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Full text of "The Loyolan"

T HE I vJ E S U I T CENT EN N I A L 



::;iii|S»s?s. -.^i 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

CARL!: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/loyolan1958unse 



THE 

1958 

LOYOLAN 




ROBERT F. DOHERTY Editor-in-Chief 
RICHARD F. LISK Business Manager 

HARRY L. McCLOSKY Faculty Advisor 



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• ■ • f » • 







UNIVERSITY 



ILLIIVOIS 



LOYOLAN CONTENTS 

THE CENTENNIAL 8 

ADMINISTRATION 26 

UNIVERSITY 40 

College of Arts and Science ^2 

College of Dental Surgery ^" 

School of Law ^^ 

Stritch School of Medicine HO 

University College ^3" 

CcUege of Commerce l"^" 

Graduate School ^"- 

School of Social Work 166 

School of Nursing 1^0 

ORGANIZATIONS and GREEKS 178 

ATHLETICS 238 





LOUIS JOLIET. The layman has ahvays 
followed the Jesuit in his endeavors. Louis Joliet 
was the first of the many laymen and lay organi- 
zations that have helped the Society of Jesus in 
the Chicagoland area. 

In 1673 Joliet, the layman, accompanied 
Father Jacques Marquette's expedition which 
discovered Chicago. Joliet was in search of the 
Mississippi River which it was believed might 
be a water highway to the Orient. Joliet and 
Marquette left their starting point, the De Pere 
mission which was located at the present site of 
Green Bay, Wisconsin. 

On the expedition to the Mississippi Father 
Marquette had been appalled by the decrepit 
condition of the Indian tribes in Illinois and 
had proinised himself he would return to preach 
the Gospel to them. When he set out again 
Marquette and his companions sailed their canoes 
down the shore of Lake Michigan to the mouth 
of the Chicago River and then up the river six 
miles. At this point Father Marquette became 
ill and was forced to stay for the winter. 



The exact site of the cabin in which they spent 
the winter, which made Marquette and his lay 
companions the first civilized inhabitants of 
Illinois, is the junction of Damen Avenue and 
the Chicago River. 

Oddly enough Damen Avenue was named 
after Reverend Arnold Damen S.J. who in 
1857 was the next Jesuit to come to Chicago 
and founded Holy Family Parish and St. Ig- 
natius College which ultimately become Loyola 
Universitv. 




IN RECOGNITION 



This past year marked the 100th Anniversary of the Jesuits 
in Chicago. Our dedication is to the Jesuits who have served 
and are serving Chicago. We also wish to include in our dedi- 
cation those laymen, parishioners, lay faculty, alumni, students, 
and those many benefactors and friends whose interest and 
help have enabled the Jesuit Fathers to continue to serve the 
spiritual and educational needs of this community. 

We have used the illustration of Louis Joliet as symbolic 
of the spirit of cooperation between laymen and Jesuit Fathers. 
It is also indicative of the fact that since the very earliest days 
on this North American Continent, that spirit of cooperation 
between laymen and Jesuits has made possible remarkable 
growth and expansion in the spiritual, educational, medical, 
and scientific facilities and services of the Jesuit institutions 
of Chicago. 

As the spirit of Father Marquette and Louis Joliet pioneered 
the great mid-west in the 1670's so today that same spirit of 
cooperation among the present Fathers and the laymen of 
Chicago continues for the greater glory of God. It is to a 
glorious future as well as to a remarkable past century of 
Jesuit influence in Chicago that the 1958 Loyolan is dedicated. 



Mayor Richard J. Daley pre- 
sents Rev. James F. Maguire, 
S.J. and Joel Goldblatt with 
the official document pro- 
claiming civic recognition*of 
Jesuit Centennial ^Week. 





THE JESUITS 
OF CHICAGO 



CELEBRATING A 

CENTENNIAL OF 
SERVICE 



October 8, 1871 — on this night looking out over Chicago 
from high in the wind-blown bell-tower oj St. Ignatius College, 
one would see the darkened shapes of the homes of the city on 
all sides; the scene is very peaceful. Now in the distance to 
the northeast there appears a glimmer; the glimmer grows to 
a flame and thence to a raging inferno; the Chicago Fire had 
started. 

From its starting point, the corner of Jefferson and Dehoven 
Streets, the fire, driven by a strong wind, begins to move south- 
west. Directly in its path lies Holy Family Parish and St. 
Ignatius College. It appears as if nothing can save them. 

Reverend Arnold Damen, S.jf., who founded the parish and 
the college on the bleak prairies of Chicago'' s south side, was 
holding a mission in Brooklyn at that time. His assistant 
telegraphed him that there was grave danger of his beloved 
college being destroyed. The message was handed to Father 
Damen in the confessional at St. Patrick's Church. 

Praying for the safety of his college and parish. Father 
Damen went to the altar and remained there alone the greater 
part of the night. For many years he had struggled to amor- 
tize the mortgage on the church and to raise the money to con- 
truct St. Ignatius College. 

With tears streaming down his cheeks, he made a vow that, 
if his petition were answered, he would, for all time, keep 
seven vigil lights burning in front of the statue of Our Lady 
of Perpetual Help in Holy Family Church. 

It IS a matter of history that the wind shifted and drove 
the fire eastward across the river and afterwards to the lake. 
St. Ignatius College was saved. 




Holy Family Church as it looked around 1860. This was the first Jesuit Institution in the Chicago area. 



The first white man ever to set foot on Chicago soil or 
conduct rehgious services in this locality was Reverend 
James Marquette, S.J.. Two centuries later a thriving and 
prosperous little city had taken the place of the wilderness, 
which had been known to Father Marquette. To this city 
in 1857, at the invitation of Archbishop Anthony O'Regan, 
came another "Black Robe," Reverend Arnold Damen, 
S.J., to establish a parish and a college. 

Father Damen, a native of Holland, responding to the 
call for priests to serve in the westward expansion of 
America, sailed for the United States in 1837, to begin 
his studies in the Jesuit Order at Florissant, Missouri. 
After his ordination in 1844, he became an outstanding 
preacher in St. Louis and throughout the Midwest. 

Father Damen selected a site for his parish in the south- 
western portion of the city. A small wooden church was 
erected at the corner of May and Eleventh Streets. Shortly 
after the cornerstone was laid for the permanent church. 
Holy Family Church, which stands today after a century 
of service to God. 

From the very beginning of his duration in Chicago, 
Father Damen was possessed with the burning desire 
familiar to every Jesuit — to found an institution for the 
higher education of youth. Accordingly, in 1869, Father 
Damen acquired a site just east of the church and on it 
built his college. A charter was granted by the state in 
the name of St. Ignatius College on June 30, 1870. 



The following Septeinber the college opened its doors 
for the first time and thirty-seven young men applied for 
admission. The college truly started small, for of the five 
courses taught, four — English, Greek, Latin, and Arith- 
metic — were taught by one man, Mr. J. J. Stephens, S.J.. 
The other course, German, was taught by Reverend D. 
Niederkorn, S.J.. The president of the college was naturally 
Father Damen. 

Until 1895, few note-worthy events occurred. The stu- 
dents came and went; their numbers increased with the 
years. Good conduct and diligence were encouraged 
through a system of awards. The new rectors and members 
of the faculty looked always toward the betterment and 
harmonious development of the institution while the 
character of the work remained the same. The first class, 
graduating in 1881, consisted of only two members: 
Thomas Finn, who later became a Jesuit; and Carter 
Harrison, seven-times mayor of Chicago. 

Beginning with the Rectorship of Reverend Henr\ J. 
Dumbach, S.J., in 1900, the college entered upon a new 
stage of development. The curriculum was improved. 
A post-graduate course in philosophy was established. 
In 1906, the Department of Law was introduced. In that 
year, too, the site of Loyola's present Lake Shore Campus 
was purchased, at a cost of $161,000, with the intention 
that it would one day house university facilities for the 
school. 




The Very Reverend James F. Maguire, S.J., 
presenting Frank J. Lewis the first annual Loyola 
University Damen Award. The Damen Award 
is given to outstanding Americans "for their 
dedication in the Jesuit tradition to God, to 
society, and to the nation.'' Plans call for future 
awards to be given at a major convocation of the 
University's faculty and students. 



The purchase of the Lake Shore Campus proved to be 
an act of great foresight on the part of Father Dumbach. 
He understood that expansion into the professional fields 
might be necessary. The additional land could provide 
room for this expansion. Two reasons seemed to make it 
imperative that the Jesuits should enter the field of ad- 
vanced and specialized education. 

The first was the fact that the college as an organic 
part of the educational system was no longer capable of 
producing the amount of good accomplished by it in the 
past. This was due to a gradual change in the tome of 
American education from the liberal arts subjects to the 
more specialized studies. Because of their lack of uni- 
versity facilities, the Jesuits were sufTering a loss of control 
of students at a time when they were most in need of 
proper guidance. 



The apex of the Jesuit Centennial was a Civic banquet honoring 
the 100 outstanding Chicagoans. The dinner was held in the Grand 
Ball Room of the Palmer House in Chicago. 

10 



The second cause was the increasing flood of atheism 
and materialism in the professional schools of the country. 
The Jesuits understood that coming generations of doctors 
and dentists, lawyers and accountants must be firmly 
grounded in a Divine Moral Code. For these reasons 
they entered the field of specialized education. 

On November 21, 1909, the state granted a charter 
under the title of Loyola University, and St. Ignatius 
College became the College of Arts and Sciences of Loyola 
University. Even before this time, however, the expansion 
to university size had begun. In 1908, the Lincoln School 
of Law was affiliated, thereby becoming the Law School 
of St. Ignatius College and eventually the Loyola University 
School of Law. During the period from 1909 to 1915, 
various medical schools were affiliated until in 1915 they 
passed under the complete control of the trustees and 
laecame the Loyola University School of Medicine. 

The year 1923 marked the beginning of the Department 
of Home Study. Also in that year, the Chicago College 
of Dental Surgery was annexed under an agreement by 
which it became the Dental Department of Loyola Llni- 
versity. 

The College of Commerce was started as a night school 
in 1927, under the Deanship of Henry Chamberlain. 

Loyola today, one of the finest and largest Catholic 
Universities in the nation, has an enrollment of more 
than 8,500 students in sixteen buildings on three widely 




^>.ir:f:v:;'' : 



separated campuses and at an affiliated theological sem- 
inary in West Baden, Indiana. 

There is a Graduate School granting doctorate and 
master's degrees. Undergraduate divisions include the 
College of Arts and Sciences, College of Commerce, 
School of Nursing, and University College. Professional 
schools include the Stritch School of Medicine, School of 
Dentistry, School of Law, and School of Social Work. 
There is also the Institute of Social and Industrial Rela- 
tions, which grants master's degrees in its specialities. In 
addition, the Loyola Guidance Center, under Father Doyle, 
its director for twenty-four years, provides psychological 
care for maladjusted children and serves as a training 
ground for graduate students in psychology. 

As evidence of the greatness of the university's accom- 
plishments, forty-eight per cent of Chicago's dentists were 
educated at Loyola's Dental School, which is located at 
1757 West Harrison Street. Twenty-three per cent of the 
city's physicians receive their education at the university's 
Stritch School of Medicine, which is situated at 706 South 



Reverend Arnold Damen in 1857 established 
the first Jesuit Institution in the Chicago area. 
In 1870 due to his energy and dedication, the 
doors of St. Ignatius College were opened and 
Loyola University's future was thus insured 





> -^^ 




Three Loyola Students, Don Gallagher and John Ryan both Juniors in the Medical School, and 
Stan Szydlik, graduate student, start off on their trip up the Chicago River. The three repre- 
senting Father Marquette, Louis Joliet, and an Indian guide, were taking part in the celebration 
of the Jesuit Centennial last September. 



VVolcott. The importance of the two schools is additionally 
emphasized when it is pointed out that the medical school 
provided clinical care to more than 60,000 patients last 
year, and the dental school clinic had 70,000 patients 
during the same period. 

The College of Arts and Sciences, as well as the Pre- 
Medical and Pre-Dental Departments and the School of 
Nursing, is located on the Lake Shore Campus. The 
Lewis Towers Campus houses an associate division of the 
College of Arts and Sciences, the Commerce, Graduate, 
Social Work Schools, University College, Institute of Social 
and Industrial Relations, and Loyola Guidance Center. 
The Law School is located at 41 East Pearson. 



Of Loyola's 32,000 living alumni, 22,000 reside in the 
Chicago area. A great number serve the public and 
parochial school systems, the courts and many social 
agencies, the nursing profession, and very many of Chi- 
cago's business firms in the capacities of executives, ac- 
countants, salesmen, chemists, and economists. 

The seventy-one Jesuits who serve as administrators 
and teachers at the university are supplemented by a 
three-hundred member, full-time faculty and more than 
five-hundred part-time instructors. 

The university has far from stopped its expansion. Year 
by year the school increases in prominence in Chicago. 
Facilities are gradually being expanded to meet the ever- 



Conversation flows easily between the dignitaries at the Centennial Civic Banquet. 



vv yv 




growing demand for higher education. 

Aid in this expansion is coming from outside Loyola 
as well as from within. Several educational foundations, 
seeing the worth of Loyola's cause, have contributed sig- 
nificant sums of money to accelerate this development. 
Notable among these has been the Ford Foundation's 
grant of $900,000 to Loyola's Stritch School of Medicine, 
which was given in recognition of the great work done 
by this school. 

In addition, the annual deficit of the Stritch School of 
Medicine, sometimes running to as much as 1500,000, is 
supplied by the Archdiocese of Chicago. 

In this same vein, there has been formed this year a 
new organization known as Businessmen for Loyola. This 
group of distinguished business leaders has raised 1225,000. 
These funds will be used to initiate Loyola's greater 
teaching program, which will increase the salaries of the 
university's teaching staflT. 

The most recent addition to Loyola's facilities is the 
newly acquired Commonwealth Edison generating station 
at 820 North Rush Street. Plans for the use of this build- 
ing have not yet been completed, but it is felt that the 
prime factor in the decision of the function of this building 
in the educational scheme of the university will be for 
the good of the student. Several plans have been suggested 
for the possible use of the building. Among these are a 
library, a student union, or an addition to the Law School. 

In commemoration of their first one hundred years in 
Chicago, the Jesuit Fathers compiled the Jesuit Centennial 
list of one hundred outstanding Chicagoans. These one 
hundred were chosen for their distinguished achievement 
and outstanding contributions to this city. 

The naming of Chicago's most distinguished citizens 
was a part of the four-month long Jesuit Centennial ob- 
servance. Prompted by newspaper and radio-television 
support of the project, more than nine-thousand Chi- 



cagoans submitted nominations of men and women whom 
they considered to be outstanding in their activities for 
the advancement of Chicago. 

Awarding the citations is the Jesuits' way of expressing 
the Order's appreciation for the opportunity to serve 
Chicago and its citizens for the past one hundred years. 

Members of virtually every field of endeavor received 
citations. A few of those honored were: 

Judge John P. Barnes, formerly of the Federal District 
Court of Chicago; 

Dr. Herman N. Bundesen, President of the Clhicago 
Board of Health; 

Henry Crown, Chairman of the Board, Material Service 
Corporation; 

John F. Cuneo, President of the Cuneo Press; 

Richard J. Daly, Mayor of the City of Chicago; 

Honorable Paul H. Douglas, United States Senator from 
Illinois; 

Willis Gale, Chairman of the Board, Commonwealth 
Edison Company; 

Maurice Goldblatt, Chairman of the Board, Goldblatt 
Brothers Incorporated; 

James S. Kemper, Chairman of the Board, Lumber- 
man's Mutual Casualty Company; and according to 
Fortune Magazine, one of the ten richest men in America; 

Martin H. Kennelly, Business and civic leader; 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Lewis, philanthropists; 

William L. Fetridge, General President. Building Ser- 
vice Employees' International Union; and 

Adlai E. Stevenson, twice Democratic nominee for 
President of the United States. 

The Jesuits, this year, are embarking on their second 
century in Chicago with the same zealous determination 
which motivated Reverend Arnold Damen, S.J., one 
hundred years ago. May their second century in Chicago 
be as fruitful as their first. 



During a break at the Centennial Civic Banquet Joel Goldblatt, Father James Maguire, S.J., 
and Bishop Hillinger comment on the crowd as Jose Maria de Areilza, Spanish ambassador to 
the United States looks on. 




THE ONE HUNDRED 



CHOSEN FOR THEIR 



AND MERITORIOUS 



OUTSTANDING CHICAGOANS: Top Row: Charles Rozmarek, Polish-American leader; Irving Rudolph, Chicago Boys Clubs' leader; Daniel 
B. Ryan, president. Cook County Board; Dr. Marcell Schein, scientist; Arthur J. Schmitt, businessman; Dr. Isaac S. Schour, educator; John G. 
Sevceik, business and civic leader; Dr. John J. Scheinin; Leo J. Sheridan, realtor and civic leader; William J. Sinek, businessman; Robert F. Wilson, 
businessman and civic leader; William J. Stcbler, businessman. Second Row: Daniel Catton Rich, director of Art Institute; Dr. John A. Wilson, 
educator: Dr. John T. Rettaliata, educator; Dr. Reuben M. Strong;, educator; Dr. Robert Redfield, educator; Dr. Willis J. Potts; Miss Marie Plam- 
ondon, social worker; Holman D. Pettibone, banker; Stanley Pargilis, author and historian; Dr. Eric Oldbert; Harold H. Swift, businessman phil- 
anthropist; William B. Traynor, businessman and civic leader; Dr. Harold C. Urey, scientist; Dr. Benjamin C. Willis, educator; Gen. Robert E. 
Wood, businessman and philanthropist; Austin L. Wyman, civic leader. Bottom Row: Samuel Levin, labor and civic leader; R. Stuart List, pub- 
lisher; Homer J. Livingston, banker; Major Lenox R. Lohr, civic leader; Earle Ludgin, advertising executive; Oscar G. Mayer, business and civic 
leader; William L. McFetridge, labor leader; Joseph B. Meegan, community leader; Joseph E. Merrion, housing project developer: Dr. Karl Meyer, 
leader in medical and charitv societies; Dr. J. Roscoe Miller, educator; Timothy J. O'Connor, Police Commissioner of Chicago. THOSE NOT 
PRESENT FOR PHOTO: Chesser M. Campbell, publisher, The Chicago Tribune- Richard J. Daley, Mayor, City of Chicago; Paul H Douelas, 
LT. S. Senator from Illinois; Andrew T. Frain, founder of Andy Frain Ushers' organization; Willis Gale, chairman of Commonwealth Edison Albert 
W. Harris, former president of Harris Trust and Savings; Dr. Ernest E. Irons, physician and President of Municipal Tuberculosis Sanitarium Philip 
M. Klutznick, International President of B'nai B'rith; Franklin M. Kreml, director. Transportation Center, Northwestern LTniveisitv Mi. and 
Mrs. Frank J. Lewis, benefactors of Loyola and De Paul Universities. 




14 



)UTSTANDING CHICAGOANS 



)ISTINGUISHED ACHIEVEMENT 



lONTRIBUTIONS TO THE CITY 



OUTSTANDING CHICAGOANS: Top Row: Dr. Rudolph Ganz, music leader; Dr. Roscoe C.Giles; Maurice Goldblatt, businessman philanthropist; 
George S. Halas, sports leader; Miss Nellie X. Havvkinson, nursing educator; Dr. Harold H. Hillenbrand; Fred K. Hoehler, public relations; Theodore 
V. House, business and civic leader; Dr. Percy L.Julian, scienctist; Meyer Kestmbaum, business leader; Dr. Lawrence A. Kimpton, educator. Second 
Row: Joseph J. Cavanagh, highway traffic expert; Dr. Lowell T. Coggeshall; Fiarfax M. Cone, advertising executive; Michael J. Corrigan, former 
fire commissioner; Patrick F. Crowley, lawyer; Mrs. Patrick F. Crowley, civic leader; Col. Henry Crown, industrialist; John F. Cuneo, businessman 
benefactor; James E. Day, business and civic leader; Marshall Field Jr., publisher; Mrs. Carol Fox Flanagan, opera impresario; Paul V. Galvin, 
business leader; James S. Kemper, business leader; Martin H. Kennelly, former mayor; Charles C. Kerwin, civic leader; Weymouth Kirkland, 
lawyer; John S. Knight, publisher. Bottom Row: Miss Mary Amberg, social worker; Stephen M. Bailey, labor leader; Judge John P. Barnes; Robert 
A. Bean, zoologist; Miss Jessie F. Binford, social worker; Cushman Bissell, lawyer; Mrs. Gwendolyn Brooks Blakely, poet and author; Dr. Herman 
N. Bundesen; Kenneth F. Burgess, lawyer; Leo Burnett, advertising executive; Bertram J. Cahn, business and civic leader; Robert J. Casey, author 
and newspaperman. THOSE NOT PRESENT FOR PHOTO: Leverett S. Lyon, Chairman, Executive Committee, Chicago -Association of Com- 
merce and Industry; Hughston M. McBain, chairman, Marshall Field and Co.; Mrs. Chauncey McCormick, society leader; Clarence B. Randall, 
special assistant to President Eisenhower; Edward L. Ryerson, retired chairman of the board, Ryerson Physical Laboratory; .Adlai E. Stevenson, 
twice Democratic party nominee for president; Ludwig Mies Van Der Rohe, chairman. Department of Architecture, Illinois Institute of Technology; 
Thomas E. Wilson, Founder of Wilson and Company, meat packers. 





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TAf University, a body almost human in its actions, 

living, moving, functioning according to the design set 

downjor it — a body made up oj parts. These parts, 

the colleges and organizations, depend upon the body 

as a whole for their life, while, in their own way, add 
to the life of the body. Now, to look at the 

body, the University as it is today, and then at each 
of its parts. 



LOYOLA TODAY 



When founding" Loyola, then called St. Ignatius College, 
in 1869, Reverend Arnold Damen, S.J. stated that he 
wanted a school "to rival Georgetown." Now 100 Years 
later, Loyola is larger, and we feel greater, then George- 
town. Many people, even Loyola students, are unaware 
of the true greatness of Loyola. The accomplishments of 
the school, its distinguished faculty, and its students and 
graduates are too many and too varied to fit in one volume, 
let alone one short article. 

From its small beginnings Loyola has grown to the 
extent that enrollment is now approaching 9000 students. 
These students are scattered throughout Arts and Sciences, 
Commerce, Nursing, and the pre-professional curricula 
in the undergraduate division; the Medical School, School 
of Social Work, Dental School, Law School, Institute of 
Social and Industrial Relations, and Graduate School in 
the graduate division and the University College and 
Home Study Div-ision. Of the total enrollment, only 3600 
are full-time undergraduate students. 

Most notable of Loyola's accomplishments have been 
those of the several graduate schools. Their singular 
record of achievement has distinguished Loyola as a 
leader in the field of post-graduate education. Awards 
and grants in recognition of these accomplishments have 
flooded the University during the year just ended; spe- 
cifically the Ford Foundation grant of S900,000 to further 
the research work of the Stritch School of Medicine, the 
allocation of an eight acre tract of land to the LTniversity 
by the Illinois Medical Center Commission. This land, 
located at Hoyne Avenue on the Congress Street Express- 
way, will provide space for the construction of a new 
Dental School. Loyola's present Dental School is the 
largest in the State of Illinois and one of the best known 
in the world. Also in the line of recognition of achieve- 
ment is the gift of 150,000 to the School of Law by the 
Robert R. McCormick Charitable Trust. This money 
will be used to create the Roljert R. McCormick Lecture 
Hall in the Law School. 

During the past year a group of Chicago businessmen 
organized Businessmen for Loyola and collected S225,000 
to finance the Greater Teaching Program. 

The expansion of the University has been continuing 
at an ever-quickening rate in the last 12 months. This 
expansion has become evident by the acquisition of ad- 
ditional facilities for the use of the LIniversity's students. 
Most significant among these acquisitions was the occupy- 
ing of Dumbach Hall. Dumbach Hall, the first building 
to be constructed on the Lake Shore Campus and named 
for the President of St. Ignatius College at the time it 
became Loyola University in 1909, Reverend Henry 
Dumbach, S.J., had previously been occupied by Loyola 
Academy. Dumbach Hall now houses most of the class- 
rooms for the Lake Shore Division of the College of Arts 
and Sciences. 



Expansion was carried on with the purchasing of the 
Commonwealth Edison Generating Station across from 
Lewis Towers on the downtown campus. Plans for the 
ultimate use of this spacious building have not yet been 
revealed by the administration; however, we feel the only 
factor in their decision will be the good of the student body. 

The University also obtained the previously mentioned 
tract of land for the construction of the new Dental School. 

The 1957-58 school year marked one of the most suc- 
cessful athletic programs in the school's history. This 
recent athletic prowess brings back memories of the days 
when the Ramblers were one of the dominant football 
powers in the Midwest. Although high scholastic standards 
have eliminated all possibilities of a football team, however, 
the year after year growth of the power of the basketball 
squad is giving neighboring coachs bleeding ulcers over 
prospects of having to meet the Ramblers under the 
backboards in the years to come. 

In the year just ended, the basketball squad with a 
starting unit made up of sophomores and juniors with the 
exception of Captain Art McZier, gave a hard go even 
to contenders for the national championship. The accom- 
plishments of the basketball team must be viewed in the 
light of the fact that they represent an undergraduate 
student body of only 3600 and a university with no physical 
education program to make school easy for its athletes. 
In Loyola a eager must also be a scholar. Our scholarly 
cagers this year defeated teams like Kentucky, which 
represents 23,000 students and a physical education pro- 
gram. The team missed an invitation to the NCAA 
Tournament by two points in the Bowling Green game. 
Next year, substantially the same team plus an additional 
year's experience may well be a national contender. 

Because most Loyola students are not resident students 
and spend only class time at school before rushing home 
or to work, many of us never realize what a truly great 
school we attend. It is little known but true that one-half 
of Chicago's dentists and one-fourth of its doctors are 
Loyola graduates, that Loyola's Law School graduates 
have an unparalleled record for passing the bar examina- 
tion; that the Chamberlain C. P. A. review, a nationally 
used review for accountants planning to take the C. P. A. 
examination, was developed by the first Dean of the Col- 
lege of Commerce, Henry Chamberlain. Few people 
know that now on the faculty of the LTniversity College 
is possibly the leading Federal Tax expert in the United 
States, Mr. Alexander Eulenberg, C. P. A., L. L. B. 
Loyola's Institute of Social and Industrial Relations is one 
of only three in the country, and its School of Social 
Work was the first Catholic social work school in the 
country. The Department of Home Study is one of three 
Catholic home study departments and the only one ap- 
proved for use by the Armed Forces of the United States. 

This is a great university, of which we can be pi'oud. 

17 



The Shroud of Turcn is displayed by Rev. Francis L. Filas, S.J., to the male Arts Students during 
their annual retreat. 




18 




The Ins and Outs of modern science challenge Loyola students as they measure and test theorys 
in a modern laboratory- 



19 





Paul Sheedy displays his rebounding ability, as 
he sparks the Ramblers to victory over Ripon 
College. 



Elizabeth Cudahy Memorial Library offers the best place for a conscientious student to study. 
It lends scholarly atmosphere and is a gold mine for reference work. 




21 




The end of a typical class day finds some students gathering for friendly conversation and a smoke. 



As the bells announce the first-period class, students start to fill the campus pathways. 



22 







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"•»♦♦ 







I 




V 




A quiet Autumn afternoon offers time to study the world of books and_the world of nature. 



Moving toward fulfillment of countless hours' work. Degree Candidates file to the communion 
rail on Graduation Day. 



24 










■ ii .mmM lB H HWIWUllpfc-- 



Faculty members and administrators don cap and gown as pomp and circumstance adds dignity 
to tlie commencement exercises. 




ADMINISTRATION 




UNIVERSITY 
ADMINISTRATION 



The lifeblood of any civilization is the provisions which 
it makes for its future in terms of the coming generation. 
The most valuable gift that any community can offer to 
its young is educational opportunities. The business of 
education is a serious and complicated process. Fortunate- 
ly, the Society of Jesus, "the schoolmasters of the world," 
have helped our city meet this responsibility. On a choice 
location in the downtown area of naetropolitan Chicago, 
Loyola University has its headquarters. 

Lewis Towers, named after Mr. Frank J. Lewis, our 
great benefactor, who donated the building to Loyola, 
has for a long time been known affectionately as L. T. 
In this tall, impressive building are housed the offices 
which are so necessary for the smooth functioning of the 
university. 

The registrar, the dean of students, and the deans oi 
several colleges are but a small percentage of the necessary 
offices from which all the important decisions which 
affect the university originate. 

Near the heart of a great city, the headquarters of one 
of its diligently devoted groups is located. 



p? 



« 



Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S.J. 

University President 

Father Maguire has been at the helm of Loyola Uni- 
versity since August, 1955, when he left the presidencv of 
Xavier University of Cincinnati to return to the city of 
his birth. 

He received his A.B. and M.A. at St. Louis Universit\-. 
After his ordination in 1935, he was assigned to Xavier 
High School in Cincinnati. With a Licentiate in Sacred 
Theology and many years of devoted teaching, Father 
Maguire was well prepared to assume the rectorship of 
West Baden College in West Baden, Indiana. His fol- 
lowing position was that of President at Xavier University. 

As rector of all Jesuits at Loyola, Father Maguire is 
not only the temporal leader but also the spiritual leader 
of one of the largest Catholic universities in the United 
States. In this capacity he attended the Thirtieth General 
Congregation of the Society of Jesus, held in Rome last 
September. 

The success of the Jesuit Centennial in Chicago could 
not have been so great without the abilitv of our leader 
at Lovola. 



"1^^ 



" ^WQ ' 




Rev. Jeremiah J. O'Callaghan, S.J., S.T.L., 

Ph.D. 

Executive Vice-President 



ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT: Loyola's answer to financial responsibility is an excellent 
Accounting Department which handles its monetary problems. 



H 


Si 


.IS iii-.-'- 


i^^^^^ 


^ite^j 




r 


_± 



i 



J 






W. Daniel Conroyd, B.S.C., J.D. 
Assistant to the President, in charge of 
Alumni, Development and Public Relations 



Thomas F. Hawkins, C.P.A. 
Business Manager 





Harry L. McCloskey, M.B.A. 
Dean of Students 



32 




Marietta LeBlanc, A.M. 
Dean of Women 




Reverend John C. Malloy, S.J., A.M. 
Dean of Admission 




Mii\ R Manzke, B..S. 
Du'ector of .Admissions 



E BURSAR'S OFFICE STAFF. Left to right: Joan Riese, 
mor Adornetto, Betty Weber, Rose Schneider. 



OFFICE OF ADMISSION'S STAFF. Lffl lo right: Mary Jo 
Shannon, Pat Walsh, Shirley Zak. 







■ 


^^^^^ 


^^H 


^^^Kfw -^ ^j 


^m 


^■k -' 1 


i^^H 


^^^^^B ^cr- 


^^^H 












aH^M^TM 




1^ 




Elizabeth A. McCann, A.M. 
Registrar 



Mr. Hugh C. McAvoy, B.S. 
Director of Student Placement 



The staff of the Public Relations Office is responsible for acquainting the public with the many 
activities of Loyola University. 




Mr. Eugene Knight, A.B. 
Director, Veteran's Affairs 





Mary L. McPartlin, A.B., A.M. 
Director of Home Study 



PLACEMENT BUREAU STAFF. 
Rosemary Deegan, StafT Assistant; Loretta 
Jones, B.S., A.B., Associate Director. 




REGISTRAR'S OFFICE STAFF. 
Left to right: Barbara Dean, Fran O'Connor, 
Jerry Murpfiy, Mary Efroymsom, ,Lois 
Reynolds, Joyce Buns. 




Cliiistma Saletta, B A 
I e\\ IS Tow (IS I ihii ai lan 




35 




kcvi'.riul losrpli \\ Hunan, S.J. 
Stiidi-iU Counselor and Sodalitv Moderator 




Ur. Huber 
Director of Student Health 




Mr. Dan Oahill, .\.B. 
Director of Public Relations 




36 



WEST BADEN COLLEGE 
Departments of Philosophy and Theology 

West Baden College, founded in 1934, is the school of philosophy and theology for Loyola University. 
As in all Jesuit institutions, philosophy is given very special attention at Loyola. West Baden College, in 
West Baden, Indiana, was originally opened to serve as a seminary, but the pressure of lay students who wanted 
the degrees in philosophy and the eventual availabilitx' of other quarters made the admission of lay students 
advisable. 

The old West Baden Springs was destined for far greater things when Charles Edward Ballard gave it to 
the Jesuits for the purpose of founding a school. The college has an enrollment of some two hundred students 
and a faculty of about forty members. 

It is an ideal training place for Loyola faculty since it is authorized to confer the highest pontifical degrees. 
The School of Philosophy and Theology at West Baden trains Jesuits for all of the campuses in the Chicago- 
Detroit Province. Thus, we see that the Chicago Jesuit university makes a real and continuing contribution 
to the education of the nation and thereby enhances the prestige of the Chicago area. 

The continuous flow of great philosophers and theologians that come to the Chicago area from West Baden 
is without a doubt one of the greatest services that the Jesuits in this area give to this vast metropolitan area. 



The towers of West Baden Theological College tell the tale of a job well done. 





Rev. Murel R. Vogcl, SJ. 
Dean of West Baden College 




Rev. Stephen E. Doulon, SJ. 
Dean of Theology 



The ancient spellbinding power of Christmas is apparent in the 
majestir rotunda- 




38 



The wisdom of age and the energy of youth blend to the service of God. 




■'Go, therefore teach ye all nations . . ." At West Baden, every year this command is given to those who have left all to follow Him. 




/^ 



m^ ^ 



^^^mm^. 




'That class is closed." "That course is dropped." Registration "en masse' — strange and confusing. 




UNIVERSITY 




The Loyola Lake Shore Union. Mecca 
of smoke, coke and Mundelien g^irls. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCE 



With the birth of St. Ignatius College in 1870, collegiate 
instruction was formally inaugurated. In 1909, however, 
the college was chartered under the title of Loyola Uni- 
versity; and the name of the school was consequently 
changed from St. Ignatius College to the College of Arts 
and Sciences of Loyola LIni\ersity. Since St. Ignatius 
College was cramped and limited in space because of the 
continuously large enrollment, additional land was pur- 
chased on the north side in Rogers Park approximately 
four decades later; and in 1911, instruction commenced 
on the present Lake Shore Campus. Furthermore, by 
1922, the two divisions, St. Ignatius College and Loyola 
University, had merged into one academic unit — the 
College of Arts and Sciences of Loyola University; the 
university then transferred all departments of instruction 
to the new north-side campus. 

The Lake Shore Campus, with Reverend Roljcrt C. 
Hartnett, S.J., as dean, now truly represents the rambling, 
idealized college with ivy walls and winding walks. How- 
ever, it did not always present this picture. The erection 
of the Faculty Building initiated the development program. 
Cudahy Science Hall with its Renaissance dome soon 
followed. A little later, Dumbach Hall, which only this 
year supplied additional classroom space for the university, 
was erected. This edifice formerly housed Loyola Academy 
until it established itself this past September in its new- 
home in Wilmette. Some of the other structures of the 
heterogeneous Loyola University that followed were: 
Elizabeth M. Cudahy Memorial Library, Alumni Gym- 
nasium, and Madonna Delia Strada Chapel. 

Again in 1934, the university experienced growing pains; 
and West Baden College, at West Baden Springs, Indiana, 

42 



became another branch of the College of Arts and Sciences 
under the administration of an associate dean, at present. 
Reverend Murel R. Vogel, S.J. Presenting yet another 
example of Loyola's varied architecture through expan- 
sion. West Baden College, with its predominately Moorish 
style and magnificent domes, houses the philosophical 
studies of the Jesuit scholastics in the Chicago province 
of the Society of Jesus. Prior to its religious conversion. 
West Baden was an exclusive health resort. West Baden 
Springs Hotel; but during the heart of the depression it 
was donated by Mr. Edward Ballard to the Society for the 
training of young scholastics. However, the serene and 
academic atmosphere of the encompassing grounds is con- 
ducive not only to philosophy but also to the other liberal 
arts, especially the classics and sciences. 

Growing, constantly growing, new facilities of Loyola — 
Lewis Towers — became available in 1946 for day classes 
through a philanthropic gift of Mr. Frank J. Lewis. This 
gift opened another branch of the Arts school under the 
guidance of an associate dean, who is presently Reverend 
Richard E. Tischler, S.J. The Towers, an efficient college 
in a bustling, metropolitan area, reaches skyward with its 
seventeen floors of Gothic architecture. Here are found 
completely compact libraries, both reference and reading; 
the Chapel of the Sacred Heart; departmental offices; 
classrooms; and the union lounge. 

The College of Arts and Sciences, therefore, is at present 
tri-campused with a combined enrollment of approxi- 
mately seven-hundred students. Perhaps in the near future, 
when the use of the newly-acquired building on Rush 
Street is determined, the university will be able to boast 
of an additional location of its College of Arts and Sciences. 




Cudahy Science Hall houses the facil- 
ities necessary to instruct students in- 
terested in scientific endeavors. 




Reverand Robert C. Hartnett, S.J., S.T.L., Ph.D. 
Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 



43 




Reverand Richard Tischler, S.J., A.M. 
Lewis Towers Dean of Arts and Sciences 



"The function of the College of Arts and Sciences at 
Loyola is to unite with the efforts of the home and of the 
Church to bring orderly cultural growth to human persons, 
to Christianize their modes of thinking and acting, to 
train them to become honorable and prudent molders of 
human society, loyal sons and daughters of God our 
Heavenly Father." 

The aims of this college are to enable students to better 
know and understand their compository factors — soul, 
mind, and body; to make distinctions between erroneous 
and useless, true and good; and to fully develop the stu- 
dent's characters for perfection, happiness, and success in 
later life. 

The College of Liberal Arts — theology; philosophy; 
history; literature; speculative, physical, and mathematical 
sciences; civil government; and human relations generally — 
forms the core of the Jesuit plan of education. The sig- 
nificance of these arts is to prepare leaders for present and 
future society by integrating general education, cultural 
improvement, and professional excellence with Catholic 
philosophy. 



The liberal arts, united with Christian ideals, bear the 
weighty quality and ability of molding the many aspects 
and desires of humanity into the "whole man" — physically, 
socially, and spiritually perfect. However, this product 
of perfection can only be achieved with the stalwart 
assistance of a formative curriculum. The characteristics 
of this curriculum necessarily stress the basic and Christian 
subjects. These, in turn, enable a thorough and diversified 
program of studies stimulating the many faculties of the 
mind through a series of courses based on the fundamental 
general education. 

This training in the liberal arts, furthermore, is of 
tremendous value because it develops additional abilities 
in professional people — business administrators, lawyers, 
doctors, and dentists — by giving them knowledge beyond 
the specialized one of their vocations. This formation will 
encourage an ease in solving the problems of the time, 
an appreciation of the cultural advantages of society, and 
occupational and social confidence in the presence of all 
people. Briefly, the liberal arts "evaluate life with the 
wisdom of the centuries and of eternitv." 



44 





Office staff of the Lew 



Dean of Arts and Sciences 



Joan Ste2:^:ers and Pat Keenan aid the Dean of Arts and Sciences at 
Lake Shore campus in administering policy. 




Reverand Jeroine J. Jaconsen, Ph.D. 
Director, Institute of Jesuit History 



Paul S. Lietz, Ph.D. 
Chairman, Department of 
History 



Lloyd L. Arnold, Ph.D. 
Chairman, Department of 
Natural Science 




ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Rev. Fr. Herr, SJ. 
Psychology Dcpt. 



Dr. Mariclla, Ph.D. 
Chemistry Dept 



Rev. Fr. Mertz,';SJ. 
Classical Languages Dept. 









Mr. Dickenson, M.A. 
Speech Dept. 



Dr. LeBlanc, Ph.D. 
Modern Languages Dept. 



Dr. Wozniak, Ph.D. 
Education Dept. 



46 



DEPARTMENT HEADS 



Rev. Fr. Woelfl, S.J. 
Political Science Dept. 



Rev. Fr. Mulligan, S.J. 
PhiIosoph>' Dept. 



Rev. Fr. Evett, S.J. 
Religion Dept. 







Rev. Fr. Surtz, S.J. 
English Dept 




47 




Arts students too appreciate the mundane. Here 
Bette Jane Wall and Bill Pedersen sell chances 
to raise money for the Arts Council. 



Sciences are nothing more than applied arts, but 
they require more work than devotion, as is in- 
dicated by this industrious ^roup. 





Ciommerce and arts students learn about the 
intimacies of science from Dr. Arnold head of 
the Natural Science department at Lewis Towers. 




Time stands still while work goes on in the chemistry lab. Tlie "tools of the trade"' may be varied, 
but the explosions sound the same. 



The world of large organisms spies upon the world of tiny organisms under the guidance of Dr. 
Hudson. 





The Water Tower is the scene of deadly combat as the coeds wage battle against their friendly enemies. 



Junior advisors meet to discuss policy, but find 
that a party can be more fun. Lejt to right: Tom 
Camden, Rita Condon, Bill Hegan, Teri Mulkern, 
Bill Pederson, Betty Jane Wall, Vince Grant, 
Sheila Carroll, Dave Knudsen. 





THE ARTS COUNCIL OFFICERS. Mary 
Anne Banahan, Bcrnie Schroeder, Don Rogan, 
Jim Sneider. 




THE ARTS COUNCIL. Seated left to right: Mary Anne Banahan, Bernie Schroeder, Don Rogan, Jim Sneider, Marilee McRae. Standing left to 
right: Ben Theis, Bill Duffy, John Dentzer, Bill Pederson, Jack Darrah, Hugh Sheean, Frank Konicek, John Moran, Gerry Culhane, Frank Lan- 
caster, Betty Jane Wall. 



It's not that teacher doesn't trust the students, but thev like to lease a chair for a \\anderin? aneel of mercy. 




ARTS AND SCIENCE GRADUATES 



Joseph S. Abbato 
B.S., S.S. 
Sociology 



Francis S. Agnoli 

B.S., N.S. 

Biology 



Joscpli J. Aniato 

B.S.", N.S. 

Biology 



Steve J. .Atsaves 

B.S., N.S. 

Biology 



Jacqueline Baffetti 

B.S., N.S. 

Biology 





(ieorgc \V. Bailev 

B.S. 

Education 



Russell W. B<.k 

;.s., N.S. 

Biology 



Robert L. Baianei 

l.S. (Hum.) 

English 



Mbeit Bellini 
B.S.. S.S. 
Pol. Sc. 



Joseph F. Bernard 

A.B. 

History 



1958 



Mary Jane Bieszczat 
B.S., S.S. 
Sociology 



Joan C. Biltgen 
B.S. 

Education 



Richard J. Sober 



Kenneth T. Bochat 

B.S. (Hum.) 

English 



Barbara Bowman 

B.S. (Hum.) 

History 



Robert D. Bo 
B.S. (Hum. 
History 




52 



Richard J. Brennan 

";.s., s.s. 

Pol. Science 



Anthony T. Buckun 

B.S., S.S. 

Pol. Science 





Matilda M. Carlone 


Louis J. Casa 


Michael F. Ghiappetta 


Patricia M. Clhutka 


Donald T. Clichoszewski 


B.S. (Hum.) 


B.S. (Hum.) 


B.S., N.S. 


B.S. (Hum.) 


B.S. (Hum.) 


Speech and Drama 


History 


Psychology 


History 


History 



1958 



ohn J. Cleary 
B.S., S.S. 
Sociology 



Bruce D. Codv 

B.S. (Hum.)' 

History 



Colette Cogger 
B.S., S.S^ 
Education 



Joan Combiths 
B.S., S.S. 
.Sociology 



Mary Anne Coyne 
A.B. 
Latin 




53 



ARTS AND SCIENCE GRADUATES 



Gerald T. Culhanc 


John F. Cunninifham 


Robert G. Cunnine;ham 


George E. Curran 


Dennis P. Curtain 


A.B. 


B.S. (Hum.) 


B.S.. S.S. 




B.S. (Hum.) 


English 


Ent^lish 


Economics 




English 





Herbert E. Cygan 
B.S., S.S. 
Psychology 



John R. Dainauskas 

B.S., N.S. 

Biology 



Thomas A. Dalv 
B.S., S.S. 
Sociology 



John Dongles 



. \ I 



Josephine DeFay 
A.B. 
Latin 



1958 



vard M. Delaney 


Helen DelMissier 


Bernard Dentzer 


loseph A. Donnelly 


Therese M. Doranski 


James J. Dowc 


B.S. (Hum.) 


B.S., S.S. 


B.S., S.S. 


B.S.. S.S. 


B.S. 


B.S., N.S. 


Philosophy 


Sociology 


Sociology 


Sociology 


Education 


Physics 










54 



Richard M. Dowd 


William B. Duffie 


Patricia J. Duggan 


Patricia Dunphy 


Thomas J. Dwyer 


A.B. (Honors) 


B.S., N.S. 


A.B. 


A.B. 


A.B. 


History 


Matliematics 


English 


English 


Philosophy 





Raffaela M. Emanuele 


Edward \ Engel 


Dennis J. Eslick 


John R Eterno 


Lhdr Fa\aro 


B.S., N.S. 


B.S. (Hum ) 


B.S., S S 


B.S , N S 


BS. 


Biology 


English 


Pol Science 


Biology 


History 



1958 



s E. Flanagan 


John H. Flodstrom 


Diane M. Fogarty 


Mary F. Foley 


Nancy Fraser 


Br. Francis J. Garvis.C.S.V. 


5. (Hum.) 


A.B. 


B.S., N.S. 


B.S. 


B.S. 


A.B. 


lilosophy 


Philosophy 


Chemistry 


Education 


Education 


Mathematics 




ARTS AND SCIENCE GRADUATES 



Ralph C. Gauci- 


Joan G. Gcnsler 


Mary E, Geoghc^an 


Gordon J. Gerbec 


Roberta A. Gerke 


B.S., S.S. 


B.S. 


B.S. 


B.S. (Hum.) 


B.S., S.S. 


Pol. Science 


Education 


Education 


Pol. Science 


Sociology 





laid C. Giannetti 


Martin J. Gleason 


John B. Goe^ein 


Colette V. Gory 


Shirley M. Gorsk 


B.S. (Hum.) 


B.S'.. S.S. 


B.S. (Hum.) 


B.S. (Hum.) 


B.S. (Hum.) 


.Spanish 


Pol. Science 


History 


History 


Spanish 



1958 



Charles R. Hall 


Thomas A. Hamill 


Judith E. Hammer 


Margaret M. Harrington 


Mary K. Herely 


B.S. (Hum.) 


A.B. 


B.S. (Hum.) 


B.S. 


B.S. (Hum.) 


Philosophy 


Latin 


Philosophy 


Education 


English 



Elaine J. Herma 

B.S. 

Education 




56 



Roger J. Hesslav 

A.B. 

Philosophy 



Thomas P. Hickey, Jr. 

A.B. 

English 



F. Edward Higgins 

B.S. (Hum.) 

History 



Raymond P. Hoare 

B.8., N.S. 

Biology 




^mtkiM 





I i.tnk ). H(jiuu 

B.S., N..S. 

Biology 



James G. Houses 



Rita C. Izzo 

B.S. 

Education 



rome J. Jacobst-n 

B.S. (Hum.) 

Pol. Science 



Howard J. Jennings 



1958 



William R.Johnson 



John M. Joyce 
A.~ 

Philosophy 



Kenneth J. Judy 
B.S.. N.S. 
Biology 



Patricia R. Kasper 

l.S., N.S. 
Chemistry 




57 



ARTS AND SCIENCE GRADUATES 



Bernard M. Keating 

A.B. 

Poi. Science 



Richard A. Kennicker 
B.S., S.S. 
Sociology 



Dorothy I. Kelt 

B.S. 

Education 



WiiUam M. Kiedaisch 

B.S., N.S. 

Mathematics 



James Kilduff 

B.S. (Hum.) 

English 





Lorraine King 



(.i.t;..i\ K. KL 
A.B. 
Philosophy 



Elaine G. Koprowski 

B.S. (Hum.) 

German 



1958 



Casey M. Krol 


Richard J. Kukielka 


Joseph C. Kunkel 


J. Francis Lancaster 


Michael J. Lane 


B.S., S.S. 


B.S., S.S. 


A.B, 


B.S., S.S. 


B.S., S.S. 


Sociology 


Sociology 


Philosophy 


Sociology 


Pol. Science 



Jeanne C. LaV 
B.S., S.S. 
Sociology 




58 



illiam K. Leahy 


Robert W. Lenieux 


Raymond C. Lusson 


James E. Lynam 


Adrienne Macherzynski 


B.S. (Hum.) 


B.S. (Hum.) 






B.S.. S.S. 


English 


German 






Sociology 





Bro. Margotte, C.S.V. 

A.B. 

History 



VVilUam J. Martin 

B.S.; S.S. 

Pol. Science 



Robert H Mathev\s 

\B 

English 



Andrew M. Mayer 

B.S. (Hum.) 

History 



Huul. I \1(( abe 

AB 

English 



1958 



f McClatchie 


Jack W. McDonald 


Lawrence J. McDonnell 


John P. McGinley 


Thomas A. Meger, C.S.V. 


John M. Mohan 


S. (Hum.) 


B.S., N.S. 


B.S., N.S. 


B.S., S.S. 


.•\.B. (Honors) 


A.B. 


hilosophy 


Chemistry 


Physics 


Sociology 


Philosophy 


Philosophy 




59 



ARTS AND SCIENCE GRADUATES 



ilv R. Molezzi 


Gwendolyn Moreland 


Step'ien J. Mrkvicka 


.Stanley J. Mysliwiec 


Edward H. Neira 


B.S., S.S. 


B.S., S.S. 


B.S.. S.S. 


B.S., S.S. 


B.S., N.S. 


Education 


Psychology 


Pol. Science 


Pol. Science 


Biology 










p 





\1 


IN 1 \,,l.,„ 


Barbara Norbut 


James .A. ()ak('\- 


Robert .A.. O'Brill 


John A. O'Neil 




A.B. 


B.S.. S.S. 


B.S., S.S. 


B.S., S.S. 


B.S., S.S. 




English 


Sociology 


Sociology 


Sociology 


Pol. Science 



1958 



Nancy A. Pannier 
B.S. (Hum.) 
Philosophy 



James E. Paresko 




60 



Bhemal P. Persaud 

B.S., N.S. 

Biology 



Hany M. Peiun 
B.S., S.S. 
Psychology 



Allen H. Phillips 

B.S. 

Education 



Gerald J. Pierce 

B.S. (Hum.) 

History 



Gloria L. Pierotti 

B.S. (Hum.) 

English 





Theresa M. Piro 

B.S. 

Education 



David J. Plesic 

A.B. 

French 



George L. Plumb 

B.S., N.S. 

Biology 



Gharlotte .A. Projansky 



Barbara J. Rand 
B.S., S.S. 
Education 



1958 



ard J. Reidy 
A.B. 

bilosophy 



Lois Rodgers 



Donald V. Rogan 

A.B. 
English — History 



Dorothv A. Rosenbeck 

B.S. (Hum.) 

English 



Warren Rosenow 

B.S. (Hum.) 

English 



Violet Rudis 
B.S., S.S. 
Education 




ARTS AND SCIENCE GRADUATES 



Mary Alice Ryan 


PhvllisJ. Rvan 


Richard A. .Saccone 


Robert y. Sansone 


John H. Saunders 


B.S. (Hum.) 


B.S. (Hum ) 


B.S., S.S. 


B.S., S.S. 


B.S. (Hum.) 


History 


Pliilosophy 


Sociology 


Psychology 


Philosophy 





Jonna Sayre 


Mary .'Vnn Schaeffer 


Steve J. Schostok 


Marilyn Schultz 


Sue A. Sheridan 




A.B. 




B.S., S.S. 


B.S. (Hum.) 




English 




Sociology 


History 



1958 



Sue V. Snietanka 
B.S., S.S. 
Sociology 



Robert Smith 

B.S. (Hum.) 

English 



William J. Smith 
B.S., S.S. 
Sociology 



Walter J. Smolvch 

A.B. 

English 



James R. Sneider 
B.S., N.S. 



Bernadine S. Sokols 
B.S., N.S. 
Chcmistrv 




62 



Thomas F. Strubbe 

B.S. (Hum ) 

History 



Eugene W. Sullivan 

A.B. 

Ens^lish 



Richard G. Tomase 

B.S. (Hum.) 

English 





George E. Tomek 


C ihailrs A. Trapp 


Richard F.\Trvba 


Jov L. Ungcr 


Lorctta T. Uyehara 




B.S., N.S. 


B.S. (Hum.) 


B.S., N.S. 


.^.B. 




Chemistry 


English 


Mathematics 


EngHsh 



1958 



IS A. Vittore 


Richard H. Vogt 


James F. Walsh 


James J. Walsh 


Thomas G. Walter 


Robert Ward 


S., N.S. 


B.S., N.S. 


B.S., S.S. 


B.S., S.S. 


B.S., S.S. 


B.S. (Hum.) 


icmistry 


Physics 


Sociology 


Psycliology 


Education 


English 




ARTS AND SCIENCE GRADUATES 



Charles A. Weibrcd 
A, 
Lat: 



1958 



Michael C. Winn 

S., S.S. 

Sociology 



Edward A. Wojcik 

B.S., N.S. 

Biology 





Marv K. \Vria;ht 


Allen VVyseeki 


Richard S. Zembron 


r.lKn ( :. /linker 


Jerry Ziula 


A.B. 


E.S., N.S. 


A.B. 


B.S., N.S. 


■ B.S., S.S. 


English 


Chemistry 


Sociology 


Biology 


Pol. Science 



)rton Flanagan 


William Gilligan 


Francis Varallo 


B.S., N.S. 


B.S.. N.S. 


B.S. (Hum.) 


Biology 


Biology 


Spanish 






64 




\t ttu; Lakt^ Shore Campus the student appetite is satisfied witli greasy cliicken as well as Chaucer. 



A mixer, a meeting, char- 
ity drive, a note from the 
dean, the bulletin board 
keeps students, informed. 





A freshman at the Beanie Bounce meets the charming co-ed who got his beanie. 



E.xam Tomorrow ! ! 





The students use the chem- 
istry labs at Lake Shore 
Campus to brew a new mix- 
ture; ingredients are H^O 
and Tea Bags. 



Last seconds to study before writing that exam. 




Officers of the VVasmann Society. 
Left to right: Dr. John W. Hudson, 
moderator; Priscella Perry: Joe Amato, 
president; John Stokes, Greg Eckstein. 





WASMANN BIOLOGICAL SOCIETY 



The VVasmann Biological Society was founded at the 
University of San Francisco in 1936 for the purpose of 
fostering interest and active participation in the bio- 
logical sciences. It is particularly fitting for this organi- 
zation, for Father Erich- Wasmann, S.J., after whom 
the society was named, was one of the outstanding 
cleric-scientists of the world. 

The society at Loyola was founded in November, 
1940, under the leadership of Father Charles Wideman, 
S.J. In its early days at Loyola Wasmann concentrated 
on faculty seminars and student symposiums. Its 
tremendous growth here at Loyola can best be shown b\ 
the activities that the society has undertaken during 



this academic year: a mixer, an annual turtle race 
held in conjunction with this mixer, a Christmas party, 
an initiation dinner at which approximately seventy- 
five new members were welcomed into the society, 
monthly trips to local hospitals, bi-monthly meetings 
which were highlighted by student research papers, 
films, and seminars, the publication of its newsletter. 
The Probe, and, Communion-Breakfast for its members 
and their families, and, perhaps most important in 
these days when the world is seeking trained scientists, 
its annual Biology Fair attended and participated in 
by high school and college students throughout the 
Chicagoland area. 



Members of the Wasmann Society. 
Top Row: Ken Goljan, Greg Eckstein, 
Diane Kula, John Stokes, Casimir Fir- 
lit, Jerry Alaksiewicz, Bob Kessler, 
Gene Koziol, Gene Duda. Bottom 
Row: Joe Amato, Frank Kozak, Joe 
Matz, Tom Swierhowski, Ginny 
Louden, Cecile Liebl, Tony Acardo, 
Fred Herzog. 




Top Roiv: Kay Janke, Violet Stasiak, 
Adrienne Malusiak, Ray Podwika, Bob 
Wilkus, John Wierz, Rudy Maier, Don 
Jasinski, Hank .\nselmo, Bruce Knowles. 
Ken Goljan, Greg Eckstein. Bottom 
Row: Richard Krezo, Priscilla Perry, 
Dr. John Hudson, Joe .^inato. Frank 
Kozak. 

68 




FINE ARTS CLUB 



Despite the fact that the Loyola University Fine Arts 
Club is a relatively new organization, it has already 
proceeded to make social history at Loyola. Since its 
foundation, just five years ago in 1953, the club has been 
the center of student interest concerning the many cultural 
activities that are available in the City of Chicago. Its 
accoinplishments have been extremely rewarding, reward- 
ing not only in the esthetic sense, but in the fact that year 
after year, membership has increased to include more and 
more students in almost all of Loyola's nine Colleges. 

The variety of this year's events was in accordance with 
the very principles of the club; those are to make sure 
that the students enjoy the nearness of all artistic endeavors. 

This year the club attended two fine films, "Monsieur 
\ incent"' and a choice Charlie Chaplin series. The per- 
formances of the New York City Ballet and the Lyric 
Opera of Chicago were attended too -and greatly enjoyed 
by a large margin of the club membership. An ample 
supply of tickets were secured for two great Broadway 
plays, "The Diary of Anne Frank" and Eugene O'Neil's 
"Long Day's Journey into Night." Following each at- 
tended performance, the group gathered in one of Chicago's 
fine restaurants to discuss the play and offer an intelligent 
criticism. 




Officers of the Loyola University Fine Arts Club; 
Dr. Hummart, moderator; Julius Hovany, Tom 
Doyle, Ray Orbrachta, and Gene Sullivan, pres- 
ident. 




Gene Sullivan checks and okey's new publicity 
of the club. The publicity job this year was amply 
handled by the versatile Dave Burden. 



69 




PHYSICS CLUB 



Rev. Fr. Roil, SJ., moderator; Kenneth Fabian, secretary; James 
Gushing, president; Frank Tuma, treasurer. 



The Loyola University Phvsics Club was founded in 
1953 by a small group of undergraduate physics majors. 
The purpose of the club is to bring together those students 
interested in physical science for discussions of physics and 
its applications. The organization also provides an oppor- 
tunity for the lower and upper division physics students 
to become better acquainted. Although the club is open 
to anyone in the University interested in physics, most of 
the members are from Lake Shore Campus since the 
science schools are located here. 

In order to stimulate an extracurricular interest in 
physics, the club sponsors monthly lectures, given Ijy 
professional men, and periodic field trips to government 
and industrial research laboratories. In the fall semester 
of 1957 the organization had an engineer from Armour 
Research Foundation speak on the design and operation 
of guided missiles; the chairman of the physics department 
addressed the members on Loyola's seismology program; 
and a club member discussed the special theory of relatively. 
In this same semester the field trips included a tour ot 
Armour Research Foundation and one of the Chicago 
Lighting Institute. 

The Physics Club also provides a service to the University 
and the Chicagoland area by maintaining a seismology 
station on the Lake Shore Campus. Earthquakes haxe 
been detected as far away as Chile, Peru, the Aleutian 
Islands, Iran, and China. This year Fr. Roll, director 
of the program, has obtained government surplus equip- 
ment to improve the facilities of the station. 







h.i'^ Cs 




Back row: Larry Gray, Paul Kreutzer, John McFadyen, Ron Farmer, Jim Dowd. 
John Stubler, Ralph Krippner, Ray Orloski. 



Front row: Ron O'Brian, Tom Galinas, 



70 



EPSILON PI RHO 



Epsilon Pi Rho has as its objective the promotion of 
interest among the students of the university of that part 
of our literary heritage which was derived from Greece 
and Rome. With its membership of all of those students 
who are interested in both Greek and Latin, it not only 
accomplishes its purpose by means of lectures of various 
experts in these fields but also by promoting various social 
functions throughout the school year. The officers of the 
organization, which is moderated by Dr. Abel, are George 
Nix and John Lempkowski as co-presidents, Mary Schaefer 
as secretarx, and Peggv La Plante as treasurer. 




Moderator of the Latin Club, Dr. D. Herbert ,Kbel, Ph.D. 



Some of the members of the Loyola LIniversity Latin Club gather with Doctor .\bel in tlie Lewis Towers L'nion for coffee and Caesar. 





Officers of the Modern Language Club. Carol 
Friend, Spanish vice-president; Mary Phillips, 
president; Dr. Michael Flys, moderator; Jo 
Humphrey, treasurer. Missing from photo are: 
Dick Tryba, German vice-president; Tom Hol- 
land, French vice-president. 



MODERN LANGUAGE 
CLUB 



The Modern Language Club, an association of German, 
Spanish, and French students, was formed in the fall of 
1956. The President plans activities and is aided by the 
three \'ice-Presidents. First semester activities began with 
an address by Dr. Paul Lietz of the History Department, 
who spoke on study abroad and gave the members valuable 
information on Fulbright scholarships. The annual Christ- 
mas dinner was a traditional Mexican fiesta, held this 
year in the El Jarocho Restaurant. Second semester's 
activities included movies of French and Mexican life and 
a tour of Europe. A special assembly for high school 
students was held in the Lake Shore Union house. Dr. 
Joseph LeBlanc, head of the French department. Miss 
Winifred Bowman, Assistant Professor of French, and 
Mary Phillips, president of the club, presented their 
views on studying the Modern languages. The special 
highlight of the semester was an address by the Spanish 
consul, Sr. de Puga. The celebrated diplomat spoke on 
the arts of contemporary Spain. The years activities 
ended with the traditional picnic. 

The club attempts to sponsor both cultural and social 
activities. Moderator of the group is Dr. Michael Flys 
who is assisted by the Language department of the uni- 
versity. Officers are elected yearly; President is Mary 
Phillips, L.T. Arts Junior; French vice-president, Tom 
Holland, L.T. Arts Junior; Spanish vice-president, Carol 
Friend, L.T. Arts Junior; German vice-president, Dick 
Tryba, L.T. Arts Senior and treasurer, Mary Jo Humphrey, 
L.T. Arts Junior. All students of the university interested 
in languages are invited to join. 



Members of the Modern Language Club. Top Row: Ken Taylor, Bob Silich, Joseph Abbate. Second Roiv: Sandra 
Waljeski, Sue Smietanka, Carol Rogalski, Kay Cottrell, Mary Enders. Boltom Row: Jo Humphrey, Eve Architect, 
Pauline Zarankh, Karen Smith, Mary Phillips. 





Dr. Patrick Casey, moderator of the Hopkins Society, and 
Bill Hegan, president, review the tentative program of 
lecturers, which is presented as a service to the students. 



GERARD MANLEY 
HOPKINS SOCIETY 



The Gerard Manley Hopkins Society, as Loyola's English 
club, serves as a supplement to a student's regular English 
courses, for it is concerned with increasing a student's 
appreciation and understanding of works of litereary merit. 

When the club was founded at Loyola in 1931, it was 
christened the Gerard Manley Hopkins Society, after the 
Jesuit poet, who was just becoming known at that time as 
one of the greatest of the modern poets. 

In the last two years, the Hopkins Society has greatly 
expanded its services to students, through its inauguration 
of a series of lectures given by members of the English 
department or distinguished guests. 

In choosing works from the required reading list for 
English majors, the society not only aids English majors 
to prepare for their comprehensive examinations, but also 
gives students a familiarity with a basic library of great 
books. In concentrating on such basic best works, the 
club stresses a student's continual reading, analyzation and 
appreciation of litereary works, thus enabling them to 
gain a wider grasp of critical and aesthetic standards for 
judgment of such works. 

Also new on the club's agenda is the sponsoring of 
meetings on some of the better known foreign authors. 




Members of the Hopkins .Society. Top Row: Jack 
Frisz, Bob Silich, Tom Haney. Second Row: Mary 
Hereley, Bobbie Gerke, Mary .Anne Schaefer. 
Botlojn Row: Bob Ryba, Jim Dunne. 



73 



VARIETY SHOW 



The Dental School Choral group in icalistic duplication. 




Theta Pi Alpha's "pass that peace-pipe 




Top: Phi Mu Chi's "quick change artists." 

Bottom: Mulkern and Healy, "fancy songs and snappy 



74 





Each year the Arts and Commerce Council undertakes 
the most attractive venture in Loyola's calendar of social 
events, the Variety Show. The social and academic 
societies of Loyola participate by writing, producing and 
directing their own presentations; the act may be serious, 
or humorous and may consist of any number of people. 
The pictures you see here are actual photos taken from 
the live Television presentation, the mode of the over-all 
production on March 7 and 8 this year. Mr. Antonio 
Spina, Junior, Arts, produced the show, Eleanor Lummel, 
a CBS stafT-director, directed the Variety Show to the 
perfected fantasmagoria that two full-houses witnessed. 
The Debate Society took non-social first prize for its 
"Carl Sandbardge," Phi Mu Chi took social first prize 
for its "quick-change-artist" presentation, and Tau Delta 
Phi's Jim Moreno took first place in the individuals. 



Ron Junius, typical-tee-vee-viewcr. 





Iggies winners receive their honors, heft to right: Don Rogan, Arts leader; Joanne Roman, mistress of ceremonies; 
Harry Fremgen, Commerce leader; and producer Tony .Spina. 





"'. . . Its alumni are found wherever 
progressive dentistry is practiced . . ." 



COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 



The Chicago College of Dental Surgery was founded 
in 1883. It was the pioneer institution of dental educa- 
tion in the state of Illinois. In 1923 this college came 
under the complete control of the trustees of Loyola 
University and became the Loyola L'niversity School 
of Dentistry. 

As a Catholic dental school, the Loyola University 
School of Dentistry strives to prepare the student so 
that he may be competent to begin in the general 
practice of dentistry, and to educate the student in an 
appreciation of the social, moral, and spiritual values 
in life. To realize these broad objectives, the faculty 
of the dental school endeavors to furnish an intellectual 
atmosphere that is conductive to presentation of faith 
and morals, and undertakes to train students so that 
they may be competent in the diagnosis, prevention, 
and treatment of oral diseases, insofar as there is a 
direct dental relationship; to appreciate the value of 
continuing study after graduation so that they may 
apply accumulated knowledge to new situations as they 
arise; to co-operate with the persons engaged in associ- 
ated fields of service in order to relate their respective 
knowledge to dental problems; to be better equipped 
to assume the responsibilities of citizenship and com- 
munity life. 



The Lo)ola Llniversity School of Dentistry is housed 
in a five story building situated in Chicago's great West 
Side Medical Center. The building contains all the 
facilities needed for the four year dental program. 
Significant among these facilities are two amphitheatres, 
or lecture rooms seating 275 and 150 students respec- 
tively; a dental library equipped with text and reference 
books, as well as the current journals of dental, medical, 
and allied subjects, and also a new and somewhat 
revolutionary aid, closed circuit television. This is the 
first dental school to own a permanently installed closed 
circuit television unit. Techniques and operations per- 
formed by an instructor are viewed by the television 
camera, clearly shown and demonstrated to an entire 
class simultaneously, each student having an unob- 
structed view of the procedure being described in any- 
type of demonstration. The building also contains 
many well equipped clinical and technical laboratories 
for the use of the students. 

The Loyola L'niversity School of Dentistry recognizes 
its responsibility to members of the dental profession 
as regards refresher courses and instruction in the cur- 
rent advances in Dentistry. In order to meet the need 
and desires of the dental profession, a post graduate 
program is offered. 



76 



I 




William P. Schoen, Jr., D.D.S., B.S., M.S. 
Dean of the Dental School 



Dent School Secretaries. Lrfl to ri_s,ht. 
Barbara Furmaniak, Kathy Redmond, 
Mary Mullen and_ Phyllis Zaccaria. 




Thomas Wright and Burton Bocha- 
koff polish dentures in the lab. 




Wallace Connell pouring out a model 





Rc\'. Vaughn 

Dental School Counsellor 



The Bursars Office, Loyola Dental 
School. Left to right: Patricia Sapata; 
William Hanko, treasurer; Blanche 
Imber. 




Dr. Amaturo 

Dental School Faculty Secretary 



The school has attracted a class of students whose 
subsequent careers have placed them among the leaders 
of the profession. Its alumni are foimd wherever 
progressive dentistry is practiced. 

Many of the distinguished dental educators through- 
out the world are alumni of this college. With more 
than seven thousand graduates it has an outstanding 
record in the past with future prospects which promise 
even to eclipse previous achievements. 




Miss Rita Caprini 
Dental School Librarian 




DENTAL COLLEGE 




George Matousek, D.D.S. 
Fixed Prosthesis Department 



Thomas L. Grisamore, D.D.S., M.D. 
Bacteriology and Pathology Dept. 




Viggo Sorensen, D.D.S. 
Oral Surgery Department 




Arthur Krol, D.D.S. 
Prosthetic Department 




Patrick D. Toto, D.D.S. 

Director of Clinics 

Oral Diagnosis Department 




DEPARTMENT HEADS 



Paul T. Dawson, B.S., D.D.S. 
Operative Department 





E. James Best, D.D.,S. 
Endodontia Department 



Harry Sicher, M.D., D.Sc. 
Anatomy & Histology Department 





Kvron J. May, D.D.S. 
Kddiodontia Department 



Frank M. Wentz, M.S., D.D.S., Ph.D. 
Periodontics Department & Director 
Graduate Division, 





John Snyder working in Operative Clinic on 
patient. 



Edward Hildcr and Jerome Hochstatter in Soph- 
omore Bacteriology Laboratory. 





Gene Goorman working on a child patient 
in Pedodontia Clinic. 





John McBee and Dr. G(ury;c Maluusek in Fixed 
Prosthesis Clinic. 



Dr. Rinert Gerhard. Ronald Hill.nbrand. and 
Frank Skowyra in Prosthetics Department. 



Sophomore Class attending lecture by Dr. Gustav Rapp. Dr. Rapp is the head of the Physiology 
Department. 






Peter Haigney and Dr. Jolin Giannini in Oral 
Surgery preparing patient for tooth extraction. 



Bart Kostrubala, Frank Skowyra, and Henry 
Elsbach at work in the Senior Laboratory. 



Dental School C hoial Chib Dnectoi Mi James Maniatis Moderator Di \far?ha!! Srrmlson. 




V^ri-ff '-^ry. 




?5>-«^>'' 




Sophomores at work in Bacteriology Laboratory. 





Seniors at work in Senior Laboratory doing Fixed 
Prosthesis and Prosthetics. 



DENTISTRY GRADUATES 



Steve N. Asahino 
D.D.S. 



Alexander Artisuk Francis G. Bane 

D.D.S. D.D.S. 



Francis V. Banigan 
D.D.S. 



Stanley Bielowski 
D.D.S. 





William C. Binzer Lawrence .A. Bissmeyer Richard J. Blecha 

D.D.S. D.D.S. D.D.S. 



Burton Bochakoff 
D.D.S. 



Donald J. Cerniglia 
D.D.S. 



1958 



Joseph C. Cerniglia Michael G. Churosh Wallace J. Connell 

D.D.S. D.D.S. D.D.S. 



Malcolm W. Connor 

n.D.s. 



Edward B. Doherty 
D.D.S. 



Everett C. Dou 
D.D.S. 




86 



James H. Duffy 
D.D.S. 



Robert J. Duresa Henrv G. Elsbach 

D.D.S. D.D.S. 



Dermot E. Fleming 
D.D.S. 



Robert !>. Flynn 
D.D.S. 





Glenn H. Fujihara 
D.D.S. 



Gene R. Goorman 
D.D.S. 



James E. Gorman 
D.D.S. 



1958 



. Gowgiel Peter J. Haigney 

3.S. D.D.S. 



John A. Harchanko 
D.D.S. 



Ronald K. Hill Ronald E. Hillenbrand MacKinnon Hinckley 

D.D.S. D.D.S. D.D.S. 




87 



DENTISTRY GRADUATES 



William J. Holohan Forrest L. Johnson Harper L. Jones 



D.D.S. 



D.D.S. 



D.D.S. 



William A. Kagians 
D.D.S. 



George A. Kamys 
D.D.S. 





Walter F. Kamys 
D.D.S. 



Hal J. Killpack 
D.D.S. 



.Albert N. Kosior 
D.D.S. 



1958 



Bart J. Kostrubala Raymond F. Krvavica Robert W. Lrvallef Jerry F. Lerch Frank J. Madro Jack G. Magnific 

D.D.S. D.D.S. D.D.S. D.D.S. D.D.S. D.D.S. 



John J. Ma^on 
D.D.S." 



Peter N. Maniatis 
D.D.S. 



Norbert J. Mann 
D.D.S. 



Rav C:. Marks 
D.D.S. 



John G. McBee 
D.D.S. 





Wayne McCann 
D.D.S. 




Arthur G. McDonnell 
D.D.S. 



Melburn F. McKell 
D.D.S. 




Harold C:. Milki 
D.D.S. 




George C. Mitchel. 
D.D.S. 



1958 



el T. Miyasakim Richard J. Montano James D. Morrcy John J. Nilles 

D.D.S. D.D.S. D.D.S. ' D.D.S. 



Terrence O'Brien 
D.D.S. 



James T. O'Connor 
D.D.S. 




89 



DENTISTRY GRADUATES 



Neitor Ostojic 
D.D.S. 



Fred J. Pacer 
D.D.S. 



Donald E. Peara Bernard J. Pennine Robert A. Pfluger 



D.D..S. 



D.D.S. 



D.D.S. 





Eugene VV. Prystalski 
D.D.S. 



Paul A. Purdv 
D.D.S. 



Charles M. Reevt 
D.D.S. 



Thomas J. Rogers 
D.D.S. 



Walter F. Rusnaczyk 
D.D.S. 



1958 



John M. Sachs 
D.D.S. 



John C. Sasso 
D.D.S. 



Cyril E. Schrimph 
D.D.S. 



i 



Erwin J. Shay Frank S. Showyra 

D.D.S. D.D.S. 



John R. Snvdct 
D.D.S. 




William Soiva 
D.D.S. 



Stanley J. Stanford Corvin F. Stine 

D.D.S. D.D.S. 



James M. .Sutton 
D.D.S. 



James W. Syms 
D.D.S. 






Thomas Thanasouras 
D.D.S. 



Charles F. Thometz 
D.D.S. 



John D. Thorpe 
D.D.S. 



James R. Toolson John R. Traualini 

D.D.S. D.D.S. 



Frank E. Watkins Richard C. Westergren Thomas E. Wright 

D.D.S. D.D.S. D.D.S. 




1958 



91 



STUDENT DENTISTRY ASStX:L\'rKJ.\. lop How: Jack Akaminc. Russell iJmri. Ja\ Mm.-. Richard Montano, Terrence 
O'Brian, Karl Nishimura, Thomas Thanasouras. Bottom Row: Lorcn Mills, James Brown, Charles Giroux, Thomas Wright, 
President; Leonard Weiss, Dr. Richard Stramm, D.D.S., Moderator. 



DENTAL SCHOOL STUDENT GOVERNMENT 



DENTAL STUDENT COUNCIL. Top Roiv: Thomas Sullivan, Al McManama, Louis Mazzucchelli, John Dolce, Lawrence 
Bissmeyer, Thomas Thanasouras, William Holohan, Peter Maniatis. Bottom Row:. William Todd, Frank Banigan, Corvin 
Stine, Mike Churosh, Jolin .Sachs, President; Harper Jones. 




ST. APOLLANIA 



In the year 1920 the St. Apollonia Guild was founded 
b)- a group of dentists in the greater Boston area of 
Massachusetts with the sanction of his Eminence, the 
Cardinal Archbishop of Boston. It was begun with 
the idea of caring for the dental needs of the poor 
children in and around Boston. In co-operation with 
the Forsythe Infirmary the participating dentists lent 
their services to some forty thousand children. 

After four years of successful activity in the Boston 
area the ideal of the Guild spread to dental schools. 
The Alpha Chapter was organized in the Loyola Uni- 
versity School of Dentistry in 1924. The Loyola Chapter 
flourished for about four years and then for some un- 
known reason became inactive. In 1943 under the 
presidency of Rev. James T. Hussey, S.J., the Guild 
was reorganized and reactivated by the Senior Dental 
students under the guidance of Dr. Jerome Vik. 

Since that time the Loyola Chapter of the Guild has 
flourished in varying degrees under the direction of the 
regents and student counselors of the Dental School. 
At the present time it is one of the most important 
extra curricular activities of the Lo\ola Dental School. 




OFFICER.S. Paul Noto, Secretary; Malcom Connor, Treasurer; 
Edward Doherty, President; Frank Banigan, Vice-President; Thomas 
.Sullivan, .Student Council Representative. 



GUILD OF ST. APOLLONI.^. Top 
Row: Harper Jones, Frank Banigan, 
John .Sachs, Paul Schonenberger, Rus- 
sell Elgin, Walter Lichota, .'\ldo Vacco. 
Second Row: Robert Flynn, Peter Haig- 
ney, Paul Noto, Dermot Fleming, 
Robert Lavailee, Richard Montano. 
Bottom Row: Malcolm Connor, Thomas 
Sullivan, Francis .\. Vaughn, .S.J.. 
Edward Doherty, President; .Alfred 
McManama, Marshall Smulson, D.D..S. 




ALPHA OMEGA 




OFFICERS. Albert Schonberg, Secretary; Leonard Weiss, Presi- 
dent; Myron Chubin, Vice-President. 



"Harmonia et Veritas," "Harmony, Love, and 
Truth." This, in a few simple words, expresses the 
ideal which inspired a small group of pioneers to con- 
ceive the plan for the first national Jewish dental 
fraternity. Thus, in 1907 at the Pennsylvania College 
of Dental Surgery, Alpha Omega was born. 

That Alpha Omega was a welcomed addition to 
organized dentistry is evidenced by the rapidity of 
growth from an infinitesimal body of four members to 
an organization now boasting almost seventy-five chap- 
ters and over five thousand members scattered through- 
out the world. 

This, the Alpha Lambda chapter, was organized and 
chartered in 1932 and has since then assumed propor- 
tions far and above the fondest dreams of its founders. 
Each year the fraternity starts its social ball rolling 
with a freshman smoker, followed almost immediately 
by a Halloween costume party. Between these affairs 
and the April Dinner-Dance many and various social 
and cultural events are interjected into our fraternal 
curriculum. 

OFFICERS 
Leonard Weiss .... President 
Myron Chubin .... Treasurer 
Albert Schonberg .... Secretary 



ALPHA OMEGA FRATERNITY. Left to right: Elliott Felbe, John Sachs, Burton Bochakoff, Leonard Weiss, President; 
Joseph Gordon, Jerry Hoffman, Myron Chubin, Albert Schonberg, Dr. Marshall Smulson, D.D..S., Moderator. 




PSI OMEGA 



Psi Omega Fraternity as a part of Loyola Dental 
School has become an integral part in the educational 
program of the University to produce men of a caliber 
worthy to the dental profession. During the past year 
the fraternity has been active in all school affairs of 
both an academic and social nature. Academically the 
men of the fraternity have shown the way by having 
a number of their members at the top of their respective 
classes, and participation in Student A.D.A programs 
have been one of the highlights of the past year. 

With the exception of the summer months the fra- 
ternity holds regular monthly meetings and social affairs. 
High on the list of parties are those concerning the 
incoming Freshmen, namely, the freshman open house, 
freshman smoker, and freshman pledge banquet. 

Psi Omega is Dentistry's largest Fraternity. As a 
whole the fraternity has for its objectives to cultivate 
the social qualities of its members; To assist its members 
in all their laudable undertakings; To exert its influence 
for the advancement of the dental profession and 
lastly, To surround each member with friends to whom 
he mav turn for advice and assistance. 




OFFICl Kn 
President; Cliarles Ree 
(missing). 



nil N I I. I ii\ I liiini IS Kii__. IS \ ice- 
licdbuiLi, William Hululidn, Pusident, 



PSI OMEGA FRATERNITY. Top Row Standing: Erick Nehls, Everett Shafer, Bart Kostrubala, James Schram, Chris Karras, Peter Maniatis, 
John McBee, Anthony Silla, Ronald Slovick, Donald Schude, Russell Elgin, Robert Grenda, James Maniatis, Wallace Connell, Ray Marks, Thomas 
Rogers, Charles Cooper, Gerald Ewing, William Todd, William Holahan. President; Eugene Prystalski, Charles Reeve, Stanley Podsiadlo. Third 
Row: Phillip MioUis, George Karays, Walter Kamys, Robert Pfluger, Henry Elsbach, Louis Pattan, Socrates Philopoulos, Fred Pacer, Rlbert Jones, 
Melburn McKell. Second Row: Robert Gallagher, James Brown, Charles Giroux, Ernest Faith, Richard Witek, Julio Battustoni. Ronald Latin, 
Terrence Moriarty. Bottom Row: John Laczynski, Walter Lichota, Jerome Hochstatter, Ernest Sesselmann, Dale Kostiwa. Richard Logullo, Ed- 
ward Luzwick. 





OFFICERS. Left lo right: R. Brandt, F. Banii?an, A. McDonnell 
S. Bell, W. Bercik, J. Snyder, E. Maier. 



DELTA SIGMA DELTA 



Delta Sigma Delta is the oldest dental fraternity in 
existence. It was founded at the University of Michigan 
on November 15, 1882. ■ Three years later, under the 
direction of L. L. Davis, Beta Chapter was founded at 
the Chicago College of Dental Surgery. The date was 
March 24, 1885. 

Delta Sigma Delta can claim the honor of having 
brother Delts in charge of our Dental School from its 
beginning to the present. The fraternity is justly proud 
of this record. 

The social year this year was touched off with a 
"Welcome" Party for the new freshmen. Parties fol- 
lowing this throughout the year were the Halloween 
Party, the Monte Carlo Party, the Christmas Party, 
and a .St. Pat's Party. 

However, not only house parties took place. .\ 
smoker, a "Pledge Banquet,"' and an all-school picnic 
were sponsored by the Delts. Then a special event for 
the year occurred in May, this was the "Annual Spring 
Formal." 

The enthusiastic officers who helped make this an 
enjoyable and successful year were: Frank Banigan, 
Grand Master; Art McDonnell, Worthy Master; Robert 
Brandt, Scribe; Bill Bercik, Treasurer; Joe Cerniglia, 
Historian; Steve Bell, Tyler; John Snyder, Senior Page; 
and Earl Males, Junior Page. 



DELT.\ SIGM.\ DELT.^. Top Row: D. Miosaki, J. Snyder, R. Ireland, S. Bielovvski, .\. Kozior. Third Row: B. Kwarta, D. Fleming, J. Lerch, 
F. Watkins, J. Michiels, M. Moffet, C. Borden, T. Wright, B. .4dler, E. Gowgiel, P. Schoenenberger, E. Oseteh, B. Grothur, C. Thometz, J. Ochab. 
Second Row: J. Kosakiewicz, C. Kalbhen, A. McDonald, J. Magnifico, P. Noto, D. Kozub, J. Christie, J. Cannon, A. Vocco, G. Takahaski. Bottom 
Row: G. Fujihora, R. Hillenbrand, S. -Asahino, J. Cerniglio, R. Brandt, D. Peara, K. Nishimura, S. Bryan, F. Madro, F. Bannigan. 




XI PSI PHI 



Xi Psi Phi Fraternity was founded February 8, 1889 
at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. 

Lambda Chapter is the sixth oldest of the thirty existing 
college chapters in the United States. Organized on 
March 14, 1896 at the Chicago College of Dental Surgery 
which is now Loyola University School of Dentistry. 
Since then Lambda has consistendy boasted one of the 
largest college chapters in the country. The present active 
college membership numbers seventy-five. 

Meetings are held each month at which time school 
and fraternity business is discussed. Guest lecturers are 
often invited to speak on subjects pertinent to the var- 
ious phases of the practice of Dentistry. 

A Chapter house is maintained at 838 South Ashland 
Avenue. Accommodations, including room and board, 
recreation and laboratory facilities are asailable to ap- 
proximately thirty students. 

Social functions of the fraternity include numerous 
house parties, a spring formal, an open house at Christmas 
time, an annual Freshman pledge banquet, and sponsoring 
an all-school golf tournament. 




OFFICERS. Top Row: Paul Kennedy, Treas- 
urer; Larry Bissmeyer, Student Council Repre- 
sentative; Forrest Jolinson, Editor; Clifford Au- 
dette, House Manager. Bottom Row: John Dolce, 
Secretary; Corvin Stine, President; Gregory 
Catramone, Vice-President. 



XI PSI PHI FR.VTERXITY. Top Row Standing: Larry McCarthy, Robert Zimmerman, Clifford 
Steinle, Peter Wall. Edward Doherty, Norb Mann, John Nilles, Gene Goorman, Clifford .Audette, 
John Ballack, James Hodur, Paul Kennedy, James Gorman, Peter Brask, Richard Montano, Gene 
Walkowiak, Richard Grisius, Luis Garcia, Ronald Gambia, John Toomey, William King, Jerome 
Jabcon, Wayne McCann, John Dolce. Fifth Row: Thomas .Sullivan, Terry Baker, A\ Artisuk, 
ClHff Doughty, Malcolm Connor, Paul Brockbank, Jay Stine, Gregory Catrambone, Frank Gavin, 
Robert Lavallee, Donald Hilgers. Fourth Row: A\ McManama, Don Reeder, George Mitchell, 
Frank Bane, Larry Bissmeyer, Harper Jones, Phillip DeGregorio, Maurice Hack, John Barren. 
Third Row: Frank McCall, Dan Sanders. Second Row: Corvin -Stine, Vincent Piscitelli, Earl 
Maier, George Sweetnam, Casimir Ziemba, Joseph McLaughlin, Guy McCarry, James Kerrigan. 
Bottom Row: James Moran, Robert Flynn, Louis Blanchet. 





". . . the opportunity to study the art 
of legal analysis and to seek the solution 
of lep^al problems . . ." 



SCHOOL OF LAW 



"I think it an indeniable position, that a competent 
knowledge of the laws of the society in which we live, is 
the proper accomplishment of every gentleman and scholar, 
an highly useful, I had almost said essential, part of liberal 
and polite education. And in this I am warranted by 
the example of ancient Rome, where as Cicero informs us, 
the very boys were obliged to learn the twelve tablets by 
heart, as a 'carmen necessarium.' or indispensable lesson, 
to imprint on their tender minds an earlv knowledge of 
the laws and the constitution of their countrw" — Black- 
stone. 

The Loyola University School of Law was established 
in 1908, with an enrollment of thirty students. For the 
first year of its existence it was known as the Lincoln 
Law School, the following year the name was changed to 
Loyola University School of Law. The School of Law 
gradually grew until, in 1921, and under the regency of 
Reverend Frederic Siedenburg, S.J., a morning division 
was added and the school was made co-educational. In 
1924, it became a member of the Association of American 
Law Schools and the following year was placed on the 
approved list of the American Bar Association. 

Its location afifords exceptional opportunity to observe 
sessions of the United States Court of Appeals, the United 
States District Court, the Appellate Court of Illinois, the 
Courts of Cook County, and the Municipal Court of 
Chicago and otherwise to benefit by studying law in the 

98 



second largest city in the United States. 

The School of Law has a student body of approximately 
250 students under the deanship of John C. Fitzgerald, 
A.B., L.L.B. It is staffed by a faculty of twenty outstanding 
professors and instructors, and it is composed of full-time 
resident professors and a group of general practitioners, 
who teach courses or ofTer special lectures in their respec- 
tive fields of interest, on a part-time basis. 

The School of Law offers instruction designed primarily 
to prepare students for the practice of law in any juris- 
diction where the common law prevails. The school aims 
at alerting the consciences of its students to the fulfillment 
of their civil, social, and religious duties, especially in their 
professional aspects. The faculty endeavors, whenever 
possible, to evaluate the positive law in relation to scho- 
lastic, natural law principles. The rules, standards, and 
principles of law are treated not as ends in themselves bul 
as a rational means to the attainment of objective justice. 

By the case method of instruction, the school offers to 
the law student the opportunity to study the art of legal 
analysis and to seek the solution of legal problems by the 
same process of reasoning and research he must use in his 
professional career. He must analyze complicated fact 
situations, discover therein the legal issues, locate and 
understand the applicable case and statute law, and sohe 
the legal problem bv accurate and logical use of principle 
and authoritv. 




Many law students attend the "Red 
Mass", for the Catholic lawyers of the 
city. 



Dean John C. Fitzgerald, A.B., L.L.I 





Frederic D. Donnelly, Jr. 
Ph.B., M.S. in L.S. 
Librarian 



ILLINOIS BAR JOURNAL 
"RECENT DECISIONS" 



Beginning with the February, 1949, issue of the Illinois 
Bar Journal (the official monthly publication of the Illinois 
State Bar Association), Loyola law students have written 
and edited the "Recent Decisions'" section of the Journal, 
consisting of comments on significant current Illinois and 
Federal cases. The comments not only report and analyze 
the cases, but also orient them and demonstrate their 
significance. The Journal has a circulation of about 8,000 
copies. The student editorial staff for the school year 
1957-58 was as follows: Editor-in-Chief: Francis D. Mor- 
rissey. Associate Editors: Thomas F. Bridgman, Richard 
A. Michael, William J. Rooney. Copy Editor: Gerald P. 
Lucey. Administrative Assistant: Helen C. McCabe. 
Staflf Contributors: Patrick J. Molohon, Ronald P. Kiefer, 
Robert J. Klovstad. Faculty Advisor: Professor John C. 
Haves. 



100 



Secretaries, Law School: Inez Reynolds and Jane Davis. 






Richard V. Carpenter 
A.B., M.A., LL.B. 



Francis C. Sullivan 
B.S.,J.D. 



LAW SCHOOL RESIDENT PROFESSORS 




John A. Zvetina 
A.M.,J.D. 



John C. Hayes 
A.B.,J.D. 





James M. Forkins 
Ph.B., LL.B. 



William L. Lames 
Ph.B., J.D. 





"f 



. , ,» ■ 1 I BiR f f f^ 







The faculty corridor at 41 E Pearson, the 
location of Loyola's Law School. 



First Year Day Division students learning the art. 








./- 




Second Year Day Division students seeking 
the solution. 




Robert O'Connor, Bill Hanley, and friend relax 
in the Law School Lounge. 



John SuUivan, Patrick Sheerin. and Anthony 
DiBenedetto in the Law School library. 




MOOT COURT TEAM. Left to right: David Schippers, Jr., Howard E. Haynie, Jr., Thomas R. Doran, Nelson Brown, Patrick J. Moiohon, 
and Thomas F. Bridgman. 




LAW GRADUATES 



Robert VV Agin Ralph A. Anderskow John P. Andringa 

J.D. LL.B. J.D. 



Wahcr R. Baron 
J.D. 



Arthur L. Birkholz 
J.D. 





Thomas F. Bridgman 
J.D. 



Nelson F. Brown 
J.D. 



Theodore J. Cachey 
J.D. 



Robert E. Cltiii.iK\ 
J.D. 



Ruliiii U. C:loud 
J.D. 



1958 



George A. Collias Thomas E. Cunningham S. Robert Depka Raymond F. Doherty Ursala S. Donaubauer William J. Du 

"J.D. ,1 1) J.D. J.D. J.D. J.D. 




k^Ull 





104 



Gerald J. Haney, Jr. Robert E. Harrington 

J.D. LL.B. 



Richard P. HefFeran 
Senior 



Clare L. Hillyard 
Senior 



David W. Hotchkin 
J.D. 





Earl B. Lichten 
J.D. 



Gerald P. Lucey 
J.D. 



James P. Martin 
J.D. 



iam D. M^irtin 
J.D. 



Carl F. McGarritv 
J.D. 



Patrick J. McNally, Jr. Robert T. McNaney 

J.D. LL.B. 



1958 



Richard A. Michael Patrick J. Molohon 

J.D. J.D. 




105 



LAW GRADUATES 



Francis D. Monisscv 



Charles J. Murphy 
J.D. 



Allan J. Newman 
LL.B. 



Thomas D. Nyhan 
J.D. 



Charles J. O'Connor 
JD. 





Cornelius J. O'Connor William F. O'Meara, Jr. Richard .\. Palewicz 

JD- JD. J.D. 



John F. Kt-ynolds 
J.D. 



Gerald C. Risner 
LL.B. 



1958 



Carl^H. Rolewick 
J.D. 



William J. Rooney 
J.D. 



Carl W. Rudolph 
J.D. 



Ellis M. Smith 
J.D. 




Thomas P. Smith 
Senior 



n 



Uf»>^ 



106 



Sheldon H. Staubitz Martin L. Sturman 

J.D. LL.B. 



John M. Sullivan James B. Thompson James N. Vail 

LL.B. Srnior LL.B. 





Edward G.^Vogt 
J.D.' 



Peter D. Walter 
LL.B. 



Robert E. Wieczorowski 
T.D. 



Senior class, day students, 
some dreaming of the years 
to come. 




RES IPSA LOQUITUR. Left lo right: Carl 
H. Rolewick, Richard VVittry, Helen McCabe, 
Francis Goodman, Editor; and James McPolin. 




THE STUDENT 
BAR ASSOCIATION 



The Student Bar Association was established in 1932 
to aid Loyola School of Law in accomplishing the 
intellectual, moral, and social development of students 
of the legal profession. 

The main purposes of the Association are to ad- 
minister student affairs and so promote and encourage 
extra-curricular activities which are essential to the full 
development of a member of the legal profession. In 
other words, the Student Bar Association is similar to 
the Chicago Bar Association or the Illinois Bar Associa- 
tion, only on a smaller scale. 

The Loyola Student Bar Association is a member of 
the American Law Student Association, which is spon- 
sored by the American Bar Association. In general, 
the purpose of the American Law Student Association 
is to improve professional preparation in the legal field 
with resulting benefits to the individual law student, 
the legal profession, and the public. 



RES IPSA LOQUITUR 

Inspired Isy a principle of law, "Res Ipsa Loquitur"" 
(The thing speaks for itself) has strived o\'er the last 
four vears to be a vehicle of opinion and dissents of 
the law student body. 

This publication which was born in strife and con- 
troversy, emerges today as the one voice of independence 
available to the students to exhort their fellow students 
or to air a "gripe."" 

The paper published bv the .Student Bar Association 
has a student circulation of 250 and recently expanded 
to include 1000 law alumni throughout the Chicago area. 

The staff of the bi-weekly paper consists of Francis 
Goodman, Editor; Helen McCabe and Richard Wittry, 
Associate Editors; and numerous others whose duties 
run from cartooning to feature writing. 



STUDENT BAR ASSOCIATION. Left to right: Ursula Donabaucr, William O'Meara, Charles O" Connor, Richard Michael, and Robert Clemency. 





OFFICERS. Left to right: 
Martin, John Ryan. 



Howard HayniCj John Sullivan, James 



PHI ALPHA DELTA 



Phi Alpha Delta evolved from the Lambda Epsilon 
Fraternity, Lambda, standing for, law, an'd Epsilon for, 
equity. The founders of Lambda Epsilon, undoubtedly 
meant to establish a fraternity, and it vtas their am- 
Ijition to be known as the fathers of what they hoped 
would be and what has since become the greatest law 
fraternity in the world. 

Mistakes which had been made in drawing up the 
original constitution of the fraternity caused the dele- 
gates who were present at the convention held at Colonial 
Tavern, in South Haven, Michigan, to dissolve the fra- 
ternity and adopt the new articles which were to be the 
foundation of Phi Alpha Delta. On November 8, 1902, 
in Chicago the name of Phi Alpha Delta together with 
the constitution and by-laws were formally adopted. 

Within a month of that meeting, the Webster chapter 
of the fraternity was organized at Loyola University 
School of Law. The Chapter has been active ever since 
that time except for the period during the World War 
II when the law school operations were suspended. 

The present chapter is composed of seventy-eight 
members from both the day and evening divisions of 
the Law School. Its present officers are: John Sullivan, 
Justice; James Martin, Vice-Justice; John Kelley, Treas- 
urer; Howard Haynie, Clerk, and John Ryan, Marshall. 



PHI .\LPH.A DELT.\ FR.\TERNITY. Top Row: Jim McPolin, John Bcny, Ray Dohcrty, Pat .\IcNalIy, Bob 
Nolan, Sheldon Staubitz, Dick Michael, Bob Clemency, Tom Cunningham, Bob Cloud, Ellis Smith, Gal Sparrow, 
Pat Molohon, Dick Palewitz, John Flannerv, Jim Bailey, John O'Toole. Bottom Row: Howard Haynie, John Sullivan, 
Howard Haynie, John Sulli\an, Martin Sturman, Dave Schippers, Jack Ryan, Phil Seals, Jim Freel, Neil Houtsma, 
John Gaydos, Lute Smith, John Caulheld Jim Martin. 





The Stritch School of Medicine, located 
in the heart of the world famous Chicago 
medical center. 



STRITCH SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



At the beginning of this century, medical education 
in the United States underwent a critical investigation 
by Dr. Abraham Flexner under the auspices of the 
Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. 
There were at this time no uniform requirements for 
entrance into a medical school and only such super- 
vision of the medical schools as could be exercised by 
the various state licensing boards. Medical education, 
with a few notable exceptions, was carried on outside 
of the educational atmosphere and guidance of uni- 
versities, which was considered unfortunate by many of 
the leading physicians and educators of the day. 

The authorities of Loyola University recognized the 
value of the recommendations of the Flexner Report 
and sensed the need of a strong Catholic medical school, 
under university auspices in the Chicago area. There 
were in Chicago at this time several independent and 
unaffiliated medical schools. After extended consulta- 
tion and serious consideration it was decided that medical 
education in general, and Loyola's aim in particular 
could best be served by gradual evolution through 
affiliation and absorption of a few of the leading and 
existing independent medical schools. Thus, in 1909, 
the Illinois Medical School was affiliated with Loyola, 
followed in 1910 by the Bennett and Reliance Medical 
Colleges. In 1915 the whole organization passed to the 
complete control of the trustees of Loyola L^niversity 



and became Lovola L^nixersitv School of Medicine. 
The Chicago College of Medicine and Surgery owned 
property and physical facilities ideally situated near the 
3300 bed Cook County Hospital. This college with 
its laboratories and other physical facilities was acquired 
by mutual agreement in 1917. The building was ex- 
tensively remodeled in 1925 to proxide more teaching 
and laboratory space. 

The assimiliation and comljination of four inde- 
pendent, proprietary schools into one institution which 
became an integral part of Loyola LTniversity proved 
to be a marked contribution to the raising of standards 
of medical education in Illinois and throughout the 
Midwest. Loyola University School of Medicine was 
accredited by the Council on Medical Education and 
Hospitals of the American Medical .Association on 
Februarv 9, 1920 and has been a member of the Associ- 
ation of American Medical Colleges since 1921. 

In gratitude for his generosity, encouragement, and 
assistance on behalf of this institution, the Board of 
Trustees of Loyola University, on April 15, 1948. 
unanimously approved a resolution to designate this 
school as the Stritch School of Medicine in honor of 
His Eminence Samual Cardinal Stritch, .Archbishop of 
Chicago. 

The Stritch School of Medicine, at present is one of 
the leading Catholic medical schools in the world. 



110 




An architect's drawing of the proposed 
Loyola Medical School which is to be 
built in the near future. 



Dr. John Sheehan, M.D., Dean of the Medical School 




111 





Office Staff, Medical School. Mrs. 
Sally Wilson, Miss Dorothy Strzechow- 
ski. Miss Joanne Carey, Miss Patricia 
Dohertv- 



Dr. Fredrick Selfridge 

Head of Mercy Hospital Clinic 




A growing and expanding arm of the University, the 
school has as its objective the providing of an opportunits' 
for education in sound medical science and to fit the 
qualified student for the practice of medicine. An 
additional responsibility, and one which goes hand in 
hand with this fundamental objective of education, is 
that of extending, through the research effort of teacher 
and student the knowledge and methods of control of 
the physical afflictions of man. 

To carry out their noble objectives the school must 
select from its many applicants those men and women 
who by reason of social and emotional maturity seem 
ready to begin the arduous task of the study of medicine. 
These selected applicants are exposed, throughout their 
four year course of study, to the finest instructors ob- 
tainable. The students are subjected to the strictest 
course of studies possible and are given all the practical 
experience which can be fitted into their alread\' 
over-burdened schedule. 



Miss Helen Huelsman, Librarian 




The high school skeleton which is tiic object of so many jokes, in a medical school becomes the 
object of serious study, as these students quickly discover. 



Besides the objectives enumerated above it is the 
further aim of the school to encourage advanced study 
and research and to provide such opportunities for those 
students who possess the necessary desire and special 
aptitude. Finally, it is also the aim of Loyola, as a 
Catholic .school of medicine, to foster in professional 
students a sense of other values of supreme importance 
to the physician and to society — ideals of high personal 
integrity, Christian ethics and human charity. 

In connection with the aim to encourage advanced 
study and research in 1947 the Board of Graduate 
Studies of the University approved the graduate pro- 
grams of the departments of Anatomy, Biochemistry, 
Microbiology, Pharmacology and Physiology. Graduate 
work carried on in these departments is under the 
auspices of the Graduate School, 820 N. Michigan in 
Lewis Towers. The courses offered lead to the degree 
Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy. 



Most of the basic science and preclinical studies of 
the undergraduate division are conducted in the lab- 
oratory building at 706 South Walcott Avenue, opposite 
the Cook Center area. This building houses the offices 
of administration, library, lecture and offices and re- 
search rooms for teaching staffs. 

The Medical School maintains clinical facilities with 
various hospitals for the purpose of giving its students 
as much practical experience as po.ssible. Important 
among these clinics are those operated at Mercy Hos- 
pital, Loretto Hospital, Louis Memorial Maternity 
Hospital, and Cook County Hospital. The benefits 
to be derived from this experience in dealing with the 
great variety of affliction represented in these hospitals 
are obvious. 

In recognition of the great work it has done and to 
continue this work, the Ford Foundation awarded the 
Stritch School of Medicine $900,000. 



113 



MEDICAL SCHOOL 



Dr. Leslie Emmert, Ph.D. 
Department of Anatomy 
.Associate Professor 



Dr. Walter C. Randall, Ph.D. 
Department of Physiology 
Chairman 



Dr. Einar Leifson, Ph.D. 
Department of Microbiology 
Chairman 








Dr. L. V. Domm, Ph.D. 
Department of .Anatomy 
Chairman 



Dr. MacDonald Fulton, Ph.D. 
Department of Microbiology 
Associate Professor 




DEPARTMENT HEADS 



Dr. George F. O'Brian, M.D. 
Department of Medicine 
Chairman 



Dr. Alexander Karczmar, Phi.D. 
Department of Pharmacology 
Chairman 



Dr. John T. Madden, Ph.D. 
Department of Psychiatry 
Chairman 







James A. Nowlan, Leo Roberts, Jose 
Zieglschmid, Frank Puc, and Dr. Irvin 
Strub are in the process of diagnosing 
the stomach ailment of their patient. 



Joseph J. Hiebel, Ronald G. Hoffman 
and Dr. Frederick M. Selfridge are 
using the Audio-Visual Heart Sound 
Recorder to obtain a complete picture 
of a cardiac condition. 





Dr. James W. Madura demonstrates the proper 
method of skin examination to Kenneth J. Patt 
and James A. Novvlan. 



James A. Nowlan, James J. Kase, Dr. Mervin 
Shalowitz and Dr. Morris A. Colbert diagnose 
the symptoms of a patient and hold a brief con- 
sultation. 





Attention is focused on the cutting table, as the 
mysteries of the anatomy are disclosed. 





Microbiology and bacteriology seem to hold the interest of sophomore medical students in spite 
of the stories of horror which are told about the things which have happened to students of these 
subjects. 



It's been a hard day, but it looks as though everyone survived and will return tomorrow for more 
of the same. 






Phil La Fata, Di . Jack Van Elk, and Gerald J. 
Liesen use the Fluoroscope to examine a patient's 
heart. 



Leo Roberts, Frank Puc, and Dr. Irvin Strub 
use the Gastroscope to examine stomach disorder. 



Research for a Ph.D. thesis must be beyond criticism. Here candidates Rsbert E. Lee, Henry 
Perlmutter, and William Wellband assist each other in performing a delicate procedure. 




Interpretation of the things one sees in the micro- 
scope is of the utmost importance. Dr. Emmert 
is the one who is responsible for most of the stu- 
dents' accomplishments in this field. 





Helen Jackson, Mrs. Joycelyn Turner and Mrs. 
Esther Bregman are faced with the task of making 
the necessary chemical tests for the clinic. 



Dr. Williams seems to be urging his students to 
see what they should as he coaches them while 
they scan a set of slides. 






Julian Lis in the process of a routine check-up 
at the Mercy Hospital clinic. 



Dr. Selfridge, clinic head, demonstrates how to 
conduct an eye examination to George Hartlaub 
and Phil Kauchak. 




Mrs. Esther Bregman operating a scintillation 
counter — used extensively in the radio activity 
field. 



120 



Helen Jackson operates a Spectro- 
photometer, a device which determines 
the amounts of Sodium and Potassium 
contained in the body. 




The waiting room in Mercy Clinic is a constant flow of experience for the Lovo 



la medical student. 




MEDICAL GRADUATES 



Patrick J. Adams 
M.D. 



Gregory J. Bcirne 
M.D. 



Stephen L. Bland Lawrence A. Caliguiri Lucian F. Capobianco 

M.D. M.D. M.D. 





Joseph R. Castro 
M.D. 



John G. Christenson 
M.D. 



Joseph F. Colhgan 
M.D. 



Jerr)- S. Cowan 
M.D. 



Frank H. Dcsconreuez 
M.D. 



1958 



Michael J. Doyle Richard G. Doyle William E. Duggan James V. Dunphy Violet M. Eggert John J. Fitzgei 

M.D. 








122 



William A. Flynn Charles L. Foerster Paul L. Goethals 

M.D. M.D. M.D. 

^ ~ irr"" — ' 



John P. Griffin 
M.D. 



George H. Hartlaub 
M.D. 





Jiiii 



Joseph J. Hiebel Ronald G. Hoffman Charles .\. Janda Michael J. Jerva Pliiliii J I .il atd 

M.D. M.D. M.D. M.D. Ml). 



1958 



lerald J. Liesen Julian T. Lis Richard M. Loeffler Gerald F. Loftus Micholas J. Manno Peter T. Mao 

M.D. M.D. M.D. M.D. M.D. M.D. 




123 



MEDICAL GRADUATES 

John J. Messitt Peter A. Michaels Robert T. Middo 

M.D. M.D. , M.D. 



Louis F. Minella 
M.D. 



Walter L. Moleski 







«3k\'. .. 



I/.., 



•^ 



i^ 




fc_j^. 



Jerome L. Murphv James A. Nowlan Richard B. O'Grady Kenneth J. Patt 

M.D. M.D. M.D. M.D. 




1958 



Leo F. Quinn 
M.D, 



Joseph J. Rambo 
M.D. 



Leo J. Roberts Raymond S. Roscdale Theodore E. Schafer Thomas W.'^Stach 

M.D. M.D. M.D. M.D.' 




124 



George A. VanDorpe 
M.D. 



Antnn \'nn:rl 
M !) 



Conrad Wiet 
M.D. 





Frank L. Wilkie 
M.D. 



Harvey B. Williams 
M.D. 



John F. Zie,glschmid 
M.D. 



John Zumerchik 
M.D. 



jhn W. Luce 




The initial history is the first procedure 
for an incoming patient. Here, Phil 
Kauchak receives the necessary in- 
formation from a patient in the men's 
division of Mercy Hospital clinic. 




STUDENT MED. ASSOC. 

The American Medical Association is without a doubt 
the voice of the medical profession in the United States. 
The intricacies of this large, political, social, and scientific 
organization are many and varied. In spite of its intricacies 
it is important that all its members be well informed on its 
functions and activities. 

In order to provide the students of medicine with his 
first introduction to organized medicine the Student 
American Medical Association was formed. 

The Loyola section of the S.A.M.A. is one of the most 
active groups and as a result is the leading organization 
at the medical school campus. 

This year in addition to all of their social functions such 
as the annual dinner and dance, and their academic 
functions such as seminars and group discussions of per- 
tinent cases, the S.A.M.A. at Loyola had three displays 
at the annual convention which was held at the Morrison 
Hotel. These displays are designed to show fellow students 
from the many different medical schools the aim and 
accomplishments of the research which these students are 
doing, in addition to their many studies. President Hugh 
Smith and the other officers are to be congratulated for a 
very successful year. 




Lejt to right: B. Smcdley, R. Schendl, C. Sternhagen, B. Hufsen. 
Seated: H. Smith. 



The lively discussion which followed the speaker at this S.A.M..A. seminar, came because of the 
careful notes everyone took. 




PHI CHI 



The origin of the Phi Sigma chapter of Phi Chi dates 
as far back as 1907 when it had its beginning as a local 
medical fraternity known as Epsilon Phi Sigma. Shortly 
after this the members of this small, but extremely active 
group, showed a desire to affiliate themselves with the 
national organization of Phi Chi and its charter was 
granted the following year at the twelfth annual chapter 
convention held in Baltimore. At present the total active 
membership numbers around one hundred and the forty 
members who reside in the house are accommodated in 
three houses in the seven hundred block on South Ashland. 
Two of these houses, being adjacent, have been consolidated 
to make one large house and the third, located two doors 
south, is large enough that it accommodates over half of 
the total residing members. 

The recently elected officers of this organization include 
Presiding Seniors, Bob O'Bryan; Presiding Junior, Mike 
Howard; Treasurer, Lloyd Cavanaugh; Secretary, Ted 
Will; Judge Advocate, Bill Hehemann; Assistant treasurer, 
Don Romanaggi; and Sergeat-at-Arms, Paul Ziegler. 
Recently elected also is the man who will serve as house 
manager for the next year, Dan Madigan. Dan will 
replace Ameel Rashid in this capacity. 

Despite the largeness of the group there exists an unusual 
closeness among all the members of the fraternity. In 
addition to being held together by the friendships naturally 
acquired under a fraternity system, the men of Phi Chi 
share their personal interest in the medical profession and 
are thereby united in a bond which must be experienced 
to be really understood. The concern of all the members 
to see that everyone attains these values to the greatest 
degree that each is capable has become a matter of tra- 
dition at Phi Sigma of Phi Chi. 





Officers of Phi Chi Fraternity; Patrick Adams, president; John 

Ryan, junior-officer; Bob O'Brian, secretary; and Charlie Forrester, ' 

judge advocate. 




Through these doors pass the hardest studying physi- 
cians in the world. 



A strong defense allowed only this photo of the fraternity 
members. 



127 




At one of the first parties of the year, the fames Sheridan Road Shack hosts members, their date 
and a smattering of pledges. A fitting introduction to the acadtmic plowing that lies ahead. 



Christmas vacation is always a time to forget the books. 
Here we see the tree trimming ceremony, usually followed 
by a community sing and refreshments. 




128 




PHI BETA PI 



The Phi Beta Dinner Dance is one of their largest social functions 
of the Academic year. It is a chance for the tjrads and students to 
compare notes, and dates. 



Four hours of lecture, four hours of laboratory, and the 
tired medical student makes his way to the House on the 
lake shore for dinner, followed by four hours of study. 
Put this way, our days sound dull and drab. But life is 
never so uninteresting in the Alpha Omega Chapter of 
Phi Beta Pi. Long hours of study are made bearable by 
the congenial fellowship of all in the House, and this is 
perhaps the most important function of our Fraternity. 
This purpose is fulfilled in many ways; a lively coffee 
session discussion, our monthly parties, our Freshman and 
Senior Banquets, these are only some of the ways that the 
burdens of medical school life are alleviated in our friendly 
atmosphere. 

Historically, Phi Beta Pi dates back to 1891, when the 
Alpha chapter was originated at the University of Pitts- 
burgh Medical School. Our chapter. Alpha Omega, was 
chartered by the National Fraternity Headquarters in 
1921, and today, the Fraternity has thirty-two chapters 
in medical schools throughout the United States. One of 
our chapter's founders. Dr. L, D. Moorehead, rose to 
greatness in the medical world, and became Dean of 
Loyola's medical school. His memory is to this day per- 
petuated in our annual Moorehead lectureship. 

Presently our chapter boasts 111 active members and 
over 1,000 alumni. All of us owe a debt of gratitude to 
the Fraternity for the in\aluable contribution it has made 
toward the attainment of our profession. It has been, in 
every true sense, our medical home. 



The living room of the Phi Beta house is where a fellow can forget the books, the class notes, the long study hours, 
and a whole raft of other thinijs. 





Richard A. Matre, A.M. 
Dean of the University College 



UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 



lu 1914, the far-seeing Reverend Frederic Siedenburg, 
S.J., began the organization of the now flourishing 
University College. Its history has been one of con- 
stant expansion and growth; and it offers excellent 
opportunities to people in all occupations. It was 
originally founded to supplement the education of 
school teachers and others who were occupied during 
the day and could not otherwise attend college. Never- 
theless, University College at present offers a selection 
of courses of special interest to students who are not 
working for degrees but who are seeking to broaden 
their education in cultural, business, professional, or 
avocational fields. Particularly of late, this college has 
attracted many only for a series of courses that will 
lead to self-satisfaction primarily. Courses of current 
interests, those enabling occupational advancement, 
and others taken for personal satisfaction have proved 
to be most successful. Although it operates only during 
the late afternoons, evenings, and on Saturdays, it 
offers primarily to part-time and occasionally to full- 
time undergraduate students the complete curricula 



toward baccalaureate degrees. The present dean of 
University College is Mr. Richard A. Matre on whose 
staff there is approximately sixty-five per cent of the 
faculty that teaches during the day sessions. 

An out-growth of the university's efforts toward adult 
and extension education is the organization of University 
College. The results are that both Lake Shore's and 
Lewis Towers' campuses are home to the college's 
students. Consequently, facilities including laboratories, 
libraries, and chapels of both locations are available for 
their needs. 

Although a lack of free time of the students is evident, 
they do participate in the extracurricular activities of 
the university. Fraternities, sororities, dramatics, sodal- 
ities, and various other social and intellectual organi- 
zations offer memberships to the students. But as a 
consequence of the lack of available time, the extra- 
curricular activities unfortunately never reach the pro- 
portions of the day schools. 

Opposite to the day student in many features, the 
average University College student presents quite a 



130 




Michael Postilion, A.B. 

Asst. Dean of the University Colle 



different picture. He is determined: he is definitely 
aware of his desire to receive an education and proceeds 
to base all his actions upon the fulfillment of that plan. 
He is purposeful: he knows the purpose for his attending 
college is his own personal advancement and mental 
growth and, consequently, never wanders from that 
objective. He is serious: he chooses his course to follow 
and permits only a compulsory act delay him from 
attaining his goal. He is self-sacrificing: he is willing 
to trade his free time and leisure moments for serious 
time-consuming hours of study and research. 

University College is a microcosm of the universal 
Loyola University. The College of Arts and Sciences 
is represented by the arts and classical languages, 
mathematics, natural sciences, humanities, social studies, 
and education courses. Symbolic of the College of 
Commerce are those courses familiar to business ad- 
ministrators: accounting, finance, economics, and man- 
agement. Here is the independent world of University 
College, which has been most effective in its vast scope 
of activities only because of its students qualities. 



Secretaries to Mr. Matre: Shirley 
Dillman and Rosellen Peirv. 




131 




You don't carry coffee on this stairway. 



Here is a University College class posing; for the LOYOLAN. 




132 



SBB! uiSB S BSSEa 




Ihr Lewis Towers lounge at night, less smoke more studymg, same long line. 



Donalda MacLean, Aggie Sebastian, Barbara Ross and Beverly Chandler showing-off. 



UNIVERSITY COLLEGE GRADUATES 



James R. Black 


Alice R. Conway 


David W. Cronin 


John P. Donohue 


Joseph A. Ferguson 


Bs. Ad. 


Bs. Ad. 


Bs. Ad. 


Bs. Ad. 


Bs. Ad. 


Management 


English 


Sociology 


Marketing 


Marketing 





Thomas J. Flavin 


Robert J. Gorman 


Raymond T. Hanch 


Evelyn T. Happ 


Ra 


ymondj. Harrmgton 


Bs. Ad. 


Bs. Ad. 


A.B. 


B.S. (Educ.) 




Bs. Ad. 


.-Vccounting 


Political Science 


Philosophy 


Education 




Accounting 



1958 



Doris A. Herzog 

Bs. Ad. 

Psychology 



Joseph W. Huck 

B.S. 

Sociology 



William J. Kunzler 

Bs. Ad. 

Management 



John E. Liberty 

B.S. 
Political Science 



Robert G. Liberty 

B.S. 

English 



Edward McCa 
B.S. 
Philosophy 




134 



)mas E. Ryan 


James C. Schiltz 


Richard B. Smolar 


Thomas E. Thayer 


Bs. Ad. 


B.S. (Math) 


B.S. 


Bs. Ad. 


Marketinej 


Mathematics 


Sociology 


.\ccountin,G^ 



Marion S. Wienckowski Alexander S. Wychocki 

Bs. Ad. Bs. Ad. 

Accounting Management 



1958 



Music composition and counterpoint, proof that the University Colle.qr h:i,s j wide rani:'' in it-^ curriculum. 




135 



S^v*5^.^ 4 




After a hard days work any place is relaxing to a night school student. 



Anything suffices as a coffee table. 




UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 
STUDENT COUNCIL 



The University College Student Council was reorganized, 
under the direction of Dean Richard Matre, in March, 
1953. The purpose of the organization is to bring Uni- 
versity College students closer to Loyola. 

In November, 1955, the Council introduced an orien- 
tation program for new students. This program has since 
been held each year. The Dean welcomes the students and 
informs them of the numerous services available to them. 
Other evening school representatives introduce their or- 
ganizations and the benefits afforded the University 
College students. 

The University College Council sponsors a banquet for 
the graduates of the undergraduate evening division. This 
dinner also honors evening students who have been out- 
standing in scholarship and leadership. 

The Council encourages the University College students 
to support the projects sponsored by other di\isions of the 
University. 

It is thought that if the most important function of the 
Council — to make University College students feel that 
they are an important part of Loyola — is successful, then 
it, as an organization, has fulfilled its purpose. 




Phil Brankin, president of University College Student Council, with 
Dean Richard A. Matre, Dean of the University College. 




Rev. Joseph F. Hogan, Dean Richard 
A. Matre, and Mr. George Kollintzas 
gathered at student council meeting. 



137 




Members of Sigma Alpha Rho. Left to right: Joanna Carey, Pat Houlihan, Mary Jane Keating, Eleanor Adoruetto, 
Sue Clark, Dolores Marck, Eileen Sweeney. 



SIGMA ALPHA RHO 



This Yearbook, being a biography of Loyola University, 
is planned to be of a "digestable" variety. A mixture of 
worthwhile ingredients is needed to accomplish this aim. 
Groups of students compose this mixture and add flavor 
to the Yearbook. One such "palatable "group is Sigma 
Alpha Rho. 

Prior to 1956, Loyola's sororities were comprised only 
of day school students. The general thought was that 
women attending evening school just didn't have the time 
nor interest to participate in and become active members 
of school life. 

In February, 1956, a group of ten women met and out 
of their -"togetherness" emerged Sigma Alpha Rho. 
Although small in number, this group achieved what was 
thought never to be done — establishing a "campus life" 
for the women attending evening school. As of November, 
1957, the membership in Sigma Alpha Rho consists of 
19 evening school students plus a moderator. Miss Cecilia 
Wasisco. The pledging of students interested in joining 
Sigma Alpha Rho is conducted early in the school year. 

The goal of Sigma Alpha Rho is to prove that its women 
are and will always strive, as one, to be an asset to Loyola 
University. Eager to further its cause and to afford a 
"campus life" atmosphere, Sigma Alpha Rho has activities 
planned to enrich each member with a spirit of cooperation. 

138 



Officers of Sigma ."Mpha Rho. Lejt to 
right: Mary Ann Keating, Eleanor 
Adoruetto, Sue Clark, president, and 
Pat Houlihan. 





Officers of Sigma Lambda Beta. Left 
to right: Jact Donahue, Gerald Horn, 
and Eugene Clark. 



SIGMA LAMBDA BETA 



While Sigma Lambda Beta is today one of Loyola's 
smallest fraternities it is likewise one of the oldest. The 
Fraternity was chartered and incorporated on February 1, 
1927, by a group of undergraduate students from the 
School of Commerce, then located on Franklin Street, 
but the growth of the Fraternity revealed that its purely 
local status was not fulfilling the needs of its members 
nor the School of Commerce; consequently, in the Spring 
of 1952, Sigma Lambda Beta applied for and received 
recognition as a chapter of the well-known National Com- 
merce Fraternity, Alpha Kappa Psi. 

Today, Sigma Lambda Beta enjoys the reputation of 
being not only one of the very active undergraduate 
organizations, but also highly respected. In recent years 
past officers of Sigma Lambda Beta have held twice the 
highest office in the Student Union. Repeatedly, members 
have served in offices of the University College Student 
Association and have been most instrumental in helping 
to fulfill the needs of an expanded and growing University 
College. 

While Sigma Lambda Beta can trace its charter back 
some 31 years, 1958 is most significant to the Fraternity 
in its present position. On June 2nd, Sigma Lambda 
Beta will celebrate at its Annual Banquet its 5th year as 
the outstanding University College organization known 
throughout Loyola University for leadership and respect. 



Theme of Halloween party; ''What me worry." 





Members of Sigma Lambda Beta. Top Row: Phil Brankin, Jack Donohue, Bob 
Miskelly, Gene Warren, John Ward. In Jront: Bob Shaughnessy, Gene Clark, 
Kenneth Bouldin. 



139 




There are times in the life of a 
student when advice from the 
■'Dean of Peace" is a necessity. 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 



Until the year l')21 the undergraduate division of 
Loyola University had been completely made up of the 
arts and science courses. In 1922, the Jesuit Admin- 
istration, seeing the trend toward specialization in 
education, established the College of Commerce as a 
separate and distinct entity of the University. From 
that time and until 1946, a small Day Division of the 
Commerce school was conducted on the Lake Shore 
Campus while the inuch larger Evening Division was 
held in the University's building at 28 N. Franklin St. 
In September, 1946, as a result of Lewis Towers being 
given to the University by Frank J. Lewis, the entire 
College of Commerce was moved to Lewis Towers 
where both Day and Evening Divisions operated until 
June, 1950. The Evening Division was then disassoci- 
ated from the College and joined to the University 
College which is the present evening school of the 
University. 

At present, the College of Commerce is made up of 
approximately 750 students. Only full time students, 
who must take twelve or more semester hours of study, 
are admitted with the exception of special students, 
admitted solely to the C.P.A. Problems Course. 

In its curricula and schedules the college screens 
students seeking a complete course in business admin- 
istration; students seeking to enter the Accounting 
profession and to secure the public service certificate 
of C.P.A. ; students seeking collegiate business prepara- 
tion before entering studies in the School of Law; and, 
students preparing for a teaching career in the field of 
Commerce. 

The plan for executing to the fullest degree the four 
objectives mentioned is a much more complex thing 
than is generally credited to the College of Commerce, 
or than the plan used by other colleges of Commerce 
throughout the country. Unlike education at purely 

140 



vocational schools, the system of preparation for liusiness 
at Loyola is directed at a profession rather than at a job. 

The faculty believes the educational objectives of 
potential business executives can best be carried out 
by inculcating in the student a basic knowledge of the 
arts. This is in full agreement with the policv and 
traditions of Loyola University. In following this 
course of action, the main objective is a student equipped 
to fulfill the prerequisites of any situation. Two years 
of the Commerce program guides the student through 
the fields of history, the arts of communication, the 
natural sciences, literature, philosophy and Theology. 
The latter two provide a means of integrating all the 
functions of higher Catholic education. 

The professional objective consists in developing a 
high degree of student performance in a specific area 
of the business world. This development is carried out 
in the latter portion of the Commerce program. The 
courses in this half of the curriculum study the complex 
technical society of contemporary America, and the 
history behind the development of this society. All 
students, regardless of their selected fields of concentra- 
tion, are required to acquaint themselves with all the 
areas of business. 

The College of Commerce is possibly the fastest 
growing school of the University. Led by its present 
dean, J. Raymond Sheriff", the school each semester 
sees new courses being taught, a larger and improved 
faculty; each year brings a bigger, more eager freshman 
class. At present there is talk of improvements in the 
curricula and the possible addition of a graduate pro- 
gram for the College of Commerce. To make room 
for this expansion, the University is gradually acquiring 
additional downtown facilities and transferring more 
and more arts and sciences classes to the Lake Shore 
Campus. The College of Commerce is a "growth stock." 




Tom Ward, Jack Bresnahan, Jim 
O'Grady, and Joe O'Connell criticize 
Mike Burke's selection of albums be- 
cause they lack the symphonic over- 
tones necessary in perfect reproduction 
through high fidelity. 



J. Raymond Sheriff, A.M., J.D. 
Dean, College of Commerce 




John R. Jozwiak, A.B., J.D. 

Assistant Dean, College of Commerce 





OfficeT Staff of the Commerce School. 
Donalda MacLean, Manetta Calkins, 
and Beverly Chandler. 



142 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE DEPARTMENT HEADS 




Theodosi A. Mogilnitsky, 

Ph.D. 
Chairman 
Department of Economics 

and Finance 



Kenneth B. Hass, Ed.B. 

Chairman 

Department of Marketing 





Robert A. Meier, MB. A., 

C.P.A. 
Chairman 
Department of Accounting 



Peter Y. Swanish, Ph.D. 

Chairman 

Department of Management 




Richard F. Kusek, M.B..A., Francis Murans, 
Ph.D., Joseph V. McCullough, M.B.A., 
check over exam papers. 





Present and future plans of the Commerce Council 
are discussed with Dean Sheriff at a "coffee 
clutch." 



This must be an English Class in the College of 
Commerce, not one student is taking notes. 



f 


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The different media of advertising are explained 
in Mr. Wagner's Marketing class. 




The Commerce Council rides in style to the Pow-Wow. 



Frank Lancaster and Ginny Stift chat with George KoUintzas at 
the Sno-Bail, while Harry Fremgen enters the scene in search of 
refreshment. 





The time spent in preparation for the Sno-Ball is well worth the 
effort, when the big night arrives. 



145 




The members of the Olympic drinking 
Team hold a meeting to discuss quan- 
tity and capacity. 



Typical reaction to an old time movie 
starring *'Laurel and Hardy." 





Are you really supposed to ski on a 
"ski weekend"? 





You too may be the lucky student whose 
name is posted on the bulletin board 
requesting your presence in the Com- 
merce office. 



The Loyolan goes commercial and uses 
the medium of display advertising to 
boost sales. 



THE COMMERCE COUNCIL. Seated left to right: Wayne Lowe, Harold Fremgen, president; Tom Riordan. 
Standing left to right: Henry Grannon, Bob Doherty, Chuck Parrish, Bob Matthei, Jim Fitzgerald, Jack Doyle, Chuck 
Ptacek, Dick Yetter, Stella Stasulaitis. 




COMMERCE GRADUATES 



James E. Ackerman 
B.S.C. 
Finance 



1958 



Patrick H. Arbor 
B.S.C. 
Finance 



Werner J. Baeckelandt 

B.S.C. 

Marketing 



Thomas A. Berry 



Stephen J. Blank 
B.S.C. 

Marketing 





enry S. Blazej 


Norman M. Borowski 


Edward D. Boyle 


Robert L. Bracken 


John P. Brennan 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


Accounting 


Accounting 


Management 


Marketing 


Marketing 



Virginia Burke 

B.S.C. 

Accounting 



Ronald P. Burton 



Robert J. Cambora 

B.S.C. 

Marketing 



William J. Carnegie 

B.S.C. 

Marketing 



William J. Casey 
B.S.C. 



Charles F. Cau 
B.S.C. 
Accounting 




Richard C Claahsen 


Joiin T. Coffman 


Edward J. Condon 


Donald J. Connelly 


Richard T. Coombes 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


Accounting 


Marketing 


Management 


Accounting 


Marketing 





James I*. (:ri[3ptn 


Edward H. Czadla 


John F. Damhesel 


Virgil B. DelGhingare 


Donald F. Devitt 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


Marketing 


Marketing 


Accounting 


Accounting 


Marketing 



1958 



lliam J. Devlin 


James N. DeWulf 


Dean B. Dolan 


Roman L. Dombrowski 


Robert M. Donohue 


Thomas J. Doyle 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


Marketing 


Accounting 


Accounting 


Marketing 


Management 


Management 




149 



COMMERCE GRADUATES 



Robert W. Dyer 

B.S.C. 

Accounting 



1958 



Joel G. Eckner 

B.S.C. 

Accounting 



Gerald Epstein 



Roy L. Fabbrini 

B.S.C. 

Management 



Ronald R Falcon 




lames P. Finnegan 


Harold W Fitmijen 


VVendelin Friedcr 


.Angelo P. Frigo 


Robert R. Fuesal 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


Economics 


Economics 


Management 


Marketing 


Accounting 



Thomas J. Galvin 

B.S.C. 

Management 



James E. Gavin 

B.S.C. 

Marketing 



Martin J. Ginnane 

B.S.C. 

Accounting 



John V. Giovenco 

B.S.C. 

Accounting 



Henry M. Grannon 

B.S.C. 

Accounting 



Michael Harrii 
B.S.C. 

Accountine 




150 



James D. Hartigan 






\ — 



I 



Robert W. Helt 
.S.C. 

Acci)iiiUint> 



John E. Hesse 









Eugene L. Hlavacek 
B.S.C. 
Finance 



Ralph P. Hudgin 

B.S.C. 

Accounting 



William P. Hummel 

B.S.C. 

Management 



Edward A. Hunter 

B.S.C. 

Marketing 



Ricliard J. Illian 

B.S.C. 

Accounting: 



1958 



d D. Janowicz 
B.S.C. 
ccounting 



Vincent T. Keegan 

"l.S.C. 

Maikrtinsj 



James G. Kelly 

B.S.C. 

Accounting 



John E. Kiley 



Albert J. Kozakiewicz 




COMMERCE GRADUATES 



Charles H. Kunzer 
B.S.C. 

Marketing 



William L. Kiirz 

B.S.C. 

Marketing 



John P. La Framboise 

B.S.C. 

Marketing 



Robert J. Lane 

B.S.C. 

Marketing 



1958 



Dennis M. La Fevre 

B.S.C. 

Marketing 





John V. Lenart 


Donzld Lipkin 


John D. Lobecki 


James J. Lussem 


Eugene J. Machnik 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


Accounting 


Management 


Management 


Management 


Management 



'aul M. Maffia 


Dorothy F. Martin 


Robert T. Matthei 


Danial T. McCurdy 


Patrick J. McGowan 


Richard S. Mc 


B.S.C. 




B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


Management 




Management 


Marketing 


.Accounting 


Marketing 




Walter T. McMahon 
B.S.C. 

Accounting 



Frank J. McNamara 

B.S.C. 

Economics 



Frank C. McNicholas 

B.S.C. 

Accounting 



Anthony J. Merges 

B.S.C. 

Marketing 



James B. Moran 

B.S.C. 

Management 





Donald F. Morse 


Robert V. Motto 


Clemens Mueller 


Robert L. Murrin 


Dennis 1,. N.iqcL 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 




B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


Marketing 


AccountinE^ 




Accounting 


Accounting 



1958 



ter C. Nicpon 

B.S.C. 
[anagement 



Robert M. Niesen 
B.S.C. 

Marketing 



John W. Nolan 
B.S.C. 

Management 



Thomas P. Nolan 


Richard J. Norris 


Terrance R. Nosek 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


Accounting 


Management 


Marketing 




153 



COMMERCE GRADUATES 



Thomas F. Nugent 


Patrick J. O'Connor 


Benedict A. Oik 


Edward \. Otis 


Walter A. Ovaert 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


Accounting 


Accounting 


Marketing 


Marketing 


Accounting 





^i^ 




1958 



ank N. Paulo 


Edward C. Pawlewski 


Anthony S. Phillips 


Dale G. Phillips 


Fred C. Pierce 


Viljo S. Piikk 


B.S.C. 




B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C 


Marketing 




Management 


Accounting 


Marketing 


Marketing 




154 



Albert S. Polzer 

B.S.C. 

Marketing 



Ronald M. Pontius 
B.S.C. 

Marketing 





Raymond C. Rettig 
B..S.C. 

Markrtina: 



Louis A. Romagnano 
B.S.C. 

-XcrotiiitinL^r 



■J- 





James .A. Roman 


Bernard S. Roser 


James VV. Ryan 


Dennis J. Santoni 


Merrill J. Sauriol 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


Management 


Accounting 


Management 


Accounting 


Marketing 



1958 



bert J. Schmitz 

B.S.C. 
Accounting 



Sister M. Rita, OFS 

B.S.C. 

Accounting 



Andrew J. Schumi 

B.S.C. 

Accounting 



Joseph W. .Schwarzbauer 

B.S.C. 

Accounting 



Edmund .Seebauer 

B.S.C. 

Marketing 



Donald A. Skriba 
B.S.C. 

Manatjement 




COMMERCE GRADUATES 



Robert J. Slobig 

B.S.C. 

Accounting; 



Thomas W. Smita 
B.S.C. 

Marketing 



Clayton E. Soklcy 
B.S.C. 

Marketing 



Thomas E. Split 
B.S.C. 
Finance 





Frederick C. Stephen 

B.S.C. 

Accounting 



Raymond F. Stopa 

B.S.C. 

Management 



Steve D. Streniski 
B.S.C. 
Finance 



Edmund J. Swain 

B.S.C. 

Management 



Robert Tackes 
B.S.C. 



1958 




156 



James U. Tomazin 

B.S.C. 

Marketing 




/ ' L^ 



Davade W. Tomei 

B.S.C. 

Mark.tiiii. 



Walter J. Valter 
B.S c: 

} .( oiiomics 



Raymond A. Van de Walle 

B.S.C. 

Marketing 



Michael B. Westbcrg 
B.S.C. 
Finance 





Joseph E. Williams 

B.S.C. 

Accounting 



Practical application on calculating machines is one method of teaching Statistics. 





Members of tin- Accounting Club. lop Row: Terry Mosck, Kixci, /k . \^A\n Terry, Dennis Nagela. Second Row: 
Gene Novak, Tom Vicek, Ron Sarbieski, Joe OUetti, Jack Zinuuci , George Alexander, Will King, Louis Ray, John 
Arnold, Stan Kazial. Sitting: Joyce Rodeck, Henry Blazic, Walter Connelly, Mr. Richard Kusec, Norm Borowski, 
Charlie Caufield, Tom Nolan, Den Santoni, and Honore Zenk. 



ACCOUNTING CLUB 



Founded in December of 1949, and open to all Com- 
merce students who have successfully completed one course 
in accounting, the Loyola University Accounting Club 
strives to bridge the chasm between accounting theory 
and practice. 

This bridging is accomplished through speakers, repre- 
sentatives of public accounting firms, industry, and bank- 
ing; through a planned field trip to the headquarters of 
a nation-wide public accounting firm; and through the 
distribution of literature. The newest project of the 
Accounting Club has been a senior-undergraduate coun- 
seling program which supplements the instructions the 
undergraduates receive. 

For the past three years, the Loyola University Account- 
ing Club has been affiliated with the Illinois Conference 
of Accountancy Clubs. As a member of this organization, 
Loyola has actively participated in presenting an Oppor- 
tunity Conclave, an entire day devoted to acquainting 
the accounting student with the opportunities available 
for employment, training, and advancement with these 
corporations. 

These activities have led to the advanced caliber of 
accounting students as a whole and brought more qualified 
students into accounting as their field of concentration. 

158 



Officers of the Accounting Club: Charles Caufield, 
Henry Blazek, president; Mr. Richard Kusec, 
moderator; Honore Zenk and Tom Nolan. 





Officers of Econ-Finance. Standing: Gene Havacek, Betty Jo 
Hawkins, Jerome Stephonic, Pat Arbor. Sitting: Dr. S. M. Frizol, 
moderator, and Steve D. Stremski, president. 



ECONOMICS -FINANCE 
SOCIETY 



The Economics-Finance Society was established at 
Loyola University on January 21, 1956. It is an official 
member of the American Finance Association which is a 
national organization founded in 1940. The primary aim 
of the student chapter at Loyola is to supplement the 
Jesuit education received by students majoring in eco- 
nomics or finance. 

Prior to the beginning of a semester, the society's pro- 
gram committee formulates a professional program. A 
typical semester's program includes speakers, tours, forums, 
and movies on both current and related topics of interest. 
A service to the school is also performed by the society, 
for many of these professional functions are opened to the 
entire student body. 

During the school year 1957-58, the Economics-Finance 
Society had a paid membership of fifty-one students. This 
figure includes only those students who are currently en- 
rolled in the College of Commerce and are actively seeking 
a degree in one of the five major fields of concentration. 
The only requirements for membership in the society are 
that the student have at least one semester at Loyola and 
be in good standing with the university. 



Members of Econ-Finance Society. Lrft ti> n\^/it: Robert Morrtjw. Dcnnv- Net 
Harry Drayson, Robert Kane, John I'erry. Tad Wynnvski, Denis .\o\ak. 



;la, Flank (^.oreeki, Terry Notari, 




159 




Officers of the Marketing Club: Jack Brennan, 
Jack Smyth, Jim Gavin, Dick McKay, Jack 
Wisniewski, Frank Paulo. Sitting is Jack Kiley, 
president. 



MARKETING CLUB 



The object of the Marketing Club, as in other organi- 
zations, is to create and maintain interest in the field of 
Marketing. This is done through a more intimate relation- 
ship between the professors and the students, and also 
through the efforts of speakers from the many fields of 
marketing in the business world. These speakers inform 
the student of the workaday world, and the problems 
presently surrounding us. 

Through the Marketing Club, the student is better 
acquainted with the opportunities, careers, and positions 
available to college graduates. The club also has business 
meetings the purpose of which is to allow the students to 
express their preferences towards the subjects they wish 
to be discussed. The professors in Marketing are avail- 
able at these meetings to answer any questions that would 
be raised in the various fields. 

As a member of the Marketing Club, one is entitled to 
the advantages of the American Marketing Association. 
These advantages can be very helpful upon graduation 
for the purposes of seeking the employment desired bv 
the members. 

The club's activities are also of a social nature, with a 
party at the beginning of the school year, and also a party 
combined with the other business organizations. Besides 
the members being invited to the party, there is also the 
professors and their. wives in attendance. The Marketing 
Club also takes part in other major school activities, one 
of these is the Lovola Fair. 



Mrmhrr^ of thr MarkrtinE^ T'lnti .-^t nnr of their business meeting 



tirriculum covers e\-pi-%' 



liable media. 




160 




Top Row: Raymond Stopa, Joseph Burke, Mort Multack, Ed Urbanski, Don Kaider, Don Lipkin, E. Swain. Second 
Row: Jim Roman, Ed Otis, Al Kozakiewicz, Jim Ryan, Richard Norris, Harry Dreyson, Al Osowski. Third Row: Gene 
Croisant, Jim Lussem, Ed Condon, Joe Sebastian, Dale PhilHps, Ed Petzck, John Tevenan, John Lebecki. Boltom 
Row: Joseph Panarale, Paul Maffia, Al Guerra, John Hannon, William Hummel, Frank Smith, Terry McGovern, 
Joel Chraska, Bob Kayer, Mike Metzger. 



MANAGEMENT CLUB 



The Society for the Advancement of Management is a 
recognized national professional organization devoted to 
the accomplishment of furthering and developing manage- 
ment. 

The Society was formed in 1936 by the merging of the 
Taylor Society, which was organized in 1912 with the 
purpose of promulgating the ideas of Frederick Taylor 
and his associates and the Society of Industrial Engineers, 
formed in 1917. A third organization the Industrial 
Methods Society merged with S.A.M. in 1946. Since the 
merging twenty years ago the Society has built a large 
effective national organization of fifty-eight chapters with 
some 7,000 senior members. 

The purpose of the Society is to participate in activities 
of planning, directing, and controlling of activities. This 
is truly an organization which belongs at Loyola since its 
main purpose is to train leaders who are capable, shrewd, 
and hard workers. Since 1950 under the devoted guidance 
of Dr. Peter T. Swanish the organization has progressed 
as only an organization of real leaders can. Hard work 
has been their constant activity and they have been able 
to give members the welcomed opportunity to make a 
professional tour of such industrial leaders as Nabisco, 
A. O. Smith, U. S. Steel, they have also had guest speakers 
from such industries as utilities and electronics and mail 
order. These came from Northern Illinois Gas, Motorola 
Inc. and Aldens. 



Society for the Advancement of Management 
Officers: .Alan Osowski, John Hannon. James 
Lussem, Donald I^ipkin, and James Ryan. 




161 




", . . the transformation and develop- 
ment of the student into a competent 
scholar . . ." 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



With the beginning of the academic year, September, 
1926, the Graduate School was constituted a distinct 
unit of the university by Reverend Wilham H. Agnew, 
S.J., who was then the president of the university. 
However, this was not the initial offering of courses 
in the various fields of advanced scholarship. Prior to 
this time, several departments had courses of graduate 
academic nature in e.xistence; but the work often 
suffered from insufficient supervision and organization. 
In addition, a demand for advanced instruction was 
constantly increasing and eventually necessitated the 
university's having a separate and independent school 
which would have complete jurisdiction over graduate 
degrees. This was the motivating force behind the 
formal establishment of the Graduate School as an 
individual college. At present, the dean, is Reverend 
Stewart E. Bollard, S.J. 

The aims of the school are to further develop the 
foundation of knowledge laid in the undergraduate 
divisions, to commence more complex studies in the 
major field, and to prepare the student more fully for 
research work and the proper presentation of its results. 
The primary objective of the Graduate School is natur- 
ally the same as that of the university as a whole: to 
integrate cultural, scientific, and literary training with 
a sound philosophy of life based on Christian principles 
of right thinking and right reasoning. 

The principal purpose of a school is the education of 
the student; but the principal purpose of the Graduate 
School is the transformation and development of the 
student into a competent scholar. To be successful in 



cooperating with the college's primary purpose, the 
student must be able to work independently; he must 
be spurred on by an unquenchable intellectual curi- 
osity that originates with a deep love and extreme 
interest in knowledge, particularly for its own sake. 
These qualities, if acknowledged and permitted to 
inature, will form the ingenious graduate student who 
is accurate, thorough in his endeavors, and foremost 
a success. He must be acquainted and well-versed in 
the elementary undergraduate courses, for these will be 
his tools in the new position of a researcher. Further- 
more, he must be a critical and original thinker able 
to consolidate his knowledge and conclusions with those 
received from many long years of tedious study. This 
unification must then be applied towards scholarly 
contributions in his field of knowledge. Perhaps most 
important, the graduate student must be courageous 
even in the time of momentary faulures and trials, for 
this alone can present him with the necessary thrust 
of confidence that occasionally becomes imperative. 

It probably seems that the Graduate School stresses 
only the development of the mind and reasoning 
faculties. Nevertheless, the college also encourages an 
intimate understanding of God. With his acquired 
knowledge, the scholar conceives His wisdom, his great 
ignorance; His independence, his complete dependence; 
His power, his utter impotence. Since knowledge pre- 
cedes love and dedication, the student approaches 
Perfection through this elementary realization. The 
scholar, therefore, employs his acquired skills ''for the 
greater glory of God." 



162 




The Reverend Stewart E. Dollard 

SJ., Ph.D. 

Dean of the Graduate School 



Paul Kiniery, Ph.D. 
Asst. Dean 





i 


H 






P 


F Bi^ 


1 


:<: 




Kay Smith 
Secretary to the Dean 



163 




John Zvetina, J.D., A.M., Emory William Morris, D.D.S., Very Rev. James F. Maguire, John L. McCaffrey, J. S.D., 
and Mrs. Clem Lane at the confering of Honorary Graduate degrees in February, 1958. 




The Rev. Ralph .i^. Gallagher, SJ., Ph.D. 
Director of the Institute of Social and Industrial 
Relations. 



164 



Miriam Keating 

Secretary to Dean Gallagher 




LOYOLA INSTITUTE 

OF 

SOCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS 

GRADUATES 



John Burton Bulger (Ph.B., Loyola University) 

Thesis: Public Relations — .-1 Human Relations Approach 
in Industry. 



Gerald James Caraher (A.B., De Paul University) 

Thesis: A Survey oj a Sample oj the Membership of the 
Industrial Relations Research Association to Deter- 
mine Their Opinion of Certain Proposed Changes 
and Additions to the Nation s Labor Laws. 



Jeffie C. Davis (B.S., ED,, Loyola University) 

Thesis: The ll'hite Collar Crime of Embezzlement in 
Cook County. 



Lloyd Davis (Ph.B., De Paul University) 

Thesis: Catholic Participation in Eight Foundations. 



James C. Koch (B.A., Conception Seminary) 

Thesis: Supplemental Unemployment Benefit: Its Effect in 
a Condition of Permanent Layoff. 

Reverend Stephen F. Latchford, S.J. (A.B. Woodstock 
College; M.A., Georgetown University) 

Thesis: Government Services in Industrial Relations. 

Karl J. Maes (Diploma, LIniversity of Chicago) 

Thesis: Budgeting, A Comparative Study of the Mam 
Features of Budgetary Process in the Federal 
Republic of Germany and the United Stales. 

Arthur Anthony Malinowski (B.S.C., De Paul Uni- 
versity) 

Thesis: The Computer: The Industrial Relations Aspect, 
A Case Study. 



Maurice V. Dias (B.A., Madras University, India) 
Thesis: Industrial Relations in India. 

Frank R. Di Giovanni (B.S., Loyola Llniversity) 

Thesis: Predetermined Time Standards and Wage Deter- 
mination. 

Ramzi Nadhim Franqul (B.A., College of Commerce 
and Economics, Bagdad, Iraq) 

Thesis: The Social and Economic Status of Labor in Iraq 
During the Last Two Decades with Special 
Emphasis on Unionism and Its Effect on This 
Status. 

Leslie H. Greenfield (B.B.A., University of Miami) 

Thesis: Political Action of American Trade Unions in 
Presidential Elections, 1932-1956. 

Joseph L. Kennedy (B.A., Loyola University) 

Thesis: Chica^oland Salary Surveys: A Critical Analysis. 



James F. Murphy (B.A., University of Illinois) 

Thesis: A Case Study of Continental Can Company's 
Pre-Supervisory Training Program at Plant 51 
{Chicago Stockyards) . 

Allen Jerome Paneral (B.S., De Paul University) 
Thesis: A Study of Educational Assistance Programs Offered 
To Employees by Chicago Area Companies. 

Paul J. Proteau (B.S.C., Loyola University) 

Thesis: Survey of How Firms in the Chicago Area Prepare 
for Collective Bargaining. 

Sister Mary Carol (Puchalski), C.S.J. (A.B., Rosary 
College) 

Thesis: Lay Leadership in a Suburban Parish. 

Douglas W. Schimmel (B.S., University of Illinois) 

Thesis: The Role of Employee Communications in a Union 
Organizational Drive: A Case Study. 

165 




School of Social Work Christmas Din- 
ner. This year held at the Conrad 
Hilton Hotel. 



SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 



The Loyola University School of Social Work is the 
oldest Catholic school of social work in the country. 
The germ of the present school was Loyola University 
Lecture Bureau, organized in 1913, by Reverend 
Frederic Seidenburg, S.J. 

In 1916 Father Seidenberg hired teachers and began 
a night school for those who wished to specialize in 
social work, setting up the classes in the Downtown 
School on Franklin St., calling it the School of Sociology. 
The location of the school gave easy access to the 
library facilities of Chicago Public Library, John Crerar, 
and the Newberry Libraries, in addition to the 60,000 
volumes available in the Cudahy Memorial Library on 
the University's Lake Shore campus. 

The School of Social Work grew out of the School of 
Sociology, in 1932, aiming its program toward graduate 
students. In 1938 the School of Social Work was or- 
ganized as a distinct professional school within the 
University, with its major emphasis on generic case- 
work. 

Today the objectives of Loyola LIniversity School of 
Social Work is to prepare men and women, in con- 
formity with the principles of Catholic education, for 
professional participation in the existing social welfare 
organizations, institutions and agencies; and ultimately 
for contributing to the further dynamic development 
of social work. It is expected that students will mani- 
fest the ability to work independentiv, and be spurred 

166 



on by intellectual curiosity and love of knowledge for 
its own sake. The courses are arranged in time so that 
a full-time student will have the opportunity to attend 
a maximum number of classes concurrently with his 
field-work assignment. Classes are held ordinarily in 
the lecture rooms at Lewis Towers. Selected classes in 
medical and psychiatric social work are held at 
medical institutions in Chicago's West Side medical 
center. Agencies participating total twenty-three, and 
are made up of both private and public facilities of 
greater Chicago and suburban areas, as well as agencies 
in Evanston and Rockford, 111., Fort Wayne and Gary, 
Indiana, and Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

Approximately 4300 persons have attended the School 
of Social Work, either as part-time or full time students, 
over the past twenty-five years. Almost half of the 
trained personnel in a large correctional program in 
the Chicago area are Loyola University School of Social 
Work graduates. 

Students have come to Loyola Social Work School 
from all over the continental USA, the territories of 
Alaska, and Hawaii, from the Phillippines, and the 
Orient, and returned to social work in these respective 
areas. 

The faculty consists of eleven full time members, and 
a part-time faculty of ten. Prominent author in social 
work publications, Fr. Felix Biestek is also a faculty 
inember. 



Secretaries of the School of Social Work: Vir- 
ginia O'Rourke, Gloria Dicesare (not in photo). 




Matthew H. Schoenbaum, J.D., M.S.S.W. 
Dean of the School of Social Work 




167 




School of social work forum brings out members 
of senior class. Left to right: Mary Alice O'Laugh- 
lin, Instructor; Glenn Teske, Charlotte Klein 
and Gretchen Backstammer. 



Standing: Thomas Trompeter, James Burke, 
Bill O'Connell. Sitting: Dorothv Kebi, Frank 
Baler. 






L^ 


f?Ej 


1 


w 1 




Standing: James Wiebler, Dorothy Aebi, Alice 
Treanor, Merilyn Bierraan. Sitting: Nancy Cog- 
ger, Carol Ronan, Mary Ferriter. 




Through Key-Sort cards, a permanent record 
is kept of all projects. A seminar brings Sylvia 
Aleroger, Jim Wiebler, Marion Meganck, Jay 
Pivaronas, and Jim Cantrell together for card 
comparison. 




At outside location, the students set-up office and 
begin their tireless effort of research. 



SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK GRADUATES 



Abrogar, Sylvia C. 

Children's Memorial Hospital 

Aebi, Dorothx- R. 

Chicago Welfare Department 

Allen, Spencer 

Lake Bluff Children's Home 

Anderson, Violette V. 

Children's Memorial Hospital 

Baler, Frankie H. 

Mercy Hospital Clinics 

Bierman, Marilyn W. 

\'eterans Administration Hospital 
Downey, Illinois 

Brandenburg, James H. 
Veterans Administration 
West Side Hospital 

Byrne, James R. 

Veterans Administration Hospital 
Downey, Illinois 

Cantrell, James E. 

U, S. Probation Office 

Carr, Mary Joan 

Mercy Hospital Clinics 

Cogger, Nance J. 

Institute for Juvenile Research 

Cunningham, Gloria 

Institute for Juvenile Research 



Dellorto, John A. 

Veterans Adininistration 

\\'est Side Hospital 
Emmanuel, Sister M. 

Mercy Hospital Clinics 

Ferriter, Marv 

Chicago Welfare Department 

Kazyak, Bernard V. 

Veterans Administration Hospital 
Downey, Illinois 

Klein, Charlotte 

Institute for Juvenile Research 

Matzek, Robert J. 

Veterans Administration 
Research Hospital 

McDowell, Charles E. 

Veterans Administration Hospital 
Hines, Illinois 

Meganck, Marion J. 
Mercy Hospital Clinics 

O'Connell, William M. 
Veterans Administration 
West Side Hospital 

Paonessa, John J. 

Catholic Home Bureau 

Paulik, Charlotte C. 

Veterans Administration 
Research Hospital 



Pivaronas, Joy G. 

Veterans Administration Hospital 
Hines, Illinois 

Purdy, Beatrice 

Chicago Welfare Department 

Quinn, Ellen 

Chicago Welfare Department 

Ronan, Carol 

Veterans Administration 
West Side Hospital 

Snell, Nina R. 

Veterans Administration Hospital 
Downey, Illinois 

Steagala, Virginia M. 
Catholic Charities 

Stevens, Gordon 

Veterans Administration 
West Side Hospital 

Teske, Glenn J. 

Institute for Juvenile Research 

Treanor, Alice V. 

Mercy Hospital Clinics 

Trompeter, Thomas E. 
Mercy Hospital Clinics 

Weisenhorn, Donald J. 
U. S. Probation Office 

Wiebler, James R. 

Veterans Administration 
West Side Hospital 



169 




"... a deeper realization and com- 
prehension of the values of Nursing 
which supersedes mere professional 
competency . . ." 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



The School of Nursing, one of the younger colleges 
of the University, was first organized in 1935. At that 
time two degree programs were offered, the Bachelor 
of Science in Nursing and the Bachelor of Science in 
Nursing Education. Three years later, a program in 
Public Health Nursing was added to the curriculum of 
the University College. In order to unite these pro- 
grams and to facilitate the achievement of the aims of 
the School, in 1948 the School of Nursing was reor- 
ganized into its present structure. Now offering the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing and numerous 
special programs, the School of Nursing has an enroll- 
ment of 125 students and is under the administration 
of Miss Gladys Kiniery, Dean. 

In order to meet the needs of all types of nursing 
students, the School of Nursing provides two programs 
of study. The first is the basic program, for which 
high school graduates are eligible, that enables them 
to obtain a college education while concentrating on 
theory and practice in the field of their major interest. 
The second is a supplemental program, designed for 
the graduate of a three-year hospital nursing course, 
which adds to her practical knowledge by stressing 
theory in nursing, education, and the arts. While those 
who follow the basic program pursue their academic 
studies at Loyola, they also receive valuable clinical 
experience at St. Francis Hospital in Evanston, and 
numerous other hospitals and health agencies, which 
are chosen because they each furnish the best opportunity 
for experience in a special aspect of the nursing field. 



The combined liberal arts and professional program 
offers the student an opportunity for practical prepara- 
tion for her career while enriching her cultural and 
intellectual background. Since nursing has taken its 
place among the worthy and commendable professions 
which serve the needs of mankind, the School of Nursing 
seeks to imbue its students with an understanding of 
their duties and obligations as members of this important 
group. The foundation of Christian ethics which under- 
lies the entire program provides a deeper realization 
and comprehension of the values of nursing which 
supersedes mere professional competency. For the aims 
of the School of Nursing go beyond this standard and 
seek a higher, more meaningful one. Naturally, the 
students are expected to accomplish that degree of skill 
which will allow them to assume the responsibilities 
of nursing in the many agencies that require their 
services; but they are also expected to combine skill 
with an appreciation of the purpose of nursing and a 
perception of the concepts of nursing as a profession. 

Such objectives demand a program that maintains 
a careful balance between the liberal arts studies and 
the professional studies. By adhering closely to the 
Jesuit ideals of education, the School of Nursing has 
devised such a program. Consequently, its graduates 
are possessors of a liberal education which benefits 
them, not only as members of the nursing profession, 
but also as intelligent human beings; and they are fully 
and well prepared for their profession by the training 
and preparation they have received. 



170 



Essie Anglum, R.N., M.S. 

Chairman of the Department of PubUc Health 

Nursing 




Gladys Kiniery, R.N., MSPH. 
Dean of the School of Nursine; 




171 



NURSING GRADUATES 



Mary E. Dell 
B.S.N. 



Renella M. Eckman 
B.S.N. 



Gloria M. Grina 
B.S.N. 



Carolla J. Jung 
B.S.N. 



MarjorieJ. Kaepplinger 
B.S.N. 





Marv Jean Krug 
B.S.N. 



NIarv A. Lescher 
■fi.S.N. 



.Ann M. Marelli 
B.S.N 



1958 



Mary B. McGuire 
B.S.N. 



Maureen E. Milke Marilyn A. Poynton Shariene T. Rzegocki -'\nna M. Schraut 

B.S.N. B.S.N. B.S.N. B.S.N. 



Mary K. Scu 
B.S.N. 




172 



Alice D. Slater 
B.S.N. 



Carol A. Urbamis Catherine M. Walsh Audrey M. Zabella 

B.S.N. B.S.N. B.S.N. 




fS 



t 











Joan R. .Anderson 
B.S.N. 



Nancy R. Gawne 
B.S.N. 



Kathleen G. Klinger 
B.S.N. 



Patricia A. Manning 
B.S., P.H.N. 



Dorothy D. Petrowski 

B.S.N. 

Cum Laude 



1958 



Marie C. Schorn 
B.S., P.H.N. 



Frances M. Stinn 
B.S.N. 




173 




Ginny Stift, Carol Urbanas, and Barbara Klinger 
prove that nurses have diversified interests, as 
they collect tickets at their annual mixer. 



The Alumnae dinner of the Nursing School is 
a wonderful time to exchange facts on extra- 
ordinary thermometer readings. 





Margaret Fisher, freshman class president; Carol 
Urbanus, senior class president; Mary Ann 
Michor, junior class president: and Barbara 
Klinger, sophomore class president, as they plan 
futureactivities of the Nursing School. 





At St. Francis hospital, Jean Krug finds out that 
an integral part of the nurse's job is to handle 
all factual data concerning the patient. 



Mary Bell knows that a check on a baby's weight 
must be made every day in order to maintain its 
health. 



THE STUDENT NURSING COUNCIL. Top Row: Ann Schraut, Sheila Fitzgerald, Mitzie 
Steinle, Cathrine Walsh, Laurcen Dupre, Margaret Fischer, Ann Slater, Mary Ann Kelly, Linda 
Kretz. Sitting: Carol Urbanus, Jane San Hamel, Marilee McRae, Judy Ireland, Elaine Dybas, 
Barbara Klinger, Mary Ann Michor, Ginny Stift, Ginny Lauden. 





Members of Alpha Tau Delta. Back Row: Maureen Gibbs, Mary Kay Ball, Marilyn Scavonc. 
Marilee McRae, Mary Ann Michor. Front Roic: Toni Litlowski, Janis Fahrbach, Audrey Zabella, 
Pat McCarter, Pat Cerzan, Ginny Stift. 




More members: left row, lop lo bottom: Mary Ann Will, 
Eleanor Zabiaka, Barb Donovan, Mary Rose Diehl. Middle 
row: Rita Pace, Lita Grabovv, Mitzi .Steinle, Carol Ander- 
son. Right row: Mary .Ann Krol, Barbara Klinger, Helen 
Slingsby. Elaine Dybas. 



Out of uniform, a group of .Alpha Tau Delta s, 
and friend, strike-up a Nursing smile for the 
camera. 



176 





The Branding Iron, near the Lake 
Shore Campus, is the scene of the 
annual Alpha Tau Delta dinner. 



ALPHA TAU DELTA 



Alpha Tau Delta is a national Professional Fraternity 
which was founded on February 15, 1921 at the University 
of California at Berkeley. The Alpha chapter is aptly 
called the "Lady of the Lamp" in memory of history's 
most famous nurse, Florence Nightingale. In the years 
that followed its birth, the fraternity has been active in 
promoting the five year Nursing Program to prospective 
nurses. At the present time, the period has been reduced 
to four years. 

The purposes of Alpha Tau Delta arc to promote higher 
professional standards in the field of education; to develop 
the nursing profession through an improved program of 
nursing education and a more thorough preparation of all 
its members; to inaugurate projects that enrich the specific 
field of professional nursing; and to form a close bond of 
friendship, fellowship, helpfulness, and understanding 
among college women in the nursing profession. 

Chapters of Alpha Tau Delta are located at those 
Universities and Colleges who offer a Basic Course in 
Nursing on the college level. The Fraternity as a whole 
is a member of the Professional Panhellenic Association. 

Xi chapter was organized at Loyola University in 
October, 1956. It was officially installed as a chapter on 
February 3, 1957. 

Among the activities and projects undertaken Ijy Alpha 
Tau Delta in the past year were a summer formal, a 
Christmas Formal, and the Loyola homecoming festivities. 



The winning float. .Alpha Tau's ''don't toy with us." .A heeded message given to Ripon in the Homecoming game. 





■■% 



'#^ 



*-«*.m^^ 



Some familiar faces, and Frosty, prove Loyola's versatility in student activities. 




ORCANIZATIONi^ 

AND 

CREEK!^ 





Mr. George Koliintzas 
Director of the Loyola Union 



Bill Plante 
President of the Loyola L'nion 



The Student Union Board of Governors at the first session of the congressional year. They are, 
seated left to right: Boh Doherty, vice-president; Bill Plante, president; Bill Hegan, executive secretary. 
Standing: Phil Brankin, Ken Printon, Andy Kelly, John Terry, Toni Shea, Pat Rast, Tim Schneider, 
Mary Wodarczyk, Dave Smith, Pete Wall, and Joe Donnelly. 





The Committee on Intcr-Fraternity Relations stop to }jiisf i< 
The committee's purpose is to govern and regulate fratemits 



\A |^ < M.AN after the election of its chii; 
;(ii(.tiitv activities. 



I, Hel) Doherty. 



STUDENT UNION 



The Loyola Union Congress, founded ten years ago, is 
Loyola's Student Government body. Every student in the 
University is a member of the Union, and as such is en- 
titled to representation through his or her college, fra- 
ternity or sorority, or academic organization. 

LInification and government of the many student activ- 
ities is the substance of the Union's function at Loyola. 
Since its inception the Union has taken the initiative in 
obtaining lounge facilities for the student body, coordi- 
nating a group of all-university activities, and sponsoring 
the annual Loyola Fair. The Fair is the largest single 
student undertaking at Loyola, and as such represents a 
tremendous amount of work undertaken on a cooperative, 
all-school level. Profits from the Fair are used to provide 
improved student facilities and to finance the plans of the 
L^nion and various other student organizations. 

The body of the congress meets five times yearly and 
is made up of representatives from all colleges, fraternal 
organizations, and academic societies in the University. 
The past year has seen the formation of an undergraduate 
Interfraternity Council whose specific purpose is to deal 
with the problems of the undergraduate fraternities and 
sororities, as well as extensive revision of the original con- 
stitution in order to facilitate the completion of business. 

In a university the size of Loyola, a unifying govern- 
mental body such as the student LTnion seems to be most 
necessary in rounding out the program of complete educa- 
tion offered to the student. In addition to oflfering each 
student an opportunity to participate and gain valuable 
experience in dealing with people, the Union has sponsored 
social activities such as the Fair, the Homecoming and 
Pow-Wow, and the Fall Frolic. 



"Miss Varsity'' voting — Cornelius 
Rogers casts his \-ote, while Rep's 
from other frats look on. 





ARLEN PHILLIPS — Miss Varsity — 1958 



The Queen's court and contenders: 
Sheila Fitzgerald, Barbara Klinger, 
Marianne Lunn, Arlen Phillips, Aggie 
Sebastion, Joanne Hartzer, Lee Smuda, 
and Emily Schwartz. 



182 






This is a picture of the ferris wheel 
at the Loyola Fair. 




This is a picture of a Student Union 
Congress meeting at Lewis Towers. 



INSIDE THE BIG TOP 



Lake Shore book store; student requirements: 
a scripto pencil, something to take^notes on, and 
a Pinochle deck. 




DEAN OF STUDENTS OFFICE 




llic' Oliitr ul lilt iJcdii of Students. Lejt to right: Jan W'ulff. secrt-tary lu Mr. McC'losky; George Kollintzas, asst. 
Dean of Students; Joan Vacaro, asst. Dean of Women. Sitting: Nora Kaufman, secretary to asst. Deans. 



The office of the Dean of Students is the university 
committee on student activities and welfare under the 
chairmanship of the Dean of Students. The function 
of this committee is to set policies in the matter of all 
student organizations with the exception of religious 
organizations and the over-all student organization of 
a particular college or school. 

The Dean of Students acts as coordinator of the 
various phases and programs of the office of the Dean 
of Students. Student welfare is another very important 
phase within the function of the Dean of Students. 

The Dean of Women is concerned with activities and 
welfare pertaining to all women students of the uni- 
versity. Counselling women students, assisting them 
in the formation of new activities, administering the 
women's residence hall and serving as secretary to the 
committee on student activities and welfare are some 
of her fimctions. 

184 



Miss Joan Vaccaro, the Assistant Dean of Women, is 
coordinator of undergraduate women's activities and 
assists in the counselling of new women students at the 
university. In addition, she is housing director for the 
men and women's residence halls, off-campus approved 
housing and for faculty housing. 

The position of Assistant Dean of Students and 
Director of the Loyola Union is filled by Mr. George 
Kollintzas. As Assistant Dean of Students, Mr. Kol- 
lintzas assists in the coordination and promotion of the 
activities of the Office of the Dean of Students. As 
Director of the Loyola Union, he is responsible for the 
various business operations and student programs of the 
L^nion such as Activities Day of Freshman Orientation, 
all-university dances, Charity Day, Loyola Fair, Senior 
Week and many other activities. 

Aiding the administrative personnel are Miss Nora 
Kaufman and Miss Janice Wulf. 




A. U.S. A. 



.U.S.-'X. OFFICERS. Standing: Cadet S F C Harold Murphv 
;nd Lt., A. U.S. A. Treasurer); Cadet Lt. Col. Paul M. Maffia 
St Sgt., U.S.A. Secretary); Cadet Major Gerald J. Pierce, Jr. 
nd Lt., U.S..'^. Treasurer); Cadet James Gmelich (.^.U.S..^. 
istorian). Seated: Cadet 1st Lt. Thomas P. Nolan (Captain, 
.U.S..'^., President); Lt. Col. James L. McCrory. Jr. (P M S & T 
id Faculty Advisor); Cadet C'aptain Eugene R. Croisant (1st. Lt. 
.U.S.A., Vice-President). 



The Association of the United States Army was organized 
at Loyola University in September, 1957, by Lt. Col. 
James L. McCrory, Jr., with the aid of a group of cadets 
who recognized the need for an organization to function 
as an agent in behalf of the R.O.T.C. At that time, a 
compan\- of cadets was formed to act as the basis of the 
.Association. The charter was granted to the company's 
representatives, Gerald Pierce and Paul Maffia, during 
the annual Association meeting which took place in 
Washington, D. C. in late October. 1957. 

The objectives of the Association of the United States 
Army are determined by the level at which it functions. 
Nationally, its purpose can be summarized in one state- 
ment: "To promote the role of the .Army in National 
Defense." However, the goals at the companx level in- 
clude the aforementioned plus: (1) The promotion of the 
R.O.T.C. cadets' professional aptitudes, and (2) Provisions 
to stabilize the social atmosphere in which the cadets 
must associate with professional military men and their 
fellow students. 

To accomplish its national objectives, the Association 
uses a variety of methods, such as: information releases 
and public relation activities. On the R.O.T.C. level 
methods applied include: discussions on military prob- 
lems, movies, speakers, parties, and the annual Military 
Ball which is the social ape.x for every cadet in the corps. 

In compliance with the objectives of the Association of 
the United States Army, the Military Ball will be opened 
to public attendance as a means of furthering the knowl- 
edge of those not connected with the Association. 

Another gigantic step taken by the Association was the 
Military Open House which was held on March 23, 1958. 

By putting its best foot forward, the Association has 
proved that it is destined to play an important part in 
the life of the cadet and Lovola Universitv. 



Tactical meeting and class of the .A.l'.S.A 




BLUE KEY HONOR FRATERNITY 




Kenneth M. Jackson, Ph.D. 
Moderator of the Blue Key 




The Blue Key National Honor Fraternity was founded 
at the University of Florida in 1924. Since that time its 
growth has been phenomenal and it has come to be 
accepted as the leadership equivalent of scholarly Phi 
Beta Kappa. The membership now totals more than 
35,000. The Loyola Chapter of Blue Key was established 
in 1926. Among its founders were Rev. Robert C. Hart- 
nett, S.J., Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Dr. 
William Schoen, Dean of the School of Dentistry, and 
Dr. Paul S. Lietz, Chairman of the Department of History. 
The fraternity has functioned for many years as an honor- 
ary leadership organization. Many of the University's 
most distinguished alumni and faculty are members. 

Three years ago the local chapter was reorganized as a 
service group designed to assist the administration and 
faculty, and to support and encourage all student organi- 
zations. Under the leadership of president Bennett E. 
Thies the members have been appointed permanent 
student marshalls for all Convocations and Commence- 
ments, and representatives of the Dean of Admissions in 
Chicago area high schools for the recruitment of new 
students. Yearly, the Chapter selects and bestows an 
award upon the Faculty Man of the Year, the Organiza- 
tion of the Year, and the student groups which have most 
distinguished themselves in the fields of academic, cultural, 
and social activity, respectively. An initiation dinner- 
dance is held each Spring in the Conrad Hilton Hotel. 

Pledges are accepted during their junior or senior years. 
Students eligible are those men of required scholastic 
standing who have been most active in extracurricular 
activities and have maintained a continuous record of 
unselfish service to the University and the community. 



Tuni Flanagan, Ben Thies and Charles Caiificld conyratulate eacli 
otli' I on their election as 1958 officers. 




186 




A night of tradition at Loyola is the formal in- 
duction to the Blue Key at its dinner dance. 



Time out from a conference meeting 
is taken, as Francis V. Varallo and J. 
David Smith enjoy a cup of coffee 
offered by their hostess. Miss McDade. 




Officers of the Blue Key. Standing: Joe 
Zahaitis, Jinn Sneider, Frank Lancaster, 
Mike Harrington. Sitting: Dave Smith, 
Bob Varallo, president; John Stokes. 





John Dentzer presents Rev. Lester Evett with an award for services 
rendered to the Lake Shore Campus sodahty. 



LAKE SHORE SODALITY 



By integrating spiritual activities with the social apos- 
tolate, the Lake Shore sodalist finds the blend of the whole 
man, — the ideal of Jesuit teaching. 

Under the guidance of the moderator. Father Evett, 
and the direction of John Dentzer, 1957 prefect, and 
Lester Bonaguro, the 1958 prefect, the LSC Sodality has 
engaged in a year of varied activities. 

Highlights of the spiritual activities of the sodality in 
the past year were the annual Mary's Hour held for 
Loyola students on May first in Madonna della Strada 
to honor Mary during an hour of prayer climaxed by her 
solemn coronation; the fifth annual Chicagoland Col- 
legiate Marian Program of discussion and Holy Hour on 
the vigil of the Immaculate Conception; the Parents- 
Sodalists Communion Mass and Breakfast; the always 
solemn and inspiring Reception of new sodalists; the 
monthly First Friday Holy Hours; and the days of Recol- 
lection. The annual four-day closed retreat for sodalists 
is the spiritual dynamo that provides the spiritual energy 
for these activities. 

On the Apostolic side, a Halloween party for the children 
at St. Hedwig's orphanage, a clothing and food drive for 
needy families at Christmas, the singing of Christmas 
carols at the Municipal Sanitarium, the periodic visits to 
the patients at Cook County Hospital and to the Little 
Sisters of the Poor, all these provide an inspiring apostolic 
element to the Sodality way of life at Loyola. 

In the social sphere, the sodality has its annual mixer 
and Christmas party, plus the direction of the social 
diversions of all the collegians who come to Chicago in 
late August for the Summer School of Catholic Action. 
Two first-place trophies and one second-place trophy 
have been merited by the Sodality in the annual Float 
Parade in the past four years, as well as one first-place 
award in the annual booth-contest of the Spring Fair 
and Frolic. 



The sodalists arrange a program with a variety of speakers in order to cover all the aspects of the Catholic Religion. 





CADENCE 



Cadence, the Loyola literary quarterly, exists to provide 
a stimulus for fine writing on the part of the student body. 
Each year, Cadence publishes a wide selection of articles 
on the arts, philosophy, political science, history, and 
current events. In addition. Cadence attempts to publish 
the best fiction and poetry written at Loyola, as well as 
reviews of notable books and recordings. 

Last year, for the sixth consecutive year. Cadence was 
awarded an Ail-American rating by the Associated Col- 
legiate Press, and one of the articles that appeared in its 
pages, "To All Its People," by Martin Gleason, was 
reprinted in Realities, a recent anthology of significant 
writings from the Catholic Press. 

Above and beyond its function as a vehicle for fine 
writing by the students at Loyola, Cadence attempts to 
convey an attitude: a belief that the role of the Catholic 
university is a vital one in our time; that the pages of any 
Catholic university publication should reflect, with all the 
articulateness at its command, the Christian humanistic 
point of view; that it should, at all times and in all its 
writings, impart a vigorous belief in the principles that 
underlie Catholicism, and a strong objection to those 
beliefs and attitudes that contradict or ignore the human- 
istic viewpoint. 

Cadence attempts this Ijy reflecting the fruits of Catholic 
university training in true perspective: free from pious 
moralizing and too great a reliance on the apologetic 
tradition of the Catholic university in America. Always, 
by attempting to encourage discussion and debate, analysis 
and criticism, Cadence hopes to impart to the students of 
Loyola and all its readers, a firm belief in the necessity 
for continual examination of the world around is in the 
light of Catholic principles; a belief that the problems we 
face today must be confronted directly with all the energy, 
intelligence and faith at our command. 



The Staff of Cadence. Left to right: Mary .^nne 
Schaefcr, Dick Tryba, Dr. E. J. Clark, moder- 
ator; Sally Lawrence, Robert Cahill, editor; and 
Jack Frisz. Jim D'anna, Jerome Long, Daniel 
Quinn, John Lempkowski, Charles Keil, Werner 
Baekelandt, Patricia Rawley, Bill Shanahan, and 
Gene .Sullivan not in photo. 





Don Hose and Michaila, Robert Olson and Ann Salvador, 
sing their farewell duet. 



CHORAL SOCIETY 

During the 1957 school year, the Loyola Choral Society 
had one of its major achievements, but unfortunately, this 
occured after publication of the 1957 LOYOLAN. In 
June, the Choral Society presented Verdi's Requiem in the 
Madonna Delia Strada Chapel on the Lake Shore Campus. 
The Mass was presented by a seventy-five voice segment 
of the society and the group was assisted by a thirty piece 
orchestra. 

In the fall of 1957, the society performed its most suc- 
cessful presentation since its conception, Bizet's Carmen. 
It played to a full house in the Loyola Community Theatre 
on January 11, 1958. Miss Mary Ann Pawelko played 
Carmen: Done Hose and Escamillio were portrayed by 
Robert Olsen and Si Burgheimer. The ballet of the 
North Shore Academy of Fine Arts opened the show and 
gave each dancing scene that extra touch and sparkle. 
The famed Violetta Andre was the choreographer. 

The 1957-1958 school year productions of the Society 
were under the capable hand of Dr. Graciano Salvador. 
The student officers of the year include: Marion Kizen- 
kevich, president; Frank Feeney, 1st vice president; Martin 
Gora, 2nd vice president; Mary Ann Kelley, secretary; 
and Lauretta Bombe, treasurer. 



The stage of Loyola Community Thi- 
atre: many nights and hours produced 
a wonder. 





A tired but very energetic Dr. Graciano 
Salvador (extreme right), director of 
the Choral Society. 



CURTAIN GUILD 



The Curtain Guild, an all-university student organi- 
zation, has a two-fold purpose. It provides an oppor- 
tunity for interested Loyolans to gain experience in the 
theatrical arts, and for student audiences to witness 
plays, new and old, which are part of the culture of 
educated citizens. Its long-term aim is to instill in its 
members an appreciation of drama that will be for 
them a life-long enrichment, and thus to help per- 
petuate the great tradition of living theater. 

Under faculty direction, Guildsmen present a season 
of four plays. Casting try-outs and crew-calls are open 
to all Loyola students, men and women. Students 
achieve membership after making a substantial con- 
tribution to two major productions, whether in acting, 
production staff-work or house-management. Member- 
ship is maintained by participating in at least one 



subsequent production each season. 

The Curtain Guild productions provide varied fare 
for student audiences. Payment Deferred supplied the 
dramatic touch, while Hobson's Choice, a situation 
comedy, kept the audience abounding with laughter. 
At present, rehearsals are in progress for the fabulous 
musical. Kiss Me Kate, which promises to be the out- 
standing production of the season. 

The members of the Guild produce plays, non- 
professionally, but adopt professional techniques, and 
set professional standards. 

Officers elected for the 1957-1958 season were: John 
Drossart, president; Matilda Carlone, vice-president; 
and John Rzymski, secretary-treasurer. William C. 
Morris and Donald H. Dickenson, moderator, are 
directors of the Guild productions. 



Bill Hale and John Cappelletti discuss murder 
in this scene from Payment Dejerrt'd. 





The discovery of a husband's unfaithfulness is 
dramatized by Mary Brennan, Joanne Roman, 
and John Cappelletti. 



191 





Caria Leo, Norman Mortimer, Don Edwards, John Whalen, Joanne 
Roman, Danny Atkinson,, Mary Brennan and John Tibbs are busy 
adding up the number of curtain calls. 



John Cappelletti laughs in relief when he realizes Joanne Roman 
is unaware of his plans of murder. 



The ueddins; scene from Hobsotts Choice is portrayed by Danny Atkinson, Norman Mortimer, Rose O'Hanley, CarIa 
Leo and loanne Roman. 





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John VVhalen, Don Edwards, John Tibbs, and John C'appelletti, in a scene from Hohsoui Choice. 




John Cappellctti, Rosahe O'Hanley, and Frank Canino in a scene 
from Payment Deferred. 



Joanne Roman, Dan Atkinson, and Mary Brennan in a scene 
from Hob sort s Choice. 





Editor Johanns eyes the vies, one of the Loyola News^ largest editions. 



Editor-in-Chief Charles Johanns 

Executive Editor Roberta Gerke 

Managing Editor Bill Hegan 

Featurt Editor Mary Wright 

Sports Editor Bob Marlin 

Copy Editor Mary Lou Clark 

Assistant Copy Editor Bill Schultz 

Business Manager Ken Klein 

Editorial Consultant Mary Hereley 

Advisory Editor Gloria Pierotti 

Advertising Director Dick Lisk 

Moderator Rev. Joseph Small, S.J. 

Technical Advisor Howard Barrv 

Staff: Tom Haney, Bob Ryba, Mary Healy, Fred Semmler, 
Elaine Koprowski, Jim Dunne, Julius Hovany, Lorraine 
Atherton, Ernie Lippe, John Stubler, John Lempkowski, 
Roy Horton, Tom Kawka, Ron Wielgos, Dick Cegielski, 
John Plotzke, John Frisz, Steve Vranick, Bob Silich, 
Charles Vygantas. 

194 




Gloria Pierotti 
Advisory Editor 



Roberta Gerke 
Executive Editor 




Clharlcs Julianns 
Editor-in-Chief 



LOYOLA NEWS 



The Loyola News was founded by the university to serve 
as a news gatherer, a sounding board of student ideas and 
as a representative of the University among the newspapers 
of other colleges. 

Editor-in-Chief for the 1957-58 year was Charles Johanns, 
LT Arts Senior. During his four years with the paper, 
Johanns had held positions of Lewis Towers News Editor 
and Managing Editor. His deft touch with make-up and 
the comprehensive news coverage of the university as a 
whole were noted by both faculty and students. 

Gloria Pierotti, Executive Editor during the Fall semester, 
and Roberta Gerke, who held the position from February 
to June, assisted Johanns in coordinating assignments, 
counseling reporters and in making up the paper. Bill 
Hegan, Managing Editor, kept the readers up to date on 
school politics. 

In its new offices on the sixth floor of Lewis Towers, 
the newspaper was able to expand to eight pages for a 
great many issues. A new advertising policy was inau- 
gurated which increased the paper's income and perinitted 
more frequent publication. Richard Lisk, Commerce 
Junior, was named advertising director of l)oth the Loyolan 
and the Loyola News. 

The feature department under the direction of Editor 
Mary Wright, LT Arts senior, included pieces on fashions, 
interviews with faculty members, student opinion articles 
and write-ups covering the David B. Steinman Poetry 
Series. Among its most notable achievements was a series 
of "in-depth" interviews among students and faculty as 
to their opinion on the so-called "silent generation." 

Early in February, four members of the staff attended 
the annual MacMurray College Press Workshop held in 
Jackson\ille, Illinois. 



The staff of the Loyola News gathers in the news room for pre-pubUcation on their Tuesday-Night-Togetherness Party. Left 
to right: Editor Johanns, Gloria Pierotti, Tom Haney, Bob Ryba, Ken Klein, and Bobbie Gerke. 




HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



As the largest undergraduate academic organization 
at Loyola, the Historical Society has consistently en- 
joyed the interested support of the student body. In 
keeping with its aim of serving the University, the 
History Department, and its members, the Society 
presents informative and entertaining programs covering 
a wide range of subjects. History is brought to life 
for Society members through stimulating lectures, 
interesting motion pictures, and addresses by prominent 
local and national figures. The Society's annual Christ- 
mas party has been welcomed to a permanent place in 
University activities. 

In the recent past the Historical Societ\ brought 
mayoral candidates Richard Daley and Robert Merriam 
together for debate and, in the field of international 
affairs, presented a lecture by Far Eastern expert Dr. 
K. C. Wu. A personal account of life in a C'hinese 



Communist prison was given to a capacity audience by 
Father Harold Rigney. This year the eminent author 
and lecturer Dr. Richard Pattee spoke to Society 
meniljers on the problems faced by an awakening 
African continent. The Omnibus films on the U.S. 
Constitution were viewed by members, as were films 
on the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II. Comple- 
menting this varied agenda was an address by Sen. Paul 
Douglas and a showing of Father Zabkar's very popular 
color slides of Middle Eastern landmarks. 

Gratified by the enthusiastic support its efforts have 
received, the Historical Societ>' plans to present pro- 
grams of equal merit in the future. Membership in the 
Society is open to all interested Loyola students. During 
the 1957-1958 academic year the Society functioned un- 
der the leadership of its President, Don Rogan, and the 
able direction of its moderator. Dr. Kenneth Jackson. 




The Christmas Party of the Historical Society 
ofTered Dickens' "A Christmas Carol" — live from 
Loyola Lewis Towers L'nion. Don Ro^an por- 
trayed Mr. .Scrooge. 



Officers of the Historical .Society. Top Row: 
Harold Fremgen, Judy Wolfgram, Don Rogan, 
Colette Gorey, and Mike Polelle. Bottom Row: 
Rosemarie Uovare, Wayne .Stuart Lowe, and 
Marge Harrington. 

196 





Sen. Douglas enters Lewis Towers with Rev. O'Callahan and 
Mr. Michael Kelly. Sen. Douglas spoke to Loyola on Febru- 
ary 13th of 1958 on ''Your Right to Vote." 



Guest speaker of the Loyola Historical Society, Senator Paul H. 
Douglas, Democrat, Illinois. 




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Dr. Jackson and the membership committee discuss plans for the 
coming year 



197 



VETERANS CLUB 



The Loyola Veterans Club is primarilv a social organi- 
zation providing an outlet for veterans attending Loyola. 
A secondary function of the organization is to provide 
information which would be pertinent to veterans affairs 
both at Loyola and in personal matters. This service has 
become available through the co-operation of the Loyola 
representative of the V.A., Mr. Knight. 

On the social front, the Veterans Club plays an active 
role in supporting all Loyola functions. In addition, the 
club sponsors such activities as smokers, parties, and 
dances. The Veterans Club also sponsors a Communion 
Breakfast for its members. 



If it was possible to pick out any one event which was the 
highlight of the year, undoubtedly the event would be the 
Annual Veterans Dance. This dance is open to all members 
of Loyola and the Miss Veteran of the year is usually chosen 
at this dance. The award given to Miss Veteran is an 
inscribed bronze combat boot. 

The Veterans Club was founded at Loyola in October 
of 1956 through the efforts of three students; Pat Culhane, 
Jim Hagerty, and Jack Brennan. Since its inception, the 
club has had a phenomenal growth. From the original 
seventy-five members, the club has grown to its present 
one hundred and thirtv-five members. 



Veteran's Club Members. Top Row: Ed Grant, Joe Malarke, Pat Sharkey, Don McCurdy, Tony Buckan, Bill Deulin, 
Tom Doyle, Chuck Lawrence, Jim Thielen, Gary Crow, .'^ndy Kelly, Bill .Anderson, Clay Sokley, Bob Liston, Stan 
Komosa, Joe Dietrick. Ron Donteus. Second Row: Frank Fitzsimmons, Jim Hastings, Tom McMahon, George Alex- 
ander, John Casa, Andy Mayor, John Young, Marty Ginnane, Gene Wright, John Hannon, John Fernandez, John 
Cleveland. Bottom Row: Fr. Paul VVoefl, Tom Smith, Jack Brennan, Mr. R. Lee Wagner, Frank McNamara, Tom 
Barrv, Fr. T. Bryant. 




198 




Clay Sokley, Tom Doyle 

Party at American Legion Club, Greenleaf and Devon. 

Action — Collection for Tractor Fund of Fr. Fernando. 



The business meeting, the place where 
wars are won, parties are planned, and 
an enlisted-man air is ever constant. 





Mike Metzger at the bar, unidentified 
officer in rear. 



Maureen Marley, Sue Kelly, and friends. Taken 
at the Vet's Club Dance. 




199 




The Coed Club formal, the high-point of the year's activities. This year it was held on December 26, in the Grand 
Ball Room of the Sheraton-Blackstonc Hotel. 




Aggie Sebastian and Judy Wolfgram 
at the Christmas Party held for the 
orphans at St. Vincent's. 



200 



COED CLUB 



The coeds of Loyola met March 18, 1949 to lay founda- 
tions for a club open to all women students attending the 
day divisions of the university. Out of this ambitious 
handful of girls resulted the Coed Club, today one of the 
largest social organizations on campus with 250 active 
members. 

The club makes it its business to give new women 
students the feeling that they have an important place in 
Loyola. Concrete evidence of this purpose is the famous 
"Big Sister" movement. Every new coed is assigned an 
upperclassman who takes the neophyte "under her wing," 
introducing her to the mysteries of Lo\ola academic 
standards, politics, and social activities. This method of 
personal interest has been lauded by administration and 
faculty alike. At the beginning of each semester a Wel- 
come Tea and Reception is held in honor of freshmen and 
transfer students. A formal dance, many closed parties 
and activities are traditional functions throughout the 
year. At the Annual Fashion Show the candidates of the 
Miss Varsity Crown make their debut. The Coed Club 
also participates in Pow Wow Day, the Variety Show, 
and the Loyola Fair. This year the members and their 
guests celebrated the ninth anniversary of the Coed Club 
at the annual Birthday Party Dance in the spring. 




The members of the Coed Club pause, on their way to the Lounge, 
for a big grin. 




Board of Governors — Coed Club. Left lo right staiulnni: ( .miiic 
.Stift, Gay Lee Luhrs, Donna Rae Vero, Teri Mulkern, Maryanne 
Banahan, Colette Cogger, Nancy Pannier, Marge Harrington. 
Silling: Dottie Rosenbeck and Mary Donahoe. 



Corrinc Cowperthwait, one of the lovely Coed 
Club models at their annual Card Party and 
Fashion Show — held in the Loyola Union. 




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Members of the Monogram Club. Track 
and Cross-Country Team: Standing: Brian 
Shutts. Mike Burke, Pat Hudgin Terry 
Nosek. Lou Kujawinski. Kneeling: Bob 
Boyle, Jack Kiley, president; Roy Horton. 



MONOGRAM CLUB 



The Monogram Club is an honorary organization 
consisting of athletes who have won monograms in the 
three major sports: track, swimming, and basketball. 
These men must have competed in one of the major 
sports at least one year before they can obtain a mono- 
gram and therefore become a member of the Monogram 
Club. This honorary organization develops a closer 
bond between the athletes of the different sports and 
their coaches. 

The workings of the club also include a Mass and 
breakfast, which is held every year on the Lake Shore 



Campus. The attendance at this particular function 
shows the spiritual aspect of the members of the club. 
There is also a mixer sponsored by the club which is 
open to the university. The name of this mixer is 
strangely enough, the Athletes Fete. This mixer is 
something new developed by the officers, and it is just 
a beginning of tremendous steps into the school ac- 
tivities that are so much desired. 

The Monogram Club also has a party each year, 
which is highly successful and adds more to the 
strengthening of the social aspect of college life. 



Members of the Monogram Club. Basket- 
ball Team.: Top Row: Ron Schwingen, Jim 
Gorman, Paul O'Connor, .W Norville, Frank 
Hogan. Bollom Row: Jim DeWolf, Art Mc- 
Zier, Ray Stopa, Paul Sheedy. 



202 




HUMAN RELATIONS 
CLUB 

The Human Relations Club of Loyola has been in 
existence since February of 1956, when Dr. Gordon Zahn, 
:hairman of the sociology department, inaugurated the 
dub for the purpose of acquainting the students with the 
problems to be found in the various fields of human 
relations, delinquency, narcotics, industrial relations, and 
race problems. 

In the fall semester of 1956, now under the guidance of 
Dr. Frank Cizon, of the sociology department, various 
k^ery successful programs were presented. In the months 
Df November and December, during the period of fighting 
in the Suez area, three speakers presented the views of 
the three factions involved in battle; an Arab, an English- 
man and an Israelite. The attendance was most gratifying. 

In March, the author of Journal of a Southern Pastor, 
Father J. Gremillion of Louisiana discussed the racial 
problem in the South. He was introduced by Lloyd Davis 
of C. I. C. who took the opportunity to commend the 
Human Relations Club as "one of the best in the mid-west." 

Through the efforts of its moderator and members, the 
Human Relations Club of Loyola has succeeded in bringing 
a strong light to bear on the problems currently facing 
society and enlightening the students at Loyola as to 
their existence, encouraging them to seek solutions in the 
light of Christian principles. 




Human Relations Cllub Officers. Henry Miller, 
Mary Geo^hegan, Dr. Francis A. Cizon, moder- 
ator; Mary Herelcy, Joseph Donnelly, president; 
Mary Jane Biesczat. 




ALPHA SIGMA NU 



This distinguished Jesuit Honorary society was founded 
forty-two years ago, and in 1938, a chapter was established 
at Loyola University. Alpha Sigma Nu is now represented 
in the leading Catholic universities throughout the entire 
nation. 

Excellence in scholastic ability and characteristics which 
are elevating to the intellectual and cultural attributes of 
his fellow students are determining factors for society 
members. He must be a person ready to contribute 
service and loyalty to his institution and to promulgate 
harmony and understanding between faculty and students. 

In the graduating class of 1958, three such men were 
pledged into Alpha Sigma Nu: Harold Fremgen, Donald 
Rogan, and Charles Caufield. 



203 



The staff officers of Loyola University R.O.T.C. 
program. Left to right: Capt. Allen Bostad, 
Capt. John Dumas, Col. James L. McCrorey, Jr., 
Capt. Kenneth R. Rees. 




RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING 



"Leaders of tomorrow," is a phrase much used when 
describing college students. Although graduates of 
Loyola distinguished themselves throughout World War 
II, everyone admitted that here was a definite lack of 
military training and knowledge. The Reserve Officers 
Training Corps at Loyola provides the necessary training 
to enable Loyola graduates to take their place in the 
defense of their country as leaders. 

R.O.T.C. is not a compulsory program at Lovola, 
and therefore, has in its ranks enthusiastic, high spirited 
members. Under the able command of Lt. Col. J. L. 
McCrorey, Jr., the unit has becoine one of the leading 
units in the Chicago area. 

This is attested to by the great success of the tactical 
problems, which the unit executes during the summer 
camp. The summer camp is the training course where 



the military science learned in the classroom is applied 
in the field. 

Also, testifying to the quality of any military outfit 
is its "esprit de corps," and the successes of the rifle 
team in competition with other colleges indicate that 
the Lovolan unit excels in spirit. The other test of a 
good outfit is its unity. The accuracy of the precision 
drills executed by the drill team proves how well the 
unit functions as a whole. 

Upon completion the men will be known as soldiers 
and gentlemen. To attain the latter end is why the 
social functions are held. The choosing of the "Fair 
Damsel," to be the sweetheart of the unit, is a hotly 
but gentlemanly contested affair. Every bit of social 
polish that a cadet attains is tested at the Annual 
Military Ball, which every coed aspires to attend. 



The drill team of Loyola in full dress reejalia. 




Summer camp includes a full T O and training 
schedule. Here, a Loyola cadet practices fire 
control on the tank range. 





Enlisted staff members of R.O.T.C. program. 
Top Row: Sgt. Boudel Simpson, M/Sgt, Stanley 
Stann. Bottom Row: M/Sgt. Walter Duffy, 
M/Sgt. Clyde Martin, M/Sgt. Robert Davis. 



Sweetheart of the R.O.T.C.^MissI Barbara 
Khnger, Nursing School. 





Officers of the Debate Society. Michael Polelle, Elaine Koprowski, 
Moderator Donald Stinson, Patricia Kubistal. 



DEBATE SOCIETY 



Founded in 1875, the Loyola Debating Society is the 
oldest academic organization on the campus. For the 
past nine years under the guidance of the moderator, 
Donald J. Stinson, the team has been upholding the 
traditions handed down to it by its predecessors. 

During the 1957-58 season, the members have again 
brought home the wreath of victory. At home and on 
the road the team has successfully represented Loyola. 
As far East as New York and as close to home as our 
Lake Shore Campus, during the many tournaments and 
its still more numerous debates, the teams have managed 
to establish a seventy-five per cent record of wins. All 
along the route of the five thousand miles which they 
traveled they left the impression that Loyola has a firm 
hold on collegiate forensics. New York, Washington, 
D. C, Cleveland, Milwaukee, are but a few of the 
cities where our debaters left this impression. 

These successful jaunts have been accented by the 
many and varied successful ventures which the debate 
team has had in activities outside of debate. It would 
seem that the motto of the debate team is "Enthusiasm." 
With this enthusiasm the team made a big success of 
a historical first, an "All Jesuit College Debate Tourna- 
ment." With the same zeal the team members plunged 
into the Variety Show contest. The result was two 
first place awards. These continuing accomplishments 
were the deciding factors which prompted the Blue Key 
Fraternity to award its annual "Organization of the 
Year" trophy to the Loyola Debating Society. 

The team is justly proud of its record under its officers 
Elaine Koprowski, Michael Polelle, Patricia Kubistal. 



Members of the Debate Team. Sitting, left to right: Bill Hegan, Elaine Koprowski, Mr. Donald J. Stinson, Joanne 
Hartzer, Janet Finsen, Pat. Kubistal. Standing: Gary Burger, Maury McCarthy, Leroy Blommert, Tom Dienas, 
Mike Polelle, Barry CuUinan, Tom Enright, John Fernandez, John Stasey, Dick Bock, Alan Jorganson. 




"■^ srl ^^^SW^ 










The many successes of Loyola's debate team include the capture of first place in the all Jesuit college debate tournament. 
Miss Kay Dwyer third from left holds trophy she won for her effort on the right to work laws. 



Mr. Don Stinson entertains the idea of 
success in all fields. Mike Polelle and 
friends look on in understanding sym- 
pathy. 




207 




Officers of the Lewis Towers Sodality 
Top Row: Dan Matuszewski, George 
Krippner, Tom Camden, Don Grain. 
Second Row: Jim Moreno, Loretta 
Krozei, Delphine Migacz, Marcia 
Dopke. Bottom Row: Lee Smuda, 
John Gapocy. Sheila Garroll, Walt 
Powers. 



Serving breakfast to Sodality members after Friday morning Mass is the job of the breakfast committee. 





Following the Float Parade, Diana Pallasch and 
Walt Powers strike an imposure of relaxation. 
That's Gene Rudnicki in the rear. 



LEWIS TOWERS 
SODALITY 

In the sixteenth century two great organizations arose 
in Europe to stem the anti-Catholic tide of times. These 
were the Jesuit Order and the Sodality movement. A 
young Jesuit teacher at the Roman College, John Leunis, 
realized that the students of the day would be called upon 
to bear the intellectual and emotional assault of the 
enemies of the Church. Leunis organized his prize pupils, 
a group of young men belligerently Catholic in faith and 
in practice, and dedicated them to Mary in a lay apostolate. 

These were intelligent Catholics who read and studied 
and talked and argued and upheld Catholic truth against 
its adversaries. These were active Catholics, militant 
Catholics, Catholics whose deeds of charity and of zeal 
and of service marked them off as followers of the social 
Christ. The Lewis Towers Sodality is conscious of this 
heritage of action. 

Within a decade the Sodality had, with the growth of 
the Jesuit educational system, spread across the whole face 
of Europe. The Sodality at Lewis Towers became affiliated 
with Prima Primaria, the Mother Sodality at Rome, in 
1947 and thus added to the number of some 80,000 branches 
throughout the world. The first moderator, Fr. William 
P. Walsh, S.J., guided a numerically modest membership 
of ten. Today under Fr. Joseph Hogan, S.J., the organi- 
zation has more than five times its original number. The 
Sodalists are keenly aware that the present time demands 
fearless Catholics to whom it is supremely natural to 
confess their faith openly in word and in deed every time 
the law of God and regard for Christian honor demand it. 
Accordingly, they have stationed themselves in the fore- 
ground of Catholic Action. 



Edward Walsh (top, right) hosts the Lewis Towers 
Sodality in his home in Park Ridge. The party 
followed the Sodality Outing Day. 




Robert F. Doherty 
Editor-in-Chief 



THE LOYOLAN 





In September, 1957, the Loyola Annual, aptly called 
the Loyolan, was brought back to the confines of the 
University. Its specific purpose was to record the activities 
and the functions which are the very essence of life at 
Loyola; and present them to the students and the public 
in order to acquaint them with Loyola University. To 
meet these prerequisites, the book was carefully planned 
to unite the many different phases into one organized 
presentation under the theme — "The Jesuit Centennial." 

Faced with this gigantic task, the staff began to proceed 
with a good deal of caution, for they were unfamiliar with 
the different processes which are synonymous with the 
production of an annual. As the weeks quickly passed, 
the pace increased in proportion to production knowledge. 
Finally, all caution thrown to the wind, the staff proceeded 
with a certainty which had been obtained through a 
period of trial and error which had accompanied the 
production at its earlier stages, for caution was not the 
order of e\er\- day. 

W'hen the term "Loyolan" is defined, the meaning derived 
is: all-university. In adhering to the meaning, the Loyolan 
has achieved the unique position of presenting a picture 
of Loyola L^niversity in its environment, for the first time 
in eight \ears. To accomplish this, a policy of representa- 
tion for all was effected, and as the pages of the Loyolan 
are imfolded, the wisdom of this policy can clearly be seen. 

The reasons why both students and the public recognize 
Loyola University as an institution in which to take pride 
fill the pages of the Loyolan to capacity. Thus, it is said: 
"THE LOYOLAN IS FOR ALL." Read it, enjoy it, 
and heed its message of good will. 



Ricfiard F. Lisk 
Business Manager 



Frank T. Fitzsimmons. J 
Photographic Editor 



Patricia Dunphy 
.Seniors Editor 





A production meeting, ulcer-making 
type, finds Phil Cook, Editor Doherty, 
Fitz and John O'Brian going over last 
minute changes before printing. 



Putting together a book is one thing, selling it is altogether another. 





Room 608-B, Lewis Towers, where an epic is born. 



211 



WOMEN'S RESIDENCE 
HALL 



The one and only dormitory provided for Loyola's 
coeds is located on the corner of E. Delaware and Seneca, 
four blocks from Lewis Towers. This four story building 
originally was used for private apartments and later 
adopted as a medical fraternity house. Nurses from 
Passavant Hospital were the last occupants of the quarters 
before it was acquired by Loyola L^niversity in June of 
1956. In adapting the building to a suitable women's 
dorm, a considerable amount of remodeling was done. 
With the help and hard work of some faculty members, 
the residence hall was opened to the coeds in September 
of '56 under the direction of Mrs. Leona Ranftl. 

The dorm is well equipped to provide for the various 
needs of the students. A television and Hi Fi set are 
available for everyone in the dining room, while, if peace 
and quiet are desired, one can retreat to a special study 
room. 

Women from both campuses, including graduate stu- 
dents, reside at the dorm. Student government is enacted 
to formulate and enforce the rules of the hall. The student 
officers for the year 1957-58 are: Honore Zenk, Commerce 
senior, president; Mary Koestner, LT Art's sophomore, 
vice president; Betty Koscielski, LT Nursing, secretary; 
Jo Anne Martin, LT Arts freshman, treasurer: Helen 
Slingsby, Nursing sophomore, social chaiman. 

The residence hall is relatively new, but has been the 
site of various social functions and is gradually becoming 
known throughout the Lfniversity. 



Terry Mulkern, Donna Collinson, and Janet 
Finsen gather in the laundry room to discuss 
Chaucer, Shakespeare and Loyola men. 





Mrs. Leona Ranftl 
Director of Women's Residence 



S. Glaus pauses to preside at the house Christmas 
celebration, but we all know it is really Sandy 
St. Martin. 




212 



Ci 




The reception room of the Women's "Res" is 
where you'll find a long receiving line as you 
pick up your date. 



Loyola University Women's Residence Hall, 
196 E. Delaware St. 




Residents of the Women's Dormitory. Top Row: Bernadette "i'ang, Mary Ellen Branif. Hyjenja Chung, Beatr 
Purdy, Janet Finsen, Peggy Fischer, Charlotte Paulik, Lorelei Keleske, Marge Swarthout, Marion Meganck, .'\li 



Weiss 



rice 

, Marge Swarthout, Marion Meganck, ."Klma 

Kazuko .^ihara, Virginia Stegala. Third Row: Barbara Gilsdorf, June Liu, Doniia Collinson, 



Second Ri __^ ^^^ ^ ^ ^^^„^^ 

Betty Koscielski, Marinne Burke. Sandra'St. Martin, Terry Mulkern, Mary Twohig.' ''Fourth Row: Honore Zenk! 
Pauhne Zaranka, Sylvia .^brog, Ngo Thi Pham, Barbara Burgess. Bottom Row: Barbara Mahieu, Helen Slingsby 
Nanette Santos, Mary Rosera, Wanda Kuan, Remedies Varios. 





LOYOLA HALL 



Opened two years before this Jesuit Centennial, Loyola 
Hall affords handsome and spacious accommodations for 
the male students of Loyola University. 

The student wishing to study may retire to the quiet 
of his room or to the Elizabeth Cudahy Library, but 
college life is not all work and no play. 

A television room, pool tables, ping-pong tables, and 
lounge are among the many recreational benefits available 
at the dorm. The dormitory is located a short block from 
the Alumni Gymnasium, whose facilities are available to 
all residents. Basketball, handball, and softball equipment 
can usually be obtained at the switchboard. Many socials 
are held throughout the year at Loyola Hall and the 
residents are often invited to social functions sponsored 
by various women's colleges of the Chicago area. 

Mass and confession are available to hall residents, and 
the hall also sponsors a closed retreat. 

Under the able leadership of Rev. Small, S.J., Loyola 
Hall has grown to where it is operating to near-full 
capacity. 

The comradeship of fellow students, a home-like at- 
mosphere and collegiate surroundings will all be long 
remembered l)y those members of the graduating class 
who have lived much of their college life at Lovola Hall. 



Reverend Father Small 
Director of Men"s Residence Hall 



Dorm Council. Left lo right: Jim Moorman, Dave Fitzgerald, Ron Wadle, Gene Callahan, Steve Mrkvika, Tom 
Hickey, president; Phil Augustine, Mort Flanagan, Paul Diener. Dick Krezo, Joe Gajeuski. 








Jiic main reception room of the Men's Dorm. 



Dorm Officers. Left to right: Bill Gilligan, Bob 
Murrin, president; Ray Hoare. 



mun 



as5«!:i: 




The Loyola University Men's Residence Hall, 6551 N. Sheridan, 
at the Lake Shore Campus. 




If 



1st 



■■■Mini 





FLOAT PARADE 



Delta Sigma Pi's "Ramblers on to Victory." 




Kappa Beta Gamma's pumpkin-theme float. 



Tau Kappa Epsilon's "Jesuit Progress 
in 100 years/' caught here on the 
Outer Drive. 



216 




k 




Homecoming activity is centered around the Student Union at the 
Lake Shore Campus. Here are gathered some Paraders, and some 
parade followers. 



The Homecoming Celebration i.s kicked-off with one of 
the most sparkling events of the year, the Float Parade. 
Each year, ail of the academic and social societies of the 
university put their group-heads together for the purpose 
of creating the most original and elaborate float. 

The Parade leaves Balbo Drive, at Jackson, and proceeds 
down Michigan .A.venue, at parade pace, to the Drake 
Hotel. What's left of the Floats once they reach the Lake 
Shore Campus is contributed to the Pow-Wow Bonfire. 

This year the Nursing Float, "Don't Toy With Loyola," 
walked away with first prize for originality as well as 
durability (see page 177). 



Inside the Union students enjoy a bar-b-q lunch, followed by the 
Pow-Wow Dance that evening. 







Iltrll.^^ i cMc lin. . ul Alpha Dflta GainilUi. 1 he 
Iratcnuty moved in at the beginning of the 
1957-1958 school year. The house is located 
at Kenmore near Sheridan Road, at the Lake 
Shore Campus. 



I lie Orphan's Day, held at Loyola and spon- 
sored by the Fraternity was hailed as .\lpha 
Delt's biggest success of the year. 



The 1957 .-Mpha Convention Dance, held at the Conrad Hilton Hotel. 




218 



ALPHA DELTA GAMMA 



Since its inception at Loyola Universit\' in 1924, Alpha 
Delta Gamma has become the largest National Catholic- 
College Social Fraternity in the United States. Last 
August, the brothers of Alpha chapter played host to the 
fraternity's 26th Annual National Convention held in 
Chicago. 

Though Alpha Delta Gamma is primarily a social 
fraternity, the brothers are strongly urged to participate 
in all activities of Loyola University. 

The brothers of Alpha Delta Gamma realize the im- 
portance of the fraternity being operated in a businesslike 
manner. It is through the l)usiness meeting that this aim 
is fulfilled. 

In coordination with their policy of active participation 
in University affairs. Alpha Delta Gamma has advanced 
to meet the expansion program of the University. In 
keeping with this expansion, the "Delts" this year opened 
its long awaited house. 

During the year Alpha Delta Gamma sponsored its 
Third Annual Orphans' Day where all of the fraternities 
and sororities of the University extended their fraternal 
hand to those less fortunate. This is just one of the many 
events which the fraternity endorses throughout the year, 
in keeping with the University's Motto "Ad Majorem 
Dei Gloriam." 




Officers of Alpha Delta Gamma. Standing: Joe 
Ferretti, Frank Paulo, Bill Pederson, Emmett 
Burns. Sitting: Frank Konicek, Karl Sanzen- 
bichcr, Mike Harrington, president; Bill Dastic, 
Bill Duffie. 



Members of .\lpha Delta Gamma. Top Row: Bernie .Schroeder, Frank Konicek, Frank Paulo, Joe Ferretti, Lee Rea, 
Herbert Cygan, Bill Duffie, Don Feeley, Steve .Schostok. Second Row: Al De Stefano, Karl .Sanzenbacher, Bill Dastic. 
Mike Harrington, Bill Pederson, Emmett Burns, Tom Brendall. Bottom Row: John Moran, Ken Fezler, Jim Gmelich, 
Bob Mison. John Di\'anc. 





The fraternity's annual costume Halloween 
party provides an outlet for all those who care 
to throw ofT the everyday shackles of life. 



ALPHA KAPPA PSI 



Gamma lota Chapter of Alpha Kappa Psi Professional 
Commerce Fraternity was installed at Loyola University 
in 1952. Since then they have imitated the fact that Alpha 
Kappa Psi is the first professional fraternity by establishins; 
many "firsts" of their own. One of these is the annual 
Career Day. This event is given in behalf of the sophomores 
in the hope that it will aid them in the choice and under- 
standing of their proposed specialized field of endeavor. 

In keeping with the high ideals of furthering the interests 
of its members, the Chapter is primarily concerned with 
presenting the latest available information on practices and 
theories in the business field. The Chapter is also occupied 
with a research project which will aid in the coordination 
of high schools and colleges in regards to the orientation 
of high school graduates. 

Deficient in nothing, especiallv social activities, the 
brothers sponsor some of the bigger highlights of the year 
which are the annual Halloween Costume Party, New 
Year's Eve Party, St. Patrick's Party, and the climax of 
the school year, the Golf Outing after finals in June. 

Since Jesuit education calls for the development of the 
whole man, Gamma Iota Chapter sponsers each semester 
a Father-Son Communion Breakfast. The Mass is offered 
by our Chaplain, Father Lester Evett. A closed retreat 
is made each year by a majority of the members. 

The conduction and coordination of all our activities, 
is accomplished with the cooperation of all the members 
and the advice of our Deputy Councilor Mr. Joseph V. 
McCullough, makes for a well-rounded school year, which 
not onlv benefits the members but also serves Lovola. 



Members of .Alpha Kappa Psi. Standing: .'\nthony Giannini. Donald Skriba, John Wisniewski, Andrew Schumi, 
Richard Claahscn, Dean Dolan, Charles Parrish, Robert Niesen, Frank McNicholas, James Lussem, Joseph Panarale. 
Sealed: Robert Murrin, vice president: Charles Cauhcld, president; John Smyth, Donald Connelly, treasurer. 





The congenial atmosphere of an Alpha Kappa 
Psi social event is evident. Such events breed 
life-long fraternal friendship. 




After the bii; hasrball game members and thrir 
dates retire to the lunch table. This event is the 
mid-summer picnic sponsored by the fraternity. 



Members of Alpha Kappa Psi. Standing: James Tomazin, Clifford Stephan, Charles Ptacek, Robert Bravieri, Richard 
Janowicz, Harold Fremgen, Richard Yetter, Richard Lisk, William Kraft, Thomas Flatley, Thomas Mueller, Ralph 
Korn, Eugene Groisant, Walter Vallers, Donald Buker, Edward Ptaszek. Seated: Robert Fuesel, Nicholas Vitaioll, 
Edmund Swain, master of rituals; Robert Raniere, John Tevenan, secretary; Gerald O'Brien. 






Miss Kalhy O'Connor 
Rose of Delta Sig - 1958 



The Lewis Towers Lounge; the Delta Sig's, the 
Co-eds. 



Delta Sigma Pi members. Top Row: Bill Lint- 
zenich, Dan DeCarlo, Edmund McGrath, Tom 
Split, Jack Drill. Second Row: Carl Longo, 
Merrill Saurioi, Tom Kolin, Harold Murphy. 
Bottom Rozv: Robert Zordani, Patrick Anderson, 
Jim Foley, Robert Goodsell. 




Delta Sigma Pi members. Top Row: Ed Hunter, 
Phil Pape, Steve Stremski, Bob Hess. Second 
Row: Edward Pawlowski, Bill Kurz, John Terry, 
Jim Ackermann, Tom Hanson. Bollom Row: 
John Lenart, Joe Zahaitis. Jim Gavin, Jim 
Roman. 




222 



DELTA SIGMA PI 



Delta Sigma Pi is an international professional-social 
fraternity in the field of commerce and business admin- 
istration. Founded at New York University in 1907, 
Delta Sigma Pi draws its membership solely from com- 
merce students who display the qualities of leadership, 
integrity and scholastic ability in such a degree as is 
deemed acceptable by the undergraduate chapter. 

Among its objectives Delta Sigma Pi endeavors to 
develop in its membership that high degree of proficiency 
in the field of business administration consonant with the 
ideals and traditions of the international organization itself 
of which Delta Sigma Pi at Loyola is only one of more 
than one hundred chapters. Loyola's chapter, designated 
Gamma Pi by the international organization, in carrying 
out its professional objectives promotes an extensive pro- 
gram of activities designed to broaden the members 
knowledge of the business world as it is today. This pro- 
gram includes professional tours, speakers, and movies, 
interspersed throughout the year. 

Delta Sigma Pi at Loyola has an extensive social program 
made up of; aside from the many parties, picnics, hayrides, 
and beach parties, held by any social fraternity; the Rose 
of Delta Sig Contest and Rose Mixer, Initiation Dinner 
Dances, and the National Fraternity Convention. The 
Fraternity maintains a Key Club at 115 E. Chicago. This 
club is used as a meeting place for the fraternity as well 
as a place for the brothers to spend their leisure time, 
whether in recreation or in study; the club is well adapted 
for both. This is the only facility of its kind maintained by 
an\' fraternity on the downtown-Lewis Towers campus. 




Officers of Delta Sigma Pi. Top Row: John 
Lenart, Merrill Sauriol, Pat O'Connor, Jim 
Gavin. Sitting: Joe Zahaitis, president; Dr. .S. 
M. Firzol. 



Tlie Delta .Sig liidr-oiit. 115 E. Chicago: hardly room at the bar. 





Wanted: Larger table for use In Kappa girls. 



KAPPA BETA GAMMA 



Kappa Beta Gamma is a national, social sorority, 
founded at Marquette University in 1917. Epsilon Chapter 
at Loyola University was founded in 1954. 

Its monthly summer activities commenced with a picnic 
in June, were followed up with a beach party, and were 
concluded with a lawn party which originated at one 
member's house and terminated at another's. An "in- 
teresting" scene was provided by the caravan of members 
and dates trudging down the street with folding chairs in 
arms heading from house to house. 

Delegates of Epsilon Chapter attended an off-con- 
\ention-year national meeting in Milwaukee in August 
at which time many suggestions were made and problems 
discussed. 

Rushing provides an outlet for much creativity at the 
costume teas. Ne.xt on the social calendar was the "Ivy 
League Mixer" which might possibly become an annual 
aflPair with the Kappas as a result of its tremendous social 
success. 

The social calendar was filled out with a Dinner Dance 
at the Sherry Hotel, a Mother-Daughter Day, the Spring 
Formal, Spring Rushing, and numerous parties scattered 
out over the school year. 

Father Richard J. Tischler is Kappa's chaplain, and 
Miss Rita Clarkson of Loyola's English Department is the 
sorority moderator. 



Members of Kappa Beta Gamma. Top Row: Charmaine Tortorello, Mary .^nne Banahan, Joan Combiths, Mary 
Nolan, Teri Mulkern, Donna Vero. Second Row: Joan Gensler, Pat Dumphy, Gina Burke, Mary Alice Nebel, Joan 
Biltgen, Anne McNally, Dottie Rosenbeck, Casey Krol, Nola Latkowski. Bottom Row: Honore Zenk, Terry Lesiak, 
Rita Clarkson. moderator: Eileen Peifer, Mary McClatchie, Mary .Anne Coyne. 





Orphan's day finds Kappa girls surrounded by 
men. 



The cast of Kappa's Variety Show act; they pre- 
sented a student version of Pajama Game, without 

"P.J.'S." 





Officers of Kappa Beta Gamma: Joan Gensler, Mary Anne Coyne, Terry Lesiak, Mary McClatchie, Honore Zenk, 
Joan Bilt=^en, Nola Lankovvski. Sitting: Eileen Pfiefer, president. 



225 





\ liard day at the office. 



Hey Guys, Look ! a football player. 



Watch out table, here comes the Queen. 




PHI MU CHI 



The 1957-58 school year was a big one for Phi Mu Chi, 
Loyola's oldest social fraternity. Besides the popular Easter 
Queenship Ball and a successful mixer, the group sponsored 
a closed dinner dance, two communion breakfasts, and 
several parties. They were a major power in the intra- 
mural sports program. 

The members realize that the traditions of their fra- 
ternity require active participation in campus activities. 
All it's members are trying to maintain the splendid record 
of former Phi Mu"s. 

Phi Mu Chi is responsible for some famous firsts at 
Loyola. Founded in 1921 at the University of Chicago, 
they paved the way for our present system of fraternities 
by becoming the first social fraternity at Loyola. They 
received their charter in 1922. Other groups followed Phi 
Mu"s lead, and within a few years most of our present 
fraternities were founded. Phi Mu Chi was also the first 
to hold an off-campus dance. Today the various fraternity 
dances are the backbone of the Loyola social system, and 
Phi Mu"s Easter Queenship ball has become a springtime 
tradition. 

This year Phi Mu Chi was led by Terry Sullivan, senior 
pre-med. His Vice-President was John Eterno. Thev 
were assisted by Treasurer Joe Fischer, Recording Secre- 
tary Ken Youngman, and Corresponding Secretary Bernie 
Tess. Mike Walton and Ron Wadle were respectively. 
Historian and Religious chairman. The leadership of 
these men and the cooperation of their brothers enabled 
Phi Mu Chi to further enhance their reputation by making 
this past year one of many accomplishments. 




Officers of Phi Mu Chi. Lejt to right: Fr. Donald 
Roll, moderator; Norm Brunner, Edward Neria, 
Terry Sullivan, president; John Eterno, Bernie 
Tess, Robert Norys. 



Members of Phi Mu Chi. Top Row: Joe Johnson, Al Schoen, Dick Lebich, Jeff Fleming, Ron Wadle, Peter Wagner, 
Jim Kearney. Bottom Row: Don Maraloso, Tom Wedig, Quin San Hamel, Paul Sampson, Jerry Biranowski, Stan 
Wyszynski, Jack Miller, Jim Moorman. 





Officers of Pi Alpha Lambda. Top Row: Ron 
Burton, Brian Van Viierbergen, Dick Wain- 
wright. Ben Thies, Tom Nugent. Sitting: Tom 
Flanagan, Warren Rosenow, Bob Ward, presi- 
dent; Connie Rodgers. Jim Sneider. 



PI ALPHA LAMBDA 



Since 1924, when the social fraternity of Pi Alpha 
Lambda was founded by the Reverend James J. Mertz, 
S.J.. the history of the organization has been one of suc- 
cess — success socially, spiritually, scholastically, and ath- 
letically. This fraternity was founded on the highest ideals 
of Catholic manhood, dedicated to the service of Loyola 
and its own membership. These ideals have been un- 
falteringly maintained. 

During the past year such activities as: the third con- 
secutive crowning of the Pi Alpha candidate for Miss 
Varsity, the sponsorship of the second annual Intercollegiate 
Dance, have afforded just pride to the accomplishments 
of the organization. 

The UniversitN' is expanding as never before in its 
history. A fraternity which hopes to adequately service 
the school and its own members must e.xpand accordingly. 

Pi .■\lpha Lambda, being the largest social fraternity at 
Loyola, is meeting this challenge by fostering an active 
interest in all school organizations and projects. That 
members of Pi Alph have maintained ofHces in many 
Loyola groups, cultural, honorary, and political, not only 
indicates the heterogeneity of the Fraternity, but also 
points to the conscious effort of each member to manifest 
the ideals of that foundation upon which Pi Alpha Lambda 
was built. 



The Orphan's Day was a success, almost every- 
one contributed, here are the Pi Alpha clowns. 



The pinochle-playing Pi .\lph"s in Lewis Towers 
Lounge. 






Highlighting the fraternity's activities is the Pi 
Alpha Lambda Inter-Collegiate Dance.*] It was 
held at the Lake Shore Athletic Club during the 
Christmas Vacation. 




The Pi Alph float withstood the storm and at- 
tracted lots of attention at the Homecoming 
Float Parade. 



Members of Pi Alpha Lambda. Top Row: Bob Marlin, Jerry Ring, John Fitzpatrick, Dave Bresnahan, Nort Flanagan, 
John Horan, John Arnold, Mike Ryan, Mike Francis, Dick Wittingham, Terry McDermott, Jim Gorman. Second 
Row: John Scotty, Bob Boyle, Mike Metzger, Brian Van Vlierbergen, Tom Nugent, Ben Thies, Jim Sneider, Warren 
Rosenow, Bob Ward, Connie Rodgers, Ron Burton, Tom Flanagan, Phil Cook, Chuck Thompson, Frank Smith. 
Third Row: Tony Merges, Stan Wiencek, Dave Manning, Dick Spatafora, Tom Kilbane, Pat Whalen, Tony Strak, 
Dick Wright, Bob Varallo, Dave Lynch, Gene Callahan, Frank Hogan. Bottom Row: Graham Heikes, John O'Brien, 
Charlie Vygantas, Rich Baginski, Bob Gallagher, John Scheid, Bob Brown, Kevin McKeough, Jim Metzger, Ernie 
Lippe, Bob Doherty. 




229 




Sigma Pi's meet at tlie drop of a hat; here they 
are enjoying each other's company at their own 
regular spot. In the back is Fr. Evett. 



The sweetheart of Sigma Pi, Miss Lee Smuda. 





Officers of Sigma Pi Alpha. 



230 



SIGMA PI ALPHA 

In 1933, this local social fraternity was organized for 
the purpose of uniting Loyola students of Polish decent. 
In 1947, however, membership in this organization was 
opened to all male students regardless of creed or nation- 
ality. Today, the fraternity has a large membership 
of men on both campuses. 

Sigma Pi Alpha was founded in order to promote 
intellectual and social interest among its members, and 
to provide opportunities for their developinent, both 
morally and physicallv, in an atmosphere of friendship 
and cooperation. 

Throughout the year Sigma Pi Alpha sponsors many 
social functions including smoker, socials, and mixers. 
The most important affair on their social calendar, which 
is open to the entire university, is the annual "'Fraternity 
Man of the Year" Ball. At this dance a trophy is awarded 
to the male student who has proven himself as the most 
valuable to his fraternity. 

The Sadie Hawkin's Memorial Dogpatch Dance is 
another all-university favorite sponsored by Sigma Pi Alpha. 

Sigma Pi Alpha is determined to continue as one of the 
outstanding fraternities on campus and keep up their 
tradition of offering a high spirit of Ijrotherhood. 




Members of the Fraternity chose the possibles 



Members of Sigma Pi .\lpha. Top Row: W CarzoH, James Egan, Bob .\gin, Dick Foertsch, Tom Brennan. Bottom 
Row: John Capocy, Paul Rubino, Don Provenzale, Richard Schuth, Jim Del Giorno, Gerry Tarsitano, Ron Kiefer, 
Joe Murphy, Tom Haracz, Ron Peterson, John Martin, Leo Finley, Robert Donohue. 





iJHic 
Dion 
Tom 
non. 



; IS of Tail Delta Phi. Standing: Jim Moreno, 
J. Wilhelmi, moderator; Gene Slioff. Sitting: 
Berry- Jerry Epstein, president; John Han- 



TAU DELTA PHI 

Tau Eta Chapter of Tau Delta Phi, one of the smallest 
but most dynamic fraternal organizations at Loyola, can 
proudly number this as one of the most outstanding years 
in its history. 

We began this year holding the coveted Blue Key 
award for, "The Outstanding Fraternity,'' at Loyola. 
Among its awards are several prized trophys from the 
Tau Delta Phi National, presented at the annual con- 
vention; the National Expansion Trophy, Outstanding 
\'ice-President, Outstanding Convention Delegate, all in 
national competition with chapters in the U.S. and Canada. 

As the Loyola News said almost two years ago, "Tau 
Delta Phi has established what may well prove to be the 
biggest and most forward moving steps since undergrad 
fraternities were founded at Loyola." This prophesy 
seems to have come true as the "Tau Delt House' seems 
to have become a part of Loyola as a mark of unity, fun, 
and fraternal stability. Also the fact that Tau Delta Phi 
has welcomed two other undergrad fraternitys to the 
family of "the housed" shows the vital significance of 
this foresighted move. 

With an active membership of twenty-se\en, the fra- 
ternity has undertaken functions fulfilling its role as a 
social organization, among them the Annual Freshman 
Mixer, a Halloween Costume Party, a New Years Eve 
Partv, and the Faculty Cocktail Party, this year held at 
the Penthouse of the Knickerbocker Hotel. 



Members of Tan Delta Phi. Top Row: Frank T. Fitzsimmons, Barry Cullinan, Tom Murray. Dick Server, Dan 
Vondran, .W Lauter, George Fernandez, Don Headley, Joel Heller, Hal Britton. Second Row: Tom Enright, Stan 
Komosa, Tom Berry, John Klein, Mike Zmina. f.d Otis. Third Row: John Hannon, Gene Riidnicki. John Fernendez, 
Gerry Epstein, Mort Multark, Dion J. Wilhelmi. Siiiini]: i'.vnr Skoft, llarl Dolson. 

! 




I 




Tau Delta Phi Fraternity house, 6346 N. Ken- 
more, at the Lake Shore Campus. 



The Christmas Party, at the fraternity house, 
was one of the social events of the year. 




A "Friday-Nitc-Drop-In"' — Larry Seres and Tom Berry at the window-seat. 




233 



"A bunch of the boys were whooping it up 




The Ugly Man Contest sponsored by the TKE's was a success. A picture is worth a thousand words. 




234 



TAU KAPPA EPSILON 



Epsilon Kappa Chapter of Tau Kappa Epsilon National 
Fraternity is only in its second year at Loyola, yet it has 
enjoyed a position in school affairs pre-eminent among 
many active organizations on Campus. Its "Ugly Mixer" 
and "Ugly Man of the Year Contest," the Co-Ed tea, 
the traditional St. Patrick's Day Dance of the University 
Club, TEKE's predecessor, its "Sweetheart Contest," and 
inter-fraternity "Greased" contest are just a few of its 
sponsored affairs. 

This year TEKE has won honors in the Float Parade 
and in Intramurals. Members of the 42 man chapter 
hold positions of responsibility in the Loyola News, Sodal- 
ity, Blue Key, SAL, Choral Society, Variety Show, 
Dorm Council, R.O.T.C., and Union Congress. The 
TEKE's heartily support all school functions and com- 
plement their school studies and activities with their own 
private affairs and parties. 




Officers of Tau Kappa Epsilon: Tony Spina, 
Frank Gorecki, Larry Bruozis, Greg Eckstein, 
Tom Strubbe. John .Stokes, president, missing 
from photo. 



Members of Tau Kappa Epsilon. Top Row: Dick Linehan. Bob Bant, Tom Stubbe, Marty Gora, 
John Parker, Larry Braozis, Ed Condon, Bert Taymons. Second Row: Greg Eckstein, Steve 
Luzhetok, Ed Glabus, Bob Wilhus, H. Taft Roe, Tony Lenant, Mike Serritella, Don Fontanna. 
Bottom Row: Frank Mustoni, Bob Beaton, Frank Garecki, George Lumpke, Bill Mullen, Gerry 
Vande Velde, Tom Milland. Tony .Spina. 





Officers of Theta Pi Alpha. Top Row: Nancy 
Schwind, Sue Kelly, president; Judy Wolfgram. 
Bottom Roiu: Judy Hammer, Maryalice Ryan, 
Arlen Phillips, Colette Gorey. 



THETA PHI ALPHA 



Theta Phi Alpha is the oldest and largest sorority at 
Loyola. Bishop Edward D. Kelly guided the sorority into 
1912. Upsilon Chapter was founded in 1942 at Loyola. 
The sorority was founded for the purpose of attaining 
a closer comradeship among women students, and to 
advance their educational, social, and religious interests. 
In 1951, the sorority was accepted into full membership 
of National Pan-Hellenic Conference. This national or- 
ganization co-operates with college authorities in their 
effort to maintain high social and scholastic standards. 
Upsilon's moderator is Miss Mary Lou McPartlin and 
the Chaplain is Father Lester Evett, S.J. 

Theta Phi participates in all school activities. Regard- 
less of the weather, every fall there is someone riding atop 
Theta Phi's float in the Float Parade. Each spring the 
sorority's time is divided between working on the "Variety 
Show" and "The Fair and Frolic."" Theta Phi has always 
been privileged to have candidates in the Miss Varsity 
Contest. We are honored to say Miss Arlen Phillips was 
elected Miss Varsity for 1957-58. Throughout the year 
time is devoted to Orphan's Day, Charity Day, and the 
Thanksgiving Drive for the Litde Sisters of the Poor. 

Theta Phi has a busy year with its own social functions. 
Each semester begins with rushing parties and a formal 
rushing tea. On April 30, the feast of St. Catherine of 
Siena, patroness of the sorority, National Founders' Day 
is celebrated. The School year is climaxed with the most 
important social event — the White Rose Ball. 



Members of Theta Pi Alpha. Top Row: Sally Salfaggio, Sue Kelly, Judy Hammer, Nancy Schwind, 
Maryalice Ryan, Judy Wolfgram, Mary McVane, Barbara Reed, Geri Klopack. Bottom Row: 
Nancy Dower, Lucille Farrara, Mary Donahoe. 





Hell-nite-stick-too-it-tive-ness. 



Flo Morelli receives Tau Delt Key from Chieftess 
Joanne Hartzer in "Peace Pipe" act of Variety 
Show . 




Members of Theta Pi Alplia. Top Row: Toni Shea, Betty Jo Hawkins, Correne Cowperthwait, 
Aggie Sebastian, Gay Lee Luhrs. Bottom Row: Flora Morelli, Roxane Slaski, Rita Izzo, Gloria 
Javor, Toni Kurbiel, Rita Horan, Joyce McAuIiffe, Joanne Hartzer. 





r^ 



f 



mi, 



Xl 



Loyola vs Marquette, the Chicago Stadium - a lesson the latter learned. 




ATHLETICS 




BASKETBALL 



Meet Loyola's head basketball coach, George M. Ire- 
land. Ireland, a native of Madison, Wisconsin, attended 
Campion Academy where he was named the outstanding 
player in the 1932 National Catholic High School Tour- 
nament held at Loyola. He then went on to Notre Dame 
where he was named to the Ail-American team for two 
straight seasons. In his three years of competition, Ireland 
played in all of Notre Dame's 72 games. 

For fifteen years after his graduation Ireland coached 
at Marmion Military Academy. Aurora, Illinois where 
his teams built up a .751 percentage in 349 games. 

In his first year as the Loyola pilot in 1951, the Ramblers 
compiled an enviable 17-8 record. This year with his 
team completing the season with a 16-8 record, Ireland 
was named the outstanding coach of the Chicago Stadium 
series which had such men in contention as Adolph Rupp 
of Kentucky and Frank McGuire of North Carolina to 
mention but two. His fine coaching has been rewarded 
not only by awards, but by a sense of pride in the teams 
and the individual gentlemen he has produced. 

We, Loyolan's can be extremely proud and grateful 
that such a man as George M. Ireland has been given to us. 



George Irclaml 
Basketball Coach 



Paul Sheedy slides to steal that basketball from a Memphis State player. The Ramblers defeated the Southerners in a double over-time 
maintaining; a 3 to 1 record in the Chicago Stadium Championship Basketball series. 




240 



With every success there seems to be a formula, and 
the game of modern-day basketball affords no exception 
to this rule. To some universities and colleges, having 
a winning season or a championship team hinges on 
their having a seven-foot center around whom they 
can build their offense, or maybe on a well-mechanized 
recruiting system reaching out across the nation and 
actually luring talent under a "citizen-sponsorship" 
program of recompense, or then again inaybe on the 
fact that the team has one, or inaybe two, ball players 
of Ail-American stature. Whatever the reason, one 
must take note for it is in this fact that the significance 
of Loyola's success of this past year can be seen and 
appreciated. In this big-city Jesuit University we have 
no seven-foot center, nor a recruiting system as ex- 
tensive or as lucrative to offer as some other schools, 
nor any Ail-Americans — vet, we do have success and 
a winning team. 

The Ramblers of 1957-58 faced perhaps the toughest 
schedule it has had in the last decade, and fared better 
than did eighty per cent of their predecessor-teams 
during that time. Needless to say, they have certainly 



had an outstanding season, and their formula has been 
nothing more than smart coaching, a tremendous team 
spirit, and a full actualization of their potentials. 
Throughout the year the Ramblers have made their 
opponents play the type of game they wanted them 
to — if the team was a fast-breaking-five they were 
forced to play the type of ball control game Loyola 
dictated, and hence, were thwarted in their usual 
offensive pattern: in other words, the Ramblers brought 
out the worst in each of their competitors, and then 
capitalized on their deficiencies. 

It has been said that this year's squad had no AU- 
Americans. This is true, but they most certainly had 
some exceptionally outstanding ball players, team 
players who never gave up and fought all the way 
down to the last buzzer. And it is doubtful if ever a 
Rambler unit had as much spirit, or knew and exercised 
its potential more than this Year's team. In every game 
played a well-balanced club was fielded, and where 
one player may have been off, someone else was there 
to play a little harder and do a little better to com- 
pensate for his teammate's tough luck. The Ramblers 



Athlete of the Year - that's Art McZier as he is triumphantly carried off the Chicago Stadium 
basketball floor after his spectacular last second shot that upset Kentucky, 1958 NCA.A Basketball 
Clhainpions. 





n 




l^iNTft 



.94 



a: 



V 




Again its McZier fighting for thai 
precious rebound. The Wildcats o 
Kentucky defeated Loyola in this con 
test but the Ramblers had their swee 
revenge. 



were always a team, a unit of five bodies with one mind 
and one common goal — victory and a representative 
showing indicative of Loyola. 

Never before have Loyolans ever been presented with 
a more dramatic victory than when Art McZier, 
graduating co-captain, hooked in a one point edge in 
the very last second of the Kentucky game, defeating 
this year's National Collegiate Athletic Association 
champions by a score of 57-56 before a capacity crowd 
at Chicago's emporium of sport, the Stadium. This 
explosive victory came after the game was all but lost, 
as with four seconds left to play Vern Hatton, Ken- 
tucky's Ail-American and leading scorer, had sup- 
posedly put the game on ice with a beautiful jump shot 
from the corner. But the never-say-die Ramblers 
fought desperately to win, and with one sweeping 
motion of McZier's arm triumph was theirs, climaxing 
a highly successful stadium series which saw them drop 
but one contest in four starts, that being to the team 
that went on to capture this year's coveted National 
Invitation Tournament crown, Xavier. 

In the series opener Loyola jarred its traditional rival 



Marquette by a score of 63-58. Led by Paul Sheedy's 
18 points the Ramblers managed to outlast the Warriors 
in this see-saw battle which brought their all-time 
record against Marquette to an impressive 18-12 mark, 
and which also saw vengeance wrought for an earlier 
thj'ee point loss to them on their home court with less 
then a minute to play. 

The following week, however, brought disappointment 
to a highly-spirited Loyola squad as the Musketeers 
from Xavier proved to be too much under the boards 
for the h.V. crew. Seldom was the short team able 
to take more than one shot at a time as was evidenced 
by their opponents twenty-two rebound edge. All was 
not dark that evening though as Paul .Sheedy's 16 
points led the field in the losing attempt which finaled 
at 65-54. 

The third game of the stadium series brought Loyola 
up against the highly-rated Timers from Memphis State 
as the crowd more than got their money's worth in a 
double-overtime thriller. Fighting back from as far 
behind as twelve points in the second half, led by 
Al Norvilles 31 points and Jim Gorman's great tipping, 



Members of 1957-58 Loyola Basketball .Squad. Standing, left to right: Jim DeWulf, Greg Griffith, 
Jim Gorman, Ray Stopa, Art McZier, Ctoach George Ireland. Silling: Ron .Schwingen, Paul 
Sheedy, Al Norville, Paul O'Connor, Frank Hogan, Ed .-\hern. 




the Ramblers, in what may have been their hardest 
fought game of the year, beat the Tigers 79-76. Before 
meeting Loyola, Memphis State had already taken the 
Sugar Bowl Tournament and last winter had lost by 
only a single point to Bradley in the championship 
game of the National In\'itation Tournament at New 
York's Madison Square Garden. 

Aside from these four home games, the Ramblers 
rolled up six other home court victories while losing 
but one game to Bowling Green, 65-63, when in the 
last four minutes of play the Falcons, sparked by sharp- 
shooting guard Jim Darrow, tallied six consecutive 
baskets whereupon Loyola pulled back to within two 
points only to have the buzzer sound while Frank 
Hogan's desperation heave at the basket fell short. 
Al Norville, however, was high scorer for the night 
with 31 points. 

In their opening contest of the season, the Ireland- 
men racked the Redmen from Ripon 90-73 behind the 
sparkplug of Norville's shooting eye. Pushing through 
30 points Al spirited the ball club to a run-away win 
which saw Ripon never even close after the first few 
minutes of play. 

Following Ripon into the raging Rambler's den was 
the University of Omaha which tumbled 84-46 in a 
game marked by the exceptional shooting of Norville, 




Jim Groman, Loyola's tall center, attempts to 
block that shot of a Drake man. Gorman was 
the mainstay in that defense up the middle that 
kept the opponents score at an all time low. 



"Touche," says Al Norville as he charges for the 
ball in the hands of a Western Michigan player. 
Jim Gorman directly behind Norville looks on 
contemptlv, unable to t^et his liands on the ball. 





Co-captain .\rt McZicr and Coach Ireland talk over the line season 
of 16-8. If credit is to be parcelled out then Art McZier should 
receive the great part of it for his fine rebounding and shooting. 





Reaching for that ball is Co-Clapt. Jim DeWulf 
and an Aii" Force Cadet. DeVVulf saw little 
action in the early part of the season because cf 
an injured elbow but finished climaticly the 
season in a superb performance against Uni- 
versity of Detroit. 



orville goes for that loose ball in the Western Michigan game, 
ine scrappy ball playing like this enabled Xorville to set a new 
■dividual game record of 40 points, with 15 field goals. 



he camera catches Art McZier and Mike Moran suspended in mid-air with their hands glued to 
le ball during the Marquette-Loyola game at the Chicago Stadium. 




Loyola . . . 


90 


Loyola . . . 


86 


Loyola . . . 


84 


Lovola . . . 


58 


Loyola . . . 


63 


Loyola . . . 


89 


Loyola . . . 


88 


Loyola . . . 


42 


Loyola . . . 


61 


Loyola . . . 


71 


Lovola . . . 


68 


Loyola . . . 


86 


Loyola . . . 


63 


Lovola . . . 


54 


Loyola . . . 


73 


Loyola . . . 


66 


Loyola . . . 


63 


Loyola . . . 


79 


Loyola . . . 


68 


Loyola . . . 


57 


Loyola . . . 


63 


Loyola . . . 


63 


Loyola . . . 


87 


Loyola . . . 


56 


Total . . 


1678 




^Von 



WON AND LOST FOR '57-'58 

Ripon 73 

Omaha 46 

South Dakota St. . . 58 

Drake 70 

Notre Dame 82 

Ohio VVesleyan .... 66 

Colby 43 

Kentucky 75 

Marquette 64 

Air Academy 50 

Eastern Kentucky . . 62 

Western Michigan. . 58 

Marquette 58 

Xavier 65 

Western Ontario ... 43 

lona 67 

St. Peter's 92 

Memphis State 76 

Western Michigan. . 61 

Kentucky 56 

Washington 50 

Bowling Green .... 65 

John Carroll 84 

Detroit 51 

Total 1515 

16— Lost 8 



sophomore flash Ron Schvvingen, and Jim Gorman 
whose excellent rebounding with that of Art McZier 
was a large factor in Loyola's winning. Similar in the 
type of game played was the Rambler's next home 
romp over South Dakota State. Once again outstanding 
rebounding by the front line and some timely shooting 
by Norville and Paul Sheedy led the squad to a 84-58 
night-after-Christmas win. 

The next two un-hospitable treatments of visitors came 
to Eastern Kentucky and Western Michigan. Despite 
an acute height disadvantage where Eastern averaged 
a starting lineup of 6'5", the Rambler's eked out a 
68-62 victory thanks to the tremendous fight and tipping 
of Gorman and Art McZier. Paul Sheedy and Al 
Norville again contributed heavily to the scoring for 
Loyola. In the 86-58 endeavor over Western Michigan 
Al Norville had his name permanently etched in the 
record books of Loyola as he tallied 40 points, with 
15 field goals and 10 free throws, breaking three scoring 
marks — most points in one game, most field goals in 
one game, and a new fieldhouse scoring record. Espe- 
cially noteworthy here is the fact that once his team- 
mates were aware of his opportunity to set new records, 
they fed him frantically in hopes that he would, and 
then with but twelve seconds left he pumped in a 
15 foot jump shot making history. 

In their last game of the season the Rambler's man- 
aged to beat Detroit University 56-51 before a capacity 
crowd in Alumni Gymnasium. Especially outstanding 
was the brilliant defensive play of Frank Hogan who 

246 



held down the Titan's ace-scoring guard Mike Walsh, 
and the fine rebounding and passing of co-captain Jim 
DeWulf who closed his college career with a very im- 
pressive showing. Next year's co-captains Norville and 
Sheedy did the bulk of the Rambler's scoring, and 
once again spurred the team on. 

On the road Loyola still managed to keep a winning 
record though this is where their percentage suffered 
as it was here that they accrued the bulk of their eight 
losses. Facing Drake without the resources of Art 
McZier, who was out with an injury, the Rambler's 
lost 70-58, even though his replacement Ron Schwingen 
scored 21 points. Under the boards is where the team 
was hurt, and this proved to be too much. The losses 
to Kentucky and Marquette on their home courts, 
75-42 and 64-61 respectively, were avenged when these 
squads visited Chicago. The loss to the Fighting Irish 
of Notre Dame 82-63 wasn't really as down-trodden 
as the score indicates. AU-American Tom Hawkins 
and his compatriot John McCarthy combined in a 



Al Norville pushes the ball up during the Drake 
game while attempts are made to block it. Wait- 
ing for the rebound is Frank Hogan, Paul Sheedy 
and Jim Gorman. 




second-half thrust to score 27 points and pull away 
from their valiant, hard-fighting foes. In the East a 
free throw with less then 20 seconds left inflicted a 
67-66 loss on our crew by lona of Upper New York, 
and their fellow state inhabitants from St. Peter's 
weren't too hospitable either as they poured through 
92 points to the Rambler's 63. 

All was not dismal away from home, however, as 
romping wins over Ohio Wesleyan (89-66), Colby 
College (88-43), the Denver Air Academy (71-50), 
Western Ontario in Canada (73-43), Western Michigan 
(68-61) and Washington University of St. Louis (63-50) 
all illustrated the tremendous realization of the team's 
potential. And perhaps the most noteworthy game 
away was that one played in Cleveland against John 
Carroll University, a game which saw the Rambler's 
trailing by 14 points at one time in the second half and 
then coming fast at the end on tremendous ball playing 
by McZier and Sheedy, whose drive-in shots are still 
being talked about, to win the contest 87-84. For this 



game a bus was chartered by Loyola to transport the 
avid followers of the team there for moral support, and 
obviously the encouragement of these fans proved in- 
strumental in the team's victory. 

In concluding, our congratulations are extended to 
the team, and to Art McZier who was voted the Most 
Valuable Player on this year's squad. He led a team 
which was highly underrated throughout the year. 
In the East the Rambler's were twenty-point underdogs 
in both the Kentucky and Memphis State games, but 
unfortunately for them, oddsmakers and spotters can't 
very well predict a score when they deal with a team 
that will never lay down, a team that has the will, the 
desire, the drive, and the determination to win, a team 
that exhausts every ounce of its potential, a team which 
has a little thing called spirit, a team which has excel- 
lent coaching, a team that is set upon going to a major 
tournament next year, and on not only playing, but 
on winning — a team called the Rambler's from Loyola 
University in Chicago. 



Art McZier tries a hook-shot against the blocking 
efforts of a Marquette hoopster. The Ramblers 
won this contest to avenge an earlier defeat by 
the Hilltoppers. 



It was fine shooting like this in the second half 
of the Kentucky game by Paul Sheedy that kept 
Loyola within striking distance of the Wildcats. 
Sheedy made this shot despite the foul by the 
Kentucky player. 






The panorama of action and excitement is recorded for posterity by the alert eye of the camera 
during the battle between Loyola and Kentucky at the stadium. 



Althougli shooting from behind the 
basket, Paul Sheedy makes the shot 
count while the Ramblers down Colby. 




248 




^-^ 



Al Norville lets go of another shot 
which compiled gave him the highest 
shooting percentage on the squad and 
also in Loyola's records books. The 
18.1 average per game topped the old 
Jack Kerris mark of 14.1. 




01. 
eo 



CROSS COUNTRY 



The 1957-58 Loyola trackteam again compiled a fine 
season in indoor meets. The indoor season saw Loyola's 
relay team capture the Daily News Relays, set a new 
record at Naperville, and win twice in the Chicago 
University Fieldhouse. It also saw Louis Kujawinski 
become the new Central Collegiate two mile champ. 

The indoor season rolled into shape in late November, 
when Coach Jerry Weiland moved the practice sessions 
from the cross-country turf of Montrose Park to the 
lose dirt of the Chicago Avenue Armory. The familiar 
equestrian scent diffused with the odor of analgesic and 
sweat could only indicate that work and hard work was 
on the agenda. Then on January 11, the crudely 
polished product was first shown off. In that meet 
Don Griffith set a new record in the 60 yd. high hurdles 
with a time of 7.7 seconds. Mike Burke captured second 
in the 880 yd run. A week later the two-mile relay 
team composed of Louis Kujawinski, Brian Shutts, 
Tony Lenart, and Charles Vygantas won first place in 
the Chicago University Relays. 

Again the team returned to the Armory for more 
hard work. After some sweat-producing sessions, the 
opportunities came soon enough to show off the finished 



product. The Michigan AAU meet and the Michigan 
State Relays were held respectively in mid-February 
during the semester break. Although the Ramblers 
showed in the money in every event that they entered, 
better performances of the relay team were hampered 
ijy the loss of Mike Burke due to sickness. However, 
in the Michigan State meet, Louis Kujawinski was 4th 
in the 1000 yd run and the mile relay team also finished 
fourth in their race. On February 22, Washington's 
Birthday, the annual Chicago University Invitational 
Meet was held in the Chicago Fieldhouse. The Ram- 
blers managed to scoop up three first places and two 
fourths. Mike Burke in the 440 yd dash, Phil Stokes 
in the 60 yd low hurdles, and the mile relay each con- 
tributed with firsts, while Charlie Vygantas and Lou 
Kujawinski placed fourth in the 440 yd dash and mile 
run respectively. 

In roared March and now came the climax of the 
indoor season. On March 8 the Central Collegiate 
championships were held in Kalamazoo. A week later 
in Chicago the Daily News relays took place. On the 
following day, the annual Naperville Relays are held, 
and a week later the indoors season comes to an end 



Cloach Jerry Weiland points to the watch as members of Loyola's 1957-58 cross-country team look 
on. Kriffling, left to right: L. Kujawinski, C. Vygantas, M. Wheeler, and B. .Shutts. Standing: 
R. Horton, T. Lenart, N. .Slowikoski, E. BiUups. 




250 



TRACK 



with the Knights of Columbus meet in Cleveland. 

Just as March roared so did Lou Kujawinski in the 
Central Collegiate meet. Considered an underdog by 
the experts, Kujawinski pulled an upset victory by 
coming from behind to win the two mile in 9:40.5. 
Running behind the pack for a mile and a half, Lou 
suddenly shot out with a burst of speed that amazed 
the eager crowd. The Rambler distance star passed 
runner after runner while being cheered by the appre- 
ciative Kalamazoo crowd. Crossing the finish line, 
Kujawinski was 30 yards ahead of the nearest competitor. 

Climaxing the indoor season was the victory of the 
mile relay team a week later at the Chicago Daily 
News Relays. The Quartette composed of Bob Boyle, 
Bill Kehoe, Charlie Vygantas, and Mike Burke whizzed 
over the boards of the International Amphitheatre in 
3:26 for the best mile relay time of the indoor season. 
Bob Boyle, leadoff man, ran a fine race and came from 
behind to pass the baton to Bill Kehoe. Bill made 
two attempts to capture the lead but was unsuccessful. 
Charlie Vygantas took the baton and made up some 
of the lost distance, passing off the stick to Mike Burke 
in second place and in good striking position. Burke 



toyed with the field as he stayed behind but then put 
on the finishing kick on the last straightaway to win. 

The next night the same quartette with Brian Shutts 
running for Bill Kehoe set a new North Central Relays 
record in the 12 lap relay. The time of 3:56.5 was 
better than the old record of 3:57.6 which Loyola also 
set in 1954. A week later the indoor season's last meet 
was held in Cleveland where Loyola's two mile relay 
team, consisting of L. Kujawinski, B. Shutts, C. Vygantas 
and M. Burke, finished second against the finest com- 
petition from all over the country. 

Fine performances were also turned in by Norb 
Slowikoski, Tony Lenart, and Roy Horton in the 
distance race, while equally well did Terry Nosek, Bill 
Dougherty, Jack Cranley, and Jack Kiley perform in 
the shorter distances. 

The outdoor season begins with the Bradley Relays 
on April 12 in Peoria. The following week, April 19, 
the relay squads travel to the Kansas Relays. Seven 
days later, April 26, the annual Drake Relays will be 
on Loyola's travelling list. Then comes the annual 
Elmhurst Relays and the team ends its outdoor season 
with the Central Collegiate Championships. 



Members of Loyola's 1957-58 track team. Kneeling^ left to right: Roy Horton, Norb Slowikoski, Jack Cranley, Terry Nosek, Ernie Biilups, Jack 
Kiley, Bill Kehoe, Phil Stokes. Standing: Coach Jerry Weiland, Lou Kujawinski, Brian Shutts, Tom Grossman, Mike Burke, Matt Wheeler, 
Bill Dougherty, Charlie Vygantas, Tony Lenart, Bob Boyle. 




251 




Coacli J< I I \ W ( iKind ( on.^i .itulati s J i< k ki' 
of Lovola'ij tiack team, tor the fine ptiluimanc* 
himself and the rest of the team. 



captam 
of Jack 




Mike Burke hands off the baton to Terry Nosek in the 
880-yd relay in the University of Chicago Fieldhouse. 
The Ramblers place first in the semifinal heat only to 
be beat by the University of Chicago Track Club team 
later that evening. 




Mike Burke finishes first in the 440-yd dash during the 
University of Chicago Invitational Meet. Directly behind 
Burke and partially blocked from the camera's view is 
Charlie Vygantas who finished fourth in the race. 



252 





Pliil .Stokes clears the hurdle in classic style in a practice 
session at the Armory. Stokes won his share of first places 
until a pulled muscle laid him off for a few weeks. 



Ernie Billups hands the bat.)ii oil t.i Low Kujawuiski. 
Besides being a member of the two mile relay team, Kuja- 
winski won the Central Collegiate two mile run. 



Members of the mile relay team. Froyn lefl lo right: Terry Nosek, alternate; Bob Boyle, Bill Kehoe, 
Charlie Vygantas, and Mike Burke. This team achieved most recognition during the indoor 
season as they won numerous meets including the Daily News Relay held in the International 
Amphitheatre. 



r 



?^ 



i 



,v 






i[ to churn through the water (from h-ft fo 
right ) arc Joe Wojcik, Pete Shuflitowski, Jim 
Smith, Mike Francis, Bob Barnes, and Jim Kelly 
waiting till the camera shutter has clicked. 



Looking at the record table and admiring the 
new university records are members of the med- 
ley relay team who also established a new uni- 
versity record this year. From left to right: Len 
Vertuno, Bob Dring, John Stokes, and Tony 
KiefFer. 



Members of the 1957-58 Loyola Swimming Team. 
Top Roiv: Bob Bielinski, Joe Wojcik, Mike Fran- 
cis, Coach Chalmers. Middle Row: Pete Shufli- 
towski, Bob Barnes, Ray Van De Wall, John 
Stokes, Tony Kieffer, Len Vertuno. Bottom 
Row: Bob Dring, Jim Kelly, Jim Smith. 



254 



SWIMMING 



If a seasonal record of wins and losses is an indication 
of the nature of a team then the 1957-58 Loyola swim- 
ming team is a rather poor one. However, to observers 
who have closely followed the teams performances this 
year the opposite is true. For the first time in several 
years Coach Don Chalmers has a squad that is young, 
fast, strong, and lacking in experience. This lack cf 
experience, however, they overcame during the latter 
part of the season. 

The season started outdismally as the Water-Ramblers 
lost four of their first six meets. The young finmen 
bounced back strong with four straight wins only to 
be stopped on their fifth attempt by the powerful Iowa 
State team. The overall seasonal record of 7-6 was not 
the best that Coach Chalmers has had at Loyola, but 
the Ramblers did decisively outscore their opponents 
635-576. Top scorer for the Maroon and Gold was a 
freshman from L.S.C., Jim Kelly. Amassing 113 points, 
he edged out Tony Kiefl"er who compiled 110. Next 
in line on the honor roll was also a freshman, Bob 
Barnes, who picked up 91 points during the season. 
Bob Bring and Len Vertuno, both also freshmen, scored 
50 points apiece to be matched by the only two upper- 
classmen on the squad Capt. Ray Van De Wall and 
John Stokes with the same point total. 

A new Alumni Pool record was established by Tony 
KiefTer in the 200-yd butterfly with a time of 2:31. 
The record stood a week only to be broken by B. Alix 
of North Central College with 2:30.6. 

Three new Loyola University records were set this 
year by Coach Chalmers crew. 



Chuck Thompson takes a high jack-knife in 
classic style as Tony Kieffer, Bob Dring, Pete 
Shuflitowski, Jim Kelly, and Bob Barnes" watch 
the spectacular performance. 



Waiting for the starting gun during the Loyola 
Relays is Capt. Ray Van De Wall (third from 
left on starting block). Directly behind Ray is 
Pete Shuflikowski anchoring the relay team. 




7- 




ffifiiiiif^ i 




1333] 



m 



'# 



■1 



? 




INTRAMURAL PROGRAM 



The intramural program was introduced at Loyola 
with the express purpose of staging competitive events 
at the non-varsity level. It gives each student the 
opportunity to partake in individual or group coin- 
petition. 

Though restricted by limited facilities, Mr. Leonard 
Zimny, intramual director, and John Owens, intra- 
mural manager, have successfully adopted a program 
to fulfill the desires created bv diversified interests. 
The schedule of standard events included: a chess 
tournament, a checkers tournament, shuffleboard, bad- 
mitton, table tennis, horseshoes, a mile track event, and 
the most successful basketball tournament ever held at 
the intramural level. 

The basketball tournament is the ape.x of the program. 
This year, the B.V.D.'s, the Lewis Towers champions, 
defeated the Hamms, the Lake Shore Campus cham- 
pions, by a score of 68-48. The most valuable plaver 



award went to John Gobby of the B.\'.D.'s. who was 
responsible for 30 points. He was ably assisted by 
Hube Owens who played to the tune of 20 points. 

Other events are also introduced into the program 
as the occasion befits. The medicine ball contest is an 
example of such an event. 

The intramural program is a positive force in ac- 
quainting the freshmen class with the various activities 
which are a part of Loyola. This year, the achieve- 
ment of the program in this vein was outstanding. The 
freshmen plaved a major role in every event. They 
were victorious in both the indixidual and group 
competition. 

At present, plans are being drawn for a bigger and 
better program. This will be achieved by the addition 
of more events into the program. This new policy is 
the result of the tremendous acceptance of the intra- 
mural program. 



A B.V.D. bucket against the Pi Alphs was badly 
in'cdt'd to insure victory. 



Badmitton: tlic frrsliman's ni<ihtmare. 





256 



Modern Robin Hoods' with ttie pigskin. 



Social event of the season: the annual Medicine 
"Ball." 



Chess is an intellectual game anywhere. 





John Genovese and Ed McGrath team up^in the 
table tennis doubles tournament. 




John Gobby, John Owens, and Bob Buckley 
smile with glee as they sum up the total points 
scored by their team, the B.V.D.'s. 




The medicine ball contest is an integral part of 
the intramural body building program. 



John Owens misses a free throw for the B.V.D.'s, 
but hits for 20 with the assistance of his team- 
mates. 




Tennis (table variety) anyone? 




Hube Owens, Ron Burton, Dave Bresnahan, 
and Ed Beisinger, discover that shufTieboard does 
not depend on your attire, but on your skill. 





Loyola Memorial Gymnasium 
Lake Shore Campus 



A DEDICATION: 



260 



These past pages have been dedicated to Leonard D. 
Sacks, Loyola's great basketball coach during 1923-42. 
Besides producing winning Maroon and Gold Teams on 
the hard courts of Alumni Gym, Leonard D. Sacks achieved 
something more substantial; he built men, men who strove 
to excellence in the physical and mental phases of their 
lives. Although Mr. Sacks passed away in 1942 while 
still in the prime of his dynamic life, the Sacksian spirit 
of building the whole man still prevails at Loyola. To 
Leonard Sacks, as to the present day Loyola athlete, it 
is not the game that counts, it is the way that the game 
is played. If the athletic field is a tiny mirror of life, then 
that Sacksian spirit is not only the spirit of Lovola's ath- 
letes, but it is the spirit of all Loyola. 



x^ 




■ 'ik 



XX 



■'-^J^-J 



y 



THANKS FOR EVERYTHING 



Since this is the first \-olume of the LOYOLAN in 
eight years, many problems occurred during the year 
which would not have been experienced if the staff and 
the University had a recent tradition on an all-university 
yearbook. These problems were quickly and effectively 
dealt with because of the great spirit and enthusiasm 
that was forthcoming from all persons concerned. This 
sincere interest and understanding of the many obstacles 
that confronted us was a constant reminder of the 
feeling of the University that this book must succeed. 

That success is now in your hands. We hope that 
it has lived up to the expectations of the student body 
and the faculty. It is the sincere wish of the editors 
and the entire staflF that this 1958 LOYOLAN has filled 
in the eyes of the students and the faculty what we felt 
was a real need and that the success of this book will 
be the rebirth of the tradition of the LOYOLAN. 

It would be impossible to thank everyone by name 
who has helped to make the LOYOLAN a reality, but 
there would be great injustice if the following were not 
thanked publicly for their efforts, sincere interest, and 
invaluable knowledge that helped to make this volume 
possible. 

Our most sincere thanks go to: 

The Very Reverend James F. Maguire, S.J., President 
of Loyola University, who, in the formulation of the 
long range plans for the development of Loyola saw 
that we must have a yearbook that would have the 
prestige of annuals published by other universities of 
our size. 

Dean Harry L. McCloskey, Dean of Students, who 
was our faculty advisor, and who, more than any 
other faculty member, worked for the rebirth of the 
LOYOLAN. 

The colleges of the University with their student 
bodies made up what was, of course, the essence of 
the book. Special thanks go to: Dean Robert Hart- 
nett, S.J. and Dean Richard Tischler, S.J., of the 
College of Arts and Sciences and their staff, especially 
Pat Mclntyre and Don Rogan, president of the Arts 
Council; Dean Schoen of the Dental School and his 
staff, especially Kathy Redman and John Sachs, presi- 



dent of the Dental Student Council; Dean John F. 
Sheen of the Stritch School of Medicine and his staff, 
especially Dr. Gallino, Dr. Selfridge, and Jerry Loftus, 
president of the Medical Student Council; Dean John 
C. Fitzgerald of the School of Law and his staff, espe- 
cially Jane Davis and Charles O'Connor, president of 
the Student Bar Association; Dean Richard A. Matre 
of University College, especially Shirley Dillman. 
Rosellen Perry and Phil Brankin, president of the 
University College Student Council; Dean J. Raymond 
Sheriff of the College of Commerce, especially Manetta 
Calkins, Beverly Chandler, Donalda MacLean, and 
Harry Fremgen, president of the Commerce Council; 
Dean Steward Dollard, S.J., of the Graduate School 
and his staff, especially Dave Smith; Dean Matthew 
Schoenbaum of the School of Social Work and his 
staff; Dean Gladys Kiniery of the Nursing School, 
especially Carol LTrbanus, president of the Nursing 
Council. 

Without the valuable technical advice of the following 
the LOYOLAN would have been a ship without a 
rudder. Our thanks go to: 

Jahn & Oilier, our engravers, and especially to two 
fine Irishmen, Bill O'Connor and John Hancock. 

Rogers Printing Company, our printer, and espe- 
cially to Ollie Rogers. 

Marshall Photographers, our professional photog- 
raphers, especially Tony Comunle and Art Sanor. 

S. K. Smith, our cover makers, especially Dick 
Dwver, whose ideas helped design our unique cover. 

We are also grateful to the Public Relations Office 
of Loyola University. 

The entire staff listed below also is deserving of a 
"job well done," and I would like to publicly thank 
Frank Fitzsimmons and Frank Smith for their fine 
work and special favors performed in the last days of 
the production of the book. 

Lastly, but far from least, I wish to thank on behalf 
of the staff, the entire student body of Loyola Uni- 
versity for its support and encouragement that made 
this book a success .... THANKS FOR EVERY- 
THING. R. F. D. 



Robert Doherty — EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

Richard Lisk — BUSINESS MANAGER 

Frank Fitzsimmons — ASSOCIATE EDITOR 
Frank Smith — PRODUCTION EDITOR 



PHOTOGRAPHERS 

Jim Moreno 
Tom Camden 
Stan Malinowski 
Jim Gubbins 



SPORTS 
Ron Burton 
Ed McGrath 
Bob Bucklev 



HELPING HANDS 

Kay Marrin 
Mary Fran Wagner 
Kay Dwyer 
Sally Salvaggio 



COPY 

John Owens 
Maureen Marlev 



Ro.xanne Slaski 
Rita Condon 
Dawn Svetich 
Terry Bruno 



John Fernandez — COPY EDITOR 

Patricia Dunphy — SENIOR EDITOR 

Charles Vygantas — SPORTS EDITOR 
John Terry — THEME EDITOR 



BUSINESS 
Bob Brown 
Tony Spina 
Mike Sartella 
Frank Mustoni 
Dick Yetter 



ENGRAVING 
John O'Brien 
Phil Cook 



Carol Anderson 
Eleanor Barnett 
Mary Donohue 
Sue Kelly 



ART 

Diane Pollash 



Bobbi Mirek 
Christine Buczak 
Annette Krai 
Donna Casey 



262 




Student Photographers Jim Moreno (left) and 
Tom Camden. 



A LOYOLAN TALKS: 



September of 1957 rolled around rather quietly for 
most people. Summer's end produced a plethora of 
students who welcomed the beginning of the fall term 
as a fitting end to three months of relaxation. But 
there is a group of Loyolans who hardly had time to 
lift their heads from their work to notice that the school 
year was beginning for some 8,500 other students. 
This group of people is the erratic LOYOLAN staff 
.... the people that put this epic together .... If 
you're interested in some of these folks, we'd like to 
tell you about them. 

First there's Bob Doherty; he's the Editor-in-Chief. 
In order for his parents to know of his whereabouts he's 
begun to write home every so often. Anyway, his ulcer 
is going away and he's begun to smile now and then. 

A fellow by the name of Dick Lisk has the hardest 
job of all; he collects the money, spends the money, 
counts the money, pays the money .... we've begun 
to call him "greenback" Lisk .... Greenback is the 
Business Manager and the rose is coming back to his 
cheeks again. 

The Associate editor is Frank Fitzsimmons; his for- 
warding address is Battabongza, Madagascar, by order 



of his physician. He handled the photos, took the 
photos, cropped the photos, chopped the photos. We 
know for sure he'll never look at another picture again. 
His aids were Jim Moreno and Tom Camden .... 
we know they will never look at Fitz again .... 

The graduating class of February, 1958 left us Patricia 
Dunphy to do a wonderful job as Seniors Editor .... 
She did such a wonderful job she nearly flunked her 
"comps." .... Now she's run off to teach somewhere 
and we never hear from her. 

Charlie Vygantas worked like the devil on Sports. 
His aids were Ron Burton and Ed McGrath. They 
worked like the devil too. 

John Fernandez handled the copy and he's taken to 
drink because of it. His aids were Frank Smith and 
John Terry .... we think they've quit drinking because 
of him .... Anyway, we guarantee every word to he. 
true, sincere, and original. 

That just about does it for the "big-cheeses" of the 
LOYOLAN. But rest assured, this epic was put to- 
gether by a "cast of thousands," and we thank them all. 

263 



ORGANIZATIONS INDEX 



Accounting Club 158 

Alpha Delta Gamma 218 

Alpha Kappa Psi 220 

Alpha Omega 94 

Alpha Sigma Nu 203 

Alpha Tau Delta 176 

A.U.S.A 185 

Blue Key Honor Society 186 

Cadence Magazine 189 

Coed Club _ 200 

Choral Society 190 

Curtain Guild 192 

Debate Society 206 

Delta Sigma Delta 96 

Delta Sigma Pi 222 

Dental School Student Council 92 

Economic-Finance Society 159 

Epsilon Pi Rho 71 

Fine Arts Club 69 

Float Parade 216 

Gerard Manley Hopkins Society 73 

Historical Society 196 

Human Relations Club 203 

Kappa Beta Gamma 224 

Loyolan 210 

Loyola News 194 

Loyola Union 180 

Marketing Club 160 

Men's Residence Hall 214 



Modern Language Society 72 

Monogram Club 202 

Phi Alpha Delta 109 

Phi Beta Pi 128 

Phi Chi 127 

Phi Mu Chi 226 

Physics Club 70 

Pi Alpha Lambda 228 

Psi Omega 95 

Res Ipsa Loquitur 108 

R.O.T.C 204 

St. Appolina Guild 93 

Sigma Alpha Rho 138 

Sigma Lambda Beta 139 

Sigma Pi Alpha 230 

Society for Advancement of Management 161 

Sodality of Our Lady: 

Lake Shore Campus 188 

Lewis Towers Campus 208 

Student American Dental Association 92 

Student American Medical Association 126 

Student Bar Association 108 

Tau Delta Phi 232 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 234 

Theta Phi Alpha 236 

LTniversity-College Student Council 136 

Variety Show 74 

Veteran's Club 198 

VVasman Biological Society 68 

Woman's Residence Hall 212 

Xi Psi Phi 97 



264 



SENIORS 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND 
SCIENCE 

ABBATE, JOSEPH S., B.S. 
Social Science 

Human Relations 4; Modern Language 
Club 2, 3, 4. 

AGNOLI, FRANCIS S., B.S. 
Biology 

Sodality of Our Lady 1, 2, 3, 4; Wasmann 
Biological Society 1, 2; Fine Arts Club 1, 2. 
AM.'^TO, JOSEPH J., B.S. 
Biology 

Wasmann Biological Society 1, 2, 3, Presi- 
dent 1; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Historical Society 
I. 

BAFFETTI, JACQUELINE C, B.S. 

Natural Science 

Wasmann Biological Society 1 ; Sodality 

1, 2, 3, 4, Executive Secretary 1; Dean's 
Leadership Award 3. 

BAKSIC, RUSSELL W., B.S. 

Biology 

VV'asmann Biological Society 1 . 

BAUMER, ROBERT L., B.S. 

BELLINI, ALBERT C, B.S. 

Social Science 

Alpha Delta Gamma 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, 

Vice-President 3. 

BERNARD, JOSEPH F., A.B. 

Humanities 

Maroon and Gold 1 ; Historical Society 

2, 3, 4; Choral Society 4. 
BIESZCZAT, M.A.RYJANE, B.S. 
Social Science 

Human Relations Club 1, 2, Vice-Presi- 
dent 1. 

BILTGEN, JOAN CAROLINE, B.S. 
Education 

Coed Club 4; Kappa Beta Gamma Society 
2; History Club 2. 
BOBER, RICHARD J., B.S. 
Social Science 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 3, 4; Choral Society 
2. 

BOCHAT, KENNETH T., B.S. 
Humanities 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Chaplain 1. 
BOWM.AN, BARBARA J., B.S. 
Humanities 

Sodality 2, 3, 4; Human Relations 2; 
Historical Society 3, 4; Coed Club 3, 4; 
Spanish Club 2. 
BOYLE, ROBERT D., B.S. 
History 
Pi Alpha Lambda 2, 3, 4; Track Team 2, 

3, 4; Historical .Society 3, 4; Maroon and 
Gold 3; .Student Associates of Loyola 4; 
Monogram Club 2, 3, 4. 
BRENNAN, RICHARD J., B.S. 

Social .Science 

Historical Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Fine Arts 

Club 3, 4; Maroon and Gold 4. 

BRUNZIE, GERALD F., B.S. 

Chemistry 

American Chemical Society 3, Chairman 1. 

BUCKUN, ANTHONY T., B.S. 

Social .Science 

Phi .Sigma Tau 4; Economics and Finance 

Club 2, 3; Veteran's Club 3, 4. 

BULA, EDWIN W., B.S. 

Natural Science 

R.O.T.C. Rifle Team 1, 2, 3, 4; .Spanish 

Club 2; Mathematics Club 3, 4; Sodality 2. 

BURKE, MARYJO J., B.S. 

Humanities 

Spanish Club 1, 2; Historical Society 1, 

2; Human Relations Club 1; Sodality 1, 

2, 3; Coed Club 2. 



CARLONE, MATILDA M., B.S. 

Humanities 

Curtain Guild 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 1; 

Latin Club 1, 2, 3, Secretary 1; Historical 

Society 2; Human Relations Club 1. 

CASA, LOUIS J., B.S. 

Humanities 

CHIAPPETTA, MICHELE F., B.S. 

Psychology 

N.F.C.dS. 2, 3, 4, Senior Delegate 2; 

Loyola News 2. 

CHUTKA, P.ATRICIA M., B.S. 

Humanities 

Historical Society 3, 4; Human Relations 

Club 3, 4; .Sodality 2, 3, 4; Modern 

Languages Club 3, 4. 

CICHOSZEWSKI, DONALD T., B.S. 

Humanities 

Human Relations Club 3, 4; Sodality 1; 

Historical Society 3, 4: Psychology Club 1. 

CLEARY, JOHN J., B.S. 

.Social .Science 

Phi Sigma Tau 3, 4; R.O.T.C. Rifle Team 

1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 4; R.O.T.C. Drill Team 

1, 2, 3, 4, Captain; .Accounting Club 4. 
CODY, BRUCE D., B.S. 
Humanities 

COGGER, COLETTE R., B.S. 

Social Sciences 

Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Big Sister Chairman 

4; Historical Society 1; Sodality of Our 

Lady 1, 2, 3; Latin Club 1, 2, 3; Human 

Relations Club 2; Student .Associates of 

Loyola 3, 4; Maroon and Gold 3. 

COMBITHS, JOAN M., B.S. 

Social .Science 

Kappa Beta Gamma 3, 4; Coed Club 1, 

2, 3, 4, Membership Chairman 2, Social 
Chairman 3; Historical Society 1, 2, 3: 
Human Relations Club 4; Sodality of Our 
Lady 1, 2, Counsellor 2; Student Associ- 
ates of Loyola 3; Fine Arts Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; .Arts Yearbook 3. 

COX, NONA, B.S. 
COYNE, MARY.ANN, A.B. 
Kappa Beta Gamma 3, 4, Recording Sec- 
retary 4; Latin Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Union 
Representative 4; Curtain Guild 3, 4. 
CULH.ANE, GERALD T., A.B. 
Humanities 

Vice-President Senior Class; Maroon and 
Gold 3: Latin Club 1, 2, 3. 
CUNNINGHAM, JOHN F., B.S. 
Humanities 
Choral Club 3, 4. 

CUNNINGHAM, ROBERT G., B.S. 
Social Science 

Alpha Kappa Psi 2; History Club 2. 
CURRAN, GEORGE E., B.S. 
Humanities 

Wasmann Biological Society 1 , 2. 
CURTIN, DENNIS P., B.S. 
Humanities 

CYGAN, HERBERT E., B.S. 
.Social Science 

.Alpha Delta Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural 
Manager 2, Secretary 3, Pledgemaster 4; 
Phi Sigma Tau 3, 4, Secretary 3; Alpha 
Sigma "Nu 3, 4; Gold Torch 1, 2, 3, Vice- 
President 3; Blue Key 4; R.O.T.C. Drill 
Team 3, 4; Maroon and Gold 2, 3, 4; 
Psychology Club 2, 3, Secretary-Treasurer 
2, Vice-President 3. 

DAIN.AUSKAS, JOHN R., B.S. 

Biology 

DALY, THOMAS A., B.S. 

Social Science 

DEF AY, JOSEPHINE F., A.B. 

Humanities 

Sodality 2, 3, 4; Coed Club 2, 3, 4; Cheer 

Leader 1; Latin Club 2, 3; Historical 

Society 3, 4. 



DEL.ANEY, EDWARD M., B.S. 
Humanities 
Veterans Club 1. 

DEL MESSIER, HELEN F., B.S. 
Social Science 
Human Relations Club 2. 
DENTZER, BERNARD N., B.S. 
Social Science 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Sergeant 
at Arms 4; .Sodality 1, 2; R.O.T.C. Drill 
Team 1, 2, 3. 

DONNELLY, JOSEPH A., B.S. 
Social Science 

.Art Council 2, 3, Vice-President 2, Sec- 
retary 3; Historical Society 2, 3, 4, Treas- 
urer 3; Human Relations Club 3, 4, 
President 4; Fine Arts Club 2, 3; Blue 
Key Fraternity 3, 4. 
DOR.ANSKI, THERESE M., B.S. 
Education 

Sodality 1, 2; Loyola News 1, 2; Historical 
Society 3; Coed Club 3. 
DOWD, JAMES J., B.S. 
Natural Science 
Physics Club 1, 2. 
DOWD, RICHARD M., A.B. 
Maroon and Gold 2; Loyola Historical 
Society 2, 3, 4; Yearbook 3. 
DUFFIE, WILLIAM B., B.S. 
Mathematics 

.Alpha Delta Gamma 2, 3, 4; Historical 
Club 3, 4; Epsilon Pi Rho (Latin Club) 

1, 2; LTnion Representative 3, 4; .Arts 
Council 4; Mathematics Club 3, 4. 
DUGG.AN, P.ATRICIAJ., B.A. 
F.ducation 

Kappa Beta Gamma .Sorority 2, 3, 4; 
Gerard Manley Hopkins .Society 4; So- 
dality 1, 2, 3, 4; Latin Club 1, 2, 3; Coed 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

DUNPHY, PATRICIA A., A.B. 
English 

Kappa Beta Gamma 2, 3, 4, Historian 3, 
President 4; Sodality of Our Lady 1, 2, 

3, 4; Loyola News 1; Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 

4, Union Representative 3; Loyola Union 
Congress 3, 4, Board of Governors 4; Fine 
.Arts Club 3, 4; Loyola Yearbook 3, 4, 
Coordinating Editor 3, Senior Editor 4. 

EMANUELE, RAFFAELA M., B.S. 
Biology 

Wasmann Biological .Society 2. 
ENGEL, EDWARD A., B.S. 
Humanities 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Pledge- 
master 1 ; Choral .Society 2, 3, 4, President 
4; Gold Torch 3; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4. 
ESLICK, DENNIS J., B.S. 
Social Science 
ETERNO,JOHN R., B.S. 
Natural Science 

Phi Mu Chi 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secre- 
tary 2, Vice-President 2; Maroon and Gold 
1 ; Wasmann Biological Society 1 . 

F.AVARO, ELIDE, B.S. 

Humanities 

Loyola Historical Society 1, 2, 3; Human 

Relations Club 1. 

FLANAGAN, THOMAS E., B.S. 

Humanities 

Pi .Alpha Lambda 1, 2, 3, 4, Historian 4; 

.Arts Council 1, President 1; Yearbook 1, 

2, 3, Editor 3; Blue Key 3, 4; Intramurals 
1, 2, 3, 4; Loyola News 1, 2, 3; L.S.C. 
News Editor 2, 3. 

FLODSTROM, JOHN H., B.A. 
Philosophy 

FOG.ARTY, DI.ANNE M., B.S. 
Natural Science 

Phi Sigma Tau 3, 4; Sodality 2, 3, 4; 
.American Chemical Society 2, 3, 4, Sec- 
retary 3. 

265 



FOLEY, MARY F., B.S. 

Education 

Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Intia- 

murals 1, 2, 3, 4; History Club 2. 

ERASER, NANCY, B.S. 

Education 

Kappa Beta Gamma 2, 3, 4, Historian 4: 

Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Historical Society 

1, 2; Student Associates of Loyola 3; 
Maroon and Gold 3. 

GARVIS, BRO. FRANCIS J., C.S.V., 
.\.B. Humanities 
GAUER, RALPH C, B.S. 
Social Science 

Psychology Club 1; R.O.T.C. Drill Team 
2; Gold Torch Club 3; Historical Society 1. 
GENSLER, G. JOAN. B.S. 
Education 

Kappa Beta Gamma 2, 3, 4, Pledgemis- 
stress 4; Sodality 2, 3, 4; Coed Club 2, 3, 4; 
Historical Society 2. 
GEOGHEGAN, MARY E., B.S. 
Education 

Human Relations Club 3, 4, Treasurer; 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Variety Show 3. 
GERBEC, GORDON J., B.S. 
Political Science 

Loyola Historical Society 1 ; Loyola Choral 
Society 1. 

GERKE, ROBERTA A., B.S. 
Social Science 

Loyola News, Reporter 2, Feature Editor 
3, Managing Editor 4; Sodality 2, 3, 4; 
Human Relations Club 3, 4; Loyola His- 
torical Society 2, 3; Gerard Manley Hop- 
kins Society 3, 4; Union Congressman 3, 4, 
GLA.NNETTI, DONALD C, B.S. 
Humanities 

Modern Language Club 3, 4. 
GLEASON, MARTIN J., B.S. 
Social Science 

Loyola Historical Society 1, 2, 3, 4, Treas- 
urer 4: Modern Language Club 2, 3; 
Maroon and Gold 3; Cadence 3; Phi 
Sigma Tau (Philosophy) 3, 4; .^rt. Nursing 
Yearbook Staff 3; Human Relations Club 
3, 4. 

GOGGIN, JOHN B., B.S. 
Alpha Delta Gamma Fraternity 2; Fine 
Arts Club 2: Historical Society 1; Market- 
ing Club 1. 

GOREY, COLETTE V., B.S. 
History 

Theta Phi Alpha 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, 4, 
Vice-President 3, 4; Loyola Historical 
Society, Secretary 3, 4. 
GORSKI, SHIRLEY M., B.S. 
Humanities 

Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Spanish Club 1, 2, 
3, 4; Historical Society 3, 4. 

H.ALL, CH.A.RLES R., B.S. 

Philosophy 

Phi .Sigma Tau 3, 4. 

HAMILL, THOMAS A.. A.B. 

HAMMER, JUDITH E., B.S. 

Philosophy 

Theta Phi Alpha 2, 3, 4, Historian 3, 

Recording Secretary 4; Phi Sigma Tau 

3, 4. " 

HARRINGTON, MARGARET M., B.S. 

Education 

Loyola Historical Society 3, 4, Secretary 

4: Loyola Coed Club 3, 4, Membership 

Chairman 4. 

HERELEY, MARY K., B.S. 

Humanities 

Loyola News 1, 2, 3, 4, Editor-in-Chief 

2, 3; Gerard Manley Hopkins Society 1, 
2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, 4; Human Relations 
Club 3, 4, Secretary 3, 4; Coed Club 1, 
2, 4; Historical Society 1, 2, 3; Cadence 2. 
HERM.ANN, ELAINE J., B.S. 
Education 

Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; History Club 2, 3; 
Human Relations Club 4; Gerard Manley 
Hopkins Society 3. 
HESSL.AU,,ROGERJ., A.B. 
Philosophy 

266 



HICKEY, THOMAS P., A.B. 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Yearbook Staff 3; 

Gerard Manley Hopkins Society 4; Loyola 

Hall Dormitory Council, Secretary 2; 

Treasurer 4, President 4. 

HIGGENS, F. EDWARD, B.S. 

Humanities 

Historical Society 1, 2, 3, 4. 

HO.A.RE, R.AYMOND R., B.S. 

Natural Science 

Wasmann Biological Society 1, 3; Fine 

.^rts Club 4; Maroon and Gold 2, 3: 

Dormitory Council 2, 3, 4, Judiciary 4; 

Variety Shows 1, 2, 3. 

HONIG, FR.A.NKJ., B.S. 

Natural Science 

Wasmann Biological Society 3, 4; Intra- 

murals 4. 

HOUSES, JAMES G., B.S. 

Humanities 

IZZO, RITA C, B.S. 

Education 

Theta Phi Alpha 3, 4; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 

4; Historical Society 1, 2, 3; Fine Arts 

Club 2, 3, 4; Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; N.F. 

CCS. 4. 

JACOBSEN, JEROME J., B.S. 
Social Science, Political Science 
Pi Alpha Lambda 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramurals 

2, 3; Historical Society 3, 4. 
JENNINGS, HOWARD J., B.S. 
Social Science 

Tau Delta Phi Fraternity 2, 3, 4, Gustos. 

JOHANNS, CHARLES F., B.A. 

Journalism 

Alpha Sigma Nu 3, 4; Blue Key 3, 4, 

Publicity Chairman 4; Loyola News 1, 2, 

3, 4, Managing Editor 3, Editor-in-Chief 
4; Historical Society 2, 3, 4. 
JOHNSON, WILLIAM R., B.S. 
English 

Sodality 4; Human Relations Club 4; 
Yearbook 4; History Club 4. 
JOYCE, JOHN M., A.B. 
JUDY, KENNETH J., B.S. 
Natural Science 

Wasmann Biological Society 1; Intra- 
murals 1, 2, 3. 

KAHR, RONALD C, B.S. 

Natural Science 
Mathematics Club 2, 3. 
KASPER, PATRICIA R., B.S. 
Natural Science 

Sodality 2, 3, 4: American Chemical 
Society 3, 4. 

KE.A.TING, BERNARD M., A.B. 
Historical Society; Veteran's Club; Latin 
Club. 

KENNICKER, RICHARD A., B.S. 
Social Science 

Veteran's Club 2; Human Relations Club 
1. 

KETT, DOROTHY I., B.S. 
Education 

Historical .Society 2. 
KIEDAISCH, WILLIAM M., B.S. 
Natural Science 

Mathematics Club 1, 3, 4; Historical 
Society 1, 2. 

KILDUFF, JAMES K., B.S. 
Humanities 

Alpha Delta Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Assistant 
House Manager 4; Historical Society 2, 
3, 4; Gerard Manley Hopkins Society 2, 
3, 4; Fine .Arts Club 3, 4. 
KING, LORRAINE M., B.S. 
Humanities 

KLAZURA, GREGORY' R., B.A. 
KONIECZNY, ROBERT B., B.S. 
History 

Historical .Society 1, 2. 
KOPROWSKI, ELAINE G., B.S. 
English 

Debating Society 1 , 2, 3, 4 Secretary- 
Treasurer 2, Vice-President 3; Modern 
Language Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Sigma Tau 
4; Loyola News 1, 2, 4; Loyolan Year- 
book 4. 



KROL, CASEY M., B.S. 

English 

Kappa Beta Gamma 3, 4; Union Repre- 
sentative 3, 4; Human Relations Club 3 
4; Coed Club 2, 3, 4; .Sodahty of Our 
Lady 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 2, Spiritual 
Chairman 3. 

KUKIELKA, RICHARD J., B.S. 
Social Science 
Phi Mu Chi 4. 

KUNKEL, JOSEPH C, A.B. 
Humanities 

Sodality of Our Lady 3, 4; Human Re- 
lations Club 2, 3, 4. 

LANCA.STER, FRANK J., B.S. 

Social .Science 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, 

4: Loyola News 3, 4; Choral Society 1, 2, 

3, 4, Vice-President 2; Human Relations 

Club 2; Arts Council 4; Fair Grounds 

Committee 2; Blue Key 3, 4. 

LANE, MICHAEL J., B.S. 

Political Science 

Loyola Historical Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Fine 

Arts Club 3, 4; Huinan Relations Club 

3, 4. 

LA VERE, JEANNE C, B.S. 

Social Science 

Coed Club 2, 3, 4; Historical Society 2, 

3, 4; Variety Show 2. 

LE.AHY, WILLIAM K., B.S. 

Social Science 

LEMIEUX, ROBERT W., B.S. 

German 

Loyola News 1; Cadence 2, 3; Modern 

Language Club 3, 4. 

LUSSON, RAYMOND C, B.S. 

Social Science 

LYNAM, JAMES E., B.S. 

Humanities 

MACHERZY'NSKI, ADRIENNE J., B.S. 
Social Sciences 

Coed Club 3, 4; Human Relations Club 
3, 4; Union Representative 3, 4; Historical 
Society 3, 4; Psychology Club 3. 
MARCOTTE, BRO. RONALDJ., C.S.V., 
A.B. History 

MARTIN, WILLIAM J., B.S. 
Social Science 

MATHEWS, ROBERT H., B.S. 
English 

Human Relations Club 1; Latin Club 1. 
M.AYER, ANDREW M., B.S. 
Humanities 

Historical Society 3; Veterans Club 4. 
McCABE, HUGH E., A.B. 
Humanities 

McCL.ATCHIE, MARY, B.S. 
Humanities 

Kappa Beta Gamma 2, 3, 4, Vice-Presi- 
dent 4; Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Historical 
Society 1,2, 3, 4; Fine Arts Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
McDONALD, JACK W., B.S. 
Chemistry 
Alpha Delta Gamma 4. 

McDonnell, lawrence j., b.s. 

Physics 

Alpha Delta Gamma 4. 
McGINLEY, JOHN P., B.S. 
.Social .Science 
MOHAN, JOHN M., B.A. 
English 

MOLEZZI, EMILY R., B.S. 
Social Science 

Theta Phi .Alpha 2, 3, 4; Historical Society 
1, 2, 3, 4; Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
MORELAND, GWENDOLYN, B.S. 
Psychology 

Human Relations Club 2. 
MRKVICKA, STEPHEN J., B.S. 
Social Science 

Pi Alpha Lambda 2, 3, 4; Varsity Basket- 
ball 2, 3; Monogram Club 2, 3, 4, Secre- 
tary-Treasurer 4; Dormitory Council 3, 4; 
Maroon and Gold 3; Historical Society 1; 
Blue Key Honor Fraternity 4. 



MYSLIWIEC, STANLEY,!., B.S. 
Political Science 

Arts Council Leadership Award 1; His- 
torical Society 1, 2, 3; Freshman Council 
1; Maroon and Gold 3. 

NEIRA, EDVn'ARD H., B.S. 

Natural Science 

Phi Mu Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; Wasmann Biological 

Society 1 . 

NOLAN, MARY E., B.A. 

English 

Kappa Gamma Gamma 2, 3, 4; Phi Sigma 

Tau 3, 4; Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Sodality 

of Our Lady 1, 2, 3, 4; Latin Club 1, 2, 

3; Gerard Manley Hopkins 4. 

NORBUT, BARBARA A., B.S. 

Social Science 

Phi Sigma Tau 3, 4; Historical Society 3; 

Human Relations Club 3, 4; Sodality 1; 

Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

OAKEY, JAMES A., B.S. 

Social Science 

Veteran's Club 4; Human Relations Club 

3, 4; Modern Languages Club 4. 

O'BRILL, ROBERT A., B.S. 

Humanities 

Human Relations Club 3, 4, Secretary 3; 

Maroon and Gold 1, 2, 3: Intramurals 2, 

3, 4; Fine Arts 2, 3, 4. 
O'NEILL, JOHN A., B.S. 
Psychology 

Historical Society 3, 4. 

PANNIER, NANCY A., B.S. 
Humanities 

Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4: Human 
Relations Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; Fine 
Arts Club 3, 4, Secretary 4; Phi Sigma 
Tau 4; History Club 4. 
PAREJKO, JAMES E., B.S. 
Humanities 

PEIFER, EILEEN M., B.S. 
Humanities 

Kappa Beta Gamma 2, 3, 4, President 4; 
Sodality of Our Lady 1, 2, 3, 4, Corre- 
sponding Secretary 2, Co-Prefect 3: Cheer- 
leader 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 4: Fine Arts 
Club 3, 4; Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4: Arts 
Yearbook 1, 2, 3, 4, Business Manager 3; 
Maroon and Gold 3. 
PERKAUS, ROBERT P., B.S. 
Natural Science 

Alpha Delta Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Sergeant- 
at-Arms 3; Sodality of Our Lady 1, 2, 3: 
Intramural Board 1, 2, 3; Maroon and 
Gold 2, 3. 

PERRIN, HENRY J., B.S. 
Humanities 

Human Relations Club 3, 4. 
PERSAUD, BHEMAL P., B.S. 
Billogy 

Sodality of Our Lady 1, 2; Foreign Stu- 
dent's Association 3, 4; Student Associates 
of Loyola 3, 4. 
PERUN, HARRY M., B.S. 
Psychology 

Modern Language Club 3, 4. 
PERRY, PRISCILLA A., B.S. 
Natural Science 

Wasmann Biological Society 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Secretary 3, 4; Sodality of Our Lady 1, 

2, 3, 4; Coed Club 1. 
PHILLIPS, ARLEN H., B.S. 
Education 

Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4: Theta Phi Alpha 

1, 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 1; 

Variety Show 1; Miss Variety 1957. 

PIERCE, GERALD J., B.S. 

Humanities 

R.O.T.C. 1, 2, 3, 4, Assistant Battalion 3, 

Executive Officer 4; Drill Team 1, 2, 3, 

4, Executive Officer 4; Rifle Team 1, 2, 

3, 4; Choral Society 3, 4; Historical 
Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4. 



PIEROTTI, GLORIA L., B.S. 
Humanities 

Theta Phi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; Historical 
Society 1, 2, 3; Fine Arts Club 3, 4; Loyola 
News 1, 2, 3, 4, Copy Editor 1, 2, LT 
News Editor 3, Executive Editor 4. 
PIRO, THERESE MARIE L., B.S. 
Education 

Coed Club 1, 2; Historical Society 1, 2. 
PLESIC, DAVID J., A.B. 
Classical Club 4; Historical Society 1; 
Modern Language Club 3. 
PLUMB, GEORGE L., B.S. 
Natural Science 

Maroon and Gold 2, 3; Wasmann Bio- 
logical Society 2, 3, 4. 
PROJANSKY, CHARLOTTE A., B.S. 
Education 

Human Relations Club 3, 4; Coed Club 
3, 4. 

RAND, BARBARA J., B.S. 

Social .Science 

Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Latin Club 1, 2; 

Historical Society 3, 4. 

REIDY, EDWARD J., A.B. 

Philosophy 

Pliilosophy Council 3, 4. 

RODGERS, LOIS, B.S. 

Huinanitics 

Theta Phi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, Historian 3 

Phi Sigma Tau 4; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4 

Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Historical Society 2 

Human Relations Club 3; German Club 

1. 2. 

ROGAN, DONALD V., B.A. 
History 

Alpha Sigma Nu 3, 4; Blue Key 3, 4; 
Historical Society 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; 
President Junior Class; Director Arts; 
Commerce Variety Show 3; President 
Arts Council 4; Fluman Relations Club 
3, 4; Latin Club 1, 2, Treasurer 1; Loyola 
Union Delegate 3, 4; Head of Arts Dele- 
gation 3, 4; Arts-Nursing Yearbook 3. 
ROSENBECK, DOROTHY A., B.S. 
Humanities 
Kappa Beta Gamma 3, 4; Coed Club 1, 

2, President 1; Sodality 2, 3; Loyola News 
1; G. R. Hopkins Society 1, 2; Sodality 
of Our Ladv 1, 2; Rose of Delta Sig 3. 
RUDIS, VIOLET A., B.S. 

Social Science 

Theta Phi Alpha 2, 3, 4; Historical Society 

2, 3, 4; Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Variety 

Show 2. 

RYAN, MARYALICE, B.S. 

Humanities 

Theta Phi Alpha 2, 3, 4, Historian 4; 

Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Historical Society 

1, 2, 3, 4; Human Relations Club 3. 
RYAN, PHYLLIS J., B.S. 
Humanities 

Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Gerard Manley Hop- 
kins .Society 3, 4; Women's Intramurals 

2, 3, 4, Director 4; Human Relations Club 
4; Historical Societv 3, 4. 
SACCONE, RICHARD A., B.S. 

Social Science 

Tau Delta Phi 3, 4, Social Chairman 3; 
Quastor 4; Human Relations Club 4. 
SANSONE, ROBERT J., B.S. 
Psychology 

Wasmann Biological Society 1 ; Psychology 
Club 3, 4. 

SAUNDERS, JOHN H., B.S. 
Humanities 

Sodality of Our Lady 3, 4. 
SAYRE, JONNA, A.B. 
Latin 

Kappa Beta Gamma 3, 4, Union Repre- 
sentative 3, 4; Latin Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Coed 
Club 1, 2, 3; Curtain Guild 1, 2, 3, 4. 
SCHAEFER, MARY A., B.A. 
English 

Phi Sigma Tau 4; Gerard Manley Hop- 
kins 1, 2, 3, 4, President 3, 4; Latin Club 
1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3: Cadence 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Loyola News 1, 2, 3; Historical Society 2. 



SCHOSTOK, STEVE J., A.B. 

History 

Alpha Delta Gamma 3, 4, Alumni Liaison 

3; Historical Society 1, 2, 3, 4. 

SCHULTZ, MARILYNN E., B.S. 

Social .Science 

Human Relations Club 3, 4. 

SHERIDAN, SUE ANN, B.S. 

Historv 

Phi Sigma Tau 1, 2, 3, 4; Historical Society 

1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3. 
SMITH, ROBERT, B.S. 
Humanities 

Sodality of Our Lady 3, 4. 
SMITH, WILLIAM JAMES, B.S. 
Social .Sciences 

SMOLVCH, WALTER J., Jr., A.B. 
History 

Historical Society 1, 2; Loyola News 1; 
Yearbook 3; Gerard Manley Hopkins 
Society 3, 4; Fine Arts Club 1, 2. 3, 4. 
SNEIDER, JAMES ROM.^N, B.S. 
Chemistry 

Pi Alpha Lambda 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; 
Blue Key 3, 4, Union Representative 4; 
Union Congress 2, 4; Interfraternity Coun- 
cil 4; Arts Council 3, 4, Vice President 4; 
Dormitory Council 3; Class Vice-President 
3; Float Parade Chairman 4; Maroon and 
Gold 2, 3; Variety Show 2, 3, Assistant 
Director 3; Yearbook 3; Dean's Leader- 
ship Award 2. 
SNIETANKA, SUE V., B.S. 
Social Sciences 

Modern Language Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Human 
Relations Club 3, 4. 
SOKOLSKI, BERN.\DINE S., B.S. 
Natural Science 

Sodality of Our Lady 1, 2, 3, 4. Secretary 
3; Students American Chemical Society 2; 
N.F.C.C.S. Representative 1. 
STRUBBE, THOMAS F., B.S. 
Humanities 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 2, 3, 4; Historical 
Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Choral Society 2, 3, 4; 
Human Relations Club 3; Freshman Bas- 
ketball 1; Sodality of Our Lady 2, 3, 4. 
SULLIVAN, EUGENE WILLIAM, A.B. 
English 

Cadence 1, 2, 3, 4; Loyola News 4; Fine 
Arts Club 2, 3, 4; Yearbook 3, Literary 
Editor 3; R.O.T.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Fine Arts 
Club 2, 3, 4, President 4. 
TESS, BERNARD RICHARD, B.S. 
Natural Science 

Phi Mu Chi 2, 3, 4; Wasmann Biological 
Society 1, 2, 3. 

THIES, BENNETT EDWARD, B.S. 
Humanities 

Phi Alpha Lambda 1, 2, 3, 4, House 
Steward 4; Blue Key 4, President 4; Cur- 
tain Guild 1, 2; Human Relations Club 
3, 4; Gerard Manley Hopkins Society 3, 
4; Fine Arts Club 3, 4; Year Book 3, 
Managing Editor 3; Loyola News 2, 3; 
Class President 4; Loyola Fair Committee 

2, 3, 4; Intramurals 1, 2. 

TOMASO, RICHARD GREGORY, B.S. 

Humanities 

Student Council 1; Historical Society 1, 

2; Curtain Guild 2; Blue and Gold 3. 

TOMEK, GEORGE EDWARD, B.S. 

Humanities 

Historical Society 3, 4; Modern Language 

Club 3, 4. 

TRAPP, CHARLES A., B.S. 

Chemistry 

Alpha Sigma Nu 1 ; Sodality of Our Lady 

2, 3, 4, Vice-Prefect 3: Students' American 

Chemical Society 2. 3, 4. 

TRYBA, RICHARD FRANK, B.S. 

Humanities 

Cadence 2, 3, 4, Art Editor 2, 3, 4; Modern 

Language Club 3, 4; Vice-President 4. 

UNGER, JOY L., B.S. 

Natural Science 

Sodality of Our Lady 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 

4; Spanish Club 1, 2, Vice-President 2; 

Theta Phi Alpha 3, 4. 

267 



UYEHARA, LORETTA T., A.B. 

Education 

Latin Club 2. 

VARALLO, FRANCIS V., B.S. 

Humanities 

Blue Key Fraternity 3, 4, President 4; Pi 

Alpha Lambda 3, 4; Loyola News Editor 

3, 4: Lovolan Yearbook 4; Maroon and 

Gold 4; Loyola Union 3, 4: Basketball 

Manager 2, 3, 4; Fine Arts Club 3, 4; 

Loyola Historical Society 4; Loyola Choral 

Society 1,2; Fraternity Man of the Year 

4; Dean's Leadership Award 3, 4; Human 

Relations Club 4. 

VITTORE, NICHOLAS A., B.S. 

Chemistry 

Alpha Delta Gamma 2, 3, 4; Gold Torch 

Club 2. 

VOGT, RICHARD H., B.S. 

Physics 

Physics Club 1 . 

WALSH, JAMES F., Jr., B.S. 

Sociology 

WALSH, JAMES J., B.S. 

Psvchologv 

Psychology Club 1, 2, Vice-President 1; 

Historical Society 1 . 

WAHER, THOMAS G., B.S. 

Education 

Human Relations Club 3, 4; Historical 

Society 1, 2; Associates of Lovola 3, 4. 

WARD, ROBERT E., B.S. 

Humanities 

Pi Alpha Lambda 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; 

Loyola L'nion 3, 4, Congressman 3, 4; 

Fine Arts Club 2, 3, 4; Gerard Manley 

Hopkins Society 2, 3, 4; Choral Society 1; 

Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Maroon and Gold 

2, 3: Student Associates of Loyola 4; Blue 

Kev Honor Fraternity 4. 

WEISBROD, CHARLES A. B.A. 

Historical Society 2; James J. Mertz 

Classical Award 3. 

WEISS, MERYL L., B.S. 

Humanities 

Historical Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Coed Club 

1, 2. 3, 4; Human Relations Club 3; 

Spanish Club 2. 

WENDELL, RONALD, B.S. 

Humanities 

Loyola News 1 , Reporter 1 ; Historical 

.Society 2; Curtain Guild 1; Variety Show. 

WINN, MICHAEL B., B.S. 

.Social Science 

Pi .Alpha Lambda 1, 2, 3, 4; Choral 

Society 1 , 2. 

WRIGHT, MARY K., A.B. 

Delta Sigma Rho 1, 2, 3; Coed Club 1, 

2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Loyola News 1, 2, 

3, 4, Feature Editor 4: Women's Intra- 
murals 1, 2, 3, 4, Board Member 3, 4; 
Gerard Manley Hopkins Society 3, 4. 
WOJCIK, EDWARD A., B.S. 

Natural .Science 

Sodality of Our Lady 1, 2, 3, 4, 1st Vice- 
Prefect 3, 4; Philarets 1, 2, 3, 4; Wasmann 
Biological .Society 1, 2, 3, 4. 
WYSOCKI, ALLEN J., B.S. 
Chemistry 

Sodality of Our Lady 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 
4; Honors Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Maroon and 
Gold 2, 3; Student American Chemical 
Society 3, 4. 

ZEMBRON, RICHARD S., B.S. 
.Social Science 

Human Relations Club 3, 4; Sodality o) 
Our Lady 3, 4. 
ZUNKER, ELLYN G., B.S. 
Biology 

Phi Sigma Tau 3, 4; Sodality of Our Lady 
3, 4; Wasmann Biological Society 1, 2, ■ 
3, 4; Coed Club 1. 
ZURLA, JERRY N., B.S. 
.Social Science 

Pi .'Mpha Lambda 1, 2, 3, 4; Freshman 
Vice-President; Historical Society 1; Cur- 
tain Guild 1. 

268 



DENTAL SCHOOL 

ELSBACH, HENRY G., D.D.S. 
L^ni\'ersity of Southern California 
Psi Omega 2. 

FLEMING, DERMOT E., D.D.S. 

Wisconsin State College 

Delta .Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4; St. Apollonia 

Guild 3, 4. 

FLYNN, ROBERT L., D.D.S. 

.St. Michael's College 

Xi Psi Phi 4, House Manager 2; Class 

Treasurer 3; St. Apollonia Guild 4. 

FUJIHARA, GLENN J., D.D.S. 

Xavier Uniyersity 

Delta Sigma Delta 3. 

GARCIA, LUIS J., D.D.S. 

Polytechnic Institute of Puerto Rico 

Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4. 

GIBLIN, JAMES M., D.D.S. 

Texas A. and M. College 

GOWGIEL, EDWARD J., D.D.S. 

L'ni\-ersity of Illinois 

Delta Sigma Delta 4, Social Chairman 1 ; 

Junior .American Dental Association 4, 

GOORM.AN, GENE R., D.D.S. 

Hope College 

Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3. 

GORMAN, JAMES E., D.D.S. 

LIniyersity of Illinois 

Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4; Student American 

Dental Association 4; St. .\pollonia Guild 

1, 2, 3, 4. 

HAIGNEY, PETER J., D.D.S. 
St. John's College 

Psi Omega; Junior American Dental As- 
sociation; St. Apollonia Guild. 
HILL, RONALD K., D.D.S. 
Lovola LIniversity 
XiPsi Phi 1, 2, 3. 

HILLENBRAND, RONALD E., D.D.S. 
Loyola LIniversity 

Delta Sigma Delta 4, Social Chairman 1 ; 
Junior American Dental Association 4. 
HINCKLEY, MACKINNON, D.D.S. 
LIniversity of Litah 
HOLOHAN, WILLIAM J., D.D.S. 
.St. Mary's College 
Psi Omega 2, 3, 4, President 4. 

JOHNSON, FORREST L., D.D.S. 

Compton College 

Xi Psi Phi 4; .Student American Dental 

-Association. 

JONES, H.ARPER L., D.D.S. 

Carroll College 

Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Vice-President 

1; Class President 3. 

KAGIANAS, WILLIAM A., D.D.S. 

De Paul LTniversity 

Psi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4. 

KAMYS, GEORGE A., D.D.S. 

Loyola LIniversity 

Psi Omega 4. 

KAMYS, WALTER F., D.D.S. 

Loyola University 

Psi Omega 4. 

KARR.AS, CHRIS, D.D.S. 

Northwestern University 

Psi Omega. 

KILLIAN, REINHOLD H., D.D.S. 

Roosevelt University 

Delta Sigma Delta 4; Junior .American 

Dental Association. 

KILLPACK, HAL J., D.D.S. 

L^niversitv of LUah 

KOSIOR, .ALBERT N., D.D.S. 

Lovola L^niversitv 

Delta Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4. 

KOSTRUBALA, BART J., D.D.S. 

Wright Junior College 

Psi Omega 4. 

KRVAVICA, RAYMOND F., D.D.S. 

Loyola LTniversity 

LAVALLEF, ROBERT W., D.D.S. 

.St. .Anselm's College 

Xi Psi Phi 4; St. Apollonia Guild 1. 



MADRO, FRANK J., D.D.S. 

Loyola L'niversity 

Delta .Sigma Delta 3, Scribe 1. 

MAGON, JOHNJ., D.D.S. 

Wilson Junior College 

Delta Sigma Delta 2, 3, 4. 

MAGNIFICO, JACK G., D.D.S. 

Rutgers College of Pharmacy 

Delta Sigma Delta 2, 3, 4. 

MANLVriS, PETER N., D.D.S. 

University of Colorado 

Psi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 2, Social 

Chairman 3; Blue Key Honor Fraternity 

4. 

MANN, MORBERTJ., D.D.S. 

Loyola University 

MARKS, RAY C, D.D.S. 

Illinois College 

Psi Omega 1,2,3, 4. 

McBEE, JOHN G., D.D.S. 

Uniyersity of Oregon 

Psi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Grand Master 3; 

Student Council 3. 

McCANN, WAYNE, D.D.S. 

LIniversity of North Dakota 

Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4. 

McDonnell, arthur g., d.d.s. 

St. Mary's College 

Delta Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4, Worthy 

Master 4; Blue Key Honor Fraternity 4. 

McKELL, MELBURN E., D.D.S. 

Brigham Young University 

Psi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Senator 1. 

MILLER, H.AROLD C, D.D.S. 

Grand Rapids Junior College 

Psi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4. 

MITCHELL, GEORGE C, D.D.S. 

St. Michael's College 

Xi Psi Phi 3; Class Treasurer 1, 2. 

MIYASAKI, DANIEL T., D.D.S. 

LTniversity of California 

Delta Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4. 

MONT.ANO, RICH.ARDJ., D.D.S. 

Los .Angeles City College 

Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4; Junior American 

Dental .Association, Vice-President 4; Blue 

Key Honor Fraternity. 

MORREY, JAMES D., D.D.S. 

Loras College 

Delta Sigma Delta 1,2,3, 4. Junior Page 

1; St. .Apollonia Guild 2. 

NILLES, JOHNJ., D.D.S. 

Loyola University 

Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 3; 

.St. Apollonia Guild 2. 

O'CONNOR, JAMES T., D.D.S. 
Loras College 

Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4; St. Apollonia Guild 2. 
OSTOJIC, NEITOR, D.D.S. 

University of Cologne 

PACER, FRED J., D.D.S. 

Northwestern LIniversity 

Psi Omega 3, 4, Intaglio 3, Editor 4; Blue 

Key Honor Fraternity 4. 

PEARA, DON.ALD E., D.D.S. 

LIniversity of Illinois 

Delta Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4. 

PENNINO, BERNARD J., D.D.S. 

Loyola L'niversity 

PFLUGER, ROBERT .A., D.D.S. 

Loyola University 

Psi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, House Manager 3, 

Secretary 4. 

PRYSTALSKI, EUGENE W., D.D.S. 

Loyola LTniversity 

Psi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4. 

PURDY^ PAUL A., D.D.S. 

St. John's LTniversity 

Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4. 

REEVE, CHARLES M., D.D.S. 
University of Minnesota 
Psi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Historian 3, Treas- 
urer 4. 

ROGERS, THOMAS J., D.D.S. 
Notre Dame LIniversity 
Psi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4. 



RUSNACZYK, WALTER F.. D.D.S. 
John Carroll University 
Psi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4. 

SACHS, JOHN M., D.D.S. 

Loyola LTniversity 

Student Council 3, 4, President 4; Blue 
Key 3, 4; Alpha Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice- 
President 3; St. ApoUonia Guild 3, 4. 
S.ASSO, J.JiCK S., D.D.S. 
Wright Junior College 
Delta Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4. 
SCHRIMF, CYRIL E., D.D.S. 
Xavier University 
Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4. 
SH.\Y, ERWLNJ., D.D.S. 
Port Hinon Junior College 
Delta Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4. 
SKOVVYRA, FRANK S., D.D.S. 
St. Michael's College 
Xi Psi Phi 4. 

SNYDER, JOHN M., D.D.S. 
LTniversity of Wisconsin 
Delta Sigma Delta 3. 
ST.^NFORD, ST.\NLEYJ., D.D.S. 
Loras College 
Psi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4. 
STINE, CORVIN F., D.D.S. 
St. Joseph's College 

Xi Psi Phi 3, 4, Vice-President 3, Presi- 
dent 4; Blue Key 3, 4; .Student Council 
3, 4. 

SYMS, JAMES W.. D.D.S. 
Loyola LTni\-ersity 
Delta Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4. 

THAN.ASOUR.^S, THOMAS, D.D.S. 

Beloit College 

Junior American Dental Association 1, 2, 

3, 4, Student Council 2, Treasurer 2; Blue 

Key Honor Fraternitv 4. 

THOMETZ, CH.\RLES F., D.D.S. 

Lovola LTniversity 

Delta Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4: St. ApoUonia 

Guild 4. 

TOOLSON, JAMES R., D.D.S. 

Brigham Young LTniversity 

THORPE. JOHN D., D.D.S. 

St. Joseph's College. 

TRAUALINL JOHN R., D.D.S. 

Boston College 

Delta Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4. 

W.ATKINS. FRANK E., D.D.S. 

Pomona College 

Delta Sigma Delta 2; Student Union 2; 

Junior .American Dental .Association .4; 

Class President 1, 2. 

WE,STERGREN, RICH.ARD C, D.D.S. 

DePaul LTniversity 

WRIGHT, THOMAS E., D.D.S. 

LTniversity of Southern California 

Delta Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4; .American 

Dental .Association 2, 3, 4; Student Union 

1, 2: Class President 3, 4; Class Secretary 

1 ; Blue Key Honor Fraternity 4. 



LAW SCHOOL 

ANDRINGA, JOHN P., J.D. 

Delta Theta Phi; .Student Bar .Association. 

BARON, WALTER ROBERT, J.D. 
BIRKHOLZ, .ARTHUR L., J.D. 
BRIDGM.AN, THOMAS F., J.D. 
Alpha Sigma Nu; Phi Alpha Delta; Recent 
Decisions; National Moot Court Contest. 
BROWN, NELSON F., J.D. 
Phi .Alpha Delta 3, 4; Student Bar Associ- 
ation; National Moot Court Contest, t 

C.ACHEY, THEODORE J., J.D. 
Phi Alpha Delta 2, 3, 4. 
CLEMENCY, ROBERT E, J.D. 
Phi .Alpha Delta 3, 4; Student Bar Associ- 
ation, Vice-President 3. 
CLOUD, ROBERT D.ANIEL, J.D. 
Phi Alpha Delta 3, 4. 
CUNNINGHAM, THOMAS E., J.D. 
Phi Alpha Delta 2, 3, 4. 



DEPKA, S. ROBERT, J.D. 

DONAUBAUER, URSULA S., J.D. 

Student Bar .Association, Chairman of the 

Board 3.t 

DUFFY, WILLIAM J, J.D. 

Phi .Alpha Delta 3, 4. 

H.ARRINGTON, ROBERT E., L.L.B. 
Blue Key 2, 3, 4, President 1 ; .Alpha Delta 
Gamma 4; Arts Council 1. 
HEFFERAN, RICHARD P., J.D. 
HILLYARD, CL.ARE L., J.D. 
HOTCHKIN, D.AVID W., J.D. 

KELLEY, JOHN P., J.D. 
Phi Alpha Delta 3, 4; Student Bar .Associ- 
ation 2, 3, 4; Class Representative 1, 2, 3, 
4; Blue Key Honor Fraternity 4. 
KOMO.S.A, EDWARD J., J.D. 

LIGHTEN, E.ARL S., J.D. 

Student Bar .Association 2, 3. 

LUCEY, GER.ALD P., J.D. 

Phi Alpha Delta 2, 3, 4; Student Bar 

Association 3; Loyola LInion 2, 3, Board 

Governors 3; Recent Decisions, Copy 

Editor 4. 

MARTIN, JAMES P., J.D. 

Phi Alpha Delta 3, Vice Justice 3. 

MARTIN, WILLIAM D., J.D. 

McNALLY, P.ATRICKJ.,Jr., J.D. 

Phi .Alpha Delta 2. 3, 4. 

McNANEY, ROBERT T., J.D. 

Phi .Alpha Delta 2, 3, 4; Blue Key 2. 3, 4; 

Recent Decisions 3. 

MICHAEL, RICH.ARD A, J.D. 

Phi .Alpha Delta 2, 3, 4; Student Bar 

.Association 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 1; Recent 

Decisions, .Associate Editor 1 ; Blue Key 

Honor Fraternity 4. 

MOLOHON, PATRICK J., J.D. 

Blue Key 2, 3; Phi Alpha Delta 2, 3, 4; 

Moot Court Commissioner 3; Recent 

Decisions 3, 4. 

MORRISSEY, FR.ANCIS D. 

Phi .Alpha Delta 3, 4; Moot Court 3, 4; 

Recent Decisions, Editor-in-Chief 4; Blue 

Key Honorary Fraternity 4. 

MURPHY, CH.ARLESJ., J.D. 

NEWM.AN. .ALLEN J., L.L.B. 
Phi .Alpha Delta 2, 3, 4; Student Bar 
.Association 2, 3, 4, Student Representa- 
tive 3; Blue Key Honor Fraternity 4. 
NYHAM, THOMAS D., J.D. 
O'CONNOR, CORNELIUS J., J.D. 
Student Bar .Association 2, 3, 4, President 
4; Blue Key Honor Fraternity 4. 

O'MEARA, WILLIAM F., Jr., J.D. 
Phi Alpha Delta 2, 3; Student Bar Associ- 
ation 1, 2, 3, Secretary 3. 

PALENICZ, RICH.ARD A., J.D. 
Phi .Alpha Delta 2. 
REYNOLDS, JOHN F., J.D. 
Phi .Alpha Delta 3. 

RISNER, GERALD C, J.D. 
ROONEY, WILLIAM J., J.D. 
Recent Decisions 2, 3, 4, Associate Editor 
1 ; Blue Key Honor Fraternity. 
RUDOLPH, CARL W., J.D. 

SMITH, ELLIS M., J.D. 
Phi .Alpha Delta 2, 3. 
SMITH, THOM.AS P., J.D. 
Phi .Alpha Delta 3, 4; Student Bar Associ- 
ation 2, 3, 4. 

STAUBITZ, SHELDON H., J.D. 
Phi .Alpha Delta 4; Student Bar .Associa- 
tion I, 2, 3, 4. 

SULLIV.AN, JOHN M., L.L.B. 
Phi .Alpha Delta 2, 3, President 3; Blue 
Key Honor Fraternity 4. 

THOMP.SON, JAMES B., J.D. 

V.AIL, JAMES N., J.D. 

VOGT, EDWARD G., J.D. 

Moot Court 1 ; Recent Decisions 2 3 

W.ALTER, PETER D., L.L.B. 



UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 

BLACK, JAMES RAYMOND, B.S.C. 

Business .Administration 

CONW.AY, ALICE RITA, B.S. 

Humanities 

CRONIN, DAVID W., B.S. 

Social Sciences 

DONOHUE, JOHN PATRICK, B.S.C. 
Business .Administration 
Alpha Sigma Nu 2, 3, 4; Blue Key 4; 
Loyola Lfnion 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; 
Sigma Lambda Beta 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 
1; Student Council 2, President 1. 

FL.AVIN, THOM.AS JAMES, B.S.C. 
Business Administration 

GORM.AN, ROBERT JOSEPH, B.S 

Sodality of Our Lady 1, 2, 3, 4. 

HAPP, EVELYN TERESA, B.S. 

Education 

HANCH, RAYMOND JOHN, A.B. 

HERZOG, DORIS A., B.S. 

Philosophy 

HUCK, JOSEPH WALTER, B.S.C. 

Business .Administration 

University Club 1; German Club 1, 2 

KUNZLER, WILLIAM JOHN, B.S.C. 
Business .Administration 
.Society for .Advancement of Management 
1, 2. 3, 4. 

LIBERTY, JOHN E., B.S. 

.Social Sciences 

LISTON, ROBERT CHARLES, B.S. 

English 

Veteran's Club 1; Historical Society 1. 

McCARDELL, EDWARD, B.S. 
Philosophy 

RYAN, THOMAS EDWARD, B.S. 

SCHLITZ, JAMES C, B.S. 

Mathematics 

Sodality of Our Lady 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, 

Social Chairman 4. 

SMOL.AR RICH.ARD BEN.ARD, B.S. 

Sociology 

THAY'ER, THOMAS EUGENE. B.S. 
Business .Administration 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 

ACKERM.ANN, JAMES E., B.S.C. 
Finance 

Delta Sigma Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Chancellor 4; 
Economics and Finance Society 3, 4. 
ARBOR, P.ATRICK H., B.S.C. 
Finance 

Curtain Guild 1; Loyola News 2; Eco- 
nomics and Finance Society 3, Treasurer 3. 

B.AECKEL.ANDT, WERNER J., B.S.C. 

Marketing 

Loyola News 1, 2; Cadence 2, 3, 4; Mar- 
keting Club 3, 4. 
BERRY, THOM.AS A., B.S.C. 
Accounting 

Tau Delta Phi 3, 4, Vice-President 4; 
Veteran's Club 3, 4, Vice-President 4. 
BL.ANK, STEPHEN JOHN, B.S.C. 
Marketing 

R.O.T.C." 1, 2, 3, 4; Society for the .Ad- 
vancement of Management 1 ; .Accounting 
Club 4; Marketing Club 3, 4. 
BLAZEJ, HENRY STANLEY, B.S.C. 
.Accounting 

Delta Sigma Pi 3, 4; .Accounting Club 2, 
3, 4, President 4, Treasurer 3. 
BOROWSKI, NORM.AN M., B.S. 
.Accounting 

Delta Sigrna Pi 1; .Accounting Club 2. 
BOYLE, EDWARD DANIEL, B.S.C. 
Management 

269 



Delta Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4; Veteran's Club 3, 
4; Society for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment 4. 

BRACKEN, ROBERT L., B.S. 
Marketing 

Marketing Club 2, 3, 4; Yearbook 3, 4. 
BRENNAN, JOHN PATRICK, B.S.C. 
Marketing 

Student Union 3, Governor 3; Veteran's 
Club 3, 4, Sergeant-at-Arms 2, Vice- 
President 2; Marketing Club 3, 4, Treas- 
urer 3, 4. 

BURKE, VIRGINIA. B.S.C. 
Accounting 

Kappa Beta Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Pledge- 
mistress 2, Treasurer 3, Alumnae Repre- 
sentative 4; Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Sodality 
of Our Lady 1, 2, 3, 4; Accounting Club 
3, 4; Historical Society 1; Commerce Coed 
Club 3, 4. 

BURTON, RONALD PATRICK, B.S.C. 
Management 

Pi .\lpha Lambda 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; 
Yearbook 4, Managing Editor 4: Society 
for the .Advancement of Management 1; 
Accounting Club 1: Gold Torch Club 1, 

2, 3, 4; Loyola Historical Society 1, 2, 

3, 4; R.O.T.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Fine .Arts Club 
3, 4; Human Relations Club 3, 4; Intra- 
murals 1, 2, 3, 4. 

C.AMBORA, ROBERT JOSEPH, B.S.C. 

Marketing 

CARNEGIE, WILLIAM JAMES, B.S.C. 
Marketing 

Marketing Club 2; Veteran's Club 2. 
CASEY, WILLIAM J., B.S.C. 
Marketing 

Marketing Club 3, 4; Alpha Kappa Psi 
3, 4. 

CAUFIELD, CH.ARLES F., B.S.C. 
Accounting 

Alpha Kappa Psi 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, 
President 4; Blue Key 4; Alpha Sigma Nu 
3, 4; .Accounting Club 2, 3, 4, Vice-Presi- 
dent 4; Loyola Union 2, 3, Vice-President 
3; Historical Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Towers 
Yearbook Staff 2; Senior Week 3, Chair- 
man 3; Interfraternity Council 3; Fine .Arts 
Club 2, 3, 4. 

CLAAHSEN, RICHARD C, B.S.C. 
Accounting 
Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4; .Accounting Club 

2, 3, 4. 

COFFM.AN, JOHN THOMAS, B.S.C. 
Marketing 

Alpha Delta Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4; Marketing 
Club 2, 3, 4; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Loyola 
Fair 2, 3, 4; Society for the .Advancement 
of Management 3; Gold Torch 1, 2, 3. 
CONDON, EDWARD JOSEPH, B.S.C. 
Management 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 3, 4; Loyola News 
Staff 3, 4; Society for the Advancement of 
Management 3, 4. 

CONNELLY, DONALD JAMES, B.S.C. 
.Accounting 

.Alpha Kappa Psi 3, 4, Treasurer 4; .Ac- 
counting Club 3, 4. 
COOMBES, RICHARD T., B.S.C. 
Marketing 

Marketing Club 3, 4. 
CZAPLA, EDWARD H., B.S.C. 
Marketing 
Marketing Club 2, 3. 4; Management Club 

DAMHESEL, JOHN FRANCIS, B.S.C. 

Accounting 

-Alpha Kappa Psi 3, 4; Accounting Club 

3, 4; Society for the .Advancement of 
Management 2. 

DEVITT, DON.ALD F., B.S.C. 

Marketing 

Marketing Club 3, 4. 

DEVLIN, WILLI.AMJ., B.S.C. 

Marketing 

Marketing Club 3, 4; Veteran's Club 3, 4. 

270 



DEWULF, JAMES N., B.S.C. 

Accounting 

Accounting Club 2, 3, 4; Lettermen's Club 

2, 3, 4; R.O.T.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 

1, 2, 3, 4, Co-Captain 4. 

DEL GHINGARO, VIRGIL B., B.S.C. 

Accounting 

DOL.AN, DEAN B., B.S.C. 

Accounting 

Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4; Accounting Club 

2, 3, 4; Yearbook 2. 
DOMBROWSKI, ROMAN L., B.S.C. 
Marketing 

Veteran's Club 3, 4. 
DONOHUE, ROBERT M., B.S.C. 
Management 

Sigma Pi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, Pledgemaster 
4; Society for the .Advancement of Manage- 
ment 1. 

DOYLE, THOMAS JOSEPH, B.S.C. 
Management 

Loyola Veteran's Club 3, 4, President 3; 
Society for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment 2, 3, 4. 

DWYER, ROBERT WILLIAM, B.S.C. 
Accounting 

ECKNER, JOEL C, B.S.C. 

.Accounting 

EPSTEIN, GERALD, B.S.C. 

Tau Delta Phi 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3, 

Treasurer 3, President 4; Marketing Club 

2, 3, 4; Loyola News Staff 4; Intramurals 

2, 3, 4. 

F.ABBRINI, ROY L., B.S.C. 

Management 

Veteran's Club 3, 4; Society for the -Ad- 
vancement of Management 4. 
FALCON, RONALD RUSSELL, B.S.C. 
FINNEGAN, JAMES PATRICK, B.S.C. 
Economics 

Economic-Finance Society 3, 4; Veteran's 
Club 3, 4; Society for the Advancement of 
Management 1. 

FREMGEN, HAROLD W., B.S.C. 
Economics 

.Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4; .Alpha Sigma 
Nu 3, 4; Blue Key 4; Commerce Council 

3, 4, Vice-President 3, President 4: Class 
President 3, 4: Economics-Finance Club 
3, 4; Historical Society 3, 4, Vice-President 
4; Loyola Union Representative 3. 4; 
Students .Associates of Loyola 3, 4. 
FRIEDER, WENDELIN, Jr., B.S.C. 
Management 

Society for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment 4. 

FRIGO, ANGELO PETER, B.S.C. 
Marketing 

Marketing Club 3, 4. 
FUESEL, ROBERT RAYMOND, B.S.C. 
Accounting 

.Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4, .Assistant Treas- 
urer 4; Accounting Club 3, 4. 

G.ALVIN, THOMAS J., B.S.C. 

Management 

.Society for the -Advancement of Manage- 
ment 1, 2, 3, 4. 
GAVIN, JAMES EARL, B.S.C. 
Marketing 

Delta Sigma Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Marketing Club 
1, 2, 3, 4: Accounting Club 1, 2; Society 
for the Advancement of Management 4; 
Raffle Committee 3, 4. 
GINNANE, MARTIN JOSEPH, B.S.C. 
Accounting 

Veteran's Club 3, 4; Accounting Club 4. 
GIOVENCO, JOHN VINCENT, B.S.C. 
-Accounting 
-Accounting Club 3. 

GR.ANN.AN, HENRY MEEHAN, B.S.C. 
-Accounting 

Alpha Kappa Psi 1,2,3, 4, -Auditing Chair- 
man 2, Social Chairman 3; Commerce 
Council 3, 4, Vice-President 3, Secretary 
4: .Accounting Club 2, 3, 4; Intramurals 
1, 2, 3, 4; Yearbook 2, 3, 4; S..A.M 7 3 



HARTIGAN, JAMES DAVID, B.S.C. 

Marketing 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4. 

HARTLER, ALEX, B.S.C. 

Marketing 

Marketing Club 2; Fine Arts Club 4. 

HAU, THOMAS CALLOPY, B.S.C. 

-Accounting 

■Accounting Club 2, 3, 4. 

HELT, ROBERT WILLIAM, B.S.C. 

-Accounting 

-Accounting Club 3, 4. 

HESSE, JOHN EMMETT 

HL.AVACEK, EUGENE L., B.S.C. 

Finance 

Econ-Finance Society 2. 

HUDGIN, RALPH PATRICK, B.S.C. 

.Accounting 

Track Team 1, 2, 3, 4, Co-Captain 4. 

HUMMELL, WILLIAM R., B.S.C. 

Management 

S.A.M. 3, 4; Veteran's Club 4. 

HUNTER, EDWARD ALBERT, B.S.C. 

Marketing 

Delta .Sigma Pi 4; Marketing Club 2. 

ILLI.AN, RICHARD JOHN, B.S.C. 

Accounting 

-Accounting Club 2; Veteran's Club 2. 

J.ANOWICZ, RICH.ARD D., B.S.C. 

.Accounting 

.Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4; Accounting Club 

2, 3, 4. 

KEEGAN, VINCENT T., B.S.C. 
Marketing 

Veteran's Club; Marketing Club. 
KELLY, JAMES GEORGE, B.S.C. 
Accounting 

-Accounting Club 2, 3, 4. 
KILEY, JOHN E. 

-Alpha Delta Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Convention 
Chairman 4, Intramural Manager 3; Mar- 
keting Club 2, 3, 4, President 4, Union 
Representative 3; Monogram Club 3, 4, 
President 4; Track Team 1, 2, 3, 4, Cap- 
tain 4: Historical Society 3; Leadership 
.Award 3. 

KING, WILLIAM V., B.S.C. 
.Accounting 

.Accounting Club 3, 4; Gold Torch 1, 2, 3. 
KOZAKIEWICZ, ALBERT JOHN 
S.A.M. 3, 4. 

KUNZER, CH-ARLES H., B.S.C. 
Marketing 
Marketing Club 

KURZ, WILLIAM LEO, B.S.C. 
Marketing 

Delta Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4; Veteran's Club 3, 
4; Marketing Club 3, 4; Intramurals 2, 

3, 4; Student Associates of Loyola 3, 4. 

L.AFRAMBOISE, JOHN PAUL, B.S.C. 

Marketing 

Veteran's" Club 2. 

LANE, ROBERT J., B.S.C. 

Marketing 

Alpha Delta Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 

1 ; Fine -Arts Club 2, 3, 4; Marketing Club 

3, 4: -Accounting Club 4. 

LE FEVRE, DE;NNIS MICHAEL, B.S.C. 

Marketing 

Marketing Club 3, 4. 

LEN.ART, JOHN v., B.S.C. 

Accounting 

Delta Sigma Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; 

Leadership Award 2, 3; Scholarship .Award 

3; Loyola Union Congress 2, 3; Student 

Associates of Loyola 3, Section Leader 3; 

Commerce A^earbook 3; Intramurals 1, 2, 

3, 4, .Sweepstake Champion 3; .Accounting 

Club 3, 4. 

LIPKIN, DON.ALD, B.S.C. 

Management 

Gold Torch 2, 3, 4; S.A.M. 1, 2, 3, 4, 

Vice-President 1 ; Association of U.S. Army 

4. 

LOBOCKI, JOHN D., B.S.C. 

Management 

S.A.M.; Econ-Finance Society. 



LUSSEM, JAMES JUDE, B.S.C. 

Management 

Alpha" Kappa Psi 3, 4; S.A.M. 3, 4, Re- 
cording Secretary 3, President 4; Econ- 
Finance Society 4; Marketing Club 3, 4; 
Gold Torch Club 1 ; Accounting Club 4. 

MACHNIK, EUGENE JOHN, B.S.C. 
Management 
S.A.M". 2. 

MAFFIA, PAUL M., B.S.C. 
Management 

S.A.M. 3, 4; Gold Torch 1, 2, 3; Ass'n of 
the U.S. Army 4; R.O.T.C. 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Lt. Col. 4. 

MARTIN, DOROTHY E. 
MATTHEI, ROBERT T., B.S.C. 
Management 

Delta Sigma Pi 3, 4; Loyola Union Con- 
gress 3; Commerce Council 4, Vice-Presi- 
dent 4; S.A.M. 3, 4; Historical Society 2. 
McCURDY, DANIEL THOMAS, B.S.C. 
Marketing 

Veteran's Club 2, 3, 4; Marketing Club 
McGOWAN, PATRICK J., B.S.C. 
Accounting 

Econ-Finance Society 4; Veteran's Club 
4; Accoimting Club 4. 
McK.A.Y, RICHARD SAMUEL, B.S.C. 
Marketing 

Alpha Delta Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4; Marketing 
Club 3, 4, Steward 4. 
McMAHON, WALTER T., B.S.C. 
Economics 

S.A.M. 3; Econ-Finance Society 4: Vet- 
eran's Club 3, 4, Treasurer 3, President 4. 
McNICHOLAS, FRANK C, B.S.C. 
-Accounting 

Alpha Kappa Psi 3, 4; Accounting Club 4. 
MERGES, ANTHONY JOSEPH, B.S.C. 
Marketing 

Pi Alpha Lambda 3, 4, Vice-President 4; 
Marketing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Yearbook 4; 
Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4. 
MORAN, JAMES BARRY, B.S.C. 
Management 

S.A.M. 3, 4; Sodality 3, 4. 
MORSE, DONALD F., B.S.C. 
Marketing 

MOTTO, ROBERT V., B.S.C. 
Accounting 

MURRIN, ROBERT L., B.S.C. 
Accounting 

Alpha Kappa Psi 3, 4; Student Council 3, 
Justice 3; Men's Dorm Judiciary 3, 4, 
Chief Justice 4; Gold Torch Club 1, 2; 
Accounting Club 2, 3, 4. 

NAGELA, DENNIS EUGENE, B.S.C. 
Accounting 

Historical Society 2; Veteran's Club 4; 
Accounting Club 4. 
NICPON,"w.'\LTER C, B.S.C. 
Management 

Alpha Kappa Psi 3, 4; Gold Torch Club 
1, 2, 3. 

NIESEN, ROBERT M., B.S.C. 
Marketing 

Alpha Kappa Psi 3, 4: Gold Torch Club 
4; Marketing Club 3, 4. 
NOL.AN, JOHN W., B.S.C. 
Management 

NOLAN, THOMAS P., B.S.C. 
Accounting 

Alpha Delta Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4; Accounting 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4, Union Repre- 
sentative; A. U.S. .A. 4, President 4; Gold 
Torch 1, 2, 3; SodaHty 1, 2, 3; Ticket 
Chairman Fall Frolic 4; Intramurals 1,2,3. 
NORRIS, RICHARD J., B.S.C. 
Management 
S.A.M. 3, 4. 

NOSEK, TERRENCE R., B.S.C. 
Marketing 

Marketing Club 3, 4; Track 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Monogram Club 2. 3 4. 
NUGENT, THOMAS F., B.S.C. 
Accounting 

Pi -Alpha Lambda 3, 4, Sergeant-at-Arms 
4; -AccountingJClub 3, 4. 



O'CONNOR, PATRICK J., B.S.C. 
Accounting 

Delta Sigma Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, Senior Vice- 
President 4; Union Congressman 3: Ac- 
counting Club 2, 3, 4; Gold Torch 1, 2, 3. 
OLK, BENEDICK A., B.S.C. 
Marketing 

Marketing Club 3, 4. 
OTIS, EDWARD A., B.S.C. 
Marketing 

Tau Delta Phi 3, 4; Marketing Club 3, 4; 
S.A.M. 3, 4; Econ-Finance Society 4; 
Loyola Fair 3, 4; Sodality 3, 4; Human 
Relations Club 4; Intramurals 1, 3, 4. 
OVAERT, WALTER A., B.S.C. 
Accounting 

Pi Alpha Lambda 3, 4; Accounting Club 
3, 4. 

OWENS, JOHN E., B.S.C. 
Finance 

PALDAUF, NORMAN J., B.S.C. 
Management 

S.-A.M. 3, 4; Econ-Finance Society 4; 
Veteran's Club 3, 4. 
P-ANAR.ALE, JOSEPH A., B.S.C. 
Management 

Alpha Kappa Psi 2. 3, 4; S.-A.M. 3, 4. 
P.ANEBI-\NCO, SAM V., B.S.C. 
Marketing 

-Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4; Marketing Club 
4. 

PAPE, PHILLIP D., B.S.C. 
Marketing 

Delta Sigma Pi 4; Marketing Club 3, 4. 
PAULO, FRANK N., B.S.C. 
Marketing 

Alpha Delta Gamma 2, 3, 4, Chapter 
Steward 4, House Manager 4, National 
Steward 4; Veteran's Club 4; Marketing 
Club 3, 4, Corresponding .Secretary 4; 
S.A.L. 3, 4; Gold Torch" 1; Commerce 
Yearbook 3. 

PAWLOWSKI, EDWARD C, Jr., B.S-C. 
Delta Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4; Loyola Union 
Congressman; Drill Team R.O.T.C; R.O. 
T.C. Rifle Team. 
PHILLIPS, -ANTHONY S., B.S.C. 
Management 
S.A.M. 1. 

PHILLIPS, DALE GEORGE, B.S.C. 
Accounting 

-Accounting Club 4; Society for -Advance- 
ment of Management 4. 
PIERCE, FRED C, B.S.C. 
Marketing 
Marketing Club 2. 
PIIKKILA, V. S., B.S.C. 
Marketing 

Marketing Club 2; Society for the Ad- 
vancement of Management 1 ; Veteran's 
Club 1. 

POLZER, ALBERT STEPHEN, B.S.C. 
Marketing 

Marketing Club 2; Veteran's Club 1. 
PONTILfS, RONALD M., B.S.C. 
Marketing 
Veteran's Club 2. 
PR-ANG, GILES N., B.S.C. 
Marketing 
Marketing Club 2. 

RETTIG, RAYMOND C, B.S.C. 
Marketing 

Marketing Club; Society for -Advancement 
of Management. 

ROMAGN-ANO, LOUIS A., B.S.C. 
Accounting 

Accounting Club 3; Veteran's Club 2. 
ROMAN, JAMES ALBERT, B.S.C. 
Management 

Delta Sigma Pi 3, Public Relations Chair- 
man 1; S.-A.M. 

ROSER, BERNARD S., B.S.C. 
Accounting 

RYAN, J-AMES WALTER, B.S.C. 
Management 

Society for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment 3, 4, Secretary 1; R.O.T.C. 1, 2, 3. 



SANTONI, DENNIS JOSEPH, B.S.C. 

Accounting 

Accounting Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

SAURIOL, MERRILL JOSEPH, B.S.C. 

Marketing 

Delta Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4; Marketing Club 

1, 2, 3, 4; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Gold Torch 

1, 2, 3; Drill Team 1, 2. 
SCHMITZ, ROBERT JOSEPH, B.S.C. 
Accounting 

Accounting Club 4. 

(SCHROEDER), SISTER M. RITA, 

OSF, B.S.C. 

-Accounting 

Historical Society. 

SCHUMI, ANDREW JOHN, B.S.C. 

-Accounting 

-Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4; -Accounting Club 

2, 3, 4. 

SCHW-ARZBAUER, JOSEPH W., B.S.C. 

Accounting 

Delta Sigma Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Drill Team 1, 2, 

3, 4, Treasurer 2, 3, 4; Accounting Club 
3, 4; Gold Torch 1, 2, 3.t 
SEEBAUER, EDMUND JOSEPH, B.S.C. 
Marketing 

Marketing Club 2. 
SKRIBA^ DON.ALD AL-AN, B.S.C. 
Management 

-Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4, Professional 
Chairman 3, 4; S.A.M. 3; R.O.T.C. 1, 
2, 3; Gold Torch 1, 2, 3. 
SLOBIC, ROBERT JAMES, B.S.C. 
Accounting 
Accounting Club 3, 4. 
SMITH, THOMAS WILLIAM, B.S.C. 
Marketing 

Marketing Club 2, 3, 4; Loyola Veteran's 
Club 3, 4, Vice-President 3, Secretary 4. 
Chairman Advertising Committee — Mar- 
keting Club — Loyola Fair 4.t 
SMYTH, JACK HUGH, B.S.C. 
Marketing 

Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4; Marketing Club, 
Vice-President l.t 
SOKLEY, CLAYTON E., B.S.C. 
Marketing 
Society for Advancement of Management 

2, 3, Union Representative 3; Veteran's 
Club 3, 4; Marketing Club 4.t 
SPLIT, THOMAS EDWIN, B.S.C. 
Finance 

Delta Sigma Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, Athletic Chair- 
man 2, 3, Professional Chairman 4; Com- 
merce Council 2, 3, Vice-President 4, Pub- 
lic Relations Chairman 4; Union Con- 
gressman 4; Blue Key National Honor 
Fraternity 4; Economics-Finance Society 

3, 4, Vice-President 4, Public Relations 
Chairman 4; Commerce Y'earbook 4; Uni- 
versity Yearbook 4; Swimming Team 1 ; 
Society for Advancement o Management 
2; Historical Society 3, 4; Student -Associ- 
ates 3, 4; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4. t 
STEPHAN, FREDERICK C, B.S.C. 
Accounting 

Alpha Kappa Psi 3, 4; Accounting Club 

2, 3, 4. 

STOPA, R-AYMOND FRANK, B.S.C 
Management 

Monogram Club 2; Society for .Advance- 
ment of Management 2; Blue Key Fra- 
ternity 1; Freshman Basketball Team 1, 
Co-Captain; Varsity Basketball Team 3, 
4; Golf Team 3, 4, Co-Captain, t 
.STREMSKI, STEVE DONALD, B.S.C. 
Finance 

Delta Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4; Economics-Finance 
Society 2, 3, 4, President 4; S.A.M. 4; 
Sodality 3; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4. t 
SWAIN, EDMUND JOSEPH, B.S.C. 
Management 
Alpha Kappa Psi 1, 2, 3, Pledgemaster 

3, 4; Varsity Basketball 2; Society for Ad- 
vancement of Management 2, 3, 4; Mar- 
keting Club 3; R.O.T.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Gold 
Torch Club 1, 2, 3; Association of U.S. 
-Army 4; Dance Committee 3; Intramurals 
1, 2, 3, 4. 

271 



TOMAZIN, JAMES URBAN, B.S.C. 
Marketing 

Alpha Kappa Psi 3, 4; Marketing Club 
3, 4; Society for Advancement of Manage- 
ment 4. 

TOMEI, DAVIDE W., B.S.C. 
Marketing 
Marketing Club 2, 3, 4. 

VALTERS, WALTER JOSEPH, B.S.C. 
Economics 

Alpha Kappa Psi 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramurals 
1, 2, 3, 4; Econ-Finance Club 4; Union 
Congressman 4. 

V.AN DE VVALLE, RAYMOND, B.S.C. 
Marketing 

Pi Alpha Lambda 1, 2, 3, 4; Swimming 
Team 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 4; Monogram 
Club 2, 3, 4, Vice-President; Loyola News 
1, 2, 3, 4: Drama Guild 1; Student Associ- 
ates of Loyola 4; Marketing Club 3, 4; 
Loyola Yearbook 3, 4. 

WESTBERG, MICHAEL BYRNE, B.S.C. 

Finance 

WILLL\MS, JOSEPH EMMET, B.S.C. 

.'\ccounting 

-Alpha Delta Gamma 3, Treasurer 1 ; 

.Accounting Club 2; Marketing Club 1; 

Fine .Arts Club 1. 

WISNiEWSKL JOHN PETER, B.S.C. 

Marketing 

.Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4: Marketing Club 

3, 4, Sergeant-at-Arms 4. 
WRIGHT, RICHARD ANDREW, B.S.C. 
-Accounting 

Pi .Alpha Lambda 2, 3, 4: Accounting 
Club 4; Chairman — Miss Varsity Contest 
4; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Z.AH-AITIS, JOSEPH JOHN, B.S.C. 

-Accounting 

Delta Sigma Pi 1 , 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, 

President 3; Loyola Student Union 2, 3, 

4, Treasurer 3; Blue Key Fraternity 3, 4; 
Commerce Council Representative 3; -Ac- 
counting Club 2. 3, 4; .Student -Associates 
3, Sectional Leader 2; R.O-T.C. 2, 3. 



ZENK, HONORE K.ATHERINE, B-S.C. 

Accounting 

Kappa Beta Gamma 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; 

Honors Program 1, 2; Historical Society 

1; Coed Club 2, 3, 4; Commerce Coed 

Club 3, 4, President 4; Accounting Club 

2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; Economics-Finance 
Society 4; Loyola Women's Residence 
Council 4, President 4; Loyolan Staff 3, 4. 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

DELL, MARY ELIZ.ABETH, B.S.N. 
S.N. A. I. 1, 2, 3, 4: Wasmann Biological 
Society 1 . 

ECKMAN, RENELLA, B.S.N. 
S.N. A. I. 1, 2, 3, 4; Sophomore Nursing 
Class President 2; Nursing Council 2, 3, 
Secretary 2; Union Representative 2; 
Alpha Tau Delta 3, 4. 
GRINA, GLORIA M-ARIE, B.S.N. 
S.N. -A.I. 1, 2, 3, 4; Freshman Nursing 
Class, President 1 ; Nursing Council Treas- 
urer 1 ; Union Representative 1 ; Coed 
Club 1. 

JUNG, C.AROLLA JOSEPHINE, B.S.N. 
S. N.A.I. 1, 2, 3, 4; Wasmann Biological 
Society 1 . 

KEMPER, J-ANE, B.S.N. 

S.N. -A.I. 1, 2, 3, 4; Sophomore Nursing 

Class Vice-President 2; Nursing Council 

2; Women's Intramural Board 1, 2, 3; 

Coed Club. 

KING, CECILE CATHERINE, B.S.N. 

S.N. .A.I. 1, 2, 3, 4; Wasmann Biological 

Society 1 : Junior Nursing Class Secretary 

3; Nursing Council 3; Alpha Tau Delta 

3, 4; Coed Club 1. 

KRUG, MARY JEAN, B.S.N. 
S.N.A.I. 2, 3, 4; Alpha Tau Delta 3, 4; 
Coed Club 2, 3; Miss Varsity 3; Cheer- 
leader 2, 3. 

LESCHER, MARY ANN, B.S.N. 
S.N.A.I. 2, 3, 4; Historical Society 2; Lake 
Shore Sodality 2; Alpha Tau Delta 3, 4; 
Coed Club 2, 3. 



MARELLI, ANN MARGARET, B.S.N. 
S.N. -A. I. 1, 2, 3, 4; Junior Nursing Class 
Treasurer 3; Nursing Council 3; Alpha 
Tau Delta 3, 4; Coed Club 1, 3. 
MILKE, MAUREEN E., B.S.N. 
S.N.A.I. 1, 2, 3, 4. 
McGUIRE, M.ARY B., B.S.N. 
S.N. -A.I. 2, 3, 4; Junior Nursing Class 
President 3; Nursing Council Vice-Presi- 
dent 3; -Alpha Tau Delta 3, 4. 

POYNTON, MARILYN -ANN, B.S.N. 

S.N.A.I. 2, 3, 4; Junior Nursing Class 
Vice-President 3; Nursing Council 3. 
SCHRAUT, ANNA M-ARIE, B.S.N. 
S.N..A.I. 2, 3, 4; Senior Nursing Class 
Secretary; Nursing Council 4; Coed Club 
2. 

RZEGOCKI, .SH-ARLENE T., B.S.N. 
S.N.A.I. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

SCULLY, MARY K-ATHERINE, B.S.N. 
S.N.A.I. i, 2, 3, 4; .Sophomore Nursing 
Class Secretary; Nursing Council 2; W^as- 
man Biological Society 1, 2; Lake Shore 
Sodality 2, 3; Coed Club 1, 2. 

SLATER, ALICE DOROTHY, B.S.N. 
S.N.A.I. 1, 2, 3, 4; Senior Nursing Class 
Treasurer: Nursing Council 4; Lake Shore 
Sodality 1, 2; Coed Club 1. 

URBANUS, CAROL ANN, B.S.N. 
S.N. -A. I. 1, 2, 3, 4; Senior Nursing Class 
President; Nursing Council 2, 4, President 
4; Loyola LTnion 1, 2, Executive Sec. 2; 
Women's Intramural Board 1, 2, 3: Coed 
Club 1, 2, 3. 

WALSH, CATHERINE, B.S.N. 

S.N. -A. I. 1, 2, 3, 4; Senior Nursing Class 

Vice-President; Nursing Council 4. 

ZABELLA, AUDREY M-ARIE, B.S.N. 
S.N.A.I. 1, 2, 3, 4; Freshman Nursing 
Class Secretary; Nursing Council 1; Lake 
Shore Sodality 1, 2; Alpha Tau Delta 3, 
4. Corresponding Secretary 3, President 4; 
Coed Club 1, 2, 3. 



272 



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