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The 



LOYOL AN 



COPYRIGHTED, 1930, BY 

RICHARD O'CONNOR 
ROBERT J. THOMSON 



THE 
NINETEEN THIRTY 
liOYOLAN 




PUBLISHED BY 
THE STUDENTS OF LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 

CHICACO 




DEDICATION 



The 1930 Loyolan is proudly dedicated to 
Mr. Stuyvesant Peabody, Chairman of the 
Loyola University Administrative Council, 
in recognition of the services he has rendered 
to the institution. 

As the possessor of a war record of which 
any man might be proud, one of the financial 
powers of the country, the active director of 
his own interests, a sportsman of note, and 
a Catholic by conviction, Mr. Peabody is out- 
standing among men. 

It is the hope of the university officials, as 
well as the staff of this booh, that the sons of 
Loyola may aspire, in a small measure, to 
such a position of eminence and distinction as 
has been secured by Stuyvesant Peabody. 



FOREWORD 



Any student who has spent his college years under the 
direction of the Jesuits, and received the benefits of their 
long years of training and study, will testify to the fact 
that they are men of foresight and capability, ready to 
seize any opportunity to further the cause of youth and 
education. 

Back in 1870, Father Damen, Loyola's founder and 
president, showed the ingenuity and devotion which was 
to characterize the future directors of the policies of 
Loyola University. The school was known in those days 
as St. Ignatius College, and was situated on the out- 
skirts of early Chicago on west Twelfth Street. 

A rough and rarely used roadway separated the college 
building from the parish church. Father Damen went 
before the council and convinced the city fathers that the 
street was more of a detriment than an asset, and that 
it should be closed. When the council decided in his 
favor, after having made an investigation, he rallied his 
forces and by midnight had a shift of workmen construct- 
ing a fence by torchlight across both ends of the street 
so that the order of the council would be firmly sealed. 
It would be unbecoming to mention here the neighbor- 
hood riot which ensued the next morning. At any rate 
the west wing of the college was soon extended over the 
disputed territory, and from that time the growth of the 
college was sure and rapid. 

The 1930 LOYOLAN is not intended to be an histori- 
cal account of the institution and the men who made it, 
but it does attempt to show that Loyola University is 
finishing its sixtieth year of progress — an asset to the 
city of Chicago and a realization of the dreams of its 
vigorous founder, Fr. Damen. 



THE STAFF 

Richard O'Connor Editor-in-Chief 

Robert John Thomson .... Managing Editor 

John Leo Lenihan Business Manager 

Edward Joseph Dowling Senior Editor 

Robert James Rafferty. .Loyola Life Editor 



THE BOOKS 

Book One LOYOLA 

Book Two ADMINISTRATION 

Book Three CLASSES 

Book Four - - - LOYOLA LIFE 

Book Five ACTIVITIES 

Book Six ATHLETICS 

Book Seven . FRATERNITIES 
Book Eight FEATURE 



IN MEMORIAM 

John M. Sheedy 

Charles G. Schrofer 

Alice Ruth McAllister 

Elmer G. Wiadnyansky 

Dr. Yutaka Oyama 




LOITOLA 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 



The Administration Building 




THE 1930 LOYOLAN 




Toward Lake Michigan 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 



Michael Cudahy Hall 




THE 1930 



L O Y O L A N 




The Gymnasium 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 



Pillars of Learning 




T H E 



19 3 



L O Y O L A N 




The School of Medicine 



19 3 



L O Y O L A N 



Henry Dumbach Hall 




"The ground floor, which opens 
on the college campus, contains 
a large recreation hall and bi- 
cycle accommodations." 

Early Bulletin oj Information. 







ADMINISTRATION 



The 
YEAR'S ACHIEVEMENT 

Two years ago there was formed at Loyola University 
a Council of Deans and Regents, the purpose of which 
was to advise the President in matters academic. One 
year ago there was formed the Loyola Union, an elective 
student organization of all departments the purpose of 
which was to control the student activities by acting as 
a subsidiary to the President. This year has seen a still 
greater step in the strengthening and unifying the Uni- 
versity. An administrative Council was formed for the 
purpose of advising the President in matters pertaining 
to the practical operation of the institution. 

The year has seen also the erection of the Elizabeth 
M. Cudahy Memorial Library, a structure which has 
satisfied a need which has been existing for many years. 

The west section of the Loyola University Stadium 
was erected during the past summer and an improved 
field was constructed in time for the 1929 football season. 
Plans have been fully completed for the finishing of the 
stadium and the introduction of an intense lighting sys- 
tem by means of which night games may be played dur- 
ing the 1930 season. 

These constitute the outstanding achievements of the 
University since June, 1929. There are others — many 
others — the importance of which cannot be denied. The 
school is constantly advancing, its reputation is daily 
becoming more admirable both in the educational and 
sport worlds, and its graduates are ever becoming more 
prominent and successful. Altogether, another long stride 
has been taken toward the advancement of Catholic 
education. 



T H E 



L O y O L A N 




ROBERT M. KELLEY, SJ. 

President oj Loyola University 



Page twenty-six 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 



The 
PRESIDENT'S GREETING 

The theme chosen for this year's Loyoian, the 
place of Loyola in the history of Chicago, is of 
wide and of deep interest. Loyola is celebrating 
its sixtieth birthday as a school and its twenty- 
first as a university: Chicago is making ready to 
celebrate worthily a century of progress. It is 
always important to know the relation existing 
between an educational institution and its site or 
habitat. Chicago is to me the typical city of the 
United States — typical of the country in its energy, 
in its bigness, in its enterprise, in its resourceful- 
ness, in its boastfulness, in the pride it takes in its 
material accomplishments. There is, however, a 
hidden quality which is too often overlooked in 
telling the history of cities, which I believe is the 
chief element in the greatness of "the world's 
youngest great city." I refer to the spiritual qual- 
ity of Chicago, the soul of the city which supplies 
the vital motives for its towering, visible achieve- 
ments. While Loyola has contributed much to the 
material welfare of its home city, as this year book 
shows so convincingly, still its chief claim for 
notice and for consideration is its output of men 
and of women — Christian gentlemen and Christian 
women of a character which alone give a city true 
greatness. The Loyoian of 1950 correlates the 
history of Chicago with that of Loyola University. 



Page twenty-seven 



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Reading clockwise: CHAS. F. CLARKE, EDWARD J. MEHREN, MATTHEW J. HICKEY, MARTIN J. QUIGLEY, 

SAMUEL INSULL, JR., PRESIDENT ROBERT M. KELLEY, S.J., STCYVESANT PEABODY, EDWARD A. 

CUDAHY, JR., PETER J. ANGSTEN. 



The 
THE ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL 

"As the Academic Council (consisting of the Regents and the 
Deans of Loyola University) advises the President of the University 
regarding matters educational, so the Administrative Council advises 
the President in matters of business." The above, taken directly 
from the constitution of the Administrative Council, expresses in a 
few words the significance ol this newly organized group. 

The Council consists of three committees: the Finance, headed by 
Samuel Insull, Jr., who is assisted by Charles F. Clarke of the Halsey- 
Stuart Company and Matthew J. Hickey of the Hickey-Doyle Com- 
pany; the Public Relations, consisting of Martin J. Ouigley of the 
Ouigley Publishing Company and Editor of the Chicagoan, Edward 
J. Mehren of the McGraw-Hill Company, and Peter J. Angsten of 
the Angsten-Farrell Company, with Mr. Ouigley as chairman; and 
the Grounds and Buildings Committee, consisting of David F. 
Bremner of the Bremner Bros. Biscuit Company and Edward A. 
Cudahy of the Cudahy Packing Company. The entire Council is 
headed by Stuyvesant Peabody, head of the Peabody Coal and nu- 
merous other companies. 

Taken collectively and individually, the Council is functioning 
most successfully. The first of the general quarterly meetings was 
held at the Downtown College on March thirteenth, 1930, and plans 
were laid which upon completion will prove vital in the development 
of the Universitv. 



Page twenty-eight 



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Top. Row: A. BROWN', E. SMITH, C. GRUNER, WM. MURPHY, J. O'CONNOR, MC TIGUE. Second Ron 

J. CROWE, J. BRENNAN, J. WHITE, (PreS.), FR. SCHULTE, E. MADDEN, C. LA FOND. Front Rou 

V. TOWLE, V. BARKER, F. MOLONEY, M. CORRIGAN, D. KAIN, J. WHALEY 



THE LOYOLA UNION 

In its second year the Loyola Union advanced beyond the achieve- 
ments of 1929 in better organization, and more definite and detailed 
execution of the plans outlined by the Union in its beginnings. The 
Freshman Frolic and Sophomore Cotillion of 1929 were real advances 
in Social events, and the Junior Prom of 1930 is still a lively memory 
to all the Students. The Senior Ball is to be the climax. 

Senior Booklets are again issued, more attractive and better 
balanced, the School of Sociology and the Graduate School have 
joined the Union in full representation, the April elections have 
replaced the retiring seniors of the Union with capable new directors, 
the Annual Jamboree was another unqualified success — in short, 
all the all-university-activities have stepped up to a real university 
plane, and the hope of Father Kelley, our genial President, of creating 
something like a real University Spirit in our scattered domains, 
seems to be more fully realized in 1930 than ever before. We con- 
gratulate the Loyola Union members on their work and devotedness. 

The following members represent their respective departments: 
Arts: James Brennan, Daniel R. Murphy, John D. White, (Pres.); 
Commerce: Charles LaFond, J. Lawrence Murphy, Frank McTigue; 
Dental: Harold Hillenbrand, Charles Gruner, Paul A. Topel; Law 
(Day): Al Brown, (Vice-Pres.), Emmett Davis, Edward Smith; 
Law (Evening): Joseph Crowe, William Murphy, (Treas.), John 
O'Connor; Medical: Edward Madden, Vic Towle, John H. Whaley; 
Sociology: Virginia Barker, Marie C. Corrigan, Dorothy Kain, 
(Secretary) ; Graduate: Frances Moloney. 



Page twenty-nine 



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E 1930 LOYOLAN 




The 

COLLEGE OF 

ARTS AND SCIENCES 



JOSEPH S. REINER, S.J. 

Dean 



FACULTY 



Robert M. Kelley, S.J. 

George J. Brunner, S.J. 

Charles Stephen Costello, Ph. 

Hugh Forsaith Field, Ph.D. 

Phillip William Froebes, S.J. 

Cornelius S. Hagerty, B.S. 

Aloysius Phillip Hodapp, A.M. 

Rev. Conrad Hoffman, A.M. 

John Walter Hudson, M.S. 

Julius Victor Kuhinka, A.M. 

Michael Donald Linehan, B.S. 

George Henry' Mahowald, S.J. 

Robert Wilkenson McNulty", A. 
D.D.S. 

John Michael Melchiors, A.M. 

James Joseph Mertz, S.J. 

Bernard Joseph Murray, S.J. 

Leonard Henry Otting, S.J. 

Louis James Puhl, S.J. 



Joseph S. Reiner, S.J. 

Graciano Salvador, A.B., LL.B. 

B. George Michael Schmeing, M.S. 

Charles E. Schrader, S.J. 

Theodore John Shulte, S.J. 

Joseph E. Semrad, Ph.B. 

Bertram John Steggert, A.M. 

Peter Theodore Swanish, M.B.A. 
Ph.D. 

John F. Walsh, S.J. 

Morton Dauwen Zabel, A.M. 

M. Lillian Ryan 

Alice O'Meara 

Harold Anthony - Hillenbrand 

Earl William Kerns, B.S. 

Daniel James Lamont, LL.B. 

Robert Emmet Morris, A.B. 

Edwin Joseph Norton, D.D.S. 

Leonard D. Sachs. 



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The 
LAKE SHORE CAMPUS 



3ERTRAM STEGGERT, M.A., 
Registrar 




Perhaps one of the most outstanding steps toward unifying the 
various departments of Loyola University was taken when Mr. 
Bertram Steggert, of the Lake Shore Campus, was made chief regis- 
trar for the College of Arts and Sciences, the Graduate and Com- 
merce Schools, and the Downtown College, with those people for- 
merly in charge of the records of those departments acting as assist- 
ants. 

Rather than to subordinate the former registrars and secretaries 
the motive was to bring the records of the school under a unified 
control by means of which all departments will function together 
more satisfactorily, especially in the transfer of students from one 
course to another. The records themselves are, for the most part, 
still kept in their original offices. 

Mr. Steggert has been affiliated with Loyola since September, 1924, 
long enough to know fully the duties of his office and to establish 
himself as a part of the institution. Since coming here, he has effected 
the installation of new record systems and the improvement of those 
formerly in use; he has established and directed the Loyola University 
Glee Club prior to its being assigned to Mr. Salvador, the Director of 
Music; and he reorganized the defunct Sock and Buskin Club, intro- 
ducing the idea of allowing co-eds to take part in the production of 
plays, and directed plays previous to the coming of Mr. Costello, 
the present coach, to Loyola. 

Mr. Steggert is a member of the American Association of Collegiate 
Registrars, the Knights of Columbus, and the Pi Gamma Mu and 
Phi Mu Chi Fraternities. 



Page thirty-one 



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The 
DOWNTOWN COLLEGE 

The School oj Sociology 



FREDERIC SIEDENBURG, 
S.J. 

Dean 



FACULTY 



Gennaro Albachiara, D.Sc. 
Anne L. Austin, B.S., R.N. 
William R. Bowlin, Ph.B. 
Francis T. Boylan, A.B. 
Sister M. Corona Kent, Ph.B. 
Claude De Crespigny, Ph.D. 
Cecille H. Egan, A.M. 
Howard E. Egan, Ph.D. 
Gertrude M. Engbring, B.S., M.D. 
William J. Finan, S.J. 
Charles Gallagher, A.M., J.D. 
Helen M. Ganey, A.M. 
Francis J. Gerty, B.S., M.D. 
Eneas B. Goodwin, S.T.B., J.D. 
William P. Hagedorn, S.J. 
Bernard A. Horn, S.J. 
William H. Johnson, Ph.D. 
John J. Keefe, S.J. 
Marie Kelly- 
Jerome G. Kerwin, Ph.D. 
Dorothy C. Kleespies, A.B. 
Paul Kiniery, A.M. 
Julius V. Kuhinka, A.M. 
Helen M. Langer, Ph.D. 
Nellie MacNamara, LL.B. 
Emma M. McCredie, B.S. 
Wilson McGrath, B.S. 
Florence H. McIntosh, A.M. 
George H. Mahowald, S.J. 
Michael Metlin, A.M. 



Sister Modesta, A.M. 
Robert Bakewell Morrison, S.J. 
Joseph L. Moss, A.B. 
Emmet P. O'Connell, S.J. 
Arthur O'Mara, A.B. 
Leonard H. Otting, S.J. 
Sister M. Paschalina, A.B. 
Claude J. Pernin, S.J. 
Paul Pierce, A.M. 
Sister Rapahaelis Gehlin, A.M. 
Hubert Ryan, B.S., M.D. 
Graciano Salvador, A.M., LL.B. 
George M. Schmeing, M.S. 
Austin G. Schmidt, S.J. 
E. J. Schmitt, A.M. 
Charles J. Scott, S.J. 
Bernard Sellmeyer, S.J., M.D. 
Maurice S. Sheehy, Ph.D. 
Frederic Siedenburg, S.J. 
Henry S. Spalding, S.J. 
Catherine V. Starbeck, A.M. 
Joseph C. Thompson, A.M. 
Andrew J. Townsend, Ph.D. 
Agnes Van Driel, A.M. 
James F. Walsh, S.J. 
John F. Walsh, S.J. 
Margaret V. Walsh, A.M. 
Robert B. Watson. B.S., C.P.H. 
Samuel K. Wilson, S.J. 
Morton D. Zabel, A.M. 



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The 
SCHOOL OF LAW 



JOHN V. MCCORMICK, 
A.B., J.D. 

Dean 




Robert M. Kelley, S.J. 

Frederic Siedenburg, S.J. 

John V. McCormick, A.B., J.D. 

Francis J. Rooney, A.M., LL.B. 

Sherman Steele, Litt.B., LL.B. 

John C. Fitzgerald, A.B., LL.B. 

James F. Walsh, S.J. 

William C.Woodward, M.D.,LL.M. 

Joseph F. Elward, A.B., LL.B. 

Payton J. Tuohy, A.M., LL.B. 

Joseph A. Graber, A.M., LL.B. 

Lawrence W. Spuller, A.B., J.D., 
LL.B. 

Frank Mast, LL.B. 

Urban A. La very, A.B., J.D. 

Leo L. Donahoe, A.B., LL.B. 

Walter W. L. Meyer, LL.B. 

James A. Cahill, Ph.B., LL.B. 



FACULTY 

Goodwin L. Dosland, A.B., J.D. 
William P. Fortune, A.B., LL.B. 
Hayes Kennedy, Ph.B., J.D. 
Louis J. Victor, Ph.B., J.D. 
Stephen Love, LL.B. 
Cornelius Palmer, A.B., LL.B. 
Jacob J. Becker, Ph.B., J.D. 
William F. Friedman, Ph.B., J.D. 
Joseph F. Geary, LL.B. 
O. John Rogge, A.B., LL.B. 
Aloysius B. Cawley, A.M., J.U.D. 
Raymond J. Goss, LL.B. 
Herman Reiling, LL.B. 
Archie H. Cohen, LL.B. 
John J. Sharon, A.B., LL.B. 
Marsile J. Hughes, B.A., S.D. 
Agnes Ewing 



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The 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



LOUIS U. MOORHEAD, 
A.M., M.D.. LI-.D., F.A.C.S. 

Dean 



FACULTY 



Ulysses Joshua Grim, M.D. 
Henry Schmitz, M.D., A.M., LL.D. 
Frederick Mueller, M.D. 
Robert A. Black, M.D. 
Reuben Myron Strong, A.B., A.M., 

Ph.D. 
Bertha Van Hoosen, A.B., A.M., 

M.D. 
George W. Mahoney, M.D. 
Charles Louis Mix, A.B., A.M., 

M.D., LL.D. 
Benjamin Barker Beeson, M.D. 
William C. Austin, B.A., Ph.D. 
Charles F. Read, B.S., M.D. 
Frank Adam Mc Junkin, A.M., M.D. 
Frank Marion Phifer, M.D. 
Theodore E. Boyd, B.S., Ph.D. 
William E. Morgan, M.D., LL.D. 
Isadore M. Trace, M.D. 
Phillip H. Kreuscher, M.D. 
Charles F. Sawyer, M.D. 
Benjamin H. Orndoff, Ph.G., M.D., 

A.M. 
John Ferdinand Golden, M.D. 
Milton Mandel, M.D. 
Stephen Roman Pietrowicz, A.B., 

M.D. 



Richard J. Tivnen, M.D., LL.D. 

Frank E. Pierce, B.S., M.D. 

Thesle T. Job, A.B., M.S., Ph.D. 

Daniel A. Orth, M.D. 

George Mueller, M.D. 

Joseph P. Smyth, M.D. 

Louis David Moorhead, A.B., M.D., 

M.S. 
Italo F. Bolini, B.S., M.D. 
Thomas E. Meany, M.D. 
Robert S. Berghoff, M.D. 
Fred M. Drennan, B.S., M.S., M.D. 
William Sheridan Hector, M.D. 
Clement Leon Martin, A.B., M.D. 
William Fred Scott, M.D. 
A. Cosmas Garvy, A.B., M.D. 
Michael McGuire, A.B., M.B. 
George Leonard Apfelbach, A.B., 

M.S., M.D. 
Ernest August Pribram, M.D. 
Edward Milton Brown, M.D. 
J. William Davis, B.S., M.D. 
Samuel Salinger, A.B., M.D. 
George T. Jordan, B.S., M.D. 
William Joseph Ouigley, S.B., M.D. 
Sidney A. Portis, S.B., M.D. 



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The 
COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 



WILLIAM H. G. LOGAN, 

M.D., D.D.S.. I.L.U. 

F.A.C.S., F.A.C.D. 

Dean 




FACULTY 



William H. G. Logan, M.D., D.D.S., 
LL.D., F.A.C.S. 

Charles N. Johnson, M.A., L.D.S., 
D.D.S., LL.D. 

John P. Buckley, Ph.G., D.D.S. 

Pliny G. Puterbaugh, M.D., D.D.S. 

Robert E. MacBoyle, D.D.S. 

Thomas L. Grisamore, Ph.G., D.D.S. 

Rupert E. Hall, D.D.S. 

John L. Kendall, B.S., Ph.G., M.D. 

William D. Zoethout, Ph.D. 

Emanuel B. Fink, Ph.D., M.D. 

Thesle T. Job, A.B., M.S., Ph.D. 

Julius V. Kuhimka, A.M. 

William I. McNeil, D.D.S. 



Edgar D. Coolidge, B.S., D.D.S. 

Rudolph Kronfeld, M.D. 

Karl A. Meyer, M.D. 

John R. Watt, D.D.S. 

Augustus H. Mueller, B.S., D.D.S. 

Lewis A. Platts, M.S., D.D.S. 

Earl P. Boulger, D.D.S., L.D.S. 

Ralph H. Fouser, D.D.S., B.S., M.D. 

Elbert C. Pendelton, D.D.S. 

Lozier D. Warner, B.A. 

Harold W. Oppice, D.D.S. 

LeGrand M. Cox, M.D., D.D.S. 

Harry Bowman Pinney, D.D.S. 

Gail Martin Hambleton, B.S., 
D.D.S. 



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The 
SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 



THOMAS J. REEDY, 
A.M., LL.B., C.P.A. 

Dean 



FACULTY 



Thomas Ouinn Beesley, A.M., 

LlTT.B. 

Francis T. Boylan, A.B. 

Howard E. Egan, Ph.D. 

Matt C. Egan, B.C.S., J.D. 

Edward H. Enright, U. S. Naval 
Acad., J.D. 

Hugh F. Field, Ph.D. 

Waltar A. Foy, Ph.B. 

Charles B. Gallagher, A.M., J.D. 

Leland T. Hadley', A.B. 

James M. Hayden, A.B., C.P.A. 

Granville B. Jacobs, A.M. 

Daniel J. Kelly, C.P.A. 



Harold F. Keen, Ph.B., C.P.A. 

George A. Lane, A.B., J.D. 

Perry D. Lipscombe, B.S., C.P.A. 

John B. Mannion, A.B. 

Cornelius P. Palmer, A.B., LL.B. 

Herbert V. Prochnow, A.M. 

Thomas J. Reedy, A.M., LL.B. 
C.P.A. 

Elmer P. Schaefer, Ph.B., J.D. 

Lawrence W. Spuller, A.B., J.D. 

Peter T. Swanish, M.B.A. 

Lawrence A. Wallace, Ph.B. 

James F. Walsh, S.J. 

John A. Zvetina, A.B., J.D. 

Theodore.Wagenknecht, B.S. 



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The 
GRADUATE SCHOOL 



AUSTIN G. SCHMIDT, 
S.J., PH.D. 

Dean 




FACULTY 



Anna L. Austin, B.S., R.N. 
William Clardy Austin, Ph.D. 
Earl Patrick Boulger, D.D.S., 

L.D.S. 
Theodore Elliot Boyd, Ph.D. 
Simon B. Chandler, Ph.B., M.D. 
Archie Cohen, LL.B. 
Edgar David Coolidge, B.S., D.D.S. 
LeGrand Marvin Cox, D.D.S., xM.D. 
Robert Earl Cummings, B.S., M.D. 
John William Davis, M.D. 
Goodwin L. Dosland, A.B., J.D. 
Howard Eston Egan, Ph.D. 
William J. Finan, S.J., A.M. 
Ralph Homer Fouser, B.S., D.D.S. 
Helen Mary Ganey, A.M. 
Francis Joseph Gerty, B.S., M.D. 
Eneis Bernard Goodwin, S.T.B., 

J.D. 
Thomas L. Grisamore, Ph.G., D.D.S. 
Ellamy Horan, A.M. 
Grace Huff, A.B. 
Wilhelm A. Hueper, M.D. 
Thesle Theodore Job, Ph.D. 
William Harding Johnson, Ph.D. 
Rudolph Kronfeld, M.D. 
William H. G. Logan, M.D., D.D.S. 
George Henry Mahowald, S.J., 

Ph.D. 



Patrick Henry Matimore, S.T.D. 
John Vincent McCormick, A.B., J.D. 
Florence McIntosh, A.M. 
Frank Adam McJunkin, A.M., M.D. 
Walter W. Meyer, LL.B. 
Howard Michener, D.D.S. 
B. Adalbert Morris, D.D.S. 
Robert Bakewell Morrison, S.J., 

A.M. 
Joseph T. Moss, B.S. 
Balint Orban, B.S., M.D. 
Leonard H. Otting, S.J., A.M. 
George Charles Pike, D.D.S. 
Harry Bowman Pinney, D.D.S. 
Pliny- Guy Puterbaugh, M.D., 

D.D.S. 
Charles Francis Read, B.S., M.D. 
Herman Reiling, LL.B. 
Alice Rood, A.M. 
Francis James Rooney, A.M., LL.B. 
Miriam Loughran Rooney, Ph.D. 
Austin Gilford Schmidt, S. J., Ph.D. 
E. J. Schmidt, A.M. 
Charles E. Shrader, S.J., A.M. 
Bernard T. Sellmeyer, S.J. 
Maurice S. Sheehy, Ph.D. 
J. B. Shine, A.M. 
Frederic Siedenburg, S.J. 



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The 
HOME STUDY DEPARTMENT 



MARIE SHEEHAN 

Director 



FACULTY 



George Aka, Ph.D. 
James R. Beck, A.B. 
Carol C. Carey, B.S. 
Clara M. Carmody, Ph.B. 
Amy E. Crisler, A.B. 
J. William Davis, B.S., M.D. 
M. C. D'Argonne, Ph.D. 
Julia M. Doyle, A.M. 
Helen M. Ganey, A.M. 
Ella M. Garvey, A.M. 
Joseph F. Gonnelly, A.M. 
Harriet Hackler, A.M. 
Frederick Gruhn, A.M. 
Marsile J. Hughes, A.B. 

DOMITILLA HUNOLT, A.M. 

Florence M. Kane, Ph.B. 



Robert C. Kennan, A.B. 

Florence M. Leininger, A.B. 

Wilfred McPartlin, A.B. 

Noretta Miller, B.S. 

Charles W. Mulligan, A.B. 

Mary Ellen Reynolds, Ph.B. 

Felix Saunders, Ph.D. 

Marie Sheahan, Ph.B. 

J. Raymond Sheriff, A.B. 

Vincent J. Sheridan, A.M. 

Mme. Germaine Gallois Starrs, 
A.M. 

Richard T. Tobin, Ph.B. 

Joseph John Urbancek, B.S. 

Morton D. Zabel, A.M. 

Frieda B. Zeeb, A.M. 



Page thirty-eight 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 



The 
LOYOLA UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 



M. LILLIAN RYAN 

Librarian 




The work of Loyola University Library has been stimulated this 
year by the beautiful new library now nearing completion on the 
Lake Shore Campus. Prospect of adequate facilities promises well 
for the future. The Elizabeth M. Cudahy Memorial Library will 
be a striking example of architectural beauty and it will be the aim 
of those concerned with its administration to make it one of the 
outstanding Catholic Reference Libraries in this country. 

In order that the methods may be in keeping with the best and 
foremost library procedure the Library of Congress scheme of classi- 
fication has recently been adopted. This is the plan now followed 
by many college and university libraries. 

The Library welcomed this year the Regional group meeting of 
the Library Section of the N.C.E.A. which was held on the afternoon 
of December 29th. At this conference plans were further formulated 
to publish the Catholic Periodical Index, the first issue of which 
appeared in March, 1930. This Index is a mighty step forward in 
the field of Catholic endeavor, and will be a useful tool for the 
Librarian, and an invaluable help to all research workers. Loyola 
is proud to have helped in this endeavor. 

Following the procedure of other years the book collection has 
been augmented along special lines, keeping up in as far as possible 
with general reference books. The best of the new titles and the 
representative Catholic contributions are purchased. The recom- 
mendations of the Catholic Book Club are carefully considered, and 
bibliographies, both general and specific, are constantly checked 
with an eye to immediate or future purchase. The Library aims to 
give adequate and up to date book information. 

M. Lillian Ryan. 



Page thirty-nine 



'There were seven men on the 
faculty, including the presi- 
dent and dean of men during 
the first year of the college's 
existence. Only one man, Mr. 
J. J. Stevens, S. J., a scholastic, 
did the actual teaching." 

College Catalog, 1870. 




CLASSES 




GRADUATES 



T H 



O 



y o 



A N 



Raymond Leo Abraham, A.B. 
Bachelor oj Science in Medicine. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Nicholas A. Alexander 
Doctor of Medicine. 
A$A, <J>X 

Entered from Carnegie Institute, 
University of Pittsburgh, Mar- 
quette University and Binghamp- 
ton Central High School, 
Binghampton, New York. 



Mary Louise Alfree 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
Entered from Teachers College 
of Indianapolis and Darlington 
Seminary, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



J. L. Amorose, B. S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
4>Bn, Tivnen Ophthalmological 
Society. 

Entered from Lewis Institute. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

David Albert Anderman, A.B. 
Bachelor oj Science in Medicine. 
*AK 

Entered from University of Ala- 
bama and Boys High School, 
Brooklyn. Freshman Dance Com- 
mittee 4, Student-Faculty Ban- 
quet Committee 4. 

New York, New York. 

Albert Ralph Andrisek. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
AKK 

Entered from Lisle College, John 
Carrol University, Marquette 
University and St. Procopius 
Academy. 

Cleveland, Ohio. 





Angelo Albert Barberio, B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
IM2, Seminar. 

Entered from Fordham Universi- 
ty, and DeWitt Clinton High 
School. 

New York City. 



Virginia Rose Barker 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
Entered from Chicago Normal 
College, and the Immaculata 
High. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Romulo B. Barrionuevo, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
Entered from Villanova College, 
and San Jose High School. 
Arequipa, Peru. 



Nicholas James Barron Jr., A.B. 
Doctor oj Laws. 

Entered from St. Mary of the 
Lake University. 

River Forest, Illinois. 



Margaret Madeline Barry 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
Entered from Chicago Normal 
College and St. Mary's High. 
Sock and Buskin Club. Choral 
Society. 

Oak Park, Illinois. 



Richard William Bartlett 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 

nAA 

Entered from Loyola Academy, 
Sodality 1, 2. Cross Country 
Team 3. 

Evanston, Illinois. 



Dean reiner presents one of those 
pleasant smiles. 



Page forty-two 



LOYOLA 



N 



John Richard Beardsley, B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 

Entered from University of Chi- 
cago, and Huntington High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Dante Angelo Becchetti 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
*X 

Entered from Marquette Uni- 
versity, Hibbing Junior Collegt 
and Hibbing High School. 
Hibbing, Minnesota. 



Anthony John Bell, B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
Seminar. 

Entered from Waller High Scho 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Albert Carl Bellini, B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
IM2 

Entered from Harrison Technical 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Raymond Ignatius Berens 
Bachelor oj Arts. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High 
School. Sodality 2, 3, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Gertrude Harriet Block 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
Entered from Chicago Normal 
College and Waller High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 




William F. Bollinger, B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
Entered from Columbus Acade- 
my, Sioux Falls, S. D. 
Bridgewater, South Dakota. 

Camillo Borruso, B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
IMS, Seminar. 

Entered from Fordham Universi- 
ty and Stuyvesant High School. 
Brooklyn, New York. 

Irene Marie Bouscaren 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
Entered from Chicago Normal 
College and St. Mary's High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 

Charles Augustine Boyle 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
Blue Key. 

Entered irom Mt. Carmel High 
School. Student Council Pres. 4, 
Secy. 3. Intercollegiate Debating 
Team 2, 4. Finalist Harrison 
Oratorical Contest 1, 2, 5, Winner 
4. Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4. Loyola 
News 4. Student Initiative Com- 
mittee 3. 

Hammond, Indiana. 

Alexander Joseph Brown, Jr. 
Bachelor oj Laws. 

|hAa, Ae$, Bn 

Entered from De Paul University 
and St. Mel High School. 
Vice-Pres. Commerce Club 1. 
Cheer Leader I, 2, 3, 4. Lovolan 
Staff 1,2. Sodality 1. Vice-Pres. 
Commerce Student Council, 1. 
Law Debating Club 4. Loyola 
Union 3, 4. 

Chicago, |IIIinois. 

John H. Buckley 
Bachelor oj Laws. 
A0$ 

Entered from St. Ienatius High 
School. Football 1, 2, 3. Basket- 
ball 1, 2, 3. Track 2, 3. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



fr. schrader gives the snapshot 
shooter a break. 




Page forty-three 



T H 



LOYOLA 



N 



Andrew F. Bulfer, B.S. 
Doctor of Jledicine. 
*K, Seminar, Blue Key. IlKE. 
Entered from St. John's Univer- 
sity and St. Bede Academy. 
President Tivnen Ophthalmologi- 
cal Society 4. Class officer 2. 
Peru, Illinois. 



Arthur Bernard Burke 
Bachelor of Laws. 
AST, A9* 

Entered from St. Ignatius Hiiih 
School. Sodality 1, 2. Pres. 
Junior Evening Law Class 3. 
Chairman Junior Prom 3. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Alice Loretta Burns 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
Entered from Chicago Norma] 
College and the Immaculata 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Robert John Burns 

Bachelor oj Science in Commerce. 
Entered from Notre Dame Uni- 
versity and Loyola Academy. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

John J. Butler 

Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
Entered from Chicago Normal 
College, University of Chicago, 
De Paul University and Tilden 
Technical High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Joseph Bushe Byrnes, A.B. 
Doctor oj Laws. 
nAA, Bn 

Entered from St. Ignatius High 
School. Dramatics 1, Editor 
Loyola Quarterly 2, 3. Loyolan 
Staff 3. President Senior Eve- 
ning Law Class 4. 

Chicago, Illinois. 





Joseph Edward Caliendo, B.S. 
Doctor oj Jledicine. 
IMS, nKE, Seminar. 
Entered from Crane Junior Col- 
lege and St. Ignatius High School. 
Class Vice-Pres. 3. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



George D. Caloger 
Bachelor oj Laws. 
Entered from Northwestern Uni- 
versity and Senn High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Henry S. Cambridge, B.S. 
Doctor of Jledicine. 
Entered from Lewis Institute 
and Lewis Prep. 
Hanley, Staffordshire, England. 



Clair Martin Carey, B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 

♦Bn, nKE 

Tivnen Ophthalmological Society. 
Entered from De Paul University, 
Trinity College, and Trinity 
Academy. 

Manson, Iowa. 



Harold William Carey, B.S. 
Doctor oj Jledicine. 

*Bn 

Tivnen Ophthalmological Society. 
Entered from Notre Dame Univ. 
and Argyle, Wise, High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



John James Carrol 
Bachelor oj Arts. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High 
School. Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4. Glee 
Club 4. Philosophy Club 4. In- 
tramural Basketball 3, 4. 
Chicago. Illinois. 



Perhaps FR. BRUNNER is thinking 
about'' a little calculus problem, 
mavbe. 



Page forty-jour 



o 



y O L A N 



John James Casciato, B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
IMS 

Entered from McKinley High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Frank Philip Cassaretto 
Bachelor oj Science. 
HAA 

Entered from Crane Junior Col- 
lege and Lake View High School. 
Sodality 3, 4. Debating Club 
3, 4. Delia Strada Lecture Club 
5, 4. Sock and Buskin Club 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Virginia Agnes Cassidy 
Bacliclor oj Philosophy. 
Entered from De Paul University, 
and Trinity High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Joseph R. Chianelli 

Certified Public Accountant. 
Entered from Nashwank High 
School. 

Naskwank, Minnesota. 



Michael Pamfilowich Chichkan, 
B.S. 

Doctor oj Medicine. 
Entered from Teachers Institute 
and Seminary, Russia, and Uni- 
versity of Chicago. 

Kiew, Russia. 



Herman Yu Chu 
Bachelor oj Science. 
Entered from St. Louis High 
School, Honolulu. 

Honolulu, Hawaii. 




Richard K. N. Chun, B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
Tivnen Ophthalmological Society. 
Entered irom Dayton University, 
and St. Louis High School, 
Honolulu. 

Honolulu, Hawaii. 

Francis MacAuley Conley 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
BH, Blue Key. 

Entered from Loyola Academy. 
Loyola News 1, 2, 3. Editor in 
Chief3. President Senior Class 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

William Henry Conley - 

Bachelor oj Science in Commerce. 
nAA, Bn, IITM, Blue Key. 
Entered from Sharon High School. 
Loyolan Staff 1, 2, 3. Editor in 
Chief 3. Loyola News 1, 2. 
Loyola Quarterly 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Managing Editor 4. Varsity 
Debating Team 1, 2, 3, 4. Presi- 
dent Debating Club 4. Sodality 
1, 2, 3, 4. Harrison Oratorical 
Medal. 2. Naghten Debate 
Medal 2. Central States Collegi- 
ate Oratorical Champion 2. 
Sharon, Wisconsin. 

Timothy John Connelly 
Bachelor oj Arts. 
Blue Key. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High 
School. Sodality 1, 2. Loyolan 
Staff. 4 Class secy. 4. Sock and 
Buskin Club 5, 4; Pres. 4. Glee 
Club 2, 3. Varsity Football 2, 3, 
4. Track 4. 

Chicago, Illinois. 

John Clement Connery 
Bachelor oj Laws. 
Entered from Notre Dame Univ. 
and St. Mary's High School, 
Kansas. 

Chicago, Illinois. 

Ray'mond G. Connor 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
Entered from De Paul University 
and New Trier High School. 
Wilmette, Illinois. 



'Tres bien," says fr. bellemare. 




Page jorly-jioe 



o 



y O L A 



N 



Philip Medford Corboy, B.S. 
Bachelor oj Science in Medicine. 

Entered from Valparaiso Univer- 
sity and University of Chicago. 
Sociality 2. Manager of Band 2. 
Class Editor 5. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Marie Catherine Corrigan 
Bachelor oj Philosophy 
Entered from Chicago. Normal 
College and St. Mary's High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Harry Cotell 

Bachelor oj Science in Medicine. 
Entered from Crane Junior Col- 
lege, and Jewish Peoples Institute. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Charles Lewis Coyle 

Bachelor of Science in Medicine. 

*X 

Entered from Morton Junior 

College, Lewis Institute and 

Morton High School. 

Berwyn, Illinois. 



John Crasseros, B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
Entered from Lewis Institute. 
Chicaso, Illinois. 



Kathleen Creach 

Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
Entered from Chicago Normal 
College and St. Patrick's Acad- 
emy. 

Chicago, Illinois. 









Joseph Allen Crowe, A.B. 
Doctor oj Laws. 
A9* 

Entered from St. Ignatius High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



George H. Curran 
Bachelor oj Laws. 
Entered from University of Chi- 
cago and Escanaba High School. 
Escanaba, Michigan. 



Joseph Callahan Dea 
Bachelor of Laws. 
$KA 

Entered from De Paul University 
and Senn High School. 
Chicaeo, 111. 



Joshua Paul D'Esposito, Jr. 
Bachelor oj Science. 
Entered from Loyola Academy, 
Class Secy. 3. Golf Team 1, 2, 
5, 4. Captain 2, 3. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Edna Devlin 

Bachelor oj Laws. 
Entered from University of To- 
ronto, Northwestern University 
and St. Catherine Collegiate In- 
stitute, St. Catherine, Ontario. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Joseph Anthony Dileo, B.S. 
Doctor of Jledtcine. 
*K 

Entered from St. John's College, 
and St. John's Hish School, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Glen Cove, Long Island, N. Y. 



The Beau Brummel of Loyola's 

faculty, MR. SEMRAD. 



Page forty-six 



o 



y o 



A 



N 



Hilton Louis Doeringsfeld 
Doctor of Medicine, 
AHE, *Bn 

Entered from iMarquette Univer- 
sity and Fennimore High School. 
Fennimore, Wisconsin. 



John Joseph Doherty 
Bachelor of Laws. 
AG* 

Entered from De La Salle Insti- 
tute. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Neill J. Doherty 
Bachelor of Science 
*MX, $Bn 

Entered from McHenry 
School. 

McHenry. Illinois. 



Medicine 



High 



Martin Aloysius Dolan 

Bachelor oj Science in Medicine. 

Entered from Columbia College 

and Prairie duChien High School. 

West Prairie, Wisconsin. 



Eugene Vincent Donlan, A.B. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 

*Bn 

Entered from University ot Mich- 
igan and Clinton High School. 
Clinton, Iowa. 



Edward Joseph Dowling 
Bachelor of Arts. 
Bn, Blue Key 

Entered from Loyola Academy. 
Sodality 1, 2, Treas. 3, Ass't. 
Prefect 4. Loyola News Staff 2. 
Senior Editor Loyolan 4. Ex- 
change Editor Loyola Quarterly 
4. Intercollegiate Debating Team 
4. Varsity Track Team 4. Col- 
lege Bookstore 2, 3, Mgr. 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 




Helen Marie Downey 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Entered from Chicago Normal 
College, St. Xavier College and 
Academy of Our Lady. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



oseph Stephen Drabanski 
Bachelor oj Science in Medicine. 

APa 

Entered from University of Chi- 
cago, and Weber High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Philip Charles Dunne 
Bachelor oj Laws. 
Entered from St. Ignatius High 
School. Sodality 1, 2. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Margaret Durso 
Bachelor of Science. 
Entered from Chicago Normal 
College and Waller High School. 
Choral Society, and Sock and 
Buskin Club. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



John Joseph Dwyer, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
nKE, XP, TOZ 

Entered from St. Ignatius High 
School. Class President 1. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Robert E. Elliot 

Bachelor oj Science in Medicine. 

Entered from De Paul University, 
Lewis Institute and Marshall 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



MR. SCHMITT stands staring studious- 
ly at "sumpin." 




Page forty-seven 



o l o y o 



A N 



Martin Joseph Emili, 
Bachelor oj Arts. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High 
School. Sodality 1, 2, 3. 4. In- 
tramural Basketball, 2, 3, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Nathan Flaxman, B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
Entered from Crane Junior Col- 
lege and Marshall High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Mae Agnes Flynn 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Charles Joseph Foley. B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 

*Bn 

Entered from Notre Dame Uni- 
versity and Waukegan High 
School. 

Waukegan, Illinois. 



William Henry Froembgen 
Bachelor oj Laws. 
AHA 

Entered from St. John's Univer- 
sity and University of Chicago. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Herman John Fulco, A.B., Ph.B. 
Bachelor oj Science in Medicine. 
IMS 

Entered from Fordham Univer- 
sity, University of California, and 
Loyola High School, Los Angeles. 
Los Angeles, California. 





James Griffin Gallagher 

Bachelor oj Science In Medicine. 

nKE 

Entered from St. Viator College 
and St. Thomas High School, 
Rockford, Illinois. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Mary Margaret Ganey 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
Entered from Chicago Normal 
College and St. Gabriel's High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Joseph Paul Gardzielewski, B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
Entered from Lewis Institute and 
Harrison Technical High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Joseph Henry Garthe, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
*MX, *X 

Entered from Lovola Academv. 

Sodality 1, 2. Glee Club 1, 2. 

Evanston, Illinois. 



Virginia Marie Gill 
Bachelor oj Arts. 

Entered from Chicago Normal 
College, University of Wisconsin 
and Providence Academy. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Frederick William Gillig, B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
Entered from Heidelberg Univer- 
sity, Ohio State Universitv and 
Melmore, Ohio, High School 
Melmore, Ohio. 



How much a pint, MR. SCHMEING? 



Page jorly-eighl 



LOYOLA 



James Douglas Glynn 

Bachelor of Science in Medicine. 
Entered from Marquette Univer- 
sity, University ot Chicago, Lewis 
Institute and Mora, Minn., High 
School. 

Duluth, Minn. 



Max Harold Goby 
Bachelor of Laws. 
Entered from Northwestern Uni- 
versity, and New Haven Com- 
mercial High School. 

New Haven, Connecticut. 



Dagoberto Ernesto Gonzalez 
Bachelor of Science in Medicine. 
Entered from University of San 
Marcos, Lima, Peru, and Callao 
High School. 

Callao, Peru. 



Ben Ferson Gordon, B S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
3>AK 

Entered from Crane Junior Col- 
lege, and Marshall High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



David Bernard Gorman 
Bachelor oj Arts. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High 
School. Sodality 2, 3, 4. Foot- 
ball 1. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Howard Edwin Graham, A. B., B.S 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
4>Bn, Tivnen Ophthalmologics] 
Society. 

Entered from Marquette Univer- 
sity, St. Mary's College and St. 
Mary's High School, Kansas. 
Galesburg, Illinois. 




Agnes Catherine Griffin 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
Entered from Chicago Normal 
College and St. Gabriel High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Lillian Mary Griffin 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
Entered from Chicago Normal 
College and St. Gabriel High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Nellie Josephine Griffin 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
Entered from Chicago Normal 
College and St. Gabriel High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Rosemary Griffin 

Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
Entered from St. Mary's College, 
Notre Dame, Ind., De Paul Uni- 
versity and St. Mary's Academy. 
Chicaeo, Illinois. 



Carlo Albert Gualano 
Bachelor oj Science. 
Entered from Schurz High School 
Glee Club 5, 4. Choral Society 
3, 4. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



George Michael Gura 

Bachelor of Science in Medicine. 
Entered from St. Procopius Col- 
lege and St. Thomas Seminary, 
Hartford, Connecticut. 



MR. zabel, w?s it Shakespeare or 
Chaucer who wrote the Stein 
Song? 




Page forty-nine 



H 



O 



y O L A 



N 



John James Hackett 
Bachelor oj Science in Commerce. 

nrM 

Entered from St. Patrick Acade- 
my. Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4. Glee 
Club 2. 3, Bus. Mgr. 4. Choral 
Society 2, 3, Bus. Mgr. 4. Phi- 
losophy Club 3, 4. 

Chicago, Illinois. 

John Martin Hajduk 
Bachelor of Science in Medicine. 
Entered from St. Stanislaus High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Gerald Joseph Haley, B.S. 
Doctor oj Laws. 
AT*, *AA, AA* 

Entered from University of Illi- 
nois, School of Engineering and 
Parker High School. Class Vice- 
Pres. 4. 

Chicago, Illinois. 

Thomas Bernard Hart 
Bachelor oj Laws. 
AA* 

Entered from the Cathol'c Uni- 
versity of America and Ottawa 
Township High School. 
Ottawa, Illinois 

Henry Albert Hartman, Ph.G., 
B.S. 

Doclor of Jledictne. 
B*2, 4>X, HKE 

Tivnen Ophthalmological Society. 
Entered from Philadelphia Col- 
lege of Pharmacy. St. Joseph's 
College, and Bethlehem High 
School. 

Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. 

Robert James Harvey 
Certificate in Commerce. 
Entered from De La Salle Insti- 
tute. Class Vice-Pres. 4. Student 
Council Representative 5, 4. 
Chicauo, Illinois. 





Vernon Francis Hauser, B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
*K. nKE, AP, Seminar, Tivnen 
Ophthalmological Society. 
Entered from Michigan State 
College and St. Mary's High 
School. Class President 3, Secre- 
tary 4. 

Benton Harbor, Michigan. 

Charles Martin Hausman 

Bachelor oj Science in Medicine. 
Seminar. 

Entered from Lewis Institute and 
McKinley High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Edward John Healy 
Bachelor oj Arts. 
nAA, Bn, Blue Key. 
Entered from Loyola Academy. 
Loyolan Staff 2. Fraternity Edi- 
tor, 5, 4. Loyola News L 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Fred Joseph Hecht 

Bachelor oj Science in Commerce. 

nrM 

Entered from St. Ignatius High 
School. Band 2, 3, 4. Orchestra 
4. Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4. Glee 
Club 5, 4. Choral Society 3, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Helene Martha Himsel 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
Entered from Chicago Normal 
College and Northwest Division 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Maurice Michael Hoeltgren 
Bachelor oj Science in Medicine. 

*Bn 

Entered from University of Chi- 
cago, and Cathedral Hiah School, 
Duluth. 

Duluth, Minnesota. 



R. kerns 
exercise. 



Dean of freshman 



Pagefijli/ 



T H 



3 



O Y O L A N 



Albert A. Horn, B.S. 
Doctor oj haws. 

Entered from Northwestern Uni- 
versity, De Paul University and 
Tuley High School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



John Andrew Horne 
Bachelor oj Arts. 
LTAA 

Entered from Loyola Academy. 
Sodality 1, 2, 5, 4. Track 2, 5, 4. 
Cross Country 2, 5. 

Evanston, Illinois. 



Matthew Frederick Ignoffo 
Bachelor oj Science in Medicine. 
Seminar. 

Entered irom Crane College and 
Lane Technical High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Casimir Lucien Jakubowski 
Bachelor oj Science. 
Entered from Trinity High School 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Arthur Edward Johnson, A.B., 
LL.B. 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Entered from Carnegie Technical 
College. Chicago Kent College of 
Law and Sturgeon Bay High 
School. 

Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin. 



David Wesley Johnston, Jr., A.B. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 

z:x, 3>Bn 

Entered from College of the City 
of Detroit, University of Michi- 
gan and Southeastern High 
School. 

Detroit, Michigan. 




Dorothy Mary Kain 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
Entered from Chicago Normal 
College and the Academy of 
Our Lady. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Joseph Stephen Kearney 
Bachelor oj Science. 
Entered from Loyola Academy. 
Sodality 2, 5, 4. Student Council 
Secretary 2. Class President 5. 
Cross Country Team 2, 5; Capt. 2. 
Chairman Student Faculty Ban- 
quet 4. Track 4. 

Evanston, Illinois. 

Martin Joseph Kearns 
Bachelor oj Arts. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



John Joseph Kelly 
Bachelor oj Laws. 
AO<p 

Entered from De Paul University 
and St. Ignatius High School. 
Class President 1, 2. Student 
Councd President 5, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Marie A. Kelly 

Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
Entered from Northern Illinois 
State Normal College, and Michi- 
gan State Normal College. 
Gurnee, Illinois. 

Lawrence Edmond Kelsey 

Bachelor oj Science in Medicine 
KAL 

Entered from Butler University 
and Monterey High Schcol. 
Monterey, Indiana. 



Stalling again. It's all in the da 
work for AL MICHAELS. 




Page jijty-on e 



o 



y O L A 



Mary C. Kenny 

Diploma in Commerce. 

Entered from St. James High 

School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Margaret Avis King 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
Entered from Providence High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Earl Albert Kleinwachter, B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
*X 

Entered from University of Chi- 
cago and East Chicago High 
School. 

East Chicago, Indiana. 



Margaret Kleppel 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Entered from Providence High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



John Edward Klest 
Bachelor oj Arts. 

Entered from Harrison Technical 
Hkh School. Sodality 1, 2. 3, 
4. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. De- 
bating Society 1. 

Chicago, Illinois. 

Eugene Lewis Klimaszewski 
Bachelor oj Laws. 
Entered from Polish National 
Alliance College. 

Gary, Indiana. 





Gerald Joseph Kohne, Ph.G. 
Bachelor of Science In Medicine. 
4>X, AP, Tivnen Ophthalmologics! 
Society. 

Entered from Notre Dame Uni- 
versity and Decatur High School. 
Decatur, Indiana. 



Jerome Joseph Kozlowski 
Bachelor of Science in Commerce. 
Entered from St. Ignatius High 
School. Sodalitv 2, 3, 4. News 
Staff 2. Football 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Dramatics 3. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Milton R. Kukuk, B.S. 

Doctor oj Medicine. 

AP, Tivnen Ophthalmological 

Society. 

Entered from Toledo University 

and Scott High School, Toledo. 

Class Treasurer 2. 

Toledo, Ohio. 



Norbert Michael Latz, B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 

*Bn 

Entered from Conception College, 
Conception, Mo. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Frank M. Laurenzana, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
AAV 

Entered from John Marshall 
High School. Football 1, 2. Chair- 
man Dance Committee 2. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Irene M. Lawler 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Entered from Chicago Normal 
College, De Paul University and 
St. Mary's High School. 
Oak Park, Illinois. 



BROTHER ROSNER may well smile. 
This year is his 50th as a Jesuit. 



Page jijty-Uoo 



3 



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Richard H. Lawler 

Bachelor of Science in Jledicine. 
<S>X, AP, Tivnen Ophthalmologi- 
cal Society. 

Entered from University of Wis- 
consin and Universitv of Michi- 



Chi 



III), 



icago, Jllinois 



Thomas Emmett Leahy, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
Entered from Notre Dame Uni- 
versity and St. Ignatius High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Louis Lebovitz, B.S. 
Doctor of Jledicine. 
Entered irom Lewis Institute, 
Crane College and Englewood 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Bernice M. Lennon 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Entered from Providence High 
School and Chicago, Normal 
College. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Walter V. Lesniak 
Certificate in Commerce. 
Entered from Harrison Technica 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Frederick Lettvin 
Diploma in Commerce. 
Entered from University of De- 
troit and Northern High School, 
Detroit. 

Detroit, iMichigan. 




Herman Abraham Levy 

Bachelor of Science in Medicine. 

*AK 

Entered from Crane College and 

Tuley High School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Casimir Louis Libnoch, B.S. 
Doctor of Jledicine. 
Entered from De Paul University 
and Holy Trinity High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



John Anthony Loef, B.S. 
Doctor of Jledicine. 
Tivnen Ophthalmological Society. 
Entered from St. Ignatius High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Robert Edward Ludwig 
Bachelor of Arts. 

nAA 

Entered from LoYoIa Academv. 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4. Basketball 1. 
Golf Team 5, 4. 

Evanston, Illinois. 



Elmer Joseph Lukats 

Bachelor of Science of Jledicine. 
Entered from Notre Dame Uni- 
versity and Froehel High School, 
Gary. 

Gary, Indiana. 

Elsie Regina Lynch 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Entered from Chicago Normal 
College, University of Chicago 
and St. Xavier Academy. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Custodian of the steam and heat- 
brother klucken. 




Page fifty-three 



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Edward Patrick Madden, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
3>X, Seminar, Blue Key. 
Entered from Salida High School. 
Loyola Union 3, 4. 

Salida, Colorado. 



Joseph Michael Mahoney, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
<£X, Tivnen Ophthalmological 
Society. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Ralph Joseph Major 

Bachelor of Science in Medicine. 

#MX 

Entered from St. Ignatius High 

School, Chicago. 

Fanwood, New Jersey. 



Lawrence Thomas Manning 
Bachelor of Arts. 

Entered from Lovola Academy. 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4l 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Jerome Benedict Marciniak 
Bachelor of Science in Medicine. 
*X, AP 

Entered from Crane College, 
University of Chicago and Bowen 
Hi^h School. Class Vice-Presi- 
dent 2. 

Chicago, Illinois. 

Joseph Adam Marzano 
Bachelor of Arts. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High 
School. Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4. Band 
2, 3. Philosophy Club 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 





Joseph M. Marzano, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
IMS, IlKE 

Entered from Lewis Institute and 
St. Viator's Academy- Class 
President 4. Medical Guild 1, 2. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Takejiro Matsui, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
Seminar. 

Entered from Crane Colleg 
Stanford University. 

Sizuoka Ken, Japan. 



John Maza, A,B., B.S. 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Entered from Sorbonne College, 
Paris, the University of Barcelona 
and Barcelona High School. 
Barcelona, Spain. 



Marie Catherine McCann 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Entered from Chicago Normal 
College and St. James High 
School. 

Chicago. Illinois. 



Elinor Crescentia McCollom 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Entered from Chicago Normal 
College and St. Mary's High 
School. Sock and Buskin Club. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Marrion ThereseMcCcrrie 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Entered from Chicago Normal 
College and St. James High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



"This is good stuff! Get it?" 
fr. mahowald phil sopher par 
excellence. 



Page fifty -fo, 



l o y o 



A 



Donald James McEvoy 

Bachelor of Science in Commerce. 
Entered from St. Philip's High 
School. Sodality 1, 2. Loyola 
News 3, 4. Glee Club 3, 4. 
Chicago Illinois. 



Alexander James McGavick 
Bachelor of Arts. 
Entered from De Paul Academy 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Jessie V. McGeever, LL.B. 
Bachelor oj Philosophy.' 
Entered from St. Mary's High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Virgil Bernard McGowan 
Bachelor oj Laws. 
A 9* 

Entered from University of Illi- 
nois and Decatur High School. 
Decatur, Illinois. 



Harold Francis McGrath, B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
AP 

Entered from Mount Carmel 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Mary Ellen McGrath 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
Entered from Northwest Division 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 




Philip John McQuire, A.B. 

Bachelor of Science in Medicine, 
$X, Tivnen Ophthalmological So- 
ciety. 

Entered from the University of 
Toledo and Libby High School, 
Toledo. 

Toledo, Ohio. 



Anna Grace McHenry 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
Entered from Chicago Normal 
College, Columbia University and 
Calumet High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Malcolm Lamson McInnes, B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
SX, Tivnen Ophthalmological So- 
ciety. 

Entered from University of Mich- 
igan, Denison University, Toledo, 
University and Waite High 
School, Toledo. 

Toledo, Ohio. 

Nora Avelline McNicholas 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
Entered from Chicago Normal 
College and St. Gabriel's High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Emmett John Meagher 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Entered from Loyola Academy. 
Sodality 1, 2, Secretary 3, Prefect 
4. Class Vice-President 3. Phi- 
losophy Club 3, 4. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Michael Joseph Medvezky 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
Entered from Michigan State 
Normal College. Marquette Uni- 
versity and Sterling High School. 
Sterling, Michigan, 



A picture of FR. MERTZ. too. 
gods and little fishes " 




Page fijty-jivt 



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y O L A N 



James Vincent Meli 
Doctor of Medicine. 

Entered from University of Pitts- 
burgh, Marquette University and 
Charleroi High School. 

Charleroi, Pennsylvania. 



Francis Ford Melody 
Bachelor of Arts. 
Bn, Blue Key. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High 
School. Loyola News 1, 2, Alan- 
aging Editor 3, Editor in Chief 
5. Varsity Tennis Team 2, 3, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



James Vincent Menella, B.S- 
Doctor of Medicine. 
IMS, nKE 

Entered from Crane College and 
McKinley High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



William Edward Merwick 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Entered from Tilden Technical 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Peter Anthony Meyer 

Bachelor of Science in Commerce. 
Entered from St. Patrick's Aca- 
demy. Sodality 1, 2, 3,4. Phi- 
losophy Club 3, 4. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Margie Irene Miller 
Bachelor of Science. 
Entered from Fisk University and 
Ballard Normal School. 





James Leopold Milos, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 
Catholic Medical Guild. 
Entered from Royal Gymnasium, 
Susak, Jugoslavia. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



William Edward Moran 
Bachelor of Laws. 
Entered from St. Ignatius High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Leroy Frederick Morneau 
Doctor of Medicine. 
Entered from Marquette Uni- 
versity and Appleton High School 
Appleton, Wisconsin. 



Joseph Francis Moroney 
Bachelor of Arts. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High 
School. Sodality 2, 3, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Joseph Charles Murphy 

Bachelor of Science in Medicine. 
Entered from Marquette Uni- 
versity, Superior State Normal 
College and Duluth Cathedral 
High School. 

Duluth, Minneapolis. 



James Emmett Murtaugh 

Bachelor of Science in Medicine 

* X 

Entered from Loyola Academy. 



This (brother carrigan) is the 
man who takes our monev — and 



Page fifty-six 



T H 



L O y O L A N 



Hubert F. Nearv 

Diploma in Commerce. 
SAB 

Entered from Loyola Academy. 
Student Council 5, 4. Vice-Pres- 
ident Commerce Club 5. 
Chicago. Illinois. 



Gabriel Emery Obester, A.B. 
Bachelor oj Science in Medicine. 
*X 

Entered from University and 
Fordham High School. 



Michael Hayes O'Brien 

Bachelor oj Science in Commerce. 
*MX 

Entered from Loyola Academy. 
Highland Park, Illinois. 



E. C. O'Connor 

Doctor oj Jledicine. 
Entered from Marquette Uni- 
versity. . 

Appleton, Wisconsin. 



James Joseph O'Connor 
Doctor oj Jledicine . 
$X, AP, Tivnen Ophthalmologi- 
cal Society. 

Entered from Northwestern Uni- 
versity, and East Chicago High 
School. 

East Chicago, Indiana. 



Richard O'Connor 
Bachelor oj Science. 
nAA, Bn, Blue Key. 
Entered from Monticello, Indiana, 
High School. Loyola News 2. 
Loyolan 1, 2, Managing Editor 
5, Editor in Chief 4. Sock land 
Buskin Club, Business Manager 
2. 

Chicago, Illinois. 




Wilfred Takashi Ohta 

Bachelor oj Science in Jledicine. 
Entered from University of Ha- 
waii, and McKinley High School, 
Hawaii. 

Honolulu, Hawaii. 



James Rochford O'Leary 
Bachelor oj Laws. 
Entered from Crane College and 
Hibbard High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Ethel Anna O'Neill 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
Entered from Chicago Normal 
College and Visitation High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Alfred Joseph Ouellette, A.B., 
M.S. 
Doctor of Jledicine. 

nKE 

Entered from Catholic University 
of America and Duluth Cathedral 
High School. 

Duluth, Minneapolis. 



Frederick Alton Paradise, B.S. 
Doctor oj Jledicine. 
Entered from De Paul University. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Theodore Henry Pauli, B.S. 
Doctor of Jledicine. 
n<J>0, *X, AP, Tivnen Ophthal- 
mological Society. 
Entered from College of the City 
of Detroit, and St. Frederick's 
High School, Pontiac. 
Pontiac, Michigan. 



-FR. ienneman, the treasurer 
manages to get rid ot it. 




Page fifty-seven 



o 



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N 



Thomas Joseph Pekin, B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
AX, *BII, nKE 

Entered from De Paul University 
and De Paul Academy. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Anthony P. Perzia 

Bachelor oj Science in Jledicine. 
*X 

Entered from University of Flori- 
da and Hillsboro High School 
Tampa. 

Tampa, Florida. 



John E. Petcoff 

Bachelor oj Science in Medicine. 
<i>X, AP, Tivnen Ophthalmologi- 
cal Society. 

Entered from University of Tole- 
do, and Waite High School, 
Toledo. 

Toledo, Ohio. 



Marco Salvatore Petrone, B.S. 
Doctor oj Jledicine. 
IMS 

Entered from University of Chi- 
cago, Lewis Institute and Loyola 
Academy. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Kyran Vincent Phelan 
Bachelor oj Laws. 

Entered from St. Patrick's Acad- 
emy. 

Chicago, Illinois. 

Helen Marion Pidgeon 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
Entered from St. Mary's High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 





George Brazil Pimental, B.S. 
Doctor oj Jledicine. 
Entered from University of Ne- 
vada, and Fresno, Calif., High 
School. 

Fresno, California. 



Paul Mary Plunkett 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
AAI\ Blue Key. 

Entered from Loyola Academy. 
Class Treasurer 4. President In- 
ter-frat Council 3, 4. Student 
Initiative Committee 5, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Anthony Edward Polito 

Bachelor oj Science in Jledicine. 

IMS, *KE, Seminar. 

Entered from the University of 

Chicago and Englewood High 

School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Kenneth Fred Prefontaine, B.S. 
Doctor oj Jledicine. 

*Bn 

Entered from the University of 
Washington, Marquette Univer- 
sitv and West Hieh School, Green 
Bay. 

Green Bav, Wisconsin. 



John James Prendergast 

Bachelor oj Science in Jledicine. 
*X 

Entered from Regis College and 
Regis High School, Denver. 
Denver, Colorado. 



George Leonard Rand, B.S. 
Doctor oj Jledicine. 
4>AK 

Entered from Crane College and 
Englewood High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Trying to see how it feels to 
graduate, fr. kelley? 



Page jijty-cight 



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Paul Eugene Reed 
Bachelor of Science. 

Entered from Loyola Academy. 
Debating Club 2, 5. Lovolan 
Staff 2, 3. Glee Club 2. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Floyd Milton Reischling 
Bachelor oj Laws. 
ATO, <*>A<I> 

Entered from University of Mon- 
tana and Butte High School. 
Butte, Montana. 



Herman Renkoff 

Bachelor oj Science in 'Jledictne. 
3>AK, Seminar. 

Entered from College of the City 
of New York, Columbia Univer- 
sity and DeWitt Clinton High 
School. 

New York, New York. 



D'Artagan Rivera, B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
Entered from Dickinson College, 
Vanderbilt University and Baya- 
mon High School. 

Bavamon, Porto Rico. 



Stanley Wilberforce Robinson, 
B.S. 

Doctor oj Medicine. 
Tivnen Ophthalmological Society. 
Entered trom Hey worth School, 
Liverpool, England. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Vincent Arthur Roccisano 
Bachelor oj Science. 
Entered from St. Francis College 
and Brooklyn College Prep. Glee 
Club 5, 4. Choral Society 3, 4. 
Band 3, 4. 

Brooklyn, New York. 




g^L^ra |^K^M| 




George E. Rooney, B.S. 
Doctor oj Jledictne. 
Entered from Lewis Institute and 
Lane Technical High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



John Edward Rosich 

Bachelor oj Science in Commerce. 
Entered from St. Ignatius High 
School. Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4. Glee 
Club 3, 4. Band 3, 4. Varsitv 
Basketball 4. 

Chicago. Illinois. 



Armando Justin Rotandi 

Bachelor oj Science in Medicine. 
Entered from Lewis Institute and 
St. Ignatius High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



John Eugene Roszkowski 
Bachelor oj Laws. 
Entered from Polish National 
Alliance College. 



Gary, Indiana. 



John Russell, B.S. 

Master oj Science in Medicine. 
Seminar. 

Entered from Crane College and 
Lindblom High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Lawrence A. Russell, B.S. 
Doctor oj Jledictne. 
Entered from St. Ignatius High 
School. 

Cicero, Illinois. 



Here he is, the genial registrar, 



MR. STEGGERT. 




Page fijly-nine 



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30 LOYOLA 



N 



Raymond Lawrence Russomano 
Doctor of Medicine. 
Entered from Ford ham Universi- 
ty and Central High School, 
Newark. 

Newark, New Jersey. 



James Courtney Ryan 

Bachelor oj Science in Commerce. 

Entered from St. Bede Academy. 
Sodality 2, 5. Loyola n Staff 5- 
Student Athletic Manager 5, 4. 
Harmon, Illinois. 



Stanley George Saber 
Bachelor oj Laws. 
Entered from Crane College, De 
Paul University and Harrison 
Technical High School. 
Cicero, Illinois. 



Edward William Sachs, B.S. 
Bachelor oj Science in Medicine. 

<pBn. 

Entered from St. Xavier's Uni- 
versity, University of Dayton 
and University of Dayton High 
School. 

Dayton, Ohio. 



Frank John Saletta, B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
IMS 

Entered from Lindblom High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Chester August Samlow, B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
Entered from Crane College and 
Lane Technical High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 





AfellA 




Arthur Samuels 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
<*>AE 

Entered from Crane College, 
Marquette University and Medill 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Manning Ira Sankstone 

Bachelor oj Science in Medicine 
Entered from Northwestern Uni 
versity and Senn High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Joseph Bernard Santucci 
Bachelor oj Laws. 
SN* 

Entered from St. Ignatius High 
School. Class Vice-President 2. 
Loyola News 2, 3. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Pera Paul Sarmas, B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
Entered from the American Uni- 
versity of Beirut, Syria, and 
Memorial High School, Tabriz, 
Persia. 

Tabriz, Persia. 



Carl John Scheribel 

Bachelor oj Science in Medicine. 
IlKE, Seminar. 

Entered from Crane College and 
Lake View High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Paul Joseph Schneider 
Doctor oj Medicine. 

<pBn 

Entered from Des Moines Uni- 
versity, Marquette University, 
St. Mary's College, Winona, Minn, 
and Adams High School. 
Adams, Minnesota. 



He doesn't live here and he doesn't 
teach here but fr. lord is almost 
a part of Loyola. 



Page sixty 



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John P. Schommer 

Bachelor oj Science in Commerce. 

nrM 

Entered from Chaminade Acade- 
my, St. Louis. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Benjamin Edward Schwarcz 
Bachelor oj Science in Medicine. 
4>AK, Seminar. 

Entered from Crane College and 
Crane High School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Joseph Settino, B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
A<t>A, 4>X 

Entered from University of Pitts- 
burgh, Marquette University and 
Sharpsburg High School. 

Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania. 



Fred Richard Sextro 
Bachelor of Science in Commerce . 
Entered from Lovola Academv. 
Varsity Football 2, 3, 4. Basket- 
ball 2, 3, 4. Golf team 2, 3. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Richard Patrick Shanahan 
Bachelor oj Arts. 

Anr 

Entered from Quigley Prep. 
Seminarv. Sodalitv 1, 2, 5, 4. 
Lovola News 1, 2. Football 1, 2, 
5,4. Basketball 1. Golf Team 
1, 2, 3, 4. Tennis team 2, 5. 
Glee Club 2. 

Chicago, Illinois. 

H. L. Shapiro. A.B., B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
<t>AK 

Entered from Hiram College, and 
Leipsic, Ohio, High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 




Leo Benjamin Sheehan 

Bachelor oj Science in Commerce. 
Entered from University of Chi- 
cago and .Mount Carmel High 
School. Loyola News 2, Busi- 
ness Manager 3, Campus Editor 
4. Assistant Manager Intramural 
Sports 5, 4. Glee Club 3. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Louis Julius Simbalmos 
Bachelor of Laws. 
2IIK 

Entered from De Paul University 
and Falling Spring High School, 
West Virginia. 

East Chicago, Indiana. 



Herbert James Simon, A.B. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
Entered from University of Col- 
orado, and East Denver High 
School. 

Denver, Colorado. 



John Joseph Simonaitis, B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
Entered from St. John's High 
School, New York City. 
New York, New York. 



Charles Joseph Smalley, B.S.M. 
Master oj Science in Medicine. 
Entered from De La Salle Insti 
tute. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Thomas Patrick Smith 

Bachelor oj Science in Commerce. 

Entered from Aquinas High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



"There he is!" fr. schulte. 




Page sixty-one 



LOYOLA 



Eva C. Soldinger 

Bachelor oj Philosophy . 

Entered from Crane College and 
Marshall High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Thomas Luke Spelman 
Bachelor oj Arts. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High 
School. Sodality 1, 2, 3,4. Loyola 
News 1, 2, 4. Dramatic Editor 
Loyola Quarterly 4. Sock and 
Buskin Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 
3, 4. Debating Club 1, 2. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

William Blase Spiteri 

Bachelor oj Science in Medicine. 
IMS 

Entered from De La Salle Insti- 
tute. Class Treasurer 3. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Harry William Stauder 

Bachelor oj Science in Commerce. 
*MX 

Entered from Northwestern Uni- 
versity and Lane Technical High 
School. Glee Club 2, 3, 4. Loyo- 
la News 4. 

Chicago, Illinois. 

Donald V. Steger 
Bachelor of Laws. 
SN* 

Entered from St. Mary's College, 

Kansas, and Loyola Academy. 

Chicago, Illinois. 

Ben Charles Steinbrecher 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
*X 

Entered from Harrison Technical 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 





Clifford John Steinle 

Bachelor oj Science in Medicine. 
Entered from De Paul Academy. 
Sodality 1, 2. Loyola News 3. 
Medical Representative, Lovo- 
lan 4. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Frank Charles Sternasty, B.S. 
Master oj Science in Medicine. 
Seminar. 

Entered from Crane College and 
Lindblom High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Francis Edward Streysman, A.B., 
B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 

*Bn 

Entered from St. Ignatius High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Mary E. Sweeney 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
Entered from Chicago Normal 
College and Academy of Our 
Lady. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



John S. Sweetman 
Diploma in Commerce. 
Entered from Central Preparatory 
School. Commerce Club 1 , 2, 
3, 4. Student Council 2, 3, 4. 
President 2, 3. Secretary 4. Com- 
merce Representative, Loyolan 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Stanley* Dennis Swiontkowski, 
B.S. 

Doctor oj Medicine. 
Entered from University of Chi- 
cago, Notre Dame University 
and St. Stanislaus High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



R. SPALDING protested but we 
sot him anyhow. 



Page sixty-two 



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Francis Bernard Tabaka 

Bachelor oj Science in Medicine, 
Entered from De Paul University 
and Waller High School. In 
tramural Basketball 3, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Lillian Solomon Tar low, B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
N2<£, Tivnen Ophthalmological 
Society. 

Entered from Crane College and 
Tuley High School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Virginia S. Tarlow 

Bachelor oj Science in Medicine. 

N2$, Tivnen Ophthalmological 

Society. 

Entered from Crane College, 

University of Chicago and Tuley 

High School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 




-. 







Alvin M. Townley 
Diploma in Commerce. 
Entered from Crane College. 
Northwestern University and 
SneadSeminary. Commerce Club. 
Oneonta, Alabama. 



John Timothy Tracey 

Bachelor oj Science in Commera 

$MX 

Entered from Loyola Acaderm 

Sodality 1, 2. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Mary Silvia Tressel 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
Entered from Rhode Island Col- 
lege of Education, Carnegie In- 
stitute, and Rogers High School, 
Newport. 

Newport, Rhode Island. 



Robert John Thomson 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
IIAA, Bn, Blue Key. 
Entered from St. Patrick Acade- 
my. Loyolan 2, 5, 4. Athletic 
Editor 3. Business Manager 4. 
Loyola News 2. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Peter Joseph Timmons, B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 

*Bn 

Entered from St. Bonaventure 
College, and Ansonia High School 
Ansonia, Connecticut. 





Joseph Thomas Twohey 

Bachelor oj Science in Medicine 

<J>X 

Entered from St. Ignatius High 

School and University of Wiscon- 



Ch 



icago, 



Illii 



Anton ine O'Brien Uling 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 
Entered from Northern Illinois 
State Normal School, and St. 
Vincent's Academy, Dubuque. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Joseph John Tovarek, B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
Entered from Morton 
School. 

Berwvn. 



Hish 





The difference between an electron 
and a proton is — you tell 'em 
FR. FROEBES. 



Francis Edward Urban 

Bachelor oj Science in Medicine. 
Entered from St. Mel High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 






Page sixty-three 



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LOYOLA 



Lor is Bertrand Vallely 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
Entered from St. Viator College 
and St. Viator Academy. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Anthony P. Vincenti 
Bachelor oj Science. 
Entered from Proviso Township 
High School. Choral Society 3, 
4. Glee Club 5, 4, Treasurer 4, 
Band 3, 4. Track 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Melrose Park, Illinois. 



Camillo Eugene Volini 

Bachelor oj Science in Medicine. 
IMS 

Entered from Northwestern Mili- 
tary and Naval Academy. Class 
President 4. Student Council 2. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



John Coleman Wall. B.S. 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
IIKE, AP, Tivnen Ophthalmologi- 
cal Society. 

Entered from University of Chi- 
cago, De Paul University, Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, and St. 
Ignatius High School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 

Ralph Curtis Wallin 

Entered from North Park College 
and North Park Academy. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



John Joseph Walsh 

Bachelor of Science in Medicim 

Entered from Campion Academy 

Chicago, Illinois. 




-* 




John Weinless 

Bachelor oj Science in Medicine. 
*AK 

Entered from New York Uni- 
versity, Fordham University and 
Stuyvesant High School, New 
York. 
New York City, New York. 



Ray L. Weir 

Doctor oj Medicine. 
Entered from University of North 
Dakota, Marquette University 
and Miller High School. 
Miller, South Dakota. 



John Dwyer White 
Bachelor oj Arts. 
nAA, Bn, Blue Key. 
Entered from Loyola Academy. 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4. Loyola Union 
Secretary 3, President 4. Class 
Vice-President 4. Loyola News 
1,2. Business Manager 3. Delia 
Strada Lecture Club 2, 3, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Joseph John Wiedemann 
Bachelor oj Laws. 
2N4> 

Entered from Elgin Junior Col- 
lege, St. Edward's University, and 
Elgin High School. 

Elgin, Illinois. 



Dion James Wilhelmi 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 
$MX 

Entered from St. Mary's College, 
and St. Mary's High School, 
Kansas. Sodalitv 5, 4. Glee 
Club 4. 

Joliet, Illinois. 

Harry Reginald Williams 
Doctor of Medicine. 
Entered from Brookfield High 
School. 

Brookfield, Illinois. 



DR. SWANISH disembarks at Balak- 
lava, in the Crimea. 



Page stxtt/-/ottr 



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Harry Raymond Wilson 

Bachelor oj Science in Medicine. 

<pBLT, IlKE, Seminar, Tivnen 

Ophthalmological. 

Entered from University of Santa 

Clara, and Santa Clara Prep. 

School. 

Santa Clara, California. 



Felix. Casimir Wiwskiwas 

Bachelor oj Science in Medicine, 
Entered from Crane Tumor Col- 
lege and Harrison Technical 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



John Stephen Witkowski 
Doctor oj Medicine. 
Entered from Canisius College 
and St. John High School. 
North Tonawanda, New York. 



Richard Noboru Yamane 

Bachelor oj Science in Medicine. 
Entered from St. Louis Universi- 
ty and St. Louis High School, 
Honolulu. 

Honolulu, Hawaii. 



Santa Marie Zampardi 
Bachelor oj Philosophy. 

ArE 

Entered from Chicago Normal 
College and St. Catherine Acade- 
my. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Anthony Zelazny 

Bachelor oj Science in Medicine. 
AP 

Entered from Thornton Town- 
ship High School. 

Harvev, Illinois. 




Edward Anton Zencka 

Bachelor oj Science in Medicine. 
AP 

Entered from Crane Junior Col- 
lege and Bowen High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Clarence Jacob Zurfli, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine. 

*Bn, nKE 

Entered from Lake View High 
School. 

Chicaso, Illinois. 



Eyes Tired? 

Well, gaze at this bit of pastoral 
bliss before strolling to the 
Graduate Nurses from Columbus 
Hospital. 



Kathryn Rosemarie Baltunis 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Immaculate Con- 
ception Academy, Dubuque. 
Dubuque, Iowa. 



Mildred Mary Boyer 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Our Lady of Angels 
Academy, Lyons, Iowa. 
Morrison, Illinois. 



Emma Dietzel 
Registered Nurse. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



MR. kuhinka took a trip somewhere, 
too. Here he is — there. 




Page sixty -jive 



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Catherine Cecelia Finnegan 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Lawler High School. 
Lawler, Iowa- 



Helen F. Harney 

Registered Nurse. 

Entered from Lincoln High 

School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Mary Rita Jardin 
Registered Nurse. 

Rock, Michigan. 



Elinor Agnes Jones 
Registered Nurse. 

Chicago, 111. 



Mary Gabrielle McGovern 
Registered Nurse. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Emma Dorothy Mucklinksy 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Kenosha High 
School. 

Kenosha, Wisconsin. 



I 




Josephine Finn Showalter 
Registered Nurse. 

Ashland, Kentucky. 



Edna Marie Vondenbosch 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Altamont 
munitv High School. 

Altamont, Illinois. 



Not So Many There 

But Mercy turns out quite a 
class. Here they go! 



Dorothy Rita Berry 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Loratto Academy. 
Sodality. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Marquerite Genevieve Buck 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from St. Paul High 
School. 
Sodality. 

' Odell, Illinois. 



Marian Josephine Butler 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Appleton 
School. 
Sodality. 

Appleton, Wisconsin. 



High 



An authority 
SIEDENBURG. 



on Sociology 



Page sixty -six 



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LOYOLA 



Anastasia M. Campion 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from St. Mary's Aca- 
demy. 

Camp Grove, Illinois. 



Ruth M. Carroll 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Stockton High 
School. 
Sodality. 

Stockton, Illinois. 



Mary Frances Conlin 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Immaculate Con- 
ception Academv. Oldenburn, 
Ind. 
Sodality. 

Arthur, Illinois. 



Alice Elizabeth Connor 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Galena High Scho 
Sodality. 

Galena, Illinois. 



Kathleen M. Cronin 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Fremont High 
School. 
Sodality. 

Fremont, Nebraska. 



Alice Mary Danmeyer 

Registered Nurse. 
Sodality. 

Chicago, Illinois. 




Edna Marie Dooley 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered trom St. Xavier Acad- 
emy. Ottawa, 111. 
Sodality. 

Ransom, Illinois. 



Rose Marie Doubek 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from De Paul University 
and Holy Ghost Academy. 
Sodality. 

Chicago. Illinois. 



Nora B. Dunn 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Wisconsin State 
Teachers College, and Hillsboro, 
Wisconsin, High School. 
Sodality. 
Richland Center, Wisconsin. 



Kathryn Eileen Farley 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Lemont High 
School. 
Sodality. 

Lemont, Illinois. 



Anna Evelyn Felix 
Registered Nurse. 
Sodality. 

Edgar, Wisconsin. 



Emma Frances Fenten 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Amboy High 
School. 
Sodality. 

Ambov, Illinois. 



And here's an authority on the 
theory of education — fr. SCHMIDT, 
Dean of the Graduate School. 




Page sixty-sewn 



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Mary Ann Fitzpatrick 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from St. Mary's College, 
Rosary College, and Bridgeport 
Township High School. 
Sodality. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Genevieve Margaret Foley 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from St. Patrick's High 
School, Delmar, la. 
Sodality. 

Delmar, Iowa. 



Ruth Isabel Frazer 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Baraboo, Wis. ; 
High School. 
Sodality. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Claire B. Haas 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Lidgerwood High 
School. 
Sodality. 

Lidgerwood, North Dakota. 



Mary Catherine Halleran 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Flower Technical 
High School. 
Sodality. 

Chicago, Illinois. 

Ruth Gertrude Holmquist 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Greer High School, 
Hoopeston, 111. 
Sodality. 

Hoopeston, Illinois. 





Mary Catherine Kane 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from St. Thomas Apostle 
High School. 
Sodality. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Celeste Anne Kirn 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Effingham, 111.. 
High School. 
Sodality. 

Sigel, Illinois. 



Virginia Eloise Knott 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Emmerson High 
School. 
Sodality. 

Garv, Indiana. 



Magdalene Kubeck. 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Whiting High 
School. 
Sodality. 

Whiting, Indiana. 



Longine Mabel Lapado 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Crane College and 
Harrison Technical High School. 
Sodality. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Evelyn Jeanne Lappin 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from St. Thomas High 
School. 
Sodality. 

Rockford, Illinois. 



Want to know something about 
Loyola? Ask ed rasche. 



Page sixty-eight 



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Marie E. Legris 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Notre Dame Ac 
emy, Bourbonnais, 111. 
Sociality. 

Ottawa, Ontario. 



Rachel A. Lingford 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Visitation 
Academy, Dubuque. 
Sodality. 

Stockton, Illinois 



Claudine Mahan 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from the Immaculatf 
High School. 
Sodality. 

Evanston, Illinois. 



Margaret Marie Matthews 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Yankton High 
School. 
Sodality. 

Yankton, So. Dakota. 



Mary Elizabeth McGarry 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from St. Xavier's 
Academy. 
Sodality. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Anne Frances McGovern 
■Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Visitation Hi^ 
School. 
Sodality. 

Chicago, Illinois. 




Kathryn V. McIntyre 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Manston High 
School. 
Sodality. 

Manston, Wisconsin. 



Margaret Mary' Meade 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Brooklyn High 
School. 
Sodality. 

Brooklyn, New York. 



Eleanor D. Miller 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Loretto Academy. 
Sodality. 

Grand Rapids, Michigan. 



Patricia Angela Morrisey 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Joliet Township 



High Scho 
Sodalitv. 



Joliet, Illinois. 



Margaret Helen Neiggeimann 
Registered Nurse. 
Sodality. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Muriel Adele O'Brien 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Calumet 
School. 
Sodality. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



High 



Boy wonders. cassaretto and 
CONLEY made the faculty. 




Page sixty-nine 



LOYOLA 



N 



Cecelia Theresa Oiinesorg 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Josephinum 
Academy. 
Sodality. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Rose Ann O'Leary 
Registered Nurse. 
Sodality. 

Coloma, Michig 



Margaret Joan Rammer 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Appelton High 
School. 
Sodality. 

Appleton, Wisconsin. 



Mary Beatrice Rooney 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Amboy High 
School. 
Sodality. 

Ambov, Illinois. 



Rosanne Rowan 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from St. Joseph 
Academy. 
Sodality. 

Dubuque, Iowa. 

Marie Louise Schilling 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from New Hampton 
High School. 
Sodality. 





Flora Genevieve |Schiner 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered irom Aberdeen 
School. 
Sodality. 

Aberdeen, So. Dakota. 



High 



Mae Schneller 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from IDollar Bay High 
School. 
Sodality. 

Dollar Bav, Michigan. 



Dorothy Ann Schroeder 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from St. Mary's High 
School. 
Sodality. 

West Point, Iowa. 



Bertha R. Schuman 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Loretto Academy. 
Sodality. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Catherine Jean Shaugnessy 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Westphalia High 
School. 
Sodality. 

Westphalia, Kansas. 



Louise M. Takes 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from St. Ma 
School. 
Sodality. 

Cascade, Iowa. 



High 



MR. COSTELLO, dramatic coach ex- 
traordinary to their majesties, the 
Lovola students. 



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Rosealyn Jean Toth 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Eveleth Normal 
College, and Eveleth High School. 
Sodality. 

Eveleth, Minnesota. 



Leona Joanne Vogel 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from El Paso Township 
High School. 
Sodality. 

El Paso, Illinois 



Stand By 

While we scoot to Oak Park and 
see what it has to ofrer. 



Alta Lenore Alford 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Blanchardville 
High School. 

Blanchardville, Wisconsin. 



Mary Imogene DeVet 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Northern State 
Normal School and Garden, 
Mich. High School. 

Fairport, Michigan. 



Margaret Helen Fallon 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Castleblayney 
High School, Ireland. 
Biackhon, County 
Cavan, Ireland. 




Jean Hariette Heffron 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from East Dubuque 
High School. 

East Dubuque, Iowa. 



Allegra Madelyn Heimerdinger 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Hillsboro High 
School Tampa, Fla. 

Freeport, Illinois. 



Hilda Marie Hoerschgen 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from St. Francis Borgi, 
High School. 

Washington, Missouri. 



Agnes Catherine Keating 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from St. Mary's High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Mary Mayme Kovalik 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Northern Illinois 
Teachers' College, and Thornton 
High School. 

Homewood, Illinois. 



Theresa Blossom Leveille 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from York Community 
High School. 

Elmhurst, Illinois. 



Dayton's gift to Loyola, MR, ABLE. 




Page seventy-one 



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Dorothy Mae Madison 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Antigo High 
School. 

Antiso, Wisconsin. 



Mary Catherine Mulqueen 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Providence High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Madelyn Alice Quirici 
Registered Nurse . 
Entered from Morton High 
School. 

Cicero, Illinois. 



Elizabeth Ann Scott 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from St. Catherine's 
High School. 

River Forest, Illinois. 



Alvera Rose Smith 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Schurz High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Kathleen Teresa Tuohy 
Registered Nurse. 

County Clare, Ireland. 





While We're Out Here 

We might as well stop a minute 
or two at St. Anne's. 



Nela G. Budreau 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Sacred Heart 
Academy. 

Fowler, Indiana. 



Sernadette Joan Burns 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Schurz High School. 
Ashkum, Illinois. 



Mary Ellen Collins 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from University of Illi- 
nois, and DeKalb High School. 
Champaign. Illinois. 



Julia Conole 
Registered Nurse. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Helen Loretta Dixon 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Ypsilanti Normal 
and St. Joseph's High School, 
Detroit. 

Riverside, Illinois. 



Page seventy -tu 



MAMIE MC GARRY, distributor of food 
to the academy brats and others, 
including the monogram men 
(also brats). 



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Mary Elizabeth Dobesh 

Registered Nurse. 

Entered from Bedford Road 

High School, Canada. 
Kenosven, Saskatchewan, Canada. 



Bernardine Dunning 
Registered Nurse. 



Helen Marie Eggsten 
Registered Nurse. 



Maria Eyelyn Fullan 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from San Pierre 
School. 

San Pierre, Indiana. 



Helen Patricia Gilchrist 
Registered Nurse. 



High 



Ruth Elizabeth Haessig 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Catholic Central 
High School, Fort Madison. 
For Madison, Iowa. 




Margaret Hallisy 
Registered Nurse. 



Margaret Agnes Hutton 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from De Kalb Normal 
School. 

Sterling, Illinois. 



Virginia Caroline Hyde 
Registered Nurse 

Entered from St. Patrick's High 
School for Girls. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Frances Marie Komisky 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from St. Michael's High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Dorothy Martha Mailloux 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Lisbon, N. Dakota 
High School. 

Verona, North Dakota. 



Frances Mikulec 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Austin High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Miss welderbach is Directress of 
Nurses at ST. anne's. 



FI 


I3»J 



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Bertha Neuroth 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from St. Joseph's High 
School. 

Granville, Iowa. 



Helen Margaret Scholtz 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Catholic Centr 
High School, Fort Madison. 
Fort Madison, Iowa. 



Susanna Helen Tabaka 
Registered Nurse 

Entered from Florence High 
School. 

Florence, Wisconsin. 



Helen Twohey 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Austin High School. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Veronica Williams 
Registered Nurse. 



Helen Mary Wilson 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Leavenworth High 
School. 

Leavenworth, Kansas. 

Margaret Mary Wirig 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from St. Joseph's High 
School, Rock Island. 

Rock Island, Illinois. 





Josephine Anne Zaborski 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Waukegan High 
School. 

Waukegan, Illinois. 



Looks Like We're Running 

A hospital corporation by this 
time, does'nt it? This just proves 
we have a good Medical Dept. 
Here's St. Elizabeth's. 



John Phillips Armstrong 
Registered Nurse. 

New York City. 



Eleanor Jean Block 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Mercy High Schc 
Chicago, Illinois. 



June Rita Claygone 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from St. Mary's High 
School, Windsor, Ontario, Can- 
ada. 

Detroit, Michigan. 



Margaret Lee Cook 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Gilliam, Mo., High 
School. 

Kansas City, Mo. 



Erna Kathryne Dart 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from St. Joseph's 
Academy, Green Bay. 

Green Bay, Wisconsin. 



FR. sellmeyer was an M. D. before 
he joined the Jesuit order. He 
wields a mean scalpel. 



Page seventy-Jo 



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Vada Marie Gildea 
Registered Nurse. 

Entered from Omaha Technical 
High School. 

Omaha, Nebraska. 



Helen Catherine Halligan 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from St. Angela Acade- 
my, Carroll, Iowa. 

Moorhead, Iowa. 



Christina Mathilda Haas 
Registered Nurse. 

Sparta, Wisconsin 



Carmel Marion Hinsch 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Superior Central 
High School. 

Superior, Wisconsin. 



Carolyne Anne Huss 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from New Ulm High 
School. 

New Ulm, Minnesota. 



Estelle Marie Kosacz 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from DePaul University 
and Argo Community High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Albert Cyril Leusen 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from St. Joseph's High 
School, Dubuque, Iowa. 
Waterloo, Iowa. 




Irene Ann Maresch 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Lincoln High 
School, Manitowoc. 

Manitowoc, Wisconsin. 



Mary Claire Massic 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Kingston High 
School. 

Kingston, Pennsylvania. 



William Miller 
Registered Nurse. 

Chicago. Illinois. 



Pauline Eleanore Nelson 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from St. Cloud Technical 
High School. 

St. Cloud, Minnesota. 



Bernice Margaret Nesler 
Registered Nurse. 

Dversville, Iowa. 



Margaret Frances Smarke 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Angel Guardian 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 

Emma Jean Ver Cauteren 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Green Bay Voca- 
tional School. 

Green Bay, Wisconsin. 



MR. HLJDSON, biolog 

experimentalist. 



instructor and 




Page seventy-five 



LOYOLA 



N 



arie Lucille Ver Cauteren 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Green Bay Voca- 
tional School. 

Green Bay, Wisconsin. 



Edna Mae Walters 
Registered Nurse. 

Terre Haute, Indiana. 



Elizabeth Cecilia Wendorf 
Registered Nurse. 

Melrose, Minnesota. 



Heavenly Daze 

We're going to run out of scenery 
here, in a minute. Maybe we can 
work up a trip to get more? 
Nope. Well, here's St. Bernard's. 



Hazel Charlotte Andersen 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from East Chicago High 
School. 

East Chicago, Indiana. 



Helen Elizabeth Conrad 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from St. Mary's 
Academy. 

Fairbury, Nebraska. 

ie Louise DeGuide 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Lindblom High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 





Louise Margaret Dickenson 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Calumet High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Marcella Anne Dudeck 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Bowen High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Mary Agnes Flynn 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Visitation High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Margaret Isabel Gilsinger 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Valparaiso Uni- 
versity, and Winnamac High 
School. 

Winnamac, Indiana. 



Marion Josephine Gurrister 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Harrison Technical 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Amelia Clementine Gutmann 
Registered Nurse. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Florence Mae Kennedy 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from St. Casimir 
Academy. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Miss o'meara and miss ryan look 
as though they had just collected 
a big fine. 



Page seventy-six 



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Helen Virginia Lampke 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from St. Mary's High 
School. 

Fort Wayne, Indiana. 



Mary Elizabeth Lehmann 

Entered from Washington High 
School, East Chicago. 

East Chicago, Illinois. 



Martha Justine Lynch 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from St. Joseph's High, 
Edina. 

Edina, Missouri. 



Alice Ruth McAllister 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Streator High 
School. 

Streator, Illinois. 



Margaret Mary Miller 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from St. Mary's 



Acade 



Emmetsburg, Iowa. 



Mary Elizabeth Quinlan 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Sacred Heart 
Academy. 

Pocahontas, Iowa. 



My Gracious! 

Looks as though we were ap- 
proaching the end of the line. 




Cecilia Ann Rivera 
Registered Nurse, 
Entered from Sacred Heart 
Academy. 

Pocahontas, Iowa. 



Carroll Ethelbert Russell 
Registered Nurse. 

Entered from Our Lady of 
Lourdes High School, Marinette. 
Marinette, Wisconsin. 



Clara Leona Schraeder 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Manson High 
School. 

Manson, Iowa. 



Mary Agatha Schwartz 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from St. Mary's High 



School. 



Chicago, Illinois. 



Mary Agnes Sheehan 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Mercy Academy, 
Ireland. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



Gertrude Celeste Stanton 
Registered Nurse. 
Entered from Visitation High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois. 



And That's That 
By golly. 



We didn't mean to omit so many of 
the faculty. Here's their building. 
The others are inside. 




Page seventy-seven 



"The first commencement was 
held June 29, 1871. No de- 
grees were conferred. The pro- 
gram consisting ol music and 
song and speeches on Chicago, 
Ireland, and Daniel O'Con- 
nell." 

Early Catalan. 




ARTS and SCIENCES 



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The 
ARTS STUDENT COUNCIL 



CHARLES BOYLE, 
President 




OFFICERS 

Charles Boyle President 

Fred Sextro Vice-President 

Daniel R. Murphy Secretary 

James Brennan Treasurer 





SEXTRO 
iMURPHY 
BRENNAN 



The Student Council rounded out its program by 
engaging some of the most prominent men in civic 
affairs, national interest, and religion as lecturers. 
Among those called upon to address the student 
body were such notables as Doctor Moorhead, 
Dr. Herman N. Bundesen, Mr. Sheed of the London 
Educational Guild, Father Keith, nationally 
famous lecturer on the Mass, James J. Kelly and 
Vachel Lindsay, famous poet and man of letters. 

Another distinct accomplishment accredited to 
the Student Association was the acknowledgment 
of the services of Mr. Sachs, Loyola's nationally 
famous basket ball coach, by the presentation 
of a player in effigy mounted upon a valuable 
desk set. Frank Conle3 7 was responsible for the 
work. 

Realizing that the promotion of true scholarship 
was within its province the Student Initiative 
Committee was reorganized under the leadership 
of Paul Plunkett. The success of the Student 
Association may well serve as a mirror of the 
development and intelligence of the student body. 

The Student Association, or the Campus Com- 



Pa^e eighty 



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Top Row: F. CONLEY, MEAGHER, MALLON, TOMCZAK. Front Row: WHITE, SEXTRO, 
BOYI.E, DOOLEY, D. R. MURPHY 



monwealth, is promised a happy iuture if the multiple achievements 
of this year's organization can be called upon to forecast for the 
future. The Student Association, apart from its more widely heralded 
duties of ironing out the many entanglements and difficulties which 
are inherent in the complex character of college life, and the establish- 
ment and preservation of amicable relations between students and 
faculty, has as the reason for its existence the development of a 
civic consciousness which should serve the students when they 
assume the duties of citizenship. 

A singular achievement of the 1929-30 Student Council was the 
adoption of the Hare system of preferential voting in all elections. 
The salient features of this system are: the defeat of factionalism 
and its attendant evils of quarreling, lust for power, and disharmony; 
the promotion of groups on the various boards, committees, and 
offices in proportion to their respective strengths; and the speeding- 
up of all elections. 



ACTIVITY REPRESENTATIVES 

F. Conley Senior Class John White Blue Key 

Robert Murphy Junior Class Robert Dooley Athletics 

Herbert Stanton . . . Sophomore Class Emmett Meagher Sodality 

Charles Mallon .... Freshman Class Anthony To.mczak Loyola News 



Page eighty-one 



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1930 LOYOLAN 




The 
CLASS OF 1930 

Lake Shore Campus 



FRANK M. CONLEV, 

President 






WHITE 
CONNELLY 
PLUNKETT 



OFFICERS 

Frank M. Conley President 

John D. White J' ice-President 

Timothy Connelly Secretary 

Paul M. Plunkett Treasurer 



In early September some sixty aspirants for the 
coveted sheepskins entered the last lap in the 
undergraduate race for honors, credits, education, 
or whatever college students do strive for. Since 
then the number of white hopes has decreased by 
only a few — the majority either succeeding in 
keeping a jump ahead of the professors and the 
dean or bearing up under the strain of caps and 
gowns, bachelor's theses, and senior privileges. 

In all, the last year climaxed a successful colle- 
giate career for the majority of the graduates. 
The number engaged in activities was unusually 
large, their scholastic standings were necessarily 
high, and only a very small minority had difficulty 
in persuading the librarians that overdue books on 
their cards were a credit to the institution. 



Paiie eighty-two 



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Group One 

Top Row: KEARNEY, SEXTRO, STAUDER, CONLEY, MEYER, ROSICH, HECHT, SMITH. Second Row: 

reed, burns, o'brien, huppert, bartlett, gualano, kozlovvski, monachino. Front Row: 
d'esposito, mc evoy, hackett, roccisano, wallin, cassaretto, chu, vincenti 





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Top Row: KEARNS, MORONEY> SHANAHAN, SPELMAN, TRACEY, CORRIGAN, WHITE. Third Row: 

HORNE, HEALY, THOMSON, LUDWIG, MANNING, MELODY, EVERDING. Second Row: MARZANO, 

MEAGHER, GORMAN, EMILL, CONNELLY, DOWLING, KILEY. Front Row: KLEST, CARROLL, SCHOMMER, 

CONLEY, BERENS, BOYLE, O'CONNOR 



Page eighty-three 



T H 



LOYOLA 




The 
CLASS OF 1931 

Lake Shore Campus 



ROBERT J. MURPHY 

President 



OFFICERS 

Robert Murphy President 

Walter Durkin V ire-President 

Anthony Tomczak Secretary 

Russell Higgins Treasurer 



TOMCZAK 
HIGGINS 



Soft, soothing, foot loosening music, the girl, 
shimmering lights, your crowd, nifty favors, Mass, 
Wags, and home. What a night! The Junior 
Prom. 

After several years of wanness for fear of being 
caught up by all-hearing profs and subjected to 
the torments of quizzing in an attempt to see 
whether you were "punching the bag" or giving 
facts it is only natural that a junior, when relating 
the accomplishments of his class, would not be 
inclined to be verbose or effusive — even when he 
had indisputable facts to back up his claims. 

Suffice it to say in narrating the work of the 
juniors that they put over a keen dance, lost a 
number of its members through the rampages of 
the White Elephant, scholarship, had a number of 
hot class meetings, and hope to return en masse 
next year to don the flowing monkey suits and 
stove plate hats relinquished at Commencement 
bv the Class of 1930. 



Page eighty-four 



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Z"op /fou'.- O'GRADY, WEST, MOLLOY, W. MITCHELL, WEIMER, MOOTER, EGAN, MC GIVERN, MILLER. 

Third Row: o'reilly, mc neil, mc clellan, waesco, reidy - , copp, grant, creagh, keevins. 

Second Row: durkin, mullaney, fogarty, quinn, healy, Curtis, kuehnle, radakovich. 

Front Row: GRAHAM, FRIZOL, trizna, waldovgel, mc COURT, J. MC CORMICK, CULLEN, brisch 




Top Row: DOOLEY, W. CAHILL, F. J. YOUNG, D. R. MURPHY, BECKER, CUNY, o'TOOLE, BRUUN, 

smythe. Second Row: c. powers, r. higgins, finan, j. smith, spalding, hallinan, lannon, 

S. MURPHY, LUKITSCH. Front Row: MC HUGH, R. NOLAN, STROBEL, R. MURPHY, TOMCZAK, R. 
RAFFERTY', QUANE, KEELEY' 



Page etiihty-fii'e 



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The 
CLASS OF 1932 



Lade Shore Cam 



HERBERT STANTON, 

President 




STADLER 

ARADO 

COLANGEI.O 



OFFICERS 

Herbert Stanton President 

Martin Stadler J' ice-President 

Frank Arado Secretary 

Anthony Colangelo 

Treasurer (First Semester) 

Joseph A. Walsh 

Treasurer (Second Semester) 



The collegiate movie opens on the porch ol the 
sorority house. A group of professional dancers 
goes through a series of contortions on the railings 
and then . . . the heroine skips out. Naturally, 
she is awfully sweet and says cute things like, 
"and how." 

It is always the poor sophomore who, in the 
throes of his new found glory as an upper classman, 
is the one deluded by the sweet young thing and 
in the resulting coma proceeds to hand over every- 
thing from his fraternity pin to his allowance to 
the afore-mentioned s. y. t. 

So we see that a poor soph has more than the 
ordinary burden to bear up under. He must "fit 
the type," as expected by the public, and besides 
put in his "thirty hours a week, or more, of study 
outside of class," as required by the dean. With 
all due fear ol offending anyone we are glad to say 
that verv few of the class are normal. 



Page eighty-six 



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Top Row: DWAN, DAEGLING, MALANOWSKI, OLECHOWSKI, MINNIS, BRUNDZA, SCRIBANO, FAHEY, 

pilut, modica, motier. Third Row: Fleming, goder, mc shane, matuszewski, kaveny, 
landeck, ;. guerin, rach, lee, t. kearns, mehmert, WALL, REIS. Second Row: CHWATAL, 

F. W. YOUNG, RASO, R. FITZSIMMONS, KRVAVICA, SRAMEK, GIARDINA, DIMICEI.I.I, PALERMO, WAGNER, 

MADDEN, DEHNERT. First Row: E. CAHILL, KARRASCH, SKEMBARE, NOTO, MASTRIANNI, CIAGLIA, 

STANTON, PARRILLI, o'HARE, WAJERT, CALI, J. FITZGERALD 




Top Row: o'neill, KAIN, GIBBONS, MUNGOVAN, STADLER, BRENNAN, ROWAN, schuhmann, REID, 
MC CARTHY, OHLHEISER, HAMMER, FEELEY, MONTANA, SCHULTZ, VACY, SALERNO, BUTZEN. Fourth 
Row: FARRELL, HINES, C. MANN, PODWIKA, FORS, JASINSKY, BAI.SA.MO, LANNAN, DRUGAY, DOWNEY, 
POYNTON, LANDRETH, d'eSPOSITO. Third Row: A. MbLLANEY, LAEMMAR, MANGOLD, DOHERTY, 
B. MC CORMICK, ALLEGRETTI, COLANGELO, R. MC CABE, CALKINS, G. MITCHELL, SCHUCK, MC DONNELL, 

mondo, alaimo. Second Row: girsch, F. arado, w. Fitzgerald, brown, mc gillen, mc cracken, 

M. OEHLBERG, BELL, J. RAFFERTY, BAK, J. WALSH, DALY, LENIHAN. Front Row: GUERRINI, C 
CAVANAUGH, E. CAREY, KNITTEL, ZWIKSTRA, MIGEY', SPACKMAN, F. LUDWIG, VONESH, PETERHANS, 

A. CLEARY 



Page eighty-stven 



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The 
CLASS OF 1933 

Lake Shore Campus 



CHARLES MALLON, 

J President 






CLARK 
SCHM1TZ 
FRANEY 



OFFICERS 

Charles Mallon President 

Thomas Clark V ice-President 

William Schmitz Secretary 

John Franey Treasurer 



Those of the Class of 1935, in spite of all efforts 
of themselves, have accomplished several things 
of importance during their short stay in the uni- 
versity- Following the usual custom they were 
the largest class yet ushered into the sanctum of 
the Cudahy Hall; several of its members distin- 
guished themselves as potential greats in the fields 
of scholarship, athletics, dramatics, music, foren- 
sics and social activities (being able to put a dance 
over, both socially and financially — quite an ac- 
complishment in these troubled times); they fidget- 
ed as much as any of the past sixty odd frosh 
classes which have remained behind in chapel or 
assembly while the "seniors passed out first"; and, 
as usual, possessed the herd psychology character- 
istic of all underlings not possessing an over great 
amount of intelligence or self control. 

The dean, and several of the more optimistic of 
the upper classmen, have hopes, however, of see- 
ing them develop into normal human beings who 
will be able to yell themselves hoarse on Saturday 
afternoons during the football season, think up 
creditable and original cuses for their cuts and 
abstain from dates with high school girls. 



Page eighty-eight 



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GROUP ONE 

Top Row: KOPACEK, MCINTOSH, DAUM, BENNAN, LEWIS, J. \V. H1GGINS, TIIOS. MURPHY, AVERILL, 
MC HALE, LOGMAN, Third Row: KIEFER, NORTON, D. CAVANAUGH, POKORNEY, SILVESTRI, RYBA, 
FEENEY, GORMICAN, SULLIVAN. Second Row: H. O'BRIEN, G. CAH1LL, TORDELLA, T. CLARK, PEN- 
DERGAST, BROPHY, ERWIN, F.HOGAN. Front Row: E. JOYCE, R. FITZGERALD, KEES, WM. I. MURPHY, 
|. DURKIN, LALLY, MC NICHOLAS, HELLWIG, NAPOLILLI. 




GROUP TWO 

Top Row: DOHEARTY', J. MORRISON, MC DONALD, ZINNGRABE, KOEPKE, RADKE, HARTFORD, DUNLAP, 
J. BURKE. Second Row: HERBERT, FAGAN, BURBACH, C. DWYER, T. LYNCH, MC AULIFFE, JACKSON, 
JUCIUS, J. JOYCE. Front Row: P. BARRON, JONUSKA, G. JOHNSON, WM. H. MURPHY, NICKELS, 
FAUL, BURG, GILL 



Page eight)/-: 



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GROUP THREE 
Top Row: LOFTUS, EDW. SZYMANSKI, UNGARO, WELCH, KOVALCHIK, DALET, POTUZNIK, HURLEY, 
MC VADY, LEWIS. Third Row: BLOCK, OBUCHOWSKI, G. GRIFFIN, ZIMMERMAN, BREEN, MC DERMOTT, 
CIRESE, J. MC CARTHY, BRONIARCZYK, HOWLAND. Second Row: T. O'BRIEN, JANSEN, RING, RZESZO- 
TARSKI, BACZYNSKL, MALICK, PHILIPP, GENGE, KERPEC. Front Row: NOVAK, MORAN, SZCZEPANSKI, 
WECHSLER, ELENTENY, MARCINKOWSKI, ERN. SZYMANSKI, MICHUDA, MARGANELLI 




GROUP FOUR 
Top Row: J. F. HIGGINS, FRISCH, T. WALSH, J. R. HIGGINS, ZARAZINSKI, GERLACH, H. MC GUIRE, 
KEANE, GOTTSCHALK, HUCKENPOEHLER, MASSUCCI. Third Row: W. CAREY, MOSES, SATORY', 
ACKER, P. QUINN, C. MALLON, FRANEY, MAMMOSER, JANOWSKI, J. C. MC DUFFIE, HENDERSON. 
Second Row: RAMMINGER, A. MORRISON, NOWOTARSKI, POKLENKOWSKI, KEENAN, POTEMPA. 
DY'DAK, BEUTLER, NIBBE, MOORE, REIF. Front Row: T. CASEY, STALZER, M. CARROLL, VAIL, 
RICKABY, C. JOHNSON, KRUSIEC, PALICA, MEENAN, J. P. MURPHY", E. CONNELLY 



Page ninety 



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GROUP FIVE 

Top Row: L. COUGHLIN, J. o' CONNOR, BRADY, HENRY, STAVINAGA, HEINEN, LORITZ, DULLAGHAN, 

CZALGOSZEWSKI, KIRBY. Second Ron:' PANZARELLA, KOENIG, DEVITT, RAUWOLF, RYAN, SCHO- 

WALTER, BROSNAN, J. POYNTON, NATALE. Front Row: T. SHANAHAN, KROPILDOWSKI, WICKHAM, 

BUKOWSKI, M. OEHLBERG, ZABORSKY', FIDLER, LORENTY. 




GROUP SIX 



Top Row: GORMAN, COLLINS, BAUER, MC NICHOLAS, RIVER, WIATRAK, T. ARADO, ELLARD, DOY'LE. 
Second Row: CALLAHAN, O'CONNOR, BOMBA, WIENCEK, SCHUESSLER, HAND, WALSH, MATAVORSKI. 
Front Row: GROARK, MAGHER, GRIFFIN, CLANCY', URWAN, SCHULER, CICHON 



Page ninety-one 



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The 
CLASS OF 1930 

Downtown College 



VIRGINIA BARKER 

President 



OFFICERS 

Virginia Barker President 

Dion J. Wilhelmi Vice-President 

Alice Burns Secretary 

Louis Vallely Treasurer 

Rosemary Griffin Social Chairman 



WILHELMI 
VALLELY 
GRIFFIN 



The Downtown Sociology School includes stud- 
ents whose interests are of a multiple nature. The 
greater number are teachers who seek credits 
toward a degree. Some are undergraduates; some 
are post-graduates. It is safe to say that a degree 
of one kind or another is the aim of all ; it is fairly 
safe to add that in the attainment of this degree 
the time limit is of a very flexible character. Pro- 
fessional advancement in the teaching profession 
involves certain requirements which allow much 
individual preference and when these requirements 
are satisfied the teacher is free to continue her 
studies at her leisure. Needless to say the con- 
tinuation character of the school is not conducive 
to concentrated class action. Students are engaged 
in professional work which makes extensive de- 
mands on time and energy; moreover, outside 
interest are of a very varied nature. The surprise 
is that the response to class demands should be so 
spontaneous and sincere. 

A Senior dinner in December and a Senior 
banquet in June represent the sum total of Senior 
group activities. And it is unanimously conceded 



Page ninety~two 



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^i Small Group of Sociology Students 

Top Row: E. C. MC COLLOM, M. KELLY, H. LIETSENSTOFER, K. CREAGH, D. o'dONNELL, I. LAWLER, 

M. GANEY, M. L. ALLFREED. Second Row: D. WILHELMI, M. DURSO, A. ULING, M. E. MC GRATH, 

MAE FLYNN, M. KING, S. MC GEEVER, L. B. VALLELY. Front Row: R. GRIFFIN, G. SHEN, V. BARKER, 

G. SMITH, SR. M. PANCRATIUS, M. BARRY, B. LENNON, A. BURNS 



that the smallness oi the figure is deplorable, the more so in that the 
former affair was manifestly a success and the attitude displayed was 
one of enthusiastic encouragement of similar functions. Circum- 
stances, however, including the omnipresent financial note, and the 
difficult time problem made further get-togethers a matter more for 
a mathematical strategist than a social committee. 

Despite these few meetings there has been developed within this 
class an admirable class spirit which centers in the fine class officers 
through whom the various class activities, few as they were, have 
been successfully accomplished. This class spirit has also fostered 
in each and every student a strong bond of friendship for one an- 
other which will not end with their days together in studies but will 
carry on far beyond the sphere of school life and bring them closer 
together as they tread on through life. 

If conditions permit of but little group action on the one hand, 
they are on the other hand conducive to a very noticeable and ad- 
mirable individual loyalty. Intermittent contact with Loyola's 
faculty breeds a realization of its superior pedagogy, and of the 
soundness, consistency and inspirational Catholicity of underlying 
principles of thought. The impress of Jesuit teaching is one which 
a student is indeed loath to lose. The Seniors of 1930 depart with 
every expression of appreciation and gratitude for the interest 
manifested in their welfare. 

Rosemary Griffin. 



Page ninety-three 



T H E 



19 3 



L O Y O L A N 




The 
SOCIAL SERVICE CLASS 



Downtown College 




AGNES VANDRIEL, 

Faculty Advisor 



Due to the organizing genius of its founder and the competence 
of its faculty Loyola School of Sociology, the first Catholic school of 
social work in this country, is today a prominent institution. In 
1913 the Reverend Frederic Siedenburg, S. J., organized the Loyola 
University Lecture Bureau. In 1914 the Bureau gave place to the 
School of Sociology which was formally established as a school of 
Loyola University. It has membership in the Association of Schools 
of Professional Social Work and in the North Central Association. 

The purpose of the School is thus stated : "The School of Sociology 
is a professional school for education in social work based on Christian 
principles. It aims to instruct in the fundamental principles upon 
which procedure and special technique are based. It does not offer 
short courses nor classes for specialists believing rather that a knowl- 
edge of fundamental principles which govern all human relationships, 
knowledge of the history of social relorm, of the laws under which 
we live, grounds one for the various types of social work. More 
intensive study in special fields is offered for advanced students, 
through individualized study programs." While under Catholic 
auspices, the School admits students of all beliefs. 

Social Service work opens a new and fruitful field to students. 
Without wishing to sound like a maudlin salesman one can truthfully 
say that its potentialities are almost unlimited. These potentialities 
are consequent upon a profession still in swaddling clothes. They 
promise satisfying futures to those who would share in the matura- 
tion of a worthy profession. The joys of research, of experiment, of 
creative work along the socio-medico, socio-pohtico, socio-religious, 



Page ninety-jour 



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Partial Group oj the Social Service Class 

Top Roto: R. CHISSEL, M. SCHELLY, R. GRIFFIN, M. CONWAY. Front Row: M. HUGHES, E. SCULLIN 
M. SAUTTER, V. CASSIDY 



socio-educational lines await the student who today enters pro- 
fessional social work. 

Social Service Work briefly defined is the business of professionally 
dispensing with private and community resources for social better- 
ment. In one sense all humanity-helping professions fall under this 
heading. But as so many of these professions are of established, 
definite character — medicine, nursing, teaching — they are not included 
under the conception of Social Service which is limited to the newer 
methods of effecting social harmony. This most recent step involves 
organized agencies which attempt to remedy social disorders by 
scientifically utilizing all educational, recreational, medical, economi- 
cal, religious facilities. The working principle in this profession is 
that individuals, families and even communities may be adjusted to 
more harmonious social relations through assistance of professional 
workers thoroughly grounded in the ways and means of helping 
people. 

There is certainly no more compensating work than that of helping 
people and no subject more deserving of study than that of how to 
help people. Granted that there is a need of danger signals for those 
students whose first startling contacts with intricate life problems 
leave them contused, unstable, and of little value to their profession. 
Yet one may prophesy that the young social worker who has mental 
poise which acceptance of Christian principles begets will personally 
profit by broadening experiences and at the same time generously 
contribute to the development of this serviceable profession. 

Rosemarv Griffin. 



Page ninety-five 



The Lake Shore campus, con- 
sisting of twenty-two acres, 
was purchased on March 9, 
1906, for $161,255. At pres- 
ent the land, without the im- 
provements, is valued in ex- 
cess of two and a half million 
dollars. 




LAW 



T H E 



19 3 



L O Y O L A N 




Top Row: mcaullife, cassidy. Front Row: c. collins, lear, Wiedemann 



The DAY LAW STUDENT COUNCIL 

Joseph Wiedemann President 

Daniel O'Rourke Senior Class President 

Martin Griffin Senior Class Representative 

Cornelius Collins Junior Class President 

Alfred D. Cassidy Junior Class Representative 

Neal McAuliffe Freshman Class President 

Matthew Lear Freshman Class Representative 

During the past year the Day Law Student Council has succeeded 
in establishing itself more permanently as a concrete organization at 
Loyola. It is the fourth year of its existence. The group consists of 
one elected representative from each of the three classes, the class 
president of each of the classes, and a president, elected by the entire 
student body. From this well distributed 
representation the Council is firmly sup- 
ported by the entire student body. 

The purpose of the council is not to 
attempt to determine the method in 
which the school shall be managed and 
the system which shall be adopted but 
rather a means by which a student may 
make a suggestion or declare his rights in 
a sensible and effective manner. The 
Student Council represents the students 
as a body politic and by performing its 
duties in a fair and conscientious manner 
since its inauguration has won the sup- 
port and confidence of the students as 
Wiedemann well as the faculty. 




Page ninety-eight 



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Top Row: J. O'CONNOR, J. WALDRON, T. CRANE, E. DALEY. Front Row: M. BARRON, J. KELLY, 
JOHN O'CONNOR, J. CURRY 



The 
NIGHT LAW STUDENT COUNCIL 

John J. Kelly President 

E. Daley Senior Class Representative 

J. Curry Junior Class Representative 

John Waldron Sophomore Class Representative 

S. Crane Freshman Class Representative 

The Student Council in the Night Law Department serves as a 
medium through which the entire student body is united in spite of 
the somewhat loose nature in which it is assembled as a class. The 
classes meet three nights a week throughout the scholastic season and 
student council meetings are called as frequently as necessary. 

One of the purposes of the Association 
is to serve as the medium through which 
the Loyola Union may function in the 
department. While the latter has direct 
representatives in the Night Law School, 
it is still somewhat hampered without 
the sanction of a strictly Night Law 
Organization. Hence when the Union 
endeavors to promote some project the 
Student Council immediately takes up 
its share of the work and something is 
actually accomplished. 

Mr. Kelly, the President for two con- 
secutive years, has lent his time and 
efforts unlimitedly throughout his terms. 




Page ninety-nine 



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The 
DAY LAW CLASS OF 1930 



DANIEL O'ROURKK 

President 



OFFICERS 

Daniel O'Rourke President 

Virgil McGowan I' ice-President 

Helen Newman Secretary 

Eleanor Waters Treasurer 

Alexander J. Brown Loyola Union 



The Seniors of the year of 1929-30, of the Day Law School, have 
enjoyed a most refulgent year under the able guidance of President of 
the Student Council, Joseph Wiedmann, President of the Senior 
Class, Daniel O'Rourke, Vice-President, Virgil McGowan, Secretary 
Helen Newman, Treasurer, Eleanor Waters. 

As is characteristic of them, the Seniors were always well repre- 
sented in every line of endeavor, social or athletic, of the University. 
To Football they contributed Griffin and 
Walsh; to Intramural Basketball, a most 
enviable quintet; to the Law Debating 
Society, Wiedmann, Hart, Brown, Solo- 
mon, and McGowan; and to the Loyola 
News, Waters and Santucci. 

The annual Stag given bv the Seniors 
for a "get acquainted, Freshman!" pur- 
pose, was so successful that the Freshmen 
now notoriously cut in on the conversa- 
tions of the Seniors and Juniors without 
their former blush of brazenness or em- 
barrassment. 

To end their days in college in glamor- 
mc gowan ous resplendence, the Seniors have been 




Page one hundred 



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Top Row: M. DALEY, G. CALOGER, E. KLIMOSZEWSKI, J. ROSZKOWSKI, W. MORAN, G. WALSH, M. 
GRIFFIN, R. MURPHY, WALSH. Second Row: S. FAGIN, W. DEA, V. MC GOWAN, T. HART, JOS. WIEDE- 
MANN, A. brown, E. davis, J. o'malley. Bottom Row: W. BASTA, P. DUNNE, H. NEWMAN 
D. O ROURKE, E. WATERS, J. SANTUCCI, L. SIMBALMUS 



honored this year with the management and care of the Senior Ball, 
the greatest social function of the University each year. 

With aught but tender regard and esteem for each and every pro- 
fessor of the Law School, and an affectionate warmth of loyalty for 
Dear Loyola, the Seniors leave its old walls of learning for the more 
ancient and obstinate walls of experience of that other school uni- 
versally known as the World, fully equipped to combat its avaricious- 
ness, and glory in its munificence. 

Helen Newman. 

Editor's Note: It seems a shame that with such a good subject 
to talk about and such a capable person as Miss Newman, one of the 
two pretty gifts of nature in the above picture, doing the talking that 
more wasn't said. In the first place, every little statement she made 
was as true as they make 'em. The Senior Day Law Class is honestly 
a credit to the institution. Just because there is a copper in the 
picture there is no reason to believe that he is there to maintain 
order. He's an ordinary student but he's awfully Irish so he had 
to be a copper part of the time. Another reason for which we would 
like to have had Miss Newman write more is this — we had to fill 
out the rest of the page. 



Page one hundred one 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 




The 
DAY LAW CLASS OF 1931 



CORNELIUS J. COLLINS, 
President 



OFFICERS 

Cornelius Collins President 

William Lowrey Vice-president 

Daniel J. Buckley Secretary 

Peter V. Fazio Treasurer 

Alfred J. Cassidy Student Council 

Edward F. Smith Loyola Union 



Under the active leadership of Cornelius J. 
Collins, the lunior Day Law Class completed a 
very successful year. The responsibility and bur- 
dens of the officers were placed upon the shoulders 
of men who earnestly worked for the benefit of 
the class. Alfred "Packey" Cassidy, represented 
our constitutional rights in the Student Council 
while Ed Smith served in the same capacity, but 
his duties were attached with the Loyola Union. 
Bill Lowrey was Corny's understudy and capably 
fulfilled the office of vice-president. 

We can only recall one incident when Lowrey 
and Cassidy failed to appear, and that was the 
time when they became "snow bound" in Johet, 
during the great blizzard. 

Dan Buckley brightened things up with his 
colorful character, beside carrying out his duties 
as Secretary. There he proved to be a big help 



PtiiJC one hundred two 



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Top Row: A. CROWLEY, A. FELDSTEIN, E. MAJEWSKI, D. BARRY, W. DEVINE, D. BUCKLEY, J. WHEALAN, 

j. Sullivan, A. cassidy. Second Row: L. pheres, e. smith, w. lowrey, f. mc donough, 

T. SULLIVAN, H. PRETH, J. SEARS. Front Row: W. LYNCH, T. NIEMIRA, II. WILHELM, C. COLLINS, 
P. FAZIO, P. CALOGER, I. BRANZEL 



to Pete Fazio, who had many difficulties in handling the financial 
resources which had been accumulated by the class. 

The class was represented on the football field by Captain Collins, 
who carried the team through a successful season and Bob Burke, 
one of the best half-backs ever produced on the Loyola gridiron. 

The right wing ol the Grand March of the Junior Prom was led 
by President Cornelius Collins. The class cooperated with the 
Union officials to the utmost in this as well as the other endeavors 
sponsored by that organization. The Jamboree, Senior Ball, the 
class dances, and events sponsored by the various organizations of 
the school, and especially those of the Downtown College, were 
supported to a great extent by members of the Junior Day Law Class. 

The vitality which characterized the class was evident at all times. 
Not alone in extra curricular activities, and extra scholastic ones but 
during class sessions was it noticeable. Being determined in pur- 
suing the profession they made the most of their opportunities for 
unlike students who attend college with only the vaguest of ideas 
as to their future occupation, Law students, on the whole, are 
seriously intent upon learning the "trade." 

Generally, the scholastic standing of the class was high and the 
students caused little or no trouble to the professors. In conclusion, 
the year passed very quickly and will be one which each member 
of the class will remember throughout his law career. 

Peter V. Fazio. 



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The 
DAY LAW CLASS OF 1932 



NEAL MCAUI.IFFE, 
President 



OFFICERS 

Neal McAuliffe President 

James C. Ryan T~ ice-President 

Jean M. Connell Secretary 

Chris J. Poppelreiter Treasurer 



CONNELL 
RYAN 



Behold the great freshmen! And the funny 
part of it is, we really are great. There's our size, 
for one thing. The class of 1953 is one of the 
largest freshman classes which ever infested these 
more or less spacious halls of learning. 

But it isn't quantity alone by which we prove 
our case. When you went to see Loyola win her 
football games last season, did you realize that 
five men from the Freshman Law class were on 
the team? There's Ray Nolan, who also shines 
as a heart-breaker, you know, Frank Murphy, 
John Unavitch, and the famous twins: Frank 
Lutsenkirchen and Chris Poppelreiter. Pop by 
the way, is also famous as being the strong man 
who played in every one of the games this past 
season. 

As to our loyalty — that elusive school spirit — 
you have only to remember the way we supported 
the great work of the Stadium Committee, and how 
we've turned out to attend the games and the 
meetings of various sorts. Sixty per cent of the 
class, too, are engaged in school activities. The 
Sock and Buskin Club knows our talent; the News 



Page one hundred jour 



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rJHTj^l 


„-*?Lft . > 1 11 ^ ik^ w!„ji 


(^ JJ 1 


1 




T » » 
» "ft 


1 f 1 


,1 t 


1 tflr J*/ m 

s. a v 

™ vr ■ ' w 


p^jHp jUKl' 


1 ^ ■' . 

r tw 


' 7 







2'f/7 if<?»: S. LUSTER, E. DROLET, C. POPPELREITER, M. LEAR, J. C. RYAN, F. LUTSENKIRCHEN, J. 
CULLEN, CRIGI, J. BARRETT, D. BROWN. Second Ron:' S. DELOVE, R. KELLY, R. SWEITZER, I. BENSON, 
C. BRADY, F. BARELLI, J. D. LISLE, L. CROWLEY, H. MALLOY, D. J. MURPHY. Front Row: L. BEOWN, 
J. EISEN, A. ROSKOWSKI, N. MCAULIFFE, J. CONNELL, J. SANFILLIPPO, J. UNAVITCH, J. JASIONEK, 
J. WAGNER, M. BROWN 



bears the impressions of our genii. Well, the editors think it's that, 
at any rate! And speaking of the News — we even help run it! Dan 
Murphy, freshman, is Sports Editor, and Larry Crowley is Managing 
Editor of the Downtown Campus. These same two, Dan and Larry, 
together with Sidney DeLove, another freshman, get the credit for 
organizing the Debate Club of the Law School — of which Mr. DeLove 
is president and Larry Crowley business manager. These three 
again — (we'll be calling them the musketeers next) — arranged with 
Station W C R W for the weekly College hour when Loyola takes the 
air. 

The officers we have chosen are well fitted to guide such a brilliant 
company. Neal McAuliffe, who took his predegal on the North Side, 
is our president. Our vice-president, James Courtney Ryan, manages 
the business of the football team. The secretary Jean Connell, one 
of the four girls in the class, took her pre-legal at the College of Saint 
Teresa, in Winona, Minnesota. Chris Poppelreiter is treasurer — we 
need say nothing more about him! Matthew Lear nobly represents 
us in the Student Council. 

Of our future we can say nothing more than — Judge what it will 
he bv this glance at our past. 

J. M. C. 



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Th 



te 



NIGHT LAW CLASS OF 1930 



JOSEPH BYRNES, 

President 





OFFICERS 

J. Byrnes President 

G. Haley J' ice-President 

E. Devlin Secretary-Treasurer 

E. Daley Rep. to Student Council 



The business of preparing a background of legal 
knowledge of sufficient depth to merit a sheepskin 
at the June Commencement kept the class keyed 
to a high pitch of scholastic effort. This was 
reflected in the favorable record of achievement 
set by the group, serving to advance the standards 
of the school a few more points in its march to a 
position of preeminence. The class average was 
outstanding. Over and above the work in the 
classroom, the members have been ardent sup- 
porters of the Loyola Union in all of the all- 
university functions that it has sponsored. This 
evidence of a genuine Loyola spirit was made in 
the face of the usual difficulties that beset those 
enrolled in a night school. Alive to the necessity 
of an active cooperation with all the departments 
of the university if the ideal of a united Loyola 
was to be realized the seniors lent themselves 
heartily to any constructive program in which 
they were asked to participate. This, in spite of 
the generally recognized fact that night school is 
hardly the place to look for the apogee of the 
social whirl commonly supposed to be a necessary 
concomitant to college life. 



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Top Row: E. DALEY, G. HALEY, J. KELLY, H. SCHLACKS, J. CONNERY', J. o'LEARY. First Row: J. BUCK- 
LEY', N. BARRON, J. BY'RNES, E. DEVLIN, J. CROWE, S. SABER, A. BURKE 



The roster of graduates is smaller than that of last year, numbering 
but thirteen which may be taken as a substantiation of the popular 
superstition attaching to that much maligned integer. However, 
there is some pronunciamento to the effect that quality is preferable 
to quantity, which rather slight vindication is amply sufficient for 
the needs of the present senior law class. 

Mr. Joseph Byrnes was chosen president at the annual class 
elections in September. In his freshman year Mr. Byrnes discharged 
the duties of class scribe, recording in the 1927 Loyolan the Class's 
activities during the preceding year, a function that all the present 
members of the class seemed extremely hesitant in fulfilling. Mr. 
John J. Kelly was president of the freshman class. He is now ready 
to reap the rewards of four years' study at Loyola. Mr. Howard F. 
Schlacks was president of the class in his sophmore year and Mr. 
Joseph Byrnes was vice-president. Miss Edna Devlin held the 
position of secretary-treasurer, a position which she has continued 
to fill in the succeeding years. Mr. Arthur Burke was elected presi- 
dent of the class last year, the junior year. Mr. James R. O'Leary 
was vice-president, and Miss Devlin retained the office of secretary- 
treasurer. The seniors this year elected Mr. Byrnes president, Mr. 
Gerald Haley vice-president, Miss Devlin secretary-treasurer, and 
Mr. E. Daley student representative. 

Francis Steinbrecher. 



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The 
NIGHT LAW CLASS OF 1931 



JOHN O CONNOR, 

President 



OFFICERS 

J. O'Connor President 

S. Blake Vice-President 

J. M.AHEK Secretary 

J. Curry Rep. to Student Council 



The supreme manner in which the president of the Night Law Class 
of 1931 led the way for his classmates was so admirable that we 
can't resist the temptation to give him a little send-off in this section 
of THE LOYOLAN. You know, presidents of classes in the Night 
Law School don't have much opportunity to rake in graft because 
there isn't anything in the way of funds, all members of the class 
being broke like the rest of us. Now by saying that he doesn't have 
any opportunity to rake in graft we are not trying to imply that other 
presidents of other classes actually do such low things but we do 
say that they have the opportunity. 

The vice-president of the class, Miss Susan Blake, was superb 
likewise in performing her duties. The duties of the vice-president 
of an Evening Law Class are about as heavy as those of the vice- 
president of the United States, except that the vice-president ol 
the United States has to serve as an object of talk on the part of 
William Rogers and such. Miss Blake would have been very won- 
derful as a class president but it seems that Mr. O'Connor didn't 
kick off. There was some talk for a while that she was plotting 
against him and had eyes on the presidency but that was just talk. 

lack Maher is the secretary whose duties, among others, is to 
write these little items which appear in the Yearbook. Now if we 
were to go ahead and sign lack's name to this article it might not 



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Top Row: O. CLONTZA, E. DALEY, S. BLAKE, J. O'CONNOR, R. HARTNETT. First Row: E. Mc GUIRE, 
E. MAHER. H. HOOPER, F. DE CASTRO, H. EISENSTEIN 



be the best thing in the world for Jack so we won't do it. Anyway 
we don't know Jack and he might be bigger'n us. 

Mr. Curry is the secretary of the class. He has been held down 
during the entire year by the worries of the financial administration of 
the class which has annual dues of ten cents which nobody but the 
most foolish pay. There being nobody in the class who is foolish, 
the results can with a little amount of reasoning be readily grasped. 

Why we should waste all this space, all this ink, all this time, all 
your time — not to mention the wear and tear on the type — on the 
class officers is strange. Perhaps the other members of the class are 
the really great ones. Perhaps they offered these offices to everyone 
in the class before they finally got these particular people to accept 
them. That may be wrong too. It's just an idea. Anyway, there 
is Ed Maguire. He made Lindbergh look like a back number when 
he came forth in some of the Sock and Buskin Club plays. Mr. 
Hartnett is a great man too. We haven't heard of anything he has 
done but he looks like a big strong he-man. (See the opposite page.) 
We sort of think that Mr. Hooper would like to be president of the 
class. He hopped into the center seat in the picture. That's all 
right though. Maybe he wants to be president next year and is 
just practicing up. The picture on the opposite page isn't the entire 
group. You see it was snapped just after one of the classes was dis- 
missed and most of the members couldn't wait to crash into print. 
Isn't that too bad. My, My, My, think what we would be missing 
if we were Doris Blakes trying to find a good character. Such a small 
group to choose from. But, Oh, what quality there is in this little 



group 



Page one hundred nine 



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The 
NIGHT LAW CLASS OF 1932 



JAMES C. O CONNOR 

President 



CLASS OFFICERS 

J. O'Connor President 

G. K. Fox J' ice-President 

H. O'Leary Secretary-Treasurer 

J. Waldron Rep. to Student Council 



Legal education in Chicago, where crooked 
politicians and racketeers seem to play such an 
important part in the dispensation of justice, is 
like the double edged sword. That, perhaps, is 
why the general public is so anxious for the Loyola 
Evening Law Class of 1932 to get into practice and 
right the many wrongs to which the city has been 
subjected. 

The officers in this particular class are men who 
have shown themselves entirely fit for their posi- 
tions. Several of them came from the Lake Shore 
Campus just a couple of years ago and brought 
with them some of that spirit with which that 
campus is exploding. 

Jim O'Connor, the class president, was, once 
upon a time, editor of THE LOYOLAN. That same 
year he was President of the Loyola Debating 
Club. He was recently elected to the Presidency 
of the Blue Key Honor Society, which office he 
will assume during the ensuing year. Maybe we 
shouldn't have mentioned anything about THE 
LOYOLAN. Jim's book was far more sensible 
than this one, though, so that explains matters. 



Page one hundred ten 



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Class of 1932 

Top Row: J. KEOBER, J. WALDRON, D. SULLIVAN, J. GRADY, W. JOHNSON, W. CALDWELL, P. EARLY, 

G. kelley. Second Row: A. kelly, a. sullivan, r. kilbride, c. lynch, j. kavanaugh, m. 

MASSMAN, V. HUBDKA. First Row: L. HIRSHORN, J. POWERS, T. ZAHLER, A. PETTINGER, J. o'CON- 
NOR, T. BYRNE, H. o'LEARY 



The Vice-president, Miss Fox, was an invaluable aid to Mr. 
O'Connor throughout the year, helping as she did, to overcome the 
many problems of the class. Wonder what they were? 

Mr. O'Leary served as Secretary and Treasurer during the year 
and fulfilled his duties quite admirably with the exception of an error 
in his balance sheet at the end of the year. The loss which ran well 
into ten figures, was charged to depreciation and forgotten. The 
Class of 1932 decided unanimously to put Mr. O'Leary into politics 
and run him for County Treasurer. He would be most efficient he 
assures us. 

Mr. Waldron came from the Lake Shore Campus where he was 
President of the Student Association during his senior year. Jack 
is the Sophomore Night Law representative to the Night Law 
Student Council this year and he ought to know how to handle it 
pretty well. 

This Class actually stands out. Look at the men in the picture 
across the page! Joe Grady, a man who knows what he thinks and 
says it! Ambrose Kelly, former Editor of the Loyola News and first 
creator of good journalism in a big way at Loyola! Tom Byrne, 
former Editor of THE LOYOLAN and a stickler when it comes to 
getting things done! John Powers, ripsnorting he-man from Oak 
Park, former big shot on the Loyola News and general good fellow! 
But we can't go on naming all of 'em. Thev're all great fellows. 



Page one hundred eleven 



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The 
NIGHT LAW CLASS OF 1933 



COSTELLO 
BURKE 



CLASS OFFICERS 

M. Barron President 

J. Costello J 'ice- President 

F. Burke Secretary-Treasurer 

S. Crane Rep. to Student Council 

Did you ever see a more attractive group of 
individuals than you see on the opposite page? 
Now that has a low-down implication. We didn't 
mean to say that the ones on this page were not 
attractive. They are handsome chaps, too. But 
anyway, these fellows are not going to Loyola's 
School of Law just because they are John Barry- 
mores. They seek legal education. 

One of the most outstanding men in this re- 
nowned group of serious minded youngsters is 
Jim Hammond. He has made a name for himself 
around Loyola ever since he came forth with a 
heart rending recital of "The Face on the Bar- 
room Floor" several years ago. First he acts as 
though he is a drunkard, then he becomes a bar- 
tender, then pretty soon he is a dead man. But 
then everybody again realizes that it is only Jim 
Hammond displaying his mental wares. It has 
been said that James Hammond makes the best 
drunkard of all the men ever to have gone on the 
stage. Oft the stage, Jim does not indulge ever. 
That's true! Just ask Jim. 

The serious minded looking chap at the top 
of this page is without doubt the most successful, 
the most popular, the most admired man who has 
ever attained to the presidency of the Freshman 
Class of 1935. He has led the class with enthu- 



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Top Row: D. ARGUELLES, J. HAMMOND, W. MULLADY, A. PETERKA, F. DONNELLY, E. O'CONNOR, 

J. CHAPMAN. Second Row: L. CLARK, A. HANKO, C. DERNBACH, J. McGUIRE, D. GOLDENY, J. TORREY, 

J. MAYER. First Row: R. TAGLIERI, J. COSTELLO, T. CAREY', M. BARRON, F. BURKE, G. GOLES. 



siastic vigor throughout the year with such punctiliousness that it is 
sometimes believed that he seeks the office for next year. Well, 
doesn't he deserve it? He's the best one they had this year. Ot 
course he has been aided to no small degree by the ever helping 
Costello and Burke, his understudies. Maybe we should call them 
henchmen — or bodyguards — or gunmen. It is reported that they 
perpetrated the Valentine's Day affair and also the Easter Sunday 
pop-gun party. It is well known that they always favored holidays 
and this is one of the reasons which caused the cops to lay the blame 
of the above-mentioned holiday affairs onto them. 

Many of the men in this class are old-timers at Loyola having done 
preparatory work in the Pre-legal department, a subsidiary of the 
Commerce Department, believe it or not. That's just one of the 
little things which you and others do not understand but what 
difference does it make. It's true, just the same. Ask Ripley. And 
it couldn't be wrong — its in print right here. 

It might be good to explain here how these classes are arranged. 
The Night Law Department requires four years work to receive 
degrees and, as pre-requisite work, demands a certain amount of 
college credits or the equivalent which can be taken in the pre-legal 
department of which there are three years. The men who attend the 
pre-legal department frequently change to commerce and men 
originally intending to get a degree in commerce change to the legal 
department. The two are closely related in some respects and the 
change can frequently be made in the early stages with very little 
difficulty. At all events, the boys get some education which is 
really quite valuable in the business world. 



Page one hundred thirlee n 



A woman was refused admis- 
sion to the college during the 
first year of its existence. 




MEDICINE 



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The 
CLASS OF 1930 

Medicine 



JOSEPH MARZANO 
President 





STREYSMAN 
PETRONE 



OFFICERS 

Joseph Marzano President 

Michael Petrone Vice-President 

Vernon Hauser Secretary 

Frank Streysman Treasurer 

George Rooney Class Representative 

Angelo Barberio Sergeant at Arms 



Don't these fellows look as if they could cut a 
mean slice? They're all doctors of the first degree 
now and whether or not they saw straight makes 
little difference, just so the patient doesn't find 
out — and the patient usually doesn't. The coroner 
does. 

Just the other day someone was saying some- 
thing about having an appendectomy performed 
and if these gentlemen who have just foxed the 
University out of a series of M.D.'s know how to 
do that, they deserve one of the hard earned sheep- 
skins. The rest of us ordinary individuals can't 
even pronounce the thing without hesitating. 
Maybe that's why they have such things as Arts 
colleges — to provide a place to learn how to pro- 
nounce what the docs do. Just a thought, though. 
Just a thought. 

Getting down to brass tacks, these men who 
manage to get degrees from the Loyola University 
School of Medicine have won the respect of the 
entire student body. The Medical School is gen- 
erally regarded as offering the most complete, the 
most thorough, and the hardest course in the Uni- 



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Top Row: CASCIATO, SETTINO, GORDON, SIMON, MURPHY, LEAHY, WEIR, COLLEGE, GRAHAM, WIL- 
LIAMS, FOLEY, CAREY, DOERINGSFELD, BELL, TOVAREK, PEKIN, RUSSELL. Second Row: ALEXANDER 
WITKOWSKI, CHUN, SCHNEIDER, SALETTA, BUI.FER, FLAXMAN, BARBERIO, MORNEAU, LIBNOCK* 
LOEF, DWYER, MENELLA, TARLOW, MELI. Front Row: RUSSOMANO, BORRUSO, ROONEY, MARZANO' 
DI LEO, CAMBRIDGE, O'CONNOR, PREFONTAINE, ANDRISEK, MC GRATH, RAND, STEINBRECHER, SAM" 
LOW, PIMENTAL, KUKUK, RIVERA 



versity. And any student In that department will vouch for it — at 
least, lor the matter of hardness. When they graduate out there 
they know their stuff! Here's to 'em! 



__-r^~ " ."- ~~ r ~z r~ _ _ — 








>l 


■fll ^V '^V^H^H ( ^b y 'A IPflksv Mil •■ 




U 




jg „ -. ~~-^j 





Top /foil': BARRIONUEVO, BOLLINGER, HAUSER, CRASSEROS, MILOS, AMOROSE, GARDZIELEWS, 

MC INNES, LEBOVITZ, PAULI, STREYSMAN. Front Row: LATZ, ZURFLI, LAURENZANA, RAND, SAMUELS, 

SLMONAITIS, SARMAS, MATSUI, KLEINWACHTER 



Page one hundred seventeen 



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The 
CLASS OF 1931 

Medicine 



RONALD LINDSAY 

President 






LEVY 
BUTTON 
OAWNE 



OFFICERS 

Ronald Lindsay President 

Herman Levy Vice-President 

Charles B. Gawne Secretary 

Miss Helen Button Treasurer 

Jack Konopa Class Representative 

Albert Hupa Editor 



Out of an original one hundred and forty mem- 
bers, one hundred and twenty remain to tell of the 
difficulties to be overcome by a medical student 
during the first three years. Ronald Lindsay, as 
president of the class is a capable leader and to- 
gether with the cooperation of the administration 
has instilled a spirit of loyalty to Loyola into the 
members of the Junior Class. 

The class consists of representatives from India, 
South America, The Philippines, and practically 
every state in the Union. That the study of 
medicine is not limited to men is evidenced bv 
the fact that there are four women in the class. 

This spring the class as a whole was earnestly 
engaged in preparation for the state and county 
examinations. It is the avowed purpose of every 
member to put forth his best effort that the 
Loyola Medical School may retain its high stand- 
ing as an institution of learning. 

J. K. 



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Top Row: CARNEY, KLAUS, KOHNE, WEIGEL, KUCHTA, MOLENGRAFT. Third Row: KRAMPS, 
GALLAGHER, BUNATA, ROCCO. Second Row: ZULEY, KONOPA, FAZIO, SACHS, GAWNE. Front 
Row: SPANGLER, WATERS, LAVIN, IZNER, BUTTON, MARQUARDT 

Rather than allow someone else to jump at conclusions we offer 
the following explanation as to why live men in the lower picture 
do not appear under hats as the others do. There is no breach of 
etiquette on the part of those who have them. They have colds. 
Of the other five, the two in the front row are merely trying to be 
collegiate and wouldn't wear hats even though it would help the 
appearance of the picture and the three in the upper row have not 
had enough ready cash to get a 1950 model. They're saving up to 
get derbies for next year, though. 




Top Row: MARCINIAK, DRABANSKI, ZEI.AZNY, LEBOLDT, CAR.MANDY, HERRING, WERTHMAN. 
Row: MC GREW, CASTALDO, ALLEGRETTI, PARENTI, MC CARTHY, ZENCKA 



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The 
CLASS OF 1932 

Jl edict ne 



CAMILLO VOL INI, 
President 





SOLOMON 
ROBERTS 
MANIKAS 



OFFICERS 

Camillo Volini President 

S. D. Solomon Vice-President 

J. Roberts Secretary 

A. J. Manikas Treasurer 

William Kroupa Class Representative 

Matthew G. Sanders Editor 

In Autumn 1928 one hundred and thirty aspiring 
sawbones entered the halls of the Loyola Medical 
School hopeful of emulating the ideal physician 
as portrayed in the Oath of Hippocrates. Quar- 
terly and semester exams took their toll and still 
others feeling that medicine was not the profession 
which their youthful dreams had led them to 
believe adapted themselves accordingly. 

The class, as freshmen, staged a cooperative 
dance with the Sophomore Class and the result 
was one of the most successful affairs in recent 
years at the medical school. 

With the beginning of the second year the class 
returned almost intact. Camilio Vohni, an ami- 
able leader, took over the duties of former presi- 
dent Larry Crowley who, believing that one should 
see Loyola first, had changed to the Law School. 

Classes are becoming more and more difficult. 
The junior year will be devoted in a large part to 
work in the clinic. The whole process is one which 
steadily rounds the future M. D. into an auto- 
maton who can carry on without sleep; consume 
the wares of the all-night lunch counter with im- 
punity; and assimilate lawsuits and knocks with 
composure. 



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Top Row: MICKEWICK, CORBOY, GLOSS, SANDERS, GARVEY, KUCHYNKA, FIERAMOSCA , ABRAHAM, 
DEANE, YONAN, GARRISON, URIST, WAWSZKOWICZ, BARONE. Second Row: SWASTEK, MILLER, 
HAJDUK, VANECKO, HOFRICHTER, MANELLI, DOY'LE, MITCHELL, KINDAR, EISENMAN, BROWNSTEIN, 
JELSOMINO, VOLINI. Front Row: CAFARO, SPITERI, PISZCZEK, STYBEL, MOSZCZENSKI, DERBY, 
CZYZEWSKI, MANIKAS, WODEK, COLII, ESPOSITO, ZIA, RE1DER, CAMPBELL, FISCHER. 




Top Row: DOHERTY, ENGLE, JAMES, IORIO, SULLIVAN, SHEEHAN, WALSH, MAJOR, GERBST, BERRY, 
MURTAUGH, MURPHY, SMYTH, KEATING, GROUT, MARSHALL, SMULLEN, KRISTAN. Second Row: 
SCHMIDT, URBAN, JESSER, SANDERS, TOWLE, MOXON, ROBERTS, CHRYANOWSKI, COYLE, CHRYANOWSKI, 
HETREED, FIORE, VINCENTI, NIGRO, SERIO, GOUGH, WOJCIK, HUGHES, MARKEY. Front Row: LINN, 
AJAMION, STEINLE, KRUSZKA, SIMONE, KRANKOWSKI, RAYMOND, CHAPMAN, MC VEY, RODGERS, 
FIORITO, BUTTICE, NATALE, BRESCIA, FETCHO, STEWART, GARVY. 



Page one hundred twenty-one 



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The 
CLASS OF 1933 

Medicine 



IOHN K. DURIiURG 

i President 



OFFICERS 

John R. Durburg President 

AnGELO VlNCENTI J' ice-President 

Reginald Queen an Secretary 

Samuel Saletta Treasurer 

Lawrence J. La Porte Editor 

Avon S. Walsh Class Representative 



A medical student's time is of great value to him, 
every minute being required for his studies. His 
recreations and social activities are few and far 
apart. Still these obstacles did not faze the high- 
spirited men in the freshman class. There may be 
found in the group a surprising number oi athletes 
who participate heavily in the sporting side of 
Loyola life not to mention those who take an active 
interest in the other extra-curricular undertakings. 
The success of the Loyola All-University Freshman 
Dance was made a success in no small way by the 
efforts of this Class of 1933. 

With an enrollment of one hundred and fifty the 
Freshman class began its career as the largest ever 
to enter Loyola's Medical School. Its members 
have congregated from all parts of the United 
States and various foreign countries ready to put 
their "noses to the grindstone." They have quick- 
ly grasped the idea that their "Rah Rah" high 
school days are over and that to get results they 
must pay the price. 



Page one hundred twenty-two 



T H 



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L A 




Top Row: HOWLIK, OZELKA, MENNITE, WALSH, MC GUIRE, KOBELN L K V, OLSZEWSKI, FELRELLr, 

mileski. Middle Row: llporello, cutrera, ferlita, souka, cargelosi, borkenhagen. 
ZARSECKI, OLIVIER!, moriority. Front Row: PEREZ, kudele, torrigo, alban, vincenti, stazio, 

SIRICA, AULETTA, SYSLO 




Top Row: FALVO, SARNEKI, SKUZINSKI, DIGATE, SPELLBERG, HALL, SINGER, MALIK KOZDROJ. 

Second Row: baloga, hrdina, cangelosi, schirippa, di graci, banner, splithoff, hemwaltz, 

borkenhagen, jupina. Front Row: RAUSA, mosca, schultz, tsalof, jasinski, thieda, palum- 

bo, saletta, vitacco, guerrieri 



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i'c»p Row: seeley, falk, anastasi, chobian, mironus, FLANDERS, PRESTON, REED, ANDREWS, 

CHAN, DURBURG, RAINES, NERI. Middle Row: LUKE, KOBULNECKY, ZIKMUND, MATTHIES, MAR- 
TINEZ, MCCARTHY, MYERS, GOVINE, FINLEY, BLACK, MOKROHAJSKY, VALENTINE. Front Row: 
LASKOWITZ, GLUECKAUF, MOORE, TEMPLETON, PROVENZANO, SCALA, DURANTE, RUOCCO, DI FIORE, 

BERNAUER 



Page one hundred twenty-three 



'The College Museum of Sci- 
ence and Natural History is 
the outstanding institution of 
its kind in the city." 

Early Catalog 




COMMERCE 



T H 



o y 



o 



A 



N 




The 
COMMERCE STUDENT COUNCIL 



EDWARD GLASSER 

President 



COUNCIL OFFICERS 

Edward Glasser President 

William J. Coughlin Vice-President 

Robert McGurn Secretary 

Hubert Neary Treasurer 

As the Pre-Legal department is merely a subsidiary oi the Com- 
merce it likewise has representatives in the Council. Glasser, as a 
matter of fact, is a second year Pre-Legal student himself. The fact 
that the group represents so many classes accounts for the large 
number of members. Class presidents are automatically included in 
the list as well as the individual class representatives who are elected 
directly. Thus, the association is truly representative of the students. 
A glance over the picture above will indicate several men who have 
gained eminence in all-university activity. The Commerce Depart- 
ment has in the past contributed much toward the development of 
spirit, not only by furnishing leaders but by furnishing general and 
popular support to a man. If other departments would take as active 
an interest as these men do, if other student councils would get the 
results that this one does, if other individuals would have half the 
enthusiasm as these, Loyola would be sitting pretty in every respect. 
Three years ago there was formed in the Commerce Department 
of the University a group of ambitious students called the Commerce 
Club. It was the only attempt ever made in the 
Commerce School to establish any sort of organiza- 
tion and at first there was much fear as to its suc- 
cess. But it weathered the rough knocks that it re- 
ceived shortly after the first few months of its exis- 
tence, when interest was lagging and the first glitter 
of experiment was gone, and it still exists today — 
but under another name. 

Last year it changed to what is called the Com- 
merce Student Council and in so doing became a 
part of the all-university organization. At that 
time the original entrance requirements were slightly 




Page one hundred twenty-six 



T H 



LOYOLA 



N 




Top Row: F. MC TIGUE, J. MC GROGAN, R. WALSH, H. SAVAGE, A. DEVOVY, E. BARRETT, D. KERWIN, 

\V. LENNON. Second Row: D. NASH, W. KILEY, J. LARDNER, T. COLE, F. DELANEY, J. SWEETMAN, 

P. BAGNUOLO. Front Row: R. MC GURN, H. NEARY', E. GLASSER. W. COUGHLIN, F. LETTVIN 

changed but the purpose is practically the same — the promotion of 
better understanding between faculty and students, the righting of 
any wrongs that may occur in the progress of scholastic activity, and 
the advancement of the social relations between students of the 
department. 

Various attempts have been made, with a great amount ol success, 
to foster social gatherings in the Downtown College for the benefit 
of these students and, that the entire university may take part, every- 
one is invited. These usually consist of a smoker supplemented by 
entertainment of some various kinds and followed by a dance. 

The Student Council sponsors, also, the Commerce Student Faculty 
Banquet, one of the most successful social affairs held in the Universi- 
ty. The one held during the present year is mentioned on page two 
hundred and seventy-five of this book. 

Much of the work this year was done chiefly through the efforts of 
the president of the group, Edward Glasser. Ed is at the present time 
completing the second year of his work at Loyola but in his short time 
here has gained a thorough knowledge of the conditions that exist 
not only in the Commerce Department and the Downtown College 
but in the entire University as well. 

The Commerce Student Council has, during its few years of exist- 
ence rendered more than one invaluable service to the University. 
It has tried to guide the activities of the Commerce department in 
such a way as to promote its general welfare. And no one will deny 
that it has been visited with success on everv venture. 



Page one hundred twenty-seven 



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The 
COMMERCE CLASSES OF 1930; 1931 



HUBERT NEARY, 

President, 1930 



CLASS OF 1930 

Hubert Neary President 

Robert J. Harvey J' ice-President 

John J. Sweetman Secretary 

Fredrick Lettvin Treasurer 

CLASS OF 1931 

John I. Lardner President 

Owen P. McGovern Vice-President 

James J. Scott Secretary 

Thomas F. Cole Treasurer 



Students from the Commerce Department prepare themselves 
for the business world with unexpected diligence. Most of them 
are employed during the day and have adopted this method of train- 
ing themselves for bigger and better things. No doubt they'll get 'em. 
The Commerce school was in the early stages of its existence 
at 28 North Franklin when these groups started as freshmen. To 
them the Department owes much credit for the instilling of school 
spirit into the newly formed department. 
For the last few years the various func- 
tions ot the University, from athletics to 
dramatics, has been supported most con- 
spicuously by Commerce students and 
this attitude of good will seems to extend 
to every member of the classes. We only 
hope that it continues. 

The graduating class has been for- 
tunate in securing the leadership of Hu- 
bert Neary, a man outstanding among 
those few who are able to put life into a 
group of men in such a way that some- 
thing really worth while can be accom- 
plished. 

The Junior Class, likewise, has as its 




JOHN I. LARDNER, 

President, 1931 



Page one hundred twenty-eight 



H 



O 



y O L A 




Senior Commerce 

Top Row: J. P. FISK, P. A. WOZLUTOVITZ, T. J. MEEHAN, A. M. TOWNLEY, J. MC DONALD, J. F. WALSH, 
S.J. (DEAN OF MEN). Front Row: M. MILLER, M. C. KENNY, H. F. NEARY, J. S. SWEETMAN, 

J. R. CHIANILLI. 



president a man who is quite capable of the position to which he has 
been elected. He has carried on the work of the class with careful at- 
tention throughout the year in perfect unison with the other officers. 




Third Year Commerce 

Top Row: G. M. DITTRICH, W. A. KERR, J. KOEHLER, O.' P. MC GOVERN, A. SNYDER, A. JOSTES' 
A. NORRIS. Front Row: J. I. LARDNER, R. L. HECHINCER, M.J«. KENNY, F. G. BEALE, T. F. COLE' 

J. J. SCOTT. 



Page one hundred twenty-nine 



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The 
COMMERCE CLASS OF 1932 



ROBERT J. HARVEY, 

President 



OFFICERS 

Robert J. Harvey President 

Andrew J. Devery Vice-President 

James P. Granahan Secretary 

Joseph P. Hayes Treasurer 



If a man has three stenographers, two messenger 
boys, a box of stale cigars, and a Jew's harp with 
a rough edge, how long will it take to build a 
building twelve stories high, about as narrow as 
the one just north of the Wrigley tower, and con- 
taining plate glass windows on all the upper floors 
and isinglass on the lower two, and with a cigar 
store Indian out in front? 

The precise subject matter covered by the 
members of the Class of 1932 in the Commerce 
Department is not definitely known but we feel 
that we can state here with a reasonable amount 
of certainty that they are not required to 
memorize answers to questions of the above type. 
Oi course, we don't want to be quoted as saying 
this but it has been rumored that one day in one 
of the classrooms one of the students asked one 
of the other students something of that nature and 
it was necessary to turn on the fire hose to quell 
the disturbance. That seems sort of juvenile 
though, so it probably never happened. 

Other things do happen down there though. 
For instance, the school being located as it is just 



Page one hundred thirty 



T H E 



19 3 



L O y O L A N 




Top Row: A. J. DEVERY, A. BRADY, S. J. VUKITS, J. MORAVEK, J. P. GRANAHAN, C. K. SCHMIDT. 
Front Row: G. L. BECKER, T. FABBRINI, M. J. LEAHY, J. VAN PELT, J. J. HAYES. 

a step or two from the loop and not much further from the Chicago 
River is ideally situated to provide the students with what are nearly 
as good as box seats for all the Communist meetings, downtown fires, 
and river drownings. The fact that the classes meet in the evening is an 
added attraction. There is always the possibility of a robbery 
turning up at the most unexpected moment and everyone knows 
that the most daring, the most sensational, the most interesting of 
all Chicago excitement takes place after the curfew bell rings. 

That brings on another matter. Is there a curfew bell in Chicago? 
And if there is where is it and when does it ring? Also, who rings 
it and do we all have to go to bed when it rings? These are only a 
few of the questions which are not answered in the 1932 Commerce 
Class of Loyola. There are thousands of others. 

The rumor that has been circulated rather promiscuously around 
the department since this book has appeared implying that several 
of the second year commerce men are blind is totally incorrect. 
The impression was gotten from the above picture which was taken 
the morning after one of those "previous nights." The boys are 
merely a little fatigued and quickly grasped this opportunity to 
catch up on sleep. The professors in the Commerce Department 
aren't the least considerate. They wouldn't think of allowing 
members of their class to take a little nap now and then while volumes 
upon volumes of deep thought are being made available. But any- 
wav, this will serve to knock that vile rumor on the head. 



Page one hundred thirty-one 



H 



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N 




The 
COMMERCE CLASS OF 1933 



ROBERT M. WALSH, 

President 




OFFICERS 

Robert M. Walsh President 

Kenneth F. Coleman .... rice-President 

Francis Delaney Secretary 

William Lennon Treasurer 





COLEMAN 
DELANEY 
LENNON 



A complete scoop on the play given by the 
members of the Class of 1933 in the Department 
of Commerce was secured by an ever alert (like 
on Rockne's teams) staff member of The 1950 
LOYOLAN. Inasmuch as it was impossible to 
secure the title of the play, or the names of the 
members of the class who took part in it, or what 
it was about, or where it was presented, or how 
much it cost to get it, or whether it was any good, 
it is practically impossible to say very much about 
it. But of course the writing of this book is merely 
one type of journalism and journalism doesn't 
need to be true because people will believe any- 
thing that gets into print anyway. There is one 
which is certain. The play wasn't any good and 
the entire audience would have walked out except 
that there wasn't any audience to speak of. But 
why should we go into detail on the matter? The 
play will not be presented again and the general 
public will not be interested in a review of a play 
that they will not get to see. 

The Freshman Class, as this one is more com- 
monly known, is made up for the most part of men 



Page one hundred Ihirly-lwo 



T H 



O 



y O L A 



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Top Row: A. SMITH, F. SHEVLIN, WM. LANNON, R. SUCH, S. R. RILEY, A. COOK, S. PANTOLA, 
J. MCORO.GAN, D. KAVANAUGH, E. STRUMIL, T. BROWN, J. FITZSI.MMONS, J. J. SMITH. Second Row: 
S. SWEENEY, S. JACKSON, E. CYGAN, A. FLEMING, R. WILSDON, T. DUNNE, R. BRAUN, J. BROST, 
F. DELANEY, J. COFFEY - , P. CORDES, J. MCLENNON, A. BECK. Front Ron': SPILKY, E. DOOLEY", 
P. WALSH, J. WILKIN, J. VAUGHN, W. KAZMEROWSKI, J. JONES, J. WHITE, W. BOY'CE, I. ROSLY'N, 
J. MESKIS, J. MURPHY 



who are employed during the day and seek knowledge after the cur- 
few bell. But the question again arises: is there a curfew bell? Then 
there are the accompanying matters of doubt which arise. 

But we must get back to that play. The members of the class being 
employed during the day at an average salary of two hundred and 
twelve dollars and fifty-four cents per week could well afford to make 
it a thing of beauty and a joy forever. However, it seems that the 
recent (and hackneyed) stock market crash had entirely too much 
effect on the avoirdupois of their benign purses, all of which led to 
results that you can guess as well as we. Lennon, the most gracious 
and esteemed master of the exchequer, intended to pull a fast one on 
the rest of the "clath" as he would call them if he lisped, which he 
doesn't, by gently skipping out for Mexico as soon as some of the 
money came rolling in but inasmuch as the money not only did not 
come in but was necessarily drawn out to cover the terrible overhead 
on the play thereby causing little red ink marks on the wrong side of 
the ledger in the bank, little Willie had to go to Bridewell to see a 
man about a big contract. 

No human being has an imagination terrible enough to think up 
all the above things, you say? No, that's what we say too. It was a 
dream that Bob Walsh had one day last week. No. He didn't write 
this. He had one of the stenographers in one of his offices in one of 
his branch factories do it. Now wait. Maybe we're thinking of 
another fellow. Perhaps this is about some other class. Well, what 
of it? 



Page one hundred tfurtu-tlirec 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 




The 
PRELEGAL CLASS OF 1930 



THOMAS NASH 
President 




OFFICERS 

Thomas Nash President 

Francis J. McTighe Vice-President 

Robert McGurn Secretary 

Daniel Nash Treasurer 




MC TIGHE 
MC GURN 
D. NASH 



The first business of the class during the scholas- 
tic year, 1929-1930, was, in genuine legal regard 
for precedents, the election of the class officers for 
the ensuing year. If there is never another meeting 
you can at least be certain that a convocation will 
be called to determine upon whose shoulders will 
devolve the task of leading the class members out 
of the welter of routine obligations, social as well 
as academic, unto the promised time of June, for 
some a continuation, for others an ending of their 
education, but for the Third Year Pre-legal it is 
in a strict sense a commencement, since with the 
approach of June they leave behind the anticipa- 
tory studies of pre-law and enter into the special- 
ized fields of their choice. 

The results of the election were a surprise to 
no one, the men chosen constituting the most able 
group in so far as executive ability stamps a man 
as superior. All that was required of the class 
members was an official cognizance of the merit of 
the men and the stamp of class approval in the 
form of ballots proclaiming the desirability of 
these men to function in the capacity of class 



Page one hundred thirty-Jour 



T H 



O Y O L A N 




Top Row: P. C. KILKELLY, A. SHIPKA, C. R. DUDAY, T. D. NASH, E. A. GLASSER, A. T- MULLI NS. Front 
Row: D. C. NASH, J. SYKORA, W. R. SCHUMACHER, G. A. SUFFEL, R. F. MCGURN, E. R. CARLTON, 

J. SCHLESS 



officers. The results favored Mr. Thomas Nash for president of the class. 
Mr. Francis J. McTighe was elected vice-president, with Mr. Robert 
McGurn secretary, and Mr. Daniel Nash treasurer. Although the 
duties of class officers at no time tend to become unduly exacting, 
nevertheless the recognition of the officers-elect as potential leaders of 
the class is a mark of signal honor requiring for its efficacy no real 
destination unto which they might lead the body to demonstrate the 
actual possession of the powers imputed to them. 

Our genial president, 'Tommy' Nash, has devoted himself to the 
duties of his office in a highly praiseworthy manner discharging them 
with expedition and precision. 'Introspective' McTighe stood ever 
ready to carry on in the absence of Nash, but such an ardent student 
is our 'Tommy' that McTighe was given but little opportunity to 
assume the reins of class government; however he was an able second 
of the president in all matters of school improvement. 

If you should now suddenly turn to page three hundred and sixty 
and glance over the names on the Blue Key list, lovely reader, you 
will find inserted the names of more than one man from this class. 
There you have proof more solid than words can tell of the actual 
significance of the work done during the year by members of this 
third year Pre-Legal class. Blue Key has a large and worthy repre- 
sentation from the Pre-Legal Department. 



Page one hundred thirty-Jive 



T H 



O y O L A 




The 
PRELEGAL CLASS OF 1931 



DANIEL HOWE 

President 



OFFICERS 

Daniel C. Howe President 

Edward Glasser V ice-President 

William J. Kiley Secretary 

David Kerwin Treasurer 



Brutus was taking a walk one day out on the 
streets of Rome when his old friend Julius Caesar 
came along. "Let's go into the temple and shoot 
some pool," suggested Brutus. "OK, Chief?" 

"OK, Chief," replied Caesar. And they stepped 
inside. 

After they had been playing for a short time 
and it was Caesar's turn to shoot, something oc- 
curred. Julius was leaning over the table getting 
ready to do a fancy backhand slice when Brutus 
dashed over to him, yanked out his dagger, and 
stabbed the great Caesar, saying "Sic semper 
tyranny." Caesar was deeply hurt and turning, 
looked up from the stairs upon which he was rolling 
down and cried "Et tu Brute" and Brutus replied 
"Et tu." 

And thus came the end to one of the world's 
greatest rulers. 

Daniel Howe is another of the world's great 
rulers. He has ruled the second year prelegal 
students with an iron will for the past year, firm 
in his convictions at all times, consistent in his 
commands, tired of his job, and bored with life in 
general, but forever inspiring to those who look to 
him as their model in virtue. 



Piiije one hundred thirty-six 



H E 



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Top Row: W. MALONEY, B. M. KINNEY, H. EDFORS, C. BERNSTEIN, S. J. FEGAN, A. POPE. Second 

Row: E. F. GARTLANT, F. J. ROACH, K. BRANNOCK, F. P. DOHEARTY, T. C. BAKER, E. D. O'REILLY. 

Front Row: M. W. DENKAL, A. P.. LASDON, E. A. GLASSER, D. KERWIN, J. L. MURPHY 



Ed Glasser crashed into office again here by means of his well 
organized political crew in the department but more so by his ability 
for leadership and accomplishment. He is president of the Commerce 
Student Council, a fact which you, dear reader, have already dis- 
covered unless it so happened that those pages where it is represented 
were accidentally stuck together when the pastepot upset or unless 
the reader previous to you didn't like Commerce Student Councils 
and yanked those pages from this trite little publication. 

Kiley and Kerwin wanted to throw a dance this year but it seems 
that the latter sprained his arm playing baseball with the Tribune's 
Training School for Kiddies. Inasmuch as Kiley was so anxious to 
throw the dance and had made so many plans for a big one it was 
suggested that Al Lasdon come to his assistance. 

Well, Al said that he had been brought up pretty well and that he 
was never allowed to throw things around so he didn't think that he 
would be the man for the job. So Kiley and his happy idea sort of 
took a back seat. But Kiley isn't the man to be stopped, once he 
makes up his mind to do a thing. As soon as it was made certain to 
him that there was no one in the entire class strong enough to throw 
a dance Kiley marched right over to the Sports Department of the 
Chicago Daily News and asks for Big Moose. It seems that Big 
Moose was out picking raspberries that afternoon so Howie said he 
could take care of the matter for Kiley. By this time Kiley was so 
disgusted with people in general, weak or strong, that he gritted his 
teeth, tore out to a dance hall, grabbed a couple of dances, swung 
them around his head and out the window they did go. NEXT! 



Page one hundred thirty-seven 



T H 



L O y O L A N 




The 
PRELEGAL CLASS OF 1932 



WILLIAM OOUGHUN 
President 



OFFICERS 

William J. Coughlin President 

Edward Barrett Vice-President 

Hugh Savage Secretary 

Peter Bagnuolo Treasurer 



BARRETT 

SAVAGE 

BAGNUOLO 



Up until April, 1930 Bill Coughlin acted as 
President of the first year Prelegal class but at 
that time was succeeded by the Vice-president, 
Ed Barrett, as Bill accepted a position substituting 
for Tom Mix in the Sells Floto Circus. Bill cannot 
ride a horse so he gets shot out of a cannon instead. 
A lot of the people are so busy watching the 
monkeys and feeding peanuts to the elephants 
that they don't know the difference anyway. His 
salary wasn't much so he took it out in pink 
lemonade. That was his first grave mistake, 
though, because three women (riders of white 
horses) brought him to court on the charges of 
non-support, recklessness with money, and general 
cruelty. His second grave mistake occurred when 
he tried to take the judge's mind off the subject 
by telling a joke. His Honor had heard the joke 
when a boy. 

Bill's going to make good, though. You can 
just see success written all over his face and its the 
first impression that always counts. He's just as 
good as retired now. In a few years he'll probably 
buv a new building or football team for Loyola. 



Pugc one hundred Ihirly-tight 



L O y O L A N 



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Top i?oci'.- J. J. SMITH, A. F. KUHLINEY, M. RUGIS, G. J. CULLINAN, T- E. GALLAGHER, A. QUINLAN, 
D. C. HOWE, W. J. KILEY, M. LEAHY, E. BETZ, J. RIORDAN. Third Row: A. M. NELSON, R. BEELER, 
C. E. GUZMAN, E. BETTS, F. DATER, J. SULLIVAN, J. J. HINDMAN, J. D. SMITH, G. H. WALLACE, E. J. 
KUKUSKI, S. FEGEN, A. R. LASDON. Second Row: M. ABERMAN, R. MOSS, H. SAVAGE, W. J. COUGHLIN, 
A. T. BROWN, P. BAGNUOLO, J. P. CAIRNS, O. SVOBODA, P. NOONAN, R. TRACY. Front Roit>: J. CRONE, 
R. JACKSON, D. BENOIT, N. BUTTIMER, P. LIPSCOMB, S. WILSON, C. ESSERMAN, W. J. BIEBAL 



People will point to him and say, "There's Bill Coughhn," just as if 
it were Lindbergh or someone equally as great. Pst. Bill, how about 
a fin 'til t'morrer? 

Hugh Savage learned his politics from his hid brother who once 
was President of the Freshman Class on the Lake Shore Campus. 
Gene was a gun when it came to getting votes. He seemed to find 
them around behind trees — just like mushrooms, in waste baskets, 
and — well, he actually seemed to make votes. Hugh is a different 
type of person, though. He has a gang working for him. Anybody 
that won't vote his way goes for a ride. 

This little group of yearlings did quite a bit for the University 
this year. Some of them flunked out.- Others paid their tuition. It 
has not been the intention of the class to accomplish great things as a 
class but rather as individuals. A chain is as strong as its weakest 
link, according to them, so every man has to do something for him- 
self — except in times of examination, of course. Then everybody 
helps everybody else. 



Page one hundred thirty-nine 



'Applicants for admission to 
the college must be ten years 
of age, must know how to 
read, write, and spell credit- 
ably, and should be able to do 
long division . . . It is recom- 
mended that pupils finish the 
sixth grade . . . before apply- 
ing for admission into college. 
Early Catalog. 




DENTISTRY 



o y 



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L A 




The 
CLASS OF 1930 

Dentistry 



GEORGE HABERLINE, 

President 





OFFICERS 

George Haberline President 

Paul Topel First J' ice-President 

John Lapka Second I' ice-President 

Isaac Keyser Secretary 

Frank Farrell Treasurer 

James Hodur Sergeant-al- Arms 

George Lauber 

Chairman, Executive Committee 



"We had just succeeded in extracting a bad 
tooth and I, in company with several of my class- 
mates was discussing the efficiency of gas as an an- 
aesthetic agent. 'Just for fun,' I said laughingly, 
'I'd like to take gas.' 

'All right, hop into the chair,' said one of the 
boys. And not without some misgivings I sat down 
and allowed my fellow students to place the nozzle 
over my face. 

For several moments there was nothing but a 
steady hum-m-m-m, that seemed to throb through 
my brain; everything seemed hazy; then suddenly 
there was a crash and with a start I opened my 
eyes on an amazing scene. About me were grouped 
my classmates and gradually it dawned on me 
that they were holding a meeting. 

Each of us held a round roll of paper under our 
arms. Upon examining it I found that I was a 
recognized Doctor of Dental Surgery. Four years 
had passed! Four years in a daze! Here I stood 
an accredited extractor of aching molars!" 



Page one hundred jorty-lwo 



T H E 



19 3 



L O y O L A N 



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2'op Row: HODUR, COLLEN, BAILENS, FARRELL, T. BRYAN, J. M. BRYAN, COLE. Second Row: CHARLES, 

BOWERSON, HILLENBRAND, BUCKNER, ABNER, BECHERER, BAJINOFF. Front Row: BUTLER, KEISER, 

HABERLINE, GRIFFITHS, GEGNER, ADAMS, KEMPKA 




Top Row: SIGTENBORST, MICHELS, TWOJIEY, TODD, MATTIR, TOPEL, ALCZNEWICZ, SCZEPANSKI, 
LIGHTED, NUGENT. Second Row: LAPKA, GILLISPIE, OLEKSKY, MC NAMARA, VAROUNIS, TURNER. 
VAN DAM, SCAMBLER, STEVENS. SPIRA. Front Row: LAUBER, SOBERJASKI, MCDONALD, MINKOW- 
SKI, PABURTZY. SCOTT, SMIBY, NORTON, RAGO 



Page one hundred forly-lhrt 



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The 
CLASS OF 1931 

Dentistry 



SIDNEY POLLACK, 

President 



OFFICERS 

Sidney Pollack President 

R. Jackson rice-President 

A. Horwitz Secretary 

I. Podore Treasurer 

W. Allison Class Editor 

Harold Salzman .... Editor of The Dentos 



The gentlemen gazing out at you, dear reader, 
from the opposite page are about to go out into 
the world seeking teeth to pull, fill, X-ray, and 
whatever else there is to be done to teeth. In 
another year they will be supervising admiringly 
the erection of a professional looking sign bearing 
their name. They will be wondering if and when 
somebody is going to come yelping for relief and 
if and when they will be able to administer relief 
to the yelping patient successfully. 

The Junior class, among other things, edits the 
Dentos, a yearbook devoted entirely to the Dental 
School. The initiative shown by the classes each 
year as they prepare the book is really admirable 
in as much as time for such activities as yearbooks 
is scarce. It is more than probable, however, that 
the Dentos and the Loyolan will someday unite. 
When that will be we cannot say. Maybe next 
year, maybe not for ten. 



Page one hundred jorly-jour 



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Top Row: H. CORNWALL, S. CHU, F. NAPOLILLI, A. FREEDMAN, H. BALM, \V. ALLISON, W. HOLMES, 
R. HEUPEL, W. CALDER, E. KIRBY, J. BERGMAN, F. SNIDER, S. HARRIS, S. ZOPOLSKY, C. GOLDBERG. 
Third Row: A. KLEBANSKY, E. HALL, V, CHURCHILL, R. JACKSON, P. KANCHIER, P. HOBE, A. GILLETTE, 
L. GREENBERG, N. CHERNER, E. FARRELL, K. EDMONDSON, R. GROETZINGER, A. FELT, M. FORKOSH, 
E. GEYER, A. ATKOCINAS, H. BROWNSTEIN. Second Row: S. SHERMAN, C. GRUNNER, V. FISHMAN, 
E. CERNICH, G. MURIELLA, M. SPLATT, V. CORBETT, E. JOHANSON, H. HECKENLAIBLE, A. BERKOUSKY, 
D. CONGER, L. DAVIDSON, H. MARTIN, P. KANCHIER, H. CIASTER. Front Row: R. KRAUSE, H. KUR- 
LAND, J. BROPHY, I. DUGAS, A. HOROWITZ, C. HOFFMAN, S. SHANOFF, L. COHEN, M. BAUM, H. BREGAR, 
J. LOADUCA, R. CHESROW, S. LIBERMAN, A. JACOBS, H. ACKERMAN 




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ZiijO /JouV F. LACH, L. MIKUCK, L. GOTTAINER, L. KOBRINSKY - , M. MICEK, T. REDMAN, P. MC EWEN, 
W. WIENER, J. MILLER, R. PELKA, J. WROBLER, J. WRUBLEWSKI, K. POLLACKS, S. SADLER, W. REESE. 

Second Row: H. salzman, j. boersmat, j. valha, j. simpson, j. mc vey, a. treece, c. moore, 

E. KLENDA, H. STYPINSKI, C SCHMITT, J. SILVERMAN, H. WOODLOCK, M. BLICHMANN. Front Row: 

W. SLAVIN, L. SIMON, I. LEVY', M. WALSH, H. RADCLIFFE, R. WALL, M. VIEL, R. WAXLER, A. PODORE, 

I. ZERWER, D. PETERS, C. O'CONNOR 



Page one hundred jorty-Jwt 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 




The 
CLASS OF 1932 

Dentistry 



GEORGE LE.MIRE 
President 



OFFICERS 

George Lemire President 

Al. Balserski Vice-President 

Kenneth Sanders Secretary 

Edward Glavin Treasurer 

Wallace Fanning 

Circulating Manager The Dentos 

Dingy Kiwagaushi 

Business Manager The Dentos 



BALSERSKI 
SANDERS 
GLAVIN 



Uneasy lies the tooth that wears a crown. 
Sophomores, completing the second year of their 
dental studies, are becoming more and more aware 
of the veracity of this statement. Not that they 
have progressed to such an extent in their studies 
that they are able to crown teeth of the all-suffer- 
ing patrons of the clinic — they leave that to their 
more advanced juniors and seniors — but the diffi- 
culties experienced in less intricate tasks by some 
members of the class do not bode well for the 
crowned heads. 

The class under the able direction of Drs. Puter- 
baugh and Pike is learning their class song, loot! 
Toot! Toothie, Goodbye! in the best possible man- 
ner. As yet only the first few verses, and the least 
difficult, have been set to memory but progress 
toward the goal of knowing all about dental sur- 
gery is being made. 



Page one hundred forty-six 



T H E 



19 3 



L O Y O LAN 



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Top RoiVC KAPLAN, SOMMERFELD, LEBOW, LIEBERMAN, JURKOSKI, MC SWEENEY, NOVACK, SKRYSAK, 
MC DONALD, SOBECKI, WALDEN. Third Row: KAWAHIGASHI, MC CORMICK, SCANLAN, VASUMPAUR, 
LETURNO, JACOBSON, KUNIK, JACOBSON, SKWIOT, PESZYNSKI, PIKAS. Second Row: KARCH, 
JAKUS, PUTNIS, PARILLI, WALLS, KUNZE, WILLER, WILCOX, MERCER, PERRY. Front Row: EKLUND, 
MCCOY, WARCZAK, THORSON, LEMIRE, LAING, SEBEK, WEINTRAUB, ZULEY, SIMINKSI 




Top Row: KOCHONSKI, RUBENSTEIN, KUBIK, PETERSON, HILL, SCHALLER, SORSEN, SANDERS, MIT- 
CHELL, GRADY, COVINGTON, FLAVIN, FAILLO. Third Row: DANIELS, GELMAN, AVERY, CREABLE, 
CHRISTSESEN, HARLEY, BURNS, CLAWSON, FANNING, GLAVIN, BERMAN, HOFFMAN. Second Row: 
KENWARD, KLATT, GERSCHBERG, BALCERSKI, FITZ, BOOTH, DAHLBERG, ROSS, DANFORTH, MARCIN- 

kowski. Front Row: czub, charney, Ginsberg, ash, graham, herrick, duxler, sianco, 

SIEDLINSKI, SACHTLEBEN 



Page one hundred jorly-seven 



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The 
CLASS OF 1933 

Dentistry 



WALLACE N. KIRKV 

President 



OFFICERS 

Wallace N. Kirby President 

John Akan I' ice-President 

George Kelly Secretary 

Henry Baker Treasurer 



The Freshman class was led a merry chase this 
year by Wallace Kirby, Class President. "Bill" 
as they call him sometimes up on the North 
Campus was a crack half-miler on the Track team 
as well as tooth-puller deluxe from the Dental 
Department. Evidently he fears that some dav 
he will extract a tooth without removing the pain 
and will need his athletic ability to gain safety. 
Then again it may be that he merely likes track. 

Some of the men in this class have gone through 
one year of pre-dental training and others trans- 
fered with the necessary pre-requisites. However, 
they are now well started on the road to dental 
fame, maybe. They claim that a decayed root is 
the source of all evil and who doubts it — when he 
has a decayed root? There are various other 
sources of evil, of course, which these men will not 
be able to remove but every man can do his part 
and they are doing theirs. 

When something is hard to do, people say "it's 
like pulling teeth trying to get it done." Well, 
pulling teeth isn't so hard to do. The very first 
day the class president pulled a whole set — out of 



Page one hundred forty-eight 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 



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Top Row: JEDLOWSKI, BIESTEK, HOWLAND, GOLDBERG, AKAN, BAKER, ALLEN, JACOBSON, HIRSCHEN- 
BEIN, HENSON, BERMAN, HOFSTEEN, HARELIK. Fourth Ron': FOSTER, HYDE, JUCHINS, COTE, 
DENING, HAYES, GOLDENBERG, HAWKINS, GRACZYK, ENOCH. Third Row: GOLDFEILD, GUSZAK, 
DEBSKI, BALL, BIALECKE, ABRAMS, ALLAN. GOBLER, GORDON, DONELAN, ETU, JONES. Second Row: 
BERNERO, APPLEBAU.M, FREY, BRAHM, COUGHLIN, HERSH, CUTTONE, BAIM, DEACH, JOSEPH, CO.MROL, 
JOHNSON, BATLER. Front Row: HEINZ, BLUME, DANREITER, FIRNSIN, CANNING, HURWITZ, FREED- 
.MAX, KORTELKA, KIRBY, FRAZIN, HALMOS, HARRIS, ANDREWS 

a cabinet. Someone is always pulling a last one . . . especially the 
president being such as he is, which is, if you refer back to paragraph 
one, where we said it in the first place, a very fast man. 







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Top /Sou'.* KOCKOL, MILNARIK, QLINLAX, RIXGA, OLSEN, SKINNER, WILEN, KURPIEWSKI, WACHOW- 
SKI, SAFARIK, KARMILOWICZ, VICHICK. Fourth Row: LERMAN, POWERS, KLEIN, SIMON, KELLY, 
KENYON, STERN, NEEDHA.M, KUTTLER, KELLY L. M., PFUHL, KELLY L. D. Third Row: NAUSEDA, 
LACHMANN, SIMKUS, KONARD, MITSUNAGA, VERNE, MALINA, KRYSINSKI, KAMINSKI, LOCKWOOD, 
LESTINA, WORKMAN. Second Row: LEM, WEISS, SIMPSON, KEARNEY", KEENAN, THIEL, LAPP, 
WURSCH, SCHOONMAKER, SCHWARTZ, RYLL, KERSH, WOJCZYNSKI. Front Row: RONSPIEZ, MAREMA, 
KOTULA, MITZ, MACHEK, POTASHNIK, PIKE, LUBAR, RUBIN, OLECH, NICHOLS, LUKINS 



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The 
CLASS OF 1954 

Pre-Dental 



G. HAUSMANN, 
President 



OFFICERS 

G. Hausmann President 

George Lingen Vice-President 

Ted Gusik Secretary 

A. Jacobson Treasurer 

"But Daniel was not to be outdone when the 
cruel king threw him into the deep dark pit of 
lions. Daniel was a man of resourcefulness! He 
had believed in being prepared! Daniel was a 
dentist and he pulled the lions' teeth. 

"That, dear little predental students, is the 
story of Daniel and the lions den as it should have 
been," concluded the professor as he closed his 
book and smiled a pleasing smirk. 

These hard-hearted looking individuals don't 
look like they would believe a story such as this, 
do they? Perhaps they don't. 

We'll wager one thing though. These fellows 
aren't going to go out behind their cabinets after 
they become dentists and cry their eyes out every 
time a poor, poor patient comes groaning with a 
tooth. Wait, wait, dear reader. When we say poor 
patient we are expressing sympathy for the patient, 
not characterizing his financial condition. Yes, if 
the latter were true, no doubt the dentist would 
do the crying, and loudly. 



Page one hundred fijly 



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Top Row: PHILIPS, WEX.LER, DEEGAN, TARS, CODY, GULL, GRESSER, YATES, MERDES, ROCKE, GERBER, 
GUTHMAN, DAUWEN. Third Row: CAMINO, WHITE, DUNN, SHUTTE, LYZNICKI, BENIDETTO, MOORE, 
MEYER, REA, HEINNAMON, SIELOFF, DAVIS. Second Row: EICK, ZILOWSKI, WINOER, SMITH, FILEK, 
ALENROTH, CIORCA, CHUBIN, PATTI, GUZIK, ZIHERLE, FROZE. Front Row: REYNOLDS, LOSSMAN 
FOWLER, NEER, ROHIN, METCALF, NEDVED, RUSSELL, DOMUTH, JINOLICK, OFFENLOCK 



THE CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

Now that we have waded through the chaff, here are the actual 
facts pertaining to the Chicago College of Dental Surgery. 

The school came into existence forty-eight years ago during which 
period it gained a considerable reputation in its field. The institution 
has been most fortunate in attracting a type of student whose sub- 
sequent career has reacted to the greater renown of the school. Of 
over five thousand graduates, many have achieved great distinction 
and are recognized as authorities in dental education and practice. 
In 1924 the school became a part of Loyola University. 

The Dental School, while a strictly collegiate atmosphere prevails, 
is a center of professional ambitions. Students of this department 
have selected their goal and work toward it with unfailing and de- 
termined interest. The standing which it has reached in the realm 
of dental education has made it an intellectual center for those of 
the profession. 



Page one hundred fifty-one 



On October 8, 1871, the Chi- 
cago lire broke out a few 
blocks east of the college. A 
sudden veering of the wind 
saved the building just as 
destruction seemed imminent. 
Immediately after the fire the 
Bishop established his head- 
quarters in the college build- 
ing for a period of six months, 
after which he presented a 
thousand dollars to the col- 
lege Museum of Science and 
Natural Historv. 




NURSING 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 




The 
MERCY HOSPITAL 

School for Xtirses 



It is a generally accepted principle that most of the credit tor 
greatness in an individual belongs to the mother. During the loving 
association and companionship with that God-given guardian, the 
child imbibes the parent's excellent characteristics — alertness of in- 
tellectual perception and the pure and elevated qualities of her 
nature. 

It may never be recognized nor appreciated how much of our prog- 
ress in learning and of our acquisition of the sense of real responsi- 
bility we owe both directly and indirectly to the influence of the 
Sisters of Mercy upon us at Mercy Hospital. In all our struggles, 
temptations, and vicissitudes of the past three years of training the 
Sisters ever maintained not only a clear and alert understanding 
toward us but also a steadfast and loyal sincerity in the conscien- 
tious discharge of their duty. 

On graduation day many trails through the immensity of life's 
future will loom up before us. Then, in answer to the call oi service 
to humanity, we will hear the voice of duty bid us sever the ties 
of close friendships formed during our intimate relationship with 
associates and instructors. Each and every individual member of 
the Class of 1930 will come forward ready for duty bearing within 
the sanctuary of her own being an invisible equipment of funda- 
mental qualities and principles necessary to reach the ideals of 
success inspired by the Sisters of Mercy. 

Mary B. Rooney 



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T H E 



LOYOLA 



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Mercy Hospital 



THE CLASS OF 1950 

Mary Rooney President 

Leona Vogel Vice-President 

Catherine McIntyre .Secretary-Treasurer 

Within this class, one finds a mass of marvelous 
material, a field worthy of any sculptor's efforts to 
mould into figures of immortal beauty. Truly, a 
class has arrived that will fulfill every hope that 
has been cherished, that will realize the highest 
ideals presented by their teachers and that will give 
to the world that something that money cannot buy 
— the voluntary giving of self to a noble ideal, living 
a life of principle, and devoting that life to all that 
is beautiful and worth while. That life — a nurse's 
life — is an inspiration to all who behold it. 

Such is the class of today that is prepared by 
their years of study to ease suffering, to lighten 
life's burdens and to fold within their own kindly 
influence all those who are fortunate enough to 
come in contact with them. A class that we feel 
will make an indelible impression on life and will 
be an inspiration to all who follow in the footsteps 
of the Great Healer. 

Sister Mary Therese. 





sW 




MC INTYRE 



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LOYOLA 



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9&;1k '&$$$$ 





Top Row: KHYSIAK, FINKELDER, WOLF, MC KINCHY, JUSKA. Third Row: WOLF, BENNETT, DOWNS, 
DRISCOLL, GLEASON, ERICKSON, CLYDE, STEPHEN. Second Row: MURPHY, PRATT, KEENAN, STACK- 
MAN, YATES, HARNEY, RUDDY, NANITSKY, CREEN, LYNCH. Front Row: HERINGER, NAHANA, 
MULLEN, RACINE, HEMPHETT, CLARK, LKSEMAN, B. SETAR, G. SETAR, MOORE, HAGER. 



THE CLASS OF 1931 

Frances Erickson President 

Felicia Juska J' ice-President 

erickson Emma Finkelder Secretary-Treasurer 






FINKELDER 



Whatever attainments may be achieved by the 
class of '31, it is evident that class spirit, ambition, 
and enthusiasm run high. Every heart in this 
exceptional class is filled with animation, every 
mind is kindled with ideals and aspirations, and 
every face is aglow with expectancv as each new 
sun brings another day of interest to the aspiring 
nurse. 

As we tread this path of our predecessors and 
cope with the problems they encountered we 
hope we may display the same patience and per- 
severance and gain the success that is theirs. 

Among our interests are the devotional activity 
of our Sodality, which is dedicated to "The 
Blessed Virgin Mary," our class studies, and our 
limited social functions, foremost of these being 
the Junior-Senior Prom; and our Christmas party. 

Frances Erickson. 



Page one hundred Jt/li/six 



E' 1930 LOYOLAN 




Top Row: SLADE, MC CARNEY, KELLY, WOOD, COLLINS. Fifth Row: JOHNSON, GINTER, WISE, 
SPECKEEN, BOGER. Fourth Row: HALTON, LAWLESS, BERENDSEN, CONSAMUS, HERON, COSTELLO, 
D. HAYES. Third Row: MILLER, HAYES, ZENZ, OBERTHUS, WINTERS, MATZA, PINK. Second Row: 
D. NABER, WARL, OLSEN, SEIDL, BRENNAN, FRAY, STREIT, BAPST, SULLIVAN. Front Row: MITCHEL, 
POWERS, L. NABER, MARTIS, CAREN, MATTESON, ENRIGHT, FINDLAY, DE CLAUX, ARNTZ. 



THE CLASS OF 1932 

Catherine Hart President 

Blanche Musman I' ice-President 

Maurine Haas Secretary-Treasurer 




During the month oi September, nineteen 
twenty-nine we forty-seven came from parts far 
and wide to unite our hearts and our interests 
to those of Mercy Hospital Training School, and 
to realize our ideals and ambitions in the field ol 
Nursing. Many new and novel experiences await- 
ed us, and, unsuspectingly, we went forth to meet 
them, affording our predecessors numerous op- 
portunities for merriment — as was ever the wont 
of Probationers. 

But now that we have become more accustomed 
to the rigorous routine ol hie in a Training School 
and have been initiated into many of the mysteries 
of medicine and surgery, we will strive toward 
greater class unity and the attainment of honor 
and glory for our beloved Alma Mater. 

Catherine Hart. 





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The Nurses' Home 



ST. BERNARD'S HOSPITAL 

Now, more than ever before, education is within the grasp of all 
who endeavor to push forward. The classes realize that their possi- 
bilities for advancement are numerous, and they are striving for the 
noblest and the best through the opportunities afforded them by 
their course of studies, and valuable information which they are 
able to attain through the help of their instructors who give of their 
best so unstintedly and are ever striving by word and example to 
lead them on to the highest efficiency in their chosen profession. 

Moral intelligence is the most essential asset of a conscientious 
nurse. It is a requirement that must be fulfilled by those who aspire 
to prove themselves worthy of their profession. For this purpose the 
classes here at St. Bernard place their aspirations, endeavors, and 
efforts under the care and guidance of the Blessed Mother and her 
Divine Son. Under her mantle of protection they will reach the 
mark of perfection that is their goal. Holy Mass and Communion 
has a special place in the life of each novice nurse. Through the 
faithful practice of daily attendance they will merit the reward of 
their quest. 

To Reverend Mother Murray and the devoted Sisters of St. 
Bernard's, we, the student nurses here at St. Bernard's, are deeply 
grateful and extend thanks for their efforts in making our days in 
this institution happy days — and by their shining example of 
Christian charity, they lead us on to higher and nobler ambitions. 
The Classes of St. Bernard School of Nursing. 



Page one hundred fifty-eight 



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Top Row: SCHROEDER, QUINLAN, LYNCH, RIVARD, KENNEDY, CONRAD, ANDERSON, DUDECK. Second 

Row: GILSINGER, RUSSELL, SHEEHAN, LEHMANN, DICKENSON, GURRISTER, GUTMANN. Front 

Row: DE GUIDE, STANTON, ,MC ALLISTER, LAMPKE, SCHWARTZ, FLYNN, MILLER 



CLASS OF 1950 

Alice Ruth McAllister President 

Helen Virginia Lampke . J' ice-President 
Gertrude Celeste Stanton .... Secretary 
Mary Agatha Schwartz Treasurer 

"Ecce iructus laboris" — behold the fruits of 
toil. We are at last ready to take our places in the 
field of duty, equipped with that efficient knowl- 
edge and spirit of charity essential to our profes- 
sion. During our years of training we were met by 
difficulties and failures, but through the patience, 
understanding and willingness on the part of those 
to whom the difficult task of fashioning us into 
real nurses was assigned we have arrived at the 
peak ol our ambitions — graduation. 

In these three years here at St. Bernard's we 
have had the privilege of participating in various 
activities, witnessing the dedication of our Nurses' 
beautiful new Home, and the Silver Jubilee of our 
Alma Mater. Both of these events together with 
the undying kindness of the Religious Hospitalers 
of St. Joseph have so inspired us that we say in 
conclusion, "We feel it is a difficult task to our 
institution's name, but we will attempt to show our 
appreciation by our immortal loyalty to our Alma 
Mater and by successfully serving humanity." 
Alice Ruth McAllister.. 



MC ALLISTER 



SCHWARTZ 



Page one hundred fijly-nine 



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Top Row: PILLING, MC GARR, NEVILLE, BARRY, DARGELLA, KELLY, SENDER, BROMBOZ, MC HUGH, 

KELLEHER. Second Row: COSGROVE, MILORD, MC BRIDE, NOETHE, PAVIK, CLARK, KOZCZYNSKI, 

BARRY', REARDON, MARTIN. Front Row: O'NEILL, MURPHY', SOUTHERLAND, CRAMER, NOLAN, 

CAMPBELL, BARRETT, VANRUSKA, DONOVAN 



CAMPBELL 



CLASS OF 1931 

OFFICERS 

Mary Anna Nolan President 

Agnes Henrietta Campbell 

Vice-President 

Ruth Josephine Cramer Secretary 

Helen Marie Barrett Treasurer 

When we glance back and realize what those 
who have gone before us have accomplished and 
then direct our gaze on our worthy Seniors who 
are so soon to leave us, and who bv their example 
of high noble aspirations and undying loyalty 
have blazed the way for us to follow, we realize 
that we must set about the task eagerly and ear- 
nestly of becoming worthy instruments in the hands 
of our devoted Directress in shaping and moulding 
us into as perfect nurses as those who have gone 
before us. 

We have the distinction of being the Silver 
Jubilee Class of St. Bernard's School of Nursing, 
as we entered as Freshmen shortly before our 
venerated Sisters, the Religious Hospitalers of 
St. Joseph, celebrated the Silver Anniversary of 
their coming to Chicago. 

Mary Ann Nolan, President. 






Page one hundred sixty 



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Top Row: MELLON, DE VOY, ANDERSON, CROWLEY, DE.MPSEY, SHARP, MATZ, SMITH, KELSEY. Sec- 
ond Row: GOECKEL, NORBUT, MC EWEN, GLYNN, KELLY, HOWE, HANNON, PATERSON, DECKMAN. 
Front Row: GRACE, COFFEY, KAUTH, DOOLIN, J. KIEFER, DORF., K. KIEFER, FAHEY, OLIETTI 



CLASS OF 1932 

Josephine Carol Kiefer President 

Mary Margaret Doolin.. .Vice-president 

Gertrude Mary Kauth Secretary 

Mary Ellen Dore Treasurer 



Members of the Freshman Class of St. Bernard's 
have taken their places in the ranks of those worthy 
ones who have preceded them and are earnestly 
striving to follow along the paths that will lead to 
the accomplishment of a great and noble aim. 

Even before beginning their course they realized 
the beauty of their chosen profession, and now that 
they have begun their work, they do indeed, ap- 
preciate its value, and experience the deep sense 
of gratification that comes in giving service. 

The talent of the class is unlimited. Already 
their musical and dramatic ability have been 
experienced, especially during the Christmas sea- 
son. Their interest and support will be a deciding 
factor in the future when more opportunity is 
afforded. The class looks eagerly forward to the 
coming years that are to be spent in nursing. 

Josephine Carol Kiefer, President. 



Page one hundred sixty-one 



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Kl!!!i!i1j"f Pltlllf 




ARCHITECT S CONCEPTION OF THE STRUCTURE 



THE NEW ST. ELIZABETH HOSPITAL 

On October 2, 1929, ground was broken for the new St. Elizabeth 
Hospital, now under construction. The above sketch gives an idea 
of the structure when completed. On December 15, 1929, the Rt. 
Rev. Msgr. P. L. Bierman of Evanston, laid the cornerstone. Rev. 
J. J. Rengel gave the ceremonial address. 

In the new building the Administrative offices, Parlors, Consulta- 
tion rooms, Laboratories, X-Ray and Physiotherapy Departments 
will be located on the first floor. The second to the eighth floors 
will contain private and semi-private rooms and wards for surgical, 
medical, obstetrical and pediatric patients. The ninth floor will be 
utilized for the Surgical and Deliver Rooms. A beautiful solarium 
will occupy the tenth floor, and a heliotherapy department will be 
located on the eleventh. There will be accommodations for one 
hundred sixty-five patients in the units now under construction. 

The Sisters, Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ, hope that this insti- 
tution devoted to medicine and nursing will meet the needs of the 
communitv which thev are interested in serving. 






Page one hundred sixly-two 



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wmsm 









Top Row: C. HUSS, E. BLOCK, E. KOSACZ, M. MASSIC, E. DART, C. HINSCH, H. HALLIGAN. 
Row: P. NELSON, I. MARESCH, M. VER CAUTEREN, E. WENDORF, V. GILDEA, B. NESLER, E. V 
TEREN. Front Row: C. HAAS, J. CLAYGONE, W. MILLER, J. ARMSTRONG, A. LEUSEN, M. 

E. ALTERS. 

THE CLASS OF 1950 

Irene Maresch President 

Marie VerCauteren J ice-President 

Mary Massic Secretary-Treasurer 

Though there be a feeling of great joy beneath 
it all, there is indeed a touch of sadness and regret 
in the thought of our graduation from dear old 
St. Elizabeth's. 

To the faithful Sisters, Poor Handmaids of 
Jesus Christ, who have helped and watched our 
progress during the years of training in this noble 
career, we, as graduates, owe a debt of gratitude. 
To our efficient staff of Doctors; our worthy 
Superintendent and her assistants, all so well 
qualified to fit us for our work in life; and to those 
who in any way influenced or encouraged us in 
the attainment of this long sought goal, may we 
express our sincere and heartfelt thanks. 

Perhaps the only way we can show our appre- 
ciation for all that they have done is to pledge our 
loyalty to the ideals set forth for us. And so it is, 
with this noble thought ever before us, that we, 
the class of 1930, wish to make our farewell from 
our beloved Alma Mater. May we always keep 
before us that motto we so ardently chose " Vivimus 
ut Serviamus" — We live that we may serve. 
Irene Maresch. 



Second 
ER CAU- 
SMARKE, 




VERCAUTEREN 




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Bottom Row: A. GALLAGHER, M. GAVANAUGH, J. MCVEIGH, H. GOLATKA, M. KENNER. Second Row: 

M. SABO, L. WISNIEWSKI, C. VER CAUTEREN, M. CHRISTIAENS, V. LOSINSKI, F. FLIEGE. Third Row: 

T. SARWIN, S. GREGORY, B. o'NEILL, H. ZALAS, M. THOMPSON, E. GENRICH, M. JOHNSON 



THE CLASS OF 1931 







WISNIEWSKI 





CIllilSTI SENS 



OFFICERS 

Helen Golatka President 

Lucille Wisniewski Treasurer 

Mary Christiaens Secretary 

The class of 1931 of St. Elizabeth Hospital 
School of Nursing, has been steadily striving 
forward lor the goal that lies just a year ahead. 

The class abounds in school spirit and is always 
ready to respond to student activities. A fine 
spirit of co-operation exists between the class and 
their superiors, as well as that which has made 
itself apparent among the students themselves. 
Their loyalty and support are given for the en- 
joyment gained from the offered services, and this 
pleasure has rendered its thanks. The class motto 
will serve as a guide — "We won by perseverance." 



Page one hundred s/.vl [1/-J0 



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Top Row: E. COULEUR, E. LAKEMEYER, L. FRENCH, M. PAXTON, J. I.EIER, T. TUNIC Front Ro 
A. POLCHLAPEK, H. SWIATEK, M. DALTON, M. SHIFRER, L. DES MARAIS 



CLASS OF 1932 



OFFICERS 

Mary Shifrer President 

Marie Dalton rice-President 

HARRIET SwiATEK Secretary-Treasurer 



The class of 1932 is characterized by a spirit of 
co-operation to instructors and superiors, as well 
as a willingness to sacrifice for duty. This ever- 
predominant attitude has led us on to great ac- 
complishments during the past year. We are 
striving continually to make ourselves worthy to 
serve in this new hospital, now being constructed. 
We wish to acknowledge our deep-rooted thanks 
to the Poor Handmaids, who have guided us in 
our efforts. We also wish to express our apprecia- 
tion to all our instructors and superiors, and to 
everyone who has in any way assisted us in working 
towards our careers. 

Harriet M. Swiatek. 






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ST. ANNE S HOSPITAL. 



FIVE YEARS HENCE 

Five years have passed since the Class of 1930 graduated and our 
long looked for class reunion day finally dawned, June 24, 1935. 

When we reached the Black Cat Room of the Edgewater Beach 
Hotel several of our classmates had already arrived, Budreau, 
Mailloux and Haessig, who are at the present time doing private 
duty and Scholtz who is a Public Health Nurse. 

Komisky is at the present time employed as assistant to the well 
known Charlotte Johnson of the Anna Durand Contagious Hospital. 
Wirig holds the very important position of Dietitian at Cook County. 

Wilson is Superintendent of Nurses at a well known Hospital in 
India. Twohey and Hendrickson are with the Foreign Missions in 
Africa and Neuroth is an O B Supervisor in a large Hospital in 
China. 

Zaborski is a Dominican Nun, teaching the kiddies at the Im- 
maculate Conception here in Chicago. Dobesh is a Surgical Super- 
visor at St. ^Elizabeth's, wearing the robes of a Poor Handmaid. 
Mikulec is a novice in the B. V. M. order. 

Hyde is a nurse at the Western Electric and Gilchrist and Collins 
were at St. Vincent's Orphanage for some time, but both Gilchrist 
and Collins have nurseries of their own now. Hutton took an aero- 
plane trip to the Rocky Mountains a year ago, but no word has 
been heard of her or from her since. Fullan is doing private duty. 



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Top Ron:- B. BURNS, M. WILLIAMS, H. GILCHRIST, M. HUTTEN. M. WIRIG, D. MAILLOUX, J. CONOLE, 

M. FULLAN. Second Row: M. DOBESH, H. WILSON, R. HAESSIG, I. ZABORSKI, S. TABAKA, M. HALLISY, 

F. KOMISKY, N. BUDREAU. Front Row: B. NEUROTH, H. TWOHEY, I. M. HENDRICKSON, H. SCHOLTZ, 

V. HYDE, B. DUNNING, F. MIKULEC, H. DIXON 



CLASS OF 1930 

OFFICERS 

Helen Gilchrist President 

Julia Conole Vice-President 

Helen Eggsteen Secretary-Treasurer 



The Class of 1930 is the largest class that ever 
entered at the Nurses' Training School of St. 
Anne's. It is with mingled feelings of joy and 
sorrow that we approach graduation day. Often 
we have pepped ourselves up with the thought 
of graduation but now that the sight of the parting 
is in view, we feel a deep regret within us at the 
thought of leaving one another and dear old St. 
Anne's. During our three years here, we have 
experienced many never-to-be-forgotten pleasures 
and now that we are nearing our goal, we hope we 
will carry with us our ideas and ideals learned 
while under the stately portals of St. Anne's. We 
owe a debt of deep gratitude to our Superintend- 
ent, teachers and instructors, which we can never 
hope to repay. 

Helen Gilchrist. 



EGGSTEEN 



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fop Row: G. CROWLEY, E. RILEY, A. RYAN, H. MURPHY, A. SULLIVAN, A. CARUFEL, A. PILOTTE. 

Second Ron:- H. sobie, p. jesky, a. haltmeyer, e. schnaubelt, m. busse, a. mc donnall. Front 
Row: E. PRICE, T. STEVE, v. o'brien, k. strubbe, c. burns, m. miller 




SCHNAUBELT 




SULLIVAN 



CLASS OF 1931 

OFFICERS 

Bertha Miller President 

Esther Schnaubelt Vice-President 

Kathryn Strubbe Treasurer 

Annabelle Sullivan Secretary 

But one year now separates our fondest and most 
cherished dreams from their realization. It is 
with envy that we look upon the Class of '30, who 
have reached their goal. With deep regret we 
watch their departure and hope to attain their 
wisdom and thoughtfulness during our seniority. 
They were ever helpful during our first hardships 
and difficulties and spurred us on to greater hopes 
and ideals. Likewise do we hope to set a like 
example to those following in our footsteps. 

But all is not work as we have participated in 
many pleasurable events with the knowledge that 
there is more to follow during the coming year. 

Now that we have attained the cherished posi- 
tion ol being "Senior Nurse" we eagerly look 
forward to the goal of our ambition that will 
bring us to the realization that we must soon part 
from our training days and enter the ranks of the 
graduate nurse. 

Class of '31. 



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ZtfyO j?0lt>: M. HARCHARIK, H. RYAN, M. GLONIGAN, M. BALES, E. HECKMAN, J. WHALEN, D. KERR, 

V. LA CASSE. Second Row: J. MEIKLEJOHN, M. HENDERSON, E. WOOD, M. LAWINGER, C. SUTTON, 

A. DAVETTE, C. SHEARER, L. DUGGAN. Front Row: A. KRIESER, E. KOEHLER, M. STROIK, S. KING, 

Z. STOMBARS, M. FANE, G. WILHELM 



CLASS OF 1932 

Sheila King President 

Maurine Blonigan J "ice-President 

Madelynne Stroik. . .Secretary-Treasurer 

The beautiful and new St. Anne's Hospital 
received our class, into the Training School during 
the year of nineteen twenty-nine. We were not 
only overwhelmed and awed by the greatness of 
the hospital, but also by the apparent knowledge 
and dignity of the student nurses. But before our 
four months of "drudgery" terminated, we realized 
that their severity of demeanor was, perhaps, more 
apparent than real. 

The pangs of home-sickness were keen at first, 
but were soon lessened as we fell into the routine, 
and formed friendships which we hope will con- 
tinue through the coming years. 

Having passed the first milestone creditably, 

we look forward to the coming years, judging 

from the past, as years of opportunities, and we 

trust that we may measure up to the standards set 

by our predecessors; as we pledge our loyalty to 

each other and our "alma mater." c , -i 12 -- 

Sheila rving. 






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OAK PARK HOSPITAL 



ST. ROSALIE HALL 

It was the year '25 that brought forth a great surprise, an abun- 
dance of joy and a new spirit among the student nurses of the Oak 
Park Hospital, for a beautiful nurses' home was erected for them. 
The building is four stories high, is of brick structure and accom- 
modates a great number of nurses. On each floor are a number of 
private rooms, several double rooms and well equipped lavatories. 
The rooms are cheerful and cozy and offer a great deal of comfort 
and ease to the nurse who seeks rest and privacy. 

A short staircase leads into the lobby where beautiful peasant 
arches bring forth a touching sense of comfort and luxury. On 
either side of the lobby are small beau parlors which are exquisitely 
furnished and add great beauty to the home. Opening directly off 
of the lobby is a well lighted library which contains large glass book 
cases of excellent literature, combined with every comfort in the form 
of large lounging chairs, a long library table, and a divan. The 
pictures gracing the walls are of lustrous oil paintings. Some are of 
great historical value, and are of great interest to both residents 
and visitors. 

Standing ajar from the library are the long French doors which 
lead to the parlor. In the parlor we find beautiful over-stuffed 
furniture, a cozy fireplace, radio, piano, phonograph and splendid 
lighting fixtures. Everything that could possibly insure comfort, or 
happiness for the nurses, is installed in the nurses' home. 

The building was given the name St. Rosalie Hall in honor of the 
foundress of the Sisters of Misencorde. St. Rosalie Hall stands 
before us with the same graceful beauty, the same comfort, and the 
same luxuries, and each year there is an added amount of joy due 
to the increasing number of graduate nurses sent forth. 

H. J. Heffron. 



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Top Row: E. SCOTT, M. BROWN, K. TUOHY, A. SMITH, H. HEFFRON, M. QUIRICI, N. LEVEILLE, A. AL- 

FORD. Front Row: H. HOERSCHGEN, M. QJJINN, I. DE VET, M. MULQUEEN, M. KOVALICK, D. MADISON, 

M. FALLON, A. HEIMENDINGER. 



CLASS OF 1930 

Kathleen Tuohy President 

Imogene DeVet. . . J ice-President 

Mary Mulqueen Secretary-Treasurer 

Greetings little outside world! We feel very 
happy to tell you that we are graduating. Yes! 
We have reached our goal, but it is only a beginning 
of what we are going to do. You see our class 
motto is "Excelsior," and we are going to try to 
accomplish higher things. 

As we are leaving our school with our much 
cherished diplomas in hand, a certain little spirit 
beats within our hearts and seems to urge us on. 
Onward to offer ourselves to Christ and Humanity. 
And we're going to do it with all the faith, courage, 
hope and determination to win, thereby helping 
our fellow sufferers and by promoting a better 
citizenship. 

The future will be very bright for us we hope, 
and although we're extremely happy in the thought 
of advancing into a new world, we are unhappy to 
leave the one behind us, so let us turn back just 
for a moment. The three years we have spent as 
student nurses in the Oak Park Hospital will 
always be sacred in our memories. With great 
sincerity and loyalty we will always admire and 
praise our Alma Mater. 

H. J. Heffron. 





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Top Roto: H. HERALD, M. MOLINOWSKI, B. DRISCOLL, G. O'CONNOR, A. PTASZEK, G. FILLAFER. 
Front Row: B. SERACINO, M. NEEDHAH, D. LINDSAY, L. HOMAN, C. GRAZIANO 



CLASS OF 1931 

OFFICERS 

Agnes Ptaszek President 

Louise Homan f ice-President 

Helen Herald Secretary-Treasurer 




H 




HERALD k 



During our first year we encountered many 
difficulties as novices in the field of nursing, but 
with the help of our superiors we overcame them 
all. We lost no time in getting acquainted among 
ourselves, and next we organized our class, for with 
organization comes co-operation. 

In 1929 we entered our Junior year, but with the 
"survival of the fittest'' the numbers slightly de- 
creased while in quality we increased. We began 
to realize the responsibilities placed before us. 
Many happy moments were spent in entertain- 
ments and parties, and our next great event is 
the Junior-Senior annual party. 

We are now looking forward with eagerness to 
the time when we will be Seniors and setting 
examples to the underclassmen. For two years 
now we have been training to take this leadership, 
and it is with pride and hopefulness to our Senior 
year which we will endeavor to make of note- 
worthy accomplishment. 

Agnes Ptaszek. 



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Top Ron 1 : M. JOHNSON, M. RO0CE, M. POWELL, S. VINCENT. II. BRUCE, M. PFIFFNER, L. LARSON. 
Front Row: W. LECHLINSKI, E. FRIES, M. MCCOY, ]. MOLINOSKI, G. TANTON, J. BATES, G. PLANTE, 

P. FORD. 



CLASS OF 1932 

OFFICERS 

Stella Vincent President 

Marie Powell Vice-President 

Harriet Bruce. . .Secretary and Treasurer 
Jewell Bates Social Chairman 

We, the class of 1932, have given ample prooi of 
our ability to shoulder the responsibility which is 
falling upon us as we advance in our Nursing 
Profession. The scope of training which is allowed 
us is very broad and even then we have showed 
that we have pep and zeal for our work. 

We were put on trial before the upper classmen, 
and we have convinced them that there is an 
inspiring group of students ready to fill the gaps 
left when older ones graduate. Well can we 
remember that first day we entered training 
school, the lectures which we attended, the tasks 
which were expected of us, all seemed like massive 
barriers. 

The future is still in front of us and must be con- 
quered with the same determination with which 
the past has been conquered. 

Wanda Lechlinski. 







Page one hundred seventy-three 



LOYOLA 



N 




COLUMBUS HOSPITAL 



THE YEAR 

The past year has brought a great change in the School of Nurs- 
ing at Columbus, for during this time we have become part of 
Loyola University and closely related with the excellent Medical 
Department of that institution. By this union the educational rank 
of the Hospital has become higher and the expanse of the Medical 
Department of the University has become greater. 

The nurses in training are given the advantage of the professor- 
ship of men whose training in the field of Medicine is very competent 
and extended. Likewise the young students leaving medical school 
have another institution of high caliber open to them in which they 
may take their internship. Consequently, Columbus Hospital and 
Loyola University have both gained by this union. 

From the portals of Columbus Hospital comes forth this year a 
class remarkable in many ways. They are one of the most efficiently 
trained groups that have ever left the halls of this hospital and with 
their graduating a new era has been reached in the history of this 
nursing school. For this class, the first to graduate from Loyola 
University through this institution, has in its twenty-six graduates 
fourteen Sisters of the order of the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred 
Heart, the first nuns of this order to ever graduate from a nursing 
school. 

This class is going forth into the field of duty carrying with them 
the knowledge and faith they have received during the past three 
years. They have been trained in profession and faith. It is their 
duty to carry forth the ideals of the Hospital and the University. 
They may work always with the confidence that their Alma Mater 
is ever ready to support them in their actions. 



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Back Row: BOYER, SHOWALTER, VONDENBOSH, BAULTUNIS, LAWLESS, JARDIN. Front Row: FINNI- 
GAN, HARNEY, MC GOVERN, MUCKLINSKI, JONES, DIETZEL 



CLASS OF 1930 

OFFICERS 

Edna' ; Vondenbosch President 

Mary |Jardin Vice-President 

Catherine Baltunis. .Secretary-Treasurer 

It is with a feeling of regret as well as happiness 
as we come to the close of this chapter in our life, 
the graduating class of 1930 of Columbus Hospital. 
For three years we have toiled in expectation of 
this day when we leave the ranks of nurses in 
training and take up our existence as graduates. 
During our stay in the training school we have 
experienced many joyful incidents which will 
always remain ever present in our memory of our 
days in our old Alma Mater. 

There are twenty-six in our graduating class of 
which fourteen are Sisters. They are the first 
trained nurses of their order, which is the Mission- 
ary Sisters ol the Sacred Heart, founded by Mother 
Francis Cabrini. Our class is unique for another 
reason since it is the first class to graduate from 
Columbus Hospital since the union of that hospital 
with Loyola University, an incident which has 
added color to our days at Columbus. 

We thank Airs. Thornton, our superintendent, 
for all the interest and kindness she has bestowed 
upon us while our stay under her guidance. 

Edna Vondenbosch. 




VONDENBOSCM 




/ JARDIN 




BALTUNIS 



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Back Ron': DELLA MARIE, LAMASNEY, GUIRR1NI, ANDREWS, BOYLE. Front Row: DAMATA, SULLI- 
VAN, WEBBER, PENDY, CALLAHAN 





CLASS OF 1931 
OFFICERS 

Sophia Guerrini President 

Rosalynne Pendy Vice-President 

Victoria Damata Secretary-Treasurer 

Some two years ago we came into the ranks of 
the Training School of Columbus Hospital to 
begin our life in the nursing world. For the first 
few days we seemed absolutely lost in our new 
surroundings, although everyone in the institution 
tried his best to put us at ease. Gradually the 
newness gave way to a feeling of security and each 
and every student began the hard work necessary 
to reach her ultimate goal, all striving eagerly to 
gain success. 

We are now on the threshold of our last and 
most important year of our career. We will go 
on to be Seniors with that same ambitious spirit 
which has always characterized every one of our 
endeavors. As we take the leadership over the 
underclassmen we will strive to leave with them 
by example the true ideals of our profession as 
given to us by our hospital and our University. 

Sophie Guerrini. 



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BRODERICK 



Back Ron:- la chapelle, borsik, rector, dixon, vondenbosh, pleskovitch. Front Row: 

KENNY, TENNYSON, RICHARDSON, DES COMIER, KOSTOR, BRODERICK 



CLASS OF 1952 

OFFICERS 

Julie Broderick President 

Josephine Kenny J' ice-President 

PEARL DlXON Secretary-Treasurer 

Here we are, the Freshman Class in this excellent 
school of Nursing. Our position necessarily im- 
plies that we are not to stand out as impressively 
as the upperclassmen who have been in studies 
for one and two years longer, but there is no law 
against telling what we intend to do. From the 
ever striving spirit for higher things already 
evidenced in the members of our class it is only 
probable that we will create history just as im- 
pressive in the life of Columbus Hospital as any 
of our predecessors. 

We have the distinction to be the first class to 
have entered Columbus Hospital after their 
affiliation with the distinctive University of Loy- 
ola. This has aided us in getting an excellent 
foundation upon which to build our entire nursing 
career. You shall hear more of our doings in the 
future as step after step we stride to the peak of 
successful nursing. 

Julie Broderick. 





PLESKOVITCH 




Page one hundred seventy-seven 



The Roentgen ray was first 
demonstrated to the people of 
Chicago in 1896 by the de- 
partment of science ot St. Ig- 
natius Colleee. 




ALU M N I 



HE 1930 LOYOLAN 



The 
ALUMNI 

The purpose of The Loyolan is to present the year's 
history of all Loyola activities in a journalistic manner, 
rather than an editorial one. But circumstances which 
have been encountered during the preparation of the 
Alumni section have uncovered a situation which cannot 
conscientiously be passed over. 

The reporter in charge of the section attempted several 
times to get information concerning the activities and 
ambitions of the Loyola University Alumni Association 
without results. The people approached, some of whom 
were officers and others who may be considered good 
authorities on campus affairs, invariable assumed a sad 
look of despair when questioned and suggested that the 
reporter see So-and-so. So-and-so proved to know as 
little and suggested a third person. Eventually the re- 
porter was back where he started and had no information. 

This has been regarded generally as the nature of the 
situation for the past few years, and certain people affili- 
ated with the Association have been unjustly blamed for 
it. That outsiders should say what is wrong and who is 
to blame for it would be folly. This Association has met 
difficulties, no doubt, which are not divulged to the 
general public. The general feeling is that the University 
authorities should take a hand in the matter. 

One of the first aims of the newly formed Administrative 
Council is the adjusting of this very situation. The stu- 
dents and the alumni are merely asked to lend, for the 
present, their good will, and to criticize constructively — 
not^destructively. Will they? 

The Editor. 



Page one hundred eighty 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 



The 
ALUMNAE 

The happy combination of vision and valor made pos- 
sible the founding of the School of Sociology by Rev. 
Frederic Siedenburg, S.J., in 1914. A group of women, 
whose lofty ideals and practical experience bound them 
in a unity of interest, constituted the initial group of 
students. These women naturally were impelled to organ- 
ize in order that they might mutually share each other's 
experiences and profit thereby. So, the Loyola Univer- 
sity Alumnae had its organization meeting in October, 
1915. 

The Alumnae Association has motivated itself quietly 
through a series of purposeful activities under the leader- 
ship of their faculty advisor, Rev. Frederic Siedenburg, 
S.J. Over fifteen hundred dollars was spent by the 
Alumnae in furnishing the sacristy of the faculty chapel 
on the campus. A bronze plate on the sacristy door 
memorializes this gift of the members of University 
Alumnae and their faculty advisor. 

Seven scholarships have been established for the train- 
ing of social workers in the School of Sociology. Funds 
for these scholarships have been reached through lectures 
and card parties sponsored by the Loyola Alumnae. 

Membership in the organization is open to all graduates 
of the School of Sociology and to students who have had 
a specified number of courses in the School. 

Loyola University Alumnae looks forward with keen 
interest to fulfilling its obligations in the departments of 
Civics, Philanthropy, Education, and Art and Literature. 
The growing membership of the organization has made 
possible the grouping of the members into departments, 
each of which will sponsor one meeting during the year. 



OFFICERS 

Acting President JIary E. Kelly 

Secretary Oiwe Pence 

Treasurer Marie Helen Kelly 

Delegate Agnes Jladden 

Alternate Helen Brindle 



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.MONSIGNOR D. BYRNES, PRESIDENT ROBERT M. KELLEY. S.J., JUDGE MARCUS KAVANAUGH 

Members of the largest graduating class in the history of Loyola 
University received their degrees on June 12, 1929. The solemn 
exercises which marked the occasion were held in the Alumni Gym- 
nasium where several thousand people gathered to witness the event. 
Saul ot Tarsus" was the title oi the address presented by the Honor- 
able Marcus A. Kavanaugh, speaker of the day. Judge Kavanaugh is 
one of the best known jurists in the country at the present time and, 
in addition, has gained a most admirable reputation as an author. 
The address consumed the better part of an hour but the audience, 
including the seniors who were becoming more anxious every instant, 




the carefree seniors ASSEMBLE. The general feeling may be gained from, the broad grin 
Paul S. Ltelz in the upper left center. See it? 



Page one hundred eighty-two 



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O 



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A 




BACCALAUREATE SERVICES IN ST. IGNATIUS CHURCH, GLEN'WOOD AND 



)I.A AVENUES 



exhibited extreme interest throughout. 

Selections were rendered by the Loyola University orchestra at 
various intervals during the program of the afternoon. The Very 
Reverend Monsignor D. Byrnes gave the invocation. 

The program was closed late in the afternoon with an address 
"Retrospect and Prospect'' given by President Robert M. Kelley, 
S. J. In it he reviewed to the graduating students the ideals and aims 
of the University both in regard to its development and to the later 
life of the students it graduated. He outlined the brilliant growth of 
the past few years and expressed high hopes for the future. 




YES, they FEEL pretty* GOOD. Some are wondering if they are going to gel blank diplomas and others 
are wondering when the messenger boy will come running up with "that yellow roadster." 



Page one hundred eighty-three 



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The 
ELIZABETH M. CUDAHY 

MEMORIAL LIBRARY 



EDWARD A. CUDAHY, 

Donor 



EDWARD A. CUDAH 
CHICAGO 



January 13, 1930. 



Dear Father Kelley:- 

As a tribute of devotion to my beloved 
wife, Elizabeth M. Cudahy, It la my cherished privilege to 
present to Loyola University the Elizabeth M. Cudahy Memorial 
Library. 

I feel that in thus adding to the facili- 
ties of this great institution I am recording in a definite 
and permanent way, my loyalty to my faith, my esteem for the 
sons of the saintly Ignatius of Loyola, and my desire to 
further the cause of Christian education. 

The most precious of our possessions are 
not the material things of life, but rather those endowments 
that make for higher cultural standards. Libraries, those 
store houses of wisdom, are essential in our educational 
designs, and to have been the medium through which this libra- 
ry is provided for Loyola, Is an honor of which I am deeply 
appreciative. 

It is my fervent wish that the faculty, 
students and friends of Loyola may find in this memorial, not 
a mere thing of steel and stone, but a living, vibrant force 
and an eduring monument to the advancement of learning and 
those spiritual values in which our securities as Christians 
and citizens of our country are reposed. 

Aocept then, dear father, this library. 
My high hope is that it prove an inspiration and a haven to 
the thousands who may enroll under the colors of Loyola in 
our own day and in the generations that are to follow us. 



Rev. Robt. M. Kelley, S.J., 
President of Loyola University, 
Chioago, Illinois. 



Very sincerely yours, 



Page one hundred eighty-Jour 



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•—I'm 58 *- 



The New Slructu 



The cornerstone of the Elizabeth M. Cudahy Memorial Library 
was slowly settled into position at a private ceremony on January 
sixth, 1950, with President Robert M. Kelley, S. J., officiating, and 
in the presence of the students of the Lake Shore Campus. The 
building was presented to the University by Mr. E. A. Cudahy in 
memory of his wife who is still living. 

The ceremony consisted of the blessing of the cornerstone, the 
depositing behind it of a small copper box containing several memo- 
rials, a short talk by Father Kelley, and the singing of the hymn 
"Laus Deo" by the students. An official opening ceremony will 
take place in June. 




Fr. Kelley Blesses the Cornerstone. 



Page one hundred eighty-fiat 



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N 




The 
LOYOLA STADIUM 



PETER J. ANGSTEN, 
Chairman, Stadium 
Committee 



The Loyola Stadium is fairly on its way towards completion. 
Much remains to be done to make this the outstanding one of its 
kind in America. Assurances have been given me, and I see no reason 
to discount same, to the effect that the completed stadium will be 
ours by the beginning of the football season of 1930. 

The present plans call for a double-decking of the West Stand with 
permanent seats on the East and if necessary, on the North and South 
of the field. The electrification of the field is now under consideration 
and it is my belief that this feature will be accomplished along with 
the building of the field as outlined. To my mind, the lighting of the 
field for night games, especially during October, would go a long ways 
towards guaranteeing a successful season from the financial stand- 
point. 

There are a number of very unique features which the committee is 
working on and which when initiated, I know, will please the student 
body immensely. 

Your Stadium Committee, of course, is depending upon the com- 
plete co-operation of the students in bringing to a successful conclu- 
sion the program we have in mind. 

At this time, I want to take this means of thanking the many 
students who have assisted the Committee in the work of building the 
Loyola Stadium. 

Peter J. Angsten. 



Page one hundred eighty-six 



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The First Section of the New Loyola Stadii 



The following people have purchased the first boxes in the New 
Stadium. A metal plate bearing the name of the owner will be 
affixed permanently to each box. 



P. J. Angsten 
J. F. Bulger 
D. F. Bremner 
H. A. Brundage 

C. E. Byrne 
P. B. Carey 

Walter and W. J. Carroll 
Class of 1926 (Arts) 
Charles A. Comiskey 
H. Dugan 
Walter Dunn 
A. W. Goodrich 
James E. Grimes 

D. M. Healy 
W. J. Lang 
Daniel Laughlin 
P. E. McGivena 



M. J. McNally 
Matthew Morrison 
William Mueler 
Patrick Nash 
Richard Nash 
Thomas Nash 
W. E. O'Neil 
D. C. O'Shea 
Math Rauen 
J. P. Roche 
L. J. Sayre 
J. M. Schack 
Joseph Stenson 
R. M. Sweitzer 
Joseph H. Quin 
J. B. Ward 



Page one hundred eighty-seven 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 




The 

MADONNA DELL A STRADA 

CHAPEL 



REV. JAMES J. MERTZ, S.J. 



Rev. James J. Mertz, S.J., promises that the long awaited and 
much desired chapel on the Lake Shore Campus will become a reality 
before many months have passed. Ever since the Arts and Sciences 
department of the University was moved to the Lake Shore Campus, 
it has been the cherished ambition and hope of the entire faculty 
and student body to have a chapel which might be called their own. 
Since the college has been on the North Campus its religious activi- 
ties have been confined to neighboring churches and the chapel of 
the Administration building. But as the enrollment increased con- 
ditions became more and more cramped. Some years ago Father 
Mertz saw the acute need for the erection of a new and larger chapel, 
and he accordingly took steps in making preparations for the erec- 
tion of such a building. Funds were collected and then plans drawn 
up, and now this dream of the chapel is soon to be realized. 

The sketch gives some idea of how the interior of the Madonna 
Delia Strada Chapel will look. The simplicity ot the decorations, 
as well as the beautiful harmony of the architectural embellishments, 
are but suggested in this preliminary drawing, as the actual beauty 
' of the proposed edifice can only be imagined and not portrayed on 
paper. 

The chapel will have a seating capacity of about one thousand. 
This will easily accommodate all that the Lake Shore Campus will 
have for some time to come. This will obviate the present necessity 
of seeking the neighboring church for the weekly student devotions, 
as well as eliminate the obstacle of insufficient room for all the 
students, a condition which now exists in the present chapel in the 
Administration building. 



Page one hundred eigldy-c'tgld 



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The 

MADONNA DELLA STRADA 

CHAPEL 



AN INTERIOR VIEW. 




The main altar will be of the Baldachino or canopy type. There 
will be four shrines on the sides of the chapel. A large one will be 
consecrated to the North American martyrs, while the others will be 
dedicated, one to St. Ignatius, another to St. Francis Xavier, and 
the third to St. Therese, the Little Flower, and the last one to the 
Three Youthful Saints. 

Mankato marble will make up the interior decoration of the walls 
and columns, while the vaulted ceiling will be of chestnut wood. In 
general, the architectural plan will closely resemble that of the re- 
cently completed Cudahy Memorial Library, and with it will present 
two more augmentations to the existing beauty of Loyola's Lake 
Shore Campus. 

Father Mertz has been working hard on his coming chapel, yet 
funds are still insufficient with which to start building. The many 
generous people who have already contributed to the fund realize 
that things cannot be done or begun until enough money is in. 
Perhaps it is interesting to know that work on churches or chapels 
cannot be started until practically the entire cost of the construction 
is available. This ought to conciliate impatient students who com- 
plain that the chapel will be ready only for those who come after 
them. 

Particular credit for the boundless amount of work involved in 
collecting funds for the erection of this edifice must of necessity go 
to Father Mertz, the man who originated the idea, and who is in 
complete charge of the arrangements for the new unit. For the past 
few years he has given whole heartedly of his time and energy in 
this direction. His work is deserving of the thanks of the students 
and administration alike. 



Page one hundred eighty-nine 



The College in 1870 comprised 
both academy and college, the 
complete course requiring 
seven years. The three 
academic years were followed 
by "Humanities," "Poetry," 
"Rhetoric" and " Philosophy," 
successively. "Humanities" 
corresponded to senior acade- 
my and freshman college 
classes as we know them to- 
day. 



^> 



<tv 







LOYOLA LIFE 



T H 



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A 




■r's a crowd! Rumble seat riders will testify to Hi 



Registrars and deans make dates 
wit/iout the consent of the other 
parti/. Jiang a good dag is 
spoiled tig their notices informing 
one of the fact. 



Page one hundred ninety-one 



T H E 



1 9 3 




All the ear marks of a bit teller's union. 

Even the medics have time for 

pasthmes other than carving and 

hacking. 




The ass was the only one in 
the holy picture without a ^ 
halo. 




Believe it or not; we're on our wag to the chapel. 




MAKING FRIENDS. Rather an odd way one might say. True 
it's not exactly necessary but there's a lot of fun in it and espe- 
cially so if you're on the right end of the paddle. 




Good hunting! The 

The hogs congregate on the front porch to meet the mailman season opens in Oak Captain Smith scans the horizon 
and the hills. Park. from the quarter-deck. 

Page one hundred ninetg-two 



T H E 



1930 LOYOLA N 




Mundelein College, the Cardinal's answer to the 
problem, arises. 



ixed marriage 




A turret, if you wish, on the 
Medical School. 



CAMPUS VIEWS. 
It's highly improbable 
that necks are not 
strained to the limit by 
every neophyte upon 
his entrance to school. 
(There's beauty in more 
than the hidden fittings.) 



Arts Campus; 
lots of lawn. 
Nolta coed; daw- 
gone. (Pssst.poe- 
tn/.) 




It's easier com- 
ing out than 
going into this 
operating parlor. 
St. Anne's Hos- 
pital is part of 
the Med i c a I 
School. 







A Reminder. Students park their blimps or buggies {depending on the circumstances) in the 

backyard, herewith shown. 

Page one hundred ninety-three 



T H 



o y o 



A N 




FOOTBALL. The raccoon coat, jazz, and bigger 
and better football crowds are almost correlatives. 
Despite their extremes there exists beneath them 
all a structure which, though sometimes obscured, 
rests upon a wholesome foundation — youth. 





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The squad spots Pcpsodent, the demon cheer-leader. 
Page one hundred ninety-jour 



Hired Jor the 1950 season. 



T H 



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A N 





r £he smoking room is the scene of some 
intellectual application — at times. 



All the benefits oj the lab given you dear read, 
without Hie smell of formaldehyde. 




MENTAL ANGUISH. The profligate use of opportunities 
eventually brings down the wrath of the dean. Said dean 
speaks feelingly on one's obligations to himself; the high 
standards of the school; and concludes by bringing down the 
anathemas of the learned on your brow. Result is intense 
application for periods lasting as long as two days. 




Of course, it's all faked. Nurses 

play poker, or variations of it, all 

night. 




The laying of the corner stone of the new\library presents an opportunity of 
entering the building without fear of an impending fine. 



Page one hundred ninety-five 



T H E 



19 3 



L O Y O L A N 




The girls form the stag lines at Loyola dances. 



It ain't all flowers what bloom in gardens. 



Page one hundred ninety-six 



T H 




L O y O L A N 



Joe and Ed Bookstore at the old stand. "Business as 

usual, if not more so," said Ed, stuffing the swag into 

gunnysacks. 




WORKING THEIR WAY If it isn't 
one thins, it's another, and self-support- 
ing students are constantly between the 
Boss and the Bursar. 




Theme Song: 
Working on the 



/jf*-\ 


^i 


j J 

EF ^ 


L Til 


yjjfcjfcf^^i ,„ r ■ 


h£^5 


\m/T 


CSS J 



'Yes, Lady, this is Loyola . 




Complete with underslung hand- 
bag and overhead cigar lighter. 



Doug's Place: not the psychopathic ward, despite the bars and 
the boys being only half there. 



Page one hundred ninety-seven 



T H 



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A N 




Can you judge her age? The other demure lasses with Bruun 
and Downey hare just turned fourteen. 

Page one hundred ninety-eight 



This not being the feature section we re- 
quest that you note the color oj his eyes. 



T H 




A N 



Trying to make up his mind whether the easier coi 
is to put up the boat or to back water. 




SUMMER "ACTIVITIES. If, during school, 
one were to suggest that you leave a comfort- 
able bed at four A. M. to do your work may- 
hem would probably result. Yet a fishing trip 
or excursion at that hour during summer is quite 
the thing. That's life, however. 




Lit Jack Strobet proves himself a 

mass oj powerful ligaments. 

Urn Urn. 



After enduring several coats oj sunburn the tan finally comes. 
It ' s worth it they say. 

Page one hundred ninety-nine 



T H E 



LOYOLA 




& CS-& 






Lli 



7tJp and right: "That thing Osmosis," or "Hey, 
Shirtsleeves, how did you get off the reservation?" 




VACATION DAYS. Summertime, and Loyolans scat- 
ter between the mountains and the sea shore. Some seem 
to be affected by the heat, or the humidity, but they make 
a strong comeback. 




Here's lookin atch 



On the rock pile. 



Page two hundred 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 




The Students' Mass. 




RELIGION. Scenes like this may be 

encountered any day. Loyolans have 

ever before them the ideal of a constantly 

Catholic life. 




Fr. Schutte, in the center oj tt alt. 



Grant, Keating, 
Cullman, and 
O'Connor at Mil- 




After Sodality; the gangplank . 



Page two hundred one 



T H E 



9 3 



L O y O L A N 




Jim Rafferty views the Mardi Gras 

from a vantage-point in New Orleans. 




This is not a pajama party! It s 

the basket ball team, under a real 

Carolina moon. 





EXCURSIONS. Some are forced to go; others 
are only too willing to take a jaunt or ramble 
around the country to view God's handiwork in 
the line of what you see scattered here about. 




Alpha Dell suggested that its pledges 
Several advantages oj taking a investigate the Art Institute lions, 
sojourn jrom the Arts campus. ' Twas all thai was needed. 

Page two hundred two 



Soliciting your trade. We deal in 
prevarications, quibbles, and men- 
dacity. Bill Conley — notorious de- 
baler. 




Big Phil KraUse pops the winner against St. X 
in the tournament's tightest game. 




BASKETBALL. There's a lot more to the same 
than is apparent to the average spectator who sees 
the team in action, once or possibly twice, during 
the week. Long hard practice sessions bring out 
the real qualities of a man besides numerous floor 
burns and aches. 




Tom Godjreg, the most vatuabte 

man to his team Jor two years 

in tournament competition. 




Several bounces 
down Jor two n. 



Lhariie can atmost took 
down on the basket. 

Page two hundred three 



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The News reporters play the big shot. Guess 
where the portable typewriter is concealed. 



Frozen heart throbs! Ij it doesn't luke like Spelman. 




" 'I learned while sprinting to and. from 
my ontology class.' You can too." 



A mirage! Four working the Loyotan office at one time. 
Page two hundred jour 



T H E 



9 3 



L O y O L A N 




Shins and Gri 




ASSOCIATIONS — Informal groups 
are indispensable to a true Loyola Life. 





Bet they' re holding hands! 




This sure is the limb-it! 



A leaf from our cartoonist's "Idea Notebook." 

Page two hundred five 



T H 



L O Y O L A N 




t ou re goot 



Panters and Panties. Another leg show. 





MINOR SPORTS. These portray better the ideal 

of college athletics than the commercialized sports 

of the stadia. In minor sports the man plays the 

game for the game and benefits accordingly. 




Willingly! 



Eyes front'. The hand is faster than the eye. 
Page tiro hundred six 



T H E 



19 3 



L O Y O L A N 




Mother pin a rose on me! 



Marty's the bread line we null Join. 




COMMENCEMENT. The culmina- 
tion of at least four years of labor and 
self denial comes when the candidate 
mounts the boards and receives his 
sheepskin. Then it's only "the finish 
to begin." 




The balcony scene from the Senior Ball. 




How to be nonchalant though wearing your senior 
socket. 



The Baccalaureate Mass, seenjrom the balcony. 

Page two hundred seven 



"The college opens class every 
morning at 7 l i o'clock and 
continues until Z}4 o'clock, 
with l x 2 hours for luncheon." 

Early Cataloq . 




PUBLICATIONS 



T H 



l o y o 



A N 




The LOYOLAN 

and 

The LOYOLA QUARTERLY 



MORTON D. ZABET., 

Moderator 



In its seventh volume, The Loyotan attempts to suggest again, 
as it did in its first, the role of Loyola University in the development 
of Chicago. In compiling the material of this book, the editors have 
faced the problems and labors with which their predecessors con- 
tended. But like those predecessors, they have come away from 
their work not only with the knowledge that they mastered their 
swarming difficulties, but that they gained a kind of administrative 
and literary training which will provide them with a score of ad- 
vantages in their future work. The retiring staff of The Loyola 
Quarterly, through having kept alive a far older institution in the 
school, may count a profit probably less material but no less es- 
sential. They have given a large fraction of their time to reminding 
the student-body that literature is not wholly a theoretical matter, 
that no literature is so close to a living generation as that which is 
being written within its own lifetime, and that no piece of writing is 
so important as that which a man produces himself. The class-room 
activities of a university — always and indubitably the first considera- 
tion — would lack vital assets were they to be deprived of these 
journalistic enterprises. Certain activities in a school have no organic 
relationship to its academic ideals. The journalistic projects should 
be a realization of those ideals in practical terms. The sciences, 
literature, philosophy, and the arts here find their forum; the entire 
life of the school-year here finds its chronicle. As attributes of a 
modern university, both The Loyolan and The Loyola Quarterly 
have a real responsibility to observe. It is to the credit of their 
respective editors that this responsibility has been faced, and in so 
worthy a manner discharged. 

Morton Dauwen Zabel. 



Page two hundred ten 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 



The 
LOYOLA NEWS 



D. HERBERT ABEL, 

Moderator 




My first year as moderator of the Loyola University weekly 
newspaper, the Loyola News, has been one replete with new experi- 
ences and the pleasurable friendship of the many students with 
whom I have come in contact. It has been a most happy year for 
me in every way. The spirit of the staff members, as displayed 
through their constant and faithful work on the publication, has 
made a comparatively easy task of moderating the News. 

I feel sure that the time and effort which the individual members 
of the staff have put into making the News a truly representative 
organ of the university has been of tremendous value to them. They 
have learned to write in a clear, concise style about subjects which 
they have unearthed about the campus through their own research. 
This independence of thought and action has developed all who 
labored diligently into better and more capable students. A training 
has been received which has meant as much to the staff members as 
the knowledge they have received from class-room exercises. It has 
been an unquestionably beneficial supplement to the recognized 
curriculum. 

The Loyola News has a firm foundation upon which to build. At 
present it is recognized as an excellent college weekly, but the mem- 
bers of the staff are looking forward to even greater things in the 
future. This is a healthy attitude, for once an organization becomes 
stagnant, it is slipping. I look forward with pleasure to a continued 
association with the publication. This past year I have found my 
greatest pleasure in working with the staff, and I can only hope that 
next year will be as successful from every viewpoint. 

D. Herbert Abel. 



Page two hundred eleven 



T H E 



LOYOLA 



N 




The 
1930 LOYOLAN 



RICHARD O CONNOR, 

Editor-in-Chief 






THE STAFF OF THE 1930 LOYOLAN 

Richard O'Connor Editor-in-Chief 

Robert Thomson Managing Editor 

John L. Lenihan Business Manager 

Edward J. Dowling Senior Editor 

Robert J. Rafferty Life Editor 

Section Editors 

Joseph A. Walsh Forensics 

Timothy J. Connelly' Football 

James F. Rafferty Basketball 

Fred Ludwig Minor Sports 

James Vonesh Administration 

Edward Healy Fraternities 

Frank D. Arado . . . Society 

John K. Bruun Dramatics 

Oliver Landreth Publications 

Edward Drolet . . . Life Art Editor 

Departmental Editors 

Rosemary Griffin Sociology 

Edward Glasser P re-Legal 

John J. Kelly Evening Law 

Edward Smith Day Law 

Clifford Steinle Medicine 

John Sweetman Commerce 

Freshman Assistants 

John Callahan, Louis Tordella, Robert O'Connor, 

Thomas Murphy, Mark Guerin, Paul Gormican, Louis 

Zingrabe 



Pntje two hundred twelve 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 



Ihe 
YEAR'S HISTORY 



A whole lot oj 

work jammed 

Into a little book. 




Gosh! 

It's really wonderful to work with a staff that is 
always alert, always willing, always overflowing 
with initiative, never in the way, never wasting 
time, never needing to be told the second time; 
it's really wonderful. It seems like a dream. 

It was a dream, alas. That's why there are a few 
mistakes in this book which could have and 
should have been avoided. That's why the book 
did not appear on the Fifth of May as was origin- 
ally intended. That is why the poor abused editor 
was in the mood to use a gat several times during 
the year. 

But now that it is all over and the book is out, 
successful or unsuccessful, why harangue about 
how it was done? The real reward for working on 
a publication comes only to those who actually 
work, and only in proportion to the amount of 
work they do. 

Those who usurp energy rather than furnish it 
place themselves in the category of the noble jelly- 
fish: exceedingly clever but rather useless. We 
bow to their success if that's what they believe 
success is. 

Several members of the staff have developed 
an initiative that is really admirable. It is to 
those few that the success of this book may be 
attributed. 





RAFFERTY 




LANDRETH 



Page tu'o hundred thirteen 



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A 




Top Row: STEINLE, R. RAFFERTY, CONNELLY, MANN, J. RAFFERTY, WALSH, LANDRETH. Second 

Row: TOMCZAK, GORMICAN, LUDWIG, VONESH, BRUUN, SPELMAN, SMITH. Front Row: LENIHAN 

HEALY, ZABEL (MODERATOR), R. O'CONNOR, THOMSON, DOWLING, CONLEY, MURPHY. 



In preparing The 1950 Loyolan, the seventh 
volume to be issued, the most outstanding change 
attempted was one of mechanical construction. 
In previous years it has been the custom to follow 
the same general layout in a rather conservative 
manner. This year, in spite of the fact that nearly 
every man on the staff was new to the work, new 
forms were designed throughout. Possibly some 
of the pages will strike the reader as being some- 
what radical and unappealing; yet, taking the 
book as a whole, an effect is obtained that is rather 
different from that of the average yearbook. 

The present book varies radically, likewise, in 
the nature of many parts of its literary content. 
This was done as a result of the general talk to the 
effect that "no one reads it anyway." If no one 
does read it, we are safe. It they do, they will 
weep and tell us at any rate how terrible the book 
is; then we'll have proof that someone read some- 
thing. No doubt there are stretches of poor taste. 
Such is to be expected in anything that vanes 
slightly from the commonplace — but the space 
had to be filled and at times it was difficult to be 
serious. 

The 1931 Loyolan will be edited by Robert 
Rafferty, assisted by John Lenihan. Believing 
that the best policy is to allow the new editor to 



Page two hundred fourteen 



l o y o 



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// '.i a fake. Nobody is really working. 



pick his own staff from the most able members 
of the past staff and to place them as he sees best 
the rest of the positions can not be announced. 

Joseph Walsh, James Rafferty, Louis Tordella, 
John Callahan, James Vonesh, Frank Arado, 
Francis Steinbrecher, Robert O'Connor, Mark 
Guerin, Frank Arado, John Bruun, Oliver Land- 
reth, Fred Ludwig, and Ed Drolet are the ones 
who, on the basis of work done this year, should 
merit responsible positions. 

Among the members of the present staff the 
most outstanding for common sense, ability and 
initiative was Edward Dowling, Senior Editor. 
His section was, without doubt, the largest in the 
book and we leave it to the reader to decide 
whether or not it is the most accurate and pleasing. 
However, the real worth of a staff member is 
sometimes not fully indicated merely by his sec- 
tion. Ed finished his work on time. That's what 
counts. 

It is impossible to ramble over the accomplish- 
ments of every member of the staff. Some ful- 
filled their duties rather haphazardly, others lacked 
the initiative that was expected of them and others 
failed completely in fulfilling their trust. Happily 
these were merely a few. The others worked along 
in a satisfactory manner and the book was finished 
after all. 



Page two hundred fifteen 



T H E 



o y o 



A N 




The 
LOYOLA NEWS 



ANTHONY TOMCZAK, 

Editor 



U. J. MURPHY 



THE SEASON 

In spite of what well meaning contemporaries 
may say in challenge to the claim of the Loyola 
News as the greatest Catholic college newspaper 
in America, we still maintain that it is that, and 
offer as proof volume six, just recently completed. 

The beginning of the school year saw a complete 
change of staff heads, including a new editor-in- 
chief, which position was taken over by Anthony 
Tomczak, a new managing editor, John King 
Bruun, business manager, Thomas M. Poynton, 
Jr., and, by no means least, a new iaculty modera- 
tor, D. Herbert Abel, formerly of the Dayton U. 
News, and the Dayton Journal. 

The staff was new, but the spirit of the News 
was the same. The traditional yearly Fall Frolic 
was sponsored on October 19, the tennis tourna- 
ment, though abruptly terminated by the weather 
before the finals were held, was again held in the 
early fall, the annual basketball tournament issue, 
published in March, surpassed in excellence and 
news content all other former tournament issues, the 
fourth annual Ho-Hum book was published in 
May, and the annual banquet, at which John King 



Page two hundred sixteen 



T H E 



19 3 



L O Y O L A N 



The 
LOYOLA NEWS 



The weekly news sheet ggfr 
issued by loyola students. 



^•^^ ?Coijola tflfius 
JANUARY JAMBOREE SATURDAY 

m 




Bruun was made editor-in-chiet for volume seven, 
brought to a very fine close another year of suc- 
cess and prosperity for the News. 

Such a brief resume of the year's activity hardly 
does the paper justice, for it says nothing at all 
about new features introduced, further develop- 
ment of an inter-departmental organization, and 
the undying promotion of all-university functions. 

Further, an account of the News would be in- 
complete without giving proper credit to several 
outstanding individual members of the staff. Most 
important, and probably responsible to a great 
degree for the success of volume six, was the effi- 
ciency of the business department, so nobly man- 
aged by Thomas M. Poynton, Jr. With remod- 
eled offices wherein to work, new and adequate 
equipment and furniture wherewith to work, and 
willing and talented assistants who co-operated 
with his plans, Mr. Poynton developed such an 
efficient business department as would give credit 
to the most complicated of business offices. Ad- 
vertising was increased, circulation was expanded, 
and office records and files for the first time took 
upon themselves a real semblance of order and 
efficient arrangement. 



DAHLBERG 



Page two hundred seventeen 



T H 



O 



y O L A 



N 






Top /?<w: FARRELL, SCHOWALTER, LANDRETH, GIBBONS, SPELMAN, FUCHS, STEINLE, FEELEY, 
MC NICHOLAS, UNGARO, HAMMOND, BAK. Second Row: KAIN, BURNS, SKWIOT, WAGER, MONGOVEN, 
GOTTSCHALK, DOYLE, FRANEY, MC DUFFIE, M. WALSH, J. RAFFERTY, R. MURPHY. Front Row: 
WEST, KOZLOWSKI, ABEL (MODERATOR), MOOTER, KNITTLE, TOMCZAK, D. J. MURPHY, POYNTON, 
OHLHEISER, BRUUN, J. WALSH. 



D. R. MURPHY 





The experience in newspaper work, coupled 
with a true spirit of mutual help and understand- 
ing, that was the possession of Mr. D. Herbert 
Abel, the faculty moderator, added considerably 
to the editorial and reportorial efficiency of the 
paper. Being, once, a college newspaper editor 
himself, he knew the various ramifications and pit- 
falls of editing so well, that the editor of the News 
almost did not have to "learn by experience" — he 
profited by the experience of Mr. Abel. 

John King Bruun, the editor-elect, acting as 
managing editor, and incidentally, as chairman of 
the editorial board, helped considerably in organ- 
izing the departments, and in securing editorials, 
many of which were commented upon and re- 
printed by several other college papers. 

It is impossible to enumerate the fine work done 
by others on the staff. Suffice it to say, however, 
that the work done by each individual on the staff 
was appreciated by the editors, even though a 
paragraph is not devoted to them in this article. 

And now the Loyola News is looking forward to 
another year of progress and success, ever working 
to merit our claim to the title of "The Greatest 
Catholic College Newspaper in America." 

Anthony C. Tomczak. 



Page twdlfiundred eighteen 



T H 



l o y o 



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Action in the News Tower. 



THE STAFF 

Anthony C. Tomczak Editor-in-Chtef 

John K. Bruun Managing Editor 

Thomas Poynton Business Manager 

Robert Healy | 

V Lake Shore Campus Editors 

Paul Kain J 

Larry Crowley' Downtown College Managing Editor 

Daniel J. Murphy Sports Editor 

Austin J. Doyle ^ 

John T. Franey V Ass' I Sports Editors 

Matt Oehlberg J 

Joseph Mooter Advertising Manager 

James Feeley 1 

,. -. > Circulation Managers 

Merlin Mungoven J 

Martin Walsh Exchange Editor 

Columnists 

Daniel R. Murphy Ho-Hum 

Oliver Landreth Inquiring Reporter 

Roger Knittel What Of It? 

Victor Ungaro Book Xotes 

Thomas Cole Commerce Chatter 

John P. Strobel Who's Who 

Joseph Norton Monogram Musings 

Page two hundred nineteen 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 




The 
LOYOLA QUARTERLY 



ROBERT JAMES RAFFERTY, 

Editor 






THE STAFF 

Robert J. Rafferty Editor 

William H. Conley Managing Editor 

Jack J. Lannon Literary Editor 

Thomas L. Spelman Dramatic Editor 

Francis Steinbrecher Feature Editor 

Francis Calkins Business Manager 

Charles Mann Circulation Manager 

Edward Dowling Exchange Editor 

HISTORY 

The Loyola Quarterly is the oldest publication of 
the university. Though changing its name several 
times during the course of its existence the maga- 
zine has always remained essentially one of the 
same nature. 

It was founded in 1888 and after being issued 
for a period of a few years was discontinued. It 
was revived in 1901 under the title of The St. 
Ignatius Collegian and kept this name until 1915 
when it became known as The Loyola University 
Magazine. In 1921 it was again renamed. It 
assumed the monicker of The Loyola Quarterly 
then. 

The functions of year book and newspaper have 
been relinquished by The Quarterly as the other 
publications of the university were established. 
It is now devoted entirely to literary writing. 



Page two hundred twenty 



T H 



LOYOLA 



The 
LOYOLA QUARTERLY 



IvOYOIv^A 
.QUARTSRI^T 



A magazine containing 
some of the literary achieve- 
ments oj Loyola students. 




THE YEAR 

It is axiomatic that such endeavors as fail to merit for themselves 
the place in the sun to which their nurturers would exalt them are 
often bolstered up to a place of high repute by omissions of fact and 
the employment of half truths. It is rather a facile method of satis- 
fying the all important ego and also of putting up a strong front to 
the unknowing. 

To summarize the accomplishments and attainment of the Loyola 
Quarterly in such a manner would be no unpleasant task. One 
could pass over the discouragements confronted by the few workers 
when their efforts were ridiculed in fellow publications and by half 
baked orators; he could forget or laugh aside the insistence of would-be 
literates that their term papers be handed down to posterity in 
ten point caps and the offense taken when they were not ; and he 
might even brush aside the realization that pipe dreams, hopes, 
and plans of the previous summer vacation had not seen their entire 
culmination. 

This is not to infer that the Quarterly failed in its purpose of pre- 
senting the student body with such aspirations for literary renown 
as were inferior to those which in the past made the magazine a 
leader of its kind. It does signify, however, that the student body 
is not sufficiently appreciative of the quality of the publication. 
Perhaps the pendulum will swing. A grind of the first water re- 
cently vouchsafed the information that a short story pleased him. 
Mayhap this is a good sign. 

Credit for what the volume has indicated itself to be is especially 
due to three staff members. William H. Conley, Managing Editor, 
besides taking care of the majority of articles assigned to contribu- 
tors, found time to write editorials, Coffee House material and a 
series of articles entitled "What Price Prosperity?" which gained 
recognition throughout the country. Thomas L. Spelman, the 



Page two hundred twenty-one 



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1 


K _::"!■ 9~ 9 B| flj 

V ' -'■p '■ Jot *- ' JSt H ^h : ^1 H 





Zop ff/ni'; LUDWIG, DOWLING, BRUUN, SPEL.MAN', MANN. Front Row: R. O'CONNOR, TOMCZAK, 
ZABEL (MODERATOR), R. RAFFERTY, CONLEY, LANDRETH. 

volatile dramatic editor, employed his adjectives in such an uncom- 
mon way that his reviews were nothing short of things of beauty, 
joys forever, and gems for the people. Ed Dowling, holding a com- 
paratively minor position on the staff, besides contributing regularly 
and editing his column, found time to do numerous uncredited 
tasks. The remainder of the staff: Jack J. Lannon, Charles Mann, 
Francis (What-a-man) Calkins, and Francis Steinbrecher helped 
by discharging their duties competently. 

It is gratifying to the outgoing staff to know that the publication 
will be in capable hands when the duties of putting out Volume 
XXVIII begin to assume proportions. An exceedingly able group of 
freshmen will have advanced to fill the ranks of staff members and 
contributors who have received their diplomas. The ablest of these, 
from indications given up to the present, are Louis Tordella, Paul 
Quinn, John Gill, Joseph Mammoser, John Callahan, John Durkin, 
William Wilkins, Mark Guerin, William Collins, and James Poynton. 

The most willing of the upper classmen to devote their talents 
to the magazine by contributing were Alex. McGavick, Lothar 
Nurnberger, Richard O'Connor, Roger Knittel, John Bruun, Julian 
D'Esposito, Frank Conley, Douglas McCabe, Anthony Tomczak, 
Roman Zalatorious, and Benedict Spalding. Unfortunately some 
of the most able of them are graduating in the class of 1950. 

The future of the publication, resting as it will be in the hands of 
such of the talented ones as will return to the university, is assured. 
May they aspire to more than they can accomplish; relegate per- 
sonal gratification to the interests of the Quarterly; trust in the good 
sense of printers and advisors; and encourage writing of such a char- 
acter as will reflect credit on a worthy publication of a truly great 

universitv. r, t t> 

J Robert James Rafferty. 

Page two hundred twenty-two 



T H 



L O Y O L A N 



1 ^^? C " 



tor-,, 




OTHER PUBLICATIONS 

In addition to the three major publications of the University there 
are several others of varying importance. 

The Delia Strada is a monthly newspaper published by Rev. James 
J. Mertz, S.J., in the interest of the Maria Delia Strada Chapel. In 
addition to giving news concerning the progress in the drive for the 
Chapel it contains a regular message from Fr. Mertz to the students 
and to friends of Loyola. 

Jl id- America, formerly the Illinois Catholic Historical Review and 
still published by the Illinois Catholic Historic Association, is the 
official organ of a society so closely related to the University that it 
may well be called a University publication. 

Ciscora is the organ of the Chicago Student Conference on Relig- 
ious Activities. The paper consists of eight pages and is issued 
monthly by a staff consisting entirely of Loyola Students. Thomas 
Downey, the Editor, is assisted by Martin Walsh and Thomas 
Murphy, Assistant Editor and Circulation Manager, respectively. 

The Bur is published by the Loyola College of Dentistry to pro- 
vide the latest news in the Dental Profession to the members of the 
alumni. It is published quarterly and contains valuable information. 

The Denlos is a yearbook published by the students of the College 
of Dental Surgery along the same lines as The Loyolan although on 
a smaller scale. Harold Salzman edited the 1930 book. 

The Loyola Educational Digest contains the current news in the 
educational field in a condensed form. The Educational Department 
under the direction of Dean Austin G. Schmidt, S.J., of the Down- 
town College publishes it. 



Page two hundred twenty-three 



"We respectfully dedicate these 
our first efforts at regular 
journalism to His Grace, the 
Most Reverend James Ed- 
ward Ouigley, D.D., Arch- 
bishop of Chicago, our Father 
and Friend. — The Students of 
St. Ignatius College." 

Si. Ignatius Collegian, 1905. 




FORENSICS 



T H 



O Y O L A N 




The 

LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 
DEBATING CLUB 

and the 

SOCK AND BUSKIN CLUB 



CHARLES S. COSTELLO, 

Forensics and Dramatics 
Coach 



The growth of debating activities at Loyola is, without question 
quite remarkable. The splendid trips and the excellent schedule 
arranged by Robert McCabe, the manly showings of the team at 
home and on tour, the fine spirit of the semi-public debates, makes this 
year Loyola's greatest. 

In no small way has the success of this year and the successes of 
the past three years been aided by the splendid leadership of the 
president of the Debating Club, William H. Conley. His friendly 
personality, his scholarhip, his ability to speak, his willingness to 
help the less fortunate members of the club have made him the 
outstanding figure in the history of Loyola's forensic activities. 

The Sock and Buskin Club has functioned most successfully 
during the past season. This was due in no small way to the inspiring 
way in which work was carried on by the two outstanding men in 
the club, Ted Connelly, President, and John Bruun, Business Man- 
ager. Under their leadership spirit was high and success was practi- 
cally assured throughout the year. 

Charles S. Costello. 



Page two hundred twenty-six 



o 



y O L A N 



The 
DEBATING CLUB 



WILLIAM H. CONLEY 

President 




"Debating is one of the major sports at Loyola," was the tribute 
paid to the forensic endeavors of the University by Dr. Starr, head 
of the Bureau of Business Research at the University of Indiana 
when he presided over the debate between the Ramblers and the 
Hoosiers at Bloomington in March. Truly, the record of the debaters 
this year in addition to past achievements marks Loyola as one of 
the forensic centers of the nation. Her name is known from Boston 
to Los Angeles and from Detroit to New Orleans. 

The success of Loyola in the debating and oratorical world is out- 
standing not only because of victories but because of the initiative 
on the part of students themselves which have made victories pos- 
sible. Under the guidance of a skilled coach, by means of individual 
initiative, and through balanced team work rather than individual 
glorification the organization has not only collected a long line of 
impressive victories but has performed a function in the University 
by providing training which cannot be received through any other 
medium. 

In spite of the continued success of the club there is one thing 
which marks the entire organization. It is never satisfied with the 
past but is continually striving for still greater heights. As long as 
that spirit is predominant Loyola will continue to be known as a 
debating center, will continue to be known as a contender for the 
national debating championship, and will continue to be known as 
a University where the opportunities for a complete education are 
still made use of. 

Individual stars do not make Loyola nationally known. It is the 
spirit of the entire organization. With that spirit which becomes 
more intense every year she will continue her climb to fame. As 
those of us who this year had the opportunity to guide the debating 
course pass on the administration to other hands we feel our efforts 
will be but mere shadows of the work which will be accomplished in 
the future. Wm. H. Conley. 



Page two hundred twenty-seven 



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The 

LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 
DEBATING CLUB 



ROBERT MCCABE, 

Business Manager 



CASSARETTO 






OFFICERS 

William H. Conley President 

Frank P. Cassaretto Vice-President 

Robert J. Murphy Secretary 

Robert J. McCabe. . . .Business Manager 

Charles H. Mann 

Assistant Business Manager 

Thomas Downey' 

JIanager of Semi-Public Debates 

Joseph A. Walsh Publicity Director 



Thirty-four intercollegiate debates with schools 
of recognized forensic caliber; two trips through 
the southeast, totaling more than 4500 miles; nu- 
merous semi-public debates held in all sections of 
the city — thus we briefly summarize the largest 
and most successful season in the history of the 
Loyola University debating club. 

Realizing that friendly relationships are far more 
valuable than judges decisions, Loyola, contrary 
to the policy of most schools, has debated ten dif- 
ferent questions during the past season. These 
ten topics were discussed in thirty-four contests, 
seventeen of which were non-decision debates. Of 
the remaining, Loyola won ten and lost seven. 



Page two hundred twenty-eight 



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4k 

1 




I! 


I 


W ^ ® 


W ' 


I 


r f- ? 





Top Row: J. RAFFERTY, WALSH, MC DUFFIE, R. RAFFERTY, LENIHAN, AR.ADO, GORMICAN. Second 

Row: MALLON, POYNTON, DOWLING, MOOTER, SHANAHAN, DURKIN. Front Row: BRUUN, DOWNEY, 

CONLEY, MURPHY, CASSARETTO. 

The season was officially opened on December 13 with Indiana 
Lmversity as the first opponent. The topic of this debate, one of 
the most interesting and important questions of the season, was: 
Resolved: that the principle of the chain store is detrimental to the 
best interest of the American public. William Conley, John Bruun, 
and Robert Murphy, all veteran debaters, upheld the affirmative 
lor Loyola, before the student assembly. Charles Boyle acted as 
chairman, before an audience that was about equally divided con- 
cerning the winner. No decision was rendered. 

After a two month's intermission, the debaters from the University 
ol Louisville met and defeated Loyola before the student body of 
Sacred Heart College at Lake Forest. Murphy and Bruun again 
spoke affirmatively on the chain store question, with Conley as 
chairman. 

Later a rather unique and very interesting question was discussed 
with the men from the University of Cincinnati; Resolved: that 
higher education should be reserved for those of superior ability. 
Edward Dowling, James Rafferty and William Conley took the af- 
firmative, and though the debate was officially a non-decision affair, 
the students of Longwood academy, who comprised the audience, 
seemed to favor the local men. John Lenihan acted as chairman. 

Two days later, Charles Mallon and Thomas Downey represented 
Loyola in a debate with Lincoln Memorial university, at Mercy 
High School. Lincoln Memorial upheld the affirmative of a much 
discussed question, Resolved: that the nations should adopt a plan 
of complete disarmament, excepting such forces as are necessary for 
police purposes. Joseph A. Walsh acted as chairman before an ap- 
preciative audience of about 1000 girls. 



Page two hundred twenty-nine 



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Standing: ROBERT MURPHY, JAMES RAFFERTY, JOHN BRUUN, THOMAS DOWNEY. Seated: WILLIAM 

CON LEY. 

On Sunday morning, March 2, William Conley and James Rafferty 
left for the south to compete in twelve intercollegiate debates. Of 
these they won eight, lost two, while two were no-decision contests. 

Two days later, as the home debaters, composed of Joseph A. 
Walsh, Louis Tordella and Robert J. Murphy, were given a unani- 
mous judges' decision over Detroit University, Conley and Rafferty 
won a critic judge's decision from Loyola of New Orleans. 

While Rafferty and Conley, team "A," were enjoying the Mardi 
Gras at New Orleans, team "B," composed of John Bruun and 
Thomas Downey engaged in a no-decision contest with Washington 
University at St. Louis. 

Continuing their tour through the picturesque southland, team A 
defeated Howard College, Lincoln Memorial University, and Center 
College, discussing in these debates variations of the disarmament 
question. Downey and Bruun won their next debate from Southeast 
Missouri State Teachers, and then lost three debates, to Southwestern 
College, Birmingham Southern, and Emory, the only thing to mar 
an otherwise successful schedule. 

As the travelling debaters were making the name of Loyola famous 
in the south, two more home debates were held, one with the Universi- 
ty of Florida, the other with St. Louis University. The Florida 
debate was presented before the students of St. Xavier's College by 
Edward Dowling and Robert Murphy, with Joseph Walsh as chair- 
man. This also was a nondecision debate on disarmament, Loyola 
opposing this policy. The St. Louis debaters continued their string 
of victories by defeating Charles Mallon and John Durkin, both 
freshmen, on the disarmament question, at Alvernia. 

After a brief stay in Lexington, Kentucky, famous for its fine 
horses and women, Conley and Rafferty, having engaged with the 



Page two-hundred thirty 



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University of Kentucky in a no-decision contest, proceeded to the 
University of Louisville where they won a debate on the chain stores. 
Then journeying to Indiana U, where Robert Murphy joined them, 
another no-decision debate on the chain store question was held. 
Four more debates completed the schedule of team "A." A victory 
from Indiana State Normal College, also on the chain store topic; 
a defeat from Wabash College on the affirmative of the Lake-to- 
ocean-waterway; a decision over Purdue, which was given in the 
form of a three to one verdict of an audience numbering more than 
500; and the second defeat of the entire trip, suffered at the hands of 
Manchester College, brought to a close a most interesting and 
valuable itinerary. 

The final, and undoubtedly the most interesting debate of the 
year, was held on Tuesday evening, April 15 before an appreciative 
audience at the Loyola Community Theater. In this debate with 
Purdue University, on the very attractive question, "Should intercol- 
legiate athletics be abolished?" Loyola was represented by "Bill" 
Conley, and his teammate, "Bob" Murphy. Opposing Loyola's 
best, were Charles "Stretch" Murphy, nationally famous basketball 
man, and "Eb" Caraway, of football and baseball fame. Loyola's 
Charlie Murphy acted as chairman. No decision was rendered. 




GOR.MICAN 



TORDEILA 



Page two hundred thirty-one 



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THE JOHN NAGHTEN DEBATE 



With the increased interest in forensic endeavors at Loyola, it is 
little wonder that the John Naghten debate aroused the enthusiasm 
of the entire student body. Four members of the debating club sur- 
vived the preliminary contests, and were chosen to compete for the 
John Naghten medal, significant of the debating championship of 
the university. 

Held before a large audience at the St. Ignatius Auditorium, the 
four veteran debaters argued the question, Resolved: that the five 
day week should be adopted in all American industries. Upholding 
the affirmative, were John Keating and George Ray, the latter, the 
winner of the Carter Harrison Oratorical Medal. Richard Ford and 
Robert Murphy presented the case for the negative. Three of the 
debaters had distinguished themselves on the trip through the east, 
just a few months previous to this contest, and the fourth man, 
Robert Murphy, participated in all the home debates of the season. 

A critic judge's decision was rendered by Professor Bernheimer, a 
member of the Northwestern University School of Speech. Accord- 
ing to his decision, the negative won the debate, and Richard Ford 
was awarded the Naghten medal. Mr. Ford, who was president of 
the debating club during the 1928-1929 season, had distinguished 
himself as a debater during the four years he spent as a member of 
the debating society, and the debating championship of the univer- 
sitv brought to a fitting close his admirable forensic career. 




Page two hundred thirty-two 



HE 1930 LOYOLAN 




The 
CARTER H. HARRISON ORATORICAL CONTEST 

Climaxing a brilliant college career, Charles A. Boyle, a senior in 
the Liberal Arts college, won the Carter H. Harrison Medal, emble- 
matic of the oratorical championship of Loyola. Boyle, with three 
others, delivered his winning oration at the assembly of Lake Shore 
Campus students, on April 2. Choosing as the subject of his speech, 
"John Marshall and the Constitution," he very aptly showed what 
a prominent part this great soldier, scholar and statesman played in 
the formation of this sacred document. 

At the elimination contest held early in March, in which members 
from the Law school also participated, six men were chosen to compete 
in the finals. Only four of these men, however, engaged in the final 
contest : Boyle, Paul Ouinn, who ranked second, Robert W. O'Connor 
and John Durkin. A critic judge's decision rendered by Reverend 
Edward F. Garraghan, S. J., gave Boyle 15 out of a possible 24 points. 

Boyle, who is also president of the student council, one of the 
highest honors a Loyolan can obtain, is, despite the fact that he 
works eight hours per day outside of class time, an active member 
of the Sodality, the Loyola News staff, and the debating club. Since 
his entrance to Loyola, he has endeared himseli to the faculty mem- 
bers as well as to the students, and his victory in this contest, is one 
of the most popular decisions ever rendered at Loyola. 



Page t:l>b hundred tidiiy-thn 



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The 
LAW DEBATING CLUB 



SYDNEY DE LOVE, 

President. 



OFFICERS 

Sydney DeLove President 

Al Brown I' ice-President 

Larry Crowley Business Manager 

Daniel J. Murphy . Secretary and Treasurer 



CROWLEY 
.MURPHY 



Not long after the rigors of registration and its 
accessory tribulations had passed away at the 
Downtown College last fall, the happy thought 
occurred to a few members of the Day Law School 
that there should be a law debating organization. 
Since there was no adequate means for training 
the future lawyers in the art of speech, which is 
so essential to their success, the proposal met with 
the immediate approval of the students and the 
faculty. 

The work of organization fell to Sidney DeLove, 
formerly of Valparaiso University, and Larry 
Crowley, formerly of the Loyola Medical School. 
DeLove was elected president of the new organiza- 
tion and Crowley took over the difficult task of 
manager of debates. Under their guidance a 
number of students made use of the opportunities 
offered for development of forensic talent. 

The work of organization was soon accomplished 
and the work was then begun to schedule debates 
and procure locations to hold them. Because of 
the enviable reputation of the University Squad in 
previous years little difficulty was met on the part 
of the lawyers in scheduling important law schools. 



Page two hundred thirty-jour 



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Top Row: J. WIEDEMANN, J. EISEN, A. ROSKOWSKI, J. C. RYAN, W. LYNCH, P. FAZIO, T. NIEMEIRA, 
T. HART, E. SMITH, J. UNIVITCH, J. SANFILLIPPO, M. LEAR. Second Row: C. COLLINS, A. BROWN, 
R. SWEITZER, F. BORELLI, L. CROWLEY, S. LUSTER, E. CURLY, V. MC GOWAN, N. MC AULIFFE, 
N. MALLOY, W. CASSIDY. Front Row: J. BASTA, E. DROLET, J. SOLOMON, S. DE LOVE, MR. JAMES W. 
MILNE (Coach), J. CONNELL, J. WAGNER, D. J. MURPHY, R. KELLY. 



The matter of staging the contests offered a more serious problem. 
Chicago, not being particularly interested in such things as debating, 
proved a poor field for the contests. Since the debaters could not 
leave town for every debate the only solution lay in the radio. While 
the allotted time was short for an adequate presentation of arguments 
the possibility of an audience made the radio debate the more desir- 
able means of staging the contests. 

The nucleus of the squad this year was made up of Sidney DeLove, 
Al Brown, John Waldron, Edward Hubke, Neal McAuliffe, Larry 
Crowley, Lee Hosea, Edward Drolet and Edmund Neimera. Their 
efforts have been rewarded with success far beyond that which 
could be expected for the first year. The initiative of the men re- 
sponsible for the organization and the success of the endeavor 
is another manifestation of the spirit permeating Loyola forensics. 
Mr. James W. Milne, a prominent Chicago attorney, coached the 
team. 

The organization fills a long felt need in the Law School for some 
outlet for forensic ability and for practice in speech. The enthusiasm 
of the faculty and the interest manifest by the students in the new 
club assures those interested of its continued success. The organiza- 
tion has received the good wishes of the various schools of the Uni- 
versity who hope that this organization may represent the law 
school in the same capable manner that the Varsity squad represents 
the University in the forensic world. 



Page two hundred thirty-five 



"The Loyola Debating Society 
was organized on the 10th of 
November, 1875. Its object 
is to promote the cultivation 
of eloquence, the acquisition 
of sound knowledge and a 
taste for literary studies." 

Early Catalog. 




DRAMATICS 



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The 
SOCK AND BUSKIN CLUB 



TIMOTHY J. CONNELLY, 

President 






OFFICERS 

Timothy J. Connelly President 

Virginia Barker J' ice-President 

Thomas L. Spelman Secretary 

Iohn Lenihan Stage Manager 



With Ted Connelly at the helm, the good ship 
"Sock and Buskin" has battled its way through 
another year of highly successful dramatics. Aided 
by two score devout followers of things histrionic, 
Connelly piloted the old show boat into two major 
performances and out again with colors flying. 
The first to pack the Loyola Community Hippo- 
drome with thousands of contented customers was 
"Turn To The Right" and the second opus which 
had the public packed in solidly from the orchestra 
pit to the peanut gallery was "The Call Of The 
Banshee." And because that same public could 
not be denied, two one act plays were offered them 
toward the end of the year. These shorter come- 
diettas were received as enthusiastically as the 
full length plays. 

Working for the first time in conjunction with 
the Loyola Community Theater, the productions 
were highly successful both from an artistic and a 
financial viewpoint. The arrangement provided 
that the Sock and Buskin Club retain its identity 
and that the Community Theater present it under 
the Community's auspices. 



Page two hundred thirty-eight 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 



The 

UNIVERSITY DRAMATIC 

SOCIETY 



JOHN K. BRUUN 

Business Manager 




While Ted Connelly can claim the lion's share of credit for the 
progress of the Club, lest we forget (and lose our lives thereby) there 
was a woman in the case. Miss Virginia Barker, known first and 
foremost as an actress of distinction and proven ability, is second and 
next most the vice-president of the organization. It was she who was 
Ted's right hand man, (no, you can't say that) well, she was his right 
hand lady, and no little honor is rightfully hers. The secretary of the 
group was Thomas L. Spelman who capably handled the correspond- 
ence and such. John K. Bruun held the office of Business Manager 
and put in a strenuous year trying to make jingle on the cash register. 




Top Row: TORDELLA, MAMMOSER, BRUUN, CONNELLY, SPELMAN, NORTEN, ARADO. 
CALKINS, J. MAGNER, V. BARKER, B. CRAULEY, C. HOGAN, GOTTSCHALK 



it Roa 



Page two hundred thirty-nine 



o 



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A 




GEORGE DUNLAP, JR., MARY PUERTE, JAMES HAMMOND, ANN KREGER, BARBARA DIETER AND JAMES 
BRENNAN GROW SOMEWHAT (?) AFFECTIONATE IN "TURN TO THE RIGHT" 



WHAT'S IN A NAME? 

"Call a rose a violet, and still you aint got a rose" — James Ham- 
mond in the "Call of the Banshee." 

Names are funny things — especially the Loyola dramatic club's. 
At first glance "Sock and Buskin Club" has about as much meaning 
as the Abendpost's editorials in the News Tower. But then, if you are 
a representative Loyola student with a natural bent for ferreting 
out mysteries, you are not supposed to be satisfied with a first glance. 
You must have the perseverance to look up the meaning in Miss 
Ryan's Emporium or at least to ask George, the Greek, at George's 
restaurant. 

The club was started back in the good old days at St. Ignatius. 
For years it flourished as a dramatic society under the name of Sock 
and Buskin Club. It seems that the name was derived from the 
costumes of the ancient Athenian actors. In those days you never 
knew when you saw a man sneak up and plunge a dagger into an 
unsuspecting back whether he was a dastardly villain or whether he 
was only fooling. This led to complications, and they decided some- 
thing had to be done about it. So they passed a law requiring all 
comedians to wear high socks, and now even the great unwashed 
could tell the Charlie Chaplins from the John Gilberts. To make 
identification even more certain the tragedians found themselves 
the subject of another amendment. It was their duty to wear a kind 
of half shoe, known in those days as buskins. Now to come back 
to St. Ignatius. The dramatic club was portraying both the humor- 
ous and the more serious sides of life and it was fitting that they 
choose a name which embraced both. So they borrowed the word 
"Sock" symbolizing a comedian and the word "Buskin" associated 
with the tragedian. And joining these two words into a corporate 



Page Iwo hundred jorty 



T H E 



19 3 



L O y O L A N 




JAMES HAMMOND. GEORGE DUNLAP, JR., 
FROM 



JAMES BRENNAN AND FRANK CASSARETTO IN A SCENE 
'TURN TO THE RIGHT" 



form, the "Sock and Buskin Club" was born. The name, therefore, 
has a real significance. 

It was not until five years ago that the club was reorganized upon 
the Lake Shore Campus of the university. There was a vital need 
for dramatics and it was Mr. Steggert who first recognized this and 
volunteered to sponsor the rebuilding of the club. He was successful 
from the start, because he found a great number of students who 
were interested. A couple of plays were given the very first year. 
The name Sock and Buskin Club was retrieved from the ashes of 
the former group. When Mr. Costello took over the direction of the 
club a little later he built upon that foundation. 

It has been the custom of the club to put on two major productions 
and several one act plays during the school term. This provides an 
outlet for the dramatic talent which floats around the various camp- 
uses. While the club was reorganized upon the North Side, it is by 
no means an Arts activity. During the last few years a great amount 
of talent has been secured from the Loop campus and the professional 
schools. A former president was a medical student, and the vice- 
president this year pursued her studies at the Sociological School. 

Mr. Charles S. Costello is dramatic director. So much has been 
written in the past about his capabilities as a coach, and since he is 
now recognized as one of the foremost in his field, it is useless to 
eulogize him further. He has been ever successful in his contacts 
with the actors in securing their greatest measure of good will, and 
the high and well-merited praise which has followed all his presenta- 
tions is magnificent proof of his abilities as coach. His reputation 
is established and whatever we might say here could neither add to 
nor detract from it. 



Page two hundred jorly-one 



T H E 



LOYOLA 



N 




PLAY PRODUCTION CLASS TAKES PART IN LITTLE OLD NEW YORK, 
LOYOLA COMMUNITY THEATER 



I'KKSKN'TED BY 



THE PLAY PRODUCTION CLASS 

Organized at the beginning of the year, the play production class 
was a vital factor in the success of the Sock and Buskin Club plays. 
Under the direction of Mr. Costello, the class assumed complete 
charge of the staging, and this meant that the scenery was con- 
structed, painted, and set up for all the performances of both plays. 
Besides this, the lighting, properties and costumes were taken care 
of by members of the class. 

In order that all the time would not be spent backstage Mr. 
Costello included the members of the class in the mob scene of 
"Little Old New York" so that some experience in acting would be 
acquired. This Community Theater play was well received and 
produced about a dozen times, and before it finished its run there 
wasn't a member of the class who didn't feel like an accomplished 
performer. 

As a final and conclusive test of what had been learned during the 
year the class was divided into two sections and each one produced 
its own one act play. The members of the group chose the plays 
themselves, selected the casts, directed them, drew plans for the set, 
ordered the lumber, constructed the set, painted it, took care of the 
lighting, made arrangements for costumes and properties, and finally 
produced the plays before an audience which was enticed to St. 
Ignatius Auditorium. The first play to be presented was "Box and 
Cox" which was acted by a faculty cast. The second was "A Night 
At An Inn" acted by a group of capable students. 



Page two hundred jorly-lwi 



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MR. COSTELLO DIRECTS SCENE IN THE CALL OF THE BANSHEE 



"TURN TO THE RIGHT" 

(December 9th and 10th) 

"Turn To The Right" was the first of this year's two major pro- 
ductions. Presented at the Loyola Community Theater, it received 
a splendid welcome and exceptionally large crowds were on hand for 
the two performances. 

The acting of James Brennan and James Hammond featured the 
show as did the excellent interpretation of the old mother by Coletta 
Hogan. George Dunlap, Jr., starred in the role of the son. The other 
roles were capably played by James McGuire, Frank Calkins, Eugene 
Cerise, Dominic Mastriani, Frank Casseretto, James Spackman, 
Anne Kreger, Barbara Dieter, and Mary Puerte. 

"THE CALL OF THE BANSHEE" 

(February 24th and 25th) 
A mystery play was the second offering of the year. This was 
"The Call of the Banshee." James Brennan acted well the part of 
the mysterious Dr. Lacey, and the old doctor and friend of the 
afflicted family, Dr. Markowitz, was ably handled by James Ham- 
mond. Thomas L. Spelman was the Hindu servant and the villain 
of the play. Coletta Hogan was Mrs. Grimes, the superstitious 
housekeeper. Josephine Magner and Virginia Barker had the roles of 
the young girls, and the humor was provided by Virginia Gill as 
Hilda. Berniece Crawley and Ardine Jaeger found themselves cast 
as darkies. The part of Peter Adair was taken by Joseph Mammoser, 
and Jerry Kozlowski played Tom Scott. Linda Perkins was taken 
by Catherine Gill. Dod Norton and Ted Connelly were the arms 
of the law. 



Page two hundred forty-three 



"The tuition fee per session of 
ten months is $40, payable 
quarterly." 

Catalog oj St. Ignatius College, 1884. 




MUSIC 



o y 



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A 




MUSICAL ACTIVITIES 



GRACIANO SALVADOR, 

Director 



It is only three years since a small group of music lovers at Loyola 
gathered together under the leadership and inspiration of the ever- 
tireless Dean Reiner and organized into various musical units. At 
first it was a band; next came a glee club; then a choral society; and 
finally this year another one was added: an orchestra. 

We have, therefore, four musical organizations which, notwith- 
standing their shortcomings due to the lack of general support from 
the student body, are actually resting on a firm basis. This basis 
is the genuine love of music burning in the hearts of the members of 
these different units, their spirit of sacrifice, their splendid goodwill 
and co-operation. The basis being such, we may well rest assured 
that these musical units will never die out at Loyola. Their splendid 
past achievements during this last year testify to this wonderful 
spirit of the will to accomplish. 

As a moderator and director of these organizations, I wish to take 
this opportunity to extend to them collectively as well as individually 
my most sincere thanks for their splendid co-operation and wonderful 
response to my humble efforts. 

Graciano Salvador. 



Page two hundred forty-six 



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On the Field. 




MUSIC AT LOYOLA 

The rapidity with which Loyola changed from an entirely un- 
musical institution to the position which it now holds is due mainly 
to the efforts of Professor Graciano Salvador, who has directed the 
Glee Club, the Choral Society, and the Band with untiring enthu- 
siasm since their inauguration, and to Dean Joseph Reiner, S.J., 
who while not directly affiliated with any one of the organizations 
has aided them all by lending his moral support. 

All three groups were organized within a few months of each other 
just a little over two years ago. Since then they have come to assume 
prominent positions in the list of Loyola activities and possibly no 
organization meets as regularly and with more zest than these three. 

As may be expected there has been adverse criticism on the part 
of students and others who are not fully aware of the position to 
which music has been relegated at the University until within the 
last few years. None of the organizations claim perfection but they 
all claim, and rightfully, that they are making an admirable effort 
and a distinct step toward it. 

Nothing will give more encouragement to these societies than the 
moral support of the students and no organization will return more 
in the way of spirit to the students than these, especially the band, 
when fully developed. Let's give 'em a hand! 



Page two hundred Jorty-sev 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 




The 
LOYOLA UNIVERSITY BAND 



EDWARD KEEVINS, 
President 



WALDVOGAL 



ROCCISANO 



OFFICERS 

Edward Keevins President 

Joseph L. Waldvogal. .Business Manager 

John E. Rosich Secretary 

Vincent A. Roccisano Librarian 

The Loyola University Band has completed a 
successful year under trying and cumbersome con- 
ditions. The director, Graciano Salvador, had a 
difficult task to muster together the players for the 
first football game, but due to his dynamic person- 
ality, he overcame the difficulties and sallied forth 
with a first class band. By October 5, the band 
was well organized, and the following week, Octo- 
ber 12, they participated in the official dedication 
of the athletic field. 

When the St. Louis delegation arrived in Chicago 
on October 26, with their well organized band, the 
Loyola University band, encouraged bv the enthu- 
siasm of the student body, and the aggressiveness 
of the football team, plaved their best. Next in 
order was the engagement with De Paul at Sol- 
diers Field, on November 2, where the Loyola 
band, in competition with St. Mary's, St. George's, 



V.uv two hundred jorly-eight 



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Top Row: J. SATORY, J. WALDVOGAL, A. WEISS, A. VINCENT1, S. DEMICELI, I!. RICKABV, S. CALI, 

j. rosich. Middle Row: f. dwan, a. koepke, r. bose, a. feeny, a. Palermo, f. hecht, l. greiber. 
Front Row: j. labaris, j. mccarty, h. brownstein, s. de cola, e. keevins, e. jansen, v. 

UNGARO, H. SILVERMAN. 



and De Paul's bands, showed the City of Chicago how Loyola com- 
pared with outstanding competitors. 

At the last game of the season, against North Dakota on Novem- 
ber 30, due to adverse weather conditions the Loyola band was 
unable to play. However, their appearance on the field was appre- 
ciated by the spectators, and the members sung the school song to 
add atmosphere to the game. 

When the basketball season was opened, the band was at hand to 
play at all the home games, and judging from the response of the 
spectators, it seems the band was well appreciated. By this time 
their reputation had become so great that they were invited to play 
at the National Catholic Basketball Tournament. The band played 
for five nights during the tournament, and offered keen competition 
to the championship band from De La Salle High School. With the 
close of the basketball season, the activities of the band were brought 
to a finish. The members were rewarded for their work with sweaters 
and letters, which thev well deserved. 



Page two hundred jorty-nine 



T H 



LOYOLA 



N 




The 
GLEE CLUB 



HARRY STAUDER, 

President 



Harry Stauder President 

John J. Hackett Business Manager 

Carlo Gualano Secretary 

Anton Vincenti Treasurer 



VINCENTI 



Three short years have elapsed since the Glee 
Club under the direction of our ever energetic Mr. 
Steggert was founded with a nucleus of fourteen 
members. This organization has turned out to be 
one of the most valuable assets that Loyola Uni- 
versity possesses. Mr. Steggert was forced after 
a month to relinquish the reins of directorship to 
Mr. Salvador, due to outside work of a most 
pressing nature. His great desire has at last been 
realized, namely that of having a glee club of fifty 
male voices. That goal was attained this year 
when the membership reached fifty-five. Although 
new numbers have been added frequently during 
the three year period of the Glee Club's existence, 
still the memory of that musical duel of those 
fourteen members lingers on in the mind of all 
those that heard it back in the fall of 1927, namely 
"Spanish Cavaliers" and "Solomon Levi." 

The Glee Club continued as in the past to offer 
various programs at the weekly student assembly. 
Its first public appearance of the year was given 
in December in conjunction with the Choral 
Societv at St. Ienatius auditorium. This was the 



Page two hundred fifty 



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Top Row: A. FEENEY, G. DALET, L. WACNER, J. GIARDINA, E. JANSEN, G. STALZER. Second Row: 

M. DEUTSCH, G. KEENAN, L. REIF, P. KEANE, V. ROCCISANO, A. VINCENTI. Front Row: H. STAUDER, 

R. BOSE, V. UNGARO, J. KLEST, J. HACKETT, J. KRASNIEWSKI 



occasion of its second annual Christmas Concert. The first part of 
the program consisted of the following numbers: "Silent Night," 
"Pilgrims' Chorus," "The Viking," "Last Rose of Summer," "Sweet 
and Low," "See the Conquering Hero." The second part of the 
program was devoted to the rendering of Hawley's "The Christ 
Child." This Cantata has been claimed by music critics to be one 
of the most beautiful and melodious cantatas that has ever been 
written. The solo numbers were very well taken care of by the 
Messrs. Keevins, Stalzer, Stauder, Wagner; and the Misses Barron, 
Braasch, and Walsh. 

At the start of the second semester the Glee Club underwent a 
reorganization process. Only those members who were best fitted to 
carry on the musical activities of the Club were retained. Work began 
in earnest for the preparation of our Third Annual Spring Concert, 
which was given in May. The group was forced to dispense tempo- 
rarily with the practice due to the unforeseen demand on the part of 
the public for another rendition of Maunder's Cantata "Olivet to 
Calvary." The Choral Society had previously presented this master 
work the past two years and now were asked to give it at various 
parishes throughout the city. It was given in the following churches: 
Sancta Maria Incoronata, Assumption, St. Anthony's Notre Dame, 
and St. Peter Canisius. This Cantata recalls to the mind of the public 
simply and reverently the scenes which mark the last few days of the 
Saviour's life on earth, and some of the reflections suggested thereby. 
It was a very appropriate number for the Lenten season. The solo 
numbers were taken care of by the Misses Braasch, Barron, Murray, 
Walsh; and the Messrs. Keevins and St. Pierre. 

After fulfilling these engagements the Glee Club was urged to 



Page two hundred fijty-onc 



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The 
CHORAL SOCIETY 



JOHN J. HACKETT, 

Bustne.fs Manager 



assist the Loyola Community Theatre in the presentation of their 
Lenten Drama "Everyman." This has been the first time that an 
outside organization has requested the services of Loyola University s 
Glee Club to assist in their undertakings. The Glee Club sung the 
Gregorian music for the offering of "Everyman." 

Finally after the Easter holidays the members once more set down 
to practice for the Spring Concert. It was given about the middle 
of May to an overwhelming crowd of musically inclined listeners. 
Again the Club was requested to give the program out of town, namely 
at St. Patrick's High School at Desplaines, Illinois. 

Although the Glee Club did not offer any radio programs this year, 
several of its star soloists were heard from time to time over the air 
during "College Hour." 

The year finally closed with a banquet and dance at one of the 
leading hotels in the loop. Here the faithful attendance members 
were given a token of remembrance by the Club and they in turn 
expressed their deep appreciation for the untiring efforts of the 
director, Mr. Salvador who was always ready to offer the benefits of 
his careful and skilled training at a moment's notice. Also a vote of 
thanks was given to Father Reiner for the manner in which he so 
frequently co-operated with the Club from time to time during the 
year. 

With the great success that the Glee Club and Choral Society has 
enjoyed this past year the present officers at this time sincerely wish a 
continuation of this success in the years to come to those that are to 
follow in making a name for Loyola in the field of music. 

John J. Hackett. 



Page two hundred fijti/rtwt 



T H 



O y O L A 




Top Ron:- E. JANSEN, G. STALZER, J. HACKETT, A. FEENEY, C. BUKOWSKI, G. KEENAN, P. KEANE, 
L. REIF, J. GIARD1NA, J. MURPHY, D. MC EVOY, J. WALDVOGEL. Fourth Row: A. COLANGELO. V 
GILL, F. GILL, G. BLOCK, M. CALLANAN, E. iMOONEY, F. ROONEY', J. DUGAN, E. KEEVINS, J. KRASNIEW- 
SKI, M. DEUTSCH, J. ROSICK, F. HECHT, J. CARROLL, M. MC MAHON, C. O'MALLEY. Third Row: 
H. STAUDER, K. o'sHEA, C. WIXTED, C. KERWICK, J. MC LAUGHI.IN, E. BERGIN, M. JOYCE, D. o'DONNELL, 
K. CREAGH, R. POPE, M. CORBETT, A. O'MALLEY, M. MULCAHY, T. MULCAHY, M. KINSELLA, G. SALVA- 
DOR (director). Second Row: b. walsh, f. braasch, m. tobin, g. shea, s. rogers. m. villani, 

A. PAVESE, M. BELLINI, H. HIMSEL, A. ULING, M. PATERSON, M. CONNORS, E. FAUNT, B. KINSELLA, 

M. MAC DONALD. Front Row: v. ungaro, J. KLEST, a. kropidlowski, b. obuchowski, a. vin- 

CENTI, V. ROCCISANO. M. SALVODOR, A. BEUTLER, J. NICKELS, L. WAGNER, G. DALET, R. BOSE, J. 
MCCARTHY. D. WILHELMI 



The Loyola University Choral Society represents one of the most 
outstanding achievements in extra-curricular activities that the Uni- 
versity has seen for many years. The male members were brought 
together easily enough by the existence of the already well estab- 
lished Glee Club on the Lake Shore Campus. But the securing of 
enough good female voices was a real problem in the eyes of Mr. 
Salvador. Inasmuch as the Downtown College, the only department 
in which co-education exists to any degree, does not attempt to spon- 
sor or foster such activities the entire work fell upon Mr. Salvador 
as an individual. 

By spreading the word through his classes in that Department, 
however, the Director of Music aroused interest at once among the 
young ladies. A sufficient group was immediately found and the 
Loyola University became an established reality for the time being. 

The next most fatiguing difficulty met with was the arrangement 
of practice sessions. Many of the men were employed, invariably 
at different hours, many in the club lived at distances too great to be 
asked to remain late at night, and a favorable location for practice 
was lacking. But somehow, probably due to the determined driving 
power of Mr. Salvador, the Choral Society has gained an admirable 
reputation. Popular support from the student body is growing 
rapidly and a great future is assured. 



Page two hundred fifty-three 



T H 



9 3 



L O y O L 



A 



N 











S^S 














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Ha ^H' 1 " -& 


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iJ 


it 


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Top Row: MCHUGH, NOLAN, BARRETT, CRAMER, BARRY, REARDON, KOZICZYNSKI, KELLY, PILLING, 

cosgrove. Front Row: Neville, Campbell, southerland, mc bride, clark, donovan, barry', 

NOETHE, DARGELLA 



ST. CECELIA BAND 

St. Bernard's School of Nursing 

OFFICERS 

Anne Cosgrove President 

Estelle Noethe Secretary 

Mary McHugh Treasurer 



The St. Cecelia Band, which has now been in existence for about 
six months, is quite a novelty in that it is the first nurses' band in 
Chicago. Much of the credit for the success of the organization may 
be attributed to Mr. Guido Matte, the bandmaster. To him, to 
Mother Murray, our devoted directress, and to Sister Jarrell, the 
members of the band are deeply indebted and feel that through 
their support and encouragement the band has been made possible. 

The band is composed of members of the Junior Class. The first 
concert was given on December twenty-eighth and proved at once to 
the faculty that there really was talent in the group. However, we 
have a great deal to learn, and some "static" to overcome. 

We hope to make our band a great success worthy to take its place 
with the other high standards of St. Bernard's School of Nursing. 

The students in our school are very proud of our new endeavor and 
all have pledged us their loyalty and support. 



Ai 



nne Cosgrove. 



Page two hundred fifty-Jour 



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Top Row: ENRIGHT, ARNTZ, HALTON, PHALEN, FRAY, MARTIS, CARTER, MALTESON, MARX, FENTON, 
ROWEN, SULLIVAN, BAPST, CLEMENS, WARL, DUBECK, FOWL. Third Row: COSTELLO, DUNN, 
MCGUIRE, BERENDSEN, MC CARNEY, DONMEYER, ERICKSON, ROONEY, SEIDL, LIDDY, HERON, JUSKA. 
Second Row: KELLY, MILLER, M. POWERS, D. ANDEREM, M. SHAUMBERG, FORLEY. Front Row: 
B. SETAR, M. MULLER, G. SETAR 



THE CECELIAN CHOIR 

The Cecehan Choir was organized at Mercy Hospital several years 
ago and has since developed and improved until it now contains forty 
members, all of whom are student nurses. 

The original intention was merely to provide a slight deviation 
from the daily routine of the nurses and at the same time offer a 
pleasing and valuable opportunity lor the girls to develop their 
musical talents. It has become so efficient, however, that it regularly 
furnishes the music for religious services at the hospital on all oc- 
casions including Sunday and Holy Day Masses, Benedictions, and 
Requiems. 

By meeting twice a week for practice and rehearsals it has become 
possible for the group to attempt musical compositions exceedingly 
difficult and to master them most admirably. Many voices have 
been developed to a degree which is most astounding considering 
the fact that the entire idea of the choir is a matter of enjoyment 
rather than duty. The different voices, which include lyrics, mezzos, 
dramatics, and contraltos, possess real authority and under careful, 
efficient training, graceful phrasing, pleasing crescendos, and stout 
climaxes are reached. 

Much of the success of the Cecelian Choir is due to Sister Mary 
Thomasina, under whose direction it has developed. 



Page two hundred fijty-fivt 



Bi-monthly bulletins are sent 
to the parents or guardians, 
to inform them of the deport- 
ment, diligence, proficiency, 
and attendance of their sons 
or wards. 

Early Calaloq. 







SPIRITUAL 



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The 
SODALITY 



THEODORE J. SCHULTE, S.J. 
Spiritual Director 



THE YEAR IN BRIEF 

This year saw the continued efficiency of the Sodality, its regular 
weekly meetings, the usual activities, and a few extraordinary events 
that individualized the year. A most recent event was the Solemn 
Mass, Special Sermon and Solemn Benediction in atonement for the 
outrages of the Soviets. The Student Conference on Religious 
Activities held three Conventions during the year, at Visitation 
High, Providence High and Alvernia High, and at the last Conven- 
tion steps were taken to make the National Convention, to be held 
in June at The Palmer House, the center of activity of all Chicago 
School Sodalities. 

The four sections, Catholic Action, Catholic Literature, Missions, 
and Eucharistic, have each had their usual round of labors and 
successes. Christmas Boxes of huge proportions were sent to the 
Indian Missions and the missions of British Honduras. The most 
commendable feature of the Sodality's year was the regularity of 
attendance at the weekly meetings. 

Fr. T. J. Schulte, S.J. 



Page two hundred fifty-eight 



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RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES 



THE CHAPEL 




THE LAKE SHORE CAMPUS SODALITY 

In promoting and increasing the spiritual welfare and the personal 
sanctification of the students as individuals, and in carrying out a 
campaign to help our less fortunate brethren in other climes, the 
Lake Shore Campus Sodality has enjoyed a year of marked success. 

During the year the Sodality was able to turn over a substantial 
sum to the missions through the collections at the Friday morning 
Masses. An "old clothes" day brought in much useful material for 
the Indian Mission in South Dakota. Through the co-operation of 
the bookstore, a campaign for the sale of Christian Christmas cards 
was carried out during the two weeks preceding the Holidays. More 
than fifteen hundred cards were placed in circulation. Later on a 
penny collection helped purchase the candle holders for the new 
Delia Strada Chapel. 

Besides this group effort, the Sodality has been able to give each 
individual member something very valuable. The brief talks by the 
moderator, Fr. Schulte, at the weekly meetings gave the students 
many useful pointers. 

In conclusion, the Sodality has successfully related for its members 
the religious spirit with their daily student duties. It has aided them 
in bringing more Christian principles to bear in their lives, and in so 
doing has made them more sincere and more active Catholics. 

E. J. D. 



Page two hundred fifty-nine 



THE 19 



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The 
SODALITY 



EMMETT J. MEAGHER, 

Prefect 




OFFICERS 

Emmett Meagher Prefect 

Edward Dowling Assistant Prefect 

Douglas McCabe Secretary 

JOHN LANNON Treasurer 

The first of that series ol religious events which 
has characterized Loyola, was the Mass of the 
Holy Ghost celebrated on September 27th, at St. 
Ignatius Church. Each year a Mass of this nature 
is offered up in order to ask the Holy Spirit to 
shower His graces upon the students in their schol- 
astic trials and labors. The Mass was featured by 
the first appearance of the Senior Class in cap and 
gown. Many parents and friends of the students 
were gathered in the church for the services. 

The second event of particular interest to Sodal- 
ists was the eighth assembly of the Chicago Cath- 
olic Students' Council on Religious Activities, com- 
monly known as Ciscora. This meeting was held 
at Visitation High School on the Southwest side 
on November 1, 1929. It was another success from 
every point of view. The attendance record showed 
over five hundred representatives from thirty-one 
high schools and colleges in the Archdiocese of 
Chicago. In the election of officers for the coming 
year Loyola University was again chosen as 
president. 

The yearly Mass in memory of Michael Cudahv, 



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The Group 

one of Loyola s most generous benefactors, was held late in Novem- 
ber. The student bodies of the Academy and College were present. 

On December 4th, at the usual Friday morning Mass, twenty-nine 
candidates were received into the Sodality. Fr. Schulte officiated at 
the reception, and was assisted by Prefect Emmett Meagher and 
Secretary Douglas McCabe. This addition of new men, mostly Fresh- 
men assured the Sodality of a reasonably large future membership. 

On Saturday, February 22, the Ciscora held its Ninth general 
meeting, this time at Providence High School. At the Mass, held 
before the meeting a fair sized crowd was present, and by the time 
the convention opened it had swelled to the enormous gathering of 
1200, the largest of any convention of Ciscora. Fifty Catholic High 
Schools and Colleges were represented. The subjects discussed were: 
personal holiness, the Boy Scout and Girl Scout movement among 
Catholics, Catholic literature and Catechetical Instruction. Emmett 
Meagher, representing Loyola, presided over the meeting. 

The concluding meeting of the year was held at Alvernia High 
School on May 19. The special feature of the gathering was a four 
cornered discussion of Catholic higher education. A representative 
from Providence High gave a paper on the girls' high school, Rosary 
College presented a paper on the Catholic College for women, while 
St. Ignatius spoke on boys' high schools, and Loyola University on 
the College for men. William H. Conley delivered this last paper. 

This meeting was also honored by the presence of Fr. Lord, the 
national director of Sodalities. He outlined the plans now under 
way for the National Convention of Sodalists, which will be held at 
the Palmer House in Chicago, in June. 

E. J. D. 



Page two hundred sixty-one 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 





THE EUCHARISTIC SECTION 
The Euchanstic section of the Sodality might well be considered 
as the most important section of the four sections that comprise the 
Sodality of the Blessed Virgin Mary. It has for its purpose: "Per- 
sonal devotion to Jesus Christ, our Lord, in the Holy Eucharist.'' 
It entertains motives such as the sponsoring of weekly Communion, 
the backing of the "Four Minute Men" — those who make brief 
visits to the chapel, the managing of the acolythical service for the 
weekly masses. It also takes up a survey each month of the Com- 
munions Received, Masses Heard, and Visits to the Blessed Sacra- 
ment, not however in order to check up on the students, but rather 
to strive to stimulate all by a knowledge of what everyone is doing. 

John J. Hackett, Chairman. 






THE LITERATURE SECTION 

To foster reading of Catholic Literature by both Catholics and 
non-Catholics constitutes one of the principal aims of the University 
Sodality. With this end in view organized effort has been directed 
toward the dissemination of Catholic periodicals of every kind by the 
Literature Section. Catholic magazines and papers have been 
distributed throughout hospitals and have been placed in public 
centers, and various other places where it was thought that the 
distribution would bring results. 

The basic principle around which this section of the Sodality is 
centered is that if an intense interest in Catholic literature can be 
secured many circles of people outside the reach of the missionary 
efforts of the clergy will be influenced. 

John Klest, Chairman. 



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THE MISSION SECTION 

The Mission Section of the Sodality is probably one of the most 
active and at the same time least heard of sections. Due to the 
untiring efforts of the vice-president, Robert Healy, we have this 
year distributed a great amount of old clothes which were collected 
during the Pre-Christmas Drive. A great many students and the 
families as well as friends responded generously to the call for castoff 
clothing, toys, etc. All of these articles were sent to the Indians of 
South Dakota. 

In addition to the small regular collections made at the Friday 
Masses the entire fund remaining in the treasury at the end of the 
year is sent to Mr. Marshall Moran, S.J., an ex-Loyola student who 
is now a Missionary in India. 

Joseph Kearney. 



THE CATHOLIC ACTION SECTION 

The Catholic Action Section of the Loyola University Sodality 
bears the distinction of being the first one to be established in the 
United States. Its activities, because of the nature of the work, 
necessarily take on a pretentious program. During the past year 
considerable emphasis has been placed on lectures and debates, 
wholesome recreation for parish organizations, catechetical instruc- 
tion, lay retreats, Holy Name membership and activity, participation 
in civic, state, national and international thought with solution to 
problems formulated from Catholic doctrine, and the complete 
projection of religion into every activity of the student's life. The 
aim of the section is to impress upon the students that the theory 
of the Catholic religion, which they have studied throughout their 
entire school life, must be applied. The success of the Catholic Ac- 
tion section can be measured only by the Catholic Lay Action of the 
graduates of Loyola. 

William H. Conlev. 



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HELEN M. GANEY, 
Dean oj Women, 
Downtown College 



DR. C. N. JOHNSON, 

Dean of Jlen 
School oj Dentistry 



THE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS RETREAT 

The Annual retreat for the students of the downtown and west 
side branches of the University was held in the early part of March, 
at the downtown school. Fr. McDonnell, a missionary, conducted 
the exercises, while the entire program was under the supervision of 
Fr. James F. Walsh, S. J., the dean of men of the professional schools. 

Considering the fact that none of the students were obliged to 
make the retreat, the large turnout throughout the retreat was in no 
small measure due to the efforts of Fr. Walsh. Not only were the 
downtown students in evidence but a goodly delegation from the 
Medical campus was also there. A retreat of this nature is very 
difficult to bring to the reach of many people, since the students of 
these departments of the University have classes at very different 
times of the day, and many of them work during their out-of-class 
time. Moreover, the medics had to come into the loop to attend the 
services. 

Owing to the fact that there is no chapel at the downtown building, 

a lecture room was used for all the services. With special permission 

. Holy Mass and Benediction were celebrated there on the closing day. 



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REV. JAMES J. WALSH, J 

Dean oj Men, 
Professional Schools 



REV. JOHN P. MC NICHOLS, S.J. 

Retreat Master, 
Lake Shore Campus 



LAKE SHORE CAMPUS RETREAT 

The Annual Lake Shore Campus Retreat opened Tuesday morning, 
October 1, and closed the following Friday. The services were held 
at St. Ignatius Church. Father John P. McNichols, S.J., president 
of the University of Detroit conducted the daily exercises. 

The choice of Fr. McNichols as spiritual director was indeed a 
happy one. The retreat of the previous year conducted by Fr. Lord, 
well known lor his prominent work, especially in the field of Sodality 
organization, set a particularly high standard. But this year's 
students were equally appreciative of Fr. McNichols' work. 

The annual retreat has always been considered one of the most 
important events of the school year, and consequently every Catholic 
student of the Arts department is required to attend. In the matter 
of retreats, as in other classroom and extra-curricular endeavors, 
much of its success was conditioned on the fine co-operation of the 
students and faculty. When the students were urged to give the 
retreat conductor every opportunity to help them, they responded 
with most noticeably fine conduct during the three days. This year s 
retreat has already taken its place as the most successful of all 
similar exercises of the past. 

The student body and the faculty have already expressed, and 
will continue to express their thanks to Fr. McNichols for his interest 
in Lovola and for his fine retreat. 



Ptiye two hundred sixly-fiv 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 




Top Riw: CASSARETTO, WALSH, MALLON, DOWNEY, J. RAFFERTY, GORMICAN. Front Row: LENIHAN. 
ARADO, CONLEY - , DURKIN, BRUUN 



THE DELLA STRADA LECTURE CLUB 

With the organization of the Delia Strada Lecture Club, about six 
years ago, the students of the Arts and Sciences department have 
tried in some way to express their appreciation to Fr. Mertz, by 
aiding him in carrying out his plans for the erection of the Lady of 
the Wayside Chapel. Begun by a group of men especially interested 
in this work, the club has continually increased in membership and 
activity, and at present about fifteen students are actively engaged 
in this instructive work. 

Men skilled in the art of public speaking, and possessing a knowl- 
edge of religious topics, have travelled throughout the city and there, 
before intensely interested audiences, they delivered their illustrated 
lectures. These talks, covering a large field of subjects, were made 
even more interesting by stereopticon slides depicting scenes in 
the lives of Marquette, Joan of Arc, the Little Flower, and the 
Jesuit Martyrs of North America. Especially well adapted to the 
phases of these talks, these slides were reproductions of actual 
photographs having a historical as well as an aesthetic value. 

In keeping with the general spirit of aiding the chapel, these men 
turned over the entire proceeds obtained from these lectures to the 
fund being raised for the building of the Lady of the Wayside Chapel. 
The large number of active freshmen and sophomores engaged in this 
work, insures continued success to the work of the Delia Strada Club. 



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ST. BERNARD S SODALITY 



THE MARIA DELLA STRADA SODALITY 

OFFICERS 

Alice Nihill Prefect 

Teresa Ryan Secretary 

Agnes Van Driel Treasurer 

Catherine Madden Sacristan 

Realizing the need for an organization to promote the spiritual 
welfare of the women students of the Downtown College, Rev. 
Frederic Siedenburg, S.J., true to Jesuit traditions, organized a 
sodality of the Blessed Virgin Mary on April 27, 1925. 

The Maria Delia Strada Sodality meets lor the recitation of the 
Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary and for a conference conducted 
by the spiritual director, Rev. Frederic Siedenburg, S.J. 

An annual Retreat for the members of the Sodality is offered. 
This year the Sodality made arrangements to have their Retreat at 
the Cenacle. At the request of members of the Sodality a Day of 
Recollection has been arranged for the Sodality members to be held 
at the Convent of the Cenacle on March 30. 

Women students interested in the Maria Delia Strada Sodality are 
requested to call upon the Dean ol Women. 

The above picture is of the Sodality at St. Bernard's School of 
Nursing. Practically every student in that department belongs. 
Owing to the fact that it is practically impossible to get a representa- 
tive portion of the Maria Delia Strada Sodality ol the Downtown 
College together at one time, a picture of the group could not be 
obtained. 



Page two hundred sixty-seven 



'At the beginning of May, 1876, 
students of their own accord 
asked to be given the oppor- 
tunity of assisting at daily 
Mass." 

Early School Publication. 




SOCIETY 



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THE SENIOR BALL 

The finale of the 1928-9 Social Season at Loyola sounded as the 
last strains of the well known waltz wafted through the dancing 
figures, a tribute to our departing Seniors. The Senior Ball was 
beyond doubt the grandest and socially the most successful dance of 
the season. 

A magnitude of credit for this success goes to the Loyola Union. 
The Union worked in co-ordination with the Arts Department and 
with the aid of the entire University brought to a climactic close the 
Social Calendar of the Year. 

This dance differed from other Senior Balls by admitting students 
from all classes and all departments. Heretofore Seniors alone en- 
joyed this privilege of attending these affairs. The Loyola Union 
hoped that by setting a precedent that all future Senior Balls would 
be open to the entire University in view of the fact that this dance 
marks the final social function of the year. The number of bids, 
however, were limited to Two hundred and fifty. The demand far 
superseded this number but the only consolation that may be offered 
to those less fortunate — if it may be considered consoling — is: 
"Remember the early bird," etc. 

The Grand March was led by Charles La Fond of the Downtown 
Commerce Department and Miss Marie Lane. The Arts Department 
was led by Jack Ennis and Miss Lorraine Schreiber. Incidentally, both 
couples have since been married. 

The music was furnished by "Tweet" Hogan's Syncopating Merry- 
makers while the Oriental Room at the Knickerbocker Hotel was 
favored as the site for the Ball. 



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THE SOPHOMORE COTILLION 

The Sophomore Cotillion, now an integral part in the Society of 
Loyola, made its debut on January Eleventh. This affair was truly 
characteristic of a real Sophomore dance. The syncopation was 
furnished in great abundance and in all varieties by Kenny's Red 
Peppers. The Red Peppers are — well everybody knows how good 
they are! 

The crowd was one of the most congenial and jovial of any group 
that has ever attended a Loyola dance. Throughout the entire 
dance the floor was filled to capacity with a gay, fun-loving group. 

The Grand Ballroom of the Hotel Sherman was chosen as the 
scene for the Sophomore dance. Tables about the sides of the dance 
floor were filled with pleasure seekers enjoying relreshments gratis. 
Father Schulte of the Lake Shore Campus and Dean of Men at that 
College acted as Faculty chaperon for the evening. 

The evening whizzed by and almost unexpectedly and certainly un- 
desired by all came the final waltz of the evening. And so we find 
brought to a close the Sophomore Cotillion of Nineteen hundred 
thirty, successfully rated with the best of the season. 

Much of the credit for the success of this dance must go to Herb 
Stanton, President of the Sophomore Class on the Lake Shore Cam- 
pus, who with the backing of the Loyola Union, secured the enthu- 
siasm of the entire student body. Every Department of Loyola was 
well represented. If we look real closely we can see Herb glancing 
quite demurely at the camera from the center of the picture. Lookit! 
He must be an old man! He has a moustache, hasn't he? 



Page two hundred seventy-one 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 




THE FRESHMAN DANCE 

The first all-university Freshman Dance ever presented at Loyola 
was held in the Oriental Room of the Knickerbocker Hotel on Feb- 
ruary twentieth, 1950, and resulted in one of the most interesting 
social affairs of the year. 

Tack Higgins appeared again with his orchestra, popular and well 
known among Loyola students tor the last four or five years, offering 
all the scintillating music that anyone could desire; vocal choruses by 
Ed Keevins, tenor from the Arts Department; snappy saxophone 
solos by the other two Higgins: "Rus" and John; and clever little 
toots and snorts by the entire orchestra. 

The support of the Loyola Union contributed much to the success 
of the affair. Every department of the University was well repre- 
sented and — oh, what a swell collection of ladies attended that dance! 
It has been said since that no social function in the history of Loyola 
ever had so many good looking girls. In fact, someone said that there 
wasn't a single one there that wouldn't have carried off honors if 
she'd only try. That ought to be a little bit of cheer to those who 
Were there. 

At the well filled tables around the floor, drinks were served con- 
tinuously — of course they were soft drinks, this being a freshman 
dance — and everybody was hopping around on the dimly lit floor 
with nothing but good time to think about. 

Report has it that Charlie Mallon, President of the Freshman 
Class on the Lake Shore Campus and Johnnie Durburg from the 
Medical School were passing out half pints of something or other to 
all their friends but all their friends denied it when interviewed later. 
Anyway everybody had a good time whether these two fellows had 
anything to do with it or not. 



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THE JAMBOREE 

The Second Annual Jamboree was one of the numerous events 
sponsored by the Loyola Union which reflected credit on the newly 
formed organization. (There is only one meaning in that statement — 
it was good credit.) John White, President of the Loyola Union, 
who was in charge of the affair, procured Tomczak's Blue Kittens 
for the evening. 

The evening began with a basketball game between Detroit 
University's Titans and the Loyola Ramblers who were seeking their 
twenty-ninth consecutive victory. Due to the fact that Detroit 
refused to make any attempt to score when they had possession of 
the ball the Ramblers were forced to come out of their defense and 
force the play in Detroit's territory. As a result the Titan's fast 
breaking game ran up a lead which they held until the final few 
minutes. Charlie Murphy eventually took the situation in hand 
and scored two baskets in the final moments to bring Loyola a 12-10 
victory. 

As soon as the teams had left the floor, dancing began. At various 
intervals tag dances were held. How those stags did go for them! 
The girls, many of whom had been invited from neighboring schools, 
were monopolized. Eventually the basketball players appeared on 
the floor and the process was reversed. The bashful Rambler captain 
was forced into another and even more exhausting contest: one of 
endeavoring to sit in the stands for a few minutes to rest. The 
women just don t know where to stop. 



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THE ARTS STUDENT FACULTY BANQUET 

On a Thursday evening, the fifth of December, 1929, about one 
hundred and twenty-five members of the student body, the alumni 
and the faculty of the Lake Shore Campus met at a dinner at the 
Bismarck Hotel. 

The principal speaker of the meeting was Mr. James J. Kelly, a 
prominent Chicago attorney, who brought out in his talk the real 
value of religion in the educational world. "The day is approaching" 
stated Mr. Kelly, "when the people will recognize that the salvation 
of the country is dependent entirely upon the education given in the 
parochial and other Catholic schools in the country." Mr. Kelly's 
experience and friendly manner won the good will of those present 
almost instantly. The talk was enjoyed throughout by everyone. 

Father Theodore Schulte, S. J., Dean of men, and Mr. Aloysius 
Hodapp, professor of economics, represented the faculty with short 
addresses in which they brought out the salient features of the 
educational system now in use and the value of student extra-curricu- 
lar activities. 

Charles Stimming, former president of the Student Association 
represented the Alumni while William H. Conley, President of the 
Debating Club brought out the views of the students. 

Dean Joseph Reiner, S. J., concluded the evening by comparing 
the extra-curricular activities with a musical symphony, each of the 
four divisions having a definite important function without which 
the whole would not be complete. 

Charles Boyle, President of the Student Association, acted as 
toastmaster for the evening, promoting enthusiasm intermittently 
with his clever remarks. 



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COMMERCE STUDENT-FACULTY BANQUET 

The Pre-legal and Commerce Schools of Loyola held their annual 
Student-Faculty Banquet at the Midland Club late in December. 

The toastmaster of the evening was Mr. E. A. Glasser. Mr. 
Glasser at the opportune moment introduced Judge Joseph Burke 
of the Municipal Court of Chicago. After a splendid speech by 
Judge Burke, Mr. Glasser called upon the speakers of the evening 
who, in the order of their appearance, were: Reverend Frederic 
Siedenburg, S.J., Reverend J. F. Walsh, S. J., Dean T. H. Reedy, 
Mr. Peter Angstcn, and Mr. Charles H. Gallagher. 

This banquet afforded the students and the faculty a means that 
has long been sought of meeting each other on a social as well as an 
educational plane. In spite of the fact that all the students are 
attending night school with practically no time for social affairs, 
the Commerce men have created a spirit and feeling of mutual 
friendship that can compare favorably with that of any other 
Department. 

After the speeches were completed many of the men retired to the 
parlors of the club and here enjoyed a brief smoker while several 
interesting discussions were held. 

Several hours later the meeting disbanded and the men returned 
to their respective destinations well pleased with an evening of en- 
joyment that also afforded them the pleasure of knowing and becom- 
ing better acquainted with each other. 



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SIGMA LAMBDA BETA FORMAL 

The annual formal dinner-dance sponsored by the Sigma Lambda 
Beta Fraternity of the Commerce School was held on Saturday 
evening, November 23. The scene of the festivities was the Dutch 
Room of the Bismarck Hotel. 

The men in charge of the affair: Messrs. Johnson, Norris, LaFond, 
Cole, and Slingerland, outdid themselves in their efforts to make the 
dance a successful one. The tables were placed in crescent shape 
with the dance floor completing the circle. This arrangement was 
particularly satisfactory because of the ease with which the floor 
could be reached from all locations and the geniality which naturally 
arose due to the close grouping of the parties. 

The committee secured the services of Anthony Tomczak's Campus 
Orchestra for the evening and Tom's gang did super service until one 
of the more effusive of the girls insisted on sitting on the clarinet 
player's lap. This, though slightly disconcerting, did not cramp the 
style of the orchestra on any numbers excepting the more difficult 
movements such as Piccolo Pete and Horses. 

A lavish dinner was served at about eleven o'clock with the cuisine 
of the Bismarck doing credit to the long established reputation of the 
hotel. During the course of the evening carnations were passed out 
(don't ask why) and with difficulty suspended on the tux lapels (don't 
ask how). The air was filled with streamers, confetti, and yelps of 
regret as the orchestra finally played its last number at two o'clock 
and the crowd wended its way to the cloak room and from thence 
onward. 



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PI ALPHA LAMBDA FORMAL 

Pi Alph has a reputation for throwing swanky dances. The first 
Pi Alph Formal of the year was no exception to those of the past which 
built up the reputation which the fraternity has for sponsoring pre- 
eminent social affairs. 

The dance was a closed affair; no bids were sold and no effort was 
made to induce outsiders to attend. The party was, therefore, 
exclusive; the crowd congenial — nearly all being intimate friends; 
and fraternity spirit dominated the entire attendance. 

The scene of the activity was the Petit Salon of the Sovereign Hotel. 
Jack Higgins, a Pi Alph himself, and his Royal Purple Orchestra 
furnished the heat, playing until shortly after two o'clock. Despite 
the fact that Bill Conley was called back to Sharon (not because of it) 
the dance was entirely successful. 

One who has been in the Petit Salon realizes only too well what an 
ideal place it is to have a dance. The depressed floor with the tables 
surrounding it, soft lights, flying streamers and pretty girls all com- 
bine to make a dance an auspicious affair. The only fly in the ointment 
was the confetti on the steak. Several over enthusiastic waiters 
insisted in handing out the serpentines during the dinner and the air 
and plates were both deluged. No casualties resulted. 

The favors, small bill folds with the fraternity crest in colors im- 
pressed upon the surface, were exceedingly novel and ingenious. In 
all it was a most fitting way to open the social season for one of 
Lovola's outstanding fraternities. 



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THE FALL FROLIC 

The fifth annual Fall Frolic, sponsored by the Loyola News for 
the incoming freshman class, opened the 1929-30 social calendar 
of the University. 

The Lake Shore Athletic Club (not a part of the Lake Shore 
Campus) furnished the locale, and the date was October 19. Jack 
Higgins, of Chicago, Twin Lakes, and Loyola, directed his ten-piece 
band of merry-makers in a truly merry-mad rhythm so characteristic 
of his orchestra. Ed Keevins, Arts Junior and a new member of 
the orchestra, featured with cornet and tenor solos. 

The decorations committee, headed by Daniel J. Murphy, had 
adorned the spacious ballroom in a novel and thoroughly appropriate 
manner. Suspended from the balconies were thousands of copies of 
college newspapers from all parts of the country with penants and 
banners of all the leading schools. 

Despite the fact that the Lake Shore Athletic Club had been the 
recipient but a few weeks before of one of the choicest products of a 
local pineapple-throwing union there was no unseemly restraint 
weighing upon the happy throng. Apparently, the youth of the 
city were more willing to take a chance on seeing Chicago from the 
air than to miss the great event. They were reassured, too, by the 
unworried attitude of John I^ardinal Brunn, the tuxedoed gentleman 
who stayed afterward to finish the punch and collect loose pearls. 
At any rate, five hundred couples enjoyed a romping evening. 



Page two hundred seventy-eight 



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PHI MU CHI FORMAL 

The formal dance season of the Lakeshore Campus was opened 
by the Phi Mu Chi Fraternity on November 9th with a dance that 
will long be remembered for more reasons than one. 

Le Petit Salon of the Illinois Women's Athletic Club was the place. 
The room, which is supposed to be an exact reproduction of a night 
club in France, is exceedingly novel. The walls are hand-painted to 
correspond perfectly with the lighting system, the latter owing much 
of its success to its lack of intensity. (Come, now! Come, now!) 

The master of ceremonies for the evening was Ray Jerome Binder, 
graduate of St. Ignatius College, and, at present, social director of 
the I. W. A. C. The features of the evening were the acts and special- 
ty numbers by Mack Murray and his partner, Jack Lomas, stars of 
the Follow Thru Show Company. Much of the credit for the social 
success of the dance goes to the committee which was composed of 
Edward Garrity, Herbert Stanton and Daniel Murphy, with Joseph 
Mooter acting as chairman. 

The syncopation was furnished by Phi Mu's own Herb Stanton 
and his Collegiate Orchestra. They produced that kind of music 
that delights all fraternity men and makes co-eds go "oo." Tiger 
Rag, Saint Louis Blues, and Sweetheart of — Phi Mu Chi were all 
plunked prettily from Herb's banjo. 

All too soon did that magic hour of three roll around when this 
hotter than hot band began to boil over and the fire had to be 
quenched by the homeward trek of the merry throng. 



Page two hundred seventy-nine 



"Popular music is of many dif- 
ferent types. There is the 
catchy two-step, the waltz, 
the rag-time oddity, the senti- 
mental song — generally trash, 
and the so-called comic song. 
Some of the prettiest numbers 
now current are: 'The Jump- 
ing Jack's Jubilee,' 'Hot- 
Scotch,' and a novelty two- 
step called 'Sky-Rochets.' We 
mustn't forget the 'Goo-Goo 
Man' and 'Incandescent Eyes.' 
Everybody's whistling the 
new minstrel curtain-raiser 
'Hallelujah,' and 'If I Were 
You and You Were Me.' " 

St. Ignatius Collegian, 1904. 




ATHLETICS 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 




DANIEL J. LAMONT, 
Athletic Director 



FAREWELL 



This year has seen the passing of Loyola's most outstanding and 
colorful athletic figure from the annals of our ever-rising institution. 
The departure of Dan Lamont from Loyola has darkened considerably 
the outlook for the future from an athletic viewpoint. It was during 
the administration of Mr. Lamont as Athletic Director and Head 
Football Coach that Loyola first began to advance by leaps and 
bounds; it was during this time that the stadium changed from a 
vague dream into a lasting reality; it was under his able guidance as 
head football coach that Loyola was able to place its best team on 
the gridiron — a team which emerged from a most difficult schedule 
with six wins, one tie and two close defeats. 

It is with much heart-felt sorrow and sad recollection that we 
give up Dan Lamont to Washington University where we hope and 
know that he will enjoy the greatest measure of success, happiness 
and true friendship. Farewell, Dan! 



Page two hundred eighty-one 



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The 
ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT 



REV. THOMAS J. POWERS, S.J., 

Faculty Moderator 

Who doesn't know the man who has been getting so much done for 
the athletic department? Dan Lamont, youthful yet brilliant Athletic 
Director and football coach, to whom is due Loyola's phenomenal 
rise on the gridiron, not only developed a superb team but he built a 
splendid stadium for it to play in, and he built that stadium at a 
time and under circumstances which made older and wiser heads 
than his declare that it simply could not be done. He is gone now, 
to take a coaching position at the University of Washington, but, 
no matter who may be the man or men who assume the two positions 
which he simultaneously held at Loyola, and whose task it will be 
to finish the now half completed stadium, no one will ever deny 
that that stadium and the future teams which shall play in it owe 
their existence to the business acumen, the courage, and the genuine 
"school spirit" of Loyola's beloved son, Dan Lamont. 

But it must not be supposed that 
Dan is the only one associated with the 
Gym who possesses these qualities, for 
they are to be found also in the person 
of Loyola's "Little General," Bob 
Morris, Graduate Manager, Alumni 
Secretary, and Chairman of the Board 
of Directors of the National Catholic 
Basketball Tournament. Unselfish, un- 
assuming, hard-working, cool-headed, 
lovable Bob has so ingrained himseli 
into the very fiber of the Athletic De- 
partment that his name and its name 
are synonyms. 

Bob shares his office with the most 
genial fellow in the world, Earl Kerns, 
Physical Director, and coach of the 
Academy swimming team. Hillenbrand 




Page two hundred eighty-two 



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The 
ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT 



ROBERT MORRIS, 

Graduate Manager 




The Dental School is represented in the Gym by Harold Hillen- 
brand, Publicity Director of the University and Executive Secretary 
of the National Catholic Basketball Tournament. 

Another man as closely connected to the Gym for the past lour 
years as its doors is James C. Ryan. Courtney, once student man- 
ager, has never been able to shake off the lure of the gym and is 
usually running around doing something for somebody and not 
getting credit for it. 

The name of the attractive and efficient young stenographer in the 
Gym is Jeannette, and she is a member of the famous Smith clan. 
Then there are Doug McCabe, the Superintendent of the Gym, 
and his assistants, Chuck Cuny, Manager of the Billiard Room, Jack 
Strobel, Manager of the Tank Room, and Tom Kearns and Vin 
Clark, life guards. 

Hovering about all these individuals, 
encouraging them, advising them, and 
helping them, is Father Thomas Powers, 
S. J., Faculty Adviser of Athletics, 
Director of the Tournament, and, since 
the departure of Lamont, Athletic 
Director. It is easy to talk to him and 
easy to listen to him, and when you 
make a mistake he can bawl you out 
without rubbing it in too hard. It 
requires a great deal of oil to keep a 
complicated Athletic Department run- 
ning smoothly, especially when it is 
situated in the line of fire between the 
coldly calculative world of business on 
the one hand and the realm of profound 
thought on the other, and Father 
Powers is just the man to provide it. 




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Captain Cornelius Collins 
Co-capt. elect Leslie Molloy 
Co-capt. elect Chris Poppel- 

REITER 

Walter Durkin 
Ted Connelly 
Jerome Kozlowski 
John Smith 



Captain Charles Murphy 
John Waesco 
Fred Sextro 




VARSITY LETTER 
AWARDS 



FOOTBALL 

Robert Burke 
John Waesco 
Frank Murphy 
William McNeil 
Ray\mond Nolan 
Edward Moran 
George Weimer 



BASKETBALL 

John Durburg 
John Smith 
Richard Butzen 




WALDVOCEL 



Fred Sextro 
Jerome Huppert 
Lawrence Faul 
Thomas Flynn 
Maurice Walsh 
Martin Griffen 
Thomas Howland 
Frank Lutzenkirchen 



Thomas Flynn 
Robert Schuhmann 
Richard Finn 



Bert Francisco 
Thomas O'Neil 



TRACK 

Edward Dowling Wallace Kirby Anton Vincenti 

John Horne Bert Zuley John Strobel 




BECKEK 

Page two hundred eighty-four 



GOLF 

» Thomas Corrigan 
Richard Shanahan 
Joshua D'Esposito 
Robert Ludwig 
Julian D'Esposito 
Fred Sextro 
Anthony Maulella 
Richard Raysa 



TENNIS 

George Zwikstra 
Robert Murphy 
Frank Melody- 
William Reidy 





KRVAVICA 



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The Team Gets a Send-off 

LOYOLA AND SCHOOL SPIRIT 

Does the school spirit of Loyola compare favorably with that of 
similar universities and colleges throughout the country? One must 
consider the scattered nature of the university, the diverse interests 
of the student bodies, and the fact that contests of a competitive 
nature are but a recent development of the University. 

The attendance in such considerable numbers of appreciative and 
spirited crowds at the football and basketball games bodes well for 
the future of intercollegiate athletics at Loyola. Those who oppose 
their continuance charge that the atmosphere is not a wholesome 
one, that the dollar is put before the game itself, and that the para- 
mount idea is to win at any cost. Any observer, no matter how dis- 
interested, could not help but note and admire the spirit of the men 
playing in the games and that of the students on the sidelines. The 
opposing team is treated in a courteous and sportsmanlike manner; 
"home team decisions" are entirely eliminated; and unnecessary 
roughness, booing, and disputing of decisions is entirely absent. 
Coach Sachs has gained a nation-wide reputation as the coach who 
never questions a referee's verdict. Pittsburgh papers rapped a home 
university for their conduct when Loyola was beaten there but not 
any one connected with Loyola followed suit. Loyola, if no other 
neighboring university does, refutes the charges of the antagonists 
of college athletics. There are abuses even here but they are fast 
being done away with. 

The student body is becoming more and more conscious of the 
value and renown of their university; the university officials are 
doing their best to advance the standards of the school; and more 
and more the ideals of a great university are being widespread by 
staunch backers. Is not that the real criterion of the much used 
term, "school spirit"? 



Page two hundred etgiily-ju 



'There is a fine opportunity 
for some generous friend to 
endear his name to the rising 
generation . . . by building 
and founding a gymnasium 
worthy of the college . . . 
Eight or ten thousand dollars 
would be required for the pur- 
pose." 

Early Annual College Bulletin . 




FOOTBALL 



T H 



O y O L A N 




COACH DANIEL J. LAMONT 

Dan Lamont was head football coach during the past season and 
succeeded in leading the most successful football machine in Loyola 
history through its most strenuous schedule. This was his first 
full year as head coach and, we are sorry to say, his last. 

The squad worked hard for Lamont and it was this together with 
the fighting spirit which he instilled into his charges that made it 
possible for the Ramblers to enjoy the success which they did. Any 
coach would be proud of Lamont's record and they all envy him his 
personality and his influence over those with whom he comes in 
contact, both on and off the field. 



Page two hundred eighty-eight 



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Mr. Lamont had an efficient coaching staff this year and a great 
deal of credit is due them for the wonderful success which the Loyola 
gridders enjoyed this season. The vital importance of a competent 
coaching staff is little realized and consequently praise for the assis- 
tant coach is seldom heard. However, any member of Loyola's 
staff would prove worthy of any university or college in the country 
and, both individually and collectively, they are to be commended 
for their splendid work. 

The head coach's right hand man and chief adviser was Dr. 
Edward J. Norton, a former star of Loyola and now a practicing 
dentist. Norton specialized in backfield work and is well-informed 
as to its every phase. Eddie can also demonstrate it in a manner 
which any "back" would be proud of. 

The line-coaching was taken care of by two former Detroit stars, 
Sod Ryan and Harvey Long. They both played regular tackles for 
the undefeated Detroit team of 1928. It is an undisputed fact that 
the Rambler line of the season just finished was the best in Loyola's 
history. Ryan and Long worked hard, and the answer to their tods 
is found in the very limited scoring done by opposing teams. A 
New Orleans paper on one occasion stated that Loyola of Chicago 
had "the best coached team that played in the south during the season 
of 1929." This is due in no small measure to the Ramblers' line and 
their coaching by Ryan and Long. 

Phil Brennan, captain of Loyola's 1928 team, was freshman coach. 
Before the season was ended he had turned a squad of carefree and 
inexperienced Ireshmen into a group of high-spirited and promising 
ball players. The freshman team of this year was a source of inspira- 
tion to the varsity and demonstrated, on more than one occasion, 
that it excelled all other campus organizations in school spirit. A 
good deal of this was breathed into them by their coach, Phil, who, 
besides teaching them the fundamentals, also instilled in them that 
spirit which all winning teams must have. 



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CAPTAIN "CORNY" COLLINS 

The Rambler football machine of 1950 was 
led by a diminutive and scrappy quarterback 
whose undying spirit and winning personality 
kept his team mates "on edge" throughout the 
season. Loyola teams of former years have 
boasted many stars but did not enjoy the suc- 
cess of this year's eleven due to a different 
mental attitude — and for this Loyola and its 
followers can be thankful to its little leader, 
"Corny" Collins. 

The captain has won for himself the distinc- 
tion of being one of the most accurate passers in 
Loyola's history besides being a good ball-carrier 
and a vicious blocker and tackier. "Corny s" 
ball-toting was hindered somewhat this fall be- 
cause of a knee injury sustained early in the 
season and even with this he always proved him- 
self to be a thorn in the side of the opposing 
eleven. 




Page two hundred ninety 



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LOYOLA 12— OKLAHOMA 

The Ramblers played an inspired brand of 
football in their opening game in the new sta- 
dium. A brilliant gallop around right end 
towards the close of the second quarter by Les 
Molloy accounted for the first score, while Boy 
Weimer boosted the ante to 12 by blocking and 
recovering a Goldbug punt after which he per- 
sonally conducted it twenty-two yards to the 
goal line. The tries for extra point failed to 
materialize and the scoreboard showed 12-0 as 
the spectators started homeward and the war- 
riors hied their sweaty selves to the fieldhouse. 




LES MOLLOY. 

CO-CAPT. -ELECT; half-back; 
junior; 'l' '28, '29. 




CHRIS POPPELREITER, 

CO-CAPT. -ELECT; guard; 

junior; 'l' '28, '29. 





MARTY GRIFFIN, 

half-back; senior; 
'l' '26, '27, '29. 



BOB BURKE, 

half-back; SENIOR; 

V '27, '28, '29. 



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CORNY COLLINS, 

CAPT. ; quarter-back; 

senior; V '27, '28, '29. 




Start of a non-stop flight by BURKE 




'JERRY KOZLOWSKI, 

center; senior; 
V '27, '28, '29. 



LOYOLA 6— COE 

On dedication day, October 12, the Loyola gridders 
chalked up their second victory of the year, when they 
humbled the Kohawks from Coe to the tune of 6-0. 
The score does not indicate the Rambler's superiority 
over the boys from Cedar Rapids, however, and it was 
due only to inopportune penalties and a costly fumble 
which deprived the Chicagoans of at least three more 
touchdowns. The lone score came in the second quarter 
when Bob Burke tore loose for a pretty 50 yard jaunt 
to place the oval on the ten-yard stripe. Two plays 
later he twisted over the goal-line, into the promised 
land for the only score of the afternoon. The game 
ended with the ball on Coe's 2 vard line. 




; @*U<8 



RED MORAN, 

tackle; senior; 
V '27, '28, '29. 




FRED SEXTRO, 

end; senior; 
V '27, '28, '29. 



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Loyola's secondary "goes calling" 

LOYOLA 6— DUOUESNE 7 

On October 19, Dan Lamont brought his charges to 
Pittsburgh, "Jinx-town," and after a game which 
proved to be a veritable nightmare, came out on the 
short end of a 7-6 count. The Ramblers outclassed 
their opponents in every department of the game and 
it was only in the closing minutes of play that the 
Smoky City boys were able to negotiate Loyola terri- 
tory. It was then that they completed two passes and 
scored when Burns snagged a 30-yard pass from Mc- 
Carthy. Donelli booted the pigskin through the 
crossbars lor the deciding point. A 25-yard pass from 
Molloy to Burke in the third quarter netted the lone 
marker for Loyola after which Flynn's kick missed by a 
scant few inches. What a whale of a difference just a 
few inches made. 




WALLY DURKIN', 

half-buck; JUNIOR: 
V '28, '29. 




TED CONNELLY, 

quarter-back; senior; 
'l' '28, '29. 



RED WALSH, 

tackle; senior; 
V '27. '28. '29. 




JERRY huppert, 

quarter-back; JUNIOR; 

'l' '29. 




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LARRY FAUL, 

guard; junior; 
V '29. 





"JIM FERLITA, 

tackle; junior; 
V '28. 



^ visiting back picks up a jew 

LOYOLA 12— ST. LOUIS 

October 26 was Homecoming Day and a good time 
was had by all. The Ramblers handed "the strongest 
Billiken machine in the last decade" a 12-0 thrashing 
after a beautiful display of football technique. In 
the third quarter Flynn gathered in a pass from Les 
Molloy that was good for 40 yards, placing the ball 
on the Saints' 37-yard line. On the next play Molloy 
slashed off right tackle and raced the remaining dis- 
tance for a touchdown. Towards the end of the fourth 
quarter Marty Griffin, standing on the Billihen's 25- 
yard line, heaved a pass to Connelly who snared it 
on the 15-yard mark and ran into the end-zone to 
complete the day's scoring. 




TOMMY FLYNN, 

full-back; junior; 
V '29. 




TOM HOWLAND, 

half-back; JUNIOR; 
•l' '29. 



Page two hundred ninety-Jour 



T H E 



O y O L A N 





DICK SHANAHAN, 

half-back; SENIOR. 



One ball-carrier and six Ramblers — -figure it out 

LOYOLA 15^DE PAUL 

Loyola 255 yards from scrimmage, De Paul 67; 
Loyola 19 first downs, De Paul 2; Loyola 13, De 
Paul 0. Thus went the November 3rd game at Soldier's 
Field, which was played before 51,000 spectators for 
the Catholic College championship of Chicago. It 
was Loyola from start to finish. The score was kept 
down due to numerous substitutions on the Rambler 
team; practically every member of the squad saw 
action. Flynn scored the first touchdown in the second 
quarter when he received a 20-yard heave from Molloy 
and scampered the remaining 25 yards for a marker. 
Bob Burke scored again in the fourth quarter after he, 
Flynn and Molloy had advanced the oval to the three 
yard stripe from deep in De Paul territory. 




BILL MCNEIL, 

end; JUNIOR; 
V '29. 



JOE LUKITSCH, 

end; junior. 




LUTZ 
LUTZENKIRCHEN, 

tackle; junior; 
V '28, '29. 




Page two hundred ninety-five 



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SMITTY SMITH, 

hill-back; JUNIOR; 
V '28, '29. 




A driving lesson by FLYNN 




FRANK MURPHY, 

half-back; junior; 
V '29. 



LOYOLA 6— LOYOLA (New Orleans) 6 

The Ramblers travelled south to engage the Loyola 
Wolves of New Orleans on Armistice night, November 
11. It was the first performance of the Chicago boys 
under lights; New Orleans boasted the most torrid heat 
wave in years ; and the game was played, from start to 
finish, in a driving rain. These obstacles failed to stop 
the Ramblers, however, and even though the score 
was knotted at 6-6, they managed to collect 16 first 
downs as against 2 for the Wolves. The Chicagoans' 
score came late in the first quarter when Flynn plunged 
over from the ten-yard mark. Lopez carried the scor- 
ing honors for the southern boys when, early in the 
third quarter, he took the ball over from the five- 
yard line. 





JOHN COPP, 

''guard; junior. 



Page Iwo hundred ninety-. 



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RED BRADY 

right tackle; junior. 



les molloy — and another ten yards 

LOYOLA 21— SOUTH DAKOTA STATE 7 

The Ramblers had a comparatively easy time in 
turning back the South Dakota Jackrabbits on No- 
vember 23. All three of Loyola's touchdowns resulted 
from long, steady marches. Flynn scored the first one 
when he crashed over from the four-yard line in the 
second quarter, afterwards plunging over for the extra 
point. Griffin accounted for the next marker in the 
third period, placing the pigskin in the end-zone after 
racing over from the twelve-yard mark. Burke kicked 
goal. The third was made possible when Molloy, late 
in the same quarter, piled through the entire Jack- 
rabbit team for 13 yards and a score. Burke again 
booted goal. Playing recklessly in the closing minutes 
of play the Dakotans completed many passes and, 
incidentally, slipped over a touchdown and threatened 
another. 




BOY WEIMER, 

end; junior; 
V '29. 



JOHN UNAVITCH, 

full-hack; junior. 




MIKE WAESCO, 

center; junior; 
V '28, '29. 




Page two hundred ninety-seven 



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MARTY STADLER, 

half-back; sophomore. 



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lt'hen Loyola'.* Ramblers ramble it's "tag-day" for De Paul 




DUFF DUFFY, 

guard; sophomore. 



LOYOLA 0— NORTH DAKOTA 7 

Meeting the only team which outplayed them 
throughout the entire season, the Loyola gridders fell 
before the all-mighty Nodaks from North Dakota on 
November 30 at the Rogers Park field. Although play- 
ing without Molloy, the star half-back who was seri- 
ously ill, the Ramblers proffer no alibis and pay due 
respect to any team which can crush the powerful 
Creighton team 54-0 as did North Dakota on the 
previous Saturday. The only score of the game was 
made in the third quarter when Jarrett circled Loyola's 
right end for 25 yards and a touchdown. The seventh 
point was allowed when Loyola was off-side. 




DICK FINN, 

guard; sophomore. 




BUD FLAVIN", 

lull-back; JUNIOR. 



Page two hundred ninety-eight 



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BOB DOOLEY, 
Manager; 
JUNIOR 



Wei me r receives tins Nodak with open arms 

LOYOLA 26— LOYOLA (NEW ORLEANS) 6 
On their second trip to the south, the Ramblers 'went 
to town' and defeated Loyola of New Orleans 26-6 on 
the afternoon of December 22. It was a banner day 
for Flynn and Collins, the former scoring three of the 
Northerners four touchdowns and the latter calling his 
plays faultlessly. Flynn scored early in the first quarter 
after he, Molloy and Burke had advanced the oval 
to the 2 yard line. Burke booted the extra point. 
History repeated itself and early in the second period 
Collins heaved a pretty pass from the 16 yard line and 
Burke gathered it in for another score. Two brilliant 
runs by Flynn in the third quarter, the first for 15 yards 
and the second for 10, told the tale of the third and 
fourth touchdowns respectively. Connelly ran over 
for the 26th point. Lopez scored for the Wolves when 
he raced over from the five yard line in the final quarter. 




GEORGE PROBST, 

right tackle; 

SOPHOMORE 



BERT LANNON, 

center; 

SOPHOMORE 




HANK PLOYHART, 

halj-back; 

SOPHOMORE 




Page two hundred ninety-nine 



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9 © * © P e" *, ■ "'.. 



JL § * £W*€ #?.» 



'■fis " ft*"" ar 



^g ' *> jBWi, 



^ e 



tVjwJ! JF$&& -„ 



Top Row: ryan (line coach), ferlita, mc neil, molloy, nolan, moran, poppelreiter, how- 
land, KOZLOWSKI, WEI.MER, SMITH, LANNAN. Third row: LONG {line coach), FINN, STADLER, 
PLOYHART, BRADY', BALL, WAESCO, FAUL, FLYNN, COPP, SEXTRO, NORTON (asst. Coach), LAMONT 

{head coach). Second row: walsh, noland, unavitch, griffin, huppert, Collins (capl.), 

DURKIN, DUFFY, CONNELLY, BURKE, PROBST. Front row: HENNES (trainer), FLAVIN, LUKITSCH, 
LUTZENKIRCHEN, MURPHY, SHANAHAN. 



THE VARSITY SQUAD 

Season's Record 

Loyola 12; Oklahoma City University 

Loyola 6; Coe College 

Loyola 6; Duquesne University 7 

Loyola 12 ; Saint Louis University 

Loyola 13 ; De Paul University 

Loyola 6; Loyola of New Orleans 6 

Loyola 21 ; South Dakota University 7 

Loyola 0; North Dakota University 7 

Loyola 26; Loyola of New Orleans 6 

Total Points 102 53 



Page three hundred 



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L O y O L A N 



# 1; 



Top Row: BOMBA, ZARAZINSKI, DAUM, FORS, MC INTOSH, KOPACEK, WALSH, (Capt.) CLARK, AVERILL, 
NORTON. Second Row: PHELAN, RADKE, O'BRIEN, SCHMIT2, HARTFORD, DRUGAY, SILVESTRI, 
KERPEC, NAPPOLILLI. Bottom Row: SHANAHAN, JOYCE, FURCHISS, RYBA, FAUL, HUCKENPOCHLER 



THE FRESHMAN SQUAD 

This year's Freshmen, under the able tutelage ol Phil Brennan, 
varsity captain of 1928, developed and came along in great shape. 
As an answer to the initial call, a collection ol embryo All-Americans 
came out. Huge, gawky youths from the rural districts, city-bred 
lads, fellows who were all-state and all-city players, others who were 
playing football for the first time, were all on hand to receive the toil- 
worn outfits of last year's varsity. 

After a few weeks those who had come out merely to get in the 
squad picture dropped out and only the hale, hearty and courageous 
remained. Then the real work of developing an outfit strong enough 
to cope with the powerful varsity began. 

Playing Lake Forest Academy and Marquette Frosh in the only 
two games of the season, the "Big Green" lost the former and tied 
the latter. These games, however, were no criteria of the class of foot- 
ball which the Frosh displayed in their scrimmages with the varsity. 

There were no outstanding players on the Freshman squad, al- 
though a goodly number of the yearlings look like promising candi- 
dates for next year's varsity. 



Page three hundred one 



"Once every month, in the 
presence of the Faculty and 
students, badges of distinction 
for proficiency, and testimo- 
nials of good conduct and dili- 
gence, are bestowed upon the 
most deserving." 

Early Bulletin 




BASKETBALL 



T H E 



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A N 




Coach 

Leonard D. Sachs 

Ace of American Basket-Ball Coaches 

Loyola's unusual rise in sporting cir- 
cles in the last few years is mostly due to 
Leonard Sachs and the basket-ball teams 
he turns out. When Sachs came to 
Loyola he found difficulty in scheduling 
any other than the smallest and most 
meaningless college teams in the district. 
During his brief stay he has given Loyola 
a nation-wide reputation and has done 
much to make basket-ball leadership and 
Loyola synonymous. 

During the past season he turned out 
a team which made a world's record for 
consecutive victories despite the fact that 
only two regulars were available at the 
start of the year. This remarkable string 
includes victories over champions of ev- 
ery part of the country. Probably Mr. 
Sachs' greatest achievement was develop- 
ing Murphy into what Minnesota's coach 
called, "The most finished college basket- 
ball player I have ever seen." 

With an abundance of prospective 
stars available Loyola looks for the con- 
tinuance of her basket-ball reputation 
under Coach Sachs, the cleverest and most 
sportsmanlike coach in the nation. 



Pane three hundred Jour 



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Captain 

Charles "Feed" Murphy 

All-American Center 

For four years Charlie Murphy has led 
Rambler cage squads from his position at 
center and during his three years on the 
varsity he has been regarded by his team- 
mates and Loyola followers as the finest 
player that has ever worn the maroon 
and gold. For sheer perfection as a ball 
handler he has no equal in the country, 
and this, coupled with bodily grace sel- 
dom found in one of his size, make him an 
ideal floor man. His willingness to sacri- 
fice individual scoring opportunities for 
team play merited the name "Feed;" 
yet, when the games were tightest and the 
opponent defense strong he was always 
able to grab high scoring honors. 

For two years he was relegated on all 
star teams to a position after his name- 
sake from Purdue but at the close of the 
past season his superior ability was recog- 
nized and he was named on all authentic 
All-Westerns and All-American teams as 
the regular center. Murphy graduates 
this year and his persistent geniality and 
incomparable ball playing will be greatly 
missed by all true followers of sport. 




u.wAl 



! ' V 




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Top row: dooley (manager), finn, Connelly, j. rafferty, smith, butzen, 
MCCRACKEN, SACHS (coach). Bottom row: SEXTRO, DURBURG, MURPHY (captain), 

WAESCO, SCHUHMANN 



THE VARSITY SOUAD 



Loyola 29 

Loyola 42 

Loyola 33 

Lovola 38 



Loyola 33 

Loyola 37 

Loyola 12 

Loyola 18 

Loyola 37 

Loyola 18_ 

Loyola 22-; 

Loyola 20 

Loyola 16 

Loyola 25 

Loyola 25 

Loyola 26 

Loyola 27 

Loyola 20 

Totals 478; 



Duquesne 13 

Arkansas State 12 

Vanderbilt 16 

Montana State 28 

North Dakota State 10 

South Dakota State 11 

Detroit 10 

Saint Xavier 13 

Dayton 16 

Saint Xavier 13 

Butler 14 

Purdue '. 25 

Duquesne 18 

Georgetown 24 

Loyola (Baltimore) 19 

North Carolina 25 

Duke 30 

Detroit 25 

332 



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"mike" waesco adds two points despite Detroit' s Jootbatl tactics 



THE SEASON 

Though Loyola's latest season on the basket-ball court was not as 
successful as previous ones from the view of games won as con- 
trasted to those lost, it was, nevertheless, her outstanding year 
when considered from other angles. Starting with but two regulars 
available Coach Sachs built a team around Captain Charles Murphy 
which established a world's record for consecutive victories in inter- 
collegiate competition, and, in so doing downed some of the nation s 
best teams. Champions from every section of the country were 
met and defeated and even near the end of the year when injuries 
and ineligibility had completely demoralized the team they com- 
pleted a rather disastrous eastern trip with decisions over two of 
the best schools on the Atlantic coast. The cool ball-playing which 
enabled them to add victory after victory to their remarkable string 
while skeptics were shaking their heads and saying, "It just can t 
continue," and the determined spirit which merited eastern vic- 
tories when even their staunchest advocates were unable to visualize 
them piling up enough points to win, were the characteristics which 
place the 1930 squad in a class by itself. 

The graduation of co-captains Bremner and Lawless and the 
injury to the veteran Sextro left three gaps which were not ex- 
pected to be filled very early in the year. For this reason the decisive 
victory over Duquesne in the opening game was a pleasant surprise 
to the student body. The easterners had won the Tri-State champion- 
ship for three years and they were represented by an experienced, 
clever team. Their inability to solve Loyola's defense was the main 
reason for the 29 to 8 score which the home team had amassed with 



Paae three hundred seven 



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JOHN WAESCO 

Forward — 'l' man 

JUNIOR 





FRED SEXTRO 

Guard — V MAN 

SENIOR 




JOHN DURBURG 

Centei V MAN 

JUNIOR 



SCHUHMANN about to score: butzen and SMITH do their part 



but two minutes to play. The removal of the regulars 
permitted the Pittsburgh team to slip in five points 
while the Loyolans were forced to be content with 
spraying the backboards with fruitless shots. 

New Year's Eve Loyola met Montana State in an 
effort to complete their list of 1929 games without a 
defeat. The Bobcats who boasted two All-American 
basketeers seem to have an option on the Rocky 
Mountain title which they have won for the last four 
years, and, after seeing them play it is not hard to 
understand why. Using a fast offense which had beaten 
Marquette, Purdue, Minnesota, and Nebraska and 
had failed by but one point to beat Pittsburg, winners 
of the eastern title; the Bobcats strove to spoil Loyola's 
record. With Murphy, Flynn and Schuhmann doing 
the scoring and the impassionate but effective Mike 
Waesco starring on defense the home team managed 
to hold a ten-point lead which they had garnered in 
the opening period. Though other games were won 
by smaller margins than 38 to 28 this was undoubtedly 
the year's best home game. 

The closest game on the home schedule was played 
with the University of Detroit on January 16. The 
visitors were content to make no effort to advance 
the ball until Loyola would discard its familiar zone 
defense and then they crashed through to obtain a 
10 to 8 lead with two minutes to go. Murphy showed 
his ability to score when needed and added four points 
as the final seconds ticked away, 



Page three hundred eight 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 





TOM FLYNN 

Forward — 'l' man 

SOPHOMORE 



WAESCO, MURPHY and sextro exhibit a legal block play 

A short jaunt into the east was the next event on 
the team's schedule, and the first game was played 
against the University oi Dayton. With Murphy 
saving himseli for the impending games with Xavier 
and Butler the burden of scoring was taken over by 
Waesco. Mike, who is usually willing to let others 
score while he passes and stars on defense, discarded 
his reluctance to shoot and made fourteen points. The 
Dayton papers in reviewing the game classed the 
Ramblers as the most finished team to ever play in Ohio 
and were profuse in their praise of Murphy and Waesco. 

An exact duplication of the Chicago victor overy 
Xavier was staged in Cincinnati the next evening. 
Durburg and Murphy did the best work for Loyola and 
through their efforts in the final half Loyola won, 18 to 15. 

The third game in as many nights was played against 
Butler on January 24. The Butler team was the 1929 
National Champion and their 1930 team with im- 
pressive victories over Montana, Purdue, Indiana, Illi- 
nois, and Chicago seemed to be out for a duplication 
of their predecessors' feat — until they met Loyola. 
The game was played before 10,000 spectators in 
Indianapolis' massive indoor stadium. There can be 
no doubt but that for perfection of play by both 
sides, this game had no equal in 1930, the Bulldogs 
handling the ball far better than any other Loyola 
opponents, and the Ramblers using an offense and a 
defense which was machine-like in its perfection. 
This was the high point in the season's record because 
not onlv did it mark the establishment of a world's 




BOB schuhmann 
Guard — V MAN 

SOPHOMORE 




DICK BUTZEN 

Guard — 'l' man 

SOPHOMORE 



Page three hundred nine 



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JOHN SMITH 
Guard — V MAN 





TED CONNELLY 

Forward 
SENIOR 




DICK FINN 

Guard — 'l' man 

SOPHOMORE 



RAFFERTY and MC cracken: a mighty small pair oj jorwards 

record but also it accomplished the impossible: making 
the Indiana press, which has always maintained that 
theirs is the heritage of basket-ball supremacy, admit 
that Loyola produced a better team than any they had. 
The much talked about struggle between Loyola 
and Purdue took place on January 30 at Lafayette. 
The attraction ot this game was the conflict between 
the two Murphys — Purdue's famous "Stretch" and 
Loyola's well-known "Feed." For two years there 
had been discussion as to which of these players was 
more entitled to All-Western and All-American honors 
and though Purdue's center was usually given the 
preference many of the shrewder critics were of the 
opinion that Loyola's pivot man was more deserving. 
Because of this the stands were filled and the rafters 
crowded when the game started. It was evident 
from the start that the Loyola team, with the exception 
of Murphy, was considerably off its game and though 
it obtained the lead for a few minutes the Purdue 
team by virtue oi several long shots obtained a 14 to 9 
advantage at the half. A shift of lineup with Durburg 
replacing the injured Schuhmann enabled Loyola to 
work the score to 20 to 19 Purdue's favor with half a 
minute to go. Purdue's two guards were attempting 
to stall when Murphy intercepted a pass and was fouled 
as he attempted a basket with fifteen seconds to play. 
Murphy made a point to send the game into an over- 
time period but the Big Ten Champs, after making 
the opening basket, drew Loyola out of their zone 
defense and scored three more points to bring the final 



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JIM RAFFERTY 

Forward 
SOPHOMORE 



Connelly and FINN: two football players a' courting 

score to 25 to 20. Loyola's Murphy with ten points 
and a remarkably fine defensive game easily established 
his superiority over his namesake and in this conceded 
victory the Ramblers had to be satisfied. 

A discouraged team returned to be greeted with the 
announcement that Flynn, one of the year's most de- 
pendable players, was to be ineligible for the rest of the 
year, and after a week of practice the team left for its 
eastern trip. The opening contest was dropped to Du- 
quesne after an overtime period of a rough game. The 
injuries sustained in this contest hampered the team 
during the week of games along the east coast, but even 
with this handicap the Ramblers beat North Carolina, 
the Southern champs and lost to Duke, the runner-ups 
by three points. A few other games were played but 
only one victory was obtained. In all these games 
Murphy was the outstanding player and it was his 
very fine showing on this tour that influenced the 
eastern press to give him their unanimous choice of 
All-Amencan center. This review only touches the 
high-lights of the season's record and makes no attempt 
to record the fine team work and skilled play which 
the members of the 1930 squad evidenced. 

Next year's team will be forced to do without Mur- 
phy, Sextro and Connelly but with Waesco, Durburg, 
Smith, Schuhmann, Butzen, Finn, Rafferty and Mc- 
Cracken of this year's varsity and the better players 
on the freshmen squad to draw from there is every 
indication that the 1931 team will be another one of 
which the University can be proud. 




FRANK MCCRACKEN 

Forward 

SOPHOMORE 




JOHN ROSICH 

Guard 



Page three hundred eleven 



o y O L A N 




The 
FRESHMAN TEAM 



JAMES X. BRE '.N'ER 

Coach 



THE SEASON 

One of the best moves the Athletic Department made during 
the past year was the appointment of James Bremner as freshmen 
coach. Jimmy captained the 1929 team through a season without 
a defeat and though he is a medical student at the present time he 
has completed his three years of varsity eligibility. He is an ideal 
coach because not only is he a wonderful player but also he has 
an intimate knowledge of the system of play which Coach Sachs 
uses, thus making it possible to drill the freshmen in the style of 
play which they will be expected to use when they become eligible 
for varsity competition. 

The call for candidates was answered by about fifty aspirants and 
alter a week of intensive drill only the twenty who showed the most 
promise remained. For the first two months the only thing they 
did was provide regular scrimmage for the varsity but as the sea- 
son neared the end and the varsity were getting more practice than 
was good for them the freshmen turned toward the completion of 
the games that had been arranged for them. 

The first game and the only one played on the home floor was 
with the Illinois College of Chiropody and the frosh with Joe Wag- 
goner starring had little trouble beating the embryonic doctors by a 
33 to 15 score. Nine players performed for Loyola and all showed 
considerable ability. 

The second contest was with Culver iMilitary Academy at Cul- 
ver, Indiana. The cadets who were runner-ups for the National 



Page three hundred twelve 



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Top Row: ACKER, CONNELLY, SWEENEY, FRISCH, POTL'ZNIK, O'BRIEN, SCHMITZ, CAVANAUGH, 

linklater (manager) . Bottom Row: dwyer, Fitzgerald, ryba, nappolili, 

SYLVESTRI, MATAVOWSKI, JACKSON, HARTFORD 



Academy title were no match for the green team and with Drugay 
and Waggoner tied for high scoring honors the team came home 
with their second victory, this one by the score of 43 to 14. 

The McNamara Boosters, Champion Independent team of In- 
diana, were met in a benefit game in East Chicago and the frosh 
dropped a close game by a 39 to 38 score. The freshmen's offense 
worked well but their poor defense in the last quarter when the home 
team came from behind was responsible for the one point loss. Cava- 
naugh and Waggoner did the best playing for Loyola until they 
were removed on fouls. 

The final game of the season was p'ayed in the opening round 
of the Central States Amateur Tournament and the freshmen 
dropped the game to the Goland Athletic Club by a 35 to 31 score. 
The game was one of the closest in the tournament and it was not 
until the final moments that the result was evident. The victors 
were not eliminated until the final round and so the frosh's fine 
showing gives every hope for some fine varsity material for the 
next year. 

In all probability Waggoner will replace Murphy as varsity center 
and though he is not as experienced or as clever as Charlie he has the 
necessary size and endurance to be a regular. Connelly, Potusnik, 
Sylvestri, Drugay, Cavanaugh, Frish and Acker, the other numeral 
winners, will also be of great aid next year if their past performances 
are an indication of their true worth. 



Page three hundred thirteen 



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President Robed M. Kelley, S.J.. 



presents the Cardinal'-* 
De La Salle Team 



cup to "Phil" Krause, Captain oj the 



The seventh annual National Catholic Interscholastic Basketball 
Tournament was held in Alumni Gym from March 19 to 23 and 
during that short period of time almost sixty thousand spectators 
crowded the stands to witness the various rounds of the meet. This 
record-breaking attendance can be accounted for by the high caliber 
of the teams participating; the absence of any accepted favorite; 
and the consequent rather general speculation as to the final outcome. 
Father Thomas Powers S. J., the new Athletic Director; Harold 
Hillenbrand, the tournament's Executive Secretary; and Robert 
Morris, Chairman of the Board oi Directors, spent weeks reviewing 
the records of the applicants and their efforts were repaid by the total 
absence of any team which might be classed as a "set up." Of the 
thirty-two teams entered from twenty-six states only a few were not 
state champions and even these boasted sectional titles. 

The resignation of Dan Lamont, an experienced tournament 
director, which was received just a month before the opening game of 
the classic might seriously have impaired the efficiency of the direction 
if Father Powers had not been capable of carrying an unfamiliar task 
to a successful, conclusion. Through his efforts the visitors were met 
at the train station; given the city's finest hotel accommodations; 
placed in the hand of experienced trainers; and in general had the 
most minute details of their arrangements taken care of. The de- 
partments which came in contact with spectators were equally well 
organized ; a corps of experienced ticket sellers under the direction of 
Father V. L. Jennemann S. J., was employed; the members of the 
Blue Key Honorary Fraternity took charge of the direction of the 
ushers; and the members of the Monogram Club assisted the fans in 
finding their seats. 

In previous years some of the teams displayed rather erratic team 



Page three handled fourteen 



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Jasper Fights to the Finish 

work because they were awed by the size of the floor and by the 
immensity of the crowds. This year, however, all the squads seemed 
to take the conditions as a matter of course, and awe struck, self- 
concious players were noticeable by their absence. Most of the 
teams which had participated in previous tournaments struggled 
through the first round though some of them had difficulty in doing 
so. Jasper Academy, Loyola Academy, and Columbia Academy, 
who were among the best liked teams, entered the second round by 
virtue of second half scoring assaults which turned close games into 
victories. De La Salle, the defending champs; and St. Stanislaus of 
Bay Saint Louis, Mississippi, runner-ups in the 1929 tournament 
had less difficulty in advancing. 

The second round was jammed with close games which kept large 
audiences excited all day long. The hostilities for the day were 
opened with a game between St. Xavier of Louisville and De La 
Salle. The Kentuckians have been in five of the seven tournaments 
and in four of them they have placed among the first four. De La 
Salle was out to show that champions do repeat while Xavier wanted 
to get their name on the Cardinal's cup for the second time also. 
This was the closest game of the tournament. There was never more 
than two points difference between the teams. In the closing minute 
of play De La Salle made the two points that meant a 12 to 11 victory 
though some of Xavier's followers will maintain for the rest of their 
lives that the referees were blind. Decatur High School, northern 
Indiana champs, won a four point victory from St. Louis; Bishop 
England High School won from Charleston; South Carolina defeated 
the Nebraska champs. St. Michaels, the eastern title holders came 
from a nine point loss in the first half to beat Duquesne of Pittsburgh 
by ten points; Loyola Academy fell before Columbia of Dubuque by 



Page three hundred fifteen 



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Apparently there 'j 
enough for all. 



a 12 to 10 score; Jasper beat Father Ryan High of Nashville; Spalding 
Institute ol Peoria won from Campion, Wisconsin's delegates; and 
Rockhurst High from Kansas City beat St. Stanislaus by an 18 to 17 
score. In this last game the Kansas Champions took an 8 point lead 
before the quarter was over and the Southerners were extended to 
cut down this advantage. A free-throw in the last two minutes won 
the game lor Rockhurst. 

De La Salle opened the quarter finals with a victory over Decatur 
by the score of 29 to 25. Mylott, Decatur's All-Tournament forward, 
scored most of his team points and it was through his efforts that 
Decatur kept in the running. Bishop England's 29 to 26 win over 
St. Michaels was the surprise of the round. The winners showed a 
fine offense and they won because the New Jersey team's defense 
weakened. Jasper Academy advanced at the expense of Columbia 
while the other game ended with Spaldmg as victors over Rockhurst. 

In the semi-finals De La Salle, defending champs, had little difficul- 
ty in beating Bishop England. The easterners were too small to 
prevent their larger opponents from controlling the ball and De La 
Salle scored at will. Jasper, Indiana Champions, beat Spalding of 
Peoria in the other game. Ouinlan and O. Aubin were the high 
scorers while Peters, of Peoria, handled the ball well. The game was 
close and ended with the score 19 to 16. With a day's rest, the four 
teams contending for the various places were in good condition again. 

In the opening game Spalding won the third place for the second 
consecutive year, beating Bishop England by a 27 to 17 score. The 
Carolinians exhibited a superb floor game but their shooting was 
ragged after the first halt. The score at the start of the period was 
11 to 10 and though the Bishops continued to excel at floor play they 
were able to score only three baskets during the second half. 

The final game, for which sixty five hundred spectators had crowded 



Page three hundred sixteen 



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Cathedral High {Denver) 
Bows to Loi/nla Academy 



If 


J&k 




r 




K 



the gym, was virtually the same as the game for third place: a contest 
between giants and faster smaller players and, as in the other game, 
the good big team beat a good little team. With Aubin, Jasper's 
midget forward, scoring almost half of his teams points, the Indiana 
team managed to keep fairly close for the first half but they were 
unable to stop the Chicago team in the second half. Ed Krause, 
with twelve points, led the scoring and played a fine enough defense 
game to merit the award of All Tournament. 

The Carinal's cup, indicative of national supremacy, went to De 
La Salle; the Thompson trophy for the best showing made by an 
Illinois team was likewise awarded to De La Salle. The Dempsey 
trophy for the most points in the opening round went to Nashville 
this year where Father Ryan High School, whose team amassed 55 
points in one game, is located. The award for the team coming from 
behind to win by the largest score went to St. Michaels who scored 
22 points more in the second half than did Duquesne. The Grimes 
award for the best coached team was won by Bishop England and 
the Nash award for the least number of fouls was won by the same 
team. The Evening American cup for the most sportsmanlike team 
was given to Neumann High, of Williamsville, New York. This is a 
distinct honor and is generally regarded as being second in importance 
only to the Cardinal's trophy. St. Marys High School, Walensburg, 
Colorado, was given the Chicago Catholic League placque for the 
team traveling furthest to compete and the Molloy cup for the most 
freethrows was given to Rockhurst. 

As a climax to the greatest tournament as yet staged the officials 
announced their All-Tournament team and the Angsten medals were 
awarded by Father Kelly to: Peters, of Spalding, and Schwartzl, of 
Xavier, forwards; Ouinlan, of Jasper, center; Krause, of De La Salle, 
and Mylott, Decatur, guards. And so the seventh tournament 
became historv. 



Pdpe three hundred seventeen 



A charter was granted to the 
institution by the Legislature 
of the State of Illinois, June 
30, 1870, with power to con- 
fer the usual degrees in the 
various faculties of a uni- 
versity. 




MINOR SPORTS 



T H 



L O Y O L A N 




The 
TRACK TEAM 



JOSEPH B. TIGERMAN, 

Coach 



The year 1930 saw the successful beginning of a Rambler team on 
the cinder path. In the past, some attempts had been made to 
organize a cross-country team, and for a few years the efforts bore 
fruit. But now, with things well under way, Loyola's future position 
on the track seems assured. 

After the Christmas holidays, Coach Tigerman issued a call for 
candidates. About 15 men answered. These men have made up the 
nucleus of the team, and have stuck to their regular practice through 
the winter and spring training. Mr. Tigerman who is a star himself, 
competes for the Illinois Athletic Club. He is one of the country's 
best walkers. He has given his time and energy freely, and has 
developed from a group of inexperienced young men a good team. 
Mr. Tigerman's patience and encouragement have been responsible 
for the ultimate success of more than one green and disappointed 
candidate. 

Up to the time of printing this book, five meets had been held. 
The team got its first test in a quadrangular meet with the University 
of Chicago, Lake Forest College, and Beloit College, at Bartlett 
Gym on February 1st. The Ramblers took second with 22 points. 
Chicago won the meet with 70. Loyola's team gave a fine account of 
themselves in their first appearance. Bert Francisco, the Loyola 
star, gathered 11^ points to gain high point honors of the meet. 
Edward Dowling, lanky senior, was second highest in points for 
Loyola. 

Three weeks later Loyola dropped a dual meet to Sears-Roebuck 
Y. M. C. A. at the latter's cramped gymnasium. Tom O'Neill won 
the mile and two mile event being high point man of the meet. 
Loyola's sprinters could not hold on the abrupt turns of the diminutive 



Page three hundred twenty 



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Top Ron:- HORNE, KIRBY, ZULEY, o'NEILL.'cONNELLY, VINCENTI, FRANCISCO. Coach: TIGERMAN. 

Front Row: strobel, johnson, mann, dowling 



track, and hence were unsuccessful. Walsh, Zuley and Vincent! won 
first places in the high Jump, 440 yard dash, and shot put, respectively. 

The Rambler flyers met with another reverse in a dual meet with 
Armour Institute, at Bartlett Gym on March 1st. Armour's distance 
runners won the meet for their school. Sademan featured with 
brilliant wins in the two mile and mile runs. Bert Francisco, was 
again high point man with three victories: the 50 yd. dash, the high 
hurdles, and the pole vault. 

On March 8th, a selected team journeyed to South Bend for the 
Notre Dame relay, but one Loyola man was injured in a preliminary 
heat, preventing Loyola from scoring. 

A few of the men also went down to the Illinois Relays, but here 
the nation wide competition was too great, and again Loyola went 
scoreless. 

On April 7th, Coach Tigerman called out his ever striving Rambler 
to the cinder path. Due to several injuries to our athletes the ma- 
chine did not function in the proper manner but showed signs of 
excellent material for the future meets. 

Glancing at the remaining schedule it appears that the Campus 
will be a scene of perpetual motion as the hoofers dash around the 
track in preparation for the coming meets. They will compete every 
Saturday from April Nineteenth to the end of school. 

The contests that have attracted our attention are the Kansas 
relays, the Drake relays, two triangular meets at Milwaukee, the 
National meet at Stagg Field and possibly the Ohio Relay. 

The men who have received special commendation tor their 
stellar work and their constant striving for the success of the Maroon 
and Gold on the cinder path are: 



Page three hundred twenty-one 



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bert francisco gives a display of good form over the hurdle 



BERT FRANCISCO, who is the all-around man of the team. His 
specialty is the clashes, and he is co-holder of the world's record at 
40 yds. He also runs the high and low hurdles, high jumps, pole 
vaults and tosses the shot. In the first three meets Bert picked up 
51 points. He is a sophmore. 

THOMAS O'NEILL, also a sophomore is the distance star of the 
team. Tom is superb in the hall mile, mile and two mile. He is 
also a valuable relay man. 

WALLACE KIRBY, is another sterling distance man, and a fine 
teammate for O'Neill. Kirby is a freshman at the Dental School. 

JACK STROBEL'S work in the relay in the Chicago meet was 
the finest seen on the rambler squad. Jack is a junior. 

ANTON VINCENTI takes care of the school's interests in the 
weight events. Anton is always good for a first or second in the 
discus and shot. He is a senior, and the team will miss him next year. 

BERT ZULEY, is a crack quarter miler and regular on the relay 
team. Zuley is a classmate of Kirby' s in the Dental Department. 

THOMAS WALSH is always striving for the highest and usually 
finds it somewhere above six feet in the high jump. Tom is a fresh- 
man and will be a valuable Rambler oi the future on both the track 
and iiridiron. 

EDWARD DOWLING, alias "Duke," runs the high and low 
hurdles in no mean time and clears the high jump bar in the neighbor- 
hood of five feet six. Ed is a senior. 

GERALD JOHNSON, another freshman flash, keeps the varsity 
distance stars on the jump. He specializes in the half mile and mile. 

JOHN HORNE is the most reliable middle distance man on the 



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LOYOLA shows up well at the Quadrangular meet at bartlett gym 



squad. In addition he is Loyola's best bet in the broad jump. John 
leaves via graudation. 

THOMAS HOWLAND is a valuable sprinter and is especially 
reliable in the 220. Tom is a sophomore. 

JAY MANN is the outstanding freshman quarter miler and 
sprinter. Jay will win many victories for Loyola in the next three 
years. 

ED MARCIN, is the best sprinter in the freshman group. He 
does everything from 50 to 440, and equally well in all. He will be a 
valuable Rambler in coming years. 

JOE KEARNEY, former captain of the cross country team, is 
also helping the track team in the two mile run. His steeple-chasing 
has helped him in many races. Joe will graduate. 

JEROME NIBBE, "is the Ramblers' best bet in the pole vault. 
He also runs the hurdles, and competes in the high jump. Jerome 
is a freshman, and more will be heard from him. 

The remaining members of the squad are working hard for places 
with the regulars. They are Bodin, Silvestri, Connelly, Kaminski, 
Huckin, Ployhart and Stadler. Excepting Connelly, all of these 
men will be back next vear. 



Page three hundred twenty-three 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 



The 
TENNIS TEAM 




zwikstra (Captain), hodapp (Coach), MURPHY (Manager) 



The Loyola University tennis team started the season handicapped 
by the loss of four of its outstanding players of last year's team. 
Paul Lietz, 1929 captain and first ranking player, and Harold Pren- 
dergast were lost through graduation, while Paul O'Connor and Paul 
Diggles did not return to Loyola in September. Nevertheless, tennis 
hopes are rather bright because of the exceptional good material 
produced from the freshmen squad, also, several upper classmen dis- 
tinguished themselves on the clay court in the Loyola News Tour- 
nament. As a result a very well balanced team is assured, although 
it may not have the individual talent that last year's squad boasted. 
Mr. Hodapp, who has taken upon himself the position as coach, is 
confident of a representative team. 

Among the regulars from last year's team who reported at the 
first practice were Frank Melody and Bill Reidy. Frank was ex- 
tremely busy last year on the publications and could not show his 
hidden qualities but this year his fast over-hand stroke will be fatal 
to many of the opponents. Reidy was a fairly consistent winner this 
year, and with last year's seasoning behind him, should develop 
into a great star. 

George Zwikstra, winner of the Loyola News Tourney, although 
only a sophomore, is expected to be one of the leading candidates for a 
position on the squad. Last season, as a freshman, he was able to give 
Paul Lietz an interesting afternoon's work on the single court. As a 
member of the varsity, he should surpass his former excellence. 

The freshmen also boasted of a strong team this year. Several of 
its members were more than a match for some of the varsity men. 
Especially was this true of Bob O'Connor and Jack McGuire, both 
former Loyola Academy stars. They will add a great deal of strength 
to the squad next year. 



Page three hundred twenty-four 



T H 



LOYOLA 




Top Row: hodapp (Coach), murphy, jhelody, frisch, zwikstra. 

DOHERTY, O'CONNOR. 



Front Row: REIDY', LAEMMAR, 



Among the new faces on the squad are those of Joe Kuenhle, Jack 
Lannon, Joe Frisch and Sid Hirschfield. All these men are upper 
classmen who were unable to play on last year's squad. Kuenhle 
was the captain and first ranking player at Lake View high school 
three years ago. Hirschfield hails from Crane, while Joe Frisch was 
a star at Loyola Academy two years back. Jack Lannon and Charlie 
Mann were not on their high school teams, but have developed a 
good game since their entry into college. Jack Laemmar and Norm 
Doherty are also very skilled with the racket. 

Mr. Hodapp has played an important part in the development of 
last year's squad and his effort will not have gone to naught. The 
team appreciates his help, as shown by their constant cooperation. 
As manager, Bob Murphy arranged the schedule, passed out tennis 
balls, and performed those other various duties which are demanded 
of him. He occasionally batted a ball around himself. 

When the Loyolan went to press, the tennis team was just getting 
in shape for its first match, so it will not be possible to state the 
outcome of any of the matches. 

The following schedule was arranged for the 1930 season. 

April 21 YMCA College Here 

April 25 Northwestern University There 

April 29 Armour Institute There 

May 1 Notre Dame Here 

May 2 Wheaton College Here 

May 13 Armour Institute Here 

Mav 19 Western State Teacher's College Here 

May 21 YMCA College There 

May 30 Indiana State Teacher's College Here 

May 31 Wheaton College There 



Page three hundred twenty-five 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 



^%, 




The 
GOLF TEAM 



Six years ago golf was officially introduced as a varsity sport at 
Loyola in a very unprompted manner. Roger Kiley, who was then 
coach of the baseball team, called for four volunteers to play. Luckily 
there were four on the baseball team who, incidentally, could play 
golf, for otherwise it is improbable that the sport should have reached 
the pinnacle of importance it now occupies at the University. 

Once the start was made the worst difficulty was passed, and if 
the team continues to surmont the obstacles as before, the sport is 
bound to progress in days to come. 

In 1927 the team was entered in the Central Intercollegiate cham- 
pionship at Milwaukee, sponsored by Marquette University, and 
could do no better than second place. The championship was won 
by Armour Tech, the strongest and most successful foe that the team 
has had for four years, and the individual championship was taken 
by Len Fons of Marquette. In 1928 Loyola won the Central Inter- 
collegiate championship and Joshua D'Esposito won the Individual 
Trophy. The golfers were unable to repeat last 3 r ear as Marquette 
had no team and consequently the tournament which had been under 
their auspices was not held. 

However, four matches were played. The team got off to a poor 
start at Detroit on a day more fit tor a freezing hockey game than 
anything else, and suffered its first defeat. Returning to Chicago 
the team met its second defeat by a half point margin at the hands of 
Armour Tech, a match the winning of which depended on the last 



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SHANAHAN, D ESPOSITO, CORR1GAN, LUDWIG 



putt on the last green. St. Johns of Toledo was played next and a 
gratifying victory resulted over this powerful team. To complete 
the season, revenge was taken from Armour by a top-heavy score. 
This was the first victory over Armour in six matches and promises 
well for the coming years. 

This year's team promises to be the strongest representation Loyola 
has ever had in the sport. Two of the men are completing their 
fourth year, one is on his third season and another on his second, 
and so, besides ability, the team possesses experience. In addition 
several men will be in line who can give any of the veterans a run for 
their money. The team is composed of Shanahan and D'Esposito, 
who are the four year men and Corrigan, Ludwig, Maulella and Dick 
Raysa all of whom have represented Loyola in the past. Freddie 
Sextro, Julian D'Esposito, and Jim Vonesh have shown the requisite 
ability to play with the varsity. 

The schedule calls for matches with Detroit, St. John's of Toledo, 
Armour Tech, and Notre Dame. Matches are also pending with 
several others, notable among which is Drake University, a team of 
the finest golfers and sportsmen any Loyola team has ever met. It 
is hard to forecast the results ot the matches at the present time, but 
we can only say that a defeat this year is not something that is bar- 
gained for and by all appearances it will be unexpected. 



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G. JOHNSON, E. MARCINKOWSKI, J. MANN 



INTRAMURAL TRACK MEET 

During the winter months, Coach Joseph B. Tigerman organized 
and conducted the second annual intramural track meet. The 
purpose of this, was to find capable men to represent the maroon and 
gold in the varsity meets and to develop them during the pre-season 
weather. 

On Friday afternoon, January 17th, thirty green and inexperienced 
runners appeared in the gymnasium to represent their classes and 
to show some of their hidden talent. By the appearance of their 
uniforms, little was expected by the onlookers, but soon the specta- 
tors were astonished by the fleetness of their classmen. 

The Sophmore Arts were the victors in the meet with a total oi 
36 points. They were closely followed by the freshmen with 26 
points. The seniors and juniors Gathered 9 and 5 points respectively. 

As Bert Francisco lowered his own record for the 40 yd. dash, Mr. 
Tigerman was astonished at the exceptional material he would have 
for the coming events. He realized that a successful track team could 
be organized. While Bert also won the shot put and 40 yard high 
hurdles, his classmate, Tom O'Neil copped the mile and the l /i mile 
race. These two men alone collected sufficient points to win the 
meet for the sophomore class. The freshmen showed signs of develop- 
ing into runners as they followed behind their lawful superiors to 
gain second place. 

Dan Lamont, the Director of Athletics, acting in the capacity as 
the official starter, commended the athletes on their prospects. He 
wished them success as he awarded the winners of the events with 
gold medals. 



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Top Row: STROBEL, NORTON, QUINN. Front Row: DOOLEY, CUNY, WEIMER, KEARNS 



INTRAMURAL BASKET-BALL 

To further the interest of activities at Loyola, the Loyola News, 
thru its representative, Leo Sheehan, sponsored the third intra- 
mural basketball tournament to a successful completion. 

The anxiety created by the last tournament caused sixteen teams 
from all departments of the university to participate. The Lake 
Shore Campus had the majority of entries as the teams from the 
other schools had difficulty in keeping their meetings on the evenings 
assigned. 

Many close games were held in the gymnasium as the teams strove 
to eliminate their opponents. In the semi-finals, the Alpha Delts 
conquered the defending champs from the Medical School to enter 
the finals. After an overtime period between the Iggies and the 
Juniors, Cuny, star center of the Juniors sank the decisive basket 
to defeat the Iggies. 

On March 14, McNeil led his fraternity brothers against the tower- 
ing Juniors composed of Kearns, Ouinn, Strobel, Dooley, Cuny, 
Weimer and Norton but the Juniors proved too much for the Alpha 
Delts and defeated them 19 to 17 to win the Intra-mural Basket-ball 
Championship of 1930. 

The value of such a tournament cannot be over-estimated because 
of the personal benefits it gives to each participant. Many students 
are confronted with handicaps which hinder them from entering 
varsity competition but by means of an intra-mural tournament the 
less efficient player may receive all the benefits^of the Varsity ath- 
letics. 



Page three hundred twenty-nine 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 




Kavanaugh, Ohlheiser and Frisch Smite jor Their Public 



THE BOWLING LEAGUE 

After a lapse of a few years, the desire to continue the sport of 
bowling was resumed in a concrete way during the past season. 
Practically every student who was not taking an active part in the 
major sports found ever increasing enjoyment and recreation at the 
bowling alley. 

This sport became so intensified by the increasing popularity that 
a well organized league of eight teams was formed by Fred Ludwig, a 
Sophomore of the Arts Campus. Entries came from every campus of 
the University, but due to times of meeting, the teams were selected 
only from the Arts and Law Schools. 

The Cannons, an aggregation composed of Joe Ohlheiser, Joe 
Frisch and Don Kavanaugh were the outstanding bowlers in the 
league. Their regular strikes and spares caused them to be con- 
sistent winners, and only on exceptional occasions could the oppon- 
ents afford real competition. They were credited with nineteen 
victories and two defeats. 

The other rankings were a struggle from the very beginning. After 
the teams had completed their schedule, four teams ended in a 
quadrangular tie for second place. 

After a poor start, the Shysters, a team from the Law School, came 
back strongly to enter the tie of fourteen wins and seven loses. 
Their team composed of P. Fazio, Matt Lear, and Neal McAuhffe 
were veterans of the past tournament. 

Ed Keevens, the anchor man of his chosen team, kept up the 
standard of his team by his exceptional high bowling. He holds high 
individual honors tor the league. 



Page three hundred thirty 



LOYOLA 



N 




Jack La en 



■ ami Bab O'Connor Tight it Out. 



LOYOLA NEWS INTRAMURAL TENNIS TOURNAMENT 

Soon after the opening of school, the Loyola News showed the 
newly acquainted freshmen just how a real tennis tournament should 
be conducted. The work was directed by Robert Murphy who is 
credited with the success of the fourth annual tournament. Through 
his efforts, forty men were brought together to compete for final honors. 

The tournament has many great features which distinguish it as a 
major event at Loyola. On account of the few requirements to 
enter, any individual may participate. He need not be a master of 
the art to receive the full benefits of the game. 

The ceded players of the meet were Zwikstra, Reidy, and Melody. 
Melody failed to show his skill because of his defeat in the first 
round by Wallen, the dark horse of the tournament. Reidy was 
strong until he met Bob O'Connor who proved to be his conquerer. 
With little trouble, Zwikstra entered the final round by defeating 
Calkins, Miller, and Mann in respective order. 

After several weeks of extensive playing and upsets, the veteran 
George Zwikstra met his Bob O'Connor in the final round. George's 
experience from previous years proved too much for his freshman rival. 
His back-court game was a decisive factor in controlling his placement 
shots and slow lobs. George was presented with an expensive racquet 
while O'Connor received a fine sweater presented by the sponsors 
of the tournament. 

The men who have fostered such activities should be commended 
on their persistent efforts to create an interest in sports throughout 
the student body. They have striven to give to the college man every 
opportunity to develop into an athlete and to adapt himself better 
to his favorite sport and should be congratulated by the coaches, 
whom they assisted by helping select men for the varsity squad. 



Page three hundred thirty-one 



"St. Ignatius College lost a 
baseball game in the ninth 
inning to the University of 
Chicago on May 5th. It was 
the first defeat of the year for 
St. Ignatius. We were lead- 
ing 5 to 4, until Capt. Harper 
of Chicago, knocked a home 
run with one man on in the 
last of the ninth." 

St. Ignatius Collegian. 




FRATERNITIES 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 



FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES 

With dates of establishment at Loyola 

SOCIAL 

Phi Mu Chi 1922 

Iota Mu Sigma , 1925 

Alpha Delta Gamma 1924 

Pi Alpha Lambda 1925 

Sigma Lambda Beta 1927 

Pi Mu Phi 1950 

PROFESSIONAL 

Phi Chi 1904 

Phi Beta Pi 1921 

Phi Lambda Kappa 1921 

Delta Theta Phi 1925 

SORORITIES 

Nu Sigma Phi 1921 

HONOR SOCIETIES 

Tivnen Ophthalmological 1922 

Lambda Rho 1925 

Blue Key 1926 

Beta Pi 1926 

Alpha Kappa Delta 1928 



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PHI MU CHI 

BETA CHAPTER 

6739 Newgard Avenue 

Founded at the University of Chicago, November 22, 1921 

Established at Loyola University, November 22, 1922 

Colors: Crimson and White 



OFFICERS 

Daniel R. Murphy Worthy Master 

John T. Tracy Senior Warden 

Herbert M. Stanton Scribe 

Thomas P. Smith Treasurer 

Harold Twomey Junior Warden 

Dion Wilhelmi 1 M , , D , , 

T. Leo Waldvogel ^Masters oj Pledges 

Harry Stauder , Steward 

Hayes O'Brien Historian 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

Bertram J. Steggert, M. A. Aloy-sius P. Hodapp, M.A. 
Howard E. Egan, Ph.D. George A. Schmeing, M. A., 

J. Edward Madden, M.S. 



M.S. 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Class oj 1950 

Thomas Ahearn John Leahy- Harry Stauder 

James E. Curry Hayes O'Brien John T. Tracey 

Joseph H. Garthe Thomas P. Smith Francis Lodeski 

Dion J. Wilhelmi Paul E. Reed 



Thomas B. Carney 
Samuel Grant 
Thomas Kallal 
Francis J. Young 



Class oj 1951 

Wayne S. McSweeney 
Daniel R. Murphy 
Charles J. Weigel 
Raymond L. Abraham 



Neil J. Doherty 
Monroe Garrison 
Joseph A. Mooter 
Gerald Wynn 



j. condra o'hare 
Jerry Quinlan < 
Herbert M. Stanton 



Class oj 1952 



Robert Adams 
John Griffin 
Paul Kain 



Burton Zinnamon 



Robert Adams 



Harold Twomey 
Leo Waldvogel 
Eugene Brady 



John Koenig 



Class oj 1955 

Edward Lally' 
Edward Schowalter 

Pledged 



Edward Jansen 



Raymond Schucks William Dullaghan Daniel Cleary 

Thomas Lynch Horace Ring 



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Top Row: KAIN, P. REED, GREIBER, SCHOWALTER, LALLY, KOENIG, CLEARY. Second Row: YOUNG, 

DULLAGHAN, JANSEN, WYNN, TWOMEY', WILHELMI. Front Row: H. O'BRIEN, STANTON, TRACEY, 

MURPHY, T. SMITH, WALDVOGEL 



Phi Mu Chi Fraternity was founded at the University of Chicago 
on November 22,1921, and exactly a year later at Loyola University. 
It is the oldest social fraternity at Loyola. The first meetings were 
held in the biology laboratory where the ideals of the small group of 
founders were formulated and the constitution drawn up. 

The next year a chapter house was secured and has since been the 
nucleus around which the activities of the fraternity revolve. The 
succeeding years have shown progress in material, social, and scho- 
lastic advancement. The six original founders have passed on, im- 
buing their successors with the ideals which inspired them. 

In 1926 the Grand Chapter disbanded in favor of the Board of 
Trustees which directs the active chapter in all its financial and 
administrative policies. 

Phi Mu Chi Fraternity has always encourgaed extra-curricular 
activities at Loyola. It has given its best talent to school publica- 
tions, class positions, and societies of all kinds. Scholarships, too, 
have not been a minor consideration of the fraternity and Phi Mu 
Chi considers it a distinct compliment to regard as honorary members 
Howard E. Egan, Ph.D.; George A. Schmeing, M.A., M.S.; Bertram 
J. Steggert, A.M.; and Aloysius Hodapp, M.A. 

The social life of the fraternity has been one of fondest memories. 
Sleigh rides, smokers, house parties, and dances have been the call 
of the day. The annual spring dance has become tradition and the 
fraternity has done credit to it this year with the brilliant supper 
dance held on Mav 23 in the Oriental Room of the Knickerbocker 
Hotel. 



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IOTA MU SIGMA 

Established at Loyola University, 1925 
Colors: Maroon and Gold 



OFFICERS 

A. Barberio President 

F. Saletta Vice-President 

A. Polito Treasurer 

J. Belmonte Secretary 

E. Castaldo Librarian 

C. Volini Assl. Librarian 

A. Barone Editor 

A. Balletti Sergeant-at- Arms 




Dr. I. Volini 
Dr. A. Partipilo 



J. Casciato 
J. Caliendo 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

Dr. J. Suldane Dr. A. Geraci 

Dr. S. Governale Dr. R. Drago 

. L. Caroliglio Rev. J. F. Walsh, S.J. 



Class oj 1950 

M. Petrone' 
C. Borruso 
J. Marzano, Jr. 



A. Bellini 

J. Mennella, Jr. 



L. Ibelli 
H. De Feo 

N. Casciateo 



A. Totundi 



Class oj 1951 

H. Fulco 
N. Balsamo 
L. Muzzicato 



J. ROBILOTTI 



A. Allegretti 
R. Fazio 
M. Parenti 



A. Esposito 
S. Jelsomino 

E. FlERAMOSCA 



Class oj 1952 

F. Vincenti 
M. Serio 
F. Fiore 
B. Simone 



D. Nigro 
L. Fiorito 
\V. Spiteri 



F. H. DiGraci 
J. J. Vitacco 
H. Cutrera 
L. A. jMaglio 

F. B. Perretta 
N. Felicei.li 

G. A. Luparello 
G. M. Stazio 



Class oj 1955 

L. J. Sirica 
T. A. Cabaliere 
J. Vertuno 
L. T. Palumbo 
G. A. Bica 
J. Digate 

E. Olivieri 

F. R. SCHIRRIPA 



\V. B. Falvo 



W. B. Ruocco 
W. DiGiacomo 
J. Guerrieri 
G. C. Ferrante 

R. SCALA 

A. Vincenti 

J. J. Pitzoferro 

M. Neri 



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Front Row: IBELLI, ROTONDI, BELMONTE, F. SAI.ETTA, BARBERIO, BALETTI, POLITO, CASTAI.DO, 
BALSAMO, ALLEGRETTI, FIORITO, CALIENDO. Second Row: OLIVIERI, FIERAMOSCA, SCHIRIPPA, 
NERI, MAGLIO, CAVALERI, LUPARELI.O, ACARDI, DI GRACI, SCALA, FERRANTE, RUOCCO, DEFEO, 
PETRONE. Front Row: VINCENTI, STAZIO, S. SALETTA, PALUMBO, DEGATE, J. CASCIATO, MARZANO, 
CUTRERA, FAZIO, PERRETA, ESPOSITO, MANEI.LA, FALVO, N. CASCIATO 



The Iota Mu Sigma fraternity was organized at the Loyola Uni- 
versity School of Medicine in the year 1922. The founders were 
Drs. Partipillo, Governale, A Geraci, S. Geraci, Drago, Champagne, 
and Conforti. The constitution was drawn up in the same year. 

The purpose of the organization was to organize the students of 
Italian parentage at the Medical School for social and scholastic 
benefits. 

The year 1923 saw the membership increased to thirteen. Doctors 
Volini and Suldane were elected honorary members and the prestige 
of the fraternity increased accordingly. The fraternity has a key 
as its insignia of membership during these years. Scientific questions 
were read and discussed at the meetings and the ideal of scholastic 
advancement was furthered. The by-laws of the fraternity were 
amended in this year to provide that the members of Iota Mu Sigma 
should not belong to any other medical fraternity of a social nature . 

By 1925 the membership had been increased to twenty-one. The 
fraternity began, in this year, to select its members in accordance 
with their scholastic standing. Pledge pins were used for the first 
time. The year, a successful one, was climaxed by a big dance at 
the Hotel La Salle. 

The pin now in use was selected as the fraternity emblem in 1926. 
This year also saw the recognition of Iota Mu Sigma by the other 
medical faternities and Doctors Drago, Pace, and Vianisi were ad- 
mitted to Pi Kappa Epsilon Honorary Fraternity. 

Iota Mu Sigma has held the distinction of placing more members 
on the Medical Seminary than any other medical fraternity. 



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ALPHA DELTA GAMMA 

Founded at Loyola University, 1924 
Colors: Maroon and Gold 



officers 

Richard Shanahan President 

William McNeil First Vice-President 

Paul Plunkett '. .Second Vice-President 

John McCormick Secretary 

Raymond Kilev Treasurer 

Rorbet Healy Historian 

James Brennan Serjeant-at-Arms 

Robert Fitzgerald Steward 




MEMBER IN THE FACULTY 

Claude J. Pernin, S.J. 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 



Raymond J. Kiley 



Class of 1950 
Paul M. Plunkett 



Rich ard P. Shanahan 



Walter Durkin 
Robert Keeley 



Class of 1951 

Cassin Graham 
John McCourt 
John McCormick 



Robert Healy 
William McNeil 



James Brennan 
Robert Fitzgerald 
Edward Hines 



Class of 1952 

Thomas Brisch 
Charles Girsch 
Bernard McCormick 
Joseph Ohlheiser 



Norman Doherty 
Bertram Lannon 

Eugene Migely 



Class of 1955 
George Cahill Gerard Johnson 



John Cella 
Charles Magrady- 
Hugh McGuire 

Merlin Mungoven 



Pledges 

Leonard Coughlin 
Hugh McCarthy- 
John Meany 
William Reed 
William Wilkins 



Bernard Gibbons 
William McDermott 
William Mitchell 
Martin Stadler 



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Top Row: MC COURT, BRENNAN, BRISCH, DOHERTY, MC CORMICK, JOHNSON. Second Row: GRAHAM, 

R. MURPHY", CAHILL, OHLHE1SER, HINES, GIRSCH. Front Row: HEALY, MC CORMICK, KILEY - , SHANAHAN, 

PLUNKETT, KEELEY" 



Alpha Delta Gamma was founded on the Lake Shore Campus of 
Loyola University in the year 1924. Three years later the work of 
expansion began and Beta Chapter was founded and installed at 
St. Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri. Gamma Chapter, at 
DePaul University, Chicago, was added the following year, closing, 
temporarily, new installations in other colleges and universities 
throughout the Middle West. 

Alpha Delt has gained quite a reputation for holding large and 
socially successful dances. They ordinarily give two each year, one 
in the fall and the other shortly after Easter. While there is no 
set rule the dances are ordinarily informal and attract large numbers 
of non-fraternity men and other fraternity men from all branches of 
the University. Since it is primarily a social fraternity it fulfills its 
purpose admirably. 

Members of the Alpha Delta Gamma Fraternity have always 
taken an active part in the activities of Loyola, many have been 
elected to high offices in the classes, and there have always been 
some who are deeply engaged in various phases of varsity athletics. 

The Fraternity confines itself to the Lake Shore Campus. 



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PI ALPHA LAMBDA 

6713 Newgard Avenue 

Established at Loyola University, February 28, 1925 

Colors: Blle and White 



OFFICERS 

Edward Healy President 

Robert E. Ludwig Vice-President 

Richard Bartlett Recording Secretary 

George J. Becker Corresponding Secretary 

Richard O'Connor Treasurer 

John Lenihan Assistant Treasurer 

John D. White Pledge Master 

Robert Thomson Sergeanl-at-Arms 

Fred Ludwig Steward 

Frank D. Arado Historian 



Rev. James J. Mertz, S.J. 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

Rev. George M. Maho- 
wald, S.J., Ph. D. 



Rev. Theodore J. 
Schulte, S.J. 



Richard W. Bartlett 
Frank P. Cassaretto 
Edward J. Healy 



Class oj 1930 



John A. Horne 
Walter J. Huppert 
Robert E. Ludwig 



Richard O'Connor 
Robert J. Thomson 
John D. White 



George J. Becker 
Charles H. Cuny 



Frank D. Arado 
Francis M. Dwan 
William A. Fitzgerald 



Class oj 1951 

Russel G. Higgins 
Francis M. Quinn 
Robert F. Rafferty 

Class of 1932 

John W. Guerin 
John L. Lenihan 
Fred M. Ludwig 



John P. Strobel 
Anthony C. Tomczak 



Charles H. Mann 
John J. Spackman 
James F. Vonesh 



Charles R. Acker 
Philip W. Barron 



Class oj 1933 

John L. Durkin 
Mark E. Guerin 
Paul J. Gormican 



Charles E. Mallon 
Robert W. O'Connor 



John Ahern 
Thomas Arado 
John Callahan 



Pledged 

Roger Knittel 
Charles Morris 
Paul Quinn 



James Rafferty 
Charles Sweeney 
Louis Tordella 



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1 


t* y * © i> l 


I § § ftlkf 






1 * $1 * 




f f iPf Jl 


■ ■ f ; 7 „ 





Top iJow: RAFFERTY, FITZGERALD, ZWIKSTRA, BARRON, DURKIN, SPACKMAN, GORMICAN, SWEENEY, 

BECKER, lenihan. Second Row: F. ARADO, dvvan, bartlett, acker, t. arado, mallon, vonesh, 
mann, M. guerin. Front Row: f. ludwig, o'connor, r. ludwig, healy, white, conley, Thomson 

February 28, 1930, marked the fifth anniversary of the founding of 
the fraternity of Pi Alpha Lambda whose development has kept a 
steady pace with the progress of Loyola University. 

The Charter members in 1925 started the fraternity on its road to 
success, and during the intervening five years, the members have 
followed in the footsteps of the illustrious founders and have made 
an enviable history for Pi Alpha Lambda. 

Besides a dinner and meeting on Monday nights, the strong fra- 
ternal spirit has been further welded among the members by monthly 
House parties, and by the three closed formal dances given during 
the school year. The Founders Day Forma! caps the climax of social 
events and binds the alumni and active members in the fraternal ties. 

In the extra-curricular activities of the Lake Shore Campus Pi 
Alpha Lambda has made an enviable record. Student government 
was promoted by a Pi Alph alumnus who became the first president 
of the Student Council. It was through the efforts of members of this 
fraternity that the honorary fraternities of Blue Key and Beta Pi 
were brought to Loyola University. The publications, the debating 
club and the other activities of the University have always had as 
their high lights the members of Pi Alpha Lambda. 

A fitting epitaph of the fraternity was expressed by a past president : 
"Pi Alpha Lambda is an organization which Irom its very birth has 
been the stormy petrel of Loyola extra-curricular life, hated by many, 
admired by more, respected by all, ignored by none." 



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SIGMA LAMBDA BETA 

Suite 118, Atlantic Hotel 

Established at Loyola University, February 1. 1927 

Colors: Maroon and Gold 



OFFICERS 



Alpha Chapter 




Beta Chapter 

Charles J. La Fond Grand Regent Adam Norris 

Raymond Hebenstreit. . Vice-Grand Regent Owen McGovern 

Harold F. Wirth Custodian of Records Allen Snyder 

Edward Cox Grand Banker John Lardner 

Walter A. Johnson Scribe John VanPelt 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 
Dean Thomas J. Reedy Cornelius Palmer 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 



Edward Cloonan 
Raymond Hebenstreit 
Charles LaFond 
William Norkett 
Thomas J. Reedy* 
Harry - C. VanPelt 



Alpha Chapter 

Edward Cooney 
James Hammond 
Hubert Neary 
Cornelius Palmer 
Robert Scott 
Harold Wirth 
Gerald Rooney 



Joseph Crawley 
Walter Johnson 
James Neary 
Herbert Pfeifer 
Frank Slingerland 
Edward Cox 



Adam Norris 
Thomas Dunn 
Thomas Cole 
Peter Smith 



Beta Chapter 

Allen Snyder 
Louis Pahls 
John Lardner 
James Hajek 
John VanPelt 



James Haggerty 
Charles Murphy 
Owen McGovern 
James Scott 



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Top Ron:' E. COONEY, W. JOHNSON, J. CROWLEY, H. NEARY, G. ROONEY. Second Row: T. SCOTT, 

L. PAHLS, H. PFEIFER, H. VAN PELT, H. WIRTH, P. SMITH. Front Row: R. HEBENSTREIT, A. NORRIS, 

T. REEDY. C. LA FOND, O. MC GOVERN 



In February, 1927, the Sigma Lambda Beta Fraternity was organ- 
ized at Loyola University by the pioneer students of the newly found- 
ed Night Commerce Department. It had as its purpose the encour- 
agement of social activities and the promotion of commercial theories 
and ideas and high moral standards as exemplified at Loyola Univer- 
sity. Membership has been granted only to those who are proficient 
in studies, interested in the school and its students, and active in 
athletic and social functions. 

During its short existence Sigma Lambda Beta has always firmly 
adhered to these principles, and as a result, has more than accom- 
plished its purpose. The annual drive for new students has brought 
an increased enrollment to the University. An attendance of over 
two hundred and fifty enthusiastic and appreciative students at the 
regular smokers, boxing and vaudeville entertainments is a good 
indication as to their success. The banquets, parties, dances, the 
Thanksgiving Jamboree, the New Year's Eve formal, the Easter 
informal, etc., have always proven delightful and pleasing. 

The Sigma Lambda Beta Fraternity has both an active and an 
alumni group. Regular meetings are held semi-monthly at Suite 
118, Atlantic Hotel. 



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PI MU PHI 

POLISH MEDICAL FRATERNITY 

Established Lovola University, January, 1930 

Colors: Red and White 



OFFICERS 

Casimir Libnoch Honorary Senior President 

John Konopa President 

Stanislaus Radzyminski Vice-President 

Edward Piszczek Recording Secretary 

Joseph Stybel Financial Secretary 

Anthony Zelazny Treasurer 

Van Walter Ko.masinski Editor 

John Hajuk Sergeant-at- Arms 




Rev. James Walsh 
S. Pietrowicz 
T. Larkowski 
E. Warszewski 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

V. TORCZYNSKI 

M. Uznanski 

F. DULAK 



A. WOCZYNSKI 

A. Sampolinski 
J. Wojtalewicz 
A. Linowiecki 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 



Class of 1950 



C. Libnoch 

J. Gardzielewsli 



S. SwiANTKOWSKI 
J. WlTKOWSKI 



+ 



J. Drabanski 

J. Dubiel 

V. W. Ko.masinski 



R. Abraham 

L. Chryanowski 

J. CZYSZEVVSKI 

J. Hajduk 



Class of 1951 

J. Konopa 

S. Radzyminski 

S. Witkiewicz 



Class oj 1952 

A. Moszczenski 
E. Piszczek 
J. Stybel 



A. Zelasny 
E. Zencka 
J. Zielinski 



E. SwASTEK 

A. Waszkowicz 

W. WODEK 

S. Wojcik 



T. Chobian 
T. Jasinski 
R. Kochanski 
C. Kozdroj 
E. Krazniewski 



Class oj 1955 

A. Przednowek 
H. Malinowski 

E. MlLEWSKI 

M. Sarnecki 



P. SOWKA 

J. Skuzinski 
J. Syslo 
W. Zarzecki 
W. Zuraski 



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2'op -/foif: ZENCKA, MALINOWSKI, KOCHANSKI, WODEK, DUBIEL, SARNECKI, HAJDUK, CZYSEWSKI, 
SKUZINSKI, SYSLO, ZURAWSKI, MILEWSKI. Second Ron-: WITKOWSKI, KRASNIEWSKI, SWASTEK, 
KOZDROJ, SOWKA, WOJCIK, JASINSKI, GARDZIELEWSKI, WAWSZKOWICZ, MOSZCZENSKI, DRABANSKI, 

witkiewicz. Front Row: CHRYANOWSKI. KOMASINSKI, stybel, libnock, konopa, radzyminski, 

PISZCZEK, ZALAZNY, ABRAHAM. 



Pi Mu Phi Fraternity was established during the present scholastic 
year. The organization was founded on January 10, 1930, with the 
full approbation of the faculty of the Loyola University School 
of Medicine. Even at this early date its roster is graced with the 
names of many prominent faculty members. 

Pi Mu Phi was organized to promote friendship and social con- 
tact among the medical students of Polish extraction. In the pur- 
suance of this purpose of creating a spirit of organization and mu- 
tual co-operation between one another and also between the students 
and faculty it has been successful. It has as its motivating interest 
the imparting and obtaining of medical knowledge, the mitigating 
of difficulties attendent upon its members, and, in general, the aid 
of fellow students to one another for the attainment of the student's 
goal — success in the medical profession. 

The foundation of Pi Mu Phi is due to the zealous and untiring 
efforts of the members. Credit is due especially to Messrs. Libnock, 
Konopa, Piszczek, Stybel, Hajduk, Sarnecki, and Kozdroj. These 
men are to be congratulated upon their noble efforts and congratu- 
lated upon the success of their great undertaking — the organization 
of Pi Mu' Phi. 



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PHI CHI 

PHI SIGMA CHAPTER 

3345 W. Washington Blvd. 

National Medical Fraternity 

Founded at University of Vermont, March 31, 1899 

Established at Loyola University, March 7, 1907 

Colors: Green and White 



OFFICERS 

Edward P. Madden Presiding Senior 

Cyril D. Klaus Presiding Junior 

Charles J. Weigel Secretary 

Ronald J. Lindsay Treasurer 

Milton R. Kukuk Assistant Treasurer 

Robert F. Berry First Guide 

Lambert F. Mammoser Vaster oj Ceremonies 

Charles W. Hughes Alumni Secretary 

Gerald J. Kohne Judge Advocate 




MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 



+ 



Dr. M. E. Creighton 


Dr. A. E. Jones 


Dr. M. M. Weaver 


Dr. R. A. Black 


Dr. C. H. Johnson 


Dr. T. J. Walsh 


Dr. T. A. Boyd 


Dr. M. Cikrit 


Dr. Vloedman 


Dr. W. E. Coen 


Dr. P. Lawler 


Dr. F. Mueller 


Dr. E. M. Drennan 


Dr. M. McGuire 


Dr. J. B. Nanninga 


Dr. H. W. Elgham.mer 


Dr. W. G. McGuire 


Dr. J. J. Smith 


Dr. G. H. Ensminger 


Dr. E. J. Meyer 


Dr. F. C. Valdez 


Dr. W. G. Epstein 


Dr. W. S. Hector 


Dr. Vaughn 


Dr. F. J. Gerty 


Dr. M. C. Mullen 


Dr. M. A. Walker 


Dr. P. E. Grabow 


Dr. G. W. Mahony 


Dr. E. J. Viskocil 


Dr. U. L Grimm 




Dr. J. Meyer 


MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 






Class of 1950 




I. DiLeo 


T. Pauli 


E. Kleinwachter 


V. Hauser 


J. Garthe 


J. Mahoney 


H. Hartma 


M. Kukuk 


E. Madden 


J. O'Connor 


B. Steinbrecker 
Class oj 1951 


A. Bulfer 


C. B. Gawne 


C. J. Weigel 


J. Wiialey 


G. J. Kohne 


J. Marciniak 


J. TwOHEY 


C. D. Klaus 


T. B. Carney 


H. K ramps 


T. P. HlCKEY 


E. Spangler 


J. Burke 


J. M. Leahey 


J. Prendergast 


S. H. Gallagher 


P. E. Leahey 


L. Mammoser 


J. Keehan 


P. McGuire 


P. Werthman 


G. Obester 


J. E. Petcoff 


R. J. Lindsay 


A. Perzia 


J. Mullen 


R. H. Lawler 
Class of 1952 


L. ZULEY- 


C. Coyle 


R. Berry 


E. James 


L Markey 


C. Hughes 


M. Garrison 


C. Serbsts 


D. Keating 


P. Corboy 


1. Bremner 


P. Engle 


J. Walsh 


E. Stepan 


Class of 1955 


F. Murtaugh 


C. Kramer 


J. Hem wall 


G.Day 


M. Exley 


H. Claycomb 
E. Hydock 


J. Murphy 



Paqe three hundredjorty-six 



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Top Row: MACEY, MURPHY, BULFER, KKAMER, COYLE, LEAHY, PRENDERGAST, JAMES, HICKEY. 

Second Row: claycomb, Keating, pauli, corboy, hydock, serbst, walsh, exley, day. 

Front Row: MCGUIRE, FOX, LINDSAY, KUKUK, WEIGEL, MARKEY, PETCO FF, BERRY 



The Phi Chi Medical Fraternity, Incorporated, was founded in 
the year of 1889 at the University ol Vermont, which has since been 
designated as the Alpha chapter of the Fraternity. From this humble 
beginning, the Fraternity has grown during the last forty-one years 
to be one of the largest and most respected ol Medical societies. It 
stands to reason that it did not "just grow" to its enviable position 
in the Fraternity World. While it may be true that it made its repu- 
tation on the character of its membership and adherence to the basic 
principles enunciated by its Founders, something like a system and 
the exploitation of that system has a great deal to do with it. And 
briefly, the system has been basically in the selection of men of 
character, principle, endeavor and love of the Medical Arts. From 
such a soil and with the cultivation of such membership, the society 
ol Phi Chi has grown to be as it is today! 

The Loyola Chapter of Phi Chi, known as Phi Sigma, was founded 
in the year of 1907, the present University Department then being 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons, at the same location. Phi 
Chi is proud to say that some six hundred graduates passed through 
its portals, and are today most ably representing the high ideals and 
principles of the fraternity. With the acquiring of the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons by Loyola University in 1919, the frater- 
nity has locally made great strides, until today, it is symbolic of the 
scholarship and high ideals of the University. It is firmly represented 
in our faculty, and it promises to remain and be the stellate leader 
of society activities in the Medical Department of Loyola University. 
Its present Chapter House is located at 3345 Washington Boulevard. 



Page three hundred forty-seven 



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PHI BETA PI 

ALPHA OMEGA CHAPTER 

3221 Washington Blvd. 

National Medical Fraternity 

Founded at University of Pittsburgh, 1891 

Established at Loyola University, 1921 

Colors: Green and White 



OFFICERS IN UNIVERSITY 

C.M.Carey Archon 

C. J. Zurfli Vice-Archon 

H. R. Wilson Secretary 

G. E. Kenny ' Treasurer 

E. M. Steffes Editor 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 




B. Baker Beeson, M.D. 

John J. Boland, B.S., M.D. 

Vincent B. Bowler, B.S., M.D. 

Harry J. Dooley, M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Thos. P. Foley. M.D. 

Geo. D. J. Griffin, M.D., F.A.C.A. 

Lester A. Halloran, A.B., M.D. 

Eugene T. Hartigan, M.D., Ll.B., J.D. 

Edward M. Hess, M.D. 

Wilhelm K. Hueper, M.D. 

Alexander J. Javois, B.S., M.D. 

Edgmund G. Lawler, B.S., M.D. 

F. C Leeming, M.D. 

Frank A. McJunkin, A.M., M.D 

John V. McMahon, B.S., M.D. 



Jos. L. Meyer, M.D. 

Louis D. Moorhead, A.M., M.S., M.D., Dean 

John C. Murray, M.D. 

Robert R. Mustell, B.S., A.M., M.D. 

Anthony V. Partipilo, M.D. 

Wm. J. Pickett, M.D. 

Ernst A. Pribram, M.D. 

Geo. B. Rosengrant, B.S., M.D. 

Henry Schmitz, A.M., M.D., F.A.C.S., F.A.C.R. 

Herbert E. Schmitz. B.S., M.D. 

Wm. Somerville, B.S., M.D. 

Leo P. A. Sweeney, M.D. 

Reuben M. Strong, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 

Wm. J. Swift, M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Eugene E.Tayfor, B.S., M.D. 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 



J. L. Amorose 
C. M. Carey 
H. Doeringsfeld 
E. V. Donlon 



R. W. Albi 
C. L. Armington 
R. F. Carmody 
I. J. Collins 
T. W. Falke 
J. A. Forbrich 



F. J. Clark 

N. J. DOHERTY 

W. T. Elnen 

F. G. GUARNIERI 



Seniors 
H. E. Graham 

W. JOHNSTON 

N. M. Latz- 
T. J. Pekin 
C. J. Foley 

Juniors 

V. J. Guzzeta 

M. M. HOELTGEN 

F. A. Heupler 

B. J. Johnston, Jr. 

G. E. Kenney- 



Sophomores 

J. A. McNamara 
J. A. Gibney - 
G. J. Rau 
S. D. Solomon 



P. Schneider 
F. E. Streysman 

P. J. TlMMONS 

C. J. Zurfli 



C. J. Molengraft 
M. Murphy 
E. W. Sachs 
M. A. Wagner 
H. R. Wilson 
C. A. Marquardt 



E. M. Steffes 
W. F. Stewart 
A. Ferrari 
G. Schmidt 



G. Andrew 
E. J. Black 
R. A. Queenan 
R. A. Matthies 



Freshmen 

P. A. McGuire 
I. P. Moore 
W. Prusait 
P. A. Seeley 



H. V. Valentine 

B. J. WlLLETT 

A. Zikmund 



Page three hundred forty-eight 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 




3X 



if t t;i I; 



Z<7/> 7?0ic: J. S. COLLINS, RAU, VALENTINI, ZIKMUND, MOORE, I. MOORE, QUEENAN, P. MC GUIRE, 

MATTHIES, WAGNER, MARQUARDT, STEWART. Second Row: STEFFES, HUEPLIS, WILETTE, ELNEN, 

SEELEY, BLACK, ANDREW, MOLENGRAF, GUARNIERI, GIBNEY. Front Row: SCHMIDT, SCHNEIDER, 

KENNY, WILSON, CAREY, M. MURPHY, DOERINGSFELD, TIMMONS 



Phi Beta Pi was organized as a local Medical Fraternity at the 
University of Pittsburgh in 1891. Since then it has spread to many of 
the leading colleges and universities throughout the United States. 
It now has over thirty-five chapters. 

In 1921 the Alpha Omega Chapter was formed at the Loyola 
University School of Medicine. It was made up of men who had 
grouped themselves together in an effort to better their social condi- 
tions and to foster an interest in the medical professions. In the 
short time that the fraternity has been established here, a good rep- 
resentation has been made in the faculty, some, however, having 
originally been members of chapters in other departments. At the 
present time there are almost as many faculty members as student 
members. 

The fraternity occupies the house at 3729 Lake Park Avenue. 



Page three hundred forty-nine 



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PHI LAMBDA KAPPA 

GAMMA CHAPTER 

National Medical Fraternity 

Established at Loyola University, 1921 

Colors: White and Blue 




OFFICERS 

Herman Shapiro Worthy Superior 

Jack Weinless Worth}/ Chancellor 

J. H. Jesser Recording Scribe 

L. S. Eiseman Corresponding Scribe 

Herman Levy Worthy Exchequer 

David Anderman Sergeant-at-.lrms 



Dr. J. J. Mendlesohn 
Dr. L. J. Brady 
Dr. A. Finkle 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

Dr. N. Fox 

Dr. A. H. Goldfine 



Dr. S. Salinger 
Dr. L. M. Trace 
Dr. L. SiNGEa 



N. Flaxman 
L. Lebovitz 



H. Levy 

B. SCHWARCZ 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Class of 1950 
B. Gordon 



Class of 1951 

J. Weinless 
R. Edelstein 



H. Shapiro 
G. Rand 



H. Renkoff 
D. Anderman 



L. S. Eiseman 



Class oj 1952 

S. Brownstein 
J. H. Reider 



J. H. Jesser 



Page three hundred fifty 



LOYOLA 





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KH| 


[ • ' I 


ir 




lT-W : 






: Utf 


f^oj 






I mm. M 


■wl sBB 




1 cH 


1 J 




1 "^L - 


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i L 


|- jH 


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I? 

Pi 

1 


Tjm 






III 






m >. 



2'op TJoic: LEVY, JESSER, RAXD, REIDER. .Middle RoW: ANDER.MAN, SCHWARCZ, BROWNSTEIN, 
LEBOVITZ. Bottom Row: ELLIOTT, EISEN'MAN, SHAPIRO, WEINLESS 



The Gamma Chapter of the Phi Lambda Kappa Fraternity was 
established at Loyola University in 1921 from a group of students 
in the School of Medicine. 

Since its establishment the fraternity has held its membership 
down to a limited number more for the purpose of keeping a high 
social standing rather than considering the advantages of many 
members of mediocre talents. 

The group was lormed originally from a small number of men who 
desired to earn a degree in Medicine, not for the purpose of establish- 
ing a reputation for social proficiency around the campus by pro- 
moting large dances and taking an active part in the affairs of the 
school but rather of bringing together those men who otherwise 
might find difficulty in establishing lasting friendships. The fraterni- 
ty has successfully retained and fulfilled this purpose up to the 
present and by so doing has made itself conspicuous by its contrast 
with other fraternities on the Medical School Campus. 



Page three hundred fifty-one 



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DELTA THETA PHI 

National Legal Fraternity 

Founded at Chicago, Illinois, 1915 

Established at Loyola University, 1923 

Colors: Green and White 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 



Dean J. V. McCormick 



Professor P. J. Tuohy 
Professor \V. Fortune 



Judge W. L. Meyer 




A. Brown 
J. Buckley 
N. Barron 
A. Burke 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Class of 1950 

J. DOHERTY' 

E. Daly 
G. Haley 
I. Kelly 
J. Crowe 



D. McCarthy 
J. O'Leary 
P. Reed 
H. Schlacks 



$ 



J. Farrell 
E. Bamrick 
V. McGowan 
I. O'Dowd 
P. Early' 
R. Raysa 
W. Caldwell 
J. Toomey 
D. Buckley 

D. Carey' 
J. Curry 

E. Dreis 
W. Johnson 



Under Classmen 

E. McGuire 

E. Cloonan 
J. Waldron 

F. Crowley 

F. Donahue 
M. Barron 

G. Brady 
T. Carey' 
J. Cullen 
L. Clark 
W. Clark 
A. Cassidy 

J. COSTELLO 

J. Klees 



T. Gregory 
J. Hammond 
T. Hart 
J. Kavanaugh 
M. Lear 
W. Lowrey 

N. McAuLIFFE 

F. McDonough 
J. O'Connor 
C. Poppelreiter 
J. Ryan 
J. Sanders 
R. Sweitzer 



Page three hundred fifty-two 



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Top Row: CLARK, KAVANAUGH, COSTELLO, MC CARTHY, MC GUIRE, D. BUCKLEY, CULLEN, SANDERS, 
WALDRON, MC DONOUGH, CALDWELL, LEAR, RYAN. Middle Rolf: MC GOWAN, J. BUCKLEY, o'DOWD, 
BURKE, KLEES, DREIS, KELLY, DOHERTY, FARREL, BARRON, JOHNSON, CAREY, POPPELREITER. 
Front Ron:' REED, N. BARRON, HALEY, CROWE, MC CARTHY, MEYER, BROWN, CURRY, DALY, 

O'CONNOR, CLARK 



Delta Theta Phi Law Fraternity was founded at the Cleveland 
Lav/ School of Baldwin Wallace College, Cleveland, Ohio, in 1900. 
Three fraternities: Delta Phi Delta, Alpha Kappa Phi, and Theta 
Lambda Phi, amalgamated to form this fraternity and used as a 
name a part of each of the three original names. 

Delta Theta Phi, one of the oldest and largest law fraternities in 
the country has sixty-five active and ten alumni senates. The sen- 
ates which are named after leading jurists are honored by the names 
of many of the outstanding judges in the United States Courts. 

McKenna Senate, named after the United States Supreme Court 
Justice, William McKenna, was established at Loyola University 
School of Law in December, 1925. It originated from the Thirteen 
Club, a small social group of thirteen members, and has now grown 
to include over a hundred active and alumni brothers. 

The object of Delta Theta Phi is to unite fraternally students of 
law, to surround them with an environment whereby the traditions 
of the profession may descend upon them, to lead them and their 
fellow students to higher scholarship and legal learning, to promote 
justice, and to inspire respect for the noblest qualities oi manhood. 



Page three hundred 'fifty-three 



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NU SIGMA PHI 

EPSILON CHAPTER 

National Medical Sorority 

Founded at the University of Illinois 

Established at Loyola University, April 20, 1920 




OFFICERS 

Lillian S. Tarlow Noble Grand 

Marie McVey Vice-Noble Grand 

Virginia S. Tarlow Treasurer 

Helen L. Button Secretary 

Ethel Chapman Secretary 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 



Dr.Noreen Sullivan 



Dr. Gertrude Engbring 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Class oj 1950 
Lillian S. Tarlow 



Kathryn R. Lavin 



Marie McVey 
Ethel Chapman 



Class oj 1951 

Helen L. Button 
Virginia S. Tarlow 



Class oj 1952 

Eleanor Chambers 
Marjorie Rodgers 
Clementine Frankowski 



Bernice Izner 



Beatrice Raymond 
Aida Salvatti 



Class oj 1955 
Mary Le Balbo 



Page three hundred fijly-jour 



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Top Row: CHAPMAN, RODGERS, FRANKOWSKI, LAVIN, RAYMOND. 
MCVEY, V. TARLOW 



Front Row: BUTTON, L. TARLOW . 



Nu Sigma Phi Fraternity was organized in 1896, at what was then 
called the College of Physicians and Surgeons — now the University 
of Illinois College of Medicine. The organizers — a group of far- 
seeing, ambitious women — recognized the need for a union of women 
with so many common ideals and professional and social interests, 
as medical women have. 

From a humble start of about 12 members, with Dr. Irene Robinson 
Pratt as the first Noble Grand, the Fraternity has flourished until at 
the present time, there are over twenty chapters in universities 
scattered throughout the United States, with hundreds of active 
members, and many more members of the Grand Chapter. 

Grand Chapter, organized in 1913, served more closely to unify and 
preserve the bonds of friendship between the members actively en- 
gaged in the practice of their profession. It was in that year that 
Drs. Julia Holmes Smith, Sophia Brumback, Jennie Clark, and Lois 
Lindsay Wynekoop were made permanent trustees of the Fraternity. 

Epsilon Chapter, at Loyola, was reorganized in October, 1916, from 
a previously disbanded Chapter at the Bennett Medical School. 
Among the women instrumental in reviving Epsilon were, Drs. 
Grace Mitchell Eide, Charlotte B. Nelson, and Bertha Eide, all of 
whom are in active practice in Chicago. 

Among the alumnae members of whom Epsilon Chapter may be 
especially proud are, Dr. Grace Mitchell, Dr. Bertha Eide, Dr. 
Noreen Sullivan, and a more recent member — Dr. Gertrude Eng- 
bnng, who is doing excellent work asa resident at Cook County Hospital . 

With a present active membership of twelve in Epsilon, and many 
more in Alpha, Beta, and Pi, other Chicago Chapters, much con- 
structive work has been done along scientific and social lines. 



Page three hundred fifty-five 



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LAMBDA RHO 

Honorary Radiological Fraternity 
Established at Loyola University, 1925 



OFFICERS 

Theodore H. Pauli President 

Edward P. Madden Vice- President 

John Wall Secretary 

M. R. Kukuk Treasurer 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 



Benjamin H. Orndorff, A.M., M.D., 
F.A.C.R. Honorary President 

Bertha Van Hoosen, A.B., A.M., M.D. 

Richard J. Tivnen, M.D., LL.D. 



Henry Schmitz, A.M., M.D., F.A.C.R., 

Honorary Vice- President 

Joseph E. Laibe, B.S., M.D. 
Irvin F. Hum.mon, Jr., B.S., M.D. 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 



T. H. Pauli 
John Wall 
J. J. O'Connor 
L. Mammoser 
L. Tarlow 
G. Leibold 
J. Twohey 
R. Lawler 
J. Petkoff 
Edw. Zencka 



Edw. P. Madden 

Harold McGrath 

John Dwyer 

J. Loef 

V. Tarlow 

J. Keenan 

R. Lindsay - 

C. Weigle 

J. Kohne 

A. Zelazny 



M. R. Kukuk 
V. F. Hauser 
Fred Ouilette 

G. ROONEY 

H. Button 
J. Whalley 
C. Klaus 
P. McGuire 
J. Marciniak 



Page three hundred fijty-six 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 




Top Row: PAULI, LOEF, KUKUK, WALL, MC GRATH. Middle Row: TWOHEY, WHALEY, MARCINIAK, 
ZENCKA, DWYER. Bottom Row: WEIGEL, L. TARLOW, BUTTON, V. TARLOW, LEIBOLD 



The Lambda Rho Honorary Radiological Fraternity was organ- 
ised in the school year of 1924-5 by members of the Junior Class of 
the Loyola University School of Medicine. 

The Fraternity was organized to provide means whereby the 
therapeutic and diagnostic application of physical phenomena may 
be presented to the students of Loyola University School of Medicine 
by men who are authorities in these branches of Medicine and to 
permit greater amplification of these subjects than was possible in 
the regular schedule. 

The proposal was taken up with Dr. B. H. Ordoff, Professor and 
Head of the Department of Radiology, and Dr. Henry Schmitz, 
Professor and Head of the Department of Gynecology, who agreed to 
sponsor the Fraternity and aid in its management. With this sup- 
port the subject was taken up with the Dean and Regent who 
heartily endorsed the proposed Fraternity. 

The first meeting was held at the Chicago Cit3 T Club where the 
first steps to organization were taken. Subsequent meetings were 
held at the downtown school. 



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DR. RICHARD J. TIVNEN 

OPHTHALMOLOGICAL SOCIETY 

Honorary Medical Fraternity 
Established at Loyola University, 1922 



OFFICERS 

Dr. Richard J. Tivnen Honorary President 

Dr. George H. Ensminger Honorary Vice-President 

A. F. Bulfer President 

C. M. Carey Vice-President 

T. Pauli Treasurer 

L. Tarlow Secretaru 




J. L. Amorose 
H. W. Carey 
H. E. Graham 
M. Kukuk 
J. Mahoney 
A. Ouellette 
L. Tarlow 



T. F. Ahearn 
G. E. Kenny 
R. H. Lawlor 
P. McGuire 
V. S. Tarlow 



MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 

Class oj 1930 

A. F. Bulfer 
R. K. Chun 
H. Hartman 

J. LOEF 

M. McInnes 
T. Pauli 



Class oj 1931 

J. J. Collins 
C. D. Klaus 
J. L. Leahy 
W. S. McSweeney 
J. H. Whaley 



I. C. Wall 
C. M. Carey 

I. J. DWYER 

V. Hauser 
E. P. Madden 
I.J. O'Connor 
S. Robinson 



J. A. Forbrich 
G. Kohne 
R. J. Lindsay 
J. Petkoff 
H. R. Wilson 



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Top Ron': MAHONEY, WALL, ROBINSON, CHUN, KUKUK. Middle Row: O'CONNOR, H. W. CAREY, 

.MADDEN, LOEF, MC INNES. Front Row: C. CAREY, DOCTOR GEORGE ENSMINGER, MISS LILLIAN TARLOW, 

DOCTOR RICHARD J. TIVNEN, BULFER 



The Tivnen Ophthalmological Society was founded at The Loyola 
University School of Medicine in the year 1922 for the purpose of 
bringing to the students of the Medical School extra-curricular dis- 
cussions of matters pertaining to the study of the functions and 
diseases of the eye. 

Meetings are held monthly, at which papers on assigned subjects 
are prepared and read by students. Following the reading, discus- 
sion is led by appointed members, others joining in at will. Doctors 
Tivnen and Ensminger usually add some very valuable remarks 
which throw added light upon discussions. 

The Society is greatly indebted to Doctors Tivnen and Ensminger 
for their kindly interest and encouragement. 

Admittance to membership is based on scholastic standing and 
personality. The Society has been exceedingly careful and unpre- 
judiced in making selections from the student body at all times since 
its establishment and it is generally regarded among the student 
body that only those who are the most deserving have been honored 
with membership. New members are admitted regularly in order 
to keep up the work started and to keep the fraternity and its 
endeavors a permanent part of the University. 



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BLUE KEY 

NATIONAL HONORARY FRATERNITY 

Founded at University of Florida, October, 1924 
Established at Loyola University, February, 1926 



OFFICERS 

Edward Madden President, First Semester 

John D. White President, Second Semester 

Thomas Hickey Vice-President 

James C. O'Connor Treasurer 

Walter Buckmann Corresponding Secretary 

Joseph Grady Recording Secretary 



mm 



Frank D. Arado 
Charles A. Boyle 
John K. Bruun 
Frank M. Conley 
William H. Conley 
Timothy J. Connelly 



MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 

Arts and Sciences 

Edward J. Dowling 
Edward Healy 
Roger Knittel 
John Lenihan 
Frank Melody 



Thomas F. Cole 
Edward A. Glasser 



Walter A. Buckmann 
Albert A. Dahlberg 
Francis Farrell 



Commerce 

Charles J. LaFond 
Robert F. McGurn 



Dentistry 

Harold A. Hillenbrand 
Harold L. Salzman 
Fred M. Scambler 
Charles J. Gruner 



Robert J. Murphy 
Richard O'Connor 
Paul M. Plunkett 
Robert J. Rafferty 
Robert Thomson 
John White 



Thomas D. Nash 
Joseph F. Osten 



Raymond J. Todd 
Paul Topel 
Harold O. Walsh 



Thomas J. Byrne 
Cornelius Collins 



Law 

John S. Kavanaugh 
Ambrose B. Kelly 
Joseph W. Grady 



James C. O'Connor 
John A. Waldron 



James X. Bremner 
Andrew Bulfer 
Stephen H. Gallagher 
Thomas Hickey 



Medicine 

Charles W. Hughes 
Cyril D. Klaus 
Paul E. Leahy 
Ronald J. Lindsay- 



Edward Madden 
Joseph P. Markey 
William J. McCarthy 
Charles J. Weigel 



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Top Row. J. OSTEN, J. P. MARKEY, C. LA FOND, W. BUCKMANN, J. C. OCONNOR, C. BOYLE, J. GRADY, 
J. KAVANAUGH. Front Row: R. O'CONNOR, P. TOPEL, T. IIICKEY, J. D. WHITE, R. TODD, F. CONLEY, 

A. BULFER 



Blue Key is a national honor fraternity with a two-fold purpose, 
first, the honoring of men who have proved themselves outstanding 
in service to their college, and second, the support and encourage- 
ment of activities which tend to further the interest of the university. 

The fraternity was founded at the University of Florida in October, 
1924, and since then has spread over the entire country. In 1926 the 
Loyola chapter was admitted as the nineteenth; today there are 
over fifty chapters, with some of the largest universities in the 
country on the list. The chapters are kept in close touch with each 
other from the national headquarters and general extension division 
at Gainesville, Florida, the engaging letters of Colonel B. R. Riley, 
national president and founder, serving as an excellent medium for 
constant exchange of ideas among active groups the country over. 

Some of the outstanding accomplishments of the Loyola chapter 
have been the founding and development of Hello Week and Fresh- 
man Welcome Day on the North Campus, which was later turned 
over to the Student Council, the promotion of the first all-university 
Homecoming Dance, which was then given to the Monogram Club 
to handle in succeeding years, and the development of the Loyola 
Union after several other bodies had failed at an all-university or- 
ganization. Ever since its establishment, the Loyola chapter has 
been in charge of the seating and reception work of the National 
Catholic Basketball Tournament. 

The national constitution provides "The test shall be that the 
men chosen shall be recognized as all-around men in scholarship, 
college activities, high moral standing and personality." 



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BETA PI 

Honorary Publications Fraternity 
Established at Loyola University, 1926 



OFFICERS 

Morton D. Zabel Honorary President 

Richard O'Connor President 

Robert Rafferty Vice-President 

Anthony Tomczak Secretary 

Robert Thomson Treasurer 

John Bruun Assistant Treasurer 




Alexander Brown 
Harold A. Hillenbrand 
Pall A. Reed 



James X. Bremner 
Edward Healy 
Rohert Rafferty 



MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 
Class oj 1950 
Frank M. Conley 



Francis Melody 
William H. Conley 



Class oj 1951 

John Bruun 
Anthony Tomczak 
Francis Quinn 



Richard O'Connor 
Robert Thomson 
John White 



James O'Connor 
Laurence Crowley 
Ambrose Kelly 



Eligible 

Thomas Poynton, News John Lenihan, Loyolan 

Thomas Spelman, Quarterly Edward Dowling, Quarterly, Loyolan 

Francis Steinbrecher, Quarterly Daniel J. Murphy', News 

Timothy Connelly, Loyolan 



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Row: CONNELLY, DOWLING, BRUUN, SPELMAN, HEALY. Front Row: RAFFERTY, 
ZABEL, O'CONNOR, CONLEY, THOMSON 



Beta Pi Fraternity was organized at Loyola University in 1926 
for the purpose of honoring those men who have advanced to major 
positions on the staffs of Loyola Publications and to provide a more 
concrete aim for those underclassmen who are entering upon pub- 
lication work in the school. 

Membership is limited to those who have excelled in the editorial 
or literary aspects of the publications rather than those who have 
dealt with the mechanical work. Inasmuch as it is necessar3 r for a 
man to be recommended twice, that is, at the end of two different 
years, before he may receive a key, only those who have reached 
the end of their sophomore year may become members. An excep- 
tion to this rule is made in the rare instance when a man is made 
editor of a publication at the beginning of his second year of work 
on it and also when a senior has held a major position satisfactorily 
and yet has not worked on the publication during his three previous 
years at the University. 

Being purely an honorary fraternity Beta Pi has not attempted any 
particular constructive program other than serving as a reward for 
high literary achievement. It is hoped that in the future some sort 
of scholarship of a literary nature may be established. 



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ALPHA KAPPA DELTA 

National Honorary Sociological Fraternity 
Established at Loyola Universitj', 1928 



OFFICERS 

Howard E. Egan, Ph.D President 

Francis J. Gerty, M.D Vice-President 

Helen M. Ganey-, A.M Secretary 

Marguerite McManemin Treasurer 



MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 

Rev. Frederic Siedenburg, S.J Dean of School of Sociology 

Rev. Austin G. Schmidt, S.J Dean of Graduate School 

Rev. James F. Walsh, S.J Dean of Men, Loyola Downtown College 

Agnes Van Driel Secretary of Downtown College 

Dr. Francis J. Gerty Superintendent of Psychopathic Hospital 

Dr. J. William Davis Instructor, Loyola School of Medicine 

Dr. Howard Egan Loyola Graduate School 

Marguerite McManemin Social Worker, Madonna Center 

Ravenna Van Houten Social Worker, Children's Memorial Hospital 

Cecile Egan Instructor in Child Welfare 

Lucille Behm United Charities 

Paul Martin Graduate Student in Sociology 

Helen O'Toole Graduate Student in Social Work 

Clare Fain Graduate of School of Sociology 

Teresa Finley Social Worker,. Cook County Hospital 

Jean Vincent Graduate of School of Sociology 

Helen M. Ganey Dean of Women, Downtown College 

Ruth McGee Graduate of School of Sociology 



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,jf . >v 


4 


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^e ' ; ^l 


m^ • ■ 


1 ■ Wk 1 


Bp - V 


SP ^^B 


res _Jr Jj 








m ^1 



Top i?OW: C. EGAN, H. EGAN, A. VAN DRIEL, M. MCMANIMIN, W. DAVIS. Front Row: R. VAN HOUTEN, 
T. FINLEY, FR. SIEDENBURG, H. GANEY, L. BEHM 



Beta Chapter of Illinois, Loyola University, Chicago, was elected 
to membership in Alpha Kappa Delta, National Honor Society in 
Sociology, February 7, 1928. The Chapter was organized under the 
inspiration and leadership of Rev. Frederic Siedenburg, S. J., founder 
and Dean of the School of Sociology. Mr. Kimball Young, National 
Secretary of Alpha Kappa Delta installed Loyola Chapter and ini- 
tiated the fourteen charter members. 

The primary purpose of Alpha Kappa Delta is conceded to be that 
of stimulating interest in the development of the science of Sociology 
and its application to society and its problems. Unbiased social 
research is the keystone of this honor society, whose members aim to 
become investigators of social phenomena and to interpret their 
findings in significant relationships pertaining to the development of 
society. 

Lecturers of note in the field of Sociology and Social Welfare have 
appeared on the programs of Loyola Chapter and have stimulated 
interest through the round-table discussions. Members of the 
Chapter, since its organization, have contributed worthwhile studies 
in special phases of social research and many thought-provoking 
book reviews have been presented by the members. 



Page three hundred sixty-five 



THE 



1930 LOYOLAN 



THE INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 

Of the Lake Shore Campus 



OFFICERS 

John L. Lenihan President 

Dion J. Wilhelmi Vice-President 

Raymond J. Kiley Secretary 



MEMBERS FROM FRATERNITIES 

Pi Alpha Lambda 

John L. Lenihan Robert J. Rafferty 

Edward J. Healy 




Phi Jlu Chi 

Dion J. Wilhelmi Daniel R. Murphy 

John T. Tracey 



Alpha Delta Gamma 

Raymond J. Kiley Paul M. Plunkett 

Richard P. Shanahan 



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Top Row: D. R. MURPHY, P. M. PLUNKETT, E. J. HEALY. 
R. P. SHANAHAN 



Front Row: T. T. TRACEY, I. L. LENIHAN, 



History and Purpose : The Interfraternity Council oi the Lake 
Shore Campus was established at the beginning of the scholastic 
year of 1928. The purpose of the organization was to bring about a 
unified spirit among the social fraternities of the campus so that the 
fraternities might work together for the betterment of the University. 
Among the activities which were aided by the council were the athle- 
tic rallies and the class dances. In addition to the aid given to various 
organizations the council settled all disputes among the fraternities 
and determined the policy of pledging and rushing. 



Page three hundred sixty-seven 



30 LOYOLA 



ACKNOWLEDGMENT 

Deepest gratitude for their efforts in 
preparing this book are expressed to the 
following: 

The Root Studio, Photographers 

The Standard Photo Engraving Co. 

D. F. Keller and Co., Printers 

William Charles Griffith, Artist 

There are many individuals who stand 
out prominently among the others for 
the favors they have performed but to 
mention one would be unjust unless all 
were given equal credit. 

Naturally, we cannot include the names 
of all the deserving ones on one small 
page. THE LOYOLAN could not be 
issued without the general support of the 
entire student body, it could not be issued 
without the individual labors of many 
who do not hold prominent staff positions, 
in fact — well, let's all have a drink on 
the house. 

DICK O'C. 



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OUR ADVERTISERS 
PATRONIZE THEM 







Page three hundred seventy-sewn 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 



Seating Comfort 



Plus a long period of satisfactory service, have re- 
sulted in Johnson Classroom and Dormitory Chairs 
being selected as standard equipment at such well- 
known neighborhood institutions as 

ST. MARY'S OF THE WOODS 
ST. MARY'S OF THE LAKE 

AND 

DE PAUL UNIVERSITY 



Bring Your Seating Problems 
To 

JOHNSON CHAIR CO. 

4401-4531 West North Avenue 
CHICAGO ILLINOIS 



Page three hundred seventy-eight 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 



Compliments of 

JOSEPH B. McDONOUGH 

Democratic Candidate 

for 
County Treasurer 



Page three hundred seventy-nine 



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If you like our Gordon Chemistries 
tell your friends about them. 

Just off the press 

THE SPIRITUAL WAY 

by 

Mother Bolton 

Religious of the Cenacle 
A splendid new presentation of the 
Baltimore Catechism Number Two 

The newest and best in Standardized Tests 

WORLD BOOK COMPANY 

2126 Prairie Avenue Chicago, Illinois 
E. M. Briggs — Chicago Representative 


IRVING S. GELMAN 

Tramps and Shades jor the Home 
6566 Sheridan Road Rogers Park 0149 


MUNGER'S 

WEST SIDE LAUNDRY 


FEDERAL CEMENT TILE CO. 


1435-1437-1439 Madison Street 


Ftreprooj — Permanent 


Telephones: 
Monroe 0687— Euclid 8206 (Oak Park) 


Precast Concrete Roof Slabs 


The very best work at the right price 


608 S. Dearborn Street 


All Services — Individual Finish, Family Finish, 
Rough Dry, Hydro and Wet Wa'sh 


CHICAGO 


Phone Pensacola 6700-1-2 


FOOD SHOP 




1006-08-10 Davis St. 


JEFFERSON PARK 


Evanston, 111. 


MILL WORK CO., Inc. 


BLACKLER MARKET 


SASH. DOORS AND INTERIOR FINISH 


Lake Forest, 111. 


5214-36 Milwaukee Ave. 


P. G. RAPP COMPANY 




Market and Grocery 


d8£!g& 


1449-51 Devon Avenue 
Phone Sheldrake 0250 




CHICAGO 


Edward J. Vonesh 




6978 Owen Ave., Chicago 


RAPP BROS. RAPP BROS. 


NEWCASTLE 0121 


Winnetka, 111. Highland Park. 111. 



Page three hundred eighty 



THE 1930 LOYOLA 



The Printer who is himself 
an arttst 



HE finest art — the best plates — 
the most interesting layout are of 
little value in a yearbook unless 
the printer is himself an artist. 

He must have an enthusiastic 
desire never to be satisfied until 
the yearbook carries the complete 
visualization of the editor's idea. 

That Keller succeeds is evidenced 
by the many trophies which 
Keller produced year- 
books have won. 



D F KELLER & COMPANY 

Seven Thirty-two Sherman Street 
CHICAGO 



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THE I MM AC UL ATA 

Irving Park Boulevard at the Lake 

A Central High School jor Girls on the North Side. 

A chartered institution, fully accredited in all its departments. 

{Preparatory School for Mundelein College, which will ~]L 
open in September, 1930, at 6367 Sheridan Road JF 



Fall Term opens 
September 8, 1930 



For particulars, address 

Sister Superior 

Telephone Lakeview 0175 



UPTOWN METROPOLITAN BUSINESS COLLEGE 

4750 SHERIDAN ROAD 
{America's Finest Si/stem of Commercial Schools) 

ESTABLISHED 1873 

Offers Thorough Training in 
STENOGRAPHIC, SECRETARIAL and COMMERCIAL COURSES 

DAY AND EVENING CLASSES 
Call at Our Office or Telephone Longbeach 1775 

ST. XAVIER COLLEGE 

For Women 
4928 COTTAGE GROVE AVENUE, CHICAGO, ILL. 

Conducted In/ the Sisters oj Mercy 

Liberal Arts Course, Pre-Medical, Music, Art 

Teachers' Promotional Credit Classes 
Autumn, Winter, Spring, Summer Terms 

SEND FOR ANNOUNCEMENT 

We Offer Experience, Reputation, Responsibility OF 60 YEARS Good Service Continuously in Chicago 

Geo. E. Moore, Pies. Jas. E. O'Neill, Secy. 

Telephones Franklin 0822-7259 

Established 1867 :: Incorporated 1903 

H. R. SHAFFER COMPANY 

Roofing and Waterproofing Contractors 

Yard and Warehouse 

1737-43 MATTHEW STREET 

Office 

228 N. LA SALLE STREET 
CHICAGO 



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CI4ICAG0AN 



THE CHICAGOAN, a fortnightly for the modern 
reader, recites the swift saga of Chicago brightly, 
accurately, always entertainingly. It is the resident 
Chicagoan's ready index to places, persons and 
things worth while ... to the Chicagoan abroad, as 
to the hosts of young Americans whose university 
years in Chicago have bred an enduring interest in 
affairs of the Town, it is an ever welcome contact 
with the ever vibrant metropolis. 



THE CHICAGOAN is available by subscription 
at three dollars the year; two-year subscription at 
five dollars. Single copies are obtainable at news- 
stands in Chicago and principal American cities 
at fifteen cents each. 



TUECI4ICAGOAN 

407 South Dearborn Street 
Chicago, Illinois 



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Established 1865 

SPANGENBERG & CO. 

WHOLESALE 

BUTTER and EGGS 

Institutions, Hatch, Clubs and 
Hospitals a specialty 

48 W. Kinzie Street, Chicago 
Phone Superior 7165 



FRANK RASMUSSEN 

9th Floor 
29 E. Madison Street 

Corner Wabash and Madison 

JEWELRY- SILVERWARE -CLOCKS 

Specialists in Sport Prizes 

CENTRAL 7158 



CENTRAL LIME & 
CEMENT CO. 

20 North Wacker Drive 

CHICAGO 



Est. 1856 

W. P. NELSON COMPANY 

N. J. Nelson, President 

Interior Decorators and Furnishers 

153 W. Ohio Street 

Show Rooms at the Drake 



CLOTHES FOR 

Men at Wholesale 

Wide Woolen Variety — Latest 
styles. Strictly made to measure 

We sell more clothes to the Clergy 
than any house in America! 

Open Saturday Until 5 P. .11. 



M. BORN & COMPANY 

Wells and Harrison 
CHICAGO 



ACCURATE 

CLEAR 

CONCRETE 

BUSINESS LAW 

By Ralph S. Bauer, A.M.. J.D. 

Formerly Princmal of the Blue Mound and 

Vienna (111.) Hiah Schools, now Professor of 

Law at De Paul University. Chica S o 

Author of CASES ON BUSINESS LAW 

by Bauer and Dillavou, CASES ON 

BUSINESS LAW by Britton and Bauer 

From his years of experience as a teacher of busi- 
ness law, the author has evolved a text for high 
school students which possesses what he defines 
as the five necessary qualities: the highest pos- 
sible degree of accuracy of statement, clearness 
to the student, absence of material so detailed as 
to bewilder the student, a reasonably full devel- 
opment of important points, and concreteness. 

400 pp. (5 x 7'A), cloth 
binding, with illustrations 



J. B. LIPPINCOTT COMPANY 



L257 South Wabash Avenue 



Chi, 



Page three hundred eighty-four 



THE 1930 LOYOLA 



LANG, WEISE & CELLA 

Real Estate and Building Management 
308 W. WASHINGTON STREET, CHICAGO 

adam I. lang Telephone Randolph 2574 

WILLIAM T. WEISE r 

david L. CELLA All Departments 

Managing Agents for 

MERCANTILE EXCHANGE BUILDING 
MACHINERY HALL BUILDING 
MOXLEY BUILDING 
WILLIAMSON BUILDING 
LANQUIST BUILDING 
KIPER BUILDING 
WORCESTER BUILDING 
DEEANKAY BUILDING 
WURLITZER BUILDING 

SKOGLUND BUILDING 

COX BUILDING 

McINTOSH BUILDING 

katzinger building 

american optical building 

axmerican hardware co. building 

m. McCarthy building 

freeman & miller building 

wright & lawrence building 

orleans-huron building 
ahlborn building 
giertsen building 
loyola university properties 
william r. linn properties 
edgar a. buzzell properties 
sturtevant estate properties 
marion s. crush properties 
a. v. gillespie properties 



Page three hundred tighly-Jiv 



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Special Sunday Dinner Table d'Hote Dinner 
Luncheon 

BRIARGATE 2859 

ANGELA ITALIAN 
RESTAURANT 

OPEN 11:30 A.M. TO 12 M. 

Dinning Room /or Banquets and Parties 

A. ANGELA, MANAGER 
1219 DEVON AVE. CHICAGO 


Modern Gymnasium Equipment 

CHICAGO 

GYMNASIUM EQUIPMENT 

COMPANY 

1855 W. Lake Street Chicago 


Telephones Central 3174-5175 

JOHN M. ROGERS 

Amusement Enterprises 

MUSIC — ENTERTAINMENT 

162 North State Street 
Suite 615 Butler Building 

CHICAGO 


TELEPHONE CALUMET 4244 

SLATER & WEBER 

CARPETS, DRAPERIES AND LINOLEUMS 

Schools, Churches, Hospitals 

2517-21 Calumet Avenue 
CHICAGO 


Compliments 
of 

A FRIEND 


McNEILLY'S 
CATERERS 

Banquets, Weddings, Dinners, 
Buffet Lunches, Frappes Served 
Any Time — Any Place 

None too Large — None too S/nah 

Tables, Chairs, Silverware and 
China to Rent 

PHONE RADCLIFFE 0700 
227 WEST 75th STREET 

Special Attention to Confirmation 
and Ordination Dinners 



Page three hundred eighly-stx 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 



Commission Drivers c3 Chauffeurs Union 



Wm. J. Haxley, Secretary 



1425 South Racine Avenue 



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/42SE&-* a little bit the 


THE GREEN GATE 


ictsjeSIIi n ' cer * ra ' n *° 




\Jggjf 1 travel on 


Special Dinner Every Day 75 Cents 


the Legionnaire 


LUNCH 11 A. M. TO 2 P. M. 75 CTS. 


forStPaul 




Minneapolis 


Special Sunday Chicken Dinner $1.00 


Rochester 


ACCOMMODATIONS FOR PRIVATE PARTIES 


Lt. Chicago • ■ 6:30 p. m. 




A r. Rochester . 7:00 a. m. 




Ar. St. Paul . . 7:10 a.m. 




Ar. Minneapolis 7:50 a. m. 


BANQUET HALL 


Consolidated Ticket Office 




179 W.Jackson Blvd. 




Chicago 




Phone Wabash 2661 


Phone Div. 2894 


Grand Central Station 




Harrison and Wells Sts. 




Phone Harrison 2393 


2426 NORTH CLARK ST. 






Chicago GreatWestern 




The Rochester Line 2711 


Nevada 6161 


Phone Experience 




Franklin 7760 Over 50 Years 


ALLEN TILING 




COMPANY 






MEHRING & HANSON 




COMPANY 


Contractors For 




TILES, MOSAICS, FIREPLACES 




BATH ROOMS 


Heating, Cooling and 


KITCHENS 


Ventilating Systems 


SWIMMING POOLS 




MOSAIC FLOORS 




FIREPLACES 


Power Plants — Power Piping 


REMODELING 


General Steam Fitting 


QUARRY TILE INSTALLATIONS 




FOUNTAINS 






162-166 North Clinton Street 


918 N. Kedzie Avenue 


CHICAGO 



Page three hundred eighty-eight 



T H E 



1930 LOYOLAN 




COAL COMPANY 

CHICAGO 



Producers and Shippers of 
Quality Coals Since 1885 



44 MINES 

Daily Capacity 100,000 Tons 



Sales Offices 

CINCINNATI OMAHA KANSAS CITY 

SPRINGFIELD MINNEAPOLIS 

ST. LOUIS DAVENPORT 



Page three hundred eighty-nine 



T H 



LOYOLA 



GOLD NOTES 




THE CATHOLIC BISHOP OF CHICAGO 




Signed by His Eminence, George Cardinal Mundelein 




Denominations $500 and $1000 
Maturities: 2 to 10 Years 




CREMIN & O'CONNOR 




50 North La Salle Street Telephone State 


0240 


Compliments o) 

INNODAY TEA ROOM 

Under the "L" at Loyola 


Compliments of 

PATRICK SHERIDAN SMITH 




C. D. GAMMON CO. 




H. BAIRSTOW 


Cartage Contractors 




Excavating 






Sand and Gravel 


riG&fgSb 




dSBSSk 


118 N. Ada Street 




1820 Norwood Avenue 






Sheldrake 1211 


Telephone All Departments 
Monroe 7400 





Page three hundred ninety 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 



CHINESE AMERICAN 
FOOD PRODUCTS CO. 

WHOLESALERS 

Specializing in Bamboo Shoots, Water Chestnuts 
Bean Sprouts 

Chow Mein Noodles 

Imported Chinese Sauce 
Imported Bead Molasses 
Chop Suey Vegetables 
Chinese Noodles 

552-4 W. Polk Street, Chicago, 111. 

5HWAI 

Brand Foods are quality products 



Page three hundred ninety-one 



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For Successful Parties 



large or small social gatherings of every 
kind . . . you will find unusual facilities 
and a superior cuisine at 

HOTEL SOVEREIGN 

6200 KENMORE AVENUE, North 

Phone Briargate 8000 Clifford Purcell, Manager 



Our Magnificent Ballroom . . . The Prince of Wales 
Room and other private party rooms are available 



lir.v<iiil<>Slr<ilfoii 

C O^J. E G E 

Offers Special Summer Secretariat Course to College Students 

Secretarial Training enables you to learn the business from 
an executive who knows the business. As Secretary to such 
a man you are in intimate touch with all the activities of the 
organization and immediately associated with the person who 
has the power to advance you to a higher place. 

This Summer Course enables you to continue college and 
equips you to EARN part or all your way, or it gives you a 
three months' advantage toward business success as compared 
with students starting in the Fall. 

PHONE OR WRITE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION 
BUSINESS MEN BELIEVE IN BRYANT S STRJTTON COLLEGE 

18 So. Michigan Avenue, CHICAGO Phone Randolph 1575 



Page three hundred ninety-two 



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_N EFFICIENT 
COAST. TO- COAST 
INVESTMENT SERVICE 

OUR CHICAGO HEADQUAR- 
TERS, M¥ YORK AND SAN 
FRANCISCO OFFICES, AND 
EIGHT OTHER STRATEGICALLY 
LOCATED BRANCHES, PROVIDE 
AN EFFICIENT COAST-TO-COAST 
INVESTMENT SERVICE TO AN 
EVER INCREASING CLIENTELE. 

UTILITY SECURITIES 
COMPANY 

230 SO. LA SALLE ST., CHICAGO 



NEW YORK • DETROIT RICHMOND ■ MINNEAPOLIS 

ST. LOUIS • INDIANAPOLIS • LOUISVILLE ■ MILWAUKEE 

SAN FRANCISCO • KANSAS CITY 



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IVe Welcome 
LOYOLA STUDENTS 



Our food is good — 

Prices are right — 

Friendly service 

LOYOLA RESTAURANT 

6536 Sheridan Road 
ROGERS PARK 1036 



1 ou re always Welcome at 

HOTEL 
KNICKERBOCKER 



Headquarters jor 

Dinners — Dances — Banquets 

Luncheons — Teas 



Unusual Facilities in the 
Oriental Room — Silver Club 
Towne Club — Garden Room 



For Information Telephone Sup. 4264 
J. I. iMcDonell, Manager 

HOTEL KNICKERBOCKER 

163 E. Walton Place 




HALSEY, STUART & CO 

INCORPORATED 

CHICAGO zoi South La Salle St. NEW YORK J5 Wall St. 

PHILADELPHIA III South Fifteenth St. Detroit 6oi Gritwold St. 

Cleveland 925 Euclid Ave. PITTSBURGH $07 Fifth Ave. 

MINNEAPOLIS 109 South Seventh St. ST. LOUIS 319 N. Fourth St. 

BOSTON' 8s Devonshire St. MILWAUKEE 4ZS E. Water St. 



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Follow the Boys to Papel's 

LOYOLA BARBER SHOP 

1143 Lovola Avenue 
TELEPHONE ROGERS PARK 1036 



EPPIG-MULHOLLAND CO 

Catholic Church Bonds and 

Notes. Mortgages on Small 

Homes 

Insurance 
In all of its branches 
Office: 6 N. Michigan Ave. 
Phone: Franklin 0280 
GEORGE T. EPPIG 



FRANK A. MULHOLLAND CO. 

We Buy, Sell, Rent, Manage 
and Appraise Real Estate 



Office: 6257 S. Western Ave. 
Phone: Republic 3200 
FRANK A. MULHOLLAND 




Jlumidiato 



the HEALTH RADIATOR SHIELD 



COPYRIGHTED 

The Radiator Cover " oj Merit" 

ART METAL PRODUCTS CO. 

514-26 S. Green Street, Chicago, 111. 
Phone Monroe 2726 



Select the Time — this is the Place! 

The St. Clair, one of Chicago's newest hotels offers 
ideal facilities for those important college affairs. 

Convenient for meetings of faculty or student 
groups. Lunch in the beautiful Spanish dining room 
— or private rooms, if you prefer. Food and service 
unexcelled. The ball-room you've been dreaming 
about to make the fraternity dance a distinctive event. 
The very place for the contemplated banquet. All 
priced to suit the college purse. 

Delightful rooms and complete, courteous hotel 
service at reasonable rates for the out-of-town 
visitor. Convenient to the shopping and theatre 
district of the Loop. 

St. Clair Hotel 

Ohio Street at St. Clair St. CHICAGO 

SUPERIOR 4660 




1 'J 'ast a Whisper from the Loop 



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LOYOLA TAILORS 
& CLEANERS 

1145 Loyola Ave. Rogers Park 4558 

Suits made to order 

REASONABLE PRICES 


Compliments of 

CHAS. V. McERLEAN 

39 South La Salle St. 


Cleaning — Dyeing — Repairing 
Work Called For and Delivered 


STATE 2911 



JNO. A. McGARRY CO. 

Paving Contractors 
189 W. MADISON ST. 



Compliments oj 

A 
FRIEND 




JOHN A. MALLIN 



410 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago 



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GOOD SET 

GUARANTEED 



y^SStC 1 ^ PAINLESS 

oMIM EX c T u ^^ ON 

CLEAN $1.00 

EXTRACT ...$1.00 
FILLING ....$1.00 

CROWN $4.00 

m BRIDGE $4.00 

EXAMINE FREE 
CREDIT TERMS 



*5; 



00 





CHEAPEST PLATE IN CHICAGO 

OTHER SETS $10. $15. $20 AND 

NATURAL PEARLY PINK. $25 

WORK FINISHED IN 24 HOURS 

KlSDr.OTonnellSr. 

39 W. Adams St. 

6405 N. Clark St. 6334 Cottage Gr. 
3235 W. Roosevelt Rd. 




GOOD COUNSEL HIGH SCHOOL 



Resident and Day School 
FOR GIRLS 

Conducted By 

The Felician Sisters of Illinois 

Fully Accredited 

3800 Peterson Ave., Chicago, 111. 



Rogers Park Hotel 

Sheridan Road at Pratt Avenue 
Chicago, 111. 



Three blocks from Loyola University. One block from 
Farwell Avenue bathing beach. Convenient transportation 
to the loop by L and Bus. 

Large light 1^-2-3 and 5 room kitchenette apartments. 
Newly decorated. Also attractive sleeping rooms with 
private bath. 

Complete hotel service 

RATES REASONABLE 



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NORTON 
CLOSER 




DOOR 
CO. 



Established 1886 

ROSSBACH & SONS, Inc. 

Phone: Seeley 9014-9015 




Manufacturers of 
VENTILATORS 

CASEMENT 

FRAMES AND 

DOMES FOR 

CHURCHES, 

ORNAMENTAL 

IRONWORK, FIRE 

AND SIDEWALK 

DOORS AND 
BLACKSMITHING 



Oxy-Acetylene Welding 



Jobbing 



512-20 So. Washtenaw Ave. 
CHICAGO 



OVERLOOKING LOYOLA 
The Beautiful 

CAMPUS TOWER 

Fourteen Stories oj Delightful Apartment Homes 

Units of three and four rooms 

with 

one and two bedrooms 

Unfurnished 



1033 LOYOLA AVENUE 



HOLLYCOURT 2700 



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Now . . . any Crane installation on easy payments 



Now you can have the new beauty, convenience, 
and comfort of such a bathroom as this and pay 
only a few dollars down, a small sum monthly. 
You can have a $300 bathroom or a $10,000 one. 
You can have anything in the Crane line . . . the 
finest marble or twice-fired vitreous china color 
fixtures or the most inexpensive enameled fixtures 
in white; fittings in gold, silver, chromium, or 



nickel plate; valves that are the measure of de- 
pendability everywhere . . . and pay at your leisure. 
These terms are offered under the Crane Budget 
Plan, drawn to put first quality in plumbing and 
the most modern improvements within easiest 
reach of every home owner. For complete instal- 
lation on easy monthly payments under this plan, 
consult a Crane Qualified Contractor-Dealer. 



^ 



CRAN E 



' Fittings 



Fixtures, Valves, Fittings, and Piping, for Domestic and Industrial Use 

Crane Co., General Offices: 836 S. Michigan Are., Chicago ♦ 23 W. 44th St., New York ♦ Branches and sales offices in one hundred and ninety-four cities 



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Phone Franklin 1440 



M. J. BRANSFIELD 

Municipal Bonds and City Vouchers 

120 South La Salle Street 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



JOHN CARROLL SONS 

Funeral Directors 

1158 North Clark Street 
Diversey 0735-56 

4542 W. Ravenswood Avenue 
Longbeach 6713-14 

Dennis Jl. Carroll Eugene J . Carroll 
CHICAGO 




The cover for 
this annual 
was created by 
The DAVID J. 
MOLLOY CO. 

2857 N. Western Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 

Gwt> Molloy Mod* 



ALL 

TELEPHONES 

OAKLAND 

1551 




JOHN <M. 



NORTH SIDE YARD 
I30I FULLERTON AVE- 

CHICAGO. MILWAUKEE*. ST PAUL PAILWAV 



Dependable Service 
duality Coal 
Satisfied Customers 



COALCO. 



SOUTH SIDE YARD 
5IOO FEDERAL STREET 
:W YORK CENTRAL RAILROAD 



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< 


j 




—POWER— ——RADIO— ——LIGHT— 


j 




j 
! Telephone and Broadcasting I 




1 


! Installations j 




'1 
'I 








i 

Erickson Electric 






Company 






'Electrical Contractors I 






2756 DIVERSEY AVENUE 

j 






; Phone Armitage 8497 

j 




< 


j 
WESTERN ELECTRIC AMPLIFIERS 






PERMANENT INSTALLATIONS | 


i 




OR 


| 




RENTED FOR ANY OCCASION 






j 






I 
1 

M. A. BOOM CHICAGO 






(Manager) I 

S 

I 
{ 





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Lincoln 8304 

ABLE TRANSFER COMPANY 

{Able to Transfer Anything) 

C. J. Ryan, Pies. 

Machinery, Stacks, Boilers and Safes 

Moved and Erected 

Structural Steel Hauling 

Office, Warehouse and Garage 

1500-08 Smith Ave. 
900 BLACKHAWK STREET 




OUR GUEST SAYS 

Stop at the 

ALBION SHORE HOTEL 

Reasonable Rates 
Exceptional Restaurant Facilities 

R. M. Burke. Mgr. 

Tel. Sheldrake 8804 



Appearance 



*> READY "^ 

JE8 



and 
Economy 



•«s&* 



RUDOLPH ANDRINGA 

Sectional Office Partitions' and Railings 
2419 W. Monroe St. Seeley 3024 



SAVE 25% ON YOUR FUEL BILL 

by having your heating boiler and pipes in- 
sulated. The heat will also be evenly distributed 
through the house instead of being lost in the 
basement. 

Call us on Contract Work or Materials 
Only 

STANDARD ASBESTOS 

Manufacturing Company 

820-822 West Lake Street 

Telephone Monroe 6475 




PORSTELAIN CHICAGO 
COMPANY 

Vincent J. Sheridan, Mgr. 
Cook County Distributor 

PORSTELAIN 

System of Standard Wall Tiling 



4809 W. Harrison St. 



Austin 4776 



& 



Wei OJaskl^^JjCaunclru. 

ZZOA- 10 Lawrence Ave. %»«..^° Phone. Long Beach 7520 

A Semce For Every Home -Wet Wash to the Comp/ete finished Fami/v Washing. 



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rj, , , [Rogers Park 70o6 

lelephones< tj • , ,,o, 

r [rmargate oo21 



Sheridan Furniture 
Mfg. Co., Inc. 

JIakers of 

Fine Upholstered Furniture 



Represented by 
B. SEGLIN 



1 120 Loyola Ave. 
6714-16 Sheridan Road 

CHICAGO, ILL. 



Edward O'Callaghan 



Henrv O'Callaghan 



O'CALLAGHAN BROS. 

Plumbing Contractors for 
New Library Building 

21 SOUTH GREEN ST. 
CHICAGO 

Telephone Haymarket 4566 



Compliments of 

THE M. P. MOLLER ORGAN WORKS 

Hagerstown, Maryland 

Moller organs lead all makes for college, church, auditorium, 
or in fact for all uses. 

The Moller "Artiste" reproducing residence organs have 
no equal for the home. 

Budders of the large organs in Our Lady of Vilna, St. 
Matthias, St. Clement's, St. Gregory's, St. Clara's and many 
Catholic Churches in Chicago, also organs for more than 
eight hundred other Catholic Churches. 

Every organ a special creation for a particular use and 
fully guaranteed. 

Booklets, specifications and full particulars on request. 

Address: 

M. P. MOLLER 

Factory and General Offices: 

HAGERSTOWN, MARYLAND 

Chicago Office: 

6054 Cottage Grove Avenue. 

Fairfax 2823-5239 



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ST. CATHERINE 
HIGH SCHOOL 

{For Girls and Young Ladies) 

WASHINGTON BLVD. AT CENTRAL AVE. 

CHICAGO 

Under the direction of the Sisters of Mercy 

Accredited by the University of Illinois 
and Chicago Teachers' College 
Telephone Columbus 7576 



Compliments of 



BATufet 

Glectrical Supply 
Company, he. 

12 N. Jefferson Street • Chicago, UL 




With the Compliment.? 

oj 




ICE CREAM 



Compliments 
of 

FRANK J. BURKE 

Funeral Director 

6749 SHERIDAN ROAD 

Lady Assistant Ambulance Service 

Phone Sheldrake 0144 



ii i ii i ii i iii ii i ii i m r 



Fresh Air in your home 
u ilh an 

AIRMASTER 

Custom-Built Ventilator 




; For free home demonstration 
call Randolph 1200, Local 285 

COMMONWEALTH EDISON 
COMPANY 



Ij l/ie Field oj Education is Your 
Immediate Interest. We Can Serve You 



Our Publications in the Elementary 
and High School Fields Reflect 



The application of up-to-date and 
sound pedagogical principles. 

Courses which have been checked against 
authoritative requirements. 



Our Service to Instructors Includes 

Syllabi, educational monographs, personal 
demonstration and direction 



Write j or our catalog of publications 

LYONS & CARNAHAN 

CHICAGO NEW YORK 

221 E. 20th St. 131 E. 23rd St. 



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JOHN C. DILLON & COMPANY 

Specializing in this District 

Real Estate, Loans, Renting, Insurance 

We own Forest Haven Estates, Lake Forest, 
Asbury Park, Evanston, and other properties. 

6616 SHERIDAN ROAD 

Phone Rogers Park 4501 

CHICAGO 

17 Years Here — You Know the Reason 



TOMPKINS-KIEL 
MARBLE CO. 

400 NO. MICHIGAN AVE. 

T. \V. SINDING. 2nd Vice Pres.. Mgr. 

Wholesale Dealers in 

Block and Sawn 

Marble, Stone, Onyx, Serpentine, Slate, 

Mosaic Placquettes, 

Granito, Etc. 

WE DO CUSTOM SAWING 



4613 N. Clark St. 



Longbeach 8996 



R. U. NICHOLS COMPANY 

INSECT SCREENS 
Rust-proof Metal or Wood Frames 

BURROWES 

Metal Weatherstrips, Weather-pruf 
Sliding Casement Windows 



All Phones Dorchester 7800 

ESTABLISHED 1813 

PAUL A. HAZARD & CO. 

'Hazard Knows Where Money Grows 

REALTORS 

5324-26-28 Lake Park Avenue 



Compliments oj 

W. E. O'NEIL CONSTRUCTION CO. 

508 W. Washington Street 
TELEPHONE STATE 4316 



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MOUNTAIN VALLEY 


WHY NOT GET HIGHER MARKS? 


MINERAL WATER 


FOR YOUR HOME WORK 


and the Famous Mountain Vallev 
GINGER ALE 


USE A WOODSTOCK TYPEWRITER 
SPECIAL STUDENT RATE 


From Hot Springs, Ark. 


$2.00 per month 


739 WEST JACKSON BLVD. 
Phone Monroe 5460 


WOODSTOCK TYPEWRITER 
COMPANY 


Evanslon — Greenleaf 4777 


35 North Dearborn St. 


Deliveries JIade All Over 


TELEPHONE STATE 5925. 




Compliments of 


Compliments 


A-l CLEANERS & DYERS, Inc. 




JOS. B. WOODMAN 


WILLIAM J. McGAH 


5312-18 Broadway, Chicago 




Longbeach 7232 




Evanston Branch — Greenleaf 6298 




[5516 




Phone West! 55 17 


cSSM&k 


[5518 


GEORGE STANISLAUS SMITH 




ARCHITECT 


MUTUAL CONSTRUCTION 




COMPANY 


8532 Luella Avenue 




CHICAGO 




Phone Saginaw 3555 


GENERAL CONTRACTORS 


°G$%®F 






2532-2534 Warren Blvd. 




Patrick warren, Pres. CHICAGO, ILL. 



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BROADMOOR 


Choice Native Meats, 


APARTMENT HOTEL 


Fresh Dressed Poultry, 


Howard at Bosworth 


Sea Food and Game 


Catering to the family 


FRESH MEATS, FISH, POULTRY 


One, Two, Three and Four Rooms 
with full hotel service 


AND EGGS 


Convenient to all necessities 


WM. C. GEHRING 


A Few Unfurnished Apartments 


MEAT MARKET 


SHELDRAKE 5170 


1443 Devon Avenue Sheldrake 3956 


Phone Hollycourt 1648 


James J. Cullen Telephone 
John B. Boltz Central 1687 




CULLEN & BOLTZ 


CARLSON FOOD SHOP 


Fire Insurance — Surety Bonds — 
Casualty Insurance 


1319 LOYOLA AVENUE 


SUITE 1406-8— 160'NO. LA SALLE ST. 




CHICAGO, ILL. 




Special Agents 


We Deliver CHICAGO, ILL. 


The Metropolitan Casualty Insurance 
Co. of New York 


Phone Yards 0768 


J. M. BRENNAN & CO. 


Painting and Decorating Contractors 


RESIDENCES CLUBS STORES FACTORIES 


OFFICES SCHOOLS APARTMENTS WAREHOUSES 


HOTELS CHURCHES THEATRES GARAGES 


We are in a position to operate any place in the country 


651 WEST 43rd STREET 



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VARIETY FIRE DOOR 
COMPANY 

Steel Fire Doors, Hollow Metal Doors, 

Freight Elevator Doors, Kalamein Doors, 

Underwriters Labelled Doors 

CARROLL & SACRAMENTO AVENUES 

PHONE KEDZIE 3434 CHICAGO 


NATIONAL BANK PROTECTION 

For Your Savings 

BROADWAY 
NATIONAL BANK 

BROADWAY & DEVON 


ATLAS BOX COMPANY 

1385 N. Branch Street, Chicago 
PHONE LINCOLN 9000 

The Atlas Certificate on Corrugated 

and Solid Fibre Shipping Containers 

Is a Symbol oj Quality 


School and College Text Books 

NEW AND USED 

Largest Stock oj School Books in the 
Jliddle West 

Phone Hyde Park 7737 
For Prompt Service 

WOOD WORTH'S BOOK STORE 

1511 East 57th Street 


STAINED GLASS WINDOWS 

Designers and JIakers 

Established 1883 

GRAND PRIZE, WORLD'S FAIR 
ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Send for Catalog M. C. 

Flanagan & Biedenweg Studios 

312-320 w. illinois st., chicago 

telephone superior 8466 


. Established ISW 

Office Telephones: Lincoln 9105-9106-9107 

Night Telephone: Rogers Park 3010 

ELECTRIC WELDING 

GEO. E. CORBETT 
BOILER & TANK COMPANY 

Boiler Setting and Furnace Building 

Boiler Repairing Day or Night 

General Mason Repairs 

Portable Air Compressor and Welder 

Oxy-Acetylene Welding and Cutting 

1332-1336"C0RTLAND STREET 


Building Material Cement Work 

M. FOLEY COMPANY 

STREET PAVING CONTRACTORS 
Evanston, Illinois 

Office: 1521 Lyons Street Telephones: University 1687 

Yards: 1521 Lyons Street University 1688 

2100 Greenleaf Street University 1686 



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Phones: Ardmore 10245 Office Hours 
Ravenswood 7103 6 to 8 P. M. 

WESTERN LANDSCAPE 
GARDENERS 

Dependable Nursery Stock 

Fruit and Ornamental Trees 

Shrubs, Roses, Hedging, Vines, Etc. 

Hedges Trimmed Black Soil and Fertilizer 

Trees Trimmed and Removed 

Trees and Shrubs Sprayed 

Grounds Maintained on Contract Basis 

4858 N. Lincoln Street 


JOHN SHERRIFFS 

1515 Loyola 
Phone Briargate 4585 

We Deliver Free 

GROCERIES— FRUIT— VEGETABLES 


SHIEBLER-GAYTON 
COMPANY, Inc. 

General Furnishing Contractors 
and Furniture Specialists 

560 N. Michigan Avenue 
CHICAGO 

THEO. C. EPPIG, Secy. Franklin 1079 


Phone Canal 0262 
Hardwoods — Pine — Cypress 

WM. C. SCHREIBER 
LUMBER CO. 

22nd and Throop Streets 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

T. J. CURLEY, Pres. 


4— CLEARING HOUSE BANKS— 4 

THE IRVING PARK NATIONAL BANK 

4201 Irving Park Blvd. 

ALBANY PARK NATIONAL BANK AND TRUST CO. 

5424 Lawrence Avenue 

THE PORTAGE PARK NATIONAL BANK 

4717 Irving Park Blvd. 
5973 Milwaukee Avenue 

WEST IRVING STATE BANK 

Irving Park Blvd. at Austin Avenue 

Serving The Northwest Side 



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Phones Humboldt 0902-3-4-5 

ANDERSON & LIND MFG. CO. 

Manufacturers of 
MILLWORK 

General Office and Factory: 2127-45 Iowa Street, CHICAGO 



Makers oj 
LOYOLA BAND UNIFORMS 

also makers oj 
ROBES, GOWNS and CAPS 

CHICAGO 
UNIFORM & CAP CO. 

208 W. Monroe Street 
Telephone Franklin 0188-0189 



ATTENTION STUDENTS! 

WE RENT 

For Your Proms and Affairs the Smartest 

Tuxedos — Full Dress — Cutaways 

Complete Line oj Furnishings jor 

Well Dressed Men 

SPECIAL STUDENT RATES 

Open Evenings and Sundays by Appointment 

SAM GINGISS & SON 

6 E. Lake Street Dearborn 8946 



Sixty Years In Business 

with thousands of satisfied customers on our books. Let us 
help you to solve your insurance problems whether they be 
Fire, Plate Glass, Automobile, Liability, Compensation, Steam 
Boiler Accident or any other form of insurance. We will give 
you the benefit of an experience acquired over many years 
devoted to the problems of insurance. A telephone call, 
letter or post card will bring our service to you. 

JOHN NAGHTEN & CO. 

(Established 1863) 

INSURANCE 

175 West Jackson Boulevard 

CHICAGO 

Telephone Wabash 1120 



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THE 1930 LOYOLAN 




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GERALD A. BARRY 

ARCHITECT 

180 N. Michigan Avenue 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



Established 1872 

CHAS. JOHNSON & SON 
FIRE ESCAPE CO. 

/Manufacturers of 

Stairway Fire Escapes 

and 

General Blacksmithmg 

859 N. Spaulding Avenue, Chicago 
Phone Kedzie 0205-0206 



THE WORSHAM SCHOOL 


Dearborn 6175 Randolph 3776 


620 S. Lincoln Street 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

America's Leading Institution for 


DRESS SUIT RENTAL CO. 

For Rent — Full Dress, Tuxedos, Cutaways, 
Silk Hats, Shoes, Shirts 


Embalming and Funeral Directing 


FURNISHINGS FOR SALE 


Catalog and Further Information 
Furnished Upon Application 


310 Capitol Building 
159 N. State Street 


TELEPHONE WEST 3222 


COLLEGIATE MODELS 



Dance 

TO THE IRRESISTIBLE MUSIC 
OF 

WAYNE 

KING 

and His Orchestra 

■ ■ ■ 

ARAGON 

BALLROOM 

LAWRENCE NEAR BROADWAY 

Dancing every night except Monday 
EVERY FRIDAY— WALTZ NIGHT 




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WILLIAM J. OUIGLEY 
& COMPANY 

Workshops 

ONE SEVENTEEN E. DELAWARE PLACE 
CHICAGO 



JOHN SEXTON & COMPANY 

Manufacturing Wholesale Grocers 
CHICAGO 

Established 1887 



E. R. NEUENFELDT 

LIVE FROGS— TURTLES— FROG LEGS 

625 W. Randolph Street 
Telephone Monroe 0984 



Telephone Superior 0600 

CUDNEY & COMPANY 

Wholesale Provisions 

ORLEANS AT KINZIE STREET 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



^Old Dutc 

1 Cleanser 



Safeguards Your Home 
with 




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HOME FUEL and SUPPLY CO. 

D. S. WILLIS, Pres. 

Retail Distributors of 
ALL FINE QUALITY COAL and COKE 



Compliments of 

CLEVELAND and JACKSON 

Attorneys-al-Law 

1146 First National Bank Building 
RANDOLPH 0504 



Telephone Monroe 6520 

V. SENG TEAMING 
COMPANY 

GENERAL TRUCKING CONTRACTORS 

Garage and Warehouse 

Erie and Union Streets 

CHICAGO 



Phone Mansfield 0820 

SELL & ELLINGSEN 

CUT STONE CONTRACTORS 

4619 W. Walton Street 
CHICAGO 



Telephone Saginaw 7362 — South Shore 7300 



GATEWAY 



OTHTI 



COMPANY 



1661 East 79th Street 
CHICAGO 

Investment Bonds and Mortgages 





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FARNEY ELECTRIC COMPANY 

Contractors and Engineers 
BUILDERS' BUILDING, CHICAGO 

Contractors lor Electrical Work in 

NEW CUDAHY LIBRARY BUILDING 



NORTH CHICAGO 
ROOFING CO. 

851 W. North Avenue 
Sixty-Two Years in Business 

P. B. RANSOM, Secy. 
WALTER W. SPRINGER, V. Pres. 

Phones: Lincoln 0570 — Diversev 6068 



Phone Humboldt 2650 

JOHN P. MOOS 

Sheet Metal and Roofing Work 

1512-18 N. Western Avenue 
CHICAGO 

Contractors for the Sheet Metal Work, 
Tile and Composition Roofing on the 
New Cudahv Librarv 



MATH. RAUEN COMPANY 

General Contractors 
526 W. MADISON STREET 

CANAL STATION 

CHICAGO 



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Our reputation for over 40 years is 

your guarantee of the utmost in 

Optical Service 

MORGAN and HANSON 

Optometrists 

115 West Washington Street 
Ground Floor, Conway Bldg. 



Phone Armitage 2417 

ECCLESIASTICAL GOODS CO. 

(The Eee Gee Co.) 
John S. Konopa, Pres. 

Church Goods, Religious Articles 
Banners, Badges, Pictures, Frames and Novelties 

984-986 MILWAUKEE AVENUE 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



Rogers Park 10136 
We Deliver 

Ice Cream and Candies — Cigars and Cigarettes 
Sandwiches 

KLOMAN'S 

School Supplies 

Barbecue and Luncheonette 

1247 Loyola Avenue 

CHICAGO 



For Good Values 

STREB'S MARKET 

Telephone Midway 8490 

1466 E. 55th Street, Cor. Harper Ave. 

CHICAGO 



THE MOODY BIBLE INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO 

Founded by Evangelist D. L. Moody in 18S6 
Rev. James M. Gray, D.D., President 

DAY AND EVENING SCHOOLS 

For Resident and Non-Resident Students 

Tuition Free — Send for Catalog 

CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL— HOME WORK 

Fourteen Courses — Send for Prospectus 

THE RADIO SCHOOL OF THE BIBLE 
W-M-B-I 1080 Kc. 

NOMINAL CHARGE 



Send for Weekly Program 



Address 



153 Institute Place, Chicago Avenue Station, Div. L30, Chicago, 111. 



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ACADEMY OF OUR LADY 


HUBBARD OVEN CO. 


93th and Throop Streets 
LONGWOOD, CHICAGO, ILL. 


Bake Ovens j or Institutions 


Academic Course 


1134-44 BELDEN AVENUE 


Music, Art 
Graded Courses 




Physical Culture and Athletics 




Domestic Science and Household Arts 


HART-SPENCER COMPANY 


LOYOLA TEA SHOP 


3956 AVONDALE AVENUE 


1232 Loyola Avenue 


CHICAGO 


LUNCHEON— TEA— DINNER 


dC&f&fc 


Parties by Special Arrangement 


Furniture for 




SCHOOLS, OFFICES & CHURCHES 


Louise Mather, Prop. 


Kildare 6870 


HOLLYCOURT 2075 


Peter J. Angsten Thomas J. Farrell 


ANGSTEN, FARRELL & COMPANY 


INSURANCE 


11 So. La Salle Street Central 5162-5163 



Page jour hundred seventeen 



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LAW BOOKS 




Everything In Law Books 

.for 

Lawyers and Students 






New and Second-hand 




dsmk 




We specialize in students* text 




and case books. We buy and sell 




for cash, and trade lor books in use. 




DISPOSE of your books while they 
have value. Students' books are of 


Compliments 


no value in PRACTICE. We have 


a large stock of second-hand books 




on hand at all times. 


of 


Any book you may need in prac- 


tice can be secured from us at low- 




est prices, including state reports, 
statutes, Ruling Case Law, Cyc and 


THE 


Corpus luris, and American and 




English Encyclopedia of Law, En- 
cyclopedia of Pleading and Practice, 


TRIPP LUMBER 


Encyclopedia of Forms, etc., etc. 




Latest catalog of law books can 
be had on request. 


COMPANY 


It pays to buy second-hand books, 




as new books are second-hand the 


Mundelein. 111. 


moment you secure them and de- 


preciate in value to the extent of 




50% or more. 




•joSBSSde. 




ILLINOIS BOOK EXCHANGE 




J. P. GIESE, Prop. 




357 W. Madison Street 




Third Floor — Hunter Building 




Opposite Hearst Building 




Phone Franklin 1059 





Pane four hundred eighteen 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 



Purchasers Securities Corporation 



c-cSISk 



INVESTMENT SECURITIES 



10 SOUTH LA SALLE STREET 

Telephone Franklin 6212 
CHICAGO 

Ray P. Tennes, Pres. & Treas. M. J. Tennes, Vice Pres. M. J. Tennes, Jr., Secy. 



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Phone Rogers Park 3667 

LOYOLA GARAGE 

1236-46 Loyola Avenue 

CHICAGO 


Phone Central 5885 

Corpus Juris-Cyc 
FOR SALE BY 

EDWARD M. JOHNSON 

Suite 1340—160 N. La Salle Street 
CHICAGO 


BENNING 

General and Special 

CABINET WORK 

Metal Spinners Wood Chucks of All Kinds in 

Quantities to Order 

2160 S. Jefferson Street, Chicago 
Roosevelt 2255 


Independence 1320 

FARWELL-DETTMERS 
COMPANY 

Sheet Metal and Roofing Contractors 

2625 FLETCHER STREET 
CHICAGO 


BENGSON 

STORAGE WAREHOUSES 

Moving — Shipping Everywhere 

Kildare 7000 


CIRCULATING LIBRARY 

Cards — Novelties — Gifts — Framing 

THE GLENLAKE ART SHOP 

6168 Broadway Rogers Park 2425 
Near Granville 


Compliments of 

JUDGE 
ALBERT B. GEORGE 


Talk— Don 7 Walk 

SHELDRAKE 0211 

We Deliver Promptly 

LAKEWOOD PHARMACY 

I. Hcimann, R. Ph. 

1259 Devon Avenue 

Corner LaUewood 



Page Jour hundred twenty 



T H E 



1930 LOYOLAN 



Buy Your Coal on 
Approval! 




THERE is always satisfaction in 
buying reliable merchandise 
from a reliable firm — the satisfac- 
tion of getting your money's worth. 

And you can be just as sure of 
your coal as of anything else you 
buy. 

Every load of Consumers Coal or 
Coke is sold under our guarantee 
of high quality, full weight and sat- 
isfaction — "it must satisfy you or we 
remove it and refund your money." 

Phone us your orders with entire 
confidence. 

BUY YOUR COAL ON APPROVAL 



(Snsugiers (company: 



(a I elephorte i 

"frankuh* 

I&400 



jCOAL- COKE- ICE 
BUILDING MATERIAL 



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Compliments oj 

BIEDERMANN 
BROTHERS, Inc. 

727 W. Randolph Street 



CASE MOODY PIE COMPANY 

1807 Walnut Street 
Tea Room Pies 



ST. BONIFACE CEMETERY 
4825 N. Clark Street Longbeach 2790 

ST. JOSEPH CEMETERY 
River Grove, 111. Merrimac 9033 

ST. MARY'S CEMETERY 
Evergreen Park, 111. Beverly 3778 

The net income oj these cemeteries 
is used for the support oj the 

ANGEL GUARDIAN ORPHANAGE 



1919-21 HANNIBAL uncob, 

Sheffield Ave. mc0Rp0RATED 7180 

Office and Home 
Furniture Repairing, Refinishing, Upholstering 

High Grade Leather Work 
Chairs Reseated with Cane 

Repairing of Antique Furniture a Specially 

Our organization of skilled Cabinetmakers, 

Upholsterers and Refinishers is devoted 

exclusively to Furniture Repairing 



You will always find the 

WELCOME SIGN 

on the 

DOOR MAT 

at the 

LOYOLA-SHERIDAN 
RECREATION CENTER 

1227-31 Lovola Avenue 



ANDERSEN-WITTE 
ENGRAVING CO. 

Engraved Stationery 

Business Cards, Wedding Invitations 

and Announcements 

Letter Heads Envelopes 

Christmas Cards 

525 S. DEARBORN STREET 
Phone Wabash 5751 



COOKE ELECTRIC 
REFRIGERATION CO. 

30 N. Green Street 
HAYMARKET 5600 



Telephones: Hyde Park 0242-0243 

W. L. ROBINSON COAL CO. 

Established in 1869 

COAL, COKE and WOOD 

5229 Lake Park Avenue 

CHICAGO 

Hugh Reid, Manager 



Page jour hundred twenty-two 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 



THE MERCY BUSINESS GIRLS' CLUB 




2834 Wabash Avenue 




riQ&gR&k 


The 
of 


Latest Important Activity 
the Sisters oj Mercy 


The 
for 


Club Furnishes Ideal Service 
the Young Business Woman 




dt&f&fe 


PRIVATE ROOMS SOCIAL HALLS 

MODERN SHOWERS EASY, QUICK TRANSPORTATION 

CAFETERIA RELIGIOUS ATMOSPHERE 




REASONABLE RATES 




J&g$h 


Telephones: 


Victory 10384; Calumet*3225-3226 



Page four hundred twenty-three 



T H E 



L O Y O L A N 



Sisters of Charity, B.J .Jl. 

ST. MARY'S HIGH SCHOOL 

1031 Cypress 



Telephones: Central 4325-4326 



Office Furniture — Fire Proof Safes 



KENDRICK FURNITURE CO. 

Complete Office Outfitters 

Largest Stock of All Kinds of Used Office Furniture in City 

We Also Rent and Buv 



Display Rooms 



221-223 W. Randolph Street 



CHICAGO 



IRWIN BROS., Inc. 

Wholesale Meats 

197-199 S. Water Market 

CHICAGO 



McCarthy storage 

MODERN FIREPROOF WAREHOUSE 

2219-2221 HOWARD STREET 

Rogers Park 1524—6269 

Storage — Shipping — Packing — Moving 



Page jour hundred twenty-Jour 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 




in:iinn»:w7.yji,-[gil 



Page Jour hundred twenty-five 



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The 

BRANSON SYSTEM 

INC. 

230 E. Ohio Street 
Chicago 


ALVERNIA HIGH SCHOOL 

A Day School for Girls 

3901 N. Ridgeway Avenue 
CHICAGO 


Compliments of 

CARTER BLATCHFORD 


NAME PLATES 

Dials for Clocks and Instruments 
Radio Escutcheons 

CROWE 

Name Plate & Manufacturing Co. 

Lakeview 3865 

1749 Grace Street 

CHICAGO 


Longbeach 3905-3564 

HOOVER WINDOW SHADE 
AND DRAPERY CO. 

Est. 1909 

RICHARD OLSON 

Manufacturers and Cleaners 

1509 Lawrence Avenue 
CHICAGO, ILL. 


Compliments oj 

JUDGE 

Joseph l. McCarthy 


ILLINOIS HARDWARE COMPANY 

NOT INCORPORATED 

Sates Office 

230 N. Michigan Avenue 

Telephone Central 5484 

CHICAGO 

Distributors oj 

QUALITY LOCKS AND HARDWARE 

STAIR RAILINGS— GATES— GRILLES— FIREPLACE FIXTURES 

Importers of French and English Decorative Hardware Surety Master Key Systems 
Designers and Manufacturers of Wrought Iron and Bronze Hardware 



Page jour hundred twenty-six 



T H E 



1930 LOYOLAN 



VULCAN GAS RANGES 






for 






HOTELS, RESTAURANTS 






and 


1 7*t ■ 




INSTITUTIONS 


^^H 




csSI&fc 


L 1 1 

.'ft &\ ' 1 




STANDARD 




GAS EQUIPMENT 
CORPORATION 


y?/j/ .Bej - / Wishes to the 
Faculty and Students of 




<£St$<g£h 




LOYOLA 


cS&Mk 


UNIVERSITY 




-£&!&», 




John A. Massen 


122 S. Michigan Boulevard 


Alderman 


HARRISON 9436 


Forty-eighth Ward 



Page jour hundred twenty-seven 



LOYOLA 



N 



HOTEL PLANTERS 

19 N. Clark Street 
Just North of Madison 

Telephone Randolph 4800 
GEO. YOUST 



HEBARD 

STORAGE 
MOVING 
PACKING 
SHIPPING 

6327-35 Broadway 



BARAT COLLEGE 

and 

CONVENT OF THE 
SACRED HEART 

LAKE FOREST. ILLINOIS 

Conducted by 
The Religious of the Sacred Heart 

For Catalog, apply to Reverend Mother Superlo 



Flowers for All Occasions 
WE DELIVER ANYWHERE 

WALTER F. WILKES 

THE ROGERS PARK 
Florist 

7056 N. Clark Street 
Telephone Rogers Park 0760 



Always 



FINE FOODS 

at 

LOW PRICES 




THE GREAT 

ATLANTIC & PACIFIC 

TEA COMPANY 




PERFECTO GARCIA 

Supreme in Quality 

Perfecto Garcia Cigars have for years 
represented the very finest in quality and 
workmanship in Clear Havana Cigars. 

Their unvarying excellence has won un- 
challenged leadership, whether it be the 
line clubs, cafes, hotel stands, restaurants, 
or the plain, everv-dav cigar merchant — - 
PERFECTO GARCIA Cigars have been 
and continue to be a trade-winning and 
business-building commodity. 

Office: 
208 X. Wells Street, Chicago 

Factories: 
Tampa, Florida 



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ESTABLISHED 1878 




BRENNAN PACKING 


AUG. BURKE 




COMPANY 


ROOFING CO. 




Packers 


ROOFING CONTRACTORS 




UNION STOCK YARDS 
CHICAGO 

Phone Yards 2300 


Main Office 
2621-23 N. HALSTED STREET 




Private Exchange — All Departments 


Phone Bittersweet 1420-1421 




CABLE ADDRESS: BRENNAN 
EXPORT CODES: 


North Shore Branch 




Liebers, Baltimore Export, A. B.C. 
5th Edition, Utility, Western Union, 


720 MAIN STREET 
EVANSTON 




Bentley's 
DOMESTIC CODES: 


Phone University 8411 




Cross-Robinson 


A. 


E 


\. c. 


PARCEL 


DELIVERY 


228 So. Market Street 




2948 N. Kenneth Avenue 


Franklin 5981 




Res. Phone Pensacola 8150 


Artist Material Dept. 

605 N. Michigan Blvd. 307 N. Michigan 1 
Tel. Superior 8537 Tel. State 704( 


BRANCH OFFICES 
ilvd. 24 E. Van Buren St. 334 S. Wabash Ave. 
i Tel. Harrison 8597 


CROFOOT, 


NIELSEN & CO. 


Blue Printers 


Blue Printing. Black Printing, Blue Line . 


ind Color Printing — Artist and Drawing Materials 


Special Service, Always Speed and Resulb 


;Bt 


g Floor Space and Equipment jor Rush Orders 


TELEPHONE STATE 2870 




14 N. FRANKLIN STREET 



Page jour hundred twenty-nine 



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ETZTF 



I LEE BROS 
^Compan y 

Good Clothes 

■Hats, Furnishings 
men's Shoes 



Wf& 



Two Stores 

^ BELMONT & LINCOLN AVE. 
| MILWAUKEE O ASHLAND AVE. [| 

m rr4 




For Accurate Scientific Glasses 

DR. EVEN 

Optometrist 

Save Your Precious Eyes and Nerve-Energy and 
Cure Headache and Nervousness 

PHONE LAKEVIEW 2092 

We do our own Grinding 

3209 N. CLARK STREET 
(At Belmont Avenue) 



JOHN J. MORAN, Inc. 

Fashionable Furs 

Storage — Remodeling — Repairing 

58 East Washington Street 
STATE 4177 



Wm. J. Maas Philip F. Maas 

MAAS BROS., HARDWARE 

Cutlery, Stores, Furnaces, 
Furnishings, Shop Work 

1822-1824 W. Van Buren Street 

Corner Ogden Avenue 



Telephone West 1005 



Chicago 



HESSER & SODEN 

Authorized FORD Dealers 

1234 Morse Avenue — Near Sheridan Road 
BrJargate 4100 — All Departments 



Page four hundred thirty 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 



Mercy Federation 

What is the Mercy Federation? 

The Mercy Federation is a Federation of the Alumnae of 
the following schools: 

SAINT XAVIER COLLEGE 
SAINT XAVIER ACADEMY 

MERCY HOSPITAL TRAINING 
SCHOOL FOR NURSES 
MERCY HIGH SCHOOL 

SAINT PATRICK (South Chicago) 
SAINT ELIZABETH 
SAINT GABRIEL 
SAINT JAMES 
SAINT ITA 



Why the Mercy Federation? 

To keep all Mercy Graduates closely associated with 
their Alma Mater. 



What do we owe Our Alma Mater? 

A great measure of our happiness and success today is 
due to training we received at school. 

How can we repay our Debt to Alma Mater? 

Bv paving our yearly dues of $1.00 promptly and sup- 
porting our Sisters, THE SISTERS OF MERCY, in all 
their undertakings. 



MERCY FEDERATION 0/ ALUMNAE 

8100 Prairie Avenue 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

Telephone Stewart 0395 



Page jour hundred thirty-one 



T H 



L O y O L A N 




CORONA 

NELSON 
TYPEWRITER SERVICE 

ROOM 1110 

189 W. MADISON ST. 

Franklin 8258 

Also all other makes 

Repairs e3 Sales 



Established 1898 



Phone Superior 7915 



JOHN T. DORSE Y & SON 

Plumbing Contractors 
321 West Huron Street, Chicago 




^Re iner (oal ( qmpany 



TO and FROM 

ALL 

FOREIGN 

COUNTRIES 




"ECONOMICAL 
TRANS- 
PORTATION" 



FAST FREIGHT SERVICE 

International Forwarding Co. 



431 So. Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 
TEL. HARR. 7667 



6 State St., New York. N. Y. 
TEL. WHITEHALL 1390 



Page jour hundred thirty-two 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 



FROM THE HEART 

OF 

LOYOLA ACTIVITY 

COMES 

THE LOYOLA NEWS 

TO PRESERVE 

YOUR LOYOLA SPIRIT 



Note: If you prefer not to mutilate this page kindly include all the information 
requested below in your letter 

Circulation Manager, 

LOYOLA NEWS, 

6525 Sheridan Road, Chicago, Illinois, 

Dear Sir: 

Inclosed find $ for years subscription 

to the Loyola News. One Year $2.00— Two Years $3.00.— Three Years $4.00 



Name Check One of the Following 

Alumnus 

Address □ Class 

Dept. 

City State □ Friend 



Page jour hundred thirty-tlire 



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R.A-D-I-O 


J. T. PARSONS 


is Seeking 


SPORTING GOODS GOLF BAGS 


Ambitious, Trained Men to 


TENNIS RACKETS AND COVERS 


fill Highly Paid Positions 






DOG GOODS OF ALL KINDS 


We have given resident 


GOLF AND TENNIS BALLS 


instruction for thirteen 




years, and we teach 


All supplies for the Equestrian 


Radio Exclusively. 


and Sportsman. 


Special classes in Radio 


Repairing on all leather goods 


Operating, Servicing, 


neatly done. 


Broadcasting and En- 




gineering — day or even- 


Riding Saddles, Bridles 


ing. 


and Blankets 


Call or Write. 


Leather Goods of AU Kinds 


CHICAGO RADIO INST. 


1718 N. WELLS STREET 


64 E. LAKE ST. 


Phone Diversey 5733 CHICAGO 


CHICAGO 

LANDSCAPE 


NORT 


H SHORE HOTEL 


/ivururlon 


COMPANY 




The Hub of All 
Evanston Activities 


Landscape Architects 




A Few Kitchenettes 


Contractors 




Available 


GOLF COURSES 






PARK SYSTEMS 




Ballrooms and 


SUBDIVISIONS 
PLAYGROUNDS 




Reception Rooms 


CEMETERIES 






ESTATES 




Magnificent Lobby 


SURVEYS 






RESORT DEVELOPMENTS 






TENNIS COURTS 




DAVIS STREET AT 
CHICAGO AVE. 


720 N. MICHIGAN AVE. 






Whitehall 6530 




Fred J. Kihm, Mgr. 



Page jour hundred thirty-jour 



T H 



L O y O L A N 



■mss 



I'.'/THji] 



5000 FOUNTAIN 
PENS TO REPAIR 



^2^ 



ALL MAKES— WHILE YOU WAIT— ALL MAKES 

WELTY'S COMBINATION PEN AND PENCIL— $5.00 to $8.00 

6th Floor WM. A. WELTY & CO. North American. Bldg. 



Phone Briargate 8684 

SHULL TRANSFER 
AND VAN CO. 

EXPRESS AND BAGGAGE 
Local and Long Distance Removals 

6437 North Clark Street 
CHICAGO 



Compliments oj 

U. S. SANITARY 
SPECIALTIES CORP. 

Manufacturing Chemists 

GENERAL OFFICES 

435-441 S. Western Ave. 

CHICAGO 

BIRMINGHAM NEW YORK 



"IMPERIAL" 

ROOFING TILES 

JIanufactured by 

LUDOWICI-CELADON CO. 



CHICAGO 



New York 



Washington 



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WALTER FREEMAN & CO. 

Investment Securities 

111 W Washington St. CHICAGO Phone Randolph 8140 


Changeable — Cast Bronze 
SIGNS — Electrical Directional- 
Name Plate. 

SEALS Embossed — 

Fraternity and Sorority. 
LABELS Gummed Pennant Die Cut 
LETTERS Gummed Paper Die Cut 

Davenport-Taylor Mfg. Co. 

412 Orleans St., Chicago, 111. 
Est. 1919 Superior 9275 


THE MARYWOOD SCHOOL 

For Girls 

RESIDENT AND DAY STUDENTS 

Conducted by 

SISTERS OF PROVIDENCE 

of 

SAINT MARY OF THE WOODS 

2128 Ridge Avenue ■ Evanston, Illinois 


Compliments 

B. MERCIL & SONS 
PLATING CO. 

1911 Fulton Street 
Chicago, 111. 

SEELEY 0103 




Loose Sheets Bound without Holes Punched in Paper 

COLLEGE "BOOK STORE 

or Direct to —VAN BUREN BROS. 

1950 Warren Blvd. - CHICAGO 



Page jour hundred thirty-six 



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RIDDELL 



The Trade Mark of 




Quality 
Football 



ATHLETIC SHOES 

Riddell Football shoes were first used in 1922. 
Northwestern University has used them continu- 
ously since 1925, University of Chicago, since 
1924, Illinois and Nebraska and many others 
since 1925. This continuous use speaks for itself. 
Riddell cleats have won for themselves the unique 
distinction of being the original and only screw 
cleat that will stand up under hard usage. 

Manufactured by 

JOHN T. RIDDELL, Inc. 

1259 N. Wood St., Chicago 



Compliments 
of 

A FRIEND 



Compliments of 

dsypesethng C3 (Dleclrolyftu i g 

\_son\pany. 

4001 RAVENSWOOD AVENUE 
CHICAGO 



TELEPHONES: LA REVIEW 

82 01 • 8202 • 8203 • 8204 • 820 5 



NASH BROTHERS 

10 South LaSalle 



Page jour hundred thirty-seven 



T H 



O y O L A N 



MT. C ARM EL HIGH SCHOOL 

6410-20 DANTE AVE. 
conducted by 

CARMELITE FATHERS 

Courses Offered: 
All P re-College, 

General, Scientific, Business. 

Unequalled Transportation Facilities, 
Surface Lines, Elevated, I. C, Bus Service 

THE HIGH SCHOOL FOR SOUTH SIDE BOYS! 



Compliments of 

W. J. LANG CONSTRUCTION CO. 

CHICAGO 



J_i VERY man who expects to 

achieve substantial success in 
the business or professional 
world . . . should he legally 
trained. 

—WILLIAM HOWARD TAFT, Late 
Chief Justice, U. S. Supreme Court 

Blackstone Institute is recognized as pre- 
eminent in the non-resident field — teach- 
ing law. Its home-study course is con- 
tributed to, and highly endorsed by lead- 
ing lawyers, judges and authorities every- 
where. Send for "The Law Trained JIan" 
— an intensely interesting book — there's 
no obligation! 




BLACKSTONE INSTITUTE 

570 North Michigan Ave. 
CHICAGO 



Eva FitzGerald 

STUDIO OF DRAMATIC ART 

Dramatic Art — Diction — Public 
Speaking — High pitched voices 
lowered — Weak voices strength- 
ened — Lost voices restored. 



PRIVATE OR CLASS LESSONS WITH 
EVA FITZGERALD OR ASSISTANTS 



Flnchley House 

25 E. Jackson Blvd. 

WEBSTER 5909 



Page four hundred thirty-eight 



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BASKIN HAS FIVE STORES WITH 
HART SCHAFFNER & MARX CLOTHES 

[ Authentic University Styles J 

Br;'|l Hart Schaffner & Marx go directly to 
m jm sources for style— they have men in per' 
■ ■■*■ sonal touch with every big University 
in the land. Because they know so well -what 
you want, they're able at all times to please you 



BASKIN 



336 North State Street just Corner of Clark 63rd Street Cor of Lake 

Michigan north of Adams and Washington at Maryland and Marion 

Open evenings Oak Park 



MUNDELEIN COLLEGE 

Sheridan Road at the Lake, Chicago 

Conducted by the Sisters of Charity of the Blessed Jirgin Mary 

Most modern building in architectural de- 
sign, interior arrangement and equipment 

Will be ready to accept students, September, 1930 
DEPARTMENTS 

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Conservatory of Music, Art, and Speech Arts — Home Economics — Physical Education 

Commerce — Finance — Library Science — Journalism 

A wide opportunity for students to specialize along vocational lines 

Teachers' Promotional and Credit Classes 

Registration now open in present Faculty Building for School of Music: 
Spring, Summer and Autumn classes 

ADDRESS: THE REGISTRAR 

6367 Sheridan Road 

Telephone: Rogers Park 0856 



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MISSION PRESS 

Church Printing a Specialty 
MISSION CANDLES 

Candles guaranteed as to quality and pric 

Call 
Father Ouille 
Havmarket 9400 



DOMINICAN HIGH SCHOOL 
AQUINAS 

2100 East Seventy-second Street 
CHICAGO 

Under the direction of the 
Sisters of St. Dominic 

ADRIAN, MICHIGAN 

Members of the N. C. A. 



CARPET 
LINOLEUM 
RUBBER TILE 
DRAPERIES 






OFFICES 

516 X. Michigan 

Chicago 

1616 Sherman 

Evanston 



For 



HOMES 

OFFICES 

HOTELS 

SHOPS 

INSTITUTIONS 



H. B. BARNARD 
BUILDER 



140 South Dearborn Street 
Chicago 



To Be Given Away at an 
All Star Vaudeville Show 

A MODERN 
TWO FLAT BUILDING 

Now being Erected at 
1819 Euclid Ave., Bervvyn, 111. 

Also 

Chevrolet Sedan, 1930 Model 

Ford Sedan, 1930 Model 

and Forty Other Gifts 

For the Benefit of 

WEST SIDE CLUB BUILDING 

To Be Held at the Club House 

4711-4723 W. Madison Street 
Four Nights, lune 18, 19. 20, 21, 1930 

ADMISSION $1.00 



BETHLEHEM ACADEMY 

SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

In the Beautiful Suburb of § 

La Grange, Illinois 



.aKSfik 



Conducted by 

SISTERS OF ST. JOSEPH 

Telephone La Grange 4398 



Page Jour hundred Jo rly 



THE 1930 LOYOLAN 



ROOT STUDIOS 


185 North Wabash Avenue at Lake Street 


OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS for 


THE 1930 LOYOLAN 


jSMs, 


Special Rates to Loyola Students at All Times 



Page jour hundred forty-one 



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South Shore Office Enslewood Office Rogers Park Office Woodlawn Office 

7413-15 Stonv Island Ave. 571 f S. Halsted St. 6428 No. Clark St. 6150 Cottage Grove Ave. 

Dorchester 1200 Englewood 0700 Rogers Park 0053 Fairfax 7000 



Joyce Bros. 
Storage *nd WsVan Company 



6428-30-32 NORTH CLARK STREET 
CHICAGO 



MOVING— PACKING 
SHIPPING^EXPRESSING 



BUS VANS FOR 
LONG DISTANCE MOVING 



Ask Your Xaborhood Druggist For 

EVERLASTONE 

Photo Prints 

Druggists' Co-operative Photo 
Service 



Phone Columbus 5488 

A. J. O'CONNELL & SON 

Expert Blasting 

Bank Vault, Engine Beds 

Re-infored Concrete of all Descriptions 

Removed by 

Compressed Air or Dynamite 

4506 Washington Blvd., Chicago 



Compliments of 



HOLZER, Inc. 



INVESTMENT SECURITIES 



29 So. La Salle St., Chicago 



Page jour hundred jorty-two 



T H E 



L O y O L A N 



ALGOM A TABLES 

Patented Folding Banquet 

and 

Kindergarten Tables 




WARK-BEACON STEEL 

Folding Chairs 




Made in all colors and in 

Regular and 

Kindergarten Sizes 



<*£!£& 



WILLIAM H. WARK 

Sales Agent 

1410 So. Wabash Ave. 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



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INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 



A Page 

A-l Cleaners & Dvers 406 

A. B. C. Parcel Delivery Co 429 

Able Transfer Co 402 

Academy of Our Ladv 417 

Albany Park National Bank 409 

Albion Shore Hotel 402 

Allen Tiling iCo 588 

Alvernia High School. . 426 

Andersen-Witte Engraving Co 422 

Anderson & Lind Mfg. Co" 410 

Andringa, Rudolph 402 

Angel Guardian Orphanage 422 

Angela Restaurant 586 

Angsten, Farrell & Co 417 

Araaon Ballroom 412 

Art Metal Products Co 595 

Atlas Box Co 408 

B 

Bairsto-w, H 590 

Barat College 428 

Barnard, H. B 440 

Barry, Gerald A 412 

Baskin's 459 

Bensson Warehouses 420 

Benning, Albin A 420 

Bethlehem Academy 440 

Biederman Bros 422 

Blackstone Institute 458 

Blatchford, Carter 426 

Born, M„ & Co 584 

Braneiield, M.J 400 

Branson System, Inc 426 

Brennan, J. M., & Co 407 

Brennan Packing Co 429 

Broadmoor Apartment Hotel 407 

Broadway National Bank 408 

Brvant & Stratton College 592 

Burke. August 429 

Burke. Frank J 404 

C 

Campus Tower 598 

Carlson Food Shop 407 

Carroll & Sons, John 400 

Case Moody Pie Co 422 

Central Lime & Cement Co. 384 

Chicago Great Western 388 

Chicago jGymnasium Equipment Co. . . . 586 

Chicago Landscape Co 434 

Chicago Radio Institute 434 

Chicago Uniform & Cap Co 410 

Chicagoan, The 585 

Chinese American Food Products Co... . 591 

Cleveland |& Jackson 414 

Commission Drivers & Chauffeurs Union 587 

Commonwealth Edison Co 404 

Consumers Co 421 

Convent of Sacred Heart 428 

Cooke Electric Refrigeration Co 422 

Corbett, George E., Co 408 

Crane Company 399 

Cremin & O'Connor 590 

Crofoot, Nielsen & Co 429 

Crowe Name Plate Co 426 

Cudahv (Packing Co 413 

Cudnev & Co 415 

Cullen & Boltz 407 



D Page 

Davenport-Tavlor Manufacturing Co. . . 456 

Dillon, Jno. C., & Co 405 

Dominican High School 440 

Dorsey, Jno. T., & Son 452 

Dress Suit Rental Co 412 

Druggists' Co-operative Service 442 

Dunn Coal Co., Jno. J 400 

E 

Ecclesiastical Gootls Co 416 

Efen^ee Electric Supply Co 404 

Eppig & Mulholland Co 595 

Erickson Electric Co .' 401 

Even, Optometrist 450 

F 

Farney Electric Co 415 

Farwell-Dettmers Co 420 

Federal Cement Tile Co 380 

FitzGerald, Eva 458 

Flanagan & Biedenweii 408 

Foley," M 408 

Freeman, Walter &. Co 456 

G 

Gammon, C. D., Co 390 

Gateway Securities Co. 414 

Gehring, Wm. C 407 

Gelman, Irving S 580 

George, Albert B 420 

Gins;iss, Sam & Son 410 

Glenlake Art Shop 420 

Good Counsel Hi^h School 397 

Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co 428 

Green Gate 588 

H 

Halsey, Stuart & Co 594 

Hannibal, Inc 422 

Hart-Spencer Co 417 

Hazard, Paul A., & Co 405 

Hebard Warehouses 428 

Hesser & Soden 450 

Holzer, Inc 442 

Home Fuel & Supply 414 

Hoover Window Shade 42b 

Hotel Knickerbocker 594 

Hotel Planters 428 

Hotel Sovereign 592 

Hubbard Oven Co 417 

I 

Illinois Book Exchange 418 

Illinois Hardware Co 426 

Immaculata, The 581 

Innoday Tea Rooms 590 

International Forwarding Co 452 

Irving Park National Bank 409 

Irwin Bros., Inc 424 

i 

lefferson Park Millwork Co.. Inc 580 

Johnson, Chas. & Son 412 

Johnson Chair Co 578 

Johnson, Ed*v. M 420 

Joyce Bros 442 



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L O y O L A N 



K Page 

Keller Co., D. F 381 

Kendrick Furniture Company 424 

Klee Bros. & Co 430 

Kloman's 416 

Knickerbocker Hotel 394 

L 

Lakewood Pharmacy 420 

Lang, W. J., Construction Co 438 

Lang, Weise & Cella 385 

Lippincott, J. B., Co 384 

Loyola Barber Shop 395 

Loyola Garage 420 

Loyola News 433 

Loyola Recreation Center 422 

Loyola Restaurant 394 

Loyola Tailors & Cleaners 396 

Loyola Tea Shop 417 

Ludowici-Celadon Co 455 

Lyons & Carnahan 404 

M 

McCarthy, Jos. L 426 

McCarthy Storage 424 

McDonough, Jos. B 379 

McErlean, Chas. V 396 

McGah, Wm. J 406 

McGarry Co., Jno. A 396 

McNeill'y's Caterers 386 

M & L typesetting Co 437 

Maas Bros. Hardvyare Co 430 

Mallin, Jno. A 396 

Maywood School 436 

Ma'ssen, Jno. A 427 

Mehrins & Hanson 388 

Mercil, B., & Sons 436 

Mercy Business Girls Club 423 

Mercy Federation ol Alumnae 431 

Metropolitan Business College 382 

Mission Press 440 

Moller, M. P., Organ Works 403 

Molloy, David J„ Co 400 

Moody Bible Institute 416 

Moos," Jno. P 415 

Moran, Jno. J 430 

Morgan & Hanson 416 

Mother's Wet Wash Laundry 402 

Mountain Vallev Mineral Water Co 406 

Mt. Carmel High School 438 

Mulholland, Frank A., Co 395 

Mundelein College 439 

Mungers West Side Laundry 380 

Mutual Construction Co 406 

N 

Naghten, Jno., & Co 410 

Nash Bros 437 

Nelson Typewriter Seryice 432 

Nelson, W. P., Co 384 

Neuenfeldt, E. R 413 

Nichols, R. U., Co 405 

North Chicago Rooting Co 415 

North Shore Hotel 434 

Norton Door Closer Co 398 

O 

O'Callaghan Bros.. 403 

O'Connell, A. J 442 

O'Connell, J. S 597 

Old Dutch Cleanser 413 

O'Neil, W. E., Construction Co 405 



P Page 

Parsons, J. T 434 

Peabody Coal Co 389 

People's Ice Cream 404 

Pertecto Garcia 428 

Planters Hotel 428 

Porstelain Chicago Co 402 

Portage Park National Bank 409 

Purchasers Securities Corporation 419 

Q 

Quisley, Wm. J., & Co 413 

R 

Rapp Co., P. G 380 

Rasmussen, Frank 584 

Rauen, Math Co 415 

Reiner Coal Co 452 

Riddell, Jno. T., Inc 457 

Robinson Coal Co., W. L 422 

Rogers, Jno. M 586 

Rogers Park Hotel 597 

Root Studios 441 

Rossbach & Sons 398 

S 

St. Boniface Cemetery 422 

St. Catherine's Hish School 404 

St. Clair Hotel 395 

St. Joseph Cemetery 422 

St. Marv's Cemetery 422 

St. Mary's High School 424 

St. Xavier Academy 451 

St. Xavier College 582 

Schaultz, Fritz & Co 400 

Schrieber, Wm. C, Lbr. Co 409 

Sell & Ellingsen 414 

Seng, V., Teaming Co 414 

Sexton, Jno. & Co 415 

Shaeffer, H. R„ Co ..382 

Sheridan Furniture Mfg. Co 403 

Sherriffs, John 409 

Shieber, Gavton Co 409 

Shull Transfer & Van Co 435 

Slater 6k Weber 386 

Slater, Wm., Jr 440 

Smith, George S 406 

Smith, Patrick S 590 

Sovereign Hotel 592 

Spangenburg & Co 584 

Standard Asbestos Mfg. Co 402 

Standard Gas Equipment Co 427 

Standard Photo Engraving Co 425 

Streb's Market 416 

T 

Tompkins-Kiel Marble Co 405 

Tripp Lumber Co 418 

. U . 

U. S. Sanitary Specialties 455 

Uptown Metropolitan Business College. 582 

Utility Securities Co 595 

V 

Van Buren Bros 436 

Variety Fire Door Co 408 

w 

Wark, Wm. H 443 

Welty, Wm. A., & Co 455 

Western Landscape Gardens 409 

West Irving State Bank 409 

West Side K. C 440 

Wilkes, Walter F 428 

Woodstock Typrwriter Co 406 

Woodworth's Book Store 408 

World Book Co 580 

Worsham School 412 



Page four hundred forty-fivi 



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GENERAL INDEX 



Abel, D. Herbert; 71, 211, 218 
Aberman, M.; 139 
Abraham, Raymond Leo; 42, 

121, 345 
Acker, Charles; 90, 313 
Ajamion, Ajax; 121 
Akan, John; 148 
Alaimo, Calogero; 87 
Alexander, Nicholas A.; 42, 117 
Alford, AltaL.; 71, 171 
Alfree, Marv Louise; 42, 95 
Allegretti, Anthony; 87, 119, 337 
Alpha Delta Gamma 

Fraternity; 338 
Alpha Kappa Delta 

Fraternity; 564 
Ambrose, J. L. ; 42 
Amorose, Joseph; 117 
Anderem, D.; 255 
Anderman, David Albert; 42, 

351 
Andersen, Hazel C; 76, 159 
Anderson, Miss; 161 
Andrew, Aloysius; 349 
Andrews, Miss; 176 
Andrisek, Albert Ralph; 42, 117 
Angsten, Peter J.; 28, 186 
Arado, Frank D.; 86, 87, 229, 

239, 266, 341 
Arado, Thomas; 91, 341 
Arguelles, D.; 113 
Armstrong, John P.; 74, 163 
Arntz, Miss; 157, 255 
Athletics; 281 
Averill, Alexander; 89, 301 

B 

Baczvnski, Ferdinand; 90 
Bagnuolo, Peter; 127, 138, 139 
Bak, Alexander; 87, 218 
Baker, Henrv; 148 
Baker, T. C; 137 
Baler; 169 
Ball, Harold; 300 
Balletti, Arthur P.; 337 
Balsamo, Anthony; 87 
Balsamo, Nicholas J.; 337 
Balserski, Albert; 146 
Baltunis, Kathryn R.; 65 
Band, The University; 248 
Bapst, Miss; 157, 255 
Barberio, Angelo A. ; 42, 337, 117 
Barelli, F.; 105 
Barker, Virginia R.; 29, 42, 92, 

93, 238, 239 
Barone, Anthonv; 121 
Barrett, Edward; 127, 138 
Barrett, Helen; 160 
Barrett, J.; 105 
Barrett, Miss; 254 
Barrionuevo, Romulo B. ; 42, 117 
Barron, Maurice; 99, 112, 113, 

353 



Barron, Nicholas J.; 42, 107, 353 

Barron, Philip; 89, 341 

Barry, Miss (St. B.); 160, 254 

Barry, David; 103 

BarrV, Margaret M.; 42, 93 

Bartlett, Richard; 42, 83 

Basketball; 303 

Basta, J.; 235 

Basta, William; 101 

Bauer, Roland; 91 

Baultunis, Miss; 175 

Bates, J.; 173 

Beale, Frances G.; 129 

Beardsley, John R.; 45 

Becchetti, Dante Angelo; 43 

Beck, A.; 133 

Becker, George Jesebel; 85, 284 

341 
Becker, G. L.; 131 
Beeler, R.; 139 
Behm, L. ; 565 
Bell, Anthonv J.; 45, 117 
Bell, William; 87 
Bellemare, David (Rev); 45 
Bellini, Albert C; 43 
Bellini, M.; 255 
Bennan, James; 89 
Bennett, Miss; 156 
Benoit, D.; 139 
Benson, L; 105 
Beown, L.; 105 
Berendsen, Miss; 157, 255 
Berens, Raymond L; 43, 83 
Bergin, E.; 255 
Bernstein, C.; 137 
Berry, Dorothy R.; 66 
Berry, Robert; 121 
Beta Pi Fraternity; 362 
Betts, E.; 139 
Betz, E.; 139 
Beutler, Albert; 90, 255 
Biebal, W. J.; 139 
Black, Bauer; 349 
Blake, Susan; 109 
Block, E.; 163 
Block, Gertrude H.; 43, 255 
Block, Rudolph; 90 
Blonigan, Maurine; 169 
Blue Key- Fraternity; 560 
Boser, Miss; 157 
Bollinger, William F.; 43, 117 
Bomba, Joseph; 91, 301 
Borelli, F.; 235 
Borruso, Camillo; 43, 117 
Borsik, Miss; 177 
Bose, Rufus; 249, 251, 253 
Bouscaren, Irene M.; 43 
Boyer, Mildred M.; 65, 175 
Bovce, W. ; 133 
Bo'vle, Charels A.; 43, 80, 81, 83, 

185, 233, 361 
Boyle, Miss; 176 
Braasch, F.; 255 
Brady, Al; 131 
Brady, Charles; 105, 297, 300 



Brady, Paul; 91 
Brandzel, Gadore; 103 
Brannock, K; 137 
Braun, Raj'mond; 135 
Breen, Thomas; 90 
Bremner, James X.; 312 
Brennan, James; 29, 80, 87, 240, 

241, 339 
Brennan, Miss; 157 
Brescia, Michael; 121 
Brisch, Thomas; 85, 539 
Broderick, Miss; 177 
Bromboz, Miss; 160 
Broniarczyk, Ray; 90 
Brophy, Thomas; 89 
Brosnan, Jerome; 91 
Brost, J.; 133 
Brown, A. T.; 139 
Brown, Alexander J.; 29, 43, 101, 

235, 553 
Brown, D.; 105 
Brown, Edward; 87 
Brown, M. (Law); 105 
Brown, M. (O. P.); 171 
Brown, T.: 133 
Brownstein, Stanlev; 121, 249, 

351 
Bruce, H.; 173 
Brundza, Frank; 87 
Brunner, George G. (S. J.); 44 
Brusse, M.; 168 
Bruun, John K; 85, 214, 216, 

218, 222, 229, 230, 239, 266, 

363 
Buck, Marguerite G. ; 66 
Buckley, Daniel; 102, 105, 355 
Buckley, John H.; 43, 107, 353 
Buckmann, Walter; 361 
Budreau, Nela; 72, 167 
Bukowski, Chester; 91, 253 
Bulfer, Andrew F.; 44, 117, 347, 

358, 359, 561 
Bunata, Emil; 119 
Burbach, Vincent; 89 
Burg, Henry ; 89 
Burke, Arthur B.; 44, 107, 555 
Burke, F.; 112, 113 
Burke, John; 89 
Burke, Robert; 291. 292, 300 
Burns, Alice L.; 44, 93 
Burns, Burnadette; 72, 167 
Burns, C; 168 
Burns, Robert J.; 44, 85, 218 
Butler, John J.; 44 
Butler, Marian J.; 66 
Buttice, Gaetano; 121 
Buttimer, N.; 139 
Button, Helen L.; 118, 119, 355, 

357 
Butzen, Richard; 87, 306, 308, 

309 
Bvrne, Thomas; 111 
Byrnes, Joseph B.; 44. 106, 107 
Byrnes, Monsignor D.; 182 



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Carfaro, Secundo; 121 
Cahill, Edward; 87 
Cahill, George; 89, 359 
Cahill, William; 85 
Cairns, J. P.; 139 
Caldwell, William; 111, 353 
Cali, Sam; 87, 249 
Caliendo, Joseph Edward; 44, 

337 
Calkins, Francis; 87, 259 
Callahan, John J.; 91 
Callahan, M.; 176, 253 
Caloger, George D.; 44, 101 
Caloger, Peter; 103 
Cambridge, Henry S.; 44, 117 
Campbell, Agnes; 160 
Campbell, Howard; 121 
Campbell, Miss; 254 
Campion, Anastasia M.J 67 
Caren, Miss; 157 
Carey, Clair M.; 44, 359 
Carey, Daniel; 355 
Carer, Edward L.; 87 
Carey, Harold W.; 44, 117, 349, 

559 
Carer, T.; 115 
Carev, William; 90 
Carlton, E. R.; 135 
Carney, Thomas; 119 
Carrigan, Bro. Martin (S. J.); 56 
Carroll, John James; 44, 85, 255 
Carroll, Melrin; 90 
Carroll, Ruth M.; 67 
Carter, Miss; 255 
Carufel, A.; 168 
Casciato, John J.; 45, 337 
Casciato, Nicholas A.; 117, 357 
Casey, Thomas; 90 
Cassaretto, Frank P.; 45, 69, 85, 

228, 229, 241, 266 
Cassidy, Alfred; 98, 103 
Cassidy, Virginia A.; 45, 95 
Cassidy, W.; 235 
Castaldo, Enzo; 119, 337 
Caranaugh, Charles; 87 
Caranaugh, Donald; 89, 515 
Caranaugh, M-; 164 
Chapman, Ethel; 121, 355 
Chapman, J.; 115 
Chianelli, Joseph R.; 45, 129 
Chichkan, Michael P.; 45 
Chissel, R. ; 95 
Choral Society, Loyola 

University; 252 
Christiaens, Mary; 164 
Chrranowski, Leon; 121, 345 
Chryanowski, Patrick; 121 
Chu, Herman Yu; 45, 83 
Chun, Richard; 45, 117, 359 
Chwatal, Herbert; 87 
Ciaglia, Ernest; 87 
Cichon, Walter; 91 
Cirese, Eugene; 90 
Claney, Philip; 91 
Clark, Lawrence; 115, 555 
Clark, Miss (Mercy); 156 



Clark, Miss (St. Bernard's) 160, 

254 
Clark, Thomas; 88, 89, 301 
Clark, Wallace J.; 353 
Clarke, Charles F.; 28 
Claygone, June R.; 74, 165 
Cleary, Arthur; 87, 335 
Clemens, Miss; 255 
Clontza, Olimpius; 109 
Clyde, Miss; 156 
Coffer, J.; 133 
Coffe"r, Miss; 161 
Colangelo, Anthonr; 86, 87, 253 
Cole, Thomas F.; 127, 129 
Coleman, Kenneth F.; 132 
Colii, Morton; 121 
College, Joseph; 117 
Collens, Marr E.; 72 
Collins, Cornelius; 98, 102, 103, 

235, 290, 292, 300 
Collins, J. S.; 349 
Collins, Miss; 157 
Collins, William; 91 
Columbus Hospital; 174 
Commerce Department; 125 
Conlev, Frank McAuley; 45, 81, 

82, 83, 361 
Conler, William H.; 45, 69, 83, 

214,~ 220, 222, 227, 229, 250, 

263, 266, 341, 363 
Conlin, Marr F.; 67 
Connell, Jean; 104, 105, 235 
Connelly, Edward; 90, 313 
Connelly, Timothr; 45, 82, 83, 

214, 258, 259, 295, 500, 506, 

310, 311, 321, 363 
Connery, John Clement; 45, 107 
Connor, Alice E.; 67 
Connor, Raymond G.; 45 
Connors, M.; 253 
Conole, Julia; 72, 167 
Conrad, Helen E.; 76, 159 
Consamus, Miss; 157 
Conway, M.; 95 
Cook, A.; 133 
Cook, Margaret; 74 
Coonev, E.; 545 
Copp,"john; 85, 296, 500 
Corbett, M.; 255 
Corboy, Philip M.; 46, 121, 547 
Cordes, P.; 133 
Corrigan, Marie C; 29, 46 
Corrigan, Thomas; 83, 327 
Cosgrove, Miss; 160, 254 
Costello, Charles; 70, 226 
Costello, John; 112, 115, 553 
Costello, Miss; 157, 255 
Cotell, Harry; 46 
Coughlin, Leonard; 91 
Coughlin, William; 126, 127. 

138, 139 
Couleur, E.; 165 
Coyle, Charles; 46, 121 
Coyle, Joseph; 347 
Cramer, Miss; 254 
Cramer, Ruth; 160 
Crane, Thomas; 99 
Crasseros, John; 46, 117 



Crauley, Berenice; 239 

Creagh, Kathleen; 46, 95, 253 

Criqui, Francis; 105 

Crone, J.; 159 

Cronin, Kathleen M.; 67 

Crowe, Joseph A.; 29, 46, 107, 

353 
Crowley, Andrew; 103 
Crowley, G.; 168 
Crowley, J.; 343 
CrowleV, Larrv; 105, 217, 234, 

235 
Crowley, Miss; 161 
Cudahy, Edward A.; 28, 184 
Cudahy Memorial Library; 

184 
Alumni; 179 
Cullen, George; 85 
Cullen, J.; 105, 353 
Cullinan, G. J.; 139 
Cunr, Charles; 85, 329 
Curly, E.; 235 
Curran, George H.; 46 
Curry, James; 99, 355 
Curtis, Francis; 85 
Cygan, E.; 133 
Czalgoszewski, Edward; 91 
Czyzewski, John F.; 121, 345 

D 

Daegling, Francis; 87 

Dahlberg, Albert; 217 

Dalet, Georse; 90, 251, 255 

Daley, Edward; 99, 107, 109 

Dalton, Marie; 165 

Dalr, Edmund; 353 

Daly, Joseph; 87 

Damata, Miss; 176 

Danmerer, Alice M-; 67 

Dargella, Miss; 160, 254 

Dart, ErnaK.; 74, 165 

Dater, F.; 139 

Daum, John; 89, 301 

Darette, A.; 169 

Daris, E.; 101 

Daris, N.; 365 

Dea, Joseph; 46 

Dea, William; 101 

Deane, Harry; 121 

Debating Club, The Loyola 

University; 225 
deCastro; 109 
Deckman, Miss; 161 
DeClaux, Miss; 157 
DeCola, S.; 249 
DeFea, Herman F.; 337 
DeGuide, Marie L.; 76, 159 
Dehnert, Ernst; 87 
Delaney, Francis; 127, 152, 153 
Delia Marie, Miss; 176 
Della Strada Chapel; 188 
Delove, Sidney; 105, 254, 235 
Delta Theta Phi Fraternity; 

552 
Demecili, S.; 249 
Dempser, Miss; 161 
Denkal, M. W.; 157 



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Dentistry; 141 
Derby, Felton; 121 
Dernback, Clement; 113 
DesComier, Miss; 177 
DesMarias, L.; 165 
D'Esposito, Joshua; 46, 83, 326, 

327 
D'Esposito, Julian; 87 
Deutsch, Maurice; 251, 253 
DeVay, Miss; 161 
Deverv, Andrew; 150, 131 
DeVet, Mary I.; 71, 171 
Devine, William; 103 
Devitt, Robert; 91 
Devlin, Edna; 46, 106, 107 
Devorey, A.; 127 
Dickinson, Louis M.; 76, 159 
Dieter, Barbara; 240 
Dietzel, Emma; 65, 175 
DiLeo, Joseph A.; 46, 117 
Dimicelli, S.; 87 
Dittrich, Georse; 129 
Dixon, Helen; 72, 167 
Dixon, Miss; 177 
Dobesh, Mary; 75, 167 
Doerincsiield, Hilton; 47, 117, 

349 
Doheartv, E. P.; 137 
Doheartv, John E.; 89 
Dohertv", John J.; 47, 353 
Doherty, Neill J.; 47, 121 
Dohertv, Norman; 87, 525, 559 
Dolan, 'Martin, A.; 47 
Donlan, Eugene V.; 47 
Donmeyer, Miss; 255 
Donneflt, F.; 115 
Donovan, Miss; 160, 254 
Dooley, E.; 133 
DooleV, Edna M.;67 
Dooley, Robert; 81, 85, 299, 506, 

329 
Doolin, Mary M.; 161 
Dore, Mary'E.; 161 
Doubek, Rose M.; 67 
Dowling, Edward J.; 47, 83, 212, 

214, 220, 222, 229, 251, 260, 

321, 365 
Downev, Helen M.; 47 
Downey, Thomas; 87, 229, 250, 

266 
Downs, Miss; 156 
Dovle, Austin; 91, 218 
Doyle, Douglas; 121 
Drabanski, Joseph S.; 47, 119, 

545 
Dreis, Edward; 555 
Driscoll, Blanche; 172 
Driscoll, Miss; 156 
Drolet, Edward; 105, 235 
Drugav, Joseph; 87, 301 
Dubeck, Miss; 255 
Dubiel, John C; 345 
Duday, C. R.; 155 
Dudeck, Marcella, A.; 76, 159 
Duffy, Edward; 298, 500 
Dugan, J.; 253 
Duggan, L.; 169 
Duflaghan, Owen; 91, 335 



Dunlap, George; 89, 240, 241 
Dunn, Miss; 255 
Dunn, Nora B.; 67 
Dunne, Philip C; 47, 101 
Dunne, T.; 135 
Dunning, Bernardine; 75, 167 
Durburg, John; 122, 306, 308 
Durkin, John; 89, 231, 341 
Durkin, Walter J.; 85, 293, 300 
Durso, Margaret; 47, 93 
Dwan, Frank; 87, 249 
Dwyer, Charles; 89, 313 
Dwver, John J.; 47, 117, 357 
Dydak, Edwin; 90 



Earlv, Paul; 111 

Edfors, H. ; 157 

Egan, C; 565 

Egan, H.; 365 

Egan, Joseph; 85 

Eggsteen, Helen; 75 

Eisen, J.; 105, 255 

Eisenman, Leon; 121, 551 

Eisenstein, H.; 109 

Elenteny, Joseph; 90 

Ellard, Ferguson; 91 

Elliot, Robert E.; 47 

Elnen, Walter; 349 

Emill, Martin J.; 48, 85 

Engle, Paul; 121 

Enright, Miss; 157, 255 

Ensminger, George (M.D.); 559 

Erickson, Frances; 156, 255 

Erwin, John; 89 

Esposito, Andrew R.; 121, 557 

Esserman, C; 139 

Everdins, Arthur; 83 



Fabbrini, Thomas: 151 

Fagan, Arthur; 89 

Fagin, Stanley; 101 

Fahev, Eugene; 87 

Fahey, Miss; 161 

Fallin, Margaret; 71 

Fallon, M.; 171 

Fane, M. ; 169 

Farlev, Kathrvn E. ; 67 

FarreU, Frank; 142, 218 

Farrell, James; 555 

Farrell, John; 87 

Faul, Lawrence; 294, 300 

Faul, Thomas; 89, 500 

Faunt, E.; 255 

Fazio, Peter; 105, 255 

Faxio, Rocco; 119, 357 

Feelev, James; 87, 218 

Feenev, Allan; 89, 249, 251. 255 

Fegan, S. J.; 157 

Fegen, S.; 159 

Feldstein, Aaron; 105 

Felix, Anna E.; 67 

Fenten, Emma F.; 67, 255 

Ferlita, Americo; 294, 500 

Fetcho, William; 121 

Fedler, Arnold; 91 



Fieromosca, Ettore F.; 121, 557 

Fillai'er, Gertrude; 172 

Finan, Eugene; 85 

Findlay, Miss; 157 

Finkelder, Emma; 156 

Finlev, T.; 565 

Finn," Richard; 298, 500, 506, 

310, 511 
Finnigan, Catherine; 66, 175 
Fiore, Frank; 121 
Fiorito, Louis; 121, 557 
Fischer, Otto; 121 
Fisk, J. P.; 129 
Fitzgerald, James; 87 
Fitzgerald, Raymond; 89, 515 
Fitzgerald, William: 87, 341 
Fitzpatrick, Mary A.; 68 
Fitzsimmons, J.; 153 
Fitzsimmons, Robert; 87 
Flavin, Bud; 298, 300 
Flaxman, Nathan; 48, 117 
Fleming, A.; 155 
Fleming, James; 87 
Fliege, F.; 164 
Flvnn, Mae Agnes; 48 
Fl'vnn, Mary A.; 76, 159 
Flvnn, Thomas J.; 294, 296, 500. 

509 
Fosartv, Thomas; 85 
Forey, Charles J.; 48, 117 
Foley, Genevieve M.; 68 
Football; 287 
Ford, P.; 175 
Ford, Richard; 252 
Forlev, Miss; 255 
Fors.'Harold; 87, 501 
Francisco, Bert; 521, 522, 525 
Franey, John; 88, 90, 218 
Frankowski, Clementine; 555 
Frav, Miss; 157, 255 
Fra'zer, Ruth I.; 68 
French, L-; 165 

Frisch. Joseph; 90, 315, 525, 550 
Fnzol, Sylvester; 85 
Froebes, Philip (S.J.); 65 
Froembgen, William H.; 48 
Fuchs, Theodore; 218 
Fulco, Herman J.; 48 
Fullan, Maria; 75. 167 



Gallagher, A.: 164 
Gallaeher, J. E.; 139 
Gallagher, James G.; 48, 119 
Ganey*, Helen M.; 264, 365 
Ganeym, Mary M.; 48, 95 
Gardzielewski, Joseph P.; 48. 

117, 345 
Garrison, Monroe; 121 
Garthe, Joseph H.; 48 
Gartlant, E. F.; 137 
Garvy, Andrew Cosmos; 121 
Gawne, Charles; 118. 119 
Genge, William; 90 
Genrich, E.; 164 
Gerlach, Francis; 90 
Giardina, Jacob; 87, 251, 253 



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Gibbons, Bernard; 87, 218 
Gibnev, James; 349 
Gilchrist, Helen H.; 73, 167 
Gildea, Vada M.; 75, 163 
Gill, F.; 253 
Gill, John; 89 
Gill, Virginia M.; 48, 255 
Gillig, Frederick W.; 48 
Gilsinger, Margaret I.; 76, 157 
Ginter, Miss; 157 
Girsch, Charles; 87, 339 
Glasser, E. A.; 126, 127, 136, 

__ 137, 135, 214 
Glavin, Edward; 146 
Gleason, Miss; 156 
Glee Club, The Loyola Uni- 
versity; 250 
Gloss, Albert; 121 
Glynn, James D.; 49 
Gl'vnn, Miss; 161 
Goby, Max H.; 49 
Goeckel, Miss; 161 
Goeder, George; 87 
Golatka, Helen; 164 
Goldeny, D.; 115 
Goles, G.; 113 
Golf; 326 
Gonzalez, Dagoberto E.; 49 

Gordon, Ben F.; 49, 117 

Gorman, Bernard; 91 

Gorman, David B.; 49, 85 

Gormican, Paul; 89, 214, 229, 
231, 266, 341 

Gottschalk, Jerome; 90, 218, 239 

Gough, Lawrence; 121 

Grace, Miss; 161 

Grady, Joseph; 11, 361 

Graham, Cassin; 85, 339 

Graham, Howard E.; 49, 117 

Granahan, James; 130, 151 

Grant, Samuel; 85 

Graziano, Geraldine; 172 

Green, Miss; 156 

Gregory, S.; 164 

Grieber, Leonard; 249, 355 

Griffen, Martin; 101, 291, 500 

Griffin, Agnes C; 49 

Griffin, George; 90 

Griffin, James; 91 

Griffin, Lillian M.; 49 

Griffin, Louis; 92 

Griffin, Nellie J.; 49 

Griffin, Rosemary; 49, 93, 95, 
215 

Groark, Theodore; 91 

Grout, John; 121 

Gruner, Charles; 29 

Gualano, Carlo A.; 49, 83, 250 

Guarnien, Frank; 349 

Guerin, John; 87 

Guerin, Mark; 541 

Guerrini, Joseph; 87 

Guirrini, Miss; 176 

Gura, George M.; 49 

Gurrister, Marion J.; 76, 159 

Gusik, Ted; 150 

Gutmann, Amelia C; 76, 159 

Guzman, C. E.; 139 



H 

Haas, Christina M.; 75, 163 
Haas, Claire B.; 68 
Haas, Maurine; 157 
Haberline, George; 142 
Hackett, John J.; 50, 83, 251, 

252, 255, 262 
Haessig, Ruth; 75, 167 
Hager, Miss; 156 
Hajduk, John M.; 50, 121, 545 
Haley, Gerald J.; 50, 106, 107, 

355 
Halleran, Mary C; 68 
Halligan, Helen C.J 75, 163 
Halhnan, Harry; 85 
Hallisv, Margaret; 75, 167 
Haltmeyer, A.; 168 
Halton, Miss; 157, 255 
Hammer, Erwin; 87 
Hammond, James; 113, 218, 240, 

241 
Hand, Edward; 91 
Hanko, A.; 113 
Hannon, Miss; 161 
Harcharik, M.; 169 
Harney, Helen; 66, 156, 175 
Hart, Catherine; 157 
Hart, Thomas B.; 50, 101, 235 
Hartford, Matthew; 89, 301, 313 

Hartman, Henrv A.; 50 

Hartnett, Ray; 109 

Harvey, Robert; 50, 130 

Hauser, Vernon F.; 50, 117 

Hausman, Charles M.; 50 

Hausmann, G-; 150 

Hayes, D.; 157 

Hayes, John; 151 

Hayes, Miss; 157 

Healv, Edward J.; 50, 83, 367, 
341, 363 

Healv, Robert; 85, 214, 539 

Hebenstiert, R.; 343 

Hechinger, Rose L. ; 129 

Hecht, Fed J.; 50, 85, 249, 255 

Hackman, E.; 169 

Heffron, Jean H.; 71, 171 

Heimerdinger, Allegra M.; 71, 
171 

Heinen, Joseph; 91 

Hellwig, Clarence; 89 

Hemphett, Miss; 156 

Henderson, George; 90 

Henderson, M.J 169 

Hendnckson, I.; 167 

Hennew, Bernard; 300 

Henrv, James; 91 

Herald, Helen; 172 

Herbert, John; 89 

Heringer, Miss; 156 

Heron, Miss; 157, 255 

Hetreed, Francis; 121 

Hickey, Matthew J.; 28 

Hickey, Thomas; 347, 361 

Higgins, John F.; 90 

Higgins, John R.; 90 

Higgins, John Willis; 89 

Higgins, Russell; 84, 85 



Hillenbrand, Harold; 282 
Himsel, Helene Martha; 50, 255 
Hindman, J. J.; 159 
Hines, Edward; 87, 339 
Hinsch, Carmel M.; 75, 165 
Hirshorn, Lynn; 111 
Hodapp, Aloysius; 325 
Hoeltgren, Maurice M.; 50 
Hoerschgen, Hilda M.; 71, 171 
Hofrichter, Frank; 121 
Hogan, Coletta; 239 
Hogan, Frank; 89 
Holmquist, Ruth G.; 68 
Hooper, Harry; 109 
Homan, Louise; 172 
Horn, Albert A.; 51 
Home, John; 51, 85, 521 
Horwitz, A.; 144 
Howe, Daniel; 156, 159 
Howe, Miss; 161 
Howland, Bernard; 90 
Howland, Thomas; 294, 300 
Howlik, Dauwen; 125 
Hubdke, Vernon; 111 
Hudson, J. Walter; 75 
Huckenpochler, Clayton; 90, 501 
Hueplis, Bernard; 549 
Hughes, Charles; 121 
Hughes, M.; 95 
Hupper, Walter Jerome; 85, 295, 

300 
Hurley, Otis; 90 
Huss, Carolyne A.; 75, 165 
Hutten, Margaret; 75, 167 
Hyde, Virginia; 75, 167 



I 

Ibelli, Louis P.; 337 

Ignoffo, Matthew F.; 51 

Insull, Samuel, Jr.; 28 

Interfraternity Council; 556 

Intramural Sports; 578-331 

Iorio, Frank; 121 

Iota Mu Sigma Fraternity; 

336 
Izner, Miss; 119 



I 
Jackobson, A.; 150 
Jackson, Martin; 89, 513 
Jackson, R.; 159, 144 
Jackson, S. ; 133 
Jakubowski, Casimir L.; 51 
James, Elmer; 121, 347 
Janowski, Stanley; 90 
Jansen, Edward; 90, 249, 251, 

253, 335 
Jardin, Miss; 175 
Jasinski, J.; 345 
Jasinski, S.; 87 
Jasionek, J.; 105 
Jelsomino, Samuel; 121 
Jenneman, Vincent L. (S. J.); 57 
Jesky, P.; 168 
Jesser, Joseph; 127, 351 
Johnson, Arthur E.; 51 



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Johnson, Cecil; 90 

Johnson, C. N.; 264 

Johnson, Gerard; 89, 528, 321, 

339 
Johnson, M. (Oak Park); 173 
Johnson, M. (St. Eliz.); 164 
Johnson, Walter; 111, 545, 555 
Johnston, David W.; 51 
Jones, Elinor A.; 66, 175 
Jones, J.; 155 
Jonuska, Francis; 89 
Jostes, Arthur C; 129 
Joyce, Emmett; 89 
Jo3 - ce, Joseph; 89, 501 
Joyce, M.; 255 
Jucius, John; 89 
Junio, J.; 165 
Juska, Felicia; 156, 255 

K 

Kain, Dorothy M.; 29, 51 
Kain, Paul; 87, 218, 555 
Kane, Mary C; 68 
Karrasch, Ralph; 87 
Kauth, Gertrude M.; 161 
Kavanaugh, D.; 155 
Kavanaugh, Donald; 550 
Kavanaugh, John; 111, 553 361 
Kavanaugh, Judge Marcus; 182 
Kavney, Charles; 87 
Kazmerowski, \\\; 155 
Keane, Paul; 90, 251, 255 
Kearnev, Joseph; 51, 83, 185, 

265 
Kearns, Martin J.; 51, 83, 529 
Kearns, Thomas; 87 
Keatina, Aanes C. ; 71 
Keating. Donald; 121, 547 
Keating. John; 232 
Keeleyr Robert ; 85, 559 
Keenan, George; 90, 251, 255 
Keenan, Miss; 156 
Kees. Ravmond; 89 
Keevins, Edward; 85, 248, 249, 

255 
Kelleher. Miss; 160 
Kelley. George; 111 
Kellev, President Robert M. 

(S.J.); 26, 28, 58, 182, 185 
Kelly, Ambrose; 111 
Kellv, George; 148 
Kelly, John Joseph; 51, 99, 107, 

214, 555 
Kellv, Marie A.; 51, 95 
Kellv, Miss (St. Bernard's); 161, 

254 
Kellv, Miss (Mercy); 157, 255 
Kelly, R.; 105 
Kelsey, Lawrence; 51 
Kelsey, Miss; 161 
Kennedy, Florence M-; 76, 159 
Kenney, Miss; 177 
Kenny, George; 549 
Kenn'v, MarvC.;52, 129 
Kennv, Mary M.; 129 
Koeber. J.; Ill 
Kerns, Earl J.; 50 



Kerpec, Louis; 90, 501 

Kerr, D.; 169 

Kerr, W. A.; 129 

Kerwick, C; 253 

Kerwin, David; 127, 156, 157 

Kevser, Isaac; 142 

Kiefer, John; 89 

Kiefer, Josephine C; 161 

Kiefer, K.; 161 

Kilbride, Raymond; 111 

Kilev, Rav; 85, 339 

Kiley, William J.; 127, 136, 139 

Kilkelly, P. C; 135 

Kinder, Adam; 121 

King, Margaret Avis; 52, 95 

King, Sheila; 169 

Kinney, B. M.; 157 

Kinsella, B.; 255 

Kinsella, M.; 253 

Kirbv, Nicholas; 91 

Kirbv, Wallace; 148, 321 

Kirn, Celeste A.; 68 

Klaus, Cyril; 119 

Klees, James; 355 

Kleinwachter, Earl Albert; 52, 

117 
Kleppel, Margaret; 52 
Klest, John Edward; 52, 85, 251, 

253, 262 
Klimaszewski, Eugene L. ; 52, 

101 
Klucken, Brother (S.J.); 55 
Knittel, Roger; 87, 218 
Knott, Viraima E.; 68 
Kobelnuky" Ethelbert; 125 
Kochanski, Richard V.; 345 
Koehler, E.; 169 
Koehler, J.; 129 
Koenig, Jawn Barrymore; 91, 

535 
Koepke, Albert; 89. 249 
Kohne, Gerald J.; 52, 119 
Komasinski, Marmaduke; 545 
Komiskv, Frances; 73, 167 
Konopa', John; 119, 345 
Kapacek, Peter; 89, 301 
Kosacz, Estelle M.; 75, 165 
Kostor, Miss; 177 
Kovalchik, Joseph; 90 
Kavalik, Mary M.; 71, 171 
Ko/.droj, F.; 345 
Kozczynski, Miss; 160 
Kozicynski, Miss; 254 
Kozlowski, Jerome J.; 52, 85, 

218, 292, 500 
Kramps, Herbert; 119 
Krankowski, Kanute; 121 
Krasniewski, Joseph, 251, 255, 

545 
Kreger, Ann; 240 
Krieser, A.; 169 
Krutan, George; 121 
Kropidlowski, Alphonse; 91, 255 
Krusiec, Eugene; 90 
Kruszka, George; 121 
Krvavica, Anthony; 87, 284 
Krysiak, Miss; 156 
Ku'beck, Magdalene; 68 



Kuchta, Thomas; 119 
Kuchynka, Otto; 121 
Kuehnle, Joseph; 85 
Kuhinka, Julius V.; 65 
Kuhliney, A. F.; 139 
Kukuk, Milton R.; 52, 117, 347, 

357, 359 
Kuhuski, E. J.; 139 



Labaris, J.; 249 
LaCasse, V.; 169 
LaChapelle, N.; 177 
Laemmar, John; 87, 325, 551 
LaFond, Charles; 29, 270, 545, 

361 
Lakemeyer, E.; 165 
Lake Shore Campus; 79 
Lally, Edward; 89, 555 
Lamasney, C; 176 
Lambda Rho Fraternity; 556 
Lamont, Daniel J.; 281, 288, 500 
Lampke, Helen V.; 77, 159 
Landeck, Edward; 87 
Landreth, Oliver; 87, 215, 214, 

218, 222 
Lannan, Bertram; 87, 299, 500 
Lannon, John; 85, 260 
LaPado, Longine M.; 68 
Lappin, Evelvn J.; 68 
Lardner, John 1.; 127, 128, 129 
Lardon, A. R.; 137, 139 
Latz, Norbert M.; 52, 117 
Laurenzana, Frank M.; 52, 117 
Lavin, Katherine, 119, 355 
Law; 97 

Lawler, Irene M.; 95 
Lawler, Richard H.; 55 
Lawless, R.; 175 
Lawless, J.; 157 
Lawringer, M.; 169 
Leahy, M. J.; 151, 159 
Leahv, Thomas E. ; 53, 117, 547 
Lear," Matthew; 98, 105, 255, 555 
Lebovitz. Louis; 53, 117, 551 
Lechlinski, W.; 173 
Lee, Frank; 87 
Legris, Marie E.; 69 
Lehmann, Mary E.; 77, 159 
Leibold, G.; 557 
Leier, J.; 165 
Lemire, Georue; 146 
Lender, G.; 160 
Lenihan, John; 87, 212, 214. 215. 

229, 231, 258, 266, 367, 341 
Lennon, Bernice; 55, 93 
Lennon, William; 127, 152, 155 
Leuman, D.; 156 
Lesniak, Walter E.; 55 
Lettvin, Frederick; 55, 127 
Leusen, Albert C; 75, 165 
Leveille, Teresa B.; 71, 171 
Lew, Herman A.; 55, 118, 551 
Lew'is, Charles; 89, 90 
Libnoch, Casimir L.; 55, 117, 

545 
Liddy, M.;255 



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Lietsenstofer, H.; 93 
Lindsav, Dorothv; 172 
Lindsay, Ronald"; 118, 347 
Lingen, George; 150 
Lingforn, Rachel A.; 69 
Linklater, William; 313 
Linn, Dauwen; 121 
Lisle, J. D.; 105 

Loef, John A.; 55, 117, 357, 359 
Loftus, James; 90 
Logan, William H. G. ; 35 
Logman, Kdward; 89 
Long, Harvev; 289, 300 
Lord, Daniel" J. (S.J.);60 
Lorenty, Thaddeus; 91 
Loritz, Anthony; 91 
Losinski, V.; 164 
Lowrey, William; 102, 105 
Loyolan, The; 212 
Loyola News, The; 216 
Loyola Quarterly, The; 220 
Ludwig, Fred; 87, 214, 222, 341 
Ludwig, Robert Edw.; 53, 83, 

341, 327 
Lukats, Elmer J.; 53 
Lukitsch, Joseph; 85, 295, 300 
Luster, Shelley; 105, 235 
Lutzenkirchen, F. ; 105, 295,300 
Lvnch, Charles; 111 
Lynch, Elsie R.; 53, 159 
Lynch, Martha J.; 77, 156 
Lvnch, Thomas; 89 
Lynch, William; 103, 235 

M 

Madden, Edward Joseph; 54, 

129, 359 
Madden, J. McDonald; 87 
Madison, Dorothy M.; 72, 171 
Magher, Arthur; 91 
Magner, Josephine; 239 
Mahan, Claudine; 69 
Maher, Edmund; 109 
Mahoney, Joseph M.; 54, 359 
Mahowald, George H. (S.J.); 54 
Mailloux, Dorothy; 75, 167 
Majewski, Edward; 103 
Major, Ralph; 54, 121 
Malanowski, John; 87, 345 
Malick, George; 90 
Mallon, Charles; 81, 88, 90, 229, 

231, 266 
Mallov, H.; 105, 235 
Malonev, W.; 137 
Malteron, M.; 255 
Mammoser, Joseph C; 259, 90 
Manelli, Daniel; 121 
Mangold, Eugene; 87 
Manfkas, Alphonse; 12 0, 121 
Mann, Charles Hubert; 187, 214, 

222, 228, 341 
Mann, Jay; 321, 328 
Manning, Lawrence; 54, 83 
Marcinkowski, Edw.; 90, 328 
Marciniak, Jerome B.; 54, 119, 

357 
Maresch, Irene A.; 75, 163 
Marganelli, Dominic; 90 



Marker, Joseph; 121, 547, 361 

Marquardt, Carl; 119, 349 

Marshall, John; 121 

Martin, M.; 157, 160, 255 

Marx, J.; 255 

Marzano, Joseph A.; 54, 116, 

117, 337 
Marzano, Joseph M.; 54, 83 
Massig, Mary C; 75, 163 
Massman, Martin; 111 
Massucci, Louis; 90 
Mastranni, Dominic; 87 
Matavowski, Frank; 91, 313 
Matsui, Takejiro; 54, 117 
Matterson, A.; 157 
Matthews, Margaret M.; 69 
Matthies, Morton; 349 
Matuszewski, Rudolph; 87 
Matz, M.; 161 
Matza,-M.; 157 
Mayer, J.; 113 
Maza, John; 54 
Meade, Margaret M.; 69 
Meagher, Emmett; 55, 81, 83, 

185, 260 
Medicine; 115 
Medvezky, Michael Jos.; 55 
Meehan, T. J.; 129 
Meenan, Cyril; 90 
Mehmert, Henry; 87 
Mehren, Edward J.; 28 
Meiklejohn, J.; 169 
Meli, James; 56, 117 
Mellan, M.; 161 
Melody, Francis; 56, 83, 325 
Menella, James; 56, 117 
Mercy Hospital; 154 
Mertz, Jas. J. (S.J.);55, 188 
Merwick, William E.; 56 
Meskis, J.; 133 
Meyer, Peter; 56, 83, 353 
Michaels, Algernon P.; 51 
Michuda, Rudolph; 90 
Mickewick, Stephen; 121, 129 
Migelv, Eugene; 87, 339 
Mikulec, Frances; 73, 167 
Milewski, A.; 345 
Miller, B.; 168 
Miller, Loren; 85 
Miller, Louis; 121 
Miller, M.; 157, 255 
Miller, Margaret ; 77, 129 
Miller, Eleanor D.; 69, 159 
Miller, Margis Irene; 56 
Miller, W.; 163 
Miller, Wm.; 75 
Milne, James W.; 235 
Milord, M.; 160 
Milos, James; 56, 117 
Minnis, Edw.; 87 
Mitchel, M.; 157 
Mitchel, G.; 87 
Mitchel, Oliver; 121 
Mitchell, Wm.;85 
Modica, Chas.; 87 
Molengraf, Morton; 349 
Molengraft, C; 119 
Molinowski, Anna M.; 172 



Molinowski, J.; 173 

Molloy, Leslie; 85, 291, 297, 300 

Moloney, Frances; 29 

Monachino, Thomas; 83 

Mondo, Joseph; 87 

Montana, Jos.; 91 

Mooney, E.; 253 

Moore, Ignatius; 349 

Moore, M.; 156 

Moore, Oliver; 349 

Moore, Robert; 90 

Moorehead, Louis D.; 34 

Mooter, Joseph; 85, 218, 229 

Moran, Matthew; 90 

Moran, Wm. Edw.; 56, 101, 292, 

300 
Moravek, Joseph; 151 
Morneau, Leroy; 56, 117 
Moronev, Joseph; 56, 83 
Morris, "Robert; 283 
Morrisey, Patricia A.; 69 
Morrison, Aloysius; 90 
Morrison, John; 89 
Moses, Morton; 90 
Moss, R.; 139 
Moszczenski, Alphonse A.; 121, 

545 
Motier, Jean; 87 
Moxon, James; 121 
Mucklinski, Emma D.; 66, 175 
Mulcahv, M.; 253 
MulcahV, T.; 253 
Mullady, W.; 113 
Mullaney, Austin; 87 
Mullanev, Dominic; 85 
Mullen, 'M.; 156 
Muller, M.; 255 
Mullins, J.; 135 
Mulqueen, Mary C; 72, 171 
Mungovan, Merlin; 87, 218 
Murphy, Charles; 305. 506, 309 
Murphv, Cornelius; 121 
Murphy, Daniel J.; 105, 216, 

218, 234, 235 
Murphv. Daniel R.; 80, 81, 85, 

332, 367 
Murphv, Frank; 296, 300 
Murphv, J.; 133 
Murphy, John P.; 90, 255 
Murphy, Joseph Charles; 56, 117 
Murphy, Miss (M.); 156 
Murphy, Miss (S.B.); 160 
Murphv, Marion; 349 
MurphV, Robert; 84, 85, 218, 

228, 229, 232, 324, 325, 359 
Murphy, Robert; 101 
Murphv, Stanley; 85 
Murphy, Thos.; 89, 214 
Murphv, William H.; 89 
MurphV, Wm. J; 89 
Murphy, Wm R ; 29, 110 
Murtaugh, James E.; 56, 121 
Musman, Blanche; 157 
McAllister, Alice R.; 77, 159 
McAuliffe, John; 89 
McAuliffe, Neal; 98, 105, 114, 

235 



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McBride, M.; 160, 254 
McCabe, Robert : 87, 228 
McCann, Marie Catherine; 54 
iMcCarney. M.; 157, 255 
McCarthy, Daniel; 555 
McCarthV, Hugh; 87 
McCarthv, lack; 90, 255 
McCartv". I.; 249 
Macey, Edmund; 547 
McClellan. Francis; 85 
McCollom, Elinor; 54, 95 
McCormick, Bernard; 87, 559 
McCormick, John V.; 55 
McCormick. John W.; 85 
McCourt. John; 85, 339 
McCoy, M.; 175 
McCracken, Francis; 187, 306, 

510. 311 
McCurrie, Marion T.; 54 
McDermott, Wm.; 90 
McDonald, J.; 129 
MacDonald. M.; 253 
McDonald. Thos.; 89 
McDonnall, A.; 168 
McDonnell, Robert; 87 
McDonoush, Frank; 103, 555 
McDuffie,~Tames C; 90, 218, 229 
McEvov, Donald ; 55, 83, 255 
McEwen, M.; 161 
McGarr. M.; 160 
McGarrv, Mamie; 72 
McGarry. Mary E. ; 69 
McGavick, Alexander; 55 
McGeever, Bessie; 55, 93 
McGillen, John; 87 
McGivern, Edw.; 85 
McGovern. Anne F.; 69 
McGovern, Owen; 129, 543 
McGovern, Mary E.; 66, 175 
McGowan, Vergil B.; 55, 100, 

101, 255, 555 
McGrath, Harold; 55, 117, 557 
McGrath. Mary E.; 55_, 95 
McGrogan, J.; 127, 153 
McGuire, Edw.; 109, 553 
McGuire. Hugh; 90 
McGuire, J.; llo 
McGuire, Philip; 123 
McGuire, John P.; 55 
McGuire, M.; 255 
McGuire. Philip; 549 
McGurn, Robert; 126, 127, 154, 

McHale, Edward; 89 
McHenrv, Anna G. ; 55 
McHuah", James; 85 
McHugh. M.; 160, 254 
Mclnnes, Malcolm; 55, 117, 359 
Mcintosh. Harold; 89, 301 
Mclntvre, Kathrvn V.; 69, 155 
McKinchv, M.; 156 
McLaughlin, J.; 255 
McLennon, J.; 153 
McMahon. M.; 255 
McManimin, N.; 365 
McNeil, Wm.; 85, 295, 500 
McNicholas. Charles; 89, 218 
McNicholas, James; 91 
McXicholas, Nora; 55 



McNichols, John P. (S.J.); 265 
McShane, Patrick; 87 
McTigue, Frank; 29, 127, 154 
McVadv, John; 90 
McVeigh, J.; 164 
McVev, Marie; 121, 555 



Naber, D.; 157 

Naber, L. ; 157 

Natichv, M.; 156 

Xappolilli, V.; 89, 501, 515 

Nash, Daniel: 127. 134, 155 

Nash, Thomas; 154, 135 

Natale, Pasquale; 121 

Natale, Patsy; 91 

Nearv, Hubert F.; 57, 126, 127, 

128, 129, 545 
Needham, Monica; 172 
Neiggemann, Margaret H.; 69 
Nelson, A. M.; 139 
Nelson, Pauline E. ; 75, 16.5 
Nesler, Berenice M.; 75, 165 
Newmann. Helen; 101 
Neuroth, Bertha; 74, 167 
Neville; 160, 254 
Nibbe, Jerome; 90 
Nickels, Joseph; 89, 255 
Nimaira, Ted; 105, 255 
Nigro, Dominic; 121 
Noethe; 160, 254 
Nohana; 156 

Nolan, Mary A.; 160. 254 
Nolan, Raymond; 296, 500 
Nolan, Robert; 85 
Noland, Paul; 300 
Noonan, P.; 159 
Norbert; 161 
Norris, Adam; 129, 545 
Norton, Edward; 289, 500 
Norton, Joseph; 89, 259, 501. 

329 
Noto, Samuel; 87 
Novak, Joseph; 90 
Nowotarski, John; 90 
Nu Sigma Phi Sorority; 554 

O 

Oak Park Hospital; 170 
Oberthur; 157 
Obester, Gabriel E.; 57 
O'Brien, Muriel A.; 69 
O'Brien, Harry; 89 
O'Brien, Haves M.; 57, 85, 555 
O'Brien, Thomas; 90, 501, 515 
O'Brien, V.; 168 
Obuchowski, Bruno; 90, 255 
O'Connor, E.; 113 
O'Connor, E. C; 57 
O'Connor, Geraldine; 172 
O'Connor, James; 57, 110, 117. 

359 
O'Connor, James C; 99, 111. 

361 
O'Connor. John; 29. 99, 108. 109, 

353 
O'Connor. John \V.: 91 



O'Connor. Richard; 57, 185, 
212, 214, 215, 222, 541, 561. 
362, 363 

O'Connor. Robert; 91. 325, 551 

0|Donnell, D.; 93, 255 

O'Dowd, James; 355 

Oehlberg, Mathias; 91 

Oehlberg, Nick; 87 

O'Gradv, John; 85 

O'Hare; James C; 87 

Ohlheiser, Joseph; 87, 218, 550, 
339 

Ohnesora, Cecelia T.; 70 

Ohta. Wilfred T.; 57 

O'Learv, Hilarv F.; 110, 111 

O'Leary, James R.; 57, 107 

O'Leary, Rose A.; 70 

Olechowski. Henrv; 87 

Olietti; 161 

Olsen; 157 

Olszewski; 125 

O'Mallev, A; 253 

O'MalleV, C; 255 

O'Mallev, John; 101 

O'Meara, Alice; 76 

O'Neill, B.; 164 

O'Neill, Ethel A.; 57 

O'Neill; 160 

O'Neill, Thomas; 87, 521 

O'Reillv, E. D.; 137 

O'Reillv, Edward; 85 

O'Rourke, Daniel; 100, 101 

O'Shea, K.; 253 

Osten, Joseph; 361 

O'Toole, James; 85 

Ouellette. Alfred J.; 57 

Ozelka; 125 



Pahls, Louis; 345 

Palermo, A.; 249 

Palermo, Ettore; 87 

Palica, Joseph; 90 

Pancratius, Sr. Mary; 95 

Pantola. S.; 155 

Panzarella, Carlo; 91 

Paradise, Frederick A.; 57 

Parenti, Michael; 119 

Parrilli, Sam; 87 

Paterson, M.; 253, 161 

Pauli, Theodore; 57. 557, 547. 

117 
Pavese, A.; 253 
Pavik, Miss; 160 
Paxton, M.; 165 
Peabody, Stuvvesant; 9, 28 
Pekin, Thomas; 58, 117 
Peterhans, Louis: 87 
Pelling, Miss; 160 
Penderiiast, Charles; 89 
Pendy, Miss; 176 
Perzia. Anthonv P.; 58 
Petcoff, John E.; 58, 547 
Peterka, A.; 113 
Petrone, Marco S.; 58, 557 
Petrone, Michael; 116 
Pettinger, Andrew; 111 
Pfeifer, Herbert; 545 
Phffner, M.: 175 



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Phalen, .Miss; 255 

Phelan. Joseph; 301 

Phelan. Kyran V.; 58 

Pheres, Lawrence: 105 

Phi Beta Pi ; 548 

Phi Chi; 546 

Phi Lambda Kappa ; 350 

Philipp. lohn; 90 

Phi Ml Chi; 254 

Pidgeon, Helen M.; 58 

Pilling, Miss: 254 

Pilotte. A.; 168 

Pilut, John; 87 

Pimental, George; 58, 117 

Pi Alpha Lambda; 340 

Pi Mu Phi; 344 

Pink, Miss; 157 

Piszczek, Edward A.; 121, 545 

Pleskovitch, Miss; 177 

Plovhart, Henry; 299, 300 

Plunkett. Paul; 539, 367. 58. 82 

Podore, L; 144 

Podwika, Joseph ; 87 

Poklenkowski, Aloysius; 90 

Pokorney, Frank; 89 

Polchlapek. A.; 165 

Polito, Anthony E.; 58, 557 

Pollack. Sidney; 144 

Pope. A.; 157 

Pope, R. ; 255 

Poppelreiter, Chris J.; 291. 500, 

353, 105 
Potempa, Louis; 90 
Potuznik, James; 313, 90 
Powell, M.; 175 
Powers, Cyril; 85 
Powers, John ; 1 1 1 
Powers, M.; 255, 157 
Powers, Thomas J. (S.J.); 282 
Povnton, James; 91 
Po'vnton, Thomas; 229, 216, 218, 

87 
Pratt, Miss; 156 
Prefontaine, Kenneth F.; 58, 117 
Pre-Legal; 154 
Prendereast, John; 58, 347 
Preth, H.; 105 
Price, E.; 168 
Probst. George; 299, 300 
Ptosek, Mary Agnes; 172 
Publications; 209 
Puerte, Mary; 240 

Q 
Quane, Robert; 85 
Queenan, Vachel; 549 
Queenan, Reginald: 122 
Quislev, Martin J.; 28 
Ouinlan. Mary E.; 77, 159 
Ouinn, Frank; 85, 529 
Quinn, M.; 171 
Ouinn, Paul; 90 
Quirici. Madelyn A.; 72, 171 

R 

Rach, Daniel; 87 
Racine, Miss; 156 



Radakovich, Dushan; S5 
Radke, Francis; 89, 301 
Radzvminski, Stanislaus F.; 545 
Raffertv, James F.; 87. 214. 218, 

229, 250, 266, 506, 510, 511 
Raffertv, Robert Jas.; 85, 213, 

214, 215, 220, 222, 229, 541, 

363 
Rammer, Margaret J.; 70 
Ramminger, Hubert; 90 
Rand, George; 58, 117, 551 
Rasche, Edward; 68 
Raco, Frank; 87 
Rau, George; 349 
Rauwoli", Andrew; 91 
Ray, George; 232 
Ravmond, Beatrice; 555, 121 
Reardon, Miss; 160, 254 
Rector. Miss; 177 
Reed, Paul A.; 85, 555, 555 
Reed, Paul E.; 59 
Reedy, Thomas J.; 56, 545 
Reid," William; 87 
Reider, Jack; 121 
Reidy, \\illiam; 85, 525 
Reif, Lawrence; 90, 251, 255 
Reiner, Joseph S. (S. J.); 50, 42 
Reis, George; 87 
Reischling, Floyd M.; 59 
Renkoff, Herman ; 59 
Richardson, Miss; 177 
Rickaby, Basil; 90, 249 
Rilev. E.; 168 
Riley. S. R.; 155 
Ring, Horace; 90 
Riordan, J.; 139 
River, Bryan; 91 
Rivera, Cecilia; 77 
Rivera, D'Artagan; 59, 117 
Roach, F. J.; 157 
Roberti, Jack; 120. 121 
Robinson, Stanley W.; 59, 559_ 
Roccisano, Vincent A.; 59, 85, 

248, 251, 253 
Rocco, Paul; 119 
Rodgers, Marjorie; 121, 355 
Rogers, S. ; 255 
Ronce, M.; 173 
Rooney, George E.; 59, 117 
Rooney, Gerald; 543 
Rooney, Mary B.; 70, 155 
Rooney, Miss F.; 255, 255 
Rosich, John; 59, 83, 248, 249, 

255, 511 
Roskowski, A.; 105, 235 
Roslyn, D.; 135 
Rosner, Albert (Bro., S. J.); 52 
Roszkowski, John E.; 59. 101 
Rotandi, Armando J.; 59, 557 
Rowan, Edward; 87 
Rowan, Rosanne; 70 
Rowen, Miss; 255 
Ruddv, Miss; 156 
Rugis, M.; 159 
Russell, Carroll; 77 
Russell, John; 59 
Russell, Lawrence A.; 5°^ 
Russell, Miss; 159 



Russomano, Ravmond L.; 60, 

117 
Ryan, A.; 168 
Ryan, Charles; 91 
RVan, H.; 169 
Rvan, James C; 60, 104, 105, 

255. 283. 355 
Rvan, John J.; 289, 300 
Rvan, M. Lillian; 39, 76 
Ryba, Malter; 89. 301, 515 

S 

Saber, Stanley; 60, 107 
Sachs, Edward; 60, 119 
Sachs Leonard; 304, 506 
Sabo. M.; 164 
St. Anne's Hospital; 166 
St. Bernard's Hospital; 158 
St. Elizabeth's Hospital; 162 
Salerno, George; 87 
Salletta, Frank 1.; 60, 337 
Saletta, Samuel; 122, 357 
Salvador, Graciano; 246, 253 
Salvador, M.; 253 
Samlow, Chester A.; 60, 117 
Samuels, Arthur; 60, 117 
Sanders, John; 353 
Sanders, Kenneth; 146 
Sanfillippo, J.; 105, 235 
Santucci, Joseph; 60, 101 
Sarmas, Peia P.; 60, 117 
Sarnecki, Pistacchio; 545 
Sarwin, T.; 164 
Sautter, M.; 95 
Saukstone, Manning L; 60 
Savage, Hugh; 127, 158. 159 
Schelly, N.; 95 
Scheribel, Carl J.; 60 
Schilling, Marie L.; 70 
Schiner, Flora G. ; 70 
Schlacks, Howard; 107 
Schless, J.; 135 
Schmeing, George M.; 48 
Schmidt," Austin G. (S. J.); 57, 

67 
Schmidt, Charles; 131 
Schmidt, Gustave; 121, 549 
Schmitt, Edward J.; 47 
Schmitz, William; 88, 501, 515 
Schnaubelt, Esther; 168 
Schneider, Paul J.; 60, 117, 549 
Schneller, Mae; 70 
Scholtz, Helen; 74, 167 
Schommer, John P.; 61, 85 
Schowalter, Edward; 91, 218, 

335 
Schowalter, Josephine F.; 66 
Schrader, Charles E. (S. J.}; 45 
Schraeder, Clara L, ; 77 
Schroeder, Dorothy A.; 70, 159 
Schuck, Raymond; 87 
Schuessler, Rudolph; 91 
Schumann, Robert; 87, 506, 508, 

309 
Schuler, George 91 
Schulte, Theodore J. (S. J. I; 29, 

61, 258 
Schultz, Andrew; 87 



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Schumacher, \V. R.; 135 
Schuman, Bertha R.; 70 
Schwarcz, Benjamin K.; 61, 351 
Schwartz, Mary A.; 77, 159 
Scott, Elizabeth A.; 72, 171 
Scott, James H.; 129, 343 
Scribano, Emanuel; 87 
Scullin, E.; 95 __ 
Sears, John; 103 
Seelev, Stanley; 349 
Seidf, Miss; 157, 255 
Sellmeyer, Bernard L. (S. J.); 74 
Semrad, Joseph E.; 46 
Serbst, Charles; 121 
Serb, Michael; 121 
Setar, B.; 156, 255 
Serbst, Charles; 347 
Settino, James; 61, 117 
Sextro, Fred R.; 61, 80, 81, 85, 

292, 300, 306, 508, 309 
Shanahan, Richard; 61, 83, 229, 

295, 300, 367, 327 
Shanahan, Thomas; 91, 301 
Shapiro, Herman L.; 61 , 551 
Sharp, Miss; 161 
Shaughnessy, Catherine J.; 70 
Shaumberg, M.; 255 
Shea, G.; 255 
Shearer, C; 169 
Sheehan, Edward; 121 
Sheehan, Leo B.; 61 
Sheehan, Marie; 58, 159 
Sheehan, Mary A.; 77 
Shan, G.; 93 
Shevlin, F.; 133 
Shifrer, Mary; 165 
Shipka, A.; 135 
Showalter, Miss; 175 
Siedenbura, Frederick (S. J.); 

32, 66, 365 
Sigma Lambda Beta; 342 
Silverman, H.; 249 
Silvestri, George; 89, 301 
Simbalmos, Louis J.; 61, 101 
Simon, Herbert J.; 61, 117 
Simonaitis, John J.; 61, 117 
Simone, Benedict; 121 
Skembore, Carmen; 87 
Skuzinski, Bartholomew; 345 
Skwiot, Philip; 218 
Slade, Miss; 157 
Smalley, Charles, J.; 61 
Smarke, Margaret K.; 75, 165 
Smith, A.; 133 
Smith. Alvera R.; 72, 171 
Smith, Edward; 29, 103, 214, 

215, 235 
Smith, G.;93 
Smith, J. D.; 139 
Smith, J. J.; 133, 139 
Smith, John J.; 85, 296, 500, 306, 

308, 310 
Smith, Miss; 161 
Smith, Peter; 343 
Smith, Thomas P.; 61, 83, 335 
Smullen, James; 121 
Smyth, Homer; 85 
Smyth, Joseph; 121 
Snyder, A.; 129 



Sobie, H.; 168 
Society; 269 
Sociology; 92 

Sock and Buskin Club; 237 
Sodality; 257 
Soldinger, Eva C; 62 
Solomon, J.; 235 
Solomon, S. D.; 120 
Southerland, G.; 160, 254 
Spackman, James; 87, 341 
Spalding, Benedict; 85 
Spalding, Henry S. (S. J.); 62 
Spangler, Edward; 119 
Spelman, Thomas L. ; 62, 83, 214, 

218, 220, 222, 238, 239, 363 
Spiteri, William; 62, 121 
Sramek, Joseph; 87 
Stadium Association; 187 
Stadler, Martin; 86, 87, 298, 300 
Stalzer, George; 90, 251, 253 
Stanton, Gertrude C; 77, 159 
Stanton, Herbert; 86, 87, 535 
Stauder, Harry; 62, 85, 250, 251, 

253 
Stavinga, Robert; 91 
Steffes, Everett; 349 
Steggert, Bertram; 51, 59 
Steger, Donald V.; 62 
Steinbreacher, Ben C; 62, 117 
Steinbrecher, Francis; 222 
Steinle, Clifford J.; 62, 121, 214, 

215, 217, 218 
Steve, T.; 168 
Sternastv, Frank C. ; 62 
Stewart,' Wilbur; 121, 349 
Stombrac, Z.; 169 
Strevsman, Frank; 62, 116, 117 
Strobel, John P.; 85, 321, 329 
Strock, Madelynne; 169 
Strubbe, Kathrun; 168 
Strumil, E. ; 133 
Stybel, Joseph; 121, 345 
Such, R.; 133 
Suffel, G. A.; 135 
Sullivan, Alphonso; 111 
Sullivan, Annabelle; 168 
Sullivan, Daniel; 111 
Sullivan, Donald; 121 
Sullivan, J.; 103 
Sullivan, John; 89 
Sullivan, John; 139 
Sullivan, Thomas; 103 
Sutton, C; 169 
Sroboda, O.; 139 
Swanish, Peter; 64 
Swastek, Edward J.; 121. 345 
Sweeney, Charles; 513, 341 
Sweeney, Mary E.; 62 
Sweeney, S.; 133 
Sweetman, John S.; 62, 127, 129, 

214 
Sweitzer, Robert; 105, 235 
Swiatak, Harriet; 165 
Swiontkowski, Stanley; 62 
Sykora, J.; 155 
Sydvestri, George; 313 
Szymanski, Edward; 90 
Szvmanski, Erwin; 90 



Tabaka, Bessie B.; 65 

Tabaka, Susan; 74, 167 

Taglieri, R. ; 113 

Takes, Louise M.; 70 

Tanton, S.; 173 

Tarlowe, Lillian; 63, 117, 355, 

357, 359 
Tarlow, Virginia; 63, 355, 557 
Tennis; 324 
Tennyson, J.; 177 
Thompson, M.; 164 
Thomson, Robert M.; 65, 85. 

213, 214, 215, 341, 365 
Tigerman, Joseph B. ; 520, 521 
Timmons, Peter J.; 65, 349 
Tivnen Ophthalmological 

Society; 358 
Tivnen, M.D., Richard J.; 559 
Tobin, M.; 253 
Todd, Ray; 361 
Tomczak, Anthony; 81, 84, 85, 

214, 216, 218, 22'2, 363 
Topel, Paul; 142, 361 
Tordella, Louis W.; 89, 251. 259 
Torrey, J.; 113 

Toth, Rosealyn; 71 
Towle, Victor; 29, 121 
Tovarek, Joseph J.; 65, 117 
Townley, Alvin M.; 65. 129 
Tracev, John T.; 65, 83, 367 
Track; 320 
Tracy, R.; 139 
Tressel, Mary S. ; 65 
Trizne, Joseph; 85 
Tuohy, Kathleen T.; 72, 171 
Twohey, Helen; 74, 167 
Twohey, Joseph T.; 63, 557 
Twomey, Harold; 335 

u 

Uling, A.; 65, 93, 253 
Unavitch, John; 105, 255, 297, 

300 
Ungaro, Victor; 90, 218, 249, 251, 

253 
Urban, Francis E.; 63, 121 
Urut, Morris; 121 
Urwan, Leon; 91 

V 

Vacv, John; 87 
Vail, William; 90 
Valentini, Alovsius; 349 
Vallely, Louis'; 64, 92, 93 
Van Driel, Agnes; 94, 365 
Vanecko, Michael; 121 
Van Pelt, Harrv; 543 
Van Pelt, John; 131 
Vanruska, R.; 160 
Van Vouten, R.; 365 
Vaughn, J.; 133 
Vercauteren, C; 164 
VerCauteren, Emma J.; 75, 165 
VerCauteren, Marie L. ; 76, 165 
Villani, M.;253 



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Vincent, S.: 173 
Vincenti, Angelo; 122 
Vincenti, Anton; 64, 85. 249, 

251, 255. 521 
Vincenti, Fred; 121, 557 
Vogel, Leona J.; 71, 155 
Volini, Camillo; 64, 120, 121 
Vondenbosh, Edna; 175 
Vondenbosh, Edna Marie; 66, 

177 
Vonesh, Tames; 87, 214, 541 
Vukits, S. J.; 131 

W 

Waesco, John; 85, 297, 500, 506, 

507, -508, 509 
Wagner, Vachel; 549 
Wagner, J.; 105, 255 
Wagner, Leonard; 87, 251, 255 
Waiert. Leo; 87 
Waldron, John; 99, 111, 355 
Waldvogel, Joseph; 85, 248, 249, 

255, 284, 555 
Wall, James; 87 
Wall, John Coleman; 64, 557, 

359 
Wallace, G. H.; 159 
Wallin. Ralph C; 64, 85 
Walsh, B. ; 255 
Walsh. Frank; 295, 500 
Walsh, James; 123 
Walsh, James J. (S. J.); 129, 265 
Walsh John J.; 64, 127 
Walsh, Joseph A.; 87, 212, 214, 

218, 229. 251, 266 
Walsh. Martin; 91, 218 
Walsh, P.; 155 
Walsh. Richard M.; 101 
Walsh. Robert M.; 127, 152 
Walsh. Thomas; 501, 90 
Walters. Edna M.; 76. 163 
Ware, W.j 157, 255 
Waters. Elenor; 101 
Waters. Gregory; 119 



Wawazkowocz, Alovsius; 121, 

345 
Webber, T.; 176 
Wecgsler, Jacob; 90 
Weigel. Charles J.; 119, 547,357 
Weimer, George; 85, 297, 299, 

500, 329 
Weinless, Jacob; 551 
Weinless, John; 64 
Weir, Rav L.;64, 117 
Weiss, A.; 249 
Welch, James; 90 
Welderba':h, Helen M.; 75 
Wendorf, Elizabeth C. ; 76, 165 
Werthman. Paul; 119 
West, Charles; 85, 218 
Whalen J.; 169 
Whaley, John H.; 29, 557 
Whsalan, James; 103 
White. John D.; 29, 64, 81, 82, 

83, 341, 360, 361 
White, J.; 133 
Wiatrak, Leon; 91 
Wickham, William; 91 
Wiedeman, Joseph; 64, 98, 101, 

255 
Wiencek, Chester; 91 
Wildson, R.; 133 
Wilette, Wilfred; 349 
Wilhelm, G.; 169 
Wilhelm, Henry; 103 
Wilhelmi, Dion; 64, 92, 95, 253, 

335 
Wilkin, J.; 135 
Williams, Harry R. ; 64, 117 
Wilson, Helen M.; 74, 167 
Wilson, Harris R.; 64, 549 
Wilson, S.; 139 
Winters, L.; 157 
Wirig, Margaret; 74, 167 
Wirth, Harold; 345 
Wise, L.; 157 
Wisniewski, Lucille; 164 
Witkiewicz, Stephen F.; 545 
Witkowski, John S.; 65, 117, 545 



Wnvskiwas, Felix C; 65 
Wixted, C.;253 
Wodek, Walter R.; 121, 345 
Wojcik, Stephen J.; 121, 545 
Wolf, D. ; 156, 255 
Wood, E.; 169 
Wood, J.; 157 
Wozlutovicz, J. P.; 129 
Wynn, Gerald; 335 



Y 

Yamans, Richard M.; 65 
Yater, D.; 156 
Yonan, John; 121 
Young, Francis J.; 85 
Young, Frank M.; 87, 555 



Zabel, Morton Dauwen; 49, 210, 

214, 222, 565 
Zaborski, Josephine; 74, 167 
Zaborsky, Emil; 91 
Zahler, ted; 111 
Zampardi, Santa M. ; 65 
Zarazinski, Edward; 90, 501 
Zalas, H.; 164 

Zelazny, Anthony; 65, 119, 545 
Zencka, Edward Anton; 65, 119, 

345, 557 
Zenz, B.; 157 
Zia, Khan; 121 
Zikmund, John; 349 
Zimmerman, Baron ; 90 
Zinngrabe, Louis; 89 
Zuley, Bert; 521 
Zuley, J^awrence; 119 
Zurawski, H.; 345 
Zurfli, Clarence; 65, 117 
Zwikstra, George; 87, 524, 525, 

541 



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