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Full text of "The Loyolan"

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SUIT EDUCATION 


15 4 0-1940 















JESUIT UNIVERSITIES THROUGHOUT THE WORLD 









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ST. IGNATIUS, FOUNDER, SOCIETY OF JESUS 




















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Published by the students of Loyola 
University of Chicago, Illinois, to 
commemorate the 400th anniver- 
sary of the Society of Jesus and 
the 70th year of the University. 


























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THESE MEN, PRESIDENTS OF ST. IGNATIUS COLLEGE, HAVE BEEN THE PRIME FACTORS IN 
THE GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE COLLEGE. BY THEIR ABILITY AND SELF-SAC- 
RIFICING LABORS FOR THE SCHOOL FROM 1870 TO 1908 THEY HAVE MERITED A PLACE 
IN THE ANNALS OF GREAT EDUCATORS. 















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THE LAST PRESIDENT OF ST. IGNATIUS HANDED THE BATON OF 
THE FIRST PRESIDENT OF LOYOLA UNIVERSITY AND TO HIS SUCCESSORS. THESE PRESI- 
DENTS, SIX IN ALL, HAVE FOR THIRTY-TWO YEARS WORKED FOR LOYOLA IN SUCH WISE 
AS TO MAKE IT NOT ONLY ONE OF THE LARGEST CATHOLIC UNIVERSITIES BUT ALSO 
OF THE MOST IMPORTANT EDUCATIONAL FACTORS IN THE MIDDLE WEST. 







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• GEORGE CARDINAL MUNDELEIN 



• DR. RUDOLPH KRONFELD 



MARY BOUSCAREN 



REQUIEM AETERNAM DONA EIS, DOMINE: ET LUX PERPETUA LUCEAT EIS 




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The Eeverend Alexander J. Burrowes, S.J., 
was the first president of Loyola University, and 
during his administration the first buildings 
were erected on the Lake Shore Campus. Because 
of his zeal in promoting the cause of Catholic 
education, and because of his material and spirit- 
ual farsightedness for Loyola, this section deal- 
ing with the University of which he was first 
president has been dedicated to his memory. 






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SCHOOLS 



GRADUATE 

LAKE SHORE 

MEDICAL 

LAW 

COMMERCE 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 

WEST BADEN 

SOCIAL WORK 

NURSING SCHOOLS 

ST. BERNARD'S 
ST. ELIZABETH'S 
COLUMBUS 

ST. ANNE'S 
OAK PARK 
ST. FRANCIS 

CLASS OF 1940 



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This year lias seen the advent of a 
new archbishop to Chicago. To a man 
whose record has so consistently shown 
him to be wholeheartedly absorbed in 
the problems of youth and of Catholic 
education, we, the students of Loy- 
ola University, can extent! only the 
most heartfelt welcome. We concur 
most heartily with the words of Bishop 
Sheil : "Both by experience and by 
fine talent of mind and heart he will 
lead this great Archdiocese of Chicago 
to new heights of achievement for the 
glory of God and the salvation of 
souls. - ' It is most fitting that to 
Archbishop Samuel A. Stritch we dedi- 
cate the 1940 Lovolan. 



Lavccclia Stitdii 





His Excellency Samuel A. Stritch, 
I).]).. Archbishop of Chicago. 



Nuns in a Milwaukee convent bid the 
Archbishop farewell as he leaves to 
take up the duties of the new arch- 
diocese. 



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Father Wilson 




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Attending and presiding :i t com- 
mencement ceremonies :nnl holding fac- 
ulty receptions are lint a few of the du- 
ties Father Wilson assumes as president. 
He is in great demand as a speaker, is 
active in educational groups, and is also 
of recognized authority :is an historian. 



When last year the Reverend Samuel Knox 
Wilson, S.J., president of Loyola University was 
being interviewed, he remarked, "I have 
achieved two things at Loyola; I introduced the 
honors courses and T planted trees." And it 
is with considerable truth that he has made this 
remark for the introduction of the Honors 
courses has been one of the most far reaching 
steps in education that has been taken at the 
University. As a leader in progressive educa- 
tion and as an eminent authority in history. 
Father Wilson has received national recognition. 
He has received his Ph.D. degree in history 
from Cambridge University and is the author of 
a widely used textbook on American history. 

His interest in the University has been both 
scholarly and intensely practical. Like the trees 
which he has planted and which will grow to ma- 
turity only after many years, so will many of 
his ideas for the expansion of the University be 
realized in the years to come. 

As Father Wilson completes his seventh year 
as president, the student body cannot but feel 
proud of him for his outstanding career as a 
nationally known and respected educator, for 
his many services to Loyola, ami for the progress 
which Loyola has made under his guidance. 




LOYOLA • MCMXL 



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THE KEVEKKIXD SAMI KL KXO\ WILSON, S.J. 
President oft' Lov«»la University 



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Administrative 
Council 

It is exceedingly difficult for a religions 
order to handle properly the financial affairs 
of ;i large educational institution, such as 
Loyola. Trained for educational and religious 
purposes, clerics are not meant to administer 
affairs in the financial world. Realizing this 
fact, the previous presidents of the Qniver- 
city set about procuring a body that would 
serve as advisor and administrator of the 
financial business of the University. 

Loyola has been most fortunate in her choice 
of administrators. She has acquired men for 
that Council whose personal records in the 
business world present the answer to Loyola's 
successful financial condition of today. 

The Administrative ( louncil is made up of a 
general adviser, a legal adviser, and three 
committees of three members each. These com- 
mittees are designated as the Finance Com- 
mittee, the Public Relations Committee, and 
the Buildings and Grounds Committee. 

The lirst (if these committees is particularly 
active in the supervision of investments. The 
workings and duties of the latter two are to 
shape the advertising and public policies of 
the school, and to advise on major problems 
connected with Loyola's buildings and other 

properties, -lust as the Academic Council in- 
sures proper management and regulation of 

the educational side of the institution, so the 

Administrative Council insures the proper 
handling of the financial end of the school. 
The whole council meets annually but once, 
but committee meetings arc called more fre- 
quently, and the advice of individual members 
is sought whenever needed by 1 he officers of 1 he 

I luivcrsity. 




Stuyvesaxt Peabody 

Chairman of the 
Administrative Council 




Edward .T. Farrell 
Legal Adviser of the 

Administrative Council 



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FINANCE 
COMMITTEE 

Samuel Insull, 
Jr. 

Charles F. 
Clarke 

Matthew .T. 

HlCKEY 





PUBLIC 
RELATIONS 
COMMITTEE 

Edward .1. 
Mehres 

Maktix J. 
Quicley 

Lawrence A. 
Downs 



BUILDING 
AND GROUNDS 

COMMITTEE 

David F. Bremner 

Edward A. 
Cudahy, Jr. 

Walter J. 
Commings 




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A c a il e in i © I ] o n n c i 1 



The Academic Council had its origin in the Univer- 
sity Senate founded in 1928 by the Reverend Robert 
M. Kelley, S.J., the president at the time. The Coun- 
cil is made up of the regents, deans, and assistant deans 
of the various branches of the University together 
with the central registrar and the president. This 
board serves in an advisory capacity to the president 
on matters involving the educational policy of two or 



more branches of the university as a whole. 

This organization enables the president to keep in 
close touch with all the various departments and 
schools, and to give personal consideration to all prob- 
lems presented. Too, it provides these educators an 
opportunity to contact other departments, and to ap- 
preciate or advise those departments in their work- 
ings. 



First Row — Tile Reverend William A. Finnegan, S.J., Mr. Henry T. Chani icrlain. The Reverend Elmer A. Barton. S.J., Dr. William H. G. Logan, 

Sir John (\ Fitzgerald. 
Second Row — The Reverend Edward L. Colnon, S.J., The Reverend Thomas A. Egan, S.J., Dr. Louis D. Moorhead, The Reverend Francis J. Gerst, 

S.J., The Reverend John P. Noonan. S.J., The Reverend James V. Kelly, S.J. 
Third Row — Dr. James A. Fitzgerald. .Mr. Bertram J. Steggert, The Reverend George L. Warth, S.J., Mr. Francis J. Rooney, Dr. Paul Kiniery, Dr. 

John G. Powers. 




LOYOLA • MCMXL 



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HE REVEREND AUSTIN G. SCHMIDT. S. J. 

the first Dean of the Graduate School, 

held office from 1926 to 1932 



In llli'ii, the Graduate School of Loyola University was 
founded in order to organize and supervise the graduate courses 
that were being offered at sonic of the other schools of the uni- 
versity. Although its existence has been limited to fourteen 
■sin Ht years, it has. nevertheless, exerted considerable influence 
in the held ot research anil scholarship throughout this area. 
Father Agnew, then President of the ['Diversity, founded the 
Graduate School and made the Reverend Austin G. Schmidt, S.J., 
its first Dean. 

Ai the beginning the Master of Arts degree was offered in 
Education, Law. Medicine, Psychology, and Sociology, as well as 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Education. Later the 
graduate degrees ill Medicine and Law were discontinued and 
advanced work in Sociology was replaced by the degree in Social 
Work. Advanced courses leading to the Master's degree in His- 
tory. English, Mathematics. Philosophy, French, and Chemistry 
were placed on the curriculum. Doctoral work in English, Latin. 
Philosophy, and History was added. 'Phis year the first Doctor 
of Philosophy in Chemistry was awarded to Clyde Aubrey 
Crowley. Fourteen other graduate degrees were also awarded 
Ihis year at the Midyear Convocation. 

When, in 1932, Father Schmidt resigned to lake charge of 
the Loyola University Press. Father Samuel Knox Wilson, S..I.. 
took charge of the school. 1 1 is tenure of office was for only twelve 
months, for at the completion of the term he was appointed Presi- 
dent of the University. Be was succeeded by the Reverend Fran- 
cis .1. < I erst. S.J., tlie present incumbent. 

The school offers five degrees. Since earliest university times 
the degree of Master of Arts has been the traditional and histori- 
cal degree. It has been awarded by the inn versit ies of Bologna. 

Salerno, Paris, and Oxford, Eor over six hundred years. The de- 
gree of Master of Science is neither as old no]' as traditional as 
the Arts degree, but it carries much weight and prestige. The 




Tin: Reverend Francis J. 

Gerst, S.J. 

Dean of the Graduate Svhool 




Dr. Pali. Kin mi: \ 

Assistant Dean of the Graduate 

School 



20 



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GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Irmil l: — Flyini. Novatny, 

Mann. Klodzinski, Rublv: Rear 
Ron- — Bro. Martin. Hohmaii. 
Ocenasek, Speidel. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 
Front It'tir — Sonnehorn. Twint- 
ini, r . Cummings, Mueller, Ran 
Rear Row — Olson, Rev. Quinn, 
O.P.. Rev. Flynn O.S.M.. Wal- 
lace. Haley. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Front Run: — Pai'enti, Hrnhy. 
Brother Hubert, Atnar, Hanly. 
Fitzpatrkk: IfUUtlf Ron- 
Duffy, Flannery. Rnzicka. Wlia- 
len. Sister Marv Evangelist, 

O.S.M.: Rem- 1! — Jeniiines, 

Browne, Simonson, Bird, Wil- 
liams. Conglau. 



1 >R LOVIS W. TOKDELLA 
Instructor in the Department 
Mathematics 





Elizabeth a. McCanx 
Secretary of the Graduate School 



degree of I >oetor of Philosophy is, of course, the highest scholastic 
degree indicating advanced ami detailed research work. Every 
candidate for a doctoral degree is obliged to present in his thesis 
evidence of having engaged in original research work in the 
tield in which he is being examined. The degree tit' .Master of 
Education, one of the must popular degrees in Graduate School 
Work, was introduced to till the needs of those who felt that 
they needed an advanced degree but who were unable to devote 
the time to fulfilling the requirements of the more stringent Arts 
Curriculum. After the establishment of the honors program in 
undergraduate work - , plans were immediately formulated for 
continuing Honors work in the Graduate School, culminating in 
the degree of Master of Arts with Honors. The program has met 
with considerable success in the several years that it has now 
been operat ing. 

M D C C C L X X • 

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The reverend henry Dumbach, S.J., 

eleventh president of the institution, founder 
of the site of the present Lake Shore Campus 
and builder of Dumbach Hall 



The Lake Shore * lampus of Loyola University comprises both 
the College of Arts and Sciences and the Day division of the Com- 
merce School. Its site was selected in 1906 by Father Dumbach and 
the first building. Dumbach Hall was erected in 1909. Shortly after 
through the generosity of Michael < 'udahy a new building was erected 
bearing the name of the donor. During the twenties the faculty build- 
ing and gymnasium were erected and in 1932 the library was donated 
1o the 1'niversitv in memory of Llizabeth Cudahy. 



I )umbach Hall 



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CUDAHY HALL 
The home of the College of Arts and Sciences. 



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The rkvkrend Joseph s. Reiner, S.J., 

dean of the College of Arts and Sciences from 

1^23 to L931 who was instrumental in building 

the present organization of the college. 



The Reverend 

William A. Fixxegax, S..T. 

Dean of the College of Arts and 

Sciences 



The College of Arts and Sciences founded in 1870 under 
the name of St. Ignatius College moved l<> its present site of the 
bike shore in D'2'2. At present the Lake Shore Campus is com- 
posed of eight buildings and has an enrollment of about six hun- 
dred students. 

The students of this branch of the I'niversity display great 
school spirit lending themselves enthusiastically to the extra-cur- 
ricular activities of the school. From their numbers come many 
of the leaders of the University. The students of the North Shore 
( 'a ni pus form a majority in the various clubs and in the dramatic 
and musical organizations. They hold the staff positions on the 
University publications and provide the eager participation in 
the intramural ami intercollegiate sports. 

The Student Council which is the governing body of tin 1 
campus lias sponsored several major events throughout the year, 
chief among which was Loyalty Week held at the close of the 
basketball season as a tribute to the team as well as to the other 
squads representing Loyola University in intercollegiate sports. 
The unqualified success of this venture has reflected much credit 

u| t In 1 ( 'ouncil. 

Tin: Reverend 
.1 in es V. Kelly, S.J. 
Assistant Dean of the College of 
Arts and Sciences 




'I'm: Reverend 

William E. SlIIELS, S.J. 

Assistant professor of History 



'I'm: Reverend 

Arthur .1. Kelly, S..I. 

Assistant professor of Philosophy 



'I'm; Reverend 

John F. McCorhick, S.J. 

rofessor unci chairman of the 

Department of Philosophy 




24 




Mr. Aloysius Hodapp, assistant pro- The Reverend James Hussey, S.J.. in- Doctor Joseph E. Semrad and Mr. J. 

fessor of Economies and Dr. George struetor in Religion and Student Coun- Walter Hudson, assistant professors 

M. Sehmeing, professor and chairman cilor. of Biologv. 
of the Department of Chemistry. 

Mr. Richard O'Connor, instructor in The Reverend Edward F. Maher, S.J., The Reverend William J. Millor, S.J., 
Physics and head of the Placement head of the Athletic Board and in- instructor in the Classics. 
Bureau. struetor in Psychology. 

Mr. Frank P. Cassaretto, instructor in 
Chemistry. 



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Father Wilson presides at a meeting of the Academic Council 



Familiar Faculty Faces 



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UNDERGRADUATES 

1. ARTS JUNIORS. Front Row — Dymek, 
Kowalski, Machowski, Billon, Pahis, Cilia, 
Schell, Etzkorn, Houlihan. Grant: Second Roto 
■ — Fox, Riordan. Kiley, Beauregard, Wallace. 
Ramker, O'Shauehoessy. Keating, Slotkowski, 
Peele ; R<ear Row — Winn, Hennessy, Sevens, 
Siwek, Schiavone. Graham, Kiley, Goodwillie, 
Kepner, Crowley, McCoy. 

■J. ARTS JUNIORS. Front Row—Ahevn, Ja- 
robsen, Koenig, Podq;orski, Traukina, Murnig- 
lian, Smurdon, Smullen, Marino, Ponzio : Sec- 
ond Row — McDonald, Salvador. Kilev, Good- 
willie. Martinez. McCarthy. Mark.' White, 
ottman, McKeever, Micaletti : Third Rov — 
Linnell, McGarrity, Adamski, Kiley, Happ, Be- 
tleKsem, Leonard, Tordella, Shapiro, Simpson, 
Cole, Esposito. 

::. ARTS JUNIORS. Front Roto— Kiel?, 
Goodwillie. Conway, Frey, Flynn, Warchol, 
Galante. Reams, Bleeh, Kernis, Martinez, Mar- 
zano: Second Row — Slattery, Collins, Fox, 
Wanck, Matousek, Duffj-, Hosna, Barrett, 
Krosrli, Broz, Fisher. Cahill, Orphan: Rear 
Rov: — Moorhead, Layden, Kiley. Happ, Nelson. 
F.sser, Dnlazinski. Dougherty, Yanikiotis. 
Bravos, Govostis, Waldron, Wenskus. 

4 ARTS SOPHOMORES Front 7?<w— 

Ein'cli. Cnnroyd. Seofield, Berk, Ruddy, Lanff. 
Jakocko. MeGarr Pierandozzi. Doyle : Second 
Row — Sheehan, Cole, McNulty. Kelly. Branni- 
gan, Kennedy. Kane, Fox, McKennon. Kelle- 
her: Roar Row — Michalik. Hayden, Kennedy. 
R., Kennedy, T., Sisson. Soth, Guskay. Scully. 
Bussert, Earth, Powers, Delaney. 

5. ARTS SOPHOMORES. Front Rov—Yot- 
ter. Dowd. O'Leary. Vassolo, Tohin, Ronan. 
Conroyd, Lang, Philbin, Ewerts. Conerlis: Sec- 
ond Row — Blaszek. SehaeflVr. Kclleher. Byrne, 
Wheeler, Nickele, Cornell. McMahon. Dorsran, 
Martin, Howe. Straka. T.hiii«y: Renr Row 
— Lenover. Lipinski, Bialek Koezur, McMana- 
mon. Craven, Muraskas, Wnsarz, Hartnett. 
Duncan, Bacharz. Siriiuarco, Boisdean. 



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LOYOLA • MCMXL 



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UNDERGRADUATES 



nt Row — Lau- 
nch, < 

VIooi 



6. ARTS SOPHOMORES. I.-. 
caster, Clifford, Essig, Reitly, Lynch, Conw 
Alonzi, Huston, Lyons, Durso, 
oiul Row — Brinskelle, Donohue, Petrus, l'"\\ 
ers, < >'Reilly, Lindenmeyer, Dowd, Graydon, 
Hartnett, Van Heule, Landgren, Foody; Rear 
Rote — Mone, Krzeminski, Breniian, Sl» 
Shanahan. Hayes, Salvatore, Shinnick, Wat 
Tobolski, Sentiere, Rossing, McGaw. 

7. Ain'S SOPHOMORKS. Front /.'../•■ - 
Graves, Larson, Brockman. Souralula, Euan, 
McNeil, ( > Reilly. Patekzvk, Alonzi ; Second 
Ron — Finley, Link. Tilka, Miller, Carlin, Rob 
erts, Soth, Guskay, Fanvll : Rear Row — Pelka. 
Pearson, Schulfer, Suffka, Plahetka. Dowd. 
Krol, Vaco, Graydon, Lenover, 

8. A UTS FRESHMEN. Front Ro-u 
rone. McDonald, Dougherty, Kiley, t 
Greene, Duffy, Faye, Zeduek, Ladner; S< 
Row — Dalka, Riley, Sutley, Murphy, Consi 
Klein, Hannah, Forrander, Schaeffer, Martii 
Doherty; Rear Row — Zelezinski, Kusch, I'm 
sich, McGarrity. M.-Aulitre, Flaunery. Bnwinai 
Ryan, Campion, Trapanese, Lavin, Fitzpatricl 
Cuneo. 



9. ARTS FRESHMEN. Front Row—So- 
botka. H;iirau. Corcoran, Lawler, Nugent, De 
(i-ior^io. Frodahl, Padden, Dickinson : Second 
Row — O'Connor. Dudek, Dolehide, Carter, El- 
lis. Spina. King, Haskins, Gunkel; Rear Row — 
Dougherty, Garvey, Clohesy, Pet role, r.,s,.t inn. 
Matuszak. Covin*: ton. Gudgeon, Smith, Dillon. 

10. ARTS FRESHMEN. Front Ron — Mi 
alek, Lawler, Tietz, Durkin, Lee. Dougherty, 
Curran. Zednek; *<■•■<>,, tl Ron: — Denmiert. Dou- 
ble, Sobotka, Legner, Wagener, Suriano, Con- 
sidine. Berren. Rottner ; Rear Row^ZelerAn 
ski, Kennedy. Giannasi, Brabets, Fleming, Cur- 
ran, Foote. O'Brien, Schramm. 





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ARTS FRESHMEN, Front Row 
— Grens, Walsh, Fink, Hines, Boss- 
hart, Jedknvski, O'Brien, Nicola, 
Honian ; Second Row — Quick, Dri- 
ll an, Sarahan, Ostler, Johnson, 
O'Reilly, O'Connor, Narsette; Rear 
Row — Clohisy, Czubek, Tliim, 
Recliman, Steffens, Kiley, Reedy, 
Bettenbender, Fergus, Smith. 



AKTS KKKSIIMK.V Front A'«.,r— 

Bozovsky, McNally, Curran, Wat- 
son, Walsh, Sweenie, Tietz, Cour- 
\ r oisier, Russell, Kelter : -Second 
Row — Sin non. Lay den. Soft check, 
Mac Adam, Watts, Laenertz, Kiech- 
ler, Siemers, Davis, McMahon : Rear 
Row — Duffy, Aiu;iii. Laurence, 
Matre, McClellan, Strubbe, Grydyk, 
'I' in m id/. Sciacca, Krystosak, Fin- 
ley, DeGior^io. 



ARTS FRESHMEN. Front. Rou — 
Rooney, Rocks, Allen, Lenihan, 
Freiclla, Ant '/is. Romano, Pitaro, 
Reddy. Abbott : Second Row—Mc- 
Call, Harmon, Mussmanni, Palinski, 
Hartney. Collins. Demmert, Grady, 
Tortorello, Quinn ; R>ear Raw — 
Wasiclewski. Hand, Dougherty, 
Hough, Meilleur, Allegra, Tullv, 
Bowman, Durkin, Collins. Kennedv. 



ARTS FRESHMEN. Front Raw— 
Keefe, Murlas, Brabets, Lach, Smith. 
Gronewald, Niewzwiadek, Kazubow- 
ski. Bona, Graham; Second Row — 
O'Keefe, Duffy, Tholcn. Siemian, 
Bergh, Harrington, Honig, Heinz. 
White, Waldo. Hnnna : Rear Ron — 
Mnrley, Keshan, I'awlikowski, Oeis, 
I >rc i tier, Czerlowski, Rottner, 
Movies, Grafft, Double. Trein, 
Grace. 



28 



Student government at Loyola as 
represented by the student council 
shows frosh the error of his way, in 
refusing to wear the green cap. 
A small fine for the first offense, 
suspension for the second is the 
rule. 



Many members of the faculty are 
working on advanced degree. Kus- 
sell Koppa of the Chemistry de- 
partment is shown as he receives 
his Master's hood at the Midyear 
Convocation. 



The June Convocation means the 
end of four years' work for the 
undergraduates. An impressive 
spectacle, it never fails to make 
one appreciate the solemnity of the 
occasion. 




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<z~> clival or y I ' LeJticine 



The Reverend John B. Furay, S. J. 

President of Loyola University under whose administration 
the School of Medicine was established in 1915. 



The Loyola University School of Medicine became an integral 
part of Loyola University in 1915 upon purchase by the Univer- 
sity of Bennett Medical College which had been established in 
L86S. In order to better meet the trends in medical education 
then being advocated by the American Medical Association, the 
University in 1917 acquired the purchase of Chicago College of 
Medicine and Surgery. 

The physical facilities were improved and teaching in the basic- 
sciences was given over to full time faculty personnel, each mem- 
ber of which is specialized in his particular field. Loyola Univer- 
sity School of Medicine is an approved School of the ( 'ouncil on 
Medical Kducation of the American Medical Association and is a 
member of the Association of American Medical Colleges. 

Preclinical or fundamental studies are conducted in the labo- 
ratory building at 706 South Wolcott Avenue, equipped with 
library, museums, laboratories and offices of administration for 
the teaching staff. Clinical studies are conducted mainly at 
Mercy Hospital, ('(ink County Hospital, and in the affiliated and 
public hospitals. The teaching in .Mercy Hospital is under direct 
control of the closed staff, all members of the faculty of Loyola 
University School of Medicine. In the affiliated institutions teach- 




Dr. Louis D. Moorhead 

Dean of the 

School of Medicine 





The Reverend 

George L. Warth, S..T. 

Regent of the 

School of Meilicine 



The Mercy Hospital 
Dispensary 



LOYOLA 



MCMXL 



30 



MDXL • SOCIETY OF 



The Loyola University 
School of Medicine 




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With the aid of Mr. Zingrone, 
Clinical Associate in Roentgen- 
ology, Dr. Voris examines a pa- 
tient while Art Wise and K.I 
Galapeaux look on. 



John ('.union an. I Ait Wise ex- 
amine a young patient in the 
clinical department while Miss 
Sheridan, Directress of Mercy 
at the Loyola Clinic looks on. 




mg is under direct supervision of members of 
the staffs who are members of the Medical 
School faculty. 

The clinical units at Mercy are now desig- 
nated as Mercy Hospital-Loyola University 
Clinics, owned and financially administrated 
by the Religious Sisters of Mercy, Province of 
Chicago of the Union of the United States. 
The medical and educational policies of these 
institutions are vested in the School of Medi- 
cine. The administration of the departments 
within the hospital are the responsibility of 
the Chairmen of the corresponding depart- 
ments of the School of Medicine. 

In training properly qualified applicants 
For the practice of Medicine, Loyola Univer- 
sity School of Medicine strives to retain the 
intellectual atmosphere that is contributive to 
the preservation of faith and morals by re- 
maining dominantly Catholic in spirit. Per- 
sonal attention is given by the faculty to stu- 
dents in regard to their scholarship, character, 
habits of work, rest and recreation. 



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Doctor Wilbur B. Tweedy, prof essor and head Dr. John B. O'Donoghue, clinical pro- Dr. Peter A. Nelson, clinical instructor in the 
of the Department of Physiological fessor of surgery Division of Urology 

Chemistry 



J>r. Anthony A. Pearson, associate in Dr. Harold C. Voris, clinical professor of 

Dr. Jacob M. Essenberg, associate professor Anatomy Surgery 
"l* Anatomy 

Dr. Jacob P. Greenhill, cbnical prof es- Dr. Reuben M. Strong, professor and head of 

Dr. Stewart Craig Thomson, associate in sor of Obstetrics and Gynecology the Department of Anatomy 
Anatomy 



School of Medici no Faculty 



32 



Medical Life 



The curriculum is designed to realize the 
objectives of the School of Medicine in con- 
formity with the latest trends in Medical edu- 
cation. The program of studies attempts to 
provide an undergraduate plan of instruction 
which will insure the highest measure of clin- 
ical contacts and so fit the student for the gen- 
eral practice of Medicine. At the same time 
it is sufficiently specialized to enable properly 
qualified students to lay the foundation for 
practice in Medical specialties. 

The Dean of the School of Medicine is Dr. 
Louis David Moorliead, M.S.. M.I).. K.S.G.. 
who is one of the foremost surgeons in the 
middle west. Dr. Moorliead is an outstanding 
Catholic layman, whose services to the Catho- 
lic ideals of medical education have brought 
him Papal knighthood and a decoration from 
the King of Italy. 

The activities at the School of Medicine are 
largely restricted to technical fields. The three 
honorary fraternities, the Moorliead Surgical 
Seminar, the Volini Medical Society, and 
Lambda Rho, spend most of their time as a 
group in hearing papers on various fields. 

The school is not without its social events. 
Both major fraternities have several dances 
throughout the year, which are well attended 
as are also the all-University dances spon- 
sored by the Union. 



The School of Medicine places special 
emphasis on close contact between the 
faculty and the students. With such 
exhibits as the cross sectional slides 
(picture two) and the model demon- 
strations (pictures one and three) in 
conjunction with instruction, the stu- 
dent has every opportunity to learn. 




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MEDICAL SCHOOL JUNIORS. 
Front Ron: — Concannon, Lombardo, 
CorniHe, Dillon, Cronin, Ulane, Boy- 
laii; Middle Ron: — Moleski, ToosoiV 
ian, Lillnville, Towle. Kolankn, 
Sinnott, Vasquez, Bellew : Rear 
Row — Le Mire. Donlon, Andolina. 
Albini, lilmiski. Feltes, Fenske, 
Kasmer, Sykora. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL JUNIORS. 
Front Ron: — Beresky, Fiiltz, Topp, 
Carroll, Pijan, Tesauro, Daly, 
Thompson, Adams: Middle Row— 
Vlcek, O'Neill, Russomanno, Chock, 
Flentie, Brennan, Russell, Gibson, 
Diskey, Fair: Rear Row — Maier, 
Wojtowicz, Drabek. Barthes, 
Wichek, Ulane, Nisins. Hagan, Led- 
ernian. Garret, Delfosse, 



MEDICAL school SOPHO- 
MORES. Front Ron: — Cnrran, Scil- 
lieri. Anderson. Alesio, Trnmfio. 
Werniuth, Weinstein, Miller: Middle 
Row — Fowle, Scagnelli, Flynn. Mi- 
zen, Thompson, Beall, Jesacher, 
Merkel : Rear Row — Weiss, West- 
hoven, Griffin, Daly, Lyons, Pnlmis- 
sano, Vnlach, Pitaro, D'AUessandro. 



LOYOLA • MCMXL 



34 



MDXL • SOCIETY OF 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SOPHO- 
MORES. Front Ron — Cecil, Don- 
ald, Ann on, Deeb, Stock, Lieber, 
Dowell; Middle Row — Koenig, Con- 
cannon, Rynne, Gora, Denten, Lo- 
l'usso ; Rear Rote— Gajewski, Don- 
Ion, Nemecek, Angerman, Dunn, 
Mullenix, Ippolito, Blough. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL FRESHMEN. 
Front Row — Tornello, Schupmann, 
Gambler, O'Connell, Sauevs. Mann, 
Sullivan, I vers : Middle Row — 
Fordon, Fogel, Tate, Galante, Beach. 
Krzeminski, Lyons, Wuerst ; Rear 
Row — Catena, Archibald, Borino, 
PMtzgerald, DeSinyter, Moon, Ruzicli, 
Fitzgerald, Roberts. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL FRESHMEN. 
Front Row — Weigel, Pleiss, Allan- 
son, Puppendah], Pfister, Lally, 
Forrette, La Maida ; Middle Row— 
Platz, Galabte. Zaikis, Wawriski, 
Foley, Pellkore, Vitiello, Kessler ; 
Rear Row — McDonnell, Smith, Smy- 
ka, Siemans, Shorr, Buklad, Cas- 
serta, Cooper, Frey. 




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<z~>clwol ar 




aw 



William Dillon 

first Dean of the School of Law 
who served from 1908 until 1915 



The School of Law enjoys the distinction of being the first 
of many successful professional schools to become attached to the 
University. In 1908 the Alumni of < (Id Saint Ignatius ( 'ollege fos- 
tered the founding of the Lincoln ( 'ollege of Law. Shortly after- 
wards the school was accepted as an integral portion of Loyola 
University. 

The first Dean of the Law School was the late William Dillon, 
a graduate of Catholic University and King's Inn, Dublin, and 
the Middle Temple London. lie continued as Dean till 1915 when 
he retired to private practice. 

Under Dean MeMahon, who held the administrative power from 
1915 till 1925. the Law School inaugurated a three-year day divi- 
sion and a four-year evening division course of study. This is the 
same course that is offered today. 

The law school curriculum is subject to three divisions: con- 
tract, non-contract and property law. The first year student is 
introduced to the study of common law pleading, criminal law. 
real and personal property, torts and contract law. From ma- 
triculation to graduation the student follows a rigorous sched- 
ule that becomes more and more specialized. 

Contrary to popular belief, the Law School does not have for its 
aim the preparation of students for the bar examination in the 
student's particular state. Instead of this the student has out- 
lined for him at thc> inception of his course of study a plan by 
which lie will learn the nature and fundamentals of the law the 
inference being that if he concludes his studies successfully, he 
will be in a position to pass the bar examinations of the several 
states. One of the bases of this plan is the common knowledge that 
I he lie Id of 1,-iu is nut a Mai ic 'bill rather one thai is eonsl a in I \ 




Me. John C 

Dean of the 



FlTZGEKALD 

.•I I of Lai 




The Reverend 

John P. Noonan, s..t. 

Recent of the School of Law 



::t; 




DAY LAW SOPHOMORES AND JUNIORS. Front Bow — Guinane, Lynch, Cullen, O'Con- 
nor, Czonstka, Brennan, Scliatz; Bear Bow — Lynch, Schreiner, Anzalone, Abranis, LimperiSj 
Newlious©j Wl i it m i ire 

DAY LAW FRESHMEN. Front Bow— Lewing, Seheurieli, Keane, O'Brien, McCarthy, 
Walsh; Bear Bow — Byrne, McDonald, Haskins, Knoll, Crowley, Masek 



changing and growing. The student must prepare for the tremen- 
dous amount of research that will be demanded of him after he 
leaves the classroom for good. So during the years in school he is 
expected to inform himself concerning the mechanics of using 
the various digests and annotated series that go to form the back- 
log of the school's library. 

To aid him in becoming thoroughly conversant with these im- 
portant steps, students are handed definite library assignments 
and are encouraged to compete among themselves in mock court 
trials. The purpose here of course is to give to all a foretaste of 
what will make up his life after graduation. So a thorough knowl- 
edge of the library and a deft facility with legal bibliographies is 
considered by the faculty as mandatory to the proper pursuance 
of the study of law. 

At the present time the School of Law grants either a Bachelor 
of Laws degree, or a Doctor of Jurisprudence. The Bachelor de- 
gree demands less pre-legal training but consists of the same 
courses as the Doctor of Jurisprudence. 



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NIGHT LAW JUNIORS. First 
Row — Maguire, Bland, Nelson, 
Carney, Sanders, Berman ; Middle 
Row — Ballard, Downing, Kelly, 
Barnett, Murray, Calihan ; Rear 
Row — Brahm, Moss, Loewe, Kuja- 
wimsM, Brennan, Pauls. 



NIGHT LAW SOPHOMORES. 
First Raw — Anderson, Sinnott, Hel- 
mer, Valentine, Hamell. Zess, 
Barth: Middle Roiv — Willis, Kerch- 
ner, Moss, Hobil, Whalen, Pender- 
gast, Kissane ; Rear Row — Dauber, 
Harris, Zimmerman, Seales, Kelly, 
White, Boberg, Seheib. 



NIGHT LAW FRESHMEN. First 
Row — Beahan.- Dillon, Hendele, 
Perry, "Weidman, Phillips, Hansen : 
Middle Row — Micbaud, Rainey, 
Walsh, Boyle, O'Connor, Adams : 
Rear Row — Gannon, Duffy, Kil- 
lackev. Stetson, O'Rourke, Fiesehko, 
Turek, Riee. 



NIGHT LAW FRESHMEN. First 
Row — Walsh. Gannon, Stetson, Kil- 
laekev, Miehaud. Fiesehko, Duffy ; 
Middle Row — O'Rourke, Dahme, 
McKechney, Watts, Birong, Mor- 
rissey, McCarthy: Rear Row — 
O'Connor. Lithall, Love, True, Ben- 
nett, Boyle, Dever. 



38 



MDXL • SOCIETY OF 



L a w Faculty 



m 

c 



Joseph F. Elwakd 
professor of Law 

John C. Hayes 
instructor in Law 

Barnard M. Fitzgerald 
instructor in Law 



Edward A. Rihai. 
instructor in Law 

James A. ^. Howell 
assistanl professor of Law 

Jinx. John V. McCormick 
professoi of Law 



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a\ 




owiuietce 



Thomas Reedy 

first Dean of the School of Commerce 
was appointed to the post in 1924 



Realizing the need of providing courses to study business 
conditions and methods, the School of Commerce was founded in 
1924. Since that time it has steadily increased in size and pres- 
tige until now it has gained a notable reputation throughout this 
section. 

A Bachelor of Science in Commerce degree is offered by 
this department, which requires two years of preparatory work, 
followed by two more years of specialized study. Besides these 
courses leading to a college degree, extensive classes are held in 
preparation for the Certified Public Accountant Examinations. 
The reputation for this course is well known in the Middle West 
and was climaxed when Russell W. Laxon, a graduate, won high- 
est honors in the State of Illinois Examinations, having his paper 
chosen as the best in the United States. The degree of Master of 
Business Administration is also awarded on completing the fifth 
year of study. 

In 1935 the Commerce School was split up into two divi- 
sions, the original remaining on the downtown campus, and a 
new branch being formed in the Lake Shore division. Now stu- 
dents may enjoy all the ordinary atmosphere of college life on 
the Arts Campus and yet pursue a business curriculum. 

Each individual school has its own activities. In the down- 
town school the main organization is the Sigma Lambda Beta 
fraternity. This provides occasional programs of interest and 
has an active roster of graduates as well as the students them- 
selves. On the Arts and Science campus, the activities run some- 
what differently and consist of the Finance ( 'lub under Mr. Foy 
and the Economic Seminar under Dr. Mogilnitsky. Both hold 
periodic meetings and discuss current developments in the busi- 
ness world. 

New courses are continually being added to the curriculum 
to keep the standards of this school high, in the esteem of business 
educators. The faculty is also undergoing constant revision, for 
just this year Mr. George Lane one of the oldest members of the 
faculty was transferred In the Ninth Side School to teach business 
law. 




Mr. William Roberts 

Administrator of the Day Commerce 

School 



10 




The Reverend Eneas B. Goodwin, pro- Bernard W. Zimmerman, lecturei on Doctor Theodosi A. Mogilnitsky, in- 

fessor and chairman of the Depart- Organization and Marketing. struetor in Economics and Business 

nn nt of Economics and Business Ad- Administration, 

ministration. 



Walter A. For, instructor in Eco- 
nomics :ind Business Administration. 



Charles .1. LaFond, assistant Bursar. 



Tl ffice "f tin" Lake Shore 

Commerce .School. The other di- 
vision of the Commerce School 
is located downtown in the 28 
North Franklin Building. 




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UNDERGRADUATES 

1. COMMERCE. Front Row — Smythe, 
Grimes, Froemling, Mallon, Helblins, Doush- 
erty, Kane ; Middle Row — Conway, Rinehart, 
Froenilins;. Gerrity, Leonard. Dickson; Rrnr 
Ron- — Skinner, Burehett. O'Brien, Reykjalin. 
DeWolf, Kaesbera;, Berber. 

2. COMMERCE. Front Rnw— Galante, Kai- 
ser, Maier, Brown, Evans, McKugo, Callins. 
Joyce; Middle Row — Reedy, Nack, Tyrell, 
Hushes, O'Connor, Curte, Rooney, Kearny, 
Meiwdl; Rear Row — Albertsen, Garner, Auto- 
mucci. Converse. Weber, Marsh, Quinn. Mar- 
key, Hea'y, Cinski. Siegel. 

3. COMMERCE Front Row— Weber, Hol- 
mer, Heinz, Robinson, McGuigan, Gendron ; 
Middle Row — Lnzarski, Cody, Monaco, Garvey, 
Misiewicz. Tarppy; Rear Row — Sheehan, Ho- 
gan, Jackson, Gntshall, Kochan, Dotmikar, 
Hession. 

4. COMMERCE. Front Row— Klein, Grant. 
Macy, Clogue, Skeels, Cnnis, Kane; Middle Roi" 
— KeNy, Prendergast, Hosek, Carey. Davy, Jen- 
nings. Duffy: Rear Row — Tagjia, Windier, Mc- 
Kibbin, Quilty, Cleary, Delaney, Shanahan, Co- 
"uto. 

5. COMMERCE. Front Row— Golden, Rvan, 
Sievert, Stander, Rafferty, Bielanski; Middle 
Row — Gntshall, Kwasny. Nelson, Kunke, 
O'Toole, Ryan: Rear Row— Hejna, DuBroek, 
Hagamami. Hughes, Keneaiy, Catalano, Strns- 
ser. 




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MDXL • SOCIETY OF 




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mvetM 



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Cell 



(I 



Father John J. mathery, s. J. 

former president of Loyola University, in 

whose administration the University 

College was established in 1914 



Since going to uigh.1 school seems to be a modem adventure 
in education, it will be surprising to know that Loyola's Uni- 
versity College has been in existence since 1D14. 

Ii was established for the convenience of those who are not 
able to attend class during the day, but who are willing to sac- 
rifice part of their evenings for education. In this way they are 
not neglected because of their handicap and may continue in 
their pursuit of learning. 

This branch of the University offers a curriculum leading to 
the baccalaureate degrees. The members of the faculty teaching 
in this division of the University are, with hut a few exceptions, 
also teaching on the North Side campus. Apart from this, it 
functions as a separate group, having its own dean. Father Egan. 
Moreover, this school operates under a different semestral system, 
in thai the year consists of three quarters, which is equivalent 
to three semesters work. In this way more material is covered ami 
in a more concentrated fashion. 




The Reverend 
Thomas A. Egan, S.J. 
n of the University College 



Doctor Helen Langee May 
Dean of Women and Assistant Professor of French 



Doctor Samuel M. Steward 
Assistant Professor of English 




11 



Due to thi' husv life of its students, the University College 
does not have the great diversity of activities which the Lake 
Shore Campus has. The Loyola Service Guild is a social organi- 
zation which sponsors lectures and gives parties for the benefit 
of the pour. The Delia Strada Sodality provides the students 
with a spiritual environment and climaxes its activities in a -i 
annual retreat. The Alumnae Association of the College yearly 
takes means to enlarge its scholarship fund. 



The entrance to the Downtown College. 




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u»miuw.uMummi**iMHMmm*Ml> 




^ £3 ^ g| ft is 




UNDERGRADUATES 

1. UNIVERSITY COLLEGE. Front Bom) — Dempsey, Lan- 
cotot, Bogdziewicz, Ryan, Brown, Kennedy, O'Shea, Riordan ; 
Middle Row — Carroll, Lenert, Barron, Thoner, Zenilicka, Mc- 
Cormick, James; Rear Row- — Walton, Javaras, Becht, Frank- 
lin, Cogley, Jewett, Kabat, Damko, Vannucci. 

2. UNIVERSITY COLLEGE. Front Ron — Reid, McBride, 
Carlson, Sprieger, Banahan, Zwiefke, Guerrieri, Schradel ; 
Middle Row — Davidson, Fox, Kelly, Toniaso, Hayes, Veatch, 
Fassier, Pavey; Rear Row — Teasdale. Wolta, Martin, Feeny, 
Corcoran, Hisert, Spadea, Curt in, Durhan. 

3. UNIVERSITY COLLEGE: Front Bow— Coleman, Ellenz, 
Toomey, Lyons, Kotula, Vannucci, Wilson, Lischalk; Middle 
Roiv — Hurtubise, Neimet, McNamara, Petraitis, Carlson, 
Paluszek, Cleland, Konopa ; Rear Row — Tatge, Cppon, Such, 
Lemske. Mangis, Stannard, Czech, Chudik, Samp. 

4. UNIVERSITY COLLEGE. Front Ron — Perry, Bev- 
tnan, Gluck, Fitzgerald, Butler, Wickman, Maher, Wittmeyer; 
Middle Row — Daran, Rempe, Bailey. Baumann, Homer, Cor- 
der, Grotefeld ; Rear Rotv — Nable, Murphy, McElligoIt, Sulli- 
van, Sayre, Kassel, Witnik, Slvan, Tarns. 

5. UNIVERSITY COLLEGE. Front Row — Sullivan, De- 
laney. White, Feeley, Jennings, Radell, Reel, Jones; 
Middle Rmr — Slianahan, Flynn, Doyle, Simmons, Coduto, 
Dunphy, Oakes, Freese, Marciniak; Rear Row — DeNeo, Mc- 
Nellis, Clarett, Hahn, Koleski, Stewart, Love, Monaco, Folland, 
McCarthy. 

6. UNIVERSITY COLLEGE. Front Row—Lnpo, Doyle, 
Johnson, McNally, Saunders, Crowe; Middle Row — McHugh, 
Burns, Jennings, Bomba, Hodapp. Tatge; Rear Row — Armin, 
Dunne, Daley, McG-nire. Hurler, Zinn, Colin. 



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LOYOLA • MCMXL 



it; 



MDXL • SOCIETY OF 




<£«ft*©*0 



7. UNIVERSITY COLLEGE. Front Kom— Vaughan, 
Gooker, Schofield, Grocyanna, De Meo, Rickert, Prossos; 
Second Row — Traub, Preib, Byrne, Clifford, Boyd, Bona, 
Harris; Rear Row — Shelby, Larson, Baskett, Hoefling, Gold- 
en, Rieck, Molloy, Byrne. 

8. UNIVERSITY COLLEGE. Front Sow— Kelly, Nobel, 
Leahy, Dawson. Stanton, McEnery; Middle Row — Iniorio, 
Detrana, Thornton, Zinn. Lynch; Rear Row — Thurow, 
Polchlopek, Sterbentz. 

9. UNIVERSITY COLLEGE. Front Ron — Derby, Gast. 
Murphy, Mascione, Delaney, O'Connell, Johnson, O'Brien, 
Flynn ; Middle Row — Bohor. Fitzpatrick. Sexton, Cagney, 
Kalinaskas, Edison, Grady, O'Neill; Rear Row — Crane, Ton- 
er, Carroll, Binz, Murray, McGowan, Walsh, Christian, Miller, 
Keefer. 

10. UNIVERSITY COLLEGE. Front Ron — O'Gorman, 
Feehan, Cozzens, Keenan, Ghormley ; Middle Row — Sayre, 
Langdon, Geraty, Carey, Fitzgerald, Bencur; Rear Row — Van 
Riemsdyk, Collins, Cox, Dillon, King, Black. 

11. UNIVERSITY COLLEGE. Front Row— Guest, Koppa, 
Harper, Corboy, Ringins, O'Donnell, Schulty; Middle Row — 
Boss, Rainbow, Johnson, O'Regan, Jordan, Coleman, Sladeck, 
Collins, Mattia; Rear Row— Hruby, Heintz, Kasper, Wilgen, 
Shields, Johnson, Trahey, Greensley, Gersa, Carroll. 

12. UNIVERSITY COLLEGE. Front Row—Yorisek, Hill, 
Dussell, Hausman, Dostal, Steinmetz; Rear Row— Bowler, 
Stewart, Melin, O'Connor, Hanna, Di Leone, Masterson, 
Bowler. 




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acKen, 



The reverend Allan P. Farrell, S.J. 

first Dean of West Baden College 
was appointed in 1934 



Wesl Baden College, once the world famed West-Baden 
Springs Hotel, is the philosophical seminary of the ( Jhicago 
Province of the Society of Jesus. It is academically a unit of Loy- 
ola University. Here the young men engaged in the long course 
of Jesuit training preparatory to their future work in education 
and I he sacred ministry devote three years to a uniquely thorough 
course of philosophy. 

Philosophy is the major intellectual diet of the young Jesuits 
at West Laden. Further cultural and scientific studies also con- 
tribute, however, to a thorough preparation for the varied duties 
of the Jesuit . History, Knglish, Latin and Greek, Mathematics, 
Economics, Pedagogy, Sacred Oratory, and a course in the 
Natural Sciences from the viewpoint of contact with philosophy 
thus find place in the curriculum offered. 

The energy and varied interests of the young; clerics has led 
during the year to many further activities of an academic nature. 
Chief among these is the Sodality. Aimed specifically at future 
work in directing Sodality activity, the West Baden unit devoted 
itself throughout the scholastic year to study and practice in five 
major fields. The Literature Group dealt with the problems of 
directing a successful study unit in Catholic literature for high 

scl I boys. Knowledge of the missions through fact and story 

was the interesting objecl of the .Mission Group's endeavor. 

Catholic journalism was studied from various angles by the 
Fourth Estate, which also began this year to provide a weekly col- 
umn of Catholic information and comment called "Talking It 
Over" in the local paper and in that of a neighboring town. The 
Social Action unit studied the Pope's plans for social reconstruc- 
tion, while the ( 'alholic Evidence Guild section busied itself with 
various forms of round-table discussion, informal dialogue, map 
talks, and narral ion of experience with non-( 'atholics in its efforts 
to equip its members with essential Catholic facts and the most 
interest ing ways of presenting them to persons spiritually less for- 
tunate. 




Thk Rkvkrexh 
Thomas J. Donnelly, S.J. 
Rector of West Baden College 



48 




A winter view of West Baden College taken 
by Mr. Schnieders, S.J., Theologian at West 
Baden College. 



Dramatics, with its valuable experience and cultural benefits, 
also found place in the crowded program of the young Jesuits. 
On November 24, Mr. Robert Pingstock, S.J., and the cast work- 
ing under his direction produced Henry IV, Part I, with highly 
commendable artistic skill. The Shrove Monday play, directed by 
Mr. Walter Farrell, S.J., was the tensely dramatic Old Wang of 
Henri Gheon. 



x 

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MDCCCLXX • 



49 




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FIRST YEAR PHILOSOPHY. 
Seated — O'Kane, Downey, Walsh, 
Owens, Sommer, Schmitt ; Standing 
— Larch, Maher, Small, Liston, Cor- 
nillie. McNerney, Wilzbacher, Will- 
nes, Follen. 



SECOND YEAR PHILOSOPHY. 
Front Rote — Hughes, Henry, Gib- 
bons, Farrell, O'Kelly, Liska, Ronan, 
Lovely; Second Row — Manion, 
Harvanek, Mattingly, Knoepfle, 
Huchra, Forsthoefel, Becker; Third 
Row — Keleher, Osuch, Burke, E. E., 
Hartmann, Milunas, Schuchert, 
Woods, Mentag ; Rear Row — Har- 
don, Pingstock, Martin, Stegman, 
Blan chard, Finan, Purcell, Dunn, 
Welt in. 



ORCHESTRA. Standing — Burke, 
E. W., Schuchert, Pingstock, Sulli- 
van, McKechney ; Seated — Peters, 
Mentag, Downey, Shanley, Conrath, 
Schmidt, Rosenfelder, Cornillie, Mar- 
tin, Williams, Ronan. 



THIRD YEAR PHILOSOPHY. 
Front Row — Rosenfelder, McNeeve, 
Williams, Rowland. Peterman, 
Downing ; Second Row — Pollauf, 
McKechney, Sell wind, Yaughan, 
Burke, E. W., Shanley; Rear Row 
— Wenzel, Birney, Schoder, Hecht, 
Conroy, Conrath. 



ACTIYITIES OFFICIALS. Seated 
— Becker, Conroy, Rosenfelder, Pol- 
lauf, Stegman, Peterman, Har- 
vanek ; Standing — Finan, Woods, 
McKechney, Heeht, Ronan, Osuch, 
Follen, Weltin. 



LOYOLA • MCMXI. 



50 



MDXL • SOCIETY OF 




cz$ "clival ar cz~>acial 




ark 



in 



THE REVEREND FREDERIC SlEDENBURG, S.J., 

first Dean of the School of Social Work 

held office from 1914 to 1932 



2 

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x 



During the past four centuries, the Jesuits have known fame 
for their zeal in teaching Christian principles to young people 
who have had to take their places in a world that has sorely 
needed such principles. With no less zeal have they at Loyola 
University sought to impart to social workers these same Chris- 
tian fundamentals without which there can be no adequate service 
to the needy poor. 

In 191-1. the late Reverend Frederic Siedenburg. S.J., organized 
the Department of Sociology, for the express purpose of introduc- 
ing into Catholic colleges a sociology founded on Christian prin- 
ciples. Since that time, a separate professional school of social 
work has developed under the deanship of the Reverend Elmer 
A. Barton, S. J. In keeping with the Jesuit ideals, it teaches not 
only the necessary professional theory and practice, but it also 
imparts the fundamental principles of philosophy and ethics. 
It is today, one of thirty-eight schools comprising the American 
Association of Schools of Social Work and is the oldest of the six 
Catholic schools of its kind in the country. 

With the development of governmental programs has come 
expansion in the public welfare courses. The inclusion of Hous- 




The Keverexd 
Elmer A. Barton, S.J. 

Dean of the 
School of Social Work 



Doctor Boman L. Haeemski 
instructor in Child Welfare 



Elizabeth E. Lloyd 
director of Field Work 




51 



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JESUS • MCMXL 



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X 

□ 



ing, Health Insurance, and State Action for Children are in- 
dicative of the attempt to meet changing needs. The most signi- 
ficant addition of the year was the introduction of a sequence in 
medical social work under the direction of Miss Aileen McBrien, 
M.A., at Mercy Hospital. 

An innovation in 1939 was the monthly Forum sponsored by 
the Dean, the Reverend Elmer A. Barton, S.J. An occasion was 
thus provided for the students and their guests to participate in 
lively discussions of important welfare topics of the moment. 
Socialized medicine, unions for professionals, the functions of pri- 
vate agencies, categorical assistance, and merit systems were 
but a few of the subjects that aroused serious debate. 



.SCHOOL OF SOCIAL "WORK. First Bow— Bredlau, Back, Brimstin, Reardon ; Second ffoir— Sprafka. Wilkins, Rowan, Listinan, 
Jaszczak; Third How — Carnes, Wenigman, Brady, Marciniak; Fourth Hon- — Davis, Jesicak, Karpen, Aries, Mullen, Egan; 
Fifth How — Trusky, Loeffler, Jones, Harris, Latman. 

First How — Clough, Loeffler, Jesieak, Krasniewski, Ragu, Ginsberg; Second How — Karpen, Listwan, Harris, Ferguson, Boden, 
Chevy; Third Sow — Straiten, Lotman, Aries, Bell, Pyles, Iversky; Fourth How — Davis, Powell, Back, O'Connor, Dardwin, 
Biraz; Fifth Bow — Lynch, Martin, Mullen, Reardon, Wilkins, Marciniak; Sixth How — Brimstin, Pavlik, Bredlan, Carnes, 
Jaszczak. 




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53 



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The Reverend Terence h. ahearn, S.J. 

who was appointed in 1935 as the first 

Dean of the Consolidated Loyola University 

School of Nursing 



Sister Helen Jaeeell, R.N., A.M. 

Directress of the Loyola University School of 

Nursing 




LOYOLA • MCMXL 



54 



MDXL • SOCIETY OF 



Under Father Ahearn the hospitals affiliated with Loyola 
were consolidated into a school with a united curriculum. Under 
this setup, the educational policy as well as the administrative 
function is vested in the president of the University. Each school 
is governed by a council composed of the directress, a regent and 
two members from the hospital staff. They are supervised by the 
Administrative Board which consists of the various directresses 
of the hospitals. Through them comes the policy of the various 
units to be ratified by the president. 



IT, 

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Leonie See, president of the senior cla^s at tlu 
St. Bernard School of Nursing. 



Winona Schmidt, president of the senior class at 
St. Elizabeth's School of Nursing. 



Rose Mastronardi, president of the senior class 
at the Columbus School of Nursing. 



Marjory Closer, president of the senior class at 
the St. Anne's School of Nursing. 



Clara Pembroke, president of the senior class of 
the Oak Park School of Nursing. 



Rose Mary Kelz, president of the senior class at 
the St. Francis' School of Nursing. 




55 



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JESUS • MCMXL 



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St. Bernard's Hospital 
St. Antic's Hospital 



St. Francis' Hospital 



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Columbus Hospital 



Oak Park Hospital < 

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St. Elizabeth's Hospital O 

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MDCCCLXX • -J 



57 




•Sister Helen Jarrell, R.N., A.M. 

Directress of Nursing at the St. 

Bernard 's School of Nursing 



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School of Nursing 

In 1903, St. Bernard's Hospital was founded by the Re- 
ligious Hospitallers of St. Joseph, an order of Canadian Nuns. 
The School of Nursing offers a complete and intensive course in 
nursing education. The nurses' residence is one of the best 
equipped and newest in the city. Provision is made for each 
nurse to have a private room, completely and attractively fur- 
nished. The building contains a chapel, library, spacious audi- 
torium, classrooms, and laboratories of the highest quality. 

The spiritual program consists of an annual three day re- 
treat for each class, active participation in the sodality and at- 
tendance at lectures and conferences throughout the year. 

Socially the nurses participate in qvute a variety of activi- 
ties. The freshman welcome party and the senior ball are prob- 
ably the two outstanding social affairs. Besides these two, plays, 
motion pictures, dances, picnics, and sleigh ride parties, fill the 
nurses' program. The concluding event of the year is the senior 
picnic at which they are the guests of the Alumnae Association. 



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ST. BERNARD'S JUNIORS. 
Front Row — M. O'Neil, L. 
Crowe, E. Logan, J. Burckal, 
Sister Anna, Sister Mary Clare, 
Sister Teresa, M. Collachia, M. 
Finigan, H. Barry, I. Eischeid; 
Rear Row — V. Tierney, B. 
Dougherty. C, Merrick, A. Past- 
rnak, L. Bergin, M. Boldue, H. 
Brohm, D, Cullinan, M. Sinn, C. 
Gallagher, V. Guthrie, R. Ten- 
1 1 \ son. 



ST. BERNARD'S FRESHMEN. 
Front Row — A. King, G. Meli- 
char, M. Judge, O. Santora. F. 
Bomba, Sister M. Paschalisa, 
Sister M. Leonoria, L, Cusack, 
H. Jones, M. Gleich, F. Weber, 
E. Donnelly; Rear Row — E. 
Breen, M. Graff, L. Lynn, A. 
Nikolai, L. Hering, D. Schilling, 
J. Richards, E. Kowalski, M. 
Spellacy, E. Rogers, S. Eisin, 



LOYOLA 

58 



• MCMXL 



MDXL • SOCIETY OF 



St. CllraLtli\ 



School of \ in-si ii u 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital was founded in 1886 by the Poor 

Handmaids of Jesus Christ. In 1914 the nursing school was 
founded and when, in 1020. the new hospital was erected it lie- 
came affiliated with the university. 

Particular emphasis is placed upon religious activities at St. 
Elizabeth's. The annual three day retreat is the most important 
of these, although the coronation of the Blessed Virgin in May, 
and the singing of Christmas carols are also outstanding events 
in their religious life. 

Socially the nurses also engage in a considerable variety of 
affairs. The annual initiation of freshmen nurses culminating 
in the Halloween "•weenie" roast, the Christmas party with the 
presenting of gifts and the singing of carols, and the Senior hall 
all aid in filling their social calendar. 

With the Senior ball, most of the social activities of the year 
terminate. Graduation is the final step for the seniors; advance- 
ment for the underclassmen is their goal. Both of these aims have 
been brought about by the happy combination of work and play 
throughout the school year. 




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Sister Mary Cornelia, R.X., B.S. 

Directress (if the St. Klizaltrtli 

School of Nursing 



ST. ELIZABETH JUNIORS. 
Front Row — Gianutsos, Arns, 
Cassidy, Minter, Sister Provi- 
dencia, Niven, McCabe. Kwilosz, 
Falkenbere;, DeBates ; Middle 
Row — Michno, McDonald, Nei- 
TTian, Benante, Charkowski, Oeth, 
Conway, Gallagher. Murphy ; 
Rmr Row — League, Jacobs, Sto- 
jak, Wellens, Spanier. Machery. 
Carroll, Sherraak, Grenkovitz, 
DnFon. 



ST. ELIZABETH FRESHMEN. 
Front Row — Basten, Krol. Nib- 
lick, Sister Gerald, Sister Ros- 
anne, Sister Ruth Marie, Sister 
Petronella, Hoesel, Trowske, Riz- 
zo; Middle Row — Pachen, Wil- 
lis, Gerlach, Sostarich, "Wodniak, 
Stemler, McNamara. Ohsann, 
DaMart, Donohue; Rear Row — 
Kliinek, Huston, Kominowski, 
Bradfield, Pachen, OXonnell, 
Schulze, Gilbert, Herbert, Ger- 
lach, Gerlach. 







59 



JESUS • MCMXL 



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Sister II. Clement, R.X., A.B. 
Directress of the Columbus School of Nursing 



K^alufiibiU 



School of Nursing 

Founded in l!l()."i by Blessed Mother Frances Cabrini, Co- 
lumlms Hospital is not only a medical centre but also possesses 
a highly accredited nursing school. Maintained by the Mission- 
ary Sisters of the Sacred Heart, it provides the regular three- 
year course in nursing. During this time the student is given 
both theoretical and practical work in the department of obstet- 
rics, gynecology, medicine, pediatrics, orthopedics, diet therapy 
and emergency work. 

The hospital is fortuitously located across from Lincoln Park. 
This proximity affords the nurses ample opportunity to indulge 
in nearby recreational facilities. In the summer there is swim- 
ming, picnicking in fall and spring, and ice-skating in the winter. 

The Sodality of Mary, because of its religious significance is the 
most important nursing' organization. Under the leadership of 
the Sodality, the Nurses maintain the annual custom of singing 
Christmas carols on the eve of the feast, and the distributing of 
holly to the patients. The coronation of the Blessed Virgin in 
May is the most beautiful event of the vear. 




COLUMBUS JUNIORS. Front 
Role — Hennessey, Music. Jarosz. 
Belniak, Shurpit, Schaub; Sec- 
ond Row — Driscoll. Siulrovech, 
Uher, Crisanti, O'Donnell, Zan- 
in. -lurionas, Pescoller; Rear 
Row — Corbett, Williams. Hey- 
dens. Randall, McGee, Back, Los- 
kowski. Kaywood. 



COLUMBUS FRESHMEN. 
Front Roir—ZaUo, McCarthy, 
Came, Dwyer, Burke ; Middle 
Row — Lamach, Gac, Rogers; 
Rear Row — Franzen, Ricea, 
Payne, Shaughnessy, Gilbert, 
Delerville. 



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School of \iii-siiij; 

St. Anne's Hospital, originally organized as an auxiliary to 
St. Elizabeth's Hospital to care lor tuberculosis patients, was 
chartered as a separate unit in PHIS. The nursing school was 
opened in 1913. 

'Phis year has seen a new superintendent of nurses. Sister M. 
Will ia who took office duly 16, 1939. This year Sister Willia or- 
ganized a Parent -Nurses association which has already been suc- 
cessful ; one of their recent purchases for the nurses has been a 
sixteen millimeter movie projector equipped with sound. An 
orchestra was also organized this year by Miss Lindsay, assistant 
superintendent. 

The Senior class held their annual dance at the .Morrison in 
November and a Skirt and Sweater Hop at Columbus Park Hall 
before Lent. The Junior class also held their social affairs in- 
cluding a Hallowe'en party at the school and a "Professional 
Swing" at the Colonial Club in Oak Park. 

The preliminary class were raised to the dignity of Fresh- 
men at the capping ceremonies on December 21 after which all 
classes were entertained at a Christmas party sponsored by the 
Parent-Nurses Association. 



I'M 




Sister Mary Willia, K.N., B.S. 
ctress of tin' St. Anne School of NTursiiig 



ST. ANNE JUNIORS. First 
Row — Burke. Monhan, W'eske, 
Wilson, Schmidt, Bradfield, iia- 
lone, Anderson, Szyper ; Second 
Row — Fruzynski, Plotz, Samp- 
son, Mersch, Hoessler, Sayen, 
Deiehstetter; Thud Row — Bur- 
nett, Conway, Lynch, Shaffery, 
Curtin, Kartje, Luby, Cantwell, 
Rear Roiv — O'Connor, Walsh, 
Gibbons, Murphy, Neuwirth, 
Hughes, Tragni, Kriegsgeld, 
Rose, Meagher, St. Onge, Guy. 



ST. ANNE FRESHMEN. First 
Row — Merna, Rupp, Petrowski, 
Miller, Fitzpatrick, Koch, Been- 
ing, Cleland, Schober; Second 
Row — Christensen, Winters, Kir- 
by, Zeller, Butler, Condon, 
Charlton, Aicllo, Hodas, McMen- 
amin, Conboy, Poterek, Den- 
ning; Rear Row — Schiffler, Me- 
Donough, Chawk, Leach, Bene- 
cek, Knittel, Walderbach, Mor- 
row, Murray, J., Murray, B., 
Lhotka. 




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IIIIIIINUUJIIIJIIIIUIBB 



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Sister St. Timothy, R.N., Ph.B. 
Directress of the Oak Park School of Nursing 



Oak fttk 
School of Nursing 

In 1 !)17 the Oak Park School of Nursing under the direction 
of the Sisters of Miserieorde became affiliated with Loyola and 
in 1933 it became one of its nursing units. 

The round of activities at the scl 1 is well organized and 

quite complete. In September the new group of twenty-five pre- 
clinical students entertained the upper classmen and graduates 
at a traditional evening gathering. The October dance proved to 
be a successful affair both financially and socially. 

In December the Glee Club under the direction of Mrs. John 
Conway presented an operetta followed by the Dramatic Club's 
presentation of a Christmas Play. The Christmas party itself 
and the singing of carols, both traditional activities closed the 
year. 

The three day retreat in March conducted by the Reverend 
Henry J. Walsh was an important spiritual function. The final 
school dance was given by the Seniors on April 1st. and the social 
climax of the year was attained by the University's Senior Ball 
held in Mav. 



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OAK PARK JUNIORS. Front 
.Row) — Miurs, Curtis, Scharep, 
Castle. Schroeder, Eiselt; Second 
Row — Cosch, Yaudenhroucke, 
Sheedy, Behn, Krueger, Dooley; 
Rear Rot'- — Humph re ville. No- 
wak. Zitkovich, Vausrhan. Hoff, 
Scluerhorn, Kirby, Sterling. 



/ 



OAK PARK FRESHMAN. Front 
Row — West, Bozie, Goulding, 
Cusack, Holdorf, Hosslin ; Sec- 
ond Row — Klinefelter, McPar- 
land, Paull. Boeiusky, McDade, 
Maiers, Claess, Claus ; Rear Row 
— Bastien, Bries, Mueller, Bins- 
field. Bily, Feyereisen, Allan, 
Murphy, Kirkpatrick. 



LOYOLA • MCMXL 



62 



MDXL • SOCIETY OF 



St. J)% 



tancu 



Siliool of Nursing 

The St. Francis School of Nursing is the northermost of the 
Loyola affiliated units. It has a bed capacity of :!l!n and is attended 
by a medical staff of seventy-six members and a visiting staff of 
about fifty other doctors. The Nurses' Residence has a spacious 
lounge and reception rooms, together with a solarium on each 
floor. The educational unit consists of a large lecture room, dem- 
onstration room, and laboratories for dietetics and the biological 
sciences. 

The social activities are varied with each group holding its 
own significant and memorable events. The Freshmen are wel- 
comed at an outdoor party in September. The capping and candle 
lighting ceremony takes place four months after their admission 
to the school. The Junior and Senior groups hold a number of 
parties throughout the year, but the crowning social effort is the 
annual spring formal which is in effect a farewell gesture of the 
seniors to their fellow students and their school. The spiritual 
exercises consist of an annual retreat, membership in the Sodality 
and the crowning of the Blessed Virgin by a student selected 
Hay Queen. 




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Directri 



Sister M. Gertrtidis, R.X. 
3 of the St. Francis School of Nursing 



ST. FRANCIS .irxniRs — 

First Ron S. Barton, M. Eekes. 

P. Duffy. J. Reinke. B. Wertz. 
,T. O'Toole, J. Kelly, J. Lochner, 
E. Christiansoii : Second Row — 

A. Riddiford, B. Morton, R. Dix. 

B. Riser, H. Miller, R. Smillie. 
R. Schwinn, N. Seattrave, C. 
Bagley, M. Link, J. Stevenson, 
A. Blough. H. Crawler; Rear 
Row — C. Briertv. M. Peart, C. 
Nied, G. Clissold, B. Stall, H. 
Klinker, G. Eack, M. Moran, C. 
Lenzi, R. Ford. 



ST. FRANCIS FRESHMEN— 
First Ron — F. Gardiner, R. 
Grennan. A. Wall. A. O'Hart, E. 
Schram, A. Lovewell, M. Polaeh. 
R. Jobusch, E. Graham; Second 
Roir — F Si-dlari-k, E. Towle, J. 
Forgie, F. Connelly, R. Potter, 
M. Reynolds, J. Painter, M. Pat- 
terson, Z. Vidok. B. Roth, R. 
Weiae, J. Behlke. D. Koski, E. 

Esu'ert; Rear Rou A. Herzog, 

D. Lies, E. Wedemeyer, K. Jus- 
ten, B. Hanlev, M. Heaton, C. 
Ried, J. Butted, M. LeSarge, V. 
Brown, M. Kleinfehn. 



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JESUS • MCMXL 




Careful preparation of all antisep- 
tics is one of the first duties which a 
student nurse must learn. 



Dissecting cats in biology provides 
the nurses with a knowledge of verte- 
brate anatomy. 



Preparing meals comes primarily 
under the head of nursing education 
and more particularly under the head 
of dietetics. 



An ample supply of sterile bandages 
must always lie on hand so a few 
nurses are always assigned the duly 
of helping prepare them. 



Keeping reports on the progress of 
the patients to assist the doctor's daily 
diagnosis is extremely important. 



Theoretic anatomy classes are part 
of the regular curriculum leading to 
the Registered Nurse degree. 



The nurses also eat occasionally; 
this picture was snapped of two of 
them receiving their trays. 



Prayer and religious instruction is 
an integral part of the curriculum in 
the Loyola University School of Nurs- 



64 




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u 



MDCCCLXX 

65 



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David F. Bremner of the class of 
1891 is one of the school 's outstand- 
ing graduates. He is president of 
the Bremner Biscuit Company and is 
also a member of Loyola 's Admin- 
istrative Council. 



Loyola's 
lor 
Seventy Years 



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Upon no other foundation than its graduates does the true reputation of any 
University depend. Loyola University can be no exception to this rule and as a 
consequence it looks to those men who are working in all the varied fields of 
activity in the world to reflect credit upon their teachers. Prom the first gradu- 
ate of Saint Ignatius College, almost seventy years ago, to the present class of 
1940, there have been many who reflected only good. They have proved a credit 
to their Catholic training holding high the ideals in which they have been in- 
structed. It is to produce this type of Catholic leadership that Loyola exists. 
That it has produced such leadership is her justification of existence. 

Loyola's graduates have been leaders. Many well-known men have been the 
products of the Jesuit training either at old Saint Ignatius or at the present 
university. They have fulfilled that function for which the Jesuits have ever 
striven, namely: providing the modern world with Catholic leadership. But yet 
these outstanding leaders are necessarily but a fraction of the army of gradu- 
ates. It is to that great majority of men and women who have founded Catholic 
homes, who have maintained the Catholic ideal by their example, that Loyola 
has looked and will continue to look as the exemplars of its purpose. The great 
leaders lack a certain reality that lessens the effect of their example; those who 
lead the daily life of the ordinary man have far greater opportunities to aid 
in the personal sanctification of their neighbors. 

This volume has been dedicated throughout to those Jesuits who have been 
concerned with the founding of the various schools of the University or who 
have by their efforts given an impetus to some branch of school activities. But 
their work means absolutely nothing without the cooperation of those whom 
they have instructed. The cavalcade of Catholic youth winch reaches back 
through seventy years of Chicago's history are the crucial test of Jesuit training; 
they are the ones who will try in the tires of the world the temper of their edu- 
cation. That sonic will fall by the wayside is regrettable but not unexpected; 
but that most will remain true to the ideals which have been inculcated in 
them — that is not only desired but it is positively necessary. Xo wonder that 
at the bottom of the " Loyolan's ( 'ode of Honor' ' are placed these words. "Loyola's 
greatest pride must be her graduates." 



LOYOLA • MCMXL 



tin 



MDXL • SOCIETY OF 



Within but a few short weeks after the publication of this volume the Seniors 
whose names are listed in the succeeding pages will join that ever-increasing army 
of Loyola alumni. For most of them it turns the last page on one of the major 
chapters of their life. From this point on, they enter other spheres of influence of 
which their long period of preparation has been in anticipation. A school is but 
an artificial world at best, but it does reproduce in a mimic way many of the diffi- 
culties which the graduate will later face in a more stern reality. Most of the 
campus leaders will continue their career of leadership into later life. 

It is to the Seniors that the lot falls of guiding the destinies of the student body 
through that form of student government which has been set up. The head of the 
Loyola Union is faced with this problem and for this reason this position is the 
most responsible and honored elective office in the university. Emanuel Wil- 
helm, Medical School Senior, has discharged his duties as Union head throughout 
the year creditably and successfully. Fred L. Brandstrader. as President of the 
Bar Association, had the direction of the Law School's governing body in his 
charge. Martin 'Shaughnessy has been faced with the task of coordinating the 
activities of the Student Council of the Lake Shore Campus. 

The heads of the Senior Classes on the various campuses are men who have 
been considered by their fellow classmates as having executive ability, and an 
active interest in the welfare of the school and of their class. They not only rep- 
resent their class in the councils of the student governing body but they also 
assume additional responsibility for the success of the various social functions 
which their class undertakes. ( hi the Arts < lampus this year the Senior < 'lass was 
headed by John Devaney who capably fulfilled the requirements of his office, while 
Edward Galapeaux at the Medical School was chosen by his classmates to repre- 
sent them. The Presidency of Blue Key was held by John O'Connor of the Law 
School. 

If this class continues in the promise it has shown then t nily " Loyola 's pride 
will be in her graduates." 



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Emanuel Wilhelm, President 
of the Loyola Union. 
Martin O 'Shaughnessy, Pres- 
ident of the Arts Council 
Fred Brandstrader, Presi- 
dent of the Junior Bar Asso- 
ciation. 



Edward Galapeaux, Presi- 
dent of the Medical School 
Senior Class 

John Devaney, President of 
the Arts Senior Class 
John O 'Connor, President of 
Blue Key 








67 



nsm 







1^ ^2> ^^^H^M^HiaNgfeh^-^n^ "^_ j* 

BERNSTEIN BERTUCCI SR.M. CLEMENTINE BLANCHARD BLASIOLE BLOOMQUIS'lj 




OMB A 



BOONE 



BOTTINO 



BOYD BRANDSTRADER BBEIT 



68 



Charles Edward Ahlm, B.S.M., Certifi- 
cate in Medicine; $>X ; entered from John 
Carroll University and Cathedra! Latin ; 
Volini Medical Society; Moorehead Surgi- 
cal Seminar; Cleveland, Ohio. 

"Wesley Ogden Alyen. Th.B., Bachelor nf 
Philosophy ; entered from Northern Baptist 
Theological Seminary and Carl Schurz 
High School; Chicago, Illinois. 



Mary Carroll Anderson, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Denfeld High School; 

Duluth. Minnesota. 

Raymond Otho Bailey, Bachelor of Phi- 
losophy; entered from Indiana University, 
Gary College, and Valparaiso University; 
Gary, Indiana. 



Mabel Catherine Ballas, Registered 
Nurse ; entered from Resurrection High 
School ; Chicago, Illinois. 

William J. Barrett, Bachelor of Science 
in Commerce; entered from St. Ignatius 
High School ; Monogram Club ; Sodality 
3, 4; Cudahy Debating 1, 2; Debating So- 
ciety 3, 4; Track 2 ; St. Thomas More Club 
2, 3; Economic Seminar 4; Finance Club 
4 ; Chicago, Illinois. 



John Willlvm Barry, B.S., Certificate in 
Medicine; <I>X ; AP; entered from DePaul 
Academy ; Honorary Medical Seminar ; 
Moorhead Surgical Seminar 3, 4 ; Volini 
Medical Society, 3, 4 ; Chicago, Illinois. 

Wilder Walter Bartels, B.S., Certifi- 
cate in Medicine : <pMA ; 4>X ; entered from 
Northwestern University; Volini Medical 
Seminar ; Honorary Medical Seminar ; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Ilya G. BARTOLOMEI. Registered Nurse; 
entered from Maine Township High 
School; Des Plaines, Illinois. 



Harry L. Barton, B.S.M., Certificate in 
Medicine; ITM4> : AP ; entered from Crane 
Junior College, and Lewis Institute; Moor- 
head Surgical Seminar ; Manistee, Michi- 
ga n . 



Ione Crow Baskett. Bachelor of Sci- 
ence , entered from Southeast Missouri 
State Teachers College and Crossett High 
School; Crossett, Arkansas. 

Alyix Francis Bates, B.S.M., Certificate 
in Medicine; entered from Curl Schurz 
High School; Chicago, Illinois 



John G. Beall. B.S.M., Certificate in 
Medicine; $X; AP; entered from Michigan 
Central State College, and Grand Rapids 
Junior College; Blue Key; Honorary Medi- 
cal Seminar; Moorhead Surgical Seminar; 
Volini Medical Seminar; Sophomore Class 
President ; Elgin, Illinois. 

Walter G. Becker, S.J., Bachelor of 
Arts; entered from Northwestern Univer- 
sity, Xavier University, and St. Mel Hish 
School: Sodality 3, 4, Secretary 4; Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 



Charles Casimir Benz, B.S.M., Certifi- 
cate in Medidrve; IIM<t» ; entered from New 
York University; Honorary Medical Sem- 
inar; Moorhead Surgical Society; Volini 
Medical Society; Interfraternity Council; 
New York City, New York. 

Barnabas Stefan Bereczky, Bachelor of 
Science; AXZ ; entered from Lindblom 
High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Chemical 
Club 1, 2. 3. 4; Tennis Team Manager 4; 
Biology Club 1, 2; Loyolan 4; Chicago, 
Illinois. 



HT'ijh Bernardi. Bachelor of Science; 
entered from Collegio Municipale Alassio 
(Savona) Italy; Sodality 3, 4; Gorman 
Club 3, President 4; Hishwood, Illinois. 



Sister Mary Bernardo, Registered 
Nurse; entered from St. Francis Hospital; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Elmer Bernstein, B.S.M., Certificate in 
Medicine: 4>AK: entered from Lewis Insti- 
tute and John Marshall High School; Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 

Joseph Anthony Bertucci. B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine ; AP; entered from 
Austin High School ; Loyola Honorary 
Medical Seminar: Moorhead Surgical 
Seminar; Volini Medical Seminar; Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 



Sister Mary Clementine Bisku, Ad. 
PP,S., Registered Nurse; entered from St. 
Joseph Academy; Columbia, Penn. 



John Lodger Blanchard, S.J., Bachelor 
nf Arts; entered from Xavier University; 
Sodalitv 3, 4; Glee Club 3, 4; Toledo, 
Ohio. 



Ralph S. Blasiole, A.B., Certifienle, in 
Medicine ; 4>A9; entered from Wayncsbiiry 
College and Greensburg High School ; 
Honorary Seminar ; Greensburg, Penna. 

Ethel Louise Bloomquist, R.N., Biielie- 
lor of Philosophy ; entered from Ashland 
County Normal, and St. Luke's Training 
School for Nurses: Ashland, Wisconsin. 



Harold W. Boedeker, C.P.A., Bachelor 
of Science in Commerce; entered from 
De Paul University and De Paul Acad- 
emy; Chicago, Illinois. 

Carol Louise Boehm, Registered Nurse; 
entered from College of Saint Teresa and 
Merrill High School, Merrill. Wisconsin. 



Katitryn Bogue. Registered Nurse; en- 
tered from Flower High School; Chicago, 
Illinois. 



Richard James Roland, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Commerce ; AAI*; entered from 
Loyola Academy ; Loyola News 1. 2, 3, 
Business Manager 4 ; Sodality 1, 2. 3 ; 
Student Council 4; Loyola Union 4; Eco- 
nomic Seminar 3. 4; Chicago, Illinois. 



Thomas Eugene Boland, Bachelor of 
Philosophy ; AAT ; entered from Loyola 
Academy; Sodality 2, 3. 4; Intrarnnrals 
2, 3, 4; Loyolan 4; Loyola News 4; Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 

Donald James Boles, Certificate in 
Medicine ; AP : entered Joliet Junior Col- 
lege and Joliet Catholic High School; Jo- 
liet, Illinois. 



Mildred Ann Bomba, R.N.. Bachelor of 
Philosophy ; entered from Mercy Hospital, 
Nursing School and Lindblom High 
School; Chicago, Illinois. 

Charles Leverett Boone, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; <pX; entered from 
Loyola University and Carl Schurz Hish 
School ; Chicago, Illinois. 



Clement Gino Bottino, B.S., Certificate 
in Medicine ; entered from City College 
New York, Fordham, Columbia, and De 
Witt Clinton Hish School ; New York City, 
New York. 

Jack Lynn Boyd, Certificate in Medi- 
cine ; 4»BII ; entered from Grand Rapids 
Junior College, Calvin College and Creston 
High School; Volini Medical Society: 
Grand Rapids, Michigan. 



Fred Lucas Branpstrader. A.J1., Doctor 
of Jurisprudence; A0<p ; HAP; Blue Key; 
entered from St. Ignatius ; Brandeis 
Competition 2, 3, Winner 4; Loyola Bar 
Association 3. President 4, Moot Court 4; 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Julius William Breit, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence; entered from Loyola Academv; Ger- 
man Club 1, 2, 3, Sodality 1, 2, 3, *4, Cur- 
tain Guild 4, Chemistry Club 3, 4, Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 



69 



Thomas Joseph Brennan, Bachelor of 
Arts; entered from St. Philip's High 
School; Chicago, Illinois. 

Margaret Lenore Brixkmax, Regis 
tered Nurse : entered from St. Francis 
Academy: Hankinson, North Dakota. 



Edward Joseph Britt, Bachelor of Phi- 
losophy; entered from Loyola Academy; 
Green Circle, Treasurer 2, President 3 ; 
Sodality 2, 3; Freshman Basketball; Var- 
sity Basketball 2; French Club 1, 2, 3; 
Track 1. 2. 3, 4; Chicago, Illinois. 

Fred William Brown, B.S., Certificate 
of Medicine; AP ; entered from Lewis In- 
stitute and Lindblom High School ; Moor- 
head Surgical Seminar: Volini Medical So- 
ciety; Huntington, Indiana. 



John Anthony Brown, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence; AXZ : entered from St. George High 
School; Orchestra 2. 3, 4: Chemistry Club 
2, 3, 4; German Club 1; Niles Center, 
Illinois. 

Mary Margaret Brown, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Visitation High 
School ; Sodality 1, 2, 3 ; Chicago, Illinois. 



Frank Leo Brundza. B.S.M., Certificate 
of Medicine; entered from McKinley High 

Si:1kiu1 Sodalitj l. 2; Chicago, [llinois, 

Robert VanZandt Bucklin. B.S.M., 
Certificate in. Medicine ; entered from St. 
Mary's, Loyola University and St. George 
High School: Honorary Medical Seminar; 
Evanston, Illinois. 



Betty Bl'RDETT, Registered Nurse; en- 
tered from Arlington High School; Arling- 
ton, South Dakota. 

Alexander Edward Burke, Bachelor of 
Science in Commerce ; AAr; entered from 
Fen wick High School : Cudahy Debating 
Society 1, 2, Varsity Swimming 1, 2, 3, 
Co-Captain 4, Robert Bellarmine Philoso- 
phy Club 3. 4, Monogram Club 2, 3, 4, 
Sodality 2, 3. 4, Legal Club 3, Economic 
Seminar 3, Secretary 4; River Forest, Illi- 
nois. 



Nathaniel Leo Burke, Bachelor of Phi- 
losophy; entered from Loyola Academy; 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4: International Relations 
1, 2, 3, 4; French Club 2, 3, 4; Chicago, 
Illinois. 

Chester Burski, Certificate in Medicine; 
NM<f> ; AP : entered from Crane College, 
Lewis Institute, and Central Y.M.C.A. 
High School; Chicago, Illinois. 



Roger F. Callanan. Bachelor of Science 
in Commerce; IIAA ; entered from St. 
George High School; Sodality 1, 2; Swim- 
ming Team 2 ; Economic Seminar 3, 4 ; In- 
ternational Relations Club 2; Bellarmine 
Philosophy Club 3, 4; Chicago, Illinois. 

Joseph Francis Carroll, A.B., Doctor of 
Jurisprudence : A9<p ; entered from St. 
Mary of the Lake Seminary and Quigley 
Preparatory Seminary ; Brandeis Com- 
petition Finalist: Illinois Bar Association 
Moot Court; Illinois Junior Bar Associa- 
tion ; Chicago, Illinois. 



Vida Elizabeth Casper, Registered 
Nurse ; entered from Washington Junior 
College, and "Washington High School; 
"Washington, Iowa. 

Raymond Patrick Cayanagh, Bachelor 
of Laws; entered from St. Viator College: 
Brandeis Competition 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Class 
Representative 1, 4; Illinois Junior Bar 
Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Chicago, Illinois. 



Mary Frances Coerstner, Registered 
Nwrse ; MO ; entered from St. Mary College, 
and Channing High School; Milwaukee, 
"Wisconsin. 

John Sherman Clark. Bachelor nf Phi- 
losophy; entered from Notre Dame Univer- 
sity and Campion Prep ; Chicago, Illinois. 



Sister Mary Clement, Registered Nurse ; 
entered from Ancilla Domine High School; 
Areistan, Illinois. 

Edward Churchill, Bachelor of Science 
in Education ; entered from Chicago Nor- 
mal College and Lane Technical High 
School; Chicago, Illinois. 



Sophie Ann Ciesla. Registered Nurse; 
entered from Holy Family Academy; Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 

LaVerne Helen Cielenski, Registered 
Nurse ; entered from Farragut High 
School, Chicago, Illinois. 



Caroline Veronica Clemitus, Regis- 
tered Nurse; entered from Crystal Falls, 
High School; Crystal Falls. Michigan. 

Josephine M. Clifford, Bachelor of 
Philosophy ; ATK; entered from Chicago 
Normal and St. Gabriel's High School; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Lawrence Edward Cofone. Bachelor of 
Science in Commerce ; entered from St. 
George High School; Intramurals 1, 2, 3. 
4; Economic Seminar 4; Chicago, Illinois. 

John Byrne Condon, B.S.M., Certificate 
in Medicine; AT: 4>Bn ; AIN ; entered 
from University of Iowa and Des Moines 
Catholic Academy ; Loyolan Campus Rep- 
resentative 4: Loyola News 2, 3, 4: Volini 
Medical Society 3, 4 ; Moorhead Surgical 
Seminar 3. 4 ; Honorary Seminar 3, 4 ; 
Chicago, Illinois, 



Raymond Hubert Conley, B.S.M., Certif- 
icate in Medicine ; IIAA ; entered from 
Lake View High School; Honorary Medi- 
cal Seminar; Chicago, Illinois. 

Jean Louise Costanza, Registered 
Nurse: entered from Central High School; 
Pueblo, Colorado. 



Florence Pauline Cotugno, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Proviso Township 
High School; Hillside, Illinois. 

Marie Celeste Counihan, Registered 
Nurse: MOM: entered from Iron River 
High School; Iron River, Michigan. 



LUOY It*>ss Crawford, Registered Nurse; 
entered from St. Mary's Academy; Roches- 
ter, New York. 

Dan G. Cunningham, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Commerce; entered from St. Mich- 
ael's High School: German Club President 
1: Economic Seminar 4: Finance Club 4; 
Chemistry Club 2 ; Chicago, Illinois. 



Margaret Mary Curtin, Bachelor of 
Philosophy ; ArK ; entered from Chicago 
Teachers College and Mercy High School ; 
Philosophy Club 3, 4; Chicago. Illinois. 

James Edward Cutler, Bachelor of Arts 
Honor Curriculum; entered from Loyola 
Academy ; Quarterly Staff 2, 3, 4, Loy- 
ola News 3. 4 : Lovolan 4 ; Ballarminc 
Club 4; Classical Club 1. 2. 3. 4: G. M. 
Hopkins Literary Society 3. 4; Sodality 4; 
Chicago. Illinois. 



Frances Geraldine Dadrowski. Regis- 
tered Nurse; entered from St. Louis Acad- 
emy; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Chicago, Illinois. 

Tillie C. Danoff, Bachelor of Philoso- 
phy: entered from Chicago Teachers Col- 
lege and Tuley High School; Chicago, Illi- 



70 





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72 



Blanche Elizabeth Dahinten, Regis- 
tered Nurse; entered from East De Pere 
High School; De Pere, Wisconsin. 

Edward Henry Daley. Jr., B.S., Certif- 
icnte in Medicine ; <f>BIT ; Blue Key ; Hon- 
orary Medical Seminar; Moorhead Surgi- 
cal Seminar ; Volini Medical Society ; en- 
tered from University of Notre Dame ; La 
Porte High School; La Porte, Indiana. 



Harriet Marie Daman sk as, Registered 
Nurse; entered from St. Louis Academy; 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Thelma Jean Dasiewicz, Registered 
Nw&e ; entered from Carl Schurz High 
School ; Chicago, Illinois. 



Mary Beth Davey, Registered Nwrse; 
entered from Evanston Township High 
School; Loyola Union; Chicago, Illinois. 

Charles Brown David. Certificate in 
Medicine; <I>BII; entered from Lake View 
Higli School and Brown University ; Vo- 
lini Medical Society; Honorary Medical 
Seminar ; Chicago, Illinois. 



Harry Peter Davlantes, Bachelor of 
Science in Commerce; entered from Sulli- 
van High School ; St. Thomas Legal Club 
2, 3; Finance Club 3; Economic Seminar 
4 ; Chicago, Illinois. 

Steven Robert DeMeter. B.S.M., Certif- 
icate in Medicine ; entered from Western 
Reserve University and John Adams Hish 
School; Loyola Honorary Medical Sem- 
inar; Moorhead Surgical Seminar ; Cleve- 
land. Ohio. 



Lor etta Marie Deter ville. Registered 
Nurse, entered from Oeonto High School; 
Oeonto. Wisconsin. 

Margery Devney, Registered Nitrse; en- 
tered from St. Catherine's College and 
Villa Sancta Scholastica; Duluth. Minne- 
sota. 



Reynold Paul Deutschmann, B.S., Cer- 
tificate in. Medicine; <I>X ; AT. entered 
from John Carroll University and Cathe 
dral Latin High School ; Volini Honorary 
Medical Society 4. Moorhead Surgical Sem- 
inar; Secretary 4 ; Cleveland, Ohio. 

John Donald Devaney, Bachelor of 
Arts; AAr; BII ; <&AP; entered from Leo 
High School; Sodality 1. 2, 3, 4; Class 
President 4. Green Circle 3. 4; News Staff 
1, 2, 3. 4 ; Executive Editor 4 ; Interna- 
tional Relations Club 2, 3, 4; St. Thomas 
More Pre-Legal Club 2, 3, 4; Curtain 
Guild 3; Track 3, 4; Cudahy Forum 2; 
Varsity Debating 3. 4; Student Council 4; 
Classical Club 2, 3, 4 ; Chicago, Illinois. 



Peter Anthony DiFrancesca Jr., 
Bachelor of Science; entered from Provi- 
so Township Hish School : Biology Sem- 
inar 2, 3, 4; Melrose Park, Illinois. 

Willard Edward Dixon, Bachelor of 
Science in Commerce; entered from St. 
Viators College and Leo High School ; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



James Robert Dolan, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Commerce ; AAF ; entered from Mt. 
Carmel High School; Sodality 1. 2; Eco- 
nomic Seminar 4; Loyolan 4; St. Thom- 
as More Club 3 ; Chicago, Illinois. 

Irene Marie DORCY, Registci-ed Nurse ; 
entered from St. Joseph's High School ; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Martha C l a r i k D r a v e o , Registered 
Nwrse; entered from Austin High School; 
Sociality 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Chicago, Illinois. 

Donald James Drolett. B.S.M.. Certifi- 
cate in Medicine ; 4>BH ; entered from 
Michigan State College and Lansing Cen- 
tral High School ; Lansing, Michigan. 



Clara Katherine Dvorak. Registered 
Nurse ; entered from Tony High School ; 
Tony, Wisconsin. 

Eugene Noel Dubay, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence; AAT; BIT; Blue Key; entered from 
Loyola Academy; Class Vice President 1; 
Sodality 1, 4; Freshman Basketball; Var- 
sity Tennis 1, 2, 4; Captain 3; Monogram 
Club 3: President 4; Loyola News 2; Edi- 
torial Board 3; Associate Editor 4; Loyola 
Quarterly; Associate Editor 4; Loyolan 1; 
Fraternity Editor 2: Business Manager 3; 
Editor-in-Chief 4; Chicago, Illinois. 



Hugh Edward Dunn, S.J., Bachrlor of 
Arts; entered from Jackson Junior College 
Xavier University and St. Mary High 
School; Sodality 3, 4; Glee Club 3; Jack- 
son, Michigan. 

Lillian Marie Duris, Registered Nurse; 
entered from Visitation High School; Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 



Delia Marie Dvorak. Registered Nurse; 
entered from Rusk County Normal; and 
Tony High School; Tony, Wisconsin. 

William John Dvonch, Certificate in 
Medicine ; <I>B1I ; entered from Harrison 
Technical High School; Chicago, Illinois. 



Dorothy Ann Dymek, Registered Nurse; 
entered from New Trier Township High 
School; Winnetka, Illinois. 

Virginia Pauline Eastbv, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Wright Junior Col- 
lege and Washburne High School ; Min- 
neapolis. Minnesota. 



Morton Effron, Certificate in Medicine; 
entered from Tnley High School; Honor- 
ary Medical Seminar; Chicago, Illinois. 

Erma Linnea Einola, Registered Nurse; 
entered from Lincoln High School ; Gile, 
Wisconsin. 



Paul Michael Einsweiler Jr., Bache- 
lor of Arts; entered from Loyola Acad- 
emv ; Bellarmine Philosophy Club 2, 3, 
4; Classical Club 1, 2, 3 : Heidelburg Club 
1, 2, 3; Sodality 1, 2; Track Team 1, 2; 
Chicago, Illinois. 

William O. Elson, Bachelor of Science; 
AXX; entered from Wright Junior College 
and St. George High School: German Club 
2 ; Chemistry Club 2. 3, 4 ; Chemistry 
Seminar 3, 4: Biology Club 2, 3; Track 
Team 2, 3 ; Captain 4 ; Monogram Club 2, 
3. Treasurer 4; Chicago, Illinois. 



Jeanne Marie Engels, Registered 
Nurse; entered from St. Michael Central; 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Shirley Christine Evans, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Lincoln School ; 
Manitowoc, Wisconsin. 



Hilma Mae Feay, Registered- Nurse; 
entered from the University of Iowa and 
Larchwood High School; Iowa City, Iowa. 

Thomas Hugh Fegan, Bachelor of Laws; 
A6#; entered from St, Rita High School; 
Loyola Bar Association ; Treasurer 3 ; Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 



Mary Evangeline Fell, R.N., Bachelor 
of Philosophy ; entered from Indiana Uni- 
versity, Columbia University and St. 
Mary's Academy; Oak Park, Illinois. 

John Nick Felten, Bachelor of Arts, in 
Honors Caurs>r; UAA ; entered from Loy- 
ola Academy; Robert Bellarmine Club 2, 
3. 4; Sodality 1. 2, 3. 4; President of 
Cisca 4; Cudahy Debating Society 1; Clas- 
sical Club 2, 3, President 4; Loyola Quar- 
terly 3, 4; Gerard Manley Hopkins Liter- 
ary Society 3. 4; Curtain Guild 2; Honors 
Program ; Chicago, Illinois. 



73 



Alice Beatrice Fejjel, Registered 
Nurse ; entered from J. Sterling Morton 
High School; Cicero, Illinois. 

Arthur Francis Fenner, Bachelor of 
Arts; entered from Georgetown University 
and Loyola Academy : Sodality 2, 3, 4 ; 
Quarterly 3, 4; G. M. Hopkins Literary 
Society 3, 4; Classical Club 2, 3, 4; Bel- 
larmine Philosophy Club 3, 4; Chicago, 
Illinois. 



Mark Anthony Fin an, S.J., Bachelor of 
Arts; entered from Xavier University and 
St. Ignatius High School: Sodality 3, 4; 
Suaraquin Academy 4; Orchestra 3; Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 

Mary Rosalie Fitzgerald, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Benton Public High 
School ; Benton, Wisconsin. 



Alice Collita Fitzpatrick, Bachelor 
of Philosophy ; AKA; entered from Chicago 
Normal College University of Chicago and 
Loretto Academy; Loyola Choral Club; 
Delia Strada Sodality; Chicago, Illinois. 

Mary Elizabeth FitzSimmons, Ba-chelor 
of Philosophy ; ArK ; rZA ; entered from 
Visitation High School ; Loyola Univer- 
sity Players 1 ; Choral Club 2 ; Sodality 2 ; 
Le Circle Francaise 2, 3, 4; Women's 
Social Club 3, 4; Service Guild 3, 4; Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 



James T. Fletcher, Bachelor of Science 
in Commerce ; AAF; 4>AP; entered from St. 
Georsre High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Loyola News 2, 3, 4; Cudahy Debate 1, 2; 
Varsity Debating 3, 4; Economic Seminar 
4; Pre Legal Club 2, 3; Chicago, Illinois. 

Marie Maud Foote. Bachelor of Philoso- 
phy ; entered from Chicago Normal College 
and St. Xavier Academy; Chicago, Illinois. 



Marguerite Lewis Foulk, A.B.; Certifi- 
cate in Medicine; N2<£; entered from Uni- 
versity of California and Girl's High 
School; Honorary Seminar 4; San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Freida Freiman, Registered Nurse; en- 
tered from Highland Park High School ; 
Deerfield, Illinois. 



Monica Anne Gabel, Registered Nurse; 
entered from Morris High School; Sodality 
1, 2, 3; Morris, Illinois. 

Edward A. Galapeaux, B.S.M., Certifi- 
cate in Medicine; <pBII ; ZZ; entered from 
University of Chicago and Lindblom High 
School ; Honorary Seminar ; President of 
Senior Class ; Chicago, Illinois. 



Flurian A. Gecewicz, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Commerce ; entered from Mt. Car- 
mel Hiffh School; Sodality 2, 3, 4; Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 

Ray Robert Geimer, Bachelor of Science 
in Commerce : entered from Canisius Col- 
lege and Loyola Academy ; Finance Club 
4; Economic Seminar 4; Chicago, Illinois 



Elizabeth Mary Gerlach, Registered 
Nurse ; entered from Preston Community 
High School ; Preston, Iowa. 

Catherine Eugenia Ghiardi, Registere_d 
Nurse ; entered from Negaunee High 
School: Negaunee, Michigan. 



John Francis Gibbons, S.J., Bachelor of 
Ai'ts ; entered from Xavier Universitv and 
West Technical High School; Sodality 3; 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

William Mark Gibbons, Bachelor of 
Philosophy; AAI" ; AXN ; BIT ; Blue Key; 
entered from Mt. Carmel High School; 
Loyola News 1, 2. 3, Editor-in-Chief 4; 
Associate Editor Quarterly 4; Sodality 2, 
3, 4; Monogram Club 3; Business Man- 
ager Curtain Guild 3. 4; Bellarmine Phi- 
losophy Club 2, 3; President 4; Cudahy 
Forum 1; Varsity Debating 2, 3; Student 
Council 3, 4; Loyola Union 3, 4; Intra- 
mural Board 1, 2 ; Secretary 3 ; Chicago, 
Illinois. 



James Richard Gill. Bachelor of Arts; 
TEAA ; HTM; entered from Loyola Acad- 
emy : Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Class Secre- 
tary 2 ; Class Treasurer 3 ; Class Vice- 
President 4 : Associate Editor Quarterly 
3, 4; Curtain Guild 3, 4; Bellarmine Phi- 
losophy Club 3. 4; LeCercIe Francais 2, 
3, 4 ; Chicago, Illinois. 

Irene Joan Glinski, Registered Nurse; 
entered from Wells High School; Sodality 
1, 2, 3; Secretary-Treasurer 2. 3; Chi 
cago, Illinois. 



Marguerite Pearl Goeden, Registered 
Nwrse; entered from The University of 
Wisconsin and Edge wood High School ; 
Madison, Wisconsin. 

Edward James Gradv. Bachelor of Sci- 
ence; AAr; entered from St. Ignatius 
High School ; Sodality 2, 3 ; Chicago, Illi- 
nois. 



Kathleen Theresa Graham, Registered 
Nurse ; entered from Sheldahl High 
School: Sodality 1. 2, 3 ; Polk City, Iowa. 

Joseph Francis Granhold. Bachelor of 
Seien-ce in Co-mmeree ; entered from De 
La Salle High School; Sodality 2, 3, 4; 
Green Circle 3, 4; Chicago, Illinois. 



Catherine Virginia Gray, Registered 
Nurse ; entered from Sacred Heart High 
School ; Calumet, Michigan. 

Joseph Sire Greene, Th.B., Bachelor of 
Philosophy; entered from University of 
Washington and Northern Baptist Theolo- 
gical Seminary ; Seattle, Washington. 



Mary Gregorich, Registered Nurse: en- 
tered from Joliet Township High School; 
Joliet, Illinois. 

Dorothy Jane Gregory, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Rhinelander High 

School : Rliinelander, Wisconsin. 



Ernest M. Grochowski, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence ; SUA entered from Kelly Senior 
High School; Sodality 2. 3: Biology Sem- 
inar 1, 2, 3, 4 : Bellarmine Philosophy 
Club 4; Chicago, Illinois. 

Henry E. Gross, Bachelor of Science in 
Education; entered from Chicago 
Normal College and Lane Technical High 
School ; Chicago, Illinois. 



KATHRYN May Gunning, Registered 

Nurse ; entered from Aquinas High 

School; Sodality 2, 3, 4; Chicago, Illi- 
nois. 

DoRorirv Elizabeth Gunnison'. Regis- 
tered Nurse; entered from Sullivan High 
School: Chicago, Illinois. 



Lillian Christine Habel. Registered 
Nurse : entered from Wells Senior High 
School: Sodality 1, 2, 3; Chicago., Illinois. 

Harold Howard Hall, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Commerce : entered from Senn 
High School: Finance Club 3; Economic 
Seminar 4 ; Philosophy Club 2 ; Interna- 
tional Relations Club 2; Chicago, Illinois. 



Leslie Marshall Harkness, Bachelor of 
Science; entered from Morgan Park Jun- 
ior College and Calumet High School: Biol- 
ogy Seminar 3 ; Chemistry Club 3, 4 ; 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Charles Thomas Haskins, Bachelor of 
Philosophy, AAf: $AP; AG*; entered from 
Mt. Carmel High School; Freshman Bas- 
ketball 1; Varsity 2; Track 1, 2; Cudahy 
Debating 1, 2: Varsity 3: Sodality 1, 2, 
3; Brandeis Competition 4; Junior Bar 
Association 4; Loyola News 1. 2; St. 
Thomas More Club 1, 2, 3: Chicago, Illi- 
nois. 



74 



FEN EL 



FTNAN FITZGERALD FITZPATRICK FITZSIMMONS 







gecewicz geimer gerlach ghiardi GIRBONS, J. GIBBONS, w. 




GILL 



GLJNSKI GOEDEN 




GRADY 



GRAHAM GRANHOLD 




GREGORICH GREGORY GROCHOWSKI 



GUNNING GUNNISON- 





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HALL HARKNESS HASKINS 



75 



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sR.M.BERNICE HULTGEN, F. HULTGEN, W. HUMMERT INTFEN 



MURPHY 




Wik JA.KUBIEC JANIUS SR. ST. JAMES JENKINS JESSUP, "C. 

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76 



Frank William Hausmann, A.B., Doc- 
tor of Jurisprudence; AG*; ASN ; *AP; 
BII ; Blue Key ; entered from Campion 
Academy and Loyola University College ot 
Arts & Sciences; Junior Bar Association 
1, 2, 3, 4; Brandeis Competition 2; Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 

Margaret Hedkick, Registered Nurse; 
entered from Rockland High School ; 
Rockland, Michigan. 



Genevieve Louise Henderson, Regis- 
tered Nurse; entered from Lindbloom High 
School ; Chicago, Illinois. 

Fa ye Catherine Heraoe. Registered 
Nurse; entered from Senior High School; 
Rhinelander. Wisconsin . 



Joseph Michael Herat v, Bachelor of 
Arts; entered from St. Mary of the Lake 
Seminary and Quigley Preparatory Sem- 
inary : Choral Society 3, 4 ; Bellanuine 
Philosophy Club : Biology Seminar 3. 4 ; 
Classical Club 3. 4 ; International Rela- 
tions Club 3; Chicago, Illinois. 

Imogene Hesselman, Registered Nurse ; 
entered from Visitation Academy ; Du- 
buque, Iowa, 



LeRoy C. Hill, Bachelor of Philosophy; 
entered from Serm High School : Loyola 
News 1, 2; Track Team 1, 2, 3; Cross 
Country 1, 2; Cudahy Debating Forum 1; 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Lucille Elsie Hinze. Registered Nurse-; 
entered from Downers Grove High School; 
Downers Grove, Illinois. 



Michael Joseph Hitchko, B.S., Certifi- 
cate in Medicine; AP : 4-Z ; 4>X : entered 
from John Carroll University and John 
Marshal] High School ; Volini Medical 
Society; Moorhead Surgical Seminar; 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

Jean Hoffman, Registered Nurse; en- 
tered from St. Columkille High School ; 
Dubuque, Iowa. 



Edward Joseph Horohko, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; ILM*; AP; entered 
from Y.M.C.A. College and Holy Trinity 
High School : Volini Medical Society; In- 

terfraternity Council 4 ; Chicago, Illinois. 

Doroth v Eleanor Howe, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Washington Clay 
High School; South Bend. Indiana. 



Sister Bern ice Hughes, R.H.R.N., 
Bachelor of Science in Nursing Education; 
entered from Academy of Our Lady; Hotel 
Dieu of St. Joseph ; Kingston, Ontario, 
Canada. 

Francis John Hultgen. B.S.M., Certif- 
icate in Medicine ; 4>BII ; entered from 
Mount Carmel High School ; Honorary 
Seminar ; Moorhead Surgical Seminar 3, 
4 ; Chicago, Illinois. 



William James Hultgen, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; 4>BII ; entered from 
Mount Carmel High School; Glee Club 1, 
2; Loyola News 4; Chicago, Illinois. 

Paul A. Hummert, Bachelor of Arts; 
Blue Key; IIAA ; IIPM; entered from Loy- 
ola Academy ; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4 : Loy- 
olan 2, 3, 4; Associate Editor 3, 4; 
Quarterly Associate Editor 3. 4; Curtain 
Guild 2,*3, 4; Le Cercle Francais 2, 3, 4; 
Philosophy Club 3, 4; Breese, Illinois. 



Helen Ma urine Ixtfen, Regis! c red 
Nurse; entered from Mount St. Scholas- 
tics ; Atchison, Kansas. 

Francis Clement Murphv, B.S., Certif- 
icate in Medicine; AP ; 4>X ; entered from 
St. Ambrose College and Durand High 
School; Class Treasurer 3: Moorhead Sur- 
gical Seminar; Volini Medical Seminar; 
Blue Key; Durand, Illinois. 



Mary Jean Isberg, Registered Nurse; en- 
tered from Newaygo High School; Rhine- 
lander, Wisconsin. 

Alice Marie Jack, Registered Nurse; 
entered from Thornton Township High 
School, Harvey, Illinois. 



Claire Jean Jack, Registered Nurse; en- 
tered from Thornton Township ; Harvey, 
Illinois. 

Simon Adrian Jackson, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Commerce ; entered from North- 
western and Central YMCA : Maywood, 
Illinois. 



Margaret Madeline James, Registered 
Nibrse; entered from La Salle Peru Higli 
School ; Peru, Illinois. 

Madeline Mary Janette, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Immaculata High 
School; Chicago, Illinois. 



William James Janik. Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Commerce ; XIIA ; BII : entered 
from St. Bonaventure High School; Mono- 
gram Club; Loyola News, 1, 2, 3, 4; Loy- 
olan, 4; Sodality, 1, 2, 3; Varsity Tennis, 
1, 2, 3, Captain, 4: Thomas More Legal 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Finance Club 3, 4; Eco- 
nomic Seminar 4; University Club 3, 4; 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Louise Theresa Jakubiec, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Tuley High School; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Dorothy RoskMarie J an i us, Registered 
Nurse, entered from Providence High 
School; Chicago, Illinois. 

Sister St. James Jarrell, R.H., R.N., 
Bachelor of Science in Nursing Educa- 
tion; entered from Academy of our Lady; 
Kingston, Ontario, Canada. 



Marguerite Jenkins, Registered Nurse; 
entered from Shawneetown Community 
High School: Shawneetown. Illinois. 

Constance Lida Jess up. Registered 
Nurse; entered from Hirsch High School; 
Class Secretary 1, 2, 3 ; Chicago, Illinois. 



Mary Jane Jessup, Registered Nurse; 
entered from Hirsch High School ; Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 

Esther Marie Johnson, Registered 
Nurse ; entered from Superior State 
Teachers College and Superior East High 
School ; Superior, Wisconsin. 



Harold Joseph Johnson, Bachelor of 
Science in Commerce ; entered from North- 
western University and Schurz High 
School; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Economics Sem- 
inar 4 ; Finance Club 4 ; International 
Relations Club 1 ; Chicago, Illinois. 

Marvin Linton Johnson, Bachelor of 
Science; IIAA; AXS ; entered from Senn 
High School; Sodality 2, 3, 4; Chemistry 
Club 2, 3. 4; Chicago, Illinois. 



Merlin Harvey Johnson, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine ; 4»BIT ; entered from 

Manchester College and Indiana Univer- 
sity ; Moorhead Surgical Seminar: Wa- 
bash, Indiana. 

Mitchell Decatur Johnson. A.B., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine ; 'bBn ; entered from 
Washington University and Rolla High 
School ; Class Treasurer, 1, Moorhead Sur- 
gical Seminar ; Volini Medical Society ; 
Licking, Missouri. 



77 



Richard Joseph Jones Jr., B.S., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine ; ( I>X; AP : entered from 
Oak Park High School ; Moorhead Sur- 
gical Seminar" Volini Medical Society; 
Chicago, Illinois. 

J annle Selam Kalinaski, Registered 
Niiirse; entered from Superior Central 
High School; Superior, Wisconsin. 



Edward William Kallal, Certificate in 
Medicine; 'pBII ; entered from Harrison 
Technical High School ; Chicago, Illinois. 

Anne Elizabeth Kalter, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Steinmetz High 
School; Chicago, Illinois. 



Walter Joseph Kawula, Bachelor of 
Science; entered from Harrison Technical 
High School; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Busi- 
ness Manager 4; Biology Seminar 2, 3, 4; 
German Club 3 ; Chicago, Illinois. 

George Thomas Kelleher, Certificate in 
Medicine ; $BII ; entered from Postville 
Public High School : Blue Key ; Volini 
Medical Seminar; Vice President 2; Loy- 
ola News 3 ; Postville, Iowa. 



Frances Marie Kellev, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Berrien Springs High 
School ; Berrien Springs, Michigan. 

Francis Eugene Kelly, Bachelor of 
Arts; entered from Knox College and 
Palatine Township High School ; Loyola 
University Forum; Galeshurg, Illinois. 



Rose Mary Kelz, Registered Nurse; en- 
tered from St. Joseph's High School, 
Brooklyn, New York. 

Jerome J. Kennellv, LL.B., Bachelor 
of Philosophy ; <£Ar ; ASN ; entered from 
Leo High School ; Chicago, Illinois. 



H. Frances Kenny, Registered Nurse; 
entered from Alvernia High School; Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 

Helen Virginia Ketter, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Harrison High 
School ; Chicago, Illinois, 



Mary Eileen King, Registered Nurse; 
entered from Longwood Academy; Sodal- 
ity, 1, 2, 3 ; Chicago, Illinois. 

William C. King, Bachelor of Arts; 
4>MX ; lll'M ; entered from Loyola Acad- 
emy ; Track, 1; Sodality, 2, 3, 4; Class 
Treasurer, 4; French Club. 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre- 
Legal Club, 3; Classical Club, 1, 2; Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 



Thaddeus Martin Klabacha, Certificate 
in Medicine; IfM<i> ; XXX ; entered from 
Crane College and Lindbloom High School; 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Frank Philip Knoll, Bachelor of Phi- 
losophy; ANT ; BH; <£AP ; entered from 
Loyola Academy ; Sodality, 1, 2, 3, 4 ; 
Loyola News, 1, 2, 3, 4, Fraternity Editor, 
3; Debating, 2, 3; Track, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Monogram Club, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Legal Club, 
2, 3 ; International Relations Club, 1, 2, 3 ; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Genevieve Eve Kocur, Registered 
Niorse; entered from John Marshall High 
School, Chicago, Illinois. 

Arthur W. Kogstad, Bachelor of Science 
in Commerce ; Blue Key, BII ; HTM; AXN; 
4>AP ; entered from St. Mel; Loyola News, 
1, 2, 3, 4, Managing Editor 4 ; Loyola 
Quarterly, 1, 2, 3, 4, Associate Editor, 4; 
Debating 1, 2, 3, 4, Manager, 4; Sodality, 
1, 2. 3. 4; Bellarmine Philosophy, 3, 4; 
Economics Seminar, 3, 4; Legal Club, 3, 
4; University Club, 4: Chicago, Illinois. 



Frances Suzanne Kolle, Registered 
Nurse; entered from The Academy of Our 
Lady ; Chicago, Illinois. 

Stanislaus Mkceslaus Koziol, B.S.M., 
Certificate in Medicine ; TIM"? ; entered 
from Weber Higli School; Moorhead Sur- 
gical Seminar; Chicago, Illinois. 



Marie Anastasia Kremer, Registered 
Nurse ; entered from Loretto Academy ; 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Michael Joseph Krisko, B.S.M., Certif- 
icate in Medicine ; entered from John 
Carroll University and Cathedral Latin; 
Cleveland, Ohio. 



Frances Margaret Kumskis, Registered 
Nurse; entered from St. Casimir Academy; 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Robert Stephen Kuni, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Commerce ; AAP ; entered from 
Huron High School; Sodality 2, 3, 4; 
Economics Seminar, 3, President 4; Fin- 
ance Club 4; Green Circle, 3, 4; Huron, 
South Dakota. 



Doris Wilheminia La Framboise, Reg- 
istered Nurse; entered from Gladstone 
High School ; Gladstone, Illinois. 

Viola Helene Lasei-j, Registered Nurse; 
entered from St. Joseph's Academy; De- 
Pere, Wisconsin. 



Louis Joseph Larch, S.J., Bachelor of 
Arts; entered from Xavier University and 
St. Joseph's High School ; Sodality 4; 
Escanaba, Michigan. 

John B. Lavezzorio, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence; entered from St. Mel High School; 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Biology Seminar 1, 2, 
3, 4; Philosophy Club, 3, 4; Glee Club, 2; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Mary Agnes Lentz, Registered Nurse; 
entered from La Porte High School ; La 
Porte, Indiana. 

Gerard M. Leies, Bachelor of Science ; 
entered from University of Dayton ; Bel- 
larmine Philosophy 4; LeCercle Francais 
3. 4 : Chicago, Illinois. 



Sister Marie Anna Le Sage, R.H., 
R.N., Bachelor of Science in Nursing Edu- 
cation; entered from Burlington Business 
College and St. Ann's Academy; Winooski, 
Vermont. 

Frederick Hallkt Lindenfeld, B.S.M,, 

Certificate in Medicine ; «l>.\ ; AP ; en- 
tered from Michigan State College and 
Benton Harbor High School; Volini 
Medical Society 3, 4; Honorary Seminar, 
1, 2. 3, 4; Moorhead Sureical Seminar, 3, 
4 ; Benton Harbor, Michigan. 



James Michael Liston. S.J.. Bachelor 
of Arts,- Sodality 4; Chicago, Illinois, 

John Swepson Llewellvn, B.A.. Cer- 
tificate in Medicine ; <pBII ; entered from 
University of Southern California and 
Schreiner Institute ; Moorhead Surgical 
Si'ininar, 4 ; Volini Medical Society, 4 ; 
Honorary Medical Seminar 4: Liberty, 
Texas. 



Marquette Frances Lorrig, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Mattoon High School; 
Mattoon, Wisconsin. 

Eleanore Elvire Lozinski, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Providence High 
School; Sodality. 1, 2, 3; Chicago, Illi- 
nois. 



78 




I, ^ J 

SR. M. ANNA LINDENFELD 



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am 



ma 



LUCHTMAN LYONS 



MAHER MAJSTEREK MANDERNACK iVIANGAN 




mi 



Bett . J axe I.i'chtmax. Registered 
Nurse; entered from Elston Hitch School: 
Michigan City. Indiana. 

JOHN Patrick Lyons, Bachelor of Arts; 
Honors Curriculum-. BIT: AIX: Blue Key 
entered from St. Ignatius High School 
Loyola Quarterly 1, 2, 4, Editor 2, 3 ; 
Loyola News, 2, 3, 4 ; Cudahy Forum 

1. 2: Intercollegiate Essav Contest 1 . 2 : 
Sodality 3, 4; Curtain Guild 1: Harrison 
Oratorical Finalist 1, 2: Classical Cluh 1, 

2, 3, 4; Bellarniine Philosophy Club 3, 4: 
Gerard Manley Hopkins Literary Societj 
1, 2, 3. 4 ; Chicago, Illinois. 



Thomas James Maker, Bachelor of Arts; 
entered from Xavier University and Holv 
Redeemer Higli School; Sodality 4; Bei- 
larmine Philosophy Club 4: Portsmouth, 

Ohio. 

Stanley Majsterek. Certificate in Medi- 
cine; IIM4; entered from Y.M C.A. Col- 
lege and High School: Chicago. Illinois. 



Loben Eda ard Maxderxack, B.S.M., 

< ertificate in Medicim . entered from Dm- 
versit: of Chicago and Lindblom High 
School: Moorhead Surgical Seminar; Yo- 
lini Medical Society; Chicago, Illinois. 

-Mai;. ELLA Marv Max-; ax. Roistered 
Nurse; entered from Mount St. Clare 
Hish School; Clinton, Iowa. 



Edward Gerard Manxebach, Bachelor 
Of Philosophy; entered from Notre Dame 
University and Campion High School: St. 
Thomas More Leg;il Club 4. 

Simon Victor Mahkiewicz, B.S.. Certi- 
ficate in Medicine; nM*t> ; AP; entered 
from Alliance Jr. College and Alliance 
Academy; Yolini Medical Society: Moore- 
head Surgical Seminar: Chicago. Illinois. 



Loris Frank Marrella, B.S., Certificate 
in Medicine: entered from Fordham Uni- 
versity and Lincoln Hish School : Yolini 
Medical Society: Jersey City. New Jersey. 

Edward James Marsh, Bachelor of St 
ence ; entered from Lewis Institute, ai 
De La Salle Institute: Chicago, Illinois 



Adelaii i: Mar Marta, Registered 
Nurse ; entered from Negaunee High 
School : Negaunee, Michigan. 

Leo James Martin, S.J., Bachelor of 
Arts; entered from Xavier University and 
De La Salle High School ; Sodality:* Phi- 
losophy < 'lub : ( trchestra : Joliet, Illinois. 



Mary Evelyn Martix, Registered Nurse; 
entered from John D. Pierce Hi°:h School ; 
Marquette. Michigan. 

Vincent Valentine Marzaxo, Bachelor 
of Science; entered from Lovola Academy; 
Sodality 2: Chemistry Club 1, 2. 3. 4: 
Biology Seminar 1. 2, 3, 4: Chicago. Illi- 
nois. 



Eileen Catherine Mastersox. B.P.E.. 
Bachelor of Science : <t>rn : entered from 
American College of Physical Education 
and Mary wood High School; Choral Soci- 
ety 3, 4 ; Chicago, Illinois. 

Rose Marie Mastroxardi, Registered 
Xurse; entered from Mother Cabrini High 
School : Brooklyn. New York. 



Lauretta Marie Mathison, Registered 
Nurse ; entered from Leyden Commercial 

St'hnn] . Elm wood Park, Illinois. 

Wayland Paul Matt. B.S., Certificate 
in Mediciwe; Bine Key. AP; <I'X : entered 
from Carroll High School : Honorary 
Medical Seminar: Yolini Medical Society; 
Moorhead Surgical Seminar ; Carroll, 
Iowa. 



Franklin Joseph Mattixgly, Bachelor 
of Arts; entered from Xavier University 
and St. Xavier High School ; Louisville, 
Kentucky. 

Stanley John Matuszewski, B.S., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from John 
Carroll University and St. Ignatius High 
School; Volini Medical Seminar. Moorhead 
Surgical Seminar: Cleveland. Ohio. 



Sister St. Bernardixe Maurer, Regis- 
tered Nurse; entered from Our Lady's of 
Angels Academy: Wilt, Illinois. 

Lvov Bel Mayer, Registered Nurse- 
entered from St. John's High School; Ben- 
ton Harbor. Michigan. 



Margret Mary McCaxn, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Longwood Academy; 
Chicago. Illinois. 

Alice Theresa McClelland, Registered 
Nurse ; entered from Providence High 
School ; Chicago, Illinois. 



Bernard Thomas McCovrt, Bachelor of 
Arts, entered from St. Ignatius High 
School: Classical Club 1. 2, 3. 4: Orches- 
tra 1. 2, 3. 4; Glee Club 1. 2. 3. 4; Phi- 
losophy Club 3, 4; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4: Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 

Rosemary Ann McDermott. Registered 
Nurse, entered from New Trier High 
School ; VCilmette. Illinois. 



Margaret Mary MlElyane. Registered 
Nurse; entered from Rhinelander High School: 
Rhinelander, Wisconsin. 

William Bernard McEnery, Bachelor 
of Science; entered from Quigley Prepara- 
tory Seminary; Biology Club 2, 3. 4; In- 
ternational Relations Club, 2; Intramurals 
2, 3. 4; Varsity Golf 2, 3, Captain 4; 
Chemistry Club 2: Libertyville, Illinois. 



Georgia Mae M< K early. Registered 
Nurse; entered from Providence High 
School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Chicago, Illinois. 

Peter James McLexnon, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine ; entered from Crane 
College, Central Y.M.C.A. College and St. 
Patrick's Academy; Chicago, Illinois. 



Thomas Robert McMorrow, Certificate 
in Medicine; 9KX : entered from Bradley 
Polytechnical Institute and Spalding In- 
stitute : Honorary Medical Seminar ; Pe- 
oria, Illinois. 

Margaret C. McXellis, Bachelor of Phil- 
osophy; A A ; entered from St. Angela's 
Academy; Morris, Illinois. 



John Virgil Mextag. Bachelor of Arts; 
entered from Xavier University and St. 
Mary's High School; Sodality, 3. 4; Mich- 
igan City, Indiana. 

Helex Mae Meyers, Registered. Nurse ; 
entered from Veoga Township High 
School; Yeoga. Illinois. 



Clement John Michet, B.S.M.. Certifi- 
cate in Medicine; 4>KA : entered from De 
Paul University and De La Salle High 
School ; Chicago, Illinois. 

Elizabeth H. Mickey, Bachelor of Phil- 
osophy; entered from Englewood High 
School: Brooklyn, Xew York. 



81 



Ronald Lewis Millar, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence; 4»MX ; AX£ ; entered from Loyola 
Academy; Sodality 2, 3, 4; French Club 
1; Chemistry Club 2, 3, 4; Chicago, Illi- 



Helen Virginia Mitchell, Registered 
Nurse; MOM; entered from Kelvyn Park 
High ; Chicago, Illinois. 



Joseph Martin Mitrick, Certificate in 
Medicine ; entered from Oglethorpe Uni- 
versity and Calumet High School; Chicago, 
Illinois. 

Lorraine Marie Mlady, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Rhinelander High 
School ; Rhinelander, Wisconsin. 



Mary Helen Molloy, Registered Nurse; 
entered from Lindbloom High School ; 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Marjory Ellen Moser, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Council Grove High 
School ; Council Grove, Kansas. 



Frank Leo Mvllarkey, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Commerce; entered from St. Via- 
tor College ; Economic Seminar 3, 4 ; 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Daniel Joseph Murphy, Bachelor of 
Science; AAr ; AXN; BII ; AX2 ; entered 
from Loyola ; Sodality 2, 3, 4 ; Loyola 
News 1, 2, News Editor 3, Executive Edi- 
tor 4 ; German Club 1, 2 ; Philosophy 
Club 3, 4; Secretary of Student Council 
3, Class Treasurer 2 ; Chicago, Illinois. 



Sister Frances Murphy, Bachelor of 
Science in Nursing Education; entered 
from Mount St. Mary Academy; Burling- 
ton, Vermont. 

Jerome H. Nerger. Bachelor of Science 
in Commerce ; entered from St. Mel High 
School, Sodality 1, 2, 3. 4 ; Dramatic 
Club 1 ; Economic Seminar 4; Finance 
Club 4; Chicago, Illinois. 



Clare Donna Neyeaux, Registered 
Nurse ; entered from Gladstone High 
School ; Gladstone, Michigan. 

Edna Jane Braaten Nickels, Regis- 
tered Nurse; entered from Superior State 
Teachers College and Superior Central 
High School ; Superior, Wisconsin. 



Henry John Niemeyer, B.S., Certificate 
in Medicine ; entered from Milwaukee 
State Teachers' College and Shawano High 
School ; Shawano, "Wisconsin. 

Robert Edward Nissen, Bachelor of 
Science in Commerce; entered from Lake 
View High School ; Economics Seminar 
3, 4; Finance Club 4; International Re- 
lations Club 2, 3 ; Chicago, Illinois. 



Katherine Joan NoojTan, Registered 
Nurse; entered from University of Wash- 
ington and the Academy of Our Lady; So- 
dality 2, 3, 4; Union 4; Chicago, Illinois. 

Eileen Marie O'Bovle, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Fenger High School; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Alice Elizabeth O'Brien. Registered 
Nurse; entered from Hirsch High School; 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Kennedy William O'Brien, B.S., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; 4>B1T ; All Hallows 
High School, Astoria, New York. 



Dorothy Theresa Ochata, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Bowen High School; 
Chicago, Illinois. 

John Davtd O'Connor, Bachelor of Let- 
ters and Laws; 4>AA ; Blue Key; entered 
from St. Patrick's Academy; Loyola Union 
Representative 4 ; Blue Key Treasurer 1, 
President 4; Class President 4; Chicago, 
Illinois. 



John Michael O'Connor. Bachelor of 
Philosophy; entered from St. Viator Col- 
lege and Leo High School ; Chicago, Illi- 
nois. 

John Patrick O'Connor, Bachelor of 
Letters and Laivs; entered from St. Mel 
High School; Chicago, Illinois. 



Robert Joseph O'Day, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Commerce ; 4>MX ; entered from 
Loyola Academy ; Freshman Basketball 
Manager 1: Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Cur- 
tain Guild 4 ; Chicago, Illinois. 

John Warren O'Donnell, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine ; $X ; entered from 
Notre Dame University, University of 
Louisville, Y.M.C.A. College and Hale 
High School; Moorhead Surgical Seminar; 
Volini Medical Society; Chicago, Illinois. 



Thomas Patrick O'Donnell, Bachelor 
of Philosophy ; entered from Uni versify 
of Mississippi and St. Mel High School; 
Cicero, Illinois. 

Sister Helen O'Hara, R.H., Registered 
Nurse; entered from Loretto High School; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Clare Elizabeth Pembroke, Registered 
Nurse ; entered from Nazereth Academy ; 
Oak Park. Illinois. 

Eugene Curtis Penn, B.A.. Certificate 
in Medicine; entered from Simpson Col- 
lege; Chicago, Illinois. 



Martin Edward O'Shaughnessy, Bach- 
elor of Philosophy ; Blue Key; AAr; A2N; 
BII; IIFM; entered from Loyola Academy; 
Loyola Union 1, 2; Treasurer 3, 4; Stu- 
dent Council 1, 2, 3; President 4; Loyola 
News 1 ; Sports Editor 2, 3 ; Executive 
Editor 4; Loyolan 1, 4: Intramural Board 
1, 2, 3; Director 4; Monogram Club 2, 3, 
4; Swimming 1; Captain 2, 3, 4; Sodalitv 
1, 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 2: Green Circle 2, 
3, 4; Debating 2. 3, 4; Class President 2; 
Class Vice-President 2, 3; French Club 1, 
2; Philosophy Club 2, 3, 4; Chicago, Illi- 
nois. 

Clarence John Pagano, Bachelor of 
Science; TfAA ; entered from Oak Park 
Hiffh School; Sodality 1, 2. 3. 4: Biology 
Seminar 1, 2, 3. 4; River Forest, Illinois. 

William H. Pokorny, Bachelor of Lean's 
and- Letters; <f»AA; entered from La 
Grange Junior College and Argo High 
School; Brandeis 1, 2, 3, 4; Loyola Union 
4; Illinois Junior Bar Association 1, 2, 3, 
4 ; Argo, Illinois. 

Eileen Marie Perry, Registered Nurse; 
entered from Denfeld High School ; So- 
dnlity 4; Vice President 4; Duluth, Min- 
nesota. 



Anne Rita Patras, Certificate in Medi- 
cine ; entered from Morton Junior College 
and Morton High School; Class Secretary 
1 ; Chicago, Illinois. 

B. Frances Patrick, Registered Nurse; 
entered from St. Mary's High School ; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Frances Barbara Petkiewicz, Regis- 
tered Nurse ; entered from Lucy Flower 
Technical High ; Chicago, Illinois. 

Sister Mary Pius, Registered Nurse; 
Kenosha, Wisconsin. 



82 




NIEMEYER NISSEN 



NOONAN O'BOYLE O'BRIEN, A. O'BRIEN, K. 




OCHATA O'CONNORJ.D. O'CONNORJ.M. O'CONNORJ.P. O'DAY 



O'DONNELL 




PEMBROKE PENN 



POKOB5NY 



PERRY PETKIEWSKI SR. M. PIUS, 



83 



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PRIORE PROKOPOYITZ RAJ CHART REEDY, M. 



SATEK 



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S( :HA \R S( 'IN LTZ SCHM] DT, G. SG 1 1 M 1 DT. W, 




84 



Mary Elizabeth Porche, Registered 
Nwrse ; entered from Mother Cabrini High 
School: Loyola Union; New Orleans, 
Louisiana. 

Thomas A. Powers, Bachelor of Phi- 
losophy j entered from Northwestern Uni- 
versity and Loyola Academy; Sodality 4: 
French Club 4 ; International Relations 
Club 4; Chicago, Illinois. 



Lerov Arthur Priori-:. Bachelor of Phi- 
losophy; entered from Lewis Institute and 
McKinley High School ; Chicago, Illinois. 

Mary Ann Prokopovitz. Registered 
Nurse; entered from St. Joseph's Acad- 
emy : Pulaski, Wisconsin. 



William A. EUichart, B.S.M., Certificate 
in Medicine; AT; <(>X ; entered from Mor- 
ton High School; Yolini Medical Society; 
Moorhead Surgical Seminar: Bsrwyn. Illi- 



Marion Terese Reedy, Reqistered Nurse; 
entered from Calumet High School; So- 
dality ; Treasurer : Chicago, Illinois. 



Thomas Davis Reedy, Bachelor of Phi- 
losophy; entered from St. Viator College 
and Leo Hiffh School: Chicago, Illinois. 

David Joseph Reed, Bachvlor of Philoso- 
phy; entered from Culver Military Acad- 
emy; Chicago, Illinois. 



Meriruth LUCILLE RENESCH, Bachelor 
of Philosophy. ABT ; AKP: entered from 
Chicago Normal College and Academy of 
Our Ladv : Philosophy Club; Delia Strada 
Sodality: Chicago, Illinois. 

Victor Manuel Rivera, Certificate in 
Medicine ; 4-X ; entered from University 
of Puerto Rico and Coamo High School ; 
Honorary Seminar ; Moorhead Surgical 
Seminar; Volini Medical Seminar; Coamo, 
Puerto Rico. 



Frank Michael Rizzo, Certificate in 

Me, Urine ,■ enteral from University, nf I>.- 
troit and Oelwein High School ; Volini 
Medical Society; Oelwein, Iowa. 

Frederick Phillip Robbins, B.S.M., 

Certificate in Medicine ; -I'AK; entered 
from Crane College, University of Chicago 
Y.M.C.A. College and Carl Schurz High 
School ; Volini Medical Society ; Moor- 
head Surgical Seminar: Chicago, I1H- 



Daniel Paul Roberto, A.B., Certificate 
in Medicine: A3»A ; entered from Western 
Reserve University and Cleveland Heights 
High School ; Volini Medical Society ; 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

Mary Louise Robles, Registered Nurse; 
entered from Mercy High School; Chicago. 
Illinois. 



Salvatore Robert RODINO, R.S., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine ; A$M ; entered from 
Lous Island University and Abraham Lin- 
coln High School; class vice-president 3; 
Honorary Medical Seminar ; Moorhead 
Surgical Seminar; Volini Medical Society; 
Brooklyn, New York. 

Charles Edward Rowan, Bachelor of 
Arts; entered from Xavier University ami 
Fox Valley Catholic High School: Sodal- 
ity 3. 4; Orchestra 3, 4: St. Charles, Illi- 
nois. 



James Andrew RoOney, B.S.M., Certif- 
icate in Medicine; <1>X ; AP; entered from 
Lewis Institute and Lane Technical High 
School ; Moorhead Surgical Seminar ; Vo- 
lini Medical Society; Chicago, Illinois. 

Conrad Thomas Rusin, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine ,- <f>BH : entered from 
Xavier University and Lorain High 
School; Honorary Seminar; Moorhead Sur- 
gical Seminar; Lorain. Ohio. 



Martha Anne Russell, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Austin High School; 
Stat'ort, Illinois. 

Charles Desmond Ryan. Bachelor of 
Philosophy; entered from De Paul Uni- 
versity and Fenwick High School; Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 



l.uiis Salerno. A.B., Certificate in Medi- 
cine; $X ; AP; entered from University of 
North Carolina and Clifton High School; 
Volini Medical Society; Moorhead Surgical 
Seminar; Class Treasurer 2; Clifton, New 
Jersey. 

Elizabeth Mary Salin. Registered 
Nurse ; entered from Rhinelander High 
School : Rhinelander, Wisconsin. 



Helen Marie Sarafolean, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Steinmetz High 
School; Chicago, Illinois. 

Roger Finer Savre, Bachelor of Arts; 
AAl; entered from Mount Carmel High 
School ; Loyola News 1, 2, 3 ; Curtain 
Guild 3; Sodality 2, 3; Classical Club 2; 
French Club 1. 2; Chicago, Illinois. 



Francis J. Satek, Bachelor of Science; 
Air; entered from Marquette University 
and St. Ignatius High School; Sodalitv 2, 
3, 4; Chemistry Club 3, 4: Track 2," 3; 
German Club 2 ; Chicago, Illinois. 

Virginia Marie Sazma, Registered 
Nurse ; entered from Aquinas High 
School; Chicago, Illinois. 



Charles Herhert Schaar, Bachelor of 
Science; entered from St. Ignatius Higli 
School; Cudahy Forum 1, 2: Chicago. Illi- 



Verone Dorothy Schiltz, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Loretta ; Caledonia, 
Minnesota. 



Cenerva Florence Schmidt, B.A., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine ; N£* ; entered from 
North Central College ; Class Secretary 3 ; 
Hinckley, Illinois. 

Winona Josephine Schmidt, Registered 
Nurse ; entered from Kelvvn Park High 
School: Class President 2, 3; Chicago, Illi- 
nois. 



Sister Mary Agnes Schneider, O.S.F., 
Registered Nurse; entered from St. Fran- 
cis Academy; Hankinson, North Dakota. 

Adam Stanley Schultz, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine : AP : entered from 
Loyola University and Proviso Township 
High School; Melrose Park, Illinois. 



Margaret Ann Schultz, Registered 
Nurse; entered from St. Scholastica Acad- 
emy; Chicago, Illinois. 

Robert Arthur Schultz, Bachelor of 
Philosophy ; entered from Loyola Acad- 
emy ; Sodality 1. 2; Finance Club 4; Eco- 
nomics Seminar 4; Green Circle 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Intramural 1, 2; Philosophy Club 3, I; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Eloise Josephine Schumacher, A. A., 
Registered Nurse ; Achoth ; entered from 
The University of Chicago, and New Trier 
Township High School ; Chicago, Illinois. 

Chauncev Goodrich Schuyler, D.D.S., 
Certificate of Medicine; entered from 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery, and 
DeKalb Township High School; Honorary 
Seminar ; DeKalb, Illinois. 



S5 



Mary Elizabeth Scott, Registered 
Nwrse; entered from Duluth State Teach- 
ers Colleere and Duluth Denfeld High 
School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Duluth, Minne- 
sota. 

Sister Mary Sebastian, Registered 
Nurse ; Chicago, Illinois. 



Leonie Edythe See, Registered Nurse ; 
entered from Loretta of Englewood; Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 

Elizabeth Mary Sepsi, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Fenger High School; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Sakaye Shigekawa, Certificate in Medi- 
cine; NZ4» ; entered from University of 
Southern California and Thomas Jeffer- 
son High School; Class Secretary 2, Los 
Angeles, California. 

Leone Margaret Shunick, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Alexis Community 
High School; Alexis, Illinois. 



Udine Letha Shuler, Registered Nurse; 
entered from Albion High School; Albion, 
Nebraska. 

Bernice Ruth Signorella, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Proviso Township 
High School ; Melrose Park, Illinois. 



Albert Alan Silverman, Bachelor of 
Letters and Laws; entered from North- 
western University Y.M.C.A. College and 
High School ; Chicago, Illinois. 

Wiley Simmons, Bachelor of Science in 
Education; entered from University of 
Chicago and Vienna Township High 
School; Oak Lawn, Illinois. 



Ethel Mary Skradski, Registered 
Nurse ; entered from St. Joseph High 
School; Sodality; Escanaba, Michigan.. 

George Francis Slama, B.S.M., Certif- 
icate in Medicine; entered from St. Pro- 
copius College ; Moorhead Surgical Sem- 
inar ; Chicago, Illinois. 



Joseph Francis Small, Bachelor of Arts; 
entered from Xavier University and St. 
Ignatius High School; Sodality 4; Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 

James John Smtd, Bachelor of Science; 
entered from St. Patrick Academy; Biolo- 
gy Seminar 1, 2, 3, 4; Chicago, Illinois. 



Frank James Soltes, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence ; entered from St. Ignatius High 
School; Sodalitv 1, 2, 3, 4; German Club 
2, 3; Chemistrv Club 1, 2; Biology Sem- 
inar 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2; Bellar- 
mine Philosophy Club 4; Freesoil, Michi- 
gan. 

Dominador Alegrado Soriano, Bache- 
lor of Science; entered from University of 
Washington and Garfield High School; So- 
dality; Lobo, Batangas, Philippines. 



Charles A. Sossoxg, Bachelor of Science 
in Commerce ; IIAA ; entered from Loyola 
Academy; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Loyolan 1; 
Curtain Guild 3, 4; Economics Seminar 3, 
4; Debating 4; Evanston, Illinois. 

Marianne Catrambone Spadea, Bache- 
lor of Philosophy; entered from Univer- 
sity of Chicago and McKinley High 
School; Chicago, Illinois. 



Frank Charles Spratt, B.S.M., Certif- 
icate in Medicine ; entered from Creighton 
University and Mellette High School; Mel- 
lette, South Dakota. 

Dolores Patricia Stanley, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Alpha High School; 
Omaha, Nebraska. 



Robert Carl Stegman, S.J., Bachelor of 
Arts; entered from Xavier University and 
Xavier High School; Sodality, 3, 4; Sci- 
entific Academy, 3, 4 ; Bellarmine Acad- 
emy 3; Sacred Heart Academy 4; Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. 

Robert John Stell, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence; AXS ; entered from St. Philip High 
School; Sodality 2, 3, 4; German Club 1, 
2; Chicago, Illinois. 



Helen Stephen, Registered Nurse; en- 
tered from Wright Junior College and 
Steinmetz High School; Elmwood, Illinois. 

Irene Pearl Steplyk, Registered Nurse; 
entered from Waukegan Township High 
School; Waukegan, Illinois. 



Genevieve Pauline Stradum, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Englewood High 
School; Chicago, Illinois. 

Julianne Barbara Stulginskas. Regis- 
tered' Nurse; entered from St. Casimir's 
Academy; Chicago, Illinois. 



Lucille Patricia Sutkus, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Waukegan Township 
High School; Waukegan, Illinois. 

Sister Mary Gabriel Svaglic, Ad. P. 
P.S., Registered Nurse; entered from St. 
Joseph Academy; Columbia, Pennsylvania. 



Albert Swtrsky, B.S.M., Certificate in 
Medicine ; 4>AK ; entered from Lewis Insti- 
tute and Harrison Technical High School; 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Anita Alberta Thomas, Registered 

Nurse; entered from Kenosha High 

School ; Sodality 1, 2, 3 : Kenosha. Wis- 
consin. 



Joseph William Thomas, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine; entered from Uni- 
versity of Detroit and Flint Northern 
High School; Honorai'y Medical Seminar; 
Flint, Michigan. 

Shirley Eugenia Thomas, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Negaunee High 
School; Negaunee, Michigan. 



Mary Jane Thompson, Registered Nurse; 
entered from Westville High School, West- 
vine, Indiana. 

Louise M. Tilges, Registered Nurse; 
entered from Amundsen High School ; 
Niles Center, Illinois. 



Thomas Joseph Tobin, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Commerce ; entered from Mount 
Carmel High School ; Glee Club 2, 3 ; So- 
dality 1, 2 ; Economic Seminar 4 ; Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 

Mary Josephine Toomey, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Siena High School; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



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88 



Kenneth Fkedekii k Trunk. Bachelor 
of ■Science in Commerce; entered from 
St. Ignatius High School; Sodality 1, 2, 
3, 4; Orchestra 2, 3. 4; Chicago, Illinois. 

Margaret Ann Turk, Registered Nurse; 
entered from St. Patricks Academy; Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 



Mary Alines Turner, Registered Nurse; 
ML>M; entered from Holv Family High 
School; Tulsa, Oklahoma. 



Mary Li 

entered 

School; Sodality 1 

nois. 



Vai card, Registered Nurse; 
Savanna Township High 



Savanna, Illi- 



Tiiomas Joseph Van Derslice, Bachelor 
of Philosophy; entered from Hoover High 
School; Sociality 1. 2. 3; Class Secretary 
1; President of Cudahy Porum 2, San 

I »iego, California. 

Alh 'E Mai; IK \" \n Dqrn, Register ed 
Nurse; entered from Carlyle High School; 
Carlyle, Illinois. 



Frank Anthox.' Vicari, B.S.M., Cer- 
tificate in Medicine ; 2X2 ; entered from 
Central Y.M.C.A. Collage and Harrison 
Technical High School: Yolini Medical 
Society ; Moorhead Surgical Seminar ; 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Mary Anne Vidak, Registered Nurse; 
entered from Hihbing Junior College and 
Hibbing High School ; Hibbing, Minne- 
sota. 



Ralph Victor Yiglione. liar helm- of 

Philosophy ; entered from Proviso Town- 
sllip High School Glee Club 2, :;. 4; 
Melrose Park. Illinois. 

Norma Marije Volkmasn, Registered 
Nurse; entered from Sam Houston High 
School : Houston, Texas. 



G krdo Maria Von G ehr, Registered 
Nurse . entered from Proviso Township 
High School; May wood, Illinois 

Edward Thomas Vori g< k, A B , Doctor 
of Jurisprudence ; entered from Univer- 
sity of Michigan and University of Illi- 
nois : Barrington, Illinois. 



Helen Lois Wagxer, Registered Nurse; 
MflM : entered from University of Wis- 
consin, and Washington High School ; 
Two Rivers. Wisconsin. 



foSEPH Michael Walsh, S.J., Bachelor 
■' iris; entered from Xavier University 
and St. Ignatius High School: Sodality -J; 
Choir 4. Chicago, Illinois. 



Carl Wereliits, B.S.M., Certificate in 
Medicine; 1<\-1 ; *l'\ ; AP ; entered from 
The University of Chicago; Moorhead 

Surgical Seminar : < Ihicago, Illinois. 



James Reiner Walsh. Bachelor of Arts; 
entered from St. Anthony College, and 
St. Anthony High School ; Chicago, Illi- 
nois. 



Roman George Weltin. S.J., Bachelor 
of Arts; entered from St. John's Univer- 
sity, and St. Xavier' s University: Scien- 
tific Academy 3, 4; Sodality 3.' 4; Eph- 
pheta 3, 4 ; Premont. Ohio. 



Rolert Joseph West. Bachelor of Phi- 
losophy; AAF; entered from Central Cath- 
olic High School; Sodality 2, 3; Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania. 



Richard H. Wienke. Bachelor of Science 
in Commerce; AAT ; 4>AP : Cudahy Forum 
1, 2; Varsity Debating 3. 4: Sodality 1. 2, 
3, 4: Economics Seminar 4; Chicago, 
Illinois. 

Emanuel Charles Wilhelm, B.S.M., 
Certificate in Medicine ; AP ; 4>X ; en- 
tered from Northwestern University; 
Moorhead Surgical Seminar 3, 4 : Volini 
Medical Society 3, 4; Loyola News 1 ; 
Loyola Union 2. 3, President 4 ; Traverse 
City. Michigan. 



Albertus Jui in Wtjlzbacher, S.J., 
Bachelor of Arts: entered from Xavier 
University and Rietz Memorial High 
School ; Sodality 4 ; Evansville. Indiana. 

Arthur Charles Wise, Certificate in 
Medicine ; A2N ; AP ; 4>X ; entered from 
Fenwick High School; Volini Medical So- 
ciety, President 4 ; Class President 1 ; 
Varsity Swimming 1, 2; Moorhead Surgi- 
cal Seminar; Oak Park, Illinois. 



Harriet Bettv Wykowski. Registered 
Nurse.- Three Lakes, Wisconsin. 

Hexrv James Wynsln. B.S.M., Certifi- 
cate in Medicine; entered from South 
High School; Sodality 1; German Club 2; 
Moorhead Surgical Seminar; Youngstown, 

Ohio. 

Owen Tvlin Ym n«;, Bachelor of Philoso- 
phy; entered from St. Louis College; 
Honolulu, T.H.. Hawaii. 



Marvelon HOBOTHE Zahn, Registered 
Nurse; MfiM; entered from Two Harbors 
High School; St. Cloud. Minnesota. 

Samuel Zaidenuerg, B.S.M., Certificate 
in Medicine ; 4>AK ; entered from Central 
Y.M.C.A. College and Tuley High School; 
Chicago, Illinois. 



John Joseph Zannini, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence : ASS ; entered from St. Mary's of 
Winona and St. Mel High School; Chem- 
istry Club 2, 3. 4; Le Cercle Francais 2; 
Sodality 2, 3; Biology Club 3; Bellarmine 
Philosophy Club 4 ; Waukegau. Illinois. 

James JOSEPH ZigeRell, Bachelor of 
Arts: entered from St. Viator's College and 
St. Rita High School: Chicago. Illinois. 



Anne Mary Zizox. Registered Nnr.se; 
entered from Carl Schurz High School ; 
( 'hicago, Illinois. 

Theodore Franvk Zmidgrodski. A B., 

Certificate in Medicine; entered from Uni- 
versity of Alabama and Perth Amboy High 
School ; Perth Amboy, New Jersey. 

Daniel Lawrence Aurams. Bachelor of 
L-etters and Lines; entered from Nicholas 
Semi High School ; vice-president 4 : 
Brandeis Competition 3, 4 ; Chicago, 

Illinois. 



Anthonv Michael Anzalone, Doctor of 

Laics ; AG4> ; entered from University of 
Illinois and Lane Technical School; Bran- 
deis Competition ; Loyola Bar Association ; 
Brandeis Board ; Chicago, Illinois. 

Thomas A. Guinane, Ph.B., Doctor of 
Laics; entered from De La Salle Insti- 
tute; Illinois Junior Bar Association; 
Loyola Bar Association; Chicago, Illinois. 



Nicholas S. Limperis. Bachelor of Let- 
ters and Laws; entered from "Robert 
Waller High School ; vice-president 3 ; 
Brandeis Competition; Loyola Bar Asso- 
ciation; Chicago, Illinois. 

Stelios Paul Mamalakis, Doctor of 
Laws; entered from University of Athens: 
Rethymuon, Greece. 



To ma sin a Parka Mexdoza, Re aisle red 
Nurse.- entered from Joseph Medill High 
School; New Bruusville, Texas. 

Frank -lo- e;-ii Si jikeiner, Bachelor of 
Letters ami Lairs ; entered from Univer- 
sity of Illinois : Loyola Bar Association ; 
Illinois Junior Bar Association; ("'hicago, 
Illinois. 

Eugene M. Stussi, Bachelor of Letters 
and Laws: entered from Crane High 
School ; Loyola Bar Association ; Illinois 
Junior Bar Association; Chicago, Illinois. 



S!) 



Harriet S. Aries 
Beatrice Blaker Baxter 
Ethel Louise Bloomquist 
Rudolph E. Bohor 
Mildred Ann Bomba 
Marion S. Buckley 
Thomas E. Buckley 
Mary S. Carey 
Philip Cordes 
William E. Corrigan 
Dorothy Agnes Courtney 
Joseph A. Czonstka 
Alfred Daubenfeld 
Vincent J. Del Beccaro 
Antoinette Florence Dilibert 
John Joseph Duffy 
Charles S. Dunphy 
James T. Durkin 
John R. Fahey 
Walter Feinstein 
Alice Colleta Fitzpatrick 
Phillip Henry Frankel 
Ralph Henry Franzen 
Robert John Freedman 




O I 111 It 



I. Hartzell Givens 
Alfred Waldemar Glaess 
Richard J. Gleason 
John P. Goedert 
James J. Godfrey 
Julia Twomey Grashoff 
Leslie Hammond, Jr. 
Ruth Denise Hanagan 
Julia Mary Hanna 
Genevieve C. Hereley 
Margaret L. Hunter 
Jeremiah Anglim Hynes, Jr. 
Simon Adrian Jackson 
Edward C. Jakubowski 
Martin J. Jennings 
Jannette C. Johnson 
Reuben A. Johnson 
Sister M. Imelda Kryger, C.S.J. 
Simon Kass 
Jerome J. Kennelly 
Alex Matthew Kezes 
Stanislaus Meceslaus Koziol 
Esther Lakin 



JP£3^ 



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CANDIDATES 



James J. Lally 

Amy Elizabeth Lawrenson 

Frank T. Leahy 

Henry Edward LeClaire 

Charles Xavier Lumpkin 

George W. Lyon 

Helen Virginia Lynch 

Marie C. Lynch 

Walter Gerard Lynn 

Mary Rose Mahoney 

Edgar Manske 

Edward James Marsh 

Donald Albert Meier 

James Joseph McNulty 

Donald K. Mcintosh 

Coletta Barbara Mertes 

Gerald II. Move 

Eileen Ann Murphy 

Francis C. Murphy 

Margaret T. Myers 

Leo J. Newhonse 

Eleanor Emma Newton 

Bro. Nicholas Norusis, O.S.M. 



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Annie Dora Oakes 

Michael M. Pontecore 

Richard J. Prendergast 

Marguerite Rebedeau 

Dolly Rcick 

William II. Roberts 

Rosmarie Eva Rochetta 

Phillip Herzl Ross 

Leonard Saxon 

^linie Audrie Shandross 

Angeline C. Shields 

Frank Stanley Skopek 

Sister M. Corita Slattery. B.V.M. 

Joseph John Slomka 

Mary Elizabeth Smith 

Mary G. Smith 

Francis Charles Spratt 

Joseph E. Tobin 

David Harry Weinstein 

Margaret Mary Wilhelm 

Frank Zambrotta 

Florence Marie Zimmerman 

James Raymond Zvetina 




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SI anion f Honors 



In line with the Jesui1 plan of studies, the Ratio 
Studiorum, the College of Arts and Sciences holds 
annual Honors ('(invocations. This plan, begun two 
years ago by the Reverend William A. Finnegan, 
S.J., Dean of the College, is primarily intended to 

reward the students who have excelled in their stu- 
dies. Certificates of merit are presented to them at 
the Convocation which is attended by the faculty 
and parents. At the end <it' the year another Con- 
vocation is held, this time to reward those students 
who have participated in activities sponsored by 
the school. At this Convocation the much coveted 



Dean's Keys are awarded to those Seniors whose 
work in extra-curricular activities has been of such 
a calibre as to merit special note. 

One of the most important student honors is the 
appointment to the post of a school orator. This 
honor is merited by the winner of the annual ( 'arter 
II. Harrison Oratorical Contest. This year the con- 
test was won by Oerard (lalante who spoke on "St. 
Robert Bellarmine. " The second place position was 
merited by Edward Corboy of the University Col- 
lege. 



The Faculty and Seniors in academic robes file in for the 
Honors < !onvoeation. 

Father rear] awards an Honor Certitirat c to Harold Frev. 



Mi. Thomas Bvrne, judge of the Harrison Oratorical Con- 
test, congratulates the winner, Gerard Galante. 




<IU 




tacMLzati&ub 





To the Keverend James J. Mertz, S.J., the stu- 
dent body owes an inestimable debt of gratitude 
for his untiring efforts to build for them a chapel. 
The clubs and fraternities of the University have 
endeavored to repay in some measure their debt 
of gratitude to him, and in recognition of his 
services to the student body we have dedicated 
this section to Father Mertz. 



c 



teviU 



STUDENT ASSOCIATIONS 
UNION 

ARTS COUNCIL 

BAR ASSOCIATION 

CLUBS 

MOTHERS' CLUB 

FATHERS' CLUB 

BIOLOGY SEMINAR 

CHEMISTRY CLUB 

CLASSICAL CLUB 

FRENCH CLUB 

ECONOMICS SEMINAR 

FINANCE CLUB 

BELLARMINE PHILOSOPHY CLUB 

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB 

GREEN CIRCLE 

UNIVERSITY CLUB 

MONOGRAM CLUB 

FRATERNITIES 
SOCIAL 
HONORARY 



Loyola Union 



The Loyola Union, made up of all registered students of the 
University, is governed by the Union Board of Governors. Theo- 
retically the Governors are elected by their classmates to repre- 
sent them for three years, but more often than not, the Board 
members are appointed by the Deans of the various branches of 
the University. 

Once each month, thirty-four representatives to the Union 
meet to bring student opinion to the campus heads, and integrate 
the far-flung Loyola schools. 

The Union sponsors many social events, the first of which is 
properly termed the Pow Wow. The alumni gymnasium was 
packed on this occasion, lint not at the succeeding Fall Frolic. 
The annual Senior Ball, biggest of all Loyola Formals. had not 
occurred when the Annual went to press. 

Besides regulating the sale of class rings, the Union worked 
out a satisfactory financial plan. A political football for nine 
years, the officers devised a plan, whereby the Union would be- 
come self-supporting. 

Officers were : Emanuel Wilhelm, Medical Senior, President ; 
Harry Courtney. Law Junior, Vice-President ; Emilie Kruppa, 
University College Senior, Secretary; and Martin O'Shaugh- 
nessy. Arts Senior, Treasurer. The Rev. Edward F. Maher. S.J., 
guided the group through an active and constructive year in his 
capacity of faculty moderator. 




The Loyola Union was well directed 
by two capable executives, the Rev. 
Edward F. Maher, S.J., ami Emanuel 
Wilhelm. 



Front Bow — La Framboise, Thompson, Kruppa, Wilhelm, Fr. Maher, Moderator, O'Shaugh- 

nessy, Noonan, Gibbons. 
Middle Bow — Davey, Burnett, Sullivan, Feehan, McKeever, P. Conway. Mtillenix. Wellnow, 

Francis. 
Bear Eoie — Murphy, 'Neill, Burchett, Wallace, Evan, Fox. 




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|aH 




Martin 'Shaughnessy, active, inspir- 
ing leader of tin' Arts Couneil, is al- 
ready an outstanding figure in Loyola 
history. 



Arts Student Couneil 



Ideal college life was brought to every Loyola student this 
year by the Arts Student Council under the leadership and in- 
spiration of President Martin E. 'Shaughnessy, Arts Senior. 

The council promised bonfires and the students got one as 
part of many rallies. The council initiated a non-profit book 
exchange, and cooperated with the Green Circle in the first an- 
nual "Loyalty Week." John Devaney, Arts Senior Class 
President, took a step forward in separate class activity by start- 
ing payment of class dues each semester. The council purchased 
Loyola's first official mascot, a young Minnesota wolf. The group 
maintained many traditional practices, notably dances and sup- 
port of varsity athletics. 

Students were given an opportunity to participate in the 
affairs of the University through the establishment of an auxiliary 
council. Another change initiated by 'Shaughnessy was a re- 
organization of the council to give more equal representation to 
underclassmen whose representatives formerly had only half a 
vote. 

The men who held enviable positions in the council were: 
Robert Bremer. Secretary-Treasure]': .John Devaney, Senior Class 
President; William Gibbons, News Editor; Richard Roland. Sen- 
ior Commerce Representative; Francis 'Shaughnessy. Junior 
('lass Presidenl ; .lames Lyons, Sophomore Class President; "Wil- 
liam .Murphy. Freshman ('lass President; and Robert Wallace, 
who replaced Gibbons as News Editor. 



Front Him -Gibbons, Bremer, 'Shaughnessy M., 'Shaughnessy F., Lyons. 
Second lion- — Johnson, Devaney, Boland, Wallace, Tursich. 
Hear Mow — Howe, Beauregard, Brannigan, Koenig. 



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MDXL • SOCIETY OF 




Seated — Pokoray, Brahm, Brandstrader, Abrams; Standing — 
Brennan, Gvrinane, Anzalone, Carroll, Courtney, Sclireiner. 
Schatz. Newliouse, Pauls 



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This was the second year of existence for the Loyola Bar As- 
sociation, the new consolidated form of student government in the 
Law School, in which the major extra-curricular activities are 
managed through committees, the members of which meet to- 
gether and constitute the board of managers. 'The new consti- 
tution, ratified last year by the student body, was followed as 
closely as possible with gratifying results. 

The latter part of October saw a Welcome Freshman party 
at the LaSalle I Intel at which approximately one hundred sin- 
dents of the day ami night divisions congregated socially and 
exchanged views on various and sundry topics. Short talks by 
Dean Fitzgerald, Father Noonan, and several members of the fac- 
ulty, plus an appearance by each of the student activity leaders 
to explain and introduce the different forms of endeavor to the 
new men. preceded refreshments and general fraternizing. 

Seventy-one men were enrolled in the Illinois Junior Bar 
Association by a committee beaded by John Brennan, Niglrl Law 
junior. .Monthly editions of the Bar Journal ami a membership 
card entitling the holder to all the privileges of the liar Associa- 
I ion went to each man. 



Fred L. Bhandstradee 
President of tlir Bar Association 



Bar Association 




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Front Row — Mesdames Riley De Lano, Kiiw. P. Nesbitt, August Hummert, Andrew Sossong, 

Frank .1. Murnighan. 
Hear Utur — Mesdames Peter L. Conway, .1. .1. Kavanaugh, Hubert Human. .1. Wheeler, Fred 

Floberg, .1. .1. Martin, Adolf Strigl. 




The success of the Mothers' Club this 
year speaks for the exceptional presi- 
dential ability of Mrs. August Hum- 
inert. 



As each year passes, the Mothers' ('lull increases in im- 
portance and loyalty. Pounded primarily to bring the mothei's 
into a closer relationship with the University and to raise the 
scholarship fund at Loyola, it has done much to realize these 
aims under the unselfish ami capable leadership of its president, 
Mrs. A. .1. Mil iert. 

Monthly parties were sponsored by the mothers of the various 
classes. .Mrs. Birren, .Mrs. Delano, .Mrs. Conway, and Mrs. Sos- 
song were the chairmen of the Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, and 

Senior ( 'hisses respective!}". At these meet inii's. leet ures and short 

talks were given by members of the faculty. To mention but one. 
ih<' Rev. Ralph A. Gallagher, S.J., was invited and spoke on 
' ' Your Sons. 

'The annual Christmas Party was a huge success. It received 
the cooperation of the Mothei's of the various classes, the Loyola 
I 'niversity Glee < 'lull and John "Santa Claus" De\ alley. 

The mothers' club combined with the fathers' club in pre- 
senting the outstanding event of the year. It was the second 
annual Scholarship Lund Parly ami was held at the Stevens 
Hotel. The proceeds from the party were turned over to the Rev. 
William Pinnegan, S.J., Mean of the ( 'ollege of Arts and Science, 
ami Moderator of i he (dub. It was a fitting climax to a year filled 
with busy activity and many thanks are due the mothers for 
their earnest work in behalf of the [Tnivevsitv. 



Tho Mothers' 4 lull 



KM) 



The Fathers' Club 



In 1936, on the North Shore Campus, the Loyola University 
Fathers' Club was formed as an outgrowth of the Dads' day din- 
ners. The club intends that the Fathers derive some of the same 
benefits from the University as their sons, and understand the 
student duties of their sons more fully. 

The Dads started the year with the Fathers-Sons Faculty 
Smoker on September 27. Next on the calendar was the annual 
event of the Alumni- Varsity Basketball game, which was played 
on December 9. It was an exceptional game this year because of 
the play of members of the teams of "30" and "39." Many All- 
American basketball players studded the roster of the Alumni. 

The club continued quietly until April 4 of 1940 when the 
Fathers-Sons Banquet was held at the Knickerbocker Hotel. On 
this occasion the Fathers indicated their interest in Varsity ath- 
letics by awarding trophies to the members of the basketball 
squad. 

Then, as the crowning achievement of a successful year, the 
Fathers, in cooperation with the Mothers' Club, sponsored the 
annual Scholarship Fund Card Party and Dance. This was held 
at the Stevens Hotel on May 10. 

Mr. Andrew C. Sossong, as President, and the Rev. James J. 
Mahoney, S.J., Moderator, merit recognition for their service to 
the group. The other worthy officers were : Mr. August J. Hum- 
mert, Vice-president ; Mr. George Farrell, Secretary ; Mr. Charles 
J. Graham, Treasurer. 




The Fathers' Club enjoyed a success- 
ful year under the leadership of Mr. 
Andrew Sossong. 



Front How — Messrs. J. J. Kavanaugh, Frank J. Murnighan, Andrew Sossong, Hubert A. Homan. 
Hear Sow — Messrs. J. J. Martin, Fred Floberg, Peter L. Conway, J. Wheeler, Riley De Lano. 




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Vincent Marzano is probably the 
most active Pre-Medical Senior, and 
this year he devoted a large share of 
his time to the Bioloev Club. 



Biology Seminar 



The Biology Seminar, composed solely of students inter- 
ested in biology, is one of the most active organizations on the 
Lake Shore Campus. It has just finished one of its busiest and 
most productive years. 

Much of its success is due to the efforts and leadership of its 
moderator and chairman of the Biology Department, Dr. Joseph 
Semrad. Also contributing largely to the success of the club were 
its officers; Vincent iiarzano, president; Ceorgc Bravos, vice- 
president; John Fahey, secretary, and John Cilia, treasurer, all 
Arts Juniors, 

The main purpose of the Seminal' was to acquaint the stu- 
dent with existing biological phenomena so that he could combine 
i1 with his classroom theory into a well-knit and compact program. 
This was successfully accomplished by means of the meetings 
which were all conducted on an informal basis and by the lectures 
delivered by various members of the biology department. Numer- 
ous movies were shown and field trips were taken, offering to the 
student a diversified program and a wide variety of topics. Much 
valuable aid and many interesting sessions were given by the 
Rev. Charles Wiedeman, 8. J., and Mr. Walter Hudson. 

The importance of the work that the Seminar is doing can be 
understood when it is realized thai fully three-fourths of its 
members will eventually enter medical schools. Thus, the Biology 
Seminar has done much to augmenl the student's knowledge of 
his chosen field. 



First Row — Macliowski, lilcch, Cilia, Marzano, Dr. Semrad, Fahey, Marina, Kernis. 

Second How — Grochowski, Lamey, Pulus, Kowalski, Vanikiotis, Ponizo, Siwek, Houlihan, 

Grant, White, Pelka, Bcdessem, McCoy, Smid, Kawula. 
1,'iu, Koir — Xaisctc, Lciu-ll, Condon, Podgorski, Govostis, Koczur, Slotkowski, Dolehide, 

Bernardi, Micaletti, Pagano, Suites. 



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First Sow — O'Connor, McDonald, Musmanni, Brennan, McManamon. 

Second Bow — Grady, Harkness, Smullen, Rossing, Gackocko. 

Third Sow — Tully, Condon, Tordella, Esser, Prey. 

Fourth Sow — Dr. Schmeing, Marzano, Domkc, Narsete, Runtz. 

Fifth Soil' — Beresky, Zannini, Millar, ^atck. Murphy. 

Sixth Sow — Mr. Cassereto, Barrett. 



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Tin 1 Chemistry Club was formed to correlate the theory of 
lecture with the practical applications of the subject in the in- 
dustrial world. 

During class the professor can point to but comparatively 
few of the vast possibilities in the field, so the Club undertakes in- 
dicating others of them. In truth, the < 'lub does more than indi- 
cate them, for it arranges field trips to various commercial plants 
for student tours. Often there are lectures and demonstrations 
given. 

The group started at home by taking up the uses of chemis- 
try throughout the University, itself. This proved a very popular 
and informative series of lectures which consumed a large part 
of the program. A movie was brought in. which explained the 
chemical details in the recent development of color photography. 
Welding was demonstrated at one of the lectures and the students 
were given an opportunity to do the work themselves. On the 
trips the students visited a steel mill, paint factories and sewage 
disposal plants. The steel mill trip was particularly interesting 
because it was operating at capacity to produce war materials. 
The club was successful in enlisting many of the members in a 
class in glass blowing. Student interest rose as they learned, and 
ultimately many men were proficient at the art. 

Tile ('lub was under the direction of President John Tor- 
della. Arts Junior. As a rule students managed the affairs, but 
when needed the Moderator. Mr. George M. Schmeing. Ph.D.. 
Acting Chairman of the Department of Chemistry, gave all his 
interest, and help. 



Chemistry Club 



Jolm Tordella is as apt ami learned in 
the sciences as any student in the col- 
lege and was the logical choice for 
president of the Chemistry Club. 




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First "Row — Esposito, Cutler, Slattery, Fleming. 

Second Sow — Fr. Millor, Mr. Melchiors, McCourt, Harden, Sehaefer. 

Third Row — Hayes, Fr. Mertz, Gallagher. 



John Felten, left, President and Mr. 
Melchiors, Moderator, of the Classical 
Cluli prepare the agenda before one of 
the meetings of the group. 




The Classical Club serves to increase the appreciation for 
and the knowledge of the culture of Greece and Rome among the 
students of that field and in other fields. 

The club met each month usually in the student lounge. In 
the discussions the members defined the value of the Classics, 
learned about the social customs of that time, and took up the 
works of the philosophical sages of that era. They took up classi- 
cal music and Greek architecture. The mode of teaching- Latin 
among European Universities was explained. An interesting topic 
was the Roman use of ' * modern ' ' inventions such as plumbing, etc. 
The form of life among the ancients, particularly that of So- 
crates, also created considerable interest. 

The club enjoyed the patronage of many faculty members. 
They were : the Moderator, Mr. John Melchiors. Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Classical Languages; the Rev. James J. Mertz, S.J., Pro- 
fessor and Head of the Department of Classical Languages ; the 
Rev. W. J. Millor, S. J., Professor of Classical Languages, and 
Mr. I). Herbert Abel, Assistant Professor of Classical Languages. 
The officers of the ( Hub were : John Felten, Arts Senior, President, 
and James Slattery, Arts Junior, Secretary. 

Some of the students interested in the club were John Lyons, 
James Cutler, Arthur Fenner, Arts Seniors; Kenneth Hayes, 
Frank McGarr, Carl ltayden, Charles Lang, Robert Sh.anab.an, 
and William Ryan, Arts Sophomores, and .lames Fleming, Arts 
Freshman. 



Classical Club 



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French I hi b 



The bi-monthly meetings of Le Circle Frangais were designed 
to acquaint the students of the French language with the social, 
cultural, and intellectual life of that people. 

At the regular meetings .short talks and papers were offered 
on the history and tradition of France by means of translations 
from classic French writers. 

At the joint meetings with Les D'Arciennes of Mundelein 
College the social aspect took the fore. French songs were sung 
and the atmosphere of French life was increased by an almost ex- 
elusive use of French in conversation. A high point of the year 
was the puppet show. Le Medecin Malgre Suns Lui, given by Les 
D'Arciennes. Tentative plans were made at that time for the 
French Clubs of Mundelein and Loyola to form a class in French 
conversation taught by a faculty member of either school. 

The activity of the French Club lias done much to instill 
extra-curricular interest in the French language and French in 
general. The club's moderator, Dr. LeBlanc, and the officei-s, Jo- 
seph Duffy, President, and Joseph McNeela, secretary-treasurer, 
both Arts Juniors, did fine work with, the club throughout the 
year. Much of the credit for the popularity of the club must be 
given to these men. After a busy year of studying French in the 
classroom and studying it over at Mundelein, the activities of the 
club culminated in the annual banquet held in a well-known 
French restaurant. 




Joseph Duffy is greatly interested in 
the French language and obviously is 
the man to bring the French Clubs of 
Mundelein and Loyola in closer rela- 
tion. 



Seated — Ahem, Schlottman, McNeela, Duffy, Fahey, Esposito, Marzano. 
Standing — Koczur, Bremer, Ostler, Gudgeon, Lavezzorio, Marzano. 



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Commerce students elected Ray Gei- 
mer, president eut of respect for his 
knowledge of and interest in Finance. 



Finance Club 



The Finance Club established on the Lake Shore Campus, 
was originated by Mr. Walter A. Foy, Assistanl Professor in the 
Department of Economics, and advisor to'the students who major 
in I lie subject of Finance. 

The club was founded to maintain the -Jesuit policy of close 
union between professor and student. The club met regularly :uid 
functioned efficiently during its first year. The bi-monthly meet- 
ings in neighborhood restaurants gave men an opportunity i<< 
discuss their problems. ( )n these occasions, the program arranged 
by Ray Geimer, Commerce Senior, included a talk on some phase 
of finance by one of the .students. The club has an unusual tradi- 
tion whereby the topic of the speech is withheld until delivery. 
At one of their meetings, a joint banquet was arranged with 
the Economic Seminar. At this joint meeting, Mr. Foy lectured 
on " Mathematical Economies" and Dr. Mogilnitsky presented a 
counter-lecture on "Orthodox Economists and Their Teachings." 

Extremely active in this year's programs were Raymond 
Geimer, Chairman and Commerce Senior; George Wenskus. Sec- 
retary and Commerce Junior; Alexander Burke, Jerome Nerger 
and Bill Janik, < 'ommerce Seniors. Hill Janik and .Jerome Nerger 
organized the first Finance comprehensive review class. The class 
met weekly for a period of two months in the ('ommerce office 
with Mr. Walter Foy presiding. 



Front Row — Wenskus. Matt. Scliell, Janik. Geimer, Dirksen, Graham. 

Second Bow — Schiavone, Johnson, Davlantes, Nelson, Burke, Dillon. 

Rear How Behlottman, Hennessy, Koerner, Graliam, Smurdon, Mack, Mr. For. 



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front Hon— Cofone, T. Boland, U. Boland, Davlantes, Janik. 

llcai How — Barrelt, Nerger, Kuni, Dr. MoRilnitskv, Burke. Fletcher. 



The Economic Seminar, founded on the Lake Shore 'ampus 
by Doctor Theodosi Mogilnitsky, Associate Professor of Econom- 
ics, in 193JS. has completed another highly successful year. The 
Seminal' has given the students an opportunity to apply their 
knowledge of economics to contemporary problems. At each meet- 
ing a paper is voluntarily presented by one of the members, and 
is followed by an open discussion by the group who have been 
informed of the subject chosen so that they may he prepared. 

.Moderator of the Seminal' again this year was Doctor .Mogil- 
nitsky. Student officers were Robert Kuni and Alexander Burke, 
Commerce seniors and president and secretary respectively. Doc- 
tor Mogilnitsky 's untiring efforts have been in no small way re- 
sponsible for the success of the Seminar. 

The Seminar opened the year with a dinner at a local hotel 
at which an outstanding paper "Mathematical Economics" was 
presented by Mr. Walter A. Poy, Associate Professor of Eco- 
nomics. Other excellent papers delivered during the year were by 
Alexander Burke, William Barrett, and .lames T. Fletcher, Com- 
merce Seniors. 

Plans have been made and will be presented next year for 
the Seminar's contribution to the program honoring the quadri- 
eentennial of the Eounding of the Jesuit I >rder. 

The opening and closing functions at a nearby hotel, and 
the meeting in the Student Lounge throughout the year were 
arranged by Alexander Burke. 



Economic Seminar 



The fact that the Economic ('lull was 
one of the most active ami successful 
groups on the campus may he ac- 
credited to the excellent handling of it 
clone by President Robert Kuni. 




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First Soiv — Fr. McCormick, Gibbons, Riordan. 

Second Sow — Reneseh, McCourt, Hosna. 

Bear Sow — Lavezzorio, Wauck, Dr. O'Neill, Slotkowski, Mussmani, 'Shaughnessy. 



One of the most capable student minds 
is in the head of William Gibbons who 
led Bellarmine Philosophy Club. 




The Robert Bellarmine Philosophy Club, which lias for its 
aim the provision of extra-curricular philosophical discussion for 
those students with a special interest in the subject, this year spe- 
culated on ''the concept of end and its application in the various 
fields of philosophy." 

The Rev. John F. McCormick, S.J., Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Philosophy, continued as moderator of the club ; and 
William Gibbons, Arts Senior, acted in the capacity of president. 
He was aided by Secretary Edward Riordan, Arts Junior. 

Members who presented papers at the bi-monthly meetings 
were : James Slattery, John Felten, John Lyons, James Cutler, 
LeRoy Wauck, Eugene Slotkowski, James Hosna, Joseph Mc- 
Neela, Robert Moorhead, Arthur Fenner, Martin 'Shaughnessy, 
John Lavezzorio, John Fahey, Gerald Leies, Mariruth Renesch 
and Lillian Bannahan. 

As a part of Mundelein College 's celebration of the feast of 
St. Thomas Aquinas, Gibbons and 'Shaughnessy addressed the 
annual symposium late in February. 

The policy of maintaining one subject throughout the year 
was suggested by the Rev. James J. Mahoney, S.J., as was the 
title of the subject. The members unanimously accepted the idea. 

Members of the philosophy department, besides Father Mc- 
Cormick and Father Mahoney, who guided the young philosophi- 
cal minds were: the Rev. Arthur J. Kelly, S.J.. the Rev. John J. 
Wellmuth, S.J., Dr. James O'Neill, and Mr. John D. MeKian. 



Itoliori Bellarmine 
Philosophy Cluh 



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Iiiteruatioiia 1 
Relations i lull 

Recent developments of war and Loss of international i 1 1 1 fii- 

rily point t«i the hungry need for study of International Rela- 
tions. 

The comprehensive <•< nti inoul on international events in all 
publications furnished abundant material for discussion. Every 
member was assigned sonic special phase of the subject to inves- 
tigate and round table discussion brought out what each hail 
found. In addition, books on Europe and Asia were taken up in 
the manner of debate with two students holding Lip each side. 
Noteworthy among these discussions was one held by Robert Etz- 
korn. Arts Junior, and John Devaney, Arts Senior, on Edward 
Benes' book. Democracy, Today and Tomorrow. 

The club prevailed upon members of the faculty to expound 
on the problem. < >ne was the Rev. Joseph Roubik. S.J.. ( 'hairman 
of the Department of History, who spoke on, "The Background 
of the Present "War." Dr. Paul Kiniery. Assistant Dean of the 
Graduate School, addressed the group on. "The United States in 

the International Scene. " Mr. Zvetina, Professor in the Sel I o£ 

Law. related bis experiences and impressions derived from a very 
recent and extended tour of southeastern Europe. 

When .lames Wallace. Arts Junior, John Devaney and Rob- 
ert Etzkorn attended the Regional Conference of the Catholic 
Association for International Peace at St. Francis College. Juliet. 
Illinois, -lames Wallace was honored with the office of vice-presi- 
dent of the Association. 

The officers were: Air. John Kemp, S.J., Director; Nathaniel 
Burke, Ails Senior. Chairman ; and Robert Etzkorn. Arts Junior, 
Secretary. 




Whoever, whatever, or whenever, it 
\v:is in history, Nathaniel Burke tins a 
good idea of the "why" of it all. 
and lie transferred this diligence and 
learning to the members of the 1 1 1 1 • ■ i 
national Relations Club. 



First Row — Garrity, McCarthy, Mr. Kemp, Moderator. 

Second Row — Kennedy, Carlin, Reams, Hennessy, Hosna, Galante. 

Third Hole — Wallace, Wallace, Conway, Biordan, Nieoli, Moorhead. 
Fourth lioir — Burke, Ilolman. Nicola. Devaney, Speaker, Etzkorn. 




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The Task of building up student spirit 
and publicity fell to Robert Schultz as 
President of the Green Circle. 



Green Circle 



Pounded on a principle of creating school spirit and keeping 
it alive ami vigorous a1 Loyola, the Green Circle is probably one 
of the most importanl organizations on the Lake Shore Campus. 
With its membership open to any student who wishes to promote 
these ideals, its influence was fell by all. 

The Green Circle was always ready to make the studenl con- 
scious of his alma mater and to convince him that Loyola is truly 
the "Mother of Men." Informal dances were held almost every 
other Sunday evening in the student lounge under the auspices 
of the Green Circle. When the Ails student Council wanted a 
bonfire last fall for a pep rally, it was the (ireen Circle that col- 
lected the wood and touched the match to this expression of school 
spirit. True to Green Circle tradition, this was followed by danc- 
ing and refreshments in the lounge. In collaboration with the 
Arts Council again, the Circle supported the successful first an- 
nual "Loyalty Week" complete with its " no-shave-f or-a-wcek " 
program, its tag day for the benefit of the basketball team and its 
rallies and celebrations. 

( 'arrying the burden of responsibilities and leadership of the 
(ireen Circle for the first semester were: Robert Schultz. presi- 
dent: Bob Bremer, recording secretary; Jim Wallace, treasurer, 
ami Frank ( ) 'Shaughnessy. corresponding secretary. For the sec- 
ond semester. .lames Wallace was elected to the post of president 
and he was ably assisted by Bob Bremer as secretary, Louis Byrne 
as treasurer, and Dan Bayley as corresponding secretary. 

The greatest undertaking of the (Ireen Circle was its perfect 
job of ushering at athletic events and other Loyola activities. 



Heated Wallace, Byrne, Matt, Dougherty, Wallace. Schultz, Bremer, 'Shaughnessy, Boland, 

Bailey, Granhol'd. 
Sltinding — Ivoenig, McKeever, Mumighan, Dirksen, llapp, Schiavone, Kuni. 



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First 7i'oic — Haves, McKeever, 'Shaughnessy, Kepner, Schiavone, Berens, Conrovd, Dirksen, 

Philbin. 
Second Sou- — Koenig, Graham, A., Koerner, Kssi^, Cole, Etzkorn. Wallace, J.. Baeharz, Wal- 
lace, R. 
Hear How — Sehell, Graham, Cahill, Lee, SHeehau, Lynch, Bums, Hennessy, Eirich, Kelly. 

Abut tit Members — Alonzi, P., Alonzi, S., Brozowski, Burns, Conway, Duffy, Durso, Hennessy, 
Janik, Kiely, Kogstad, Lang, Layden, Lenover, MeNeela, Nelson, Pivovar, Ptacin, Shay, 
Waldron, Wenskus. 



With the foundal ion se1 during the previous year by a group 
of energetic' Arts Sopliomores, the University Club started to 
build under the direction of President Robert Schiavone. Arts 
Junior. 

The club strove to make its members, limited to non-fratern- 
ity men. Loyola conscious, and t » > promote activity in the Uni- 
versity affairs. 

The Rev. dames Ilussey, S. J., Student Councillor, accepted 
the position of Moderator, and Arthur Kogstad, Commerce Sen- 
ior, was voted honorary membership. Members of the faculty 
and athletic board were invited to speak at the weekly meetings. 
Social strides were made on Hallowe'en night when the club held 
an outstanding dance, the Harvest Hop. This was the tirst dance 
which the club sponsored and it attracted a near record crowd in 
the Alumni gymnasium. On many occasions the members treked 
lo the Edgewater Beach Hotel en masse. The Intramural team, 
which at the time the book goes to press is but six points behind 
the leaders of the Sweepstakes, gave an entertaining athletic car- 
nival in the gymnasium. Following Holy Mass on the tirst Friday 
of each month, the club breakfasted at the nearby restaurant. The 
Club had two initiations during the year, and formal banquets 
were held after each. 

The club must be indebted to ils officers for the effective lead- 
ership they have given during the year. I f the club maintains its 
present rate of progression, it will attain an enviable position 
among the Universitv organizations. 



University Club 



Sponsoring dances, Intramural trams, 
an<] initiating pledges were some of the 
many tilings Robert Schiavone, Presi- 
dent of the University Club handled 
flawlessly. 




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At Table— Dubay. 

Seated — Janik, O'Shaughnessy, Kiley, Dirksen, Beauregard, McKeever, Gibbons. 

Standing — Sehell, Graham, Kiely, Elson, Layden, Matt, Barrett, Dougherty. 



Interest in and participation in ath- 
letics, ami support of the Club meant 
the reward of presidency of the Mono 
gram Club to Gene Dubay. 




This year's officers of the Monogram Club set out to put new 
Life and activity into an organization that, for all practical pur- 
poses, had ceased to function. 

The group attempted to regain its traditional prestige. The 
firsl function of the year was to initiate twelve letter-winners 
from the previous year. On this occasion, the Rev. William Fin- 
negan, S.J., Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, credited 
the club with the first action in several years. Next came the 
Monogram party following the Alumni basketball game, which 
featured pictures of the Loyola-Long Island game for the national 
intercollegiate title. Many interested Loyolans were able to see 
the showing of their team in the '"Garden." 

The club cooperated with the Dean when he secured athletic 
passes for the Alumni Monogram club members who had gradu- 
ated within the last three years. 

Officers for the year were: G-ene Dubay. Arts Senior and 
President; Bill Barrett, Commerce Senior and Vice-President; 
liill Gibbons, Arts Senior and Secretary and Rill Elson, Arts 
.1 unior ami Treasurer. 

The club approached extinction after football was dropped. 
The candidates were so few that the group could not carry on, 
until minor-letter men were admitted after 1938. By virtue of 
this fact, and through the energetic efforts of its officers, the club 
is regaining lost ground and promises in the future the prestige 
and honor that once belonged to the members of the club. 



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Alpha Delta Gamiiia 

FACULTY MEMBERS 
'.' — Rev. A. J. Kelly. S.J. 

J. D. Parent. Ph.D. 
J. A. Waldron, A.B.. J.D. 
J. E. Brennan. A.B.. J.D. 

OFFICERS 

Daniel Murphy Preside n ' 

E _ -:ie Dubay Vice-President 

E i rd Grady Secretary 

i rd Boland Treasun r 

James Dolan Sergeant-at-Arms 

James Fletcher Sfe ward 

Robert West Pledge n • 

John Crowley Athletic Din f 

MEMBERS 

Ahern. Robert Dnbay. Eugene Lyons. James 

Bayley. Daniel Dussel. Andrew Murphy. Daniel 

Beauregard. Charles Esser, Robert Murphy. William 

Bettenbender. John Fisher. William O'Keefe. Thomas 

Boland. Richard Fletcher. James "Shaughnessy. Martin 

Boland. Thomas Fox. James Padden. Charles 

Bowman. Jerry Fox. John Petrus. Eiimund 

Burke. Alexander Gibbons, William Powers. Eugene 

sy, Jean Grady. Edward Reidy. Edward 

Considine. Frank Graydon. William Romano. Patrick 

Crowley. John Happ. Leonard Satek. Frank 

Curran, Gene Hough. John Spina. Anthony 

Delaney. Walter Howe. Daniel Tietz. Robert 

Devaney. John Kearns. Bernard Tilka. Edward 

Dillon. Robert Kiley. Bernard Wendt. William 

Dillon. Timothy King. Lawrence West. Robert 

Dolan. James Kuni. Robert Wienke. Richard 

Dolebide, Eugene Lindenmeyer. Robert 

Dowd. Frank Litti.2. Ross 



Esser. Lyons, Boland. Dussell. O "Shaughnessy. Kiley. Fox. Gibbons 
Beauregard. Growler, Devanev. Burke. Wienke. Dowd. Kuni. Fisher. Satek. Griffin 
Fletcher, West. Boland, Murphy. BeT. A. J. Kelly. S..J.. DiDon, Grady. D 



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Pi Alpha Laiiihtla 

Paul Hummert President 

Roger Callanan Pledge-Master 

James Gill Vice Presidt nt 

Ed Miller Treasurer 

Clarence Pagano Re cording Secretary 

Francis Goessling Corresponding Si eretary 

James Marzano sv rgeant-at-arms 

Robert Bremer Stt ward 



FAiTJ/I'V MEM HERS 



D. Herbert Abel, M.A. 
Thomas J. Buckley. A. P.. 
John Callahan, M.A. 
Frank P. Cassaretto, M. A. 
William 11. Conley, M.B.A. 
John Gerriets. M. A. 
Mark E. Guerin 



John I). McKian, M.A. 
Rev. James J. Mertz. S.J. 
Theodosi Mogilnitsky, Ph.D. 
Richard O'Connor, M.A. 
Edward J. Sutfin. M.A. 
Martin J. Svaglic, A.B. 
Louis \V. Tordella, Ph.D. 



Robert Blake 
James Bowman 
Roliert Bremer 
William Bryar 
L. James Byrne 
Roger Callanan 
Robert Carroll 
Warren Clohisy 
James Conway 
David Delano 
Daniel Dickow 
Edward Dolaziuski 
Ray mom I Dougherty 
Michael Esposito 
Charles Ewerta 
Roliert Farrell 



James R. Yore, M.A. 



MEMBERS 

John Felten 
Charles Flynn 
Harold Frey 
Joseph Gallagher 
James Gill 
Francis I ic i.->sl i n^ 
Charles Goodwillie 
Robert Graves 
Robert Gusskay 
Paul Hummert 
Richard Huston 
Linton Johnson 
Marvin Johnson 
William Joyce 
Raymond Kennedy 
James Marzano 
Warren Matt 



George McClellan 
John MeMahon 
Edward Miller 
John Murnighan 
Robert O'Connor 
Clarence Pagano 
Robert Petrole 
Cy Schaeffer 
Dick Schlottman 
Warren Sehmitt 
George Scully 
William Smurdon 
Charles Sossong 
John Tordella 
Gregory White 
Robert Van Heule 



Ln 



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Paul Hummert 



Byrne, MeMahon, Johnson, Gusskay, Kennedy, Dickow, Joyce, Esposito, Bryar. 

Ewerts, Blake, Schlottman, Worchol, Van Heule, White, Matt, Carroll, Dolaziuski. Delani 

Frey, Smurdon, Goessling, Gill, Hummert, Callanan, Marzano, Sossong. 





115 



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"- JESUS • MCMXL 
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Wti,t.i.\m King 



Phi Mu Chi 

William King President 

John Grant Vice President 

Ronald Millar Junior Warden 

Robert 'I >ay Treasurer 

James Houlihan Pledgemaster 

Robert O'Rielly Recording Secretary 

Oi'rin Wheeler Corresponding Secretary 

James Orphan Steward 

Edgar Martin Historian 

Robert Craven Intramural Manager 

FACULTY 

Dr. George M. Schmeing, Ph.D. 

Bertram .1. Sleggert. A.M. 
Frank J. Lodeski, A.M. 
Aloys P. Hodapp, A.M. 
Wilfred Horner, M.S. 
Philip Le Francois, .M.S. 



Class of '42 

Emil Berger 
Peter ( longlis 
Robert ( 'raven 
Edgar Martin 
Edward Miehalik 
Edward Mnraskns 
Robert O'Rielly 
Arch Pearson 
Francis X. Pelka 
Orrin Wheeler 



Class of '41 

John J. Cilia 
John Grant 
•James Houlihan 
John J. Marino 
James Orphan 
Thad A. Pains 
Bernic Peele 



Class of 

William King 
Ronald Millar 
Robert O'Dav 



40 



Cilia, Martin, Michelik, Pearson. Wheeler, Doughertj 

Pains, Marino, Gonglis 

O'Rielly, Grant, Kiiifi, Houlihan. O'Day, Orphan 





116 



Sigma Pi Alpha 

Ernest M. Grochowski President 

( 'hester Podgorski Vice Presidi nt 

Felix Gordon Seen tary 

Jerry Dombrowski Treasurer 

John Hibner N, rgeant 

Class of 1940 
William Janik Ernest Grochowski 

Class of 1941 
Eugene Slotkowski ('hester Podgorski 

Leonard Kowalski Edward Machowski 

Class of 1942 
L. Francis Tobolsk! Joseph Koezur 

Class of 1943 

Richard Blasczyk Stanley Czech 

Stanley Grydyk Leonard Pawlikowski 

John Pivovar Frank Zelezinski 
Lucian Matusczak 

Alumni 

Felix Gordon Arthur Torezella 

Jerry Dombrowski Walter Zeigal 

John Hibner Waller Kurek 

Boleslaus Dydek LeEoy Olsta 

Boleslaus Pietrasek Joseph Zygmuntowicz 

Caesar Koenig Chester Koenig 

Albert Poklenkowski Louis Potempa 

Fred Grohowiak Adam Kowalczyk 




Ernest M. Grochowski 



Urydyk, Matuczak. Lack, Tobolski, Czech, Pivovar, Kowalski 

Blasczyk, Pawlikowski, Zelezinski 

Janik, Gordon, Podgorski, Grochowski, Dombrowski, Poklenkowski 




MS. 




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117 




Maktix .Tenxinos 



Sigma Lambda Beta 

OFFICERS 
Alpha Chapter 

John L. Sloan Grand Regent 

Len Hermann Vice Grand Regent 

Minchin G. Lewis Secretary and Treasurer 

Beta Chapter 

Martin Jennings Grand Regent 

William Loftus Vice Grand Regent 

Thomas Day Treasurer 

Jack Troy Secretary 

FACULTY MEMBERS 
Crofford H. Buckles, C.P.A. Walter A. Foy. M.B.A. 
Henry T. Chamberlain. ( i.P.A. ( lharles LaFond, ( !.P.A. 
Ernest W. Ludlow, C.P.A. 

MEMBERS 

Beta Chapter 

Mel J. Boyne James Fedigan Paul Johnson 

Thomas Davy John Feeley William Loftus 

James Durkin Edward Gorman Redmond McCarthy 

Mario Coduto George Hansen Roger McCormick 

Thomas Creagh Martin Jennings Frank Phee 

Peter Fitzpatriek Jack Troy 

Alpha Chapter 

John J. Amoto John Horan Herb Pfeiffer 

Ed Barrett Jerry Jehlik Ken Racette 

Joe Claremont Walter Johnson Gerald Rooney 

John Coffey David Kerwin James Rocks 

Ed Cooney William Kiley James Scott 

Philip H. Cordes Charles J. LaFond John L. Sloan 

John Coyle Vincent Lane Frank Slingerland 

Joe Crowley Frank Lane Pete Smith 

Francis Delaney William Lennon Bernard A. Snyder 

Joe Gill Minehin (f. Lewis Harry Van Pelt 

William Gorman William Linane John Vaughn 

Larry Hansen Frank Latito .Maurice Walser 

Ray Hebenstreit Owen P. Mcdovcrn Harry Walsh 

Len Hermann Rudolph Petrik Harold Wirth 



c. A. Snyder, Scott, B. Snyder, McCormack, McCarthy, Boyne, Feeley, Cooney. 
Kacette, Shanahan, F. Lane, Lennon, Knuth, LaFond, Coduto, V.Lane, Fitzpatriek. 
Cordes, Loftns, Davy, Troy, Jennings, Sloan, Herman, Lewis. 



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118 



MDXL • SOCIETY OF 



Alpha Sigma Nu 

OFFICERS 

Robert G. Herthneck President 

William (ribbons Vice President 

Arthur Ivogstad Secretary 

Arthur Wise Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Graduate 
Gregory Mann Francis J. Sweeney 

Norbert 1 1 ruby 

Arts 
Martin E. 'Shaughnessy John Lyons 

William Gibbons Frank 'Shaughnessy 

Daniel Murphy Robert Wallace 

University College 
Joseph E. King Edward D. Corboy 

Robert W. Daly Ha ile Steinmetz 

Law 

Leo Newhouse William B. Lynch 

Frank Hausmann Alfred B. Pauls 

Commi rce 
John L. Sloan Arthur E. Burchett 

Arthur Kogstad Edward J. Schell 

Social Work 
Thomas F. Desmond Leon P. Listwan 

Medicine 
John Condon Matthew Boylan 

Arthur Wise Lyle Russell 

Dental 

Robert G. Herthneck Clair Hocking 

Kenneth L. Dedekind Edward Garguilo 




2 
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Robert G. Herthneck 



Pr. Egan, Dedekind, Condon, Murphy, Newhouse 
La Maida, Gibbons, Herthneck, Kogstad, Wise 





119 



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JESUS • MCMXL 



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Phi Beta Pi 

OFFICERS 

Mitchell D. Johnson Archon 

Franklin D. Swan Secretary 

Richard L. Merkel Treasurer 

James J. Daly Editor 



X 

a 



FACULTY MEMBERS 





Mitchell D. Johnson 



Moorhead, Louis D., A.B., B.S., M.S., 

A.M., M.D., F.A.C.S., LL.D.— Dean 
Powers, J. Glen, A.B., B.S., M.D.— 

Assistant Dean, Faculty Adviser 
Beeson, B. Barker, M.D. 
Kleinschmi.lt, Earl E., B.S., M.S., 

M.D., Dr. P.H. 
MeJunkin, Frank A., A.M., M.D., 

F.A.C.P., Pathology 
Moorhead, Louis D., A.B., B.S., M.S.. 

A.M., M.D., F.A.C.S., LL.D 
Sehaul), Carl F., A.B., B.S., M.D. 
Sclnnitz, Herbert E., B.S., M.D., 

F.A.C.S. 
Strong, Reuben M„ A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 
Volini, Italo F., B.S., M.D., F.A.C.P. 
Bailey, John H., B.S., Ph.D., Dr. P.H. 
Bonnell, Ellis, B.S., M.D. 
Bowler, Vincent B., B.S., M.D. 
Burke, Thomas J., A.B., M.D. 
Carlisle, William T., M.D. 
Connolly, Joel I., B.S., M.S. 
Essenberg, Jacob M., B.S., 

B. Pg. Ph.D. 
Ferguson, Ralph L., B.S., M.S., M.D. 
Fillis, Ben E., M.D., F.A.C.S. 
Fink, J. Eussell, B.S.M., M.D. 
Fitzgerald, Maurice D.. D.S.M., M.D. 
Flora, Wayne W., M.D. 
Forbieh, Joseph A., B..-s., M.D. 
Geiger, Clyde J., M.D., F.A.C.S. 
Gramer, Edward P., B.S., M.D., 

F.A.C.S. 



M.S., M.D.. 



Ph.D. 
M.D. 



Griffin, George, D.J., M.D., F.A.C.S. 
Hagstrom, William J., B.S.M., M.D. 
Hanrahan, William M., B.S., M.S., 

M.D., F.A.C.S. 
Harclt, Leo L., B.S., 

F.A.C.P. 
Jana, Edward C, M.D. 
Jones, David S., B.S., M.S., 
Kerwin, Raymond W., B.S., 
Klimek, John W., A.B., M.S. 
Kraus. Adrian D., Ph.B., B.S., M.D. 
Latz, Leo J., A.B., B.S., M.D., LL.D. 
Lawler. Edmund G., B.S., M.D. 
Madden, John J., B.S., M.D. 
McEnery, Eugene T., B.S., M.S., M.D. 
Murray, John C, M.D. 
Partipilo, Anthony V., M.D., F.A.C.S. 
Pearson, Anthony A., B.S., M.A., 

Ph.D. 

Penhale, Kenneth W., D.D.S., M.D. 
Pickett, William J., M.D., F.A.C.S. 
Plice, Samuel G., B.S., M.D., F.A.C.P. 
Pribram, Ernest A., M.D. 
Ritter, Robert 0., A.B., M.D. 
Russell, James V., M.D., B.S.M. 
Sweeney, Leo P. A., B.S., M.D. 
Taylor, Eugene E., B.S., M.D. 
Toman, Andrew J., B.S., M.D. 
Warszewski, Edward H., B.S., M.D.. 

F.A.C.S. 
Welsh, Raphael G., B.S., M.D. 
Zingrone, John B. 



Westhoven, Catena, Usalis, Murphy, Pitaro, Allison, Seupmann, Po 
Owings, Flente, Ippolito, Daly, Scagnelli, Kasmer, Podesta 
Swan, Cooper, Drolett, Johnson, M.D., Pleiss, Viletto, Tornello 



HF 




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120 



Phi 



Pi 



Jack Boyd 
John Condon 
Edward Daley 
Charles David 
Donald Drolett 



Fred Adams 
Fred Barthes 
Francis Brennan 



James Daly 
James Fume 
Robert Lieber 



Douglas Beach 
George Blough 
William Catina 
Louis Curran 



Mario Albini 

Patrick Allanson 
James Bayer 
Jehu Cooper 



-MEMBERS 

Class of 1940 
William Dvonch Merlin Johnson 

Edward Galapeaux Mitchell Johnson 

Alfred Glaess Edward Kallal 

Francis Hultgen George Kelleher 

William Hultgen John Llewellyn 



John Delfosse 
Edgar Flentie 
Boyce Gibson 



Maurice Murphj 
Vincent Pollard 
Adrian Powell 



Class of 1941 

Edward Kasmer 
Leroy Linnville 
Richard Merkel 

Class of 1942 

( 'harles Roehm 
Burke Scagnelli 
Frank Scillieri 



Class of 1943 



William Foley 
Jerome Frey 
James Goebel 
Anthonv Ippolito 



Alfred Cornille 
Naseef Deeb 
(.'harles Dowell 
Leonard Drabek 
Rav Dussman 



Theodore Kretsehmer 
Jerry ( )wings 
Philip Pleiss 
Andrew Podesta 



Pledges 



John Fey 
Bernard Flynn 
James Langstaff 
Robert Lieber 
Raymond Mann 



John Niemeyer 
Kennedy O'Brien 
Conrad Rusin 
Frank Skopek 
Robert Wetzler 



Lyle Russell 
Eugene Wichek 



Franklin Swan 
Vincent Usalis 
Joseph Westhoven 



Gustav Schupmann 
Robert Tornello 
Anthonv Vitiello 



George Meisinger 
Charles Pfister 
Dominic Pitaro 
Lawrence Svkora 



Kallal, Brennan, "VVichek, Boyd, Skopek, Kelleher, Johnson, M. H., O 'Brien 

Roehm, Llewelyn, Russell, Foley, Hultgen, Rusin, Blough, Powell, Beach, Coneon, Wetzler 

Dailey, llerkel, Frey, Johnson, M, D., Kretehmer, Hultgen 



ffl|^ 



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121 



Pi Mu Phi 



OFFICERS 

Edward .J. Horodko Honorary Senior President 

Henry Wojtowicz President 

Joseph V. Moleski Vice President 

Zdislaw < '. Koenig Secretary and Treasurer 

Ben Tatarowicz Librarian and Editor 




Henry Wojtowicz 



FACULTY MEMBERS 

Robert L. Abraham, M.D. Anthony Sampolinski, M. D. 

Francis A. Dulak. M.D. Edward H. Warszewski, M.D. 

Thaddeus M. Larkowski, M.D. Norbert Zielinski, M. D. 
Edward A. Piszczek, M.D. 



MEMBERS 
Class of 1940 



Henry L. Barton 
C. C. Benz 
( tester ( '. Burski 
Edward J. Horodko 
M. J. Krisko 



T. M. Klobacha 

S. M. Ivoziol 
S. L. Majsterek 
S. Y. Markiewiez 



.lose] ili V. Moleski 



Class of 1911 

Henry Wojtowicz 



.John Skowron 
John Poniatowski 



Class of 1942 



Ben Tatarowicz 
Zdzislaw C. Koenig 



II. Buklad 



Class of 1913 
R. Mann 



Tatarowicz, Zmidgrodski, Burski, Buklad, Majsterek, Poniatowski, Kozial, Koenig. 
Benz, Horodko, Wojtowicz, Moleski. 



2 
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LOYOLA • MCMXL 



122 



MDXL • SOCIETY OF 



Delta Tin-la Phi 



on 



Frank Hausmann, Jr Dean 

Paul Maguire Vice Dean 

Fred Brandstrader Tribune 

Frank Ililkin Clerk of Exchequer 

Thomas Regan Mash r of the Rolls 

FACULTY MEMBERS 

John Fitzgerald, Dean of the Law School 
Judge John MeCormick 
Mr. John Waldron 
Mr. John Lagorio 
Mr. Edward Ribal 

MEMBERSHIP LIST 



Michael Anzalone 
Fred Brandstrader 

( leoft'rey Burns 
Thomas Regan 
James Godfrey 
Frank Hausmann 
Frank Ililkin 
Joseph Lynch 
William Lynch 
George Lyon 
Paul Maguire 
Robert Mullen 
Alfred Pauls 



Joseph Peters 
Edmund Sinnott 
Joseph Carroll 
( 'harles Haskins 
Thomas ( 'rowley 
Bernard Killackey 
WilliamJudd 
John Gannon 
Joseph Tobin 
Leo Adams 
William Whelan 
William < ) 'Brien 



2 
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Frank Hausmann, Jr. 



Crowley, Mullen, Carroll, Haskins, Burns, Peters, Lyon 
Vonesh, Hilkin, Brandstrader, Hausmann, Maguire, Regan 





123 



"■ JESUS • MCMXL 
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Emanuel D. Wiljiklm 



Phi Chi 

OFFICERS 

Emanuel C. Wilhelm Presiding Senior 

Matthew J. Boylan. -Ir Presiding Junior 

James H. Topp Secretary 

Louis Salerno Treasurer 

John BealL Jr Judge Advocate 

Michael J. Hitchko Sentinel 

FACULTY MEMBERS 

R. A. Barrett, M.D. P. E. Lawler. M.D. 

R. A. Black. M.D. R. E. Lee. B.S., M.S., M.D. 

J. X. Bremner, M.D. J. M. Leonard. M.D. 

T. E. Boyd, B.S., Ph.D. A. J. Linowiecki, B.S., M.D. 

.1. .1. Callahan. M.D. G. W. Mahoney, M.D. 

L. E. Cella. M.D. A. F. Martin. M.D. 

.). T. Coyle, M.D. A. R. MeCradie, M.D. 

M. 10. Creighton, M.D. E. J. Meyer, M.D. 

II. W. Blghammer, M.D. -I. T. Meyer. M.D. 

G. II. Ensminger, M.D. ( '. F. Meuller, M.D. 

W. G. Epstein, A.B., M.D. M C. Mullen, M.D. 

J. P. Evans, M.D. P. A. Nelson. Ph.D., M.D. 

W. D. Fitzgerald, M.D. G. F. O'Brien, A.B., M.D. 

II. B. Fox, B.S., M.D. F. J. Piszkiewicz. M.D. 

R L. French, M.D. W. B. Raycraft, M.D. 

<\ B. Gawne, M.D. J. M. Roberts, M.D. 

F. .1. Gerty, B.S., M.D. C. S. Scuderi, M.D. 

P. B. Grabow, M.D. I. D. Simonson. A.B., M.D. 

R. .1. Hawkins, B.S., M.D. F. H. Snyder. A.B., Ph. D. 

W. S. Hector, M.D. C. S. Sommer, M.D. 
.LB. Henry. B.S.M., M.S.. M.D. F. .7. Stucker. M.D. 
('. W. Hughes, B.S.M., M.S., S. C. Thomson, A.B.. M.S., M.D. 

AID. V. G. Urse, M.D. 

W. F. Janz, M.D. F. C. Val Dez. B.S.. M.D. 

S. M. Kelly, B.S., M.D. A. M. Vaughn, B.S., M.S., M.D. 

K. .1. Kloeker, Ml). .1. < '. Vermeren, B.S.. M.D. 

B. C. Kolter, M.D. T. F. Walsh, M.D. 

Philip Law, M.D. G. A. Wiltrakis, .M.D. 
(I.. I. Zwikster, B.S., M.S., M.D. 



Higgrns .Miller, Pfhal, Weslowski, Siemans, Wawroski, Arnold, Guzauskas, La Maida, Albasio 
McDonald, Griffin, Fontenetta, Weiss. Ivors, Aubuschon, Souers, Lagorio, Jesacher, Smith 
Topp, Boylan, Salerno, Dr. Vaughn, Dr. Carey, Wilhelm, Ceriani, Borino 





124 



Phi Chi 



Ahlm, Edward 
Barry, John 
Bartels, Wilbur 
Beall. John 
Deutschmann, Rev 



Boylan. Matthew 
Carroll. John 
Cronin, John 
Daly, Anthony 
Diskey, Donald 



Annan, Murray 
Arnold. Sherman 
Ceriani, Ernest 
D'Alessandro. Arthur 
Donald, Rnssel 
Dunn, Richard 
Fontenetta, Michael 
Guzauskas, Anthony 

Albasio, Dante 
Archibald, John 
Aubusehon, Rodger 
Borino, John 
DeSmyter, George 



MEMBERS 

Class of 1940 

Hitchko, Michael Meier, Donald 

Jaskunas, Stanley Murphy, Francis 

Jones. Richard Raiehart, William 

Lindenfeld. Fred Rivera. Victor 

Matt, Wayland Rooney, James 

Class of 1941 

Fairbairn, James Sinnott, Richard 

Fintz. Ralph Smith, Victor 

Hagan, Robert Thompson, Lee 

Nisius, George Topp, James 

Class of 1942 

Griffin. William Meany, Robert 

Higgens, Gerry Miller, Robert 

Jesacher, Andrew .Mi/en. Michael 

Kimaid, Emil Mulhern, Joseph 

Kordiyak, George Mullenix, Charles 

Lagorio. Francis Ouelette, Phil 

Lyons, Robert Pfahl, Carl 



Class of 1943 



Fitzgerald, George 
Fitzgerald, Richard 
Hawkins, Samuel 
Ivers, Thomas 
Krzywicki, Witold 
LaMaida, Vincent 



Mist, Jose] ih 
McDonald, Thomas 
McDonnell, Thomas 

MorbitO, Joseph 

Nemecek, Ray 
Pellicore, Ray 



Salerno, Louis 
Werelius, ( 'ail 
Wise, Arthur 
Wilhelm, Emanuel 



Tosoonian, Harry 
Ulane, Roman 
Vasquez, Hector 
Wolf. Sherwin 



Tierney. Thomas 
Valach, Frank 
Wawroski, Stanley 
Weiss. Harry 
Wcslowski. Stanley 
Wyatt, James 
Zalu.ua. Henry 



Ruzich, Stanley 
Sauers, Frank 
Siemans, Roman 
Smith. Warren 
Steey, George 



Sinnott, Weir, Deutschmann, Daly, Carroll, Ulane, Lindenfeld, Fintz. Diskey 
Barry, Bartels, Nisius, Hitchko, Thompson, Cronin, Murphy, Wise. Matt 
Topp, Boylan, Salerno, Dr. Vaughn, Dr. Carey, Wilhelm, Beall, Ahlm 





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125 




\\'1U.IAM H. POKOBNY 



Phi Alpha Delta 

OFFICERS 

William H. Pokorny Justice 

Bruno J. Verbeek Vice Justice 

A Kin .]. Ragan Clerk 

Lee S. Sanders Treasurer 

( 'harles F. Strubbe Marshal 



FACULTY MEMBERS 
James A. S. Howell Francis J. Roonev 



William II. Pokorny 
Bruno J. Verbeek 
Alvin J. Ragan 
Lee S. Sanders 
Charles F. Strubbe 
Harold D. Brown 
Richard Loewe 
Clair F. Achenbach 



MEMBERS 

William D. Kelly 
Albert E. Bennett 
William J. Lithall. Jr. 
John T. Love 
Arthur Willis 
Thomas J. Sciieib 
John I). 0'< 'onnor 
Eusene M. Stussi 



Bennett, Lithall, Willis, O'Connor, Sciieib, Loewe 
Achenbach, Strubbe, Verbeek, Pokorny, Rainin, Sanders, Kellv 



2 

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LOYOLA • MCMXL 



126 



MDXL • SOCIETY OF 



Nu Sigma Phi 

OFFICERS 

Generva Schmidt Noble Grand 

Tullia Tessauro Noble Vice Grand 

Mary Albright Secretary 

Luella Trombley Treasurer 

Rose O'Connell Pledge Captain 

MEMBERS 

Class of 1940 
Anne Atras Generva Schmidt 

Marguerite Foulk Sakaya Shigekawa 

Class of 1941 
Delores Dillion Lullia Tessanro 

Margaret Piuans 

Class of 1942 
Mary Albright Luella Trombley 

Class of 1943 
Rose O'Connell Magda Puppendahl 

Eleanor Fordon Grace Mary Wurst 

Carol Platz Callista Kessler 

Trembly, Puppendahl, Albright, Wuerst, Pijan. Platz 
Shigekawa, Tesauro, Sehmiflt, Foulk. Fordon 

<: vJU +- _ >K ~ 

_.. 



CO 

c 



n 
x 




Generva Schmidt 





127 



"■ JESUS • MCMXL 
O 

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1X1 





00 



X 

D 




Fked Robbixs 



Phi Lambda Kappa 

OFFICERS 

Fred Robbins President 

Samuel Zaidenberg Vice President 

Walter Feinstein Tn usurer 

Elmer Bernstein Scribe 

FACULTY MEMBERS 



.Julius Adler, M.D. 
Benedict Aron, M.D. 
Louis .1. Brody, M. D. 
Nathan Flaxman, M.D. 
Nicholas 1. Fox. M.D. 
Morris A. (ilatt. M.D. 
Aseher A. Goldfine, M.D. 



Morris .1. Hoffman. .M.D. 
Jacob .1. Mendelsohn. M.I). 
John Peters, M.D. 
Isadore R. Pritikin, M.D. 
Hyman I. Sapoznik, M.D. 
William Shapiro, M.D. 
Isadore M. Trace. M.D. 



Maurice Belinski 
Elmer Bernstein 
Morton Effron 
Walter Feinstein 
Fred Robbins 



MEMBERS 

Leonard Saxon 
Ben Shore 
Albert Swirsky 
Burton Weinstein 
Samuel Zaidenberg 



Swirsky, Robbins, Blinski 
Zaidenberg, Bernstein 




128 



Beta Pi 



OFFICERS 

Eugene Dubay P resident, 

William Gibbons Vice President 

James Cutler Secretary 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



William H. Conley. M.B.A. 
Mark E. Guerin 
Thomas Kennedy. A.B. 
G. Warren MeGrath, A.B. 
John 1). .McKian. A.B. 
Francis Monek, A.B.. .1.1). 



Richard ( >'< 'minor. U.S.. M.S. 
Norbert 1 1 ruby, A.B. 
James ( ). Supple, A.B. 
Martin Svaglic, A.B. 
Louis Tordella, Ph.D. 
Morton D. Zabel, Ph.D. 



James ( 'omvay 
John Condon 
James Cutler 
Frank Derby 
John Devaney 
Timothy Dillon 
Eugene Dubay 
Arthur Fenner 
Harold Frey 
William Gibbons 



MEMBERS 



John Gannon 
James (Jill 
Paul Hummert 
Sal Impelliteri 
Arthur Kogstad 
Frank Knoll 
John Lyons 
Daniel Murphy 
Martin 'Shaughnessy 
Robert Wallace 




Eugene Dubay 



Murphy, O 'Shaughnessy, Frey, Janik. 
Lyons, Cutler, Dubay, Gibbons, Kogstad 





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MDCCCLXX • -■ 



129 




James Git,i, 



2 

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X 
X 




Pi Gamma Mu 

OFFICERS 

James Gill President 

Paul Hummert F;'ce President 

William King Secretary 

Arthur Kogstad Treasurer 

Martin 'Shaughnessy Pledgmaster 

Mr. Aloysius P. Hodapp Moderator 

.MKMBKRS 
Class of 1940 

John ( 'In rk William Janik 
James Gill William Kino- 
Harold Hall Arthur Kogstad 
Paul Hninmert Martin (.) \Shaughnessy 

Class of 1941 

Andrew Dussel Warren Matt 

Charles Goodwillie John Murnighan 

Michael Govostis Eugene Slotkowski 

-lames Ilosna William Smurdon 

John .Marino .lames Wallace 
.lames Marzano 

Kogstad, O'Shauglincssv. Gill, Mr. Hodapp, King, Hummert 




LOYOLA • MCMXL 



130 



MDXL • SOCIETY OF 



Phi Alpha It lio 



m 

C 



Arthur Kogstad President 

John Devaney Vice President 

James Fletcher Secretary 



William Barrett 
William Bryar 
John Devaney 
Timothy Dillon 
( 'harles Ewerts 
James Fletcher 
Gerard Galante 



MEMBERS 

Joseph Gallagher 
( 'arl Hayden 
James Hosna 
Arthur Kogstad 
Frank MeGarr 
William Ryan 
Robert Shanahan 
Richard Wienke 




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Arthur Kogstad 



Gallagher, Ewerts, Ryan, Dillon, McGarr, Hayden, Galante 
Wienke. Kogstad, Mr. Brandstrader, Fletcher 





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Robert Stell 



Lambda Chi Sigma 

OFFICERS 

Robert Stell President 

Ronald Millar Treasurer 

Marvin Johnson Secretary 

Philip Lefrancois Program Chairman 

Lucille Trudeau Social Director 



FACULTY 

Dr. George M. Schmeing 
Dr. Joseph D. Parent 
Dr. Ardith P. Davis 
Rev. Alphonse Sehmitt, S.J. 
Dr. Louis W. Tordella 



MEMBERS 

Mr. Frank P. Cassaretto 
Mr. Frank J. Lodeski 
Mr. F. Russell Koppa 
Mr. Philip P. Lefrancois 
Mr. Adam Kowalczvk 



Miss Lucille Trudeau 



ACTIVE GRADUATE MEMBERS 



Clyde Crowley 
Lilyan Emmons 
James Kieffer 
Raymond Melchione 
John Mullen 
Jean Nowakowska 
Claron While 

John Printz 



Wilfrid White 
Otto P. Richiardi 
Dr. Edwin A. Thiele 
Ivatheryn Strubbe 
John Tomimak 
Elizabeth Johannes 
Brother Joseph Schneiders 



ACTIVE UNDERGRADUATE MEMBERS 

William Elson John Zannini 

Marvin Johnson Harold Frey 

Ronald Millar Daniel Ramker 

Daniel Murphy Charles Schaar 

Robert Stell John Tordella 

Barnabas Beresky Charles Domke 




Johnson, Davis, Parent, Kowalczvk, Lefrancois, Lodeski, Mullen, Elson, Bro%vn, Koppa, Frey 
Tordella, Nowakowski, Schmeing, Cameron, Tulene, Scharr, Tomimak, Trudeau, Cassaretto, 

Murphy, Domke Beresky 
Rmmors, Oehlberg, Stell. Zannini, Strubbe 




132 



Blue Key 

OFFICERS 

John D. ()'< 'onnor Presidt nt 

Charles Mullenix Vice President 

Jolm White Treasurer 

.Joseph Czonstka h'i curding Secretary 

Charles Shanahan Corresponding Secretary 

HONI )RARY FA( !ULTY MEMBERS 

Robert E. Black, M.D. John V. McCormick, J.D. 

Theodore Boyd, Ph.D. Rev. Joseph A. McLaughlin, S.J. 

Henry T. Chamberlain, Ph.B. Rev. James J. Mertz, S.J. 

Walter J. Cummrngs Louis D. Moorhead, M.D. 

Rev. William A. Finnegan, S.J. G. G. Pike, D.D.S. 

John C. Fitzgerald, LL.B. Francis J. Roonev, LL.B. 

Walter A. Fov, M.B.A. Leonard D. Sachs, Ph.B. 

Rev. Ralph A. Gallagher. S.J. Sherman Steele, LL.B. 

Francis J. Gertv, M.D. Bertram J. Steggert, M.A. 

Rev. Arthur J. Kelly, S.J. Italo F. Volini, M.D. 

William II. Logan, D.D.S. Morton 1). Zabel, Ph.D. 

FACULTY MEMBERS 

Paul W. Dawson, D.D.S. James Yore, J.D. 

William H. Conley, M.A. Charles W. Hughes, M.D. 

Paul F. Pox, M.D. Raymond Kerwin, M.D. 

Irvin F. Hummon, M.D. Robert E. Lee, M.D. 

John McKian, M.A. Richard O'Connor, M.S. 

Edward Sutfin, M.A. William Sehoen, M.D. 

Norbert Hruby, A. I:. Martin Svaglie, M.A. 
Theodore Tracy, A.B. 

ME -MISERS 
Gradual* School 

Richard Garvey Edward Marciniak 

Thomas Kennedy John Walch 

1>< ill id School 
Jolm Francis Milford Riley 

Peter Griffo Viggo Sorenson 

John Misstretta Roman Ziolokowske 

Medical Sell mil 
John Barrv John Manning- 
John Beall Wayland Mat: 
Francis Brennan Charles Mullenix 
John Carroll Lawrence Sykora 
Edward Dailey Thomas Thale 
Jolm Llewelyn James Topp 
Loren Mamlernack 

Night Law School 

John Boedert Frank Hausniann 

Fred Brandstrader Edward Murray 

John Brennan Charles Strubbe 




John D. o'Coxxoi; 



Kogstad, Kelleher, Lyons, Strubbe, Burchett 

Walch, Durkin, Bowler, White. O'Connor, Mullenix, Shanahan, Riley, Beall. Daley 




him 



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John W. Barky 



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LOYOLA • MCMXL 




Moorliead Surgical 
Seminar 

OFFICERS 

Louis D. Moorhead, M.D Honorary President 

John W. Harry President 

James Rooney Vict President 

Victor Rivera Treasurer 

Raymond Deutschman Secretary 

HOARD OF COUNSELLORS 

Dr. J. J. Callahan Dr. C. C. Guy Dr. R. E. Lee 

Dr. W. T. Carlisle Dr. R, J. Hawkins Dr. A. V. Partipilo 

In. .1. D. Claridge Dr. C. W. Hughes Dr. C. F. Schaub 

Dr. T. F. Finegan Dr. I. F. Hummon Dr. A. M. Vaughn 

SENIOR FELLOWS 

John W. Barry William .1. Hultgen Wayland P. Matt 

Joseph A. Bertucci Edward Horodko Salvatore Rodino 

John Beall Merlin J. Johnson James A. Rooney 

Fred Brown Mitchell D. Johnson Victor Rivera 

John B. Condon Richard J. Jones ( onrad Rusin 

Steven Demeter Fred Lindenfeld l.ouis Salerno 

Raymond Deutschman John Lowcllyn Pari Werelius 

Edward H. Daley Francis .Murphy Robert Wetzler 

Francis J. Hultgen John Mandernak Emanuel Wilhelm 
Arthur G. Wise 

JUNIOR FELLOWS 

M. J. Albini A. J. Cornille S. M. Koziol L. \V. Russell 

H. L. Barton A. J. Dalv L. A. Kolanko A. Schultz 

R. S. Blasiolo li. «. Diskev H. V. Ledermann R. F. Sinnott 

W. K. Bellew L. Drabek J. L. Maier L. Sykora 

F. Brennan E. J. Feltes S. V. Markiewicz L. Thompson 

M. J. Boylan li. J. Fintz L. F. Marrella J. H. Topp 

J. C. Carroll E. H. Flentie I». J. McLennon R. V. Ulane 

W. T. Chock R. K. Hagan R. E. Merkel EL Vasquez 

J. J. Cronin E. T. Kasmer G. F. Nisius K. H. Wichek 
W. S. Wolf 

Commerce School 

Charles Beauregard Robert Burchett Martin Jennings 

Richard Boland Mario Cudotto Warren Matt 

George Bowler Timothy Dillon John Rafferty 

James Bowler James Durkin Charles Shanahan 

Day L<nr School 
Joseph Czonstka William Lynch William O'Brien 

Frank Knoll Leo Newhouse John O'Connor 

Arts College 

Robert Bremer William Gibbons Robert McKeever 

James Cutler James Gill Daniel Murphy 

John Devaney Paul Hummert Frank O 'Shauglmessy 

John Felten Arthur Kogstad Martin O 'Shauglmessy 

Harold Frey John Lyons Robert Wallace 

Carroll, Topp, Cronin, Cornille. Chock, Rodino, Maier, He Meter, Blasiole, Raichart. 
yicLennon, Marelht, Sinnott, Bellew, Kasmer, Wichek, Kolanko, Thompson, U/laiie. Ledermann, 

Werelius. 
Russell, Flentie, Daley, Diskev, Boylan, Albini. Feltes, Vasquez, Bertucci. 
Hultgen. Hultgen, Rivera, Barry, Davison, Condon, Deutschman. 




1.34 



MDXL • SOCIETY OF 



Volini Medical 
Society 

Arthur Wise Presidi nt 

Louis Salerno Vice President 

Wilbur Bartels Secretary 

John Beall Treasurer 

Kasmir Benz Librarian 

FACULTY MEMBERS 



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Dr 


1. F. Volini 


Dr. W 


Shapiro 




Dr. 


(i. Engbring 

Dr. II. 


Dr. 11. 
I. Sehmitz, Jr. 


F. DeFeo 






Class of mil 




John Carroll 




Lawrence Sykora 


Richard Merkel 


Leo Kolanko 


E. H. Wichek 




Anton Vlcak 


Edward Feltes 


Ralph Fintz 


Gilbert Towle 




George Nisius 


Hector Vasquez 


John Cranin 


Richard Sinnc 


tt 


William Hultgen 


Alfred ( 'ornille 


T. Beresky 


Leonard Drab 


er 


Tullio Tesauro 


Dolores Dillon 


William Bellew 


Russamano 




Anton J. Daly 


Wah Tim Clinch 


Mario John Albini 


James Topp 




Lyle Russell 


Lawrence Concannon Joseph Malewski 


Edward Kasmir 


James O'Neil 


William Wolf 


Stanislaus Koziol 


Henry Wojtowiez 


Victor Smith 


Ramon Ulane 


Jack Boyd 


Lee Thompson 






Robert Hagan 






Class of 1940 




C. E. Ahlm 




R. Deutschman 


L. Mandernack 


J. Rooney 


J. W. Barry 




M. Faulk 


S. Markiewicz 


P. Russ 


J. G. Beall 




P. Frankel 


L. Marella 


( '. Rusin 


C. C. Benz 




M. Hitchko 


('. Michel 


L. Salerno 


J. A. Bertucci 




E. Horodko 


F. Murphy 


L. Saxon 


D. J. Boles 




S. Jaskunas 


J. O'Donnell 


F. Skopek 


J. T. Boyd 




M. Johnson 


W. Raichart 


F. Vieari 


R. Buchlin 




R. Jones 


V. Rinera 


R. Wetzler 


J. Condon 




(i. Kelleher 


F. Rizzo 


E. Wilhelm 


E. Daley 




F. ]•:. Lindciit'el.l 


F. Robbins 


A. Wise 


C. David 




J. S. Llewellyn 


S. Rodino 






Arthur Wise 



Jaskunas, Rizzo, Eodino, Marello, Hitchko, Bertucci, Condon, Johnson, Richart. 

Barton, Faulk, Deutseliman, Boles, .tones, Horodko, Marky, Hultgen 
Lindenfelil, Hultgen, Barry, Wise, Ileal. Da\id 





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JESUS • MCMXL 




-TOHN BEALL 



Lambda II lio 

OFFICERS 

Johl) Beall President 

Carl Werelius Vice President 

Fred Lindenfeld Secretary 

Michael Hitchko Treasurer 

Richard Jones Librarian 

FACULTY MEMBERS 
Gertrude M. Engbring, B.S.M., Benjamin H. Orndoff, F. A. 

M.I). C.P.. M.D., A.M. 

Robert J. Hawkins, B.S., M.D. Henry Sehmitz, M.A., LL.D., 
Irwin F. Huinnion. Jr., B.S., M.D. 

M.S.. M.D. Lillian Tarlow, B.S.. M.D. 

Joseph E. Laibe. B.S.. M.D. Virginia Tarlow. B.S.. M.D. 

Robert E. Lee. B.S., M.D. Bertha Van Hoosen, A.B., M.A., 

MIC F.A.C.S., LL.D. 

Class of 1940 

John Barry Michael Hitch ko Peter McLennon 

Harry Barton Edward Horodko Francis Murphy 

John Beall Stanley Jaskunas William Raichart 

Joseph Bertucci Richard Jones James Rooney 

Donald Boles Henry Le Clair Louis Salerno 

Fred Brown Fred Lindenfeld Adam Schiiltz 

Ray Deutschnianii Simon Markiewiez Carl Werelius 

Marguerite Foulk Wayland Mall Arthur Wise 

Class of 1941 

William Bellew James Fairbairn James O'Neill 

Matthew Boylan Edward Feltes Margaret Pi j an 

John Carroll Ralph Fintz Richard Sinnott 

Wah Tim I 'hock Robert Hagan Tullia Tesauro 

Alfred Cornille Leo Kolanko Lee Thompson 

Anthony Daly Richard Merkel James Topp 

Dolores Dillon George Merkel Roman Ulane 

Donald Diskey George Nisius Hector Vasquez 

William Wolf 



Wise, Cornille, Chock, O'Xiel 

Dillon, Sinnott, Carroll. Kolanko, Merkel, Hagen, Beresky, Draylieek 
Topp, McCabe, Bellew, Ulane, Daly. Diskey. Boylan, Barton, Bertueci 
I'oulk, Barry, Deutschmann, Boles, Nisius, Horodko, Marky, Sehnltz 
McLennon, Lindenfeld, Beall, Werelius, Jones, Hitchko 





i:;ii 





The Reverend William H. Agnew, S.J., was 
the president of Loyola University when it moved 
to the Lake Shore Campus and when the Alumni 
Gym was erected. It was due to his guidance and 
inspiration that athletics was advanced at Loy- 
ola. It is therefore only fitting that we should 
dedicate this section to a man who has been the 
greatest single factor in the development of ath- 
letics in the University. 



V^tf^l 



teuu 



ATHLETIC BOARD 

VARSITY BASKETBALL 

FRESHMAN BASKETBALL 

VARSITY TRACK 

VARSITY SWIMMING 

LOYOLA TOURNAMENT 

CROSS COUNTRY 

TENNIS 

GOLF 

INTRAMURAL SEASON 

INTRAMURAL BOARD 



Athletic Board 

Loyola's success in the athletic world has been spon- 
sored and authorized by a Board of Control, invested 
with the executive powers of the athletic department. It 
was founded four years ago when it was chartered to aid 
the growing needs of the University. 

This year the acting chairman was Father Maher, Dean 
of Men. wlio succeeds Father Grace who had been in 
charge for two years and is now stationed in Detroit. The 
active members constitute the college coaches and are as 
follows: Mi\ Sachs, the Varsity basketball coach and Di 
rector of Athletics; Mr. Wilson, the track and swimming 
coach; Mr. Heffernan, boxing coach; and Wilis Kautz 
who is in charge of the Freshman basketball team. 

The basketball schedule for the past season was ar- 
ranged through the efforts of Father Mallei' and Coach 
Sachs. It included the great teams from all over the 
country and is said to have provided the toughesl com- 
petition that the Ramblers have ever had to face. 

Coach Al Wilson's swimming and track teams were 
the most successful squads on the campus during the 
past year. The Tankers ended the season with nine wins 
and one defeat, and brought to a close the best campaign 
in their history. 

The powerful Frosh quintet was developed by our late 
alumnus "Wibs" Kautz who won all- American fame 
while playing for three years with the Varsity. Coach 
Jerry Heffernan spent his time in the boxing ring show- 
ing the budding pugilists the tricks of self defense. 



The Reverend 

Edward F. Maher, S.J. 

Chairman of tin- Athletic Board of 

Control. 




Leonard D. Sachs 

Coach of the Basketball team and 

member of the Board. 



Alex Wilsox 
Coach of cross country, track, and 
swimming, and member of the Board. 



Jerky Hefferxax 

Boxing instructor and member of the 

Board. 



"Wibs" Kautz 

Coach of the Frosh Basketball team 

and member of the Board. 




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1939 



1939-40 SEASON 
By Leonard D. Sachs 
The Loyola team of 1939-40 has 
completed one of the toughest 
schedules in the history of Loyola 
Basketball. Champions of all sec- 
tions of the country were included. 
Four of the six teams which com- 
peted in the National Champion- 
ship defeated our Midgets by a few 
points. Kansas which was a finalist 
in the Collegiate championship 
managed to gain a victory over 
Loyola in the last few minutes. 

The Varsity squad lacked height 
and experience; their spirit was 
remarkable. They have never con- 
ceded victory to an opponent re- 
gardless of reputation; the Team 
improved with each succeeding 
game; in the last two games of the 
season, they were a smart polished 
ball club and able to give all op- 
ponents a real game. Practically 
all of the boys are back next sea- 
son: Loyola should have another 
tine year. 

I want to take this opportunity 
to state that despite the season's 
record in defeat, I am very proud 
of the 1939-40 learn and hope they 
will cany on with their great 
"Loyola Spirit. " 



LOYOLA • MCMXL 



142 



Uatut 



7 




Sehell 
Wenskus 



Durso 



Bottuer 

I 'mwlrv 







MDXL • SOCIETY OF 



1940 



The team this season had only three 
veterans of the last year champion- 
ship squad. Captain Wenskus had 
previously shown ability as a fine de- 
fensive man. as a good shut, and as a 
team leader, and this year he lias 
maintained a constant improvement, 
under the tutelage of Coach Sachs. 

Vinny Graham is a fast, accurate 
player whose ability at center this 
year has contributed much to the 
fighting spirit of the team. With Ed 
Schell, the other veteran mi the reg- 
ulars, they have been two of the main- 
stays on this year's team. 

Dan Cahill has engaged for the first 
time this year in tournament play. He 
originally came to ( 'oach Sach s at- 
tention for his fine work in leading 
his intramural team to victory in the 
basketball tourney. This year his work 
at guard lias been particularly well 
done. 

The fifth member of the regulars 
was Ed Lee who won his numerals 
last year as a frosh basketeer at the 
forward post. He has developed this 
year into an excellent player and has 
two good years ahead of him. 

Mickey Rottner who joined the 
squad at the semester has proved to 
be one of the most versatile stars on 
the team. His brilliant playing has 
done much to spark the team during 
the hitter half of its tough season. 

Frank Leahy the only senior on the 
squad. Jack Crowley, former player 
for Loyola Academy. Don Burns, pre- 
vious Quigley basketeer, Augie Durso 
and Lob Van Ileule both from the 
Academy, saw considerable action 
throughout the season as substitutes. 
Without their invaluable aid the 
squad would have had no strong re- 
serves to fall back upon. 



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Lee 
CaHll 



Kryzeminski 



Graham 
Leahy 



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JESUS • MCMXL 



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The Season 

With graduation last June went the stars of 
last year's team. Kautz, Novak. O'Brien, Ho- 
gan, and Driscoll. This season saw the return ot 
hut three veterans. Wenskus. Graham, and 
Sehell, Wenskus the only one who had seen a 
great deal of active service. Witli a schedule 
which included some of the strongest teams in 
the country, this young and inexperienced team 
showed an ability far beyond most expectations. 
True it is that the record of games won and lost 
is not favorable: bill it is more true that Loyola 
has shown that it has a team greater in some re- 
spects. — in their fight, their courage in the face 
of stiff opposition. — than any other at school in 
recent years. The team this year deserves great 
credit for their showing ; the student body, in 
general, merits censure for their poor showing in 
attendance at the games. 

The Ramblers opened their season with a 42- 
24 victory over the Arkansas Indians. Graham 
led the scoring in this game with 14 points, while 
the whole squad saw some service. 




The Arkansas Game 



The crowd intently watches Loyola play in the Alumni Gymnasium 




144 




The Indiana State Game 



Hie Kansas Game 



The Alumni Game 




The lH'xf game of the season was the Alumni 
contest held under the auspices of the Fathers' 
• 'lull. The Varsity won by an overtime 32-28 
score after the Alumni had given a beautiful ex- 
hibition of ball handling, Eddie Sehell led the 
scoring for the evening with seventeen points. 

i Mi I (ecember 15th the Ramblers hung up their 
third straight victory of the year against Kala- 
mazoo ( 'nllege. defending .Michigan Intercollegi- 
ate conference champs. Loyola led at the half 
25-6 but were pressed very hard in the second 
half as the Hornets collected twenty-seven 
points. The tinal score was 43-33. 

The squad opened the double header programs 
in the Coliseum by losing to the Carnegie Tech 
Skiboes in a 45 to 36 score. The game was fea- 
tured by Graham's constant rushing on defense 
and Wenskus's brilliant floor play. 

In a closely fought contest in the Alumni Gym 
the team lost to Oklahoma A. and M. by a 29 to 
24 score. At the end of eight minutes the Ram- 
blers led 5 to 1, and at the half they were still 
ahead 13 to 12. Successive long shots at the be- 
ginning of the second half gave the Aggies a lead 
which they never relinquished. 

Against the Mustangs of Southern Methodist, 
Loyola lost a close game. Ed Lee and Dan < !a- 
1 1 i 1 1 sparked the Rambler attack in the first half, 
and the Loyola boys led at the end of that period 
22 to 21. Wenskus was Loyola's big gun in the 



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The Illinois College Game 



The Chicago Game 



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second half, chalking up eight points to bring 
his total for the evening to twelve. Southern 
Methodist sank two baskets in quick succession 
to gain the lead which they never lost. 

The Ramblers lost a hard fought game to Rice 
Institute 55 to 41. Although beaten by fourteen 
points the team managed to ring up forty them- 
selves, and Wenskus was high scorer with 19 
points. 

()n New Year's night Michigan State won 
after a closely fought contest by the score of 30 
to '-''J. During the first half it was a nip and 
tuck battle but after several successive field goals 
Loyola lost the lead for the evening. 

In the second Coliseum game of the season 
Loyola ran up against the Kansas university cag- 
ers. Rated one of the country's leading quintets, 
the liuys from Kansas met an inspired Loyola 
squad. Paced by Ralph .Miller, star center, who 
made "Ji2 points during the game, the Jayhawks 
finally overcame the Ramblers' threat by a clos- 
ing minute rally making the score 40 to 36. 

A fast stepping squad from Omaha dealt the 
Squad a 41 In '■')'.) defeat by a bucket made in the 
last minute of play. Loyola had led through 
most Of the game lnxiiio- their lead lull once. 

Tlie next game with Duquesne was even more 
of a photO finish as Loyola was nosed out al the 
< 'oliseiini by a 28 to 27 score. Schell was the high 
scorer for this game with eleven points. 

The next two games at the Coliseum also saw 
scoring disaster for the squad although they per- 



Tlie Kalamazoo Game 




LOYOLA • MCMXL 



146 



MDXL • SOCIETY OF 




The St. John's Game 



formed with brilliant consistency. The Ramblers 
losl tn Manhattan, one of the best in the country, 
by a 31 to 3(1 score. The last minutes of play 
saw the score tied four times until the boys from 
New York forged a point ahead. Two disastrous 
free throws which Loyola missed concluded the 
gainc leaving the score in favor of Manhattan 
by one point. 

In a closely contested gallic with Butler, the 
score was closely matched throughout. The accu- 
rate shooting of Butler gave them an eight point 
lead which tin- Ramblers could reduce only by 
lour points before the gun. leaving Butler on the 
long end of a 43 to .'ill score. 

Although they played a superb brand of defen- 
sive ball against I )e Paul anil "hook shot" 
Wozny, Loyola succumbed '_'l to 15 before 8,000 
fans in the C.Y.O. charity game. Against a I )e 
Paul team which rated one of the best in the 
country Loyola played on the defensive, holding 
De Paul to 2] points while at the same time the 
Ramblers got 15. 

The Saint John's Redskins in an Armory game 
beat the Ramblers 43 to i'T by their accurate 
shooting and clever play. 

The Ramblers broke their losing streak against 
I lliiiois college trouncing them by a decisive score 
of 55 to .'17. The Illinois team kept up for the 
first half but ( 'ah ill and Rottner boosted the score 
to 42-27 before the second period was half over. 

In the final game Loyola overcame a strong 
Beloit five .71 to L'S. The game was marked by 
fast accurate Loyola shooting as well as by clever 
defensive play which held Beloit to 3 points for 
the first sixteen minutes of the game. 



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The De Paul Game 



The Oklahoma A. & M. Game 




147 



"- JESUS • MCMXL 



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Freshman 
Basketball 

The one bright star on Loyola's '40 basketball 
horizon was the Frosh cage quintet. Our greenmen 
went through a tough schedule undefeated and 
later teamed up with the varsity to make consist- 
ently good showings in several post-season tourna- 
ments. 

Led by Captain Ed Prim and the high scoring 
two-point twins, Mickey Rottner and Art Double, 
the Frosh squad defeated the Chinese All-Stars 46- 
29, De Paul Frosh 40-38, Wright Junior College 
41-38, American College of Physical Education 42- 
28, and St. Sabina C.Y.O. 34-24. The squad lost 
Rottner to the varsity just before the Sabina game 
when he became eligible for inter-collegiate compe- 
tition. 

The team's record in the later tourneys boasts 
10 wins to 3 losses. The frosh advanced to the third 
round of the St. Sabina and Queen of Angels tour- 
neys, won the Irving Park Y.M.C.A. loop, and seem 
to be well on their way toward swiping the bacon 
at the Larabee Y. at the time this book is due at 
press. Rottner, Double, and the boys did not fare 
so well in the Central A.A.U. set-to in which they 
got their ears pinned back by Frankie Harmon's 
Demons 32-22 in the initial round. 

The starting quintet was composed of a permuta- 
tion of the following players : Art Double, Mickey 
Rottner, ('apt. Ed Prim, Mike Dougherty, Hill Dur- 
kin, Howie Zednek, Bob Lee, Jack Stanton, John 
Dwan, Bob Tietz, and Jim Kostol. In other words 
Coach Wibs Kautz gave every man on the squad a 
chance to show what he could do under the pressure 
of game conditions. 




Ed Prim, captain of the Frosh 
Basketball Squad. 




Front Sow — Double, 
Graham, Stanton, Caliill, 
Kautz ; Sear How — Dur- 
k i n , Tietz, Zednek, 
Dougherty, Lee. 



148 




Alex Wilson, eoaeh of the track 
team and Jim Lyons, manager of the 
team. 



Track Season 

Ai the outset of the track season, the thinclads had a noble 
precedent to uphold, for last year's team had gained na- 
tional esteem after a series of victories over the outstanding 
competitors of the nation. However, today it can be said 
that they have won new laurels for Loyola and that they 
have successfully preserved its reputation. 

The indoor season began on February 10 in a dual meet 
with North Central college, and closed on March 23 with the 
Chicago Relays in the International Amphitheater. During 
the intervening weeks the team won both of the scheduled 
dual encounters by swamping its opponents with decisive 
scores. ( >n the remaining open dates, with the relay combin- 
ations led by Captain Rill Elson. and the distance events 
featuring .Max Lenover, the team competed five collegiate 
meets. Each established new records before the season 
ended. 

The Texas Relays in Austin inaugurated the outdoor sea- 
son which does not end till dune 22nd at the National Inter- 
collegiate Meet on the University of Minnesota track in Min- 
neapolis. However, until that time. Loyola will enter the 
Drake Relays at Des Moines and compete in six other meets 
throughout the middle west. 



Lenorer breasting" the tape in the Chicago meet. 




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Captain Bill Elson lias been responsi- 
ble for many a winning point during his 
years of competition. As leadoff man of 
the relay team he lias provided it with a 
winning margin innumerable times. 
With Bill's graduation this year the 
track team will suffer an inestimable 
loss. 

Tom Laydcn completed his third year 
on the team this season. As captain of 
the Harriers during the fall season, he 
led the cross country team through a suc- 
cessful schedule. During the winter and 
spring lie is a regular on the track team 
where he holds an important position on 
the relay combinations. 

Little Charlie Beauregard shows us 
that success on the cinders is not re- 
stricted to those big lanky fellows, for 
ilespite this handicap, "Prenchy - ' is one 
of the leading scorers on the team. He 
piles up points in the distance medley 
and on the two mile relay squad. In three 
dual meets he has been undefeated in the 
half mile run. 

Norb Essig is the endurance man of 
the whole squad, for although this is only 
his second year he has found thai the 
two mile event is the race for him. Norb 
also competes with the cross country 
team in the fall. Considering the promise 
he has shown in bolh fields he bids fair 
to be one of the fastest two milers in 
Loyola 's history. 

Art Lancaster has proved to be Loy- 
ola's most successful hurdler in recent 
years. Continual improvement this year 
has given Alex Wilson great hope that 
before the season is over Art will repeat 
his great performances and become a 
leading scorer on the team. 

Max Lenover is Loyola's greatest and 
most publicized performer. The "Fly- 
ing Canadian" has broken numerous 
middle distance records throughout the 



WHO'S 




Eeidy 
Layden 



Kux 
Elson 



Essig 
Watts 



LOYOLA • MCMXL 



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tCLC 



WHO 



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middle west and remains as a standout 
on the relay teams. He has piled up more 
points than anyone else on the whole 
squad. 

Dan Howe divides his time between 
sprints and work on the relay team. He 
competes in the 44(1 and 220 and runs 
with the one mile combination. 

Ed Reidy proved to be an outstanding 
performer during the outdoor season. It 
took him a little while to get into shape, 
but as soon as he had warmed up he be- 
gan to clip oft' the mile and half-mile in 
winning time. 

Joe Dougherty, a new recruit from the 
freshman class with an outstanding rec- 
ord as a high school sprinter, is a mem- 
ber of the mile relay and sprint medley 
teams. 

Emil Mennes occupies an important 
position on the relay combinations al- 
though this is only his first year under 
( 'oach Wilson. 

Roy McCall showed consistent im- 
provement as the season wore on. He be- 
gan his achievements at New Trier's 
championship team, and he now com- 
petes in the relays and dashes for the 
scpiad. 

High jumping has been monopolized 
by Vinny Graham and George Kiley for 
the past three years. 

Bill Tortorello has taken charge of the 
pole-vaulting department. His perform- 
ance has been confined to the outdoors, 
where he has shown great promise. 

Although Rux is taking his courses at 
the Downtown School, he spends his free 
time in working out for Wilson ; in spite 
of this handicap he occupies a position 
on two relay teams. 

Bill Watts waited until spring to burn 
up the track on the half mile and mile 
run, but his success then was a result of 
the tedious practice he carried on the 
year round. 



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Howe 



Lenover 
Beauregard 



Dougherty 

Lancaster 



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Polinski practices putting the shot. 

Beauregard, Layden, Elson, and Lenover, track team stars pose for a 

picture. 

Lancaster leads against Armour in the hurdles. 



Hilites of 



At the Illinois Relays at Champaign, 
the medley team of Beauregard, Elson, 
Layden, and Lenover finished second. 
The mile team ran fourth and Max Len- 
over climaxed the afternoon with a first 
in the special 1500 meter open. 

In the second dual meet of the season, 
Loyola trounced Armour Tech by a 
score of 68-26. First places were cap- 
tured in all the events except in the pole 
vault and shot put. 

The thinclads were squeezed out of 
third place by a margin of one and a half 
points in the Midwest Conference Meet. 
Captain Bill Elson took the mile in 
0:52.3 and Lenover took second in the 
mile event after a costly fall. Lancaster 
and Beauregard were the other scorers 
for Loyola. 

On March 9, Max Lenover broke the 
Central Collegiate Conference mile rec- 
ord by r unn ing the distance in 4:15.8. 
The previous mark had been established 
by Greg Rice of Notre Dame in 1937. 
Layden who was handicapped with 
bronchitis, and Art Lancaster failed to 
finish in the money. 

As spring approached the more im- 
portant meets were scheduled. At the 
Armour Relays in the University of Chi- 
cago fieldhouse. Loyola's relay teams 
piled ii]i twenty-six points to finish in 
third place. The medley combination of 
Elson, Dougherty, McCall, and Lenover 
headed the group into first place. Rux. 
Beauregard, Layden, and Lenover 
placed third in the two mile event; 
Dougherty. Mennes. Howe, and Elson 
ended up in the same spot in the mile 
relay. In both the high and low hurdles. 



152 



I In* Season 



Art Lancaster stepped high and fast to 
finish fourth in both events. 

With a ten yard lead established by 
Bill Bison, the rest of the mile relay 
team of Beauregard. Mennes, and Ben- 
over retained the margin and broke the 
tape in 2.3 seconds faster than the Chi- 
cago Relay Record. <>n the same night 
in the Amphitheatre, Lenover was third 
in the 1.(100 yard run behind Borican. 
the world's record holder and Kane of 
Indiana. The Chicago relays marked the 
end of the indoor season with new rec- 
ords for the Loyola track team. 

The Maroon and Gold fii'st glittered 
outdoors in the Texas Relays in Austin. 
This was the second consecutive year 
that Loyola was invited to compete in 
this annual classic. This was the longest 
trip that any athletic team made during 
the school year. After a thousand mile 
journey the team entered in the sprint 
medley and half-mile relay. They took 
fourth place in the college medley di- 
\ isiim. 

The Drake Relays at Des Moines, Iowa 
on April 26th and 27th was the next 
major attraction. Following this was the 
Central Collegiate Conference on June 
7th. There were four other meets dur- 
ing the remainder of the season. 

This past year marks another step in 
the recognition of the track team which 
has been Alex Wilson's major aim. "Wil- 
sonmen this year have earned recogni- 
tion from schools that had formerly 
looked upon Loyola merely as a practice 
team. Loyola was invited to take part in 
various relays that are gaining consid- 
erable popularity in the west and south. 





"Over tin- Tup" is the motto of these high jumpers, Murnighan (top 
picture), Vinny Graham, (middh picture) and George Kiley, (bottom 
picture.) 



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The eleven men who composed Loy- 
ola's great swimming team this season 
have hung up a record of nine wins and 
one loss which will stand for a good 
many years before it is bettered. 

Marty O'Shaughnessy has co-cap- 
tained this year's team and 1ms also 
turned in one of his best seasons. As 
backstroke artist he won the second berth 
on scoring honors and was a member of 
the medley team which set a new pool 
record. Marty has hung up the amazing- 
record of forty-three straight meets for 
Loyola. 

The other co-captain, Al Burke, is also 
swimming for his fourth year in Varsity 
competition. He has been a mainstay in 
the breaststroke division as well as in 
the underwater event. Al set a new mark 
for the pool in the underwater swim 
going three full lengths of the pool with- 
out breaking the surface. 

High point man on the squad for the 
second successive season the sensational 
sophomore Bob Carroll was one of the 
major contributing causes to the mer- 
men's brilliant season. His record of 
line hundred points for the season was 
not only almost a quarter of the total 
team's score but it was also one of the 
highest scores ever made in the swim- 
ming team's history. 

Tied with Captain 'Shaughnessy for 
second place in scoiing honors is the 
diving star and free style artist, Ray 
Dougherty. In three years of competi- 
tion Kay has been a dependable and able 
point gatherer. He has consistently 
taken the diving event in Loyola meets 
and his assistance in the free style divi- 
sion is invaluable. 

Warren Matt, styled "the blonde tor- 
pedo" has upheld the breaststroke de- 
partment I'd]- three years. Before coming 
to the university he had never engaged 
in competition but under the tutelage 

of Al Wilson lie s developed into a 

sensation. This year he amassed forty- 
nine points and broke the pool record al 



t 



WHO'S 




Martv O 'Shaughnessy 
Ed Corboy 



Bull Carroll Larry Marley 

Bob McKeever 



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WIWIWILU 



WHO 




Naperville swimming the 100 yard 
breaststroke in 1 :11.6. 

Larry Marley, frosh artist in the free 
style section, has done well this season 
as his record of forty seven points tes- 
tifies, lie has been groomed this season 
to take the place of Max Shapiro, former 
flash, who was lost to the squad last sea- 
son through graduation. 

Bob MeKeever is another three year 
veteran who has done his work in the free 
style department. This has been his best 
year to date under the direction of Coach 
Wilson. lie has also been paced this 
year by Bob O'Connor a freshman from 
the Academy. This friendly competition 
between tlie two has improved their time 
considerably. 

Bob O'Connor lias already shown con- 
siderable promise of becoming one of the 
swimming team's mainstays. He has im- 
proved considerably this year and if he 
continues to improve his work will be 
quite notable. 

Ebby Corboy is the elongated gentle- 
man who swims the backstroke. He holds 
the record for the 100 yard event for 
Loyola which he established last year. 
Since Ebby is in attendance at the Down- 
town School this year, it has meant con- 
siderable effort and sacrifice for him to 
show ii]i at practices and meets. 

Warren McNeil in the free style and 
Bill Sisson in the breaststroke depart- 
ments have been of value to the squad 
not only in their contributions of scoring 
points but also as reserves. They have 
been useful in complementing the medley 
teams and filling out the events. Sisson 
has set a new record of 4 :31 for the 300 
yard backstroke which has stood for this 
season. 

Shattered for the third straight year 
was the team scoring record. Al Wil- 
son's boys garnered a grand total of 451 
points over the season as compared to the 
previous high of 385, set last year, and 
366, set two years ago. The Eamblers 
averaged over forty-five points per meet 
in their ten meets. 



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mgherty Warren McNeil 



Al Burke 
Warren Matt 



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The Season 



The high powered Rambler swimming team, 
launched by Coach Wilson in the second week of 
January against Armour Tech, turned out to lie 
the best squad of its kind in Loyola's history. It 
blazed through the season with nine wins and one 
defeat. For the third successive year the scoring 
record was shattered; this time it was boosted 66 
points to establish a new high of 451. 

After a few practice meets, the mermen clashed 
with Armour Tech to start the season a'rollin'. and 
trounced them with the decisive score of 51-15. In 
the strange surroundings of the Institute the fresh- 
men swimmers gained valuable experience in inter- 
collegiate competition which proved so necessary 
for the tougher opponents ahead. Ray Dougherty 
of Loyola finished with individual honors, followed 
closely by Armour's captain, Ray Dodge. 

On the following day the team journeyed to Mil- 
waukee, to take revenge over the State Teachers. 
This meet marked the first win over the Teachers 
in four straight years, and it was only the second 
meet lost by Milwaukee in five years. After the final 
event Loyola finished with a ten point margin hav- 
ing 3<S points, to their opponents total of 2N. 

Despite the examinations during the last week 
in January, the tankers accounted for their third 
and fourth victories of the season. North Central 




Bob Carroll, high point man on this year's team. 

was the third victim by a score of 42-33. Only 
five on the opposing team were responsible for 
the 33 points, led by the individual star of the 
evening. Harold Helming who came through with 
three first places. In winning the meet "Warren 
Matt established a new breaststroke mark at the 
Naperville fieldhouse. The 200 yard free-style re- 
lay combination also set a new record of 1 :43.5 in 
their event. 

Since the swimming team had most of its meets 
scheduled for over the week-ends, they took the 
next train for Peoria to polish off Bradley Tech for 
their fourth victory on the following eve. Here they 
seemed to have little opposition with the exception 
of one man, George Davis, who finished with 13 
points to his credit. Loyola's high scorers were led 



At Burke and Marty 'Shauglmessy, co-captains of the swimming team. 




.' ' 



'£AMt< 




.-' 




c,t; 




Eil Corboy and Marty O'Sliutinluiessy yet ntt' to a speedy start in a back stroke race. 



by Bob Carroll with two firsts, and then came 
O'Shaughnessy, Matt, Dougherty, and Marley. 

To prove that they were out for a championship 
season, the mermen scored two more overwhelming 
decisions over Chicago Teachers College and 
George Williams. By now the ' ' freshies. ' ' along 
with their experienced brethren, were beginning to 
take things serious. For although the team contin- 
ued to win by long margins they became responsi- 
ble for numerous points. Due to this fact, Alex 
Wilson was accused of developing a dream team 
that would go undefeated. 

But during the following week their high hopes 
were shattered on a fateful Friday night down in 
Greeneastle, Indiana, where a strong Hoosier squad 
from De Pauw University nosed them out by two 

Warren Matt, team 's mainstay in the breast stroke division. 




scant points. It was a wild evening from the start 
of the first event. Records were consistently 
broken by both teams, and although Loyola gained 
four firsts, their antagonists finished with a two 
point lead. 

Although somewhat disheartened after their first 
defeat of the year, the Ramblers went out and 
swamped George Williams mercilessly to the tune 
of 49-2li. Loyola took six firsts and four seconds in 
the individual events. The sensational sophomore, 
Bob Carroll, again led the scoring spree. Warren 
Matt won his third successive breaststroke event 
and Bob McKeever, who had been steadily improv- 
ing, won the 220 yard free style. This was the sev- 
enth victory of the eight starts. 

With the idea still in their mind of taking revenge 
for that lone defeat, they again pushed over North 
Central in the home pool, in tuning up for their 
crucial engagement with Kentucky during the fol- 
lowing week. Loyola's speed stars continued to 
break their home records, and captured five firsts 
and five seconds to put everything on ice. 

Kentucky's dry dock champs were the next guests 
of the mermen, and they sought their third victory. 
But this final meet ended in a blaze of glory for the 
spirited Ramblers; for while the largest throng of 
the year clung from the balcony with anxious eyes. 
Loyola's spirited squad defeated their rivals, 35-33. 
Co-captains Al Burke and Marty 'Shaughnessy in 
the last meet of their careers, finished in record 
times. Bob Carroll brought his total of the season's 
points up to the hundred mark, to become the high- 
est scorer of the year. Matt and McKeever won 
their individual events, along with the record break- 
ing relay team. Loyola's greatest season was at an 
end. 



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The tip-up in the championship Central Catholic- 
St. Michael game. 



Thirty-two teams were brought from thirteen 
states ranging geographically from New Mexico to 
Minnesota, and Virginia to New York to play for 
the seventeenth National Catholic Basketball Cham- 
pionship. 

The Shamrocks of Central Catholic from Fort 
Wayne, Indiana, retained their title, but to do so 
had to beat the strong St. Michael quintet of Santa 
Fe, New Mexico, and the Chicago ( Jhampions, Leo 
High School. Before the early tournament rounds 



Loyola 

Tournament 



were completed St. Michael's was generally con- 
ceded to be the team with the best chance to de- 
throne the champions. They played up to expeeta- 
t ions for they led throughout the final game until 
the lasl minute when Central Catholic eked out a 
victory. The game pitted the two outstanding play- 
ers of the tourney, John Hiller of St. Michael, and 
Captain Stanczak of Central Catholic, against each 
other. 

Central ( 'atholic nearly stumbled over St. Phil- 
lip, runner-up for the Chicago High School title, in 
tin' quarterfinals as the 33-31 score indicates. St. 
Michael qualified for the final round by defeating 
the Indians from St. Francis Mission. South Da- 
kota, who had played their eighteen game schedule 
without a defeat. Leo gave them their second 
straight defeat to win third place honors. 

The teams qualified for the tournament by their 
records or by the titles they held. Eight city and 
state champions were entered. There were three re- 
gional champions, one regional runner-up and one 
diocesan champion. 



The grand opening of the Tournament for 1940. 



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MDXL • SOCIETY OF 



Cross Country 



While losing but one meet throughout the sea- 
son the Loyola Cross Country team won second 
place in the state competition, and Lenover, the 
blazing Canadian, won the individual state title. 

The squad including Captain Turn Layden, .Max 
Lenover, Ed Kiedy, Norb Essig, Chuck Beauregard 
and Bill Watts, opened the season with a 28-28 tie 
against Eastern Illinois Teachers. Although Len- 
over again won top honors, the team lost to .Mil- 
waukee State Teachers, 27-30. Lssig ran third ami 
Layden fifth. 

Early in November the nations best came to the 
Loyola Invitational. It was a year ago after this race 
that Lenover collapsed, but this year lie was strong 
enough to finish third behind Walter Mehl. Captain 
of Wisconsin University, and Marion ( 'ole, ( !aptain 
of the Illinois State Normal team. Mehl, who fin- 
ished in 17:4:!, set a new record for the meet, and 
took one second from the record which Greg Rice 
set the year before. The Badgers had the lowest 
score in the meet with 27 points, while Illinois State 
Normal had .">4. Milwaukee State Teachers College. 
68, and Loyola University, 83. 




Lenover rounds tlie bend well in advance in the Naperville 
tinss country inert. 



Lenover won the Illinois Intercollegiate Confer- 
ence meet held at Charleston, Illinois over a 3.53 
mile course in the time. 1!> ::!.'!. The race for first 
place was a dual battle between Lenover and Cole. 
.Max tells that they passed each other any number 
of times during the race, hut ('ole did try to take a 
big lead. Mas knowing that ('ole has never been 
able to finish strong, waited, and beat him decisively 
in the final sprint. 



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The start of tlie Naperville cress country meet. 




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Tennis 



.Mr. John Kemp. S.J., new coach of varsity tennis. 
will depend on three veterans. Captain Bill Janik, 
Hank Scofield and dene Dnbay, when the team 
plays what Manager Barney Beresky says, "is the 
toughest schedule in Loyola tennis history." 

The fact that the squad has opponents like West- 
ern State. Marquette. Kalamazoo. Northwestern, 
and Michigan State, whose players are the best in 
the Middle West prove the statement of the mana- 
ger. The squad also plays home and home matches 
against ; North ( 'entral. Armour. Lake Forest, and 
Beloit. 

In rounding out the team Mr. Kemp can pick 
from Boh West, Alex Trohdahl, Jim Marzano, 
Charlie Goodwillie, Ed Grens, Bill Juvancie, Bill 
Joyce, Ray Kennedy, Bud Birren. Jim Orphan and 
liill Lcgiu'r. 

The team practice began indoors early in March 
and found the squad playing on a court laid out in 
the gym, and at north and south side armories. 
Weather will not permit outside play before the 
matches which begin as early as April 13. The team 
plans some practice sessions on the clay courts of 
the University of Chicago fieldhouse. 

Captain Bill Janik has brought his game up un- 
der the tutelage of former coach and former cap- 




Bill Janik, captain of this year's tennis team. 



tain. George O'C'onnell and Tibor Beresky. Janik 
has spent recent summers in tournament competi- 
tion against exceptional players and has improved 
from his valuable experience. 

Hank Scofield. Freshman star during last season. 
promises to be the outstanding player in Loyola 
tennis history. Scofield led the team in the number 
one position last year. His showing during sum- 
mer tourneys gives certain indication that lie will 
become a Loyola great. 

Gene Dubay goes into his final year with the rec- 
ord of winning the most matches on the squads of 
'37 and '38. His showing as a Junior was not as ex- 
ceptional, but with the early practice for this sea- 
son he hopes to return to previous form. 




Gene Dubay, (left) 
four year veteran of 
the team, is one of 
the top ranking play- 
ers. 

Hank Scofield, one of 
the best players Loy- 
ola has had, is an im- 
portant member of 
this year 's squad. 



Kid 




Bill McEnery putts one across the green. 



At the time of this writing the varsity golf team 
is still a somewhat unknown quantity, due to the 
loss of three out of four members of last year's 
great team. The only returning regular this year 
is Bill McEnery who played at number four last 
year. 

Bob Blake, an alternate last year, is back and 
has the duties of both manager and acting captain 
to fulfill. The team is augmented by the services 
of Tom Waldron, who also gained experience last 
rear as an alternate. 



<M»lf 



The greater part of the team material will be 
drawn from those who starred in the Intramural 
tournament last fall. Among the men who will lie 
relied upon heavily are Dave Delano, winner of the 
fall tournament, and Bill Sheehan, runner-up. 

Inclement spring weather has thus far hampered 
greatly the spring practice sessions, but consistent 
low scores by McEnery, Sheehan, Waldron. Blake. 
Delano and George (leis. a freshman, has indicated 
that Loyola shall place a consistent, low-scoring 
foursome on the fairways this season. 

Home matches will be played this year at Pick- 
wick Country Club, scene of the fall intramural 
tournament. 

A well rounded schedule has been drawn up by 
the manager which includes such opponents as Ar- 
mour Tech. Wright College. St. Ambrose ( 'ollcge, 
the Alumni. Grinned and Cue Colleges. 



Sheehan, Kane, Wald- 
ron, Delano, and Blake 
are among the mem- 
bers of this year's 
golf team. 




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Loyola 



Marty 'Shaughnessy, head <>t" the Intramural Board. 

The Bennies, star freshman tram, were winners of the touchball 
I-M names. 



I'.uli Kuni competed in the pool tourney 
in tin' l-M sweepstakes. 



This year saw perhaps the most success- 
ful season in intramurals since the lime 
that program was first inaugurated at Loy- 
ola. The I-M Board this year continued 
its drive for a more extensive inclusion of 
the student body in intramural competi- 
tion, and according to present statistics, 
admirably succeeded. 

The University Club 's entry, the Dodg- 
ers, was considered a strong pre-season 
favorite, but the keenness of competition 
this year afforded by the freshman outfits 
upset all calculations, and at press time, 
the points have been so distributed that the 
Alpha Delts have a very handy lead that 
the Dodgers can hardly hope to surmount. 

The frosh first displayed their upsetting 
tendencies in the Fall Relays when the 
Bennies spiked the Dodger guns at the 
outset of the Sweepstakes race. In doing 
so, the Bennies broke several team records 
for the Relays, and amassed 37 points to 
the second place Dodgers' 32. 

The same outfit went on to sweep through 
the frosh touchball circuit and then took 
the senior champs, the Dodgers again, by 
the insulting score of 24-0. 

The Delts began to move up with a 
close victory over the Pi Alphs in the I-M 
swimming meet held early in December. 
Five intramural pacldlers rang up nine in- 
dividual points in this meet: Bill Gibbons, 
George MeClellan, Bob O'Connor, Larry 
Marley, and Al "Watson. 

The Delts and the Dodgers staged a dog 
fight for three months while they fought 
for the I-M basketball title.. After playing 
smooth ball throughout the season, the 
Dodgers blew up in the crucial title tilt be- 
fore the onslaught of the Delts, sparked by 
Graydon and Wendt, and dropped the sen- 
ior title to the Delts. Meanwhile, the frosh 



LOYOLA • MCMXL 



lti2 



MDXL • SOCIETY OF 



Iiitraiiiurals 



league was furnishing' a counterpart of the 
senior battle in the Friars-Hoboes tooth 
and nail struggle. The Friars outclassed 
and outshot the Hoboes to clinch the title in 
the final game of the junior loop. 

The Friars and Delts met in a playoff 
to decide the Arts Campus crown, and the 
Delts shaded the t'rosh outfit by six points, 
2:5-17. 

The I-M season reached its peak with the 
most successful Carnival of Champions yet 
held. The ( 'arnival. held on April 12th. saw 
the crowning of the champions of five tour- 
naments. 

Hill Smurdon and Jim Marzano of the Pi 
Alphs met one another for the handball 
crown, and Smurdon copped the trophy in 
a gruelling three game match. Meanwhile, 
the Delts were taking the all-University 
basketball championship from the Phi Chi's 
of the Med school, and running away with 
the novelty events. 

The Delts registered two more victories 
in the pool and bowling tourney finals 
when Jack Crowley and Bob Ahern came 
through to score wins. 

Another freshman darkhorse appeared in 
the ping-pong tourney where Jack Smith, 
unattached, slashed his way through a rec- 
ord field, and conquered Jim Houlihan of 
the Phi Mil's in the finals held the night of 
the Carnival. 

There are still a few tournaments to be 
run off which cannot be included in this 
book. The golf tourney will be held in the 
early part of May ; the tennis tournament, 
halted by inclement weather in Fall, will 
be resumed, and the Spring Relays, soft- 
ball, and handball tournaments will decide 
the Sweepstakes champions. At the time of 
printing, the Delts seem to have clinched 
the title, but there is still possibility of an 
upset. 




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Jim Houlihan, ping-pong fiinilist in the I-M sweepstakes. 



Ross Littig, director of the channel swim, congratulates Larry 
Marley upon completion of the five mile course. 



The tip-up in the sophomore, junior interclass basketball game. 



163 



"■ JESUS • MCMXL 
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Intramural Directors 



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'Phis year the Intramural Board achieved sin- 
gular success in pursuance of its plan to provide a 
more extensive, more variegated program of intra- 
school sports competition. At the time of printing, 
although few of the tournaments have been com- 
pleted 1h us far, the board managers have an- 
nounced the tournament entries this year have far 
surpassed the number who engaged in the Intra- 
mural program in the past years. 

The performance of the board has been enhanced 
in the past few years by the adoption of selective 
system of managerial advancement. This year's 
board has been most effective in the operation of its 
extensive program for that very reason. The sys- 
tem provides for selection of three sophomore man- 
agers from the several freshman managers. The 
selection is made on the basis of individual applica- 
tion during the intramural season. Following this 
line, two junior managers are chosen from the three 
sophomore managers, and from these two is chosen 
the senior manager. The position of senior manager 
entails full responsibility for the board's perform- 
ance; the senior manager is awarded a full scholar- 
ship anil a major monogram in recognition of his 



work during his assistantships and his new respon- 
sibility. 

The general control of the Board this year was 
in the hands of senior manager, Martin O'Shaugh- 
nessy. Departing from strict observance of the sys- 
tem above outlined, three junior managers were in 
service this year. Three candidates stood out, none 
of whom could be rejected in view of their excellent 
co-operation as freshman and sophomore managers. 
Therefore, Robert Sehiavone, Bernard Kiley. and 
Bruce Berens assisted 'Shaughnessy this year in 
the capacity of junior managers. Ross Littig, Dan 
Conroyd, and John Sheahan filled the positions of 
sophomore managers, and Bill Keefe, Pat Romano, 
.lames Kiley, James Pitaro, and Dick Carter served 
as freshman assistants. 

One very important step taken this year was a 
compilation of the 1-M records of the past decade. 
With only scattered records and News stories to 
work from, senior manager, Martin 'Shaughnessy 
has brought records completely up to date. The 
records have been mimeographed and supplied to 
every team and every agency which may have 
cause to use them. 



INTRAMURAL BOARD. Garter, Pitaro, Sheahan, Berens, B. Kiley, Martin 'Shaughnessy, Sehiavone, Conroyd, 
Litti"-, Romano, .T. Kiley. 




164 



ctivdui- 





The Reverend William A. Finnegan, S.J., 
Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, has 
encouraged activities among the students in or- 
der to aid them in the development of their char- 
acter and initiative. It is because of his interest 
in these activities and because of the support 
and assistance he has given them that we have 
dedicated this section to him. 



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outeuu 

SODALITY 

BOARD OF PUBLICATION 

LOYOLAN 

LOYOLA NEWS 

LOYOLA QUARTERLY 

MUSIC 

DRAMA 

VARSITY DEBATE 

CUDAHY FORUM 

LAW COMPETITION 

EVENTS OF THE YEAR 

INDEX 



Soilnlily of 
Our Lady 

LAKE SHORE BRAV.lt 



All activity renters around religion, the fount of all inspi- 
ration and recourse, from which campus social life and education 
derives a true purpose and a full meaning. Religion has always 
been the backbone of a Catholic university and unless it gov- 
erned our every action of the day there would be no reason for 
establishing Catholic colleges and universities and there would be 
no place for Catholics in this world. But when students make 
religion an integral part of their varied lives and put into prac- 
tise the truths they have learned concerning their faith it is noth- 
ing more than the natural action of an interested and conscien- 
tious group of Catholics. It is really the action of Catholics or — 
Catholic Action. 

Thus it has always been at Loyola. Catholic Action, for 
the greater part through the Sodality of Our Lady, has been 
foremost in all activities as the active profession of a lively faith 
which is very near and sacred to the hearts of the Loyola sodalists. 
The Sodality on the Lake Shore Campus has given to the student 




Paul Huhmert 

President of the 

Lake Shore Sodality 



THE TANNERY 
Mr. Kemp, S.J., Goodwillie, Hayes, Murnighan, Kennedy, Fenner, Burke, Cutler, Felten, White. 




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Sodalitv of 
Our Lady 



body thai vivifying principle thai makes Loyola University the 
university that it is- a Catholic university. 

With the end in view of removing the chill from the so- 
called cold facts of religion and presenting it more informally, 
and, above all, of enhancing the working's of the Sodality so thai 
all I. civilians might become Socialists the program for the year was 
altered. Under the direction of Mr. John A. Kemp, S..).. Modera- 
tor, and Paul Hummert, Prefect, the Sociality began this year 
with a program that was initiated and approved by all the 
students. 

In September a meeting was held of some twenty outstand- 
ing personalities in the various campus circles who were asked to 
consider the difficulties of the students and to present a plan that 
would meet with the needs of all. The program which was pre- 
sented and accepted divided the Sodality into seven distinct 
groups. 

The "M" ('lull, a religious and devotional group under the 
direction of John Devaney, was one of these units. The "M" 
Club took charge of the plans of the Sodality for the Quadri- 
centennial Anniversary of the Society of Jesus, conducted the 
highly successful May devotions, and served and ushered at the 
st in hi it weekly mass. 

James Cutler was appointed head of the Candle Club, an 
organization fur those who have shown promise in literary fields 
and those who merely arc interested in and appreciate good lit- 
eral inc. The group is indebted to John Lyons who did excellent 




Father James Hussey, S.J. 
Moderator of the Sodality 



CANDLE CLUB 
McNeela, McCourt, Esposito, Gill, Kennedy, Cutler, Burke, McCarthy, Galante. Ilosna, Fleming 



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Soilalil v of Our Lailv 



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work in reviewing Catholic literature and non- 
Catholic literature alike for the group. 

Due to the efforts of Arthur Fenner. Tannery has 
proved to be one of the most outstanding organiza- 
tions on the campus. Its increasing popularity is 
perhaps due to the intense interest of the students 
in problems that are common to all college men or 
because of the clear honest solutions offered by 
Father .James T. Hussey, S.J.. moderator. Meeting 
very informally any ami all subjects and difficulties 



are brought up ami a reasonably practical solution 
is guaranteed. Membership is small and has been 
limited by the consent of the members. 

The Xavier Club, the mission unit of the Sodal- 
ity, through the leadership of Carl Bayden has en- 
joyed excellent cooperation from the students in 
the work of gathering funds fur the missions and 
developed a real interest in the work of the mission- 
aries. This year Loyola led the province colleges 
in contributions to the missions. 



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" M" CLUB 
Front Bow — Dirksen. Satek, Maehowski, Devaney, Grady, Conway; Second How — Murniglian, Graiihold, Tordella, Breit, Koe- 
nig, Dillon, Cornell, Wallace; Bear Roto — Wheeler, Johnson, Dillon, Fun, Wallace, (i Iwillie, McMahon, Beauregard. 




FRESHMAN SODAL1ST GROUP. Sitting— Johnson, Fleming, MeMahon, Condon, Smith, Gudgeon, Ryan, Ellis, Petiole 
Standing — Dolehide, Keefe, Rooney, O'Kcet'e, Gramelli, ('raven, (Sweeney, Garvey, Carter. Clahisy, O'Brien, McClellan. 



171 



"- JESUS • MCMXL 
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Mailoiina Delia Strada 
University College Sociality 

The Delia Strada Womens' Sodality of the University Col- 
lege had a very tine year. The members met every other month 
for Mass, Communion, Sodality recital, instruction, breakfast, 
and business meeting on the Lake Shore Campus. In the alternate 
months the office, benediction, and tea on Sunday afternoon con- 
stituted the meetings. < >n Passion Sunday, a Day of Recollection 
under Father Millor was held in the University Chapel of the 
Arts Campus. The mission Unit gathered in the University Col- 
lege on the second Tuesday of each month and prepared many 
articles for (lie missions. The collections of magazines for hos- 
pitals reached a new high this year. 

In charge of the Sodality in a capacity of moderator and 
responsible for the organized and varied program was the Rev. 
Thomas A. Egan, S.J., Dean of the University College. The offi- 
cers of the Sodality were : Mary Connors, President ; Mary Breen, 
Vice-President: Alice Ilaues, Secretary; Emilinc Schumacher, 
Treasurer, and Delphine Ilealy, Chairman, Mission Section. 




Father Egan is moderator of the 
Delia Strada Sodality. 



BELLA STRADA SODALITY. Seated— Brimstin, McXichols, Healy ; Standing— Healy, Myers. 




172 




Charles T. Co.xroy, S.J. 



Sodality 

WEST BADEN BRANCH 



Al West Baden the Sodality is the must importanl extra-cur- 
ricular activity. Aimed specifically at I'm hit work in directing 
Sodality activity, the West Baden unit devoted itself throughout 
the scholastic year to study and practice in five major fields. A 
special feature of Sodality work were the general meetings of the 
whole body. On these occasions, one of the live groups would 

present an original program to illustrate its | uliar field of study. 

The Evidence Guild staged a dramatic re-eiiactineiit of the 
famous "Monkey Trial" of 1925, adapted to the extent of having 
an Evidence Guild man come to the patform and present Catholic 
answers to Clarence Darrow's cynical questions which proved too 
much for fundamentalist William Jennings Bryan. The Litera- 
ture Group dramatized Father Lord's pamphlet, "The Success- 
ful Failure." The Fourth Estate group simulated a dinner dis- 
cussion by several famous Catholic writers to explain their views 
on the progress of Catholic journalism. The mission group offered 
a "Flying Carpet" feature in which the audience was brought 
in imagination from one mission station to another in Patna. 
India. 



Si ated — Ruscnfelder. Conroy, Becker. 

Standing — Williams. Selmelie.it, Hughes, Downing. 




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Dr. Morton 1). Zabel, 
chairman of the Faculty Committee 
on Student Publications and modera- 
tor of the Loyolan and Loyola 
Quarterly. 




Mr. Mark Gueein 
nember of the Faculty Committee on Stu- 
dent Publications and moderator of the 
Loyola News. 



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Board of 
Publications 



Loyola publications maintain an enviable consistency in con- 
trast to the output of many "modern" schools, whose journalism 
depends on sensational matter. The men who are responsible for 
the high standards are the members of the Board of Publications. 

This board supervises the three student publications, the Loy- 
nliiii, the Loyola Quarterly, and the Loyola Nines. The Chair- 
man of the Board is Dr. Morton D. Zabel, and he also supervises 
as Moderator of the Loyolan and the Loyola Quarterly. Mr. Mark 
Guerin is Moderator of The Loyola News. Other members of the 
Board are: the Reverend Eugene Shiels, S.J., Mr. Julius Ku- 
hinka, and Mr. James J. Young. 

The exceptional talents of this group serve to balance the in- 
experience of the students who are in charge of the publica- 
tions. They are conscientious in organizing plans, inspecting 
contracts, and checking copy. These duties cover the development 
of the entire publication and demand the energy and attention 
of these men throughout the year. They are willing to put forth 
the tedious labor which these duties demand because of interest 
in the University and in this particular field. 

Full credit can be given to the Board for the consistent ex- 
cellence of the Loyola publications. Though at times the staff may 
bridle at the necessity of control, they really appreciate the nec- 
essity and value of the Board's restraining hand. 



The Loyola News Banquet hold 
at the end of the semester is the 
occasion for the appointment of 
I he new editor as well as to 
honor the retiring men. 




LOYOLA • MCMXL 



174 



MDXL • SOCIETY OF 



1940 




To commemorate the Quadrieentennial of the Society of Jesus 
and the 70th anniversary of Loyola University as the L940 
Loyolan is designed to do is a superlative task. The staff hopes 
the job is fittingly done, and the editor demands that the credit 
be given to the staff. 

One who contributed to the book in his work, worry and loss 
of sleep is the Managing Editor, Harold Frey. There are seem 
ingly an infinite number of details to be taken care of, and Frey 
was able to carry them all. His position was well tilled. 

Jim Conway had charge of the senior section carrying the pic- 
tures of over four hundred Loyola graduates. ( 'onway had to cor- 
respond with all of them, place posters in all of the schools, rep- 
resent the staff in the studio, and last but not least, set up the 
section with the pictures and copy for these graduates. Conway 
was the first to finish his section. 

The sophomore who was head and shoulders above all the others 
in that year and answers completely to the adjectives, depend- 
able and capable, is Edgar Martin. Photography Editor. Only 
a rough estimate is possible of how many pictures he had charge 
of, but we do not exaggerate to place it at a thousand. Ed sacri- 
ficed a great deal of his time and energy both during class hours 
and out of class hours to do his job. It could not have been done 
better. 

Next in line for honors is another sophomore, Ed Landgren. 
There are many more pictures in this book than we would have 
been able to pay for were it not for the saving which Ed made 
for us in Ins developing and enlarging work. His thorough 
knowledge of photography, helped immeasurably when he was 
taking pictures, and he merited the position of Head of Pho- 
tography. 





Eugene Dubay as editor in chief has hail 
the full measure of responsibility for 
the success or failure of the Loyolan. 
The ideas, layouts, and general appear- 
ance of the book are directly due to his 
selections. 




The duties of a managing editor are some- 
what undefined but nonetheless real. Harold 
Frey has concerned himself chiefly with 
working on the dummy, checking on edi- 
tors for copy, identifications, and pictures. 



It is to these men that the Loyolan is in- 
debted for making it an accurate pic- 
torial representation of Loyola life. John 
Gannon, Frank Derby, and Charlie Flynn 
took care of the downtown school, while 
Ed Landgren took most of the pictures 
on the Lake Shore Campus. 



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JESUS • MCMXL 




Edgar Martin, the photography editor, 
has capably performed his difficult job 
of editing the pictures as well as engag- 
ing in considerable photographic activity 
himself. 



Every Editor worries about some section which 
may get behind schedule. The kind of a man to 
have in that predicament is Justin McCarthy, Or- 
ganizations Editor. Organizations had fallen by 
the wayside when we called on McCarthy to pull us 
out of the hole. He stepped in and made appoint- 
ments for group pictures of the clubs in record time. 
He then besieged the heads of the clubs for facts on 
their group to insure accuracy iu the copy. 

Previous editors of the yearbook could tell you 
how much trouble copy can become. There was a 
minimum of trouble this year when it was handled 



Loyola 



by Andrew Dussel. The activities including West 
Baden Groups, University College groups, and the 
usual number of Arts and Science functions were 
cared for by the Activities Editor, Gene Powers. 
The unusual opening of the book demanded art 
work from the staff artist, Joe Condon. The Loy- 
olan costs money, and Bill Janik, Business Manager 
of the Commerce school meticulously handled the 
expenses, thereby making savings that added to the 
book. 

The work of arranging for group pictures of the 
fraternities, and pictures also of the presidents fell 
to Charles Ewerts, the Fraternity Editor. Sports 
copy and pictures absorbed the time of Warren 
Matt who was the Editor of the Sports section. 

The complications which arrive from having sev- 
eral divisions of the University throughout the city 
are handled by the representatives at the other cam- 
pus. John Gannon is the representative at the Uni- 
versity College. Gannon's sincere, earnest work 
was certainly an important factor in the book, and 
he represents a large number of the students whom 
this book includes. They couldn't have been repre- 
sented any better. 



Some of the LOYOLAN staff. Front Bow— Kiley, Beresky, Fi ey ; Middle Bow— Janik, Dussel, Seofield; Bear Sow— Condon, 
Martin, Berk, Conroyd, Kennedy, Landgren, Conway. 




17li 




James Conway lias been responsible for the 
Senior section while Andy Dussel has had the 
arduous task of editing copy. 



Warren Matt has handled the difficult sports 
section with the able assistance of Warren 
Clohisy. Bill Janik has kept the Loyolan 
accounts as business manager. 



.1 List 111 Mil 'hi tin lias secured the club a p 
pointnients and stories, while Gene Powers 
and Charles Ewerts have had the same re- 
sponsibility in the activity and fraternity 
section respectively. 

John Condon has kept the staff informed of 
Medical School happenings as well as identi- 
fying all the pictures from that division. His 
brother Joe has been responsible for most of 
the art work in the opening section. 



The Condon family contributes two men who hold 
staff positions on the book, the second being John 
Condon, Medical School representative. John had 
to arrange appointments, identify faculty, students 
and fraternities which the medical school con- 
tributes. The representation at the Law School was 
handled by Frank Derby. The Law School gave 
unqualified cooperation in their portion and it 
must be attributable to the work by Derby. 

In addition to this number of men who held staff 
positions, there was also a great number who per- 
formed as assistants. In view of the number of de- 



tails they cleared one can appreciate their impor- 
tance. The staff of this edition is larger than any 
other Loyolan, and it is a good thing. This large 
number of assistants was always available and will- 
ing to chase to the different places throughout the 
city to handle the work. After the pictures were 
taken it was the assistants who were called upon 
for the tedious task of identification. They had to 
live up to the assignment of being exact in spelling 
of these names, and we feel certain that the identi- 
fication of photographs will be as correct as human 
fallibility will allow. 

M D C C C L X X • 



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Arthur Kogstad, managing editor of the publication, has 
been an industrious and dependable worker. His column 
"In the Headlines" lias been one of the more interesting 
features in the paper. 

Seniors Devaney and Boland give freshman reporters 
Smith ;ni<l Dolehide some pointers on writing news copy. 




A\ T jllifim Gibbons, retiring" editor of the News, lias put 
out a paper whose prime objective has been to foster 
school spirit. 



Commended by moderator Mark Guerin in his 
Honors Day speech as "the finest editor the Loyola 
News has ever had," William Gibbons opened the 
second half of his term lasl September with the 
resolution to foster and nourish a genuine school 
spirit, "a feeling of pride that we are Loyola men." 
as he stated in his inaugural editorial. This became 
the paper's major policy for the remainder of his 
yea r. 

(iibhons and his managing editor, Arthur Ivog- 
stad, worked methodically with an excellent staff to 
establish the News firmly as an all-University or- 
gan. The fifteenth birthday of the publication on 
December 15th brought ou1 a parallel between its 
original purpose and its present status. In 1924, 
Edmond Richer, William Schoen, John Sweeney, 
Ambrose Kelly, and Harold Hillenbrand published 
four mimeographed pages of ordinary notebook 
paper size. In it they stated: 

"The interested parties responsible for the Loy- 
ola \i ws believe that they are performing a service 
in the interest of the entire University. There has 
long existed a need of more frequent communica- 
tion between the student bodies of the various de- 



LOYOLA • MCMXL 



ITS 



MDXL • SOCIETY OF 



partments. In this is contained the paramount pur- 
pose of the News. To unify the whole University 
into a common body is the chief objective. Despite 
the modest appearance of this effort, the project of 
a greater paper is held forth. " 

Although the editor felt the loss of the invaluable 
former editors. Norbert ITrnby and Thomas Shields, 
he began his year with an experienced staff. 

Kogstad in addition to his duties as managing 
editor conducted "In the Headlines" a column de- 
voted to events of special student interest. Seniors 
Martin 'Shaughnessy, Daniel Murphy, ami John 
Devaney, with positions as executive editors, acted 
as an advisory body. Devaney also maintained the 
humorous tradition of "Ho-Hum" disguised as the 
now famous "Herman." Associate editors Eugene 
Dubay, James Cutler, and John Lyons kept the 
News informed of happenings on the Loyolcm and 
Quartely. The latter wrote informal essays in his 
column "The Billboard" which was considered by 
many to be one of the best features of the paper. 
Richard Roland saw to the smooth running of the 




Robert Wallace, former news editor, was appointed at 
the semester to the position of editor-in-chief of the -V' ws. 



business end of the publication in his capacity of 
business manager. 

The four outstanding Juniors on the staff. Rob- 
ert Wallace. Robert Koenig, Timothy Dillon, and 
Joseph McNeela headed their departments with 
considerable journalistic ability. Wallace issued as- 
signments as news editor; Koenig covered the 
sports front: Dillon handled the news on the fra- 
ternities and clubs; and McNeela ran an efficient 
circulation department. 



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Some of the mainstays of the News staft. Seated — Smith, Devaney, 'Shaughnessy, Kogstad, and Boland; Standing- 
Dillon, Littig. Wallace, and Boland. 




179 



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Former sports editor and his assistant, 
Robert Koenig has been promoted to the 
post of managing editor while Ross Littig 
has advanced to the position of sports 
editor. 



Campus representatives who were an integral 
part of Gibbon's unification program were Maurice 
Murphy. Medical School; Frank Knoll, the Daj r 
I jaw School ; Kenneth Dedekind, the Dental School ; 
Emilie Kruppa, University College; and Katherine 
Reardon, Social Work. Miss Reardon covered 
activities in the School of Social Work campus in 
her " Soeial-Lites" column. 

At the yearly staff banquet in February, Robert 
Wallace was appointed editor-in-chief to succeed 



News 



Gibbons. Robert Koenig was named as Kogstad's 
successor in the post of managing editor. 

Wallace's staff consisted of Joseph MeNeela as 
news editor, Ross Littig, sports editor, James Fox, 
fraternity editor, Charles Beauregard, business 
manager and John Ruddy, circulation manager. 

Soon after Gibbon's appointment last year, he 
revived the stagger-type headline which had been 
in vogue during the editorship of James Quinn. 
This headline has a streamline effect, and was main- 
tained, for the most part, by Wallace, who occasion- 
ally reverted to a flush left headline. Seeing the 
need for the inclusion of more names in the Neivs, 
Gibbons installed a "Who's Here" column which 
became the "Campus Broadcasting System" under 
the direction of Frank Considine. Another change 
made by Gibbons was the reduction of a full-sized 
fraternity page to the column form "Fraternity 
Row." This style was continued by Wallace. A 
needed improvement in the sports section was ' ' I-M 
Talkin'. " a column devoted exclusively to events in 
the intramural athletic world conducted by Bruce 
Berens. 



' ' Pinky ' ' Byrne, Frank O 'Shauglmessy, 
Jack Ruddy, Jim Wallace, and Ray Ken- 
nedy are some of the News' most dependable 
feature writers. 



Joe MeNeela, news editor, and Ed Laudgren, 
staff photographer contributed considerably 
to the interest of the front page. 




180 




Marty 'Shaughnessy, executive editor, and 
Timothy Dillon, fraternity editor during the 
first semester. 

Frank Considine, popular freshman column- 
ist, and James Fox, fraternity editor. 



Kan Howe, Leu Hupp, Edward Miller. 
James Fletcher, and Andrew Dussell all re- 
porters for the X' ws. 

Richard Boland and Charles Beauregard, 
business managers during the first and sec- 
ond semesters, respectively. 



Among' other features of particular interest to 
the students was the series of articles contributed 
by Dr. Le Blanc on "Church and State." The ex 
change column, with interesting stories quoted 
from the newspapers of other schools, proved to 
be one of the more popular features also. The series 
of faculty pen portraits enabled the students 1o 
become better acquainted with their teachers. 



One of the interesting surveys conducted this 
year by the News was an inquiry into what con- 
stituted the Loyola buys' ideal girl. The girls from 
Mundelein retaliated in the next issue by describing 
their ideal man. which they added was no1 to be 
found a1 Loyola a1 the present time. The feature 
section of the copy on the X< ws contributed several 
other articles of like nature which enlivened student 
interest considerably. 

MDCCCLXX 



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ouoia 

Quarterly 



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.Tames Gill, managing editor, has carried on the business 
end of the Quarterly with capability. .Tames Hosna has 
lieen a frequent runt rihutur of articles dealing particu- 
larly with subjects (if musical interest. 

Both Arthur Fennel' and John I'Vlten have contributed 
prolincally to the Quarterly throughout their college 
career. This year Fenner handled the Bock Review Corner 
ami litis provided an interesting number of reviews each 
issue. 




James Cutler, as editor of the Quarterly, has maintained 
the tradition set by former editors in upholding the lit- 
erary excellence and distinction of the magazine. 



Oldest and most distinguished of the Loy- 
ola publications is the literary magazine, the 
Loyola Quarterly. During the thirty-seven years 
if has heen published, the Quarterly has reached 
a very high level among college magazines, and 
this year the quality has been maintained by the 
Editor, James Cutler, Arts Senior. Devoted to 
the writings of students and faculty, the maga- 
zine lias long attracted the attention of a wide 
and discriminating audience. 

This year saw the publication of several out- 
standing pieces of work, especially along crea- 
tive lines. Robert Welter Daly. Graduate Student 
contributed another of his fine short stories, 
"Ave atque Vale,'' and the Autumn issue pre- 
sented some excellent translations from the .Me- 
dieval Latin by Clare Rooney, also a Graduate 
Student. Poetry was represented by the work of 
Norhcrt Hruby. Graduate Student in English, 
and John Lyons, Arts Senior and former editor 
of the Quarterly. Mr. Eruby's poem was "The 
General Rows by Moonlight," a psychological 
study of Benedict Arnold, and Mr. Lyons pre- 
sented "Riiderie of Urbino," a dramatic mono- 
logue. 

Of the critical articles submitted, the most in- 
teresting were a series pro and con James Hil- 
ton. "Goodbye, Mr. Hilton," by Harold Prey, 



LOYOLA 



MCMXL 



182 



MDXL • SOCIETY OF 




John Lyons, former editor of the Quarterly, lias been for 
four years one of the major fat-tors in making it a publi- 
cation of excellence. 



Arts Junior, started the series in the Winter is- 
sue and in the Spring issue Henry Marciniak 
rushed to the aid (if the beleaguered author with 
"Hello, Mr. Hilton." And then, to finish things 
off. Arthur Peimer. Arts Senior, tried to recon- 
cile the combatants and patch the various holes 
in their arguments. Mark A. Finan. S.J., of 
West Baden, contributed an extremely lucid and 
diverting study of the difficult matter of objec- 
tive evidence and its place in Scholastic Philoso- 
phy, and Xorbert Hruby in "('redo" presented 
his views on the matter of Expressionistic tech- 
nique in the modern theatre. 

In the Spring issue two of the Loyola entries 
in the Bremner Intercollegiate Essay contest ap- 
peared, those by James Ostler, which won second 
place, and by John Lyons. James Cutler, the 
Editor, was the author of an interesting study 
of the much-perplexed question of the character 
of Hamlet. 

The Book-Shelf this year continued its policy 
of reviewing the latest books of interest under the 
direction of Arthur Fenner. With its new for- 
mat, developed last year under the editorship of 
John Lyons, and the variety and excellence of 
its material, the Loyola Quarterly of 1940 was a 
magazine of which any university might be 
proud. 



Lovoia's 

Literary 

Magazine* 



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William Joyce ami John Ruddy, assistant editors, have 
helped the publication throughout the year in a business 
capacity. 

Harold Trey and Charles Eiverts have contributed several 
articles during the year chiefly on subjects of literary 
interest. 



183 



JESUS • MCMXL 



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Geaciaxo Salvador 
Director of Music 



Music 

at 
Loyola 




Mario Salvador 
Director of the Orchestra 



To inculcate an interest in music among the stu- 
dents of the University and to provide an outlet for 
those who are interested in singing or playing musi- 
cal instruments, the musical organizations have 
been founded. 

The musical groups of the University are the Lake 
Shore Campus Glee Club, the University College 
Women's Choir, and the orchestra. This year West 
Baden College has also developed a thirteen-piece 
orchestra to supplement their Glee Club. All Chi- 
cago musical activities are under the direction 
of Mr. Graciano Salvador. 

The orchestra under the direction of Mario Sal- 
vador has had a fairly successful year making one 
public appearance this year. They played at the 
Christmas assembly and proved to be quite popular, 
particularly in their rendition of Ravel's Bolero. 



The Glee Club is one of the more active campus 
groups. This year it has resumed its custom of 
giving public concerts at various churches and 
clubs in response to their invitations. During Lent 
it sang appropriate songs and hymns of the season 
at St. Gertrude's, St. Catherine's, and St. Mat- 
thew's churches. This year one of the special num- 
bers in their repertoire was the Sacred Cantata, 
"Olivet to Calvary," which has as its theme the 
Passion of Christ. 

The Club also assisted with the massed Glee 
Clubs of Catholic High Schools and Universities in 
the public reception of Archbishop Stritch. They 
have also been contemplating an outdoor concert 
on the school grounds. A benefit concert for the 
Chapel was held on A}3ril 14th which met with ap- 
proval from the student body and enabled the group 
to make a considerable donation to the Chapel fund. 



The orchestra rehearses for one of its annual concerts. 



The orchestra and glee club record the school songs for use at 
pep meeting's. 



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184 



THE WEST BADEX 
GLEE CLUB. Standing 
— Downey, Wenzel, Ping- 
stock, Blanchard, Rosen- 
f elder, Sullivan, Woods ; 
Seated — Downing, Finan. 



THE LAKE SHORE 
CAMPUS GLEE CLUE. 
Standing — Lenihan, 
Tliielen, Bacharz, Ostler, 
Nelson, Ziolkowski, Lip- 
inski. Pawlikowski. Ma- 
rio Salvador, and Mr. 
Graeiano Salvador. 




Ostler and Lenihan of the Glee Club 
observe the poster advertising' Mario 
Salvador's benefit concert for the 
F* chapel fund. 




The mainstays of the Glee Club this year in- 
clude Joe Duffy, Norbert Kssig. Leonard Pawli- 
kowski, Noel Lenihan, Joseph Tursieh, John Dor- 
gan, Joseph Ileraty, Ralph Viglione, James Ostler. 
Casimir Bacharz, Walter Kawula. The president of 
the organization was Claytus Nelson, who also held 
this position last year. 

Besides their special concerts the Club lias per- 
formed their usual function of singing at the stu- 
denl Masses throughout the year. They have made 
the student body more cognizant of the beauty and 
power of music and the solemnity and devotion of 
the Mass. They have likewise contributed their 
services as entertainment for the Mothers' Club 
Parties. 

A vote of thanks is due Mr. Graeiano Salvador 
for his capable and artistic direction of the musical 
organizations during the past year. He has kept 
the tradition of good music alive at Loyola. 

Mario Salvador has contributed his services as 
organist to various school functions including the 
several Honors Convocations. 



M D C C C L X X • 



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The Curtain 
Guild 



Bert G. Walker 
Director of The Curtain Guild 



The Curtain Guild is a student organization 
which exists for the purpose of producing plays. 
The director is Mr. Bert G. Walker and the fac- 
ulty moderator the Reverend Edward V. Carri- 
gan, S.J. 

This year the group was extremely fortunate 
in its choice of a play. Father Malachy's Miracle, 
and equally as fortunate in its selection of a 
cast. The play by Bruce Marshall concerned the 
efforts of a humble Benedictine monk, played by 
Richard Kiley, to bring belief into a pagan world 
by means of a miracle. He succeeds in working 
the miracle, moving a dance hall twenty miles. 



but is greeted with incredulity and sneers on all 
sides. The situation becomes such that he is 
prompted to perform another miracle and move 
the dance hall back to its original location, pro- 
viding a successful and comical denouement. 

With such a play as this, the casting required 
characters which are able to bring out the full 
comedy of the dialogue and situation. Paul 
Hummert, president of the Guild, who ployed 
the role of the straightlaced Canon, William 
Joyce, his curate, Charles Flynn who took the 
part of the Bishop, and Michael Esposito, the 
Cardinal sent from Rome, brought out the full 



Front Sow — Hummert, Hayden, Marzano, Duffy, Joyce, Clark, Dirksen, Sossong. 
Sear Sow — Gill, Prey, Kennedy, Kiley, Smith, Esposito. 



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LOYOLA • MCMXL 



186 



MDXL • SOCIETY OF 



flavor of the clerical parts. Carl Hayden, the 
Anglican cleric. Andrew Gillespie, the Bishop's 
bad brother, and Peter, the tipsy Irish servant 
played by .lames Marzano took care of the major 
supporting roles with unusual effectiveness. 
Agnes Stroth as Peggy McNab, Hetty Stroth as 
the dance hall girl, and -lane Stack as the < 'anon 's 
housekeeper provided the roster of girls in the 
plaj . Other members of the cast were Hartney, 
<!ill. Smith. Wallace. Sossonu, Dirksen, ('lark. 
G-oessling, anil Frey. all of whom played their 
minor parts with considerable distinction. 




c 



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Paul Hummert 
President of The Curtain Guild 



Kay Kennedy of the stage crew adds a finishing touch 
tn one of the sets. 



The ingenue and the vampire in the play were, quite 
surprisingly, really sisters. Even Loyola has its sister act. 



"Don't act your aye" is the motto of the players as 
exemplified in the way the makeup man is adding fifty 
years to Dick Kiley's age. 

''Don't wave that dirty cigar under my nose," shrieks 
Annie to the liarksta^e villain. Jim Mai /.ami as Peter 
seems to In' frightfully bored and frightfully worried. 




187 



"- JESUS • MCMXL 
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Varsity Debate 



The Varsity debating team again enjoyed an- 
other very successful season under the capable 
tutelage of Mr. Fred L. Brandstrader, moderator 
of the team and a faculty member of the department 
of speech. As always this extra currieular activity 
found favor among many upperclassmen as they 
debated the Pi Kappa Delta question : ' ' Resolved ; 
that the Tinted States should maintain a strict 
policy of military and economic isolation towards 
all belligerents engaged in armed international or 
civil conflict outside of the western hemisphere." 
The immediate need for a practical solution of this 
problem on the part of the American people made 




Feed L. Brandstrader 
Head of the Varsity Debating Team 



for an extremely vital and pertinent discussion not 
only on the part of the debaters but also by their 
audience at each debate. 

Beginning in early November with a series of 
intra-team debates and later engaging in a num- 
ber of intercollegiate contests with various teams 
representing schools in the Chicagoland district, 
die team prepared for the more important inter- 
regional and tournament debates. This prepara- 
tion preceded the regular debate season which be- 
gan after the Christmas holidays. 



Members of the Varsity Debating team are: Hayden, Wienke, Barrett, Ewerts, 
strader, Gallagher, Shanahan, Fletcher, Dillon, Devaney, Hosna, Galante. 



Ryan. Koestad, MeGarr, Mr. Brand- 




188 




Gerard Gralante defends his side of the ease while li is partner, Frank MeGarr anil William Bryar listen intently to the ease 
Joseph Gallagher, makes a few mental notes for rebuttal, presented by their fair opponents in the Marquette Uni- 
versity debate. 



After the semester examinations teams repre- 
senting colleges and universities from all parts of 
the United States visited Loyola in their forensic 
travels. A novel audience feature was introduced 
by Arthur Kogstad. It consisted of presenting de- 
bates before the various social fraternities of the 
campus and awarding a plaque to the fraternity 
having the largest attendance. 

Teams chosen from the abler forensic-minded 
members of the Varsity squad were chosen to travel 
to the annual Xorthwest debate tournament held at 




Arthur Kogstad 
Manager of the Varsity Debate Team. 



St. Thomas College in St. Paul. Minnesota. Accom- 
panied by ilr. Brandstrader, the four men from 
Loyola who participated in the tournament were 
Frank MeGarr, William Ryan, Charles Ewerts. and 
William Barrett. 

As a compensation for four years of debating, a 
long trip was awarded to three outstanding seniors, 
Arthur Kogstad, manager of the debate team, John 
Devaney and James Fletcher. The team left on 
Easter Sunday for a ten day tour of the Smith and 
the Southeast, visiting schools who had sent repre- 
sentatives earlier in the year for debates at Loyola. 
Among the colleges visited were the University of 
Florida at Gainsville, Spring Hill, Florida College 
for Women. Loyola University of New Orleans, and 
St. Louis University. While on the return trip 
home, they stopped at Culver-Stockton College at 
Canton, Missouri. The highlight of the trip was 
their stay at Knoxville, Tennessee where they at- 
tended the national convention of Pi Kappa Delta. 
Membership in this coveted fraternity was awarded 
to Loyola at this meeting. The importance of mem- 
bership in this organization cannot be overlooked 
when it is realized that Pi Kappa Delta is a virtual 
dictator of debating activities in almost all the large 

colleges and universities in the United States. 

>■ 

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189 




Frank McGrarr and William Ryan, members of the Varsity Debate squad, ably defend their ease against the debaters 
from St. Louis University. 



Dehatt* 



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Iii addition to the regularly scheduled debate 
trips, members of the team gave a series of exhibi- 
tion debutes before such audiences as the Knights 
of Columbus. Holy Name Society, ('atholie girls' 
High Schools, and various other Catholic organi- 
zations. 

The quality of the debating as in the past main- 
tained a high degree of excellence. Under the stu- 
dent Leadership of Arthur Kogstad, the executive 
side of the debate program was handled with an un- 
usual display of efficiency. Although missing such 
men as .Jim Quinn, Peter ( 'onway. and Ed Marcin- 
iak, the debating society made a splendid showing 
throughout the year. Valuable men to lie lost this 
year through graduation are Arthur Kogstad, John 
Devaney, .lames Fletcher, Roberl Kuni. William 
Barrett, and Richard Wienke. 

Another notable feature which carries with it an 
anticipated value was the infusion of new blood into 
the organization by the inclusion of several sopho- 
more debaters. Ordinarily, this would not be per- 
mitted but these men made such enviable records 
as members of the junior organization, the Cudahy 



Forum, that they were extended the privilege of 
membership in the upperclass organization. 

Members of the Varsity Debate squad who have 
made at least five intercollegiate debates as well as 
having shown a consistent quality in debating have 
been admitted as the first members of the Loyola 
Chapter of the national debate fraternity, Pi Kap- 
pa Delta. Included in this group are Arthur Kog- 
stad, John Devaney, James Fletcher. William Bar- 
rett, Joseph Gallagher, Gerard Galante, winner of 
the Harrison Oratorical Contest in 194(1, Frank 
McGarr, Charles Ewerts, William Ryan, and Carl 
Hayden. Membership in this organization awarded 
to these men reveals indirectly the outstanding suc- 
cess which the Varsity debating team has added to 
its previous laurels. 

Well known debating organizations that visited 
Loyola during the past year included such schools 
as. St. Olaf's College, St. Thomas College, Niagara 
University, Omaha University, John Carroll Uni- 
versity, Quincy College, and Northwestern Univer- 
sity. As usual, the squad held a home-and-home 
series with Mundelein College. 



LOYOLA • MCMXL 



190 



MDXL • SOCIETY OF 



The rmlali v Forum 



The Cudahy Forum, Loyola's undergraduate de- 
bating society, is now concluding one of its mosl 
successful seasons. With an initial turnout of some 
twenty interested students, the first meetings 
showed that the Forum numbered no small group 
of experienced debators among its members. 

An initial series of intra-forum debates prepared 
the speakers for the exhibition debate presented he- 
fore high school audiences throughout the city. 

For I he aspiring debaters, the high tide of the 
year came during the months of January and Feb- 
ruary when delegations from the Forum took part 
in three debate tournaments at North Park College, 
Northwestern University, and Huntingdon College, 
respectively. The speakers taking part in these tour- 



neys were : LeRoy Gudgeon, Ted Layden, John Clif- 
ford, Charles Padden, .lames Ostler, -lames Hart- 
ney. John O'Brien, and John Bettenbender. The 
two delegates to the Northwestern tournament were 
Richard Huston and Robert Covington together 
with LeRoy Gudgeon and William Watts. 

'This year the Forum won nine out of twenty-four 
debates at the Huntington Tournament. Last year 
tin' Forum won live out of six but this year they 
entered the class A competition. The remaining 
debates of the season are a series with Fox Secre- 
tarial ( lollege. As the season approaches its close. 
the members look back on a most enjoyable year 
and anticipate possible activity on the Varsity 
squad next year. 



c 



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Hartney, Gudgeon, Bettenbender, ami Clifford were four very 
active members of the Cudahv Forum. 




191 



"- JESUS • MCMXL 
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2 



Brandeis 
Competition 



The Brandeis Competition was created by Dean 
John ( '. Fitzgerald in II):!:!. It represents the out- 
standing activity of the law student apart from 
his classroom work and library research. The com- 
petition encourages student initiative and acquaints 
the student with the proper procedure in the prac- 
tice (if the legal profession. Participants must be 
thoroughly familiar with legal bibliographies and 
the preparation of trial and appellate briefs. 

First year students are organized into clubs 
which remain intact during their remaining years 
in school. Club members gain their initial experi- 
ence in arguments within the club, later moving 
to inter-club competition. In the senior year the 
groups of clubs have been cut down to two and the 
winners of the final arguments arc the entrants 
into the Intercollegiate .Moot Court Trials for the 
state championship. Practicing attorneys and 
judges preside at all cases and arguments between 
the clubs. Their decision is based on excellence of 
briefs and oral arguments. 




M i '. Thomas Waldron 
of the Law School was 
the judge and super- 
visor of the Competi- 
tion. 



The final arguments this year were concerned 
with the problem of recission for mistake. Fred 
Lucas lirandstrader and Joseph Carroll of the 
night school emerged victorious over the day school 
team of Leo Newhouse and Dan Abrams. The Hon. 
John M. O'Connor of the Appellate Court presided 
and was assisted by Hon. Hugo M. Friend and Hon. 
John V. MeCormiek. 

The second year Brandeis men met the Univer- 
sity of Chicago in a special home and home series, 
and the first year men had a series of four intra- 
school arguments. The entire Brandeis competi- 
tion is under the direct supervision of Mr. John 
A. Waldron. 



Carroll, Brandstrader, Abrams, and Newhouse were the finalists in the Law School's Brandeis Competition. 




III.' 




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193 




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V939 




September . . . back to school again . . . filling 
out these interminable blanks for registration — 
what a job! . . . book lists . . . changed again . . . 
no used copies ... oh. well . . . first day of class 
. . . Fr. Finnegan sings the Mass of the Holy 
Ghost for the Arts boys . . . father, son, and fac- 
ulty party given by Fathers ' Club in the gym . . . 
pretty nice . . . Hello Week a success . . . now for 
the green caps . . . frats start making plans for 
rush week . . . everything happens to the frosh 
. . . first issue of the News for the year comes out 
. . . government picks Loyola as a Flight Training 
School . . . now we'll have some aces to raise the 
deuce . . . everybody worries about the war . . . 
will we be in uniform before the semester"? . . . no 
use studying . . . were we fooled ! . . . frosh cagers 
look good . . . Wilson is cheerful about the swim- 
ming season . . . looks like a good year for Loyola 
all the way around. 



'Corpus Domini nostri Jesus 
Christi. ... " 




Don't say we didn't warn you. Thirty 
durs. 





Loyola still has its faculties. 

Gym dance; Jack dance; everybody dance. 

What won't they think of next? 



Looks like Ed 's popping tonight. 

Planning the 400th year. 

Goodwillie's one of the sirens in 
' ' Gangbusters. ' ' 



195 




let d i 



uietcla££ 




at t ate Lft . . 



Great sorrow came to all Chicago 
. . . ( !ardinal Muiidelein died on the 
2nd . . . Devaney, Frank O'Shaugh- 
nessy, and Lyons are elected class 
prexies . . . Marty says, "The frosh 
must wear their green caps'' . . . 
Herman conducts Ho-lium for the 
first time ... oh frabjous day . . . Phi 
(.'hi boys pledge twenty-six . . .Arts 
frats throw pledge parties and then 
give the prospects the works . . . 
pledge pins sprout all over ... so does 
that harried look ! . . . Union Pow "Wow 
on Friday 13 in the gym big social 
success . . . eerie too, but not from 
the lake of the same name . . . the 
Maroon Keg disappears suddenly . . . 
wonder why? . . . Council sentences 
erring Frosh for not wearing caps . . . 
surprised? — so were they . . . Bill 
Murphy conducts whirlwind cam- 
paign to win Arts frosh prexyship . . . 
Richard Sinnott and Tornello become 
Med. School class presidents . . . Phi 
Alpha Delts hold a big pledge party 
;i1 the Bismarck . . . out of those law 
books, boys . . . the Big Poosh Ball 
contest comes off with quite a bang 
. . . Frosh take the Sophs into camp in 
spite of an organ- 
ized kidnapping 
campaign on the 
part of the losers 
. . . legally the Frosh 
have to keep their 
caps till they win at 
basketball . . . actu- 
ally — we-c-11 . . . 
Halloween . . . U. 
Club throws Har- 
vest Hop in the gym 
. . . pumpkins, corn- 
stalks, and pushball 
prizes . . . pretty 
nice. 
196 




Killing snakes 1 



Irresistible force and 
an immovable object. 



Death comes to a 
Lovola dance. 



Drop that gun, Jack 
Dalton! 



Mama, do they really 
run across the coun- 
try? 



Scrubwomen a la Loy- 
ola. 



In the gloaming, oh 
mv darling. 



Roll out the barrel. 



Philosophy Club dis- 
cussing Man's Nat- 
ural Rights. 



Well pick 'em up and 
Layden down. 



Stop ! It 's Wonder- 
ful! 









Prom L tn Heaven. 
Don't B-flat even if you are A mini 
Camera shy, no doubt. 



Vacant jug — vacant expression. 
Rectangular crap game. 

Wliv nnise, Phi Mil's. 



198 




19 20 i? ] 5 16 8 U 

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Fall Frolic big dance in November . . . two big 
bands, play Frolico . . . Ed Galapeaux becomes 
Med School Senior president . . . Arts Council 
hears fight over class dues . . . some of the boys 
don't believe in Hector, the tax collector . . . 
Brandstrader and Carroll best Abrams and New- 
house in Brandeis Competition . . . that's fast 
talking there . . . Arts Council seeks assistance 
from the students . . . they form an auxiliary 
body helping the big boys . . . tough job running 
Loyola . . . isn't it Father "Wilson"? . . . that ag- 
gressive class, the sophomores, take all the poor 
upperclassmen into camp and revenge them- 
selves on the frosh for their pushball defeat by 
copping the interclass touchball series . . . they'll 
have to put a new addition on the wailing wall 
. . . ending the month with a big bang the Alpha 
Belts give the first formal of the year at the 666 
club . . . Bon Chiesta, the Alpha Belt queen, her 
court of honor . . . vou can 't lose. 




Don 't point that jaw at me : it may 

go off I 



Interfrat Council. 

The attractions of the Loyolan office 



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9 20 21 % $ 
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1 



Goodwillie telling 
about his operation. 




ketbail 



How to celebrate a 
channel swim victory! 




Any similarity to real 
persons living or dead 
is purely coincidental. 



Shake the hand that 
shook the hand. 



The bigger and bet- 
ter bonfire. 



There is nice back- 
ground in this shot. 

John and the Senior 
Queen. 

There 's Bill King 
with that blonde 
again. 



Father Malaelw fades. 



Mumbledy-peg. 



The All-American boy 

lias TWO girls. 



Whee ... a short month . . . but a 
lot happened . . . Father Finnegan 
suggests a wolf as a Loyola mascot . . . 
no irony intended, — we hope! . . . a 
number of howls went up from the 
students anyhow . . . Green Circle 
holds big outside pep rally for the 
cagers opening game . . . big bonfire 
. . . everybody brought a box . . . Ram- 
blers open against Arkansas and took 
them into camp . . . Varsity plays 
Alumni under the auspices of the 
Dads' Club . . . Monogram Club lias 
lounge dance afterwards . . . big night 
for all ... it took a miracle to do it 
but the Curtain Guild gave a highly 
successful play, "Father Malachy's 
Miracle"' . . . cast very good, staging- 
exceptional . . . one of the best Loy- 
ola's seen . . . University Club holds 
their initiation . . . more additions to 
the Dead end kids, no doubt . . . Var- 
sity debate squad opens season with 
Niagara . . . sounds all wet . . . Glee 
flub gives concert at Christmas as- 
sembly . . . Bolero great hit . . . the 
boys thought it was another "Music 
Goes Round and Round" piece . . . 
maybe it was ... Li Alph formal 
closes the '39 social season at school 
. . . Electric Club. Dick Carlton . . . 
at $2.50, oy, ve're losing money . . . 
Christmas . . . it's too bad about those 
neckties . . . 
New Year's 
Eve . . . 'nuff 
said.... 
"well it was 
swell while it 
lasted." . . . 
' b y e no w 
1939. 




201 




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1940 







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19 30 



New Year 's Day . . . glad we 've got two days 
to recuperate . . . basketball team had some tough 
breaks over the holidays ... it's a tough league 
. . . keep fighting gang . . . sophs pick class jack- 
ets ... a couple of style made experts were in 
on the deal for a change . . . Bremer has been 
appointed to go wolfing (for the mascot that is) 
and is having no end of trouble . . . what a 
change for Bob . . . semester exams . . . writer's 
cramp, midnight oil, wurra-wurra, and then sur- 
prise . . . the marks come out and you're still in 
school . . . maybe we knew more than the profs 
thought we did, or did we? . . . nothing like relax- 
ing at the Junior Prom . . . no, you 're not seeing 
double . . . there are two Prom Kings . . . and 
Queens too, woo-woo . . . big banquet next . . . 
News's annual affair . . . Wallace and Koenig are 
appointed . . . good luck boys . . . lucky for yon 
it isn 't a daily. 



The end of the retreat. 

It isn't the girls, it's the scenery. 
Who 's holding whose hand .' 






They've got good imaginations. 

Try to find yourself. 

The photographer started a ' ' Conrovd Booster 
Week. ' ' 



And then Frank bit the mike. 
Senior Retreat in the Chapel. 
Has somebody spiked the teal 



203 



leAae^ ret teat . . . 



a 



It tetteat JiidXtn-a . . 

Midyear Convocation held at the 
Community Theatre ... a few stu- 
dents got the third degree from the 
President . . . bad news for the stu- 
dent body . . . Herman folds up his col- 
umn for the rear . . . new team of 
screwballs under the nom de plumes 
"Nuts and Hulls" take over . . . Cag- 
ers hold DePaul to a six point victory, 
Congrats, boys . . . Honors Convoca- 
tion comes off next . . . smart boys cash 
in for their work . . . the Alpha Sigs 
try to revive the Interfrat Council . . . 
looks like they better put it in a tem- 
porary coffin next time they bury it 
. . . Doctor Steward publicly com- 
plains about the foreign post card sit- 
uation in the News ... at least lie 
doesn't have to worry about it this 
summer . . . last dance before Lent is 
the Phi Betes formal quadrate ... no 
more fun once Lent starts . . . Loyalty 
Week with beard contests, free throw 
contests, tags, and (Quasimodo . . . 
don't forget Goodwillie and Gang- 
busters — how could we? . . . what's 
Cagney got that Charlie hasn't . . . 
Arts Frats pick Matt, Dillon, and 
Martin for prexies . . . looks like a 
good year for the Irish . . . school 
B. M. 0. C. 's in Junior classes ap- 
pointed to Alpha Sigma Nu . . . exclu- 
sive bunch aren't they? . . . Glee Club 
cantatas at local parish . . . some yo- 
delling . . . and they're all hymns- 
no hers. 




D'va get it? 



This is too much for 
us to handle. 



Take those grins off 
y 1 1 u r faces; you 
haven't won it vet. 



Getting close to heav- 
en bo vs. 



So I ain 't neat ! 



What the Loyolan's 
got that the News 
hasn't got. 



Goodwillie isn't kid- 
fling this time. 



And you're the All- 
American boy, tsk, 
tsk. 



The Curtain Guild 
business staff sends 
out for more red ink. 



Remember what Fath- 
er Kellv said. 



The men who eame to 
dinner. 



1940FE|^ 






-111 

25 26 ^ 7 2 1 



,q 3 n gout* KaCKS-SyHYSS 1837 
,837 ALPHA DEUS 1338 

lfsna ALPHA BEITS 1S3B 



A CHAMPIONS Y 






204 




/\ 



k v 







, ■ f'iT. i* 



CMHOUC 









W\ " ? # i 

1 


T 

IF 



■■^HB 



■■H 



Board growing contestants start from scratch, 
or is it scrape? 

Edgar "Harmageddon" Martin presents 
trophy. 

Looks bad for St. Michael's. 

206 



Marty sells back Manhattan Island. 

Loyola could use a mascot like this. 

Free Throw Contest Winner — Mr. Sachs. 



1940 



^&£H 





an 



1 



oiitnauieiit^ 




Archbishop Striteh comes to Chicago . . . Loy- 
ola's own John Felten makes welcoming speech 
on behalf of Catholic Youth . . . no doubt the talk 
was heartfelten . . . Kogstad discovers Loyola 
is getting a wolf . . . writes column denouncing 
whole idea as undermining the constitution as 
well as being a danger to American youth . . . 
murder in the Lounge . . . freshman killer 
devours the Loyola mascot, Loytucky . . . just an 
inoffensive goldfish . . . what 's he think the lunch- 
room's for anyway? . . . Kogstad, Devaney, and 
Fletcher take debate road trip . . . come back with 
southern accents — and bulging address books . . . 
Soph Cottilion with the ' ' Ideal Date of 1940 ' ' big 
success . . . Phi Mu's hold fancy Easter night 
dance on a yacht . . . the bar was in the bilge — or 
was the bilge in the bar? 





a Ike spuria 



h 



The personality boys 
at the Dads ' Banquet. 



Looking for an hon- 
est man in a snow- 
storm in April. 



Dearie, look 
appendix. 



a uo-iutq man A taiicit . . . 



First big event of the month is Dad- 
Son banquet in honor of the basket- 
hall team . . . music, magic, and meal 
. . . nice job Dads . . . Arts campus 
takes Roosevelt third-term survey . . . 
boys give Franklin the negative by a 
slight majority . . . that should decide 
if anything does ... ye editor gets ex- 
cited in his little column in the middle 
of the paper about Bertram! Russell 
. . . his scorching editorial reduced the 
University to the verge of nervous 
prostration for several days . . . frats 
get all wound up on their second 
pledge season . . . more splinters again 
. . . oh well — cheer up — it's only a 
short pledgeship . . . Mario gives big 
benefit concert for the chapel fund 
. . . big crowd expected — the more the 
Mario 'r . . . wolf cub formally chris- 
tened by a contest . . . four students 
submit nickname "Rambler" . . . 
what, aren't they going to put him in 
a cage"? ... if they don't, they better 
pull his teeth or put the Loyola boys 
in the cage . . . fifteen Loyolans trek 
down to Greencastle to see about the 
International Relations . . . Germany 
attacked Norway — Denmark immedi- 
ately afterwards . . . Alpha Delts hold 
their annual spring dance at the Fur- 
niture .Mart . . . what with Johnny 
Gilbert as orchestra leader and the 
Delt socialites as guests it should be 
a pretty tricky affair . . . I-M carni- 
val big attraction for April . . . see all 
the winners light for their crowms. 



Ceiling zero. 



Look out Fred ! Don 't 
fall over a bluff. 



1942 — will he make 
it? 



at that 



Everybody listens to 
Martin. 



Basketball banquet. 
Where's the food? 



Dean use3 muscle on 
Dussel. 



From soup to Mertz. 



So Rernie stood up 
and three sat down. 




209 



1940 



JUNE 



1940 



-S V Lantk ar y l/Latu 



• • • 




mt<i 



irv 



4 * 



1940 



NVAV 



1940 



SAT 



"SUN_ 



N\QN_ 



5 6 



n 1 • j 

» 1 ^ 3 4 

MS i 



q a * o f 3 £ | 

1 1 $ i » m t 



At last the long awaited Senior Ball . . . Bob 
Strong and his NBC orchestra at the beautiful 
ballroom of the Lake Shore Athletic Club . . . un- 
forgettable memories . . . Mothers' and Fathers' 
Club Scholarship party at the Stevens is a big 
success . . . not much time left in the year . . . 
comps for the Seniors roll around now ... so 
long boys . . . this ain't no way to treat them 
after working four years . . . high school seniors 
ciime up to take scholarship exams . . . whatcha 
think of Loyola? . . . don't worry, all the exams at 
Loyola aren't like this one, (snicker, snicker) 
. . . the Loyolan banquet, the Loyolan is issued 
... is the staff glad! . . . and then, semester 
exams ... if we live through these we've got all 
summer to rest up in . . . don 't forget the Pi Alph 
formal . . . last dance of the year . . . see you 
there . . . 'bye now till September. 




So Mrs. Pettibone said . . . 
Cobina, I found a man. 

Still no date, huh Frank? 





Big brother act. 

Their day is clone. 

Galapeaux works for the Gallup poll. 



O tempore, mores. O M.D. 's. 

Portrait of one of Loyola's popular registrars. 

Beachcombing — it's done with mirrors. 



211 



c^4-ck.^awleJiaenient 



To put out a school annual is no small task. The innumerable details, the 
great diversity of sources, the difficulty of organizing the material — all of these 
things make the job of compilation and publication difficult. It is at this point — 
when all the pictures have been taken, when all the copy save this has gone to 
the printers, and when the editor has nothing to do except read final proofs, — 
that he feels that the time for casting up accounts has come. 

The sincerest and most heartfelt thanks of the editors must be extended 
primarily to the staff. Few finer, more co-operative groups could be found on 
any campus and it is due to their efforts on behalf of the LOYOLAN that the 
editorial burden has been considerably lightened. 

To Doctor Zabel, our moderator, we extend a heartfelt vote of thanks for 
the personal interest he has taken in the publication of this book and for his 
invaluable assistance in solving major problems. 

Since a yearbook is a commercial product of the engraving, printing, pho- 
tographic and cover designing arts, the representatives of these firms come into 
considerable contact with the editors. A personal opinion is that few men could 
be found with more genuine interest in the problems of the editor or with more 
sympathy for the difficult situation into which his inexperience occasionally 
leads li i in. .Mr. Fred Montiegel, of Pontiac Engraving and Electrotype Com- 
pany, has been friend, companion and mentor to this year's editors. His re- 
straining humor has calmed the somewhat distracted members of the staff when 
the situation became increasingly complex. Mr. Edward J. Bryan of the Pan- 
tagraph Printing and Stationery Company has capably solved our printing 
problems for us. The success of his task lies in the reader's hands. Without John 
Roach of Root Studios, the yearbook as a pictorial record of University Life 
would be surprisingly inadequate. Class groups. Senior pictures, and many 
other special groups have been due to the trusty camera of John's which has 
travelled the length and breadth of Chicago for the LOYOLAN. Mr. Harold 
Beckett of Kingscraft Products has been responsible for the beautiful cover 
of this book. 

Our twelve month task is nearing its close. So now until the work on the 
next book begins, this is the 

E.N.D. 



212 



A 

Abratns 37, 88, 99, 192 

Abbott 28 

Aohenbaeh 126 

Adams 34, 38 

Adamski 26 

Ahern 26. 105 

Ahlm 68, 125 

Aiello 61 

Albasio 124 

Albertsen 42 

Albini 34. 134 

Albright 127 

Alesio 34 

Allan 62 

Adamson 35 

Allegra 28 

Allen 28 

Allison 120 

Alonzi 27 

Alven 68 

Anian 28 

Amar 21 

Andelina 34 

Anderson 34. 38, 61, 68 

Andriacchi 43 

Angerman 35 

Sr Anna 58 

Annon 35 

Antzis 28 

Anzalone 37, 88, 99 

Archibald 35 

Aries 52 

Armin 46 

Arnold 124 

Arns 59 

Aste 43 

Aubuschon 124 

Automicci 42 



Bacharz 26. Ill 

Bark 52, fid 

Bailey 46. 68, 110 

Ballard 38 

Ballas 68 

Banahan 46 

Barnett 38. 188 

Barry 125. 134, 135, 136 

Bartels 68, 125 

Barth 26, 38 

Barthes 34 

Bartolomei 68 

Barton 63. 68. 135. 136 

Barton, Fr 18, 51 

Barrett 26, 68. 103 

107. 112 

Barron 46 

Barry 58. 68 

Bates 68 

Bauer 43 

Baskett 47. 68 

Basten 59 

Bastien 62 

Beach 35 

Beahan 38 

Beall 34, 68, 125, 133 

135, 136 

Beauregard ....26, 98, 112. 114 

150. 152. 171. 181 

Becht 46 

Becker 50. 68, 173 

Bedessem 26. 102 

Beening 61 

Behlke 63 

Behn 62 

Beiger 43 

Bell 52 

Bellew 34, 134, 136 

Benante 59 

Bencur 47 

Benecek 61 

Bennett 38. 126 

Benz 68, 122 

Berens 26, 111, 164 

Beresky ....34, 68. 103, 136, 176 

Bergen 58 

Berger 42 

Bergh 28 

Berk 26. 176 

Berman 38 

Bernardi 68. 102 

Bernardo. Sr 68 

Bernstein 68, 126, 128 

Birren 27 

Bertucci 68. 134, 13.5. 136 

Bettenbender 28, 191 

Beyinan 46 

Brakek , 26 

Brelanski 42 

Briggs 43 

Bily 62 

Bingins 47 

Binsfleld 62 

Binz 47 

Biraz 52 

Bird 21 

Birney 50 

Birong 38 

Bisku, Sr 68 

Blake 161 

Blanohard 59, 185 

Bland 38 

Blanchard, Fr 68 



Blasiole 68, 134 

Blasczyk 26, 117 

Blech 26, 102 

Blinski 34, 128 

Bloomquist 68 

Blough 35. 63. 121 

Boberg 38 

Bocinsky 62 

Boden 52 

Bogue 68 

Boedeker 68 

Boehin 68 

Bogdziewicz 46 

Bogley 63 

Bohor 47 

Boisdeau 26 

Boland, R 98, 107, 110. 114 

178. 179. 181 

Boland, T 68, 107. 114. 1711 

Boldsur 58 

Boles 68, 135, 136 

Binnlia 46, 58, 68 

Bona 28 

Boone . 68 

Borino 35. 124 

Boss 47 

Bosshart 28 

Bnttino 68 

Bowler 47. 133 

Bowman 27. 28, 46 

Bind 47, 68, 121 

B.ivlan 34, 124, 125 

134. 136 

Boyle 38 

Boyne 118 

Bozie 62 

Bozovsky 28 

Brabets" 27, 28 

Bradfield 59, 61 

Brady 52 

Brahm 3S, 99 

Brandstrader 67. 68. 99, 123 

131, 188, 192 

Brannigan 26, 98 

Bravos 26 

Bredlau 52 

Breen 58 

Breit 68, 171 

Bremer 98, 105, 110 

Bremner 17, 66 

Brennan 27, 37, 38, 34. 71 

99. 103, 121 

Brickler 43 

Brierty 63 

Bries 62 

Brimstin 52, 172 

Brinkman 71 

Brinskelle 27 

Britt 71 

Briihm 58 

Brown 42. 46, 63. 71, 132 

Browne 21 

Broz 26 

Brundza 71 

Bryar 115. 189 

Bucklin 71 

Buklad 35, 122 

Burchett 42, 97, 133 

Burdett 71 

Burke, A 60, 106. 107. 109 

114. 155, 156, 170 

Burke. E 50 

Burke, N 71, 109, 169 

Burnett 61. 97 

Burns 43, 46, 111. 123 

Burski 71. 122 

Bussert 26 

Butler 46. 61 

Buttell 63 

Burdett 71 

Byrne 26, 37. 47. 92, 110 

115. 180 

C 

Cagney 47 

Cahill 26. 111. 142. 148 

Caliban 38 

Callanan 71. 115 

Cameron 132 

Campion 27 

Cantwell 61 

Carey 42. 43. 47 

Carey, Dr 124, 125 

Carlin 27, 109 

Carlson 46 

Came 60 

Carnes 52 

Carney 38 

Carroll ...34, 46, 59, 47, 71, 99 

115. 123, 125, 134. 136 

154, 192 

Carter 27. 164, 171 

Casper 71 

Cassnretto 25, 103. 132 

Casserta 35 

Cassiday 59 

Ca stanza 71 

Castle 62 

Catalano 42 

Catena 35, 120 

Cayanaugh 71 

Cech 35 

Cepon 46 

Ceriani 124 

Chevy 52 

Chock 34, 134, 136 



Chamberlain is. 40 

Charkowski 59 

Charlton 61 

Cliawk 61 

Christian 47 

Christianson 61. 63 

Chudik 46 

Churchill 71 

Cilia 26. Iii2, 1 lfi 

Cielenski 71 

Ciesla 7 1 

Claess 62 

Clare 58 

Clarett 46 

Clark 71, 188 

Clarke 17 

Clans 62 

Cleary 42 

Cleland 46, 61 

Clement 71 

Clement, Sr 60 

Clemitus 71 

Clifford 27, 47. 71. 191 

Clissold 63 

Clohesy 27 

t 'It.hisy 28, 1 7 1 

Clogue 42 

Clough 52 

Coduto 42, 46. lis 

i loebstner 71 

Cofone 71, 107 

Cogley 46 

Cognlau 21 

Colin 46 

< lody 42 

Cole 26. Ill 

Coleman 46. 47 

Collachia 58 

Collins 26, 28, 42. 47 

Colnon 18 

Colvin 43 

Concannon 34. 35 

Condon. .27, 61. 71, 102, 103, 121 

134. 135. 171, 176, 177 

Conglis 26. 116 

Conlev 71 

Con nelly 63 

Conrath 50 

Conroy 50, 173 

Conroyd 26, 111, 164, 176 

Conway 26, 27. 59. 61. 109 

171, 176, 177 

Conway, Mrs loo 

Conway, Mr 101 

Conway 97 

Considine 27, 181 

Converse 42 

' looney 118 

< m, per 35, 1 28 

Corbett 60 

Corboy 47, 154, 157 

Corcoran 27, 46 

('order 46. 118 

Cornelia, Sr 59 

Cornell 26. 171 

Cornillie 50 

Cornille 34, 134. 136 

Cosch 62 

Cosetino 27 

Cotugno 71 

Counihan 71 

Courtney 99 

Courvoisier 28 

Covington 27 

Cox 47 

Cozzens 47 

Crane 47 

Craven 26. 171 

Crawford 71 

Crisanti 60 

Cn, n in 34. 125. 134 

Crowley 26. 37. 63, 114 

123. 142 

Crowe 46, 58 

Cudahy 17 

Cullen 37 

Cullivan 58 

Cuiiiinings 17. 21 

dims 42 

Cuneo 27 

Ciinin 43 

Cunnar 43 

Cunningham 71 

Cm-ran 27. 28. 34 

Curte 42 

Curtin 46, 61. 71 

Curtis 62 

Cusack 58, 62 

Cutler 71, 104. 129. 169 

170, 182 

Czech 46 

Czerlowski 28 

Czonstka 37 

Czulick 28 

D 

Dabrowski 71 

rialime 38 

Dahinten 72 

Dakes 46 

Daley 46. 72, 121, 133, 134 

Daiy 34. 120. 125, 136 

Dallessandro 34 

Daiuko 46 

Damanskas 72 



DaMart 59 

Daiilon 34 

Danoff 71 

]>aran 46 

Dardwin 52 

Dasiewicz 72 

Dauber 38 

Davey 42, 72. 97, 118 

David 72, 135 

Davidson 46 

Davis 28, 52, 132 

Davison 134 

Davlantes 72, 106, 107 

Daw sun 47 

Deflates 59 

Dedekind 119 

Deeh 35 

Deely 47 

De Giorgio 27 

Deiehstetter 61 

Delaney 26, 42. 43. 46. 47 

Delano 115. 161 

Delano, Mrs 100 

Delano, Mr 101 

Delfosse 34 

De Meter 73, 134 

Demmert 27, 28 

Dempsey 46 

De .N'ei. 46 

Denning 61 

Deliten 35 

Derby 175 

De Smyter 35 

Deterville 60. 72 

Detrano 47 

Devney 72 

Deutsehmami 72, 125, 134 

135, 136 

Devaney ...67, 72. 98. 109, 114 

171. 178. 179. 188 

Dever 38 

De Wolf 42 

Dickinson 27 

Dickow 115 

Dickson 42 

Di Francesca 72 

1 >i Leone 47 

Dillon . . . .27, 106, 114, 131. 136 

179. 181, 188 

Dillon R 26, 171 

Dill. m 38 

Dill. in 34 

Dillon 47 

Dirksen 106, 110. Ill, 112 

171. 188 

Diskev 34. 125, 134. 136 

Dix 63 

Dixon 72 

D.ilniikar 42 

Doherty 27 

Dnlan 72. 114 

Dolazinski 26. 1 15 

Dolehide 27, 102. 171. 178 

Dombrowski 117 

Domke 103 

Donald 35 

Dnnl.iii 35 

Donnelly 48. 58 

Donohne 27, 59. 114 

Doolev 62 

D.ircy 72 

Dorgan 26 

Dostal 47 

Double 27, 28, 148 

Dougherty 58, 116 

Dougherty 26. 27, 110, 112 

148, 151, 154 

Dons 72 

D.iwd 26. 27. 114 

Dowell 35 

Downey 50. 185 

Downing 38, 50, 173. 185 

Doyle 26, 46 

Drabek 34 

Dravee 72 

Drayheck 136 

Dreiner 28 

Driscoll 43. 60 

Drill a n 28 

Drolett 72, 120 

Dubay 72. 112. 129. 160 

175, 189 

Du Brock 42 

Dm lek 27 

DuF.ni 59 

Huffy 21. 27. 28, 38, 42, 43 

63, 105, 188 

Duncan 26 

Dunn 35. 50. 72 

Dunne 46 

Dtinphy 46 

Dvinicb 72 

Dvorak 72 

Durban 46 

Durkin 27, 28. 133. 148 

Dursn 27, 142 

Dussell . . .47. 114, 176. 177. 181 

Dwyer 68 

Dymek 26. 72 



E 

Eastbv 72 

Eack ' 63 

Eckes 63 

Edison 47 



213 



Effron 72 

Egan 27, 52 

Egan, Fr 18, 44, 119 

Eggert 63 

Einola 72 

Eirich 26, 72 

Eiselt 62 

Eischend 58 

Eisin 58 

Einsweiler 72 

Ellenz 46 

Ellis 27, 171 

Elson 72, 112, 132, 150, 152 

Elward 39 

Emmons 132 

Engels 72 

Esposito 26, 104, 105, 115 

170, 188 

Essenberg, Dr 32 

Esser 26, 103, 114 

Essig 27, 111, 150 

Etzkoni 26, 109, 111 

Evangelists, Sr 21 

Evans 42, 72 

Ewerts 26, 115, 131, 177 

183, 188 



F 

Pahey 102, 105 

Fair 34 

Palkenberg 59 

Parrel 16, 27, 50 

Fassier 46 

Faye 27 

Feay 72 

Feehan 47, 97 

Feeiey 46, 118 

Peeney 46 

Fegan 72 

Fell 72 

Felten 72, 104, 169, 180 

Feltes 34, 134 

Fenel 75 

Penner 75, 169, 182 

Fenske 34 

Fergus 28 

Ferguson 52 

Ferrell 43 

Fiesohko 38 

Fiuan 50, 75, 185 

Finigan 58 

Fink 28 

Finley 28 

Pinnegan, Fr 18, 24, 92 

Finley 27 

Fintz 34, 125 

Fisher 26, 114 

Fitzgerald, J 18, 35, 36 

Fitzgerald, B 39 

Fitzgerald 46, 47, 75 

Fitzpatrick 21, 27, 43, 47 

61, 75, 118 

Fitzsimmons 75 

Flannery 21, 27 

Fleming' 27, 104, 170, 171 

Flentie 34, 120, 134 

Fletcher 75, 107, 114, 131 

181, 188 

Floberg 101 

Flnbei g, Mrs loo 

Flvnn 26, 34, 46, 47, 175 

Plynn, Fr 21 

Pogel 35 

Foley 35, 121 

Pollard 46 

Pollen 50 

Fontanetta 124 

Foody 27 

Poote 27, 75 

Ford 63 

Pordon 35, 127 

Porgie 63 

Forrander 27 

Porrette 35 

Porsthoefel 50 

Foulk 75, 127, 135, 136 

Fowle 34 

Fox 26, 97, 111, 181 

Pox 46 

Foy 41, 106 

Francis 97 

Franklin 46 

Franzen 43, 60 

Freese 46 

Freidla 28 

Freimon 75 

Frcy 26, 92, 103, 1 15, 129 

132, 175, 176, 183, 188 

Frcy 35, 121 

Froemling 43 

Froeiuberg 42 

Fruzynski 61 

G 

Gabel 75 

l in.' 60 

Gackacko 103 

i rarret 34 

Gajewski 35 

Galante ..26, 35, 42, 92, 109, 131 

170, Iss, ISO 

Galapeaux 31, 67, 75 

Gallagher 58, 59, 104, 131 

lS.-i ISO 

Gambler 35 

Gannon 38, 175 

Gardimer 63 

tinnier 42 



Garnty 109 

Gait 47 

Garvey 27, 42, 171 

Gecewicz 75 

Gerald, Sr 59 

Geriach 59, 75 

Geimer 75, 106 

Gerrity 42, 43 

Gerse 43 

Gertrude, Sr 63 

Geraty 47 

Gets 28 

Geisa 47 

Gerst, Fr 18, 20 

Gendron 42 

Ghormley 47 

Ghiardi 75 

Gianutsis 59 

Gibbons . .50, 61, 75, 97, 98, 108 
112, 119, 129, 178 

Gibson 34 

Gilbert 59. 60 

Gill ..75, 115, 130, 170, 182, 188 

Ginsberg 52 

Ginski 42 

Gleich 58 

(ilinski 75 

Gluck 46 

Goessling 115 

Gulden 42, 47, 75 

Goodman 43 

Goodwillie 26, 169, 171 

Goodwin, Fr 41 

Gooker 47 

Gora 35 

Gordon 117 

Goulding 62 

Govostis 26, 102 

Grace 28 

Grady 28, 75, 103, 114, 171 

Grady 47 

Graff 58 

Graft 28 

Graham ...26, 106, 111, 112, 142 
148, 153 

Graham 63, 75 

Graham 28 

Granhold 75, 110, 171 

Grandpre 43 

Grannasi 27 

Grant 26, 42, 102, 116 

Graves 27 

Gray 75 

Graydon 27 

Greene 27, 75 

Greenhill 32 

Greensley 47 

Gregorich 75 

Gregory 75 

Grenkovitz 59 

Grennan 63 

Grens 28 

Griffin 34, 114, 124 

Grimes 42 

Groehowski 75, 102, 117 

Grocyanna 47 

Gronewald 28 

Gross 75 

Grotefeld 46 

Grydyk 28, 117 

Gudgeon 27, 105, 171, 191 

Guerrieri 46 

Guerin 174 

Guest 47 

Guinanc 37, 88, 99 

Gunkel 27 

Gunning 75 

Gunnison 75 

Guskay 26, 27, 115 

Guthrie 58 

Gutshall 42 

Guy 61 

I luzauslas 124 



H 

Habel 75 

Hadas 61 

Hagamann 43 

Hagan 2 7 

Hagen 34, 136 

llahn 46 

Haley 21 

Hall 75 

Hamell 38 

Hammond 43 

Hand 28 

Hanley 63 

Hanly 21 

Hun 101 28, 47 

Hannah 27 

Hansen 3.3 

Happ 26, 110, 181 

Haremski 51 

llaikness 75, 103 

Harmon 28 

Harper 47 

Harrington 28 

Harris 38, 47, 52 

Hartmann 43, 50 

Hartnett 27 

Hartney 28, 191 

lliu vanok 50 

Hasch 43 

Haskins 37, 75, 123 

Haskins 27 

Hassett 43 

Hausmnnn 47, 76, 123 

Hayes 26, 104, 131, 188 

Hayes 39 



Hayes 27, 46, 104, 111, 169 

Healy 42, 43, 172 

Heaton 63 

Hecht 50 

Hedke 43 

Hedrick 76 

Heffernan 141 

Hejna 42 

Heibling 43 

Heinz 28, 42 

Heibling 42 

Helmer 38 

Hendele 38 

Henderson 76 

Hennessey ..26, 60, 106, 109, 111 

Henry 50 

Herace 76 

Heraty 76 

Herbert 59 

Hering 58 

Herman 118 

Herthneck 119 

Herzog 63 

Hesseltnan 76 

Hession 42 

Hoydens 60 

Hickman 43 

Higgins 124 

Hilkin 123 

Hill 47, 76 

Hines 28 

Hinkel 43 

Hickey 17 

Hinze 76 

Hisert 46 

Ilitchko 76, 125, 135, 136 

Hodapp 25, 46, 130 

Hoesel 59 

Hoessler 61 

Hoff 62 

Hoffman 76 

Hogamann 42 

Hogan 42 

Hohiuan 21 

Hold 38 

Holdorf 62 

Holding 47 

Holman 109 

Holmer 42 

Homan 28, 101 

Hoinan, Mrs 100 

Hnnig 28 

Hordon 50 

Homer 46 

Horodko 76, 122, 135, 136 

Hosek 42 

Hosna 26, 108, 109, 170 

182, 188 

Hosslin 62 

Hough 28 

Houlihan 26. 102, 116. 163 

Howe 26, 76, 98, 151, 181 

Howell 39 

Hruby 21, 47 

Hubert 21 

Hudson 25 

Hughes, Sr 76 

Hughes 42, 50, 61, 173 

Hu.hia 50 

Hultgen 76, 121. 134, 135 

Huinmert, Mrs 100 

Hummert 76, 115, 130 

169, 188 

Humphreville 62 

Hurley 46 

Hurtubise 46 

Hussey, Fr 25, 170 

Huston 27, 59 

I 

Iniorio 47 

Tnsnll 17 

Intfen 76 

Tppolito 35, 120 

Isberg 76 

Ivers 35, 124 

Iversky 52 

J 

-Tacliiin 43 

Jack, A 76 

Jack, C 76 

Jackson 42, 76 

Jacobs 59 

Jacobsen 26 

Jackocko 26 

Jakubiec 76 

James 46, 76 

Janette 76 

Janik 76. 106, 107, 112, 117 

Janius 76 

Jarosz 60 

Jarrell, Sr. M 54, 76 

Javaras 46 

Jedlowski 28 

Jenkins 76 

Jennings 21, 42, 46 

Jesaeher 34 

Jcssup, C 76 

Jcssup, M 76 

Jcwett 46 

Jobusch 63 

Johnson ..28, 46, 47, 76, 98, 115 

Jones 46, 58, 79 

Jordan 47 

Joyce 115, 188 

Judge 58 

Junonas 60 

Justen 63 



K 

Kabat 

Kaisberg 

Kaiser 

Kalabacha 

Kalinaskas 

Kallal 79 r 

Kalinaski 

Kalter 

Kane 42, 

Karpen 

Karlje 

Kasmer 34, 120, 

Kasper 

Kassel 

Kautz 141, 

Kavanaugh 

Kawula 72, 

Kaywood 

Kazubowski 

Keane 

Kearns 26. 

Kearny 

Keating 

Keefe 28, 

Keefer 

Keehan 

Keenan 

Kelleher ....26, 50, 79, 121, 

Kelly, Rev. A. J 24 

Kelly, Rev. J. V 18 



46 
42 



12] 
79 



Kcll 

K 

Kelly 



ey 



Kelter . . . 

Kelz 

Kemp, Mr. 
Keneealy . 
Kennedy, I 
Kennedy . 



42. 46 
111. 



. 109, 



.26. 115, 188. 
:7, 28, 43, 46, 
169, 170, 
43 



■ 26. 



Kennelly 

Kenny 

Kepner 

Kerch 11 er .... 

Kernis 26, 

Kessler 

Ketter 

Kezes 

Kiechler 

Kielv 

Kiley . .26. 27. 28, 114, 153, 
176, 188, 

Killackey 

King ..'..27, 47, 58, 79, 116, 

Kiniery, Dr 

Kirby ' 61 

Kirkpatrick 

Kiser 

Kissane 

Klien 27 

Klienfehn 

Kliinck 

Klinefelten 

Klinker 

Klo.lzinski 

Knittel 

Knoepfle 

Knoll 37, 

Knuth 

Koch 

Kochan 

Kocur 

Koczur 26, 102, 

Koenig 26, 35, 98, 110, 

122, 171, 

Koerner 106, 

Kogstad ..79, 119, 129, 130, 
133, 17S, 179, 188, 

Kolando 34, 134, 

Koleski 

Kolle 

Kominowski 

Kones 

Konopa 

Koppa 29, 47, 

Koski 

Kotula 

Kowalczyk 

Kowalski 26, 58, 102, 

Koziol 79, 

Krasniewski 

Krelner . 

Kretchmer 

Kriegsgeld 

Krisko 

Krogh 

Krol 27, 

Krueger 

Kruse 

Kruppa 

Kryzcmenski 27, 

Krzwminski 

Kijawimski 

Kumskis 

Kuni 79, 107, 110, 114, 

Kunke 

Kuscll 

Kwasny 

Kwilasz 



52 

61 

134 

35 

46 

148 

101 

102 

60 

28 

37 

109 

42 

26 

171 

47 

47 

133 

114 

24 

79 

63 

47 

126 

28 

. 79 

169 

42 

189 

109 

176 

, 79 

79 

111 

38 

102 

35 

79 

43 

28 

112 

164 

189 

38 

130 

18 

, 62 

62 

63 

38 

42 

63 

59 

62 

63 

21 

61 

50 

79 

118 

61 

42 

79 

105 

111 

I SO 

111 

131 

189 

136 

46 

79 

59 

135 

46 

132 

63 

46 

132 

117 

122 

52 

79 

121 

61 

79 



59 
62 
43 

97 
142 



79 
162 
42 
27 
42 
59 



L 

Lacll 28 

Laemerz 28 

La Fond 41, 118 

La Framboise 79, 97 

La Giovine 43 

Lagorio 124 



214 



Lally 35 

Lamaeh 60 

La Maida 35, 119, 124 

Lainey 26, 102 

Lancaster 27, 151, 172 

Lancotot 46 

Landsren 27, 175, 176, ISO 

Lane 118 

Lang: 26 

Langdon 47 

Larch 50, 79 

Larson 27, 43, 47 

Lasee 79 

Laurence 28 

Lavezzorio 79, 105, 108 

Lavin 27 

Lavino 43 

Lawler 27 

Layden 26. 28, 112, 150, 152 

Lazarski 42 

Leach 61 

League 59 

Leahy 47, 142 

Ledermann 34, 134 

Lee . . . 27, 111, 142, 148 

Lefrancois 132 

Legner 27 

Lehnart 43 

Leies 79 

Le Mire 34 

Lenell 102 

Lenert 46 

Lenihan 28, 185 

Lennon 118 

Lenover 26, 27. 149, 150 

152, 159 

Lenske 46 

Lenty 79 

Lenzi 63 

Leonard 26, 42 

Le Sarge 63, 79 

Levander 43 

Lewing 37 

Lewis 118 

Lhotka 61 

Lieber 3 a 

Lies 63 

Liniperis 37. AA 

Lindenfeld 79, 125, 135. 136 

Lindennieyer 27 

Lindsev 43 

Link -. 27, 63 

Linnville 3-4 

Lis chalk 46 

Liska 50 

Liston 50, 79 

Listwan 52 

Lithall 38, 126 

Littig 163, 164, 179, 180 

Llewellyn 79, 121 

Lochner 63 

Lodeski 132 

Loeffler 52 

Loewe 38, 126 

Loftus 118 

Logan, Dr 18 

Logan 58 

Lombardo 34 

Lorusso 35 

Loskowski 60 

Lotman 52 

Love 38, 46 

Lovely 50 

Lovewell 63 

Loyons 46 

Lozinski 79 

Luby 61 

Luchtman 80 

Luetke 43 

Lupo 46 

Lynch ...27. 37. 47, 52, 61. Ill 

Lvnn 58 

Lyon 123 

Lvons 34, 35 

Lvons 27, SO, 114. 129. 133 

149. 183 

Lipinski 26 

M 

Mac Adam 28 

Macherv 59 

Machowski 26, 102. 171 

Mack 26, 106 

Macy 42 

Magnire 123 

Maher, Rev 25, 97, 141 

Maher 46, 50, 80 

Maier 34, 42, 134 

Maiers 62 

Mfijsterek 80, 122 

Mallon 42 

Malone 61 

Malonev 43 

Mamolakis SS 

Mandel 43 

Mandernack 80 

Mangan 80 

Marion 50 

Mann 21, 35 

Mannebaeh 80 

Maciniak 46, 52 

Marek 43 

Marella 134. 135 

Margis 46 

Marie. Sr. Ruth 59 

Marino 26, 102, 116 

Marky 42, 135, 136 

Markiewicz 80 

Marlev 28, 154, 163 

Marrella 80 













SO 


Martin .... 21, 27. 


46. 50, 52, 80 
100. 101 

116, 176 

. . 26 






26 


Marzano . .26, 103, 


115, 


188. 189 
. . . . 105 












. . . . 47 






. . . . 37 


Mastronardi 




47, 80 
. .55. 80 
. . . . 80 








Mali SO, 

Matt, W 


108, 
.155, 


110, 112 
115, 125 
157, 177 
. . . . 47 












. . . . 52 






.27. 117 


Matuszewski 




. . . . 80 

. . . . so 


May Dr 




44 






. . . . SO 






°7 






. . . . 46 


McCabe 




.59, 136 


McCall 










. . . . SO 


McCarthy 26, 

109, 117, 
MeClellan 


37. 3 
118, 


8, 43, 60 
170, 177 

28 


McClelland 




.... SO 






. 118 


McCormick, Hon. J 
McCormick, Rev. . . 


v.. . 


39 
108 


MeCourt 80, 


104. 


IDS. 170 


McDade 




.... 62 






. . . . 80 


McDonald 


26. 2 


7. 37. 59 
103, 124 
. . . . 35 






61 


MeElligott 




.... 46 






80 


McGarr . . .26, 131 

Mi-Gee 

McGowan 


1S8. 


, 80, 161 
189, 190 

.... 60 
.... 47 






42, 43 
.... 46 


McKearly 

McKechney 

McKeever 26. 97. 


.... 80 
. .38, 50 
110, 111 
112, 154 
.... 26 


McKibbin 






McKugo . . . 




.... 42 


McLennon 

McMahon 26 


. .80. 
115, 


134, 136 
128, 171 

.... 103 






.... 61 


McMorrow 

McNamara 




.... 80 

46. 59 
.... 26 


McNella 


. 105, 


170, 180 


McNeil 




. .27. 155 
.... 50 


McNichols 

McNulty 

McParland 




.... 172 
. .26. 43 


Meagher 

Meilleur 

Melchiors 

Melichor 




.... 61 

.... 28 
.... 104 






47 














Merkel 


. .34, 


121, 136 



Merna 

Merrick 

Mersch 

Mertz, Rev. J. J 96, 

Meilller 

Meyers 

Miealetti 26. 

Michalik 26, 27, 

Midland 

Michel 

Michew 

Mickey 

Millar 83. 

Miller 27, 34. 47. 61 

124. 

Millor, Rev 25, 

Miliuios 

Minter 

Misiewicz 

Misus 

Mitchell 

Mitrek 

Mla.lv 

Mogilnitsky, Dr 41. 

Moleski 34, 

Molloy 47. 

Mcmaeo 43, 

Monahan 

Mone 

Moon 



61 

58 

i,l 

104 

21 

80 

102 

116 

38 

80 

59 

Sll 

103 

63 

I -1 

104 

50 

'.9 

42 

125 

83 

83 

83 

107 

I 2 j 

, 83 

46 



Moore 27 

Moorehead 26, 109 

Moorehead, Dr 18, 30, 33 

Moran 63 

Morrissey 38 

Morrow 61 

Morton 63 

Moser 55, 83 

Moss 38 

Moyles 28 

Mueller 62 

Mullarkey 83 

Mullen 52, 123. 132 

Mulleneix 35, 97, 133 

Muraskas 26 

Murlas 28 

Mnrnighan ....26, 100, 101, 153 

169, 171 

Murphy ...27, 46. 47, 59, 61, 76 

83, 97, 103, 114, 119, 120 

125. 129 

Murray 38, 47, 61 

Murray 61 

Music 60 

Musmanni 28, 103, 108 

Myers 172 



N 

Narsette 28, 102, 103 

Neiman 59 

Neimet 46 

Nelson. Dr. ...26, 32, 38, 42, 106 

Nemecek 35 

Nerger 83, 107 

Newhouse 99. 119, 192 

Neveaux 83 

Niblick 59 

Nirkele 26 

Nickels S3 

Nicola 28, 109 

Nied 63 

Niemeyer 83 

Niewzwiadek 28 

Nikolai 58 

Nisins 34, 136 

Nissen S3 

Niven 59 

Nobel 47 

Noble 46 

Noonan 97 

Noonan, Rev 18, 36 

Novatny 21 

Nowakowaki 132 

Nugent 27, 43 

O 

Oakes 43 

O'Bovle S3 

O'Brien. A 83 

O'Brien. K 83 

O'Brien, M 121. 171 

O'Brien 27, 28, 37, 42, 47 

Ocenasek 21 

Ochata 83 

O'Connell 35. 47, 59 

O'Connor. .T S3 

O'Connor, J. M 83 

O'Connor, ,7. P 83 

O'Connor, R 25 

O'Connor ..27, 28. 37. 38, 42. 47 

52. 61, 67, 103, 126, 133, 155 

O'Dav 83. 116 

O'Donnell 47. 60, S3 

O'Donoghue. Dr 32 

Oehlberg 132 

Oeth 59 

O'Gorman 47 

O'Hara, Sr S3 

O'Hart 63 

O'Hearn 43 

Ohsann 59 

O'Kane 50 

O'Keefe 28, 171 

O'Kelly 50 

O'Learv 26 

Olson 21 

O'Neil 58 

O'Neill, Dr 10S 

O'Neill 34, 17. 07 

O'Regan 47 

O'Reilly, R 116 

O'Reilly, C 27. 28 

Orphan 26, 116 

O'Rourke 38, 43 

O'Shaughnessv, F 98, 111 

179, 180 

O'Shaughnessy, M...67. 83, 97. 98 

108, 110, 112, 114, 120. 130 

154, 156, 157, 162, 164, 1S1 

O'Shea 46 

Ostler 28, 105, 1S5 

Osnch 50 

O'Toole 42, 43, 63 

Owens 50 

Owings 120 

P 

Pacben 59 

Padden 27 

Pagano 83, 102 

Palinski 28 

Palmissano 34 

Palus 26, 11)2. 110 

Parent. Dr 132 

Parenti 21 

Parker 20S 

Paschalisa, Sr 58 



Pastinak 58 

Patelczyk 27 

Patrick 83 

Paull 62 

Pauls 38, 99 

Pavev 46 

Pavlik 52. 121 

Pawlikowski 28 

Payne 60 

Pearson, Dr 32 

Pearson 2 7. 116 

Peart 63 

Petaro 120 

Petrus 123 

Petrole 171 

Peele 26 

Pelka 27, 102 

Pellicore 35 

Pembroke 55. 83 

Pendergast 38 

I'enn 83 

Perry 38, 46, S3 

Pescoller 60 

Peterman 50 

Peters 50 

Petkiewski 83 

Petroitis 46 

Petras 83 

Petrole 27 

Petrone . 27 

Petronella 59 

Petrowski 61 

Petrus 27 

Pfhalx 124 

Pflster 35 

Philbin 26 

Phillips 38 

Pierandozzi 26 

Pijan 34, 127 

Pingstock 50, 185 

Pilar., 28, 34. 164 

Pius. Sr. M S3 

Pivovac 117 

Ploketka 27 

Plotz 35. 61, 127 

Pleiss 35. 120 

Podesta 120 

Podgorski 26. 102, 117 

Poklenkowski 117 

Pokornv 83, 99, 126 

Polach 63 

Polchopek 47 

Polinski 152 

Pollard 120 

Pollauf 50 

Poluszek 46 

Poniatowski 122 

Ponzio 26, 102 

Porcbe 84 

Poterek 61 

Potter 63 

Powers, Dr 18 

Powers, Gene 177 

Powers 26, 27, 84 

Prieb 47 

Prenddergast 42, 43 

Prim 148 

Priore 84 

Prokopovitz 84 

Prosses - 47 

Provideneia, Sr 59 

Puppendahl 35, 127 

Purcell 50 

Pyler 52 

Q 

Quiek 28 

Quigley, Mr. J 17 

Quilty 42 

yuinn, O. P.. Rev 21 

Quinn 28, 42 

R 

Raeette US 

Radell 46 

Rafferty 42 

Rago 52 

Raicbart 84. 134 

Rainey 38 

Rambow 47 

Rauiker 26 

Randall 60 

Raic 21 

Reardon 52 

Rechman 28 

Ke.l.lv 28 

Reed 84 

Reedy 28, 84 

Reedy, T 28, S4 

Reel 46 

Regan 123 

Reiebart 43 

Reid 43. 46 

Reidy 2.. 150 

Rempe -*G 

Reinke 63 

Renesch 84. 108 

Reykjalin 42 

Reynolds 63 

Ribal 39 

Bicca 60 

Rice 38 

Richards 53 

Richart 135 

Rickert 47 

Riddiford 63 

Rieck ±~ 

Ried 63 

Riedy 1M 



215 



Riley 133 

Riley 27 

Rinehart 42, 43 

Riordan ' 46 

Riordan 26, 108, 109 

Rivera 84, 134 

Rizzo 59, 84, 135 

Kohl. ins 84, 1 28 

Roberts .' 27 

Roberts, W 40 

Roberts 35 

Robinson 42 

Roberto 84 

Robles 84 

Rochm 121 

Rocks 28 

Rodino 84, 134, 135 

Rogers 58, tin 

Rohrbach 43 

Romano 28, 164 

Ronan 26, 50, 84 

Rooney 42, 84, ]71 

Rosanne 59 

Rose 61 

Rosenfelder 50, 173, 185 

Rossing 27, 103 

Roth 53 

Rottner 27, 28. 142 

Rowan , .' 52 

Reardon 52 

Rozetka 43 

Rowland 43 50 

Rubly ' 21 

Ruddy 26, 180, 1 83 

Ru^an j 2d 

Runtz 103 

Rupp 61 

Russamannn 34 

Rusin 84, 121 

Russell 28, 34, 84, 121^ 134 

Rux 150 

Ruzieha 21 

Ruxich 35 

Ryan 27, 42, 43, 46,' 84, 97 

131, 188, 190 

Rynne 35 

S 

Sach 117 

Sachs 141 

Safarik 43 

Salerno 84, ] 24, 1 25 

Salin '.....' 84 

Saltes 1 02 

Sanders 126 

Salvador 184 

Salvador, M 26, 184 

Salvatore .' 27 

Samp 4 

Sampson 01 

Santora 58 

Sarafolean 84 

Sarahan 28 

Satek 84, 103, 1 14 

Saten 171 

Saunders 40 

Saven 01 

Sayre 40, 84 

Sazma 84 

Scagnelli 34 

Scales 38 

Schaar 84 

Schaefer, C 104 

Schaeffer 26, 27 

Srharninchousen 43 

Scharpe 52 

Scharr 132 

S.liulz 99 

Sehaub 00 

Scheib 38, 126 

Schell, E 142 

Schell 26, 106, 111, 112 

Scheurich 37 

Schiavone 26, 106, 110, 111 

Schierhorn 6'» 

Schiffler . 01 

Schilling 58 

Schiltz hi 

Sehlottman ....26, 105,106, 115 

Schmeing 132 

Schraeing, G 1 03 

Schmidt 50, 55, 61, 127 

Schmidt, G 84 

Schmidt, W. 84 

Schmitt 50 

Schnoider 84 

Schober oi 

Schodor 50 

Schofield . .... 47 

Schatz 37 

Schramm . 27 

Schram, E 03 

Schreiner 37, 88, 99 

Schrodel 4 

Schroeder 02 

Schuchert 50, 1 73 

Schnefer 27 

Schultz 47. 1 in, 136 

Schultz, A 84 

Schultz, M 84 

Schultz, R 84 

Scliulzo 59 

Schumacher 84 

Schupmnnn . 35 

Schuyler 84 

Schweitzer 43 

Schwind 50 

Sclnvinn, R 63 

Scincea 28 

Scilliere 34 

Scofield 26, 160, 1 76 



Scagnelli 120 

Scott 87, 118 

Scully 26 

Scnpmann 120 

Seagrave 63 

Sebastian 87 

Sedlacek 63 

See 55, 37 

Semrad 25, 102 

Sentiere .' 27 

•^epsi 87 

Sexton 47 

Shaffery 61 

Shanahan 27, 42, 46, 118 

133, 188 

Shanley 50 

Sliaufflinessy 60 

Sliapiro 26 

Sheedy 62 

Sheahan 164 

Sheehan ....26, 27, 42 111 161 

Shelby .' 47 

Sheridan 31 

Shermak 59 

Shields 47 

Shiels, S. J 24 

Shitfehawa 87 127 

Shinnick 26 

Sinnoti 125, 134. 135 

Skopek 121 

Slvan 118 

Shorr 35 

Shuler 87 

Shuniek 87 

Shurpit 60 

Siegel 42 

Sieman 28 

Siemans 35, 124 

Sierners 28 

Sievert 42 

Si^nnrella 87 

Silver 43 

Silverman 87 

Simmons 46, 87 

Simonson 21 

Simpson 26 

Sinn 58 

Sinnon 28 

Sinnott 34, 38 

Sirimarco 26 

Sisson 26 

Sisson, B 155 

Sivan 46 

Siwek 26, 102 

Skeels 42, 43 

Skinner 42, 43 

Skradski 87 

Sladeok 47 

Slama 87 

Slattery 26, 104 

Slotkowski 26, 108 

Slotowski 102 

Small 50, 87 

Smid 87, 102 

Smillie 03 

Smith 27, 28, 35, 124, 171 

178, 179, 188 

Smullen 26, 103 

Smurdon 26, 106] 115 

Srnyka 35 

Smythe 42 

Snyder, R 118 

Snyder, C. A 118 

Sobers 35 

Sobotka 27 

Softcheck 28 

Solan 42 

Soltes 87 

Summers 50 

Sonnehorn 21 

Soriano 87 

Sossong ...87, 100, 101, 115. 188 

Sostarieh 59 

Soth 26 

Soners 124 

Sonrahdo 27 

Spndea 87 

Spanier 59 

Speaker 109 

Spellany 58 

Spiedel 21 

Spina 27 

Spadea 46 

Sprafka 52 

Spratt 87 

Sprieger 46 

Stajah 59 

Stander . 42 

Stanley ' 87 

Stannnrd 46 

Stanton 47, 148 

Steffens 28 

Stcggert, R 18 

Stegman 50, 87 

Steinmetz 47 

Stoll 87. 132 

Stephen 87 

Stcplyk 87 

Steml'er 59 

Rterhentz 47 

Sterling 62 

Stetson 3.8 

Stevenson, .T 63 

Steward, S. M 44 

Stewart 46, 47 

Slock 35 

Slradum 87 

Slniha 26 

Slralhm 52 

Slrasser 42 

Streil 43 

Strenk 43 



Stngl 100 

Strong 32 

Strubbe 28, 126, 133 

Sullivan 185 

Stulginskas 87 

Stun 63 

Stussi gs 

Such 40 

Sudrovech 60 

Suflka 27 

Sullivan 35, 46, 50, 57 

Suriano 27 

Sutkus 87 

Sutley 27 

Svaglic 87 

Swan 120 

Sweenie 28 

Sweeney 171 

Swirsky 128 

Swisky 87 

Szyper 61 

T 

Tadner 27 

Taglia 42. 43 

Tarns 46 

Tarpey 42 

Tatarowicz 122 

Tawler 27 

Tennyson 58 

Teonoria 58 

Teasdale 46 

Teresa 58 

Tesauro 127 

Teversen 62 

Tholen 28 

Thomas, J 87 

Thomas, S 87 

Thometz 28 

Thomson, S 32 

Thompson ...34, 87, 97, 125, 134 

Thoner 46 

Thornton 47 

Thurnw 47 

Tierney 53 

Tietz 27, 28, 48 

Tilges 87 

Tilka 27 

Timothv 6*' 

Tinnell 26 

Tobin 26, 87 

Tobolaki 117 

Tobolski 27 

Toomey 46 87 

Topp 34, 124, 125, 134, 136 

Toniaso 46 

Towle 34 

Tomurak 132 

Taner 47 

Tordella 103, 132, 171 

Tornello 35. 120 

Tortorello 28, 151 

Torsonian 34 

Tote 35 

Totge 40 

Towle 63 

Tragni 01 

Trahey 47 

Trapanese 27 

Traub 47 

Trein 28 

Trodahl 27 

Trombly 127 

Trowske 59 

Trudeau 132 

True 38 

Trumfro . , 34 

Trunk 88 

Trusky 50 

Turek 38 

Tulene 130 

Tully 38, 103 

Turk gs 

Turner 83 

Tursich 27 98 

Tweedy, W. R '32 

Twinting 21 

U 

t T her 00 

Ulane 125, 134, 136 

Ulane 34, 125, 136 

Usalis 120 

V 

Vaccard 83 

Yaco 27 

Valacli 34 

Valentine 38 

Yandenbrouke 62 

Vanikiotis 26, 102 

Vannueci 40 

Van Heule 27, 115 

Van Riemsdyh 47 

Vasquez . . .' 34. 134 

Vassolo 26 

Vaughan 47. 50. 62, 125 

Vaughn 124. 125 

Veatcli 46 

Verbeck 126 

Vidak 88 

Vidok 63 

Viglione 88 

Viletto 120 

Vitiello 30 

Vlcek 34 

Volkmanu 88 

Vonesh 123 



Von Gehr 
Vorbeck 
Voresek . . 
Voris . . . 



88 

88 



W 

Wagner 88 

Wa^ener 27 

Watch 133 

Walderbach 61 

Waldo 28 

Wall 63 

Wallace 26, 98, 109, 110 

111, 171 

Wallace 21. 97, 109, 110 

171, 179, 180 

Wallace 1 1 1 

Walker, B 188 

Walsh 28, 37, 38, 47, 50 

61, 88 

Walton 40 

Wajtawicz 47 

Warchol 26 

Wargin 43 

Warick 26 

Warth, S. J 18, 30 

Wasacz 26 

Waxielewski 28 

Waters 27 

Watson 28 

Watts 28, 38, 150 

Wauck 108 

Wawaroski 124 

Wawriske 35 

Weber 42, 43, 58 

Wedemeyer 63 

Weidmann 38 

Weisel 35 

Weinke 114 

Weinstein 34 

Weir 125 

"U'eise 63 

Weiss 34. 124 

Wellens 59 

Wellnow 97 

Weltin 50, 88 

Wenitrman 52 

Wenskus 26, 108, 142 

Wcnzel 50, 185 

Werelius 88, 134, 136 

Wermuth 34, 39 

Wertz 03 

Weske 61 

Weslowski 124 

West 62, 88, 114 

Westhonen 120 

Wetzler 121 

Whalen 21, 38 

Wheeler ...26. 100, 101, 116, 171 
White 26, 28, 46, 102, 115 

133, 169 

Whitmore 37 

Wichek 34, 121, 134 

Wichel 43 

Wickman 46 

Wienke 88, 131. 188 

Wilgen 47 

Wilhelm 67, 88, 97. 124 

Wilkins 52 

Williams 21, 50, 60, 173 

Willis 38, 59, 61, 126 

Wilson 14, 15, 25, 46, 61 

Wilson. A 141, 149 

Wilzbacher 50 

Windier 42, 43 

Winn 26 

Winters <> I 

Wise 31, 88, 119, 125 

130, 135 

Witnik 46 

Wittmeyer 46 

Wodniah 59 

Wolta 46 

Wojtowioz 122 

Woods 50, 185 

Worehol 115 

Wuerst 35, 127 

Wulzbaeher 88 

Wykowski 88 

Wynesen 88 



Tetter 

Y01111;; 



z 

Zabel, M 174 

Zalm 88 

Zaidenberg 88, 128 

Zaikis 35 

Zanin 60 

Zannini 8S, 103, 132 

Zodnok 27. 148 

Zelezinski 27, 1 1 7 

Zeller 43, 61 

Zemlicka 46 

Zess 38 

Zigerell 88 

Zimmerman 38, 4 1 

Zingione 31 

Zinn 46, 47 

Zitkowich 62 

Zizon 88 

Zmidgrowski 88, 122 

Zolfo 60 

Zwiefke 46 



216 



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