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Full text of "The Loyolan"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/loyolan1947unse 



^ 



THE 1947 



L oyolaH 

PRESENTED BY THE STUDENTS OF 
LOYOLA UNIVERSITY AS A RECORD 
OF THE YEAR'S ACHIEVEMENTS 




yB 






The Staff 

Clare C. Acton, Editor 
William J. Kilkenny, Managing Editor 

E. John Clark Paul F. Elward 

Stuart D. Corboy James F. Bourgeois 

Edward V. Donovan William A. Isaacson 

Robert J. Dempsey Frank McCabe 

Bernard J. Cunningham John Malone 

Francis X. Steggert Richard Quinn 

Raymond A. McDermott Robert Carroll 





Zkc Campus Beautiful 




OREWORD 



The forerunner of Loyola University, St. Ignatius College, was founded in 1870 on the 
West Side of Chicago. The school was faced with a problem common to every new 
institution of learning — the establishment of a cohesive unity in the student body and 
the foundation of a tradition for succeeding students to follow. The students themselves 
had to solve this problem, and they solved it admirably. It was then the task of succeeding 
Loyolans to nurture this unity and enrich this tradition during their years of study. As 
a result of this erForr on the patt of th^ 5tudeht b6dy, h6 ttue L6y(I)la graduate nas lett 
the school without benefiting from this spirit or contributing to it in some way. 

The diamond anniversary of Loyola University was 1945; the same year also saw the 
school entering into a new era. During the way years enrollment was abnormally low 
in many of the departments. Simultaneously, then, Loyola entered into its second 
seventy-five years and expanded its facilities to accommodate the great influx of students. 
This issue of the LOYOLAN records the accomplishments ot tne student body in the 
first full year of this new era. The task of today's Loyolan is comparable to that of the 
student of old St. Ignatius. It has been his duty to re-establish Loyola's unity and 
tradition in the face of a rapid expansion and further decentralization of campus life. 
How well he has succeeded in his task can be seen from the following pages. 



AT WORK 



AT PLAY 





E D IC 



This book is respectfully dedicdted to those 



Loyolans who gave their lives in the service of 
their country. 



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I T I O N 





Zke M^^ Whom We Monor 




Baker, Eugene L. 
Barthes, Frederick E. 
Beauregard, Joseph F. 
Benjamin, Lawrence 
Branman, George E. 
Broccolo, Frank J. 
Burke, John J. 
Burke, Raymond G. 
BuTTiMER, James M. 
Cahill, Joseph E. 
Carmody, John L. 
Chap, Norman R. 
Cherikos, Thomas G. 
Clarke, John J. 
Cleary, Michael D. 
Courtney, Henry A. 
Curran, Eugene L. 
Denny, John P. 
Drew, James F. 
Duffy, Stephen B. 
Faltysek, Edward J. 
Farrell, Warren J. 
Fedigan, James J. 
Gaffney, John C 



Grady, Edward J. 
Gresik, Herman E. 
Grimm, Robert W. 
Heaney, John J. 
Herthneck, Robert G. 
Huston, Richard J. 
Hyman, Abe A. 
Jagor, Thomas R. 
Johnson, Robert S. 
Kasper, Albert W. 
Kelly, John E. 
Kennedy, Joseph A. 
Kiely, George W. 
Kloss, George E. 
Krucks, Kenneth E. 
Lavin, Edward J. 
Leach, Edmund L. 
Murphy, Jerome J. 
Murray, James W. 
McAndrew, Harold J. 
McCoRD, Edwin L. 
McDonnell, Peter E. 
McKitrick, Thomas A. 
McNuLTY, James J. 



Neff, James G. 
Noesges, John C. 
O'Day, William E. 
O'Neill, Vincent M. 
O'Reilly. Edward 
Plahetka, Henry 
Purdy, Iohn ). 
Rall, Richard R. 
Reinert, Dean P. 
Roberts, H. William 
Shay, Thomas F. 
SiERKS, Richard J. 
Simpson, Robert F. 
Smith, Robert W. 
Spellman, William J 
Stevens, John E. 
Sweeney, Edward H. 
Terlecke, Rudolph 
■Vader, John J. 
Waldron, Robert C 
Walsh, William B. 
White, Ralph W. 
WiLCZEWSKi, Edward J 
Wiley. Frank W. 





Twm small begmlngs 




1870—1947 




Reverend Charles Truygens, S.J., and Reverend Arnold Damen, S.J., arrived in Chicago 
in 1857 to set up the first Jesuit parish in the city. Father Damen, who was to be the 
pastor, was severely criticized for selecting a site in the southwest section, far from 
where most of the homes were then located. Holy Family Church, hov, e. er, was erected 
at the corner of Eleventh and May as Father Damen wished. 

The devout priest burned with the desire to form a Jesuit college in what he knew 
was to be the leading city of the area. He received permission and was granted a charter 
in 1869. The building for St. Ignatius College was begun immediately. The doors 
were opened for the first time on September 5, 1870, before the building was even 
Snished. 

Thirty-seven men were enrolled in that first class. The college was an immediate 
success, however, and before the end of the first year the enrollment had swelled to 
ninety-nine. Sixty-one students were present at opening-day classes in 1871. On October 
8 of that year, the College almost suffered a tragedy. The Great Fire broke out just a few 
blocks north and east of St. Ignatius. Father Damen, now president of the college, was 
not on the grounds at the time, but arrived in time to see a sudden shift in the wind 
turn the flames toward the lake and river and away from the school. To this day seven 
vigil lights are kept burning in Holy Family Church as a token of gratitude to Our Lady 
of Perpetual Help for this seeming miracle. 

The first class was not graduated from the college until 1881. Of the two graduates 
one, Thomas Finn, became a priest; the other, Carter Harrison, is renowned as one of 
Chicago's greatest mayors. 




Through 



As the number of students increased, old St. Ignatius College began to make plans for 
expansion. In the earliest years of the present century work was begun on the Lake 
Shore Campus, which now houses the College of Arts and Sciences. In 1908 the 
Lincoln School of Law was founded by a group of alumni ; this school was soon accepted 
as an integral part of the College. In the following year, 1909, the Jesuit institution 
attained university status and became Loyola University. 

The University olfered its first extension courses in 1913. At first these studies were 
limited to the social sciences; but, as the demand and enrollment grew, the department 
was divided to form the present University College and School of Social Work. 

Loyola purchased Bennett College in 1915 and incorporated it as the Loyola University 
School of Medicine. 

The demand of business for trained men in the fields of accounting, economics, and 
finance led to the formation of the School of Commerce in 1924. 

Several departments had long been offering graduate studies which were to lead 
towards graduate degrees. These advanced academic studies were incorporated into the 
Graduate School in 1926. The school otfered its first opportunity for the doctoral degree 
in 1932. The Graduate School now offers masters' and doctors' degrees in most fields. 

Mr. Charles E. Ballard gave the famous resort hotel at 'West Baden Springs, Indiana, 
to the Society of Jesus in 1934. The building was to be used as a house of studies. The 
college now is the Jesuit school of philosophy and theology for the Chicago province. It 
operates under an affilation with Loyola University. 

Loyola has had affiliated with it several nursing schools in Chicago for many years; 
however, the curriculum in each school was vastly different. In 1935 a project was begun 
through the efforts of Sister Helen Jarrell and the Reverend Terence H. Ahern, S.J., 
to unify these schools under a single course of studies. This undertaking has met with 
great success. 



10 



iradual growth 



'>^i^^'\ 

^ ♦v";^ 





Ti> coHtempomry 



In keeping with the expansion program of the University, through the generosity of 
Frank J. Lewis, prominent Chicago manufacturer, Loyola obtained the use of Lewis 
Towers, at 820 North Michigan Avenue, for the downtown schools. In December of 
1945, Mr. Lewis donated to the University the first nine floors of this building. Classes 
were begun on the thirtieth of September of last year, with 721 students attending the 
day classes of the Commerce School. In addition to the School of Commerce, Lewis 
Towers contains the Graduate School, the School of Law, the School of Social Work, and 
the University College. All incoming freshmen to the pre-legal and bachelor of philosophy 
curricula are also in attendance at Lewis Towers. These changes in the shifting of B.S. 
(C), new pre-legal, and new Ph.B. students from the Lake Shore Campus were due to the 
forty per cent increase in registration. The total enrollment of Lewis Towers was, in 
September, approximately 2500. At the beginning of the second semester in February, 
the number of students was more than 3000. 

Reconversion of Lewis Towers from its wartime use in training naval officer candidates 
has recently been made complete. Offices for the Dean of Men, the Dean of Women, the 
Student Counsellor, the Public Relations Officer, and other administrative heads, have 
been established in this building. A student lounge provides the students a place for 
relaxation in ease between classes. A chapel, the libraries of the several schools and 
laboratories for science courses have also been added. 

In the future, Lewis Towers will continue to be, as it has been in the past year, an 
integral and important part of Loyola. 




cfcpansioH 



Vlitk bright plam for the 




future 




Already well on her way towards becoming the nation's outstanding Catholic university, 
Loyola has well defined plans which will establish this title for her in the very near future. 

Under the guidance of Reverend Laurence T. Lynch, S.J., the Student Union of 
Loyola University was reorganized in April of this year. The purpose of the Union is 
the unification of the various schools of the University so that they may function as a 
single body. The policy of the Union in social, athletic, and academic activities has been 
so formulated as to make the University as a whole able to look forward to greater 
progress and expansion through this unification. 

Soon to be completed is the magnificent Madonna Delia Strada Chapel, the work of 
Reverend James J. Mertz, S.J. The Chapel stands on the Lake Shore Campus, overlooking 
Lake Michigan. The neoclassical Romanesque design, done in white stone, harmonizes 
with that of the adjacent Elizabeth M. Cudahy Memorial Library, erected in 1930. 

Still in the future is the erection of a new Medical School building. The site of the 
old school is to be a part of a proposed medical center; and, therefore, although at the 
present time actual construction of Loyola's new building has not begun, definite plans 
have been laid that will bring it into reality within the next few years. 

In keeping with the defense measures of the nation, an ROTC unit is to be established 
at Loyola within the next year. By means of this program students will be able to obtain 
a commission in the Army Reserve upon completion of their college training. 



15 



Tke spirit of Jloyola 




Table of Contents 



BOOK ONE 

\AoyolaHS and their school 



BOOK TWO 

hoyolaHS and their organizations 



BOOK THREE 

iMoyola life 



BOOK FOUR 

hoyolans in action 



17 




19 



c 



OYOLANS AND THEIR SCHOOL 





The President 



Reverend James T. Hussey, S.J., became president of Loyola University on the thirteenth 
of September, 1945. The appointment came almost simultaneously with the end of the 
war, and so the new head was immediately faced with the problems of increased 
enrollment of men returning from the armed services. Father Hussey and his staff 
formulated the policy for expansion of classroom facilities and increased faculty 
appointments. 

In his drive for a greater Loyola Father Hussey has given much time and attention to 
the Loyola Foundation and the new endowment drive to obtain a twenty-four million 
lollar endowment by the time of the University's centenary celebration. 

During Father Hussey's short tenure of office University enrollment has swelled to 
an all-time high. Because of the generosity of Frank J. Lewis, the president was able 
to set up a new downtown campus and centralize University administrative work at 
Lewis Towers. 



21 



The President's Comeil 

A Catholic institution, necessarily operated by men trained and fitted primarily for 
educational and religious instruction, can very easily encounter serious financial or legal 
problems. This is due, largely, to the wide difference between the cultural training of 
the religious and the mundane operations of the financial world. It is imperative, there- 
fore, that laymen should be found who are capable of performing these duties with the 
ability so much needed for the successful operation of a large institution like Loyola 
University. 

Thus, civic leaders in legal, industrial, and financial circles were sought out and 
made members of the President's Council of the University. Though their work is 
accomplished without commensurate publicity, the duties which they carry out remain 
one of the most important tasks connected with the institution. 

On these pages are pictured most of the members of the Council. Those whose 
pictures are missing are the Honorable Martin H. Kennelly and Justice Philip L. 
Sullivan. 



JOHN F. CUNEO 

CHAIRMAN 



MATTHEW J. HICKEY 

SECRETARY 





22 



DAVID F. BREMNER 



AARON J. COLNON 



VALTER J. CUMMINGS 





EDWARD J. FARRELL 



PAUL V. GALVIN 



SAMUEL INSULL, JR. 



JOHN F. O'KEEFE 



WILLIAM B. TRAYNOR 




23 



Academic Council 

The purpose of the Academic Council is to achieve the unity of government necessary 
m running any university. It acts as the coordinating agency between the several agencies 
of the University. It was organized in 1928 under the presidency of Reverend Robert M. 
Kelley, S.J., and has since been functioning most successfully. The Council is composed 
of the President, all regents, deans, and assistant deans, and the general registrar of 
the University. 

The primary duty of the Council is to act as an advisory board to the president on 
educational policy of the University as a whole. The group also has the task of maintain- 
ing the high academic standards of the University. 



24 



UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION 

Reverend James T. Hussey, S.J., President of the Unhersity 



UNIVERSITY TRUSTEES 

Reverend Joseph M. Egan, S.J., Chairman of the Boai-J 
Reverend James T. Hussey, S.J. 
Reverend Michael I. English, S.J. 
I'i P'l Reverend William A. Finnegan, S.J. 
Reverend Nicholas H. Mann, S.J. 



UNIVERSITY COUNCIL OF DEANS AND REGENTS 

Reverend James T. Hussey, S.J., A.M., Chairinan 

William H. Conley, A.M., M.B.A., Ph.D., Dean, School of Commerce 

Reverend Stewart E. Dollard, S.J., Ph.D., S.T.L., Dean, Graduate School 

Howard E. Egan, Ph.D., Executive Secretary 

Reverend Michael I. English, S.J., A.M., S.T.L., Regent. School of Aiedicine 

Reverend William A. Finnegan, S.J., A.M., Dean. College of Arts and Sciences 

John C. Fitzgerald, A.B., LL.B., Dean. School of Law 

Reverend Ralph A. Gallagher, S.J., Ph.D., Regent. School of Social Work 

Thesle T. Job, Ph.D., Assistant Dean, School of Medicine 

Paul Kiniery, Ph.D., Assistant Dean. Graduate School 

Reverend Laurence J. Lynch, S.J., A.M., Dean of Men 

Reverend James V. McCummiskey, S.J., A.M., S.T.L., 

Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 

Robert W. McNulty, A.M., D.D.S., Dean. School of Dentistry 

Reverend John C. Malloy, S.J., A.M., Dean, University College 

Francis J. Rooney, A.M., LL.B., Assistant Dean. School of Law 

J. Raymond Sheriff, A.M., J.D., Assistant Dean, School of Commerce 

James J. Smith, M.D., Ph.D., Dean. School of Medicine 

Bertram J. Steggert, University Examiner of Credentials 

Lyman J. Templin, A.M., Registrar 

Reverend Richard E. Tischler, S.J., A.M., Dean of Freshmen 

Reverend Murel R. Vogel, S.J., Ph.D., S.T.L., Associate Dean. West BaJen College 

Reverend Robert J. Willmes, S.J., A.M., S.T.L., Regent. School of Dentistry 

Roman Haremski, Ph.D., Dean, School of Social Work 



25 



"Loyola ^omdatioH 

The Loyola Foundation was founded by the Alumni Association of Loyola University 
in 1943 to give graduates and former students of the University the opportunity to 
assist Loyola in carrying on the work of giving its students Catholic university training. 
The response to the first and subsequent calls for donations was immediate and most 
gratifying. 

The great majority of the good accomplished by the Loyola Foundation was made 
possible through small individual donations. The constant problem of higher education 
is "how to make ends meet." The thousands of Loyolans acting together have eased 
somewhat the financial worries of University ofiicials. 

Plans have already been drawn up for a campaign to secure for Loyola a substantial 
endowment, comparable to that enjoyed by many of the larger universities of the land. 
It is desired to complete this program in time for the University's centennial celebration. 
The drive for funds during the year 1947-1948 will attempt to set the Medical and 
Dental Schools on the soundest financial footing. 

Director of the Alumni Foundation is Rev. G. G. Grant, S.J., who also serves as 
director of the Alumni Association. Father Grant has been aided in his work by many 
of the loyal alumni of Loyola. Limitations in space prevent listing their names and 
contributions here. 

"There are many appeals of a deserving nature that come to the attention of the 
public. A university's needs will not impress the majority of Americans. But you who 
have received the benefits of a college education are the ones on whom universities like 
Loyola must count for the gifts that mean the difference between success and mediocrity 
in their work." "With these words Father Grant has directed his appeal to all alumni 
of Loyola University. 



Alumni Associatm 



Closely associated with the Loyola 
Foundation is the Alumni Associa- 
tion. Father Grant, director of the 
Foundation, is also the director ot 
the Association. 

The purpose of the Alumni As- 
sociation is to keep the graduates 
of the University in contact with 
the ideals and teachings which are 
an integral part of Loyola. Groups 
from the Medical and Dental 
schools have been especially active, 
organizing in various sections of the 
country in order to further the pro- 
fessional ethics connected with their 
work. 

During the war years the Asso- 
ciation printed the Loyola Alumnus, 
informing the "old grads' as to the 
whereabouts of their former class- 
mates. This publication, the only of 
Loyola's to function during the war, 
was one of the most welcome items 
at many a mail call. 

As the University has progressed 
since August of 1945, so has the 
Association become increasingly ac- 
tive in its participation in the affairs 
of Loyola. 



ALUMNI IN THE MAKING 





Rev. Stewart E. Dollard, SJ. 

De^m of the Gr^iiuate School 



Qraduate School 

On August 15, 1946, Rev. Stewart E. Dollard, S.J., became Dean of the Graduate School. 
He was the fourth Dean to hold that office. In 1926, when the Graduate School was 
organized, Rev. Austin G. Schmidt was appointed its first Dean. After several years 
spent in administering the affairs of the Graduate School, Father Schmidt relinquished 
the position to Rev. Samuel K. Wilson, S.J. When Father Wilson became the President 
of Loyola University in 1933, Rev. Francis J. Gerst, S.J., was appointed Dean of the 
Graduate School. He held this office until succeeded by Father Dollard. 

During the administrations of the various Deans, substantially the same objectives 
were kept in mind. From its beginning the Graduate School has sought to give its 
students a thorough training in some special field of knowledge, and at the same time it 
has attempted to make them proficient in the methods of research and in the presentation 
of results. The primary objective of the Graduate School is naturally the same as that 
of the University as a whole: to integrate scientific, literary, and cultural training with 
a sound philosophy of life based on Catholic principles of right thinking and right living. 

During the period of the war, leaves of absence were granted to many of the members 
of the faculty. The result was the curtailment of some of the activities of the Graduate 
School. Since the war has been over, every effort has been made to offer graduate 
instruction in as many departments as possible. At the present time the following 
degrees are being conferred : Master of Education, Master of Arts, and Master of Arts 
(Honors). Preparation for the Doctor of Philosophy degree is possible in classics, 
English, history, philosophy, and psychology. The degree of Master of Arts (Honors) 
may be secured in the fields of classics and philosophy. The Master of Arts degree may 
be secured upon the completion of advanced work in the fields of classics, education, 
English, history, mathematics, modern language, philosophy, and psychology. Jurisdiction 
over all academic work of a graduate nature is in the hands of the Dean of the Graduate 



28 



School, who in turn is aided by the Graduate Senate, the members of which are 
appointed by the President of the University. 

West Baden College is academically a unit of Loyola University. Its students are 
engaged in graduate studies in philosophy and theology in preparation for the ordination 
to the priesthood of the Society of Jesus. Other branches of education are not neglected, 
and studies in biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics give the necessary scientific 
background for the philosophical studies. Most of the young Jesuits have already 
obtained the Bachelor of Arts degree from Loyola University and are enrolled in the 
Graduate School. Special courses are also oifered in English, history, the classics, speech, 
and education. 



Row one — M. Hahn, B. Harrington, Sister Helen 
Angela, Dr. Paul Kiniery, Sister M. Rayneria, J. 
Harmon, A. Finan. 

Row two — R. CuUen, J. Donegan, G. Mulhern, 
G. Lynch, L. Wilson, M. Lichenwalter, B. Amar, 
M. Fatz, D. VanBramer, A. Green. 



Seated — Mr. Joseph A. Sommer, S.J., Mr. Louis 
A. Kaluzsa, S.J., Rev. Robert A. Pollauf, S.J., 
Rev. Edward J. Hodous, S.J., Mr. Paul V. Sieg- 
fried, S.J., Mr. Leo J. Martin, S.J., Mr. Robert G. 
Lisica, S.J. 

Standing — Mr. Joseph F. Small, S.J., Mr. A. 
Jerome Clifford, S.J., Mr. John H. Williams, S.J. 




29 



S ckool of M^dicim 

The Loyola University School of Medicine became an integral part of Loyola University 
in 1915 upon the purchase by the University of Bennett College. In 1917 the Chicago 
College of Medicine and Surgery was also purchased by the University. This association 
gave Loyola better facilities and a desirable site in the midst of Chicago's West Side 
medical center. 

At the present time the fundamental or preclinic studies are conducted in the labora- 
tory building at 706 South Wolcott Avenue. This four-story building houses the medical 
library, laboratories, and the offices of administration. More advanced studies are con- 
ducted at Mercy Hospital, Cook County Hospital, and other public and affiliated hospitals. 
The teaching at Mercy Hospital is under direct control of a closed medical staff, all 
members of the faculty of the Loyola University School of Medicine. In the affiliated 
institutions teaching is under the supervision of staff members who are members of the 
Medical School faculty. 

Dr. James J. Smith was appointed dean of the School of Medicine last fall. Dr. Smith 
succeeds Dr. Italo F. Volini. who was acting dean during the war years. A new regent, 
Rev. Michael I. English, S.j., was appointed a few months later to succeed Rev. Edward 
F. Maher, S.J. 

Dr. Smith, a graduate of St. Louis University, also received his M.D. degree at the 



IN THE WORKSHOP . 



IN THE WORLD 





Dr. James J. Smith 
Dean of the School of Medicine 



Rev. Michael I. English, S.J. 
Regent of the School of Medicine 



St. Louis University School of Medicine. After an internship at Ancker Hospital in St. 
Paul, Dr. Smith came to Northwestern University, where he obtained a Master of Science 
degree in pathology in 1939 and a Ph.D. in physiology in 19-il. Dr. Smith then entered 
the army and spent five years in service in both the United States and Europe. As a 
lieutenant colonel in the air corps, he was attached to the Eighth Air Force Central 
Medical Establishment, serving as both Commanding Officer and" Director of Physiology. 
Dr. Smith has also been assistant professor in the Department of Physiology at North- 
western and an assistant in clinical pathology at the University of Illinois. 

Father English was a member of the Department of Philosophy at John Carroll 
University in 1939 and 1940. After a year's graduate work at Northwestern University, 
Father English entered the army and spent five years as a chaplain. Two and a half 
years of this service were spent in the European Theater of Operations with the 34th 
Infantry Division and the 94th Evacuation Hospital. After his release from active military 
service. Father English came to Loyola as regent of the Medical School. 

In keeping with future plans for advancement, the School of Medicine this year 
enlarged its administrative body with the appointment of two assistant deans. Dr. Thesle 
T. Job was appointed assistant dean in charge of pre-clinic affairs. Dr. Job, a graduate 
of Simpson College, took his M.S. and Ph.D. at the University of Iowa. The assistant 
dean of clinical affairs, Dr. Charles J. Thill, is a graduate of the University of Dayton. 
He received his medical degree at the University of Michigan and interned at the St. 
Louis University Hospital. 



31 




MEDICAL SCHOOL STUDENT COUNCIL 

Roic one — R. Nenno, J. R. McCarthy, E. Anderson, J. Edler, M. Lyons. 

Roll- two — J. Colavincenzo, J. Doran, R. Wear, A. Diipee, J. Reidy, D. Fahrenbach. 



Medical School Undergraduates 

When William Harvey of England, the discoverer of the circulation of the blood, entered 
the medical school of the University of Padua in Venice as a freshman in 1598, the 
academic year began on October 18 with the celebration of Mass in honor of St. Luke. 
Since St. Luke is central in the traditions and practice of medicine, it was no mere 
chronological accident that the school year opened on his feast day. 

This year the Medical School Council revived this ancient custom. In keeping with 
tradition, the day started with Mass and Communion for the faculty and students. This 
was followed by the autumn convocation and the awarding of preclinical honors to the 
qualified students. An open house for the faculty and students at the Phi Beta Pi 
fraternity house and a faculty-student golf tournament at the Butterfield Country Club 
marked the informal activities of the afternoon. The climax of the celebration came in the 
evening with a faculty-student banquet at the Furniture Club. Imitations of various 
faculty members staged by a group of students and several musical selections kept the 
audience well entertained after the dinner. Present plans call for establishment of this 
St. Luke's Day celebration as an annual affair at Loyola. 

The senior convocation, at which the members of the honorary fraternities receive 
certificates, is another time when the entire student body and the faculty members meet 
for a formal ceremony. The honorary societies — the Volini Medical Society, the 
Moorhead Surgical Society and the Lambda Rho Radiological Society — have a yearly 
program which includes papers and talks on various medical topics by the student 
members and guest speakers prominent in many fields of medicine. These organizations 
have also sponsored several round-table or forum discussions at which prominent 
physicians were brought together to discuss the aspects of particular medical problems. 
These forum discussions were open to all members of the student body and their guests. 



32 



Medical School activities are not without purely social events to balance the calendar, 
however. Both major fraternities hold several dances and parties throughout the year! 
These parties are usually open to the entire student body. An annual Student Council 
"Loan Fund" dance, established at the school a few years ago, is held once each year 
for the purpose of raising a fund from which students who are financially unable to 
continue their work may draw. This year the Council also sponsored a dance in order 
to provide money to furnish the new student lounge. 

A scholastic innovation this year was the panel discussion used for the seniors' medical 
ethics classes. The chairman of this panel. Rev. Robert J. Willmes, S.J., acted as leader 
of the discussion each week. He was assisted by ten other panel members, who were 
usually practicing physicians with experience in the particular subject under' discussion 
In this way the students were taught not only the ethical principles, but also the manner 
in which to handle the particular applications. 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



706 S. Wolcott Ave. 




Medical 



Row one — J. R. Green, S. Wallace, G. 
Haniger, E. H. Anderson, W. Nordin, 
C. Austin, F. Hirsch. 

Roiv two — R. Bernal, J. Doran, H. 
Bilder, T. Ingarra, A. Mendel, R. Yates, 
W. J. Donnelly, A. Dupee. R. Gian- 
nattasio, F. Nordstrom, J. Dodsworth. 

Row three— K. J. Schmitt, G. Peiffer, J. 
Foy, R. Schulfer, A. Vana, R. Smitley, 
E. Jimenez, P. Cella, L. Gourash. 



Row one — R. Purcell, J. Murphy, R. 
Shapiro, A. McSweeny, C. Peterson, B. 
Winne, F. VanZandt. 

Row two — W. Glover, N. Kozokoflf, A. 
Cook, W, Barbee, R. Goodman, R. Bor- 
ris, F. Roach, M. Hagedorn, R. Wear, 
R. Grattan, A. Geordan. 

Row three — E. Gleser, W. Long, R. 
Rourke, J. Powers, J. Pilliod, M. Hen- 
derson, G. Diamond, L. Goldberg, P. 
McGrath. 



Row one — E. Cayia, T. Ulrich, P. Kear- 
ney, G. Marrae, C. O'Reilly, R. Stankey, 
R. Woods. 

Row two — R. Palombi, J. Waitkunas, R. 
Baxter, H. Freeman, W. J. Conroy, I. 
Neville, M. Guinan, L. Raymond, J. 
Glaser. 

Row three— W. Long, E. Wygant, M. L. 
McGrath, M. A. Miller, J, Reidy, T. 
Flynn, H. Pilaszewski, R. Giusti, E. R. 
Lee, D. Fahrenbach. 



Row one—W. Cryns, R. Shank, F. 
O'Connell, N. Gulyassy, R. Tentler. 

Row two— J. Schuler, S. Blair, J. Mc- 
Carthy, P. Tucker, E. Bertagnolli, G. 
Weber, J. A. Bowman. 

Row three — R. Brown, R. Moses, M. 
Lyons, J. Cassidy, R. Foley, R. Stoy, H. 
Kalsch. 




34 




School 



Rou' one — W. Bayham, J. E. Murphy, 
E. Nora, A. Sampoliwski, H. Niekamp. 

Roiv two — G. Andriole, R. Navarre, A. 
Rodriguez, M. Kralicka, R. C. Romano, 
A. Puglisi, H. Weiss, B. Perdziak. 

Row three — D. Cirincione, A. Ribisi, A. 
LeBeau, R. Baker, J. Leshock, R. E. 
Rourke, J. Tafaro, J. Goralka. 



Row one — F. Keville, J. Bimmerle, F. 
Litwin, J. Viboch, J. Breadon, D. O'Sul- 
livan, L. Goedert. 

Roiv lu'o — ^J. Caserta, E. Hoenig, J. 
Onorato, J. Allen, R. Adler, J. Edler, A. 
Barraco, K. McKendry, G. Swiderek, 
R. Dougherty. 

Roif three — S. Certo, B. Bereczky, R. 
Kircher, R. Walsh, L. Davksa, R. Eades, 
M. DiGilio, N. Scatunno, M. Kioebge, 
D. Woerther, D. Lulinski, R. Tarsitano. 



Row one — S. Erd, J Edwards, P. Ro- 
mano, R. Cronin, T. Egan, F. Igini, A. 
Grant. 

Roiv two — G. Nora, E. Nielsen, M. 
Scala, J. Miranti, H, Lee, J. Fahey, T. 
Kidwell, E. Dolazinski, R. Halpin, G. 

Kampner. 

Row three — E. Leopardi, R. Vega-Lara- 
cuente, J. McKenna, J. Morales, J. Kane, 
H. Prunier, J. Feeney, E. DeGiorgio, 
H. Hartleb. 



Row one — J. Sharpe, N. Ruzic, J. Sciar- 
rillo, L. Weinstein, E. Strull, W. Smith, 
M. Fredericks. 

Row two — F. Spadafore, G. Siemers, J. 
Sofranec, D. Romeo, J. Solovy, P. Sheri- 
dan, M. Timlin, A. Sheetz, J. Pelletier. 

Row three — A. Perkins, W. Thompson, 
I. Pesek, Shalowitz, L. Rodriguez, R. 
Topogna, C. Vast, G. Tolentino. 



35 




John C. Fitzgerald 

Dean of the School of Law 



School of £atv 



The School of Law resumed classes September 16, 1946, on the ninth floor of the Lewis 
Towers building. After Pearl Harbor new students were not admitted to the School of 
Law, but classes were continued for those then enrolled until 1944. When classes were 
resumed 192 students, including 186 veterans, were enrolled. Of the students 85 had 
received at least part of their pre-legal work at Loyola University and 107 had attended 
some 49 other colleges and universities. With two exceptions the pre-war faculty is intact. 
Mr. Sherman Steele died during the war and Professor James A. Howell decided to 
continue to practice law and not to return to the faculty. 

Mr. Francis J. Rooney, originally appointed in 1924, served as Acting Dean during 
the war and has now resumed his status of Assistant Dean. Dean John C. Fitzgerald, 
appointed to the faculty in 1928, has returned, having been Chairman of the Vested 
Property Claims Committee in the Office of Alien Property Custodian. Mr. John J. 
Waldron has also returned to the faculty; he had been associated since 1942 with Pam, 
Hurd & Reichmann of Chicago. Mr. John C. Hayes has returned after four years of 
service with the Army Air Forces and a brief period with the Office of Alien Property 
Custodian in Washington, D. C. Mr. William J. Lamey was appointed last summer to 
the full-time faculty after a varied legal experience in the fields of insurance, corporation 
and labor law. Mr. Lamey served for two years with the Army Ground Forces in both 
America and Europe. The faculty appointed Mr. Lamey as Director of the school's Moot 
Court program. He plans to expand this program considerably so that it will become a 
major activity in the academic lives of the law students. 

Since 177 of the present students are first-year men, the complete faculty will not be 
in full operation during the present year. Mr. John A. Zvetina, Mr. Edmund A. Stephan, 
and Mr. Otto F. Reis are, however, presently active. Mr. Zvetina is now teaching courses 
in Evidence and Constitutional Law in the Day Division. Mr. Stephan lectures in the 
Day Division on Federal Jurisdiction and Procedure. Mr. Reis, for some eighteen years 
on the law faculties of Creighton and Marquette Universities and now on the editorial 
staff of Callaghan & Company, conducts a course in Persons in the Day Division. Mr. 
Joseph F. Elward, Judge John V. McCormick, and Mr. Edward A. Ribal of the pre-law 
faculty have promised to take up their teaching duties again as the present classes advance. 



36 




Sven'mg Zaw 



Row one — Kupris, Juettner, Vonesh, 
Motz, W. H. Smith, Towles, Waite, 
Krause, Proesel. 

Row two — Chaderton, Johnson, Kolb, 
Bovie, Wallace, Durkin, Kelly, Macrae, 
Devine, Wren. 

Row three — Glowienke, Fait, Shanahan, 
Huffman, Casey, Kay, Nickow, Palermo, 
Walker, Ford, Malinosky. 



Roif one — Rogers, Kiesling, Stodder, 
Murray, McGarr, Ryan, Birchard. 

Row two — Hladis, Reed, McNamara, 
Apcel, E. Smith, Keenan, Doyle, Keevers. 

Row three — Williams, Fegen, Cornell, 
Nelson, Dick, Christie, Cullen, Gavin, 
Michiels. 



The Student Bar Association — the student governing body of the School of Law — was 
reactivated in January 1947. The following were elected officers; President, James F. 
Mulvaney; Vice President, Francis J. McGarr; Secretary, Philip D. Corboy ; and Treasurer, 
Miss Paulyne J. Dick. The officers and the Board of Managers appointed the following 
committees: Committee on Library, Mr. Robert B. Kramer, Mr. Caleb H. Canby, and 
Miss Dick; Committee on Student Entertainment, Mr. Robert Immel, Miss Marjorie 
Kellogg, and Mr. Gahan Haskins; Committee on Moot Court Competition, Mr. James 
Walden, Mr. McGarr, and Mr. L Earl Arkiss; Committee on Student Publications, Mr. 
Corboy, Mr. Philip Hill, and Mr. Richard Henslee. 

For the time being the school is operating on a two-year pre-legal basis and offering 
the opportunity of graduating from the Day Division in approximately two calendar 
years. Except for this change the school is on substantially a peacetime basis. 



37 



DAY 



Row one — Flynn, Ryan, Immel, Burke, 
Keleher, Haskins, Canby. 

Row two — Martin, Fielding, Hines, Car- 
roll, Doucette, Gearon, Hayes, Hanley. 

Row three — Armstrong, Holloway, Hor- 
ton, Buonfede, Cinnerblatt, Condon, Kay, 
Bleser, DufEcy. 



Row one — Devane, Flood, Hill, Fonner, 
Coluzzi, Cavanaugh, Cooney, Corboy, 
Lane. 

Rou' two — Bertling, French, Bulger, 
Frogli, Berent, Karmel, Johnson, Dever, 
Benz, Cummings. 




38 




LAW 



Row one — Mulvaney, Poile, Michael, 
Loftus, Meerman, McCann, Ryan, Scharf, 
McAuliffe. 

Row two — McGrath, Gudgeon, Wier- 
cioch, O'Flaherty, Schmidt, Otto, Paluch, 
Riley, W. J. Schmidt, Pappas, McMana- 
mon. 

Roxv three — Pilawski, Wolfe, Larson, 
Wallace, Royal, Schroeder, Ostler, E. 
Ring, Monaghan, Tremko, Walden. 



Row one — McGovern, McGah, Soft- 
check, Swanson, Udoni, PistiUi, Wayd. 

Roiu tivo — Camasto, J. Williams, R. 
Rmg, Strunck, Quirk, McCambridge, 
Mackey, Storer, Tighe, Scruton, Stodola. 



Row one — Dee, Arkiss, Kramer, Kel- 
logg, Moran, Gushing, Shirey. 

Row two — Janik, Deright, Henslee, Cur- 
ran, Webber, Larson, Wrenn, Murray. 



39 




Dr. Robert W. McNulty 
Dean of the School oj Dentistry 



School of Dentistry 

Sixty-four years ago the Chicago College of Dental Surgery opened its doors to its first 
freshman class. Then known as the Chicago Dental Infirmary, it was located at 22-24 
Adams Street. Changing its name to the Chicago College of Dental Surgery, the College 
also changed its location to the corner of Madison and Wabash. Five years later, necessary 
larger quarters were obtained at Michigan and Randolph. In 1893 the first section of the 
present school building at 1757 Harrison Street was erected. With additional construction 
work being done on the building from time to time, the college was finally completed. 

Since the first commencement program in 1884, when two men were graduated from 
the College, almost 7000 dentists have received the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery 
from this professional school. From 1889 to 1903 the College was affiliated with Lake 
Forest University, and from 1905 to 1918 with Valparaiso University. In 1924 it became 
the Dental College of Loyola University. The Dental School has the full approval of the 
Council of Dental Education of the American Dental Association. 

The colorful history of this professional school claims many "firsts" in its annals. It 
was the first among dental schools to maintain bacteriological equipment, the first to give 
its students definite technic courses since 1888, and the first to offer instruction for 
practicing members of the dental profession since 1889. 

The College has offered to its students, through the years, the best in dental education. 
Between September of 1943 and December of 19-i5, the student body was comprised 
almost entirely of army (ASTP) and navy (V-12) trainees. With the discontinuance of 
these programs, the majority of the men in uniform elected to continue their studies 
at Loyola. At the present time the number of veterans enrolled is one hundred and 
thirty, more than one-half of the total enrollment. 



40 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 
1757 Harrison Street 




Many prominent men in the field of dentistry have been and still are associated with 
the Loyola School of Dentistry. Men who have carved their niche in the dentistry Hall 
of Fame include professors of past years: Doctors Truman W. Brophy, C. N. Johnson, 
W. H. G. Logan, G. V. Black, Ludwig Hektoen, H. J. Goslee, Nicholas Senn, and J. P. 
Buckley. Today's roster of faculty members, who have made valuable contributions not 
only to the University but also to their profession, include Doctors R. E. MacBoyle, 
P. G. Puterbaugh, E. D. Coolidge, E. C. Pendleton, and Warren Willman. The present 
faculty is under the direction of Dr. Robert W. McNulty, Dean, who is one of today's 
outstanding educators in the dental profession. The representative of the University is 
Rev. Robert J. 'Willmes, S.J., Regent. He has kept the finger of his wise and careful 
direction upon the pulse of all the activities of the School. Faculty members and 
graduates of the School have written numerous books and articles for dental publications 
and have held high offices in national, state, and local dental societies. These members 
of the faculty have done much to add to the stature of the School of Dentistry of 
Loyola University. 




The Dents give close-order 
drill a new meaning. 



41 



Through the years the building itself has kept in step with the trend of the day in 
decoration and equipment. The first two floors house the dental clinic, while the rest of 
the building provides lecture rooms, laboratories, research facilities, and offices. As is 
the case in the large majority of schools of the university, the School of Dentistry is 
sorely in need of larger quarters to meet with the increased demand for facilities. 

The College prides itself upon a vibrant Alumni Association. Its publication. The Bur, 
helps the graduates maintain ties with their Alma Mater. "Homecoming," which is held 
annually, provides the opportunity for graduates to return to their old haunts for two 
days in which they are given lectures and clinics pertinent to topics of current interests 
to the dental profession. In addition to rousing reminiscences of former days, "Homecom- 
ing" does much to sharpen sometimes worn-dull edges of a dentist's skill and introduces 
graduates to new and up-to-date methods. 



42 



In the words of Dr. C. N. Johnson, "Any institution that serves a growing profession 
steadily for . . . over . . . half a century in the capacity of training students for the 
fundamentals of their life work, and during all this time ministers to the advanced 
learning of the profession through the latest available knowledge in a very wide cur- 
riculum of professional studies, must at once command the respect of the whole 
profession as well as the community in which the institution is located." 

As a Catholic Dental School, the School of Dentistry of Loyola University strives to 
prepare the student so that he may be competent to begin in the general practice of 
dentistry as a health service and to continue his self education: and to educate the student 
in an appreciation of social, moral, and spiritual values in life. 



43 



School of 



Roir one — P. Goaz, T. Gorman, T. Gish, 
R. Bardis, N. Choukas, P. Aceuedo, P. 
Hodierne, R. Baker. 

Roir two — L. Cain, P. Fook, }. Cullen, 
R. Castrillo, R. Crouch, D. FJeagle, N. 
Brescia, R. Gerhard, R. De Salvo, P. Di 
Francesca, K. Fujii, L. Axehad. 

Row three — C. Anderson, W. Fanizzo, 
J. Goodrich, R. Clark, J, Gowgiel, H. 
be Decker, H. Gilbert, 'E. Doman, W. 
Hoover, N. Baker, L. Castagna, G. 
Fadul. 



Roll' one — E. Nieusma, J. McGrath, J. 
Mitchell. J. Hoppers, B. Powers, J. Phil- 
lips, E. Nadeau, B. Pawlowski. 

Roll' two — S. Pisarski, A. Pang, D. 
Kidd, J. Miller, J. Howaniec, E. Ka- 
pustka, F. Klepacki, R. Keating, J. 
O'Connell, C. Padgett, G. Padovani. 

Row three — L. Kosinski, L. PiniUa, S. 
Japan, C. Lauder, H. Pachowicz, S. Li 
Vacarri, E. Ostertal, J. Park, H. Oniori, 
D. O'Connell, T. Ogawa, C. Pacsani. 



Row one — P. Traubert, A. Pronobis, G. 
Schmitt, F. Shroeder. R. Ruetz. R. Per- 
low, A. Smith, J. Roling. 

Row tiro — J. Wegrzyn, E. Tanaka, R. 
Streitz, W. Riley, A. Wagner, H. Strom, 
R. Terese, R. Walker, L. Stigliani, E. 
Silko, T. Sieckowski, M. Smulson, S. 
Veuntcn. D. Silberberg. 

Ron- three — J. Trowbridge, R. Van 
Dyke, A. Siepker, M. Steinberg, A. 
Van Noord, P. Schultz, H. Syzek, L. 
Schwartz, R. Steinkenip. M. White, C. 
Thompson, J. Romano. 




44 





Row one — L. Riggs, J. Voss, J. Moran, 
C. Smyk, D. Warrick, F. Fyk, F. 
Schwartz. 

Row two—^. Smith, B. Schwartz, M. 
Lifschutz, M. Susina, E. Machowski, C. 
Wiik, S. Wawroski, A. Spiro, C. Martin, 
J. Rybak. 

Row three — C. Norris, F. ParriUi, R. 
Lambrecht, C. Lewendowski, L. Roth, 
F. Panico, J. Wawro, R. Perez, G. Mat- 
sumoto. 



Roiv one — J. Churan, A. Kagan, J. East- 
man, J. Krivanek, H. Harvey, J. Alden- 
difer, R. Knochel. 

Row two — A. Frankel, D. Clark, M. 
Hayden, E. Drozdziewicz, G. Cerullo, 
L. Angelopoulos, R. Kelly, S. Krol. 

Row three — W. Foust, H. Eisenberg, B. 
Andriacchi, C. Harmon, J. Ferris, E. 
Colson, J. Esposito, R. Chabot, G. 
Bravo. 



Row one — E. Siarkiewicz, H. Weinfield, 
R. Tiersky, C. Randall, R. Bardis, J. 
Avery, C. Heinzmann. 

Row two — A. RIskin, K. Vesledahl, D, 
Englund, W. Lutton. G. Kuehner, R. 
Mitchenek, T. Hall, P. Gazarek. 

Row three — R. Stamm, H. Lyn, M, Car- 
now, C. Carpenter. D. Knoedler, P. 
D,ilin, D. Chastek, R. Rux. 



45 



School of 




Row one — D. Catrambone, R. Carroll, 
E. Pacocha, J. Thometz, H. Lyn, J. 
Churan, C. Smyk, F. Schwartz. 

Row tuo — P. Gazarek, R. Stamm, J. 
Toth, B. Andriacchi, W. Frett, J. Nico- 
letti, J. Rybak, R. Rux, G. Matsumoto. 

Kow three — E. Siarkiewicz, J. GrifSn, G. 
Bravo, C. Heinzmann, C. Randall, R. 
Chabot, E. Machowski, D. Chastek, G. 
Cerullo. 



Row one — H. Syzek, T. Gorman, R. 
Clark, H. Lyn, B. Pawlowski, T. Gish, 
R. Terese, J. Roling. 

Row two — J. Romano, J. Wegrzyn, G. 
Schmitt, D. O'Connell, F. Schroeder, E. 
Ostertag, J. O'Connell, E. Silko, T. 
Siekowski, R. De Salvo, R. Keating, L. 
Kosinski. 

Row three — R. Streitz, J. Howaniac, W. 
Riley, F. Klepacki, A. Pronobis, P. 
Schultz, E. Kapustka, H. De Decker, S. 
Li Vaccari, J. White, B. Powers, N. 
Brescia, C. Paesani. 




46 




% chool of Social Work 

The School of Social Work was founded in 1914, when Rev. Frederick Siedenburg, SJ., 
on his return from completing graduate work in Europe, laid the foundations for the 
Department of Practical Sociology. From a rather humble beginning, as the first Catholic 
school of its kind in this country, the School has developed into one of the largest of the 
forty-six professional schools accredited by the American Association of Schools of 
Social Work. 

The curriculum, organized on a graduate level, seeks to equip the student with the 
scientific knowledge, professional Catholic philosophy, and practical skills which enter 
into the effective performance of social work in the welfare agencies of recognized high 
standing. As a Catholic institution, the School bases its educational program on Catholic 
principles and particularly on the objectives and ideals of the social teachings of the 
Church. 

The School, with the Rev. Ralph Gallagher, S.J., as Regent, and Dr. Roman Haremski 
as Dean, together with an able faculty, has continued to instruct and guide social workers, 
who, motivated by a love for Christ and mankind, will participate actively in the move- 
ment to make this a better world. 

In 1941, there was opened an Institute of Social Administration to train men and 
women in the specific fields of labor and industrial relations, personnel management, 
public administration, and sociology. This Institute is under the direction of the School 
of Social Work. Father Gallagher is its director and Mr. Marciniak is his assistant. A 
faculty of outstanding men in the various departments of the Institute conduct the 
courses. 



Dr. Roman Haremski 

Dean oj the School of Social Work 




Rev. Ralph Gallagher, S.J., Regent, 
addresses a class of police officers. 



A7 



C ollege of Ms dud Sciences 

The Lake Shore Campus comprises the College of Arts and Sciences. During the past 
year the enrollment was the highest in the history of the school. Courses were offered to 
lead to Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Philosophy degrees. 
Medical and Dental students also take their pre-professional training at this campus. 

The facilities include new Madonna Delia Strada Chapel, the Elizabeth M. Cudahy 
Memorial Library, the Alumni Gymnasium, and the athletic and recreation fields, in 
addition to the class buildings. 

An extensive intra-mural program was reinstated for the first time since the war 
interrupted the school's operations. The sweepstakes for the year were won by the team 
representing Pi Alpha Lambda, Arts social fraternity. Besides the team tournaments, in 
football, basketball, softball, cross-country, and relays, individual tournaments were 
held in such events as table tennis, golf, swimming, pocket billiards, and handball. 

The school's social program for the year got under way at the Freshman 'Welcome 
Dance, held in the fall at the Stevens Hotel. The dance schedule throughout the year 
was filled with events sponsored by the campus' various fraternities and clubs. The 
climax of the calendar was once again the all-University Senior Ball, held this spring 
at the Congress Hotel. 




Rkv. 'William A. Finnegan, S. J. 

Dean o/ the College of Arts and Sciences 



Rev. James V. McCummiskey, S.J. 

Assistant Dean 



48 




Amending the Constitution 



Posed BY and AS students 



Some of the outstanding organizations and study groups that meet at the Lake Shore 
Campus are listed on succeeding pages of this book. There would not be room to cover 
them adequately here. But it should be mentioned that most of these organizations are 
of an academic or scholarly nature. The accent is on studies on the Lake Shore Campus, 
just as it is throughout the University. The extra-curricular program is designed to make 
a well-rounded college program. 

Rev. William A. Finnegan, S.J., has completed over fifteen years in the dean's office. 
His vast experience in college administrative work and his intimate knowledge of the 
workings of Loyola University through the thick and thin years have made him invaluable 
in maintaining a smooth-running school. It has become a perennial joke with Father 
Finnegan to mention at some assembly or public gathering that plans are completed for 
him to retire to the relative obscurity of parish work in Ohio. It has not happened yet, 
and there are thousands of Loyolans who are ever grateful that he has been present to 
help them over some of the rough spots. 

Rev. James V. McCummiskey, S.J., is a comparative newcomer to the College of Arts 
and Sciences. Father McCummiskey became Dean of freshmen of the school in September, 
1946. In one short year he has impressed all the students on the campus with his ability, 
sincerity, and pleasing nature. His talk at the annual Father and Son banquet gave the 
affair a solemn and inspiring note. Father McCummiskey's popularity with the student 
body testifies to his ability to be serious or jovial as the occasion demands. 



49 



College of ^r/^ 




Rolf one — E. Bogdanski, J. Bates, D. Burke, P. Breen, K. 
Borchardt, J. Bartholow, J. Stanton, A. Bissonette, Z. 
Kosicki. 

Row two — J. Chisholm, A. Abbatiello, D. R. Burke, A. 
Adams, R. Kvasnicka, J. Bauer, A. Aycock, W. Aquilino, 
M. Badzmierowski, J. Ahern. 

Row three — M. Clinton, L. Alonzi, S. Oddo, C. Koerner, T. 
Devine, D. Cotter, G. Bowen, B. Bluitt. 



Roiv one — W. Bock, E. Rucker, J. Cox, N. Campagna, J. 
Burelbach, J. Colnon, M. Basch, E. Barrett, A. Christmann, 
J. Colletti. 

Row two — A. Busalacchi, J. Bourgeois, J. Bins, J. Callahan, 
J. Bremnar, J. Brennwald, J. Amato, J. Aylward, J. Burns, 
C. Cooney, J. Budzinski. 

Row three — V. Alesi, J. L. Barry, E. M. Burke, D. Conley, 
J. S. Barry, S. Boll, C. Calhoun, R. Cimino. 



Row one — T. Sowinski, J. Treacy, T. Dee, F. Curran, C. 
Martini, L. Aiello, T. Bastable, V. LaHart, A. O'Brien. 

Row two — R. Townsend, M. Ryan, D. O'Donnell, R. 
Taylor, R. Leach, W. Mullally, R. O'Connor, A. Marchese, 
J. Martin. 

Rou three — R. Sikes, G. Mullen, G. 'Vondriska, J. O'Neill, 
R. Rodenkirk, L. O'Connor, J. Carolan, T. Martinek, R. 
Nowak. 



Row one — F. Del Monaco, J. Daly, C. Csar, J. Dilibert, J. 
Dewey, J. Dullea, C. Dunn, D. Duffy, R. Deering, W. 
DuSold. 

Row two — J. Dilger, J. Devane, A. Diombala, L. Duszyn- 
ski, S. Boovas, K. Crook, D. Devine, T, Doody, E. Doran, 
R. Babick. 

Row three — G. Elliott, F. Desdoits, P. Crowley, T. Dockery, 
L. Dunn, P. Cleary, J. Cummings, R. Marco. 



50 



iftd Sciences 




Row one — M. Donine, J. Donahue, J. Fahey, J. Elward, E. 
Patlak, J. Falecki, D. DeLave, W. Dunn, R. Dunne, W. 
Dougherty. 

Row two — G. Erlach, S. Dulak, J. Ellis, J. Foreman, J. 
Cyboran, R. Drolet, T. Tafejian. 

Row three — D. Fauls, C. Shelley, R. Dempsey, E. Donovan, 
R. A. Egan, P. Delahunt, A. Foster, J. Gentile. 



Roiv one — F. Fisher, G. Demange, W. Gallagher,' G. Burns, 
P. Geraghty, G. de Smet, G. FitzGerald, E. Fuhrman, R. 
Foran, W. Foley. 

Row two — J. Flynn, W. Franta, E. Garzoni, J. Gilligan, J. 
Galvin, F. Galla, R. Ferguson, D. Gareia. 

Roir three — A. Gordon, T. Ducey, G. Ferenzi, P. Girard, 
C. FitzGerald, W. Evans, T. Golden, W. Grenier. 



Row one — J. Graydon, W. Foley, G. Garwood, D. Erma- 
tinger, W. Depa, R. Fox, S. Frasca, P. Funck. 

Row two — T. Hackett, T. Finnegan, D. Frogh, R. Gillette, 
W. d'Autremont, H. Hohn, W. Fischer. 

Roiu three — D. Flanagan, T. Foley, J. Forrctte, W. J. John- 
son, J. Froelich, W. Saunders, J. Brown. 



Row one — J. Heller. F. Steggert, D. Fay, J. Finnegan, C. 
Kunze, H. Hamlin, M. Harrington, J. Harbaugh, J. H.ihn. 

Roif two — M. Howard, E. Graham, A. Baltowski, D. 
Harenah, C. Homan, W. Haupers, N. Hoffman, J. Gotte- 
moller, C. Greenstein. 

Row three — J. Gray, C. Hebting, F. Hayes, F. Hayes, L. 
Goyke, J. Green, J. Hnilo, H. Halm, A. Giorgi. 



51 




Row one—]. Gauer, J. Gckas, W. Hurley, P. Gould, J. 
Green, T. Hewell, F. Wlodyga, G. Huaswirth, J. Hogg. 

Row two—]. Healy. T. Hannan, W. Wickman, C. Eller- 
mann, H. Harkenau, F. Gauer, M. Galliano, W. Greene- 
baum, J. Groszek. 

Row three — L. Fortman, L. Hayes, E. Hartrich, R. Hanley, 
R. Heffernan, J. Hefferren, B. Flanagan. P. Henry, J. 
Hurley, P. Hussey. 



Row one — L. Hector, C. Regan, C. Kennedy, R. lanecke, W. 
Connery, T. Burke, M. Henslee, W. Hoffman, J. Wallace. 

Row two—?. Vaughan, D. Healy, W. Willsman, E. Klapka, 

E. Hyland, T. Devine, R. Kearney, E. Kuras, J. Eisinger, 

F. Kelly, J. Reddington. 

Row three — G. Johnston, R. Keegan, L. Mizvtowicz, F. 
Jorstad, L. Klotz, R. Hechinger, f'. Inden, G. Kenney, H. 
Butts, C. Konstant. 



Row one — A. Kretz, S. Javaras, A. Kelley, R. Kelley, H. 
Keller, R. Kugel, W. Kilkenny, R. Ktahn, C. Kingsley. 

Kow two — R. Keshen, A. Jensen, E. Detloff, T. Krupa, T. 
Kaepplinger, J. Kelly, G. Kelly, D. Fortman, J. Kane. 

Row three — H. Johns, R. Klaw, H. Jankowski, B. Jarchow, 
C. Koerner, J. Kelley, R. Kennedy, G. Hall, J. Kilbridge. 



Rolf one—V^. Levin, H. Mann, W. O'Dunn, E. King, E. 
Kowaleski, J. Harmon, B. Jagor, J. Nolan, J. Nugent. 

Row two — R. Lucchctti, P. MacMahon, R. Lotrig, E. Licz- 
wek, J. Maher, F. Mikals, P. Collins, J. Malecki, T. 
Kuprewicz, E. Kelly. 

Row three — J. Meyering, R. Gillen, R. Linzcr, J. Jansky, 
J. Buishas, R. Meisner, J. Lassa, D. Maloney, R. Lindberg, 
U. Korbakes, D. Lawless, A. Masella. 



52 



w-'\^ 



# ::'M: 




Row one — T. F. McNulty, J. Meyenberg, E. Langhenry, J. 
McNichols, D. Smith, W. Uruba, G. Gaubatz, J. O'Meaia, 
L. OBrien. 

Row tuo—K. Laurick, R. Parenty, R. Peck, E. Miller, J. 
Philipp, P. VonDriska, J. Muno, P. Jacobs, J. Burns, J. 
O'Hara. 

Row three — T. Lockie, R. Lamermayer, A. Pankau, J. Pa- 
procki, W. Penrice, A. Liebeceit, R. Miller, F. Lavin, T. 
Hewlett, J, Steurer. 



Row one — J. McMahon, L. Mulvaney, W. Murphy, J. Mc- 
Nulty, J. McCarthy, J. Morreale, D. Kenney, H. Jacobs, 
W. Mulvihill, 

Roiv two — G. McNamara, N. Kahler, V. Mickus, J. Mc- 
Manus, J. Mitchell, D. O'Gorman, G. McCoy, E. Matre. 

Row three—]. McBride, W. McNulty, J. McNichols, T. 
McNulty, G. McDonnell, J. Moyer, J. Moore, E. McCabe, 
J. Murray, W. Miller. 



Row one — S. McKenney, G. Cashion, J. Madigan, J. Lynch, 
J. McCauley, F. Peifer, E. Morrissey, D. Lilly, M. Campbell. 

Row tivo—G. Mullen, W. McNulty, R. Luhr, D. Kiersted, 
E. Murphey, P. Loftus, A. Menza, F. Quinn, J. Wong. 

Row three — J. Malone, J. McGuire, A. Luckey, S. Gembica, 
J. Long, G. McNulty, R. Spencer. 



Row one — J. Moss, D. Murray, L. Nathan, R. Glassman, P. 
Puca, N. Pitaro, T. Lynch, W. McCreary, T. Morgan. 

Row two — J. Lydon, J. King, E. McDermott, R. McParland, 
W. McGinnity, J. McNamara, J. Durso, T. O'Shea, D. 
Campe. 

Row three — J. McCullough, J. O'Malley, J. McNichols, P. 
Moloney, J. Ball, J. O'Rourk, J, McGoldrich, R. McGrath, 
J. Munson. 



53 




Roiv one — T. Panaretos, F. Occhiuto, E. Niemic, H. Pierce, 
E. Schuize, R. Ramos, T. O'Farrell, F. O'Connor, L. J. 
O'Brien. 

Rotv two — E. Nowak, J. Paulissen, L. Pinkowski, B. 
Pappageorge, E. R. O'Neill, J. Osetek, R. Osmanski, P. 
Nessel, S. Narsete, C. 'Wach. 

Row three — 'W. Gawne, R. O'Connor, M. Neu, J. Palko, L. 
Osborn, B. Sheberm, J. Morrissey, 'W, Nemanich. 



Roic one—E. Roznowski, P. O'Malley, R. Phillips, A. Boyle, 
F. Pape, W. O'Donoghue, R. Tuinstra, R. O'Laughlin, J. 
Poerio. 

Row two — G. Rosenkranz, R. Sheehan, H. Quinn, C. 
Prentice, C. Sagerstrom, E. Rink, J. Rozewicki, R. Schweis 
thai, J. Levy, F. Schonta. 

Row three — E. Ryan, 'V. Schweistal, D. Rennolds, T. John- 
son, M. Schoeffel, T. Ronan, H. Rose, R. Rauth, J. Pritscher. 



Row one—]. O'Dwyer, R. Keshen, B. Buckley, R. Dalka, 
R. Liss, G. Sisko, J. Bradshaw, J. Barry. 

Row two — J. Haas, G. Brogan, J. Steiirer, D. Sullivan, G. 
Sweet, 'W. Sheehan, A. Chambers, F. Conrrique, D. Banez. 



Roif one — F. Ruhl, E. Rinaldo, E. Sendzik, J. Cwick, R. 
Otremba, R. Reeve, 'W. Raleigh, M. Somen, D. Sundt. 

Row two — B. Rouse, R. E. Quinn, C. Rollings, E. Ceragioli, 
F. Rolfes, H. Shatinsky, J. Hurley, J. Skrandel, J. Roche. 

Roic three — E. D. Ryan, J. Cagney, G. Schnitzius, T. Schultz, 
E. Reynolds, I. Schultz, G. Reynolds, 'W. Sands, O. Schnetz- 
er, R. Schnetzer. 



54 




Row one — J. Sowie, W. Sieben, J. Vowes, J. Ahem, H. 
Stevens, H. Adamson, F. Tomara, Tansey, E. Tazelaar. 

Row iwo — E. Steiger, W, Shelley, T. Troinan, D. J. Sulli- 
van, R. Tullis, E. Setlik, E. Sujack, M. Urbin, E. Stachura, 
J. M. Sullivan. 

Row three — L. Turro, R. Rheaume, F. Reddington, J. Stocks, 
D. Sherry, W. Svehla, D. Byrne, E. Tertilli, J. Steckel, W. 
Stapleton. 



Row oiie—L. Wilcox, J. Walsh, R. White, L. O'Brien. 
Jerry Slattery, James Slattery, L. Ujiak}', L. Terlizzi, T. 
Simpson. 

Row two — J. Zavadil, J. Vestal, A. Ydreo, J. Watson, C. 
Sterk, W. Wettengel, H. Zdanek, E. Walsh, A. Wilson. 

Row three— K. White, C. Wister, F. Zvetina, J. Wheeler, L. 
Stein, C. VonVogt, D. Yarashus, H. Zander. 



Row one — T. Tuomey. A. Uher, R. Warner, J. Welland, 
Robt. Wagener, Richard Wagener, L. Zelazo, F. Zidek, 
W. Leonhardt. 

Row two — L. Boveri, E. Finnegan, W. Warda, F. Titus, 
P. Conaghan, J. L. Quinn, R. Spellman. F. Waymel, E, 
Rowley. 

Row three — A. Vacco, M. Crowley, G. Rickard, J. Quinn, 
P. Simpson, E. Marbach, R. Haas. 



55 




Rev, J;hn C. Malloy, S.J., Dean 



Vmersity College 



Uni\'ersity College is the downtown division of the College of Arts and Sciences of 
Loyola Uni\ersity. Now in its thirty-third year, University College offers complete 
curricula toward baccalaureate degrees. 

Originally founded to supplement the education of school teachers and others who 
were occupied during the day, University College gradually developed complete curricula 
for the early afternoon and evening students who elected to pursue full-time work toward 
their bachelor's degrees. 

In February of this year University College opened its full-time day school to meet 
the current demands. Over four hundred students, carefully selected through a battery of 
qualifying examinations, answered the roll-call on February 17, to usher in a new era of 
educational activity for Loyola's University College. 

Centrally located, near the loop and in the newly developing business district. 
University College now serves day or evening students from the whole of metropolitan 
Chicago. Both day and evening students of University College participate in school 
forensics, dramatics, and athletics, and are eligible for membership in the sodalities, 
sororities, and fraternities. All of the facilities of the University including laboratories and 
libraries on both campuses are available to the students. 

Tribute must here be paid to the far-seeing Father Frederic Siedenburg, S.J., who 
in 1914 began the organization of the now flourishing Downtown College. After IS 
years of tireless work Father Siedenburg was succeeded by Father Thomas A. Egan, S.J. 

Succeeding Father Egan in 1944, Father John C. Malloy, S.J., has already effected 
changes that are beneficial to faculty and students alike. Under his energetic and kindly 
guidance University College should reach even greater heights. Its history has been 



56 



that of constant expansion and growth. The greatest obstacle to future development was 
the cramped quarters of the Franklin Street College which has since been alleviated by 
the acquisition of the Lewis Towers as the home of the University College. 

University College has given the teachers of Chicagoland an opportunity to supplement 
their training in the public Normal School with Catholic principles of philosophy and 
to receive their degrees under Jesuit auspices. Many of the students attending classes of 
the University College are such teachers. 

The classes of the College are so arranged that students who de\ote full time to their 
studies may obtain the regular academic degree in the prescribed four years. The members 
of the faculty who teach in this division with few exceptions are also teaching on the 
Lake Shore Campus. 



Rott) one — M. Jennings, J. Pacholik, C. Mills, C. B.icon, G. Liebermin, R. 
O'Connor, J. Hog.m. 

Row two — L. Wauck, R. Teichert, G. P. Sullivan, E. Szmuilo, R. Forbes, R. 
Foster, M. Funk, T. Ott, R. Cain. 

r^ow lhree~~U. Miktyn, G. Geiger, E. Dyczewski, W. Wolf, H. Allen, G. 
Hampsch, T. Smart, E. Jedlicka, L. DeSaulniers, M. Adlerz, J. Hayburn. L. 
Jackson. 




ST 



JJmuemty 




Row one — J. Collins, M. Kinn.i. L. Hebel, L, Tuffents.imer, 
J. Molchan, J. Murray, R. Miller. 

Rou> two — J. Schubert, J. Lamberty, E. Dineen, C. Bochenek, 
W. Barnes, D. McKee, S. Skertic, C. Mikail, T. Mitchell. 

Row three — B. Dziadowiec, J. Ahern, M. Raune, A. Knitter, 
J. Thale, W. Charnota, R. Bortee, R. Hassenaur, R. Dunne, 
J. Lauser. 



Roil' one — B. Armstrong, D. Shelley, W. Cooper, R. Salach, 
R. Malonc, W. Burpeau, J. Schmitz, J. Finch, M. Simmons. 

Rote two — S. Mertes, T- Weir, J. Kulis, M. Eissman, R. 
Sesko, G. Wiehle, R. Couture, D. Mariani, C. Evans, W. 
Beduze, J. Gardner. 

Row three — M. Gallagher, J. Taylor, N. Hudoba, H. Rogers, 
J. Anderson, J. Chyrek, R. Shebilla, J. Repetto, W. O'Brien, 
J. Donahue, H. Weiss, E. Kapustka, D. Niersbach, V. 
biMatteo. 



Roir one — M. Kelley, J. Anderson, R. Vitu. R. Callahan, 
R. Mainoe, L. Collins, J. Ellerman, L. Michiels. 

Row two — M. Gallagher, M. Simmons, E. Bonk, R. Wurth, 
J. Gardner, D. Walsh, S. Koenig, P. Callahan, S. Mertes, 
E. Drauden, N. Schwentner, W. Hitchcock. 



Row one — M. Kinna, E, Satala, H. Vipont, J. Conley, J. J. 
Ryan, J. Almaguer, 

Row two — ^J. Schubert, J. Bona, M. Funk, G. Whitehouse, 
A. Pandazi, L. J. McCarthy, H. DeFeo, A. Gramacke, E. 
Lyies. 

Row three — L. Moe, F. Kory, D. Polk, K. Lajeunesse, V. 
Louchios, N. Dubin, J. Klcinman, B, Harris, M. Kory. 



58 



College 




Row one — B. Samp, L. Wegloski, W. Lauf, G. Vogel, J. 
Loftos, T. O'Connell, H. Bowler, J. R. Maloney, L. Brucks. 
Row tivo—B. Shamus, B. Beazlev, G. Hampsch, E. Dineen 
W. Will, D. McKee, E. McKeon, C. Q-Connor, C. Lanzil- 
lotti, J. Dougherty, H. Schmidt, F. Vallo, T. Adams, E. 
Jedlicka, A. Salvador, 

Row three~L. Jackson, E. Bennett, M. Coleman, T. Tierney, 
M. Harris, R. Plaisance, J. Casey, M. Graves, C. Truse, j' 
Cawley, A. Tochalauski, M. McGoy, A. Jurgovsky, J. 
Hayburn, H. Kaplan, I. Arns. 



Row one—Q. Probst, R. Forbes, C. Mills, B. Komose, J. 
Finch, G. Peschke, J. Davenport. 

Row two—K. Miller, R. Hassenauer, G. Lenardo, G. 
Schaedler, F. Hummel, C. Bochenek, J. Thale, D. Pawle, 
J. Smead, F. Oros. 



59 




WiLLlAM H. CONLEY, Dean 



J. RAYMOND SHERIFF, Assistant Dean 



School of Commerce 

For the University's School of Commerce, the past year has been one of triumph over 
material difficulties. On the scholastic front, however, the School of Commerce not only 
held its own, but in many fields of endeavor forged brilliantly ahead. Playing a strong 
part in bringing about this laudable state of affairs were Commerce Dean William H. 
Conley and his faculty. 

This was the first year that the school operated in its new quarters, the Lewis Tower; 
building. The University obtained the use of this building through the generosity of 
Frank J. Lewis, retired manufacturer and Catholic philanthropist. Despite the fact that, 
on account of shortages of various materials, the building was not completely ready for 
occupancy, classes were still able to start last September. 

Commenting on the School of Commerce and its aims. Dean William H. Conley 
stated in an interview for the Loyola News: 

"The primary objectives of the School of Commerce were to develop well-rounded 
men through a general education ; to give them a sound philosophy of life based upon 
a sound moral foundation with the ability to cope with the present-day civilization; 
and to impart a general knowledge of the business world with specialized training in 
one of the areas of business." 

Mr. Conley is excellently equipped to carry out these aforementioned aims. A graduate 
of Loyola, he was associated with numerous organizations while a student here. He 
gained his teaching experience at Mundelein, Northwestern, and the University of 
Chicago Graduate School. Later he became assistant dean of Loyola's School of Commerce. 
In 1935 he left to become dean of Wright Junior College, leaving there, when the war 
began, for government and naval service. 

Concerning the future, it is planned to expand the existing facilities and enlarge the 
faculty in order to handle the increased enrollment for the coming terms. It is hoped 
that the lounge, which was a victim of the material shortage through-out the first part 
of the year, will finally be ready for use. More fortunate was the school library, which 
was able to get under way almost immediately with a 20,000 volume capacity, with an 
emphasis on books dealing with subjects relative to the study of commerce. 

For the statistically minded the following facts and figures may be of interest. Out of 
a total enrollment of 1,818 for both the day and night School of Commerce, 60.6% are 
veterans. (For the day school 66.8% are veterans while for the night school 54.1% are 
veterans.) While the School of Commerce is a part of a Catholic university, still more 
than 24.1% are of non-Catholic faith. 

Strongly in the majority, due in ail probability to the influx of returning veterans, are 
the freshmen, who comprise over 76.8% of the total enrollment. Together with the 
sophomores they comprise over 91.1% of the School's total student body, while the 
upperciassmen are only 8.9'"f of the total. These percentages are no more than another 
result of the post-war situation and in time will become more equitable. 



60 



Perhaps proving that the business world still is principally a man's world are the 
following ratios. For the day school the ration of men to women is 140 to 1 ! Not so 
extremely one-sided is the night school ratio of 8.5 to 1. Last year most universities had 
a predominance of males in their schools, but probably none as radical as the day school, 
which was virtually a counterpart, in reverse, of the national capital during the war. 

As a result of the recent change in the school's new location, social and extra-curricular 
activities were at a minimum during the past year. Several clubs, most notable the 
Debating Club, monitored by Dr. Theodose Mogilnitsky, have already been successfully 
started. The new year should see many new clubs and groups organized and underway, 
and also a larger number of social functions. Intra-murals were also started under the 
direction of the Student Council. This last semester the Chicago 'Water Tower grounds, 
which are directly across the street from the School, served as an ersatz campus and may 
continue in this capacity for some time. 

As was previously stated, the use of the first nine floors of Lewis Towers by Loyola 
is due to the Christmas (1945) gift of Mr. Frank J. Lewis to Loyola University. Mr. 
Lewis, trustee of the Catholic Charities of Chicago, is noted for his philanthropic work 
in the city. Other outstanding endowments of his are the Lewis Memorial Maternity 
Hospital and the Lewis School of Aeronautics. 

The building itself has a history of intrigue. During the war the building was used as 
quarters and study-hall for the Navy V-12 cadets, and for the training of Army counter- 
espionage agents. The latter was top-secret and not revealed till after actual hostilities 
ceased. The Navy program served as a highly effective front. 

The School of Commerce, now that it is securely settled in its new quarters, can 
continue to grow and flourish. Its avowed purpose is the development of astute business 
men able to cope with the atomic age by a firm basis of Catholic philosophy tind action. 
Its success in the past is strong proof that its success in the future will be even greater 



COMMERCE STUDENT 
COUNCIL 

Row one — J. Malone, R. O'Brien, T. 
Lane, R. McDermott. 

Row two — J. O'Keefe, 'W. Dankowski, 
T. Colgan, T. O'Dea. 




61 



School of 




Row one — M. Ruscli, L. Schuster, J. W. Muiphy, J. Fl.ina- 
pan, T. Venn, J. Roesch, C. Seavers, A. Zulevich. 

Roll- lico — K. Tiainor, J. Finn, E, B.iiley, J. Rcilly, D. 
Pecyna, J. Hicks, R. Daly, W. Bastian, J. Biauc-, R. Simpson. 

Roil- three — H. Onoda, G. B. Murphy, R. Rees, A. Paienty, 
R. Buaiis, S. Rinella, J. Bedore, R. Hedrich, J. H. Bowman. 



Roir one — J, Heinz, C. Kramer, R. Dwyer, J. Semple, R. 
Schoeller, J. Hurley, M. Lange, R. Lupini. 

Rotv liro—W. Crowe, J. Martm, J. T. Doyle, A. Race, V. 
Emanuel, R. Schaefer, R. Benes, R. J Sullivan, J. Benz. 

Row three — I. Abramson, J. Nowicki, D. F. O'Brien, C. 
Emanuel, C. Jackson, T. Lukaszewski, W. O'Lcary, N. 
Rliodes. 



Ron- one — W. Even, J. Kinsella, J. T. McCarthy, R. Luxem, 
S. Bucol, M. G. DeGrande, T. McErlean. 

Ron- two — J. May, P. Bouchy, L. Gattorna, J. Richards, S. 
Byrne, J. Christoph, D. Gass, F. Constable, C. Scliniitt, A. 
Bernardi, W. McErlean, J. Hamilton. 

Row three — L. LaMair. T. Horan, J. Bresnahan, L. Georgen, 
W. McDermott, V. Clohisy, R. Woodruff, J. Maloney, P. 
Kane, R. Frische, A. Pellegrlno. 



Roll' one — R. Wesley, R. Meysing, A. Pavlick, N. Seeley, 
M. Saidikowski, R. Losch, T. Colgan, M. Stevenson, B. 
Kellinger. 

Row two—M. Nicol, F. Oddi, A. Bayham, W. Dankowski, 

D. Mattucci, J. Lavin, E. Sobol, J. MacDonakl, F. Rooney, 
W. Kilbridge, T. Meade, R. Babiarz, E. Rosenberg. 

Row three— 1. Wren, W. Kristl. E.- Lay, J. Skok, L. 
Fiorentino, E. Schuler, F. Noftz, A. Evlasich, R. Wagner, 

E. Andrewson, G. Maloney, W. Olach, R. Soldato. 



62 



Commerce 




* 



Roll' one — B. Cummings, D. Cleary, R. Wall, A. Williams, 
J. Goodwin, M. Draths, J. McSweeney, T. Karon. 

Roll iwo—K. Brooker, R. Shea, F. Muriello, T. Goebel, J. 
Socha, R, Condon, T. Pendergast, A. Franconi, R. Brennan, 
W. Wolf. 



Row one — D. Moarn, C. LiUig, E. Donahue, E. Dawson, 
T. Flack, J. Donahoe, W. Griffin, P. Buckley. 

Row two — E. Lamich, V. Walsh, A. Landerghini, B. 
Crowley, J. Dalton, G. Lake, R. Lyons, W. Deppen, J. 
Dowdle, E. O'Reilly. 



Row one^H. Allen, M. Myholt, N. Kinsella, T. Kelly, D. 
Heffernan, R, Riley, J. Hopkinson, W. Walsh. 
Row two — R. Conway, P. Kuhn, J. Hollahan, C. Pulham, 
R. Lucas, C. Sheehan, W. Finn, T. Collins, M. Rubenstein, 
A. Moroni. 

Row three — J. Crowe, J. Hurley, L. Deskovitch, R. Hults, 
S. La Planca, J. O'Connor, H. Moroni, J. Bernacki, T, 
Haugh, A. Cihlar, H. Hines. 



Row one—]. O'Brien, J. Quill, W. Flaherty, D. Loftus, 
K. Murphy, J. Keleher, W. Doran, J. Mclnerney. 

Row two — R. Caprile, D. Jones, R. Ratty, J. Miske, T. Cox, 
A. Hildebrand, F. Casey, J. Mclnerney, M. Sanborn, M. 
Jossey, J. Kaufmann. 



63 



School of Commerce 




Row one — M. Broderick, W. Isaacson, E. Skalecki, A. 
Besbekos, H. Gotzes, G. Doyle, B. Witr-, G. Baustert, H. 
Wolf. 

Rotf luo — A. Biissette. L. Jacobs, R. Young, L. Scnica, }. 
Walsh, L. Guderyahn, H. Peponis, N. Neybeit, F. La Phica. 
F. Munch, Krippinger. 



Row one — R. Belt, A. Grunwald. J. Lynn, C. Kenlay, F. 
Robinson, G. Vannier, J. Ulbert, M. Jordan. 

Row two — T. Peppet, H. McCauley, A. Ingles, G. Pullman, 
F. Considine, C. Fuener, S. Dolan, W. Edelmann, C. Dunne. 

Row three — H. Thompson, R. Fletcher, B. Gargior, A. 
Buehling, F. Lunt, B. Arthofer. 



Row oiie—K. Vranek, J. May, B. Gast, T. McNeil, J. 
Kerris, J. Weixel, W. Mueller, A. Sullivan, B. Vidani. 

Row two — R. Cronin, R. Flando, B. McAndrew, J. 
Hutchinson, T. Barrett, J. Schulz, M. Golden, A. Shapiro, 
H. Van Roekel, E. Francdeur, J. O'Malley, E. Cadamagnani. 

Row three — A. Di Canio, G. Passolt, T. Casey, R. Hourihan, 
N. Dillon, D. Bailer, T. Cronin, F. Downes, P. Lo Coco, E. 
Kelly, R. Hackett. 



Rnn' line — A. Palma, F. Lusson, R. Lucas, J. Palermini, H, 
Smith. W. Joern, D. Kramer, R. Collins, M. Volino. 

/?■'!(' two — G. Sedlmayer, J. Smith, J. Elliott. P. Ennessy, 
W. Vonder Heide, J. Panek, W. Fanning, M. Berent, J. 
Stoltenberg, A. Boyer. 

Row three — J. Corcoran, R. Jones, F. Ghinelli, J. Hedrick, 
J. Sebastian, V. Hakman, S. Gorski, M. Leclerc, B. Cilella. 



Row one — R. Beelen, H. Geiger, D. McGrath, R. Althus, A. 
Nichols, J. Reid, R. Smith, C. Walles, W. Grace. 

Rou' two — J. McKeon, T. Mongoven, T. Kohl, T. Ryan, 
R. Goodrich, P. Dunne, J. Waite, F. Hanmore, G. Sarahan, 
W. McCarthy, F. Simack, P. Allot, R. Froberg. 

Roic three~R. Hile, E. Pontillo, R. Geis, R. Donahue, E. 
Hurley, E. Kernan, W. Foran, E. Shufelot, J. Dicken, G. 
Kaiser, J. Sweeney. 

Row one — M. McNefF, D. Christman, T. Stedman, V. 
McCarthy, T. Compton, J. Matthis, P. Finn, C. Dome, R. 
Nance, J. Ogron. 

Row tivo — B. Walters, E. Skorupski, M. Devine, R. Shelley, 
D. O'Brien, J. Geary, L.' Dombrou, H. Fielding, J. De- 
Lunge, T. Ramesey, F. Endres, C. Kurnalian. 

Row three — R. Lifvendaul, T. Henson, G. Burns, D. Fahey, 
J. Fagerman, N. Langley, H. Somerville, C. Cassidy. 



64 



School of J^ms'mg 

The nursing schools which operated under an affihation with Loyohi University were 
completely united with the University in 1935 and 1936. Before this time each of the 
five hospitals was operating under a different curriculum which was related m no 
particular way with a definite University program. The present coordination is a result 
of the efforts of the Reverend Terence H. Ahearn, S.J., Regent of the Loyola University 
School of Medicine, and Sister Helen Jarrell. Early in the year 1935 the standardization 
of the curriculum was begun. On August of 1936 the sixth and last hospital was added 
to the enrollment. 

As a result of the unification of standards, the various schools are able to realize the 
benefits of affiliation with Loyola University. At the same time, the program enables 
Loyola to offer the highest type of Catholic nursing education to young women. 

In 1941 a five-year course in nursing was inaugurated leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Nursing. This is another sign of the progress the School of 
Nursing is making. 




Sister Helen Jarrell, R.N., A.M. 
Dean of the School of Nursing 



NURSES IN TRAINING 




65 




Sister Helen Jarrell, R.N., A.M. 
Directress 



St. Bernard 



In 1903, St. Bernard's Hospital was founded by the Religious Hospitallers of St. Joseph, 
an order of Canadian nuns. The School of Nursing offers a complete and intensive 
course in nursing education, equipped as it is with new and complete facilities. The 
nurses' home contains a chapel, library, spacious auditorium, classrooms, and laboratories, 
all of the highest quality. 

The spiritual program consists mainly of a three-day retreat, although a number of 
other exercises including candle-light services held at Christmas and the May Queen 
coronation occupy a prominent place. 

The Freshman welcome party and the Senior Ball are the outstanding events of the 
social season. Besides these events, the nurses enjoy motion pictures, dances, picnics, and 
sleigh ride parties. The Junior-Senior dinner and the Senior picnic, at which the 
graduating class is the guest of the Alumnae organization, are likewise eagerly looked 
forward to. 




r\ F^: <Tk % 



D Ci 







k^^^^^Mli J^WiMMIt^ 



JUNIORS 

Row one — Grasso, Feminella, Pater- 
noster, Thetreau, Schafer, Sister Kane, 
R.H., Vaicunas, Lackovitch. Raus, 
Hardy, Glenday. 

Roiv two — Blaszczak, Griffin, Fisher, 
Flynn, Sagert, Raila, Betsinger, Glass- 
coe, Loftus, Tracy, Kelly, Mallaney, 
O'Dea, Cawley. 

Rnw three — Brna, Geisen, De'Ostro- 

phe, Kopitzki, McKeone, Gorgas, 

Welty, Tierney. Collins, Cassidy, 
W'antroba, Pippin, Murphy. 





Pi r> ^f r 





FRESHMEN 

Row one — Gallagher, Reed, Hogan, 
Walsh. Michiels Sister St. Joseph, 
R.H.. Adams, Hess, Keeley, Ware. 
Kufrovich. 

Row two — Schwentner. O'Connor, 
Koll, George, Wirfs, McFadden. Blah- 
nik, Banton, McCarthy, Janscn, 
O'Leary, Macdonald. 

Row three— Hitchcock. Drauden, Cal- 
lahan, Reilly, Carroll, Gardner, Klnal- 
ski, Lewis, Mertes, Simmons, Bonk. 



JUNIORS 

.Row one — L. James, J. Spcziale, C. 
Aurit, M. Chapp, E. Kracht, J. Hop- 
pekjan, K. Joyce, A. Anderson, P. 
Ojendyk. C. Wall, T. Piontkowski, 
C. Ferris, R. Floryan. 

Row two — R. Wagner, J. Marfandino, 
L, W'urm, E. Lockwood, E. McCarty, 
B. Benetti, E. Schultz, A. Wright, Y. 
Larson. R. Riberdy, D. White, F. 
Ready. M. Hartl. M. Chwalisz, C. 
Meyer, E. Papineau. 

Row tbree~R. Frey, D. Nohr, G. 
RukavJna, M. Goodwin, R. Mader, C. 
Ward, M. McAvoy, A. Strank, M. 
Flynn, M. Duffy, R. Hartnett, R. 
Bertelsman, I. Kawa, D. Calhoun. 



FRESHMEN 

Row one—D. Pachan, M. Pirt, T. 
Morrison, L. Masterson, M. Walsh, 
J. Swiderski, M. Brefeld, M. Baldo- 
vin, L. Dary, E. Dary. 

Row I wo — E. Czajka, J. Zadra, G. 
Luciano, M. Robinson, L. Chapman, 
J. Beirl, M. ShuU, G. Billings, L. 
Pfeffer, E. Kicul. 

Row three — L. Brumirski, G. Vitucci, 
A. Voelker, M. McQuillan, M. Koe- 
necke. M. Pachan, R. Gross, M. 
Wilczewski, B. Thurber. 




St SUzabetk 



Oldest in date of founding, St. Elizabeth's is also one of the largest of the six hospitals 
in Loyola's affiliated system. Founded in 1886, the old building still remains to contrast 
with the modern structure erected a few years ago. The School of Nursing conducted by 
the Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ was established at St. Elizabeth's in 1914 and 
affiliated with Loyola in 1929. The school provides service in every branch of the 
medical profession. Each department is under the direction of a highly qualified instructor. 
Thus with a well coordinated system to regulate the ardous task of ministering to the 
sick throughout the entire year, the hospital proper and the nursing school have always 
been highly praised by the members of the medical profession. 

This year a Freshman 'Welcome and Initiation Party in the form of a 'Wienie Roast 
started the round of social activities for the year. The Pumpkin Prance and the annual 
Christmas party were other outstanding events on the calendar. In the second half of 
the year the students were entertained at the January 29 Dinner Dance, the Spring Frolic, 
a Bunco Party, and as a climax for the year, the Senior Ball. 



Sister Mary Margaritis, R.N., B.S. 
Directress 




t,7 




JUNIORS 

Row one — S. Morrissey, J. Dornback, 
M. DeYoung, P. Bell, N. Johnston, 
J. LaFountain, M. Kramer, J. Ogden, 
L. Strzynski. 

Roll' two — C. Rizza, K. Haberkorn, B. 
Grcenleaf, T. Lamach, J. Donahue, 
I. Harbecke. 

Row three — D. Stefanovich, M. Am- 
ato. M. Norgan, M. Walsh, V. 
Ziesmer, D. Banks, M. Zuccolla. 



FRESHMEN 

Row one — Mother Irene, Mother Ga- 
briel, Mother Veronica, Mother Jose- 
phine. 

Row two — F. Stock, A. Vallortigara, 
M. Butler, M. Gewecke, D. Lindner, 
J. Rogers, F. Stock. 



Columbus 



Sister M. Clement, R.N., A.B. 

Directress of the Columbus 

School of Nursing 




The twentieth century had just turned the corner when Mother Francesca Cabrini 
paused before a hotel across from Lincoln Park. The on-looker saw it in its future 
destiny: the mending place of sick bodies, the refuge of sick souls, the dwelling place 
of her Lord. Mother Cabrini's task between 1903 and 1905 was not an easy one; but 
with undimmed vision that always seemed with her, she worked with her sisters, at last 
establishing what is today Columbus Hospital. A recent cause of great celebration at 
Columbus was, of course, the canonization of Mother Cabrini. 

The Columbus Hospital School of Nursing today offers her students the privilege of 
affiliation with Loyola. Courses are offered in religion, English, chemistry, psychology, 
psychiatry, and the usual nursing subjects. At Columbus itself, the students have 
practical experience in various other departments: obstetrics, surgery, diet kitchen, 
medicine, central supply, nursery, gynecology, emergency and accident, and pediatrics. 

Students are attracted to Columbus School for many reasons: the prized affiliation with 
Loyola and the college credits that may be earned toward the coveted degree, the privilege 
of working and praying in the home of a saint, and the thrill of living in Chicago. 



68 




St, ^////^ 



Sister Mary Willia, R.N., B.S. 
Directress 



There was a definite need for another hospital in the rapidly-expanding West Side of 
Chicago forty years ago. To satisfy this need St. Anne's hospital was given a separate 
charter in 1908. Originally the unit had been a division of St. Elizabeth's hospital; its 
sole duty had been to care for tuberculosis patients. The nursing school was opened in 
1913. Since its institution thousands of young women have been given a Catholic 
education and training to aid them in their resolve of carrying mercy to the sick. 

The nursing unit this year actively participated in all of the Loyola University activities, 
including the Freshman "Welcome Dance at the opening of the school year and the all- 
University Senior Ball to close it. In addition to these functions, the school also 
sponsored many social activities for its own students. 



JUNIORS 

Row one — K. Hartnett, D. Walters, 
E. DeTomasi, A. Dominick, M. 
Mooney, A. Junkerman, D. Clemens, 
P. Gray. R. Lulich, D. Slater, A. 
Kanarski, A. Fiala. 

Row two — I. Kortz, M. DelBello, P. 
Salerno, R. Lubash, G. Sobieski, C. 
Osterkorn, B. CIcary, A. Aschenbren- 
ner, M. Kolak, R. Grill, S. Gaides, 
B. Meyers, G. Kozelka, B. Hall, L. 
Wentink, E. Toton, R. DelGuidice, 
J. Cwiklin. 

Row three — E. Burke, M. Marsells, A. 
Margowski, J. Senchak, C. Yasiunas, 
A. Janzer, M. E. Hannon, B. Phillip, 
R. Fleming, A. Sinkuler, Renee Simon, 
J. O'Brien, M. Jcfferies, M. DeBlase. 



FRESHMEN 

Row one — L. Drab, A. Regis, A. 
Mack, M. J. Blair, J. Pfaff, S. Simon, 
G. Angaran, M, O'Connor, P. Patnoe, 
M. C. Wagner. 

Row two — R. M. Thomas, A. Janik. 
M. A. Alkofer, M. Walsh, J. Davis. 
M. Lemck, I. Zouvas, A. Brenk, G. 
Rabe, P. Pfaff, L. Rathje, M. No- 
votny, R. Mudra. 








Sister St. Timothy, R.N., Ph.B. 
Directress 



Oak Park 






The Oak Park School of Nursing came under the direction of the Sisters of Misericorde 
in 1917 and became affiliated with Loyola University in 1933, when it became one of 
Loyola's nursing units. The school offers the standard nursing curriculum, which is 
intended to give the students a well-rounded Catholic education as well as the necessary 
technical training for the nursing profession. 

In addition to the required academic and professional training, the school offers the 
student nurses a balanced program of extra-curricular and social activities. There are 
individual affairs as well as the all-University functions on the calendar for the year. The 
program includes dances, parties, and plays as well as the more important religious 
functions, such as the annual three-day retreat. 





©, ® 











JUNIORS 

Ro!f one — M. Sample, L. Miles, M. 
Puhl. M. Farrell, E. Melxi, P. Ham- 
mond, A. Fahey, B. Lang, T. Lusch. 

Roiv lu'o—C. O'Hara, V. Shehan, H. 

Smith, L. Vockmar, F. Duffy. D. 

Cassin, R. Schclecht, L. Vogelsang, 
M. Failla. 

Row three—]. Wells, M. Kirkpatrick, 
C. Dvorak, M. Ouellette, L. Wray, E. 
Lee, A. McMannus, M. Gercttie, G. 
Becker. 



FRESHMEN 

'Row one — D. Kokta. A. Hartlaub, B. 
Schultz, C. Flynn, C. King, L. Wood, 
R. Connolly. 

Row (wo~K. Buffa, S. Weston, M. 
Ceranek, A. Graves, B. Donnelly, E. 
Slapnicka, P. Elliott. 






A^ 



JUNIORS 

Row one — J. Moore, L. Ladesky, L. 
Lorscheider, A. Dumelle, C. Geisler, 
B. Collins, T. Jans, H. Meier, B. 
Logan, M. Knoedler, J. Conway. 
Row iwo—B. Pape, C. Philbin, R. 
Owens, A. Cesarski, L. Muhlenfeld, 
E. Clancy, V. Nash, A. Higgins, H. 
Maloney, P. Bochat, L, McCormick, 
M. Rosberg, R. Suchor. 
Row three — K. Hamilton, P. La Pak, 
M. Smith, S. Unge, B. \f/\tzg,A\, p! 
Keltner, D. Jones, M. O'Brien, C. 
Dalacher, P. Sorensen, B. Weber, D. 
Dailey, M. Schnerre, M. Johnston, R. 
Gewerth, R. Patterson. 
Row jour — M. Johnson, J. Freschette, 

A. Erspamer, R. Strobel, J. Austgen, 

B. Wahl, E. Shemroske, P. dinger, 
T. Kuras, J. Rudnick, L. Kohnke! 
L. Mungerson. N. Noylan, C. Ryan, 

. D. Koester. B. Reding, J. Bushold. 



FRESHMEN 

Row one — H. Marcell, Y. Gregory, J. 
Turck, M. Cunningham, E. Rfntz, R. 
Wynne, R. Woerner, J. Furey. 
Row two — J. Healy, B. Panek, D. 
Kurek, M. Kuta, H. Jurasewicz, C. 
Kibler, M. Schreiber, M. Popp, J. 
Scheurell, R. Fleischmann, D. Kiirek. 
R. Himmes. 

Row three — J. Hohlfelder, L. Mayew, 
M. Harrington, P. Swantowski, d! 
Stockling, P. Burke, M. Robinson, B. 
Larson, G. Keller, M. Mclnnis, E 
Pape, D. Schultz, J. Graham. 
Row four — P. Murphy, D. Crane, D. 
Sauter, G. Robison, J. Johnson, M. 
Brown, L. Mahon, V. Wegrzyn, H. 
O'Neill, D. Kohley, P. Higgins,' M. 
Devery, D. Walczinski. 







1^- i^if^'^tiPif-^^:d^^\^ ■ ••^' 





St "Francis 



The St. Francis School of Nursing at Evanston, Illinois, was established in 19iy. At 
present one hundred and seventy students are enrolled, fifty-eight of whom comprise 
the current graduating class. 

The nursing school was affiliated with Loyola University in 1936 so that all candidates 
might acquire the desired cultural background for their chosen profession. Students are 
provided with a varied clinical experience in medical, surgical, orthopedic, obstetric, 
and pediatric nursing. These courses are supplemented by work in psychiatry and public 
health nursing. ^ 

A Franciscan school of nursing affiliated with a Jesuit university must of necessity be 
motivated by the highest spiritual and moral concepts in the formulation of its religious 
educational, and professional program. Basically, the complete development of the 
individual according to the philosophy of Christian education is the prime consideration 
of the school. Toward this end, the spiritual exercises of the school include an annual 
retreat, membership in the Sodality, and special devotions to the Blessed Virein during 
the month of May. ^ ^ 



Sister M. Gertrudis, R.N., Ph.B. 
Directress 




71 



Student Mo HOTS 



Conspicuous among the honors conferred by Loyola University upon certain outstanding 
students, the Honors degree was won by only two of the University's graduates this year. 
The Honors program is a well-integrated study course offered to exceptional students 
in the College of Arts and Sciences who are allowed outside activity in their particular 
field of study. Each department offers a curriculum in this course, and the student, for a 
period of two years, follows the study of his particular field privately, holding periodic 
conferences with his adviser, who is usually the chairman of the department. In addition 
to these studies the student takes certain courses dealing with the cultural development 
of various countries. An oral examination is conducted at the end of the second year, at 
which the candidate for the degree is quizzed by the members of the particular department. 

The Honors program was begun again this year with the two honored students 
remaining from pre-war days. Various undergraduates have enrolled in this program, 
which was resumed last September. This year the Bachelor of Philosophy Honors Degree 
was conferred on Don Joseph Buckley, who won the honor in the department of English. 
Paul Francis Elward received the Bachelor of Arts Honors Degrees for his work in the 
department of Philosophy. 

The English Essay Contest, open to all students of Jesuit colleges throughout the 
Middle West, was not held this year. 




DON J. BUCKLEY 



PAUL F. ELWARD 



72 




The Class of 1947 

Loyola's graduates have been leaders. Many well-known men have been the products 
of the Jesuit training, either at old St. Ignatius or at the present University. They have 
fulfilled that function for which the Jesuits have ever striven, namely: to provide the 
world with Catholic leadership. The graduates of this year, whose names are listed in 
the succeeding pages, have joined that ever-increasing army of Loyola Alumni, From 
this period they enter spheres of influence of which their long period of preparation 
has been in anticipation. Some will fall by the wayside, but most will remain true to 
their ideals, which have become part of their very existence. It is the ardent hope of 
Loyola that all the graduates will remember that at the bottom of the "Loyolan's Code 
of Honor" are these words, "Loyola's greatest pride must be her graduates." If they do 
remember, Loyola will have justified her existence by producing the highest type of 
Catholic leaders. ^ 

The following graduation pictures are arranged in this sequence: School of Medicine 
School of Dentistry, College of Arts and Sciences, School of Commerce, University 
College, School of Nursing, and West Baden College. 



73 




cftlors of J 947 







1 



^<i^M 




ANTZIS, ELI, Bachelor of Science; Doctor of Medicine . . . Member of 
Phi Delta Epsilon, Lambda Rho, and the Moorhead Surgical Society ; 
entered from George Washington High School and the University of 
Chicago ; Biological Seminar 4 ; Chemistry Club 2 ; home in Chicago, 
lUmois. 

BAIMA, MARGARET A., Doclor of Medicine . . . Member of Nu 
Sigma Phi, Lambda Rho, Moorhead Surgical Society, and the Vollni 
Medical Society ; entered from Blessed Sacrament (Detroit) and the 
University of Detroit ; Biological Seminar 3, 4 ; home in Detroit, 
Michigan. 

BARRETT, THOMAS JOSEPH. Doctor of Medicine ... En- 
tered from St. Ignatius High School (Cleveland, O.) and John 
Carroll LI^ni\'ersity ; home in Cleveland, Ohio. 

BERNIER, JEAN RICHARD, Doctor of Medicine . . . Member of Phi Chi 
and Lambda Rho; entered from Nicolet High School (Que.), Seminary of 
Nicolet, and Assumption College; home in Sanford, Maine. 

BLANCHARD, ARTHUR JAMES, Bachelor of Science; Doctor of 
Medicine . . . Member of Phi Chi, Blue Key, Honorary Seminar, 
Moorhead Surgical Seminar, and Lambda Rho ; entered from Central 
Catholic High School, the University of Toronto, the LIniversJty of 
Toledo, and Middleberry College ; Class Officer: Secretary 3 ; home in 
Toledo, Ohio. 

BODENSTEIN, CLETUS HAROLD, Doctor of Medicine . . . 
Member of Phi Chi; entered from DeSales High School, Loras 
College, and Westminster College ; home in Ossian, Iowa. 

BRENNAN, MICHAEL JAMES, Bachelor of Science; Doctor of Medicine 
. . . Member of Phi Beta Pi, Blue Key, Honorary Seminar, and Moorhead 
Surgical Society ; entered from Detroit Prep., the University of Detroit, and 
the University of Chicago; home in Detroit, Michigan. 

BUBALO, JOHN MATTHEW. Bacljelor of Science; Doctor of Medi- 
cine . . . Member of Sigma Nu, Phi Beta Pi, Volini Medical Society, 
Moorhead Surgical Society, Lambda Rho, and Blue Key ; entered from 
Doane College and the L^ni versify of Oregon ; home in Portland, 
Oregon. 

BULFIN. MATTHEW JOSEPH, Bacf?elor of Science; Doctor of 
Medicine . . . Member of Phi Beta Pi, Blue Key, Volini Medical 
Society, Moorhead Surgical Society ; entered from Quigley Pre- 
paratory Seminary; Class Officer: President 4; home in Chicago. 

Illinois. 



BURIK, ALEXANDER JOHN, Doctor of Medicine . . . Member of Phi 
Sigma of Phi Chi ; entered from Forest City High School, St. Procopius 
College, and the Ll^niversity of Scranton ; home in Forest City, Pennsylvania. 

CALDARELLI, RAYMOND AUGUST. Bachelor of Science; Doctor 
of Medicine . . . Member of Phi Beta Pi and Honorary Seminar ; 
entered from Aliquippa High School and the L^nivcrsity of Scranton ; 
home in Aliquippa, Pennsylvania. 

CILELLA, CARMINE ALFRED. Bachelor of Science; Doctor of 
Medicine . . . Member of Phi Beta Pi, Honorary Seminar, and 
the Volini Medical Society ; entered from John Marshall High 
School and Central Y.M.C.A. College; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

COLAVINCENZO, JOHN WILLIAM. Doctor of Medicine . . . Member of 
Phi Beta Pi, Blue Key, Honorary Seminar, Moorhead Surgical Society, and 
Volini Medical Society ; Student Council 3: Treasurer 4 ; Class Officer; 
home in Ellwood City. Pennsylvania. 

COMPALL. THEODORE CARL. Doctor of Medicine . . . Member of 
Phi Chi and the Honorary Seminar ; entered from Steinmetz High 
School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

CONLEY, WILLARD JOHN. ,Doctor of Medicine . . . Member 
of Phi Beta Pi, Volini Medical Society, and the Moorhead 
Surgical Society ; entered from Los Angeles High School and 
Loyola University of Los Angeles ; Crimson Circle 3 ; Sodality 
2 ; home in Los Angeles, California. 



74 



COTTRELL, THOMAS L. C, Doctor of Medicine . . . Member of Sigma 
Chi, Phi Beta Pi, Honorary Seminar, and the Volini Medical Society ; 
entered from University High School and the University of Chicago; home 
in Chicago, Illinois. 

CLYNE, JOHN CLAYTON, Bachelor of Science: Doctor of Medicine 
. . . Member of Phi Beta Pi and the Honorary Seminar ; entered from 
Central High School and the University of Notre Dame ; home in 
Muncie, Indiana. 

DEMKE, ROBERT LUCIEN, Doctor of Medicine . . . Member 
of Preclinical Honors Society; entered from University of North 
Dakota and Arizona State College; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

DEVLIN, REV. WILLIAM JOSEPH, of the Society of Jesus, Bachelor of 
Arts: Master of Arts: Doctor of Philosophy: Ph. L. : S.T.L.: M.S.S.Vf.: 
and Doctor of Medicine . . . Member of Pi Alpha Lambda, Blue Key, 
American Association of Psychiatric Social Workers, American Psychological 
Association. Honorary Seminar, Alpha Sigma Nu, Volini Medical Society, 
and the Moorhead Surgical Society ; entered from Campion Academy ; 
Sodality 1, 2, 3; Loyolan Staff 1, 2; Monogram Club 1, 2, 3; Football 1, 
;, 3: Basketball 1, 2: Captain 3; Baseball I ; Track 2, 3; Drama Club 2, 3; 
Class Officer: President 3 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

DIECIDUE, ALFONSO ANTHONY, Bachelor of Arts: Doctor of 
Medicine . . . Member of Theta Chi and Phi Chi ; entered from 
Hillsborough High School and the University of Southern California; 
home in Tampa, Florida. 

DOHREN, WALTER JOHN, Doctor of Medicine . . . Member 
of Honorary Seminar and Alpha Sigma Nu : entered from Lyons 
Twsp. High School, Lyons Twsp. Junior College, and Central 
Y. College; Class Officer: Treasurer 2; President 3; home in 
Chicago, Illinois. 

DONOVAN, DANIEL LAFAYETTE, JR., Bachelor of Arts: Doctor of 
Medicine . . . Member of Phi Beta Pi, Blue Key, Honorary Seminar; 
entered from Loyola Academy and Holy Cross College; Student Council I; 
Class Officer: President 1 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

FINK. ROBERT JOEL, Doctor of Medicine . . . Member of Phi Beta 
Pi and the Moorhead Surgical Society ; entered from Leo High School 
and the LTniversity of Notre Dame; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

FITZGERALD, KENNETH JOHN, Doctor of Medicine . . . 
Member of Phi Mu Chi ; entered from De LaSalle High School ; 
Sociality 1, 2, 3; Wasmann Biological Society 2, 3; home in 
Chicago, Illinois. 



FLOOD, FRANCIS, Doctor of Medicine . . . Entered from Sparta High 
School. Marquette University, and Lawrence College; home in Sparta, 
Wisconsin. 

GARRITY. EDWARD RAYMOND, Doctor of Medicine . . . Member 
of Alpha Delta Gamma and Phi Chi; entered from Loyola Academy; 
Green Circle 2, 3; Wasmann Biological Society 1, 2; home in 
Chicago, Illinois. 

GIORDANO, ROCCO PETER, Bachelor of Arts: Doctor of 
Medicine . . . Member of Phi Chi ; entered from New Uthrecht 
High School and New York University; home in Brooklyn 
New York. 



GRABER, WILLIAM ALLAN, Doctor of Medicine . . . Member of Phi 
Chi; entered from St. Ignatius High School and Loras College; home in 
Chicago, Illinois- 

GRIFFIN, GEORGE D. J., JR., Bachelor of Science: Doctor of 
Medicine . . . Member of Phi Beta Pi and Kappa Sigma, Volini 
Medical Society, and Preclinical Honorary Seminar; entered from 
Loyola Academy and Northwestern University ; home in Chicago, 
Illinois. 

GUSTAITIS, JOHN WILLIAM, Bachelor of Science: Doctor of 
Medicine . . . Member of the Honorarv Seminar ; entered from 
Washington High ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 




75 





HARNAGEL, DANA LEE, Bachelor of Arts; Master of Science; Doctor of 
Medicine . . . Member of Nu Sigma Phi and Phi Sigma ; entered from 
Central High (St. Louis) and the University of Wisconsin, Ripon College, 
and Marquette University ; home in St. Louis, Missouri. 

HOCKETT, WILLIAM JOSEPH, JR.. Bachelor of Arts; Doctor of 
Medicine . . . Member of Delta Tau Delta ; entered from South Side 
High; home in Fort Wayne, Indiana. 

IGINI, JOHN PETER. Doctor of Medicine . . . Member of Phi 
Chi, Phi Mu Chi, Volini Medical Society, and Lambda Rho ; 
entered from Harrison Tech ; Loyola News 1, 2 ; Green Circle 
2, 3 ; member of Wasmann Biological Society 2, 3 ; Academic 
Honor Key Award 2; Chemistry Club 2, 3; Sodality 2, 3; 
Intramural Keys 1, 2, 3; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

JANECKE, ARTHUR THOMAS. Doctor of Medicine . . . Entered from 
De LaSalle ; member of Wasmann Biological Society: Vice-President 3 ; 
Sodality 2, 3 ; Wasmann Biological Honorary Key 3 ; Chairman of Research 
Division of Wasmann Biological Society 2, 3 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

KELLY, CHARLES RAYMOND, Doctor of Medicine . . . Member 
of Phi Mu Delta and Phi Chi ; entered from Loyola Academy and 
Northwestern University ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

KELLY, JOHN S., Doclor of Medicine . . . Member of Phi Chi, 
Blue Key, Alpha Sigma Nu, Volini Medical Society, and the 
Moorhead Surgical Society ; entered from Fenwick, University of 
Notre Dame, University of Chicago, and Northwestern University; 
Student Council 1 ; Class Officer: President 2 ; home in Chicago, 
Illinois. 



KENTER, THOMAS PATRICK, Doctor of Medicine . . . Member of 
University Club and Phi Chi; entered from Loyola Academy; Class Officer: 
Vice-President 3 ; Green Circle 2, 3 ; Wasmann Biological Society 1, 2 ; 
Sodality 1, 2 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

KONDRATOWICZ, WALTER FRANCIS, Doctor of Medicine . . . 
Member of the Volini Medical Society, Lambda Rho, Honorary Seminar, 
and Moorhead Surgical Society ; entered from Lane Technical ; home 
in Chicago, Illinois. 

KUHLMAN. KEITH, Doctor of Medicine . . . Entered from 
St. Louis College High (Honolulu), University of Hawaii, and 
University of San Francisco; home in Honolulu, Hawaii. 



LAUER, JOHN WILLIAM, Doctor of Medicine , . . Member of Phi Chi. 
Honorary Seminar, and Moorhead Surgical Society; entered from St. Mel's 
High School; Wasmann Biological: President 2, 3; Bellarmine Philosophy 
Club: President 3; Green Circle: Secretary 2; Editor of Probe 2; Loyolan 
2, 3 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

LAVIERI, VINCENT ANTHONY, Bachelor of Science; Doctor of 
Medicine . . . Member of Phi Chi and the Volini Medical Society ; 
entered from Kelvyn Park and Northwestern University ; home in 
Chicago, Illinois. 

LESCHER, ROBERT CHARLES, Doctor of Medicine . . . 
Member of Phi Chi ; entered from Crane High School ; home in 
Chicago, Illinois. 



LUKES, ROBERT JOHN, Doctor of Medicine . . . Member of Phi Beta Pi ; 
entered from Parma High School and Western Reserve University and 
Ohio Northern University ; home in Parma, Ohio. 



MANFREDI, HAROLD, Doctor of Medicine 
Mel's High School, Northwestern University, 
home in Chicago, Illinois. 



. . Entered from St. 
nd Loyola University ; 



MARKUS, GEORGE W., Bachelor of Science; Doctor of Medi- 
cine . . . Member of Sigma Delta Pi and Phi Chi ; entered from 
Riser High School and the University of Dayton ; home in 
Dayton, Ohio. 



76 



Sc 



eniors of 1947 



MARTIN. CLEMENT GREENE. Bachelor of Science: Doctor of Medicine 
. . . Member of Volini Medical Society and Moorhead Surgical Society ; 
entered from Loyola Academy; Green Circle 3, 4; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

MARTINAITIS, CASIMIR DOMINIC. Doctor of Medicine . . . 
Member of Phi Sigma of Phi Chi, Honorary Seminar, Moorhead 
Surgical Society, and Lambda Rho ; entered from Duquesne Prepara- 
tory School and Duquesne University; home in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

McDERMOTT, RAYMOND ADAM, JR.. Doctor of Medicine 
. . . Member of Pi Alpha Lambda, Blue Key, Honorary Seminar, 
Volini Medical Societ>', Moorhead Surgical Society, and Lambda 
Rho; entered from Loyola Academy; Sodality 1, 2, 3: Governing 
Board 1; Loyola News 1, 2, 5: News Editor 2: Managing Editor 
3; Intramural Board 1; Glee Club 2, 3; Debating 1, 2, 3; 
Green Circle 3 ; Loyolan 4 ; Wasmann Biological Society 2, 3 ; 
Editor of Probe 3; Swimming 1, 2; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

McKAY, JOSEPH PATRICK, Doctor of Medicine . . . Member of Phi 
Beta Pi, Blue Key, Honorary Seminar, Volini Medical Society ; entered from 
York Community High School and Elmhurst College; Class Officer: Secretary 
4 ; home in Elmhurst, Illinois. 

MENTA. JULIUS DANIEL, Doctor of Medicine . . . Entered from 
John Adams High School and Ohio University ; home in Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

MOFFETT, FRANCES TERESA, Bachelor of Arts; Doctor of 
Medicine . . . Member of Honorary Seminar and Volini Medical 
Society ; entered from Notre Dame Academy, San Francisco 
College for Women, and the University of California ; Class 
Officer: Secretary 2 ; home in San Francisco, California. 



MORAN, THOMAS JOSEPH, Doctor of Medicine . . . Entered from North 
Montana College, University of Montana, Great Falls College, and the 
University of Chicago; home in Great Falls, Montana. 

MOTTO. EDWIN ANTHONY. Bachelor of Science : Doctor of Medi- 
cine . . . Member of Phi Chi, Volini Medical Society, and Moorhead 
Surgical Society ; entered from Fenwick High School and St. Ambrose 
College; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

NAKUTNY. MICHAEL, Doctor of Medicine . . . Member of 
Phi Chi ; entered from Steinmetz High School, and Wright Junior 
College ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



NENNO, ROBERT PETER, Bachelor of Science: Doctor of Medicine . . . 
Member of Phi Chi, Blue Key, Volini Medical Society, and Honorary 
Seminar ; entered from Bennett High School, University of Notre Dame, and 
Canisius College; Class Officer: Secretary 1; Student Council: Secretary 3, 
President 4 ; home in Buffalo, New York. 

NINE-CURT. JOSE; Doctor of Medicine . . . Member of Phi Beta 
Pi; entered from Mayaquez High School and St. John's University; 
home in Santurce, Puerto Rico. 

OLIVIER!, DANIEL WAYNE. Doctor of Medicine . . . Mem- 
ber of Phi Mu Chi, Phi Chi, Honorary Seminar, Lambda Rho, 
and Moorhead Surgical Society ; entered from Harrison Tech ; 
Wasmann Biological Society 1, 2, 3; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



OLMEDO, JOSE CASIMIRO, Bachelor of Science; Doctor of Medicine . . . 
Member of Phi Chi, Honorary Seminar, and Lambda Rho ; entered from 
Humacao High School and the University of Puerto Rico ; home in 
Humacao, Puerto Rico. 

PASCALE, LUKE RICHARD, Bachelor of Science: Doctor of Medi- 
cine . . . Member of Phi Beta Pi, Blue Key, Volini Medical Society, 
Lambda Rho, and Moorhead Surgical Society ; entered from Mount 
Carmel High School and University of Chicago; Student Council 3; 
home in Chicago, Illinois. 

PECORA. VINCENT, Doctor of Medicine . . . Entered from 
St. Mel's High School, De Paul University, and St. Mary's 
College (Winona) ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 







77 



Semors of 1947 




H^. cs. 



^*- V 



%^R- 1^ 




^ 1 ^--^— -. 



POHLEX, MARION DAMARIS, Bachelor of Arts; Doctor of Medicine . . . 
Member of Alpha Chi Honorary Society, Nu Sigma Phi, Lambda Rho. and 
Moorhead Surgical Society ; entered from Our Lady of the Lake High School 
and the University of Texas ; home in San Antonio, Texas. 

PRIMOMO, JOHN S., Bachelor of Science; Doctor of Medicine . . . 
Member of Phi Sigma of Phi Chi, Lambda Rho; entered from Siena 
College ; home in Albany, New York. 

REVIS, NICHOLAS T., Doctor of Medicine . . . Member of 
Phi Chi, Honorary Seminar, and"Volini Medical Society; entered 
from Crane High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



RIORDAN, GERALD THOMAS, Doctor of Medicine . . . Member of 
Alpha Delta Gamma ; entered from Campion High School and Notre Dame 
University ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

ROSS-DUGGAN, JOHN KIMBELL, Doctor of Medicine . . . Member 
of Phi Beta Pi, Honorary Seminar ; entered from Darlington School 
and the University of Chicago ; home in Rome, Georgia. 

ROST, EIMER CHARLES, JR., Doctor of Medicine . . . Member 
of Sigma Nu Tau, Phi Beta Pi, Moorhead Surgical Society, 
Volini Medical Society, and Lambda Rho ; entered from 
Defiance High School and Defiance College ; home in Defiance, 
Ohio. 



SHEERAN, EMMET THOMAS, .Doctor of Medicine . . . Member of Phi 
Beta Pi, Blue Key ; entered from Ft. Wendelin High School and the 
University of Notre Dame ; home in Fostoria, Ohio. 

SORIANO, DOMINADOR ALEGRADO, Bachelor of Science; Doctor 
of Medicine . . . Member of Volini Medical Society, Lambda Rho; 
entered from Garfield High School (Seattle) and the University of 
Washington ; home in Lobo, Batangas, Philippine Islands. 

SOWKA, ALBIN JOSEPH, Doctor of Medicine . . . Member of 
Sigma Pi Alpha, Honorary Seminar, Volini Medical Society, and 
Lambda Rho ; entered from Holy Trinity High ; Wasmann 
Biological Society 1, 2, 3; Glee Club 2, 3; home in Chicago, 
Illinois. 



SPiNL'ZZA, STEVEN J., Doctor of Medicine . . . Entered from Foreman 
High School and Loyola University ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

STANNARD. DALE HAMPTON, Bachelor of Science: Doctor of 
Medicine . . . Member of Phi Beta Pi, Honorary Seminar, Volini 
Medical Society, and Moorhead Surgical Society ; entered from Ford- 
ham Prep and University of Notre Dame ; home in Jackson Heights, 
Long Island, New York. 

VACHA, VICTORIA B., Bachelor of Serene: Master of Arts: 
Doctor of Medicine . . . Member of Nu Sigma Phi, Mnorhead 
Surgical Society, Volini Medical Society, and Lambdi Rho ; 
entered from Harrison Tech, Northwestern Llniversity, and DePaul 
University; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

WARREN, JEROME, Doctor of Medicine . . . Member of Phi Delta Epsilon, 
Volini Medical Society, Lambda Rho, and Honorary Society ; entered from 
Roosevelt High School and Wright City College ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

WATTS, WALTER FRANCIS, Doctor of Medicine . . . Member of 
Phi Chi, Blue Key, Volini Medical Society, and Moorhead Surgical 
Society; entered from St. Mel High School and St. Mary's University; 
Wasmann Biological Society 2, 3; Intramurals 2, 3; home in Chicago, 
Illinois. 

WEISS. ALLEN HERBERT, Bachelor of Science: Doctor of 
Medicine . . . Member of Phi Beta Pi, Volini Medical Society, 
Lambda Rho, Honorary Society, and Moorhead Surgical Society ; 
entered from Latrobe High School and Saint Vincent College ; 
home in Latrobe, Pennsylvania. 



78 



WHELAN. HARRY GABRIEL, JR.. Bachelor of Arts; Doctor of Medicitie 
. . . Member of Phi Beta Pi, Honorary Society, and Moorhead Surgical 
Society ; entered from Bellarmine College Prep, and Stanford University ; 
home in San Francisco, California. 

WRIGHT, ALLEN L., Bachelor of Science; Doctor of Mediciyie . . . 
Member of Lambda Rho, Volini Medical Society, and Moorhead 
Surgical Society; entered from Jean B. P. Du Sable High School and 
Wilson Junior College; Wasmann Biological Society 1, 3, 4; home in 
Chicago, Illinois. 

BEST, E. JAMES, Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . Member of 
Pi Alpha Lambda and Psi Omega ; entered from Loyola Academy ; 
News 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2; Green Circle 2; Wasmann Biological 
Society 1: President 2; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



BEST, VERNON CLAIRE, Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . Entered from 
Freeport High School and North Central College; home in Davis, Illinois. 

BOBINSKI, MITCHELL M., Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . Member 
of Psi Omega; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

BRZEZINSKI, STANLEY DAVID, Doctor of Dental Surgery 
. . . Member of Psi Omega ; entered from Austin High School ; 
home in Chicago, Illinois. 



CARLUCCI, RICHARD ALBERT, Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . Member 
of Phi Mu Chi and Xi Psi Phi; entered from Austin High School and John 
Carrol University; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

CARPENTER, DONALD LEE, Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . Member 
of Delta Sigma Delta ; entered from Perrysville High School and the 
University of Indiana; Class Officer: President 1; home in Perrysville, 
Indiana. 

CARROL, ROBERT JOSEPH, Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . 
Member of Phi Mu Chi. Psi Omega, Alpha Chi, Alpha Sigma 
Nu, and Blue Key ; entered from St. Ignatius High School ; 
Sodality: Prefect 3; Class Officer: President 3; Green Circle 2, 
3 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



CATRAMBONE, DOMINIC JOSEPH, Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . 
Member of Xi PsJ Phi and Alpha Chi ; entered from Manley High School 
and Wright Junior College; home in Chicago. Illinois. 

CHING, KOON SUT, Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . Member of 
Delta Sigma Delta ; entered from Punahou Academy (Honolulu, 
Hawaii) and Northwestern University; home in Honolulu, Hawaii. 

COGLIANESE. BENJAMIN R., Doctor of Dental Surge.-y . . . 
Member of Psi Omega ; entered from Harper High School ; home 
in Chicago, Illinois. 



CONSTANTINE. AARAY, Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . Member of Alpha 
Delta Gamma and Delta Sigma Delta ; entered from Amundsen High School 
and University of Illinois ; Wasmann Biological Society 1 , 2 ; home in 
Chicago, Illinois. 

CORY, CLIFFORD DEAN, Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . Member 
of Psi Omega ; entered from Great Fall High School, Macalestar 
College, and Dubuque University; home in Great Falls, Iowa. 

DOLAN. WALTER JOSEPH. Bachelor of Arts: Doctor of 
Dental Surgery . . . Entered from Boston College High School 
and Boston College; home in Billerica, Massachusetts. 







i^& 



79 




DOLCE. PETER LAWRENCE, Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . Member of 
Alpha Chi and the University Club ; entered from St. Philip High School ; 
Track Team 2 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

DOWLING, ROBERT, Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . Member of 
Alpha Gamma Rho; entered from New Mexico A. & M. and the 
University of Connecticut; home in Norwalk, Connecticut. 

FIJAL, CHESTER PHILIP, Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . 
Member of Psi Omega ; entered from Englewood High School ; 
home in Chicago, Illinois. 



FRETT, WILLIAM ROBERT, Doctor of Denial Surgery . . . Member of 
Apha Delta Gamma, Delta Sigma Delta. Alpha Sigma Nu and Blue Key ; 
entered from St. George High School and De Paul University; Green Circle 
2 ; Glee Club 2 ; Wasmann Biological Society: Secretary 2 ; Class Officer: 
President 2, 3 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

GORDON, MORRIS DAVID, Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . Member 
of Alpha Omega ; entered from Ogden High School and the University 
of Utah ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

GREEN, GEORGE HALE, Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . Mem- 
ber of Psi Omega and Blue Key; Class Officer: Treasurer, 3; 
entered from Jacksonville High School and Illinois College; 
home in Jacksonville, Illinois. 



GRIFFIN, JAMES H., Doctor of Denial Surgery . . . Member of Alpha 
Delta Gamma, Alpha Chi, and Delta Sigma Delta ; entered from Loyola 
Academy ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

HASS, ROBERT LOUIS. Bachelor of Science: Doctor of Dental 

Surgery . . . Member of Psi Omega and Blue Key ; entered from 

Harrison Technical High School. Central Y.M.C.A. College, and 

Texas A. & M. ; home in Chicago. Illinois. 

HERMSMEIR, WILLIAM EDWARD. Doctor of Dental Surgery 
. . . Member of Psi Omega ; entered from Frceport High School 
and University of Wisconsin ; home in Frceport, Illinois. 



KOESTER. WILLIAM MARTIN, JR., Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . 
Member of Delta Sigma Delta; entered from Central Catholic High School, 
St. Joseph's College, Rutgers University, and Washington University; home 
in Fort Wayne, Indiana. 

KROL, ARTHUR JOSEPH, Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . Member 
of Sigma Pi Alpha ; entered from St. Ignatius High School ; Sodality 
1, 2; Wasmann Biological Society 1, 2; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

KRUEGER. JEROME JOSEPH, Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . 
Member of Sigma Pi Alpha and Psi Omega ; entered from De 
Paul Academy and De Paul University; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



KUZNETSKY, EARL NORMAN, Doc/or of Dental Surgery . . . Member 
of Alpha Omega ; entered from Von Steuben High School and the University 
of Illinois; Class Officer: Secretary 4; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

McHALE, JOHN JOSEPH, Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . Member 
of Psi Omega , entered from St. Ignatius High School ; home in 
Chicago, Illinois. 



80 



Seniors of 1947 



NICOLETTI, JOSEPH PAUL, Bacheht of Arts, Doctor of Dental Surgery 
. . . Member of Alpha Chi ; entered from Riverside High School afld North 
Central College; home in Villa Park, Illinois. 

NYSTUL, RODERICK L, Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . Member of 
Delta Sigma Delta ; entered from North Park Academy and the Uni%'er- 
sity of Pennsylvania; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

OSTROM, LEONARD J., Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . Member 
of Psi Omega and Blue Key; entered from St. Mary's College and 
Northwestern L'niversity ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



PACOCHA, EDMUND CASIMIR, Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . Member 
of Alpha Chi and Xi Psi Phi ; entered from Thomas Kelly High School, 
Woodrow Wilson College, and the University of Pennsylvania ; home in 
Chicago, Illinois. 

PIOTROWSKI, LEON. Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . Member of 
Delta Sigma Delta ; entered from Schurz High School and Wright 
Junior College ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



RUSZKOWSKI, FELIX F., Doctor of Dental Surgery 
from Weber High School; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



, Entered 



SCHWARTZ, ARTHUR, Doctor of Denial Surgery . . . Member of Alpha 
Omega : entered from Marshall High School and Wright Junior College ; 
home in Chicago, Illinois. 

SCISLOWICZ, EMIL JOHN, Doctor of Denial Surgery . . . Entered 
from Holy Trinity and De Paul University, University of Wisconsin, 
University of Illinois, Washington and Lee University, University of 
Utah, and the University of Chicago; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

SINK, HAROLD EUGENE, Bachelor of Science: Doctor of 
Denial Surgery . . . Member of Delta Tau Delta and Delta Sigma 
Delta; entered from Redford High School and Hillsdale College; 
home in Detroit, Michigan. 



STRENK, ROBERT STEPHEN, Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . Member of 
Xi Psi Phi ; entered from Kelly High School and Woodrow Wilson Junior 
College; Class Olficer: Vice-President 5; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

SyPNIEWSKI, ALOYSIUS JOHN, Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . 
Member of Xi Psi Phi and Blue Key; entered from Bowen High and 
Wilson Junior College and the University of Washington ; home in 
Chicago, Illinois. 

TARSITANO, JOHN JOSEPH. Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . 
Member of Phi Mu Chi and Xi Psi Phi ; entered from McKinley 
High School and De Paul University ; Green Circle 1, 2 ; 
Wasmann Biological Society I, 2; Class Officer: Vice-President 4; 
home in Chicago, Illinois. 



TOTH, JOSEPH A., Bachelor of Science; Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . 
Entered from Central Catholic High, St. Joseph's College, and the University 
of Notre Dame; home in South Bend, Indiana. 

TOVSTEIN, BYRON COLMAN. Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . 
Entered from South Shore High School, Central Y.M.C.A. College, 
and Denison University ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

TSOFLIAS, NICK C, Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . Member 
of Xi Psi Phi; entered from Froebel High School (Gary, Ind.) 
and Purdue University ; home in Gary, Indiana. 




81 



Seniors of 1947 




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f^^35r ^'1 






WILKIN, DONALD N., Bachelor of Science; Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . 
Member of Delta Sigma Delta ; entered from Fenwick High School and 
St. Ambrose College ; home in Cicero, Illinois. 

WISOTZKY, JOEL. Bachelor of Science: Doctor of Dental Surgery 
. . . Entered from John Marshall High School, Herzl College, Wilson 
Junior College and Central Y.M.C.A. College ; home in Chicago, 

Illinois. 

ZIMMERMAN, JACK WILLIAM, Doctor of Dental Surgery . . . 
Member of Alpha Omega ; entered from Roosevelt High School ; 
home in Chicago, Illinois. 



ACTON. CLARE CONNORS, Bachelor of Arts . . . Member of Pi Alpha 
Lambda, Beta Pi. and Blue Key ; entered from Loyola Academy ; Dean's 
Key 4; News 1; News Editor 2; Loyolan 1: Editor 4; Freshman Debate 
Winner 1 ; Cudahy Forum 1 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

ADLER, HENRY FRANK, Bachelor of Philosophy . . . Entered from 
Hirsch Senior High School and the University of Alabama: home in 
Chicago, Illinois. 

BERGER, EMIL A.. Bachelor of Philosophy . . . Member of 
Phi Mu Chi ; entered from Glenbard High School, Glen Ellyn, 
Illinois ; home in West Chicago. Illinois. 



BIALEK. HENRY FRANK, Bachelor of Science . 
Technical High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

BONA, JOHN J., Bachelor of Science 
School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered from Harrison 



Entered from Weber High 



BORUCKI. ARTHUR J., Bachelor of Scietjce . . . Entered from 
Grand Rapids Central Catholic High School and Aquinas Col- 
lege ; Wasmann Biological Society 1, 2 ; Chemistry Club 1, 2 ; 
home in Grand Rapids, Michigan. 



BUCKLEY, DON JOSEPH. Bac/^elor of Philosophy . . . Entered from Leo 
High School and St. Louis University; Dean's Key 4; News 2, 3: Editorial 
Writer 4 ; Cadence: Editor 4 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

BUCKLEY, WILLIAM JAMES, Bachelor of Arts . . . Entered from 
Loyola Academy and West Baden College ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

BULGER, JOHN BURTON. Bachelor of Philosophy . . . Mem- 
., ^ ber of Pi Gamma Mut entered from St. George High School and 

Marmion Military Academy; Bellarmine Philosophy Club 1, 2; 
■ _ Sodality 1, 2; Le Circle Francais 1, 2; Green Circle 1, 2, 4: 

President .3 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



BURKE, JOHN THOMAS, Bachelor of Philosophy . . . Member of Univer- 
sity Club and Blue Key ; entered from De Paul Academy, Central Missouri 
State Teachers, and the University of Notre Dame; Veteran's Club 2; News 
3 ; Green Circle ; Vice-President 4 ; Orchestra 4 ; Intramural Basketball 4 ; 
home in Chicago, Illinois. 

CELLITTI, RAYMOND ANTHONY, Bacfjelor of Science . . . Entered 
from St. Ignatius High School and John Carroll University ; home in 
Chicago. Illinois. 

CRAINE, JOSEPH B.. Bachelor of Science . . . Entered from 
De Paul Academy, John Carroll University and Illinois Institute 
of Technology; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



82 



CUNNINGHAM, BERNARD GEORGE, Bachelor of Science . . . Member 
of Pi Alpha Lambda and Beta Pi ; entered from Loyola Academy and Kansas 
State College; Class Officer: Secretary 1; Sodality 1, 2; News 1: Managing 
Editor 2; Loyolan I, 2; Intramural Medalist 1, 2, 4; home in Wilmette, 
Illinois. 

DOYLE. JAMES PATRICK, Bachelor of Philosophy . . . Member of 
Pi Alpha Lambda ; entered from Loyola Academy and John Carroll Uni- 
versity; Sodality 1; Varsity Basketball 1, 2; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; 
home in Chicago, Illinois. 

EGAN, RAYMOND ALOYSIUS, Bachelor of Arls . . . Member 
of Alpha Delta Gamma ; entered from Campion High School ; 
News 3 ; Spanish Club: Vice-President 3 ; Curtain Guild 2, 3 ; 
home in Oak Park, Illinois. 

ELWARD, PAUL FRANCIS, Bachelor of Arts . . . Member of Alpha Sigma 
Nu, Blue Key, and Phi Alpha Rho ; entered from Loyola Academy ; Sodality 
1 ,2, 4 ; Debating 1 : President 2 : Vice-President 4 ; News 1, 2: Editorial 
Staff 4 ; Loyolan: Activities Editor 4 ; Bellarmine Philosophy Club 4 ; 
Naghten Debate Medal 1 ; Freshman Debate Medal 1 ; Harrison Oratorical 
Medal I; NFCCS, Senior Delegate 1, 2: Regional President 2: 3rd Vice- 
President 1; NFCCS Forensic Chairman 4: 3rd National Vice-President 4; 
Greek Club 4 ; Thomas More Club 4 ; Green Circle 4 ; NFCCS to NSO 
Conference 4 ; International Relations Club 1,2,4; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

EVANS. RICHARD CARL, Bachelor of Science . . . Entered from 
St. Bede High School and Duquesne University ; home in Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. 

FORESTER, URBAN MICHAEL. Jr., Bachelor of Philosophy 
. . . Member of Phi Mu Chi and Blue Key; entered from Cam- 
pion High School and John Carroll University ; Green Circle 4 ; 
home in Glencoe, Illinois. 



GENSERT, JOSEPH F., Bachelor of Arts . . . Member of University Club 
and Blue Key; entered from St. Joseph Academy and St. Joseph College; 
Sodality 2, 3, 4 ; News 3. 4 ; Cadence: Managing Editor 4 ; Green Circle 4 ; 
Glee Club 2, 3, 4 ; Orchestra: President 4; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

GERINGER, RAYMOND JOSEPH, Bachelor of Philosophy . . . Mem- 
ber of Alpha Delta Gamma and Blue Key; Class Officers: President 4; 
Dean's Key 4; Green Circle 4; Student Council 4; Loyolan 4; Inter- 
national Relations Club 4; Track 2; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



GLEASON. JOHN B., Bachelor of Science 
home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Sodality 1, 2 ; 



GRENNAN, EDMUND JAMES, Bachelor of Philosophy . . . Member of 
University Club ; entered from St. Ignatius High School ; Green Circle 3 ; 
Curtain Guild 1, 2, 3: Director 4; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

GUTIERREZ, PETER EMANUEL. Bachelor of Scieiice . . . Member 
of Blue Key and Phi Alpha Rho; entered from Horace Mann High 
School and The Citadel ; Debating 3: Treasurer 4; Wasmann Biological 
Society 3. 4 ; home in Gary, Indiana. 

HASTEN, ERWIN JOSEPH, Jr., Bachelor of Science . . . Entered 
from Loyola Academy, Northwestern University, and the Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



JACKWERTH. ROBERT FRANCIS, Bachelor of Philosophy . . . Entered 
from St. George High School and Loras College; Golf 2, 3. 4; home in 
Chicago, Illinois. 

KAWULA, LEONARD E., Bachelor of Science . . . Member of Phi 
Mu Chi; entered from Harrison Tech; Chemistry Club 3, 4; Choir 2; 
home in Chicago, Illinois. 

KILLACKEY, BERNARD ANTHONY, Bachelor of Philosophy 
. . . Member of Delta Theta Phi ; entered from Fenwick High 
School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 




83 








-^ » 



^^4: 




KOLB. ROBERT FRANCIS. Bachelor of Philosophy . . . Entered from St. 
Gregory High School and John Carroll University; Glee Club 1, 2 ; home in 
Chicago, Illinois. 

KREWER, WILLIAM ANTHONY, Bachelor of Science . . . Member 
of Lambda Chi Sigma; entered from Loyola Academy; Chemistry Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Freshman Basketball 1: home in Slcokie, Illinois. 

LAMBIN, HENRY JOSEPH, Jr., Bachelor of Arts . . . Entered 
from Loyola Academy; Curtain Guild: Stage Manager 4; Bellar- 
mine Philosophy Club 2, 3 ; Rough Writers 1, 2 ; home in 
Chicago, Illinois. 



LANS, SHERMAN BENNET. Bachelor of Science . . . Entered from Lane 
Technical High School and Wright Junior College; Bellarmine Philosophy 
Club 2, 3; Psychology Club 4; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

LATINO, VINCENT MICHAEL, Bachelor of Science . . . Entered 
from St. Ignatius High School ; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4 ; home in River 
Grove, Illinois. 

LINTON, JOHN RIGGS, Bachelor of Arts . . , Entered from 
Loyola Academy and the University of Notre Dame; News I; 
Spanish Club: Vice-President 2; Candle Club 2; home in 
Chicago, Illinois. 



MALEY, ROBERT CARLETON, Bachelor of Science in Commerce . . . 
Entered from Albany High School and Siena College ; home in Albany, 
New York. 

MAZURK, L. ROBERT, Bachelor of Science . . . Member of Amer- 
ican Chemical Society; entered from St. Philip High School; Chemistry 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

McGRATH, JOHN FRANCIS, Bachelor of Philosophy . . , 
Member of Alpha Delta Gamma and Blue Key ; entered from 
Regis High School and Regis College; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4: Vice- 
President 1 ; Bellarmine Philosophy Club: Secretary 4: President 
4 ; International Relations Club 1 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



McKERR, GEORGE WILLIAM. Bachelor of Philosophy .... Member of 
Alpha Delta Gamma ; entered from Fcnwick High School ; Sodality 1, 2 ; 
Green Circle 4; Glee Club 4; Candidate for Student Council President 3; 
home in River Forest, Illinois. 

McKITRICK, JOSEPH PATRICK. Bachelor of Science . . . Member 
of University Club; entered from St. Xavier (Cincinnati, Ohio) ; Sodal- 
ity 2; News 1, 2: Sports Editor 3; Green Circle 1, 2: Vice-President 4; 
Bellarmine Philosophy Club 2 ; Chemistry Club 2 ; home in Oak Park, 
Illinois. 

McNALLY, JOHN JOSEPH. Bachelor of Arls . . . Entered from 
Loyola Academy and the Lfniversity of Oregon ; Track 1 ; Cross 

Country 1 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



ML'RPHY. JOHN FRANCIS, Bachelor of Philosophy . . . Member of Alpha 
Delta Gamma ; entered from St. Ignatius High School and John Carroll 
L'niversity; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

O'CONNOR, GERALD MICHAEL, Bachelor of Philosophy . . . Mem- 
ber of Alpha Delta Gamma ; entered from St. Bede High School (Peru, 
Indiana ) , Bradley University, and John Carroll University ; Class 
Officer: Vice-President 4; home in Peoria, Illinois. 

O'NEIL, JAMES WILIIAM, Jr., Bachelor of Arts . . . Entered 
from St. Ignatius High School ; Sodality 1, 2 ; Loyolan 3 ; Vet- 
eran's Club 3; Curtain Guild 1, 2, 3, 4; home in Chicago, 

Illinois. 



84 



Seniors of 1947 



O'NEILL, EUGENE JOHN, Bachelor of Philosophy . . . Member of Uni- 
versity Club ; entered from St. Ignatius High School ; home in Chicago, 
Illinois. 

QUINN, DOMINIC R., Bachelor of Arts . . . Entered from Loyola 
Academy; News 2: Feature Editor 3; Quarterly 2: Managing Editor 3; 
Curtain Guild 4 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

RODIA, JACOB S., Bachelor of Science . . . Member of Lambda 
Chi Sigma ; entered from Manley High School and John Carroll 
University; Basketball 1, 2; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



TURNER. MICHAEL JAY, Jr., Bachelor of Arts . . . Member of Pi Alpha 
Lambda and Blue Key ; entered from Loyola Academy ; Dean's Key 4 ; 
Student Council 4; Green Circle 4; News 1, 4; Classics Club 1 ; Bellarmine 
Philosophy Club 2 ; Intramural Board 3 ; Senior Director 4 ; Monogram Club 
4 ; Intramural Gold Medal 3, 4 ; home in Evanston, Illinois. 

VON EBERS, PAUL JOSEPH, Bachelor of Philosophy . . . Entered 
from Quigley Seminary, University of Missouri, University of Nancy 
( France ) , and University of Vienna (Austria ) ; home in Chicago, 
Illinois. 

WELDON. WILLIAM GLYNN. Bachelor of Philosophy . . . 
Member of Pi Alpha Lambda; entered from Loyola Academy; 
Curtain Guild 2 ; Green Circle 2, 3 ; Harrison Oratorical Finals 
3 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



BEST. JOHN JAMES, Bachelor of Science in Commerce . . . Entered from 
Loyola Academy; Freshman Basketball 1; Intramurals 1, 2. 3; home in 
Chicago, Illinois. 

BRANSFIELD. JOHN, Jr., Bachelor of Science in Commerce . . . 
Member of Pi Alpha Lambda, entered from Culver Military Academy; 
home m Chicago, Illinois. 

BUETTGEN. WINAND CHARLES. Bachelor of Science in Com- 
merce . . . Member of Pi Gamma Mu ; entered from St. George 
High School; Green Circle 1: Vice-President 2; Orchestra 1, 2; 
Glee Club 1, 2; Veteran's Club 4; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



COOK. FRANK J., Bachelor of Philosophy . . . Entered from St. Ignatius 
High School and the University of Indiana; Chemistry Club 1, 2; home in 
Chicago, Illinois. 

FYANES, VERNE MARY, Bachelor of Science . . . Entered from 
Academy of Our Lady and St. Xavier University ; Wasmann Biological 
Society 1, 2. 3; Chemistry Club 3; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

HAAKER, GEORGE F. Jr.. Bachelor of Science in Commerce 
. . . Member of Tau Kappa Epsilon ; entered from St. Philip High 
School and the University of Illinois; home in Berwyn, Illinois. 



KELEHER. JOHN THOMAS, Bachelor of Philosophy . . . Member of 
Alpha Delta Gamma; entered from Quigley Preparatory Seminary and the 
University of Notre Dame; Green Circle: Vice-President 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2; 
International Relations Club 1. 2; Wasmann Biological Society 1, 2; Philos- 
ophy Seminar 1, 2; Student Council 1, 2; Debating 1, 2; home in Chicago, 
Illinois. 

KENNEDY, GERALD J.. Bachelor of Science in Commerce . . . 
Entered from Leo High School and Colgate University; Sodality 1. 2; 
Economics Club 2 ; Debating 4 ; Curtain Guild 1 ; Glee Club 1 ; Vet- 
eran's Club 4; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

LANE, THOMAS JAMES, Bachelor of Science in Commerce . . . 
Member of University Club; entered from St. Patrick Academy 
and Wright Junior College; Class Officer: President of Commerce 
School 4; home in Chicago, Illinois. 




85 



s. 



eniors of 1947 




LIMACHER, JOSEPH JOHN, Bachelor of Science in Commerce 
from Joliet Township High School; home in JoHet. Illinois. 



Entered 



MALONE, JOHN LEE III. Bachelor of Science in Commerce . . . 
Member of Alpha Delta Gamma ; entered from West Philadelphia 
Catholic High School and Villanova College ; Class Officer: Commerce 
School Treasurer 4 ; News: Commerce School Editor 4 ; Loyolan 4 ; 
home in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

McDERMOTT, FRANCIS PATRICK, Bachelor of Science in 
Commerce . . . Member of Alpha Delta Gamma; entered trom 
Mount Carmel High School and the University of Durham (Eng- 
land) ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



McDERMOTT, ROBERT FRANCIS, Bachelor of Science in Commerce . . . 
Entered from St. Philip High School; Class Office: Vice-President of Com- 
merce School 4; News: Business Manager 2 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

McGOWAN, ROBERT DANIEL, Bachelor of Science in Commerce . . 
Entered from St. Mel High School and North Carolina State College: 
Sodality 1, 2; News 1, 2; Curtam Guild 1, 2; Glee Club 1; Intra- 
murals 2: Manager 1; Track and Cross Country Manager 2; Veteran's 
Club 4; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

McGregor, WILLIAM JOSEPH, Bachelor of Science in Com- 
merce . . . Member of University Club ; entered from Fenwick 
High School ; Class Officer: President 3 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



McNULTY, JAMES MICHAEL, Bachelor of Science in Commerce . . . 
Member of Pi Alpha Lambda; entered from Loyola Academy; Sodality 1, 2, 
3; Green Circle 1, 2; Student Council 3; News 1; Commerce Club 1, 2; 
International Relations Club 1, 2 ; Assistant Varsity Basketball Manager 1, 
2 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

NELSON, HARRY KENNETH, Bachelor of Philosophy . . . Entered 
from Mount Vernon High School and Northern Baptist Theological 
Seminary; home in Warren, Oregon. 

PARKER, ROBERT JAMES, Bachelor of Science in Commerce 
. . . Member of University Club ; entered from Fenwick ; home 
in Chicago, Illinois. 



RAFFERTY. CHARLES JEROME, Bachelor of Science in CommerrP . . . 
Member of Pi Alpha Lambda ; entered from Hirsch High School ; Loyolan 1 ; 
News 1 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

RUSSELL, DANIEL JOSEPH. Bachelor of Science in Commerce . . . 
Member of University Club , entered from Loyola Academy ; Sodality 
1, 2, 3, 4 ; German Club 1, 2; Debating I ; Economics Club 1, 2, 3; 
Intramurals 1, 2, 3 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

RUSSELL, JOHN WILLIAM, Bachelor of Science in Commerce 
. . . Member of University Club; entered from Loyola Academy; 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Debating 1, 2: Economics Club 1, 2, 3; 
Bellarmine Philosophy Club 2, 3 ; home. in Chicago, Illinois. 



RUSSELL. RUSS WILLIAM, Bachelor of Science in Commerce . . . Member 
of Sigma Phi ; entered from Austin High School and the University of Wis- 
consin ; home in Chicago, Illmois. 

SCHIAVONE, JOHN MICHAEL. Bachelor of Science in Commerce 
. . . Member of University Club ; entered from Loyola Academy ; 
Sodality 1, 2, 3 ; News 1, 2, 3; Green Circle 1, 2 ,3; Monogram Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Board 1, 2, 3; home in Evanston, Illinois. 

SOELTER. EDWARD L., Bachelor of Science in Commerce . . . 
Member of University Club; entered from Lane Technical High 
School: home in Chicago, Illinois. 



86 



SULLIVAN, ANDREW JEROME, Bachelor of Philosophy 
2, 3; Intramural Manager 3; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Sodality 1, 



McCLOSKEY, HARRY LAURENCE, Bachelor of Science in Commerce 
. . . Entered from Mount Carmel High School and John Carroll Univer- 
sity ; member of Alpha Delta Gamma ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

. McENROE, THOMAS PATRICK, Bachelor of Science in Com- 
merce . . . Entered from Fenwick High School ; home in Oak 
Park, Illinois. 



O'BRIEN, ROBERT THOMAS, Bachelor of Science in Commerce . . . Entered 
from Loyola Academy, Western Michigan College, and De Paul University ; 
member of University Club; Class Officer: Secretary 4; Green Circle 4; 
Intramurals 3, 4; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

RILEY, WILLIAM EDWARD, Bachelor of Science in Commerce . . . 
Entered from Fenwick High School and the University of Notre Dame; 
member of University Club and Alpha Sigma Nu ; Sodality 1, 2, 3; 
Student Council 2, 3; home in Oak Park, Illinois. 

SIMON, JOSEPH JOHN, Bachelor of Philosophy, and Doctor 
Juris . . . Member of Pi Alpha Lambda and Blue Key; entered 
from Loyola Academy and Columbia University; Sodality I, 2; 
Green Circle 2, 3, 4; Debating 1, 2; News 2, 3; International 
Relations Club 1, 2, 3; Thomas More Club 3, 4; home in 
Chicago, Illinois. 




8/ 




ALTEN. MARY LORETTO, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Immaculate 
Conception High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant Choir 1, 2, 3; home 
in Evanston, Illinois. 

ANFANG, SHIRLEY DOLORES, Bachelor of Science. Registered 
Nurse . . . Entered from Academy of Notre Dame; Sodality 1, 2, 3: 
Plain Chant Choir 1, 2, 3; home in Belleville, Illinois. 

BAYAK, ANN MARIE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Calumet High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant Choir 1, 2, 
3 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



BREEN, PATRICIA JOAN, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Parker 
High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant Choir 1, 2, 3; home in Chicago, 
Illinois. 

BUSSE, LORRAINE MARIE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Gage 
Park High School: Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant Choir 1, 2, 3; home 
in Chicago, Illinois. 

CORCORAN, SISTER WINIFRED, Bachelor of Science and Reg- 
istered Nurse; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



COTTON, ELIZABETH JANE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from St. 
Thomas the Apostle High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant Choir 1, 2, 
3 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

CUNNEA, MARY JANE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from St. 
Thomas Aquinas High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant Choir 1, 
2, 3 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

DAGES, DOLORES ANNETTE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Loogootee High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant Choir 
I, 2, 3: home in Loogootee, Indiana. 



DEASKA, MARY VIRGINIA, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Loretto 
Woodlawn High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant Choir 1, 2, 3; home 
in Chicago, Illinois. 

DEGITZ, MARGARET ANN, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Central High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant Choir I, 2, 3; 
home in Fort Wayne, Indiana. 

DE MOSS, YVONNE ROSE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
St. Casimir High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant Choir 1, 
2, 3 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



DONOVAN, ELIZABETH LOUISE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from St. 
Xavier's Academy; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant Choir 1, 2, 3; home in 
LaSalle, Illinois. 

DOYLE, SISTER NOREEN, Bachelor of Science and Registered Nurse: 
home in Chicago, Illinois. 

GILMARTIN, MARY ADELEINE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from St. Mary's High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant 
Choir 1, 2, 3; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



88 



Seniors of 1947 



HALLESY, LAUREL JEAN, KegUtered Nurse . . . Entered from Loretto 
Academy; Sodality I, 2, 3; Plain Chant Choir 1, 2, 3; home in Sault Ste. 
Marie, Michigan. 

HAYES, ROSE BERNADETTE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Providence Hjgh School; Sodality: Vice-President 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant 
Choir 1,2,3; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

HEBEL, MARY ELISE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from St. 
Xavier's Academy; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant Choir 1, 2, 3; 
home in LaSalle, Illinois. 



HOULE, MARY RITA, Bachelor of Science and Registered Nurse . . . 
Entered from Mercy High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Plain Chant Choir I, 
2, 3, 4 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

IWASON, THERESA MARY, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Kelly High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant Choir 1, 2, 3; home 
in Chicago, Illinois. 

KELLEHER, PATRICIA JANE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Mercy High School; Sodality I, 2. 3: Plain Chant Choir 1, 
2, 3 : home in Chicago, Illinois. 



KELLY, DOLORES HELEN. Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Harper 
High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant Choir 1, 2, 3; home in Chicago, 
Illinois. 

KELLY, MARY PEARL, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Daven- 
port High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3 ; Plain Chant Choir 1, 2, 3; home 
in Davenport, Iowa. 

KERWIN, RITA FRANCIS, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Englewood High School; Sodality I, 2. 3; Plain Chant Choir 
1, 2, 3; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



KUBOUICH, MARGARET MARY, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Mercy High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant Choir 1, 2, 3; home in 
Chicago, Illinois. 

LE LEIVRE, GLORIA FRANCES, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Loretto High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant Choir 1, 2, 3; 
home in Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. 

LISTER, MARY JANE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Loretto Woodlawn High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant 
Choir 1, 2, 3; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



MAGUIRE, MARY ISABEL, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Parker 
High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant Choir 1, 2, 3; home in Chicago, 
Illinois. 

MAHER, WINIFRED AGNES, Bachelor of Science and Registered 
Nurse . . . Entered from St. Mary's High School ; Class Officer: Secre- 
tary 3: Sodality 1: Secretary 2; Prefect 3; Plain Chant Choir 1, 2, 3; 
home in Chicago, Illinois. 

MALESKE, HELEN PATRICIA, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Saginaw High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant Choir 
1, 2, 3; home in Saginaw, Michigan. 




89 



Seniors of 1947 




McKEOUN. JEAN THERESE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Visita- 
tion High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant Choir 1, 2, 3; home in 
Chicago, Illinois. 

MEEHAN, CONSUELO THERESE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from St. Thomas Aquinas High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3 ; Plain Chant 
Choir 1, 2, 3; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

MICHAELS, JEAN MARIE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Calumet High School; Sodality 1, 2, '3; Pfain Chant Choir 1, 2, 
3 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



O'HARA, COLLETTE CATHERINE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Mercy High School; Sodality I, 2, 3: Apostolic Committee; Plain Chant 
Choir 1, 2, 3; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

PETRONE, ELIZABETH JANE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Marywood High School (Evanston); Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant 
Choir 1, 2, 3; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

POWER, MARY THERESE. Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
St. Thomas the Apostle; Sodality 1, 2: Treasurer 3; Plain Chant 
Choir 1,2; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



RACIC. MARGARET JOSEPHINE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from St. 
Thomas the Apostle; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant Choir 1, 2, 3; home in 
Chicago, Illinois. 



RAISCH, VIRGINIA. Registered Nurse 
High School ; home in Davenport, Iowa. 



Entered from Davenport 



REDPATH, WANDA JEAN. Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
St. Scholastica's Academy; Class Officer; Treasurer 3; Sodality 

1, 2, 3 ; Plain Chant Choir 1, 2, 3 ; home in McAlester, Oklahoma. 



ROSE, ANN THERESE. Registered Nurse . . 
Academy; Sodality 1, 2, 3: Plain Chant Choir 1, 
home in Ottawa, Illinois. 



Entered from St. Xavier 
, 3; Delegate to S.S.C.A. ; 



RCSSITER, MARY JOHANNA, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
St. Thomas the Apostle; Sodality 1, 2, 3: Plain Chant Choir 1, 2, 3; 
home in Chicago, Illinois. 

SCHMITT, HONORA AGNES, Bachelor of Science and Reg- 
istered Nurse . . . Entered from Decatur Catholic High School ; 
Class Officer: President 4; Sodality 1, 2, 4; Prefect 3; Plain 
Chant Choir 1, 2, 3, 4; home in Decatur, Indiana. 



SHEEHAN, MARY ELIZABETH, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Loretto (Englewood) High School ; Sodality I, 2: Vice-Prefect 3 ; Plain 
Chant Choir 1, 2, 3; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

SILVA, CECILIA MOJICA. Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Bogota High School (Colombia) ; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant Choir 
1, 2, 3; home in Columbia, South America. 

STERMER, LILLIAN EMILY, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Visitation High School"; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant 
Choir 1, 2, 3 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



90 



SUBER, BERNADINE SOPHIE. Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Lourdes 
High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant Choir 1, 2, 3; home in Chicago, 
Illinois. 

SUTLEY, MARY ELAINE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Visita- 
tion High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant Choir 1, 2, 3; home 
in Chicago, Illinois. 

THULIS, MARGARET ANN, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from St. Thomas Aquinas High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain 
Chant Choir 1, 2, 3; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



ULLRICH, DOROTHY MAE, Bachelor of Science and Registsered Nurse 
. . . Entered from St. Xavier's Academy; Class Officer: Vice-President 3; 
Sodality 1, 2, 3 ; Plain Chant Choir 1, 2, 3 ; Delegate to S.S.C.A. ; home in 
Ottawa, Illinois. 

VIGNONO. LILIA ANNETTE. Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Harper High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Plain Chant Choir 1, 2. 3; 
home in Omaha, Nebraska. 

WALSH, ANNA MARIE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
St. Mary of Perpetual Help High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; 
Plain Chant Choir 1, 2, 3; Social Action Committee; home in 
Chicago, Illinois. 



WIELAND, ELIZABETH JANE. Bachelor of Science; Registered Nurse 
. . . Entered from St. Mar>- of Perpetual Help and St. Mary of the Wood, 
Sodality 1, 2, 3 ; Plain Chant Choir 1, 2, 3 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

ZDERAD. LORETTA THERESE, Bachelor of Science and Registered 
Nurse . . . Entered from Sacred Heart (Lisle, Illinois) ; Sodality 1, 2, 
3 ; Plain Chant Choir 1, 2, 3 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

AGAZIM, PATRICIA GERALDINE, Registered Nurse . . . 
Entered from Senn High School; Eliza-Beacon: Feature Writer; 
home in Chicago, Illinois. 



BARKER, LOIS EUGENIA, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Lincoln 
High School (Milwaukee) ; home in Merton, Wisconsin. 



BOEHMER, KATHERINE MARIE, Registered Nurse . 
from Angel Guardian High School ; home in Gary, Indiana. 



Entered 



BURBUL, ANTONIA VICTORIA, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Superior East High School; home in Superior, Wisconsin. 



CASKEY, MARIE VIOLET, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from West 
DePere High School ; home in West DePere, Wisconsin. 

COMMONS. DOROTHY JEANETTE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from St. Josephinum High School ; home in La Porte, Indiana. 

CUKIERSKI. ANNE CECILIA, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from St. Josephinum High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 




93 




DALL, FRANCES EILEEN. Registered Nurse 
High School ; home in Lancaster, Wisconsin. 



. Entered from Lancaster 



DEERING, HENRIETTA LUCILLE. Registered Nurse . . 
from St. Sebastian's High School; home in Chicago. Illinois. 



Entered 



DENNISTON. DOROTHY ANN. Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Immaculate Conception High School; home in Lombard. 
Illinois. 



DEVINE, BEATRICE AMANDA, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
McDonell Memorial High School ; home in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin. 

DOOLEY, AGNES THERESA, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Grovertown High School ; Class Officer: President 4 ; home in New 
York City, New York. 

EAGEN, LOUISE PATRICIA, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Greenfield High School ; home in Greenfield. Iowa. 



FRANK. PATRICIA ANN, Registered Nurse 
High School ; home in South Bend, Indiana. 



Entered from John Adams 



FRIES, FLORENCE MARY, Registered Nurse 
Loretto High School ; home in Chicago. Illinois. 



Entered from 



GIGUERE. DOLORES MARIE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from St. Patrick's High School ; home in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. 



GILROY, LUELLA TERESE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Calumet 
High School; Loyola News: Correspondent; Eliza-Beacon: Business Editor; 
home in Chicago, Illinois. 



GLAVIN, MARY ELIZABETH, Registered Nurse . . . 
Parker High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

GREENBAUM, LOUELLA, Registered Nurse . . . 
Mallinckrodt High School; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered from 



Entered from 



HAGERSTROM, IRENE MAE. Registered Nurse 
High School ; home in Chicago. Illinois. 

HESLY, LORAINE C, Registered Nurse . . . 
School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



. . . Entered from Taft 
Entered from Kelly High 



HUGHES. CELESTE MARY. Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Lindblom High School; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



I: 1. 



i. -M,. 



92 



Semors of 1947 



JILK, JOYCE, Registered Nurse 
School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered from Von Steuben High 



KEVAX, MARY ELLEN. Registered Nurse . . . Entered from St. 
Ambrose High School : home in Ironwood, Michigan. 



KOLTON, IRENE GENEVIEVE, Registered Nurse 
from Taft High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered 



KREUSER, JUNE MIRIAM, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Notre 
Dame High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

KRONICK, ANNA FAITH, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Superior Central High School ; home in Superior, Wisconsin. 



KL'BITZ. MILDRED CLAIRE, Registered Nurse . . 
from Staples High School ; home in Staples, Minnesota. 



Entered 



KURR. DARLINE T., Registered Nurse 
School ; home in Chicago, lUmois. 



Entered from Providence High 



LANDGREN. ELAINE MARIE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
McHenr>- High School ; home in McHenry, Illinois. 

LEAGUE, EMILIE ELLEN. Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Lake View High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



LEE, GWENDOLYN JANE, Registered Nurse 
Academy ; home in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 



Entered from St. Mary's 



LORDON, MARY LOUISE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Holy 
Family Academy: home in Chicago, Illinois. 

MARTH, DOROTHY MARY, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Good Counsel High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



MAZL'REK, LORETTA MARIE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Holy 
Family Academy; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



McELLIGOTT, OLGA JANE, Registered Nurse 
Trinity- High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



. Entered fr< 



MOLOSIK, GERTRUDE JOAN, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Watersmeet High School; home in Watersmeet, Michigan. 




iH^ 1i 




93 



s. 



emm of 1947 




MORELLI, THERESA. Registered Nurse 
School : home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered from Marshall High 



NOVAK, HELEN MARIE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Lake 
View High School; Eliza-Beacon: Editor; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

NOWAK, STEPHANIE MARIE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Good Counsel High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



PERSHERN, JULIA MAGDALINE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Gilbert High School ; home in Gilbert, Minnesota. 

PIHA, LORETTA, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Lindblom High 
School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

PRZYBLEK, EVELYN FRANCES, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Josephinum High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



REGAN, MARIE THERESE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Le Roy 
Public High School; Eliza-Beacon: Feature Writer: home in Le Roy, 
Minnesota. 

SCAVONE, MILDRED MARIE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
John Marshall High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

SCHEERER, DARLINE DORIS, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from St. Cloud Technical High School ; home in Waite Park, 
Minnesota. 



SCHILF, LORRAINE MARIE, Registered Nurse 
High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



. Entered from Manley 



SHARON, SISTER MARY, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from St. 
Francis Academy (Little Falls) ; home in Nicollet, Minnesota. 

SILARSKI, LORRAINE JOSEPHINE, Bachelor of Science. Reg- 
istered Nurse . , . Entered from Carl Schurz High School, Rosary 
College, De Paul University ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



SINGLER, HELEN JUANITA. Reftslered Nurse 
High School ; home in South Bend, Indiana. 



Entered from Central 



SIWE, GEORGIANA BARBARA, Registered Nurse 
from Alvernia High School ; home m Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered 



94 



SORENSEN, DOLORES LILLIAN, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Stanley High School ; home in Stanley, Wisconsin. 

STROHM, LORRAINE RUTH, Registered Nurse , , . Entered from 
Senti High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

TIMMER, MARY JACQUELINE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from St. Mary's High School and Mount Saint Clare College ; 
home in Clinton, Iowa. 



VAN LISTER. ANNA MAE, Registered Nurse , 
High School ; home in Escanaba, Michigan. 



Entered from St. Joseph's 



WEBER, HELENA BERTHA, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Rhinelander High School ; home in Rhinelander, Wisconsin. 



ZIMMERMAN, DORIS MAE, Registered Nurse . . 
from Steinmetz High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered 



AUCKLY, KATHLEEN LOIS, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from St. 
Agnes Academy (Indianapolis) and Purdue University ; Sodality 1, 2, 3 ; 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Music Appreciation 1, 2, 3; Beachcombers 1, 2, 3; home 
in Indianapolis, Indiana. 

BRADY. PATRICIA ANN, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Iron 
River High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Dramatic 
Club 3 ; Music Appreciation 3 ; Beachcombers 3 ; home in Iron River, 
Michigan. 

CESHKER, FRANCES ALICE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Pewaukee High School ; home in Pewaukee, Wisconsin. 



CLARAHAN, THERESE IRENE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Our 
Lady of Victory Academy; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Glee Club 2, 3; Dramatic Club 
1, 3: Beachcombers 1, 2, 3; home in Waterloo, Iowa. 

COGHILL, MARGARET JEANETTE, Registered Nurse , . . Entered 
from Maine Township High School; Glee Club 1; Camera Club 1, 2, 
3; Dramatic Club 1, 3; Beachcombers 1, 2, 5; home in Chicago, 
Illinois. 

DELUTRI, FLORENCE ROSE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Ida Grove High School ; Class Officer: Recording Secretary 
3; Sodality: Social Committee 1, 2, 3; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Dra- 
matic Club 3 ; Music Appreciation 3 ; Beachcombers 2, 3 ; home 
in Ida Grove, Iowa. 



DE STEFANO. MARGARET CHARLOTTE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Lindblom High School; Sodality 3; Glee Club 1, 2; Dramatic Club 3; 
Music Appreciation 3 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

FROBEL. VIRGINIA RUTH, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from St. 
Joseph High School; Camera Club 2, 3; Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3; 
Beachcombers 1, 2, 3; home in St. Joseph, Michigan. 

HARRANT. FRANCES LEILA, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Mooseheart High School ; home in Mooseheart, Illinois. 







95 




HOUDEK, ROSEMARY, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Calmar High 
School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Glee Club 1, 2; Camera Club 3; Music Apprecia- 
tion 3; Beachcombers 1, 2, 3; home in Calmar, Iowa. 

KENNY, PATRICIA, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Escanaba 
High School: Sodality 1, 2, 3; Glee Club 1, 2; Dramatic Club 1, 2, 
3; Camera Club 2, 3; Music Appreciation 3; Beachcombers 1, 2, 3; 
home in Escanaba, Michigan. 

LADD, FRANCES KRISTINA, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Our Lady of Victory Academy; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Glee Club 
1, 2, 3: Music Appreciation 3; Beachcombers 1, 2, 3; home in 
Waterloo, Iowa. 



LOHWATER, LEONA MARGARET, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Portage High School: Glee Club 1, 2; Camera Club 3; Beachcombers 1, 2, 
3 ; home in Portage, Wisconsin. 

McBRIDE, REGINA BERNADETTE, Registered Nurse . , . Entered 
from Alvernia High School; Sodality I, 2; Prefect 3; Glee Club 1, 2; 
Camera Club 3 ; home in Chicago, Illinois, 

NEHRING, JOYCE MARIE. Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
.West Bend High School; Sodality !.■ 2, 3; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; 
Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3; Camera Club 3; Music Appreciation 3; 
home in West Bend, Wisconsin. 



NOWICKi, ROSEMARIE C, Registered Nurse .• 
tion Academy ; Sodality 1, 2, 3 ; Glee Club 1, 
Beachcombers 2, 3 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered from Resurrec- 
3 ; Dramatic Club 3 ; 



PANFIL, ELAINE ELIZABETH, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Wells High School ; Class Officer; Corresponding Secretary 3 ; Sodality 
I, 2, 3; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Camera Club 3; Beachcombers 1, 2; home 
in Chicago, Illinois. 

PASKOWICZ, MARY JANE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
■ horn Wells High School; Sodality 2. 3; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; 
Music Appreciation 3; Beachcombers 1, 2, 3; home in Chicago, 
Illinois. 



PESEK, VIRGINIA MYRL, Registered Nuy<e . . . Entered from Ravenna 
High School; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Camera Club 5; Music Appreciation 3; 
Beachcombers 3 : home m Ravenna, Nebraska. 



REINKING, ALMA AMELIA, Registered Nurse , . 
Woodburn High School ; home in Woodburn, Indiana. 



Entered from 



ROSS. MARY IRENE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from St. 
Mary s High School; home in O'Fallon, Missouri. 



SECOR, MARGARET ROSE, Bachelor oj Arts and Registered Nurse . . . 
Entered from Ursuline Academy and LFrsuline College; Class Officer: Presi- 
dent 3; Sodality 1, 2, 3: Loyola Neu-s 3; Dramatic Club 2, 3; Glee Club 1, 
2, 3 ; Camera Club 1, 2 ; home in Louisville, Kentucky. 



SHARP, VIRGINIA CHARITY, Registered Nurse . . 
St. Scholastica High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered from 



ZANIN, GLORIA AMELIA, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Calumet High School; Sodality 3; Glee Club 1, 2; Camera Club, 
I, 2, 3: Music Appreciation 3; Beachcombers 1, 2, 3; home in 
Calumet, Michigan. 



96 



Seniors of 1947 



ZUBE. BERNICE DOLORES, Registered Nurse 
Casimir Academy ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered from St. 



AHERN, EILEEN MARY, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Austin 
High School and De Paul University ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



ATTERBERRY, SHIRLEY ANNE, Registered Nurse . 
from Hirsch High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered 



BARKSTROM, DORA MAE. Registered Nurse 
High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered from Foreman 
. Entered from 



BONK, 5YNETA GLORIA, Registered Nurse . 
Providence High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

BRECKENFELD, JANE MARIEN, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
rrom Kenosha High School ; home in Kenosha, Wisconsin. 



BRESNAHAN. PATRICIA MAE, Registered Nurse 
Nazareth Academy ; home m Berw^n, Illinois. 



Entered from 



BROOKS, EMMA RUTH, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Dresden 
High School and the University of Tennessee ; home in Dresden, 
Tennessee. 

CALLAHAN. JOAN MARIE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Wausau (Wisconsin) High School; Class Officer; Vice-President 
4; home m Wausau, Wisconsin. 



CIVINSKAS, IRENE JOSEPHINE, Registered Nurse . 
Mercy Academy; home in Grand Rapids, Michigan. 



Entered from Mt. 



CRUDELE, ANN MARIE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Notre 
Dame High School and Gregg Business College ; home in Chicago, 
Illinois. 

DE LANY, MARGARET MARY, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Austin High School; home in Chicago. Illinois. 



FERGUSON. JOSEPHINE. Registered Nurse 
High School ; home in Jackson, Tennessee. 



Entered from Jackson 
Entered from 



FIORELLA, ANNE MAY. Registered Nurse . . 
McKinley High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

FITZPATRICK. MARY LOU, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Providence High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 




97 



s. 



e^iors of 1947 




FREIMAN, LORETTA CLAIRE. Registered Nurse 
Trinity High School ; home in River Forest, Illinois. 



Entered from 



FUCHS, GENEVA C, Bachelor of Arts and Registered Nurse . . . 
Entered from Sacred Heart High School and College of St. Benedict; 
Prefect of Sodality ; home in Grand Forks, North Dakota. 

FURRY, HELEN MARGARET, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Lew Wallace High School and College of St. Theresa 
(Winona, Minnesota) ; home in Gary, Indiana. 



GRANGER, PATRICIA, Registered Nurse 
School ; home in Maywood, Illinois. 



Entered from Proviso High 
. Entered from 



HARRISON, BETTY JANE, Registered Nurse . . 
Lucy Flower High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

HETZEL, IRENE L., Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Providence High School; Class Officer: Treasurer 4; home in 
Chicago, Illinois. 



HUGHES, ROSEMARY MILDRED. Registered Nurse 
Siena High School; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered from 



JAY, MARY ANN PATRICIA, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Notre Dame High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

JAYKO, DOLORES MARY. Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Good Counsel High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



JINDRICH. EDITH ANN. Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Morton 
High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

KIRBY, ANAMAE DEBORAH, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Providence High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

KLEMCZYK. VIRGINIA FRANCES, Registered Nurse . . . 
Entered from Good Counsel High School ; home in Chicago, 
Illinois. 



LEONARD. RUTH MAGDALEN, Registered Nurse 
Nazareth Academy ; home in LaGrange, Illinois. 



Entered from 



McLaughlin. JANICE EILEEN, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Providence High School ; home in Aberdeen, South Dakota. 

MAHER, MARY JOHAN, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Providence High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



.L_,_ 



98 



MARTIN, MARIE TERESE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Providence 
High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



MOSCATO, RUTH CHRISTINE, Registered Nurse . 
St. Mary's High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered from 



MURRAY, BERNADETTE VERONICA, Registered Nurse . . . 
Entered from Providence High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



O'BRIEN. JOAN DOLORES, Registered Nurse . 
Academy ; home in LaGrange, Illinois. 



Entered from Nazareth 



O'BRIEN. MERCEDES JOY, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Oak Park High School; home in River Forest, Illinois. 

PEACHEY, JOAN MARY, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Proviso High School ; home in South Bend, Indiana. 



PETKO, HELENA M., Registered Nurse 
Technical High School ; home in Chicago, I 



Entered from Harrison 



PODZIABANY, IRENE MARTHA, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Harrison Technical High School; Class OfScer: President 1, 3; 
home in Geneva, Illinois. 

POLIQUIN, MARY ELIZABETH, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Alvernia High School and De Paul University ; home in 
Chicago, Illinois. 



POWALOWSKI, EVELYN MARY, Registered Nurse . 
Good Counsel High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered from 



QUENNERSTEDT, GERALDINE GLORIA, Registered Nurse . . . 
Entered from Alvernia High School; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

REVERA, ALBINA EUGENIA, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from St. Constance High School; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



RISETTO, DOROTHY, Registered Nurse . . 
School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered from Austin High 



ROGERS, ELIZABETH MAE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
South Bend High School ; home in Grand Rapids, Michigan. 

RYBNIK. ALICE MARY, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Carl Schurz High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 





-•■•i 




.' . \> 






• 

99 




SCHOFIELD, MARY PATRICIA, Registered Nurse 
Immaculata High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois, 

SMITH, EILEEN RITA, Registered Nurse . . 
dence High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



. . . Entered from 
. Entered from Provi- 



STEC, ALBINA KJDITH, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
St. Joseph High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



STEINBERG, MARY JANE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Providence 
High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

SULLIVAN, ELAINE MARIE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Mundelein Cathedral High School; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

THOMAS. MARGARET ANN, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Trinity High School and Rosary College ; home in Oak 
Park, Illinois. 



TOMASIK, GERALDINE JOSEPHINE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
St. Constance; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

TWAROWSKI, LORRAINE MARIA. Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Steinmetz High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

VALLEE, MARY MARGARET, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Providence High School; Class Officer: President 4; home 
in Chicago, Illinois. 



WEIMER, JOAN RUTH, Registered Nurse 
School ; home in LaPorte, Indiana. 



Entered from LaPorte High 



BLONIEN, ARLENE ROSE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from St. 
Joseph's Academy (Stevens Point, Wisconsin) ; Class Officer: Vice- 
President 1. 2, 3; home in Rudolph, Wisconsin. 

BOGACZ. LILLIAN LOUISE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Morton High School ; home in Brookfield, Illinois. 



COLLINS, JEAN ANNE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Trinity High 
School (River Forest, Illinois) ; home in Oak Park, Illinois. 

CONNELLY, JEANNE BERNICE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Siena High School and the Bryant and Stratton Business College; 
home in Chicago, Illinois. 

DOOLING, THERESA DONALDA, Registered Nurse ... En- 
tered from Evanston Township High School ; home in Evanston, 
Illinois. 



•«< 



100 



Semors of 1947 



FLIGIEL, ISABELLA BARBARA, Registered Nurse . 
Holy Family Academy ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered from 



HOOPER, MYRTLE LEOLA, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Negaunee High School and the Gregg Business College; home in 
Nagaunee, Michigan. 

HORN, DOLORES MINERVA, Bachelor of Education, Bachelor 
of Science in Nursing Education, and Registered Nurse . . . 
Entered from Morton High School and Morton Junior College ; 
home in Lyons, Illinois. 



HORN, LUELLA ANN, Registered Nurse 
School ; home in Berwyn, Illinois. 



HRIVNAK, BETTY JANE, Registered Nurse . 
Springdale High School ; home in Cicero, Illinois 



KELLY, MARY RITA, Registered Nurse . 
Siena High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



. . Entered from Trinity High 
Entered from 
Entered from 



KNOTH, MARY ANN, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Trinity High 
School (River Forest, Illinois) ; home in Oak Park, Illinois. 

KRUMDICK, VIRGINIA MAE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Lincoln High School and the University of Wisconsin ; home in 
Manitowoc, Wisconsin. 

LA ROCCA, ANNA LUCILLE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Maine Township High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



McCarthy, HELEN Elizabeth, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Morton High School and Morton Junior College; home in Berwyn, Illinois. 

McGUIRE, JEANNE DOROTHEA, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Proviso Township High School and Elmhurst College ; home in 
Maywood, Illinois. 

MULLENBACK, ROSEMARY ELIZABETH, Registered Nurse 
. . . Entered from Trinity High School ; home in Oak Park, 
Illinois. 



MYERS, JOANNE ALYCE, Registered Nurse . 
Senn High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

O'BRIEN, MARY HELEN, Registered Nurse 
Oelwcin High School ; home in Oelwein, Iowa. 



Entered from Nicholas 



Entered from 




I 



A*^ 



101 



Seniors of 1947 







O'SHEA. MARIAN ELIZABETH, Keghtered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Siena High School and Austin Evening College ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



PHELPS, SHIRLEY JEAN, Registered Nurse . 
Quincy High School ; home in Quincy, Illinois. 



Entered from 



PLEWA, SYLVIA AGNES, Registered Nurse . , . Entered from 
Lourdes High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



RUSCITTO. MARGUERITE ANTONETT. Registered Nurse 
from Morton High School ; home in Berwyn, Illinois. 



Entered 



SAUTER, HELEN LOUISE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Appleton High School ; home in Appleton, Wisconsin. 

SHYSTER, MARY ANGELA. Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Oregon Community High School (Oregon, Illinois) ; Class 
Officer; President I, 2, 3 ; home in Elmhurst, Illinois. 



SPANG, MARY VIRGINIA. Registered Nurse . 
maculata High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered from Im- 



VESELY, JUNE PRISCILLA. Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Morton High School and Morton Junior College ; Class Officer: 
Treasurer and Secretary 1, 2, 3; home in Cicero, Illinois. 

YOWAISH. LORRAINE VICTORIA. Associate in Arts. Bachelor 
of Science in Nursing Education, and Registered Nurse . . . 
Entered from Union High School and Grand Rapids Junior 
College; home in Grand Rapids, Michigan. 



ALCOCK, MARY ELIZABETH, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from St. 
Patrick Academy (Des Plaines, Illinois) ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

BARNES, BARBARA JANE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Immaculata High School; home in Chicago. Illinois. 

BECKER. CONSTANCE DOROTHY. Registered Nurse . . . 
Entered from Immaculata High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



BRINKMAN, GENEVA IRENE. Registered Nurse . . . Entered from St. 
Francis Academy; Glee Club 1; Sodality 1, 2; home in Hankinson, North 
Dakota. 



BUCKLEY, MARIE ALICE, Registered Nurse . . 
Notre Dame Academy ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

BURKE. RUTH MARIE, Registered Nurse . . 
Hirsch High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered from 



Entered from 



102 



CARL, MARGUERITE A., Registered Nurse 
High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered from Parker 



CLARK, JANANN MARILYN, Bachelor of Science in Nursing Edu- 
cation and Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Visitation Academy 
and Clarke College; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Glee Club 1, Dramatics 1; 
home in Dubuque, Iowa. 

COLLETTI, MARION ANTOINETTE, Registered Nurse . . . 
Entered from Notre Dame Academy ; home in Elmwood Park, 
Illinois. 



CONNOLLY, VELMA FRANCES, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
St. Joseph High School (Farley, Iowa) ; home in Anamosa, Iowa. 



COPP. GERALDINE FRANCES, Registered Nurse 
Waukegan Township High School ; Sodality 1, 2, 
2 ; home in Waukegan, Illinois. 

COY. MARGARET MARY, Registered Nurse . . 
Alvernia Academy ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



, Entered from 
Glee Club 1, 

Entered from 



CRONIN. MARGARET THERESA, Registered Nurse 
Notre Dame Academy ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered from 



DANIHER, MARY K.. Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Dwight 
Township High School ; home in Ransom, Illinois. 

DITTMER. RITA ELEANOR, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Notre Dame Academy; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



DOUR, LOLITA CHARLOTTE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Alvernia High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

EILERT. CELINE THERESE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Saint Gregory High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

FITZGERALD, MARY ELIZABETH. Registered Nurse . . . 
Entered from Springfield High School and Springfield Junior 
College ; home in Springfield, Illinois. 



GIESE, PATRICIA JEAN, Registered Nurse . 
Gregory High School; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered from Saint 



GRAHAM, HELEN MARY, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Warren Township High School ; home in Gurnee, Illinois. 

GRAINER. PHYLLIS MARGARET, Registered Nurse . . . 
Entered from Nicholas Senn High School ; home in Chicago, 
Illinois. 




103 




HARRIS. ELAINE BLAKE, Registered Nurse 
High School; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered from Sullivan 



HARTNETT, PATRICIA ANN, Bachelor of Science in Nursing Edu- 
cation and Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Madonna High School 
and the College of St. Joseph (Winona, Michigan) ; Class Officer: 
President 3 ; home in Aurora, Illinois. 

HERZOG, POLLYANNA, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Somonauk High School ; home in Somonauk. Illinois. 



HYNES, PATRICIA, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Marywood High 
School (Evanston, Illinois), and St. Mary's College (Holy Cross, Indiana) ; 
home in Evanston, Illinois. 

JAEGER, FRANCES M., Registered Nurse . . . Entered from St. 
Francis Academy (Joliet, Illinois) ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

KOLLOCH, PHYLLIS JEAN. . Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Notre Dame Academy ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



SISTER VINCENTINE KUSEK, C.R.. Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
De Paul University and Resurrection High School ; home in Ord, Nebraska. 



LARSON, ELOISE MARIE, Registered Nurse . . 
Norway High School ; home in Norway, Michigan. 



Entered from 



LUDINGTON, JOAN MARGARET, Registered Nurse . . . 
Entered from St. Michael Central High School ; Sodality 1, 2, 
3 ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



LYNCH, MARGARET MARY. Registered Nurse . . 
Dame Academy (Toledo, Ohio) ; home in Chicago, 



Entered from Notre 
llinois. 



MAIBUSCH, FRANCES BERTHA, Registered Nurse 
from Alvernia High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered 



MARSHALL, MARY Y., Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Amundsen High School and Wright Junior College ; home in 
Chicago, Illinois. 



McELLIGOTT, THERESE ANNE, Registered Nurse . 
Alvernia High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered from 



NAUGHTON, MARY MARGARET, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from St. Michael High School ; Class Officer: Secretary 3 ; home in 
Chicago, Illinois. 

O'CONNELL, YVONNE M., Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from St. Michael High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



104 



Sc 



eniors of 1947 



O'MALLEY, MARY JANE, Bachelor of Science in Nursing Education and 
Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Immaculate Conception High School 
(Lansing, Iowa) and the College of St. Francis (Joliet, Illinois) ; home in 
Lansing, Iowa. 

O'SHAUGHNESSV. MARY ALICE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Notre Dame Academy; Sodality 1, 2, 3; home in Chicago, 
Illinois. 

PAPE, DOLORES MARY, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Mallinckrodt High School ; home in Wilmette, Illinois. 



PL'RCELL, PATRICIA MARIE, Bachelor of Science in Nursing Education 
and Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Loretto High School and the 
College of St. Teresa fW'inona, Minnesota) ; Class Officer: President 1, 2, 
3; Sodality 1, 2, 5; May Queen 3; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

REYNOLDS, TERESE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Catholic 
Central High School (Hammond, Indiana) ; Class Officer: Treasurer 
I: Sodality 1, 2, 3; Glee Club 1; Dramatics 1, 2, 3; home in East 
Chicago, Indiana. 

SISTER MARY THECLA ROTH, C.R., Registered Nurse . . . 
Entered from Blessed Sacrament Academy and St. Rose College; 
home in Yonkers, New York. 



RUMFORD. HELEN LOIS, Registered Nurse 
High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered from St. Gregory 



SANREGRET. HELEN LOUISE. Registered Nune . . . Entered from 
H'^u'-'^ton HiVh School ; Sodality 1, 2, 3 ; Glee Club 1 ; home in 
Houghton, Michigan. 

SCHEEL, MARY IVY, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from St. 
Scholastica Academy; home in Park Ridge, Illinois. 



SCHULZ. MARJORY RUTH, Registered Nurse 
High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered from Amundsen 



SIMONDS, PATRICIA ANN, Registered Nurse 
Galena High School ; home in Galena, Illinois. 



Entered fror 



SKOTT, DOROTHY MARIE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Waukegan Township High School ; home in Waukegan, 
Illinois. 



SNYDER, DOROTHY FRANCES, Registered Nurse 
St. Gregory High School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered from 



SPELLACY, PATRICIA HELEN, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Hirsch High School; Sodality 1, 2, 3 ; Glee Club 1, 2; Dramatics 1, 
2, 3; home in Chicago, Illinois. 

SPELMAN, MARY JOAN, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
St. Scholastica Academy ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 




105 




THLIMMENOS, CLEOPATRA, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Niles 
Township High School ; home in Morton Grove, Illinois. 

TUNINGA, JOAN, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from Maine 
Township High School ; home in Downey, California. 

WALL, JOYCE IRENE. Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Norway High School ; home in Norway, Michigan. 



WELTER, GLORIA R.. Registered Nurse 
School ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



Entered from Siena High 



WESLEY, HONORE ANN, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from 
Maine Township High School and Rosary College ; home in Park 
Ridge, Illinois. 

WINTER, ADELAIDE AGNES. Registered Nurse . . . Entered 
from Mallinckrodt High School ; home in Glencoe, Illinois. 



WOLTER. JOAN MARIE, Registered Nurse . . . Entered from St. 
Scholastica Academy; Sodality 1, 2, 3; home in Wilmette, Illinois. 



106 



West baden candidates 
for graduate degrees 



MR. DAVID BOWMAN, S.J., Mailer of Arts: Bachelor of Arts . . . 
Entered from Loyola Academy ; home in Oak Park, Illinois. 

MR. EDWARD E. CINCOSKI, S.J., Master of Arts: Bachelor of 
Arts . . . Entered from Loyola University ; home in Chicago, Illinois. 



MR. GEORGE A. 
Arts. 



CURRAN, S.J., Master of Arts: Bachelor of 



MR. JAMES V. McGLYNN, S.J., Master of Arts; Bachelor of Literature 
. . . Entered from Xavier University ; home in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

MR. EUGENE WATRIN, S.J., Master of Arts; Bachelor of Arts; 
home in Dayton, Ohio. 

MR. FRANCIS WIEMAN, S.J., Master of Arts; Bachelor of 
Arts: home in Shively, Kentucky. 




107 



West baden candidates 
for bachelor degrees 




Row one — Messrs. Theodore C. Thiepe, S.J.; Eugene J. Prior, S.J.; Norbert J. Tracy, S.J.; Francis 
M. Oppenheim, S.J.; Francis X. Grullig, S.J.; John D. Gerken, S.J.; John E. Festle, S.J. 

Row two — Messrs. Nicholas Schiel, S.J.; Richard H. Lundstrom, S.J.; James F. X. Owens, S.J.; 
Richard F. Bocklage, S.J.; James E. Chambers, S.J.; John P. Beall, S.J.; F. James Wetzel, S.J. ; 
Vincent A. Forde, S.J.; Richard J. Colgan, S.J.; Donald V. O'Brien, S.J.; Edward F. Maloney, S.J. 

Row three — Messrs. Robert J. Shanahan, S.J.; Johnston B. Kennedy, S.J.; Ralph A. Jacobs, S.J.; 
William L. Kelly, S.J.; Edward A. Bradley, S.J.; James J. Fisher, S.J.; Robert J. McAuIey, S.J.; 
Daniel T. Costello, S.J. 



108 



'*9^ 



"<^ 



*k 




109 



c 



OYOLANS AND THEIR ORGANIZATIONS 




Rev. T. Lincoln Bouscaren, S.J., teaching 
West Baden Theologians how to say Mass. 




West baden study groups 



Outstanding among the activities of West Baden College are the various Study Groups, 
which are made up of Jesuit scholastics studying for the priesthood. Pictured here are 
shots of the Rites Class, which cares for the obviously necessary instructions on the rites 
of the Mass for the information of West Baden Theologians, and the "Fishers of Souls" 
Group, the Jesuit Catholic Information Group of West Baden College. The center picture 
shows the leaders of the student activities. The officers of the Sodality, the Christian 
Social Order Group, the Suaraquin Philosophical Academy, the Catholic Information 
Group, the Missions Stamp Mart, the Catholic Publicity Group, and the Sacred Heart 
Academy are included in the picture. 

These study groups are an essential part in the training of the young seminarians. As 
can be seen from the list of the special activities of the groups, much of useful and 
expedient information is afforded to them in these groups. 



Rou one — Messrs. William J. Everett, S.J.; 
Thomas N. Munson, S.J.; Daniel P. Foley, S.J. ; 
Paul P. Harbrecht, S.J.; Thomas R. Byrne, S.J. 

Row tuo — Robert J. Murphy, S.J.; Robert J. 
McAuley, S.J.; Robert A. White, S.J.; Michael J. 
Montague, S.J. 



Row one — Messrs. Theodore C. Thiepe, S.J. ; 
Michael J. Montague, S.J.; Robert J. Shanahan, 
S.J. ; Nobert J. Tracy, S.J.; F. James Wetzel, S.J.; 
Francis M. Oppenheim, S.J. ; James A. Mohler, 
S.J.; Francis X. GroUig, S.J. 

Row two — Messrs. Thomas N. Munson, S.J. 
Francis D. Johnson, S.J.; Edward A. Bradley, S.J. 
John F. X. Condon, S.J.; James E. Chambers, S.J. 
Nicholas A. Predovich, S.J. ; Nicholas Schiel, S.J. 
Vincent A. Forde, S.J.; Carl J. Moell, S.J.; John 
W. Garvey, S.J.; Herbert I. Raterman, David J. 
Hassel, S.J.; Jeremiah E. Connolly, S.J. ; John P. 
Beall, S.J. 

Row three—Messii. Robert A. White, S.J.; Wil- 
liam J. Everett, S.J.; Edward F. Maloney, S.J. 
Marker E. Tracy, S.J.; Donald V. O'Brien, S.J. 
James J. Fischer, S.J. ; J. Hamilton Neale, S.J. 
Henry A. Gardocki, S.J.; John D. Gerken, S.J 




c 



OYOLA STUDENT UNION 



The year 1947 marked the rejuvenation of the Loyola Student Union, the supreme student 
organization, with jurisdiction over all student organizations and functions. Faced with 
the herculean task of uniting a University sprawling throughout the city, the Reverend 
Laurence J. Lynch, S.J., newly-appointed Dean of Men, set about to revise and rewrite 
the old constitution of the Loyola Union. In constant collaboration with the President of 
the University, the Reverend James T. Hussey, S.J., and the various Deans of the 
Colleges, Father Lynch was able to produce a new and obviously more comprehensive 
constitution for the new and obviously more complex Loyola University. The constitution, 
after a hectic existence of notes and revisions, was approved by Father Hussey and was 
ratified by the Congress of the Loyola Union on April 23, 1947. 

The purpose of the Loyola Union, according to the Preamble of the Constitution, is 
"to unify the student body of Loyola University; to promote student unity in each School 
and College of the University; to provide liaison between student body and the University; 
to support the religious program of the University; to encourage student academic and 
social societies ; to govern the student body according to sound principles of self-govern- 
ment; to form and uphold traditions; to voice student opinions; to create wholesome 
relations among student organizations; to enlarge University life for succeeding genera- 
tions of students; to meet the needs of a greater Loyola student body and of a greater 
Loyola University; and to perpetuate the Loyola Union of Loyola University." 




Rev. Laurence J. Lynch, S.J. 



Eugene Hartrich 



112 




Student Union Board of Governors 



Elections were conducted in each of the Colleges of the University to determine repre- 
sentatives of the College to the sessions of the Congress, which meets in February, April, 
October, and December. From two to six students of each College, known as School 
Congressmen, were elected, and this number of delegates was added to the number of 
Fraternity Congressmen and Organizations Congressmen, determined as each organization 
and fraternity of the University sent one representative to the Congress. In the first session 
in April, which represented the February session, Eugene Hartrich, Arts and Sciences 
College Junior, was elected President of the Loyola Union. Seven Congressional Com- 
mittees were formed to begin immediate action. These committees are as follows: 
Committee for Religious Welfare; Committee on Budget, Management and Finance; 
Committee on Internal Relations ; Committee on Interf raternity Relations ; Committee for 
Student Academic Societies ; Committee on Public Relations ; Committee on Union 
Government. 

The second session of the Congress in early May saw the actual functioning of the 
Union. Difficulties are being met squarely by the conscientious students under the 
advisory aegis of Father Lynch. Great things are expected from the Union by all 
students of the University. 



113 




B. Buckley, K. Keating, P. Elward, A. Chisholm 



Sm m J^ 0^ 0^ u^ 



The National Federation of Catholic College Students was organized in 1937 at 
Manhattanville College in New York City. A group of students representing colleges 
and universities in the New York metropolitan area agreed that there was a definite 
need for a unification of student forces. These students said that a "contented individual- 
ism and effective isolationism" made it impossible for students in the various Catholic 
colleges and universities to work towards a common objective. At present there are 130 
American colleges and universities in the organization. 

This year the delegates from Loyola attended the Fourth National Congress held in 
Toledo on April 18, 19, and 20. A new constitution was adopted and vigorous steps were 
taken toward spreading the influence, of NFCCS. The first National Catholic Debate 
Tournament in history was held at Loyola on May 9 and 10. 

Rev. Norman T. Weyand, S.J., is Moderator of the Loyola chapter of NFCCS. Paul 
F. Elward is Chairman of the National Commission on Forensic Activities; Keith A. 
Keating is Loyola's Senior Delegate to the Federation ; Brian J. Buckley is Vice-President 
of the Chicago Region; Adrian Chisholm is the Loyola University Junior Delegate to 
NFCCS. 



114 




Rou' one — J. Wallace, J. Turner, P. Bowman, R. Le.ich, R. Geringer, R. Spencer. 
Row two — R. Heffernan. C. Kennedy, J. Graydun. P. Cleary. 



A rts Students Council 

All students on the Lake Shore Campus are members of the Student Association. The 
main function of this body is to develop student self-government by initiating, organizing, 
systematizing, and supporting student activities; and by controlling, as far as is within 
the power of the student body, inter-class relations, class customs and privileges and 
such other matters as pertain to the best interests of the students. 

The Student Council is the governing body of the Student Association. The business 
details of the Association are cared for by the Council, as is all such business as does 
not require the action or approval of the entire student body. 

Election of the Student Council officers and representatives takes place in March 
of each year and has become one of the highlights on the Arts and Sciences College 
calendar of events. This year, Gene Hartrich and Robert Spencer were elected president 
and secretary of the Council, respectively. In the elections held last March the following 
men were chosen by their class-mates to represent them: Ray Geringer, Senior Class 
President; Robert Heffernan, Junior Class President; James Graydon, Sophomore Class 
President; Robert Spencer, Freshman Class President. 

The Council also has members representing some of the outstanding University 
organizations. Last year Charles Rollings and Robert Dempsey represented the Publica- 
tions; Jay Turner represented the Intra-mural Board; Richard Leach represented the 
Sodality; and John Wallace represented the Green Circle. 

Paul Bowman served as Student Council President until the elections in March 
provided the new officers. Charles Kennedy also served on the Council as Publications 
representative until he retired as editor of the Loyola NEWS in the second semester. 



115 



"Debatmff Society 

The debating organizations at Loyola in the past thirteen years have continued to 
carry out the poUcy that was inaugurated in 1933, which provided for a Loyola 
University Debating Society. The purpose of the organization was to provide students 
with a group to consider the problems facing the world today and to exchange opinions 
with the students of other colleges and universities. Until the spring of 1943 it was 
the usual policy to divide the group into the Varsity Debating Team, composed of 
members of the upper classes, and the Cudahy Forum, whose members were taken from 
the freshman ranks. The war made this plan impractical ; so at present all debaters belong 
to this one organization. 

The emphasis on debating at Loyola is on personal achievement and the ability to 
express ideas clearly rather than on winning debates. As a result of this approach to the 
situation, the quality of the debating squads representing the University has been greatly 
improved during each of the passing years. The men, interested in their own abilities 
first, improve the squad by becoming individually better. To encourage this individual 
forensic ability, the Harrison Oratorial Contest and the John Naghten Debate Tournament 
were originated and have met with outstanding success. This year the Harrison Oratorical 
Contest was won by Keith Keating and the John Naghten Debate Tournament was won 
by Frank Goosens. The interest in these contests, as well as the interest in the progress 
of the debating squads manifested by the entire school, shows the result of all this 
debate activity. 



Rou one — R. Starrs, B. Buckley, E. Murphy, P. Elw.ird, P. Gutierrez. 

Rou' two — A. Chisholm, D. Byrne, Rev. Richard Tischler, S.J., E. J. Clark. W. Sheehan, A. 
Chambers, L. Hayes. 





Rolf one — R. Condon. A. Sullivan, A. Linck, Dr. Theodosi Mogilnitsky, Moderator, F. Goossens, 
W. Isaacson, W. Vander Heide. 

Koiv two — C. Lighten, E. Dadamagnani, F. Ghinelli, F. Donnelly, J. O'Connor, C. Enyart, A. 
Brissette, G. Maloney, W. OLeary. 



This year the debating organization operated in two branches. The Lake Shore Campus 
section operated under the direction of Rev. Richard E. Tischler, S.J. The new Lewis 
Towers division was organized and headed by Theodosi Mogilnitsky of the Commerce 
School faculty. This program was instituted to meet with the ever-widening scope of 
Loyola's debating. 

This year the inter-collegiate debate topic was "Resolved: That labor should have a 
direct share in the management of industry." This proved a timely as well as moot 
question, and the year's debates were well-split in the matter of decisions. A preliminary 
advantage to the negative side of the argument was early offset by a series of ingenious 
affirmative plans. 

It was the policy of the University to split the teams evenly between the squads of 
Lake Shore Campus and the Commerce School in all tourneys. This facilitated equal 
representation in the major tournaments in which Loyola participated. As for the won- 
and-lost record, Loyola's over-all record was not as satisfying as was expected. Dampened 
spirits prevented Loyola from reaching eminence in the debate tournament at Terre 
Haute, Indiana, but much greater success was achieved at St. Thomas College, Minnesota. 
There, the Lake Shore Campus team won six of eight debates, while the Commerce team 
won three of eight. This was accomplished against the stiffest competition of the 
universities of the Middle West. 

A Freshman Debate class was formed towards the end of the year in order to build 
up future Loyola teams. Much of the success in forming this group is due to the efforts 
of Edward Murphy, Lake Shore Campus President. 



117 



^Loyola J^ews 



Within the past year the Loyola News attained once again the high degree of perfection 
of which it so proudh' boasted before the war. Under the capable direction of co-editors 
Charles Kennedy and Patrick Cleary, the publication has surpassed all expectations of 
its traditional merit. 

Technical perfection was not the only type of excellence striven for by the industrious 
staff. The editors endeavored to introduce an accurate all-University coverage — the real 
purpose of any school publication. In spite of the increased size of Loyola, this coverage 
was handled with a thoroughness characteristic of only the most conscientious of newsmen. 

The quality of any newspaper is judged by its staff, for their effort, time, accuracy, and 
cooperation are reflections on the finished product. Thus we look to this backbone of 
the News and find such men as Gene Hartrich, News Editor; J. L. Malone, Lewis Towers 
Editor; Charles Rollings, Makeup Editor; "Dude" O'Hara, Sports Editor; Donald Fauls, 
Feature Editor ; Peter Erback, Commerce News Editor ; and Robert Dempscy, Copy 
Editor. Each of these men proved a specialist in his particular field, and thus reduced 
greatly the work of Kennedy and Cleary. 

The jobs of Hartrich, Malone, and Erback required that they take complete charge 
of assignments and keep in close contact with reporters, assuring that deadlines were 
kept and only presentable copy handed in. These positions were handled with an 
efficiency that not only improved the caliber of copy, but also developed several freshman 
reporters into reliable and experienced writers. 



Roil one — J. Turner, E. Donovan, D. Fauls, C. Rollings, P. Clear;, C. Kennedy, E. Hartrich, R. Dempsey, J. Bourgeois, J. O'Hara. 



Row tiio — R. Clark, A. Abbatiello, P. Vaughn, B. Buckley. L. 
Hayes, W. J. Kilkenny, E. J. Clark, L. Hector, J. Cummings, C. 
Fitzgerald, J. Green, P. Elward, W. Sands. 



Ron ihr^e — L. Lehr, M. Basch, G. Cashion, P. Long, V. LaHart, 
B. Cagney, W. Evans, J. Forbes, J. Treacy, A. Kretz, C. Berrigan, 
F. Steggert, J. Wallace. 




Charles J. Kennedy 
C. Patrick Cleary 





Rollings provided a professional style of make-up that is rarely seen in college publica- 
tions. Copy evaluation, the placing of cuts, and the appropriateness of heads reached a 
perfection unequalled in past years of the publication of the News. 

A tough pace for any up-and-coming sports editor was set by "Dude" (Arch) O'Hara. 
His ability in personally covering events held immediately before the deadline and then 
writing up these events in a professional fashion has brought new life to the sports page. 

Don Pauls' spontaneous humor and his ability to make any topic laughable have 
made his "1001 Days at Loyola" column the most widely read article on the editorial 
page. Under Don's supervision the Feature Staff was considered one of the finest in the 
history of Loyola. 

The man with the red pencil was Bob Dempsey. To him fell the lot of correcting all — 
well, nearly all — grammatical errors m articles submitted by math-major reporters and 
columnists. Bob also caught printing mistakes on the galley sheet. He has performed a 
difficult task with much generosity of time. 



Row one — J. O'Toole, J. O'Con- 
nell, P. Erbach, W. Isaacson, N. 
Ruzic, J. Grabert, W. Freeman. 

Row tuo—E. HoefFcr, W. Gio- 
vacchini, W. VonderHeide, R. 
Condon, R. Schweik, C. Bcrrigan, 
J. Malone. 




119 



The position of advertising manager was also handled with the greatest possible 
efficiency. Eddie (The Shadow) Donovan secured more advertising space than had ever 
before been had by the Loyola News. William Freeman, Donald Buckley, and Paul 
Elward were frequent contributors to the editorial page. They submitted both timely and 
interesting articles concerning subjects pertinent to the average Loyola University student. 

The appearance of feature articles every week provided a greater reading interest for 
the student body. Frank McCabe's "Campus Broadcasting System" is reported to be the 
most widely read and most often cursed. The names of several prominent students of the 
Arts school are sure to be found in it every week. Perry Vaughan informs the students 
of the activities in the oft-frequented Yacht Club. Byron Rouse delves into the more 
serious aspects of life in his "Of Cabbages and Kings" column. Jack Clark writes "A 
Look at the Record," reviewing the latest and the best in classical records, often referring 
to Artur Rubinstein's technique v\hen he wants to bring out the facts of musical 
perfection. "Disc Dictions" is written by Wilham J. Kilkenny, who deplores nearly 
everything put on wax within the last year. 

In the sports department of the features. Jay Turner writes his "LM Talkin'," 
keeping the school posted on the results of all the intra-mural contests held throughout 
the year. "Chalkin' 'Em Up" was revived this year by Frank Steggert, who wrote of other 
aspects of athletic life here at Loyola. Vern LaHart covered all sports matters in his 
"Sports Ramblings." 



120 



Aurelius Abbatiello and J. P. Grabert were Dempsey's valuable assistants in proof- 
reading the copy. Chris FitzGerald, Jack Clark, and Lou Lehr helped Rollings in the 
makeup department. Bob Caprille, Ed and Bob Lussier, Bob Clark, Jim Moore, John 
Green, John Wallace, and Bill Evans presented an abundance of ideas for improving the 
sports section. Ed Donovan was assisted by Al Kretz in taking care of the advertising. 

The excellent photography in the News was the work of Jim Bourgeois, Bill Isaacson, 
and Joe Mitchell. All sports events, important club meetings, assemblies, dances, and 
other school activities were ably covered by these men. 

Regular contributors, to whom the Loyola News owes a debt of gratitude, were Robert 
Bardis, Herbert Weinfield, James Eastman, Dolores Horn, Leda Castrodale, Rosemarie 
Grill, Maralyn McCarthy, Ray Bardis, and Helen Novak. 

The cartoons for the paper were marked by the touch of professionality of John 
McCauley, Vic Mickus, and Ed Lussier. 

To all these men we at Loyola express our appreciation and our wishes for continued 
success. We wish to assure them that their days spent in the drafty, isolated tower have 
not passed in vain. 



121 



Cadence 



In its first postwar publication, the Loyola Quarterly assumed a change not 
only in title, but also in thought content and style. Cadence, the rose by another 
name, is the reflection of the best m Loyola student thought, marking the 
change and the pace of that thought. Hence the general theme has been con- 
cerned with the developments brought about by the recent war and their effects 
upon the college student in particular. 

The editor of Cadence, versatile Don Buckley, is, of course, largely responsible 
for the success of the magazine and its popularity widi the student body. 
However, not even the best of editors could produce a quarterly of the quality 
of Cadence without a more than competent staff of fellow workers and con- 
tributors. Joseph F. Gensert and Donald F. Scalzo filled the capacity of man- 
aging editors, taking with Don Buckley much of the credit for the magazine. 
The trying task of make-up editor %\as ably taken up by Aurelius Abbatiello. 
William R. Glynn and Francis X. Curran, red pencils and dictionaries in hand, 
served as copy editors, assisted by Ted Johnson. The excellent art work is the 
product of John T. McCauley, also a staff' member of the Loyola News. Brian 
Buckley, in his capacity of book-review editor, kept himself and his readers 
abreast of all the latest in the field of literature by both writing and revising 
reviews. Mr. Paul A. Hummert of the English Department acted as moderator. 




D. BUCKLEY, B. BUCKLEY, 
A. ABBATIELLO, W. GLYNN 



Outstanding feature of the past year's Cadence was the "Hot Potato" series 
of articles, dealing with pertinent controversial topics, giving both sides of the 
question equal opportunity to voice their opinions. In the Christmas edition, 
John R. Linton and Edward J. Murphy took the negative stand on the question 
"Is the Use of the Atom Bomb Justifiable?" while Bernard G. Cunningham and 
Dominic Quinn upheld the affirmative. Joseph F. Gensert and James D. Barry 
debated in the spring Cadence on the advisability of affiliation of Catholic 
colleges and universities with the International Union of Students and the 
National Student Organization. The Greco-Turkish loan was discussed in the 
summer issue by Brian Buckley and Leo J. Dunn. 

One of the most prolific and best-liked contributors to Cadence was William 
M. Healy. His articles of humor and satire, as well as his review of Bergen 
Evans' Natural History of Nonsense, were among the best written. E. John Clark 
added the classical touch with his "Translation of an Ode Of Horace" — most 
unwidely read of any article in any Cadence — but wrote, in addition, an excel- 
lent review of John Steinbeck's Wayward Bus and a very good short story of 
his own, "The Last Bell." 

Jack O'Toole, writer of the "Odds and Ends" feature article in the Loyola 
News, wrote both prose and poetry in the last two issues of Cadence. Byron 
Rouse, momentarily unconcerned with cabbages and kings, turned his abilities 
to the "Critics' Corner" of Cadence, writing reviews of George Bernanos' Joy 
and Eugene O'Neill's The Iceman Cometh. 

In his articles in the Christmas and summer editions of the magazine, Carl 
VonVogt discussed the esthetic side of art and sculpture, bringing to the unin- 
formed an appreciation of some of "the finer things in life." This same theme, 
in regard to music, was also expressed by Don Scalzo in his "Opera off Its 
Pedestal." 

It is these men, as well as many others who have been instrumental in writing 
and preparing copy for publication, to whom we of Loyola "owe a deep debt 
of gratitude." 



123 



"Loyolan of 1947 



No year book is complete without a section devoted to the athletic life of the 
students. It was Frank Steggert's job to see to it that the Sports Section truly 
represents the students who participated. In addition to the organized team 
sports, Frank devoted much space to the newly-instituted intra-mural programs 
at the Lake Shore Campus and the Lewis Towers Campus. 

Bob Dempsey was in charge of that section of the book devoted to the various 
organizations, clubs, and fraternities that make up the extra-curricular life of 
the student. The position was much more difficult to execute than in former 
books, because many of the groups had been discontinued during the war years. 
Some of these have been re-organized, while still others have thus far remained 
on the inactive list. The roster listed in Book Two of this volume is so complete 
only because Bob tackled the job with the same vigor he exercised during his 
years on the Loyola News. 



Row one — J. Green, P. Elward, W. J. Kilkenny, R. Dempsey, F. Steggert, J. Row two — R. Geringer, J. Hahn, J. Malone, C. Acton, F. McCabe, R. 

Wallace. E. J. Clark. 



■'~\ "S^^TXT^Ty 



An annual without pictures would be an absurdity, and an annual without 
good pictures would be almost as bad. Jim Bourgeois has acted as photographer 
for newspapers and yearbooks ever since his days at St. Ignatius High School. 
His diligence in snapping candids and special events throughout the school 
year have made him invaluable to Loyola publications. In addition to his duties 
as Photographic Editor of the Loyola Neii's, this year he was given a similar 
job on the Loyolan. 

Ed Donovan's real job starts only when the rest of the editors have set aside 
their blue pencils. He was put in charge of circulation and distribution for this, 
the first post-war Loyolan. 

Space limitations prevent us from giving the students at the various University 
schools who helped in the production of this book all the thanks and recognition 
they deserve. We can only state that we are deeply indebted to such men and 
women as Mr. Lawrence Flynn, S.J., Ray McDermott, Bob Carroll, Jack Malone, 
and the many people who sent us copy and information without attaching the 
name of the worker. Without them the book could never have been completed. 

The Editor and Managing Editor formed the end of the long line of ardent 
workers who compiled and arranged the copy and photographs that make up 
the twentieth Loyolan. Their problems were made simpler by the conscientious 
students who helped them. Thanks are definitely in order, and the Editor and 
the Managing Editor gratefully extend them. 




Clare C. Acton, Editor-in-Chief 
William J. Kilkenny, Managing Editor 



125 



'Lot/olan of 1947 



The problems confronting this year's editors of the Loyolan were almost as 
many and as great as those faced by the original staff over twenty years ago. 
The last edition of the year book was published in 1942, before such a large 
part of the male enrollment was called into service. In the four intervening 
years the fortunes of the various schools, and the student body, wavered con- 
stantly; wartime shortages put all consideration for a record of student life 
out of the question. 

The end of the war made publication once again feasible. So, it was that in 
the fall of 1946 plans were drawn up to publish die twentieth edition of the 
Loyolan. The call for a staff was issued and all comers were gratefully received. 
Unfortunately there were few students among them who had previous experi- 
ence in putting out a university year book — and those that had, had been away 
from such work for a number of years. On top of everything else, the editors 
soon discovered that the age of shortages was not yet passed. Many difficulties 
were encountered in securing a sufficient supply of paper and film to produce 
a book commesurate with so great a university as Loyola. One by one these 
problems were conquered and the great task was begun. Schedules were neces- 
sarily set back; it is regrettable that the volume was not ready at the proper 
time, but the staff is convinced tliat the twentieth Loyolan is the first in a new 
era. Henceforth the Loyolan hopes to grow as rapidly and as smoothly as the 
University. 



126 



The enormous job of negotiating contracts and obtaining materials — or 
information as to where they could be obtained — was thrust upon Mr. John 
Gerrietts, moderator, of the English Department. Himself a former editor of 
the Loyolan, Mr. Gerrietts appreciated the peculiar difficulties involved in 
producing a record of tlie year's events. "Without his vast fund of yearbook- and 
Loyola-lore, his great capacity for work, and his prodding of staff members at 
the proper time, it is doubtful whether this volume would ever have reached 
the students. 

Perhaps the greatest and most thankless task handed to any of the student 
editors was given to Stu Corboy. Schools editor is not a very impressive- 
sounding title, but one need only consider the decentralization of Loyola's 
many campuses — from the Lake Shore Campus and St. Francis hospital on the 
north all the way to West Baden College to the south — to appreciate what a 
huge amount of work was necessary to gadier all the necessary information 
and photographs. All schools and departments had to be contacted, appoint- 
ments had to be made for interviews and pictures — and only then could the work 
get under way. 

In all of the University's schools there were over four hundred and fifty men 
and women in their last year of study. It was the job of Jack Clark to see to it 
that the portrait and pertinent information for each one was at the printer's at 
the proper time. Before the annual had progressed very far Jack's filing system 
was threatening to crowd out the year book and newspaper staft's as well as 
his three locker-mates. Pairing up hundreds of photographs with as many cards 
did not turn the Senior Editor's hair a mousey gray — but it was a sobering task 
and a long one. 



127 



'Radio Work Shop 



This is the first year in the history of Loyola University that the student body 
has been able to do actual production and direction of radio shows. Under the 
direction of Mr. Thorlund W. Thorson, the Loyola University Radio Workshop 
was formed. The group aired a program each Wednesday evening at 10:00 P.M. 
over radio station WGES. Mr. Thorson acted as production director of the 
new organization. 

Programs were written, produced, directed, and acted by students of Loyola 
University and Mundelein College. Auditions and try-outs were held at intervals 
during the school year for all those who expressed an interest in radio work. 
Various types of shows were presented, including programs on classical music, 
biographical sketches of famous personalities, and informal discussions on 
various aspects of collegiate life. 

It is the hope of the Loyola LIniversity Radio Workshop that talent will be 
discovered and exercised among the students. Plans are already under way 
to expand the facilities available to the members. As this book goes to press 
negotiations are proceeding to arrange for two programs each week instead 
of one. 




THORLUND W. THORSON 

and 

EDMUND GRENNAN 



128 



Qlee Club 



The knowledge and appreciation of music has been and always will be one 
of the essential components of a true classical education. Thus it is only natural 
that the Loyola University Glee Club should be centered at the College of Arts 
and Sciences. However, the love of music has never been limited to any one 
group or class. So it was also natural that the Glee Club should draw its mem- 
bers from many of the University's branches. 

Under the directorship of Dr. Graciano Salvador, the Loyola Glee Club has 
just completed one of its most eventful and successful years. Practice for the 
organization was a difficult thing to arrange. The members were called upon 
to give up much of their free time. Saturdays and Sundays were often the only 
available times when all members could be present for a rehearsal. The high 
point of polish the organization attained is remarkable indeed, considering the 
problems with which it was beset. 

The high point of the year for the Glee Club was the Sacred Concert, held 
in the Madonna Delia Strada Chapel on Sunday, May IL At this concert the 
chapel's new organ was dedicated. Girls from Mundelein College sang with 
the Glee Club for this concert to give the choral group a full range of voices. 



Glee Club members tune up. 
Dr. Salvador at the organ, Mundelein choristers at right. 




129 



lHatmal Student Orgamzation 



In an attempt to form an American counterpart for the student organizations 
found in many European countries, more than four hundred and fifty delegates 
from every part of the United States attended the Chicago Student Conference. 
The meetings were held at the University of Chicago on December 28, 29, 30 
of last year. The delegates from Loyola were Ed Murphy, Dick Leach, and 
Brian Buckley. Bob Schweitzer, Keith Keating, and Paul Elward were sent to 
the conference as observers. The main purpose of the meeting was to ascertain 
the desirability of forming a National Student Organization and what its aims 
should be. Out of this organization, the National Student Organization was 
formed. 

The Loyola delegation to the union is made up of Leach, Keating, Schweitzer, 
Buckley, and Elward. The main task confronting this group during the opening 
months of tlie national organization was to present the Catholic viewpoint and 
to see that Communistic tendencies were held in check. 

During the year the Student Council voted on whether or not the Loyola 
delegation should withdraw from N.S.O. because of its Communistic leanings. 
The Council upheld the delegation by one vote in the policy that stated: 
"Nothing is to be gained by withdrawing; let us assume the role of questioners. 
Let us show the organization that it is the lack of basic principle that exposes 
it to Communistic attack." 




K. Keating, R. Leach, 
P. Elward, B. Buckley 



130 




Kow one—]. Graydon, B. Cunningham, J. Green, P. Ehvard, J. Wallace, F. McCabe, W. Evans, 

J. O'Hara, C. Martini, G. Cashion. 

j^g^i iu,o — F. Wiodyga, F. Steggert, H. Adamson, R. O'Brien, R. Reeve, R. Dempsey, J. CoUett, 

D. Pauls, J. Turner, Rev. R. Tischler, S.J. 

Roiv three — T. McNulty, B. Buckley, U. Foerster, R. Geringer, J. Kelley, S. Corboy, R. Heffernan, 

G. McKerr, L. Lehr, C. Rollings, N. Pitaro, J. Moore. 



Oreen Circle 



A small group of freshmen gathered to form the Green Circle in 1935. The 
purpose of this group was to promote school spirit and to support school 
activities. In the intervening twelve years the Green Circle has grown to its 
present stature of importance. No longer composed only of freshmen, the 
organization draws its members from among the most active men on the campus. 

John "Wallace served as president of the Green Circle this year and directed 
its policy. He was assisted by John Burke, vice-president; Frank McCabe, 
secretary; John O'Hara, treasurer; Bill Evans, sergeant-at-arms; and John 
Green, social chairman. 

The great increase in general enrollment made it necessary for the organiza- 
tion to expand proportionately. A new constitution was drawn up and ratified 
in which it was stated that every activity sponsored by Loyola University would 
be supported by the group. Maximum membership was set at forty. 

Rev. Richard E. Tischler, S.J., acted as moderator of the organization. 
Father Tischler is largely responsible for the steps the Green Circle has made 
toward awakening student interest and increasing school spirit. 



131 




Chemistry Club 



The Chemistry Club is one of that number of organizaticr.j whose work is 
closely allied with classroom study. Science students who show a particular 
interest in chemistry can, through this organization, study the latest industrial 
methods and developments with others who share an equal interest. Informal 
discussion among the student members serves to heighten interest in the subject 
as \^'ell as further the individual's knowledge of research and newly developed 
techniques. 

Meetings were held throughout the school year on the Lake Shore Campus. 
At a few of these meetings members of the Loyola faculty conducted forums 
on topics of widespread interest. 

Plans are already under way to make next year a bigger year than ever for 
the Chemistry Club. As enrollment of science students is expected to reach an 
all-time high, the members are hoping that the club will also break its enroll- 
ment record. 

John Oster served this year as chairman of the club. William Saunders acted 
as secretary, and Robert Otremba as librarian.. 



132 



Viasmam Kiological 



The object of the Wasmann Biological Society, which is a national organization 
with chapters established in Jesuit colleges and universities, is to stimulate 
interest in the biological sciences. This is done by the presentation of original 
research in the Society's journal, The Wasmann Collector, by scientific lectures 
and demonstrations, and by the encouragement of members to assist in the 
development of the University's biological museum. 

The 'Probe, official paper of Loyola's chapter, is devoted exclusively to 
undergraduate effort in biology, and to the social activities of the chapter. It 
offers a fine medium for the publication of student investigation in the fields of 
zoology. 

Rev. Charles J. "Wideman, S.J., is moderator of the Loyola chapter. Father 
'Wideman also serves as National President of the Society. Thomas O'Shea was 
elected president of 'Wasmann early in the year. At the same meeting Richard 
"Wallyn was elected vice-president. 




133 



Vstjckologtj Club 



The Psychology Club is a group of interested students whose aim is to comple- 
ment their class-learned psychology with outside study and informal discussions. 
Organizational plans now call for a strong membership drive, a definite program 
of social events, and a list of guest speakers for general meetings. Club officials 
have high hopes that most of these goals can be achieved with marked success 
next year. 

"The thing we can't put over to a lot of people," said one member, "is that 
this is not another academic course. I am convinced that without the outside 
knowledge I've picked up as a member of this club — even in the most informal 
chats with faculty members and advanced students — psychology would not have 
been nearly as interesting for me. And the more interested I am in a course, the 
less difficult it becomes for me. It is for this reason that we think the Psychology 
Club could be a great help to all those who join." 

This year's ofiicers are as follows: Francis X. Curran, president; Dan Devine, 
vice-president; George Rosenkranz, secretary; George Zimmy, treasurer; Robert 
Fitzmaurice, program chairman. 




134 




:J^ -d >/ 




IbA^. C 



The International Relations Club is a student organization on the Lake Shore 
Campus whose purpose it is to promote a clearer understanding of the problems 
of international relations and to work toward a solution of these problems from 
the standpoint of Christian ethics. 

During this year the club had guest speakers come to Loyola to deliver 
addresses on current events. The Loyola delegation also attended meetings at 
Marquette University, Mundelein College, Rosary College, and Butler Uni- 
versity. 

Dr. Paul Leitz of the history department is Moderator of the group. Fred 
Inden was elected president of the club early in the year. At the same time 
Brian Buckley was elected vice-president. 



135 




TraterHities 



Fraternities have a definite place in the hfe at Loyola. The parties and dances 
they sponsor are a part of the college life. The school spirit they promote is an 
integral part of Loyola. The friendly rivalry they encourage harpens the competi- 
tive spirit of the student. The friendships they bring about are never forgotten. 



136 





ALPHA DELTA GAMMA 



The social fraternity of Alpha Delta Gamma is the only such organization on the Lake 
Shore Campus of Loyola University enjoying national membership. The mother chapter 
was formed at Loyola in 1924; and, when additional chapters were added at other 
schools, became known as the alpha chapter. The fraternity's national convention was 
conducted last May at the Stevens Hotel. 

The officers of the fraternity for the year are as follows: Paul Bowman, president; 
Richard Finn, vice-president ; John Nugent, secretary ; Sam Oddo, treasurer ; Dan Sweeney, 
pledgemaster ; Jake Bowman, sergeant-at-arms ; Jerry Nolan, steward; Frank Lynch, 
historian; Ed McGrath, LM manager; and Bill Reid, '32, alumni director. 

Faculty members of the fraternity include Reverend Arthur J. Kelly, S.J., moderator; 
Robert McDonald ; Robert Lindinmeyer ; John Brannigan ; and Thomas Kennedy. 

The fraternity's membership is as follows: Joe Badore, Chuck Bartel, Harry Brand- 
strader, Sam Cassato, Pat Conaghan, Frank Cullen, Jim Doherty, Bill Cowhey, Ted 
Colgan, John Carolyn, Bob Deering, Bill Denton, Tom Devine, John Doyle, Emil Den- 
namark, Bill Dunne, Jim Dunne, Ray Egan, Don Ewald, Paul Erback, Herb Frake, Bob 
Frische, Ray Geringer, Bill Gawne, Fred Graver, Bob Hagan, Bob Heffernan, Gene 
Hartrich, Bob Hanley, David James, Rog Kelly, Ed Kelly, Tim Kelly, Jim Kellaher, 
Cliff Kennedy, Dick Leach, Phil Long, Jim Mannelly, Tom Meade, Ralph Marotta, Don 
McAllister, Bob McCarthy, Will McDermott, John McGrath, George McKerr, George 
Mullen, Sam Narsette, Pete Nicopolos, Marion Omiatek, Jerry O'Connor, Leo O'Connor, 
John O'Dwyer, John O'Neil, John Pachetti, Al Parnety, Harry Pierce, James Quinn, 
J. T. Ryan, Ed Ryan, Bob Simpson, Joe Spanola, Bob Spellman, John Spellman, Bob 
Spencer, Robert Smith, John Sherlock, Tom Venn, and Jim Waite. 



137 



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PHI MU CHI 



Phi Mu Chi is the oldest social fraternity at Loyola. Its primary end is to increase and 
maintain a brotherly feeling among its men. In connection with this, it attempts to sup- 
port all social functions and intramural programs open to the fraternity to the fullest 
possible extent. 

Officers of the fraternity for the last year included Urban Forester, president; Nate 
Pitaro, vice-president ; Robert Serbinski, secretary ; Richard Wagener, treasurer. Rev. 
Thomas J. Bryant, S.J., served as moderator to the fraternity. 

Dr. George M. Schmeing, Bertram J. Steggert, Aloysius P. Hodapp, Frank J. Lodeski, 
D. J. Wilhelmi, Rev. Charles Wideman, S.J., Rev. Gerald Grant, S.J., and Rev. William 
P. Walsh, S.J., are members of the fraternity now serving as faculty members at the 
University. 

Members of the fraternity are as follows: Michael Angelos, Angelo Angelos, Louis 
Aiello, Henry Butts, John Bradshaw, Armello Bax, Sam G. Bays, Eugene Capec, Jerome 
CoUetti, Raymond Dalka, George Ferenzi, John Forrette, Ted Floros, James Green, 
Haydn Johns, Leonard Kawula, Robert Leali, Thomas Locke, Kenneth Lavette, Chester 
Martini, John McNichols, Patrick Puca, Charles Roe, Eugene Rinaldo, Robert Taylor, 
John Theodorou, Robert Wagener, John Dougherty, Anthony Alabick, Leo Blcokus, 
Robert Babick, Leonard O'Connor, Edward Garmoe, William Saunders, John Sullivan, 
Eugene Narsette. 



138 





PI ALPHA LAMBDA 



Pi Alpha Lambda was founded in 1925 by a group of Catholic gentlemen, under the 
guidance of the present moderator, the Rev. James J. Mertz, S.J. Since its organization, 
the fraternity has been intimately identified with the growth and partial completion of 
its moderator's dream, the Madonna Delia Strada Chapel. 

To further Loyola by engaging in things Loyolan is one of the chief aims of the 
fraternity. Its members are not only supporters of things Loyolan but strive to be leaders 
on any activity undertaken. 

M. Jay Turner and Thomas F. McNulty served as the principal oiScers of the 
fraternity, respectively president and pledgemaster. Other officers included Donald B. 
Pauls, vice-president; Robert Dempsey, treasurer; Clare Acton, recording secretary; 
Perry Vaughn, corresponding secretary; James Shelly, historian; and James A. Graydon, 
Intramural manager. 

Faculty members include: D. Herbert Abel, Thomas Buckley, John Callahan, Frank 
Cassaretto, William H. Conley, John Gerrietts, William Hawkette, Paul Lietz, John D. 
McKian, Rev. James J. Mertz, S.J., Theodosi Mogilnitsky, Martin Svaglic, and Louis 
Tordella. 

Pi Alpha Lambda members are: Robert Azar, Howard Boll, Peter Bowman, Cyril 
Brennan, James Burlbach, Bert Cagney, Donald Campe, Bill Campe, Jack Clark, Pat 
Cleary, Ted Corbett, Don Devine, James Doyle, Jim Feely, Charles Frahm, Bud Gast, 
George Gaubatz, Joe Gauer, Don Gruendel, Tom Hackett, jack Hahn, Larry Hayes, Dan 
Healy, Bud Healy, Joe Hein, Bill Hillsman, Bert Hinkes, Bert Hoffman, Charles Homan, 
Ed Hyland, George Kaiser, Bob Kearney, Bill Kelly, Ed Kelly, Jim Kelly, Dick Keshin, 
Bill Kilkenny, Vern Lahart, Bill Lavazzorio, Ed Lussier, Bob Lussier, John Maloney, 
Walter McCue, Dan Mclntyre, John McNulty, Robert McNulty, Gene Mitchell, James 
Moore, Joe Morreale, Art O'Brien, Jim O'Connor, Bill O'Donoghue, Dick O'Laughlin, 
Jim Preib, Dick Quinn, Ned Rickard, Walter Sands, Oscar Schnetzer, Bill Seeberg, Bill 
Sheehan, Bill Shelley, Frank Sullivan, Harry Sullivan, Hank Theisen, Bill Uruba, Dick 
Weber, and Jack White. 



139 




PHI ALPHA RHO 



Phi Alpha Rho, national Catholic honorary forensic fraternity, was established at Loyola 
in 1930 for the purpose of rewarding those who had achieved proficiency in debate and 
oratory, to honor those who had at the same time merited scholastic distinction, and to 
promote Catholic forensic cooperation on a national scale. These aims it sought to 
accomplish by affording recognition of merit, by instituting requirements of such strictness 
as would ensure proper standards, and by providing a concrete means for the realization 
of national collaboration. 

The Rev. Richard E. Tischler, S.J., moderator of the Debating Society, was installed 
as this year's Phi Alpha Rho moderator. Activity in the fraternity was limited, because 
of the small number of members who were inducted at the end of the first semester. 
Members of the fraternity are Adrian Chisholm, Edward Murphy, Paul F. Ehvard, Brian 
Buckley, and Keith Keating. 




140 




DELTA SIGMA DELTA 



Delta Sigma Delta, the first fraternity designed strictly for students of the dental 
profession, was founded at the University of Michigan in 1882. The Beta chapter was 
established at the Chicago College of Dental Surgery in 1885, which became the Dental 
College of Loyola University in 1924. 

Officers of the fraternity are Donald L. Carpenter, president; Roderick L. Nystul, vice- 
president; Charles R. Heinzmann, secretary; and Harry Constantine, treasurer. 

Members of the fraternity shown in the picture below are: 

First row: Don Wilkin, Harry Constantine, Charles Heinzmann, President Donald 
Carpenter, Roderick Nystul, William Frett. 

Middle row: Casimir Smyk, Dick Wierenga, Keon Sut Ching, James Griffin, Frank 
Tyk, William Koester, Leon Peotrowski, Frank Parilli. 

Top row: Dale Chastik, Gregory Moran, Carl Harmon, Jerome Voss, Harold Sink, 
Jack Ferris, Edward Colson, John Esposito, Frank Madden. 




141 





PHI ALPHA DELTA 



Phi Alpha Delta, a fraternity made up of members of the School of Law, was intro- 
duced at Loyola University in 1934. The fraternity was founded in Chicago, Illinois, 
November 8, 1902. It was the outgrowth and reorganization of a fraternity of law 
students known as Lambda Epsilon, founded in 1897. Webster Chapter of Loyola was 
one of the four original chapters which constituted the Lambda Epsilon organization. 

Activities of the fraternity were slow to materialize this year. They were of the type 
in keeping with a fraternity of the high ideals which Phi Alpha Delta possesses. 

The fraternity claims among its members of the faculty of the School of Law. Francis 
J. Rooney, John C. Hayes, and James A. Howell participated in the year's activities to 
add another year to their credit as faculty members of Phi Alpha Delta. 



142 




PSI OMEGA 



Psi Omega is the largest Greek Letter Dental Fraternity in the world. 1 here have been 
initiated into Psi Omega over 22,000 members, and the fraternity has active chapters 
in practically all of the dental schools in the United States and Canada, a ^•ery active 
European chapter, and about fifty alumni chapters. 

The chapter at Loyola is Kappa, founded in 1898. The Deputy Counsellor is Dr. Cedric 
K. Dittmer, whose persevering efforts have developed Kappa to its present status. The 
offices of grand master, junior grand master, secretary, and treasurer are held by Stan 
Brezinski, Bill Foust, Duane England, and Chuck Carpenter, respectively. The fraternity 
is fortunate in having a house, in which bi-monthly meetings are held, as well as social 
events and lectures; in the basement is a well-equipped laboratory for the more zealous 
members. 

In the bottom rovv' of the picture are W. E. Hermsmeier, E. B. Siarkiewicz, D. A. 
Englund, S. D. Brezinski, W. M. Foust, C. R. Carpenter, and B. R. Coglianese. In the 
middle row are L. J. Ostrom, K. O. Vesledahl, R. J. Carroll, T. S. Hall, M, M. Bobinski, 
C. P. Fijal, and G. H. Green. In the top row are J. S. Wawro, J. J. Krueger, R. L. Hass, 
C. D. Cory, J. J. McHale, J. L. Avery, C. B. Randall, and A. Kagan. 



143 




PHI CHI 



The Phi Chi Medical Fraternity, Incorporated, was founded in the year 1889 at the 
University of Vermont, which has since been designated as the Alpha chapter of the 
fraternity. From this humble beginning the fraternity has grown during the last fifty- 
eight years to be one of the largest and most respected of medical societies. It stands to 
reason that it did not "just grow" to its enviable position in the fraternity world. While 
it may be true that it made its reputation through the character of its membership and 
adherence to the basic principles enunciated by its founders, something like a system and 
the exploitation of that system has a great deal to do with its success. And briefly, that 
system has been basically in the selection of men of character, principle, endeavor, and 
love of the medical arts. From such a soil and with the cultivation of such membership 
the society of Phi Chi has grown to be what it is today. 

The Loyola Chapter of Phi Chi, known as Phi Sigma, was founded in the year 1907, 
the present department then being the College of Physicians and Surgeons. Over the 
ensuing period the success of this chapter has been reflected in the members who have 
been outstanding in their achievement in the professional world, as well as in its growth, 
which has made it one of the largest organizations on the campus and an institution 
symbolic of scholarship and the high ideals of the university. It is ■well represented on 
the faculty, and it promises to remain the leader of social activities in the medical depart- 
ment of Loyola University. 




144 




ALPHA OMEGA 



The Alpha Omega international dental fraternity was founded at Pennsylvania College in 
1907. In 1933 the Alpha Lambda chapter was organized at the Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery to include members of the already-existing Alpha Zeta Gamma fraternity 
of Loyola. Today Alpha Omega consists of thirty-two chapters and sixteen alumni clubs, 
extending throughout the United States and Canada. 

Officers are Raymond Tiersky, chancellor; Earl Kuznetsky, vice-chancellor; Morris 
Gordon, quaestor; and Herbert Weinfield, scribe. 

Pictured above are the following members of the fraternity: 

Front row: M. Lifschutz, A. Riskin, H. Weinfield, R. Tiersky, J. Zimmerman, E. 
Kuznetsky, M. Gordon. 

Back row: M. Carnon, A. Frankel, A. Schwartz, A. Spiro, M. Levinson, P. Dolin, C. 
Wilk, H. Eisenberg, B. Toustein. 




145 




Vmersity Club 



The University Club is an organization founded on the Arts campus in 1938 by a group 
of students interested in establishing social affiliations by which they could maintain 
more fully their own personal Christian development and in so doing contribute to a 
greater Loyola. 

The objectives of the University Club are three: to provide members with a social 
outlet; to encourage participation by members in social and athletic activities at Loyola; 
to establish a bond of friendship for life between members of the Club. 

Frank Steggert heads the Club with the capable assistance of Bill Aquilino, vice- 
president; John E. Wallace, secretary: Bob Phillips, treasurer; and Ted Panaretos, 
pledgemaster. 

Rev. Norbert Huetter, S.J., and Rev. Norman T. Weyand, S.J., are moderators of the 
University Club. Other faculty members are Rev. James T. Hussey, S.J., Rev. Richard 
Tischler, S.J., Walter Foody, Alex Wilson, Thomas Haggerty, and Jerry Heffernan. 

Members of the University Club on the Lake Shore Campus include: Bob Bedell, Dan 
Cotter, Jack Dwan, Dude O'Hara, Chuck Rollings, Joe Caparros, Bart Heffernan, Dan 
Murray, Bill Olach, Wally Bock, Joe Madigan, Jack McBride, John Murray. Tom Foley, 
Joe Gensert, Phil Gould, John Heller, Jack Kerris, Bob Klein, Bill McCarthy, John 
O'Callahan, Bud Ray, Bill Sheehan. Dave Sherry, John Wheeler, Hank Adamson, Brian 
Buckley, Dan DeLave, Bill Evans, Bill Ermatinger, Chris FitzGerald, Bernie Flannagan, 
Bob Foran, Bill Hurley, Fred Inden, Ed Langhenry, Lou Lehr, Frank McCabe, Jim 
McMahon, Ray Miller, Bill Moses, Dick Ramos, Jim Reddington, Ralph Reeve, Jerry 
Slattery, Ed Walsh, John Burke, George Cashion, Frank Hayes, Jerry FitzGerald, John 
Green. 

Members of the University Club on the Downtown campus are: Pete Dolce, Joe 
Elwood, Pat Hanley, Tom Lane, John McCabe, Bob McDermott, Bill McGregor, Jay 
O'Hara, Al Sheetz, James Bastian, Bill Carroll, Ken Fishleigh, Bill Foran, Robert O'Brien, 
Joe Schultz, Jack Breen, Paul Buckley, Bill Connery, Jim Corbert, Bob Cronin. Maurice 
DeGrand, Jerry Forrestal, Bob Gorman, Dan Heffernan, Al Jongleux, Gene Mazurek, 
Harvey Reed, and Bob Schweitzer. 



146 




XI PSI PHI 



The Xi Psi Phi fraternity was founded in the year 1899 at Ann Arbor, Michigan. Since 
that time it has expanded to include many chapters, the one at the Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery being the Lambda chapter. 

Faculty members affiliated with Xi Psi Phi include Jerome J. Vlk, D.D.S., M.D.S. ; 
Edgar ]. Coolidge, M.S., D.D.S.; Harold W. Oppice, D.D.S.; and John ]. OConnell, 
D.D.S. 

Officers are A. J. Sypniewski, president; J. Tarsitano, vice-president; Robert S. Strenk, 
secretary; E. Pacocha, treasurer; D. Catrambone, publicity chairman; and Raymond Dux, 
pledgemaster. 

Pictured above are the following members of the fraternity: 

Front row: P. Gazarek, N. Tsoflias, E. Pacocha, J. Tarsitano, R. Strenk, D. Catrombone, 
L. Krol. 

Back row: R. Carlucci, C. Norris, R. Rux, G. Bravo, V. Levy, M. Koscielniak, B. 
Andriacchi, L. Angelpoulos, J. Krivanek, F. Ranico. 




147 



M 00 r head Surgical Semimr 



Since its founding in 1931, the Moorhead Surgical Seminar has proved invaluable as a 
means by which senior medical students can further their knowledge of the more detailed 
branches of surgery. This honorary medical organization was named in honor of the 
late Dr. E. L. Moorhead who, in his capacity as head of the department of surgery at 
Loyola, brought credit not only to himself but to the school that he represented. 

Membership in the Seminar is restricted to the more prominent senior and junior 
students, who are in a position to appreciate the benefits to be derived from their mutual 
interest. Men noted for their ability and knowledge in certain fields of medicine are 
invited as guest speakers. 

A. James Blanchard was the president of the Moorhead Surgical Seminar for the past 
year. He was ably assisted by Walter F. Kondratowicz, vice-president ; Victorian B. Vacha, 
secretary, and Elmer C. Rost, treasurer. Members of the Seminar in the class of 1947 
included E. Antzis, M. A. Daima, J. M. Bubalo, J. W. Colavincenzo, J. W. Conley, Rev. 
W. J. Devlin, S.J., R. J. Fink, J. S. Kelly, C. G. Martin, C. D. Martinaitis, R. A. Mc- 
Dermott, E. A. Motto, D. W. Olivieri, L. R. Pascale, S. J. Spinuzza, D. H. Stannard, 
E. F. Watts, A. H. Weiss, H. C. Whelan, and A. J. Wright. 





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148 




ALPHA KAPPA DELTA 



Alpha Kappa Delta was organized in 1913 at the University of Southern California. 
Loyola University was granted a Charter in 1922, and the organization functioned under 
the direction of the Rev. Frederick Seidenburg, S.J. In 1936 the Rev. Ralph A. Gallagher, 
S.J., Chairman of the Department of Sociology, took over the direction of the society. 
After a lapse of activities during the war years, the society was reorganized at Loyola by 
Theodore E. Cornell, Jr., '42, a former officer of the society. 

The officers for the year 1946-47 are: Theodore E. Cornell, Jr., president; Vincent 
Keller, vice-president; Ruth Crowe, secretary; and Charles O'Reilly, membership 
chairman. 

Members of the society from the faculty include Rev. Ralph A. Gallagher, S.I., Dr. 
Paul Kiniery, and Edward A. Marciniak. 

Members of the society are Louis Zale, John Sinnott, Norine Jennings, Edward M. 
Wies, Raymond Jasczak, Alvina Junk, Donald Keevers. Dora Casino. William O. Hane, 
Florence Michels, and jane V. Rogers. 




149 




Volmi M^dicdl Society 



The Volini Medical Society, founded in 193-j by seniors of the Medical School, is 
composed only of students in their junior or senior year and of those underclassmen who 
have maintained an exceptional average in medical subjects. 

Faculty members of the society are Dr. William D. Jack, moderator ; Dr. Italo F. Volini ; 
Dr. H. F. DeFoe; Dr. H. I. Schmitz; Dr. G. M. Engbring; and Dr. W. Shapiro. The 
officers are John M. Bubalo, president; and Margaret A. Baima, secretary. 

Other members of the society are M. |. Bulhn, J. W. Conley, T. C. Cottrell, Rev. W. J. 
Devlin. S.J., D. L. Donovan, F. T. Flood, G. D. Griffin, J. S, Kelly, W. F. Kondratowicz, 
V. A. Lavieri, R. J. Lukes, R. A. McDermott, C. G. Martin, F. T. Motfett, E. A. Motto, 
R. P. Nenno, L. R. Pascale, E. L. Rau, N. T. Revis, E. C. Rost, D. A. Soriano, 
A. J. Sowka, D. H. Stannard, V. B. Vacha, W. F. Watts, A. H. Weiss, andA. L. Wright. 



150 






LAMBDA RHO 



Lambda Rho, honorary radiological fraternity, was established at Loyola in 192 5. Its 
purpose is instruction in the therapeutic and diagnostic application of radiology under 
the guidance of the foremost exponents of this branch of medicine. 

The Board of Counsellors of the fraternity is composed of Doctors J. J. Callahan, 
W. T. Carlisle, J. D. Claridge, T. F. Finegan, P. Fox, C. C. Guy, R. J. Hawkins, C. \V. 
Hughes, L F. Hummon, R. E. Lee, A. V. Partipillo, C. F. Schaub, A. M. Vaughn. 

Officers are A. James Blanchard, president; Walter F. Kondratowicz, vice-president; 
Victoria B. Vacha, secretary; and Elmer C. Rost, Jr., treasurer. 

Other members are E. Antzis, M. A. Baima, J. M. Bubalo, J. W. Colavincenzo, J. W. 
Conley, Rev. W. J. Devlin, S.J., R. J. Fink, J. S. Kelly, C. G. Martin, C. D. Martinaitis, 
R. A. McDermott, E. A. Mott, D. W. Olivieri, L. R. P&scale, S. J. Spinuzza. D. H. 
Stannard, W. F. Watts, A. H. Weiss, H. G. Whelan, and A. L. Wright. 



151 



_^.t 



152 



We realize that some organizations have been omitted from this last section of the 
Loyolan. As a result, if you are looking for your name, your picture, or your favorite 
club, it must be remembered that your name may not have been submitted, your picture 
was probably not taken, or your favorite club has only recently been formed or re-formed. 
These difficulties added up to your being left out of the Loyolan. We sincerely wish that 
we could have included all groups, such as Beta Pi, honorary publications fraternity; 
Blue Key. honorary scholastic fraternity; and the Beliarmine Society, philosophy study 
group. Under the pressure of bringing to you the first Loyolan in five years, we were 
unable to obtain sufficient data on these groups as we went to press. 




153 




OYOLA LIFE 




i 



'S**> 



L 





Life at Loyola ,s not restricted to classes, studies, and clubs. Loyola life has its liohter 
moments . . . ,ts livelier moments, its lazier moments. And over all this is a relieion^that 
IS not merely felt, but lived. 



155 








fUelangt 





Religious 



Campus life at Loyola is permeated with an atmosphere of 
religion that influences the students during their school years 
and for the rest of their lives. Rev. Thomas A. Egan, S.J., Rev. 
James J. Mahoney, S.J., and Rev. Robert J. Willmes, S.J., act as 
Student Counsellors for Lewis Towers, Lake Shore Campus, and 
professional schools, respectively. These men are constantly at the 
disposal of the student body for consultation and advice. In addi- 
tion, the Student Counsellors organize the annual retreats, the 
student Masses, and the support of the Missions for which Loyola 
has become so renowned. 




'Jmi'^mwi^ 



hife 



Loyola has long been recognized as a center of Catholic life in 
Chicago and the Middle West. During the past year the 
University was honored with a visit by His Emminence Thomas 
Cardinal Tien, S.V.D., of China. Rev. Joseph M. Egan, S.J., 
escorted Cardinal Tien on his tour of the Loyola grounds. 

The University was also a temporary residence for six young 
Jesuits bound for India and the Mission field in Patna. These men 
were the first Jesuits to be sent to Patna since the war made 
transportation to the East impossible. 





■~"-*-<"| 




NIGHT 



Nights to relax, forget about the translation of axes in Mon 
day's analytics class and the translation of "Beatus ille" 
in Monday's Latin class. Tomorrow night is the time 
to do the term paper. 




162 



LIFE 



Nights to relax, remember the score of the game that the 
Ramblers are winning or the name of the tune the orchestra 
is playing. Last night the report on The Art of 
Thinking was finished. 




163 




"Our first petty cash slip.' 



Lewis Towers Campus view. 



B. M. O. C. 



In every university there are certain men whose partial occupation is that 
of making themselves prominent in some field of extra-curricular activity. 
Loyola has her share of these men who establish themselves, by the time 
they have reached their sophmore year, in minor roles on publications, 
on athletic teams, in literary and debating clubs, or simply at a card table 
surrounded by avid pinochle fans in a smoky student lounge. They have 
learned to spend their lunch hours in good company on Granville Avenue 
or Rush Street; but sometimes, on Monday afternoons, they can be seen 
sittmg alone at a drugstore counter, eating only a grilled cheese sandwich 
with a small coke. 



These men, as they progress in their college life, gradually adjust them- 
selves to the increased amount of time required by their stepping into 
more important roles in extra-curricular endeavors. And so they arrange 



"Yes, Father.' 



It was a nice library. 



The night before the morning after. 









"You're faded. 



Cudahy Library Annex 



New Erector set for tlie boy 



their class schedules accordingly, so that they can still maintain the B 
average along with outside work. This may entail a session of summer 
school, which they really do not mind. Much. 

When the average B.M.O.C. has entered his senior year, he is un- 
doubtedly the main cog in one or another university organization. He 
smokes a pipe both off and on the campus (he has become used to the 
vile taste), and he never plays pinochle in the lounge. He does everything 
he can to get his name on a plaque or a trophy, and he usually succeeds^ 
He continues to work hard to keep his B average — in his major sequence. 

After the B.M.O.C. has graduated, he has not really left Loyola. His 
name remains on classroom desks, in Loyola News articles, and in the 
minds of the deans and instructors whose ward and worry he has been. 
He has become an idol whose faults are better left unmentioned. 



"Sorry, ttiis is Itie student lounge!' 



A look at ttie record. 





CAMPUS 



"Poll-watcher with eyes shut" — (Dali?). 



'Debaters with voices stilled. 



'Students with books closed. 



"Workmen with beam up," or "Men beaming at 




LIFE 



The LOYOLAN records the evidence 



The dance was better than the advance publicity 





PUSHBALL 



168 





169 



OYOLANS IN ACTION 




I 



^-•' 









athletic ^oard Coaches 



The sudden renewal of intercollegiate athletics on a large scale made the task 
of the Loyola Athletic Board much more difficult than it was during the war 
years. It is the duty of this council to see that the athletic policies of the school 
are correlated to its scholastic policies. The agency was organized in 1936 as 
the Loyola University Athletic Board of Control. The board is made up of 
members of the coaching staff and the academic faculty of the University. The 
Athletic Board decides on all matters of athletic policy, particularly the matter 
of approving all scheduled games or meets. 

Athletics are a vital part of a university, and athletic success is something to 
be prized, but not to be secured at the price of the finer things of Catholic 
university life. This, in brief, is the athletic policy of Loyola. Mr. Alex Wilson 
serves as Director of Athletics, coach of the track team, and member of the 
board. Mr. Wilson and his staff of coaches cooperate with the various deans 
and professors of Loyola who also serve on the board. 

The staff of coaches, the men who guide the destiny of Loyola in inter- 
collegiate competition, include the following: Tom Haggerty, coach of basket- 
ball; Marty O'Shaughnessy, coach of swimming; Jerry Heffernan, coach of 
boxing; and Mr. Wilson, coach of track and cross-country. 



Alex Wilson 
Director of Athletics 



Thomas Haggerty 
Coach of Basketball 





Track 



"Having just emerged from the trackless war years, we have had to build for 
the last two years. This season has proven that our runners can hold their own 
against the best competition, but we have been practically pointless in our field 
events." In the words of time-honored Coach Alex Wilson, that means that the 
record of the track team for the past year has not been especially successful. 
A close look at the record will show that the Ramblers' practically non-existent 
scoring in field events was responsible for the low percentage of their wins 
in the meets in which they participated. 

The Loyola men found themselves on the short end of eight meets, and they 
won only two. However, the one mile relay team, composed of Vern Lahart, 
Maurice Mizel, Joe Egan, and Bert Cagney, made a showing in all of these 
meets that would rival some of the best seasons Loyola's milers have ever had. 
They broke the tape first on every occasion except one; and, in losing this one, 
they strangely enough established their best time — an amazing 3:18.5 mile. 




172 




After this particular feat, which took place during the Annual Drake Relays, 
Coach Wilson stated in an interview with the Loyola News: "In my fifteen 
years at Loyola, I have had an ambition to have a 3:20 relay team. I am more 
proud of our third at Drake, which rates us as the number three college team 
in the country, than of all our other championships indoors this summer." The 
Loyola time is better than the Chicago Stadium record by seven seconds, and 
five seconds better than Loyola's own previous record. 

In addition, the mile relay team set a new record for all colleges that have 
participated in the Chicago Relays. The time that has to be beaten now is 
Loyola's 3:25.6. 

Anchor man Bert Cagney was high point man for the season, taking time off 
from his relay team to run in individual competition. Crowning achievement 
was his taking second place in the Central Collegiate Conference quarter mile. 




173 



Vern Lahart, also of the relay team, placed second highest in total points for 
the season. Moe Mizel and Joe Egan also rated high in scoring on their own as 
well as with co-runners Lahart and Cagney. Long distance man Ed Miller was 
a consistent good bet in the one mile and two mile events, usually giving Loyola 
points when they were the most needed. Shining star on the field events horizon 
was Bill McNulty, high-jumper. 

Consolation for next year's squad lies in the fact that the large majority of 
the last season's stellar performers will return. With the "return to normalcy" 
Loyola can expect one of the finest teams Loyolans have ever seen. 

Student Manager of the squad was Al Uher. Other trackmen, for whom a 
bright future can be anticipated, are Bob Bedell, George Burns, Keenan Burns, 
Marc Campbell, Jack Casey, Tom Dee, Lou Goldberg, Gene Gould, Dan 
Heffernan, Amon Luckey, John Moloney, Fred Morgan, Joe Paprocki, Bob 
"Wagoner, and Bob Weatherford. 




174 




Cross CouHtty 



The Loyola Cross Country team was commonly regarded as one of the strongest 
squads assembled by the University since 1939 as they rounded into shape for 
their first meet of the season on October 19. Most of the veterans and youngsters 
who hoped to make the grade in track were on hand to work off the softness 
brought on by a summer of comparative idleness. Milwaukee State Teachers 
College was Loyola's first opponent. The Ramblers handled the situation nicely 
by taking the meet and five of the first six places along with it. Ed Miller took 
an early lead for Loyola and by careful pacing managed to increase it steadily. 
Kugler of Milwaukee held the second position, although seriously pressed at 
the finish by Loyola's Vern Lahart who finished third. Louis Goldberg, Pat 
Henry, and Jack Kane, all of the Ramblers, took fourth, fifth, and sixth 
respectively. 

The harriers were not so fortunate when they met Wheaton on October 26. 
The men on the orange and blue dealt Loyola a defeat, and so evened the 
Ramblers' score for the season. 

The high point of the Cross Country season was the fourteenth annual Loyola 
Invitational meet, held at Loyola on November 2. Most of the large Midwest 
colleges were represented. First place was taken by Illinois. They were closely 
followed by the teams from Michigan and Michigan State. Miller, Loyola's 
strongest hope in the race, developed a cramp soon after the start but gamely 
finished out. Loyola finished eighth in team standings. 



175 




COACH TOM HAGGERTY 



'Basketball 



The conclusion of the 1946-47 hardwood campaign marked the second consecu- 
tive success of Coach Tom Haggerty in his drive to renew the glory of Loyola's 
basketball name. In what has been perhaps the most difficult schedule ever 
arranged by the Athletic Board, his charges managed to win twenty games 
while dropping nine. Utilizing all available material, inexperienced as well as 
experienced, he brought the Ramblers through to prominent ranking in the 
Middle Western area. 

Disposing of the first three opponents, Chicago Teachers, Wisconsin State 
Teachers, and Illinois Tech, witli little difficulty, the squad swung southwest for 
a three game series in Texas. At Fort Worth they defeated a strong Southern 
Methodist team, 59 to 49, and then took on Texas Christian twice, wirming 
47 to 41 and 45 to 39- 

In New York's Madison Square Garden the Loyolans fell before the powerful 
St. John's quintet, 58 to 43. A stop at Toledo on the return trip netted an over- 
time defeat of the highly-rated Ohioans. Back on the home floor a loss to Tulane 
was followed by one of the season's most satisfying victories, tlie 60 to 53 
triumph over tlie Indiana Hoosiers. 

An unexpected slump came as the squad lost two in a row, to Fort Sheridan 
and Southern Methodist. Regaining form somewhat, the Ramblers went on to 
defeat Texas Christian, 61 to 55, and to divide a two game series with a fine 
Bowling Green team. 




176 




Playing their finest ball of the season, the boys went on to build up an 
impressive eight-game winning streak. Marquette, the Alumni, Western Michi- 
gan, Havana, Bowhng Green, Oklahoma A & M, Valparaiso, and Toledo fell 
before tlie Loyola advance. The victories over Bowling Green and the Okla- 
homa Aggies took place in the Chicago Stadium's round-robin tourney and 
focused national attention on the team. 

Hamline snapped the victory chain with an uninspired win, 45 to 43, in the 
Alumni Gymnasium. At Cincinnati, Miami University was overwhelmed by a 
72 to 57 score, but, the following night in Louisville, Morehead Teachers won 
a heartbreaker, 60 to 59. Hamline again proved stubborn in winning a return 
engagement at St. Paul, 54 to 38. The final home contest saw the Ramblers 
emerge victorious, 62 to 52, over their Milwaukee rivals from Marquette. The 
season ended with the traditional stadium battle against DePaul. Loyola led 
until the final minutes when the Demons rallied to snatch a 55 to 51 victory. 

Mainstays of the varsity this year were veterans Jack Dwan and Jack Dee, 
and the amazingly improved sophomore. Jack Kerris. Dwan ended his four 
years of collegiate stardom with a brilliant all-round performance. After two 
fine years at Notre Dame, Jack Dee brought his talents to Loyola where he 
became invaluable to the Rambler cause. Jack Kerris led the team in scoring, 
amassing 420 points over the season's distance. Averaging over fourteen points 
a game, Kerris became the finest center in this section of the land. 

Gerry Nagel, in his sophomore year, played a beautiful defensive game all 
season. Ed Bogdanski broke into the lineup early in the year and remained to 
bolster the team's offensive punch. The development of freshman Ed Earle 
proved almost as surprising as the performance of Kerris. When Jack Dee 
injured his ankle, Ed stepped into the starting lineup and played e.xcellent ball 
the remainder of the games. 

Jim Nicholl, Jack Hildebrand, Joe Morreale, Don Kenney, Ben Bluitt, Ed 
Dawson, Dan Pecyna, Corky Prentice, and the others made up a very formidable 
reserve list. All performed more than adequately whenever called upon. The 
majority of the group are only first year men and promise to develop even more 
during the coming seasons. 



177 




SEASON 



Loyola 54 

Loyola 78 

Loyola 84 

Loyola 59 

Loyola 47 

Loyola 45 

Loyola 43 

Loyola 60 

Loyola 52 

Loyola 60 

Loyola 61 

Loyola 53 

Loyola 61 

Loyola 49 

Loyola 59 



Chicago Teachers 35 

Wisconsin State 4l 

Illinois Tech 40 

S. M. U 49 

T. C. U 41 

T. C. U 39 

St. John's 58 

Toledo 57 

Tulane 67 

Indiana 53 

Ft. Sheridan 64 

S. M. U 62 

T. C U 55 

Bowling Green 40 

Bowling Green 65 



178 



SUMMARY 



Loyola 55 

Loyola 57 

Loyola 64 

Loyola 42 

Loyola 54 

Loyola 34 

Loyola 59 

Loyola 73 

Loyola 43 

Loyola 72 

Loyola 59 

Loyola 38 

Loyola 62 

Loyola 51 



Marquette 50 

Alumni 32 

West. Michigan 51 

U. of Havana 39 

Bowling Green 45 

Oklahoma A. & M 31 

Valparaiso 46 

Toledo 60 

Hamline 45 

Miami 57 

Morehead 60 

Hamline 54 

Marquette 52 

De Paul 55 




179 



'Leomrd'D, SachsAi^ard 



The Leonard D. Sachs trophy is presented annually to the Senior Athlete out- 
standing in scholarship, athletics, and sportsmanship. The award for this year 
was given to Jack Dwan, captain of the basketball and golf teams. Dwan 
entered Loyola from Senn high school in Chicago at the time when Mr. Sachs 
was coach of the basketball team and member of the Athletic Board. Dwan 
returned to Loyola last year after serving for close to three years as an officer in 
the Army Air Forces. He is the last Loyola athlete who played on a Sachs- 
coached team, so this year's award bears a special significance. 




180 




Alumfii Qame 



The Varsity-Alumni game has been an annual outing for basketball lovers as 
far back as all students and most faculty members can recall. Breaking into the 
season as it does, it gives the varsity men a chance to relieve the strain of inter- 
collegiate competition and play a regulation game with the Loyola greats of 
former years. For the "old-timers" — some of who are pushing thirty! — it is an 
event to look forward to with enthusiasm and to look back on with aching 
muscles. 

In this year's contest "Wibs" Kautz, Mike Novak, George Wenskus, and 
George Hogan — all members of the starting five of Loyola's great 1938-39 
squad — returned to the Alumni Gym to show the kids how they used to do it. 
Other stars from former years were Mickey Rottner, Marv Colen, Jack Stanton, 




The Alumni still look like stars. 



and Bob Tietz. It would be impossible to mention all the Loyola graduates who 
participated in this great event. It can only be stated that Loyola's stars of 
former years were present and gave a showing that brought back memories to 
sports lovers and never failed to entertain the capacity house. 
The varsity won this year's contest to the tune of 57-32. 



Dee goes high to score. 



It's anybody's ball. 




182 



Special 
A wards 



Kerris takes Most Valuable 
award at Chicago Stadium. 




Loyola's return to major intercollegiate competition this year met v/ith remark- 
able success. No one could deny that victories over such great teams as Indiana, 
Bowling Green, and Oklahoma A. & M. were magnificent team efforts. Never- 
theless, fans and sports writers saw during the season that certain members of 
the squad were also stars in their own right and especially deserving of praise. 

Jack Kerris, center, stands head and shoulders above the average basketball 
player physically; those who saw Loyola's Ramblers play also realized that he 
stood similarly above the average in ability. The rangy sophomore was high 
scorer for the team and among the leading scorers in the midwest. In the 
Chicago Stadium Round Robin Tournament, held in the middle of the season, 
Kerris was awarded the Most Valuable Player's award. 

At the conclusion of the basketball year, the Chicago Basketball Writers 
voted Kerris the outstanding player of the year in the Metropolitan area. At the 
same time Tom Haggerty, Rambler coach, was selected as the writers' Coach 
of the Year. 

Loyola's basketball hopes are high for next year, since both award winners — 
and the greater part of the team that contributed to their success — will be 
on hand. 



Coach Haggerty accepts the winners' 
trophy in Round Robin Tournament. 





B- Zeam 



Schuize sharpens his eye in practice. 



Since Loyola was still operating under wartime eligibility rules, there was no 
freshman team during the 1946-47 season. Instead, many of the first year men 
gained the necessary experience playing with the B-Team. The squad was 
wonderfully equipped in personnel. Men such as Schuize andf McNulty lent 
experience to the team; Dawson and Bluitt gave it height; and such speedsters 
as Hildebrand, Klaerich, Flando, and Thomas furnished it with a fast-breaking 
offense. 

Most of the B-Team's members at one time or another during the year saw 
service with the varsity. This system has built a well-balanced, well-experienced 
team for the seasons yet to come. 

The B-Team played a large percentage of its games on double-header pro- 
grams with the varsity in Alumni Gymnasium. It was not uncommon to see 
B-Team players go through their paces in the opening game against B-squads 
from Northwestern or Illinois, and then come back in the featured game of the 
evening to toss a few more baskets through the hoop. 



The "Pont Squad" — small but swift. 




184 



Flando and Klaerich, 

teammates now after a 

high school rivalry. 



Coach Haggerty 
points the way. 




The B-Team operated under the tutelage of Tom Haggerty, varsity coach. Since 
so many of the team's members also played with the senior team, the idea of 
playing under the same coach had a sound basis. 

Many of last year's greats in Chicago high school basketball matriculated at 
Loyola. All of these players saw much action during the season. Most of the 
freshmen gained intercollegiate experience on the B-Team. 

At the upper right on this page are Messrs. Flando and Klaerich, now friends 
but last year rivals in a hot race for scoring honors in the Chicago Catholic 
High School Basketball League. Flando performed his tricks for St. Philip 
high school, while Klaerich did his chores for St. Ignatius. Both men played this 
season on both Rambler squads. 

At the bottom of the page is another star from last year's Catholic League. 
Art Hildebrand prepped at De Paul Academy and came to Loyola bearing the 
tag "He's small, but he's good." Art played among the giants of college basket- 
ball and managed to score his share of the points. Speed and a hard-driving 
style put Hildebrand high on the list of future Loyola stars. 

There is not room here to mention all those players who are deserving of 
note. But all members of this team will be heard from when basketball time 
rolls around again. 



Hildebrand goes up 
on a fast break. 




Swimming 



Coach Marty O'Shaugnessy and 
co-captain Bradley. 




Co-captains John Braue and John Bradley led the varsity swimmers through an 
evenly divided season. The Waterboys won five meets and lost an equal number 
against representative opposition in the middlewest. The small Rambler squad 
sank De Paul, Herzl, Wilson, and Bradley Tech (twice). 

Well-balanced squads from Detroit, Milwaukee State, Illinois Tech and the 
University of Chicago inflicted the five defeats. Highlight of the season was 
provided at the Central Collegiate Conference meet where the medley relay 
team of Hatch, Dunne, and Hoelzer, and the sprint relay team of Braue, 
Campagna, and Hoelzer garnered four points for a final standing of sixth in 
the meet. 




Everything's swell, but who did that 
lettering on the side of the pool? 



Ijfloaj 



w«iW.'//Af«VVW«V»W/AV.-.v.-.-, 




186 




Major letters were awarded to Braue, Bradley, Campagna, Hoelzer, Hatch, 
and Dunne. Minor awards were presented to Healy, Franta, and Hayes. Braue 
led all scorers for the season in compiling 91 points in the ten meets. Braue 
was defeated only twice in dual competition. Close behind was sprint-star Dick 
Hoelzer, with a season's total of 84 points. 

Midway in the season Athletic Director Alex Wilson relinquished the 
coaching reins after fifteen successful years with the swimmers. Appointed to 
finish out the schedule was Marty O'Shaugnessy, a former pupil of Wilson. 
O'Shaugnessy was captain of the Rambler swimming team in 1938-39-40. 




Frank Hayes goes off the deep end. 



187 



B onng 



Sullivan looks for the right. 




The students of Loyola clamored for a boxing team, so the Athletic Board got 
one of the best coaches and instructors in the country for them. Jerry Heffernan 
sent out the first call for pugilists and was met with a squad of eager and 
talented, but inexperienced, lads. In a few short montlis he trained them into 
a group that reflected credit on themselves, their coach, and their school. 

A large number of men in tlie lighter weight divisions came out for the squad. 
At first difficulty was encountered in the top weight brackets, but the work of 
John Theodorou gave the team proper balance. Many of the men had high 
school and Golden Gloves experience, but only Frank Hayes and Leslie Royal 
had previous intercollegiate competition. 

In the first match of the year the Ramblers met a team from Bradley Tech, 
Peoria, in Alumni Gymnasium. Loyola won this match by a conclusive 5^2 to 
21/^ margin. In their next engagement, the team dropped a hard-fought, heart- 
breaking contest to the boys in blue from Iowa Pre-Flight School. The final 
results of that meeting: Iowa Pre-Flight 5, Loyola 4. The final match of the 
season was held in Cleveland, where the Ramblers dropped another close one — 
this time to John Carroll University— by a 41/2 ^ 3l^ margin. 

Most of the members of the team will be back again next year, determined 
to avenge their two defeats. 




Left to right: Jacobs, Sheeran, Slattery, 
Hayes, Reddington, FitzGerald. 



188 



II 




Golf 



Posed on the greens at Lewis Towers. 



Jack Dwan took over the role of player-coach early in the golf season, and 
with the aid of manager Jack McCabe got together a squad and a schedule to 
represent Loyola in intercollegiate golf circles. 

Members of the golf team include Bob Balek, John Bernacki, Mark Camp- 
bell, Bob Jackwerth, Bud McCambridge, and Ross Whitney. 

The squad dropped the first three matches of the year, but hoped that more 
practice and warmer weather would help them on to a better second half. The 
University of Detroit conquered the Ramblers in their first outing by a score of 
18 to 9. A return engagement was scheduled for later in the year. The next 
two meets were with Lake Forest College. That the Loyolans were steadily 
improving was shown by the scores of these matches. Loyola dropped the first 
by a 9 to 3 count, but in the second closed the margin to 71/^ to 41/2. 

The fact that the rest of the meets were scheduled too late in the year pro- 
hibits publication of the results, but all of the golfers were certain that they 
would hit their stride before the end of the semester. 



Left to right: McCabe, Jaclcwerth, Dwan, 
McCambridge, Capparos, Campbell. 




189 



'Loyola 
Jntramumls 



Basketball in the 
Lewis Towers league. 




Gast runs out a close one for the Pi Alphs. 





These are the boys that run the show. 
In the top picture, the Lake Shore 
Campus Intramural board; in the bot- 
tom, the board from Lewis Towers. 



Intramurals are as important to Loyolans as the big intercollegiate contests. Only 
in this system can every student who is unable to participate in varsity athletics 
be given a chance to indulge in sports. And sports are an essential part of a 
Catholic education, for it gives the student tlie opportunity to exercise and 
develop sportsman-like qualities. 

Teams are formed by students who band tliemselves together and enter as a 
team. These teams compete for the Intramural Sweepstakes Championship, 
awarded each year to the team that garners the most points in all the events 
held during the school year. This year the team representing Pi Alpha Lambda, 
Arts Social fraternity, won the Sweepstakes. 

The following is a summary of the main contests of this year: 



EVENT 

Fall Relays 

Golf Tournament 

Turkey Run (cross-country) 

Touch Football 

Basketball 

Swimming 

Table Tennis 

Handball 



WINNER 



Pi Alpha Lambda 

Bud McCambridee 
o 

Gerry Fitzgerald (U. Club) 

Pi Alpha Lambda 

Stokers 

University Club 

Dude O'Hara (U. Club) 

Bill Uruba (Pi Alphs) 



191 






The Last Word 

The 1947 Loyolau probably has the distinction of being the 
latest yearbook ever published. To some of us it is a wonder 
that it appeared at all, and so it is not a little without the 
you're lucky-you-got-it attitude that we honestly beg your 
pardon for our tardiness. Excuses could be made in a frantic 
attempt to vindicate the staff from blame, but the Loyola News 
has pretty well worn the matter into the ground. 

The deepest gratitude of the staff must necessarily go to 
Mr. John S. Gerrietts, our moderator. He has done far 
more than his share in everything from makeup work and proof- 
reading to the inglorious task of using the scissors and glue in 
arranging engraver's proofs. To him and to the staff members 
who spent scorching summer afternoons, evenings, and Saturday 
mornings in the Newsroom, we owe the fact that there is a 
Loyolan. And, of course, our thanks are due to the Pontiac 
Engraving Company; our photographers, Sidney Gordon 
AND Root Studios; and, especially, our printer, Mr. Anthony 
Abbatiello of The Anthony Press. 

As the writer of this article listens to the rapid clicking of 
tlie typewriter next to him, he thinks of the hours that he and 
the others have spent in this, the Newsroom. Here there have 
been harsh words, phone calls from irate deans, letters from 
patient students and business associates, and cartons of Chester- 
fields and Pall Malls smoked almost at a single sitting. But 
through it all there has been the satisfaction of watching the 
Loyolan take shape under our own hands — something that we 
have done and can be proud of, because to us a yearbook is 
more than a conglomeration of group photos and campus shots ; 
it is more than a pithy caption or an occasional squib of 
Loyola's history. It is a concrete memory of days at Cudahy 
Hall or Lewis Towers or St. Bernard's Hospital or any one of 
Loyola's schools. The Loyolan is a tangible contact with the 
days in Patsy's or Inglish's, pathology labs or English classes. 
It is an enduring account of Loyola and Loyolans. 

And so we have completed the 1947 Loyolan, hoping that 
it will, in part at least, take the place of the Loyolans not 
published since 1942 and the Loyolan not to be published in 
1948 .... 



192