(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Loyolan"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/loyolan1939unse 



?^f ^ 



LAKE SHORE CAMPUS MEMBERS 

Charles J. O'Laughlin, editor-in-chief 



Roger C. Slatterv, managing editor 
Harold J. Frev, assistaiit editor 
John Walch, staff artist 
William C. Smvrdoisi, fraternity editor 
Warren Matt, sports editor 
Edgar Martin, photographer 
Edward Landgren, photographer 



Charles J. Nesbitt, copy editor 
Norbert Hrubv, associate editor 
Eugene Dubay, business manager 
Paul Hummert, club editor 
James Conway, senior editor 
Frank Derby, photographer 
Edward Nesbitt, photographer 



Jack O'Connor, Ray Kennedy, Bernie Kiley, John Grogan, assistants 



REPRESENTATIVES 

Edward X. Crowley, Medical School James C. O'Brien, Law School 

John Gannon, University College Torrence Hecht, S.J., ff'est Baden College 





CHARLES J. O'LAUGHLIN, Editor 
ROGER C. SLATTERY, Managing Editor 




IN MEMORIAM 

Reverend Frederick. Siedenburg, S.J. 
Dr. Charles N. Johnson 

Dr. Henry Schmitz 




unde^ ^^^ ^^,,, and g 

, . evoWed a 





West Baden College 
CuDAHY Tower 

Gynmasium 





CUDAHV 

Science Hall 
Hall 



S' 




School of Medicine 



DuMBACH Hall 
Mercy Hospital Dispensary 



'm^% 













Faculty 

Building 




University Coi.lece 
School of Dentistry 
Library Walk 




Klizabeth M. Cudahy 
Memorial Library 




Early Stages in the CoNSTRUCTroN 
OF THE Chapel. 



The "Song in Stone" Assuming 
Form. 



The Skeleton of the Chapel is 
Completed and Is Now Ready For 
THE Stone Work. 




. o 



. A^^^ 



r^ov3^^^ 



^o^^^' 



S^^' 



^\0^ 




hAt^<^^ 




REVEREND SAMUEL KNOX WILSON, S. J. 

President of Loyola University 



[Hini i 



PRESIDENT OF LOYOLA UNIVERSITY, 
AN EDUCATOR OF WIDE RENOWN. 



FROM DREAM TO REALITY is the 

iiiispcikcii sentiment of both Father 
Wilson and Father Mertz as they 
ciinipare tlie model of the chapel with 
what has already been completed. 




With a keen eye of the lapidly changing world 
and with the Christian principles guiding Jesuit edu- 
cation fixed firmly in mind, the Rev. Samuel Knox 
Wilson, S.J., president, skillfully directs the course of 
Loyola University. 

Having received his Ph.D. degree in history at 
Cambridge University, Father Wilson is the author of 
a widely used textbook on American history and a 
competent authority on present-day affairs. One of 
the most prominent and influential educators in the 
United States, he was re-elected secretary of the Col- 
lege and University Department of the National 
Catholic Educational Association and a member of 



the National Executive Board of that organization. 
He is also a member of several other of its committees 
and Editor of its newspaper. The College News- 
letter, which is issued quarterly to Catholic colleges 
and universities. 

Chief among the several advancements made at 
Loyola since Father Wilson jjceanic President in 1933 
is the inauguration of the honors system, a develop- 
ment for which he received nation-wide recognition. 
For his many services to Loyola, for the remarkable 
progress Loyola has made under his leadership, and 
for his outstanding career as a nationally known and 
respected educator. Father Wilson is a President of 
whom we may feel justly proud. 



THE NEWEST BUILDING in the T'ni- 
versity is right outside I'ather Wilson's 
office. He freciuentlv inspects the 
progress of the construction of the 



AN UNTIRING WORKER, Father 
Wilson remains at his desk until late 
every day seeing that all those details 
of the LTniversity requiring his atten- 
tion are properly disposed of. 



AS PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVER- 
SITY, Father Wilson jiresides at all 
Convocations. As one interested in 
true education, he cannot but feel 
proud of these products of Jesuit 
teaching. 





STUYVESANT PEABODY is chairman of the Adminis- 
trative Council. 

EDWARD J. FARRELL is the legal adviser of the Ad- 
ministrative Council. 




ADMINISTRATIVE 



To direct the affairs of any laige university requires 
a knowledge of business as well as of education. Recog- 
nizing the fact that men in religious orders oftentimes 
have not had the necessary training for the successful 
management of finances, Loyola's administrators in 1930 
organized a small group of experienced, outstanding 
Chicago business men who were both able and willing 
to give sound advice to aid in the solution of Loyola's 
business problems. Thus was begun the Administrative 
Council, a body which has time and again proved itself 
indispensable to the university. 

The Administrative Council is composed of a general 
chairman, a legal adviser, and three committees of three 
members each. These eleven men have unselfishly and 
unsparingly given of their time and counsel to Loyola. 
They are men who, having achieved great success in the 
business world, have not forgotten that period of training 
through which all men must pass, but rather, mindful of 
the Catholic traditions in education, they are freely 
aiding the furthering of those traditions by giving to 
Loyola that which is most dear to them, their own time 
and service. And to them Loyola owes a real debt of 
gratitude. 

The three committees are finance, public relations, 
and buildings and grounds. The whole council meets 
only once annually, but committee meetings are called 
more frequently, and the advice of individual members 
is sought whenever needed by the administrators of the 
University. 

General chairman of the council is Mr. Stuyvesant 
Peabody, of the Peabody Coal Company. Mr. Edward 
J. Farrell, of Brewer and Farrell, leading Chicago attor- 
neys, is legal adviser. 

Necessarily the most active of the three committees 
during the past several years has been the Finance 
Committee, of which Mr. Samuel InsuU Jr., of the W. A. 
Alexander Company, is chairman. He is assisted by Mr. 
Charles F. Clarke, cf Halsey, Stuart and Company, and 
by Mr. Matthew J. Hickey, President of Hickey and 
Company. 

The Committee on Public Relations shapes the adver- 
tising and publicity policies of the University. Its 
chairman is Mr. Edward J. Mehren, of the Portland 
Cement Association. Its other members are Mr. Lawrence 
A. Downs, of the Illinois Central Railroad, and Mr. Martin 
J. Quigley, of the Quigley Publishing Company. 

The Committee on Buildings and Grounds advises on 
major problems connected with Lo3'ola's buildings and 
other properties. It is composed of Mr. David F. Brem- 
ner, of Brcmner Brothers Biscuit Company, chairman, 
Mr. Edward A. Cudahy Jr., cf the Cudahy Packing 
Company, and Mr. Walter J. Cummings, of the Con- 
tinental Illinois National Bank and Trust Company. 



COUNCIL 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Samuel Ixsul, Jr. 
Charles F. Clarke 
Matthew J. Hickey 



PUBLIC RELATIONS 
COMMITTEE 

Edward J. Mehrex 
Martin J. Quigley 
Lawrence A. Downs 



BUILDING AND 

GROUNDS 

COMMITTEE 



David F. Bremner f 

Edward A. Cudahy, .In j 

Walter J. Cummings 





THE REVEREND SAMUEL KNOX WILSON, S.J., 

chairman of tlie Afademic Council. 



Perfect unity of government is essential to 
any university. Realizing that such unity is best 
achieved through the operation of a body of 
representatives from the several divisions of the 
university, in 1928 the Reverend Robert M. 
Kelley, S.J., then President of Loyola University, 
founded the Academic Council. The Council is 
composed of the President, all regents, deans, and 
assistant deans, and the general registrar of the 
University. At regular meetings, presided over 
by Father Wilson, it considers important aca- 
demic and student welfare problems affecting 
more than one division of the University. 

There is no doubt that the Academic Council 
has had a greater effect upon the coordination 
and cohesion of the various units of the University 
than any other single factor. The spirit of 
cooperation and of making the needs of one 
division subservient to these of the whole Uni- 
versity has spread down from the Council through 
the faculty to the student governing bodies, and 
finally to the students themselves, thus per- 
meating the entire structure of Loyola. 



Among the things decided upon this year by the Academic 
Council was a reduction in tuition granted to all full-time 
employees of the University and their children in the various 
academic and commerce divisions of the University (in- 
cluding Loyola Academy). This will extend to members 
of the faculty, clerical help, and the maintenance staff. 

Also approved this year was the beginning of student 
personnel work on the Lake Shore Campus, with the Dean 
of the College of Arts and Sciences acting as personnel 
officer and being assisted by the assistant dean, the registrar, 
and a special clerk to make the materials and information 
needed for this work readily available. 

Among the changes made in the curricula was the 
abolition of the degree of Bachelor of Science in Medicine, 
to be effective at the close of the present academic year. 
This degree was given after the completion of three pre- 
medical work and the first year in the School of Medicine. 

A proposal was made by the Dean of the College of 
Arts and Sciences to arrange a special curriculum for a 
selected group of superior students working for the Bachelor 
of Arts degree which would enable them to secure that 
degree after three years of college work and should induce 
them to go on into the Graduate School. If successful, 
this special curriculum might eventually be extended into 
Loyola Academy, so that outstanding students could begin 
it in their third year of high school. The Academic Council 
approved the experiment and when the details are worked 
out it will be put into effect. 

Among other questions discussed but not definitely 
decided upon at the time of this printing were the abolition 
of the degree of Bachelor of Science in Dentistry and the 
discontinuance of the combined curriculum leading to a 
Bachelor of Arts degree after three years of college and 
one year of medicine. 

From the measures adopted by the council during the 
past year, it is rather obvious that at all times they have 
the best interests of the school in mind. To keep the school 
up to a high scholastic level, and at the same time main- 
tain the personal relationship of faculty and student that 
is characteristic of Loyola is one of its greatest problems. 
The Council has been responsible for the course of action 
that Loyola has taken for the past eleven years and, with 
this responsibility has been extremely successful. It is 
through the work of this body, that the various divisions 
of the university have been enabled to work more as a 
unit and less as a separate school with no common ties 
to the rest of the departments. There can be little doubt 
that the Council will continue to be successful along these 
lines for many years to come. 



1 
J 








1 
J 





First Row T\w Kt-vercnd William A. Fiiiiipnai), S..I., Mi-. Henry T. Chaiulicilain, The Reverend Elmer A. Barton, 
S..I., Dr. William H. G. Logan, Mr. John C. Fitzgerald. 

Second Row—The Reverend Edward I,, ('ohion, S..!., The Reverend Thomas A. Egan, S..I., Dr. Louis D. Moorhead, 
The Reverend Francis ,J. Gerst, S..I., The Revciend .John P. Xoonan, S.J., The Reverend Jame.s V. Kelly, S..J. 

Third Row- Dr. James A. Fitzgerald, Mi-. Bertram J. Steggert, The Reverend George L. Warth, S.J., Mr. Francis 
J. Rooney, Dr. Paul Kiniery, Dr. John G. Powers. 





THE REVEREND RALPH A. 
GALLAGHER, S.J., professor 
and chairman of the depart- 
ment of sociology. 



DR. THOMAS L.GRISAMORE, 

professor of orthodontia in the 
school of Dentistry. 





MR. WALTER A. FOY, assist 
ant professor of economies. 



DR. JOSEPH SEMRAD, asso.' 
iate professor of liiology. 




MR. WILLIAM 
H. CONLEY, 

lecturer in eco- 
nomics. 



FACULTY 




MISS MARIE SHEAHAN, 

Directress of the Home Study 
Dep.artment. 




THE REVEREND AUSTIN G. 
SCHMIDT, S.J., professor of 
education and director of the 
Loyola University Press. 



FACULTY 



THE REVEREND JAMES J. 
MERTZ, S.J., professor and 
chairman of the department of 
classical languages. 




THE REVEREND JOHN I. 
GRACE, S.J., instructor in phil- 
osophy, Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Athletics, and Father 
Minister. 






MR. J. RAYMOND SHERIFF, 

instructor of English. 



THE PEVEREND ALLAN P. 
FARRELL, S.J., Prefect general 
of studies of the Chicago Prov- 
ince of the Society of Jesus. 



DR. EDWARD P. LILLY, in- 
structor of History. 




DR. FRANK A. McJUNKIN, 

judlcssdr and cliainnan of the 
de])aitment iif pathology, bac- 
teriology, and preventive med- 
icine in the School of Medicine. 



DR. PLINY G. PUTERBAUGH, 

professor of oral surgery in the 
school of Dentistry. 





FACULTY 



DR. THESLE JOB, (upper left), pro- 
fessor of anatomy in the School of 
Medicine. 



DR. EARL E. KLEINSCHMIDT, 

(upper right), chairman of the depart- 
ment of pubUc health in the School 
of Medicine. 



MR. JOHN J. WALDRON, (center 
left), insfructiii- of Law in the School 
of Law. 



MR. LOUIS TORDELLA, (center 
right), in.-<tructor in the department 
of Mathematics. 



DR. JOSEPH Y. LeBLANC, (circle), 
assistant professor and chairman of 
the department of Modern Languages. 



MR. JAMES A. S. HOWELL, (lower 
left), assistant professor of law in the 
School of Law. 



DR. JAMES J. CALLAHAN, (lower 
right), associate professor of Bone and 
.Joint surgery in the School of Medicine. 




FACULTY 



THE REVEREND ENEAS 
B. GOODWIN, (upper left), 
professor and chairman of 
the Department of Economics. 



MR. JOHN ARTHUR 
KEMP.S.J., (upper right), in- 
structor in History. 



DR. THEODOSI A. MOG- 
ILNITSKY, (centei- right), 
assistant professor of Eco- 
nomics. 



DR. REUBEN M. STRONG, 

(center left), professor and 
chairman of the department 
Medicine. 



THE REVEREND AL- 
PHONSE SCHMITT, S.J., 
(circle), professor and chair- 
man of the Department of 
Phvsies. 



MR. JOHN C. HAYES, 

(lower left), in.structor of 
Law. 



MR. SHERMAN STEELE, 

(lower right), professor of Law. 





LOYOLA 



THE REVEREND EDWARD L. COLNON, S.J., 

iiio<lerator of the I'liion. 

HENRY McDonald, president of the Union. 



OFFICERS 

Henry J. McDonald 

Jerome Burke 

Martin E. O'Shaughnessy 

Emelie Krttppa 

Rev. Edward L. Colnon, S.J. . 



President 

Vice-President 

Treasurer 

Secretary 

Faculty Moderator 



Most authoritative of all student organizations 
is the Loyola Union Board of Governors, created in 
1928, the supreme student governing body of the 
University. All students are i-pso facto members of 
the Union, but only their elected representatives on 
the Board of Governors actually do the governing. 

Generally, the Union, by which general name the 
Board of Governors is most commonly known, works 
towards all university integration and student har- 
mony. Specifically, it runs four social functions a year; 
tells other organizations how to run theirs; holds 
money in trust for classes and clubs; searches for 
ways and means to attain financial independence; 
reflects student opinion to the Academic Council; 
meets once monthly and dines once yearly at a close- 
season banquet. 

The Union is composed of three representatives 
from each school, the editor of the Loyola News, 
and a faculty moderator. During its first year of 
existence it did little else than meet monthly and 
hold dances periodically, being hindered in its opera- 
tions by differences of opinion among representatives 
from the various schools. Later on, however, repre- 
sentatives learned to subordinate the interests of one 
school to those of the whole university and harmony 
was affected. Standouts in the fight for greater 
cooperation among the schools were James Brennan, 
1931-1932; Martin Fee, 1934-1935; John E. Brennan 
and John Hayes, 1936-1937. 

This year the LInion took an amazing bound 
forward in actual accomplishment. A well-balanced 
group of officers, elected from their number, took the 
helm last spring. President was Henry J. McDonald, 
this year a senior in the Day Law School. Long 
active on the Arts campus, McDonald's name is a 
password in the Law School as well. Serious, legal- 
minded and efficient, McDonald has proved an ideal 
leader. Vice-President was Jerome Burke, quiet but 
popular Medical senior. Gifted with Irish humor, 
as well as a rare sense of responsibility, Burke has 
been an invaluable cog in the Union. Youngest of 
the officers was Martin E. O'Shaughnessy, aggressive 
and executive-minded Arts junior, who was elected 
by acclamation to the treasurer's post. Emilie Kruppa, 
shy, pretty University College junior was the fourth 



UNION 



speedily cliiuljetl out of the I'cd with fervent erics (jf 
"Nevermore." It took a step towards campus con- 
cessions by furnishing the Arts student lounge with 
an electrical phonograph. It tightened up its internal 
finances; and provided for an annual public statement 
of finances. 



member and secretary of the quartet which produced 
such striking changes in Union policies and action. 

Executively speaking, this year the Union revised 
and streamlined its constitution, by-laws, and statutes. 
Vague points regarding student action and organiza- 
tion were clarified, as well as much legislative "dead 
timber lopped off. It sanctioned open campaigning 
for election to the Board of Governors, thus arousing 
student interest in their own representatives. More 
aggressive representation will result. It threw open 
Union records to the student eye by placing them in 
the Cudahy Library for inspection. It resolved to 
draw up annual reports to the student body. It 
completed plans for the Student Handbook, which 
will be put out in September. 



Financially speaking, at the start of last September 
the Union, for the second time in its nine years of 
history opened the year deficit in the treasury. It 



Socially speaking, the Union amazed Loyolans. 
The Freshman Welcome Pow-Wow, held September 
30 in the Alumni gymnasium, drew a record throng 
of over three hundred couples. It was the official 
opener of all-University social life. More lavish was 
the Fall Frolic, held November 11 in the beautiful 
Gold Room of the Congress Hotel and featuring 
Charlie Gaylord and his orchestra. An overflow 
crowd jammed into every corner and kept Union 
members busy rolling up carpets and setting tables. 
Something new was the St. Patrick's Day Dance 
held March 17 in the gymnasium. Originated by 
Treasurer O'Shaughnessy, it proved an overwhelming 
success, luring a full house of merry-makers. No 
small part of the success of the dance was due to 
The Loyola News, which merged with the Union to 
stage it. Last of the smash hits was the Senior Ball, 
which kept up the tradition of a social and financial 
success and ended the year in a dignified manner. 
The striking feature of this year's dances was the 
novel advertising displays before each, employing all 
sorts of stunts to arouse student interest. 



LOYOLA UNION. Seated, O'Brien, Murphy, Lennertz, Feehan, Shanahan, O'Shaughnessy, McDonald, Burke, Kruppa, Conway, 
Canie, Prendeisast, Tliompson, O'Neill; Standing, Wilhelm, Courtney, Schmidt, McKeever, Prindaville. 





WILLIAM O'BRIEN 

President of the 
Arts Student Council 



Front Row — Burns, Wendt, Drisooll, Bremer, Hruby, 
Maroiniak, Garvey. 

Second Row — M. O'Shaugnessy, McKeever, Shields, 
Dickow, Hofherr, F. O'Shaugnessy. 

Back to Camera — O'Brien. 



ARTS COUNCIL 



The Arts Student Council is the official student governing 
body on the campus of the College of Arts and Sciences. In 
general its tasks are to organize and correlate student activities, 
to foster customs and traditions, and to effect friendly rela- 
tions between faculty and students. Specifically it prepares 
agenda for all class meetings and assemblies, approves class 
jackets and rings, oversees class dances and other class under- 
takings, sponsors interclass football games, arranges tea-dances 
with Mundelein and Rosary Colleges, and has the last word 
in all student matters, subject, of course, to the dean. 

The Council is composed of activity leaders and its own 
specially elected officers. This year under the exceptional 
leadership of William O'Brien, Arts senior, it was particularly 
active and efficient. Besides handling its routine business 
with great effectiveness and success, it also took upon itself 
the task of improving student government. In January it 
sanctioned open electioneering for all class and Council offices, 
and in March, to make for greater efficiency, it cut its own 
membership from seventeen to seven. 




BAR ASSOCIATION 



The students of the Loyola Law School voted their approval 
to the institution of the Loyola Bar Association during the 
fall semester. The old Law Council had become inactive and 
the new vehicle was substituted to revitalize and co-ordinate 
activities in the Law School. 

Officers for this year were: Raymond Vonesh, day senior, 
president; Joseph Prindeville, night senior, vice-president; 
Joseph Czonstka, day junior, secretary; and Thomas Segan, 
night junior, treasurer. The offices are divided among the 
day and night school and the positions alternate yearly. 

The greater part of the year was spent in the tedious 
process of organization. A constitution was formulated and 
attempts made to stimulate activities in the school. The 
first undertaking was a smoker to fete the Frosh. 

The Loyola Bar Association consists of a faculty moderator 
appointed by the dean and four elected officers. At least one 
of the officers must be included on each of the various com- 
mittees on student activities such as the committee on Legal 
Publications, on Brandeis Competition, on entertainment, 
on the Illinois Junior Bar Association, on Student Welfare, 
on Student convocations, and on Loyola Union Representa- 
tives. 




RAYMOND VONESH 

President, of tlie 
Har .\ssoeiation 



LOYOLA BAR ASSOCIATION— Lynch, Brandstrader, 
McDonald, Peiel, P.rennan, Czonstka, Vonesh, Xevv- 
house. 





CLASS 
PRESIDENTS 



LAKE SHORE 




ROBEKT A. HofHERR 


Senior Class 


George Fitzgerald 


Junior Class 


Frank O'Shaughnessy 


Sophomore Class 


Dan Dickow 


Freshman Class 


MEDICINE 




John J. Manning 


Senior Class 


John B. Condon 


Junior Class 


Ralph Fintz 


Sophomore Class 


LAW 




Frederick Brookmeyer 


Senior Class 


Thomas Guinane 


Junior Class 


Eugene White . 


Freshman Class 



CH©®"- 



A«® C8t^ 






THE 



THE REVEREND FRANCIS J. GERST, SJ. 

(far left), dean of the Graduate School. 



DR. PAUL KINIERY, (left), assistant dean of 
the Graduate ScIkjoI. 



Although the Graduate School of Loyola University 
has been in existence only thirteen years, its influence 
is widely felt in fields of research and scholai'ship. 
Although some graduate courses had been offered 
prior to 1926 by the various schools of the university, 
it was believed that such work suffered from lack of 
organization and supervision. Consequently, in that 
year, the Reverend William H. Agnew, S.J., then 
President of the University, founded the Graduate 
School. The first Dean of the Graduate School was 
the Reverend Austin G. Schmidt, S.J. 

In 1926 the Master of Arts degree was offered in 
Education, Law, Medicine, Psychology, and Sociology, 
and the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Education. 
In subsequent years the graduate degrees in Law and 
Medicine were discontinued and the degree in Social 
Work replaced the degree in Sociology. Advanced 



courses leading to the Master's degree in Historj^, 
English, Mathematics, Philosophy, French, and Chem- 
istry were placed in the curriculum. Finally, doctoral 
work in English, Latin, Philosophy, and History 
was added. 

In 1932 Father Schmidt resigned as Dean of the 
Graduate School when he took charge of the Loyola 
University Press. He was succeeded by the Reverend 
Samuel Knox Wilson, S.J., now President of the 
University, who held office twelve months. Father 
Wilson was followed by the Reverend Francis J. 
Gerst, S.J., the present Dean. 

The school offers five degrees. The Master of 
Arts is the traditional and historical degree that has 
been offered by universities since the time of Bologna, 
Salerno, Paris and Oxford. The degree of Master of 




THE ORAL COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION lor a master's degree is a much feared ordeal for most graduate students. However, 
George Dubay takes his cxaiiiinatioji ni mathematics quite in stride while being examined by Mr. Tordella, Father Gerst, and 
Dr. Mahony, members of the department. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Science is not as old or as traditional as the Arts 
degree, but it now carries much weight and prestige. 
The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is, of course, 
the highest scholastic degree, indicating advanced and 
detailed research work. To meet a definite need, the 
degree of Master of Education was introduced. The 
work required for this degree is less stringent than 
the traditional Arts curriculum. After the establish- 
ment of the honors program in undergraduate work, 
an innovation for which Loyola received nationwide 
recognition, plans were immediately formulated for 
continuing honors work in the Graduate School, 
culminating in the degree of Master of Arts with 
Honors. The program which was developed has met 
with great success. 

The purpose of the school is to develop scholars 
who are able to work independently, spurred on by 
intellectual curiosity and a love of knowledge. They 
must be fully equipped to engage in research in their 
chosen subject, and be able to make in their theses 
scholarly contributions to the field of knowledge. 

Although each department has considerable free- 
dom of scope as far as degree requirements, quality 



of woi'k, and personal qualifications of applicants are 
concerned, no special departmental regulations are 
effective without the approval of the Dean. In his 
hands rest all matters pertaining to the immediate 
regulation of academic work. In this he is assisted 
by the Graduate Senate, of which he is chairman. 
Members of the Senate are appointed by the President 
of the University, and represent each department in 
which Graduate work is done. 

It is the intention of the faculty of the Graduate 
School to perfect its courses of instruction so as to 
attract students in the upper scholastic strata of 
Catholic and non-Catholic colleges and universities 
in the middle west. Already Loyola LTniversity's 
Graduate School boasts the finest philosophy and 
history departments among the Catholic universities 
in this area. As an indication of this prominence 
to which the Graduate School has already attained, 
other universities with national reputations have been 
using Loyola's program for the degree of Master of 
Education as a model for their own curriculum. It 
will be the aim of the Graduate School in the future 
not merely to maintain its present high standards 
but to promote even higher ones in all fields of academic 
endeavor. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL. Front 
row, HarkiiLs, Connors, Ander- 
son, Kelley, Lopate; rear row, 
Devereaux, Cleary, Quinn, Fitz- 
patrick, DeFilippif, O'Biien. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL. Front 
row, Heerey, Connery, Glcason, 
Carroll, Burke; rear row, Siiauld- 
ing, Schmitz, Doll, Steven, Sulli- 
van, Westermeyer. 





LAKE SHORE CAMPUS 





THE LOYOLAN'S CODE OF HONOR is an 

ideal towardjwhich all students of the university 
should strive. 



THIS LECTURE BY DOCTOR MOGILNITSKY 

is a typical elassroom scene on the Lake Shore 
Campus. 



The College of Arts and Sciences is the oldest 
branch of the University. It was founded in 1870, 
and for many years was the only school. In 1909, 
when the University was chartered, the name of the 
school was changed from St. Ignatius College to the 
College of Arts and Sciences of Loyola University 
and in 1922 its location was changed from the west 
side to its present place on the lake shore. The north 
side campus now comprises eight buildings, and has 
an enrollment of about five hundred and sixty students. 

The College of Arts and Sciences is the life-blood 
of the University. Its students lead the other divisions 
of the University in extra curricular activities and 
have more school spirit. They engage most in clubs 
and dramatic and musical organizations and provide 
most of the participants and enthusiasm for intramural 
and intercollegiate sports. They also hold the staff 
positions on the University publications. 

The Reverend William A. Finnegan, S.J., has been 
Dean of the College since April, 1936. To him belongs 
the credit for innumerable improvements in the 
curriculum and increased school spirit on the campus. 



The Reverend James V. Kelly, S.J., former assistant 
professor of philosophy, has just completed his first 
year as Dean of the freshmen; he guided them in the 
selection of courses and extracurricular activities. 

The Madonna Delia Strada Chapel, is the 
result of the untiring zeal of the Reverend James J. 
Mertz, S.J., who has worked long and arduously that 
the students of the Lake Shore Campus might have 
their own chapel. The chapel is treated in detail in 
another section of this book. 

New in the curriculum this year were the General 
Culture courses — a further development of the Honors 
program inaugurated in the University three years 
ago. The new courses taught this year were Appre- 
ciation of Latin, Greek, French, and German Litera- 
tures, and Appreciation of the fine arts. Music and 
Painting. While designed primarily for Honors stu- 
dents and obligatory for them, the courses are also 
open to all upperclassmen. Three seniors and eight 
juniors have been following the honors program this 
year. New also is the expansion of the Department 
of Sociology on the Lake Shore Campus, thus enabling 



ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Arts Students to major in Sociology. Already ten 
seniors and eleven juniors are majoring in that depart- 
ment, many of whom intend to continue in social 
work after graduation. 

Arts Freshmen began school one week earlier than 
the rest of the students. Affairs of Freshman Week 
included addresses by the President of the University, 
by the Dean and assistant Dean of the College, and 
by student activity leaders, as well as vai'ious place- 
ment tests and a medical examination. To further 
enable the freshmen to become accustomed to college 
work, a one hour course in orientation, compulsory 
for all, was taught by Dr. James C. Fitzgerald, assistant 
Dean of the University College. 

One of the most important extracurricular reforms 
this year was the sanctioning of campus politics and 
open electioneering by the Student Council. The 
Council cut its membership from seventeen to seven 
to make for greater efficiency. Student leaders on 
the Arts Campus, this year took the initiative in a 
drive for increased all-university spirit. The Loyola 
News especially endeavored to cultivate this spirit 
by giving equal representation to all branches of the 
University. 





THE REVEREND WILLIAM A. 
FINNEGAN, S.J., dean of the 
C'i]llef;e (if .-Vits and Sciences. 
THE REVEREND JAMES V. 
KELLY, S.J., assistant dean of 
the College of Arts and Sciences. 



ARTS FRESHMEN. Front row, 

.h\vee, Littig, Bayley, C'onghs, 
O'Brien, Wittowski, Conroyd, 
Xichole; second row, Bialek, 
Kluge, Dav, Sentiere, Essig, 
Tabor, Peniice, Tilka, Clifford, 
Farrell; rear row, Pivovar, Glas- 
kewics, Kelly, Ptacin, Delano, 
McNeil, Horn, McGaw, Hart- 
nett, Wheeler. 



ARTS FRESHMEN. Front row, 
Hayes, Senteori, Patelczyk, 
Bacharz, Donoghue, .lakocko, 
Moore, Durso; second row, 
McMahon, Barth, Egan, More, 
Perlinski, Enright, Larson. Mu- 
raski, Przynzyl, Eirich, Laugh- 
Lauterbach. 



LAKE SHORE CAMPUS 




ARTS FRESHMEN. Front row, 

Mulcuhv, PdWC'is, Mi'Sliayno, 
Schaefer, Blake, Fox, Alonzi, 
McXulty; second row, Ewerts, 
Carlin, Gleason, Walsli, Erick- 
sen, Alonzi, Roberts, Lamey; 
rear row, Cole, Kelleher, Dickow, 
Kelly, Xeale, Kiistens, Kennedy, 
Wasacz. 



ARTS FRESHMEN. Front row, 

Eean, Havden, Krzvminski, 
Fen Ion, "O'Rielly, .Sheahan, 
Scully, Gusskay; second row, 
Bigane, Finley, O'Reilly, Leh- 
man, Kelly, Powei-.s, Petrus; 
rear row, Koezur, Weinstein, 
Walsh, Straka, Altenbach, Sal- 
vatore, McMorrow, Schulfef, 
Barry. 



ARTS FRESHMEN. Front row, 
Spirro, Sirimaico, Vettei-. Ronan, 
Lynch, Hamer, Cornell; second 
row, O'Leary, Craven, Linden- 
meyer, Brennan, Vassolo, Brock- 
man, Mellen, Dorgan, Branigan; 
rear row, Plahetka, Link, Foody, 
Conway, Philbin, Figel, Chaney, 
Shinnick, Kennedy. 





ARTS FRESHMEN. Front row, 
S h a n a h a n , Kane, C a r 1 i n , 
McManamon, McGarr, Land- 
gren, Lyons, Nijakowski; second 
row, .Jackimic, Sheehan, Bois- 
deay, Doyle, Hoffman, McGarry, 
Tobolsk!; rear row, Mirhelik, 
Reidy, Murphy, Howe, Lennon, 
Lang, Maguire, Curtin. 



UNDERGRADUATES 



ART SOPHOMORES. Front 
row, (!okl, O'C'dniH'l, Keiner, 
Lenilocli, Smullon, Kepner, 
Ganicr, (joodwillio, Matuzek, 
Murnighan; second row, Schi- 
avone, Bryar, Govostis, Oliver, 
.IiiinoiisDii, I,o\venstein, Baker, 
Wallare, Kislier, Koenif!;; rear 
row, C'lowley, MeXella, Rim- 
dan, Vanikiofis, Malarhowski, 
Wenskus, Mclntyre, Lindsay, 
Griffin, Graham. 




ART SOPHOMORES. Front 
row, Galante, Marzano, Tobin, 
Beauregard, Salvadore, Kiley, 
Dillon, Dirkson; second row, 
Fox, Orphan, Crowley, Corboy, 
Schlottman, Van Heule, Lee 
Esser; rear row, Kiley, Henne.ssy, 
Berens, Waldron, Griffin, Bros- 
zowski, M our head, Burn.s, 
Burny. 



ARTS SOPHOMORES. Front 

row, .McDniiald, ZcNiiiaiin, Etz- 
korn, Diiuf^hcrty. IJuiitz, Ueni- 
erov, Worchol, Waurh: second 
row, McKeon, Scliell, Kowalski. 
Slomeszewski, Slotkowski, Shay. 
Smurdon, C'u.sick; rear row, 
O'Shaughnessv, McManus, 
Growe, Tordella, McCarthy, 
McCarthy, Happ, Cahill, Dus- 
sell. 



ARTS SOPHOMORES. Front 
row, Strauch, Simpson, Link, 
Frey, Murphy, Ferrara, Grey, 
Conway; second row, O'Connor, 
Kennedy, Lazare, Slattery, 
White, Xekson, Oliver; rear row, 
Hitza, Grant, Houlihan, Garrity, 
Quain, Serritella, Citro, Mor- 
rison, Purcell. 





ARTS JUNIORS. Front row, 

I )iiiiji~cy, Flcti-licr, Toliin, Xur- 
i;ci. Chiik, Trunk, Kuni, Koe;- 
stail, .liiliiison; second row, Hall, 
^'cuiiig, .\issen,Dav]antes,.Ianik, 
() I'ca, Cieecwicz, Granhold, 
Xolan; rear row, Coione, Leahy, 
Scissonfi, Cipinici', Callahan, Bar- 
rett, Wienke, West, Mularkey. 



ARTS JUNIORS. Front row, 
Lask, Quick, Hartcr, McCourt, 
Salvadore, Gibbons, Harkness, 
Vanderslice, Cagano ; second row, 
Johnson, Goessling, Gill, Hum- 
mert, Beresky, Cunningham, 
Sfhultz, Gallaglier, Burke; rear 
row, Moore, J. Fisher, Breit, 
Miller, Einsweiler, Murphy, 
King, Burke. 



ARTS JUNIORS. Front row, 

Pellicore, Kawula, Lavezzcirio, 
Fahey, Sniid, Desmyter; second 
row, Blough, O'Connor, Heether, 
Galante, Felten, Saltes; rea: 
row, Fitzgerald, Zingrone, Zan- 
nini, Schaar, Powers, Stecy, 
Ruzich. 




ARTS JUNIORS. Front row, 

Pfister, Grochowski, Devaney, 
Ream, Wendt, Forrette, Lally, 
Satek, Viglione; second row, 
Reidy, Sellett, Leies, Marzano, 
JjVons, Cutler, Fenner, Maddi, 
Di Francesco; rear row, Bernardi, 
Britt, McEnery, Hakins, 
B o 1 a n d , Grady, D u b a y, 
O'Shaughnessy, Stell, Weigel. 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 




DR. LOUIS D. MOORHEAD, 

(right), clean of the School of 
Medicine. 



THE REVEREND GEORGE L. 
WARTH, S.J., (left), regent of the 
School of Medicine. 




Loyola University School of Medicine was established as an integral 
part of Loyola University in September, 1915, by the purchase of Bennett 
Medical College, established in the year 1868. Owing to the limited quarters 
and undesirable location of this school, the property and equipment of the 
Chicago College of Medicine and Surgery were purchased in 1917. The 
building thus secured was remodeled so as to afford adequate laboratory 
space for the pre-clinical departments. The courses in these departments 
were put upon a strict university basis. Loyola Medical School is recognized 



as an approved medical school by the Committee on 
Education and Hospitals of the American Medical 
Association and is a member of the Association of 
American Medical Colleges. 

In October, 1937, a contract was entered into by 
the President of Loyola L^niversity and the Mother 
Provincial of the Religious Sisters of Mercy of the 
Union of the United States, Province of Chicago, 
whereby Mercy Hospital became the university hos- 
pital of Loyola Medical School. Under the terms of 
the contract the medical policy of the hospital is 
vested in the Medical School while the financial and 
nursing administration of the Institution remains in 



the hands of the Sisters. The Dispensary, located in 
the Medical School building at 706 South Wolcott 
Avenue, was merged with Mercy Free Dispensary, 
the Out-Patient Department of Mercy Hospital. 

The clinical units, housed on the campus of Mercy 
Hospital, are now designated as Mercy Hospital 
Loyola University Clinics and are administered by 
an Executive Board of which the Dean of the Medical 
School is chairman. The facilities of the Department 
of Pathology of the Medical School have been housed 
in a unit of Mercy Hospital-Loyola L^niversity Clinics 
and a new Department, the Department of E.xperi- 
mental Medicine, under the Chairmanship of Dr. 



DR. CAMPIOGNI lectures to 
the medical students in the am- 
phitheater at Mercy Hospital. 




MEDICAL SCHOOL 




MEDICAL SCHOOL JUNIORS. 
Front row, Murphj-, R:iii-li\vit, 
W y a s e n , M (• T i n n o n , W i s c , 
Bartels, David, Wilhelm; second 
row, Bpall, Bucklin, Mitrifk, 
Kcllchcr, Boyd, Craydun, Kallal, 
( '.111 hell ; rear row, Dvcmcli, Con- 
liv, II. Meier, (!alai)eaux, .Inhii- 
scjii, M. H., Ilitehko, ])eutseh- 
maii, .lones, 15anv. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL JUNIORS. 
Front row, Barry, Shigikawa, 
,Iones, Patros, Rivera, Glaeso, 
Matuszewski; second row, M. 
Morrow, Salerno, Rooney, 
Roberts, Krisko, Niemeyer, 
Conley; rear row, M. D. .John- 
son, F. J. Hultgen, Bertueei, 
W. .J. Hultgen, Bernstein, 
Harodko, De Meter, Ahlm. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL JUNIORS. 
Front row, V). Meier, M:irrella, 
Battiiii, Foulk, Sehniidt, Penn; 
second row,0'Donnell, Uodino, 
Slania, Drolett, Bobbins, Swir- 
sky; rear row, Thomas, Barry, 
Jones, Vicari, tlffron, Zniid- 
grodski, Micket. 




MEDICAL SCHOOL SOPHO- 
MORES. Front row, Thompson, 
Pi|an, Tesauro, Gibson, O'Xeil; 
second row, Usalis, Meany, 
Biennan, Brenner, Pollard; rear 
row, Moleski, Adams, Merkel, 
Kenney, Tovvle, Wesakowski, 
Soillieri. 



UNDERGRADUATES 



medical; SCHOOL SOPHO- 
MORES. Front row, Xiitlian- 
son, Baithes, Bellew, Fais, 
Towle, Dillon; second row, 
Nisius, Le Mise, Faiibauer, 
Feltcs, Chock; rear row, Scalzo, 
Ciiidolina, l^C'oinille, Blinski, 
I'loiie, Daly. 




MEDICAL SCHOOL SOPHO- 
MORES. Front row, Cronin, 
Zuliifi:!, Siniiiitt, Kolaiikci, TJiin- 
villc, Pliihl, \V;L.jt(Jwicz, Hucsky, 
HauKcii; second row, Vasquez, 
Lombunlii, Kinrannon, Duss- 
man, Sknunin, Hoylan, Drabek, 
Tapp, C'aiToll; rear row, Wichek, 
Delfcissc, Weill', .Sykora, Kasmer, 
Albini, Diskey, Donlon. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL FRESH- 
MEN. Front row, .Annan, Hij;- 
gins. Griffin, .Arnold, Lyons, 
Jesacker, Dowell; second row, 
Anderson, Mulhern, Cerinni, 
Fontanetta, Kordijak, Gora, 
Valach; rear row, Cecil, Guz- 
auskas, D'Alessandro, MuUenix, 
Koenig, I-{vnne, Westhoven, 
Dalv. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL FRESH- 
MEN. Front row, Lieber, 
Ouellette, Swan, Wermuth, 
Flynn, Bayer, Powell; second 
row, Tiisoonian, Sniitli, T.nrusso, 
Daly, I'ddcr-ta, Stack; rear row, 
Kuscll, Russiiinaniiii, Aubuckan, 
Dunn, Weiss, Murphy, Pitaro. 




MEDICAL SCHOOL STUDENTS 




JOHN CARROLL carefully takes notes on the growth and 
observed reaftions of these laboratory specimens. 



WHITE RATS jjrovide an excellent testing ground for the 
proving of serums, and the effect of diet. Anderson, Mr. Plenk, 
and Murphy note the condition of the animals. 




Julius Sendroy, Jr., has been established. 

The Dean of the School of Medicine is Dr. Louis 
David Moorhead, M.S., M.D., K.S.G., who is one 
of the foremost surgeons in the middle west. Dr. 
Moorhead is an outstanding Catholic layman, whose 
services to the Catholic ideal of medical education has 
brought him Papal knighthood and a decoration from 
the King of Italy. 

Within the past two years the curriculum of the 
School of Medicine has been radically revamped to 
conform to the most modern principles of medical 
education now in force in the leading medical schools 
in the country. The full-time faculty has been almost 
doubled diuing the past year and a new Department 
of Public Health, Preventive Medicine, and Bac- 
teriology has been established under the Chairman- 
ship of' Dr. Earl E. Kleinschmidt, M.D., Dr. P.H., 
Associate Professor of Preventive Medicin e. Associ- 
iated with Dr. Kleinschmidt are Dr. John H. Bailey, 
Ph.D., Dr.P.H., and Dr. John Khmek, Ph.D. Under 
the leadership of Dr. Kleinschmidt has been set up 
an entire new curriculum in Public Health and Pre- 
ventive Medicine and the foundation has been laid 
for the only organized School of Public Health in 
Chicago which is on a university basis. 

The year has been notable for the number of fine 
clinicians who have been added to the clinical 



LAWRENCE CONCANNON, upper left, also learns the cor- 
rect treatment antl handling of white mice. 

CHEMICAL ANALYSIS, lower left, is extremely important. 
Kenneth Bottino learns the correct laboratory technique in 

ysis. 



IN REVIEW 



faculty of the School of Medicine. Among 
these are: Dr. William T. Carlisle, Associ- 
ate Professor of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 
Attending Gynecologist at Cook County 
Hospital; Dr. Joseph Greengard, Assistant 
Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, Attending 
Pediatrician at Cook County Hospital; Dr. 
Samuel G. Plice, Associate Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Medicine, Attending Physician at 
Cook County Hospital; Dr. Harry A. 
Richter, Clinical Associate in Medicine, 
Attending Cardiologist at Saint Francis' 
Hospital, Evanston; Dr. Harry Isaacs, Clin- 
ical Professor in Medicine, Attending Physi- 
cian at Cook County Hospital; Dr. Charles 
Stepan, Clinical Associate in Pediatrics; 
Dr. Andrew J. Toman, Clinical Instructor 
in Surgery; Dr. Leonard J. Kratz, Clinical 
Associate in Surgery, Attending Surgeon 
at St. Joseph's Hospital. 



;TJSTIN SCHWIND, below left, Teaching Fellow 
in the Department of Anatomy, demonstrating 
anatomical sections to Medical Students. 

SENIORS, below right,0'Donovan, Campagna.and 
Glickman reading periodicals in Medical School 
Library. 




AL CORNILLE, above (top), does some intensive microscopic 
work in preiiaiing one of the reports Med students must turn in. 
JOHN CRONIN, ."hove (lower), examines a young patient in 
the Mercy H(is]iital dispensary. Medical students are sent to 
the various Hospitals of the city to obtain practical application 
of their classroom and laboratory principles. 




SCHOOL OF LAW 



The Loyola University School of Law has the distinction of being 
the first professional school in the university. This important unit traces 
its beginning to the Lincoln College of Law, founded in 1908 at the insti- 
gation of the administrative officers and Aliunni of Saint Ignatius College, 
parent school of Loyola. When Loyola received its charter as a LTniversity 
one year later, Lincoln College of Law became the Loyola LTniversity School 
of Law. Thus, this school was one of the most important developments 
in the plan for expansion of small Saint Ignatius College. The school 
is accredited by the Ainerican Bar Association and is a member of the 
Association of American Law Schools, the highest law school accrediting 
body. 

The School has owed its success in an inestimable measure to the 
capable deans who have had its destiny under their control. The first 
Dean of the Law School was William Dillon, a graduate of the Catholic 
University and King's Inn, Dublin, as well as the Middle Temple, London. 
He held his office from 1908 until 1915, when he retired to engage in 
private practice. Prior to his becoming Dean, he had served as editor 
of the New AVorld. 

Following Dean Dillon was Arnold D. McMahon, who held office 
from 1915 to 1925. LTnder his leadership many far-reaching and im- 
portant changes were made. The night courses were lengthened to the 




MR. JOHN C. FITZGERALD, 

clean of the Loyola Universitj' 
School of Law. 



mim 




BRIEFING CASES requires that 
many sources of all types be 
examined and thoroughly di- 
gested in order that all sides of 
the question may be fully cov- 
ered. Many such assignments 
are the lot of Law students as 
Frank Corboy to the left. 



LIBRARY WORK occupies a 
major poitioii of the law stu- 
dents time. Ihe law branch o! 
the Cudahy library is more than 
ample to meet the needs of the 
most exacting student. 



MR. JOHN HAYES conducts 
a class in contracts explaining 
and clarifying any points that 
the students may find difficult 
and hard to understand. 




THE REVEREND JOHN P. 
NOONAN, S.J., regent of the 
School of Law. 




present four year basis and a three year day school was added. The 
administration of the succeeding dean, John V. McCormick, was par- 
ticularly noteworthy for the fostering of various clubs and activities. 
The Brandeis competition and the Junior Bar Association were both 
begun under his guidance. When Dean McCormick resigned to assume 
a seat on the municipal bench, a graduate of Harvard Law School and 
a teacher at Loyola for nine years, Mr. John C. Fitzgerald, was made 
acting dean. In 1938 he officially became the fourth dean of the Loyola 
University School of Law. 

The past year in the Law School has been one of reorganization. 
The faculty has been making numerous changes both in scholastic require- 
ments and in activities. As a means of securing the highest scholastic 
standards among its graduates, this year the faculty inaugurated a new 
system of comprehensive examinations whereby each examination in- 
cludes all the material that has been covered on that subject prior to the 
time of examination. This method, although it places a heavier burden 
upon the students while in school, will insure organization and corre- 
lation of things learned in the different courses throughout the period 
spent in Law School. 

Due to the intensity of the curriculum. Law students have little 
time for extra-curricular activity which is not directly connected with 




FRESHMAN DAY LAW. Front 

row, (lelt to right) J. Lynch, 
Fitzyeiald, Sinnott, W. Lj'nch, 
CulU'ii; second row, O'Brien, 
Anderson, Kay, Brennan, Court- 
ney; rear row. White, McEwen, 
Hehiier, Trapshanis, Supernau, 
Whitmore, Newman. 



JUNIOR DAY LAW. Front row, 
Aliranis, O'Brien, Mamalakis, 
( 'luinane. Murphy, Czonstka, 
Spurlark; rear row, O'Connor, 
Anzalone, Xewhouse, Bobal, 
Weinstein, Limperis, Greanias. 



SCHOOL OF LAW 



their chosen profession. The Brandeis competition, 
organized six years ago, has proved most popular and 
beneficial. This competition consists in arguing a case, 
in a manner closely parelleling actual law practice. 
Two students represent the defendant and two the 
plaintiff. Each class is organized into law clubs 
which argue with other clubs on a competitive basis 
until they reach the finals. Participants in the Bran- 
deis competition represent the school in intercollegiate 
competition, which is known as the Moot Court 
Competition. This year Raymond Vonesh and William 
Lamey defeated Philip Collins and John McKenzie in 
the finals of the Brandeis. Lamey, McKenzie, and 
Miss Eva Charles, representing Loyola in the Moot 



Court Competition, battled through to the finals, but 
lost a close decision to Northwestern. Mr. John J. 
Waldron served as faculty adviser to the competition. 
This year was particularly notable for the forma- 
tion of a new student governing body, known as the 
Loyola Bar Association. The new system of govern- 
ment, modeled after the charter of the Chicago Bar 
Association, represents the first attempt in this state 
to conduct Law School activities in accordance with 
those principles established and followed by the regular 
bar associations. The new system was adopted in 
the belief that it would develop a more intensive 
interest both in Law School and in all-University 
activities, as well as afford a thorough knowledge of 




NIGHT LAW FRESHMEN. 
Front row, Kcwin, Wliulcii, 
Hciuiii, Hurth, Schcib, Scales, 
Aldinc; second row, BcibciK, 
IjVncli, Hansen, ZiniimTiiiaii, 
Hanis, iStrubbe, Valentine; rear 
row, Zess, Gorman, O'Neill, 
Dauber, Ragan, Verbeck, Kueik, 
Kelly. 



NIGHT LAW SOPHOMORES. 
Front row, C'oiby, Downing, 
McAdams, Barnett, Pauls, 
Ballard, Torrey; second row, 
Hamill, Kelly, Brahm, Murray, 
Sanders; rear row, McDonnell, 
Borkowski, Nelson, Maguire, 
Bland, Carnev, Brennan. 



DNDERGRADUATES 



the proper function of bar associations to the would-be 
lawyers. All students of the Law School are ipso- 
facto members of the association. 

Raymond Vonesh, day Law senior, was elected 
the first president of the Bar Association; other officers 
are Joseph Prindeville, night senior, vice-president; 
Joseph Czonstka, day junior, secretary; and Thomas 
Fegan, night junior, treasurer. LTnder these capable 
leaders, there is no doubt that the new association 
will become firmly established and will be able to 
carry out its ideals and hopes for the future with 
great success. 

The curriculum of the Law School in a broad 



fashion follows the traditional method of division. 
The three fimdamental and basic sections of the law 
are considered to be as follows: non-contract, con- 
tract and property. These divisions are subdivided 
into subjects which can be more easily handled. 
Under this system, the students learn torts, the 
division of non-contract law dealing with the violation 
of personal rights arising by the creation of the law; 
property law, with respect to the basic rights in land, 
titles, and future estates; contracts, and the several 
branches which have been fully developed recently 
and have been again divided into other branches, as 
agency, insurance, partnership, and domestic rela- 
tions which are based on contract and moral concepts 




NIGHT LAW JUNIORS. Front 
row, Kiuse, (iddlicy, Fagan, 
Silverman, Herman, Hilkin, 
Pokorny, DelBecarro; second 
row, Karlin, Burns, Tobin, Vor- 
beck, Mullens, Brandstrader, 
Hausmann, Donnell}', Johnson; 
rear row, Cavanagh, Peters, 
Koppes, Maguire, Corrigan, 
Jakubowski, Kelly, O'Connor, 
Stussi. 



as well as protected by statutes; corporations, public 
and private; trusts, which involve contracts and 
property laws; Bailments, carriers, sales, and nego- 
tiable instruments, which are members of the contract 
group; and wills, a statutory subject covering the 
right to dispose of property at death. Administrative 
law, labor law, aeronautical law, and restitutive are 
new fields of activity covered by courses recently 
added to the law school curriculum. As in most 
Jesuit law schools, a course in jurisprudence is offered 
as the philosophic basis for the positive law courses. 
The degrees granted by the school are the Bachelor 
of Laws and the Doctor of Jurisprudence. Only the 



fact that the latter requires a more thorough back- 
ground in general college work distinguishes it from 
the former. 

The final product of the Loyola University School 
of Law is a well rounded person, trained in Catholic 
ideals and prepared to apply them in his future 
work. Since the reputation of a school depends on the 
quality of its graduates, it is imperative that they be 
men outstanding in their profession of law, as well 
as in their practice both through example and precept 
of the Catholic way of life. Loyola has been proud 
of its law graduates, and hopes that their careers 
will enable her to continue to be proud of them. 



SCHOOL OF LAW 



INSTRUCTOR FRANCIS J. 
ROONEY devotes a little time 
after class to clear up a problem 
that has arisen in the mind of 
student Marion Buckley. The 
law and the reason behind the 
law must be understood, for 
without reason there is no law. 




SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 




MR. HENRY T. CHAMBER- 
LAIN, (right), dean uf the School 
(if t'ommerce. 



MR. WILLIAM ROBERTS, 

(left), on whose shoulders many 
of the problems involved in the 
administration of the day di- 
vision of the School of Com- 
merce have fallen. 




For a long time it was believed that the best 
training for a business executive was the regular 
college course plus a period of apprenticeship in a 
given industry. However, due to the complexity of 
modern business, it has become next to impossible 
to obtain a thorough knowledge of the principles 
underlying business from first hand experience. For 




that reason the Loyola University School of Com- 
merce was formed in 1924. 

The School of Commerce has acquired a wide 
reputation in the middle west, particularly in regard 
to its training of Certified Public Accountants. About 
twenty per cent of those who have taken the C. P. A. 
exams in Chicago since 1930 have prepared for the 
examination at Loyola and about forty per cent of 
the successful candidates have been Loyola-trained 
men and women. 

The curriculum in the Commerce School is arranged 
for three types of students. It enables the high school 
graduate to work for the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Commerce, acquiring a general knowledge of 
economics. It is suited for those already in the business 
world, who wish to obtain either a general knowledge 



MISS BERTHA FLOROS, 

efficient secretary of the night 
division of the School of Com- 
merce has the duty of keeping 
the classes functioning smoothly. 
At the left, she assists .James 
McGooey in registration. 




COMMERCE STUDENTS. 

Front row, Siicll, Hri'yfr, Staii- 

tnii. Smitli, White, Valentino, 

Sloilki, Kikenheny; second row, 

I'it, DufTv, I''ianklin, Sielisch, 

niteleld, Delatre, Hickman, 

avnllini, Hodapp; rear row, 

Sinitli, .1. Muiphv, Vei'hulst, 

MeUoey, Belda, Mullarkey, De- 

'aney, Meyers. 



COMMERCE STUDENTS. 
Front row, Oswald, Kohnen, 
Kyan, O'Brien, Paleeek, Lemke, 
Cozzens; second row, Frehe, 
Xagle, O'Toole, Ireland, Burke, 
Greene, Fox; rear row, Sheridan, 
Sieliseh, R. Murphy, Sloan, Sos- 
nowski, Caveney, Silsby, Clark. 



SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 



COMMERCE STUDENTS. 

Epich, .1. MeCartliy, Peuser, 
Sheehan, Fitzgerald, J. Rann, 
Morrissey; second row, V. Row- 
land, O'Connor, Reykjalin, T. 
McCarthy, Rebmann, McElli- 
gott; rear row, Garvey, .Joyce, 
Southon, McAleer, Prendergast, 
Bash, Kelly. 



COMMERCE STUDENTS. 
Front row, Daly, .1. Rowland, 
Kilmer, S o h a r n i n g h a u s e n , 
Dusky, Hammond, Mosher; 
second row, Bielanski, Ryan, 
Marek, Wolta, Zeller, Turro, 
Burcier; rear row, Xash, Krein, 
Grandpre, Kennedy, Hansen, 
Harnett, Soper, Fitzpatrick. 




COMMERCE STUDENTS. 
Front row, Ociiif;, I'liuiegan, 
Fiirifll, Morion, McGovern, 
Feidigan, Lally; back row, Gar- 
ner, Vosicky, H. McAndrew, 
K. Boyene, M. Boyene, Frenzen, 
Guthaus, McLaughlin, T. 
McAndrew. 



COMMERCE STUDENTS. 
Front row, Sherlock, Colton, V. 
Murphy, Gray, Carrigan, Hard- 
ing, Flynn, Oakes; second row, 
E. Lindsey, Lehnert, Wargini, 
Schweitzer, Sochim, Tayloi-, 
Franklin; rear row, B. Lindsey, 
Lemske, McXulty, Wemheuer, 
Brickler, Leutke, Faber, Wind- 
ier, Kaesberg. 




UNDERGRADUATES 




COMMERCE STUDENTS. 
Front row, Helbing, Koehn, 
Orther, Frank, Macy, Gerrity, 
Dougherty, Skinger; second row, 
Schumacher, Diffendal, Prender- 
ga.'^f, .lurczak, Aste, Kennedy, 
Murphy, Jamieson, Andriacchi; 
Back row, Burchett, McGoey 
Leonard, Ahern, Hosek, Eiken- 
berry, Peirce, Yarnell, O'Brien. 



COMMERCE STUDENTS. 
Front row, Hoffman, Polls, 
More^i, Wagner, .lacobsen, Gal- 
lagher; second row, Rozetka, 
Svoliiida, Cummings, R. Rann, 
St mill ; back row, Gorman, Lang- 
dun, Zenner, Streicher, Crowlev, 
DuVall, Zabiniski. 




COMMERCE STUDENTS. 
Front row, Halin, Sossong, 
O'C'onnoi-, Marrfin, Greene, 
Hcikman; back row, Graham, 
Maldiipy, Long, Damler, Rogers, 
Sturm, Prendergast, Epich. 



COMMERCE STUDENTS. 
Front row, La Giovine, Reid, 
Gerstcin, McGinnis, Pershing, 
Hush, Hcdke, Dowhng; second 
row, DriscoU, Troy, O'Connor, 
Cleary, Hassett, Burns, Somers, 
Reid; back row, Conway, Duffy, 
Shanahan, Delaney, Xolan, 
McKibbin, Johnston, Ziehnski, 
Bvrne. 



ACCOUNTING WORK 
SHEETS are a famiUar every- 
day sight in the Cudahy Library. 
Dick Boland and Art MeCou'rt 
work out the long assignments 
that the Commerce students 
must prepare. 




of the workings of business or aid in the particular 
work in which they are employed. And lastly the 
school offers special training in accounting for those 
who wish to take the C. P. A. examination. 

The Commerce School holds day classes on the 
Lake Shore Campus and late-afternoon and evening 
classes on the downtown campus at 28 North Franklin 
Street. Thus the student who is able to devote only 
a part of his time to his education finds it convenient 
to take late afternoon and evening classes on the down- 
town campus, which can easily be reached by a short 
walk from the loop. Likewise the younger student 
who wishes to obtain a fully-rounded college education 
can attend the day classes on the Lake Shore Campus. 
Indeed, the north side Commerce students are an 
integral part of the student body on the Lake Shore 
Campus, partaking in the same extra-curricular activi- 
ties and exercises as the Arts students. 



UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 



Not all the students who would obtain academic degrees from 
Loyola University would be able to attend the day classes of the 
College of Arts and Sciences on the Lake Shore Campus. In- 
deed, it was to fulfill the need of a Catholic college of liberal 
arts, which would be easily accessible to those whose time during 
the day was taken up with other pursuits, that the University 
College was founded in 1914. Located on the downtown campus 
at 2S North Franklin Street, it offers full curricula leading to 
baccalaureate degrees in late afternoon, evening, and Saturday 
classes. 

Due to lack of time which they necessarily demand, extra- 
curricular activities at the University College do not reach the 
proportions of those on the Lake Shore Campus, yet are by no 
means to be overlooked. The Loyola Service Guild periodically 
sponsors lectures on topics of current interest and holds several 
p-irties each year for the under-privileged children of Holy Family 
Parish School. The Delia Strada Sodality, a branch of the 
international organization bearing the same name, holds benefit 
parties, lectures, and an annual retreat. The Alunmae Associa- 
tion yearly enlarges the fund for scholarships. This year all 
previous registration records were broken in the autumn and 
spring quarters. 




THE REVEREND THOMAS A. 
EGAN, S.J., (lean (if the rnivcrsity 
Colk'gf. 



BULLETIN BOARD NOTICES, lower left, 
containing information about classes, new 
courses, lectures and other items of interest 
are examined daily by the students of the 
I'niversity College. 

A NECESSARY PART OF EDUCATION, 

lower right, is the visit to the cashier's cage. 
But this duty is made less burdensome by 
the University College plan of work at 
day, and school at night. 





m'^€ii^. 



1 




mmm 



Front row, R. Devereaux, M. 
Carroll, R. Pilette, F. Westor- 
meyer, E. Bonfield, R. Kelley. 
second row, M. Coulehan, M. 
Fitzfjcrald, J. Parker, F. Dwyer, 
L. CliiUagher, E. Duwgan, J. 
O'Heillv, J. Smith; rear row, 
M. Gallagher, E. Daly, P. Fitz- 
gerald, M. Dondon, C. Ander- 
son, E. Corrigan, H. McQuillan. 



Front row, I. akin, Shandross, 
Thompson, Corbett, Wall, Ryan, 
McXellis; second row, Sheahan, 
Baskett, Kelly, Coffey, Racky, 
Lord, Bittle; rejir row, Hallinan, 
Cooney, Dilibert, Trongeau, 
Leyden, Reynolds, Barry, 
Sternet, Walker. 



Front row, E. Newton, M. Brant, 
M. Holstein, H. Reel, E. Eder, 
M. Lvnch; second row, F. 
Dostai; L. Clairy, P. Cordes, 
P. Sylvester, G. Schmidt, R. 
Davis, R. Fenger; rear row, R. 
Hoiss, H. Wilgen, D. Ford, M. 
Coyne, V. Rau, E. Mueller, 
R. Di Leone. 



Front row, \. Carroll, M. Lyons, 

D. Pearsons, E. Elkin, S. Brice, 
J. Saxwold, A. O'Brien, L. Webb; 
second row, .J. Quigley, W. 
Shean, .1. Gannon, W. Grotefeld, 
J. McBride, G. Puszkiewiez, 
J. Bovln, .J. Rafferty; rear row, 

E. McKugo, A. Smith, S. Con- 
way, E. Burns, M. Crane, R. 
Toner, L. Grothe, M. Vogt; 
M. Cornyn, E. Smilzoff. 



Front row, L. Gleason, H. 
O'ConnclI, H. Peterson, E. Zosel, 
B. Taheny, \. Taheny, F. Vogl; 
second row, R. Bohor, L Crane, 
D. Edison, R. Brennan, E. Spear, 
O. Griffin, .]. Ryan, E. Dalton; 
rear row, F. Brickel, F. Hoefiing, 
M. Walsh, L. Poduska, F. Liska, 
J. Taheny, E. Kinsella, R. 
Rochetta. 



umn 



Front row, K. MiCiuiio, W. 
MiKi'chney, (_'. Kipp, C. Dum- 
phv; second row, H. Hamilton, 
W." Healy, W. Lithall, W. 
Houren; rear row, G. Howler, 
A. Gladzeszewski, S. Gladzes- 
zewski, M. Mahoney, M. Smith, 
I. Ambrosius, .]. Bowler. 



Front row, K. Barrv, G. Resabek, 
D. Kelly, .1. Grashoff, H. Morris; 
second row, O. McCormick, E. 
J a n u s c h , M . L e y den, X . 
McMahon, D. Hurney, E. 
Miller, G. Harley; rear row, R. 
DeMes, A. Lubv, R. MrTigue, 
A. Martin, C. Traub, A. 
McGrath, X. Fortaw. 



Front row, R. Martyn, M. Ban- 
ner, B. Ryan, A. La Deaux, 
H. Home; second row, C. McDer- 
mott, L. Street, Sister Prender- 
gast, B. Costello, H. Cybulski, 
M. Golden, J. King; rear row, 
J. Cunniff, M.Garvey, A. 
Kanopa, R. Williams, U. Court- 
ney, C. Murphy, El. Masterson. 



Front row, R. O'Connor, Sister 
Francis Marv, Sister Saint 
Odilon, Sister M. LeSage, M. E. 
Sullivan; second row, R. Daly, 
R. Griffin, M. Brooks, J. De- 
Vanon; rear row, R. Cummings, 
P. Marcott, M. .Johnson, M. 
Trahey, M. Grunt, W. Fitz- 
patrick, E. Schomburg. 



Front row, E. Maloney, M. 
Yrman, D. Urbaeek, K. Murphy, 
L Zwiefke; second row, M. 
O'Xeill, .J. Felten, .1. Leohner, 
J. Mooney, G. Mann, V. Dowd; 
rear row, J. Duffy, D. Ronan, 
A. Monaco, J. Tarpey, E. O'Call- 
ahan, L. Paranty, G. Antonelli. 




^ € f> t ^ ^ i^%fy 



¥ik W ^¥ :J^ 



im- 





WEST 



THE REVEREND THOMAS J. 
DONNELLY, S.J., ifar left), 
rector of West Haclen College. 



THE REVEREND CHARLES 
H. CLOUD, SJ., (left), newly 
appointed dean of West Baden 
College. 



The magnificent dome of West Baden College 
surmoimts the philosophical studies of the Jesuit 
scholastics in the Chicago Province of the Society of 
Jesus. This year West Baden completes its fifth 
year as a division of Loyola University; but its previous 
history is both colorful and surprising. 

Prior to its becoming a college, West Baden was 
known as West Baden Springs Hotel, an exclusive 
health resort famed for its natural springs. Earliest 
mention of the springs was made by George Rogers 
Clark in the memoirs of his famous expedition to 
Kaskaskia and Vincennes. Shortly before the Civil 
War a hotel was built in the spot and in 1888 it passed 
into the hands of Mr. Lee W. Sinclair. After the 
original building had been destroyed by cyclone and 
a second hotel had been consumed by fire in 1901, 
Mr. Sinclair in 1902 built the magnificent 708 room 
structure that now stands on the spot. 

The hotel building is a marvel of architecture. 
The six hundred room structure, octahedral in shape, 
is crowned by a huge dome of glass and steel over 
two hundred feet in diameter. This dome, the largest 
of its kind in the world, is supported by twenty-four 
majestic columns set in the walls around the mag- 
nificent Atriimi, or Pompeian Court, which is orna- 
mented with marble and tile. The architecture is 
predominantly Moorish. Extensive grounds, a nine 
hole golf course, the beautiful sulphur spring buildings, 
and the gorgeous Italian gardens lend a setting that 
is incomparable in grandeur. At the time ot Mr. 
Sinclair's death in 1916, the hotel was estimated at 
$3,500,000. In 1922, Mr. Edward Ballard took over 
complete management of the establishment. In the 
years following, however, with the gradual shift of 
the vacation area from the central states, the hotel 
declined in popularity, and, in the depths of the 
depre.s.sion in 1932, closed its doors. 

In 1934, Mr. Ballard donated it to the Society of 
Jesus for the training of young Jesuits for the priest- 
hood. At the beginning of this year the Reverend 



Charles H. Cloud, S.J., succeeded the Reverend Allen 
P. Farrell, S.J., as Dean of West Baden College. The 
President and rector of the College is the Reverend 
Thomas Donnelly, S.J. 

At West Baden not only are all the branches of 
scholastic philosophy taught, but auxiliary courses in 
Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Mathematics give 
the necessary scientific background for the philosoph- 
ical studies. Many of the young Jesuit scholastics 
have already obtained the Bachelor of Arts degree 
from Loyola University and are enrolled in its graduate 



FEATURED BROADCASTS are an eagerly awaited event 
in the students recreational activities. To the left, 
F. Biestek, R. Jancauskis, E. Berbusse, J. Fahey (at the 
microphone) and J. Dolan, engage in a rehearsal. 




BADEN 



TEACHING TEACHERS TO 
TEACH, rijiht, is tlie responsi- 
bility of Educators at West 
Baden. In the class room scene 
to the left .). Blanchard, T. 
Hecht, F. Mattinglv, R. Weltin, 
P. Forsthoelel, J. Mentag, R. 
Jancauskis, C. Besse absorb the 
principles that will guide thcin 
in later life. 



WEST BADEN'S CHOIR, 

right, is noted for its excell- 
ence. Left to right: A. Schwind, 
H. Dunn, W. Berdan, V. Coli- 
more, W. Farrell, J. Williams, 
J. Tennert, F. Conrath, R. 
Schuchert, E. O'Brien, J. Blan- 
chard, J. Woods, S. Tillman, 
(organist), J. Reinke, (director). 




school. Besides the philosophical courses, special 
courses in English, History, Classics, Speech, Educa- 
tion, and the Sciences are offered. 

Chief among the extracurricular activities is the 
Sodality, which is divided into several groups. The 
Catholic Evidence Guild practices the technique or 
open air preaching, has given several public lectures 
during the past year, and sponsors the group working 
to spread a knowledge of the Catholic Faith in the 
neighborhood. The Mission Circle studies mission 
theory and the biographies of famous Jesuit mission- 
aries, as well as acting as a patron of the Patna Mission 
Stamp Mart. Catholic newspaper style and propa- 
ganda methods were among the subjects inquired into 
by the Journalism Group. This group also produced 



"And They Heil Hitler . . . ?" a one act expose of 
Nazi propaganda, written by one of the members, 
Mr. Harry Gilmore, S.J. The Drama Section of the 
Sodality made original researches into the possibilities 
of a Catholic drama and the methods used by modern 
playwrights in putting their message on the stage. 
At the final meeting they enacted scenes from four 
Broadway hits porti-aying the unsound philosophical 
basis of the modern theatre. This was followed by a 
three scene musical satire, "Blood Over Mexico", 
which was set to music and directed by Mr. John 
Reinke, S.J. The Social Action Academy, examining 
the modern social problems in the light of the Papal 
encyclicals, solved the problem of distribution by the 
corporative state. 




THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES 
are embraced in the West Baden 
Student's course of studies as 
well as the classics and philoso- 
phv. The students to the left, 
F."Filas, T. Hecht, and E. W. 
Burke, conduct an experiment 
in chemistry. 



AMATEUR THEATRICALS are 

not neglected in p:ist tinifs at 
West Baden. A. Blancliard, H. 
Pingstock, J. Schwind, R. Weltin, 
J. Tennert, and J. Reinke (at 
the piano) rehearse a skit to be 
presented for the other students 
and surrounding townspeople. 



The Classical Academy under the direction of Mr. 
Raymond Schoder, S.J., continued its fortnightly 
meetings to inspire interest in the vitally human 
literature of the ancient world. The Scientific Acad- 
emy, with Mr. Louis DeGenova, S.J., as president, 
popularized the new theories and latest inventions by 
motion pictures and lectures. A new movement in 
the form of the Bellarmine Sermon Society gave 
weekly practice and criticism to the future pulpit 
orators. Those interested in doing apostolic work 
among the underprivileged deaf and dumb continued 
their activity in the Dactylology Club. Conferences 
on the Sacred Heart, organized this year by Mr. 
John McKechney, S.J., centered their attention on 
the relation of the devotion of the Sacred Heart to 
the Society of Jesus. 



Under the direction of Father Cloud, a series of 
Forum Lectures was arranged, in which prominent 
authorities addressed the scholastics on specialized 
subjects. The chief intramural athletic activities were 
golf, baseball, basketball, and volleyball. Many im- 
provements of the grounds were due to the initiative 
of the young clerics, especially the conversion of the 
unused Hygeia springhouse into a shrine to the Blessed 
\'irgin Mary. 

The theatre arts were not neglected. On the 
Feat of St. Catherine, patron of the Philosophers, 
the Gilbert and Sullivan musical, "The Gondoliers", 
was produced. This year, under the inspiration of 
Mr. Edward Conrath, S.J., the fourteen piece Phil- 
osophers Orchestra was organized, and gave three 
recitals. 



SCHOOL OF 
SOCIAL WORK 



In the year 1914 the Loyola University School of 
Social Work was founded. The guilding hand of this 
first Catholic department of its kind in the country 
was that of the late Reverend Frederic Seidenburg, 
S.J., whose name will ever be most intimately associ- 
ated not only with Loyola but with social work in 
Chicago. When, in 1932, Father Seidenburg was 
called to Detroit, he was ably succeeded by the Rev- 
erend Thomas Egan, S.J. In 1937, the Department 
of Social Work of the Graduate School became a 
separate professional school under the direction of the 
Reverend Elmer Barton, S.J. 

During the quarter century of its existence, the 
School has sought to equip young men and women 
for their all-important service to society. In keeping 
with the Jesuit system of education, this has meant 
the teaching not only of professional theory and prac- 
tice but also of fundamental principles of philosophy 
and ethics. With its well integrated program, the 




THE REVEREND ELMER A. BARTON, 
S.J., dean of the School of So( ial Work. 



SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK. Front row, 

Martin, Pembrooke, Meany, Gowenlock, 
Kane, Hoeschen, Rakoski; second row, Mor- 
rison, Donelan, Many, Back, Rosner; Gross- 
berg; rear row, Hildreth, E. Finnegan, R. 
Finnegan, Murray, Maloney, KirkUng, Wor- 
tell. 





APPLIED SOCIAL 

WORK is one oi the 
requisites for most courses 
at the School of Social 
Work. George Clough, 
a student, makes a call 
on one of his regular 
assigned visits. 



CLOSE CONTACT 

between student 
and teacher is one 
of the distinctive 
notes in this school. 
Miss Lloyd, an in- 
structor, and Sid- 
ney St. Leger, a 
member of the stu- 
dent body, hold a 
conference. 



WRITING UP CASE HISTORIES is an 

important part of the training each social 
worker receives. This is a typical scene of 
the worker preparing their reports for their 
classes. 



School has attracted approximately one hundred full 
and part time students from a wide area. They are 
being prepared for positions in Catholic as well as 
public agencies. 

Changes have had to occur to meet the demands 
of progress. Each year, therefore, has seen significant 
developments in the curriculum. From one that in 
the early days numbered but few courses, the pro- 
gram has developed into a two-year, minimum sequence 
that gives the student a basic background as well as 
some specialization in his particular field of interest. 

The training has never been completely confined 
to the classroom. The opportunity for broader experi- 
ence in field work has been provided with the inclusion 
of several new recognizee! agencies. Elizabeth E. 
Lloyd, M.A., as Director of Field Work, has done 



valuable work in coordinating this field program with 
the classroom instruction. 

The expansion of governmental services to those 
in need has necessitated the preparation of trained 
personnel for administration. In attempting to meet 
this need, the School has developed a sequence of 
courses, including Social Security Legislation, Public 
Assistance, Social Insurance, Unemployment Com- 
pen.=;ation, and the newest of fields. Housing Programs, 
all under the direction of Katherine Radke, Ph.D. 

Besides the two members of the faculty already 
mentioned, Mary J. McCormick, Ph.D., Alice B 
Hora, M.A., Roman L. Hareraski, Ph.D., and Daniel 
E. O'Keefe, M.S., are full time instructors who have 
substantially altered course content to teach the 
current developments. 



ca© ® ^ 



^ ^ ^ 



^ \^ ^ 




SIlliE 1«[ 




ST. ANNE'S has a well equipped library and 
study room. Nurses Wilson, Monahan, 
Hughes, Curtin, Gunderson, Schmidt and 
Plotz avail themselves of their opportunity 
to add to the knowledge that the\ have ob- 
tained in the classroom. 




ASSISTING AT OPERATIONS is an ex- 
tremelv important part of a nurse's training. 
Xurses" Rose Mary Cassin, Bernadine Geor- 
gen and Catherine Burns, prepare themselves 
in the surgery for an operation. 




AN INSIOffTTNTG CHEMISTRY is re- 
quired t(i iil)t:i.in the degree of Registered 
Xurse, Miss Melba Davis does some ana- 
lytic weighing as part of her instruction in 
laboratory technique. 



PREPARING AND SERVING the patients' 
meals is an important duty of a Tmrse. 
Xurses Maker, Felton, and Zenslicka are 
shown in the kitchen making tlie food ready 
to be served. 





«4l 



EVliWTORSES MUST EAT, and from the 
smiJe on their faces they evidently enjoy 
meal time. Nurses Kiefer, Stekel, Smillie, 
and Moran wait in line for their lunches as 
served cafeteria st\'le. 



%?if 



COMPLETE CLEANLINESS is the con- 
comitant of modern advance in medicine. 
Xurses Wykowski, Kelz, Prieto, Quartuck, 
and Carver don rubber gloves before treating 
patients. 




NURSES La Rocque, Kalchik, Albihl, and 
Mangan watch as Sister Mary Margaritis 
demonstrates a difficult point in procedure. 
This intimate student teacher instruction is 
characteristic of the nursing schools. 



NING TO DUTY this group of stu- 
rses enjoy a walk through the grounds 
of St. Elizabeth's. Ample opportunities _for 
rest and rela.Kation are afforded by "the 
hospitals to enable the students to work 
efficiently. 



SAINT 



THE NURSES' RESIDENCE at 

St. Hcriiaiil's Ilospltul is one of 
the newest and best equipped 
of its kind in the city. It con- 
tains a hbrary, and classrooms 
as well as laboratories of un- 
usual quality. 




INTENSELY DRAMAT- 
IC are pii-tincs of opera- 
tions. The slighte.st slip 
may mean death. This 
part of the nurses' train- 
ing must be of the highest 
quality in order that they 
may be completely effic- 
ient and dependable in 
the ease of emergencies. 



BERNARD'S 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 



St. Bernard's Hospital was founded in 1903 by the Religious Hos- 
pitalers, an order of Canadian Nuns. These zealous sisters have built 
St. Bernard's Hospital and Nursing School into a unit of which the medical 
profession in Chicago may be very proud. A nui'sing program has been 
built which is rich in scientific, cultural, and e.xtra-ciirricular data. 

The nurses' residence is connected directly to the hospital and houses 
over one hundred nurses. The house itself is equipped with a library, 
class rooms, and laboratories, which are of the highest quality. 

Religion is the most important activity in which the nurses engage. 
The Sodality and Cisca are very active and promote Catholic ideals 
through their monthly meetings and discussions. Christmas baskets are 
also an important function of this group, as well as is the annual three 
day retreat. 

Not only these, but other activities of a social nature have been pio- 
vided for by the faculty. Plays, motion pictures, picnics, and dances all 
fill the program of the nurse. The Junior-Senior dinner is the outstanding 
event of the year, and is invariablj' successful. The Senior picnic, at 
which this class is the guest of the Alumnae, is the closing event of the 
school vear. 




SISTER HELEN JARRELL, R.N., M.A., 

(liroctiess of luirsiiift ;it. tlic St. Heriuud's 
Schodl <ii' Nursing, and Dean of tlie School 
of Xurr^ing. 



ST. BERNARD'S JUN- 
IORS. First row, (left 
to right), M. Brown, A. 
O'Brien, M. Vaccaro, Sr. 
Gabriel, Sr. O'Hara, Sr. 
Agnes, Sr. Clementine, C. 
Jessup, M. Reedy, G. 
Stradum; second row, F. 
Kolle, M. Gable, L. Duris, 
M. Janette, B. Sepsi, F. 
Dabrowski, F. Kumskis, 
M. Jessup, K. Gonning, 
K. Graham, E. Skradski; 
rear row, K.Xoonan, J. 
Stulginskas, K. Bogne, H. 
Ketter, C. Jack, M. Mc- 
Cann, L.See, M. James, 
M. Brinkman, A. Jack, 
D. Ochota, E. King. 



ST. BERNARD'S 
FRESHMEN. First row, 
(left to right), .1. Burckal, 
C. Gallagher, Sr. Anna, 
Sr. Teresa, Sr. Mary 
Clare, M. Sinn, M. Col- 
lachia; second row, M. 
Finigan, E. Logan, I. 
Eischeid, H. Barry, L. 
Crowe, R. Tennyson, M. 
O'Neil, V. Tierney; rear 
row, B. Dougherty, A. 
Pastrnak, L. Bergin, M. 
Bolduc, M. Callahan, B. 
Leketas, D. CuUinan, H. 
Brohm, C. Merrick, V. 
Guthrie. 





SISTER MARY CORNELIA, 
R.N., B.S., directress of the 
School of Nursing at St. Eliza- 
beth's Hospital. 




THIS NEW AND MODERN 
STRUCTURE houses St. lOliza- 
beth's Hospital. It has a cap- 
acity of three hundred and 
twenty patients, and is equipped 
with the most modern facilities. 



ST. ELIZABETH'S 

SCHOOL OF NDRSINE 




ST. ELIZABETH JUN- 
IORS. Front row, Ger.st- 
ner, t'it'sla, nnniunskas, 
Sister Almurita, Sister 
Arcadia, Sister Liguoria, 
Stephen, Habel, MoKear- 
ly; middle row, Mitchell, 
Counihan, Molloy, Man- 
gan, Ballas, Eiigels, Da- 
liinti'ii, Wagner, Eastby, 
Stanley, Schmidt, Kalter, 
Schiltz: rear row, Turner, 
Dorey, Meyers, Jakubiec, 
Thomas, LaRocque, Glin- 
ski, Oravec, Robles, Gray, 
Lozinski. 



ST. ELIZABETH 
FRESHMEN. Front row, 
Falkcnhcig. Carroll, Ben- 
ante, Sifter Mary Provid- 
encia, McC'abe, Minter, 
Inman, Kwilosz; middle 
row, Schaefer, DeBates, 
Niven, Spanier, Neiman, 
Conway, Oeth, Charkow- 
ski, Arns; rear row. Mur- 
phy, Wellens, Macherey, 
Dougherty, Vaters, Gian- 
otsos, Jacolas, Grenkovitz, 
DuFon, League. 



fipia ^ c) 
Pi f^\ ^< 





THE STERILIZATION 
OF ALL BANDAGJiS and 

surgical instruments, as 
well as anything else that 
would spread infection is 
one of a nurse's chief 
duties. Nurse Alice King 
stores the now sterilized 
towels in sanitary cabi- 
nets. 



O n /^ 0;P|n n r^ p . n 



St. Elizabeth's Hospital has the distinction of being the second oldest 
hospital in the system of nursing schools affiliated with Loyola. The 
hospital was founded in 1886, while the nursing school itself was initiated 
in 1914 by the Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ. Its affiliation with the 
University took place in 1920, shortly after the construction of a new 
and enlarged hospital. The new hospital has accommodations for three 
hundred and twenty patients, and is particularly well equipped in all 
regards. 

Besides the regular course of studies which are prescribed for the various 
classes, the nurses also take part in various types of activities which are 
similar to those enjoyed in other schools of the university. The annual 
initiation of the freshmen by the junior nurses culminating in the annual 
Halloween party, is one of the brightest spots of the social season. 

The thanksgiving dinner sponsored by the Senior Class had its mee.sure 
of success, while the next holiday, Christmas, was ushered in with a 
candy and cookie sale, which proved extremely popular. The annual 
Christmas party itself, with the presenting of gifts and singing of carols, 
and all the other trimmings of the season was one of the mcst pleasurable 
events of the year. 

The Senior dinner-dance which ranks as the social event of the year, 
took place at the Drake Hotel on February fifteenth, to the music of 
Wayne King. This nationally known orchestra, playing in the famous 
Gold Coast Room was coupled with the efforts of the Senior Class Presi- 
dent, Josephine Nalazek, and her aides, to make the affair the crowning 
event of their years at school. 

With this affair, all the activities, except graduation, terminate. The 
undeniably successful accomplishments of the student leaders have been 
aided by the spirit of cooperation which they have received from all the 
students. 




SISTER M. CLEMENT, R.N., A.B., director 
of nursing at the Columbus School of Nursing. 



THE COLUMBUS 



Columbus Hospital, located on the North Side opposite Lincoln Park, 
was founded in 1905 by Mother Frances Cabrini, who was beatified 
November 13th, 1938. It is maintained by the Missionary Sisters of the 
Sacred Heart, who have by their careful and thorough training gained a 
reputation for the Nursing School which is of the highest quality. The 
school provides the regular three year course in nursing, during which 
time the student is given both theoretical and practical work in the 
department of obstetrics, gynecology, medicine, pediatrics, orthopedics, 
diet therapy and emergency work. Through these well equipped and 
well taught courses, the graduate nurse has a training of the highest 
quality. 

This school of nursing is unique in the recreational advantages it is 
able to afford its student nurses. The proximity of Lincoln Park makes 
tennis, ice-skating, and swimming some of the more easily obtainable 
sports. It also affords a pleasant spot for picnics and parties both in the 
fall and in the spring. 

The religious activities of this Nursing School are the most important 
events of the year to the nurses. On this account, the Sodality of the 
Children of Mary receives the most support of all organizations. Under 




COLUMBUS JUNIORS 
First row, I. Bartolomei, 
E. Einola, J. Dale, F. 
Theis, M. Lightfoot, S. 
Makar, M. Russell; sec- 
ond row, T. Mendoza, 
M. Yates, U. Schuler, I. 
Kingston, M. Davey, M. 
Hedrick, M. Porche; rear 
row, L. Sutkus, R. Mas- 
tronardi, J. Morrison, L. 
Deterville, L. Hinze, E. 
Cahill, I. Steplyk, D. 
Felton, L. Mayer. 



COLUMBUS FRESH- 
MEN. First row, A. Los- 
koski, F. Back, K. Cor- 
liett, I. Schaub, M. Zanin, 
second row, M. Sudrvech; 
V. Kavwood, M. Hen- 
nessY, R. O'Donnell, M. 
Uher, D. Rigotti, M. 
Crisanti; rear row, K. 
Williams, G. Randall, L. 
Shurpit, R. Music, I. 
Jarosz, R. McGee, V. 
Heydens, F. Barkley. 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 





OVERLOOKING LINCOLN PARK, Colum- 
bus Huspital is easily accessible. It has 
become a medical center, and it maintains 
a highly accredited nursing school. 



MATERNITY WORK forms a large item in 
the training of a nurse since this work is 
one of the most important functions of a 
hospital. 



the leadership of the Sodahty, the Nurses 
maintain the annual custom of singing Christ- 
mas carols on the eve of the feast, and the 
distributing of holly to the patients. The 
coronation of the Blessed Mother in May in 
which all the nurses participate is the most 
beautiful event of the year. 

The social life of the nur.ses is diversified 
and varied providing them with a full quota 
of interests. Parties and dances are held en 
the various holiday occasions, and this year 
culiminated in a card and bunco party, held 
in June before the vacation. The ideal of 
progress has been the keynote of this year 
at Columbus, and all indications point to the 
fulfillment of this objective. 



SAINT ANNE'S 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 



St. Anne's Hospital, originally organized as an 
auxiliary to St. Elizabeth's Hospital to care for tuber- 
culosis patients, obtained its charter in 1908 as a 
separate unit. Five years later, in 1913, its nursing 
school was officially opened. From a class of eight 
nurses, in its first year, the school has developed until 
at the present time, the student bodj' numbers over 
one hundred. 

As is customary in most nursing schools, the 
Freshmen put the Probationers through their paces 
in an informal initiation. The ceremony was held 
around a campfire in the park surrounding the nurses' 
home. The traditional Halloween party was sponsored 
by the Juniors; the nurses used their originality in 
designing and wearing novel costumes to this affair. 
The Senior Ball, before the Thanksgiving Holidays, 
was held at the Graemere Hotel, imder the capalale 
baton of Carl Sands. 




THE PREPARATION OF FOOD in the diet 
kitchen provides the practical apphcation of the 
nurses' study of dietetics. Nurses Alice Mc- 
Clelland and Jane Feeney take turns in this 
branch of education. 





1^ i^ >^) ? 5g; 4'W V^ V'«? 




t \ . s 



K 



ST. ANNE'S JUNIORS. 
First row, (left to right), 
B. Signorelle, C. Cleim- 
itus, M. Kremer, Miss H. 
Wnlderbach, M. Lentz, 
M. Moser, L. Shunick; 
second row, M. O'Con- 
nell, X. Volkman, E. Ger- 
lach, I. Hesselman, M. 
Gneden, M. Isberg, E. 
Skidbul, H. Intfen, A. 
Marta, G. Kocur; rear 
row, M. Thompson, H. 
Sarafolean, L. Mathison, 

A. Fencl, H. Feay, F. 
Freiman, B. Patrick, T. 
Dasiewicz, A. Van Dorn, 
F. Petkiewicz, R. O' 
Grady, M. Torraco. 

ST. ANNE'S FRESH- 
MEN. First row, (left 
to right), M. Burke, L. 
Gibbons, A. Von Kriegs- 
feld, C. Burnett, M. 
Schmidt, D. Hughes, M. 
Malone, E. Anderson, M. 
Lockwood; second row, 
K. Plotz, G. Fruzynski, 
M. Guy, K. Anderson, 

E. Sayen, A. Sampson, 

F. Deichstetter; rear row, 
E. Cantwell, R. Conway, 

B. Kartie, E. Shaffrev, 
X. Curtin, T. Tragni, M. 
Luby, J. Gunderson; top 
row, M. Wilson, R. Brad- 
field, G. Walsh, R. 
Meagher, L. Xeuwirth. 
I^. Koca, L. Huerta, C. 
O'Connor, A. Mersch, ,J. 
Rose, J. Murphy, V. 
Szyper, B. Hoessler, C. 
Monohan. 




SURROUNDED BY A BEAUTIFUL PARK, St. Anne's Hospital 
is one of the most completely equipped hospitals on the west 
side. The building itself is an architectural model, and fulfills 
the function of beauty as well as utility. 




M 



MISS HELEN M. WALDERBACH, 
R.N., directress of nursing at St. Anne's 
Hospital has just completed twenty- 
five years of service. 



During the winter, the Sisters sponsored a series 
of sleigh rides for those who enjoy winter sports. 
The nuns also gave a Christmas party for the nurses, 
which ranked as the most looked-for event on the 
nurses' social calendar. On Christmas day, the annual 
singing of Christmas carols to the patients took place, 
to cheer those who were forced to spend their holiday 
in a hospital. 

Since this year marked the twenty-fifth anniversary' 
of Miss Helen Walderbach as superintendent of the 
Nurses, a gala celebration was held in her honor on 
the last day of February. 

With the end of the semester, the probationary 
period of the freshmen nurses reached a close. Those 
who had proved themselves worthy of the tasks that 
were given them during the preceding six months were 
formally made students of the Nursing School of St. 
Anne's. This goal toward which they have been 
striving is made possible b>' the happy combination 
of work and play throughout the school j'ear. 




OAK 

SCHOOL OF 



PARR 

NURSING 



EVEN FLORAL ARRANGEMENTS come 
under tlie head of eduiatiim fur the nurses. 
While it is not, of ciiuise, taught formally. 
Nurses Frances Hartman and Emily Cecchini 
compare notes on the best possible arrange- 
m^snt. 



SISTER ST. TIMOTHY. R.N. Ch.B., is direct- 
ress of nurses at the Oak Park School of Nursing. 




The training that a nurse receives gives her an insight and 
an e.xperience that is difficult to duphcate. This is true onlj' 
where this training is complete and wholly adequate; nowhere 
does it more capably fulfill these qualifications than at Oak Park 
Nursing School. The Hospital, with which the school is affiliated, 
was founded in 1906 by the Sisters of Misericorde in the same 
year that Oak Park was incorporated as a village. The Hospital 
has grown until now it has one hundred and seventy beds, and 
a well-manned staff of physicians. 

In 1917, the nursing school became affiliated with Loyola 
University, and in 19.33 it became an integral part of the Uni- 
versity by becoming one of its nursing units. Today, its students 
receive a well rounded cultural as well as professional education. 
It is the aim of the school not only to develop proficiency in the 
art of nursing, but also to engender in its students high ideals 
and a true design for living. 

During the past year the list of social activities has been 
very complete. It is to fulfill their ideal of imparting a complete 
education, that the faculty have cooperated in holding these 
events. These activities are planned to draw out latent talents 
and to give exercise to favorite hobbies. Formal teas, an annual 
Christmas party, student dances, and card parties are sponsored. 
All students are eligible to become members of the Dramatic 
Club, directed by Mrs. Walter J. Donovan, and of the Glee 
Club under the guidance of Mrs. John Conway. 

Thus, Oak Park Hospital, being full}' accredited, not onlj' 
gives its students every opportunitj' to attain the desired "R.N." 
and the Bachelor of Science degree from Loyola University, but 
also to fill creditably their appointed places in a world which 
demands social and cultural attainments as well as technical or 
professional training. 







)'-^ I 




OAK PARK JUNIORS. 
Front row, Costanza, O' 
Hciylc, Sister St. Berna- 
illnc, Zizon, Ghiardi; rear 
row, Cotugno, Piokopo- 
vitz, Henderson, Fitz- 
gerald, Thomas, Puhach, 



OAK PARK FRESH- 
MEN. Front row, Kreug- 

er, Schroeder, Castle, 
Sterling. Vandenbreocke, 
Eiselt, Johnson; second 
row, Vaughn, Sullivan, 
vSheedy, Gosch, Nowak, 
X orris, Dooley; rear row, 
Korosy, Scharep, Ki rby, 
Schierhorn, Zitkovich, 
D ickerson, Marrs, Curtis. 



THIS HOSPI- 
TAL is the finest 
one in Oak Park. 
Through its ex- 
pert facilities 
and competent 
staff it not only 
serves the vil- 
lage but also 
Chicago. 




SAINT FRANCIS 

SCHOOL OF PRSING 



St. Francis School of Nursing is the most recent 
addition to the Loyola University Nursing school 
affiliates. The Hospital itself is one of the largest 
hospitals in the Chicago area, with a bed capacity of 
three hundred and fifty and a medical staff of almost 
ninety members. 

The Nursing School, under the direction of Sr. M. 
Gertrudis, R.N., numbers over one hundred students, 
who are very carefully examined as to their qualifica- 
tions. The school has the reputation of being one of 
the most difficult to obtain entrance to, in the city. 
As an evidence of the high quality of the student 
nurses, over one quarter of the Freshman Class regis- 
tering last fall, had two to four years of education 
beyond high school. 

Besides offering the regular nursing courses leading 
to the degree cf Regi.stered Nurse, the school also 




SISTER M. GERTRUDIS, R.N., directress 
of St. Francis School of Xursing. 













(^ a A n a Pi ^ AdrCko 



^ ^ p^ J ^a^ >'^^ f -^ ^ C^pv .:.^,^ ^'^ 



ST. FRANCIS JUNIORS. 
First row, (loft to right), 
E. Saline, M. Turk, M. 
McElrone, Sr. M. Sebast- 
ian, Sr. M.Pius, D. La- 
Frambiiisc, M. Gregorich, 
K. Kclz; second row, V. 
C'aspei, H. Wvkowski, D. 
Dvorak, F. " Kelly, C. 
Dvorak, F. Verage, V. 
Tjasee, D. Gunnison, M. 
Scliultz, M. Lorrig; rear 
row, M. Devney, C. 
Hdchni, A. Schumacher, 
L. Tilges, C. Xeveaux, B. 
Burdett, D. Gregory, S. 
Evans, D. Dymek, F. 
Kenny. 



ST. FRANCIS FRESH- 
MEN. First row, E. 
Christianson, B. Stull, M. 
Conwav, R. Murphy, P. 
Marshall, J. O'Toole, IG. 
Eack, G. Clissold, H. Cau- 
lev; second row, A. Riddi- 
ford, A. Blough, H. Miller, 

B. Morton, P. Duffy, H. 
Gorman, M. McKuen, J. 
Stevenson, N. Seagrave, 

C. Baglev, M. Schwinn, 
K. Kellv", B. Mulvihill, 
B. Kiser, R. Dix, R. 
Smillie, M. Link; rear 
row, M. Moran, C. Lenzi, 
S. Barton, H, Klinker, 
M. Eckes, C. Xied, B. 
Wertz, J. Reinke, M. 
Peart, R. Ford, C. Brierty. 



SAINT FRANCIS HOS- 
PITAL located on ol!l 
Ridge Avenue, Evanston, 
is one of the largest in 
the city and surroundings, 
having a capacity of 350 
beds. 




A LABORATORY DEMON- 
STRATION by Miss Elizabeth 
Faber is watched attentively by 
nurses Margaret Schultz and 
Marv Foley. 




offer.s several graduate courses in surgery, first aid, 
and obstetrics. 

The activities at St. Francis are many and varied. 
The opening event of the season is the annual welcome 
party given to the pre-clinical group. The Glee Club 
presented its usual Christmas concert, as well as pro- 
viding the choir music during the year. One of the 
most important organizations is the Dramatic Club, 
which this year presented a full length play at the 
Christmas party, as well as a series of four one-act 
plays on February 24th, at the Loyola Community 
Theatre. The dramatic club owes much of its success 
this year to the capable direction of Catherine Wallace 
Hennessey. 

The spiritual exercises consist of an annual retreat, 
given this year by Reverend Father Phillips, S.J., the 
capping and reception into the Sodality of the pre- 
clinical students, and the coronation of the May Queen. 

The climax to the year's activities and the social 
event of the season was the senior dance. An event 
looked forward to by all the student nurses, as well 
as a great number of the Alumnae, the dance was 
presented at the Lake Shore Athletic Club, on June 
2, and was attended by over 150 couples. It proved 
to be a suitable climax to the year's work and an 
agreeable preface to the summer vacation. 



PRESIDENTS 



LORRAINE HORN, President of the 
senidr class at St. Francis Hospital. 

JOSEPHINE MONICA NALAZEK, 

President of the senior class at St. 
Elizabeth Hospital. 



COLETTE MARY MAIERS, President 

of the senior class at St. Anne's Hos- 
pital. 

HELEN GANEY GOVANS, President 
of the senior class at Oak Park Hos- 
pital. 




MARY VIRGINIA LEE, 

President of the senior class 
at Columbus Hospital. 

LOIS KATHRYN O'BRIEN, 

President of the senior class 
at St. Bernard's Hospital. 



ALMEROTH 




LEO E. ADAMS, Bachelor of Science; 
entered from Mount Carmel High 
School; -Alpha Delta Gamma: Sodality 
2, 3. 4; German Club; Chemistry Club 
o. 4; Intramurals 2, 3. 4; Chicago. 
Illinois. 



ALDINE AGEE, Bachelor of Philcs- 
ophy ; entered from Chicago Normal 
College and Englewood High SchocI; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



CHARLES J. ALMEROTH. Bachelor 
of Philosophy; entered from Xavier 
University and Saint Ignatius High 
School; Basketball 3, 4; Sodality 1, 2, 
3. 4; Intramurals 2, 3, 4; Chicago, 
Illinois. 



JOHN B. AMBERG, SJ., A.B., 
Master of Arts; entered from Xavier 
University, Loyola University, and 
Loyola Academy; Chicago. Illinois. 



GUY A. ANTONEILI. Bachelor of 
Science; entered from Fen wick High 
School ; Delta A Ipha Sigma ; Chicago 
Iliianis. 



CHARLES E. ANZINGER, B.S.M., 

CertiHcate in Medicine; entered from 
Xa\ier University and Dayton Prep; 
Honorary Medical Seminar; Spring- 
field, Ohio. 



E. LIBUSE BAITEL, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence ; entered from Chicago Normal 
College and J. Sterling Morton High 
School; Chicago, Illinois. 



EDWARD A. BANNER, B.S., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
University of Illinois. Northwestern 
University, and Lake View High 
School; Zeta Psi: Honorary Medical 
Seminar; Volini Medical Society; Chi- 
cago. Illinois. 



ELMER A. BARRON, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
Lewis Institute and Marshall High 
School; Phi Lambda Kappa; Chicago, 
Illinois. 

HAROLD C. BECKER, D.D.S., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
Northwestern University and Love- 
land High School, Loveland. Colorado; 
Phi Chi; Lambda Rho; Omicron Kappa 
Upsilon ; H onorary Medical Seminar; 
Loveland, Colorado. 

LOUIS J. BELNIAK, B.S.M., M.S.; 
Certificate in Medicine; entered from 
Y. M. C. A. College and Lane Tech- 
nical High SchocI; Pi Mu Phi; Honor- 
ary Medical Seminar; Moorhead Sur- 
gical Seminar; Volini Medical Society; 
Chicago. Illinois. 

ALFRED H. BENSON, B.S.M., M.S.; 
Certificate in Medicine; entered from 
Central Y. M. C. A. College and York 
Community High School; Honorary 
Medical Seminar; Volini Medical Soci- 
ety; Chicago, Illinois. 



GEORGE S. BERG, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
DePaul University and Holy Trinity 
High School; Pi Mu Phi; Chicago. 
Illinois. 



ELI A. BERNICK, B.S.M., Certificate 
in Medicine; entered from University 
of Illinois and Tuley High School; 
Alpha Epsilon Pi; Phi Lambda Kappa; 
Honorary Medical Seminar; Volini 
Medical Society; Chicago, Illinois. 



JOHN B. BIRCH, B.S.. Certificate in 
Medicine; entered from Notre Dame 
University and Proviso Township High 
School ; Phi Chi ; Moorhead Surgical 
Seminar; May wood, Illincis. 



ROBERT P. BIRREN, Bachelor of 
Philosophy ; entered from Campion 
High School; Monogram Club 2. 3, 
4; Swimming 1. 2; Green Circle 1, 2, 
3, 4; Sodality 1, 2; Intramurals 1. 2. 
3, 4; Chicago, Illinois. 



CLASS OF^39 



BLUE 

BONGIOVANNI 
BOWYER 
BRICKMA^ 



BROCCOLO 
BROOKMEYER 
BROSNAN 
BROWN 



BRYANT 
BUCKLEY 
BURKE, E. 
BURKE, J. 



BURNS 
BUSH 
CACACE 
CAMPAGNA, A. 




'^fWI 




RUTH M. BLUE, Bachelor of Science 
in Education; entered from Chicago 
Normal College and University High 
School; Chicaso, Illinoie. 



SAMUEL E. BONGIOVANNI, Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
Niagara Falls Senior High School; 
Volini Medical Society, Niagara Falls. 
New York. 



ALFRED M. BOWYER, Bachelor f.f 
Philosophy; entered from Crane Tech- 
nical High School and Y. M. C. A. 
College; Alpha Sigma Nu; Chicago. 
Illinois. 



EDWARD A. BRICKMAN, Certificate 
in Medicine; entered from Austin 
High School and Y. M. C. A. College; 
Chicago. Illinois. 



FRANK J. BROCCOLO, Certificate in 

Medicine; entered from Saint Ignatius 
High School and DePaul University; 
Volini Medical Society; Cicero. Illinois. 

FREDERIC R. BROOKMEYER, 
B.S.C., Di.i'tor of .lurisprudencp; en- 
tered from riii\er9ity of Nutre Eianie 
and Saint Ignatius High School. Cle\ e- 
land. Ohio; Class President 1, 2. 3. 
Law Student Council 1. 2, 3; Secretary 
Student Council 2. 3; Junior Bar 
Association 1. 2. 3; Chicago. Illinois. 

JOHN J. BROSNAN, B.S.M., M.S., 
Certificate in Medicine; entered from 
DePaul University and Saint Rita 
High School; Phi Chi; Volini Medical 
Society; Moorhead Surgical Seminar; 
Honorary Seminar; Chicago, Illinois. 

JOSEPH E. BROWN, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
Notre Dame University and Proviso 
Township High School; Lambda Rho; 
Volini Medical Society; Moorhead 
Surgical Seminar; Maywood. Illincis. 



DONALD S. BRYANT, B.S., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
University of Chicago and Lakeland 
High School; Phi Kappa Sigma; Lake- 
land. Florida- 



MARION S. BUCKLEY, A.B., Doctor 
of Jurisprudence; entered from Uni- 
versity of Chicago and Texhoma High 
School. Texhoma. Oklahoma; Chicago. 
Illinois. 



EDMUND P. BURKE, S.J., Bachelor 
of Arts; entered from Xavier University 
and Saint Ign.atius High School; Sodal- 
ity 4; Classical .\cademy 4; Oak Park, 
Illinois. 



JEROME J. BURKE, Certificate in 
Medicine; entered from Saint Patrick 
High School; Phi Chi; Moorhead Sur- 
gical Seminar; Chii-ago. Illincis. 



THOMAS W. BURNS, Bachelor of 
.\rts; entered from I^oyola Academy; 
Pi Alpha Lambda; Alpha Sigma Nu; 
Blue Key; Sodality 2, 3. 4; Student 
Council 1. 2. 3. 4; Loyola Union 1. 2. 
3. 4; Green Circle 1. 2. 3, 4; Harrison 
Oratorical Contest Winner 1; Intra- 
murals 1. 2. 3, 4; Loyola News 1; 
Curtain Guild 1. 2. 3. 4. Vice-President 
4; Chicago. Illinois. 

THADDEUS F. BUSH, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
University of .Alabama and Dodd 
Harris High School; Phi Mu Sigma; 
Phi Chi; Lambda Rho; Moorhead 
Surgical Seminar; Volini Medical Soci- 
ety; Chicago. Illinois. 

VINCENT A. CACACE, B.S., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
Catholic University and New Kaven 
High School; New Haven. Connecticut. 

AUGUST J. CAMPAGNA, Certificate 
in Medicine; entered from Lewis In- 
stitute and McKinley High School 
lambda Fhi Mu; Chicago. Illinois. 





CAMPAGNA. P. 
CAUL 

CAVALLINI 
CECALA 



CECCOLINI 



CHARLES 
CLANCY 



CLARK 
COLEMAN 
COLLIAS 
CONVERSE 



CONWAY 

COYNE 
CRANE 
CRISP 



PHILIP L. CAMPAGNA, Certificate 
in Medicine; entered from Y. M, C. 
A. College and DeLaSalle High 
School; Lambda Phi Mu; Volini Medi- 
cal Society; Chicago. Illinois. 



CHA.RLES J. CAUL, B.S.M., M.S., 
Certificate in Medicine; entered from 
Loyola L'niversity and Saint Mels 
High School; Alpha Delta Gamma; 
Phi Beta Pi; Lambda Rho; Tau Zeta 
Delta; Chicago, Illinois. 



BRUNO J. CAVALLINI, Bachelor of 
Science in Commerce; entered from 
St. Vincent's College; Sodality 2, 3. 
4; Saint Thomas More Legal Club 3, 
4; International Relations Club 2, 3; 
Economics Seminar 4; Erie, Pennsyl- 



PHILIP J. CECALA, Certificate in 
Medicine; entered from Loyola Uni- 
versity and DePaul Academy; Moor- 
head Surgical Seminar; Houston, Texas. 



EDWARD M. CECCOLINI, A.B., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
Kansas State Teachers' College and 
North Tarrytown High School; Phi 
Beta Pi; North Tarrytown, New York. 



FRANK J. CERNY, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
Lewis Institute and Morton High 
School; Lambda Rho; Moorhead Sur- 
gical Seminar; Cicero. Illinois. 



EVA M. CHARLES, Bachelor of Law; 
entered from Frankfort Community 
High School; Kappa Beta Pi; Chicago, 
Illinois. 



EDWARD J. CLANCY, Certificate in 
Medicine; entered from L^niversitv of 
Chicago and DeLaSalle High School; 
Volini Medical Society; Lambda Rho; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



GEORGE E. CLARK, Bachelor of 
Science in Commerce; entered from 
Highland Park High School; Phi Mu 
Chi; Alpha Sigma Nu; Track 1. 2. 3, 
4. Captain 4; Monogram Club 2, 3, 4; 
Economics Seminar 4; Highland Park, 
Illinois. , 

MADELINE C. COLEMAN, R.N., 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing Edu- 
cation ; entered from Mercy High 
School; Chicago, Illinois. 

PHILIP J. COLLIAS, A.B., Doctor of 
Jurisprudence; entered from North- 
western University and Crane Tech- 
nical High School; Phi Alpha Delta; 
Brandeis Competition 1, 2, 3; Law 
Quarterly 1, 2; Chicago, Illinois. 

JOSEPH L CONVERSE, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
Loyola University and New Trier 
High School; Lambda Rho; Phi Beta 
Pi; Moorhead Surgical Seminar; ^'o]ini 
Medical Society; Wilmette, Illinois. 



PETER L. CONWAY, JR., Bachelor 
of Science in Commerce; entered from 
Mount Carmel High School; Pi Alpha 
Lambda; Phi Alpha Rho; Beta Sigma; 
Sodality 1. 2. 3. 4; Glee Club 1. 2, 3. 
4; Saint Thomas More Legal Club 3. 
4; Varsity Debate 3, 4, Business Man- 
ager 4; Loyola News 1, 2, 3, 4; Winner 
John Naughton Debate 3 ; Chicago, 
Illinois. 

MARY V. COYNE, Bachelor of Philos- 
ophy, entered from DePaul University 
and Immaculata High School; Chi- 
cago. Illinois. 

IRVING F. CRANE, Bachelor of Philos- 
ophy; entered from Saint Mel High 
School; Alpha Delta Gamma; Sodality 
2. 3; Curtain Guild 2. 3; Spanish Club 
2; Intramurals 2; International Rela- 
tions Club 2, 3; Chicago, Illinois. 

JOSEPH C. CRISP, B.S.M.. Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
Canisius College and Asbury Park 
High School; Lambda Phi Mu: Hon- 
orary Medical Seminar: \'olini Medical 
Society; Asbury Park. New Jersey. 




CROWLEY, E. 
CROWLEY, T. 
CUSHNIE 
DAHLBERG 



DAHME 
DAVIS, B. 
DAVIS, J. 
DELIA 



DENKER 
DENKEWALTER 
DE NYSE 
DOHENY 



DOMEIER 
DONLON 
DOROTHEA, SR. 
DORE 




WTfl 







EDWARD X. CROWLEY, JR., B.S., 

Certificate in Medicine; entered from 
Loyola U. and Acad.; Pi Alpha Lamb- 
da; Lambda Rho; Beta Pi; Pi Gamma 
Mu; Lambda Chi Sigma; Blue Key 1. 
2. 3. 4, Pres. 4 ; Moorhead Surgical 
Seminar; Volini Med. Soc; Campus 
Ed., Loyolan 1, 2, 3, 4; Loyola News 
1. 2. 3, 4; Intramurals 1. 2. Board 1; 
Class Rep. 1, 2; Class See. 3: Chicago. 
Illinois. 

THOMAS E. CROWLEY, Bachelor of 
Arts; entered from Saint Ignatius H. 
S.; Class Sec. 1. 2. 3; Alpha Delta 
Gamma; Alpha Sigma Nu; Pi Gamma 
Mu; Curtain Guild 1. 2; Chemistry 
Club 3. 4; Classical 1, 2; Cicero. 111. 
EDWARD F. CUSHNIE, A.B., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
University of Hawaii and Hilo H. S.; 
Phi Beta Pi; Lambda Rho; Moorhead 
Surgical Seminar; Volini Med. Soc; 
Hon. .lulu. Hawiiii. 

ANDREW V. DAHLBERG, JR., B.S., 
Certificate in Meiliciiie; entered from 
University of Illinois and University 
H. S.; Psi Upsilon; Lambda Rho; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



JACK K. DAHME, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Commerce; entered from Loyola 
Academy; Pi Alpha Lambda: Curtain 
Guild 1. 2, 3. 4; Loyola News 1. 2; 
Intramurals 1, 2. 3; Green Circle 1, 
2. 3. 4; French Club 1; Economic 
Seminar 4; Sodality 1, 2; Chicago. 
Illinois. 



BLANCHE DAVIS, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Nursing Education; entered 
from SpeTicer High School; Spencer. 
West \'irginia. 



JACK R. DAVIS, Certificate in Medi- 
cine; entered from Loyola University 
and Calumet High School; Honorary 
Medical Seminar; Chicago, Illinois. 



EMILIO F. DELIA, B.S., Certificate 
in Medicine; entered from University 
of Notre Dame and Barringer High 
School, Newark, New Jersey; Honorary 
Medical Seminar; Newark, New Jersey. 



MERLE J. DENKER, Certificate in 
Medicine: entered from Central Y. M. 
C. A. College and Riverside-Brook- 
field High School; Phi Chi; Lambda 
Rho; Moorhead Surgical Seminar; 
Volini Medical Society; Riverside, 
Illinois. 



ROBERT G. DENKEWATER, Bach- 
elor of Science; entered from Loyola 
Academy; Pi Alpha Lambda; Lambda 
Chi Sigma; Honors Course; Chicago, 
Illinois. 



WALTER J. DE NYSE, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
Loyola L^niversity and DePaul Acad- 
emy; Phi Chi; Honorary Medical 
Seminar; Middleville. Michigan. 



THOMAS P. DOHENY, Bachelor of 
Science in Commerce; entered from 
Saint Viator College and Saint Mel 
High School; Chicago, Illinois. 



LtrVERNE H. DOMEIER, B.S.M.. 

Certificate in Medicine; entered from 
Saint Thomas College and Saint Mary's 
High School, Sleepy Eye, Minnesota, 
Phi Beta Pi; Volini Medical Society; 
Sleepy Eye. Minnesota. 



JOHN J. DONLON, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
Loyola University and Campion Acad- 
emy; Moorhead Surgical Seminar; 
Chicago. Ilhnois. 



SISTER MARY D9ROTHEA, Bach- 
elor of Science in Nursing Education; 
entered from Ancilla Domini High 
School, Donaldson, Indiana; West- 
phalia, Michigan. 



JAMES D. DORE, JR., Bachelor of 
Arts; entered from University of Illi- 
nois and Danville High School; Dan- 
ville, Illinois. 



CLASS OF^39 




JOHN P, DRISCOLL, Bachelor of 
T-aw; entered from Loyola Academy; 
Claasical Club 1. 2; Varsity Manaper 
2; Sodality 1. 2; Junior Bar Associa- 
tion 3, 4; Chicago. Illinois, 

JOHN T. DRISCOLL, Bachelor of 
Science in Commerce: entered from 
Fenwick High School; Alpha Delta 
Lambda; Intramural Board 1. 2, 3, 
4, Director 4; \'ar8ity Basketball 3, 4; 
Monogram Club 3. 4; Economic Sem- 
inar 4; Loyola News 1, 2, 3; Student 
Council 4; Chairman Junior Prom 3, 
Chairman Sophomore Cotillion 2; Oak 
Park, Illinois. 

HUGH E. DUNN, SJ., Bachelor of 
Arts; entered from Xavier University 
and St. Mary High School; Sodality 4; 
Jackson, Michigan. 

JOSEPH A. DUPONT, B.S., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
Saint Thomas College. St. Paul. Minn, 
and DeLaSalle High School, Minnea- 
polis; Phi Chi; Lambda Rho; Moor- 
head Surgical Seminar; Minneapolis, 
Minnesota. 



JOHN E. DURKEE, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence; entered from Saint Viator Col- 
lege and Saint Charles High School; 
Detroit, Michigan. 



JOHN E. DWYER, Bachelor of Phil- 
osophy; entered from St. Mels High 
School; Lovola News 1, 2, 3. 4, Assist- 
ant Editor 4; Sodality 1. 2. 3, 4; St. 
Thomas More Club 3, 4; Philosophy 
Club 4; Chicago, Illinois. 



DAVID A. EISENBERG, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine ; entered from 
Central High School and John Carroll 
University ; Cleveland, Ohio. 



JOHN S. ENRIGHT, Bachelor of 
Philosophy; entered from New Trier 
High School; Sodality 2, 3. 4; Loyolan 
Staff 1, 2; Green Circle 1. 2, 3. 4; 
Cross Country 1; Glencoe, Illinois. 



SIDNEY E. EPSTEIN, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from Lake 
\'iew High School; Phi Lambda Kappa; 
Honorary Medical Seminar. 



JOHN F. FADGEN. Certificate in 
Medicine; entered from University of 
Illinois and Clinton High School, Clin- 
ton. Massachusetts; Phi Chi; Moor- 
head Surgical Seminar; Clinton, Massa- 
chusetts. 



HENRY FALK, Certificate in Medi- 
cine; entered from Central Y. M. C. 
A. College and Crane Technical High 
School; Phi Lambda Kappa; Chicago. 
Illinois. 



EDWARD J. FARRELL, Bachelor of 
Science in Commerce; entered from 
Crane College and St. Patrick High 
School; Commerce Club 3, 4; Techny. 
Illinois. 



WALTER L. FARRELL. S.J., Bachelor 
of Arts; entered from Xavier Uni- 
versity and St. Ignatius High School, 
Cleveland, Ohio; Sodality 4; Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 



WALTER J. FILIPEK, Certificate in 
Medicine; entered from University of 
Notre Dame and South Bend Central 
High School; Pi Mu Phi; Volini Med- 
ical Society; South Bend, Indiana. 



MARK A. FINAN, S.J., Bachelor of 
.\rts; entered from Xavier University 
and St. Ignatius High School; Sodality 
4; Chicago, Illinois. 



IRENE F. FITZSIMMONS, Bachelor 
of Philosophy; entered from Chicago 
Normal College and Academy of Our 
Lady Chicago. Illinois. 



CLASS 0FV39 



FOLLMAR 
FORSTHOEFEL 
GALLAGHER 
GANNON 



GANSER 
GARVEY 
GECAN 
GIEREN 



GIGANTI 
GILLIES 
GINO 
GLICKMAN 



GOLDHABER 
GOTTLER 
GRAHAM 
GRUDZIEN 





^^n ^^1 




FRED F. FOLLMAR, B.S.. Certificate 
in Medicine; entered from University 
of Notre Dame and St. Joseph's Col- 
lege; Phi Beta Pi; Chicago. Illinois. 



PAULINUS F. FORSTHOEFEL, SJ., 

Bachelor of Arte; entered from Xavier 
University and Immaculate Concep- 
tion High School, Celina, Ohio; Sci- 
entific Academy; Sodality 4; Celina, 
Ohio. 



WILLIAM C. GALLAGHER, A.B., 

Doctor of Jurisprudence; entered from 
L^niversity of Chicago and Hyde Park 
High School ; Sigma Alpha Epsilon ; 
Pi Alpha Delta; Junior Bar Association 
3. 4; Chicago, Illinois. 



JOHN GANNON, Bachelor of Philos- 
ophy; entered from DePaul Academy; 
Alpha Delta Gamma; Loyola News 2. 
3; Intramurals 2. 3; Loyolan 3. 4; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



HOWARD 1. GANSER, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
Lewis Institute and Schurz High 
School; Phi Lambda Kappa; Chicago, 
Illinois. 

RICHARD J. GARVEY, Bachelor of 
Arts; entered from Campion Academy; 
Pi Gamma Mu; Honors Course 4; 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Loyola News 3. 4; 
Asst. Editor 4; Loyola Quarterly 3, 4, 
Associate Editor 4; Class Vice-Presi- 
dent 4; Lovolan Staff 4; St. Thomas 
More Club 3, 4. President 4; Debating 
Society 4; Gerard Manley Hopkins 
Literary Society 3, 4; Robert Bellar- 
mine Philosophy Club 4; Classical 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Chicago. Illinois. 



ANTON R. GECAN. Bachelor of Law; 
entered from DePaul University and 
Lindbloom; Chicago, Illinois. 

ALBERT J. GIEREN, Bachelor of Law; 
entered from Tuley High School; Chi- 
cago. Illinois. 



JAMES J. GIGANTI, Certificate in 
Medicine; entered from Central Y. M. 
C. A. College and Tuley High School- 
Lambda Phi Mu; Honorary Medical 
Seminar; Chicago, Illinois. 



MARY A. GaLIES, Bachelor of Phil- 
osophy; Chicago. Illinois. 



MARIELLO V. GINO, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
St. Ignatius High School; Lambda Phi 
Mu; Chicago. Illinois. 



MILTON GLICKMAN, Certificate in 
Medicine; entered from Central Y. M. 
C. A. College and Roosevelt High 
School: Phi Lambda Kappa; Honorary 
Medical Seminar; Chicago, Illinois. 



SAMUEL j;. GOLDHABER, Certifi- 
cate in Medicine; entered from Central 
Y. M. C. A. College and Crane Tech- 
nical High School; Honorary Medical 
Seminar; Volini Medical Society; Chi- 
cago. Illinois. 

PAULINE GOTTLER, R.N.. Bachelor 
of Science in Nursing Education; 
entered from St. Elizabeth's School of 
Nursing and Washington High School; 
Maseillon. Ohio. 

ROBERT R. GRAHAM, Bachelor of 
Science in Commerce; entered from 
Quigley Preparatory Seminary; Pi Al- 
pha Lambda; Phi Alpha Rho; Sodality 
1. 2. 3. 4; Loyola News 1, 2. 3. 4. Edi- 
torial Staff 3. Asst. News Ed. 4; Glee 
Club 2, 3. 4. Vice-President 4; Debating 
Society 3, 4; St. Thomas More Club; 
Chicago. Illinois. 

STANLEY R. GRUDZIEN, Certificate 
in Medicine: entered from Weber High 
School: Pi Mu Phi; Volini Medical 
Society: Chicago, Illinois. 





MARYALICE GRUESBECK, R.N., 
Bachelor of Philosophy; entered from 
Columbia City High .School, Columbia 
City. Indiana. 



PETER J. GUOKAS, Certificate in 
Medicine; entered from Central Y. M. 
C. A.CoIlepe and St. Mel High School; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



THOMAS C. HALL, Certificate in 
Medicine; entered from Central Y. M. 
C. A. College and Thornton Township 
High School; Harvey. Illinois. 



RICHARD L. HALPIN. A.B., Doctor 
of .Jurisprudence; entered from Uni- 
versity of Notre Dame and PeLaSalle 
High School; Chicago. Illinois. 



ROBERT F. HARRANEK, S.J., Bach- 
elor of Arts; entered from Xavier 
University and St. Igratius High 
School; Sodality 4; Claseiral Academy; 
Chicago, Iliinois. 



JOHN M. HAYES, Bachelor of Sci- 
enci- ill Cornnierce; entered from St. 
CU:.ri_r,. iiifrh .s^hool ; Monogram Chib 

2, '.i. 4; Iiiteniational Relations Club 

3. 4; Economics Seminar 3, 4, Secre- 
tary 4; Sodality 3, 4; St. Thomas More 
Club 4; Chicago, Illinois. 



SAMUEL S. HAYES, Bachelor of Phil- 
osophy; entered from Loyola Academv; 
Sodality 2. 3. 4; Green Circle; Athletic 
Manager 1 ; Economics Seminar 4 ; 
French Club 1; Chicago. Illinois. 



ROBERT T. HAZINSKI, B.S.M., Cer- 

tifi<atr-i;i Medicin.-; I i M ii Phi ; entered 
from I.ovria Uiii\er?itv and South 
Bend Ceutrid high School ; Scuth 
Bend. Indiaria. 



JOHN E. HEALY, Bachelor of Science 
in Commerce; entered from St. Bene- 
dicts College and Maine Township 
High School; St. Thomas More Club 
3. 4; International Relations Club 4; 
Tennis 3; Park Ridge. Illincis. 

JOHN G. HENRY. S.J., Bachelor of 
Arts; entt-r-^il from Xavier University 
and St. I^nattiis Hi-^h School; Sodality 
4; Chicago. Illinois. 

GEORGE F. HOGAN. Bachelor of 
Philosophy; entered from Loyola Acad- 
emy; Basketball 1. 2. 3. 4; Monogram 
Club 2. 3. 4; Intramurals 1. 2. 3, 4; 
Spanish Club 1 ; Economics Seminar 
4; Chicago, Illinois. 

ROBERT A. HOFHERR, Bachelor of 
Philosophy; eiitered from Loyola Acad- 
emy; Class President 1. 2. 3. 4; Mono- 
gram Club 4; Sodality 1. 2. 3, 4; Green 
Circle 1, 2. 3, 4; Senior Basketball 
Manager 4; Student Council 1. 2, 3. 
4; French Club 3; Intramurals 1. 2, 
3, 4; Chicago. Illiuoi?. 



HARRY H. HOMAN, Bachelor of Arts; 
entered from [,ovola Academy; Sodality 

1. 2, 3. 4; Philosophy Club 3, 4; Class- 
ical Club 3. 4; German Club 3. Secre- 
tary 3; International Relations Club 

2. 3; Evanston, Illinois. 

JOHN B. HOWE, A.B., Doctor of 
.Jurisprudence; entered from University 
of Chicago and Austin High School; 
Riverside, Illinois. 

NORBERT J. HRUBY. Bachelor of 
Philosophy; entered from Riverside- 
Brookfield H. S.; Pi Gamma Mu; Phi 
Alpha Rho; Beta Pi; Blue Key; Loyola 
News I, 2. 3. Ed. 4; Loyola Quarterly 

3. 4; Loyolan 3. 4; Varsity Tennis 2, 
3, 4; Student Council 4; Loyola Union 
4; Varsity Debating 3. 4; Gerard Man- 
ley Hopkins Society 4; President Jesuit 
College Newspaper Assn.; Riverside, 
Iliinois. 

PAUL A. HUBER, S.J., A.B., Master 
of Arts; entered from Xavier U. and 
Xavier H. S.; Sodality. Newport, Ken. 



,t i 




HUGHES 
HUNT 
lANDOLI 
IRWIN 



TAKATZ 
JAROSZ 
JASIEL 
JOY 



JUZULENAS 
KALETA 
KASS 
KAUTZ 



KAVANAUGH 
KELEHER 
KENNEDY 
KLIMASZEWSKI 




HERMAN S. HUGHES, S.J., Bachelor 
of Arts; entered from Xavier University 
and St. Mary's High School, Flint, 
Michigan: Sodality: Scientific Acad- 
emy: Flint. Michigan. 



JOHN R. HUNT, B.S.M., Certificate 
in Medicine: entered from St. Thomas 
College and Roosevelt High School, 
Minneapolis. Minnesota: Phi Beta Pi; 
Lambda Rho: Minneapolis, Minnesota. 



JOHN P, lANDOLI, B.S., Certificate 
in Medicine: entered from Fordham 
University and Yonker's High School. 
Yonkers. New York: Lambda Phi Mu: 
Y'onkers, New York. 



CARMELITA JAKATZ, Bachelor of 
Philosophy: entered from Chicago Nor- 
mal College and Parker High School: 
Chicago, Illinois. 



ADOLF J. JAROSZ, Certificate in 
Medicine: entered from Loyola Uni- 
versity and Tuley High School: Pi 
Mu Phi: Volini Medical Society; Chi- 
cago. Illinois. 



CHARLES W. JASIEL, Bachelor of 
Science in Commerce; entered from St. 
Patrick Academy; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4: 
Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2; 
Swimming 1, 2; Intramurals 1; St. 
Thomas More Club 2, 3, 4; Economics 
Seminar: Chicago, Illinois. 



VINCENT T. JUZULENAS, Bachelor 
of Science; entered from St. Ignatius 
High School: Lambda Chi Sigma; 
Chemistry Club; French Club; Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 



EDWARD J. KALETA, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine: entered from 
Loyola University and Holy Trinity 
High School; Pi Mu Phi; Lambda 
Rho; Volini Medical Society: Moor- 
head Surgical Seminar: Chicago, Illi- 



ALBERT J, KASS, B.S.M., Certificate 
in Medicine: entered from Loyola Uni- 
versity and Holy Trinity High School: 
Pi Mu Phi; Chicago, Illinois. 



JOHN J. KAVANAUGH, Bachelor of 
Science: entered from Loyola Academy; 
Sodality I, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Club I, 
2, 3; German Club 1. 2; Intramurals 
1, 2, 3; Chicago, Illinois. 



JOHN J. JCELEHER, S.J., Bachelor 
of Arts; entered from Xavier Uni- 
versity and St. Ignatius High School; 
Sodality 4; Classical Academy 4; Chi- 
cago. Illinois. 



THOMAS R. KENNEDY, A.B., Doctor 
of .lurisprudence; entered from St. 
Ignatius High School; Junior Bar I, 
2, 3; Chicago, Illinois, 



RAYMOND J. IRWIN, Bachelor of 
Science: entered from Lane Technical 
High School; Phi Mu Chi; Biology 
Club; Chicago, Illinois. 



HARRY J. JOY, Bachelor of Law; 
entered from Uak Park High School; 
Alpha Delta Gamma; Phi Alpha Delta; 
Track 1. 2; Cross Country 1.2; Sodality 
1, 2; Oak Park, Illinois. 



WILBERT KAUTZ, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Commerce; entered from Tilden 
Technical High School; Basketball 1, 
2, 3, 4; Monogram Club 3, 4; Chicago. 
Illinois. 



L0CYAN F. KLIMASZEWSKI, A.B., 

Certificate in Medicine;enteredfromSt. 
Bonaventure's College and Most Holy 
Rosary High School; \'olmi Medical 
Society: Syracuse, New Y'ork. 



CLASS OF^39 



" i "I 



KNOEPFLE 
KOEPKE 
KOWALCZYK 
KRAMER 




RUDOLPH J. KNOEPFLE, S.J., Bach- 
elor nf Arts; ciiti-rpd from Xavier 
University aii<l St. Xavier High School; 
Cincinnati. Ohio; Sodality; Cincin- 
nati. Ohio. 



RDSSELL C. KOEPKE, Bachelor of 
Phiioeophy; entered from DeLaSalle 
High School: I'hi Mu Chi; Intramurals 
2. 3; Loyola News 1, 2; Economics 
Semiriar 4; Monogram Club; Chicago, 
Illinois. 



ADAM S. KOWALCZYK, Bachelor of 
Science; entered frmn St. Mary of the 



Lake Seminarv and Qu 


iLdev Prepara- 


tory Seminarv; Sijiiiui 


1 Pi Alpha; 


Chemistry Club 2. .3. 4; 


Sodality 2. 3, 


4; Chicago. Illinois. 





CHARLES F. KRAMER, B.S.M.. Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
Loyola University and Mount Carmel 
High School; Phi Chi; Volini Medical 
Society; Moorhead Surgical Heminar; 
Intramurals 3, 4; Chicago. Illinois. 



EDWARD J. KROL, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
Central Y. M. C. A. College and 
Central Y. M. C. A. High School; Pi 
Mu Phi; Lambda Rho; Moorhead 
Surgical Seminar; Class Secretary 3 ; 
Vice-President 4; Intrafraternity Coun- 
cil 3, 4; Chicago, Illinois. 



KENNETH E. KRUCKSTEIN, Bach- 
elor of Law; entered from Loyola 
University and Schurz H igh School ; 
Lambda Delta Gamma; Swimming 1. 
2. 3; Monogram Club 2. 3; Junior Bar 
1. 2, 3; Chicago. Illinois. 

WALTER R. KRZEMINSKI, Bachelor 
of Science; entered from North Park 
College and Waller High School; Sigma 
Pi Alpha; Biology Seminar; Chicago, 
Illinois. 



HARRY J. KRZYWICKI, Bachelor of 
Science; entered from Central Y. M. 
C. A. College and Austin High School; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



STANLEY J. KUMAN, B.S., M.S., 

Certificate in Medicine; entered from 
College of the City of New York and 
Port Richmond High School, Staten 
Island. New York; Pi Mu Phi; Port 
Richmond, Staten Island, New York. 



WALTER S. KUREK, Bachelor of 
Science; entered from St. Mary's High 
School, Orchard Lake, Michigan; Sigma 
Pi Alpha; Biology Club 2, 3. 4; Chem- 
istry Club 3, 4; Chicago, Illinois. 



IRENE L. KUZMINSKI, Bachelor of 
Philosophy; entered from Chicago Nor- 
mal College and Tuley High School 
Chicago, Illinois. 



WILLIAM LAMEY, JR., Ph.B., 

Dnctor nf .lurisprudence; entered from 
Lovnla .Academy; Pi Alpha Lambda; 
Pi rVIt;. Mu; Blue Key; Brandeis 
Competition 4; Chicago. Illinois. 



ELMER G. LAMPERT, B.S., Cer- 
tificate in Metlicine; entered from 
Wheaton College and Wheaton High 
School; Phi Beta Pi; Honorary Medical 
Seminar ; Volini Medical Society; 
Wheaton, Illinois. 



WALTER W. LAMPERT, Bachelor of 
Law; entered from University of Chi- 
cago and Hyde Park High School; 
Delta Theta Phi; Junior Bar Associa- 
tion; Chicago, Illinois. 



HARRY M. LANDBERG, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
Northwestern University; Phi Lambda 
Kappa; Honorary Medical Seminar; 
Intramurals 1; Volini Medical Society 
3. 4; Chicago, Illinois. 



MAGDALEN V. LETZ, R.N., Bachelor 

of Srlfinc 111 Nursing Education; en- 
tered fr. pMi M'Tr\- School of Nursing 
and \ isitatiun High School; Chicago, 
Illinois. 



CLASS OF^ 39 



LEWIS 
LEYDEN 
LISKA 
LOISELLE 



LOMBARDI 
LOVELEY 
MACKEY, C. 
MACKEY, W. 



MACIEJEWSKI 
MADURA 
MAGGIO 
MANION 



MANN 
MANNING 
MARCINIAK 
MAROTTA 




RAYMOND O. LEWIS, B.S., Cer- 
tificate ill Medicine; entered from 
Montana State College and Roundup 
High School, Lambda Chi Alpha; Phi 
Chi; Lambda Rho: Moorhead Surgical 
Seminar; Class Treasurer 2; Roundup, 
Montana. 



MARY M. LEYDEN, Bachelor of Phil- 
osophy; entered from Chicago Normal 
College and Parker High School; Sodal- 
ity 4; Chicago, Illinois. 



ROBERT G. LISKA, S,J., Bachelor 
of .Arts; entered from Xavier L^niversity 
and St. Iffnatius High School; Sodality 
4; Riverside, Illinois. 



ALBERT O. LOISELLE, Certificate in 
.Medicine; entered fruin University of 
Chiiacn, Illinois and St. Philip's High 
S(hf)ol; Phi Chi; .M(»orhead Surgical 
Seminar; Voiini Medical Society; Chi- 
cago, Illinois, 



LOUIS F. LOMBARDI, B.S., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
University of Akron and St. Vincent's 
High School, Akron, Ohio; Voiini Med- 
ical Society; Honorary Medical Sem- 
inar; .\kron. Ohio. 



EDWARD M. LOVELEY, S,J., Bach- 
elor of Arts; entered from Xavier 
University and Sacred Heart Seminary; 
Sodality 4; Classical Academy 4; De- 
troit, Michigan. 



CHARLES E. MACKEY, Bachelor of 
Science in Commerce: entered from 
Sullivan High School: St. Thomas More 
Club; Economic Seminar 4, President 
4; Chicago, Illinois, 



WILLIAM J. MACKEY, Bachelor of 
Arts; entered from Loyola Academy; 
Sodality 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 2, 3. 4; 
Intramurals 1, 2; Philosophy Club 4; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



EDWARD S. MACIEJEWSKI, Bach- 
elor of Science in Commerce; entered 
from St. Mary's; Chicago, Illinois. 



IGNATIUS W, MADURA, Certificate 
in Medicine: entered from DePaul 
University and Holy Trinity High 
School; Pi Mu Phi; Chicago, Illinois. 



NICHOLAS A. MAGGIO, Ph.D., B.S, 

M., Certificate in Medicine; Honorary 
Medical Seminar; Lambda Phi Mu; 
Newark, New Jersey, 



FREDERICK P. MANION, S.J., Bach- 
elor of Arts; entered from Xavier Uni- 
versity and ,Toliet Catholic High School; 
Freeport, Illinois, 



GREGORY J. MANN, Bachelor of 
Science: entered from Loyola Academy; 
Pi Alpha Lambda; Sodality 1, 2. 3, 4; 
German Club 2; Chemistry Club 1, 2, 
3, 4; Wilmette, Illinois. 

JOHN J. MANNING, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
St, George High School; Phi Chi; 
Lambda Rho; Honorary Medical Semi- 
nar: Voiini Medical Society: Moorhead 
Surgical Seminary; Chicago, Illinois, 

EDWARD A. MARCINIAK, Bachelor 
of Arts: entered from Quigley Prepara- 
tory Seminary; Phi Alpha Rho; Loyola 
News 3; Editorial Board 4; Student 
Council 4; Sodality 2, 3; President 4; 
Cudahy Forum 2; Varsity Debating 
3. 4; International Relations Club 2, 
3, 4; Economics Club 4; Chicago, III. 

SAMUEL R. MAROTTA, Bachelor of 
Science in Commerce; entered from 
Loyola Academy; Pi -Alpha Lambda; 
Pi Gamma Mu; Sodality 1, 2, 3. 4; 
Green Circle: Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Basketball 1; International Relations 
Club 3; Chicago, Illinois. 





REV. MANETTUS M. MARRON, 
O.S.M., Bachelor of Science in Coni- 
merce; entered from St. Philip High 
School; Chicaso. Ilhiioia. 



MARIE B. MARTIN, R.N., Bachelor 
of Science in Nursing Education; en- 
tered from DePauI University and Holy 
Family Academy; Chicago, Illinois. 



GEORGE H. MASEK, Bachelor of 
Arts; entered from Loyola Academy; 
Classical Club President 3. -1; Honors 
Course; Chicago, Illinois. 



JAMES J. MATEJKA, Certificate in 
Medicine; entered from Loyola Uni- 
versity and Harrison Technical High 
School; Phi Chi; Lambda Rho; Moor- 
head Surcical Seminar; ^'olini Medical 
Society; Chicago, Hlinois. 



A. HOMER MATTLIN, S.J., B.A., 
Master of Arts; entered from Xavler 
University and Central Catholic High 
School; Sodality; Classical Academy; 
Toledo. Ohio. 



SEYMOUR MAZURSKY, Bachelor of 
Law; >-uU-u->\ fmni H.tzI .hmior Col- 
lege and .Marsluill ili-ili School; Junior 
Bar Assijciatiun; liraiidcis Competition; 
Chicago. Illinois. 



FRANCIS A. McCALL, Bachelor of 
Science in Commerce; entered from 
Fvanston Township F igh Schorl; Glee 
Club 1. 2. 3. 4; Vice-President 3; Track 
1; Choral Society 1. 2. 3. 4; Wilmette. 
Illinois. 



MARTIN J. McCarthy. B.S.M., Cer- 
tificati^ in Medicine; entered from 
DePanl Univcrsitv and St. Rita High 
Schoiil; Land da Rho; Moorhead Sur- 
gical Seminar; \'olini Medical Society; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



ARTHUR y. McCOURT, Bachelor of 
Science in Commerce; entered from 
Campion Academy; Green Circle 1. 
2. 3. 4; Junior Prom King 3; Chicago. 
Illinois. 

ROBERT B. McCREADY, B.S.M. . 
Certificate in Medicine; entered from 
Central Y. M. C. A. College and Calu- 
met High School; Volini Medical Soci- 
ety; Moorhead Surgical Seminar; 
Chicago. Illinois. 

HENRY J. McDonald, A.B., Doctor 
of Jurisprudence; entered from Loyola 
University and Campion Academy; 
Blue Key; Alpha Delta Ciamma; Gam- 
ma Zeta Delta; Alpha Sigma Nu; Beta 
Pi; Loyola Union 1. 2. 3. President 3; 
Law Corner 2. 3; Brandeis Competi- 
tion 2; Student Council 1. 2; Chicago. 
Illinois. 

PETER E. McDonnell, Bachelor 
of Philosophy; entered from Quigley 
Preparatory Seminary; Alpha Delta 
Gamma; Philosophy Club 3. 4; St 
Thomas More Clvib 4; Sodality 4 
Monogram Club 4; Finance Club 4 
Chicago. Illinois. 



HUGH McGUIRE, Bachelor of Phil- 
osophy; entered from De La Salle High 
School; Chicago, Illinois. 



J. BLANCHE McILVAIN, B.S., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
Mount Saint Joseph College and Notre 
Dame Academy; Alpha Gamma; Nu 
Sigma Phi; Honorary Medical Seminar; 
^'olini Medical Society; American Med- 
ical Women's Association; Pres., Loyola 
Chapter; Atlantic City, New Jersey. 



WILLIAM McKECHNEY. Bachelor of 

Philosophy; entered from Loyola Acad- 
emy; Chicago, Illinois. 



WILLIAM C. McKENNA. Bachelor 
of Science in Commerce; entered from 
Xavier L^niversity and Campion Acad- 
emy; Intramurals 2, 3. 4; Economics 
Seminar 4; Chicago, Illinois. 




McNAMARA 

McNAMEE 

McNEEVE 

McQuillan 



MEIER 
MIER 
MILDNAS 
MINDLIN 



OHR 

OLLOY 
MONACO 
ifAUGHTON 



NESBITT, C. 
NESBITT, E. 
NEWELL 
O'BRIEN 




E;DWARD G. McNAMARA, B.S., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
Loyola University and Calumet High 
School; Chicago, Illinois. 



PAUL L. McNAMEE, Bachelor of 
Philosophy; entered from University 
of Notre Dame; Peoria, Illinois. 



FRANCIS W. McNEEVE, S.J., Bach- 
elor of .\rts; entered from Xavier 
University and Xavier Hiph School. 
Cincinnati, Ohio; Sodality: Covington. 
Kentucky. 



HELEN A. Mcquillan, Bachelor of 
Science in Education; entered from 
Chicago Normal College and St. Mary's 
High School; Chicago. Illinois. 



HENRY H. MEIER, B.S., Certificate 
in Medicine; entered from New York 
University and the Ridgewood High 
School. Ridgewood, New Jersey; Phi 
Chi; Phi Beta Pi; Lambda Rho; Volini 
Medical Society; Highland Park, New- 
Jersey. 



THOMAS M. MIER, Certificate in 
Medicine; entered from Mount Carmel 
High School; Lambda Rho; Chicago. 
Illinois. 



JOSEPH G. MaUNAS, S.J., Bachelor 
of Arts; entered from St. Vincent Col- 
lege and Schenley Evening High School; 
Sodality; Bellarmine Sermon Society; 
Homestead, Pennsylvania. 



JOSEPH MINDLIN, B.S., Certificate 
in Medicine; entered from North- 
western University and '1 uley High 
School; Chicago. Illinois. 



JOHN F. MOHR, Bachelor of Phil- 
osophy; entered from John Carrol 
University and St. Ignatius High 
School. Cleveland. Ohio; Sodality 4; 
Cleveland Ohio. 

ROBERT E. MOLLOY, Bachelor of 
Science: entered from Loyola Univer- 
sity; Sodality 1. 2. .3, 4; Intramurals 
1. 2; Chemistry 1, 2. .3; Biology Club 
1. 2, 3; German Club 1, 2; Green 
Circle 1. 2. 3, 4; Chicago, Illinois. 

ARTHUR N. MONACO, Bachelor of 
Science: entered from Austin High 
School; Biology Seminar 1. 2. 3; Chem- 
istry Club 3, 4; Sodality 2. 3; Pre- 
Medical Club 1. 2; Student Representa- 
tive American Medical Society 4; 
Chicago, Illinois. 

THOMAS J. NAUGHTON, B.S.M., 

Certiticat.- in .\I,>,liriri.'; .■nirn-d frnin 
Loyola ri,iv.T,«ilv iiii.l ,-:(. IsiHMtiiia 
High School; Lambda Hlio, I'rcsi.li-nt; 
Moorhead Surgical Seminar; Volini 
Medical Society; Chicago. Illinois. 



CHARLES J. NESBITT, Bachelor of 
-Arts: entered from Loyola Academy: 
Pi .Alpha Lambda; Beta Pi; Sodality 
1, 2. 3, 4; Loyola News 2. 3, 4; Loyolan 
I. 2. 3. 4. Copy Editor 4; Curtain 
Guild 1, 2, 3, 4. Pres. 4; Green Circle 

1. 2. 3. 4, Sec. 4; Classical Club 2. 3. 4, 
Sec. 3. 4; International Relations Club 
3; Philosophv Club 4; Intramurals 1, 

2, 3, 4; Chicago, Illinois. 
EDWARD J. NESBITT. Bachelor of 
.Arts; entered from Loyola Academy: 
Pi Alpha Lambda; Sodality 1, 2. 3. 4; 
Loyolan 2. 3; Curtain Guild I, 2, 3, 4; 
Loyola News 3. 4; International Rela- 
tions Club 2. 3. 4; Philosophy Club 4; 
Green Circle 1. 2, 3, 4; Chicago, 111. 
FRANK W. NEWELL, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
Loyola U. and St. George H. S.; Loyola 
News 1, 2. 3, 4; Interfraternity Council 
Pres. 3; Intramural Mgr. 2; Blue Key; 
Honorar.v Medical Seminar; Moorhead 
Surgical Seminar; Volini Med. Soc; 
Chicago. Illinois. 

WILLLAM M. O'BRIEN, Bachelor of 
.Arts; entered frnni Lnvola .Academy; 
Pi Alpha Lambda; Sndalltv 1. 2, 3, 4; 
Class Sec. 3. I; Student Council Treas. 
2. Sec. 3. Pres. 4; Monogram Club 2. 3, 
4: Green Circle 1. 2. 3, 4; Lovolan Staff 
1; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4: Track 3, 4; 
French Club 2, 3; P.B.S.A. League, 
Pres. 4; Classical Club 2, 3; Philosophy 
Club 4; Chicago. Illinois. 



CLASS OF^39 



O'CALLAHAN 
';i O'CONNELL 

ODILON, SR. ST 
O'DONOVAN 




EDWARD O'CALLAHAN, Bachelor of 
Science; entered from St. Mel High 
School; Phi Mu Chi; Sodalitv 2, 3. 4; 
Class Secretary 4; Chemistry Club 
2. 3. 4; Student Council 4; Chicago, 
IllinoiB. 

SiCHAEL I. O'CONNELL, Bachelor 
of Philosophy ; entered from Loyola 
Academy; Green Circle 1. 2. 3, 4; 
Curtain Guild 1. 2, 3, 4; International 
Relations Club 3; French Club 2. 3; 
Sodality 1; Chicago. Illinois. 

SISTER ST. ODILON BELANGER, 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing Educa- 
tion; entered from Presentation of Mary 
High School, Granby. Provine of Que- 
bec. Canada; Oak Park. Illinois. 

EDWARD J. O'DONOVAN, A.B., 
M.S., Certificate in Medicine; entered 
from Saint Ignatius High School and 
Georgetown University; Lambda Rho; 
Phi Chi; Blue Key; Honorary Seminar: 
Voiini Medical Society. President 4 
Moorbead Surgical Seminar 3. 4; Chi- 
cago. Illinois. 



HELEN O'HERON, Bachelor of Phil- 
osophy; entered from Chicago Normal 
College and Saint Marv's High School; 
Curtain Guild; Chicago. Illinois. 



GREGORY J. O'KELLY, S.J., Bach- 
elor of Arts; entered from Xavier 
University and St. Ignatius High 
School; Sodality 4; Chicago, Illinois. 



CHARLES J. O'LAUGHLIN, Bachelor 
of Science in Commerce; entered from 
Loyola Academy; Pi Alpha Lambda; 
Beta Pi; Phi Alpha Rho; Loyolan Staff 
1. 2. 3. 4. Editor-in-chief 4; Loyola 
News 1, 2, 4; Saint Thomas More Club 
3, 4; Economics Seminar 4; Varsity 
Debating 3. 4; Cudahy Forum 2; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



LEROY A. OLSTA, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence; entered from Weber High School; 
Lambda Chi Sigma; Glee Club 1. 2; 
Chemistry Club 3. 4; Interfraternity 
Counfil 2. 3; Chicago. Illinois. 



JAMES T. O'NEIL, B.S.M., Certificate 
in Medicine; entered from University 
of Arizona; Tau Sigma Phi; Phi Beta 
Pi; Lambda Rho; Voiini Medical Soci- 
ety; Clifton. Arizona. 



ROBERT R. ONORATO, B. S. M., 

Certificate jn Mfiiicinr; entered from 
BeriiM-tt Hi-li S. h,,,,]. Huffalo; Lambda 
Phi Mu; Lanibdu Rho; Class Secretary 
4; Moorhead Surgical Seminar 4; Buf- 
falo, New York. 



ALBERT Y. OSBORN. Bachelor of 
Laws; entered from Eiiglewood High 
School; Brandeis Competition 3; Phi 
Alpha Delta; Chicago, Illinois. 



VERONICA M. PATTEE, Bachelor of 
Science in Nursing Education; entered 
from St. Joseph's Mercy Hospital and 
Sacred Heart High School, Pocahontas, 
Iowa; Sioux City. Iowa. 



LEONARD J. PELLECCHIA, B.S., 

Certificate in Medicine; entered from 
Catholic Universitv and Barringer High 
School. Newark; Phi Kappa; Phi Chi; 
Lambda Rho; Moorhead Surgical Sem- 
inar; Newark. New Jersey. 



GEORGE A. PENDERGAST, Bachelor 

of Science in Commerce; entered from 
Senn High School; Spanish Club 2, 
Intramurals 2; Chicago. Illinois. 



BARNET PEREL, Bachelor of Law; 
entered from Herzl Junior College and 
Tuley High School; Chicago, Illinois. 



ROBERT P. PINGSTOCK, S.J.. Bach- 
elor of .Arts; entered from Xavier Uni- 
versity and St. John The Baptist High 
School. Sodality; Classical Academy; 
Canton, Ohio. 



CLASS OF^39 



POLLAtJF 
PONTECORE 
POREMBSKI 
POTICHA 



POWERS 
PRINDAVILLE 
RABAUT 
RAFFERTY 



REDING 
RICCI 
RILEY 
ROGALSKI 



RONAN 

ROWLAND,"!. J. 
ROWLAND, J. P. 

RUMORE 




ROBERT A. POLLAUF. S.J., Bachelor 
of Arts; entered from Xavier LTniver- 
aity and St. John's High School, Toledo, 
Ohio; Sodality; Scientific Academy; 
Toledo. Ohio. 



MICHAEL M. PONTECORE, Bach- 
elor of Law ; entered from Loyola 
University and Lake View High School; 
Delta Alpha Sigma; Sodality; Junior 
Bar Association; Intramurals; Chicago. 
Illinois. 



THADDEUS A. POREMBSKI, B.S., 

Certificate in Medicine; entered from 
Loyola University and Quigley Pre- 
paratory Seminary; Pi Mu Phi; Pi 
Gamma Mu; Volini Medical Society; 
Chicago. Illinois. 



PAUL W. POTICHA, Bachelor of Law; 
entered from Herzl Junior College and 
Farragiit High School: Junior Bar 
Association 1, 2; Brandeia Competiton; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



RICHARD J. POWERS, Bachelor. 
Arts; entered from St. Viator College 
and St. Ignatius High School; Chicago, 
Illinois. 



JOSEPH PRINDAVILLE. Bachelor of 
Law; entered from Northwestern Uni- 
versity and Mount Carmel Hiah School ; 
Phi Alpha Delta; Chicago, Illinois. 



F. DERMOTT RABAUT, S.J., Litt.B., 

Master of Arts; entered from Xavier 
Univeraity and University of Detroit 
High School; Sodality; Detroit, Mich- 
igan. 



JOHN M. RAFFERTY, Bachelor of 
Science in Commerce; entered from 
St. Ignatius High School; Pi Alpha 
Lambda; Phi Alpha Rho; Sodality 1. 
2; Loyolan 2; Quarterly 1, 2; Student 
Council Treaaurer 2 ; Secretary 3 ; 
Debating 1, 2, 3; Chicago, Illinois. 



FLORENCE C. REDING, R.N., Bach- 
elor of Philosophy; entered from Mun- 
delein College and Immaculata High 
School; Chicago, Illinois. 

HENRY N. RICCI, B.S.M., Certificate 
in Medicine; entered from Central 
Y. M. C. A. College and Crane Tech- 
nical High School; Pi Chi Phi; Moor- 
head Surgical Seminar; Volini Medical 
Society; Chicago. Illinois. 

ROBERT A. RILEY, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Commerce; entered from Mount 
Carmel High School; Glee Club 1, 2. 
3. 4; Treasurer 4; Thomas More Club 
3. 4; Chicago. Illinois. 

FLOYD J. ROGALSKI, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
Grand Rapids Junior College and 
Union High School, Grand Rapids 
Michigan; Lambda Rho; Phi Chi; 
Moorhead Medical Seminar; Volin 
Medical Society; Grand Rapids, Michi- 



JOHN T. RONAN, B.S.C., Doctor of 
Jurisprudence; entered from Loyola 
University and St. Mel High School; 
French Club 1, 2; Junior Bar Associa- 
tion 2, 3. 4; Loyola Bar Association 
4; Chicago. Illinois. 



JOHN P. ROWLAND, SJ., Bachelor 
of Arts; entered from Xavier University 
and St. Marv High School; Akron. 

Ohio. 



JOHN J. ROWLAND, Diploma in 
Commerce, entered from Senn High 
School; Chicago, lUincis. 



PETER C. RUMORE, A.B., Certificate 

in Medicine; entered from Columbia 
University and Boys High School. 
Brooklyn. New York; Lambda Rho; 
Phi Chi; Alpha Phi Delta; Volini 
Medical Society 3, Secretary 4; Honor- 
ary Medical Seminar 3. 4; Brooklyn 
New York. 





THOMAS C. RYAN, B.S., Certificate 
in Medicine; entered from Caniaius 
College and Bennett High School; Phi 
Chi; Lambda Rho; Honorary Medical 
Seminar; Moorhead Surgical Seminar; 
Buffalo, New York. 



SOLOMON SACHS, Bachelor of Law 
and Bachelor of Science; entered from 
Lewis Institute and Roosevelt High 
School; Chicago, Illinois. 



HAROLD P. SANDQUIST, Bachelor 
of Philosophy, entered from St. A'iator 
College and Calumet High School; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



JOSEPH L. SCHMITZ, JR., Bachelor 
of Science in Commerce; entered from 
Oak Park High School; Thomas More 
Club 3, 4; Economics Seminar 4; 
International Relations Club 3; Sodal- 
ity 3. 4; Oak Park. Illinois. 



WILLIAM G. SCHMITZ, Ph.D., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from Uni- 
versity of San Francisco and St. James 
High School. San Francisco, California. 



JUSTIN V. SCHWIND, B.S., M.S., 

Certificate in M.-<ii( iTir; Phi Beta Pi; 
entered from Tnlt-dM Lnivcrsity and 
Perrysburg High Sch(i"l, Honorary 
Medical Seminar; Blue Key; Perrys- 
burg, Ohio. 



NATHAN J. SEROTA, Bachelor of 
Law; entered from Herzl Junior Col- 
lege and Crane Technical High School; 
.lunior Bar 1. 2; Brandeis Competition 
L 2; Chicago. Illinois. 



AILEEN C. SETTER, Bachelor of 
Science in Education ; entered from 
Lewis Institute and Schurz High 
School; Chicago, Illinois. 



THOMAS M. SHIELDS, Bachelor of 
Philosophy ; entered from Harvard 
Community High School, Harvard. 
Illinois; .-Mpha Sigma Nu; Beta Pi; 
Phi Alpha Rho; Loyola News 1, 2, 3, 
4. Editor 3; Sodality 2. 3, 4; Cudahy 
Forum 1.2 ;Varsity Debating Society 3,4; 
Philosophy Club 3. 4; Harvard, Illinois. 
EDMUND W. SINNOTT, Bachelor of 
Arts; entered from St. Ignatius High 
School; Sodality 1. 2, 3; Loyola News 
4; Curtain Guild 3; Class Treasurer 3; 
Debating Society 1, 2 ; President 2 ; 
Chemistry 1; Classical Clnb 1, 2, 3; 
InteriKitinnal Rclntion.^ 2; Intramural 
Board ?; Chir;,g(.. [Iliiiois. 
MERTON B. SKINNER, B.S., D.D.S., 
CertiHcate in .Medicine; entered from 
Loyola University and Joliet Town- 
ship High School; Blue Key; \"olim 
Medical Society; Phi Beta Pi; Omicron 
Kappa Psi; Joliet. Illinois. 
JULIUS SKOLLER, B.A.M.. Certifi- 
cate in Medicine; entered from Uni- 
versity of Chicago and Marshall; 
Honorary Medical Seminar; Chicago, 
Illinois. 



ROGER C. SLATTERY, Bachelor of 
Philosophy; entered from Loyola Acad- 
emy; Curtain Guild 1, 2, 3. 4; Loyola 
News 2. 3. 4; Loyolan 2, 3, 4, Managing 
Editor 4; Beta Pi; Green Circle 1, 2. 
3, 4, President 4; French Club 1, 2. 3; 
President 3; Intramurals 2, 3, 4; Inter- 
national Relations Club 2, 3; Student 
Council 4; EconomiicB Seminar 4; Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 

MARGARET M. SLINGO, Bachelor 
of Philosophy; entered from University 
of Illinois and Schurz High School; 
French Qub 3; Choral Society 3, 4; 
Chicago, Illinois. 

EVERETT J. SMITH, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
Central Y. M. C. A. College and 
DeLaSalle High School ; Honorary 
Medical Seminar; Volini Medical Soci- 
ety; Lambda Rho; Chicago, Illinois. 

BERNARD A. SNYDER, Bachelor of 
Law; entered from Sumner, Nebraska 
High School; Phi Alpha Delta; Chi- 
cago. Illinois. 





SOUERS 
STREIT 
STUART 
SWEENEY, A. 



SWEENEY. R. 
SYLVESTER 
SZEFCZYK 
TAMBONE 



THALE 
TODD 
TOFUKUJI 
TOM 



TOOHEY 
TOWEY 

TRACY 
UNGER 




FRANK R. SOUERS, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence; entered from St. Vincent High 
School, Akron; Phi Mvi Chi; Biology 
Club 1, 2. 3. 4; French Club 2. 3; 
Chemistry Club 1, 2; Akron, Ohio. 



HAL A. STREIT, Certificate in Medi- 
cine; entered from St. Celia Academy, 
Algona ; Phi Chi ; Moorhead Surgical 
Seminar; Algona, Iowa. 



DANIEL D. STUART, Certificate in 
Medicine; entered from Paseo High 
School, Kansas City, Missouri; Phi 
Chi; Lambda Rho; Kappa Sigma; 
Moorhead Surgical Seminar; Class 
President 3; Jersey City, New Jersey. 



ANTHONY J. SWEENEY, B.S.M., 
Certificate in Medicine; entered from 
Loyola Academy; Phi Chi; Alpha Delta 
Gamma ; Honorary Medical Seminar; 
Moorhead Surgical Seminar; Chicago, 
Illinois. 



ROBERT A. SWEENEY, Bachelor of 
Philosophy; entered from St. George 
High School; Pi Alpha Lambda; Inter- 
national Relations Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
President 4; Sodalitv 3, 4; Loyolan 
Staff 2; Evanston. Illinois. 

J. PAUL SYLVESTER, Bachelor of 
Philosophy; entered from O'Dea High 
School. Seattle; Phi Mu Chi; Phi Alpha 
Rho; Sodality 1. 2. 3; Class Secretary 
1; Cudahy Forum 1, 2; Varsity Debat- 
ing 3. 4; Curtain Guild 2. 3; Seattle, 
Washington. 

MATTHEW J. SZEFCZYK, A.B., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
Passaic High School; Pi Mu Phi; Hon- 
orary Medical Seminar; Volini Medical 
Society; Passaic, New Jersey. 

JOHN R. TAMBONE, B.S., Certificate 
in Medicine; entered from Univereitv 
of Chicago Mild St. Mel High School; 
Lambda Phi Mu; Lambda Rho; Loyola 
News Representative 1, 2, -3, 4; Moor- 
head Surgical Seminar; Volini Medical 
Society; Chicago, Illinois. 



THOMAS THALE, B.S.M., Certificate 
in Medicine; entered from New Trier 
High School; Pi Alpha Lambda; Lamb- 
da Rho ; Omicron Chi ; Blue Key ; 
Honorary Medical Seminar; Volini 
Medical Society; Moorhead Surgical 
Seminar; Wilmette. Illinois. 

HOBART H. TODD, B.S., M.S., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
LTniversity of Chicago and Culver 
Military Academy; Delta Kappa Ep- 
silon; Lambda Rho; Blue Key; Honor- 
ary Medical Seminar; Volini Medical 
Society; Moorhead Surgical Seminar; 
Oak Park. Illinois. 

MAMORU TOFUKUJI, A.B., Certifi- 
cate in Medicine; entered from Uni- 
versity of Southern California and 
Maui High School; Wailuku. Maui, 
Hawaii. 

KAM SUNG TOM, B.S., Certificate 
in Medicine; entered from University 
of Hawaii and St. Louis College. Hono- 
lulu; Honorary Medical Seminar; Volini 
Medical Society ; Moorhead Surgical 
Seminar Honolulu, Hawaii. 



GENEVIEVE A. TOOHEY, Bachelor 
of Laws; entered from St. Mary of the 
Woods College and Riverside-Brook- 
field High School; Brandeie Competi- 
tion 1; Junior Bar Association 1. 2, 
3; Riverside, Illinois. 



JANE J. TOWEY, R.N., Bachelor of 
Science; entered from St. Francis Hos- 
pital and St. John High School, 
Rochester, Minnesota. 



PAUL C. TRACY, B.S.M., Certificate 
in Medicine; entered from Loyola 
Academy and University of Illinois; 
Alpha Sigma Nu; Phi Kappa; Moor- 
head Surgical Seminar; ^'olini Medical 
Society; Class President 2; Chicago. 
Illinois. 



THEODORE UNGER, Bachelor of 
Laws ; entered from Lewis Institute 
and Tuley High School; Chicago, 
Illinois. 



CLASS OF^39 








VRACIU 
WAGENER 
WALCH 
WALLACE 




DeMARIS URBANCEK, R.N., Bach- 
■elor of Science in Nursing Education; 
■entered from St. Francis Hospital and 
Coffeen High School; Coffpen, Illinois. 



FLORENT J. VERHULST, Bachelor 
of Science in Commerce; entered from 
Senn High School; Alpha Sigma Nu; 
Sodality 2, 3. 4; Economics Seminar 
4; Robert Bellarmine Philosophy Club 
4; Intramurals 2, 3, 4; Chicago. Illinois. 



RICHARD L. VOLLER, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from St. 
Ignatius High School; Lambda Rho; 
Phi Chi; Moorhead Surgical Seminar; 
Volini Medical Society; Class Treasurer 
4; Cicero. Illinois. 



RAYMOND J. VONESH, Bachelor 
of Law; entered from Fenwick High 
School; Delta Theta Phi; Student 
Council 2, 3. President 4; Junior Bar 
Association; Winner Brandeis Com- 
petition; Oak Park, Illinois. 



DANIEL J, VRACIU, Certificate in 
Medicine; entered from Washington 
High School. East Chicago, and Uni- 
versity of Indiana; Lambda Chi Alpha; 
East Chicago. Illinois. 

PAUL R. WAGENER, Bachelor of 
Philosophy; entered from Loyola Acad- 
emy; Alpha Delta Gamma; Cross 
Country 3. 4, Captain 4; Track 3. 4; 
Philosophy Club 4; Chicago, Illinois. 

JOHN L. WALCH, Bachelor of Arts; 
entcn-.l ffMin .h.hn Carrol] H. S., Okla- 
homu f 'ity ; Pi Alpha Lambda; Beta 
Pi; Phi Alpha Rho; Pi Gamma Mu; 
Loyolan 3. 4; Loyola News 3, 4. Asst. 
Ed. 4; Loyola Quarterly 3. 4, Man. 
Ed. 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra 
1, 2; Sodality 1, 2. 3, 4; Intercollegiate 
English Essay Contest 10th place 3; 
Chicago, Illinois. 

WILLIAM T. WALLACE. Bachelor of 
Arts; entered from Loyola Academy 
Cudahy Forum 1 ; Intramurals 1. 2 
3. 4; International Relations Club 3 
Robert Bellarmine Philosophy Club 4 
Chicago, Illinois. 



RAYMOND L. WHITE, B.S.. Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from 
College of Idaho and New Plymouth 
Idaho High School; Phi Beta Pi; Class 
Vice-President 1. 3; New Plymouth, 
Idaho. 



MARY M. WIDMANN, Bachelor of 
Philosophy; entered from DePaul Uni- 
versity and St. Mary's High School; 
Sodality 4; Oak Park. Ilhnois. 



JOSEPH B. WOODS. S.J., Bachelor 
of Arts ; entered from St. Ignatius 
High School; Classical Academy; Sodal- 
ity; Choir; Chicago, Illinois. 



WILLIAM H. WOLAVKA, B.S.M., 

M.S., Certificate in Medicine; entered 
from Central Y. M. C. A. College and 
Schurz High School ; Lambda Rho ; 
Honorary Medical Seminar; Volini 
Medical Society ; Moorhead Surgical 
Seminar; Chicago, Illinoip. 



JOSEPH B. WYLIE, Certificate in 
Medicine; entered from Loyola Uni- 
versity, Los Angeles, and Brophy High 
School; Phoenix, Arizona. | 

ARTHUR F. ZECH, Bachelor of Phil- 
osophy; entered from Loyola Academy; 
Sodality 1, 4; Intramurals 1, 2. 3, 4; 
Green Circle 1. 2, 3. 4; Wilmette. 
Illinois. 

ROBERT F. ZELLER. B.S., Certificate 
in Medicine; entered from Ashland 
High School and Mansfield High 
School; Lambda Rho; Volini Medical 
Society; Mansfield, Ohio. 

JOHN E. ZUR, Bachelor of Science; 
entered from St. George High School; 
Phi Mu Chi; Class Secretary 1; Sodality 
2, 3, 4; German Club 2; Intramurals 
2. 3. 4; Biology Club 3; Chemistry 
Club 1. 2; Chicago, Illinois. 

JOSEPH A. ZYGMUNTOWICZ, Bach- 
elor of Philosophy; entered from St. 
Ignatius High School; Sigma Pi Alpha; 
Chicago. Illinois. 



CLASS OF^39 



HiSH^^ ^ 



^^a?^c^^ 





dhi^t^MkM 





ALICE I. ABBIHL, Registered Nurse; 
Saint Elizabeth Hospital; entered from 
Senn High School; Mu Omega Mvi; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



DOROTHY B. ALSTROM, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Anne's Hospital; entered 
from Steinmetz High School; Chicago. 
Illinois. 



RUTH A. ASHELFORD, Registered 
Nurse; Oak Park Hospital; Clare. 
Illinois. 



MARY V. BAGAN, Registered Nurse; 
Saint Elizabeth Hospital; entered from 
Menomonie High School; Menomonie, 
Wisconsin. 



ETHEL C.BARTEK, Registered Nurse; 
Saint Bernard Hospital; entered from 
Wahoo High School; Los Angeles. 
California. 



SISTER MARY BERNARDINE, 
O.S.F., Registered Nurse; Saint Ber- 
nard Hospital; entered from Saint 
Francis Academy; Hankinson. North 
Dakota. 



WILMA L. BESSO, Registered Nurse; 
Coin minis Hospital; entered from Waller 
Hiirh Srhodl; Chicago. Illinois. 



ESTHER BIEL, Registered Nurse; 
Saint Anne's Hospital; entered from 
Carl Schurz High School; Chicago. 
Illinois. 



ROSEMARY BLACKBURN, Regis- 
tered Nurse; Saint Bernard's Hospital; 
entered from Saint Francis Academy; 
Joliet, Illinois. 



MARTHA E. BUIT, Registered Nurse; 
Saint Francis Hospital; entered from 
Saint Francis High School; LaFayette. 
Indiana. 



MARY C. BURNS, Registered Nurse; 
Saint Anne's Hospital; entered from 
Sienna High School; Chicago. Illinois. 



DORIS M. CARLSON, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Elizabeth Hospital; en- 
tered from Lucy Flower High School; 
Mu Omega Mu; Chicago, Illinois. 



CECILE M. CARNE, Registered Nurse 
Columbus Hospital; entered from Iro ; 
River High School; Iron River. Mich- 
igan. 



BETTY B. CARVER, Registered Nurse; 
Saint Francis Hospital; entered from 
Grant High School; Evanston. Illinois. 



MARGUERITE C. CASHEN, Reg- 
istered Nurse; Saint Francis Hospital; 
entered from McCook Junior College 
and McCook High School; McCook 
Nebraska. 



DOROTHY I. CASS, Registered Nurse; 
Saint Bernard's Hospital; entered from 
Escanaba High School; Escanaba 
Michigan. 




CECCHINI 
CHEKAL 
COMMERFORD 
CREIGHTEN 



CRUME 
CUNNINGHAM 
CURTIS 
DANSART 



DARGIS, J. 



DARGIS, S. 



DAArtS 

DIETMEYER 

DOHERTY 

DORE 




EMILY M. CECCHINI, Registered 
Nurse; Oak Park Hospital; entered 
from Lucy Flower High School; Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 



GEORGETTE P. CRUME, Registered 
Nurse; Oak Park Hospital; entered 
from Cado High School; Cado, 
North Dakota. 



JOSEPHINE C. DARGIS, Registered 

Nurse; Saint Francis Hospital; entered 
from Lindbloom High School; Chicago. 
Illinois. 



MELBA C. DAVIS, Registered Nurse; 
Saint Bernard's Hospital: entered from 
Elise Academy; Carthage, North Car- 
olina. 



ELSIE M. CHEKAL, Registered Nurse; 
Bachelor of Science in Nursing Edu- 
cation ; St. Elizabeth Hospital ; en- 
tered from Matton High School ; 
Matton, Wisconsin. 



SISTER JOHN BAPTIST COMMER- 
FORD, Registered Nurse; Saint Eliza- 
beth Hospital; entered from Saint 
Isidore High School ; Farmersville, 
Illinois. 



VIRGINIA F. CUNNINGHAM, Reg- 
istered Nurse; Saint Elizabeth's Hos- 
pital; entered from Roosevelt High 
School; Mu Omega Mu; \ irginia, 
Minnesota. 



MARIA D. CURTIS, Registered Nurse; 
Saint Francis Hospital; entered from 
Mailinckrodt High School; Evanston, 
Illinois. 



STELLA J. DARGIS Registered 
Nurse; Saint Anne's Hospital; entered 
from Chicago College of Commerce 
and Saint Casiniir Academy; Chicago, 
Illinois. 



FLORENCE M. DAVEY, Registered 
Nurse; Columbus Hospital; entered 
frc m Norway H igh School ; Norway . 
Michigan. 



MARY E. DIETMEYER, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Bernard's Hospital; en- 
tered from Academy of Our Lady ; 
Sodality 1. 2. .3; Chicago. Illinois. 



LORRAINE A. DOHERTY, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Francis Hospital; entered 
from Saint Patrick Academy, Des 
Plaines; Chicago, Illinois. 



SISTER CREIGHTON, Registered 

Nurse; Saint Bernard's Hospital; en- 
tered from Loretto High School; Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 



ALMA G. DANSART, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Anne's Hospital; entered 
from Macomb High School; Macomb. 
Illinois. 



MARGARET DAVID, Registered 
Nurse; Columbus Hospital; entered 
from Blue Island Community high 
School; Blue Island. Illinois. 



CATHERINE E. DORE, Registered 
Nurse: Saint Bernard's Hospital; en- 
tered from Englewood High School; 
Chicago. Illinois. 



CLASS OF^39 




BARBARA B. DOUGHERTY, Reg- 
istered Nuree; Snint Francis Hospital; 
entered from Hibbing High School; 
Hibbing, Minnesota. 



MARY E. FOLEY, Registered Nurse; 
Saint Francis Hospital; entered from 
Al.ernia High School; Chicago, Illinois. 



MARY G. GIBSON, Registered Nurse; 
Saint H.riKtnl fi Hospital; entered from 
\i-^itati<.[i Hi^ih School; Sodality 1, 2, 

.3; Cliicagu, Illinois. 



REGINA M. GRACE, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Bernard's Hospital; en- 
tered from Academy of Our Lady; 
Sodality 1. 2. 3;Chicago. Illinois. 



RUTH A. FARLEY, Registered Nurse; 
Saint Anne's Hospital; entered from 
Preston High School; Preston, Iowa. 



LUCILLE GAWORSKI, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Francis Hospital; entered 
from Lucy Flower Technical High 
School; Cicero, Illinois. 



ALICE M. GIROUX, Registered Nurse; 
Saint Francis Hospital; entered from 
Mundelein College and Sullivan High 
School; Chicago. Illinois. 



MARGARET H. GREEN, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Francis Hospital; entered 
from Lake View High School; Chicago 
Illincis. 



BERNICE M. FIRKUS, Registered 
Nurse ; Oak Park Hospital ; entered 
from Emerson High School ; Stevens 
Point, Wisconsin. 



BERNADINE L. GEORGEN, Reg- 
istered Nurse; Saint .Anne's Hospital; 
entered from Saint Mary's High School; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



MARX C. GOEBEL, Registered Nurse; 
Saint Francis Hospital; entered from 
Fort Atkinson Senior High School; 
Fort Atkinson. Wisconsin. 



TEAN L. GRILLO, Registered Nurse; 
Saint Elizabeth's Hospital; entered 
from Froefcel High School;Gary, Ind- 
iana; Mu Omega Mu; Gary. Indiana. 



SISTER ALICE MARIE FITZ- 
GERALD, Registered Nurse; Saint 
Elizabeth's Hospital; entered from 
Sacred Heart Convent; Decatur. 
Illinois. 



MARCELLA J. GERLEVE, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Anne's Hospital; entered 
from Saint Mary's High School; Chi- 
cago. Illinois. 



HELEN G. GOVANS. Registered 
Nurse ; Oak Park Hospital ; entered 
from Taylorville Township High School; 
Taylorville. Illinois. 



MARGARET M. HANSEN, Registered 
Nurse: Saint Anne's Hospital; entered 
from Lindbloom High School; Chicago. 
Illmois. 



CLASS OFV39 



HARTMAN 
HELIODORE, SR. 
HEINY 
HINES 



HLETKO 

HORN 

HORTIN 

JODWALIS 



KALCHIK 

KARBIN 

KAMP 

KELLY 



KENNEDY 
KING 

KLAZYSNKI 
KLEBER 




CATHERINE F. HARTMAN, Hes- 
istered Nurse; Oak Park Plospital; 
entered from Morrison High School ; 
Watertown, South Dakota. 



SISTER HELIODORE, Registered 
Nurse; Oak Park Hospital; entered 
from Our Lady of Angels' Academy; 
Oak Park, Illinois. 



ROSEMARY E. HEINY, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Francis Hospital; entered 
from Sairit Catherine Academy; Fort 
Wayne, Indiana. 



CATHERINE M. HLETKO, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Anne's Hospital; entered 
from Saint Xavier Academy; Chicago, 
Illinois. 



LORRAINE HORN, Registered Nurse; 
Saiiit Francis Hospital; entered from 
Parker Senior High School; Chicago, 

Illinois. 



MINNIE K. HORTIN, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Elizaleth Hospital; en- 
tered from Albion Community High 
School; Albion, Illinois. 



MARY K. KALCHIK, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Elizateth Hospital; en- 
tered from Northport Consolidated 
High School; Mu Omega Mu; Omena, 
Michigan. 



ANN M. KARBIN, Registered Nurse; 
Columbus Hospital; entered from 
Thomas Kelly High School; Chicago, 
Illinois. 



DOROTHY A. KAMP, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Elizabeth Hospital; en- 
tered from Waller High School; Mu 
Omega Mu; Chicago. Illinois. 



ELEANOR F. KENNEDY, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Bernard's Hospital; en- 
tered from Ludington High School ; 
Ludington, Michigan. 



ALICE M. KING, Registered Nurse; 
Saint Elizabeth Hospital; entered from 
Parker High School; Mu Omega Mu; 
Chicago. Illinois. 



LORETTA E. KLAZYNSKI, Registered 

Nurse; Saint Anne's Hospital; entered 
from Fenger High School; Chicago, 
Illinois. 



CATHERINE M. HINES, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Francis Hospital; entered 
from Alvernia High School; DesPlaines. 
Illinois. 



LUCILLE L. JODWALIS, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Elizabeth "8 Hospital; 
entered from Saint Casimir .Academy; 
Mu Omega Mu; Chicago. Illinois. 



MARY I. KELLY. Registered Nurse; 
Saint Bernard's Hospital; enterei! from 
Mercy High School; Chicago, Illinois. 



MARGUERITE E. KLEBER, Regis- 
tered Nurse; Saint Bernard's Hospital; 
entered from Englewood High School; 
Antigo, Wisconsin. 






MACAL0SO 

MADIGAN 

MAIERS 

MASCOLA 



ROSEMARY KNOWLES, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Bernard's Hospital; 
entered from Bowen Hi^h School; 
Chicago, Illinf)i8. 



ELEANOR KNUTSON, Registered 
N'urse; Saint Elizabeth's Hospital; 
entered from Chicago Normal College 
and McKinley High School; Chicago. 
Illinois. 



ANNA S. KOBETZ, Registered 
Xurse; Saint Anne's Hospital; entered 
from Tuley High School; Chicago, 



AUNE E. KURIKKALA, Registered 
Nurse; Oak Park Hospital; entered 
from Negaiinee High School; Negaunee. 
Michigan. 



MARY V. LEE, Registered Nurse; 
Columbus Hospital ; entered from Lake- 
view High School, Chicago. Illinois. 



ALINE D. LEEDS, Registered Nurse; 
Saint BiTnard's Hospital; entered from 
Lindbloum Technical High School; 
Sodality 1. 2, 3; Chicago. Illinois. 



BARBARA F. LENNERTZ, Registered 

Nursf: Saint Klizal^th's Hospital; 
cnttTc'l frnni Hlnoin Township High 
S.'hnol; Mu ( -mejia Mu; Chicago 
Heights. Illinois. 



RUTH V. LIBOTTE, Registered Nurse; 
Oak Park Hospital ; entered from 
Eastern Illinois State Teachers Col- 
lege and Matton High School, Mat- 
ton, Illinois; Gays, Illinois. 



BERNADINE J. LUCKIESH, Reg- 
istered Nurse; Saint Anne's Hospital; 
entered from Preston Public High 
School, Preston. Iowa; Charlotte, Iowa. 



MARY A. MACALUSO, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Anne's Hospital; entered 
from Saint Mary's School; Chicaeo 
Illinois. 



HELEN M. MADIGAN, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Francis Hospital; entered 
from Leeds Public High School; Leeds 
North Dakota. 



COLETTE M. MAIERS. Registered 
Nurse; Saint Anne's Hospital; entered 
from \isitation Academy ; Dubuque . 



HELEN A. KOZAK, Registered Nurse; 
Saint Elizabeth's Hospital; entered 
from Steiiimetz High School; Mu 
Omega Mu; Chicago, Illinois. 



LOUISE M. LENICH, Registered 
Nurse; Oak Park Hospital; entered 
from Lyons Township High School; 
LaOrange. Illinois. 



HARRIET A. LUX, Registered Nurse; 
Saint Elizabeth's Hospital ; entered 
from Bloom Township High School; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



SYLVIA A. MASCOLA, Registered 
Nurse; Columbus Hospital; enterecl 
from Blue Island Community High 
School; Blue Island, Illinois. 





MAURA, SR 



MAURICE 



McHUGH 



^ W''^' 



METZER 
MILLER 
MLADY 
MOONEY 



MORRISSEY 
MURPHY, E. 
MURPHY, R. 

NALAZEK 



NEYLON 
NOLL 

O'BRIEN, SR. 
O'BRIEN 




SISTER MAURA, Registered Nurse; 
Saint Bernard's Hospital; entered from 
Immaculata Hifih School; Springfield, 
Illinois. 



HELEN ELIZABETH MAURICE, Reg- 
istered Nurse: Oak Park Hospital: 
entered from Union Free High School; 
Racine, Wisconsin. 



FRANCES L. McHUGH, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Bernard's Hospital: en- 
tered from Saint Thomas .\postle High 
School: Chicago, Illinois. 



MARGARET M. MEANY, Registered 
Nurse; Oak Park Hospital; entered 
from Downers Grove High .School, 
Downers Grove. Illinois. 



DORA P. METZER, Registered Nurse; 
Saint Francis Hospital; entered from 
Remer High School; Remer, Minne- 
sota. 



JEANNE R. MILLER, Registered 
Nurse: Saint Francis Hospital; entered 
from Fort Atkinson High School: Fort 
Atkinson. Wisconsin. 



MARGARET C. MLADY, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Francis Hospital: entered 
from Rhinelander High School; Rhine- 
lander, Wisconsin. 



ANN M. MOONEY, Registered Nurse; 
Columbus Hospital; entered from 
Evanston Township High School; 
F.vanston. lUinuis. 



EUSTACA R. MORRISSEY, Reg- 
istered Nurse; Saint Elizabeth's Hos- 
pital; entered from .\mes High School; 
Mu Omega Mu; .\mes. Iowa. 



EILEEN M. MURPHY, Registered 
Nurse: Saint Francis Hospital; entered 
from Saint Patrick Academy: Park 
Ridge. Illinois. 



RITA L. MURPHY, Registered Nurse; 
Saint Elizabeth's Hospital: entered 
from Saint Mary's High School; Mu 
Omega Mu; Sodality 1, 2. 3; Secretary- 
Treasurer 1; Oak Park. Illinois. 

JOSEPHINE M. NALAZEK, Regis- 
tered Nurse: Saint Elizabeth's Hos- 
pital: entered from Tuley High School; 
Mu Omega Mu; Sodality 1, 2, 3; 
Class Vice-President 2; Class Presi- 
dent 3; Chicago. Illinois. 



MARIE C. NEYLON, Registered 
Nurse: Samt Bernard's Hospital; en- 
tered from .\cademy of Our Lady: 
Chicago. Illinois. 



ANITA G. NOLL, Registered Nurse; 
Saint Anne's Hospital; entered from 
Alvernia High School; Chicago. Illinois. 



SISTER O'BREIN, Registered Nurse; 
.Saint Bernard's Hospital; entered from 
Loretta High School; Saint Clara's 
Grammar School. Ireland. 



LOIS K. O'BREIN, Registered Nurse; 
Saint Bernard Hospital; entered from 
Rosary College and Immaculata High 
School; Sodality 1. 2, 3; Loyola Union 
3; Class President 3; Chicago, Illinois. 



CLASS OFV39 



22IH 





EILEEN M. O'DONNELL, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Bernards Hospital; en- 
tered from Francis Parker High School; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



JEANNE J. PENGAL, Registered 
Nurse ; Oak Park Hospital ; entered 
from Ely Memorial High School; Ely. 
Minnesota. 



BEATRICE J. PRIETO, Rgistered 
Nurse; Saint Francis Hospital; entered 
from Schurz High School ; Chicago, 

Illinois. 



LOU E. ROETHIER, Reaistered Nurse; 
Saint Bernard's Hospital; entered from 
Saint Joseph's High School; Sodality 
1, 2. 3; Elkader, Iowa. 



VIRGINIA K. OELRICH, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Francis Hospital. Chi- 
cago. Illinois. 



RUTH M. O'NEILL, Registered Nurse; 
Columbus Hospital; entered from Ra- 
venna High School; Ravenna, Neb. 



RONITA R. OSBY. Registered Nurse; 
SaiTit H'-r[i:ir(l's lliispital; entered from 
Hanin,n,,,i HiL-h Srho,,]; Sodality 2. 3. 
4; HaniUK.nd, ItidiaTia. 



ELSIE E. PETERSON, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Anne's Hospital; entered 
from Hibbing Junior College and Chis- 
holm High School; Chjsholm, Minne- 
sota. 



SERAPHINE V. PERTOCELLI, Reg- 
istered Nurse; Columbus Hospital; 
entered from Fenger High School; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



ALMA G. PREISKER, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Bernard's Hospital; en- 
tered from Ben Id Township High 
School; Benld, Illinois. 



MARJORIE L. OUARTUCH, Regis- 
tered Nurse; Saint Fr.incis Hospital; 
entered from Saint Mary's High School; 
Michigan City, Indiana 



ELVA REICHARD, Registered Nurse; 
Saint Francis Hospital; entered from 
New Trier Township High School; 
Stone Harbor, New .Jersey. 



RUTH D. REZEK, Registered Nurse; 
Saint Anrirs Hospita'; entered from 
Sc..tl:ni(i Hi-t, School; Scotland, South 
Dakota. 



KATHERINE M. ROSSITER, Reg- 
istered Nurse; Saint Bernard's Hos- 
pital; entered from Parker High School; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



COLETTA M. ROTH, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Anne's Hospital; entered 
from Lucy Flower Technical High 
School; Chicago, Illinois. 



KATHERINE E. RYAN, Registered 

Nurse; Saint Anne's Hospital; entered 
fn.ni Prnvid<Mice High School; Chi- 
cago, Illinuis. 





SADAY 

SCHWEITZER 

SIPCHEN 

SLAATS 



SOHM 
STOCK 
STOCKER 
SWENSON 



SWITZER 
SYPIN 
THOMPSON 
TITZLEE 



VOGEL 
WARD 
WEGNER 
WESTERMAN 



YURCEK 

WITTEKINDT 
WILLY, 
WILLEY, 
WHITFIELD 




REGINA SADAY, Reffistered 
Nurse; Saint Francis Hospital; 
entered from Schurz High 
School; Flint. Michigan. 



HELEN C. SCHWEITZER, 
Registered Nurse; Oak Park 
HospitaJ; entered from Holy 
Angela Academy; Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin. 



ELAINE M. SIPCHEN, Reg- 
istered Nurse; Oak Park Hos- 
pital; entered from Proviso 
Township High School; May- 
wood, Illinois. 



ALPHARETTA E. SLAATS, 
Registered Nurse; Saint Anne's 
Hospital; entered from Saint 
Joseph's Academy; East Du- 
buque. Illindie. 



MARCELLA J. SOHM, Hc?- 
istered Nurse; Saint Elizabeth's 
Hospital ; en tered from A 1- 
vernia High School; Chicago, 
Tllinoie. 



LORETTA L. STOCK, Reg- 
istered Nurse; Columbus Hos- 
pital; entered from Lindblom 
High School; Chicago, Illinois. 



ELIZABETH A. STOCKER, 

Registered Nurse; Saint Anne's 
Hospital; Chicago, Illinois. 



LORRAINE A. SWENSEN, 
Ro'j;istored Nurse; Saint Francis 
Hospital; entered from Uni- 
versity of Southern California 
and Rhinelander High School; 
Rhinelander, Wisconsin. 



VIRGINIA L. SWITZER, Reg- 
istered Nurse; Saint Bernard's 
Hospital ; entered from Oak 
Park High School; Chicago. 
Illinois. 



LAURA D. SYPIN, Registered 
Nurse; Uak Park Hospital; 
entered from Tuley High 
School; Sodality; Class Tieae- 
urer; Chicago, Illinois. 



MARIAN J. THOMPSON, 

Registered Nurse; Saint Eliza- 
beth's Hospital; entered from 
Evanston Township High 
School; Mu Omega Mu; Evan- 
ston. Illinois. 



ELIZABETH C. TITZLEE, 

Registered Nurse; Saint Eliza- 
beth's Hospital; entered from 
Lucy Flower High School; Mu 
Omega Mu; Chicago. Illinois. 



ELOISE C. VOGEL, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Anne's Hospital; 
entered from Benson Com- 
munity High School; Benson, 
Illinois. 



LORRAINE C. WARD, Reg- 
istered Nurse; Saint Anne's 
Hospital; entered from Ottum- 
wa Heights Junior College and 
Melrose High School; Melrose, 
Iowa. 



M. ANTOINETTE WEGNER, 

Registered Nurse; Saint Fran- 
cis Hospital; entered from Dun- 
dee High School; Algonquin. 

Illinois. 



RITA E. WESTERMAN, Reg- 
istered Ntir.sc; Saint .\nne's 
H<,spita';<'nt.'r.-d from Alvernia 
Hi-h SrIionI; Clufu-o, Illinois. 



ANNE M. YURCEK, Regis- 
tered Nurse; Saint Bernard's 
Hospital; entered from Sacred 
Heart Academy; Savannah. 
Illinois. 

MARION L. WITTEKINDT, 

Registered Nurse. Oak Park 
HcEpi'al; eTitered from Proviso 
To.vnshio High School; May- 
wood. Illinois. 

JOSEPHINE E. WILLY. Reg- 
istered Nurse; Saint Francis 
Hospital; entered from Rella 
High School; Rella. Missouri 

ANNA C. WILLEY, Registered 
Nurse; Saint Anne's Hospital; 
entered from Saint Mary's High 
School; Columbus, Ohio. 

MARY J. WHITFIELD, Reg- 

istereil Nurse; Saint Francis 
Hospital; entered from Saint 
Francis College and IMano 
Comm u nity High School; 
Piano. Illinois. 



CLASS OF^39 




OTHER 
CANDIDATES 



Sister Mary Adalbert (Joyce) 

Akeman, Ernest W. 

Amato, John J 

Sister M. Antonella (Cieslewicz) 

Armitage, Martha Ann 

Bansau, Irene Augusta 

Baxter, Beatrice Blaker 

BiELiNSKi, Stephen 

Bishop, John L. 

BoLAND, Rose Frances 

Breslin, John X. 

Brosnahan, Paul T. 

BuNTA, Andrew W. 

Burke, John J. 

Campagna, Ettor a. 

CiRRINCIONE, ROSARIA MaRGARET 

Condon, Margaret Cecelia 

Cribben, Genevieve T. 

Crinion, Florence M. 

Croarkin, William Francis 

CuMMixGS, Robert E. 

CuNNiFF, Jean Marie 

Dailey, Dee Williams 

Dixon, Thomas L. 

Donovan, Willouise Artingstall 

DowD, Vincent John 

Du Bois, Helen B. 

Dzierlenga, Sophie Helen 

Egan, Francis X. 

Eichstaedt, Dorothy Margaret 



Enrietto, Paul Anthony 
Sister Mary Eusabia (Reichle) 
Fedigan, James J. 
FiNNEGAN, Eveline Mary 
FiTZPATRiCK, Collins T. 
Gallagher, Francis X. 
Garner, Thomas W. 
Gillman, Edward Lile 
Glaister, Amy Butler 
Gleason, Richard J. 
Goedert, John P. 
GoGGiN, Catherine Terese 
Goldberg, Harry 
Gremmels, L. Berenice 
Greens, Mary A. 
Gross, Ervine Joseph Paul 
Hanley, Ann F. 
Hatcher, Clarice M. 
Huntington, John L. 
Hutchins, William John- 
Sister Irene Prexdergast, R.H. 
Johansen, Fred 
Johnson, Mary A. 
Jordan, Marion Lorraine 
Joyce, Josephine C. 
Kelly, Dorothy Cecelia 
Kennedy, Joseph T. 
Korzeneski, Arthur L. 
Lally, Thomas D. 
Lautenbach, Edward Evert 



CHIIIDHnS 



Le Marquis, Antoinette Yvonne 

Levy, Selma 

Lynch, Maky Louise Helen 

Lucas, Robert J. 

McCarthy, Lillian E. 

McKenzie, John C. 

McKernan, Bernard Joseph 

McQuAiD, Mary Catherine 

Maier, Charles W. 

Morgan, Grace Bernice 

Mourek, Margaret J. Walsh 

Murphy, Catherine Veronica 

Nettleton, Ethel Lillian 

O'CoNNELL, Helen C. 

O'Mara, Nellie L. 

O'Reilly, Dorothy 

Parenti, Leo Stephen 

Penar, Adam J. 

Peterson, Edith L. 

Phelan, William Patrick 

Sister Mary Prudentia Blake 

Rapp, Catherine Loretta 

Resabek, Grace Dorothy 

Restivo, Jack Liborio 

Reynolds, Frances J. 

Riley, Mary C. 

Sister Mary Ritella Sharp, B.V.M. 

Rochetta, Rosemarie E. 

Ronan, Mary M. 

Ry'an, Catherine Agnes 




Ryan, Helen Marie 
Ryan, John Naughton 
Sister St. Jerome Evans 
Sanner, Marie Albertina 
Shean, William Francis 
Sine, Jeanne B. 
Smilgoff, Edna S. 
Stacknik, Frank E. 
Stoffel, George G. 
Stewart, Agnes L. 
Sullivan, Mary E. 
Trongeau, Lorraine Mary M. 
Walsh, Eleanor Sheridan 
Weinstein, David Harry 
Whitmore, John Earl 
Worth, Fred E. 





o^^^^ 



^\^ 



^^v.^ 



CtV3^^' 




A CAPABLE EXECUTIVE, Mrs. 
Mioliael O'Lauglilin has enabled the 
Mothers' Club to enjoy a successful 
season. Through her efforts, as also 
through those of the other officers, the 
scholarship fund has been augmented. 



THE 



The year 1938-1939 has seen the continued development of the Mother's 
Ckib, one of the loyalest and most efficient of the many organizations 
connected with Loyola University. Composed of the mothers of the 
students of the College of Arts and Sciences, it is the purpose of this 
group to further the reputation of Loyola University and to endeavor to 
help the school in a material way. 

Under the presidency of Mrs. Michael W. O'Laughlin, the Mother's 
Club this year continued the program inaugurated with the founding of 
the Club five years ago. In order to make the mothers of the students 
better acquainted with the school which their sons attend, a series of 
parties was held at intervals throughout the year. These gatherings 
took the form of dessert-bridge parties, the mothers of the students in 
various classes meeting separately. 

In charge of the arrangements for the meeting of the senior mothers 
was Mrs. Thomas W. Burns and this party, which like all of them was 
an outstanding success, took place on January 24th. The party for the 
junior mothers was taken care of by Mrs. August Hummert and occurred 
on February 28th. The gatherings of the mothers of the members of the 
sophomore and freshman classes took place on March 28th and April 
25th respectively. Chairwomen for these affairs were Mrs. Schlottman 
and Mrs. E. P. Carroll. 

Climaxing the year's activities for the Mother's club was its first 
annual party held at the Stevens Hotel, May 19th. An innovation it 
proved to be a big success. Proceeds from the affair were turned over 
to the Reverend William A. Finnegan, S.J., dean of the College of Arts 
and Sciences for the scholarship fund. 



THE 



AS PRESIDENT OF THE FATHERS' 
CLUB, Mr. Kdward Xcsbitt has been 
in no little measure responsible for the 
successful year just completed. Under 
his guidance, the club swelled the 
ranks of its members througli its inter- 
esting program. 




To foster the dad's interest in the son's school life, and through that 
interest to help make Loyola a better place for him, is the purpose of the 
Fathers' Club. The club was organized four years ago, and has grown 
in size, reputation, and achievement ever since. 

Each year the Fathers' Club throws one giant card party and dance, 
cooperates with the Mothers' Club on a second, and holds Father and 
Son and Faculty get-together smokers and a banquet. 

This year's first party was the Fall Festival, held November ISth, 
featuring old fashioned barn dance contests. By means of this party, 
the Fathers' Club helped to equip the gym with the new collapsible 
bleacher seats. Mcst outstanding and auspicious event in the year was 
the annual Father and Son banquet to honor the basketball team and 
Coach Leonard D. Sachs. The banquet was held at the Knickerbocker 
Hotel, March 28th and was attended by a record breaking crowd. The 
climaxing event of the year was the card party and dance held at the 
Stevens Hotel, May 19th, in cooperation with the Mothers' Club for 
the benefit of the scholarship fund. 

In no small way responsible for the success and innovations cf the 
Fathers' Club this year was president Mr. Edward P. Nesbitt. Under 
the guidance of Reverend William A. Finnegan, S.J., dean of the College 
of Arts and Sciences, moderator, and the counselling of the officers and 
committees, the course of the club was guided through the most pro- 
gressive year in their history. 



MOTHERS CLUB 



OFFICERS 



Mr.s. Michael O'Laugumn 
Rev. William A. Finnecan, S..I. 



President 
Moderator 



WORK AND PLAY are inter 
mingled for the mothers at their 
various card parties. That they 
enjoy these contacts with the 
school, that they feel that they 
are, through their acquaintance 
with each other, establishing a 
better and a truer Loyola spirit, 
is indisputable. Besides bene- 
fitting the school through these 
intangibles, they also are giving 
positive evidence of their loyalty 
through their contributions to 
the scholarship fund. 




FATHERS CLUB 



OFFICERS 



Edward P. Nesbitt 

John J. Martin .... 

Dr. Vincent Marzano 

Charles J. Graham 

Reverend William A. FiNNECiAx, S..I. 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Moderator 



THIS IS A TYPICAL MEET- 
ING of the Fathers' Club at 
which the members plan the 
events for their sons' and their 
own amusement. These men, 
as well as the rest of the mem- 
bers of the Club, are intensely 
interested in the welfare of their 
sons; this interest has become 
a vital and influential factor 
around Loyola. 



m - 


V 


■>^ 


- ■ .r- 

Hi 






'ft 


[^M 


j.t.^ 


■* 


■ 


*• c. 


' ""'Ta 


-^*jfe, T 


^H 


- «( 




-'i 


I ■ ' // 




BOB SWEENEY, president of the Interna- 
tional Helations Club can already rank as 
an expert in the field. It is certain that 
through his knowledge of affairs he has been 
able to guide many of the discussions capably. 



OFFICERS 



Robert Sweeney 
John Hennessy 



President 
Secretary 



THE INTERNATIONAL 
RELATIONS CLUB 



Greatest of all the temporal problems that are confronting the 
modern world is that of international relations. The suddenly 
changing national and international policies of nations are a con- 
stant threat to world peace and harmony. In this day when national 
boundaries are seen to change overnight, when nations are con- 
testing with each other in the race for military power, and when 
civil war is either going on or imminent in several countries through- 
out the world, the question of international relations presents a 
constantly interesting and endless topic for discussion. 

The International Relations Club aims at giving Loyola students 
a firmer grasp on the international situation. Under the guidance 
of Dr. Edward P. Lilly, professor of history, the group attacks 
world problems and divides them into their component parts. The 
parts are then studied, and an effort made to apprehend the proper 
relationships of ca-se and effect. Thus while studying a particular 
problem, the students also learn how to go about the solving of 
international problems in a scientific way. 

Student officers for this year were Robert Sweeney, Arts senior, 
president, and John Hennessy, Arts sophomore, secretary. General 
direction of this year's study was the various movements in Europe. 
The club also studied the influences of the different European 
nations on South American countries as compared with those of 
the United States. To these ends the club obtained the services of 
various speakers, both from the faculty of the University and from 
outside sources. Such speakers were of great assistance to the club 
in understanding world problems, and were greatly appreciated by 
the members. Also, on occasions, individual members of the club 
prepared papers on various topics and presented them at the meetings. 




"WHAT'S HITLER'S NEXT 
MOVE?" is one of the ciuestions 
whicli this active organization 
finds of particular interest. 
Here, Ed Nesbitt is laying down 
his opinions on the subject with 
the help of a map of Europe to 
members Burke, Healy, Hen- 
nessy, Wallace and Sweeney. 
Under the moderatorship of Dr. 
Lilly, history professor, this or- 
ganization is well equipped to 
assign current events to their 
proper historical focus. 



GLASS-BLOWING, electio- 
platiii;;, scmp bubbles, and pho- 
tograpli developing are but a few 
of the many items denKinstrated 
to this chib of science students. 
The demonstrations and lectures 
are given both liy students and 
by authorities in their respective 
fields. The topics are carefully 
selected to correlate with the 
matter taken in class with special 
emphasis upon industrial ap- 
plications. 




The Chemistry Club, founded at St. Ignatius on the West Side 
is the oldest organization of its kind en the Arts Campus. Its 
purpose is to offer the student a more interesting and practical 
outlook on this field than he would meet in class. The club is some- 
what of a connecting link or stepping stone between the chemistry 
of the classroom and its application in industry. The lectures and 
demonstrations are devised and given to the student on some special 
interest. This year some very interesting papers have been given 
on subjects appealing to those who take an interest in the relation 
of chemistry to industry. 

Not least among the activities of the club is the arrangement 
of field trips where the actual application of the principles is studied. 
Several of these trips were taken in the course of this year from 
which much valuable information was gleaned by the interested 
student. 

The first paper read to the club concerned itself with the chem- 
istry of photography. Mr. John Tordella who has dabbled in this 
field prepared a striking aggregation of facts dealing with this 
popular scientific hobby and the part chemistry plays in its develop- 
ment. Besides this paper, several others treating such subjects as 
electro plating, glass blowing, war gasses, and many other subjects 
were submitted by the students. 

This is an organization by and for the student, but, as is the 
way with all such groups, a very particular note of thanks is due 
to the generous and unstinted help and guidance of its moderator 
Mr. Schmeing. 



OFFICERS 



THE CHEMISTRY CLUB 



John Tordella 



Hakold Frey 



President 



Secretary 



JOHN TORDELLA, displays his practical 
and technical knowledge of chemistry as well 
as the theoretical grasp that he shows as 
president of the club and leader of the 
group discussions. 





PHILOSOPHER-DE-LUXE is Tom 
Shields, president of the intellectual 
and erudite Philosophy Club. This 
year, by his thorough knowledge of 
the subject, he has ably led the dis- 
cussion groups through the mazes of 
Aristotle, Aquinas, Descartes, and the 
other ancient and modern philosophers 
which were brought up. 



BELLARMINE 



The aim of the Robert Bellarmine Philosophy Chib is to provide 
students interested in philosophy an opportunity for discussion outside 
of the classroom. This year the club first discussed the various proofs 
for the existence of God, and then turned its attention to modern phil- 
osophies of life. 

The Rev. John F. McCormick, S.J., chairman of the Department of 
Philosophy, continued as moderator of the club. The student chairman 
was Thomas Shields, Art senior. 

Among the members who gave papers before the club during the 
year were: William Wallace, Geoi-go ^lasek, Charles Nesbitt, Edward 
Nesbitt, Harry Homan, Florence \'erhulst, Robert Denkewalter, John 
Lyons, Arthur Fenner, John Felten, Frank Knoll, Edward Marciniak, 
and Richard Garvey. The club met every two weeks. 

On the feast of St. Thomas Aquinas, March 7, the club sponsored 
a symposium in the Cudahy lounge. John Lyons spoke on "St. Thomas 
on Liberality;" Arthur Fenner Spoke on "St. Thomas on the Desire to 
Know"; and John Felten spoke on "St. Thomas on War". An address 
on St. Thomas was given by Father McCormick. 

Members of the philosophy department, besides Father McCormick, 
who have taken part in the discussions of the club during the year, are: 
The Rev. James J. Mahoney, S.J., The Rev. A. J. Kelly, S.J., Mr. Ernest 
V. McClear, S.J., Mr. John D. McKian, and Mr. Edward Sutfin. 



THE 




GEORGE MASEK lui-^ tlic icputation 
of bciiiK the most thoi-ougli classii-al 
scholar on the various campi of the 
University. It is undoubtedly his 
thorough knowledge of the learning 
and language of the ancient world that 
has obtained him the position of pres- 
ident of this select group. 



The Classical Club gives Loyola students an opportunity to become 
more familiar with ancient civilizations. The club meets monthly to 
discuss the social aspects of Roman and Grecian life, which form such 
an important background for the work taken in the classroom. 

Papers and discussions have one point in common: the tying-up 
of the habits and customs of today with those of the ancient peoples. 
They weave a real story of a real world in the past. They show the good 
and, to make it real, they show the b;id, but above all, they show the 
ancient in his true light. 

Moderator of the club is Mr. John Melchiors, assistant professor of 
classical languages. This year George Masek, Arts senior, was president 
and Charles Nesbitt, Arts senior, secretary. The Reverend John J. 
Mertz, S.J., chairman of the Department of Classical Languages, has 
always taken an active part in the affairs of the club and was ever wont 
to lend interest to the discussion. Under the leadership of these men and 
spurred on by the extreme interest of such students as Richard Garvey, 
Arts senior, James Cutler, John Devaney, John Felten, and John Lyons, 
Arts juniors, the club hes had a most successful year. 

In line with the subject matter of the discussions, many of the meetings 
were held in the evening, and refreshments served. Speakers both from 
the faculty of the University and from outside sources were secured to 
address the club. To further stimulate interest, joint meetings were 
held with the Classical clubs of Mundelein College and De Paul Uni- 
versity. 



PHILOSOPHY CLUB 



Thomas Shields 



OFFICERS 



President and Chairman 



SUBSTANCE AND ACCIDENT, 
being and non-being, these and 
other technical terms of phil- 
osophy are the stock in trade 
of this group of earnest thinkers 
who weekly meet and discuss 
the philosophies, both ancient 
and modern, of those thinkers 
from Plato to William James. 
This group of incipient philos- 
ophers includes Hummert, Gib- 
bons, Garvey, Shields, Walch, 
Nesbitt, Dwyer, Knoll and 
Goessling. 




CLASSICAL CLUB 



OFFICERS 



George Masek . 
Charles Nesbitt 



. President 
Secretary 



ARMA VIRUMQUE CANO, 

construe the Classical Club stu- 
dents during their lecture on 
Latin prosody. The require- 
ment that each member give an 
original talk upon some phase 
of classicism make the member- 
ship of this club an extremely 
select one, and one which it is 
an honor to attain. The mem- 
bers of this club include Slatterv, 
Masek, McCourt, Galante, 
Quick, Hosna, Walch, Wallace, 
Goodwillie, and Garvey. Mr. 
Melchiors, instructor in the 
classic, is the moderator of this 
club. 




ECONOMICS SEMINAR 



OFFICERS 



Charles Mackey 



John Hayes . 



President 



Secretary 




DR. MOGILNITSKY shows the presi- 
dent of the Economic Seminar, Charles 
Mackey, how to interpret a question 
that has arisen during the discussions 
of the club. 



The Economics Seminar, instituted by Doctor 
Theodosi Mogilnitsky, associate professor of Eco- 
nomics, in the fall of this year, presents to the students 
of the Lake Shore Campus an opportunity to apply 
their knowledge of economic principles to contemporary 
problems. At each meeting a paper is presented by 
one of the members, and a discussion follows in which 
all are invited to participate. The student chooses 
a subject and voluntarily offers to prepare his material. 
The other members are informed of the subject chosen 
that they may be prepared for the discussion. 

Moderator of the Seminar this year was Doctor 
Mogilnitsky. Student officers were Charles Mackey 
and John Hayes, Commerce seniors, president and 
secretary, respectively. 



Among the papers given this year were "The 
Economic Aspects of Corporate Saving", by Charles 
Mackey; "The International Effects of the Influx of 
Fascist Nations into South American Trade," by 
Florent Verhulst; a practical proposal by Peter Con- 
way for the realization of the ethical doctrine of the 
living wage in our modern economic system; "The 
Nature of Capital and Income," given by John Hayes 
and George Clark, Commerce seniors; and an analysis 
of the radio industry by Jack Dahme, Commerce 
senior. 

The year's activities ended with a social function 
at a nearby hotel. The arrangements were made by 
Peter Conway. 




THE ANNUAL BAN- 
QUET (if the Seminar was 
attended by all the mem- 
beis. Attending the ban- 
quet and included in this 
picture are Dr. Mogil- 
nitsky, Jasiel, Hayes, 
McCoui-t, Verhulst, Mar- 
otta, Mackey, Peter Con- 
way, James Conwav, and 
Drl Flatlev. 




THE FRENCH CLUB 



OFFICERS 



Robert Bremer 



Jack O'Connor 



President 



Secretary-Treasure !• 



BOB BREMER li;i> hci'ii selected as 
I'leMcleiit "I the Ficiieh C'luli iiiit only 
because ot his ])iiitici('ncy at languages 
but also because of his executive ability. 
He has capably fulfilled the demands 
placed upon him by the management 
of this organization. 

High among the nacre active groups of Loyola 
stands the French Chib, Le Cercle Francais. The 
purpose of the club is to supplement the knowledge 
of the French language with a knowledge of the 
French people, of their history, traditions, and life, 
and to make practical use of the advances made in 
class. Thus the student of French is introduced to 
the social cultural, and intellectual aspects of French 
life in the freedom of a social gathering. Regular 
meetings of the club are given over to the study of 
French life by means of prepared papers, by free 
discussions and criticism. Works of art and literature 
and scientific advances made in France are studied. 

This year the club's moderator, Mr. John Martin, 
instructor in French, and the officers, Robert Bremer, 



president, and Jack O'Connor, secretary-treasurer, led 
the organization through a colorful series of activities. 
Part of the year's program was given to the repro- 
duction of a copy of the French life. Motion pictures 
of France and French people were shown. Joint 
meetings were held with the French club of neigh- 
boring Mundelein College, Les D'Arciennes, which 
were of a lighter vein and more social, the conver- 
sation being conducted almost entirely in French. 
Needless to say, such meetings proved very popular. 
The two clubs co-staged a marionette show during 
November, which was a huge success. The active 
year of Le Cercle Francais closed with its annual 
banquet — a dinner of French food in a French res- 
taurant with French conversation. 



Front row, (left to right), 
G. Leies, J. Gill, P. Hum- 
mert, J. Walch, R. Brem- 
er, J. O'Connor, F. Goess- 
lin, R. Garvey; second 
row, H. Broszowski, R. 
Ahearn, E. Britt, C. 
Moore, T. Cornell, C. 
Goodwillie, J. Crowley, E. 
Miller, M. Schmidt, R. 
Schlottman; rear row, G. 
Stoeffel, S. Lask, M. 
O'Shaughnessy, J. Duffy, 
F. O'Shaughnessy, J. 
McXella, .J. Wallace, R. 
Kepner, W. Gibbons. 




BRANDEIS 
COMPETITION 




BILL LAMEY AND 
RAY VONISH, 

winners of the eom- 
petitiiin. Riglit, 
scene of the finals. 



Student interest in the Law School's proudest 
tradition, the Brandeis Competition, was this year, 
in both day and evening divisions, even more active 
and satisfying than it has traditionally been. Super- 
vision of the year's activities was in the hands of the 
student board, composed of Mr. Fred Brandstrater, 
Mr. Philip Collias and Mr. Raymond Vonesh, coun- 
selled by Professor John J. Waldron. 

The Senior argument was held on the evening of 
Wednesday, November 9, 1938, in the library of the 
Law School. Mr. Phillip Collias and Mr. John McKen- 
zie were opposed to Mr. William Lamey and Mr. 
Raymond Vonesh, on a question involving the right 
of recovery of money paid to discharge a supposedly 
valid mortgage on real estate. Judges John M. O'Con- 
nor, Ross M. Rail and Joseph Burke presided and 
gave their decision to the Lamey-Vonesh team. 

In the Freshman and Junior sections of the com- 
petition, wider interest this year entailed a considerably 
longer program of arguments and the completion of 
the schedule consumed the remainder of the first 
semester. The character of the work displayed, both 
in research and preparation of briefs and in oral 
argument, was especially encouraging, and the con- 
viction is stronger than ever that the Brandeis 
Competition is providing an opportunity for experience 
in appellate court practice and argument which it is 
impossible elsewhere to obtain under circumstances so 



closely approximating appellate procedure as the 
lawyer meets it in his actual practice. 

The Law School wishes to express its thanks to 
its graduates, former Brandeis competitors and now 
practicing lawyers, who have served as judges of the 
Freshman and Junior arguments. The measure of 
experience and training to be derived from participa- 
tion in Brandeis work is dependent, very directly, 
upon the skillfulness of the judges in questioning the 
student arguing before them and in compelling him 
to support his case against an effective and well- 
directed attack. 

At the close of the arguments this year the Brandeis 
Board published a ranking of student competitors 
based upon the scores given each student by the 
judges in their balloting. In accordance with the 
new rules promulgated by the student board, com- 
petitors in the Senior argument will be chosen on the 
basis of this standing. Other changes in the rules 
governing competition are the reduction of arguments 
from two to one a year, made necessary by the larger 
number of students participating ; the provision for the 
conduct of the default argument; the scheduling of 
the Senior argument in the first quarter of the school 
year, Junior argument in the second quarter, and the 
Freshman argument in the third quarter, with the 
final quarter devoted to a preparation of statistics by 
the board, the revision of the rules and the selection 
of the student board for the succeeding year. 




MOOT COURT 



The prime reason for the increased interest in the 
Moot Court Competition in recent years has been the 
timehness of the questions argued. The question for 
this year — the constitutionahty of taxation of income 
from state and municipal bonds by the Federal govern- 
ment — could not have been more timely. 

The Loyola team, composed of three senior students, 
Miss Eva Charles, Mr. William Lamey and Mr. John 
McKenzie, in both the first and final round, argued 
against the constitutionality of such legislation. In 
the first round held on January 13, 1939 the Loyola 
team opposed a team from the University of Illinois 
Law School. The judges, Mr. Edward C. Austin, 
Judge Harry M. Fisher and Mr. William H. King, Jr., 
gave Loyola the decision. 

On March 10, 1939 the final round, in which 
Loyola was opposed to Northwestern University, was 



held. The judges' decision went to Northwestern by 
a score of 18.65 to 17.35 (out of a possible 20 pointsj. 
Members of both teams received the compliments of 
the judges for the effectiveness of their argument 
and the impressiveness of their presentation. It is 
interesting to note that the United States Supreme 
Court, in a significant decision handed down a few 
days after the conclusion of the final round, upheld, 
in effect the constitutionality of the legislation in- 
volved in this year's argument. In this there is 
certainly implicit a compliment to the Bar Association 
Committee responsible for the choice of the question 
for the Competition. 

Mr. Lamey received the State Bar Association 
award for the presentation evincing the most thorough 
research, and Mr. McKenzie the award for most 
effective answering of questions proposed by the 
judges in the course of the argument. 



LAMEY AND MCKENZIE prepare for the 
trials. Left, actual court scene. 





GREEN CIRCLE 



OFFICERS 



Roger Slattery 
Charles Nesbitt 
Edward Britt 



President 



Secretary 



Treasurer 



ROG SLATTERY aihieved the presi- 
deiK-y of this organization which is 
devoted to the furthering of Loyola 
spirit as a recognition of the leadership 
he had already evidenced in this line. 



Most active of all Lake Shore Campus clubs is the 
Loyola Green Circle, organized by Ralph Swanson in 
1934 with the specific purpose of fostering school 
spirit by lending organized support to student activities 
and undertakings. Membership in the Green Circle 
has become an honor and a job. 

The club began this year by making a survey of 
activities, found that what most activities needed was 
enthusiasm and push, and offered its publicity services 
and personal support whenever called upon. Giving 
assistance to the Sodality in promoting the inter- 
class football games was the ne.xt enterprise of the 
club. Gold footballs were awarded to each member 
of the winning team. Biggest single undertaking and 
achievement this year was again the complete handling 
and furnishing of ushers at the home basketball games. 
Green Circle ushers are regularly called upon by the 
Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences to serve at 
school affairs. Later in the year, after Green Circle 



member Marty O'Shaughnessy had effected a marked 
increase in attendance at Loyola swim meets by 
inviting Mundelein girls, a similar suggestion was 
made for the basketball games. Even in the worst of 
weather, the results were terrific. 

In no small way responsible for the Green Circle's 
success this year was its president Roger Slattery, 
who was constantly thinking up and promoting new 
ideas and projects for the club. Ably assisting Slattery 
was Charles Nesbitt, secretary, who proved dependable 
and thorough in putting ideas into effect. Outstanding 
in the support of the club this year were its other 
officers. Bob Birren and Bob Schultz. 

The mid-year election of officers, which took place 
at one of the most memorable dinners of the club's 
history, saw the former treasurer and outstanding 
member of the club, Edward Britt, chosen to succeed 

Slattery. 




Left table, Murninghan, Smur- 
don, Marguerite, O'Connell, 
Reuter, Hayes, Sauer, Marotta, 
Mclntyre, O'Shaughnessy, 
Koenig, Dirksen, Schiavone, 
Wallace, Birren, Schultz, Fr. 
Finnegan, Gibbons, McKeever, 
Mack; right table, Byrne, De- 
vaney, Vadcr, Slattery, O'Brien, 
Britt, O'Sliaughnessy, Boland, 
Kuni, O'Callahan, Murphy, 
Granhold, Molloy, E. Nesbitt, 
.1. Wallace, T. Enright, Littig, 
Bailey, .1. Enright. 










Seated, Gibbins, H(jlari(l, 
Maikoy, Knoll, Gill, Burke, 
Hi'aly, Sclimitz, Ms|)ijsit(i, Kog- 
stail, Wicrikc, Owvci-, .Smurdon, 
M a <• i cj !■ w s k i , G'Sliaunliiiessy, 
(larvcy, (back to camera); 
standing, .lasiel, Hummert, Bar- 
rett, Devaney, Goessling, 
Walcli, Graham. 




ST. THOMAS MORE 
LEGAL CLUB 



OFFICERS 



Richard Garvey 
Fraxk Knoll 



President 
Secretary 



DICK GARVEY, as president of the 
St. Thomas More Legal Club has 
secured recognition as an executive of 
undoubted ability. He has captained 
the pre-legal club through the past 
year with success, enabling them to 
obtain speakers which would acquaint 
the members with the problems and 
difficulties of the legal field. 



The St. Thomas More Legal Club, established on 
the Lake Shore Campus a year ago, continued to 
function efficiently during the past year. Founded to 
satisfy a long felt need, the Legal Club this year set 
about accomplishing certain objectives in line with 
the reason for its existence. 

This club \vas founded to offer the pre-legal student 
an opportimity to come into contact with men who 
are already in the law profession and who are thus 
capable of giving a better insight into the nature and 
requirements of that profession. Therefore in order 
to fill this need, the St. Thomas More Club invited 
numerous speakers to address its members. The 
speakers were mostly lawyers, and were of three types: 
first, practising attorneys; second, teachers in law 
schools; and third, students who are at present seeking 



a law degree. It was felt that in this way the prospec- 
tive lawyer could see his future from the best possible 
vantage points. 

Extremely active in this program were Mr. John 
Hayes, instructor in the School of Law, Richard 
Garvey, Arts senior, who was elected president early 
in the year, and Frank Knoll, Art junior, secretary. 
Among the speakers this year were Mr. John Fitz- 
gerald, Dean of the School of Law, Mr. Robert Mar- 
tineau, a practising attorney, and Mr. Fred Brand- 
strader, instructor in speech and moderator of the 
Cudahy Debating Forum. Special mention should be 
made of Edward Maciejewski, Arts senior, and William 
Janik, Commerce Junior, who served £s a committee 
to procure these speakers for the club. 




Front row, Shigekawa, Mcllvain. Foulk, Nathansoii; rear row, LeMarquis, Albright, O'Connell 
Hoist, Tromblv. 



officf:rs 



BLANCHE McILVAIN, 

President 



OFFICERS 



THOMAS KOERNER, 

President 



ROBERT SCHIAVONE, 

\'ice-President 



THOMAS SHAY, 

Pledge-Master 



JAMES LINDSAY, 

.Secretary 



BRUCE BERENS, 

Treasurer 



Front row, Wallace, Kiley, Broszowski, Schiavone, Koerner, Berens, Lindsay, Keonig; rear 
row, Shay, Duft'y, A. Graham, V. Graham, Schell, Nelson, Dirksen, Cahill, O'Shaughnessy, 
Hennessy, Kepner. 



-,2 




^$M 






I ■-. V T 



WOMEN'S MEDICAL 
CLUB 

Founded in 1934, the Women's Medical Club has made rapid 
sti-ides toward the high goal that its founder set up for it; namely, 
an active place ff)r women in Medicine. This year under the 
leadership of Miss Blanche ^Nlcllvain, several new projects were 
undertaken besides the numerous papers that were submitted by 
the members, and delivered before the other members. Various 
experiments were undertaken through which a keener insight 
into the various fields of medicine was obtained. This club has 
been a revelation to the Loyola Medical School because it has 
proved that women can and do undertake the endeavors which 
for so many j'ears have been i-eserved for men. Through their 
active participation in the intricate discoveries in the field of 
medicine these women have made a name for themselves in the 
annals of the Loyola Medical School, and have set up a precedent 
which should attract manj' more women who have chosen this 
honorable profession for their life's work. 

Miss Mcllvain and her workers are to be congratulated for 
their whole hearted cooperation in making the Women's Medical 
Affiliate one of the most active clubs in the University. 




J^^^A 




MISS BLANCHE McILVAINE, who 

heads tliis organizatidii of women 
interested in the Medical Profession, 
lias, througli her abiUty, enabled them 
to enjoy an interesting and suocessful 
year. 



THE UNIVERSITY CLUB 



New this year on the Lake Shore Campus is the LTniversity 
Club, founded last fall by a group of spirited Arts sophomores. 
The University Club is a non-fraternity, social organization which 
has the unique purpose of banding together those students who, 
for whatever reasons they might have, are not members of fra- 
ternities, but who are desirous of acquiring some social affiliation. 
The specific aims of the club are to make non-fraternitj' men on 
the Lake Shore Campus more "Loyola conscious" by enabling 
them to share in the work of a "Loyola-centered" organization; 
to encourage school activities and to create a deeper school 
spirit; and to provide its members with a means of making their 
social activities a part of their college life. 

Thomas Koerner, Arts Sophomore, w-as elected first president 
of the organization. To him and the other officers must go 
much of the credit for the club's successful first year. Lender 
their capable leadership the club systematically set about the 
process of establishing itself. With the work of organizing com- 
pleted, the club commenced to work ardently toward the realiza- 
tion of its specifically-stated ends. 

Most important of all, the club pledged itself to support 
every Loyola activity and to put itself solidly behind all school 
undertakings. It held several informal dances in the student lounge, 
secured guest speakers to address the club members on topics of 
current interest. In the second semester it held smokers for pro- 
spective pledges and took in new members. The organization 
can well be proud of its intramural athletic team which looms 
as winner of the intramural sweepstakes. 



KOERNER AND LINDSAY, head men 
in this new organization, consider a list 
of activities for the year. 




MONOGRAM CLUB 



OFFICERS 



William O'Brien . 
George Hogan ... 
Eugene Dubay ... 
Jack Hayes ..... 

For the first time in the history of the Monogram 
Club the members doffed their attractive sweaters, 
rolled up their sleaves, and undertook an active pro- 
gram. 

The club began this j'ear by increasing the scope 
of membership to all major and minor letter winners. 
This made the Monogram Club a group of athletes 
representative of all university sports: basketball, 
track, swimming, golf, tennis, cross country and intra- 
mural managers. 

The most constructive step taken by the organiza- 
tion was the revision of the dilapidated constitution. 
The improved set of laws defined the aims and means 
of the club more clearly and explicitly, thereby dii-ecting 
the efforts of the club to more concrete achievements. 

The club honored many of her own members when 
it sponsored the rally for the team before it left to 
play in the National tournament in New York. It 
was commonly agreed that this was the most spirited 
rally that the students have enjoyed in several years. 

They turned their efforts toward giving credit to 
the exceptional track team when they sponsored the 
track dance. This successful affair featured a uni- 
versity dual meet followed by a free dance in the 
gymnasium. 

At the close of the year the club conducted the 
informal initiation wherein the new members enjoyed 
meeting and knowing old alumni members who re- 
turned for the occasion. It is intended that this 
precedent will be made an annual custom. 



President 
ice-President 

Secretary 
. Treasurer 




BILL O'BRIEN has been elected 
president of the Monogram Club 
not only because of his athletic 
ability but also because of his 
executive talent and universal 
popularity. 



To commemorate the senior monogram club mem- 
bers, a frame containing their pictures was hung in 
the lounge. 

The officers were led by Bill O'Brien, president, 
whose aids were, George Hogan, Vice-President, Gene 
Dubay secretary, and Jack Hayes treasurer. The 
members from the basketball team were O'Brien, 
Kautz, Novak, Hogan, Hayes, and Driscoll. Track 
gave Wagener, Clark, Knoll, Elson, Barrett and 
Wendt. The swimming monogram members were 
O'Shaughnessy and Burke. From the tennis team 
came Hruby and Dubay. Birren, Koepke and Gibbons 
were members by virtue of their position as intramural 
managers. 




Front row, (left to right), M. O'Shaugh- 
nessy, F. Knoll, W. Elson, Rev. John 
I. Grace, S.J., P. Wagener, J. Driscoll, 
E. Dubay; rear row, A. Burke, W. 
Wendt, W. O'Brien, G. Clark, M. 
No\ak, W. Kautz, J. Haves, W. 
Barrett, W. Gibbons. 



? 




i"l^fB 




j^LJ 




t m. 


^f^K .^^^^E^^^kk^' 






Front Row — Sauer, Sylvester, O'Callahan, Brosnahan, Grant. 
Second Row — Orphan, Bircher, King, Millar, Kelly, Murphy. 
Rear Row — Kennedy, O'Dea, Conroy, Martin, Fenlon, Irwin, Lally. 



OFFICERS 



Edward P. 0'Call.».han 
J. Paul Sylvester 
Robert O'Day 
John R. Jennings 
John Grant 
Frank R. Souers 
Raymond J. Irwin 

RUSSEL C. KOEPKE 



Worthy Master 

Senior Warden 

Junior Warden 

E.xchequer 

Scribe 

Master of Pledges 

Steward 

. Historian 



Paul Brosnahan 
George Clark 
Raymond Irwin 
John Jennings 



MEMBERS 
Class of 1939 

John Zur 
Class of 1940 



Russel Koepke 
Edward O'Callahan 
Frank Souers 
Paul Sylvester 



Clarence Forrette 
William King 
James Lally 



Ronald Millar 
Robert O'Day 
Roman Siemens 



Class of 1941 



William Cusick 
John Grant 



John Dymek 
James Houlihan 



James Orphan 



Class of 1942 



Thomas Fenlon 
Joseph Kelly 



Edgar Martin 
Edward Michalik 



Robert O'Reilly 



D y 





First Row — Callanan, Hummert, C. Nesbitt, J. Walch, T. Burns, O'Brien, Marotta, E. Nesbitt. 

Second Row — Marzano, Conway, Bremer, R. Pagano, C. Pagano, Dougherty, Sossong, O'Laughlin, O'Connor. 

Rear Row — Rafferty, Johnson, Tordella, Esposito, Gill, Goessling, White, Murnighan, Sweeney, Matt. 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



D. Herbert Abel, M.A. 
Thomas J. Buckley, A.B. 
John Callahan, M.A. 
Frank P. Cassaretto, B.S. 
William H. Conley, M.B.A. 
John Gerriets, M.A. 
Mark E. Giierin 



John D. McKian, A.B. 
Rev. James J. Mertz, S.J. 
Richard O'Connor, B.S. 
Edward J. Sutfin, B.S. 
Martin J. Svaglic, A.B. 
Louis W. Tordella, M.A. 
James R. Yore, A.B. 



MEMBERS 



Robert Bremer 
William Bryar 
Thomas Burns 
Roger Callanan 
Robert Carroll 
Peter Conway 
Jahn Dahme 
David DeLano 
Robert Denkewaler 
Edward Dolazinski 
Raymond Dougherty 
Michael Esposito 
John Felten 
Charles Flynn 
Harold Frey 
James Gill 
Francis Goessling 
Robert Graham 
Robert Harvey 
Paul Hummert 
Marvin Johnson 

Gregory 



Sam Marotta 
James Marzano 
Gregory Mann 
Warren Matt 
Edward Miller 
John Murnighan 
Charles Nesbitt 
Edward Nesbitt 
William O'Brien 
Thomas O'Connor 
Charles O'Laughlin 
Aurelius Pagano 
Clarence Pagano 
Ralph Pagano 
George Scully 
William Smurdcn 
Charles Sosscng 
Robert Sweeney 
John Tordella 
Thomas Vanderslice 
John Walch 
White 



OFFICERS 



Thomas Burns . 
William O'Brien 
John Walch 
Sam Marotta 
Paul Hummert 
Charles Nesbitt . 
Roger Callanan 
Francis Goessling 
Edward Nesbitt 



. President 

Pledge-Master 

Vice-President 

Treasurer 

Recording Secretary 

Corresponding Secretary 

Sergeant-at-arms 

Historian 

Stewart 



PI lipy iuu 




Front Row — Gordon, Grocliowski, Olsta, Mombowski. 

Second Row — Grohovviak, Shepanek, Zegiel, Janik, Merek, Pakleukawski, Dydak. 

Rear Row — Hibner, Zygmuntowicz, Slotkowski. 




ALUMNI MEMBERS 



OFFICERS 



Leroy Olsta 
Ernest Grochowski 
Felix Gordon . 
Jerome Dombrowski 
Louis Potempa 



President 

Pledgemaster 

. Secretary 

Treasurer 

Sergeant-at-Arnis 



Jerome Dombrowski 
Boleslaus Dydak 
Felix Gordon 
John Hibner 
Caesar Koenig 
John Krasowski 



Eugene Kwasinski 
Boleslaus Pietraszek 
Louis Potempa 
Raymond Shepanek 
Warclaw Wawrzynski 
Walter Ziegel 



MEMBERS 



Class of 1939 



Walter Ivi-zeminski 
Edward Marciniak 



Leroy Olsta 

Joseph Zygmuntowicz 



Class of 1940 



Ernest Grochowski 
Fred Grohowiak 



William Janik 
Raymond Komajda 



Class of 1941 
Chester Podgorski Eugene Slotkowski 







^ 



T^ 



First Row — McDonnell, Knoll, Adams, Murphy, Crowley, Wendt, Fletcher, DriscoU, Dempsey. 

Second Row — Gannon, Crowley, Grady, Weinke, Dolan, West, Kuni, Garner, Fox, Gibbons, Beauregard. 

Rear Row — Kiley, Hausmann, Sayre, Esser, Satek, Dillon, Burke, Griffin, Ahern, O'Shaugnessy, Dubay. 



FACULTY MEMBERS 

James J. Brennan, A.B. Rev. A. J. Kelly, S.J. 



OFFICERS 



MEMBERS 



Leo Adams 
Robert Ahern 
Charles Beauregard 
Richard Boland 
Al Burke 
John Crowley 
Thomas Crowley 
AI Dempsey 
John Devaney 
James Dolan 
Frank Dowd 
Tim Dillon 
John Driscoll 
Gene Dubay 
Frank Durby 
Andrew Dussell 
Robert Esser 
William Fisher 
James Fletcher 
John Fox 
John Gannon 



William Garner 
William Gibbons 
Edward Grady 
Edward Griffin 
Charles Haskins 
John Hausmann 
John Kelly 
Bernard Kiley 
Frank Knoll 
Robert Kuni 
Peter McDonnell 
Dan Murphy 
Martin O'Shaughnessy 
Edward Reidy 
Frank Satek 
Roger Sayre 
Edward Tilka 
Robert West 
Paul Wagener 
William Wendt 
Richard Wienke 



Thomas Crowley 
Dan Murphy 
William Wendt 
Leo Adams 
Al Dempsey 
Frank Knoll . 
James Fletcher 
Jim Dolan 
Ch.'Irles Haskins 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Pledge Master 

Historian 

Steward 

Sergeant-at-Ar ms 

Athletic Director 



liPIH DiilH GiU 



tYXI'tl 




Front Row — LaFond, Fedigaii, Bowler, Durkiii, Sloan, Cordes, Lennon. 

Second Row — Loftus, Boyne, Feeley, Lewis, Creagh, Ijane, Horan. 

Rear Row — Smith, J. Bowler, Racette, Lane, Barrett, McCarthy, McCormack, Caduto, Latito. 



OFFICERS 

Alpha Chapter 



FACULTY MEMBERS 

Crofford H. Buckles, C.P.A. 
Henrv T. Chamberlain, C.P.A. 
Walter A. Foy, M.B.A. ' 
Charles J. LaFond, C.P.A. Ernest W. Ludlow, C.P.A. 
MEMBERS 
Alpha Chapter 



Philip Cordes 
William Lennon 
Harry Walsh 
John L. Sloan . 



Grand Regent 

Vice Grand Regent 

. Treasurer 

Secretary 



Beta Chapter 
James Durkin . Grand Regent 

Mario Coduto . . Vice Grand Regent 

George Bowler . . . Treasurer 

James Fedigan .... Secretary 




Edward Cooney 
John Coyle 
Philip Cordes 
Edward Co.x 
Joseph Crowley 
Francis Delaney 
Joseph Gill 
Larry Hansen 
Raymond Hebinstreit 
Leonard A. Herman 
John Horan 
Jerry Jehlik 
Frank B. Lane 
Vincent Lane 
Minchin G. Lewis 
William Lennon 
William Linnane 
Frank Lotito 



George Bowler 
James Bowler 
Mel Boyne 
Mario Coduto 
Thomas Creagh 
Thomas Davy 
James Durkin 
James Fedigan 
John Feelcv 



Beta Chapter 



Owen McGovern 
John Moss 
Louis Pohls 
Rudolph Petrik 
Herbert Pfeiffer 
Kenneth Racette 
James Rocks 
Gerald Rooney 
James Scott 
Frank Slingerland 
John L. Sloan 
Peter Smith 
Bernard Snyder 
C. A. Snyder 
George Spevacek 
John Vaughn 
Maurice F. Walser 
Harry Walsh 

Peter Fitzpatrick 
Martin Jennings 
Paul Johnson 
Edward Gorman 
William Loftus 
Redmond McCarthy 
Roger McCormack 
Frank Phee 
John Troy 



um [HMBii niH 





Jerbi, Ti-ary, Verhulst, DeWitt, C'ordes, Clai'k, McDonald, Shields. 



MEMBERS 






Arts 






(las Burns Thomas Crowley 
Thomas Shields 






Night Commerce 


OFFICERS 




Philip Cordcs 






Day Commerce 


Paul Tracy 


President 


nt Verhulst George Clark 


Thomas Crowley 


Vice-President 


Medical 


Thomas Shields 


Secretary 


k Newell Paul Tracy 


Russell Griffin 


Treasurer 


Dental 


Rev. Thomas A. Eoan 





Faculty Representative 



University College 
William Croarkin Russell Griffin 

Night Law 

James Yore 

Day Law 

Henrv McDonald 



k 





Front Row — J. Converse, C. Caul, Dr. Powers, R. White, F. Brenniin, J. Boj-d, D. Drolett, J. Condon. 
Second Row— H Galapeaux, E. Cushnie, W. Schmitz, M. Johnson, G. Kelleher, D. Daley, J. O'Xeil, 

H. Meier, J. Llewellyn, F. Follniar, E. Lampert, F. Hultgen. 
Rear Row— F. Newell, W. Dvonche, M. D. Johnson, J. Hunt, C. David, A. Glaess, K. O'Brien, E. 

Dailey, W. Hultgen, E. Ceecolini, E. Kallal. 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



OFFICERS 



Raymond Leroy White 



Francis J. Brennan 



Jack L. Boyd 



Lyle Russell 





Dr. J. H. Bailey 


Dr. E. J. McEnery 




Dr. B. B. Beeson 


Dr. F. A. McTunkin 




Dr. J. J. Boland 


Dr. L. D. Moorhead 




Dr. V. B. Bowler 


Dr. A. V. Partipilo 




Dr. H. J. Dooley 


Dr. A. A. Pearson 




Dr. J. M. Essenberg 


Dr. W. Peckett 


Archon 


Dr. R. L. Ferguson 


Dr. R. A. Perritt 


Dr. M. Fitzgerald 


Dr. S. A. Plice 




Dr. T. P. Foley 


Dr. T. G. Powers 


Secretary 


Dr. J. A. Forbrick 


Dr. E. A. Pribram 




Dr. C. Geiger 


Dr. J. V. Russell 




Dr. E. P. Gramer 


Dr. C. F. Sehaub 


Treasurer 


Dr. G. D. Griffin 


Dr. H. Schmitz 




Dr. W. Hanrahan 


Dr. H. E. Schmitz 




Dr. W. Hogstrom 


Dr. R. M. Strong 


Editor 


Dr. D. S. Jones 


Dr. L. D. Sweeney 




Dr. R. W. Kerwin 


Dr. E. E. Ta.vlor 




Dr. E. E. Kleinschniidt 


Dr. R. D. Templeton 




Dr. J. W. Klimek 


Dr. R. J. Tivnen 




Dr. A. D. Kraus 


Dr. I. F. Vohni 




Dr. E. G. Lawler 


Dr. J. M. Warren 




Mr. J. 


Zingrone 



PHI niH p 




f f ft f tt?tf 

; f f t f i f , f 



Front Row— J. Westhoven, J. Daly, Brenner, F. Barthes, R. Merckel, J. Pollard. 

Second Row — E. Flentie, H. LeClaire, F. Skopek, C. Russin, A. Powell, F. Brennan, L. Russell, Deeb, F. Swan. 

Rear Row— J. Scagrelli, R. Black, R. Wetzler, M. Murphy, B. Scagrelli, Delfoss, E. Wichek, Dowell, F. Adams. 



Charles Caul 
Edward Ceccolini 
Edward Cushnie 
Dee Dailej' 
Loverne Domeier 



Jack Boyd 
John Condon 
Edward Daley 
Charles David 
Donald Drolett 
William Dvonch 



Fred Adams 
Fred Barthes 
Francis Brennan 
John Deltosse 



James Daly 
James Furrie 
Maurice Murphy 



MEMBERS 

Class of 1939 

Fred F. Follmar 
John R. Hunt 
Elmer Lampert 
Herbert Meier 
Frank Newell 

Class of 1940 

Edward Galapeaux 
Alfred Glaess 
Francis Hultgen 
William Hultgen 
Merlin Johnson 
Mitchell Johnson 
Edward Kallal 

Class of 1941 

Edgar Flentie 
Boyce Gibson 
Edward Kasmer 

Class of 1942 

Vincent Pollard 
Adrian Powell 
Charles Roehm 
Burke Scagnelli 



James O'Neil 
William Schmitz 
Martin Skinner 
Raymond White 
Joseph Converse 



George Kelleher 
John Llewellyn 
Kennedy O'Brien 
Conrad Rusin 
Frank Shopek 
Robert Wetzler 



Leroy Linnville 
Richard Merkel 
Lyle Russell 
Eugene Wichek 



James Scagnelli 
Frank Swan 
Joseph Westhoven 



PNI B[li P 




Front Row — Campagna, Rodino, Tambone, Onorato, Crisp, Zambrotta. 
Rear Row — Giganti, Campagna, Vicari, Maggio, Alesio, Lombardo. 



OFFICERS 



Robert Oxorato 
John Tambone . 
Joseph Crisp 
Frank Vicari . 
Salvatore Rodino 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Historian 



FACULTY MEMBERS 
Dr. Champagne 
Dr. R. Drago 
Dr. Angelo Geraci 
Dr. Samuel Gouvernale 
Dr. Herman De Fee 
Dr. A. V. Partipilo 
Dr. Pintozzi 
Dr. J. J. Vitacco 
Dr. I. F. Volini (Honorary) 

MEMBERS 

Joseph Alesio 
August Campagna 
Ettor Campagna 
Phillip Campagna 
Joseph Crisp 
James Giganti 
Marcello Gino 
John landoli 
Thomas Lombardo 
Nicholas Maggio 
Robert Onorato 
Jack Restivo 
Salvatore Rodino 
John Tambone 
Joseph Trunfio 
Frank Vicari 
Frank Zambrotta 







I 1 




■IH 


■■ri f 


lJiI 


^'^rl^fl 


^H^ A. ^^^H 


^^K v\ ^^^BHH^ ^i 






^^^HV'Cr.< T ^H 


^^^^^^tt b;: ^^^^l^^l 


^H^^^^^^w'^^^^^Hi 


^^Ka^^H 


■1 


F^a 



Front Row — Robbins, Beniit-k, Landbeig, Falk. 

Rear Row — Barron, Weinstein, Eisen, Blinski, Feinstein. 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



Julius Adler, M.D. 
Benedict Aron, M.D. 
Louis J. Brody, M.D. 
Nathan Flaxman, M.D. 
Nicholas I. Fox, M.D. 
Morris A. Glatt, M.D. 
Ascher H. Goldfine, M.D. 



Morris J. Hoffman, M.D. 
Jacob J. Mendelsohn, M.D. 
John Peters, M.D. 
Isadore R. Pritikin, M.D. 
Hyman I. Sapoznik, M.D. 
William Shapiro, M.D. 
Lsadore M. Trace, M.D. 



MEMBERS 

Class of 1939 
Eli Bernick Howard Ganser 

Elmer A. Barram Joseph Mindiin 

Sidney E. Epstein Milton Glickman 

Henry Falk Sam J. Goldhabcr 

Julius Shollcr 

Class of 1940 
Elmer Bernstein Fred P. Robbins 

Morton Effran Albert Swinski 

Walter Feinstein Sam Zeidenberg 

Class of 1941 

Morris Blinski 

Class of 1942 
Burton Weinstein 



OFFICERS 

Dr. Isadore M. Trace Trea.surer 

Jerry Kane . . Chapter Adviser 

Harry Landberg Worthy Superior 

Eli Bernick . . Worthy Chancellor 

Samuel Zaidenberg Guardian of Exchequer 
Fred P. Robbins . . . Scribe 




pii iiMnn iippfl 





unm 



Standing — Poniatowski, Grudzien, Skowron, Jarosz, Wojtovvicz, Koziol, Klabocha. 
Seated — Berg, Porembski, Horodko, Krol, Szefczyk, Kaleta, Madura, Kass. 



OFFICERS 

Edward J. Krol Honorary Senior President 

Edward J. Horodko 

Casimir C. Benz 

Henry Wojtowicz 

John Skowron . 

Joseph Moleski 

Jerome Poniatowski 

Stanislaus Koziol 



. President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

. Treasurer 

Financial Secretary 

Sergeant-at-Arms 

Editor and Librarian 




I n 



FACULTY MEMBERS 

Robert L. Abraham, M.D. 
Francis A. Dulak, M.D. 
Thaddeus M. Larkowski, M.D. 
Edward A. Piszczek, M.D. 
Anthony Sampolinski, M.D. 
Edward H. Warszewski, M.D. 
Norbert Ziehnski, M.D. 

MEMBERS 

Class of 1939 
Louis J. Belniak Albert J. Kass 

George S. Berg Lucyan F. Kliniaszewski 

Walter J. Filipek Edward J. Krol 

Stanley R. Grudzien Stanley J. Kuman 

Robert T. Hazinski Ignatius W. Madura 

Adolf J. Jarosz Thaddeus A. Porembski 

Pxlward J. Kaleta Matthew J. Szefczyk 

Class of 1940 

Harry L. Barton M. J. Krisko 

Casimir C. Benz Thaddeus M. Klabacha 

Chester C. Burski Stanislaus M. Koziol 

Edward J. Horodko Stanley L. Majsterek 

Simon V. Markiewicz 

Class of 1941 

Joseph V. Moleski John Skowron 

Henry Wojtowicz 

Class of 1942 
Zdzislaw C. Koenig John Poniatowski 

Ben Tatarowicz 





Front Row — Huussman, Regan, Vonesh, Brandstrader, Maguirc, Muipliy. 
Second Row — Golden, Haskins, Peters, Hilkin, Pauls. 
Rear Row — Lamey, Anzalone, Lyon, Monek, Yore, Lagorio. 



FACULTY MEMBERS 

John C. Fitzgerald, L.L.B. 
Hon. John V. McCormick, J.D. 
Franci.« Monek, J.D. 
Edward A. Ribal, J.D. 
John J. Waldron, J.D. 



OFFICERS 



MEMBERS 



John F. Baker 
Charles Blachinski 
Fred Brandstrader 
Edward A. Cogley, Jr. 
George D. Crowley 
Robert Connors 
Thomas Fegan 
James Griffin 
John Golden 
Robert Haskins 

Walter Williams 



Frank Hausmann 
Arthur Korzeneski 
John Lagorio 
Walter Lamport 
Paul Maguire 
Fank Monek 
Andrew Murphj' 
Adam Penar 
John Sullivan 
Raymond J. Vonesh 



Raymond J. Vonesh 
Paul Maguire 
Fred L. Brandstrader 
Frank Haussman 
Andrew Murphy 
Thomas Fegan . 



Dean 

Vice Dean 

Treasurer 

Tribune 

Master of Rituals 

. Secretary 



PLEDGES 



Michael Anzalone 
Frank Hiltgen 
George Lyons 



Henry McDonald 
Alfred Pauls 
James Peters 




Kill II[II 



DU 





Front Row — Topp, Carol!, Diskey, Wilhelm, Todd, Lewis, Deutschman, Thompson, Ulane. 
Second Row — Barray, Boylan, Daily, Cronan, Xissius, Hagen, Mulenix, Warovvski, Toosonian, Jones. 
Rear Row — Laruso, Griffan, Arnold, Wolf, Tierney, Miller, Fintz, Guzauskas, Zaluga. 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



OFFICERS 

HoBART Todd Presiding Senior 

Emanuel Wilhelm 

Presiding Junior 

Louis Salerno Treasurer 

Raymond Deutschman 

Steward 

Raymond Lewis . Secretary 

Albert Loiselle 

Judge Advocate 



Wayland Matt 



Editor 



r u 



R. A. Barrett, M.D. 

R. A. Black, M.D. 

J. X. Bremner, M.D. 

T. E. Boyd, B.S., Ph.D. 

J. J. Callahan, M.D. 

L. E. Cella, M.D. 

J. T. Coyle, M.D. 

M. E. Creighton, M.D. 

H. W. Eighammer, M.D. 

G. H. Ensminger, M.D. 

W. G. Epstein, A.B., M.D. 

J. P. Evans, M.D. 

W. D. Fitzgerald, M.D. 

H. B. Fo.x, B.S., M.D. 

R. L. French, M.D. 

C. B. Gawne, M.D. 

F. J. Gerty, B.S., M.D. 

P. E. Grabow, M.D. 

R. J. Hawkins, B.S., M.D. 

W. S. Hector, M.D. 

J. B. Henry, B.S.M., M.S., M.D. 

C. W. Hughes, B.S.M., M.S., M.D. 

W. F. Janz, M.D. 

S. M., Kelly, B.S., M.D. 

K. J. Klocker, M.D. 

B. C. Kolter, M.D. 

Philip Law, M.D. 

P. E. Lawler, M.D. 



R. E. Lee, B.S., M.S., M.D. 

J. M. Leonard, M.D. 

A. J. Linowiecki, B.S., M.D. 

G. W. Mahoney, M.D. 

A. F. Martin, M.D. 

A. R. McCradie, M.D. 

E. J. Meyer, M.D. 
J. T. Meyer, M.D. 
C. F. Meuller, M.D. 
M. C. Mullen, M.D. 
P. A. Nelson, Ph.D., M.D. 
G. F. O'Brien, A.B., M.D. 

F. J. Piszkiewicz, M.D. 
W. B. Raycraft, M.D. 
J. M. Roberts, M.D. 
C. S. Scuderi, M.D. 
L D. Simonson, A.B., M.D. 
F. H. Snyder, A.B., Ph.D. 
C. S. Sommer, M.D. 
F. J. Stucker, M.D. 
S. C. Thomson, A.B., 
V. G. Urse, M.D. 

F. C. Val Dez, B.S., M.D. 
A. M. Vaughn, B.S. 
J. C. Vermeren, B.S. 
T. F. Walsh, M.D. 

G. A. Wiltrakis, M.D. 

G. J. Zwikster, B.S., M.S., M.D. 



M.S., M.D. 



M.S., M.D. 
M.D. 



K '1 












1 

j V 1 


^^ 


^ ih r, 


r 


^it 


ri 


^ 

:ii.- 


1 


.^r,rx 


j^r p 




^ ♦ V*'-!^'^ 



Front Row — Becker, Matejka, Lewis, Bush, Todd, Wilhelm, Ryan, Sweeney, Burke, Deutschman. 
Second Row — Barray, Dr. Schneider, Wise, Ahlm, Denker, Hitchko, Dr. Hummler, Dr. Schneider, 

Dr. Thompson, O'Donovan, Dr. F>nsminger, Voller, Kramer, Salerno, .Jones. 
Rear Row — Brosnan, WereUus, Rivera, Rooney, Manning, Naughton, Dr. Pronko, Dupont, Meier, 

Jaskunas, Raichart, Bartels, Birch. 



Harold Becker 
John Brosnan 
Jerome Burke 
John Birch 
Marie Denker 
Walter DeNyse 
Joseph Dupont 
John Fadgen 

Edward Ahlm 

John Barry 

Wilbur Bartels 

John Beall 

Raymond Deutschman 

Michael Hitchko 

Stanley Jaskunas 



Matthew Boylan 
John Carroll 
John Cronin 
Anthony Daly 
Donald Diskey 
John Fair 
James Fairbairn 

Cornelius Annan 
Sherman Arnold 
Ernest Ceriani 
Richard Dunn 
Michael Fontanetta 
Joseph Gora 



MEMBERS 
Class of 1939 

Charles Kramer 
Raymond Lewis 
Albert Loiselle 
John Manning 
James Matejka 
Thomas Naughton 
Edward O'Donovan 
Floyd Rcgalski 

Class of 1940 
Richard Jones 
Fred Lindenfeld 
Wayland Matt 
Francis Murphy 
John O'Donnell 
William Raichert 
Victor Rivera 
James Rooney 

Class of 1941 
Ralph Fintz 
Robert Hagen 
Leo Kolanko 
Robert Meany 
George Nissus 
Joseph Scalzo 
Richard Sinnot 

Class of 1942 
WiUiam Griffin 
Tony Gazaiskas 
Jerry Higgins 
Andrew Jesacher 
Robert Lyons 
Francis Lagorio 
Nicholas Laruso 



Peter Rumore 
Thomas Ryan 
Harold Streit 
Daniel Stuart 
Anthony Sweeny 
Thomas Thale 
Hobart Todd 
Richard Voller 

Louis Salerno 
Clarence Walls 
Carl Werelius 
Emanuel Wilhelm 
Arthur Wise 
Charles Boone 
Donald Meier 



Lee Thompson 
James Topp 
Harry Tosoonian 
Roman Ulane 
Sherwin Wolf 
James Wyatt 
Henry Zaluga 

James Mulhern 
Charles Mullenix 
Robert Miller 
Thomas Tierny 
Harry Weiss 
^tai^fy Wesolawsl^ 





^:^0 



Front Row — Brown, Snyder, Sanders, Gallagher. 

Rear Row — Lucas, Kucik Loewe, Strubbe, Carney, Ragan, Verbeck. 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



OFFICERS 




James A. b. Howell 


Francis J. Rooney 


Bernard A. Snyder 


Justice 


MEMBERS 




J. Max Mitchell 


Vice-Justice 










Clair F. Achenbach 


William D. Kelly 


Albert Osborn 


Treasurer 


John X. Breslin 


Richard Loewe 


Joseph Prindaville 


. Clerk 


Fred R. Brookmeyer 


Robert F. McEwen 


Phillip Collias 


Marshall 


Harold D. Brown 


John C. McKenzie 






Vincent J. Carney 


Albert Osborn 






Phillip CoUias 


William Pokorny 






Robert E. Cummings 


Joseph Prindaville 


,^ 




William Gallagher 


Alvin J. Ragan 


^ 




Harry J. Joy 


Lee S. Sanders 


W 




Thomas F. Kay 


Bernard A. Snyder 


^r 




Leonard Keaster 


Frank E. Stachnik 






Charles Strubbe 


, Jr. 



1 



mil 





Front Row — Walch, Hruby, O'Laughlin, Shield; 
Rear Row — C. Xesbitt, Slattery, Garvej'. 



FACULTY MEMBERS 

William H. Conley, M.B.A. 
Mark E. Guerin 
Thomas Kennedy, A.B. 
G. Warren McGrath, A.B. 
John D. McKian, A.B. 
Francis Monek, A.B., J.D. 
Richard O'Connor, B.S. 
James O. Supple, A.B. 
Martin Svaglic, A.B. 
Louis Tordella, M.S. 
Morton D. Zabel, Ph.D. 



MEMBERS 



Edward X. Crowley 
John Devaney 
Eugene Dubay 
John Dwyer 
Richard Garvey 
William Gibbons 
Norbert Hruby 
Arthur Kogstad 
Frank Knoll 



OFFICERS 



John 



John Lyons 
Daniel Murphy 
Charles Ncsbitt 
Charles O'Laughlin 
Martin O'Shaughnessy 
Thomas Shields 
Max Shipiro 
Roger Slattery 
Charles Strubbe, Jr. 
Walch 



Charles O'Laughlin 



Norbert Hruby 



Thomas Shields 



President 



Vice-President 



Secretary 



nil p 




Front Row — O'Brien, Crowley, Hruby. 
Rear Row — Walch, Marotta, Garvey. 




MEMBERS 



OFFICERS 



Thomas Crowley 
NoRBERT Hruby 
John Walch 
William O'Brien 
Richard Garvey 
Sam Marotta . 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Membership Chairman 

Social Chairman 



Thomas Crowley 
Richard Garvey 
Norbert Hruby 
Sam Marotta 
WilHam O'Brien 
John Walch 



eiyi M 





■ 


■ 


^^^^ 


■pi 


P^H 


^ 




^^ik 




^^^^ a 


i^^B^^^Bi 


#^^|i 






W.'m m 


^ 






■ ^^^B- ^ r 


■ 
f 


■Kjj^ 


f^''"' ■■■■ .'J^B 


PV 


KflEI^I 


Pj^B 


BI<«r'^^^^^H 




'^H 


1 






^X v^ t^^^^H 


^^^1 •> ^fl^^^^^l 


1 



Front Row — Graham, Hrubj', Conway, Shields. 

Rear Row — Brandstrader, Garvey, O'Laughhn, Walch, Maroiniak. 



OFFICERS 



Peter Conway 



President 



MEMBERS 



John Devaney 
Timothy Dillon 
James Fletcher 
Richard Garvey 
Charles Haskins 
Norbert Hruby 



Frank Knoll 
Arthur Kogstad 
Edward Maroiniak 
Charles O'Laughlin 
Thomas Shields 
Paul Sylvester 



John Walch 



D y 




Front Row — Xeirincka, MirmKuc, Silininnf;, Denkewalter, Xdwakowska, Dr. Davis 
Second Row — Dr. Parent, C. White, Olsta, Millar, Minogue, Mullen, Parent. 
Rear Row — Lefrancois, Juzulenas, Brother Kramer, Koppa, Richiardi. 



Lodeski. 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



OFFICERS 



George M. Schmeing, Chrmn. of Dept. of Chemistry 
Dr. Joseph D. Parent Mr. Wilfred White 

Dr. Ardith P. Davis Mr. F. Russell Koppa 

Mr. Frank P. Cassaretto Mr. Philip P. Lefrancois 
Mr. Frank J. Lodeski Mr. Adam Kowalczyk 



Robert Denkewalter . President 



ACTIVE GRADUATE MEMBERS 



Daniel Murphy 



Robert Stell 



Treasurer 



Secretary 



Marvin Johnson 

Program Committee, Chairman 



Dr. 0. Kanner 
Bro. Norbert Kramer 
Dominic J. LoCascio 
Mildred Minogue 
John Nurnberger 
Thomas Moran 
Arthur Hesse 



Otto Richiardi 
Jean Nowakowska 
John Mullen 
Raymond Melchione 
James Kiefer 
Dr. Erwin Gubitsch 
Lilyan Emmon 



Clyde Crowley 



UNDERGRADUATE MEMBERS 



Robert Denkewalter 
William Elson 
Marvin Johnson 
Vincent Juzulenas 
Ronald Millar 



John Minogue 
Daniel Murphy 
Louise Neirinckx 
Leroy Olsta 
Robert Stell 



im 



14 ^-"^ J 



¥ 




Front Row- ()'I5iicii, O'Donovan, Hausmann, Crowley, O't'unnoi-, Strubbe, St-liwiiid. 

Second Row— Todd, Adams, Lamey, Czonstka. 

Third Row — Sliields, Bums, Thale, Newell, Shanahan, Rafferty. 



OFFICERS 



Edward X. Crowley 
Frank W. Hausmann 



Edward O'Donovan 
Thomas Kennedy 



John O'Connor 



. President 

Vice-President 

Cor. Secretary 

Rec. Secretary 

Treasurer 



HONORARY FACULTY MEMBERS 
Robert E. Black, M.D. William H. Logan, M.D., D.D.S. 

Theodore Boyd, Ph.D. John V. McCormick, J.D. 

Henry T. Chamberlain, Ph.B. Rev. Jo.seph A. McLaughlin, S.J. 

Walter J. Cummings Rev. James J. Mertz, S.J. 

Rev. William A. Finnegan, S.J. Louis D. Moorhead, M.D. 

John C. Fitzgerald, LL.B. Leonard D. Sachs, Ph.B. 

Rev. Ralph A. Gallagher, S.J. Sherman Steele, LL.B. 

Francis J. Gerty, M.D. Bertram J. Steggert, M.A. 

Rudolf Kronfeld, D.D.S. Italo F. Volini, M.D. 

Morton D. Zabel, Ph.D. 
FACULTY MEMBERS 

Charles W. Hughes, M.D. 
Raymond Kerwin, M.D. 
Robert E. Lee, M.D. 
M.D. Richard O'Connor, B.S. 

William Schoen, M.D. 

MEMBERS 
Thomas Ryan 
Justin Schwind 
Thomas Thale 
Hobart Todd 



Paul W. Dawson, D.D.S. 
William H. Conley, M.A. 
Paul F. Fox, M.D. 
Lvin F. Hummon, Jr., 



Graduate School 

Thomas Kennedy 
Warren McGrath 
John McKian 
P.dward Sutfin 
Martin Svaglic 
Theodore Tracy 

Dental School 

Arthur Adams 
Peter Griffo 
William Limacher 
Victor McKee 
Milford Riley 

Medical School 
John Beall 
Pkiward Crowley 
Edward Dailey 
George Kelleher 
John Manning 
Wayland Matt 
Charles Mullenix 
Frank Murphy 
Frank Newell 
Edward O'Donovan 



Night Law School 
Fred Brandstrader 
John Brennan 
John Burns 
John Goedert 
Frank Hausmann 
William Lamey 
John MacKenzie 
E!dward Murray 
Joseph Prindaville 
Charles Strubbe 
James Vore 

Commerce 
George Bowler 
Robert Burchett 
James Durkin 
John Rafferty 
Charles Shanahan 
John White 



Day Law School 

Philip CoUias 
Joseph Czonstka 
William Lynch 
Henry McDonald 
.Andrew Murphy 
Leo Newhouse 
John O'Connor 
Raymond Vonesh 

Arts 
Thomas Burns 
Richard Garvey 
William Gibbons 
Norbert Hruby 
Paul Hummert 
Arthur Kogstad 
John Lyons 
Edward Marciniak 
Daniel Murphy 
Charles Xesbitt 
William O'Brien 
Martin O'Shaughnessv 
Thomas Shields 
John Walch 



i[|[ U! 



-»- f- ?. t- 








Front Row — Xaughton, Dr. Vaughn, Burke, Ryan, Lewis, Pellecchia. 

Second Row — VoUer, Newell, Sweeney, Matejka, Cerny, Ceeala, Thale, Bernick. 

Third Row — O'Donovan, Deutschman, Stuart, Onorato, Wise, Kramer, Krol, Kaleta, Rogalski. 

Fourth Row — David, Rivera, Mandernak, Llewellyn, Jones, Markiewicz, Barry, Rodino, Salerno. 

Fifth Row — Hultgen, .laskunas, Reichert, Lindenfeld, Demeter, Russin, Werelius, Congdon, Bertucci, 

Johnson. 
Sixth Row — Brown, Crowley, Wolavka, Cushnie, Hultgen, Todd, Murphy, Wilhelm, Rooney. 



BOARD OF COUNSELLORS 



OFFICERS 

LOVIS D. MOORHEAD, M.D. 

Honorary President 
Thom.\s C. Ry.'iN President 

Jerome J. Burke Vice-President 

Leonard Pellecchia Treasurer 

Raymond O. Lewis Seoretarv 



Dr. J. J. Callahan 


Dr. C. C. Guy 


Dr 


R. E. Lee 


Dr. W. T. Carlisle 


Dr. R. J. Hawkins 


Dr 


A. V. Partipilo 


Dr. J. D. Claridge 


Dr. C. W. Hughes 


Dr 


C. F. Schaub 


Dr. T. F. Finegan 


Dr. L F. Hummon 
SENIOR FELLOWS 


Dr 


A. M. Vaughn 


Louis Belniak 


Merle Denker 


Henry Ricci 


John Birch 


John Donlon 


Floyd Rogalski 


,John Brosnan 


Joseph Dupont 


Thomas Ryan 


Joseph Brown 


Raymond Lewis 


Daniel Stuart 


Jerome Burke 


James Matejka 


John Tambone 


Thaddeus Bush 


Martin McCarthy 


Thomas Thale 


Philip Ceeala 


Thomas Naughton 


Hobart Todd 


Frank Cerny 


Frank Newell 


Paul Tracy 


Joseph Converse 


Edward O'Donovan 


Kan Sung Tom 


Edward Crowely 


James O'Neill 


Ri( 


hard Vollar 


Dee Daley 


Leonard Pellecchia 


William Wolvaka 




JUNIOR FELLOWS 






E. Ahlm 


F. Frankel 




J. Mandernak 


J. Barry 


T. Galpeau 




W. Matt 


J. Benz 


F. Hultgen 




J. O'Donnel 


J. Bertucci 


W. Hultgen 




R. Onorato 


J. Beall 


M. Hithco 




S. Rodino 


E. Brickman 


K. Harudko 




J. Rooney 


K. Bernick 


M. J. Johnson 




V. Rivera 


F. Brown 


M. D. .Johnson 




C. Russin 


J. Condon 


E. Kaleta 




H. Streit 


E. Cushnie 


C. Kramer 




A. Sweeney 


S. Demeter 


E. Krol 




L. Salerno 


R. David 


F. Lindenfield 




C. Werelius 


R. Deutschman 


F. Lewellyn 




F. Wetzler 


E. Daley 


F. Murphy 
R. McCready 




E. Wilhelm 



ililD I 



DP PL 



SiyillR! 





Front Row — Tom, VoUer, Mcllvaine, Brosnan, O'Donovan, Rumore, Sweeney, Crowley. 

Second Row — Tambone, McCready, Meier, Matejka, Cushnie, Campagna, Clancy, Broccolo, Xaughton. 

Rear Row — Brown, Lampert, Todd, Skinner, Syfscyik, Kramer, Rogalski, Crisp, Hunt. 



Dr. I. F. Volini 
Dr. G. Engbring 



E. A. Banner 
L. J. Belniak 
A. Benson 
G. S. Berg 

E. A. Bernick 

S. E. Bongiovanni 

F. Broccolo 
J. Brosnan 
J. E. Brown 
T. F. Bush 

P. L. Campagna 
E. J. Clancy 
J. I. Converse 
J. C. Crisp 
E. X. Crowley 
E. F. Cushnie 
D. W. Dailey 
L. S. Davis 
M. J. Denker 



C. E. Ahlm 
J. W. Barry 
J. G. Beall 

C. C. Benz 

J. A. Bertucci 

D. J. Boles 
J. L. Boyd 
R. Bucklin 
J. B. Condon 

E. H. Daley, Jr. 
C. B. David 

R. Deutschnian 
M. L. Foulk 
P. Frankel 
M. I. Hitchko 



FACULTY MEMBERS 
Dr. W. Shapiro 

MEMBERS 
Class of 1939 
M. V. tiino 
S. R. Grudzien 
.J. R. Hunt 
J. P. landoli 
A. J. Jarosz 
E. J. Kaleta 
A. J. Kass 
L. Klimaszewski 
C. F. Kramer 

E. .1. Krol 

H. M. Landberg 
L. F. Ijombardi 
X. A. Maggio 
J. Manning 
J. J. Matejka 
M. J. McCarthy 
R. McCready 
H. H. Meier 
T. Naughton 

F. W. Newell 

Class of 1940 

E. Horodko 
S. Jaskunas 
M. D. Johnson 
R. J. Jones 

G. T. Kelleher 

F. E. Lindenfeld 
J. S. LLewellyn 
L. Mandernack 
S. V. Markiewicz 
L. Marrella 

C. J. Michet 
F. C. Murphy 
J. W. O'Donnel 
W. Raichart 
V. M. Rivera 



Dr. H. F. DeFeo 

Dr. H. L. Schmitz, Jr. 



a. O'Donovan 
J. T. O'Neil 
L. J. Pellecchia 
T. A. Porembski 
F. Rogalski 
P. Rumore 
T. C. Ryan 
M. B. Skinner 
E. J. Smith 
A. Sweeney 
M. J. Szefczyk 
J. R. Tambone 
T. Thale 
H. Todd 
K. S. Tom 
P. C. Tracv 
R. L. VolleV 
W. Wolavka 
R. Zeller 



F. Rizzo 
F. Robbins 

D. Roberto 
S. R. Rodino 
J. Rooney 

P. Ross 
C. T. Rusin 
L. Salerno 
L. Saxon 
A. Schmitz 
F. Skopek 
F. A. Vicari 
R. A. Wetzler 

E. C. Wilhelm 
A. C. Wise 



OFFICERS 



Edward O'Donovan 
Alfred Benson 
Peter Rumore 
John Brosnan 
Robert Zeller 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

. Librarian 



[I! 





Front Row — Burke, Voller, Matejka, XauKlitcm, Stuart, Tliale. 

Second Row — Todd, Wcilavka, Lewis, Hyan, C'einy, Pellechia, Rogalski, Befnick. 

Third Row — Clancy, O'Donovan, Deutschman, Oiiorato, Wise, Krol, Kaleta, Berg, Caul. 

Fourth Row — Werelius, .Jaskunas, Reichert, Lindenfeld, .Jones, Markiewicz, Barry, Bertucci, Salerno. 

Rear Row — Brown, Cushnie, McLennon, Schultz, Hunt, Rooney, Wilhelm, Murphy, White, McCarthy. 



OFFICERS 

Thomas J. Naughton . President 

Daniel D. Stewart 

Vice-President 

James J. Matejka . Treasurer 

Thomas T. Thale Secretary 

Richard Voller Editor 



FACULTY MEMBERS 

Gertrude M. Engbring, B.S.M., M.D. 

Robert J. Hawkins, B.S., M.D. 

Irwin F. Humraon, Jr., B.S., M.S., M.D. 

Joseph E. Laibe, B.S., M.D. 

Robert E. Lee, B.S., M.D. 

Benjamin H. Orndoff, F.A.C.P., M.D., A.M. 

Henry Sehmitz, M.A., LL.D., M.D. 

Lillian Tarlow, B.S., M.D. 

Virginia Tarlow, B.S., M.D. 

Bertha Van Hoosen, A.B., M.A., M.D., F.A.C.S., LL.D. 





MEMBERS 






Class of 1939 




J. Becker 


H. McCarthy 


P. Rumore 


J. Brown 


H. Manning 


T. Ryan 


J. Brosnan 


J. Matejka 


B. Smith 


T. Bush 


T. Naughton 


D. Stuart 


C. Caul 


H. O'Neil 


W. Thale 


F. Cerny 


E. O'Donovan 


H. Todd 


C. Clancy 


R. Onorato 


K. Tom 


J. Converse 


R. Meir 


R. Voller 


H. Denker 


L. Pellecchia 


C. Waulavka 


J. Hunt 


T. Rogalski 
Class of 1940 


R. Zeller 


J. Barrv 


R. Deutschman 


H. H. Meir 


J. Beall 


P. Fraenkel 


C. J. Michet 


G. Berg 


M. Hitchko 


F. Murphy 


E. A. Bernick 


E. Kaleta 


L. Salerno 


J. Bertucci 


E. Kroll 


A. Schultz 


D. Boles 


F. Lindenfeld 


J. Tambone 


S. E. Bongiovanni 


W. Matt 


W. Wilhelm 


E. Cushnie 


P. McLennon 





iuiu m 





MEMBERS 



Seated — Sliisakawa, LeMarquis, Foulk. 
Standing — Pijan, [Schmidt Tesauro, Xathanson. 



OFFICERS 



Class of 1939 

A. Yvonne LeMarquis Blanche Mcllvain 



Class of 1940 



Marguerite Foulk 
Anne Petras 



Generva Schmidt 
Sakaje Shigakawa 



A. Yvonne LeMarquis 



Marguerite Foulk 



Generva Schmidt 



Margaret Pijan 



President 



Vice-President 



Treasurer 



Secretary 



Class of 1943 



Dolores Dillon 
Charlotte Nathanson 



Margaret Pijan 
Tullia Tesauro 



Charlotte Nathanson . Pledge Captain 
Sakaje Shigakawa . Keeper of the Keys 



ill 



I Pi 




. VR^^^^^ 



B^ 



s\^ 



t^^ 




THE 



THE REVEREND JOHN 
I. GRACE, S.J., (left), is 
chairman of the Athletic 
Board. 



The Board of Control, the power behind the 
scenes as far as athletics is concerned, gave to 
Loyola this year a program that was greatly ex- 
panded in comparison with other j'ears. Through 
this program there was a greater emphasis laid 
upon the minor sports. Swimming, formerly a 
minor, was raised to the dignity of a major 
sport. 

Headed by Father Grace, the Board was 
made up of Mr. Sachs, the Varsity basketball 
coach and the Director of Athletics; Mr. Butzen, 
Frosh basketball coach; Mr. Wilson, track and 
swimming coach; and Mr. Heffernan, the boxing 
coach. 

Through the work of Father Grace and Mr. 
Sachs, this year's basketball schedule was made 
up of the finest teams in the country. Appre- 
ciation of the great work that these men accom- 
plished was shown by the large turnout at the 
Father and Son Banquet that was given in honor 
of the team. All of the guest speakers at the 
dinner were loud in their praise of the fine 
Christian example that all of the coaches had 
given to the students during the year. It was 
due to Mr. Sachs and the rest of the coaches 
that the men of Loyola were trained in sports- 
manship as well as athletic prowess. 

Great credit is also due to Coach Butzen 
because of the manner in which he took over 



JERRY HEFFERNAN, (upper left), boxing 
instructor and former ring star is also a 
member of the Board. 



DICK BUTZEN, who this year has succeeded 
Marv Colen as coach of Freshman Basket- 
ball, is the newest member of the Board. 



BOARD OF CONTROL 



the job of initiating the Frosh into the intricacies 
of the leather sphere. Mr. Butzen took over 
the job that was vacated by Marv Colen toward 
the middle of the season. 

One of the busiest men on the campus was 
Coach Al Wilson, who had to divide his time 
between the cross country, swimming, and varsity 
track. Mr. Wilson, a former Olympic athlete, has 
brought all of his athletic experience into play 
in tuining out the finest teams that Loyola has 
had in many years. 

Coach Heffernan has spent many aftei'noons 
in teaching Loyolans the art of self defense that 
is so necessary. The result of all this work was 
shown to the outsiders when the intramural 
boxing tournament was held in the early spring. 



AL WILSON, the fourth mem- 
ber of the group, has acquired 
a reputation around Loyola for 
versatihty, being both gym in- 
structor and the coach of the 
cross countr}', swimming, and 
varsity track teams. 




LEONARD D. SACHS, coach 
of tlie varsity basketball team 
and member of the Board, is 
seen reviewing the successful 
season at the Welcome banquet 
giv.'ii to the team. 



George Hogan 




VARSITY 



BY COACH LEONARD D. SACHS 



This year The Ramblers completed one of the 
most successful seasons in the history of Loyola 
basketball, twenty-one successive victories and 
the only defeat in the game for the National 
Championship. A truly remarkable record. We 
can't blame them for finally losing a game. There 
was bound to be a let-down — a squad of eight 
boys with such limited substitution giving all 
they had every game. When at last their en- 
durance was spent, the collapse came after the 
finish of one of the most difficult schedules in 
the basketball year. 

Let us consider the team and its personnel. 
There is no need of going into detail regarding 
Mike Novak and "Wibs" Kautz; everyone recog- 
nized their ability. They were both selected on 
the Ail-American Team. When two boys from 
the same school make this team, they have to 
be good. This is what a New York sports writer 
wrote after seeing a certain game in Madison 
Square Garden, "You will live a long while 
before you see two such All-Americans on one 
team as Novak and Kautz." 

We hear so much about Novak and Kautz 
that we sometimes think of Loyola as a two man 
team. This is a mistake, for without the other 
players Loyola could never have been the great 



Mike Xovak 



BASKETBALL 



team that achieved twenty-one successive vic- 
tories. 

Can we over forget the fine defensive play 
of Bill O'Brien, his fast, accurate passing ability, 
and his coolness under pressure? He did a 
splendid job in feeding and making it possible 
for Kautz, Novak, and Hogan to score. 

George Hogan was never the sensational type 
of player, but how often he came through in a 
pinch! \'ery few men could feed a pivot man 
as well as George. I shall never forget his fight 
and play, particularly during the National Tour- 
nament! He was a leader and a fighter and a 
representative Loyolan if there ever was one. 

We cannot overlook George Wenskus, the 
sophomore flash. His was a tough assignment, 
working in with four seniors. He did a fine job. 
His work in the Chicago game was typical of 
the play that George exhibited throughout the 
year. He was a fine defensive man, a good shot, 
and his leadership ability was clearly demon- 
strated when the squad, by a unanimous vote, 
elected him to captain the Ramblers of 1939-40. 

Jack Driscoll, the smallest man in collegiate 
basketball, was undoubtedly the equal of any 
man on the squad and gave a splendid exhibition 
of speed and all around ability in every game. 



George Wensku 




Jack Driscoll 





COACH SACHS adresses the basketball team 
just before the game. In the first row are 
Wenskus, Driscoll, Graham, ScheU, and O'Brien. 
In the rear are Hofherr, Novak, Kautz and 
Hogan. 



Joe Mande 



Bob Hofherr 



In the crucial game in Toledo, Kautz was 
able to play but a few minutes and 
Driscoll played the greater part of the 
game. The fans at Toledo are still 
talking about him. Remember the City 
College of New York game. Jack, with 
seconds remaining sank a basket nearly 
three-fourths the length of the floor. 

We cannot overlook the "Gold Dust 
Twins," Vinny Graham and Ed Schell, 
two more sophomores. Improving with 
each game, at the end of the season they 
were splendid basketball players. Schell 
played a great part of the game against 
Long Island and was very much at home. 
I expect a great deal from him next 
season. 

Vinny Graham is what coaches refer 
to as a competition player. He does not 
know the meaning of the word quit. I 
shall never forget the Michigan State 
game: three minutes to go and Loyola 
8 points behind, a basket, a free throw 
and another basket by Graham, ten 
seconds to go and the score is tied, an 
overtime victory for Loyola. Thanks 
to that grand competitor, Vinny Graham. 

Thc3' were all great, — I am proud of 
each and every one of them as a player 
and as a man. 



REVIEWING THE SEASON 



ONE OF THE MOST spectacular pictures of the 
season is this action shot from the St. John-Loyola 
game, at Madison Square Garden. This hotly con- 
tested game saw brilliant action throughout, and 
culminated in a victory for Loyola. 





The Toledo Game. 



Of all the Loyola teams coached by Len Sachs the 
1939 Ramblers were no doubt the finest squad that 
he has ever produced. Lacking the advantages of a 
large team, Loyola made up in quality what it lacked 
in quantity. Beginning with its first game on De- 
cember seventh, at the start of the basketball year, 
the team ran up an undefeated season of twenty-one 
games, meeting the best of the country, and bringing 
Loyola into the very center of the limelight of sports. 
When Loyola's squad finally turned in tneir uniforms, 
two Ail-Americans had been named from the Ramblers. 

Much of the credit for our national reputation this 
year is directly due to players Mike Novak and Wilbur 
Kautz. They formed a nucleus for the machine that 
sped around them in pivot and block plays, matching 



in precision and ingenuity the speed, fast break, and 
rougher game of most of the opposition. 



Loyola 67; Arkansas State 22. 

The Ramblers made their debut of the season with 
Arkansas State. In this contest, "Wibs" Kautz led 
the team to a 67-22 victory, and aided considerably 
in running up a new all-time team scoring record by 
tying his personal record of 27 points for one game. 



Loyola 56; Columbia 24. 

Columbia, now Loris College, followed Arkansas 
State to defeat in the next encounter. The Dubuque 
team, unable to furnish much opposition for the 
Ramblers, went down 56 to 24. 



Loyola 50; North Dakota 32. 

One of the greatest basketball promotions in the 
West this year was the 132nd Armory "double- 
headers" with Loyola and DePaul as home teams 
against the nations best. The first of these games for 
Loyola was its meeting with North Dakota. Paced 
by Kautz and Hogan, the Ramblers played the entire 
game with a comfortable lead winding up with a 
50 to 32 win. 



Loyola 67; Millikix 31. 

The Sachsnien then returned to the Alumni Gym 
to tie their recently acquired scoring record in trouncing 
the iSlillikin five 67 to 31. Kautz fell two points short 
of his own record of 27 points. 



liOYOLA 44; Southern Methodist 31. 

The holiday season saw the Ramblers back into 
action in another double-header against Southern 
Methodist, southern conference champions. Coach 
Sachs, at the end of the season, called the Mustangs 
the best coached team of the year. Leading at the 
half by a mere 23 to 22 margin, the boys saw they had 
a tough job on their hands. Hogan and Novak 
finally got the team ahead, ending the game with a 
44 to 31 lead. 



Loyola 35; Chicago 28. 

It was the sensational George Wenskus who pro- 
vided the spark as the Ramblers snapped a three 
year losing streak in defeating the Midway men 35 
to 28. Close guarding of Kautz held him to a low 
of 13 points, but O'Brien and Hogan and Wenskus 
kept the ball going in and around Novak for the sixth 
straight victorv of the season. 



The North Dakota Game. 



Loyola 46; Michigan State 44. 

One of the greatest thrillers staged at the Armory 
was the Loyola-Michigan State game in which Kautz's 
ten-second basket gave the Ramblers a 46 to 44 win. 
The team was unable to pull away in the first half 
as the Michigan team matched them basket for basket. 
The half ended in a 21-21 deadlock. With three 
minutes left to play State led 38 to 30. Sensational 
ball by Graham, Wenskus, and Novak brought the 
game into an overtime. Wenskus then scored two 
baskets and Kautz broke through for the winning 
shot. 



The Millikin Game. 




Loyola 33; Santa Clara 31. 



Loyola 46; Drake 32. 



Recovering from the Michigan State tussle, the 
Ramblers met the fast, colorful Santa Clara quintet 
at the gym. The razzle-dazzle style of the Broncos 
wath their fast breaks and one-hand shots forced the 
Ramblers almost to the point of exhaustion, and kept 
the fans up on their feet throughout most of the game. 
The Ramblers proved themselves to be a superb ball 
club. The intelligent direction and accurate passing 
of O'Brien, the great defensive work of Novak, and 
the teamwork of Hogan and Wenskus carried Loyola 
on to another victory by a score of 33 to 3L 



The Chicago Game. 




Trailing 20-17 at the half before a hostile Des 
Moines crowd, the Loyola cagers recovered in the 
second frame and drove to an eventual triumph over 
a strong Drake team, 46 to 32. Mike Novak, the 
center of defense, was top point man with 16 points. 



Loyola 51 ; Villanova 32. 

Returning to the armory, the Ramblers routed 
Villanova University 51-32 in what was termed by 
the local sports writers as "the Sachsmen's big test." 
Ail-Americans Kautz and Novak with 15 points apiece 
paced the Loyola attack before a capacity crowd of 
5,500. In all, the game slightly resembled a grid 
contest, 23 personals and 3 technicals being called on 
the visitors. 



Loyola 37 ; Augustana 29. 

Just before the semester examinations the Ramblers 
journeyed to Rock Island, Illinois, to take the Augu- 
stana College quintet into camp by the score of 37 
to 29. Kautz was high scorer with 18 points. 



The Southern Methodist Game. 




The Michigan State Game. 



Loyola 37; Alumni 28. 

The varsity squad returned home to meet an 
ahimni team composed of all-time Rambler greats 
such as former Ail-Americans Charlie Murphy, Dick 
Butzen, and Marv Colen. Before a cheering crowd 
the Varsity defeated the Alumni 37 to 28. Sophomore 
Vinny Graham led the varsity in scoring while Marv 
Colen took top scoring honors with five baskets and 
one free throw. 



Loyola 34; Drake 23. 

The Ramblers then made it thirteen in a row and 
twenty straight at home when they took the powerful 
Drake LTniversity team by a score of 34 to 23. At the 
half Drake led by a score of 15 to 14, but in the be- 
ginning of the second period Kautz and Novak put 
the local cagers out in front and from then on they 
never relinquished the lead. 



Loyola 52; City College of New York 27. 

Returning to the armory for the last time this 
season the Ramblers trounced the famed City College 
of New York quintet by the score of 52 to 27. By 
their wonderful performance the Sachsmen strength- 
ened their claim for national recognition. Big Mike 
Noval led the scoring with six baskets and five free 
throws and was the mainstay of the Rambler attack 
throughout the entire game. Nat Holman, coach of 



The Santa Clara Game. 



the New York team and one of basketball's all-time 
greats, said that Novak was the best center he has 
seen this season and that the Loyola team was on an 
equal footing with any eastern quintet. 



Loyola 36; DePaul 26. 

The highlight of the past season was the Loyola- 
DePaul game in which the C.Y.O. trophy was at 
stake. The Ramblers defeated the famed Blue Demons 
of DePaul by a score of 36 to 26 in a game marked 




The Villanova Game. 



by fouls and rough play. By conquering DePaul for 
the third straight year the Ramblers took permanent 
possession of the C.Y.O. trophy emblematic of the 
state Catholic college championship. George Hogan 
captured top scoring honors by garnering 13 points. 



Loyola 58; St. Thomas 36. 

After a suspected let-down from the DePaul tussle 
the Loyola cagers made it sixteen in a row by defeating 
St. Thomas college 58 to 36. It was a game in which 



The DePaul Game. 



the regulars saw very little action, for Coach Sachs 
frequently substituted the other players. Highlight 
of the evening was the sensational play of Bob Hofherr. 



Loyola 44; George Washington 33. 

Remembering last year's game against George 
Washington University, the Ramblers played heads- 
up ball all the way to defeat the Colonials 44-33. 
Washington will be remembered as a team of a high 
sportsmanship caliber. 



Loyola 52; Cumberland 39. 

Following the George Washington game, the Ram- 
blers headed south to play a team made up of all the 
best players from the vicinity of Cumberland Mary- 
land. Putting on one of the greatest exhibitions of 
the year the Ramblers swamped the All-Star team 
by the score of 52 to 39. This game was marked 
by the great passing of Hogan and O'Brien, along 
with the high scoring of Kautz and Big Mike. 



Loyola 51; Toledo 38. 

Playing on a home and home basis with Toledo 
University, Loyola journeyed east to take Toledo's 
great team by the score of 51 to 38. The Toledoites 
were so overcome by the swift plays that centered 
around Novak that they were helpless to stop the 
Sachsmen. 



Loyola 50; Toledo 46. 

In the Toledo game at Loyola the Ramblers were 
given a tougher battle. Kaiitz broke through in the 
second half to show the crowd that he was clearly 
better than the famed Chuokovits when it came to 
all around playing ability. However it was thanks to 
the great play of the whole team that Loyola was 
ahead at the end of the game by the score of 50 to 46. 



out onto the floor of Madison Square Garden in the 
final game of the National Championship Tournament, 
it was not the same team that had met St. Johns, 
City College, Southern Methodist, Villanova, Santa 
Clara, and others. Loyola obviously was not playing 
its best game. Long Island made seventeen baskets 
and ten out of twelve free throws. Loyola made 
fifteen baskets and missed eleven out of thirteen free 
throws. Had Loyola played its regular game, perhaps 
the Ramblers would not have won, but the score 
would not have been 44-32. 



Loyola 51; St. John's 46. 



It was then on to the National Championship 
Tournament — Loyola was to meet the greatest team 
of its season, St. Johns. In spite of the loss that Loyola 
incurred at the hands of Long Island, there is no 
doubt that St. Johns were the best of all the opponents 
Loyola faced during the year. The spectacular play 
of Mike Novak during this game left the New York 
crowd breathless. Kautz played one of the fastest 
games of his career. The whole team was at its best. 



Long Island 44; Loyola 32. 

It was the last game of the season that broke 
Loyola's winning streak. When the Ramblers walked 



The George Washington Game. 



The City College of New York Game. 



yLVi 



J « t -^f * 







rii, 



FRESHMAN BASKETBALL 



Handicapped by inexperience and a lack of sufficient 
material, Loyola's freshman basketball team fought 
through the season with a spirit that was deserving 
of better things. Although their season's record of 
two won and four lost is far from enviable, it does not 
give an adequate or complete picture of the drive and 
spirit which were so characteristic of the 1939 fresh- 
man team. With a squad of only seven men, including 
the manager, the team was forced to play out their 
schedule of six games without the reserves which are 
so necessary for a really outstanding team. 

In the opening game of the season Loyola's green- 
men chalked up their first win of the year against 
one of their traditional rivals, the neophytes from 
Armour Tech. In a tight and hotly contested battle 
Loyola came out on the long end of a 26 to 18 score. 
Starring for Loyola was lanky Augie Durso, one of 
the mainstays of the team throughout the season, 
whose effective work under the basket contributed 
more than anything else to a Loyola victory. 

Next on the list of freshman opponents were the 
DePaul Blue Demons, who gave the greenmen their 
worst drubbing of the year by a tally of 32 to 16. 
Outstanding factor in the DePaul victory was their 
greater experience and this more than anything else 
made the game a losing battle for the Loyolans. 

The DePaul contest was followed by a bitterly 
fought battle with the famed Collegians, the former 
A.A.U. champs. Loyola surprised their more experi- 
enced opponents by jumping out into an 8 to lead 



but the Collegians staged an uphill fight to take the 
lead at the half and to win going away. The frosh 
played with their characteristic spirit, but were up 
against a veteran aggregation that had played together 
for a long time. 

In the St. Sabina game a week later the freshmen 
again succumbed to superior opposition, but only after 
extending their larger opponents to the utmost before 
they eventually came in on the short end of a 36 to 
28 score. Again the height of Durso, together with 
the speed of flashy Jim Roberts, was one of the greatest 
factors in keeping the greenies in the game all the 
way. 

They next met the freshmen from Armour Tech 
in a return engagement, again defeating their north 
side neighbors by a score of 34 to 21. The frosh 
offensive which had long been threatening to show 
the results of long periods of practice finally broke 
loose and the Ramblers rolled up their largest score 
of the season. Starring in this victory were Bob 
Van Heule, Bruno Krzeminski, and Durso. 

The final game of the season took place in the 
St. Sabina tourney, to which the frosh were invited 
because of their status as defending champs. Striving 
to live up to advance notices, the frosh engaged in 
a tight, closely contested battle with a tall, fast Swift 
& Co. team, but the latter's height advantage gave 
them the game by a 21 to 18 score. 

Outstanding courtman for the frosh basketeers 
throughout the season was tall Augie Durso. A 



Mone, Cornell, Ryan, Lee, Durso, Van Heule, Roberts, Leahy, Donoghue. 




hook-shot artist and high point man of the team, 
Augie was especially valual)le for iiis dependable floor 
play on the pivot line and his work under the basket. 

Jim Roberts, speedy little forward, also developed 
into one of the steadiest and most capable ball handlers 
on the squad. Not noted for his scoring ability, Jim 
was nevertheless invaluable for his flashy floor play 
and for his ability to set up successful scoring plays 
for his teammates. This more than anything else 
marks Jim as futm-e varsity material. 

Bob \'an Heule, Robert's running mate at tor- 
ward, was the outstanding team player on the squad. 
His height advantage helped in getting the ball on 
rebounds and his coolness in the stress of a tight 
game made him a very valuable man to the freshman 
team. He was especially adept in handling the ball 
and with Durso helped control the sphere under the 
liasket. 

Small but shifty, Bruno Krzeminski rapidly de- 
veloped into one of the most capable players on the 
squad. His fighting spirit and his ability to hit the 
basket made him one of the Frosh's most consistent 
floormen and most capable sharpshooters. 

The other guard position was capably handled by 
Ted Cornell, who alternated at the post with Pat 
Mone. Although neither of these was particularly 
flashy, both were long on dependability and steadiness 
and rounded out a well-balanced team. 

Last but not least and of the the most dependable 





JERRY DONOGHUE, one of the new pros- 
pects, takes a free throw. He and his team- 
mates provide the material for next years 
varsity squad. 



THE GREENMEN, (above) engage in a 
spirited contest with the Basketeers of Arm- 
our Tech. 

men on the squad was Bill Duncan, hard working 
player-manager, to whom the team owed a great deal 
of the success that it had. Filling in at any position 
and on hand at all of the practice scrimmages to see 
to it that the equipment was ready and to take a 
hand in the practice. Bill was the most valuable man 
to his team. 

Among others that were with the squad at various 
times diu'ing the year, but who were prevented from 
consistent competition by scholastic work or other 
things, were Ira Hartnett, former Loyola Academy 
star, Bill Ryan, one of the most promising of the 
frosh players, ]3ill Midwood, Charley Moore, and 
Jerry Donohue. 

All of these players will be promising material for 
the varsity squad ne.xt year. With a year of experience 
and hard work behind them, they should be able to 
carry on the tradition of great varsity teams. 




r* Loyola's Cross Country team this year has begun 
to show more than ever that Coach Wilson's efforts 
have not been in vain. The team this year has had 
the most successful season that Loyola has ever 
enjoyed. Led by Captain Paul Wagener and fresh- 
man Max Lenover the harriers eliminated a host of 
talented teams from the victory column. 

The Ramblers were undefeated in dual competition, 
and with a more or less inexperienced team had a 
sea,son total of twelve victories and four defeats. 

The first of the dual meets showed the timber of 
the team when they defeated powerful Milwaukee 
State Teachers by the score of 243^ to SO^- It was 
also in this meet that Loyola was given its first view 
of the "Flying Canadian" Max Lenover. 

This victory was followed by others over the Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 17 to 38; Wheaton College, 21 to 
34; and Eastern Illinois Teachers, 25 to 30. Inex- 
perience began to show through however when the 
team entered a meet with several other teams and 
were forced to bow to the unbeatable team fi'om 
Wisconsin 42 to 17. 



THE CROSS 



PAUL WAGENER, (extreme left), captain of the cross-country 
squad. 



COACH WILSON <'halking up another victory. 




THE STARTING GUN in the Invitational Cross-Country Meet 
in which Loyola took fourth place, (above) 



LENOVER, (lower), pushed Xotre Dame's Greg Rice all the 
way. 



In the annual Invitational Cross Country Run, 
the harriers again were forced to bow to the superiority 



COUNTRY SEASON 



LENOVER (t(i]i i)l<-tuio) clips off a couple 
more secoiuls. 

RICE OF NOTRE DAME (lower picture) 
wins the Cross-Country Invitational Meet. 




Of Notre Dame and Illinois State Normal, but were 
able to save fourth place in the large field that entered 
the competition. 

In a return meet with Milwaukee State Teachers' 
the Ramblers again humbled their opponents 22 to 
33. Chicago University followed through with a 
perfect imitation of State Teachers by bowing to 
Loyola 15 to 44. Illinois State Normal in their second 
meeting with Loyola again showed their superior 
strength by the score of 18 to 40. 

In rapid succession the Ramblers finished off the 
following teams: Eastern Illinois State Teachers, 
26 to 29; Wheaton, 21 to 34; and Monmouth College' 
15 to 41. 

Special credit for the season should be given to 
Chuck Beauregard, arts sophomore, and to Dan 
Howe, Ed Reidy, and Norb Essig, all freshmen who 
gave valuable assistance all during the year. 

The Ramblers had two post season meets with 
Macomb Teachers, and kept their average up by 
defeating them twice by the scores of 18 to 40, and 
19 to 36. This was the climax of the most successful 
season that any Cross Country Team from Loyola 
has enjoyed in many a year. 



Front Row — Wagener, Essig, Layden. 

Back Row — Wilson, Reidy, Howe, Lenover, 
Graham. 





LONG GEORGE 
CLARK steps nut 
in prai'tict'. 



KNOLL, 

up and over. 




VARSITY TRACK 



Coming as a climax to one of the most success- 
ful seasons that Loyola has ever had in the field 
of athletics, the track team, has come through 
with a team that has claims for national honors 
at the end of the year. Jjong an underdog in 
cinder competition, the speedsters are at last 
beginning to show that the trust their coach 
Ale.x Wilson has always had in them is not 
without foundation. Coach Wilson has taken 
the best of the veterans and moulded them 
together with those greenmen who have shown 
such brilliant promise this year. 

Stories of the courage of some of the men 
that have taken part in meets so far this year 
have come back to the students to give them 
a greater admiration for the spirit of the team 
than for the victories that have been won. Men 
that were sick the day before meets have come 
out and called upon their courage alone to 
finish ahead of their opponents; men that ordi- 
narily should have been under the care of a 
doctor have said nothing and gone out on the 
track and earned victories for the school. Such 
stories as these have come to the attention of 
the students, not from the members of the team, 
but from those who were close and were able 
to find them out only after the races had been 
won. Such courage as this could not go unre- 
warded: and to prove that it has not gone unre- 
warded, it is only necessary to see the trophy 
case which now has been filled to the limit by 
the efforts of these men. 

Wilsonmen this year have earned recognition 
from schools that had formerly looked upon 
Loyola as merely a practice team. Loyola was 




MAX LENOVER as he broke the tape set 
a new tieldliouse record for the half-mile, 
1:59.2 at North Central. 




LAYDEN wmms up before knocking off nine 
or ten laps. 

WENDT (top right) provides an action shot 
as he looses the javelin. 

DIRKSEN (middle) poises for the heave. 

BRITT (below) lets go of the plate. 



invited to take part in the relays that are gaining 
so much popularity in the west and the states 
that have weather suitable tor this sport the 
year round. 

The most notable of these rela3^s which they 
attended was the Butler Relays at Butler Uni- 
versitj'. The thinclads were able to garner 
first place in the medley relay and second in the 
sprint relay. By virtue of these victories they 
were invited to the Texas Relays at Austin 
where they placed second in the sprint relays. 
Worthy of mention is the remarkable running of 
Max Lenover. The first man in the relay team 
was boxed so that he lost almost sixty yards. 
The next two runners were able to pick up 
little of the distance but Max Lenover staged 
one of the most spectacular sprints ever seen. 
He ran the half mile just short of the world's 
record losing out only lay a yard. 

The veterans that made up the backbone of 
the team were Bill Elson, captain George Clark, 
and Bud Knoll. The practice that the}' have 
had in the past showed in their efforts on the 
track . 

The newcomers on the squad show signs of 
being Olympic material in a few short years. 
Outstanding is the sensational freshman Max 
Lenover. Max left his home in Canada to run 
with the Wilsonmen, and has been setting new 
records ever since he came here. At the beginning 
of the year he put on an exhibition for some of 
the graduates who had come to see whether this 
year's team had ability enough to uphold the 
records set by the former teams. This turned 
out to be one of the fastest exhibitions that has 
ever been seen in these parts. Paced at different 






intervals during the race Lenover turned on the 
heat and set a new record for the half mile on 
the indoor track. 

This year Lenover added still another record 
to his already impressing; list. In the annual 
Wilson Invitational Mile Run he led a field of 
contestants a gruelling pace to break the record 
set last year by twenty seconds. It is doubtful 
that anyone but Ma.x himself will ever break 
this record. 

Another underclassman sensation is Tom 
Layden, the former holder of the record for the 
Wilson Mile that is run annually. Tom ran 
the three-quarters in the medley relays this 
year, performing remarkablj' well in the Butler 
and Illinois Relays. 

The third distance man on the medley team 
was freshman Ed Reidy, former Ignatius star 
half-miler, and winner of the Catholic League 
title last year. Bill Elson ran regularly as the 
fourth man of the medley squad, as sprint man. 
The task of getting a lead is the job of the sprint 
man, and Bill seldom gave Coach Wilson cause 
to worry. 

Dan Howe and Charlie Beauregard alternated 
on the sprint relay squad that did so well this 
season. Dan is a product of Loyola Academy 
where last year he gained distinction in winning 
the National Catholic 440 title last year at. 
Notre Dame. Dan has gained the name of 
"Whiffle Bird" by reason of his style. His 
head bobs from side to side as he extends him- 
self. It is much more natural to see Beau running 
than to see him walking, since he does most of 
his practicing on the way to classes. 

Frank Knoll has had a reputation on the 
track squad for dependability. He has been a 
memlier of the squad three years now in the 
capacity of pole-vaulter. 




LANCASTER (top) the sen- 
sational freshman timber top- 
per. 



ELSON AND REIDY (be- 
low) get off to a fast start in 
prai'tit-e. 



MILE RELAY TEAM (left) 
Elson, Howe, Layden and 
Lenover. 



When the name of George Clark is mentioned, 
the memories that are recalled are those of a 
giant of man throwing himself over the hurdles 
a mile a minute. The fact that he was made 
captain of the greatest team that Loyola has 
had in years shows how much the team thinks 
ot him. No better leader could have been found 
than this tall specimen of athletic ability. One 
of the steadiest of all the pointgetters, he is 
counted on to bring home the bacon this year 
as soon as he is through with his comprehensives. 

Another veteran is Paul Wagener. The men 
that have raced against Paul have always won- 
dered where he got energy to finish those distance 
runs. The answer to this could be found in 
watching the manner in which he is always 
practicing. Paul has well merited the name 
"Tarzan" since his powerful shoulders have so 
often carried the hopes of the team. 

Although the outdoor season has not yet 



begun at press time, a word about the rest of 
the team is necessary here. There are sopho- 
mores Graham and Kicly in the high jump. 
Graham jumped slightly over six feet last year 
and will certainly go higher this year. He also 
competes in the liroad jump. George Kiely 
placed in the only meet he competed in this 
season, and with further experience should add 
quite a few points to the outdoor season. During 
the coming outdoor competition, Tony Dirksen 
will throw the .shot for Loyola, Ed Britt the 
discus, Vinny Graham the javelin. 

If the meets so far this year are any criterion 
Loyola should have its most successful season. 
Congratulations are always due a coach who has 
turned in a good job, and we hastened to add 
our congratulations to the mounting acclaim. 
Loyola is on the upgrade on the track and mainly 
through the efforts of Coach Alex Wilson. 




Standing — Wilson, A. Graham. 

Front Row — Plahetka, Essig, Layden, Lenover, Beaure- 
gard. 

Second Row — Wagener, V. Graham, Kirshng, Brockman, 
Lyons. 

Third Row — Satek, Elson, Reidy, Lancaster, Howe, Duffy. 



VARSITY SWIMMING 



This year the Loyola Varsity Swimmers set a new Loyola 
record by winning eight meets during the season. This successful 
season was partially due to the fact that the Reverend John L 
Grace, S.J., elevated swimming to the rank of a major sport. 

In the real sense, the promotion given to swimming is con- 
firmation of the coaching ot Ale.x Wilson. This is his seventh 
year directing the team, and diu'ing this period he has produced 
expert swimmers and fine men. The quality of his coaching is 
exemplified by the fact that the first seven scorers of this years 
team have been developed entirely by Coach Wilson. He will 
bring forth the potentialities of the lower ranking men to the 
point where they can score on future teams. Through his expert 
tutelage he improves the individual swimmers and maintains the 
standard of his teams. 

In winning eight meets and losing two, the team compiled 
the best average they have had in five years, and second highest 
since the inauguration of the sport in 1930. Some of the victories 
were scored against Armour, Bradley, North Central, Illinois 
College, and other leading Midwestern schools. The team lest 
when taking on undefeated southern invaders from Kentucky 
State. A second defeat was suffered when they traveled north 
to meet Milwaukee State. 

The outstanding man on the squad in many respects is Cap- 
tain Marty O'Shaughnessy, Arts Junior. He is the only man in 
the history of the school to hold the captaincy in his sophomore 
year, and he has retained the office this year as well. The squad 
does well to elect him captain, for he exerts remarkable influence 
on his mates. They profit, not only by his expert example, 
but also because he prods them all to practice regularly encourages 
them on their improvement. 

O'Shaughnessy swims backstroke in the 100 yard distance, 
and takes the backstroke leg on the medley relay team. This 
was his best season thus far, for only two opponent teams cap- 
tured first place in the backstroke event. 

Max Shapiro, Dental school senior, completed four years of 




MARTY O'SHAUGHNESSY 

(above) captain and back- 
stroke specialist. 



RAY DOUGHERTY (left) 
second highest scorer has 
been the mainstay of the 
team in tlie diving events. 





AL BURKE (above) swimming the back- 
stroke is one of the mainstays of the team. 



THE SWIMMING TEAM (upper right) 
O'Sliaughncssy, Corboy, Carroll, McXoil, 
Wilson, Shapiro, Moore, Moorhead, Burke, 
McKeever, Matt, Dougherty. 

service. Despite the inconvenience of the trip from the Dental 
school to the" north side daily for practice Max appeared regularly 
and went through his paces. The combination of his swimming 
feats and his intramural work establish him as the outstanding 
contribution of the Dental school to Loyola athletics. Max had 
the gruelling task of swimming free style in the fifty, hundred, 
and sprint relay events. A year ago he was the highest scorer 
on the team, and this time he finished in fourth place with 47 
points. 

Another veteran who performed well in the breast-stroke is 
Al Burke, Arts Junior. Al has had a number of years of tank 
experience, and under the instruction of Coach Wilson is still 
improving his time. Throughout the entire season Al splashed 
in ahead of Loyola's opponents in all but two meets. 

The other star in the bi-eaststroke division is Wai-ren Matt, 
Arts sophomore. This underclassman began his swimming 
career here at Loyola two years ago, and all of his ability may be 
attributed directly to Coach Wilson. Mr. Wilson concerning this 
says, "Matt has developed more rapidly than any member of the 
team". This year he was so efficient that he was beaten only 
in the meet with University of Kentucky. His seasons total is 
48 to place him third in the scoring. 

Another sophomore star who garnered 59 points and next to 
the top in seasons total points is Ray Dougherty, of the Arts 
campus. Dougherty is the team diver, and also swims the free 
style in the sprint and medley relay events. This is his sixth 
year of work under Coach Wilson lor he prefaced his university 
career by four seasons in Loyola Academy. 

A sensational sprint star this year stole all the glory. Bob 
Carroll, Arts Freshman, walked ofT with 83 individual points and 
high scoring honors for the team. He is another example of the 
coaching prowess of Mr. Wilson, who handled him for four pre- 
vious years in Loyola Academy. Carroll performed in the fifty 
and hundred yard free style events, as well anchoring the free 
style relay team. 

Ebby Corboy, sophomore from the North Side campus, 
represented I/Oyola in the backstroke events. Possessed of a 
huge, ideal frame for a swimmer, Ebby takes advantage of his 
natural ability to turn in sterling performances. 

The grind in the two hundred yard marathon was adequately 
handled by Bob McKeever and Bus Moore. To stand up under 




the tremendous strain of this long distance, these men must 
practice long and dihgently. McKeever and Moore kept in 
condition and were able to take a great many of first places before 
the season was out. 

The other men who round out the natators are Warren McNeil, 
free style artist. Bill McNulty and Bill Sisson of the breaststroke 
division, and Bob Moorhead, a diver. 

The Rambler debut was made against Armour Tech whom 
they defeated by the score of 46-20. The Ramblers scored every 
first place except the one in the two hundred yard free style. 
In his first intercollegiate meet Bob Carroll led the team scoring 
with 12 points. 

The second meet brought North Central, and much stiffer 
competition, which they nosed out by 37-29. The veteran 
Shapiro flashed into his old form to garner two firsts and one 
second place for a very fruitful day. 

The Wilsonmen made it three straight when they paddled in 
ahead of George Williams College 41-25. By scoring 10 points 
Bob Carroll again led the assault in which Loyola took six out 
of eight events. 

The Milwaukee Teachers College blotted the undefeated 
record of the Ramblers when they defeated them by the score 
of 38-28. In spite of the loss Warren Matt shone in the breast- 
stroke event which he swam in the amazing time of 1:11.4. The 
medley relay team also brought their light from under the pro- 
verbial bushel, when O'Shaughnessy, Matt and Dougherty went 
through the 150 yard distance in 1:28.8, only one second more 
than the record. 

The tankers wrecked the displeasure of this defeat upon 
Bradley Tech in their next contest. They downed Bradley by 
the overwhelming score of 36-22. They took the second victory 
of the year against North Central, this time emerging with a 
score of 40-26. In so doing they shattered two tank records. 
Matt now holds the breaststroke record of 1:12.4, and Henning 
of North Central the backstroke record of 1:3.7. Bob Carroll 
came in again with the high point honors by scoring ten. 

The Ramblers were faced with a very heavy week end when 
they journeyed to DePauw and then returned to oppose Kentucky 
the following night. Ebby Corboy stood up best under the 




THE THIRD HIGHEST point man on the 
team, Warren Matt (above) is a breast 
stroke swimmer of unusual ability. A con- 
sistent performer, he has enabled Loyola to 
win many of its meets. 



"BUS" MOORE (below) not only managed 
the team this year but also swam the two 
hundred yard marathon. His endurance in 
this gruelling event has given Lo}'ola several 
first places. 



VARSITY SWIMMING 

strain ami led the onslaught afjainst DcJ'auw which ilch'atcd 
them 46-38. The next night, however, took its toll from the 
Ramblers record for they were not able to turn back Jventucky, 
succumbing 45-21. Ebby Corboy maintained his fast pace and 
came through with the liacksti'oke event in the time of 1:10.1. 
Bob McKeever also performed better than the rest to take the 
200 yard free style event. 

The largest crowd that the Alumni gymnasium has ever 
attracted to a swimming event was present to see the Maroon 
and Gold against Illinois College, defending champions of the 
Little Nineteen Conierence. The entire team rose to the occasion 
and the score 48-26, indicates the calibre of their performance. 
Those who wei'e particularly effective against the downstate 
opponents were Dougherty, Carroll, Matt and Corboy. 

The Loj'ola l^niversity team closed their season with a one- 
sided victory over George Williams. This was the last appearance 
of Max Shapiro and he made it a good one by winning in both 
tree style sprints and then leading the victorious relay team. 
The Loyola swimmers were too well balanced for the opposition; 
they gathered an early lead of over ten points and then built it 
up as the meet progressed. 

Major letters were given to swimmers this year for the first 
time. Those to receive them were: Matt, Shapiro, and Dough- 
erty. The minor letter awards were to Burke, Corboy, McKeever 
and Capt. O'Shaughnessy. Bob Carroll merited numerals. 

THE BEAUTY OF A JACK-KNIFE (upper 
right) is demonstrated by Ray Dougherty, 
Loyola's spectacular diver. Ray has won 
firsts in almost every meet in which he has 
paiticipnted. 

BOB CARROLL (lower right) is one of the 
most unusual swimmers Loyola has had. 
He has amassed eighty-five points for the 
team, winning a place for himself as the 
high point man. 





TENNIS TEAM 





This years tennis team has hopes of bettering its last season record 
of three victories and four defeats. With the capable aggregation of 
players under the coaching of Mr. Ernest V. McClear, S.J., there is no 
reason why this hope should not be fulfilled. Fifteen meets have already 
been scheduled for the six weeks season against some of the best com- 
petition in the country. 

Some of the schools which the team will hold meets with this year 
are North Central College, Armour Tech, Lake Forest, and Beloit. Single 
meets with Kalamazoo, Detroit, Marquette, Wayne, Wheaton, and 
Williams have also been definitely dated. Details of a meet with Notre 
Dame are still pending. 

Coach McClear is building this year's team around the three remaining 
.stars of last year. These men, Hruby, Dubay, and Janik have all seen 
three years of play, and are highly dependable. They were members of 
last year's team, and also saw service on the great squad of 1937. To 
bolster his veteran material. Coach McClear must depend on John Healy, 
senior reserve player and hero of last year's victory over Detroit, Jack 
O'Connor, junior ace, and Roman Siemans, another junior prospect. 
Besides these men, the team will also be supported by ten or twelve 
freshman aspirants of, at present, unknown ability. 

A probable ranking of material on this year's team would be : Dubay, 
Hruby, Janik, Healy, O'Connor or Siemans. 



NORB HRUBY (upper left) manager of the 
team and a four year veteran smashes a drive 
down the Une. 

GENE DUBAY (middle left) tries out his 
Vjackhand in a practice game. He is one of 
the best players that Loyola has had in 
several years. 

ROMAN SIEMANS (lower left) burns a 
fast line (Idwn the court to take another point. 
THE SPIRIT OF FRIENDLY RIVALRY 
(below) is a characteristic of the team as 
they play each other in practice. Bill Janik 
and Jack O'Connor shake hands upon com- 
pletion of a hotly-contested match. 





'*<*^f*te-ti 



GIL JORGENSON (upper right) is captain 
and cdufli of the golf team. 



TOM KOERNER (upper left) gets ready 
for a long drive. The perfecting of form 
on the strokes is requisite to becoming a 
good player. 



BOB LINDSAY (above) demonstrates the 
correct technique of the "follow through." 



This year's golf team, according to all present indications, 
is one of the finest that has appeared within recent years. 
Since the matches are played late in the season, no actual 
playing data is available, but from the quality of the men 
who have appeared for practice, it is safe to predict that 
the team will enjoy a successful season. The competition 
among the newer members of the squad to outshine the 
veterans has fostered and developed a type of golf which will 
bring the team a string of victories. This team has the 
unique distinction of being almost entirely composed of 
underclassmen. 

Captained by Gil Jorgenson, the team opened their 
practice season as soon as weather conditions permitted. 
Gil has also taken over the job of coaching the team, since 
at the present time they are without the services of a pro- 
fessional coach. He has also taken care of arranging the 
schedules, and performing other managerial duties. During 
the time that he does not devote to being the executive 
director of the team, he consistently breaks various course 
records. Under his direction the team has welded itself 
into a unit of almost professional ability. Rather than 
allow the members of the squad to spend all their time 
competing against each other in practise, he prefers that 
they take especial care to become more proficient on the 
various shots. As a consequence, the members are fast 
developing into polished linksmen. 

Some of the outstanding players on this year's team are 
Smith, a Dental student, who has been assigned the position 
of number three man on the team and Limacher, who has 
been assigned number one position for his brilliant practice 
playing. In the first meet of the year, Limacher shot a 
seventy-six, after having gone all winter without any 
practise. 

The reserves on the team are McErney, Lindsay, Wal- 
dron, and Koerner. These men have been showing great 
improvement in their game, and will be called upon to take 
the place of the regulars should any mishap occur. 



ii[ uw niH 




THE INTRAMURAL BOARD is composed of 
O'Shaughnessy, Cornell, Littig, Moore, Gai- 
ner, Conroyd, Kiley, Sheehan, Schiavone, 
Gibbons, DriscoU. 



JACK DRISCOLL piloted the I-M board this 
year through one of its most successful 
seasons. 




Intramural sports play a big part in the student's life at Loyola. 
Varsity competition is reserved for those few who excel in the several 
fields, but the whole school is enabled to take part in the variegated 
intramural program. 

This year, the I-M Board sponsored sixteen tournaments. Through 
the Board's efficient operation the percentage of students taking part 
in intramural activities has been increased from the sixty per cent of 
last year to about eighty-five per cent. This figure is for the Lake Shore 
Campus only however, for the downtown LTniversity College does not 
participate. The Medical and Dental Schools proved active enough 
however, and maintained an extensive and spirited sports program. 
The schedule on the Lake Shore Campus divides the competition into 
the Freshman and Senior Divisions. It also provides for a Sweepstake 
to determine the all around champions of the campus. In line with this 
Sweepstake, a carefully tabulated system of team and individual points 
is maintained. Each man with a high individual score is awarded a 
gold, silver, or bronze medal at the end of the I-M season according to the 
number of points gainered. Each member of the team winning the 
Sweepstake receives a gold medal, and the team name is put on the I-M 
banner in the Lounge. 

The I-M season opened with the golf tournament. Here the Dodgers 
first revealed their power, making a clean sweep. Jim Lindsay's eighty- 
two was good enough to cop a first, but Dodgers Koerner and Wuldron 
were close on his divot marks with eighty-three and eighty-four respec- 
tively. 

The failure of so many of the freshman teams to show up for their 
games almost resulted in the disbandment of the frosh touchball division. 
Three teams infused life into the circuit however, and advanced to the 
round robin playoff. These were the Hoplites, the freshman Greek 




i 



HUHIUyiS 



students, and the Aces and Deuces, former Academj^ men. A surprisingly 
well developed Phi Mu unit swept through the playoff to take first place, 
while the Delts took second, and the Aces and Hoplites tied for third. 
The Phi Mu success \\as due principally to their passing wonder, Johnnie 
Dymek. 

The Delts and Pi Alphs took joint possession of the swimming cham- 
pionship, the Phi Mus taking third, and the Hoplites fourth. The in- 
dividual stars deserving of mention were Bus Moore, the Nesbitt twins, 
Tom Burns, Carroll, Lynch, and Dixon. 

After their failure to count in the water, the Dodgers scored an easy 
win on the cinders in the Fall Relays. A short time later. Dodger Vinny 
Graham won the Turkey Rim, setting a new record, but the Delts won 
with more places. 







In the Channel Swim, the finishing order was Delts, 
Dodgers, and Pi Alphs, and the individual winners 
were Moore, Ed Nesbitt, and Ross Littig. 

This year's basketball tourney featured keen com- 
petition in both senior and freshman divisions. The 
senior circuit championship went to the Dodgers after 
a season-long battle that culminated in a final melee 
that the Dodgers won from the Alpha Delts by a slim 
margin. The Ozarks scored a surprise victory in the 
freshman loop, but lost to the senior champs. The 
night of the I-M Carnival, the Dodgers crushed the 
Hoplites from the Med School, 36-16, for the all- 
university championship. 

The same night, pool and boxing championships 
were decided. In the pool tournament, Kuni reached 
the finals for the third consecutive year, but lost 
this year to Art Zech who came through to win, 100-78, 
after a brilliant rally. The turnout for boxing this 
year was the heaviest in the history of the tournament. 
Keen interest was shown by the student body in all 
the fights. At the time of this writing, the tourney 
is not completed, but the titles already decided went 
to George Kiely, Tim Dillon, and Jack Larsen. 

In the ping-pong finals, Beresky whipped Lask to 
take the trophy awarded this year. Sam Marotta 





rolled 512 to beat Markiewicz, Med School champ, 
in the bowling tourney. 

The tennis tournament, begun early in the school 
year, had to be postponed until spring by reason of 
inclement weather, and the handball tournament was 
put off indefinitely until arrangements could be made 
for its completion. 

Credit for the efficient and active intramural pro- 
gram this year goes to senior manager Jack Driscoll 
and his staff. Junior managers, Marty O'Shaughnessy 
and Bill Gibbons bore most of the load for Driscoll, 
and it was through their efforts that the I-M Carnival 
was so successful this year. The rest of the staff on 
the Lake Shore Campus was comprised of sophomore 
managers Bruce Berens, Bill Garner, Bernie Kiley, 
and Bob Schiavone; freshman managers Jim Byrne, 
Dan Conroyd, Ted Cornell, Ross Littig, and Bill 
Sheahan. Lyle Russell of the Med school, and Max 
Shapiro and Howard Gault of the Dent school made 
up the rest of the board. The entire program was 
under the supervision of Moderator Alex Wilson. 






• ^AV3 



s\c^^ 



.ViB^^*^ 



^^\0^^^ 



. soo' 




\0^^^ 



BOARD OF PUBLICATIONS 



The Board of Publications, 
the guiding hand of all uni- 
versity literary activities, is com- 
posed of the Reverend Eugene 
Shiels, S.J., Dr. Morton D. 
Zabel, Mr. Mark E. Guerin, 
Mr. Julius Kuhinka, and Mr. 
James J. Young. 

It is the duty of this board 
to supervise the three student 
publications, the LOYOLAN, the 
Quarterly, and the News. Dr. 
Zabel, the chairman of the board, 
serves as Moderator of the 
LOYOLAN and also of the 
Quarterly. Mr. Guerin is the 
moderator of the Loyola News. 

One of the accomplishments 
of the Board of Publications was 
the bringing of the Jesuit College 
Newspaper Association convention to Chicago at 
Loyola. This convention was held on the 8th, 9th, 
and 10th of December and marked the high point of 
the journalistic year. Present at this convention were 
representatives of Holy Cross, Spring Hill, Loyola of 
the South, Regis, Rockhurst, John Carroll, Detroit, 
Marquette, St. Louis, Creighton, and Xavier, all 
Jesuit colleges and universities. 

Heading the list of speakers at this meeting were 
Dr. Harry M. Gage, president of Coe College, Dr. 
Edward A. Fitzpatrick, president of Mount Mary 





DR. MORTON D. ZABEL, chairman of the 
Faculty Committee on Student Publications 
and moderator of the Loyolan and the 
Loyola Quarterly. 

Mr. MARK GUERIN, member of the Faculty 
Committee on Student Publications and 
moderator of the Loyola News. 



College, Dean John C. Fitzgerald of the Loyola Law 
School, and the Reverend William J. McGucken, S.J., 
prefect of studies in the Missouri province of the 
Society of Jesus. These speakers stressed particularly 
the Catholic heritage of culture, democracy and the 
Catholic college, the place of the Jesuit College Pub- 
lication in the student world, and the combating of 
subversive propaganda. The convention closed with 
the establishment of the J. C. N. A. press service, the 
purpose of which is to effect closer coordination of 
Jesuit College newspapers. 




THE BANQUET of the Jesuit Colleges 

Newspaper Association was held this year 
at Loyola. This convention was cHmaxed 
l)y the election of Norbert Hruby to the 
position of president of the organization. 




THE LOYOLAN 



CHARLIE O'LAUGHLIN (above) as Editor, 
was responsible for tlie planning, the style, 
and the contents of the '39 LOYOLAX. 
He supervised indirectly the work of all the 
editors, made all contracts, and contacted 
the schools and faculty. It is due to him 
that the book is in its present form. 



Putting out a year-book is a year's job. Plans for 
the 1939 LOYOLAN were begun last June and it is 
the sincere hope of the staff that the book will be in 
the hands of the students by June. In other schools 
the plans may be laid, the contracts may be signed, 
or the layouts designed by faculty members or a 
committee, but the LOYOLAN is strictly a product 
of the student body. 

The pictures for the LOYOLAN this year are the 
finest of any that have ever been taken. Great pres- 
sure was exerted to obtain photographic equipment 
worthy of the demands of the staff, but such equip- 




ment was not forthcoming and 
the staff was again forced to 
rely on what was owned by the 
students themselves. However, 
Rog Slattery in his position as 
managing editor took personal 
supervision of the photography. 
With his extensive experience 
gained last year, Rog has gotten 
photographs that will take many 
years to duplicate. The amount 
of time and effort required to 
take pictures is enormous. From 
the fact that a single picture may 
take hours, carrying the photog- 
rapher to all ends of the city, 
one can see that the total volume 
of work required, when you con- 
sider that there are over 500 
staff pictures appearing in the 
LOYOLAN this year. We point to the nursing school 
section as an example of the work done by Slattery. 

In charge of the copy was Charles Nesbitt, who 
served his fourth year on the staff. It was his duty 
to see that all copy was written in presentable style. 
This required some prodding in order to secure the 
stories originally, and a great deal of effort in rewriting 
these stories so as to brush them up in final form. 
Also the group pictures of the classes of the various 
schools of the university were in Charlie's hands, no 
small task by itself. 

Chief assistant to the editor and general handy- 



ROG SLATTERY (above right) combined jobs 
this year being both managing editor and pho- 
tographer. The lack of grey hairs in the 
editor's head testify to his ability in the 
former position, and the pictures in this 
book are a tribute to his success in the latter. 

CHARLEY NESBITT (left) is happy as 
his job is completed. As copy editor he had 
the task of editing and checking all the copy 
in the book within a two months period. 

EDWARD CROWLEY (extreme right) our 
medical school representative, provided the 
staff with fast accurate service in regai'd to 
all copy and pictures dealing with the school. 
He has the longest record of service on the 
annual having been on the staff for seven 
years. 





man for all occasions was Harold Frey. Handling all duties 
given to him with dispatch, he proved to be one of the most 
valuable men on the staff. Securing identifications, rewriting 
copy, writing captions, and general brush up work all fell to the 
lot of Frey and were quickly disposed of by him. He proved 
especially valuable during the later stages of the production of 
the book, when the fear of comprehensive examinations caused 
the seniors on the staff to limit their activity on the book. 

In charge of the various divisions of the book were the section 
editors. Gene Dubay in his position as Business Manager took 
charge of the activities section, securing pictures and copy on 
the publications, debating, musical organizations, etc. Working 
along with him on this was Bernie Kiley. 

The traternity section, one of the biggest sections in the book 
was edited by Bill Smurdon. This position required Bill to 
remain in contact with every fraternity, and, of course, our one 
sorority, in the university. The task of securing group pictures, 
identifications, members and lists of officers was a large one and 
one very efficiently taken care of by Smurdon. 

The Senior section and the sports section were edited by Jim 
Conway and Warren Matt respectively. The excellence of these 
two sections must be attributed to the efforts ot these men. The 
Clubs section is indebted to Paul Hummert for its final form. 



THE BUSINESS MANAGER (above) 
Gt'iic Dubay, has had the tough assign- 
ment of gathering his material from 
wideh' diversified sources for those 
sections that he was responsible for 
of the business end of the publication. 

BILL SMURDON (below) has con- 
tacted the heads of each fraternity 
more than ten times apiece in order 
to obtain all the details for the fra- 
ternity section. 



PAUL HUMMERT, the club editor, 
fakes a phone call to the head of the 
International Circle. But seriously 
Paul did make a lot of phone calls 
in collecting his pictures and copy, — 
to complete his section. 




THE ATHLETIC EDITOR, Warren 
Matt, and the senior editor, Jim Con- 
way, hold a discussion on the aesthetic 
principle in yearbooks. These men 
have contributed their work toward 
the completion of two of the most 
important sections of the book. 




THE CONCLAVE OF THE PHO- 
TOGRAPHERS, Landgien, Derby and 
Martin contributed no end of pictures 
to the pictorial effect of this book. 



HAROLD FREY AND RAY KEN- 
NEDY here ponder some dubious 
point in tlie copy. Both of these men 
did a httle of everything around the 
office, talking hand at writing, cap- 
tioning pictures, writing letters, and 
assisting the editor in various other 
ways. 




JOHN WALCH is the man responsible 
for those clever, little incidental draw- 
ings which adorn the pages. 



Paul found it his job to write much of the copy and to arrange 
dates for pictures for these organizations, and despite the pressure 
of other duties, fulfilled the assignment with much credit. 

Not to be forgotten are the younger men on the staff, who 
contributed so much to the success of the book. Ed Martin and 
Ed Landgren, our neophite photographers, and Frank Derby, 
our downtown photographer spent many hours fulfilling the 
assignments that fell on their shoulders, and the experience they 
gained this year argues well for the success of future years. Jack 
O'Connor aided greatly in writing sports copy, and Ray Kennedy 
was of great value lending his talents wherever directed. Our 
representatives, Ed Crowley of the Medical School, who has 
completed the remarkable record of seven years' service on the 
LOYOLAN, Jim O'Brien of the Law School, Torrence Heeht, 
S.J., of West Baden, and John Gannon of the University College 
saw to it that their division of the University' was properl.y repre- 
sented. 

Great credit must be given also to John Walch for the orig- 
inality and sophistication which his art work has lent to this 
year's LOYOLAN. 

The staff has labored long and hard in the production of the 
1939 LOYOLAN, and has left no stone unturned to make it 
the best yet. 



THE LOYOLA NEWS 



^^^^ggk^^^E 


i ?^^^ 














P _ "« 








B^^^B 



NORB HRUBY (left) was editor of 
the Xews during the first semester of 
the sihoiil year. The editions that he 
has put out have been notable for 
their originality and constructive spirit. 



TOM SHIELDS (right) is past-editor 
of the news, holding office dui'ing the 
seoond semester of last year. He was 
managing editor this year, and as such, 
has been completely efficient and 
dependable. 



In an editorial contained in the first issue of tlie 
Loyola News for the 1938-1939 academic year it was 
stated that the policy of the News was to be "a 
positive platform aimed to make the student body 
more acutely aware of itself in its virtues and its 
possible shortcomings." Further, it was to be "a 
positive program for the improvement of the student 
body religiously, intellectually, culturally, socially, and 



athletically." Finally, wrote the editor, "to the uni- 
fication of the interests of the schools of Loyola LTni- 
versity, the News editorial staff dedicates itself for 
the coming year." 

With these stated aims before it, the staff of the 
Loyola News under the leadership of Norbert Hruby, 
Arts senior and editor-in-chief, began the business of 
putting out a presentable collegiate news publication 




NEWS EDITOR DAN MURPHY 

drops a few sage words of advice to 
reporters Bud Knoll, and Dick Boland 
on what makes news. The news sec- 
tion is one of the most important parts 
of the paper, and as such it requires 
capable handling. 




FRESHMEN REPORTERS Dickow, Martin, and Donoghue 
see how their stories look in print. 



JOHN GANNON, University College representative gets a httle 
news from the Kenilworth exchange. 



comparable to the issues of former regimes. For the 
first time in recent years the News was not content 
merely to report and to comment on the activities cf 
the University, but also to make some of that news 
itself. A war participation poll was conducted on the 
Arts campus at the time of the Munich crisis; the 
first annual Loyola. University short story competition 
was sponsored by the News; the Jesuit College News- 
paper Association was reorganized directly through the 
work of News men and the News moderator, Mr. 
Mark E. Guerin. 

Of invaluable assistance to Hruby during his regime 
was Thomas Shields, editor-in-chief during the second 
semester last year. His tireless and understanding 
cooperation in his role of managing editor materially 
relieved the editor of many of the customary worries. 
In Richard Garvey, Hruby was blessed with a scholarly, 
yet interesting feature writer. John Walch and John 
Dwyer made the lot of the editor an easier one. The 
four outstanding juniors on the staff, William Gibbons, 
Arthur Kogstad, Martin O'Shaughnessy, and Daniel 
Murphy left little to be desired in their respective 
departments; Gibbons succeeded O'Shaughnessy as the 
sports editor midway in the first semester. Kogstad 
copy editor, combined his with Jim Cutler's meta- 
physical wit to present a happy alloy to the readers 
of "Ho-Hum." John Lyons' "Skimming the Cream" 
illustrated the high degree of excellence to which a 
collegiate drama critic can raise his art. Dan Mur- 
phy's skillful and unquestionably fair treatment of 
fraternity news on the fraternity page more than 



justified the wisdom of his appointment to the post. 
The off-campus representatives of the News, those 
vitally important in making the News an all-Uni- 
versity activity, were extraordinarily faithiul in the 
performance of their duties ; their names, John Condon, 
Edmund Sinnott, Charles Strubbe, Martin Svaglic, 
Max Shapiro, Alice Kies, and John Gannon. 



JOHN DEVANEY, who now holds the position of news editor 
evidentlv likes his own stories. 





THE NEWS GOES 



ART KOGSTAD, newly appointed managing 
editor, looks up a little back information in 
the files to complete a story. 



& i\ 



\ 




ED NESBITT (above) is either looking f 
inspiration to complete his story, or thinki 
about last night. 



THE NEWS (left) has gone to press, 
Bill Gibbons, the new editor, is very hap] 
about the whole thing. 



PRESS 



MARTY O'SHAUGHNESSY, lust semeHtor's 
sports editor, cons his incinory for unusual 
details for his popular column, "Marty at 
the Mike." 



GARVEY AND DWYER as rewrite men and 
members of the editorial lioard took care to 
see that the literary (juality of the paper 
was on a consistently high level. 




JOHNNY WALCH, associate editor makes 
a suggestion to the assistant news editor, 
Bob Graham. These two men have also 
contributed their time and talents to main- 
tain the newspaper's high level of interest. 



William Gibbons succeeded Hruby as editor in 
February, and Arthur Kogstad followed Thomas 
Shields as managing editor. Gibbons appointed the 
following staff for his tenure which is to last until 
February, 1940; executive editors, O'Shaughnessy and 
Murphy; news editor, John Devaney; business man- 
ager, Richard Boland; sports editor, Robert Wallace; 
fraternity editor, Frank Ivnoll; copy editor, James 
Cutler; circulation manager, Timothy Dillon. 

Gibbons is the first editor of the News for a full 
year since the regime of Frank Hausmann in 1935- 
1936. In a few month's time he has already displayed 
remarkable editorial capabilities. 






EDITOR OF THE QUARTER- 
LY is John Lyons, one of the 
most outstanding writers and 
students of English in the Uni- 
versity. Through his efforts the 
quaUty of the publication has 
been kept on a consistently 
high level. 



THE LOYOLA 



The Loyola Quarterly, now in its .36th year, is the literary 
publication of the University, and as such, provides an oppor- 
tunity to the student body and the faculty for the expression of 
their ideas and the cultivation of literary talent. During its 
life it has built a reputation for quality and intellectual maturity, 
and this year the editors, John Lyons, Arts junior, editor-in- 
chief, and John Walch, Arts senior, inaiiafiiufi editor, have kept 
up the traditionally high standards of the magazine. In addition 
they have tried to broaden the field of interest and to present 
material of a lighter nature than that which had it carried inthe 
years immediately previous. 

This year's Quarterly was an interesting and stimulating 
magazine of which any college might well be proud. Each issue 
carried one article by a faculty member, and numerous short 
stories and poems appeared. Several new writers of exceptional 
talent were presented to the student body, including Robert 
Welter Daly, Earle R. Steinmetz, and Leo Parenti of the Uni- 
versity College, and Francis Goessling, Harold J. Frey, and 
Thomas Fenlon of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

One of the unusual features of this year's Quarterly" was 
the Short Story contest which was sponsored by the Loyola 
News. The Winter issue carried the two prize winning stories, 
"Vae Victis", by Robert Daly, and "Ten Years From Now", 
by John Walch. Both stories were of outstanding quality, and 
plans have been made to conduct the short story contest as a 
yearly feature of both the Quarterly and the News. 

Another interesting feature this year was the revival of the 
Coffee House, a department for lighter material, which had been 
popular in the Quarterly a number of years ago, but which 
had beendropped. This department featured personal essays, 
parodies, poetry, and articles of a less serious nature than 
those in the body of the magazine. 




THESE MEN OF THE STAFF 

have contributed their time and 
talents to make the Quarterly 
a success. Xorbert Hruby, 
Arthur Kogstad, James Cutler, 
and Uichard Garvey have been 
rcspdusible for many of the 
contributions appearing in this 
year's issues. 



QUARTERLY 



Poetry, too, had a revival this year, hiohhghtcd by two long 
poems, "Tragedy in Rhythm", by Norbert Hruby, Arts senior, 
a study of the mechanistic evils of our age which appeared in the 
Winter issue, and "Cassandra", by John Lyons, which appeared 
in the Spring issue. Numerous shorter poems by Thomas Fenlon, 
James Cutler, Leo Parenti, and others appeared during the course 
of the year. In line with the editors' policy of presenting the 
creative work of the students, this renascence of the poetic spirit 
among Loyola writers was most significant. 

Another change was that of the "Editor's Foreword", which 
took the place of the "Contributor's Page." The old page carried 
the names of the individual contributors and an enumeration of 
their distinctions, memberships in clubs, etc. to further identify 
them. The new page, written by John Lyons, is a synopsis of 
the issue — mention of the articles and brief comment upon them . 

Each issue carried articles on topics of interest to the student 
body. Arthur Kogstad, Arts junior, published a series of illumin- 
ating on radio in education, and Louis C. Baldwin contributed 
several articles on topics ranging from the European crisis of 
last January to the value of modern advertising. Richard Garvey, 
Arts senior, in several articles commented penetratingly on the 
problems that confront the young college student of to-day, from 
the problem of the next war to a discussion of the place of college 
education in democratic America today. 

The Art and Music section, under the direction of John Walch 
carried a number of interesting discussions, notably those of 
Mr. Walch himself and of Earle Steinmetz. The Book Shelf 
under the direction of James Cutler kept the student body abreast 
of the latest developments on the literary scene. 




MANAGING EDITOR, .John 
Walch is one of the most ver- 
satile members of the staff. 
Equally at home in the fields 
of the short story, literary and 
musical criticism, art work, and 
poetry, he has helped keep up 
the publication to its high stand- 
ards. 



ARTHUR KOGSTAD (below) 
has been a very prolific con- 
tributor to the Quarterly for 
several years. This year he 
wrote a series of articles dealing 
with the role of radio in educa- 
tion which have been extremely 
interesting and informative. 



RICHARD GARVEY (left) has 
contributed many timely and 
interesting articles on the prob- 
lems of the American college 
student. His informal and 
charming essays have been one 
of the features of the "Coffee 
House" section. 





EDWARD MARCINIAK, President of the 
Lake Shiire Sodality. 



First Row — Mareiniak, Homan, McCourt, 

Burns, Granhold, Verhulst, McMahon, 

Gallagher, .Jasiel. 
Second Row — White, Lyons, Barth, Zur, 

Shields, Marotta, Chambers, Hummert. 
Rear Row — T. Kennedy, Deyaney, Sweeney, 

Felten, Dwyer, Finley, Enright, Durkee. 



SODALITY OF 



In the activities of the true Catholic, religion will play the 
most important role. In the Catholic college and university, the 
function of the Sodality of Our Lady is to make religion play the 
primary part in the life of every student and to provide the world 
with leaders once college days are over. With this end in mind, 
Mr. John A. Kemp, S.J. took over the direction of the .sodality. 
To Edward A. Mareiniak, president of Cisca went the office of 
president. Harry Homan succeeded to the office of vice-president, 
and John Felten became secretary. 

The work of the Eucharistic Committee was entrusted to 
Frank Knoll. The Friday morning mass, the retreat, the daily 
devotions to the Blessed Virgin Mary during the month of May, 
the practice of more frequent visits to the chapel were all part 
of the program of the Eucharistic Committee. 

John Dwyer was in charge of the Social Action Committee. 
Under his leadership, the Sodality sponsored a series of inter- 
class football games for the Thanksgiving basket funds, proceeds 
of which went to provide baskets for families in some of the 
poorer parishes of Chicago. Later in the year, the Social Action 
Committee issued a series of leaflets on the "Living Wage" and 
other correlated subjects. 

To Paul Hummert was given the chairmanship of the Apostolic 
Committee. An old clothes drive was held which brought hun- 
dreds of pounds of clothing for the Indian Missions. Under the 
direction of Mr. Ernest V. McClear, S.J. the Apostolic Committee 
worked to aid the missions in Patna, Indiana and many of the 
poorer parishes in Chicago by the sale of Christmas seals. 

The chairmanship of the Literature Committee was entrusted 
to Thomas Shields. The work of providing speakers for assemblies 




OUR LADY 




Front Row — Catharine Schneider, Delphine Healey, Margaret Huesing, Mary Fitzsimmons, Ehzabeth Heil. 
Rear Row — Helen Hanley, Mary Widmann, Mrs. Helen L. May, Mary Meyer, Virginia Gleason, Marie ShitTer, 
Loretto Figg, Mary Breen. 



and sodality meetings was done by this committee. Through 
the sodality pamphlet rack, students were furnished with the 
best in the way of pamphlets and magazines at cost. The best 
in contemporary Catholic thought was thus put into the reach 
of every student. In this work, Shields was assisted by Joseph 
McNeela. The committee cooperated with Cisca in putting out 
weekly bulletins and the Cisca page in the New" World. 

The climax of the Sodality's activity was climaxed on February 
26th when the Loyola sodality was host to hundreds of college 
students and alumni of Chicago's colleges in the third of Cisca's 
college forums. With Edward Marciniak as chairman, Thomas 
Shields, John Felten, and William Bryar presented papers and 
led a discussion on the topic "We Face the World." The enter- 
tainment committee for this affair was headed by Thomas Burns 
and Charles Jasiel. 

The Delia Strada Sodality is a group of Catholic women 
attending the University College division of the University. 
These women have banded themselves together into a sodality, 
under the moderatorship of the Reverend Thomas A. Egan, S.J. 
They hold a yearly retreat in which all members participate. 
Under the presidency of Delphine Healy they hold several benefit 
parties for the underprivileged children of several Catholic 
parishes in Chicago. They hold weekly group meetings and 
discussions and arrange for occasional Catholic guests peakers. 

The Sodality of West Baden College is a training camp for 
future Sodality leaders and moderators. It drills the Jesuit 
Scholastic in manipulating the mechanism and technique of 
Sodality organizations so that he in turn may lead high school 
and college men and women to the imitation of Christ through 
a devotion to Mary. 

This year the Sodality has been composed of five committees 



MISS DELPHINE HEALY, President of the 
University College Sodality. 





IN A SOLEMN CEREMONY, 

the schdlas^tics at West Baden 
College are inducted into the 
Sodality. 



MR. FELIX P. BIESTEK, S.J., 

President of the West Baden 
College Sodality. 




which met every Monday evening. The Socio-economic com- 
mittee, under the direction of Mr. John P. Dolan, S.J., studied 
the Corporative states, Cooperatives and Communism. The 
Literature Guild, directed by Mr. Edmund J. Montville, S.J., 
made an intensive study of CathoHc drama. Mr. Ignatius W. 
Colhns, S.J. coached the Fourth Estate in a critical analysis of 
propaganda: communistic, fascistic, and Spanish. The Evi- 
dence Guild, with Mr. Anthony J. Peterman, S.J. as chairman, 
studied the methods of street-preaching, the popular exposition 
of Catholic dogma, and the effective refutation of anti-Catholic 
bias. Finallj^, Mr. John J. McKechnej^ S.J. was the leader of 
the Mission Committee which studied the life, problems and 
progress of home and foreign missionaries. 

The most noteworthy contribution of the West Baden College 
to the progress of Sodality work is the development of the "general 
meeting." Each committee undertakes one such "general meet- 
ing" during the year. Its purpose is to acquaint the entire 
Sodality with the work of each committee, to unify the efforts 
of the individual committees and to add variety to the year's 
program. 

Besides the regular weekly and the "general meetings" 
spiritual academies in honor of the Blessed Virgin were held on 
a few of Our Lady's feast days. The reading of a paper about the 
Blessed Virgin, the recitation of the Rosary, and the singing of 
hymns constituted the program. 

Seen thus in its various aspects on the different campuses 
of Loyola University, the remarkable unity and cohesion running 
through the Sodality organization is at once apparent. The 
measure of the success of the Sodality is in the intensity of Catholic 
life as manifested on the campus and later. That is the ultimate 
criteria. 



LOYOLA MUSICIANS 



The musical organizations at Loyola University have a three 
fold aim. They are designed to provide a cultural phase to 
education, to cultivate the students' tastes, and to develop their 
abilities upon musical lines. As a natural concommitant of this 
purpose these groups present to both the student body and to 
other selected groups the results of their endeavors. 

The musical groups of the university are the Lake Shore 
Campus Glee Club, the University College Women's Choir, and 
the orchestra. Upon occasion, the Glee Club and the Women's 
Choir unite to form the Choral Society. Both vocal groups are 
under the direction of Mr. Graciano Salvador, assistant professor 
of modern languages, while Mario Salvador, Arts Junior, directs 
the orchestra. 

The organizations have maintained three of their traditional 
services to the school. This group has sung at the student High 
Masses, has led the school songs at student assemblies, and has 
contributed their services upon special occasions. They have 
entertained this year at the Honors Convocation, at the Mothers' 
Club Card parties and at other gatherings. 

As an added feature this year, the Choral Society has con- 
tributed their services to various Catholic Churches throughout 
the city. On the fourth Sunday of Lent, it sang at Holy Family 
and at St. Andrew's Churches. Later on during Lent, it accom- 
panied the services at Notre Dame Church. 




MR. GRACIANO SALVADOR, 

director of the Glee Club and 
Women's Choir. 



Front Row, Manghera, Basso, 
Floros, Cramer, Peters, A. Bas- 
so, Milozzo, Kramer, Junio; 
second row, Coleman, Master- 
son, DriscoU, Shulzen, Milazzo; 
third row, Johnson, Viglione, 
Duffy, Gallagher, Essig, Citro, 
Lebinsky, McCourt, Powers, 
Kawula, O'Connor; rear row, 
Conway, Powers, Mohr, Grey, 
Nelson, Murphy, Zelsman, Ka- 
leta, Graham, Smurdon, Mar- 





ORCHESTRA • • CHOIR 



MARIO SALVADOR, organist extra- 
iiriliii:iiv, has had tlie difficult task 
tliis year of directing the orchestra. 
Widely known as a musician, he gives 
to the members the benefits of his 
experience. 




Front row, Oliver, Krzeminski, Kel- 
leher, Boisdeau, Trunk, Scully; second 
row, Weinstein, McCourt, Barth, 
Brown, Murphy, Jasiel; back to cam- 
era, Mr. Salvador. 




THE CHOIR sings the Kyrie at the 
student Mass, as Murphy and Grey 
blend their voices in this beautiful 
melody. 



Some of the outstanding singers in this year's 
organization are Walter Kawula, Claytus Nelson, Bob 
Graham, and Francis McCall. 

The eighteen-piece orchestra of the University is a 
capable group of musicians. They have not as yet 
given any recitals to display tlieir ability, but their 
reputation is such that the student body are certain 
that the entertainment they contribute will be of the 
highest quality. This C(uality may be judged from 
the fact that many of the members are of professional 
status. 

Charles Jasiel and his trombone have completed 
four years of service with the Loyola orchestra. He 
has been one of the mainstays and dependable members 
of this organization. Harold Weinstein, a freshman 
this year, has demonstrated his versatility on both the 
clarinet and the saxophone. In string music, the 
orchestra has exceptional talent in Frank Oliver, 
Bruno Krzeminski, and John Pierondozzi. 

The officers of the Glee Club have been changed 



GLEE CLUB • • CHORDS 




The Women's Choral Group at University 

College 

First row, .lunio, Kramer, O'Lenich, Coens, 

Basso, Mr. Salvador; second row, Sill, Moore, 

Floros, Slingo, Basso; rear row, Peters, 

Manghera, Cramer, Coleman. 



during the course of the year. Peter Conway has 
been succeeded by Claytus Nelson as President; 
Bob Reilly has also resigned as secretary, while Edgar 
Zelsman, Walter Kawula, and Norbert Essig have 
been elected vice-president, secretary, and treasurer, 
respectively. These new officers are planning to 
resume the program formerly offered by the Glee 
Club, and intend to sponsor several popular concerts 
before the completion of this year. 

Their singing at the student Masses during the 



year has been a means of carrying on one of the most 
inspiring and elevating traditions at Loyola. They 
have made the student body more cognizant of the 
beauty and power of music and of the solemnity 
and devotion of the Mass. This one thing alone would 
serve as a raison d'etre for their existence. 

A vote of thanks is due Mr. Graciano Salvador 
for his capable and artistic direction of the musical 
organizations during the past year. He has kept 
the tradition of good music alive at Loyola. 



"FOLLOW ME" says tenor 
Claytus Nelson, and each singer 
doe.s. Each public performance 
requires many hours of such 
long and careful practice. 





[ CUIIilH 



AS DIRECTOR oi the Curtain Guild, 
Mr. Bertram Walker is in charge of 
producing the yearly plays. This year 
he has been capably assisted by Charles 
Nesbitt, president of the Curtain 
Guild, and manager of the production 
staff. 



Dramatic productions at Loyola are in the hands of the 
Curtain Guild, an organization composed of students interested 
in the theater. The director of the guild is Mr. Bert G. Walker; 
the Reverend James V. Kelly, S.J., Assistant Dean of the College 
of Arts and Sciences, is the facidty moderator. Ordinarily the 
Curtain Guild stages two full-length plays annually before the 
students and their friends. 

This year, however, was exceptional in that the Curtain 
Guild was able to give only one play. On April 14 it presented 
Sinclair Lewis' "It Can't Happen Here" to a capacity house of 
over 900 people in the Loyola Community Theater. The play 
was staged and directed by Mr. Walker. 

The cast for the play was headed by Paul Sylvester, Arts 
senior and Curtain Guild veteran, who took the role of Doremus 
Jessup, the newspaper editor. His daughter, Mary, was played 
by Agnes Marie Stroth of the L^niversity College. Rosemary 
Brandstrader, also of the University College, filled the role of 
Lorinda Pike, spinster society editor of Jessup's paper. Par- 
ticularily noteworthy was the job of acting was done by James 
Marzano, Arts sophomore and newcomer to the Curtain Guild, 
in the role of Shad Ledue, henchman of the dictatorship party. 
Charles Flynn, Arts sophomore, gave an exceptional performance 
as Effingham Swan, local commissioner for the dictator. The 
part of Julian Flzck, disappointed college graduate, was handled 
by John Devaney, Arts junior. 

Others in the cast were Gordon Murphy, Arts Freshman, and 
Betty Stroth of the University College as Mr. and Mrs. Veeder; 
Orrin Wheeler, Arts Freshman; Ray Kennedy, Arts Freshmen, 

JACK MURNIGHAN, PAUL SYLVESTER, AND GERARD 
GALANTE take a few minutes off before preparing themselves 
for going on stage. 

REHEARSAL, as demonstrated by Orrin Wheeler, Ray Ken- 
nedy, Betty Stroth, and Gordon Murphy, must be held for 
many weeks before the play is ready to be produced. 




as Nickcrson: Charles Sossong, Arts Junior,' as Fowler 
Greenhill; Gerard Galante, Arts sophomore, as Tas- 
brough; Edward Nesbitt, Arts senior, as Dan Wilgus; 
Jack Clifford, Arts Freshman, as Dimmick; and Nor- 
bert Essig and Greg White, Arts Freshman and 
Sophomore, as corpo officers. Smallest actor in the 
play, and certainly one of the best, was Jackie Hal- 
ligan, sixth grade student in St. Ignatius school, who 
gave a remarkable performance in the role of Davy, 
ten year old grandson of Jessup. 

Heading the production staff for the play was 
Charles Nesbitt, Arts Senior and president of the 
Guild. Tickets and business were entrusted to William 
Gibbons, Arts Junior and business manager. Assisting 
Gibbons were Roger Sajre, Arts Junior, and Bob 
Bremer and Mike Esposito, Arts Sophomores. No 
small share of the details was handled by Rosemary 
Brandstrader in her office of secretary-treasurer. The 
stage work was in charge of Roger Slattery, Arts 
Senior. Others on the stage crew were Charles 
Schaeffer, Paul Hummert, Jack Mohr, Jack Mur- 
nighan, and Bob Esser. Thomas Burns, Arts Senior 
and vice-president, was chairman of the play-selection 
commitl^ce. 




THE SAYING '■ItV hunl Lines" was certainly not orig- 
inati'il liy this hajipy finiup of actor-s. Charles Flynn, 
Charles SossiinK, Agnes Marie Stroth, and Paul Sylvester 
find memorizing their lines an almost agreeable task. 




"HOW DOES IT SOUND TO THE AUDIENCE?" 

is the que.stion this group of the cast is trying to 
answer. Gordon Murphy, Agnes Marie Stroth, Betty 
Stroth, Paul Sylvester, Rosemary Brandstrader, and 
Charles Nesbitt watch their fellow actors perform. 



BACKSTAGE DIRECTIONS are laid down by Rog Slattery, 
as Charles Nesbitt keeps pace with the technicalities of lighting 
and properties as shown in the script. The technical details 
are tremendously important to the success of any production. 



nn 




This year the Varsity Debating Team has enjoyed 
a very successful season under the capable direction 
of Mr. Fred L. Brandstrader, the moderator of this 
organization. This activity has considerable popular- 
ity among the upper classmen since it provides un- 
usually good training in public speaking and extempore 
thinking. This year the society debated the timely 
question — "Resolved: that the United States should 
cease to use public funds for the stimulation of busi- 
ness." The opportunities and ramifications surround- 
ing this question are obviously numerous, and as 
such, it provided an excellent topic for debate. 

Beginning in early November, the society engaged 
in a number of intercollegiate debates with the various 
colleges in and about Chicago. All this was, however, 
only preparation for the regular debate season that 
began after the Christmas holidays. At this time 
the varsity squad began to compete in the regular 
college debate cycle. 

After the semester examinations, teams from repre- 
sentative colleges and universities of the United 
States visited Loyola and met members of the club 
in debates before the student body. Four states were 
represented in this section of the debating season. 
Ohio sent a debate squad from Xavier University; 
Michigan had Western State Teachers College; Iowa 
was represented by St. Ambrose College, and Texas 
by Anderson College. 



JOHN WALCH AND ART KOGSTAD pay 

rlose attention to their opponent's arguments 
in order to prepare successful rebuttals. 




MR. FRED L. BRANDSTRADER, moder- 
ator of the Varsity Debating Squad. 

During February, the squad sent two teams to the 
St. Thomas Tournament in St. Paul, where both 
teams made good records. Although they were both 
eliminated in the semi-finals they had already avenged 
themselves upon St. Thomas, who had beaten them 
earlier in the season. 

At this regional Pi Kappa Delta tournament, 
Loyola met and defeated some of the best teams in 
the northwest before being themselves eliminated. 
It is noteworthy that all the judges who witnessed the 
Loyola debaters in action remarked upon the quality 
of their debating. 

While these men were in the northwest, the men 
at Loyola met the team from Niagara College of New 
York State and split a dual decision. At the same 
time, Loyola vanquished a squad from the southern 
college, William and Mary. 

Early in March, the debaters met the visitors from 
Gonzaga of Spokane, Washington, representing the 
Pacific northwest, and won a decision from them. 
They again defeated the team from the L^niversity 
of Dayton. Loyola also held a no-decision debate 
with the University of Detroit, and a roimd table 
discussion with Erskine College. 

After the Easter week end, the team sent two men 
on a tour of the eastern states, meeting such schools 
as Marquette, Mount Saint Mary's, Detroit, John 
Carroll, Xavier, University of Akron, Dayton, and 
St. Louis, this last being a radio debate. 



[8 




PETER CONWAY, President of the Varsity 
Debating Team. 



In addition to the regular program, the debaters 
gave a number of exhibition debates before such 
audiences as the Knights of Columbus, the various 
Holy Name Societies, and the South Side Catholic 
Women's Club. Each exhibition brought requests for 
return debates and new audiences. As a result these 
debates were continued until the end of the school 
year. 

The regular debate season ended with a second 
round of debates with the schools in Chicagoland, 



namely, Mundelein, DePaul, Rosary, Chicago, North- 
western and John Marshall Law School. 

This year has seen a return to a high quality of 
debating. Under the leadership of Peter Conway, 
John Naghten Debate Winner in 1938, the team has 
had a highly successful season, winning a large per- 
centage of their scheduled debates. With other 
members on the squad such as Ed Marciniak, Tom 
Burns, Richard Garvey, and Tom Shields, as senior 
members, it can be easily seen why such a record was 
hung up. 

A large amount of credit must be given to the 
junior members of the squad who in their first year 
of varsity debating have shown such promise and 
capability. They are to be highly commended for 
their interest and enthusiasm in this activity. 

A new feature in varsity debating this year was 
the announcement by Mr. Brandstrader that those 
sophomore members of the Cudahy Forum who show 
considerable ability would be put on the varsity 
debate squad in order to give them collegiate com- 
petition and make them more experienced debaters in 
their suoceechng two years. Consequently, about six 
sophomores have performed faithfully in some of the 
home debates gaining both experience for themselves 
and victories for the team. 

Great credit must be given to Mr. Brandstrader 
for his capable coaching and handling of this year's 
team. A debater of considerable experience himself, 
he has turned out a squad of men who are able to 
hold their own with almost any school in the country. 
The record of the past season demonstrates the truth 
of this seemingly broad statement. It will not detract 
from the credit that these men on the team are entitled 
to, if Mr. Brandstrader is allotted his full share of 
responsibility in the team's record. 

By being also moderator of the Cudahy Forum, 
he is able to keep a close watch on good debating 
material, and to promote them to varsity debating 
as soon as their talents mature. This close consolida- 
tion of the two squads bodes well for the future of 
debating at Loyola. 



ft 



r^ 






Front row, Hosna. Marciniak. 
Garvey, Conway, Shields, 
Burns; second row, Brandstra- 
der, Walch, Knoll, Graham, 
Galante, O'Shaughnessy; rear 
row, Devaney, Gallagher, Wien- 
ko, Dillon, Worchol, Kogstad. 






Wirf ■ ff 




TIM DILLON AND JOE GALLAGHER 

make final arrangements before opening the 
debate. 



LISTENING TO THE OPPO- 
SITION and gathering material 
for a rebuttal engrosses the 
attention of Tom Burns, while 
John Walch thinks of an appro- 
priate method of stating his 
next point'. 



MARTY O'SHAUGHNESSY delivers a 

scathing rebuttal, without, however, seem- 
ingly disconcerting his opponents . 



ii[ imu \n 



The Cudaliy Forum is tho .iuuior (lebatins society 
of Loyola. Its function is to train freshmen and 
sophomoies of the Lake Shore Campus for future 
varsity competition. 

This year, the moderator, Mr. Fred Brandstrader, 
instructor in speech, and the chaii'man, Francis 
McGarr, Arts Freshman and Harrison Oratoi'ical 
Contest winner, led the group through a particularly 
full and successful season. The question debated 
was the collegiate debate question of the year, "Re- 
solved: The United States should cease using public 
funds for the stimulation of business." 

The Forum's greatest achievement was the record 
they established at the Manchester tournament in 
Huntington, Indiana. In the senior division, in 
which in previous years Loyola was represented by 
varsity debaters, an affirmative team composed of 
McGarr and Hayden won five and lost one, and Robert 
Shanahan and William Ryan, defending the negative, 
made a record oi three and three. In the junior 
division, the affirmative team of William Bryar and 
Edward Riordan won three while losing two, and 
the negative team of Daniel Dickow and Charles 
Ewerts won two out of four. 

The Forum this year began the practice of giving 
exhibition debates before Chicago high schools and 
parishes. Debates were given at Notre Dame High 
School, St. Joseph's and Anne's parish, and St. Fer- 
dinand's parish. McGarr and Hayden journeyed to 
Milwaukee to debate the junior debating society of 
Marquette University. In the Chicago tournament 
held at Northwestern University, the Forum entered 
two teams composed of McGarr and Hayden, and 
Ryan and Edward Corboy. 



MR. FRED L. 
BRANDSTRADER 

Mcxlcrutor (if tlic 
C'uduhv Fonim. 




TIMOTHY DIL- 
LON, President of 
the Cudahy Forum. 



'^IS^v-^ 




First row: Hayden, Guskay, Dillon, 
Mr. Brandstrader, McGarr, Cliford, 
Shanahan. 

Second row: Ryan, Riordan, Bac- 
havz, Galante, Worohol, Doyle. 

Rear row: Ewerts, Bryar, Donohue, 
Smurdon, Schlottman, Fox. 





FRANK McGARR, winner (if the Har- 
lUon Oratoriciil Contest, receives the 
congratulations of Mr. Garrett Rich- 
ard, judge of the speeches. 

WILLIAM RYAN, wins the debating 
award founded iiy John Naghten. 
Mr. Waldron, one of the judges of 
the debate, extends his congratula- 
tions. 



$p[[cniHi[is 




The Harrison Oratorical Contest has been a tra- 
dition at Loyola since 1901 when it was established 
by the Honorable Carter H. Harrison, then mayor 
of Chicago. The winner is given a gold key and is 
declared the official orator of the Lake Shore Campus 
student body. 

This year an Arts Freshman, Francis McGarr, won 
the contest. The general topic was, "What is Wrong 
with the Modern World?" Other finalists were 
Gerard Galante, Edward Marciniak, Charles Nesbitt, 
and James Oi'phan. 

The contest was judged by Mr. Garret Richard, 
M.A., superintendent of Lafayette High School. The 
speakers were judged on choice of topic, selection and 
organization of material, oratorical style, adaptation 
of subjection to audience, expression, voice, and 
diction. 

A great deal of earlier experience both forensic and 
dramatic compensated for any disadvantage McGarr 
may have had because of his youth. At St. Ignatius 
High School, he was a member of the debating society, 
winner of the elocution contest and winner of the 
symposium on St. Thomas Aquinas. At present he 
is manager of the Cudahy Forum. The particular 
subject of McGarr's speech was "Government by the 
People." 

Each contestant was obliged to submit his speech 
before the preliminary round to Mr. James J. Young, 
assistant professor of English, and chairman of the 
contest. A careful method of selection was used to 
insure that the speeches be worthy of the high calibre 
of previous years' competition. 



The Loyola debaters annually participate in the 
John Naghten Debate; this competition was begun 
thirty-eight years ago to stimulate interest in debating, 
and to determine the forensic champion of the Uni- 
versity. 

This year's event was won by William Rj^an, Arts 
Freshman and member of the Cudahy Forum. In 
second place, one point behind the winner, was Frank 
McGarr, another Arts Freshman and member of the 
Cudahy Forum, and winner of the Harrison Oratorical 
Contest. Edward Corboy, Arts Sophomore, merited 
third place, while Carl Haj^den placed fourth. 

The decision was rendered by three members of 
the facult}^ of the Law School, Mr. John Waldron, 
Mr. James Howell, and Mr. John Hayes. In choosing 
the winning team, they unanimously gave the decision 
to the negative, composed of Ryan and Corboy. The 
question was, "Resolved: That the LTnited States 
cease using public funds for the stimulation of busi- 
ness." Mr. Waldron, who reported the decision, 
participated in the competition eleven years ago. The 
main considerations in determining the winners were 
eloquence of delivery and ability to answer arguments 
in the rebuttals. 

Mr. Fred L. Brandstrader, instructor in speech 
and director of debating, was chairman of this event. 
The preliminary round is open to all students. The 
contestants choose their own side of the question and 
the chairman selects the four best speakers. The 
toss of a coin decides which side each of the four will 
take in the finals. 



BOB WEST, King of the Prom, and 
he's worrying about tlie vagaries of 
his butterfly tie. 




NOW A HELPING HAND uith 
miladv ■- uia]), and then 

THEY'RE OFF lor the Prgu 




OFF IN A CORNER, the Kiim nnd (Jiiepii <h\u<-r in nwil style. 




m^'P"'^ 




YEP, THEY'RE JITTERBUGS. 

(Mundelein {'alls them music majors.) 



OH, LANDLORD Hll tliat t\imu\ii 
bowL 




SOPIIMIi[ COIIiilOl 




NOBODY TRUSTS tli( 
ticket sellei's. 




THE SKIPPER cracks; somebody en- 
joys it. 



IT'S THE DELT frolic. Is everybody 
happy? 





THE CLIVEDEN SET at the Millikan game. 



IT'S NICE to have an extra one. 





A FUGITIVE from thu BaibtT of 
Seville. 



THE PRE-MEDS celebnite at the 
Juninr Prom. 





Couches were made foi' two. 


They haven't even 








What price 


Number Please! 


learned to walk. 








publicity. 




We could use 
more of these. 




Clearing the way 
for knowledge. 


The show hasn't 


Titration 


Lone night 








changed in years. 


Beautiful and a technique. 












nurse. 




Now for 






Ain't them 


Horace isn't 


What's the 


the beer 






inventions 


Philosophical Juvenal; he's 


contraption. 


or bier. 






swell? 


complacency. grown up 
















Posed. 








Happy daze. 

The queen and her 
court. 

Class of '94. 

A little more quiet. 



None of 
that. 



"When I was in 
Spain, Franco ..." 

The Wake come's to Loyola. 



Four sweet little 
frosh 



So-o-o long. 



Good Morning. 



Must have been 
a dime. 



Could be from 
Lovola. 



" I love a Parade." 



Don't crv. 



'Yes, father!' 



A sociology 
major — no 
books!!! 

Nice, eh, John? 




Ijft em (Hit pleuse. 
Big Mickey is hot again. 
And it isn't even Saturday. 

Don't be scared boys. 



Any old clothes — shoes??? 
First prize in the tango contest Baldheaded Row. 

(Adv.) What is it — soccer? 

I eat Wheaties. Nutzi storm troopers. 




Only one Bob? Friday Sunday — The girls didn't have anything 
else to do. 

She has I bet he's doing I didn't know you 
our number. it backwards. could write George. 




Posed students Working through 
(Howelsc?) College. 

Working on the news. 
The boys on the retreat. 


Wasting film. 

"And thirtiethly ..." 
It's a conspiracy. 




Set a word Just a "salt" 
in edgewise. from the 
"Cellar." 




He's not a bit nervous. Water pfptt. 


One of the Dead End Kids. 




. . And then Little Red Riding Hood . . " 




Now I have tu Quit shoveling. 
chase it. 

Will some one give the lady a seat. 




Thaf 


s what you think. 

Keep in the parade 


■'I flunked Courtney hasn't 
too." a chance. 






Yes, your picture 
came out. 


Sociology Lab. Put 


a 


nickle 


in it. 


"My father told me . . . Oh, Al V 


ou 


great 


wonderful track coach 



Thar's fire in them thar eyes. 
Hold tight. 



Send ten cents 
and one wrapper. 



Paul, put out 
that smoke. 



It's the shadow. 
Must be through for the week. 




Keep a light for me in the window. 
How to make Fox-de-luxe. 
Last minute questioning. 
Somebody's in bad company 
North-bound car of south-bound "L" 



Every "dog" has his three days, 
being initiated., 

Who's been eating onions? 

I didn't know, so I took out the ap- 
pendix. 

The parade began at Union Station. 

Just inquire for Esquire. 

( 'orridor gossipers. 



Some students read signs. 
Them's dangerous curves, Sammy. 
Other students don't read signs. 
Fanc.v meeting you in class. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENT 



This being the last copy to bo written for the Loyolan, being written in the offices of 
the Rogers Printing Company in Dixon, Illinois, the great task of compiling the 1939 
Loyolan is at last done. 

This has been a great year at Loyola. Our Basketball team was the finest ever to 
represent Loyola; our track team is achieving heights hitherto unknown to Loyola track 
teams; our swimming team, in its first season as a major sport has had an enviable record; 
student government has had much greater prestige and influence than in previous years; 
for the first time a Loyola Llniversity Student has won the intercollegiate Latin contest; 
the student body has awakened to the value of the Loyola News as an organ of student 
opinion. It is our hope that the LOYOLAN has given adequate interpretation to these 
and, if possible, be placed in their ranks itself. 

Looking back, we find ourself indebted to many people for their fine service. The 
staff itself has given unsparingly of its time and effort to fulfill the countless tasks placed 
upon it. 

Of our professional assistants, nothing but the best can be said. 

Root Studios, despite the death of its director, gave service that is equalled only by 
the work that they have done in the past. John Roach with his camera has become a 
familiar sight around Loyola functions, and it is an imusual student that has not come 
in contact with him at least once during the year. 

Pontiac Engraving and Electrotype Company, represented by Mr. Fred Montiegel, 
formerly publicity director to Loyola, has again earned the eternal thanks of the staff 
for its service and quality of product. It is the job of the engravers to start the wheels 
in motion in the formation of a new yearbook, and by assisting and guiding the editor 
in all his choices, Fred Montiegel has proved the proverbial rock of Gibralter on which 
to lean. 

This year has seen the return of the Rogers Printing Company as the printers of the 
LOYOLAN. Firmly established as a yearbook printer, excelled by none, after a lapse 
of 12 years, Rogers Printing Company has assumed the responsibility of printing the 
LOYOLAN. Represented by Mr. Oliver D. Rogers, the firm has given to the LOYOLAN the 
wealth of experience and ability that is theirs. 

The covers have been made by the S. K. Smith Co., manufacturers of LOYOLAN 
Covers for many years, and long acknowledged the leader in the cover field. 

To these and the countless others that have aided so much in the production of the 
1939 LOYOLAN, a large debt of gratitude is owed, and it is the sincere wish of the editor 
that they may continue their fine service for many years. 

C. J. O'L. 



Pa^e 226 



INDEX 



Abbihl 102 

Abrams 52 

Adams. A 149 

Adams. F 46. 137 

Adams. L 84, 133 

Alstrom 102 

Agee 84 

Agnes. Sr 7 1 

Ahearn 1 2 1 

Ahern 57, 133 

Ahem 46, 143 

Albihl 69 

Albini 47 

Aldige 5 3 

Alesio 1 38 

Almarita, Sr 73 

Almeroch 84 

Alonzi 42 

Altenbach 42 

Amberg 84 

Ambrosius 61 

Anderson. C 60 

Anderson. K 76 

Anderson. E 76 

Anderson 52 

Anderson 47. 48 

Anderson 39 

Andriacchi 57 

Anna, Sr 71 

Annan 47 

Antonelli 61, 84 

Anzalone 52, 141 

Arcadia, Sr 73 

Arnold 47, 142 

Arns 73 

Ashelford 102 

Aste 57 

Aubuckan 47 

B 

Bacharz 41, 209 

Back 65, 74 

Bagan 1 02 

Bagley 80 

Bailey 124 

Ballard 5 3 

Ballas 73 

Banner 84 

Barkley 74 

Barnett 53 

Barray 142, 143 

Barrett 44, 125, 128, 134 

Barron 84, 139 

Barry 42 

Barry, J 46, 150, 152 

Barry. C 61 

Barry. H 71 

Barry 60 

Bartek 102 

Barrel 84 

Barrels 46. 143 

Barth 41, 198, 202 

Barth 53 

Barthes 47, 1 37 

Bartolomei 74 

Barton, S 80 

Barton 27 

Bash 56 

Basket! 60 

Basso 201, 203 

Battini 46 

Bayer 47 

Bayley 41 

Beall 46 

Beauregard 133, 175 

Becker 143 

Becker 84 

Belanger, Sr 96 

Belda 56 

Bellew 47 

Belniak 84 

Benante 73 

Benson 84 

Berbusse 62 

Berdan 63 

Berg 84, 140, 152 

Beresky 44 

Bergin 71 

Berman 54 

Bernardi 44 

Bernadine, Sr 79, 102 

Bernick 139, 150, 152 

Bernstein 46 

Bertucci 46, 150, 152 

Bernick, E 84 

Besse 63 

Besso 102 

Bialek 4 1 

Biel 102 

Bielanski 56 

Biestek 62, 200 

Birch 84, 143 

Bircher 1 30 

Birren 84, 124 

Bitde 60 

Bigane 42 

Black 1 37 

Blackburn 102 

Blake 42 

Blanchard 63, 64 

Bland 53 

Blinski 47, 139 

Blough 44, 80 

Blue 85 

Bobal 52 

Bobery 53 

Boehm 80 

Bogne 71 

Bohor 60 

Boisdeau 42. 202 

Boland 44, 124, 125, 192 



Boland 58 

Bolduc 71 

Bonfield 60 

Bongiovanni 85 

Borkowski 5 3 

Bociino 48 

Bowler 61. 134 

Bowyer 85 

Boyd 46. 136 

Boyene 57 

Boyene, R 57 

Boylan 47. 60, 142 

Boyne 1 34 

Bradfield 76 

Brahm 53 

Brandstrader.. 35, 54, 141, 147, 206, 
207, 209 

Branigan 42 

Brant 60 

Breen 1 99 

Breit 44 

Bremer 34, 121, 131 

Bremner 25 

Brennan 35. 53, 136, 137 

Brennan 52 

Brennan 46 

Brennan. R 60 

Brenner 46, 137 

Brennan 42 

Breyer 56 

Brice 60 

Brickel 60 

Bricklcr 57 

Brickman 85 

Brierty 80 

Brinkman 71 

Britt 44, 121, 124, 173 

Broccalo 85, 151 

Brockman 42, 175 

Brohm 71 

Brookmeyer 36, 85 

Brooks 61 

Brosnahan 130 

Brosnan 85, 143, 151 

Brozowski 121 

Brown, J 85. 150, 151, 152 

Brown, M 7 1 

Brown. H 144 

Brown. J 202 

Bryant 85 

Bryar 209 

Buckley 85 

Bucklen 46 

Buesky 47 

Buit 102 

Burchett 5 1 

Burcier 56 

Burckal 71 

Burdett 80 

Burke, J 85, 143, 150, 152 

Burke 33, 39 

Burke 44, 125, 128, 133, 177 

Burke 116 

Burke, M 70 

Burke, E. 64 

Burke, E., S. J 56, 85 

Burnett 76 

Burns, M 102 

Burns, T 34, 85, 131, 149, 

198, 207, 208 

Burns 54 

Burns 58 

Burns, E 60 

Burns, C 68 

Bush 85. 143 

Butzen 156 

Byrne 58. 124 



Charles 86 

Christiansen 80 

Chekal 103 

Chock 47 

Cindolina 47 

Citro 201 

Clairy 60 

Clancy 86. 151. 152 

Clark. G 86. 128. 135, 172 

Clark 44 

Clark 56 

Clark, C 25 

Cleary 38, 58 

Cleimitus 76 

Clement, jr 74 

Clementine. Sr 71 

Clifford 41, 209 

Ciissold 80 

Cloud. Rev 62 

Clough 66 

Coens 203 

Coffey 60 

Cofone 44 

Cole [ ,'~ 42 

Coleman 201. 203 

Colimore 63 

CoUachia 71 

Collias 86 

Colnon. Rev 27, 32 

Colton 57 

Commerford, Sr. 103 

Concannon 48 

Condon 36, 136 

Congdon 150 

Conglis 41 

Conley 28, 46 

Connery 39 

Connors 39 

Conrath 63 

Conroy " ''"i 30 

Conroyd 41, 182 

Converse 86, 136 

Cornyn 60 

Conway, T 42 

Conway. J 42. 120 

Conway 33, 58 

Conway 73 

Conway, R 76 

Conway. S , , 60 

Conway, P 86, 120, 131, 147, 

201, 207, 208 

Conway, M go 

Cooney 'J'ZZ'. 60 

Corbett 60 

Corbett, K. 74 

Corboy, E 50, 537 177 



136. 



68, 



Cordes 
Cornelia, Sr. 

Cornell 

Corrigan 
Corrigan. 



60. 134. 135 
72 



42, 121, 168, 182 

54 



56 



85 
134 

. 74 



49 

138 
45 



Cacace 

Caduto 

Cahill 

Callahan 

Callahan. M 71 

Callahan 44 

Callanan 131 

Campagna 85, 138. 151 

Campagna. P 

Campagna. E 

Campiogni 

Canrwell 76 

Carlin 42 

Carlson 102 

Carne 33, 102 

Carney 53, 144 

Carrigan 57 

Carroll, M 60 

Carroll, A 60 

Carroll 73 

Caroll. J 47, 48, 142 

Carroll. R 39. 177, 179 

Carver 69. 102 

Cashen 102 

Cass 102 

Cassaretto 148 

Cassin 68 

Casper 80 

Castle 79 

Caul 86. 136. 152 

Cauley 80 

Cavallini 56. 86 

Cavanagh 54 

Caveney 56 

Cecala 86. 150 

Cecchini 78. 103 

Ceccolini 86, 136 

Cech 47 

Cerinni 47 

Cerry 86, 150, 152 

Chamberlain 27, 54 

Chambers 198 

Chaney 42 



Cosrello, B | 61 

Cotugno 79 

Coulehan 60 

Counihan 73 

Courtney 33^52, 61 

Coyne 60, * 

Cozzens 

Cramer 201 T 203 

Crane. 1 60. 86 

Crane. M. 60 

Craven 42 

Craydon 45 

Creagh 134 

Creighton, Sr 103 

Crisanti 74 

Crisp 86," 151, 138 

Cresia 73 

Cronan 142 

Cronin 47_ 49 

Crowe '71 

Crowley, T 57, 87, 133, 146 

Crowley, J 121, 133 

Crowley, E 57, 87, 149, 

150, 151, 189 

Crume 103 

Cudahy 25 

Cullen 52 

Cullinan 71 

Cummings 25, 57, 61 

Cunn;ff 61 

Cunningham 103, 44 

Curtin ' 42 

Curtin, N 76 

Curtin 68 

Curtis 79. 103 

Cushnie 87, 136, 150. 151. 152 

Cutler 44, 196 

Czonstka 35. 52 149 



Dabrowski 


■>■[ 


Dahunter 


73 


Dahlberg 


87 


Dahme 


87 


Dailey 


136. 142 


Daly 


47 


Daly 


56. 137 


Daly, E 


60 


Daly, R. 


61 


Daly. J. 


74 


Daly, D, 


136 


Davis 


87 


D'Alessandro 


47 


Dalton 


60 


Damanskas 


73 


Dansart 


103 


Damler 


58 


Danber 


53 


Dargis 


103 



Dasicwicz 

Davcy, F 

Davey. M. 
David. C, . 
David. M. 

Davis. Or 

Davis. M 

Davis, R. 

Davlances 

Day 

De Bates 

Deeb 

De Filippif 

Dcichsteller 

Delaney 

Delano 

Delatre "''" ' 

Dei Becarno 

Delfosse 47 

Delia ''Z~. 

Decker 

Denkewalter 87 

De Nyse 

Derby 'L.~~r 

De Mes 

De Meter 

Dempsey ^4 

Denker ' 

Derrig 

Desmyter ' 

Deterville 

Deutschman 46 142 

r^ .7 " 150, 

De Vanon 

Devaney, J 44, 124, 125. 

n ., 198. 

Uevaney. M 

Devereaux ^.q 

De Witt 'I~IL.. 

Dickerson 

Dickow 34r36. 42." 

Dietmeyer . 

Diffendal ZZI~IIZ 

Di Francesco " 

Di Leone . 

Dilibert 

Dillon 47, 133, 207r208r 

Dirksen 124 

Diskey 47' 

Dix '' zr'zzzL. ,. ; 

Doheny Z"ZZ. 

Doherty [ 

Dolan /iy 

Doll ■z:::z::.... 1. 

Domeier 

Dondon ' 

Donelan 

Donlan 47 

Donnelly. Rev 

Donnelley 

. 168, 169, 193, 



Donoghu 
Dooley 
Dore, C. 

Dore. J 

Dorey 

Dorgan 

Dorothea, Sr. 

Dostal 

Dougherty 
Dougherty 
Dougherty. B. 
Dougherty, R. 

Dowd. V 

Dowling 

Downing 

Dowell 

Downs 

Doyle 

Drabek 

DriscoU 



71 
176, 177, 



42, 



34, 58, 88, 133, 
160, 178, 182, 

Drolett 

Dubay 44, 128, 133^ 1867 

Duffy 

Duffy 

Duffy. J 175; 

Duffy, J 

Duffy, P 

Du Fon 

Du Pont 88, 

Dumphy 

Dunn 47. 63 

Duris 

Durkee 88 

Durkin '. 

Durso 41. 

Dusky 

Dussman 

Du Vail ;.;; 

Duwgan 

Dvoncke 46. 

Dvorak 

Dwyer. F. 
Dwyer. J. 
Dydak , 
Dymek 



Eack 

Eastby 

Eckes , 

Eder 

Edison 

Effron 

Egan. 

Egan 

Eean 

Eikenbirry 

Einola 

Einsweiler 

Eirich 

Eischeid ,„ 



88. 119. 125. 195. 



76 

103 

„ 74 

150 

103 

148 

103 

. 60 

. 44 

41 

73 

137 

39 

76 

. 58 

, 41 

56 

54 

137 

. 87 

87 

148 

87 

191 

61 

150 

133 

143 

,. 57 

44 

74 

143. 

152 

61 

193. 

207 

80 

60 

135 

.. 79 

195 

.103 

57 

...44 

,., 60 

.. 60 

209 

173 

142 

.. 80 

.. 87 

103 

133 

... 39 

....87 

60 

. 65 

, 87 

62 

54 

209 

79 

103 

.. 87 

... 73 

,., 42 

,. 87 

.. 60 

57 

73 

104 

179 

61 

.. 58 

53 

137 

25 

209 

..-47 

159, 

201 

.136 

190 

56 

58 

201 

...61 

, 80 

. 73 

143 

61 

88 

71 

198 

134 

168 

56 

.47 

57 

60 

136 

80 

60 

198 

132 

80 

80 
73 
80 
60 
60 



Rev. 



Eisen 139 

Eisenberg 88 

Eisdt 79 

Elkin 60 

Elson 128. 174. 175 



73 
41, 88. 124. 198 

143 

56. 58 



125. 131 

133 

175. 201 



42. 209 
57, 81 



44. 62 

47 

47 

.88, 139 

73 

104 

41 

57 

29 



Engels 

Enrighi 

Ensminger 

Epich 

Epstein 

Ericksen 

Esposito 

Esser 

Essig 

Evans 

Ewerts 



Faber 

Fadgen 

Fagan 

Fahey 

Fairbauer 

Fais 

Falk 

Falkenberg 

Farley 

Farrell , 

Farrell . 

Farrell. Re- 

Farrell. E 8» 

Farrell. E. J 24 

Farrell, W 63 

Farrell, W 88 

Feay .....76 

Fedigan 134 

Feehan 33 

Feeiey 134 

Feenev 76 

Feinstein 139 

Feit 56 

Felten 44, 198. 61 

Feltes 47 

Felton 68, 74 

Fenel 76 

Fenger 60 

Fenlon 42, 130 

Fenner 44 

Ferdigan 57 

rigel 42 

Figg 199 

F.las 64 

Filipek 88 

F.nan 88 

Fitzsimmons 88 

Finigan 71 

Finley 42, 198 

Finnegan. Rev 8, 27, 41, 124 

Fintz 36, 142 

Firkus 104 

Fisher 44 

Fitzgerald 44 

Fitzgerald 52 

Fitzgerald 56 

Fitzgerald 79 

Fitzgerald, G 36 

Fitzgerald. Dr 27 

Fitzgerald. J 50 

Fitzgerald. M 60 

Fitzgerald, P. 60 

Fitzgerald. Sr 104 

F.tzpatrick 39 

Fitzpatrick 56 

Fitzpatrick, W 61 

Fitzsimmons 199 

Flatley 120 

Flentie 137 

Fletcher 44, 133 

Floros 54, 201, 203 

Flynn 47 

Flynn 57 



Flynn, C. 
Foley 
Follmar 
Fontanetta 

Foody 

Ford , 

Ford, M. , 

Forette 

Forsthoefel 

Fortaw 

Foulk 

Fox 



. ... 205 
81. 104 
.136. 89 



60 

80 

44 

. 63. 89 

61 

46, 153 

56 



Fox, J 42, 133, 209 

Foy 28 

Francis. Sr 61 



Frank 

Franklin 

Frehe 

Freiman 

Frenzen 

Frey 

Futz 
Frusynski 



Gable 

Gabriel. Sr. 
Galante 
Gallagher 
Gallagher. Rev. 
Gallagher. C. 
Gallagher. J. 



,57 

56. 57 

56 

76 

5 7 

:2. 191 

142 

76 

71 



Gallagher. L. 
Gallagher. M. 
Gallagher. W. 

Galapeaux 

Gannon 

Ganser 

Garner 

Garvey 

Garvey, 



60 

60 

89 

46. 136 

60. 89. 133. 193 

89 

57. 133. 182 

56 

34. 89. 119. 121. 
125, 145. 146, 147, 195, 197 



Garvey, M. 
Geworski 
Gecan 
Gecewicz 

Geimer 

Georgen 

Gerlach 

Gerleve 

Gerriry 
Gerst. Rev. 
Gerstein 
Gerstner 
Gertrudis, Sr. 

Ghiordi 

Gianotsrs 

Gibbons, L 

Gibbons. W. .. 



61 

104 
89 



Haesett . 

Hangcn 

Hajssman 



M. 



44. 



Gibson 

Gibson. 

Gieren 

Giganti 

Gill 

Gillies 

Gino 

Giroux , ., 
Glaess 
Glaskewics 
Gleason 
Gleason, L. 
Gleason. V. 

Gleason 

Glickman 

Gludzeszewsk 

Glinski 

Griokas 

Godfrey 

Goed:n 

Goebel 

Goessl.ng 

Golden 

Goldhaber 

Goodwillie 

Goodwin 

Gora . , 

Gordon 
Gorman 
Gorman. H. 
Gorman 

Gosch 

Gottler 
Gowenlock 
Govans 
Grace. Rev. 
Grace. R. 
Grady . .. 

Graham 
Graham. A. 
Graham, K. 
Graham, R. 



Graham. V. 

Grandpre 

Granhold 

Grant 

Grashoff 

Gray . 

Greanias 

Greene 

Green 

Gregory 
Gregorich 
Grenkovitz . 

Grey 

Griffin 

Griffin. D. 

Griffin. R. 

Grillo. J. 

Grisamore 

Grochowski 

Grogan 

Grohowiak 

Grossberg 

Grotefeld 

Grothe 

Grudzien 

Grunt 

Gruesbeck 

Guerin 

Guinane 

Gunderson 

Gunnison 

Gusskay 

Guthaus 

Gutheil 

Guthrie 

Guy 

Guzauskas 



104 

57 

27. 38. 59 

58 

7 3 

80 

79 

7 3 

76 

., 44, 121, 124, 125, 
128, 133, 182, 194 

46 

104 

89 

89. 138 

121. 125. HI. 203 

89 

89 

U)4 

n6. 46 

41 



199 

39 

49, 89 

61 

73 

90 
54 
76 

104 

1 19, 121, 125, 131 

61, 141 

89 

. . 119. 121 

M 

47 

132 

53 

80 

57 

79 

89 

65 

82. 104 



44 

58 

175 

.-. 71 

89. 125. 147, 195, 
201, 207 

159, 160. 

171, 175 

56 

44, 124. 198 

130 

61 

57, 73 

52 

56, 58 

104 

80 

80 



73 

. 201, 202 
133. 142 



44. 



104 
28 

13: 



132 

65 

56, 60 

60 
140, 189 

61 

90 



36. 



Ha,?en 

Hahn 

Hall 

Hallman , 

Halpin 

Hammond 

Hauley 

Hansen 

Harding , 

Harkins 

Harkness 

Harley 

Harranek 

Hartnett 

Harodko , 

Harter 

Hartman, C 

Hartman. I 

Harris 

Hartnett 

Harvey 

Hasktns ... 



52 
76 
. 80 

42. 209 

57 

46 

71 

76 
47. 142 



142 

58 
90. 94 



90 

56 

199 

53. 56 

57 
.. 39 
44 
61 
90 
56 

46 

44 

105 

78 

53 
41 



42. 209 

90. 128 

90. 120. 124 

41 

51, 210 
90 



31, 



Hayden 

Hayes, J 

Hayes, S 

Hayes 

Hayes, Mr. J. , 
Hazinski 

Hamer 

HamiU 53 

Hamilton 61 

Healey 199 

Healy, J 90. 116. 125 

Healy 61 

Hecht 63. 64 

Heckman 58 

Hedke 58 

Hedrick 74 

Heevey 39 

Heether 44 

Heffernan 156 

Heil 199 

Heiny 105 

Helbing 57 

Hel.odore, Sr 105 

Helmer 52 

Henderson 79 

Hennessy 1 1 6 

Hennessy. M. 74 

Henry 90 

Hesselman 76 

Heydens 74 



Joy 91 

Joyce 4 1 

Joyce 56 

Junio 201 , 203 

Jurczak 57 

Juzulenas 91, 148 

E 

Kaesburg 57 

Kalchik 69, 105 

Kaleta 91, 140, 150, 152. 201 

Kallal 46. 136 

Kalter 73 

Kamp 105 

Kane 42. 65 

Kanopa 61 

Karbin 105 

Karlin 54 

Kartje 76 

Kasmer 47 



132 

25 

56 

47 

65 

J4. 141 

105 

74 

46 

105 
56 
60 
65 
76 
42. 57 

Hofherr 34, 36, 90, 160 

Hogan 90, 158, 160 

Hoiss 60 

Holstein 60 

Homan 90 

Home 61 

Horan 134 

Horn 41. 82. 105 

Horten 105 



Hibner 

Hickey 

Hickman 

Higgins 

Hildreth 

Hilkin 

Hines 

Hinze 

H:[chko 

Hletko 

Hodapp 

Hoefling 

Hoeschen 

Hoessler 

Hoffman 



Horodko 

Hosek 

Hosna 

Houren 

Homan 

Howe 

Howell 



140 

57 

.119. 207 
61 



198 

42. 90. 171, 174. 175 

30 

Hitchko 143 

Hruby 34, 146, 147, 145, 90, 

180, 192, 196 

Huber 90 

Huerta 76 

Huesing 199 

Hughes 68 

Hughes. D 76 

Hughes. H 91 

Hultgen. F 46. 136. 150 

Huramert 190. 119, 121, 125. 

131, 144. 198 

Hummler 143 

Hunt 91. 136. 151, 152 

Hurney 61 



41 landoli 91 



In 

InsuU 

Isberg 

Intfen 

Ireland 

Irwin 



...71 



Jackimic 42 

Jacobs 73 

Jacobsen 57 

Jodwalis 105 

Jakatz 91 

Jackocko 41 

Jakubic 73 

.Takubowski 54 

James 71 

Jamieson 57 

Jancauskis 62, 63 

Janik 44, 132, 180 

Janette 71 

Janusch . 61 

Jarosz 74. 91. 140 

Jarrell 71 

Tasiel 91. 120. 125. 19S. 202 

Jaskunas l4i. I 50. 152 

.lerbi 135 

Tessup 71 

Jessup. C 71^ 

Jesucker 

Job 

Johnson 

Johnson 

Johnson 46 

Johnson, M 

Johnson 

Johnson 

Johnston 

Jones 46. 142. lli 

Jorgenson 



30 

201 

44. ni 

n6. 150 

61 

79 

54 



91, 140 
91. 128, 158. 160 

44, 201 

52 

74 



Kass 

Kautz 

Kawula 

Kay 

Kaywood 

Keleher 

Kelleher 

Kelleher . 

Kelley 

Kelley. R. 

Kelley, Rev 27, 41 

Kelly 41, 130 



202 

42 

46, 136 

39 

. 60 



Kelly 

Kelly 

Kelly 

Kelly 

Kelly 
Kelly. D. 
Kelly. F. 
Kelly. K. 
Kelly. M. 
Kelz 
Kemp 



69. 



31 

Kennedy 56 

Kennedy 57 

Kennedy. E 105 

Kennedy. R 42, 130, 204, 191 

Kennedy. T 42, 198 

Kenney 46 

Kenny 80 

Kepner 121 

Ketter 71 

Kewin 53 

Kiefer 69 

Kiley 133, 182 

Kilmer 56 

Kincannon 47 

King 44, 130 

King. A 105 

King, E 71 

King. J 61 

Kingston 74 

Kiniery 27. 38 

Kinsella 60 

Kipp 61 

Kirby 79 

Kirkling 65 

Kirsling 175 

Kirstens 42 

Kiser ._ 80 

Klabocha 140 

Klazynski 105 

Kleber 105 

Kleinschmidt 30 

Klinker 80 

Kluge 41 

Knoepfle 92 

Knoll 125. 128. 119. 133. 172. 

192. 207 

Knowles 1 06 

Knutson 106 

Kobertz 106 

Koca .76 

Kocur 76 

Koczur 42 

Koehn 57 

Koenig 1 24 

Koepke 62 

Koerner 181 

Kogstad 44. 125, 194. 197, 

206. 207 

Konnen 56 

Kolanko 47 

KoUe 71 

Koppa 148 

Koppes 54 



47 
79 

92 

106 

140 

92, 143, 150, 151 
.148 



Kordijak 

Korosy 

Kowalczyk 

Kozak 

Koziol 
Kramer. C. 
Kramer. N. 

Kramer, M 76, 201, 203 

Krein 56 

Kreuger 79 

Krisko 46 

Krol 92, 140, 150, 152 

Kruckstein 92 

Kruppa 33 

Kruse 54 

Krzeminski 42, 92, 202 

Krzywicki 92 

Kucik 53, 144 

Kumakis 71 

Kuman 92 

Kuni 44, 124, 133 

Kurek 92 

Kurikkla 106 

Kuzminski 92 

L 

La Deaux 61 

La Fond 134 



La Framboise 80 

Lagorio 141 

La Glovine 58 

Lakin 60 

Lally 44, 57, 150 

Lamey 42, 92. 123, 122. 

141, 149 

Lamport 92, 136, 151 

Lancaster 174, 175 

Landberg, H 92, 139 

Landberg, W 92 

Landgren 42, 191 

Lane 1 34 

Lang 42 

Langdon 57 

La Rocque 69 

La Rocque 73 

Larson 41 

Laruso 142 

Lasee 80 

Lask 44, 121 

Laiito 134 

Laughlin 4 1 

Laiiterbach 4 1 

Lavezzorio 44 

Layden 171, 173, 174, 175 

League 73 

Leahy 44, 1 68 

Lebinsky 201 

Le Blanc 30 

Lechner 61 

Le Cla.re 1 37 

Lee 1 06 

Lee 1 68 

Lee, V 82 

Leeds 1 06 

Lefrancois 148 

Lehnert 57 

Leies 121 

Leketas 7 1 

Le Marquis 15 3 

Le Mise 47 

Lemske 56, 57 

Lenich 106 

Lennertz 33, 106 

Lennon 134 

Lenover 170. 171, 172, 174. 175 

Lensje 80 

Lentke 57 

Lentz 76 

Leonard 5 7 

Le Sage. Sr 61 

Letz 92 

Lewis 93, 142, 143. 150, 152 

Lewis, M. 134 

Leyden 60, 61. 93 

Libotte 1 06 

Lieber 47 

Lightfoot 74 

Ligouria, Sr 7 3 

Lilly 29 

Limperis 52 

Lindenmeyer 42 

Lindenfeld 150, 152 

Lindsay 57 

Lindsay, R 181 

Link, G 42 

Link. M 80 

Linnville 47 

Linski 41 

Liska 60, 93 

Litball 61 

Lictig 41, 134, 182 

Uewellyn 136. 150 

Lloyd 66 

Lockwood 76 

Lodeski 148 

Loewe 1 44 

Loftus 134 

Logan 27, 71 

Lohman 42 

LoiscUe 93 

Lombardi 93 

Lombardo 47, 138 

Long 58 

Lopate 39 

Lord 60 

Lorrig 80 

Lorusso 47 

Loskoski 74 

Loveley 93 

Lozinski 73 

Luby, A 61 

Luby. M 76 

Lucas 1 44 

Luckiesh 1 06 

Lux 1 06 

Lynch 3 5 

Lynch 42 

Lynch 5 3 

Lynch, J 52 

Lynch, M 60 

Lynch. W 52 

Lyon 141 

Lyons, M 60 

Lyons 141 

Lyons, J 42, 47. 144. 175. 

196. 198 

M 

MacDonald 32 

Machery 7 3 

Macaluso 106 

Mackey. C 93, 120, 125 

Mackey, W 93 

Mack 124 

Maciejewski 93, 125 

Macy 57 

Maddi 44 

Madigan 106 

Madura 93. 140 



Maggio 138, 93 

Maguire 42, 54 

Maguire, P 53, 141 

Mahoney 61 

Maiers 79. 82. 106 

Makar 74, 68 

Malone 76 

Maloney 61, 65 

Mamalakis 52 

Mangan 73 

Mandel 1 1 

Mandemak , 150 

Manghera 203 

Manion 93 

Mann 61, 93 

Manning 36, 93, 143 

Marciniak 34, 93, 147, 198. 207 

Marcott 61 

Mareck 56 

Marguerite 1 24 

Maskiewicz 152 

Marotta 93, 120. 124, 131, 

146, 198 

Marrella 46 

Matron 94 

Many 65 

Marta 76 

Martin 65, 130. 191. 193 

Martin, A 61 

Martin, M 94 

Martyn 61 

Mary Clare 71 

Marzano 44, 131, 301 

Mascola 106 

Masek 94, 118. 119 

Masctrson 61. 201 

Mastronardi 74 

Matejka 94. 143. 150. 151. 152 

Mathison 76 

Matt 131, 177. 178. 190 

Mattingly 63 

Mattlin 94 

Matuszewski 46 

Maura 107 

Maurice 107 

May 1 99 

Mayer 74 

Mazursky 94 

Meagher 76 

Mcany 46, 65. 107 

Mehren 2 5 

Meier. D 46 

Meier. H 95, 136, 143, 151 

Melchiors 119 

Mellen 42 

Mendoza 74 

Mentag 63 

Merkel 46 

Merckcl 137 

Merek 132 

Merrick 7 1 

Mcrsch 76 

Mertz 29 

Metzer 1 07 

Meyer 199 

Meyers 73 

Michelik 42 

Micket 46 

Mier 95 

Milady 107 

Millar 130, 148 

Milazzo 201 

Miller. E 61 

Miller 44. 121. 142 

Miller. J 107 

Miller. H 80 

Milunas 95 

Mindlin 95 

Minter 7 3 

Minogue 1 43 

Mitchell 73 

Mitrick 46 

Mogilnitsky 120. 131 

Mohr 95, 201 

Moleski 46 

Molloy 73, 95, 124 

Mombowski 132 

Monaco 61, 95 

Monohan 68*, 76 

Mone '1 68 

Monek 141 

Mooney 107 

Mooney 61 

Moore 41, 121, 177, 178. 182 

Moorhead 177 

Moorhead. Dr. L. D 27, 45 

Moran 69! 80 

More 4 1 

Moresi 57 

Morris 61 

Morrison 65, 74 

Morrissey '_ 1 07 

Morton 57 

Morrow 46 

Morton !!.!.1.!,80 

Moser 1!Z!I". 76 

Mueller 60 

Mulcahy , 42 

Mulenix 142 

Mulhern 47 

Mularkey 44 

Mullarkey 56 

Mullen 148 

Mullenix 47 

Mullens 54 

Mulvihill 80 

Muraskis 41 

Murnighan 124, 131, 204 

Murphy. C 61 

Murphy. E 61^ 107 

Murphy, D. 33, 44, 124. 130, 192 



Murphy, G 42, 2U1. 204 

Murphy, 1 76 

Murphy 80, 107 

Murphy 44, 46, 47, 48, 52, 56, 

57, 73, 133, 137. 150, 152 

Murray 53, 65 

Music 74 

McAdams 5 3 

Mc Aleer 5 6 

McAndrew 57 

McBride 60 

McCabe 73 

McCann 7 1 

McCarthy, J „ 56 

McCarthy, M 94 

McCarthy, R 136 

McCarthy, T 56 

McCelland 76 

McCormick 61 

McCormack 134 

McCourt 58, 94. 119. 120, 

., ^ J 198, 201, 202 

McCready 94 

McDermott 61 

McDonald 33 35 94 135 

McDonnell 53, 94, 133 

McElligott 56 

McElrone 80 

McEnery 44 

McEwen 52 

McGarr, F .'..'.'..'.'."427 2097 2 1 

McGarry 43 

McGaw 1"ZI 4 1 



McGee 



74 



McGinnis 5 

M<:Goey IZZZ'ser 5 7 

McGovern 57 

McGrath 61 

McGuire 61 94 

McHugh '107 

Mcllvain 94, 151 

Mclntyre 124 

Mcjunkin !.!I'^.7!" 29 

McKechney 94 

McKearly !-.*.7!!ZZ!! 73 

McKenna 94 

McKeever 33, 34r"l24,"l77 

McKensie 123 

McKibbin 7!.'7".!!7! ! 58 

McKuen 80 

McHugo "~'~Z. 60 

McLaughlin 57 



ODea 44, 130 

Odilon. Sf. Saint 61 

O'Donnfll 46, 108 

O'Donnell. R. 74 

O'Donovan 49. 96. 100. 143 149 

Oelnch 108 

Oeth 73 

O'Grady ^^' 76 

O'Hara '^ 72 

O'Heron qK 

o'Keiiy :::::::'% 

O Laughlin. Mrs. M. 114 

OLaughlin. C 96.131,145 

r,., 147. 189 

O Leary 42 

oiLeo'ch :..i::::i 203 

Oliver 202 

01«a .■.''I"967"i'32","l48 

°f«;"fo 96. 150. 152 

O.N<^', 71. 96. 136 

ONeill 33, 46, 53, 108 

Oravec 7 2 

O'Reilly ^^ 

oR^'i'v. J :;:::::: 60 

°''p''»" 130 

Urthei cy 

Osborn , . o/c 

Osby ,g| 

O Shaughnessy. F 34. 36, 44, 121 

ri'Ck K w '24. 207 

U bhaughnessy. M. 33 34 124 

125. 128,' 133, 176! 

177, 182, 195, 208 
56 



Oswald ... 
OToole, J. 

OToole 

Ovellette .... 



80 



McLennon 



152 



McMahon 41 61 198 

McManamon * ' 42 

McMorrow 7!!.ZZZ"! 42 

McNamara ' '.'77! 95 

McNamee 95 

McNeeve 05 

McNeil 77777Z 4i"l 77 

McNella ' 1 7 7 

McNeills :77777;:7:: 6o 

McNulty 42 57 

McQuillan 60' 95 

McShayne ' 42 

McTigue ~'^ 6 1 

McTinnon 46 

Nagle 5g 

J^^'?"l< 82,' 107 

Nash 5g 

Nauhanson 4-7 153 

Naughton 95, 143, 150^' 151, 152 

Nealc 42 

N<;'son 201 7' 203 

Ncsbitt. E. 95. 116. 124, 131, 194 
Nesbitt, C 95, 119, 131, 145 

K, u w .- 204. 189 

Nesbjtt. Mr. E 114 

Neuwirth. L ' ■' 75 

Neveaux go 

Newell 95, 136, "1497 150 

Newhouse 35 52 

Newton 7 60 

Newman 52 

Neylon 7.". 107 

Nickoli 777 4 1 

Nied 77777!!! 80 

Nieman 73 

Niemeyer 46 

Nijakowski 42 

Nsius 47, " 142 

Nissen 44 

Niven 73 

Nolan 44 58 

Noll 7', .,'107 

Noonan 27, 51, 71 

Norrsi ' 79 

Novak 128. 158, 160 

Nowak 79 

Nowakowska 148 

Nurger 44 



Oakes 57 

O'Bayle 79 

O'Brien 60, 7 1 

O'Brien. E 63 

O'Brien. L 82, 107 

O'Brien. Sr. 107 

O'Brien. W. 33, 34, 95, 124, 128. 

131. 146, 149, 158. 160 

O'Brien 39. 52. 41, 56. 57. 136 

OCallahan 61, 96, 124, 130 

Ochota 71 

O'Connell 96. 124 

O'Connell, H 60 

O'Connor 52, 54, 56, 58, 149 

O'Connor, R 61 

O'Connor. C 76 

O'Connor T 44, 131, 201 

O'Connor 44, 121, 180 



Pagano, C 44 ,,, 

Pagano. R '*' }?J 

Palacck .. '2i 

PalJ5 56 

Pakleukawski ,11 

Paranty '?f 

Parent ', ?„ 

Parker '5§ 

Pastrnak SV 

Patelczyk i \ 

Patrick .... il 

Pattee ^f 

Pauls Vi lAf 

P^body Z:77:ZZ7Z7"' 't\ 

Pearsons ?„ 

Peart ^0 

Peirce °° 

^c^' : ■■■■ 5'^' '5«'i2 

Pembrooke ?? 

Pendergast .... S? 

Pengal ,96 

Penrice j? 

Pershing ". 96 

Pertocelli , ^S 

ll^^L. 54, "1417201, 20f 

60 
.76 
...42 
.56 

47 



Peterson 
Peterson. R 
Petkiewicz 

Petrus 

Peusu , .. 

Pfahl 

Pfester 



Ph.lbin ji 

Picoch :7777: 70 

Pingstock ai 

^■leJle :: ===--^^: 1 

Plahctka '42 -,7' 



Plenk 
Plotz 



..48 

PtS^ta 7: ^«' l^ 

Poduska iL 

Pokorny ?^ 

Pollard 77:777: 46""l37 

Pollauf *^- ^U 

Poniatowski ... iin 

Pontecore . '5? 

Porche „ 4] 

Porembski z;;"; 'o, ^ir, 

Poricha ■"■ Q7 

Powell 47 , U 

Powers 42,44,97,136,201 

Powers. Dr. J. G !. .7'... ....„.".. 27 



Preisker 



108 



Prendergast ^ 56, 57 jg gj 

Pneto ^q ', gi 

Prindaville 33 97 

Prokopovity 70 

Pronko 7.7 143 

Provindencia Sr. Mary 73 

Przynzye / j 

Ptacin 41 

Puszkiewiez !::!!:;77;77:7777777:: 60 

Putcrbaugh 29 

Q^"'"<:k 69, 108 

Q"!"^^ 44. 119 

Q":el^V 25. 60 

Quinn 39 



Rabaut . ... 

Racky 

Racctte . 
Raffcrty. C. 
Rafferty 
Rafferty. J. 



97 

60 

134 

131 

149 

60. 97 



Ragan 53, 144 

Raichwit 46. 14} 

Rakoski 65 

Rann, J 56 

Rann. R 57 

Rau 60 

Randall 74 

Ream _ 44 

Rebmann 56 

Reding - 97 

Reedy — 71 

Reel 60 

Regan : - 141 

Reichard - 108 

Reichere 150, 152 

Rjchiardi ■..i.s.:148 

Reid ^J.w-:.. 58 

Reidy 42, 171, 174, 175 

Reidy 44 

Reinke. J 63, 64, 80 

Renter 124 

Resabek 61 

Reykjalin 56 

Reynolds 60 

Rezek 108 

Ricci 97 

Riddiford 80 

Rigotti 74 

Riley 97 

Riordan 209 

Rivera 143, 150 

Rivera 46 

Robbins 46. 139 

Robles 73 

Roberts, W 54 

Roberts 42, 168 

Roberts 46 

Rochetta 60 

Rodino 46, 138, 150 

Rogalski 97, 151, 152, 150 

Roger 58 

Rogers 58 

Ronan 42 

Ronan 5 3 

Ronan. J 97 

Ronan, D 61 

Roethier 108 

Rooney 143, 150, 152 

Rooney, F 27, 54 

Rose 76 

Rosner 65 

Rossiter 108 

Roth..,: 108 

Rowland, J 56. 97 

Rowland. V 56 

Rozetka 57 

Rumore 97 , 151 

Russell 74 

Russell, L 47. 137 

Russin 137, 150 

Russomanno 47 

Ruzich 44 

Ryan. W 168, 209. 210 

Ryan 56 

Ryan, B 61 

Ryan, K 108 

Ryan, T 98, 143, 150. 152 

Ryan 60 

Rynne 47 

S 

Sachs 98 

Sachs, L 1 57 

Saday 109 

St. Leger 65 

Salerno 143, 150, 152 

Saltes 44 

Salvador, G 201, 202, 203 

Salvador, M 44, 202 

Salvatore 42 

Sampson 76 

Sanders 53, 144 

Sandquist 98 

Sanner - 61 

Sarafolean 76 

Satek., 44, 133,175 

Sauer 99, 124, 130 

Saxwold 60 

Sayen 76 

Sayre 133 

Scagrelli 137 

Schaar 44 

Schaefer 42. 7} 

Scharep 79 

Scharninghausen 56 

Schaub 74 

Scheib 53 

Schell 159, 160 

Schiavone 124. 182 

Schierhorn 79 

Schlottman 209. 121 

Schmeing 148 

Schmitt 31 

Schmidt 33, 46. 153 

Schmidt 73 

Schmidt 28 

Schmidt 6^ 

Schmidt. G 60 

Schmidt. M 121 

Schmidt. M 76 

Schmitz 39 

Schmitz. J 98. 125 

Schmitz 98. 136 

Schneider 143 

Schneider. C 199 

Schonburg 61 

Schroeder 79 

Schuebert 6 3 

Schuler 74 

ScMfer 42 

8«hultz 1 24 

Schuitz 152 



Schuliz:.._ 73 

Schultz 80, 81 

Schumacher 57 

Schumacher, A 80 

Schweitzer 109 

Schweitzer 57 

Schwind 63, 64, 98, 149 

Schwinn 80 

Scillieri 46 

Scully 42, 202 

Sculzo 47 

Seagrave 80 

Seales 53 

Sebastian. Sr 80 

See 71 

Sellett 44 

Semrad 28 

Sentiere 41 

Sepsi 71 

Serota 98 

Settera 98 

Shaffrey 76 

Shanahan 33, 50, 149 

Shanahan, R 42, 209 

Shandross 60 

Shapiro 177 

Sheahan 60 

Sheahan 28 

Sheahan 42 

Shean 60 

Sheedy 79 

Sheehan 182 

Sheehan 42 

Sheehan 56 

Sheridan 56 

Sheriff 29 

Sherlock 57 

Shields 34, 98, 118. 

119, 135, 145, 147, 
149, 192, 198, 207 

Shiffer 199 

Shigikawa 46, 153 

Shinnick 42 

Shultz 44 

Shulzen 201 

Shunick 76 

Shurpit 74 

Sielisch 56 

Siemans 180 

Signorelle 76 

Silsby 56 

Silverman 54 

Sinn 71 

Sinnot 47, 52, 98 

Sipchen 109 

Sirimarco 42 

Skinger 57 

Skinner 98, 151 

Skoller 98 

Skopek 1 37 

Skowrwn 140 

Skradski 71 

Skrobul 76 

Slaats 109 

Slama 46 

Slattery, J 119 

Slattery, R 98, 124, 145, 189 

Slingo 98. 203 

Sloan 56. 134 

Slodki 56 

Slotkowski 132 

Smid 44 

Smilie 80 

Smillie 69 

Smilzoff 60 

Smith 47 

Smith 60 

Smith, E 98 

Smith, J. 56 

Smith, M 61 

Smith, P. . 134 

Smurdon 124, 125, 190. 201, 209 

Smurnelli, R 124, 125. 190. 

201. 209 

Shell 56 

Snyder 98. 144 

Sochim 57 

Sohm 109 

Somers 58 

Soper 56 

Sosnowski 56 

Sossong 44. 58. 131. 205 

Southon 56 

Sranier 73 

Spaulding 39 

Spear 60 

Spirro 42 

Spurlark 52 

Stack 47 

Stanley 73 

Stanton 56 

Stecy 44 

Sterle 31 

Steggert 27 

Stekel ,, 69 

Stell 44 

Stephen 73 

Shepanek 132 

Steplyk 74 

Sterling 79 

Sterneit 60 

Stern 39 

Stevenson 80 

Stock 109 

Stocker 109 

Stoeffel 121 

Stradum 71 

Straka 42 

Street 57 

Streicher 57 

Strait , 99 



Strong 31 

Stroth. A 205 

Stroth. B 204 

Stuart 99 

Strubbe 53. 144. 149 

Stuart 150. 152 

Stulguskas 71 

Smll 80 

Sturm 57, 58 

Strussi 54 

Sudrvech 74 

Sullivan 79 

Sullivan 39 

Sullivan. M 61 

Supernau 52 

Sutkus 74 

Svoboda 57 

Swan 137. 47 

Sweeney. R 99. 116. 131. 198 

Sweeney. A 99, 143, 150, 151 

Swensen 109 

Swirsky 46 

Switzer 109 

Syfscyck 1 5 1 

Sykora 47 

Sylvester 60, 99, 130, 204, 205 

Sypin 109 

Syyper 76 

Szcfczyk 99, 140 

T 

Tabor 41 

Taheny. A 60 

Taheny, B 60 

Taheny. J 60 

Tambone 99, 138, 151 

Tapp 47 

Tarpey 61 

Taylor 57 

Tennert 63, 64 

Tennyson 7 1 

Teresa. Sr 7 1 

Terlecke 41 

Tesauro 46, 153 

Thale 99, 149, 150, 152 

Theis 74 

Thomas 46, 73, 79 

Thompson 3 3 

Thompson 46 

Thompson 60 

Thompson, L 142, 143 

Thompson, M 76, 109 

Tierney 142 

Tierney, V 7 1 

Tilges 80 

Tilka 4 1 

Tilman 63 

Timothy, Sr 78 

Titzlee 109 

Tobin 44 

Tobalski 42 

Todd 99, 142, 143, 149, 

150, 151 

Tofukuzi 99 

Tolin 54 

Tom 99, 151 

Toner 60 

Toohey 99 

Topp 142 

Tordella, J 117, 131 

Tordella. L 30 

Torraco 76 

Torrey 53 

Tosoonian 142 

Towey 99 

Towle 46, 47 

Tracy 135 

Tracy. P 99 

Tragni 76 

Trahey 61 

Trapshanis 52 

Traub 61 

Trongeau 60 

Troy 58 

Trunk 44. 202 

Turk 80 

Turner 73 

Turro .., 56 



Uher . 
Ulane 
Unger 
Urbancek 



U 



74 

47. 142 

99 

61, 100 



Vaccaro 71 

Vader 1 24 

Valach 47 

Valentine 5 3 

Valentino 56 

Volkman 76 

VoUer 100 

Van Dorn 76 

Vanderslice 44 

Van Heule 168 

Vasquez 47 

Vassolo 42 

Vaters 7 3 

Vauehn 150 

Vaughn 79 

Verage 80 

Verbeck 53, 144 

Verhulst 56. 100. 120, 135, 198 

Vicari 46, 138 

V'elione 44 

Vogel 109 

VogI 60 

Vogt 60 

Voller 143. 150. 151. 152 

Vone.sh . 35. 100. 122. 141 

Von Kriefsgeld 76 

Vorlick 54 

Voslcky 57 



W 

Wagener ,, 100. 128. 170. 171. 175 

Wagner 57 

Wagner 73 

Wajtowicz 47 

Walch 100, 119. 121. 125, 

131. 145, 146. 147. 191. 
195, 197. 206. 207, 208 

Walderbach 76, 77 

Waldron 30 

Walker 60 

Walker. B 204 

Wall 60 

Wallace. J 116, 121. 124 

Wallace. R 119, 124 

Wallace. W 100 

Walsh 42 

Walsh. G 76 

Walsh. M. 60 

Ward 109 

Wargim 57 

Warowski 142 

Warth 27, 45 

Wasacz 42 

Webb 60 

Wegner 109 

Weigel 44 

Weinstein 139, 202, 42 

Weinstein 52 

Weiss 47 

Welleus 73 

Wemheuer 57 

Wendt 34, 44, 128, 133, 173 

Wenskus 159, 160 

Werelius 143, 150. 152 

Wermuth 47 

Wertz 80 

Westerman 109 

Wesukowski 46 

West 44, 133, 212, 213 

Westermeyer 39, 60 

Westhoven 47, 137 

Wetlin 63, 64 

Wctzler 137 

Whalen 53 

Wheeler 41, 204 

White 131. 198 

White 52. 152 

White 56 

White, C 148 

White. E 36 

White. R 100 

White. R 136 

Whitfield 109 

Whitmore 52 

Wichek 47, 137 

Widmann 100, 199 

Wienke 44, 125, 133, 207 

Wilgen 60 

Wilhelm 33, 46, 142, 143. 

150. 152 

WiUey 109 

Williams. J 63 

Williams. K 74 

Williams. R 61 

Willy 109 

Wilson, A 157. 170. 171, 

175, 177 

Wilson. N 76 

Wilson. S. K. 22, 23, 26 

Wilson 68 

Wilson 5 3 

Windier 57 

Wise 46, 143. 150, 152 

Wittekindt 109 

Wittowski 41 

Wojtowicz 140 

Wolavka 100. 150. 152 

Wolf 47, 142 

Wolta 56 

Woods 63. 100 

Worchol 207, 209 

Worrell 65 

Wyasen 46 

Wykowski 69, 80 

Wylie 100 



Yarnell 57 

Yates 74 

Yetter 42 

Yore 141 

Young 44 

Yrman 61 

Yurcek 109 

Z 

Zabel 188 

Zabinski 57 

Zaluga 142 

Zauen 74 

Zannini 44 

Zech 100 

Zegiel 132 

Zellen 56, 100 

Zelsman 201 

Zenner 57 

Zenslicka . 68 

Zess 55 

Zielinski 58 

Zimmerman 53 

Zingrone 44 

Zisjon 79 

Zitkovich fy 

Zmidgrodski 46 

Zosel 60 

Zur 100, 198 

Zwerfke 61 

Zygmuntowicz 100, 132