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Full text of "The Loyolan"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/loyolan1931unse 



Copptf0&teD, 1931, op 

Eooert 31ame0 Raffertp 

3Ioon Leo ILenftmn 



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Chicago 




Co 



? /^ ptoarD 3f« Q9eforen, '99, tofcose career as an OEOitor, OBngi* 
? neer, tfouernment aouisor and aiD, &as oroua&t Dtstfnc* 



g^jtk tion to irfs (Hnroersitp and to&ose services as a member 
of t&e 30mfnfstratitie Council fratie materially aiDeD bet 
progress. 



s—r^rouno a tbeme portraping tbe significance of tbe tJniuersitp 
I seal tbe 1931 Lopolan presents a cbronicle of tbe past 



j~A, scholastic peat. 



jFrom tfje founDation of tbe Lopola familp in tbe ttoelftb 
centucp until its ultimate rise to Jjonor in tftc siiteentb, tlje 
escutcheon of tlje bouse gtaouallp assumeD its symbolism: cout> 
age, bonor, saintliness, integrity anD self*sacrifice. 

JLopoIa 23nitiersitp bas aDopteD a moDification of tbe crest of 
tbe familp of JLopola for its seal. Wbt Lopolan seeks to correlate 
tbe accomplisbments of tbe SJnioersitp in tbe past pear toitb tbose 
of m Lopola bouse in centuries tobicb noto are bistotp. 



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James JFrands Iftafferrp 



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'Business Manager 

P&otopapbic CDitor 

Senior (Btiitot 

athletic CDitor 



3Ioim 31. Calla&an, Louis m. Cornelia, i&ooert £21. ©'Connor, 

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toell tfjat tfje toolbes altoaps founO something in tfte camp kettles 

aftet tfje retainers &aO ftaD t&efr fill. 

m jLodo w (toolf) and "olla" (kettle) toete eoentuallp contracted 

into "Hopola". 



LAKE SHORE CAMPUS 
Color Views 



Page Seventeen 

Page Twenty 
Page Twenty-one 

Page Twenty-four 
Page Twenty-five 

Page Twenty-eight 
Page Twenty-nine . 
Page Thirty-two 



Elizabeth M. Cndahy Memorial Library 
— The Approach 

Facade of the Administration Building 

Henry Dumbach Hall 
— From the Lake 

Along the Lake Road 

Michael Cudahy Science Hall 
— Across the Terrace 

Doorways to the Alumni Gymnasium 

At the Science Hall Steps 

Library Main Entrance 
—Detail 





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LOYOLA IN THE LOOP 
The Doivntown College 




FACULTY BUILDING CHAPEL 

Lake Shore Campus 



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Administration Building 




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sovereigns long past as retoarDs of tiirtue, seruice anD oalor, tbep 
ftauc oecome tbt spmool of another's administration tobosc 
charge, too, is tbe conduct of pout!) in tjjc sbadoto of tbt cross. 



THE YEARS ACHIEVEMENTS 

Consistent with the aims of the Jesuit educational program, scholastic ad- 
vancement is the outstanding achievement of the past year. Entrance re- 
quirements throughout the university were raised to an even higher plane; 
academic progress was given an impetus by the recent reorganization of the 
faculty, courses, and pedagogical methods employed; and at the same time, 
opportunities for concurrent, physical development were presented in the 
form of a comprehensive intra-mural athletic program. 

Opportunities for private study and research work in the Graduate field, 
were greatly enhanced by the completion of the Cudahy Memorial Library. 
The University was distinctly honored by the American Catholic Philosophical 
Association, which held its sixth annual convention, composed of philosophical 
celebrities of the nation, at the Lake Shore campus, during the Christmas 
season. Students evinced a commendable interest in this convocation. 

Despite stringent entrance requirements, the total student enrollment con- 
tinued to augment. Success eclipsing that of all previous years, attended the 
Law students in their examinations for the Bar, the Commerce students in 
their C. P. A. examinations, and the Medics in their examinations for interne- 
ships at the County Hospital. 

The report of the committee of deans appointed by President Kelley to 
present practical suggestions for the unification of aims and methods of pro- 
cedure in the various departments, resulted in the reorganization of the cur- 
ricula, each educational field headed by a scholar experienced in his respec- 
tive sphere. 

The abolition of intercollegiate football ushered in an intensive and diverse 
program of intra-mural sports, which was enthusiastically received throughout 
the entire university. The aims of the institution, and the achievements it 
has realized during the past year, were revealed to the public through an 
active publicity department, recently reorganized. 



jggfl&fjgfel THE 1931 LOYOLA* JC&&Ttt&*m?&85 





ROBERT M. KELLEY, S.J., LL.D. 
President. Loyola University 



THE 



19 3 



I, © Y © L A X 



THE PRESIDENTS GREETINGS 

The Loyolan represents the complex life of a large and varied 
educational institution. Its contributors are representative of 
the administrative, academic, professional, social, fraternal and 
athletic life of a large modern university. In spite of the 
broad and varied interests which it portrays, I believe that it 
shows forth a certain unity — a certain outlook on life which 
distinguishes its faculty and student-body from the many other 
similar groups who hold allegiance to other American col- 
leges and universities. 

I like to believe that each succeeding annual shows our 
student-bodies, despite the special educational goals they are 
striving to reach, more or less consciously and seriously bent 
on becoming men and women of upright character and of 
Christian culture. I would not like to see the ideal for which 
Jesuit education has stood for three hundred and fifty years 
lost to sight and to aim in the educational complexity and con- 
fusion of these latter days. The world in general, and our 
country in particular, greatly needs men and women trained in 
the Jesuit educational tradition. 

My greetings to the staff of The Loyolan and to the stu- 
dents of the University are that The Loyolan may worthily 
show forth to the public the quality of manhood and woman- 
hood of those who are privileged to call Loyola University 
their Alma Mater. 



9 3 1 



LOYOLAN 





Reading clockwise: chas. f. clarke, edwasd J. mehren, Matthew j. hickey, martin j. 

QUIGLEY, SAMUEL INSULL, JR., PRESIDENT ROBERT M. KELLEY, S.J., STUYVESANT PEABODY 
EDWARD A. CUDAHY, JR., PETER J. ANCSTEN. 




THE ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL 

The Administrative Council, with the same personnel as 
when formed on January 21st, 1930, has been of marked 
assistance to President Kelley during the past school year. 
The entire Council, consisting of nine leaders in the public 
and business life of Chicago, has met on the second Thurs- 
day of June, October, January and April. 

The standing committees on Finance. Buildings and 

Grounds, and Public Relations, have met separately and 

peabody rather frequently to discuss University affairs relating to the 

business of the particular committee. 
The Finance Committee, headed by Mr. Samuel Insull. Jr.. has reviewed the 
securities held by the University. It has recommended a definite and conser- 
vative policy regarding investments and has appointed Mr. Matthew J. Hickey 
of the same Committee as the counselor to the Treasurer of the University in 
regard to all investments. Mr. Charles F. Clarke. Vice-President of Halsey, 
Stuart & Company, is the third member of this committee. 

The Buildings and Grounds Committee has had several matters of improve- 
ment and purchase for consideration. On its recommendation, too, the com- 
mission for the planning of the Delia Strada Chapel has been given to the 
architect. Mr. A. N. Rebori, who did such outstanding creative work in design- 
ing the Elizabeth M. Cudahy Memorial Library. Messrs. David F. Bremner 
and Edward A. Cudahy. Jr., form this committee. 

The Public Relations Committee, headed by Martin J. Quigley of the Quig- 
ley Publishing Company, has been most active. It is largely responsible for 
the re-organization of the alumni, the employment of a full-time publicity 
director, the vocational talks to the Arts seniors given bv Chicago business 
leaders. Mr. Edward J. Mehren. to whom The 1931 Loyolan is dedicated, is 
the other active member on this committee. 

Mr. Stuyvesant Peabody has been the efficient chairman of this council, and 
the success attained and further achievements planned are in his capable 
hands. 



THE 



9 3 



LOYO LAN 









KF.LLEY, S.J. 



the problems of 
been enabled to 



THE COUNCIL OF DEANS AND REGENTS 

The main function of the Loyola University Council of 
Regents and Deans is to advise the President of the Uni- 
versity in educational matters. Since its establishment on 
November 11th, 1927, the Council has very successfully ful- 
filled its purpose of co-ordinating the policies of the various 
schools and colleges of the University. It has been a means 
of unifying administration, particularly of academic affairs 
throughout the various units which collectively are the Uni- 
versity. 

At the monthly dinner meetings President Kelley has 
had the best of opportunities to become acquainted with 
the various schools: the individual Deans and Regents hav< 
know what is going on in schools other than the one which is under their 
supervision. After listening to the sincere, enlightening and earnest discus- 
sion of problems affecting the LTniversity as a whole or in its members, the 
President has been able to reach more just and effective decisions. 

During eight meetings held this current school year the following topics 
among others have been discussed, and are typical of the meetings held since 
the foundation of the Council: the organization of a general University alumni 
association: the character of Loyola university: an effective departmental or- 
ganization; nominations for honorary degrees; the advisability of raising 
academic requirements in the School of Medicine; policy regarding inter- 
collegiate athletics; health service to students; general and particular endow- 
ment. 

The personnel of the Council follows: Rev. Robert M. Kelly. S.J., Presi- 
dent: Rev. Joseph S. Reiner, S..L, Dean of the College of Arts and Science: 
Rev. Frederic Siedenburg, S.J.. Dean of the School of Sociology and Regent 
of the School of Law; Rev. Austin G. Schmidt, S.J.. Dean of the Graduate 
School; Rev. Patrick J. Mahan, S.J., Regent of the School of Medicine: Dr. 
William H. G. Logan, Dean of the Chicago College of Dental Surgery: Dr. 
L. D. Moorehead, Dean of the School of Medicine: Mr. John V. McCormick. 
Dean of the School of Law; Mr. Thomas J. Reedy. Dean of the School of 
Commerce, and Mr. Bertram J. Steggert, Registrar of the College of Arts and 
Sciences. 



mrm^sm: 



T H 



10 3 1 



1, O V O L A > 



£ ^5r7r»:«Si d**r}+ 4 





CAREY, F. KEID. LEAR, CROWLEY 
o'lWEAKA, SUMMERS, MCARDLE, CAVANAUGH, BRENNAN, GRUI> 
LEMMIRE. D. MURPHY. WHALEY, KERWIN, MC COYERN 



THE LOYOLA UNION 



§f^^\ The Loyola Union began its third year of existence in a 

T-=*. ,. ' rather chaotic manner because of the loss of all previous 

records of the organization. This placed upon the shoulders 
^C V of the newly elected President Whaley, and the newly ap- 

Wk ^^ pointed moderator. Father LeMay, the task of complete re- 

9p^m organization. Despite this handicap the I nion has pro- 

gressed comparatively well. 
whaley Tne L y i a Union was founded three years ago in the 

scholastic year of 1928-29. Father Kelley having at that 
time seen the advantages in an All-University organization of faculty in the 
Council of Deans and Regents believed it would be equally effective to have 
the students of the various departments joined in such a manner. Conse- 
quently the Loyola Union was brought into existence with all its charter mem- 
bers Blue Key men. Lender the guidance of such executive ability as was fur- 
nished in this first council in the personages of James C. O'Connor, Ambrose 
Kelly, James Neary, John White and J. Francis Walsh the Union was put on a 
stable foundation. With this accomplished, these men then turned the LTnion 
over to representatives elected by the students who were to carry on the ex- 
cellent work begun by these members. 

The purpose set down for the Union was to act as a body which should 
foster and encourage all interdepartmental activities of the University. The 
Union in the past year, however, has confined itself to the support of the class 
dances, the arrangement of the senior booklet, and the awarding of keys to 
itself. 

It was because of this narrow field of activity and the inefficiencies displayed 
even in these that the Blue Key fraternity which had been eagerly watching 
this project from which they had looked for great things, deemed it necessary 
to investigate. The report of this investigation pointed out the faults which had 
developed in the Union and offered remedies. The broadening of the' Union's 
sphere was also advised in order to include other all-university activities be- 
sides mere social affairs and to thus accomplish the end for which it was 
founded. 



THE 



9 3 



LAN 






.reR 



THE ARTS STUDENT COUNCIL 

In accordance with the policy, now followed quite gen- 
erally throughout the country, of allowing student bodies to 
govern themselves to an extent commensurate with their 
abilities to do so, the college has seen fit to extend more 
and more authority to the Student Council as the years 
passed. 

The 1930-31 school year found the Council installed in an 
office of its own in the Administration Building and the 
campus authorities willing to cooperate in an extension of 
the body's powers. The student body evinced a desire to 
govern itself through duly elected representatives in a heartines 
denced in the past. 

Probably the outstanding accomplishment of the Council was the improve- 
ment in the programs and management of the weekly student assemblies. 
Douglas MeCabe, program chairman and the outstanding member of the 
Council, was responsible for the selection of numerous nationally known and 
locally famous lecturers. Men from all walks of life, of varying races, 
creeds, and employments presented their views on present topics of interest. 

The first Mundelein dance was managed entirely through a Council com- 
mittee. The point system, an arbitrary standard whereby the extra cur- 
ricular activities of the Arts students could be regulated on the basis of 
their scholastic attainments, was revised and after numerous setbacks, en- 
forced. The point system provides a means whereby the activity future of 
students can be regulated and is a most progressive step in the matter of 
student government. 

Numerous heated discussions enlivened the Council meetings, especially in 
regard to the keys which the Student Association voted to award to the 
Council. The eventual result of the discussions was the awarding of keys to 
Daniel Murphy, Robert Healy, James Brennan, Charles Mallon. Robert 
Murphy. James Rafferty, Thomas Walsh, Douglas MeCabe and Walter Durkin. 



T H 



I 9 3 1 



L O Y O L A > 





HTHE DAY LAW STUDENT COUNCIL 
Gratifying success in fields hitherto not attempted by the 
Law student councils, attended the efforts of the Day Law 
group during the past year. Beginning its term under a 
handicap of passive disregard on the part of the students, 
this representative body of student leaders concentrated its 
attempts on the removal of this indifference, and the incul- 
1 cation of an active interest in legal and student movements. 

lynch Early in the first semester, a convocation of the entire 

student body was held in the Downtown College. Arrange- 
ments were made by the council, to have Judge J. William Brooks of the 
Municipal court address the assemblage on important phases of Probate Work 
in Cook County. Ably qualified by his vast experiences in this field of legal 
endeavor. Judge Brooks" discussion met with the unanimous approval of the 
entire group. 

The success of this first attempt of the student council to promote a satis- 
factory assembly prompted two similar convocations during the second semes- 
ter. A lecture by Floyd Thompson, former Chief Justice of the Supreme 
Court of Illinois, and opponent of Governor Emmerson during the last guber- 
natorial campaign, on the "General Trend of Modern Political Science," proved 
to be one of the best attended and most interesting discourses the hopeful 
lawyers were privileged to hear. Judge Graber of the Municipal Court, a 
former faculty member of the Law school, discussed "Detail Work in the 
Sheriff's Office," with special emphasis on liens, executions of judgments, and 
points of a like nature. 

Not only was the success of these ventures due to the revival of student 
interest by the council, but projects of other natures, ranging from the regu- 
lation of elections of class officers, to aid for needy families through the Christ- 
mas Basket fund, were also realized. Through the concerted efforts of both 
faculty and student body, seventeen baskets were distributed during the 
Christmas season. 

The participation in. and development of intra-mural athletics by members 
of the Law school, were due in no small way to the invaluable aid proffered 
by the Council. 



THE 



9 3 1 



L O ¥ O L A X 





H 



THE NIGHT LAW STUDENT COUNCIL 

If the maxim of Thomas Jefferson. "That people is best 
governed which is least governed" is still valid in this 
modern age, the students of the Night Law School are 
blessed with the most benign and efficient ruling organiza- 
tion in the University. This is merely a long way of saying 
that the Night Law Student Council has done, is doing, and 
will continue to do as little as possible to annoy those who 
pursue the study of law after dark. Happy is the people curry 

that has no history — an account of the doings of the Night 

Law Student Council could be written by a fair-minded historian on the back 
of a postage stamp, with space for three additional words. 

Let us call the roll of this august body, chosen so carefully by the students. 
In its infrequent deliberations, the membership was composed of Messrs. 
Keene and Farrell, representing the Seniors, Mr. Kelly as official spokesman 
for the Juniors, Mr. Costello. picked by the Sophomores and Mr. Plunkett. 
mouthpiece of the Freshmen. I The prefix Mr. is not used in token of re- 
spect, but merely because the first names of the gentlemen are unknown to 
the author of this chronicle.) 

For a long time it seemed that the Council was about to break its long 
record of inactivity and submit a report to the dean on the faculty which 
leads the students through the maze of legal technicalities. Up to the present 
writing, however, it has kept its record clear. 

The record of this year should furnish rather conclusive proof that the only 
useful occupation of the Night Law Student Council is to fill a page of the 
LoYOLAN with some material, which may be decorative or may not, depending 
on whether the representatives are chosen for pictorial value. It is of course, 
not appropriate to use the pages of the Loyolan for a soapbox oration on the 
uselessness of the Night Law Council. There can be no doubt that the present 
administration is very popular because of the fact that it has left the students 
alone and not bothered them with dances, meetings, student-facultv dinners, 
or any of the other manifestations of good fellowship and departmental spirit 
indulged in by the other departments. As long as it meets so perfectly the 
wishes of the electorate, why should anyone protest, particularly when no 
more is expected. — A. K. 



THE 



1931 LOYOLAN 





I, MCGUIRE, H. CORDES, LENNOX, FECAN, COLGHLIN. K0< 
BECKER, FVB1SH, PODL SKA, MAURICE, DE BAETS, KILEY. 
HANZEL, KERWIN, LEAHY, SCOTT, J., LASDON, LARDNER, 



rULSKI, SAVAGE, MC COVERN 
V„ BARRY, HAYDON 
FLEMING, MC GLIRE 




THE COMMERCE STUDENT COUNCIL 
The Student Council of the Commerce school is composed 
of a representative group of students, elected from the var- 
ious classes of both the Commerce department, and its sub- 
sidiary, the Pre-Legal department. Its purpose is to give 
proper representation and organization to the students in 
all matters which concern the betterment of this depart- 
ment. Originating in the form of the Commerce Club, an 
organization developed four years ago to maintain and di- 
rect student interest, it has since evolved into a dynamic 
society which has introduced and successfully fulfilled proj- 
ects mainly of a social nature. 

Progress during the past year has been most satisfactory. 
I rider the guidance of president James Scott, regular meet- 
ings were held, and much was done to benefit both the 
school and the student. The first social affair of the year 
was in the form of a "get-together." held early in the first 
semester at the Downtown College. Several acts of enter- 
tainment were presented; refreshments were served; and 
dancing made possible by the cooperation of some former stu- 
dents who composed the orchestra. The satisfaction ex- 
pressed by the students, practically all of whom attended this initial gather- 
ing, was so gratifying, that the council fostered another similar affair during 
the second semester. 

Among its members are listed men who have distinguished themselves in 
numerous all-university activities, and the application to the Commerce Coun- 
cil of the same energy which has characterized their other interests, is in no 
small way accountable for the successful year just completed. The obstacles 
encountered since its institution as the Commerce Club, have at times been 
great; student interest during its early years was often regrettably absent, and 
in many instances displaced by a positive spirit of antagonism: but the con- 
quest of these hindrances, the success it has encountered during the past two 
years in developing and maintaining student interest of a high type redounds 



m 



Ml, S. 



to its credit and makes its achievements outstanding. 



S^S^BE^SBl THE 



9 3 



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THE ARTS INTER-FRATERNITY COUNCIL 

The Interfraternity Council of the North Campus has just 
completed another year of advancement and accomplish- 
ment. The year began with John L. Lenihan of Pi Alpha 
Lambda in the office of president. He was succeeded by 
Robert Nolan of Phi Mu Chi at the semester. 

The beginning; of the scholastic year of 1928 marked the 
establishment of the Interfraternity Council among the 
tbree then existing fraternities: Pi Alpha Lambda, Phi Mu 
Chi. and Alpha Delta Gamma. 

The purpose of the organization is to bring about a 
unified spirit among the fraternities for their mutual ad- 
vantages and for the betterment of the University. Among 
the activities aided during the past year were the athletic 
rallies and the dances fostered by the various classes. There 
has also been introduced into this body the support of the 
various intramural sports. 

In addition to the aid given to various organizations, the 
Council settles all disputes among the fraternities and deter- 
mines the policy of pledging and rushing. This latter point 
has been given careful consideration by the Council of the 
past year and a systemized procedure has been adopted. 

The Council has also taken into its membership, which nolan 

includes two delegates from each fraternity, the represen- 
tatives of the new Italian fraternity. Delta Alpha Sigma. 

Due to the development of the Council the lack of flexibility of the con- 
stitution was seen. A committee comprising the presidents of the various 
fraternities with Bob Nolan acting as chairman set out to draw up a new 
constitution. This new constitution was excellently prepared due to the 
initiative of delegates Healy and Rafferty, and was adopted as the guide for 
the Council of the future. 

The membership of the past year was composed of Robert Rafferty and 
John Lenihan of Pi Alpha Lambda. Ray Kiley and Robert Healy of Alpha 
Delta Gamma, and Daniel Murpby and Joseph Mooter of Phi Mu Chi. 




T H E 1931 LOYOLAN 



COLLEGE OF 
ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Joseph S. Reiner, S.J. 




FACULTY 



Robert M. Kelley, S.J., President 
D. Herbert Abel. A.M. 
David Bellemare, A.B. 
Timothy Bousoaren, S.J. 
George Brunner. S.J. 
Frank Cassaretto. B.S. 
W illiam Conley, B.C.S. 
Charles S. Costello, A.M. 
Philip Froebes, S.J. 



Eneas Goodwin, S.T.B., J.D. 
Aloysius Hodapp. A.M. 
J. Walter Hudson, M.S. 
George Kiley. S.J. 
Julius V. Kuhinka, A.M. 
Clifford LeMay, S.J. 
George Mahowald. S.J. 
John Melchiors, A.M. 
James J. Mertz, S.J. 



H*HE1 



BRL'NNF.R 
C\SSARKTTO 



C.OSTEU.O CONI.EY 

HODAPP HUDSON 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 




THE LAKE 
SHORE CAMPUS 







Bertram J. Steggert, 


A.M., 






Registrar 








FACULTY 


Michael Metlen, A.M. 




Joseph Semrad. Ph.B. 


Richard O'Connor, B.S. 




William Shiels. S.J. 


Leonard Otting, S.J. 




Bertram Steggert, A.M. 


Louis J. Puhl, S.J. 




Peter T. Swanish, M.B.A. 


Joseph Reiner. S.J. 




C.P.A., Ph.D. 


M. Lillian Rvan, Librarian 




John F. Walsh. S.J. 


Graciano Salvador, A.M. 




Samuel K. Wilson, S.J. 


George M. Schmeing, M.S. 




Morton D. Zabel, A.M. 


Bernard Sellmever, S.J. 




Richard Thompson 






Mary Bouscaren. 


Secretary 







THE 1931 L O Y O L A X 



jta^feaaas ^ a 




THE 
DOWNTOWN COLLEGE 



Frederick Siedenburg, S.J. 
Dean 




Gennaro Albachiara, D.Sc. 
Sr. Mary Amancia, A.M. 
David Bellemare, A.B. 
Francis T. Boylan. A.B. 
George J. B runner, S.J. 
Josephine K. Burns, Ph.B. 
Sr. Marv Cajetana, Ph.B. 
Stanley Carroll, M.S. 
James E. Coogan, S.J. 
Sr. Mary Corona, O.S.F., A.M 
Claude De Crespigny. Ph.D. 
Sr. Marv Dulcissima, S.Sp.S., 

A.M. 
Cecille H. Egan, A.M. 
Howard E. E^an, Ph.D. 
Sr. Mary Egidia, A.B. 



ACULTY 

Nan H. Ewing, Ph.B., R.N. 
William J. Finan. S.J. 
Marv A. Flannagan, A.M. 
Charles Gallagher. A.M., J.D. 
Helen M. Ganev, A.M. 
Francis J. Gerty, B.S., M.D. 
Sr. Mary Gonzaga. S. H.C.J. 
Eneas B. Goodwin. S.T.B.. J.D. 
William P. Hagerty. S.J. 
Valeria K. Huppeler. M.S. 
William H. Johnson. Ph.D. 
Marie A. Kellv, Ph.B. 
Paul Kiniery. Ph.D. 
Julius V. Kuhinka. A.M. 
Helen M. Langer, Ph.D. 
Abel J. McAllister, B.S. 
Florence H. Mcintosh, A.M. 




Klofc 



Ak 



SBH 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y © L A X 




THE SCHOOL 
OF SOCIOLOGY 



Agnes Van Driel, A.M. 
Secretary 




James A. Magner, Ph.D., D.D. 
George H. Mahowald, S.J., 

Ph.D. 
John C. Malloy, S.J. 
Sr. Marv Maria. A.M. 
Paul R.' Martin, A.M. 
Michael Metlen, A.M. 
Joseph L. Moss, A.B. 
Margaret B. O'Connor, Ph.D. 
Arthur 0"Mara, A.B. 
Leonard H. Otting, S.J. 
Claude J. Pernin, S.J. 
Francis T. Ryan, Ph.D. 
John A. Ryan, S.J. 
Graciano Salvador, A.M., LL.I 



Sr. Mary Sanctoslaus, A.M. 
Austin G. Schmidt, S.J. 
Charles J. Scott, S.J. 
Bernard Sellmeyer, S.J., M.D. 
Frederic Siedenburg, S.J. 
Henry S. Spalding, S.J. 
Joseph C. Thompson, A.M. 
Eston V. Tubbs. Ph.D. 
Agnes Van Driel. A.M. 
Louis Vigneras, A.M. 
James F. Walsh, S.J. 
John Walsh, S.J. 
Margaret V. Walsh. A.M. 
Dion J. Wilhelmi. Ph.B. 
Samuel K. Wilson, S.J. 
Morton D. Zabel. A.M. 




B*ii 




Z&E&^&L 



THE 



9 3 



Y © L A N 




THE SCHOOL 
OF MEDICINE 



Louis D. Moorhead, 

A.M., M.S., M.D., F.A.C.S. 
Dean 




FACULTY 



George L. Apfelbach. A.B., 

M.S., M.D. 
William C. Austin, A.M.. Ph.D. 
Benjamin B. Beeson. M.D. 
Bobert S. Berghoff, M.D. 
Bobert A. Black. M.D.. F.A.C.P. 
Theodore E. Boyd, B.S.. Ph.D. 
Edward M. Brown, M.D., 

F.A.C.S. 
J. William Davis, B.S., M.D. 
Fred M. Drennan, B.S., M.S., 

M.D. 
A. Cosmas Garvv, A.B.. M.D. 
John F. Golden,' M.D. 



Ulysses J. Grim, M.D., F.A.C.S. 
William S. Hector, M.D. 
Thesle T. Job, A.B., M.S., Ph.D. 
George T. Jordan, B.S., M.D. 
Philip H. Kreuscher, M.D. 
George W. Mahonev. M.D.. 

F.A.C.S. 
Milton Mandel, M.D. 
Clement L. Martin, A.B.. M.D. 
Michael McGuire, A.B., M.B., 

B.Ch., B.A.O. 
Frank A Mcjunkin, A.M., M.D. 
Thomas E. Meanv, M. D. 



HEIGH 
BOH! 



THE 



931 LOYOLA* 




THE 
MEDICAL SCHOOL 




feJaE Acnes Durkin 




^HE Registrar 




FACULTY 


Charles L. Mix, A.M., M.D., 


Sidney A. Portis, B.S., M.D. 


LL.D. 


Ernest A. Pribram, M.D. 


Louis D. Moorhead, M.S., A.M., 


William J. Quiglev, B.S., M.D. 


M.D., F.A.C.S. 


Charles F. Read, B.S., M.D. 


William E. Morgan, M.D., 


Samuel Salinger. AB., M.D., 


LL.D. 


F.A.C.S. 


Frederick Mueller, M.D. 


Charles F. Sawver, M.D. 


George Mueller. M.D., F.A.C.S. 


Henrv Schmitz, M.D.. A.M.. 


Benjamin H. Orndoff. Ph.G.. 


LL.D., F.A.C.S.. F.A.C.R. 


M.D., A.M., F.A.C.R., 


William F. Scott. M.D. 


F.A.C.P. 


Joseph P. Smvth, M.D. 


Daniel A. Orth, M.D., F.A.C.S. 


Reuben M. Strong. A.M.. Ph.D. 


Frank M. Phifer, M.D. 


Richard J. Tivnen, M.D.. LL.D. 


Frank E. Pierce, B.S., M.D., 


Isadore M. Trace. M.D.. F.A.C.P. 


F.A.C.S. 


Italo F. Volini, B.S.. M.D. 


Stephen R. Pietrowicz, A.B., 


Bertha Van Hoosen, M.D., 


M.D. 


A.M., F.A.C.S. 




~< mmiiz 



^B&S^gft THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A X 



iaS^^SS!?^ 




THE 
SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 



Thomas J. Reedy, 

A.B., A.M., LL.B., C.P.A. 




FACULTY 



Thomas Q. Beeslev. A.B., 

Litt.B. 
Francis T. Bovlan, A.B. 
Henry T. Chamberlain, C.P.A. 
Brian J. Ducev, B.S. 
Edward H. Enright, J.D. 
Walter A. Fov. Ph.B. 
Charles J. Gallagher, A.M., 

J.D. 
Leland T. Hadlev, A.B. 
James M. Havden. A.B., C.P.A. 
Stanley F. Jablonski, B.S. 

C.P.A. 
Wallace N. Kirby, B.S. 
Hugo A. Klemm. A.B. 



George A. Lane, Jr., A.B., J.D. 
Perrv D. Lipscombe, B.S., 

C.P.A. 
Lome V. Locker, C.P.A. 
John B. Mannion. A.B. 
Thomas J. Montgomery. A.B. 
Thomas J. Reedy, A.M., LL.B. 
Elmer P. Schaefer. Ph.B., J.D. 
Harry F. Shea, C.P.A. 
Harry E. Snyder, C.P.A., Ph.B., 

LL.M. 
Lawrence W. Spiiller. A.B., 

J.D.. LL.M. 
James F. Walsh, S.J. 
John A. Zvetina, A.B., J.D. 



HI BB 
BBBB 



BEESLEV 
FOY 


BOYLAN 
GALLAGHER 


CHAMBERLAIN DUCEY 
HADLEY JABLONSKI 




m&*im&&s?&L 


THE 


1931 I. O Y O L A \ 


m^s&gm 






30 


i 




FINANCE AND 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



George A. Lane, Jr. 
Secretary 



A.B., J.D. 



In compliance with the increased demand tor a high order of 
commercial efficiency, the School of Commerce was organized as a 
separate unit of Loyola University in September. 1924. Since 
courses in accounting, economics, and business administration are 
given in the Arts and Sciences department during the daytime, the 
purpose of the Commerce school is to offer to those unable to at- 
tend these day classes, training in business administration together 
with the many advantages accruing from a university education, 
obtainable by these students, only through evening sessions. 

Men, who during the day are actively engaged in the business 
world, have been selected to compose the faculty of this college. 
This combination of practical experience together with theoretical 
knowledge on the part of the faculty, plus a comprehensive ex- 
tension of its curriculum, has enabled the Commerce school to ex- 
pand in a manner most gratifying. 

DDDQ 



nno 




KIRBY KLEMM LIPSCOMBE 

MANNION MONTGOMERY SCHAEFER 



3#B8^3g£ 



9 3 1 L 



LAN 




THE 
SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 



William H. G. Logan 

M.D., D.D.S., LL.D., M.S., 

F.A.C.S. 
Dean <>/ Faculty 




FACULTY 



Earl P. Boul-er. D.D.S., L.D.S. 
John P. Bucklev, Ph.G., D.D.S. 
Walter M. Clulev, D.D.S. 
Donald F. Cole, D.D.S. 
Lois |E. Conger, R.N. 
Edgar David Coolidge, M.S., 

D.D.S. 
LeGrand M. Cox, M.D.. D.D.S. 
Paul W. Dawson. D.D.S. 
Emmanuel B. Fink, M.D.,Ph.D. 
Ralph H. Fouser, D.D.S., B.S., 

M.D. 
Max Frazier, D.D.S 
William A. Gilruth, D.D.S. 
Henrv Glupker, D.D.S. 
Rudolph Kronfeld, M.D. 



Thomas L. Grisamore. Ph.G., 

D.D.S. 
Rupert E. Hall. D.D.S. 
Gail Martin Hambleton. B.S., 

D.D.S. 
Harold H. Hillenbrand, B.S.. 

D.D.S. 
Gerald J. Hooper, D.D.S. 
Thesle T. Job, M.S., Ph.D. 
Charles N. Johnson, M.A.. 

L.D.S., D.D.S., M.D.S., 

LL.D. 
R. Harold Johnson, D.D.S. 
John L. Kendall. B.S., Ph.G., 

M.D. 
Julius V. Kuhinka, Ph.B., A.M. 







BOULCER COOLIDCE CI.l'PKER GRISYMORE 

HAMBLETON - MEYERS PENDLETON PUTEBBAUGH 



THE 



19 3 1 



LOYO LAN 




THE 
COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 




Charles N. Johnson, A.M. 

D.D.S., M.D.S., LL.D. 
Dean of Students 



FACULTY 



Frank P. Lindner, D.D.S. 
William H. G. Logan, M.D.. 

D.D.S., F.A.C.S., M.S., 

LL.D. 
Robert E. MacBovle, D.D.S. 
William I. McNeil D.D.S. 
Robert W. McNultv, A.B., 

D.D.S. 
Karl A. Meyer, M.D. 
Howard Michener, D.D.S. 
Lon W. Morrev, D.D.S. 
Augustus H. Mueller, B.S., 

D.D.S. 
Harold W. Oppice, D.D.S. 



Elbert C. Pendleton, D.D.S. 
George C. Pike, D.D.S. 
Harrv Bowman Pinnev. D.D.S. 
Lewi's A. Platts, M.S., D.D.S. 
Plinv G. Puterbaugh, M.D., 

D.D.S. 
Elmer Seheussler, D.D.S. 
Corvin F. Stine, D.D.S. 
Paul W. Swanson. D.D.S. 
Rose C. Theiler, R.N. 
Lozier D. Warner, A.B. 
John R. Watt. D.D.S. 
Warren Willman. B.S.. D.D.S. 
William D. Zoethout. Ph.D. 



. J „ Q 

JdJD 



ggft&£^&l T H E ? 9 3 1 L O Y O L A X 



£ Sr?»:*& S2v>'£ 




THE 
SCHOOL OF LAW 



John V. McCormick, A.B.. J.D. 
Dean 




J. Macleod Best, A.B.. J.D. 
C. B. Bissell, A.B., J.D. 
James C. Cahill, Ph.B.. LL.B. 
W. S. Chamiin. A.B.. LL.B. 
Archie H. Cohen. LL.B. 
Joseph Elward, A.B., LL.B. 
John C. Fitzgerald. A.B.. LL.B. 
William P. Fortune. A.B.. LL.B. 
Samuel Fox. J.D.. LL.M. 
James Howell. B.S., LL.D.. LL.M 
Hayes Kennedy, Ph.B., J.D. 
George A. Lane. Jr.. A.B.. J.D. 
Urban A. Lavery. A.B.. J.D. 



FACULTY 

Frank Mast. LL.B. 
Walter W. Meyer, LL.B. 
John V. McCormick, A.B., J.D. 
John J. McLaughlin, LL.B. 
Cornelius Palmer. A.B., LL.B. 
Herman R. Reiling, LL.B. 
Francis J. Rooney, A.M.. LL.B. 
William C. Scherwat. LL.B. 
John J. Sharon. A.B.. LL.B. 
Lawrence Spuller, A.B., J.D.. LL.B. 
Sherman Steele. Litt.B., LL.B. 
Payton J. Tuohy. A.M., LL.B. 
William C. Woodward, M.D. 



QHDB 



THE 1931 LOYOLA!* 




DAY AND EVENING 
LAW DEPARTMENTS 




Francs J. Rooney, A.M., LL.B. 

Srrretary 



In conjunction witth the legal departments of Loyola university, 
the Graduate School of Law was organized five years ago. offering 
courses which lead to the Master of Laws degree. Entrance re- 
quirements demand that the applicant for admission be a graduate 
of an accredited law school, and have completed in his course, two 
years of pre-legal work. Since its institution, attending students at 
the Graduate Law school have comprised not only graduate stu- 
dents, but numerous members of the bar of this state. 

An extension and practicalization of the courses offered have 
done much to augment the number of applicants for the Masters 
degree. Courses now offered, particularly the one in Medical Juris- 
prudence are most helpful to practising lawyers. The administra- 
tion believes that one of the weaknesses of most law schools is that 
they have not established the same close connections with the 
practising bar, that the medical schools have established with prac- 
tising physicians. It is this aspect, that such relationships would 
be successfully established, that the faculty of the Law School has 
endeavored to perfect. 



UuGU 



COHEN FORTUNE B1SSELI. STEELE 



931 LOYOLAN 




THE 
GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Austin G. Schmidt. S.J. 
Dean 




FACULTY 



William C. Austin. Ph.D. 
Earl P. Boulger. D.D.S., L.D.S. 
Theodore E. Bovd, Ph.D. 
Simon B. Chandler, Ph.D.. M.D. 
LeGrand M. Cox. D.D.S., M.D. 
J. Martin Essenberg. B.S.. Ph.D. 
Emmanuel B. Fink. Ph.D., M.D. 
Francis J. Gertv, B.S., M.D. 
Eneas B. Goodwin, S.T.D., J.D. 
Valeria K. Huppeler, M.S. 
Thesle T. Job, Ph.D. 
William H. Johnson, Ph.D. 
Paul F. Kiniery, Ph.D. 
William H. G. Logan, M.D.. 

D.D.S. 
James A. Magner, Ph.D.. D.D. 
George A. Mahowald. S.J.. 

Ph.D. 
Florence Mcintosh, M.A. 
Frank A. Mcjunkin. A.M., M.D. 



Walter W. Meyer, LL.B. 
Margaret B. O'Connor, Ph.D. 
Leonard H. Otting. S.J. 
Claude J. Pernin. S.J. 
Plinv G. Puterbaugh. M.D., 

D.D.S. 
Herman Reiling. LL.B. 
Francis J. Rooney. A.M., LL.B. 
Francis A. Rvan, Ph.D. 
Austin G. Schmidt, S.J.. Ph.D. 
Frederic Siedenberg, S.J. 
Sherman Steele, Litt.B., LL.B. 
Reuben M. Strong, Ph.D. 
Wilbur R. Tweedv, Ph.D. 
Eston V. Tubbs. Ph.D. 
Samuel K. Wilson. S.J., Ph.D. 
William C. Woodward, M.D., 

LL.M. 
Morton D. Zabel, A.M. 
William D. Zoethout, Ph.D. 



BB£! 



CERTY MAHOWALD WILSON 



THE 1931 LOYOLA* 




THE 
HOME STUDY DEPARTMENT 




Marie Sheehan, Ph.B. 
Director 



FACULTY 



George Aka, Ph.D. 
James R. Beck, A.B. 
Clara M. Carraody, Ph.B. 
Amy E. Crisler, A.B. 
J. William Davis, B.S., M.D. 
M. C. D'Argonne, Ph.D. 
Julia M. Doyle, A.M. 
Helen M. Ganey, A.M. 
Ella M. Garvy, A.M. 
Celia M. Gilmore. J.D., A.M. 
Joseph F. Connelly, A.M. 
Harriet Hackler, A.M. 
Frederick Gruhn, A.M. 
Domitilla Hunolt, A.M. 
Robert C. Keenan, A.B. 



Florence M. Leininger, A.B. 
Wilfred McPartlin. A.B. 
Noretta Miller. A.B. 
Charles W. Mulligan. A.B. 
Mary E. Reynolds, Ph.B. 
Felix Saunders. Ph.D. 
Marie Sheehan, Ph.B. 
J. Raymond Sheriff. A.B. 
Vincent Sheridan, A.M. 
Henry S. Spalding. S.J. 
Germaine G. Starrs, A.M. 
Richard T. Tobin, Ph.B. 
Joseph J. Urbancek, B.S. 
Morton D. Zabel, A.M. 
Frieda B. Zeeb, A.M. 



n^f.B 



GANEY CONNELLY KEENAN 



THE 1931 LOY O L A A T 




THE 
SCHOOLS FOR NURSES 



Terence A. Ahearn. S.J. 
Regent 




Loyola is especially fortunate to have in connection with its 
School of Medicine, affiliated schools of nurses training;. At present 
there are seven schools of this nature, with an approximate total 
enrollment of five hundred student nurses. The student nurses are 
under direct control of supervisors at the local schools, whose work 
is in turn directed by a board of administrators headed by Rev. 
Terence Ahearn. S.J., regent of the Medical school. 

The student nurses undergo a rigorous training which includes 
class work of a nature directly pertinent to their special field, 
studies of a cultural nature, and supervised duty in the operating 
rooms, clinics and hospital wards of their individual schools. Cath- 
olic teaching in ethics and religion is given by Jesuits in most of 
the hospitals, as a means of preparing the student nurse for the 
practical service her calling demands. 

The directresses at the various hospitals are: Miss Helen M. 
Welderbach, St. Anne's; Sr. Helen Jarrell, St. Bernard's; Mrs. Lyda 
White, Columbus; Miss Margaret Crowe. St. Elizabeth's; Sr. M. 
Lidwina. Mercv; Sr. Julian. John B. Murphy; and Sr. St. Vincent. 
Oak Park. 




.1 Mil. III. Ml. I.UIHINA SR. ST. VINCENT WEI.IIKI1H U F I 



T H 



9 3 



L O Y © L A N 




THE 
LIBRARIES 




M. Lillian Ryan 
Librarian 



With the completion of the Cudahy Memorial Lihrary. the great- 
est impetus towards an appreciation and use of the library was 
given, not only to the Lake Shore campus students, but to the mem- 
bers of the Downtown College, and the Graduate School. Ample 
reading room facilities with ready access to the periodical and ref- 
erence shelves have done much to stimulate an interest among the 
undergraduate students, while private study rooms have been an 
invaluable aid to graduate and research students. 

The Cudahy Library has greatly increased its collection of valu- 
able reference material, and to maintain an efficient system of cata- 
loguing, has recently adopted the Library of Congress method of 
classification, which policy is now nearing completion. 

Equally gratifying progress in the Law. and Medical School lib- 
raries is evidenced by the augmentation of pertinent general refer- 
ence books, in both the legal and medical fields. 

The Library Administration board is headed by Rev. William 
Kane, S.J. The librarians in charge at the various departments are: 
M. Lillian Ryan, Arts and Sciences; Agnes Ewing, Law; and Mar- 
garet Nash, Medical. 



3&fi 



IIM.I.I.ISII 



nrasRK 



19 3 1 



L O Y O L A IV 




THE ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT 



George Kiley, S.J. 
Faculty Director 




George E. Kiley, S.J. 
Robert E. Morris. '26 
Jeanette Smith, ex '29 
Leonard D. Sachs 
James X. Bremner. '30 
John Waesco, "31 
William Linklater. "32 
Harold A. Hillenbrand 
Joseph A. Gauer. "09 
Douglas McCabe. '31 
John Sweeney, "28 
Edwin Norton, "27 
O. Jay Larson . 
Robert Burke, '30 . 
Leslie Molloy. *31 
Chris Poppelreiter, 
Robert Doolev, '32 



31 



Faculty Director 
Graduate Manager 
Secretary- 
Varsity Basketball Coach 
Freshman Basketball Coach 
Varsity Basketball Captain 
Basketball Manager 
Tournament Secretary 
Reception Chairman 
Ticket Sales 
Transportation Chairman 
Varsity Football Coach 
Head Line Coach 
Backfield Coach 
Football Co-Captain 
Football Co-Captain 
Football Manager 



QSQS 



THE 1931 LOYOLAN 




INTERCOLLEGIATE 
AND INTRAMURAL SPORTS 




Robert Morris, A.B. 
Graduate Manager 



Cornelius Collins, '31 Freshman Football Coach 

Joseph Tigerman .... ... Track Coach 

Daniel F. Maher, "33 Track Manager 

Richard Thompson ..... Swimming Coach 

Jerome Gottschalk, '32 ..... Swimming Captain 

Gerald Heffernan ....... Boxing Coach 

Joseph Lukitsch, '32 ...... Boxing Captain 

Harry Wolfe, '34 . . .... Boxing Manager 

Thomas O'Neill. '32 . Track Captain. Co-Manager Intramurals 
Merlin Mungoven, *32 . . Co-Manager Intramural Sports 

Paul A. Martin, '28 LTniversity Publicity Director 

Aloysius Hodapp . . ..... Tennis Coach 

George Zwikstra, "32 ...... Tennis Captain 

Edward Hines. '32 .... . . Tennis Manager 

Lee Bradburn, "32 Golf Coach 

Julian D'Esposito, '32 ...... Golf Captain 



BElEii 



BREMNER DOOLEY LINKLATER MUNGOVEN 



THE 1931 LOYOLAN 




ADMINISTRATION 



<j£&i 



Tlie faculty of Loyola comprises approxi- 
mately five hundred teachers. This total in- 
cludes department heads, professors, instruc- 
tors, and teaching fellows. 

The Jesuit fathers while directing the Uni- 
versity are in a considerable minority. Their 
activities are confined chiefly to the Lake Shore 
Campus and the Downtown College and to the 
directing of the moral and spiritual needs of 
the students in the professional schools. 

No restrictions in the matter of religious 
preferences are placed; some of the most out- 
standing members of the facultv are non- 
Catholics. 

Approximately two hundred alumni are en- 
gaged in teaching capacities by the University. 





B or tfje greater glorp of <fcod— 3d Valorem Dei aioriam— is 
tfte portent of tfje "&a@.D.<£>."on tbe familp crest. 

SDn tfte CInitoersitp seal tfte same 9.90.D.&. is an aspiration and 
a pledge for tbe classes of t&fs pear and for tfcose following. 




GRADUATES 




'"Any other message or expression of con- 
gratulation to the members of the Senior Class 
of nineteen thirty-one on their graduation than 
one of sincere God-speed would be to my mind 
very inappropriate. 

The purpose of your collegiate courses was 
not so much the acquiring of a fund of knowl- 
edge, but rather the appreciation of principles 
of knowledge which must now be applied; 
it was not so much the sum total of credits in 
the various branches you have followed, as 
rather the application of self to the ideals of 
being a credit to God, in your devoted lives, 
a credit to your fellow-men in the charity with 
which you meet all and with which you weigh 
all, a credit to yourselves in the personal re- 
sponsibilities which you have assumed of ''re- 
storing all things in Christ." 





Baccalaureate Speaker, 1930. 




ana 



MURPHY LARDNEB LOWREY 

ARTS COMMERCE DAY LAW 



President 


Robert Murphy . 


. John I. Lardner 


. William Lowrey 


J ice-President 


Joseph Mooter 


. James Scott 


. Alfred Cassiday 


Secretary 


Anthonv Tomczak 


. Adam Norris . 


. Frank McDonough 


Treasurer . . 


Walter Durkin 


. Owen McGovern 


. Henry E. Wilhelm 



DENTAL SCHOOL 

President Walter A. Buchmann 

Vice-President Arthur Hewitt 

Secretary Harry 0. Walsh 

Treasurer John C. Schmidt 

BUCHMANN 

MEDICAL SCHOOL 

President Richard H. Lawler 

Vice-President Rocco Fazio 

Secretary Kathryn Lavin 

LAWLER 

EVENING LAW SCHOOL 

President J. A. Farrell 

Vice-President Francis Conlon 

Secretary and Treasurer . . . Edmund F. Cloonan 

FARRELL 

SCHOOL OF SOCIOLOGY 

President Coletta Hogan 

lice-President Mary Callanen 

Secretary Margaret Butler 

Treasurer Anne Mclnnis 

HOCAN 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 




ST. ANNE'S 



ST. BERNARDS 



Bertha Miller . . . Mary Nolan 

Esther Schnauhelt . Agnes Campbell 

Annabelle Sullivan . Helen Barrett . 

Kathryn Strubbe . . Ruth Cramer . 



COLUMBUS 

Sophia Guerrini . President 

Vice-President 

Victoria Damata . Secretary- 
Treasurer 




ST. ELIZABETHS 

Helen Golatka President 

Mary Christiaens V ice-President 

Lucille Wisniewski Secretary 

COLATKA 

MERCY 

Frances Erickson President 

Felicia Juska Vice-President 

Emma Finkeldei .... Secretary and Treasurer 

ERICKSON 

OAK PARK 

Agnea Ptaszek President 

Estelle Homan J ice-President 

Ellen Herald Secretary and Treasurer 

PTASZEK 

JOHN B. MURPHY 

Elizabeth Brett President 

Alice Maher Vice-President 

Margaret Grab Secretary 

Margaret Fruin Treasurer 

BRETT 



Sg^rgSgt 



THE 1931 



L O Y O L A N 




Thomas Francis Ahearn. 
B.S., M.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
<S>MX, IIKE, Seminar, Moor- 
head Surgical Seminar 
Entered from St. Ignatius 
High School. Class Vice 
President 1. Glee Club 1, 
Choral Society 4. 

Chicago, Illinois 

Anthony James Alle- 
cretti, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
MI2, AP 

Entered from McKinley 
High School. 

Chicugo, Illinois 



im Albi, 



Raphael Willi 
B.S. 

Master of Science 
*BLT 

Entered from Gonzaga Uni- 
versity and Gonzaga High 
School. Assistant Chem- 
istry 2. Fellow in Physi- 
ology 2. 

Portland. Oregon 

David Albert Anderman, 
A.B., B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
*AK 

Entered from University of 
Alabama and Boys High 
School. Dance Committee 1. 
Student - Faculty Banquet 
Committee 2. 

Brooklyn, New York 




Alice Kathryn Arbuckle 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Pine Village 
High School. 

Pine Village, Indiana 



Kate Lee Atkins 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Cedar Bluff 
High School, Cedar Bluff, 
Alabama. 

Gavlesville, Alabama 




Charles Lee Armincton 

Doctor of Medicine 
*Bn, nKE, AP, Blue Key- 
Entered from University of 
Notre Dame, University of 
Indiana, and Anderson High 
School. 

Anderson. Indiana 



Doct, 



olas Joseph Balsamo, 
/ Medicine 



Entered from Austin High 
School Intramural Basket 
Ball 3. Manager of Bowling 
Team 1. 

Chicago. Illinois 




\ndrevv M. Barone 

Bachelor of Science 
[MS 

Entered from Ohio North- 
ern University and James- 
own High School. 
Jamestown, Neiv York 



David James Barry 

Bachelor of Law 
Entered from St. Mel's High 
School. Tennis 1, 2. Stu- 
dent Council 5. 

River Forest. Illinois 



Helen Marie Barrett 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Mercy High 
School. 

Chicago. Illinois 



Isabelle Margaret Barry. 
B. Mus. 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from American 
Conservatory of Music and 
St. Mary's Academy. 

Chicago, Illinois 



THE 



9 3 1 



L O Y © L A N 



&Si»8&^1 




Margaret Kathryn Barry 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Academy of 
Our Lady. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Dorothy Louise Bass 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Greenville 
High School. 

Greenville, Illinois 



Mary Elizabeth Barry 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Mercy High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Mary Cecelia Beam 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from Chicago Nor- 
mal College and Providence 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 




\\ 111 i am Eim \R[> 



achelor of Law 



Entered from North High 
School, Akron, Ohio. 
Chicago, Illinois 



Robert Francis Berry 
Bachelor of Science i 
Medicine 

AAr, *X. AP 

Entered from Loyola J 




John Virgil Belmont, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
IMS, nKE 

Entered from Crane College 
and Harrison Technical 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Mary Ellen Bieth 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Convent High 
School. Sodality. 

Fairmont. Minnesota 



Leanora Kathryn Black Genevieve C. Blattie 
Registered Nurse Registered Nurse 

Entered from St. Mary's Entered from Convent High 

High School, Portland, Me. School. 

Lancaster, Pennsylvania Fairmont. Minnesota 



Marie Farley Boland 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from Chicago Nor- 
mal College, DePaul Univer- 
sity, University of Chicago, 
and Providence Hieh School. 
Chicago, Illinois 



Elizabeth Mary Brett 
Registered Nurse 
W aterjord, Ireland 




3©BS^^ 



THE 



19 3 1 



L O Y O L A N 



£-jzr^?».*£ jz**?** ,0 



M\rie Rose Brombos 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from St. Mary': 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 

Stanley Brownstein 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine 

♦AK, Seminar 

Entered from Crane Junioi 

College and Crane Techni 

cal High School. 
Chicago, Illinois 



Ann Brown, L.L.B. 

Bachelor of Philosopy 
Entered from DePaul Uni- 
versity and McKinley High 
School. 

Chicago. Illinois 



John Kinc Bruun 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
1'ZA, BIT. *AP, Blue Key 
Entered from Oak Park 
High School. Loyola News 
1, 2, 3. Editor-in-Chief 4. 
Student Council 4. Sock and 
Buskin Club 2. 4. Business 
Mgr. 3. Debate Club 1. 2, 
3. President 4. Traveling 
Team 3. Winner Freshman 
Debate. Loyolan 1, 2, 3. 
Naughten Debate 3. Intra- 
mural Athletic Mgr 1, 2. 
Oak Park. Illinois 




Daniel Joseph Buckley 

Bachelor of Law 
ITAA, AO* 

Entered from Lovola Acad- 
emy. Class Vice-Pres. 1, 2, 
3. Secretary 4. Loyola 
Union 3. Sodality 1, 2. In- 
tramural Basket Ball 4. De- 
bate 4. 5. N. C. B. T. 1. 2, 
3. Band 3. 

Chicago. Illinois 

Henrietta Dolores 

BuRKART 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from St. Xavier 
Academy, Ottawa, Illinois. 

Bureau. Illinois 




Emil Jerry Bunvta, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
Entered from Crane Junior 
College and Harrison Tech- 
nical High School. 

Beruiyn, Illinois 



Ethel Fitzpatrick Burke 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from St. Francis 
Xavier Art Studio and St. 
Francis Xavier Academy, 
Chicago. 



Lemont, Illinois 




Robert E. Burke 

Bachelor of Law 
Monogram Club 
Entered from Wautoma 
High School, Wautoma, 
Wis. Football 1, 2. 3, 4. 
Basket Ball 1. 

Chicago. Illinois 



Sarah Mary Burns 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from Chicago Nor- 
mal College and St. Eliza- 
beth High School. 
Chicago. Illinois 



Catherine Veronica Burns 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Immaculata 
High School. 

Chicago .Illinois 



Sabrina L. Bush 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from N. Manches- 
ter, Indiana High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



THE 



9 3 



LOYOLAN 




Margaret Ann Busse 
Registered Nurse 

Entered from Marathon 

High School. 

Marathon. Wisconsin 



Gaetano Testasecca 
Blttice 

Buchelor of Science in 

Medicine 
Entered from the Univer- 
sity of Florida, Fordham 
University, and Hillshor- 
ough High School. 

Tampa, Florida 



Evelyn Mareit\ 
Bltterbvch 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Joliet Hi 
School. 

Joliet. Illinois 



Helen L. Button, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
N2*, AP 

Entered from University of 
Pennsylvania. University of 
Wisconsin, Harvard Univer- 
sity, and Nicholson High 
School, Nicholson, Pa. Class 
Secretary 2, 3. 

Scranton, Pennsylvania 



M Adeline Catherine 
Byanskie 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from St. Joseph 
High School. 

Garrett. Indiana 



S. Raymond Cafaro 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine 

Entered from Crane Junior 

College and McKinley High 

School. 

Youngslown, Ohio 




George Cada, 
oj Medicine 



Edward 
M.S. 
Doctoi 

Entered from Lewi 
tute and Morton 
School, Cicero, 111. 
ical Research Cluh. 
Berwyn, Illinois 



Insti- 

High 
Med- 



Ailee.n Winifred Callahan 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Chaffey High 
School, Ontario, Calif. 

Hancock. Michigan 



Mary Callanan 

Buchelor of Philosophy 
Entered from Chicago Nor- 
mal, Northwestern Univer- 
sity, and St. Mary's High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Ciriaco Garcia Camean 

Doctor oj Medicine 
Entered from Crane Colleg 
and Vigan High School. 
Cagayan, Philippine 
Islands 



Peter Dennis Caloger 

Bachelor of Law 
Entered from Northwestern 
University and Senn High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Ann Cabmelita Campagne 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from Chicago Nor- 
mal College and Academy 
of Our Lady. 
Chicago, Illinois 




THE 1931 LOYOL AN 



Acnes Henrietta Campbell 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Niall Mor 
School, Ireland. 

Chicago. Illinois 



Donald G. Carlson 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine 

Entered from Oregon State 

College and Lincoln High 

School. 

Portland. Oregon 



Mary An^statia Campion 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from St. Mary's 
Academy, Nawnoo, 111. 

Camp Grove. Illinois 



Edw vrd \Velsby Carman 

Bachelor of Science 
Entered from St. John's Col- 
lege and Waite High School. 
Toledo. Ohio 




Raymond Francis Carmody 
Doctor of Medicine 

*rm 

Entered from Marquette 
University and Sturgeon 
Bay High School. 

Sturgeon Bay. W isconsin 



Alice E. Carufel 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from New Rich- 
mond High School. 

Somerset. W isconsin 




Thomas Bernard Carney - , 
B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine 
*MX, *X. TIKE, AP 
Entered from Kewanee 
High School. Class Presi 
dent 1. 

Keicunee. Illinois 



Alfred Joseph Cassiday 
Bachelor of Law 

Entered from Joliet High 



Joliet. Illinois 




.M. 



E. Frank Castaldo. 

Doctor of Medicine 
IM2, IIKE, AP 
Entered from Crane College 
and Crane Technical High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Ethel Althea <!h\pma> 
B.S.M. 

Master of Science in 

Medicine 



Entered from Crani 
College and Elgii 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



High 



Mary Lee Cwanauch 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Superior State 
Teachers' College and Black 
Earth High School. Sodality 
1, 2, 3. 

Black Earth. Wisconsin 



Mary Emeily Christiaens 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Waukegan 
High School. Sodality 1, 2, 
3. Class Secretary 1, 2, 3. 

Waukegan, Illinois 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 




Leo A. Chryanowski 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine 
II M* 

Entered from Joliet Junior 
College, University of Wis- 
eonsin, and Joliet Township 
High School. 
Joliet. Illinois 

Mary Louise Clark 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from St. Charles, 
III. High School. 

St. Charles. Illinois 



Margaret Mary Clarke 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Visitation 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Dorothy Mary Clyde 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Notre Dame 
McDonnell Memorial High 
School. 

Chippewa Fulls, tt'is. 




Thomas Francis Cole 

Diploma in Commerce 
ZAB, Blue Key 
Entered from Loyola Acad- 
emy. Loyola News 3, 4. 
Class Treasurer 2. Secre- 
tary 3. Loyolan. 3, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois 

Cornelius John Collins 

Doctor of Law 
IIAA, Blue Key 
Entered from St. Ignatius 
High School. Class Presi- 
dent 1, Treas. 2, Sec'y 3. 
Law President 1, 2. Foot- 
hall 3, 4, Capt. 5. Sodality 
1, 2. N. C. B. T. 2, 3, 4, 5. 
Intramural Basket Ball 4. 
Law Dehate Council 4, 5. 
Glee Club. Band 3. Fresh- 
man Coach 6. 

Chicago. Illinois 




Alice Louise Collins 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from La Porte High 
School. 

La Porte, Indiana 



James D. Collins, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
*BIT, IIKE, Seminar. Moor- 
head Surgical Seminar 
Entered from University of 
Dayton and Central Catholic 
High School. 

Toledo. Ohio 



Mary Catherine Collins 

Bachelor of Science 
Entered from Chicago Nor- 
mal College and Loretto 
Academy. 

Chicago. Illinois 



Dorothy Cooney 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from Oshkosh Nor 
mal, Oshkosh, Wis., and 
Manitowoc High School. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Francis Patrick Conlon, 
A.B. 

Doctor of Law 
*K, <I>AA 

Entered from University of 
Illinois and McKinley High 
School. 

Chicago. Illinois 



John Francis Copp 

Bachelor of Science 
Entered from Rutland High 
School. Varsitv Football 2, 




3, 4. 



Rutland. Illinois 



^^ 



THE 1931 



LOYOLAN 



£.' -J"Zr*?y& d*7r *+'S 



Ann Joan Coscrave 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from St. Xavier's 
Academy, Ottawa, Illinois. 

Granville. Illinois 



Ch uu.es Lewis Coyle, B.S. 

Master of Science 
*X 

Entered from Morton Junior 
College, Lewis Institute, and 
Morton High School. Stu- 
dent Fellow 4. 

Benvyn. Illinois 



Harry Cotell, B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine 
Entered from Crane College 
and Jewish People's Insti- 
tute. 

Chicago. Illinois 



Ruth Josephine Cramer 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from West Allis 
High School, West Allis 
Wisconsin. 

West Milwaukee, Wis. 




2 



£ 



Francis Chow lev 



An 

Jr. 

Bachelor of Law 
.AG* 

Entered from St. Mel's High 
School. Sodality 2, 3, 4. 
Philosophy Cluh. 

Chicago. Illinois 



George Philip Cullen 
Bachelor of Science in 
Commerce 

Entered from St. Ignatius 

High School. 
Chicago. Illinois 




Gertrude Mary Crowley 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Mercy 
Convent. 

County Clare, Ireland 



James E. Curry 

Bachelor of Law 
*MX, A9* 

Entered from St. Ignatius 
High School. Class Presi- 
dent 2. Junior Prom Com- 
mittee 3. Loyolan 4. 

Chicago, Illinois 




Hugo T. Cutrera. B.S. 

Bachelor of Science in 

Medicine 

IS 
Entered from Northwestern 
Military and Naval Acad- 

Oak Park, Illinois 



iDWAHD Francis Daley 
Bachelor of Law 

Entered from St. Mel's High 



Chicago. Illinois 



John Frances Czyzewski 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine 

ITM<!>, Seminar 

Entered from Crane Junior 

College and Lane Technical 

High School. 
Chicago. Illinois 



Edmund Bernard Daly 

Bachelor of Law 
Entered from Chicago Nor- 
mal College and Tilden 
Technical High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



THE 



9 3 



loyolan >as^saasg 




Dellj 



Catherine Theres 
Maria 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Waller High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Malrine Elizabeth 
Dickson 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from St. Thomas 
the Apostle High School. 

Chicago. Illinois 



John Joseph Donahue 

Bachelor of Law 
Entered from Columbus Col- 
lege, Sioux Falls, South 
Dakota. 

Oakland, California 



Margaret N. Donovan 

Bachelor of Philosophy- 
Entered from Chicago Nor- 
mal College and Englewood 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Victoria D'Amata 

Registered Nurse 

Entered from Jewish 

People's Institute. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Jocendra Mohan Datta, 
B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
Entered from Crane Junior 
College, University of Cal- 
cutta, University of South 
Dakota, and University of 
Chicago. 

Calcutta, India 



22 



Bernadine Catherine 
Donovan 

Registered Nurse 
St. Mary's High School. 

Eminetshurg, Iowa 



Edward Thomas Doolinc 
Diploma in Commerce 

Entered from Indiana Uni- 
versity and Hobart High 
School. 

Hobart, Indiana 



Frances Ghacei.da 
Dargella 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Nokomis 
Township High School. 

Nokomis. Illinois 



Theeea Veronica I 
Registered Nurse 
Chicago, Illinois 



Edna Devlin, LL.B. 

Muster of Law 
Entered from St. Catherine's 
Collegiate Institute, Toronto 
University, Northwestern 

University and St. Cather- 
ine's High School of To- 
ronto, Secretary-Treasurer 
1, 2, 3, 4. 

Chicago. Illinois 

Mvrtin Aloysils Dolan, 
B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
AP 

Entered from Columbia Col- 
lege and Prairie du Chien 
High School. 

Prairie du Chien. W is. 






THE 1931 



L O Y O L A N 



raggfesaa^a 



Bernadette L. Dorsey 
Bachelor of Philosophy 

Entered from Barat College 

and Sacred Heart Academy. 

Delia Strada Sodality 3, 4. 

Class Secretary 2. 
Chicago. Illinois 



Douglas John Doyle 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine 

Entered from Marquette 

University and Delavan 

High School. 

Delavan, Wisconsin 



Mary Vesper Downs 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Willow Lake 
High School. 

Willow Lake, S. D. 



Joseph Stephen Drabanski, 
B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine 

mi* 

Entered from University of 
Chicago and Weber High 
School. Intramural Basket 
Ball 2, 3. 

Chicago. Illinois 




Blanche Marcurite 
Driscoll 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Antig' 
School, Antigo. Wis. 

Sheboygan, W'iscor, 



John Casimir Dubiel, B.S. 
Doctor of Medicine 

mi* 

Entered from St. Ignatius 
High School. 
Chicago. Illinois 




Hazel May Driscoll 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Antigo High 
School, Antigo. Wis. 

Sheboygan, Wisconsin 



Lois Camille Dunn 
Registered Nurse 

Entered from Mon 

High School. 

Chicago. Illinois 




John Russell Durburc 


Walter Joseph Durkin 


Bachelor of Science in 


Bachelor of Science in 


Medicine 


Commerce 


AA1", Monogram Club 


Entered from Loyola 


Entered from St. Ignatius 


Academy. 


High School. Football 1, 2. 


Chicago, Illinois 


Basketball 1, 2. 3. 4. Class 


President 3. 




Chicago. Illinois 




Joseph Francis Ecan 


Leon S. Eisenman 


Bachelor of Philosophy 


Bachelor of Science in 


Entered from Georgetown 


Medicine 


University and Lovola 


*AK 


Academy. 


Entered from Crane Junior 




College and Crane Techni- 




cal High School. 




Chicago, Illinois 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y © L A N 




Robert Edwin Ei.mot, B. 
Doctor of Medicine 



Entered from Lewis Insl 
tute, DePaul University, an 
Marshall High School. 
Chicago. Illinois 



Frances Dunne Erickson 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from St. Mary's 
High School. Sodality. Glee 
Cluh. 

Chicago. Illinois 



Paul H. Encle, A.B. 

Bachelor oj Science in 

Medicine 
*X, AP, Blue Key 
Entered from Michigan State 
College and Lansing Central 
High School. 

Lansing, Michigan 



Theodore William Falke, 
B.S. 

Doctor oj Medicine 
<j>BII 

Entered from University of 
Dayton and University of 
Davton Prep School. Medi- 
cal Guild 2, 3, 4. 

Dayton, Ohio 




Arthur B. Farrar 

Bachelor of Law 
*AA 

Entered from DePaul Ur 
versity and Cape Girardes 
High School, Missouri. 

Tampa. Florida 



Peter Victor Fvzio 

Bachelor of Law 
SN$, Blue Key 
Entered from Lindhlom 
High School. Class Treas- 
urer 1. Law Debate Team 
2, 3. Intramural Basketball 
2, 3. Tennis 1, 2. Glee 
Club 1, 2. Sodality 1, 2. 
N. C. B. T. 1, 2, 3. 

Chicugo, Illinois 



Francis Joseph Feder 

Bachelor of Arts 
Entered from St. Mary's 
Seminary and Quigley Prep. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Mary E. Fenton 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from Normal Col- 
lege and St. Elizabeth High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois 




Nello Michael Felicelli 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine 

IMS 

Entered from St. Ignatius 

High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Americo James Ferlita 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine 
*BII, SI, Monogram Club 
Entered from University of 
Florida and Sacred Heart 
High School. Football 1, 
2, 3. 

Tampa, Florida 



James Alovsius Farrell 

Bachelor of Law 
AG* ■ 

Entered from St. Mary of 
the Lake Seminary and 
Quigley Prep. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Rocco John Fazio, B.S.M. 
Doctor of Medicine 



Entered from Lin< 
High School. 
Chicago. Illinois 



J3S 



THE 1931 



Y © L A N 



Eugene Michael Fina? 
Bachelor of Arts 



Gertrude Anne Fillafer 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from West Division Entered from St. Ignatius 
High School High School 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin Chicago, Illinois 



V I mf «» "Owl 



Emma Elizabeth Finkeldei 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Effingham 
High School. Class Secre- 
tary 4. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Otto Herman Fischer. A.B. 

Bachelor of Arts in 

Medicine 
Entered from Northwestern 
University, Elmhurst Col- 
lege, and Bensenville High 
School 

Bensenville, Illinois 




Ann Zella FitzHlch 
Registered Nurse 

Entered from Providence 

High School 
Joliet. Illinois 
Coal City. Illinois 



Freda Fliege 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Springfield 
High School 

Springfield. Illinois 




Clarence Bryan Flanacan, 
B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
Entered from Michigan State 
Teachers College, University 
of Iowa, and Iron River 
High School 

Iron River. Michigan 



Thomas Patrick Fogarty 
Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from St. Ignatius 
High School. Sodality 1, 2, 
3, 4. Chairman Eucharistic 

Chicago. Illinois 



1M 




Catherine Marie Foley 
Bachelor of Philosophy 

Entered from Chicago i\"or- 

mal College and St. Mary's 

High School 

Chicago. Illinois 



Genevieve K. Fox 

Bachelor of Law 
Entered from Northwestern 
University, DePaul Univer- 
sity, and Senn High School. 
Class Secretary 1, 2 

Chicago, Illinois 



Joseph Andrew Forbrich, 

Ph.G. 

Doctor of Medicine 
Bachelor of Science 

#Bn, k* 

Blue Key, Moorhead Sur- 
gical Seminar 

Entered from University of 
Illinois, DePaul University, 
and DePaul Academy. Chair- 
man Medic Frolic 1. Loyola 
News 4. Class Treasurer 4 
Riverside, Illinois 

James Clement Fox 
Bachelor of Science 
Doctor of Medicine 
*X, AP Blue Key 
Entered from Columbia Col- 
lege, Marquette University, 
and Shullshurg High School 
Shullsburg, Wi, 



zs^sms&^L 



T H 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 




Mahcarete Lenore Frank 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Fond du Lae 
High School 

Fond du Lac. Wisconsin 



Cixili \ M. Frik 



Registered Nurse 



Clementine E. FraH 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine 

N£*, AP 

Entered from St. Xavier's 

College and Whiting High 

School 

ff hiling, Indiunu 



Sylvester Martin Frizol 
Bachelor of Science in 
Commerce 
Entered from La Salle-Peru 
High School. Sodality 2, 3, 
4. Loyola News, 3, 4 
Peru, Illinois 



Margaret Mary Frui 
Registered Nurse 
Chicago, Illinois 



Acnes Catherine 

Gallagher 

Registered Nurse 
Chicago, Illinois 




Herman Jo 



Fu. 



A.B., B.S.. Ph.G. 

Certificate in Medicine 
IMS 

Entered from Fordham Uni- 
versity, University of Cali- 
fornia, and Loyola High 
School, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Chicago, Illinois 

James Griffin Gali.acher 

Doctor of Medicine 
Entered from St. Viator Col- 
lege and St. Thomas Acad- 
emy 

Chicago, Illinois 



William Giardina Gardine. 
A.B. 

Bachelor of Science in 

Medicine 
A*A 

Entered from West Virginia 
University and Eastern Dis- 
trict High School 

Mollis, Long Island, N. Y. 

Andrew Cosmas Garvy 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine 
LTAA, Moorhead Surgical 
Seminar 

Entered from Loyola Acad- 
emy. Class Secretary 1. So- 
dality 1, 2. Track 1, 2 
Chicago, Illinois 



Monroe Joseph Garrison 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine 

4>MX, <i>X, Seminar 

Entered from St. Ignatius 

High School. Sodality 1. 2. 

Loyola News 1. Foothall 1 
Chicago, Illinois 



Charles Bernard Gawne, 
B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
*X, AP 

Entered from St. Ignatius 
High School. Dehating Cluh 
1. Class Treasurer 3 

Oak Park, Illinois 



fo m* 



THE 



19 3 1 



L O Y O L A X 



Elsie Ann Gennrich 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Josephinum 
High School. 

Chicago. Illinois 



Irene Elizabeth Gleason 
Bachelor oj Philosophy 
Entered from Chicago 
Teachers' College. DePaul 
University, and John Mar- 
shall High School. 
Chicago. Illinois 



Lewis Gustave Glueckauf, 
B.S. 

Bachelor of Science in 

Medicine 
Entered from University of 
Michigan and Senn High 
School. 

Chicago. Illinois 



Helen Dolores Golatka 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from St. Patrick'! 
High School. 

LaSalle, Illinois 



Helen Patricia Gleason 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Lake View 
High School. 

Chicago. Illinois 



Albert John Gloss 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine 

Entered from Crane College 

and Crane Technical High 

School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



212 




James Douglas Glynn, 
B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine 
Entered from Marquette 
University, Lewis Institute, 
and Mora High, Mora, Min- 
nesota. 

Duluth, Minnesota 

Dagoberto Ernesto 
Gonzalez, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
Entered from Joliet Junior 
College, Joliet. Illinois, and 
Callao High School, Callao, 
Peru, South America. 




Vincent Depaul Goonan 

Bachelor of Law 
Entered from DePaul Uni 
versity and DePaul Acad. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Laurence Edward Gouch, 

Bachelor of Science in 

Medicine 
Entered from University of 
Dayton and Dayton High 
School. 

Dayton, Ohio 



R \lph Lufkin Gorrell 

Bachelor of Science 
Entered from Association 
College, University of Illi- 
nois, Lewis Institute, and 
Bloom Township High 
School. 

Chicago Heights, Illinois 



Margaret Lenore Grab 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Spring Valley 
Public High School. 

Spring Valley, Wisconsin 



THE 



9 3 



LOYOLA!* 




Cassin Francis Graham 
Bachelor of Arts 

Entered from St. Mel's High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Geraldine Elizabeth 
Graziano 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Austin High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Samuel Thomvs Grai 
Bachelor of Science 
Commerce 

<p.MX 

Entered from Loyola 

Academy. 

Chicago. Illinois 



Helen Cecla Greene 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from St. Paul High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois 




Sallymae Dorothea 
Gregory 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from American Col- 
lege of Physical Education 
and Waukegan Township 
High School. 

Waukegan, Illinois 

Sophie Guerrini 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from St. Francis 
Academy. 

Marseilles, Illinois 




John Louis Grout 
Bachelor of Science 

Entered from Knox College 

and J. Sterling Morton High 

School. 

Bemvn, Illinois 



George Mienzel Gura. B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
AP 

Entered from Lisle College, 
Lisle University, St. Proco- 
pius College, and St. 
Thomas Seminary of Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

Southington, Connecticut 



Vincent Joseph Guzzetta 
Certificate in Medicine 

*BII 

Entered from Northwester! 

University, Marquette Uni 

versity, and North Divisior 

High School. 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 



Michael Patrick Hallin. 

Bachelor of Arts 
Entered from St. Ignatius 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Clara Louise Haas 
Registered Nurse 

Entered from Raub High 

School. 

Raul). Indiana 



Marcaret Adel Haltmeyer 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Immaculate 
Conception Academy of 
Dubuque, Iowa. 

McGregor, Iowa 




THE 193 



L O Y O L A X 



Marguerite Claire 
Halverson 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Immacuata 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Alexander S. Hartman 
Doctor of Medicine 

Entered from Marquette 

University. 

Milwaukee. Wisconsin 



Robert Joseph Healy 

Bachelor of Arts 
Azir, Blue Key 
Entered from St. Ignatius 
High School. Sodality 1, 2. 
Class Pres. 1. Vice Pres. 2. 
Vice-President of Student 
Council 4. Loyola News 3. 
Composer of School Song. 

Chicago. Illinois 

Rose Leoni Hechinger 
Diploma in Commerce 
Chicago, Illinois 



Ruth Mary Harney 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Vest Liberty 
Hieh School. 

West Liberty, Iowa 



Charles Mai 
B.S.M. 

Certificate 
Seminar 
Entered fron 



and MeKinley High 



tllte 

Sch< 

Chicago, III 




12 



Thomas James Healy 
Bachelor of Science 
Entered from DePaui Uni- 
versity and De La Salle In- 
stitute. Track Team 2, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois 



Edith Mary Hemphill 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Aquinas High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



-_H 1 


*— * 


Ellen Margaret Herald 


Katheryn Mary Herincer 


rwi 


*#HL* 


Registered Nurse 


Registered Nurse 


Im\ 


It 


—+ 


Entered from St. Mary Col- 
lege, Notre Dame, Indiana, 
and Chatsworth Township 


wL^WI 1 


IL^& 




High School. Sodality. 


mm\ 


hn 


1 


Chatsworth, Illinois. 


- J||» t 


~~^H| 


Mildred Bertha Hermann 


Frank William Hetreed 


3L- 


Tn , 


Registered Nurse 


Bachelor of Science in 


W^mi 


*• , i 


Joliet, Illinois 


Medicine 


f :j 


£. 


; 


Seminar, Blue Key 


Aki 


ii 


1 


Entered from Notre Dame 
University and Parker High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



T H 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 




Frederick Andrew 
Heupler, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 

<prsn 

Entered from University of 
Pittsburg and North Brad- 
dock High School. 

North Braddock. Penn. 



Paul Hletko 

Bachelor of Science 
Entered from University of 
Illinois and Argo High 
School. 

Summit. Illinois 



Joaqi iNA Hickman 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Nicholas Senn 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Maurice Michael 
Hoeltcen, B.S.M. 
Doctor of Medicine 

Entered from the University 
of Chicago and Cathedral 
High School. 

Duluth. Minnesota 




Frank Charles Hofrichter 
Bachelor of Science 

Seminar 

Entered from Crane College 

and Harrison Technical 

High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



John Lawrence Holleran, 
L.L.B. 

Master of Laic 

Entered from University of 
Illinois. Basketball 1, 2. 3. 
Chicago, Illinois 




Coletta Marion Hocan 
Bachelor of Philosophy 

rz_i 

Entered from Chicago Nor- 
mal College and Holy Child 
High School. Sock and 
Buskin Club 3, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois 

Louise Estelle Homan 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Washburn 
High School. 

Washburn, If isconsin 



Gerald Edward Hornidge. 
L.L.B. 

Master of Law 
Entered from St. Michael's 
College and Academy. Wi- 
nooski, Vermont. 

Bennington, Vermont 



Lillian Hoyne 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from Austin High 
School. 

Oak Park, Illinois 



Marian D. Hover 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Trinity High 
School. 

Winters, 



Albert Alvin Huba, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
AP 

Entered from University of 
Pittsburg and Butler, Penn- 
sylvania, High School. Med- 
ical Guild 1, 2. 

Lyndora, Pennsylvania 




T II 



19 3 1 



L O Y O L A X 



Maude Jane Huff 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Table Grove 
High School. 

Table Grove, Illinois 



Matthew Frederick 
Icnoffo, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
Seminar 

Entered from Crane Junior 
College and Lane Technical 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Louis Paul Ibelli, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
IMS 

Entered from New York 
University and Erasmus Hall 
High School. Medical Guild. 

Brooklyn, New York 



Bernice Izner. A.B. 
Doctor of Medicine 

Entered from the Univers 
of Wisconsin. 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 



BE3 

*2 



Elmer David James 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine 

*X, AP 

Entered from University of 

Detroit and Dixon High 

School. 

Dixon. Illinois 



Phyllis Kathleen Jesky 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Marinette 
High School. 

Marinette, Wi 




Samuel John Jelsomino 
Bachelor of Science 

IMS 

Entered from University of 

Buffalo and Hutchinson- 

Central High School. 
Buffalo. New York 



Joseph Herman Jesser 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine 

*AK 

Entered from Crane Junior 

College and Marshall High 

School. 

Chicago, Illinois 




Bernard James Johnston, 
B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
*Bn 

Entered from Duquesne Uni- 
versity and Duquesne Uni- 
versity High School. Med- 
ical Guild 1, 2, 3. 

I'ittsburg, Pennsylvania 



John William Jordan, 
Doctor of Medicine 
Chicago. Illinois 



Marguerite Mary Johnson 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Lowville 
Academy. 

Aldrich. New York 



Aniello Anthony Juliano, 
B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
*MX 

Entered from DePaul Uni- 
versity and St. Viator Acad- 
emy. 

Chicago. Illinois 



THE 1931 LOYOLAN 



MB 








Felicia Caroline Juska 


Joseph William 


■f® ^ 


Registered Nurse 
Entered from Loretto 
Academy. Sodality. Glee 
Cluh. 


Kadzewick, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
Entered from Campion Col- 
leg,- and St. Thomas High. 


Uli 


Chicago, Illinois 


Rockford, Illinois 


^■B 


^^- 




Thomas Edward Kallal. 


Marion Joseph Khiiwri 


D 






B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
«IX 

Entered from Harrison 
Technical High. 

Chicago, Illinois 


Bachelor of Science 
Entered from St. Mary's 
College and Orchard Lake 
High School. Sodality 2, 3, 
4. Track 3. 4. 

Evanston, Illinois 


John Petes Kara 




William Peter Kearney. 


Bachelor of Science 
Entered from St. Mary's 
College and St. Mary's High 
School, Orchard Lake, Mich. 

Blue Island, Illinois 


**** 


A.B. 

Doctor of Lam 
Entered from University of 
jNotre Dame. Harvard Law 
School, and DePaul Acad- 
emy. 

Chicago. Illinois 


John Hacan Keehan, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
4>X. AP 
Entered from Mount Car- 


,. ■ ^ 1 * C :: 'B 


Bekniece Kathryn Keating 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Lockport 
High School. 


mel High School. 
Chicago. Illinois 




I 


* 


-. mm 


Lockport, Neiv York 




Donald Jeremiah Keating 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine 

AP, <J>X 

Entered from Crane College 

and Columbia Academy, 

Dubuque, Iowa. 
Chicago, Illinois 



Katherine Bernadine 
Kellaher 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Morbridge 
High School. 

Morbridge, South Dakota 



Cat hi- 



Elizabeth 
Keenan 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Mercy 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Nova Mary Kelly 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from St. Louis Con- 
vent. Monoghan, Ireland. 

Chicago, Illinois 



21 



THE 1931 



L O Y O L A A 



William Joseph Kelly 
Bachelor of Science 
Doctor of Medicine 
*MX 

Entered from Lewis Insti- 
tute, University of Chieago, 
and Batavia High School. 
Batavia, Illinois 



Mary McLean Kenner 
Registered Nurse 
Chicago. Illinois 



Mary M. Kenny 

Diplomu in Commerce 
Eiunston. Illinois 



Ray James Kiley 

Bachelor of Philosophy 

AAr 

Entered from De La Salle 
Institute. Circulation Mgr. 
Loyola News 2. Ass't Bus. 
Mgr. 3. Cross Countrv 
Track 2. 

Park Ridge. Illinois 



Lawrence Edmond Kei.sey, 
B.S.M. 

Certificate in Medicine 
KAP 

Entered from Butler Univer- 
sity and Monterey High 
School. 

Monterey, Indiana 



George Edward Kenny, 
A.B., B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine 
*Bn, AP, Moorhead Surgi- 
cal Seminar 

Entered from St. John's Col- 
lege and St. John's High 
School. 

Toledo. Ohio 



MM 

Em 




Ann A. Kerrican 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from Chicago Nor- 
mal College and Visitation 
High School. Glee Club 2. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Adam Anton Kindar 
Bachelor of Science 
A MA 

Entered from University of 
Chicago, Crane Junior Col- 
lege, and St. Mary's Insti- 
tute. 

Schenectady, New York 




Ann Kiysiak 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Kenosha High 
School. 

Kenosha. Wisconsin 



James Frank Koehleh 
Diploma in Commerce 

Entered from Loyola 

Academy. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Cyril Damon Klaus 
Bachelor of Science 
Doctor of Medicine 
*X, TIKE, AP, Blue Key. 
Moorhead Surgical Seminar 
Entered from Northwestern 
University and East High 
School. 

Green Bay, Wisconsin 

Gerald Joseph Kohne, 
Ph.G., B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine 
AP, 4>X, Moorhead Surgical 
Seminar 

Entered from Notre Dame 
University, Lewis Institute, 
and Decatur High School. 

Decatur, Illinois 



THE 



9 3 1 



L O Y O L A N 




Georce Fkank Kristan 
Bachelor of Science 

Entered from Crane Junior 

College and Crane High 

School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Otto George Kuchynka 
Bachelor of Science 

Entered from Crane Juni 

College and Crane Techi 

cal High School. 
Chicago. Illinois 



Van Walter Komasinski, 
A.B., B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 

nil* 

Entered from St. Mary's Col- 
lege, and Mt. Carmel High 
School. Loyola News 3, 4. 
American Medical Assn. 
Rep. 4. 

Chicago, Illinois 

Flavia Marie Koziczynski 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Bowen High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois 






John Francis Konopa, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
APfi, ITM* 

Entered from Weber High 
School. Loyola News 3, 4. 
Intramural Basketball 2, 3. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Doctor of Medicine 
*X, AP 

Entered from St. Joseph's 
College. Tennis 1, 2. In- 
tramural Basketball 1, 2. 

Chicago. Illinois 



George Francis Kruszka 

Bachelor of Science 
Entered from Crane College 

and I in. II. I.. hi High School. 
Chicago. Illinois 



John Thomas Kufta 
Bachelor of Science 

Entered from Lisle College 

and Lisle High School. Lisle, 

Illinois. 
Bontoon, New Jersey 



Ann Marie Kundrat 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Waukegau 
Township High School 
W aukegan, Illinois 



Mildred Ann Lasner 
Registered Nurse 

Entered from Champaign 

High School 

Chicago, Illinois 



John Ignatius Lardner 
Diploma in Commerce 
SAB 

Entered from St. Ignatius 
High School. Class Vice- 
President 2. President 3, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois 



Kathryn Rose Lavin, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
AP, N2* 

Entered from Woman's 
Medical College, Marywood 
College, Scranton, Pa., and 
St. Patrick's High School. 
Class Sec'y 4. 

Olyphant, Pennsylvania 



"jfljj ft' 




THE 



1931 LOYOLAN 



Richard H. Lawler, B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine 
#X, AP, Moorhead Surgical 
Seminar, Blue Key 
Entered from University of 
Wisconsin, and University 
of Michigan. Class Pres. 4. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Evelyn Janet Lane 

Bachelor of Arts 
Entered from Chicago Nor- 
mal College and St. Joseph's 
Academy, Adrian. Michigan. 

Chicago. Illinois 



Martha Mararet 
LaMasney 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from St. Francis 
High School, Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin. 

Plain, W isconsin 

John Joseph Lannon 

Bachelor of Arts 
BIT 

Entered from St. Ignatius 
High School. Loyola Quar- 
terly 3, Co-Editor 4. Loy- 
olan 2. Lovola News 2, 3. 
Sodality 1, 2, Treasurer 3, 
Vice-Prefect 4. Intramural 
Basketball 2. Indoor Cham- 
pions 3. 

Chicago, Illinois 




John Maurice Leahy - , 
Ph.B., B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine 
*MX, *X. AP, Moorhead 
Surgical Seminar 
Entered from John Carroll 
University and St. Ignatius 
High School, Cleveland, 0. 

Tiffin, Ohio 




22* 


George Jacob Leibold. Jr. 
B.S.M., M.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
AP 

Entered from Loyola 
Academy 

Chicago. Illinois 

Theodore Leander Lescher 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine 
Entered from Crane Junior 
College and Crane Techni- 
cal High School. 
Chicago, Illinois 


William A. LeMire, Jr. 

Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine 
ZX, Seminai- 
Entered from University of 
Michigan and Escanaba 
High School. 

Escanaba. Michigan 




mm 








SB 


Herm \n Abraham Levy, Dorothy Josepha Lindsay 
B.S.M. Registered Nurse 

Doctor of Medicine Entered from Austin High 
4>AK, Seminar School. 
Entered from Crane Junior Q tl i. Park, Illinois 
College and Tulev High 
School. Class Vice-Pres. 3. 

Chicago. Illinois 

Ronald James Lindsay, Maria Margarette LoGalbo 
B.S.M. Bachelor of Science 

Doctor of Medicine Entered from Lewis Insti- 
*X AP, Blue key. Moor- De p aul UniversitV; 
head Surg.cal Semmar „„,, Va|ler Hi h Sfhool . 
Entered Irom I niverMtv ol . . 
Wisconsin and St. Mel's High Chicago, Illinois 
School. Class President 3. 

Oak Bark, Illinois 









m^s^ss^sm riY 



9 3 



L O Y O L A X 




Vivian Mary Losinski 
Registered Nurse 
Trempealeau:, Wisconsin 



Elmer Joseph Lukats, 
B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine 
Entered from Notre Dame 
University and Froebel 
High School. 

Gary, Indiana 



William Pall Lowhey, 
Ph.B. 

Doctor oj Law 
IIAA, AO* 

Entereil from De La Salle 
High School. Band 1, 2. 
Sodality. Class Pres. 3, 
Class Vice-Pres. 2. 

Joliel, Illinois 

Joseph John Lukitsch 
Bachelor of Science in 
Commerce 
$MX 

Entered from St. Bede Col- 
lege Academy, Peru, Illinois. 
Sodality. Track 3. Foot- 
hall 3. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Marcaret Elizabeth Lynch 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Villa De 
Chantal High School, Rock 
Island, Illinois. 

Strann. Illinois 



Edw uu> Stanislaus 
Maciejewski 

Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine 

mi* 

Entered from Lewis Insti- 
tute. Crane College, and St. 
Stanislaus High School. 
Chicago, Illinois 







Willi \\i Joseph Lynch 

Doctor of Law 
Entered from Englewood 
High School. Class Pres. 2. 
Law Dehating Council. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Andrew J imes M \<.i ire. 
A.B., B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine 
Entered from Loyola 
Academy. 

Wilmette, Illinois 



Alice Mary Maher 
Registered Nurse 
Entered from Brimfield 
High School, Brimfield, 
Peoria. Illinois 



Anne Mae Malinoski 
Registered Nurse 

Entered from Walker 

School. 

Washburn, Wisconsii 



Edward Michael Majews 

Bachelor of Law 
SN* 

Entered from Notre Dai; 
University and St. Ignati 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Lambert Francis 
Mammoser, A.B., M.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
<J>X, AP, Seminar 
Entered from Quincy Col- 
lege and Quincy High 
School. 

Chicugo. Illinois 







T H 



1931 LOYOL A N 



£j^xT?»:*& 3f7r*>'w0 



Alphonse Joseph Manikas 

Bachelor of Science 
Entered from Crane College 
and Harrison Technical 
High School. Class Treas- 
urer 2. Vice-Pres. 3. 
Chicago, Illinois 



Carl Albert Marquardt, 
A.B. 

Doctor of Medicine 
$BII 

Entered from University of 
Michigan and Elmhurst Col- 
lege. 

Sf. Joseph, Michigan 



Jerome Benedict 
Marciniak, B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine 
4>X, AP 

Entered from Crane Junior 
College, University of Chi- 
cago, and Bowen High 
School. Class Vice-Pres. 2. 

Chicago, Illinois 

Frances Joan Martin 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from the Academy 
of Our Lady. 

Chicago, Illinois 




Mary M. Martin 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from Fond du Lac 
High School, Wis. 

Chicago. Illinois 



Douglas McCabe 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
IIAA, nni, Blue Key 
Entered from Loyola Acad- 
emy. Sodality 1, 2, 3, Pre- 
fect 4. Sock and Buskin 
Club 1. Cheer Leader 4. 
N. C. B. T. Glee Cluh 1, 2. 
Band 1, 2, 3. Sec'y 1, Bus. 
Mgr. 2. Ciscora 2, 3. Pres 4. 
Student Council 4. 



Chicago, Illinois 



iU 





Delia Veronica McBride 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from St. Malachy't 
High School. 

Dundalk, Ireland 



Lila Margaret McCabe 
Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from Chicago Nor- 
mal College and Visitation 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



S^ 


P^il Edward McCarthy, 


Anne Patricia McDonnall 


jfk 1 


B.S.M. 


Registered Nurse 


"♦"-4 1 


Doctor of Medicine 


Entered from Kirksville, 


"— r J 


Entered from Notre Dame 


State Teachers College and 


w 


University, Indiana Univer- 


Novinger High School, Nov- 


* A*v 


sity, and Logansport High 




w 


School. 


Kirksville, Missouri 


JB 


Logansport. Indiana 






Frank J. McDonouch, Jr. 


Catherine Dorothy 






McGarr 






Registered Nurse 


^\ '■ 


Entered from University of 


Entered from St. Xavier 


5/H 


Illinois and Austin High 


Academy. 




School. 


Ottawa. Illinois 


J 


Chicago, Illinois 





THE 



9 3 



Y © L A N 




Anna Kelly McGinnis 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from Chicago Uni- 
versity and Calumet High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Kathleen Attracta 
McGoldrick 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from Crane Junior 
College, Chicago Normal 
College and Joseph Medill 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Edward Carrol McGivebN 

Bachelor of Arts 
Entered from Loyola Acad- 
emy, Sock and Buskin 3, 4. 
Loyola News 4. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Owen Patrick McGovern 

Diploma in Commerce 
SAB, Blue Key 
Entered from St. Patrick's 
Academy. Class Secretary 
2, 4. Vice President 3. Com- 
merce Club, Loyola Union. 
Chicago, Illinois 




M. Joseph McGrath 

Bachelor of Luw 
Monogram Club 
Entered from Bradley Col- 
lege and Spalding Institute. 
Basketball 2, 3. Football 3. 

Peoria, III. 



Agnes Patricia McGuire 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Mercy High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois 




Alice Margaret McGregor 

Bachelor of Philosophy- 
Entered from Chicago Nor- 
mal College and Providence 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Eileen Mara- McGuire 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from Chicago Nor- 
mal College and Mercy 
High School. Class Secre- 
tary 1. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Philip Raymond McGuire Philip J. McGuire, A.E 



Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine 

<i>Bn 

Entered from Lane Techr 
cal High School. 
Chicago, Illinois 



Mary Ellen McHugh 
Registered Nurse 

Entered from Loretto 

Academy. 

Chicago, Illinois 



B.S.M 

Doctor of Medicine 
*X, AP, Moorhead Surgical 
Seminai- 
Entered from University o 
Toledo and Libby High 
School. 
Chicago, Illinois 

Betty- Celeste McKirchy 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Mercy High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois 




THE 



19 3 1 



L O Y O L A N 






Mary Frances McNamara 
Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from Loretto Acad- 
emy. 

Chicago, Illinois 



John Henry McVeigh 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from St. Anthony's 
Seminary. 

Santa Barbara, Calif. 



Wayne Stephen 
McSweeney, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
♦MX, Moorhead Surgical 
Seminar 

Entered from Niagara Uni- 
versity and St. Thomas Higii 
School. 

Rockford, Illinois 

Helen Patricia Melrin 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from LaCrosse High 
School. LaCrosse, Wisconsin. 

Ferryville, Wisconsin 




Nicholas Michael Me* 
Bachelor of Science i 
Medicine 

IMS 

Entered from St. Patri 

High School. Glee Clu 
Berwyn. Illinois 



Bachelor 

Medicine 



Mickewici 
of Science 




seminar 

Entered from Seton 
College and Bayonne 
School. 

Bayonne. New Jerst 



Hall 
High 



£2 



Stephen J. Michuda 

Bachelor of Laws 
Entered from Armour Insti- 
tute of Technology and Fen- 
ger High School. 

Chicago. Illinois 



Bertha A. Miller 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Klemme High 
School, Klemme, Iowa. 

Norway, Iowa 




Hilda Amelia Miller 
Registered Nurse 

Entered from St. Joseph 

High School. 

Garrett. Indiana 



Mary Ames Minster 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from Chicago Nor- 
mal College and Holy Name 
High School. 

Chicago. Illinois 



Eva Catherine Milord 
Registered Nurse 

Entered from Visitation 

High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



John Francis Mironas 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine 
Entered from St. Bede Col- 
lege and St. Bita High 
School. Sodality 2. 
Chicago, Illinois 



THE 



9 3 1 



L O Y O L A \ 




Oliver Luther Mitchell Cornelius Joseph 

Bachelor of Science Molencraft 

Entered from Crane College Doctor of Medi, 



Engle 



sd High School. 



Joseph George Mondo 

Bachelor of Science 
AAS 

Entered from the University 
of Buffalo and Dunkirk 
High School. Glee Club 4. 
Choral Society 4. 
Buffalo, New York 



*BjI 

Entered from Lake Forest 
College and Central Y. M. 
C. A. 

Chicago, Illinois 

Rita Marie Moore 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Calumet High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois 




Joseph Albert Mooter 
Bachelor of Science in 
Commerce 
<JOIX 

Entered from Indiana State 
University and Wiley High 
School. Loyola News 3, 4. 
Debating Club' 3. Secretary 
Inter-Fraternitv Council 4. 
Class Vice-President 4. 



Terre Ha 



Imli, 



Alphonse Adam 
Moszczenski 

Bachelor of Science 
LTM*, AP 

Entered from Crane College 
and Tuley High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 




Michael Martin 
Morrissey, A.B. 

Doctor of Medicine 
Entered from Drake Univer- 
sity and West Des Moines 
High School. 

Des Moines, Iowa 



Julia P. Mowitt 

Registered Nurse 
Grinnell, Ioua 



Margaret Mary Mulcahy 

Bachelor of Art 
Entered from Chicago Nor- 
mal College and St. Eliza- 
beth High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Javne Dorothy Mulvey 
Registered Nurse 

Entered from Loretto 

Academy. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Mary Lucille Mullen 
Registered Nurse 

Entered from Polo High 

School. 

Polo, Illinois 



Daniel Reilly Murphy 

Bachelor of Arts 
<S>MX 

Entered from St. Ignatius 
High School. Class Pres. 2. 
Secretary Student Council 3, 
President 4. Lovola News 1, 
2, 3, 4. Editor Ho-Hum 3. 
Loyola Union 3, 4. Inter- 
Fraternity Council 3, 4. 

Chicago, Illinois 




THE 



3 1 



L O Y O L A N 



Dolores Coletta Murphy 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Visitation 
High School. Sodality. 

Chicago. Illinois 



Michel Richard Murphy 

Doctor of Medicine 
*Bn 

Entered from St. Mary's 
College, Winona, Minn., 
Marquette University, Cath- 
olic Central High School, 
Crand Rapids, Michigan. 
Grand Rapids, Michigan 



Richard C. Murphy, L.L.B. 
Master of Law 

ag* 

Entered from DePaul Uni 
versity and DePaul Acad. 
Chicago. Illinois 



Stanley Francis Murphy 

Bachelor of Arts 
Entered from St. Ignatius. 
Sodality 1. 2, 3. Philosophy 
Club 2. 

Chicago, Illinois 



II El 

~wr I 



Helen Ione Murphy 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Dixon High 
School. 

Dixon. Illinois 



Patronella Fi.< 
Murphy 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from St. John's 
Cathedral High School. 

Milwaukee. Wisconsin 





Louis Muzzicato, B.S. 

Bachelor of Science in 

Medicine 

Doctor of Medicine 
IMS 

Entered from Manhattan 
College and Evandcr Childs 
High School. 

New York, New York 

Pat F. Natale. A.B. 

Bachelor of Science 
A*A 

Entered from Ohio State 
University and Raven High 
School. 

Youngstown, Ohio 



Robert James Murphy 

Bachelor of Arts 
AAr, *AP, Blue Key 
Entered from Loyola Acad- 
emy. Class Vice-Pres. 1. 
Class Pres. 3, 4. Debating 
2, 3, 4; Sec'y 3. Loyola 
News 2, 3. Mgr. Tennis 
2, 3. 

Chicago. Illinois 

Behnadette Veronica 
Murray 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from Chicago Nor- 
mal College and St. Mary's 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Mary Eizabeth Myeks 
Bachelor of Science 
Entered from Chicago Nor- 
mal College and St. Ga- 
briel's High School. 
Chicago, Illinois 



Vircinia Acnes Navitzky 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Racine High 
School. 

Racine, 







Monica S. Needham 
Registered Nurse 

Entered from Escanab 

High School, 
Escanaba, Michigan 



Josephine Kathleen 
Neville 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from St. Mary's 
Academy. 

Clinton, Illinois 



Michael Peter Neri 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine 

IM2, Seminar 

Entered from Schurz High 

School. Sodality 2. 
Chicago, Illinois 



Tad Niemira 

Buchelor of Laws 
Entered from Central "Y" 
College, University of Illi- 
nois, and Tuley High School. 
Law Debate Council 2, 3. 

Chicago, Illinois 




Dominic Nicko 

Bachelor of Science in 

Medicine 
IMS 

Entered from Crane College 
and McKinley High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Acnes Mary Nohaya 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Bethlehem 
Academy. Sodality. 

Lonsdale, Minnesota 




Estelle Marie Noethe 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Patch Grove 
High School. 

Patch Grove. Wisconsin 



Mary Ann Nolan 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Nativity High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Lothar Louis Nurnbercer 

Buchelor of Arts 
Entered from Cornell Uni- 
versity and Loyola Acad- 
emy. Sodality 3, 4. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Veronica M. O'Brien 
Registered Nurse 

Entered from Kilboui 

High School. 
Kilbourn, Wisconsin 



Gabriel Emery Obester. 
A.B., B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine 
AP, *X 

Entered from Fordham Uni- 
versity, and Fordham Uni- 
versity Preparatory School, 
New York City. 

Elizabeth, New Jersey 

Ambrose Joseph 
O'Callachan 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from Georgetow 
University and Loyola 
Academy. 

Chicago, Illinois 




THE 



» 3 



L O Y O L A N 



J^S^»Bag«^i8E 



Cecelia Virginia O'Connor 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from St. Joseph's 
Academy. 

South Bend, Indiana 



Wilfred Takashi Ohta, 
B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine 
Entered from University of 
Hawaii and McKinley High 
School. 

Honolulu, Hawaii 



GeRALDINE CaRMELIA 

O'Connor 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from St. Joseph's 
Academy, Adrian, Michigan 

Chicago, Illinois 



Bridget Marie O'Neill 
Registered Nurse 

Entered from St. Joseph'; 

Academy. 

I'hilo. Illinois 




Elizabeth Theresa O'Neil 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Visitation 
High School. 

Chicago. Illinois 



Louis Francis Pahi.s 
Diploma in Commerce 



Entered from DePaul 
Academy. 



Chicago. Illinois 




Jennie Ellen O'Reilly 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from Chicago Nor 
mal College and Bloon 
Township High School. 
Chicago, Illinois 



Lucelle Mary Palmer 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Chatsworth 
Township High School. 

Chatsworth. Illinois 




Michael Joseph Parenti 
B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
IMS 

Entered from McKinley 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Pauline Acnes Pavik 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Sacred Heart 
High School. 

Pocahontas. Iowa 



Margaret Munro Paterson 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from Teachers In- 
stitute, Glasgow, Scotland. 
Chicago, Illinois 



Gladys Frances Pawleck. 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Villa de Chan- 
tal High School, Rock 
Island, Illinois. 

Arlington Heights, Illinois 



S^ — JHeT 



9 3 



LOYOLA* 




Nino Mario Pellf.ttieri, 
B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
Entered from Crane College 
and McKinley High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



John E. Petcoff, B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine 
4>X, AP, Moorhead Surgical 
Seminar 

Entered from the Univer- 
sity of Toledo and Waite 
High School. 

Toledo, Ohio 



Anthony P. Pefizia, B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine 
*X 

Entered from University of 
Florida and Hillshoro High 
School. 

Tampa, Florida 

Lawrence L. Phares 

Bachelor of Law 
Entered from St. Ambrose 
College and St. Mary's High 
School. 

Moline, Illinois 




Virginia Mary Pilling 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from St. Thomi 
High School, Rockford, 
Chicago, Illinois 



Edward Andrew Piszczek 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine 

mi*, AP 

Entered from LaSalle-Peru 
Junior College and High 
School. 

LaSalle. Illinois 




Anita Eva Pilotte 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Sacred Heart 
School. 

Fowler, Indiana 



Anthony Edward Polito. 
B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine 
IMS. nivE, Seminar 
Entered from University of 
Chicago and Engle 
High School. 

Chicago. Illinois 



i I 



Mary Martha Powers 
Bachelor of Philosophy 

Entered from Providence 

High School. 
Chicago, Illinois 



John James Prendergast, 
B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
*X 

Entered from Regis College 
and Regis High School. 

Pueblo, Colorado 



Helen Mary Pratt 
Registered Nurse 

Entered from St. Pa 

Academy. 

Momence. Illinois 



Mary Adele Prendergast 
Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from Chicago Nor- 
mal College and Innnacu- 
lata High School. 
Chicago, Illinois 




THE 1931 LOYOLAN 



^asgaaasifcgg 



Agnes Mary Ptaszek 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Lincoln Cor 
munity High School. 

Lincoln. Illinois 



Stanislas Francis 
Radzyminski, A.B., B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine 
TIM*, AP 

Entered from Western Re- 
serve University and Cen- 
tral Institute Prep. School. 

Cleveland. Ohio 



Inez Racine 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Gwinn High 
School, Gwinn, Michigan 

Flint. Michigan 

Robert James Rafferty 
Bachelor of Philosophy 
IIAA, BIT, Blue Key 
Entered from Bowen High 
School. Loyolan 1, 2, Loy- 
ola Life Editor 3, Editor-in- 
Chief 4. Quarterly 1, Sec- 
retarial Editor 2, Editor-in- 
Chief 3, Feature Editor 4. 
Loyola News 1, Asst. Sports 
Editor 2. Sodality 1, 2, 3, 
4. Interfraternity Council 
3, 4. Student Council -!. De- 
hating Club 1, 3. 4. N. C. 
B. T. Chairman Reception 
Committee 4. 




Jack H. Raider 

Bachelor of Science in 

Medicine 
$AK 

Entered from Crane College 
and Jewish People's Insti- 
tute. 

Chicago, Illinois 



George John Rau 

Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine 
*BIT, AP 

Entered from University of 
Dayton and Dayton Prepar- 
atory School. 
Dayton. Ohio 




Taft Claude Raines 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine 

Entered from St. Elizabeth's 

High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Richard G. Raysa 

Bachelor of Law 
AG* 

Entered from Morton Junior 
College, Crane Junior Col- 
lege, and Oak Park and 
River Forest High School. 
Golf Team 1, 2. 

Oak Park, Illinois 




Francis Alexander Reed 
Bachelor of Science 

AST. *X, Blue Key 

Entered from Campion High 

School. Lovola Union 3, 4. 

Sodality 1, 2. 
Chicago, Illinois 



William John Reidy, Jr. 

Bachelor of Science in 

Commerce 
Entered from University of 
Illinois and De LaSalle 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Paul Alan Reed 

Bachelor of Law 
ITAA, A9*, Bn 
Entered from Loyola Acad- 
emy. Loyolan, Art Editor 1, 
Feature Editor 2, 4. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Dorothea Louise Reimers 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Savanna 
Township High School. 

Savanna, Illinois 



T H 



9 3 



LOYOLAN 



2H 




Herman Renkoff, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
*AK, Seminar 
Entered from City College 
of New York, Columbia 
University, and DeWitt 
Clinton High School. 

New York, New York 

Ellen E. Riley 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Immaculate 
Conception Academy, Du- 
buque, Iowa. 

McGregor, Iowa 



Anna Lillian Rettberc 
Registered Nurse 
Peoria, Illinois 



Helfn Joan Riordan 
Registered Nurse 

Entered from Mercy 

School, Ireland. 
Chicago, Illinois 



High 




Joseph Gerard Robilotti. 
B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
IMS 

Entered from Manhattan 
College and Manhattan Prep 
School. 

New York, Neiv York 



Armando Justin Rotondi. 
B.S 

Doctor of Medicine 
IM2 

Entered from Lewis Insti- 
tute and St. Ignat 
School. 

Chicago. Illinois 



High 




Charles Thomas Roe, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
Entered from Crane College, 
Lewis Institute, University 
of Chicago, and St. Mary's 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Margaret Catherine R 
Registered Nurse 

Entered from St. Paul's 

High School. 
Adell, Illinois 



Agnes Mary Ryan 
Registered Nurse 
Chicago, Illinois 



Mary Sabo 

Registered Nurse 
St. Louis, Missouri 



Mary Loretta Ryan 

Bachelor of Philosophy- 
Entered from Chicago Nor- 
mal College and St. James 
High School. 
Chicago, Illinois 



Edward William Sachs. 
B.S.M., B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
SUM, *BLT 

Entered from University of 
Dayton, St. Xavier College 
of Cincinnati, and Univer- 
sity of Dayton Prep School. 
Sodality 2, 3, 4. Medical 
Guild 1. 2, 3. 

Dayton. Ohio 




THE 



19 3 1 



L O Y O L A N 



Beautina Saracino 
Registered Nurse 
Entered from Proviso 
Township High School. 
Melrose Park, Illinois 



Joseph Elias Sazam^ 
L.L.B. 

Master of Law 
Chicago. Illinois 



Theresa Gertrude Sarwin 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from St. Patrick 
High School. 

LaSalle. Illinois 



Martha Mary Schaumberc 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Mineral Point 
High School. Sodality. 

Mineral Point, Wisconsin 




Carl J. Scheribel, B.S.M. 

Certificate of Medicine 
IIKE, Seminar 
Entered from Crane Colle 
and Lake View High Schoc 
Class Treasurer 2. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Gvstave Francis Schmidt. 
Jr. 

Bachelor of Science in 

Medicine 

Entered from Northwestern 
University and Robinson 
High School. 
Robinson, Illinois 




George Herman 
Schlemmer, A.B. 

Bachelor of Science in 

Medicine 

Entered from University of 
Northwestern, Indiana Uni- 
versity, and Wabash High 
School. 

Wabash. Indiana 



Esther Marie Schnaubelt 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Josephinum 
High School. Class Vice- 
President 1, 2, 3. Glee Club 
3. Sodality 1, 2, 3. 

LaGrange, Illinois 




Benjamin Edward 
Schwarcz, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
<tAK, Seminar 
Entered from Armour Insti- 
tute, Crane College, and 
Crane Technical High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois 

John Francis Sears 

Bachelor of Law 
Entered from Mt. Carmel 
High School. 

Chicago. Illinois 



James Joseph Scott 

Diploma in Commerce 
2AB, Blue Key 
Entered from St. Ignatius 
High School. Class Treas- 
urer 3. Vice-President 4. 
President Student Council 4. 
Chicago, Illinois 

Anne Bertha Sender 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Hazle Town- 
ship High School, Hazle- 
town, Pennsylvania. 

Chicago. Illinois 



THE 



9 3 



L © Y O L A \ 







Frank Boniface Simon 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from Lewis Insti- 
tute and St. Viator Academy. 
Loyola Union 4. 
Chicago. Illinois 



Bermce Elaine Sitar 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from St. Benedict*; 
College, Minnesota. 

Joliet, Illinois 



Michael Sehio 

Bachelor of Science 

Medicine 
IMS, Seminar 
Entered from Crane 
College and McKinl 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



High 



Albert Iwao Shimamura, 
B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine 
Entered from University of 
Nebraska, University of 
Iowa, and Lincoln High 
School, Lincoln, Neb. 

Honolulu, Hawaii 



ELI 



John M. Sheeh \n 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from Chicago Nor 
mal College and St. John'' 
H:gh School, Cillege :lle 
Minn. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Thelma Mary Showers 
Registered Nurse 
Garrett. Indiana 




Fred I. Simon. L.L.B., B.S. 

Master of Law 
Entered from Northwestern 
University. 

Chicago. Illinois 



John James Smith 
Bachelor of Science in 
Commerce 
Entered from De LaSalle 
High School. Football 1, 2, 
3. 4. Basketball 2. 3. 4. So- 
dality 2, 3. 
Joliet, Illinois 



James Joseph Smlllen, 
B.S.M. 

Master of Science 
Entered from Crane Junior 
College and Lakeview High 
School. 

Chicago. Illinois 



Charles Allen Snyder 
Diploma in Commerce 

SAB 

Entered from Sumner High 

School. 

Sumner, Nebraska 



Joseph Norman Smyth, 
B.S. 

Buchelor of Science in 

Medicine 

Entered from University of 
Chicago and University 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 

Helen Marcaket Sobie 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from St. Mary-of- 
the-Woods Academy. 

Jasonville, Indiana 




THE 



9 3 



I. O Y O LAN 



Joseph Maurice Solon 

Bachelor of Laws 
T_Vi> 

Entered from Northwestern 
University and Nicholas 
Senn High School. Secre- 
tary Law Debate Council. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Inez Vernette Southerland 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Marinette 
High School. 

Marinette, Wisconsin 



Eucene Nicholas Sontag 
Bachelor of Philosophy 

Entered from Quigley 

Seminary. 

Chicago. Illinois 



Paul Nicholas Sowka 
Bachelor of Science i 
Medicine 

mi* 

Entered from Weber 1 
School. 

Chicago. Illinois 




Edwarc Louis Spam.ler. 
B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 



Entered from Toulon Hi 
School, Toulon, Illinois. 
Keicunee. Illinois 



William Blase Spiteri. 
B.S.M. 

Master of Science in 

Medicine 
IMZ 

Entered from De LaSall 
High School. Class Treas 
urer 2. 



Chicago. Illinois 




Thomas Luke Spelman 

Bachelor of Arts 
TZA, Bn 

Entered from St. Ignatius 
High School. Quarterly. 
Dramatic Editor 4, 5. Loy- 
ola News 1, 2. 3, 4, Feature 
Editor 5. Sock and Buskin 
1, 2, 3, Sec'y 4, 5. Debating 
Club 1, 2. Sodality 1, 2, 3, 
4, 5. 

Chicago, Illinois 

Melba Leone Steffen 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Immaculate 
Conception High School. 

Dubuque. Iowa 




Mary Josephine Stack 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Presentati 
Convent. Ireland. 

Chicago. Illinois 



Theresa Marie Steve 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from St. Augus- 
tine's Academy, Fort 
Wayne, Indiana. 

Huntington. Indiana 



Francis John 
Steinbrecher 

Bachelor of Science in 

Commerce 
BII 

Entered from Jasper Acad- 
emy, Jasper, Ind. Sodality 
1, 3, 4, Consultor 2. Loyola 
News 2, 3, Campus Editor 
4. Quarterly 2, Feature 
Editor 3, Co-Editor 4. Loy- 
olan 3, 4. 

Aurora, Illinois 

Ethelmae Stevens 
Registered Nurse 
Mishawaka, Indiana 



THE 



9 3 



Y O L A N 




Wilbur Franklin Stewart 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine 

Entered from Northwestern 
University and Big Rapids 
High Sehool. 
Flint, Michigan 

John Philip Strobel 
Bachelor of Science in 
Commerce 
IIAA 

Entered from Loyola Aead- 
emy. Varsity Track Team 
3, 4. Loyola News 3, 4. 
Chicago, Illinois 



Gertrude Mary Stockm/ 
Registered Nurse 

Entered from Effingha 

High School. 

Effingham, Illinois 



Chiim.f.y Strong, 



Doctor of Medicine 
AKK 

Entered from Marquetti 
University and St. John": 
Military Academy. 

Miluaukee. ft isconsin 




Kathryn Frances Strubbe 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Crystal Lake 
Community High School 

Chicago. Illinois 



Francis Michael Sullivan 
Bachelor of Science in 
Commerce 
Entered from Columbia Col- 
lege, Dubuque, Iowa, and 
Public High School of Ma- 
son City, Iowa. 
Chicago. Illinois 




Annvrelle E. Sullivan 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from State Teach- 
ers College, Duluth, Minne- 
sota, and Superior Central 
High School. 

Superior, Wisconsin 



Helen S. Sullivan 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Frankford 
High School. 

Frimkford, Ontario. Can. 



James Edward Sullivan 


Marcella Marie Sullivan 


^ ^_ 


Bachelor of Law 


Bachelor of Philosophy 


fft*" 


Entered from St. Rita High 


Entered from Chicago Nor- 


fi^ffil 


School. 


mal College and Providence 




Chicago. Illinois 


High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 


m 


Thomas Joseph Sullivan 


William Henry Sumpter 


IH9HH 


Bachelor of Law 


Bachelor of Law 


4kT 


A84> 


II KA 


cm^Hb k 


Entered from Loyola Acad- 


Entered from University of 


■*fH 


emy. Sodality 1, 2, Cross 


Illinois and Northwestern 




Country Team 2, Band 2, 


University. 


^^ 


Swimming Team 3, 4. 


Ccrmi. Illinois 


.^ * ^^±, 


Chicago, Illinois 




MA 





19 3 1 



L O Y O L A X 



£' ^5^»:*£ J f^xT?!'i r S 



Sylvia Anne Surges 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from Chicago Nor- 
mal College and Hyde Park 
High School. 

Chicago. Illinois 



Edward Joseph Sw\stek 
Bachelor of Science in 
Medicine 

Entered from Crane Junior 
College and Holy Trinity 
High School. 

Chicago. Illinois 



Virginia S. Tarlow, B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine 
XZ*, AP, Moorhead Surgi- 
cal Seminar Society 
Entered from Crane College, 
University of Chicago, and 
Tuley High School. 

Chicago. Illinois 



IsuiELLE Elizabeth Testa 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Mount Olive 
High School. Mount Olive, 
Illinois. 

Wilmington. Illinois 



Susan Blake Swanson, 
Ph.G. 

Bachelor of Law 
AAA. KBIT 

Entered from University of 
Iowa, and Fort Dodge High 
School, Iowa. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Fr v 



1!kk\ 



\RD IABAKjS 



Doctor of Medicine 
Entered from DePaul Uni- 
versity and Waller High 
School. 

Champaign. Illinois 



EM 








Anna Margaret Timmons 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from Chicago Nor- 
mal College and Aquinas 
High School. 
Chicago, Illinois 



Harvey John Tompkins, 
B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
AP 

Entered from Mount Carm 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Charlotte Beatrice Teders 
Registered Nurse 
Garrett, Indiana 



Mary Georcinia 
Thompson 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Harbor 
Springs High School. 

Harbor Springs. Mich. 



Anthony Casimir 
Tomczak 

Bachelor of Arts 

ltaa, Bn, nrai, 

Blue Key 

Entered from \Teber High 
School. Class Secretary 3, 
4. Student Council 3, Lov- 
ola News 1, 2, 4, Editor-in- 
Chief 3, Student Handbook 
Editor 4, Loyolan 1. Literary 
Editor 2, Quarterly 3, Busi- 
ness Manager 4, Debating 
Club 4, Glee Club 1, Delia 
Strada 1, 2, Sodality 1, 2, 3. 
Chicago. Illinois 

Robert R. Tracht, B. S. 

Master of Science in 

Medicine 
Entered from Wittenberg 
College, Lewis Institute, and 
East Technical High School. 

Cleveland, Ohio 



THE 



9 3 



LOYOLAN 




Harold Joseph Trapp 
BacKelor of Science in 
Medicin e 
*X, AP 

Entered from Bay City Ju- 
nior College and St. James 
Academy. 

Bay City, Michigan 



Joseph Thomas Twohey. 
B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
*X, AP, Blue Kev 
Entered from University 
\\ i.-ronsin and St. Ignati 
High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Exelia Victoria Treado 
Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from Northern 
State Normal College, Mar- 
quette. Michigan, and Public 
High School of Republic, 
Michigan. 

Chicago. Illinois 

Michael S. Vanecko 
Bachelor of Science 
GNE 

Entered from Ohio Northern 
University and St. Clairs- 
ville High School. 
Barton. Ohio 




Mae Ann Vanruska 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Antigo High 
School. 

Antigo, Wisconsin 



Fred Vincenti 

Bachelor of Science in 

Medicine 
IMS 

Entered from Crane College 
and Medill High School. 

Chicago. Illinois 




Cecilia Anna VerCauteren 
Registered Nurse 
West DePere. Wisconsin 



Marion Gertrude 

UuiLLATJME 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from Chicago Nor- 
mal College and St. Mary's 
High School. 

Chicago. Illinois 



John Joseph Waesco 
Bachelor of Science in 
Commerce 
Monogram Club. 
Entered from De LaSalle 
High School. Class Secre- 
tary 1. Varsitv Football 2, 3, 
4. Basketball 2, 3, Captain 4. 
Joliet, Illinois 

Matt A. Wagner 
Doctor of Medicine 

Entered from Marquette 
University and Public High 
School of Sheboygan, Wis. 
Cleveland. Wisconsin 



Joseph Nicholas Wagner 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
*AO, Monogram Club 
Entered from Iowa State 
College, St. Ambrose Acad- 
emy and Ottumwa High 
School. Law Debate Coun- 
cil 3. Varsity Basketball 
3, 4. 

Ottumwa, Iowa 

Ralph Curtis Wallin 
Bachelor of Science 

Entered from North Park 

College and North 

Academy. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Park 




THE 



19 3 1 



L O Y O L A N 



F3~rtt$&*&?m 



James Joseph Walsh 
Bachelor of Science 

*X 

Entered from Crane College 

and Crane Technical High 

School. 

Chicago. Illinois 



Gregory Roy Waters, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
Entered from Crane Junior 
College and Y. M. C. A. 
College of Liberal Arts. 

Chicago. Illinois 



J vcob Weinless, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
*AK 

Entered from New York 
University and Kordham 
University. 

New York City. N Y. 



Charles Clement West 
Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from St. Mary's 
College, Kansas, and Quig- 
ley Preparatory Seminary. 
Loyola News 3, Freshman 
Basketball 3, Swimming 
Team 4. 

Chicago. Illinois 



Aloysius Thomas 
Waszkowicz 

Bachelor of Science in 

Medicine 

nil* 

Entered from Crane College 
and Lindblom High School. 
Chicago. Illinois 

Charles Joseph Weigel 
B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
*MX, <S>X, AP, Blue Key 
Entered from St. Ignatius 
High School. 

River Forest. Illinois 



2 





Stephen Francis 
Witkiewicz, A.B. 

Doctor of Medicine 
LTM* 

Entered from John Carroll 
University and St. Ignatius 
High School. 

Cleveland. Ohio 

Margaret Frances Wolfe 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Ossian High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Paul Anthony Werthman, 
B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine 
*X, AP 

Entered from Regis College 
and Public High School of 
Bloomington, Illinois. 

Denver, Colorado 



John Henry Whaley, 
B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine 
<f>X, AP, Moorhead Surgical 
Seminar, Blue Key 
Entered from University of 
Wisconsin and Broadwater 
County High School of 
Townsend, Montana. Loyola 
Union 3, 4. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Florence Rose Witmeyer 


Bachelor of Philosophy 


Entered from Chicago Nor- 


mal College and Marinette 


High School. 


If aduatosa, Wisconsin 


Marcaret Mary Wolfe 


Registered Nurse 


Entered from St. Xavier's 


Academy. 


Ottawa. Illinois 



THE 



9 3 



L © Y O L A X 




Henry Elton Wilhelm 
Bachelor of Lmv 

Entered from DePaul Uni- 
versity and DePaul Acad- 
emy. Class Treasurer 3, De- 
bating Clul. 2, 3. 
Chicago, Illinois 



WlNSKUN.l 



Doctor of Medicine 
Entered from Crane College 
and Harrison High School. 

Chicago. Illinois 



Harris Raymond Wilson, 
B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine 
4>lin, Moorhead Surgical 
Seminar, nKE 

Entered from University of 
Santa Clara and Santa (Mara 
Preparatory School. 

San Jose, California 

Lucille Catherine 
Wisniewskj 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Washington 
High School. 

Two Rivers, Wisconsin 




Stephen Joseph Wojcik, 
B.S. 

Master of Science 

n)i* 

Entered from DePaul Uni- 
versity, Crane College, Cen- 
tral Y. M. C. A. College, 
Holy Trinity High School, 
and Central Evening Y. M. 
C. A. High School. 
Chicago, Illinois 

Helen Catherine Zalas 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from Public High 
School of Fort Wayne, Ind. 

South Bend. Indiana 



i2Q 



Thelma E. Yates 
Registered Nurse 

Entered from Earl Park 

High School. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Rena Argentina Zei 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
Entered from Normal Col- 
lege and High School of 
Florence, Italy. 
Chicago. Illinois 



Susanne Blanche Zeller 

Registered Nurse 
Entered from St. Xavier 
Academy. 

Ottawa, Illinois 



John Francis Zielinski. 
B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
Entered from St. Bede Col- 
lege Academy. 

Trenton, Neiv Jersey 



Edward Anton Zencka. 
B.S.M. 

Doctor of Medicine 
n.M*. AP 

Entered from Crane Junior 
College and Bowen High 
School. 

Chicago, Illinois 

Lawrence E. Zuley, B.S. 

Doctor of Medicine 
*X 

Entered from Crane Junior 
College and Crane Techni- 
cal High School. Intra- 
mural Basketball 3, -t. 

Berivxn, Illinois 




THE 1 93 



L © Y © L A N 




GRADUATES 




The custom of wearing academic gowns, caps 
and hoods dates back to the twelfth century, 
and probably had its inception in France where 
the wearing of the cap and gown marked the 
formal admission of the "Licentiate" to the 
body of Masters. The cold buildings in which 
the masters were obliged to teach necessitated 
the wearing of caps and hoods and these, nat- 
urally, were patterned after the prevailing dress 
of the time. Since a number of the scholars 
were clerics the hoods were fashioned after the 
monk's cowl. These hoods eventually evolved 
into pointed caps which today are evidenced in 
the mortar-board and tassel. 

It was only natural that a great variation 
would develop and so an intercollegiate code 
for academic codes has been adopted by most 
universities. 





ARTS AND SCIENCES 




"Features that distinguished the College dur- 
ing the passing year are: Students talked more 
in terms of their standings and achievements 
in intellectual endeavors; perfecting the de- 
partmental system stimulated scholarship 
among faculty and students; the abolition of 
intercollegiate football gave impetus to intra- 
mural sports and developed student initiative, 
cooperation, sociability, sportsmanship; rela- 
tions of mutual advantage were begun with 
our distinguished neighbor, Mundelein Col- 
lege; students are taking increased interest in 
the problems of student propriety and de- 
corum ; Loyolans engaged in the beneficent en- 
terprise of preserving the faith in the hearts 
of Catholic children attending public schools; 
the consciousness that 'Tt is the Mass that mat- 
ters" was deepened; developmentts that justify 
a feeling of satisfaction and encourage high 
hopes for the future". 

Dean. 





THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND 

SCIENCES 

CLASS OF 1932 
James F. Rafferty . . . President 
William T. Reid . . J ice-President 
Thomas M. Potnton . . Secretary 
Martin J. Stadler . . . Treasurer 




J. RAFFERTY 



CLASS OF 1933 



CLASS OF 1934 



Thomas Walsh President Edward S. Pf'efferle list Sein.) 

Thomas Byrnes (2nd Sem.) 



Louis W. Tordella . 
John T. Franey . . 
Eugene L. Cirese 



. Vice-President . . . . Francis X. Murati 

Secretary . . . . Thomas E. Byrnes 

Treasurer . . ... Cyril F. Murphy 





THE 1931 LOYOLAN 





SENIOR, GROUP I 

KAMINSKI, MOLLOY, MCCIVERN, MOOTER, SMYTH, WAESCO. REIDV 
O'CRADY, WALLIN, STEINBRECHER, SPELMAN, R. MURPHY. WALDVOGEL, WACNER 

KARA, WEST, T. HEALY, D. MURPHY, S. MURPHY 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
The College of Arts and Sciences of Loyola University, formerly known as 
St. Ignatius College, was founded by members of the Society of Jesus on Sep- 
tember 5. 1870. In 1922 it was moved to its present location on the north 
shore of Lake .Michigan. On the grounds and campus which comprise twenty 
five acres are seven buildings, modern in every detail. 

It is interesting to note that the one who planned the grounds caused the 
buildings to be faced toward the lake; for in the past year, the city of Chicago 
has bought from the university the riparian rights on the lake front, and h 
made definite plans for a drive on the lake shore. Obviously, such a construe 
tion will greatly enhance the appearance of the campus. 

The educational system in use in the College of Arts and Sciences is sub- 
stantially the same as that employed in about three hundred educational insl 
tutions throughout the world. It is guided by the principles set forth in tl 
Ratio Studiorum, a svstem outlined by prominent Jesuit educators in 1399 




SENIOR, GROUP II 

STROBEL, J. SMITH, COPP. LUKITSCH, MC COURT. IvILEY, GRAHAM 
BRUUN. R. RAFFERTY. FRIZOL, GRANT, KOTAS. FOGARTY, DURKIN, CULLEN 
MONDO, R. NOLAN, LANNON, HALLINAN, R. HEALY, TOMCZAK 



^jEfUgc: 



THE 193 



L O Y O L A N 





JUNIOR, GROUP I 

BACNIOLO, CALL KACZOREWSKI, PODWICKA. MATLSZEWSKI. RACH, SALERNO 

GIARDINA, R. ADAMS, VITA. SCHl LTZE. DIMICELLI, J. BRF.NNAN. W. REID 

MINCOVAN, MULLANEY, MIGELY, MILEWSKI, KODL. H. MCCARTHY 

revised in 1832. It is truly psychological in its methods, based on the very 
nature of man's mental processes. It has on the one hand that stability so 
essential to educational thoroughness, and on the other that elasticity which 
makes allowances for the differing circumstances of time and place. Thus, it 
retains all that is valuable in the older learning, and incorporates the best re- 
sults of modern progress. 

Education in its complete sense, as understood by the Jesuits, is the full and 
harmonious development of all the faculties distinctive of man. For this 
reason it is more than mere instruction or the communication of knowledge. 
The acquirement of knowledge, though a necessary part of any educational 
system, is but a secondary result of education itself. For education has for its 
end mental and moral refinement, and in the attainment of this culture, learn- 
ing is merely an instrument. 




JUNIOR, GROUP II 

DOWNEY. K. MC CABE. DICGLES, J. FARRELL, CALKIN! 

FAHEY, VONESH, d'ESPOSITO. MANN. .1. GOI 

I.ENIHAN, J. WALSH. .1. RAFFERTY. KNITTEL. B 



. I.AF.MMAR. ZWIKSTHA 
MAN. POYNTON 
GIBBONS. LUDWIC 



9 3 



I- O Y O L A IV 





JUNIOR, GROUP III 

DOHERTY, STADLER, MCDONNELL, SCHUCK, C. CAVANAUCH, BUTZEN, J. I) MY 
SCHUHMANN, C. CAHILL, T. KEARNS, OHLHEISER, HINES. MC GILLEN, T. O'NEILL 
BAK. PETERHANS, E. DEHNERT. OEHLBERG, GIRSCH, B. MCCORMICK. MCCRACKEN 

In accordance with this view of the purpose of education, recognized edu- 
cational means, such as Science and Language, must so be chosen in kind and 
amount as will most effectively further the purpose of education. The mental 
training given is intended not proximately to fit the student for some profes- 
sion but to give him such a vigorous and rounded development as will enable 
him to cope successfully even with the unforeseen emergencies of life. Ac- 
cordingly, the studies are graded so as to be adapted to both the mental 
growth of the student and the scientific unfolding of knowledge. Under this 
system the student will gradually and harmoniously reach, as nearly as may 
be, the measure of culture of which he is capable. 

It is fundamental in the Jesuit system that the various studies have distinct 
educational values. They are complementary instruments of education to 
which the doctrine of equivalents cannot be applied. The specific training 




SOPHOMORE, GROUP I 

J. FLYNN, BAGINSKI, MICHLDA, CANCE, FUCHS. MOSES. SCHOW ALTER. KOEMG. GIANNIN1 
IANSEN, RICHARDSON, HYBKE, MC DERMOTT, MC GINNIS, MINMS, POTIZNIK. T. O'BRIEN 
FOCARTY, WECHELER. HIRSCHFIELD, WELCH. B. HOWLAND, DOBIN, J. JOHNSON, CLARIMELLO 



THE 193 



L O Y O L A X 





SOPHOMORE, (.ROUP II 



\szi \ 



WII.KINS. CORM1CW. POTEMPA. C. MCNICHOLXS. BARRON, J. IMC CURE. IM. WALSH, MALLON 

E. CONNELLY 

DANIEL MAHER, T03DELLA, M. GUERIN, BENNAN, POKLENKOWSKI, MURTAUCH, R. o'cONNOR 

J. HICCINS, P. QUINN 

HOCAN, C. SWEENEY, W. H. MURPHY, FRANEY, J. CALLAHAN, MORRIS, A. DOYLE, MAMMOSER, ACKER 



given by one cannot be supplied by another. This fact, however, does not 
prohibit the offering of systematic courses, such as the Classical and the Sci- 
entific, in view of the future career of the individual. Although recognizing 
the importance of Mathematics and the Natural Sciences, the Jesuit system 
has unwaveringly kept the languages in a position of honor. For they effect 
a higher union than the other branches of learning. By their study the whole 
mind of man is brought into the widest and subtlest play. The acquisition of 
Language especially calls for fineness of perception and for a constant and 
keen use of the reasoning powers. 

Mental and moral philosophy is likewise much stressed, as well for its influ- 
ence in mental development, as for its power in steadying the judgment of the 




SOPHOMORE, OROUP III 



:ALE, C. JOHNSON, C. JOHNSON, W. J. MURPHY. M. OEHLBERC. B. SULLIVAN. SCULLY, URWAN 
JL'CIUS, DYDAK. ZINNGRABE, J. .MORRISON. RADKE, DELANEY. W. COLLINS 
o'nW^ER, J. MC NICHOLS, CLANCY. T. WALSH. OLSON. A. MORRISON, MC COWAN 



THE 



9 3 



I, O Y O L A X 





SOPHOMORE. GROUP IV 

PANZARELLA, LORENTY, OBUCHOWSKI. RZESZOTARSKI, BACZYNSKI, UNGARO, SZYMANSKI, BREEf 

KEES, DEHNERT. LORITZ, RAUWOLF, HENRY. CZALGOSZEWSKI, STAVTNOGA. DEVITT 

KEENAN, MAGHER, DROLET. J. MC CARTHY. C. RYAN, J. O'CONNOR, WIATRAK, CORDON 



student in his outlook on life. To obtain these results, philosophy must be 
such in reality as well as in name. It must not content itself with merely 
teaching the history of philosophy detailing the vagaries of the human mind 
without venturing to condemn them. It must present a logical, unified, com- 
plete system of mind-culture in accord with the established laws of human 
thought; it must take its stand on some definite propositions expressive of 
truth. 

Finally, the Jesuit System does not share the delusion that education has of 
itself a morally elevating influence in human life. Religion alone can purify 
the heart and guide and strengthen the will. Accordingly, the moral and in- 
tellectual faculties of the student are to be developed side by side. Morality 
must be taught continuously; it must be the underlying base, the vital force 
of the whole structure of education. In a word, the purpose of Jesuit teach- 




SOPHOMORE, GROUP V 

LACORIO, SILYESTRI, MORRISSEY, LYNCH. CRIFFIN, MATAVOWSKY. CARROLL. L ALLY 

DOHEARTY. J. MURPHY, MC VADY, O. CAVANAUGH, FRISCH. BURBANK. JOYCE. J. SULLIV.' 

DUNLAP, SCHIESSLER, GILL. BELTLER. RYBA, DRLCAY. HERBERT. KOEPKE 



THE 193 



L O Y O L A -N 





FRESHMAN, GROUP I 

MIRRO. SMILEK, JUSZAK, CROSSO, ADAMSKI, COLLETTI, PEFFER, CASTIGLIA, CONTURSI 

M. FITZGERALD, MANCAN, THOMETZ, F. MC CARTHY, HELLWIG, CINCOSKI, HEINEN, SMYTH 

WAWRZNSKI, KADLUBOWSKI, MANELLI, VERMEREN, SZCZUKEK. KULA, POLLOWY, LECHOWSKI 

ing is to lay a solid substructure in the whole mind and character for any 
superstructure of science, as well as for the upbuilding of moral life, civil and 
religious. 

A revolutionary step that marked a complete reorganization of the faculty 
and courses in the College of Arts and Sciences, together with three other de- 
partments of the university, was announced early in March by President Robert 
M. Kelley. "I cannot but believe that it will greatlv improve the teaching in 
these schools", said Father Kelley as he presented the formal report of the 
committee on departmental reorganization of the Council of Deans and Re- 
gents. The report, which was the result of two years' planning on the part of 
the officials, completely organized and integrated the work in the department. 
The committee which was given the tremendous task of establishing the new 
system was appointed by Father Kelley in February, 1929. It was composed 
of Austin J. Schmidt. S.J., Frederic Siedenburg, S.J., Joseph Reiner, S.J., and 
Thomas J. Reedv. 




i-m-:sii\iAN. i.Kori' n 



&m^E£ms&L 



THE 



» 3 



I, O Y O L A N 





FRESHMAN. GROUP III 

FAILLA, POHL, WAGNER, MOCILL, HASSEN, POWERS. COVEN, CAVF.Y. SCHNEIDER, KAKRXS 
BROWN, WOLFF. WIEDEMANN. STALI.E, RIORDAN, LALLY. J. ROBERTS. BURGER, THOMSEN 
CUNNINGHAM, MORAN, BRADFORD. KOTLER, Sl.ISZ. CRAVEN, BRADY. CANNON. SCHROEDER 



The general objectives of the departments under the new system will be to 
unify and coordinate teaching policies and procedures so as ultimately to reach 
the millennium of educational methods. In order to accomplish this it will 
be necessary for the departments to increase efficiency in teaching by distribut- 
ing functions which formerly belonged to the offices among the faculty members 
who are closest to them. In addition, the committee related a number of prac- 
tical means for attaining the objectives it set forth. It advised how meetings 
within the departments should be held and the topics for discussion at the 
meetings. It required that minutes be kept of these meetings and sent to the 
dean of the college in which they are held. Again it related how the depart- 
ments should determine on the courses to be offered each semester: how pre- 
requisites and examinations should be decided upon: how reading lists should 
be composed for the students: and how a definite method of procedure in 




FRESHMAN, GROUP IV 

FIEC. MAGLIANO. MILLER. CERRIETTS. W. H. MURPHY. RECAN. DOMBROWSKI. \M ' 

PRINDAVILLE, CONNERY, C. MURPHY, DEGNAN, ARNOLDS, SCANI.AN. SRI B VS 

KENNEDY. G. WHITE, PARK. BYRNES. DAVID MAHER. F. COLLINS. D. R \FFERTY 



5#B3^iBl 



THE 



19 3 1 



L O Y O L A N 





FRESHMAN, GROUP V 

C. LYNCH, BARRY, NICOSIA, FOLEY, MC MAHON, BENLIN, D. GIBBONS, J. KEARNS, CONLEY 
JOYCE. ZIEGLER, WIESBROCK, H. COLLINS. MC INTYRE, GOODWIN, CONERTY 
J. MC GUIRE, o'DONOVAN, KELDON. JENSEN, HAMILL, ZICKUS, C. ROBERTS, MC CRAW 

teaching courses should be set down. "There can be little doubt," the com- 
mittee concluded in its report, "that departmental organization it' properly 
carried out, can help greatly toward securing or maintaining a superior type 
of education at any institution." 

The outstanding scholastic achievement of the year was furnished by Lothar 
Nurnberger, a senior in the College of Arts and Sciences. Although carrying 
twenty-three hours, he received an "A" in every subject, thereby establishing a 
new record of sixty-nine credit points. The former record was held by Norton 
O'Meara. who obtained sixty-three credit points in 1926. 

The freshman intelligence test was won by Arthur Calek of St. Ignatius High 
School. Maurice Fitzgerald of St. Philip High School was second, and John 
Gerrietts of St. Ignatius, third. This was the fifth successive year in which 
first place was taken by St. Ignatius. 



t Or' *" ^^^ > ^LB* ' ■TAff^ A ^^^iajAW^Y \ 


L_ «sa*» 4k*i -JEM 



FRESHMAN, GROUP VI 

LORITZ, MUELLER, PRAWDZIK, MEIER. R. CARROLL, T. O'BRIEN, CUCCAN, BALCERKIEWICZ 

AUDY, R. SULLIVAN, EIDEN. REID. MC GRAIL, ARENDT. o'ROURKE, E. GALLAGHER 

HRANILOYICH, ELENTENY. PAUL. MURATI, BARTON, MILLER. CHATHAS 





FRESHMAN, GROUP VII 

WALKER, E. BURKE, STILLO. P. O'CONNOR. FAY. FINN, CRADY, LINDMAN 
DOLE, CANTERBURY, DONAHUE, CALEK, W. WHITE, TRUDELLE, FLAVIN 
KELLY, MC MANUS, J. MC CARTHY, MC DONOUCH, MATULENAS, BUTTITTA, o'dONNELL 

During the year Rev. George H. Mahowakl, S. J., head of the Philosophy 
Department, founded the experimental psychology laboratory. A picture 
which appears in the "Life" section shows students engaged in the use of 
apparatus for the study of emotional response (among the things used in the 
famous "lie detectors I, color-blindness, reaction time, eye movement in read- 
ing, color zones, psychogalvanic reflex, fatigue, sound, etc. 

The course proved one of the most popular in the curricula of the upper 
classmen. Classes for advanced students were held on Saturday mornings in 
the laboratory. 

The year also saw some noted speakers addressing the general student body. 
Mr. John J. Finley, a nationally known advertising authority; Mr. Charles E. 
Byrne, the noted Chinese political authority; Mr. Tien Lai Huang, and James 
Weldon Johnson, noted negro poet, were among the lecturers. 




FRESHMAN, GROUP VIII 

BRACKEN, A. BEICHERT, CORCORAN, KENEALY, PETERSON, MRKVICKA. SLOMKA, T. SULLIVAN, RACETTE 

LYNCH, GRABER 
CARROLL, READY, DEMPSEY, PALMER, MARKHAM, HOCAN, KALKHURST, 

MCCORMICK. BOLT, WIEI.AND. BURKE. JANIS, W. REICHERT, R. SULLIVAN. 



19 3 1 



L O Y O L A N 





SMULLEN. WILEY, SCUDIERO, FANTAl ZZO. AVAKIAN, JACKS. SCHMEHIL, FAVAT, KUBICZ, 

FIEDLER, SEYFFERT, J. SEXTON, RUSSELL, HYDE, FERRARA, HOYNE, J. MURPHY, NONA, CA^ 

SCHMITZ, PFEFFERLE, TRVNCALE. TORNABENE. BOCACKI. ZARZYCKI, SENESE. WOODS 



Soon after the abolishment of intercollegiate football, an intensive program 
of intramural athletics was begun. Headed by Messrs. Merlin Mungoven and 
Thomas O'Neil, and supported by the Student Council, the movement rapidly 
gained momentum. The student body had first to be made interested, and then 
led to participate. Basketball was the sport at which the leaders first tried 
their hand. Meeting with success in this field they started handball, and then 
baseball. In the meanwhile, coaches had been acquired in boxing, swimming 
and golf. And, most important, the movement was being supported more and 
more by the students themselves. Thus, one of the purposes of the university 
in abolishing intercollegiate football was carried far on its way toward realiza- 
tion, namely, the complete participation of the entire student body in some 
form of athletic activity. 

Accounts of other activities of the Lake Shore Campus student body will be 
found in other sections of the Loyolan. 




FRESHMAN, GROUP X 

J. SMITH. WARD, CARVEY, PLESNICK, HETMAN, ALLECRETTI, PATEK, GRACE. E. KEATING 
SWEENEY. FUNK. AHERN, HYNAN. JOHNSTON, MAURER, KUSM1REK 
BIESTEK. ANDERSON, J. KEATING. HIPPI.ER. VARREI.L. J. SEXTON, SPECHT. CAI.I.ANAN 



9 3 1 



LOYOLAN 



1*4 



^ ** ^ ^ %> •*% mi 



DOWNTOWN COLLEGE SENIORS 

The Downtown College and the School of Sociology had a combined enroll- 
ment of 1588 students when the Autumn quarter began. 

The College, with the greater part of its students in the late afternoon classes, 
includes all but a few hundred of the total. Chiefly its roster is made up of 
teachers who are pursuing their studies for advancement in their profession. 

The School of Sociology was founded in 1914 by Rev. Frederic Siedenburg. 
S.J.. who had recently returned from a survey tour of Europe and saw the need 
of a school, under Catholic auspices, for social workers. The success of its 
training is well known. In the examinations to fill positions for case workers 
250 graduates of Illinois universities competed for the thirteen vacant posi- 
tions. The four Loyola graduates of the class of 1930 who took the exams were 
successful in gaining positions. 

The Maria Delia Strada Sodality was founded by Father Siedenburg in 
1925. It has met regularly for the Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary, for con- 
ferences conducted by Father Siedenburg and has sponsored the annual retreat 
for women of the loop schools. 





;roup OF SOCIAL skkvice stidlnts 



THE 



I » 3 1 



Y O L A N 



Cx7?*.<£. ^Tf'Vs 




ARTS AND SCIENCES 



tMrZlA 



The Arts and Sciences College is the oldest 
department of the University. Founded as St. 
Ignatius College it was moved from the West 
Side to the present Lake Shore Campus. 
Though numerically one of the smallest of the 
departments the members of the college have 
consistently been the backbone of the extra 
curricular activities. 

The School of Sociology in conjunction with 
the Downtown College has for its student body 
chiefly men and women who are employed in 
the business world and attend the late after- 
noon and Saturday classes. The majority of 
the students are school teachers, lay and re- 
ligious, while a fair proportion of them are 
professional people who are studying purely 
for cultural advantages. 







^B 


W|1^P 


. ^^w*ipWgifif 



LAW 



c-l«« 



X 



'"It should be our endeavor, and one in 
which we shall succeed through the coopera- 
tion of the faculty and student body, to send 
out from this school men who are not only 
learned in the law and able to attain pro- 
ficiency at the Bar but men who have had 
instilled into them a higher sense of their 
duty to the courts, their profession and them- 
selves and who shall by their conduct in the 
office and in the forum advance the cause of 
justice and maintain the highest standards of 
the ancient and honorable profession of the 
law." 




Dean. 




SCHOOL OF LAW 
POST-GRADUATE CLASS 

Joseph Sazama President 

Fred Simon lice-President 

Edna Devlin Secretary 




DAY CLASS OF 1932 
\X illiam J. Linklater 
Frank J. Murphy 
Bernadette Dorsey . 
Maurice Ritter . . 



DAY CLASS OF 1933 

President Charles A. Boyle 

J ice-President Harold J. Ball 

Secretary .... Enimett J. Meagher 
Treasurer .... Francis E. Hucbsch 





LINKLATER 



THE 1931 LOYOLAN 




SCHOOL OF LAW 

NIGHT CLASS OF 1932 

Ambrose B. Kelly President 

A. Bernard Kelly . . . Vice-President 
A. B. Kelly .... Secretary-Treasurer 
Ambrose Kelly Treasurer 




NIGHT CLASS OF 1933 




NIGHT CLASS OF 1934 


Join. P. Costello .... 


President 


. . . . Paul M. Plunkett 


Stewart A. Crane . . . 


} ice-President 


Pal E. Bush 


\ irginiua D. Johnston . 


Secretary- 


. \^ illiam M. Hennessy 




Treasurer 


. . . . Frank McTigue 





COSTEIXO 



THE 1931 LOYOLA* 





SENIOR DAY LAW 

LYNCH. A. CROWLEY, BERCHTOLD. BARRY, MC GLIRE. WILHELM, CASSIDY, JACOBS, CEFFALIO 



THE SCHOOL OF LAW 
The School of Law of Loyola university was established as the Lincoln 
College of Law in September. 1908. The first Regent of the school was the 
Reverend Francis Cassilly, S.J. The Honorable William Dillon was appointed 
Dean and Arnold D. McMahon Secretary. The opening enrollment was thirty: 
the first classes were held on the twelfth floor of the Ashland Block. In 1910 
the school was moved to larger quarters on the sixth floor because of the rap- 
idly growing student body, quarters which were subsequently enlarged in 1914. 
The second Regent was the Reverend Edward J. Gleason. S.J., who was suc- 
ceeded in 1912 by the Reverend Henry S. Spaulding, S.J. In 1916 the Rev- 
erend Patrick A. Mullens, S.J., became Regent and was followed in 1921 by 
the Reverend Frederic Siedenburg. S.J.. who is now Dean of the School of 
Sociology. Soon after he assumed office he introduced the day school and 
made both night and dav schools co-educational. Between 1916 and 1921 




SENIOR NIGHT LAW 



THE 



9 3 1 



L O Y © L A \ 



i %■> : : : f w * f I 

S. % ■: | f , |. t t 1 




LEAH, LISLE. SWEJTZER. Ml'KPHV, RITTER. UNAVITCH. DE LOVE. SANFILIPPO 

LUSTER, JACGERS, BUTLER, GOLDEN, CEASER, J. KELLY, CULI.EN 

DROLET, LINKLATER, MC AULIFFE, CHAPMAN, LIENON, ROSZKOWSKI, J ASIONEK, ZELDEN 

Arnold D. McMahon was Acting Dean; he was appointed Dean in 1921, which 
office he held until 1924. Upon his resignation John V. McCormick was made 
Acting Dean, and Francis J. Rooney, Registrar of the School. In 1927 John 
V. McCormick was appointed Dean. 

The School of Law became a member of the Association of American Law 
Schools in December, 1924, and in March, 1925, was rated a Class A school 
by the American Bar Association. In September, 1925, a Post Graduate De- 
partment was added to the school. The Law School moved to new quarters 
in a building purchased by the University at 28 N. Franklin St. in February. 
1927. The entire second, third and fourth floors are occupied by the School 
of Law. At the present time the faculty numbers twenty-eight and the student 
body more than three hundred, over one hundred of whom are in the day 
school. 

The Loyola University School of Law is especially benefited by its location 




JUNIOR NIGHT LAW 

KAVANAUCH, RYAN, SICHEN, CALDWELL, M0SSMAN, PETTINCER, DOYLE. 

D. SULLIVAN, BYRNE, CLARK, EISENSTEIN, A. SULLIVAN, POWERS, GRADY, LYNCH 
WALDRON, FACAN, LISOWSKI, COLLINS, KELLY, CODY - , J. C O'CONNOR, ZOHLER 



THE 193 



L O Y O L A N 





SOPHOMORE NHiHT law 

CAREY, HEWITT. BARRON. HANKO, DERNBACH, RAYSA, JAUCH 

LUCZAK. O. O'CONNOR. MAYER, DONNELLY. CLARK. JOHNSON'. PETERKA 

COSTELLO. BLRKE, CRANE. JOHNSTON, MALONE, REED 



in a large and busy city. Varied litigation is being carried on at all times, trial 
sessions of the Federal Courts, the Courts of Cook County, the Municipal Court' 
of Chicago, and the Industrial Commission of Illinois. All law students, ac- 
cordingly, have an opportunity to observe and study the trial methods of the 
leading lawyers at the Bar of Illinois. The library of the School of Law con- 
tains over nine thousand volumes available for constant use. including reports 
of various courts throughout the country. 

That the School of Law has very competently handled its part of the pro- 
gram to make Loyola one of the leading universities of the country was demon- 
strated by the results of the examinations for admittance to the Illinois Bar, 
which were held on March 24. 25 and 26. Seventy-two percent of the gradu- 
ates of the Loyola Legal Department seeking admittance to the bar were able 




i i;i;him\\ day law 



\1IIN I \ 



NEIL. HAMMER, DEMSKY, HARRON, 
SPALDING, KLEHNLE, HAYDEN, 



NEY, B4I.SMIO. SII.LIVVN. MOKRISSEY. 

CREDDITT. PESETSKY" 

JACOBS, BEAR. SPACKMAN, ECCLES. BOYLE, BALL. LIEBERMA 

MALINOWSKI, ARADO 

GUERRINI, BELROY, CRLBBS, MEAGHER, SHEEHAN. CAHILL. CREA.CH. WOLSC1FER. HIBDSCH. WALSH. 

BERNARDO 



THE 



9 3 



LOYOLA* 



'I "it IB V ' l ] 



a \4 f vy 




FRESHMAN NIGHT LAW, GROUP I 

SHEPHA. COONEY, QUANE, DICKEY. MITCHELL, KAIN 

MC TICUE, CONNER, BENIACHI, MOORE, WOOD 

JOHNSON, W„ PLUNKETT, DOHERTY, BRANUACH. ESSROGER 

to surmount this last barrier to their efforts to become full-fledged lawyers. 
The magnitude of the achievement can be more readily realized when it is 
considered that only forty-five percent of the applicants taking the examination 
were able to pass it. The test was completed in five sessions covering a period 
of three days. 

The successful contingent from Loyola university was composed of John 
Binkley, Virginia Collins, Vincent Goonan, Robert Higgins. Milton Jacobson, 
Eugene Jones, Martin Miller, James O'Dowd, William O'Keefe. Joseph Solon. 
Susan Blake Swanson, Maurice Walsh and Stanley Walsh. The outcome of 
the test, insofar as it affects the Law r School, corroborates a statement made 
by Dean John V. McCormick at the first convocation of the year. He con- 
tended that statistics, when available, would show that Loyola is among the 
leading educational institutions of the state. He claimed that the percenage 
of her graduates who passed the bar examination was among the highest. 



n M5jilf>iLJL 



I t i 



FRESHMAN NIGHT LAW. GROUP II 

REUTCKY, SELOLLTEN, BELL, PANKAL, RECAN, S., FLORA, CAKTOON 



BRIM H 

REBMAN, HELMERT, MC CORMICK, COX. CLASSER 
. NASH, T., QUINLAN, CARKISON, HENNESSEY. DOHERTY 



T II 



18 3 1 



L O Y O L A N 



^g^5raB8pBJ%ifiB< 





In many ways America is an oligarchy of 
lawyers; lawyers make our laws, interpret them 
and, often, execute them. Hence it is desir- 
ahle that their training; be under the auspices 
of a university. To make a contribution to 
such training St. Ignatius College, over twenty 
years ago, took out a university charter and 
established its first professional school as a 
law school. 

The story of the Loyola University Law 
School is the prosaic one of steady growth in 
numbers, standards and influence. It has al- 
ways followed the policy of small classes. The 
roster was originally limited to two hundred 
students and registrations over that number 
were cancelled. Since its establishment in 
more commodious quarters the enrollment has 
been increased; day and night classes have 
both been maintained and the schools made 
co-educational. 



N»fc 




<j£=w 



"The general growth and prosperity of the 
Medical School has been one of the most satis- 
fying features of the University's life. During 
t lie fourteen years of its existence as such, it 
has come through a most trying period in the 
history of medical schools in general, when all 
outside forces were against its very existence; 
and it has slowly, but surely, and mainly by 
the constructive scholarship of its students, the 
splendid careers of its graduates and the ex- 
cellent effort of its faculty risen to a position 
of honor and respect in the great field of 
medical education. 

We are encouraged, therefore, by the re- 
sults of the labors of the year that is closing 
and are encouraged to hope for greater and 
better things in the years that are to come." 




|<»-*i_'<-A«-«v v 




Dean. 




THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

CLASS OF 1932 

Camillo Volini President 

A. J. Manikas Vice-President 

Arthur Balletti Secretary 

Michael Brescia Treasurer 

Theodore Lescher Representative 




CLASS OF 1933 



CLASS OF 1934 



Louis Palumho President J. Donald Madden 

M. M. Sarnecki J ice-President Herbert Stanton 

Angelo Vincenti Treasurer Roger Vargas 

Philip Laskowitz Secretary Francis Young 

William Ruocco .... Representative Robert Keeley 

Sergeant-at-Arms Charles \^ ard 





PALI MHO 



THE 1931 LOYOLA* 





SENIOR GROUP I 

KRAMPS, PETCOFF, KOHNE, TABAKA, GLYNN, ROE, PELLETTIERI, FOX, CAWNE, MC CREW 
SPANGLER, MCGUIRE, MARQUARDT, ELIOTT, GURA, LEVY, COTELL, ANDERMAN, RENK.OFF, CARNEY 

WHALEY, MOLENCRAFT 
LAWLER, CASTALDO, LINDSAY, JULIANO, TWOHEY, BUTTON', IZNER, AHEARN, BELMONTE, GALLAGHER 

THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 
The Loyola University School of Medicine, established as an integral part 
of Loyola University in 1915, is one of the four Class-A Schools of Chicago. 
The beginning was made, not by the establishment of an entirely new school, 
but, as has been the case with most universities, by the purchase of schools 
already in existence. In September, 1915, the Bennett Medical College, estab- 
lished in the year 1868, was acquired. The limited quarters and undesirable 
location of this school led to the purchase in 1917 of the property and equip- 
ment of the Chicago College of Medicine and Surgery. This purchase secured 
for Loyola university a most desirable site in the midst of Chicago's famed 
medical center. The building thus obtained was remodeled to afford adequate 
laboratory space. The courses of the departments were put on a strict Uni- 
versity basis and placed in the charge of highly trained teachers. The clinical 




SENIOR (-HOI 



HAISMAN. ROBILOTTI. MIZZII : \TO. PREMIEKG \ ST. M.l.EGHETTI. LUKATS. KENNY. COLLINS. \Y ATEI 

IBELLI. PERZIA, M AMMOSER. KONOPA, BALSAMO, SCHWARCZ. GONZALES, DRABANSKI, OBESTER 

MARCINIAK, ZENCKA, ICNOFFO. PARENTI. KADZEWICH, ARMINGTON, ROBERTSON, CASCIATO 



S#£S^g5£t 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 





SENIOR GROUP III 

KEUPLER, POLITO. ZIEL1NSKI, WAGNER, ALBI, CADA, WERTHMAN, WILSON. FOKBRICH 



needs of the school were met by close affiliations with the largest Catholic 
Hospitals of Chicago. 

At the present time the Loyola University School of Medicine is one of the 
most outstanding in the country. Last September out of more than fourteen 
hundred applications it accepted one hundred and fifty-five. On its faculty 
are many notables of the world of medicine, leaders in practice, study, and 
research. Its sphere of influence has been extended to numerous hospitals 
and clinics, and it has taken an important part in the work of providing for 
the welfare of Chicago. In the examinations for interneships at the Cook 
County Hospital. Loyola university placed twenty-two of its medical students 
on the list of those accepted, leading all other medical schools which partici- 
pated. Herman Levy of Loyola ranked second in the trials. 

A far-sighted and carefully worked out plan was recently adopted, the 
acceptance of which by the Board of County Commissioners marked the great- 




JUMOR GROUP I 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y © L A > 





JUNIOR GROUP II 



est forward step in the history of the Medical Department of Lovola university. 
The subject of the plan is the reorganization of the teaching practices of the 
County Hospital. It will make Chicago the medical teaching center of the 
world, greater even than Vienna and Berlin, and will promote the welfare 
of practically every person in the Chicago area, besides helping the three other 
great medical schools of the city — Rush. Illinois and Northwestern. 

Formerly the universities had no direct teaching privileges in the hospital. 
The new plan calls for a division of the patients of the hospital into five equal 
groups. Each of the four large schools will have the doctors on its facultv 
serve as staff members of the hospital and care for one of these groups. These 
doctors will take the students of their school to the hospital and give them 
instruction. As all medical authorities agree, this is at once the ideal and most 
practical method of teaching medicine. The fifth group of patients will be 
attended by doctors not connected with one of the four universities. Since 
the Cook County Hospital is the largest general hospital for acute cases in the 




JUNIOR (iROUP III 

BARONE, KUCHYNKA, VINCENTI, VANECKO, FIORE 
IMKAS, MARSHALL, MITCHELL. KINDAR, WISNEFSRI. FIERAMOSCA 
JELSOMINO. SERIO, NICRO. SIMONE. KRLSZKA. HOFRICHTER 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 





JUNIOR GROUP IV 

MILLER, JESSER, LYNN, AJAMIAN, FERRARI, CAZZANIGA 

PISCZEK. CAFARO, STYBEL, HAJDUK, MOSZCZENSKJ, MANELLI 

STEINLE. FIORITO, ESPOSITO, MOXON, CIARDINO, FETCHO 

world, each university has between six and seven hundred patients to care for 
and to study. With the opportunities for study and research afforded under 
the plan, Chicago is destined to become the hub of the world of medicine. 

Another achievement of the Department of Medicine during the past year 
was the transforming of the old Lakota Hotel into the Lewis Memorial Mater- 
nity Hospital — the key weapon in Cardinal Mundelein's campaign against 
Birth Control. Dr. Louis D. Moorhead, head of the Department of Surgery 
of Loyola University, was elected President of the Board of Trustees of the 
hospital. The chief of staff is Dr. Wm. M. Hanrahan. assistant professor of 
obstetrics at the School of Medicine. The consulting staff is made up of the 
physicians who are heads of the various departments in the medical school. 
As may be seen, the medical work of the new institution is altogether under 
the direction of Loyola University. 

Mr. F. J. Lewis, K. S. C, who has made several liberal gifts to the Church. 




JUNIOR GROUP V 



9 3 



LOYOLA* 





JUNIOR GROUP VI 

BREMNER, ROCCO, GROUT, BUTTIC, HICKEY, GOL'CH 
GARRISON, BROWNSTEIN, ABRAHAM, MURTAUCH, URIST 
RAIDER. HIPP. FISCHER, EISENMAN, YAMANE, ROBERTS 

had the old building remodeled as a modern maternity hospital which would 
administer to the needs of Catholics in moderate circumstances. In all. his 
gift totaled in the neighborhood of a million dollars. The Sisters of Provi- 
dence of Montreal, an order which operates some thirty-five hospitals through- 
out the United States and Canada, are in charge of the hospital. The dedica- 
tion was held on Sunday. January 5. Monsignor \\ . D. O'Brien, president of 
the Catholic Church Extension Society, preached the sermon. 

After thirteen years of service to Loyola University. Rev. P. J. Mahan, S. J., 
returned to Omaha, Nebraska, where he was installed on March 19 as Presi- 
dent of Creighton University. His successor as Regent of the Medical School 
of Loyola L T niversity is Rev. Terence A. Ahearn, S.J.. who becomes executive 
director over the schools and departments of the University and eleven hun- 
dred medical and nursing students. Formerly head of the biology department 
of Loyola University. Father Ahearn left in August. 1928. to become Regent 




SOPHOMORE GROUP I 

SPELLBURG, HEMMING, CUTRERA, RAUSA, ZARZECKI, FALK, MIR' 
HELI.MUTH. ABl-KHUR. LASK.OWTTZ. PAI.L MBO. VINCENTI. MOSC 



T H 



1931 LOYOLA* 






K*4v*p' m -*■»- <W © |3 


u<fl 


**A*ir!i 





SOPHOMORE GROUP II 

HOG\N, Dl'RBL'RC. JASINSKI, DIG ATE, RALL, ANDREW. MATTHIES. ZIK.MUND 

J. MURPHY, FERRANTE, STAZIO, MALINOWSKI, REED, OZELKA, CIOVINE, CORRIERE, FELLICELLI 

SVLETTA. SCALA, OLIVIERI, MENNITE, SINGER, VITACCO, CONRAD 

of the schools of Medicine, Dentistry. Nursing, and Pharmacy of Creighton 
University. In these schools the registration numbers nearly a thousand stu- 
dents. In cooperation with the late President Agnew, Father Ahearn was a 
great factor in the progress made by the schools under his regency. Expend- 
ing thousands of dollars, he completely renovated the buildings; educational 
standards were raised and enrollment was greatly increased. With his experi- 
ence in this capacity, he will undoubtedly carry on the work initiated at the 
Medical school during the thirteen years spent there by his predecessor. 

Another newcomer to the Medical School is Doctor Victor E. Gonda. who has 
been appointed Associate Professor in the Department of Neurology. Doctor 
Gonda is a native of Hungary; he received his preliminary education at the 
state schools and pursued his medical studies at the Royal University in Buda- 
pest. He was graduated from that institution in 1911, and for the next few 



1 1 " ! 


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SOPHOMORE GROUP III 

NNITE, RAINES. OLSZEWSKI, LUPAREIXO, MORROH.i 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 





FRESHMAN GROUP I 

KENNEY, RASO, CLARKE, FORREST. REIS, SCHROEDER, HONEFENCER, HEINS. WALL 

QTJINN, KEELEY, EADES, JSSICO. FITZSIMMONS, SMITH. MODICA, EISEN, MALACHOWSKI 

KIRKLAND, MARTIN, MEAZF.K, PARISI, IRASE, VALENTA, VINCENTI 

years took post-graduate work at the Universities of Berlin and Leipsig. ^ ith 
the outbreak of the war. he became a member of the army medical staff in his 
fatherland. After the Armistice he published the records of some of his more 
noteworthy cures from the six thousand cases he handled during the war 
period. Because of the unsettled conditions in his country, he hade goodbye 
to the Republic of Hungary and embarked for the United States. He came 
directly to Chicago and was speedily appointed to the staff of the Rush Medi- 
cal College, which institution he served faithfully for five years. At the pres- 
ent time, in addition to his regular practice, he is teaching at the County Hos- 
pital, is serving on the staff of the Mercy Hospital, and on that of the Colum- 
bus Memorial Hospital. Hereafter the teaching methods of the Department 
of Neurology w ill be modelled after those employed in the European medical 
schools, the subjects of Neurology and Psychiatry being taught separately. 
This svstem is not generallv used bv American medical colleges. 







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FRESHMAN GROUP II 

SST. MC SHANE, YOUNG, K VRRISCH. DE NINO. OIBROCELLI. MCHATTON, CLANCY. BIZACK 
FITZGERALD, CONLIN, HAYES, CACIOPPO. PARILLO, PETRASAH. PAGANO 
PORREY. CHWATAL. LEE. YL SKIS. J. GL'ERIN. 1LIAMO, CARBONE 



T H 



19 3 



L O Y O L A N 




Ci&Sti 



Back in 1915 the American Medical Associa- 
tion, through its Council on Medical Educa- 
tion, had pointed its efforts to reducing the 
number of medical schools and the raising of 
the standards of the continuing schools. The 
mortality among medical schools during the 
period of 1915-1921 was evidence of the power 
of the body. 

Loyola's School of Medicine came into exis- 
tence in a locality where three class A schools 
already existed. Little sympathy if not actual 
hostility was its due. It has been under such 
stormy conditions that the school began to ex- 
ert its ethical, moral and scientific influence in 
a field where these principles are of the ut- 
most importance. That it has reached a posi- 
tion where it enjoys a national reputation is 
a considerable accomplishment. 



N«b 




COMMERCE 



ci£2tf 



"During the past year the outstanding achieve- 
ment of the School of Commerce has been 
the success of its students in the state examina- 
tions for Certified Public Accountants. We 
have strengthened our accounting courses con- 
siderably and may reasonably expect a con- 
tinuation of this success. 

Our registration last September exceeded five 
hundred. Although 1930-31 has been a dis- 
couraging year to students with outside em- 
ployment, the decline during the year was not 
excessive and augurs well for a splendid at- 
tendance next vear."' 



*2£~.J& 



=4 





SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 
CLASS OF 1932 



Casimir Kotulski 
Gerald Becker . 
Michael Leahy 
Maurice DeBaets 



President 
J ice-President 

. Secretary 
Treasurer 




CLASS OF 1933 CLASS OF 1934 

John P. Coffey President Fred A. Fabish 

Philip Cordes Vice-President Rose Hanzel 

Bernard Fleming Secretary Eileen McGuire 

William J. Lennon Treasurer .... James R. Havdon, Jr. 





THE 1931 L O Y O L A X JK3g»,fflClig^ 




PRELEGAL STUDENTS 

CLASS OF 1932 

William J. Kiley .... President 
David Kerwin . . . Vice-President 
Edward Barry . 2nd Vice-President 

Alfred Lasdon Secretary 

Neil Keohane Trea 




CLASS OF 1933 
William J. Coughlin 
Edward Barrett . . 
Hugh Savage . 
Michael Rugi* . . 



CLASS OF 1934 

President John Sbertoli 

J ice-President Laddie Poduska 

Secretary Thomas J. Fegan 

Treasurer Hugh McGuire 





THE 



9 3 1 L O Y O L A !V 



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THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 
For a number of years Loyola has offered in connection with the College of 
Arts and Sciences courses in accounting, economics, business administration and 
the languages leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Commerce. Since 
there were numerous students who found it necessary to work during the day 
time and yet were ambitious enough to want to study during the evening, the 
administration decided in 1924 that it would be advisable to extend to them 
the chance of enjoying the opportunities resulting from university education 
and associations and of receiving a scientific training measuring up to the 
standards maintained by other departments. Hence the founding of the School 
of Commerce. 




SHKMISI N 



Advantages can readily be seen in 
The student "earns while he learns." 
is taught in the evenings to his task> 



ittending an evening school of commerce. 
He is able to apply the theory which he 
in working hours. He is able to profit 




JUNIOR COMMERCE GROUP 

SIMONS. MOKAVEK, ROUSE, VAN BRUCGEN, DE BAETS. BERGEN, T. PETERSON, J. HAYI 
SCHNEIDERMAN. GRANAHAN, M. LEAHY, UNGER, HENKE, EDFORS, BECKES 



THE 1931 LOYOLA* 



M- ffffpt 





CHVMBERI.UN 



SOPHOMORE COMMERCE GROUP 



financially before he receives his bachelor's degree. The result of but a few 
months' training is apparent in the progress made in the business world. 

At Loyola the method of instruction is primarily practical. Accounting is 
taught only by certified public accountants, advertising by experts in the field 
of commercial advertising, law by practicing attorneys, economics and kindred 
subjects by trained university professors. Besides the Bachelor of Science in 
Commerce degree the schools awards the Diploma in Commerce to stu- 
dents who have carried forty-eight specified hours of study successfully and the 
certificate in Commerce to students who were not necessarily high school grad- 
uates but were able to give evidence of their ability to follow the courses with 
profit and have completed the same study requirements as are necessary for the 
Certificate in Commerce. 

Probably the outstanding accomplishment of the past scholastic year was 
the success of Loyola students in passing the state C. P. A. exams. Only fifteen 
out of three hundred candidates were successful in the state examinations for 



MMM. 



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**♦*!§ J 



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FRESHMAIN COMMERCE, GROUP I 

GAVIN, J. FABISH. DLCCINS. F. F\BISH. E. MITCHELL, GILL 
COORLAS. COSIEWSKI, BIRKHANC, LEONARD. H1M1CK. ROWLEY 
SWENDSEN. SULLIVAN, FITZPATRICK. WOODS. COONEV. HANZEL 



THE 1931 



LOYOLA!* 





FRESHMAN COMMERCE, GROUP II 

KADENS. HAYDON, CRANK, CRANDALL, JORDAN, GLENN 
GODEWSKIZ. QUINLAN, MC MAHON, MC DONALD, LOSKILL, LANSMAN 
J. SMITH. OSTEN, HVRRINCTON. MC CUIRE, SWENDSEN, PRVHL, BL\KE 



certified public accountancy. Of this small number three were from Loyola. 
Sidney Field won the silver award for second place while Myron Frantz and 
John Shaw were the other successful Loyola men. The success of this year is 
due primarily to the intensive C. P. A. quiz course given up until this year by 
Dean Reedy and during the past semester by Assistant Dean Chamberlain. 

The Girls Commerce Club was organized during the 1930-31 scholastic year. 
Presided over by Wilverta M. Swendsen the some thirty odd girls who are 
members took trips to points of educational interest about the city and through 
their minglings secured the friendships which, all too often, are difficult to 
form during an evening school. A picture of the organization taken for The 
Loyolan failed to turn out and it was impossible at the late date to rectify the 
error. 

Two social affairs were sponsored by the Commerce Council. The first get- 
together was held on Thursday, February 12, 1931, in the social room of the 
Downtown College. Cider flowed freely, doughnuts were plentiful and an eight 




II NIOB PRE-LEGAL GROl P 



THE 



9 3 1 



LOYOLA* 





LH 


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SOPHOMORE PRE-LEGAL GROUP 

WILSON. COUCHLIN, KOZIOL, REGIS. SUHLMEY, NOONAN 

SLOMKA. COTTSCHALK, HEALY, SLAUGHTER, KOENIG 

BALABAN, SAVAGE, CAREY, SHAY, BAGNUOLO 

piece orchestra played tor the dancing. Dean Reedy generously bore the bur- 
den of the expense. The second party was held on May 14 at the same place. 
The Council had as its guests students from the Law and Sociology depart- 
ments and numerous faculty members and their wives. 

The Commerce basketball team appeared during the intramural basketball 
tournament as the only uniformed team. Dean Reedy was the backer of this 
team and his support was justified when the team fought its way through the 
stiffest type of competition to the championship. Tom Cole acted as center, 
captain and manager of this team which also engaged outside teams with suc- 
cess. 

Despite the fact that the school is but slightly over six years old its registra- 
tion at the opening quarter was over the five hundred mark. The progress made 
during the short time has surpassed the hopes of even the most optimistic of 
the founders. 




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FRESHMAN PRE-LEGAL GROUP 

PODUSKA, SEMANSKI, GOLDENBERC. PETRIK. MC VEY. BAXTER. LEYACCARE. DOWD. SLOMKA. HALEYM, 

ACERRA 

WEITZNER, KAPLIN. F. KELLY. WEXLER, JEHLIK. SLAUGHTER, RICKER. CLERMONT 

DUNN, AMATO. FECAN, SBERTOLI, CORMAX. H. MC GUIRE. LOSER. CUSHING 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A X 




COMMERCE 




The splendid faculty of the Commerce School 
is deserving of the greatest thanks for the part 
they have played in making the school what 
it is now. The faculty is a perfectly halanced 
one, consisting partly of men who also teach 
on the North Side Campus and partly of men 
who are engaged during the day in the varied 
occupations which they teach during the even 
ings. Thus the school has the advantage 
both backgrounds, that of collegiate and schol 
astic atmosphere leading to scholarly and cul 
tural research, and that of a practical environ 
ment leading to ready familiarity with modern 
business life and conditions. 




DENTISTRY 




u The institution has been most fortunate in 
attracting that type of students whose subse- 
quent careers have reacted to the greater re- 
nown of the school and placed them among 
the leaders in the profession. It has graduated 
nearly five thousand dentists, ten of whom are. 
or have been, deans of other dental colleges: 
many of whom are recognized both at home 
and abroad as authorities in their respective 
specialties. With a past that has never been 
excelled, the department has a prospect for 
the future which promises even to eclipse its 
previous achievements." 



^^rff^tr-tft 



Dean. 





SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

CLASS OF 1932 

Edmund M. Glavin . . . President 

Wallace Fanning . . Vice-President 

Thomas J. Scanlan . . . Secretary 

Harold I). Danlorth . . . Treasurer 




CLASS OF 1933 

Clemens N. Frey President 

Fred C. Kuttler Vice-President 

William J. Cunningham . . . Secretary 
Marshall Blume Treasurer 



CLASS OF 1934 

. Charles A. Howard 
. . Frank W. Klees 
Zigismund Perlowski 
. . . Lvle J. Filek 





THE 



» 3 



LOYOLA* 



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SENIOR DENTAL GROUP I 

LACH, MIKLCK. GOTTAINER. KOBRINSKY, MICEK, REDMAN, IMC EWEN, WEINER, MILLER, PELKA 

WROBLEK, WRUBLEWSKI, POLLAKS, SADLER, REESE 

SALZMAN, BOERSMAT, VALHA, SIMPSON, MC VEY, TREECE, MOORE. KLENDA. STYPINSKI, SCHMIII 

SILVERMAN. WOODLOCK. BUCHMANN 
SLAVIN, SIMON, LEVEY, WALSH. RADCLIFFE. WALL. VIEL, WAXLER, PODORE. ZERWER, PETERS. O'CONNOR 



THE SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

The Chicago College of Dental Surgery was founded fifty-one years ago, 
and is the pioneer of dental education in Illinois. Immediately it acquired a 
commanding position among the dental schools of the world. The original 
plan was to confine its students to those who held the medical degree, but 
this was found impracticable, and the doors were opened to candidates show- 
ing the requisite preliminary education. 

On October 7, 1930, Dean William H. G. Logan inaugurated the forty-eighth 



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SENIOR DENTAL GROUP II 

BAUM, ALLISON. HOLMES. HAL PEL, CAI.DER. KIRBY. BERGMAN 
SNIDER, HARRIS, ZOPOI.SKY. GOLDBERG 
KLEBANSKY, HALL, CHURCHILL, JACKSON, KANCHIER, HOBE. CILLETE. GREENBERG. CHERNER. FARRELL 

EDMONDSON, CROETZINCER, FELT. FORKOSH. GEYER. ATKOCIN AS. BROW NSTEIN 
SHERMAN, CRUNNER, FISHMAN, CERNICH, MURIELLA, SPLATT, CORBETT. JOHVNSEN. HECKENLAIBLE 

BERKOUSKY, CONGER, DAVIDSON, MARTIN, KANCHIER. CASTER 

KRAUSE, KURLAND, BROPHY. DUCAS, HORROWITZ. HOFFMAN, SHANOFF. COHEN. BAUM, BHEGAR 

I.OADLCA, CHESROW. LIBERMAN. JACOBS. ACKF.RMAN 



THE 



1931 LOYOLAN 



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- 



JUNIOB DENTAL GROUP I 



Ml SWEENE 



OY, 1HRT1N. PERR1. l.EMIRE. KAPLAN. SORSEN. PESZYNSKI, Zl'I.EY, PIKAS 

VASUMPAUR 

MITCHEL. NOW\K. WARCZAK, SCANLAN, LAINC, LA DL'CA. THORSON, WEINTRAUB, SOMMERFELD 

SCHALLER, SKRYZAK, SIMINSKI, SKWIOT, SIDES 

MARCINKOWSKI, MCDONALD, MC CORMICK.YVTLLER, SHERMAN, WILCOX, WALLS, PARILLI, SIEDLINSKI 

SEBEK, LETL'RNO, WALDEN, KI'NIK, T\K. SHIPLEY. KAWAHIGASHI 

KITZMILLER, JAKUS, JERKOWSKI, KARCH, KLBIK, KOCHANSKI, EZRA JACOBSON, ELMER JACOBSON 

KIMBLE, SANDERS, ROSS, KENWARD, SOBECKI, LAHODA 

session of the Chicago College of Dental Surgery. After the blessing was given 
by Father LeMay, dean of men at the College of Arts and Sciences, Dean 
Logan introduced Dr. H. W. Oppice of the faculty, who was the speaker of 
the evening. In his talk Dr. Oppice stressed three points which, if observed, 
would assure one of a balanced career. The first was ability which is acquired 
with the assimilation of technical knowledge; the second, character which 
is governed by the student's chosen environment : the third, that intangible, 



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JUNIOR DENTAL <;R()UP II 

NEEDHAM, DANFORTH. HILL, SCHOONM\KER. KIRBY. ASH. CLAWSON, KELLEY, PFL'H, GRADY 

GLAVIN, DANIELS, FANNING, FLAVIN, KOTULA, SCHWARTZ. COVINGTON, BOOTHE, GELMAN, FAILLO, 

DUXLER. COTE 

DAHI.BERC. EKLUND, KERSH, CERSCHBERG, KARMILOWICZ, SACHTLEBEN, SIMPSON. CREABIL. CINSBERC, 

CHARNEY, FELDMAN, FITZ, GILLETTE, JEDLOWS 

GAYNOR. BLRNS, AVERY, FRAZIN. HARLEY, GRAHAM, HERRICK. BROOKS. CHRISTIE, ALBINO. BERMAN, 

HOFFMAN, BALCEKSKI 



THE 



9 3 



LOYOLA* 





SOPHOMORE DENTAL GROUP I 

OLECH, SKINNER, POWERS, JACOBSON, JOHNSON, RINGA, KRYSINSKI, KURPIEWSKI, WURSCH, KENYON 

WACHOWSKI, SMITH, STERN, WAGNER. KEENAN, MITZ, KUTTLER, CRACSYK, SAFARIS, RORSPIEZ 

MALINA, LACHMANN, MILNARIK, SIMKUS, LOCKWOOD, KONRAD 

WOJCZYNSKI, JONES, WORKMAN. WREN, THEIL, VERNE. PIKE, JOSEPH, Ll'BAR, WATSON 

KOULKOL, MACHEK, LAPP, SIMON, VICHICK, WEISS, MITSUNACA, POTASHNIK. RVI.I.. KLBIM.EM 

intrinsic faculty of the human being, personality, which is guided similarly 
by our will to attain certain ends. President Robert M. Kelley, S.J.. then 
spoke for a few minutes, saying that limitation and self-satisfaction are de- 
plorable and are always obstacles in the path of progress. Dr. Kendall, pro- 
fessor of Chemistry, also said a few words before Dr. Logan made the final 
announcements of the evening. 

More than ten thousand dentists thronged the Stevens Hotel on February 
2. 3. 4, and 5 during the sixty-seventh annual meeting of the Chicago Dental 
Society. One hundred essays were read in the course of the convention, cov- 
ering practically every field of dental problems. The latest developments in 
radiology, treatment of infections of the mouth, municipal and state dental 




SOPHOMORE DENTAL GROUP II 



BAKER. FREY, BRAHM, AKIN, BLUME, FOSTER 

HARELIK, HOWLAND, COMROE, AHNER, BAIM, ALLEN, FORTELKA, DENNING. FIRNSI, BRENNEN 

CARAFOLO. DANREITER. BATTLER. ABRAMS. DEBSKI. APPLEBAUM, HEINZ. HOFSTEE. DONELAN. ETL" 



HARRIS. BERMi 



.III III Mil 111. 



THE 1931 LOYOLA N 




nrai Hi^fe- : ^b^k^m ■■■ 


fiwm 




y f t f t 1 1 


■Jyui 



TICHY. STIERNBERG, PILLT 
, PORT\. PHILLIPS. THAYER 



FRESHMAN DENTAL GROUP I 

REYNOLDS, KI.EES, OFFLENDOCK, MALANOWSKI, MOORE, NEER, STEWAB 

ODERIZZI, MERTES 
REA, WHITE, SHAPIGO, SEGAL, TERESI, SHELINSKY, MAHONEY. LUBER, 

LANDECK. NORTON 
\ IRCO, LIPINSKI. SCHMIDT. I.OSSMAN, NEDVED, SCHWARTZ, WACMEISTER, ZIOLKOWSKI. TISCHLER, 

LEWIS, LAWLER, HOCK.E, I.IPPOLD. O'REILLY. LYZNICKI, WINDER 

SIELAFF, ZIHERLE, WEXLER, SOLOMON. ZLOTMCK. MARCINKOW SKI, KLAPER. SKLAMBERG, SYLVAN, 

MEYER. PACOCHA, P ATTI 



programs, and the relation between the teeth and general body health were 
discussed in full. Through the medium of the radio the public was kept in- 
formed of the work that the progressive and modern dentist is doing. Every 
dav during the convention, at least five or six papers were broadcast over the 
radio. 

One of the featm-es of the convention was the formation of the Chicago 
Mouth Hygiene Council, the purpose of which is to further the better knowl- 




FRESHM AN DENTAL GROUP II 

(AVIS, VIXEN, BREWER. CABLE, BEKIKR, COGLIANESE, ELLMAN, FILER, \SH WORTH, KELLY, ALLEN 
.IZIK. ALDERSON. GUTMANN, CESAL, KIELBASA, GAULT, DICKTER, CRESENS, CRANDSTAFF, JACOBSON 

JABLON, FRIEDRICH, HAUSMANN, CRAIG. KARL 
1UKOWSKI, DAMUTH, BLACK, DUNN, CHUBIN, DORMAN. DOLCE. CAMERON. HAFEBT, DVOR \K. APPEI. 

BREGER, BLOCK, CIOCCA, BRAUN, BERNEL, HOWARD 

IENDETTO, KITE. ALTHEIM. COKINS, DEEGVN, CERBEB. CRAUER. KANEFSKY, COSCICKI. FRASZ. CAMINO 

HEINEMAN, HEJNA, CARLIN 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A X 



? M 1 14* ; a 


MKi 


fit f J 

Mitt 




V rV * 




PRE-DENTAL <;ROUP I 

MC BRIDE. WADAS. WELLER, MC DERMOTT. RYWNIAK, MC CAY, NEUBARTH, RACO, OYEDA 
IKA, ONDROSEK, SVENCISKAS, MADONIA, REA, LASKOWSKI, SASSO, STAUB, MICALA, RZESZOTARSKI 
LUND, SINDELAR, NASH, VARRIAL, LYZNICKI, MARSEN, ORBAN, MANN. ROCALSKI, NEWMAN 



edge of the healtli value of proper mouth hygiene among the citizens of Chi- 
cago. In the exhibition halls, the dental manufacturing company displayed 
the latest in dental equipment and gave many valuable talks on the mechanical 
side of dentistry. While the dentists were having their convention, their 
assistants were having one of their own. The Chicago Dental Assistants Asso- 
ciation and the Illinois State Oral Hygienists had a separate meeting and a 
separate program. 

Glenn Frank, President of the University of Wisconsin, gave the main ad- 
dress at a banquet in the Grand Ballroom of the Stevens Hotel. At the 
speaker's table with him were the Reverend Robert M. Kelley, S.J., President 
of Loyola university, and Walter Dill Scott, President of Northwestern uni- 
versity. On Wednesday evening the Dental Society gave its big banquet and 
dance, the social highlight of the convention. 




!LLO, DZIOLCZYK, BRUNDACE, CARRITY, KIKBV. K \TZ. BECKMAN 
FISCHER, CRYSBEK, COGCINS. FREEDMAN, HOFR1CHTER. IVERSON, HAUFF 

BUCKLEY 
VMSON, FLAXMAN, BLOOM. ARN STEIN, CIEBIEN, FRISCH. GANGURSKY, 
HONG, ftOLCZAK 



T HE 1931 LOYOLAN 




DENTISTRY 




The policy of the Dental School forbids the 
acceptance of any transfer students after the 
first year. The pre-dental work may be taken 
at any college but the remainder of the study 
must be done in residence. 

Undoubtedly this policy is at least partially 
responsible for the professional records of its 
some twelve hundred graduates. All of the es- 
sential training of these men is received under 
a faculty which for its thoroughness and knowl- 
edge of subject matter has gained national rec- 
ognition. 

Since the affiliation of the Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery with Loyola university the union 
has proven itself profitable to both institutions. 



NWl* 



n- ■ j: fir rv 




I- ■ 



tMm 



"The nursing schools benefit by the prestige 
attached to graduation from a university and 
from the high standards of teaching laid down; 
the university gains much from the increased 
co-operation possible between the hospital and 
the medical department. Increased efficiency 
and much better service to the community are 
in consequence, immediately derived from this 
procedure. It is especially gratifying to the 
university to see the large number of nurses 
who are pursuing studies leading to the bac- 
calaureate degree, instead of dropping their 
scholastic work immediately upon receiving 
the degree of Registered Nurse. This growth 
of healthy scholarship among the nurses is a 
real portent of the flourishing condition of the 
schools of Nursine." 





Regent. School of Medicine, 1917 to 1931. 




.1(111 \ II. Ml HI'III 



lSfSg*B&gegfel THE 1931 LOYOLA* M&in£B^S2 




THE 1931 LOY PLAN 






KIN<; MURPHY 

ST. ANNE'S HOSPITAL NURSES TRAINING SCHOOL 

If any one particularly agreeable feature of the training course offered at 
St. Anne*s hospital were to be singled out, it would unquestionably be the 
happy combination achieved in its educational system, of a threefold program, 
embracing professional training, religious instruction, and the social aspect of 
a nurse's career. 

Scholastically. more stringent entrance requirements have resulted from the 
hospital's recent affiliation with Loyola university's School of Medicine. With 
higher prerequisites for admittance, a corresponding raise in the educational 
standards of the institution became evident. At present, doctors, specialists 
in their respective fields, graduate nurses, and the sisters in charge of the hos- 
pital comprise the faculty. The recent completion of a larger and more thor- 
oughly equipped hospital makes possible a more extensive training in the prac- 
tical problems of the nursing profession. 

The religious and ethical elements of this occupation, regrettably absent from 



*■' f7\ 



* v /£v 



e® 



;-% § 9 9 9 § i.f 



SENIOR GROUP 

JKSKV. CROWLEY, CARUFEL, MII.I.ER {President), SOBIE, BISSE. O'BRIEN, PAWEECK 
kundrit, MC DONNALL, showers, SCHNAUBELT (Vice-President), STRUBBE (Treasurer) ,■ riley, 



SULLIVAN (Seereta 

[AAS, PII.OTTE. STEVE. RYAN, BY ANSKI 



I.I.ER. TEDERS 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A X 




FANE. MKIK.LEJOHM. I. \CAS>E. 

koehler, stroik (Sec. Treus.). DUGl 

KRIESER. HOl.SCHER, FINE 



JUNIOR GROUP 

:s. ryan, whalen. king (President) 
hearer, wilhei.m. blonican (Vice-President' 

HECKMAN, STROMBVS. HARCHARIK 




many similar training schools, are especially stressed at St. Anne's. Direct 
training in this sphere is made possible through the careful selection of faculty 
members, while an equally important, indirect educative method is found in 
the nurses* sodality and the annual retreat. During the past year, the annual 
retreat for the nurses of the hospital was held early in January, under the di- 
rection of Father Mulhern. 

Numerous social activities have broken the monotony of the past vear. The 
senior class opened the social season with a dance held on November 25 at La 
Follette Hall. The success of this initial affair prompted a similar gathering, 
which the junior class sponsored early in February. Periodic parties held at 
the nurses's home met with popular approval. The dance presented by the 
alumnae of St. Anne's on May 5, at the Austin Town Hall, brought to a fitting 
close this unusually bright social season. 




FRESHMAN GROUP 



KUEMPKL. HI SSE. BKUIA. TKEADWELL. KIl.I.ER. OMU.l.KY. JACOBS. ROGERS, CLARK 

BLUE, SUTTON, RUBLE, BUTLER, BRADY, CILLE, PIERCE. CONDO. LAWINCER 

THOMPSON. MORROW. A. MURPHY (President), BLESSING, MASTERSON. M. MURPHY ( ScC. TredS.) , 

RIGHTMIRE 



THE 



19 3 1 



LOYOLA* 






KIEFFER, J. RAPHVEL 

ST. BERNARD'S HOSPITAL NURSES TRAINING SCHOOL 
Noteworthy among the advances made by St. Bernard's School tor Nursing 
during the past year, is the recent amplification of and increased specialization 
in the department of pediatrics. Sensing the very pronounced need for a 
more suitable specialized field of this nature, the already ample facilities of 
the hospital were augmented, and the conveniences offered were increased. 

Though practical accomplishments of a similar nature have always char- 
acterized St. Bernard's training school, this year has seen the birth of a 
gratifying sense of all-university interest, which was developed early in the 
year, and has since manifested itself in whatever activities of the university 
the meagre spare time of a student nurse permits. This spirit was especially 
evident in the work of the nurses in connection with The Loyola News; not 
only were weekly contributions forthcoming, but also tangible results in making 
the Fall Frolic a successful dance, and increasing the circulation of the News 
were realized. 




jf3i< ?V (% h PM 



i i 




i\ 



SENIOR GROI P 
IY, BROMBOZ, CAMPBELL (Vice-President). KELLEHER, PILLING, VANRUSKA, NOLAN, (Presu 

MC CARR 

SOUTHERLAND, MC HUCH, KELLY. MILORD, SENDER, DARCELLA, P. MURPHY 

MARTIN, NEVILLE. KOZICYNSKI, CRAMER (Treasurer). PAYIK. DONOVAN, CLARK, COSCROYI 

STACK, O'NEILL, NOETHE, R\RRY. RIORDAN. BARRETT. MC RRIDE 

KING. KRIESF.H. STROIK. FINDLAY, CROWLEY, SOBIE, C\RUFEL. SCHNAUBELT 



THE 



19 3 



L O Y O L A > 




■•■■« © $ jf) £ 





JUNIOR GROUP 

K. KIEFFER, KLESEV. CROWLEY, MELLON, DEVOY, FAHEY, GRACE, I). GLYNN 

deckman, doolin (President, second sent.), kenny, smith, coeckel, b. kieffer, 
KAL'TH (Treasurer) 

PATERSON, KELLY. NORBLT. HOWE. J. KIEFFER, MC EWAN, H. CLYNN 

HANNON, Anderson, DEMPSEY, dore (Secretary), sh \rp. olietti (Vice-President) 

Since its affiliation with Loyola university in 1925, the increased value of 
the educational facilities offered by St. Bernard's hospital has done much 
to make admittance to this institution even more desirable. This fact, coupled 
with a new and most modern nurses' home possessing conveniences seldom 
found in schools for nurses" training, have contributed largely to the increase 
in enrollment so pronounced at this school during the past few years. 

Outstanding among the local activities of the nurses were the periodic 
dances at which the Medical School and the News were well represented: the 
energy and zeal manifested in religious activities which has always been 
present to a remarkable degree; and the interest displayed in musical activi- 
ties, especially the glee club and string ensemble. 



K 









V-;.' 



ill I L A ,1 




FRESHMAN GROUP 

CORRICAN, HICKS, MASON, SHERWOOD. JAMES, WITTLER, COOPER, SMITH 

Raphael (president,), shields (Vice-President) . broderick. verhey, Murray, lltz (Treas- 
urer), RILEY 
Fitzgerald ( Secretary I , sibert. stalilionis, doweiko, petkosky, show, reh 



THE 1931 LOYOLAN 





SENIOR GROUP 
Cuerbini (President), della mama, fitzhugh, atkins, la masney 

SULLIVAN. BOYER. CALLAHAN, DIETZEL, MOWITT 

damata (Secretary), showalter. tfstv. hlff 

COLUMBUS HOSPITAL NURSES' TRAINING SCHOOL 
The Columbus hospital, located at 2518 Lakeview Avenue, was organized in 
1905 by the late Mother Gabrini, venerable foundress of the order of Mission- 
ary Sisters of the Sacred Heart. Under her guidance, the numerous difficulties 
encountered during the early years of the hospital's existence were successfully 
overcome, and the present high standards of this prominent institution attest 
the merits of her work. 

In 1906, a school for nurses' training was developed in connection with the 
hospital, thus extending to many an opportunity of preparing themselves for 
the profession of nursing. Since its establishment, the improvements under- 
gone at the hospital have kept pace with the rapid advances of medical science 
and nurses training. Through the curriculum and practical experience now 




JUNIOR GROUP 

HENNEBERRY. MASTROMONICA. VANDERBOSCH, DES CORMIER, RECTOR 
BOF.TTO. MC CRATH, MC LAl'GHLIN 

LA CH APELLE, Webber, dixon, Pi.ESKOMTCH [Secretary) 



THE 



9 3 



L © Y O L A IV 





s'll I)h MS (IN SI K(.l( U. sKKNKi: 



available, adequate preparation is given for any of the many careers now open 
to well-trained graduate nurses. 

The student nurses of Columbus hospital are especially fortunate in that they 
possess an active alumnae organization, an asset few similar institutions may 
boast of. Through this association a spirit of cooperation and helpfulness is 
especially advantageous to the new graduate nurse. This group, acting as an 
advisory board, assists the new nurses in adjusting themselves to their new 
fields of private and institutional work. It keeps the graduate nurses in touch 
with the advancements and improvements of their profession, and aids them in 
securing placement in the numerous fields open to registered nurses. 

The favorable location of Columbus hospital school for nurses, opposite Lin- 
coln Park with its numerous recreational advantages, tends to make even more 
pleasurable the student nurses' stay at this institution. 




FRESHMAN GROUP 

PIEROZZI. MAZAR, LOSKOSKI, DIETCH. LEWIS 
VITULLO, MARSHALL. COPA, GATONS 

layton (Secretary), BEBEAU, lev {President), colchli> 



THE 193 



L O Y O L A \ 






SHI7REK SCHAEFER 

ST. ELIZABETHS HOSPITAL NURSES TRAINING SCHOOL 

Culminating by the erection of a new and most modern hospital, its third 
year as an affiliated unit of Loyola university, the progress of St. Elizabeth's 
hospital school for nurses has been most satisfactory. Three years ago. by- 
raising its entrance requirements and elevating its educational standards, it 
became an integral part of the Loyola University School of Medicine, thus 
enabling the student's nurses to enjoy the training afforded by the hospital 
school, together with the advantages accruing from affiliation with a uni- 
versity. 

During their three year stay at St. Elizabeth's, professional nurses" training 
though an important element in itself aptly combines with it the mental, moral 
and physical development which true education demands. Conducted by the 
Sisters, Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ, whose work in the nursing profes- 
sion has long been evidenced, spiritual advancement is not neglected during 
the course of their educational pursuits. The medical faculty of the training 



&:G *>r# 



Q 7) 



*■ »■ § ? f |»- 1 

^ •' . ' 'Li '_ - Mi 

SENIOR GROUP 

losinski, fliece, christiaens (Vice-President), blattie, Thompson, zalas, crecory, sabo 

Hermann, o'neill, ver cauteran, wisniewski (Sec. and Treas.) Johnson, cennrich, cavanauch 

BIETH 

colatk* (President), freidrich. Gallagher, mc veigh, kenner, frank 
Missing: SAKWIN 





JUNIOR GROUP 

(/'resident). coui.euh, DALTON (Vice-President). Anderson. 

POLCHL\PEK. I.EIER. SI.OVVI. JU-NIO, LAKEMEYER, DE? 

Missing: SULLIVAN 



WIATEK. (Sec. 
MARAIS 



school is composed of doctors whose knowledge and ability in their respec- 
tive fields is unquestionable, while the teaching nurses have long experienced 
the practical phases of nursing work. 

The new hospital, located at 1431 N. Claremont Avenue, is considered to be 
one of the most beautiful and practical institutions of its kind in this section 
of the country. Equipped with accommodations for 350 patients, experimental 
as well as theoretical training is made available for the student nurses. Thor- 
oughly modern laboratory and operating facilities are among the outstanding 
conveniences this hospital offers. 

Since its organization as a scbool for nurses in 1914. special emphasis has 
been given by the authorities, to the development of both the theoretical and 
practical aspects of this profession. This constant striving for internal better- 
ment was given a most valuable impetus by the facilities the new hospital 
boasts, and by the educational assets made possible through its connection 
with the L niversitv. 




FRESHMAN GROUP 

:r (/'resident), mueller. kearney, holska, 
id'ent), dawson. schaefer (Sec. and Treas., 

MOUSE!., PVETOW. ZIPPI.ER. EH \S 



THE 1931 LOYOLAN 






MERCY HOSPITAL NURSES" TRAINING SCHOOL 

Since 1918. the year in which Mercy Hospital School for Nurses became af- 
filiated with Loyola university, the increased attendance, and the facilities pro- 
vided for the nurses have been remarkably evidenced. Consequent upon its ad- 
mission to the university, entrance requirements were raised. Faculty cur- 
ricula, and methods of procedure are to a large extent, regulated by the regent 
and dean of the Loyola University School of Medicine. Members of the med- 
ical faculty, in addition to thte graduate nurses who also act as instructors, 
conduct many of the classes. 

Excellent laboratory facilities, and the wide variety of cases which the hos- 
pital handles combine to give the nurses the necessary practical experience 
which their profession requires. The Sisters of Mercy, on whom the greater 
part of the responsibility for correct training rests, have succeeded not only in 
instructing the nurses in the physical aspects of their professions, but have 
added the spiritual element necessary for the correct fulfillment of their chosen 




zei.ler. juska ( I icefres.), steffen, mc kirchy. moore, ruddy, lynch 

cleason, rurkart, harney, Clyde, Mullen, nohava, yates, driscoll 

kee.nan, navitski, pratt, erickson (pres. i, downs, hemphill, stockman. krysiak. sitar 

m. f. wolfe, creen, schaumberc. hoyer, melvin, arbuckle, downs, leseman 

m. m. wolfe, herincer, stevens. mc cl'ire, mulvey, dickson 

Missing: finkeldei (Sec. Treas.) 



THE 



9 3 



L O ¥ O L A IV 





MITCHELL. POWERS, B4KITEU'. ARNTZ. OLSON. PHALEN, MARKS. 
BEKL'BI. HOI.TON, STRUT. CARTER, VERLOOVE, FREV, MC CARNEY, R. KELLY. CINTER 
ENRICHT, BERENDSEN, OBERTHUR, HOS1, HART. D. HAYES, PINK, SPECKEEN, M. SULLIVAN- 
WISE (Vice-Pres.) , costello, haas, collins, de cloux, martis, brockman, musman 
bapst, (Fres. I wurl. matteson. consamus, e. hvyes. nabob 
Missing: seidle (Sec. Treas.) 

work. Their inspiring influence has been notably present throughout the rapid 
growth of Mercy hospital, the first institution of its kind in Chicago. 

Along with their professional work, the nurses have inaugurated numerous 
social events during the past year. The Mersina club, the choral organization 
of the school, has been foremost in sponsoring social activities at the nurses" 
home. Under their auspices, several dances were held, and numerous parties 
presented. Early in the year, the senior nurses acted as hostesses to the fresh- 
men in their "Big Sister Party." This affair, an annual event for welcoming 
officially the new students, was one of the most brilliant of the year. Other 
social affairs of equal success were conducted by the various organizations of 
the school. 




burns, omvra. spiering. c.wanauch. i.etz. hoefiim;. bihi. kestel. linden, aucoin. Corcoran 

KELLEY, MCCLTRE, BIRMINGHAM, o'ROURKE, SIMKUS. o'dOWD. O'BRIEN, o'lEARY, SALLER. THEISEN, 

DVRROW. YATES, I. THEYS 

RANDALL, CUMMINS, SMITH, SLOWEY, BOMBA, NIEBAUER, MCCARTY {Sec. Treas.) , H. YATES, 

PENDERCAST 

Missing: MADIX, President: Schmidt, Vice-President 



THE 



9 3 1 



L O Y © LAN 




y 



O'GOREK 






JOHN B. MURPHY HOSPITAL NURSES TRAINING SCHOOL 

For the first time since its affiliation with the Loyola University School of 
Medicine, students of the John B. Murphy hospital are represented in the 
LoYOLAN'. Recently accredited by this institution, the student nurses are now 
accorded the privileges usually extended to university students. This affilia- 
tion has redounded to the mutual henefit of both institutions: to John B. 
Murphy hospital it has given the prestige which association with a university 
brings with it: to the student nurses it has made possible, with but little addi- 
tional work, the obtaining of baccalaureate degrees: and to the university, the 
expansion of the Medical school has been facilitated. 

During the past year, members of the senior class at John B. Murphy hos- 
pital have been especially fortunate, in that much of their practical work was 
carried on at the Cook County hospital. In view of the keen competition for 




crab (Secretary), deady, reimers, brett ( President I . KEATING 

Hickman, FRUIN ( Treasurer I . o'connor. bush, rettbi rg 

Missing: maher (Vice-President) 



SJS&MB&ggaSl the 



9 3 



LOYOLAN 





admittance to the nursing staff at this hospital, this privilege extended to stu- 
dents at John B. Murphy's is especially noteworthy. 

With the culmination of the present term, the tenth year of the training 
school governed by the hospital authorities is completed. During this period, 
attendance at this school has been limited to a comparatively small student 
body, due to the lack of more ample facilities. Though modern in every detail, 
the size of the hospital has made restriction to small classes a necessity. 

Well equipped by a competent staff of eminent physicians who compose the 
greater part of the faculty, theoretical knowledge presented to the student 
nurses is equal to that offered at any similar institution. Graduate nurses 
possessing a wealth of practical experience in their professional field, and a 
few Sisters, members of the Mercy order, complete the faculty. 




H.OIILK. MITCHELL, KHIIHIK. LEV \ NDL >K1 



THE 19 31 LOYOLAN 






nii'i in hi 



OAK PARK HOSPITAL NURSES' TRAINING SCHOOL 



The graduation of the class of 1931 from the Oak Park hospital school for 
nurses marks the completion of the twenty-third year of this institution. Es- 
pecially fortunate in its direction by the Sisters of Miserieorde, attendance at 
this school has increased with such gratifying rapidity, that the construction ot 
a new and more commodious nurses* home became necessary in 1925. With 
the completion of this home, the Dumber of high school graduates who sought 
admittance to Oak Park hospital exceeded all expectations, and the present 
freshman class, numbering more than thirty students, is by far the largest 
ever enrolled. 

Together with its material rise, other developments which redound to the 
credit of the institution are worthy of mention. Noteworthy educational prog- 
ress in the school itself, and the courses offered, was made possible by the in- 
creased entrance requirements. Well equipped by a staff of eminent doctors 







SENIOR GROUP 
nefdham. homan (Vice-President) , pal 



bass, herald ( Sec. Treas. 
im.imiski. \. ptaszek ( /'resident > 



PALMER. DRISCOLL, LINDSAY 
FILLAFEK. SACRICINO 
GRAZIANO, LASNEK, O'CONNOR 



T II 



9 3 



LAN 




A f A - U 





JUNIOR GROUP 
fokd, pfiffner, powell ( Vice-Pres. ), Vincent (President), bruce (Sec. Treas.), lechlinski 

LARSON. MC COY, FRIES, ROUCE 
TVNTON. PLANTE, MALINOSKI, BATES. JOHNSON 

who compose the faculty, theoretical instruction of a more comprehensive na- 
ture has resulted. Opportunities for observation and practical training are 
afforded the student nurses because of the size of the hospital, and the large 
number of patients who seek medical care at this institution. 

Along with the six other nurses" training schools represented in the Loyolan, 
Oak Park hospital is fully accredited to the University, and as cuch. work done 
in this school may be applied towards a degree from Loyola University. At 
present a large number of registered nurses from this hospital are availing 
themselves of the opportunity this affiliation presents, and are now in attend- 
ance at the Downtown College from which they shall receive their academic 
degrees in a short period. 







FRESHMAN GROUP 

DOWNEY, JEFFREY, REAYELL. WILSON, MOORE, HANCHETT. MALLINCER, TOPERCER ( President I . 

HANRAHAN, BALLARD. MC NEELY 

SWAN, DOLAN, GEAREN, BURKE, CONSIDINE, MURPHY, BEAULIEU, FITZGERALD, DE SYLVESTER. WOLFF 

ERUSTER, CREENE, O'CONNOR, E. PATSZEK ( Vice-Pres. I , CURRAN, OLESON, MALBOEUF. SCHWALBACH, 

scully (Sec. Treas.) 



T H 



19 3 1 LOYOLA* 




NURSING 



<j£2A 



One of the educational developments of re- 
cent years is the introduction of schools for 
nurses into the family of schools which make 
up the modern university. This movement is 
the indirect result of the development of uni- 
versity schools of medicine which have con- 
nected with them, as a necessary adjunct, hos- 
pitals for teaching. Thus many schools for 
nurses have heen placed upon a collegiate basis 
so that pupils in these schools receive academic 
credit counting toward the Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Nursing degree. 

Loyola has nine affiliated hospitals of which 
seven maintain schools of nurses training. 






"The Loyola University Alumni Association 
is at present organized in departmental asso- 
ciations, for Arts. Medicine, Law, Dentistry, 
and Alumnae. There has been healthy growth 
and development in each department. The 
Medics and Dents have their annual dinner 
and their home-coming round of clinics. The 
Arts have sponsored a program of placement 
work, functioning now for the Senior Arts of 
this year, but destined to be of service to all 
Alumni in the near future. The spirit of loy- 
alty and devotedness on the part of the alumni 
is admirable, and it is gradually being given 
tangible and visible form in a stronger and 
more efficient organization." 

Director, Alumni Reorganization. 





THE ALUMNI 
ASSOCIATION 



William H. Agnew, S.J. 

President Loyola University, 1922-28 

Dietl February 13. 1931 





WILLI IMS 

LONC 

PICKETT 

SULLIVAN 



Due to the founding of several of the schools of the Uni- 
versity under separate auspices the cohesion of the different 
alumni bodies into one organization has been found to be im- 
practicable. 

Father William T. Kane who has been placed in charge of 
the alumni reorganization program of the Administrative 
Council has seen the wisdom of having the alumni bodies of 
the Arts College, the School of Law. the School of Medicine, 
and the School of Dentistry separately established. 

During the past year Mr. John T. Long has presided over 
the alumni body of the old St. Ignatius College and the present 
College of Arts and Sciences. The vocational talks which have 
been given by outstanding business authorities to the members 
of the senior class and the endeavors to place these men in 
positions where they thought themselves best fitted; the ban- 
quet to the senior class on April 15, 1931, in the Palmer House 
and the general support given to university projects have been 
due to its activity. 

Judge Philip L. Sullivan has headed the Law alumni through 
a year where the greater part of the body's efforts had to be 
expended in organizing itself for future activity. 

The Law r and Medical alumni are bound together by alumni 
publications while the professional convocations, clinics and 
conventions further serve to organize these bodies into mili- 
tant alumni groups. Dr. W. Ira Williams was president of the 
alumni of the Chicago College of Dental Surgery while Dr. 
William J. Pickett headed the Medics. 



THE 



9 3 



LAN 




THE ALUMNAE 
ASSOCIATION 




Olive Pence 
President 



With the organization in September, 1914, of the School 
of Sociology as a separate departmental unit of Loyola 
University, the alumnae association was formed under 
the leadership of Reverend Frederic Siedenburg, S.J., 
dean of the school. The first class enrolled at the new 
department composed the nucleus from which the pres- 
ent organization, comprising graduates from all depart- 
ments of the University, has grown. 

During the early years of its establishment, the aim of 
this organization was to develop an active, loyal body of 
graduates, who by their enthusiasm in activities pertain- 
ing to Loyola might help the school materially by aiding 
in its expansion. The friendly spirit existing among the 
members from its very inauguration has realized this 
original purpose in a very tangible way. Sponsoring 
numerous card parties and other social affairs during the 
past years, the alumnae have created ten scholarships for 
the training of social workers in the School of Sociology. 

Within recent years, as a result of several card parties, 
the organization has contributed more than fifteen hun- 
dred dollars to furnish the sacristy of the faculty chapel 
on the Lake Shore Campus. A bronze plaque at the 
sacristy door commemorates the gift of this active group 
and their faculty advisor, Father Siedenburg. 

The officers who have conducted the association during 
the successful year just completed, are: Miss Olive Pence, 
president ; Miss Agatha Long, vice-president ; Miss Helen 
Brindl, secretary; Miss Agnes Madden, treasurer; Miss 
Marie Squire, delegate, and Miss Florence Kane, alternate. 





M M1DKN 
SQUIRE 
BRINDL 
LONG 



THE 1 931 LOYOLA* 



£ ^xZ?!»*£- ^IxT?»v!C 





THE BACCALAUREATE MAS 




THE 1930 COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES 
With the Baccalaureate Mass at St. Ignatius Church 
on Sunday. June 8. commencement exercises for the 
classes of 1930 were officially begun. Reverend James J. 
Mertz, S.J.. addressed the largest graduating class in the 
history of the University, recalling the inestimable privi- 
leges they had received in their Catholic education, and 
impressing upon them once more the duties incumbent 
upon them in virtue of their training. The morning 
services were brought to a fitting close by Benediction 
sheen of the Blessed Sacrament. 

Following the religious services, the graduates as- 
sembled for the dedication of the new Elizabeth Cudahy memorial library. 
Dedication ceremonies were opened with an address by Secretary Milam rep- 
resenting the American Library Association. In his dedicatory address. Ar- 
thur E. Bostwick, Ph.D.. librarian of the St. Louis public library, explained 
what constituted a real appreciation of hooks, and the place they should 
occupy in the lives of cultured people. 

The formal graduation exercises were held on Wednesday. June 11. in the 
Alumni gymnasium on the Lake Shore campus. A procession of faculty mem- 
bers and students left the administration building, and though arranged ac- 
cording to schools, marched as a unified whole, to the gymnasium. President 
Robert M. Kelley. S.J., presided at the exercises, assisted by the deans of the 
various colleges, who presented their graduates. Instead of the usual tedious 
method of having each candidate leave his place to re- 
ceive his degree, the individuals, because of the unusually 
large number involved, merely rose and acknowledged 
their presence as their names were called. 

Doctor Fulton Sheen of the Catholic L niversity in 
\\ ashing ton addressed the assemblage, speaking on the 
vast superiority of Catholic education over secular train- 
ing. He aptly illustrated by his incomparable similes, 
that education in its true sense must include moral as 
well as intellectual advancement, and that this essential 



quality 



,1,1; 



tble onlv in Catholic institutions. 




THE 



19 3 



L O Y O L A X 




SKMOliS o.N l'\R \DK 




The impressive ceremonies were brought to a climax 
with the presentation of tour honorary degrees. Dean 
Austin G. Schmidt of the Graduate school added to Doc- 
tor Sheen's distinctions the degree of Doctor of Laws. 
A graduate student of the Catholic University in Wash- 
ington, the universities of Louvain. Paris, and Rome. Dr. 
Sheen is generally recognized as one of the most bril- 
liant American philosophers. Besides the prominence 
he enjoys as a lecturer of note, he has written four out- 
standing treatises on Revelation. Philosophy and Psy- 
chology. SCHM,DT 

Edward A. Cudahy received his degree from the Reverend Claude Pernin, 
S.J. For his zealous Catholicity, his philanthropic contributions, and his ex- 
emplary life, Mr. Cudahy was recently honored by the Holy See with the 
Order of Knighthood of St. John of Malta. 

Reverend Joseph Reiner, S.J.. of the College of Arts and Sciences conferred 
the honorary degree upon Dr. Otto L. Schmidt, M.D., Litt.D. Preparing for 
his life work by years of study both at home and abroad. Dr. Schmidt is now 
recognized as an expert pathological diagnostician. At present he holds the 
presidency of the Illinois State Historical Society. 

Katherine Pomeroy Merrill was the fourth recipient of an honorary degree, 
presented by Reverend F. G. Dineen. S.J. She enjoys the distinction of being 
the first woman thus honored by the university. As an entertaining lecturer 
on the finer things in modern literature, history and 
drama. Miss Merrill has inspired audiences in universi- 
ties, colleges, schools and church groups. 

Individual honors were also conferred upon two grad- 
uataes for scholastic attainment, and two others for ora- 
torical proficiency. John Klest. "30 was the recipient of 
the Alumni Scholarship Key. emblematic of the highest 
scholastic achievement in the College of Liberal Arts. 
Joseph Santucci, "30 received the Law Scholarship Key. 
Charles A. Bovle, "30 and Thomas J. Downey received 
the Harrison Oratorical Award, and the John Naghten 
Debate Key respectively. 




THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 




THE 

MARIA DELLA STRADA 

CHAPEL 



James J. Mertz, S.J. 




Due to the labors of Father James J. Mertz. S.J., plans for the construction 
of the much desired campus chapel are being rushed to completion. The 
edifice will greatly enhance the appearance of the lake shore grounds and as 
the plans show, will balance the Cudahy Library on the south of the Admin- 
istration Building. 

The task of raising the necessary funds has been an exceedingly difficult 
one. Several times when large donations which had been promised and 
which would have made it possible for construction to begin immediately, 
unforseen difficulties made it necessary for the donors to withhold their 
offers. It is to the credit of Father Mertz that despite the constant rebuffs 
which he has received he has persistently and cheerily gone about his work. 

The chapel will resemble the exterior of the Library. Interiorilv it will 




THE 1931 LOYOLA* 



5trai>a cE. 



"OUR 

LADY OF THE WAYSIDE' 

CHAPEL 




<JLTS£/ 



Till. ( H \ri:i. HI LLETIN 



be distinguished by its high vaulted ceiling; its inlaid chestnut panels, the 
Mankato marble stone work and its marble alters. The main alter will be 
of the Baldachino or canopy type. Five shrines, one consecrated to the 
North American martyrs, one to St. Ignatius, another to St. Francis Xavier, 
one to St. Therese, and the last to the Three Youthful Saints, will be placed 
along the sides of the chapel. 

Its seating capacity will be approximately one thousand. This quota will 
accommodate as man)' students as the Jesuits care to have in attendance at 
the Arts College for a number of years. 

The Delia Strada is the monthly chapel paper. Appearing at regular in- 
tervals its cheery messages have been highly instrumental in effecting the 
personal contacts which Father Mertz has made with his numerous aids. 




«, r 




T H 



931 L O Y O L A X 




ALUMNI 




Sixty years ago the Loyola Alumni Associa- 
tion had its unofficial beginning. It was at that 
time that the first class was graduated from St. 
Ignatius College. Due to the small number of 
graduates the organization was relatively inac- 
tive. 

When the college was incorporated into a 
university difficulties of organizing the gradu- 
ates into one body were so insurmountable that 
the activity of the body was confined chiefly to 
the erection of the Alumni Gymnasium and 
to sporadic gatherings. 

\\ ith the power that rests in such a body for 
accomplishing good for the University it is sin- 
cerely hoped that the present plan of reorgani- 
zation will prove effective in stimulating gen- 
eral alumni support to Loyola projects. 





©fce ttoo tooloes ate spmoolic of t&e "ticos fcomotes"— t&e 

nooilitp. C&ep follotoeD tfce camps of tfre successful toattiots. 

C&e Defeated toattiots, of coutse, toete follotoeD op a clouo 

of Dust. 



FOREWORD 




IN THIS BOOK OF 

The Loyolan 

the staff attempts to picture the many sided life of Loyola 
university. Our review is hardly complete; the scattered na- 
ture of the student bodies, their diverse interests, and the 
difficulty of collecting a representative group of pictures neces- 
sitate the limiting of our portrayal of Loyola life. 

It is our hope, however, that in these following pages the 
reader may feel himself behind the scenes, viewing the in- 
formal life of the students of the University; seeing them at 
work and at play, in victory and in defeat; each in a small 
way contributing to the progress of the greater Loyola. 




jggggg^ 





1. Currying the jan mail. 

2. When feature sections are suppressed. 

3. With their hacks to the wall. 

4. Passing the buck. 



5. .in old Russian custom. 

6. A non-partisan candidate? 

7. Father Brunner gets the < 

8. Pepsodent ad. 







1. Same old story — editors at 

2. Mack exhorts the gigolos. 

3. No! You're not the one. 

4. That shirt itch, Doug? 



5. "ITe bagged three profs and a guide.' 

6. Cliff without the broom. 

7. Jackie takes a snifter. 

8. Why women have sinking spells. 




1. Even Meds have girl friends. 

2. Butcher's union. 

3. Dents drilling on the sidewalk. 

4. Not a brain cell working. 



5. This might have happened 

6. Five girls lost. 

7. Let's whistle. Agnes. 

8. Beware of pickpockets. 




1. Reading left to right — Whiz Bang. 
Nights in Paris, Loyola Neivs. 

2. You can't beat the game. 

3. Joe puts the bishop in his place. 

4. Some campus bootleggers. 



5. Four Faultless Felons. 

6. Trained in the Innoday. 

". Man "attending church" dur 

ment week. 
8. Dear old college days! 




1. Let's pair off and dunce. 

2. Keep your distance. 

3. Yes, Mr. Hodapp. 

4. The Unholy Three. 



5. Pony going over fence. 

6. Three knocks before entering. 

7. And then a friend suggested Herpicide. 

8. Say, why is a campus cop? 




1. Keep your eye on it, Joe. 

2. Dog pound. 

3. Leather pushers. 



4. Hunk, the spinner. 

5. Note shou- us the right way, Lee. 
(). Gettin' in shape for a just date. 




1. Just before the battle. 

2. What's the matter? Is it hot? 

3. Leaving the Mundelein Dance. 



4. Bums' rush. 

5. Thanks, I know 

6. "Stay away from 



the Merry Garden.' 




1. Not much chance for the poor boy. 

2. Internes turn out. 

3. Could you say no? 

4. Father Walsh and guardian angel. 



6. Reaching for the moon. 

7. Wrong pick-up. 

8. Horticulture faculty. 




1. Wantu buy the Gulupngos Islands 

2. Three blind mice. 

3. / icuntu dance wid the guy what 
fetched me. 



1. Banquet sidelines. 

5. L'p in God's acres. 

6. Ten cents a dance. 

7. Hols off. There's ladies present. 







© 



& 




© 




1. Chocolate Sunday. 

2. Pretty soft. 

3. Hear the bird? 

4. Medicine man and squaw. 



5. Find the flat tires. 

6. The bumper crop. 

7. Pensile or seasick! 

8. 77/ take a short on 




1. Friday morning. 

2. Behind the scenes. 

3. Mass of the Holy Ghost. 

4. Sanctuary. 



5. Four minute men? 

6. Late comers. 

7. Three Live Goats. 

8. The very latest— the square halo. 




i&w 




1. Howd' you know we was collitch babes': 

2. Getting into big time. 

3. Lining up Loyola dates. 

4. Mushrooms? 



5. W hite Loyola waited for Mundelein. 

6. Say, can she throw it. 

7. Just waiting around. 




1. Low bridge; he's Hatching. 

2. Lookin' for the danger line. 

3. Conditionally speaking. 

4. Wonder if I can get a date? 



5. The cream line never varies. 

6. There is frogs — and frogs. 
Better ooen the door. Mr. Swo 



Better open 
Not a cadai 
psychology. 



e — experi 




1. Father Keller and tht 
Mr. and Mrs. Cudahy 

2. Bush men. 

3. Seniors on parade. 



Hey pa. Willie's in one of them fit 

hats. 

End of the Line. 

Feel educated? 

Seven blank ones. 




LOYOLA LIFE 



College life a la films: rah-rah boys in rac- 
coon coats with collegiate flivvers, willowy co- 
eds who are part of the campus landscape, a 
football team playing in a jammed stadium 
before a howling mob: the hero finally stag- 
gers over the goal line to make the score 73 
to 0, the president's daughter dashes out upon 
the field discarding fraternity pins on the run 
and hurls herself into the arms of the unsus- 
pecting young sophomore who has been work- 
ing his way through school selling cows and 
other quadrupeds for the dean's office. Clinch 
. . . finis. 

a fellow up on 
dyed dog coat. 



Loyola Life: Well, there"; 
the North Campus who has t 




86% W^M 




fce amofee olacfeeneo kettle is associated vuftfj tbe life of m 
camp. Cfce Bouse of Lopola renDeteD sue!) settiice in arms to 
t&e ctoton t&at ^entp of Castille to&en leveling tije strongfcoios 
of <5uipu?coa eiempteD t&at of JLopola from t&e general Doom. 







# # 



PUBLICATIONS 



ci^sy 



''Undoubtedly the Quarterly has not the uni- 
versal appeal of the Police Gazette, the News 
of the Abendpost or The Loyolan of a Sears 
and Roebuck catalogue but none can deny 
the importance of Loyola's major publications 
to Loyola students. 

The apparent aversion on the part of the 
public-at-large may possibly be explained by 
the facts that Loyola maintains no free reading 
rooms in diverse ends of our metropolis or 
that few if any copies are carried as far as the 
'L\ much less left in the trains. 

Then, again, it may not." 




President, Beta Pi. 




A WORD FROM 
THE MODERATOR 



Morton Dauwen Zabel 
The Loyolan 

The Loyola Quarterly 




In every age man has been possessed by two great desires: to co mm un i cate 
with his contemporaries, and to preserve his own and his age's history tor 
posterity. True communication does not stop when the ear of another man 
has been won; it goes on to instil into another mind every implication of 
significance, esthetic and moral, of which human speech is capable. A his- 
torical record does not stop with fact: it attempts to bring the facts of actual 
experience into alignment with the ideals which motivated them. The Loyola 
Quarterly has served the students of the University for many years as an in- 
centive toward developing their talents in composition, and in bringing these 
talents to a point of expertness which makes of writing something more than 
a fulfilment of class-room assignments or business duties. It has existed to 
encourage the art of writing, and those students wdio have made use of its 
services may perhaps bring the honor of literary achievement back to their 
college, but will in any case have carried away one of the most fruitful cul- 
tural experiences a school can give. The editors of The Loyolan, this year 
as in the past, have tried to present a record not merely of routine events 
and scheduled duties, but of ideals. If this year-book is ultimately saved 
from the Limbo of forgotten things, it will be because the mere history it 
relates is surrounded by reminders of the principles under which the true 
student works out his apprenticeship to life. The hours of gratuitous labor 
given by student editors will be repaid not only by gains in personal experi- 
ence and skill, but by the gratitude of every alumnus who sees in these two 
publications a testimony of high cultural and spiritual idealism, and by every 
future student who finds here a model for his own untested efforts. 




Ol£otisDCLUJUjCn?aha- 



l 



THE 



9 3 



I. O Y O L A X 




SPEAKING 
FOR THE NEWS 




D. Hkrbekt Abel 
The Loyola News 



In its seventh volume, the Loyola News has continued the idealism of its 
founders. Headed by the forceful personalities of two capable editors and 
assisted by a staff of over eighty members, the News has mirrored the life 
upon the various campuses of the university, has continued its building of a 
strong all-university feeling, has aided the establishment of intramural ath- 
letics and sponsored other moves for Loyolan betterment. It has acquired a 
solidarity and recognized position of leadership among campus activities. It 
boasts perhaps the most cosmopolitan membership of any activity, yet despite 
the varied interests of the different departments a strong editorial organiza- 
tion has been perfected to give adequate representation to each group. 

The task of moderating such a college weekly as the Loyola News might be 
arduous indeed, had the moderator encountered sporadic and fitful gusts of 
energy from his staff and a lukewarm appreciation from the administration. 
Constant and faithful devotion and a spirit of genuine idealism in his writers 
together with the utmost co-operation from the administration has, however, 
transformed the task of moderating from what might have been an unpleasant 
duty into a pleasurable occupation. 

For the staff members labor on the Loyola News has meant more than 
acquiring the ability to write clearly and concisely, more than an ability to 
edit and juggle headline units. It has shown them the necessity of a wide 
range of knowledge and a cultural background: it has developed to some ex- 
tent a judicial attitude of mind; it has given them a sense of responsibility; 
it has stressed the importance of accuracy: it has fostered initiative and re- 
sourcefulness and developed habits of perseverance, tact and courtesy; it has 
made them possessed of a spirit of co-operation with their associates: it has 
developed in them a sympathetic understanding of their readers: it has given 
them a certain fearlessness and strength in their own convictions and has made 
them conscious of their mission of leadership in the world of Catholic laymen. 

The Loyola Neics recently has adopted a revised editorial platform ambi- 
tious and vast. Each department of the paper has increased in the amount 
of its service during the past year. The staff have even more sanguine hopes 
for the future. May they prosper as fruitfully and as pleasantly as in the 
past. 



Adtefok 



SSBffl&SJSBt ~^rw 



» 3 



1. O V O L A > 




THE 
1931 LOYOLAN 



Robert J. Rafferty 
Editor-in-Chief 




Among the popular campus superstitions is the one that the Loyolan is 
edited over night. To glance summarily at some four hundred odd pages one 
might easily be led to believe that the work is started in May and concluded 
the same month. Il would seem that a few hours spent in writing dimensions 
on the back of gloss prints and the pasting of proof and copy in the book 
would be but a matter of a few days. Not so, however. What the editor 
believes to be the most efficient staff yet to break windows in the Loyolan 
office spent almost eight months preparing the 1931 volume. 

When one considers that some faculty members whose pictures were essen- 
tial to completion of certain sections had to be sent as many as five personal 
letters and then driven down to the studio for a sitting; were one to realize 
that to take a picture of the golf squad, for instance, it was necessary to take 
an entire afternoon off. the problems facing the staff might better be ap- 
preciated. 

To the four outstanding junior members the editor is especially grateful. 
John Lenihan took control of the business end of publication and also super- 
vised the freshman assistants. Holy Joe Walsh besides scheduling all the 



QB*G 



J. RAFFERTY 



^g^gaEBSgsrei the 1931 HTo y o l a n Jfe^^B3aB53 




VOLUME 
VIII 




SEEN II BEFORE 5 



class and activity groups, arranged for the individual sittings of the some six 
hundred who have appeared individually in the book and acted as spiritual 
advisor to the staff members. Jim Rafferty between playing on the varsity 
basketball squad, debating;, etc.. managed to handle over fifty pages of the 
Loyolan. Fred Ludwig, took over the difficult task of editing the Senior 
Section and dispatched it with his customary efficiency. One especially grati- 
fying feature of their work was the initiative and zeal which led them to do 
more than they were individually responsible for. 

In the format of the volume the reader will no doubt notice many changes 
over the past. Five colors were used for the division page work. For the 
first time color was introduced into the View Section. The Life and Class 
sections were noticeably improved over past years, a Class Four cover was 
employed and the boiler plate and padding which too often characterize the 
class write-ups were, at least partially, omitted. 

No doubt the reader will find many instances of what he or she believes 
is poor taste. That, unfortunately, as ex-editor Dick O'Connor would say is 

one of those things which can't be avoided. Undoubtedly, they exist. 

If, in the engraving we reversed the part in your hair or cut your date's pic- 






DQ L 



TORDELLA R. (MOWOK 



THE 1931 LOYOLAN 





SOMK STAFF MEMBERS I.N TVI'ICAI, I'OSKS 



ture out of a dance photo, lay the blame on the poor light in the Loyolan 
office or to the fact that the West Side exerted too much appeal for several 
of the men on the previous night. 

To sophomore members, Callahan, and Tordella, praise of their diligence 
and energy should be forthcoming. Not satisfied with editing but one section, 
each took over several others and while engaged in extra-curricular activities 
of other natures managed to garner the coveted straight "A' averages several 
times. Bob O'Connor while doing all in his power to enliven editorial pro- 
ceedings rounded up an excellent collection of 'Life" pictures and arranged 
them in a most pleasing manner. Charlie Mann, Paul Quinn, Paul Reed. 
Cliff Steinle, Al Dahlberg and many others, too numerous to name, are staff 
members whose duties were conscientiously performed. 

The happiest tradition carried on is the one which to the outgoing staff is 
summarized in the belief that each succeeding volume is the best to date and 
that the next will be just a wee bit better for their efforts. 



We hope you like it! 




' ' i 



THE 



9 3 



LOYOLAN 




j}& n n © 



I f f t ? t 




THE LOYOLAN STAFF 

STEINLE, SPELMAN, DAHLBERC. STEINBRECHER, QUINN, D .F. MAHER 
IANN, D. B. MAHER, TORDEI LA, CALLAHAN, VONESH. J. RAFFERTY 
WALSH, R. RAFFERTY ZABEL (Moderator), LENIHAN, Ll'DWIC 



THE STAFF OF THE 1931 LOYOLAN 



Robert J. Raft'erty 
John L. Lenilian . 
Joseph A. Walsh 
James F. Rafferty 
Fred M. Ludwig 



Editor-in-Chief 

Business Manager 

Photographic Editor 

Athletic Editor 

Senior Editor 



SECTION EDITORS 



John J. Callahan Literary. Spiritual, Dramatic 

Louis W. Tordella . Fraternities, Forensics 

Paul F. Quinn Publications, Alumni 

Charles H. Mann Society 

Robert W. O'Connor Loyola Life 

Paul A. Reed Cartoonist 

James F. Vonesh Nurses 

DEPARTMENTAL EDITORS 

Clifford Steinle Medicine 

Albert A. Dahlberg Dentistry 

James A. Currv Night Laic 

John F. Sears Day Law 

Thomas F. Cole Commerce 

BUBO 



THE 1931 LOYOLAN 




THE 
LOYOLA NEWS 



J oh* K. Bruun 

Editor. First Semrster 




In its seventh year, the Loyola News is generally acknowledged to be the 
greatest single instrument in the rendering of Loyola a body of students uni- 
versity-conscious. No other organization has accomplished more to make 
the students of all departments realize they are but a part of a greater whole. 
No other activity has a membership so inclusive and representative. 

High up on the walls of the historic "Tower" is scrolled the "Editorial Plat- 
form" embodying the ideals of this unifying purpose. "Student resident halls 
for the West and Lake Shore campuses: A school of journalism for Loyola: 
Intensify all-university activity: Support the new alumni program." Such are 
the goals toward which the editors and writers have been striving in this 
seventh year. 

In the hands of the two editors. John K. Bruun and Thomas Poynton. the 
Loyola News "maintained its traditionally high standard". Self-sacrifice, gen- 
uine idealism, devotion and hours of real labor in recasting, editing, headline- 
writing, editorial work — these things cannot be measured nor can proper 
appreciation of them be voiced in cold type. 

The work of finding the news, assigning the men to cover it, editing and 
finally sending the copy to the managing board devolves upon the campus 



ismmaxsms&L the 1931 loyola* asisjfegftasjg, 




VOLUME 
VII 




Thomas Poynton 
Editor. Second Semester 



editors. The News has been fortunate during the past year in having capable 
men at the heads of the departmental boards. In the Arts Department Roger 
Knittel, Thomas Downey, John Farrell, Jack Janszen and Francis Steinbrecber 
assisted the News in this important capacity. At the Downtown College Tom 
Cole headed the local staff. Al Dahlberg found bis duties too manifold at the 
half and turned over his position of Campus Editor to Tom Scanlan after a 
successful term. Cliff Steinle, between carving cadavers and acting as the 
Loyolan representative to his school, headed the Medical department staff. 

In December, 1924, five freshmen initiated the move for an all-university 
Loyola News, printing their first number on a mimeograph. Shortly, the paper 
was transferred to the Loyola I niversitv Press, which facilitated expansion 
and embodiment of pictures and art work, and it was later placed in a plant 
with high speed circular presses. Today the successors of the original staff 
quintet consist of over one hundred students representing every department 
of the Univerity, and every Tuesday during the school year the product of 
their efforts comes "hot off the presses," to be bundled for speedy distribution 
Eo all departments. The staff mailing department promptly wraps and classi- 
fies hundreds of copies to be mailed throughout the United States and to sev- 
eral foreign points. 

iM ml i* U 



THE 19 31 LOYOLA*' 




I^Ji^L 


*\ rt f* 


> ^ /T 


3 *.*j 




^^- ^^B^Bkc -^9 


1 ■■? ^ 


hrakwA* 


s? «^<-^ 4^* ^^ 


, * ^Xi 



NEWS STAFF, GROUP I 

PALMER, FRANEY. MOSES. JANSZEN, SPELMAN, STEINBRECHER, PUCHS, O'REILLY, MC DONALD 



Foremost in the year's activity for the News staff is the endeavor to publish 
a great newspaper for Loyola. The romance of building and perfecting a 
Loyola News must be found in the hard work, for it is that, which occupies 
the greater part of the time. The lights in the News Tower continue to burn 
long after the Lake Shore campus has fallen asleep, and it is not unusual for 
the staff members to be busy long after midnight. Cares of the News have 
kept them working late as four in the morning, while at times work has de- 
manded rising at that hour. "The presses must rumble." 

W riting a Loyola News is never a simple task, however there are further 
problems of staff organization, problems of the business department, and 
problems of editing and make-up which make the student newspaper a very 
complex business and demand more time and more energy than those of many 
community newspapers. Necessarily, therefore, the editors must depend upon 
a large number of individuals whose loyalty and spirit are greatly responsible 
for the present Loyola News. Outstanding among these are a few old-timers 
like Al Dahlberg, Cliff Steinle. Tom Cole. Luke Spelman and Jack Franey. 
The loyalty and spirit which such men have devoted to work on the Loyola 
News has been an invaluable asset to the departments they represent and to 
the University. 



rllQD 



USRSBSteL&^S&L THE 1931 LOYOLA* 



A,n 



$ < 3^.,u ., Jlt^ ^L ±. 



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NEWS STAFF, GROUP II 

QUANE, MARCINKOWSKI, BEKIER, COONEY, NORTON. DOWNEY. BRENNAN 

SCANLAN, DAHLBERC, GLASSER, VONESCH, WOLFF 

PTASZEK. CIRRAN, POWELL, LECHINSKI, FILLAFER, MURPHY 

SECOND SEMESTER STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Thomas Poynton 

Managing Editor Austin J. Do vie 

Business Manager John T. Franey 

SPORTS DEPARTMENT 

Sports Editor Thomas O'Neil 

Asst. Sports Editors Charles Aeker, Maurice Fitz Gerald 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Advertising Manager Arthur Dellers 

Asst. Business Manager Frank J. Garvey 

Asst. Advertising Mgr> Francis Murali, Ralph Moran. John Mclntyre 

Circulation Manager John McGowan 

Asst. Cire. Mgrs Daniel Gibbons, Charles H. Palmer, Sam Karras 

FEATURES 

Inquiring Reporter Robert M. McDonell 

Ho-Hum Dode Norton 

Dent Spurt> Ray A. Olech 

Medical Matinee Cliff Steinle 

Drama Notes Thomas L. Spelman 

Book Notes Victor Ungaro 

Commerce Chatter Thomas Cole 

Alumni Notes Bernard Gibbons 

Faculty Advisor D. Herbert Abel 




STEINLE ROONEY DAHLBERC MOOTER 



THE 1931 LOYOLA*' 




THE LOYOLA QUARTERLY 



Jack J. Lannon 
Editor-in-Chief 




The twenty-ninth volume of The Loyola Quarterly brings to the threshold 
of its fourth decade the oldest publication in Loyola University. In the Quar- 
terly center those interests and occupations which the classes of an Arts College 
develop: original and creative thought, practice in the written word, cultivation 
of the graces of expression and persuasion, and a training in the communica- 
tion of ideas. The Quarterly has had its periods of flourishing success and of 
comparatively quiet persistence in its original aims. For the past two or three 
years it has struck a much more conservative stride than between 1923 and 
1927. but on the whole a much steadier gait than in those years I 1915-23 I when 
it was obliged to combine school chronicle with the functions of a literary 
journal. However, the past year has not been without its distinction, the spe- 
cial features that set it apart from former calendars. The Quarterly last fall 
changed its paper from the porous magazine stock of previous volumes to the 
glossy-surfaced variety which permits both a rich and luminous type-face and 
also the printing of engravings. Distinct typographical changes were intro- 
duced: a bolder type for titles and sub-titles, a two-column page instead of the 
former broad one-column arrangement, a more generous spacing of poems and 
feature articles, and a widening of margins. The assistance of student artists 
was solicited, and while costs prohibited the development of pictorial features, 
new departmental titles were drawn by Theodore Fuchs and Anthony Favat, 
and, for the fall issue, a new cover by Anthony Zichus. The various depart- 
ments — "Coffee House." "Humanist." "The Book Shelf." "Drama." "The Com- 
mentator" — have all continued in their well-ordered ways: "The Humanist" 
largely through the co-operation of the Latin classes who provided much ex- 






HQ 



IIIMI Z\k 



-I'KI M \S 



THE 1931 LOYOLAN 




VOLUME XXIX 




Francis Steinbrecher 
Associate Editor 



cellent material in the way of classical studies, particularly the papers which 
comprised the Virgilian anniversary number this spring. From the outlying 
departments of the University this year — as in the past — disappointingly few 
manuscripts have come. The Medical and even the Dental Schools have sub- 
mitted essays in the past, but this year their collaboration was once more miss- 
ing. From the Downtown School several interesting papers in philosophy and 
education have been submitted, and the Law School was represented by one 
ambitious paper, but as formerly the work of Arts and Sciences students pro- 
vided the bulk of the contributions. 

These have ranged from stories and character sketches, notably those of 
Eugene Finan and Roger Knittel. to the serious literary and historical papers 
of John Callahan, Joseph Mammoser, Edward Hines, John Gerriets, Louis 
Tordella. Lothar Nurnberger, Courtney Ryan, etc. The Book Shelf has pro- 
vided its quarterly array of interesting volumes, the majority current, but sev- 
eral of earlier seasons. "The Drama" has been limited by the limitations of 
the Chicago theatrical season and the ascetic disdain of the stage practised 
by most of the students. "The Humanist" has had one of its best years, chiefly 
through the co-operation of the Latin classes. 

In the arrangement of advertisements, the Quarterly has made concessions 
to popular demand in spacing its notices among the actual text columns. Nor 
should this record omit mention of the large and generous office quarters pro- 
vided in the recently remodelled basement of the Faculty Building: here, for 
the first time in several years, the equipment and furniture of the magazine 
claim their own private territory. 

■1 L E □ 



CALLAHAN 



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THE 



9 3 



L © Y © L A ZV 





THE QUARTERLY STAFF 

GILL, MANN, CALKINS. POVNTON. SPELMAN 
(AFFEHTV. BRUUN, TOKDELLA, CALLAHAN, KNITTEL 

jon. z\bel (Moderator), stkinbkecher. to.mczvk 



It was somewhat more than a mere while ago that the magazine attained its 
full stature as genuine literary medium, but due to extrinsic forces the limita- 
tions upon the content was not always as clearly denned as they might have 
been. In the course of its very active life the magazine has been called upon 
to reflect student life in its entirety; to render a news service to the Univers- 
ity; to provide the sole record of achievement for individuals and organiza- 
tions; and under the much abused caption of "Humor" to provide sheltering 
to sophomoric outpourings. 

With the establishment of The Loyolan; and the News the onus of extra- 
literary features has been relieved and a reversion to the originally purposed 
literary policy was forthcoming. As a complement to the truism that "the 
only way to learn is to write" follows "the only reason to write is for publica- 
tion." MM 
The Quarterly is conscious of its responsibility to the University as a whole. 
It must, if it is to justify its existence and live up to the hopes of its original 
founders, represent one of the highest and worthiest purposes behind an insti- 
tution of culture. The brunt of this responsibility has hitherto fallen upon 
too limited a number of students. The Quarterly exists as a medium of literary 
and controversial expression for every student in the school, and only by avail- 
ing themselves of its opportunities, will the students make use of one of their 
best channels toward self-development and esteem, and so find in the Quarterly 
the necessarv and vital cultural organ which it is. 

It is a much discussed cpaestion whether the fields 
opened by a literary magazine to those who have the 
desire and ability to write are so narrow that they offer 
almost nothing to the average student. While it is true 
that ambition often fails to approximate talent, it is an 
undeniable fact that the pages of The Quarterly are al- 
wavs accessible to one whose literary skill must be sup- 
plemented by earnestness. The Quarterly has always 
sought, whenever possible, to represent the thougbt of 
Loyola university, and to stimulate that thought to a 
The Quarterly better expression of itself. 




THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A I¥ 





i.uyui.vs i.ksskh i.rn:n\Hv lights 



THE MINOR PUBLICATIONS 

Ho-Hum. edited and copyrighted by Daniel R. Murphy, appeared in the 
spring of 1930. The fifth volume of excerpts from the humor column of the 
Loyola News, from the point of popular appeal, was every bit as whimsical 
and facetious as its predecessors. 

The Dentos, the annual publication of the Loyola Dental School, was edited 
by Albert A. Dahlberg. Al. who has distinguished himself in numerous activi- 
ties of the West Campus, published a volume which should merit exception- 
ally high rating in the contest of the Scholastic Editor. It appeared on May 
first of this year. 

The Student Handbook was edited by Anthony C. Tomczak, ex-editor of 
The Loyola &FWS. This publication which is popularly known as the "lay 
bible" is a comprehensive guide to things Loyola. Numerous changes in 
editing and make-up were inaugurated in the last number. 



The Bur is the alumni publication of the Dental sell 
quarterly under the direction of Dr. R. W. McNulty. 

The Ciscora ISeus was the official publication of the 
Catholic Student's Conference on Religious Activities. 
Published rather sporadically during the past year, 
due to limited finances, it was eventually discontinued. 

Mid-America, formerly known as the "Illinois Cath- 
olic Historical Society" is not officially a Loyola publi- 
cation. It is. however, published under the direction 
of Dean Austin C. Schmidt and has as its contributors 
numerous faculty members. 



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THE DENTOS 



THE 



1931 LOYOLAX 



£ C^7*»>£ C^Tf' :* •& 




PUBLICATIONS 



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The main offices of the major publications 
are situated on the Lake Shore Campus. 
Though not as centrally located as the Down- 
town College the Board of Publications decided 
some years ago that since the work on these 
publications was consonant with the aim of the 
Arts College it would be most advisable to lo- 
cate them on that campus. 

Publications Row. where the lights burned 
long into the night and rollicking ran high, 
was broken up this year. The Neivs still holds 
forth in the sanctum of the Tower but the 
Quarterly and The Loyolan have been placed 
in separate offices in the Administration Build- 
ing. Faculty authorities say there was no 
ulterior purpose in locating The Loyolan un- 
der their eyes even though feature sections are 
prone to need suppression at the last moment. 



»»fc> 




FORENSICS 



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"The college man of today is attempting, 
more than ever before, to prepare himself to 
serve and to succeed. In order to project his 
ideals to make the most of his development 
and his technical training, it is essential that 
he acquire the art of self expression. 

Realizing that the man who has ideals and 
ideas but keeps them to himself is not making 
the proper use of his education, Loyola is at- 
tempting to develop her students so that they 
can express themselves and can influence 
others. 

Opportunity to acquire this skill is offered 
to every Loyolan, in a general way. in the 
formal classes in public speaking and. in a 
particular way, in the informal discussions of 
the debating club."' 



i 6 Z y£c«st 



Instructor in Public Speaking. 




THE DEBATING CLUB 



John K. Bruun 
President 









J. KXFKKHTY 



As has been the case in recent years each successive debating 
season finds Loyola more deeply engaged in intercollegiate 
forensies. During the season recently completed thirty-four 
intercollegiate debates, the same number as last year, were 
engaged in but in view of the fact that there was only one 
three week trip instead of two the schedule was more inten- 
sified than in the past. At the close of the 1930 debate seaason 
elections for the ensuing year were held and the results were 
John Bruun. President, James F. Rafferty, lice-President, 
Joseph A. Walsh, Secretary, and Charles H. Mann, Manager. 

This year Loyola continued the fast growing practice of hav- 
ing no-decision debates and the final record showed seven won, 
six lost, and twenty-one no decision contests. In view of the 
fact that almost all the decision debates were out of town with 
home audiences or home judges to render the decisions, the 
record compiled was a tribute to the men and the coach who 
trained them. 

Shortly after the Christmas holidays the varsity squad Mas 
chosen by an elimination contest in which about twenty-five 
men engaged. Those chosen were: R. J. Murphy, J. F. Raf- 
ferty, W. S. Vita, J. Bruun, C. Mallon, L. W. Tordella. J. A. 
Walsh, R. F. Knittel, C. H. Mann, T. E. Downey, J. Gill, and 
J. Farrell. A week later these twelve men engaged in a further 
elimination contest to determine who should represent Loyola 
on the scheduled eastern trip. Robert Murphy. James Raf- 
ferty and the manager, Charles Mann, were selected. 

The squad did not limit itself to a discussion of one or two 
questions, engaging in home debates on two sides of four ques- 
tions and in traveling debates on both sides of two questions 
and one side of two additional ones. This versatility has always 



»^71^:2'»>^Txrf 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A IV 




THE FIFTY-SIXTH YEAR 



Charles H. Mann 
Manager of Deate 



been an outstanding feature of Loyola debaters. Trained as 
they are to speak extemporaneously they generally excel their 
opponents in the rebuttal arguments. 

The season was opened with Bruun. Farrell. and Mallon 
meeting North Manchester College at Sacred Heart Academy. 
As was the case in all debates held under Loyola's management 
no decision was rendered. Two weeks later, December 20. 
Vita and Murphy met Northwestern on the same question, 
Unemployment Insurance, upholding the Affirmative side in a 
very convincing manner. The unemployment question was the 
major one of the year though Free trade and the emergence of 
women came in for their share of the attention. 

A brief lull in debating activities ended on February 11, 
when Murphy and Rafferty represented Loyola in a debate 
with Marquette on unemployment insurance. This no-decision 
debate was presented before the students at Mundelein Col- 
lege. The unemployment question was further debated by the 
same two men, with the addition of Vita, at the University 
Guild of Chicago. The guild is composed of former debaters of 
Chicago university, and though no decision was rendered, audi- 
ence opinion favored Loyola. The University of Dayton was 
the next opponent, meeting Vita and Mallon before the student 
body of Providence High School. 

On February 27, a rather unusual privilege was accorded to 
Loyola — a debate with a Mormon team from Weber College 
of Ogden, LTtah. This was Loyola's first home opportunity to 
meet and argue publicly with a girls' team. Walsh and Dow- 
ney defended compulsory unemployment insurance, before an 
enthusiastic group of students at Loretta Academy of Hvde 
Park. 






DOWNEY 

M1LLON 
MIRPHV 



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9 3 



L O Y O L A N 




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THE DEBATING CLUB 

DURKIN. ZWTKSTRA. R. MC CABE. MC DONELL, D. RAFFERTY. I). MC CABE. QU1NN, TORDEEI.A, DOWNEY 
KNITTEL, R. RAFFERTY. LENIHAN, CALLAHAN, CALKINS, VONESH, MURATI, TOMCZAK 
J. WALSH, MALLON, J. RAFFERTY, BRUUN, MANN. R. MURPHY, GILL 



fo 

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TORDELLA 

VITA 
KNITTEL 



Leaving on March 2 for a tour of the East, the itinerant de- 
baters, Rafferty, Mann and Murphy, travelled over the same 
route which Loyola's debaters hallowed two years ago. In 
1929. the team representing Loyola in encounters with some 
of the most famed schools in that section, established a repu- 
tation for its logical reasoning, and forceful presentation. This 
year's team not only worthily upheld the high reputation of 
Loyola, but did much to augment the esteem which the local 
men have enjoyed in the East. 

Following a no-decision debate with Michigan State College. 
Rafferty and Murphy, arguing against unemployment insur- 
ance, administered a decisive defeat to Detroit university. The 
local audience voted 110 to 38 favoring Loyola. On March 
4 and 5 respectively. Western Reserve and John Carroll Col- 
lege were met on the Free Trade question. Loyola opposing 
the universal adoption of this policy. An audience vote at Car- 
roll, of 112 to 20, gave the decision to the travelers. 

While an impressive string of victories was being garnered 
in the East, the home debaters, Tordella. Walsh and Bruun. 
met Grinnell College in a no-decision debate on unemployment 
insurance. Criticism slips were distributed among the girls, 
students of Loretta Academy of Englewood, who constituted 
the audience, and the comments ranged from the correct use 
of adverbs to the harmonious blending of colors in somebody's 
shirt and tie. The home debaters next stop on their city wide 
tour, was at the South Shore Dominican High School, where 
Mallon and Vita engaged with the travelling representatives of 
John Carroll College. The question discussed, an unusually 
intricate one, read: Resolved, that the distinction between 



1^3&&&^&t THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A X 




AN INFORMAL CLUB MEETING 

amateurism and professionalism be abolished at contests to 
which admission is charged. The following day, Knittel, Gill 
and Bruun upheld the affirmative side of the unemployment 
insurance question against Augustana College. 

Continuing their brilliant series of forensic encounters, the 
travelling team participated in three more debates on succes- 
sive evenings. They received a judges' decision at Canisius. 
debating the free trade policy, while the debates at Syracuse 
and Rochester universities, on free trade and unemployment 
insurance, were no-decision affairs. The following night. March 
9, they suffered their first defeat of the year at the hands of 
Clark College. Endeavoring to show that the adoption of an 
effective policy of free trade must necessarily include all the 
nations of the world, and that in view of present conditions, 
this, could not possibly be effected, they concluded that the 
present adoption of this program would be most impracticable. 
The judges, however, disagreed over their interpretation of the 
question, and the favorable decision was given to Clark. 

Journeying to Holy Cross College, where an invincible team 
which had debated the same question for the past three years 
awaited them, one of Loyola's famous "trick" cases was em- 
ployed in arguing that the United States should enter the World 
Court under the terms of the Root protocol. The failure of one 
of the three judges to appear, resulted in a tie. The second 
defeat encountered on the trip, was administered by the strong 
Boston university team who opposed free trade. 

Arriving in New York for a five day stay, Mann and Murphy 
discussed the very interesting problem of the deplorable state 
of woman's emergence with the representatives of Hunter Col- 
lege. According to Mann, "we made the girls believe that they 
should not emerge from the home, so we are not only doing 




s 
a 



FARKELL 
D. MC CABE 
R. MC CABE 



THE 



9 3 1 



L O Y O L A N 





good forensic work, but we enhance it with inestimable social benefits." 
Rafferty again swung into action, debating with his famous case, the College 
of the city of New York, and New York university on two successive nights. 
No decisions were rendered. 

Fordham university, long renowned for its famous debating teams, in one 
of the most strongly contested frays of the season, managed to receive a two 
to one decision on the free trade problem. The wear and tear of strenuous 
social obligations in the "white light" district began to assert itself as the 
weary travelers met New Rochelle College. Despite an unfavorable decision 
by the judges, social contacts at the famous girls' college were greatly strength- 
ened by Mann and Murphy, though Rafferty insisted on courting Morpheus. 

During this period, three more home debates were held. Walsh, Tordella 
and Mallon defended unemployment insurance against St. John's of Toledo 
before the student body of Barat College in Lake Forest. Holy Child High 
School was the scene of the Purdue-Loyola debate on the amateurism ques- 
tion, which Vita, Mallon and Downey opposed. Downey and Bruun upheld 
the affirmative of the free trade question in the first home radio debate of 
the season against the University of Florida. 

Two favorable decisions, one against Duquesne, the other against Cincinnati 
university, and a no-decision debate with Purdue brought the schedule of the 
travelers to a close. However, their debating activities for the year were not 
yet concluded. Returning home, Rafferty and Murphy debated the unem- 
ployment topic with Boston College. The contests with Loyola of New Or- 
leans in which Rafferty and Downey participated, and St. Louis universitv. 
opposed by Mann and Rafferty, officially concluded the forensic season. 

One post season debate, the last and climaxing encounter of the year, was 
held with Mundelein College. Rafferty and Walsh debated the girls before 
an audience composed mainly of students from Mundelein and Loyola. The 
question selected was a most appropriate one — that the emergence of women 



us&fi&sgsBi: 




THE 



19 3 



LOYOLA* 



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I (isiKl.l.n 



THK LOYOLA-UINDKI.I'.IM DKIUTK 

J. RAFFERTV, J. WALSH, STAHR, SULLIVAN, BHENNAN 

into public life is deplorable. Botb in their arguments anfl presentations, all 
speakers did exceptionally well, and the interest and enthtusiasm of the 
audience remained at a high pitch throughout. Though the judges decided 
in favor of Mundelein, the debate was very correctly termed '"the best home 
debate of the year." 

The phenomenal rise to prominence of Loyola's debating teams during the 
past five years, is due in no small measure to the whole hearted interest and 
cooperation of Mr. Costello. retiring coach. Duties at the Loyola Community 
Theatre will prevent him from taking an active part in debating club projects, 
though the enthusiasm he has developed will remain in evidence long after 
his departure. 

Although not active enough to secure a section in the Loyolan, the work 
accomplished by the Law School Debating Council during the past year is 
worthy of commendation. 

A long time was spent in starting the work of the year, and the interest of 
the student body of the Law School lagged for many months. But with the 
beginning of the second semester the dissension within the club was eradicated 
and it became a smoothly running organization. Debates were secured with 
several colleges in the vicinity, in which most of the members of the club 
distinguished themselves. 

The highlight of the season was the debate with Kent College of Law. broad- 
cast over radio station WLS. The debaters were Neal McAuliffe and Peter 
Fazio. The question was: Resolved. That the Present Jury System Be Abol- 
ished. No decision was rendered, but communications received bv the station 
were very favorable to tbte Loyola debaters. The club was also active in sev- 
eral parishes throughout the city. In addition, the many intra-council debates 
held at the regular meetings showed a great variety of talent in questions 
especially suited to students of law. 



igsemsgssgi: 



THE 



9 3 1 



LOYOLAN 



^9^3Pm8swj^iS 




THE JOHN 
NAGHTEN DEBATE 






ft 

a 



The climax of the year's forensic encounters is the John 
Naghten Del)ate which is held at the very end of the sea- 
son so that all may have a chance to participate. The 
dehate was held last year in St. Ignatius Auditorium he- 
fore a large audience which was keenly interested in the 
timely question presented. The question read. Resolved: 
that a city manager form of government be adopted by 
the city of Chicago. 

The four men who discussed this question were Thomas 
Downey and John Bruun on the affirmative side, Robert 
Murphy and Robert McCabe who defended the negative 
side of the topic. These men were chosen after prelim- 
inary tryouts in which most of the members of the De- 
bating Club participated. 

All the speakers were veterans of manv inter-collegiate 
contests. Bruun and Downey had been on one of the 
southern tours and Murphy on part of the other. McCabe 
had managed the club and arranged the most extensive 
tour in the history of the organization. It mattered not 
so much which side the speaker defended as the manner 
in which he adapted his arguments to meet the opponent's 
case, at the same time defending his original stand. 

The critic judge's decision awarded the trophy to 
Thomas Downey. In the speech in which he announced 
his decision, Reverend George Mahowald, S.J., remarked 
about the exceptional ability displayed, and the extreme 
difficulty in deciding who was the best speaker. Mr. Dow- 
ney was chosen not because he clearly excelled his op- 
ponents in any one department of the science, but because 
he had all the requisites for a successful debater, namely 
the appearance, voice, ability to think clearly, to make a 
good presentation of his case, and to defend his own 
stand. He was then a Sophomore and had already dis- 
tinguished himself on the southern tour, and on the 
numerous home inter-collegiate debates in which he par- 
ticipated. His winning of the debating championship of 
the University was a fitting tribute to his ability. 



Eggg&SSfgSgil 



THE 



9 3 1 



L O Y O L A N 




THE CARTER H. HARRISON 
ORATORICAL CONTEST 



^_ JOSEPH MAMMOSER 

The Harrison Oratorical Contest is one of the oldest 
contests at Loyola, having been inaugurated more than 
forty years ago at Saint Ignatius on the west side. It has 
been customary for the winner to enter in the state finals 
and, if successful there, to be sent to Los Angeles to com- 
pete in the national contest. However, this year there 
was no national contest so the speakers were permitted 
to choose any topic they desired. Joseph C. Mammoser. 
the winner, selected for his oration, "American Liberty 
and the Prohibition Law." Father O'Connell, Prefect of 
Studies of the Chicago Province, chose Mr. Mammoser as 
the winner because of his delivery, appearance, and the 
wording of his argument. 

The elimination contest was held early in March and 
was open to any student in any department of the Uni- 
versity who had not yet completed one hundred and 
twenty-eight credit hours. Six men were chosen for the 
final contest and all were from the Lake Shore campus. 
The final contest was held in the Assembly of the Arts 
campus on April 14 and the following men spoke in the 
order named: John Bruun. with a plea for world peace: 
Douglas McCabe with a speech eulogizing Roosevelt; 
Joseph Mammoser with the topic named previously: 
Thomas Downey who chose Woodrow W ilson as his sub- 
ject : Robert McCabe who spoke on activities of college 
students: and Anthony Tomczak with an oration on Pa- 
triotism. 

The winner, Mr. Mammoser. has long been active in 
dramatic and oratorical endeavors. He is a member of the 
Sock and Buskin Club and of the Loyola Debating So- 
ciety. A Sophomore in the College of Arts and Sciences. 
he can also point with pride to his scholastic and activity 
record at Saint Ignatius High School. While a student 
there he held the lead in two of the annual plays and 
also won the oratorical contest, two of the yearly elocu- 
tion contests, and participated in debating and other ac- 
tivities. His victory was a popular one and is the first 
time in three years that a Sophomore has won the contest. 







D. MC CABE 
TOMCZAK. 
DOWNEY 



9 3 



L O Y O L A X 




FOR KNSICS 




With the exception of the Sodality the De- 
bating Club is the oldest active organization on 
the campus. As the Chrysostonian Society it 
existed lor a period almost as long as did St. 
Ignatius College. On the Lake Shore Campus 
is was variously known as the Oratorical As- 
sociation and the Debating Society and kept up 
its existence in rather a half-hearted manner. 

With the coming of Coach Charles S. Co^- 
tello such men as Robert Hartnett, James C. 
O'Connor and \\ illiam H. Conley have put 
themselves so wholeheartedly behind the club 
that debating has received the description of 
Loyola's "major sport". 



NEftb 




DRAMATICS 



ci&4 



"I am pleased to be given this opportunity 
to express publicly ruy gratitude for the fine 
spirit and good will extended to me during my 
five years at Loyola by the members, present 
and former, of the Sock and Buskin Club and 
the Loyola L Diversity Debating Club. This is 
the part of Loyola which I shall miss the most. 

My feeling of gratitude is mingled with the 
good wish that both these splendid organiza- 
tions shall carry on in the true Loyola man- 
ner; that they shall continue ever to strive for 
greater and finer things. 

May God's benediction be upon their work 
and may He give it a continued prosperity." 



V&k> 




(V. (^ 



^^Z^^o 



Retiring Coach of Dramatics and Forensics. 




THE SOCK 
AND BUSKIN CLUB 



James Brennan 
President 




During the past year the Sock and Buskin Club has entered a period of 
transition that has yet to be completed. The organization is now at a crisis. 
Whether it will disband temporarily or obtain fresh resources which will 
enable it to develop into a firmly established enterprise the coming term will 
decide. One thing is certain. It cannot continue in the course of the past 
season. The club must produce better plays. But before it can do this the 
student body must be convinced that it has the ability to do so, and the ad- 
ministration must realize that the Sock and Buskin Club is a Loyola activity 
and as such needs and deserves the support of the University. A further diffi- 
culty will be the absence of Mr. Costello during the coming year. It is to be 
hoped that the Sock and Buskin Club will overcome these obstacles in the 
way of its success and take its place among the major activities of Loyola. 

Gamma Zeta Delta, Loyola's honorary dramatic fraternity, held several 
meetings throughout the year. At the initial meeting Ted Connelly was elected 
president, John Bruun vice-president, and Virginia Barker secretary. Eleven 
members of the Sock and Buskin Club were admitted into the fraternity. At 
the second meeting plans were formulated for the growth of the organization, 
especially in other Catholic universities. Following meetings were held for 
the purpose of assisting the endeavors of the Sock and Buskin Club. The fra- 
ternity attended en masse various plays in Chicago theatres, including Fritz 
Leiber's presentation of "Julius Caesar" and Mr. Costello's performance of 
"The Kingdom of God." 



HHIL 



n 



HAMMOND HOGAN 



CALKINS TORDELLA 



THE 1931 1, O Y O L A X 



THE LOYOLA 
DRAMATIC SOCIETY 





Charles S. Costello 
Director 



Outside of the regular plays the feature of the season for the Sock and 
Buskin Club was the Marquette float in the Chicago Jubilee parade. The 
float represented the landing of Father Marquette on the shore of Lake Michi- 
gan where Chicago now stands. Father Marquette was played by James Ham- 
mond. The others who participated were James Norton. Jerome Kozlowski, 
James Brennan. Jerome Gottschalk, William Reid and Ted Connelly. The ven- 
ture was extremely successful. The silver cup awarded to the float best por- 
traying an incident in the history of Chicago was presented by the authorities 
to Loyola university. The actors themselves had an enjoyable time, notably 
Jerry Gottschalk, who stopped in mid-flight a strawberry pie intended for an- 
other member of the float. The brains behind the affair, in addition to a 
great part of the physical labor, were supplied by Mr. Costello, who lent his 
time and efforts to put a finishing touch upon his work at Loyola. 

It was but seven years ago that a small group of energetic students began 
to promote dramatics at Loyola. They derived the name of their organiza- 
tion from the characteristic costume of the early Athenian actors who fostered 
the drama in its infancy. — "Sock" to symbolize the comedy and "■Buskin" to 
signify the tragedy. 

The work of the retiring director and the cooperation of the present officers 
is a worthv tribute to the effortts of the founders. 



i* 



AA AM 




M VMMOSKK 



THE 19 31 L © Y O L A >" 





THE SOCK AND BUSKIN CLUB 

VTYRE, COTTSCHALK. GARVEY, SPELMAN, 



MURAT1 
i. MURPHY 
MURPHY 



The first major play of the Sock and Buskin Club was "The Showoff." It 
was given at the St. Ignatius Auditorium on Wednesday, December 17. For 
four weeks the members of the cast had been polishing off their parts by con- 
tinuous rehearsal, until Mr. Costello. the director, thought that the play had 
reached a stage of near perfection. Because of the fact that the number of 
players was limited there were no tryouts. and only old members of the club 
were cast in the play. Despite the favorable predictions a very small audience 
witnessed the rising of the curtain. Moreover, so many of those attending ob- 
tained admittance on complimentary tickets that the Sock and Buskin Club 
ran into a deficit that took several months to overcome. 

But those who saw the play did not regret their purchase when the laughs 



began to tumble one in 




mother as Jim Hammond and Coletta Hogan com- 
menced their delightful line of banter that 
continued throughout the performance. "Dode" 
Norton likewise spouted forth a few well 
chosen, spicy remarks. Jim played the part of 
Aubrey Piper in the name role, while Coletta 
Hogan. already famous for her mother roles, 
shone as Mrs. Fisher. Mr. Norton, although the 
part of Mr. Fisher did not call for many ap- 
pearances, made his presence felt in all of the 
three acts. The two Fisher daughters, Clara 
and Amy, were played by Bernice Crawley and 
Lorraine O'Hare respectively. Miss Crawley 
appeared last year in "The Call of the Ban- 
shee," but Miss O'Hare is a newcomer to the 
club. The part of the young son of the Fisher 
family was cleverly portrayed by Joseph Mam- 
moser, one of the most consistently good actors 



8 3 



L © Y O L A IV 





UK "SI l()\\ Oil" CAST 



in the Sock and Buskin Club, anil incidentally this year's winner of the Har- 
rison Oratorical Contest. Minor roles were capably handled by Eugene Cirese, 
Francis Calkins and John Chesney. 

The plot is a very simple one. It concerns chiefly a young man, Aubrey 
Piper, who is not afflicted in the least with that mental condition known as 
"inferiority complex." In spite of his obvious failings, he is loved by Amy 
Fisher. The two marry against the wishes of Amy's parents and sister, who 
see Aubrey through eyes unclouded by love. After the marriage, however, 
they assist Amy willingly, and upon the death of Mr. Fisher allow the young 
couple to make their home in the Fisher homestead. Aubrey appears some- 
what sobered by his new responsibilities. But when Joe Fisher reaps a fortune 
through an invention, and joy returns to the family, Aubrey's character comes 
back to him. 



CAST OF CHARACTERS 

Clara Hyland Bernice Crawley 

Mrs Fisher Coletta Hogan 

Amy Fisher Lorraine O'Hare 

Frank Hyland Eugene Cirese 

Mr. Fisher Joseph Norton 

Joe Fisher Joseph Mammoser 

Aubrey Piper James Hammond 

Mr. Gill Francis Calkins 

Mr. Rogers John Chesney 




THE 



19 3 



L O Y O L A IV 



kS^Sk^m'fe 



li.Il] 


iSatP 


S?l1 


11 lj|» „ Jr ! 







The second play of the year was '"Three Live Ghosts." Fully as clever as 
"The Showoff" in its dialogue and situations, it was even more distinguished 
by consistent acting and effective presentation. "Three Live Ghosts" was staged 
at the Chicago Civic Theatre. This fact together with the publicity given the 
play in advance made it far more successful than "The Showoff." The mem- 
bers of the cast, feeling, as it were, that their efforts would determine to a great 
extent the future of the Sock and Buskin Club did their utmost to entertain 
the audience. 

The cast was one of the most balanced ever to represent the Sock and Buskin 
Club. The name roles were played by James Hammond. Joseph Norton and 
James Brennan. The three detectives assigned to the task of solving the mys- 
tery were Joseph Dempsey. Frank Cirese and William Reid. Their two assist- 
ants were John Daugherty and William Murphy. There were four feminine 
parts, played by Annamerle Kramer. Mary Bruun. Lois Murphy and Mary 
Judge. The experience of the three leading players was well demonstrated 
throughout the play. All three participated in previous plays of the Sock and 
Buskin Club. Reid and Dempsey filled their parts with ingenuity. The latter 
especiallv shows promise of developing into one of the most capable actors in 
the club. 




Till M'lRITS DON'T SKIM TO UK VERY UXOM MOI1VTIN 



THE 1931 L O Y O L A N 




The story is well known to all who patronize the theatre or even the movies. 
The three live men are called ghosts tor pecuniary reasons. For if one of them 
were to he found alive his mother would be denied the insurance received 
upon his supposed death. The plot is further complicated by a second live 
ghost, who. being shell-shocked, shows a propensity for retrieving other peoples' 
j>ossessions and giving them to his companions. The third live ghost is being 
sought by an American detective for an error in judgment perpetrated in the 
States. These several factors serve to complicate the plot beyond the compre- 
hension of the three ghosts. But various occurrences iron out the tangle. The 
shell-shocked individual recovers his memory and the others a modicum of 
intelligence. The result is the proverbial happy ending. 

The plav consisted of three acts, packed with incident from start to finish. 
Some of the characters found difficulty at times in speaking with the accent 
necessitated by their roles. But the iapses did not destroy the illusion cre- 
ated bv the realistic acting. The setting, too, was a decided improvement over 
the scenery of former plays. All in all. "Three Live Ghosts" was not unworthy 
of the tradition of the Sock and Buskin Club. It demonstrated clearly the 
capabilities of the individual members and the resources of the club as a whole. 
We again express the hope that those resources will he amplified during the 
coming year and that the Sock and Buskin Club will receive therefrom a new- 
inspiration. 



IIITMKV HII. I.. ITS THE FIUST HF s SKIN IN -^ I \KS 




^g?^^^L_ THE 1931 LOYOLA* *&S&3$$Bi&& 




I)R VMATICS 



<j£2i 



The future of the Sock and Buskin Club rests 
in a precarious position with the conclusion of 
the 1930-31 school year. Mr. Charles S. Cos- 
tello, who for the past five years has directed 
Lovola dramatic productions, has tendered his 
resignation from the University faculty in or- 
der that he might devote his full time to the 
Loyola Community Theatre. 

As The Loyolan goes to press Mr. Costello"s 
successor has not been announced though cam- 
pus rumor has it that Mr. David Herbert Abel, 
of the Classics Department and moderator ot 
the News will be his successor. Mr. Abel has 
bad past experience with the Sock and Buskin 
Club in tbe production of one act plays and 
discharged his office creditably. 





MUSIC 



ci&4 



Instrumental music in the University under- 
went a marked change of organization and pol- 
icy during the year. Both the band and or- 
chestra suffered from delayed beginnings. The 
former did not get under way until late in the 
football season and then only under circum- 
stances that made it impossible to appear at 
the games. The success that marked its later 
activity must be attributed to the efforts of the 
director, the splendid good will of the members 
and especially to the devotion of the officers. 





Director of Instrumental Music. 




THE 
GLEE CLUB 



James .Senese 
President 





& 




MIIMIII 
BF.UTI.ER 
LAGORIO 



The Glee Club now has to its credit a record of four 
years of attempting to make Loyola musically apprecia- 
tive. It was in the fall of 1928 that Dean Reiner of the 
Arts College gave to the group the impetus which started 
it upon its career. Mr. Bertram Steggert. the genial cut 
creditor of the Lake Shore Campus, was the first director 
of the organization. Finding his duties too numerous he 
resigned from the position and Mr. Graciano Salvador, 
professor of Spanish extraordinary, was appointed maes- 
tro. Mr. Salvador has traveled throughout Europe study- 
ing music and is one of the best known organists in the 
city. His son, Mario, reflecting the true genius of his 
father, is the regular accompanist of the club. 

The Choral Society was formed the year after the Glee 
Club had been organized. Realizing that the limitations 
to which men's voices could ascend limited the possibili- 
ties of giving the highest type of concerts, Mr. Salvador 
induced the Dean of the .Downtown College, Father Sie- 
denburg. to promote singing as one of the activities of the 
College and the School of Sociology. The result was that 
a number of young women, some with extremely culti- 
vated voices, responded to the call and with the men from 
the Glee Club formed the Loyola University Choral 
Society. 

In the first year of its existence the body staged such 
difficult cantatas as Maunders "Bethlehem" and Hawley's 
"Christ Child" before appreciative audiences. Lest it be 
thought that the serious business of singing exhausted the 
energies of the choristers we might add that small socials 
were held at regular intervals and an informal dinner 
dance concluded the year. 

The 1930-31 scholastic year saw the Glee Club active 
on the Lake Shore Campus, singing at the regular Friday 
Mass of the student body and from time to time in the 
weekly assemblies. James Senese was elected president of 
the body, John Lagorio acted as vice-president. Jack Giar- 
dina and Joseph Mondo were secretary and treasurer re- 



T H E 



9 3 



L O Y O L A X 




THE 
CHORAL SOCIETY 




Graciano Salvador 
Director 



spectively, Anthony Favat performed the duties of the 
librarian while Albert Beutler acted in the important 
capacity of business manager. 

The girls' unit elected Helen Murray, president; Made- 
line Seymour, vice-president ; Anna Pavese, secretary- 
treasurer; Anna Johnson, librarian and Mary McMahon, 
business manager. 

On December 14, 1930. the two bodies were united at 
St. Ignatius Auditorium for the presentation of Maunder"s 
cantata, "Bethlehem." Part one on the program consisted 
of "The Heavens," by Beethoven, Gounod's "Sanctus," 
and an "Ava Maria" by Mascagni. Mario Salvador gave 
two piano solos during the intermission, McDowell's "Elf 
Dance" and Liszt's well known "Lieberstraum." The sing- 
ing of "Vilia," "Carmena Walz Song," and "To a Wild 
Rose" by the entire Choral Society and a baritone solo 
by Billy Schmitz concluded this part. 

Jack Janszen opened the Cantata proper with a tenor 
solo, "Quickly the Night Is Falling." Solos by Madeline 
Seymour. Helen Murray, James Senese, John Lagorio, 
Ruth Fleming and Billy Schmitz featured the three fol- 
lowing parts: The Shepherd's Gifts, The Magi's Gifts, 
and Adoration at the Manger. 

A crowd of some four hundred gathered for the even- 
ing for the performance. Not only was the vocal music 
of high order but the Loyola University Orchestra made 
its initial appearance. \ aughn Avakian. Joseph Contursi. 
Joseph Juszak, Albert Koepke. Donald Miller. Walter 
Peterson, John Smialek, Edward Szczurek and William 
Ward composed the personnel of the group. Edward 
Szczurek was elected to the presidency and retained his 
office when the orchestra was placed under the direction 
of Father Raymond Bellock. 

One of the features of the year's activity Mas the work 
of a selected octet at the Arts Alumni Banquet. The or- 
chestra played at this gathering as they also did at the 



2 

n 



SCHMITZ 
SZCZUREK 
CIARDINA 



THE 



931 LOYOLAN 






•^ 


§ a, # 9* * 


L 0U5H 


rff 


1HB' * "^M fl 




1- 1- 


bi£ *■? irJS *i* 1 





the c;lee club 

SCHVIITZ. FINN. SMYTH. BEL TLER. ZINNGRABE, MORRISON, F WAT. GIARDINA 

DIMICELLI, AMAR, WARD, UNCAHO. QUINN, BARRON, CALL MONDO 

JANSZEN, CANTERBURY. SALVADOR (Director), SENESE, LACORIO. DONAHUE 




Arts Student-Faculty Banquet, the National Catholic Alumni 
dinner and numerous informal gatherings. 

A fitting finale marked the close of the year when the 
Choral Society presented the Fourth Annual Spring Concert 
at Kimhall Hall on Sunday. May 17, 1931. Sixteen sopranos, 
fourteen altos, nineteen tenors and twelve basses composed 
the personnel of the group for the evening. As is the cus- 
janszen toln at t j le j agt performance of the year the music ap- 

proached the semi-popular variety. Part one of the program consisted of Bee- 
thoven's "God in Nature." "Till Victory Be Won" from Verdi's Aida. "The 
Bells." by Rachmaninoff, the popular melody from the Merry Widow, "Villia." 
and Strauss* "Greeting to Spring" by the entire Choral Society: "The Volga 
Boatman" and "Going Home." sung by ten picked male voices: a baritone 
solo, '"Toreador" ( Carmen I . by Albert Weimer, and a tenor solo by Jack 
Janszen. "Ah Marie," by Di Capua. 

Part two opened with a soprano solo by Madeline Seymour. "My Rosary" 
and "The Pilgrim's Chorus" were sung by the entire group. Mario Salvador 
rendered two exquisite organ solos, "Toccata in D Major" and "Le Cocou," 
by Daquin. A mixed octet sang "Mother of Mine." Ruth McCabe and Nancy 
Pegnato, assisted by the chorus, sang Flotow's "How So Fair" ( Martha I and the 
program was closed by the singing of Hayden's "The Heavens Are Telling" 
by a trio composed of Madeline Seymour. Edward Donahue and Albert Beutler. 
As is the case with most progressive organizations, plans are already being 
formulated for the expanding of the programs of the 1931-32 school year. 
If these programs show the same progress as have those of the past year, then 
can music be said to have become one of Loyola's major activities. For with 
the growth of the organizations themselves and the increasing ambition of 
the members has come a decided reaction of the student body towards sup- 
porting musical endeavors. This fact above all others insures the develop- 
ment of the Glee Club. No other single factor can do so much, for the in- 
terest of the students not only determines the growth and progress of an or- 
ganization, in music as in other fields, but even decides its very existence. 



THE 



9 3 



I. O Y O L A > T 





THE CHORAL SOCIETY 

SMYTH, WARD, DONAHUE, AMAR, UNOARO, CANTERBURY, LAGORIO, DIMICELLI. Gl \RDIN V. Z1NNGRABE 

QUINN, MONDO 
HEALY, CLINCH, RYAN, HASTY, JUDGE, R. MC CABE. I. MC CABE, MULVIHILL, CALI, JANSZEN, FAVAT 
JOHNSON, MC MAHON, DOWNEY, POPE, R. FLEMING, C. FLEMING. BELLINI, VILLANI, WALSH, GERMAINE 

smith, finn, Morrison. Salvador (Director) 

SENESE, ST. DENIS, BELLINI, SEYMOUR, HALUNAN, SEYMOUR, MURRAY, O'BRIEN, MARTIN. CORBETT 
PAVESE. BELTLER, BARRON 



SOPRANOS 



Catherine Callanan 
Catherine Clinch 
Catherine Fleming 
Rita Fleming 
Margaret Hallinan 
Ceeilia Hasty 
Margaret Healy 
Catherine Healy 
Anna Johnson 



Mary Barron 
Lauretta Bellini 
Margaret Bellini 
Marie Corhett 



Wesley Amar 
Louis Canterbury 
Sal Domicelli 
Edward Donahue 



Philip Barron 
Albert Beutler 
Sam Cali 



Mary Smith 
Marge Walsh 
Eleanor Judge 
Irene McCabe 
Ruth McCabe 
Mary McMahon 
Mary O'Brien 
Mary Ryan 
Clara St. Denis 

ALTOS 

Bernieee Cermaine 
Emily Martin 
Marge Mulvihill 
Helen Murray 
Mary Villani 

TENORS 
Cecil Finn 
Jacob Giardina 
John Janszen 
John Lagorio 

BASSES 

Anthony Favat 
Joseph Mondo 
John Morrison 
Louis Zinngrabe 




Madeline Seymour 
Marge Seymour 



Kathleen 0"Shea 
Anna Pavese 
Regina Pope 
Ruth Sullivan 



Paul Quinn 
Eugene Smyth 
Edward Srubas 
Bernard Sullivan 



Billy Schmitz 
James Senese 
Victor Lmiaro 



T HE 1931 LOYOLA* 




THE 
LOYOLA BAND 



■i 




"♦; '♦v 



Victor Charbulac 



mA 



For years Loyola university has been seeking a band that it might be proud 
to claim as its own. This search appeared to be all in vain as year after year 
the band became worse, and the interest of the students correspondingly 
waned. At the start of this year it was the same old thing the band was the 
laughing stock of the school and the students who were giving their time and 
efforts gradually became disgusted, and one by one they dropped out until 
the whole idea was given up as a dismal failure. It was at this time that 
the Blue Key fraternity stepped in to attempt a reorganization under a new 
director. 

This reorganization began with the appointment of Father Bellock. S.J., as 
moderator. This was indeed a constructive step for Father Bellock formerly 
had been in charge of the St. Louis university band and is an excellent 
musician. The St. Louis band under his supervision had grown from a poor 
imitation to one of the best college bands in the Middle West. It was with 
this same determination that had marked the rise of the St. Louis band that 
he tackled the task of rebuilding the Loyola University band. His first task 
was to try and convince the students that the band was really going to be a 
major activity with which they should be proud to be associated. With this 
accomplished he then proceeded to look around for a capable director who 
might make the band presentable musicians. Mr. Victor Cbarbulak was en- 
gaged as band director. Due to the important part that this man bad in 
establishing a creditable band at Loyola it is only proper that his record be 
briefly discussed. 

Mr. Victor J. Cbarbulak completed his courses in music in this city and 
then traveled to St. Louis where he played in their Symphony under the di- 



*\ *% A 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 




THE 
LOYOLA BAND 




\kthir Dellers 
usiness Manager 



rection of Mr. Rudolph Ganz. Then with the outbreak of the Great War he 
enlisted in the sea forces, and was commissioned by President ^ ilson to take 
charge of the bands of the Navy. With the close of hostilities he returned 
to Chicago to take his place among the first violinists in the Chicago Sym- 
phony Orchestra under the direction of Frederick Stock. It is this position 
he holds today along with his supervision of the University hand. From this 
resume it is easily seen that the new director of the band is a man with a 
great deal of experience in handling men in addition to his musical talents 
and ability. 

Under the new director the band then began to make advancements. Regu- 
lar practices were held on each ^ ednesday in the Gymnasium and the number 
of members gradually increased until on December 18th the new Loyola t ni- 
versity Band made its initial public appearance at the first basketball game 
of the season. The results were amazing for the music was of high calibre 
and of wide variety something that was entirely new coming from a Loyola 
University Band. From this time on the band continued to improve as was 
evidenced on each successive appearance until they climaxed this, by far their 
most successful season at the National Catholic Inter-scholastic Basketball 
Tournament. 

The students who aided the new moderator and director in this reorganiza- 
tion were in most part rewarded by the election to the various offices in the 
band. The president during the past year was Albert Koepke: Arthur Dellers 
was business manager: Sal Dimiceli. librarian, and L. A. Drolett the student 
director. 




A PARTIAL II UNUl '[' I OK TDK TOl RNAMENT 



THE 1931 L O Y O L A X 




] wJ^ A k , 1 



ST. ANNE'S GLEE CLUB 

CONDO. BUSSE, IREADWELL, K. BRADY, I.. BRADY, JACOBS, M. MURPHY, THOMPSON, ROCERS 
STRUBBE, WILHELM, PIERCE, BILLER, MORROW, KUEMPEL, BLESSING, MASTERSON, A. MURPHY 

THE NURSES MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

It has been onlv within the past two years that the nurse's schools have 
endeavored to sponsor student activities of other than spiritual natures. In 
the field of music, latent talent was discovered generally throughout the schools 
and efforts were made to develop it. 

Glee clubs, bands, orchestras, and choirs were the organizations which had 
the most popular appeal. In practically all tbe instances the intention of 
the groups is to offer a slight deviation from the daily routine of the nurses 
and at the same time to offer an opportunity for the girls to develop their 
musical talents. 




ST. BERNARD'S STRINl, ENSEMBLE 



THE 



» 3 



L O Y O L 






ft 





ST. ELIZABETH'S SODALITY CHlllli 



ILTO 



SARWIN, YERCALTEHEN, BI. \TTIE, I.EIER. SWIATEK. LOSINSKI. SHIFKEK, FIRJAMCK. WOLSKA 

FREIBUBG. FRIEDRICH 
CALLACHER. DES MARAIS, CAYANALT.H. ZIPPLER. CEN'NRICH. SLOW I. GOLATK \. FRANK. KENNER. 

DAWSON, SCHAEFER, HERMANN. REV. G. NIEKAMP 

O'NEILL, ZALAS, SABO, JLNIO, THOMPSON, CHRISTAENS, POLCHLAPEK. MUELLER. JOHNSON. BIETH. 

KEARNEY, SCHAEFER, DEMERS, KARLESHE 

At St. Bernard's Hospital the St. Cecelia Band was disbanded and a string 
ensemble formed in its stead. The expense of providing the brass instru- 
ments and the general lack of familiarity with the instruments induced the 
directors to take the new step. At Mercy and St. Anne's the established glee 
clubs have maintained their places while the St. Elizabeth's Sodality Choir Yvas 
organized in the latter part of October. 




THE MERCY GLEE CLUB 

PENDERGYST. LETZ. BERENDSON. BERUBI, WLRL, JUSKA. WOLFE. SPIERINC, 
SMITH, HOLTON, ENRIGHT. CAYANALGH, BO MB A, MC CARNEY. POWERS. M' 
COSTELI.O. SITAR. ERICKSON. SIDLE. SULLIVAN, RVPST 



THE 19 31 LOYOLAX 




MUSIC 




Noteworthy among the musical accomplish- 
ments of the year must be mentioned the ac- 
ceptance of the University Anthem. The words 
are by Rev. Raymond Bellock, S.J.. while the 
music was composed by Mr. Walter Dellers. 

Loyola, the Mother of Sons ever Loyal, 

Deep is our love for Thee. Mother of Men. 

All Thy fond Cares for us, 

Hopes for us, prayers for us. 

Stir the stout hearts of us, Mother of Men. 

We're proud of Thy halls and the wisdom they 

foster. 
Proud of Thy leaders. Oh Mother of Men: 
Proud of Thy story old. 
Proud of Maroon and Gold. 
Hail to Thee Mother, our Mother of Men. 







SPIRITUAL 




Discipline, education of heart and mind de- 
velop youths into men. 

Loyola sees in each youth committed to her 
care a potential, well balanced man. full of 
life and fire, who loves all beauty and detests 
all vileness, whose brain is cultured, whose 
hands are deft, and whose heart is true and 
pure. 

Loyola believes that the student who re- 
members at all times that the eyes of God are 
upon him will have the courage to maintain 
his individuality even in a crowd and will be 
able to walk within arm's length of forbidden 
pleasure with nothing between the temptation 
and its satisfaction but the law of integrity. 

Dean of Men 




SODALITY 



Douglas McCabe 
Prefect 




The Loyola University Sodality held its first meeting of the year on Sep- 
tember 22. Father LeMay, the Moderator, gave a short talk, after which 
Douglas McCabe, the Prefect, addressed the students assembled, explaining 
for the benefit of the new members the purposes and ideals of the Sodality. 
The financial status of the organization was set forth by Joseph Walsh, the 
treasurer. Mr. McCabe spoke on the various activities of the Sodality, which 
included the Eucharistic, Mission. Catholic Instruction, Altar Service and 
Music sections. From a survey taken up after the meeting, it was disclosed 
that out of sixty of the students in attendance, fifty had signified their desire 
to become affiliated with some activity of the Sodality. 

This enthusiasm was but little diminished in ensuing months. Off the 
campus and on, the activities of the Sodality far surpassed those of previous 
years. The first important event was the Mass of the Holy Ghost, celebrated 
on Friday, September 26. at St. Ignatius Church. Annually this mass is 
offered up at the beginning of the school year for the divine guidance of the 
student body throughout the coming months of scholastic endeavor. The 
mass, with its usual impressiveness, was offered up by Monsignor James H. 
Griffin: the sermon was preached by the Reverend W. T. Kane, S.J. 

At the annual Cudahy Memorial Mass. held at St. Ignatius Church on Wed- 
nesday, November 26, Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Cudahy were guests of honor. 
All the students on the Lake Shore Campus, from both Academy and College, 
attended the solemn High Mass. This year, owing to the increase in enroll- 
ment at both institutions, almost a thousand students joined in prayer for the 
soul of Mr. Michael Cudahy, to whose generosity Loyola owes her magnificent 



A.i 



SB 






DOWNEY MCDONNELL 



THE 1931 L O Y O L A N 




THE 
SIXTIETH YEAR 




Clifford Le May, S.J. 
Moderator 



location on the lake front, and for the continued prosperity of the Cudahy 
family, who so recently donated the beautiful library on the campus. 

The sixtieth annual retreat of the College of Arts and Sciences ended on 
Friday morning. October 3. with mass, papal blessing and benediction. The 
retreat master was the Reverend Clifford LeMay, S.J., dean of men at the 
Lake Shore Campus. Over five hundred students attended the exercises, the 
largest number ever present at a retreat in the history of Loyola. The in- 
structions given by Father LeMay, of which there were four each day, cen- 
tered about the dual nature of Man as its theme. Pointing out the existence 
of a struggle between body and soul, material and spiritual, the retreat master 
emphasized the necessity of controlling the instincts which are in themselves 
good, but the abuse of which brings dire consequences in the effects of mortal 
sin. 

Throughout the entire retreat Father LeMay stressed the psychological 
aspect of man's life and conduct. After insisting that a "calamity of the first 
magnitude can be examined and judged only in its effects," Father LeMay in- 
dicated that mortal sin was just that kind of calamity, and recalled the results 
of the first sin of the rebel angels under Lucifer and of the second recorded 
sin. that of Adam and Eve: Hell came into being in one case and Death in the 
other. At all times during the instructions the psychological laws operating 
in the background of sin and the formation of bad habits were stated clearly. 
The opening mass of the retreat was offered up for the repose of the soul of 
Raymond Fitzgerald, sophomore at the Arts college. 



DHO 




THE 1931 L O Y O L A X 




If 


SL * * # 1 








f ^ 


^fJ \ 







THE LARK SHORE CAMPLS SODALITY 



HENRY, MVMMOSER, E. CON' 



HEY, RYBA, PVRK. PATEK 



CALLAHAN, KNITTEL, MLRVTI. POYNTON. TORDELLA. CL ERIN. YONESH. MCDONNELL, R. MC CABE 

CILL, MCCILLEN, FINN, DYDAK, ZWIKSTRA 
VITA, DOWNEY. C\RVEY. LUDWIC, R. LORITZ. CONNERY. CARROLL. FOCARTY, .LYNCH. TORNABENE 

MC INTYRE. CASEY 
MORRIS, MATULENAS, KENNEDY, POKLENKOWSKI, A. LORITZ, RICHARDSON. I NCARO. MUELLER. DALY 

KLSMIREK, FLYNN 

MC NICHOLAS, C. LYNCH. J. RAFFERTY. BEl'TLER. D. MC CABE. LE MAY, S.J. (Moderator) , WILKINS 

J. WALSH. LENIHAN, R. RAFFERTY 

Because of the tremendous activity of the Chicago Catholic Student Confer- 
ence on Religious Activities (Ciscora), the national convention of Catholic 
colleges and high schools was held in Chicago in June, 1930. The sessions 
lasted three days, and took place at the Palmer House. More than two 
thousand delegates from all over the LTnited States registered for the event. 
John Durkin of Loyola university had charge of transportation. William 
Conley of reception, and Thomas Downey of publicity. The three days proved 
to be a source of both education and entertainment for those who attended 
the greatest conference in the annals of American religious activity. 

As president of Ciscora. Loyola university took a prominent part in the 
spiritual activities of the Catholic schools of Chicago. The first general meet- 
ing of the year, held at St. Catherine's High School on November 1. attracted 
a thousand sodalists from all parts of the city. Miss Peggy O'Neil of St. 



Xy''-;.' 



L53ra&& Sit 



DELEGATES TO A CISCORA MEETING 



THE 1931 LOYOLAN 





A SESSION \T I11K NVTloNAL CONFERENCE 



Catherine's High welcomed the visitors, after which Douglas McCabe of Loyola 
university, chairman of the Conference, made the opening speech. The 
morning was devoted to the following topics: The Effect of the June Conven- 
tion, Braille. Catholic literature and the Associated Catholic Charities. It was 
decided to support the Charities with each school giving a contribution. The 
morning session closed with a motion for sectional meetings. At the afternoon 
session it was decided to arrange sectional meetings, at which elections were 
to be held for permanent chairmen. Progress in catechetical instruction was 
brought to the attention of the members. The Catholic Boy and Girl Scout 
movement was likewise considered. After a discussion on Catholic Publica- 
tions and mission activity the meeting adjourned. 

The Catholic Instruction and Social Service Committee of Ciscora met on 
November 20 at Loyola university. Plans were outlined for the opening of 
new centers with the ultimate purpose of teaching religion to those children 
who have not the advantage of a religious training. Social service was also 
discussed; it was arranged to have various prisons, hospitals and homes for 
the delinquent visited and to have Catholic literature distributed throughout 
these institutions. 

Two thousand Catholic youths, representing thirty thousand students of the 
Catholic colleges and high schools in the Chicago metropolitan district, met 
on February 21 at Providence High School. The purposes of the conference 



• 



REPRESENTATIVE SENIORS COMMEMORATE MARQUETTE 



gggftg^gEC THE 19 3 1 LOYOL A~1\ 





THE CUDAHY MEMORIAL MASS 



were to establish interest among the students in training for positions as Boy 
and Girl Scout leaders, to cooperate in aiding home and foreign missions, to 
extend the work of Braille for the blind, to bring to the attention of the 
students the problem of morality in the theatre, and to speed the teaching 
of catechism to Catholic children in non-Catholic schools. One of the prin- 
cipal topics discussed at the meeting was the proposed support by the Catholic 
Student Conference of all Catholic educational programs for the World's Fair. 
Monsignor Horsburgh, director of the Propagation of the Faith in the Arch- 
diocese of Chicago, in a brief address called the attention of the delegates to 
the need of increased support of missionary activities. Reverend Daniel A. 
Lord, S.J., National Sodality Director, sent congratulations to the students on 
the progress made in religious activities and social work by the schools and 
colleges of the Chicago district. He announced plans for a "Summer School 
of Catholic Action' in St. Louis for Chicago parish and school sodality leaders. 
The course will cover a period of three weeks and yield three credits in 
sociology or religion from St. Louis University. 

The Ciscora conference held at Mundelein College on Ascension Thursday. 
May 14, was the grand finale of the religious activities of the year. Almost 
two thousand students attended, participating in the final discussions and in 
the election of officers for the following term. Loyola university was re- 
elected president of the conference. The feature of the morning session was 
an address by the Reverend Gerald A. Fitzgibbons, S.J., a member of the staff 
of the Queen's Work, who spent an entire week in Chicago visiting the various 
sodalities of Chicago and the outlying areas. The reports of the several com- 
mittees were heard and discussed. In the afternoon the discussion of the Boy 
and Girl Scout movement was led by Mundelein College and St. Ignatius High 
School. Six amendments were voted upon, and those passed made a part of 
the constitution. After an imposing procession upon the campus of Loyola 
university, benediction was held. The Ciscora Conference then adjourned 
until the following school year. 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 







iMA 




THE DELLA STRADA LECTURE CLUB 



An interesting sidelight on the religious activities of the University was the 
work done for the Delia Strada Chapel, which is soon to he built on the Lake 
Shore Campus. The Delia Strada Lecture Club, though not as active as it 
had been in previous years, presented several lectures on appropriate subjects 
in various parishes in and about Chicago, including the Holy Name Cathedral. 
St. Scholastica and the Church of the Holy Child in \X aukegan. The Penny 
Lamp Fund, organized by Charles McNicholas of the Arts college, was an ad- 
ded incentive to the students in the drive for funds. Continued labor in this 
direction will make the ideal a reality; too few students, however, realize the 
immensity of the task and the paucity of responsible workers. 

The annual Marquette celebration was conducted with the usual efficiency 
and fervor. Almost two hundred students from Mundelein College. St. Xav- 
ier"s. Our Lady of Bethlehem Academy and Loyola university participated in 
the parade. A cavalcade of fifty automobiles driven by students of the various 
schools, and bearing, besides their capacity loads of pilgrims, flags, banners 
and bunting, flaunted their enthusiasm and joviality on a grey December day. 
Reverend Joseph Reiner. S..L. Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, led 
the parade, his car bearing a huge American flag. From the Michigan Avenue 
bridge, the pilgrimage wended its way to the new Damen Avenue bridge over 
the Chicago River, where Father Marquette spent the winter of 1674 and ? T5. 
The spot is marked by a plaque erected by William Hale Thompson, former 
Mayor of Chicago. The last stop was Portage Creek and Harlem Avenue, 
where the monument erected by the Chicago Historical Society was visited 
and decorated by Daniel Murphy. President of the Student Council of the 
College of Arts and Sciences. 

As The Loyola?* goes to press little can be said of the annual senior re- 
treat. The usual enthusiasm has been manifested in the plans, which are 
progressing in accordance with the tradition of this notable event. 



THE 193 1 LOYOLA* 





ST. BERNARD'S SODALITY 



All the religious activity of the University has not been confined to the 
College of Arts and Sciences. Law, Medicine, all the departments have con- 
tributed their share of the year's work. The annual retreat for the students 
of the Law. Medicine and Commerce schools took place on February 20, 21 
and 22. at the Downtown College. Because of the large number of students 
which attended the retreat. Reverend Timothy Bouscaren, S.J., conducted the 
services for the Law and Commerce students, while Reverend William Kane, 
S.J., was retreat master for the Medical students. 

Of the other spiritual activities which deserve to be recorded in the year's 
history the Maria Delia Strada Sodality is worthy of especial commendation. 
Organized at the St. Bernard's School of Nurses several years ago. the Sodality 
has a very large enrollment. Not content with being almost the only organiza- 
tion of its kind in training schools for nurses, the Sodality increases its activity 
and spreads its influence with each succeeding year. In recent months, espe- 
cially, interest has always been at a high pitch.' The Sodality promises to con- 
tinue to hold an important place in the spiritual life of St. Bernard's. 

Every Sunday morning at nine o'clock large numbers of students from the 
Loyola Medical School assemble for their special mass. The private chapel of 
old St. Jarlath's church, in the very center of Chicago's West Side, is the scene 
of this unique gathering. The mass, which is the only one in Chicago limited 
to medical students, is a custom of three years' standing. The results obtained 
thus far have been gratifying. From sixty to eighty students are present each 
Sunday — a remarkably large number in view of the fact that but a small frac- 
tion of those attending live in the vicinity of the church. Moreover, through 
the instrumentality of this weekly service. Father Walsh has made several con- 
verts among the non-Catholic students. 

The annual retreat held for the women of the Downtown College was given 
by Father Bouscaren. The services were held at the Convent of the Cenacle. 
The retreat began on Friday. December 5. and continued to Monday. December 
8. As in previous years the retreat was attended by a large number of women, 
many of whom had been present at several in the past. Coming just prior to 
the Christmas season, the time was most suitable for the making of the sacri- 
fices demanded by a proper retreat. 



THE 



19 3 1 



L O Y O L A X 








AMERICA'S LEADING CATHOLIC PHILOSOPHERS 

event is the retreat for women of the Downtown College. This year's retreat 
master was Father Bouscaren. The services were held at the Convent of the 
Cenacle. Services began on Friday, December 5, and continued to Monday. 
December 8. As in previous years the retreat was attended by a large number 
of women, many of whom have been present at several in the past. 

During the Christinas holidays, Loyola University was host to the sixth an- 
nual convention of the American Catholic Philosophical Association. The 
sessions took place on December 29 and 30. the attendance being composed of 
about one hundred and twenty-five of the leading Catholic philosophers of the 
country. The discussions, which occupied the greater part of the two days, 
centered about the principles of causality and God"s relationship to the uni- 
verse in the light of modern science and philosophy. Papers treating the 
various phases of these two topics were read before the assembly by authori- 
ties outstanding in their respective fields. After the discussions of the first 
day, the annual dinner took place in the dining-room of Dumbach Hall. The 
Reverend George M. Mahowald, S.J., was the toastmaster. and introduced the 
Reverend Doctor James H. Ryan, the retiring president of the association and 
the president of the Catholic University of Washington. D.C. The discussions 
of the second day were devoted to an analysis of St. Augustine and a critical 
study of the moral philosophy of John Dewey. At the business meeting the 
Reverend Gerald B. Phelan of St. Michael College, Toronto, Canada, was 
elected president of the association for the following year. 

A retreat for the lay professors of the College of Arts and Sciences was 
held just before Christmas. Mr. Charles Costello, a professor at the Arts 
college, was the motivating force behind the event. According to his arrange- 
ment, the professors left for Mayslake on Friday. December 19, and returned 
on the following Monday. The retreat, which was conducted by the Fran- 
ciscan fathers, made such a favorable impression upon those who participated 
that they expressed themselves almost unanimously in favor of having another 
before the close of the school year. 

In the final analysis, however, the most important religious activity was em- 
bodied, not in the Ciscora conferences or in the annual retreat, but in the con- 
sistent enthusiasm of the students in attending Friday mass. This event has 
assumed an unprecedented role in the spiritual life of the students of the Arts 
college. The chief factor in this development has been Father Reiner. He 
has gone about the task persistently of instructing the student body in the value 
of the weekly mass, and his efforts are beginning to produce results. 



THE 



9 3 1 



L O Y O L A X 




SPIRITUAL 



d£&A 



A more sincere Catholicism — a personal in- 
terest in the lay apostolate — has heen the aim 
and, to a slight extent, at least, the endeavor 
of the spiritual organizations of the University. 

Loyola is frankly a Catholic school. That 
title is her chief glory. It indicates an exalted 
mission and a tremendous destiny. It is the 
prime purpose of the administration that the 
Loyola graduate have full opportunity to de- 
velop a Christian character. With this aim the 
difficult task of managing retreats at the pro- 
fessional schools; advising and instructing the 
individual students in matters relative to their 
faith, and promoting the diverse activities of 
student spiritual groups has been carried 
through. It is to the credit of Loyola that 
such a number of her former students are now 
preparing or equipped for religious vocations. 



»»1* 




SOCIETY 



cj£2tj 



"The social activities of the University are 
greatly indebted to the Loyola Union for their 
success. The Union has efficiently regulated 
the affairs both financially and socially. 

During the past school year its aims have 
been carried out by effecting a greater system 
of organization and unity among the different 
departments of Loyola. The Union is grad- 
ually bringing about a more harmonious spirit 
in the promotion of dances and is joining the 
affairs of the various colleges into fewer but 
greater University events. This action of the 
Union is in harmony with the general policv 
of co-ordination current in the whole program 
of tlie University." 





President Loyola Union. 





THE SENIOR BALL 



The 1930 social season was cub 



ited 



on June 



7 with the stately Senior 



Ball. The dance was an appropriate farewell to the largest graduating class 
yet to leave the halls of Loyola. 

The financial success of the affair was due primarily to the efforts of the 
Loyola Union working in conjunction with all the departments of the Uni- 
versity. The precedent of the previous year which allowed members of all 
classes to attend was continued and the underclassmen took full advantage of 
the invitation extended by the seniors. This being the last dance of the 
school year an unusually large attendance met the efforts of the promoters. 
The chairmanship of the dance in the regular rotation was in the hands of 
President CTRourke of the Senior Day Law Class who also led the grand 
march. Hubert Neary of the Commerce School and Virginia Barker. Sociology, 
were the committee members in charge of the favors. Frank Conley, Arts; 
Joseph Marzano, Medical and William 1 Haberline, Dental, were the members of 
the publicity committee. Charles La Fond represented the Loyola Union. 

The setting of the event was the Louis XVI Room of the Congress Hotel. 
The music was rendered by Dell Coon and his wandering syncopators who 
had returned from an eastern trip for the Senior Ball. They effectively 
banished, at least for a night, the worries of the job-seeking seniors and filled 
the whole throng with their melodious rhythm. This Senior Ball reached 
finality not only in the order of events but also in affording the ultimate in 
dance entertainment. 




THE 



19 3 1 



L O Y O L A N 





THE JUNIOR PROM 

The Junior Prom, the most distinctive formal dance of the year, took place 
on May 3. 1930. The quota of bids was limited to two hundred and fifty and 
the allotted number for each department was sold ten days before the event. 
The bids were offered to other classmen after the juniors had bought to their 
satisfaction. As a result few other than juniors were fortunate enough to 
attend the dance. 

Favors for both the ladies and their escorts were provided by a generous 
committee. The girls received silver link bracelets with the school seal im- 
pressed in white gold in the center chain. Their partners received handy 
maroon billfolds with the university crest embossed on their surfaces in gold. 

The provident committee having sold the maximum number of bids and 
realizing that the dance was certain to "go over" served ginger ale at the tables 
without charge and also kept the orchestra over time. The Main Ball Room 
of the Drake Hotel was the scene of the promenade though numerous couples 
enjoyed the dancing in the adjoining foyers and on the balcony. 

The musical features of the evening were Joe Rudolph, one of the famous 
doctors of radio station WMAQ, and his orchestra who played to the enjoy- 
ment of the listening and dancing couples. The leaders of the promenade 
were Cornelius Collins of the Day Law and Ronald Lindsay of the Medical 
School who received that honor in the regular rotation scheduled by the 
Loyola Union. This Junior Prom set up a precedent for all such events in 
the future. 




s^©K£g§©5L 



THE 



9 3 1 



L O Y O L A N 



5&}jmr&£32£m?3&Bi 





THE SOPHOMORE COTILLION 



The biggest, gayest and funniest novelty party in the history of the Uni- 
versity was held on February 14, 1931 in the Florentine Room of the Con- 
gress Hotel. This Valentine Party offered a real cotillion, the first Loyola 
dance to actually carry out that name. Marches, swarming couples, robber 
dances, lost partners, souvenirs, favors and races, all contributed to the most 
hilarious social event yet managed by one of the lower classes. 

Time was when, in the parlance of the age, a cotillion was simply a square 
dance. Now it is a novelty party-dance featuring highly ridiculous stunts un- 
der the direction of the cotillion master and accompanied by the plentiful dis- 
tribution of favors. A company of cotillion masters was engaged to break the 
ice and keep things in a state of continuous action. Suffice it to say, they ful- 
filled their contract. The committees of the various departments worked with 
unusual fervor and as a result a large and enthusiastic crowd had their expec- 
tations more than filled. 

The tuneful music was furnished by a member of the Sophomore class, 
Don Dunlap. and his tune peddlers. They worked in perfect co-operation 
with the cotillion master and helped to make the unusual affair a big suc- 
cess. The party started at nine o'clock and after one hour had passed every 
one was oblivious to all but the hypnotic strains of the music and the direc- 
tions of the cotillion master. The final number of the evening, "'Home 
Sweet Home."' had no charms for the dancing couples and they demanded 
encore after encore of the alreadv tired orchestra. 




T H 



9 3 



LOYOLA^ 





THE LOYOLA NEWS WELCOME FRESHMEN DANCE 

The Loyola AVjcs-Welcome Freshmen Dance opened the series of social 
functions under the direction of the Loyola Union for the scholastic year of 
±WfY,?i. It was the sixth annual News dance and, for the first time, it was 
officially combined with the Freshman Frolic. The purpose of the union 
was to relieve the freshmen of the arduous task of managing such a great 
undertaking. The placing of the dance under the control of the News as- 
sured its success from the very outset. The result of the planning was not 
only an enthusiastic welcome for the freshmen but a gala party for the whole 
LTniversity. 

The dance was heralded as the "Million Dollar Party" and it came closer 
to justifying this boast than had any function bearing that title previously. 
To justify the claim the News placed the frolic at the Drake Hotel in the 
Main Dining Room and the Avenue of Palms, one of the largest dancing 
floors in the city. There were tables for all but the music of Ted Fio Rito's 
orchestra kept the six hundred couples on the dance floor the greater part 
of the evening. This talented band offered the best and latest musical hits 
while the famous "Dusty" Roads drew round upon round of applause for 
his individual contributions to the entertainment. 

The various colleges of the University were well represented and a large 
number of outside guests enjoyed the evening. The success of the dance 
must be accorded to the Neivs and its staff workers. The arrangements were 
taken care of in the usual efficient and progressive manner characteristic of 
that organization. 




THE 



19 3 1 



L O Y O L A N 





THE BLUE KEY BANQUET 

Blue Key. the national honorary fraternity, held its annual banquet 



th 



evening of April 15. 1930, at the Palmer House. The banquet was attended by 
faculty, alumni and active members. The newly elected candidates were ad- 
mitted and welcomed by the fraternity. There were twenty-six new members, 
including representatives from every department of the university. The new 
officers were sworn in by Robert M. Kelley. S.J.. president of the University. 
Plans were discussed for activity during the summer and James C. O'Connor, 
the new president, immediately appointed the various committees. 




THOSE BY-GONE DAYS 

The above picture is the result of our reminiscing. It is the Medical School 
Junior Prom, held in the Congress Hotel on April 28. 1914. 

The grand march took place at about nine-thirty, because in those days it 
was considered impolite to yawn while the picture was being taken. Dr. Rob- 
ertson thought it was going to be a masquerade and came disguised as one of 
the Smith Bros. If by this time you have not let down your hair and broken 
into tears, let us quote from the lines written in the 1916 Medical School An- 
nual: "'The dancers dispersed about one o'clock, all agreeing that they had 
enjoyed a very pleasant evening." 



THE 



19 3 



LOYOLA* 





THE SENIOR SOCIOLOGY LUNCHEON 

The Senior Sociology Luncheon was held on Saturday, February 7, 1931, 
at the Women's LTniversity Club. At the luncheon the officers of the vear 
were elected and plans were discussed for the social affairs for the season. 
The gathering had among its members Father Seidenburg, Dean of the School 
of Sociology, and Miss Helen Ganey, Dean of Women, as well as some fifty 
seniors of the Sociology School. The organization of the class was promoted 
by means of this social event and plans for future gatherings formulated. 




THE FACULTY BANQUET 

Some three hundred faculty members from the various colleges of the LTni- 
versity gathered in the Gold Room of the Congress Hotel on November 6, 
1930. for the annual faculty dinner. Joseph F. Elward was toastmaster. 

The address of the evening was given by Rev. Samuel Knox Wilson. S.J., 
on the subject of "English and American Universities." Father Wilson, who 
spent three years at Cambridge university studying for his doctorate, was in 
a position to give a very lucid comparison of the two types of institutions. 

President Robert M. Kelley, S.J., congratulated the heads of the various 
schools on the accomplishments of their various departments and expressed 
high hopes for continued progress. 



19 3 



L O Y O L A N 



& JZirT^-Jfe J3cTr»>'X 





THE SIGMA LAMBDA BETA FORMAL 
The regular Formal Dinner Dance of the Sigma Lambda Beta Fraternity 
was held in the Dutch Room of the Bismarck Hotel on Saturday evening, No- 
vember 22. 1930. Music was furnished by the Midwest Revelers, a well known 
band in collegiate circles. The above picture gives evidence of the success of 
the dance. 

The credit is due to the fraternity's social committee whose effort brought 
forth results long to be remembered by those who attended. The informality 
the Sigma Lambda Beta formals is one of the biggest factors in their success. 




THE MUNDELEIN DANCE 
The first Loyola-Mundelein party took place at the Mundelein gymnasium 
and parlors on December 18, 1930. It was the initial social get-together oi 
the two neighboring institutions and it proved to be the beginning of a strong 
bond of friendship between the two colleges and, incidentally, between some 
of the students. The music was furnished by Anthony Tomczak and his cam- 
pus orchestra. During the course of the dance refreshments were served in 
the Mundelein College cafeteria. This affair served to open friendly relations 
and to foster a true neighborly spirit. With the help of more gatherings of 
this kind the bond should strengthen with both mutual benefits to Loyola 
and Mundelein. 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 









THE PI ALPHA LAMBDA WINTER FORMAL 
The Petit Salon of the Sovereign Hotel is admirably suited for a gathering 
of a small and exclusive nature. Pi Alpha Lambda was fortunate in inau- 
gurating its policy of having the annual winter formal in this cosy ballroom 
some five years ago. 

Those who gathered there on the evening of December 6, 1930, spent an 
enjovable evening in the company of intimate friends, danced to the music of 
Roy Rice, enjoved the cuisine of the hotel at dinner and, in the case of the 
escorted, received favors. 

This party officially opened the social calendar of the fraternity and served 
to set a precedent for the following events. 




THE PHI Ml CHI FORMAL PARTY 
On November 1, 1930, Phi Mu Chi inaugurated a new idea into its parties 
at the chapter house. This party was formal and the couples were served 
by caterers. It was attended by some thirty-six couples who danced to the 
music of Herb Stanton, one of the members, and his orchestra. The gay 
crowd enjoyed the innovation which lent to the house party the distinction 
of a hotel dinner dance. Those in attendance put in a most enjoyable evening 
and expressed themselves in favor of holding future formals in the fraternity's 
spacious residence. 



THE 



19 3 1 L O Y O L A N 





Probably, an advantage in attending college, 
second only to the opportunity of developing 
a mental capacity, is the opportunity which 
presents itself of making life-long acquain- 
tances. 

When men matriculate at a university they 
have reached an age where they are fair judges 
of character and where they are most desirous 
of forming friendships. 

It was probably with this view in mind that 
the University originally condoned student so- 
cial gatherings. In affairs of a more formal 
nature such as dances and dinners it was hoped 
that the same spirit of companionship would 
arise as characterized class room acquaintance- 
ships, campus associations and fraternal con- 
tacts. 





fce profile D rjelmet of rrje gentleman ano ttjc crest of bnigbt* 
rjooD signifp tijat tfje rjousc of Lopola tuas rcnoruneD in court 

anD camp alike. 
Co Dap a unitoersitp's escutdbeon represents in part a sportsman* 

s&ip anD protoess per&aps not untoort&p of a great name. 




Leonard D. Sachs 
Varsity Basketball Coach 



ATHLETIC DEDICATION 

^ hile it is a bit unusual to dedicate an athletic section it is still more 
unique to dedicate it to a member of the coaching staff. Lest it be said that 
in inscribing this section to Mr. Sachs, overzealous collegians are paying 
tribute to an accumulation of victories: let it be known that the current season 
was the most disastrous in many years. This dedication is prompted by 
more impressive and more laudable traits than the ability to produce a winner. 

A convert and an exponent of Catholic principles in sports, Mr. Sachs per- 
mits no violation of the strict set of training rules which he requires his ath- 
letes to follow. He depends for the spread of this doctrine of right living not 
on his ability as a policeman, but rather on an honor system which accom- 
plishes the same end in a way which builds rather than breaks character. 
Probably the most tangible tribute that can be paid him is to state that his 
players, those who know him best, are his staunchest admirers. 

His reputation as a producer of skilfull teams has been widely heralded. 
His prime achievement, the coaching of a team that won thirty-four inter- 
collegiate basketball games consecutively and whose captain was awarded 
the pivot position on the All-American team, needs no explanation. In honor- 
ing him, however. w r e recognize the subservience of his work as a coach to 
his work as a developer of men. 



THE 



19 3 



L O Y O L A N 




MONOGRAM AWARDS 
MAJOR SPORTS 



McCarthy 



Football Letters 



Chris Poppelreiter 
Walter Durkin 
Thomas Howland 
William McNeil 
Victor Napolilli 
Henry Ployhart 
John Waesco 
George Weimer 
Timothy Connelly 
Steve Furches 
Frank McClellan 
Frank Murphy 
Joseph Norton 
Robert Schuhmann 
John Smitli 
Leslie Molloy 
Philip Clancy 
Frank Lutzenkirchen 
Jerome Gottsehalk 
Raymond Nolan 
Martin Stadler 
Thomas Walsh 
Robert Dooley, Mgr. 



Basketball Letters 
John Waesco 
John Durhurg 
John Smith 
Joseph Drugay 
Joseph Wagner 
Robert Schuhmann 
Richard Butzen 
George Silvestri 
Edward Connelly 
Donald Cavanaugh 




THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A \ 



MONOGRAM AWARDS 
MINOR SPORTS 



\ 






«s 




Tennis Letters 



George Zwikstra 
John MeGuire 
Robert O'Connor 
Joseph Frisch 
Paul Diggles 
Edward Hines, Mgr. 



Golf Letters 
Julian D'Esposito 
Anthony Maulillo 
Emmett Morrissey 
Donald Cavanaugh 
James Vonesh 



*J£ 



Track Letters 
Thomas O'Neill 
Thomas Healy 
John Strobel 
Burt Zuley 
Jay Mann 

Seymour Liebermann 
Louis Tordella 
J. Chapman 
Thomas Walsh 
Lothar Nurnberger 
Bert Franciseo 
Joseph \X agner 
Daniel Maher. Mgr. 

Boxing Letters. 
Joseph Lukitsch 
Sam Cali 
John McGillen 
James Vonesh 
Roger Knittel 
John Koenig 
Frank Brundza 
Anthony Rauwolf 



Jerome Gottscl 
George Coven 
Edward Trick 



Swimming Letter 
Ik 



THE 



19 3 1 



L O Y O L A N 




THE IDEM, <>E ATHLETICS 




Athletic success is a thing to be sought after 
and prized but only if none of the finer things 
of university life are sacrificed. Loyola has 
had more than her share of victories but more 
than that, her men have carried the victory 
with honor to themselves. 

It is for the character that the game brings 
out that Loyola sponsors her sports program. 
Her purpose is to develop such men as Bud 
Gorman, hero-captain of the 192."> Ramblers, 
who while attaining All-American honors as 
an athlete distinguished himself to a greater 
extent by sacrificing his life that he might 
save another's. 





*+JL*r 



FOOTBALL 




"There will be no football at Loyola next 
year. 

The new stadium will be silent and empty; 
or if not that, filled with strange cheers that 
have no meaning for Loyola men. There will 
be no chit-chat of games to be played with 
strong opponents, of games — won and lost. 
The followers of the team will lose their as- 
sumed right of holding a post-mortem on every 
play, of "second-guessing" the coaches and 
players. It will be a long closed season for 
Loyola football men. 

But in this decision to abolish football, 
whether one agrees with it or not, there is 
still visible that fine courage and willingness 
to sacrifice for an ideal, which, we hope, has 
and will characterize all that Loyola univers- 
itv does". 





Graduate Manager. 





COACH E. J. NORTON 

Loyola was fortunate to have as her football 
coach for 1930. one of her own graduates and 
one of her former athletic stars. Dr. Edwin 
J. Norton, a former Arts student and a grad- 
uate of the Dental School, is a practicing den- 
tist. So keen, however, was his interest in the 
Loyola football situation that for several years 
he sacrificed time which might have been spent 
in pursuit of his chosen profession to the fur- 
therance of Loyola's athletic reputation. 

A man with a fund of knowledge pertinent 
to the sport he taught. Coach Norton is cred- 
ited with the development of the finest fresh- 
man team in the history of the school; a team 
composed of the present graduating class. In 
more recent years he was the backfield coach 
whose work was largely responsible for the of- 
fense that enabled the 1929 team to compare 
favorably with the best in this locality. At 
the start of the 1930 season he was offered the 
position of head coach and, largely because of 
his attachment for the members of the squad 
with whom he had worked for three years, he 
accepted. 

Mechanically this year's team was as well 
versed as any other; it was their mental atti- 
tude and not their lack of ability which made 
their record less impressive than it might have 
been. As a teacher of football Eddie ranks 
high and the fact that he was not the master 
psychologist needed to correlate the various 
types of mentality found in the 1930 team was 
unfortunate. Doctor Norton's influence around 
the Athletic Department will be greatlv missed. 



T II 



9 3 



LAN 



CO-CAPTAIN POPPELREITER 

In its last year of intercollegiate football, Loyola's defensive 
captain was Chris Poppelreiter who operated at one of the 
guard posts. During three seasons he maintained his superior- 
ity at his line position, and coupled with Ray Nolan and 
Waesco, Popp made up an impregnable center of the line. 

From the opening game of his junior year until second game 
of his senior year, the Georgetown game in which he sustained 
a broken rib, Chris played every moment in which Loyola teams 
engaged regularly scheduled opponents. This record of nine 
consecutive games without being removed is the longest on the 
books of the Athletic Department. 

Known as the squad's "iron man," Poppelreiter will be re- 
membered as a man who was as brilliant a performer as the 
obscurity of a line position allows. Immediately after his final 
intercollegiate game Chris embarked upon a professional foot- 
ball career and, endowed as he is with real natural ability and 
ample experience, he should be a success. 





J» I 



CO-CAPTAIN MOLLOY 

The outstanding player on the 1930 Rambler football team 
was co-captain Leslie Molloy. Not without reason did one ot 
the Chicago dailies state "As Molloy goes so goes Loyola". At 
the start of the last season Molloy accounted for four touch- 
downs against Carroll college and his play as a whole was sim- 
ilar to that which gave the late Walter Eckersall reason to 
mention him for All- Western honors. 

Georgetown's team came to town with a defense built to stop 
Molloy and to a certain extent they succeeded; but they were 
unable to prevent bis turning in an excellent defensive game. 
On the opening play against Duquesne, Les redeemed himself 
with a slashing drive which accounted for Loyola's score. Ham- 
pered as he was by the injury sustained in this play, Molloy 
never again reached the peak of which he was capable. Sim- 
ultaneously, if not because of his inability to continue as be- 
fore, the team as a whole languished and was beaten by its 
inferiors. 




THE 



1 9 



L O Y O L A X 




Exercises result in the 

loss of more than the 

proverbial "pound of 

flesh." 






REVIEW OF THE SEASON 

Loyola university's 1930 football season was marked 
by as unusual a set of events as could be crammed into 
any single season. In the year when Fordham and the 
Army dominated the East, Alabama and Loyola of New 
Orleans the South. Notre Dame, Northwestern and Mar- 
quette the Mid-West, and Southern California the West, 
Loyola of Chicago stood out as the champion enigma. 

Loyola was the first major college in the nation to in- 
stall a lighting system by means of which night football 
could be played : its veteran team opened its schedule in 
an impressive style against reasonably strong opposition; 
then, because of some inexplicable change, the same team 
became the proverbial doormat for weaker schools; and. 
ending the season disastrously, Loyola completed its con- 
quest for the possession of the most checkered football 
record of the past season by going on record as the first 
major college to abandon intercollegiate football in favor 
of intramurals and less strenuous intercollegiate sports. 

Shortly after Labor Day Doctor Norton called his squad 
together and began to whip them into a working unit 
which the student body expected to win most of the games 
on the hardest schedule ever attempted by a Rambler 
football team. After three weeks of practice, replete with 
exercises, signal practices, and reviews of fundamentals. 
Coach Norton had his twelve monogram men and some 
twenty-five sophomores ready to open the football season. 

Carroll College was slated to furnish the opposition. 
The big orange team, winners of the Wisconsin College 
Association football championship for four successive 
years, and conquerors of Lawrence I who in turn had held 
the undefeated Marquette team scoreless for three quarters 
only to lose by a touchdown in the final moments), was 
out to repeat a victory obtained in 1924 when the two 
schools had last met. 

Within two minutes Les Molloy had sliced off tackle for 
twenty-five yards and the first score. Carroll retaliated by 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 




Risholi of South Da- 
seven points and a tie 
with Loyola. 




finding the main weakness in the Loyola defense all sea- 
son, and Dillingoffski advanced the ball to the five-yard 
line on a series of off tackle smashes and then lunged 
over the line to tie the score. Immediately Molloy ripped 
off a sixty yard run which put Loyola in front with a 
lead which the team never relinquished. Frank Murphy 
was substituted for Les and he was instrumental in scor- 
ing a touchdown when he hurled a long pass to Joe 
Drugay who stepped across the goal. 

On the first play of the second half Marty Stadler ran 
sixty-five yards on a perfectly executed off-tackle play 
for a touchdown, but a head injury sustained on the 
following play made it necessary to remove him and to 
send Molloy into the game again. In less than a quarter 
Molloy made two additional touchdowns. Murphy added 
one more, which, coupled with Lutzenkirchen's first 
point-after-touchdown brought the final Loyola score to 
43. Orlebeke made his team's second and last score 
when he electrified the crowd with a fifty yard run. 
This game was by far the best Loyola played throughout 
the season. 

One week later. October third, Loyola suffered its first 
defeat at the hands of Georgetown. The Hilltoppers stop- 
ped the Rambler offense by building a defense to stop one 
man: and, when Molloy was halted, the Chicago team was 
punchless. The largest crowd to witness a game in the 
Loyola stadium, some fifteen thousand fans, saw a team 
which appeared better drilled in the fundamentals of 
blocking and tackling, crash through for a well deserved 
victory. The first score was obtained when power plays 
had carried the ball to the ten-yard line, and with the 
home team's defense set for line plays. Scalzi passed to 
Maczees for a six point lead. In the second half Loyola 
staged a 77-yard march which terminated with Ted Con- 
nelly sneaking through the line to tie the score. In the 
last quarter Bordeau scored on a plunge after an inter- 
cepted pass had placed the Washington team in the scor- 
ing zone. The final touch of the 16 to 6 score was achieved 






THE 



19 3 



L O Y O L A N 




The first kick-off un- 
der light in the Chi- 
cago district. The Cur- 
roll College game. 







when Scalzi drop-kicked perfectly from the thirty-six yard 
line. Such good kicking is more prevalent in the East 
and the crowd was greatly thrilled by the unusual oc- 
currence. 

Duquesne of Pittsburgh registered its second victory in 
as many year? by the same score when it beat Loyola 7 to 6 
on October tenth. The Easterners gained their victory not 
because of superior ability but rather because of a super- 
abundance of viciousness. Their football was clean but 
never gentle. On the first play with the ball in Loyola's 
possession. Les Molloy slid off tackle for sixty yards only 
to be downed on the two-yard line. Furches counted on 
the next play. The advantage thus gained was costly, for 
Les was obliged to withdraw from the game with a leg in- 
jury sustained on his long run. Within a few minutes 
he was followed from the field by Connelly, who suffered 
a broken collar bone and Poppelreiter who was the recip- 
ient of a broken rib. Throughout the rest of the game the 
home team outplayed their opponents and though they 
advanced well into Duke territory the loss of their out- 
standing men seemed to have halted their scoring possi- 
bilities. Duquesne counted in the second half as a result 
of two long passes by Benedict which carried the ball to 
the two yard line. Here the Ramblers held for downs, but 
as the line stopped Benedict on the last try the ball popped 
from his hands into the arms of Sullivan who circled the 
end without difficulty. Kovalchik's perfect placement won 
the game. 

A week later the squad travelled to New Orleans to meet 
Loyola, one of the strongest Southern teams, whom it had 
beaten the previous year. Here the visitors received the 
worst thrashing ever administered to a Loyola team. A 
defeat at the hands of the Wolves was pardonable, but the 
emphasis which even the 25 to score does not indicate, 
cannot be excused. Tetlow was the key to the Wolves" 
offense and though he did not score it was his ability to 
pierce the Loyola line at all places and at all times which 
enabled his mates to make touchdowns. The New Or- 



T II E 



9 3 



LOYOLA* 




The Loyolans stopped 

Duquesne this way all 

evening but they lost 

by a point. 




leans team counted in every period and though Loyola 
threatened in the third quarter the Chicago offense was 
tor the most part defunct. After the opening; kickoff 

the home team drove straight down the field and Lopez 
plunged two yards to score. In the second period the 
Chicago team had more success in halting line plays but 
a long pass Heier to Zelden, gave the home team a 13 to 
lead at the half. On the kickoff for the second half 
Tetlow ran through the entire team and was downed 
from behind on the two yard line by Smith. Zelden 
scored. The fourth quarter saw Lopez break loose on a 
brilliant fifty yard run that completed the evening's 
scoring. 

Molloy's play in the third quarter was some, yet in- 
sufficient, consolation to the Loyola of Chicago followers. 
It was generally conceded that the morale of the team 
was not what it should have been, due. perhaps to the 
repeated bad luck that had afflicted the squad. 

The fourth defeat in as many weeks was met at the 
hands of Coe College of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. The Coe 
team was a great aggregation for a small college but they 
had not been expected to beat even the disillusioned Ram- 
blers. The 1929 Loyola team had beaten the visitors em- 
phatically even though the score was fairly close, and the 
home fans had hoped that their favorites would regain 
some of their lost prestige at the expense of the Iowa 
school. Such was not to be, for before either team had 
merited a first down, Longstreet had passed twenty-five 
yards to Frisbee who was not even extended to reach the 
goal thirty yards away without interference. 

Coe gained seventy-four yards from scrimmage all eve- 
ning, yet they had the ability to combine sixty-eight of 
them into one concentrated march which gave them the 
second touchdown shortly after the third period opened. 
Loyola tried gamely and Murphy and Weimer played 
great games but as a whole the team was outclassed by a 
school originally scheduled as a rest period prior to the 
De Paul encounter. 






THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 




Georgetoivn's t e a m 

shifted, dressed and 

played like another 

Notre Dame. 






During the ensuing week Coach Norton revamped his 
entire team and offensive system in an effort to upset the 
undefeated De Paul squad. The Notre Dame shift was vir- 
tually abandoned in favor of a variation of the old Min- 
nesota shift which drew the guards back. Long practice 
sessions marked the week and it was hoped that the re- 
newed activity would result in a more desirable outcome. 
But no change was forthcoming and the Ramhlers went 
down in defeat 6 to before thirty thousand spectators 
who had gathered to aid the Rosary College Building 
Fund. The story of the game was simple. The De Paul 
team marched tlie length of the field without losing the 
ball and scored within five minutes of the opening whis- 
tle. Not satisfied by this display of superiority they con- 
tinued to threaten Loyola's goal for the rest of the half. 

Loyola's only offensive threat was in the dying moments 
of the period when Howland received a long pass and 
scampered across the goal only to have the officials rule 
that he had stepped offside on the fifteen-yard line. The 
Demons immediately went into a ^ix-man pass defense and 
Loyola's pass floated into the hands of Steffen who re- 
turned it to mid-field as the half ended. 

In justice to the Loyola team it must be said that they 
played greatly improved football in the second half. Ten 
first downs to two for De Paul left no doubt as to their 
relative merits during the last period. Despite their fine 
drive the Ramblers were never able to capitalize on their 
plays due to repeated fumbles. They tried hard but their 
proclivities were too great and the "Olde Browne Bar- 
rele," due to Loyola's abolition of football, will rest 
permanently at De Paul. 

The defeat by De Paul stirred more adverse comment 
than all the rest of the losses put together. The Loyola 
News referred to the contest as a "practice ' game and re- 
fused to give the De Paulians credit for a clear-cut vic- 
tory. The turmoil was even reflected in the daily papers; 
and, though there was a great deal of comment on the 
poor sportsmanship of the journalists, the effect produced 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 




And then there was 
that disheartening af- 
ternoon at the Stad- 
ium. De Paid 6; 
Loyola 0. 




was the only important victory of the season. 

Stirred hy what appeared to be lack of student support 
the team entered the St. Louis contest with more determin- 
ation than had marked their efforts in weeks. As a result 
they beat a squad which had a much more imposing rec- 
ord; and which was, in the final analysis, probably more 
adept in the playing of the game. 

St. Louis scored within a few minutes as the culmina- 
tion of a series of plays which alternated short passes and 
fake passes with the passer circling the end behind well 
formed interference. Walsh's hip injury caused the week 
previous, slowed him to such an extent that he could not 
stop this particular play and Bob Schuhmann, a man 
whose football was played as a conditioner for basketball, 
coupled with McNeil halted the Billiken's offense. 

With but two minutes left in the first half Pike punted 
offside on Loyola's fifteen-yard line. On the second play 
Howland squirmed off guard and tore eighty-five yards 
down the middle of the field for Loyola's first score in 
weeks. Lutzenkirchen kicked what proved to he the win- 
ning goal. The second half was characterized hy frenzied 
effort on the part of the home team to overcome Loyola's 
lead, but the Ramblers successfully withstood all attacks 
and came home with their second and last victory of the 
year. It was the only real chance the Loyola students 
had to prove their team support was justified and the 
group who entered St. Louis meekly and hopefully prob- 
ably made more noise as they left than could have been 
expected of a delegation twice as large. 

The triumphant return from St. Louis was indicative of 
the new spirit that paved the way for the prediction that 
Boston College's great team would be extended to the ut- 
most to beat Loyola. The Eagles were one of the out- 
standing Eastern teams, their record including but one 
loss, and that to Fordham by the narrow margin of a field 
goal. The game opened however with Loyola in its cus- 
tomary lethargical state and Boston scored within five 
minutes on a twentv-yard run bv Kelly. 






THE 



19 3 1 



LOYOLA* 



3k^?*x&^7*m 





THE CAMERA STOPPED COE WHEN THE LINE COULDN'T 






For the rest of the game the visitors were unable to 
gain from scrimmage. At the start of the second quarter 
Antos received a forty-five yard pass from Colbert which 
placed the ball on the two-yard line from which Marr 
scored and Colbert added the extra point. Loyola threat- 
ened twice during the second quarter but some wonderful 
defensive play halted them within the Eagle's twenty- 
yard line. 

Between the half there was a pushball game between 
the Sophs and the Frosh; and, after struggling for some 
minutes without achieving anything other than furthering 
prosperity by increasing the business of the tailors and 
the cleaners, the Frosh managed to push their elders back 
some twenty yards; which convinced Jumping Joe Tiger- 
man that he must fire his gun and end it before the pres- 
tige of the upperclassmen suffered too greatly. 

It was a rejuvenated Loyola team which entered the 
second half of the Boston game. The famous offense, 
which had made eight first downs against one of the 
East's best teams, Fordham, was brought to a standstill 
and though Loyola possessed the ball only half of the 
last period the most ground the Eagle offense could 
amass in an equal time was thirteen yards. Despite the 
fine work of the line Boston made its third touchdown 
when Marr threw a fifty yard pass to Captain Dixon. 
Napolilli was in a position to block the pass but he was 
at least a foot shorter than his opponent and he was 
unable to prevent the catch. The ball was then on the 
four yard line and on the fourth down Antos carried it 
over for a score. 

Loyola threatened repeatedly in the final quarter 
when Red McClelland and Frank Murphy alternated in 
throwing seven successive successful passes. All the aer- 
ials were very short but they put Loyola in a scoring 
position as the game ended. It was only lack of time 






THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 






. #-_-' 



■ 




/.,;„. 



THE VARSITY FOOTBALL SQUAD 

Couch), SCHUHMANN, PHELAN, MURPHY, COTTSCHU.K. HARTFORD, HOWLAND, 
weimer. hai.sh, NORTON (Coach), burke ( Back field Coach) 
linklater (Asst. Manager), flynn [Asst. Line Coach), o'brien. waesco. fors, kopacek, 

LUTZENKIRCHEN, CLANCY, NOLAN, SMITH. NORTON, T. CONNELLY. DOOLEY (Manager) 
STADLER, NAPOLLILLI, FLRCHES. MC CLELLAN, MOLLOY. POPPELRF.ITER. DURKIN, E. CONNELLY. CASEY, 

mc neil, drucay, silvestri ( Asst. Manager ) 



that prevented the determined Loyola team from scor- 
ing the first touchdown registered against the Boston 
College team this year. 

The final game of the season was a question of which 
team, Loyola or South Dakota State, was the worse. Loy- 
ola's poor record was matched by the Jackrabbits' 66 to 
7 defeat by Wisconsin, their 48 to loss to Minnesota and 
a 32 to defeat at the hands of some unheard of college 
called St. Olafs. With Ted Connelly returning to the 
game for the first time since early in October the team was 
somewhat bolstered but they still were not capable of 
gaining enough of an advantage to win. 

The first half was both scoreless and uneventful but 
the third quarter gave evidence of more action. W ith the 
ball on their own twenty-five yard line three plays with 
Molloy, Durkin, and Howland carrying the ball were good 
for twenty-five yard gains. Loyola took the lead and Lut- 
zenkirchen kicked the seventh point. After an exchange 
of punts early in the fourth quarter the Northern team 
made three quick passes and covered the forty yards that 
separated them from the Loyola goal. Risholi juggled the 
final pass but he managed to carry it over the line and 
then stepped back to tie the score with a perfect dropkick. 
Both teams tired rapidly in the fourth quarter and neither 
did anything to enliven the proceedings. 






^B&^SBl THE 1931 1 O Y O 1. V > 





IIII HIIOMI I\ I'll! I.lllli I \!lol!\l- Hill. n HI. PAUL EVEN 



4% REVIEW OF THE SEASON 

The last freshman football team ever to represent the 
-^^jL university was, in the final analysis, one of the best if not 

the best to ever do so. Other teams have presented more 
imposing records than that consisting of one victory and 
one tie of which the 1930 squad can boast, but none can 
claim the well balanced aggregation which placed the final 
team in a class by itself. 

No small part of the credit for the success of this year's 
team should be given to the coach, Corny Collins. Col- 
lins was noted for two things during his collegiate athletic 
career: his size, or rather lack of it, and the fighting spirit 
which enabled him to overcome his natural handicap and 
to rise to the captaincy of the 1929 team, Loyola's finest. 
He seemed to have been able to instill this fight into his 
team for in both games played it was only through sheer 
nerve that they brought themselves out of some ticklish 
situations. 

When the final cut had been made Collins had retained 
about twenty-five men whom he intended to carry through- 
out the year. Of these Reid and Burke at the tackle posts, 
Whelan at end, O'Connor at quarter-back, and Poppel- 
reiter at full-hack were the men who early established themselves as regulars. 
The rest of the positions were never absolutely settled and whereas one man 
might be given the call one day the next his chief rival would take precedence. 
In late November when the Varsity was weary with the poundings it had 
been taking, and was in no condition to withstand repeated scrimmage with 
the Frosh. Coach Collins arranged a schedule of two games to serve as the con- 
clusion of the season. The first of these was with the De Paul yearlings. The 
Frosh tried hard to redeem part of the Loyola prestige which had been lost 
when the Varsity lost to the De Paul team but the best they could do was to 
receive a well earned tie. 




Collins 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A X 





s £ 1* ? J? 




Wfm- L ' 







THE FRESHMAN FOOTBALL TEAM 

BURKE, JENNINGS, CAVANAUGH, REED, EIDEN, PFEFFERLE, KELLY, TAYLOR 

WHELAN, BERLIN, GRABER, SULLIVAN, O'CONNOR, BYRNE, COLLINS (Coach) 

CALLANAN, \!HAMMILL, MVIRCKA, HYNAN, OLDANI, JOHNSTON, GOODWIN 

POWERS, FUNK, LAWLOR, WOODS, D. RAFFERTY' 




Within a few moments of the opening kick-off De Paul 
was pounding at Loyola's goal due to one of a series of 
fumbles which marred the play of both teams. The dan- 
ger was averted and Loyola received the ball on its twenty- 
yard line after a De Paul pass was grounded. The re- 
mainder of the first quarter was taken up by a punting 
duel with O'Connor of Loyola having a slight edge over 
his De Paul adversary. Early in the second quarter the 
De Paul team was back trying again for a touchdown but 
a timely pass intercepted by Poppelreiter stopped the 
touchdown march six yards from the goal. 

Late in the second half the ball was in Loyola's posses- 
sion in mid-field and then two successive first downs from 
scrimmage, and one on a pass put the ball on De Paul's 
ten-yard line with a minute to go. Loyola fumbled and 
De Paul recovered. Immediately the De Paul team threw 
three completed passes in a row and the visitors were on 
the verge of scoring when O'Connor intercepted a final 
toss on his six-yard line as the game ended. 

The last game on the Freshman schedule had the most 
exciting finish of any game ever played on the Loyola 
field. With but six seconds to go Crane College's star 
half-back, Balas, missed an attempted field goal by inches 
and Loyola won the game 14 to 12. 

Two brilliant runs by Pat O'Connor more than made up for the absence of 
several of his mates. Loyola won when a scoring chance seemed to have been 
thrown away with two minutes of play remaining and the score tied. At this 
point the line broke through and Balas grounded the ball for a safety. A 
series of passes put Crane in a position to try that final kick. 

The loss of such potential varsity power as was displayed by O'Connor. Pop- 
pelreiter, Reid, Burke and Whelan is one of the more regrettable features of 
the abolition of football. 




9 3 1 



L O Y O L A N 




FOOTBALL 



<j£4A 



Despite rumors current that an All-American 
fullback was so forgetful that it was necessary 
for him to have his signals etched upon his 
thigh pads, and that a stellar guard on one of 
the Big Ten squads had to consult the center 
on every play in order that he might apprec- 
iate the strategy proposed, football requires 
sufficient intelligence to merit a place on the 
activities schedule of an institution for the 
spread of knowledge. 

In abolishing football because they consid- 
ered it out of harmony with the true aims of 
education, Loyola officials were not stamping 
the game itself as undesirable but rather the 
conditions under which it operated. They be- 
lieved that stripped of its blatancy and its 
commercialism it would not be possible to com- 
pete successfully with those schools who were 
desirous of continuing under present condi- 
tions. Hence the rather drastic step taken. 





BASKETBALL 



cifcSfl 



"A tentative schedule compiled for next year's 
basketball team contemplates a trip to Wash- 
ington. D. C. In all probability this tour will 
take place during the Christmas holidays. As 
a result of home and home arrangements under 
way with some of the leading teams of the Mid- 
dle West, the representatives of such schools as 
Michigan State and Butler will appear at Loy- 
ola during the coming season. 

The prospects for next year are good and if 
some of the freshmen can be as useful as sopho- 
mores, as have members of the last two fresh- 
man teams, I feel that we can look forward to 
the coming season with assurance that Loyola 
will make a good showing against the strongest 
competition it will encounter." 



& 



■f 



NS&> 



Varsity Basketball Coach. 




Dick Butzen, Captain, 
Mike W'aesco and Ed- 
die Connelly show 
how it's done. 




* 






C\PT. WAESCO 



n. 



|v° Y0 U 




REVIEW OF THE SEASON 

Losing seven out of sixteen games, the largest defeat 
percentage incurred by a Loyola basketball team since 
the early part of the regime of Coach Len Sachs, the 
1931 team will, nevertheless, be remembered as one 
of the oustanding aggregations in the history of the 
school. The defeats administered the team were never 
by large margins, and, because of the manly manner 
in which they were accepted, no stigma of inability 
or indifference was applied; and the student body, 
more desirous of victory than is the average group of 
their type, having for years been accustomed to it, took 
the defeats philosophically and maintained an attitude 
of friendly backing. 

The loss of Loyola's first "All American" in the per- 
son of Charlie Murphy, had so upset the vital mechan- 
ism of the Sachs" machine that it had no more been 
expected to function as before, than would any other 
machine which had suddenly been deprived of its main 
cog. Defeats were suffered at the hands of the best 
in the Mid-West, and because of the narrow margin 
usually involved, and the polished play the Loyolans 
demonstrated, the team, in defeat, was still a credit 
to the coach and the university that it represented. 

Because of the scarcity of individual stars, and be- 
cause every man was primarily the part of a whole 
rather than an individual. Mr. Sachs felt that the re- 
cent group of players more nearly approximated the 
unified idea inculcated in the word "team" than any 



.1. SMITH 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A \ 




Hob Schuhmann adds 

to the score which 

swamped Arkansas 

State. 




other which he had ever coached. It was common 
knowledge at the start of the year that the veterans 
Waesco. Schuhmann. and Butzen would uphold their 
share of the play with ease. The question which con- 
fronted Loyola followers was, "Could the novices, Wag- 
ner and Cavanaugh, he depended upon to contrihute 
satisfactorily under all conditions, or would the bur- 
den of the scoring at least, he vested in the more ex- 
perienced men?" An early answer to these questions 
was forthcoming in the opening games of the season. 

As usual, the team which yearly takes a pre-Christ- 
mas trip from Arkansas State College to Chicago, fur- 
nished the opposition in the season's opening game; 
and, as in the past, the Ramblers so overwhelmed them 
that every man on the squad saw action for almost half 
of the game. Playing slightly more than one-half of 
his first intercollegiate game Don Cavanaugh made 
eight baskets and a free throw to lead the scoring. 
Wagner, the other recruit, made ten points and though 
at no time did he act so gracefully as to be mistaken 
for Murphy, he played cool, thoughtful basketball. 
The play of these two men cleared up the last diffi- 
culty which might have existed due to unequal ability 
on the part of the various team members. 

On December 20 Western State Teachers, boasting 
a victory string reaching back to the two defeats Loyola 
gave them in 1929, came to Chicago with every inten- 
tion of squaring accounts. During the first half of the 
game they were able to convert enough banked, side 
shots into baskets to take a 13 to 11 lead. In the sec- 



£ 



ifv° VD S| 






SCHUHMANN 



1 O 3 1 



L O Y O L A > 




Dick Butzen dribbles 
out of the clanger 
zone. Milliken game. 



** V 



J. RAFFERTY 




D. CAVANAUGH 




Ml \ I Mill 



ond half the Loyolans played a tighter defensive game 
and by means of a cautious offense they worked the 
score to 22 to 21 with two minutes left to play. An 
imperfectly executed stalling game gave the Teachers 
the winning basket and Byrum added two points for 
certainty as the gun was fired. 

Without further practice the squad entrained for 
Indianapolis to continue the basketball rivalry which 
has long existed with Butler university. As usual, the 
Indiana school had one of the most powerful teams in 
the middle-west, having already taken practice games 
from two Big Ten schools. At the end of the half the 
home team was leading 11 to 10 on the basis of some 
phenomenal playing by Withrow. As the last half 
started Loyola immediately went into the lead but they 
were unable to hold it and the Indiana champions drew 
away to take the game by a 26 to 22 score. 

The losing streak was curtailed in the next game in 
a most pleasant manner. For several years the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburg, perennial contenders for the East- 
ern Championship and winners of that title last year, 
have avoided every challenge issued by Sachs. They 
were, however, unsuspecting enough to schedule West- 
ern Reserve of Cleveland, and after the smoke of battle 
had cleared away the jaunty easterners had sufferedtheir 
worst beating in a decade, by a 34 to 16 score. Imme- 
diately Coach Sachs scheduled the Ohio team and after 
a hard fought battle which matched two zone defenses 
against each other, Loyola won by a 33 to 27 score. 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A > 




DePaul-Loyola games 

are characterized by 

frequent trips to the 

free-throu line. 




Don Cavanaugh, who later led the scoring for the en- 
tire season, was the star of the game by virtue of his 
accurate shooting from the corners. 

On January 3, 4 and 14, Loyola added Milliken, 
North Dakota State, and St. Thomas College of Minne- 
apolis, respectively, to their list of games won. The 
Xorth Dakota and St. Thomas games were not excep- 
tionally difficult and most of the squad played both 
games, though Schuhmann, Wagner, and Cavanaugh 
accounted for most of the points; but the game with 
Milliken almost developed unpleasant complications. 
In the first half Loyola limited the visitors to one bas- 
ket and led at the period 20 to 4. The downstate team 
returned with instructions not to attempt to break 
through the defense but to shoot at every opportunity. 
Smith immediately cut loose with six baskets, all from 
far out on the floor and from then on the game was 
close with the home team finally emerging victorious 
by a 27 to 19 score. This game brought out the main 
defect in the zone defense. No matter how superior 
you are to your opponents, they will beat you if they 
happen to have one man who, on one particular even- 
ing, can throw baskets from afar out oil the floor where 
the zone defense makes no pretense of covering. 

With a two weeks' rest the Ramblers were ready to 
lock horns with their next foes, the University of De- 
troit's Titans. By no stretch of the imagination can 
it be said that Detroit has outstanding basketball teams. 
But it can be said to the credit of their coach that they 



5 




E. CONNELLY 



I h>°4' 



THE 1931 



L O Y O L A N 







v&-z 




THIS SHOT FAILED BUT LOYOLA MADE ENOUGH OTHERS TO WIN 



are always primed to play Loyola and they do their best to win. The Chicago 
game of the series, taking place on the last day of January, resulted in a vic- 
tory for Loyola by a 25 to 20 score. As are all other games involving these 
two teams the outcome was in doubt until the closing moments when Schuh- 
mann and Butzen combined to score two baskets and settle the issue. 

The second of February witnessed the appearance of one of the fastest teams 
ever to play on the floor of Alumni Gym, Centenary College of Schreveport, 
Louisiana. It was all Cavanaugh and Schuhmann could do by their combined 
efforts to outscore the Southern star, Nolan. Loyola led all the way by about 
five points and the final score was 25 to 19. 

On the thirteenth of February a squad of eight men left for Detroit and 
intermediate points. The first game was with the Western State Teachers, 
and playing before a capacity home crowd, the Kalamazoo team won by a 32 
to 28 score. Cavanaugh's thirteen points kept Loyola in the running all 
the way. 

Michigan State College at Lansing was the next opponent of the traveling 
Loyolans. The game was one of the closest guarding affairs ever witnessed by 
the student body of the Michigan School. Loyola led at the half by a 9 to 7 
score but the best they could do was a duplication of their previous total while 
the home team ran up fifteen points to win 22 to 18. Butzen, Wagner and 
Schuhmann were the high point men while Alike Waesco turned in his cus- 
tomarily efficient defensive game. 

In a return game with the Detroit Titans on the 16th of February the Loy- 
olans were unable to maintain an early lead and were forced to be content 
with four points in the second half, while Detroit made twelve on free throws 
alone. During the game Loyola players, despite the fact that they employ a 
defense intended to cut foul to a minimum, incurred twenty-four personal vio- 
lations, enough for four average games. Despite this, no man was removed on 
fouls, all eight men incurring three. This leaves unmarred the Loyola record 
which to our knowledge shows that no Loyolan has left a game on fouls in 
two years. 

At this time the Athletic Director scheduled two games with Loyola's most 
bitter rival, De Paul. At the next game which was played at home the entire 



9 3 



LOYOLAN 





De Paul team was in the stands. In order to conceal the formations which 
are an integral part of the Loyola playing, Sachs instructed his team to play 
the Carroll college game without formations. It was a pitiful exhibition of 
what a trained team does when forced to abandon its svstem. Carroll won 
30 to 22. 

In the first De Paul game the Ramblers were cleanly though not decisively- 
beaten. The Demons grabbed an 8 to 6 lead at the half and gradually length- 
ened it by a cleverly delayed offense until they had the game in hand by a 
21 to 15 score. Joe Wagner was the best for Loyola, but the clever defense 
that prevented the Loyolans from scoring but one point in the last ten minutes 
made even his playing look ineffective. Two days of intensive practice fol- 
lowed the iziitial loss to De Paul and when the two teams appeared on the floor 
on March 2 the fighting spirit exhibited by the home team made them as 
equally favored to win as the De Paulians. 

It was immediately evident that the Loyola team had at call a much more 
powerful offense than in the previous encounter, but the Demons were the 
same clever ball team as before, and the game was one of the tightest that 
was ever played in the gym. The new spirit, manifested in the ability to fight 
for and control the tipoffs, added much to the Loyola play and, by holding 
the ball most of the opening period, the Sachsmen were out in front 11 to 10. 
The second half was an exact duplication with the Ramblers encountering 
increased difficulty in holding Powers in check. With two minutes to play and 
the Loyola team leading 23 to 20 De Paul became more vicious in their efforts 
to get the ball and Cavanaugh slipped in two free throws as the game ended. 
The big star of the Ramblers was Joe Wagner, who led the scoring and turned 
in an exceptionally fine floor game. From a crude recruit in early November. 
Joe had developed into a man destined to be one of the oustanding players in 
Loyola history. 

Prospects for next year are extremely bright. Waesco. Smith and Durburg 
are the graduates and though their places will be hard to fill, it is expected 
that four returning regulars, five undergraduate reserves, and some exception- 
ally talented freshman material, can be molded into another typical Loyola 
team. 



^Bfc^Sgl 



THE 



9 3 



Y O L A N 





Ill UK THE FKIISH I.KXRX Till 




REVIEW OF THE SEASON 
In harmony with the practice of having last year's cap- 
tain act as freshman coach. Father Kiley. Athletic Di- 
rector, announced early in November that he had con- 
tracted with Charlie Murphy to take over the position 
of freshman basket-ball coach for the season of 1931. 
Within a few weeks of the call for candidates the 
. . men were beginning to acquire the rudiments of the 

f ^B^ pick-off style of plai. introduced to the Middle-wesl b\ 

I Hf/' Coach Sachs. At this time the Chicago Bruins, with 
^'ii, \^<^^^F whom Murphy had played earlier in the season and 

from whom he had withdrawn because of dislike of 
playing out of his normal position at center, agreed to 
place Charlie at the pivot position. Participation with 
the Bruins meant that Murphy had to travel and could 
not devote himself to ,the training of the freshman 
squad, so when he expressed a desire to return to the 
professional game the university released him from 
his contract. 

Father Kiley was then faced with the problem of 
getting a coach to carry on where Murphy had been 
obliged to leave off. His first action was to try and 
get Jim Bremner. the frosh coach of the previous year and the developer of 
such stars as Don Cavanaugh and Joe Wagner. After a period of hesitancy 
due to Jim's desire to complete his work at the Medical School with as little 
excess burdening as was possible, Bremner agreed to take the position. Im- 
mediately work resumed and in Bremner's desire to enter them in the Central 
A. A. U. Tournament the Frosh found incentive to work. 

From the first of the year till late March the Frosh practiced daily against 
the Varsity. They acquired the use of the zone defense, and the correct ap- 
plication of the man-to-inan defense; which, though widely used, is seldom 
used correctly. From day to day they appeared less awkward as they aban- 
doned the high-school style of rushing madly down the floor and assumed in its 
place the nonchalance which cool, clever basket-ball with a definite motive 
carries with it. In brief they forgot their prep school ways for the teachings 
of the fast spreading Sach"s system. 




II KI'HV 



THE 



9 3 



LOYOLA* 





THE FRESHMAN BASKETBALL SQUAD 

BYRNES, WOLCOTT, HOCAN, O'CONNELL, OLDANI, MC LAUCHLIN, BREMNER ( Coach ) 
JOHNSTON, WHELAN, HYNAN, MLIRPHY, MC CRAIN, MARKHAM 



The squad displayed unusual spirit in view of the 
tact they had none of the practice games which in 
previous years had been employed to break the mono- 
tony of continual practice. When the entries for the 
A. A. LT. tournament were sent in they included the 
names of some of the Varsity's reserves and as a re- 
sult the team presented well balanced appearance 
which led to hopes that they would go far despite the 
stiff competition offered. 

Ordinarily the team's uniform consisted of green and 
white striped trunks and green tops but because their 
opponents, Old Portage Park, third place winners in 
the 1930 tournament, were likewise arrayed in green 
the Frosh appeared in their regular trunks and white 
tops devoid of markings. The stir created when they 
walked into the Armory in what at a glance seemed 
to be their "BVDV was augmented when the park 
team scored six points before the Frosh could count. 
Finally however they began to function correctly and 
though they lagged throughout the game they were 
always within a few points of their opponents. With 
two minutes to go Silvestri crashed through with a 
basket that gave the Frosh the game 18 to 16. 

Two hours later they were back on the floor to play in the second round 
against the Steever Piano Company and with Acker and Hogan starring the 
Frosh won easily by a 21 to 7 score. At the conclusion of the first evening's 
play the team which was heartily laughed at when they entered were one of 
the favorites with the crowd. In the next round they were defeated by the 
125th Field Artillery. The soldier boys were not in any sense of the word 
a good team but with the Frosh far off their normal game the Artillery team 
was good enough to win 22 to 18. 




Kill M M i: 



3#ES^3£1 



THE 



19 3 1 



L © Y © L A N 





REVIEW OF THE NATIONAL CATHOLIC INTERSCHOLASTIC 
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

The Eighth Annual National Catholic Interscholastic Basketball Tournament 
was held in Alumni Gym from March 18 to 22 despite all predictions and 
indications to the contrary. The North Central Association had forced the 
curtailment of the University of Chicago's National Tournament for non- 
Catholic schools and the abolition of Nothwestern university's National In- 
door Track Carnival. Despite the expectation that no meet of a national 
scope would be allowed no official action was forthcoming to prevent the 
announcement in early January that Loyola would again be hosts to the best 
teams in the country. 

For the fifth successive year the "Cardinal's Cup" was won by a De La Salle 
team: this year's champions coming from Minneapolis. Minnesota. Second 




THE RUNNER-UPS— JASPEB ACADEMY, JASPER, INDIANA 



THE 1931 LOYOLAN 





JASPER CLOSING THE GAP IN THE TOURNEY FINALS 



place went to Jasper Academy, the Indiana team being runner-ups in the 
1930 meet also. The most unusual feature of Jasper's advance was that it 
was accomplished at the expense of two Indiana teams which had rated 
higher in the Hoosier State tournament than had Jasper. In fact Jasper was 
considered so unpolished that they had not been asked to repeat their appear- 
ance; and the acceptance of their entry resulted only when an Eastern team 
withdrew and it was too late to allow one of the more distant applicants to 
appear. 

If ever a team deserved to have its name engraved on the championship cup 
the Minneapolis team did. Their entire schedule was the toughest that could 
have been formulated had an intentional effort to pair them with the best 
teams been made. In the opening round they beat Spalding, the Illinois 
champions and former national champions, by a 16 to 15 score which was 
incomplete until an extra period had been played. Their next game was 




ALL THE GAMES WERE AS EQUALLY HARD FOUGHT 



Z&gg^&L THE 1031 LOYOLA* 




One of the morning 
games in which the 
team from Washington, 
Indiana advanced. 




with St. Mel, Chicago's champions, and again a close game, terminated only 
when the deciding basket was made by Gearty with fourteen seconds to play, 
resulted. Other teams to succumb to its powerful offense in De La Salle's 
march to the final round were tbe Indiana titleholders and Fr. Ryan of 
Nashville who were victors in the battle for third place. 

Jasper on the other hand had easy sledding until they reached the semi- 
final round where they encountered some difficulty in eliminating Cathedral 
of Indianapolis. They entered the final round much more physically fit than 
the De La Salle team, and that perhaps, accounts for the closeness of the 
conflict. As long as its vitality lasted the Minnesota team had things much its 
own way piling up a 10 to lead, due to superb ball handling coupled with 
an advantage in height. However, as they tired Jasper crept closer and closer 
until they tied the score at 21 each with a minute to go. Then Captain Ed. 
Roy, the smallest man on the Northern team, snuk through to sink the win- 
ning basket for his team. Father Ryan beat Cathedral in the other game on 
Sunday evening by a 25 to 21 score. The final contenders were more evenly 
matched than ever before and. the scores being much closer, the capacity 
cowd was greatlv thrilled. 




ItlSIIOI' i;\(.l.\M) I.OSKS IN \N OYKKT1ME To DE I. A SALLE 



THE 1931 LOYOLAN 




Si. Mel's, 

Chicniiolund's 

best, icon their opener 

but lost to the 



ch, 



l/JIIIIIS. 



The trophies were then awarded and an assortment of placques, cups, and 
medals were given as follows: Campion, cup, highest number of points 
scored ; Columbia, placque, highest percentage of free throws made ; Bishop 
England, placque, team coming furthest to compete; Harry Denmark of Au- 
gustinian Academy of Carthage, N. Y., cup, possessor of best coached team; 
Jasper, cup, overcoming the greatest score handicap to win; De La Salle of 
Joliet, cup, Illinois team making the best showing; Central Catholic of Wheel- 
ing, West Virginia, cup, sportsmanship contest winners; Bishop England, cup, 
making the least number of fouls: Rufus Michel of Bishop England, trophy, 
man most valuable to his team, De La Salle, Cardinal's Cup, champions; De 
La Salle, regulation size gold basketball, first place; Jasper, gold basketball, 
second pace; Fr. Ryan, silver basketball, third place; Cathedral of Indian- 
apolis, bronze basketball, fourth place; De La Salle players, gold basketball 
watch charms; Jasper team, silver watch charms; Fr. Ryan, bronze charms and 
Cathedral, bronze charms. Gold medals to the All-Tournament players were 
received by Oscar Aubin of Jasper, Patrick Curley of Fr. Ryan, Ray Buffalo 
of De La Salle of Minneapolis, Arthur Cosgrove of Cathedral of Indianapolis, 
and George O'Kane of Washington, Indiana. And so the eighth tournament 
became history. 




CWll'ION MARKS THK HK.HEST SCORK IN TOIRNKY HISTORY 



a^B&rtg&l THE 10 



L O Y O L A X 



ms&JBaas&mz 




BASKETBALL 




To the average spectator watching a basket- 
ball game from the stands, the game seems to 
be rather haphazard and unscientific. True it 
has not reached that stage of mechanical de- 
velopment that makes a football team the pup- 
pets of a coach, and that parhaps accounts for 
its universal appeal, but it is, nevertheless, a 
game requiring more intensive coaching than 
football. 

Its play is marked by previously arranged 
offensive measures but the spontaneous atmos- 
phere arises in that there exists several pos- 
sible outcomes for each play. All prospective 
contingencies are anticipated by a good coach 
and the players know what to do when certain 
conditions arise. Loyola basketball has reached 
the peak of this development and clever back- 
ward passes when the defensive men shift are 
not the impulsive movements which make the 
crowd praise the player for quick thinking 
but rather well defined movements which ar- 
rive out of anticipated contingencies. 





MINOR SPORTS 




"Intramural sports have grown by leaps and 
bounds within the past year. 1929-30 saw only 
seventy students participating in intramural 
sports. Judging from the manner in which 
intramural competition has been accepted this 
year, I believe that next year there will be at 
least seventy-five per cent of the students on 
the north campus taking part in intramural 
sports. 

Other departments have fairly large repre- 
sentations but they are too greatly handicapped 
by their scholastic courses and the distances 
necessary to travel to compete. Nevertheless 
I look forward to the day when we can hon- 
estly say that Loyola has 'athletics for all"." 

Co-Chairman of Intramural Sports. 






!S 



MURTAUGH, RALL, DAN MAHE 



THE CROSS COUNTRY SQUAD 

MAN (Coach), O'NEILL, ROONEY, HEALY 



REVIEW OF THE TRACK SEASON 



In the past 
minor sport 



■liola-tir vear 



track has progressed from 

lajor one. The progress that has 

been made within two years under the coaching of Mr. 

§Tigerman and the captaincy of Tom O'Neill has carried 
Loyola from a state where track was so insignificant as 
to go unrewarded to a place where it is conceded to pos- 
sess one of the finest track teams in the Middle West and 
is prevented from downing some of its more reputable 
opponents only through lack of sufficiently able men in 
the field events. 

The first track event scheduled for the past year was a 

J cross-country race with Wheaton College. The Lovola 

r men were unable to keep their score below thirty-five 

whereas the home team scored but twenty-two points to 
win the meet. Tom O'Neill seemed out of practice and 
finished second to Hoeldke of Wheaton who, in both the 
indoor and the outdoor seasons which followed, was never 
able to stand the fast pace O'Neill set and lost four suc- 
cessive races to the Loyola captain. The other Loyola 
men finished in the following order, Healv, Murtaugh, 
Maher, Rail and Rooney. 
The second meet in which the harriers engaged was 
o*.\eill a triangular one with Elmhurst and Illinois Normal Col- 

leges. O'Neill's third was the best place Loyola could 
garner and with her remaining men spread out in the 
following order: Healy, Murtaugh, Rooney. Rail and Maher. the Loyola team 
finished third. 

The only home cross country meet of the year was held with Lake Forest 
College on November 15 and Tom O'Neill's excellent time of fifteen and one- 
half minutes for the three mile course easily guaranteed Loyola first place. 
Sleepy Murtaugh finished with a last lap sprint to beat Hayes of Lake Forest for 
second. Twelve men ran the race and the other Loyola men were Healy, 
fourth: Rooney. sixth: Maher, eighth; and Rail, eleventh. 

A week later the men ran against the University of Chicago and they lost 
the meet to the Rig Ten team thirty-eight to seventeen. Dale Letts, the out- 



T H E 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 









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THE VARSITY TRACK TEAM 

maher (Manager), Johnston, misbe. st. clair, uebe'smann. TIGERMAN iCoach), 

MURTAUCH, RALL, TORDELEA, ZULEY 

HEALY. STROEBEL, O'NEILL, CHAPMAN, MANN 

standing middle distance runner in the country, was first 
and he was followed by his teammates. Brainard ami 
Kadin. O'Neill was fourth, with the other Loyola men 
strung out behind. 

Tbe final dual meet of the year was held against a team 
of runners representing Ogden Park. The final score was 
32 to 23 in favor of the park team. O'Neill won first 
place but his mates were unable to match the pace of 
their more experienced opponents. 

The final cross country race of the year in which Loy- 
ola men engaged was tbe annual Illinois Atbletic Club"s 
marathon. The race was run on Thanksgiving day and 
with the mercury hovering a two above zero seventy-six 
of tbe one hundred and fifty entrants started the race. 
Tom O'Neill was third, finishing behind Letts of Chicago 
and Groves of Marquette. Tom Healy was. seventh and 
Murtaugh took tenth. All six Loyola men finished and 
tbe worst done by any of them was fortietb in a race in 
which all starters finished. This showing was remarkable 
when one considers the runner's early season form. Loy- 
ola took fourth place among tbe teams. As a fitting con- 
clusion to the season Coach Tigerman awarded letters to 
Rail, Healy, and O'Neill and numerals to Murtaugh. 
Maher and Rooney. 

The first indoor track meet was staged at Bartlett gym 
and Tigerman's proteges lost to the Maroons. 43 to 37. The meet was even until 
the results of tbe weight events were recorded and it was not until then that 
the Ramblers were eliminated. O'Neill took first in tbe mile and two mile; 
Chapman captured the dash and coupled with a majority of seconds and thirds 
these points balanced the Chicago team's victories in tbe hurdles, the two 
mile and the quarter mile. The showing made gave every indication that 
Loyola had great power on the track. 

The second of a series of indoor track meets was taken by Loyola when her 
representatives downed Armour. Chicago, and Elmhurst in a quadrangular 
meet. Loyola took seven out of twelve firsts and the remainder were split 




TII.MIM \N 



E3&&ZE3M: 



THE 



19 3 



L O Y © L A N 



£i ^*?»;*& ^c**»;«', 





THE FRESHMAN TRACK TEAM 

maher (Manager), oldani, Johnston, failla, Bradford, tickrman (Coach) 



IB 



between Armour and Chicago. In justice to the Maroons 
it must be said that their four outstanding men did not 
compete. O'Neill took both the half and the mile, Nurn- 
berger won the high hurdles and was beaten in the lows 
by Leibermann. Big Tom Walsh won the high jump with 
ease and Lutzenkirchen won the shot put. The relay was 
also taken by a quartet of Loyola sprinters. 

On March 1 the trackmen dropped first place in a tri- 
angular meet to North Central College. Armour was 
third, far behind the two leaders who were separated 
only by the points scored in the relay. When the final 
race was to be run Loyola was out in front by two points 
and it seemed as though they were certain of at least a 
tie. However they did not figure with the speed and the 
jostling ability of the North Central runners. Strobel, 
running in third position, was slightly in front of the 
North Central man when, as he rounded a curve, he was 
bumped off the track and into the stands. Losing the 
race would have made the meet a tie but absolute dis- 
qualification for leaving the track gave Armour second 
place and shut Loyola out two points behind North 
Central. 



•C_ 




the meet itself Chapman Avon the sixty yard dash, 
Leibermann won both hurdle races. Walsh 
won the high jump, and O'Neill won both 
the mile and the half mile. Hinders of 
North Central kept his team in the run- 
ning with victories in the broad jump, the 
shot put, and the pole vault. Victories in 
the quarter and the relay completed the 
Naperville team's total of first places. 

The following week several of Loyola's 
men competed in the Central Intercolle- 
giates at Notre Dame. The results were 
most gratifying. Captain O'Neill took 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A X 





Practicing the 
starts ichich are 
the foundation of 
I good sprinting. 







fourth in the mile and fifth in the half mile against the 
best men in the Central States. Tom Walsh earned him- 
self a place among the best jumpers of the country when 
he cleared six feet two inches to tie for second place. Ted 
Chapman was the victim of a very unfortunate injury. 
He had won his preliminary and his semi-final heats in 
the sixty yard dash but in the final after being well out 
in front due to his exceptionally fast start he pulled a 
tendon and was out of competition for several weeks. In 
the mile relay Loyola took fifth. It was in this race that 
Alex Wilson, the Canadian Olympic star and the anchor 
man on Notre Dame's team, set an unofficial world's in- 
door quarter mile record with a time of 48 seconds. Lou 
Tordella was running the last lap for Loyola and he lost 
comparatively little ground to the Irish speedster. 

On March 14 the team traveled to Champaign to com- 
pete in Illinois Relays. Again they matched strides with 
the country's best and made good showings. In the two 
mile relay the team of Wieland. Zuley. Healy, and O'Neill 
finished fourth with an average time per man of 2:03. 
Forty minutes later virtually the same men were back to 
race in the College Medley relay. Zuley, Mann, and 
Healy ran fine races to bring the baton to O'Neill in fourth 
place. Tom, running against such competition as Man- 
ning of Wichita. Intercollegiate mile champion, could not 
better his position. The mile relay entry was not ex- 
pected to place but was entered only because the sprinters 
had been eliminated in the individual events. Mann 
and Strobel put Loyola with the leaders but Schroe- 
der, running for the first time in college competi- 
tion, was unable to hold his own. Tordella ran a 
fine anchor lap to place the team fifth. 

On March 21 Loyola won the Second Indoor Ar- 
mour Invitational Track Meet when her middle dis- 
tance runners piled up enough points to beat the 
University of Chicago team. 81 to 74. Ten teams 
competed and the meet was close throughout. Cap- 
tain East of Chicago put his team out in front with 
a victory in the sprints and Loyola lost points due 



THE 1931 LP VOL AN 

297 



^a^fessa^sgi 




Mann irins the 
Quarter at Ar- 
mour. Tordella is 

fourth. 






to the absence of Chapman. Wieland's victory in the half 
mile in which the other three places were won by O'Neill, 
Healy, and Johnson, all of Loyola, put Loyola in a lead 
it was able to maintain for the rest of the evening. O'Neill 
won the mile in the fast time of 4:33 and though three 
firsts were Loyola's limit, a series of seconds and thirds in 
the running events did much to keep the Ramblers in 
the lead. It was after this impressive victory over the 
ten best teams in the Chicago district that Loyola became 
definitely known as a team to be reckoned with in any 
meet. 

During the same week Loyola competed in the Bankers' 
Meet and again carried off honors. The medley relay 
team of Mann, Strobel, Healy, and O'Neill, won the race 
in the fast time, for the two miles, of seven minutes and 
two seconds. Ned Wieland pulled the surprise of the 
evening when he finished second to Phil Edwards of the 
Olympic team in the special six hundred yard dash. 

On March 30, Loyola took fourth place in the Central 
A. A. U. indoor track meet. The Illinois Athletic Club 
was first; Marquette Lniversity was second: Chicago was 
third and the Ramblers were fourth among some twenty 
teams who competed. The final race of the evening was 
the medley relay in which Loyola finished second. The 
Ramblers trailed in second place 
throughout the first three sections but 
as Healy passed the baton to O'Neill 
fifteen yards behind Letts, Chicago's 
Big Ten champion miler. the crowd 
witnessed one of the greatest races ever 
staged in the history of the meet. 
O'Neill was running a mile and before 
the half mark had been passed he had 
made up the handicap and was leading 
Letts. He was beaten out, however, by 
the Maroon's final sprint, but by less 
than five yards. Considering that Tom 
had taken third place in the 1,000 yard 
dash earlier in the evening and that 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A IV 




The start of the 
half mile against 
Milwaukee State. 




Letts was fresh the Loyola man's showing places him 
among the hest runners at a mile in the country. 

The last indoor meet of the year was held when Loyola 
beat Lake Forest 50 to 36. Slams in the mile, half mile 
and two mile races more than overshadowed the Loyola 
delinquency in the field events. .Mann won the quarter 
mile race this time in the fast time of 51 seconds. Jay's 
best races have always been outdoors and though he fin- 
ished second or third regularly this was the first indoor 
race in which he came home in front. 

On April 18 seven men were taken to Lawrence, Kansas, 
to compete in the Kansas relays. In the two mile relay 
the team of Wieland, Healy. Zuley, and O'Neill took 
fourth place. The best race of the afternoon by a Loyola 
man was turned in when Zuley did a half mile with a 
running start in 1:58. The race was won by Abilene 
Christian, whose four runners with an average time of 
1:57 took first place easily. The second race in which the 
Loyolans placed was the mile relay in which the team 
of Mann, Strobel, Zuley and Tordella took fifth place. 
The race was one of the closest of the afternoon, less than 
ten yards separating the first five places. With Zuley 
running in his third race the medley team of Mann. Zuley. 
Healy, and O'Neill raced to a well earned fifth place. All 
these races were rewarded with medals and added to 
those collected at Notre Dame. Illinois, and the Central 
A. A. U. meet the Loyola men now had quite an im- 
posing collection. 

A week later virtually the same men went to Des 
Moines to compete as one of fifty college and univer- 
sity teams in the Drake relays. The medley team of 
Mann, Liebermann, Stroebel and O'Neill was fourth 
when O'Neill's 1:57 half mile was just to slow to carry 
him from sixth to third place. Wichita led by the un- 
beatable Manning, was first. The mile relay team of 
Mann, Stroebel, Zuley and Tordella finished fourth 
when Zuley as anchor man instead of his regular posi- 
tion as the third man was passed just before the tape 
was reached. 




IOKIII.I I X 



ft 



THE 1931 



L O Y O L A N 





MCGUIRE. T. KEARNS, DOYLE, SULLIVAN, SCULLY, MCCARTHY, THOMPSON (Coach) 
DOOI.EY, J. KEARNS. COTTSCHALK. TRICK., DURKIN, FELDSTEIN 

Swimming was another sport to be adopted on an in- 

4tercollegiate scale for the first time this year. When 
Earl Kearns, a swimming coach who had had relatively 
little success with varsity swimming due to lack of ma- 
terial, but who had coached Loyola Academy team to 
four league titles in as many years, resigned, the Athletic 
Administration announced the engaging of Mr. Richard 
i Thompson. Thompson was a coach of the Spanish Olym- 

pic team of 1920, the French Olympic team of 1924, and 
more recently coach at the Illinois Athletic club. In the 
latter capacity he developed a water polo team which 
captured the national championship. His long experi- 
ence with the sport, and the fact that he takes a keen 
interest in seeing ordinary swimmers rise to stardom 
| i make him an ideal man for the position as coach of a 

! new team. 

; About the first of December the call for candidates was 

j I * made, and the number who responded was less than 

I j I / twenty. Most of these men were sprint swimmers and 

^^ ■ ^^ it was lack of men in the breast stroke and back stroke 

^p ^S> that handicapped the team most. The best of this turn- 

! ™^^^^~J^^ "in : lack VIcGuire, Coven, Trick and Feldstein were 

gottschalk molded into an exceptionally fast relay team. They 

were the only Loyola representatives who won their event 
in all meets. 
On December 15 elections were held; Jerry Gottschalk was chosen captain 
and Austin Doyle was honored with the managership. Gottschalk was the 
only diver on the squad, and he was the only Loyola man to compete in 
other than dual meets. Diving in the national intercollegiates in February, 
Jerry took eighth place among the best college divers in the country. A few 
days later he was seventh in the National Amateur Athletic Association's meet. 
These excellent showings give promise of a great future for the Loyola cap- 
tain. 

On March 8 Loyola engaged in its first intercollegiate swimming meet. 
Armour was the visiting team and the Loyola boys embarked upon their 



T II 



9 3 



L O Y O L A BT 





'rffif ■• * 


■if* 


j^m 




career successfully by winning 34 to 28. Gottschalk won 
the diving. Trick won the fifty and hundred yard free 
style races, and the relay team won. Weston and Cav- 
anaugh accounted for Armour's firsts when they split 
first in the backstroke, breaststroke and 220 yard free 
style races. Coven, McGuire, Feldstein, Zickus, and Jus- 
tin McCarthy were other men whose places were instru- 
mental in piling up enough points to bring home the 
victory in Loyola'9 initial meet. 

On March 20 the Loyola swimmers were the victims 
of a 35 to 27 defeat. Crane College took first places in 
the breast and back stroking events, the hundred yard 
free style and the 220 yard free style. Loyola's victories 
were in the fifty yard free style won by Trick, the low 
board diving won by Captain Gottschalk and the relay 
in which Coven, McGuire, Feldstein and Trick swam. 
Bob Dooley scored a second in the back stroke, McCarthy 
swam to a second in the breast stroke, Doyle got third 
in the backstroke and J. Kearns was third in the diving. 
The meet was close all the way and the more experienced 
Crane men were extended to the utmost to win. 

At the time the Loyolan goes to press plans are being 
made for home and home meets with the Gary Y. M. 
C. A. The Indiana team is represented by some of the 
best talent in the thriving industrial district in which the 
"Y" is situated and though no predictions are being made it 
inadequate representation in the more specialized events will cost Loyola the 
back and the breast stroke. To this is added the unfortunate experience of a 
broken ankle which will cost the Loyola team the services of its captain and 
sure winner, Gottschalk. 

Despite the fact that indications are that the swimming team will lose more 
meets than it will win, it is, nevertheless, one of the most successful athletic 
ventures of the year. With none of the men who broke into the scoring 
column this year among the list of graduates it is expected that an additional 
years coaching by the able Mr. Thompson will do much to place swimming 
on a firm basis at Loyola. 




I III1MIMIN 



expected that 



THE 



9 3 1 



L O Y O L A X 






REVIEW OF THE SEASON 

J For several years tennis has been an intercollegiate 

sport at Loyola and it has always been regarded in the 
highest favor. Such outstanding players as Lietz and 
Bremner gave Loyola a name in tennis circles several 
years ago. However this already well established sport 
received an impetus with the coining of Loyola's new ath- 
letic policy. In the past Mr. Hodapp. an Arts professor, 
has acted as coach, and. though his services as an advisor 
and as a link to the athletic department have been of 
great value, he has never been able, because of his heavy 
class schedule, to individually coach the men. 

It was for this reason that Father Kiley attempted to 
get Ellis Klingeman. a ranking tennis player and the pro- 

ffessional at the South Shore Country Club, to take over 
the duties of an active coach. LTnforseen complications 
best known to the above parties prevented the contracts 
being signed, though a public announcement had been 
made to that effect. It is understood that the main diffi- 
culty was that the time Loyola desired would conflict with 
the hours Klingeman had contracted to spend at the lake 
shore club. Negotiations therefore fell through until next 
vear when it is expected that a professional coach will be 

ZWIKSTRA } lire( , 

In the meantime Mr. Hodapp had rendered valuable 
service by obtaining the athletic department's consent to the most comprehen- 
sive tennis schedule yet attempted at Loyola. L T nder the managership of Ed 
Hines the schedule has been drawn up, and definite plans as to the personnel 
of the team have been made. 

It is certain that George Zwikstra, ranking player of the I niversity and cap- 
tain for the last two years, will be playing in one of the first two positions. 
His experience in club as well as in intercollegiate competition has enabled him 
to obtain a vast collection of strokes and tricks. In most of the matches last 
year he was meeting the best men on some of the outstanding tennis squads 
in this section of the countrv and he more than held his own with them. ■ 

Other sure scpiad members are Jack McGuire and Bob O'Connor. Both were 
members of the team last year and both have given signs of even greater ability 



&gf5&raseS&r the 



9 3 



L O Y © L A N 





iCiipln 



Manager), lie CURE. DIGCLES 




this year. McGuire will be remembered as the man who 
met Byrum. Western Intercollegiate Champion for 1930. 
and lost 6-4, 7-5. O'Connor was the third man last year 
and he is a certainty to be ranked at least as high again. 

The other men who are expected to fight it out for the 
remaining two positions are joe Frisch. Paul Diggles and 
Jack Laemmar. Frisch performed last year but he has 
not as yet reached the peak of previous performances and 
it is probable that for some of the early matches he will 
be only a reserve. Diggles was a member of the squad 
two vears ago and his remarkably steady game has been 
improved by play on European courts and he is expected 
to take a position. Jack Laemmar has had a squad rank- 
ing for several years but it was not until this spring when 
he exhibited unusual form that he was considered a pos- 
sibility. He supplanted Frisch in the early matches. 

Though matches had been scheduled for almost every 
day, weather complications prevented keeping the engage- 
ments until Armour was met on May 15. McGuire play- 
ing as number 1 beat Eddy, the Armour captain, 6-4, 
6-2; Zwikstra as number 2 beat Sweff in a very hard and 
lengthy match, 14-12, 3-6. 8-6: Diggles as number 3 beat 
Martin, 6-2, 6-4: and Laemmar dropped a match to Curry. 
6-1. 6-3. In the doubles Loyola's first team, composed of 
McGuire and Zwikstra. ran through a match with Eddy 
and Sweff to win 6-2. 6-2. Laemmar and Diggles teamed 
beaten by Martin and Curry 6-0. 6-2. 

In winning the first match of the year the men continued the success which 
gave them six victories in ten matches last year. Defeats were received from 
Notre Dame, Northwestern, and Western State Normal. The Western State 
team was probably the outstanding team in the Central States and Loyola took 
two matches when Bob O'Connor, Jack McGuire. George Zwikstra. and Jim 
Nudelmami teamed to take both doubles matches. 

On May 19 the team received a defeat from Western State by a margin of 
three victories and lost all matches on the following day to Notre Dame. Sched- 
uled contests yet remaining are with Armour, Crane, W heaton and Lake Forest. 



& ? 



>ther and were 



T H 



19 3 



L © Y © L A N 





THE VARSITY SQUAD 

HERMAN. MORRISSEY, VONESH, CAVANAUCH, D'ESPOSITO ( Captain I 



VARSITY GOLF 

There is no sport on Loyola's athletic calendar which receives as little recog- 
nition in return for its contributions to the school's athletic reputation as 
does golf. For several years Loyola's golf team have beaten universities of 
national renown but because a constant appeal for student support in the 
form of followers and publicity men was not made, the appreciation due the 
squad members was never forthcoming. Fortunately golf is a game where 
large and enthusiastic audiences are a hindrance rather than an aid and so 
their absence was in some senses not regrettable. 

The team this year has continued on the successful path made by its pre- 
decessors and under the coaching of Lee Bradburn, a former Loyola golfer 
and one of the youngest professionals in the Chicago area, has done distin- 
guished work in its maches. 

This year's contingent of golfers was led by- Captain Julian D'Esposito, the 
brother of last year's leader, a golfer who fought his way to the semi-finals 
of the Western Junior Golf Championship last year. The other veteran play- 
ers were Emmet Morrisey and Tony Maulillo from the Law school. In the 
opening matches Jim Vonesh of the Arts College was the fourth player, but 
he was soon replaced by Don Cavanaugh of the basketball team and Vonesh 
then alternated with Maulillo for the fourth position. Sid Herman was used 
in the matches where six men were needed. 

The first match of the season resulted in a 15 to 3 victory for Loyola with 
Valparaiso College as the victims. Morrissey and D'Esposito garnered all 
three points possible when they won both their matches eight up and seven 
to go. Maulillo won three and two but dropped one point when he ended 
the first nine one down. Vonesh won the first nine when he took the last 
hole but he lost the point for the last nine and the point for the match when 
he lost two up and one to play. In the best ball matches the two depart- 
ments represented combined and Maulillo and Morrisey took three points by 
winning four and three and Vonesh and D'Esposito were victors by a score 
of five and four. 



THE 



9 3 



L © Y © 1 A > 





IN THE PRACTICE NET 



The Loyola team lost its second match when it was defeated 9 1/2 to 8 1/2 
by De Paul. Julian D'Esposito was the only Loyolan to win his singles match 
when he beat Duggan three and two. The other individual matches went to 
De Paul when Mullen beat Maulillo five and four. Carney beat Morrisey five 
and three, and Mclnerny defeated Vonesh three and one. Lovola won both 
doubles matches; Vonesh and D'Esposito winning five and four and Cavan- 
augh and Morrisey winning by the same score. The results of the matches 
were not what the Loyola men either expected or thought thev deserved and 
they are looking forward to beating the Demons when the teams resume 
relations on May 25. 

The third match was won from Armour by a score of 18 to 0. Vonesh, 
Morrisey, Maulillo, Cavanaugh. and D'Esposito were the Lovola plavers. The 
following week the Loyola boys succumbed to Notre Dame, probably the best 
team in the country, by a score of 17 to 1. Most of the Loyola losses were 
by fairly large margins but Don Cavanaugh gave Larry Moller, runner-up for 
the National Intercollegiate title of 1930, a bad scare when he won the first 
nine one up and lost the match only on the final green by a score of one 
up. Cavanaugh's excellent showing makes him a threat in the National In- 
tercollegiates in which the team will compete in early June. 

Loyola won the next two matches when they beat St. John's of Toledo 18 
to and then traveled to Detroit to eke out a 9 1/2 to 8 1/2 victory over the 
Titans. Cavanaugh led the Loyola team in both these matches when he 
paired with D'Esposito to take to doubles matches and then won two single 
matches to have the only undefeated record for the matches. On May 25 
the Loyola team engaged in a triangular meet with Detroit and De Paul at 
Evergreen Park and emerged victorious after overcoming strong opposition 
from both teams. Julian D'Esposito, the Loyola captain, was the outstanding 
player, shooting the difficult course in two over par. The feature of the 
match was his two on a three hundred yard hole when he sank a mashie shot 
from the rough some one hundred yards from the hole. 



THE 



9 3 



LOYOLAN 



£'^^S?y£'^^^2y.v0» 





VARSITY BOXERS 

WOLFF (Manager). F iRRELL, BLTTITA, DOLE. FINN. VIT\. \VH 
HEFFERNAN (Coachi 
CALL ZALATORIUS, MC GILLEN, VO.NESH, LUKITSCH, KMTTEL, RALWOLF. KOENTC. MORRISSEY 



IELWOOD. CALLANAN. LIPSICH 




REVIEW OF THE SEASON 
There has been no activity initiated at Loyola in re- 
cent years which has received the same favor and ap- 
proval as has boxing. When the university's officials 
decided in December of 1930 to promote sports which 
had never before been part of the athletic program, they 
were somewhat sceptical concerning the appeal of box- 
ing. Nevertheless they contracted for the services of 
Gerald Heffernan, a graduate of Northwestern Univer- 
sity, a boxer whose pre-war record was phenomenal, a 
soldier who in winning the Croix de Guerre was so in- 
jured that he never again re-entered the ring, and more 
recently a sport writer who was considered an authority 
on boxing. As an example of the esteem in which he is 
held Jerry was chosen to act as chief second of the 
French team in the recently completed international box- 
ing tournament. 

In his first year at Loyola, Heffernan coached a team 
whose success was unparalelled when it is considered that 
but two of the ten team members ever boxed before, and 
LiKiTscH that the final bout was held less than four months from 

the date of the opening lesson. On March 20th Loyola engaged in its first 
intercollegiate match when they met Armour. The engineering school has 
sponsored boxing for eight years and they possessed a team which had had 
much experience. Loyola lost three matches to two when Frank Brundza 
received an unexpected knockout punch when he seemed to be well on his way 
to victory in the deciding match. Sam Cali and Ted Lutz were the two men 
to win their bouts, while Marty Stadler, Red Wiley and Brundza were the 
defeated members of the team. 

Prior to the St. Viator match at Bourbannais, Joe Lukitsch was elected cap- 
tain by a margin of one vote over Rog Knittel. In the downstate match the 



THE 



9 3 1 



L O Y O L A X 





A BIT OF ACTION IN THE LOYOLA -ARMOUR MATCH 



Lovola boxers were exceptionally proficient and they won 
by a five to three score. Knittel baffled Mouseratte with 
his southpaw delivery and won easily. Stadler then lost 
a match to Baldo but John McGillen put Loyola again in 
the lead with a clean knockout over Perchich. Mac was 
one of the team's most consistent winners, taking both 
his bouts by knockouts. Koenig and Lukitsch were 
forced into extra rounds to win their matches but Ted 
Lutz. the most polished boxer on the team, cut Byron 
of Viator to pieces with a barrage of vicious left hooks. 
With the victory definitely assured Heffernan threw in 
the towel at the first sign that Zalatorious and Brundza 
were losing, rather than run the possibility that they 
would be injured. 

The second series of bouts with Armour was staged at 
Lovola and the south side school was again victorious, 
this time by a score of five matches to four. Lack of 
ring experience cost the match when Lukitsch, far ahead 
in the final bout, knelt to adjust his tooth protector, and 
had the decision awarded to his opponent for going to 
the mat without being struck. Loyola won the first four bouts when Wiley, 
Cali and Lutz easily outpointed their opponents; and Knittel. chased by a 
taller and a more aggressive boxer, loosed a vicious hook to the pit of his 
opponent's stomach and whipped across a right to score a clean knockout. 
Koenig, Rauwolf, Vonesh, Brundza and Lukitsch were the Loyola men who 
were beaten. 

In the filial intercollegiate meet Loyola defeated St. Viator by a count of 
five bouts to three. Red Wiley, John McGillen. and Joe Lukitsch won quite 
easily when they pounded their opponents so heartily that the visiting coach 
threw in the towel. Buttita beat Riley of the Bourbannais team in a match 
in which about ten blows were struck due to Riley's ability to circle the ropes. 
Knittel had difficulty in beating Mouseratte who had trained to meet left- 
handers since the first Loyola-Viator match but Rog turned the trick in an 
extra round. 




Ill I'll KN \\ 



THE 



19 3 1 



L O Y O L A N 





:ommkr<:k school: intramural basketball champions 



REVIEW OF INTRAMURAL ATHLETICS 

A more intensive system of intramural sports as is in vogue at the larger 
universities of the country was inaugurated at Loyola this year. Though the 
actual impetus in the formation of an active intramural association was not 
furnished until early December, intramural athletic activities were by no 
means non-existent before that time. Tennis and cross country were sports 
carried on under the old regime and though they were carried on without the 
faculty backing that the co-managers of intramural sports, Merlin Mungovan 
and Thomas O'Neill, later received they were very successfully conducted. 

Cross Country 

On September 25 the second annual intramural cross country race was held 
under the direction of Coach Tigerman. The race was conducted over Loy- 
ola's course which circles the campus twice during its three mile course. The 
winner was Joe Rooney of the Law school and his time was seventeen and 
one-half minutes. Dan Maher took second place when he passed Sleepy 
Murtaugh on the last curve and managed to stave off Murtaugh's final chal- 
lenge. Fourth place went to Tom Healy. The race was determined on the 
basis of better condition as the varsity races later showed that the order of 
ability was almost directly reversed. 

Tennis 

The sixth intramural tennis tournament got under way in late September 
and was for the second year under the direction of Bob O'Connor. The limit 
of thirty-two entrants was soon reached and though the tournament was under 
way without delay, inclement conditions in the form of rain and cold weather 
necessitated a postponement. Those who had survived the first round were 
Maguire, Zwikstra. O'Connor. Hirshfield. J. Rafferty. and Woods. Early in 
the spring the tournament was revived and a new bracket drawn up. Due to 
reconstruction work on the tennis courts the matches have not as vet been 
resumed. Because the work is still under way and the semestral examinations 
are approaching it is very problematic whether any matches will be plaved. 



THE 



9 3 1 



L O Y O t A N 





THE TENNIS TOURNAMENT FROM THE ROOF OF CUDAHY HALL 

Basketball 

The greatest single intramural program in the history of the school was 
inaugurated when sixteen teams of ten men each had registered for the 1931 
basketball tournament. According to the schedule drawn up by O'Neill and 
Mungovan each team was to meet once during the entire bracket which was 
planned for a two-month period. During the early rounds the Catholic 
Leaguers, a team composed of men who had played on the various Catholic 
high schools of the Chicago district, grabbed off a lead with eight games won 
and none lost. Only once were they even extended and that was in the fifth 
game when the Leaguers scored seven free throws in the last half to come 
from behind to beat the Pi Alpha Lambda team 9 to 6. Because of the high 
scores they ran up in their other games it looked like they were a cinch for 
the championship but three of their outstanding players were dropped from 
school at the half for scholastic reasons, and the leaders immediately lost the 
two games which made them finish in a tie for second place with the Chicago 
Brutes. 

The team from the Commerce School lost its first game to the Catholic 
Leaguers but they then set out on a victory streak of fourteen games which 
culminated in their winning the championship cup. The regular members of 
the championship team were Frank Maggini, Tom Cole, J. Slomka, Win. Len- 
non, and R. Braun. Other members of the team which, through the backing 
of Dean Thomas Reedy obtained uniforms and became known as the best 
dressed team in the league, were W. Kolev, R. Podesta, D. Kavanaugh. and 
J. Coffey. 

The Catholic Leaguers had as their stars Jim Hogan. Tom Fay, Cy Murphy, 
Bill Foley, Ed Scanlon and Bill Shanley while the men who were outstanding 
for the Chicago Brutes were Les Molloy, Wally Durkin, Jack Stroebel, Bob 
Dooley and Charles Cuny. Ten gold medals were awarded to the Commerce 
school and ten silver ones were split between the regular members of the 
Brutes and the Leaguers. 

Fourth place went to the Chicago College of Dental Surgery or, as they 
were better known, the Dents. The Maroon Flashes, one of the two teams to 
beat the Catholic Leaguers, finished fifth while Pi Alpha Lambda finished 
sixth when they administered a rousing 22 to 2 beating to Alpha Delta Gamma 
to decide the fraternity championship. At the close of the tournament the 
officials concurred and awarded the All Tournament medals to Frank Maggini 



THE 



19 3 



L O Y O L A > T 



& ^I<Z?!»+& >H<+f»+'4 





DICK BUTZEN AND PAUL DIGGLES, HANDBALL FINALISTS 

of the Commerce School and Joe Frisch (Captain) of Pi Alpha Lambda as the 
forwards; Jim Hogan of the Catholic Leaguers at center; and Larry Faul of 
the Dental School and J. Lipinski of the Freshmen Dents at guards. 

Handball 

About forty men competed in the intramural handball tournament under 
the direction of Edward Srubas. Tbe matches were run off over a two 
month period and when they had been concluded Dick Butzen had re-estab- 
lished his right to the championship by beating Paul Diggles in straight games. 
Julian D'Esposito beat Joe Frisch for the third place medal. 

Track 

A list of the ten events ordinarily used in university decathalon meets was 
set as the barrier which those desirous competing for the intramural track 
championship must surmount. The meet was run off under the direction of 
Joe Rooney and because of the fact that events were run but weekly the nieet 
extended over both the indoor and the outdoor seasons. About forty men 
competed in the opening events but as time passed the contestant list dwindled 
until it included only those who were finally awarded the five prizes. Alan 
Schroeder was first with fifteen points while Sal Failla, his nearest competitor, 
was credited with twenty-four. The others who received medals were Joe 
Buttita for third place, Charles Callanan. fourth, and Tony Favat fifth. 

Golf 

Under the managership of Bill Reid forty contestants have begun matches 
in the intramural golf tournament. To date the matches have progressed to 
the quarter-final round and the survivors are Bill Donohue and Tom Walsh, 
from the law school, Jack Kalkburst, Frank McCracken, Joe Frisch, Marty 
Stadler. Bill Watkins, and Bern McCormiek. Four prizes will be awarded 
and because the players were not seeded somo ef the outstanding men will 
meet prior to the semi-finals and it is impossible to determine those four who 
will survive the next series of matches and place themselves within the limit 
of those who are to receive medals. 

Horseshoes 

The opening games in the annual horseshoe tournament are under way and 
despite the fact that no medals are being offered the entrants number well 
over thirty. George Keenan, a sophomore, is the favorite to win the cham- 



T H E 



931 L O Y O L A IV 



A) 


P^H 




I-AKRELL AND HERMAN, LM.HTWhX.HT FINALISTS 



pionship since he was the victor last year, but such men as Silvestri, the 
runner-up last year, Vonesh, Ohleiser and Wallin are expected to make the 
championship route extremely arduous. 

Baseball 

The intramural baseball tournament is also nearing completion and unless 
unforseen complications arise the Brutes, members of the basketball and foot- 
ball teams, will win the indoor championship. Only once have they been 
threatened and they scored twice in the last inning to beat the Pi Alphs 3 to 
1. Second place will go to the Connelly's who, after beating the Sophomore 
Arts team 8 to 7 in sixteen innings, seem to have a clear field to the runner-up 
position. Third place will receive no medal awards but the Pi Alphs, who 
by virtue of a 14 to 3 victory over the Alpha Delts have won the fraternity 
championship, are expected to battle it out with the Sophomore Arts team. 
Mungovan and O'Neill have had charge of this tournament. 

Boxing 

Over one hundred and fifty men trained for the intramural boxing tourna- 
ment yet but slightly more than fifty were willing to put on the gloves when 
the tournament started. In the heavyweight class Joe Wagner was awarded the 
championship when he used his reach to advantage to beat Bob Schuhmann. 
Schuhmann was floored twice but he finished gamely to make the final bout 
one of the most interesting staged. In the middleweight class a Dent. Milton 
Dicktor beat Bob McCabe. The fight was extremely close but it did not 
compare with the semi-final one in which Frisch, the favorite, was eliminated 
in three rounds by Dicktor. In the lightweight division Sid Herman had 
things much his own way after he had eliminated Leibermann in the opening 
bout. In the finals he stopped John Farrell in the second round with a 
vicious uppercut. The featherweight champion was Jim Rafferty who beat 
Favat for the title. In the final bout Rafferty floored his opponent with a 
barrage of left hooks but was unable to put him out. The best bout of the 
weight, if not of the tournament, was the semi-final match between Wieland 
and Rafferty. Wieland gained an early advantage but was almost knocked 
out at the close of the first round. Both continued to mix in the second 
round and because of the furiousness of the bout the boxers wer? exhausted 
when the judges decided in favor of Rafferty. 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 




MINOR SPORTS 




The new athletic policy stipulates that ex- 
perts in each sport formerly known as a "minor 
sport," shall be hired, and that the field of 
duty assigned these men shall not be limited 
to the perfection of men already athletically 
adept, but shall include the instruction of be- 
ginners and others unfit for actual intercol- 
legiate competition. 

As long as this policy of placing the instruc- 
tion of neophytes on a par with the perfection 
of already developed athletes continues, the so- 
called minor sports will have more appeal in 
the eyes of the average student ; and the stigma 
of participating in a less important sport will 
vanish with the change in student opinion. 





C: 



tie $ct)en 6ar0 in tfjc Dcrtet sJjtclD ace 0pmboltc of tbe setien 
memoers of tbe famtlg toijo Di0tingut0{)eD tftemselties in tbe 
battle of TSeottbar in 1321. 

JFcom its fraternal groups the £tntoet0ttp map tuell expect sctu* 
fee© of a like Distinction. 



FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES AT LOYOLA 
With dates of their establishment 

SOCIAL 

Phi Mu Chi 1922 

Alpha Delta Gamma 1924 

Pi Alpha Lambda 1925 

Sigma Lambda Beta 1927 

Delta Alpha Sigma 1931 

PROFESSIONAL 

Delta Sigma Delta 1883 

Xi Psi Phi 1889 

Psi Omega 1892 

Phi Chi 1904 

Alpha Zeta Gamma 1911 

Trowel 1913 

Phi Beta Pi 1921 

Ph; Lambda Kappa 1921 

Iota Mu Sigma 1923 

Sigma Nu Phi 1924 

Delta Theta Phi 1925 

Pi Mu Phi 1930 

SORORITIES 

Nu Sigma Phi 1921 

Kappa Beta Pi 1929 

HONOR SOCIETIES 

Lambda Rho 1925 

Omicron Kappa Upsilon 1925 

Blue Key 1926 

Beta Pi 1926 

Alpha Kappa Delta 1928 

Pi Gamma Mu 1929 

Moorhead Surgical Seminar 1930 

Gamma Zeta Delta 1930 

Phi Alpha Rho 1930 



W£n%^5gL THE 1931 LOYOLA* Jglggfcg flS^iftgg 





PHI MU CHI 

BETA CHAPTER 

6958 Sheridan Road 

Established at Loyola University 

November 22, 1922 

Founded at the University of Chicago, 

November 22, 1922 

Colors: Crimson and White 

OFFICERS 
Dion J. Wilhelmi .... Worthy Master 
Daniel R. Murphy .... Senior Warden 

Daniel Rach Scribe 

Harold Twoiney Treasurer 

Edward J. Garrity .... Junior Warden 
Joseph A. Mooter . . . Master of Pledges 



FACULTY MEMBERS 
Bertram J. Steggert, M.A. Aloysius P. Hodapp, M.A. 

George M. Schmeing, M.A., M.S. Frank J. Lodeski, B.S. 



Dion J. Wilhelmi 
Daniel R. Murphy 
Joseph A. Mooter 
James E. Curry 



MEMBERS 
Class of 1931 

Charles J. Weigel 
Samuel Grant 
Neil J. Doherty 
Raymond L. Abraham 



Leo J. Waldvogel 
Joseph Lukitseh 
Wayne S. McSweeney 



Daniel Rach 



Class of 1932 
Lawrence Drolett 
John Erwin 



Robert Nolan 



Edward Lally 
Thomas Lynch 
Philip C. McGinnis 
William Morrissey 



Class of 1933 

Jerry R. Quinlan 
Edward Schowalter 
Daniel J. Cleary 
Laurence P. Crowley 
John Griffin 



James L. Griffin 
Edward Jansen 
John B. Koenig 
John Gill 



Herbert M. Stanton 



Class of 1934 

Paul D. Kain 

A. Edward Hamick 



James Potuznik 



THE 



9 3 



L O V O L A N 



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r.ff IV 


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HOW \ 111, 11 



II V. Ml lll'm . \\ HUM. Ml, II S 



CH, LAI.LY, WARD, MORKISSEY 
OTER. MCGINNIS. GILL 
1. TWOMEY, DROLETT 



For Phi Mu Chi, the scholastic year of 1930-31 was one of unusual progress. 
Under the presidency of D. J. Wilhelmi notable gains were registered in sev- 
eral of the fraternity's activities, with probably the most outstanding advance 
being made in the value of its material possessions. The former Alfred Decker 
home of 6958 Sheridan Road was leased during this period and Mrs. J. M. 
O'Bryan installed as house mother. 

Numerous parties and smokers were held throughout the year, particularly 
during the football season, and the official opening of the house was held on 
November 2nd, when the alumni, under the chairmanship of Frank P. Doheny, 
presented a formal party. On November 22nd the ninth annual founders' day 
banquet was held and a spring formal in May closed the year's social activities. 

Any attempt in this small space to record services rendered by the individual 
members must necessarily be very incomplete. The hours of work given by 
the tireless President Wilhelmi are known only to a few; Twomeyand his bank 
accounts, Kelly and his accounting system, Mooter and Murphy and their 
pledging work, all constitute only a few of the workers. And no amount of 
ink on paper can adequately tell of the real pleasure of the members in their 
many informal parties, card games, chess games, and of course, heated argu- 
ments, which the fraternity provides. 

One of the big athletic events of the year was a football game with the 
Alpha Delts on the North Shore Campus. The game was hard fought and 
the result was in doubt until a pass from Griffen to some other player re- 
sulted in a touchdown and victory. The affair was rather hazy, especially 
since it was very dark and hard to distinguish the players. Our men were 
also noted for their whole-hearted support of the intra-mural program that 
was inaugurated in the University, several of them gaining special prominence 
as members of Loyola's first boxing team. 



THE 



9 3 



LOYOLA* 



J^fegfetBSigjfelS 





ALPHA DELTA GAMMA 

Founded at Loyola University, 1924 

Colors: Maroon and Gold 

OFFICERS 

Raymond Kiley 

President, First Semester 

Robert Healy 

. President, Second Semester 
Cassin Graham . . . J ice-President 

Joseph Ohlheiser Secretary 

William Reid Treasurer 

Edward Hines Historian 

Eugene Miglev Steward 



FACULTY MEMBER 
Claude J. Pernin. S.J. 

MEMBERS 

Class of 1931 
Cassin Graham Robert Healy 

Robert Murphy John McCourt 



James Brennan 
George Cahill 
Norman Dohertv 



Class of 1932 
Bernard Gibbons 
William Hines 
Eugene Migley 
Merlin Mungoven 



Bernard McCormick 
Joseph Ohlheiser 
William Reid 



Class of 1933 
George Dunlap William Murphy Sante Scully 

Gerrard Johnson John McGowan Bernard Sullivan 

Harry Olson 



Edward Arnolds 



Class of 1934 
Walter McDonough 
Norman Walker 



Gerald White 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 





GIBBONS. JOHNSON. IlOHEKTV. MCCORMICK. MIRPHY, MCDONOIGH, SCI I 
BRENNAN, MUNCOLEN.SULLIVAN, ARNOLDS, MIGLEY, WHITE, WALKER 
DUNLAP, GRAHAM, OHLHEISER, HEALY, REID, HINES 



Alpha Delta Gamma fraternity was founded at the Lake Shore Campus of 
Loyola in October, 1924. After it had become a smoothly running local organ- 
ization the work of expansion was begun with the formation of the Beta 
Chapter at St. Louis. The following year Gamma chapter was instituted at 
De Paul L T niversity. There was then a lull in the expansion activity until the 
beginning of this year when the Delta chapter was formed by the students of 
St. Mary's College, St. Mary's, California. Membership in the fraternity is 
limited to the students of Arts and Sciences departments. 

Since its beginning the fraternity has always encouraged the participation 
of its members in the various activities of the university. Several of them 
have been officers in the student association, and others have been active in 
the publications, in dramatic and forensic groups, and with the athletic teams. 

During the past year Alpha Delta Gamma maintained the high standard it 
has set as a social body by holding two successful dances and a number of 
house parties. The Kazatzka of 1930 upheld its reputation for presenting 
something new by introducing George Devron to Chicago, and the annual 
Thanksgiving formal was another Alpha Delta success. 

It will be noticed that the Fraternity was headed by two different presidents 
in the past year. This was necessitated by the fact that our president, for the 
first semester, Ray Kiley, graduated in February and thus was not in school 
to wield the power of office for the second term. Elections were held on Feb- 
ruary 17 to replace him and Robert Healy was honored by election to the 
presidency. Robert Murphy was then elected to fill the vacancy in the office 
of vice-president, and George Cahill was made sergeant-at-arms to fill the 
post vacated by Bud Girsch who withdrew from school. This date is also 
worthy of note in this year's history, since it was the day when the Delta 
Chapter was established at St. Mary's College. 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 



jNlgQfeSrelSfraH 





PI ALPHA LAMBDA 

1123 Columbia Avenue 

Established at Loyola University 

February 28, 1925 

Colors: Blue and White 



Bobert J. 



OFFICEBS 

Baffertv . . 



President 



John Lenihan .... Vice-President 
George Zwikstra . . . Pledge Master 
Charles Mann . . Recording Secretary 
Charles Mallon Corresponding Secretary 

Fred Ludwig Treasurer 

Charles Acker Steward 

James Vonesh . . . Sergeant-at-Arms 
Anthony Tomezak .... Historian 



FACULTY MEMBEBS 
Bev. George M. Mahowald. S.J. 
Bev. James J. Mertz, S.J. 
Frank Cassaretto, "29 
William Conley. '30 
Richard O'Connor, "30 



Ph.D. 



Douglas McCabe 



MEMBEBS 
Class of 1931 
Bobert J. Bafferty 
John P. Strobel 



Anthony C. Tomezak 



Roger F. Knittel 
John L. Lenihan 



Class of 1932 
Fred M. Ludwig 
Charles H. Mann 
James F. Baffertv 



James F. Vonesh 
George J. Zwikstra 



Charles B. Acker 
Philip W. Barron 
John J. Callahan 
Paul J. Gormican 



Class of 1933 
Mark E. Guerin 
John T. Janszen 
Daniel W. Maher 
Charles E. Mallon 
Charles J. Morris 



Bobert W. O'Connor 
Paul F. Quinn 
Charles T. Sweeney 
Louis W. Tordella 



Ayrley Anderson 
Vincent P. Dole 



Class of 1934 
John S. Gerrietts 
David B. Maher 



William H. Murphy 
Donal J. Baffertv 



William Byrne 
Joseph Dempsey 



Pledged 
Joseph L. Frisch 



Justin McCarthy 
William M. Roberts 



THE 



9 3 1 



L O Y O L A N 





IETTS, 




. MURPHY, J 


ANSZEN, S\ 


EEN'EY. 


ORRIS. 




NDERSON. VO 


NESH, TORDELLA, D 


R. RA 


"F 


ERTY, LUDWI 


G. MALLON, 


TOMCZ 



Though recognized throughout the University as a leading social fraternity, 
the past year has seen Pi Alpha Lambda at the crest and trough of general 
student approval. 

As has characterized past years Pi Alpha had more activity leaders than any 
kindred organization. This fact alone would probably account to a great 
extent for both its popularity and the antagonism shown toward it. It is only 
natural that power should be feared and so the definite alignments against the 
fraternity that cropped up from time to time were not unexpected. 

The year started in a blaze of glory when the house caught fire on the night 
of the first freshman smoker. The brothers, in a very decollete condition, 
turned out and manned the pumps until the conflagration was over. Repairs 
were made immediately and the rounds of house parties, meetings, and infor- 
mal gatherings went on as before. 

Pi Alpha had the pleasure of presenting four major parties during the course 
of the year. The first splash party accredited to a Loyola fraternity "went 
over" at the Edgewater Beach Apartments despite the fact that the water was 
cold and the orchestra was forced to play without a piano. The annual winter 
formal, at the Sovereign Hotel, was the usual successful gathering of alumni 
and actives. The founder's day formal at the Knickerbocker was adjudged 
torrid by the most discriminating of the alumni brothers. As the LoTOLAN 
goes to press plans are being formulated for the summer formal. All of the 
parties are closed ones. 

Scholastic-ally the fraternity rated higher than any cross section of the stu- 
dent body. Brothers Callahan, Tordella, Gormican, and Knittel garnered the 
coveted straight '"A" averages while the average of the first pledge class was 
but slightly below "B." 

All in all the year was a successful one. Three alumni were engaged in pro- 
fessorial capacities and the fraternity maintained its position of esteem in the 
eyes of the faculty and of the unbiased members of the student body. 



THE 



3 1 



L O Y O L A N 





SIGMA LAMBDA BETA 

Established at Loyola University, February 1, 1927 

Colors: Maroon and Gold 

OFFICERS 

Alpha Chapter Beta Chapter 

Grand Regent 

Charles J. LaFond Owen P. McGovern 

Vice Grand Regent 

Raymond Hebenstreit John I. Lardner 

Custodian of Records 

Harry C. Van Pelt Adam J. Norris 

Grand Banker 

Bernard Snyder James J. Scott 

Scribe 
Walter A. Johnson Allen C. Snyder 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



Thomas J. Reedy, C.P.A., LL.D. 
H. T. Chamberlain. C.P.A. 



Cornelius Palmer, LL.D. 
Stanley F. Jablonski. C.P.A. 



Edward Cloonan 
Edward Cooney 
Edward Cox 
Joseph Crowley 
Raymond Hebenstreit 
Walter A. Johnson 
Charles J. La Fond 
Hubert F. Neary 
James Neary 
William Norkett 



ALPHA CHAPTER MEMBERS 
Cornelius Palmer 
Herbert Pfeifer 
Thomas J. Reedy 
Gerald Rooney 
Robert Scott 
Bernard Snyder 
Frank Slingerland 
Harry Van Pelt 
John Van Pelt 
Harold Wirth 



Edward Barrett 
H. T. Chamberlain 
Thomas J. Cole 
Phillip Cordes 
Francis Delaney 
Stanley F. Jablonski 
William J. Kiley 
David Kerwin 



BETA CHAPTER MEMBERS 
John I. Lardner 
Owen P. McGovern 
Adam J. Norris 
Louis J. Pahls 
James J. Scott 
Peter M. Smith 
Allen C. Snyder 



&&$&&^&L 



THE 



9 3 1 



L O Y O L A X 



tXt.-f.f 




February 1, 1931, marked the fourth anniversary of the founding of Sigma 
Lambda Beta Fraternity at Loyola university. Organized in 1927, by a few 
students of the then newly formed Night Commerce Department, it has kept 
pace with progress of that fast growing department of the University. 

As a social fraternity, it has for its purpose the encouragement of social 
activities, the promotion of commercial theories and ideas, also high moral 
standards as exemplified at Loyola University. Membership in the fraternity 
is granted only to students who are proficient in studies, interested in the 
school, its students, and its athletic and social activities. During its exis- 
tence, Sigma Lambda Beta Fraternity has always firmly adhered to these 
principles, and as a result, has more than accomplished its purpose. 

Members of Sigma Lambda Beta Fraternity, have always been active in the 
promotion of all school activities about the Commerce School. The members 
of the Fraternity also sponsor regular calender affairs of their own. which 
have always been successful and well attended. The annual smoker was held 
on October 1 and was addressed by Dr. Edward Norton, Lovola's football 
coach. This smoker was also addressed by Dean Reedy of the Commerce 
School, Mr. Chamberlain and Mr. Palmer. The Thanksgiving Dinner Formal 
was given on November 15 at the Dutch Room of the Bismark Hotel and 
was very well attended; following this dance came the New Year's Formal 
Dinner Dance. The Spring Formal dance concluded the year's major social 
activities, one of the most successful programs that has ever been carried out. 
Regular meetings are held semi-monthly in Parlor D, Brevoort Hotel. The 
Alpha Chapter is made up of members who are still in the University and 
the Beta Chapter is made up of the men who have graduated from the Com- 
merce School and are still active in the life of the L T niversity. 

Sigma Lambda Beta Fraternity has both an active and an alumni chapter. 
Regular meetings are held semi-monthly in Parlor D. Breevort Hotel. 



THE 



19 3 



LOYOLA N 





PI MU PHI 

Polish Medical Fraternity 

Established Loyola University, January. 1930 

Colors: Red and White 

OFFICERS 
John Konopa . Honorary Senior President 

Joseph Stybel President 

Edward Pisezek J ice-President 

Raymond Abraham . . Recording Secretary 
M. M. Sarnecki .... Financial Secretary 

Joseph Syslo Treasurer 

John Czyzewski Editor 

Thaddeus Jasinski . . . Sergeant-at-Arms 



James Walsh, S.J. 
Dr. S. R. Pietrowicz 
Dr. A. J. Woehinski 



FACULTY MEMBERS 
Dr. A. Sampolinski 
Dr. T. M. Larkowski 
Dr. E. H. Warszewski 
Dr. V. F. Torczvnski 



Dr. M. E. Uznanski 
Dr. F. A. Dulak 
Dr. A. J. Linowiecki 



Joseph Drabanski 

John Dubiel 

Van Walter Komasinski 



MEMBERS 
Class of 1931 

John Konopa 
Stanislaus Radzvminski 



Stephen Witkiewicz 
A. Zelazny 
Edward Zencka 



Raymond Abraham 
Leon Chryanowski 
John Czyzewski 
John Hajduk 



Class of 1932 
Edward Maciejewski 
Alphonse Mosczenski 
Edward Pisezek 



Joseph Stybel 
Edward Swastek 
Aloysius Wawskowicz 
Stephen Wojcik 



Thaddeus Jasinski 
E. C. Krasniewski 
Henrv Malinowski 



Class of 1933 
Walter Olszewski 
M. M. Sarnecki 



Paul Sowka 
Joseph Syslo 
William Zarzeki 



L. J. Blaszczak 
C. Jakubowski 



Class of 1934 
L. V. Kogut 
Leon Kopalski 



Edward Pisarski 
Edward Purchla 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A X 




f.t f f.t t 



ZENCKA, RADZYMINNK.I. WITKIKW IfZ. BI.MCZSK. Z VRZECKI. HUDLK. CHII V \ NOW SKI. M ACIEJEWSKI 

SOWKA, SWASTEK, WASZKOWICZ, KOGUT, KOMASINSKI. JAKLBOWSKI. KRASIEWSKI 

DRABANSKJ. CZYZEWSKI. PISZCZEK. KONOPA, STYBEL, ABRAHAM, DL'BIEL 



Pi Mu Phi Medical Fraternity was organized at Lovola university on January 
10, 1930. Although it is less than two years old. its growth as is shown by its 
membership and activities, has already been phenomenal. For this reason 
it is recognized as an important part of the life at the Loyola School of Medi- 
cine. The fraternity has as its purpose, the encouragement of professional 
contact, and also the promotion of friendship among the medical students of 
Polish extraction. 

During the year Pi Mu Phi has sponsored several social events of major 
namely that of fostering friendship and mutual cooperation between its mem- 
bers and between them and the faculty. That the fraternity has been suc- 
cessful in this purpose is shown by the fact that all the faculty members are 
whole-heartedly taking part in its activities. It was their presence at many 
meetings that lent special importance to these affairs and on these occasions 
both professional and social subjects were discussed, and the ideals of scholas- 
tic advancement furthered. 

Pi Mu Phi Medical Fraternity is indeed proud of its history and purpose. 
For although it is still in its infancy, its past activities and successes augur well 
for its future. New chapters of Pi Mu Phi are being organized at five other 
universities, and this indicates that the fraternity will soon become national 
in scope. 

During the year Pi Mu Pni has sponsored several social events of major 
importance. The first was the annual meeting held at the Hotel La Salle, at 
which meeting the elections for the year were held. A banquet, given on 
November 19, was addressed by Father Walsh and in his speech he took par- 
ticular care to point out that at no time in history has the Catholic Church 
and science ever been at variance. Three faculty members of the fraternity 
also were in attendance and addressed the members. These two affairs to- 
gether with the spring social events constituted the major portion of the year's 
activities. 



THE 



9 3 1 



L O Y O L A N 



syTf'*& JI*+?»> .< 





DELTA ALPHA SIGMA 
Founded at Loyola LTniversity, 1930 

OFFICERS 

Samuel Cali President 

Joseph Mondo Vice-President 

Salvatore Dimieelli Secretary 

Jacob Giardina Treasurer 

Carl Panzarella Pledge Master 

Eugene Cirese Sergeant-at-Arms 

Victor Ungaro Historian 



MEMBERS 

Class of 1931 
Joseph G. Mondo 



Class of 1932 
Salvatore A. Dimieelli 



Jacob Giardina 



Eugene L. Cirese 



Class of 1933 
Carl J. Panzarella 



Victor Ungaro 



Joseph A. Cantursi 



Class of 1934 
Anthony Favata 



Felix Toriiabene 



Buttita 



Pledged 



Failla 



THE 1931 XOY O L A N 





The Delta Alpha Sigma Fraternity was organized at the College of Arts and 
Sciences of Loyola on April 1, 1930. It was originally known as the Dante 
Alighieri Society. The purpose of the fraternity is to promote good fellowship 
among the students of Italian parentage, and to assist them in their social and 
scholastic endeavors. During its short existence Delta Alpha Sigma has firmly 
adhered to these principles and has achieved exceptional success. The fra- 
ternity and pledge pins were selected in April of this year. 

The fraternity has encouraged extra-curricular activities to the fullest extent; 
her members are represented in the fields of dramatics, publications, the Band 
and the Glee Club, and in the sodality. All the school dances and intramural 
athletic programs received their support, and especially in track and boxing 
did the members show ability. 

Delta Alpha Sigma has been an ardent supporter of the intra-mural pro- 
gram of athletics inaugurated this year. Though handicapped by the small 
number of men from which to choose a representative team, we have man- 
aged to give a good account of ourselves in most of the sports. In particular 
we would mention the basketball team which was awarded the prize for the 
least number of fouls in the first round of play, and also the indoor team 
which managed to pound out a few runs in spite of the trouble in getting 
nine men together in one game. We also participated in the other activities 
of the intra-mural program, some of our men running on the track meet and 
in the other events that formed a part of the program of sports. 

The outstanding event of the year was the St. Louis trip made by some of 
the brothers in a collegiate flivver that once had been a Buick; they arrived 
in the park at the beginning of the second half of the game. Smokers and 
socials at which several physicians and persons of distinction gave short lec- 
tures, constituted the social events of the year. 



THE 193 



L O Y © L A N 



£ -J3rr?»;*& s^Tf^iji 





DELTA SIGMA DELTA 

BETA CHAPTER 

Founded at University of Michigan, 1883 

Established at Dental Department of 

Loyola University, 1885 

31 Active Chapters 

OFFICERS 

F. F. Snider Grand Master 

S. Pollock Worthy Master 

W. N. Holmes Scribe 

H. L. Perry Treasurer 

A A. Dahlberg Historian 

J. H. Barr Senior Page 

K. F. Sanders Junior Page 

R. A. Olech Tyler 



FACULTY MEMBERS 
W. H. G. Logan, M.D., D.D.S., M.S., LL.D., F.A.C.S., F.A.C.D. 
C. N. Johnson, M.A., L.D.S., M.D., F.A.C.D. G. C. Pike, D.D.S. 



J. P. Bucklev. Ph.C, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 

P. G. Puterbaugh, M.D.. D.D.S.. F.A.C.D. 

T. L. Grisamore, Ph.G.. D.D.S.. F.A.C.D. 

R. Kronfeld, M.D. 

J. R. Watts, D.D.S. 

R. W. McNultv, A.B., D.D.S. 

A. H. Mueller, B.S., D.D.S. 

F. P. Boulger, D.D.S., L.D.S. 

L. M. Cox, M.D.. D.D.S. 

W. I. McNeil. D.D.S. 



H. Glupker, D.D.S. 

R. H. Johnson, D.D.S. 

P. W. Swanson, D.D.S. 

H. Michener, D.D.S. 

F. P. Lindner, D.D.S. 

W. M. Clulev. D.D.S. 

J. G. Hooper, D.D.S. 

William P. Schoen. B.S., D.D.S. 

H. A. Hillenbrand. B.S., D.D.S. 

W. Willman, B.S.. D.D.S. 



L. A. Platts, M.S., D.D.S., Deputy 
J. H. Law, D.D.S., Assistant Deputy 
MEMBERS 
Class of 1931 
H. E. Ackerman J. S. Boersma E. B. Kirbv 

J. H. Barr E. L. Gever F. A. Napolilli 

E. J. Blain W. N. Holmes D. D. Peterson 

S. Pollock 



P. J. ReCoules 
W. J. Sadler 
F. F. Snider 



Class of 1932 



P. G. Ash 
R. G. Boothe 
J. J. Burns 
V. E. Eklund 
P. S. Faillo 
W. A. Fanning 
H. J. Pfuhl 



A. N. Allen 
H. F. Baker 
M. E. Blume 



L. P. Cote 
A. A. Dahlberg 
H. D. Danforth 
W. N. Kirbv 
J. S. Kitzmiller 
G. E. Lemire 
H. R. Herrick 



G. H. Fitz 

J. S. Gaynor 

W. F. Graham 

R. R. Ross 

K. F. Sanders 

0. B. Schaller 

J. H. Simpson 

E. P. Schoonmaker 



|G. W. Parilli 
H. L. Perrv 
C. A. Pikas 

A. M. Thorsen 
G. M. Walden 

B. W. Zulev 
L. M. Kellev 



Class of 1933 

E. J. Denning R. K. Pike H. G. Smith 

F. C. Kuttler J. Quinlan N. E. Workman 
R. A. Olech E. E. Ronspiez J. D. Brennan 






T H 



19 3 



LOYOLA* 





ASH, KELLY. PFl'HL. WAI.DEN. KITTLEH. COTE. PVRILLI. ACKERMAN, WORKMAN 

GEYER, SMITH, ROSS, PIKE, SCHOONMAKER, HERRICK, BURNS, GRAHAM, SIMPSON 

RECOLES, SCHALLER, FANNING, RONSPIEZ, DANFORTH, N. KIRBY, BLUME, DENNINC, W. I 

OLECH, SANDERS, HOLMES, SNIDER, DR. LAW, PERRY. DAHI.BERG, CAYNOR 



Delta Sigma Delta is the oldest fraternity at Loyola university at the present 
time. It was founded at the University of Michigan, and was established two 
years later at the Chicago College of Dental Surgery, now the dental depart- 
ment of Loyola university. 

Within its membership rolls have been and still are included men who are 
most active in the life of Loyola university. We point with pride to those 
who are active on the publications of the school, the Loyolan, News and 
Dentos, and also to those of our brothers who have prominently identified 
themselves with the various athletic teams and the track team in particular. 

Not only is attention given to the professional side of life by the fraternity, 
but also a great deal to the social aspect. Dances, smokers, meetings, and 
outings of various sorts are engaged in during the year. This year the frater- 
nity gave one informal and two formal dances. The big event of the season 
was the Annual May Formal Dinner Dance which was held on May 29 at the 
Bal Tabarin of the Sherman Hotel. At that dance it is customary for the 
Delts who are graduating to announce their engagements. And what a party 
it is! 

At the various dental conventions that take place from time to time all over 
the world, the Delta Sigma Delta fraternity is always active, and thus mem- 
bership to this organization is almost more valuable after graduation than dur- 
ing student days. A supreme chapter and sixty-one auxiliary chapters make 
up the organization of its alumni members. These auxiliary chapters are 
scattered all over the world so that wherever a graduate decides to go there 
will be a group of fraternity brothers ready to help him become established. 

In addition to the chapters in the L^nited States there are several in Aus- 
tralia, England, France, and Holland. 



T H 



19 3 1 



LOYOLAN 




PSI OMEGA 

KAPPA CHAPTER 

Founded at New York College of Dentistry, 1892 

Established at Loyola Dental College, 1898 

39 Active Chapters 

OFFICERS 

E. M. Glavin Grand Master 

W. J. Cunningham . . Junior Master 

C. N. Frey Treasurer 

L. J. Warszak Secretary 

T. C. Scanlon Editor 

J. P. Coughlin Senator 

C. W. Kunze .... Chief Inspector 

J. J. Keenan Historian 

G. R. Schwartz . . Chief Interrogator 

D. J. McSweeney . . . Inside Guard 

B. 0. Laing Outside Guide 

J, C. -McCoy Chaplain 



FACULTY MEMBERS 
K. A. Meyer, M.D. 
J. L. Kendall. B.S.. Ph.G.. M.D. 
R. E. Hall, D.D.S. 

F. Leiner, D.D.S. , Deputy Chancellor 
L. W. Morrey. D.D.S., Assistant Deputy Chancellor 



V. A. Corbett 
L. E. Davidson 
J. M. Dugas 



MEMBERS 

Class of 1931 
J. A. Felt 
H. M. Klenda 
J. S. Valha 



J. D. Young 
D. C. Zerwer 



W. W. Brooks 
G. E. Covington 
E. M. Glavin 
G. W. Kunze 



Class of 1932 
B. 0. Laing 
E. E. Lamb 
G. H. Lundy 
J. C. McCoy 
R. W. McDonald 



D. J- McSweeney 
T. C. Scanlon 
G. R. Schwartz 
J. A. Vasumpaur 
L. J. Warszak 



J. P. Coughlin 

W. J. Cunningham 



Class of 1933 
G. C. Fortelka G. A. Halmos 

C. N. Frey J. F. Keenan 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 





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SCHWARTZ, FORTKLKA, YALHA, KEENAN, GUCAN, HALMIN 

COUGHLIN, LUNDY, FELT, DAVIDSON, COVINGTON 

SCANLAN, CUNNINGHAM, GLAVIN, FREY, WAHCZAK 



The Psi Omega Fraternity was founded at the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery in 1892. Since its founding it has enjoyed a spectacular growth until 
it has become the largest dental fraternity in existence with an enrollment 
of 17.950 active members. Psi Omega is represented by 39 chapters located 
in leading universities throughout the United States. Besides these the society 
is well represented in foreign lands with chapters in Spain. England. Nova 
Scotia, Gibraltar, and Hawaii. 

Among the thirty-nine chapters we might mention a few of those in the 
better known schools. There are groups in schools in all parts of the country 
as will be seen from the following list : University of Southern California, 
George Washington university. Royal College of Dental Surgeons. Toronto, 
Canada; University of Pennsylvania, Baltimore Dental College, University of 
Illinois, Northwestern, University of Louisville, Tulane and Vanderbilt. These 
are onlv a few of the manv, but space does not permit the full enumeration 
of the Chapter Roll. 

Kappa chapter was established in 1896 and from the beginning it took its 
place as one of the very active chapters. It has always been the good fortune 
of Kappa to select men who are best fitted and most capable of carrying on 
the traditions of both Psi Omega and the dental profession. 

During the past year Kappa has sponsored social affairs that have proven 
to be most entertaining. In cooperation with our Illinois chapter a dance 
was given at the Knickerbocker Hotel in the early part of the year that was 
greatly enjoyed by every one present. In January the chapter entertained 
the freshman class at a smoker held at the Hotel St. Clair: later in the same 
month a party of members and prospective pledges were entertained at a 
splash party in the Lake Shore Athletic Club. 



THE 193 



L O Y O L A N 





PHI CHI 

PHI SIGMA CHAPTER 

3345 Washington Blvd. 

National Medical Fraternity 

Founded at University of Vermont 

March 31, 1899 

Established at Lovola University 

November 7, 1907 

Sixty-two Active Chapters 

Colors: Green and White 

OFFICERS 

Cyril D. Klaus . . Presiding Senior 

Charles A. Serbst . Presiding Junior 

Charles B. Gawne . . . Secretary 

Ronald J. Lindsay . . . Treasurer 

William N. Macev Assistant Treasurer 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



Dr. M. E. Creighton 


Dr. P. Lawler 


Dr. T. J. Walsh 


Dr. R. A. Black 


Dr. M. McGuire 


Dr. F. Mueller 


Dr. T. A. Boyd 


Dr. R. E. Lee 


Dr. J. P. Smyth 


Dr. E. M. Drennan 


Dr. W. G. McGuire 


Dr. A. M. Vaughn 


Dr. G. H. Ensminger 


Dr. E. J. Mever 


Dr. J. Mever 


Dr. F. J. Gertv 


Dr. W. S. Hector 


Dr. J. Oliver i 


Dr. P. E. Grabow 


Dr. M. C. Mullen 


Dr. A. Garra 


Dr. U. J. Grimm 


Dr. G. W. Mahony 
FELLOWS 


Dr. F. Stucker 


Charles Hughes 


Charles Coyle 




MEMBERS 






Class of 1931 




C. J. Fox 


J. Marciniak 


R. H. Lawler 


C. B. Gawne 


T. B. Carney 


J. Whaley 


G. J. Kohne 


E. Spangler 


J. Twohey 


C. D. Klaus 


J. Prendergast 


H. Kramps 


J. M. Leahy 


L. Mammoser 


J. Burke 


P. McGuire 


P. Werthman 


J. Keehan 


J. E. Petcoff 


R. J. Lindsay 


G. Obester 


C. J. Weigel 


L. Zuley 

Class of 1932 


A. Perzia 


H. Trappe 


M. Hydock 


P. Engle 


P. E. Leahey 


J. Bremner 


E. James 


J. Markey 


E. Stepan 


M. Garrison 


C. Serbst 


R. Berry 


P. Corboy 


J. Walsh 


D. Keating 
T. Hickey 

Class of 1933 


F. Murtaugh 


M. M. Exley 


G. T. Dav 


J. Conrad 


A. H. Claycomb 


J. B. Murphv 


J. Hemwall 


W. N. Macev 




F. A. Reed 






THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 



Bl ^<^i^wtrWm^kJ*A WmttPJH 

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EXLEY, MACEY, MURPHY. REED. KEATING, KNC1.E. O HARE, TRAPP, WARD 

WARZACK, WAGER, WALKER, VARCUS, CONRAD, CLAYCOMR, YUSKIS, MADDEN, REIGCERT 

WEIZER. BERENS, FOX. PETCOFF, KLAUS, SERBST. MARKEY, OBF.STER, DAY 



The Alpha Chapter of the Phi Chi Medical Fraternity, incorporated, was 
founded at the University of Vermont. From this small beginning, the fra- 
ternity has grown in size and reputation until at present it is one of the 
largest and most respected of the Medical fraternities. The reason for its 
growth is not hard to perceive. Its adherence to the basic principles en- 
nunciated by its founders has had something to do with it; but a far more 
important reason is the fact that only men who have character, principle, 
endeavor, and love of the medical arts are selected for membership. It is 
for these reasons that Phi Chi has grown to the position that it now holds in 
the Medical world. 

The Loyola Chapter of Phi Chi, known as Phi Sigma, was founded in 1907, 
the present University Department then being the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons at the same location. We are proud to say that some six hundred 
graduates have passed through our portals. 



R. Vargus 

D. Madden 

H. R. Honefinger 

E. Stack 
W. Jane 
A. Yuskis 



Class of 1934 

V. F. Kling 
C. Kirkland 
C. O'Hare 
L. A. LaPorte 
H. Reiggert 
H. Stanton 



E. A. Weizer 
C. F. Ward 

B. J. Walzack 

C. W. Wager 
E. Walker 
H. Breuhaus 



J. Mulhollon 
J. Connelly 
L. Waagner 



Pledge 
J. Jacobson 
P. Hemming 
R. Karrasch 
C. Hartman 



V. LaFleur 
F. Young 
J. Brennan 



g5ffB^f5gl 



T H 



19 3 



LAN 




The Loyoi.an staff apol- 
ogizes to the Phi Beta 
l'i Fraternity for mislay- 
ing the cuts of its crest 
and pins at an hour too 
late to replace them. 



PHI BETA PI 
ALPHA OMEGA CHAPTER 

3221 Washington Blvd. 

National Medical Fraternity 

Founded at University of Pittsburgh, 1891 

Established at Loyola University, 1921 

Colors: Green and White 

OFFICERS IN UNIVERSITY 

J. I. Collins Archon 

H. R. Wilson Vice-Archon 

E. M. Steffes Secretary 

C. J. McNamara Steward 

P. A. Seeley. 4sst. Steward 

H. V. Valentine Chaplain 

W. F. Stewart Editor 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



L. D. Moorhead, A.M., M.S., M.D.. Dean F. 


C. 


Leeming, M.D. 


W. J. Pickett, M.D., 


Asst 


Dean E. 


A 


Mcjunkin. A.M., M.D. 


R. M. Strong, A.M., 


Ph.D 


J. 


V. 


McMann, B.S., M.D. 


I. F. Valini. B.S., M.D. 


J. 


1.. 


Meyer, M.D. 


B. B. Beeson, M.D. 




J. 


C. 


Murrav, M.D. 


V. B. Bowler, B.S., 


M.D. 


R. 


K 


Mustell, B.S., M.A., M.D. 


H. J. Doolev, M.D., 


F.A.C.S. A. 


V 


Partipilio, M.D. 


J. M. Essenberg, B.S 


., B.Pg., Ph.D. E. 


A 


Pribram, M.D. 


T. P. Foley, M.D. 




G. 


B 


Rosengrant, B.S., M.D. 


G. D. Griffin, M.D., 


F.A.C.A. 


Schmitz, A.M., M.D., F.A.C.S., 


F. A. Halloran, A.B 


, M.D. 


F.A.C.R. 


E. T. Hartigan. M.D 


. LL.B.. J.D. H 


E 


Schmitz, B.B., M.D. 


E. M. Hess, M.D. 




W 


Somerville, B.S., M.D. 


W. K. Heuper, M.D 




L. 


P. 


Sweenev, M.D. 


A. J. Javois. B.S., M.D. 


W 


J 


Swift, M.D., F.A.C.S. 






MEMBERS 










Class of 1931 




R. W. Albi 




V. J. G'azeta 




C. A. Marquardt 


C. L. Armington 




M. M. Hoeltgen 




C. J. Malengraft 


R. F. Carmodv 




F. A. Heupler 




M. D. Murphv 


I. J. Collins 




B. J. Johnston 




E. W. Sachs ' 


T. W. Falke 




G. E. Kenny 




M. A. Wagner 


I. A. Forbrich 




Class of 1932 




H. R. Wilson 


F. J. Clark 




J. A. Gibney 




G. Schmidt 


N. J. Doherty 




F. G. Guarnieri 




S. D. Solomon 


W. T. Elnen' 




J. A. McNamara 




E. M. Steffes 


A. Ferare 




G. J. Rau 

Class of 1933 




W. F. Stewart 


G. Andrew 




R. A. Matthies 




W. Prousait 


E. J. Black 




E. G. McCarthv 




P. A. Seelev 


D. H. Bovce 




P. A. McGuire 




E. S. Thieda 


A. J. Ferl'ita 




I. P. Moore 




H. B. Valentine 


L. J. Kunsch 








A. Zikmund 


XStsSSSXL t i 


E 10 3 1 




L OYOL A* lasisjRasi 



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KL.NSCH, MCCLIRE, CLARKE. BLACK, MATTHIES. CONK M). ZIKMUND, VALENTINE, CLANCY. THIEDV 

RALL, MC NALLY, SEELEY 

PETRAZIO, O'LEARY. VAN NEST, FERLITA, FOREST. MM.ACHOWSKI. SCHROEDEB, KENNY, HOELTGEN, 

MARQUARDT 

ALBI, STEFFES. RAU, WILSON. Ml'RPHY, SOLOMON. MCNAMARA, ARMINCTON. CII.NEY. HEIPI.ER 



Phi Beta Pi Medical Fraternity took its origin at the University of Pittsburg 
in 1891. From there it has expanded into a national society with chapters 
at present in forty-one of the country's outstanding Class A Medical Schools. 

In 1921 the Alpha Omega Chapter was founded at Loyola, and with rapid 
success has firmly established itself as an integral part of the University. It 
boasts of a selected representation among the faculty and student medical body. 

Its object is in part to unite fraternally the best available students who are 
socially acceptable; to assist its members in studies and to encourage them to 
uphold the highest standards of scholarship, conduct, and service as medical 
men; to promote the advancement of medical science, and the mutual interests 
of both graduate and under-graduate students of medicine. 

The fraternity maintains a home at 3221 West Washington Boulevard. 







MEMBERS 








[continued) 








Class of 1934 




1). 


J. Clancv 


T. F. Forest 


R. R. Rail 


w 


C. Clarke 


E. Malachowski 


H. Schroeder 


H. 


Conrad 


H. McNallv 


P. F. Short 


\\ 


C. DeNinns 


D. J. O'Leary 
J. A. Petrazio 

Pledged 


W. A. Van Nest 


C. 


Eads 


T. Lane 


P. E. Snikert 


c. 


Kenny 


J. P. Leary 


B. Willett 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A X 



c ^rr?»:«£ JI*Tr »:*\.d 






& 


PHI LAMBDA KAPPA 


fete 


I 


GAMMA CHAPTER 
National Medical Fraternity 


'WPWM: 


It) i 


k Established at Loyola University, 1921 




„ f 


/ Colors: White and Blue 

OFFICERS 
Herman Levy . . . W orthy Superior 
k Leon S. Eisenman . W orthy Chancellor 






W Stanley Brownstein . . Worthy Scribe 
Joseph Lesser Guardian of the Exchequer 



David Anderman 
Robert Elliot 



MEMBERS 

Class of 1931 
Herman Levy 
Herman Renkoff 



Benjamin Sehwarcz 
Jack Weinlesa 



Class of 1932 
Stanley Brownstein Leon S. Eisenman 

Joseph Jesser 



Jack Reide 



Class of 1934 
Edward Meadow Edward Smith 



David Brotman 
L. Sandler 



Pledged 
Paul Singer 



M. A. Spellberg 
S. Wainberg 



THE 



9 3 1 



L O Y O L A N 





Phi Lambda Kappa was originally founded at the University of Pennsyl- 
vania in 1907; from these humble beginnings it has grown until it has taken 
on international proportions with the establishment of active chapters in 
England, Germany, and Austria. Gamma Chapter was founded at Loyola 
university in 1921, and though it has purposely been kept limited in member- 
ship, it has steadily maintained active participation in university and medical 
school life. The purpose in keeping the number of active members limited 
has simply been this, it was felt that a higher social standing would result 
from a small number of closely united brothers, more so than from a large 
unwieldy body. 

This year we welcome the freshmen pledges and hasten to offer our con- 
gratulations to the sophomores who, after critically evaluating the worth of 
Gamma as an instrument of attaining their ideal, have joined our ranks. We 
feel confident that they are well fitted to carry on our ideals and continue our 
policy. 

Originally founded by a small number of men who were working for their 
degree in medicine, Phi Lambda Kappa has become a national fraternity. 
It includes on its chapter rolls schools in many parts of the United States, 
among which are the following: Pennsylvania, Illinois, Columbia, Buffalo, 
Boston, Detroit, Michigan, Georgetown, Virginia, Northwestern, St. Louis, Al- 
bany and Tulane. In addition alumni clubs are established at Chicago, Phila- 
delphia, New York, Detroit and Pittsburg. 

To the retiring Worthy Superior, Herman Levy, we extend sincerest thanks 
for the capable administration he headed, and offer him our heartiest congra- 
tulations for his achievement of second place in the Cook County Hospital 
competitive examinations. It is hoped that this is merely an indication of 
what is to follow in his career. To the graduating fraters Anderman. Renkoff. 
Levy, Elliott, Schwarez, and Weinless, we extend our best wishes for a suc- 
cessful year of interneship. We feel confident that they will carrv on our 
ideals and make them an integral part of their coming professional career. 



^1&?S&1 ^Tn 



19 3 



L O Y O L A N 





IOTA MU SIGMA 

Established at Loyola University, 1925 

Colors: Maroon and Gold 

OFFICERS 

A. Allegretti President 

T. Polito J ice-President 

F. F. Fiore Secretary 

A. Barone Treasurer 

A. Esposito Librarian 

S. N. Saletta isst.-Librarian 

V. Accardi Editor 

W. B. Ruoceo Acting Editor 

F. H. DiGraci . . . Sergeant-at-Arms 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



James F. Walsh, 


S.J. 




Dr. R. 


Drazio 


Dr. Italo F. Volini 




Dr. A. 


S. Geraci 


Dr. A. V. Partip 


lo 




Dr. S. 


L. Governale 


Dr. L. Carofiglio 






Father 


Pusateri 






ALUMNI MEMBERS 


Dr. M. Indovino 




Dr. C. Muzzicato 


Dr. J. Marzano 


Dr. S. Vanise 




Dr. J. A. Suld 


ane 


Dr. F. Saletta 






MEMBERS 








Class of 


1931 




A. Allegretti 




R. Fazio 




L. Muzzicato 


N. Balsamo 




H. Fulco 




M. Parenti 


N. Casciato 




L. Ihelli 




A. Rotondi 


H. DeFeo 




Class of 


1932 


J. Robilotti 


A. Esposito 




L. Eiorito 




B. Simone 


E. Fieramosco 




S. Jelsoinino 




W. Spiteri 


F. Fiore 




D. Nigro 
M. Serio 

Class of 


1933 


F. Vincenti 


V. Accardi 




G. A. Luparello 


L. T. Polumho 


G. A. Bica 




L. A. Maglio 




Wm. B. Ruoceo 


T. A. Cavaliere 




N. Mennite 




S. N. Saletta 


H. Cutrera 




J. A. Moretti 




R. Scala 


J. Digate 




M. Neri 




F. R. Schrippa 


B. Di Giacomo 




E. Olivieri 




G. M. Stazio 


F. H. Di Graci 




F. B. Parretta 


J. Vertuno 


M. Felicelli 




J. J. Pitzaferro 


A. Vincenti 


G. C. Ferranti 








J. J. Vitacco 


K£«S£3ftB£«SBt 


T H 


E 19 3 


1 I 


o y o l a * jKasffcSBeisi 






^ w ^ : w ■* "^ ^ 




A. FELICELLI, VINCENTI, STAZIO, NERI, BELMONTE, LLPAREU.O, DICATE, FALVO 
VITACCO, OLIEVERI. MORETTI. CCTRERA, FAZIO. ROTONDI, FIORE 
PITZAFERRO. RUOCCO, DECRACI, POUTO, ALLFXRETTI. BALSAMO, ESPOSITO 



In the year 1923 the Iota Mu Sigma Medical Fraternity was organized at 
the Loyola University School of Medicine. The principal purpose of the 
group was to assemble the students of Italian parentage at the medical school, 
so that they might aid each other in securing social and scholastic benefits. 

The following year saw an increase in the membership of the fraternity, 
which used a key as its insignia during the first years of its existence. Sci- 
entific questions were read and discussed at the meetings, and the ideal of 
scholastic advancement and achievement was furthered. The by-laws of the 
fraternity were amended in that year to provide that the members of Iota Mu 
Sigma should not belong to any other social fraternity of the Medical School. 

By 1925 the membership had increased to twenty-one and the fraternity 
began in this year to select its members in accordance with their scholastic 
standing. Pledge pins of the diamond shape were used for the first time. 
The membership pin now in use was selected in 1926, and that year also saw 
the recognition of Iota Mu Sigma by the other medical fraternities. The fra- 
ternity was originally founded as a purely social fraternity but was not long 
in chartering itself as a professional group. After its recognition it grew 
with amazing rapidity until now it is one of the most active and largest groups 
at the University. 

The years social events of 1931 were climaxed by a magnificent supper dance 
at the Blackstone Hotel. The dance was very well attended and served ad- 
mirably as an affair through which to reunite all the former members and 
acquaint them with their later brothers. At the present time Iota Mu Sigma 
has the honor of placing more men in the Medical Seminar than any other 
fraternity in the Medical School. It is a record of which we are justly proud 
and hope will be continued in the future. 



Z&t&^Z&l THE 



19 3 1 



L O Y O L A N 





f 



DELTA THETA PHI 

National Legal Fraternity 

Founded at Chicago, Illinois, 1913 

Established at Loyola LTniversity, 1923 

Colors: Green and White 

OFFICERS 

Matt W. Lear Dean 

James E. Curry Retired Dean 

Thomas E. Carey . Clerk of the Exchequer 

John R. O'Connor Tribune 

Neil McAuliffe Bailiff 

Andrew Crowley . . . Master of Rituals 
John Waldron Master of Rolls 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 



William P. Fortune 



John V. McCormick, Dean Pay ton J. Touhy 
Walter W. Meyer 



Daniel J. Buckley 
James E. Curry 
Edward Daly 



LIST OF MEMBERS 
Class of 1931 
Edward A. Dries 
James Farrell 



William Lowry 
Edward McGuire 
Richard Ravsa 



Daniel A. Carey 
Alfred Cassidy 
Wallace Clark 
Edmund Cloonan 
Andrew Crowley 
James Cullen 



Class of 1932 
Walter Johnson 
John Kavanaugh 
James M. Klees 
Matt W. Lear 
William Linklater 



Neil McAuliffe 
Frank McDonough 
John R. O'Connor 
Paul Reed 
Robert Schweitzer 
John Waldron 



Maurice J. Barron 
Frank Burke 
William Caldwell 



Class of 1933 
Thomas E. Carey 
Lawrence Clark 



John A. Costello 
James Hammond 
Edmund I. O'Connor 



THE 



9 3 



LOYOLA:*' 



f 




f f f , !, f 'I 



HAMMOND, FAKHELL. KLEES, CURBY, KAVANAUCH, L. CLARK 

SCHWEITXER, RURKE, WALDRON, DALY, VV. CLARK, COSTELLO 

BARRON, CAREY, LEAR, MEYER, J. O'CONNOR, MC AULIFFE 



The Delta Theta Pi Law Fraternity was founded at the Cleveland Law 
School of Baldwin Wallace College, Cleveland, Ohio, in 1900. Three fraterni- 
ties amalgamated to form this new group and used the first word of each of 
their names to form the title of the new group. The McKenna Senate of 
Delta Theta Phi was founded in January 1926, by a group of active students 
who realized its need in Loyola university. Named after that great Justice 
— Joseph McKenna — the senate has progressed rapidly until now it is recog- 
nized as the leading and most active chapter of Delta Theta Phi in Chicago. 

The fraternity is a truly national legal association and includes within its 
chapter rolls memberships in many of the leading universities in the United 
States. There are active establishments in all parts of the country and such 
schools are included: Georgetown Law School, University of Southern Cali- 
fornia. Boston university, Yale. Fordham. Creighton university, Leland Stan- 
ford, George Washington. John Marshall Law School. University of Richmond, 
Northwestern Law School. Drake. Marquette, Ohio State. Illinois and Webster 
to mention only those in the better known schools. There are other chapters 
but space does not permit a full enumeration of the entire roll. 

With its own Fall dance as an annual event. McKenna has been the leader 
in the movement to stage an Annual Inter-Senate Formal Supper Dance. This 
year also, many of the leading students in the Loyola School of Law will be 
admitted to membership in the chapter, thus assuring the continuance of our 
aim of legal learning, fellowship, and service to the University. Our spring 
formal was very well attended and very popular. It was held on the ninth 
of May and proved to be one of the outstanding social events of the year. 

The McKenna Chapter awards to those members who qualify, the Delta 
Theta Phi scholarship Key; with this high honor assured to the leading 
students, our men have consistently finished in the vanguards of their classes. 



S&B£gi®L 



THE 193 



L O Y O L A N 



£S3»:«^ ^5r7?»:*'!ct 





SIGMA NU PHI 

Founded at Georgetown University, 1903 

Established at Loyola University, March 15, 

1924 

Colors: Purple and Gold 

OFFICERS 

Peter Fazio Chancellor 

Henry Wilhehn . . First 1 ice-Chancellor 
Raymond Kilbride . Second Vice-Chancellor 

Joseph Grady Master of Roll 

Oscar Seiben . . . Keeper of Exchequer 
Chester Lynch Marshall 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



William Belh 
Peter Fazio 



Class of 1931 

Edward Majewski 
Henry Wilhehn 



Joseph Grady 
Thomas Keane 
Raymond Kilbride 



Class of 1932 
Chester Lynch 
Joseph Mulling 
Raymond Ritterhouse 



Eugene Ryan 
Oscar Seiber 
Bruno Stanczak 



Anthony Balsamo 
William Belroy 



Class of 1933 
Joseph Guerrini 
Joseph Kuehnle 



Daniel J. Murphy 
Benjamin Spaulding 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A > 





During the year pf 1930-31 an extensive program of activities was outlined 
and put into effect by the Stephen A. Douglas Chapter of Sigma Nu Phi. a 
national legal fraternity. The first work was the pledging of Brothers Ben 
Spalding, Joseph Guerrini, Anthony Balsamo, Joseph Kuehnle. William Bel- 
roy, Bruno Stanczak. and Daniel Murphy. The Annual Founders" Day Cele- 
bration, held at the Brevoort Hotel, was the second big event, and it was at 
this gathering that the men were initiated. 

Each year Sigma Nu Phi awards to the one of its Senior members who has 
maintained the highest average in his studies for the entire time at the Law 
School a scholarship key. Last year's winner was Joseph Santucci. and this 
year the presentation will be made to Peter Fazio at graduation. The key is 
one of unusual design, and is an award that is much striven for by the mem- 
bers. 

The chapters of Sigma Nu Phi extend from coast to coast and include 
within the roll active groups at the University of Southern California, Loyola 
University of New Orleans, Northwestern Law School, Marquette. Washington 
College of Law, Georgetown Law School, and the Detroit College of Law, to 
mention only a few. In addition active alumni chapters are established at 
many of the schools. 

In April a dance was given at the Marine Dining Room of the Edgewater 
Beach Hotel. The following month Peter Fazio and Thomas Keane were the 
representatives from the Loyola Chapter at the twenty-fourth general term of 
the high court of Chancery of Sigma Nu Phi. The convention met in Detroit 
on May first, second and third. 

The chapter is very fortunate in losing only a few members through gradua- 
tion, the following being the senior members who are leaving us in June: 
William Bellamy, Henry Wilhelm, Peter Fazio, and Edward Majewski. Sigma 
Nu Phi wishes them the utmost success for their work in the legal profession, 
and feels confident that they will do their best in carrying on the tradition 
she stands for. 



^gmz^m: 



THE 



9 3 1 



L © Y O L A N 



& nZx^?*:*£.' CT^^'.O 




'Sftlr 


NU SIGMA PHI 




m 


EPSILON CHAPTER 


Tm 


National Medical Sorority 
Founded at the University of Illinois, 1891 


vc 


A/ 






Established at Loyola University 


^_ 


April 20, 1920 


?8B)tj |p 


Helen L. Button . . . Noble Grand 


fplpr- ~3 


Kathrvne R. Lavin . . . Vice-Grand 


'* S *****ca* f ^ 


Clementine Frankowski .... Scribe 




Virginia S. Tarlow .... Treasurer 


Q 


Eleanor Chambers Keeper 



FACULTY MEMBERS 
Dr. Noreen Sullivan Dr. Gertrude Engbring 

MEMBERS 

Class of 1931 
Kathrvne R. Lavin Helen L. Button Virginia S. Tarlow 

Berniee M. Izner 

Class of 1932 
Eleanor Chambers Clementine Frankowski Aida Salvati 

Marjorie Rodgers 

Class of 1933 
Ethel Chapman 



Marie Bohn 



Class of 1934 
Vita De Prima Anne Stupnicki 

Charlotte Niebrvzdowski 



fr&rJjg&S&ggS^ 



THE 1931 LOYOLA* 





The National Medical Sorority of Nu Sigma Phi was founded in 1896 at 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons, a medical school now known as the 
University of Illinois College of Medicine. Its organizers banded together 
because they recognized the need for a union of women who had so many 
common ideals, and professional and social interests. 

From its humble start of about twelve members, it has expanded until at 
present there are more than twenty chapters scattered throughout the United 
States, containing hundreds of active members. The Grand Chapter was or- 
ganized in 1913, and it has served to strengthen the bonds of friendship be- 
tween the members who are actively engaged in their profession. In that 
year, also, Drs. Julia Holmes Smith, Sophia Brumbach, Jennie Clark, and Lois 
Lindsay Wynekoop were made permanent trustees of the Sorority- 
Loyola's chapter is known as the Epsilon Chapter and it was founded in 
October 1916 from a previously disbanded chapter at the Bennett Medical 
School. Among the alumnae members to whom we point with special pride 
are: Dr. Grace Mitchell, Dr. Bertha Eide, Dr. Noreen Sullivan, and Dr. Gert- 
rude Engbring. 

The present active membership is constantly increasing as the number of 
women students grows., and includes many of the most active feminine stu- 
dents of medicine at Loyola university. These members together with many 
more in Alpha, Beta, and Pi are doing constructive work along scientific and 
social lines. The chapters named above are other Illinois groups of Nu Sigma 
Phi, Alpha being established at the University of Illinois. Beta at the L T ni- 
versity of Chicago and Pi at Northwestern university. Besides those given 
there are chapters at the Universities of Iowa, Indiana, Nebraska. Western 
Reserve, Boston. California, ^ ashington, Buffalo, Tufts, Colorado and South- 
ern California. In addition we have also an alumnae chapter at Northwestern 
university. 



931 LOYOLAN 



£, ^5rT?»:*ui -Jirr?»:»vC 






LAMBDA RHO 

Honorary Radiological Fraternity 
Established at Loyola University, 1925 

£\ OFFICERS 
»3 Joseph T. Twohey .... President 
L*W^?^N Jerome B. Marciniak . 1 ice-President 

Wr^fiZ}\ Helen I.. Button Secretary 

I^IB«^7 Edward A. Zencka .... Treasurer 




TWOHEY 


TH Charles J. Weigel Editor 



FACULTY MEMBERS 

Benjamin H. Orndorff, A.M., M.D., F.A.C.R. . . Honorary President 

Henry Schmitz, A.M., M.D., F.A.C.R. . . . Honorary Vice-President 

Irvin F. Hummon, Jr.. B.S.. M.D. 

Bertha Van Hoosen, A.M., M.D. 

Richard J. Tivnen, M.D., LL.D. 

Joseph E. Laibe, B.S., M.D. 



C. L. Armington 
A. J. Allegretti 
T. B. Carney 
N. A. Casciato 
E. F. Castaldo 
M. A. Dolan 
J. C. Dubiel 
R. Fazio 
C. B. Gawne 
G. M. Gawne 
G. M. Gura 



SENIOR MEMBERS 
A. A. Huba 
T. F. Kallal 
J. H. Keehan 
G. E. Kenny 
C. D. Klaus 
G. J. Kohne 
H. W. Kramps 
K. R. Lavin 
R. H. Lawler 
G. J. Leibold 
R. L. Lindsay 



L. F. Mammoser 
P. J. McGuire 
G. E. Obester 
J. E. Petcoff 
S. F. Radzyminski 
E. F. Spangler 
V. S. Tarlow 
H. J. Tompkins 
J. H. Whaley 
P. A. Wertman 
J. Zielinski 
L. E. Zuley 



R. L. Abraham 
P. M. Corboy 
P. H. Engle 
C. E. Frankowski 
M. E. Hydock 



JUNIOR MEMBERS 
E. D. James 

D. J. Keating 

E. F. Ley 

J. P. Markey 
W. J. McCarthy 



A. A. Mosczenski 
E. A. Piszczek 
G. F. Rau 
S. D. Solomon 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 



lM,£§Si 



9mML 



r 1 1 f t 
t it r 










PISOZEK. ZENKA. tlKI, TOMPKINS. WHU.F.Y. FAZIO. MAHCINIIK. ARMINGTON, LKAHY, FOX 

RADZYMINSKI, DUBIEL, ABRAHAM, MOSZYZENSKI, LINDSAY, WERTMAN, OBESTER, MAMMOSER, 

RAU, ALLECRETTI 

SOLOMON, CORBOY, ZL'LEY, TWOHEY, MCNAMARA, KALLAL, WEICEL, FRANKOWSKI, LEIBOLD 



The Lambda Rho Honorary Radiological Society was organized in 1925 at 
Loyola University School of Medicine to provide means whereby the thera- 
peutic and diagnostic application of radiology may be presented to the students 
by men who are authorities in this branch of medicine, and to permit greater 
amplification of this subject than was possible in the regular curriculum. 

The original sponsors of the society were Dr. Orndorff and Dr. Henry 
Schmitz who, with the support of the dean and regent, also aided in the man- 
agement. Meetings were conducted once a month at the downtown school. 

The annual dinner dance of the society was held on May 7th in the Marine 
Dining Room of the Edgewater Beach Hotel, the radiologists and future doc- 
tors dancing to the music of Phil Spitalny. The party was arranged by Dr. 
Richard H. Lawler. who has had immeasurable success in all his endeavors as 
Senior Class President and chairman of the Senior Ball committee. Among 
the distinguished guests of the evening were Doctors Hummon, Schmitz, Orn- 
doff, and Brains. Following the dinner diplomas were presented to the gradu- 
ating seniors by Dr. I, F. Hummon, Jr. Another feature of the evening was 
the installation of officers for the coming year. 

An explanation might be added here to show the importance of the hon- 
orary fraternity in benefiting the future doctors. Radiology is an important 
study owing to the fact that its knowledge is applied in fighting the effects 
and the disease of cancer, and in making X-Rays of any part of the human 
body. It is then a science and a study of the active rays of a nature similar 
to those emitted from radium and the substances of like nature, including X.- 
Ray and Cathode ray tubes. Scientists are at present experimenting with rays 
of this nature in an attempt to find an effective death-dealing weapon that will 
wipe out human life at some distance. 



THE 



9 3 1 



LOYOLA*' 





BLUE KEY 

National Honorary Fraternity 

Founded at University of Florida, October, 1924 

Established at Loyola University, February, 1926 



J. O CONNOR 

James C. O'Connor 
James X. Bremner 
Walter Buchmann 
Charles LaFond . 



President 

J ice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



MM 



I 



John Bruun 
Robert Healv 
Douglas McCabe 
Robert Murphy 
Robert Rafferty 



John Coffey 
Thomas Cole, Jr. 
David Kerwin 



MEMBERS 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Anthony Tomczak 
James Brennan 
Francis Calkins 
Thomas Downey 
Thomas Poynton 

Commerce School 
Charles LaFond 
0. Mc Govern 



Roger Knittel 
John Lenihan 
James Rafferty 
Joseph Walsh 
Louis Tordella 



Robert McGurn 
Joseph Osten 
James Scott 



Walter Buchmann 
Albert Dahlberg 
Charles Gruner 



C. Armington 
James Bremner 
Andrew Buffer 
Paul Engel 
Clement Fox 
Stephen Gallagher 
Francis Hetreed 



Frank Arado 
Charles Boyle 
Thomas Byrne 
Thomas Carey 
Cornelius Collins 
Timothy Connelly 



Dental School 
Arthur Hewitt 
Wallace A. Kirby , 
George Lemire 
Ray Olech 

School of Medicine 
Thomas Hickey 
Charles Hughes 
Cyril Klaus 
Richard Lawler 
Paul Leahy 
Ronald Lindsay 
Joseph Markey 

School of Law 
Peter Fazio 
Edward Glasser 
Joseph Grady 
John Kavanaugh 
Ambrose Kelly 



Harold Salzman 
Harry Walsh 
Maurice Woodlock 



William McCarthy 
Frank Reed 
George Rowe 
Charles Serbst 
Joseph Twohey 
Charles Weigel 
John Whaley 



William Linklater 
Neil McAuliffe 
Thomas Nash 
James O'Connor • 
Paul Plunkett 
John Waldron 



THE 193 



L O Y O 1 A > 





KNITTEL, KELLY. Pl.lNKETT. KLAUS, AKADO. CRADY, KAVANAUCH, COLLINS 

SALZMAN, CLASSER. LENIHAN, DAHLBERG, WALDRON. BRUUIN, R. RAFFERTY 
BUCHMANN, J. O'CONNOR, CONLEY, FITZGERALD, BOULCER, LODESKI, LA FOND 

In 1924 Blue Key Honorary Fraternity was founded at the University of 
Florida, and since that time it has expanded until at present there are fifty- 
two chapters in thirty-eight states. Loyola's chapter was admitted in 1926 as 
the nineteenth and immediately assumed a prominent position in the life of 
the University. Its aim has never been to control activities, but rather, to 
offer suggestions and support aimed to bolster up failing organizations. 

It was with this ideal in mind that Blue Key established the Loyola Union 
to supplant the Inter-Departmental Council and then turned it over to duly 
elected representatives to run as they saw fit. The fraternity founded Hello 
Week and Freshman Welcome Day on the Arts campus and then commissioned 
them to the care of the Student Council; and it promoted the first all-univer- 
sity Home-coming Dance and then allowed it be taken over by the "L" men. 

One of the biggest features of Blue Key's activity has been the aid rendered 
the Athletic Department. Ushering at the football games was directly under 
their supervision, and for the seventh year they have been in charge of the 
reception and the ushering at the National Catholic Basketball Tournament. 
Mention might also be made of the work done this year in creating favor and 
support for the newly organized band. 

It was through work of this nature carried on under the able regime of 
James C. O'Connor that the fraternity fulfilled its dual purpose of aiding those 
activities which are on an insecure foundation and honoring those men with 
membership who have contributed most to betterment of Loyola through their 
service. The stringency of the requirements in the form of a faculty consulta- 
tion and a definite scholarship average of at least 1.5 have done much to pre- 
vent the admission of those unworthy of the honor. 

Blue Key is not a secret organization and because of this the unusual signifi- 
cance of its key can be explained. The golden eagle symbolizes the member's 
devotion to his country; the cross signifies the applicant's religion as expressed 
in the high moral standing listed as a requirement for membership: the laurel 
wreath is for the member's personal achievement and the star is to distinguish 
the individual college. This symbolism is said to be one of the most significant 
of any key used by an honorary organization since it distinguishes its wearers 
as men who have been active not only in the lines of scholarship, but also in 
loyalty to and activity for the school. 



THE 



9 3 1 



L O Y O L A N 





VAN DRIEL 



ALPHA KAPPA DELTA 

National Honor Sociological Society 

Loyola Chapter, Beta of Illinois 

Established 1928 

OFFICERS 

1930-1931 

Agnes Van Driel, A.M President 

Rev. Austin G. Schmidt, S.J. . . . Vice-President 

Helen M. Ganey, A.M Secretary 

Lucille Behin, Ph.B Treasurer 



MEMBERS 



Frederic Siedenburg. S.J. 

Austin G. Schmidt, S.J. 

James F. Walsh. S.J. 

Agnes Van Driel, A.M. 

Francis J. Gerty, B.S.. M.D. 

J. William Davis. B.S., M.D. 

Howard Egan, Ph.D. . Dean 

Marguerite McManemin 

Ravenna Van Houten. B.S. 

Cecile Egan. A.M. 

Lucille Behm. Ph.B. 

Paul Martin. A.M. 

Helen OToole, A.B. 

Clare Fain, Ph.B. 

Teresa Finley, Ph.B. 

Jean Vincent, Ph.B. 

Helen M. Ganey, A.M. 

Ruth McGee, A.B. 

Margaret Shelley, A.B. Case W 

Gwendolyn Walls, A.B. 

Marguerite Windhauser, Ph.B. 

Paul Kinierv. Ph.D. 



Dean of School of Sociology 

Dean of Graduate School 

Dean of Men, Loyola Dountoicn College 

Secretary of Doivntown College 

Superintendent of Psychopathic Hospital 

Instructor, Loyola School of Medicine 

of College of Liberal Arts. De Paul University 

. Social Worker, Madonna Center 

Social W orker, Children's Memorial Hospital 

. Instructor in Child W elfare 

United Charities 

Instructor in Economics 

Graduate Student in Social JT ork 

Graduate of School of Sociology 

Social W orker. Cook County Hospital 

Graduate of School of Sociology 

Dean of W omen, Doivntoun College 

. Graduate of School of Sociology 

orker, Cook County Bureau of Public W elfare 

Graduate Student in Social JT ork 

. Deputy Clerk, Municipal Court of Chicago 

Professor, Doivntoun College 






THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 





Loyola Chapter. Beta of Illinois, was invited to membership in Alpha Kappa 
Delta, National Honor Society in Sociology, anil was elected to membership 
February 7, 1928. Loyola Chapter was organized under the inspiration and 
leadership of Rev. Frederic Siedenburg, S.J., founder and Dean of the School 
of Sociology. Kimball Young, National Secretary of Alpha Kappa Delta, 
installed Loyola Chapter and initiated the fourteen charter members. 

Individual membership is open to juniors, seniors, graduate students, 
alumni, and faculty members who are majoring in sociology, social work or 
any other social sciences. The prospective member must possess personality, 
a high scholastic record, and have promise of accomplishments through lead- 
ership. 

Stimulating interest in the development of the science of Sociology, its 
Problems, and its application to society is the primary purpose of Alpha 
Kappa Delta. Unbiased social research is the objective of this honor society, 
whose members aim to become investigators of social phenomena, and to 
interpret their findings in significant relationships pertaining to the develop- 
ment of society. 

Lecturers of note in the field of Sociology and Social Welfare have appeared 
as guest speakers at meetings of Loyola Chapter; stimulating round table dis- 
cussions on current sociological problems, and many thoughtful book-reviews 
have been presented. 

Members of the Chapter have contributed worth-while studies in special 
phases of social research. At present the entire membership of Loyola 
Chapter is engaged in a cooperative social research project on The Leisure 
Time Activities of Students in the College of Arts and School of Sociology 
of the Downtown College. The study will be amplified by a Symposium to 
which certain members will contribute their thinking and their analysis of 
the findings from the studv of leisure. 



THE 



9 3 1 



L O Y O L A N 





THE DR. E. L. MOORHEAD SURGICAL SEMINAR 

Honorary Medical Fraternity 

Established at Loyola University, 1931 

OFFICERS 

Dr. L. D. Moorhead Honorary President 

Ronald J. Lindsay President 

Harris R. Wilson Vice-President 

Thomas F. Ahearn Secretary 

Cvril D. Klaus Treasurer 



MEMBERS IN UNIVERSITY 



Thomas F. Ahearn 
Charles Armington 
James I. Collins 
Martin Dolan 
Joseph Farbrick 
Roeco J. Fazio 
Charles B. Gawne 
William J. Kelly 



SENIOR MEMBERS 

Class of 1931 

George Kenny 
Cyril D. Klaus 
Gerald Kohne 
Richard H. Lawler 
Gerald Leahy 
George J. Liebold, J 
Ronald J. Lindsay- 
Philip McGuire 
Wayne McSweeney 



Michael Murphy 
John Petcoff 
Edward Sachs 
Virginia Tarlow 
Joseph T. Twohey 
Charles J. Weigel 
John H. Whaley 
Harris R. Wilson 



Neil Doherty 
Walter Elnen 
Paul H. Engle 
Monroe Garrison 
A. Cosmas Garvey 



Class of 1932 
Thomas P. Hickey 
Elmer D. James 
Joseph P. Markey 
William McCarthy 
John A. McNamara 
George J. Rau 



Charles A. Serbst 
J. N. Smyth 
Harold Trapp 
James J. Walsh 
Camillo Valini 



THE 



19 3 



L O Y O L A X 





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KELLY. TWOHEV. KENNY, ARMINT.TON, GAWNE, GARVEY, MARKEY, TKAPP, MCCARTHY, JAMES, ELNEN 
RAU, SACHS, MC CUIRE, DOUGHERTY, DOLAN, LEAHY, HICKEY. VOLINI, ENCLE, FAZIO 
FARBRICK, KOHNE. PETCOFF. MURPHY. LEIBOLD, WEICLE, WALSH, GARRISON, SMYTH, MC NAMARA 
COLLINS, AHEARN. WILSON, DR. L. D. MOORHEAD, LINDSAY. KLAUS. TARLOW, LAWLER, MC SWEENEY 



Tlie E. L. Moorhead Surgical Seminar is named in honor of a man whose 
permanent interest lay in the school of medicine — the late Dr. E. L. Moorhead. 
It was established this year at the West Side school and has proven to be a most 
active and progressive society. 

The program of the seminar includes the reading of papers on surgical diag- 
nosis and technique, together with instructive lectures and demonstrations by 
men prominent in the work of their particular field. In this manner the mem- 
bers not only advance in their knowledge of the various phases of surgery, but 
also are trained in the public presentation of surgical papers on various medical 
subjects. 

Meetings are held monthly, the final meeting in May being open to all med- 
ical students. At this meeting lectures and demonstrations in specialized fields 
of surgery were given. It is expected that the training derived from the pres- 
entation of these papers will prove to be of inestimable value to the coming 
physicians and surgeons since it will aid them in the orderly arrangement of 
the matter they will find in the diagnosis and treatment of illness. 

The average required for initiation is well above that of the ordinary 
medical student and the members represent the pick of the medics. It is 
required that the new members have an average of over 85 %, and meet not 
only the requirements in their grades, but also in definite points of character 
and personality. It is on these three points that the prospective members are 
chosen from the senior and junior students of the Medical School. The Sem- 
inar is still in its infancy, but its rapid growth and large membership gives 
promise of great worth and service not only to its members, but to the pro- 
fession as well. 



THE 1931 LOYOLAN 




r> rv r» r% 






W 



II.BKKi;, CALKINS. 1JOUNI1. POYNTON, SPE 
4LSH, LENIHAN, STEINBRECHER, LUDVVIG 
>J, R. RAFFERTY, ZABEL. BRUUN, TOMCZAK 




R. RAFFERTV 




BETA PI 

Honorary Publications Fraternity 
Established at Lovola University, 1926 



OFFICERS 



Robert J. Rafferty 
Anthony C. Tomczak 
Thomas M. Povnton 



President 

1 ice-President 

Treasurer 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

Morton D. Zabel Richard O'Connor William H. Conley 

William P. Schoen Harold A. Hillenbrand 

Class of 1931 

James X. Bremner Robert J. Rafferty Thomas L. Spelman 

John K. Bruun Paul A. Reed Anthony C. Tomczak 

Class of 1932 
Thomas J. Byrne Ambrose B. Kelly Thomas M. Poynton 
Francis Quinn Daniel J. Murphy James C. O'Connor 

Eligible 
Francis Calkins John Franey 

John Callahan Roger Knittel 

Albert Dahlberg Jack Lannon 

Thomas Downey John Lenihan 

John Farrell Fred Ludwig 

Thomas O'Neill 
Membership is limited to those who have excelled in the 
editorial or literary aspects of the publications rather than 
those who have dealt with the mechanical work. Inasmuch 
as it is necessary for a man to be recommended twice, that is. 
at the end of two different years, before he may receive a 
key, only those who have reached the end of their sophomore 
vear mav become members. 



James Rafferty 
Clifford Steinle 
Francis Steinbreche 
Louis Tordella 
Joseph Walsh 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A 3f 





PI GAMMA MU 
National Social Science Honor Society 
Founded at Southwestern College, Winfield. Kansas in 
Established at Loyola University in Fall of 1929 

OFFICERS 

Sylvester M. Frizol President 

Anthony Tomczak Secretary 

MEMBERS IN FACULTY 



William H. Conley. B.C.S. 
Aloysius Hodapp, M.A. 
John Hudson. M.S. 



Bertram Steggert, M.A. 
Charles Schrader, S. J. 
Peter S. Swanish, Ph.D. 



I)..! 



MEMBERS 
Class of 1931 
lias McCabe 

Class of 1932 
Bernard Gibbons 
Edward Hines 



Anthonv Tomczak 



Roger Knittel 




Pi Gamma Mu had in 1929 one hundred and one chapters in colleges 
throughout the United States and a few of her possessions. Since that time 
chapters have been established in several of the European countries, thus 
making the society truly international. It is a non-profit-seeking organization 
and has no secret ritual or features of any kind : the three Greek letters are 
merely the first letters of the Greek words meaning "Students of Social Sci- 
ence." Many of the most distinguished social and economic authorities in the 
country are members of this fraternity, its membership rolls including names 
of famous men from every section of the United States. The older members 
act as national officers, and they give to the society a certain maturity of 
thought and depth of judgment that would be lacking if the membership 
were confined solely to undergraduates. 



5SSB3^®1 THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A X 





m 



HAMMOND. SPELMAN, BRUIN 
HOCAN, GILL, CONNELLY, BARKER 

GAMMA ZETA DELTA 

Honorary Dramatic Fraternity 

Founded in May. 1930 

OFFICERS 

Ted J. Connelly President 

John K. Bruun Vice-President 

Virginia Barker Secretary 

FACULTY 

Charles S. Costello 

MEMBERS 

Class of 1931 

John K. Bruun Coletta Hogan Thomas L. Spelman 

Class of 1932 

James Hammond 

Alumni 

Virginia Barker Ted J. Connelly Jerome Kozlowski 

Virginia M. Gill 

Gamma Zeta Delta, the all-university honorary dramatic fraternity, was or- 
ganized in May of 1930 by a group of students under the guidance of Mr. 
Charles S. Costello. The membership was limited to those who had distin- 
guished themselves in Sock and Buskin Club activities of the two previous 
years. The members have pledged themselves to work in the cause of better 
drama. 

Meetings are held regularly throughout the year and the alumni members 
take an active part in the proceedings. New members are selected from the 
outstanding members of the Sock and Buskin Club, Gamma Zeta Delta prov- 
ing an added incentive to those who participate in dramatic activities. 



fc&ggggaB^asi the 



9 3 



LOYOLA* 





PHI ALPHA RHO 
Honorary Debating Fraternity 
Founded in December, 1930 



OFFICERS 

Robert J. Murphy President 

Joseph A. Walsh .... Vice-President 
James F. Rafferty . . Secretary-Treasurer 



John 



Thomas Downey 
Charles Mann 



Class of 1931 

Class of 1932 
Robert McCabe 
James Raffertv 



Class of 1933 



Charles Mallon 



Robert Murphy 

William Vita 
Joseph Walsh 

Louis Tordella 



a 



Phi Alpha Rho, the honorary forensic fraternity, was established at Loyola 
in December. 1930, "to reward those who have achieved proficiency in debate 
and oratory, and to honor those who at the same time have merited scholas- 
tic distinction." At present, eleven men, including the coach, comprise the 
total active membership. Because of the high entrance requirements of a 
scholastic and forensic nature, admittance to this fraternity not only confers 
on the members a much coveted honor, but acts as an incentive to members 
of the debating society to strive for forensic achievement without impairing 
their scholastic standing. 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 




FRATERNITIES 




To the non-fraternity man the fraternity is 
a group organized usually for the political gain 
of its members. To the rushee the fraternity 
man is one who claps him on the hack and at 
the same time attempts to have a confidential 
chat with him. The fraternity men. to the 
pledge, are those who swat him in a lower part 
of his anatomy and are inclined to yell auto- 
cratically for service. To the fraternity man 
his fraternity brothers are those with whom he 
is bound by the closest of ties and the memory 
of whose friendships lingers long after collegi- 
ate days. 

At Loyola, as in most universities, the fra- 
ternity men are in the minority while at the 
same time they direct the greater part of the 
campus activities. 





O bis feature Section, pou map tbink, is not cractlj? in keeping 

tiiitf) tftc tbeme of tbe book. 

Jn tbzs eigbtb part, botoeoet, toe feature but the knigbt's features. 

Cbese, pou toill aomit, are sometobat nondescript. 



AUTOGRAPHS 



THE 



9 3 1 



L © Y © L A N 



L Y L E R 



^sssa 



Its sad aic *t pooi> K«ter> 
H-a a*rr.-d th.rtu Lu<-: 
Pnd rated *fi" ,„ i<). 
Ha rests w,,d Heaven's borers- 




We tried to make 



Who gangly drantf hiefWI 

Ofwy pura proof R/coho/. 
tu»s a <uood distill. 



Ifc.nKofbw 
fi fooUa/l pla 
He'd -si.il U^ 

"B^t he arque<j 





J«t jaie upon ftlomo . 

Ae*thet« J He i« not- 

He tried to pwessks 

onl<j pants- 
'/he. ir«h iioi too (lot 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y 



LAN 



THE ANNEX 



h %m 




MUNDLEIN DEBATE JUD(;E CONSIDERING HIS IMPARTIAL DECISION 

W 'as this the big time ichich Couch Konley had promised him? Like the hammer on a 
xylophone the danger slid up and down his spinal column. He wanted to speuk but he felt 
that they would not understand him. Why had he gotten himself into such a mess? To 
preserve his honor he must speak the truth: he could not violate his conviction on the 
question. Mustering up his courage and fearing the worst he whispered faintly. "No spik 
English." 





KLYPSEDRUM 

KIpysedrum was ejected from the home 
economics department at Mundlein. Re- 
fusal to chip in for the class bribe was the 



HANK, THE BIRD MAN 

most probable explanation advanced. Our 
camera man snapped him as they both hit 
the asphalt on Sheridan Road. 



g&^as^ec: 



THE 1 »31 LOYOLA* 




ANTHEM 



Here's to old Loyoler, 
And the dear old red and yeller. 
For you we'll always holler. 
Each loyal dame and feller! 



Here's to our School of Shorthand. 
And our Collitch of Dentistry! 




Both Criminal and Equity! 



Studes in Collitch! 




Here's to our men in jail 



H„ll Old Eovoler Hail! 



THE 19 31 LOYOLA K 



&?5ttX&^2* 



GRADUATES 




There they go in cap and gown, 
Gif dan vunce de up and down- 



First of all comes Archie Smeer, 
Post grad course in Itiger beer. 



Look who's coming! Henry Bu 
Highest rank in flunks and cuts. 



"Lookit Pa, an uthuleet!" 
"Shoddup. Ike. it's just his fe 



Hold your purse— he 
He sold the stadium 



Macintosh, 
, frosh. 



Treading on his heels is Binks, 
A devil with the gals, (he thinks). 



The co-eds — my don't they look dea 
That's because you're not up near. 



The honor n 
But who tht 



re here somewhere- 
> ii-f do not care. 



Come on home it looks like r 
We'll see it all next year agai 






m \ rfj&k *.'* 4#t 



THE 19 31 LOYOLAN 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 

The appearance of The 1931 Loyolan marks the conclusion of a project 
begun some nine months ago and brings to an end the labors of a large group 
of students, faculty members and business men. 

The editor believes that rarely, if ever before, has The Loyolan had the 
fortune of dealing with such a courteous and efficient group of business men. 
Not only have they evinced a personal interest in the problems which con- 
fronted the staff but without exception the representatives of the Root Photo- 
graphic Studio, The Standard Engraving Company, and D. F. Keller and 
Company have gone much farther in aiding the editors than contract specifica- 
tions necessitated. 

To the peer of humorists, Mr. William Charles Griffith, whom the editor 
found most helpful in solving all difficulties from layout to heart problems, 
we are indebted for his fine contributions to Loyola local color. To Mr. Mor- 
ton D. Zabel. the faculty moderator, we feel grateful for his constant aid in 
keeping the publication within the lines of propriety and at the same time 
allowing the staff to show the initiative which has characterized Loyola an- 
nuals from the outset. — R. J. R. 



THE 1931 LOYOLAN 



OUR 

ADVERTISERS 

DESERVE YOUR 

PATRONAGE 



TOE 1931 L O Y O L A > 



MOUNT MARY 
COLLEGE 

Conducted by School Sisters of 
Notre Dame 



Mount Mary College is a fully 
accredited college for women 
giving the complete four year 
course leading to the degrees. 

A member of the North Central 
Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools. 



For particulars, address THE REGISTRAR 

MOUNT MARY COLLEGE 



MILWAUKEE 



WISCONSIN 



EAT, SLEEP AND 
ENJOY LIFE 

ULCICUR 

For Stomach and Duodenal 

Ulcers and other Stubborn 

Stomach Troubles 

Send today for FREE booklet, 

'"The Truth about Stomach 

Ulcers." 

THE ULCICUR CO., 

Inc. 

2642 S. Michigan Ave., 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



TELEPHONES 




Dependable Service 
Quality Coal 
Satisfied Customers 



S 



JOHN«J. 



NORTH SIDE YARD 



COALCO. 



CHICAGO. MILWAUKEEiST. PAUL RAILWAY 



SOUTH SIDE YARD 
5IOO FEDERAL STREET 
V YORK CENTRAL RAILROAD 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 




CmCAGOAN 



NO, NEVER DULL 

WICKED? 

If you believe the foreign newspapers, Chicago is all of that. 

WASTREL? 

If you credit the essay magazines, there's no doubt of it. 

WANTON? 

If you accept the mushroom novelists, no city was ever more so. 

BUT NEVER DULL - 
Willfully or not, newspaper, magazine and novel join in happy 
indictment of Chicago as the liveliest spot on this lively old globe. 
Flicking the thin ash of calumny from its sleeve, the Town twitches 
its cravat and goes its gay, swift way ... a great Town to live in, 
a grand Town to read about in a magazine dedicated very strictly 
and by no means solemnly to this highly engaging subject. 



By subscription $3.00 a year 
Single copies 15c 



nk 



CI4ICAGOAN 



407 So. Dearborn Street 
CHICAGO. ILLINOIS 



THE 



9 3 1 



L O Y O L A N 



9. x 37?!»:^ 3c*?»*J 



LAW BOOKS 


We Oiler Experience, Reputation, Responsi- 
bility OF 60 YEARS Good Service Continu- 




ously in Chicago. 


Everything In Law Books 






GEO. E. MOORE, Pres. 


for 


JAS. E. O'NEILL. Secy. 


Lawyers and Students 


Telephones Franklin 0822-7259 


New and Second-hand 


Established 1867 . . . Incorporated 1903 




H. R. SHAFFER 


iwraS^Ji 


COMPANY 


We specialize in students' text 




and ease books. We buy and sell 


Roofing and Waterproofing 


for cash, and trade for books in use. 


Contractors 


DISPOSE of your books while they 




have value. Students' books are of 


Yard and Warehouse 


no value in PRACTICE. We have 


1737-43 MATTHEW STREET 


a large stock of second-hand books 




on hand at all times. 


Office 




228 NORTH LA SALLE STREET 


Any book you may need in prac- 
tice can be secured from us at low- 


CHICAGO 


est prices, including state reports, 
statutes. Ruling Case Law, Cyc and 






Corpus Juris, and American and 
English Encyclopedia of Law, En- 


ROSEMONT 


cyclopedia of Pleading and Practice. 




Encyclopedia of Forms, etc., etc. 


COLLEGE 


Latest catalog of law books can 


ROSEMONT, PA. 


be had on request. 




It pays to buy second-hand books. 


Conducted by the Religious of the 


as new books are second-hand the 


Society of the Holy Child Jesus 


moment you secure them and de- 




preciate in value to the extent of 


A COLLEGE FOR 


50', c or more. 


CATHOLIC WOMEN 




Incorporated under the laws 


IM^jCiVM 


of the Slate of Pennsylvania 




with power to confer degrees 




in Arts. Science and letters. 


ILLINOIS BOOK EXCHANGE 


For Resident and Non-resi- 


.1. P. GIESE, Prop. 


dent Students. 


337 W. Madison Street 


Situated eleven miles from 
Philadelphia on the main line 


Third Floor — Hunter Building 


of the Pennsylvania R. R. 


Opposite Hearst Building 






TELEPHONE RRYN MAUR 14 


Phone Franklin 1059 


Address Secretary 



THE 



9 3 



L © Y O L A > 



ADAM J. LANG 
WILLIAM T. WEISE 
DAVID L. CELLA 



Telephone Randolph 2571 
All Departments 



Sggsss 

SSaged 



LANG, WEISE & CELLA 

REAL ESTATE, BUjILDING 
MANAGEMENT & INSURANCE 

308 West Washington Street 
C H I C A G O 



MANAGING AGENTS FOR 



Mercantile Exchange Building 
Machinery Hall Building 
Moxley Building 
Williamson Building 
Lanquist Building 
Kiper Building 
Worcester Building 
Dceankay Building 
Wurlitzer Building 
Skoglund Building 
Mcintosh Building 
Katzinger Building 
American Optical Building 



American Hardware Co. Bldg. 
M. McCarthy Building 
Freeman & Miller Building 
Wright & Lawrence Building 
Enterprise Building 
Orleans-Huron Building 
Ahlborn Building 
Loyola University Properties 
Edgar A. Buzzell Properties 
C. P. Whitney Properties 
Sturtevant Estate Properties 
Estate of William R. Linn 
Estate of Stamford White 



THE 



19 3 1 



L O Y © L A N 





CoUars, #!) F. RUSSO 








etc. 5 ' \I DRESS 


JOHN SEXTON & 


Wfiter, SUIT 




M'lBA rental 


COMPANY 


jj^ > >4P*5w Rental of 




/// K^^SSlr Tuxedo and 




Hf 


Al Hi Dress Suits 


i^ 




H for 


MANUFACTURING 


f 

Ik 


^W! Weddings, 
^^nB|] Fraternity 


WHOLESALE GROCERS 


^■t^Hf a Hairs, etc. 
IB \.-« Model 


T*j 




IHf«= 475 ° 




1 


H IE - Sheridan lid 


CHICAGO 


I H IS — M"<>ni221 
>/ IB/llM. Longbeach 8046 




South Side Brancli 


Established 1883 


1008 S. Halsted St. 




Monroe 3310 


(0127 


Telephones Randolphs 0128 


(0129 


VALENTINE'S 


SPECIAL ASSESSMENT DEFENSE 


BUREAU 


NOT INC. 


Suite 1617-1620 City Hall Square Building 


139 North Clark Street 


CHICAGO 






9 3 



L O Y © L A N 



Engraving Mairvtaiiv 
All i\u? P<?aU-tx and; 
Artistic Qvtali*>- 

n ' _ : A _ J ... \ i _ J 



. i. d v q r i i s 1 i - - ... 




THE 1931 LOYOLAX 



ROSARY COLLEGE 

RIVER FOREST ILLINOIS 

A Standard Catholic College for 

1 \ omen 

Full recognition by: 

The Association of American Universities 
The American Association of University 

Women 

The Catholic University 
The North Central Association of Colleges 
The Association of American Colleges 
The University of Illinois with rating in 

Class A 

The Board of Education of Chicago for 

promotional credit 

< l.mlVrs decrees .,1 Kacliclor of Ails. Ba< helm <>l Science 
in Music, Music Education, and Library Science. 
Courses in Speech. Art, ami Home Economics. 

of thirty-three acres; well-equipped Gym- 

lum and IVilalorium; interesting campus life. 

tior year may be spent in French Switzerland. 

nilii.'lril li\ llic SiMri . i>l S.iinl Itonniiii ol Sin-ilia 

Wisconsin. 

ADDRESS THE SECRETARY 



PROVIDENCE 
HIGH SCHOOL 

Central Park Av. and Monroe St. 
COURSES 

Normal and College Preparatory 
General and Commercial 
Household Art and Science 

CONSERVATORY of MUSIC 



PIANO 
VOCAL 


HARP 
VIOLIN 


Accredited by State of Illinois, 
University of Illinois. North 
Central Association of Colleges 



MATH. RAUEN COMPANY 

General Contraetors 

326 W. MADISON STREET 

CHICAGO 



«*iS<k«*rs&j 



THE 



9 3 



L © Y © L A N 




COAL COMPANY 

CHICAGO 



Producers and Shippers of 
Quality Coals Since 1883 



44 MINES 
Daily Capacity 100,000 Tons 



CINCINNATI 
SPRINGFIELD 
ST. LOUIS 



Sales Offices 
OMAHA 



NEW YORK 



KANSAS CITY 
MINNEAPOLIS 
DAYENPORT 



jggflgg^®! THE 1931 L O Y O L A X 



[&S^§&S3!®5 



WITH 

THE COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

M. P. 




PORSTELAIN CHICAGO 
COMPANY 

VINCENT J. SHERIDAN, Mgr. 

Cook County Distributor 

PORSTELAIN 

System of Standard Wall Tiling 



4809 W. HARRISON ST. 



Austin 1776 




Scientific Treatmenl 
Modern Method Massage 
Specializing in Body Beauty 

ANNA R. PETERSON 

Manager 

Post-Graduate, Washington School of Naturopathy 

Washington, D. C. 




COLLEGE OF 
ST. FRANCIS 

JOLIET, ILLINOIS 

A Catholic Liberal Arts College 
for Young Women 

Incorporated under the laws of the 
State of Illinois and invested with full 
power to confer collegiate degrees. 

Formerly known as 

Assisi Junior College 

Accredited to the University of 

Illinois with rating in class "A" and 

recognized by the State Department 

of Education, Springfield. Illinois. 

A Resident and Day School 

Conducted by 
The Sisters of St. Francis of Mary Immaculate 



Telephone 101 1 



Address: The Registrar 
303 Taylor Street 



THE 



© 3 



L O Y © L A IV 



l^pt 



Each copy a specimen 

The last copy of a book, or folder or other 
printed literature from the presses of D F 
Keller & Company is just as good as the first. 
Every one is a specimen. 

And you will find that each specimen is as 
fine as the proof from the engraver .... for 
that is the way we print. 

In addition to printing we create advertising 
literature, have a staff of artists and designers 
and write copy. 

If you seek excellence in all phases of the 
graphic arts, we would like to talk with you. 

D F KELLER & COMPANY 



732 SHERMAN STREET 



CHICAGO ILLINOIS 



CREATORS AND PRODUCERS OF DISTINCTIVE LITERATURE 



THE 1931 



L O Y O L A N 



PHYSICIANS 
PROTECTIVE 
CASUALTY 
COMPANY 

Non-Cancellable 

Income Insurance 

For Everyone 

HOME OFFICE 

Bankers Bldg., 105 W. Adams St. 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

Cen. 0777 
YOUR INQUIRIES ARE INVITED 



V. MUELLER & CO. 

H Surgeons Instruments 

H Hospital and Office Furniture 



PHONE WEST 4023 
ALL DEPARTMENTS 



Ogden Ave., Van Buren 
and Honore Sts. 

CHICAGO 



Sixty Years In Business 

with thousands of satisfied customers on our books. Let us 
help you to solve your insurance problems whether they be 
Fire, Plate Glass, Automobile, Liability, Compensation, Steam 
Boiler Accident or any other form of insurance. We will give 
you the benefit of an experience acquired over many years 
devoted to the problems of insurance. A telephone call, 
letter or post card will bring our service to you. 



JOHN NAGHTEN & CO. 

(Established 1863) 

INSURANCE 

175 West Jackson Boulevard 
CHICAGO 

Telephone Wabash 1120 






19 3 



L O Y O L A IV 



PETER J. ANGSTEN 


ANDERSON 


THOMAS J. FARRELL 


& 


ANGSTEN, 


BROTHERS 


FARRELL & CO. 


Rogers Peet Clotliing 


h 


Furnishings — Hats and Shoes 


INSURANCE 


Clerical Clothing 


•a 




11 So. LaSalle Street 
Central 516-2-5163 


Michigan Blvd. at Washington 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

Phone Randolph 148? 


JOHN A. McGARRY H. FOWLER 


John A. McGarry & Co. 


Paving Contractors 


SUITE 1303 


189 W. Madison Street 


CHICAGO 


TELEPHONE RANDOLPH 4908 



THE 1931 LOYOLA IV 



£ ^5^?»;«£i ^5r7?f>'..< 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



METROPOLITAN 



MOTOR 



COACH 



COMPANY 



Mclaughlin 
funeral home 



1662 Broadway 



Telephone 
LONGBEACH 2918 



john Mclaughlin 




HALSEY, STUART &, CO, 



Chicago 201 South La Salle SI. 
iiladelphia 111 Soulh Fifteenth St. 

Cleveland 925 Euclid Ace. pi 

nneapolis 109 Soulh Seventh SI. 
oston 10 Post Office Square Mil* 



.ew YORK 35 Wall SI. 
Detroit 601 Griswold St. 
sburgh 307 Fifth Ave. 
-. LOUIS 319 N. Fourth SI. 
jkee 735 North Water St. 



THE 1931 LOYOLAN 



} ou re always Welcome at 

HOTEL 
KNICKERBOCKER 

Headquarters for 

Dinners — Dances — Banquets 

Luncheons — Teas 

Unusual Facilities in the 
Oriental Room — Silver Club 
Towne Club — Garden Room 

For Information Telephone Sup. 4~264 
.(. 1. McDonell, Manager 

HOTEL KNICKERROCKER 
163 E. Walton Place 



Office Furniture, Fireproof Safes 

KENDRICK 
FURNITURE CO. 

Complete Office Outfitters 



Largest Stock of All kinds of Used Office 
Furniture in City 

We Also Rent and Buy 



Display Rooms 

221-223 W. Randolph Street 

CHICAGO 




Telephone Regent 4900 

GATEWAY 

OJMTI 

COMPANY 

1661 East 79th Street 
CHICAGO 

Investment Bonds and Mortgages 




THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A X 



JOHN SHERRIFFS 

Grocer 

Choice Fruits & Vegetables 

1321 Loyola Ave. 

phone I^Qft FREE 

BRIARGATE 'lOOO DELIVERY 




Sisters of Charity, B. V.M. 

ST. MARYS 
HIGH SCHOOL 

1031 Cypress 

Telephone Longbeach 8960 

Wm. M. St. Clair Co. 

"The Better Kind" 
Window Shades 

Furniture 

Draperies 

4611-17 Ravenswood Avenue 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



mm> 



I Old Dutch! 
Lcieanser 




QUICKER cleaning saves you time and effort. With 
Old Dutch you simplify household cleaning tasks 
marvelously. It is a natural dirt chaser. Keep a can of 
Old Dutch handy in the bathroom, kitchen and laundry. 




■ ICTCK.I to ,he 0' d Du,ch Girl every Monday, Wednesday 

l-IO I LIN Friday morning over the Columbia Broadcasting Sys 

Tune in Station WMAQ — 7:45 a. m. 



T II 



9 3 1 



LOY O L A N 



Hospital of 
St. Anthony de Padua 

W. 19th St. & Marshall Boulevard 



FIRE 
INSURANCE 



TELEPHONE 

<:i:\Tii\L i35i 



M. F. RYAN 

Loans on Catholic Churches, 

Schools, Convents 

and Hospitals 

1504 Chicago Bank of Commerce Bldg. 

7 So. Dearborn St. 

CHICAGO 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

P. G. CO. 



NOVAK 
MOSAIC COMPANY 

Artistic Terrazzo 

800 North Clark Street 
CHICAGO 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

C. F. C. 



^©K^gL 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 



E. R. NEUENFELDT 

Live Frogs, Turtles, 
Frogs Legs 

625 W. Randolph Street 
Telephone Monroe 0984 



NASH BROTHERS 



10 South LaSalle 



A temple of classic I 

,4 home of acudemir rut/lire amidst the , 
fusion of modern life 

Mundelein College 

Sheridan Road at the Lake 
CHICAGO 

A standard institution for the higher education of 
women, incorporated under the laws of the State of 
Illinois with full power to grant collegiate degrees. 

Will meet the requirements of the North Central 
Association, the Catholic I 'diversity of America and 
the Association of American Colleges as to building, 
equipment, faculty and curricula. 

FACULTY 

isters of Charitv of the Blessed Virgin Man 
" corps of '" ' 
er.it". — i 



From a Friend 



E. R. M. CO. 



AT ANY TIME 

VISIT THE 

Cook County Forest Preserve District 



54,000 acres of Wooded Wonderland with Winter Sports, 

Skiing, Tobogganing, Golf, and All Outdoor Sports and 

Recreations 

A. J. CERMAK, President 




William Busse 

Homer B. Byrd 

Mrs. Edward J. Fleming 

Frank J. Kasper 

\1 \i rice F. Kavanagh 



Commissioners 
Peter M. Kelly 
Walter J. LaBuy 
Mary Mc.Enerney 
George A. Miller 
Mrs. Glenn E. Plumi 



Daniel Ryan 

Amelia Sears 
Charles H. Weber 
Emmett Whealan 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A W 



The Mary wood School 

For Girls 

RESIDENT AND DAY STUDENTS 

Conducted by 

SISTERS OF PROVIDENCE 

of 

SAINT MARY OF THE WOODS 

2128 Ridge Avenue . Evanslon, Illinois 



Compliments of 

The 
Martin Dawson Company 

Manufacturing Confectioners 

1520 South State Street 



Compliments 
of 

MARBELITE ART 
PRODUCTS CO. 

2652 West Lake Street 
CHICAGO 

IRWIN BROS., Inc. 

Wholesale Meats 

197-199 S. Water Market 
CHICAGO 



OVERLOOKING LOYOLA 

The Beautiful 

CAMPUS TOWER 

Fourteen Stories of Delightful Apartment Homes 

Units of three and four rooms 

with 

one and two bedrooms 

Unfurnished 



1033 LOYOLA AVENUE 



HOLLYCOURTi^TOO 



THE 19 3 1 LOYOLAN 



Gits Bros. Mfg. Go. 

Manufacturers of 

OIL CUPS 

and 

OIL SEALS 
1910 South Kilbourn Avenue 



FLORECITA 
FURNITURE COMPANY 

School, Institution, Office 

and Home Equipment 
1112 MALLERS BUILDING, 

5 S. Wabash Avenue, 
Phone— Franklin 1333 CHICAGO. ILL. 



II\HI)IM;S HKSTAIH Wl', 21 S. W:.li;.sli Ai 
( 'hir;it.'u. 111. 

I.KMMiTDN SADDLK FARM. Hipfrins Ho. 



Compliments of 

ROGER FAHERTY 



Better Copies 

Reduced Costs 

Ask About Our Service and Supplies for Your 

MIMEOGRAPH— MULTIGRAPH— 

DITTO 

Duplicator Paper & Supply Co. 

Hay. 6525 

224 N. DesPlaines St. CHICAGO, ILL 



Biyant^Stratton 

C O^ E G E 

Offers Special Summer Secretarial Course to College Students 

Secretarial Training enables you to learn the business from 
an executive who knows the business. As Secretary to such 
a man you are in intimate touch with all the activities of the 
organization and immediately associated with the person who 
has the power to advance you to a higher place. 

This Summer Course enables you to continue college and 
equips you to EARN part or all your way, or it gives you a 
three months' advantage toward business success as compared 
with students starting in the Fall. 

PHONE OR WRITE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION 

Business Men Believe in Bryant 4 Stratton College 



18 So. Michigan Avenue, 



CHICAGO 



Phone Randolph 1575 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 



TELEPHONE We Specialize in RenliiiK 
RANDOLPH 6863 Formal Dress Clothing 

Dress Suit Rental Co. 

Incorporated 

310 Capitol Building, 3rd Floor 
159 N. STATE STREET 
CHICAGO 

FOR RENT: Full Dress, Prince Albert, Tuxedos, 

Cutaways, Shoes, Striped Trousers, Silk Hats, Shirts. 

A COMPLETE LINE OF 

FURNISHINGS FOR SALE 

Latest Models— All Sizes 


GLASS TOPS 

DEARBORN GLASS CO. 

2500 West 21st Street 


RANDOLPH 9058 

W. J. DONAHOE 

Insulating Contractor 

Hot and Cold Surface Coverings 
and Linings 

9 South Clinton Street 
CHICAGO 


Superior 1818 R. T. Vv RAY, Pres. 
Inc. 1897 

Davis-Construction 
Co. 

18 W. KINZIE ST. 

Heating Contractors 

RECENT INSTALLATIONS 
MUNDELEIN COLLEGE FOR GIRLS 
MEDICAL DENTAL BUILDINGS FOR 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 


THE IMMACULATA 

Irving Park Boulevard at the Lake 

A Central High School for Girls on the North Side. 

A chartered institution, fully accredit- 
ed in all its departments. 

Preparatory School for Mundelein College 

For Particulars, address 
Fall Term opens Sister Superior 
September 8, 1931 Telephone Lakeview 0173 


Fire ^ Attacks Industry and Home 
Gives No Warning 

WOULD YOU KNOW 

how to proceed to collect your insurance — 
have you the experience to appraise the 
damage? 

DO YOU UNDERSTAND 

the operation of contribution, average and 
oilier policy conditions — will you pit your 
knowledge and experience against a 
seasoned adjuster? 

H. H. HERBST & CO. 

Adjusters for the People 

Care for your interest — prepare, show and 
prove your claim for a nominal fee. 
We know how! . . . Ask the man who has had 
a fire. 

TELEPHONE OR WRITE US 

Delays are Dangerous 

H. H. HERBST & CO. 

Suite 845— No. 175 'SYest Jackson Blvd. 
Telephone Wabash 51S1 



THE 



9 3 1 



L O Y O L A N 



sasisaaa^ggg 



Telephone Superior 0600 

Cudney & Company 

Wholesale Meats 

Orleans at Kinzie Street 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 


Consolidated Press 
Clipping Bureaus 

Reads all English daily papers pub- 
lished in the U. S. and 10,000 weeklies. 

MAIN OFFICE 

431 S. Dearborn Street 
Chicago, 111. 


Randolph 11 18 22!! \\ . Madison St. 

Courtesy Pet Shop 

Chicago's Leading 
Pet Shop 

The most complete slock of highly 
Pedigreed dogs and all kinds of pets 
in Chicago. 


YOLrLLLIKE^^ E r v 

Its refreshing pala1ahilil> will delight you. 
You'll learn the value of drinking water that 
is pure and soft. 

You'll henefit ton if you'll drink it regularly. 
Try it —you'll be well satisfied. 




CHIPPEWA 




PHO 


CHIPPEWA SPRING WATER 

COMPANY of Chicago 

SE ROOSEVELT 2920 1318 S. CANA 

Prompt Service Everywhere 


. ST. 


Fine Foods 

SKi PRICES 


Fruit Industries, Ltd. 

A grower-owned co-operati\c Manufacturing 
and Distributing Pure Grape Products 

OUR PRODUCTS: 
GUASTI WINE JELLY 

VIRGINIA DARE WINE TONIC 

VINE-GLO 

The Pure Juice of California Wine Grapes 

GUASTI COOKING WINE 


[UMBO] 

THE GREAT 

ATLANTIC & PACIFIC 

TEA COMPANY 

MIDDLE WESTERN DIVISION 


A National lust il u t ion . manufacl uring and dis- 
tributing Ihe pure prnduels of California'* tremendous 
vineyards. Food products of taste, flavor and health 

Have plenty of Grape Products in your home. 

FRUIT INDUSTRIES, LTD. 

Chicago ( Xlice. 35 E. Wacker Drive. Chicago, 

Illinois. Phone Central 8393 
Send for information of these delicious and 
beneficial drape Products. 



mzm&s&g&M: 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y O L A W 



COMPLIMENTS 

of 

Alexander Burke Sons 
PLAY BILLIARDS! 

JUNIOR PLAYMATE TABLES 
PRICED FROM $6.50 to $100.00 
Sold at Leading Stores Everywhere 

The Brunswick-Balke-Collender 
Co. 

General Offices 
623-633 So. Wabash Ave., CHICAGO, ILL. 

A 

C. G. CONN, Ltd. 

Chicago Branch 

Highest Grade Band <$ Orchestra 
Instruments and Accessories 

62 East Van Buren Street 
CHICAGO 






NATIONAL RANK PROTECTION 

For Your Savings 

DEVON TRUST & 
SAVINGS BANK 

CLARK STREET AT DEVON AVENUE 
Phone Franklin 1 U0 

M. J. BRANSFIELD 

Municipal Bonds 
and City Vouchers 

120 South La Salle Street 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

Headquarters for 

ELECTRIC 
REFRIGERATION 



Who wouldn't 
say "Pretty 




E COMMONWEALTH EDISON i 
LECTRIC SHOP, 

72 West Adams Street and Branches 






THE 



931 LOYOLAN 



COFFEE 


COMPLIMENTS 


and 

BIEDERMANN 


B. D. Co. 


Benziger Brothers 

Church Goods, 
Religious Articles, 


BARAT COLLEGE 

and 

CONVENT OF THE 
SACRED HEART 


Books 


LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 


205-7 W. Washington St. 


Conducted by 
The Religious of the Sacred Heart 


CHICAGO 


For Catalog, apply It) Reverend Mather Superior 


COLUMBUS 
HOSPITAL 


Telephones: Bittersweet 1 120-1 121 
University 8111 

Established 1878 


and 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

2548 Lake View Avenue 


AUG. BURKE 
ROOFING CO. 


Three year course. State Accredited En- 
trance requirement — Four year High 
School. 


Roofing 
Contractors 


Affiliated with Loyola University 


Main Office 4 Warehouse 


Conducted by the Missionary Sisters of 
the Sacred Heart 


2621-23 No. Halsted St., CHICAGO 


Catalog mailed upon request. 

This hospital has an ideal location, 
facing Lincoln Park 


North Shore Branch 
517 Dempster Street - EVANSTON 

J. J. BURKE, Secretary 



THE 193 



LAN 



£ SrT? »'«£!. ^~xT?» *!0 



AQUINAS 

SOUTH SHORE 

Dominican High School 
for Girls 

Seventy-second Street at Clyde Ave. 

Beautiful new building . . . completely and 

modernly equipped 
Cultural surroundings — highest alliliations 

SELECT IN EVERY WAY— JUST 
THE PLACE FOR YOUR DAUGHTER 


Q 


OUR GUEST SAYS 
Stop al the 

ALBION SHORE HOTEL 

Reasonable Rates 
Exceptional Restaurant Facilities 

R. M. Burke. Mgr. 
Tel. Sheldrake 880 1 


ANDERSEN-WITTE 
ENGRAVING CO. 

Engraved Stationery 

Business Cards. Wedding Invitations 
and Announcements 

Letter Heads — Envelopes 
Christmas Cards 

525 S. DEARBORN STREET 

Phone Wabash U190-M91 


Telephone Central 3207 

A. & E. Anderson Co. 

Building Contractors 

Room 3215 

221 North La Salle Street 

CHICAGO 


BELDEN-STRATFORD 
HOTEL 

ft 
PARKWAY HOTEL 

ft 
WEBSTER HOTEL 

ft 

2100-2300 Lincoln Park West 

ft 

Call Diversey 6610 

Mr. Arnold Shircliffe for menus and 

quotations. 

Attractive Ball Rooms and Party Rooms 
for large or small gatherings. 

FRED M. CROSBY, Gen. Manager 


Bechard Trophies 

-JLJ Bechard Trophies 

/T^^Hmk anc * P" ze Gups 

/'/ Jm^y^mi may k p pur- 

fJl ftSjjj ^^ chased through 

^J^-v all the leading 

■**/ jobbers in the 

j^'./ middle west. 

Mr \a If your local 

jJMgHWfc dealer cannot 

JPBMI*& have him order 
IB from his jobber. 

^^^HEs&aaaMl^^^ Vsk for our Trophies 
No. 30h Track Trophy 

Bechard Manufacturing Co. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 



9 3 



L O Y O L A N 



For Good Values 

Streb's Market 

Telephone Midway 8490 

1455 E. 55th Street, near Harper Ave. 
CHICAGO 


St. Xavier College 

For Women 

1928 Cottage Grove Avenue, 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

Conducted by lite Sisters of Mercy 

LIBERAL ARTS COURSE, PRE-MEDI- 

CAL, MUSIC. ART 

Teachers' Promotional Credit Classes 

\ntiinin, Winter, Spring, Summer Terms 

SEND FOR ANNOUNCEMENT 


SIENNA 
HIGH SCHOOL 

(For Girls and Young Ladies) 

Washington Blvd. at Central Ave. 

CHICAGO 

Under the direction of the Sisters of Mercy 

Accredited hy the University of Illinois 

and Chicago Teachers* College 

Telephone Columbus 7576 


Phone Coin minis 3 188 

A. J. O'Connell & Son 

Expert Blasting 

Bank Vault. Engine Beds 

Re-inforced Concrete of all Descriptions 

Removed by 

Compressed Air or Dynamite 

1506 Washington Blvd. Chicago 


BARNSDALL 

Engaged in every branch of the Petro- 
leum Industry — Our Own Crude — 
Our Own Pipe Lines — Our Own 
Refineries — Our Own Tank Cars 


ACADEMY 
OF OUR LADY 

95th and Throop Sts., Longwood 
CHICAGO. ILL. 

Boarding and Day School 
For Girls 

Accredited to the 1 'nieersilv of Illinois 

Recognized hy Slate H,„,rd of Education 

Holds Membership in \orlh Centra! Association of 

Colleges and Secondary Schools 

ACADEMIC COURSE 

Prepares for College or Normal entrance. Grammar 

and Primary Department tor lit lie girls. 

MUSIC 

Conservatory methods in piano, violin and vocal. 

ART 
Special advantages. Three studios open to visitors 

GRADED COURSES 

In both Music- and Art Departments lead to Teachers' 

Certihcates and Diplomas. 

PHYSICAL CULTURE and ATHLETICS 

Under competent teachers. 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE and HOUSEHOLD ARTS 

CAMPUS— 15 ACRES 

Catalogue will be sent upon request 

Telephone Beverly 0315 


"BE SQUARE" AUTO 
AND TRACTOR OILS 


General Sales Office 

59 East Van Buren Street, 

CHICAGO, ILL. 



&&B&mm; 



THE 1931 



LOYOLA* 



K*sifeBa&sii5SB< 



NORTH CHICAGO 
ROOFING CO. 

851 W. North Ave. 
Sixty-two years in Business 

WALTER W. SPRINGER, V. Pres. 

WM. L. O'CONNELL, Supt. 

Phone Lincoln 0570 


Compliments of 

Joyce Bros. 
Storage and Van Co. 

6428 North Clark Street 


Accustomed to serving a most 
fastidious clientele — bring- 
ing the highest quality of 
work to those demanding the 
best. 

Munger's Laundry 

South Side North Side 

CALUMET 6130 SUPERIOR 1129 

West Side 

MONROE 0687 


Home Fuel and 
Supply Co. 

D.S.WILLIS, Pres. 

Retail Distributors of 

ALL FINE QUALITY COAL 

and COKE 


Phone Virginia 1300 

ALL-WEATHER 
TIRE CO. 

1520 \V. 35th St. 1238 W. Division St. 

6621 S. State St. 4500 W. Madison St. 

Lawrence and Ashland 

Chicago Largest Distributors 
of Goodyear Tires and 
Exide Batteries 

M. <i. BYRNE, President 


W. P. REND COMPANY 

COAL 

332 So. Michigan Ave. 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Phone Har. 7573 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

Universal Garloading and 
Distributing Co. 

Owned by 
UNITED STATES FREIGHT CO. 

Daily Merchandise Car Service 

Consolidated Cars save Transfer en Route, 

Time and Equipment 

53 West Jackson Boulevard 

CHICAGO, ILL. 


American Steel Car 
Lines, Inc. 

a company owning and operating a fleet of 
more than 1200 all-steel standard railroad 
tank cars . . . engaged in the business of leasing 
and renting its cars to Railroads, Refiners, 
Manufacturers and Shippers requiring steel 
tank cars for the transportation of edible and 
inedible products. 

American Steel Car Lines, Inc. 

General Offices— '208 South La Salle Street 
CHICAGO 



THE 



9 3 



L O Y 



LAN 



Telephone Hours: 
West 1954-5 Mon. Wed. Fri. 9 to 6 
Tue. Thur. Sat. 9 to 8:30 

Dr. A. J. Lorenz 

2306 Roosevelt Road 
CHICAGO 

LORENZ OPTICAL CO. 

Optometrists 
and Opticians 


Compliments of 

St. Scholastica School for 

Girls on the 

Ridge 

CHICAGO 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

Cleaners, Dyers and Pressers 
Union Local No. 17742 

B. A. ALBERT, President 

S. WAGNER, Vice President 

I.J. FITZGERALD, Secretary 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

R. V. G. 


STEAMSHIP RESERVATIONS 
RAILROAD TICKETS 
AIRPLANE SEATS 

PRIVATE AUTOMOBILES 
MOTOR BUSSES 

Travel arrangements all over the world — 
Escorted and independent tours to Europe. 

1.000 offices and agents to meet trains — 
Special tours to the Eucharistic Congress, 
Dublin, June, 1932. 

Amerop Travel Service, Inc. 

132 N. La SaUe Street - CHICAGO 

General Agents for 
ROTALA CATHOLIC TOURS 


COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

Louis P. Piquett 

Attorney at Law 
100 North La Salle Street 



THE 



19 3 1 



LOYOLA!* 



£ 3Tr?»;«£. ^T?»vJ 



Telephone State 1223 

John L. Mclnerney 

Attorney-at-Law 

77 W. Washington St. 
CHICAGO 

Suite 1521 

CHICAGO TEMPLE BLDG. 


Telephone I Ia\ market J566 

O'Callaghan Bros. 

Plumbing Contractors 

21 South Green St. 
CHICAGO 


BOOKS p £ssr s L 

YOU CAN SAVE 1/3 TO y 2 
THOUSANDS OF USED BOOKS 


TRIANGLE 
ELECTRIC CO. 

Radio 
LIGHTING FIXTURES 

600 W. Adams St. 

CHICAGO 

Haymarket 79X0 


We Buy Used School Books 
JOHNSON'S BOOK STORE 

ZZZ4 Van Buren Street, Cor. Irving Ave. 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

D. F. B. 


DINE IN THE PINK ROOM 

(Excellent Food) 

DANCE IN THE RALLOON ROOM 

(Greatest orchestras) 

CONGRESS HOTEL 

CHICAGO 

Reservations Harrison 3800 


Phone Longbeach 6000 

Dr. G. S. Smyth 

Chiropodist 

Hours: Daily. 9 to 1 and 2 to 6 

Ground Flour 

Edgewater Beach Hotel 

CHICAGO 


LET YOUR WINDOWS 

TELL THE WORLD 

ABOUT YOUR BUSINESS 

it is OUR Business 
to Keep them Clean 

Phone Central 5176 for the World's best 
Service 

World Window Cleaning Co. 

62 W. Washington 



THE 193 



LOYOLA* 



PHONE KKDZIK 2.WI 



THOS. J. AHERN & BROS. 

Fane red Directors 



3246 JACKSON BLVD. 



CHICAGO. ILL. 



WINDOWS WASHED 10c 



ASK US FIRST ABOUT ANY JOB 

PAINTED WALLS WASHED. RUGS BEAT AND WALL PAPER CLEANED 

WE WORK CITY WIDE AND SUBURBS 

9 YEARS IN ALBANY PARK 



ALBANY PARK HOUSE CLEANERS 



3536 LAWRENCE AVENUE, 
Rear 



IRVING 1671— MIDWAY 1 
JAMES H. SNELL, Manai 





Compliments of 


Compliments 




of 


M&L 


P. A. RILEY 


cJijpeseilir i g & (Oledrolijp mg 


and 


KZompauy 


G. W. JONES 


4001 RAVENSWOOD AVENUE 




CHICAGO 




TELEPHONES: LAKEVIEW 




8201-8202-8203-8204-8205 



THE 193 



L O Y © LAN 



3£^B£B£g&m 







At The 
Track-Meet! 

... or at any summer 
sport scene, smart colleg- 
ians are enthusiastic about 
the Fair sport fashions. 
Whether active combat- 
ants or spectators, they've 
agreed that The Fair sets 
the pace in styles and 
equipment. . .at moderate 
prices. 



Telephone Hours 9:30 to 6 P. M. 
Buckingham 2487 Tues., Thurs.. Sat. Eves. S P. M. 
Closed on Wednesday 


Telephone SUPERIOR 9079 


Dr. JUANITA CHRISTLY 

Ch iropodist — Foot Spec iali.il 


THE 
JOHN R. KEHM CO. 

Piping Contractors 

General Steam Fitting — Power Plant Piping 
Process Piping — Heating and Ventilating 


1608 BELMONT AVE. 

N. W. COR. LINCOLN 

In Boston Denlists Bldg. CHICAGO 


8 EAST AUSTIN AVENUE CHICAGO 



THE 



931 LOYOLAN 



ROOT STUDIOS 


185 North Wabash Avenue at Lake Street 


OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS for 


THE LOYOLAN 


1931 


1930 


ag£S§£ 


Special Rates to Loyola Students at All Times 



THE 1931 LOYOLAN 






NDEX OF ADVERTISERS 



Academy of Our Lady 389 

Ahern. Thos. J. & Bros 393 

Albany Park House Cleaners 393 

Albion Shore Hotel 388 

All-Weather Tire Co 390 

American Steel Car Lines, Inc 390 

Amerop Travel Service, Inc 391 

Andersen-Witte Engraving Company 388 

Anderson Co., A. & E 388 

Anderson & Brothers 375 

Angsten, Farrell & Co 375 

Aquinas High School 388 



Barat College 

Barnsdall Refining Co 

Bechard Mfg. Co 

Belden-Stratford Hotel 

Benziger Bros 

Biedermann Bros 

Bransfield, M. J 

Brunswick-Balke-Collender Co.. Th. 

Bryant & Stratton College 

Burke Roofing Co., August 

Burke Sons, Alexander 

Burnham, Inc., E. 

Byrnes & Co.. \C. J 





381 


Carroll Sons. John 


385 


Case Moody Pie Corp 


. 385 


Chicagoan, The 


365 


Chippewa Spring Water Co 


384 


Christly, Dr. Juanita 


.... 394 


Cleaners, Dyers & Pressers Union 


391 


College of St. Francis 


372 


Columbus Hospital 


387 


Commonwealth Edison Co. 


386 


Congress Hotel 


392 




386 


Consolidated Press Clipping Bureau 


384 


Convent of the Sacred Heart.. 


387 


Cook County Forest Preserve 


380 


Courtesy Pet Shop 


384 


Crofoot, Nielsen & Co 


.. . 385 



Cudahy Packing Company 378 

Cudney & Company 384 

D 

Davis Construction Co 383 

Dawson Company, Martin 381 

Dearborn Glass Company.. 383 

Devon Trust & Savings Bank 386 

Donahoe, W. J 383 

Dress Suit Rental Co 383 

Dunn Coal Co., John J 364 

Duplicator Paper Co 382 

F 

Faherty, Roger 382 

Fair. The 394 

Fisher Ice Cream Co 385 

Florecita Furniture Co 382 

Fruit Industries. Ltd 384 

G 

Gateway Securities Co 377 

Gits Bros. Mfg. Co 382 

Creat Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co 384 

H 

Halsey, Stuart & Co 376 

Herbst & Co., H. H 383 

Home Fuel & Supply Co 390 

Hospital of St. Anthony de Padua 379 

Hotel Knickerbocker 377 

I 

Illinois Book Exchange 366 

Immaculata. The 383 

Irwin Bro*., Inc 381 

J 

Johnson's Book Store 392 

Jones, G. W_. 393 

Joyce Bros. Storage and Van Co 390 

K 

Kehm, John R. Co 394 

Keller & Co., D. F 373 

kendrick Furniture Co 377 

Knickerbocker Hotel 377 



THE 



19 3 



LOYOLA* 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 

(continued) 



L 

Lang, Weise & Cella 367 

Lorenze, Dr. A. J 391 

M 

M & L Typesetting & Electrotyping Co... 393 

Marbelite Art Products Co 381 

Marywood School, The 381 

McGarry & Co., John A 375 

Mclnerney, John L 392 

McLaughlin Funeral Home 376 

Metropolitan Motor Coach Co 376 

Mount Mary College 364 

Mueller & Co.. V 374 

Mundelein College 380 

Munger's Laundry 390 



N 



John 



Naghten & Co., 

Nash Brothers 

Neuenfeldt, E. R 

North Chicago Roofing Co.. 
Novak Mosaic Co 



Rend Co., W 
Riley, P. A. 
Root Studio 



Rosary College 370 

Rosemont College 366 

Russo, F 368 

Ryan, M. F 379 



St. Anthony Hospital 

St. Clair Co.. Win. M 

St. Mary's High School 

St. Scholastica High School 

St. Xavier College 

Schoultz & Co., Fritz 

Sexton & Company, John 

Shaffer Company, H. R 

Sherriffs, John 

Sienna High School 

Smyth, Dr. G. S 

Standard Photo Engraving Company.. 
Streb's Market 



379 
378 

391 
389 
378 
368 
366 
378 
389 
392 
369 
389 





O'Callaghan Bros 392 

O'Connell & Son, A. J 389 

Old Dutch Cleanser 378 

P 

Peabody Coal Company 371 

Peterson, Anna R 372 

Physicians Protective Casualty Co 374 

Piquett, Louis P 391 

Porstelain Chicago Co 372 

Providence High School 370 



Triangle Electric Co.. 



Universal Carloading and Distributing 

Co 390 

Ulcicur Co., The 364 



Valentine's Special Assessment Defense 
Bureau 368 



R 

Rauen Company, Math.. 



World Window Cleaning Company 392 



THE 19 



L O Y O L A N 



Abbink, L.; 143 

Abel, D. H.; 44, 199 

Abraham, R. L.; 135, 323, 345 

Abu-Khair, D.; 135 

Acerra, M. R.; 145 

Acker, C; 112, 206, 244, 283, 

285 
Arkerman; 149. 327 
Adams R.; 110 
Adamski, E. J.; 114 
Aderizzi, L. ; 155 
Abeam, T. (S.J.) ; 58 
Ahearn, T. F. ; 66, 131, 351 
Ahem. W. B.; 188 
Ahner, D.; 151 
Ajamian, H.: 134 
Akan, J.; 151 
Albachiara, G.; 46 
Alban, H.; 135, 335 
Albi, R. W.; 66, 132, 333 
Albino, J.; 150 
Alderson, T.; 152 
Allen, R.; 152 
Allegretti, A. J.; 66. 131. 345 
Allegretti, T.: 118, 337 
Allen, L.; 151 
Allison, W.; 149 
Altheim, I.; 152 
Amato, T. T.; 145 
Amor. F. W.; 115. 234, 235 
Anderman, D. A.; 66, 131, 335 
Anderson, A.; 118, 319 
Anderson, F.; 165 
Andrew, G.; 163 
Andrews, A.; 151 
Angsten, P. J.; 39 
Applebaum, J.; 151 
Arado, F.; 40, 126, 347 
Arbuekle, A. K.; 66 
Arendt. W. H.; 116 
Armington. C. L.; 66, 131, 132, 

33, 345, 351 
Arnolds, B.; 313 
Arnolds, E. F.: 115 
Ash, J.; 150 327 
Ashmenekas. J. P.; 52. 125, 353 
Ashworth, W.; 152 
Atkins, K.; 66, 162 
Atkociunas. P.; 149 
Audy, A. J.: 116 
Austen, W. G.; 48 
Avery, M.; 150 



Baczynski, F.; 113 

Bazinski, H.; Ill 

Bagnuolo, P.; 110, 145 

Bairn, H.; 151 

Bak, A.; Ill 

Baker, H. ; 151 

Balaban, K.; 145 

Balcerkiewicz, E. A.; 116 

Bales, M.; 159 

Ball, H.; 126 

Ball, J.; 151 

Balletti, A.; 133 

Balsamo, N. J.; 66, 126, 131, 

337 
Banner, L. ; 136 
Bapst, M.; 239 
Balcerski, A.; 150 



GENERAL INDEX 

Barker, V.; 354 
Barons, A. M.; 66, 133 
Barrett, E.; 321 
Barrett, H. M.; 66, 160, 238 
Barron M. J.; 126, 339 
Barron, P.; 112, 234, 235, 319 
Barrv, D. J.; 40, 66, 124 
Barry, I. M.; 66 
Barry, M. K.; 67, 160 
Barry. M. E.; 67, 160, 238 
Barry, M. J.; 116 
Bartlett, J.; 322 
Barton, T. J.; 116, 315 
Bass, D. T.; 67 
Battler, L.; 151 
Baum, H.; 149 
Baxter, J.; 145 
Bealin, G. W.; 116 
Beale, F.; 142 
Beam, M. C; 67 
Benr, H.: 126 
Bebeau. D.; 163 
Becker, G.; 140 
Becker, G. L.; 142 
Beeslev .T. I. ; 50 
Beeson, B. B.; 48 
Bekier, H. ; 207 
Bell, R.; 127 
Bellamy, W. E.; 67 
Bellini, M.; 235 
Bellemare, Rev. D.; 46 
Belmonte, J. V.; 67, 131, 337 
Belrov, A.; 126 
Belroy, W.; 341 
Bendetto, €.; 152 
Beniacki, T.; 127 
Benjamin, E. C.; 48 
Bennan, J.; 112 
Berchtold. W.: 124 
Berens, W.; 331 
Berg, A.: 127 
Bergen, R.; 142 
Berkowsky, A.; 149 
Berendson, M.; 239 
Bergman, J.; 149 
Bennan, H.; 152 
Berman, M.; 130 
Bernardo, J.; 126 
Bemasek, R.; 173 
Bernauer, M.; 136 
Bernel, F. A.; 152 
Berrv, R. F.; 67 
Berubi, R.; 239 
Beutler, A.; 113, 232, 234, 235, 

244 
Bialecki, E.; 151 
Biestek F.; 118 
Bieth, M. E.; 67, 164, 239 
Biller, R.; 159, 238 
Birkhaug, J.; 143 
Bishop, E.: 124 
Bissell, L. F.; 55 
Black, L. K.; 67 
Black, E. J.; 333 
Black, R.; 152 
Blake, H.; 141 
Blake, T.; 144 
Blaszcak, L. J.; 323 
Blattre, G. C; 67, 164, 239 
Blessing, L.; 159, 238 
Block. R.; 152 
Blonigan, M.; 159 



Blue, S.; 159 

Blume, M.; 151, 327 

Boersmat, J.; 149 

Boetto, M.; 162 

Bogacki, L.; 118 

Boland, M. F.; 67 

Bolt. J. H.; 117 

Bomba, M.; 239 

Boothe, R.; 158 

Boulger, E. P.; 52, 347 

Bouscaren, S.J., Rev. T.; 44 

Boyd, T.; 48 

Boyer, M.; 162 

Boylan, F. T.; 47, 50 

Bovle, P. T.: 40, 122, 126 

Butterbach, E.; 163 

Bracken, W.; 117 

Bradburn, L.; 60 

Bradford. G. M. ; 115, 296 

Bradv, A.; 115 

Brady, L.; 159, 238 

Brady, R.; 159 

Brahm, B.; 151 

Brandzel, I.; 124 

Branuach, K.; 127 

Braun, W.; 152 

Breen, T.; 113 

Bremner, J. X.; 61, 135. 287 

Brennan, J.: 38, 39, 110, 207, 
224, 226, 227, 317 

Brennan, J.; 151 

Brennan. K.; 219 

Brescia, M.; 133 

Breet, E.; 65, 67 

Brewer, A.; 152 

Bregan, H.; 149 

Brisch, X.; 127 

Broderick. J.: 163 

Bromos, M. R.; 68, 160 

Brongiel, J.; 143 

Brooks, R.; 150 
Brophy, J.; 149 

Brotman, J.; 136 

Brown, B.; 68 

Brown, J.; 115 
Brown, L.; 331 
Brownstein, H. ; 149 
Brownstein, S. ; 68, 135, 335 
Brunner. S. J., Rev. G.; 44 
Brunn, J. K.: 68, 109, 204, 206, 
210, 214, 216, 220, 226, 317 
352, 354, 355 
Buchman, W.; 64, 347 
Buckley, D.; 68. 124 
Bukowski. C.; 152 
Bunata, E.; 68, 132 
Burhach, V.; 113 
Burger, D.; 115 
Burke, E.; 117, 227 
Burke, E. F.; 68 
Burke, F. J.; 126 
Burke, F. M.; 339 
Burke, R.; 68, 124, 275 
Burkhart, H.; 68 
Burnjas, B.; 124 
Burns, C; 68 
Burns, J.; 150, 327 
Burns, S.; 68 
Bush, S.; 68 
Busse, H.; 159 
Busse, M.; 69, 158, 238 
Butler, E.; 159 



T H 



19 3 



L © Y O L A IV 



Butler. J.; 125 
Butterbach, E.; 69 
Buttice, G.; 69, 135 
Buttita, J.; 117, 296, 306 
Button, H.; 69, 131, 343 
Butzen, R.; Ill, 281, 285 
Byanskie, M.; 69, 158 
Byrne, T.; 115, 125 
Byrne, W.; 277, 287, 296 



Cable, W.; 152 

Caeser, R.; 125 

Cali, S.; 235 

Cada, E.; 69, 132 

Cafaro, S. R.; 69, 134 

Cahill, C; 126 

Cahill, G.; Ill 

Calder, W.: 149 

Caldwell, W. I.; 125 

Calek, A.; 117 

Cali, S.; 110, 234, 306, 325 

Calkins, F.; 110, 203, 210, 216, 

224, 227, 352. 353 
Callahan, A.; 69, 16 
Callahan, J.; 112. 203, 209, 210, 

201, 216, 243. 244, 311 
Callanan, C; 118, 277, 269 
Callanan, M.; 69 
Caloger, P., 69, 124 
Camean, C. G.; 69 
Cameron, M.; 152 
Campagne, A.; 69 
Campbell, A. H.; 70, 160, 238 
Campion, M.; 70 
Canning, A.; 151 
Canterbury, L.; 117, 296. 234, 

235 
Carey, D. A.; 38, 339 
Carev, J.; 145 
Carey, T. H.; 126 
Carlin, J.; 152 
Carlson, D.; 70, 132 
Carman. E. W.; 70 
Carmody. R. F.; 70, 130, 132 
Carnev, T. B.; 70, 131 
Carroll, D.; 117 
Carroll, M.; 131 
Carufel. A. E.; 70, 158 
Carufel. C; 238 
Cartoon, L.; 127 
Casciato, N. A.; 131 
Casey, T.; 244, 275 
Cassaretto; 44 
Cassiday. A. J.; 70, 124 
Castaldo, E. F.; 70, 131 
Cavanaugh, D.; 38 
Cavanaugh, D.; 113. 2!!2, 285, 

304 
Cavanaugh, G. ; 111 
Cavanaugh, I.; 239 
Cavanaugh, L.; 118, 277 
Cavanaugh, M. L.; 70, 162, 164, 

239 
Cavey, L. N.; 115 
Ceffalio, L.; 124 
Cernoch, E.; 149 
Cesal, F.; 152 
Chaffel. M.; 163 
Chamberlain, H. T.; 50 
Chandler, S. B.; 48 
Chapman, E. A.; 70, 343 
Chapman. T. : 125, 295, 299 
Charbulac, V.; 236 



Charney, M.; 150 

Chathas, W. J.; 116 

Chernes, N.; 149 

Chesney, J.; 227 

Chesrow, R.; 149 

Christie, E.; 150 

Christiaens, M. E. ; 70, 164, 239 

Chryanowski, L.; 71, 134, 323 

Chu, L.; 149 

Chubin, M.; 152 

Churchill, J.; 149 

Cineoski. S. A.; 114 

Ciocca, H.; 152 

Cirese, E.; 227, 325 

Clancy, D. J.; 333 

Clancy. P.; 112, 273, 275 

Clark, L.; 126, 339 

Clark, M. M.; 71, 160. 238 

Clark, M. L.; 71 

Clark, M.; 159 

Clark, W. J.; 125, 339 

Clark. C. F.; 36 

Clarke, W. C; 137, 333, 335 

Claster, H.; 149 

Clermont. J.; 145 

Clinch, C; 38 

Cloonan, E.; 124 

Clyde, D. M.; 71 

Cody, H. J.; 125 

Coffey, J. P.; 140, 143 

Coglianese. E.; 152 

Cohen, A.; 55 

Cohen, L.; 149 

Cole, T.; 71, 142, 203, 206, 321 

Colletti, M. J.; 114 

Collins, A.; 71 

Collins, C; 71, 124, 347. 375, 

376 
Collins, F. D.; 115, 244 
Collins. H. J.; 116 
Collins, J. D.; 71 
Collins, J. I.; 131, 351 
Collins, M. C; 71 
Collins, V.; 125 
Collins. W. D.; 112 
Coinroe, J.; 151 
Condo, T.; 159, 238 
Conerty, E. W.; 116 
Conger, D.; 149 
C.onley, W. H.; 44, 218 
Conley, W. J.; 116, 347 
Conlon. F. P.; 71 
Connelly, E.; 112. 244, 283 

285, 375 
Connellv, T.; 275, 276. 354 
Conner, V.; 127 
Connery, J. R.; 115, 244 
Connev, E. ; 143 
Conrad, J.; 136, 331 
Contursi, J. C; 114 
Coolidge, E. D.; 51 
Cooney, D. ; 71 
Coonev, J.; 127, 206 
Coorlas, C; 114, 143 
Copa, G. ; 163 
Copp. J. F.; 71, 109 
Corbett, M.; 235 
Corbett, V.; 149 
Corboy, P.; 132 
Corboy, P. M.; 345 
Corcoran, D.; 117 
Cordes, P.; 143, 321 
Cornwall, H. J.; 149 
Corriere, J.; 136 



Corgrave, A. J.; 72, 160, 238 

Costello, C. S.; 44, 219. 225 

Costello, J. P.; 126, 339 

Costello, V.; 239 

Cote, L.; 150, 327 

Cotell, H.; 72, 131 

Coughlin, (;.; 163 

Coughlin, W. J.; 141, 145, 329 

Couleur, E.; 165 

Coven, B. I.; 115 

Covington, I.; 329 

Cox, L.; 127 

Coyle, C; 72 

Craig, C; 152 

Cramer, R. J.; 72, 160 

Crandall, A. G.; 144 

Crane, S. A.; 126 

Crank. E.; 295 

Crank, G.; 144 

Craven, J. D. ; 115 

Creagh, P.; 126 

Credditt, L.; 126 

Crowley, A. F.; 72, 124 

Crowley. G. M.; 72, 158, 227, 

238 
Cudahy, E. A.. Sr.; 176 
Cudahy, E. A., Jr.; 36 
Cullen', G. P.; 72, 109 
Cullen, J. J.; 40, 125 
Cunningham, R.; 115, 329 
Cuny, C; 144 
Curron. V.; 207 
Curry. J. E.; 41, 72, 124, 202, 

339 
Cushing, H. B.; 115 
Cutrera, H. T.; 72, 135, 337 
Czalgoszewski, E.; 113 
Czyzwski, J. F.; 72. 133, 323, 

325 

n 

Dahlberg, A.: 150, 206. 327, 

347, 352 
Dalgli.-h, A.; 59 
Dalton, M.; 165. 239 
Dalev. E. B.; 72 
Ualta, J.; 73 
Dalev. E. F.; 72, 339 
Dalv: J.; Ill, 244 
DW'.nata, V. ; 73, 162 
Damuth, R.; 152 
Danforth, H.; 150. 327 
Daniels, J.; 150 
Dargella, F.; 73,160, 238 
Danreiter. C; 151 
Davidson. L.; 149, 329 
Davis, J.: 54 
Davis, R.: 152 
Dawson, M.; 165. 239 
Day. G.; 331 
Deady, N.; 151 
Deady, T.; 73 
Deane, H.; 134 
De Baets, M. R.: 142 
Debski. H.; 151 
DeCrespigny. C.; 46 
Degnan. F.; 115 
De Graci, L.; 337 
Dehnert, C; 113 
Dehnert. E.; Ill 
Delanev, F.; 143. 321 
Delanev, R.; 112 
Delia Maria, C: 72, 162 
Dellers. A.; 111. 237 




&HHBHHK: 



THE 1931 



L O Y O L A N 



DeLove, S.; 125 

Demers, C; 165, 239 

Dempsey, J.; 117 

Dening, E.; 151, 327 

Dernbach, C; 126 

Des Cormier, S. ; 162 

Des Marais, L.; 165, 239 

D'Esposito. J.; 110, 304 

Devitt, R.; 113 

Devlin, E.; 73 

Dickey, J.; 127 

Dickson, M.; 73 

Diokter, M.; 152 

Dietch, M.; 163 

Dietzel, E.; 162 

Digate, J.; 136, 337 

Diggings, P.; 143 

Higgles, P.; 110. 303 

Dimiceli, S.; 110, 234. 235, 

236, 325 
Dixon, P.; 162 
Dobin, N.; Ill 
Dohearty, J.; 113 
Dohertv. F.; 127 
Dohertv, Neil, 132, 351 
Doherty, Norman; 111. 317 
Dolan, M.; 72. 351 
Dolce, A.; 152 
Dole, V.; 117, 306, 319 
Dombrowsky, J.; 115 
Donahue, E.; 117. 234, 235 
Donahue. J.; 73 
Donelan, J.; 151 
Donnelly, F.; 126 
Donovan, B.; 73, 160, 206, 238 
Donovan. M.; 73 
Dooley, R.; 61, 126. 325 
Dooling, E.; 73, 142 
Dorman, L.; 152 
Dorsey, B.; 74 
Doud, P.; 144 
Downey, C; 235 
Downey, T.; 110, 204, 207. 215, 

216, 220. 221, 242. 244, 

247, 352, 355 
Downs, M.; 74 
Doyle. A.; 112, 205, 244 
Doyle, D.; 74, 134 
Dovle, J.; 125 
Drabanski, J.; 74. 131, 323 
Dugas, J.: 149 
Driscoll, B.; 74 
Driscoll, H.; 74 
Drolet, E.; 125 
Drolett. L.; 113. 236, 315 
Drugay, J.; 113, 275, 276. 283, 

284 
Dubiel, J.: 74. 132. 323. 345 
Duca. J.; 150 
Ducey. B.; 50 
Duggan. L.; 159 
Duggan. J.; 116 
Dunlap, 0.; 113, 317 
Dunn, L.; 74 
Dunn, P.; 152 

Durburg, J.; 74, 136, 280, 285 
Durkin, A.; 49 
Durkin. J.; 143, 247 
Durkin, W.; 74, 109. 216, 275, 

276 
Duxtles, A.; 150 
Dvorak, C; 152 
Dydak, E.; 112, 244 



Eades, J.; 137 
Eccles, M.; 126 
Edmundson. K.; 149 
Egan, C; 349 
Egan, H.; 349 
Egan. J.; 74 
Ehas, M.; 165 
Eiden, R.; 116, 277, 296 
Eisen, R.; 137 
Eiseman, L.; 74, 135, 335 
Eisenstein, H.; 124, 125 
Eklund, V.; 150 
Elenteny. J.; 116 
Eliot, R.; 75, 131, 335 
Ellis, G.; 124 
Ellman, M.; 152 
Engle, P.: 75, 331, 351 
Erickson, F. ; 65 
Enri^ht. C; 239 
Erickson, F.; 75. 239 
Esposilo, A.; 134, 337 
Essenberg, J.; 48 
Essroger, C; 127 
Etu. L.; 151 
Ewing, A.; 59 
Exlev, L.; 331 



Fabish, F.; 140, 143 

Fabish, V.; 143 

Fagan. S.; 125 

Fahev. E.; 110 

Failla, S.; 115, 296 

Faillo, P.; 150 

Falk, N.; 135 

Falke, T. W.; 75 

Falvo, W.; 136, 337 

Fane, M.; 159 

Fanning, W.; 150, 327 

Fantauzzo, J. A.; 118 

Farbrick. J.; 351 

Farrar, A. B.; 75 

Farrell. E.; 149 

Farrell, J. A.; 64, 41, 74, 124, 

339 
Farrell, J. P.; 206, 110, 217. 306, 

311 
Farrell, V.; 118 
Favat, A.; 118, 234, 235, 296, 

325, 327 
Fay, T. J.; 117 
Fazio. P. V.; 75, 124, 341, 345 
Fazio, R. J.; 75, 337, 351 
Feder, F.; 75 
Felicelli, N.; 75, 136, 337 
Felt. Y.; 149, 329 
Fenton, M. E.; 75 
Ferlita, A. J.; 75. 136, 333 
Ferrante, G.; 136 
Ferrara, N.; 118 
Ferrari, A. J.; 134 
Fetcho, W.; 134 
Fiedler, J.; 118, 262 
Fieg, J.; 115 
Fieramosca, E. ; 133 
Fillafer, G. A.; 76, 207 
Finan. E. M.; 76 
Findlav. A.; 238, 159 
Finkeldei, E. E.; 76 
Finley, G.; 136 
Finlev, Genese: 349 
Finn, C; 117, 234, 244, 306 



Fiare, F.; 133, 337 

Fiorito, L. ; 134 

Firnsin, C; 151 

Fischer, O. H.; 76, 135 

Fishman, J.; 149 

Fitz, G.; 150 

Fitzgerald, J.; 347 

Fitzgerald, M.; 114, 206 

FitzHugh, Ann; 76, 162 

Fitzsimmons, R.; 137 

Fitzpatrick, A.; 143 

Fassico, M.; 137 

Flavin, P.; 117 

Fleming, B.; 143 

Fleming, C; 235 

Fliege, F.; 76. 164 

Flora, T.; 127 

Flynn, J.; Ill, 244 

Flynn, L.; 275 

Fogartv, 6.; Ill 

Fogartv. T.; 76, 109, 243, 244 

Foley, C. M.; 76 

Foley. V.; 116 

Forbricb, J.; 76, 132 

Forkosh, M.; 149 

Forest, T. F.; 137, 333 

Fors, H.; 273, 275 

Forteka, G.; 151, 329 

Fortune. W. ; 55 

Foster, V.; 151 

Fotre. R.; 118 

Fouser, R.; 53 

Fox, G.; 76 

Fox, J. C; 76, 131, 331, 345 

Fox, S.; 54 

Fov, W.; 50 

France, J.; 136 

Francisco. B.; 296 

Franey, J.; 11. 244, 205 

Frank, M.; 77, 164, 206, 239 

Frankowski. C. E.; 77, 343, 345 

Frasz, E.; 152 

Frazein. E.; 150 

Freedman. A.; 149 

Freiberg. M., 165, 329 

Frev, Clemens; 148, 151, 329 

Friedrich, C; 77, 164 

Friedrich, L.; 152, 329 

Frisch, J.; 113 

Frizol, S.; 77, 109 

Fruin, M. M.; 77 

Fuchs. T.; Ill, 206, 205 

Fulco, H.: 77, 132 

Funk, B.; 118, 277, 315 

Fureens. S.; 275 

Furjinick, M.; 165, 239 

G 
Gairison, L.; 127 
Gallagher, A. C; 77, 164. 239 
Gallagher, C. J.; 50 
v„. .. nr, ti. J.; 116 
Gallagher, J. C; 77, 131 
Garvey, A. C; 132 
Ganey. H. M.; 57, 349 
Gannon, R. P.; 115 
Garafalo, J.; 151 
Gardine. W. G; 77 
Garrison, M. J.; 77, 135, 351 
Garritv. E.; 315 
Garvey, A. C"; 77, 351 
Garvey, F.; 118, 225, 244 
Gatons, B.; 163 
Gault, I.; 152 



£^g^g5£rf^»l THE 1031 LOYOLA IV 



Gavin, G. M.; 143 

Gawne, C. B.; 77, 131, 351 

Gaynor, J.; 158, 327 

Gazzaniga, D. ; 134 

Gelman, I.; 150 

Genge, W.; Ill 

Gennrich, E. A.; 78, 164. 239 

Gerber, A.; 152 

Germaine, B.; 235 

Gerrietts, J. S.; 115, 319, 227 

Gerschberg, M. ; 150 

Gerty, F. G.; 56 

Geyer, E.; 149, 327 

Giardina, J.; 110, 233, 234, 235 

Giardino, W.; 134, 325 

Gibbons, B.; 110, 353, 317 

Gibbons, D. J.; 116 

Gibnev, J, A.; 134, 333 

Gilbruth, W. A.; 53 

Gill, J.; 113, 210, 214, 244, 315 

Gill, J.; 143 

Gill, V.; 364 

(iiovine, L. E. ; 136 

Ginsberg, B.; 150 

Girsch, C; 111 

Glasser, E.; 127, 207, 347 

Glavin, E.; 148, 329 

Gleason, H. P.; 78 

Gleason, I. E.; 78 

Gloss, A. J.; 78 

Glueckaut. L. G.; 78, 136 

Glupker, H.; 52 

Glynn, J. D.; 78, 131 

Godlewski, E.; 144 

Golatka, H. D.; 65, 78, 164, 239 

Golden, D. G.; 125 

Goldenberg, A.; 151 

(,oldenberg, M.; 145 

Goldberg, L.; 151 

Goldberg, I.; 149 

Goldfield, S.; 151 

Gonnellv. J. F. 

Gonzalez, D. E.; 78, 131 

(Goodwin, E. B.; 46 

Goodwin, J. D.; 116, 277 

Goonan, V. D.; 78, 124 

Gordon, F.; 113 

Gorman, J.; 110 

Gormican, P.; 112, 319. 

Goscicki, G.; 152 

Gosiewski, J.; 143 

Gottainer, L.; 149 

Gottschalk, J.; 145, 226, 271, 

275, 300 
Gough, L. E.; 78, 135 
Grab, M. L.; 78 
Graczk, T.; 151 
Graber, J.; 117, 277 
Grace. G.; 118 
Grady, J.; 117, 341 
Gradv, J. W.; 125, 347 
Gradv, T.; 156 
Graham, J.; 327 
Graham, C. F.; 79, 109, 317 
Graham, W.; 150 
Granahan. J.; 142 
Grandstaff. C.; Ill 
Grant, S. T.; 79, 109 
Grauer, M.; 152 
Graziano, G. E. ; 79 
Green, H. C.; Ill 
Greenberg, L. ; 149 
Gruner, C.; 149 
Gregory, S. D.; 79 



Greiber, L.; 114 
Gresens, H.; 152 
(tiffin, J.; 113 
Grim, U.; 48 
Grisamore, T. L.; 52 
Groebzunga, B.; 149 
Grosso, W. G.; 114 
Grout, J. L.; 79, 135 
Grunner, C; 38 
Grubbs, Z.; 126 
Guariniello, J.; Ill 
Guarmere, F. ; 133 
Guerin, M. E.; 112. 244, 319 
Guerrini, S.; 79, 162 
Gugan, T.; 329 
Guerrini, J.; 126 
Gura, G. M.; 79, 131, 345 
Gusinde, F.; 114 
Gutman, E.; 152 
Guzik, T.; 152 
Guzzetta, V. J.; 132 

H 
Haas, C; 158 
Hadley, L.; 50 
Hafert, J.; 152 
Hajduk, J.; 134, 323, 325 
Haley, F. J.; 145 
Hall, E.; 149 
Hallinan, M.; 109, 255 
Halmin, J.; 329 
Halverson, M.; 80 
Hambleton, (;. M.; 52 
Hamiek, A. E.; 143 
Hammon, E. M.; 206 
Hammond, J.; 224, 226, 227, 

339, 354 
Hamner, E.; 126 
Hanko, A.; 126 
Hanzel, B.; 143 
Hanharik, M.; 159 
Harelick, N.; 17 
Harley, L.; 150 
Harney, B. M.; 80 
Harrington, L. ; 144 
Harris, H. ; 151 
Harris, S.; 149 
Harron, W.; 126 
Hartford, M.; 275 
Hartman, A. S.; 80 
Hassen, I.; 115 
Hasty. C; 235 
Hausen, C. M.; 80, 131 
Hausmenn, G.: 152 
Havlik. A.; 136 
Hawkins. J.; 151 
Havden, J.; 126, 144 
Hayes, J. P.; 142 
Healy, C; 235, 145 
Healv, B. J.; 80. 109, 39, 43, 

317. 243 
Healv, T. J.; 80, 109, 294, 295. 

298 
Healy, J. L.; 145 
Herkenlaible. H.; 149 
Heehinger. B. C; 80, 142 
Heckman, E.; 159 
Hefferman, G.; 306, 307 
Heinan, J.; 114 
Heineman, V.; 152 
Heins, J.; 137 
Heinz, J.; 151 
Hejna. G.; 152 
Hellmuth, G.; 135 



Hellwig, W.; 114 

Hellwest, G.; 127 

Hemming. P.; 135 

Hemphiei, E. M.; 80 

Henke, W.; 142 

Henneberry, E. ; 162 

Hennessey, L. ; 127 

Henry, J.; 113, 244 

Herald, E. M.; 80 

Herbert, J.; 113, 15 

Heringer, K. M.; 80 

Herman, S.; 304, 311 

Herman L. ; 143 

Hermann. M. B.; 80, 105, 239 

Herrick, H.; 237, 150 

Hetman, B.; 118 

Hetreed, F. W.; 80, 132 

Heupel, B.; 149 

Heupler, F. A.; 81. 132, 333 

Hewitt, J. J.; 126 

Hibdseh, O.; 126 

Hiekey, M. J.; 36 

Hiekey, T. P.; 135, 351 

Hiekman, J.; 81 

Higgins, J.; 112 

Hill, O.; 150 

Hillenbrand, H.; 60 

Hines, E.; Ill, 225, 227, 303, 

317. 353 
Hipp, B. B.; 135 
Hippler. J.; 118 
Hirschfield, S.; Ill 
Hletko, P.; 81 
Hobe, P.; 149 
Hodapp, A.; 44 
Hoeltgen, M. M.; 81, 333 
Hoffman. A.; 150 
Hoffman. C.; 149 
Hofriehter, F. C; 81. 133 
Hogen, C. M.; 64, 81, 224. 226, 

227, 354 
Hogan, J. A.; 117. 287 
Hogan, B. J.; 136 
Hogsteen, L. ; 151 
Holton, H.; 239 
Holleran. J. P.; 81 
Holmes. W.; 149, 327 
Holscher, P.; 159 
Homan, L. E.; 81 
Homidge, G. E.; 81 
Honefenger, J.; 137 
Howitz, A.; 149 
Howard, C. A.: 148 
Howard, C; 152 
Howland, B.; Ill 
Howland. T.; 268. 275, 151 
Hoyer. M.; 81 
Hoyne, L.; 81 
Hoyne, W.; 118 
Hranilovich, M.; 116 
Hrdina, J.; 136 
Huba, A.; 81, 132 
Hudson, J.; 44 
Huff, J.; 82, 162 
Hvbke. V.; Ill, 315 
Hvde. C; 118 
Hyman, J.; 118, 277, 287 

I 
Ibelli, L.; 82, 131 
Ignoffo. M.; 82, 131 
Insull, Samuel Jr.: 35 
Isner, B.; 82, 131 
Irase, I.; 137 




9 3 1 



L O Y O L A N 




Jablon, E.; 152 

Jablonski, S.; 50. 

Jacks, L.; 118 

Jackson, R.; 149 

Jackobs, L.; 159, 238 

Jacobs, A.; 149 

Jacobs, J.; 124, 126 

Jacobsen, M.; 41 

Jacobsen, S. ; 151 

Jacobson. A.; 152 

Jacobson, E. ; 150 

Jaggers, J.; 125 

Jakubainski, C; 323 

Jakus, S.; 150 

James, E. D.; 82, 351 

Janis, C: 117 

Jansen, E.; Ill 

Janszen, J.; 112, 204. 206. 234, 

235, 319 
Jarrell, Sister; 58 
Jasinski, T. ; 136 
Jasionek, J.; 125 
Jauch, M.; 126 
Jedlows, S.; 150 
Jchlik, J.; 146 
Jelsomino. S. J.: 82. 133 
Jennings, H.; 277 
Jensen, E.; 116 
Jesky, P.; 82, 158 
Jesser, J.; 82, 134, 335 
Job, T.; 48 
Johansen, E.; 149 
Jobn. E.; 144 
Johnson. A.; 235 
Johnson, C. ; 112 
Johnson, C; 53 
Johnson, K.; 151 
Johnson, (;.; 112, 295, 317 
Johnson, J.; Ill, 277, 287 
Johnson, M. M.; 82, 163, 239 
Johnson. W.; 127 
Johnson, Win.; 46 
Johnston, B.; 82, 296 
Johnston, R.; 118 
Johnston, V.; 126 
Jones, L.; 151 
Jordan, J.; 82, 132. 144 
Joseph, E. ; 151 
Joyce, E.; 113 
Joyce, R.; 116 
Jucitis, J.; 112 
Judge, E.; 235 
Juliano, A.; 82, 131 
Junio, J.; 165. 239 
Jurpaspi. J.; 150 
Juska, F. C; 239 
Juszak. J.; 114 



Kachel, F.; 114 
Kaczorewski, C; 110 
Kadens. B. ; 144 
Kadlubowski, E.; 114 
Kadzewick, J.; 83, 131 
Kain. P.; 127, 315 
Kalkhurst. J.; 117 
Kallal, T.; 83. 349 
Kamchier, P.; 149 
kaminski, M.; 83, 109 
Kanefski, D.; 152 
Kaplan, H.; 150 
Kara, J.; 83, 109 
March. F.; 150 



Karl, R.; 152 
.._.leshe, E.; 165, 239 
Karnilowiez, J.; 150 
Karras, S.; 115 
Karsch, F.; 150 
Kavanaugh, J.; 339, 347 
Kavanaugh, J. S. ; 125 
Kaivaliegaski, D. ; 150 
eane. T.; 41, 124 
earney, H.; 165. 239 
Kearney, W.; 83, 124 
Kearns, J.; 116 
Reams, T., Ill 
Keating, B.; 83 
Keating, D. ; 83, 331 
eating, E.; 118 
•eating, J.; 118 
Keating, X.; 331 
Kedmond, P.; 149 
Keehan, J.; 83 
Keeleher, K.; 160 
eeley, R.; 137 
eenan, G. ; 113 
eenan, J.: 151 
__eenan, R.; 57 
Kees, R.; 113 

ldon. E.; 116 
Kelley. G.; 327 

■Ily, A.; 41, 123, 125, 347 
...lly, N.; 83, 168, 238 
Kelly, O.; 137 
elly, P.; 117 

elly. R. M. (S.J.); 34, 36, 37 
elly, \T.; 152 
elly, \T. A.; 125 
elly, W. J.; 84, 351 
elsey, L.; 84, 132 
endall, J.; 53 
Kenealy, J.; 117 
Kenner, M.; 84. 164, 237 
Kennedy, T.; 115, 244 
Kenney, M. ; 142 
envvard. E. ; 150 
Kenyon, H. ; 151 
Kerwin, D.; 144 
Kieffer. J.; 160 
Kienek, P.; 150 
Kenny. G.; 84, 131, 135, 137, 

333, 535, 351, 353. 
Kenny, M.; 84 
Kerrigan, A.; 84 
Kerwin, D.; 38, 321 
Kieley, E.; 149 

ley, R.; 43, 84, 109 
Kilev, W.; 141, 144 
Kimide, H.; 150 
Kindar, A.; 84, 131, 133 
King, S.; 159, 238 
Kingston. R.; 114 



iniery, P.; 45, 349 
irby, E.; 206, 327 
irby, W.; 51, 150, 327 
kland, A.; 137 



Kitzmiller. J.; 150 



152 

siak, A.; 84 
jper, D.; 152 
aus, C; 84, 331, 347 



Klebanskv, A.; 149 
Klees. F.; 150 
Klees, J.; 339 
Klenin, J.; 51 
Klenda, H.; 149 
Kleft. J.; 177 



Knittel, R.; 110, 204, 206. 208, 
210, 216, 244, 306, 319, 341, 
352, 353 

Kobrinsky, M.; 149 

Kochanski, L.; 150 

Kodl, F.; 110 

Koehler, E.; 159 

Koehler, J.; 84 

Koenig, P.; 145 

Koenig, J.; Ill, 306 

Koepke, A.; 113, 236 

Kogart, L.; 323 

Koehne, G.; 84, 131, 351 

Komasinski, V.; 85, 132, 323 

Koness, E. ; 114 

Konopa, J.; 85, 131, 323 

Kopacek, P.; 375 

Kostner, H.; 163 

Kotas, W.; 109 

Kotler, L.; 115 

Kotula, R.; 150 

Koukal, G.; 151 

Konrad, A.; 151 

Koziol, S.; 145 

Koziczynski, F.; 85, 160, 238 

Kramps, H.; 85, 131 

Krasniewski, E.; 323 

Krause, R.; 149 

Krieser, A.; 159, 238 

Kristan, G.; 85, 134 

Krupka, J. A.; 143 

Krnszka, G.; 85, 133 

Krvavica, A.; 263 

Krysinski, T.; 151 

Kubicz, E.; 118 

Kubik, J.; 150 

Kuchynka, 0.; 85, 133 

Kude'le. L.; 136 

Kuehnle, J.; 126 

Kuempel, M.; 159 

Kufta, J.; 85 

Kuempel, M.; 238 

Kuhinka, Jule, 46, 415 

Kuhlmey, R.; 145 

Kula. E.; 114 

Kunsch,'L.;"333' 
Kurland, H.; 149 
Kurpiewski, F. ; 151 
Kusmirek, T.; 118, 244, 296 
Kuttler, 115, 327 



Lach, F.; 149 

Lachmanrr, E. ; 151 

La Duca, J.; 149 

Laemmar. J.; 110, 303 

La Casse, V.; 159 

La Chapelle, J.; 162 

La Fond, C; 347 

Letz. L.; 239 

Lagorio, J.; 113, 232, 234, 235 

Lahoda, H. L.; 150 

Laing, B. O.; 150 

Lakemeyer, E. ; 165 

Lally, E.; 113. 315 

Lallv, J. N.; 115 

La Masney, M.; 162 

Landeck, E.; 152 

Lannon, J. J.; 86, 109, 210, 242, 

352 
Lansman, H.; 144 
Lapp, B.; 151 
La Porta, M.; 152 



9 3 



L O ¥ O L A N 



Lardner, J.; 64. 85, 321 

Larson, O. J.; 275 

Lamer, M. A.; 85 

Lasdon, A. R.; 144 

Lavin, K. R.; 85, 343 

Lawler, F.; 152 

Lawler, R.; 64, 86, 131, 351 

La Masney, M. M.; 86 

Lane, E. J.; 86 

Laskowitz, P.; 135 

Law, Dr.; 327 

Lawinger, M.; 159 

Layton, E.; 163 

Leahy, G.; 345, 351 

Leahy, J. M.; 84, 142 

Lear, M. W.; 38, 125, 339 

Lechlinski, W.; 207 

Lechowski, M. F.; 114 

Lennon. W.; 143 

Lieboldt, G. L.; 345, 351 

Leier, J.; 165, 239 

LeMav, S.J., Rev. C; 45, 243, 

244 
Lemire, G. E.; 150 
Le Mire, W. A.; 38, 86 
Lenihan, J. L.; 43, 110, 200, 203, 

216, 244. 247, 319, 347, 352 
Leonard, R. T.; 143 
Lerher, X. X.; 51 
Lescher, T. L.; 86, 134 
Leturne, H. L.; 150 
Lev, F.; 163 
Levaecare. J. P.; 145 
Levy, H. A.; 86. 131, 335 
Levy, Max; 149 
Lewis, G.; 152 
Lewis, M.; 143 
Lewis, I.; 163 
Lidwina, Sr. ; 58 
Lieherman. S.; 295, 298, 149, 

126 
Likowski. T.; 124 
Lindeman, F. : 117 
Lindsay, D. J.; 86 
Lindsay, R. J.; 86, 131, 345, 

350, 351 
Linklater. W. Y.; 41, 61, 122, 

125, 275 
Lipinski, W.; 152 
Lippold, W.; 152 
Lipsrombe, P. D. Q.; 51 
Lipsirh, M.; 114, 306 
Lipson, J.; 114 
Lisle. J.; 125 
Lisowski, T. ; 125 
Lockwood, A.; 151 
Lodeski. F.; 347 
Logalbo, M. M.; 86 
Logan, W.; 37, 52 
Lorenty, T.; 113 
Loser, J.; 145 
Loritz, T.; 244 
Loritz. R. P.; 116, 244 
Loskill, E.; 144 
Loskowski. G.; 163 
Losinski, V.; 87, 164, 239 
Lossman, M. ; 162 
Lowrey, W. P.; 41, 64, 87, 124 
Lubar, P.; 151 
Luber, E.; 152 
Ludwig, F. Malack; 110, 200, 

203, 243, 245, 319, 352 
Lukats, E. J.; 87, 131 
Lukitsoh. J. J.; 87, 109, 306,315 



Lundy. Y. U.; 329 
I. ii pari I lo, G.; 136, 337 
Luster, D.; 125 
Lulzenkirchen, F.; 270, 275 
Lynch, C. A.; 116, 244 
Lynch, C. E.; 125 
Lynch, E. J.; 117 
Lynch. M. E.; 87 
Lynch, T.; 113, 244. 315 
Lynch, W. J.; 40, 87, 124 
Lynn, L. ; 134 

M 

MacBoyle, R.; 50 
MacDonald, E.; 144 
Macey, P.; 331 
Machek, F.; 151 
Maciejewski, E.; 87, 323 
Madden. J.; 130, 331 
Majin, R.; 133 
Magliono, M. ; 115 
Magner, J.; 45 
Maguire. A.; 87, 131 
Magher, A.; 113 
Mahan, P. (S.J.), 37 
Maher, D. W.; 112, 203, 294, 

295, 296, 319 
Maher, D. B.; 115, 203, 319 
Mahonv. E.; 152 
Maihev, J v ; 132 
Majewski, E.; 87, 124 
Malachowski. E.; 137, 333 
Malanowski, J.; 152 
Malina, J.; 151 
Malinowski, H.; 136 
Malinski, A.; 87 
Mallon, C. E.; 39. 112, 215, 216, 

247, 319, 355 
Mammoser, J.; 112, 220, 225, 

226, 227, 244 
Mammoser, L.; 87, 131, 345 
Manelli. D.; 134 
Manelli, L.; 114 
Mangan, F.; 114 
Manikas, A.; 88, 133 
Mann, C. H.; 110, 209, 210, 

203, 216, 218. 247, 319, 355 
Mann, J.; 295, 296 
Mannin, S.; 51 

Marciniak, J. B.: 88, 131, 345 
Marcinkowski, E.; 152 
Marcinpowski, H.; 150, 207 
Marshall, D.; 163 
Martin. P.; 60 
Marlev, J.; 351, 331 
Marklam, M.; 117, 287 
Marquardt, C. A; 88, 131, 333 
Marrisey, X.; 126 
Marshall, S.; 133 
Martin, E.; 235 
Martin. F.; 88, 160 
Martin, H.; 149 
Martin, M. ; 88 
Martin, X.; 137 
Martis, V.; 239 
Maesman, M.; 125 
Mast, F.; 54 
Masterson, B.; 159, 238 
Mastromonica, M. ; 162 
Matavowsky, F. ; 113 
Matthies. R.; 130, 332 
Matulenas, J.; 117, 244 
Matiuszewski, R.; 110 
Maurer, J.; 118 



Mayer, J.; 126 
Mehren, E. J.; 36 
Mazar, C; 163 
McArdle, M.; 38 
McAuliqe, N.; 125, 339 
McBride, D.; 88, 160, 238 
McCabe, D.; 39, 88, 216, 217, 

220, 242, 244, 263, 353 
McCabe, L.; 88 
McCabe, R.; 110, 216, 217, 220, 

235, 244, 247, 355 
McCabe, I.; 235 
McCarney, G.; 239 
McCarthy, F.; 114 
McCarthy, H.; 110 
McCarthy, J.; 113 
McCarthy, J.; 117, 262 
McCarthy. P.; 88 
McCarthy, W.; 132, 351 
McClelland, F.; 272, 275 
McCormick, B.; Ill, 317 
McCormick, J.; 117 
McCormick, John;' 150 
McCormick, J. V.; 54, 37 
McCormick, J. J.; 127 
McCourt, J.; 109 
McCoy, J.; 150 
McCracken, F.; Ill 
McDermott, W.; Ill 
McDonold, R.; 150, 206 
McDonnell. A.; 88, 206, 158 
McDonnell, R.; Ill, 204, 226, 

216, 242, 244 
McDonough, F.; 88, 124 
McDonough, W.; 117, 317 
McEwer, W.; 149 
McGarr, C; 88, 160, 238 
McGillen, J.; Ill, 244, 306 
McGinnis, A.; 89 
McGinnis, P.; Ill, 315 
M.Givern, E.; 89. 109, 225, 226 
McGoldrick, K.; 89 
Mc<;overn, O.; 38, 89, 142. 321 
McGowan, J.; 112 
McGrail, W.; 116 
McGrain, W.; 114, 287 
McGrath. C; 162 
McGrath, M.; 89, 124 
McGregor, A.; 89 
McCren, D.; 114, 131 
McGuire, A;. 89 
McGuire, E.; 124 
McGuire, Eileen; 89. 144 
McGuire, H. ; 145 
McGuire, J.; 112, 303 
McGuire, J. F.; 116 
McGuire, P. J.; 89. 132,332,351 
McGuire, P. R.; 89 
McHale. E.; 112 
McHugh, M.; 89, 160, 238 
M.Intvre. J.; 116. 226, 244 
Mcjunkin, F.; 49 
Mckirchy, B.; 89 
McLaughlin, J.; 54 
McLaughlin, F.; 114. 287 
McLaughlin, M.; 162 
McMahon, M.; 235 
McMahon, T.; 116 
McMahon, S.; 144 
McNallv, H.; 333 
McNamara, J.: 351. 345, 333 
McNamara, M.: 90 
McNeil. W.; 126, 268, 275 
McManus, M. ; 117 




9 3 



L O Y O L A N 



McNicholas. C; 112, 244 


Moretli, F.; 337 


Nihbe, N.; 295 


McNichols, J.; 112 


Morris, C; 112, 244, 319 


Nicosia, A.; 116 


McSweeney, J.; 150 


Morris, R.; 61 


Niekamp, Rev. G.; 239 


McSweeney, W.; 90. 351 


Morrissey, M. M.; 91 


Nigro, D.; 93, 133 


McPigne, F.; 127 


Morrissey, W. F.; 113, 306, 315 


Nil.nera, T.; 93, 124 


McVady, J.; 113 


Morrison. A.; 112 


Noethe, E.; 93, 160, 238 


McVey, A.; 149 


Morrison, J.; 112, 234 


Nohava, A.; 93 


MrVey. D. C; 145 


Morrow, A.; 159, 238 


Nolan, M.; 65, 93, 160, 238 


McVeigh, J.; 90, 164 


Mosca, J.; 135, 433 


Nolan. Ray; 275 


Meadow, Green ; 335 


Moses, M.; Ill, 206 


Nolan, Rohert; 109. 315 


Meaghen, E.: 126 


Moszczenski. A. A.; 91, 134. 345 


Nona, S.; 118 


Mehren, E. J.; 6, 33 


Mousel, H.; 165 


Noonan, S.; 145 


Merzek, P.; 137 


Mowitt, J. P.; 91 


Norris, A.; 321 


Meier, G.; 116 


Mowitt, J. R.; 162 


Norton, Dr. E.; 266, 275 


Meiklepohn, J.; 159 


Moron, I. M.; 134 


Norton, J.; 152, 205, 207, 225. 


Melchiors, J.; 45 


Mrkvika, W.; 117 


227, 268, 275 


Melvin, H.; 90 


Mueller, A. H.; 53 


Nowak, E.; 150 


Melwood, W.; 114, 306 


Mueller. G. B.; 116, 244 


Nurnherger, L.; 93 


Mennite, N.; 90, 136 


Mulcahy. M. M.; 91 




Menlana. J.; 126 


Mullaney, A.; 110 


O 


Mertz, S.J., Rev. J.: 45, 178 


Mullen. M. L.; 91 


Obester, G.; 93, 131, 331, 345 


Mever, E.; 160 


Muller, H.: 165. 239 


Obuchowski, B.; 113 


Mever, W.; 339 


Mulvey, J. D.; 91 


O'Brien, M.; 235 


Miuhewick, S.; 134 


Mulvihill, M.; 235 


O'Brien, P.; 144 


Mitchell, E. M.; 143 


Mungovan, M.; 61, 110. 317 


O'Brien, T.; Ill, 226 


Mitchell. J.; 127 


Munro, M. M.; 94 


O'Brien, T. K.; 116 


Miller. B.; 65 


Murati. F.; 116, 216. 226, 244 


O'Brien, V.; 93. 158 


Muhail, M.; 47 


Muriella, G. ; 149 


O'Callahan. A.; 93 


Merles. E.; 152 


Murphv, A. A.; 331 


O'Connell, J.; 114, 287 


Meyers, C; 51 


Murphy, A.; 159, 238 


O'Connor, C; 94 


Mieek, L.; 149 


Murphv, A. E.; 241 


O'Connor, Chas. ; 149 


Mirhuda, R.; Ill 


Murphy. C; 286 


O'Connor, E.; 126 


Michuda, S.; 90, 124 


Murphy, C; 134 


O'Connor, G.; 94 


Mickewich, S.; 90 


Murphv, C. F.; 115. 287 


O'Connor, J.; 125, 346, 347 


Midlaney, D.; 127 


Murphv, D. J.; 207 


O'Connor, J. R. ; 124. 339 


Migelv, E.; 110, 317 


Murphv. D. R.; 38, 39, 91, 109. 


O'Connor, J. W.; 113 


Mikueki, L.; 149 


226, 315 


O'Connor, P.; 117 


Milewski, E.: 110 


Murphv, D. Z.; 92 


O'Connor, Richard; 45. 47 


Milford, E.; 90 


Murphv, E. M.; 118 


(•'Connor, Rohert; 112. 201 


Miller, B.; 90, 158 


Murphv. F.; 215, 269, 275 


O'Donnell, A.; 117 


Miller, D.; 115 


Murphv, H. I.; 92 


O'Donovan. W.; 116 


Miller, H.; 116 


Murphy, J. B.; 118 


O'Dwyer, E.; 112 


Miller. Hilda; 90, 158 


Murphv, J. P.; 113 


Oehlherg, M. ; 112 


Miller. L.; 134 


Murphv, J. R.; 136. 331 


Oehlherg, N.; Ill 


Miller. R.; 149 


Murphv, M.; 159, 238 


Offlendork, F. ; 152 


Milnarik, M.; 151 


Murphv, M. R.; 92, 333. 351 


O'Gradv, J.; 109 


Milord, E.; 160 


Murphv. P.: 92. 160, 206 


O'Hare, J.; 227, 331 


Minnis, E.; Ill 


Murphv, R. €.; 92 


Ohla. W.; 94 


Minster, M.; 90 


Murphv. R. J.: 61,' 92, 109, 215. 


Ohlheiser, J.; 11, 317 


Mironas, J.; 90, 135 


216, 218. 220 


Oldani, W.; 118. 277, 287, 296 


Mirro, J.: 114 


Murphv, S. F.; 92, 109 


Olech, R.: 327, 151 


Mitchell, H.; 150 


Murphv. W. H.; 112, 317 


Olivieri, E. ; 136, 337 


Mitchell, O.: 91, 133 


Murphv, W. H.; 115, 319 


O'Leary. D.; 333 


Mitchell. W.; 127 


Murphv, W. J.; 112 


Olson, H.; 112 


Mitsunaga, D.; 151 


Murray, B. V.; 92 


Olszewski, W.; 136 


Mitz. R.; 151 


Murrv. H.; 235 


O'Mallev. C; 159 


Mix, C; 49 


Murtaugh, J.; 135 


O'Mara, A.; 47 


Modeca, €.; 137 


Murtaugh, L.; 40, 112. 294, 295 


O'Meara. A.; 38, 59, 226 


Mogill, R.; 115 


Muzzieato. L.; 92, 131 


O'Neill, B.; 94, 164, 239 


Mokrohajsky, S.; 136 


Mvricka, L.; 277 


O'Neill. E.; 160 


Molengraft, C; 91, 131 


Myers, M. E.; 92 


O'Neill, T.; Ill, 294, 295 


Mollov, L.; 109. 267, 270, 275 




Oppice, H.; 53 


Mondo. J. <;.; 91, 109, 227, 


N 


O'Reillv, E.; 152, 206 


232, 234, 235 


Nacev, W.; 331 


O'Reillv. J.; 92 


Montgomery, W. ; 51 


Napollilli, F.; 149 


O'Rour'ke, T. ; 116 


Moore, A.;" 127 


Napolilli, V.; 274. 275 


Osten, J. F.; 144 


Moore. E.; 149 


Nash, T.; 127 


O'Toole, J.; 349 


Moore, R. M.; 91 


Natale, P.; 92 


Ottine, S.J., Rev. L.; 47 


Moore, T.; 152 


Navitzky, V.; 92 


Ozelka, A.; 136 


Moorhead, L. D.; 37, 48,353 


Nedved, H.; 152 




Mooter. J. A.; 43, 91, 109, 206, 


Needham. M.; 93 


P 


207. 315 


Neer, I.: 152 


Pacocha, E.; 152 


Moran. R. W.; 115 


Neri. M.; 93, 136. 337 


Paeton, M.; 165 


Moravek. J. J.; 142 


Neville, J.; 93. 160. 238 


Pahls, L.; 94, 142, 321 






THE 



» 3 



LOYOLA* 



Palmer, C; 117, 206 

Palmer, L.; 94 

Palumbo, L.; 130, 135 

Panzarella, C; 113, 325 

Parisi, J.; 137 

Park, A.; 115, 244 

Parkal, L.; 127 

Parent!, M. ; 94, 131 

Patek, S.; 118, 244 

Patti, A.; 152 

Paul, J.; 116 

Parese, A.; 235 

Pavik, P.; 94, 160 

Pawleck. G. ; 94, 158 

Peabody, S.; 36 

Peffer, J.; 114 

Pelka. J.; 149 

Pellenteri, N.; 95, 131 

Pendleton, E.; 52 

Perez, M. ; 136 

Perelli, G. ; 150, 327 

Pernin, S.J., Rev. C. ; 47 

Perry, H.; 150, 327 

Perzia, A.; 95, 131 

Pesetsky, L.; 126 

Peszvnski, A.; 150 

Petooff, J.; 331, 351 

Peterhaus, L.; HI 

Peters. C; 149 

Peterson, T. C; 142 

Peterson, W.; 117 

Peterka, A.; 126 

Petrik. R.; 145 

Pettcoff. J.; 95, 131 

Petrazio, J.; 333 

Pettinger, A.; 125 

Plefferle, E. ; 39, 108, 118, 277 

Pfuhl, Henry; 150 

Pfuhl, Howard; 327 

Phalan, J.; 239 

Phares, L.; 95. 124 

Phalan, J.; 274, 275 

Phillips, J.; 152 

Plunkett, P.; 127 

Pierce, M. ; 159, 238 

Pierozzi, P.; 163 

Pike, G.; 53, 327 

Pilling. V.; 95, 160, 238 

Pillote, A.; 95 

Pilut, J.; 152 

Pinney. H.; 53 

Pikas, C; 150 

Pike, R.; 151 

Piszezek, E.; 95, 134, 323, 345 

Pitzaferro, J.; 136, 337 

Plahetka, G. W.; 144 

Pleskovitch, A.; 162 

Plesnick, W.; 118 

Plunkett, P.; 41, 119, 347 

Podore, I.; 149 

Poduska, L. F.; 145 

Podvvicka, J.; 110 

Poklenkowski. A.; 112, 244 

Polrhlapek, A.; 165, 239 

Polito. A.; 95, 140, 337 

Pollock, S.; 149 

Pollowy, C; 114 

Pope, R.: 233 

Poppelreiter, C; 267, 271, 275 

Potashnik, M.; 151 

Potempa, L.; 112, 244 

Potuznik, J.; Ill, 315 

Powell, M.; 207 

Powers, H .; 151 



Powers, J.; 115. 277 
Powers, J. F.; 125 
Powers, M.; 95, 239 
Prahh, R. L.; 144 
Pratt, H.; 95 
Prawdzik. R.; 116 
Prendergast, J.; 95, 131 
Prendergast, M.; 95, 239 
Prest, W.; 142 
Pribram, E.; 49 
Prindaville, J.; 113 
Prusait, W.; 136 
Ptaszek, A.; 65, 96, 255 
Puhl, S.J., L.; 45 
Puterbaugh. P.; 52 



Quane, R.; 127, 207 
Quigley, M. J.; 36 
(Juinlan, Z, X.; 127 
Quinlan. 0.; 144 
Quinn, F.; 137 

Quinn, P.; 110, 202, 203, 216, 
234, 235, 244, 321 



Racette, K.; 117 

Rach, D.; 110, 315 

Racine, I.; 96 

Radcliffe, R.; 149 

Radke, F.; 112 

Radzvminski, S. F.; 96, 323, 315 

Rafferty, D. J.; 115, 206, 216, 

277, 319 
Raffcrtv, J. F.; 39, 108, 110, 

200, 203, 214, 216, 218, 219, 

244, 247, 282, 285, 355 
Raffcrtv, R. J.; 39,43, 96, 109, 

200, 203, 209. 214, 216, 244, 

319, 347, 352 
Raider, J. H.; 96, 135, 335 
Raines. C. D. ; 96, 136 
Rail, R. R.; 136. 294, 295, 333 
Raphael, M.; 160 
Raso, P.; 133 

Rau, G. J.; 96, 245, 251, 353 
Rausa, G.; 135 
Rauwolf, A.; 112, 306 
Raysa. R. G.; 96, 126 
Rea, R.; 152 
Ready, J.; 117 
Rebman, F.; 127 
Recoules, D.; 327 
Rector, W.; 162 
Reed, F. A.; 6, 136, 331 
Reed, A. P.; 96, 126, 200 
Reedy, T. J.; 34, 37, 50 
Reese, L.; 149 
Regan, H. T.; 115 
Regan, S.; 127 
Reichert, A.; 117 
Reichert, W.; 117 
Reid, F.; 38 
Reid, J. E.; 116, 277 
Reid, W.; 110, 317 
Reidy, W. J.; 96, 109 
Rciggcrt, F. F.; 331 
Reimers, D. F.; 96 
Reis, L.; 137 
Reiner. S.J., Rev. J. S.; 34, 

36, 37 
Renkoff, H.; 97, 131, 335 
Reutcky, J.; 127 
Reynolds, D.; 152 



Richardson, E.; Ill, 244 

Rightmire, H.; 159 

Rilly, E. E.; 97, 158 

Rilter, R.; 125 

Riordan, H. J.; 97, 160, 238 

Riordan, R. J.; 115 

Roberts, C. L.; 116 

Roberts, J. H.; 115, 135 

Robertson, R. W. ; 131 

Robilotti, J. G.; 91, 131 

Rocco, P.; 135 

Rocke, R.; 152 

Rodgers, IVT.; 343 

Roe, C. T.; 97, 131 

Rogers, M.; 159, 238 

Ronspiez, E.; 151, 327 

Rooney, F. J.; 55, 207 

Rooney, J.; 126, 294 

Ron, G.; 132 

Rosty, I.; 143 

Ross, R. R.; 150, 327 

Roszpowspi, E. J. ; 125 

Rotondi. A. J.; 97, 132, 337 

Rowley, T.; 143 

Rubinstein, W.; 151 

Ruble, R. ; 159 

Ruddy, M.; 97 

Rugis, L.; 145 

Ruiga, E.; 151 

Ruocco, II; 337 

Russell, J.; 134 

Russell, W.; 118 

Ryan, A. M.; 97, 158 

Rvan, D.; 163 

Ryan, E.; 125 

Rvan, C; 113, 341 

Ryan, H.; 159 

Ryan. M. L.; 59 

Rvan, M. L.; 97, 235 

Rvan, W.; 113, 244 

Rzeszotarski, W.; 113 



Sabo, M.; 97, 239 
Sachs, E.; 97, 351, 353 
Sachs, L.; 60, 285 
Sachtleber, D.; 150 
Sadler, W.; 149 
Safarik, R.; 151 
Saint Vincent, Sr.; 58 
Sahchen, S.; 125 
Salerno, G.; 110 
Saletta, S.; 136 
Salvador, G.; 47, 233, 234 
Salzman, H.; 149, 347 
Sankstone, M.; 134 
Sanderman, J.; 335 
Sanders, K.; 150, 327 
Sanfilippo, J.; 125 
Saracino, B.; 98 
Sarwin. T.; 98, 239 
Savage, J.; 145 
Sazania, J.; 8. 122 
Sbertoli, J.; 141 
Scala, 136, 337 
Scanlan, T.; 150, 207, 329 
Scanlon, E. ; 115 
Schaefer, M.; 51 
Schaller. O.; 150, 327 
Schaumberg, M.; 98 
Scheribel, C; 98, 132 
Schlemmer, G.; 98, 133 
Schmehil, E.; 118 




THE 193 



L © Y O L A N 




Schmeing, G.; 45 

Schmidt, S.J.. Rev. A.; 37,56 

Schmidt, G.; 98, 132 

Schmidt. J.; 149 

Schmidt, O.; 177 

Schmidt, \T.; 152 

Schmitz, B.: 118, 233, 234, 

273, 275 
Schmitz, H.; 49 
Schnaubelt, E.; 98. 158, 238 
Schneider. L. ; 115 
Schneiderman, H.; 142 
Schoonmaker, E.: 327 
Schow later, E. ; 15 
Schram, W.; 65, 107 
Schrefer, L.; 165, 239 
Schroeder, A.; 115 
Schroeder. H., 137, 323 
Schuck, R.; Ill 
Schuessler, R.; 113 
Schweitzer, R.; 339 
Schuhmann, R.; Ill, 272, 275, 

281, 285 
Schultze, A.; 110 
Schwarcz, B.; 98, 131. 335 
Schwartz, G.; 150 
Schwartz. W.; 152, 329 
Scott, J.; 98, 142 
Scudiero, G. ; 118 
Scully, S.; 112, 317 
Sears, J.: 98. 203 
Sebek, C; 150 
Seeley, P.; 333 
Segoe, B.; 152 
Serbst, C; 132. 331 
Sellmever. S.J., Rev. B.; 47 
Sellolten, J.; 127 
Semrad, J.; 45 
Semanski, M. ; 145 
Sendek, A.; 98, 160 
Senese. J.; 118, 232, 234 
Serio. M.; 99, 133 
Sexyon, J.; 118 
Sevffert, H.; 118 
Sevmour, M.; 235 
Schreffer, M.; 206 
Shanlev, W.; 117 
Shanof, S.; 149 
Shapiro, I.; 152 
Shay, S. S.; 145 
Shea, J.; 51 
Shearer. C; 159 
Sheehan, J.; 99 
Sheehan. L.; 126 
Sheehan, M.; 57 
Sheen, Rev. F.; 176 
Shelinski, 152 
Shepka, A.; 127 
Sherman, Samuel, 149 
Sherman, Sidney, 150 
Shevlin, F. E.; 143 
Shifrer. M.; 164, 165. 239 
Shimamura, A.; 99, 132 
Shipley, W.; 150 
Shoonmaker, E.; 150 
Showalter. J.; 162 
Showers, T. M., 99, 152 
Schroeder, K. O. A.; 296 
Shultz, G.; 136 
Sides, S.; 150 
Sidle, M.; 239 
Sidenhurg. F. ; 37. 46, 349 
Siedlinski, V.; 150 
Sieloff, P.; 152 



Silverman, H. ; 149 

Silvestri, G.; 113, 275, 282, 285 

Simon, F.; 99 

Simkus. J.; 151 

Simon, J.; 151 

Simon, I.; 149 

Simone. B.; 133 

Simons; 142 

Simpson, J.; 149 

Simpson, J.; 150, 327 

Singer, P.; 136 

Siminski, W.; 150 

Sitar, B.; 99, 239 

Skinner. M.; 151 

Slaughter, M. E.; 145 

Slisz, E. J.; 115 

Slomka, E.; 117. 145 

Slowi, E.; 165, 239 

Slavin, L.; 149 

Smialek, J. H.; 114 

Smith, J. N.; 118 

Smith, J. D.: 321 

Smith, J. J.; 99. 109, 275, 280. 

285 
Smith, L.; 151, 327 
Smith, M.; 235, 239 
Smith, P.; 137, 335 
Smullen, G. H.; 118 
Smullen, J. J.; 99 
Smyth, E. T.; 114, 234. 235 
Smyth, H.; 109 
Smvth, J. N.; 99, 134, 351 
Snyder, C. A.; 99, 142, 321 
Snider, F.; 149, 327 
Sobecki. R.; 150 
Sobie. H. M.; 99, 158, 238 
Soderstrom, S. : 125 
Solomon, B.; 152 
Solomon. S. D.: 333, 345 
Solomon, S.: 132 
Solons, J. M.; 100 
Sontag, N.; 100 
Sorowski, S.; 114 
Sorsen. H.; 150 
Southerland, I.; 100 
Southerland, V.: 160. 238 
Sowka, P.; 100 
Spackman, J.; 126 
Span, E.; 206 
Spangler, E.; 100, 131 
Specht, J.; 118 
Spellburg, M.; 135 
Spelman, T.: 100. 109, 206. 

352, 354, 210, 226, 206, 208 
Spiering, M.; 239 
Spires, L.; 163 
Spiteri, W.; 100 
Splamberg. C; 152 
Splatt, M.; 149 
Sprysak, E.; 150 
Spuller, L. ; 54 
Spwiot, P.; 150 
Srubas, E.; 115 
Stalle, A.; 115 
Slavinoga, R.; 117 
Stanczak, B.; 341 
Stack, M.; 100, 160 
Stadler, M.; 111. 271, 275 
Stahr. L.; 219 
Stalle, Z.; 226 
Stazio, G.; 135, 136, 337 
St. Clair, W.; 295 
St. Denis, C; 235 
Stiffes, E.; 333 



Steele, L.; 55 
Steffen, M.; 100 
Steggart, B.; 42, 45, 37 
Steinbrecher, F.; 100, 109, 206, 

352, 203, 210, 209 
Steinle, C; 134, 203. 202, 207 
Stern, L.; 151 
Sternasty, F.; 134 
Steve, T.; 100, 158 
Stevens, E.; 100 
Stewart, D.; 152 
Stewart, W.; 132, 101 
Steinberg, F. ; 152 
Stillo, J.; 117 
Stockman, G.; 101 
Strobel, J.; 101. 109, 295, 297 
Stroik, M.; 238, 159 
Strong, R.; 101 
Strubbe, K.; 101, 238, 158 
Stvbel. J.; 134, 323 
Stypinski, C; 149 
Swastek, E.; 133 
Suczak. J.; 126 
Sullivan, A.; 125 
Sullivan, A. G.; 101, 239, 158 
Sullivan, L.; 126 
Sullivan, B.; 112, 317 
Sullivan, D.; 125 
Sullivan. Den.; 133 
Sullivan, F.; 101 
Sullivan, H.; 101. 162 
Sullivan, J.; 101 
Sullivan, John; 113, 124 
Sullivan, M.; 101, 124, 143 
Sullivan, M. J.; 219 
Sullivan, R. D.; 116 
Sullivan, R.; 117 
Sullivan, T.; 101 
Sullivan. Tim; 117. 124. 277 
Summers, I.; 38 
Summers, J.; 226 
Sumpter, W.; 101 
Surges, S.; 102 
Sutton, C; 159 
Swanish, P.; 45 
Swanson, S. ; 102 
Swastek. E.; 102 
Sweeney, Butch.; 112, 319 
Sweeney, M.; 118 
Sweitzer, M.; 125 
Swendsen, \V. M.; 142, 144 
Swiatek, H.; 165, 239 
Svlvan, A. ; 152 
Szczurek, E.; 114, 233 
Szymanski. E.; 113 



Tabaka, F. B.; 102, 131 
Tap. J. E.; 150 
Tarlow. V. S.; 102, 351 
Tavlor, E.; 117 
Taylor, R.; 277 
Teders, C. B.; 102, 158 
Teresi, G; 152 
Testa, I. E.; 102. 162 
Thayer, E.; 152 
Thieda, E. S.; 136, 333 
Thieda, Edwin; 136 
Thiel. B.; 151 
Thometz. A. L.; 114 
Thompson, A.; 117 
Thompson, E.; 159, 238 
Thompson, M. G.; 102. 162. 239 
Thompson, R.; 301 






THE 



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L O Y O L A N 



Thomsen, A. M.; 150 

Thomsen, J. H.; 115 

Tichy, J.; 152 

Tigerman, J.; 294, 295, 296 

Timmons, A. M.; 102 

Tischler, J.; 152 

Tomczak, A. C; 102, 109, 206, 

208, 216, 220, 319, 352, 353 
Tompkins, H. J.; 102, 345 
Tordella, L. W.; 108, 112, 201, 

203, 209, 210, 216, 224, 226, 

244. 295, 299 
Tornabene. F.; 118, 244, 333 
Towle, V.; 133 
Traeht, R. R.; 102, 132 
Trankner, I.; 163 
Trapp, S.; 132 
Trappe, M.; 353 
Trappe, H. J.; 103, 331, 351 
Treado, E. V.; 103 
Tread* ell. C; 159. 238 
Terese, C; 149 
Trudelle, W.; 117 
Trungabe, P.; 118 
Tubbs, E.; 47 
Tweedv, Dr.; 49 
Twohev, J. T.; 103, 131, 344, 

345, 351 
Twomey, H. ; 315 

U 
Ungaro. V.; 113, 206, 234, 235, 

325, 244 
Unger, J.; 142 
Unavitch, J.; 125 
Urist, M.; 135 
Urwan, L.; 112 
Luillaume, M.; 103 



Valba. J.; 149, 329 
Valenta, V.; 137 
Valentine, H. B.; 333 
Valini, D.; 351 
Van Druggen. A.; 142 
Vaneeko, M.; 103, 133 
Van Driel, A.; 47, 349 
Van Nest, W. A.; 333 
Van Hossen, B.; 49 
Vanderbosch, E.; 162 
Vanruska. M.; 103, 160 
Vargus, V.; 331 
Va.-umpaur, J.; 150 
Vaughan. J.; 143 
Ver Canteren, C; 103, 168, 239 
Vermeren, P.; 114 
Verne, H.; 151 
Vichick, A.; 151 
Viel, R.; 149 
Villani, M.; 235 
Vincenti. A.; 135 
Vincenti, F.; 103, 133 
Vinrenti. P.; 137, 337 
Vitaeco, J.; 136, 337 
Vitullo, A.; 163 
Viviano, M.; 136 
Volini, C; 130 

Vonesh, J.; 110, 203, 207, 216, 
244, 304. 306 



Vita, W.; 110, 216, 244, 306 
Vukits, S.; 144 



Vt a.lilowski, C; 151 

Waeseo, J.; 103, 109, 220, 275, 

280, 285 
Wager, W.; 331 
Wagner, O.; 151 
\\ agmeister, M.; 152 
Wagner, J.; 103, 109, 281. 

285, 297 
Wagner, M.; 103, 132 
Wagner, R.; 115 
Walden, G.; 150, 327 
Waldron, J.; 339, 347 
Wallvogel, L.; 109, 315 
Walker, E.; 331 
Walker, N.; 117, 317 
Wall, M.; 149 
Wallin, R.; 103, 109 
Walls, G.; 150 
Walser, M. F.; 143 
Walsh, H.; 149 
Walsh, J.; 134 
Walsh, S.J.. J. F.; 39, 47, 126 
Walsh John; 133 
Walsh, J. J.; 104, 351 
Walsh, Jos. A.; 110, 200, 203, 

214, 216, 219, 242. 244, 247, 

352, 355 
Walsh, M.; 137 
Walsh, Jennie, 165 
Walsh, Martin; 244 
Walsh, T.; 39, 122. 272, 275 
Walzack, M.; 331 
Warzrak, G.; 150, 331, 329 
Ward, M.; 331 
Ward, Win.; 118. 234, 235, 315, 

331 
Waszkowirz, A.; 104 
Waters, Gregory; 104, 131 
Watson, K.; 151 
Wawrsynski, W.; 114 
Wauszkowitz, A.; 133 
Waxier, A.; 149 
Webber. G.; 162 
Weeheler, J.; Ill 
Weigel, C; 104, 351, 345 
Weiger, ML; 331 
Weimer, G.; 275 
Weinless. J.: 104, 132, 335 
Weintraub, H.; 150 
Weiss, J.; 49, 151 
Weitzner, M.; 145 
Weleh, J.; Ill 
Welderbach, H.; 58 
Werthman, P.; 104, 132, 345 
West, C; 104. 109 
Wexler, D. L.; 145 
Whalen, J.; 159 
Wbalev. J.; 38, 104, 327, 345 
Whelan, J.; 124, 238, 287. 306 
White, G.; 115. 317 
White, W.; 117 
White, Win.; 152 
Wiatrak, L.; 113 
Wiedemann, W.; 115 



Wieland, E.; 117, 296 
Wiener, J.; 149 
Wiesbooek, J.; 116 
Wilenx, J.; 150 
Wiley, R.; 118 
Wilhelm, H.; 105, 124, 341 
Wilhelm, G.; 159, 238 
Wilhelmi, D.; 315 
Wilkins, W.; 112, 2 44 
Wilier, M.; 150 
Wilson, H.; 105, 132, 333, 35 
Wilson, S.; 145 
Wilson, S.J., S.; 56 
Windier, J.; 152 
Windhaueur, M.; 349 
Weinskunas. F.; 105, 132 
Wisniewski, L.; 105, 133, 164 
Witkiewicz, S.; 104, 323 
Witmeyer, F.; 104 
Wolrott, C; 287 
Wolfe. M.; 104, 239 
Wolff, H.; 115, 207, 306 
Wolsrifer, M.; 126 
Wal>ka, J.; 165, 239 
Wood, R.; 127 
Woodlock, D.; 149 
Woods, J.; 118, 277 
Workman. N. ; 327 
Wotcik, S.; 105 
Wozczvnski, S.; 151 
Wroble, R.; 149 
Wrublewski, K.; 149 
Wurl, J.; 239 



Yates, T.; 105 
Yamare, R.; 135 
Yuskis, Z.; 331 



Zabel, M. 1).; 56. 198. 203. 210. 

354 
Zaoharias, G.; 114 
Zahler, T. ; 125 
Zalatorius, R.: 306 
Zalas, H.; 105, 164, 239 
Zarzecki, W.; 135 
Zarzecki, E.; 118. 323 
Zapolskv. S.; 149 
Zei. R.; 105 
Zeller, S.; 105 
Zelden, Z.; 125 
Zenrka, E.; 105, 131, 323, 345 
Zerwer, D.; 149 
Zia. X.; 136 
Zirkus, A.; 116 
Ziegler, C; 116 
Ziherle. A.; 152 
Zielinski, J.; 105, 131 
Zikmund, A.; 136, 333 
Zinngrate, L.; 112, 234, 235 
Ziolhowski, H.; 152 
Zippier, L.; 165, 239 
Zulev. B.; 150, 295 
Zulev, L.; 105, 345 
Zwik'stra, G.: 110, 216, 244, 

302. 303, 319 




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T H E 1931 L © Y O I A X