O'Donnell, McFarland, Connors, McDonald. 

Front Row — Ford, McEvoy, Kerpec, Harrington, Barry, Block, Barron, Himsel, V. Gill, Har- 
rington, Shurr, Stauder, Vincenti, Rosich. 



While every member of the organisation did all possible to make the year's work 
a success the officers of the club and the committees are to be especially congratulated 
on their efforts. The faculty support through Father Schulte, Father Reiner, and 
Mr. Salvador made the undertakings a success from both the business and musical 
standpoints. 

The Choral Society did not confine itself merely to its activities as a musical or- 
ganization but throughout the year was recognized as a social society. A number of 
small socials were held at regular intervals and the season was closed with an in- 
iormal dinner dance. The affairs were all held in the social room of the Gym. 

Although the Choral Society is only two years old it has had two years of success. 
The past year has found considerable progress both from the standpoint of talent 
and from the standpoint of organization. The society has for its purpose teaching 
all who belong to it a knowledge and love of music as well as an appreciation of the 
better compositions. Its purpose has been fulfilled. 



Page two hundred fiftythne 



"A selfish regard for ourselves and for our wor\, winch 
would underrate the virtue and merit of everything out- 
side our own little circle . . . a verbose philanthropy 
preferring words to deeds: and officialdom, which would 
hamper our forward march and tie up our machinery 
with red tape: all that will hinder us." 

OzANAM: Letters. 



Page two hundred fifty-four 




SPIRITUAL 




Theodore J. Shulte, S.J. 
Spiritual Director 

RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES IN 1928-1929 

Four distinct times did the National Catholic Weekly publish articles or editorials 
that were stimulated by events that happened on our campus during this past year. 
Not so bad. Religious activities in a university seldom become national in interest — 
yet we seem to have demanded some wide-spread notice this year. 

The Religious Leadership Conference of last year was surpassed this year by three 
such conferences, and each was greater than its predecessor. Meetings were held No- 
vember 1st, February 22nd and May 9th. Practically every Catholic institution of 
learning beyond the grades was represented by delegates at these meetings. 

A new monthly publication was maugurated by this group of leaders, the first issue 
being mimeographed, but since then all copies have been printed. It has a quaint 
name — Ciscora. The word is made up of the initialed letters of the Chicago, lUinois, 
Student Conference on Religious Activities. The last issue for the current year will 
appear during the first week in June. 

The University rejoices in the formation of the Cosmas and Damian Guild for the 
Spiritual Development of Professional Students, and is particularly happy over the 
success in numbers and enthusiasm of the various retreats — the record retreat of the 
Professional Students under Father J. Donohue, S.J., and the Ladies' Retreats, at the 
University Library and at The Cenacle. The Downtown Chapel, ably managed by 
Father James Walsh, S.J., proved an attraction to the medical and dental students, 
and the Sodality has grown into a real power for those who have availed themselves 
of the opportunities afforded by Father Walsh. All in all there has been very rapid 
Catholic progress in the year. 



Page two hundred jtftysix 




SODALITY HISTORY 

The Sodality of the Blessed Virgin Mary on the Lake Shore campus 
at Loyola has seen an exceptionally successful year. Being the center 
of activity in the Catholic Student Conferences on Religious Activities 
(Ciscora) for the past year or two, it has been the gracious host of 
several local conventions, and this coming June will welcome the 
delegates from all over the country to the First National Men's 
Sodality Convention. 

The Sodality is the oldest organization at Loyola, but at no time 
was the activity as spirited and as enthusiastic as it has been in the 
last two or three years. 

Two years ago last May, Robert Hartnett, then prefect, presided 
over the first local sodality convention sponsored by Loyola. Since 
then there have been several conferences, culminating in the national 
one held in St. Louis last year, and the coming one at Loyola in June. 

The Sodality has had a most remarkable history — remarkable not 
only for the rapid progress it has made itself, but what is more im- 
portant, for the influence it exerted upon the students, not only from 
Loyola, but from every Catholic high school and college in the 
country. 

It now looks forward to another year of success and achievement. 



Page two hundred fifty-seven 



1S17>I^ 




John E. Keating 

THE SODALITY OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN 
Officers 

Prefect John Keating 

AssT. Prefect Paul Lietz 

Secretary Emmet Meagher 

Treasurer Edward Dowling 

Faculty Adviser Fr. Schulte 




Lietz 

Page two hundred pftyeight 



Meagher 



Dowling 



f^^ 




THE SODALITY 
Chairmen 

Catholic Action Section William Conley 

Catholic Literature Section Douglas McCabe 

EucHARisTic Section Alphonse Tomaso 

Mission Section John Mayer 

Consultors 

Charles A. Boyle 

Frank Doheny 

Jack Garthe 

Robert Healy 

John Klest 

Joseph Lukitsch 

Francis Steinbrecher 

Charles Slimming 

Robert Sweitzer 

John White 



Page two hundred fifty-nine 




Mayer 



Klest 



CONLEY 



It IS a rather difficult task to reduce to statements the naturally intangible accom- 
plishments of the Sodality during the year that has just drawn to a close. The objec- 
tives of the Sodality have been toward substantial and practical Christian attitudes 
and practices, and we feel that a catalog of details is important only in so far as it 
indicates, as we hope it does, an interior growth, personal and social. 

The Sodality of the Blessed Virgin at Loyola is made up of three distinct groups, 
so divided because of the separation of the departments of the University and because 
of the different time during which the groups meet. 

In the School of Sociology it was slow in coming, for until the school had its new- 
home It was hardly practicable. The charter is dated April 27 and since that time 
the Sodality has been growing slowly but steadily. At the present time it numbers 
forty-eight members who meet at intervals for the recitation of the oiBce and a spiritual 
conference. 

The meetings are usually held in the community chapel on the campus but by way 
of variety have also been held in the chapels of Barat College, Lake Forest, and Mercy 
High School. 

From November 23 to 2*), 1928, a three-day retreat was given under the direction 
of Reverend J. Francis Quinn, S.J., Principal of St. Ignatius High School. 

The Sodality at St. Bernard's Hospital is made up of the entire student body of 
nurses. While it is more of a local private organization than the other two, its accom- 
plishments are practically the same and, of course, its purpose is exactly the same. 

The Lake Shore Campus Sodality is the most active of the three. Its activities 
have been numerous and successful. They were not confined to the Campus entirely 
though the most important were, as the following will indicate. 



Page two hundred sixty 












ST. BERNARD'S SODALITY 



The first essential in the spiritual life, devotion to the Person of Christ, particularly 
in the Holy Eucharist, has been marked by representative members at Holy Com- 
munion at the weekly Mass, especially on First Fridays, and by the campaign for "Four 
Mmute Men" — brief visits to the Blessed Sacraments. Devotion to Our Lady reached 
its high point in the daily May services with talks by the sodalists themselves on the 
Mysteries of the Rosary. Catholic literature has been supported by the subscription 
of the entire student body to the S}jueens Worf^ and the weekly sales of America and 
the Commonwealth. Missionary work has been assisted by the Friday collections and 
the collection of "old clothes." The annual drive at the feast of Christ the King for 
Holy Name membership, the advocacy of civic and social mindedness, the promotion 
of total abstinence movement, and lectures on the Sodality and other subjects before 
other schools and colleges have been included in the Sodality's program for Catholic 
Action. 

Besides these more concrete achievements, the Sodality hopes itself partly responsi- 
ble for a general growth in the Catholic mind in the student body, a general Catholic 
background and loyalty, a readiness to divine the spirit of the Church and to respond 
to her appeal. 

Of course we cannot but admit that the full measure of success is far from attain- 
ment, but it would be impossible to expect that the difficulties which the Catholic 
cause must meet outside should not be paralleled in our smaller world. The fact that 
we do not reach the ideal need not blind us to the real progress made toward it. The 
important thing, the gratifying thing is that the Sodality is able to pass down through 
the college from year to year a constantly augmented tradition of practical consecration 
to Christ and Mary. 

John E. Ke.\ting. 



Pdge tu'O hundred sixty 



^?p>t 




Wm. H. Conley 
Chairman Chicago Delegation 

THE NATIONAL CONVENTION 

The Student Spiritual Leadership movement which had its beginning three years 
ago at Loyola University had grown so rapidly that last summer a national convention 
was held for these leaders at St. Louis University. The convention, which was under 
the supervision of Reverend Daniel A. Lord, S. J., National Director of Sodalities, 
continued for three days — three days packed with intelhgent discussion of student 
problems. 

Loyola's success in previous attempts along similar lines had made the convention 
possible. Her efforts in organizing the Chicago delegation to the convention and in 
contributing to the convention in no small measure added to its success. Ciscora had 
been functioning along its usual lines when the leaders suddenly decided that it was 
up to them to bring the outstanding delegation to St. Louis in August. In order to 
realize their dream a convention was held at St. Xavier's College last Memorial Day 
and plans were laid for the Chicago delegation. William H. Conley was chosen as 
the leader of the Chicago Union and the arrangements and details were left to a 
committee appointed to aid him in making the arrangements. 

It was on a sweltering August morning that over a hundred and ten students from 
Chicago schools met at the Illinois Central station and boarded their special train for 
a city noted for its torrid summers. It was a sad looking crowd that arrived in St. 
Louis at six o'clock that evening. After registration at the main convention office, 
dinner in the convention dining hall which at other times serves as the St. Louis 
LIniversity gym, and a night of trying to sleep in various boarding schools the zealous 
sodalists gathered in St. Xavier's Church on the campus for the first exercise of the 
convention. During the Mass one of the worst electrical storms in the history of the 
city struck St. Louis. Father Lord in his opening address remarked that it seemed 
providential that the storm should occur. He pointed out that at the last two great 
Church gatherings the Vatican Council and the Chicago Eucharistic Congress storms 



Page two hundred sixtytwo 




^•i 



of similar intensity had occured. Truly it seemed that providence was guiding the 
convention. For three longs days and evenings over a thousand students sweltered 
in an auditorium discussing religion when a block down the street stood the artificially 
cooled and inviting Missouri theater. The details of the convention have been made 
known to everyone and are tradition by now. 

The Chicago delegation was the largest single out-of-town delegation present. On 
every subject introduced some member of the Chicago Union was prepared to speak. 
Loyola's contributions were made by John Keating, prefect of the Sodality, and Wil- 
liam Conley, chairman of the delegation. Mr. Keating's talk on the Eucharist and 
personal devotion was one of the outstanding speeches of the three days. Mr. Conley 
had been invited by Father Lord to introduce the subject of Catholic Action. Due 
to Father Lord's preliminary introduction of the afternoon Mr. Conley was given a 
tremendous ovation when he went to the platform to open the evening discussion. He 
spoke of the meaning and significance of Cathohc Action and told what was being 
done at Loyola to promote it. Loyola was also given a singular honor in the conven- 
tion by receiving the chairmanship of the Resolutions committee. Mr. Conley repre- 
sented the institution on the committee and after working all night was able to present 
a set of resolutions which crystahzed the entire work of the convention 



Page two hundred sixty-three 



:■!?)) 




John E. Keating, President 

CiSCORA 



A CONFERENCE 



The activities ot the CathoHc Student Conference on Religious Activities of the 
Chicago District have been both widened and intensified during the year now coming 
to a close. 

Three meetings have taken the place of the single one of the first two years of the 
organization. The first, on All Saints Day, was held in the University Gymnasium 
with two hundred and forty-nine delegates representing thirty-nine schools. The 
discussions centered on ways and means of putting into effect the resolutions adopted 
by the National Convention held in St. Louis last August. In support of the resolu- 
tion commending total abstinence, Mr. William H. Conley prepared a statement, 
"Why I Am a Total Abstainer" which was widely circulated and republished in 
numerous papers. The girls' schools were invited to submit statements in support of 
the resolution endorsing the Holy Father's campaign for modesty in dress. Father 
Lord judged those submitted and presented the award, a beautiful Madonna, to the 
Immaculata High School. A constitution for the Conference was adopted at this 
meeting. 

The second conference was held on February 22 in the Auditorium of St. Ignatius 
Parish. Five hundred and forty delegates represented thirty-eight schools at it. Miss 
Evelyn McDonnell opened the first discussion with a paper on "Catholic Literature" 
and Mr. G. Raymond Sprague of St. Viator's College followed with one on, "The 
Student and Parish Loyalty." Discussion on Total Abstinence figured in the after- 
noon session. 

Plans for the third meeting are being completed as the Loyolan goes to press. It 



Page two hurtdred sixty-four 




The October Conlerence. 



will be held on Ascension Thursday, May 9, in the auditorium of the new Conserva- 
tory at the Academy of Our Lady, Longwood. The morning discussion will concern 
methods of making Catholic education more widespread, more effective, and more 
attractive. Miss Catherine Roti of St. Scholastica's Academy will read the opening 
paper. In the afternoon Mr. Edward O'Donovan of St. Ignatius High School, and a 
student of St. Xavier College not yet named will read papers respectively on "Student 
Work for the Missions," and "Catholic Literature." A business meeting will follow. 
Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament will follow the conference. 

One of the signal advances made during the year was the founding of a conference 
news sheet which is circulated monthly among the members. Acknowledgement for 
the success of the endeavor is due to Mr. William H. Conley, Mr. Robert McCabe, and 
Mr. Thomas Downey. 

Growing numbers and growing interest forecast an increasingly valuable future 
for the conference. Progress, however, is not confined to these more material factors. 
There has been progress as well toward advanced ideals m Catholic thought and prac- 
tice. Holding to the foundations of Catholic life, we must carry the basic principles 
out into definite plans to meet actual conditions. Moreover, the Catholic leaders of 
the future must not be satisfied merely with what is commanded; they must interest 
themselves as well with what is counseled by a generous apostolate. Finally, the con- 
ference emphasizes the union and sodality essential to victorious Catholic Action. Its 
constant aim has been to stress the fundamental unities between all Catholic Students 
in meeting the issues of the day. 

Such are the ideals that have directed the course of the Conference during the past 
years; they promise, we hope, even greater and finer things for the future. 



Page two hundred sixty-five 




MARQUETTE CELEBRATION 

Four years ago, under the leadership of Loyola University, the landing of Father 
Marquette at Chicago was celebrated for the first time. Ever since that time an 
effort has been made to continue the practice in some manner. 

This year Loyola University invited the other Catholic colleges of the city to 
join in honoring the memory of the Jesuit explorer. Rosary College, St. Xavier's 
College and Loyola came together on December 8, and celebrated the event by a 
trip down the Chicago River to the spot where Father Marquette lived for an 
entire winter. The trip was made on the tug Illinois which was chartered for the 
occasion. The students participating gathered at the Wrigley building at eleven 
o'clock in the morning. The florists of the city had donated flowers which 
were to be thrown into the river. The flowers were given to the girls and 
as they went down to the boat which was waiting at the foot of the bridge, the 
Pathe photographers grasped an opportunity to delight the eyes of movie-goers. 
The party rode down the river and after reaching Robey street, paused at the foot 
of a cross which marks the spot where Father Marquette camped. Mr. O'Shaugh- 
nessy of the Chicago Historical Society, gave a short talk on the significance of the 
celebration. Father Reiner closed the short ceremony with a prayer and the party re- 
turned to the Michigan Avenue bridge. 

The undertaking this year was a marked success and every effort will be made 
to continue the practice. Plans are already under way to stage an elaborate pa- 
geant on December 8 of the coming school year. 



Page two hundred sixty-six 




Standing — Ford, White, McCahe. 
Seated— Ray, Walsh, Conley. 



THE DELIA STRADA CLUB 

The Delia Strada Lecture Club was organized when Father Mertz made the first 
announcement that he was collecting funds to build a chapel for students of the Uni- 
versity on the Lake Shore campus. The first Delia Strada Club was composed of a few 
of the men of the Lake Shore campus who had skill in public speaking and who had 
a knowledge of religious subjects which might be of interest to others. This small 
group went from place to place as engagements were made for them, delivering lectures 
for which they received honorariums. The funds collected were turned over to Father 
Mertz for the chapel. 

From this small beginning the club has grown rapidly and has gained popularity not 
only in the city of Chicago but also in surrounding territory. For the past few years 
the lectures have been made more attractive and interesting by the use of colored 
slides. The slides used have been imported from Europe and the coloring and art 
work in general is outstanding. 

During the past year the club has had the largest membership in its history. The 
popularity of the club on the campus is shown by the large number of freshmen who 
applied for admission. With the large number of underclassmen who were trained 
during the year it is certain that the future Delia Strada Club will thrive. These 
younger men have been taken one by one with two older men on the various lectures 
thus giving each the practical experience necessary. 

While the amount of money collected each year is not large it is an indication that 
the students themselves are trying to help in some small part in the building of their 
chapel. In addition to the material gains the lecture club can also consider on the asset 
side of its balance sheet the untold spiritual influence on all who have heard it. 



Page two hundred sixty'seven 




Daniel A. Lord, S.J. 



THE LAKE SHORE CAMPUS RETREAT 

One of the high marks in the year's spiritual endeavor at the Arts College was the 
student retreat held in St. Ignatius Church, October second to fifth. Fr. Daniel A. 
Lord, S.J., was the retreat master, and he brought again to the conferences all the 
virile and practical spirituality which made the retreat of 1926-27 so successful. 

The theme of the retreat was "In Partnership with Christ." Under this figure. 
Father Lord discussed the various concerns of life in the aspect of a business in which 
God is the Father and generous senior partner of man. 

The retreat was well made by all of the students. The interest which was mani- 
fested by the older men inspired the younger ones to take a greater interest in the 
proceedings from day to day. 

A general Communion concluded the three fruitful days. Following the general 
communion the entire student body went to Murphy's restaurant for breakfast. This 
was the beginning of a custom which has been popular this year following the general 
communions on the first Friday of each month. Following the breakfast several in- 
formal talks were given by the students as well as by Father Lord, Father Schulte, 
and Dean Reiner. 

In addition to the annual retreat in the fall the seniors for the last three years have 
made a second retreat in the spring at the Mayslake Retreat House. The entire 
senior class took advantage of the opportunity this year. 



Pane two hundred sixty-eight 




James F. Walsh, S.J. 



PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS RETREAT 

Under the supervision of the Dean of Men of the Professional Schools, Father 
James F. Walsh, S.J., a retreat was conducted in the Downtown College for students 
of the Professional Schools. The retreat was held following the mid-year examinations 
and was well attended by students of the Downtown School and from the West 
Campus of the University. Father McDonough, S.J., a missionary, conducted the 
retreat. 

The retreat movement within the University marks a distinct step forward in re- 
ligious training. The retreats for the students of the Lake Shore campus have be- 
come a tradition of the college and the success of the retreat this year for professional 
students makes certain the continuation of the devotion for the other departments of 
the University. Small retreats have been held in past years by various groups from 
the Downtown College but this is the first time a general retreat has been given so 
that all might attend. 

The students who took advantage of the opportunity to make the retreat were 
enthusiastic over the affair and have expressed their desire to have it continued each 
year. 

The success of the retreat is in no small way due to the efforts of Father Walsh. 
His constant service as the spiritual director of the Professional Schools has brought 
the various departments to a realization that they are parts of a Catholic University 
and that religion plays an important part in the training of the University. 



Page two hundred sixtv-iiiiie 



"The St. Vincent de Paul Society is intended not only 
to help the poor and sujfering, hut especially to rescue 
professional and middleclass Catholics from a life of selfish 
apathy. It is the members themselves, rather than their 
'cases,' who are the greatest beneficiaries. As a circular 
letter of 1844 points out, the Society 'was begun bv a 
few young men and for young men,' especially for uni- 
versity students and aspirants to the professions. At 
that date M. Bailly, the President, could still declare that 
the Society consisted 'principally of young men and he 
urged that 'the young men must be set forward among 
us, they must appear in the first ran\.' 'We shall as\,' 
he says, 'if those of our Conferences which are managed 
by quite yoimg men have always been the least in fervor 
and wisdom?' Tet seven years later the President (M. 
Baudon) had to ac\nowledge the 'general complaint that 
our Conferences founded on behalf of youth and in- 
tended to \eep it by charity under the mild influence of 
religion, rec\on few or no young men'." 

OzANAM: Letters. 



Page two hundred seventy 




SOCIETY 




Arthur Burke 
Chairman 



THE JUNIOR PROM 

The climax of the social season comes every year with the Junior Prom. Since 
the foundation of the University there has been an attempt to make the Prom the 
outstanding all-university dance. This year the dance was truly the get-together 
occasion for all departments. No small credit for the success of the affair goes 
to the Loyola Union. The Union through its representatives worked for the co- 
operation of all departments so that the Prom would be a real Loyola dance dom- 
inated by no single department. 

Early in January the Junior presidents from each department met with the 
Loyola Union to make arrangements for the dance. According to the order of 
succession the Night Law school was entitled to the leadership of the 1929 Prom. 
Arthur Burke, president of the class, was authorized to assume the duties of Prom 
chairman. 

After consideration of the possible places to hold the dance and the various 
orchestras of the city it was decided to give the most brilliant of the all-university 
affairs at the New Knickerbocker Hotel's Oriental Ballroom. Surely no more fitting 
place could have been found for this particular ball. Its decorations, ser\ang as a 
background for the contrast between the somber black and white of the men and 
the varicolored gowns of their fair partners, could not he surpassed. 

Late in the evening when Arthur Burke and his partner. Miss Margaret Tierney, 
started forth across the floor nearly every couple in the large crowd present fell 
in line. Others, preferring to view the spectacle rather than to appear in it, 
hurried to the balcony which surrounds the room. From it every couple in the 
beautiful promenade could be seen. The line consisted of two wings. James 
O'Dowd, of the Day Law School, led the left wing. 

As to the orchestra that presided over the musical end of the program, much 
can be said. Jimmy Green and his group of merry-makers played their way into 



Page two hundred seventy-two 



wJi^' 




Place — Knickerbocker Hotc 



the hearts of all present with their marvelous melodies. They mixed the very 
latest and hottest tunes with those fading wait: melodies that will be popular 
when our grand children are attending proms. 

During the Grand March extraordinary enthusiasm broke forth when the strains 
of the Loyola Victory March were heard. Only a school such as Loyola and 
only a dance such as the Junior Prom could occasion the high spirited feeling that 
was absorbed by those present at this moment. 

But this high feeling had its anti-climax. The orchestra subdued itself and 
sent forth the dreamy numbers that make one think of spring, love, mammy, and 
all those other things which make life worth living. No one could say that he 
was disappointed with the evening's entertainment. The music and excitement 
destroyed every thought of sadness and instilled in every breast that lightness of 
heart that youth and youth only can have. 

About two a. m. the band blew the last saccharine note and bid adieu to sev- 
eral hundred new friends. The gentlemen who had not realized the hour, and 
there were many, suddenly regained consciousness and made a mad dash for the 
checkroom only to find themselves at the end of a line a mile long. But no one 
was tired. The line made a good imitation snake dance. Frequently, some care- 
less lad stepped ahead of the line in an attempt to fox the rest of the boys but 
just as frequently and certainly with more deiiniteness was he met with rebuffs 
and gentle words of unwelcomeness. It was merely another of the many climactic 
moments of a joyful evening. 

When the last hat had been returned to its owner finis was written into this 
gay and colorful Junior Promenade, and a mark was made which will be the 
aspiration of all future Classes of Loyola University. 



Page two hundred seventy three 




Place— Conurcss Hotel 



Date — December 21st, 1928 



THE SOPHOMORE COTILLION 

This year the Sophomores departed from the usual custom of having a dinner 
dance and held a cotillion. The scene of this new kind of dance was the, beau- 
tiful Gold Room of the Congress Hotel. The opinion of everybody was that a 
better place couldn't have been found in the city of Chicago. For this reason the 
affair can rightly be called brilliant, not to mention thrilling, amusing, entertaining, 
snappy, hot, etc. 

Maurie Sherman and his orchestra played. Only those who have heard this 
same orchestra over the radio can appreciate the sort of rhythm purveyed. There 
were fast pieces, slow pieces, dreamy pieces, pieces, and best of all "The 
Saint Louis Blues." No wonder that the couples did not sit out most of the dances 
and try to act as if they were enjoying themselves. The floor was delightful to 
dance on, the music was beyond description, the young ladies present could and 
would dance. Therefore everybody did the unusual these days and enjoyed danc 
ing at a dance. 

Along towards eleven o'clock the orchestra came to a sudden pause. Eveiy- 
body turned around. There was a blinding flash! It was only the photographer, 
however, so the excitement died down. The girls regretted that they didn't have 
time to arrange their hair, powder their noses, etc. Their gallant escorts grumbled 
because they were not up in front, so that all could see them in the picture. This 
tension was relieved by Myles Sweeney and Ed ' Keevins, two musically inclined 
sophomores, who pepped up the party with three or four vocal numbers that made 
them the center of a throng composed of everybody at the cotillion. Formality 
was thrown to the winds, all joined in the choruses. After this the fun ran on 
till some time after twelve, and the end heralded the start of the longed-for Xmas 
vacation. 



Page two hundred seventyfour 




Place — Furniture Mart 



Date— February 8, 1929 



THE FRESHMAN FROLIC 

The class of "32" held their Freshman Frolic on February 8th in the ballroom of 
the Furniture Mart and in so doing made quite a name for themselves as social lions. 
The president of the class, Marty Stadler, set aside the precedent established last year 
and brought a date to the dance. So there is complete truth in saying: "a good time 
was had by all." 

Tweet Hogan and his orchestra furnished the impetus that carried the couples' 
around the floor time and time again. Tweet is a freshman himself and his orchestra 
is well known by Loyolans, and well-liked, as the constant request for encores proved. 
Those present preferred their music in the good old-fashioned jazz time, not the- 
symphonic arrangements affected by some of the present day orchestras. To the 
freshmen present the affair was sort of an enlightenment; they didn't know what 
social lions their fellow classmen were and how they managed to have such gorgeous 
dates. There must have been magic in the name "Frosh Frolic." 

During the intermissions the young men and young ladies wandered through the 
other rooms which adjoin the ballroom and had been arranged for their convenience. 
The dining room held some whose dates had that fatal disease: hunger. Others in- 
spected the library. The most popular place of the between-dance itinerary was the 
moonlight parlor, the silvery beauty of which attracted much attention and caused 
many to linger and gaze in silent appreciation (?) . 

A good deal of upper classmen were present and conducted themselves with that 
well-known sophisticated savoir faire that one is supposed to acquire after having 
gone to college over a year. However, as time went on and the music waxed hotter 
they forgot all about their dignity and joined in the whoopie the rest had been making. 

Not only was this dance a social success, as every dance is called, but also a fra-' 
ternal success, that is, it drew together the members of the freshman class and made 
them feel that they were brothers under the skin, had many things in common, and 
could rate some nice dates. Here's hoping that future freshman will enjoy a party 
like this! 



Page two hundred seventy-jive 




Place LaSalle Hotel 



Date— November 17, 1928 



HOMECOMING DANCE 

The final event on the Homecoming Day program was the Homecoming dance 
held in the Louis VI Room of the LaSalle Hotel. The ballroom was filled to capacity 
with students from all the various departments of the University and their escorts 
celebrating the one day in the year when all the old grads return to their Alma Mater 
and join in the festivities. Mixed in with the crowd were some of the valiant foot- 
ball warriors and their adoring lady friends, the players being conspicuous by re 
minders of the battle they had gone through earb'er during the day. 

"Tweet" Hogan was on hand with his orchestra to supply all the needed rhythmic 
inspiration, and, needless to say, this was done in a highly commendable manner. 
When the dance was near half over the orchestra played the school song, and the^ 
whole hotel resounded with the chorus as sung by everybody present. "Onward to 
Victory, Loyola U," was the sole desire and wish of both alumnus and undergraduate; 
a spirit which is carrying Loyola up the ladder in everything. 

Shortly after the magic hour of midnight the crowd thinned out somewhat, but 
many remained until the last chord had been struck on the head and then regretfully 
wended their ways towards home, Wagtayle's, Sally's, etc. 



Page two hundred seventy-six 




Place— Drake Hotel 



Date— October 19, 1928 



THE LOYOLA NEWS FALL FROLIC 

This year's Loyola News Fall Frolic was under the direction of Frank Walsh 
and proved to be the most successful of all the previous Frolics. The gay crowd 
that filled the Gold Room of the Drake, which was bedecked with pennants and 
banners from the various colleges, gave ample proof of the fact that everybody 
was having the time of their Uves. An innovation this time was the placing of 
tables in the French Room for those who wished to be served. 

The syncopation was furnished by Loyola's own Jack Higgins and his Benson 
orchestra. During the past six months Jack had augmented his well known band 
and it proved to be just the kind of musicmaker that delights the collegian. Some 
of the fast numbers that Jack and his men played were the last word in nerve- 
tingling rhythm. Not till the magic hour of one rolled around did they cease to 
keep the merry throng gyrating ajfound the floor. 

A very amusing feature of the Frolic was the marathon dance. Some very at- 
tractive prizes had been offered to the couples that placed iirst, second, and third. 
Consequently about twenty couples decided that this was easy. After the eighth 
dance piece in a row of the contest it was ended and of the five or six surviving 
couples the winners were selected. The sight of some of the couples tiying to 
hurry and still keep within the regulations for dancing was excruciatingly funny to 
those who watched. This was the first time that an innovation of this sort had 
been held, and proved that Loyola is among the leaders when it comes to a social 
affair of this sort. 



Page two hundred xeventyseven 



■fj 






'.:±:-M.^^- 



Place — Rosary College 



Date— January 11th, 1929 



THE ROSARY DANCE 

This year it was the turn of Rosary College to give that long-expected social 
event: The Intercollegiate Dance. All the arrangements were m charge of the 
capable students of Rosary. From the way in which the dance went over one 
would wish that these same capable girls would impart the secret of how to make 
a dance a success. 

After it had been announced in school that the Rosary books were here, there 
was a mad rush. Those who knew their intended partners were complacent, 
those knowing more than two were rushed by the rest of the students for in- 
formation and advice. When the Lancelots from Loyola met the Guineveres 
from Rosary, there was much surface gallantry and the mental condition of both 
depended on how they thought they had fared. 

Although dancing started about nine o'clock, there was some delay while intro- 
ductions were made, fates were cast, and evenings made or ruined. Finally the 
insistent syncopation got into the blood of all, and dancing began in earnest. Here 
the man with a good date conducted himself like a prince and the others werfe 
wondering on whom they could switch their date. As time went on everybody 
settled down to have a good time. They began to notice that the orchestra was 
hot, the floor was large and easy to navigate, that after all things were O. K. The 
spirits of all rose by leaps and bounds. The party had started. 

As the hour of midnight drew close, several tag dances were held. These proved 
a blessing to the stags, the loss of a few final minutes of bliss for those with soul- 
mates, and just what those with the other kind of partners wished. A good idea- 
for future dances here would be to make every other dance a tag dance and en- 
force it. 

Promptly at twelve the orchestra ceased syncopating, and the couples reluctantly 
left the ballroom and clustered in the hall. Here is where the Beau Brummels bade a. 
sad adieu to their fair sharers in the evening's whoopee who looked wistful as they 
ascended the stairs into oblivion. At least until next year. 



Page two hundred seventy-eight 






Place — Alumni Gymnasium 



. J\ 7 ^- It* 



*.«. 



Date— February 9th, 1929 



THE JAMBOREE 

The first annual Whoopee night that Loyola has inaugurated took place on 
Saturday, February ninth, in the gymnasium. There was an impressive card of 
events for the evening. First of all was the iinal game of the intramural basket- 
ball league between the Soph Medics and the Iggies. The Soph Medics came out 
on top by the score of sixteen to live, thus winning the championship of the league. 

Promptly at eight o'clock the Loyola-Bradley game started. This game was 
sweet revenge for the varsity, as Bradley defeated them last year by the score of 
thirty-two to nine. The score this year was Loyola, forty-two, Bradley, twenty- 
one. This was the best way possible to start the whoopee night on its boisterous 
way. 

During the varsity game the stands had been gradually filling to capacity with 
. students from all departments of the university and their fair damsels. After the 
game was over the floor was sprinkled with wax and dancing begun. The Blue- 
kitten Syncopators, co-directed by Anthony Tomczak and Dan Demetiy, were the 
purveyors of ultra-modem dance music. In no' time at all the floor was crowded 
and the bashful young lads in the stands took heart and asked the bashful young 
girls in the stands to dance. After the first few whirls around the gym all signs 
of shyness and hesitation disappeared, and whoopee started to be manufactured in 
wholesale lots. This delightful condition prevailed until midnight, when the band 
ceased their soothing melody. Some said a hasty farewell to their fair acquaint- 
ances; most took them in charge and set forth ostensibly to find a place to 
eat, really to continue the friendship engendered by the all-powerful whoopee spirit. 



Page two hundred seventynine 




Place— City Club 



Date— December 6th, 1928 



ART STUDENT-FACULTY BANQUET 

One of the high spots of this year's progress was the Arts Student-Faculty Ban- 
quet held on December 6. Almost half the student body was present, and the 
faculty members were there en masse, looking and acting very much like their 
neighbors. The way in which different groups of professors and students rivalled 
each other in singing various songs and cheering was amusing. New ties of 
friendship and respect were formed between the faculty and the students: and the 
better understanding between them pointed to a successful year ahead. 

After the coffee was sei-ved Mr. Charles Stimming. the Toastmaster, arose and 
commented on the way in which the banquet was fulfilling the hopes of those who 
had planned it. After introducing the President of the Loyola Union, Mr. James 
Neary, who spoke briefly on the plans of the Union, the guest of honor, Mr. 
T. A. O'Shaughncssy, was called on by the Toastmaster. Being a prominent artist 
and historian and a member of the Chicago Historical Society, he was well qualified 
to speak on his subject, which was a review of the noble work of Father Marquette 
and his companions. His speech held the audience spellbound from beginning to 
end, and was a fitting reminder of the anniversary of Father Marquette that had 
just been celebrated. 

The Glee Club and the Band alternated for a time in supplying musical enter- 
tainment. Besides this there were several vocal numbers by Edward Keevins and 
the latest in syncopated songs by Myles Sweeney. 

Father Reiner, Dean of the Aits School, was then called upon. He dwelt at 
length upon the fine spirit the students had been showing both in their activities 
and their studies. In conclusion he introduced the leaders of the various activities 
to the students. 



Page two hundred eighty 




Place— City Club 



Time — December 13th 



COMMERCE STUDENT— FACULTY BANQUET 

The third annual Commerce Student Faculty Banquet was held this year at the 
City Club on December thirteenth. It was well attended, about one hundred and 
twenty students and faculty members being present. Mr. William Norkett, Presi- 
dent of the Commerce Student Council was the toastmaster. After everyone's appe- 
tite had been satisfied and the usual flashlights had been taken, he reminded the 
students that although some students were from the pre-legal department and others 
were from the department of finance, all were from the same school and asked that 
they always bear that in mind. 

In opening the speeches of the faculty members. Dean Reedy said: "If spirit, 
attendance, and especially noise mean anything, this is the most successful banquet 
at which I have ever been present." He then went on to congratulate the students 
for their 2,eal in attending night classes. The next thing he commented on was the 
work of the Student Council and assured everybody that it had his appreciation and 
support. After this Father Schulte, speaking for the entire University, explained 
the newly formed Loyola Union and urged the students to get behind it. Father 
James Walsh, who is Dean of Men of the professional schools of Loyola, asked the 
students not to be mislead by money or glory. "It is not the things that a man 
does that counts, it is the thoughts he thinks," he said. 

After the dinner and between and after the speeches those present were 
beguiled by the music of Johnny Martino and his Bluebird Syncopators. This was 
all that was needed to complete the musical hilarity of the occasion, and the band 
drove away all the cares and tribulations of everyone for the evening. Some of their 
novelty numbers were very entertaining, and after everything was over student and 
professor both felt a better bond between them. 



Page two hundred eighty-one 




Place — Bismarck Hotel 



Date— Februar>' 2nd, 1929 



DELTA THETA PHI FORMAL SUPPER-DANCE 

The annual formal supper-dance of the McKenna Senate of Delta Theta Phi' 
was held at the Dutch Room of the Bismarck Hotel on Saturday evening, February 
second. This was one of the most entertaining formals of the year, and the credit 
for its success lies in the committee composed of Gerald Haley, Jim Klees, John 
Buckley, Jim Curry, and, last but not least, Al Brown. 

One of the features of the arrangements was the way in which the tables were 
placed. They formed a crescent which completely enclosed the dance floor and 
enabled everybody to see each other. One was reminded of a New Year's Eve 
celebration by the way in which confetti was flying around and the dunce caps that 
were worn at all angles. 

The Collegians supplied the music for the dance part of the supper dance. This 
orchestra is extremely popular with Delta Thets, as it played at the informal which 
was held in November. As the evening progressed, the band waxed hotter and 
hotter until it seemed as if the celluloid collars of the waiters would melt. How- 
ever, they managed toi withstand the heat, and so everybody was contented. 

The only lull m the festivities came with the well-known blinding flash' of the 
photographer's flashlight, this being a feature of the better social aifairs that season. 
Unlike many happenings of this sort most of those in the picture were weanng the 
expressions they wished to wear, not those various ones of surprise, mirth, closed 
eyes, open mouths, and the like which wreck even the best of cameras. As the 
last note of the orchestra died out a huge sigh of regret arose from all, that nearly 
wrecked the windmills on the walls of the Dutch Room. There were no casualties, 
so the end arrived peacefully, as ends have a habit of doing. 



Page two hundred eightytwo 




Place— St. Clair Hotel 



Date—March 2nd, 1929 



THE PI ALPHA LAMBDA FOUNDER'S DAY FORMAL 

The appropriate words and tune to remember this event of events by are: 
"What a girl! What a night!" The alumni members of Pi Alpha. Lambda held 
this dinner-dance to celebrate the fourth birthday of the fraternity. And what a 
birthday party it was! 

The scene of the dance was the ballroom of the St. Clair Hotel, one. of those 
modernistic, Spanish motif, places. The dancers were in harmony with the color 
scheme, and the note of contrast was the blue and white of the streamers hanging 
from the lights. To an observer this presented a most pleasing and beguiling' sight. 
The bevy of beauties that glided around the floor in the arms of the black-armored 
knights were all that were needed to inspire even the dullest of artists to depict a 
picture of beauty. 

■There was real ja;; music at this dance. The Society Syncopators, a colorful 
band of music-makers, knew hot pieces only, which were the only ones in demand. 
No dreamy pieces for a celebration like this! 

About eleven o'clock, half the company trouped downstairs to the dining room 
to partake of the dinner. While in the' act of eating there was a blinding flash, 
and those in the range of the camera congratulated themselves on being fortunate 
enough, to get their pictures in the Loyolan. The rest of the members had been 
dancing upstairs and were blissfully ignorant of what had taken place. They ate 
about twelve-thirty, and then repaired to the ballroom, where the dancing and 
merriment continued till the wee sma' hours. The next stop was three o'clock 
Mass: then, breakfast; and finally, home. 



Page two hundred eighty-three 



"1/ Cod gives me life and courage, and if He assigns 
the legal profession as my vocation, I should, in m\ own 
opinion, do well to bring yny personal wor\ and my public 
duties into harmony. A Philosophy of Law and a His- 
tory of Law, treated from the Christian standpoint, would 
fill a vast void in science and would occupy the rest of 
my life." 

OzANAM: Letters. 



Page two JiundrecJ eighty-four 



ATHLETICS 




One of the favorite sports of the period was hi\ing. Ozanam and a group of fellow students 
often spent an entire day walking through the country and visiting the towns near Paris. 




B, J. QUINN, S.J. 



FAREWELL TO FATHER QUINN 

There comes a time in the life of every institution when it must lose some of its 
dearest and most valuable parts, an event which weakens the heart of those who must 
remain, and yet, which calls upon those downhearted people to wish a successful future 
to the .one leaving. 

Loyola University lost such a man when Father Bartholemew J. Quinn, S.J., left to 
assume newer and higher duties as President of Campion College. Father Quinn, dur- 
ing his office of Athletic Director of Loyola University, won the friendship and co- 
operation of every faculty member and student with whom he came in contact. His 
services to Loyola were as efficient as they were sincere. 

Evidently others felt the worth of Father Quinn's services for he has become the 
youngest Jesuit College president in the United States and in his new capacity the 
faculty and students of Loyola University wish him the happiness of a successful future. 



Page two hundred eighiyjive 



(C,'»-;-,j 




Daniel Lamont, 
Director of Athletics 



THE DIRECTOR 

The outstanding iigure in athletics at Loyola is Daniel Lamont, 
athletic director and head coach of football. In addition to his 
regular duties he has assumed burdens which few directors 
would take upon themselves. Through his efforts the Univer' 
sity will open its football season next year in a new stadium. 
This is but one of the things he has done for Loyola, his Alma 
Mater. 

Daniel Lamont has brought much to Loyola. He has given 
it a new view of athletics from an executive standpoint; he has 
made himself free to give his entire attention to the department, 
and this is decidely a distinct advantage. He has secured the 
cooperation and friendship of the officials and players alike and 
has united them into a strong organisation- for the promotion of 
athletics. His many abilities and qualities are sure to bring 
the work that he has started so brilliantly to a definite and suc- 
cessful conclusion. He his given much to Loyola University 
and Loyola owes much to him. 



Page two hundred eighty-six 



THE NEW ADMINISTRATION 



A new regime in athletics began at Loyola University when 
Daniel Lament assumed charge of the department of athletics 
last September. He brought with him a good technical knowl- 
edge of the major sports, an insight into the executive affairs 
of an athletic department, and a well established ability to make 
friends. All of these qualities were immediately apparent when 
active work was started. 

The schedule for the football and basketball teams was in 
great danger of languishing, but with the new director the 
schedules were soon in a formative state and then completed 
in competent fashion. Not satisfied with having the football 
and basketball cards for the 1929 season, he began negotiations 
for games on future schedules. This feature has not been 
given much attention in the past years, and its recognition by 
Daniel Lamont is a distinct step forward to better crowds, 
better games, and better athletic events in general. 

Through the entire football and basketball seasons Daniel 
Lamont sought a definite objective which was to put the athletic 
department on a sound basis in the matter of policy. Various 
movements were developed, others banished and a few new 
policies initiated, and all blended into new and energetic efforts 
to establish the sports in a definite manner. 

The Tournament, too, received the attention of the new 
director. The seating capacity of the Gymnasium was in- 
creased and the dispatch with which the crowds and other 
matters were handled was the cause of much favorable comment 
from many people. 



Page two hundred eighty-seven 




Bernard J. Murray, S.J., 
Chairman, Athletic Board 



THE ATHLETIC ADMINISTRATION 

In order to promote further the proper balance of athletics at Loyola, to assist the 
athletic board in its administration of all sports, inter-collegiate or intramural, and to 
assist in the arranging of schedules there was established last year a faculty advisory 
committee on athletics. The need of such an organization was apparent here at Loyola 
University; this need was shortly remedied through the untiring efforts of Father 
D'Haene, S.J. As a result of his wonderful work he was appointed chairman, and 
in this capacity he managed to set the committee on a firm foundation. The chairman 
this year is Father Murray, S.J. 

The influence of this committee had made itself felt particularly during the foot- 
ball and basketball seasons. Since the faculty is primarily concerned with the scholastic 
aspect of the athletic situation, the schedules of both the football and basketball teams, 
while as complete and as far reaching as in other years, conflicted in the smallest pos- 
sible manner with the scholastic duties of the members of the teams; this was in no 
little degree the work of the faculty advisory committee. 

In addition to the faculty committee and the coaching staff, a number of the students 
themselves are actively engaged in promoting athletics. With this end in view there 
is chosen from the student body each year two or more representative men to serve 
in the capacity of managers. From the junior class one man was chosen this year to 
act as senior manager. The man to win that distinction was James C. Ryan. From 
the sophomore class Robert Dooley and W. J. Linklater were chosen to act as assistant 
managers. It is the duty of these men to aid the athletic department not only in 
managing the teams but also in promoting interest in the teams by the student body. 
DifEculties coming up between the team and the students are taken care of by the 
student managers. 



Pi2.qe two hundred eij^hty-eight 





Hillenbrand 



Ryan 



Whether or not the university is behind its teams is largely in the hands of the 
publicity manager. Unless students see their team written up in the daily papers 
and hear comments on it among their friends they are liable to underrate it and fail 
to show that backing which is so necessary to the success of athletic endeavors. For 
this reason the athletic department employs an athletic publicity manager whose duty 
it IS to keep Loyola athletics before the attention of the public. The position during 
the past -two years has been ably filled by Harold Hillenbrand from the Dental School 
of Loyola. His position is especially important in the success of such undertakings 
as the National Catholic Basketball Tournament, which owes much of its success this 
year to the efforts of Mr. Hillenbrand. In addition tO' the services in the tournament 
the publicity received this year by other athletic activities is in no small measure due 
to Mr. Hillenbrand. 

A hard-vi'orking person whom we very little or hear of seldom is Robert Morris, 
the alumni athletic manager. Bob has aided the junior and senior managers a great 
deal during the football and basketball seasons, and his efforts are deserving of notice. 
He will also be remembered for his work on the Tournament, which he so successfully 
helped to conduct. It will be remembered that while in school he held the manager- 
ship as a junior and senior, and is now the first man to be retained as alumni manager. 

There was an innovation m the athletic administration this- past year. As Father 
Quinn, the athletic director, had been called away to become president of Campion 
College, Dan Lamont, captain of the 1926 varsity football team, assistant football 
coach and freshman basketball coach, was chosen to fill this position. Director Lamont 
had shown his devotion to his Alma Mater both as a player and as a coach, and 
now has shown his ability as director of athletics. 

Much credit for the ease and smoothness with which gymnasium activities are run 
off is due to Earl Kearns. the director of the g>'mnasium. Both the Tournament and 
the basketball games of the season were played under the best possible conditions on 
account of his efficient management. 



Page two hundred eightv-iihie 



^ 




Al Brown, Cheer Leader 

VARSITY LETTER AWARDS 

The Varsity letter was awarded to the following men: 



Captain Phil Brennan 
Captain-elect Cornelius 

Collins 
Anthony Lawless 
John Downs 
Leslie Molloy 
Robert Burke 
Emmet Etu 



FOOTBALL 

Frank Lut;enkirchen 

Fred Sextro 

Edward Moran 

Raymond Nolan 

Paul Noland 

John Waesco 

John Smith 

Manager James C. Ryan 



Jerome Koslowski 
Americo Ferlita 
Frank Walsh 
Timothy Connelly 
Walter Durkin 
Walter Scott 
Chris Poppelreiter 



Cu-captam James Bremner 
Co-captain Anthony Lawless 
Captain-elect Charles Murphy 



BASKETBALL 

John Waesco 
Fred Sextro 
John Smith 



John Durburgh 
Harry McDonough 
James Deegan 
John Baumbich 



Captain Edward Smith 
John Home 
Richard Bartlett 



CROSS-COUNTRY 

John Bartlett 
Frank Schollian 



Joseph Kuehnle 
Joseph Kearney 



Captain Paul Liets 
Paul O'Connor 
George Zwikstra 



TENNIS 

Paul Diggles 
Harold Prendergast 



J. F. Walsh 

Manager Robert Murphv 



Page two hundred ninety 




Top Row — Coach Lamont, Morris (Manager), Noland, Kozlowski, Ferlita, Moran, Lutzenkirchen, 

Molloy, Waesco, Poppelreiter, Ryan (Manager), Dr. Norton (Ass.t Coach). 
Bottom Row — Lawless, Colh'ns, Burke, Downs, Brennan, Connelly, Smith, Durkin, Scott, Etu. 



THE MONOGRAM CLUB 

The Monogram Club is an organization composed exclusively of Letter men in the 
\arious sports. The membership is thus made an exclusive right to those men who 
have played varsity sports and have proven their mettle in their respective lines of 
athletic endeavor. 

This last -year has seen a visible broadening of the organization, both in scope and 
in activities. The Club has embraced most of the departments by this time and hence 
is typically an all-university organization. Its members include the football varsity 
rnen, the basketball varsity team, and the track team. 

Followers of the Maroon and Gold will recognize in the picture above men who 
last year piled up an enviable record for our Alma Mater oa the field of football. 
The Monogram Club boasts many of the members of this successful grid contingent. 

Just now the greatest problem facing the Club is the acquiring of new quarters for 
the athletes of the university. During the past year they have been housed in a large 
home adjacent to the campus but since it was decided to raze it to make room for a 
new girls' school they have been using the social rooms of the gym for headquarters. 



Page two hundred ninety-one 



"I shall sacrifice nothing, neither my duty to the State 
through imprudence, nor my duty as a Christian through 
cowardice." 

OzANAM: Letters. 



Page two hundred ninety-two 




FOOTBALL 




Daniel Lamont 
Head Football Coach 



Page two hu7idred ninetyfour 



THE COACH 

Dan Lament took over the head coaching position this year 
after the second game of the season. He succeeded Roger 
Kiley, who resigned after his team had administered a 13 to 6 
beating to the Northwestern Reserves. 

Lamont worked hard with the squad from the time he took 
the reins, and was successful in developing one of the best 
teams that Loyola has put on the field. Perhaps in games won 
and lost the Ramblers look like only a fair aggregation, but 
those who followed the games closely know that there was a 
great deal of real power in the line-up, and at least three of 
the games lost this year were due to "breaks." 

Dan Lamont is a Loyola varsity player himself. In '20 
'21 and '22 he performed at end and was generally recognized 
as one of the greatest ends in the Middle West. He assumed 
the role of assistant coach when his playing days were over, and 
last year he was Kiley's chief adviser. 

As athletic director he will continue his activities throughout 
the year. He was Freshman basketball coach last, but Witry 
took over those duties this past season, leaving Lamont free to 
devote his time to all phases of athletic activities. 



Page two hundred iiinetyfivc 




Babe Green 
Assistayxt Coach 

In one of the hardest schedules ever played, Loyola University completed its nine- 
teen twenty-eight season on the gridiron with a .500 average. In the "won" column 
we find Northwestern "B", Lombard, St. Louis, and our traditional rival, De Paul. 
Milliken, Haskcl, Dayton and Quantico took close victories from the Ramblers. 

In a game that was not decided until the closing matches of play Milliken Univer- 
sity took the opening game of the season from the Ramblers by a score of 3-0. It was 
in the last two minutes that Burdett Corbett, flashy Milliken back, placed kicked the 
ball from the twenty yard line for the winning score. 

Playing as the second feature of a double header at Dyche stadium, Loyola made it 
only an even break for Northwestern on October 6 by beating the "B" team 13-6. 
Although at first it looked like a romp for Northwestern, Loyola tightened up and 
held the opposition scoreless for the remainder of the game. 

In the final period Collins returned a punt to the 44 yard stripe. This was followed 
by two successive first downs. On the next play Malloy broke loose for twenty yards 
and the winning touchdown. The try for the point failed and darkness found Loyola 
ahead at the final gun, 13-6. 

In their game with the powerful Haskel Indians, the Ramblers played even ball 
throughout the first half, the score being 0-0. However, late in the third quarter with 
Haskel within scoring distance, a surprise center rush was good for the winning marker. 
With the ball on Loyola's 26 yard line Haskel tried two line plunges which failed to 
bring any gain. Then, with the team feinting a wide end run, Joe Cross, an Indian 
half, grabbed the ball from the quarter and ran through center and across the goal 
line for the only score of the game. 

In the one game played on the north side campus Loyola showed her greatest 
strength by beating Lombard College overwhelmingly, 27-0. 

Loyola's lack of reserve material proved to be the deciding factor in the game with 
"Ducky" Swan and his Dayton Flyers. Although leading for three quarters by a 
score of 7-0 the Ramblers were overcome in the final period and lost a hard fought 



Page two hundred ninetysix 




Captain-Elect Collins Captain Brennan 

game, 12-7. Loyola's only touchdown, and for a while what seemed to he sufficient, 
was the result of a brilliant sixty yard run by Less Malloy, the sophomore half-back. 
However, with Scott and Poppelreiter out of the last quarter because of injuries, the 
Ramblers seemed to weaken and the Flyers were able to put over a final rally that netted 
them two touchdowns and the game. In the fourth quarter with Loyola leading 7-0 and 
with the ball on their thirty-eight yard line. Swan proved that Dayton really deserved 
the name Flyers and ran thirty-eight yards for Dayton's first touchdown. The try for 
the extra point was missed and Loyola was still ahead, 7-6. 

Aided by a twenty-two yard pass to Swan the Flyers brought the ball to Loyola's 
four-yard line. Loyola held for three downs; on the last down Swan hit the line for 
the winning score, thus ending one of the most interesting games of the schedule. 

After winning but two out of the last five games with St. Louis University, Loyola 
decided that it was time that things should be squared with the Billikens. So Coach 
Dan Lamont took his warriors down to St. Louis and accomplished what everybody 
hoped he would. It was in the second quarter that the Ramblers scored the one 
touchdown of the game. After Burke and Lawless had advanced the ball to the 
fifteen-yard line, it was lost on downs. But when St. Louis fumbled Nolan quickly 
recovered for Loyola. Two plays made five yards and then Molloy hurled a pass to 
Phil Brennan, who scampered over for six points. Lawless added the extra point. 

In the annual Homecoming game the Quantico Marines were quite at home in the 
sea at Soldier field. It was not until the final quarter, though, that they sank the good 
ship Loyola. 

After two weeks without a game the Loyola University Ramblers became restless 
and went about wrecking everything in sight: stellar halfbacks, tradition. Freshman 
proms and the Blue Demons. 

In the second period Malloy passed to Bob Burke, who ran over the goal for the 
winning points. Although Byers almost brought victory to De Paul by his exceptional 
running, Burke's touchdown was sufficient for Loyola to win. 

A successful season, indeed, for Coach Dan Lamont and his Ramblers. 



Page two hundred ninet\-seven 





CORNELIUS COLLINS 

Siuarterback, 
Captain-elect Collins is the 
grittiest quarterback that has 
ever worn the maroon and 
gold. "Corny" is a clever 
field general and an accurate tent 
passer. Thi 



LESLIE MOLLOY 

Halfback 

Les took part in every 

game. He is a sophomore 

and a flashy back. H i s 

ground gaining was consis- 

all through the year. 

sensation of the year 



was his run for a touchdown 
against Dayton on the first 
play. 




THE LOMBARD GAME 




JEROME KOSLOWSKI 
Center 

Jerry has been well known 
for his offense and defense 
work. He played consistently 
throughout the year and was 
in a majority of the games. 



FRED SEXTRO 

End 
Fred is one of Loyola's 
outstanding men and one 
whose ability to snare passes 
was the reason for a good 
number of victories. 



PAUL NOLAND 
End 
Paul was kept out of a 
number of games by a seri- 
ous injury early in the season 
but when the opportunity to 
play presented itself, he 
showed up brilliantly. 



Pa^e two liundred ninety-eight 



^<X$<KS^ 




JOHN DOWNS 
Ha]fhack 
In losing Jack, by gradua- 
tion, Loyola loses one of its 
most outstanding halfbacks. 
His work in the Lombard 
game was notable. An in- 
jury kept him out of the line- 
up the rest of the year. 



ANTHONY LAWLESS 
Halfback 

Tony leaves us this year 
after three years of great 
football. His ability to kick 
kept the enemy from Loy 
ola's goal on any number of 
occasions. He was a master 
in every department of the 
game. 



THE HASKELL GAME 





CHRISTOPHER 

POPPELREITER 

Guard 

This was "Pop's" first year 

on the squad. His work was 

of the best. An injury kept 

him from several of the 

games. 



PHILIP BRENNAN 

End 
Captain Brennan has fin- 
ished three years of brilliant 
work. He was a star in 
every game throughout his 
career. His ability and per- 
sonality were recognized and 
honored by all. 



JOHN WAESCO 

Center 
"Mike" is another sopho- 
more who made a name for 
himself in the games he 
played. He gives promise of 
even greater things next 
year. 



Page tii'o hundred ninety-nine 





M 1. 



M % 



ROBERT BURRE EMMETT ETU 

na\\hac\ Ha\\hac\ 

Bob was a dependable Emmet leaves us this year 

groundgainer and good all- with a fine record of fine 

around back, especially clever playing. He was a clever 

at receiving passes. It is ex- runner and in his day tore 

pected that next year will see off many yards around end, 
him at the top of his form. 




THE MARINE GAME 





CYRIL POWERS 

An abundance of excep- 
tionally clever tackles kept 
Powers somewhat in the 
background because of lack 
of experience. With a year 
of football under his wing, 
he ought to take a few falls 
out of the opposition next 
year. 



EDWARD MORAK 
Tdc/jle 
"Red's" work as a tackle 
was outstanding. He was 
one of the greatest defensive 
men on the team and played 
brilliantly in every game. 



EDWARD WEBER 
Center 
Weber was shifted from 
the hackfield to the line early 
in the season and due to the 
number of centers out did 
not get a chance to display 
his ahilitv. 



Page three Innidred 





THE NORTHWESTERN 
GAME 



JEROME HUPPERT 
Quarterback, 
"Rome" did not get an 
opportunity to display the 
stutf we know he has in him 
due to the presence of men 
with shghtly more experience 
on the squad. We are sure 
that given a chance he will 
show up as one of the best 
men on the team. 



WALTER SCOTT 

„ '^"""^ 
"Wally" got his big chance 

this year. His line play ful' 
tilled the greatest expecta- 
tions. Injuries prevented 
even greater work. 




WILLIAM McNEIL 
End 
"Bill," being the under- 
study of Captain Brennan. 
did not get in many games. 
He has two more years on 
the squad and great things 
are expected of him within 
that time. 



FRANK 
LUTZENKIRCHEN 
Tackle 
"Luts" IS another sopho- 
more who did clever work 
in several of the games. It 
is expected that he will be 
a regular next year. 



FRANK WALSH 
Tackle 
Frank is one of the live 
men who played their last 
game for the Ramblers this 
year. He was one of the 
mainstays of the line and his 
ability to block and tackle 
was commendable. 



Page three hundred one 





TIMOTHY CONNELLY JOHN SMITH 

Sluarterbac\ FuUbac\ 

"Ted" was this year an "Smitty" gives promise of 

understudy to Collins and being as good at football as 

one worthy of the position he is at basketball. In the 

when the Captain-elect leaves next two years it is hoped 

next year. that he will make a name for 
himself as a regular back. 




THE NORTHWESTERN GAME 





JOHN BAUMBICH 
End 
Like Durburg, Baumbich has been kept 
from the lineup on account of the presence 
of seasoned veterans on the team. 



PAUL BARRY 
Guard 
While Paul has never been a brilliant per- 
former, he has always been a good consistent 
guard. 



Pag,e three hundred two 






RAYMOND NOLAN 

Guard 
Nolan played in a good 






LOYOLA VS. DE PAUL 



RICHARD SHANAHAN 

Halfback 

Dick did not get into any 

percentage' of' the games°this games this year due to an 

hst year and showed himself abundance of more seasoned 

t.i be a brilliant guard in all material. He showed up well 

of them. in scrimmage, however, and 

good work is expected of him 

next year. 




AMERIGO FERLITA 

Tackle 

Ferlita was injured quite often in games 

this year and consequently was not able to 

give the best that was in him at all times. 

He is a consistently good tackle. 




JOHN DURBURG 
End 
John is another man who was kept on the 
bench because regular positions were held 
by older men. He is only a Sophomore. 



Page three hundred three 




Bac\ Row — Noland, Brennan, Lawless, Sextro, O'Malley, Kozlowski, Eui. Xolaii, Hogan. F., 

Poppelreiter, McNeil. 
Second Row — Coach Lamont, Ferlita, Huppert, Burke, Molloy, Powers, Lutienkirchen. Smith, 

Waesco. 
Bottom Row — Moran, Murphy, Durkin, Connelly. Downs, Copp, Barry, Weber, Shanahan. 



Loyola 

Loyola 12 

Loyola 

Loyola ; 27 

Loyola 7 

Loyola 7 

Loyola 6 

Loyola 7 



THE SEASON'S RECORD 

Milliken J 

Northwestern ""B" 6 

Haskel Indians 6 

Lombard College 

Dayton : 12 

St. Louis 

Quantico Marines 1? 

De Paul 



Ptige three hundred four 




Top Row — Bowman, Berny, Hannon, J. Twomey, Hogan, D., Ahearn, Weimer, Benson, Probst, 

Schuhmann, Coach Green. 
Second Row — McNaughton, Crowley, McNichols, Young, McClellan, Finn, Walsh, Hayes. 
Bottom Row — Griffen, Ployhart, Stadler, Flynn, Hennebry, Hannon, W., Lynch, Leincn, Lannon. 



FRESHMAN SQUAD 

The 1928 season proved a very successful one as far as the Freshman football squad 
was concerned. Under the able tutelage of "Eddie" Norton the squad proved to 
be a real football team. 

At the opening of the season the coach expected to have a "good team by the end 
of the season." With this aim in view he began practicing the freshmen, who had 
come to Loyola from various cities throughout the middle west, as well as from all 
parts of Chicago. There was much to be done in making Loyola squad from the 
extensive material which reflected such a variety of home town styles; however, as 
the practice nights added up it became evident that we had a real freshman squad. 

The first game furnished them with their only setback of the season, when on the 20th 
.of October, the squad journeyed to Lake Forest to contest with the championship 
veterans of the suburban academy. The final score was Lake Forest, 7; Loyola, 6. 

The fighting frosh were not to be disheartened by this defeat, however. They came 
back strong the rest of the season and won all of the remaining three games. In all 
of them., too, they held their opponents scoreless. This coming year will, without a 
doubt, find some of them in regular varsity positions. 



THE 

Loyola 6 

Loyola 12 

Loyola 6 

Loyola 14 



SEASON 

Lake Forest 7 

Culver 

Fort Sheridan 

Kenosha 



Page three hundred five 



let us learn of Him to forget ourselves, to 
devote ourselves to the service of God and the good of 
men. Let us learn of Him that holy preference which 
shows most love to those who suffer most." 

OzANAM : Letters. 



Page three hundred six 




BASKETBALL 




Leonard D. Sachs, 
Head Bas\etbaU Coach 



Page three hundred eight 



THE COACH 

Leonard D. Sachs has by now proved himself unquestionably one 
of the greatest basketball mentors in the country — probably the great- 
est. His work in former years alone, when he turned his apparently 
hopeless squads into teams which made Loyola comparable with the 
greatest in the middle west, would stamp him as this, but when we 
consider that he brought his squad to unheard-of heights this year, 
including clear-cut victories over some of the best basketball teams 
in this part of the country, that he does the same thing year after 
year with his high school teams, which include every sport, we begin 
to have some idea of the greatness of Sachs. As an athlete there is 
no better all-around performer in local circles, perhaps there are 
others as great in mere feats, but there is no one who combines 
athletic skill with the ability and personality to impart it to others 
as does Sachs. Loyola is proud of him and his teams, and looks for- 
ward to the future with supreme confidence. 



Page three hundred nine 



f^ 




Loyola 18 North Dakota 13 

Loyola 28 St. Louis 26 

Loyola 29 Bradley 2 3 

Loyola 37 Milliken 23 

Loyola 14 Lombard 12 

Loyola 33 Kalamazoo 31 

Loyola 20 St. Xavier 5 

Loyola 21 St. Louis 20 



JAMES BREMNER 
Forward 
Co-captain Bremner is without a 
doubt the best floor-man that ever set 
toot on the floor of Alumni Gym. In 
his four years on the team he showed 
himself to be a consistent point-getter 
and a main cog in Loyola's great ma- 
chines. 




JOHN BAUMBICH 

Guard 
John is a sophomore who, with a 
little more experience, should be able 
to fill a regular position on the Ram- 
blers. He showed he had the stuft 
in the games he played. 




JOHN SMITH 
Guard 
"Smitty," in his first year on the 
squad showed his mettle in the pinches. 
His basket in the last ten seconds 
pulled the Western State Normal game 
from the fire. 




FRED SEXTRO 

Guard 
Fred was responsible, to a great ex- 
tent, for the low scores of opposing 
teams. Few were the men who got 
past him for an effective shot. 



Page three hundred ten 




Loyola 40 Valparaiso 21 

Loyola 42 Bradley 21 

Loyola 32 Kalamazoo 20 

Loyola 22 Detroit 19 

Loyola 20 St. Xavier 10 

Loyola 24 Detroit 6 

Loyola 28 St. Ambrose 11 

Loyola 30 Dayton 12 



/4 



ANTHONY LAWLESS 
Forward 
Co-Captain Lawless was Loyola's 
Iron-man. He is a steadying influence 
to the whole team and one of high 
point men of the squad. It is needless 
to say more than that he was the last 
man to he taken from a game. 





CHARLES MURPHY 
Center 
It is the common opinion of sport 
writers in the middle west that Charlie 
is at least as good as his All-Airverican 
name sake at a near-by Big Ten School. 
He'll be the main cog of another Ram- 
bler five next year. 




JOHN DURBURG 

Guard 
Durburg played a fine guarding 
game during his first year on the squad. 
Next year will find him a good running 
mate for Sextro. 



JOHN WAESCO 

Forward 
"Mike," another first year man. gave 
promise of becoming a typical Rambler 
star. His shooting in the St. Louis 
game added another victory to the 
credit of the home team. 



Page three hundred eleven 




Assistant Coach Joe Witrey 



THE SEASON 

The ambition of every athlete is to become perfect in his particular branch of sport. 
The bowler aims for that perfect three hundred game; the baseball pitcher works for 
a nohit, no-run game; the track man strives to break the record in his event; and the 
basketball team struggles for a season without defeat. The Loyola team has com- 
pleted just such a year. An ambition cherished by every coach has become a reality 
through the efforts of the great Rambler Team of 1928 and 1929. 

Due to a lengthy football season, the basketball candidates were not called out until 
a late date. A strenuous basketball schedule had been arranged; the iirst opponent 
was to be met within two weeks of the time when practice started. Then followed 
four games on the road against Milliken, St. Louis, Bradley and Lombard. St. Louis 
had beaten Oklahoma, the Big Six Champion and Washington, which in turn beat 
Purdue and Indiana. Lombard won the little nineteen championship. With a 
schedule including schools with teams of this caliber it looked bad for Loyola. 

With the first call for candidates, four members of the 1927-28 team and the 
freshman team of the previous year reported. Two of the most important cogs of 
the 1927-28 team had been lost through graduation, and it seemed next to impossible 
to fill their places. Men had to be developed who would be equal to the task of 
coming up to the standing they had set. 

Too, the members of the team were scattered throughout the various departments 
and as a consequence, no satisfactory periods could be arranged for practice. However, 
the boys made many personal sacrifices to produce the great machine of last season, 
practicing at night. Another handicap that had to be overcome, was the fact that 
some members of the team were forced to work in their spare hours in order to con- 
tinue in school. Yet despite these various handicaps Loyola was represented by a 
team that I am certain could and would make an impressive showing against the best 

Page three hundred twelve 



\i 





in the country. It was led by two of the greatest athletes and captains that Loyola 
has ever had and represented by players who were gentlemen first, last, and all 
the time. 

The first four games were played within a single week and the Loyola defense was 
almost perfect m all of them. The opponents were kept on the small end of the score 
throughout the contests. The games were marked by fast playing and frequent scor- 
ing by the Ramblers in the first half, and a concentration on defense during the second 
half. It was said that the night the Ramblers defeated Millikin the best game in the 
history of Decatur team was played. At St. Louis an extra period testified to the 
closeness of the game, which was finally won in the closing seconds on Jim Bremner's 
field goal. 

The downstate trip was successfully completed when Lombard was defeated by the 
close score of fourteen to twelve. Due to the strenuousness of the long trip the players 
were rather tired and did not put up as fast a game as they usually do. However, after 
winning four in a row, there is no wonder that they were not up to their usual game. 

In the most hectic battle ever waged on the North Shore floor the Loyola University 
five beat the Western State Normal quintet in three overtime period, 33-31. 

Playing an almost perfect defense game, the Ramblers beat the St. Xavier Musketeers 
by the overwhelming score of 20-5. The only Ohio man to break through the strong 
Loyola defense was Cain, who sank a short shot early in the first half. That was the 
only field goal registered by St. Xavier. 



Page three hundred thirteen 




Left to Right — Baumbich, Sachs, Duiburg, Lawless, Murphy, Smith. Deegan, Bremner, 
McDonough, Sextro, Waesco. 

Loyola played one of their best offensive games of the year and beat the hitherto 
unbeaten Valparaiso quint by the amazing score of 40-21 for their eighth victory 
in a row. 

A determined scoring streak by Jmi Bremner sent the Ramblers to their tenth 
straight win when they met Bradley Tech and avenged themselves for their defeat 
at Peoria last year. The game was played before a capacity crowd. 

On their second trip of the year the Ramblers took games from Kalamazoo, 
Detroit and St. Xavier, with increasing facility. Kalamazoo gave them the most 
difficulty but after they had been put out of the way Loyola had no trouble in 
disposing of the others. 

As usual the Detroit Titans were unable to cope with the reaching power of 
Charlie Murphy and so the Ramblers won again. This time the final score was 
24-6. 

Murphy and Lawless led the Loyolan attack on the team from Iowa and beat 
them by the merry score of 28-11. The St. Ambrose quintet played a close 
guarding game but once their defense had been penetrated the score mounted until 
It reached the one mentioned above. 

The season was finished in a blaze of glory when Dayton bowed before the 
Ramblers' irresistible attack and lost by a score of 30-12. 

Although the schedule of last year did not include all the teams we v/ould have 
liked to meet, we did play schools of national reputation, such as the University of 
Detroit, National collegiate football champions, whom we met and defeated twice. 
The schedule makers sought games with every important team but to no avail. 

Next year, after our last season, we should not be denied: we feel certain that 
the next season's schedule vAW be one worthy of Loyola and we hope that the team 
play, cooperation, and sacrifices of this year's team will again be manifest and 
produce another outfit like the Loyola Team of 1928 and 1929. 



Pa.ije three hundred fourteen 




The Basketball Floor 



THE FRESHMAN SQUAD 

Although the varsity basketball team will suffer a great loss when Bremner and 
Lawless leave this year, Coach Sachs will not find it impossible to replace them. There 
are at least three members of the freshman squad who will stand a good chance of 
filling the guard and forward positions being vacated by Loyola's co'captains. 

Captain Bob Schuhmann of the freshman team should fit into one forward position. 
Bob IS a shifty floor man, a clever passer, and a very good shot. He has been the 
outstanding player of one of the greatest freshman squads which ever represented 
Loyola University. 

Dick Butzen, forward on the yearlings, must also be considered seriously. Dick 
learned his basketball at Loyola Academy so he should have little trouble in mastering 
Coach Sach's type of play. "Butz" is the most accurate shot on the green-clad team. 

Tom Flynn, who played guard, will also be fighting for a position. He is husky 
enough to stand the knocks of a season's competition yet he is fast and shifty. Tom 
has been the main cog in the freshman's defense. 

Dick Finn, Frank Hogan, Joe Norton, Charlie Mann and Gordon McNaughten 
should also be of value to the varsity squad. While these men are not as flashy as 
some of their teammates, they are consistent players who deserve praise and con- 
sideration. 

During the past season the Frosh beat such teams as the Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery; Lake Forest Academy, national academic champions last year; Stewart War- 
ner, strong local five, and numerous Knights of Columbus squads. They lost to the 
MacNamara Boosters and tied Jasper High School. 



Page three hundred fifteen 




Harold Hillenbrand 

THE SIXTH ANNUAL NATIONAL CATHOLIC INTERSCHOLASTIC 
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

The sixth annual National Catholic Basketball Tournament was again held at 
the University Gymnasium on March 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 1929. After the live days 
of competition De La Salle High School, of Chicago, was declared winner of the 
National Catholic title. St. Stanislaus Academy, Bay Saint Louis, Mississippi, took 
sedohd place honors. Spalding Institute, Peoria, 111., was third with Decatur 
Indiana, taking the fourth' place. 

A teani from a city of three million inhabitants and a team from a town of 
three thousand met in the finals of the sixth annual National Catholic Tourna- 
ment. And it was not only a game between two teams, one from a large city and 
the other from a small town, it was a game between a fast, startling attack and 
a slower, surer offense. The team from the big city won, defeating the huskies 
witj^ all their speed and stamina through a slow-footed attack that never seemed, 
to get started. 

That is the history , of the final game of the National Catholic championships 
in which De La Salle, Chicago, 111., won the title from St. Stanislaus, Bay 
St. Louis, Miss., by a 25-16 score. 

The prizes were awarded immediately after the game by President Kelley and 
several other notables who were present. De La Salle received the George Cardinal 
Mundelein Trophy for first prize. John Cretzmeyer, Columbia Academy, Du- 
buque, Iowa, received the Daniel Lamont award and cup for having the best 
coached team. The Mayor's Cup for the Illinois team making the best showing 
in the' tournamerit '^vas won by the national champs. The William H. Powell 
trophy for' the team scbring the highest number of points in the first round was 
awarded to St. Xavi'er of Cincy. Immaculate Conception, of Rapid City, S. D., 
took the Catholic League Placque for the team coming the farthest distance to 
compete. Holy Redeemer of Portsmouth, O., won the Thos. D. Nash trophy 

Page three hundred sixteen' 




DE LASALLE INSTITUTE OF CHICAUU— NA IIONAL CHAMPIONS 
Bac\ Row — Coach James Groark, R. Fitzgerald, J. Hunt, Manager M. O'Connor. 
Front Row — R. Reardon, J. Huey, Captain A. Boland, E. Krauciunas, J. Latley, P. Krauciunas. 

for the team making the least number of fouls. The sportsmanship cup of the 
Chicago Evening American was won by St. Theresa High of Detroit, Mich., 
The Daniel A. Laughran trophy for the player of most value to his team was won 
by Thomas Godfrey of Union City, N. J. The Peter J. Angsten medals for the 
members of the all tournament team were won by: Furlong, forward, Joliet; Voe- 
gcle, forward, Peoria; Corbett, center, Cincinnati; Lacner, guard, Bay St. Louis; 
E. Krause, guard, De La Salle, Chicago. 

The Blue Key Fraternity of Loyola University was again in charge of the 
Reception work, Charles Stimming being chairman of the transportation committee, 
J. Francis Walsh headed the ushers. The Loyola University band furnished the 
music (on occasion) . 

Daniel J. Lamont, head football coach and director of athletics was director of 
the tournament succeeding Rev. B. J. Quinn, S.J., who was made president of 
Campion Academy. Rev. B. J. Murray, S.J., was the faculty advisor. Harold 

A. Hillenbrand was executive Secretary succeeding Edward C. Knjpka. Robert 
E. Morris, graduate manager was secretary of the board .of directors. John E. 
Dempsey, Jr., former Loyola Academy basketball coach, again headed the Hotel 
Reception Committee. All contestants and coaches were housed at the Edgewater 
Beach Hotel. Joseph E. Gauer, Loyola U. Alumnus also acted on the reception 
committee. Others who aided were Peter J. Angsten, Daniel A. Laughlin, Dr. 
Schniedwind, Lee Daniels, Howard Brundage, William Wheeler, Rev. P. J. Molloy, 

B. J. Fallon, Dr. James Ford, Dr. Edwin Norton, Leonard D. Sachs, Brother Austin, 
Brother Sylvester, Rev. N. Liston, S.J., and others. 

Tournament will be held next year despite rumors to contrary. State associations 
will interfere but will not disrupt meet. 



Pdge three hundred seventeen 



let us prove that we are not so cowardly as 
to believe in such an allocation of duties, as would he 
an accusation against the God who would have made it, 
and a shame for us who mould have accepted it. Let us 
be prepared to prove that, we too, have our fields of 
battle on which we \now how to die. 

OzANAM: Letters. 



Page three hundred eighteen 




MINOR SPORTS 




Dean Rcmci Pitches the First Shoe, 



THE HORSESHOE TOURNAMENT 

In the past the game of horse-shoe pitching was known to be played only by the 
boys "down on the farm"" or behind the stables. No one could ever dream of seeing 
the day when this game would become popular among college men. Strange as it 
may seem this day has come, for Lxiyola University has just about completed its second 
successful horseshoe tournament. 

Few people can realize the amount of enthusiasm which was shown by the students 
over this game. A glance at the number who entered the tournament will give a 
slight idea of how the students" enthusiasm was aroused. Last year the number that 
entered the first tournament was so great that the semi-finals and finals could not be 
played before the close of school. This year this difficulty was overcome by placing 
a limit to the number which entered the tournament. In the beginning it was decided 
by Leo Sheehan, the tournament manager, that only thirty-two entrants would be 
allowed in the tournament. Within a short time after the announcement of the open- 
ing of the tournament the quota was reached. 

On Wednesday, May 8, Father Reiner, the dean of the Arts and Science depart- 
ment, started the play by pitching a game against James W. Collins, the sporting 
editor of the Loyola J^ews. The dean was not up to his usual form that day and as a 
result dropped the game to his opponent. The entire student body watched this first 
game for the assembly was called off in order to give them a chance to see a real game 
of horse-shoes. Many of the spectators claimed this to be the most interesting game 
ever witnessed by them. 

After the opening of the tournament, students who never pitched a horse-shoe in 
their lives, became enthusiasts of the game. Through the generosity of the managers 
the shoes were loaned to anyone who wanted to pitch whether or not he was enrolled 
in the tournament. Because of this latter fact many students asked to have the number 
of entrants increased to sixty-four. This was done, but still all who desired were not 
entered in the tournament, much to the regret of the managers. As a limit had to be 



Page three hundred twenty 




ONE OF THE GAMES 



placed somewhere it was decided that this number would be the most convenient in 
running off the games. 

A bracket comprising this number was placed in the Loyola News bulletin board 
in Cudahy Hall and from this the entrants could see whom they would have to play 
next. Each school day from May 6 to 31 four games were played at the noon period 
and the scores of these games were placed', in the bracket in order that all might see 
how the tournament was progressing. As we go to press the quarter finals are being 
played and as a result nothing definite can be stated concerning whet the winner 
might be. 

The horse-shoe tournament was introduced at Loyola in 1928 by Frank Conley and 
John Bruun of the Loyola News staff. This year's tournament was sponsored by the 
Loyola News under the direction of Leo B. Sheehan. 



Page three hundred twenty-one 




Joseph B. Tigerman 
Coach 

TRACK 

A year ago last witnessed the successful start of cross-country running at Loyola 
under the inspiration and encouragement of Joseph B. Tigerman, star performer ot 
the Illinois Athletic Ciub. Sporadic attempts had been made to develop track athletics 
on a sound basis, but the cross- country team was the first really successful and solid 
accomplishment. 

The call for candidates brought out about a dosen runners, many of them greatly 
inexperienced, and all of them underclassmen. Working under great handicaps, they 
displayed splendid spirit and developed swiftly under the tutelage of their coach. 
He laid out a difficult course around the Lake Shore grounds, about three and three- 
eighths miles in length, which proved very satisfactory for the home meets and for 
workouts. 




Left to Right — R. Bartlett, Scho'.lian, Kuehnle, E. Smith, Home, Kearney, J. Bartlett, 
Coach Tigerman 

e three hundred twent\-two 



-»^ 




Ml'LLKJAN 



LUPION 



Strobel 



This year when the candidates were called out for practice it was found that three 
or four of the best of last year's squad were lost to the team. There were, however, 
seven good men to carry on the work: Captain Ed. Smith, Kearney, Home, J. Bartlett, 
R. Bartlett, Kuehnle and Schollian. 

Out of the several meets they had this year, however, they did not come out vic- 
torious in any. It is to be said for them, though, that they went down fighting in all 
of them, as is fitting for wearers of the maroon and gold. 




Strobel 



LuPTON 



MULLIG.^N 



Page three hundred twenty-three 




Bruun 



Sheehan 



INTRAMURAL MEET 

Realizing that the time had come when intramural athletics should be developed at 
Loyola, Leo Sheehan and John Bruun this year made plans to further the interest of 
students in this activity. 

The first line of their endeavors was the establishment of an intramural basketball 
tournament comprising teams from all the departments of the University. This, 
indeed, was no easy job to perform. In other universities this would be a comparatively 
easy task; but in a school such as Loyola, which is scattered, the work of organizing the 
different departments was no easy matter. However, just about the time that Leo 
Sheehan first introduced this new activity. Father Schulte was organizing the new 
Student Union. With the assistance of this body the support of every department was 
given and the tournament was brought to a successful close. 

While the tournament was going on the varsity and the academy teams were in the 
midst of their hardest season. As a result the gym could be had only during the 
lunch period. At this time the sixteen teams which were entered from the Lake Shore 
Campus played their games. The winner from this department was a team made up 
of a group of boys who played together at St. Ignatius Academy who called themselves 
the Iggies. 

From the other departments ten teams were entered. This group played their games 
as curtain raisers to the regular varsity games. These games were played before the 
crowd of spectators who came to witness the varsity in action. Through a series of 
eliminations a team made up of sophomores from the medical school was the winner. 
This team was called the Medics. 

On February 9th a "Jamboree" was held in the gymnasium. The evening opened 
up with a game between the Iggies and the Medics for the title of Intramural Basket- 
ball Champion of Loyola University. The game was won by the latter team, which had 
the advantage over its opponents both in weight and in size. However, the losers 
fought to the very finish. Every basket which the winners made was done so only 
after a series of difKcult passes. The guarding of the Iggies was very good despite 
the disadvantages with which they had to contend. The final score was IS to 5. 



Page three /luiidred twentyfour 




The Champions 

The success of the intramural meet this year should assure the continuation of such 
contests. Many of the leading universities in the nation are considering the advisa- 
bility of placing emphasis on intramural contests rather than on intercollegiate con- 
tests. Should such a movement become a reality Loyola will have had some experience 
in the field. 

Probably nothing will serve to unify the schools of the University more than inter- 
departmental activities. Ne.\t year should see many interclass and interdepartmental 
meets. 



Page t/iree hundred twenty -five 



^ 




Captain Lietz and Coach Hodapp 



TENNIS 



The Loyola University Tennis Team started the 1929 season with a fair repre- 
sentation of last year's men, and several promising newcomers. At the beginning of 
the season the men were ranked on the basis of their showing in the Loyola News 
Tournament, and then a challenge system of ranking allowed those who had the 
ability to move forward. 

In most of the matches Lietz, the winner of the tournament, played first man, while 
Paul O'Connor, Zwikstra, Prendergast, Diggles and Melody played in the order 
named. In the doubles Lietz and Zwikstra, O'Connor and Walsh, and Reidy and 
Melody, were the usual combinations. Bob Murphy arranged the schedule, handed 
out the balls, and endeavored to have them returned. 

The Tennis Team was fortunate this year in securing the services of Professor 
Hodapp of the Arts department as Coach. Mr. Hodapp came to us from St. Paul, 
where he had assisted the men from St. Thomas College in the same capacity. His 
constructive criticism, helpful supervision, and genuine interest were big factors in 
welding together a representative team. The members of the team are grateful to him. 

The following schedule was arranged: 

April 20 — Chicago Normal College — here. 

April 23 — Northwestern — there. 

April 27— Y. M. C. A. College— here. 

May 4 — Wheaton College — there. 

May 13 — Crane College — here. 

May 14 — Lake Forest College — here. 

May 16, 17, 18 — Western Inter-Collegiate Tournament. 

May 20 — Wheaton College — here. 

May 23 — Crane College — there. 

May 25 — Lake Forest College — there. 

May 28 — Western State Normal — there. 



Page three hundred twenty-six 




Back P-^u — O'Connor, Walsh, Murphy, Hodapp. 
Front Row — Zwikstra, Liet:, Melody, Diggles. 



At this writing three matches have been played, of which one was won. One was 
rained out. Northwestern was played so early in the season that the match took on 
the nature of a practice encounter. Loyola evidently was more in need of practice 
than our opponents, for they swept through every match for a decisive victory. Ten 
days later, however, a much-improved Loyola team easily defeated Y. M. C. A. Ck)l- 
lege 6'1. The following Saturday we journeyed to Wheaton in search of another 
victory, but were upset by a 4-2 score. As the Loyolan goes to press, Paul Liets and 
Paul O'Connor are putting the finishing touches on their games in preparation for 
the Western Inter-Collegiate Tournament. They are expected to go a long way in 
that meet. 

As a whole, tennis has prospered at Loyola this season. A Big Ten school has been 
met for the first time. We have competed in a tournament in which leading Univer- 
sities of the Middle West were represented. A longer trip has been taken than at any 
time in the past. The prospects for next year are also bright. Although Lietz and 
-Prendergast will certainly be missed, there is a wealth of new material which is very 
promising. A longer and more varied schedule seems assured, and a greater number 
of victories is anticipated. In tennis, as in all her other endeavors, Loyola is looking 
ahead. 

ROBERT J. MURPHY. 



Page three hundred twenty-seven 




THE LOYOLA NEWS TOURNAMENT 

The third annual Loyola News Tennis Tournament, featuring a record entry of 
fifty contestants, was started on Oct. 9, 1928. After two weeks of intensive play and 
many upsets the veteran Paul Liets opposed the comparatively untried sophomore Paul 
O'Connor, who had furnished most of the upsets, in the final game for the champion- 
ship. Lietz's steadiness, however, proved to be too great a stumbling block for his 
opponent and after four hectic sets he triumphed, 6-2, 3-6, 6-1, 6-3. It was a fitting 
finish for such a closely contested tournament. 

The tournament was originated by the founders of the Loyola News three years 
ago. Both the originators of the meet and the sponsors of this year's tourney must be 
given recognition and gratitude, for they gave to the school competitive intramural 
athletics in which anyone who ever saw a tennis racquet might compete. This form 
of athletics was lacking at Loyola and the sponsors of the tournament supplied that 
need, thereby meriting the sincere appreciation of the entire student body. 

The director of this year's tournament was Frank Melody, who, besides completing 
the arduous task of arranging the meet, competed as one of the seeded players and 
managed to advance to the quarter finals before being eliminated. The courts were in 
perfect condition for the matches and the brackets were drawn up to the satisfaction 
of all. The seeded players were Paul Lietz, Richard Shanahan, Frank Melody and 
J. F. 'Walsh. 

The only upset that occurred in the first round was the defeat of Walsh by O'Con- 
nor, 8-6, 4-6, 6-2. Up to that time O'Connor had not been regarded as a major 
contender but his steady and finished net game finally overcame Walsh's driving game. 
The other seeded men won their matches by forfeits. 



Page three hundred twenty-eight 



l^d^J,Jllpli 




O'CONNOR, RIGHT, CONGRATULATES LIETZ 

In the second round Lietz was forced to three strenuous sets in order to gain his 
victory. Zwikstra, a promising freshman, won the first set from the coming champion, 
6-3, and was leading in the second within two points of victory, 5-3, when Liets finally 
rose to supreme heights, took that set, 7-5, and ran through the final set, 6-3. In the 
same round Keuhnle upset Shanahan, while Melody beat Reed, and O'Connor downed 
Sheriff, 6-3, 8-6. 

In the quarter final round another upset occurred. Paul Diggles, a sophomore, 
defeated Melody decisively, 6-0, 6-4, and established himself as a major contender for 
the title. In the same round Keuhnle, another sophomore, defeated Mann, Lietz beat 
Reidy, and O'Connor downed Lannon, putting three sophomores in the semifinal 
round. 

The longest and closest match of the tournament was fought out in the semi-final 
round between O'Connor and Diggles. The match required two days to be completed, 
O'Connor being returned the victor, 6-4, 17-15, 4-6, 6-4. Lietz entered the finals by 
running through Keuhnle, 6-2, 6-0, 6-2. 

The final match, witnessed by a capacity crowd, saw the triumph of a steady, driv- 
ing, back-court game against a sensational net game. Lietz, eked out his win by place- 
ment shots and slow lobs. O'Connor's point gatherer proved to be his kill shots from 
the net, but lost most of his points in the back court. The winner received an expensive 
racquet and the runner-up a fine sweater. 



Page three hundred twenty-nine 



. But each one had done his duty. God, for 
V^hom alone men of faitJi and courage devote themselves 
to the hard business of writing, of fighting, of being mis- 
understood, and of being misrepresented, as\s nothing 
more. 

OzANAM : Letters. 



Page three hundred, thirty 



FRATERNITIES 




The itudent movement inaugurated b3i Ozanam resolved itself into a fraternity \noum as the 
St. Vincent de Paul Society, the first fraternity house was t/ie second floor of a printing 
shop where the U)ee\ly meetings of the group tuere held. 



FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES 
With dates of establishment at Loyola 

Social 
Phi Mu Chi 1922 

Iota Mu Sigma 1923 

Alpha Delta Gamma 1924 

Pi Alpha Lambda- 1925 

Sigma Lambda Beta 1927 

Professional 

Phi Chi 1904 

Phi Beta Pi 1921 

Phi Lambda Kappa 1921 

Sigma Nu Phi__ 1924 

Delta Theta Phi 1925 

Sororities 

Nu Sigma Phi 1921 

Kappa Beta Pi 1924 

Sigma Chi Mu 1926 

Honor Society 

Tivnen Ophthalmological 1922 

Lambda Rho 1925 

Blue Key 1926 

Beta Pi 1926 

Alpha Kappa Delta 1928 



Page three hundred thirty-one 




Wl 



PHI MU CHI 
Beta Chapter 

6739 Newgard Avenue 
Founded at University of Chicago, November 22, 1921 
Founded at Loyola University, November 22, 1922 
Colors: Crimson and White 

OFFICERS IN UNIVERSITY 

John J. Garthe Worthy Master 

Edwin F. Curley Senior Warden 

John T. Tracey Scribe 

Edward W. Kelly Treasurer 

Thomas P. Smith Junior Warden 

Francis J. Walsh Master of Pledges 

Francis P. Doheny Steward 

Laurence P. Crowley Historian 



Page three hundred thirty-two 



'HHIX 



Top Row — iMurphy, Conway, Staudcr, H(it;an, Shurr, Mooter, Quinlan. 
Third Row — Ahearn, Smith, Garrity, Grant, Doherty, Abraham. 
Second Row — Walsh, Tracey, Curiey, Garthe, Kelly, Doheny, Crowley. 
Bottom Row — Stanton, Kain, Twomey, Young, Waldvogel. 

MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

Howard E. Egan, Ph.D. George A. Schmeing, A.M. 

Aloysius P. Hodapp, MA. Bertram J. Steggert, A.M. 



William S. Conway 
Joseph Coyle 
Edwin F. Curiey 
Francis P. Doheny 
John J. Garthe 



Thomas Ahearn 
James E. Curry 
Joseph H. Garthe 



Thomas B. Carney 
Samuel Grant 
Thomas Kallal 
Joseph A. Mooter 
Wayne S. McSweeney 



Robert Adams 
J. Griffin 



MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 
Cl.-kss of 1929 
Robert Hawkins L. Howard Shurr 

Walter F. Karr Alphonse Tomaso 

Edward W. Kelley Francis J. Walsh 

Robert E. Lee Edward Zimmerman 

Lars Lundgoot 



Class of 1930 
C. Stanley Duggan 
John Leahy 
Hayes O'Brien 

Class of 1931 
Daniel R. Murphy 
Charles J. Weigel 
Raymond L. Abraham 
Laurence P. Crowley 
Neil J. Doherty 

Class of 1932 
Daniel J. Hogan 
Paul Kain 



Thomas P. Smith 
Harry Stauder 
John T. Tracey 



Monroe Garrison 
J. Condra O'Hare 
Jerry Quinlan 
Herbert Stanton 
Francis Wm. Young 



Harold Twomey 
Leo Waldvogel 



Page three hundred thirty-three 



'^n 





IOTA MU SIGMA 

Established at Loyola University, 1923. 

Colors: Maroon and Gold. 



ALUMNI CHAPTER 



Members 



R. Abramo 
L. Carofiglio 
J. Conforti 
R. Drago 
S. Fieri 
A. Geraci 



S. Geraci 
S. Governale 
C. Gullo 
M. Indovina 
C. Macaluso 



C. Mu:;zicato 
A. Pace 
A. Partipilo 
T. Serio 
S. Vainisi 



OFFICERS IN UNIVERSITY 

A. M. Pecoraro President 

S. Nigro Vice-President 

F. Saletta Secretary 

J. M. Mar:;ano Treasurer 

L. Ibeili Sergeant-at-Arms 

J. Mcnnella Librarian 



Page three hundred thirty-four 




Top Row- Bclmonte, Parcnti, Rotandi, h'lorito, Polito, Jelsomino, Casciato, Simoni. 

Third Row — Bellini, Fazio, Bealletti, Robellati, Mondo, Borruso, Esposito, Fiore, Vincenti, Volini. 

Second Row — Fulco, Saletta, Marzano, Pecararo, Nigro, Castro, Ibelli. 

Bottom Row — Monachino, Fieremosca, Spiteri, Muzzicado, Castaldo, Barone, Caliendo, Mennila. 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

Dr. I. Volini Dr. J. Suldane 

Rev. Pusateri Rev. J. F. Walsh, S.J. 



Dr. I. Volini 
Dr. A. Geraci 



C. Castro 



A. Barberio 
A. Bellini 
C. Borruso 



A. Allegretti 
N. Balsamo 
J. Belmonte 
N. Casciato 
E. Castaldo 
H. De Feo 

A. Balletti 
A. Barone 
A. Esposito 

E. Fieramosca 

F. Fiore 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 
Dr. J. Suldane Dr. A. Partipilo 

Dr. R. Drago Dr. L. Carofiglio 

Rev. J. F. Walsh 

MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 
Cl.-kss of 1929 
S. Nigro A. M. Pecoraro 



Cl.-^ss of 1930 

J. Caliendo 
J. Casciato 
J. Marzano 

Cl.'\ss of 1931 
R. Fazio 
H. Fulco 
L. Ibelli 
L. Muzzicato 
M. Parenti 

Cl.\ss of 1932 
L. Fiorito 
S. Jelsomino 
T. Monachino 
J. Mondo 



J. Mennella 
M. Petrone 
F. Saletta 



N. Pelletieri 
A. P61ito 
J. Robillotti 
P. Rocco 
A. Rotondi 



S. Simone 
W. Spiteri 
F. Vincenti 
C. Volini 



Page three hundred thirtv-five 





ALPHA DELTA GAMMA 

Founded at Loyola University, 1924. 
Colors: Maroon and Gold. 



Harold J. Prendergast President 

George Ohlheiser Vice-President 

Richard P. Shanahan Secretary 

William Linklater Treasurer 

John E. Ennis Pledgemaster 

Robert J. Healy Historian 

Walter Durkin Sergeant-at-Arms 

Eugene Humphreys Steivard 



Page three hundred thirty-six 




Bottom Row — Rcid, Hannon, Ennis, Prendergast, Shanahan, Linklater, Humphrey. 

Second Row — Healy, Fitzgerald, Migely, O'Brien, Fulton, Blondin. 

Third Row — McCormick, Keeley, Slimming, Brennan, Kiley, McNeil, Lannon. 



ALPHA DELTA GAMMA 



Charles Stimming 
Harold J. Prendergast 



Class of 1929 

John E. Ennis 
George Ohlheiser 
Walter J. Scott 



Stanley Blondin 
Raymond Fulton 



Richard P. Shanahan 



Class of 1930 
Paul M. Plunkett 



Raymond J. Kiley 



Robert J. Healy 
Walter Durkin 
Frank Reed 
John McCormick 



Class of 1931 

Robert Keeley 
William McNeil 
John Wilkinson 
John O'Brien 
Dominic Mullaney 



John Durburg 
John McCourt 
William Lmklater 
Eugene Humphrey 



James Brennan 
William Hannon 



Class of 1932 

Bertram Lannon 
Eugene Migely 
Charles Girsch 



Robert Fitzgerald 
Norman Doherty 



Page three hundred thirty-seuen 




A 



PI ALPHA LAMBDA 

6801 Sheridan Road 

Established at Loyola University, Februarys 28, 1925. 
Colors: Blue and White. 



OFFICERS 

Linton G. Moustakis President 

Paul S. LrETZ Vice-President 

Robert E. Ludwig Secretary 

William H. Conley Treasurer 

Paul L. O'Connor Assistant Treasurer 

John D. White Pledge Master 

Edward Healy Sergeant-at-Arms 

Roger S. Gormican Steward 

George K. Ray Historian 

Matthew Le.ar Social Chairman 



Page three hundred thirty-eight 




Top Row — Linehan, Quinn, Thonivin, FiUKcrald, Strobcl, Ford, Cullinan, Raffcrty, Vivinto, 

R. O'Connor, Huppert, Jordan, Home. 
Second Row — McVey, R. Higgins, Sheedy, F. Ludwig, Zwikstra, Kearns, J. F. Walsh, Cuny, 

Lietz, Mann, Bartlett, Becker, F. Murphy, Tomczak. 

Front Roiu — P. Fliggins, Bryant, Ray, Conley, White, Moustakis, R. Ludwig, Gormican, Healy, 

P. O'Connor, Arado. 



Rev. James J. Mertz 



FACULTY MEMBERS 

Rev. George H. M.ahowald, S.J. 



CLASS OF 1929 



John J. Bryant 
James M. Cullman 
Richard F. Ford 



Roger S. Gormican 
J. Francis Walsh 
Preston A. Higgins 



Paul S. Lietz 
Linton G. Moustakis 
George K. Ray 



CLASS OF 1930 



Richard Bartlett 
WiHiam H. Conley 
Edward Healy 
John Home 



Jerome Huppert 
Matthew Lear 
Robert E. Ludwig 
Frank R. Murphy 



Neal McAuhtTe 
Richard O'Connor 
Robert J. Thomson 
John D. White 



Charles Cuny 
Russel Higgins 
Paul L. O'Connor 



CLASS OF 1931 

Frank Quinn 
Robert Rafferty 
John Strobel 



Anthony Tomczak 
Christie Vivirito 



Frank Arado 
George Becker 
William Fitzgerald 



CLASS OF 1932 

William Jordan 
George Zwikstra 
Thomas Kearns 



Fred Ludwig 
Charles Mann 
John Sheedy 



Page three hundred thirty-nine 





SIGMA LAMBDA BETA 
Suite 118, Atlantic Hotel. 

Established February 1, 1927, at Loyola University. 
Colors: Maroon and Gold. 



OFFICERS 

Walter Johnson Grand Regent 

Edward Cooney Vice Regent 

Frank Slingerland : Custodian of Records 

Charles La Fond Grand Ban\er 

James Neary J g^^.^j,^^ 

Harry C. Van Peltj 



Page three hundred forty 



■■■ 


■r 


wm^^^m 


^^^^K?-^ 


^^^^^HT J9 f^^H 


^ 




Blfil 


^^■i^^^^^'^ 


'\ ^'-M 


■nElw 


^ri^l'^j^^^^^L V 


H 


^^^^rfl 


M^ 


j^^M^fWf^ 



■ HONORARY MEMBERS 
Thomas J. Reedy, A.M., LL.B., C.P.A. Cornelius P. Palmer, A.B., LL.R 

MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 

Cl.^ss of 1931 
James Hammond John Martino 



Thomas Cole 



Bernard Snyder 



Cl.ass of 1930 
Edward Cox Hubert Neary 

Class of 1929 

Charles La Fond Herbert Pfeifer Gerald Rooney Harold Wirth 

William Norkett 

PosT'Gr.^duate 
Walter Johnson James Neary Harry C. Van Pelt 

Alumni Members 

Edward Cioonan Joseph Crawley Raymond Hebenstreit Frank Slingerland 

Edward Cooney Marco E. Ferrari Robert Scott 



Page three hundred forty-one 





PHI CHI 

Phi Sigma Chapter 

2825 Prairie Ave. 

National Medical Fraternity 

Founded at University of Vermont, March 31, 188! 

Established at Loyola University, March 7, 1907. 

Colors: Green and White. 



A 



OFFICERS 

Robert E. Lee Presiding Senior 

Edward P. Madden Presiding Junior 

Charles J. Weigel Secretary 

Robert J. Hawkins Treasurer 

Milton R. Kukuk Assistant Treasurer 

Charles B. Gawne first Guide 

Cyril D. Klaus Master of Ceremonies 

Joseph A. Minardi Alumni Secretary 

Joseph T. Coyle Judge Advocate 



University of Vermont 
University of Louisville 
University of Maryland 
Virginia Medical College 
Georgetown University 
Tulane University, La. 
University of Indiana 
University of Texas 
Jefferson Medical College 
University of Alabama 
George Washington Univ. 
Emory University 
Vanderbilt University 
University of N. Carolina 
Rush Medical College 
University of Michigan 
Western Reserve University 
Baylor University 
Loyola University 
University of California 



CHAPTER ROLL 

University of Pennsylvania 
Temple University 
Johns Hopkins University 
St. Louis University 
Leland Stanford University 
Tufts Medical College 
Ohio State University 
University of Oregon 
Detroit Medical College 
University of Tennessee 
University of Arkansas 
University of Kansas 
Creighton University 
University of Nebraska 
University of Cincinnati 
University of Illinois 
Northwestern University 
University of Utah 
University of Minnesota 
Columbia LJniversity 



Marquette University 
University of Colorado 
University of Wisconsin 
University of S. Dakota 
Cornell University 
Harvard University 
Boston University 
Washington University 
McGill University (Canada) 
University of Virginia 
University of Oklahoma 
Yale University 
University of Toronto 
University of Iowa 
University of Mississippi 
Medical School of State of 

South Carolina 
Dalhousie University (N.S.) 
University of Southern 

California 



Page three hundred forty-two 




Hausc 



Kohne, Pctculf. Hartniann, McGuire, 



Top Roui— Walsh, J., O'Connor, Worthm; 

Mammoser, Klaus, Obester. 
Second Row — Kukuk, Prendergast, Stcinbrecker, Dileo, Gawne, Grigsby, Mullen, Leahy, Trapp, 

Lindsay, Coyle, J. 
Third Row — Bulfer, Garthe Menardi, Madden, Lee, Haukins, Weigel, Keeley, Hickey. Whaley. 
Bottom Row — Coyle, C, Zuley, Markey, Serbst, James, Touhey, Burke, Lawlor. 

MEMBERS IN FACULTY 



Dr. L. Arnold 


Dr. F. J. Gerty 




Dr. W. G. McGuire 


D. 


•. F. Mueller 


Dr. R. A. Black 


Dr. P. E. Grahow 


Dr. E. J. Meyer 


Dt 


■. J. B. Nanninga 


Dr. T. A. Boyd 


Dr. U. J. Grimm 


Dr. W. S. Hector 


Di 


•. J. J. Smith 


Dr. W. E. Coen 


Dr. A. E. Jones 




Dr. M. C. Mullen 


Dr 


. F. C. Valde2; 


Dr. F. M. Drennan 


Dr. C. H. Johnson 


Dr. G. W. Mahony 


Dr 


. Vaughn 


Dr. H. W. Elghammer 


Dr. M. Cikrit 




Dr. M. M. Weaver 


Dr 


. M. A. Walker 


Dr. G. H. Ensminger 


Dr. P. Lawler 




Dr. T. I. Walsh 


Dr 


. M. Sievers 


Dr. W. G. Epstein 


Dr. M. McGuire 












MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 










Class 1929 






J. Coyle 


W. Jakopich 




B. £. Turner 


P. 


Stanul 


J. P. Evans 


R. E. Lee 




N. Marquis 


E. 


Kapustka 


V. Evans 


J. Moleski 




K. Grigsby 


N. 


Pavletic 


R. Gladen 


J. Minardi 




F. Walsh 


T. 


Mod:ikowski 


J. Keeley 


L. Lundgoot 




T. Will 


T. 


McCormack 


R. Hawkins 
















Cl.\ss 1930 






J. DiLeo 


J. O'Connor 




M. Kukuk 


J. 


Mahoney 


L. Mammoser 


T. Pauli 




B. Stcinbrecker 


E. 


Madden 


V. Hauser 


J. Garthe 




E. Kleinwachter 


A. 


Bulfer 


H. Hartma 
















Cl.^ss 1931 






C. B. Gawne 


J. E. Petcoff 




H. Trapp 


J. 


Burke 


G. J. Kohne 


J. Mullen 




P. Werthman 


S. 


H. Gallagher 


C. D. Klaus 


C. J. Weigel 




R. J. Lindsay 


J. 


Keehan 


T. P. Hickey 


J. Marciniak 




R. H. Lawler 


G. 


Obester 


J. M. Leahey 


T. B. Carney 




1. Whaley 


A. 


Persia 


P. E. Leahey 


E. Spangler 




J. Twohey 


L. 


Zuley 


P. McGuire 


J. Prendergast 




H. Kramps 










Cl.ass 1932 






C. Coyle 


E. Stepan 




P. Engle 


P. 


Corboy 


J. Markey 


R. Berry 




E. James 


J. 


Walsh 


C. Serbsts 


C. Hughes 











Page three hundred forty-three 





PHI BETA PI 

Alpha Omega 

3729 Lake Park Ave. 

National Medical Fraternity 

Founded at University of Pittsburg, 1891. 

Established at Loyola University, 1921. 

Colors: Green and White. 



Officers in University 

A. Santoro, B.S., A.B Archon 

T. S. Greteman, B.S Vice-Archon 

J. D. Caulfied, B.S , Secretary 

C. J. Zurfli, B.S Treasurer 

C. S. Hagerty, B.S Editor 



CHAPTER ROLL PHI BETA PI 



University of Pittsburgh 
University of Maryland 
Jeiferson Medical College 
Virginia Medical College 
Georgetown University 
University of Virginia 
Harvard University 
Johns Hopkins University 
Pennsylvania University 
West Virginia University 
University of Utah 
So. California University 
Vanderbilt University 



Alabama University 
Tulane University 
University of Texas 
Oklahoma University 
Louisville University 
Baylor University 
Emory University 
Michigan University 
Rush Medical College 
Northwestern University 
University of Illinois 
Detroit College (Surgery) 
Indiana University 



Marquette University 
Wisconsin University 
Loyola University 
St. Louis University 
Washington University 
Minnesota University 
Iowa University 
Missouri University 
J. A. Creighton University 
Kansas University 
University of Kansas 
Colorado University 
Nebraska University 



Page three hundred forty-four 




Top Row — Jonas, Wilson, Clarke, Solomon, Elven, Molengraf, Donlon, Albi. 
Second Row — StetEs, Sherwin, Armington, Falkey, Sachs, Kenny, Givney, Guarnieri. 
Bottom Row — Kenpler, Collins, Karr, Santoro, Zurfli, Haggerty, Lautiff. 



MEMBERS 

B. Barker Beeson, M.D. 

John J. Boland, B.S., M.D. 

Vincent B. Bowler, B.S., M.D. 

Harrv J. Dooley. M.D., F.A.C.S. 

*H. J. Dwyer, M.D. 

Thos. P. Foley, M.D. 

Geo. D. J. Griffin, M.D., F.A.C.A. 

Lester A. Halloran, A.B., M.D. 

Eugene T. Hartigan. M.D., LL.B.. J.D. 

Edward M. Hess, M.D. 

Wilhelm K. Hueper, M.D. 

Alexander J. Javois, B.S., M.D. 

Edmund G. Lawler. B.S., M.D. 

F. C. Leeming, M.D. 

*Samuel A. Mathews, M.D. 

Frank A. Mcjunkin, A.M., M.D. 

John V. McMahon, B.S., M.D. 

Jos. L. Meyer, M.D. 

*Edw. L.'Moorhead,M.A., M.D.,LL.D., F.A.C 



IN FACULTY 

Louis D. Moorhead, A.M., M.S., M.D., Dean. 
John C. Murray, M.D. 
Robert R. Mustell, B.S., A.M., M.D, 
Anthony V. Partipilo, M.D. 
Wm. J. Pickett, M.D. 
Ernst A. Pribram, M.D. 
Geo. B. Rosengrant, B.S., M.D. 
Henry Schmiti, A.M., M.D.. F.A.C.S.. F.A.C.R. 
Herbert E. Schmitz, B.S., M.D. 
Wm. Somerville, B.S., M.D. 
Leo. P. A. Sweeney, M.D. 
Reuben M. Strong, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 
Wm. J. Swift, M.D., F.A.C.S. 
Eugene E. Taylor, B.S., M.D. 
Richard A. Tivnen, M.D., LL.D. 
Italo F. Vohni, B.S., M.D. 
John M. Warren, A.B., A.M., M.D. 
Edw. H. Warszewski, B.S., M.D. 
.S.Arnold A. Zimmermann, Ph.D. 



*Deceased. 

Freshmen 
F. J. Clarke 
N. J. Doherty 
W. T. EInen 

F. G. Guarnieri 
J. A. McNamara 

G. J. Rau 

S. D. Solomon 
E. M. StefFes 



MEMBERS IN 

Sophomores 
R. W. Albi 
C. L. Armington 
J. Collins 
T. W. Falke 
J. A. Forbrich 
J. A. Gibney 
C. S. Hagerty 
M. M. Hoeltgen 

F. A. Heupler 

B. J. Johnston, Jr. 

G. E. Kenney 
F. P. Lautiff 

C. J. Molengraft 
E. W. Sachs 

L. P. Sherwin 
H. R. Wilson 



UNIVERSITY 

Juniors 
J. L. Amorose 
C. M. Carey 
H. Doeringsfeld 

E. V. Donlon 
C. J. Foley 

H. E. Graham 
W. Johnston 
N. M. Latz 
T. J. Pekin 
P. Schneider 

F. E. Streysman 
P. J. Timmons 
C. J. Zurfli 



Seniors 
J. D. Caulfield 
A. Conti 
W. S. Conway 
F. J. Gleason 
T. J. Greteman 
W. J. Karr 
Leo. J. Latz 
T. J. Murphy 
A. Santoro 



Page three hundred forty-jive 





PHI LAMBDA KAPPA 

Gamma Chapter 

National Medical Fraternity. 

Founded at University of Pennsylvania, 1907. 

Established at Loyola University, in 192 L 

Colors: White and Blue. 



University of Pennsylvania 
University of Illinois 
Jelferson College 
Loyola University 
Columbia University 
Bellvue College 
Long Island College 
University of Buffalo 
Tufts College 
Boston University 
University of Maryland 
University of Michigan 



CHAPTER ROLL 

Georgetown University University of Tennessee, 
Virginia Medical College College of Medicine 

St. Louis University Hahnemann Medical College 
University of Virginia of Philadelphia 

Georgetown Medical College Western Reserve University 

Albany Medical College Harvard University Medical 



Tulane University 
Northwestern University 
Rush Medical College 
University of Wisconsin 
Temple University 
Cornell University 
Ohio State University 



School 
University of Kansas 

School of Medicine 
Medical College of South 

Carolina 
Washington University 
Detroit College 



Philadelphia New York 



ALUMNI CLUBS 
Chicago Baltimore 



Detroit Pittsburgh 



OFFICERS IN UNIVERSITY 

Ingersoll Ludwig Worthy Superior 

Edward A. Crown Chancellor 

Herman Shapiro Exchequer 

Nathan Flaxman Recording Scribe 

George Rand Corresponding Scribe 

David A. Anderman Sergeant-at-Arms 

Herman Renkoff Chairman Social Committee 

Herman Levy Master of Pledges 

Harry Levy Chapter Adviser 



Page three hundred forty-six 




Top Row — Weinless, B. Schwarc;, Eisenman, Gordon, Greenburg, Renkoff. 
Second Row — Schwartz, Jesser, Edelstein, Fagelson, Reider, Levy. 
Bottom Row — Anderman, Flaxman, Ludwig, Rand, Schapiro, Pntikin. 



Dr. J. J. Mendlesohn 
Dr. L. J. Brody 
Dr. A. Finkle 



I. Ludwig 
E. Crown 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

Dr. N. Fox 

Dr. A. H. Goldfine 

Dr. S. Salinger 

Dr. Benjamin E. Elliott 
(Deceased) 

MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 
Class of 1929 
I. Pritikin 



Dr. L. M. Trace 
Dr. L. Singer 



N. Schwartz 



A. Fagelson 

B. Greenburg 



N. Flaxman 
L. Lebovit? 



CLASS OF 1930 



B. Gordon 
G. Rand 



H. Shapiro 



H. Levy 
B. Schwarcz 



CLASS OF 1931 



J. Weinless 
R. Edelstein 



H. Renkoff 
D. Anderman 



L. S. Eiseman 



S. Brownstein 



CLASS OF 1932 
J. H. Jesser 

PLEDGES 
I. Goldberg 



J. H. Reider 



A. Krascher 



Page three hundred forty-seven 




SIGMA NU PHI 

Stephen A. Douglas Chapter 

National Legal Fraternity. 

Founded at Georgetown University, 1903. 

Established at Loyola University, March 15, 1924 

Colors: Purple and Gold. 



» 



Officers in University 

Thomas Crane Chancellor 

Charles Cannon first Vice-Chancellor 

Joseph Henry Second Vice-Chancellor 

William Bellamy Registrar of Exchequer 

John Lamb Master of Rolls 

Lawrence Marino Marshall 



CHAPTER ROLL 



Alpha : National University of Law, D. C. 
Beta: Georgetown University, D. C. 
Gamma : Detroit College of Law, Mich. 
Epsilon: University of So. California 
2eta: University of Richmond, Va. 
Eta: Stetson University, Fla. 
Theta: Washington College of Law 
Iota: St. Louis University, Mo. 
Kappa: Marquette University, Wis. 



Lambda: Duke University (Law), N. C 
Mu: Temple University, Pa. 
Nu: Northwestern University (Law). 
Xi: Loyola University, Chicago 
Omicron: Loyola University, La. 
Pi: Westminster Law School, Colo. 
Rho: Hastings College (Law), Calif. 
Sigma: Duquesne University, Pa. 
Tau: Detroit College of Law, Mich. 



ALUMNI CHAPTERS 



Detroit Alumni Chapter 
District of Columbia Chapter 
Richmond Alumni Chapter 
St. Louis Alumni Chapter 



Milwaukee Alumni Chapter 
Chicago Alumni Chapter 
Los Angeles Alumni Chapter 
Minneapolis Alumni Chapter 



Page three hundred fortyeigfit 



;^ um^i^ 






'S ^er js W f 
V ^ >f ^ 1 

W »^ •%' W f 



MEMBER IN FACULTY 
Sherman A. Steele, Litt.B., LL.B. 

MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 

Class of 1929 

Lawrence Marino John Lamb Kyran Phelan Joseph Henry 

Charles Cannon J. Glenn Shehee Thomas Crane 

Class of 1930 
William Bellamy Joseph Santucci Joseph Wiedeman 

Class of 1931 
Neil Rittenhouse Thomas Keane Raymond H. Collins 

Class of 1932 
Peter Fa^io Joseph Grady Thomas Irwin Raymond Kilbride 



Page three hundred forty-nine 





DELTA THETA PHI ^_^ 

Joseph McKenna Senate. V^^j 

National Legal Fraternity VT 

Founded at Chicago, Illinois, in 1913. 
Established at Loyola University, 1925. 
Colors: Green and White. 
Officers in University 

H. F. Schlacks Dean 

G. J. Haley Vice Dean 

A. J. Brown, Jr Cler\ of Rolls 

J. M. Klees Cier^ of Exchequer 

N. J. Barron, Jr Master of Ritual 

J. H. Buckley Bailiff 

A. B. Burke Tribune 

CHAPTER ROLL 

Boston University University of Utah 

St. Louis University Washburn College School of Law 

Indiana University University of Memphis Law School 

University of North Carolina University of Richmond 

Washington University New York Law School 

University of Missouri Mercer University 

Univeisity of Kansas University of Chicago 

Creighton University Chattanooga College of Law 

Ohio State University Ohio Northern University 

University of Michigan University of Nebraska 

Drake University University of California 

Detroit College of Law Loyola University (Chicago) 

University of Illinois John Marshall School of Law (Cleveland) 

Western Reserve University University of Minnesota 

State University of Iowa New Jersey Law School 

John Marshall Law School St. Paul College of Law 

Columbia University Cleveland Law School 

Marquette University Leland Stanford University 

Loyola University (New Orleans) Kansas City Law School 

University of Southern California University of Washington 

Cornell University University of Maryland 

University of Colorado University of Pennsylvania 

Fordham University University of Indianapolis 

University of Pittsburg Detroit City Law School 

Brooklyn Law, School De Paul University 

University of South Dakota Atlanta Law School 

University of Cincinnati Chicago-Kent College of Law 

Southern Methodist University Georgetown University 

Yale University Northwestern University 

Dickinson College of Law - Northwestern College of Law 

University of Detroit George Washington University 

University of Texas 



Page three hundred fifty 




Top Row — McGuirc, Daley, Harrington, Crowe. 
Second Row — Burke, Glynn, McCarthy, McGonagle 
Bottom Row — Buckley, Brown, Haley, Barron. 





MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 








Seniors 




Deegan 
Glynn 


Harrington 
McGonagle 


Webber 
Juniors 


Toomey 


Barron 

Brown 

Buckley 

Burke 

Crowe 

Haley 


McCarthy 

McGuire 

Schlacks 

Daly 

Cloonan 


McGowan 

Raysa 

Bamrick 

Farrell 

Carey 

Sophomores 


Dunn 

J. Doberty 

J. Johnson 

O'Dowd 

Kelly 


Curry 


Dreis 


Klees 
Freshmen 


Reed 


D. Buckley 
Caldwell 


W. Johnson 


Crowley 


Early 



Pledge 



McAuliffe 



Pdge three hundred fifty-one 





NU SIGMA PHI 
Epsilon Chapter 
National Medical Sorority. 
Founded at University of Illinois, 1898. 
Established at Loyola University, April 20, 1920. 
Colors: Green and White. 



CHAPTER ROLL 

Alpha: University of Illinois Iota: University of Boston 

Beta: University of Chicago Kappa: University of California 

Gamma: University of Indiana Lambda: Washington University 

Delta: University of Nebraska Mu: University of Buffalo 

Epsilon: Loyola University Nu: Tufts College 

Zeta: University of Southern California Xi: University of Colorado 

Eta: University of Iowa Pi: Northwestern University 

Theta: Western Reserve University Omicron: Northwestern University 

(Alumnae) 

OFFICERS IN UNIVERSITY 

Nellie M. Brown President 

Ruth Jaeger Vice President 

Ella H. Valenta Secretary 

Lillian Tarlowe Treasurer 

Helen Button Archive 



Page three hundred fiftytwo 




Top Row — Button, L. Tarlowe, Brown, Valenta. 
Front Row — V. Tarlowe, Chambers, Kenny, Lavin. 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 
Dr. Noreen Sullivan 



MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 



Nellie M. Brown 



Class of 1931 
Ella H. Valenta 



Ruth Jaeger 



Class of 1930 
Lillian Tarlowe 



Virginia Tarlowe 



Class of 1931 

Eleanor Kennedy 
Catherine Lavin 



Helen Button 



Class of 1932 

Beatrice Raymond Clementine Frankowski 

Marie McVey Edith Chapman 

Ida Salvotti Alice Wilson 

Page three hundred fifty-three 




T)R. RICHARD J. TIVNEN OPHTHALMOLOGIC AL SOCIETY 

Honorary Medical Fraternity. 

Established at Loyola University, 1922. 

Honorary President — Dr. Rich.^rd Tivnen 

Honorary Vice-President — Da. George H. Ensminger 



Officers in the University 

John L. Keeley President 

Joseph J. Coyle . Vice-President 

Catherine L. McCorry Secretary 

John J. GafFney Treasurer 



Page three hundred fifty-four 




Top Row — Edwards, Gaffney, Conley, Caulficld, Lee, Gilmore, Gleason. 

Second Row — Lundgoot, Ashmenckas, Greteman, Kapustka, Jakopich, Hawkins, Karr. 

Front Row — Brown, Valenta, Ensminger, Tivnen, Keeley, McCorry, Coyle. 



Peter Ashmenckas 
Nellie M. Brown 
John Caulfield 
William Conway 
Joseph J. Coyle 
A. Pace Edwards 
Ralph F. Fouser 
John J. Gaifney 



MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 

Class of 1929 

Frank P. Gilmore 
Francis G. Gleason 
Theodore Greteman 
Robert Hawkins 
William Jakopich 
Edward Kapustka 
Edward J. Zimmerman 



Walter J. Karr 
John E. Keeley 
Paul J. Kullman 
Robert E. Lee 
Lars Lundgoot 
Catherine L. McCorry 
Ella H. Valenta 



J. L. Amorose 
Andrew F. Bulfer 
C. M. Carey 
Harold W. Carey 
John J. Dwyer 



Class of 1930 

Howard E. Graham 
Henry A, Hartman 
V. F. Hauser 
M. R. Kukuk 
John A. Loef 



Edward P. Madden 
Theodore H. Pauli 
Alfred J. Ouellette 
Lillian S. Tarlow 
John C. Wall 



Page three hundred fifty-five 




LAMBDA RHO 

Honorary Radiological Fraternity. 

Established at Loyola University, 1925. 

MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

Benjamin H. Orndorff, A.M., M.D., F.A.C.R Honorary President 

Henry Schmitz, A.M., M.D., F.A.C.R Honorary Vice-President 

Bertha Van Hoosen, A.B., A.M., M.D. 
Richard J. Tivnen, M.D., LL.D. 
Joseph E. Laibe, B.S., M.D. 
Irvin F. Hummon, Jr.. B.S., M.D. 

OFFICERS 

Robert E. Lee President 

Robert J. Ha\vkin,s Vice-President 

Nellie M. Brown Secretary 

Ella H. Valenta Treasurer 



Page three hundred fifty-six 



• ■'') 




Top Row — Jones, Marquis, J. O'Connor, H.MjM.r, M.iniiiioser, Madden, Gaffney. 
Second Row — Wall, Calania, Dwyer, Kapustka, Kukuk, Pauli, Keeley. 
Front Row — Dotterway, Brown, Lee, Hawkins, Valenta, McCorry. 



SENIOR MEMBERS 



Catherine L. McCorry 
Blanche E. Dotterway 
Joseph T. Coyle 
Joseph P. Evans 
B. Carl Turner 
William P. Jonas 
John J. GafFney 
John L. Keeley 



William J. Jakopich 
Walter Joseph Karr 
Stanley L. Moleski 
Neal J. Marquis 
Edward Kapustka 
Francis P. Gilmore 
Anthony M. Catania 
Thaddeius Modzikowski 



JUNIOR MEMBERS 



Alfred J. Ouillette 
Edward P. Madden 
Theodore H. Pauli 
John C. Wall 
James J. O'Connor 



Lambert F. Mammoser 
Harold F. McGrath 
John J. Dwyer 
Vernon F. Hauser 
William R. Kukuk 



Page three hundred fifty-seven 



MM 



BLUE KEY 

National Honor Fraternity 

Loyola Booster Club Chapter 

Established at University of Florida, October, 1924. 

Established at Loyola University, February, 1926. 

James Neary President 

J. Francis Walsh Vice-President 

John D. White Secretary 



CHAPTER ROLL 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute 

Colorado School of Mines 

University of Florida 

University of Georgia 

Oglethorpe University 

University of Idaho 

Butler University (Indiana) 

Wabash College (Indiana) 

Lombard College (Illinois) 

Loyola University (Illinois) 

Michigan State College 

N. E. Missouri State Teachers College 

Midland College 

University of Nevada 



University of North Dakota 
Wittenberg College (Ohio) 
Pacific University (Oregon) 
Williamette University (Oregon) 
University of Pennsylvania 
Temple University (Penna.) 
Woiford College (S. Car.) 
University of S. Sewanee (Tenn.) 
University of Chattanooga (Ten) . 
Southwestern University (Texas) 
Trinity University (Texas) 
University of Utah 
Emory and Henry College (Va.) 
University of Wyoming 



Page three hundred fifty-eight 



m 




Top Row — Ray, Madden, Conley, Stimming. 

Bottom Row — Norkett, Walsh, Neary. White, Van Pelt. 



MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 



James X. Bremner 
John J. Bryant 
Walter Buchman 
Andrew Bulfer 
Thomas Byrne 
John Cavanaugh 
Cornehus CoUins 
Frank Conley 
William Conley 
James Deegan 
Richard Ford 
Francis Farrell 
Joseph Grady 
Thomas Hickey 



Harold Hillenbrand 
John Keating 
Ambrose Kelly 
Cyril Klaus 
Walter Karr 
Charles LaFond 
Robert Lee 
Paul Lietz 
John Marky 
Ed Madden 
James Neary 
William Norkett 
James O'Connor 



Richard O'Connor 
Joseph Osten 
Hugh O'Hare 
George Ray 
Fred Scambler 
William Schoen 
Charles Stimming 
John Sweeney 
Ray Todd 
Paul Topel 
Harry Van Pelt 
Francis Walsh 
John Waldron 



Page three hundred fifty-nine 




BETA PI 

Honorary Publications Fraternity. 
Established at Loyola University, April 3, 1926. 

Honorary President — MORTON D. Z.ABEL, A.M. 



Requirements: Keys are awarded to staff members of Loyola publications not 
earlier than the end of their sophomore year upon special recommendation of the 
editor of the publication. 



Officers in the University 

William H. Conley President 

John E. Keating Vice-President 

Frank Conley Secretary and Treasurer 



Page three hundred sixty 




Bottom Row — Stimming, Conky, F., Zabcl, Conley, W., Keating, R. O'Connor. 
Second Rom — Crowley, Doheny, Melody, Bryant, Thomson, Ray. 



MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 



Alexander Brown 
John J. Bryant 
Harold A. Hillenbrand 
Paul S. Liet? 



CLASS OF 1929 
John E. Keating 
James A. Neary 
George K. Ray 
Paul A. Reed 



William P. Schoen 
Charles E. Stimming 
John A. Sweeney 
J. Francis Walsh 



James X. Bremner 
Frank Conley 
William H, Conley 



CLASS OF 1930 
Frank Melody 
Richard O'Connor 



Robert Thomson 
John D. White 



Edward Healy 
Robert RafFerty 



ELIGIBLE 

Anthony Tomczak 
Paul O'Connor 



Frank Quinn 



Page three hundred sixty-one 



^7^ 



ALPHA KAPPA DELTA 

National Honorary Sociology Fraternity. 
Beta Chapter of Illinois. 

Established at Loyola University in 1928. 



Individual membership may be attained to by juniors, seniors, graduate students, 
alumni, and faculty members majoring in sociology, social work or other of the social 
sciences, if the individual possesses a socialized personality and has a high scholastic 
record, with promise of accomplishments through leadership. 



Rev. Frederic Siedenburg, S.J President 

J. William Davis, M.D Vice-President 

Cecille H. Egan (Mrs. Howard Egan) Secretary 

Paul R. Martin Treasurer 



Page three hundred sixty-two 




Top Row—H. Egan, Van Houten, Van Driel, Walsh, S.J. 
Bottom Row — C. Egan, Siedenburg, S.J., Fain. 



MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 



J. William Davis 
Cecille H. Egan 
Howard E. Egan 
Helen M. Ganey 
H. Clare Garrity 
Francis J. Gerty 
Ravenna KanoufF 



Paul R. Martin 
Ruth Tennes McGee 
Marguerite M. McManemin 
Frederick Siedenberg, S.J. 
Agnes Van Driel 
M. Jean Van Etten 
James F Walsh, S.J. 



Page three hundred sixty-three 



THE INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 

Of the Lake Shore Campus 

Established 1928 

Officers 

Paul M. Plunkett President 

Linton Moustakis Vice-President 

Edward Kelly Secretary 



History and Purpose: The interfraternity council of the Lake Shore Campus was 
established at the beginning of the scholastic year of 1928. The purpose of the or- 
ganization was to bring about a unified spirit among the social fraternities of the 
campus so that the three fraternities might work together for the betterment of the 
University. Among the activities which were aided by the council were the athletic 
■rallies and the class dances. In addition to the aid given to various organizations the 
council settled all disputes among the fraternities and determined the policy of pledg- 
ing and rushing. 



Page three hundred sixtyfour ' 




Top Row — Garthe, Kelly, White. 

Bottom Row — Moustakis, Plunkett, Prendergast. 



Members from Fraternities 



ALPHA DELTA GAMMA 



Paul Plunkett 



Harold Prendergast 



Jack Garthe 



Linton Moustakis 



John Ennis 



PHI MU CHI 



Daniel Murphy 



PI ALPHA LAMBDA 



Edward Healy 



Edward Kelly 



John White 



Page three hundred sixty-five 



ACKNOWLEDGMENT 

The presentation of the Nineteen Twenty-nine Loyolan marks the end of the 
work of a large group of students, faculty members, and business men. The staff' 
realizes that without the hearty cooperation which was received from them the book 
would have suffered seriously. We extend our gratitude to all those who in any 
way aided in the production of this book. 

Special thanks are due to Father Kelley, Father Reiner, and Mr. Steggert of the 
Lake Shore Campus for their cooperation, interest and suggestions. Mr. McCormick 
and Mr. Rooney of the Law School, Mr. Reedy of the Commerce School, Miss Van 
Driel and Father Siedenburg of the Downtown College, and Miss Dooley and Miss 
Durkin of the Medical School cooperated in every way with the staff and were always 
ready to assist us. We also express our appreciation to Sister Mary Lidwina of 
Mercy Hospital, Sister Helen Jarrell of St. Bernard's hospital. Sister St. Vincent of 
Oak Park Hospital, Miss Welderbach of St. Anne's Hospital, and Sister Victoria of 
St. Elizabeth's Hospital. 

The staff feels that ,it has been most fortunate in having the pleasure of dealing 
with the most efficient and friendly group of business men evef connected with the 
Loyolan. Mr. Harry Lamberg of Clair Marcelle Studio was always ready to help 
the staff under any and all circumstances. We are especially grateful to Mr. L. M. 
Gooder, Mr. Howard Keller and Mr. S. W. Curtiss of D. F. Keller fc? Co., for their 
efficiency, helpfulness and personal interest in the book. No editor who ever knew 
and worked with the representative of Standard Photo Engraving Company, Mr. 
C. A. Mathisson, can express his appreciation in mere words to that peer of en- 
gravers whose resourcefulness has saved many annuals from ruin. 

If we might single out any one man whose constructive advice and friendly sug- 
gestions have aided the staff more than anything else, it would be our able moderator, 
Mr. Morton D. Zabel. To him the staff and the editor express their sincere thanks. 

W. H. C. 



Page three hundred sixty-six 



OUR ADVERTISERS 

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Page three hundred sixty-seven 



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CHICAGO 

Telephone Wabash 1120 



Randolph 0296 

L. P. FRIESTEDT COMPANY 

Building, Kaisxng, Movnxg and Shonng Engineers 

7 SOUTH DEARBORN STREET 
CHICAGO 

FRANK P. NOE, President 



three hundred sei'ent_v-/oiir 




For appearance and econoin\ 

RUDOLPH ANDRINGA 

Sectional Office Partitioy^s and Railings 
2419 W. Monroe St. Seeley 3024 

The cover for 
this annual 
was created by 
The DAVID J. 
MOLLOY CO. 

2857 N. Western Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 



Bring Tour Diploma and Class Pictures 
to Us for Correct Framing 



1-CT7 Molioy Stade 



Page three hundred seventy-five 



PHONE YARDS 0768 



J. M. BRENNAN &r CO. 

Painting and Decorating Contractors 



RESIDENCES CLUBS STORES FACTORIES 

OFFICES SCHOOLS APARTMENTS WAREHOUSES 

HOTELS CHURCHES THEATRES GARAGES 

WE ARE IN A POSITION TO OPERATE ANY PLACE IN THE COUNTRY 



651 WEST 43rd STREET 



Compliments of 



W. E. O^NEIL eONSTRUCTION CO. 



308 W. WASHINGTON STREET 



Telephone State 4316 



Page three hundred seventy-six 



m 



B.EEBROS. 

Good Clothes 

Hats. Furnishings 
men's Shoes 



Two Stores 

BELMONT O LINCOLN AVE 
MILWAUKEE &• ASHLAND AVE, 



MAKERS OF 
LOYOLA BAND UNIFORMS 

also ma\ers of 
ROBES, GOWNS AND CAPS 

CHICAGO 
UNIFORM & CAP CO. 

208 West Monroe Street 
Tel. Franklin 0188-0189 



DUFFY'NOONAN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY 

General Coy^tractors 

176 WEST ADAMS STREET 
CHICAGO 



Builders of the 

SACRED HEART SCHOOL 

Rosemont Ave. and Sheridan Road 



Bi.^aiit^l§^trattoii 

C O JJ^ E G C 

Offers Special Sumyner Secretarial Course to College Studeyyts 

Secretarial Training enables you to learn the business from an executive who 
knows the business. As Secretary to such a man you are in intimate touch 
with all the activities of the organization and personally associated with the 
person who has the power to advance you to a higher place. The Summer 
Course enables you to continue college and EARN part or all your way, or it 
gives you a three months' advantage toward business success as compared with 
students entering in the Fall. Phone or write for further information. 

The School 'Where a BUSLSIESS Atmosphere Prevails 
18 South Michigan Ave., Chicago Phone Randolph 1575 



Page three hundred seventy-seven 



TELEPHONE RANDOLPH 2574^ 



Lang, Weise & Cella 

Real Estate and Building Management 

308 W. WASHINGTON STREET 
CHICAGO 



\D\M T LANG -^^^ Chicago real estate poaed 

N^TIOVAL A'nSV RFAL FST\TF RO*'"^- 

WILLIAM T. WEISE BUILD;^'G ' managers associa 

DA\"ID L. CELLA the Chicago board of 



BOARDS 



THE MARSHALL FIELD GARDEN APARTMENT HOMES 
J^ow Ready for Occupancy 

Seven minutes from the Loop — one-half block from two Elevated Stations — 

iive blocks from Lincoln Park — large private park — indoor playroom, outdoor 

playground, roof gardens, auditorium. 

A modern four-story fireproof ramp garage for 27? cars, immediately opposite 
the Garden Apartment Homes. Reduced rates to tenants. 

Rents— 4 Rooms $52.00 

5 Rooms 70.00 

6 Rooms 84.00 

MARSHALL FIELD GARDEN APARTMENT HOMES 

Blackhawk, Sedgwick, Sigel Streets and Hudson Avenue 

To visit the site, take Ravenswood, Southport, or Wilson local Elevated to 

Schiller Street Station and walk one-half block West, or to Sedgwick Street 

and North Avenue Station and walk one-half block South; or take surface 

lines on Sedgwick Street. 

Renting Ojjice at 411 Bhc\haw\ Street 

Telephone Lincoln 2122 



hundred seventy-eight 



Compliments of 
A FRIEND 



Headquarters for Good Tires 

Directly opposite the Broadway Armory, at 5900 Broad' 
way, you'll find just the tire you want. No matter what 
size or type or make, we have it. At rock-bottom prices; 
and courteous, competent service which will please you. 



5900-02-04 Broadway 

Telephones 

Sunnysidc 6000 

Longbeach 7878-79 



West Side Store 

4655 W. Madison Street 

Telephones 

Mansfield 8220-21 



^.X'^'->CEO.J.EBERHARDT^-*^^x5[ 




<> 



Y \TIRE & SUPPLYT"* X^ 






CHICAGO 






three hundred $event\-nme 





SAVE 25% ON YOUR 




FUEL BILL 


MUNGER^S 
WEST SIDE LAUNDRY 


by having your heating boiler and pipes in- 
sulated. The heat will also be evenly dis- 


1435-1437-1439 Madison St. 


tributed through the house instead of be- 
ing lost in the basement. 


Telephones 
Monroe 0687— Euclid 8206 (Oak Park) 


Call Us on Contract 'Wor\ or Materials 
Only 


The very best work at the right price 


STANDARD ASBESTOS 


All Services — Individual Finish, Family Fin- 
ish, Rough Dry, Hydro and Wet Wash 


MFG. COMPANY 

820-822 WEST LAKE STREET 




TELEPHONE MONROE 6475 




If the Field of Education is Your Imme- 




diate Interest, We Can Serve You 


STUDENTS 
We have a wonderful opportunity 


Our Pubhcatioyis in the Elementary and 
High School Fields Reflect 


for you to make money in vacation 
and spare time. 


The application of up-to-date and sound 
pedagogical principles. 


For Appointment call 
Buckingham 9860 


Courses which have been checked against 
authoritative requirements. 


Asl{ for Chicago Sales Manager 
VIT-O'NET CORPORATION 

2619 N. ASHLAND AVE. 


Our Service to Instructors Includes 

Syllabi, educational monographs, per- 
sonal demonstration and direction. 

Write for our catalog of publications. 


CHICAGO 


LYONS t^ CARNAHAN 




CHICAGO NEW YORK 




221 E. 20th St. 131 E. 2?rd St. 



Page three hundred eighty 



Dance 

TO THE IRRESISTABLE MUSIC OF 

KING 

WAYNE 

And his Orchestra 

Q Q &i 

ARAGON 

BALLROOM 

LAWRENCE NEAR BROADWAY 

Dancing &v&ry night except Monday 
EVERY FRIDAY ^ WALZ NIGHT 





i ^ 



BANK IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD 



AMERICAN BANK t^ TRUST CO. 

1939 Milwaukee Ave. 
ARMITAGE STATE BANK 

3400 Armitage Ave. 
ASHLAND 63rd STATE BANK 

1536 W. Sixty-third St. 
AUBURN PK. TR. & SAV. BANK 

734 W. Seventy-ninth St. 
BRAINERD STATE BANK 

8646 S. Ashland Ave. 
CHATHAM STATE BANK 

7S50 Cottasre Grove Ave. 



CHICAGO LAWN STATE BANK 

3154 W. Si.xty-third St. 
GAGE PARK STATE BANK 

5906 S. Ked-ie Ave. 
RIDGE STATE BANK 

7050 S. Western Ave. 
STONY ISLAND STATE SAV. 

6754 Stony Island Ave. 
W. ENGLEWOOD TR. & SAV. 

1624 W. Sixty-third St. 
WEST HIGHLAND STATE BANK 

7900 S. Ashland Ave. 



BK. 



BK. 



WEST LAWN TRUST ii SAVINGS BANK 
3942 W. Sixtythird St. 

JOHN BAIN 

Chairman of the Board 



Page three hundred eighty-one 



ic.-?^ 



FEDERAL CEMENT TILE CO. 

Fireproof - Permanent 

PRECAST CONCRETE ROOF SLABS 

608 So. Dearborn Street 

CHICAGO 


Compliments of 

HARMON ELECTRIC CO. 


Investigate the Marvel 

THE -MOST PRACTICAL" VACUUM 
CLEANER FOR THE HOME 

Invaluable for keeping the home "Spic and 
Span." 

When It is necessary to vacuum, there is 
no "getting ready" with the Marvel. 

The Marvel is always ready for it requires 
no electricity, cords or connections. 

Marvels are used on Railroads, in Hotels 
and in Homes. 

Your rugs will tell wh)' Marvels sell. 

Phone or write for free demonstration in 
your own home. 

THE MARVEL COMPANY 

3450-2.4 ARCHER AVENUE 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

TEL. LAFAYETTE 1200 


THE CUNARD LINE 

TO 

EUROPE— MEDITERRANEAN- 
WEST INDIES— AROUND 
THE WORLD 

The large fleet of New Oil Burners from 
New York, Boston and Montreal, together 
with the Cunard famous Cuisine and serv- 
ice afi^ords the very best obtainable in all 
classes of Trans-Atlantic travel. 

As\ Tour Local Age;it or 

THE CUNARD LINE 

346 N. Michigan Ave. Chicago, 111. 



three hmidred eishtv-two 




lead qiw lien for 

E LECTHIC 
HEFHIGEKATION 

for Homo, Apartment anil Store 

ECOMMONWEAIIH EDISON O 
LECTRIC SHOPi3 

72 W,-t X.L.iiis Sued ,1,1,1 B,a„rU,-s 
III /'/inn.'s: /( l\ilnlpl, IJOII-l.arnU r,2. l.iH 



MOSER 

"The Business College with a 
University Atmosphere" 

Prepare for a business career at the only Busi- 
ness College in the West which requires every 
student to be at least a four-year High School 
graduate. 

Beginning on the first of April, July, October, 
and January, we conduct a special, complete, in- 
tensive, three-months course in stenography 
which is open to 

COLLEGE GRADUATES AND 
UNDERGRADUATES ONLY 

Enrollments for this course must be made before 
the opening day — preferably some time in ad- 
vance, to be sure of a place in the class. 
Stenography opens the way to independence, 
and is a very great help in any position in life. 
The ability to take shorthand notes of lectures, 
sermons, conversation, and in many other sit- 
uations is a great asset. 

BULLETIN ON REQUEST 

7\(o &o\\c\tor% Employed 

PAUL MOSER, J.D., Ph.B., President 

116 South Michigan Avenue 

Randolph 4347 12th Floor Chicago, 111. 

In the Day School Girls Only are Enrolled 



THE ONLY CLASS "A" LINERS IN 
THE WORLD 

BREMEN 

and 

EUROPA 

NORTH GERMAN 

LLOYD 

Or Local Agent 

130 West Randolph Street 

Chicago, Ilhnois 



DUVAL CONSTRUCTION 
COMPANY 

Genera] Contractors 

CHICAGO 

180 West Washington Ave. 
State 7970-7971 



Piige three hundred eighty-three 



MOTION PICTURE WORK 




in all branches 


NORTH TOWN BUILDERS and 




FINANCE CORPORATION 


DEVELOPING 


2337 Devon Avenue 


PRINTING 




TITLING 


Phone Briargate 5656 




CHICAGO 


MID WEST FILM CO. 




INCORPORATED 


M. F. SCHIAVONE 


845 South Wabash Ave. 


President 


Chicago, lUinois 




Coynpliments of 


Eight Distinct Family Washing Services 


MR. JOHN T. BENZ 


One for Tou 




LINCOLN HAND LAUNDRY 


Vice-Presidmt of 






5439 Broadway Edge. 1662 


THE FIDELITY TRUST ^ SAYINGS BANK 


TRUCKS CALL DAILY 


WILSON AVENUE AND BROADWAY 






Where i^iialitv Predominates 


CHICAGO 





Page three hundred ezght\'-/onr 



Telephone Saginaw 7362; South Shore 7300 




GATEWAY 

'CiilTI 

COMPANY 

1661 EAST 79th STREET 
CHICAGO 

Investment Bonds and Mortgages 





PERFECTO GARCIA 

SUPREME IN QUALITY 

Perfecto Garcia Cigars have for years represented the very finest in quaHty and 
workmanship in Clear Havana Cigars. Their unvarying excellence have won 
unchallenged leadership wherever fine Cigars have been in demand. It doesn't 
matter whether it be the fine clubs, cafes, hotel-stands, restaurants or the plain 
everyday cigar merchant — PERFECTO GARCIA Cigars have been and con- 
tinue to be a trade-winning and business-building commodity. 

OFFICE: 208 NO. WELLS ST., CHICAGO, ILL. 
FACTORIES: TAMPA, FLORIDA 



Page three hundred eightyfive 



v^ 





THE WORSHAM SCHOOL 




620 SOUTH LINCOLN STREET 


Phone Berkshire 443 1 


CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 


ELLIS STONE COMPANY 

INCORPORATED 


AMERICA'S 

LEADING INSTITUTION 

FOR EMBALMING 




AND FUNERAL DIRECTING 


Cut Stone Contractors 

4837 GRAKD AVENUE 
CHICAGO 


Catalogue and Further Information 
Furyiished Upon Application 




TEL. WEST 3222 


ALL MEDICAL and DENTAL BOOKS 


Dearborn 617) Randolph 3776 


used in 




THE MEDICAL AND DENTAL 


DRESS SUIT RENTAL 
COMPANY 


DEPARTMENTS OF LOYOLA 


UNIVERSITY 


FOR RENT— FULL DRESS. TUXEDOS, 


can be obtamed at 


CUTAWAYS, SILK HATS, 


SPEAKMAN^S 


SHOES, SHIRTS 


(Chicago Medical Boo\ Co.) 


FURNISHINGS FOR SALE 


Cor. Congress and Honore Sts. 


310 Capitol Building 


New and Second Hand Medical Books 


159 North State Street 


Full Line of Stationery 


COLLEGIATE MODELS 



Page three hundred eighty six 



"YySt^ous; 



FLUSH VALVES 

are installed throughout the new De Paul 
University Building and many other prom- 
inent Catholic Institutions throughout the 
country. 

We Also Ma\e 

Liquid Soap Fixtures, 

Bronze Signs, etc. 

THE IMPERIAL BRASS MFG. 
COMPANY 

1200 W. HARRISON ST. 
CHICAGO 



"Anything and Everything in Metal" 



GREEN DUCK CO. 

Mastercrafters in Metal 

Advertising Buttons, Badges, Emblems, 

Name Plates, Coins and Medals 

We Ma\e Everything We Sell 

Phones Brunswick 7580-81-82 

1725-39 W. North Avenue 

CHICAGO 



THE PALM GROVE 

T^orth Shore's Smartest Dining 

Rendezvous 

6344 BROADWAY, NEAR DEVON 

Chinese and American Dishes 

Deliciously Prepared and Courteously 

Served 

Bitsiness Luncheon 
Daily Except Sunday 60 Cents 

$1.00 Dinner Daily Except Sunday 

Sunday Special Dinner $1.25 

Special Attention Given to Private Parties 



THE HONEYCOMB RADIATOR CO. 

NOT. INC. 

Largest North Side Manufacturers of 

DECORATIVE RADIATOR 
COVERINGS 

Many Styles to Select From 

Humidify- 
ing Cabinets of 
High Grade 
Pressed Steel 
made to match 
furniture or trim. 
Finished in baked 
enamel or lacquer' 

1616-18 DEVON AVENUE 

Sheldrake 2185 

Attention Architects and Contractors: — 
Special attention is given to you for designs, 
etc., for equipping buildings with our Ra- 
diator Covers. Come to our factory or 
phone for service. 




Page three hundred eighty-seven 



F. STEIGERWALD ii CO. 

Manufacturing Furriers 

7413-15 STONY ISLAND AVENUE 

Joyce Brothers Building 

MIDWAY 7100 


Phone Briargate 9244 — Night Phone 

Rogers Park 6068 

Long Distance Moving at 

Reasonable Rates 

LOYOLA TRANSFER CO. 

Moving, Expressing and Baggage 

Storage and Van Service 

nii LOYOLA AVE. 

R. R. Checks Received before 2 P. M. 

Will Be Dehvered Same Day 

Prompt Reliable Service 

J. R. Clarke, Prop. 

CHICAGO 


Compliments of 

THE TRIPP LUMBER CO. 

MUNDELEIN. ILL. 


CHR. PASCHEN CO. 

1545 Conway Building 

BUILDING CLEANERS 

TUCK POINTERS 
CONCRETE BREAKERS 

Phones Randolph 3 2 SO — Diversey 7800 



Piige tlnee liiiiuJred fit;(ifY-eigIit 



■sNie 



A A[eu' One - and a Dandy 


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^1 




GUASTI . 


m ^'I'^B 




WINE JELLIES 






5 POPULAR FLAVORS 






PORT— SHERRY—MUSCATEL 






SAUTERNE— BURGUNDY 


HP^^^M^'^ ^^1 




24 8-02. Jars to Case 


^HHI^^HI^^^^^Hb^ *' ^^l^^^l 




ATTRACTIVELY PRICED 


My Best Wishes to 


At All Good Dealers 


The Faculty 


ITALIAN VINEYARD CO. 


and 




Students 


491 Milwaukee Avenue 


of 


CHICAGO, ILL. 


LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 




John A. M-^ssen 


(Factory Branch) 


Alderman 




Forty-eighth Ward 



Page three hundred eiglitv-nhie 



^^ 



THE NORTHWESTERN TERRA GOTTA COMPANY 

2525 CLYBOURN AVENUE 
CHICAGO 

Western Plant Southwestern Plant 

DENVER, COLO. ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Telephone SUPerior 0900 for Superior Service Established 1882 

JOSEPH H. BIGGS 

Caterer 

GOLD-GILT CHAIRS FOR RENT 

Estimates Furnished for Luncheons, Dinners, Weddings, Musicales, Receptions, 

Ball Suppers, Afternoon Teas and All Social Functions, Large or Small, 

Town or Country. Employ the Highest Class of Assistants in 

All Branches of My Business 

611-613-615 Cass Street CHICAGO 

BROGHON 

Manufacturing Jewelers — Stationery Engravers 
THE HOUSE OF FAVORS 

SCHOOL RINGS ANNOUNCEMENTS 

BADGE PINS LETTER HEADS 

TROPHIES. MEDALS CALLING CARDS 

FAVORS, EMBLEMS DANCE PROGRAMS 

235 EAST ONTARIO STREET 
CHICAGO 

Telephone Superior 8656 

A GRADUATE AND A POSITION 

What are you doing to prepare yourself for advancement? 

THE UPTOWN METROPOLITAN BUSINESS COLLEGE 

4750 Sheridan Road 

(America's Finest System of Commercial Schools) 

Founded 1873 

Offers 

THOROUGH TRAINING m 

STENOGRAPHIC, SECRETARIAL AND COMMERCIAL COURSES 

Day and Everiing Classes 

Call at Our Office or Telephone Long Beach 1775 



Page three hundred ninety 




Diumidiato 



Ihe HEALTH RADIATOR SHIELD 



COPYRIGHTED 

The Kadiator Cover "of Merit' 
ART METAL PRODUCTS CO. 

514-26 S. Green St., Chicago, 111 Phone Monroe 2726 



tlJeitOasW 




aunar if- 



2204-I0 Lawrence Ave. ^o^bo"*'- Phone, Long Beach 7529 

A ^eryice for £very Home -Wet Was/i to the Comp/efe /y/r/'s/ied Fami'/i/ Waskincr. 




^Ttael ^uaFdian 



fLoral DE3rGNs:;5i> 

CUT FLOWERS 8; PLANTS 



Greenhouit!, — Delivery Service 

and, 

UP-TO-DATE FLORAL SHOP 

2001 Devon Avenue 

Tel. Rogers Park 0546-7-8 

^yompt Delivery 



Compliments of 




INDEPENDENCE 1122 



4949 N. CRAWFORD AVENUE 



Page three hundred 7ii)iet_v-oiie 



Phone Pensacola 6700-1-2 






Telephone State 2 J 40 


JEFFERSON PARK 




MILL WORK CO. Inc. 


SERVICE PLUMBING &r 


SASH, DOORS AND INTERIOR FINISH 


HEATING CO. 


5214-36 Milwaukee Ave. 






Engineers and Contractors 




60 E. South Water St. 


Edward J. Vonesh 




6978 Owen Ave. 


CHICAGO 


HewcastU 0121 CHICAGO 




Lincoln 8. 3 04 




ABLE TRANSFER COMPANY 

Able to Transfer Anything 


MATH. RAUEN COMPANY 


Thos. C. Ryan, Pres. 




Machinery, Slacks, Boilers & Safes 


General Contractors 


Moved and Erected 




Structural Steel Hauling 


326 W. MADISON STREET 


900 Blackhawk St. 




Office, Warehouse and Garage 


CHICAGO 


1500-08 Smith Ave. 





Page three hundred ninety'two 



FOOD SHOP BLACKLER MARKET 
1006-08-10 Davis St. Lake Forest, 111. 
Evanston, 111. 

P. G. RAPP COMPANY 

Market and Grocery 

1449-51 Devon Avenue 

Phone Sheldrake 0250 

CHICAGO 

RAPP BROS. RAPP BROS. 

Winnetka, III. Highland Park, 111. 


Telephones Austin f)0 17— Euclid 7487 

C. KAMPP a SON 

Undertakers 

318-320 N. CENTRAL AVENUE 

AUSTIN-CHICAGO 

Joseph P. Kampp 


Phones E.xperience 
Franklin 7760 Over 50 Years 

MEHRING & HANSON CO. 

HEATING, COOLING e" VENTILATING 

SYSTEMS 

POWER PLANTS— POWER PIPING 

GENERAL STEAM FITTING 

162-166 North Clinton Street 

CHICAGO 


Compliments of 

A FRIEND 



Page three hundred jiinetv-tliree 



-:■'>) 





AFTER GRADUATION— WHAT? 


Telephones Franklin 3 320-3 360 


We have a few openings for young men of 
intelligence and not afraid of hard work. Such 




men will find in our business a real opportunity 


HARRY RODEMS, INC. 


for success. 

We congratulate and welcome Loyola grad- 




uates. 


DESKS ' CHAIRS - TABLES - FILES - ETC. 


THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 


Everything for the Office 


COMPANY OF NEW YORK 


111-115 South Wells Street 


Samuel Heifetz. Manager 
657 Illinois Merchants Bank Building 


Chicago 


Central 4319 




TELEPHONE CANAL 4310 


Family Washing Exclusively 


Telephone Orders Promptly Attended to 




MODEL DAIRY COMPANY 


GREAT NORTHERN LAUNDRY CO. 


Dealers in 


70 59-67 NORTH CLARK STREET 


Dairy Products of Highest Grade 


ALL PHONES ROGERS PARK 3400 


2003-5-7-9 WEST 18th PLACE 




CHICAGO 




FITZ SIMONS &■ CONNELL 


LALLY COLUMN COMPANY 


DREDGE AND DOCK COMPANY 


OF CHICAGO 


Established 1872 


Steel Shell Concrete Filled Columns 


ENGINEERS &■ CONTRACTORS 


4001 Wentworth Ave. Chicago 


Dredging — Docking — Pile Driving — 




Foundations — Piers — Bridges, etc. 


Phone Boulevard 5871 


Frankhn 7766 10 S. La Salle St. 




Phone Sheldrake 4386 


The WARNER CONSTRUCTION CO. 


NORTH SHORE 


Established 1885— Licorporated 1899 


AUTO SPRING t" WHEEL CO. 


GENERAL CONTRACTORS 


'Welding 


173 West Madison Street 


Body Builders and General Repairers 


Telephones Dearborn 6807-8 
CHICAGO 


Auto Springs, Wheels, Fenders and Frames 

Spring and Wheels in Stock 

Auto Blacksmithing 




6240 BROADWAY 



Page three hundred ninety-four 



Established 1872 

CHAS. JOHNSON L^ SON 
FIRE ESCAPE CO. 

Mdnufacturers of 
STAIRWAY FIRE ESCAPES 

and 
GENERAL BLACKSMITHING 

8?9 N. Spauldmg Ave. Chicago 
Phone Kcdzic (i:(iv(i:(l(, 


V. SENG TEAMING COMPANY 

General TrucJ^ing Contractors 

Garage and Warehouse Telephone 
719 W. Erie Street Monroe 6520 

606 West Lake Street 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 


HEBARD 

Storage 
Moving 
Packing 
Shipping 

6327-33 Broadway 


ST. BONIFACE CEMETERY 

482 5 N. Clark St. Longbeach 2790 

ST. JOSEPH CEMETERY 

River Grove, 111. Mernmac 903 3 

ST. MARY'S CEMETERY 

Evergreen Park, 111. Beverley 3778 

The net income of these cemeteries 
is used for the support of the 
Angel Guardian Orphanage 


FRANK H. GRIER, First Vicc-Prcs. 
R. A. MARSHALL, Second Vicc-Prcs. 
P. R. LEATHERMAN, Secretary 
HENRY \V. GREBE, Pres. and Trcas. 

CENTRAL ASBESTOS AND 
MAGNESIA COMPANY 

Manufacturers, Contractors and Jobbers of In- 
sulating Products in All Its Branches 

214-216 W. Grand Ave. Chicago 
Telephone Superior 3 ^ 3 3 


Tel. Haymarket 6860 E. Rutishauser, Pres. 

ARTISTIC WOOD TURNING 
WORKS 

515-523 N. Halsted Street, Chicago 

Manufacturers of 

Mahogany and Rosewood Novelties 

Window Display Fixtures 

Wood Turning of Every Description 


Compliments of 

W. J. NEWMAN CO. 


COSTUMES RENTED 

FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

Amateur or Professional Dress, Tuxedo and Din- 
ner Suits, Theatrical Merchandise, Wigs, Masks, 
Tights, Opera Hose, Tinsel Cloths and Trim- 
mings, Rhinestone and Rhinestone Setters. 

CHICAGO COSTUME WORKS, INC. 

Manufacturers and Designers 
State 6780 174 W. Randolph St. 



Page three hundred ninety-five 



WILLIAM J. QUIGLEY 
5? COMPANY 

Worlds hop5 

ONE SEVENTEEN E. DELAWARE PLACE 
CHICAGO 


CANEVINS 

Candies 

CHICAGO 

1771 Wilson Ave. 1039 Lawrence Ave. 
Ravenswood 7471 Ardmore 3 362 


MURPHY'S RESTAURANT 

6';46 SHERIDAN ROAD 
Upstairs — Nr. Loyola "L" 

"Just Like Home — Follow the Boys" 
Luncheon 1 1 a. m. to 3 p. m. — 50c 

Dinner "i to 8 p. m. — 90c 

Sunday Dmner 12 Noon to 8 P. M.— $1.2i 


JOHN C. DILLON ii CO. 

Real Estate Investments 

Loans, Renting, Insurance 

Owner Forest Haven Estates, Lake Forest and 

Asbury Park, Evanston, where investments are 

guaranteed. 

6616 SHERIDAN ROAD 

Phone Rogers Park 4501 
Established 16 Years CHICAGO 


JOHN SEXTON 6? COMPANY 

Manufacturmg 'Wholesale Grocers 

CHICAGO 

Established 1883 


E. R. NEUENFELDT 

LIVE FROGS— TURTLES 
FROG LEGS 

62*1 W. Randolph St. 

Telephone Monroe 0984 


Telephone Superior 0600 

CUDNEY fe? COMPANY 

Wholesale Provisiorts 

Orleans at Kin:ie Street 

Chicago. III. 


OFFICE CO.\TS OPERATING GOWNS 
SMOCKS WHITE TROUSERS 
DENT.XL GOWNS E.XTRACTION APRONS 
ASSISTANTS' DRESSES CHAIR COVERS. ETC. 

PROFESSIONAL GARMENTS FOR ALL 
PURPOSES 

MANHATTAN COAT FACTORY. Inc. 

Telephone Lakeview 47? 5 

322 3 NORTH HALSTED STREET 

CHICAGO. ILL. 



Paee three hundred iiiiietv-si.v 



Compiunciils 

CENTRAL LIME ii CEMENT CO. 

Builders Building 

228 NORTH LA SALLE STREET 
Telephone Randolph 4350 

CHICAGO, ILL. 


Piu.nc llanklln 144U 

M J. BRANSFIELD 

Miniicipa/ Bond.s and City Vouchers 

120 SOUTH LA SALLE STREET 
CHICAGO, ILL. 


JOHN CARROLL SONS 

Funeral Dire<:torf, 

1158 NORTH CLARK STREET 
Diversey 073 5-36 

4542 W. RAVENSWOOD AVENUE 
Longbeach 6713-14 

Dennis M. Carroll Eugene J. Carroll 

Chicago 


THE MARYWOOD SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

RESIDENT AND D.W STUDENTS 

Conducted by 

SISTERS OF PROVIDENCE 

of 

SAINT MARY OF THE WOODS 

2128 Ridge Avenue 

Evanston, 111. 


Phone Midway 2960 All Work Guaranteed 

R. G. FREYER 

Sheet Metal Work and Roofing; Special Labora- 
tory Apparatus Made from Drawings and Specifi- 
cations; Cornices. Sky Lights, Gutters and Down 
Spouts; Heating Plants Installed, Cleaned and Re- 
paired; Smoke Stacks: Ventilating; Tin, Sheet 
Iron, Tile, Slate and Gravel Roofing. 

1119 EAST 5 5th STREET 
CHICAGO 


PEACH-EE 

CLEANERS t^ DYERS 

We make a specialty of cleaning and 
relining 

FUR COATS 

and repairing and remodeling of all other 
garments. 

1228 LOYOLA AVE. 

Phone Sheldrake 6909 
W'c wiU gladly call for and deliver 


ACME MOTION PICTURE PROJECTORS 

America's Finest Portable Projectors for Church 

and School Use — Projectors, Films. Lamps, Lenses, 

Repairs and Supplies. 

ACME EDUCATIONAL FILM 
SERVICE 

728-36 S, WABASH AVENUE 
Phone Harrison 8441 


CLUB COLLEGE PROGRAM 

Write for specially prepared literature for 
young men who want to select a career in business. 
Also read Doublcday Doran's 1929 "Leader"" now 
at your book dealers, presenting the successful 
career of William A. Burnette, President of the 
Club Aluminum Company. 

Write Per.sonne! Department 

1045 LAWRENCE AVENUE 



Page tliree hundred ninetyseven 



ATLAS BOX COMPANY 


ST. CATHERINE HIGH SCHOOL 

(For Cirls and Young Ladies) 


1385 N. BRANCH ST., CHICAGO 


Washington Blvd. at Central Ave. 


Phone Lincoln 9000 


Chicago 


The Atlas Certificate on Corrugated and 


Under the Direction of the Sisters of Mercy 


Solid Fibre Shipping Containers 


Accredited by the University of Illinois 


Is a Symbol of Quality 


and Chicago Teachers' College 




Telephone Columbus 7576 


Compliments of 


Compliments 


HOWARD AVENUE TRUST c? 


FRANK J. BURKE 


SAVINGS BANK 


Funeral Director 




6749 SHERIDAN ROAD 


HOWARD G? ASHLAND 


Lady Assistant Ambulance Service 


CHICAGO 


PHONE SHELDRAKE 0144 


Compliments Chicago's Oldest Hardware Store 






DUTCH MILL CANDIES 


THEODOR KRUEGER HARDWARE 




COMPANY 


LOYOLA STORE 


Kitchen Outfitters — Paints — Janitors' Supplies 


6443 SHERIDAN ROAD 




T^ear Granada Theatre 


4543 Broadway 


Other shops all over Chicago 


Phone Long Beach 8226-27 


WILMETTE LAKE FOREST 


NORTH CHICAGO ROOFING CO. 




8 51 WEST NORTH AVENUE 


Compliments of 


Sixty Tears in Business 


ROBERTS HAND LAUNDRY CO. 


P. B. Ransom, Secy. 


Superior VJor\ and Service 


Walter W. Springer, V.-Pres. 


1211-15 Loyola Avenue 


Phones Lincoln 0570; Diversey 6068 


Phone Sheldrake 8132 



Page three hundred ninety-eight 



PHILLIP STATE BANK & TRUST CO. 

N. E. CORNER CLARK y LUNT AVENUE 

Oldest and Largest Ban\ 
in Rogers Par\ 


Telephone Harrison 1 506 

"Steven's System" 

STEVENS SOUND-ROOFING CO. 

507 SOUTH DEARBORN ST. 
CHICAGO 


McCABE & HENGLE 

Insurance 

175 WEST JACKSON BLVD. 

CHICAGO 


PATTERSON PIE CO. 

Pure Food 

4603-33 GLADYS AVENUE 

Phone Mansfield 2030 

CHICAGO 


WM. MORRIS & SONS 

Veneer Doors — Interior Finish 

1000 W. 50th STREET 


NATIONAL BANK— PROTECTION 

For Tour Savings 

BROADWAY NATIONAL BANK 

BROADWAY e? DEVON 


VARIETY FIRE DOOR COMPANY 

Steel Fire Doors. Hollow Metal Doors 

Freight Elevator Doors, Saino Doors 

Underwriters Labelled Doors 

Carroll £.'' Sacramento Aves . 
PHONE KEDZIE 3434 CHICAGO 


Telephones West 2470-2471 

NAROWETZ HEATING £? 
VENTILATING CO. 

1711-1717 MAYPOLE AVENUE 
Louis L. Narowetz, Jr., Secretdrv 

CHICAGO 



Page three hundred niiietv-nine 



Established 1879 Incorporated 1909 

Phone Monroe 1266 

MOLLIS a DUNCAN 

INCORPORATED 

PAPER 

Manufacturers Merchandise Envelopes, Paper 

Bags, Folding Boxes and Specialties 

AH Departments 

724 W. LAKE ST., CHICAGO 



MOUNTAIN VALLEY MINERAL 
WATER 

From Hot Springs, Ar\. 

739 WEST JACKSON BLVD. 

Phone Monroe 5460 

Deliveries Made AH Over in Case Lots 



Compliments 

BIEDERMANN BROTHERS, INC. 

727 W. RANDOLPH STREET 



LOYOLA PHARMACY 

A. Ginsburg, R. Ph. 

Prescription Specialists 

12 30 Devon Ave., Cor. Magnolia 

Phone Rogers Park 9498 

We Deliver 

Compliments of 

PROTECTION PRODUCTS CO. 

Wholesale Manufacturers 

FABRIC AND LEATHER GOODS 

729 Milwaukee Ave. 

Tel. Prospect 1220 

JOHN SLOVINEC 

Architect 

5138 S. ARTESIAN AVE. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 



Telephone Long Beach 7232 

Compliments of 
Al CLEANERS 5? DYERS, INC. 

Jos. B. Woodman 
5312-18 BROADWAY, CHICAGO 



BARAT COLLEGE 

and 
Convent of the Sacred Heart 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

Conducted by 

The Religious of the Sacred Heart 

For Catalog, apply to Reverend Mother Superior 



PAUL H. EIDEN 

Plumbing Contractor — Jobbing a Specialtv 

1280 ARDMORE AVENUE 

Edgewater 8120 

Wm. J. Maas Philip F. Maas 

MAAS BROS., HARDWARE 

Cut!er;y, Stoves, Furnaces 

Furnishings, Shop Wori^ 

1822-1824 W. Van Burcn St. 

Corner Ogden Ave. 

Telephone West 1005 CHICAGO 



McWAYNE CO. 

639 NORTH WELLS STREET 

Phones Superior 1508-1509 

Compliments 

HOME FUEL & SUPPLY CO. 

D. S. WILLIS, Pres. 
Phone Bittersweet 6640 or State 7680 



Page four hundred 



Fard 



HESSER &) SODEN 

AUTHORIZED Fard DEALERS 

1234 MORSE AVE.— NEAR SHERIDAN ROAD 
BRIARGATE 4100— ALL DEPARTMENTS 



Open the 'way 




(uiumiimMA 




Simply open the little port-holes in the top ot 

the package and out comes Old Dutch Cleanse 
to bring you Healthful Cleanliness — so importai 
to every home. 

Old Dutch simplifies housework, it is safe,th' 

ii'igh, economical. There's nothing else like it t 

Y ircelain and enamel, aluminum, glass ware, cc k 

1 ig utensils, tile, painted woodwork, floors, \ 

ilows, refrigerators, stoves, etc. Protects the su; 

.ind assures its longer life. 

Chases Dirt — protects the home 



Page jour hundred one 



Compliments of 

BROPHY DENTAL MFG. CO. 

2833 LOOMIS STREET 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

Tel. Lafayette 7328 




Latest Models 



We Make a Specialty of 

Renting Formal Dress 

Clothing 

BROADWAY 
DRESS SUIT CO. 

Room 2 30 
4554 Broadway 
CHICAGO 
For Rent — 

Full Dress, Prince Albert, 
Tuxedos, Cutaways, Shoes, 
Striped Trousers, Silk Hats 
and Shirts. 

A Complete Line of 
Furnishings for Sale 
All Sizes Open Evenings 



Compliments of 

W. FRANCIS BURNS 



Counselc 



622 DENRIKE BUILDING 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Federal Taxes 



1523 BELL BUILDING 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



CAPITAL STATE SAVINGS BANK 

O. A. CHRISTENSEN, President 



MEMBER 

FEDERAL RESERVE 

SYSTEM 



CLEARING HOUSE 
BANK 



5437 NORTH CLARK STREET— CHICAGO 



ROSARY COLLEGE 

RIVER FOREST, ILLINOIS 

(One-half Hour from the "Loop" in Chicago) 

Public bus service with direct connections on all elevated and surface lines. 

A standard college, fully recognised, conducted by the Dominican Sisters of 

Sinsinawa, Wisconsin. 

College students only enrolled. 

Junior year may be spent at the Fribourg Branch, in French Switzerland. 

Telephone Forest 1870, or address the Secretary. 

Tuition $75.00 a Semester 



Page four himdred tivo 



FARNEY 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 

Contractors and Engineers 
Builders Building 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



Compliments of 

LOCAL CONSTRUCTION 
COMPANY 

4337 MELROSE ST. 
CHICAGO 



HAWTHORNE TILE 

Ma}{es More Than Just a Beautiful Roof 

Hawthorne Roofing Tile is a product of exceptional merit, possessing 
every quality demanded for the ideal roof. 

Economy in its true sense is emphasized by the fact that the first cost 
is the ONLY cost. No upkeep — no replacements. It is truly a roof 
of enduring beauty at a reasonable cost. 

HAWTHORNE ROOFING TILE COMPANY 

228 North LaSalle Street 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



Pdge four hundred three 



to the 



IRISH 



FREE 
STATE 



$184.S0 and up 

round trip 

by Tourist 

Tliird Cabin 

(Cabin and Third Class Fares 
on request) 




Regular Sailings 

DIRECT TO COBH 

(Queenstown) 



Another summer — again that yearning 
to visit all that's lovable and sacred in 
the old homeland. And how much there 
is to see when you go by way of Mon- 
treal. Take this short, scenic route. See 
old French Canada. And the St. Law- 
rence seaway saves two days open sea. 
Popular Cabin liners, including new 
Duchesses. Gymnasiums. Sports and 
promenade decks. Good music. Altars 



for celebrating Mass. The food and 
service which makes Canadian Pacific 
famous. 

All travel details taken care of at one 
office — through-train reservations to 
Montreal, travellers cheques, special 
itineraries, etc. The sooner you inquire, 
the better your selection of rooms, nat- 
urally. 



To FRANCE and 
SOUTHERN EUROPE 



by way of Cherbourg and Antwerp. Ex- 
press, deluxe Empresses, fast new Duch- 
esses, other cabin liners . . carry- 
ing also Tourist Third Cabin and Third 



Class passengers. Why not join one of 
our 232 Collegiate all-expense tours, 
$406 and up. 



For details of service and ships, phone or write 

R. S. Elworthy. Steamship General Agent 
71 E. ]ackson Blvd.. Chicago. III. 

Telephone Wabash 1904 
or any local steamship agent 

Canadian Vacific 

World's Greatest Travel System 



four Jiundred four 




BATHROOM beauty does not necessarily 
mean large expenditures. In proof, this 
room is offered. The hangings are inexpen- 
sive, the walls painted plaster, the floor oak. 
Not a square of costly tiling is used. Yet it 
would be hard to find a room more color- 
fully charming. Or possessing more modern 
plumbing comfort and quality than this one, 
with its Nile green lavatory, dressing table, 



and bath, from the newest Crane Corwith 
group. Suggested for remodeled houses, 
where it will add value far past the cost, this 
room will be inspiring also in planning new 
houses .... Many other Crane ideas for 
beautiful bathrooms are collected in the 
book. New Ideas for Bathrooms. Ask for a copy. 
See your architect and a responsible plumb- 
ing contractor about plans and estimates. 



Pounds Pressu 



I CR AN E 



Fixtures, Valves, Fittings, and Piping, for Domestic and Industrial Use 

Crane Co., General O^ces, 8j6S. Michigan Ave., Chicago 4. 23 H^. 44th St., New York + B'ancbes anj sales offices in one hundred and eighty cities 

Page four hundred five 



E. L. ARCHIBALD 

General Contractors 

Conway Bldg. 

Chicago 



JOHN J. MORAN, INC. 

Fashionable Fi^rs 

Storage — RemodeUng — Repairing 

58 EAST WASHINGTON ST. 

STATE 4177 



MEMORIAL AND MAUSOLEUM WINDOWS 

Grand Prize Louisiana Purchase Exposition 

Sent Free— Our 48-Page Book 

EccJesiastkal Art in Memorial Windows 

THE FLANAGAN fe? BIEDENWEG 
STUDIO 

312-318 W. Illinois St. Chicago, III. 

Established 1883 



GRAXADA 

HOME OF TALKING 

PICTURES AND 

ORIGINAL 

STAGE 

PRODUCTIONS 



Established 1890 
Office Telephones Lincoln 9105-9106-9107 

Night Telephone Rogers Park 3010 

ELECTRIC WELDING 

GEO. E. CORBETT BOILER & TANK 

COMPANY 

Boiler Setting and Furnace Building 

Boiler Repairing Day or iNJight 

General Mason Repairs 

Portable Air Compressor and Welder 

Ox-;>'-Acet;yIe7ie Weiding and Cutting 

1332-1336 CORTLAND STREET 



NASH 8 AHERN 

111 W. WASHINGTON ST. 



Chicago's 
MORRISON HOTEL 



Corner Madison and Clark Streets 



Closest 
to 

Stores 

and 
Offices 



Tallest 
in the 
World 




Closest 

to 
Theatres 

and 
Railroad 
Stations 



Forty-six 
Stories 
Hish 



1944 ROOMS $2.50 UP 

— all outside, with bath, running ice water, tele- 
phone, bed-head lamp and Seividor. 

HOME OF THE TERRACE GARDEN 

Vaudeville and Dancing 
at Luncheon, Dinner and A/ter-Tlieatre Supper 



Page jour hundred six 



THEWHDB 

Uent^ CXijtton 8 Sons 

STATE and ]ACKSON— Chicago 

BROADWAY and FirTH— Gary MARION and LAKE— Oak Park ORRINGTON and CHURCH— £Ta«j/on 




The Best of Everything for University 
Men From Shoes to Hats in The 

Lytton College Shop 

To choose your clothes in the Lytton College Shop is to choose 
in the style center of the Middle West. Right now the choicest 
and newest — the ultra and most distinctive Spring Suits, Furnish- 
ings, Hats and Shoes are here — just as University Men want them. 



SUITS . FURNISHINGS 



HATS . SHOES 



Pdge four fiundreJ iiven 



INDEX 



Abraham, Raymond L 331 

Adams, Floyd 148 

Adams, Robert 99 

Ahearii, Thomas F 52, 331 

Ahearn, John 99 

Alford, Miss 176 

Allegretti, Anthony J 80 

Allegretti, Anthony 93 

Altshul, Sylvia 68, 175 

Ambrose, Jos 80 

Amberg, Mary Agnes 184 

Anderman 345 

Anderson. Miss 160 

Anderson, Morton Edwin 52 

Andruska, Bernice C 68 

Anglum, Essie 68, 159 

Angelles 139 

Antonation. Margaret H 68, 175 

Arado, Frank 97, 337, 219, 213 

Armington, Robert 94 

Armstrong. Miss 168 

Ashm,enckas, Peter J 52, 125, 353 

Aultz, Margaret A 68, 167 

B 

Bak. Alexander 97 

Baker. Arnold 94 

Baker, Erwin 98 

Balmonte 333 

Balsauis, Anthony 98 

Balsamo, Nicholas 80 

Barberio, Angelo 80 

Barker, Virginia 239 

Barome 333 

Barrett, Miss E 253 

Barrinivevo, Angelo 80 

Barrom, Miss 253 

Barry, Paul 91, 302 

Barry, Miss 253 

Bartlett. 1 322 

Bartlett, Richard 91, 322 

Barron, Nicholas 117 

Bartalucci, Raymond 94 

Bartlett. Richard 337 

Baumbich. John 95, 253, 302, 310, 250 

Bealletti 333 

Beardfly, John 80 

Becker, George 337 

Becker, Miss 160 

Beers, Winifred B 68, 167 

Beffa, Mabel 169 

Behrendt. Miss 169 

Behrens. Annabell. L 68 

Behm, Ann L 52, 253 

Bell. WiUiam 97 

Bellini 333 

Bennett. Helen 161 

Be:;ens. Raymond 91 

Bernasek. R 173 

Berney. James 99 



Page 

Bernstein, Chester 142 

Bessett 139 

Bilek, Barbara M 68, 163 

Bird. Veronica 101 

Birich, Rorbara, M 68, 163 

Blake 139 

Blake, H 141 

Block, Miss 168, 253 

Blondin, Thomas S 52, 33 5 

Bogetto, Margaret 68 

Bull, F 161 

BoHinger, William 80 

Borelh, Don 98 

Borriso. Camillo 80. 333 

Boyle, Charles 91, 86 

Brady, Frances M 

Bremner, David F 

Bremner, James 313, 310, 

Brennan, J 

Brennan, James 96, 98, 335, 

Brennan, John 

Brennan, Phillip 291, 304, 

Bristol, Henry 

Bristol, Lyle L 

Brown 

Brown, Al 97. 

Brown, Nellie M 52, 

Bruce, Harry 

Brunn, John 

233, 240, 93, 218, 219, 324, 

Bryant, John J 

52, 88. 89, 215, 337, 212, 213, 

Bryne, Thomas 

Bird, Veronica Marie 

Buckly, John 

Budreau. N 

Buege, Hazel 1 77, 

Bulfer 

Bulfer 

Buliin 

Burke, Arthur 117, 

Burianek, John Francis 

Burke. Helena V 52. 

Burke, James 

Burke, lohn 

Burke, Katherine M 

Burns, C 

Bums, John 

Burns. Robert 

Bussan, Eleanor A 69, 

Butler, Miss 

Button, Helen 128, 

Bryne 

Byrne 

Byrne, Martha A 

Byrnes, Joseph 



68 
184 
214 
141 
297 

98 
299 

99 

52 
355 
290 
351 

99 



359 

121 
52 
117 
172 
171 
127 
127 
139 
272 

159 

93 

80 

52 

173 

99 

91 

163 

160 

351 

161 

161 

77 

117 



Cada. EHward G 52 

Cahill, George 97 

Cahendo, John 80. 333 



Page four hundred eight 



Page 

Caliendo, Joseph E 126 

Calkins, Frank 97, 213, 219 

Cambridge 127 

Campbell, Margaret J 69, 173, 175 

Campion, Miss 160 

Cannon, Charles B 53, 115 

Carey, Clair 80 

Carey, Harold 80 

Cailton, E 139, 141 

Carney, James 94 

Carney, Thomas 80 

Carroll, John 91 

Carrol, Joseph 117 

Carroll, Helen S 69 

Carrol, John L 53 

Carufel, A 173 

Casciato, Nicholas 80, 333 

Cassaretto, Frank 91 

Cassidy, Margaret M 69, 163 

Cassidy, Stanley H 115 

Castaldo : 333 

Castro, Cosimo 53, 333 

Catania, Anthony M 53 

Caulfield, John D 53 

Cavanaugh, Charles 99 

Cavanaugh, Miss -. 169 

Cesar, Dewey K 53 

Chambers, Miss 351 

Chernkoff, Edna 77, 171 

Chesney, Jack 99 

Chickkan, Nicholas 81 

Chichkan, Nicholas 81 

Christiaens, Mary 169 

Chum, Richard 81 

Chwatal. Herbert 98 

Ciagha, Ernest 98 

Cierian, Thecla R 69, 167 

Clark, Edith M 69 

Clark, Wallace 121 

Claygone, Miss 168 

Cleary, Calista R 69 

Cleary, Gertrude M 69 

Cleary, Lucille M 69, 159 

Classon, Lorene A 69 

Clements, Louis 91 

Cole, Thomas 140 

Colhns, Cornelius 105, 291. 297, 304 

ColUns, E 172 

Collins, Tames 91, 219 

Conley, Frank 91, 218, 219, 359 

Conley, Henry 98 

Conley, William H 91, 234, 232, 233, 

236. 237. 228. 229, 262. 267. 215. 

337. 260, 217, 212, 213. 359, 230. 

3 57 

Connelly, Ted 91, 302, 291. 304 

Connelly, Miss 2 53 

Connerton. Frances 53 

Conneny, John 117 

Connor, M'ss 160 

Connors. Miss 253 

Conole. J 172 

Conti, Anthony P 53 

Conway, William 53. 331 



Page 

Cook, Miss 168 

Cooney, James 93 

Copia, Paul 94 

Corcoran, John 93 

Coxley, Karl 98 

Costello, Charles 226, 233 

Courtney, Anne 69, 163 

Cox, E 141 

Coyle, Joseph 53 

Crane, Thomas 53, 115 

Crane, Thomas 54, 124 

Crimmin, Pat 253, 250 

Crowe. Joseph 117 

Crowley, Lawrence 130, 331. 359 

Crowley 99 

Crown. Edward 54 

Cullen. George 95 

Cullinan, James M 54. 89, 337 

Cunnighan, Mae 54, 101. 100 

Cuny, Charles 95, 337 

Curran, George 117 

Curly, Edwin 54, 89, 331 

Curry, Jas 119 

Curtis, Francis 95 

Cutrera, Hugo 54, 89, 250. 253 

D 

Daly, John 54, 114, 115 

Daly, Joseph 97 

Daley. Edward 117 

Danmeyer, Miss 160 

Dart, Miss 168 

Day, George 94 

Dolina, John 99 

Davis, Beatrice 69 

Deegan, James 54, 105, 106. 107 

De Haas, Helen 70, 167 

Dehnert. Ernest 99 

Deksnis, Emily 70, 163 

Delaney, Raymond 94 

Dellers, Arthur 97 

D'Esposito, Joshua 91 

De Teo, Herman 81 

Devlin, Edna 117 

D'Esposito, Joshua 90 

D'Esposito, Julian 99 

DeVet, Miss 176 

Devhn, Edna 116 

DiLeo. Joseph 81, 127 

Dickey, J 139, 141 

Dickman, Jos 121 

Diggles, Paul .■ 93, 327. 217 

Dillon, Edmund 94 

Dillon, W 141 

Dixon, H 172 

Dobesh, M 172 

Doeringsfeld 127 

Doheny, Frank P 

54, 89, 219. 220, 238, 331, 359 

Doherty. Loretta 70 

Doherty, Neil 331 

Doherty. Norman 97 

Donegan. Miss 163 

Dooley, Miss 160 



Pdge four hundred nine 



Page 

Dooley, Robert Vi 

Donegan, Irene 70 

Donovan, Robert 54 

Doran, Miss 175 

Dore, Miss 163 

Dotterway, Blanche 351 

Dotterway, Blanche 54 

Dore, Josephine E 70 

Doubek, Miss 160 

Dougherty, Roderick 98 

Dow, Dorothy 70, 167 

Dowling, Edw 91, 258 

Downey, Thos 97, 233 

Downs. John M 54, 291, 299 

Doyle, John P 121 

Dnscoll, Wentworth V 55, 124 

Dubiel, John 81 

Duffy, Edw 99 

Duffy, Rosella M 70 

Dugan. Miss M 253 

Duke, K 141 

Dunn, Norine 55, 160 

Dunne, Edward 77, 115 

Dunning, Bernardine 70, 172 

Durburg 94, 303, 311 

Durkin, Walter 291, 304 

Dwan, Frank 98 

Dwyer, Francis 55 

Dybsinski, Walter 94 

E 

Early, Paul 121 

Edelstcin, J 345 

Edwards, A 55 

Egan, Howard 361 

Egan, Joseph 95 

Egan, Mary 77, 361 

Egan, Patrick 1 1 5 

Eggstein, H 172 

Eiseman, J 345 

Elrick, Gordon 55 

Emill, Martin 91 

England, Evelyn 70 

Ennis, John 55, 87, 88, 89, 335 

Esposito, J 333 

Etu, Emmet 291, 300, 304 

Evans, Vernon 55 

F 

Fagelson, Aaron 55. 345 

Fahey, Eugene 98 

Fain 361 

Falk, Nathan 91 

Fallon, Miss 176 

Fabry, Charles 98 

Fazio, Rocco 81, 333 

Feeley, James 99 

Felicelli, Nello 94 

Fcnton, Catherine 70, 163 

Ferlita, Americo 291, 303, 304 

' Fernandez, Simeon 55 

Ferrari, Marco 121 

Foeremasco 533 

Fierst, Angaline 70 



Finan, Eugene 93 

Fiore 333 

Fiorito 3 33 

Fitzgerald, Agnes 56 

Fitzgerald, M 2 53 

Fitzgerald, Robert 33 5 

Fitzgerald. William 97, 337 

Flaxman, M 127, 345 

Fleming, Judd 98 

Fhege, Miss 168 

Flynn, John 56, 94 

Fogarty, Thomas 95 

Foley, Miss 160 

Fonancier, Mauro 56 

Ford, Richard F 56, 88, 89, 217, 232, 

233, 234, 236, 237, 239, 250, 253, 337 

Forster, Wesley 56 

Fortuny, Rosa 56, 101 

Fransisco, B 99 

Fransisco. N 98 

Frank. Cecelia 70 

Frazier, Miss 160 

Freidburg. Sylvia 71 

Frizol. Sylvester 95 

Froebes, Philip 48 

Fruehe. Margaret 77, 171 

Fry, Helen 71 

Fules, J 333 

Fullan. Miss 160 

Fuller. Miss 177 

Fulton, Raymond 56, 89, 335 

G 

Gaffney, Charles 56 

Gaifney. John 56 

Gallagher. Margaret 56, 101, 169 

Garen, Ann 77, 171 

Garren. Philip 89 

Garrity. Edward 142, 131 

Garthe. Jack 54, 89, 331, 363 

Gennrich, Miss 169 

Giardina, Jacob 98 

Gibbons, Bernard 99 

Gilchrist. H 172 

Gildea, Miss 168 

Gill. Miss V 2 53 

Gillig, Frederick 81 

Gilmore, Francis 77 

Girsch 97 

Glasser, Edward 143 

Gleason, Francis 56 

Glynn. Michael 57. 115 

Coder. George 98 

Golatka, Helen 169 

Goodreau. Margaret 71 

Gordon. Ben ." 81, 345 

Gorman. David 91 

Gormican. James 57, 89, 337 

Gracyas. E 72 

Grady, Toseph 121 

Graff. Richard 57 

Graham. Howard 81 

Graham, Robert 93 

Grant, Samuel 331 



Page four hundred ten 



Vi 



Green, H 296 

Greenburg, Bern 57, 345 

Greenwald, Carl 147 

Greteman, Theodore 57 

Griffin, George 98 

Griffen, John 99 

Griffin, Wilham 99 

Grigsby, Kenneth 57 

Grohorslcy, Mary 71, 175 

Gross, Christina 77 

Gross, Herman 57, 171 

Gruender, Veronica 71 

Gualano, Carl 91 

Guerrini, Joseph 99 

Guerruro, Severo 57 

Guido, Seraphine 99 

Guinn, F 141 

Gutman, Edward 98 

H 

Haas, Miss -■ 160, 168 

Hackett, John 91, 250, 253 

Hackett, Miss 169 

Haessig, R 172 

Hagstrom, Joseph 77, 115 

Haik, Samuel 81, 127 

Haley, Gerald 117 

Halligan, Miss 168 

Hallinan, Michael 93 

Hallisy, M 172 

Haltmeyer, A 173 

Hammer, Erwin 99 

Hammer, Joseph 107 

Hammond, James 143 

Hanna, Robert 99 

Hannon, James 99 

Hannon, William 96, 97, 335 

Hansen, Charlotta 57, 101 

Hansen, Madeline 71 

Haraburda, Stanley 57 

Harrington, Florence 77, 253 

Harrington, Thomas 57 

Hart, Thomas 105 

Hartel, Irene 77, 171 

Hartman, Henry 126, 127 

Hasler, J 139 

Hauser, Vernon 126, 127 

Haver, Harry 57 

Hawkins, Robert 58 

Hayes, Cornelius 97 

Hayes, Mercedes 71, 175 

Hayes, Raymond 58, 107 

Hazard, Jack 58, 89 

Healy, Edward 91, 12, 213, 337 

Healy, Robert 92, 93, 335 

Hebenstreit, Kenneth 58 

Hecht, Fred 91, 250, 253 

Heffron, Miss 176 

Heles, Ursula 71 

Henderson, M 173 

Hendrickson, 1 172 

Hennessy, Mary 71, 89, 163 

Hennessy, William 58 

Henry, Joseph 58, 106, 107 



Page 

Henry, Maybellc 71, 163 

Herald, Helen 177 

Hewitt, J 141 

Hickcy, Thomas 81, 128 

Higgins, Kathleen 71, 175 

Higgins, Preston 58, 89, 337 

Higgins, Russel 95, 337 

Hillenbrand, Harold 289, 316 

Hilmcrt, P 139 

Himscl, Miss 253 

Hincs, Edward 97, 213, 233 

Hinsch, Miss 168 

Hi,hcn Ruth 71 

Hodapp, Aloysius 326, 327 

Hocrschgen, Margaret 72, 175, 176 

Hoffman, Loretta 72, 175 

Hoffman, Mildred 72, 175 

Hogan, Cameron 58, 124 

Hogan, Daniel 99, 331 

Hogan, Francis 105, 107 

Hogan, Frank 96, 99 

Holinga, Mary 72 

Holmquist, Miss 160 

Homan, Loretta 72, 175 

Homan, Louise 177 

Horn, Albert 117 

Home, John 91, 322, 337 

Houser, Vernon 81 

Howe, Daniel 143 

Huerta, Salvador 95 

Humphrey. E 335 

Huppert, Jerome 91, 337 

Huss, Miss 168 

Hulton, M 172 

Hyland, Loyola 78 

I 

Ibelli, J 333 

J 

Jablonski, Stanley 58 

Jackson, Carl 58 

Jaeger, Ruth 58 

Jakopich, William 58 

Janiak, Angeline 72 

Janssen, Frank 59 

Jasionek, Joseph 91 

Jelsomino, K 333 

Jesky, H 173 

Jesser, K 345 

Johnson, Charles 39 

Johnson, Fred '. 99 

Johnson, Miss 169 

Johnson, Walter 121 

Jonas, William 59 

Jordan, Julian 59 

Jordan, Teresa 121 

Jordan, William 99, 337 

Jostes, A 141 

luliano. Amello 81 

Jurgenson, Coletta 72 

K 

Kadzewich, Joseph 81 



Page four hundred eleven 



Kain, Paul 99, 

Kallal, Thomas 

Kamanski, Marion 

Kane, May 4T, 

Kaneke, David 

Kapustka, Edward 

Kara, John 

Karl, J 

Karr, Walter 

Kaska, Mildred 

Kavanaugh, John 

Kearney, Joseph 87, 90, 91, 

Kearns, Martin 

Kearns, Thomas 

Keating. Miss 

Keating, John.. -59. 89, 216, 217, 230. 

232. 233, 234, 236, 237, 258, 264, 

Keehan, John 

Keeley. John 

Keeley. Robert 94, 

Keenam, James 

Keevins. Edward 248, 2 50, 

Kehoe, Agnes 78, 

Kelley, Bess 72, 

Kelley, George 

Kelley, Robert, S. J 26, 28, 

Kelly, Ambrose 112, 121, 

Kelly, Edward 

59, 89, 99, 219, 220, 331, 

Kelly, Ehzabeth 

Kelly, John H^. 

Kelly, Wilham 

Kenncr. Miss 

Kent. Mary 72, 175, 

Kenny, Eleanor 

Keough. George 

Kerpec, J 250, 

Kielas, Edward 

Kiley. Raymond 91, 

Kiley, William 

Kilgallen, John 

King, J 

Kingcaid, Edna 

Kirby, Benadette 78, 

Kirchengoft, J 

Kirschner. Regina 73, 

Klein, Ida 73, 

Kleinwatcher, Earl 82, 

Klest. John 91, 250, 253, 

Kleve, Marie 73, 

Knittel, Roger 97, 

Koehler, E 

Komasinski, Van Walter 

Koneski, Chester 

Konopa, John 82, 

Kopstein. Benjamin 

Kosacz. Miss 

Kortas, Anastasia 

Kotas, Walter 

Kowaleski, Richard 

Kozacik, Marguerite 

Kozlowski, Jerome 91, 291, 298, 

Kramer. Florence 



331 
82 
94 

160 
59 
59 
94 

139 
59 
72 

121 

322 
91 

337 

176 



59 
335 

95 
253 
171 
163 
121 
184 
120 

363 
163 
117 

82 
169 
253 
351 

15 
253 

99 
335 
143 

59 
173 

72 
171 
139 
167 
175 
127 
260 
167 
219 
.173 

82 

59 
128 

59 
168 

73 

94 

94 

73 
304 

73 



Page 

Kramps, Herbert 82 

Kubeck. Miss 160 

Kuckie, Louis 98 

Kuehn, Anna 73 

Kuehnle, Joseph 93. 322 

Kukuk, Milton 82, 126. 127 

Kullman, Paul 60 

Kundrot. A 173 

Kunka, Anthony 60, 89, 217 

Kurzawa, Van 98 

L 

Laemmar, Jack 99 

La Fond, Chas. J 60, 134. 136 

Lamb. John R 115, 60, 114 

Lambeck, Carl 99 

Lament. Daniel 286, 291, 294. 304 

Landeck, Edward 98 

Landreth. Oliver 99, 219, 213 

Lane, Geo 41 

Lannan, Bert 99. 335 

Lannon, John 93, 217, 213 

Lappin, Miss 160 

Latz 127 

Latz, Leo J 60 

Lauber, Geo 148 

Laurenzana 127 

Lavin, Catherine 351 

La Violette. Katherine M 73 

Lawless. Anthony. ..31 3, 311, 299, 291. 304 

Lear, Matthew 90, 91 

Lee, Frank 98 

Lee, Robt. E 60 

Lenihan, Jno 97, 337, 213 

Leonard, Raymond 98 

Leibold, Geo. J 60 

Lensen, Miss 168 

Leveille, Lucille V 73 

Levy 345 

Lewis. Willard G 78 

Lietz, Paul S 

60, 88, 89, 233, 337, 326, 327, 258 

Lindsay, Ronald 82 

Lindsey, Miss 171 

Linehan, John 219 

Linklater. Wm 335 

Lisle. Jas '. 93 

Lloyd. Clarence L 60 

Lochner, T 172 

Locke. Florence W 60, 101, 100 

Logan, Wm, H 28, 38 

Lorge, Theresa R 78, 101 

Losinski, Miss 169 

Lossman, Robt. T 60 

Ludwig, Fred M 99, 337, 213 

Ludwig, Irving 1 60 

Ludwig, Robt"; 91, 337, 345 

Luehrsmann, Bernard C 61 

Luhowa, Anne Marie 73, 175 

Lukitsch, Jos 95 

Lundgoot, Lars E 61 

Lupton, John 95, 323 

Lutzenkirchen, Frank 95, 291, 304, 301 

Lynch, Jas 99 



Page four hundred tivelve 



Page 
M 

MacConnaugliey, Miss 169 

MacDonald, Mary E 78 

Macintosh, Florence 43 

Madaj, Benj 94 

Madden, Ed 127, 3?7 

Madden, Harry 29 

Madison, Miss 176 

Maguire, Andrew 82 

Mahan, Claudine 73 

Mahan, Miss 160 

Mahan, Patrick J., S. J 28, 37 

Maillon, D 172 

Mangold, Eugene 99 

Mann, Chas 97, 337 

Manning, Lawrence 91 

Marciniak, Jerome B 128 

Maresch, Irene 168 

Marino, Lawrence N 61 

Marnul, Miss 167 

Martin, Helen C ; 74, 17? 

Martinez, Thos. T 61, 89 

Martino, J 327 

Marsano, Jos 91 

Marzano 333 

Marzano 127 

Marsano, Jos. J 82 

Massic, Mary 168 

Massman, Martin 121 

Mataschefsky 97 

Matnul Anna J 73 

Matsui, Takejiro 82 

May, Berenice E 78 

Mayer, Jno. 1 62. 89, 260 

Meagher, Emmet 96, 91, 258 

Meany, Jno 98 

Medveski 127 

Mehmert, Henry 18 

Melody, Frank 91, 218, 327, 219, 359 

Melvin, Miss 160 

Menconi, Lawrence 98 

Mennila 3 33 

Mennite, Nicholas 94 

Mertz, J. J. S. J 180 

Messerschmidt, Ruth H 74 

-Metcalfe, Jas. J 115 

Meyer, Peter 91 

Michalski, Wanda J 74 

Michell, Gerald 99 

Migely 97. 335 

Mikulec, F 172 

Milewski, Edward 94 

Miller, B 173 

Miller, Loren 95 

Miller, Miss 168 

Menardi, Jos. A 62 

Minnis, Edward 98 

Mitchell, Edward P 62 

Mitchell. Wm 95 

Mizzicado 333 

Modica, Chas 253, 250 

Modzikowski, Thaddeus A 62 

Moleski, Stanley L 62 

Molloy, Leslie 95, 304, 291, 298 



Page 

Monachino 333 

Mondo 333 

Mciorehead. Louis D 28, 36 

Mooter, Jos. A 331 

Moran, J 291, 304, 300 

Moriarty. Geo. C 62, 89 

Morneau 127 

Mums, Robt 182, 291 

Mornssey, Dennis 1 1 5 

Morrissey 127 

Morrissey, Marie C 62 

Mount, Clara L 74 

Moustakis, Linton G 62, 89, 337, 363 

Mulcahy, Mane C 78, 101 

Mullaney, Austin 97 

Mullaney, DanI 93 

Mulligan, P 323 

Mulhns. A 141 

Mulqueen, Miss 176 

Mulvey, Miss igQ 

Murhane, Raymond H 78. 107 

Murnane, Raymond 106 

Murphy 127 

Murphy, Arthur 117 

Murphy, Chas 311 

Murphy. Danl. J 95, 219 

Murphy, D. R 93, 92, 87, 219, 331 

Murphy. Edna M 62, 101 

Murphy, Frank 91, 337 

Murphy. H 173 

Murphy, Jno. L 142 

Murphy, Robt 233, 235, 93, 327, 217 

Murphy, Stanley 93 

Murphy, Thos. J 62 

Murphy, Wm. H 62 

Murphy. Wm. R 121 

Murray, Bernard J 288 

McAuliffe. Neal 91, 213 

McCabe, Edward 94 

McCabe, Robt 233, 97, 267, 219, 235 

McCabe. Thos. R 61, 107 

McCarthy. Danl 117 

McCarthy, Dennis F 78, 107, 106 

McCarthy, Wm 130 

McCarty, Francis G 61 

McCormick. Bernard 97 

McCormick, Edw 99 

McCormick, Jno 95, 335 

McCormick, Jno. V 28, 34 

McCormick. Miss 169 

McCorry. Catherine L 61 

McCourt, Jno '. 95 

McCracken. Francis 99 

McDonald 253 

McDonald 97 

McDonnall. A 173 

McEvoy. Donald 91, 219, 253 

McFarland, Frances 78, 253 

McFarlin, Wm. C 61, 115 

McGorry, Miss 160 

McGillan. Jno 99 

McGonagle, Clyde 112 

McGonagle, Jos. C 61, 114, 115 

McGowan. Jno 99 



Page four hundred thirteen 



McGuire, Cecilia B 74 

McGuire, Philip 94 

McGurn 139, 140 

McHugh, Jas 95 

Mclntyre, Kathryn 160 

McLaughlin, Danl. D 61 

McNally, Kathleen E 61 

McNaughton, Gordon 99 

McNeil, Wm...95, 219, 291, 301, 304, 335 

McShane. Patrick 98 

McTigue, Francis 143 

McVeigh, Miss 169 

McVey, Jack 97, 337 

McVey. Mane 130 

N 

Naber, Dorothea E 74 

Naples, Louis A 63 

Nardi, Antenisea A 79, 101 

Nash 139 

Nash, Nora M 63 

Neal, Jno. M 62 

Neary, Hubert 138 

Neary, Jas 29, 214, 357 

Neff, Jas 63, 125 

Nelson, Miss 168 

Neri. Michael 94 

Nesler, Miss 168 

Neu, Helen M 74, 163 

Neuroth, B 172 

Newman, Helen 108 

Niccoh, M 172 

Niggeman, Miss 160 

Nigro, Salvatore J 63, 333 

Nolan, Raymond 303 

Noland, Paul 291, 298, 304 

Norkett, Wm. F 29, 63, 134, 136, 357 

Norris, Adam 134, 140 

Norton, Edw 291 

Noto, Jos. J 63 

O 

O'Brien, Jno 95, 335 

O'Brien, Jos. M 63 

O'Brien, M. Hayes 91 

O'Callaghan, Ambrose 95 

O'Connell, Hazel M 74 

O'Connor 127 

O'Connor, Paul 92, 95, 212, 

213, 233, 235, 236, 237, 327, 329, 337 

O'Connor, Jas. C 120, 121. 230 

O'Connor, Jas. J 82 

O'Connor, Richard 

91, 212, 213. 219, 337, 359 

O'Connor, Thos. R 63 

O'Donnell 139 

O'Donnell, Helen 74, 253 

O'Dowd, Jas. J 105, 108 

Oehlberg, Nick .-. 99 

O'FIaherty, B 141 

O'Grady, Jno 93 

Ohlheiser, Geo. R 63, 89 

Ohlheiser, Jos 99 

Oldham, Miss 103 



Page 

O'Leary, Hilary 121 

O'Leary, Jas 116, 117 

Olcnder, Adeline M 74 

O'Neill, Miss 169 

O'Reilly, Edw 94 

O'Rourke, Harry 91 

Osten, Jos 136 

Oswaldoski, Leo 99 

Ouelette 127 

Overbeck, Emma B 74 

P 

Parent, Marie A 63, 101 

Parent], Michael 82, 333 

Parisi, Madeline H 79, 171 

Pauli 127 

Pavletic, Nicholas B 63 

Pecoraro, Amedeo M 63, 333 

Pekin, Thos 83 

Pence, Olive E 64 

Perciabosco, Frank 99 

Periaton, Edna G 64 

Peske, Helen F 74, 163 

Peterhans, Louis 99 

Peterka 139, 141 

Pettinger, Andrew 121 

Pilotte, A 173 

Pilut, Jno 98 

Pink, Samuel 64 

Pittman, Ruth 75, 175 

Plunkett, Hugh 64, 115 

Plunkett, Paul 91, 363 

Pokorny, Wm 115 

Podwicka, Jos 98 

Pohto 33 3 

Poppelreiter, Chris 95, 291, 299, 304 

Porelh, Danl 98 

Powers, Miss C 2 53 

Powers, Cyril 95 

Powers, Miss A 253 

Powers, Gertrude M 64, 101, 253 

Powers, HoUis 99 

Poynton, Thos 99, 219, 233 

Prendergast, Harold J 64, 89, 3 3 5, 363 

Price, E IVJ 

Pritikin, Isadore 64, 124, 345 

Prosser, Lucy B - 75 

Pugh, Aura B 79, 171 

Pysik, Stanley L 64 

Q 

Qualcy, Marie K 79 

Quan, Anna Mary 79 

Quane, Robt 93 

Quinlan. Jerry 331, 98 

Quinn, Thos. P 64 

Quinn, Margaret H 75 

Quinn, Mary E 75 

Quigley, Margaret M 75 

Quinn, B. J., S.J 285 

Quinn, Frank 94, 213, 337 

Quirici, Miss 176 

R 

Radokovitch, Oushan 94 



Page four hundred fourteen 



Page 

Raimond, Florence 64 

Rafferty, Jas 99 

Ratferty, Robt 95, 216, 217, 218, 337 

Raines, Taft 94 

Rajik, Antoinette P 75 

Rand 345 

Raso 2 50, 2 53 

Rauchschwalke 64 

Ray, Geo. K 89, 230, 231, 233, 236, 

237, 216, 217, 234, 267, 337, 357, 359 

Reading, Grace D 75, 163 

Rcbmann, A 139, 141 

Reed, Francis 94 

Reed, Paul A 91, 117 

Reed, Paul E 233, 235 

Reedy, Thos. J 28, 40 

Reid 335 

Reid, Edwin P 121 

Reider 345 

Reidy, Wm 95 

Reiner, Jos. S., S.J : 28, 30 

Reinhart, Louise D 75, 167 

Renkoff 345 

Riley, E 173 

Rivera 127 

Robellato 333 

Roccisano, Vincent 91, 250, 253 

Rocco, Paul 83 

Rooney 127 

Rokusek, Kathryn C 75 

Rond, Geo 83 

Rooney, Fr' icis J 3 5 

Rooney, Geo. E 126, 83 

Rooney, Gerald A 65 

Rooney, Mary 160 

Rosdeba, Mary E 75, 175 

Rositch, Jno 91, 250, 253 

Roszkowski, Anthony 95 

Rotandi 333 

Rowan, Edw 99 

Rudolph, Martin A 65 

Ryan. Jas 91, 213, 214, 289, 291 

Ryan, M. Lillian 49 



Sabo, Miss 

Saletta 333, 

Salvador, G 

Samlon, Chester 

Samonte, Damaso T 

Samuels 

Sanders, Jno 

Sanders, Matt 

Sanfilippo, Jos 

Santoro, Antonio 

Sarwin, Miss 

Saylor, Helen E 79, 

Schaefer, Hasel M 75, 

Schapiro, Isador 65, 

Scheidermann 

Scheribel, Carl J 

Schifar, Miss 

Schlacks, Howard 

Schmidt, Austin S., S.J 28, 



169 

127 

246 

83 

65 

127 

121 

130 

95 

65 

169 

101 

163 

345 

139 

128 

169 

117 

42 



Page 

Schnaubelt, E 173 

Schneider 127 

Scholl, Rcgina K 7y 

Schollian, Frank 94 

Schultz, H 172 

Schommer, Jack 91 

Schram, Walter L 65, 107 

Schuck, Raymond 99 

Schulte, Theodore J 47, 256 

Schultz, Andrew 99 

Schunian, Robt 99 

Schwarcz, B 345 

Schwartz, Nathan F 63, 345 

Schweikert, Marcella E 76 

Schwiderski, Dorothy J 79, 171 

Scott, Walter J 65, 89, 291, 301^ 304 

Scullion, Dorothea 76 

Sears, Jno 105 

Sextro, Fred 298, 310 

Shanahan, Richard 91, 303, 335 

Shannon, Jno 94 

Shannon, Lillian M 79, 101 

Shapiro 127, 83 

Sharratt, Jean C 76 

Shaughnessy, Miss 160 

Sheedy, Jno 337 

Sheehan, Leo.. ..91, 218, 219, 324, 213, 250 

Shcehan, Mane 44 

Shchee, Jas. G 65, 115 

Sheriff, Robt 99 

Shiner, Miss 160 

Shipka, A 141 

Shrake, Warren 98 

Shroeder, Miss 160 

Shurr, Louis H 331, 65, 89, 219, 250, 253 

Sinioni 3 33 

Siedenberg, Frederic, S.J 28, 32, 361 

Size. Jas 95 

Smalley, Chas 83 

Smarke, Miss 168 

Smelzer, Wm. J., Jr 65, 107 

Smith, A • 139 

Smith, E 322 

Smith, Jno 95, 302, 310, 304, 291 

Smith, Miss 169 

Smith, Thos 91, 331 

Snyder 139, 141 

Sobie, H 173 

Sormos, T 127 

Sowka, Paul 91 

Spackmann, Jno 99 

Spalding, Benedict 95 

Spangler, Edw 83 

Spelman, Tom - 91, 239 

Spiteri, Wm 130, 333 

Spinnad, Chas. J 120 

Stadler, Martin 87, 96, 97 

Stanton. Herbert 98, 331 

Stasch, Anna Marie 79, 171 

Stauder, Harry 91, 250, 253, 331 

Steggart, Bertram J 28, 31 

Steinbrecher, Ben 83, 217 

Stellcrn, Mabel B 79, 171 

Stengel, Henry J 65 



Page four hundred fifteen 



Page 

Steve, T 173 

Stilwell, Marguerite E 76 

Slimming, Chas. E 29. 

66, 89, 87, 86, 335, 216, 217, 357, 359 

Strelka, Leo 99 

Strobcl, Jno 95. 337, 323 

Stroik, M 173 

Strubbe, K 173 

Suffel, Geo 141 

Sullivan, Alphonse 121, 173 

Sullivan, Jno 98 

Summers, Isabel R 66, 100, 101 

Sweeney, Jno. A 66, 107 

Sweeney, Myles 95 

Sweetman Jno 134, 138 

Sweetman, Wm. D 79, 136 

Sweitzer, Robt. M...66, 86, 87, 89, 232, 233 

T 

Tabaka, S 172 

Tangney, Mane C 66, 100, 101 

Targosz. Francis 99 

Tarlowe, Lillian 83, 127, 351 

Tarlowe, Virginia 351 

Tarnovsky, Alexander 66 

Tchinski, Adam L 66 

Teter, Lloyd F 55 

Thompson, Miss 169 

Thomson, Robt 91, 213, 214, 337, 359 

Thrccdy, Clarence E 66, 115 

Tigerman, Jos 322 

Tomaso, Alphonse R 66. 89, 250, 253 

Tomczak, Anthony.. ..93, 337, 220, 213, 219 

Tompkins, Harvey 83 

Toomey, Jno. E 66. 104, 105, 107 

Toth, Miss 160 

Tovarek 127 

Tracey, Jno 91. 331 

Trizna, Jos 94 

Trccht, Robt. R 66 

Truog, Edith M 76, 167 

Tuohy, Miss 176 

Turner, Baete E 66 

Twohey, H 172 

Twomey. Harold 99, 331 

V 

Vacy, Jno 99 

Valenta, Ellen H 67, 351 

Van Driel, Agnes 33. 361 

Van Houten 361_ 

Van Pelt, Harold 29, 219, 357 

Vaughey, Jno 99 

Veeser, lone E 79, 171 

Ver Coutcren, Marie 168, 169 

Varhalen, Jno. J 67 

Vincenti, Anton 91, 253, 250. 333 

Vivirito. Christie 95, 337 

Vocel, Leona 160 

Volini, C 3'5 

Vonesh, Jas 97 

W 

Wachtcl, Regina W 67 



Page 

Waesco, Jno 92, 95, 311, 299, 291, 304 

Wagner, Hilda 76 

Wagner, Leonard 98 

Wajay, Louis 94 

Waldvogel. Jos 95, 331 

Walker, Alice M 76, 175 

Wall, Jas 98 

Wallace, Leroy J 67 

Walsh, Chas 99 

Walsh, Francis J 67, 89, 220, 219, 331 

Walsh. Jas. F., S.J 46, 269, 364 

Walsh, J. Francis 250, 357, 

29, 233, 89, 267, 87, 337, 327, 219, 253 

Walsh, J. F 125 

Walsh, Jno. P 94, 250, 253 

Walsh, Jos 97 

Walsh, Richard 117 

Walsh, Hon. Thos. J 184 

Walters, Miss 168 

Waters, Wm 117 

Weber, Jno 95 

Weber. Kathryn 76 

Weideman, Jos 108 

Weigil, Chas 83 

Weimer, Geo 95 

Weinless 345 

Weinnch, Geo. J 67, 89, 250, 251, 253 

Weir 127 

Wendorf, Miss 168 

Werner, Margaret C 76 

Whaley, Jno 83 

White, Jno 29, 91, 267, 337, 357, 363 

Wilkinson. Jno 95 

Will, Theodore H 67 

Williams. M 172 

WiUiams, Paul 148 

Wilson. H 172 

Wiltrakis, Jos 67 

Wingfield, Mary 67, 100, 101 

Wiora, Henry 67 

Wing, M 172 

Wisniewski, Miss 169 

Witry, Jos 312 

Wojtulewicz, P 141 

Wybraniec, Albion 94 

Y 

Yclowcin. 1 115 

Young. W 94 

Young, F 331 

Z 

Zabel. Morton D 213, 217 

Zaborski. J 172 

Zalas, Miss 169 

Zavisza, M. M 76 

Zielinski, J 83 

Zimmerman, Edw. F 67 

Zinkan, A. B 67, 138 

Zmkan. A 141 

Zurawski, W 94 

Zurfli. T 127 

Zwikstra. Geo 97, 327, 337 



Page four hundred sixteen 







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