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Full text of "The Loyolan"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

CARL!: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/loyolan1950unse 




Tke LOYOLA 

1950 



^he W50 




ouolaa 



Staff 




DICK ROTH, Co-Editor 
JACK TRIBBLE, Co-Editor 

ED LUSSIER, Art Editor 

EUGENE LIPUMA, Printing Editor 
STAN PTAK, Assistant 

JOHN GREMER, Senior Editor 
JERRY RODELL, Assistant 

BILL BENJAMIN, Photo Editor 

JIM DUFFIN, FRANK BURNS, 

ART COSTELLO, Assistants 

TOM RYAN, Sports Editor 
GLEN CLARKE, BOB CONWAY, 
MARK CAMPBELL, CHARLIE GREENSTEIN, 
BILL LAMBRECHT, Assistants 

BAY FILITTI, Undergraduate Editor 
HOWARD MORRIS, Assistant 

DOLORES PAWLICKI, Organization Editor 

JANET MEANY, JOAN MARVIN, 

MARY ELLEN DIRK, RITA DILLON, Assistants 

BOB HYLARD, Business Manager 
BOB HARTIGAN, BOB MELVIN, 
DICK GLEASON, Assistants 




SECTIOT^ ONE 

LOYOLANS AND 
THEIR SCHOOL 

Page 12 



SECTIOI^ TWO 

LOYOLANS AND 

THEIR ORGANIZATIONS 

Page 122 




^able of Contents 



SECTION THREE 

LOYOLANS 
IN ACTION 

Page 182 



SECTION FOUR 

LOYOLA LIFE 

Page 208 



ZJhe [-^redident^d rl/l 



eddaae 



f 



The traditional purpose of a yearbook 
is to provide an enduring treasury of the 
graduates' most cherished campus experi- 
ences. 

As the years pass, the Loyolan will serve 
to recall that each school of the University 
derives its greatness chiefly from its devotion 
to the teaching of the Truth, the truth about 
God and man, life and death, time and eter- 
nity. 

In a confused world, no richer experi- 
ence can be enjoyed by a student than learn- 
ing the Truth, which Loyola teaches; no 
greater service can be rendered to society 
than by living according to the dictates of the 
Truth. 

Through the years, may God grant you 
grace to grow more Christ-like ; may He help 
you enrich the lives of your fellowmen by 
your saintly example. 

James T. Hussey, S.J. 










ED LUSSIER 





VERY KHVEREND JAMES T. HUSSEY, S.J. 

J-^reAidenl of oLoifola LJniuerdit^ 



REVEREND 
LAURENCE J. LYNCH, S.J. 

esDean oj- S^tuclenis 




Father Lynch was appointed Dean of Students in 1946. During the 
war he served as Chaplain (Major) in the U.S. Air Corps for four years. 
Before his war service he was Freshman Dean at Xavier University, Regent 
of the School of Law and the College of Commerce and Finance at the 
University of Detroit, and Assistant Rector at John Carroll University in 
Cleveland. 

Father Lynch began his tenure of office at Loyola by organizing the 
Loyola Union with the aim of uniting the students of all the schools 
and campuses into one student governing body. As Chairman of the 
Committee on Student Activities and Welfare, he has studied the needs 
and problems of extracurricular activities and has been instrumental in 
organizing a complete program of social, cultural and academic activities. 
He supervises the housing of out-of-town students, the University Calendar, 
and is the representative of the University to the Loyola Union. 



10 




MISS KATE MEEHAN 



^Jjean of' l/l/o 



Miss Kate Meehan was appointed Dean of Women in September of 
1949. Prioi' to that time she was a faculty member of the Department of 
English for two years. Miss Meehan received her Bachelor of Arts degree 
from De Paul University before the war, and her Master's degree from the 
University of Chicago, after having served in the Naval Reserve during 
the war. 

In addition to her duties as Dean, Miss Meehan is a member of the 
Council of Deans and Regents, the Committee on Student Activities and 
Welfare, and is ex officio an advisory member of the Board of Governors 
of the Loyola Union. She is also moderator of the Tower Club, and of 
Theta Phi Alpha Sorority. 

Loyola University has had an increasing enrollment of women stu- 
dents which gave rise to the need for someone to orient the students to the 
University, and the University to women students. Miss Meehan acts as 
an advisor to all women students and has general cognizance of all matters 
pertaining to their welfare. 



11 



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The Graduate School of Loyola Univer- 
sity was founded in 1926 by Rev. William H. 
Agnew, S.J., who was then president of the 
University, and put under the direction of 
Rev. Austin G. Schmidt, S.J. After several 
years spent in administering the affairs of 
the Graduate School, Fr. Schmidt relin- 
quished the position to Rev. Samuel K. Wil- 
son, S.J. In 1933, Rev. Francis J. Gerst, S.J., 
was appointed dean of the Graduate School. 
He held this office until succeeded by the pres- 
ent dean, Rev. Stewart E. Bollard, S.J., in 
1946. 

The University Board of Graduate 
Studies, composed of administrators and pro- 
fessors of the faculty, is the bodv that es- 



tablishes policies and standards of the Gradu- 
ate School. The dean is the chief executive 
of the School and is assisted by the assistant 
dean. Dr. Paul Kiniery; by the associate 
dean for West Baden College, Rev. Murel R. 
Vogel, S.J .; and by chairmen of departments 
of instruction within the Graduate School. 

The purpose of the school is to develop 
scholars who are capable of working inde- 
pendently and who are spurred on by intel- 
lectual curiosity and a love of knowledge. The 
Graduate School aims to give its students a 
thorough grounding in some special field of 
knowledge and a training in methods of re- 
search and in presentation of the results of 
research. These objectives are integrated 




Graduate School Faculty: 
John A. Zvetina, Kenneth 
M. Jackson, Paul Kiniery, 
Henry Borzo. 



14 




PAUL KINIERY 
Assistant Dean 



REV. STEWART E. DOLLARD, S.J. 
Dean 



with a sound philosophy of life based on 
Catholic principles of right thinking and 
right living. 

The Graduate School of Loyola Univer- 
sity offers curricula leading to the following 
degrees : the Master of Education, the Master 
of Science, the Master of Arts, the Master 
of Arts (honors), and the Doctor of Philoso- 
phy. The subjects in which a master's de- 
gree can be obtained are anatomy, biological 
chemistry, education, English, French, 
Greek, history, Latin, mathematics, pharma- 
cology, philosophy, physiology, psychology, 
religion, and Spanish. The doctor's degree in 
philosophy is conferred in the departments 
of classical languages, English, history, phil- 
osophy, and psychology. 



The Very Rev. James T. Hussey, 
SJ., President of the University, 
confers a Master of Arts degree on 
Helen Panerz of the Graduate 
School at the February Convocation. 




15 




DR. CHARLES THILL 
Clinical Dean 



DR. THESLE JOB 
Preclinical Dean 



REV. MICHAEL L ENGLISH, S.J 
Regent 



The history of the medical school at 
Loyola University began in 1909 when the 
Illinois Medical School was affiliated with 
Loyola University. In 1910 the Bennett and 
Alliance medical colleges were added, and in 
1917 the Chicago College of Medicine and 
Surgery was acquired. This assimilation and 
combination of four independent schools into 
one institution proved to be a marked con- 
tribution to the raising of standards of ]-nedi- 
cal education in Illinois and throug} out the 
Midwest. 



In 1948 the Loyola University School of 
Medicine came to be known as the Stritch 
School of Medicine. In June 1948, Mr. Frank 
J. Lewis gave the university $1,085,000.00 
for the beginning of a new building to house 
the Stritch School of Medicine and Loyola 
University School of Dentistry. This dona- 
tion was the first in the university's Fulfil- 
ment Fund campaign to provide funds for the 
completion of the $5,750,000.00 medical 
building to be located in the West Side Medi- 
cal Center. 




PRECLINICAL HON- 
ORARY SEMINAR 

First Row: Floyd Mallott, 
Albert Perkins, Jorge Mor- 
ales, Marie Kiobege, Rita 
Walsh, Edward Dolas, Mer- 
vin Shalowitz, Joseph Mi- 
ranti. Second Row: Clif- 
ford Starr, Thomas O'Shea, 
Donal O'Sullivan, Joseph 
Solovy, Lawrence Wein- 
stein, Eugene Broccolo, 
Eugene StruU. 



16 



^ c n o o I of r V I e d i 



cine 



In January 1950, Dr. James J. Smith, 
who had been the dean of the Stritch School 
of Medicine since 1946 resigned and Dr. 
John F. Sheehan was appointed as acting 
dean. 

Dr. Sheehan is a native of Manchester, 
New Hampshire. He received his early 
training at College of the Holy Cross, and 
his M.S. and M.D. degrees at Georgetown 
University. Dr. Sheehan came to Loyola in 
1937 and has been the chairman of the path- 
ology department of the Medical School since 
early in 1940. 

Assisting Dr. Sheehan are Dr. Thesle 
Job, the assistant dean in charge of preclini- 
cal affairs, and Dr. Charles J. Thill, the as- 
sistant dean of clinical affairs. 

The regent of the Stritch School of 
Medicine is Eev. Michael I. English, S.J. 
Prior to his appointment as regent at the 
Medical School, Fr. English taught philoso- 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 
Frank Keville, president, Wilbur Thompson, vice-president, 
Gerald Nora, secretary, Herbert Lee, treasurer. 



phy at John Carroll University in 1939 and 
1940, and spent five years as an army chap- 
lain. 

The fundamental objective of the Stritch 
School of Medicine is to provide an oppor- 
tunity for education in sound medical science 
and to fit the qualified student for the prac- 
tice of medicine. As a Catholic school of 
medicine, it is also the aim of the Stritch 
School of Medicine to foster in professional 
students a sense of other values of supreme 
importance to the physician and to society — 
ideals of high personal integrity. Christian 
ethics, and human charity. 




Surgical clerks at Cook County Hos- 
pital learn the treatment for spinal 
fractures. 





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ROBERT G. ADLER, M.D. 

Entered from Morton High School, Morton 
Jr. College, Lovola University; Berwyn, 
111. 

JOHN J. ALLEN, M.D. 

Entered from De La Salle High School; 
Chicago. 

ANTHONY G. BARRACO, M.D. 

iiiiitered from Bushwick High School, 
Long Island University, New York Uni- 
versity; Phi Beta Pi, Secretarv; Long 
Island, N. Y. 

BARNABAS S. BERECZKY, B.S., M.D. 

Entered from Lindblom High School, 
Loyola University ; Chicago. 

JOHN F. BIMMERLE, B.S., M.D. 

Entered from St. Mel's High School, St. 
Viator College; Phi Chi; Blue Key; 
Chicago. 

JAMES E. BREADON, M.D. 

Entered from LeMoyne College, Loyola 
University; Student Council; Chicago. 

SALATORE A. CERTO, B.S., M.D. 

Entered from Central Catholic, University 
of Pittsburgh; Phi Chi; Pittsburgh, Pa. 

RICHARD M. CRONIN, B.S., M.D. 

Entered from Fenwick High School, Uni- 
versity of Notre Dame ; Phi Chi ; Student 
Council 3 ; River Forest, 111. 

EUGENE R. DeGIORGIO, M.D. 

Entered from Lindblom High School, 
Loyola University ; Phi Beta Pi ; Chicago. 

MICHAEL M. DiGILIO, M.D. 

Entered from Loyola Academy, Loyola 
University ; Phi Beta Pi ; Chicago 

R. CHARLES EADES, A.B., M.D. 

Entered from Valparaiso High School, 
Valparaiso University; Phi Beta Pi; Val- 
paraiso, Ind. 

JOHN F. EDWARDS, M.D. 

Entered from Carroll College, Loyola Uni- 
versity ; Chicago. 

THOMAS J. EGAN, M.D. 

Entered from St. Mary of the Lake Sem- 
inary ; Chicago. 

JAMES J. FEENEY, B.S., M.D. 

Entered from St. Mary's College ; Chicago. 

LAWRENCE W. GOEDERT, M.D. 

Entered from Fenwick High School, 
Loyola University ; Alpha Delta Gamma ; 
President 4; Wasmann Biological Society; 
Loyola News 3, 4 ; Oak Park, 111. 



rl/ledicai ^( 



e n I o p S 



RAYMOND W. HALPIN, M.D. 

Entered from Fenwick High School and 
St. Mary's College; Chicago. 

ROBERT E. HANKINS, B.S., M.D. 

Entered from Parshall High School, 
Marquette University, and University of 
North Dakota ; Parshall, N. D. 

JAMES M, KANE, M.D. 

Entered from St. Mary's High School and 
University of Scranton ; Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

GODFREY A. KAMPNER, B.S., M.D. 

Entered from St. Mary's High School and 
University of Dayton ; Phi Beta Pi ; San- 
dusky, Ohio. 

FRANKLIN J. KEVILLE, B.A., M.D. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School and 
University of California ; Phi Chi ; Student 
Council, Vice-President 1, President 4; 
Chicago. 

THOMAS T. KIDWELL, B.S., M.D. 

Entered from St. Mary's High School and 
Loras College ; Chicago. 

MARIE A. KIOEBGE, B.A., B.S., M.D. 

Entered from Alvernia High School, Mun- 
delein College and University of Illinois ; 
Nu Sigma Phi ; Preclinical Honors ; Dal- 
ton, Ga. 

RITA F. KIRCHER, B.A., M.D. 

Entered from Loretto Academy and Texas 
College of Mines ; Nu Sigma Phi ; Pre- 
clinical Honors ; El Paso, Texas. 

HERBERT C. LEE, B.S., M.D. 

Entered from New Trier High School and 
University of Notre Dame ; Wilmette, 111. 

ENRICO A. LEOPARDI, M.D. 

Entered from Old Forge High School and 
University of Scranton ; Phi Beta Pi ; Old 
Forge, Pa. 

FREDERIC H. LITWIN, B.S., M.D. 

Entered from George Washington High 
School, Fordham University, and St. 
John's University; Phi Beta Pi, Treasurer 
and Vice-Archon ; Blue Key ; Student 
Union Congressman; New York. 

DOLORES P. LULINSKI, B.S., M.D. 

Entered from Lourdes High School; Nu 
Sigma Phi; Wasmann Biological Society; 
Chicago. 

JOSEPH E. McKENNA, B.S., M.D. 

Entered from Mingo Central High School 
and Ohio University; Mingo Junction, 
Ohio. 

EDWIN F. McNICHOLS, B.S., M.D. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Chicago. 

GILBERTO MEDINA-TOLENTINO, M.D. 
Chicago. 




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JOSEPH P. MIRANTI, B.S., M.D. 

Entered from Fortier High School, Loyola 
University of New Orleans, La. ; New Or- 
leans, La. 
JORGE B. MORALES-RODAS, A.B., M.D. 

Entered from University of Puerto Rico, 
Polytechnic Institute of Puerto Rico; Phi 
Chi; Preclinical Honorary Society; Rio 
Piedras, Puerto Rico. 

EARL A. NIELSEN, B.A., M.A., M.D. 

Entered from U.C.L.A.; Phi Beta Pi; 
Student Council 2, 3, 4, President 4 ; Blue 
Key; Berwyn, 111. 

GERALD NORA, M.D. 

Entered from De Paul University; Phi 
Chi, President; Student Council 2, 3; 
Chicago. 

ANTHONY M. OPISSO, B.S., M.D. 

Entered from University of North Da- 
kota; Sodality; Washington, D.C. 

DONAL D. O'SULLIVAN, M.D. 

Entered from Loyola University ; Phi Chi ; 
Preclinical Honorary Society; Blue Key; 
Oak Park, 111. 

ALBERT S. PERKINS, B.S., M.D. 

Entered from St. George's College, Kings- 
ton, Jamaica ; Western Reserve Univer- 
sity; Preclinical Honorary Society; Ja- 
maica, B.W.I. 

IRVING G. PESEK, M.D. 

Entered from Central High School, Cen- 
tral College ; Phi Chi ; Berwyn, 111. 

LUIS RODRIQUEZ-SANTOS, M.D. 
Chicago 

PAT E. ROMANO, M.D. 

Entered from De Witt Clinton High 
School, New York; Loyola University; 
Phi Beta Pi ; Student Council 1 ; Bronx, 
N. Y. 

DONALD J. ROMEO, M.D. 

Entered from Brockway-Snyder High 
School, Brockway, Pa.; Boston College; 
Phi Beta Pi ; Brochway, Pa. 

DARYL D. RUEB, M.D. 

Chicago. 

MICHAEL E. SCALA, M.D. 

Chicago. 

JOSEPH J. SCIARRILLO, M.D. 

Entered from Central High School, 
Bridgeport, Conn.; Loyola University; 
Phi Chi ; Phi Mu Chi ; Wasmann Biological 
Society; Bridgeport, Conn. 

MERVIN SHALOWITZ. A.B., M.D. 

Entered from Austin High School, Johns 
Hopkins University; Blue Key; Student 
Council 2, 3 ; Chicago. 




JAMES SHARPE, B.A., M.D. 

Entered from Calumet High School and 
Augustana College; Chicago. 

ALBERT L. SHEETZ, M.D. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School ; 
Phi Beta Pi, Officer 3 ; Sodality ; University 
Club, Vice-President 3 ; Wasmann Biologi- 
cal Society; Student Council, Vice-Presi- 
dent; Chicago. 

PHILIP H. SHERIDAN, M.D. 

Entered from Fenwick High School ; 
Loyola News 1, 2; University Club; De- 
bating; Intramurals; Evanston, 111. 

GEORGE E. SIEMERS, B.S., M.D. 

Entered from Georgetown University; 
Phi Beta Pi, Vice-President ; Blue Key ; 
Student Council, President 2 ; Chairman 
Fulfillment Fund ; University City, Mo. 

WILLIAM B. SMITH, M.D. 

Entered from Tucson Senior High School 
and University of Arizona ; Phi Chi ; 
Tucson, Arizona. 

JAMES R. SOFRANEC, M.D. 

Entered from Ursuline High School and 
Oberlin College; Youngstown, Ohio. 

JOSEPH S. SOLOVY, M.D. 

Entered from University of Chicago ; Pre- 
clinical Honor Society; Chicago. 

FRANK O. SPADAFORE, B.S., M.D. 

Entered from Marquette University; Phi 
Chi ; Three Rivers, Mich. 

EUGENE STRULL. M.D. 

Entered from Wright Junior College ; Pre- 
clinical Honor Society; Los Angeles, Calif. 

GENEVIEVE P. SWIDEREK, M.D. 

Entered from Foreman High School; Chi- 
cago. 

RICHARD H. TAPOGNA, M.D. 

Entered from Buckeley High School and 
Trinity College ; Phi Chi ; Hartford, Conn. 

ROSEMARY L. TARSITANO, B.S., M.D. 

Entered from St. Mary's High School and 
Mundelein College ; Chicago. 

WILBUR 0. THOMPSON, B.E., M.D. 

Entered from Northern Illinois State 
Teachers' College ; Phi Chi ; Stevi^ard, 111. 

ROBERTO VEGA, B.S., M.D. 

Entered from University of Puerto Rico ; 
Phi Chi ; Bo Obrero, Puerto Rico. 

JOHN P. VIBOCH, B.S., M.D. 

Entered from De La Salle High School; 
Phi Chi; Track Team; Monogram Club; 
Sodality; Wasmann Biological Society; 
Chicago. 



Drs. Job and Jones make "no bones" 
about their desire to impart knowl- 
edge. 



ilVledlcat ^. 



e n L o r 6 




RITA WALSH, B.S., M.D. 

Entered from University High School of 
Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico; University of 
Puerto Rico and Columbia University ; Nu 
Sigma Phi ; Student Council Secretary 1 ; 
Hato Rey, Puerto Rico. 

LAWRENCE M, WEINSTEIN, 

Ph.B., D.D.S., M.D. 

Entered from University High School, 
University of Chicago, and Loyola Dental 
School; Chicago. 

DOROTHY MAE WOERTHER, B.S., M.D. 

Entered from Salem High School of Salem, 
Ohio, and Notre Dame College of South 
Euclid, Ohio; Nu Sigma Phi; Salem, Ohio. 

JAMES R. P. WONG, B.S., M.D. 

Entered from Central High School of 
Georgetown, British Guiana ; Blue Key 
National Honor Fraternity ; Phi Chi ; Was- 
mann Biological Society; Editor of "The 
Probe"; Wasmann Honor Key '46; Chem- 
istry Club; Spanish Club; Glee Club; 
Board of Governors, Loyola Union (2 
years). 

CHARLES JOSEPH YAST, JR., B.S., M.D. 

Entered from La Porte High School of La 
Porte, Ind., and Northwestern University; 
Phi Chi ; La Porte, Ind. 





22 



11 v ledlcat L/lndercic 




FRESHMEN 
First Row: Elam, Bona, 
Basch, Cunningham, Quinn, 
Bickness, Hurley, Killelea, 
Wegrzynowicz. Second 
Row: Forbes, Kwiatkowski, 
Ching, Jacobs, Guerin, 
Spencer, Nebolon, Lawler, 
Rock, Sullivan, Lash. Third 
Row: Lavin, Ruffin, Mana- 
ge, Radin, Watson, Kellner, 
Levine, GottemoUer, Paul- 
issen, Schmit, Cox. Fourth 
Row: Del Becarro, Shine, 
Schirack, Limperis, Neimes, 
Vitu, Fischer, Nielander, 
Maggiano, Rothfeld, Kiely. 



FRESHMEN 
First Row: Hackert, Broz- 
da, .Morozumi, Bacevich, 
Knapp, Ballantyne, Ham- 
mer, Gruebel, Howell. Sec- 
ond Row: Hickey, Kulis, 
VVeimer, Kovach, Klassen, 
Fernandez, Schoeffel, Gor- 
man. Third Row: Gal- 
lagher, Slebir, Trettel, 
Brown, Kistner, Cesafsky, 
Baumgardner. Fourth 
Row: Higgins, lammarino, 
Butzer, Jarchow, Gruszka, 
Furnary, Dosch. 



SOPHOMORES 
First Row: Scherba, Wal- 
ters, Frahm, Peifer, Lynch, 
Tiritilli, Fitzsimmons. Sec- 
ond Row: Steiger, Mc- 
Carty, Marchlewski, Volini, 
Neiswanger, Cawley, Dor- 
man. Third Row: Poter- 
ucha, McCoy, Fox, Finne- 
gan, Kavanaugh, Curns, 
DeLave. Fourth Row: 
Gorecki, Molitor, Tully, 
McCarthy, Leieht, Ewald, 
Tagge, Weber. 



23 



SOPHOMORES 
First Row: Parenty, Tyr- 
rell, Wallyn, Volini, Kip- 
ping, Berteau, Burkhart, 
Hartlaub. Second Row: 
Barrett, Kappers, Raub, 
Wilson, Murphy, Pawlias, 
Sullivan, Swastek, Beres. 
Third Row: Howard, Nora, 
Nichols, Foster, Justini- 
ano. Backs, Heffernan, 
Samp, Kokotek, Markey. 
Fourth Row: Solgard, 
O'Dwyer, Gootee, Dowling, 
Sphire, La Rosa, Backs, 
Caylor, Gleason, Du Sold. 



SOPHOMORES 
First Row: Szweda, Hnilo, 
Hornbeck, Scheldt, Glea- 
son. Second Row: Keifer, 
Laurich, Agrinc, McNi- 
chols, Musekothen, New- 
ton, Conley. Third Row: 
Carolan, Fadul, Kuzera, 
Ferenzi, Bagby. 



JUNIORS 
First Row: Dunn, Teresi, 
Galvin, Pflum, Fea, Ellenz, 
Schaefer, Crowley. Second 
Row: Mallott, Cusick, Mc- 
Nichols, Hoffmann, Di- 
Marco, Broccollo, Con- 
nolly. Third Row: Griffin, 
Quetsch, Foss, O'Shea, 
McSherry, McLaughlin, 
Starr. Fourth Row: Mey- 
ers, McGreevey, Bormes, 
Weldon, DeMange, Le Roy, 
Hartmann, Schiller. 




24 



//I d e r c I i 



ci 6 6 m e n 




JUNIORS 
First Row: Volini, Hartan, 
Campbell, Ciatteo, Valan- 
tiejus, Kosicki, Yeager, 
Stankey. Second Row: 
Hackett, Hartleb, Fitzger- 
ald, Dolekide, Hanson, 
Salvadore, Wong, Reilly, 
Vanderbasch, Blose, Xolan, 
Murphy, Quetsch. Third 
Row: Plotnick, Radziewicz, 
Doody, Zellnskas, Mc- 
Farland, Nora, Doerr, 
Squicquero, Archdeacon, 
Brucker, Zowarski. Fourth 
Row: Dunn, Weber, Stark, 
Morrison, Marinis, Tarres, 
Edward, Tamera, Skrha, 
Dillan. 



JUNIOR CLASS 
OFFICERS 

Joseph Fitzgerald, treas- 
urer; Paul Dunn, presi- 
dent; Bernadette Stankey, 
secretary; Floyd Mallott, 
vice-president. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 
OFFICERS 

Thomas Finnegan, secre- 
tary; Lawrence McCarty, 
president; Stephen Mar- 
key, vice-president ; John 
Cawley, treasurer. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 
OFFICERS 

Dennis Higgins, vice- 
president; Robert Spencer, 
president; James Sullivan, 
treasurer; Brian Jarchan, 
secretary. 



25 



PL Beta Pi 



Phi Beta Pi was organized as a local medical fraternity 
in 1891 at the University of Pittsburgh. Through the zeal 
and foresight of its charter members, combined with the 
untiring efforts of the members in the years immediately 
following, it repeatedly faced and overcame hardships 
which might have discouraged less detei'mined men. After 
successfully justifying its existence at the University of 
Pittsburgh, the fraternity next proceeded to demonstrate on 
a national scale that Phi Beta Pi was of great benefit to the 
medical students, and that its prime motives were the al- 
leviating of the many scholastic difficulties of its members, 
and the grouping of fellow students with one another for the 
attainment of the students' highest ambition — medical 
achievement. 

The Alpha Omega Chapter was organized at Loyola 
University in 1921. From the beginning, it established 
itself as an integral part of the institution, so that at present 
it is recognized as one of the leaders in the progressive 
movements in the scientific fields. 




First Row: Robert Kappers, secre- 
tary and treasurer; Al Sheetz, 
president ; Fred Litruin, vice-presi- 
dent. Second Row: Donald Fox; 
Robert Bormes, house manager. 



26 



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The Phi Chi Medical Fraternity was founded 
at the University of Vermont in the year 1889. 
Since its beginning the fraternity has grown con- 
siderably, and now it is one of the largest of the 
medical fraternities, and one of the most re- 
spected. Its success has been attributed to the 
adherence to ideals which are instilled into those 
men coming into its ranks. To carry out these 
ideals the men chosen must be men of character, 
principle, endeavor, and leadership. 

The Loyola Chapter, known nationally as the 
Phi Sigma Chapter of Phi Chi, was founded in the 
year 1907 when the present medical department 
of the University was known as the Chicago 
College of Physicians and Surgeons. 



First Row: Stephen Markey, pre- 
siding junior; Irvin Blose, presid- 
ing senior; Edwin McNichols, 
secretary; William Cusick, treas- 
urer. Second Row: Eugene Scherba, 
sentinel; John Carolan, house 
manager; Robert Hornbeck, judge 
advocate; Joseph Beres, chapter 
editor. 




27 



28 



ANATOMY DEPARTJIENT 
First Row: Dr. David S. Jones; Dr. .\rthur 
J. Gatz; Dr. George F. .Simmons, Dr. Thesle 
Job, Pre-Clinic Dean. Second Row: ^liss 
Laura Burwell, Marie Caniiti, .\ldana Vin- 
tartes, Gareth B. Gish. Third Row: Dr. 
James C. Beyer, Paul KawaRiichi, Professor 
Harold D. Fish, Leslie T. Emmert. 



BACTERIOLOGY DEPARTMENT 
Front Row: Miss Marie Otten; Dr. Einar 
Leifson, chairman; Miss Josephine Oster- 
haudt. Second Row: Dr. Ernest Hartmann, 
Miss Pearl Dahran, Dr. MaoDonald Fulton. 



BIOCHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT 
First Row: Louis J. Blanchet; Dr. Hugh J. 
McDonald, chairman; Dr. Jacklyn Melchiar; 
Dr. Maurice V. L'Heureux. Second Row: 
Thomas McCarthy, Mr. Leonard Philipps, Dr. 
Norten C. Melchiar, Dr. Martin B. William- 



PHYSIOLOGY DEPARTMENT 
First Row: Dr. Akira Omachi; Dr. Wesley 
R. T. Metzner; Dr. Arthur G. Mulder, chair- 
man; Dr. William C. Wilson. Second Row: 
Alice Heuel, Charles Proctor, Dr. Mary 
Patras. 



PHARMACOLOGY DEPARTMENT 
First Row: Dr. Lawrence Wu ; Dr. Alfred 
Leiradorfer; Dr. Y. T. Oester, chairman; Mr. 
Charles Proctor. Second Row: Mr. Byrd, 
Mr. A. Smalenski, Kasimir Staniszewski, Dr. 
Mikulicic, O. D. Priddle. 





Dr. Mulder demonstrates intricacies of the 
electrocardiograph 



Frosh learn about physiology of the heart 
from a turtle and a hymograph 



The boys in the back room 



Life at medical fraternity house manages to 
combine work and play 



Students and faculty gather each year for 
a picnic 



29 



^^ c It o o I o ^ csD entlSLPU 



The Chicago College of Dental Surgery 
was founded in 1883. At that time the 
school was located at 22-24 Adams Street. 
Later the College was moved to new quarters 
at Madison and Wabash, and when the need 
arose for more spacious quarters a building 
at Michigan and Randolph was chosen. In 
1893 the construction of the present school 
building at 1757 Harrison Street was begun. 
From 1889 to 1903 the College was affiliated 
with Lake Forest University, and from 1905 
to 1918 with Valparaiso University. 

This pioneer in dental education in Illi- 
nois at once took a commanding position 
among the dental schools of the world. Since 
its foundation in 1883, the school has con- 
ferred the degree of Doctor of Dental 
Surgery upon 7000 dentists. Loyola Univer- 
sity School of Dentistry, Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery is fully approved by the 



Council on Dental Education of the American 
Dental Association. 

As a Catholic dental school, the Loyola 
University School of Dentistry, Chicago Col- 
lege of Dental Surgery, strives to prepare the 
student so that he may be competent to begin 
in the general practice of dentistry as a 
health service and to continue his self -educa- 
tion ; and to educate the student in an appre- 
ciation of the social, moral, and spiritual 
values of life. To realize these broad 
objectives, the faculty of the dental school 
endeavors to furnish an intellectual atmos- 
phere that is conducive to preservation of 
faith and morals, and undertakes to train 
students so that they may be competent in the 
diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of oral 
diseases, disorders, and deficiencies, insofar 
as there is a direct dental relationship ; to ap- 
preciate the value of continuing study after 




0; Christmas at Dental 

School 



30 




)r. Robert W. McNulty 
Dean 



Rev. Oswald J. Marshall, SJ. 
Regent 



graduation so that they may apply accumu- 
lated knowledge to new situations as they 
arise; to cooperate with persons engaged in 
associated fields of service in order to relate 
their respective knowledge to dental prob- 
lems; to be better equipped to assume the 
responsibilities of citizenship and community 
life. 

The School of Dentistry has had the 
good fortune to attract a class of students 
whose subsequent careers have placed them 
among the leaders of the profession. Its 



alumni are found wherever progressive den- 
tistry is practiced, and many of the distin- 
guished dental educators throughout the 
world are alumni of Loyola University School 
of Dentistry. 

The dean of the School of Dentistry at 
the present time is Dr. Robert W. McNulty 
who is one of the outstanding educators in 
the dental profession. Rev. Oswald J. Mar- 
shall, S.J., Regent, is the representative of 
the university and also a teacher of philos- 
ophy at the school. 



DENT STUDENT 
COUNCIL 

Seated: Schwartz; Hulett; 
Paesani, president ; Lidge, 
secretary ; Benam. Stand- 
ing: Simpson; Theodorou; 
Brcich; Jagor, treasurer; 
Huschart, vice-president; 
Van Dyke. Absent: Dr. 
Gustav Rapp, moderator ; 
Omori; Azzarello; Smith. 




31 



See — it's easy when you know how I 




C. BRUCE ANDERSON, D.D.S. 

Entered from the University of Puerto 
Rico; Howe, Ind. 
LEONARD D. AXELRAD, D.D.S. 

Entered from the University of New 
Hampshire; Chicago. 

NORMAN H. BAKER, D.D.S. 

Entered from Niagara Falls High School 
and the Niagara University; Delta Sigma 
Delta 1, 2, 3, 4; Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

ROBERT E. BAKER, D.D.S. 

Entered from Marion High School and 
Marion College, Marion, Ind. ; Delta Sigma 
Deltal,2, 3, 4;Chicago. 

RAYMOND S. BARDIS, D.D.S. 

Entered from William and Mary ; Psi 
Omega ; Freshman Class Secretary ; Sen- 
ior Class Vice-President; Guild of St. 
Apollonia, Berwyn, 111. 
NICHOLAS J. BRESCIA, D.D.S. 

Entered from Morton High School and 
the University of Notre Dame; Cicero, 111. 

LEONARD H. CAIN, D.D.S. 

Entered from the University of Michigan ; 

Alpha Omega ; Port Huron, Mich. 
LOUIS CASTAGNA, D.D.S. 

Entered from Wells High School and 

Wright Junior College ; Chicago. 
NICHOLAS C. CHOUKAS, D.D.S. 

Entered from Senn High School and the 

University of Chicago; Chicago. 
RICHARD J. CLARK, D.D.S. 

Entered from Belleville High School and 

the Platteville State Teachers' College ; 

Delta Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Guild of St. 

Apollonia 1, 2, 3, 4; Belleville, Wise. 

ROLLA M. CROUCH, D.D.S. 

Entered from Maroa Commercial High 
School and the University of Illinois ; Rep- 
i-esentative Student Union 4 ; Chicago. 

JOHN M. CULLEN, D.D.S. 

Entered from St. Ignatius and the Univer- 
sity of Notre Dame ; Delta Sigma Delta ; 
St. Apollonia Guild ; Chicago. 

HAYDEN T. DeDECKER, D.D.S. 

Entered from Augustana College; Delta 
Sigma Delta; Alpha Sigma Nu; St. Apol- 
lonia Guild 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 2, Presi- 
dent 4 ; Chicago. 

ROBERT A. DeSALVO, D.D.S. 

Entered from St. Mel's High School ; Chi- 
cago. 

PETER A. DiFRANCESCA, JR., D.D.S. 

Entered from Proviso "Township High 
School ; Melrose Park, 111. 



csD e n t ci I ^ 



e n I o r d 



GUILLERMO FADUL, D.D.S. 

Entered from Buena Vista College, Storm 
Lake, la. ; Delta Sigma Delta ; Guild of 
St. Apollonia ; Chicago. 

WILLIAM FANIZZO, D.D.S. 

Entered from Morgan Park Junior Col- 
lege; Psi Omega; Chicago. 

DEAN FLEAGLE, D.D.S. 

Entered from Bowling Green University; 
Delta Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Blue Key 3, 4 ; 
Loyola Union 3 ; Napoleon, Ohio. 

KENNETH FUJII, D.D.S. 

Entered from Stockton High School, 
Stockton, Calif. ; Stockton, Calif. 

RINERT GERHARD, D.D.S. 

Entered from St. Mary's College; Alpha 
Chi ; Chicago. 

HOWARD GILBERT, D.D.S. 

Entered from Lindblom High School and 
Wilson Junior College; Chicago. 

PAUL GOAZ, D.D.S. 

Entered from Oklahoma A and M College, 
Stillwater, Okla. ; Tulsa, Okla. 

JOHN GOODRICH, B,S., D.D.S. 

Entered from Corpus Christi High School ; 
Chicago. 

JOSEPH GOWGIEL, D.D.S. 

Entered from St. Rita High School; Sigma 
Pi Alpha 1, 2, 3 ; Delta Sigma Delta 2, 3, 4 ; 
Debating Society 2 ; Argo, 111. 

PAUL HODIERNE, B.S., D.D.S. 

Entered from Fordham University, New 
York ; Delta Sigma Delta ; Class President 
2; Chicago. 

JAMES HOPPERS, B.S., D.D.S. 

Entered from Johnston City High School 
and Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloom- 
ington. 111. ; Delta Sigma Delta ; Alpha 
Sigma Nu; Blue Key; Chicago. 

JOHN HOWANIEC, D.D.S. 

Entered from University of Illinois, and 
Michigan State College, East Lansing, 
Mich. ; Chicago. 

SIRPAUL JAGAN, D.D.S. 

Entered from De Paul University; St. 
Apollonia Guild; Georgetown British 
Guiana. 

EDMUND KAPUSTKA, D.D.S. 

Entered from North Carolina State Col- 
lege and University of Kentucky; Guild 
of St. Apollonia 1, 2, 3, 4; Chicago. 

DONALD KIDD, B.S., D.D.S. 

Entered from Franklin Marshall College 
and Manchester College; Maywood, 111. 




G>D e n t a I *^ . 



e n L o r 6 







FRANK HENRY KLEPACKI, D.D.S. 

Entered from St. Paul's College and Uni- 
versity of Manitoba, Canada; Delta Sigma 
Delta 1, 2, 3, 4 ; St. Apollonia Guild 1, 2, 3, 
4 ; Winnepeg, Canada. 

DAVID JOSEPH KNOEDLER, D.D.S. 
Entered from Marquette University; Psi 
Omega; Mosinee, Wise. 

LUCIUS MARION KOSINSKI, D.D.S. 
Entered from Lane Technical High School 
and De Paul University ; Psi Omega ; 
Chicago. 

IRWIN N. LEBOW, D.D.S. 

Entered from Lane Technical High 
School; Alpha Omega; Student Union; 
Chicago. 

SAM ANTHONY LiVACCARI, D.D.S. 
Entered from Northwestern University; 
Delta Sigma Delta ; Chicago. 

THOMAS GERALD MAHAN, D.D.S. 

Entered from North Dakota State College ; 
Delta Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4; Blue Key 3, 
4 ; Valley City, N. D. 

JAMES KENDRICK MILLER, D.D.S. 
Entered from North Park College ; Delta 
Sigma Delta ; Chicago. 

JOHN CHARLES MITCHELL, D.D.S. 
Entered from Bismarck Junior College; 
Delta Sigma Delta; Fargo, N. D. 

EUGENE O. NADEAU, D.D.S. 

Entered from Lane Technical High 
School and St. Norbert College, DePiere, 
Wise; Guild of St. Apollonia; Chicago. 

PATRICK MAURICE NG-A-FOOK, D.D.S. 
Entered from Central High School, 
Queen's College, and Howard University; 
Georgetown, British Guiana. 

EDWIN JAMES NIEUSMA, D.D.S. 

Entered from Hope College; Delta Sigma 
Delta ; Holland, Mich. 

DANIEL FRANCIS O'CONNELL, D.D.S. 
Entered from Austin High School, De Paul 
University, and John Carroll University; 
Chicago. 

JOHN FRANCIS O'CONNELL, JR., D.D.S. 
Entered from De Paul University; Alpha 
Chi ; Wasmann Society ; Student Council 
3, 4; St. Apollonia Guild; Chicago. 

HARRY I. OMORI, D.D.S. 

Entered from University of California, 
Berkeley, Calif. ; Vice-President of Junior 
Class ; Chicago. 

EDWARD MARK OSTERTAG, D.D.S. 
Entered from State University of Iowa; 
Guild of St. Apollonia 1, 2, 3, 4, President 
3 ; Delta Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Class Sec- 
retary 3 ; Chicago. 




HENRY S. PACHOWICZ, B.S., D.D.S. 

Entered from Illinois Institute of Tech- 
nology; Chicago. 
GARY C. PADGETT, D.D.S. 

Entered from Carl Schurz High School 
and Northern Illinois State Teachers' Col- 
lege ; Delta Sigma Delta ; Chicago. 

CURZIO PAESANI, B.S., D.D.S. 

Entered from Northwestern University: 
Delta Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Student Coun- 
cil 3, 4, President 4 ; Nokomis, 111. 

ALLEN PANG, D.D.S. 

Entered from University of Iowa ; Delta 
Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Honolulu, Hawaii. 

JONAH YACOB PARK, B.S., D.D.S. 

Entered from Baylor University; Hilo, 
Hawaii. 
BERNARD MARION PAWLOWSKL O.D.S^. 

Entered from St. Mary's College, Winona, 
Minn. ; Psi Omega ; Chicago. 

RICHARD R. PERLOW, D.D.S. 

Entered from University of Illinois ; Alpha 
Omega ; Los Angeles, Calif. 

JOSEPH E. PHILLIPS, D.D.S. 

Entered from University of Chicago; 
Delta Sigma Delta; Oilman, Wise. 

LEONID AS PINILLA, D.D.S. 

Entered from University of Houston, 
Texas ; Chicago. 
STANLEY CHESTER PISARSKL D.D.S. 

Entered from University of Notre Dame; 
Phi Mu Chi; Guild of St. Apollonia; 
Chicago. 
BERNARD JOSEPH POWERS, B.S., D.D.S. 

Entered from College of St. Thomas ; Delta 
Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4, Scribe 3, Worthy 
Master 4 ; Guild of St. Apollonia 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Secretary 2 ; Class Vice-President 1 ; St. 
Peter, Minn. 
ALOYSIUS J. PRONOBIS, B.S., D.D.S. 
Entered from Canisius High School and 
Canisius College; Delta Sigma Delta 1, 2, 
3, 4; Alpha Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; Guild of St. 
Apollonia ; Buflfalo, N. Y. 

WILLIAM D. RILOY, D.D.S. 

Entered from Columbia University; Chi- 
cago. 

JAMES L. ROLING, D.D.S. 

Entered from University of Iowa ; Delta 
Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4; Guild of St. Apol- 
lonia; Bellevue, la. 

JOHN N. ROMANO, D.D.S. 

Entered from Central Y.M.C.A. College; 
Psi Omega; Guild of St. Apollonia; Elm- 
wood Park, 111. 



No I They're not Dick Tracy's 
Crimestoppers 



My teeth are OK, aren't they? 





%h ^ 



RUSSELL M. RUETZ, Ph.B., D.D.S. 

Entered from Marquette University; 
Delta Sigma Delta; Guild of St. Apollonia; 
Racine, Wise. 

JOHN J. RYBAK, B.S., D.D.S. 

Entered from Centennial High School and 
University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Can- 
ada; Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. 

GEORGE V. SCHMITT, JR., B.S., D.D.S. 

Entered from University of Notre Dame, 
South Bend, Ind. ; Delta Sigma Delta ; 
South Bend, Ind. 

PETER J. SCHULTZ, D.D.S. 

Entered from Gonzaga University, Spo- 
kane, Wash. ; Conrad, Mont. 

FRANK A. SCHROEDER, D.D.S. 

Entered from De Paul University; Delta 
Sigma Delta ; Guild of St. Apollonia ; 
Chicago. 

LEON J. SCHWARTZ, D.D.S. 

Entered from Austin High School; Alpha 
Omega, President; Loyola Union Con- 
gress; Student Council of the Dental 
School; Chicago. 

THEODORE J. SIECKOWSKI, D.D.S. 

Entered from University of Hawaii; 
Chicago. 

ALBERT G. SIEPKER, JR., D.D.S. 

Entered from Quincy Senior High School 
and University of Illinois; Delta Sigma 
Delta; Guild of St. Apollonia; Quincy, 111. 

DANIEL F. SILBERGER, D.D.S. 

Entered from North Park College; Alpha 
Omega; Chicago. 

EDWARD A. SILKO, D.D.S. 

Entered from Wright Junior College; Psi 
Omega; Guild of St. Apollonia; Chicago. 

ALBERT SMITH, D.D.S. 

Entered from Roosevelt College; Alpha 
Omega; Corresponding Secretary 1, 2, 3, 
4 ; Chicago. 

MARSHALL H. SMULSON, D.D.S. 

Entered from Roosevelt High School and 
Central Y.M.C.A. College; Alpha Omega 
Fraternity; Curtain Guild; Chicago. 

MORTON D. STEINBERG, D.D.S. 

Entered from Scott High School and 
Toledo University, Ohio; Toledo, Ohio. 

LOUIS F, STIGLIANL D.D.S. 

Entered from W.I.S.T.C. ; De Kalb, 111. 

RICHARD F. STREITZ, O.Z).5. 

Entered from Joliet Township High School 
and Grinnell College; Joliet, 111. 



cJ^ e n t ct I ^ ( 



e n i o r 6 



HARRY STROM, D.D.S. 

Entered from Manley High School, Cen- 
tral Y.M.C.A. College, and Roosevelt Col- 
lege ; Chicago. 
HENRY SYZEK, B.S., D.D.S. 

Entered from University of Manitoba; 
Delta Sigma Delta; Alpha Chi; Guild of 
St. Apollonia ; Student Council ; Winnipeg, 
Canada. 

EARNEST S. TANAKA, B.S., D.D.S. 

Entered from Leilehua High School and 
the University of Hawaii ; Waialua, Oahu 
T. H. 

RUSSELL J. TERESE, Ph.B., M.E., D.D.S. 

Entered from Chicago Teachers' College; 
Psi Omega; Chicago. 

CHARLES E. THOMPSON, A.B., D.D.S. 

Entered from University of North Da- 
kota; Chicago. 

PAUL R. TRAUBERT, D.D.S. 

Entered from University of West Virginia, 
Morgantown, West Virginia; Delta Sigma 
Delta ; Wellsburg, W. Va. 

JACK B. TROWBRIDGE, B.S., D.D.S. 

Entered from Sullivan High School and 
Roosevelt College; Glencoe, 111. 

SENSUKE UEUNTEN, D.D.S. 

Entered from Kauai High School and Uni- 
versity of Hawaii ; Lawai, Kauai, Hawaii. 
ROBERT F. VAN DYK, A.B., D.D.S. 

Entered from Holland High School, Hol- 
land, Mich., and Hope College; Delta 
Sigma Delta ; Class President 4 ; Charlotte, 
Mich. 

GLENN A. VAN NOORD, D.D.S. 

Entered from Fremont High School, Los 
Angeles, Calif., and Calvin College, West 
Michigan; Delta Sigma Delta; Class Sec- 
retary 2 ; Grand Rapids, Mich. 

ARTHUR J. WAGNER, D.D.S. 

Entered from University of Illinois ; Delta 
Sigma Delta; Elmhurst, 111. 

ROBERT W. WALKER, D.D.S. 

Entered from Bloomington High School 
and University of Illinois ; Bloomington, 
111. 

JOHN T. WEGRZYN, D.D.S. 

Entered from Central Y.M.C.A. College; 
Psi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Guild of St. Apollonia 
1, 2, 3, 4 ; Student Council 2 ; Student Un- 
ion 2, 3 ; Chicago. 

JOHN M. WHITE, D.D.S. 

Entered from Boys' Central High School 
and Carroll College ; Butte, Mont. 

























cJ^ e n t a I 



FRESHMEN 
Seated: DeHaan, Batina, 
Blankenship, Beckmann, 
Baker, Burgess, Cola- 
surdo, Cosgrove. Second 
Row: Bollinger, Brandeau, 
Bachand, Callozzo, Coady, 
Azzarello, Ceilings, Brahe, 
Baranko, Blaisdell. Third 
Row: Cotter, Burns, Boyd, 
Dado, CuUerot, Danskin, 
Coburn, Anglis, Choos, 
Brown. 



FRESHMEN 
Seated: Olson, Yocum, 
Serr, Walter, Morikawa, 
Stofifel, Smith, Murphy. 
Second Row: Minor, Terp, 
Rowley, Wood, MuUally, 
Striebel, Rice, Zylstra, 
Povlsen, Senics, O'Don- 
nell. Third Row: Sullivan, 
Sturm, Nyboer, Reck, 
Miley, Misecko. Pescitelli, 
McGreal, Van Ort, Silver- 
man, Miller. 



SOPHOMORES 
Seated: Timm, Ridlin, Van 
De Veire, Vehr, Zelazd, 
Toomey, Strenk, Vondra- 
cek. Second Row: Tantillo, 
Sattler, Severyn, Rus, 
Stryker, Suduth, McMa- 
hon, S h o r e y, Zimmer. 
Third Row: UUmann, Wil- 
helm, Restarski, Slovick, 
Tolle, Ursoleo, Taylor, 
White, McGowan. 



FRESHMEN 
Seated: Hoyt, Fiocca, Lov- 
ell, Martin, Lay, Enter- 
man, Hayes, Maass. Sec- 
ond Row: Lefebvre, Kohl, 
Drazba, Krvavica, Maney, 
Herod, Kessler, Hughes, 
Janda, Haas, Flautt. Third 
Row: Gervason, Flannery, 
Flannery, Fennessy, Draz- 
nik, Dvorovy, K e 1 1 e y, 
Makropoulos, Koscielniak, 
Dudek, Fassler. 



38 




i/l n d e p c I 



ci 6 S m e n 




SOPHOMORES 
Seated: Flessor, Goetz, 
Fleagle, Foerster, Gon- 
zales, Harmon, Hulett, 
Criseto. Second Row: 
Green, Granath, Kenward, 
Jagor, Kolodzinski, Fran- 
ceschi, Garcia. Third Row: 
Greenebaum, Granger, 
Kapiistka, Harris, Giroulx, 
Hogg, Galliano, Krieg. 



SOPHOMORES 
Seated: Budke, Everett, 
Clark, Bochenek, Cascio, 
Bonk, Eissman, Blim. Sec- 
ond Row: Ferrandes, Daly, 
Baslle, Brown, Brcich, 
Avery, Casey, Avery. Third 
Row: Benam, Discipio, 
Cadreau, Caringella, Dix- 
on, Betz, Abati, Dunne. 



SOPHOMORES 
Seated: Maibenco, McCor- 
mack, Novak, McCarthy, 
McClanahan, P e t n u c h, 
Milligan. Second Row : 
Niemiec, Miller, Lojeski, 
Pickarski, McEvfen, Reed, 
McParland. Third Row: 
Moll, McNicholas, Mont- 
gomery, Raymond, McAn- 
drews, Lidge, Perino, 
Perino. 



JUNIORS 
Seated: Estaver, Hardi- 
gree, Huschart, Harkensee, 
Beeftlnk, Del Giorno, Bro- 
gan. Second Row: Finne- 
gan, Ahern, Fassler, Frey, 
Burke, Clarno, Holmes, 
Dinga. Third Row :Budzi]i, 
Call, Bourque, Gullberg, 
Drews, Covelli, Gibbens, 
Ishida. 



39 



>sJjen ta I Uln delete 



adSmen 



JUNIORS 
Seated: Pawlowski, Red- 
den, Later. Keehan, Bal- 
towski, Pawelek. Ledwon, 
Madison. Second Row: 
Matchus, Nikoplos. Novak. 
Pikowski, Kadlubiak. 
Knudson. Third Row: 
Pearah. Quilty. Narsete, 
Kosiek. Kolligan. Jacobs, 
Mitziga. Klocek. 



JUNIORS 
Seated: Siefker, Willough- 
by. Sowle. Vukovich. .Sul- 
tar, Sullivan. Padovani. 
Wood. Second Row: Wach- 
tenheim. Rushing. Smith, 
Setlik. Stickley. Solomon, 
O'Connor. Watson. Rogers, 
Taylor, Steinkamp. Third 
Row: Ronan, O'Brien, 
Parma, Simpson, Stroeher, 
Rochowicz, 'Theodorou. 

Zinser. Spector. 





40 



3n iHemoriam 




WILLIAM JOHN HOOVER 
Died Tuesday, February 8, 1949 



^^ I IP k a V_y 



p 



m e 



9 



a 




Sophomore busy at Crown and Bridge techniques 



The Alpha Omega international dental fraternity was 
established at Pennsylvania College in 1907. The Alpha 
Lambda chapter was originally organized in 1933 at the 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery. This new chapter, 
when formed, incorporated the members of the already- 
existing Alpha Zeta Gamma fraternity of Loyola. 

Today Alpha Omega consists of thirty-two chapters 
and sixteen alumni clubs, extending throughout the United 
States and Canada. 

Members of the fraternity are: Werner Greenebaum, 
Daniel Silberberg, Stanley Sultar, Ramon Zimmer, Irwin 
Lebow, Marshall Smulson, Marvin Eissman, Harry Strom, 
Albert Smith, Richard Perlow, Leon Schwartz, Jerry Spec- 
tor, Robert Harris, Seymour Wachtenheim. 



First Row : Eissman, 
Smulson, Lebow, Zimmer, 
Suttor, Silberberg, Greene- 
baum. Second Row: Wach- 
tenheim, Harris, Specter, 
Schwartz, Perlow, Smith, 
Strom. 




41 



DELTA SIGMA DELTA 
First Row: Van Noord, 
White, Casey, Schroeder, 
Paesani, Holmes. Second 
Row: Pronobis, Sowle, 
Schmitt, lAIiller, Baker, 
Klepacki, Timm, Lambert, 
Sullivan, r/iirrf Rou'.-Trau- 
bert. Bonk, Sattler, Dixon, 
O'Connor, Miller, Choukas, 
Thompson, Gowgiel. Siep- 
ker, Solomon, K e e h a n. 
Fourth Row: Willoughby, 
Cullen, Baker, Rochowicz, 
Brogan, Fleagle, Powers, 
Ostertag, Fadul, Padgett. 



DELTA SIGMA DELTA 
First Row: Phillips. Rol- 
ing, \ieusma, LiVaccari, 
Clarno, Mitchell, Clark, 
Huschart. Second Row: 
Harkensee, Finnegan, 
Syzek, Mahan, Hoppers, 
Ruetz, Hodierne, Brown, 
Rus, Stryker, Toohey. 
Third Row: Benam, 
Schaefer, Taylor, Budke, 
Fleagle, Taylor, Park, 
Narsete, Clark, Hulett, 
Restarski, Brescia. 



PSI OMEGA 
FRATERNITY 
First Row: Novak, Redden, 
Avery, Kolligan, Rushing, 
Ridlen, Hogg. Second Row : 
Silko, Fry, Petnuch, Foer- 
ster, Drews, .Stroher, Gir- 
oulx, Hardigree, McCor- 
mack. Third Row: Fanizzo, 
Shory, Beeftink, Daly, 
Kenward, Pawlowski, Bar- 
dis, Kadlubiak, Scruggs, 
Jagor, Kolodzinski, Ahern, 
McClanahan. Fourth Row: 
Harmon, Borque, Romano, 
Wegryzyn, Kosinski, Dis- 
cipio, Krieg, McGowan, 
Fahrenbach, Abati, Lidge. 



42 





First Row: Frank Klepacki, grand master; Bernard Powers, 
scribe. Second Row: Al Pronobis, treasurer; Frank Solo- 
man, tyler; Robert Mitchell, historian; Kenny Lambert, 
junior page. 



<s>Delta S^iamu <=Jjeltu 



9 



The object of the Delta Sigma Delta 
Fraternity shall be to keep high the standards 
of dentistry by inculcating in the minds of 
the dental students and practitioners a spirit 
of fraternal cooperation toward scientific, 
ethical and professional progress. Beta Chap- 
ter of Delta Sigma Delta Fraternity, with the 
assistance of the alumni, have acquired a fra- 
ternity house. Providing housing for many 
of the members, it helps to foster a greater 
feeling of cooperation, enables students to as- 
sist each other in theory and clinical work, 
and strengthens ties of brotherhood. 

Meetings which are held twice a month 
at the fraternity house are both business and 
social. During recent social meetings, prom- 
inent speakers and interesting programs 



have contributed to our knowledge of den- 
tistry and general affairs. 

The active undergraduate chapter totals 
82 members including those of sophomore, 
junior, and senior classes. The alumni con- 
sists of 323 members. 

The present officers of Beta Chapter are : 
Frank Klepacki, grand master; Bernard 
Powers, worthy master; Tracy Gibbens, 
scribe; Al Pronobis, treasurer; John Mitch- 
ell, historian ; Robert Van Dyke, senior page ; 
Kenneth Lambert, junior page; Frank Solo- 
mon, tyler. 

The fraternity is enjoying a worthwhile 
year both educationally and socially and has 
set a high standard for accomplishments in 
the future. 



Hey, let me take a look 




P.i Q 



meau 



f 



Psi Omega is the largest Greek letter dental fraternity 
in the world. There have been initiated into Psi Omega 
over 22,000 members, and the fraternity has active chapters 
in practically all of the dental schools in the United States 
and Canada, a very active European chapter, and about 
fifty alumni chapters. 

The chapter at Loyola is Kappa, founded in 1898. Psi 
Omega is one of the few Loyola fraternities fortunate 
enough to have a house. At the house bi-monthly meetings 
are held, as well as social events and lectures; in the base- 
ment is a well-equipped laboratory for the more zealous 
members. 



^ke vjuitcl of S^t. .,J4iJollonla 




Seated: Hayden Dedecker, president. Standing: Thad 
Restarski, treasurer; Ed Bonk, secretary. 



The Guild of St. Apollonia is a Catholic 
fraternity for dental students. The guild re- 
ceives its name from the patron saint of 
dentistry, St. Apollonia, who was cannonized 
in Rome about 300 A.D. Being a Christian, 
St. Apollonia was tortured by her persecu- 
tors by having her teeth extracted, one by 
one, and finally suffered death upon the pyre. 
Her relics are preserved in the various 
churches of Rome, Naples, Cologne, Antwerp, 
Brussels, and Quebec. The name of St. Apol- 
lonia is frequently mentioned in the prayer 
books of the Middle Ages, in prayers for the 
relief of toothaches. 

The parent organization, the St. Apol- 
lonia Guild was organized by a group of 
graduate dentists in Greater Boston on 
March 20, 1920, with the sanction and bless- 
ing of His Eminence, The Cardinal Arch- 
bishop of Boston. In cooperation with the 
Forsythe Dental Infirmary, its members 



cared for the needs of 43,000 parochial 
school children. 

After four years of successful activity 
by the Guild, the first undergraduate chapter 
of the Guild was organized at Loyola in 1924. 
This chapter was active for a few years, 
then became inactive until 1943 when it was 
reorganized by the members of the senior 
class under the able guidance of Very Rev. 
James T. Hussey, S.J., then regent of the 
Dental School, and Dr. Jerome J. Vlk, then 
moderator. Rev. Robert J. Willmes also 
gave his all in establishing the Guild when 
regent of the Dental School, before his ap- 
pointment to the office of rector of Loyola 
University. Thereafter, this organization 
has continued to flourish and is increasing 
both in membership and activity under the 
able guidance of Rev. Oswald J. Marshall, 
S.J., regent of the School of Dentistry, and 
Dr. Richard C. Thometz, moderator. 




First Row: Syzek, Van Ort, 
Sullivan, Bardis, Restarski, 
Harmon, Flautt, Carrin- 
gela, J. Clark. Second 
Row: Bonk, Ostertag, 
Bochenek, Shory, Petnuch, 
Cascio, Novak, E. Ka- 
pustka, R. Clark. Third 
Row: Nadeau, Pronobis, 
Klepacki, Keehan, Setlik, 
Jagor, DeDecker, Pawlow- 
ski, Gowgiel, Callozzo, 
.Simpson, Schroeder, Ruetz. 
Fourth Row: Silko, Benam, 
Siefker, Granger, Discipio, 
Schaefer, Romano, Abati, 
P. Flannery, J. Flannery, 
Wilhelm. 



44 




Xi Psi Pkl 



Patient in examination room 



The Xi Psi Phi fraternity was founded 
on February 8, 1889, at the University of 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. On March 
14, 1896, not too many years after the fra- 
ternity's inception. Lambda chapter was or- 
ganized at the comparatively new Chicago 
College of Dental Surgery. The fraternity 
grew right along with the new school and 
dental profession. It has since seen and 
helped dentistry emerge from the trade 
school ranks to the plane of an honored 
profession. 

The motto of the Zips (the fraternity's 
favorite nickname) is "Hospitality is the 
Life of Friendship." The motto is incorpor- 
ated into the principles which are knowledge, 
morality, and friendship. 

The moderator of Lambda Chapter is Dr. 
John J. O'Connell. The alumni members on 
the faculty include such respected names as 
Dr. Edgar D. Coolidge, Dr. Byron J. May, 
Dr. Harold W. Oppice, Dr. Elbert C. Pendle- 
ton, Dr. Robert S. Strenk, Dr. Jerome J. Vlk, 
and Dr. Stanley E. Winters. One of the 



faculty alumni members has very recently 
distinguished himself in the field of dentistry. 
At the winter meeting of the American Den- 
tal Association, the fraternity was very 
proud to see one of its members, Dr. Harold 
W. Oppice, elected as president of the 
American Dental Association. 

The past year has been one of building 
for the Zips. The officers, John Theodorou, 
president; Edward Strenk, vice-president; 
and Leland Reed, treasurer, have concen- 
trated on getting the chapter on a more even 
keel. Through their work and the efforts of 
every man in the fraternity, it can happily 
be said that Lambda chapter is in full swing 
once again. 

The new year finds the Zips with 
many new plans, among which is the obtain- 
ment of a fraternity house in the rapidly 
developing medical center. If nothing else, 
the hard work ahead will serve to unite us 
even closer in the bond of brotherhood which, 
after all, is the fundamental purpose of any 
fraternity. 



o r> /-^ 



First Row: Cringella, Nie- 
miec, Pawlowski, Novak, 
Everett, Dr. O'Connell, Dr. 
Strenk, Theodorou. Second 
Row: J. Nikoplos, P. Ni- 
koplos, McParland, Slov- 
ick, Strenk, Bochenek. 
Cascio, Raymond, Watson. 
Third Row: Flessor, Mc- 
Ewen, Basile, Setlik, Sud- 
duth, Brecich, McCarthy, 
Knudsen, Later, Reed, 
Franceschi. Fourth Row : 
Wood, O'Brien, Quilty. 
N. Perino, B. Perino, Moll, 
Vukovich, Dunne, Ursoleo, 
McNicholas, T a n t ill o, 
Griseto. 




45 



46 



This is how you do it, boys ! 



First Roiv: Joe Phillips, Dr. Matusek. Stand- 
ing: John White, John Keehan, John 
O'Connell, Dan O'Connell. 



Watch the professor, you two! 



Now Miss, in a few words, tell us your views 
on the economic situation 




Dr. Chapin instructing in Oral 
Surgery 





SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

Ray Bardis, Henry Pachowicz, Robert Van 
Dyke, Lucius Kosinski, Harry Omori 



Miss Morris, x-ray technician, at work 



Buccal-Lingual Movement 



47 



School Of- cJ^ i 



u w 



In 1908 the alumni of St. Ignatius Col- 
lege encouraged the founding of the Lincoln 
College of Law. This institution was shoi'tly 
thereafter accepted as a part of the Uni- 
versity. The Law School was the first of 
the professional units to be added to the 
institution. 

The first dean of the Law School was 
William Dillon. His term as dean extended 
from 1908 to 1915. Dean Dillon was suc- 
ceeded in 1915 by Arnold D. McMahon, who 
had served as registrar prior to his appoint- 
ment as dean. He remained in that position 
until 1925, when Judge John McCormick 



became dean. John C. Fitzgerald, the pres- 
ent dean, took office in 1938. He is a gradu- 
ate of the Harvard Law School, and had been 
an instructor in the school prior to his ap- 
pointment as dean. During the war, Dean 
Fitzgerald left the school to serve as Chair- 
man of the Vested Property Claims Commit- 
tee in the Office of Alien Property Custodian. 
During his absence, Mr. Francis J. Rooney, 
the present assistant dean, held the position 
of acting dean. 

After Pearl Harbor new students were 
not admitted to the School of Law. However, 
classes were continued for those already en- 




Members of the Law 
School Faculty around ta- 
ble: John C. Hayes, James 
M. Forklns, James B. 
O'Shaughnessy, John J. 
Waldron, Martin A. Hen- 
die, John C. Fitzgerald, 
and William L. Lamey. 



48 



""'"^"^ 



■^f 







FRANCIS J. ROONEY 
Assistant Dean 



JOHN C. FITZGERALD 
Dean 



rolled until 1944. The School of Law resumed 
classes September 16, 1946. 

The School of Law is located on the ninth 
floor of Lewis Towers. The school conducts 
both day and evening classes. 

The School of Law uses the case method 
of instruction. Under this system a text is 
not used ; the main sources of instruction are 



actual cases in the field of law being studied. 
In addition to giving its students comprehen- 
sive instruction in jurisprudence, the Loyola 
University School of Law aims to give them 
the training necessary to make them well- 
rounded persons. The true philosophical 
principles underlying jurisprudence are 
stressed during the time they attend Loyola. 



Law students pour over a 
knotty problem: L. W. 
Peters, R. L. Curry, H. L. 
McNeal, A. J. Pach, R. W. 
Peters. 




49 




MARY AVERGIN, B.A., J.D. 

Entered from Sullivan High School; 
Kappa Beta Pi ; Case Editor of the Illinois 
Bar Journal ; Chicago. 

ALAN BAYHAM, LL.B. 
Delta Theta Phi ; Chicago. 

BERNARD BEAZLEY, LL.B. 

Entered from Englewood High School 
and Wilson Junior College; Delta Theta 
Phi; Law School Librarian; Case Editor 
of the Illinois Bar Journal; Chicago. 

FRANCIS BOYLE. LL.B. 

Entered from Englewood High School and 
Englewood Night School; Delta Theta 
Phi; Chicago. 

GEORGE BROGAN, Ph.B., J.D. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Delta Theta Phi ; Chicago. 

HENRY BUDZINSKI, Ph.B., J.D. 

Entered from Weber High School ; Phi 
Alpha Delta; Chicago. 

LAWRENCE CARROLL, LL.B. 

Entered from Du Sable High School 
University of Illinois, and Herzl Junior 
College ; Member of Board of Governors : 
Student Bar Association; Chicago. 

PATRICK DUNNE, LL.B. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Phi 
Alpha Delta, Clerk; Associate Editor of 
the Illinois Bar Journal; Loyola Union 
Congressman; Interfraternity Committee 
of Union ; Chicago. 

GLYNN ELLIOTT, Ph.B., J.D. 

Entered from De Paul Academy and 
Michigan State University; Pi Gamma 
Mu; Delta Theta Phi; Loyola Neivs; 
Chicago. 

JOHN FELICE, LL.B. 

Entered from Austin High School and 
Roosevelt College ; Phi Alpha Delta ; As- 
sociate Editor of the Illinois Bar Journal; 
Chicago. 

WILLIAM FLAHERTY, LL.B. 

Entered from Mt. Carmel High School; 
Phi Alpha Delta ; Chicago. 

ROBERT HASSETT, A.B., J.D. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Delta 
Theta Phi ; Delta Epsilon Sigma ; Debat- 
ing 2, 3, 4 ; Loyola News 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

JOHN HOGAN, JR., LL.B. 

Entei-ed from Mt. Carmel High School; 
Chicago. 

ROBERT HOURIGAN, LL.B. 

Entered from De La Salle High School 
and Notre Dame University; Delta Theta 
Phi ; Chicago. 

MARK JONES, A.B., J.D. 

Entered from Attucks High School, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind. ; Tuskegee Institute, Roose- 
velt College ; Chicago. 




MITCHELL P. KOBELINSKI, Ph.B., J.D. 

Entered from Lovola University ; Sigma 
Pi Alpha; Debating; Delta Theta Phi; 
Radio Workshop ; Chicago. 

FRED N. LANE. LL.B. 

Entered from W.LS.T.C. ; Pi Alpha Delta ; 
Board of Governors (Bar Ass'n) ; Chicago. 

FRANCIS J. LEYHANE, Ph.B., J.D. 

Entered from Loyola University ; Board of 
Governors (Bar Ass'n) ; Radio Workshop; 
Sodality ; Economics Club ; Curtain Guild ; 
Loyola News; Chicago. 

FRANCIS B. LIBBE, LL.B. 

Entered from University of Pennsylvania ; 
Chicago. 

EDWARD F. LUSSIER, LL.B. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Associate 
Editor of Recent Decisions, Illinois Bar 
Journal; Loyola News; Cadence; Loyolan, 
Art Editor; Phi Alpha Delta; Alpha 
Lambda ; Glenview, 111. 

ROBERT G. LUSSIER, LL.B. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Associate 
Editor of Recent Decisions, Illinois Bar 
Journal ; Phi Alpha Delta ; Pi Alpha 
Lambda ; Glenview, 111. 

JULES V. MEYERING, LL.B. 

Entered from University of Notre Dame; 
Sodality ; Psychology Club ; Delta Theta 
Phi ; Oak Park, 111. 

JOHN P. NOONE, LL.B. 

Entered from Loyola University; Pi Gam- 
ma Mu ; Delta Theta Phi ; Chicago. 

LEO W. PETERS, LL.B. 

Entered from Loyola University; Delta 
Theta Phi ; Oak Park, 111. 

REDMOND W. PETERS, LL.B. 

Entered from Mount Carmel High School ; 
Delta Theta Phi ; Chicago. 

RICHARD E. QUINN, LL.B. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Loyolan; 
Pi Alpha Lambda; Phi Alpha Delta; Chi- 
cago. 

JOHN F. ROLLHEISER, LL.B. 

Entered from Villanova College; Delta 
Theta Phi, Treasurer ; Chicago. 

WILLIAM J. ROYAL. Ph.B., J.D. 

Entered from Loyola University; Sodal- 
ity; Swimming; Loyola News; Monogram 
Club; University Club; Phi Alpha Delta; 
Chicago. 

JOHN P. SCHELLING, LL.B. 

Entered from University of Illinois ; Board 
of Governors (Bar Ass'n) ; Chicago. 

CHARLES T. SHEEHAN, LL.B. 

Entered from Clemson College; Delta 
Theta Phi; Chicago. 




(^ a w S^ ( 



e n I o p 6 








^ 




JOHN J. SHUFELDT, Ph.B., LL.B. 

Entered from St. Philip and N.Y.U.; 
Delta Theta Phi; Chicago. 

GROVER C. WEEKS, JR., J.D. 

Entered from Lakeview and Northwest- 
ern ; Delta Theta Phi 3, 4, Dean 4 ; Chicago. 

EDMUND J. WASILESKI, LL.B. 

Entered from W. Bethlehem, Marianna, 
Pa., and Universities of Iowa and Illinois; 
Delta Theta Phi 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

DONALD E. VAILE, B.S.C., J.D. 

Entered from Dixon High School and St. 
Ambrose College ; Delta Theta Phi ; Dixon, 
111. 

WILLIAM A. URUBA, Ph.B., J.D. 

Entered from Lovola Academy; Pi Alpha 
Lambda 1, 2, 3, 4; Delta Theta Phi; I-M 
Handball Champ; Debating; International 
Relations Club; Chicago. 

WILLIAM L. TERLIZZI, LL.B. 

Entered from Fenwick ; University Club ; 
Wasmann Society 1 ; Berwyn, 111. 

ROBERT J. STARRS, LL.B. 

Entered from Loyola Academy and Pur- 
due ; Pi Alpha Delta ; Chicago. 





52 



csC a w L/ln de pclc 



addmen 




FIRST YEAR DAY 

Seated: Loo, Cone, Christ- 
mann, Sims, Alexander, 
McBroom. Butler. Second 
Row: Kiiras, Klein, Hays, 
Bereskv, Pendergast, Con- 
nolly, David. Third Row: 
Geraghty, Doutlick, Mc- 
Xeal, Beecher, Dillon. 
Feehan, Curry. 



FIRST YEAR DAY 
Seated: Slovick, Ginley, 
Valentine, Chaikin. Sec- 
ond Row: Stachura, Mc- 
Kendry, Kuras, Skelton, 
Doutlick. 



SECOND YEAR DAY 
Seated: Lane, Manning, 
Gilbert, Dyczewski, Erick- 
son, Collins, Bourgeois. 
Second Row: La Placa, 
Connelly, Hurley, Dann- 
hauer, Elward, Komosa, 
Lahart, Kelley, Kurtz, Cal- 
lahan. 



SECOND YEAR LAW 
Seated: Shelov, Black, 
O'Neill, Lehr, Wooldridge. 
Second Row: Nolan, Ley, 
O'Shea, N e e, JMurphy, 
Sweet, Richards. 



53 



&Law Ulndercli 



aSd men 



FIRST YEAR NIGHT 
Seated: Townsend, Mar- 
tinson, Kyncl, Cigal, Gold- 
stein. Second Row: Carter, 
Sanden, Fiedoral, Vance, 
VonderHeide, Coolve, For- 
tune, McNicIiols. 



SECOND YEAR NIGHT 
Seated: McPhee, Zukovv- 
ski. Lynch, Lee, Palermo, 
Blanchard, Gardner, Ma- 
son. Second Row: Solari, 
McGury, Huthert, Green, 
Lannon, Decker, Beecher, 
P e k a I a , Jares, Wolff, 
Brown, Egan. 



THIRD YEAR NIGHT 
Seated: Cronin, Keleher, 
Cain, Rouse, Dospil. Sec- 
ond Row: Walsh, Clark, 
Cassidy, Sterrett, Hunter, 
Durkin, Franger. 




54 




Ken .^lanley, tribune; Ted Cornell, vice-dean; Grover 
Weeks, Jr.. dean; Glynn Elliott, clerk of the rolls; 
John RoUheiser, clerk of exchequer. 



McKenna Senate is one of the largest 
and most active of the more than one 
hundred and ten alumni and student senates 
which comprise Delta Theta Phi Law Fra- 
ternity. This national law fraternity was 
founded in Chicago in 1913. Its purpose was 
to bring practicing lawyers and students 
together fraternally in an effort to promote 
legal learning, justice, the moral equalities of 
the individual, and to advance the interests 
of every college of law with which the fra- 
ternity is associated. 

The senate at Loyola University School 
of Law was founded in 1926 and named 
after the late United States Supreme Court 
Justice, Joseph McKenna. It was active 
from its founding until the close of the 
School of Law during the recent war. In 
1946 the senate was reactivated. 

Among its members McKenna Senate 



proudly lists several officers of the Student 
Bar Association. They are Thomas Juettner, 
president; William Ruberry, vice-president; 
and Arthur Larson, treasurer. 

The social events during the year in- 
clude smokers, dances, and parties for its 
own members as well as inter-senate activi- 
ties through the Inter-Senate Council. Par- 
ticipation in this council maintains close 
contact with sister senates of the neighbor- 
ing Chicago law schools. 

To foster scholarship the fraternity key 
is offered to senior students in the upper 
seven and one-half per cent of the class. 

In all of its efforts the senate seeks to 
carry out its purpose and prepare its mem- 
bers for a professional vocation and the high 
moral and mencal standard necessary there- 
to. 




First Row: Hurley, EI- 
ward, Uruba, Cornell, RoU- 
heiser, Weeks, Manley, 
Elliott, Juettner, Peters. 
Second Row: Fait, Brogan, 
Xoone. Callahan, La Blaca, 
Delaney, Ruberry, Birch- 
ard. Smith, Hassett, Shu- 
feldt. Manning, Beazlev. 
Thiril Row: Durkin. Mer- 
rion, Bayham, Larson, 
Meyering, Kupris, Peters, 
Leyhane, O'Neill, .Shelov, 
Schelling, Horrigan, Rich- 
ards. 




/-^ki ^y^lpnci cJDelta 



J. Howard Conway, marshall; Kichaitl Murphy, treas- 
urer; Thomas F. Dee, justice; P. William Dunne, clerk. 



Phi Alpha Delta is a national secret 
Greek letter law fraternity founded in 1898 
by a group of law students in Chicago, Illi- 
nois. One week after it was fourmed in 
November, 1902, Webster Chapter was for- 
mally installed as a chapter of Phi Alpha 
Delta. 

Phi Alpha Delta, secure in its principles 
and purposes, has weathered war and de- 
pression and has proceeded along a steady, 
conservative policy of expansion until, at the 
present time, there are fifty-eight active 



chapters and thirty-one alumni chapters. 
The total membership of the fraternity is 
over 18,000. There are few "Class A" law 
schools in America without a chapter of Phi 
Alpha Delta, and no large city without a 
strong alumni chapter. 

Phi Alpha Delta as a law fraternity is 
unique in that it is the only one whose roots 
were nurtured in a legal controversy. It is 
truly a law fraternity in every sense of the 
word. 




First Row: Starrs, Nee, 
Conway, Dee, Dunne, Mur- 
phy, Lassiter, Flaherty. 
Second Row: Lane, Crook, 
Lussier, White, Stern, Lus- 
sier, Felice. Third Row: 
0'.Shea, Lane, O'Brien, 
Libbe, Burns, Gilbert, Ley, 
Erickson. 



56 



ion6 



Inois (13 a f /journal 





I'. WILLIAM DINXE, Case Editor 
i. MILTON BURNS, Editor-in-Chief 



The Recent Decisions Section of the Illi- 
nois Bar Journal brings Loyola University 
and the School of Law before the eyes of ap- 
proximately seven thousand Illinois lawyers 
eight times yearly. The Illinois Bar Journal 
is the official organ of the Illinois State Bar 
Association and the function of the case com- 
ments in the Recent Decisions Section is to 
set forth for practicing attorneys an accur- 
ate and informative report indicating why 
a case deserves their attention. This in- 
volves a precise analysis of the case com- 
mented upon and a showing of how the de- 
cision more particularly applies a recognized 
general rule, extends, settles, modifies, shifts 
emphasis on, makes exception to, or discards 
in whole or in part, in terms or in necessary 
effect, the old rule of law. A comment of a 
case settling the law may include an outline 
of the former conflicting views while other 
articles may show the extent and cause of 
discarding old rules or point up the pattern 



of progression of cases to a rule not yet judi- 
cially declared. All cases are chosen for 
comment because their subject matter is of 
unusual present interest to Illinois lawyers. 
The comments are primarily on Illinois Su- 
preme Court decisions, Federal Court deci- 
sions in the 7th Circuit, which includes the 
State of Illinois, and on other decisions 
which may have a direct effect on the law in 
Illinois. 

In this, the Law School's second year 
of affiliation with the Illinois Bar Journal, 
the responsibilities of Editor-in-chief were 
carried by J. Milton Burns. P. William 
Dunne, acting as the case editor, assisted 
Mr. Burns in the selection, analysis and 
editing of the comments submitted. The 
associate editors were : Edward F. Lussier, 
Robert G. Lussier, John Rollheiser, Edward 
White, and William Moylan. Mr. John Cor- 
nelius Hayes served as faculty advisor. 



first Row: White, Burns, 
Dunne. Second Roiv: Lus- 
sier, Moylan, Rollheiser, 
Lussier. 




^ c n o o i of Social vU o r h 



In 1938 the School of Social Work was 
organized as a distinct professional school 
within the University. Much earlier, in 
1913, Rev. Frederic Siedenburg, S.J., laid 
the foundation for the School when he or- 
ganized the Loyola University Lecture 
Bureau. In 1914 this body of lecturers was 
admitted to the University as the School of 
Sociology. Thus Loyola became the first 
Catholic school in the United States to teach 
social work. The dean of the school at the 
present time is Mr. Matthew H. Schoenbaum. 

Loyola School of Social Work operates 
exclusively on the graduate level. It offers 
an integrated two-year program which com- 
prises generic and specialized courses in 
theory, field instruction in selected social 
agencies, social research, and professional 
Cathohc philosophy. This unified program 
is designed to prepare the student for pro- 




EDWARD S. O'REILLY, Ph.B., M.S.A. 

Entered from Austin High School; Chicago. 




Dean Schoenbaum dis- 
cusses the curriculum of 
the School of Social Work 
with Dr. Mary McCor- 
mack. Miss Mary Bruce, 
and Miss Collette 
Springer. 




MATTHEW H. SCHOENBAUM 
Dean, School of Social fVork 



REV. RALPH A. GALLAGHER, S.J. 

Director, Institute of Social 

Administration 



fessional activity both in the generalized 
area of the public and private social services 
and in the more specific area of Catholic 
social work. The program leads to the de- 
gree of Master of Social Work. 

Loyola School of Social Work is a mem- 
ber of the American Association of Schools 
of Social Work, the national accrediting 
body. Its students and alumni become eligi- 



ble for membership in the American Associa- 
tion of Social Workers. 

Some of the agencies cooperating in the 
field-work program of the school are: the 
American Red Cross, the Catholic Youth Or- 
ganization, Children's Memorial Hospital, 
Loretto Hospital, United Charities of Chi- 
cago, and the Veterans Administration Hos- 
pital, Hines, Illinois. 




Loyola L^nion Congress- 
men from the School of 
Social Work. Standing: 
Mary Jane D'Ambrosio, 
Ruth Sherlock, Frank Hig- 
glns, Helen Myers, Jacque- 
line Bledsoe. Seated: Ralph 
Cathcart. 



59 




MISS GLADYS KINIERY 
Dean 



h 



In September, 1948, the Departments of 
Nursing Education and Nursing, and the De- 
partment of Public Health Nursing, previ- 
ously administered by University College, 
were combined in a single administrative 
unit in the School of Nursing. 

The school is organized under its own 
dean, Miss Gladys Kiniery. Rev. Michael I. 
English, S.J., is regent. There are three 
full-time and 14 part-time faculty members 
in public health nursing and nursing educa- 



tion. The full-time faculty are Miss Essie 
Anglum, Miss Catherine Denning, and Miss 
Margaret Haley. 

A reorganized curriculum in Nursing 
Education for the preparation of nursing 
arts and clinical instructors, and in Public 
Health Nursing for the preparation of gen- 
eralized public health nurses, was inaugur- 
ated in September, 1949. These programs 
are open to qualified registered nurses. 

A new four-year basic collegiate pro- 




NURSING FACULTY 
Margaret Haley, Cather- 
ine Denning, Essie Ang- 
lum, Mrs. Dollie Spar- 
macher. 



60 



^ c n o o I oP III 



u r 6 L n 



f 



gram leading to the Bachelor of Science in 
Nursing was begun in September, 1949. In 
this program the student spends two years in 
college and two years in clinical practice, 
including preparation for public health 
nursing. 

The faculty of the School of Nursing- 
cooperates closely with the administrative 
and faculty personnel of St. Francis, St. 
Anne's, St. Elizabeth's and St. Bernard's 
Schools of Nursing in the development of 
clinical fields in these hospitals for the edu- 
cation of advanced and basic nursing stu- 
dents. The resources of many community 
health agencies are also used for practice 
fields for Loyola students. 

The School of Nursing has a very active 



student association whose purpose is to pro- 
mote the professional advancement of its 
members, encourage social activities, and co- 
operate with university administration to in- 
sure proper liaison. Among the activities 
sponsored by the Loyola School of Nursing 
Association are an annual Christmas dinner 
and a Commencement dinner for the gradu- 
ating class. The association cooperates closely 
with the Loyola Union in promoting student 
welfare. 

Although the newly organized school is 
in its infancy, we may look forward to sound 
growth and development in establishing pro- 
grams for the preparation of the truly pro- 
fessional nurse to meet the health and illness 
needs of our communities. 



NURSING SCHOOL 
STUDENT COUNCIL 

Seated: Othella Allen, 
Edith Heide, Margaret Ka- 
minski. Second Row: 
Martha Luby, Alice Micha- 
lak, Marion Etten, Vir- 
vinia Ritten. 




61 




School of- f /ufdlna 



lord 



OTHELLA E. ALLEN, R.N., B.S.P.H.N. 

Entered from Lincoln High School and 
Lincoln Junior College, Kansas City, Mo. ; 
Student Council 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

MILDRED A. ASH, B.S.N.Ed. 

Entered from Henrotin Hospital School of 
Nursing; Chicago. 

CHARLENE M. COOPER, B.S.P.H.S. 

Entered from Booker Washington High 
School ; Chicago. 

MARCELLA M. DRAKE, B.S.P.H.N, 

Entered from Cass Technical High School, 
Detroit, Mich. ; Student Council ; Chicago. 

MARION ETTEN, B.S.N.Ed. 

Entered from Hirsch High School; Stu- 
dent Council, Publicity Chairman; Chi- 
cago. 

MARTHA GALIANO, B.S.N.Ed. 

Entered from West High School, Rock- 
ford, 111. ; Loyola Union Congressman ; 
Student Council; Chicago. 

MARIE M. GALLAGHER, B.S.N.Ed. 

Entered from St. Francis Academy, Joliet, 
111. ; Manhattan, 111. 

WANDA J. HITCHCOCK, B.S.N.Ed. 

Entered from Roosevelt High School; 
Chicago. 

MARGARET M. KAMINSKL B.S.N.Ed. 
Entered from Lorain High School, Ohio; 
Lorain, Ohio. 

VIRGINIA L. KAYWOOD, B.S.N.Ed. 

Entered from Lakeview High School; 
Chicago. 

OLGA KEKUT, B.S.N.Ed. 

Entered from Calumet High School; 
Chicago. 

JULIA W. LAWES, B.S.P.H.N. 
Chicago. 

ALICE M. MICHALAK, B.S.P.H.N. 

Entered from Farragut High School ; Stu- 
dent Council, Chairman of Membership; 
Chicago. 

JOAN M. MOORE, B.S.N.Ed. 

Entered from St. Gregory High School, St. 
Francis Hospital and Mundelein College; 
Nursing School Org. ; Park Ridge, 111. 

JOSEPHINE ODENIAL, B.S.P.H.N. 

Entered from Decatur High School; 
C.I.C. ; P-H Society ; Chicago. 

LEONE E. STONAGE, B.S.N.Ed. 

Entered from St. Francis Academy, Joliet, 
and Immaculate Heart, Los Angeles ; Loy- 
ola Union Congressman, Committee Mem- 
ber; Student Council; Joliet, 111. 

ETHEL H. VALIKNAC, B.S.N.Ed. 

Entered from McKeesport High School, 
Pennsylvania, and Northwestern Univer- 
sity; Student Council, Publicity Commit- 
tee ; McKeesport, Pa. 

BETTY G. WITZGALL, B.S.N.Ed. 

Entered from Alvernia High School and 
St. Francis School of Nursing; Student 
Council; Chicago. 




Those exams must be tough 




NURSING SCHOOL 
DAY 
Seated: Monighan, Doody, 
Gorny, Condon, Weed, 
Laszkiewicz. Second Row: 
Gear, Dillon, McKay, 
Walsh, HofiFer, Miller, 
McCarthy. 



NIGHT 
Seated: Kaminski, Gal- 
iand, Mueller, Culver, 
Zoia, Eckblom. Second 
Row: Kelley, Graham, 
Heibe, Braby, Etten, Luby, 
Pettke, Allen, Kramer. 



NIGHT 
Seated: Gallagher, 
Schwentner, Evans, Titus, 
Hitchcock, Valiknac. Sec- 
ond Row: McGregor, 
Straka, Nichols, DeRosa, 
Stonage, McGinley, Thomp- 
son, Keeley, Miller. 



63 




REV. WILLIAM A. FINNEGAN, SJ. 
Dean 



REV. RICHARD E. TISCHLER, SJ. 
Associate Dean 



REV. CLETUS F. HARTMANN, i 
Assistant Dean 



The Liberal Arts College most ef- 
fectively mirrors the purpose of a Jesuit 
education. The archives bear this out. The 
oldest branch of Loyola University is the 
College of Arts and Sciences, established on 
the west side in 1870, as Saint Ignatius 
College. In 1909 the name was changed, 
and in 1922 the university moved to the Lake 
Shore Campus. 

In 1932, the Rev. Thomas A. Egan, S.J.. 
became dean of the College of Arts and 



Sciences, with the Rev. William A. Finne- 
gan, S.J., dean of the junior college. At the 
close of the 1935-36 school year, the schools 
were separated. Fr. Egan became the head 
of University College which moved down- 
town. Fr. Finnegan was appointed dean of 
the College of Arts and Sciences and has 
guided it in its expansion and progi'ess. 

In September, 1946, University College 
offered day arts classes, although there was 
no affiliation with the College of Arts and 




Messrs. Jerome O'Grady, 
George Drury, Gilbert 
.Snow, and Joseph Menez 
of the faculty. 



l^olleae oj^ _y\rr/j cinci *^i 



cienceS 



Sciences on the Lake Shore Campus. Rev. 
James V. McCummiskey, S.J ., was appointed 
associate dean of the College of Arts and 
Sciences with offices in the newly-acquired 
Lewis Towers building. Because of the over- 
crowded conditions at the Lake Shore 
Campus, the downtown site, the generous 
gift of Mr. Frank J. Lewis, was a timely and 
welcome addition to the university. 

Rev. Cletus F. Hartmann, S.J., associ- 
ate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 
is the head of the Lewis Towers division, 
which is known unofficially as "Day Arts". 
Fr. Hartmann was appointed in September, 
1949. 

Courses leading to Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Philosophy, Bachelor of Science 
in Social Sciences, and Bachelor of Science 
degrees have been offered since September, 



1947, at the Lewis Towers Campus. Pre- 
dental and pre-medical students were ac- 
cepted until September, 1949, but were re- 
quired to transfer to the Lake Shore Campus 
at the end of their freshman year because of 
the necessary laboratory courses. In Sep- 
tember, 1949, it became the policy that all 
pre-medical and pre-dental students were to 
be admitted directly to the Lake Shore 
Campus. 

A noticeable change in the past year has 
been the decline in veteran enrollment, and 
the increased enrollment of female students 
in the Day Arts College. Recognition was 
given to this trend in 1949 ; the Coed Club 
was formed with Miss Julia O'Malley as 
moderator. Miss Kate Meehan is now mod- 
erator. By their interest, the coeds have 
helped improve the social and student gov- 
ernment activities of the university. 



First Row: Joan McCar- 
thy, Clay Berrigan, Jack 
Picchietti, Tom Hartney, 
Pat Hennessy, Bob Hylard, 
Louise Farrell. Second 
Row: John Duffy, Jim 
Ryan, Bob Kearney, Tom 
Lund, Pau! Boehme, Chris 
Fitzgerald, Dick AlcGrath, 
Kevin Mulhern. 




Arts' Retreat 



f^ 1 El 





^ ^^.. 




CHARLES A. ABELE, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Georgia Military Academy, 
Renssalaer, North Park; University of 
Illinois; Evanston. 

DONALD H. ADAMS, B.S. 

Entered from Calumet High School, De 
Paul, St. Bede; Chicago. 

JAMES J. AHERN, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Pi Alpha 
Lambda ; Psychological Research Society 

2, 3; Chicago. 

LOUIS P. ALONZI, B.S. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Wasmann 
Biological Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Deerfleld, 111. 

CHARLES C. ARADO, Ph.B. 

Entered from Senn High School; Chicago. 

JOHN J. BAGGOT, Ph.B. 

Entered from Fenwick High School; May- 
wood, 111. 

JOHN A. BALL, A.B. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Chicago. 

JOHN H. BARKER, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Pi Gamma Mu 3, 4; Alpha Kappa Delta 

3, 4 ; Chicago. 

JOSEPH M. BAUER, B.S. 

Entered from De Paul Academy; Sigma 
Pi Alpha ; Chemistry Club ; Chicago. 

SAM G. BAYS, B.S. 

Entered from Kelly High School; Pi Mu 
Chi; Chicago. 

HENRY H, BEAN, Ph.B. 

Entered from Campion ; Cadence 3, 4 ; In- 
tramurals 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

PETER J. BELMONTE, Ph.B. 

Entered from Crane Technical High 
School; Chicago. 

THOMAS C. BENBENNICK, Ph.B. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Chicago. 

CLAYTON J, BERRIGAN, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Fenwick High School; 
Alpha Delta Gamma; Loyola Neivs 1, 2, 3, 
4 ; Cadence 4 ; Vice-President of Senior 
Class; Park Ridge, 111. 

JOHN F. BERRY, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Taft High School; Chicago. 



^J&pts ^ 



e n i o r 6 



DONALD E. BERTAUT, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School 
and Georgetown University ; Oak Park, 111. 

WALTER L. BIELAWSKI, B.S. 

Entered from Thornton High School and 
Thornton Junior College, Harvey; Phi 
Mu Chi 3, 4; Wasmann Biological Society 
3, 4 ; Loyola Neivs 3 ; Math Club 3 ; Chi- 
cago. 

JOHN E. BIRELEY, B.S. 

Entered from Loyola Academy and Santa 
Clara University ; Evanston, 111. 

WILLIAM A. BLAHA, Ph.B. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Sigma Pi 
Alpha ; Chicago. 

BENJAMIN BLUITT, B.S. 

Entered from Englewood High School and 
Southern University; Basketball Team 1, 
2, 3, 4; Chicago. 

KENNETH A. BORCHARDT, B.S. 

Entered from Luther Institute; Sigma Pi 
Alpha; Wasmann Biological Society; Chi- 
cago. 

DAVID T. BORUCKI. B.S. 

Entered from Evanston Township High 
School ; Sigma Pi Alpha ; Wasmann Bio- 
logical Society 3 ; Board of Governors 1 ; 
Debate 2; Chemistry Club 3; Pi Alpha 
Rho; Evanston, 111. 

WILLIAM G. BRADSHAW, Ph.B. 

Entered from Leo High School; Phi Mu 
Chi 1,2, 3, 4; Chicago. 

THOMAS F. BRENNAN, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Cathedral High School and 
Springfield Junior College, Springfield, 
III.; Phi Mu Chi 3, 4; Loyola Neius; So- 
dality; Knights Club, Vice-President; 
Chicago. 

JAMES E. BRENNWALD, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Loyola Academy ; Chicago. 

KEVIN V. BROWN, Ph.B. 

Entered from De La Salle High School 
and Loyola University of Los Angeles; 
Chicago. 

GEORGE W. BOWEN, JR., B.A. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Sodality; 
Cadence 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

WALLACE J. BOYLE, B.S. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Chicago. 

DONALD R. BURKE, B.S. 

Entered from St. Rita High School; Was- 
mann Biological Society 3, 4; Chicago. 

PHILBIN J. BURKE, Ph.B. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Chicago. 




^^pts ^ 



e n L o r 6 









^li^ii 




RICHARD J. CALLAHAN, Ph.B. 

Entered from University of Illinois and 
Georgetown University; Bellarmine Phil- 
osophy Society ; Oak Park, 111. 

MARK V. CAMPBELL, JR., B.S. 

Entered from Bullis Preparatory; Uni- 
versity Club 2, 3, 4 ; International Rela- 
tions Club 4; Curtain Guild 3, 4; Radio 
Workshop 4; N.F.C.C.S. 3, 4; Loyola 
News 3, 4; Track Team 1; Golf Team 1; 
Student Coach 2, 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

EUGENE F. CAPEK, Ph.B. 

Entered from Lindblom High School; Phi 
Mu Chi, Vice-President, Social Chairman; 
Chicago. 

ROBERT C. CAPRILE, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from De Paul Academy; Mono- 
gram Club, Historian ; Manager Basket- 
ball Team 4 ; Chicago. 

JOSEPH W. CARNEY, Ph.B. 

Entered from Bedford High School, Bed- 
ford, Pa. ; Spanish American Club 2, 3 ; 
Chicago. 

JOHN F. CASEY, B.S.S.S. 
Chicago. 

EDWARD L. CEDERBERG, Ph.B. 

Entered from Lane Technical High 
School ; Committee for Fulfilment Fund ; 
Chicago. 

JOHN M. CIESLEWICZ, B.S. 

Entered from South Bend Catholic High 
School and Notre Dame Universitv; Phi 
Mu Chi ; South Bend, Ind. 

FRANCIS E. CLARKE, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Alpha 
Kappa Delta 3, 4; Pi Gamma Mu, Vice- 
President 4 ; Sodality 4 ; Chicago. 

JAMES W. CLEARY, B.S. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Chemis- 
try Club 2, 3, 4; Librarian 3; Chicago. 

MALACHY F. CLEARY, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
International Relations Club, President 4 ; 
Sodality, Vice-Prefect 4 ; Chairman Re- 
gional Commission International Rela- 
tions, N.F.C.C.S.; Chicago. 

MERLE P. CLINTON, B.S. 

Entered from Crane Technical High 
School ; Chicago. 

ROBERT J. COFFEY, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Chicago. 

GREGORY A. CONNERS, B.S. 

Entered from St. Rita High School; Chi- 
cago. 

BERNARD J. CONWAY, Ph.B. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Sodality 3, 4 ; Chicago. 




Pegler says so right here 



CYRIL J. COONEY, B.S. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Phi Mu Chi ; Chicago. 

THOMAS J. CORCORAN, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from St. Leo High School and 
John Carroll University; Chicago. 

JOSEPH P. COTTER, Ph.B. 

Entered from St. Leo 
Chicago. 



High School; 



DONALD T. COUGHLAN, Ph.B. 

Entered from St. Leo High School; 
Chicago. 

JAMES C. COX, Ph.B. 

Entered from Immaculate Conception 
High School, Elmhurst, 111. ; Cadence, Re- 
view Editor 3, Copy Editor 4; Evanston, 
111. 

EDWARD J. DAWSON, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from St. Leo High School; Bas- 
ketball Team 1, 2, 3, 4; University Club; 
Monogram Club; Glee Club; Chicago. 

PHILIP J. DELAHUNT, B.S. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Chicago. 

EDWARD L. DEL BECCARO, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Austin High School; Intra- 
murals ; Union Congressman, Social Com- 
mittee of Union, Social Chairman; Was- 
mann Society; Chicago. 

JOHN D. DeLONG, Ph.B. 

Entered from Quigley Preparatory School, 
University of Utah, and Illinois Institute 
of Technology; Chicago. 

ERWIN J. DLOTKOWSKI, B.S. 

Entered from Thomas Kelly High School; 
Sodality 2 ; Chicago. 

FREDERIC D. DONNELLY, Ph.B. 

Entered from St. George High School; 
Debating 1 ; Chicago. 

ROBERT E. DONNELLY, Ph.B. 

Entered from Mt. Carmel High School; 
Knights Club 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

ERWIN G. DORAN, B.S. 

Entered from Harrison High School; 
Chicago. 

THOMAS A. DOYLE, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Wilson Junior College; 
R.O.T.C; Alpha Kappa Delta; Chicago. 

RICHARD J. DRISCOLL, B.S. 

Entered from Immaculate Conception 
High School, Elmhurst, 111. ; Elmhurst, 111. 




Not that one — I'll friiinp it 





^^P^^PM^ flr^^'^^ ^^MlF'-^ 



/*r.V 











JAMES J. DUFFIN, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Lo)joIa Neios 3, 4 ; Cadence 3, 4 ; Loyolan 
4; Glee Club 1, 2; International Relations 
Club 4 ; Chicago. 

JAMES H. DUFFY, ^.S. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Phi Mu 
Chi 2, 3, 4 ; Chemistry Club 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

THOMAS L. DUFFY, B.S. 

Entered from St. Rita High School and 
University of Illinois ; Chemistry Club 3, 
4 ; Blue Island, 111. 

WILLIAM J. DUNN, A.B. 

Entered from Fenwick High School ; 
Alpha Delta Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4; I-M 
Board 2, 3, 4 ; Oak Park, III. 

ROBERT L. DUNNE, B.S. 

Entered from Fenwick High School; 
Alpha Delta Gamma; International Rela- 
tions Club 4 ; Swimming Team 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Captain 3, 4; Monogram Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Oak Park, 111. 

BASIL DZUGAN, Ph.B. 

Entered from Crane Technical High 
School; Chicago. 

EDWIN EARLE, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Schurz High School; Bas- 
ketball Team 1, 2, 3, 4; Monogram Club 
1, 2, 3, 4 ; Track Team ; Chicago. 

JOHN P. EISINGER, B.S. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Chicago. 

ROBERT M. EISINGER, A.B. 

Entered from Quigley Preparatory Semi- 
nary and St. Mary of the Lake Seminary; 
Chicago. 

ROBERT J. EISLER, Ph.B. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Knights 
Club 3, 4; Intramurals 1, 2; Chicago. 

WAYNE L. FAULKNER, Ph.B. 

Entered from Judson High School, 
Phoenix, Ariz. ; University of Arizona ; 
Curtain Guild 2, 3, 4 ; Radio Workshop 3, 
4 ; Evanston, 111. 

JOSEPH M. FAZIO, Ph.B. 

Entered from Fenger High School and 
Morgan Park Junior College; Intramur- 
als; Chicago. 

JOHN L. FEIGH, B.S. 

Entered from Austin High School; Phi 
Mu Chi 2, 3, 4; Mass Usher 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Wasmann Biological Society 2, 3, 4; 
Chicago. 

WALTER R. FISCHER, B.S. 

Entered from Schurz High School; Was- 
mann Biological Society; Chicago. 

CHRISTOPHER J. FITZGERALD, A.B. 
Entered from Loyola Academy; Univer- 
sity Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3 ; Student 
Council 4 ; Curtain Guild 3 ; Loyola News 
1, 2, 3, 4, Editor 4 ; Union Congressman 
3; Boxing 1, 2; Riverside, Conn. 



^^rts ^ 



e ni o p 6 



RICHARD J. FLANDO, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from St. Phillips High School; 
Chicago. 

JOHN J. FLYNN, JR., Ph.B. 

Entered from Quigley Preparatory Semi- 
nary; Chicago. 

WILLIAM P. FOX, B.S. 

Entered from Quigley Preparatory Semi- 
nary and St. Mary's College ; Chicago. 

WILLIAM K. FRANTA, B.S. 

Entered from Fenwick High School; Phi 
Mu Chi; Wasmann Biological Society; 
Monogram Club ; Swimming Team ; 
Cicero, 111. 

JAY N. FULLER, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Niles Township High 
School ; Pi Alpha Lamba ; Intramural 
Board; Loyola Neivs; Skokie, 111. 

PAUL E. FUNCK. B.S. 

Entered from Kelvyn Park High School; 
Wasmann Biological Society; Psychologi- 
cal Research Society; Chicago. 

STAN A. GAJEWICZ, B.S. 

Entered from Weber High School; Phi 
Mu Chi ; Chicago. 

EDWARD G. GARZONI, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Austin High School; Phi 
Mu Chi ; Chicago. 

OLIVER J. GAUDETTE, B.S. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School, 
University of Illinois, and Bradley Univer- 
sity; Chicago. 

FRANCIS R. GAUER, B.S. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Chemis- 
try Club; Psychological Club; Sodality; 
Chicago. 

HOWARD W. GEORGE, JR., Ph.B. 

Entered from Marmion Military Acad- 
emy; Chicago. 

EDMUND A. GODULA, B.S. 

Sigma Pi Alpha; Debating Society; Was- 
mann Biological Society; Philarets; 
N.S.A. ; Union Delegate ; Chicago. 

DELBERT F. GOEBEL, B.S. 

Entered from Washington Park High 
School ; Racine, Wise. 

ADOLPHUS N. GORDON, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Central Y.M.C.A. High 
School; Psychological Society; Young 
Democrats Club; Catholic Interracial 
Club; International Relations Club; Chi- 
cago. 








\ i. M 



.^Afrtd ^. 



e n L o p d 



flD^ O ^ 




LEONARD F. GOYKE, B.S. 

Loyola Choral Society; Chemistry Club; 
Chicago. 

DONALD J. GRAY, Ph.B. 

Entered from St. Gregory High School; 

Chicago. 
JOHN A. GRAY, B.S. 

Entered from Trinity High School, Bloom- 

ington, 111. ; Loyola Choral Society, Pre.si- 

dent 3 ; Chicago. 
VICTOR E. GRECO, B.A. 

Entered from McKinley High School; 

Chicago. 
CHARLES A. GREENSTEIN, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Lane Technical High 

School; Loyola Bowling Team, Captain 3, 

Manager 4 ; Monogram Club 4 ; Loyola 

Neivs 3, 4; Wasmann Biological Society 

2 ; Chicago. 
CHARLES J. GRIES, Ph.B. 

Entered from Loyola Academy and U.S. 

Naval Academy; Loyola Neivs 2, 3, 4; 

Cadence 2, 3, 4; Sodality 1, 3, 4; Curtain 

Guild 2, 3, 4; N.F.C.C.S.; Chicago. 
JOSEPH G. GROSZEK, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Crane Technical High 

School; Chicago. 
RICHARD H. HACKETT, Ph.B. 

Entered from St. Philip High School; 

Angels Intramural Team 1, 2, 3, 4; Oak 

Park, 111. 
ROBERT M. HACKETT, Ph.B. 

Entered from St. Philip High School; 

Oak Park, 111. 
THOMAS F. HACKETT, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Pi Alpha 

Lambda 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Chicago. 
GERARD E, HAPP, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Maine Township High 

School ; Park Ridge, 111. 
JOHN B, HARBAUGH, B.S. 

Entered from Leo High School ; Wasmann 

Biological Society; Chicago. 
THOMAS C. HARTNEY, B.S. 

Entered from Leo High School; Intra- 

murals 1, 2; Chairman Athletic Promo- 
tion Committee ; Loyola Union 3, 4 ; Presi- 
dent Student Council 4 ; Chicago. 
WILLIAM H. HEALY, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from St. George High School; 

Phi Alpha Lambda ; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4 ; 

Loyola Neivs 1 ; Sodality 1 ; Chicago. 
CHARLES F. HEBTING, B.S. 

Entered^-from St. George High School; 

Wasmann Biological Society 1, 2, 3, 4, 

Vice-President 4 ; Chicago. 




RICHARD H. MECKEL, B.S. 

Entered from St. Philip High School ; Phi 
Mu Chi 2, 3, 4, President 4, Recording 
Secretary 2 ; Chicago. 

JOHN J. HEFFERREN, B.S. 

Entered from De La Salle High School ; 
Chemistry Club 1, 2, 3, 4; International 
Relations Club 4 ; Chicago. 

DAVID A. HENNESSY. JR., Pli.H. 

Entered from St. Leo High School ; 
Chicago. 

MARTIN K. HENSLEE, Ph.B. 

Entered from Loyola Academy ; Evanston, 
111. 

ARTHUR J. HILDEBRAND, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from De Paul Academy; Basket- 
ball Team 1, 2, 3, 4; Monogram Club 2, 
3, 4 ; Chicago. 

JOHN E. HILL, B.S. 

Entered from Lakeview High School; 
Chicago. 

JOSEPH R. HLAVIN, JR.. B.S.S.S. 

Entered from St. Mel's High School, Mor- 
ton Junior College; Track Team 3, 4; 
Monogram Club 3, 4 ; Cicero, 111. 

NORMAN E. HOFFMAN, B.S. 

Entered from De Paul Academy ; Sigma Pi 
Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; Wasmann Biological So- 
ciety 1, 2; Chemistry Club 2, 3, 4; Union 
Congressman 1, 4; Chicago. 

JOHN W. HOLTON, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from St. Michael High School; 
International Relations Club 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

JOHN R. HORAN, B.S. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4 ; International Rela- 
tions Club 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Club 1; 
N.F.C.C.S. 3, 4; Mary's Hour Chairman 4; 
Chicago. 

THOMAS P. HORAN, Ph.B. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School ; 
Chicago. 

JOHN P. HOULIHAN, Ph.B. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Chicago. 

PETER J. HOY, B.S. 

Entered from St. Mel's High School ; Phi 
Mu Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; Swimming Team 1; 
Chicago. 

JOHN H. HUGHES, B.S. 

Entered from Austin High School; Chem- 
istry Club; Chicago. 

ROBERT L. HYLARD, Ph.B. 

Entered from St. Leo High School ; Uni- 
versity of Illinois ; Loyolan, Business Man- 
ager 4 ; Student Council 1, 4, Liaison Sec- 
retary 4, Vice-President 1 ; Union Dance 
Committee 3, 4 ; Curtain Guild 4 ; Athletic 
Promotion Committee 4 ; Union Congress- 
man 4; N.F.C.C.S.; Bazaar Co»Chairman 
3, 4; Loyalty Week Chairman 4; Intra- 
murals 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Chicago. 





4^1 








Which one is the pledge? 





JACK M. lACONO, B.S. 

Entered from De La Salle High School; 
Chicago. 

ROBERT C. IWANS, B.S. 

Entered from St. Mel High School and 
Wright Junior College; Chicago. 

RONALD V. JONES, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Niles Township High School 
and University of Illinois ; Psychological 
Research Society 3 ; Skokie, 111. 

EDMUND B. JOSLER, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Highland 
Park, 111. 

ROBERT J. KEARNEY, A.B. 

Entered from Campion High School; Pi 
Alpha Lambda ; Blue Key ; Beta Phi ; In- 
tramural Board; Senior Director; Loyola 
News; Curtain Guild 1, 2, 3, 4; Student 
Council; Monogram Club; Sodality; Wil- 
mette, 111. 

RAYMOND H. KEEGAN, JR., B.S. 

Entered from St. Philip High School; 
Wasmann Biological Society 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

GEORGE E. KELLEY, Ph.B. 

Entered from Loyola Academy and Spring 
Hill College; Choral Society; Chicago. 

JOHN T. KELLEY, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from St. George High School; 
Alpha Delta Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Phi Alpha 
Delta 4 ; Student Union 1 ; Student Coun- 
cil, President 2; Green Circle Club 1, 2; 
International Relations Club; Chicago. 

JAMES T. KELLY, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Du Bois High School and 
North Park Junior College ; Chicago. 

ROBERT J. KENNEDY, A.B. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Choral Society; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Chicago. 

JOHN D. KENNEY, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Sullivan High School and 
St. Norberts College; Curtain Guild 2, 3, 
4; Loyola Historical Society 4; Radio 
Workshop 3 ; Chicago. 

RICHARD E. KESHEN, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Pi Alpha 
Lambda 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Intramural Board 1, 2, 
3, 4 ; Intramurals ; Chicago. 

JOHN R. KINSELLA, B.S. 

Entered from St. George High School ; Pi 
Alpha Lambda; Evanston, 111. 

RALPH D. KLAERICH, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Sodality 1, 2 ; Mono- 
gram Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Choral Society 1, 3; 
Chicago. 

ALEXANDER J. KNITTER, Ph.B. 

Entered from Weber High School; 
Chicago. 



^^pts ^ 



e n i o r 6 



EDWARD S. KOS, B.S. 

Entered from Holy Trinity High School; 
Sigma Pi Alpha ; Chicago. 

JOHN F. KOZAK, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from St. Paul's, Daytona Beach, 
Florida ; Loyola News 1 ; Philarets Club 1 ; 
Historical Society; Korona, Fla. 

JOANNE V. KULA, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Alvernia High School and 
De Paul University; Co-Ed Club 2; So- 
dality 3 ; Psychology Society 2 ; Chicago. 

ALBERT P. KRETZ, B.S. 

Entered from St. Clement's High School; 
Beta Pi ; Blue Key ; Loyola News 1 ; Adver- 
tising Manager 3, 4 ; Wasmann Biological 
Society 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Probe 2, 3, Co-Editor 4; 
Wasmann Activities Award 4 ; Chicago. 

RICHARD L. KRAHN, Ph.B. 

Entered from Leo High School ; Chicago. 

CHARLES G. KUNZE, B.S. 

Entered from Austin High School; Was- 
mann Biological Society 2; Chemistry 1, 2; 
Psychological Society 4 ; Chicago. 

RICHARD M. KUSZYNSKI, B.S. 

Entered from Holy Trinity High School 
and Wright Junior College ; Chicago. 

RICHARD J. KVASNICKA, B.S. 

Entered from Tilden High School; Psy- 
chology Club ; Intramurals ; Cicero, 111. 

MICHAEL N. LAGATTUTA, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Waller High School; Pi 
Gamma Mu ; Queen of Most Holy Rosary 
Sodality ; Loyola Historical Society, Treas- 
urer 4 ; Pan American Club ; Intramurals ; 
Chicago. 

F. VERN LAHART, A.B. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Pi Alpha 
Lambda 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3 ; Track 
Team 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 3 ; Cross-Country 
2, 3, 4, Captain 3, 4 ; Loyola Union Record- 
ing Secretary 3 ; Loyola News 1, 2, Sports 
Editor 2; Green Circle 2; Monogram Club 
1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 1, 2; Phi Alpha Delta 
4 ; Intramurals Manager 1 ; Chicago. 

ROBERT P. LAMBERT, B.S. 

Entered from De Paul Academy; Oak 
Park, 111. 

MEDARD C. LANGE, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Weber High School; Pi 
Gamma Mu ; Alpha Kappa Delta ; Chicago. 

JOHN A. LANE, Ph.B. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Pi Alpha 
Lambda 1, 2, 3, 4; Loyola Neivs 3, 4; 
Cadence 4 ; Maroons Intramural Team 1 ; 
Chicago. 

FRED P. LAUTH, B.S. 

Entered from Austin High School; Psy- 
chology Club 3, 4 ; Undergraduate Honors 
Certificate 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

WILLIAM J. LaVEZZORIO, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Georgetown University ; Phi 
Alpha Lambda; Evanston, 111. 







^- f^'O 




^Afrts ^ 



e n I o r 6 




THOMAS M. LEAHY, A.B. 

Entered from New Trier High School; 
Sodality 2 ; Intramurals 2, 3 ; Glencoe, 111. 

GUIDO D. LENARDO, B.S. 

Entered from Joliet Catholic High School ; 
Chicago. 

CHARLES F. LESCHER, B.S.N.S. 

Entered from Crane Technical High 
School, St. Mary's College ; Wasmann Bio- 
logical Society ; Intramurals ; River Forest, 
111. 

ROBERT A. LIEBELT, B.S. 

Entered from Schurz High School and 
Wright Junior College; Wasmann Bio- 
logical Society 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

ROBERT H. LINS, Ph.B. 

Entered from Maine Township High 
School, Northwestern University; Park 
Ridge, 111. 

THOMAS F. LOCKIE, Ph.B. 

Entered from University High School, 
Bloomington, Ind. ; Phi Mu Chi 1, 2, 3, 4 ; 
Wasmann Biological Society 1, 2, 3, 4 ; 
Chicago. 

VICTOR A. LOUHIOS, B.S. 

Entered from Greek Gymnasium, Cyprus; 
Famagusta, Cyprus. 

ROBERT 0. LUHR, B.S. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Chicago. 

ALAN w. McCarthy, piuB. 

Entered from Lovola Academy; Chicago. 

JAMES J. McCarthy, ph.b. 

Entered from St. Mel's High School; 
Loyola News 1, 3, 4; Curtain Guild 2, 3, 
4 ; Debating 2, 3 ; International Relations 
Club 3, 4; Chicago. 
RAYMOND J. McCarthy, jr., B.S.S.S. 
Entered from St. Leo High School ; Alpha 
Delta Gamma 2, 3, 4; International Rela- 
tions Club 3, 4 ; Wasmann Biological So- 
ciety 3; Student Leadership Certificate 3, 
Chicago. 

JOHN J. McCORMACK, B.S. 

Entered from St. Rita High School, Mar- 
quette University; Chicago. 

WILLIAM McCREARY. B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Mt. Carmel ; Chicago. 

WALTER McDUFFY, JR., B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Du Sable High School, 
North Park College; Chicago. 
CHARLES J. McGOWAN, A.B. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Pi Alpha 
Lambda 1, 2, 3, 4; Loyola Neivs 1, 3, 4; 
Senior Delegate N.F.C.C.S.; Regional 
President N.F.C.C.S. 4 ; International Re- 
lations Club 3, 4 ; Chicago. 




The answer's right here in the back 



DONALD W. McGRATH, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Hirsch High School; Chi- 
cago. 

ROBERT E. McGRATH, A.B. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Alpha Delta Gamma, President 4 ; So- 
dality 1, 2 ; International Relations Club 3, 
4 ; Intramural Board ; Chicago. 

DANIEL W. McINTYRE, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Pi Alpha 
Lambda ; Chicago. 

ALAN E. McKEOUGH, JR., B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Lovola Academy; Basket- 
ball 1, 2; Monogram Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Schol- 
astic Honors 1 ; Chicago. 

JOHN F. McMANUS, A.B. 

Entered from Quigley Preparatory Sem- 
inary ; Math Club ; Intramurals ; Oak Park, 
111. 

WILLIAM F. McNALLY, B.S. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
German Club 2 ; Chicago. 

WILLIAM G. McNULTY, JR., Ph.B. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Chicago. 

NAT P. McPARLAND, B.S. 

Entered from Foreman High School and 
Louisiana State University; Chicago. 

RONALD B. MACK, B.S. 

Entered from Senn High School ; Was- 
mann Biological Society, Wasmann Key 
Award; Co-Editor of "Probe"; Cadence 4; 
Chicago. 

JAMES MAHER, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Chicago. 
WILLIAM J. MALLERS, B.S.S.S. 

Alpha Delta Gamma 2, 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

ROBERT C. MAMOSER, B.S. 

Entered from St. Gregory High School; 
Chemistry Club 1, 2; Chicago. 

EDWARD P. MARBACH, B.S. 

Entered from Spalding High School; 
Lambda Chi Sigma; University Club; 
Union Congressman; Chemistry Club; 
Chicago. 

JOHN E. MARGUERITE, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Loyola Academy and 
Georgetown University ; Pi Alpha Lambda 
3, 4 ; Evanston, 111. 




There's one in every crowd 





ANTHONY V. MANZA, Ph.B. 

Entered from De La Salle High School; 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Sodality 4; Chicago. 

EUGENE L. MITCHELL, JR., B.S.S.S. 
Entered from Loyola Academy; Pi Alpha 
Lambda ; Chicago. 

JAMES F. MOORE, Ph.B. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Pi Alpha 
Lambda; Student Council; Intramural 
Board; Green Circle, President; Loyola 
News; Union Congress; N.F.C.C.S. ; 
Chicago. 

KEVIN P. MULHERN, A.B. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School 
and St. Xavier University; Student Union 
President 4 ; Sodality 1,3; Prefect 4 ; Bas- 
ketball 1; Student Council 3, 4; Sodality 
Award 4; N.F.C.C.S.; University Club i, 
3, Officer 4 ; Knights' Club 4 ; Chicago. 

WALTER D. MULLALLY, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Bloom Township High 
School; University Club 2, 3, 4; Sodality 
4. 

LENORE L MULVIHILL, Ph.B. 

Entered from Mundelein College ; Sodality 
3, 4 ; Co-Ed Club, Secretary 3, 4 ; Psycho- 
logical Research Society 4 ; Chicago. 

THOMAS J. MURPHY, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Campion Jesuit High School 
and John Carroll University ; Chicago. 

GEORGE P. MYLES, Ph.B. ' 

Entered from Taft High School and 
Wright Junior College; Chicago. 

LEONARD B. NEIL, Ph.B. 

Entered from Aldrich (Mo.) High School; 
Chicago. 

DONALD G. O'BRIEN, Ph.B. 

Entered from St. Mary's High School; 
Chicago. 

RICHARD J. OBROCHTA, B.S. 

Loyola Neivs 1; Sodahty 2; Psychology 
Club 2 ; Rifle Club 1 ; Chicago. 

ROBERT J. O'CONNELL, Ph.B. 

Entered from Quigley Preparatory Sem- 
inary ; Cadence 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

LOUISE M. O'DONNELL, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Aquinas Dominican High 
School and De Paul University; Sodality 
3; Co-Ed Club 3, 4; Chicago. 

THOMAS M. O'FARRELL, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Mt. Carmel High School; 
Young Democrats 3; Psychology Club 4; 
Chicago. 

JOHN C. O'GORMAN, B.S. 

Entered from Tilden Technical High 
School and De Paul University; German 
Club; Der Turm Verein 2, 3, 4; Psycho- 
logical Research Society 2, 3, 4; Chicago. 



^J^pts ^ 



e n i o r 6 



JOHN D. O'MALLEY, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from St. Thomas Military Acad- 
emy; German Club 2, 3, 4; Sodality 2, 4; 
Chicago. 

CHARLES J. OWENS, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Loyola Academy and 
Georgetown University; Sodality 1, 2; 
Chicago. 

JAMES V. PACILIO, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Foreman High School ; So- 
dality; President of Loyola Historical 
Society; Loyola News; Secretary Pan 
American Club; Intramurals; Under- 
graduate Honor Certificate; Chicago. 

ARTHUR J. PANKAU, JR., Ph.B. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Chicago. 

ALFRED PEDERSEN, Ph.B. 

Entered from St. Gregory High School; 
Chicago. 

GORDON G. PENDER, Ph.B. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School ; 
Alpha Delta Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4; Sodality 3, 
4 ; Economics Club 3, 4 ; Intramurals 4 ; 
Greek Culture Club 4 ; Chicago. 

DANIEL A. PERRITT, Ph.B. 

Entered from St. George High School and 
the University of Illinois ; University Club 
3, 4; Chicago. 

HERBERT G. PERSIL, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Lakeview High School and 
Wright Junior College; Sodality; Glee 
Club; Choral Society; Radio Workshop; 
Der Turm Verein ; Chicago. 

FRANK R. PETLAK, B.S. 

Entered from Crane Technical High 
School, Wright Junior College, and Herzl 
Junior College; Chicago. 

JOHN L. PICCHIETTI, B.S. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School ; 
Alpha Delta Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Wasmann 
Biological Society 3, 4; President Senior 
Class; Vice-President Student Council 4; 
Chicago. 

EDWARD D. PODOLINSKY, B.S.S.S. 
Chicago. 

RICHARD C. PORTEE, Ph.B. 

Entered from Community High School, 
Carrier Mills, 111. ; Sodahty 4 ; Chicago. 

JOSEPH A. PRITSCHER, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from St. George High School; 
Pi Alpha Lambda ; Chicago. 

FRANCIS H. QUINN, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Chicago. 

JOHN R. QUINN, Ph.B. 

Entered from Mt. Carmel High School; 
Chicago. 
















4ft ^H 



^Atrtd ^ 



e n L o r 6 




JOHN L. REPETTO, B.S. 

Entered from Fournier Institute; Phi Mu 
Chi; Knights' Club; Chicago. 

ROBERT G. REYNOLDS, B.S. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Chicago. 

EDWARD J. RINK, B.S. 

Entered from Crane Technical High 
School; Chicago. 

HILARY J. ROGERS, JR., B.S. 

Entered from Waller High School; Psy- 
chological Research Society 3, 4; Chicago. 

FRANCIS P. ROLFES, A.B. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Pi Alpha 
Lambda 1, 2, 3," 4; Loyola News 2, 3; 
Cadence 2, 3; Chicago. 

ROBERT J. ROLLER, B.S. 

Oak Park, 111. 

JAMES W. ROTTMAN, B.S. 

Entered from St. Michaels High School ; 
Chicago. 

ROBERT W. RUTKOWSKI, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Holy Trinity High School; 
Chicago. 

MICHAEL L. RUANE, B.S. 

Entered from St. Philip High School; 
Chicago. 

GENEVIEVE M. RUSSELL, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Loretto High School and 
the University of Illinois; Co-Ed Club 4; 
Sodality 3, 4 ; Historical Society 4 ; Catho- 
lic Interracial Council ; Chicago. 

THOMAS E. RYAN, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from St. George High School; 
Pi Alpha Lambda 1, 2, 3, President 4; 
Loyola Neics 1, 2, 3, 4; Loyolan, Sports 
Editor 4 ; Choral Society 2, 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

WILLIAM A. RYAN, A.B. 

Entered from Quigley Preparatory Semi- 
nary and St. Mary of the Lake ; Oak Park, 
III. 

RICHARD J. SAIGH. B.S.S.S. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School ; 
Sigma Lambda Beta ; Intramurals ; 
Chicago. 

RODERICK C. SALACH, B.S. 

Entered from Steinmetz High School; Phi 
MuChi2, 3, 4;Chicago. 

JOSEPH P. SANCULIUS, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Kankakee High School, Uni- 
versity of Notre Dame and the University 
of Illinois ; Psychological Research Society 
3, 4 ; Spanish Club 3 ; Kankakee, 111. 




JAMES K. SCANLON, B.S. 

Entered from St. Philip High School and 
St. Bade College; Chemistry Club 3, 4; 
Chicago. 

PETER P. SCHILLACI, Ph.B. 

Entered from Schurz High School, Uni- 
versity of niinois, Wright Junior College 
and Michigan State College ; Sodality 2 
Rifle Club, President; Choral Society 1, 2 
Chicago. 

JOSEPH J. SCHMITZ, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from New Trier High School; 
Choral Society 3, 4 ; Wilmette, 111. 

OSCAR A. SCHNETZER, B.S. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Pi Alpha 
Lambda; Basketball 1, 2; Chicago. 

ROBERT E. SCHNETZER, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Pi Alpha 
Lambda 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball Manager 1, 
2, 3; Chicago. 

THOMAS R. SCHULTZ, B.S. 

Entered from Loyola Academy ; Chicago. 

FRANK J. SCHONTA, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from St. Philip High School; 
Sodality 2, 3, 4 ; Loyola Ne^vs 3 ; Chicago. 

ROBERT C. SCHWEIK, Ph.B. 

Entered from St. Mel High School ; Debate 
Team; Economics Club; Sodality; Chicago. 

ROBERT R. SHEEHAN, B.S. 

Entered from St. Philip High School; 
Wasmann Biological Society 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Treasurer 3 ; Chicago. 

RICHARD T. SIKES, A.B. 

Entered from Fenwick High School ; Uni- 
versity Club 3, 4 ; Loyola Netvs 3, 4 ; Cur- 
tain Guild 2, 3, 4; Psychological Research 
Society 3 ; Bellarmine Philosophy Club 3, 
4; Chicago. 

ROBERT L. SIMONIS, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Central Catholic High 
School and St. Joseph's College; Chicago. 

JEROME P. SLATTERY, B.S. 

Entered from Loyola Academy ; University 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Cross Country Track 1 ; In- 
tramural Team Captain 3 ; Chicago. 

GLENN C. SMITH, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Austin High School and 
University of Nebraska ; Choral Society 3, 
4; Chicago. 

MICHAEL P. SPATZ, Ph.B. 

Entered from Quigley Preparatory Semi- 
nary; Chicago. 

RICHARD J. STANEK, B.S. 

Entered from Oak Park High School ; Glee 
Club, Secretary 2, Treasurer 3 ; Psycho- 
logical Society, Vice-President 3 ; Pi Gam- 
ma Mu 3, 4 ; Oak Park, 111. 



f^*^T' ^^^ i^mm^ 








Twa Bonnie Laddies 




am *» 



0'^ 





CARL J. STERK, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Phi Mu Chi 2, 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

DANIEL J. SULLIVAN, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Cicero, 111. 

FRANCIS .1. SULLIVAN, JR., A.B. 

Entered from Loyola Academy and 
Georgetown University; International Re- 
lations Club 4 ; Intramural Football 2, 3, 
4 ; Dramatics 2 ; Chicago. 

HAROLD E. SULLIVAN, A.B. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Intra- 
mural Handball Runner-up 1, 2 ; Wilmette, 
111. 

GEORGE B. SWIFT, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from New Trier Township High 
School ; Wilmette, 111. 

HENRY J. TABAK, Ph.B. 

Entered from Lewis High School, Lock- 
port, 111. ; Pi Gamma Mu ; Sodality 2, 8, 4 ; 
Loyola Historical Society 3, 4; Curtain 
Guild 2; Philarets Club 3, 4; Choral So- 
ciety 4 ; Knights' Club 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

JOHN E. TAYLOR, B.S. 

Entered from Harrison Technical High 
School ; Loyola Choral Society, Vice-Presi- 
dent 1, 2, 3 ; Loyola Union 2 ; Wasmann 
Biological Society 4 ; Maywood, 111. 

MICHAEL A. TENORE, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Crane Technical High 
School; Queen of the Most Holy Rosary, 
Executive Secretary 2, 3 ; Chicago. 

GIACOMO M. TESTA, B.S. 

Entered from Junior College of Connecti- 
cut; Phi Mu Chi; Bridgeport, Conn. 

LEONARD P. TOBIASKI, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Waller High School; Intra- 
murals 1, 2, 3 ; Chicago. 

THOMAS R. TROMAN, A.B. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Univer- 
sity Club 2, 3, 4 ; Phi Alpha Rho 4 ; Inter- 
national Relations Club 2, 3 ; Intramurals 
1, 2, 3 ; Debating 3 ; Chicago. 

JOHN J. TURCHAN, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Austin High School ; Cicero, 
111. 

MATTHEW V. TURNER, B.S. 

Entered from Morgan High School and the 
University of Colorado; Chicago. 

ANNE M. TURVEY, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Sacred Heart Academy and 
St. Xavier College; Co-Ed Club; Sodality; 
Psychological Research Society; Chicago. 



^^rts ^ 



e ni o p S 



CHARLES VAN WISSINK, Ph.B. 

Entered from De La Salle High School and 
Wright Junior College; Chicago. 

JAMES F. WADE, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Loyola 
News 3, 4; Chicago. 

MARGARET J. WAGNER, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Immaculata High School 
and De Paul University; Pi Gamma Mu; 
Chicago. 

EDMOND J. WALSH, JR., Ph.B. 

Entered from St. Rita High School ; Loyola 
News 2, 3, 4; University Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Wasmann Biological Society 1, 2; Curtain 
Guild 3, 4; Bellarmine Society 3, 4; 
Chicago. 

LAWRENCE A, WATSON, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Tekoa High School, Tekoa, 
Wash. ; Northwestern University and De 
Paul University; Psychological Research 
Society, Secretary 4; Chicago. 

JAMES H. WEIXEL, Ph.B. 

Entered from De Paul Academy ; Chicago. 

JOHN A. WERR, A.B. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Chicago. 

SYDNEY B. WHEELER, JR., Ph.B. 

Chicago. 

OLIVER H. WHETSTONE, B.S. 

Entered from Maine Township High 
School and Maine Junior College; Was- 
mann Biological Society; Des Plaines, 111. 

JOSEPH L. WILEY, A.B. 

Entered from De La Salle High School; 
Chicago. 

FRANCIS J. WILLIAMS, A.B. 

Entered from St. Columban's High School 
and St. Columban's College; Psychological 
Research Society; Sodality; Chicago. 

WILLIAM J. WINGER, Ph.B. 

Entered from De La Salle High School; 
German Club; Chicago. 

MARVIN WOOLF, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Von Steuben High School 
and Northwestern University; Pi Gamma 
Mu; Chicago. 

DONALD A, YARASHUS, B.S. 

Entered from Morton High School ; Phi 
Mu Chi 2, 3, 4; Wasmann Biological So- 
ciety 1, 2, 3 ; Cicero, 111. 

HERMAN G. ZANDER, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Lane Technical High 
School; Chicago. 




I ^ J. 'P-* J ' ' ^ J 








^Jii^ts ^ 



e n i o r d 




FRANK 0. ZIDEK, B.S. 

Entered from St. Philip High School; 
Chicago. 

DONALD J. ZITNIK, B.A. 

Entered from Fenwick High School; 
Berwyn, 111. 

GEORGE T. FEHRENBACHER, B.S. 

Entered from Joliet High School; Joliet, 
111. 

JOHN H. HELLER, B.S. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Univer- 
sity Club 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

JOHN F. KOZAK, B.S. 

Chicago. 

JOHN MARGUERITE, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Pi Alpha 
Lambda 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Evanston, 111. 

LEONARD G. O'CONNOR, B.S. 

Entered from Lovola Academy; Phi Mu 
Chi 2, 3, 4 ; Chicago. 





84 



^^rts l/lndercic 




FRESHMEN 
LAKE SHORE 
Seated: Bosco, Beyerlein, 
Carney, Carmody, Cala- 
brese, Falasz, Burke, 
Charlebois. Second Row: 
Casserly, Festle. Bertaut, 
BichI, Bocchieri, Blanch- 
ette, Bruno, Fox. Third 
Row: Brodie, Bowman. 
Bodinet, Considine. Alfini. 
Allen, Blais, Bahnmaier. 



FRESHMEN 
LAKE SHORE 
Seated: Dougherty. Fin- 
neran, D e t I e v, Fiegel, 
Bartlett, Donzelli, Fitz- 
gerald, Anderson. Second 
Row: Fox, F a r n h a m, 
Downes, Foster, Denigan, 
Disselhorst, Drews, But- 
ler. Third Row: Doherty, 
Drazba, Esposito, Drech- 
ney, DlSilvestro, Cronin, 
DiBenedetto, Davis, Eb- 



FRESHMEN 
LAKE SHORE 
Seated: Gazzolo, Hanra- 
han, Hunter, Jojce, Izban, 
Kannenberg, Galbraith, 
Grubba. Second Row: 
Kapelanski, Higgins, 
Groark, Hannan, Hanni- 
gan. Hill, Healy, Foley, 
Geringer. Fitzpatrick. 
Third Row: Hailing, Ka- 
bat, Hasterok, Holecek, 
Goodman, Heinzen, Healy, 
Graff, Joyce, Hagan. 



FRESHMEN 
LAKE SHORE 
Seated: Haynes, Miarka, 
Lemmer, Maglietta, Min- 
ster, LeFevour, Kordas. 
Second Row: Mahony, Le- 
vernier, Kuhn, Loritz, Ma- 
jeske, Koulback, Lynch. 
Third Row: Lies, Mason, 
Madro, Krajewski, Law, 
Keller, Michals, Mannina, 
Powers. 



85 



^J^pts Vint 



FRESHMEN 
LAKE SHORE 
Seated: 3Iurphy, Newton, 
Prystalski, Sampson, Mur- 
phy, Moran, O'Shea, Gro- 
gan. Second Row: Romano, 
McGonagle, Niego, 

O 'Grady, .McDonougli, 
Ryan, Rowan, McCabe, 
Newman. Third Row: Par- 
adise, Principe, Mueller, 
Quinn, Plowman, Polilacl<i, 
McGratli, Novak, Rosinia, 
Rathnau. 



FRESHMEN 
LAKE SHORE 
Seated: Tomaselli, Sibert, 
O'Connor, Tye, Walker, 
Simmons, Sanford, Stack, 
Wanucha. Second Row: 
Trumm, Sharkey, Solinski, 
Napiorkowske, Schwab, 
Spatafora, Szymanski, 
Sienkiewicz, Wiley. Third 
Row: Tufo, Wray, Shields, 
Sweeney, Szczepaniak, 
Schugt, Sullivan, Shana- 
han, Smentck, Sepanski, 
Stepke, Sexton, Wegnet. 



FRESHMEN 
LEWIS TOWERS 
Seated: Bednark, Andries, 
Flynn, Boland, Cozzi, 
Bilek, Catanese. Second 
Row: Gorski, Hultquist, 
Anast, Casner, Flanagan, 
Matern, Cronin, Allen, 
Jennings, Kosmach, 
Clever. 



- V 



^.»^^ ^' ^ -^~ c 



FRESHMEN 
LEWIS TOWERS 
Seated: Nickel, Cook, Si- 
munich, Krause, Hartlieb, 
Fitzpatrick, Metelko, Vig- 
nola. Second Row: Arnett, 
Huck, Suker, Hopp, Regel- 
brugge, Morrin, Shell, 
Hennessy, Flanagan. Third 
Row: Bolthazar, Kranz, 
Boffa, Gray, Soltan, Car- 
reras, Grace, Royer. 






O ^ ^A ^ ^ r^ n ^ 




FRESHMEN 
LEWIS TOWERS 
Seated: nziedzic, Faucher, 
Baschieri, Rybski, Crane, 
Bondi, Bunning, Slavicek. 
Second Row: Brady, Lib- 
erty, Skepnek, Fordney, 
Duffy, Most, Butler, Han- 
na, Dooley, McLaughlin. 



SOPHOMORES 
LAKE SHORE 
Seated: Catalano, Citko, 
Connaughton, Corrado, 

Corzoran, Balke, Abbs, 
Cox, Anderson. Second 
Row: Callaghan, Burns, 
Clauser, Brennan, Clarke, 
Brierty, Annis, Cella, Bou- 
gearel. Third Row: Buck- 
ley, Bauer, Butler, Conroy, 
Adrana, Brennan, Breen, 
Brufke, Carpenter, Brost, 
Clutteri. 



SOPHOMORES 
LAKE SHORE 
Seated: Cullinan, Dhein, 
Pascolinski, Fitzgerald, 

Finch, Dunne, Golden, 
Eisenberg, Driscoll. Sec- 
ond Row: Di Frisco, Duffy, 
Dunn, Downey, Flannery, 
Dunne, Filipek, Dittrich, 
Cunningham, Dollinger. 
Third Row: Creech, Feld- 
mann, Fitz, Ermatinger, 
Conmy, Depka, Grace, 
Duffy, Fiedler, Formeller, 
Dolan, Duffek, Gostomski. 



SOPHOMORES 
LAKE SHORE 
Seated: Kaszynski, Han- 
sen, K i r r i n, Whimple, 
Flieghty, Skimpy, Hal- 
bauer, Hoffman, Gruber. 
Second Row: Hurley, Hen- 
nenman, Karr, Hartigan, 
K r a u s e , Henneberry, 
Plocki, Jakrzewski, Lane. 
Third Row: Jaye, Klob, 
Kazmer, Guenther, Ketch- 
an. Baker, Hogan, Kapela, 
Grochowina, Herbert, 

Kroll, Kliger. 



87 



SOPHOMORES 
LAKE SHORE 
Seated: Larsen, Lund, 
Marotta, O'Connor, Lud- 
wig, Meccia, Nachowicz, 
Lee, Nicosia. Second Row: 
Lyons, O'Brien, McGrath, 
Nagler, Lestina, Lehr, 
Oakev, Langenbach, Lesch. 
Third Row: .Alilani, Navin, 
Milnamow, Miller, Schaid, 
Rooney, Letourneaux, Min- 
ucciani, Lehman, May, 
Neveril, McMahon, Lu- 
janac. 



SOPHOMORES 
LAKE SHORE 
Seated: Snurpus, Wagner, 
O'Neill, Wnorowski, Roll- 
ing, Skibbens, Storino. 
Second Row: Tarczynski, 
Skaja, Skridulis, Steerman, 
Rickard, Petersen, Wie- 
land. Third Row: Vainisi, 
Scholtes, Zuckerman, Ziul- 
kowski, Wisowatj', Sega- 
peli, Williams, Pedi, 
Vitullo. 



SOPHOMORES 
LEWIS TOWERS 
Seated: Cogan, Cibula, 
Hollerbach, Cleary, Burg- 
graf. Price, Principe, Mc- 
Donough. Second Row: 
Majewski, LaRocco, Fitz- 
gerald, Kapsa, Niemeyer, 
Duggan, Mahoney, Mad- 
den, DeLave, Anderson, 
Bruska. Third Row: 
Philipps, Ruff, O'Neill, Lis, 
LaGrippe, Parker, Geratv, 
Grant, Trybek, McTague. " 



SOPHOMORES 
LEWLS TOWERS 
Seated: Passarelli, Fisch- 
er, Philleo, Noor, KodI, 
Kennedy, Kelley, Mangier. 
Second Row: Sheen, Hein- 
rich, Simpson, Purcell, 
Ballinger, Kingsbury, 
Power, Pierotti, Lecuyer. 







88 





SOPHOMORES 
LEWIS TOWERS 
Seated: S p 1 o n, Grens, 
Kohnke, Cassaretto, Gro- 
gan, Spietz, Cleary. Sec- 
ond Row: Rolewicz, Shea- 
han, Trykowski, Pospiech, 
Yancey, Roth, Sadecki, 
Testin, Ryan. Third Row: 
Freel, Lemm, Wachter, 
Philleo, Wenzel, Skeffing- 
ton, Lucas, Werr, Swiess. 



JUNIORS 
LAKE SHORE 
Seated: Andringa, Arma- 
mentos, Adihoch, Bydalek, 
Christensen, Buxbaum, 

Finch, Anderson. Second 
Row: Bufford, Clarke, 
Burke, Cahill, Bilek, Cody, 
Condron, Begg, Andrejew- 
ski. Third Row: Andrews, 
Borkowski, Brgusch, Biel- 
awski, Conrardy, Bona, 
Cook, Corrigan, Hut- 
macher, Conway, Conway. 



JUNIORS 
LAKE SHORE 
Seated: Gerules, Devery, 
Collins, Foley, Cummings, 
Doll, Dwyer, Germann. 
Second Row: Jones, Dug- 
gan, Ellison, Gibson, Er- 
bach, Glynn, Denten, Cris- 
anti, Bradshaw. Third 
Row: Cunningham, Cos- 
Erbach, Driscoll, 
Gorny, Gibbons, 
Gillespie, Farley, 



tello, 
Daley, 
Glunz, 
Foran. 



JUNIORS 
LAKE SHORE 
Seated: Indouina, Healey, 
Jozwiak, Hazard, Jankow- 
ski, Haberle, Keck, Kem- 
per. Second Row: Hopfer, 
Grimes, Klinger, Harvey, 
Johnson, Hangsterfer, 
Kollintzas, Jekot. Third 
Row: J a k a 1 a, Janesz, 
Janusz, Heckel, Kennedy, 
Harris, Henncssy, Hackler, 
Hirota, Hackler. 



89 



^^rts l//nd 



LAKE SHORE 
Seated: Marzec, McKier- 
nan, Lehner, Norris, Le- 
gere, Lavin, McGuinness. 
Second Row: Marotta, 
Lombardo, Murphy, Lam- 
brecht. Lawless, McMahon, 
McDonald. Third Row: 
Leone, Lyons, Nolan, 
Lippe, Kubina, Madaj, 
Mattioda. 



LAKE SHORE 
Seated: Setze, Schumann, 
Szarmack, Smith, Scanlon, 
Pordugal, Tobin, Ryan. 
Second Row: Scahill, Ochs, 
Scorby, Parker, Perham, 
Nowicki, Scotese, Scar- 
pelli. Third Row: Shannon, 
R e V e t h i s, McGinnis, 
Omori, Pignatiello, Var- 
illa. Welter, Maher, 
Picard. 



LEWIS TOWERS 
Seated: Denemark, Dom- 
browski, Moore, Carey, 
Anderson, Kennedy, Spatz, 
Parro, Kvapil. Second 
Row: Dwyer, Kiedaisch, 
Kingsley, Kazek, Hechin- 
ger. Berg, Nich, Brunski, 
Dougal, Carney, Dillon. 



LEWIS TOWERS 
Seated: McNally, McCar- 
thy, Durkin, Farrell, Car- 
lin, Merwick, Lennane, 
Mannette, Martin. Second 
Row: Quinn, Kirby, Hen- 
nessy, Patterson, Devine, 
Moloney, Sheeran, Meany, 
Marinier, Mathews, Wray. 



fell '^^ 



90 




r ci . 



ci 6 6 m e n 




LEWIS TOWERS 
Seated: Heintz, Sisson, 
Markowicz, Raczykowski, 
Pawlicki, Munro, Ready, 
Byrne. Second Row: Mur- 
ray, Potts, Sindelar, Rad- 
ziejeski, Spatz, Brennan, 
Proctor, Reynolds, Stiso, 
Mines, McCann. Third 
Row: Wydra, Vlazny, Coz- 
zola, Reynolds, Pence, Rac- 
kow, Gregory, Thometz, 
Witry, Ptak. 



LEWIS TOWERS 
Seated: Hylard, Lewis, 
Bigg, Simoni, Morrelli, 
Groin, Byrnes. Second 
Row: Tracy, Brandstrader, 
Fink, Kelly, Byrne, Ma- 
loney, Kringle, Haggerty, 
Gordon, Knats, Cahill. 





91 




.-^ 



•.V 



y 



,1. IJAYMOM) >HKi;ill' 
Dean 



NOIiUKRT J. HRl UV 
Assistant Dean 



The College of Commerce has been a 
distinct unit of Loyola University for 
twenty-eight years. In September, 1946, the 
day and evening divisions of the college 
combined operations and moved to the newly 
acquired property of the university at Lewis 
Towers. 

The College of Commerce has three 
main objectives : to provide its students with 
a thorough general education based on the 
theology, philosophy, and culture of the 
Catholic religion; to give them an adequate 
business education ; and to furnish them 
with specialized professional training in a 
field of concentration. 

Through the use of this course of study 
there is developed in the student: a basic 



Christian education; the techniques and 
skills necessary to an understanding of a 
modern business enterprise; a comprehen- 
sive knowledge of the historical development, 
the principles, and the practices of business 
institutions ; and a vocational competence on 
one area of business selected by the student 
as his special interest. 

J. Raymond Sheriff, dean of the College 
of Commerce, is well equipped to carry out 
these aforementioned aims. Professor of 
three degrees, he gained his teaching experi- 
ence at Loyola Academy and University. 
Leaving the university when the war began, 
Mr. Sheriff was director of ground training 
in an advanced pilots school in the Army Air 




COMMERCE FACULTY 
Mr. O'Leary, Mr. Meier, 
and Mr. Dwyer of the 
Commerce Faculty 



A 



(^ o 1 1 e a e of O o 



m m e r c e 



Force. After the war he became assistant 
dean of the College of Commerce under 
William H. Conley who is now dean of Uni- 
versity College. Mr. Sheriff became dean of 
the College of Commerce when Mr. Conley 
took a leave of absence for a government 
position. 

The College of Commerce has two as- 
sistant deans: Mr. Norbert Hruby for the 
day division and Mr. William W. Meyer for 
the evening division. 

The College of Commerce after several 
years of expansion in its new location now 
has a curricula embracing six fields of con- 
centration which are : accounting, economics, 
finance, management, marketing, and com- 
merce and law. 



Several clubs have been established at 
the Commerce School, and there is a larger 
membership in them each year. To name a 
few: the Marketing Club, the Economics 
Society, the Accounting Club, and the Coed 
Club. The Sodality has increased its en- 
rollment and many of its members are from 
the College of Commerce. 

The use of the first nine floors of Lewis 
Towers by Loyola is due to the Christmas 
(1945) gift of Mr. Frank J. Lewis to Loyola 
University. Mr. Lewis, trustee of the Catho- 
lic Charities of Chicago, is noted for his 
philanthropic work in the city. Other out- 
standing endowments of his are the Lewis 
Memorial Maternity Hospital and the Lewis 
School of Aeronautics. 



First Row: Roth, Heffer- 
nan, Ghinelli, Spencer, 
Tribble. Second Row: 
O'Connell, Bertog, Morris, 
Hoffman, Tuohy, Kelleher. 




93 






Annual Speaker Dinner, Sigma 
Lambda Beta 



^<^ 



-&' 



;i^»jU^ 







PAUL P. ABRAHAM, B.S.C. 

Entered fi'om State Teachers' College, 
Slippery Rock, Pa. ; Sigma Lambda Beta ; 
Pi Gamma Mu; Marketing Club; Chicago. 

DAVID J. A'HEARN, B.S.C. 

Entered from Joliet Cathohc High School ; 
Joliet, 111. 

EDWARD E. ALLENDORPH, B.S.C. 

Entered from North Park Academy and 
North Park College; Chicago. 

RICHARD E. ARMSTRONG, B.S.C. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Chicago. 

ROBERT G. ARNOLD, B.S.C. 

Entered from Niles Township High 
School, University of Illinois and Austin 
Junior College; Arlington Heights, 111. 

JOHN J. AUSTIN, B.S.C. 

Entered from De La Salle High School; 
Chicago. 

JOHN T. AYRES, B.S.C. 

Entered from Fenwick High School; So- 
dality 3, 4; Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Stu- 
dent Union Congressman 4 ; Treasurer 
Student Union 4 ; Alpha Delta Gamma ; 
Oak Park, 111. 

ROBERT H. BACK, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Gregory's High School; 
Chicago. 

DONALD E. BAILER, B.S.C. 

Entered from Senn High School; Sigma 
Lambda Beta; Chicago. 

EDWARD N. BARTH, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School ; 
Sigma Lambda Beta; Marketing Club; 
Chicago. 

LEONARD P. BEEFTINK, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. George High School and 
Wright Junior College; Economics Club; 
Marketing Club; Chicago. 

THOMAS P. BENT, B.S.C. 

Entered from Crane Technical High 
School and Ford College; Des Plaines, 111. 

PAUL J. BOEHME, B.S.C. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Univer- 
sity Club; Student Union Congressman; 
Athletic Promotion Committee; Chicago. 

RAYMOND J. BOMHACK, B.S.C. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Chicago. 

JOHN C. BOPP, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Alphonsus High School; 
Marketing Club; Chicago. 



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ROBERT BOTHFELD, B.S£. 

Entered from Amundsen High School ; 
Sigma Lambda Beta; Chicago. 

ARTHUR BOUCHARD, B.S.C. 

Entered from Mt. Carmel High School; 
Chicago. 

SERGIUS BOUDREAU, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Patrick's High School, 
Kankakee ; University of Nebraska and St. 
Joseph College; Kankakee, 111. 

HARRY BRANDSTRADER, B.S.C. 

Entered from Fenwick High School; 
Alpha Delta Gamma 1, 2, 3, Secretary 4; 
Oak Park, 111. 

JAMES L. BRENNAN, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School 
and Arkansas A. & M. College ; Chicago. 

ROBERT P. BRENNAN, B.S.C. 

Entered from Fenwick High School; In- 
tramurals 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Oak Park, 111. 

JOHN P. BRESNAHAN, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Rita High School; 
Chicago. 

TIMOTHY J. BRESNAHAN, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. George High School; 
Chicago. 

GERALD BRODERICK, B.S.C. 

Entered from Campion and Xavier Uni- 
versity; Flossmoor, 111. 

GLENN BROOKER, B.S.C. 

Entered from Fenwick High School; In- 
tramurals 2, 3, 4; Cicero, 111. 

JAMES BURNS, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Leo High School; 
Chicago. 

ANTHONY BUSCAGLIA, B.S.C. 

Entered from Austin High School; Sigma 
Lambda Beta; Union Congressman 3; 
Loyolan Staff 4 ; Chicago. 

GEORGE CAGNEY, B.S.C. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Chicago. 

JOHN CALDARULO, B.S.C. 

Entered from Fenwick High School; Oak 
Park, 111. 

JOSEPH CAMPAGNA, B.S.C. 

Entered from Fenwick High School; 
Berwyn, 111. 




C\ C) i^ 



C:.:> 




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JOHN CANTALUPO, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Mel High School; So- 
dality 1 ; Intramurals 1, 3 ; Chicago. 
EDWARD CAREY, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Leo High School ; Sigma 
Lambda Beta; Marketing Club; Chicago. 

THOMAS CARROLL, B.S.C. 

Entered from Harper High School ; Sigma 
Lambda Beta; Chicago. 

GEORGE CASHION, B.S.C. 

Entered from Lovola Academy; Univer- 
sity Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Loyolan Staff 4; 
Loyola News 1; Union Dance Committee 
4; Green Circle Club; Chicago. 

ERVIN CHOJNACKI, B.S.C. 

Entered from Mt. Carmel High School; 
Chicago. 

WILLIAM CLEARY, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Sodality 1, 2; 
Economics Club 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

ROBERT CLIFFORD, B.S.C. 

Entered from Maine Township High 
School and Quincv College; Park Ridge, 
111. 

VINCENT CLOHISY, B.S.C. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Psy- 
chological Research Society 4; Chicago. 
WILLIAM COLLINS, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Leo High School; 
Chicago. 

JOHN CONDON, B.S.C. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Intra- 
murals; Senior Dance Committee; Chi- 
cago. 

EDWARD CONWAY, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Leo High School; 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Economics Club 2, 3; 
Junior Prom Committee; Student Council 
3; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Chicago. 

EDWARD CORBETT, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. George High School; 
Chicago. 

ROBERT CORMACK, B.S.C. 

Entered from Fenwick High School and 
Loras College ; River Forest, 111. 

JOAN COSTELLO, B.S.C. 

Entered from Academy of Our 
Chicago. 



Lady; 



THOMAS COX, B.S.C. 

Entered from Immaculate Conception 
High School; Sigma Lambda Beta 3, 4; 
Intramurals ; Evanston, 111. 




WILLIAM H. CROWE, B.S.C. 

Entered from Mt. Carmel High School; 
Chicago. 

JOYCE C. DANKOWSKI, B.S.C. 

Entered from Taft High School ; Chicago. 

MAURICE G. DeGRANDE, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Chicago. 

JAMES F. DeMEULENAERE, B.S.C. 

Entered from Victor Public High School, 
Victor, Iowa ; Skokie, 111. 

SAM J. DEMKOSKL B.S.C. 

Entered from Harper High School, Uni- 
versity of Illinois and Wilson Junior 
College; Chicago. 

DONALD F. DILLON, B.S.C. 

Entered from Von Steuben High School ; 
Chicago. 

JOHN D. DiVITTORIO. B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Philip High School and 
St. Am.brose College; Chicago. 

JOSEPH B. DOLD, B.S.C. 

Entered from Cathedral High School and 
Springfield Junior College; Springfield, 111. 

HARRY N. DORSEY. B.S.C. 

Entered from St. John's High School and 
Loyola College, Baltimore, Md. ; Sodality ; 
Knights' Club; Frederick, Md. 

GEORGE B. DOYLE, B.S.C. 

Entered from Fenwick High School ; 
Marketing Club ; Oak Park, 111. 

CHARLES F. DRENNAN, B.S.C. 

Entered from Holy Family Academy; 
Bayonne, N. J. 

HELEN E. DRENNAN, B.S.C. 

Entered from Immaculata High School 
and Mundelein College; Chicago. 



GEORGE W. DUERRSTEIN, B.S.C. 

Entered from Austin High School 
Wright Junior College ; Chicago. 



and 



ROBERT M. DUNNE, JR., B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Philip High School; 
Chicago. 

LAWRENCE J. ELLGASS, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Patrick Academy and 
St. Mary's College; Economics Club; 
Chicago. 



Now the mil-line rate in the Loyola 
News is — 



These courses are required 





WILLIAM FANNING, B.S.C. 

Entered from Fenwick High School; 
Oak Park, 111. 

ROBERT FERRARINL B.S.C. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Alpha 
Delta Gamma 2, 3, 4 ; Intramurals 2, 3, 4 ; 
IM. Manager for Fraternity; Chicago. 

WILLIAM D. FINN, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Mel's High School; 
Sodality 3 ; Marketing Club 4 ; Chicago. 



WILLIAM J. FINN, B.S.C. 

Entered from Fenwick High School; 
tramurals 1, 2, 8, 4 ; River Forest, 111. 



In- 



DONALD J. FISHER, B.S.C. 

Entered from Joliet Township High 
School, Joliet Junior College, University 
of Detroit ; Joliet, 111. 

EDWARD A. FISHER, B.S.C. 

Entered from Niles Township High 
School and Universitv of Illinois; Market- 
ing Club 4 ; Skokie, 111. 

THOMAS FLACK, B.S.C. 

Park Ridge, 111. 

THOMAS FLANAGAN, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Leo High School; 
Chicago. 

JOSEPH FOGARTY, B.S.C. 

Entered from Campion ; Chicago. 

THOMAS FOLEY, B.S.C. 

Entered from Fenwick High School and 
St. Mary's College ; Chicago. 

WILLIAM FOLEY, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. George High School; Pi 
Alpha Lambda ; Chicago. 

ROBERT FORAN, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. George High School ; 
University Club; Sigma Lambda Beta, 
President 4 ; Chicago. 

MARK FORRESTAL, B.S.C. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Chicago. 

WILLIAM FORTIN, B.S.C. 

Entered from De La Salle High School; 
Chicago. 

ROBERT FRENCH, B.S.C. 

Entered from Amundsen High School; 
Sodality 4 ; Economic Society 4 ; Market- 
ing Club 4 ; Chicago. 



Co 



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e n i o r 6 



CHARLES B. FRETT, B.S.C. 

Entered from Fenwick High School and 
St. Benedict's College ; Maywood, 111. 

WILLIAM A. FULLER, B.S.C. 

Entered from Campion High School ; Win- 
netka, 111. 

ROBERT P. GARFIELD. B.S.C. 

Entered from St. John's Military Acad- 
emy; Mai'ketine: Club; Chicago. 

LOUIS A. GATTORNA, JR., B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Michael High School; 
Chicago. 

NORBERT J. GENWSZ, B.S.C. 

Entered from Wells High School and 
Wright Junior College; Chicago. 

CHARLES A. GENDRON. B.S.C. 

Entered from Lovola Academy; Chicago. 

LAWRENCE E. GEORGEN, B.S.C. 

Entered from Carl Schurz High School; 
Chicago. 

FRANK D. GHINELLI, B.S.C. 

Entered from Cathedral High School ; Pi 
Gamma Mu ; Economics Club, President 3 ; 
Sigma Lambda Beta; Union Budget Man- 
agement and Finance Committee; Inter- 
Fraternity Relations Committee; Student 
Union Congressman ; Junior Class Vice- 
President ; Senior Class President ; Stu- 
dent Council President; Commerce Asso- 
ciation President; Winner 1948 National 
Association of Cost Accountants ; Market- 
ing Club; Undergraduate Leadership 
Award ; Lansing, Mich. 

CHARLES W. GILLES, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. George High School, 
Chicago Teachers' College, St. Ambrose 
College and University of New Mexico; 
Sigma Lambda Beta 3, 4; Loyola Union 
Congressman 3, 4 ; Marketing Club ; 
Northbrook, 111. 

HERBERT GLASS, B.S.C. 

Entered from John Marshall High School 
and Herzl Citv College; Chicago. 

OWEN F. GLENNON, B.S.C. 

Entered from Quigley Preparatory Sem- 
inary and St. Mary of the Lake Seminary; 
Sodality; Chicago. 

DANIEL E. GLICKMAN, B.S.C. 

Entered from Von Steuben High School, 
University of Illinois, Wright Junior Col- 
lege, De Paul University and U.C.L.A. ; 
Chicago. 

RICHARD R. GODZIELA, B.S.C. 

Entered from De Paul Academy ; Chicago. 

ROBERT F. GOLDSTEIN, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Mel's High School ; For- 
est Park 111. 

HILLARDGOLUBSKI, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Philip High School and 
University of Illinois ; Chicago. 







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STEPHEN I. GRGULA, B.S.C. 

Entered from Farragut High School and 
Wright Junior College; Economics Club; 
Marketing Club; Chicago. 

FREDERICK E. GRIMM, B.S.C. 

Entered from Glenbard High School ; 
Lombard, 111. 

THOMAS J. HACKETT, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. George High School; 
Chicago. 

THOMAS HAHN, B.S.C. 

Entered from New Trier High School; 
Wilmette, Illinois. 

GEORGE T. HALKA, B.S.C. 

Entered from Mundelein Cathedral ; Chi- 
cago. 

JOHN G. HANRAHAN, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Philip High School; 
Chicago. 

DANIEL J. HEFFERNAN, B.S.C. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Univer- 
sity Club 2, 3, 4; Track Team 1, 2, 3, 4 ; 
Monogram Club 3, 4 ; Junior Class Presi- 
dent; Senior Class Vice-President; Mar- 
keting Club 4 ; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Var- 
sity Letter Winner 3, 4 ; Athletic Promo- 
tion Committee; Student Union Dance 
Chairman 4 ; Student Council Dance Com- 
mittee 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

RICHARD A. HEFFERNAN, B.S.C. 

Entered from Calumet High School; 
Delta Theta Phi ; Chicago. 

FRANCIS M. HERATY, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Chicago. 

FRANK W. HIANIK, B.S.C. 

Entered from Von Steuben High School; 
Pi Gamma Mu ; Varsity Golf Team; Chi- 
cago. 

MATTHEW J. HICKEY, B.S.C. 

Entered from Holy Cross College; Pi 
Gamma Mu 3, 4; Sodality 3, 4; Dean's 
Honor Roll 3 ; Winnetka, 111. 

PAUL G. HIGDON, B.S.C. 

Entered from Crane Technical High 
School ; Chicago. 

HAROLD F. HILL, JR., B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Chicago. 

WILLIAM G. HILLSMAN, B.S.C. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Chicago. 

HENRY F. HINES, JR., B.S.C. 

Entered from St. John's Military Acad- 
emy; Marketing Club; Chicago. 




JOHN F. HIRSCH, B.S.C. 

Entered from Mt. Carmel High School; 
Chicago. 

JOHN M. HOGAN, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Leo High School and 
Loras College, Dubuque, la. ; Chicago. 

RICHARD T. HOURIHAN, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Leo High School and 
Iowa State College; Chicago. 

GEORGE T. HOWARD, B.S.C. 

Entered from John Harris High School, 
Harrisburg, Pa., and Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. ; Palatine, 111. 

EDWARD A. HURLEY, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Patrick High School; 
Chicago. 

JOHN M. HUTCHISON, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. George High School and 
Bradley University; Marketing Club 4; 
University Club 2, 3. 4; Chicago. 

ANTHONY F. JABLONSKI, JR., B.S.C. 
Entered from Thornton Township High 
School and St. Edward's University, 
Austin, Texas ; Harvey, 111. 

GLEN W. JASTRAM, B.S.C. 

Entered from Amundsen High School; 
Knights' Club 4 ; Chicago. 

ROBERT J. JENSEN, B.S.C. 

Entered from Fenwick High School; 
Oak Park, 111. 

WILLIAM M. JOERN, B.S.C. 

Entered from Maine Township High 
School ; Park Ridge, 111. 

JOHN W. JOHNSON, B.S.C. 

Entered from Hirsch High School and 
St. Ambrose College, Davenport, la. ; 
Chicago. 

RICHARD H. JOHNSON, B.S.C. 

Entered from Von Steuben High School; 
Pi Gamma Mu 4, Secretary 4; Sigma 
Lambda Beta 4; Economics Society 4, 
Vice-President 4; Young Democrats 4; 
Chicago. 

DONALD R. JONES, B.S.C. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Sigma 
Lambda Beta 3, 4 ; Knights' Club 2, 3, 4 ; 
Intramurals 2, 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

ALFRED D. JONGLEUX, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. George High School; 
Sigma Lambda Beta 4 ; University Club 4 ; 
Chicago. 

MILTON C. JOSSEY, B.S.C. 

Entered from Morgan Park High School; 
Pi Gamma Mu 3, 4 ; Phi Alpha Rho 3, 4, 
Secretary 4 ; Economics Society 3, 4 ; De- 
bating Society 3, 4 ; Catholic Interracial 
Council 3, 4 ; Chicago. 



Confusion in the corridors 



Mule Train 





GEORGE J. KAISER, B.S.C. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Chicago. 

PATRICK J. KANE, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Michael High School; 
Intramurals 4 ; Chicago. 

EDWARD J. KEELER, JR., B.S.C. 

Entered from New Trier High School ; 
Sigma Lambda Beta 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

FRANCIS K. KEIRNAN, B.S.C. 

Entered from Chicago Latin School and 
Notre Dame University; Chicago. 

DONALD W. KELLY, B.S.C. 

Entered from De La Salle High School, 
Wilson City College, and St. Mary's Col- 
lege, California ; Intramurals 3, 4 ; Loyolan 
Staff 3 ; Chicago. 

GEORGE W. KELLY, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Leo High School ; Phi Mu 
Chi 4; Chicago. 

THOMAS A, KELLY, B.S.C. 

Entered from Calumet High School; 
Alpha Sigma Nu 4; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Chicago. 

JOHN A. KELTY, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Mel's High School; So- 
dality 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

EDWARD KICHURA, B.S.C. 

Entered from Tuley High School and 
Wright Junior College; Chicago. 

N. MARK KINSELLA, JR., B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Chicago. 

MARIE E. KNIPPEL, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Gregory High School 
and University of Illinois ; Chicago. 

GEORGE E. KOVACIK, B.S.C. 

Entered from Austin High School and 
Illinois Institute of Technology; Chicago. 

JOSEPH KOWALSKI, B.S.C. 

Entered from Taft High School and 
Wright Junior College; Chicago. 

JOHN H. KRIPPINGER, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Michael Central High 
School ; Marketing Club 4 ; Chicago. 

JOHN F. LANGDON, B.S.C. 

Entered from Northwestern University 
and St. Louis University; Chicago. 



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JOHN J. LENNON, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Rita High School and 
Notre Dame ; Sigma Lambda Beta 3, 4 ; 
Sodality 2, 3, 4; Economics Society 2, 3, 
4 ; Chicago. 

JOSEPH V. LETTON, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Rita High School and 
Univei'sity of Detroit; Economics Society 
2,3,4; Chicago. 

CLARENCE C. LILLIG, B.S.C. 

Entered from Oak Park High School ; Oak 
Park, 111. 

KENNETH R. LINDSTROM, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

THOMAS A. LOFTUS, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Philip High School ; So- 
dality 1, 2; Chicago. 

ROBERT B, LUXEM, B.S.C. 

Entered from Loyola Academy ; Intramur- 
als 2, 3 ; Chicago. 

JAMES T. McCarthy, b.s.c. 

Entered from St. George High School; 
Chicago. 

MARTIN B. McCarthy, B.S.C. 

Entered from Loyola Academy ; Chicago. 

WILLIAM J. McCarthy, b.s.c. 

Entered from St. George High School; 
Chicago. 

JOHN J, McCONVILLE, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Rita High School; 
Chicago. 

JOHN M. McDonald, b.s.c. 

Entered from Loyola Academy and Uni- 
versity of Fribourg, Switzerland ; Chicago. 

JAMES W. McENERNEY, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Mel's High School ; Chi- 
cago. 

JOHN F. McENIFF, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Chicago. 

NEAL A. McERLEAN, B.S.C. 

Chicago. 

CLARK D. McKENNA, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Patrick's High School 
and St. Joseph's College of Indiana; 
Chicago. 




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JOHN V. McKEON, B.S.C. 

Entered from Loyola Academy ; Intramur- 

als 1,2, 3, 4; Chicago. 
JOHN F. McKITRICK, B.S.C. 

Entered from Fenwick High School; 

Alpha Delta Gamma 4 ; Oak Park, 111. 
JOHN D. MALECKI, B.S.C. 

Entered from Fenwick High School; 

Chemistry Club 1 ; Economics Society 4 ; 

Intramurals 3 ; Oak Park, 111. 
GILBERT J. MALONEY, B.S.C. 

Entered from West Green Bay High 

School ; Debating Society 4 ; Chicago. 
LOUIS M. MANFREDI, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Rita High School, St. 

Mary's College, Minnesota University of 

Delaware and De Paul University; Chi- 
cago. 
DONALD J. MARIANI, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 

Chicago. 
RICHARD V. MAROLEWSKI, B.S.C. 

Entered from Mt. Carmel High School, 

Fenn College, Cleveland, Ohio, and Illinois 

Tech. ; Chicago. 
ARNOLD M, MAROUS, B.S.C. 

Entered from Lane Technical High School ; 

Marketing Club 4 ; Chicago. 

FRANK T. MARSHALL, B.S.C. 

Entered from Spalding High School; 
Chicago. 
WILLIAM R. MAURER, B.S.C. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Market- 
ing Club 4; University Club 4; Intramur- 
als 4 ; Chicago. 

JOSEPH R. MAYER, B.S.C. 

Entered from Lane Technical High School ; 
Chicago. 

THOMAS G. MEENAN, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Rita High School and 
Mississippi College; Chicago. 

LUCIUS E. MEINE, B.S.C. 

Entered from Englewood High School 
and Wilson Junior College; Chicago. 

ROBERT E. MELVIN, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School, 
and Illinois Institute of Technology; 
Sigma Lambda Beta 3, 4 ; Economics So- 
ciety 3, 4 ; Pi Gamma Mu 3, 4, Treasurer 
4; Loyola, Netvs Staff 3, 4, LT Editor 
4; Knights' Club 4; Marketing Club 4; 
Loyolan Staff 4 ; Oak Park, 111. 

EUGENE R. MISCHKE, B.S.C. 

Entered from De Paul High School and 
University of Illinois; Economics Society 
4; Chicago. 




JAMES F. MOORE, B.S.C. 

Entered from Morgan Park Military 
Academy; Chicago. 
THOMAS J. MORIARTY, B.S.C. 

Entered from De La Salle High School ; 
Loyola Union Congressman 2 ; Chicago. 

JOHN E. MORRISON, B.S.C. 

Entered from Jesuit High School, New 
Orleans, La. ; University of Notre Dame, 
and Xavier University ; Phi Gamma Mu 4 ; 
Chicago. 

PHILIP D. MOYNIHAN, B.S.C. 

Entered from Mt. Carmel High School, 
and De Paul University; Sodality 2, 3, 4; 
Economics Society 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

RALPH MUELLER, B.S.C. 

Entered from Lakeview High School, and 
Wright Junior College, Chicago ; Econom- 
ics Society 4 ; Chicago. 

THOMAS L. MULROY, B.S.C. 

Entered from Mt. Carmel High School ; 
Chicago. 
KEVIN V. MURPHY, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Sodality 1, 2; Chicago. 

NICHOLAS G. NEYBERT, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Leo High School; So- 
dality 1, 2, 3, 4; Loyola News Staff 1, 2, 3, 
4 ; National Student Association 2, 3 ; Na- 
tional Federation of Catholic College Stu- 
dents 2, 3 ; Board of Governors of Loyola 
Union 1, 2; Committee on Religious Wel- 
fare 1, 2 ; Knights' Club 2, 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

HARVEY H. NICHOLS, B.S.C. 

Entered from Central Y.M.C.A. Evening 
School, Chicago. 

CHESTER J. NOWACZK, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Rita High School; 
Chicago. 

LAWRENCE N. O'BRIEN, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Leo High School ; Sodal- 
ity 4 ; Intramurals 4 ; Chicago. 

LEONARD D. O'BRIEN, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Leo High School ; Intra- 
murals 2, 3, 4; Chicago. 

CARLIN P. OLIPHANT, B.S.C. 

Entered from Central Catholic High 
School, Pittsburgh, Pa.; Phi Mu Chi 4; 
Debating Society 3 ; N.F.C.C.S. 3 ; Chicago. 

ABRAHAM J. OSMAN, JR., B.S.C. 

Entered from Austin High School; Mar- 
keting Club 4; Chicago. 

RAYMOND M. PALCZYNSKI, B.S.C. 
Entered from Quigley Seminary and St. 
Ambrose College, Davenport, Iowa, and 
Detroit Tech., Detroit; Chicago. 



It looks like we'll go down three 




JAMES PALERMINI, B.S.C. 

Chicago. 

WILLIAM K. PASCHEN, B.S.C. 

Entered from Lane Technical High School, 
and Wright Junior College, Chicago; 
Sigma Lambda Beta 2, 3, 4; Marketing 
Club 4 ; Chicago. 

GEORGE C. PASSOLT, B.S.C. 

Entered from Senn High School ; Chicago. 

FRANCIS W. PELLETTIERE, B.S.C. 

Entered from Spalding High School; 
Chicago. 

HAROLD A. PEPONIS, B.S.C. 

Entered from Amundsen High School; 
Pi Gamma Mu 4; Economics Society 4; 
Chicago. 

JOHN J. PERRY, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. George High School, and 
Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wise; 
Sigma Lambda Beta 4 ; Chicago. 

MELVIN S. PIETKIEWICZ, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School, 
and Northwestern University ; Chicago. 

CHARLES A. POLLOCK, B.S.C. 

Entered from Mt. Carmel High School; 
Chicago. 

GERALDINE D. POSVIC, B.S.C. 

Entered from Providence High School 
and St. Mary's College, Notre Dame, In- 
diana; Co-Ed Club 3, 4, President 4; 
Economics Society 3, 4, Treasurer 4; So- 
dality 3; Chicago. 

DONALD E. POWERS, B.S.C. 

Entered from Blue Island Community 
High School ; Pi Gamma Mu 3, 4 ; Econom- 
ics Society 3, 4 ; Blue Island, 111. 

EDWARD Y. POWERS, B.S.C. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Pi Alpha 
Lambda 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

STEPHEN PRASSA, B.S.C. 

Entered from De La Salle High School; 
Chicago. 

WILLIAM R. PRICE, B.S.C. 

Entered from Austin High School; Chi- 
cago. 

STANLEY L PUK, B.S.C. 

Entered from De La Salle High School; 
Chicago. 

ALBERT G. RACE, B.S.C. 

Entered from Fenger High School; 
Chicago. 



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EDWARD R. RAINIS, B.S.C. 

Entered from Morton High School and 
Morton Junior College ; Cicero, 111. 

ROBERT A. RATTY, B.S.C. 

Entered from De Paul Academy; Chicago. 

ROBERT J. READY, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School 
and Wilson Junior College ; Chicago. 

RAYMOND G. REES, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. George High School; 
Sigma Lambda Beta 4 ; Chicago. 

WILLIAM C. REEVES, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Sodality 1, 2; Chicago. 

THOMAS J. REILLY, B.S.C. 

Entered from De La Salle High School; 
Chicago. 

JAMES M. RENKEN, B.S.C. 

Entered from Tilden Technical High 
School; Economics Society 4; Intramurals 
4 ; Chicago. 

RICHARD H. RENTNER, B.S.C. 

Entered from Oak Park High School and 
De Paul University; Oak Park, 111. 

GEORGE G. REYNOLDS, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Philip High School; 
Sigma Lambda Beta, Chicago. 

DON J. RIDLEY, B.S.C. 

Entered from Loyola Academy; Pi Alpha 
Lambda 2, 3, 4 ; Sodality 1 ; Chicago. 

STEVE J. RIFORGIATO, B.S.C. 

Entered from Foreman High School and 
Upper Iowa University; Chicago. 

DAVID C. RIGHTMIRE, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Rita High School; 
Knights' Club 4; Marketing Club 4; In- 
tramurals 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

ROBERT F, RISTAU, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Rita High School and 
University of Illinois; Intramurals 3, 4; 
La Grange Park, 111. 

RICHARD G. ROBINSON, B.S.C. 

Entered from Senn High School and De 
Paul University; Sigma Alpha Epsilon; 
Highland Park, 111. 

EDWARD J. ROCHE, B.S.C. 

Entered from Mt. Carmel High School 
and Michigan State College ; Sodality 2, 8, 
4; Intramurals 2, 3, 4; Chicago. 




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AiS^Asn^ 



ROBERT J. ROCHE, B.S.C. 

Entered from Mt. Carmel High School; 
Chicago. 
DONALD J. ROSSI, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Philip High School; 
Chicago. 
JOSEPH J. ROSSMAN, B.S.C. 

Entered from Lane Technical High School 
and Marquette University; Commerce 
Club 4; Economics Society 4; Chicago. 

MARTIN RUBINSTEIN, B.S.C. 

Entered from Roosevelt High School; 

Economics Society 4 ; Intramurals 3 ; 

Chicago. 
EDWARD J. RYAN, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Mel High School; Ber- 

wyn, 111. 
GERHART T. RYCERZ, B.S.C. 

Entered from Lane Technical High School 

and Wright Junior College ; Chicago. 

CHRISTY F. SALETTA, B.S.C. 

Entered from Lane Technical High School ; 
Economics Society 3, 4 ; Marketing Club 
4; Chicago. 

DAYLE A. SCHALLER, B.S.C. 

Entered from Parker High School and 
Illinois College of Commerce ; Intramurals 
3 ; Chicago. 

CHARLES J. SCHMITT, JR., B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Mel High School; So- 
dality 2 ; Chicago. 

NICHOLAS J. SCHNITZIUS, B.S.C. 

Entered from Loyola Academy and Bal- 
boa Junior College; Chicago. 

CLARENCE E. SEAVERS, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Leo High School; Pi 
Gamma Mu 3; Economics Society 2, 3; 
Chicago. 
JACK L. SEMPLE, B.S.C. 

Entered from Carl Schurz High School ; Pi 
Gamma Mu 4 ; Economics Society 4 ; Ac- 
counting Key 1949 ; Chicago. 

LEONARD J. SHAFRAN, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Mel High School; Chi- 
cago. 
DONALD T. SHARKO, B.S.C. 

Entered from Tilden Technical High 
School and University of Illinois; Pi 
Gamma Mu 4; Sigma Lambda Beta 3, 4; 
Economics Society 4 ; Union Congressman 
4; Choral Club 4; Marketing Club 4; 
Chicago. 
GEORGE S, SHARKO, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Rita High School and 
Northwestern University; Pi Gamma Mu 
4 ; Chicago. 



i 




EDWARD F. SHUFELDT, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Philip High School; 
Chicago. 
ROBERT SHUST, B.S.C. 

Entered from Harrison High School ; Eco- 
nomics Society 4 ; Marketing Club 4 ; Ber- 
wyn, 111. 
EDWARD J. SIERACKI, B.S.C. 

Entered from Bowen High School; Uni- 
versity Club 4 ; Union Congressman 4 ; 
Economics Society 4 ; Sodality 4 ; Chicago. 

EDWARD M. SKALECKI, B.S.C. 

Entered from Harrison High School; 
Chicago. 
FRANK J. SMITH, B.S.C. 

Entered from Campion High School, 
Prairie Du Chien, Wise, and Xavier Uni- 
versity, Cincinnati, Ohio; Chicago. 

THOMAS W. SMITH, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Joseph's Preparatory 
School, Philadelphia, Pa. ; and St. Joseph's 
College, Philadelphia, Pa. ; Chicago. 

NORBERT J. SMOLINSKI, B.S.C. 

Entered from Taft High School, North- 
western University, Gregg Business Col- 
lege, and Wright Junior College ; Loyola 
Neivs Staff 4 ; Economics Society 4 ; 
Loyolan Staff 4; Marketing Club 4; 
Chicago. 

JAMES J. SOCHA, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Michael Central High 
School; Chicago. 

GEORGE G. STEFANI, B.S.C. 

Entered from Lane Technical High School 
and Wright Junior College; Chicago. 

EDWARD P. STOCKS, B.S.C. 

Entered from Mt. Carmel High School 
and St. Mary's College, Winona, Minn. ; 
Chicago. 

EMILIA D. STRZELECKI, B.S.C. 

Entered from Lindblom High School; 
Chicago. 

BERNARD J. SULLIVAN, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Sodality 1, 3 ; Intramurals 1, 2, 4 ; Chicago. 
JOHN E. SULLIVAN, B.S.C. 

Entered from Lane Technical High School, 
Wright Junior College, University of Illi- 
nois, and Purdue University; Chicago. 

LEO F. SWEENEY, B.S.C. 

Entered from Campion High School ; Mar- 
keting Club 4 ; Chicago. 

RAY C. TASCH, B.S.C. 

Entered from Roosevelt High School and 
Wright Junior College, Chicago; Chicago. 



^iii 




HENRY H. UBOWSKI. B.S.C. 

Entered from Weber High School; Pi 
Alpha Lambda 2, 3, 4; Marketing Club 4; 
Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Chicago. 

JOHN VALENTINO, B.S.C. 

Entered from Central Y.M.C.A. High 
School and Walton School of Commerce; 
Chicago. 




School : 



PAUL L. VAN WOLVELEAR, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. George High School; 
Sigma Lambda Beta 4 ; Intramurals 4 ; 
Chicago. 

JOHN J. VARRASSI, B.S.C. 

Entered from Manley High 
Chicago. 

MARIE G. VOLINO, B.S.C. 

Entered from Providence High School; 
Sodality 4 ; Chicago. 

WILLIAM C. VONDER HEIDE, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Leo High School; Sigma 
Lambda Beta 4 ; Pi Gamma Mu 4 ; Debat- 
ing Society 4 ; Chicago. 

KENNETH J. VRANEK, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Intramurals 4 ; Chicago. 

ROBERT H. WAGNER, B.S.C. 

Entered from Western Military Academy 
and University of Illinois ; McHenry, 111. 

CHARLES E. WAITE, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Leo High School; Uni- 
versity Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramurals 4; 
Chicago. 

JOHN W. WAITE, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Rita High School and 
Bryant and Stratton Business College; 
Chicago. 

ANTHONY J. WALSH, B.S.C. 

Entered from Crane Technical High 
School ; Sigma Lambda Beta 3, 4 ; Loyola 
Union 4, Vice-President 4 ; Sodality 2, 3, 4 ; 
Chicago. 

JOHN V. WALSH, B.S.C. 

Entered from Fenwick High School ; Mar- 
keting Club 4 ; Intramurals 3,4 ; Oak Park, 
111. 




DAMIEN J. WARD, JR., B.S.C. 

Entered from Mt. Carmel High School 
and University of Illinois; Intramurals 3, 
4; Chicago. 

LOUIS W. WEBER, JR., B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Rita High School and 
University of Illinois; Chicago. 

JOSEPH P. WEGLOSKI, B.S.C. 

Entered from Harrison Technical High 
School; Chicago. 

RICHARD E. WILLIAMS, B.S.C. 

Entered from Fenwick High School and 
University of Notre Dame ; Marketing 
Club 4; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Oak Park, 
111. 

ROBERT J. WIRTH, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. George High School and 
University of Notre Dame ; Chicago. 

THADDEUS M. WITKOWSKI, B.S.C. 

Entered from Weber High School; 
Chicago. 

BERNARD J. WITRY, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Leo High School ; Sigma 
Lambda Beta 4; Pi Gamma Mu 4; 
Chicago. 

ROBERT E. WLEKLINSKI, B.S.C. 

Entered from Taft High School; Sigma 
Lambda Beta 4 ; Chicago. 

JOSEPH R. WNENK, B.S.C. 

Entered from Hyde Park High School and 
University of Notre Dame; Chicago. 

ROBERT J." WORRELL, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School ; 
Chicago. 

JOHN P. WRENN, B.S.C. 

Entered from Lovola Academy; Chicago. 

THOMAS L. YORK, B.S.C. 

Entered from Kelly High School and 
Wilson Junior College; Sodality 2, 3, 4; 
Marketing Club 4 ; Chicago. 

BRUNO J. ZAWISLAK, B.S.C. 

Entered from Quigley Preparatory Semi- 
nary and Illinois Institute of Technology; 
Economics Society 4 ; Philarets 4 ; Chicago. 

HENRY S. ZDANEK, B.S.C. 

Entered from Holy Trinity High School; 
Sigma Pi Alpha 4 ; Chicago. 

GEORGE S. ZORIAN, B.S.C. 

Entered from Senn High School and Uni- 
versity of Chicago; Marketing Club 4; 
Chicago. 

ANGELA R. ZULEVICH, B.S.C. 

Entered from Englewood High School; 
Chicago. 

RICHARD A. GLEASON, B.S.C. 

Entered from St. George High School; 
Loyola News Staff 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Knights' Club 
1, 2, 3, 4, President 4 ; Marketing Club 4 ; 
Loyolan Staff 4 ; Chicago. 

WILLIAM A. KEELEY, B.S.C. 
Oak Park, 111. 



Seated: Stanton. Hen- 
nessy, Himpler, Cotter, 
Harrington, Oswaldowski, 
Rose. Second Row: De 
Spain, Cline, McNeil, Jle- 
higan, Mclntire, Jann, 
Johnston, O'Donnell. Third 
Row: Haydel, Webber, 
Fratesi, Houle, Plunkett, 
Lindell, Taylor, O'Malley, 
Dwyer. 



Seated: O'Neill, Ugolini, 
Kuczora, Theisen, Shook, 
Schermerhorn, Pachmayer. 
Second Row: Nasharr, 
Kuecks, Bandyk, Brum- 
field, Doucette, Dritsas, 
Neumann. Jacobs, Ken- 
nedy, Conley. Third Row: 
Eder, McMahon, Flynn, 
Meyenberg, Sheridan, 
Adams, Potter, Harrington, 
McNeil. MacKenzie. 



Seated: Petik, Parisi, Bell, 
Sullivan, King, Dore, 
Specht. Second Row : Petik, 
Kaikaris, Coatar, McNulty, 
Sauer, Rosner, MacKenzie. 
Powers, O'Toole. 



Seated: Schutter, Wheeler. 
Spector, Brown, Shaugh- 
nessy, Grant. Second Row: 
Gaumond, Connelly, 
Downey, Scullion, Janiec, 
Lynch, Newquist. 



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112 




/I n d e r c la 6 6 m e n 




Seated: Heraty, Cleary, 
Georgen, Berry, Janus, Ro- 
dell, Deady. Second Row: 
Lipuma, Hoffman, Cuccio, 
Becker, Clifford, Dillon, 
Epperson, Abrams. Third 
Row: Parrillo, Roth, Hunt, 
Fuhrman, Gremer, Walsh, 
Bertog, Hancock. 



Seated: Foran, Stanton, 
Grochowiak, Dunne, Bar- 
mazel, Kelly, Kranda. Sec- 
ond Row: Lenegan, Gainer, 
Fry, Flynn, Rackow, Raus- 
er, Phee, Freelin, McNer- 
ney, Magee. Third Row: 
Hanson, Gleason, Mc- 
Geeney, Whitehead, Pra- 
ger, Reddy, Wilikers, Mc- 
Kenna, Devereux. 



Seated: Hayden, Racz- 
kowski, Glynn, O'Connor, 
McCarron, Bonn, Kuhn. 
Second Row: Hynes, Hol- 
inger, Cassidy, Gleeson, 
McManus, Noonan, Swiess, 
Magee, Hodapp, Lach. 
Third Row: Lannon, Clif- 
ford, Heneghan, Barmazel, 
O'Brien, Parrillo, O'Brien, 
Rochford, Johnson, Hiel- 
scher. 



Seated: Keane, Constable, 
Lyman, Quinlin, Hansen, 
Kahn, Wrezel. Second 
Row: Kostyrka, Scheid, 
Jahns, Stanton, Willwerth, 
Hudson, Jongleux. Third 
Row: Hegwein, Blake, 
Beeftink, Thart, Banke, 
Tackee, Jarmuth, Keenan. 



113 



Seated: MulhoUand. Ma- 
honey, K u h n , Lipsey, 
Reichman, O'Brien, O'- 
Brien. Second Row: Wolfe, 
Kane, Trinen, Holger, O'- 
Brien. Lannon, O'Brien, 
Hartigan, .Steinbeck. Third 
Row: Jacobson, Wolter, 
Wygant, O'Brien, Kelly, 
Grochowiak, Spade, Mur- 
ray. 



Seated: M c A u li f f , 
McAuliSf, Yuhas, McCutch- 
eon, Young, Louchios. Sec- 
ond Row: Ore, Yancey, 
Slapinski, Kuhn, Strath- 
dee, Merwick, Stathakos, 
Remian. 



Seated: Rogers, Gilmore, 
Deleo, Plunkett, Houle. 
Second Row: Blahoski, 
Vlerick, Schornack, Cline, 
Fratesi, Reinwald, 
Schroeder, Tillhof. 



Seated: Viola, Arado, 
Blake, Burke, Kaljala, Kel- 
leher, Cahill. Second Row: 
Kelly, Korabik, Marre, 
Gust, Janis, Georger, Jef- 
fers, Dietz, Nugent, Como- 
ford. Third Row: Cronin, 
Moore, .Schlief, Gordon, 
Dunne, Proteau, Kiley, 
Connolly. 



m m e r c e 



114 




win ci e r c I i 



a 6 6 m e n 




Seated: Keefe, Falletta, 
Pawlowski, Gross, Coan, 
Van Lysebettens, Grace. 
Second Row: Karr, Duffy, 
Trejo, Creagan, Carreras, 
Holbrook, Musial, Carroll. 
Third Row: Holzhall, Bur- 
ton. Boyle, Hoppenrath, 
Luketin, McCarthy, i\Ic- 
Garrity, Kroske, Luczo. 



Seated: Johnston, Ghinelli, 
Hylard, Hanrahan, Boland, 
O'Brien, .Magee. Second 
Row: Kolimas, Coleman, 
Sorquist, Arkenberg, Mc- 
Jlahon, D i M a r t i n o , 

O'Toole, Brown, O'Keefe. 
Third Row: Newhart, 
Buscaglia, Tribble, Han- 
rahan, Cook, McGrail, 
Mallon, O'Brien. 



Seated: Collins, Ryan, 
^\ ozniak. Quill, Schirmer, 
Riley, Schadek. Second 
Row: Schleitwiler, Boling, 
Stuglis, Daleiden, Pren- 
dergast, Schloderback, 
Rolfsen, Sasenick, Por- 
caro. Third Row: Maloney, 
Gordon, B 1 u m e. Van 
Heule, Hayes, Doherty, 
Smith, Snyder, Sullivan, 
Sutton. 



Seated: Condon, Reimann, 
Valentine, Cormack, Cor- 
azza, Waldschmidt, 
Schmidt. Second Row: 
Zylstra, Kupfer, Tarpey, 
Yahn, Greene, Yonkovitch, 
Byrne, Cirrintano, Spell- 
man. Third Row: Thart, 
Biedermann, T a c k e s, 

Blake, Banke, Byrd, Ar- 
kenberg, Barthel, Arm- 
strong, Brennock, Carey. 



115 



y. 



n I u e p S I 



it 



^ 



C- o I I i 



e a e 



9 



University College is the downiiown di- 
vision of the College of Arts and Sciences 
of Loyola University. Now in its thirty-fifth 
year, University College offers complete cur- 
ricula toward baccalaureate degrees. 

Originally founded to supplement the 
education of school teachers and others who 
were occupied during the day, University 
College gradually developed complete cur- 
ricula for the early afternoon and evening 
students who elected to pursue full-time 
work toward their bachelor's degrees. 

Centrally located, near the loop and in 
the newly developing business district, Uni- 



versity College now serves day or evening 
students from the whole of metropolitan 
Chicago. Both day and evening students of 
University College participate in school for- 
ensics, dramatics, and athletics, and are 
eligible for membership in the sodalities, 
sororities, and fraternities. All of the fa- 
cilities of the University including labora- 
tories and libraries on both campuses are 
available to the students. 

Tribute must here be paid to the far- 
seeing Rev. Frederic Siedenburg, S.J., who 
in 1914 began the organization of the now 
flourishing Downtown College. After 18 




Members of the Univer- 
sity College faculty take 
time out from their busy 
teaching schedule to pose 
for the Loyolan. Left to 
Right: Peter Kapsalis, 
William Fill, Fr. Krzysz- 
kowski, and Roger Parr. 




\VILLIA:M H. CONLEY. Ph.D. 
Dean 



years of tireless work Fr. Siedenburg was 
succeeded by Rev. Thomas A. Egan, S.J. 

Succeeding Fr. Thomas Egan in 1944, 
Rev. John C. Malloy, S.J., guided University 
College through other developmental stages 
following the conclusion of the war. Wil- 
liam H. Conley took over the work from Fr. 
Malloy Mfhen the latter was appointed dean 
of admissions of the university. 

University College has given the 
teachers of Chicagoland an opportunity to 
supplement their training in the public 



Normal School with Catholic principles of 
philosophy and to receive their degrees 
under Jesuit auspices. Many of the students 
attending classes of the University College 
are such teachers. 

The classes of the college are so ar- 
ranged that students who devote full time to 
their studies may obtain the regular 
academic degree in the prescribed four 
years. The members of the faculty who 
teach in this division with few exceptions 
are also teaching on the Lake Shore Campus. 



First Row: June Marie 
Watters, August Strueck, 
Patricia Doherty. Second 
Row: Bob Carey, Nancy 
Nolan, Trevor Moore, June 
Tate, Pat Mclnerney. 
Absent from Picture: Jo- 
seph Abe!, Francis Bush. 




117 



This should take care of the 
weekend 





JAMES A. ARMSTRONG, Ph.B. 

Entered from Tilclen Technical High 
School; Catholic Interracial Council; 
Chicago. 

EILEEN V. BARNETT, Ph.B. 

Entered from Du Sable High School and 
Wilson Junior College ; Chicago. 

ROBERT E. BECKER, B.S. 

Entered from Quigley and St. Nazianz 
College; Pi Gamma Mu 3, 4; Chicago. 

FRANCIS J. BOLGER, Ph.B. 

Entered from St. Ignatius High School; 
Alpha Sigma Nu ; Curtain Guild ; Cadence: 
Chicago. 

MARTIN J. CORCORAN, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Calumet High School, Uni- 
versity of Chicago, and Northwestern 
University ; Radio Workshop 3, 4 ; Psy- 
cological Research Society ; Chicago. 

GERALDINE E. DULKOWSKI, Ph.B. 

Entered from St. Mary of Perpetual Help ; 
Pi Gamma Mu ; Chicago. 

EDWARD W. FINNEGAN, Ph.B. 

Entered from Austin High School; So- 
dality 2, 3, 4 ; Der Turm Verein 3, 4 ; 
Chicago. 

JOHN D. FLYNN, JR., Ph.B. 

Entered from Campion High School, 
Prairie du Chien, Wise. ; Wilmette, 111. 

ERNEST GRIESEMER, B.S. 

Entered from Kelvyn Park High School, 
Wright Junior College, and University of 
Indiana; Chicago. 
LENORE A. HENNESSY, Ph.B. 

Entered from St. Xavier Academy and St. 
Xavier College; Chicago. 

RITA M. McCLEAN, Ph.B. 

Entered from J. Sterling Morton; Theta 
Phi Alpha ; Catholic Interracial Council ; 
Oak Park, 111. 
MILDRED C. MAHANEY, B.S. 

Entered from Marshall High School and 
Herzl Junior College; Chicago. 

DOLORES P. MELVIN, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from University of Chicago; 
Alpha Kappa Delta; Pi Gamma Mu; Pan 
American Club; Catholic Interracial Coun- 
cil ; Student Union ; Chicago. 

ALAN P. MILTON, Ph.B. 

Entered from Lincoln High School, Mid- 
land, Pa. ; and Youngstown College, 
Youngstown, Ohio; Chicago. 

JOSEPH J. PACHOLIK, Ph.B. 

Entered from Fenger High School and 
Englewood Junior College; Psychological 
Research Society ; Spanish Club ; Chicago. 



?/, 



n i u e r d L 



I t u ^ o I I e a e ^ 



^ 



9 



e n i o r S 



MARY ANN G. PILARCZYK, Ph.B. 

Entered from St. Mary's of Perpetual 
Help ; Pi Gamma Mu ; Chicago. 

LEONA K. PLISKE, Ph.B. 

Entered from St. Mary's; Michigan City, 
Ind. 

MINNIE L. POHLERS, B.S. in Ed. 

Entered from Thornton Township, Chi- 
cago Teachers' College, and the University 
of Indiana ; Dolton, 111. 

ROY H. ROHN, JR., B.S.S.S. 

Entered from O'Dea and Seattle Univer- 
sity, and the University of Pennsylvania; 
Pi Gamma Mu ; Alpha Kappa Delta ; Inter- 
racial Council ; Psychological Research So- 
ciety; Chicago. 

JOHN J. RYAN, Ph.B. 

Entered from Leo and De Paul University ; 
Loyola News 2, 3, 4; Young Democrats of 
Loyola 3, 4 ; Catholic Interracial Council 
2, 8, 4 ; Curtain Guild 3 ; Psychological Re- 
search Society 2, 3, 4, President 3, 4; 
Loyola Union Congress 3, 4; Chicago. 

THOMAS L. SHANAHAN, JR., Ph.B. 

Entered from Manley and De Paul Univer- 
sity; Chicago. 

ESTHER I. SMITH. B.S. in Ed. 

Entered from Visitation and Chicago 
Teachers' College ; Chicago. 

ARTHUR J. SULLIVAN, B.S.S.S. 

Entered from Catholic Central; Debating 
Team; Catholic Interracial Council; 
Springfield, Ohio. 

PATRICIA L WERVE, Ph.B. 

Entered from St. Scholastica Academy; 
Pi Gamma Mu 3, 4 ; Historical Society 3, 
4 ; Chicago. 

YOSHIO YAMASHITA, B.S. 

Entered from George Washington High 
and Northwestern University; German 
Club; Chicago. 





119 




REV. EDWIN F. HEALY, SJ. 
Dean, School of Theology 



REV. MUREL R. VOGEL, SJ. 
Dean, School of Philosophy 



West Baden College, located in West 
Baden, Indiana, was founded in 1934, at 
which time it was affiliated with Loyola Uni- 
versity. The land and buildings are the gift 
of Charles Edward Ballard, who gave the 
famous resort to the Society of Jesus on the 
condition that they keep it intact. Formerly 
the West Baden Springs Hotel, the college 
was used only as a philosophate in the first 
five years. A faculty of theology was added 
in 1939, and in 1940 there was added another 
year of subject matter in theology. By 1942 
all four years of theology were taught there. 
It is now the School of Philosophy and The- 
ology for Jesuits of the Chicago Province of 
the Society of Jesus. On July 31, 1945, West 



Baden College was constituted a Pontifical 
Institute of the Holy See, and empowered to 
grant canonical degrees. 

Rev. Murel R. Vogel, SJ., Ph.D., S.T.L., 
is the dean of the School of Philosophy, 
which has as its primary objective the com- 
pletion of the basic education in the humani- 
ties begun by Jesuit students at Xavier Uni- 
versity and to give them such training in 
philosophy and science as will equip them 
for their apostolic and educational labors in 
the Society of Jesus. Although scholastic 
philosophy constitutes the core of this three 
years of training, other specialized courses 
in particular fields, such as history, and Eng- 




Rev. Edward J. Hodous, 
S.J., Professor of Sacred 
Scripture, confers with 
two theologians. 



West dj a d e n (^oiii 



e a e 



f 



lish are included to develop scholarly inter- 
ests and to prepare the students for later 
educational duties. 

Rev. Edwin F. Healy, S.J., A.M., S.T.L., 
Mag. Agg., is the dean of the School of 
Theology. Fr. Healy spent several months 
this year in Rome where he served as the 
one representative from America on a com- 
mittee to revise the Ratio Studiorimi Superi- 
orum, a code which regulates the teaching of 
philosophy and theology to members of the 
order. 

In Fr. Healy's absence, Rev. Stephen E. 
Donlon, S.J., A.M., S.T.D., was acting dean. 

The course of studies requires four full 
years of academic work. Holy Orders, in- 
cluding the priesthood, are conferred not 



earlier than at the end of the third year of 
studies. The principal studies are: funda- 
mental theology, dogmatic theology, moral 
theology, sacred scripture, ecclesiastical his- 
tory, and canon law. 

Among the activities in which the Jesuit 
scholastics studying for the priesthood en- 
gage are student seminars, and academies on 
Catholic action and on social studies. Prac- 
tice in sacred oratory and speech continues 
throughout the better part of the seven years 
spent at West Baden. A speech work-shop 
with several sound-proof rooms and record- 
ing apparatus was recently installed as study 
aids in radio and microphone technique. For 
six weeks during the summer, the students 
teach catechism to over one hundred children 
at the summer vacation school. 



Ordination scene in West Baden College chapel 





w 



5 









t*..j,^' 






.^- 'i 



-v^^ -^ 
/* a 




REV. LAURENCE J. LYNCH, S.J. 
Unirersity Representative 




(J3 o a r d Of 



In April of 1947, the Student Union of 
Loyola University was reorganized under 
the guidance of Rev. Laurence J. Lynch, S.J. 

The post-war expansion of Loyola Uni- 
versity gave rise to the need for better in- 
tegration of the students of the colleges and 
campuses into a new student government. 
Fr. Lynch, having conferred with the presi- 
dent of the university, the Rev. James T. 
Hussey, S.J., and the deans of the colleges, 
presented a revised constitution to the con- 
gress, which ratified it on April 23, 1947. 

The purpose of the Loyola Union of 
Loyola University, stated comprehensively 
in the Preamble of the Constitution, is, "To 
unify the student body of Loyola University, 
to promote student unity in each school and 
college of the university, to provide liaison 
between the student body and the university, 
to support the religious program of the uni- 
versity, to encourage student academic and 
social societies, to govern the student body 
according to sound principles of self-govern- 
ment, to form and uphold traditions, to voice 
student opinion, to create wholesome 
relations among student organizations, to 
enlarge university life for succeeding gen- 
erations of students, to meet the needs of a 
greater Loyola student body and of a greater 
Loyola University; and to perpetuate the 
Loyola Union of Loyola University." 

Congressmen chosen for the legislative 
body of the Loyola Union are of three kinds : 
school congressmen, fraternity congressmen, 
and organizations congressmen. Each college 



KEVLX .AIULHERN 

President 




^ovepnopS 



elects not less than two nor more than six 
congressmen, and one congressman is sent 
from each of the fraternities and organiza- 
tions. A board of governors, which is the 
general executive committee, is elected from 
the congress in such a manner that all col- 
leges are represented on the board, together 
with representation for fraternities and or- 
ganizations, the alumni, the dean of women, 
the university administration, and the 
faculty. 

The congress meets four times a year, in 
February, April, October, and December, 



and the board of governors meets regularly 
in each month from September to May. The 
constitution has provisions for eight perma- 
nent committees which cari-y forward the 
activities passed upon by the congress, and 
prepare items for the attention of the board 
of governors, and for inclusion in the agenda 
of future congress meetings. These commit- 
tees are as follows: committee for religious 
welfare ; committee on internal relations ; 
committee on budget, management and 
finance; committee on interfraternity rela- 
tions; committee for student academic 




Tony Walsh 
Vice-President 



^he i/lnion — 



.^rom ^malt (Healnnl 



f 



ncid 



9 



n 




J. Anthony Baly 
Concessions Manager 



societies; committee on public relations; 
committee on union government ; and the 
committee on special delegations and exter- 
nal relations. 

In the elections held in February, 1950, 
Kevin P. Mulhern of the College of Arts and 
Sciences, the president for the previous year, 
turned the office over to Eugene N. Lipuma, 
of the College of Commerce who was unani- 
mously elected to the presidency of the 
Fourth Congress of the Loyola Union. 

With the guidance of Fr. Lynch, to- 
gether with the advisory aid of Rev. Jeremiah 
O'Callaghan, S.J., Miss Kate Meehan, dean 
of women, and Mr. Richard Matre of the lay 
faculty, the Loyola Union hopes to make 
steady advances toward the goal set out in 
its constitution. 

For the men and women students who 
participate, the patent benefits which derive 
from participation in student activities, and 
the practical knowledge of procedures and 
parliamentary methods used in conducting 
meetings will be of value to them in the ex- 
ercise of leadership in civic activities after 
they leave the university. 

Concessions 

The sources of revenue of the Loyola 
Union of Loyola University are the snack 
bars located on the Lake Shore and Lewis 
Towers campuses, and the book store, known 
as the Union Store, located at Lewis Towers. 
These concession rights granted to the union 
by the university are administered by a con- 
cessions manager appointed by the univer- 
sity. In addition to the usual school supplies 
and textbooks, the Union Store sells other 
current and important books; literary. 
Catholic, and philosophical, to compl^.jh^nt 



126 



rhe Board of Governors 
tudies the proposed 
ludget for 1950-51. 



^he employees of the 
Jnion Store are al- 
ways ready to solve 
our shopping prob- 
ems. 




Co 



nceSA lonS 



127 




The Union Snack Bar serves the 4000 students at Lewis Towers 



Now don't try and sell me a pipe I But how about those Loyola Records 
— I understand you have a few left. 



128 




Her Majesty, Miss Loyolan 




Step into my parlor 



George F. McDonnell 
Activities Manager 



the material used in the classrooms, and 
which are of importance in the promotion of 
the full cultural development of the student. 

Under the leadership of President Kevin 
P. Mulhern, the Third Congress voted for the 
appropriation of $70,000 for the conversion 
of a building on the Lake Shore Campus into 
a structure suitable for student activities on 
an all-university scale. This building has 
been officially named the Loyola Union 
House by the Board of Governors of the 
Fourth Congress, so that the idea will be im- 
mediately conveyed that it is for every mem- 
ber of the Loyola Union, that is, for every 
student in the many colleges of Loyola Uni- 
versity. 

This building will contain a large lounge 
with a capacity of about five hundred 
couples, a social room with a capacity of 
fifty couples, a snack bar, a book store, and 



facilities for the Loyola student publications. 
It is the hope of all the members of the 
Loyola Union, their congressmen, and 
Father Lynch that the Loyola Union House 
will become the center of social life for the 
future students of Loyola University — that 
it will be for them a place of fine companion- 
ship which shall remain the focus of treas- 
ured memories long after they have left 
school. Such is the tradition which we be- 
gin. We pass it on with the sure anticipation 
that succeeding students will add to its con- 
veniences, and firmly entrench in it the spirit 
of warm hospitality begun in the year 1950. 

Activities 

At the beginning of the Fall Semester 
in 1949, the Loyola Union participated in 
the arrangements for Freshmen Orientation 
Week. The program notes state that "The 




A Union election caucus 



Kevin Mulliern, retiring 

Union president greets 

Gene Lipuma, president- 
elect. 



129 



George McDonnell 
(left), activities mana- 
ger, discusses dance 
problem with President 
Mulhern. 



Loyola Union members 
act as barkers at 
NFCCS bazaar 



Bob Hylard calls for 
the winner of the 1950 
Ford at the NFCCS 
Bazaar 



Loyolans call on the 
Mundelein booth at 
Bazaar 



Frankie Carle crowns 
Pat Gilmore "^liss Loy- 
olan of 1950" 



Union Board of Gov- 
ernors at their monthly 
meeting 



The gentleman on the 
right seems to have the 
floor 



It's Hylard again! You 
might know. 




130 



^Araaina Stores, ^nack d^cit'Sj ^Arctiuities . . . 



week is one of mutual orientation: of the 
students to the university and the university 
to the students." 

The objectives which this group of acti- 
vities were planned to attain were to enable 
the university to learn of the problems of 
the entering student in order to solve them 
before classes met; to give the Freshmen an 
opportunity to become better acquainted 
with the university, its organization and fa- 
cilities, so that it might better serve their 
needs, and to introduce the members of the 
faculty to the students as a beginning of 
good student-teacher relationships ; to aid 
the student in understanding the scope of 
education at the college level, and particu- 
larly to the emphasis given at Loyola; and 
finally, to assist the freshmen in the details 
of the registration process. 

The culmination of Freshman Orienta- 
tion Week was the Freshman Welcome 
Dance held in the alumni gymnasium. The 
dance was so well attended by the freshmen 
and their dates that the union hopes it will 
become a permanent feature of a student's 
introduction to Loyola University. 

Four other dances were sponsored by 
the Loyola Union. The Junior Prom, in 
February, was held in the Aragon Ballroom, 
with music by Griff Williams. 

The Senior Ball, free to the seniors, held 
at the Congress Hotel in the first week of 
June was the union's parting gift to the sen- 
iors. This dance was another of Kevin Mul- 
hern's innovations to establish a strong 
school spirit. It is hoped that the congress 
will perpetuate the Senior Ball, as a farewell 
gesture to each graduating class. 

The Fall Frolic was held on October 21 
at the Congress Hotel, again in the Gold 
Room, with music by Del Rene and his Or- 
chestra. The dance proved to be another 
high point in the social affairs sponsored by 
the Loyola Union. 

The Winter Frolic was the most success- 
ful dance on the year's calendar. Frankie 
Carle furnished the music at the Grand Ball- 



room of the Stevens Hotel. The appeal of 
Carle's piano artistry ; the drawing power of 
the first "big-name" band made this a 
"must" affair, but the event was even more 
notable because it was the scene of the an- 
nouncement of the winner of the Queenship 
Contest. This event, the first in the history 
of Loyola, was won by Miss Patricia Gilmore 
of the College of Commerce. 

In support of athletic events the Loyola 
Union co-sponsored a broadca,st of the semi- 
final game between Loyola and Bradley over 
I'adio station WIND. Public and student re- 
action to this activity was very favorable. 
The Loyola Basketball Banquet held in the 
alumni gymnasium was also sponsored by 
the union to show our loyalty to the team. 
By the support given by the student body 
this activity promises to be an annual event. 

Participation in inter-college student 
activities was also promoted by the Loyola 
Union. This was accomplished by sending 
delegates from Loyola University to the na- 
tional and regional conventions of the 
N. F. C. C. S., and of N. S. A. 




Charles S. Rollings 
Publications Manager 



131 




John R. Jozwiak Chiistopher J. Fitzgerald 

Editor of Cadence Editor of Loyola News 



Dick Roth and John Gremer approve a piece 
of copy for the Loyolan 



132 



The Loyolan holds one of its periodical sub- 
scription drives 



Oh, please buy one of my yearbooks I 



Get me New York right away! It's very 
important. 



^y4 n d li I o w — 




y n r e e f"^^ u biicationd — 

^T ll'^eoirth of the cJLouoii 




The Board of Experts selecting the five fin- 
alists for the "Miss Loyolan" contest 



Ted Rickard, boy journalist, pounds out his 
weekly column for the Loyola News 



News staff busy at work decorating a Christ- 
mas tree for the annual party 



Managing Editor Art Bilek OK's the last 
story 



Dick Roth and Jack Tribble 
Co-Editors of the 1950 Loyolan 




U k e 195 rJLo UO I 



Bill Benjamin 
Photo Editor 




t, 



V V 



^^^ 



Gene Lipiima 
Printing Editor 



John Gremer Bob Hjiard 

Senior Editor Husiness Manager 








Tom Kyan 
Sports Editor 



Ed Lussler Dolores Pawlicki Ray Filitti 

Art Editor Organization Editor L'ndergrad Editor 



f 



CI n 



During the past year all the Loyola pub- 
lications have been incorporated into the 
Loyola Union. Our yearbook, The Loyolan, 
which you now hold, made its reappearance 
after an absence of three years. The new 
volume gives a complete view of Loyola life, 
in its academic, athletic, and social phases. 
Personality sketches of the administrators, 
articles on each of the colleges and schools, 
the history and activities of each of the fra- 
ternities and student organizations, photo- 
graphs of the students, the faculty, the 
campuses, all combine to form the perfect 
memento of Loyola University. 



^y /t e cU, o u o I a r I 



f 



e w S 



The Loyola News, the weekly newspaper 
of Loyola University has served to unite by 
communication, all the campuses of the uni- 
versity. Its weekly calendar of events, and 
feature articles announce the advent of all 
student activities. It treats of current plays, 
books, records and concerts in its reviews. 
Columns with by-lines both serious and hu- 
morous in nature are carried each week. 
Features and personality interviews on the 
administrators and faculties of the various 




Alt Bilek 
LS News Editor 



Bill Lambrecht 
Ass't Sports Editor 



colleges and schools of Loyola University are 
included from time to time. Inter-collegiate 
and intramural athletics receive full treat- 
ment on its excellent sports page, with an 
abundance of photographs of the teams in 
action, of individual members, and of our 
competition. The editorial page is widely 
read for its topical, pertinent comment on 
issues of the week within the school, and of 
the community and nation, which affect the 
university student. 







Clay Beirigan 
Sports Editor 



Bob Melvin 
LT News Editor 



Dick SiUes 
Make-up Editor 



134 




First Row: Dillon, Marvin, 
Costello, Roth, Tribble, 
Lipuma, Bascaglia, Paw- 
licki, Meany. Second Row: 
Filitti, Bilek, Duffin, Ben- 
jamin, Gremer, Scanlon, 
Ptak, Byrne, Melvin, Smol- 
inski. 



First Row: Smolinski, 
Raczykowski, Ermatinger, 
FitzGerald, N a b h o 1 1 z, 
Cassaretto, Byrne. Second 
Row: Costello, Rickard, 
Wieland, Scanlon, Shea- 
han, Bilek, Duffin, Lam- 
brecht. Wade, Benjamin, 
Tribble. Third Row: Gries, 
Berrigan, Sikes, Price, 
Johnson, Bagley, Melvin, 
Walling, Ryan, Neybert, 
Grant, Flanagan, Jozwiak. 



135 



Tom Sheahan 
I.T Fiction Editor 




Jack Nabholtz Jim Duffin 

LSC Feature Editor Business Manager 



(^ a d 



e n c e . . . 



Jjrn oLoiiola ^nouant 



7 



9' 



Cadence, the student magazine of 
Loyola University of Chicago, is a Loyola 
Union publication and is published four 
times during the school year. It has devel- 
oped into a fine medium for student self-ex- 
pression in the essay form, in short stories, 



poetry, reviews of books and plays, feature 
articles on topics of current and permanent 
interest, and in photography. Contests have 
been sponsored for excellence in short-story 
writing by this magazine, with cash prizes 
to the winners. 



First Row: Cox, Raczy- 
kowski, Jozwiak, Mack, 
Nabholtz. Second Row: 
Sheahan, Duffin, O'Con- 
nell, Andringa, B i 1 e k , 
Clever, Gries. 



136 







Raoul Disselhorst, vice-prefect ; Gerry Walling, pre- 
fect; At Bruno, second vice-prefect. 



S^odalitu Of \^ur oLclcIu 



The Sodality of the Blessed Virgin Mary 
on the Lake Shore Campus is a religious 
body which endeavors to foster in each of its 
members a fervent devotion to Mary, the 
Mother of Jesus Christ. Through such a de- 
votion the sodality has a three-fold aim of 
personal sanctification of each member, the 
salvation and sanctification of our neighbor, 
and the defense of the Church. The six-point 
sodality program for personal sanctification 
is: 1. Mass and Communion at least twice a 
week. 2. Mass and Communion at the stu- 
dent Mass on Fridays. 3. Attendance at the 
sodality meeting. 4. Fifteen minutes of 
spiritual meditation daily. 5. A daily fifteen 
minute examination of conscience. 6. Daily 
recitation of the rosary or the sodality office. 

Since its reactivation under the direc- 
tion of the Rev. James J. Mahoney, S.J., in 
the spring of 1949, the sodality has increased 
both its membership and activities. In Sep- 
tember, 1949, the Rev. John Mullin, S.J., 
succeeded Fr. Mahonev as moderator. Mem- 



bership was increased by the reception of 31 
new candidates on February 17, 1950 in the 
Madonna Delia Strada Chapel. Kevin P. 
Mulhern, prefect, and Malachy Cleary, as- 
sistant prefect, were succeeded in office in 
February, 1950, by Gerald Walling, prefect, 
and Albert Bruno, first assistant prefect. 
Other officers are Raoul Disselhorst, second 
assistant prefect; John Grace, secretary; and 
Edward Lucas, sacristan. 

Some sodality activities are the outdoor 
recitation of a rosary decade in conjunction 
with Mundelein college during the months of 
October and May, noon-day recitation of the 
sodality office in the Madonna Delia Strada 
Chapel, first Friday exposition of the Blessed 
Sacrament and Benediction, the rosary and 
cross crusades, presentation of lectures at 
student assemblies, support of Marian pro- 
grams and Friendship House activities, old 
clothes and Christmas basket collections for 
the poor, distribution of Catholic literature, 
and a mission fund collection. 




First Row: Mahony, Mar- 
cin, Fr. Mullin, S.J., Cor- 
coran, Walling. Second 
Row: Blais, G r i e s, 
O'Grady. Jones, Schillaci. 
Third Row: Ochs, Lucas, 
Grubba, Charlebois, For- 
meller, Simmons. Fourth 
Row: Disselhorst, BichI, 
Cunningham, Moran, Ob- 
rochta. Fifth Row: Loef- 
fler, Blanchette, Horan, 
Koulbach. 



137 




\cs^aeen of the rvlodt ^-hrolu 
u S^oauliLu 



First Row: Frances Cibula, recording secretary; Fr. 
Hogan, moderator; Chester Koziol, prefect. Second 
Row: Jerry Koch, executive secretary; Hugh Fitz- 
gerald, social chairman; Ed Keefe, treasurer; Leo 
Zuleger, vice-prefect ; Frank Higgins, co-prefect. 



Three and one-half years ago the Queen 
of the Most Hoh^ Rosary SodaHty was Uttle 
more than an idea in the minds of its found- 
ing fathers. In October of 1946, twelve 
members of the Lewis Towers Commerce 
and Arts and Sciences Colleges, under the 
guidance of the Rev. William P. Walsh, S.J., 
formed the nucleus of the Lewis Towers 
Sodality. It was not until the following 
March that the sodality was officially ap- 
proved by the Prima Primaria in Rome as an 
organ of the Church. From these infantile 
beginnings the Queen of the Most Holy Ros- 
ary Sodality was expanded until it has be- 
come, at present, the largest organization of 
its kind at Loyola with over two hundred and 
fifty members. 

The first presiding officers of the then 
newly created Sodality were: Gregory Ney- 



f\o3a rii ^o act tl ti 



bert, prefect 1946-1948; Jack Fedderson, 
vice-prefect; Daniel Jette, treasurer; and 
Mike Tenore, executive secretary. 

The prime purpose of the sodality is 
personal sanctification and the application of 
Cathohc principles to the lives and activities 
of Loyola students through devotion to the 
Mother of Christ. 

Under the present moderatorship of the 
Rev. Joseph F. Hogan, S.J., and Chester 
Koziol, prefect for the past two years, the 
sodality holds first Friday breakfasts with 
speakers, and fosters frequent Communion, 
May devotions, and devotions to the Sacred 
Heart. Other functions include the singing 
of Christmas carols, relief drives and a 
rosary crusade. Socially the sodality has 
sponsored two yearly dances for its mem- 
bers, friends, and guests. It also has several 
parties and picnics throughout the year. 

In addition to prefect, Chester Koziol, 
other officers include Frances Cibula, Frank 
Higgins, Jerry Koch, Hugh Fitzgerald, Den- 
nis O'Dowd, Henry Tabak, and Leo Zuleger. 



First Row: Cibula, Koch, 
Zuleger, Koziol, Fr. Ho- 
gan, Higgins, O'Dowd, 
M u 1 V i h i 1 1, Fitzgerald, 
Skepnek. Second Row: 
Yuhas, Cleary, JNIarinier, 
Bertog, Russell, Soapinski, 
Pawlowski, L e n n a n e, 
Kaveny, Gans, CuUinan, 
Tabak, Flynn, Heintz. Third 
Row : HoUerbach, Munro, 
Andriez, Grogan, Cook, 
Melvin, Keane, Neybert, 
Brady, Kula, Nickel, Ten- 
ore, Krause, Fitzpatrick, 
Piedfort. 



138 






_#, 


^1 *>7 .^^^^^fc. 


il'lu don n a ^Jje tic i ^ tra da 


C' ^WmI. ^jk^.w 




^odalitu 


nl 





The Madonna Delia Strada Sodality is 
composed of students attending late after- 
noon and evening classes at Lewis Towers. 
It has for its ultimate goal personal sanctifi- 
cation. 



First How: Angela Anzalone. secretary; Edward 
Finnegan, co-prefect : Fr. Hogan, moderator ; Pat 
Mclnerney, co-prefect ; August Strueck, treasurer. 
Second Row: Joanne Gealy, public relations; S. W. 
Skertic, vice-social prefect; Joan Kearns, social pre- 
fect. 



Among the successful activities of the 
sodality are the day of recollection and 
rosary crusade sponsored each semester for 
the spiritual benefit of the members of the 
evening school. The dances given by this 
organization are well-remembered by all in 
attendance at Loyola. Regular monthly meet- 
ings are held on the last Wednesday of each 
month. 

After a reorganization of the group, 
Betty Gannon Harrell, prefect for two years, 
was succeeded by two co-prefects, Pat Mcln- 
erney and Edward Finnegan. Angela Anza- 
lone is secretary ; August Strueck, treasurer ; 
Joan Kearns, Jerome Murray and Francis 
Bush, spiritual committee; Lorraine Call, 
Mary Elizabeth Crowley and Stephen Sker- 



tic, social committee ; Joanne Gealy and Rob- 
ert Schweik, public relations committee. The 
Rev. Joseph F. Hogan, S.J., is moderator. 

The mission group is now headed by 
Delphine Healey and Kathleen Keating. This 
group of over one hundred alumnae has been 
in existence for over twenty years. Their 
activities include making altar linens and 
vestments and supporting Patna missions. 
Quantities of medicine have been sent to In- 
dia. The alumnae meetings are held four 
times a year. These include a day of collec- 
tion. The Rev. Thomas Egan, SJ.. is mod- 
erator of the alumnae group. 




First Row: Kay Ready, Ed 
Finnegan, Fr. Hogan, Pat 
.Alclnerney, Angela Anza- 
lone, August Strueck. Sec- 
ond Row: Joanne Gealy, 
Francis Bush, Mary Crow- 
ley, Steve Skertic, William 
O'Leary, Joan Kearns, 
Michael A. Tenore. 



1.39 



^ 



c c o u n 



t 



First Row: Ghinelli, Cuc- 
cio, iMcManus, Costello, 
Keefe, Jlr. Dwyer, Mor- 
ande. McLaughlin. Second 
Row: Hanley, Johnston, 
Ellert, Moynihan, Gawel, 
Varrassi, JlcCutcheon. 
Walsh. Third Row: Slapin- 
ski, K 1 a c z e k, Musial, 
Wojciechowski, Murphy, 
Banke, Tackes, Schleit- 
wiler, Hartigan. Fourth 
Row: Boling, O'Grady, 
Mitkey, Trejo, Schornack, 
R. Kuhn, Steinbeck, Kuhn. 



First Row: Marshall, 
Sikes, Jlr. Thomas J. 
Buckley, Dreyer, Walsh. 
Second Row: Capek, 
Glunz, Bilek, Xowicki, 
Lockie. 




Ia5 e i i a p 



mine 



PL 



140 



C^ i a b 



The Accounting Club of Loyola Univer- 
sity was organized in December, 1949. A 
need for the organization arose when the 
number of students majoring in accounting 
grew rapidly with the rise of enrollment in 
the School of Commerce. 

The general purpose of this organization 
is to further the study in and promote the 
advancement of the field of accounting. The 
specific purposes of the club are: to stimu- 
late group and individual study of problems 
and controversial areas in the fields of ac- 
counting practice and theory; to improve 
student-faculty, learning-teaching relation- 
ships ; to present leaders in the several fields 
of public and private accounting as guest 
speakers to assemblies of the organization; 
and to establish relationships between the 
College of Commerce and these professional 
leaders. 

Membership is not limited to students 
majoring in accounting. All students of the 
College of Commerce who are in good stand- 
ing and have successfully completed one 
course in accounting are eligible for member- 
ship. 

The elective officers of the organization 
are: president, vice-president, treasurer, re- 




First Row: Harold McLaughlin, recording secretary; 
Louis Morande, vice-president; Richard Keefe, treas- 
urer; Andrew Caccio, president; Charles Hartigan, 
corresponding secretary; Mr. J. Dwyer, moderator. 



cording secretary, and corresponding secre- 
tary. There is also an executive board which 
consists of the officers and five appointed 
members of the organization. 

The moderator of the Accounting Club 
is Mr. John Dwyer, assistant professor of 
accounting. Because of his association with 
accountants from all branches of business, 
Mr. Dwyer is able to fulfill the requirements 
of his position. 

At present the Commerce School offers 
twenty-one different courses in accounting 
subjects ; this fact alone seems to insure the 
growth and prosperity of the Accounting 
Club. Although the organization is new and 
has had a small beginning, the members of 
the Accounting Club are confident that it will 
prove to be one of the most stable and pro- 
gressive organizations of Loyola University. 



The Bellarmine Philosophy Society is an 
academic organization composed of a group 
of students who wish to make a more thor- 
ough study of the many problems which are 
not specifically treated in their philosophy 
courses. The society is named after the great 
Jesuit saint and philosopher, St. Robert Bel- 
larmine. The society offers its members the 
opportunity of putting into practice the prin- 
ciples, facts, and theories which are learned 
in their classroom studies. The members of 
the society believe that informal discussions 
of academic problems among students are a 
major part of a well rounded education. 

The policy of maintaining one subject 
throughout a school year was adopted unani- 
mously in 1939, at the suggestion of Rev. 
James J. Mahoney, S.J., and it has been con- 
tinued ever since. Last year the members 
discussed The Spirit of Medieval Philosophy 
by Etienne Gilson. Jacques Maritain's Art 
and Scholasticism was studied this year. 



060 



n u S^ o 



pn^ 



c i e t 



^ 



Meetings of the club are held bi- 
monthly. In addition to the informal discus- 
sions at these meetings, members of the Bel- 
larmine Philosophy Society often participate 
in symposia pertaining to philosophical sub- 
jects, not only at Loyola, but at other uni- 
versities as well. 

Officers of the society for 1949-50 in- 
clude John Dryer, president; Richard Sikes, 
vice-president; and Edmond Walsh, secre- 
tary-treasurer. 

Mr. Thomas J. Buckley is the moderator 
of the Bellarmine Philosophy Society. 



John Dreyer, Dick Sikes, Ed Walsh, 
Mr. Buckley, moderator. 




m^ Jk 




M ti 


0t^ 


mmi ■ 


1%. 




First Row: Hazard, Mar- 
bach, Schlesser, Mr. Po- 
tempa, Duffy, Jankowski, 
Adams. Second Row: Hoff- 
man, Gauer, Parker, Nor- 
ris, Citko, Rink, Scanlon. 
Third /Joit'; Anderson, Pig- 
natiello, Bauer, Goyky, 
Thompson, Bradshaw, 
Clutter, Welter, Feldmann. 



The Chemistry Club was formed to cor- 
relate the theory of lecture with the practical 
applications of the subject in the industrial 
world. 

During class the professor can point to 
but comparatively few of the vast possibili- 
ties in the field, so the club undertakes indi- 
cating others of them. In truth, the club 
does more than indicate them, for it arranges 
field trips to various commercial plants for 
student tours. Often there are lectures and 
demonstrations given. Informal discussion 
among the student members serves to 
heighten interest in the subject as well as 
further the individual's knowledge of re- 
search and newly developed techniques. 

Plans are already under way to make 
next year a bigger year than ever for the 
Chemistry Club. Members are hoping the 
club will break its enrollment record. 






Norbert Schlesser, president; John Heffer- 
ren, secretary-treasurer ; Frank Cicero, vice- 
president; Thomas Martinek, pledgemaster. 

The moderator of the club is Mr. Sylves- 
ter J. Potempa. 



first Row: VVilford Ross, librarian; Norbert Schles- 
ser, president: Sylvester J. Potempa, moderator; John 
Hefferren, secretary-treasurer. Second Row: Frank 
Cicero, vice-president; Thomas Martinek, pledge- 
master. 




first /Joij): Sheahan; Buck- 
ley; VituUo; Mr. Stinson, 
moderator; Lipuma; Cas- 
saretto, Jankowski. Second 
Row: J o s s e y, Simmons, 
Blanchette, Borucki, Spat- 
afora, Grant. Third Row: 
Wolfe, Godula, Scorby, 
Marcin, Flanagan, Jakala. 




cfDebciti 
^ocietu 



n^ 



The ability to speak logically and con- 
cisely and to express one's thoughts clearly 
and convincingly is an asset of invaluable 
importance. It is to develop in its members 
this proficiency, and to train them to assume 
responsibility by acting as representatives of 



Vincent Vitullo, president: Mr. D. Stinson, modera- 
tor; Eugene Lipuma, vice-president; Kevin Buckley, 
secretary. 




the University that the Debating Society 
exists. 

It is an honor and a trust to represent 
the university in any extra-curricular acti- 
vity, and earnest worthy debaters are privi- 
leged to participate in national tournaments 
in various sections of the country, in local 
tournaments in the Chicago area, and in in- 
dividual debates with teams from all over the 
country. 

The Loyola Debating Society has been 
engaged in one of the most active years of 
its history. Participation in over seventy- 
five intercollegiate debates, one radio debate, 
and several demonstration debates for clubs 
at Loyola as well as civic organizations in 
Chicago, kept all of the debaters busy with 
the issues involved in the topic: "Nationali- 
zation of the basic non-agricultural indus- 
tries." 

Seven mid-west college tournaments 
were attended by members of the society 
with the decisions favoring the Loyola teams 
in the great majority. Two tournaments 
were sponsored by the society: one, held at 
Lewis Towers in March, brought debaters 
from twelve colleges and universities of the 
Chicago area; the second, sponsored jointly 
with Mundelein College, was held for debat- 
ers of the Catholic high schools of the arch- 
diocese of Chicago. 

Loyola has always been highly regarded 
as a source of excellent debating teams and 
this year's group has helped to continue this 
high tradition as well as to give individual 
benefit to its members. 



143 



First Row: Andringa, Weh- 
ner. Gliinz, Mr. Gensert. 
Mulvey, Adihoch. Second 
Row: Kioll, Janesz, Tekip, 
Hollerbach. Cibula, Dug- 
gan, Home, Kirchen. 
Moore. 




Der Turm-Verein, the German Club at 
Loyola, is a social-academic organization. It 
was begun in April, 1948, at Lewis Towers. 
It now embraces those students on both 
campuses, day and evening divisions, who 
meet the requirements — a minimum grade 
of C in the course they are currently taking 
in German at time of application, and a de- 
sire to cultivate a deeper understanding and 
appreciation of the language and culture of 
the German-speaking peoples. 



Der Turm-Verein is very active socially. 
In addition to lectures on German culture, 
socials are held after every meeting with the 
typically German beer and pretzels and Ger- 
man songs being featured. 

This year the club sponsored a success- 
ful mixer in the Union Lounge, L. T., which 
was open to the entire student body. In ad- 
dition to these activities several parties, 
picnics, etc., are held during the school year 
for members and their guests. 



First Row: Louis Glunz, Mr. Gensert, Ed Finnegan. 
Second Row: Betty Wehner, Joe Janesz, Joanne 

Mulvey. 



i^Der ^urm- Uerei 



n 



144 




^conomic6 



C^ t a b 




First Row: Bill Spencer, Chris Louehios, Harold 
Peponis, Gerry Posvic. Second Row: Edwin Remian, 
Bob Melvin, Alice Quinlan, Frank Ghinelli. Don 
Powers. 



The Economics Society of Loyola Univer- 
sity has for its primary purpose the stimula- 
tion of interest in current economic thought. 
The society encourages the free exchange of 
ideas on economics and promotes discussion 
of domestic and international affairs of an 
economic nature. A firmer understanding of 
the practical aspects of modern economics, as 
well as an outlet for original economic 
thought is achieved by the members. 

The objectives of the organization are 
accomplished by presenting qualified lectur- 
ers and business men. Invitations are also 
extended to interested groups in other col- 
leges and universities to participate in 
round-table discussions. This has become 
an important part in the activities of the 
society. 

The activities of the Economic Society 
during the last year were: weekly movies of 



economic interest during the first semester 
and monthly during the second semester, 
round-table discussions with Mundelein and 
Rosary Colleges, discussion programs on 
current economics over radio station WGES, 
participation in the Founders Day program 
in which an exhibit showing the economic 
changes during the last hundred years was 
presented in graphic and display fashion, 
and a series of lectures on such subjects as 
collective bargaining, and the future of coal 
in our economy. On the social side the club 
presented two lounge mixers, socials with the 
economics clubs at Mundelein and Rosary 
Colleges, a picnic, and a club social for new 
members. 

Although at the present time the mem- 
bership of the Economics Society is made up 
primarily of College of Commerce students. 
Arts School students are encouraged to par- 
ticipate in the activities of the club. 




First Row: S h a r k o , 
Mischke, Ghinelli, Peponis, 
Louehios, Posvic, Spencer, 
Lipuma, Melvin. Second 
Row: Yuhas, Remian, John- 
son. Powers, Willwerth, 
Zawislak, Rubinstein. 
Quinlan. Third Row: Lip- 
sey, Smolinski, French, 
Saletta, Kahn, Becker, 
Young. 



145 



S^ocletu 




Bob O'Connell, president; James Cox, vice-president. 



The Gerard Manley Hopkins Literary 
Society is an organization devoted to a study 
of literature from the Catholic viewpoint. 
They are currently considering the novel in 
its many aspects with selections ranging 
from Kafka to Waugh. The society has no 
purpose beyond satisfying the desire of stu- 
dents interested in literature to meet and 
discuss among themselves their tastes and 
opinions concerning selected works. Among 
the most popular selections which the soci- 
ety has discussed to date are Brideshead 
Revisited and Das Schloss. 



The society collects no dues and, while it 
is in no way opposed to functions of a strictly 
social nature, has not sponsored or is not con- 
templating sponsoring any such affairs. 
Membership in the society is open to anyone 
in the College of Arts and Sciences or the 
Graduate School. The spirit which pervades 
the society's meetings is one of enthusiasm 
and cooperation. 

The moderator of the society is Rev. 
Norman T. Weyand, S.J. The officers : Rob- 
ert O'Connell, president; James Cox, vice- 
president. 




First Row: Harvey, O'Con- 
nell, Cox, FitzGerald. Sec- 
ond Row: Jozwiak, Fr. 
Weyand, S.J., Ochs. 




D. Herbert Abel, Ph.D., moderator; Edward F. Stace, 
president ; Ilene A. Schoenan, treasurer. 



It was last October that Epsilon Pi 
Epsilon was brought back to hfe at Loyola 
University. Beginning with only a nucleus 
of members, the club has steadily grown 
through the few months of its renewed ex- 
istence. The interests of the club are wholly 
classical, as its name, "Comrades of Greek 
culture", implies. 

This club serves to increase the appre- 
ciation for and the knowledge of the culture 
of Greece and Rome among the students of 
that field and in other fields. 

It is the plan of the president, Mr. Ed- 
ward F. Stace, with his two associates, Miss 
Theano Tomaras. vice-president, and Miss 
Eileen Schoenau, secretary-treasurer, to con- 
tinue soliciting members and to extend the 
club's activities and interest in things classi- 
cal. To Miss Terry Kane, the social chair- 
man, is entrusted the business of introducing 
culture to the meetings in numerous subtle 
ways — ■ by way, perhaps, of some Massic or 
Mabrodaphne wine. 



Before its reorganization, the club met 
each month, usually in the student lounge. 
In their discussions the members defined the 
value of the classics, learned about the social 
customs of that time, and took up the works 
of the philosophical sages of the era. They 
took up classical music and Greek architec- 
ture. The mode of teaching Latin among 
European Universities was explained. An in- 
teresting topic was the Roman use of "mod- 
ern" inventions such as plumbing. The form 
of life among the ancients, particularly that 
of Socrates, also created considerable inter- 
est. 

Now, under the direction of Dr. Abel, 
the moderator, and with the assistance of Dr. 
Kapsalis and the Classics Department, Epsi- 
lon Pi Epsilon has inaugurated a plan to have 
a guest-speaker at each meeting. During the 
first semester, Mr. Parr, Dr. McKian and Dr. 
Abel, all of Loyola University, and Dr. Ern- 
est Highbarger of Northwestern University, 
have lectured on classical civilization and 
allied cultural topics. 



First Row: Rev. John Suc- 
ackas, S..l„ Ilene Schoenau, 
Edward Stace, D. Herbert 
Abel, Irene Swarz. Second 
Row: Gordon Pender, 
Theano Tomaras, Jack 
Nabholtz, Terry Kane, 
Hugh Fitzgerald. 




First Row: Raczkowski, 
Gorney, Crowley, Sullivan, 
Pacilio, Miss O'Dwyer, No- 
land, Heintz. Second Row: 
Scarpelli, Kozak, Skepnek, 
Higgins, Bunning, Mount- 
ford, Kenney, Reynolds, 
Miller. Third Row: Rosen- 
berg, Dunkley, Grogan, 
Sommers, O'Dowd, Lagat- 
tuta. Linehan, W e r v e, 
Tabak. 



First Row: Ryan, Jozwiak, 
Cleary, Mr. Matre, Horan. 
Second Row: McCarthy, 
McCarthy, Hefferren, 
Begg, Schuster. Third 
Row: Buckley, McGrath, 
Campbell, Dunne, Hen- 
nessy. 



rJ^ O U O t CI J^ I A t { 



148 




Jj^ n tepncitlonci\ 



I C CI 



I So 



del 



^ 



In March of 1949, the Loyola Historical 
Society was formed as a scholastic society 
of the university in order to further the in- 
terests of humanity through the study of 
history and by the same medium to encour- 
age a high scholastic spirit among the stu- 
dents at Loyola University. Its establish- 
ment was the culmination of the work of its 
five student founders, William Dennis Sul- 
livan, James V. Pacilio, Henry J. Tabak, 
Michael Lagattuta, and Robert W. Daley. 
The founders, acting as pro-tern officers, 
guided the Loyola Historical Society through 
its first unsteady months of life. They were 
assisted in this project by the Historical So- 
ciety's capable moderator. Miss Margaret 
O'Dwyer of the History Department of 
Loyola University. 

The Society usually meets on the last 
Thursday of each month of the school year. 
At these meetings various programs are pre- 
sented for the enjoyment of members and 
guests. The programs have included guest 
speakers who have lectured on subjects re- 




Michael Lagattuta, treasurer ; Dennis O'Dowd, vice- 
president; James Pacilio, president; Margaret 
O'Dwyer, moderator; Henry Tabak, secretary. 



lated to history, student panel discussions 
which have presented problems of a histori- 
cal nature, and motion picture films. 

Among its other activities the Loyola 
Historical Society in conjunction with the 
Loyola Radio Workshop and Station WGES 
in Chicago has presented several radio panel 
discussions during the year. At these broad- 
casts members of the society presented their 
views on various historical topics. 

Now, established firmly, the society 
looks forward to an extremely active parti- 
cipation in university affairs. 



The International Relations Club, one of 
the most active groups in the school, has, 
during the past year, presented many pro- 
grams especially designed to acquaint its 
members with the many complex problems 
facing the world today. 

Organized on the basis that an active 
club demands interested and active members, 
student participation, as a result, has been 
stressed. Numerous panels have been pre- 
sented by the members, and less frequently, 
guest speakers have made an appearance. 
The student panel on "U. S. Foreign Policy 
in China," and another, "Spain and Recog- 
nition," are two of the more interesting and 
provocative questions thoroughly discussed 
by the club. Guest speaker. Prince Francis 
Schwarzenburg's talk on Communism in 
Czechoslovakia, will long be remembered as 
the high point of student interest in Interna- 
tional Relations Club activities. 

The club has realized many worth-while 
gains. It has, through its panels and other 
activities, acquainted the student body with 



^./, 



/ 



CI t i o n 6 



L^ I u b 



the international talking-points, and has 
tried to show what the Catholic college stu- 
dent's attitude should be towards these 
problems. 

It is extremely unlikely that the club 
will ever be at a loss for knotty discussions, 
at least not while the world remains in the 
present state of confusion. If, however, like- 
lihoods are to be proffered, then future years 
will see the International Relations Club oc- 
cupy and fulfill its role of informant and in- 
terpreter of the complex international prob- 
lems, now of such vital importance to the 
individual college student. 



John Horan, secretary-treasurer; Jack Jozwiak, vice- 
president; -Malachy Cleary, president; Mr. Matre, 
moderator. 





First Row: Fiirman, Yu- 
has, L i p u m a , Wrezel, 
Mischke, Remian, Ziemba, 
Costello, Thart, Grgula. 
Second Row: Hoffman, 
Stathdee, Lenigan, Becker, 
Ore, Jahns. Beeftink, 
Stanton, Laffaldano, Bar- 
thel, Melvin, Hodapp. 
Third Row: K o 1 i m a s, 
Keeley, Welters, Rogers, 
Hegwein, Blake, Reinwald, 
^loynihan, Jarmuth, Smol- 
inski, Ebbinger. 



The 1949-50 school year brought to 
Loyola a new organization — the Loyola 
University Marketing Club. This club was 
organized through the efforts of Dr. K. B. 
Haas, head of the Marketing Department, 
and Daniel J. Heffernan, a Commerce School 
senior. The club is affiliated with the 
American Marketing Association as a junior 
member. Two organizational meetings have 
been held during which a constitution was 
written and officers elected. 

The general purpose of the organization 
is to create intei-est in the field of marketing, 
and to encourage study and research in the 
field, thereby aiding in its advancement. To 
assist in the achievement of these goals the 
Marketing Club plans to invite men, experi- 
enced in the practical aspects of marketing, 
to address the club members and all inter- 
ested students. Field trips to various Chi- 
cago industries are also planned. The pri- 
mary purpose of these trips is to familiarize 
the members with some of the problems of 
production, promotion, and distribution. 

The Marketing Club, though one of the 
youngest organizations in the school, has laid 
plans for a very active, ambitious program 
— all for a greater Loyola. 



r V la rhetina 
L^ lab 



First Row: Harry McCloskey, faculty advisor; 
Eugene Wrezel, president ; Eugene Mischke, chair- 
man; Dr. Kenneth Haas, chairman of Marketing 
Department and moderator. Second Row: Lottie 
Ziemba, corresponding secretary; Edward Reimien, 
vice-president ; Donald Swiess, recordini; secretary. 




First Row: Dobnikar, Wat- 
son, Ryan, Dr. Kobler, Zak, 
Tabor, Nachowicz, Turvey. 
Second Row: Batryn, Clo- 
hesy, Stanek, Skibbens, 
Socha, Schweitzer. Third 
Row: Rehm O'Leary, Ob- 
rochta, Skertic, Gersch, 
Heintz. 




5> 



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I 6 ucho to alccti 
IKe6 ecircn 



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Lawrence A. Watson, secretary; John Ryan, presi- 
dent; Dr. Frank Kobler, moderator; George Zak, vice- 
president; Anthony Tabor, treasurer. 




The Loyola Psychological Research So- 
ciety, a student organization at Loyola Uni- 
versity, is composed of men and women, both 
resident students and alumni, engaged in the 
serious study of the structure and function 
of the human personality. 

The object of the society is to present 
to its members practical and interesting 
aspects of psychology, to promote beneficial 
discussions on all phases of this science, to 
provide ways and means to see and under- 
stand psychology in action, and to create a 
sense of fellowship among students of 
psychology. 

This end is accomplished by procuring 
speakers from among men prominent in the 
various fields of psychology, by the presenta- 
tion of exceptional psychological motion pic- 
tures, by the sponsoring of symposia on in- 
teresting questions in the science, by visiting 
mental hospitals and institutions, by con- 
ducting surveys of the opportunities in the 
field of psychology, by creating a social at- 
mosphere favorable to a friendly exchange of 
ideas, and by the meeting of individuals with 
similar interests and aspirations. 

Psycho, official paper of the society, is 
devoted to bringing to the attention of the 
members recent developments in psychology 
and news of current opportunities in the 
field. 



151 



First Row: Worman, ilack, 
Janusz, Hebtins. Fr. Wide- 
man, SJ., Finch, Parker, 
Borucki, Jekot. Second 
Row: Oakey, Cody, Pord il- 
eal, Condron, Nowicki. 
Lippe. Third Row: Alonzi, 
Pignatiello, Gorny, Pro- 
pach, Fischer, Wengelew- 
ski, Crisanti, Andrejewski. 




The Wasmann Biological Society has 
chapters in Jesuit colleges and universities 
throughout the United States. The chapter 
at Loyola was founded in 1940 under the 
guidance of Rev. Charles J. Wideman, S.J. 
At present this organization boasts the larg- 
est active membership of any group in the 
university. 

The purpose of the society is to stimu- 
late interest in the biological sciences, to in- 
troduce into and foster in the society a social 
spirit among its members, to form and up- 
hold traditions, and finally to perpetuate the 
Loyola chapter of the Wasmann Biological 
Society. This is accomplished by original 
research, by scientific lectures and demon- 
strations held periodically throughout the 



school term, and by encouraging members to 
do independent work in biology with subse- 
quent publication of the findings in the offi- 
cial paper of the society, The Probe. 

Every year the society sponsors a popu- 
lar lecture series known as "The Wasmann 
Forum," a student symposium, and an exhi- 
bition of project work in the laboratories. 
Trips to museums, to hospitals for the obser- 
vation of operations, and to county and city 
institutions are sponsored throughout the 
year. 

Membership of the organization is lim- 
ited to students having at least a 2.0 aver- 
age. Those who average 2.6 in biology are 
privileged to wear the Wasmann key. 



w. 



udmann 



(l3loloalcat S^oclet 



'9 



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152 



First Row: Charles Hebting, vice-president; Fr. 
Wideman, moderator; John Finch, president. Second 
Row: Al Janusz, treasurer; Leo Parker, secretary. 





First Row: Patricia Ruane, 
Lawrence McCartliy, Do- 
lores Melvin. Second Row: 
Roy Rohn, Jack Barker, 
Frank Clark, Francis Mc- 
Malion. 



Alpha Kappa Delta was organized in 
1913, at the University of Southern Califor- 
nia. Loyola University was granted a 
charter in 1922, and the organization func- 
tioned under the direction of the Rev. Fred- 
erick Seidenburg, S.J., until the Rev. Ralph 
A. Gallagher, S.J., took over the direction of 
the society in 1936. After a lapse of activi- 
ties during the war years, the society was 
reorganized at Loyola in 1947, by Theodore 
E. Cornell, Jr., a former officer of the society. 

Alpha Kappa Delta is a national frater- 
nity of sociology students dedicated to the 
achievement of a rational social order by the 



scientific investigation of social phenomena 
and the practical application of the knowl- 
edge thus derived. 

The Loyola chapter, Beta of Illinois, has 
at present fifteen members, drawn from both 
the undergraduate and graduate divisions. It 
remains under the direction of the Rev. 
Ralph A. Gallagher, S.J., regent of the 
School of Social Administration, and chair- 
man of the Department of Sociology. 

The officers of the organization for the 
current year are: Lawrence McCarthy, 
president; Patricia Ruane, vice-president; 
Dolores Melvin, secretary. 



Patricia Ruane, vice-president; Lawrence McCarthy, 
president; Dolores Melvin, secretary. 




^ff./. 



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158 



Alpha Sigma Nu, the National Jesuit 
Honor Society, is organized to honor students 
who have distinguished themselves in schol- 
arship, loyalty, and service to the university. 
Its purpose is to promote all the various 
activities of the university and all laudable 
activities of the students and student organi- 
zations; to band together those alumni who 
most fully understand and appreciate the 
ideals of a Jesuit education, and to impress 
those ideals upon their fellow men. An 
Alumni Chapter of Alpha Sigma Nu exists 
at Loyola, and all Alpha Sigma Nu members 
become eligible for it upon graduation from 
the University. 



flu 



9 



ma 




Front Row: John T. Kele- 
her. School of Law, secre- 
tary; Rev. Walter Slowiak, 
Institute of Social .Admin- 
istration; J. Kenneth .Man- 
ley. School of Law ; Robert 
Kehoe, .School of Social 
Work ; John Niemeyer, Col- 
lege of .\rts and Science; 
Ervin G. Mertes, I'niver- 
sity Collese. Second Row: 
Richard E. Murphy, School 
of Law, president 1949- 
1950; Allan E. McKeough, 
Jr., College of .Vrts and 
Science; Martin J. Burns, 
College of Commerce ; Paul 
Joseph Von Ebers, Gradu- 
ate School; Thomas A. 
Kelly, College of Com- 
merce; John Nugent, Col- 
lege of Arts and Science; 
Ha yd en T. De Decker. 
School of Dentistry; Ed- 
ward J. Dolaz, School of 
Medicine; M. Lawrence 
Weinstein, School of Medi- 
cine; James E. Hoppers, 
School of Dentistry; Ed- 
mund J. .\pcel, .School of 
Commerce. 




Udl) Alodt'. so< r('tary-tit'asiir<'r : Kd Mailnii'li. presi- 
dent; Dr. Cassaretto, moderator; Wilford Koss, 
Union congressman. 



rJLcimbclci K^hl 
S^ iama 



9 



Lambda Chi Sigma was established in 
1936 as an honorary fraternity to recognize 
and inspire scholarly excellence in chemistry 
and to promote ancl encourage scientific re- 
search. Realizing the need of producing 
men equipped not only to solve the problems 
of philosophy which attend everything, its 
purpose is to stimulate the balanced educa- 
tion of chemists so that they may see clearly 
the fundamental relation between scientific 
truth and the Creator, that they may impress 
upon the scientific world the stamp of a 
Christian culture and science insofar as it is 
within their power. 

In a secondary sense the fraternity is an 
award for distinction in chemical studies, in 
that it presents to the student of chemistry a 
stimulus to greater efliort on his part that he 
may attain the requisite qualifications for 
membership. In this manner, Lambda Chi 
Sigma will act as a driving force toward the 
better accumulation of chemical knowledge 
while the student is in school, and as a means 
but all too often forgotten, part of the appli- 
cation of that knowledge once he has entered 
into the industrial field. 

Members of the fraternity are given the 
opportunity of hearing papers read by chem- 
ists engaged in industrial as well as purely 
academic research. 



First Row: Scanlon, Hoff- 
man, Mode, Marbach, Hef- 
ferren, Schumann. Second 
Row: Dr. Budde, Dr. Low- 
rey, Mr. Potempa, Dr. 
Evans, Dr. Cassaretto. 




PLi ^l 



First Row: Jakala, Tro- 
man, Mr. Stinson, Shea- 
han, Jossey, Jankowski. 
Second Row: Vitullo, 
Buckley, Behr, Lipuma, 
Grant, Godula. 



First Row : Werver, Hianik, 
Sharko, Lipuma, Hodapp, 
Clarke, Melvin, Sharko, 
Neustadt. Second Row: 
Moore, Markay, R o h n , 
Witry, Johnson, Peponis, 
Letton, Powers, Barker, 
McMahon, Tabak, McCar- 
thy, Yuhas. Third Row: 
Abraham, Behr, Kahn, La- 
gattuta, Woolf, Hickey, 
Lawrence, Stanek, Jossey, 
Pistilli, Ghinelli, Morrison. 




A C 



156 



} n a f\n o 




First Row: Thomas Troman, president; :\Ir. Donald 
Stinson, moderator ; Thomas Sheahan, vice-president. 
Second Row: Stan Jakala, congressman; Milton 
Jossey, secretary. 



Phi Alpha Rho was established in 
December, 1930, at Loyola University in 
Chicago as an honorary forensic fraternity. 
It is intended to serve a twofold purpose : to 
reward those outstanding in debating activi- 
ties, and to serve as an advisory aid to the 
Debating Society. 

This year's activities included sponsor- 
ing several informal lectures for the Debat- 



ing Society given by members of the Loyola 
University faculty on various phases of the 
national college debate proposition, "Re- 
solved, that the United States Should Na- 
tionalize the Basic Non-Agricultural Indus- 
tries." 



Pi Gamma Mu, the National Social 
Science Honor Society, was founded in 1924, 
and now has over one hundred active chap- 
ters. Dr. Aloysius P. Hodapp is the moder- 
ator of Illinois Zeta Chapter at Loyola 
University, and is governor of the Illinois 
Province. 

The scope of Pi Gamma Mu is to en- 
courage the study of the social sciences by 
stimulating such interests among the gradu- 
ate and undergraduate students and faculty 
members in colleges and universities 
throughout the world. The privilege of mem- 
bership in the society is granted to those who 
have shown unusual interest and aptitude in 
the study of such sciences. 

By fostering high ideals of scholarship 
and social service in the study of social 
problems. Pi Gamma Mu has as its particular 
purpose the development of social idealism, 
training in scientific thought, and the coop- 
eration among students in the various 



branches of social science toward the goal of 
scientific solutions to social problems. 

At the National Convention held in 
Washington, D. C, in the summer of 1949 
on the twenty-fifth anniversary of the So- 
ciety, Illinois Zeta was represented by Dr. A. 
P. Hodapp, moderator; Eugene N. Lipuma, 
president; and Robert Melvin, treasurer. 
Past President J. V. Letton, and D. Powers 
attended as observers. 

Illinois Zeta was represented at a dinner 
held at the Congress Hotel, Chicago, for 
chapters in the Illinois province, by Dr. W. 
H. Conley, dean of University College ; Prof. 
J. A. Zvetina of the College of Commerce, 
and Eugene N. Lipuma, president of the 
chapter. 



Robert Melvin, treasurer ; Eugene Lipuma, president ; 
Dr. A. P. Hodapp, moderator; Francis Clarke, vice- 
president ; Donald Sharko, secretary. 



n m a 



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u 





First Roiv: May, Alba- 
chiaro, Casale, Meenaii. 
Second Row: Ginski, Lin- 
gle, Sweeney, Neumann. 



Beta Chapter is the parent chapter of 
Sigma Lambda Beta, the professional com- 
merce fraternity founded at Loyola Univer- 
sity in 1927. Upon the introduction of night 
courses in commerce there arose a need for a 
fraternity which would be the focal point for 
social activities of the new division. At first 
the purpose was essentially social, but as the 
organization was strengthened, the goal of 
the fraternity grew to include professional 
interests. 

The fraternal ideal instituted by Beta 
Chapter has been infused into the two other 
chapters, Alpha (alumni), and Gamma (day 
commerce). The ideal is that moral 



principles should guide the activities of 
businessmen. With a firm foundation in the 
principles of scholastic ethics upon which to 
base their professional lives, the members of 
Sigma Lambda Beta can, by their example, 
influence their business associates. 

As the students who are members of 
Beta Chapter are employed during the day, 
they have little free time in which to plan 
activities. However, in the past year they 
have ably supported the dances, picnics, 
speaker dinners, and the golf outing activi- 
ties which comprised the program of the 
Gamma Chapter of Sigma Lambda Beta. 



^lamu rJLambdci (/3et 



CL 



158 



James A. May, Jr., Frank Albachiaro, Charles J. 
Casale. Absent: Dick Schultz. 




First Row: Jongieux, Gre- 
mer, Muinane, Foran, Dr. 
Haas, Spencer, Tribble, El- 
lert, Bothfels, Sharko. Sec- 
ond Row: Abraham, Mor- 
ande, Lipuma, Benes, Car- 
ey, Harden, Johnson, ICu- 
biak, Wleklinski, Jongieux, 
Roth, Paschen, Witry, Bus- 
caglia, Saigh, Young. Third 
Row: Baron, Melvin, Bail- 
er, Cox, McManus, Carroll, 
Gilles, Carey, Marquette, 
Hunt, Rodell, Walsh, Barth, 
Keeler, Hartigan, Ghinelli. 




Sigma Lambda Beta, a professional 
commeixe fraternity, was founded in 1927 
at Loyola University. Initially it was a night 
school fraternity. Since that time it has 
grown to include three chapters: Alpha, the 
alumni chapter; Beta, the evening school 
chapter; and Gamma, the day school chap- 
ter; which was organized in April, 1947 
upon the establishment of the day division 
of the College of Commerce. 

In the three years since the Gamma day 
chapter came into being, its members have 
been active in many of the activities of the 
university. The spirit of leadership and 
loyalty has been manifest in participation in 
student government, intramural athletics, 
and social affairs. The offices of the senior 
and junior class president are held by mem- 
bers, as well as other positions of service 
and responsibility in many other university 
organizations ; student publications, the stu- 
dent congress, local and national charity 
groups. 



The calendar of fraternity events in the 
1949-50 school year has included a Closed 
Party, a Speaker Dinner with Dr. Robert N. 
McMurry, a consultant in industrial rela- 
tions as principal speaker, a Closed Retreat 
held at Mayslake, pledging and the Pledge 
Smoker, Initiation Banquet, the Annual 
Open Dance, Annual Golf Tournament, and 
the Annual Picnic. From this list it can be 
seen that members have derived spiritual, 
professional and social benefits from their 
fraternal group. 

In appreciation for their interest in, and 
support of the fraternity, certificates were 
given to Dr. Conley, Dr. Mogilnitsky, and 
Dr. Swanish at the Speaker Dinner held in 
the Webster Hotel. 

The members have been especially for- 
tunate in obtaining Rev. Lester J. Evett, S.J., 
as chaplain, and Dr. Kenneth B. Haas as 
moderator of the fraternity. 



First Row: Jim Murnane, Bill Spencer, Bob Foran, 
Jack Tribble. Second Row: Joe ElKit. Boh M.lvin. 



3 




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159 



First Row: Ryan, Dunn, 
Brandstiatei-, Murray, Fr. 
Reinke, SJ.. McC.rath, Ber- 
rigan, Cantalio, Devine. 
Second Row: Ferrarini, 
Byrne, Bock, Begg, Hayes, 
Derwinski, Marotta, Peter- 
son, Spellman, Annas, Mai- 
lers. Third Row: Scorby, 
Duffy. Ayres, Erbach, Den- 
amark, Rugen, Farrell, 
Pender, Hennessy, McCar- 
thy, Gibbons, McKenna, 
James, Fourth Row: Heinz, 
Omiatek, Carron, Picchiet- 
ti. Burns, Gurber, Scotty, 
Morris, McKitrick, Sharp, 
Moore, McGrath, Cella, 
Berry, Dunne. 




The Alpha Delta Gamma fraternity was 
founded on the Lake Shore Campus of 
Loyola University in 1924. Fourteen Loy- 
olans, realizing the tangible need for an or- 
ganization quite different from those then 
existing on the campus, and further desiring 
to establish in Catholic colleges and univer- 
sities a national fraternity, bound themselves 
together in the first Catholic group of its 
kind. Thus, at Loyola, the mother chapter 
was formed and later became known as 
Alpha Chapter of Alpha Delta Gamma. 

The ideals and principles of the frater- 
nity insured its progress, and it soon spread 
throughout the country until chapters had 



been formed in many Catholic institutions. 
Alpha Delta Gamma has much to look for- 
ward to in the future because it is the only 
national social fraternity organized solely in 
Catholic colleges and universities. 

Last year the fraternity celebrated its 
25th anniversary at its annual convention 
held in June at the Edgewater Beach Hotel 
in Chicago. 

No account of "Delt" activity would be 
complete without a word of praise and 
gratitude for the moderator, Rev. John H. 
Reinke, S.J., who also serves in the capacity 
of national spiritual director for the organi- 
zation. 



^^wlpnci cJ^elta L^i 



First Row: Clay Berrigan, treasurer; Ed McGrath, 
president; Fr. Reinke, moderator; Pat Murray, vice- 
president ; Harry Brandstrater, secretary. Second 
Row: Bill Mailers, steward; Jack Picchietti, corre- 
sponding secretary; Bill Dunne, pledgemaster; John, 
P. Ryan, sergeant -at-arms; Ray McCarthy, historian. 



ify 



cimmci 



160 




Pki Wu Cki 




John Repetto, recording secretary ; Roderick Salach, 
corresponding secretary; Richard Heckel, president; 
J. D. Roll, S.]., moderator; Thomas Lockie, pledge- 
master; Peter Hoy, sergeant-at-arms; Francis J. 
Healey, treasurer. 



Phi Mu Chi fraternity is the oldest 
social fraternity at Loyola University. It 
was founded at the University of Chicago in 
1922, and in the same year Beta Chapter was 
organized at the Lake Shore Campus of 
Loyola. 

The primary end of this fraternitj' is to 
further brotherly feeling and cooperation 
among its members, past and present. The 
attitude of Christian and brotherly co-opera- 
tion is carried on not only within the fra- 
ternity but in the social and scholastic extra- 
curricular activities of Loyola as well; the 
ideas being not only to further the primary 



end of the fraternity, but also to further the 
well-being of the university. 

Every year, this fraternity sponsors 
several dances open to all members and their 
friends. It also holds a number of closed 
parties in keeping with its tradition of a 
social fraternity. 

The officers of Phi Mu Chi are : Richard 
Heackel, president; Leo Parker, vice-presi- 
dent ; John Repetto, secretary ; and Francis 
Healey, treasurer. 

The moderator of the fraternity is Rev. 
J. D. Roll, S.J. 




First Row: Hoy, Salach. 
Repetto, Rev. J. D. Roll, 
5../., Heckel, Healey, Lockie. 
Second Row: Testa, Harris, 
Yarashiis, McNally, Duffy, 
Feigh, Collins, Marshall, 
Capek. Third Row: Brad- 
shaw, Bradshaw, Cooly, 
Kuszynski, Kelly, Brennan, 
Ryan, Garzoni, Franta. 



161 



f-^i ^^^ipka (lambda 




First Row: Henry ,M. Theisen, vice-president; Tom 
Ryan, president; William Lambrecht, pledgemaster. 
Second Row: Dave Gibbons, secretary; Bob Kearney, 
sergeant-at-arms; Frank Rolfes, treasurer. 



In 1925, with the help and guidance of 
Rev. James J. Mertz, S.J., Pi Alpha Lambda 
Fraternity was founded on a basis of high 
and impressive ideals. The fraternity has 
constantly expanded every effort to further 
the aims and interests of Loyola. 

Through the promotion of the welfare 
of its school, Pi Alpha Lambda has been in- 
timately associated with the growth and 
completion of the Madonna Delia Strada 
Chapel. 

This year a banquet was held in honor 
of Fr. Mertz who celebrated his golden an- 
niversary in the Society of Jesus. Members 
from the past twenty-five years were pres- 
ent at this event which undoubtedly ranks 
as one of the greatest in the history of the 
fraternity. 



Upon turning the pages of this histori- 
cal record of the past year at Loyola, for 
essentially that is what this yearbook is, we 
find the names of members of Pi Alpha 
Lambda at the head of, or distinctly prom- 
inent in, every activity that exists at the 
university. 

At the conclusion of every school year, 
among other social activities, the fraternity 
sponsors a formal dance at the elegantly 
modernistic Tam O'Shanter Country Club, 
while on the spiritual side we find it under- 
taking its annual retreat at the Jesuit Re- 
treat House in Barrington, Illinois. These 
activities are in accord with the Jesuit idea 
of developing the whole man, spiritually, 
physically, and mentally. 




First Row: La Vezzorio, 
Kearny, Rolfes, Theisen, 
Ryan, Lambrecht, Gibbons, 
Theisen, Isaacson. Second 
Row: Lane, O'Boyle, Wie- 
land, Garrity, Devaney, 
Mill, Whittingham, Joz- 
wiak, Lund, Dickman, 
Brennan, Fuller, Moore. 
Third Row: Marguerite, 
Ryan, Schiltz, Brennan, 
P r i t s c h a , Reichmann, 
Clarke, Corbet t, Bydalek, 
Cleary, Keshen. Fourth 
Row: Joffe, Acton, Con- 
way, Ubowski, Rickard, 
Lane, Jakrzewski, Shan- 
non, H 11 1 s m a n, Klob, 
Wrenn, Jones. 




First Row: Gerry Yablon, secretary; Norm Hoffman, 
president; Mr. Potempa, moderator; Edward Kos, 
vice-president; Joseph Bauer, historian. Second 
Row: Peter Gutierrez, faculty member; Conrad Jan- 
kowski, pledgemaster; Edmund Godula, Union dele- 
gate. 



^iama J I ^.^Iph 



ci 



Sigma Pi Alpha was organized sixteen 
years ago as an organization whose mem- 
bership was open only to students of Polish 
extraction. In 1947, however, the fraternity 
membership was open to all students with no 
restrictions as to nationality or religious 
creed. Membership extends to students of 
the College of Arts and Sciences and the 
College of Commerce. As a result of this 
change of policy, there has been a further 
strengthening of the bonds of democratic 
fellowship among its members and pledges. 



The purposes of the fraternity are to in- 
crease Christian brotherhood among its 
members, to provide members with social 
activities, and to further the social and 
scholastic activities offered by Loyola Uni- 
versity. 

Each year when the pledging ritual of 
the fraternities is resumed, the almost hilari- 
ous dignity of the black derbies and "Cham- 
berlain" umbrellas of the Sigma Pi pledges 
lends a new touch of color to the social life 
on the campuses. 



First Row: Hector, Jan- 
kowski, Kos, Hoffman, Mr. 
Potempa, Borchardt, 
Bauer. Second Row: Blaha, 
Yablon, Marinier, Gorney, 
Borucki, Finch, Woron- 
owicz, Godula, Mr. Gutier- 
rez, Butler. 




First Row: Coushlin, Bo 
veil, Benjamin, Miilheni 
Boehme, Fitzgerald, Cash- 
ion, Bilek. Second Row 
BertoK, Keefe, Marbach 
Perritt, Scanlon, Forrestal 
Heffernan, Nowicki, Ger 
mann. Third Row: Camp 
bell, Walsh, Thompson, 
Drever, Schaid. Condron, 
McCarthy, Boveri, Nab- 
holtz. Fourth Row: Har- 
rington, Sieracki, Hutchi- 
son, Kuehn, Grant, Glunz, 
Wawrzyniak, Bauer, Ochs, 
Sheeran. 



First Row: Thielen, Her- 
zog, Peck, Sweeney, Mc- 
Clean. Second Row : 
Schoenau, DiGirolamo, 

Kane, Holthaus, Kaminski. 




^neta f hi ^^ I p n 



a 



164 



First Row: Paul Boehme, president; Kevin Mulhern, 
vice-president. Second Row: Mario Boveri, pledge- 
master; Bill Benjamin, secretary; Chris FitzGerald, 
treasurer; George Cashion, social chairman. 



The University Club was founded on the 
Lake Shore Campus in 1938 by a group of 
students interested in establishing social af- 
filiation by which they could more fully 
maintain and improve their personal Chris- 
tian development, and, also, to contribute to 
the growth of Loyola University. 



The objectives of the organization are 
to provide its members with a social outlet; 
to encourage participation and leadership by 
its members in scholastic, social, and athletic 
activities, thereby directly contributing to a 
greater Loyola, and to establish lifetime 
friendship between its members. 

The membership extends to students of 
the College of Arts and Sciences, the College 
of Commerce, Alumni members, honorary 
members and the faculty moderator. Active 
status is reserved to undergraduate students 
only. 

Since its birth, the University Club has 
sponsored the annual Harvest Hop, one of 
the major social events of the fall semester. 
Another major contribution to the social 



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events of the university is a springtime 
dance which takes place in May. 

During the year, the U Club attempts 
to provide at least one social affair per month 
for its members. Lounge dances and picnics 
remain the most popular. 

This year the organization has a new 
moderator in the person of Rev. Richard E. 
Tischler, S.J., who succeeded Rev. Norbert 
J. Huetter, S.J., at the beginning of the year. 
Fr. Huetter is now teaching at the Univer- 
sity of Detroit. Although Fr. Tischler is a 
very busy man, he has always found the 
time to give the University Club able spir- 
itual guidance and assistance. 



Theta Phi Alpha came into being in the 
summer of 1912 on the campus of the Uni- 
versity of Michigan at Ann Arbor. 

At that time Bishop Edward D. Kelly, 
then Auxiliary Bishop of Detroit, realized 
the urgent need for a Catholic organization 
on the campus which would provide Catholic 
society and a Catholic chaperon in an ap- 
proved Panhellenic house and chapter com- 
ing under standardized college requirements, 
for the Catholic women enrolled at this state 
institution. 

The organization at Ann Arbor grew 
and flourished ; it existed until 1918 as a local 
sorority, when correspondence which had 
come from societies organized on a similar 
basis, asked for affiliation with Theta Phi 
Alpha. Now, the chapters number twenty, 
and the organization spreads from the Mid- 
dle West to the Atlantic to the East, and to 
the Pacific to the West. 

National conventions are held bien- 
nially, and, at the silver anniversary (1937), 
the convention was held at the site of the 
Mother Chapter House, and the Siena Medal 



award was established. This award is given 
annually to an outstanding Catholic woman 
in the United States by a vote of an estab- 
lished and representative committee of 
Catholic lay people and clergy. 

Upsilon Chapter at Loyola University 
was granted a charter on March 7, 1943, and 
seventeen charter members were installed. 

As a member of the Central Province, 
Upsilon was hostess to the Province Chap- 
ters at a Conference of the Province, held in 
October of 1949 at the Drake Hotel. Miss 
Adele Peck is active president. 



Kay Sweeney, Mildred Herzog and Adele Peck 





ectu 



For the first time in history, 
Loyola University had a beauty 
queen. The 1950 Loyolan spon- 
sored the contest in conjunction 
with its subscription drive. A 
student committee selected five 
finalists and pictures of them 
were forwarded to singer Perry 
Como. Miss Patricia Gilmore of 
the College of Commerce was 
Mr. Como's choice. Accordingly, 
the attractive Miss Gilmore re- 
ceived her crown from Frankie 
Carle at the Loyola Union's 
"Winter Frolic" on December 9. 

The other finalists, Joanne 
Kula and Janet Meany of the 
College of Arts and Sciences, 
Betty O'Bryan of the School of 
Nursing, and Mary Ellen Quinn 
of the Medical School, served in 
Miss Gilmore's court. It is easy 
to see that this quintet of Loyola 
coeds made a very pretty picture 
on the stage of the Stevens 
Hotel's Grand Ballroom. 

So, hail to Queen Pat and her 
court, the queens of The 1950 
Loyolan. 



Patricia Gilmore 



Joanne Enla 



Janet Meany 



Betty O'Bryan 



Mary Ellen Quinn 




First Row: Duncan, Ko- 
tewa, G i r s c h, Kearns, 
Tate, Moore. Second Row: 
Ryan, Hodges, Sullivan, 
McNamara, Pistilli. Third 
Row: Busse, McClean, 
Jossey, O'Neill, Rohn, 
Digirolamo. 




l^citnotic 

^ n terracial 

(^ o a n c 1 1 



The Loyola Unit of the Catholic Inter- 
racial Council of the Archdiocese of Chicago 
is a university student organization which 
has for its purpose the study and application 
of Christian thought and manners to pro- 
mote a manifest spiritual unity between 
peoples of different races, and to remove arti- 
ficial barriers between men. 

The first means of achieving this end is 
the program of education whereby the Coun- 
cil brings before the student body lecturers, 
films, forums, and discussions which illus- 
trate the Christian viewpoint on the subject 
of race relations, and which dispel some of 
the factual misconceptions about racial dif- 
ferences which are so prevalent even among 
Catholic university students. 

A further means to this end is the ap- 
plication of principles which the Council 
practices and sponsors in its social events. A 
Christmas party, an open mixer dance, 
theater parties, card parties, picnics, and 
beach parties are some of the activities of 
the organization which help to prove how we 
may learn to be actuated by the Christian 
principles of charity and justice. 

The Loyola Unit was founded in 1947 
by Rev. Ralph Gallagher, S.J., and a small 
number of students and has since grown to 
more than one hundred members. 



167 




c I e t 



Gloria De Paul, treasurer; Robert Armamentos, 
vice-president; Chester Koziol, president; Ann Salva- 
dor, secretary; Dick Stanek, publicity chairman; 
Thomas Finch, social chairman; Norma Boveri, social 
chairman. 



The 1949-50 season of the Loyola Uni- 
versity Choral Society was one of the most 
successful it has had in its long history. 
Under the direction of Dr. Graciano Salva- 
dor, the group of over seventy members — 
drawn from all branches of the university 
and including both men and women — pre- 
sented three programs including an opera. It 
has always been the policy of Dr. Salvador 
to present the best of the world's great choral 
music in the concerts of the Choral Society. 
During the past season emphasis was placed 
upon the works of Giuseppe Verdi with two 
of the programs devoted entirely to his 
music. 

The first program of the season was a 
three act musical play. The Story of Bethle- 
hem. Presented at the Loyola Community 
Theatre on December 18, the program fea- 
tured music by Maunder, Brahms. Handel, 
and Mascagni as well as many of the tradi- 
tional Christmas carols. The cast included 



the full chorus and the following soloists : 
Winifred O'Reilly as the Blessed Virgin; 
Chester Koziol, Dan Fanelli, and Richard 
Stanek as the shepherds ; Walter Kawula, 
Ralph De Paul, and Joseph Janesz as the 
magi ; and Maryanna Griglig and Joan Hol- 
lerbach. This initial concert enjoyed great 
success and foreshadowed the artistic tri- 
umphs which were to follow. 

On Passion Sunday, March 26, the an- 
nual Lenten Concert was presented at the 
Madonna Delia Strada Chapel for the benefit 
of the chapel fund. The featured work was 
Verdi's Requiem, a famous choral and or- 
chestral work which is rarely presented by 
college musical groups. Greatly adding to 
the success of the concert was the orchestral 
accompaniment furnished by an orchestra 
of twenty members. The soloists in this pres- 
entation were: Fredi Kalogerakis, Eunice 
Dankowski, Ralph Viglione, and Walter 
Kawula. 



o r% 



First Row: Gorse, De 
Vine, Stanek, Salvador, 
Koziol, Armamentos, De 
Paul, Finch, Boveri, 
Schmitz. Second Row: 
Marchetti, Hogan, De 
Paul, .Strueck, Schweitzer, 
Lucas, Di Fiore, Persil, 
Gorny, C a m i s a . Third 
Row: Krause, Nabholtz, 
Jargovsky, Lynch, Sim- 
mons, Ptak, Crowley, Ta- 
bak, Tabor, M o o n e y, 
Heintz. 



168 




(^ o e d L^ i a b 




First Row: Mary Beery, vice-president-treasurer; 
Gerry Posvic, president; Lenore Mulviliill, secretary. 
Second How: Margaret Cullinan, Big Sister chair- 
man; Janet Meany, social chairman; Dolores Paw- 
licki, publicity chairman; Genevieve Russell, arrange- 
ments chairman. 



In the spring of 1949, a group of women 
students who realized the necessity of an or- 
ganization for the women students of the 
day schools, met with Miss Julia O'Malley, 
then Dean of Women, and formed the pres- 
ent Coed Club. 

The first official meeting was held in 
April of 1949. At this meeting, the first 
elections were held, and the result was that 
Gerry Posvic was elected to the presidency; 
Mary Berry, vice-president-treasurer; Le- 
nore Mulvihill, secretary ; Janet Meany, so- 
cial chairman; Dolores Pawlicki, publicity 
chairman; and Genevieve Russell, arrange- 
ments chairman. At this eventful meeting 
the purpose of the Coed Club was defined as 
primarily social. 

Its first undertaking was a picnic in 
May, whose success was definite proof to its 
founders that its existence was wanted by 
the majority of women students. 

When the fall semester began, the Coed 
Club merited its position at Loyola Univer- 
sity through various social events which 
were different and successful. The week 



previous to the commencement of school, 
the Coed Club had an afternoon luncheon to 
which all the new coeds were invited, and the 
club's original members were invited. The 
purpose of the luncheon was successful in 
establishing friendships among the coeds. 
In October of 1949, the total of the member- 
ship revealed ninety members. Later in the 
fall, a Card Party and Fashion Show was 
given with success. Aside from these major 
activities the Coed Club has been responsible 
for other smaller social affairs. 

The success of the Coed Club through its 
first year can be directly attributed to the un- 
selfish efforts of its leaders, backed almost 
completely by the members. Its success is 
also a manifestation of its value to the 
women students and to Loyola University. 
The Coed Club is now a well established social 
organization. 

At the beginning of the year Miss Kath- 
erine Meehan replaced Miss Julia O'Malley 
as the Dean of Women and also as the Mod- 
erator of the Coed Club. 




First Row: Kodl, Russell, 
Cullinan, .Alulvihill, Posvic, 
Berry, Meany, Pawlicki, 
Dillon, Pawlowski. Second 
Row: Arend, Ziemba, Tur- 
vey, McCarthy, Cleary, 
Iveane. Lennane, Nickel, 
Quinlin, Dirck, JIarvin, 
Kula, Scholle, Simunich. 
Third Row: Farrell, Bow- 
dern, Piedfort, Fitzpatrick, 
Grogan, Carney, Krause, 
O'Donnell, Wagner, Cook, 
Andries, Gilmore, Flynn, 
Yuhas, O'Bryan. 



169 




^ n e G>L o u o I ci 



.Mike Schiltz, business manager; Rita Madaj, vice- 
president ; Hugh Fitzgerald, president. 



Five major productions, including the 
first musical comedy ever produced by the 
Curtain Guild and the midwest premiere of a 
Christopher Fry work highlighted that 
dramatic group's third postwar season under 
the direction of Messrs. John Bettenbender 
and Eugene O'Sullivan. 

Over sixty-five Loyolans appeared in 
one hundred roles in the productions, and 
some twenty-five others contributed techni- 
cal efforts in the stagings at Loyola Com- 
munity Theatre. 

The season opened with Boretz and 
Murray's hilarious farce. Room Service, on 
October 14 and 15. James O'Reilly shared 
top honors in the show-business takeoff with 
Charlie Gries, Tom Ott, and Hugh Fitzger- 
ald. Room Service featured a cast of four- 
teen players, which included Angela Vignola, 
Bob Kearney, Terry Kane, Dennis O'Dowd, 
Tom Carlin, Wayne Faulkner, and Ed 



Walsh. John Bettenbender directed the 
production. 

Less than a month later, director 
Eugene O'Sullivan and sophomore Mary 
Rose Stoesser teamed up in the Curtain 
Guild's first postwar Greek classic, as 
Electra went to the boards on November 11 
and 12. Rita Tanzi as the cruel mother, 
Clytemnestra, and Rita Madaj as the weak 
Chrisothemis, sister to Electra, supported 
Miss Stoesser in the tale of cold, deliberate 
revenge. 

Another high point in the season came 
with the January staging of Shakespeare's 
Othello, a production whose leading trio of 
James O'Reilly, Paul Erbach, and Daryl 
Grimes played the noble moor, the arch-vil- 
lain, and the faithful wife with a perfection 
that brought two full houses to a crescendo 
of applause. The work, directed by Mr. 
Bettenbender, featured a cast of twenty- 
three Loyolans. 



First Row: Faulkner, 
Geiger, .Madaj, Fitzgerald, 
Schiltz, Kearney. Second 
Row: Rix, Walsh, Con- 
naughton, O'Reilly, Ken- 
ney, Bangert, Faust. Third 
Row: Vignola, Logelin, 
Nabholtz, Kvapil, Erbach, 
Zvetina, Stoesser, Grimes. 




i/l n 1 1 
KJ u I id 



r 6 i t 



f 




Messrs. Eugene 0"Sullivan and John Bettenbender, 
co-directors of the Curtain Guild. 



Halfway through Lent the guild met a 
somewhat surprised Loyola audience with 
an unscheduled Lenten production of Chris- 
topher Fry's new work, Thor, with Angels. 
The Loyola presentation constituted a mid- 
west premiere for both Fry and Thor, icith 
Angels. 

A month later, the guild's first musical 
comedy, Lucky for Me, ran three nights to 
approximately 3000 people. Director O'Sul- 
livan chose his cast of twenty-five with a 
foresight that showed results at the box 
office and behind the footlights. 

A minor production, Moliere's Doctor in 
Spite of Himself, was staged as a forty-five 
minute arena project in St. Ignatius Parish 
gymnasium, as a part of the Catholic Theatre 
Conference presentations, and later traveled 
to Lewis Towers and Lake Shore Campus to 
do special student performances in the 
lounges there. Otto Kvapil as the doctor, led 
a cast of ten Loyolans, including Paul Er- 
bach, Joe Hylard, Hugh Fitzgerald, Don 



DeLave, Don Parker, Dennis O'Dowd, Angela 
Vignola, Rita Bachieri, and Terry Kane. 
John Bettenbender directed the farce. 

The Curtain Guild is moderated by Mr. 
John Bettenbender; and Mr. Bettenbender 
and Mr. Eugene O'Sullivan share directing 
tasks. Miss Mariette LeBlanc, a member of 
the teaching staff of the Department of 
Speech, contributes individual performance 
coaching to the Curtain Guild productions. 

A never-failing technical and business 
staff worked all season long behind closed 
curtains and closed doors; and such consist- 
ent technicians as electrician Jim Bourgeois, 
music director Ed Zvetina, costumer Made- 
leine Geiger, and carpenters Wayne Faulk- 
ner, John Kenny, and Ed Walsh spent much 
of their off-study time preparing shows and 
absorbing the blasts from the director's tele- 
phone. Mike Schiltz was the man respon- 
sible for filling the theatre and keeping 
money in the Guild's till. 




Desdemona begs lago 
to plead her cause with 
Othello. 

Othello approaches 
Desdemona in the fa- 
mous death scene. 

E 1 e c t r a recognizes 
Orestes, her lost 
brother, for the first 
time. 



The dead rises, after a 
mild case of drugging 
in "Room Service". 

Electra beseeches the 
gods to avenge the 
murder of her father. 



^sr ci r c e y ^ r a a e cl u y unci 



u a e ci u ^ an 



u 6 L c a 



e u u e 




Rita Tanzi prepares a 
character for the flood 
lights. 



Marshall S m u 1 s o n 
makes-up for his part 
in "Othello". 



Jim McCarthy "dusts 
off" Kevin Buckley. 



Roderiso receives some 
sage advice from lago. 



Jim Bourgeois stands 
by for a change of 
lighting. 



"Room Service" hab- 
itues outsmart the un- 
suspecting waiter by 
promising him a read- 
ing for their forth- 
coming play. 



Cassio and Roderigo 
dueling in "Othello". 




First Row: Novak, Glee- 
son, Brennan, Young, Rev. 
W. J. Smith, Campbell, 
Neumann, Gleason. Sec- 
ond Row: Melvin, Skertic, 
O'Leary, Clifford, Scanlon, 
O'Connor, Abbate, Has- 
sett, Mulhern, Tabak. 






9 



h 1 6 



In 1946 the Knights Club, the only 
known organization of its kind in the world, 
was founded by James P. O'Connor of Engle- 
wood Council, Knights of Columbus. The 
purpose of the club is to promote fellowship 
among the Knights of Columbus at Loyola 
and to make the over 700,000 Knights of 
Columbus conscious of Loyola University and 
its activities. Membership in the club is 
open to any member of the student body, 
faculty or staff of Loyola who is a third 
degree member of the Knights of Columbus. 



Since its organization it has been the 
policy of the club to present not only the best 
but the first. The "Night of Knights", as its 
dances are called, was the first to present 
constant entertainment using two orches- 
tras. The February 21st Third Annual 
Dmner Meeting at Adolph's Restaurant 
exemplifies the effort of the club to make its 
meetings somewhat more than a cut and dry, 
once-a-month drudgery. 

In a spiritual vein, the Knights Club 
was the first student organization to sponsor 
a mid-week retreat at the Jesuit House in 
Harrington, Illinois. The club for the past 
two years has been sponsoring a campaign 
to fulfill the wishes of Our Lady of Fatima 
by holding a Communion Mass 'on the first 
Saturday of every month at the Holy Name 
Cathedi-al. It also sponsors an annual Com- 
munion breakfast on the first Friday in June 
of each year. 

The current oflicers of the club are: 
Dennis J. Young of De La Salle Council, 
president; Thomas Brennan of Springfield 
Council, vice-president; Charles Campbell of 
Englewood Council, recording secretary; 
Frank Neumann of Auburn Park Council, 
financial secretary and John Gleeson of 
Auburn Council, sergeant-at-arms. 




First Row: Frank Neumann, treasurer; Dennis 
Young, president; Rev. Walter J. Smith, moderator; 
Thomas Brennan, vice-president; Charles Campbell, 
secretary. Second Row: Frank Byrne, publicity 
chairman; James O'Connor, founder and past presi- 
dent; Jack Gleeson, sergeant-at-arms: Richard Glea- 
son, past president. 



173 



DLW. 



onoarum 



'9 



(^iab 




James Nicholl, president; Charles Whittinfjham, 
vice-president; Fr. O'Callaghan, SJ.; moderator; 
Robert Dunne, treasurer; Robert Caprile, historian. 



The Monogram Club is made up of men 
who have distinguished themselves by par- 
ticipating in some branch of inter-collegiate 
athletics. These men have all earned a 
major or a minor letter because of their 
achievement in their particular sport. 



In 1923, the All-American end from 
Notre Dame, Rog Kiley, who was engaged 
as football coach and director of athletics at 
Loyola University, gave notice of her entry 
into inter-collegiate competition. Kiley's 
first group of letter winners and the regulars 



from coach Lennie Sach's initial Rambler 
basketball squad combined to form the 
Monogram Club. 

The purpose of this club is to develop a 
greater student, faculty, and alumni interest 
in athletics at Loyola; to work in conjunc- 
tion with the athletic department to further 
athletics in general at Loyola and to assist 
that depai'tment in any promotion that it 
may wish to undertake; to help foster a 
greater and vigorous school spirit in athletic 
events ; to promote the general welfare of 
the athletes ; and to publicize athletic events. 




First Row: Bluitt, Eai-le, 
Dunne, Fr. O'Callaghan, 
Nicholl, Caprile, Dawson, 
O'Grady. Second Row: 
Collins, Cody, Whitting- 
ham, Hlavin, Theisen, Hef- 
fernan, McKeough. Third 
Row: Loring, White, Heg- 
arty, Scarpelli, Lanibrecht, 
Anderson. 




Seated: Heriiadine Pietraszek, president; Anthony Klasin- 
ski, treasurer. Standing: Charlotte Oczkowski, recording 
secretary; Florence Janszyn, Union congressman. 



^ n e l-^hiiaret 



The Philarets Club is an organization of 
Loyola University students of Polish descent 
whose purpose is to foster and develop ideals 
set forth by the Mickiewiczan Philarets — 
love of virtue, friendship, and Polish culture. 

The goals of the club are realized 
through regular monthly meetings and num- 
erous social activities. During the past year, 
the Philarets sponsored a Christmas Party, a 
Valentine Social, Easter Party, several out- 
ings, including a trip to Mundelein Seminary 
last summer, and a tennis club. 

Meetings of the club are instructive, in- 
tellectually stimulating, and embody a spirit 



of friendliness in keeping with the tradition 
of the first Philaret clubs. Due to the efforts 
of the club's moderator. Rev. Joseph Krzysz- 
kowski, the meetings are never lacking 
educational and cultural discussions. 

The Philarets Club is an active member 
of the Chicago Intercollegiate Council, an or- 
ganization composed of Polish Clubs from 
every university in the Chicago Area. 

Officers of the Philarets at Loyola in- 
clude: Bernadine Pretraszek, president; 
Charlotte Oczkowski, recording secretary; 
Irene Piekielko, corresponding secretary; 
Anthony Klasinski, treasurer; and Florence 
Janszyn, union representative. 



A group photo of the 
Philarets 





Herb Persil, president; Rita Madaj, secretary; Otti 
Kvapil, talent director; Ed Zvetina, vice-president. 



On March 12, 1950, the Loyola Univer- 
sity Radio Workshop celebrated its third 
anniversary of broadcasting to Chicagoans 
and residents of adjoining suburbs through 
the facilities of Radio Station WGES. Be- 
ginning with a handful of talented and 
interested students and friends of Loyola 
University, the Workshop has rapidly grown 
over the years in number of personnel and 
quality of programming. 

Originally established as a function 
Loyola's Public Relations Department, the 
workshop developed until early 1949, when 
the organization was transferred to the jur- 
isdiction of the Department of Speech. There 
it became a training and experimental outlet 
for all interested students. 



It was not until September, 1949, that 
the Radio Workshop came into its own as a 
regular student organization, with Mr. 
Eugene O'Sullivan of the Speech Department 
as moderator. 

Now an active, close-knit organization, 
the Radio Workshop presents three half-hour 
educational shows weekly as a public service 
to radio listeners. Shows are directed and 
produced by experienced student personnel, 
and feature students, faculty members, and 
special guests in various types of program- 
ming. 

The Radio Workshop is especially in- 
debted to Station WGES for the excellent co- 
operation it gave in making the organization 
a valuable radio outlet for Loyola. 




First Row: Vignola, Kva- 
pil, Zvetina, Persil, Ma- 
daj, Grimes. Second Row: 
E r b a c h , Connaughton,. 
Geiger, Bangert, Joffe. 



r\ a d i o l/U o r k 6 k o 



p 




"Loyola University 
Presents ..." 



"Three years ago you 
told me that you ..." 



"You're on . 



SOUND: DOOR 
OPENS * THUNDER 
SNEAKS IN 



"Now for our next 
record ..." 



"Now I think that ..." 



177 





«'» #^ r% 



Loyola R. O . T. C. Color Guard 



le. O. O. C. 



to combat conditions. War Department 
training films, taken during major engage- 
ments of World War II, demonstrated the 
advantage of well-instructed men, putting 
their classroom knowledge to practical use, 
over the machine-trained enemy troops. 
Hours were spent assembling and disassem- 
bling the Ml rifle, 30 caliber heavy MG, and 
various mortars. Use of the "walkie talkie" 
brought everyone out to the football field (it 
was about zero that day) for a period, dem- 
onstrating the limits of an FM radio. Visits 
were made to an army camp, and 5th Army 
headquarters, to witness the military trial by 
court martial. 

Many of the wrinkles encountered in the 
formation of a new unit have been ironed out 
by the constant combined efforts of the staff' 
and the cadets. A crack drill team has been 
organized by Cadet First Lt. John J. Mc- 
Carthy. The team will perform Sunday, 
May 14, at Loyola's Open House. On this 
same day, the R. 0. T. C. will hold their open 
house for all the students and their friends. 



178 



The Loyola R. 0. T. C. was begun by 
the War Department July 1, 1947, and has 
recently reached its position as an important 
university course of study. Classes in mili- 
tary science started September 21, 1948, with 
a cadet strength of one hundred. Colonel 
Wolcott K. Dudley, Major Cleveland C. Mac- 
Lane, who returned to civil life in June, 1949, 
M/Sgt. Donald W. Murphie, M/Sgt. Odilo W. 
Bonde, and Sgt. Leonard P. Schlaak were the 
teachers on the functioning staff of the unit. 

Military courses in gunnery, motor 
transports, communications, drill and exer- 
cise of command, and tactics and strategy 
were taught, with particular emphasis placed 
upon the practical application of the subject 



Seated: Col. Dudley, moderator. Second 
Row: Thomas Doyle, congressman; John 
Spector, treasurer; Amilio Jleccia, sergeant- 
at-arms. Third Row: Walt Skridulis, presi- 
dent; Louis Kahn, vice-president; John Mc- 
Carthy, senior representative; John An- 
dringa, secretary. 



T r^vrM H 





Instruction class in the 
automatic rifle 



R.O.T.C. unit meets as a 
group 



The future officers learn 
about the machine gun 



The Rifle Team becomes 
the target of the Loyolan 
photosrapher 



The full unit on the pa- 
rade field 



179 




^y A e Cy o id 



^y o p c i 

1 



The Gold Torch Club is a fraternity 
whose members are all students of Military 
Science at Loyola University. This organi- 
zation embraces all the beliefs and objectives 
of the other social fraternities at Loyola. In 
addition to friendship, loyalty, honor, cour- 
age, and obedience, the fraternity encourages 
a close association with current military 
affairs and newly discovered and perfected 
implements of war. 

The club has sponsored many social af- 



y. 



a n 



■i 



2) 



e m o c r a 



t 



First Row : D o o 1 e y , 
Lennane, McCauley, Mc- 
Geever, Humphries. Sec- 
ond Row: Noland, Ryan, 
Scanlon, Wiley, Johnson, 
Finnegan, Wagner. Third 
Row: Dirck, Lagattuta, 
Daley, Sullivan, Pawlicki. 




180 



I a b 



fairs during the school year. Its most im- 
portant social event takes place in May when 
the formal Military Ball is held in honor of 
the graduating seniors. The ball is held in 
close conjunction with Honors Day, at which 
time the seniors receive their Reserve Com- 
missions. 

Although the unit is new, it is growing 
very quickly, and it soon will be able to take 
its place among the older and well-estab- 
lished fraternities on campus. 




Seated: Col. Dudley, moderator. Second Row: 
Thomas Doyle, congressman; John Spector, treas- 
urer; Amilio Meccia, sergeant-at-arms. Third Row: 
Walt Skridulis, president; Louis Kahn, vice-presi- 
dent; John McCarthy, senior representative; John 
Andringa, secretary. 



c^ o u o la 



^ 



Two years ago a small group of students 
who were interested in stimulating political 
activity among the students of Loyola 
formed the Young Democrats of Loyola. 
Under the able influence of Mr. Jerome 
O'Grady, moderator, the club now has a 
membership well over one hundred. 

The purpose behind the club is three- 
fold : the propagation of Catholic social 
teaching, the stimulating of political interest 
among college students, and the furthering 
of the aims of the Democratic Party. 

Following a heavy schedule of events the 
Young Democrats have presented outstand- 
ing speakers from the State Legislature, the 
Political Action Committee of the C. L O., 
the Catholic Labor Alliance, and from the 
faculty of Loyola. 

The main social affairs of the organiza- 
tion consist of an annual Roosevelt Memorial 
Banquet, and a spring dance. 

Officers of the club include : Brian 
McCauley, president; Harry Dooley, vice- 



president; Wilburn Humphries, second vice- 
president; John McGeever, third vice-presi- 
dent ; Anne Lennane, secretary-treasurer ; 
Carole Wagner, and Robert Daley, directors. 



First Row: Anne Lennane, secretary-treasurer; Brian 
JicCauley, president; Harry Dooley, vice-president; 
Carole VVagner, director. Second Row: Wilburn 
Humphries, second vice-president; John AlcGeever. 
third \ ice-president : Robert Daley, director. 




^tLL 



I 



i C A 




THOMAS J. HAGGERTY 
Athletic Director 



ALEX WILSON 
Track Coach 



REV. JEREJIIAH J. O'CALLAGHAX, SJ. 
Chairman, Athletic Board 



Rev. Jeremiah, J. O'Callaghan, S.J., chair- 
man of the athletic board, and instructor in 
the Department of Philosophy, came to 
Loyola University from the University of 
Detroit where Fr. O'Callaghan was an in- 
structor in the Department of Philosophy 
and Classics. 

Fr. O'Callaghan took his Bachelors 
Degree at Xavier University in Cincinnati. 
From there he returned to his birthplace to 
receive his Master of Arts degree from 
Loyola University in Chicago. To receive his 
Doctorate of Philosophy, Fr. O'Callaghan 
journeyed out of the United States to the 
University of Toronto. 

In his first year as chairman of the Ath- 
letic Board, Father O'Callaghan has shown 
a keen interest in the athletic program which 
is in the building process. 

Thomas J. Haggerty, athletic director, 
and head coach of the Loyola Ramblers, 
ended a five year span of coaching at Loyola 
with an impressive record of 111 wins to 41 
defeats. 

Haggerty, who has the singular spe- 
cialty of developing both men and teams into 
top flight basketball attractions, came to 
Loyola in 1945, with a 49-23 record at rival 
De Paul University. 



In five seasons, Loyola jumped from 
just another college quintet to one of the 
nation's outstanding independent teams. 
Under Haggerty, the 1948-49 Ramblers suc- 
ceeded in scoring the greatest upset of the 
National Invitation Tournament and the 
year, when thej' defeated the favored Uni- 
versity of Kentucky, and gained the number 
two spot in the national ratings. 

Mr. Haggerty began his coaching career 
in 1928 at De Paul Academy as football, bas- 
ketball, and track mentor. From there he 
moved on to De Paul University where he 
turned out such All-Americans as Bobby Neu 
and Lou Passner. 

Mr. Alex Wilson, track and cross coun- 
try coach, and member of the Athletic 
Board, has been a Loyola coach and sup- 
porter since he came here from the Univer- 
sity of Notre Dame. During the war Mr. 
Wilson took over all the athletic duties of 
the school, including that of athletic direc- 
tor. At one time or another he has coached 
swimming, track, basketball, and taken 
charge of university gym classes and intra- 
murals. 

Mr. Wilson, a Canadian citizen by birth, 
starred for the Canadian team in the Olympic 
track events. He held several records that 
were broken onlv recently. At Notre Dame 



184 




DONALD 1". CHALMERS 
Suimniiiig Coach 



GEORGE BANDY 
Freshman Basketball Coach 



MARK V. CAMPBELL, JR. 
Golf Coach 



cfDlrecior and (^oacn 



ed 



University, he was one of the main-stays 
of the team during his collegiate career." 

The track and cross-country teams that 
he has coached, have always been among the 
top ranking teams of the country. Among 
the many great runners that he has devel- 
oped was Max Lenover. His mile relay team 
of two years ago went undefeated among 
intercollegiate competition. 

Mr. Donald P. Chalmers came to Loyola 
in September, 1949, as head swimrning 
coach. He is infinitely well fitted for this po- 
sition by reason of long years of experience 
in aquatic competition. 

Mr. Chalmers received a Bachelor of 
Arts degree from Franklin and Marshall 
University, where he was a leading member 
of the swimming team. After graduation, 
he continued competitive swimming and won 
several championships in the New Jersey 
and National A. A. U. events. In 1932, he 
was a member of the American team at the 
International Championships held at Or- 
ange, N. J. 

George Bandy has finished his fifth sea- 
son as Loyola's freshman and assistant var- 
sity basketball coach. Like Tom Haggerty, 
Varsity Mentor, Bandy moved to Loyola 
from De Paul Academy when Haggerty took 



over the Ramblers coaching duties before the 
opening of the 1945-46 season. 

Bandy has been associated with Hag- 
gerty for a number of years as player and 
coach. He played basketball at De Paul 
Academy under Haggerty and won all-city 
honors at guard. 

Bandy's most successful season was in 
1948-49, when his freshman cagers romped 
through a 27-game schedule with 25 wins, 
outscoring opponents 1,481 to 1,026 points. 
Loyola won the Greater Chicago meet during 
the 1948 Christmas holidays and took third 
in the post-season St. Sabina A. A. U. 
tourney. 

Mark Campbell, Arts senior, this year 
completed his third year as Loyola "golf 
coach. This 1950 team was the culmination 
of these three seasons, as it was most prob- 
ably the strongest ever to represent Loyola. 

Mr. Campbell was a playing member of 
the golf team in his first year at Loyola, but 
an appendectomy, a shoulder operation, and 
an ankle injury over the period of the last 
three years turned him to coaching. Last 
year his team had a record of nine wins, 
three losses, and one tie. Loyola was also 
victor in the Chicago Collegiate Champion- 
ship. 



185 




Dawson should hoop two I 



(^oacfi ^J^aaaertu 6 ^cirewell 



aaeriu 



"I want to take this opportunity to thank the faculty, 
alumni, and students of Loyola of Chicago for the excellent 
spirit and cooperation accorded me during my five years as 
basketball coach and one year as athletic director. 

"I wish Loyola and Johnny Jordan all the success in 
the world. Johnny is an excellent basketball coach, a fine 
Catholic gentleman, and a credit to the University. 

"Loyola always has had a national reputation for its 
giant-killer basketball teams, and I sincerely hope that the 
school will continue to stay top with the country's best 
teams." 



^om 



^J^CIQ 



cf^eri^ 



186 




An Irishman does a swan-dive 



Klaerich might have been fouled I 



Perpetum Mobile! 



DL 



e 6 e 



y Ly u p (^ ct a e p d 

L^ ci r r i e ci tne L^ o i o r S ot rJL o u o l y 




First Row: White, Hilde- 
brand, Powers, Maracich, 
Klaerich, Buxbaum, Col- 
lins, Sullivan. Second 
Row: O'Grady, Joe Hut- 
macher, Turschman, 
Bluitt, Earle, Dawson, 
Hanrahan, Nicholl, Kladis, 
McKeon. 



187 



^ k e ^3 



e a 6 o n 6 



Q 



a m e 6 



The mid-century edition of the Loyola 
Ramblers opened their 1949-50 basketball 
campaign on November 26, 1949, with an 
easy 67-42 win over Ripon College. Prior to 
this game, the Ramblers had run their 
alumni opponents to the ground in the annual 
"Old Men's Game". 

After another impressive win, 79-48, 
over Wheaton College, the Maroon and Gold 
journeyed to Minneapolis to play the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota. In the University 
Fieldhouse, a rather sluggish Loyola team 
was defeated 55-51. The decisive factor in 
this nip-and-tuck game was Whitey Skoog 
of Minnesota, whose brilliant floor-play gave 
the opposition an early lead. 

The Ramblers then jommeyed to Still- 
water, Oklahoma, where they were given a 



48-40 lesson in "control ball", a lesson that 
was to help win some important games later 
in the season. 

Back home, the Maroon and Gold suf- 
fered the first defeat on the home court in 
two years, at the hands of Rehfeldt and the 
University of Wisconsin. 

Marquette was defeated 76-48, to bring 
the boys back to a .500 average, before the 
traditional game with Loyola's neighborhood 
rival on Sheffield Ave. 

The Chicago Stadium was the scene of 
this traditional battle. The Blue Demons 
from De Paul were well versed in Rambler 
tactics, and in one of the roughest games of 
the season, succeeded in carrying home the 
Loyola bacon by six points, 59-53. 



^^ c r o 6 6 the Illation . . . 



PL 



a u i n a 



the (JSest 



If I can just get around in front 



Halt I Who goes there? 



Marching along, side by side 



188 




The scene of the next two games was the 
alumni gym. The team from Dayton, Ohio, 
was repulsed in an easy manner, 69-46, but 
the "Ducks" from Oregon University had to 
travel about 3000 miles to be defeated 70-53. 

On December 31, 1949, New Year's Eve, 
the famous tactics of a great Loyola coach 
were seen for the first time since 1942. Coach 
Lennie Sachs used the "zone-defense" before 
his untimely death and his successor Tom 
Haggerty brought it out again, against the 
Falcons from Bowling Green U. 

The Ramblers in their tight defense 
played one of the finest games of the year, 
only to be defeated, 63-59. However, a' loss 
to as fine a group of sportsmen as Bowling 
Green, cannot be a disgrace. The fine rela- 
tionship that has existed between the players 
of Loyola and Bowling Green is something 
to be remembered in a good light after 
graduation. 

The Maroon and Gold split a series with 
teams from the state of Utah, beating Utah 
58-52, but losing another tight game to 
Brigham Young University. 

The team took their first eastern trip of 
the year and in the first game, thev met 
C. C. N. Y., whom they beat in the 1949 Na- 
tional Invitational Tournament. This time 
the New York team came off on the better 
end of a 61-46 score, in a game marked by a 
great number of personal fouls. The eastern 
invasion continued with a comparatively 
easy win over tournament-bound Syracuse 
University. 

Back home, the Maroon and Gold lost 
62-54 to Duquesne University, in a closely 
contested game. Duquesne was one of the 
smoothest, well-working ball clubs met in 
the past season. 




Bob Caprile, Senior Manager 



The Toledo game was the occasion of 
the Ramblers' second loss in the Chicago 
Stadium. Toledo was one of the last year's 
one-point losses for the Ramblers, and al- 
though the difference was eight points, the 
lads from Toledo managed to win out in a 
game marked with the outbreak of several 
player-fights. 

The Ramblers, in their next game, re- 
membered well the lesson that they had 
learned early in the season, and coupling a 
tight zone-defense with a control-ball of- 
fense, the Maroon and Gold showed the 
Aggies from Oklahoma A. & M. a 41-31 de- 
feat. This was the lowest combined score 
for the season. 

On their second eastern trip, the boys 
lost two games. Holy Cross, top team in the 



Ed Earle 



Jim Nicholl, Captain 



Ralph Klaerich 








Frank O'Grady 



Nick Kladis 



Ed Dawson 



nation at the time, came across with a five- 
point win, in a game accompanied by some 
highly disputable refereeing, and St. Bona- 
venture won, 55-51, in a very rough game. 

The Ramblers lost their third game of 
the year in the Stadium when Notre Dame, in 
the renewal of a series running from 1924 to 
1927, came out on the top of a 56-41 score. A 
few weeks later Notre Dame and Kevin 
O'Shea repeated this performance at South 
Bend. This contest was marked by Eddie 
Dawson's 26 points, the highest number 
Dawson ever scored in a single game. 

Playing in the Cleveland Arena, the 
Ramblers defeated John Carroll University, 
52-46, and then journeyed on to Bowling 
Green, Ohio. 



On the Falcons' home court, the Loy- 
olans got their revenge for the earlier defeat 
by Bowling Green. In a very close game, the 
Ramblers forged ahead in the last few sec- 
onds, to register a two-point win, 67-65. 
The Maroon and Gold were the first team in 
63 contests, to defeat the Falcons on their 
home court. Bowling Green had not been 
defeated at home since another Illinois team, 
the Great Lakes Naval Training Station, had 
accomplished the feat in 1945. 

For the rest of the season the Ramblers 
knew only how to win. Valparaiso and 
Western Michigan were both beaten twice, 
De Paul and Dayton, once. 

The second De Paul game, played in the 
Stadium, proved the old adage, that neither 



Ben Biuitt 



Alt Hildebrand 






De Paul nor Loyola can win both of the 
games in one season. The Ramblers, after 
De Paul had scored the first free throw, 
never were headed. De Paul was completely 
outclassed for the rest of the game, and the 
closest they ever came was six points. 

The final trip of the year was to Cleve- 
land, where the Ramblers defeated the Ohio 
Catholic champions, the University of Day- 
ton. The game was interesting from the 
viewpoint that Kladis played the pivot. Using 
strictly a left-handed hook, he scored 19 
points to put the game on the ice for the 
visitors. 

The 1949-50 team had a strange history. 
They were a well balanced team in scoring 





Kladis, do something! 



Bowling Green pays 
annual New Year's Eve 
visit 



Cap'n Jim N i c h o 1 1, 
about to be forced out 
after long gain against 
DePaul 



It's Rehfeldt '. Could we 
forget? 



191 




"Shoot, you're faded" 



"Watch that elbow, No. 
14" 



Kladis starts to force 



"Hey boys, it's behind 
you!" 



"Minuet in G" 



Eliminate the middle- 
man. 



5/. 



e 



n 6 



^ e ci 6 o 
/x ^ cord 



Loj'ola 


67 


Ripon 


42 


Loyola 


79 


Wheaton 


48 


Loyola 


51 


Minnesota 


55 


Loyola 


40 


Oklahoma A. & M. 


48 


Loyola 


55 


Wisconsin 


68 


Loyola 


76 


Marquette 


48 


Loyola 


53 


De Paul 


59 


Loyola 


69 


Dayton 


46 


Loyola 


70 


Oregon 


53 


Loyola 


59 


Bowling Green 


63 


Loyola 


58 


Utah 


52 


Loyola 


45 


Brigham Young 


51 


Loyola 


46 


C. C. N. Y. 


61 


Loyola 


71 


Syracuse 


59 


Loyola 


59 


Marquette 


56 


Loyola 


54 


Duquesne 


62 


Loyola 


42 


Toledo 


50 


Loyola 


41 


Oklahoma A. & M. 


31 


Loyola 


48 


Holy Cross 


53 


Loyola 


51 


St. Bonaventure 


55 


Loyola 


41 


Notre Dame 


56 


Loyola 


52 


John Carroll 


46 


Loyola 


67 


Bowling Green 


65 


Loyola 


60 


Notre Dame 


67 


Loyola 


85 


Western Michigan 


71 


Loyola 


62 


Valparaiso 


38 


Loyola 


61 


De Paul 


47 


Loyola 


61 


Western Michigan 


57 


Loyola 


60 


Dayton 


56 


Loyola 


70 


Valparaiso 


63 



Season Record: Won 17. Lost 13 



Dick Collins 




Don Hanrahan 



Ed Maracich 




Art White 




^JL o u o I CI J i^ambierd — 



j-^^laued In C^veru tvlaior ^^renu 



and height. Klaerich and Dawson fought 
for the scoring honors throughout the whole 
year, Klaerich finally winning by eleven 
points. Eddie Earle became the second man 
in Loyola history to score over 1000 points, 
and he missed his first 300-point season by 
one free throw. Ben Bluitt used his height 
to advantage especially in the late stages of 
the season and contributed 206 points. Frank 
O'Grady and Nick Kladis were valuable 
players when the going got rough, and to 
Captain Jimmy Nicholl and Art Hildebrand 
belong the role of play-making. 

The season started out with Ralph 
Klaerich carrying the ball. In the early 



games he was the one who put the ball 
through the hoop when it was most needed. 
Near the middle of the season, Dawson came 
into his own and he and Klaerich gave the 
team a better win percentage. 

At the end of the season, Bluitt, Earle 
and Nicholl had regained their form com- 
pletely, so that in the last few games, the 
team operated as a well-working unit, and 
this showed in the final tabulations. 

The Loyola Ramblers who are leaving 
Loyola this year will always be remembered 
by Loyolans as a great bunch of hard-work- 
ing athletes who always strove to put the 
school first, and themselves second. 



Earle comes from down under 



Pilgrim of Oklahoma halts Earle's progress 



Now that I'm up here, what'll I do? 





Everybody go into the act 



One reason why Oklahoma A & M go beat 



Don Hanrahan has things under control 



^ n e Uj e ar^S lIKe cord^ 



The Loyola Ramblers put together their 
longest win streak between February 16 and 
March 6, 1950. The Maroon and Gold de- 
feated Western Michigan and Valparaiso 
twice, and De Paul and Dayton, once, for a 
six game winning streak. The longest losing 
streak, three games, was duplicated when the 
Ramblers lost to Minnesota, Oklahoma, Wis- 
consin, and Holy Cross, St. Bonaventure, 
Notre Dame. 

By scoring 85 points against Western 
Michigan and 40 points against Oklahoma 
A. & M., the Ramblers recorded their high 
and low totals for the 1949-1950 season. 

Against City College of New York, and 
against the Irish of Notre Dame, was reg- 
istered the greatest loss margin, 15 points, 
but this was more than accounted for when 
the Ramblers beat Wheaton by 31 points, 
79-48. 

The lowest win margin, and the most 
hotly contested game of the year was the 
second Bowling Green game which the 
Maroon and Gold won, 67-65. 



The control-ball tactics of the Oklahoma 
A. & M. home game gave the season the low- 
est combined score, while the 156 points 
scored in the Western Michigan game were 
the highest combined total of points. 

The record of which Loyola is most 
proud is the fourteen points by which the 
Ramblers beat De Paul. This is the greatest 
difference in score ever recorded in this 
neighborhood rivalry. 




195 





Norm Buxbaum 



Don Turschman 



Bill Sullivan 



Joe Hutmacher 




^y e a m 




J c o r 


i V 


l^ 


' 






P 


G 


FGM FTA 


FTM 


Pet. 


PF Avg. 


TPS Avg. 


Klaerich, Ralph 


G 


30 


130 


164 


110 


.670 


101 


3.3 


370 


12.3 


Dawson, Ed 


C 


29 


133 


148 


93 


.615 


89 


3.0 


359 


12.3 


Earle, Ed 


F 


30 


108 


130 


83 


.638 


94 


3.1 


299 


9.9 


Bluitt, Ben 


F 


29 


86 


59 


34 


.595 


79 


2.7 


206 


7.1 


O'Grady, Frank 


F 


27 


75 


59 


25 


.423 


58 


2.1 


175 


6.5 


Kladis, Nick 


F 


28 


57 


63 


36 


.571 


43 


1.5 


150 


5.3 


Nicholl, Jim 


G 


28 


24 


38 


21 


.552 


64 


2.2 


69 


2.4 


Hildebrand, Art 


G 


28 


20 


42 


25 


.595 


81 


2.8 


65 


2.3 


Hanrahan, Don 


C 


14 


6 


16 


12 


.750 


14 


1.0 


24 


1.7 


Collins, Dick 


G 


25 


8 


19 


10 


.526 


31 


1.2 


26 


1.0 


White, Art 


G 


10 


3 


1 


1 


1.000 


5 


0.5 


7 


0.7 


Hutmacher, Joe 


G 


10 


2 


3 





.000 





0.0 


4 


0.4 


Maracich, Ed 


F 


4 





1 


1 


1.000 





0.0 


1 


0.2 


Turschman, Don 


G 


5 











.000 





0.0 





0.0 



LOYOLA TOTALS 
Opponents' Totals 



30 652 745 449 .601 
30 568 769 493 .641 



664 22.1 1753 58.4 
625 20.8 1629 54.3 



Key — P, Position; G, Games; FGM, Field Goals Made; FTA, Free 
Throws Attempted ; FTM, Free Throws Made ; Pet., Percentage ; 
PF, Personal Fouls; Avg., Average; TPS, Total Points Scored; 
Avg., Average, 



196 



^,Af ^ i n e ^ i n i 6 n 



I II lacle Uls ^jrorqet a f v lediocre (l3eQlnnin 



'9 



T 



9 



Sam, we didn't know you could fake that Govederica stopped by Nicholl. Xo Gain I 
well? 

When an irresistible force meets an im- 
Is Dawson a victim of Judo? movable object! 



Quarterback Earle is readv to hand ball off 
to left halfback — 

Control ball as demonstrated to Oklahoma 
Aggies by Loyola. 





^rednmcin (/3cisketbcill 



m 

George Bandy, Frosh Coach 



Elwood Sigwards 



Bob Collins 




The 1949-50 season saw the Freshman 
Basketball Team once again register an ex- 
cellent record. In his fifth year at Loyola, 
Coach George Bandy directed the first year 
men to a record of 16 victories and 6 losses. 
All the members of the team were graduates 
from high schools in the Chicago area and 
were prominent players on their respective 
teams. 

The freshmen played most of their 
games on a double-header program with the 
varsity in the alumni gymnasium. Before 
the varsity games it was usual to see the 
freshmen going through their paces against 
such squads as the "B" teams from Elm- 
hurst, Wheaton, Chicago Teachers, and the 
Valparaiso freshmen. Many of the other 
games were played against independent 
teams who have proved their worth in va- 
rious tournaments and leagues in Chicago. 

Opening the campaign with a 42-35 
victory over the Olympians the freshmen 
continued to win consistently. They swept 
both home and home series with the Elm- 
hurst and Wheaton "B" teams. By the end 
of January they had eleven victories and two 
one-point defeats. 

The freshmen played one of their best 
games while losing to the Loyola "B" team, 
66-50. The "B" team was represented by 
many of the players who had seen action 
with the varsity some time during the year. 
Such players as Don Hanrahan, Art White, 
Ed Maracich, Don Turschman, Carl Powers 
and the Hutmacher brothers were brought 
together to form a well experienced team. 
The freshmen held their own with the 
junior varsity until Hanrahan re-entered 
the game late in the second half and put in 
14 straight points which provided the mar- 
gin for victory. 

The freshmen did not enter the St. Sa- 
bina tournament this year, but they gained 
a second place in the Sun-Times A. A. Bas- 
ketball Tourney. 

Throughout the year the leading scor- 
ers were center Ulysses Christmas with a 9.3 
average ; forward Larry Dobberstein, 8.0 ; 
forward Elwood Sigwards, 7.9; and guard 
Tom Hill, 7.2. Ralph Szwedo and Bob Col- 
lins both performed effectively at the guard 
position and show promise for the future 
varsity team. Ken Adalbert, John Bozik, 
Bob Dougherty, Herb Rex, and Jim McKeon 
saw action during the season. 




Wheaton goes up, up, 
up — 



So near and yet so far 



Loyola 


42 


Loyola 


35 


Loyola 


59 


Loyola 


61 


Loyola 


60 


Loyola 


37 


Loyola 


35 


Loyola 


42 


Loyola 


83 


Loyola 


55 


Loyola 


60 


Loyola 


44 


Loyola 


70 


Loyola 


50 


Loyola 


58 


Loyola 


58 


Loyola 


56 


Loyola 


71 


Loyola 


57 


Loyola 


57 


Loyola 


41 


Loyola 


39 


Season Recor 



Olympians 35 

First National Bank 22 
Wheaton "B" 35 

Northern 111. Opmtry 27 
Kable Kolts ' 61 

Northern Trust 23 

Daley Boosters 37 

Illinois Tool 30 

Northern Trust 28 

Elmhurst "B" 24 

Chicago Title & Trust 22 
Chicago Aid to 

Disabled Veterans 43 
Illinois Tool 36 

Loyola "B" Squad 66 
Elmhurst "B" 38 

Clarendon Recreation 57 
Wheaton "B" 54 

Huskies 61 

Highland Livei-y 77 

Glenview Naval Sta. 20 
Valparaiso Frosh 51 
Valparaiso Frosh 42 
•d: Won 16. Lost 6 



Final Cumulative Basketball Statistics 
Summary 



Player 

Christmas, Ulysses 
Dobberstein, Larry 
Sigwards, Elwood 
Hill, Tom 
Szwedo, Ralph 
Collins, Bob 
Adalbert, Ken 
Bozik, John 
Dougherty, Bob 
Kordas, Tom 
Loeffler, Jim 
Rex, Herb 
McKeon, Jim 
Hanrahan, Don 
Hora, Jim 
Le Vitus, Bob 

LOYOLA TOTALS 

Opponents' Totals 



FGM FTM TPS 



74 


47 


195 


70 


30 


170 


71 


24 


166 


64 


31 


159 


41 


21 


103 


27 


37 


91 


23 


11 


57 


19 


8 


46 


12 


12 


36 


9 


10 


28 


10 


8 


28 


10 


6 


26 


8 


9 


25 


8 


1 


17 


6 


9 


14 





2 


2 


452 


259 


1163 


338 


213 


889 



Loyola can't lose as 
B-team plays the fresh- 
men 



Well, it was close any- 
way! 






% 




Bill C'oniaidy 



t'oach Alex Wilson 



Captain Bill Lambrecht 



(^ r o 3 3 (^ o a n L r 



^ 



With the addition of several promising 
freshmen and a transfer student, Loyola's 
Harriers raced to one of their most success- 
ful seasons in 1949. 

Outstanding freshmen on the squad, as 
well as the most consistent performer, was 
Bob Kelly. During the year his perform- 
ances indicated a bright future for him and 
Loyola. The high point of his season was 
a third place in the Loyola Invitational meet 




in which Wisconin's Don Gehrmann and 
Jim Urqhuart were the only men to beat him. 

Bill Conrardy, transfer student from 
Loras College, and another freshman. Bob 
Majeske, gave the Ramblers a fine nucleus 
for the squad. Both were among the front 
runners in every meet. These men compete 
in the middle distances during the regular 
track season. Conrardy is already well es- 
tablished as one of the better milers in the 
midwest. 

Bill Lambrecht, captain and only re- 
turning monogram winner from last year's 
squad, usually filled the fourth spot on the 
Rambler's squad. Martin Kenny and Bill 
Sibert, both freshmen, rounded out the six 
man aggregation. Bob Carreras, who won 
his numerals last year, was out of competi- 
tion this season with a broken bone in his 
right foot. 

The team scored three dual wins, one 
triangular win, one dual loss and finished 
third in the 17th Invitational Meet and fifth 
in the State Meet. 

In the final event of the year, Kelly, 
Conrardy, and Majeske finished in a three 
way tie for first place with Lambrecht and 
Kenny fifth and sixth as the Ramblers 
downed the Illinois Tech Harriers, 17-41. 

Coach Alex Wilson anticipates an even 
better season for the squad next year. The 
freshmen will then have a year of college 
competition behind them, and the team will 
be faced with a tough schedule, including the 
Central Collegiate Conference meet and the 
National Collegiates. All members of this 
year's contingent will be back next year. 



First Row: Majeske, Kenney, Sie- 
bert. Second Row: Kelly, Coach 
Wilson, Conrardy, Captain Lam- 
brecht. 



R, 



unnerd 



- VI p ^odci 



\p 



^ 



Ck 



amt)d 



p. 



7 ? 

tomorrow • 




They're off and run- 
ning at Montrose 



Bill Lambrecht 

works at the Chi- 
cago Avenue Arm- 
ory 



Conrardy of Loyola 
leads the pack over 
the last hill 



The start of the 
Loyola Invitational 
Meet 



201 



^ 



^ p CI c k — 



^J^ a r d Work J (kittle Cv t , 



u m o u r 



This year Loyola was represented by a 
track team which Coach Alex Wilson said 
was the best balanced squad he has had in 
his eighteen years at Loyola. The prospects 
for the future are even brighter. 

Heading the list of stars which led the 
team to its best year in the school's history 
were sprinter and long jumper Chuck Whit- 
tingham, middle distanceman Bill Conrardy, 
and quarter-miler Roman Grohwin. 

Early in the indoor season, Conrardy 
showed that he will be a tough man to beat as 
he finished second in the 1000-yard run in a 
meet held in Boston. Later he hit 1 :54.2 for 
the half as he anchored a relay team in the 
Illinois Tech relays. Whittingham led the 
way in the sprints and long jump as he kept 
far ahead of everyone in points scored. 

Grohwin, captain of the team, proved 
himself one of the best 440 men in the middle 
west. Combined with Whittingham and 
Frank Scarpelli in the 220's and Conrardy in 
the 880, Grohwin led off the quarter mile on a 
fine sprint medley team. 

Among the freshmen, three fine per- 
formers appeared. Bob Kelly broke the Loy- 



ola two-mile record the first time he ran the 
distance and improved with every perform- 
ance. He had it down to 9:34.2 indoors. 
Both Bob Majeske and Bill Sibert got under 
two flat in the half. Bill Lambrecht and 
Martin Kenny added to Loyola's distance 
contingent. Bob Carreras, Adam Jakrzsw- 
ski, and Jack Downs rounded out the 440 
men. 

Bob Theisen led the field event men with 
his Loyola record of 47' 11" in the shot put. 
Bill McNulty, Dominic Lenzini, and Joe 
Hlavin gave the team strength in the high 
jump. Dan Heffernan had a monopoly on 
the pole vault department. Freshman Norb 
Wiley looked good as Theisen's successor and 
as a discus throwing prospect. 

Jack Krause joined Scarpelli as a hur- 
dler and proved an adept pupil. However, 
the Loyolans remained weak in some of the 
field events. 

At the time of this writing, the team had 
won the title at the Midwest Invitational and 
placed second in the Illinois Tech relays. 
Along with this they had racked up a dual 
win, a triangular win, and a quadrangular 
triumph indoors. 



First Row: Wiley, Car- 
reras, Krause, Sibert, 
Downes. Second Row: 
Kelly, Jakrzewski, McNul- 
ty, Lambrecht, Clarke. 
Third Row: Lahart, 
assistant coach ; Rosuer : 
Conrardy; Scarpelli; Hla- 
vin; Whittingham; Groh- 
win, captain; Coach Alex 
Wilson. 




202 




Charlie Whittingham, 
Loyola dash man 



Alex Wilson, coach, and 
Roman Grohwin 



Bob Thiesen, shot-putter 



Norb Wiley solves the 
mystery of the "flying 
saucers" 



C'mon, let 



Hlavin has switched to 
poRo sticks 



The grim reapers 



Does Krause have 
acrophobia? 



203 



First Row : B o u g e a r e 1, 
Bangert, J o y c e. Second 
Row : Jaj e ; Powers: 
Dunne, captain; Hegeity ; 
Ackermans. Third Row: 
Cody, Smith, Coach Chal- 
mers, Lynch, Specht. 




s 



w i m m i n 



9 



D. 



e CI m 



With the appointment of Don Chalmers 
as new swimming coach of the university, 
Loyola began its upward climb to collegiate 
prominence in the world of swimming. 
Realizing the necessity of new blood to bol- 
ster last year's undermanned team, the new 
coach set out to induce some of Chicago'^ 
more prominent high school swimmers to 
come to Loyola. Successful in this attempt, 
Coach Chalmers then settled down to weeks 
of strenuous training, rounding out last 
year's team with five new recruits. The re- 
sult was one of the most successful swim- 
ming seasons in many years. The Ramblers 
won eight dual meets while dropping three, 
placed second in the North Central Quadran- 
gular Meet, third in the Chicago Inter- 
collegiate Meet, and fourth in the Midwest 
Invitational Meet at North Central. 

Bob Dunne, captain for his second 
straight year, found the team more to his 
liking this year. Bob has been a consistent 
point getter and until this year held the uni- 
versity record in the 200-yd. breaststroke 
event and was on the record-breaking 300- 
yd. medley relay team which won the event 
at the Chicago Invitational Meet in 1948. 
This year he specialized in the free-style 
sprint events, but came back in the latter 
part of the season to win 3rd place in the 200- 
yd. breaststroke event in the Midwest Inter- 
collegiate Invitational Meet. Bob has won 
four major letters while competing in swim- 



ming at Loyola and will be the only gradu- 
ating senior. 

Larry Specht, freshman star and former 
captain of Fenwick's squad, was the high 
point man for the past season with 105 com- 
petitive points. Larry excelled in the free- 
style sprint events capturing 13 first places. 
After his first collegiate year, he now jointly 
holds two university records. With Hank 
Ackermans and Don Sullivan he holds the 
300-yd medley relay record now lowered to 
3:15.0, and he anchored the record-breaking 
free-style team. 

Freshman diver, breast-stroker, and 
free-styler, Henry Ackermans, formerly of 
Lane Tech, turned in 67 points to place him 
second in this season's competition. "Hon- 
est Hank's" outstanding performance was 
his acquisition of the Chicago Intercollegiate 
diving crown, won in the Chicago Invita- 
tional Championship meet at Chicago Uni- 
versity. Like Specht he is on both record- 
holding relay teams. 

Aquaman Don Sullivan has proved him- 
self to be the greatest backstroker in the 
annals of Loyola's history. He set the 150-yd. 
backstroke record at 1 :48.2 and was a reli- 
able point maker throughout the season. His 
point total was 59. 

Veteran diver and two-letterman Gene 
Hegarty has again shown himself to be one 
of the best divers in the Chicago area. Gene, 



204 



who suffered a cracked foot midway in the 
season but continued diving, contributed 44 
points and seven first places to the team 
total. He was beaten only once in dual meet 
competition. 

Converting Tom Powers from a free- 
style sprint man to a distance swimmer 
proved a wise maneuver by Coach Chalmers. 
Tom ably took over the 220- and 440-yd. free 
style events, setting a new universitv record 
in the 220-yd. event of 2 :33.9. 

With determination, good coaching, and 
a considerable amount of work, Denny Joyce 
became one of the most promising swimmers 
on the squad. As a freshman this year, he 
cracked the 200-yd breaststroke record by 5 
seconds, formerly set by Dunne two years 
ago. A previous record of 2 :47.3 had stood 
since 1935. Denny has now set the record at 
2:41.2. 

Dick Kinsella, veteran free styler, found 
it difficult to swim, work, and attend night 



school but was able to add depth to the sprint 
events. He was on the 400-yd. relay team 
which lowered the university record of 
3:59.8 to 3:56.0 and personally accounted 
for 26 points. 

Chuck Cody, only other returning letter- 
man, was also a member on the record- 
breaking 400-yd. relay team. Although 
Chuck spent most of the season nursing a 
broken jaw, he came back to fill out the free 
style relay team and gain valuable points in 
the 100-yd. free style event. 

Dave Jaye and Bill Smith filled out the 
team roster. Dave showed potentiality in 
the 150-yd backstroke event while Bill 
backed up Powers in the free style distance 
events. Bill holds the university record for 
the 1500 meter swim. 

Not to be overlooked is the contribution 
to the successful season made by the hard 
working managers, John Bougearel and Noel 
Bangard. 




Diver Gene Heg- 
erty up and over 
— (continued 
below) 



Kinsella, Powers, 
and Dunne about 
to take a few 
quick laps 



Hegerty's on his 
way down 



Denny Joyce do- 
ing the butterfly 



Captain Bob 
Dunne waiting 
for the gun 



205 



Zylstra, Kupfer, Green- 
stein, Sullivan, Steerman, 
and Heilscher. Absent: 
Walters. 




iZ5 o w I I 



n 



9 



Bowling at Loyola University began 
with the creation of the Midwest Intercol- 
legiate Bowling Conference. Last year, the 
first as a member of the conference, the 
Ramblers took first place honors with a rec- 
ord of 21 wins and 9 losses, and also cap- 
tured the first Annual M. L B. C. Invitational 
Tournament, held at the University of Notre 
Dame. The bowling Ramblers took thirteen 
out of sixteen individual conference trophies. 

Bowling has been a recognized varsity 
sport since its inception in the 1948-1949 
season. Minor letters were awarded to 
Chuck Greenstein, Gene Zylstra, and Dan 
Healy, members of last year's squad. Green- 
stein and Zylstra returned to bowl the 1949- 
1950 season with two other returning men, 
Jack Walters and Bob Hielscher. 



Besides matches with teams represent- 
ing De Paul, Valparaiso, and Notre Dame, 
the Ramblers met the winner of the Big 
Ten Bowling Championship, the University 
of Illinois. 

In addition to the four returning men 
named above, additions to the roster are Bob 
Kupfer. Tom Sullivan, and Jerry Steerman. 
Greenstein is the only senior on the team. 

Loyola's bowling team is established as 
a minor sport in the university, and is in- 
creasing its matches each year as more and 
more colleges and universities recognize 
bowling as an intercollegiate sport. 

The averages of Loyola's keglers are as 
follows : 

Zylstra, Gene 183 Junior 
Greenstein, Chuck 

(capt. and mgr.) 178 Senior 

Walters, Jack 175 Junior 

Kupfer, Bob 174 Junior 

Hielscher, Bob 164 Junior 



Steerman, Jerry 
Sullivan, Tom 



160 Sophomore 
155 Sophomore 




Captain Chuck Green- 
stein ready to throw an- 
other strike. 



Bob Heilscher and 
"determined look". 



that 



Gene Zylstra shows form 
that made him the league's 
high-scorer. 



CJf 



Loyola had a veteran team representing 
the school in this year's series of golf 
matches. Eleven dual matches and two 
championship events comprised the sched- 
ule which began April 15. 

The season was highlighted by matches 
with the University of Wisconsin and Notre 
Dame. Wisconsin opened the schedule with 
a match at Loyola's home course, the Edge- 
water Golf Club, located at Pratt and Ridge 
Boulevards, Chicago. Loyola was guest at 
the University of Notre Dame's course on 
April 29. 

Other matches included a home and 
home series with Western Michigan College, 
Valparaiso University, and the University of 
Detroit. Single matches saw Lake Forest 
at Loyola, Loyola at Bradley University and 
Loyola playing Toledo at Detroit in a tri- 
angular meet. 

The second annual Chicago Intercol- 
legiate Golf Championship, which Loyola 
initiated last year, was conducted by the 
University of Chicago at Silver Lake Golf 
Course. Loyola boasted both defending 
team and individual champions. Several 
members of the team and student coach Mark 
Campbell will journey to the University of 
New Mexico late in June for the National 
Intercollegiate Championships. 

The team was led by senior Jack Atten, 
who has averaged a score of 76 during his 
golfing competition at Loyola. Atten was 
1949 Chicago Intercollegiate and Chicago 
Amateur Champion and was defeated in the 
second round of the National Intercollegiate 
Tourney at Ames, Iowa, in an extra hole 
match. Other returning lettermen were 
Frank Hianik, Bob Witt, Jim Kennedy, 
Frank Stotz, Bob Balek, and Jerry Whiston. 
Although hampered by an injured foot, Ed 
Reihsen, runner-up in the Chicago Catholic 
High School Championship in 1949, was a 
skilled freshman. Mark Campbell, Jr., 
completed his third year as student coach. 



Bob Balek shows Jim Kennedy the 
way 

Frank Hianek (left) and Bob Witt 
(right) seem to approve of Frank 
Stotz' new driver. 

Atten appears to be ready for any- 
thing! 

Coach Campbell (center) confers 
with Frank Stotz (left) and Capt. 
Jack Atten 





Reconnai.sant-f f;roup meets ciU'iny patrol 




So I says to the judge . . . 



The Dean wants to see us again ! 



Let's see — In Smith vs. Smith . 




Cases, cases — nothing but cases. 



Sir, I have a problem. 



^ke c^ u 6 t l/i/ord 



The students cried for a yearbook. The faculty demanded a yearbook. 
TIic 1950 Loyulan is being printed, and the proof of that is the fact that 
this "last word" is being written. 

The best way to express "The Last Word" would probably be in the 
form of one big sigh of relief. But before this can be done we must first 
express our sincere thanks to the Loyola Union, for without the Union 
there could not possibly be a 1950 Loyola n. Also our sincere thanks are 
expressed to the many people without whose help this annual might never 
have reached the press. Our sincerest thanks to Charles Rollings, the pub- 
lications manager of the Loyola Union. Without his guiding hand this 
yearbook would have been just a conglamoration of pages. To John Gremer, 
Ray Filitti and their staffs, go our thanks for their unending work on the 
senior and undergraduate sections. Dolores Pawlicki and her staff of coeds 
deserve much thanks for their work on the organization section. Bill Ben- 
jamin and his staff of photographers have our gracious thanks for the 
wonderful photographs and their time spent in taking the pictures of all 
of Loyola's events. The beautiful art work in the opening sections and 
throughout the yearbook is credited to Ed Lussier, and our thanks to him 
for his beautiful work. Our thanks, also, to Tom Ryan and his staff for 
their arduous work in the sport section. To Gene Lipuma, Gerry Rodell, 
and Stan Ptak go our thanks for their articles which appear throughout the 
yearbook. Our deepest gratitude and thanks go out to Messrs. Ray Langen, 
Wally Mann, and Norm Koenig of Campus Service, our printers ; to Messrs. 
Tony Barrett and James Motherway of Pontiac Engraving Co., our 
engravers ; to Mr. Paul Nelson of Durand Manufacturing Co., for the 
covers; to Mr. Arthur Hauschner of the Daguerre Studio for the photo 
work ; and finally our thanks to the faculty and the students for their 
wonderful cooperation in the welding of this annual. 

We can't forget the cooperation we have received from the faculty and 
administrators of the University. To Mr. Clarence Connelly of the Medical 
School, Rev. Oswald J. Marshall, S.J., Regent of the Dental School, Messrs. 
Dan Cahill and Dan Calibrarro of the Publicity office go our thanks. 

We would also like to express our thanks to Curzio Paesani and Stan 
Pisarski of the Dental School, and Dutch Blose and Bob Yaeger of the 
Medical School for their cooperation in assembling material from their 
respective schools. 

The 1950 Loyolan can boast of three "firsts". This yearbook is the 
first to be published after a gap of three years ; it is the first to have coeds 
on the staff ; and it is the first to have a Queen and her court. Not only can 
this annual boast of three firsts, but the staff is mighty proud of an accom- 
plishment which looked like an impossibility in the beginning. Even with 
the heart-breaking disappointments of schedules and deadlines being dis- 
rupted, the smoke-filled news room, the irate students whose pictures turned 
out bad, and all the discouraging odds and ends, we have accomplished a 
task, namely The 1950 Loyolan. The 1950 Loyolan is much more than 
just a history of a year at Loyola, it is a heart warming and sentimental 
review of the days and hours spent with our many friends at Loyola. It is 
a picture story of the many nights that we watched our basketball team 
win (or lose) at the alumni gym. It is an intangible happiness of the many 
hours and days spent in class, at Lewis Towers, or Lake Shore Campus, or 
any of the various schools throughout Loyola. Yes, The 1950 Loyolan is 
much more than just a history of the school year, it is the story of each and 
every student at Loyola. 

With the completion of The 1950 Loyolan, the editors pray and hope 
that the editors who are to follow us have in their staff the enthusiasm and 
spirit that we had in ours.