(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Loyolan"

i 






Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/loyolan1959unse 



LOYOLAN 




V 4V 



v : _ t'' V- ■ 






*n 



iA* 



•■£> 






LOYOLA 

University 



^-—^r^ ^M^L-J^ ■ B T T5 gi ti 3 



CHICAGO 

lis 







^ 



^Cj^j 









r^"*" 




KJ 




,..4.-, 



iV***fttt 



His Holiness, POPE PIUS XII 



BORN EUGENIO PACELLI, MARCH 2, 1876 

ORDAINED PRIEST, APRIL 2, 1S99 

CONSECRATED ARCHBISHOP, MAY 13, 1917 

CREATED AND PROCLAIMED CARDINAL, DECEMBER 16, 1929 

APPOINTED SECRETARY OF STATE, FEBRUARY 7, 1930 

ELECTED POPE, MARCH 2, 1939 

CROWNED AS POPE, MARCH 12, 1939 

DIED AT CASTEL GANDOLFO, OCTOBER 9, 1958 





His Holiness, POPE JOHN XXIII 



BORN ANGELO GIUSEPPE RONCALLI, NOVEMBER 25, 1881 

ORDAINED PRIEST, AUGUST 10, 1904 

CONSECRATED ARCHBISHOP, MARCH 19, 1925 

CREATED AND PROCLAIMED CARDINAL, JANUARY 12, 1953 

APPOINTED PATRIARCH OF VENICE, JANUARY 15, 1953 

ELECTED POPE, OCTOBER 28, 1958 

CROWNED AS POPE, NOVEMBER 4, 1958 



His Eminence, SAMUEL CARDINAL STRITCH 



BORN, AUGUST 17, 1887 

ORDAINED PRIEST, MAY 21, 1910 

APPOINTED ARCHBISHOP OF CHICAGO, DECEMBER 7, 1939 

CREATED AND PROCLAIMED CARDINAL, FEBRUARY 21, 1946 

APPOINTED PRO-PREFECT OF THE SACRED CONGREGATION 

FOR THE PROPAGATION OF THE FAITH, MARCH 1, 1958 

DIED AT ROME, MAY 27, 1958 





His Excellency, ARCHBISHOP ALBERT MEYER 



BORN, MARCH 9, 1903 

ORDAINED PRIEST, JULY 11, 1926 

CONSECRATED BISHOP, APRIL 11, 1946 

CONSECRATED ARCHBISHOP SEPTEMBER 24, 1953 

INSTALLED ARCHBISHOP OF CHICAGO, NOVEMBER 16, 1958 



Loyola 



is in the center of Chicago 



* 



is the center of Greatness 



Loyola's Campus 



is all of Chicago 



The 1959 Loyolan has two ends to fulfill, two stories 
to tell. First is the Chicago story, the biography of a 
city. Second is the Loyola story, the account of what 
has come to be an important part of that city. 

Birthplace of the atomic age, world renowned as a 
commerce and industry center, Chicago has become the 
core of encompassing human activity. World leader 
in air, rail, highway, and passenger transportation, 
Chicago's ideals, energy, and growth have truly earned 
it the name of great. 

Loyola's greatness is based upon an educational code 
supported by more than 300 years of Jesuit teaching 
experience. Its 1 1 colleges and schools are situated 
within the heart of the city; its graduates have con- 
sistently distinguished themselves in the city's businesses 
and professions. Loyola's facilities both contribute to 
and are strengthened by Chicago. Together, Loyola 
and Chicago represent a pattern of progress, a joint 
realization of a calling to significance. 






Table of Contents 




Introduction 


10 


The Year in Review 


-22 


Administration 


-36 


Colleges 


-60 


Loyola Highlights 


-130 


Organizations 


-146 


Greeks 


-198 


Sports 


-252 


Graduates 


-276 




This is an example of the facilities available at the institutions of higher learning in the 
Chicago area. 



The Chicago Story 



"Chicago," the Indians would say, describing the 
place near the big lake. Soon the word was used to 
designate anything big or powerful or great. Four 
centuries have seen it alter and grow; but the name has 
remained, and Chicago is still a synonym for greatness. 

Three countries have claimed the site of Chicago: 
France, in 1673-1760, because of explorations by Joliet 
and Marquette; England, in 1760-1783, through con- 
quest over France; and the United States, as the result 
of the War of Independence and a treaty with the 
Indians. 

In 1833, Chicago, with a population of 350, was 
incorporated as a town; in 1837, a population of 4,179 
gave it status as a city. The opening of the Illinois 
and Michigan canal in 1848, connecting Lake Michigan 
with the Illinois and Mississippi river systems, launched 



Chicago on its career as the nation's great central 
market place. By 1869 Chicago was an important 
railroad center, with one of its rail systems reaching to 
the Pacific coast, and was also well on its way to becom- 
ing the grain trading center of the world. 

The years 1874-1929 were a period of almost unin- 
terrupted business growth, marked by the increasing 
diversification of Chicago's industry and the birth of its 
petroleum refining and electrical appliance industries, 
today among the nation's largest. 

The period of World War II was another notable 
chapter in the city's history: nearly 450,000 Chicago 
men and women served in the armed forces; Chicago's 
industries produced more than 25 billion dollars' worth 
of war materials. 

Chicago's amazing development could not have been 



10 



accomplished without great citizens as well as great op- 
portunities. The city has always been fortunate in 
the industry of its people. To them and to their leaders 
is due a large measure of the credit for the city's re- 
markable record of progress. 

Nearly four million people live within Chicago's 
213 square miles. The city has 2,400 churches, syna- 
gogues, and other places of worship. The first Sunday 
School was begun in 1832, when the community had 
less than 100 inhabitants. Both St. Mary's Catholic 
Church and the First Presbyterian Church were organ- 
ized in 1833. The first synagogue was erected in 1849. 

The Chicago area includes 20 colleges and universi- 
ties, and over 200 technical schools. The parochial 



school system operates 376 elementary and 85 high 
schools whose attendance approximates 250,000. The 
public school system, with its 345 elementary schools, 
42 high schools, seven vocational schools, one junior 
college, and a teacher's college, has a yearly enrollment 
of 500,000. Chicago's first school, opened in 1833, 
was located above a bakery shop. 

A famous cultural center, Chicago boasts the Chicago 
Symphony Orchestra, a musical organization of inter- 
national reputation; the phenomenal lyric Opera, which 
in five years has captured world acclaim for the bril- 
liance of its productions, and a subsidy from the Italian 
government in recognition of its success; the Art 
Institute, one of the largest of its kind; numerous 



The soybean pit is a vital center of activity in Chicago's financial world. 




V-:4 








1 

I' 








|l l 




1 



"SB! 



V*: 







*&m 




One of the highlights of the summer sporting world is the 
innual All-Star game held in Soldier Field. 



theatres; and a complex of museums and libraries de- 
voted to every department of human knowledge. 

Chicago's contribution to the financing of the nation's 
Lusiness is substantial. Six of America's largest com- 
mercial banks are located here. The Midwest Stock 
Exchange, a market place for the purchase and sale 
of stocks and bonds, is the largest outside of New York. 

Chicago has 168 public parks and over 200 miles of 
boulevards. Brookfield and Lincoln Park Zoos are 
visited by nearly three million people annually. 

The 14,500 factories in the Chicago area produce 
21 billion dollars worth of goods a year, furnishing 
employment for over one million industrial workers. 
Chicago's largest industry is iron and steel. Next in 
importance are machinery, metal-working, food prod- 
ucts, printing and publishing, transportation equipment, 
chemicals, furniture, and ceramic products. 

Every mode of passenger transportation is required 
to help Chicagoans get about their city, a need which 
is better appreciated when it is understood that 950,000 
Chicagoans a day come to the central business district, 



A popular recreational area of the city is the zoo, which many Chicago animals affection- 
ately call home. 





The Chicago waterways are the arteries that bring the lifeblood of ore to the steel mills, 
Chicago's largest industrial complex. 



Another of Chicago's principal industries is meat packing, 
whose annual product is distributed throughout the country 
to feed millions of Americans. 



which is just one of 75 such districts throughout the 
city. In addition to steam, diesel, and electrically oper- 
ated railways, Chicago has one million automobiles, 
70 miles of double track elevated railways, and nine 
miles of subways. 

Chicago is served by twenty railroads which operate 
nearly one-half of the nation's total railroad mileage. 
Passenger train arrivals and departures average 1,770 
per day. The Chicago Terminal district contains al- 
most 8,000 miles of railroad tracks. 

Chicago's Midway airport, the world's busiest, ac- 
commodates 900 nights a day. O Hare International 
Field, with an area of 10 square miles, is the wor'd's 
largest airport. Air passengers handled here annually 
account for one -fourth of the nation's total air travel, 
and one-sixth of the world's. Chicago is served by 
14 mapr air lines, 12 of which offer direct service 
abroad. 

Chicago has four great daily newspapers, 54 foreign 
language newspapers, many neighborhood journals, and 
one daily newspaper devoted exclusively to business 
news. The city supports 1,783,000 telephones, 30 
radio broadcasting stations, 5 television stations, and 
two million television sets. 





_ The multiple railroad lines converging upon 
Chicago make it possible for the city's in- 
dustries and businesses to ship their products 
to every corner of the land. 



The world's busiest airport is Midway, through which pass nine million passengers a year. 




14 






Some 11,250 Chicago wholesalers do about 22 
billion dollars' worth of business a year. Leading lines 
of wholesale trade ranked according to dollar sales are 
groceries, farm products, automotive equipment, ma- 
chinery, paper, electrical goods, drugs, lumber, dry 
goods, and hardware. 

There are 75 separate shopping centers within the 
city limits, the best known of them being State Street 
with its world-famous department stores. Chicago's 
retail trade, exclusive of its mail order trade, amounts 
to 5.7 billion dollars a year. The city's mail order 
houses distribute 40 million catalogs annually, and 
account for 93 percent of the nation's total mail order 
business. 

Chicago possesses a Mayor-City Council form of 
government. The City Council is composed of 50 
aldermen representing as many city wards. The execu- 



tive branch of the city government includes the mayor, 
city clerk, treasurer, and the heads of the various city 
departments. These men administer and enforce the 
laws enacted by the legislative branch, the City Council. 
The judicial branch consists of the chief justice of the 
Municipal Court, 36 associate justices, and their clerks 
and bailiffs. The cost of running the city of Chicago 
is slightly over 700 million dollars per year. 

According to the National Research Council, 
Chicago, with its more than 1,200 industrial research 
laboratories, is the first city in the nation in industrial 
research. Scientists at the University of Chicago pro- 
duced the first atomic chain reaction. The first reactor 
for providing electric power from atomic energy was 
also made here. Argonne National Laboratory, located 
in a Chicago suburb, is the nation's leading center of 
research in the industrial uses of atomic energy. 



Millions of newspapers a year are printed and distributed in Chicago, thus making Chi- 
cagoans among the most well-informed in the world. 




THE 1959 LOYOLAN 




CHICAGO JOURNALISM 



The heart of all journalism is the news. The task 
of the journalist is gathering, recording, and distributing 
the news. As such, his function has come to be one of 
the most crucial in modern times. 

American democracy, with all its benefits, imposes 
upon its members the responsibility of active and in- 
telligent participation in their country's affairs, a re- 
sponsibility which demands that Americans themselves 
be fully and ably informed of significant personalities 
and events. 

The service, however, which a newspaper renders 
its readers goes beyond the routine recording of a specific 
event. The truth of a given situation is neither easy 



to find nor simple to portray. To bring truth alive, to 
portray it in print, requires the precision and objectivity 
which is indicative of journalism at its best. The speed 
and immediacy, moreover, with which a newspaper can 
perform its role places it in the unique position of acting 
as the historian of today, the prophet of tomorrow. 

The Loyolan, therefore, proudly dedicates its 1959 
edition to journalism and especially to the journalists 
of Chicago. The city's four major dailies, its many 
neighborhood and foreign language journals, as well as 
The New World, have demonstrated their outstanding 
dedication and skill. Chicago and the nation are richer 
for their service. 




16 




Very Rev. Msgr. John M. Kelly 
Editor 



Official Catholic Paper of the Archdiocese of Chicago and the Dioceae of Joliet 

Pope St. Pius X once said: "In vain will you found 
missions and build schools if you are not able to wield the 
offensive and defensive weapons of a loyal Catholic Press." 

Ever aware of the prime importance of a strong and 
widely circulated Catholic newspaper, The New World 
keeps Chicagoland Catholics informed of the latest and 
most important news events that in any way affect their 
lives as Catholics and Americans. Careful and extensive 
attention is given to matters of domestic, national, and 
international importance. 

To accomplish its purpose, The New World employs 
forty persons in its own offices for editorial, advertising, 
circulation, and general business operations. At an ex- 
penditure of about $20,000 per week, The New World 
brings to the faithful of the Archdiocese of Chicago and 
the Diocese of Joliet more news, pictures, features, instruc- 
tion, and advertising than any other diocesan paper in the 
country. A circulation growth of more than 128 percent 
during the last ten years is an impressive index of its success. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. The backbone of the New World 
is its editorial staff, a group of dedicated men and women 
who devote themselves to bringing to Chicagoland Catholics 
a Catholic point of view in current news events. 




17 




(Eljiragtf Wnknmt 



ROM A first edition of 400 copies pulled from a Wash- 
ington hand press on June 10, 1847, the Chicago Tribune in 

1 years has grown into one of the most widely read standard- 
sized newspapers in the United States, with a circulation that 
exceeds 900,000 on weekdays and 1,400,000 on Sundays. 

From a single room above a Chicago grocery store, its 
offices and plant, centered in world-famous Tribune Tower, 
have grown into a newspaper publishing organization encom- 
passing timberlands, paper mills, a shipping line, radio and 
television stations, and other newspapers. From a few col- 
umns of hand-set, hand-printed news, it has become a news- 
paper printed in black and white, newsprint color, color 
rotogravure, and comicolor on high speed presses of the latest 
design. 

As the Chicago Tribune moves into its 112th year of con- 
tinuous publication, its news coverage and production facilities 
are considered among the most complete and efficient avail- 
able; its editorials are regularly quoted throughout the world; 
and the annual advertising investment in its columns are un- 
surpassed by any newspaper in the world. 




W. D. Maxwell 
Editor 



Tribune Tower has been 
the home of the Chicago 
Tribune since 1925, when 
the Tower was erected 
from the design awarded 
first prize in the inter- 
national architectural com- 
petition sponsored by the 
Tribune in 1922. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS 





T 

JL HE Chicago Daily News was first published as a four- 
page newspaper on January 3, 1876. Its beginning was 
modest; it was launched with more faith than capital. Its 
editorial staff finding the only available quarters in the com- 
posing room sat on kitchen chairs and wrote copy on a rough 
pine table. It did not even own the press upon which it was 
printed. 

From the outset, the Daily News has been an independent 
newspaper. It was established in an age when partisanship 
was high, but it escaped the disadvantages and perils of polit- 
ical domination and ushered in a new era in newspaper man- 
agement. 

The Chicago Daily News was the first newspaper in America 
to establish its own world-wide news-gathering organization; 
it was the first newspaper to place advertising upon a fixed-rate 
basis and the first to use the linotype machine. 

Under the direction of John S. Knight, its editor and pub- 
lisher from 1944 to the early part of 1959, the Daily News is 
now in the process of an $11,000,000 expansion program 
which reflects the faith of the Daily News in the Chicago 
community, and the faith of that community in the Chicago 
Daily News. 

On January 5, 1959, the Chicago Daily News was sold to 
Field Enterprises, Inc., owners of the Chicago Sun-Times. 
Mr. Marshall Field, Jr., publisher of the Sun-Times, became 
the new publisher of the Chicago Daily News. 



I w 



» * W y "i ~ ■ ■ B n 

i is 



•3|, 







l I 

a i 
i 



■ *•**«« I IIS 1 1 

3 as 3 si; aa. 



ui.ii 



III! 



i 
II IB BIB 

I 



II 



s i . . 
Ptiiiii 

■iiimiiiiin 
i ildi einiBiisisiiiia'ii! 
I!l3l3IIIIIimiii3iimi 
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 li ill iiaaiiiiini 
Hi 9iiii ■i*L.<IJ , .!. , .! , - , t,!M! 



Ground for the Daily News Build- 
ing was broken on December 29, 
1927, and on June 8, 1929, the 
Daily News moved from its old 
home at 15 North Wells Street to 
its present quarters at 400 West 
Madison. 




19 




Marshall Field, Jr. 
Publisher 



CHICAGO DAILY 

SUN-TIMES 

JL HE dedication of the new Sun-Times Building in Janu- 
ary, 1958, marked the tenth anniversary of the founding of the 
Sun-Times through the merger of the Chicago Sun and the 
Chicago Times on February 2, 1948. 

A modern metropolitan newspaper has great responsibilities 
and obligations. Chief among them are those of advancing the 
interest of the community and the nation in every possible 
way; of informing the reader so fully and ably that he can 
properly exercise his own responsibilities as a citizen of a 
democracy; and the creation of a market through advertising 
for those who have goods or services to sell. 

All this, the Sun-Times believes, requires an enormous 
amount of dedication and service as well as the best physical 
equipment; hence the purpose of its plant, the newest and 
most modern in the country. 



Formally dedicated in January of 1958, the new 
Sun-Times Building symbolizes the excitement and 
adventure of publishing a great metropolitan news- 
paper. The building is located in the heart of the city 
on the north bank of the Chicago River. 




20 






The Chicago American 



T, 



HE Chicago American descends from a line of news- 
papers which has served Chicago since 1872. Though ir has 
changed, and is still changing along with the city, it has never 
departed from its zeal to serve Chicago. 

Today the American records Chicago's problems and growth; 
its vitality, humor, and humanity. It mirrors the vast changes 
taking place in Chicago's way of life. 

The American's news profile, however, is not the only side 
of its personality. Another facet consists of the top writers 
whose columns and features regularly appear in the American: 
articles by Ernest Tucker, William Gleason, and Jim Bishop; 
informative pieces by George Murray and Nate Gross; a tele- 
vision column by Janet Kern, society by Cholly Dearborn, 
business news by Hal Thompson, and sports by a notable staff 
of expert writers. 

To keep its goals firmly fixed in mind, the Chicago American 
has adopted as its slogan: "Chicago owned, Chicago edited, 
Chicago dedicated." 





Edward P. Doyle 
Executive Editor 



k 







Headquarters for the 
Chicago American is the 
American Building, lo- 
cated at 326 West 
Madison. 



21 




Union leaders Bob Dohetty, Bill Plante, Bill Hegan, and Andy Kelly, discuss a unanimous 
Congressional resolution calling for new student unions. 



22 



"£s-~ 



Loyola 1959 — 
The Year io Review 



Loyola students party it up at the annual Union Fall Frolic, one of the big fall social events. 




Kappa Beta Gamma's float was one of the many colorful entries in the Union's annual 
Pow-Wow Homecoming celebration. 



24 



•Sp— 



The Loyola Ramblers add another chapter of thrills to their sparkling court history. 





26 



Interior of the Lake Shore Campus's Madonna della Strada Chapel, one of the prominent 
architectural designs in Chicago. 



Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Lewis, generous benefactors of Loyola, are honored by the students 
and faculty at the annual Frank J. Lewis Mass. 






* * m I 



l2i>" 



Juniors Mary Koestner and Tom Haney, instruct freshman students about life at Loyola 
as part of the Maroon and Gold junior advisory program. 



may 



Members of Loyola's R.O.T.C. unit line up in formation on the Lake Shore Campus 
athletic field. 



*>*m 



Patterns of Culture 




Rev. Robert W. Mulligan, S.J., vice-president of Loyola, wel- 
comes the Japanese Consul of Chicago, Mr. Masayoshi Kawa- 
nami, and Rev. Francis K. Numazawa, S.V.D., president of 
Nanzan University, Nagoya, Japan. Father Numazawa, who 
was presented with the Loyola Key, spoke on Japanese philos- 
ophy. 



Mr. Bernard W. Cullen, distinguished young American artist 
and critic, illustrates a point from his lecture on themes in 
contemporary French painting. 





The third visiting lecturer in the series was Dr. A. Robert 
Caponigri, professor of philosophy, Notre Dame University, 
who spoke on comtemporary Italian thought. 



Man's evolving role in the universe was the subject of the 
concluding lecture by Rev. Walter Ong, S.J., associate professor 
of English at St. Louis University. 




30 



>- 



he Emergence of Personality in Ancient Society 



The emergence of personality in ancient society was 
the theme of Loyola's Biblical History Symposium. 
Four noted Biblical scholars met to discuss the follow- 
ng topics: Rev. Louis V. Zabkar, Loyola University, 
'The Relation of the Individual to his Religion"; Dr. 
George E. Mendenhall, University of Michigan, "The 



Relation of the Individual to Political Society"; Rev. 
John L. McKenzie, S.J., Loyola University, "The Person 
as Self-Conscious Individual"; Dr. E. A. Speiser, Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, "The Relation of the Individual 
to his Family." Pictured below are Father McKenzie, 
Dr. Speiser, Dr. Mendenhall, and Father Zabkar- 




Pius XII Memorial Lectures 



One of the special Enthronement Lecture Series, the 
Pius XII Memorial Lectures were delivered by four 
noted scholars. The program opened with Rev. Robert 
F. Harvanek, S.J., Ph.D., Director of Studies, Chicago 
Province, Society of Jesus, who spoke on "Pope Pius XII 
and Education in a Free World." Rev. John C. Hardon, 
S.J., S.T.D., Assistant Professor of Theology, West 
Baden Theological College, discussed "Pope Pius XII 



and Theology." "Pope Pius XII and Law" was th 
subject of a lecture delivered by John C. Fitzgerak 
LL.B., Dean, Loyola School of Law. The program wa 
concluded with a talk by John F. Sheehan, M.D., Dear 
Stritch School of Medicine, entitled "Pope Pius XII an 
Medicine." Pictured below are Dr. Sheehan, M: 
Fitzgerald, and Father Harvanek. 




32 



:'-' — 



Enthronement Series 



A special series of public academic events in vital areas of Humanities and 
the Sciences honoring the Enthronement of His Excellency, Albert G. Meyer, 
Archbishop of Chicago. 



Biblical History Symposium "A Summer Forum on the 

Philosophy of Science 

Pope Pius XII Memorial Lectures 

Seminar on the Case for Government "The Post-Graduate Seminars 

Control of Obscene Literature in Dental Studies 



A Study of Court Congestion 'Profit-Sharing in the 

in Cook County American Economy 



The Round Table Conferences on 'Special State Conference of 

Business Ethics Catholic Social Workers 



The Graduate Lectures I & II e Spring Theology Lectures 

The Summer Program of *The 19th Century . . . 

Communism Studies Man in Evolution 



33 



Graduate Lectures 




Rev. Ernest Burrus, S.J., of the In- 
stitute of Jesuit History, Rome, 
lectured on "The Opportunities for 
Research in American and Euro- 
pean Archives." 




R. S. Crane, Distinguished Servic 
Professor Emeritus, University c 
Chicago, presented the idea "Ever 
Man His Own Critic." 



Rev. William J. Kenealy, S.J., Visit- 
ing Professor of Law at Loyola, dis- 
cussed "Legal Aspects of School 
Segregation." 



Mr. William H. Lowe, treasurer of 
Inland Steel Corporation; Robert F. 
Doherty, president of the Com- 
merce Council; Andrew Kelly; Lee 
Cieslak; and Thomas Borrelli, as- 
sistant to the Dean of the Com- 
merce School. Mr. Lowe spoke on 
"Big Steel, Recession, and Reason- 
ing." 




Commerce Council Lectures 




Robert Doherty; J. Raymond Sher- 
iff; W. Allen Wallis, dean of Chi- 
cago University's School of Busi- 
ness; Leon A. Bosch, associate dean 
and director of Northwestern Uni- 
versity's Graduate School of Busi- 
ness Administration; Edmund Mc- 
Grath. Mr. Wallis and Mr. Bosch 
spoke on the M.B.A. program and 
its advantages to Loyola graduates. 



J. Raymond Sheriff, John C. Marcin, 
Robert Doherty, Andrew Kelly. At 
luncheon held at Normandy 
House, Mr. Marcin, Chicago City 
Clerk, spoke on "College Graduates 
and Chicago Politics." 




**f*^^y?*% 9 



■> 



./%. 



i *■ 



^il 1 



v 



lu — I — m^L^Wf^i 






•jf* 



o_» 



W 



To call a city great is to imply that its in- 
habitants also are great. To say that they have 
risen to extraordinary civic achievement 
reflects directly upon their own personal 
achievement. Greatness, in any form, de- 
mands the fullest command of those prin- 
ciples and values which stand above what is 
merely particular and contemporary. 

Chicago's position, then, as a great religious 
center is hardly surprising. Seat of the largest 
Roman Catholic archdiocese in the United 
States, Chicago, with its thousands of churches 
and synagogues, provides the requisite spirit- 
ual focus for its four million citizens, and the 
context for a university administration of 
proved dedication. 



• a si i ai *m siiur«i: i 







imfr isSn L ,\ '^** 3 u ■«'■'■" 1 







ADMINISTRATION 




i 




38 



Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S. J. 

Jniversity President 



Born in Chicago in 1904, Father Maguire was ap- 
pointed the twentieth president of Loyola University 
in July, 1955. 

Before assuming his position at Loyola, Father 
Maguire had been president of Xavier University, Cin- 
cinnati, and rector of West Baden College, the Jesuit 
theologate in West Baden Springs, Indiana. 

Father Maguire was born on the West Side of Chi- 
cago, across the street from St. Ignatius High School 
where he later received his secondary school education. 
Graduating in 1922, Father Maguire entered the Jesuit 
novitiate at Florissant, Missouri, took his studies at St. 
Louis University and St. Mary's College, Kansas, and 
was ordained in 1935. 

As rector of all Jesuits at Loyola, Father Maguire is 
spiritual as well as temporal leader of one of the largest 
Catholic universities in the United States. His presi- 
dency has been an unusually successful one, well suited 
to the role he has fashioned for Loyola as an influential 
center of Christian learning in an ever expanding 
Chicago. 



Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S.J. 
President of Loyola University 



<2S 



fcvi 






m^m 




i 



Board of Trustees 



Very Reverend James F. Maguire, S.J., Chairman 
Reverend Felix P. Biestek, S.J. 

Reverend Stewart E. Dollard, S.J. 

Reverend Franklin C. Fischer, S.J. 

Reverend Jerome V. Jacobsen, S.J. 

Reverend William M. Magee, S.J. 

Reverend John A. McEvoy, S.J. 

Reverend Robert W. Mulligan, S.J. 

Reverend Richard E. Tischler, S.J. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. Standing: Rev. F. P. Biestek, S.J.; Rev. F. C. Fischer, S.J.; 
Rev. R. E. Tischler, S.J.; Rev. R. W. Mulligan, S.J. Seated: Rev. S. E. Dollard, S.J.; Rev 
W. M. Magee, S.J.; Very Rev. J. F. Maguire, S.J.'; Rev. John A. McEvoy, S.J.; Rev. J. V. 
Jacobsen, S.J. 




40 




ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL. Standing: Mr. J. Raymond Sheriff; Mr. W. Daniel 
Conroyd; Mr. Harry L. McCIoskey; Mr. John C. Fitzgerald; Mr. Richard A. Matre; Rev. 
Hugh B. Rodman, S.J.; Dr. William P. Schoen, Jr. Seated: Miss Elizabeth A. McCann; 
Mr. Thomas F. Hawkins; Rev. Robert W. Mulligan, S.J.; Dr. John F. Sheehan; Very Rev. 
James F. Maguire, S.J.; Miss Gladys Kiniery; Rev. Stewart E. Dollard, S.J.; Mr. Matthew 
H. Schoenbaum; Rev. Richard E. Tischler, S.J. 



Administrative Council 



Very Reverend James F. Maguire, S.J., Chairman 



Mr. W. Daniel Conroyd 
Reverend Stewart E. Dollard, S.J. 
Mr. John C. Fitzgerald 
Mr. Thomas F. Hawkins 
Miss Gladys Kiniery 
Mr. Richard A. Matre 
Reverend A. Homer Mattlin, S.J. 
Miss Elizabeth A. McCann 



Mr. Harry L. McCIoskey 
Reverend Robert W. Mulligan, S.J. 
Reverend Hugh B. Rodman, S.J. 
Dr. William P. Schoen, Jr. 
Mr. Matthew H. Schoenbaum 
Dr. John F. Sheehan 
Mr. J. Raymond Sheriff 
Reverend Richard E. Tischler, S.J. 



-41 



The President's Council 



Very Rev. James F. Louis H. G. Bouscaren Augustine J. Bowe David F. Bremner, Sr. 



Maguire, S.J. 

Edward A. Cudahy 

Matthew J. Hickey, Jr 

Weymouth Kirkland 

Herbert E. Schmitz 

M.D. 



Homer J. Buckley Henry T. Chamberlain 



Walter J. Cummings 
Charles M. Hines 

Frank |. Lewis 
William J. Sinek 



Thomas A. Dean 

Samuel Insull, Jr. 

John L. McCaffrey 

Frederick W. Specht 



Querin P. Dorschel 

Arthur Keating 
Charles F. Murphy 
William J. Stebler 



Edward J. Farrell 

Charles H. Kellstadt 

John F. O'Keefe 

Bolton Sullivan 



Paul V. Galvin 
Charles C. Kerwin 
John Pierre Roche 

Honorable 
Philip L. Sullivan 




Business Men for Loyola 



In a complex age, no educational institution, and cer- 
tainly not a private university of Loyola University's 
scope, can exist without the assistance of its alumni 
and a host of friends. In the Businessmen for Loyola 
University, Loyola has found very staunch friends. 

Founded in the fall of 1955, the purpose of BMLU 
is to enlist financial cooperation from Chicago corpora- 
tions. Since its inception, the organization has pre- 
sented the University with more than 500,000 dollars. 
Directed by Mr. William Stebler, President of General 



American Transportation Corporation, this year's drive 
anticipates contributions totaling 175,000 dollars. 

Funds made available by BMLU are used for annual 
teachers' salary increments and the creation of new 
professorships. According to Mr. W. Daniel Conroyd, 
Vice-President, Businessmen for Loyola University have 
already made definite salary raises possible. In so 
doing, they have distinguished themselves as out- 
standing servants of the University. 



J. L. Adank 
John H. Anderson 
Louis H. Bachner 
Stephen M. Bailey 
John F. Baker 
Gerald A. Barry 
Louis H. G. Bouscaren 
Augustine J. Bowe 
Hon. Charles A. Boyle 
Clarence J. Bredcmann 
A. J. Bremner 
David F. Bremner, Sr. 
Edward G. Bremner 
Bernard T. Brennan 
James G. Brennan 
R. D. Brizzolara 
Clemens H. Bruns 
John Bryant 
Homer J. Buckley 
Francis J. Burke 
James O. Burke 
C. J. Burny 
Thomas J. Byrne, Jr. 
Richard D. Cagney 
William E. Cahill 
Andrew R. Carlson 
Anthony E. Cascino 
Thomas J. Cavanagh 
Henry T. Chamberlain 
James W. Close 
Timothy J. Connelly 
Francis M. Corby 
Philip H. Cordes 
Walter R. Costello 
F. X. Courtney 
Joseph W. Cremin 
Louis J. Cross 
John E. Crouch 
Patrick F. Crowley 
Edward A. Cudahy 
Martin A. Culhane 
Walter J. Cummings 
Walter J. Cummings, Jr. 
A. J. Cusick 
Dr. August F. Daro 
Thomas A. Dean 
Charles DeGryse 
Joshua D'Esposito, Jr. 



Angelo Dicello 

William H. Dillon, Si. 

James L. Donnelly 

James A. Dooley 

Richard F. Dooley 

William G. Dooley 

Querin P. Dorschel 

Leo J. Doyle 

William J. Drennan 

Hon. Raymond P. Drymalski 

John J. Dunn, Jr. 

Edward W. Dunne 

Raymond W. Durst 

Alexander Eulenberg 

Lawrence S. Fanning 

Edward J. Farrell 

Peter V. Fazio 

Edward Fenner 

George Fiedler 

George J. Fitzgerald 

Frank Flick 

Fahey Flynn 

John J. Foley 

Henry C. Forster 

Clarence E. Fox 

Maurice B. Frank 

Charles J. Gallagher 

Paul V. Galvin 

James H. Gavin 

Joel Goldblatt 

Louis Glunz 

Thomas D. Griffin 

William J. Halligan, Sr. 

R. Emmett Hanley 

Felix Healy 

Matthew J. Hickey, Jr. 

Charles M. Hines 

Samuel Insull, Jr. 

Bruce R. Jagor 

Howard J. Johnson 

Murray Joslin 

Robert E. Joyce 

John S. Kavanaugh 

Thomas E. Keane 

Joseph S. Kearney 

Arthur Keating 

Joseph W. Kehoe 

Paul A. Keim 



Charles J. Kellstadt 
John E. Kenney 
Edmund J. Kenny 
Charles C. Kerwin 
Edward M. Kerwin 
John J. Kinnare 
Weymouth Kirkland 
T. W. Kleisner 
Frank P. Knoll 
Leonard O. Krez 
Anthony J. Kueber 
Francis H. Kullman, Jr. 
Elmer F. Layden 
William A. Lee 
Frank J. Lewis 
Thomas A. Lewis 
Eugene K. Lydon 
Frank J. Lynch 
William J. Lynch 
William C. MacDonald 
John Madden 
James R. Martin 
Howard G. Mayer 
John L. McCaffrey 
lames B. McCahey, Jr. 
Fdwin B. McConville 
Morgan F. McDonnell 
John J. McDorough 
William L. McFetridge 
John B. McGuire 
H. V. McNamara 
John E. McNulty 
Henry W. Meers 
Edward A. Menke 
Joseph E. Merrion 
Jim Moran 
John T. Moran 
Edward J. Morrissey 
Paul L. Mullaney 
Charles F. Murphy 
Herbert F. Murphy 
John A. Naghten 
T. Clifford Noonan 
Frank B. O'Brien 
Vincent O'Brien 
John F. O'Keefe 
William P. O'Keefe 
Norton O'Meara 



William F. O'Meara 
John F. O'Shaughnessy 
Michael F. Peckels 
James R. Quinn 
Frank C. Rathje 
Ben Regan 
Thomas Reilly 
Harlan Richards 
John H. Riley 
Burke B. Roche 
John P. Roche 
Charles J. Roubik 
Charles Rozmarek 
Anthony J. Rudis 
Daniel Ryan 
M. L. Samson 
Edward Sauter 
Dr. Herbert E. Schmitz 
L. E. Schoenbrunn 
Thomas W. Sexton 
Edward D. Sheehan 
J. Glenn Shehee 
Vincent J. Sheridan 
William J. Sinek 
John F. Smith, Jr. 
John M. Smyth, Jr. 
Frederick W. Specht 
Carlos A. Spiess 
A. L. Starshak 
William J. Stebler 
Nelson D. Stoker 
Bolton Sullivan 
John P. Sullivan 
Hon. Philip L. Sullivan 
Dario L. Toffenetti 
Frank H. Uriell 
Joseph E. Valenti 
Dr. Arkell M. Vaughn 
Charles S. Vrtis 
Leo Wacholz 
John J. Waldron 
Donald J. Walsh 
Frank Wetzel 
Frank M. Whiston 
William P. White, Jr. 
Elmer J. Whitty 
John C. Wright 
Eugene R. Zacher 



43 



Citizens Board 



Several years ago, to mark the occasion of Loyola 
University's 75 th Anniversary of service to Chicago, 
the Loyola University Citizens Board was formed. Pur- 
poses of the Citizens Board are to acquaint citizens of 
Chicago with the distinctive character of Loyola Uni- 
versity's educational program; to inform leading Chi- 
cagoans of Loyola's contribution to the community and 
to the nation; to come to know members of Loyola's 
faculty; to interpret by publicity the activities of the 
University; to aid the University's program of teaching 
and research; and to further the cause of higher educa- 
tion. 

The membership of the Board consists of leading 
business executives and professional leaders. The 



Citizens Board meets five times a year. At the luncheon 
meetings faculty members of the University present 
subjects of interest in their fields of specialization. 

Through these meetings the contributions and serv- 
ices of the University to the city and country become 
more widely known to the citizens of Chicago. The 
Citizens Board provides a medium through which the 
public may become acquainted with and interested in 
the distinctive type of education Loyola offers. The 
University and the Jesuit community have labored to 
enrich the cultural life of the city, and to instill in the 
alumni and students the ideals of democracy and good 
citizenship which are the concomitants of the religious 
and philosophic education each receives. 



CITIZENS BOARD. Seated at the speaker's table are Mr. Thomas A. Lewis of White, 
Weld and Company; Mr. Cushman B. Bissell of Lord, Bissell and Brook; Mr. Augustine 
J. Bowe of Bowe and Bowe, Chairman of the Citizens Board of Loyola; Very Rev. James 
F. Maguire, S.J., President of Loyola; Mt. Louis J. Cross of Hornblower and Weeks; Mr. 
Samuel Insull, Jr., of Insull Insurance Agency; Mr. W. Daniel Conroyd, Vice-President of 
Loyola. 




44 



■t^.1 ' - -)— » 



Members of the Citizens Board 



Mr. Frank Ahlforth 

John D. Allen 

H. Leslie Atlass 

Mr. Charles A. Bane 

Gerald A. Barry 

O. D. Bast 

Thomas H. Beacom 

Robert L. Berncr 

Dr. Otto L. Bettag 

Cushman B. Bissell 

Andrew R. Bopp 

Louis H. G. Bouscaren 

Augustine J. Bowe 

William J. Bowe 

Malcolm J. Boyle 

A. J. Bremner 
David F. Bremner, Sr. 
Bernard T. Brennan 
James G. Brennan 
James J. Brennan 
John E. Brennan 
Mr. Ralph D. Brizzolara 
Edward Eagle Brown 
Howard A. Brundage 
Clemens H. Bruns 
Homer J. Buckley 
Francis J. Burke 
James O. Burke 
Robert E. Burke 
Leo Burnett 
C. J. Burny 
Thomas J. Byrne. Jr. 
W. Jerome Byrnes 
Julien J. Caestecker 
Mr. Richard D. Cagney 
Dr. James J. Callahan 
Hon. William J. Campbell 
Andrew R. Carlson 
Wallace E. Carroll 
Anthony E. Cascino 
Joseph J. Cavanagh 
Thomas J. Cavanagh 
Leo D. Cavanaugh 
Henry T. Chamberlain 
John A. Clark 
John W. Clarke 
James W. Close 
Philip Conley 
Timothy J. Connelly 
Mr. D. Vincent Considine 
Francis M. Corby 
Walter R. Costello 
Louis J. Cross 
~ol. Henry Crown 
Edward A. Cudahy 
Martin A. Culhane 
Walter J. Cummings 
Walter J. Cummings, Jr. 
Henry J. Curran 
A. J. Cusick 
Andrew J. Dallstream 
J. Francis Dammann 
Thomas A. Dean 



Donald Defrees 

Charles DeGryse 

William H. Dillon, Sr. 

William J. Donahoe 

James L. Donnelly 

George T. Donoghue 

James F. Donovan 

James A. Dooley 

Richard F. Dooley 

Mr. William G. Dooley 

Querin P. Dorschel 

Edward J. Doyle, Sr. 

Leo J. Doyle 

Hon. Raymond P. Drymalski 

Edward W. Dunne 

Hon. Robert Jerome Dunne 

Joseph F. Elward 

Mr. Raymond Epsrein 

Alexander Eulenberg 

John W. Evers 

Mr. Lawrence S. Fanning 

Peter V. Fazio 

Edward Fenner 

George Fiedler 

George J. Fitzgerald 

Matthew J. Fitzgerald 

Leonard S. Florsheim 

John J. Foley 

Mr. Clarence E. Fox 

Arrhur J. Gallagher 

Paul V. Galvin 

James L. Garard 

Lee J. Gary 

Frank J. Gillespie 

Mr. John S. Gleason, Jr. 

Louis Glunz 

Maurice Goldblatt 

Thomas A. Grant 

Thomas D. GrifKn 

Charles J. Haines 

George S. Halas 

William J. Halligan, Sr. 

Dr. Eugene A. Hamilton 

R. Emmett Hanley 

Felix Healy 

Matthew J. Hickey, Jr. 

Matthew J. Hickey, III 

Thomas J. Higgins 

Raymond M. Hilliard 

John B. Huarisa 

James T. Igoe, Jr. 

Hon. Michael L. Igoe 

Samuel Insull, Jr. 

Bruce R. Jagor 

Clarence B. Jennett 

Howard J. Johnson 

Murray Joslin 

Walter J. Joy, Jr. 

Robert E. Joyce 

Frank Karrheiser 

John S. Kavanaugh 

Arrhur Keating 

Joseph S. Kearney 



Edward Keating 
Paul A. Keim 
Peter M. Kelliher 
George A. Kelly 
John J. Kelly 
Hayes Kennedy 
W. McNeil Kennedy 
John E. Kenney 
Charles C. Kerwin 
Edward M. Kerwin 
John P. Kiley 
John J. Kinnare 
Weymouth Kirkland 
John S. Knight 
Hon. Win G. Knoch 
Leonard O. Krez 
Francis H. Kullman, Jr. 
Hon. Walter J. LaBuy 
Dr. Paul E. Lawler 
William J. Lawlor, Jr. 
Russell J. Leander 
William A. Lee 
Arthur T. Leonard 
Frank J. Lewis 
Thomas A. Lewis 
Stuart List 
Edward C. Logelin 
Eugene K. Lydon 
Bernard W. Lynch 
Frank J. Lynch 
Richard Lynch 
William J. Lynch 
John Madden 
Walrer J. Madigan 
John J. Maher 
James R. Martin 
Howard G. Mayer 
John L. McCaffrey 
James B. McCahey, Jr. 
Edwin B. McConville 
Hon. John V. McCormick 
Morgan F. McDonnell 
John J. McDonough 
William L. McFetridge 
William J. McGah 
John P. McGoorry 
John B. McGuire 
Ivan A. McKenna 
Martin J. McNally 
Harlcy V. McNamara 
John E. McNulty 
Henry W. Meers 
Joseph E. Merrion 
Dr. Joseph T. Meyer 
John T. Moran 
Michael F. Mulcahy 
Edward F. Mulhern 
Paul L. Mullaney 
Charles F. Murphy 
Herberr F. Murphy 
Joseph D. Murphy 
Morgan Murphy 
John A. Naghren 
Cyrus H. Neuses 



Vincent O'Brien 
Harry J. O'Haire 
James L. O'Keefe 
John F. O'Keefe 
William P. O'Keefe 
Robert A. O'Reilly 
Marcellus M. Oshe 
Michael F. Peckels 
James M. Pigott 
Paul M. Plunkett 
Robert A. Podesta 
Harry W. Puccetti 
James R. Quinn 
William J. Quinn 
Frank C. Rathje 
Ben Regan 
Henry Regnery 
Thomas A. Reynolds 
John H. Riley 
G. Gale Roberson 
Burke B. Roche 
John Pierre Roche 
Charles J. Roubik 
Anrhony J. Rudis 
George F. Salerno 
Joseph P. Savage 
John Schmidt 
Dr. Herbert E. Schmitz 
Thomas W. Sexton 
Admiral D. F. J. Shea 
J. Glenn Shehee 
Leo J. Sheridan 
Vincent Sheridan 
Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr. 
William J. Sinek 
Jackson W. Smart 
John F. Smith, Jr. 
John M. Smyth, Jr. 
Fred B. Snite 
Frederick W. Specht 
A. L. Starshak 
William J. Stebler 
Joseph D. Stockton 
Bolton Sullivan 
John P. Sullivan 
Joseph F. Sullivan 
Hon. Philip L. Sullivan 
Stuart J. Templeton 
William B. Trayr.or 
Hon. William J. Tuohy 
Francis H. Uriell 
Dr. Arkell M. Vaughn 
J. W. Voller, Sr. 
Herman Waldeck 
John J. Waldron 
Irwin N. Walker 
Donald J. Walsh 
J. Harris Ward 
Frank M. Whisron 
Philip O'Connell White 
Elmer J. Whitty 
James C. Worthy 
Eugene R. Zacher 
Russell A. Zimmerman 



45 




Rev. Robert W. Mulligan, S.J., S.T.L, Ph.D. 
Vice-President and Dean of Faculties 



Harry L. McCloskey, M.B.A. 
Dean of Students 



W. Daniel Conroyd, B.S.C., J.D. 

Vice-President for Development, Public 
Relations and Alumni Relations 



Thomas F. Hawkins, C.P.A. 

Vice-President and Business Manager 



46 




ACCOUNTING AND PURCHASING DEPARTMENTS. Loyola's financial transac- 
tions and its supply needs are responsibly and efficiently handled by the Accounting and 
Purchasing Departments. 




Office of the Dean of Students 




The office of the Dean of Students reptesents the 
University Committee on Student Activities and Wel- 
fare. Under the chairmanship of the Dean of Students, 
the function of this committee is to set and regulate 
policies relating to all student organizations with the 
exception of religious organizations, and the over-all 
student organization of the individual colleges and 
schools. 

Mr. Harry McCloskey, the Dean of Students, acts as 
coordinator of the various programs of the office of the 
Dean of Students. The student welfare program also 
falls within his jurisdiction. 

Miss Mariette LeBlanc, the Dean of Women, has 
supervision of the activities and welfare of the women 
students of the University. Counselling women stu- 
dents, assisting them in the formation of new activities, 
and administering the women's residence hall are her 
major functions. 



Mariette LeBlanc, A.M. 
Dean of Women 



COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND WELFARE. Mr. James Forkins, 
Mr. William Meyer, Mr. William Plante, Miss Essie Anglum, Mr. Harry McCloskey, 
Miss Pearl Heffron, Dr. Clarence Peiss. Absent from picture. Miss Colette Springer, 
Dr. Gustav Rapp, Rev. Gerard G. Grant, S.J., Rev. J. Donald Roll, S.J., Mr. Joseph 
McCulIough, and Rev. Joseph Small, S.J. 




- 



George N. Kollintzas 

Assistant Dean of Students 



Miss Joan Vaccaro, the Assistant Dean of Women, 
coordinates undergraduate women's activities and assists 
in the counselling of new women students. In addition, 
she is housing director for Loyola Hall, the women's 
residence hall, off-campus approved housing, and faculty 
housing. She is also the Director of the Coed Club. 

Mr. George Kollintzas holds the position of Assistant 
Dean of Students and Director of the Loyola Union. 
As Assistant Dean of Students, Mr. Kollintzas assists 
in the promotion and coordination of the programs 
of the office of the Dean of Students. As Director of 
the Loyola Union, he is responsible for the Union's 
business operations and Union-sponsored activities such 
as Charity Day, the Loyola Fair, the Freshman Orienta- 
tion Days, the Pow-Wow, and Senior Week. 



Joan Vaccaro 
Assistant Dean of Women 



5TAFF OF THE OFFICE OF THE 
DEAN OF STUDENTS. Nora Kaufman, 
Mary Marie Limpert, Jan Wulff. 






Rev. John C. Malloy, S.J., A.M. 
Dean of Admissions 




Mary R. Manzke, B.S. 
University Examiner of Credentials 



ADMISSIONS OFFICE PERSONNEL. Mrs. Elizabeth Walter, Thomas J. Dyba, Loretta 
Herman. 















John F. Bowman 
Director of Development 




Arnold R. Schaid 
Associate Director of Development 




DEVELOPMENT, PUBLIC RELATIONS, AND ALUMNI RELATIONS OFFICE 
PERSONNEL. Through the efforts of this energetic group Loyola and its accomplish- 
ments are made known to those outside the University. 



51 




Eugene J. Kennedy, B.S.C., M.S. 
Director, Alumni Relations 



Elizabeth A. McCann, A.M. 
Registrar 




Thomas M. Kennedy, Ph.D. 
Director, Student Personnel 



Richard Barry, B.S.C. 
Direcror, Public Relations 




REGISTRAR'S OFFICE. Frances O'Connor, Joyce Byron, Elizabeth I.eisner, Dolores 
Schanken. 





BURSAR'S OFFICE. Marianne Veselets; Cecilia Wasisco, Bursar; Dorothy Tydingco; 
Eleanor Adornetto; Elizabeth Wehner. 



53 



Rev. William A. Finnegan, S.J. 
Student Counselor 



Rev. Joseph F. Hogan, S.J. 
Student Counselor 







Rev. John P. Downey, S.J. 
Student Counselor 



Rev. A. Homer Mattlin, S.J., S.T.L., A.B.L.S., A.M. 
Librarian 



54 



wmmmmmmmmm 




Paul R. Huber, M.D. 

Director, Student Health 



Hugh McAvoy 
Director, Student Placement 




LEWIS TOWERS LIBRARY STAFF. Christina Saletta, Ruth Carney, Rev. Leonard R. 
Stachura, C.S.V. 




55 





William L. Lamey, J.D. 
Legal Counsel for the University 



Nancy Gallagher 
Editor, The Alumnus 





Stanley Szydlik 
Director, Radio and Television 



PLACEMENT OFFICE STAFF. Miss Rose- 
mary Deegan and Miss Loretta Jones. 



56 



■S^nBi 



mmmmmmmmm 



in invaluable asset to the Administration is the conference, where the problems and 
ecisions of the University are discussed and resolved. The conference room and the 
inference table are symbols of the Administration's interest in thoughtful discussion 
i promote the continued success of the University. 







=\&g 



HB 




Rev. James J. Mertz, S.J., extends a grateful thank you to the Executive Committee of the 
Parents Associates of Loyola on behalf of the University for a successful program. 



Parents Associates of Loyola 



The admissions program of the Parents Associates 
of Loyola constitutes an important part of the over-all 
development plan for Loyola University. Established 
in the spring of 1957, its specific purpose is to en- 
courage the parents of high school seniors to talk to 
their sons and daughters about Loyola and the bene- 
fits of a Jesuit education. PAL accomplishes its end 
by appointing parents of present Loyola students to 
contact the parents of high school seniors. The Parents 
Associates feel that many questions of a personal nature, 
questions regarding Loyola's tuition, its educational 
programs and facilities, can most effectively be answered 
informally; hence PAL's determination to develop a 



personal touch through the phone calls and home visits 
of its workers. 

The success of the program is demonstrated by PAL's 
record for the past year. Under the chairmanship of 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Ostendorf, PAL workers contacted 
the parents of 2,740 high school seniors; from this num- 
ber, over 5 percent of the students concerned expressed 
an interest in attending Loyola. 

In view of the achievements of its formative years, 
the program of the Parents Associates of Loyola 
seems earmarked for valuable and lasting service to the 
University. 



58 



Students Associates of Loyola 



The Students Associates of Loyola have recently com- 
peted their third successful year of operation. Under 
he chairmanship of Larry Bruozis, Lewis Towers Arts 
enior, 200 SAL workers contacted 1,325 high school 
eniors. 

Organized in the autumn of 1956, SAL originally 
onducted its business through the office cf the Dean 
if Admissions. At the present, SAL is part of the 
Jniversity's development program. 

More than any other organization at Loyola, SAL 
;ives its members an opportunity to render direct serv- 



ice to the University. The most important function of 
Loyola students in the program is the guidance which 
they can give to graduating high school seniors. College 
students are most effectively equipped to answer the 
questions of those about to begin their university 
education. 

As it has developed, the SAL program has been able 
to enlist an ever increasing amount of student support, 
due mainly to the role various fraternal and academic 
organizations have assumed in its expansion. All indi- 
cations point to its continued success. 



AL LEADERS. Standing: Tom Brennan, Tom LaVelle, Pat Kubistal, Bob Olson, Eileen 
'fcNulty, Hank Tufo, Dave O'Neill. Seated: Mr. Arnold Schaid, Very Rev. James F. 
iaguire, S.J., Larry Bruozis. 



■I...' 




I 



., .'h [, 











A city, to succeed, must adequately fulfill its needs. 
Chicago's response to its citizens' demands for in- 
tellectual development has been to create the world's 
most diversified educational center. With its 34 col- 
leges and universities, its 450 parochial and 400 
public schools, Chicago's school system serves nearly 
a million students annually. Three unique research 
libraries, 800 public and private libraries, great 
museums offering graphic instruction in every major 
academic discipline, the world's largest art school, 
and a major musical center bear dramatic testimony 
to a seldom-considered facet of Chicago's greatness. 
The following pages describe Loyola's participation 
in Chicago's educational pattern. 



COLLEGES 





■ .., 



;****, 




Rev. Stewart E. Dollard, S.J. 
Dean 



Paul Kiniery, Ph.D. 
Assistant Dean 




GRADUATE SCHOOL 



The primary end of a school is the education of the 
student; the primary end of the Graduate School is the 
transformation and development of the student into a 
competent scholar. To be successful in cooperating 
with the college's purpose, the student must be able to 
work independently; he must be motivated by the un- 
quenchable intellectual curiosity which stems from a 
deep love of and compelling interest in knowledge, par- 
ticularly for its own sake. These qualities, if culti- 
vated and permitted to mature, will produce the gradu- 
ate student who is accurate, thorough, and successful. 
He must be acquainted with and well-versed in the 
standard elementary courses, for these will be his tools 
as a researcher. He must, in addition, be a critical and 



orignal thinker, able to consolidate his own knowledge 
and conclusions with those received from many years 
of study. This consolidation must then be applied 
toward scholarly contributions in his field of endeavor. 
Most important, the graduate student must be persistent 
in times of trial and failure, and able to rely upon the 
self-confidence which at times will be his only spur to 
action. 

In answer to constantly increasing demands for ad- 
vanced instruction, the Graduate School was established 
as a distinct unit of the University by the Reverend 
William H. Agnew, S.J., in September, 1926. At pres- 
ent, the dean is the Reverend Stewart E. Dollard, S.J. 



(.2 



IFFICE PERSONNEL OF THE GRAD- 
ATE SCHOOL. Susan Schoeben and 
fary Agnes McDonnell. 




Graduate student, Mrs. Gloria Johanns, makes use of reference material available in the 
Graduate School office to complete an assignment for her graduate studies in English. 




63 





Rev. Hugh B. Rodman, S.J. 
Associate Dean 



Rev. Richard £. Tischler, S.J. 
Dean 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



"The true Christian product of Christian education," 
Pope Pius XI stated, "is the supernatural man who 
thinks, judges, and acts constantly and consistently in 
accordance with right reason illumined by the super- 
natural light of Christ's example and teaching." 

The function of Loyola University's College of Arts 
and Sciences is to form the type of individual spoken 
of by Pope Pius XL The aims of the College are to 
enable students to better know and understand the 
principles of which they are composed: soul, body, and 
mind; to be able to distinguish between the erroneous 
and true; and to fully develop the student's capacities 
for later happiness, success, and perfection. 

The liberal arts college forms the core of the Jesuit 
plan of education. The significance of these arts is 



that they are most truly equipped to prepare leaders oi 
society by integrating general education, cultural im- 
provement, and professional excellence with Catholic 
philosophy. 

United with Christian ideals, the liberal arts posses; 
the ability to mold the individual into the "whole man,' 
physically, socially, and spiritually perfect. The char 
acteristics of this type of formative curriculum neces 
sarily stress the basic and Christian disciplines. 

Liberal arts training is of tremendous value. It give! 
people trained for the professions knowledge beyond th( 
particular interests of their specialties. The liberal arts 
indeed, enable the individual to "evaluate life with th( 
wisdom of the ages and of eternity." 



64 



ILOGY FACULTY. Standing: Dr. Boris 
off, Dr. Frank E. Halleck, Dr. Edward 
'alincsar, Robert E. Pearson, Dr. Kenichi 
-lisaoka. Seated: Virginia A. Kuta, John 
Hudson, Dr. Benedict J. Jaskoski. 




Lloyd L. Arnold, Ph.D. 
Chairman, Natural Science Department 



TURAL SCIENCE FACULTY. Louis 
ichet, Mrs. Marjorie C. Andre, Dr. Rich- 
W. Balek. 



Raymond P. Mariella, D.Sc. 
Chairman, Chemistry Department 




CHEMISTRY FACULTY. Dr. Harvey W. Posvic, Dr. Edward 
C. Lim, Dr. John F. Reed, Dr. Raymond P. Mariella, Dr. 
Frank P. Cassaretto, Dr. John L. Huston, Dr. Carl E. Moore. 





John M. Wozniak, Ph.D. 
Chairman, Education Department 



EDUCATION FACULTY. Standing: Doug 
las F. Van Bramer, Arthur P. O'Mara, Di 
Henry R. Malecki, Elizabeth T. Mollahar 
Carter M. Frieberg, Dr. Ernest I. Proulx, Dl 
Harry L. Wellbank, Dr. Samuel T. Mayc 
William W. Meyer, Dr. John A. Wellingto: 
Seated: Dr. Jasper J. Valenti, Rosemary I 
Donatelli, Dr. John M. Wozniak, Margare 
M. Dagenais. 



66 



LASSICAL LANGUAGES FACULTY. 
ev. Theodore J. Tracy, S.J., Dr. Leo M. 
aiser, Dr. D. Herbert Abel, Rev. James J. 
!ertz, S.J., Rev. Laurence E. Henderson, S.J., 
narles Weisbrod. 



Rev. James J. Mertz, S.J. 
Chairman, Classical Languages Department 





ENGLISH FACULTY. Top picture, standing: Dr. Joseph J. 
Wolff, Dion J. Wilhelmi, Thomas R. Gorman, Dr. Martin J. 
Svaglic, Dr. Earl John Clark. Seated: Dr. Patrick J. Casey, 
Mary Jane Kearney, Marilyn J. DeMara, Ruth McGugan, 
Rev. Edward L. Surtz, S.J. Bottom picture, standing: James 
E. Kulas, Edward A. Morin, Harold B. Murphy, John S. 
Brennan, Dr. James D. Barry, Julius V. Kuhinka, Dr. George 
J. Engelhardt. Seated: Rev. Carl J. Stratman, C.S.V., Jocye C. 
Gutzeit, Rita C Clarkson, Dr. Ligeia C. Gallgaher, William J. 
Dempsey. 




John S. Gerrietts, Ph.D. 
Chairman, English Department 





Paul S. Lietz, Ph.D. 
Chairman, History Department 



HISTORY FACULTY. Standing: Hubert J. Miller, J. Michael Hayden, 
Sue Sheridan, Donald Rogan, Dr. Kenneth M. Jackson. Seated: Anne 
T. Molloy, Paul I. Davis, Dr. Margaret M. O'Dwyer, Dr. Robert W. 
McCluggage, Dr. Franklin A. Walker, Rev. John A. Kemp, S.J., Rev. 
Louis Zabkar, Rev. Charles E. Ronan, S.J., Dr. Edward T. Gargan, Rita 
C. Kucera, Dr. William R. Trimble. 



MATHEMATICS FACULTY. Dr. Richard J. Driscoll, Joseph J. 
Zajdel, Rev. Charles H. Rust, S.J., Rev. Francis J. Gerst, S.J., Dr. 
Robert B. Reisel, John J. Connelly. 





Rev. Charles H. Rust, S.J. 
Chairman, Mathematics Department 



^> 



ILITARY SCIENCE FACULTY. Stand- 
g: M/Sgt. Walter J. Duffey, M/Sgt. Clyde 
Martin, M/Sgt. Stanley S. Stann, M/Sgt. 
'alter K. Jorgensen, M/Sgt. Harold J. 
svatt. Seated: Capt. Kenneth R. Rees, Lt. 
al. James L. McCrorey, Capt. John D. 
agin, Capt. Robert F. Gallagher. Missing: 
;t. Boyde L. Simpson. 



Lt. Col. James L. McCrorey, Jr. 

Chairman, Military Science Department 





MODERN LANGUAGE FACULTY'. Stand- 
ing: Dr. Leo M. Kaiser, Rev. Francis J. 
Ladowicz, Dr. Albin Liaugminas, Winifred 
Bowman, Dr. Michael J. Flys, Joseph 
Wandel, Dr. Mario Federici. Seated: Dr. 
Joseph LeBlanc, Dr. Graciano Salvador. 




Joseph LeBlanc, Ph.D. 

Chairman, Modern Language Departmcnr 



09 



Rev. Robert W. Mulligan, S.J. 
Chairman, Philosophy Department 



Rev. J. Donald Roll, SJ. 

Chairman, Physics Department 



Rev. Paul A. Woelfl, S.J. 
Chairman, Political Science Department 



Rev. Michael J. O'Brien, C.S.V. 

Chairman, Psychology Department 





PHYSICS FACULTY. Dr. Theodore G. 
Phillips, Rev. J. Donald Roll, S.J., John M. 
Melchiors. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE FACULTY. Stand- 
ing: Frank M. Covey, Dr. Francis Schwarzen- 
berg, Dr. Joseph F. Menez. Seated: Rev. 
Joseph F. Small, S.J., Rev. Paul A. Woelfl, 
S.J., Dr. Arthur C. Marlow. 



PSYCHOLOGY FACULTY. Standing: Dr. 
Halmuth H. Schaefer, Dr. Robert C. Nicolay, 
Rev. Michael J. O'Brien, C.S.V., Dr. Robert 
N. Traisman, Dr. Horacio J. Rimoldi, 
Joseph R. Devane, James A. Becker, Paul J. 
Von Ebers. Seated: Rev. Charles A. Curran, 
Marcella A. Twomey, Dr. Magda B. Arnold, 
Rev. William J. Devlin, S.J., Rev. Charles 
I. Doyle, S.J. 

'HILOSOPHY FACULTY. Thomas J. 
iuckley, Rev. Joseph V. Loftus, S.J., Nelson 
i. LaPlante, Rev. J. Vincent Kelly, S.J., Dr. 
ohn F. Bannan, Dr. Joseph J. Sikora, Rev. 
.othar Nurnberger, S.J., Rev. Robert W. 
Mulligan, S.J., Robert J. Armamentos, Dr. 
tichard C. Hinners, Rev. J. Donald Hayes, 
I.J., Gerard Egan, Rev. John P. Downey, 
J., Edward Wojciechowski, Rev. Gerard 
}. Grant, S.J. 




Rev. Ralph A. Gallagher, S.J. 
Chairman, Sociology Department 





SOCIOLOGY FACULTY. Dr. Paul Mundy, Rev. Sylvester 
A. Sieber, S.V.D., Dr. Francis A. Cizon, Rev. Ralph A. 
Gallagher, S.J. 



Donald H. Dickinson, M.F.A. 
Chairman, Speech Department 



SPEECH FACULTY. Standing: William C. Morris, Donald 
J. Stinson, Donald H. Dickinson. Seated: Catherine M. Geary, 
Pearl M. Heffron. 




Rev. Lester J. Evett, S.J. 
Chairman, Theology Department 



72 




THEOLOGY FACULTY. Standing: Rev. Edward F. Maher, S.J., Rev. Louis Zabkar, 
Rev. Thomas J. Bryant, S.T., Rev. William A. Dehler, S.J. Seated: Rev. George A. 
Slominski, Rev. Lester J. Evett, S.J., Rev. Cornelius J. Bresnahan, C.S.V. 



Students return from Tau Delta Phi's basketball trip to Marquette where they witnessed 
an exciting performance by the Ramblers and the Warriors. 




73 




A dreaded but necessary chore of each stu- 
dent is registration, where the semester's 
work is planned and arranged with an eye 
toward those "easy A's." 




Rev. Robert Liska, S.J., of Detroit, Michigan, 
directs the male students of the Arts School 
through the spiritual exercises of their an- 
nual retreat, an integral part of the Uni- 
versity's spiritual program. 




A view of the Lewis Towers Lounge not 
often seen is the one of the women who 
devotedly serve the students light snacks 
and refreshments between classes. 



Arts Council 



The Arts Council was established to foster the mental, 
moral, and physical development of the students of the 
College of the Arts and Sciences; to support student 
activities; and to develop friendly relations between 
students and faculty. 

The Council is composed of the executive officers of 
the Council, the class officers elected by the Arts stu- 
dents, an interfraternity representative, a Sodality rep- 
resentative, a Blue Key National Honor Fraternity 
representative, and a nursing representative. 

This year's Arts Council activities included the Junior 
Advisory Program for freshmen; the Arts Council 
Dance, which was held at the Morrison Hotel; class 
parties; the production operations of the Variety Show; 
the Beanie Bounce; and the organizations picnic, which 
was held at the end of the school year. 




ARTS COUNCIL OFFICERS. Mel Kamm, 
vice-president; Jim Gorman, treasurer; John 
Dentzer, president; Maureen Kaveny, secre- 
tary. 



ARTS COUNCIL: Standing: John O'Keefe, Dominic Fabbri, Bill Pederson, Matt 
Wheeler, Maury McCarthy, Tom Camden, Mike Hartman, Bill Hegan. Seated: Quin 
San Hamel, Larry Bruozis, Frank Konicek, Kevin McKeough, Peggy Fischer. 




75 



Arts Council Activities 




Officials of the Arts Council welcome guests 
to the annual Arts Council Dance, which 
was held this year at the Morrison Hotel. 



A muddy but exciting event of the Arts 
Council is the annual tug-of-war between 
the freshmen and sophomores of the Arts 
School. 



76 




An annual event for the members of the 
freshman class is rhe Arts Council's Beanie 
Bounce, where the fellows reclaim the 
beanies from the girls in exchange for a 
dance. 



An evening filled with the fun of a costume 
party was found by all who attended the 
Bohemian Binge, sponsored by the sopho- 
more class of the Arts School. 



Members of the Junior Advisory Program 
recall amusing incidents of their counselling 
the freshmen students of the Arts School. 






Rev. Michael J. Montague, S.J. 
Dean of Philosophy 



Rev. Walter L. Farrell, S.J. 
Rector 



WEST BADEN COLLEGE 



The Chicago Province of the Society of Jesus ac- 
quired the West Baden Springs Hotel on June 28, 
1934, and transformed it into West Baden College, an 
affiliate of Loyola University reserved exclusively for 
the education of Jesuit seminarians. 

This "Eighth Wonder of the World," which for 
decades had been a favorite vacation resort for Chi- 
cagoans and whose circular structure boasted the world's 
widest unsupported dome, soon was stripped of its finery 
and fitted out with the more austere raiment of an 
institution dedicated to prayer and study. With its 
School of Philosophy and School of Theology, West 
Baden College has become the training center for most 
of the Jesuits working in the Chicago area. 

In the past twenty-three years West Baden College 
has assumed its proper place among the divisions of 
Loyola University. On July 31, 1945, the school was 



constituted a Pontifical Institute and was empowered to 
grant the canonical degree of Licentiate in Philosophy. 
Special courses in other fields such as history, sociology, 
English, and mathematics go hand in hand with the 
regular philosophy courses. The School of Theology 
has authority from the Sacred Congregation of Semin- 
aries and University Studies to grant the degrees of licen- 
tiate and doctorate in sacred theology. 

Today at West Baden College there are nearly one 
hundred Jesuits enrolled in the School of Theology 
and ninety in the School of Philosophy, along with an 
administration and faculty of some fifty Jesuit priests 
and twenty lay brothers. Together they form the West 
Baden College community of 250 Jesuits. In the past 
score of years Jesuits from all over the world have 
come to West Baden, to study at the new "Eighth 
Wonder of the World." 



78 




Rev. William LeSaint, S.J. 
Dean of Theology 




A place where members of the community can find solitude 
for a moment's meditation is this wayside cross on the way to 
the St. Ignatius Shrine at West Baden College. 



Located among the rolling hills of southern Indiana is West 
Baden College, the Chicago Province's house of studies for 
philosophy and theology. 






■ 1 " 

'l ■' 


rr 


ii | 




!! II 


|l 


II 




II ii 
e II SI 


il 
il 

ii 


II 

!i 




'\H 







■ I BB 



n 



■■ 



■ ! 



11 - « n 



1 




"~ - 




Hi in mi if 

!AI ■■■ Ml 
I MU ■ ■%*! 



This sight of the Latin classics reminds one 
that at West Baden man's classical heritage 
is investigated and studied in the light of 
our modern Christian society. 



~-'. 313*1 SB | SB 1**1**1 |**|t 

ri J 



The focal point of West Baden College is 
the atrium, located in the center of the build- 
ing, in which the members of the com- 
munity and guests may perambulate and 
meditate in silence. 



This scene shows the main entrance of West Baden College, revealing 
the picturesque surroundings of the pleasant Indiana countryside. 




SO 



The newly-ordained priests give their bless- 
ings to the elder priests of the community. 



A group of scholastics are instructed in vari- 
ous speech techniques during their course of 
studies in preparation for their three years 
of regency. 




When not boating on the golf course (in 
the rainy season ) , scholastics can often be 
found engaging in a fast game of volleyball 
on a nearby court. 






Thomas L. Borrdli, B.^.C. 
Assistant to the Dean 



J. Raymond Sheriff, A.M., J.D. 
Dean 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 



Until 1921, the undergraduate division of Loyola 
University had been composed entirely of arts and sci- 
ence courses. In 1922, the Jesuit Administration, 
realizing the trend toward specialization in education, 
established the College of Commerce as a separate and 
distinct unit of the University. From then until 1946, 
a small Day Division of the Commerce school was con- 
ducted on the Lake Shore Campus while the much 
larger Evening Division was held in the University's 
building at 28 N. Franklin St. In September, 1946, 
the entire College of Commerce was moved to Lewis 
Towers where both day and evening Divisions operated 
until June, 1950. The Evening Division was then 
disassociated from the College and joined to the Uni- 
versity College which is the present evening school of 
the University. At present, the College of Commerce 
serves approximately 750 students. 

The professional objective of the College consists in 



developing a student who will effectively meet the 
challenge of the business world. This development is 
carried out in the latter portion of the Commerce pro- 
gram. The courses in this half of the curriculum study 
the complex technical society of contemporary Amer- 
society. All students, regardless of their selected fields 
of concentration, are required to acquaint themselves 
with all the areas of business. 

The College of Commerce is possibly the fastest grow- 
ing school of the University. Led by its present dean, 
J. Raymond Sheriff, the school offers new courses and 
a larger and improved faculty each semester. At pres- 
ent there is talk of improvements in the curricula and 
the possible addition of a graduate program for the 
College of Commerce. To make room for this expan- 
sion, the University is acquiring additional downtown 
facilities. 




ACCOUNTING FACULTY. Standing: Adam P. 
Stach, Richard F. Kusek. Seated: Arnold N. Schorn, 
Rev. Dumas L. McCleary, C.S.V., Dr. Robsrt A. Meier. 




Rob:rt A. Msier, Ph.D., C.P.A. 
Chairman, Accounting Department 




BUSINESS LAW FACULTY. Standing: 

William B. Smith, John D. O'Malley, 

Nicholas S. Limperis. Seated: John A. 
Zvetina, chairman. 



83 



Theodosi A. Mogilnitsky, Ph.D. 
Chairman, Economics-Finance Department 




MANAGEMENT FACULTY. Dr. Walter H. Peterson, 
Joseph V. McCullcugh, Dr. Peter T. Swanish. 



Peter T. Swanish, Ph.D 
Chairman, Management Department 



MARKETING FACULTY. Rev. Raymond C. Jancauskas, S.J., 
Dr. Orange A. Smalley, Lioyd G. Allen. 




Orange A. Smalley, Ph.D. 
Chairman, Marketing Department 




84 




ECONOMICS-FINANCE DEPARTMENT. Dr. Francis Murans, Alfred S. Oskamp, 
Dr. Sylvester M. Frizol, Edwin H. Draine, Dr. Theodosi A. Mogilnitsky, Charles W. 
Anrod, Dr. Hugh A. Weiss, Rev. Raymond C. Jancauskas, S.J., Dr. Helen C. Potter, 
Dr. Joseph O. Englet. 



Students and members of the faculty of the College of Commerce mingle coffee and ideas 
at frequent coffee-hours held in Dean Sheriff's otfkc. 





Guests take time out for refreshments and 
relaxation between dances at the Commerce 
Council's annual Sno-Ball. 




The Loyolan photographer catches members 
of the Commerce College entertaining Arts 
student Corene Cowperthwait. 




A Commerce student uses one of the many 
calculators available for students who are 
taking courses in finance, mathematics, and 
statistics. 



Commerce Council 



The Commerce Council was established to unify the 
administration of the student affairs and extra-curricular 
activities, to encourage participation in extra-curricular 
activities, and to provide student self-government to the 
members of the College of Commerce. 

The Council is composed of the executive officers, the 
class officers elected by the Commerce students, and the 
Blue Key National Honor Fraternity representative. 

This year's activities sponsored by the Commerce 
Council included the annual Sno-Ball Dance, which was 
held in January at the Edgewater Beach Hotel; a senior 
cocktail party; class parties; and the financial operations 
of the Variety Show. A new event in the Council's 
activities this year was the Lecture and Luncheon Series, 
which brought representatives of business, government, 
and education to Loyol?. 




COMMERCE COUNCIL OFFICERS. Stand- 
ing: John Nicholson, treasurer; James Perell, 
secretary; Andrew Kelly, vice-president. 
Seated; Robert Doherty, president. 



COMMERCE COUNCIL. Standing: John Gaspers, John Payne, Lee Cieslak, Charles 
Ptacek, Michael Francis, Ed McGrath, Robert Buckley, John Puetz. Seated: James Perell, 
Robsrt Doherty, Andrew Kelly, John Nicholson. 




87 




Richard A. Matre, A.M. 
Dean 



UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 



The history of University College has been one of 
constant expansion and growth. Originally founded to 
supplement the education of teachers and others who 
could not otherwise attend college during the day, 
University College at present offers a selection of 
courses of special interest to students who are not work- 
ing for degrees but who are seeking to broaden their 
education in cultural, business, and generally avocation- 
al fields. 

Recently, the College has attracted many students 
with a series of courses designed primarily for personal 
satisfaction and advancement. 

Although University College operates only during 
late afternoons, evenings, and on Saturdays, it offers 
students complete curricula toward baccalaureate de- 
grees. 

The average University College s?jdent is, in many 



respects, a contrast to his day school counterpart. He 
is determined, purposeful, serious. He is definitely 
aware of his desire to recehe an education, and bases 
his actions on the fulfillment of that desire. He realizes, 
moreover, that his purpose for attending college is his 
own improvement and growth. 

University College is, in a sense, Loyola University 
in miniature. The College of Arts and Sciences is rep- 
resented by courses in humanities, mathematics, social 
studies and education; the College of Commerce by ac- 
counting, finance, economics, and management. It is, 
in effect, an independent academic world, liberal in the 
scope of its activities, forceful in its resolve to present 
education of the highest competence to as great a num- 
ber of students as possible. Its success is a tribute to 
its own dedication and the quality of its students. 



88 



Camillo Volini 
Assistant to the D.>an 




JNIVERSITY COLLEGE COUNCIL. Lorctta Stern, Eileen Sweeney, Philip Brankin, 
.osellen Perry, Barbara Cavar.augh, Pat Houlihan, Barbara Fritzer, Jo Ann Carey. 






Frank M. Amaturo, D.D.S. 
Secretary of the Faculty 



William P. Schoen, D.D.S. 
Dean 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 



As a Catholic dental school, the Loyola University 
School of Dentistry strives to prepare its students to be 
competent in the general practice of dentistry, and to 
impart to them a sound appreciation of the moral, social, 
and spiritual values of life. To realize these broad 
objectives, the faculty of the School endeavors to pro- 
vide an intellectual atmosphere which is conducive to 
the presentation of faith and morals, and undertakes to 
train students in the responsible diagnosis, treatment, 
and prevention of oral diseases. 

Situated in the heart of the West Side Medical Cen- 
ter, the Dental School is housed in a five-story building 
which contains all the facilities needed for the four-year 
dental program. Significant among these facilities are 
two amphitheatres seating 275 and 150 students re- 
spectively; a reference library equipped with text and 
reference volumes, as well as current dental and medical 



journals; and a closed circuit television system. The 
School, in fact, was the first in the nation to integrate 
television techniques into its curriculum. As a result, 
operations and techniques performed by an instructor 
can be clearly shown to an entire class simultaneously, 
each student receiving an unobstructed view of the 
procedure being described in any type of demonstration. 
The Loyola University School of Dentistry's record 
of service to the Chicagoland community is impressive. 
Half of the dentists of the area, for instance, are grad- 
uates of the School. In addition, Dental School stu- 
dents and faculty staff the Loyola Dental Clinic — the 
School's teaching laboratory. The Clinic provides serv- 
ice for people of moderate means seeking expert dental 
care. During the past year, the staff handled 70,000 
patient visits. 



90 




Rev. Francis A. Vaughan, S.J. 
Student Counselor 



A familiar sight to Loyola's future dentists 
is the Dental building, a tall gray structure- 
located in Chicago's West Side Medical 
Center. 





Rita Caprini 
Librarian 




John R. Allison, D.D.S 
Director of Clinics 



PERSONNEL OF THE OF- 
FICE OF THE DEAN. Mary 
Ann Raclawski and Diane J. 
Sevchuck. 




.ANATOMY AND HISTOLOGY FACULTY. Dr. John J. 
O'Mallcy, Dr. Nicholas C. Brescia, Dr. Harry Sicher. 






Thomas L. Grisamore, M.D., D.D.S. 

Chairman, Bacteriology Departmert 

Director of Post Graduate School 



BACTERIOLOGY FACULTY. Dr. Kenneth 
E. Nowlan, Dr. Frank M. Lucatorto, Dr. 
Thomas L. Grisamore. 



Gustav W. Rapp, Ph.D. 

Chairman, Chemistry and Physiology 

Department 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY FACULTY. Vincent J. 
Sawinski and B. Franklin Gurn^v. 






E. James Best, D.D.S. 
Chairman, Endodontics Department 




ENDODONTICS FACULTY. Dr. William J. Holohan, Dr. 
Marshall H. Smulson, Dr. Allan B. Klein. 



S* 




ORAL SURGERY FACULTY. Standing: 
Dr. John P. Giannini, Dr. Frank M. Grem, 
Dr. Viggo B. Sorenson, Dr. Lawrence Chase. 
Seated: Dr. John Sachs, graduate student. 



OPERATIVE DENTISTRY FACULTY. Dr. Thomas W. Russell, Dr. John J. OConnell, 
Dr. M. Michael Ivans, Dr. John M. Coady, Dr. Rolf G. Grub.r. 




94 




George J. Matousek, D.D.S. FIXED PROTHESIS FACULTY. Leonidas 

Chairman, Fixed Prothesis Department Ragauskas, Dr. George J. Matousek, Dr. 

John Economopoulos, Dr. Thomas Thana- 
souras. 





Paul T. Dawson, D.D.S. 

Chairman, Operative Dentistry 
Department 




ORAL DIAGNOSIS FACULTY. Dr. Mario 
V. Santangelo; Mrs. Maria A. Gylys; Dr. 
Patrick D. Toto, chairman; Dr. Kenneth E. 
Nowlan. 




Viggo B. Sorenson, D.D.S. 
Chairman, Oral Surgery Department 



95 



PERIODONTICS FACULTY. Dr. Malbern 
Wilderman, Dr. Charles Reeve, Dr. Anthony 
W. Gargiulo, Dr. Harry Staffileno. 



Joseph R. Jarabak, D.D.S., Ph.D. 

Chairman, Orthodontics Department 




Prank M. Wentz, D.D.S., Ph.D. 

Chairman, Periodontics Department 
Director of Grduate School 




PROSTHETICS FACULTY. Norman J. 
Sawyer, Dr. Thomas E. Newman, Dr. Rinert 
J. Gerhard, Dr. Arthur J. Krol. 



Arthur J. Krol, D.D.S. 
Chairman, Prosthetics Department 




% 



ORTHODONTICS FACULTY. Standing: 
Dr. Charles Smith, Dr. Bernard Pawlowski, 
Dr. Bernard Widen, Dr. J. Patrick Gantt, 
Dr. David Edgar, Dr. Naishadh Parikh, Dr. 
Steve Asahine, Dr. Raul Acevedo, Dr. Rich- 
ard Shanahan. Seated: Dr. Joseph Jarabak, 
Miss Barbara Furmaniak, Dr. Gilbert Carter, 
Dr. Francis Hanagan. 




Theodore R. Ferguson, D.D.S. 

Chairman, Pedodontics Department 



PEDODONTICS FACULTY. Dr. Joanna 
Baranouskis, Dr. Theodore R. Ferguson, Dr. 
Marya Tunkunas. 





STUDENT DENTAL COUNCIL. Standing: Charles Giroux and Phillip Miollis. Seated: 
Dr. Marshall Smulson, Sam Liaros, Alfred McManama. 



Students in file room check dental impressions of patients. 



98 





Student in clinic prepares his patient for 
dental repairs. 




Student examines teeth of his clinical patient. 



Future dentists gain practice in dental tech- 
niques in the crown and bridge department. 




99 




Part of the dental training of sophomores 
is work in the physiology laboratory. 



Student shares a dental problem with his 
fellow seniors in the laboratory. 



Student drills tooth of his patient in prepara- 
tion for filling. 






Facial expressions of patients in waiting room of dental clinic betray their mixed emoti 



Dental training of seniors includes extensive work in laboratory. 




101 





Frederic D. Donnelly 
Librarian 



John C. Fitzgerald, LLJ 
Dean 



SCHOOL OF LAW 



It was Blackstone who said, "I think it an undeniable 
position that a competent knowledge of the laws of the 
society in which we live is the proper accomplishment 
of every gentleman and scholar, a highly useful, I had 
almost said essential, part of liberal and polite edu- 
cation." 

Giving proper recognition to the permanent value 
of Blackstone's statement, as well as achieving a more 
basic orientation, the School of Law of Loyola Uni- 
versity is dedicated to the philosophy that there is an 
ideal and objective order of justice, based upon the 
natural law, by which human beings are endowed with 
certain inalienable rights and obligations, to enable 
them to realize in human dignity the divine destiny 
decreed by their Creator; that the natural law respects 
and governs all human actions and therefore the actions 
of man in a civil society which is subject to constantly 
changing political, social, and economic forces; that by 
the recognition and application of the natural to the 



positive civil law, human society can approach the ideal 
and objective order of justice intended for human be- 
ings. 

Established in 1908, the School of Law grew until, 
in 1921, a morning division was added and the School 
was made co-educational. In 1924 it became a mem- 
ber of the Association of American Law Schools, and 
the following year was placed on the approved list of 
the American Bar Association. 

Today, headed by Dean John C. Fitzgerald, the School 
of Law serves approximately 250 students. A staff of 
twenty outstanding professors and instructors offer a 
course of studies designed primarily to prepare stu- 
dents for the practice of law in any jurisdiction where 
the common law prevails. The standards and prin- 
ciples of law are treated not as ends in themselves, but 
as the rational means to the attainment of objective 
justice. 



The law building, located at 41 East Pearson, 
affords exceptional opportunity to observe 
sessions of the many law courts of Chicago. 




I 1 I j 



TC"i»' 




Law students take advantage of the facilities of the law library, which contains over 
twenty-five thousand volumes. 




103 



Rev. William J. Kenealy, S. J 
Visitins Professor 




LAW SCHOOL FACULTY. Standi, 
Francis C. Sullivan, Rev. William J. Kenealy, 
S.J., Richard V. Carpenter. Seated: Dean 
John C. Fitzg:rald and John C. Hayes. 




^ 





Professor John C. Hayes emphasizes a point of law for his students. 



STUDENT BAR ASSOCIATION. Standing: Steve D. Stremski, John J. O'Toole, 
Thomas R. Doran, David P. Schippers, Edward P. Keavy, Michael T. McCarthy. Seated, 
clockwise: Cornelius Houtsma, Pamela M. Lynch, Richard G. Wittry, Francis E. Good- 
man, Julia M. Quinn, James C. Byrne, Frank Fiorite, Arvid C. Johnson. 




105 



Q 




The student lounge, located in the basement 
of the Law School, provides a congenial 
meeting place for Chi~ag:>'s future lawyers 
to discuss their briefs. 



The Law School library affords an excellent 
place for study as well as sleep. 



Law students can take advantage of the many 
reports, digests, and cases available for legal 
research in the law library. 



106 






.aw students make use cf the many conference and study rooms available in the Law 
chool. 



Law students Dick Wittry (on the stand) and John Tuohy (standing) demonstrate 
court techniques in the Law School's Moot Court room. 






Thomas P. Galarneault, Ph.D. 
Assistant Dean 



John F. Sheehan, M.D. 
Dean 



STRITCH SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



The Stritch School of Medicine at present is one of 
the leading Catholic medical schools in the world. A 
growing and expanding arm of the University, the 
fundamental objective of the School is to provide an 
opportunity for education in sound medical science and 
to fit the qualified student for the practice of medicine. 
An additional responsibility, and one which goes hand 
in hand with this objective, is that of extending, 
through the research effort of teacher and student, the 
knowledge and methods of control of the physical and 
mental afflictions of man. 

To accomplish its objectives, the School must select 
from its many applicants those men and women who 
by reason of social and emotional maturity seem pre- 
pared to begin the arduous study of medicine. These 
selected applicants are exposed, throughout their course 
of study, to the finest education obtainable. 

In connection with the aim to encourage advanced 



study and research, the Board of Graduate Studies of 
the University approved, in 1947, the graduate pro- 
grams of the departments of Anatomy, Biochemistry, 
Microbiology, Pharmacology, and Physiology. 

The Medical School maintains clinical facilities with 
various hospitals for the purpose of giving its students 
as much practical experience as possible. Important 
among these clinics are those operated at Mercy Hos- 
pital, Loretto Hospital, Lewis Memorial Maternity Hos- 
pital, and Cook County Hospital. 

Students and faculty of the School staff the Free 
Dispensary at Mercy Hospital whose clinic is one of 
only two clinics serving low income families in a 12.5 
square mile area on Chicago's near south side. 

Medical faculty members are engaged in research in 
heart disease, geriatrics, and infant care. Their find- 
ings form part of the fund of medical knowledge be- 
ing uncovered in Chicago's great Medical Center. 



108 



A member of the Medical School faculty uses 
a skeleton to instruct students in the bone 
structure of the human b3dy. 



Frederick M. Selfridge, M.D. 
Head of Mercy Hospital Clinic 






The home of the Stritch School of Medicine is its laboratory 
building at 706 South Wolcott Avenue, opposite the Cook 
County Hospital in the West Side Medical Center area. 



Helen P. Huelsman, MA.L.S. 
Librarian 




109 







ffep 


k , a 






Lincoln V. Domm, Ph.D. 
Chairman, Anatomy Department 



James J. Callahan, M.D. 
Chairmar., Bor.e and Joint Surgery Department 



Dr. Hugh J. McDonald, chairman of the biochemistry department, and Len Banozak work 
with Dr. McDonald's new invention — a circular chromatograph which is designed to 
5arate various chemicals. 





MEDICAL SCHOOL COUNCIL. Standing: Chuck Sternhagen, Dick Mitchell, 
Bill Tansey, Ken Printen, Art Price, George Joseph, Richard Stalzsr, Roger 
Smith. Seated: Mike Kaye, Bob Walsh, Joe Eraci, Bob Novak, Larry Flaherty, 
Dom AIlocco. 




Einar Leifson, Ph.D., M.D.C.M. 
Chairman, Microbiology Department 




111 





John Fernandez prepares a dilution of radio- 
active isotope, sulfur 35, to be injected into J 
animals for special-function studies in 
Loyola's radio-isotope laboratory. 



John J. Madden, M.D. 

Chairman, Neurology and Psychiatry 

Department 




The Medical School library offers the stud- 
ents a place for study and research. 



John Passman, Ph.D., a medical student 
working towards his doctorate degree in 
medicine, prepares a polygraph, one of the 
ultramodern devices Loyola uses for the 
general study of physiology. 




Herbert E. Schmitz, M.D. 

Chairman, Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Department 




Laura De Lapp checks culture for bacteria 
in bacteriology laboratory. 



H. William Elghammer, M.D. 
Chairman, Pediatrics Department 





Alexander G. Karczmar, Ph.D. 
Chairman, Pharmacology Department 







Mm 



m. 



Jim Eggers and Doctor Bird check plate for 
fungus growth. 





Sophomores in pharmacology lab work with 
polygraph as its records changes in physio- 
logical phenomena. 



Walter C. Randall, Ph.D. 
Chairman, Physiology Department 





Edward A. Piszczek, M.D. 
Chairman, Preventive Medicine Department 




Doctor Yvo T. Oester demonstrates to stu- 
dents the action of drugs on small animals. 



Mary Kay and Joe experiment in biochem- 
istry laboratory. 



Benjamin H. Orndoff, M.D. 
Chairman, Radiology Department 





John L. Keeley, M.D. 

Chairman, Surgery Department 




Martin J. Phee and Dr. Harry Freeman 
examine a patient at Mercy Hospital Clinic. 






Essie Anglum, R.N., M.S. 
Chairman, Public Health Nursing 



Gladys Kiniery, R.N., M.S.P.H. 
Dean 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



The Loyola School of Nursing is one of the young- 
est colleges of the University, and at the same time one 
of the most remarkable. It offers, for example, one 
of only four collegiate nursing programs in the state 
of Illinois; thirty-two per cent of Illinois students en- 
rolled in collegiate nursing programs during the last 
academic year were studying at the Loyola School of 
Nursing; and more than 600 graduates of the School 
hold staff positions in Chicago hospitals, welfare agen- 
cies, public schools, and industries. 

The School of Nursing first granted University de- 
grees in 1935. It now offers two degree programs: 
a basic program designed primarily for the high school 
graduate, combining nurses' training with college aca- 
demic work; and a supplemental academic program 
for the professional nurse, as well as a course of study 
in Public Health Nursing. 



The formidable record of the School reflects the 
philosophy of Loyola University as a whole. The School 
believes that nurses profit much from the liberal arts 
taught under Christian inspiration. These studies 
stimulate the development of the specifically human 
powers, they promote orderly mental growth, they open 
the heart's ambition to serve fellow men with com- 
petent skill and with the charity of Christ. Specialized 
concentrations in nursing studies add the professional 
knowledge needed for a more complete realization of 
personality and of devotion to the welfare of others. 

Graduates of the School of Nursing receive experi- 
ence in the surgical, medical, obstetrical, pediatric, psy- 
chiatric, tuberculosis, and public health fields. Twenty 
Chicago area hospitals and welfare agencies cooperate 
in providing professional training under Loyola faculty 
supervision. 



116 



NURSING FACULTY. Cecilia Fennessy, Mrs. Mary Sloan, Ann Snell, Mrs. Martha 
Goodrich, Gladys Kiniery, Sarah Zeeman, Theresa Petrone, Shirley Boettger, Constance 
Ferris. 





BASIC NURSING ASSOCIATION. Standing: Patricia Mulvihill, Judy Kosloskus, 
Arlene O'Brien, Verna Christian, Virginia Stift, Geraldine McCarter, Virginia Louden, 
Mary Rose Biehl, Sheila Fitzgerald, Nance Zimmerman. Seated: Patricia McCarter, 
Helen Slingsby, Mrs. Mary Sloan, Violet Stasiak, Troy Ehlert. 



117 




Bob Marlin tells student nurses Mary Kay 
Ball, Mitzi Steinle, and Pat McCarter where 
to go on public health nursing. 




Student nurses playfully cavort in the snow 
on Lake Shore Campus. 




Professional nurses prepare for class in their 
Professional Degree Completion Program. 




Student nurses prepare reports on their 
patients as a part of their nursing training. 




As a part of the nursing program, the stu- 
dents spend a considerable amount of time 
working and observing in various hospitals 
in the Chicagoland area. 



SCHOOL OF NURSING ASSOCIATION. Standing: Theresa Lash, Grace Maher, Lee 
Dudas, Cathy Schmitt. Seated: Margaret McMahon, Sheila Boyd, Jean O'Reilly, Marita 
Maxey, Betty Koscielski, Pat Rast, Dolores Froelich. 




119 




Student nurse Judy Ireland prepares an in 
jection for one of her patients. 



Student nurses practice their public health nursing on a not-so-willing subject, Judy 
Kohnke. 




120 



The winning charm of Loyola's student nurses helps to expel the gloom and the doubts 
of patients convalescing in their hospitals. 




121 




Rev. Ralph A. Gallagher, S.J., Ph.D. 
Director 



LOYOLA INSTITUTE OF SOCIAL AND 
INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS 



Loyola University, recognizing the strategic impor- 
tance of employer-employee relationships in modern 
industrial society, founded the Institute of Social and 
Industrial Relations in 1941. By this pioneer action, 
Loyola became the first institution of higher learning 
in the Middle West to offer a comprehensive program 
of study in the area of industrial relations. Starting 
with but a few students, the Institute has, over a period 
of years, grown into one of the largest institutes of this 
type in the United States. 

The purpose of the Institute has been to give thor- 
ough training on the graduate level to men and women 
in expanding fields of labor relations, personnel man- 
agement, and public administration. The training 
combines theoretical studies and practical experience. 
The program is founded on the principles of Christian 
ethics and philosophy. 

Early in its history, the Institute inaugurated a plan 



for providing the individual student with practical ex- 
perience in his field. At that time the Institute sought 
and received the full cooperation of organizations in 
the Chicago area which are involved in industrial rela- 
tions. Various companies, unions, and government 
agencies regularly devote time and energy to introduce 
Institute students to the actual operation of that phase 
of industrial relations in which they are engaged. This 
plan is called the Internship Program (cooperative 
training program ) . 

All part-time students who cannot take the Intern- 
ship are required to attend five informal seminars dur- 
ing their academic residency. These meetings give the 
student an opportunity to discuss the problems and 
practices of the various organizations with top-level 
men, and to supplement theoretical knowledge the stu- 
dent has gained in the classroom. 



122 



Denis T. Walsh, regional manager of Magna- 
fiux Corporation, was the first speaker in the 
Institute's new lecture series. 




LISAIR FACULTY. Dr. Julius Rezler, John M. Heneghan, Rev. Ralph A. Gallagher, 
S. J., and Ronald E. Haydanek. 




123 




Matthew H. Schoenbaum, 
M.S.S.W., J.D. 



SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 



Social work is a helping profession. Social workers 
help troubled people cope with problems which stand 
in the way of productive and satisfying living. 

The Catholic social worker, in helping the under- 
privileged, the needy, the physically and mentally ill, 
recognizes the essential dignity of man and appreciates 
both his natural and supernatural qualities. He applies 
moral and ethical principles in freeing individuals from 
the obstacles which impede their continued growth. 
The social worker, then, assists in God's own work — 
the betterment of mankind. 

But more than principles go into the make-up of a 
social worker. Scientific knowledge of human behavior, 
familiarity with community social services, and an in- 
tense, warm interest in people are necessary equipment. 
The social worker must be able to create in the indi- 
vidual a desire to help himself. For only by taking an 



active and responsible part in the solution of his prob- 
lem will anyone be directed toward recovery and inde- 
pendent living. 

The Loyola School of Social Work possesses a spe- 
cific philosophy with which it permeates its curriculum. 
Within a framework of Scholastic philosophy and 
Catholic theology, the School provides an atmosphere 
conducive to an integration of the highest professional 
competence with the ideals of the Christian way of life. 

Current enrollment in the School is 132, including 
some part-time students. The Student Council plans 
professional and social activities which are conducted 
by the student body throughout the school year. Stu- 
dents have the opportunity to contribute to the three 
student publications of the University and one publica- 
tion of the School. 



124 



Students and faculty of the School of Social 
Work enjoy a festive evening at the School's 
annual Christmas party. 




SOCIAL WORK FACULTY. Standing: Shirley Anderson, Colette M. Springer, Marge 
Dwyer, Betty Begg, Mary Alice O'Laughlin, Margaret Mary Pembroke, Margaret Crossen. 
Seated: Matthew H. Schoenbaum, Rev. Felix P. Biestek, S.J. 




125 




SOCIAL WORK COUNCIL. Standing: Edward Corcoran, John Durkin, Thomas Dwyer. 
Seated: Dianne Smith, Walter Rogers, Jane Archibald, Mary Wodarczyk. 



At Mercy Hospital's Child Guidance Clinic, 
Jack Egan, a second-year student in the 
School of Social Work, employs play ob- 
jects to help children such as this one to 
talk about their emotional disturbances. 



126 




rfjwiii^L-i 



FIELDWORK SUPERVISORS. Standing: 
Constance Kellam, Colette Baynes, Robert 
Jendreau, Mrs. Louise Marks, Margaret 
Crossen, Mrs. Mary Fischer, Betty Begg. 
Seated: Dorothy Shaw, Mrs. Kathleen Durk- 
ott, Mrs. Ina Stringer, Gertrude Mack. 




Elizabeth Kane, a student in the School of 
Social Work, receives the appreciation of 
a woman who has been receiving old-age 
assistance. 




Rose Winter, first year student, talks over 
a family problem with one of her clients 
at the Cook County Department of Welfare. 




DEPARTMENT OF HOME STUDY 



Recognizing an accepted principle among educators 
that educational methods must be adapted to human 
needs and to actual social conditions, Loyola University 
has extended its educational services to men and women 
whom circumstances prevent from receiving training 
as resident students. To meet the needs of thousands 
of persons eager to continue their education but unable 
to attend school, Loyola in 1922 established its Home 
Study Division. 

Today, Loyola is the only Catholic University in the 
United States to be affiliated with the U. S. Armed 
Forces Institute, enabling servicemen to study at their 
posts throughout the world. One-third of the present 
Home Study enrollment is composed of such service- 
men. 

The courses of the Home Study Division are open to 
men and women, to students of college grade and to 
those preparing for college entrance, to resident stu- 
dents recommended to the division by their dean, and 
to non-resident students within and beyond the state of 
Illinois, or in any foreign country. 




Mary L. McPartlin, A.M. 
Director 




LOYOLA CENTER FOR 
CHILD GUIDANCE 

Established in 1941, the Loyola Center for Child 
Guidance provides psychological service to disturbed 
children and to their often anxious and perplexed par- 
ents. 

Staffed by seven full-time psychologists and gradu- 
ate students in clinical psychology and counseling, the 
Center offers complete psychological examinations, 
counseling of parents, recreational therapy for young 
children, and individual and group remedial work in 
reading. 

Since its founding, the Center has assisted more 
than 7,000 clients. The intake of new families aver- 
ages over 500 a year. 



Included in the services of the Child Guid- 
ance Center is psychological therapy to treat 
children's emotional problems. 



INSTITUTE OF JESUIT HISTORY 



The Institute of Jesuit History was founded in 1936 
by the President of the University, Father Samuel K. 
Wilson, S.J., a noted historian. The purpose of the 
Institute is to gather historical documents pertaining 
to the Jesuits in the Americas and to publish books and 
articles from these sources. The members of the Insti- 
tute also direct the research of graduate students. Since 
1936 the Jesuit members of the Institute have published 
fourteen volumes, six of which have been sponsored by 
the University. The books have dealt with the colonial 
period of New France and the Mississippi Valley and 
have uncovered many new facts about the colonial 



period of Canadian, Mississippi Valley, Louisiana, Ari- 
zona, and Mexican history. 

The Institute has published Mid-America, a historical 
quarterly magazine containing scholarly articles by his- 
torians of this country, Canada, England, France, and 
Italy, who have written not only on the Jesuits but on 
topics of national and international interest. The maga- 
zine can be found in all important libraries in this coun- 
try and abroad. Historians regularly consult the large 
collections of documents in the Institute files. 

The Director of the Institute and Managing Editor 
of Mid-America has been Rev. Jerome V. Jacobsen, S.J. 




Rev. Jerome V. Jacobsen, S.J. 
Director 



129 



To govern a city of Chicago's size is a monumental task. To 
govern it well demands leadership of the highest order. The 
quality of leadership which Chicago continues to enjoy, ac- 
cordingly, is indicated by its remarkable record of progress. 

The following description of the Loyolan Awards, the Miss 
Varsity Contest, and Who's Who in American Colleges repre- 
sents the University's recognition of student leaders at Loyola. 



'* -1 




sapsjsBH 



■ ■ ' -_'-'. "'■' ■'.'.' 



«il 



Pm? 






■ 1 1 1 I 11 




IPx. * ' - -V '-: 


gfflfig^^^ggW 



[I.LI.y.nnn.nn. 



WHO'S WHO AMONG STUDENTS IN AMERICAN 
UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES 



Who's Who Among Students in American Universi- 
ties and Colleges was first published for the school year 
1934-35. Some time before this publication the idea 
of creating one national basis of recognition for college 
students that would be democratic and devoid of dues, 
initiation fees, or cost to the student was conceived. 
Two years of investigation and inquiry among college 
administrators and students was held before the begin- 
ning of Who's Who. Endorsement by these groups 
encouraged the venture, which became a reality in 1934. 

This year marks the first time Loyola University has 
participated in this national recognition organization. 
Recognition by Who's Who means that the student was 
first officially recommended from Loyola and then ac- 
cepted by the organization. 



Selection for the organization is based upon a stu- 
dent's scholarship, his leadership, his cooperation in 
educational and extracurricular activities, and his prom- 
ise of future usefulness. Each institution participating 
is assigned a separate quota large enough to give a well- 
rounded representation of the student body but small 
enough to confine nominations to an exceptional group 
of students. 

Each student who becomes a member receives, with- 
out cost, a certificate of recognition awarded by the 
organization, recognition in the annual publication for 
the year during which he was selected in the form of a 
writeup of his college and personal record, and benefits 
of the Student Placement Service provided by the or- 
ganization. 



WHO'S WHO. Standing: Dick Yetter, Brian Van Vlierbergen, Frank Hogan, Dick 
Lisk, Charles Parrish, Mike Polelle, Larry Bruozis, Bob Buckley, Karl Nishimura, John 
Hannan, Russell Elgin. Seated: Mary Donohoe, Bill Plante, Mary Kay Ball. 




IJPT"-! 




v> 



r.,i' 



*P^ 







WHO'S WHO. Standing: Frank Konicek, Su2 Kelly, Phil Brankin, Judy Wolfgrai: 
Bob Doherty, Gay Lee Luhrs, Ed McGrath. Seated: Pat McCarter, Bill Hegan. 



WHO'S WHO. Mel Kamm. 




MEMBERS OF WHO'S WHO 



Mary Kay Ball 
Philip Brankin 
Lawrence Bruozis 
Robert Buckley 
Robert Doherty 
Mary Donohoe 
Russell Elgin 
John Hannan 
William Hegan 
Frank Hogan 
Mel Kamm 
Mary Sue Kelly 
Frank Konicek 



Richard Lisk 

Wayne Lowe 

Gay Lee Luhrs 

Patricia McCarter 

Edmund McGrath 

Karl Nishimura 

Charles Parrish 

William Plante 

Michael Polelle 

J. David Smith 

Brian Van Vlierbergen 

Judith Wolfgram 

Richard Yetter 



133 



LOYOLAN AWARDS 



Recognizing the great demands made upon student 
leaders and the value of the services which such stu- 
dents perform for Loyola, the 1959 LOYOLAN this 
year inaugurated the practice of presenting awards to 
nine graduates who have distinguished themselves by 
their leadership in the university. 

To select the recipients of the awards, a committee 
of eight persons, students and faculty, were selected 
on the basis of their impartiality and their wide knowl- 
edge of the student body. The student members of the 
committee were: Thomas Haney, chairman; Robert 
Ryba, LOYOLAN representative; Wayne Lowe, Blue 
Key representative; Andrew Kelly, Loyola Union rep- 
resentative; and Patricia Kubistal, coed representative. 
The faculty members were Rev. Thomas J. Bryant, S.J., 
LOYOLAN moderator; Dr. Earl John Clark; and Dr. 
Kenneth M. Jackson. 

To help the committee in its selection, the moderators 



of the various student organizations, the deans of the 
university, and certain administrators were asked to sub- 
mit nominations for students they considered eligible 
for the awards. 

At the invitation of Loyola, Chicago Chapter, Blue 
Key Honor Fraternity, the editorial board presented its 
awards at the annual Blue Key dinner-dance. 

The following students, selected because of their out- 
standing leadership at Loyola, their dedication to their 
university, and their over-all participation in university 
activities, are presented with the first annual LOY- 
OLAN Awards: 

Robert F. Doherty (Commerce), Joseph Eraci 
( Medical ) , Francis E. Goodman ( Law ) , William 
M. Hegan (Arts), Sam P. Liaros (Dental), Patri- 
cia McCarter (Nursing), William M. Plante 
(Arts), Michael Polelle (Arts), Judith M. 
Wolfgram (Arts). 



LOYOLAN AWARDS COMMITTEE. Robert Ryba, Patricia Kubistal, Thomas Haney, 
Dr. Kenneth M. Jackson, Andrew Kelly. 




LOYOLAN AWARDS RECIPIENTS. Judith M. Wolfgram, College of Arts and 
Sciences; William M. Plante, College of Arts and Sciences; William M. Hegan, College 
of Arts and Sciences. 




135 











^ 








^ '• T 


9 


"HH 




/ [ 






' 


^m 




^•^ ^| 








9 * J 


Kr^lfl^ 3Ja& 


'#-4 






'^^dS&S^^ '^^ 








m 


'&jm 


Bh ii"* ' ■-,'■ 

1 IV^''. ^<5/ 






JM 


I > 


^RIL Ha m :, '^ : >- ; .''' ; 


-■'1 


■ 


1 ■ "'■■> 


w f 



























LOYOLAN AWARDS RECIPIENTS. Robert F. Doherty, College of Commerce; 
Patricia McCarter, School of Nursing; Michael Polelle, College of Arts and Sciences. 



136 



LOYOLAN AWARDS RECIPIENTS. Sam P. Liaros, College of Dentistry; Francis 
E. Goodman, School of Law; Joseph Eraci, School of Medicine. 




137 



UNION POW-WOW 



Highlighting the fall social calendar was the Ram- 
bler Pow-Wow held in December. Sponsored by the 
Loyola Union, the Pow-Wow featured a variety of color- 
ful events. Opening the weekend's events was a jazz 
concert in the Union House, starring Bob Scobey, Clancy 
Hayes, Toni Lee Scott, and Dave Black. 

Following the concert a pep rally was held on the 
athletic field to cheer the basketball team on to victory. 
The evening was climaxed with an informal mixer. 

On Saturday the Pow-Wow activities began with a 
float parade. Over twenty floats participated in the 
parade down Sheridan Road to the Lake Shore Campus. 
The afternoon's activities included the annual freshman- 
sophomore tug-of-war, a reception for the alumni, and 
fraternity open-houses. In the evening the students 
watched the Ramblers crush the Denver University 
team in Alumni Gym. To conclude the Pow-Wow's 
activities a Victory Dance was held at the Edgewater 
Golf Club. 

The general chairman for the Pow-Wow was Frank 
J. Hogan III. 




Standing in back: Roxane Slaski, Frank Hogan, Bill Plante. 
Standing in front: Norb Slowikowski, holding trophy presented 
to Alpha Delta Gamma for best fraternity float, and Bill Peder- 
son, holding trophy presented to Alpha Delta Gamma for 
best float in the Float Parade. 



The award for the best decoration of a fra- 
ternity house was presented to Tau Kappa 
Epsilon, whose house is pictured below. 



Coach George Ireland encourages students 
to support the basketball team at the pep 
rally held in conjunction with the Pow-Wow. 




138 




Alpha Delta Gamma's colorful representa- 
tion of the map of the United States was 
judged to be the best float of the Pow-Wow 
Float Parade. 



Second place distinction in the Float Parade 
was awarded to the Lake Shore Sodality's 
unique entry entitled "Don Quixote." 



"Show Boat," Tau Kappa Epsilon's entry in 
the Float Parade, was awarded third place 
in the competition. 



Another of the spectacular floats in the 
parade was the entry of Tau Delta Phi. 





Roxane Slaski 
Miss Varsity, 1958-59 



MISS VARSITY CONTEST 



Highlighting the social calendar of the first semester 
was the annual Miss Varsity contest. Sponsored by 
the Loyola Union, the contest was the featured attrac- 
tion of the Fall Frolic. 

Described as the most spirited event in years, the 
Miss Varsity contest had seventeen participants, repre- 
senting many of Loyola's organizations and fraternities. 
Miss Roxane Slaski, the candidate of Pi Alpha Lambda 



fraternity, was selected Miss Varsity of Loyola. Miss 
Slaski's duties as Miss Varsity are to reign over all 
Union activities and to represent the Union at all school 
functions. 

Andy Kelly, president of the Union, was chairman 
of the Fall Frolic and Mel Kamm served as chairman 
of the Miss Varsity contest. 



140 





Aden Phillips, Miss Varsity of 1957-58, crowns her 
successor, Roxane Slaski, at the Union Fall Frolic. 



Members of Loyola's fraternities operate the voting booths 
for the Miss Varsity Contest. 



MISS VARSITY CANDIDATES. Standing: Kathy Kerrott, Corene Cowperthwait, 
Sheila Fitzgerald, Bobette Monighan, Pat Sclafini, Gay Lee Luhrs, Jan Finsen. Seated: 
Anne Loan, Joanne Hartzer, Jan Hamilton, Jane Donovan, Roxane Slaski, Barbara 
Klinger, Stella Stasulaitis. Seated on floor: Maureen Marley, Donna Collinson, Mary 
Jane Keating. 




VARIETY SHOW 



"Loyola Today" was the theme of the annual Arts 
and Commerce Variety Show. Playing to capacity 
audiences, the Variety Show was a sparkling display of 
student talent, which ranged from singing and dancing 
to comedy and farce. 

Winners of the Friday night awards presented by the 
Arts and Commerce Councils were: the Coed Club's 
act in the social-academic organization category, Theta 
Phi Alpha's take-off on the basketball team in the fra- 
ternity category, and Joanne Roman and Alan Jorgen- 
sen's "Foreign Intrigue" in the individual-act category. 

The Alumni Association's "IGGY" award for the 
most outstanding act in the show was won by Roman 
and Jorgensen's satire on the late-late movies on tele- 
vision. 

Kevin McKeough, president of the Arts junior class, 
was the producer of the Variety Show. The assistant 
producer was Maury McCarthy, vice-president of the 
Arts junior class. Miss Eleanor Lommel was the show's 
director. The business chairman of the show was Jack 
Nicholson, who was assisted by Mel Kamm as promo- 
tion manager and Bob Buckley as finance manager. 



VARIETY SHOW COMMITTEE. Bob Doherty, Brian Van 
Vlierbergen, Pat Culhane, Bill Plante, Eleanor Lommel, Kevin 
McKeough, Jerry Bannon, Bill Trapp, John Dentzer. 




142 




Winners of the outstanding-act award, the 
"IGGY," were Joanne Roman and Alan 
Jorgensen for their "Foreign Intrigue" act. 



One of the highlights of the first act of the 
Variety Show was Theta Phi Alpha's take-off 
on the basketball team. 



Kappa Beta Gamma's suffragette act brought 
back memories to the older members of the 
audience. 



The old-fashioned minstrel show provided 
the inspiration for the Nursing Council's act. 



One of the outstanding professional school 
acts was the Dental School Choir. 



Opening the Variety Show was the Coed 
Club's satire on the attendance of coeds at 
Loyola. 





Round and round went many Loyola students 
on the ferris wheel at the annual Student 
Fair. 



On Thursday night the fairgrounds were 
crowded with students preparing for the 
Fair weekend. 



The 1959 Loyola Fair was housed in a 
large tent located on the athletic field at Lake 
Shore Campus. 



One of the many colorful booths at the Fair 
was Theta Phi Alpha's huckley-buck. 



Bill Plante, general chairman of the Fair, 
calls out the winning number for the 1959 
Chevrolet Impala. 



The skooter ride offered fun for all visitors 
to the Fair. 




\ 



LOYOLA FAIR 



Originally called the Loyola Fair and Frolic when 
is was organized in 1954, the Loyola Fair is sponsored 
annually by the student Union to raise funds for the 
improvement of student recreational facilities. The 
Fair has become the largest and most successful student 
undertaking in the University. 

Held annually in May, the Fair brings rides, tents, 
raffle booths, and big-name entertainment to the Lake 
Shore Campus. This year, over thirty booths were in- 
stalled in several tents located on the athletic field. 
Such popular rides as the ferris wheel, merry-go-round, 
and tilt-a-whirl provide entertainment for the younger 
visitors to the Fair. 

Such nationally-known entertainers as Sauter-Finne- 
gan, Erroll Garner, Shelly Berman, Roger Williams, 
and Richard Maltby have been star attractions. 

Cadillacs, Thunderbirds, hi-fi units, and color tele- 
vision sets have been given away in the raffle held in 
conjunction with the Fair. 

For the second successive year, the Fair was under 
the general chairmanship of William M. Plante. As- 
sisting Mr. Plante were Bill Hegan, vice-chairman, and 
Andy Kelly, treasurer. 



FAIR COMMITTEE. Jerry White, Bob McCauley, Tom 
Haney, Barb Dwyer, Bill Hegan, Sue Kelly, Bill Plante, Joel 
Chrastka, Andy Kelly, Tony Strak, Jim Gorman, Toni Shea, 
Frank Smith. 





Chicago's eminence as a center of science and research is not surprising. 
Scientific proficiency is an irreplaceable requisite for the high level of 
material prosperity the city has consistently enjoyed. With its more than 
1200 laboratories constantly striving to improve the products used in its 
daily life and to discover new methods of raising its standard of living, 
Chicago leads the nation in industrial research. 

Loyola's academic organizations acquaint their members with the im- 
portance of science in their daily lives. 



ORGANIZATIONS 




L f 



V .-_<*; V> 



ACCOUNTING CLUB 



Founded in 1949, the Accounting Club strives to 
bridge the gap between accounting theory and its prac- 
tical application. The Club accomplishes this aim 
through speakers; representatives of public accounting 
firms, industry, and banking; field trips; and the dis- 
tribution of literature. 

For the past three years, the Accounting Club has 
been affiliated with the Illinois Conference of Ac- 
countancy Clubs. As a member of this organization, 
Loyola actively participates in presenting an Oppor- 
tunity Conclave, an entire day devoted to acquainting 
the accounting student with the opportunities available 
for employment, training, and advancement in the busi- 
ness world. 




ACCOUNTING CLUB OFFICERS. Bob Buckley, 
Owens, Mr. Richard Kusek, John Terry. 



John 



ACCOUNTING CLUB. Standing: Carl Patek, Mark Waldron, Joseph Oletti, John 
Zimmer, Ronald McGovern, Thomas Kean, Bob Buckley, Ray Blastic, Ken Blake, 
Thomas Dowd, James Orchowski, William Schmitt, Glenn Jaworski. Seated: Ed 
Winchester, James Lyons, Lawrence Seres, William Muldowney, John Terry, Mr. Richard 
F. Kusek, John Owens, Joseph Russo, John Sullivan, Terry Kucharski. 




148 




Dr. Harvey Posvic shows the use of the infra-red to Helmuth Fuchs, Jerome Biranowski, 
Donald Janninck, and Ralph Funer. 



AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY OFFICERS. Tony 
Scafidi, vice-president; Dr. Harvey Posvic, moderator; Ray- 
mond F. Orloski, president; George Kotrba, secretary-treasurer. 




AMERICAN CHEMICAL 
SOCIETY 



The Student Affiliate of the American Chemical 
Society is designed for those students who manifest a 
firm and sincere interest, via their academic program, 
in the science of chemistry. 

The Society has bi-monthly meetings which are 
aimed at gathering together students of chemistry and 
other interested individuals in order to increase and 
enrich their knowledge of this science. Guest lecturers, 
films, demonstrations, and other interesting highlights 
are featured at these meetings. 

The Society also publishes a monthly paper, entitled 
The Loyola Chemisphere, which was distributed for the 
first time this year in place of the organization's former 
publication, The Catalyst. 



149 




ASSOCIATION OF THE UNITED STATES ARMY. Standing: Daniel Alkovich, 
Robert Snyder, Ray Hartman, John Billimack, William Schultz. Seated: John Dentzer, 
David Lynch, Joseph Burke, Ed Ptaszek, Robert Kristufek. 



ASSOCIATION OF 
THE II. S. ARMY 



The Association of the United States Army (A. U.S. A.) 
is a professional and social organization comprised of 
civilian and Army personnel and ROTC college units. 
Its purpose is both to inform military and civilian per- 
sonnel of new Army technological advances and to 
promote government legislation to further Army aims. 

The Association brings to Loyola prominent military 
men to address the Cadet Corps, which, as a result, 
gains a closer contact with Army personnel and Army 
life in general. 

In addition to its professional activity, the Associa- 
tion also sponsors such social events as the annual Mili- 
tary Ball and an Open House. 

The Association also provides an orientation program 
for the freshmen at the beginning of each year. 



A.U.S.A. OFFICERS. 
John Dentzer. 



Ed Ptaszek, Dave Lynch, Joseph Burke, 



150 





BELLARMINE PHILOSOPHY CLUB OFFICERS. Standing: 
Claude Davis, Mr. George Drury, Joe Kunkel. Seated: Doreen 
Funk. 



BELLARMINE PHILOSOPHY 
CLUB 



The recently reorganized Robert Bellarmine Philoso- 
phy Club of Lewis Towers is open to all students who 
desire to discuss current philosophic problems. The 
main purpose of the Club is to give students an oppor- 
tunity to become acquainted with the various systems 
of philosophy and, in addition, to lead them toward 
a better knowledge and appreciation of Scholastic 
philosophy. 

Interspersed with these discussions this year, a series 
of six informal talks have been delivered by members 
of the faculty. These intercourses aim both at broad- 
ening the knowledge of members and also at promoting 
a closer student-faculty relationship. This year's theme 
for discussion was philosophy's place among the other 
sciences and arts. 



BELLARMINE PHILOSOPHY CLUB. Stephen Kanafokyj, Mr. George Drury, Ty 
Jung, John Kucenas, Frank St. Lawrence, Dr. Richard J. Westley, Joseph Kunkel, Robert 
Joyce, Mary Rosera, Robert Olson, Doreen Funk, Claude Davis, James Schwartz. 




151 



CADENCE 



Cadence, the Loyola literary quarterly, exists to pro- 
vide a stimulus for fine writing on the part of the stu- 
dent body. Each year, Cadence publishes a wide selec- 
tion of articles on the arts, philosophy, political science, 
history, and current events. In addition, Cadence at- 
tempts to publish the best fiction and poetry written at 
Loyola, as well as reviews of notable books and record- 
ings. 

Always, by attempting to encourage discussion and 
debate, analysis and criticism, Cadence hopes to im- 
part to all its readers a firm belief in the necessity for 
continual examination of the world around them in 
light of Catholic principles and a belief that the prob- 
lems they face today must be confronted directly with 
all the energy, intelligence, and faith at their command. 




CADENCE STAFF. Sally Lawrence, Jim D'Anna, John Frisz, Maureen Marley, Bob 
Cahill. 




152 




Members of the Choral Society take time out from their rehearsal for the Lenten Concert 
of Sacred Music to pose for the LOYOLAN photographer. 



CHORAL SOCIETY OFFICERS. Lauretta Bonke, secretary- 
treasurer; Dr. Graciano Salvador, moderator; Marian Kizen- 
kavich, president. 




CHORAL SOCIETY 



Founded in 1926, the Loyola Choral Society pro- 
vides an opportunity for students interested in music 
to publicly display their talents. This aim is achieved 
through the presentation of such musical expressions 
as the opera, concert, and various other programs. 

In December, 1958, the Society presented its annual 
Christmas Program at the Loyola Community Theatre. 
Featured in this program were "Bethlehem," a sacred 
cantata by J. H. Maunder, and other Christmas choral 
numbers. In February, 1959, the Society presented 
its Lenten Concert of Sacred Music at Madonna Delia 
Strada Chapel. 

In May, 1959, Verdi's opera "The Masked Ball" was 
presented at the Loyola Community Theatre. 



153 




COED CLUB. Standing: Diana Pallasch, Carolyn Mattern, Mary Lee Cullen, Mary Kay 
Loess, Christine Kaub, Judy Wolfgram, Mary Gill, Mary Donohoe, Joan Kwaitkowski, 
Ginny Szigeti, Joanna Hosteny, Ann Shannon, Mary Martin, Teri Mulkern, Lu Anichini. 
Seated: Virginia Zitnan, June Antonucci, Joan Taylor, Karen Kearns, Dolores Zablotny, 
Mariette LeBlanc, Joan Vaccaro, Jan Hamilton, Mary Lou Kelly, Judy Altendorf, Ellen 
Bernacki, Anna Marie Strauss, Barbara O'Brien, Nancy McCarthy. On floor: Clare 
Hayden, Stella Stasulaitis. 




Coeds jam Welcoming Tea at the Congress 
Hotel, which the Coed Club holds each 
semester to welcome freshmen and transfer 
students. 



• ' m?\ : 


^^^^"^^^■^ '"^H*-- 


M»^ ^^HIb 




>> ^\ HBF . v 


1 ^^^M 


|M^L 


^k ^M ^^»ll///M//i 


v% 


53 


Pbm 


jbg| 


/1u 







COED CLUB 



This year the Coed Club celebrated its tenth anni- 
versary. Founded in the spring of 1949, the Club has 
become one of the largest social organizations on 
campus. 

Through its "Big Sister" plan the Coed Club assists 
new coeds to orient themselves to life at Loyola. In 
addition, the club sponsors numerous activities through- 
out the year. At the beginning of each semester a wel- 
coming tea is held in honor of incoming freshmen and 
transfer students. Candidates for the Miss Varsity Con- 
test make their debut at the Club's Card Party and 
Fashion Show. Highlights of the Christmas vacation 
were the party at St. Vincent's Orphanage and the 
formal dance which this year was held at the Conrad 
Hilton Hotel. 



COED CLUB OFFICERS. Standing: Judy Altendorf, Barbara 
Ross, Mary Lou Kelly, Jo Humphrey, Rita Condon. Seated: 
Lu Anichini, Judy Wolfgram, Mary Donohoe, Maureen 
Kaveny, Angelle Alessi. 

COED CLUB. Standing: Patricia Baumet, Bonita Solzak, Marian Borgstrom, Betty 
McDonald, Donna Droney, Laureen Dupre, Betty Prochaska, Joan Le Monnier, Catherine 
O'Leary, Mabel Blizzard, Lillian Smrha, Janice Tanabe, Catherine Staunton, Carolyn 
Posch, Carole Ascherl, Pat Cordan, Judy Dorini. Seated: Judy Block, Carol Austin, 
Shirley Maynes, Sue Glader, Monica Kozak, Carol Anderson, Isabelle Cunningham, Sally 
Byrne, Carolyn Dovichi, Carole Cantello, Kathy Fitzpatrick, Tina Spena, Barbara 
Branche. On floor: Eleanore Geiger, Angelle Alessi, Mary Ann Bamberger. 




155 




CURTAIN GUILD 



Highlighting the Curtain Guild's twenty-second sea- 
son were four major productions. Shakespeare's epic 
Henry IV was performed in November on a set modeled 
after an Elizabethan theatre. In January audiences 
roared their approval of The Skin of Our Teeth, Thorn- 
ton Wilder's chronicle of the human race replete with 
trick scenery and a domesticated mammoth. Arthur 
Miller's All My Sons was a moving and provocative 
offering in April. A musical climaxed the year's activi- 
ties in May. 

In addition to the Guild's major productions, the 
members of the organization produced a series of work- 
shops on Sunday afternoons at the Lake Shore Speech 
and Drama Room. Original scripts by Frank Canino 
and Alan Jorgensen, an adaptation by John Cappelletti, 
scenes from The Lark, The Cocktail Party, and The 
Chairs were among the selections presented. 

The Guild's productions were under the direction of 
Moderator Hugh D. Dickinson and William C. Morris, 
chairman and assistant professor respectively of the 
Speech Department. 



The Curtain Guild's first production of the 
school year was Henry IV, Shakespeare's 
epic about early fifteenth-century England. 



The Skin of Our Teeth, Thornton Wilder's 
chronicle of the human race, was the Curtain 
Guild's January production. 



Mr. Hugh Dickinson, chairman of the Speech 
and Drama Department, offers the classic 
pose of an anxious director as he watches 
a Guild rehearsal. 



Spencer Cosmos, as Prince Hal of the 
Henry IV production, aims a fatal thrust at 
his enemy, Hotspur, played by Richard 
Crook. 



'W 




\- 




The cast of the Curtain Guild's January production, The Skin of Our Teeth, takes 
time out to pose for the LOYOLAN photographer. 



CURTAIN GUILD OFFICERS. Hugh 
Dickinson, moderator; Mariann Rempala; 
Dan Atkinson; and Frank Canino, president. 



Members and guests mingle at the Curtain 
Guild-sponsored Sunday workshops, held at 
various times throughout the year. 





157 




DEBATING SOCIETY. Standing: Tim Materer, Bill Ford, Tom Dienes, Jim Harris, 
Barry Cullinan, Ken Feit, Mike Polelle, Leroy Blommaert, Jerry Swick, Richard Gillis. 
Seated: William Hegan, Mary Lee Cullen, Dick Bock, Pat Kubistal, Kay Dwyer, Donald 
J. Stinson, Alan Jorgensen. 



DEBATING SOCIETY 



During the 1958-59 season, the Loyola Debate 
Society traveled far and wide spreading the name of 
Loyola University. From Boston on the east coast to 
Chicago's neighbors in Milwaukee, the debaters of 
Loyola have carried on the tradition of forensics long 
established at the University. 

Under the direction of Mr. Donald J. Stinson, mod- 
erator, the Debate Society again sponsored the "All 
Jesuit College Debate Tournament," a tradition estab- 
lished last year in honor of the Jesuit Centennial. 

Individual members of the Society also distinguished 
themselves in the year's activities. The freshmen de- 
baters placed in the upper quarter for speaker's honors 
at the Navy Pier Tournament. Mary Lee Cullen was 
awarded the medal for most outstanding speaker at the 
Tournament. 



DEBATING SOCIETY OFFICERS. Standing: Donald 
Stinson, moderator; Patricia Kubistal, secretary. Seated: Kay 
Dwyer, president. 



158 





Mary Lee Cullen presents her case to an 
interested listener after outlining her argu- 
ments on the blackboard. 



Leroy Blommaert, Bill Ford, and Tom Dienes 
prepare a case for a coming debate. 



Barry Cullinon, Mike Polelle, Mary Lee Cullen, and Kay Dwyer, winners of the "All 
Jesuit College Debate Tournament," are congratulated by Harry L. McCloskey, Dean of 
Students; Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S.J., President of Loyola; and Donald J. Stinson, 
moderator of the Debate Society. 



ECONOMICS-FINANCE 
SOCIETY 



The Economics-Finance Society, a member chapter 
of the American Finance Association, is designed to 
supplement its members' education in finance and eco- 
nomics with an interesting and informative program of 
speakers and professional tours. 

Speakers for the year included Mr. Julian Howes of 
Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner and Smith, who spoke 
on the fundamentals of investment; and Mr. Arnold 
Schumacher of the Chicago Title and Trust Company, 
who presented his economic forecast of the business 
conditions for 1959- 

In early December, the Society participated in an 
open-house program sponsored by Loyola for high 
school seniors from various Chicagoland schools. Also 
in December, the Society sponsored a tour to the Mid- 
west Stock Exchange and the Chicago Board of Trade. 




ECONOMICS-FINANCE SOCIETY OFFICERS. Standing: 
Marty Corrigan, Jim Foley. Seated: Harry Drayson, president; 
Dr. Sylvester M. Frizol, moderator. 



ECONOMICS-FINANCE SOCIETY. Standing: Don McLean, Thaddeus Wyroski, Leo 
Brennan, Joe Burke, Matt Moran, Dick Donovan, Dan Kummer, Joseph Russo. Seated: 
Frank Gorecki, Andy Kelly, Bill Ressel, Dick Lucas, Bob Goodsell, Nick Motherway, 
Ed McGrath, Rich Roberts. 




in tm 



160 




vtembers of the Education Society gather at one of their regular lecture meetings 



Dr. Jasper J. Valenti 
Moderator, Education Society 




EDUCATION SOCIETY 



The Education Society is an academic and social 
organization of students who intend to teach and of 
graduate students in the Department of Education. 

Informal in its organization, the work of the society 
is planned by a group committee consisting of alumni, 
graduate, and undergraduate students and the modera- 
tor, Dr. J. J. Valenti. The Society meets four times a 
year, providing each time a program consisting of a 
lecture, discussion, or a panel. 

This year's program of activities included a series of 
lectures by Rev. William Kenealy, S.J., Visiting Pro- 
fessor of Law at Loyola, on "Legal Aspects of School 
Segregation" and Dr. Joseph Park of Northwestern 
University on "John Dewey, Exponent of Intellectual 
Discipline." 



161 







EPSILON PI RHO. Standing: E. Robert Olson, Michael Kelly, Daniel J. Ryan, Terry 
Muller, Joan Kwiatkowski, Christine Smith, Kathleen Staunton, Beverly Chandler, Frank 
St. Lawrence, Penny Pinkous, Donna C. Collinson, Judy Kohnke, Patricia De Wall, 
Kevin McKeough, Don Van Dyke, William Bannon, Albert J. Snyder. Seated: Dawn 
Svetich, Gloria Forte, Margaret Conroy, Peggy Jo LaPlante ( secretary-treasurer ) , Dr. D. 
Herbert Abel (moderator), John E. Lempkowski (co-president), George E. Nix (co- 
president), John M. Veto, Loretta Krozel, Donna K. Doyle. 



EPSILON PI RHO 



The antecedents of a civilization are no less impor- 
tant than the civilization itself; things are inevitably 
more meaningful when considered in terms of that from 
which they came than when examined solely in them- 
selves. 

With this in mind, Epsilon Pi Rho was established 
to help its members explore the impact of the civiliza- 
tions of Greece and Rome upon our own, and in so 
doing, to better appreciate the achievements of both 
the modern and ancient worlds. 

The club's most elaborate activity during the past 
year was to act as host for the Illinois Latin Tourna- 
ment on May 2. In addition to organizing and direct- 
ing the Tournament, several members appeared in a 
radio play, "Beyond the Pillars of Hercules." 



EPSILON PI RHO OFFICERS. John E. Lempkowski, co- 
president; Dr. D. Herbert Abel, moderator; Peggy Jo LaPlante, 
secretary-treasurer; George Nix, co-president. 



162 





FINE ARTS CLUB 



Since its establishment at Loyola in 1953, the Fine 
Arts Club has made a considerable contribution to the 
cultural development of its members and of the student 
body in general. By introducing the students to the 
many cultural activities in Chicago, the organization 
has produced many rewarding accomplishments, not the 
least of which is its annual increase in membership, 
which now includes students in most of the various 
colleges at Loyola. 

This year the club took advantage of the many di- 
versified cultural attractions in Chicago. Two of its 
most successful projects were its attendance at the popu- 
lar stage production, "My Fair Lady," and at the Lyric 
Opera's production of Verdi's "Aida." 



FINE ARTS CLUB OFFICERS. Bob Marlin, president, and 
Dr. Paul Hummert, moderator. 



FINE ARTS CLUB. Standing: Bob Roach, Maury McCarthy, Bill Hegan. Seated: Kay McNeive, Kay Kerrott, Pauline Zaranka. 




163 



FOREIGN STUDENTS 
ASSOCIATION 



With approximately a hundred foreign students en- 
rolled in the undergraduate divisions, the Graduate 
School, and the professional schools, the Foreign Stu- 
dents Association was formed to serve as a medium 
through which students from various countries could 
become acquainted with each other and with American 
students. It is the hope of the organization that through 
such contacts, social and educational, fellowship and 
understanding can be promoted. 

Among its activities the association sponsors lec- 
tures, discussions, and other social events. An annual 
attraction is a panel discussion with members of the 
Chicago Junior Chamber of Commerce. Each year 
the group also produces its Spring Festival, at which 
the members of the club entertain the spectators with 
national sontrs and dances. 




FOREIGN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION OFFICERS. Dr. 

Margaret M. O'Dwyer, moderator; Marcellinus Fredericks 
(British Guiana), secretary; Rev. Singarayer Fernando 
(India), president; Remedios Varias (Philippines), vice- 
president. 



Members of the Foreign Students Association attend a reception as the guests of Theta 
Phi Alpha sorority. 




164 




Dr. E. John Clark, assistant professor of the English department, addresses the members 
of the Gerard Manley Hopkins Society on Geoffrey Chaucer. 



HOPKINS SOCIETY OFFICERS. Robert Ryba, secretary- 
treasurer; Dr. Patrick J. Case, moderaror; Thomas M. Haney, 
president. 




GERARD MANLEY 
HOPKINS SOCIETY 



Serving both English majors and those students in- 
terested in our literary heritage, the Gerard Manley 
Hopkins Society is designed to act as a supplement to 
the students' regular English courses, for it is con- 
cerned with increasing the appreciation and under- 
standing of works of literary merit. 

Founded at Loyola in 1931, the Society was named 
the Gerard Manley Hopkins Society after the Jesuit 
poet who was then becoming known as one of the 
greatest of the modern poets. 

This year's speakers included Mr. Hugh Dickinson 
of the speech department; Rev. Louis Zabkar of the 
history and theology faculties; Dr. E. J. Clark of the 
English department; and Dr. Michael Flys of the mod- 
ern languages department. 



165 




Dr. Harold Emiley, left, discusses his lecture for the Historical Society with some mem- 
bers of the audience. 



Dr. K. C. Wu, former governor of Formosa, spoke 
to the members of the Historical Society on the 
Formosan crisis. Pictured above are: Standing, 
Dr. Kenneth M. Jackson and Larry Bruozis: seated, 
Dr. Francis Schwarzenberg, Mrs. Wu, Dr. K. 
C. Wu. 





HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



In keeping with its aim of serving the University, 
the History Department, and its members, the His- 
torical Society, the largest undergraduate academic or- 
ganization at Loyola, presents informative and enter- 
taining programs covering a wide range of subjects. 
History is brought to life for Society members through 
stimulating lectures, interesting motion pictures, and 
addresses by prominent local and national figures. 

During the past year, the Society sponsored lectures 
by such distinguished persons as Dr. K. C. Wu, Dr. 
Harold Emiley, and Rev. John Fitzgerald, O.S.A. Grati- 
fied by the enthusiastic support its efforts have received, 
the Historical Society plans to present programs of 
equal merit in the future. Membership in the Society is 
open to all interested Loyola students. 



HISTORICAL SOCIETY OFFICERS. Standing: Larry Bruozis, 
Mike Polelle, Dr. Kenneth M. Jackson, Joe Chrastka. Seated: 
Joanne Hartzer, Donna Collinson, Judy Wolfgram. 



Dr. Kenneth M. Jackson 
Moderator, Historical Society 



Lu Anichini, secretary, catches up on some 
of her Historical Society work. 





167 



HONORS PROGRAM 



The Honors Program offers special opportunities for 
intellectual achievement on an individualized basis to 
those students who have high academic qualifications, 
as well as the ambition and time to devote themselves 
to an intensive program of studies. The program pro- 
vides more personal contact with the faculty and friend- 
ly association with other superior students who share 
similar intellectual interests and objectives. 

The lower-division curriculum contains the same sub- 
jects as any of the regular curricula in the college. But 
the honors students are given a fuller course of study 
and a special class section in English, history, speech, 
logic, and metaphysics in the freshmen and sophomore 
programs. The upper-division curriculum is deter- 
mined by the major subject which the student has 
chosen. 




Rev. Carl J. Burlage, S.J. 
Director, Honors Program 



Honors students Charles Hart, Christine Nahnsen, Thomas Haney, and Frank Canino 
listen to Bill Hegan give his ideas on the critical theory of Plato for their English honors 
course. 



Xi 







fir- 1 i ^HHI BrM)i.i ^*F?*I 

1 \W\ rlnl ■f?***v , v - 




lllffi 


, 


f: *a#HwV VifP 




■lK"!OUS5Wi35i 






P* ^H 


PL--^*€j! 


7^ 


1 


^^_ ^0*"" 




^Sp 1 ^' '$*- o^| 


a^ / ■ 


mf^j^m J 




<_^ 


"*">». ^^mta 




HUMAN RELATIONS CLUB. Standing: John Veto, Marge Lowe, Rita Kindahl, Sally 
Byrne, Rita Condon, Dawn Svetich, Cecilia Schmuttenmaer, Loretta Krozel, Martin Jones. 
Seated: George Van Ryan, Philip Martin, Pat Geoghagen, Mary Twohig, David 
Knudsen, William Moorehead. 



HUMAN RELATIONS CLUB OFFICERS. Standing: Philip 
K. Martin, president; David Knudsen. Seated: Mary Twohig, 
Pat Geoghagen. 




HUMAN RELATIONS CLUB 



Appealing to both general college students and to 
sociology majors, the programs of the Human Rela- 
tions Club are designed to acquaint the student body 
with the various aspects of social phenomena and prob- 
lem areas. 

Dr. Francis Cizon, the present moderator, has initi- 
ated a reorganization of the Club by dividing it into 
several subcommittees, one to deal with each of the 
various fields of social relations: Racial Relations, 
Social Psychology, Criminology, Urban Development, 
Labor and Industrial Relations, and Foreign Affairs. 
The members of the various subcommittees undertake 
special projects which range from field trips through 
factories, courts, and problem areas to actual experi- 
ence in diversified fields by volunteer employment. 



169 




LAKE SHORE SODALITY. Standing, back row: Wally Block, John O'Reilly, Joe Chamberlain, 
Bob Austin, Jerry Ochota, Bill Nico. Standing, fourth row: Bud Koczor, Mike Coffey, Troy Ehlert, 
John Dentzer, Kereen Forster, John Scheie!, Jack Kramer. Standing, third row: Dave Carey, Paul 
Patterson, Bernie Kuczynski, Maryann Hopkinson, Judy Ryan, Frank Dentzer, Don Rowe, Mike 
Carbine. Standing, second row: Larry Gray, Kay Fish, Stan Zak, Sam Cipolla, Don Janninck, 
Mary Kay Bussert, Ray Orloski, Dennis McDermott, Shawn Concannon. Standing, front row: 
Ken Snyher, Wilma Cruz, Ellen Nyderek, Mary De Vlieger, Rev. Lester Evett, S.J., Joan Traver, 
Barbara Pankos, Pat Kelly, Margy Malone. 



LAKE SHORE SODALITY 



The Sodality of the Blessed Virgin Mary, commonly 
known as the Lake Shore Campus Sodality, is an off- 
spring of the Jesuit Sodality which was founded at 
Rome in 1563. 

Under the guidance of the Rev. Lester J. Evett, S.J., 
its moderator, the Sodality has sponsored many spirit- 
ual activities during the past year. Prominent among 
them were such activities as the sixth annual Chicago- 
land Collegiate Marian Program on Catholic Leader- 
ship, many Holy Hours, and Communion Breakfasts. 
Apostolic activities of the Sodality included training 
discussions and visits to hospitals and orphanages. The 
Sodalists also sponsored a float in this year's Float 
Parade. 

The purpose of these activities is to foster a deep 
devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary and develop the 
true practical Catholic. 



LAKE SHORE SODALITY OFFICERS. Standing: Jack Kramer, first 
vice-prefect; Jerome Ochota, treasurer; Paul Patterson, second vice- 
prefect. Seated: Kathleen Fish, corresponding secretary; Larry Gray, 
prefect; Kereen Forster, recording secretary. 



170 





LEWIS TOWERS SODALITY 



The Lewis Towers Sodality, officially entitled the 
Queen of the Most Holy Rosary Sodality, is a religious 
organization which aims at fostering in its members 
an ardent devotion, reverence, and filial love toward 
the Blessed Virgin Mary. The formation of zealous, 
intellectual Catholics is its goal, and for this purpose 
the sodality offers a social, cultural, and spiritual pro- 
gram. This program is based on the principle that 
man as a social being is best helped toward his ultimate 
goal by other people. 

During the first semester, the Sodality sponsors three 
closed retreats for all students. And besides its spiritual 
activities, the group also participates in an annual 
Christmas party for seventy-five children and goes carol- 
ing at a Chicago hospital. 



SODALITY OFFICERS. Standing: Bill Johnson, Fred Row- 
den, Lee Smuda, Paul Dentzer, Joe Matulis. Seated: Carol 
Rogalski, Peggy Jo LaPlante, Walter Powers (prefect), Rev. 
Joseph Hogan, S.J. (moderator), Delphine Migacz (co- 
prefect ) , Dick Triska, Dawn Svetich. 

LEWIS TOWERS SODALITY. Standing, back row: Martin Jones, Jack Kroger, Fred 
Rowden, Jim Moreno, George Krippner, Terry McGovern. Standing: Sheila Carroll, 
Rita Zaug, Pat Curry, Margie Lowe, Chris Smith, Joanna Hosteny, Mike Hauser, Bill 
Moorhead, Ann Shannon, Loretta Krozel, Sheila Keller, Virginia Szigetti, Joan Kwiat- 
kowski, Kathleen Staunton. Seated: Joe Matulis, Carol Rogalski, Bill Johnson, Peggy 
LaPlante, Walter Powers, Rev. Joseph Hogan, S.J., Delphine Migacz, Dick Triska, 
Dawn Svetich, Paul Dentzer, Lee Smuda. 




171 



LOYOLA HALL 



Located adjacent to the Lake Shore Campus, Loyola 
Hall, a $1,500,000 modern three-story building, affords 
handsome and spacious accommodations for 360 male 
students and seven Jesuit counselors. 

The facilities of the Hall include lounges and recrea- 
tion rooms, a cafeteria, a chapel, and laundry areas. 

Opened three years ago, the dormitory offers a per- 
fect combination of privacy, comfort, convenience, 
economy, and integration into college life. 

Mass and confession are available to the Hall resi- 
dents. A closed retreat for the residents is also spon- 
sored at the beginning of the school year. In addition 
to its spiritual benefits, the Hall provides various socials 
and mixers for the residents and their guests. 

Under the leadership of Rev. Edmund Montville, 
S.J., Loyola Hall has grown to be a vital part of the 
life of the University. 




Rev. Edmund J. Montville, S.J. 
Director, Loyola Hall 



DORM COUNCIL. Standing: John F. Morreale, Frank E. Kozak, Michael S. Hmura, 
Robert R. Rinderman, Daniel Foley, Timothy Ames, John J. O'Keefe, Albert D. Tay- 
mans, John Q. McFadyen, Thomas R. Haessler. Seated: Claude J. Davis, William F. 
Mullen, Anthony Byrne. 



\- - 1^? fTS 



172 





The Loyola University Men's Residence Hall, 6551 N. Sheridan Road, at the Lake 
shore Campus. 




Modern accommodations are typical of the 
facilities of the student rooms in Loyola Hall. 



173 




LOYOLA NEWS STAFF. Howard Barry, technical advisor; Jerry White; Judy Kohnke; 
Tom Millard; John Moran; Frank Mustari; Larry Kaufman. 



LOYOLA NEWS STAFF. Standing: Bud Koczor, Ellen Huck, Mike Kutza, Gene 
Burke, Fred Ludwig, Mike Naughton, Dan Croke. Seated: Jo Tomaszewski. 





LOYOLA NEWS 



"Keep Campus Conscious" was the by-word for The 
Loyola News during the 1958-59 academic year. The 
News, through its editorial pages and general news 
emphasis, stressed the oneness of the University on all 
levels of endeavor. 

For the first year in the history of The Loyola News 
the women were featured on a society page designed 
to help the co-eds keep in touch with the social activi- 
ties at Loyola and to give hints toward fashion and 
etiquette. 

Four members of the staff attended a newspaper 
convention at MacMurray College in Jacksonville, Illi- 
nois, to sharpen their journalistic talents. The conven- 
tion, which was held in February, had some of the out- 
standing experts in Chicago journalism who served as 
"faculty" members for the conferences. 

The technical advisor for the News was Mr. Howard 
Barry of the sports staff of the Chicago Tribune. 



Jan Finsen 

Assistant Editor, first semester 



LOYOLA NEWS STAFF. Back row: Frank 
Mustari, Bob Murray, Bob Marlin, John 
Moran, Noel Whitney. Front row: Tom 
Millard and Judy Kohnke. 





175 



LOYOLA UNION 



The Loyola Union is the central student governing 
body of the University. Since its re-establishment at 
Loyola twelve years ago, the Union has continued to 
grow and has markedly contributed to the improvement 
or student life at the University. 

Among the Union's many social activities are the 
Fall Frolic and Miss Varsity Contest, the Rambler Pow- 
Wow and Float Parade, the Freshman Invitational 
Dance, the Loyola Fair, and Senior Week. 

In addition, the Union operates the student lounges 
at Lake Shore and Lewis Towers, bookstores, snackbars, 
and a catering service. 

All students of the University are members of the 
Union. However, the activities and programs of the 
Union are under the supervision of the Director, the 
student congress, and the board of governors. The 
congress is composed of representatives from all the 
schools and colleges, the organizations, and the fra- 
ternities and sororities of the University. The Board 
of Governors is the general executive committee of the 
congress. 




George Kollintzas 
Director, Loyola Union 



Members of the Union student congress con- 
vened in February to elect the executive 
officers and board of governors of the Union. 



\Wk """■^^^^^^■^■■■■■l 


^ 


s»l - 


I 


-.«■ -rap^w 


■■W «H^H& ^H P**IhJbH H^H^hV *"^l 

1 he' 


* 



J. David Smith 
Manager, Union House 



176 





BOARD OF GOVERNORS. Standing: Stanley Clawson, Thomas M. Haney, Kenneth 
Printen, Marilyn Scavone, Mary Jo Finch, John Johns, Robert Walsh, Thomas Cauley. 
Seated: William M. Plante; John Nicholson, treasurer; Andrew P. Kelly, president; John 
Doyle, executive secretary; Kevin McKeough, recording secretary. 



William M. Plante 
Union President, 1957-58 






Andrew P. 


Kelly 




Union 


President 


, 1958-59 


/ 1 












B^Sfiv 


m-M 












k ■■■- _^ 








2jmg|f* 







177 




LOYOLAN STAFF. Mel Kamm, Barbara O'Brien, Walter Hanson, Joan Leister, Pauline 
Zaranka, Bob Doherty, Tom Maloney, Karen Lester, Ken Klein. 




SENIOR EDITORS. Judith M. Wolfgram 
and Edwin Biesinger. 



Charles Vygantas 
Sports Editor 



178 





THE 1959 LOYOLAN 



Founded at Loyola University in 1924, the Loyola 
Annual, known as THE LOYOLAN, is designed to 
record the activities and functions which are the very 
essence of university life at Loyola. 

Being all-university in its scope, THE LOYOLAN 
offers a composite picture of Loyola's colleges and di- 
visions, its clubs and organizations, its fraternities and 
sororities, and its faculty and administration. 

The yearbook provides for all students, and especially 
for the seniors, a permanent, visual record of Loyola 
University for the year 1958-59. In the years to come 
the yearbook will serve to remind the students of the 
memorable time spent in college at Loyola University. 



William M. Hegan 
Editor-in-chief 




William M. Hegan 
Editor-in-chief 

Thomas M. Haney 
Assistant Editor 

Francis W. Smith 
Managing Editor 

Robert W. Ryba 
Business Manager 



John E. Lempkowski 
Copy Editor 

Charles Vygantas 
Sports Editor 



Thomas M. Haney 
Assistant Editor 



Judith M. Wolfgram 

Edwin Biesinger 

Senior Editors 

Robert F. Doherty 
Advisory Editor 

Rev. Thomas J. Bryant, S.J. 
Faculty Moderator 



Francis W. Smith 
Managing Editor 



Robert W. Ryba 

Business Manager 



John E. Lempkowski 
Copy Ediror 




T k J . ^ 



179 



MARKETING CLUB 



Broader student interest in the many-faceted field of 
merchandising is the aim of the Marketing Club. 

Every month, members get a peek at the workaday 
world when guest speakers who are leaders in the busi- 
ness world address them. Discussion of the problems 
these men face in the day-to-day conduct of their affairs 
gives the student a better picture of the economic 
forces working in today's world, knowledge that is a 
valuable supplement to the student's classroom work. 

In addition, the Club publishes a monthly newsletter, 
containing news of the marketing field. 

Members of the Marketing Club are also members 
of the American Marketing Association, a nationwide 
organization. 




MARKETING CLUB OFFICERS. Standing: Robert Mison, 
James Smith, Robert Goodsell. Seated: Dr. Hugh A. Weiss, 
moderator; Emmett Burns, president; Charles Ptacek, vice- 
president. 



MARKETING CLUB. Standing: William Muldowney, Michael Kelly, Richard Cegielski, 
Joseph Russo, Robert Goodsell, Emmett Burns, Melba Hompertz, Olivia Harrell, Jack 
Doyle, Terry Kucharski, Gary Crow, Thomas Walsh, Robert Mison, John Bresnahan. 
Seated: Dan Alkovich, Dr. Hugh Weiss, Michael Burke, James Smith, Robert Spero, 
Nicholas Tompulis, Michael Walcik, Jerry Byrne, Richard Lenihan, Robert Kristufek.' 




^IrS 





MATHEMATICS CLUB. Standing: Ed Murray, Joe O'Malley, Grace Griskenas, Joe 
Wojcik, Tom Millard, Stan Polick, Marty O'Donnell, Ron O'Brien, Bernard Kelly, John 
McFadyen, Eileen McNulty. Seated: Marty Danforth, Bob Kujala, Dr. Robert Reisel 
( moderator ) , Ken Hartmann, Bernie Petosa, Jack Miller. 



MATHEMATICS CLUB OFFICERS. Bernie Petosa, Bob 
Kujala, and Ken Hartmann. 




MATHEMATICS CLUB 



The members of the Mathematics Club, since its re- 
organization in 1958, have been working to foster the 
appreciation of mathematics among members of the 
student body. 

During the past school year, the Club has sponsored 
three series of lectures: The Foundations of Mathe- 
matics, conducted by faculty members; Special Topics 
in Mathematics, by students; and Opportunities in 
Mathematics, by guest speakers. The Club additionally 
conducted a special counseling program during which 
members were available twice weekly to answer ques- 
tions or resolve difficulties which students may have 
had concerning mathematics. 



181 




MODERN LANGUAGES CLUB. Standing: John Wilson, Jim Linsley, Nordic Winch, 
Marcello Canelas, Murray Arnold, Joe Stainer. Seated: Kay McNeive, Clare F. Hayden, 
Judy Munat, Pauline Zaranka, Dr. Joseph LeBlanc, Donna Collinson, Peggy Jo LaPlante, 
Theresa Wittan, Grace Griskenas. 



MODERN LANGUAGES CLUB 



Because of the importance of cultural exchange be- 
tween nations, the Modern Languages Club was formed 
in the fall of 1956. Conversation groups in French, 
Spanish, and German have helped members gain skill 
and fluency in the modern languages, and have pro- 
vided opportunities for an exchange of ideas with stu- 
dents of other countries. 

During its monthly meetings the Club has sponsored 
an address by Dr. LeBlanc, a slide lecture on Spanish 
art by Dr. Flys, a German Christmas dinner, and movies 
on Spanish student life. By fostering appreciation of 
the customs and thought of France, Germany, and 
Spain, the Modern Languages Club helps fulfill the 
current need for understanding among nations. 



MODERN LANGUAGES CLUB OFFICERS. Kay Cornell, 
president; Joseph Wandel, moderator; Sandra Waljeski; Harry 
Perrun; Mary Endres. Missing: Carol Friend, James Dunne, 
Mary Spence. 



182 





MONOGRAM CLUB 

The Monogram Club, composed of varsity letter 
winners in Loyola's three major sports (basketball, 
swimming, and track), aims to foster esprit de corps 
and a closer bond of friendship among the school's 
intercollegiate athletic personnel. 

During the past year the Club concentrated its efforts 
on compiling a complete list of Monogram Club mem- 
bers from the old days of football until the present. 
A complete roster of alumni members has been made 
from records in the athletic offices, coaches, former 
Loyolan yearbooks, and — for years in which the Loyolan 
was not published — from the Loyola News. Meetings 
of active and alumni monogram men are planned which 
will draw up a constitution and plan alumni support 
of athletics and Monogram Club activities. 



MONOGRAM CLUB OFFICERS. Roy Horton and Frank 
Hogan. 



MONOGRAM CLUB. Back row: Tom O'Connor and Norb Slowikowski. Front row: 
Charlie Vygantas, Frank Hogan, Ron Schwingen. 




183 



PHYSICS CLUB. Standing: John McFadyen, Ron O'Brien, Jim Cushing. 
Denis Ciesla, George Bart, Fred Wagner, Jim Dowd. 



Seated: 



PHYSICS CLUB OFFICERS. Tom Fox, secretary; Frank 
Tuma, president; Larry Gray, treasurer. 




PHYSICS CLUB 



Established in 1953 by a group of undergraduate 
physics majors, Loyola University's Physics Club pro- 
vides a common meeting ground for students interested 
in the physical sciences and their applications. 

During the past year, to stimulate an extra-curricular 
interest in physics, the Club sponsored a series of six 
lectures, and periodic field trips to government and 
industrial research laboratories. Professional men de- 
livered lectures on seismology, the Greenwich Observa- 
tory, the special theory of relativity, operations research, 
and the tracking of earth satellites; the trips included 
tours of Republic Steel, Standard Oil Company, and 
Argonne Laboratories. 

The Club's seismographic station, directed by Father 
Roll, detects and supplies information on earthquakes 
as far away as Chile, the Aleutian Islands, and Iran. 



RECENT DECISIONS 



Since 1949 Loyola law students have written and 
edited the "Recent Decisions" section of the Illinois 
Bar Journal, the official monthly publication of the Illi- 
nois Bar Association. "Recent Decisions" consists of 
current significant cases decided by the Illinois and 
Federal Courts. The comments not only report and 
analyze the cases but also orient them and demonstrate 
their significance. An addition to the established 



routine of publishing comments has been adopted this 
year to correlate the comments of past years to the cases 
decided subsequently, thus forming an annotation of 
those prior published comments. John C. Hayes is 
the faculty moderator. Editor-in-Chief is Ronald P. 
Kiefer; Associate Editors are Robert J. Klovstad, Helen 
C. McCabe, and Richard J. Troy. 



RECENT DECISIONS STAFF. Robert J. 
Klovstad; Helen McCabe; Richard Troy; 
lohn C. Hayes, faculty adviser; Ronald Kie- 
fer, editor-in-chief. 




RES IPSA LOQUITUR 



Res Ipsa Loquitur, the student publication of the Law 
School, has for the past five years served as a vehicle 
of opinion and dissent for the law student body. 

Inspired by a principle of law, Res Ipsa Loquitur 
("The Thing Speaks for Itself") has emerged from its 
often-troubled history as a voice of independence for 
the law student at Loyola. 



Published by the Student Bar Association, the paper 
has a student circulation of two-hundred and fifty and 
an ever-expanding alumni circulation of over one thous- 
and in the Chicagoland area. 

Thomas O'Bryan has been editor of Res Ipsa Loqui- 
tur for the past year. 




RES IPSA LOQUITUR STAFF. Thomas 
Cauley, James Fitzgibbon, John McDonald, 
Robert Lane, Thomas O'Bryan. 



185 




ST. APOLLONIA GUILD OFFICERS. Back row: Thomas Sullivan, Rev. Francis 
Vaughan, S.J., and Thomas Schneider. Front row: Dr. Joseph Cantafio, Walter Lichota, 
and Paul Noto. Missing: Al McManama. 



186 



SAINT APOLLONIA GUILD 



The St. Apollonia Guild is named in honor of a 
third-century virgin martyr who was seized by the 
persecutors and by repeated blows had all her teeth 
broken. 

In 1920, the St. Apollonia Guild was founded by a 
group of dentists in the greater Boston area with the 
sanction of His Eminence, Cardinal O'Connell. Its 
aim was to care for the dental needs of poor children 
in and around Boston. The participating dentists lent 
their services to care for the dental needs of some forty 
thousand poor children. 

The Alpha Chapter was organized in the School of 
Dentistry in 1924. After four years, the guild became 
inactive. But in 193 4 the Guild was reorganized by 
the senior dental students under Dr. Jerome Vik. 



In a place of honor in rhe Dental School is the statue of St. 
Apollonia, the patron of the school's religious society. 





ST. LUKE'S GUILD OFFICERS. Standing: Dom Allocco, Bill 
Tansey. Seated: Bob Walsh, president; Rev. John W. Bieri, 
S. J., moderator; Miles Lynch. 



SAINT LUKE'S GUILD 



Several years ago, to ensure their own spiritual de- 
velopment as well as a proper understanding of typical 
moral problems, a group of medical students banded 
together, with Father John W. Bieri as their moderator, 
to form the Alpha Chapter of St. Luke's Student Guild. 

To accomplish its twofold goal, the Guild sponsors 
regular spiritual exercises and bi-monthly meetings. A 
guest speaker or a movie is usually featured at one meet- 
ing of the month, the other being devoted to business 
and discussion of medical, moral, and social issues of 
general interest. 

The professional life for which the medical student 
prepares himself is one filled with moral crises. The 
men who support the St. Luke's Guild realize that in 
so doing, they will better be able to become good 
Catholic physicians. 



Members of St. Luke's Guild gather in the Medical School at one of their regular meetings. 




187 



SOCIETY FOR THE 

ADVANCEMENT 

OF MANAGEMENT 



Under the guidance of Dr. Peter T. Swanish since 
1950, the Management Club has progressed to a posi- 
tion of eminence among similar clubs in schools 
throughout the Chicago area. Last year the Loyola 
Chapter of the Society for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment won the Chicago Area Award, a large rotating 
trophy, for the best chapter in the city. The Club hopes 
to keep the trophy at Loyola this year. 

The Club's most ambitious activity during the past 
year has been to present as speakers experts on as many 
phases of business activity as possible. This project, 
in turn, has been supplemented by tours of such cor- 
porations as Texaco Refineries, A. O. Smith, Nabisco, 
and U. S. Steel. 




S.A.M. OFFICERS. Standing: Terence McGovern, Robert 
Kayer, Joseph Sebastian. Seated: Joel Chrastka, John Hannan, 
Joseph Burke. 



S.A.M. Standing: Mike Kelly, Ted Wyroski, Ed Kilboy, Frank Smith, Terence Mc- 
Govern, Jim McGrath, Bob Raniere, James Johnson, Anthony Gianini, Larry Somecka, 
Ed Watkowski, Eugene Nowak, Gerald O'Brien, Martin Kielty, Bob Gawlik, John 
Tevenan, Robert Kayer. Seated: Paul Dentzer, James Mulcahey, Tom Hickey, Gerald 
Jamnik, John Hannan, Joseph Burke, Joel Chrastka, John Gobby, Joseph Sebastian, 
Bob Johnson. 




188 




STUDENT AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION. Back row: Ken Printen, Dick 
Mitchell, John Baron, Joe Drugay, Ray Nemickas, John Johns, Tom Rodda, Ron 
Sererino. Front row: Carlo DiNello, Bob Walsh, Jerry O'Connell, Ed Garvin. 



S.A.M.A. OFFICERS. Standing: John C. Wall, secretary; 
Donald L. Meccia, treasurer. Seated: Stanley M. Zydlo, vice- 
president; William P. Smedley, president. 




STUDENT AMERICAN 
MEDICAL ASSOCIATION 



The Student American Medical Association is the 
largest student medical group in the world. Founded 
in December, 1950, 72 schools constitute its member- 
ship today. 

The objects of the Association are to advance the 
medical profession, to contribute to the welfare and 
education of medical students, to familiarize its mem- 
bers with the purposes and ideals of organized medi- 
cine, and to prepare them to meet the social and ethical 
obligations of the medical profession. 

The Loyola Chapter of the S.A.M.A. conducts 
monthly meetings highlighted by motion pictures con- 
cerning various areas of research and the diagnosis and 
treatment of disease entities. During the current year, 
a chapter constitution was adopted, student directories 
were printed and distributed, and current medical litera- 
ture was circulated to the Association members. 



189 




STUDENT DENTAL ASSOCIATION EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. Standing: Norman 
Marchelya, Carl Frielman, Richard Delo, Karl Nishimura, Peter Cunningham, Monte 
Levett, Kenneth Robinson. Seated: Jay Stine, Leonard Weiss, James Brown, Jack 
Akamine, Charles Giroux, Russell Elgin. 



STUDENT DENTAL 
ASSOCIATION 



Patterned after the American Dental Association, the 
Student A.D.A. of Loyola is designed to promote dental 
education among its members. Each class has four 
representatives on the executive council, which is the 
governing body setting the program of events for the 
year. 

Student A.D.A. activities have included three dinner 
meetings, featuring guest lecturers Dr. Harry Sicher, Dr. 
Nicholas Brescia, and Dr. Marshall Smulson, members 
of the dental faculty. Another annual event is the 
Clinic Day, which presents original student displays on 
particular phases of dentistry. 

Closing the year's program, the Honors Banquet 
witnessed the bestowing of academic and clinical awards 
to the top students. 



STUDENT DENTAL ASSOCIATION OFFICERS: Standing: 
Jack Akamine, vice-president. Seated: Karl Nishimura, treas- 
urer; James Brown, president. Absent: Loren Mills. Secretary. 



190 





UNIVERSITY COLLEGE SODALITY OFFICERS. 
Henry Liese, treasurer; Marilyn Zefran, social chairman; Sue 
Finigan, secretary; and James Schiltz, spiritual chairman. 
Seated: Victor Colucci, prefect; Rev. Joseph F. Hogan, S.J., 
moderator; Josephine Valenti, co-prefect. 



UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 
SODALITY 



The Madonna della Strada Sodality, primarily a re- 
ligious organization, is designed for men and women 
of the University College. 

Like the Society of Jesus, on whose rules it is mod- 
eled, it aims "at the salvation and perfection of one's 
own soul and that of one's neighbor." 

In addition to bi-monthly spiritual meetings it spon- 
sors two days of recollection and an annual closed re- 
treat for the night school men and women. Its other 
activities include the Apostleship of Prayer, a discuss- 
sion club, a Christmas party for orphans, Thanksgiving 
baskets for the poor, two mixers for the night school 
students, and other social activities. 

The officers of the Sodality are: Vic Colucci, prefect; 
Josephine Valenti, co-prefect; Sue Finigan, secretary; 
and Henry Liese, treasurer. 



UNIVERSITY COLLEGE SODALITY. Standing: Walter Powers, Betty Hammer, Mary 
Tohomella, Dorothy Larney, Leona Reynolds, Paul Dentzer, Florence McCann, Pat 
Poturalski, Sue Finigan, Larry Hite. Seated: Marilyn Zefran, Victor Colucci, Rev. Joseph 
F. Hogan, S. J., Josephine Valenti, James Schiltz. 




191 



I* 



VETERANS CLUB 



Besides fulfilling its primary function as a social or- 
ganization providing an outlet for veterans at Loyola, 
the Veterans Club also serves to provide information 
pertinent to veterans' affairs both at Loyola and in per- 
sonal matters. This latter service is made available 
through the cooperation of the Loyola representative of 
the Veterans Administration, Eugene Knight. 

Social events, however, are the club's main function. 
Besides supporting general university activities, the or- 
ganization sponsors its own smokers, parties, and dances, 
as well as an annual Communion Breakfast for its mem- 
bers. The highlight of the year for the Veterans Club 
is its annual Veterans Dance, at which Miss Veteran 
is presented with a bronze combat boot. 




VETERANS CLUB OFFICERS. John Owens, vice-president; 
Joseph Taylor, president; Hugh McAvoy, moderator; Andrew 
Kelly, treasurer. 



VETERANS CLUB. Standing, back row: Mike Sheehan, Tom Sheehan, Charles Harti- 
gan, Jerry Fitzpatrick. Standing, middle row: Glen Jaworski, Eugene Curran, Bob 
Broderick, Dave Megley, Martin Ryan, Thaddeus Wyroski, Dennis Sullivan, Tom 
LaVelle, Bob Stamm, Jim Thielen, Tom Green, Gene Nelson, Richard Kerwin, John 
Hannan. Seated: Mike Metzzen, Pat Lundy, Andy Kelly, John Owens, Joe Taylor, 
Warren Wessel, Bob Martin, Tom Walsh, Gerald Joyce. 




192 




/ 






On a nice spring day, the members of the Veterans Club gather in front of Lewis Towers 
to soak up the sunshine and discuss veterans' affairs. 



Between classes, one can always find the veterans in the lounge catching up on their 
"studies." 




195 



WASMANN BIOLOGICAL SOCIETY. Standing: Charles Baldwin, Virginia Kuta, 
Dr. Boris Spiroff, Mr. J. W. Hudson. Seated, back row: Dr. Kenneth Hisaoka and Dr. 
Edward Palincsar. Seated, third row: Frank Neidhart, Daniel Sampson, Richard Pena, 
Joseph Pribyl, Richard Szatkiewicz. Seated, second row: Ray Koziol, John Kottra, Ronald 
Draur, Steve Dutcher, Robert Sladek. Seated, front row: Pat Sclafini, Barbara Vaughn, 
Judy Ryan, Donald Jasinski, Michael Kutza." " 



WASMANN BIOLOGICAL 
SOCIETY 



The Wasmann Biological Society honors the memory 
of Erich Wasmann, a Jesuit philosopher-scientist, world 
famous for his writings on comparative animal psy- 
chology. The Society at Loyola was founded in Novem- 
ber, 1940, by Father Charles Widemann, S.J. 

Besides encouraging general interest in biological 
studies, the Society puts special emphasis on student 
research. To its outstanding members the Society 
awards the Wasmann Key and a certificate of recog- 
nition. 

This year's activities included a full round of special 
scientific lectures and movies, a counseling service for 
freshmen, the initiation dinner, and communion break- 
fasts. Highlighting its work the Society presented the 
Annual Biology Fair, open to the students and the gen- 
eral public. 



WASMANN SOCIETY OFFICERS. Standing: Barbara 
Vaughn, Donald Jasinski, Pat Sclafini. Seated: Charles Baldwin, 
president. 




194 




Kenneth Zysko, Kathy Hawkins, and Bob Sladek discuss their 
favorite brand of mock turtle soup. 



The amphioxus circulatory system proves no mystery whatsoever to Judith T. Joyce, 
Reno C. Unger, and Rochelle Randolph. 




195 



WOMEN'S RESIDENCE HALL 



The Women's Residence Hall offers a combination 
of comfort, convenience, and economy which makes it 
a model of urban college dormitories. 

Situated a block east of famed Michigan Avenue, the 
women's residence is a part of the city's Gold Coast. 
Lake Michigan lies a block to the east of the Hall, 
Lewis Towers a block to the west. Loyola's Lake Shore 
Campus is a convenient twenty-minute ride by public 
transportation. Chicago's Loop, with its outstanding 
stores and theatres, is a few minutes' walk away. 

In adapting the building to a suitable women's dor- 
mitory, a considerable amount of remodeling was done 
that it would be well equipped to provide for the vari- 
ous needs of the women students. Under the direction 
of Mrs. Leona Rantfl, the dormitory has continued to 
maintain the home-away-from-home atmosphere desired 
by the residents. 

The women students at the Hall have done their 
part by forming a dorm council to enforce their self- 
made laws. This spirit of cooperation has been the 
very essence of Loyola's women's residence. 




Mrs. Leona Rantfl 
Director, Women's Residence Hall 



Terry Tamburrino and Sandy Smith 
take a few minutes off from their 
studies to see what has been hap- 
pening in the outer world. 



The library at the Residence Hall 
affords the students a place to catch 
up on their studies as well as on the 
latest gossip from Lewis Towers. 






WOMEN'S DORM COUNCIL. Standing: Kay McNieve, Barbara Gilsdorf, Glenda 
McDonald. Seated: Andrea DeMarco, Mary Twohig, Donna Collinson, Teri Mulkern. 




P 1 VII 




The Loyola University Women's Residence 
Hall, 162 East Delaware Place, which was 
acquired by the University in June, 1956. 



197 



Chicago's position as the nation's crossroads extends to the field 
of finance as well as transportation, trade, and communications. The 
Midwest Stock Exchange is the largest outside of New York; six of 
America's largest commercial banks are located here. The Chicago 
Board of Trade transacts 18 billion dollars worth of business each year, 
providing a sound base of operation for the many prominent invest- 
ment bankers and brokers who have their headquarters in the city. 

Loyola's fraternal and social organizations, described in the follow- 
ing pages, provide their members with a sense of social responsibility 
necessary for careers in the financial world. 



GREEKS 






G 



- 'J 



INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 

Composed of all undergraduate fraternity and soror- 
ity congressmen of the Union student congress, the 
Interfraternity Council deals with the problems, activi- 
ties, and matters concerning the undergraduate fraterni- 
ties and sororities. 

The Interfraternity Council's most important duty is 
the supervision of fraternity and sorority rushing and 
pledging. In addition, the Council is responsible for 
regulating and studying all undergraduate fraternity 
and sorority problems and relations. 

The Council, a permanent subcommittee of the 
Union's Committee on Interfraternity Relations, is un- 
der the chairmanship of a member of the Council who 
is elected by the group. The other elected officers of 
the Council are a secretary and a treasurer. 




Frank Konicek 
Chairman, Interfraternity Council 



Freshmen and members of Loyola's fraternities and sororities mingle at the Interfraternity 
Council's Freshman Reception held at the beginning of the school year. 




200 



The paddle, bottle of "spirits," and mug all in some way represent the spirit and fellow- 
ship of fraternity life — the paddle, a symbol of pledging; the bottle of "spirits" and 
mug, symbols of the fraternity bond of friendship. 









fFALLf 
CLASS 
OF 57 




w'm 



NORM BOROWSKI 
MARTY CORRIGAN 

JACK DOYLE 
HARRY DRAYSON 

ANDY KELLY 
GENE MACHINIK 

RON MASINI 
TERRY NOTARI 





- 






ALPHA DELTA GAMMA 



Since its inception at Loyola University in 1924, 
Alpha Delta Gamma has become the largest National 
Catholic-College Social Fraternity in the United States. 

The fraternity was founded with a three-fold pur- 
pose in mind: of affording the social advantages of a 
fraternity to students of high morals and high ideals, 
of promoting and supporting all activities of Loyola 
University, and of effecting a stronger bond among 
similarly inclined students of the University. 

In coordination with their policy of active participa- 
tion in University activities, Alpha Delta Gamma initi- 



ated and has continued to promote its Annual Orphans' 
Day program, in which all of the fraternities and sorori- 
ties of the University extend their fraternal hand to 
those less fortunate. 

In addition to its many smokers, parties, and fra- 
ternal activities, Alpha Delta Gamma sponsors its an- 
nual Thanksgiving Dance for the students of the Uni- 
versity. 

The fraternity's successes this year included a first- 
place victory in the Interfraternity Sing and two first- 
place trophies for its entry in the annual Float Parade. 



ALPHA DELTA GAMMA. Standing, back row: Jerry Atwood, John Kean, Maurice 
McCarthy, Mike Colandrea, Frank Paulo. Standing, third row: William Devine, Robert 
Von Kaenel, Peter Amberson, Al Alekna, Jack Fournier, Bob Murray, Larry Bernier, 
Bob Mison, Bill Gould, Brian Shuns. Seated, second row: Joe Ferretti, John Divane, 
Ed Biesinger, Bill Pederson, Emmett Burns, Bob Bielinski, Norb Slowikowski. Seated, 
on floor: Frank Konicek, Rich Krezo, Jim Gmelich, Jim Bayley, Tom Eberl. 




202 




The Alpha Delta Gamma fraternity house is located at 6332 No. Kenmore, only a 
few blocks from Lake Shore Campus. 



ALPHA DELTA GAMMA OFFICERS. 
Standing: Bob Bielinski, pledgemaster; Frank 
Konicek, IFC representative; Joe Ferretti, 
corresponding secretary; John Divane, treas- 
urer. Seated: Ed Biesinger, steward; Bill 
Pederson, president; Emmett Burns, vice- 
president. 



Alpha Delts Bill Pederson, Bill Gibbons, 
Harry Olson, and Rick Olson demonstrate 
their talents which won for them the first- 
place trophy in the Interfratcrnity Sing. 





203 




ALPHA KAPPA PSI OFFICERS. Bob Raniere,Dick Lisk, John Tevenan.Gene Croisant, 
Dick Yetter, Jim Johnson. 




Members of Alpha Kappa Psi gather in the 
upper floors of Lewis Towers at one of their 
many lecture meetings. 



Brother Leo V. Ryan, C.S.V., addresses the 
fraternity as one of its special guest lecturers. 




ALPHA KAPPA PSI 



Gamma Iota Chapter of Alpha Kappa Psi Profes- 
sional Fraternity in Commerce was established at Loyola 
University in 1952. The chapter has consistently en- 
deavored to maintain a fine professional attitude among 
its members and to further the welfare of Commerce 
students at Loyola. The chapter conducts an annual 
program for all Commerce sophomores entitled "Career 
Days," which consists of bringing speakers from the 
business world to give the students a practical outlook 
on the various fields on concentration in the College 
of Commerce. Professional meetings and other such 
events of a professional nature are held throughout the 
year for the benefit of the brothers and pledges. 



In keeping with the background of a Catholic uni- 
versity, the chapter sponsors a Communion Breakfast 
each semester for the members and their fathers. An- 
other annual event of the fraternity is its Research Proj- 
ect, this year entitled "How Various Students Apportion 
Their Time," a project which has attracted much atten- 
tion from the administration of the university. 

Among the social events of a school year for Alpha 
Kappa Psi are the annual Halloween Costume Party, 
the New Year's Eve Party, a St. Patrick's Day Party, 
and a Golf Outing on the night after the final exams 
in June. 



ALPHA KAPPA PSI. Shunting, back row: Tony Giannini, Ralph Korn, Jim Blake, Jim 
Talamonti, Ken Fedorka, Jim Fitzgerald. Standing, middle roiv: Bob Kayer, John 
Marshall, Rich Gannan, Jim Sandner, John Payne, Jerry O'Brien, Joel Chrastka, Chuck 
Ptacek, Bob Morrow, Bob Bravieri, Bill Kraft, Tom Flatley. Seated: Ron Przybyl, Dick 
Yetter, Gene Croisant, John Tevenan, Dick Lisk, Bob Raniere, Jim Johnson. 




205 



ALPHA OMEGA 



That ideal which Alpha Omega, the first national 
Jewish dental fraternity, endeavors to achieve is best 
expressed by its motto: "Harmonia, Amor, et Veritas," 
Harmony, Love, and Truth. These words were the 
inspiration of a small group of pioneers who founded 
Alpha Omega in 1907 at the Pennsylvania College of 
Dental Surgery. 

From a fraternity numbering four members, Alpha 
Omega has grown into an organization boasting sev- 
enty-five chapters with over five thousand members. 
It has been a welcomed addition to the field of dentistry. 
Its rapid growth is a credit to both its founders and its 
members. 



The Alpha Lambda Chapter of Alpha Omega was 
organized at the Loyola School of Dentistry in 1932 
and has, since that time, assumed proportions far and 
above the fondest dreams of its founders. 

Alpha Lambda Chapter prides itself in not only aid- 
ing its members in preparing themselves for their 
chosen profession, but also in maintaining their social 
life. Each year the fraternity fills its calendar with 
events such as smokers, a Halloween Dance, and an 
April dinner-dance. It also sponsors many activities 
appealing to both the cultural and professional inter- 
ests of all its members. 



ALPHA OMEGA. Standing: Myron Chubin, Dan Davitz, Al Schonberg, Max Berman, 
and Jerry Hoffman. Seated: Joe Gordon, Eliott Folbe, and Len Weiss. 




206 




Joseph Gordon, Len Weiss, and Myron Chubin inspect the fossils on display in the 
Dental School Library. 



Max Berman feeds his physical as well as 
intellectual appetite in the Dental School 
Library. 



ALPHA OMEGA OFFICERS. Dr. Marshall 
Smulson, moderator; Jerry Hoffman; Myron 
Chubin; David Marcus; Eliott Folbe, presi- 
dent. 




V 




iA 




207 







Maureen Walsh, Mitzi Steinle, Marilyn Scavone, and Toni Litkowski enjoy themselves 
at their Founders' Dinner at Younker's restaurant. 




Peggy McAndrews, Monica Trocker, and 

Kay Janke inspect a map of the chapters 

of Alpha Tau Delta as well as the sorority 

scrapbook. 

ALPHA TAU DELTA OFFICERS. Stand- 
ing: Nancy Zimmerman, Dianne Kula, Joan 
Zaharski, Adrienne Gurdak, Pat Metz, Mary 
Anne Will. Seated: Geri McCarter, Kay 
Kocher, Mary Kay Ball, Lita Grabow, Marilee 
McRae. 



208 




ALPHA TAU DELTA 



Xi Chapter of Alpha Tau Delta National Fraternity 
for women in nursing was organized at Loyola in 1956 
and was officially installed on campus in 1957. 

The purposes of Alpha Tau Delta are to promote 
higher professional standards in the field of nursing; 
to develop the profession through an improved pro- 
gram of nursing education; and to form a close bond 
of friendship, fellowship, helpfulness, and understand- 
ing among women in the nursing profession. 

Chapters of Alpha Tau Delta are located at those 
universities and colleges which offer a basic course in 
nursing on the college level. The fraternity was 
founded at the University of California at Berkeley in 



1921. Since that time, the fraternity has been active in 
promoting the five-year nursing program for prospective 
nurses; at the present time, this program has been re- 
duced to four years. 

Among the activities and projects undertaken by the 
fraternity during the past year were a series of lectures 
and several charitable programs. In addition, Alpha 
Tau Delta participated in the 1959 Pow-Wow and the 
Loyola Fair. 

Although the fraternity is relatively new on the cam- 
pus, it has displayed its potential to a remarkable de- 
gree, for example, by winning the SAL award for its 
service to the university in recruiting new students. 



ALPHA TAU DELTA. Back row: Peggy Fischer, Monica Trocker, Adrienne Gurdak, 
Joan Zaharski, Helen Slingsby, Rita Pace, Geri McCarter, Mary Ann Dzik, Caroline 
Mcdl, Kay Janke. Middle row: Rosemary Fraser, Barbara Klinger, Kay Kocher, Nancy 
Zimmerman, Pat Wozniak, Ceil Liebl, Pat Metz, Ginny Laudon, Dianne Kula, Mary 
Ann Will, Cathy Monco. Seated: Virginia Stift, Emma Wills, Rita Rauen, Mary Kay 
Ball, Janis Fahrbach, Lita Grabow, Marilee McRae. 




£ 





BLUE KEY HONOR FRATERNITY 



Blue Key National Honor Fraternity was founded 
at the University of Florida in 1924. Since that time 
it has come to be accepted as the leadership equivalent 
of scholarly Phi Beta Kappa. Its membership now 
totals more than 35,000. 

The Loyola Chapter of Blue Key was established in 
1926 through the efforts of Rev. Robert C. Hartnett, 
S.J., Dr. William P. Schoen, and Dr. Paul S. Lietz. 
Since its founding at Loyola, the fraternity has func- 
tioned as an honorary leadership organization. 

Three years ago, the local chapter was reorganized 
as a service group designed to assist the administration 
and faculty and to support and encourage all student 



organizations. Blue Key members have been appointed 
permanent student marshals for all Convocations and 
Commencements and have represented the Dean of 
Admissions in the Chicago-area high schools for the 
recruitment of new students. 

Each year the Blue Key Chapter selects and bestows 
an award upon the Faculty Man of the Year, the Or- 
ganization of the Year, and the student groups which 
have most distinguished themselves in the fields of aca- 
demic, cultural, and social activity, respectively. 

New members are initiated at the chapter's annual 
dinner-dance, which was held this year at the Lake 
Shore Club. 



BLUE KEY. Standing: William Hegan, Richard Lisk, John Divane, Robert Doherty, 
Wayne Lowe. Seated: William Tansey, Richard Yetter, Frank Hogan III, William 
Plante, Brian Van Vlierbergen, Frank Lancaster. On floor: Anthony Spina, William 
Pederson. Missing: John Lempkowski and John Dentzer. 




210 




Blue Key men gather around the piano at a member's home for a festive evening 
of song. 



BLUE KEY OFFICERS. Standing: William 
Hegan, Richard Lisk, Brian Van Vlierbergen, 
William Pederson, Anthony Spina. Seated: 
William Plante; Frank Hogan III, president; 
Richard Yetter. 



Dr. Kenneth M. Jackson 
Moderator 






211 




The Chi Theta girls like to meet in the Lake Shore Campus Union house to discuss 
their studies and their sorority activities. 



Chi Theta's Mary Lou Kelly, Mary Fran 
Wagner, moderator Rosemary Donatelli, 
Joan McCabe, and Jo Tomaszewski proudly 
display their sorority's award from the 
S.A.I, program. 



CHI THETA UPSILON OFFICERS. Stand- 
ing: Joan McCabe, vice-president; Jo Tomas- 
zewski, treasurer. Seated: Stella Stasulaitis, 
.secretary; Mary Lou Kelly, president. 




CHI THETA UPSILON 



Approved by the University in May, 1958, Chi Theta 
Upsilon is the newest sorority at Loyola. It is open 
to women students on both campuses. 

Members of Chi Theta hold positions of responsi- 
bility in the Debate Society, Students Associates of 
Loyola, Coed Club, Sodality, and on the staff of the 
Loyola News. With youthful enthusiasm Chi Theta 
has adopted the various activities at Loyola as its own 
projects. As a proof of success, Chi Theta holds the 
S.A.L. plaque for obtaining the highest possible poten- 
tial of all organizations contributing to S.A.L.'s pro- 
gram. Chi Theta has participated in all major func- 
tions of the school year. Its members took part in the 



Ugly Man Contest and the Miss Varsity Contest in 
which the sorority boasted several candidates. The 
sorority was represented at the Float Parade, one of 
the most important events of the year. 

At the beginning of the school year a dinner was 
given in honor of the moderator of the sorority, Miss 
Rosemarie Donatelli. Charter members were formally 
inducted in November. Among other "firsts" for Chi 
Theta were the rushing teas, a party given for a poor 
family at Christmas time, and a formal dance held in 
May. Members also enjoyed a winter carnival and 
several parties. 



CHI THETA UPSILON SORORITY. Standing: Mary Lou Kelly, Mary Jane Mature, 

Mary Laskowski, Joan McCabe, Carol Fulgoni, Fran Elward. Seated: Jan Finsen, Stella 

Stasulaitis, Judy Kohnke, Pat Podraza, Joe Tomaszewski. Seated on floor: Chris 
Szostecki, Mary Koestner, Carol Rogalski, Kay Dwyer. 




213 



DELTA SIGMA DELTA 



Delta Sigma Delta, the oldest dental fraternity in 
existence, was founded at the University of Michigan 
on November 15, 1882. Three years later, under the 
direction of L. L. Davis, Beta Chapter was established 
at the Chicago College of Dental Surgery. This date, 
March 24, 1885, marks the entrance of the fraternity 
into the dental profession in the Mid-west. 

Delta Sigma Delta can claim the honor of having 
had members of the fraternity in administrative capaci- 
ties within the School of Dentistry from its beginning 
to the present time. It is very proud of this record. 



As part of its social program, the fraternity sponsors 
an all-school picnic, as well as a Christmas party and 
a St. Patrick's Day party. 

Delta Sigma Delta exists for its members, and its 
members, realizing this fact, have continually devoted 
themselves to maintaining the honor of the fraternity. 
They have accomplished this end by initiating into their 
ranks members who have maintained the tradition 
which has always been characteristic of Delta Sigma 
Delta. 



DELTA SIGMA DELTA. Standing, back: William Penrock, Earl Maier, Sam Liaros, 
Frank Arostegui, Millard Blackburn, Robert Adler, Robert Brandt, Sherwood Bryan, Carl 
Kalbhen, Bruce Kwarta, Daniel Kozub, Dr. Richard Stamm. Standing: Aldo Varco, 
Kenneth Robison, John Welsh, James Pride, Robert Berquist, Paul Polydoran, Robert 
Calderwood, Stephen Chantos, Gilbert Winters, Paul DiFranco, James Rota, Thomas 
Schneider, Larry Coyne, Joel Diven, Jack Akamine, Dr. John M. Coady. Seated: Karl 
Nishimura, William Bercik, John Moss, Stephen Bell, Alfred Wenzel, Robert Ireland, 
George Takahashi. 




214 




Joe Wallner and Bill Maastricht make use of their free time at the fraternity house to 
catch up on some homework. 



The LOYOLAN photographer catches Steve 
Chantos and Ron Olen in the process of 
casting. 



DELTA SIGMA DELTA OFFICERS. Stand- 
ing: Karl Nishimura, treasurer; Robert Ire- 
land, junior page; Dr. John M. Coady, deputy 
supreme councilor; William Bercik, his- 
torian; Dr. Richard Stamm, assistant deputy 
supreme councilor. Sealed: John Moss, 
sergeant-at-arms; Stephen Bell, grand master 
( president ) ; Alfred Wenzel, junior grand 
master (vice-president). 





215 




DELTA SIGMA PI. Back row: Jack Drill, Terry Notari, Marty Corrigan. Middle row: 
Joe Lang, Dave O'Neill, Tom Kolin, John Puetz, Jack Doyle, Chuck Papish, John 
Sullivan, Pete Marchi. Seated: Ron White, Dan Fortney, Pat McWeeny, Herman Becker, 
Harry Drayson, Carl Longo. 



Rose Mary Piraino is crowned as the Rose of 
Delta Sig by Betty Jane Wall at the fra- 
ternity's annual Rose Mixer. 



DELTA SIGMA PI OFFICERS. Ronald 
Masini, Dan DeCarlo, Ed McGrath, and 
Robert Goodsell. 




DELTA SIGMA PI 



Delta Sigma Pi successfully manages to guide its 
members towards careers in business and at the same 
time to plan their social activities here at Loyola. 

Founded at New York University in 1907, this inter- 
national fraternity's purpose is to promote closer affilia- 
tion between commerce students and the commercial 
world. Loyola's chapter, Gamma Pi, accomplishes this 
goal through professional tours, speakers, and movies 
scheduled throughout the year. The highlight of the 
fraternity's social program is the Rose Mixer at which 
is chosen the girl who reigns as the Rose of Delta Sigma 
Pi for the year. 

In addition, the fraternity holds parties, hayrides, 



beach parties, and picnics. Members attend a semi- 
annual national convention and an annual regional 
convention. Delta Sig's active interest in athletics has 
won for it the Intramural Banner and numerous 
trophies. 

The fraternity maintains a Key Club at 115 East 
Chicago Avenue which is used for meetings and as a 
lounge for members. The Key Club is the only facility 
of its kind operated by any fraternity in the Lewis 
Towers area. During the 1957-58 academic year, 
Delta Sigma Pi earned the "Organization of the Year" 
award given by Blue Key. 



DELTA SIGMA PI. Back row: Tony Mastro, Chuck Harrison, Jim McGrath. Middle 
row: Jim Orchowski, Jim Foley, Mike Sullivan, Nick Motherway, Norb Florek, Rick 
Roberts. Seated: Bob Hess, Jack Nicholson, Bill Schmitt, Harold Murphy, Dick Lucas, 
Dale Granacki. 




KAPPA BETA GAMMA 



Sisterhood in Kappa Beta Gamma is indicative of a 
liaison which cannot be derived from mere member- 
ship in an organization. It connotes a working to- 
gether, praying together, learning together, and enjoy- 
ing together. 

This national, social sorority was founded at Mar- 
quette University in 1917. Since the establishment 
of Epsilon chapter at Loyola in 1954, coeds have been 
afforded an opportunity to develop a strong bond of 
friendship while working for degrees. Active partici- 
pation in later years is made possible through the 
alumnae chapters. 

During the academic year, Kappa sponsors novel rush- 



ing teas, numerous parties, and a Winter Dinner Dance. 
The spiritual aspect is not neglected, however. The 
Kappa-sponsored retreat, Communion breakfasts, inter- 
est in charitable projects, and weekly rosary all give 
testimony to this. 

Among the projects sponsored this year were a prize- 
winning entry in the Float Parade, a sparkling Variety 
Show act, and a raffle booth for the Loyola Fair. 

Kappans display their "school spirit" through their 
membership and offices in Loyola-centered organiza- 
tions, such as the SAL program, Maroon and Gold, 
Coed Club, Sodality, Curtain Guild, Fine Arts Club, 
and varied academic groups. 



KAPPA BETA GAMMA. Standing: Mary Anne Banahan, Sandy St. Martin, Charmaine 
Tortorello, Eileen McNulty. Seated: Eva Nickolich, Mary Alice Nebel, Marlene Cap- 
parelli, Rosemary Udvare, Virginia Zittnan, Carol Kuna. Seated on floor: Rosemary 
Deppert. Eleanor Barnett. 



218 





KAPPA BETA GAMMA. Rita Circo, Geri Tripp, Berni Nowak, Monica Kozak, 
Nancy McCarthy, Angelle Alessi, Eileen Dobosz, Mary Buford. 



KAPPA BETA GAMMA OFFICERS. 
Eleanor Barnett, corresponding secretary; 
Rosemarie Udvare, president; Eileen Mc- 
Nulty, treasurer; Virginia Zittnan, vice- 
president. 

KAPPA BETA GAMMA. Standing: Delores 
Zablotny, Charmaine Tortorello, Ruth Mc- 
Evoy. Seated: Lee Smuda, Joan Trojan, 
Angelle Alessi. Seated on floor: Judy 
Altendorf. 





219 




Members of Phi Alpha Delta enjoy a sociable evening at one of their many parties. 



Phi Alpha Delta fraternity members spend 
a serious few hours preparing their briefs. 



Another serious evening? 




220 




PHI ALPHA DELTA 



Lambda Epsilon Fraternity, Phi Alpha Delta's prede- 
cessor, was quite aptly named: Lambda for law and 
Epsilon for equity. The founders of Lambda Epsilon 
had as their dream the establishment of a law fraternity 
which would one day be one of the greatest in the 
nation. 

When it was seen that there were serious defects in 
the original constitution of the fraternity, a convention 
was held in South Haven, Michigan, which eventually 
dissolved Lambda Epsilon and drew up a new set of 
articles for a new fraternity which was to be named 
Phi Alpha Delta. On November 8, 1902, the consti- 
tution and by-laws of Phi Alpha Delta were formally 



adopted. 

Within a month, the Webster Chapter of the fra- 
ternity was organized at Loyola University School of 
Law. The chapter has been extremely active ever 
since its establishment, except for a period during 
World War II when law school operations were tempo- 
rarily suspended. 

The present chapter is composed of approximately 
eighty members from both the day and evening divisions 
of the School of Law. A harmonious organization has 
been effected which evokes full cooperation from the 
individual members to work for the good of Phi Alpha 
Delta. 



PHI ALPHA DELTA. Standing, back row: John Caulfield, James McPolin, Frank 
Goodman, Philbert Seals, Cornelius Houtsma, Jr., James Freel, James Young, Thomas 
Barto. Standing, middle row: Campbell MacArthur, Jr., John O'Toole, Robert McHugh, 
Thomas Redden, Bruce Golden, Patrick Caraher, John Flannery, Howard Haynie, Jr., 
Thomas Geary, Edward Keavy, David Schippers, Jr. Seated: Robert Nolan, John Lang, 
Jr., Thomas Doran, Leonard Gerin, Frank Bouska, Jr., Howard Seiselmeyer, Richard 
Thistlethwaite. 




221 



PHI BETA PI 



Phi Beta Pi dates back to 1891, when its Alpha 
Chapter was organized at the University of Pittsburgh 
Medical School. Alpha Omega Chapter was brought 
to Loyola's Stritch School of Medicine in 1921. At 
present, the fraternity has thirty-two chapters in medi- 
cal schools throughout the United States. 

The history of the Alpha Omega Chapter is as illus- 
trious as that of the fraternity itself. Particularly note- 
worthy is the fact that Dr. L. D. Moorehead, one of 
the chapter's founders and former Dean of Loyola's 
Medical School, achieved greatness in the medical pro- 
fession. Today this medical genius is commemorated 



in the anuual Moorehead lectureship of Phi Beta Pi. 

Alpha Omega maintains a chapter house for its mem- 
bers at 6341 North Sheridan Road. Here, the burdens 
of medical school life are alleviated by the congenial 
fellowship which exists within the ranks of the fra- 
ternity. It is also here that the 110 members gather 
at the various professional and social events sponsored 
by the fraternity for a few moments of well-earned 
relaxation. 

The members of Phi Beta Pi are ever grateful to the 
invaluable contribution the fraternity has made in aid- 
ing them to reach the fullness of their profession. 



PHI BETA PI. Standing: Felix Kroch. Seated: Ed Garvin, Joe O'Grady, Rodger Smith, 
David Connolly, Ken Printen, Ron Nagy, Dick Mitchell, Phillip Howard, Joe Cullen, 
Floyd Okoda. 




222 










PHI BETA PI OFFICERS. Standing: 
Dave Connolly, housemanager; Joe 
Drugay, treasurer; John Johns, secre- 
tary. Seated: George Brodmerkle, vice- 
archon; Sigurd C. Sandzen, archon. 



PHI BETA PI. Standing: Tom Koenig, Georg.* Brod:nerkle, Bob Flannagin. 
Staled: Sigurd Sandzen, Val Mersol, Frank Guzzo, Pat Albano, Joe Drugay, Larry 
Schmidt, John Johns. 



223 




Members of Phi Chi fraternity find the floor of the fraterniry house a comfortable place 
to relax after a hard day at the Medical School. 



The fraternity members seem to spend most 
of their time sitting in the fraternity house. 




PHI CHI OFFICERS. Standing: Robert D. 
Helferry, secretary; Daniel M. Madigan, sen- 
tinel; William V. Hehemann, judge advo- 
cate; William Passinault, junior treasurer. 
Seated: Thomas P. O'Malley, presiding 
junior; Michael A. Howard, presiding 
senior; Donald Romanaggi, senior treasurer. 



224 




PHI CHI 



Phi Sigma Chapter of Phi Chi National Medical fra- 
ternity dates from 1907 when it was founded as a local 
medical fraternity. Shortly after its inception, the 
members of this small but active group expressed a 
desire to affiliate themselves with the national organiza- 
tion of Phi Chi. The Chapter had its birth at the 
twelfth national convention of Phi Chi held the fol- 
lowing year in Baltimore. 

At present, the fraternity has a total active member- 
ship of approximately one hundred and forty, most of 
which is housed in the fraternity quarters at 712 S. 



Ashland Blvd. These quarters are composed of three 
houses, two of which have been consolidated into one 
fraternity unit where a bulk of its activities are centered. 
In spite of the large size of the organization, the 
members of Phi Chi show an unusual closeness. This 
spirit is motivated by the friendship naturally acquired 
under the fraternity system, as well as the constant 
sharing of personal interests in the medical profession. 
This unique relationship among its members has given 
Phi Chi a distinct quality fostered by its members and 
respected by all who come within its scope. 



Members of Phi Chi fraternity gather at their fraternity house, 712 So. Ashland Blvd., for 
one of their regular "business" meetings. 




225 



PHI MU CHI 



The oldest social fraternity at Loyola, Phi Mu Chi 
has completed its thirty-seventh year on campus, main- 
taining that tradition which requires active participa- 
tion in all campus activities. 

The fraternity began the social year with a dance 
on registration day. During the year, it sponsored sev- 
eral other parties and dances, including a Halloween 
party and the annual dinner dance. To culminate the 
social year, the fraternity sponsors the Easter Queen- 
ship Ball. 

In addition to these purely social activities, the fra- 
ternity sponsors several Communion breakfasts. The 
spiritual aspect is given serious consideration by Phi 



Mu Chi in keeping with the purposes for which it was 
founded: to promote moral and social culture. 

Phi Mu Chi is responsible for many firsts at Loyola. 
It was the first social fraternity on campus. It also 
sponsored the first off-campus dance, thus establishing 
a precedent which other fraternities have followed. 
Today off-campus dances are the backbone of Loyola's 
social life. 

This year Phi Mu Chi enjoyed a highly successful 
year under the leadership of Rev. J. Donald Roll, S.J., 
moderator; Mike Walton, president; Tom Wedig, vice- 
president; and Peter Wagner, treasurer. 



PHI MU CHI. Standing: Frank Kozak, William Bell, Patrick Smith, Joe Johnson, Alan 
Schoen, Rev. J. Donald Roll, S.J., Gerald Biranowski, John Miller, James Moorman, 
Stanley Wyszynski, Gerald Brennock, Thomas Murphy. Seated: Quin San Hamel, Peter 
Wagner, Michael Walton, Paul Sampson, Dennis Hillenbrand. 




226 




As usual, Phi Mus utilize every precious moment in the pursuit of their goal. 



A famous quote commonly heard at the Phi 
Mu table — "Jacks or better to open." 



PHI MU CHI OFFICERS. Standing: Quin 
San Hamel, Paul Sampson, Pete Wagner. 
Seated: Mike Walton, president; Rev. J. 
Donald Roll, S.J., Moderator. 





227 




FJ ALPHA LAMBDA. Standing: Bill Towne, Bob Marlin, Dave Manning, Mike 
Francis, Dave Burden, Pat Whalen. Seated: Bob Donnelly, Jack Cranley, Pete Rigney, 
Phil Cook, Jerry Ring. On floor: Kevin McKeough, Charles Vygantas, Don Priola, Mike 
Ryan. 



The newly-acquired Pi Alpha Lambda 
house, located at 6336 No. Winthrop, is the 
first fraternity house to be owned by a local 
fraternity at Loyola. 



PI ALPHA LAMBDA OFFICERS. Stand- 
ing: Dave Lynch, historian; Jim Gorman, 
sergeant-at-arms; Don Gramata, secretary; 
Frank Smith, treasurer. Seated: John O'Brien, 
vice-president; Gene Callahan, president; 
Tony Strak, house steward. 




PI ALPHA LAMBDA 



For the past thirty-five years, the social fraternity of 
Pi Alpha Lambda has maintained the ideals upon which 
it was founded — loyalty to God, Loyola, and Fraternity. 
From the year in which it was established by Rev. James 
J. Mertz, S.J., the history of the fraternity has been one 
of success — success spiritually, scholastically, athletical- 
ly, and socially. 

Today Pi Alpha Lambda is one of the largest and 
oldest social fraternities at Loyola. To sustain its tra- 
ditional integrity, it has always desired and sought out 
the cream of Loyola's men. This never ending search 
has accounted for Pi Alpha Lambda's respected posi- 
tion among the many organizations at Loyola. The 



end result which the fraternity endeavors to produce 
in its members can be simply stated — the whole man. 

During the past year, Pi Alpha Lambda has been 
participating in all school functions and in the pro- 
motion of new ideas in fraternity activities. Such events 
as the second annual Intercollegiate Dance and such 
honors as the fourth consecutive crowning of the Pi 
Alpha candidate for Miss Varsity have afforded just 
pride to the members of the organization. 

Pi Alpha Lambda sincerely feels that its members 
make the fraternity what it is. Pi Alpha Lambda is 
its members and its members are Pi Alpha Lambda. 



PI ALPHA LAMBDA. Standing: Mike Burke, Jim Laurie, Greg Griffin, John Arnold, 
Dave Bresnahan. Seated: James O'Shaughnessy, George Weymer, Mike Caldwell, Bob 
Doherty, Hank Tufo. On floor: Jack Moustakis, Joe Garvey, Jim Smith, Bob Barnes. 




229 



PS! OMEGA 



Psi Omega dental fraternity has a two-fold purpose: 
first, to develop membership devoted to its profession, 
school, and fraternity; second, to aid its members in 
pursuing their professional, social, and cultural desires. 
Psi Omega feels justified in boasting the accomplish- 
ment of its ambitions. 

The fraternity has become an integral part of the 
Loyola School of Dentistry. Academically, its mem- 
bers have shown their excellence by maintaining a con- 
sistently high level of scholastic achievement. 

In addition to cultivating the professional aspirations 
of its members, Psi Omega maintains a program o? 



social events which begin with those functions at which 
the fraternity welcomes incoming freshmen into the 
School of Dentistry. The freshmen open house, fresh- 
men smoker, and freshmen pledge banquet are the lead- 
ing events on the social calendar of the fraternity. 

Psi Omega is proud of its past record; its members 
look confidently to the future. 

The officers of Psi Omega include William Todd, 
grand master; James Brown, junior grand master; Rus- 
sell Elgin, treasurer; Robert Gallagher, secretary; and 
Everett Shafer, historian. 



PSI OMEGA. Standing, back: Thomas Cavanaugh, Joseph C. Hantsch, Irwin Rysdam, 
William Randolf, Terence Moriorty, Philip J. Miollis, Harvey Vieth, Paul W. Stimson, 
Gregg Swenson, Michael Francis. Standing: Thomas A. Paison, Julio Battistoni, Norman 
Marchelya, Edward Luzwick, Richard Logullo, Billy Smith, Robert P. Jones, Jerry Hoch- 
statter, Louis Patten, Richard Kozal, Donald Schude, Socrates Philopoulous. Seated: 
Gerald A. Ewing, Everett E. Shafer, James Brown, William R. Todd, Russell C. Elgin, 
Robert A. Gallagher, John D. Petrich. 




230 




William Kohler and Norman Greisen discuss their problems, dental and otherwise with 
Ruby, chief dental counselor" at the Psi Omega house 



The Psi Omega fraternity house is located 
at 834 So. Ashland Blvd., not far from the 
Dental School. 



PSI OMEGA OFFICERS. Standing: Everett 
Shafer, historian; Gerald Ewing, senator; 
Phillip Miollis, social chairman; John Pet- 
rich, chaplain. Seated: James Brown, junior 
grand master (vice-president); William 
Todd, grand master (president); Russell 
Elgin, treasurer; Robert Gallagher, secretary. 





* e* 



Eileen Sweeney, Dolores Marck, and Pat Houlihan stop to chat after a har.1 evening of 
classes, 




SIGMA ALPHA RHO OFFICERS. Stand 

in on stairs: Dolores Marck, Loretta Stern. 
Standing: Pat Houlihan, Joanna Carey, and 
Eileen Sweeney. 



Cecilia T. WasisTO 
Moderator, Sigma Aipha Rho 




232 




SIGMA ALPHA RHO 



Activities, which are the student's complement and 
fulfillment, are the balance of the curriculum at Loyola. 
The foremost purpose of Sigma Alpha Rho is to pro- 
mote student interest in these activities. 

Founded in 1956, Sigma Alpha Rho is the "night 
school" sorority of Loyola. The sorority endeavors to 
promote a closer relationship between its members and 
the University. All women in the University College 
are eligible to benefit from this organization. 

This year Sigma Alpha Rho has given many leaders 
to the University College. From its membership the 
students have elected the president and vice pre:k'.ent 



of the University College Council and three of the coun- 
cil members. Four repre:entatives of the University 
College to the Loyola Union have been selected from 
Sigma Alpha Rho. In addition to supporting many 
projects sponsored by the various organizations of 
Loyola, Sigma Alpha Rho has a program designed to 
enrich the social and intellectual life of its members 
and to aid them in their future plans. Sigma Alpha 
Rho fulfills its goal by stressing the religious, academic, 
and social opportunities of Loyola, and the various pro- 
grams which the University sponsors, in addition to 
the activities organized by the sorority itself. 



SIGMA ALPHA RHO. Standing: Catherine Owens, Rosellen Perry, Eileen Sweeney, 
Joanna Carey, Eleanor Riley. Seated: Loretta Fritzen, Patricia Houlihan, Suzanne Clark, 
Mary Jane Keating, Barbara Fritzen, Dolores Marck, Loretta Sten. 



iM^M¥f^^MXMS^^ 






«vssr. 





■■■HHBI 



SIGMA DELTA PHI 



Sigma Delta Phi is the newest social fraternity at 
Loyola, presently on probationary status. After a year 
on campus, it will be able to apply to the Interfraternity 
Council for official recognition. 

Sigma Delta Phi was founded as a local fraternity 
on January 2, 1958, when its nine founders pledged to 
uphold a constitution which is guaranteed to benefit 
its members academically, morally, physically, and 
socially. 

During 1958, the fraternity grew from its original 
nine members to over thirty. Among the major events 
sponsored by the group was a trip to Cleveland for the 



Loyola-John Carroll game. Besides this, the fraternity 
also provided numerous parties, mixers, picnics, and a 
three-day vacation at Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. The 
group also entered a float in this year's Pow-Wow. An 
open dance was held at the Palmer House on April 4. 
Ken Sain, whose idea led to the founding of the fra- 
ternity, was elected its first president. Rev. Marcellus 
Monaco is the group's moderator. Among the other 
officers of Sigma Delta Phi are Dick Cegielski, adminis- 
trative vice-president; Joe Bicek, executive vice-presi- 
dent; Steve Cenek, treasurer; and Dan Grant, secretary. 



SIGMA DELTA PHI. Standing, back row: Frank Ferrara, Jim Burns, Jim McGrath, 
Jim Caron, Jerry Ochata, Jim Vinci, Howie Warchol, Jack Sweetman. Standing, middle 
roiv: Ron Wielgos, Tom Kawka, Karl Youtsey, Chuck Riso, Jerry Burns, Dave Smith, 
Dick Miller, Lcs Boesze. Seated: Jack Neary, Don Sprengel, Den Hromadka, Rev. 
Marcellus Monaco, Don Nolan, Bob Kane, Bill Eck. 



^ 




e 







\ 



A*~kKf' 






* #■ % 




SIGMA DELTA PHI FOUNDERS. Steve Cenek, Bill Eck, Don Nolan, Dan Grant, 
Ken Sain, Dick Cegielski, Joe Bicek, Ron Wielgos. 



Members of Sigma Delta Phi add zest to 
their cooking at one of their regular meet- 
ings. 

jpmiLPipjppjP-P 




SIGMA DELTA PHI OFFICERS. Stand- 
ing: Paul Didzsrekis, director; Mike Carbine, 
director; Dan Grant, secretary; Tom Cough- 
Ian, seig:ant-at-arms; Vince Intrivici, direc- 
tor; Steve Cenek, treasurer. Seated: Joe 
Bicek, executive vice-persident; Ken Sain, 
president; Rev. Marcellus Monaco, modera- 
tor; Dick Cegielski, administrative vice- 
president. 




235 




John Ward, John Erickson, and Jerry Horan meet to discuss plans for one of Sigma 
lambda Beta's frequent parties. 




Jerry Horan and John Ward enter night 
school class. 



SIGMA LAMBDA BETA OFFICERS. 
Standing: John Erickson, Jerry Horan, Pete 
Quinn. Seated: John Acke, Rev. Raymond 
Jancauskas, S. J., Tabu of Galewood. 



236 




SIGMA LAMBDA BETA 



While Sigma Lambda Beta is today one of Loyola's 
smallest fraternities it is likewise one of the oldest. 
The fraternity was chartered and incorporated on Feb- 
ruary 1, 1927, by a group of undergraduate students 
from the College of Commerce, then located on Frank- 
lin Street. 

However, the growth of the fraternity revealed that 
its strictly local status was not fulfilling the needs of 
its members nor the College of Commerce. Thus in 
the spring of 1952, Sigma Lambda Beta applied for 
and received recognition as a chapter of Alpha Kappa 



Psi, National Commerce Fraternity. 

Today, Sigma Lambda Beta enjoys the reputation of 
being one of the very active undergraduate organiza- 
tions. In recent years, past officers of the fraternity 
have twice held the highest office in the Loyola Union, 
as well as other important Union positions. 

Repeatedly, members of the fraternity have served in 
offices of the University College Student Association 
and have been very instrumental in helping to fulfill 
the needs of an expanded and growing University Col- 
lege. 



SIGMA LAMBDA BETA. Sta-iding: Jerry Horan, Bob Shaughnessy, Joe Arneson, Mike 
Walsh, Jack Donahue, John Ward, John Acke, Jeffrey Roberts, John Erickson. Seated: 
Pete Quinn, Rev. Raymond C. Jancauskas, S. J., Gene Clarke. 




SIGMA PI ALPHA 



Sigma Pi Alpha, a local social fraternity, was founded 
in 1932 to promote intellectual and social interest 
among its members and to provide for their develop- 
ment, both spiritually and physically, in an atmos- 
phere of friendship and cooperation. 

This year the fraternity has tried to live up to these 
high ideals by projects such as its Springfield trip. The 
tour of Springfield and the surrounding countryside 
proved to be of exceptional value to all students who 
attended it. Open to all students of the university, the 
journey acquainted the Loyolans with an area rich in 
relics of American history and of one of our greatest 



presidents, Abraham Lincoln. 

During the fall semester, Sigma Pi Alpha initiated 
a drive for funds for the victims of the tragic fire at 
Our Lady of the Angels School. Loyolans contributed 
a thousand dollars in response to this appeal. 

Besides its two special projects, Sigma Pi Alpha held 
its annual "Spring Nocturne" dance, at which the fra- 
ternity presented its "Fraternity Man of the Year" award 
to the fraternity member who best exemplified the aims 
and ideals of his fraternity. Numerous parties and 
socials rounded out the social year for the fraternity. 



SIGMA PI ALPHA. Standing: James Del Giorno, Paul Rubino, Louis Ray, Edward 
Costello, Victor Vitullo, Richard Schuth, James McCormick. Seated: Thomas Brennan, 
Rev. Lester Evett, S.J., and Donald Provenzale. 



£i 




\r 





Members and guests of Sigma Pi Alpha gather around the fraternity table at the first 
smoker of the second semester. 



Members of the fraternity enjoy a friendly 
game of cards at one of their many parties. 



SIGMA PI ALPHA OFFICERS. Standing: 
James Del Giorno, pledgemaster; Thomas 
Brennan, treasurer. Seated: Donald Proven- 
zale, president; Paul Rubino, recording sec- 
retary. 






The Hon. Charles A. Boyle, Chicago Con- 
gressman, is made an honorary Tau Delt at 
ceremonies in the Tau Delt house. Pictured 
above are Rev. Robert Mulligan, S. J., vice- 
president of Loyola; Congressman Boyle: 
Richard Rosen, administrative aide to Mr. 
Boyle; and John Hannan, president of Tau 
Delta Phi. 







■r 


« 


' 5* 








\- J 


i 


':> Jp 


m ! 




■ *A 




• MEb 


L5s# ^ 


L 




Iffi 

PV J 





TAU DELTA PHI OFFICERS. Barry 
Cullinan, Tom Murray, John Hannan, Stan 
Komosa, John Klein. 



John Hannan looks on as Ed Urbanski pins 
Charmaine Tortorello on New Year's Eve. 



240 




TAU DELTA PHI 



A look at the imposing list of Tau Delta Phi's activi- 
ties of the year demonstrates the reason why it has won 
the Blue Key social organization award for the past 
two years. 

Early in the first semester, United States Congress- 
man Charles A. Boyle, a prominent Loyola alumnus, 
was initiated into the fraternity as an honorary frater. 
Many outstanding city and state officials were present 
at the reception held for Congressman Boyle at the 
fraternity house. 

For the first time among Loyola fraternities, Tau 
Delta Phi sponsored bus trips to the basketball games 
played at the Universities of Notre Dame and Mar- 



quette. The fraternity has also contributed to Loyola 
spirit by its continued policy of developing friendly 
bonds among both the student body and the faculty. 
The annual faculty reception, which has become a tra- 
dition at Loyola, was again a Tau Delt success. 

Another reception was given by the fraternity for 
the debaters of the National Jesuit College Debate 
Tournament held at Loyola in November. In the be- 
lief that all fraternities at Loyola have common inter- 
ests, Tau Delta Phi again sponsored its popular Inter- 
fraternity Sing Contest. The fraternity also enjoyed an 
active social season for its fraters and pledges. 



■; 




TAU DELTA PHI. Standing: Mike Morawey, Marty Zydell, Larry Vonckx, Bill Sieger, 
Mike Polelle, John Drechny, Barry Cullinan. Seated: John Hannan, Ed Kamstock, Jack 
Moses, Bob Silich, Stan Komosa, Richard Roch, Dave Willson. Seated on floor: John 
Gaffke, Tom Murray, John Klein. 

I! mmmmmmm 



JO 




TAU KAPPA EPSILON 



The Epsilon Kappa Chapter of Tau Kappa Epsilon 
is in its third year on the Loyola campus and enjoys a 
prominent position among the organizations of the Uni- 
versity. Starting from its humble origins in 1938 as 
the University Club, the Epsilon Kappa Chapter has 
progressed to the dynamic fraternity it is today. 

In the fall semester of 1958 the TEKES moved into 
a fifteen-room house adjoining the Lake Shore Campus, 
fulfilling a dream of many years. The fraternity also 
has a summer cottage at Power's Lake, Wisconsin, 
which affords the brothers a varied year-round activity. 

Among the TEKE-sponsored activities of the year 
are the annual Halloween Ugly Man Mixer with its 



Ugly Man Contest for the benefit of the Patna Mis- 
sions, the St. Patrick's Day Dance in conjunction with 
the TEKE Sweetheart Contest, the Co-ed Tea, and fac- 
ulty Lectures at the fraternity house. 

This year the TEKES have won various awards in 
school activities, among them a first place trophy for 
the best house decorations during the Pow-Wow festivi- 
ties and an award for their entry in the Float Parade. 

The Epsilon Kappa Chapter also received recognition 
from the National Interfraternity Council for top aca- 
demic achievement among the national fraternities on 
campus. 



The third fraternity at Loyola to acquire a fraternity house, Tau Kappa Epsilon has 
established itself at 6229 No. Winthrop. 




242 



TAU KAPPA EP: : I!.ON. Standing, 
back row: Ed Glabu?, Bob Wilkus, 
Matt Uib:rt, Dick Lenihan, Taft Roe, 
Tom lavclle. Standing, third row: 
Ron Frost, Tom Millard, Tony Spina, 
Steve Luzbetak, Bob Beaton, Bob 
Dooley, George Lempke. Seated, sec- 
ond row: Larry Bruozis, Bert Taymens, 
Tony Lenart, Marty Gora. Seated, 
front row: John Dentzer, Bob Bart, 
Frank Musrari, Frank Gorecki. 




' . ■ ■ • 




1 i' ; -^^ 




" TW~~ 


w% 


► -- jy 






2#^% 


^n^ 




:u 


fci^W 


^ 


mm 


_____ ■ ' 






Put 


V 




^| ^ v 












■BBSBBP 


s 


r 








■ 


m 










t 



TAU KAPPA EPSILON OFFICERS. Bob 
Beaton, pledgemaster; Bob Bart, treasurer; 
George Lempke, secretary; Ed Glabus, vice- 
president; Tony Spina, president; Tom Millard, 
chaplain; Frank Mustari, historian; Steve 
Luzbetak, house president. 



TAU KAPPA EPSILON. Standing: 
Jim Szwed, Rocco Romano, Bill 
Weiher, Bob Coglianese, Phil Augus- 
tine, Ed Murray. Seated: Bill Haun- 
roth, Ron Paulson, Mike Kutza, Fred 
Herzog, Joe Gajewski, Ron Olech. 






THETA PHI ALPHA. Standing: Gay Lee Luhrs, Judy Wolfgram, Madeleine Doman. 
Carolyn Schwind, Ellen Bernacki. Seated: Mary Donohoe, Joyce McAuliffe, Barbara 
Ross, Ellen Huck, Sally Salvaggio, Antoinette Kurpiel, Gloria Javor. On floor: Toni 
Shea, Mary Phillips. 




Barb Cysewski, Rita Condon, Marian En- 
righr. Marge Kneer, and Marilyn Florence 
prepare publicity material for their "Player 
of the Night" award at the Loyola-Marquette 
game. 



THETA PHI ALPHA OFFICERS. Stand- 
ing: Judy Wolfgram, vice-president; Barbara 
Ross, recording secretary; Roxane Slaski, 
corresponding secretary; Mary Phillips, treas- 
urer. Seated: Gay Lee Luhrs, president; 
Mary Donohoe, historian. 




THETA PHI ALPHA 



Founded in 1942 at Loyola, Upsilon chapter of 
Theta Phi Alpha is the oldest and largest sorority on 
campus. Theta Phi is the only national Catholic social 
sorority, and the only sorority at Loyola, in the National 
Pan-Hellenic Conference. The moderator of the chap- 
ter is Miss Mary Lou McPartlin and the chaplain is 
Rev. Lester J. Evett, S.J. Miss Joan Vaccaro, Loyola's 
assistant dean of women, was this year elected National 
Director of Extension of Theta Phi Alpha. 

Theta Phi's social calendar was opened with a cock- 
tail party, the "September Sip," at the Roof Garden of 
the St. Clair Hotel. Each semester began with a rush- 
ing party and was closed with a formal initiation, 



which this year was held at the Ambassador West 
Hotel. One of the most successful school parties of 
the year was Theta Phi's "Player of the Night" party 
after the Loyola-Marquette game. Trophies were 
awarded to the player of the night from each team. 
The annual formal dance, the White Rose Ball, cli- 
maxed the social year. 

Besides its own activities, Theta Phi also participated 
in the various school events of the year, such as the 
Interfraternity Sing, the Ugly Man Contest, and the 
Hoola-Hoop Contest. Five Theta Phi girls were candi- 
dates in the Miss Varsity contest, and one of them, Rox- 
ane Slaski, was chosen Miss Varsity. 



THETA PHI ALPHA. Standing: Mary Ellen Hayes, Sue Kelly, Sue Mulvehill, Anna 
Stauss. Seated: Mary Beth McAuliffe, Maureen Fitzpatrick, Maureen Conroy, Flora 
Morelli, Joanne Hartzer, Mary Virginia McVane, Agnes Sebastian. On floor: Nancy 
Dower, Geraldine Kolpak, Corene Cowperthwait, Roxanc Slaski. 




245 



XI PSI PHI 



The Lambda Chapter of Xi Psi Phi was established 
at Loyola in 1930. That the present undergraduate 
membership of Xi Psi Phi is surpassed by no other 
Loyola Dental Fraternity is indicated by the organiza- 
tion's many functions. In addition to house parties, 
lectures, and the annual formal, the "Zips" sponsor a 
yearly golf outing which is open to the entire faculty 
and student body. 

The objectives of Xi Psi Phi are professional and 
social development, and greater school unity. The 
fraternity also has an auxiliary division, the "Zippette"," 



composed of the wives and fiancees of its members. 
They serve the fraternity by arranging refreshments 
and decorations for social activities, and providing 
clerical work for reviews. The alumni division pro- 
vides encouragement and ideas for improvement of the 
members, the fraternity, and the school. 

The Xi Psi Phi Quarterly unifies all the chapters 
and gives each group the opportunity to publish the 
results of its activities, and to view the development 
and accomplishments of other chapters. 



XI PSI PHI. Standing, back: Frank Sadowski, George McWalter, Charles Laurx.Donald 
Sanders, Donald Roeder, William Byrd, John Toomey, John Caulfield, John Barron, 
Loren Hofer. Standing: Theodore Carney, Louis Mazzucchelli, Casmir Ziemba, Guy 
McGarry, William King, Richard Grisius, Maurice Hack, Joseph McLaughlin, William 
Shambarger, William Misischia, Theodore Krysinski, George Stepanek. Seated: Daniel 
Tylka, Peter Wall, Clifford Audette, Dr. John Allison, Frank J. Gavin, Dr. Mitchell 
Kaminski, James Hodur. 




246 




One of the "Zips" raids the Xi Psi Phi icebox for a chicken sandwich, one of the 
advantages of having a fraternity house close to school. 



The Xi Psi Phi house is located at 838 So. 
Ashland Blvd. 



XI PSI PHI OFFICERS. Standing: Theo- 
dore Carney, editor; Clifford Audette, junior 
grand master (vice-president); Peter Wall, 
secretary-treasurer. Seated: Dr. John R. 
Allison, deputy supreme councilor; Frank 
Gavin, grand master ( president ) ; Dr. 
Mitchell V. Kaminski, assistant deputy 
supreme councilor. 





247 



ALPHA SIGMA NU 



The three-fold requirement for membership in Alpha 
Sigma Nu gives the Society a high place among hon- 
orary fraternities. A student, to be eligible for mem- 
bership, must rank in the upper twenty-five per cent 
of his class, and must, in addition, demonstrate a devo- 
tion to scholarship, a loyalty to principle, and a capacity 
for service of the highest order. 

Alpha Sigma Nu was founded at Marquette Uni- 
versity in 1915 by the Rev. John A. Danihy, S.J. The 
Society continued as a local organization until 1921 
when Creighton University was invited to join, and a 
Chapter was installed there on December 18, 1921. 

On April 5, 1938, a Chapter of Alpha Sigma Nu 
was installed at Loyola University. Since then, over 
three hundred alumni of the fraternity at Loyola have 
filled positions which reflect the high esteem of their 
colleagues in the professions and in the world of 
business. 

Alpha Sigma Nu, in addition to giving recognition 
to the outstanding qualities of its members, actively 
assists their continued development both within the 
University and the world beyond it. 




ALPHA SIGMA NU OFFICERS. Standing: Dick Yetter, 
John Tuohy, and Mike Polelle. Seated: Rev. John A. Kemp, 
S.J., moderator; Jim Cushing, president. 




STUDENTS RECEIVED INTO ALPHA SIGMA NU 
IN MAY, 1958: 

James Cushing and Michael Polelle of Lake Shore Arts 
William Hegan and John Lempkowski of Lewis Towers Arts 
Edward Grant and Richard Yetter of the College of Commerce 
John Sachs and Thomas Wright of the School of Dentistry 
Arthur Malinowski of the Institute of Social and Industrial Relations 
Ronald Kiefer and John Tuohy of the School of Law 
James Foresman and Hugh Smith of the School of Medicine 
Robert Gorman of University College 
Dr. Rolf G. Gruber, D.D.S., to complete the Class of 1954 

STUDENTS RECEIVED INTO ALPHA SIGMA NU 
IN MAY, 1959: 
Rudolph Maier and Peter Wagner of Lake Shore Arts 
Thomas Haney and Kenneth Jamison of Lewis Towers Arts 
Richard Donovan and John O'Keefe of the College of Commerce 
Jack Akamine and Sam Liaros of the School of Dentistry 
Donald Klein of the Institute of Social and Industrial Relations 
Robert Lane and John Nichele of the School of Law 
Richard Blair and Richard Stalzer of the School of Medicine 
Paul Davis of the Graduate School 

Dr. Joseph Cantafio, D.D.S., to complete the Class of 1954 
Dr. William A. Schienheider, D.D.S., to complete the Class of 1956 



248 



HONORARY SOCIETY 
FOR WOMEN 



Last year the first Women's Leadership Honor Soci- 
ety, newly named "Circumference," was inaugurated at 
Loyola University. The purpose of this society is to 
give united service to the University whenever called 
upon. 

The undergraduate deans and moderators of organ- 
izations of which there are women members recom- 
mend for nomination those junior and senior women 
students who they feel are demonstrating outstanding 
leadership and service to their organization, college, 
and University. An acceptable academic average is 
expected of all candidates. 

The members of the Women's Leadership Honor 
Society represent all divisions of the undergraduate 
colleges: the College of Arts and Sciences, Lewis 
Towers and Lake Shore Campuses; the College of 
Commerce; University College; and the School of Nurs- 
ing, including both the full-time basic program and 
the supplemental program. The society is under the 
direction of the Dean of Women. 

HONOR SOCIETY FOR WOMEN. Standing: Carol 
Mary Ann Krol, Judy Wolfgram. Seated: Mrs. Kathk 
Vaccaro, Mrs. Elsa Brown. 



Lorraine Atherton 
Mary Kay Ball 
Joan C. Black 
Mrs. Elsa M. Brown 
Josephine DeFay 
Helen Hick Faust 
Dianne Fogarty 
Carol Friend 
Roberta Gerke 
Colette Gorey 
Judith Hammer 
Margaret Harrington 
Mary Hereley 
Patricia Kasper 
Sue Kelly 
Kathleen Klinger 
Elaine Koprowski 
Mary Ann Krol 
Gay Lee Luhrs 
Ella Mayer 



Patricia McCarter 
Mary Ann Michor 
Mary Elizabeth Nolan 
Barbara Ann Norbut 
Nancy Pannier 
Eileen Peifer 
Priscilla Perry 
Betty Ann Petta 
Sister Mary Rita, O.S.F. 
Joan Roman Rzymski 
Mary Ann Schaefer 
Nancy Schwind 
Rosemary Udvare 
Carol Urbanus 
Judith Wolfgram 
Mary Wright 
Audrey Zabella 
Honore Zenk 
Margaret Zimmerman 
Ellen Zunker 



Friend, Sue Kelly, Pat McCarter, 
en Klinger, Gay Lee Luhrs, Joan 





,\ 



V 



> 








PHI SIGMA TAU 



Phi Sigma Tau is the official honor society for col- 
lege men and women interested in philosophy. It 
contains twenty-five chapters, and the only Catholic 
university to have a chapter is Loyola. 

Established at Loyola in 1955, Phi Sigma Tau is 
designed to serve as a means of awarding distinction 
to students having high scholarship, to promote stu- 
dent interest in research and advanced study, to pro- 
vide opportunities for publication of student research 
papers, and to popularize interest in philosophy among 
the general collegiate public. 

The Society meets four times a year. Each meeting 
features a lecture by a professor from Loyola or some 
other university. 




PHI SIGMA TAU OFFICERS. Robert Walsh, president 
and Rev. Robert W. Mulligan, S.J., moderator. 



PHI SIGMA TAU. First row: Miles Lynch, Robert Kujala, Neil Bracht, Fred Kramer, 
D. J. Allocco. Second row: Rev. Robert W. Mulligan, S. J., Robert Walsh, Edward 
Wojciechowski, Joseph Kunkel, Mary Rosera, Ronald Bednar. Third row: Maryanne 
Schaefer, Elaine Hermann, Ann M. Janiec.Joan O'Brien, Marvina Osborn, Barbara Norbut, 
Mrs. Nancv Donnellv. Fourth row: Franklin St. Lawrence. 




250 



PI DELTA EPSILON 



Pi Delta Epsilon, founded at Syracuse University 
in 1909, is an honorary fraternity designed to reward 
the student journalist for his efforts, services, and ac- 
complishments. 

In the latter part of 1958, a group of students on 
the staffs of the LOYOLAN, Cadence, and The Loyola 
News formed an organization to petition Pi Delta 
Epsilon to establish a chapter at Loyola. On May 29, 
final arrangements were concluded with the national 
headquarters, and a Loyola chapter of Pi Delta Epsilon 
was officially established. 

The founders of the Loyola Chapter are Robert 
Cahill, Roberty Doherty, Thomas Haney, William 
Hegan, Kenneth Klein, Sally Lawrence, Richard Lisk, 
Robert Marlin, Robert Ryba., Frank Smith, and 
Charles Vygantas. 




PI DELTA EPSILON 
and Dick Lisk. 



Bob Marlin, Frank Smith, 



PI DELTA EPSILON. Standing: Bill Hegan, Charlie Vygantas, John Lempkowski, Bob 
Ryba. Seated: Bob Cahill and Tom Haney. 



m 



(■'?•> 



«>} 



,:., 



A 





The Roman satirist Juvenal wrote 
that the truly fortunate person com- 
mands mens sana in corpore sano, a 
sound mind within a sound body. 

That Juvenal's motto is part of Jesuit 
education is demonstrated by Loyola's 
active support of both intramural and 
intercollegiate sports. 






'v'i.:. 



/ •-.. 



- --'^W^, 



t< • i 



uiuM^H 



L. 



■us- 



**-£^- 




i>*i' 



SPORTS 




wm00** 




Rev. John W. Bieri, S.J. 

Athletic Director 



LOYOLA SPORTS 



Athletics is a form of social activity. To the non- 
participant, the tension of an athletic conflict, with the 
outcome to be determined before his eyes, separates 
him from the preoccupations of ordinary life and 
causes him to focus his entire attention on the struggle 
of reflexes on the playing field. Psychologists call this 
a release, while the loyal sports fan looks upon it as a 
struggle of human nature. 

If the spectator gains from the athletic contest, the 
athlete profits in even greater measure, for in his hands 
rests the outcome of the struggle. In every phase of 
the struggle the mind must completely control the 
body. For this is the beauty of sports, the champion 
completely in control of his body, not only a mark of 
a champion on the athletic field but in life. 



George Ireland 
Coach, Basketball 



Jerry Weiland 
Coach, Track 



Don Chalmers 
Coach, Swimming 






Tall man Clarence Red goes up high in the air for two against 
Marquette University at the Chicago Stadium. 



Brian Sheehan of Georgetown has to step on Ron Schwingen 
to get by the "spaceman." Georgetown was one of the two 
teams able to defeat the Ramblers on home court. 



BASKETBALL TEAM. Standing: Ron Schwingen, Frank Hogan, Howie Falk, Tom 
O'Connor, Jim Gorman, Coach Georg: Ireland, Greg Griffin, Clarence Red, Jim Touvelle, 
Al Denenb.rg, Ray S:opa. Kneeling: Co-captains Paul Sheedy and Al Norville. 



ffflti \ 



h 



Zl 






V 



W 



ai 



84* 



1 



m^mpm 




M 4 

25 < 




■ j*^-^ -^ 




VARSITY BASKETBALL 



As preseason reports indicated, the future for George 
Ireland's Ramblers looked bright. A strong team of 
experienced veterans and promising sophomores, led 
by Clarence Red, predicted sufficient experience and 
bench strength to compensate for the height deficit 
and youthful inexperience which plagued the Rambler 
teams of the past seasons. The optimism of the team 
spread to the student body who, dreaming of a tourna- 
ment invitation, began to look toward the season's 
opener with great anticipation. Loyola emerged from 
its 1958-59 debut victorious, having defeated Carleton 
79-65, but the optimism which had surrounded the 
team before had been dampened by the definite news 
that the services of Jim Gorman would be lost for the 
duration of the season. 

The Ramblers returned from their first road trip 
with their first defeat, a 64-5 9 loss to Eastern Kentucky. 
Thus, with a record of 5-1, a Loyola team still search- 
ing for an efficient scoring combination met Seattle, 
last year's NCAA tournament runner-up. In this, the 
first of their five games to be played in the Chicago 
Sradium, the Ramblers, held score'ess in the early 
moments of play, experienced a definite setback as they 
were unable to match the scoring prowess of the 
Chieftains from the Northwest. Loyola fell in defeat 
70-49. Subsequent games found the Ramblers sweep- 
ing past Western Michigan, but going down in defeat 
at the hands of Marquette, Air Force Academy, 
Duquesne, and Notre Dame. 

Searching for their first Stadium victory and an 
end to a five-game losing streak, Loyola entered the 
Stadium against Toledo. The Ramblers, unable to hold 
on to an early lead, fell 80-78. The following week 
Loyola again appeared at the Stadium but this time 
without the services of Al Norville, the high-scoring 
forward who last year and early in the current season 
had proved highly instrumental in Rambler victories. 
S.ill the spirited Ramblers, led by Frank Hogan's scor- 
ing, handed St. John's of Brooklyn their worst defeat 
of the season, 95-85, in a game that required two 
overtimes. The inspired Ramblers then journeyed to 
Omaha and kept the flames of victory burning by de- 
feating Creighton for the second time 59-57. Return- 
ing to the Stadium, Coach Ireland's men sought to 
avenge their earlier loss to Marquette, but the Warriors 
proved to be too much for the injury-ridden Maroon 




Al Norville reaches high but has the ball snared out of his 
hands by Keith Sterk of Western Michigan. This was the 
first of two defeats that the Broncos suffered at the hands of 
Loyola, 113-91 and 84-81. 



257 




Ron Schwingen, vexed at the fast Seattle 
man who managed to sneak by, could not 
do much to stop the Chieftains in their 70-49 
victory over Loyola. 



Tom O'Connor grabs the loose ball high in 
the air, but Loyola still suffered their first 
home court defeat at the hand of the Flying 
Falcon of the Air Force Academy. 




Fine hooking and all-around hustle by Greg 
Griffin in the Marquete game merited him 
the selection of Player of the Night Award. 



"With three on one, "Loyola, aided "by the long 
fingers of Clarence Red, increased its score 
by two points. Greg Griffin <($2) helps, 
'while Al Denenberg looks '.on. 



258 





The Ramblers were on the move as Greg 
Griffin eyed a pass to Tom O'Connor with 
Frank Hogan and Paul Sheedy covering the 
play on the floor in the Creighton game. 
Loyola rolled over the Nebraskans twice this 
season, 67-54 and 59-57. 



CHEERLEADERS. Clockwise: Frank Lan- 
caster, Barbara Ross, Jule Swinehart, Mari- 
anne Nelson, Bobbie Gormaly, Beverly 
Wilson, Mary Glenda McDonald, Mary Kay 
Ball, Rhoda Lesko, Dick Linehan. 




and Gold. The 90-60 loss came despite the fine of- 
fensive and defensive play of Greg Griffin. 

The final appearance of the season at the Stadium 
for Loyola ended in defeat as the Ramblers, unable 
to take advantage of the mistakes made by a nationally- 
rated North Carolina team, fell 76-57. The follow- 
ing games at Detroit, Canisius, and Bowling Green 
found Coach Ireland's men again occupying the losing 
column. However, against their traditional rival John 
Carroll, the Ramblers put on a show of power with 
Paul Sheedy breaking the all-time scoring mark with 
46 points. During the game Loyola fans also saw 
eight records wiped off the books before the final buzzer 
sounded, signalling the end of a 127-89 Loyola victory 
and an 11-13 season. 



In the final analysis, the record of 1 1 victories in 24 
contests stands up as a fine performance. Towards 
the end of the season, Coach Ireland started a team 
of five sophomores and juniors without one of the 
original season's starters in the line-up. Jim Gorman 
had an operation performed on his bad knee; Al Nor- 
ville was confined to bed because of his eye injury; and 
Paul Sheedy, along with Frank Hogan, missed several 
crucial games as victims of the flu. The reserves played 
unexpectedly well but still they lacked the experience 
to take over the reigns in mid-season. The season had 
its bright moments and its distasteful moments, but it 
was still full of hustle and desire, again showing the 
true determined spirit of Loyola's basketball teams. 



Half time — the moments of tense recol- 
lection and strong determination. 




;**«*> 



a I 




fl?. 



,-- ? 



Sophomore phenomenon Clarence 
Red futilely reaches for the ball in 
the hands of Tom Coleman of 
Georgetown. Although hustling 
during the entire game, the Ram- 
blers were unable to stop the shoot- 
ing of the Eastern invaders and lost 
103-93. 




FRESHMAN SQUAD. Standing: Dick Gelbuda, Marty Norville, Robert Roach, John 
Crnokrak, Nick Hriljac, Coach Bill Shay, Arnie Blaszinski, Ted Tormey, Bernie Geers, 
Assistant Coach Art McZier. Kneeling: Mike Gavin and Jerry Vervey. 



Jerry Vervey goes up for two in the frosh 
victory over the Fifth Army team, 93-63. 



Bernie Geers outraces the Army guards and 
makes it look easy to score two for Loyola. 



262 





LOYOLA'S FRESHMAN 
TEAM RECORD AND HIGH SCORERS 

Loyola 47 Fr. Perez Council 38 

High scorer: Bern.e Geers — 14 
Loyola 65 Jamaco 67 

High scorer: Mike Gavin — 18 

Loyola 73 Wheaton Frosh 57 

High scorer: Marty Norville — 20 
Loyola 74 Fr. Perez Council 74 

High scorer: Mike Gavin — 23 
Loyola 93 Fifth Army 63 

High scorer: Mike Gavin — 33 
Loyola 89 Wilson 75 

High scorer: Bernie Geers — 21 

Loyola 87 Crane 65 

High scorer: Marty Norville — 19 




Mike Hriljac of the frosh squad and an 
Army man perform some game-time acro- 
batics to get that rebound. 



Big John Crnokrak lets go of a behind-the- 
backboard shot that must have gone in for 
all that effort. John used his weight effec- 
tively this season under the freshman boards. 





CROSS-COUNTRY TEAM. Lou Kujawinski, Brian Shutts, Ernie Billups, Roy Horton, 
Norb Slowikowski, Tom Flanagan, Ed Flores, Coach Jerry Weiland. 



CROSS COUNTRY 



A greatly-improved Loyola harrier squad was unable 
to keep pace with the tremendous upswing in Ameri- 
can distance running standards this year. Along with 
this rise in competition was the lack of reserve strength 
which kept Loyola at the minimum of five runners 
while the track factories of the Midwest were fielding 
20-man squads. 

On the Notre Dame golf course, against the National 
.Champions and Central Collegiate Champions, Loyola 
turned in a tremendous team average of 21.24 per man 
for four miles. (In 1955, a Loyola harrier team 
covered the same distance in 21:53, in 1956, 21:38, 
and in 1957, 22:07.) Though four years ago this 
would have made Loyola one of the top teams in the 
Midwest, in 1958 it was commonplace. 



At the starting gun, Loyola's cross-country runners move 
cut to whitewash Wayne 15-47. 




264 



TRACK 



Loyola's track team during the 1958-59 season at- 
tained a level of success not reached since 1949. Its 
success stemmed from the outstanding performances of 
the indoor two-mile relay team composed of Ernie 
Billups, Mike Burke, Lou Kujawinski, Norb Slowikow- 
ski, and substitute runner Brian Shutts. 

The addition of hurdler Jim Ashmore, sprinter Hal 
Brownlee, and middle distance men Joe Shea, Tom 
Flanagan, Ed Flores, and Jim Bush has given Coach 
Jerry Weiland a balanced team that has produced dual 
meet as well as relay carnival triumphs. 

The two-mile relay team maintained a fine record 
of impressive wins by defeating such powerhouses as 
Michigan, Michigan State, Oklahoma State, Iowa State 
and Colorado. In the National Junior AAU Indoor 
Championship at the University of Chicago, this quartet 
set a new standard with a time of 7:53.6, eclipsing the 
old mark of 7:58.8 set by Yale in 1951. The outdoor 
season should also provide this Rambler team with 
excellent competition against which the Maroon and 
Gold men will have a chance to prove their outstand- 
ing quality. 




Ernie Billups returned to competition after a year of illness 
and proved to be the mainstay and anchor man of the two- 
mile relay team, covering the 440 in 0:49 and the 880 in 1:53. 



TRACK TEAM. Standing, back row: Joe Shea, Frank Sobol, Matt Wheeler, Bill 
Dougherty, Mike Burke, Lou Kujawinski, Charlie Vygantas. Standing: Tony Lenart, 
Jack Cranley, Ernie Billups, Jim Bush, Jim Ashmore, Brian Shutts, Coach Jerry Weiland. 
Kneeling: Barry Schutz, Tom Flanagan, Norb Slowikowski, Hal Brownlee, Bob Shane- 
wise, Ed Biesinger. 






x*°4/l 



4 



tf*o> 



^°<. 



Jp°< 



5^°*yi 



^.r> a 




o*°-d 



%?•» 



v 





TRACK TEAM FRESHMEN. Back row: Barry Schutz, Joe Shea, Jim Bush, Jim Ash- 
more, Frank Sobol. Front row: Tom Flanagan, Ed Flores, Bob Shanewise, Hal Brownlee. 



Nick Cicinelli, Loyola's only shotputter, 
heaves the lead ball at a practice session in 
the Armory. 



Hal Brownlee, fastest man on the track team, 
devoted to becoming even faster as he prac- 
tices his start. 




266 




^v *V 


■ ■ 


w ^M -^M 


^m f % i ■ 


ri^Mj- 




WjB } ^fl 


& •■ 


w ^^B 




■ ( M 


m J M 


KTfl 




wjl- 



Three outstanding senior distancemen of the 
Rambler track team, Lou Kujawinski, Brian 
Shutts, and Roy Horton consistently place 
high in the- numerous mile and two-mile 
events. 



Senior Mike Burke, besides running 
on the two-mile relay team, last year 
at the Bradley relays tied Loyola 
University's 440 yd. record with a 
48.8 second performance. 




Freshman Jim Ashmore, the hottest 
streak of talent to grace LU track, 
is a specialist over the high and 
low hurdles. While a prep, Ashmore 
was one of the fastest prep hurdlers 
in the country. 




The two-mile relay team of Brian Shutts, Lou Kujawinski, 
Mike Burke, and Ernie Billups won five straight indoor meets 
before tasting defeat at the hands of Western Michigan in 
the Knights of Columbus Relays in Cleveland. 





Joe Huhn glides through a swan during a warm-up session 
at Alumni pool. Huhn was Loyola's only diver this season. 



Freshman Bill Bishop stretches his hands way back in a 
beautiful exhibition of the butterfly stroke. 



The 1958-59 Loyola University swimming team 
finished the season with five victories and seven de- 
feats, as well as a second place in the Chicago Inter- 
collegiate Championship. The record does not neces- 
sarily indicate the true strength of the young, inexperi- 
enced, but talented squad. 

The team, composed almost entirely of freshmen 
and sophomores and captained by Bob Bielinski, com- 
piled a four and two won-lost record during the first 
half of the season, including a startling upset over 
defending champion North Central College in the 
Loyola Relays. During the second half of the season, 
however, the team lost four meets in succession. In the 
last meet of the season the tankers looked as if they 
were going to engineer their second upset by capturing 
the Chicago Intercollegiate meet, but a disqualification 
cost the victory. The nucleus of the team was provided 
by Bielinski, Bob Barnes, Jim Kelly, Bob Dring, and 
Len Vertuno. The impetus of the major victories came 
from the freshmen Peter Trummer, Butch Blau, Bill 
Bishop, Bill Newman, John Horan, Bill Horan, Dan 
Schmitt, and Joe Huhn. 

New records were set in the 440-yard medley relay, 
the 200-yard backstroke, and the 200-yard breaststroke. 



268 





The freshmen relay team of Butch Blau, Bill Bishop, Peter Trummer, and Paul Newman 
set a new record for the 440-yard medley relay this season. 



7IMMING TEAM. Standing: Bob Barnes, Jim Smith, Bill Horan, Mike Francis, 
te Trummer, Ken Spirak, Don Schmitt, Coach Don Chalmers. Seated: Bob Dring, 
:k Banks, captain Bob Bielinski, Joe Huhn, Len Vertuno, Bob Blau. Seated on floor: 
n Kelly, Paul Newman, Bill Bishop. 



gaat^ 




Jim Kelly, Paul Newman, Bob Barnes, and 
Bill Horan composed the 400-yard freestyle 
relay team that set a new university standard 
this year. 



Coach Don Chalmers talks with captain Bob 
Bielinski who has just completed his work- 
out. 



P_t..r Trurnmer, the outstanding freshman 
on this year's rquad, set a new university 
and pool record in the 200-yard br^aststroke. 





BOWLING 



Under the guidance of Coach Charles Greenstein, 
Loyola's bowling team is acquiring a fine reputation 
in the Midwestern Collegiate Bowling League. 

The young and inexperienced team is led by Jack 
Brown who in twenty-six games has maintained a 183 
average. He is closely followed by Den Suder, the 
only senior on the team, bowling a 180 average, with 
the team's high series score of 1010. Bill Shaw, third 
with a 179 average, has the distinction of having 
bowled the best game of the season — 244. 

The team, which finished in fourth place in the 
five-team league, picked up momentum at the end of 
the season and consistently improved in its scoring. 



iOWLING TEAM. Back row: Bill Shaw, Tony Licata, Den 
aider, Dick Baum. Front row: Wally Draus, Coach Charley 
ireenstein, Jack Brown. 



Three members of the Bowling Team show their style on the alleys: Den Suder, Bill 
Shaw, and Dick Baum. 




INTRAMURALS 



The intramural program at Loyola's two campuses 
provides the students with a wide variety of physically 
relaxing pursuits. Although the programs at LT and 
LSC vary somewhat, the majority of events are the 
same: football contests, basketball games, and spring 
Softball. 

The LSC intramural program is under the direction 
of Coach Don Chalmers. He is assisted by Bob Marlin, 
Bill Pederson, and Jim Kelly. Contests most actively 
participated in are football, basketball, Softball, and 
handball. Students may participate at any time during 
the school year in swimming, padd.ebail, and track. 

The most popular event spectator-wise is the annual 
turkey-trot, won this year by four-time winner George 
Plum. Observers believe that Plum's record of four 
wins will never be equalled. The Pi Alphs are again 
leading the LSC sweepstakes contest, having won the 
football championship. 

The LT program is under the direction of Leonard 
Zimny, assisted by John Gobby, Bob Buckley, and 
John Owens. The major event of the program is the 
basketball championship, which again seems to be in 
the hands of the BVDs. Other activities include a dart 
throwing contest, table-tennis, checker tournament, and 
the free-throw contest. 



Hank Anselmo takes a few practice swings at the punching 
bag. 



Bob Buckley and John Gobby take time out from their official 
intramural duties to discuss the intramural program. 

John Karklin makes an attempt at playing ping-pong. 



One of the major activities of the intramural program is 
basketball. 




was a ninety-pound weakling, until 





All eyes follow the opening jump between 
the Hamms and Dorm I at Lake Shore's 
Alumni Gym. 



IM 



Mi, 



m 




i 

1 



it 



n 



tap* 



Ed Rasdi. Loyola's man-behind-the-cage for 
the past thirty years, hands towel to Charlie 
Vygantas. 



BVD, LT intramural champs, again outjump 
competition at the Chicago Avenue Armory. 



What do you mean I Iojc the birdie?' 



arry Schuttz aims for his fifth straight miss. 



t tak 



es ten to tangle. 




Chicago, with its 14,500 factories which produce 21 billion dollars worth of 
goods a year, is one of the world's largest manufacturing areas. Many, no doubt, 
of Loyola University's 900 yearly graduates choose careers for themselves within 
some division of Chicago's vast manufacturing network. Yet no matter what their 
walk of life, Loyola graduates fulfill an important role as consumers of their city's 
products. They, and through them Loyola, influence the economic well-being of 
both Chicago and the nation. 



GRADUATES 




GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Recipients of the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 



Sister Mary Edith (Willow), C.S.F.N. 
A.B., De Paul University; A.M., Ibid. — English 
Dissertation: An Analysis of the English Poems of St. 
Thomas More. 



Edward William Bermes, Jr. 

B.S., St. Mary's College; M.S., Loyola University — Biochemistry 
Dissertation: Some Aspects of the Stability of Human Serum 
Lipoproteins, in Vitro. 

James Wendell Flesher 

B.S., Northwestern University; M.S., Loyola University — 

Pharmacology 
Dissertation: Synthesis and Pharmacological Actions of 5 

AdenylmethylenediphosphoKate. an Analog of A.T.P. 

Edith Marie Godar 

B.S., Rosary College; M.S., Loyola University — Chemistry 
Dissertation: Synthesis and Infrared Spectra of Some Sub- 
stituted- Pyridines. 

Henry Joseph Lambin 

A.B. Loyola University; A.M., Ibid. — Psychology 
Dissertation: An Experimental Study of the Relation be- 
tween Perception of Self and Evaluation of Another. 



Mary A. McNeill 

A.B., St. Xavier College; A.M., Catholic University of America 

— Psychology 
Dissertation: A Study of the Relation between Deductive 

and Inductile Reasoning Ability and Adjustment in Adults. 

Helen K. Pancerz 

B.S., University of Alabama; A.M., Loyola University — 

Psychology 
Dissertation: The Structured Diary as an Aid in Counseling 

Parents. 

Russell Charles Seckendorf 

B.S., Siena College; M.S., St. Louis University — Physiology 
Dissertation: Thermal Reflex Sweating in Normal and Para- 
plegic Man. 

Anthony B. Tabor 

B.S., Loyola University; A.M., Ibid. — Psychology 

Dissertation: Process Analysis of Rorschach Interpretation. 

Eugene H. Welsand 

A.B., St. Francis Seminary; A.M., Loyola University- 
Psychology 

Dissertation: The Usefulness of the Spranger Values in the 
Determination of Basic Values. 



Recipients of the Degree of Doctor of Education 



278 



Lucille Armstrong Foster 

B.S., University of Illinois; M.Ed., Dj Paul LIniversity — 

Education 
Dissertation: An Empirical Evaluation of the Theory of 

Manifest Structure Analysis, 



Reverend Charles E. Kenney, M.M. 

B.C.L., Pontifical Lateran Athenaeum, Rome; M.Ed., Loyol 

University — Education 
Dissertation: Differential Vocational Interest Pattern: 

Successful and Unsuccessful Foreign Mission Seminarian. 



Recipients of the Degree of Master of Arts 



Sister Mary Ann Juliana (McCarrhy), O.S.M. 

James A. Becker 

John Paul Beifuss 

John Adolph Bertacchi 

Joan Biederstedt 

Reverend Jerome Francis Bowman, S.J. 

John Edmund Burke 

Carolyn Luser Cabanski 

Sister M. Charlotte (Schmitz.1, S.C.C. 

Angela Lucille Chemazar 

Alice Elizabeth Conlon 

Sister M. Dominic (Miller), S.C.C. 

Sister Mary Ethel (Wiedling), I.H.M. 

Sister M. Euthelia (Schlesser), O.S.F. 

Reverend Eugene Joseph Faucher 

Thomas F. Grib 

Sister M. Helen Michael (Kelly), O.P. 

Sister Jean Mary (Dougherty), O.P. 

Sister M. Joan of Arc (Guthrie), I.H.M. 

Reverend Denis Mary Hickey, O.S.M. 

Robert Folkes Kelly 

Sister Mary Kilian (Pollard), B.V.M. 

James Francis Leonard 



Sister Mary Lillian ( Jerauskas) , S.S.C. 

Ellenmae Quan Long 

Reverend Charles Leonard Maranto, C.S.V. 

Edward Ronald Marcin 

Sister Marie Catherine (Pohr.dorf), S.L. 

Paul Martin 

Harold C. Messinides 

Reverend Robert William Mohrhardt 

Pham Thi Ngo 

Marie Jeanne Petrone 

Vincent D. Pisani 

Sister Roberta Mary ( Fitzsimmons) , O.P. 

Richard Henry Roe 

Sister M. Rosaire (Lucassen), O.P. 

Sister M. Rosalie (King), O.S.F. 

Mary Adele Rosera 

Sister Mary St. Denis (Stanton), B.V.M. 

Sister Mary St. Peter (Smith), S.N.D. 

Valentino Santostefano 

Reverend Werner Joseph Shadeg, S.V.D. 

Brother Paul Joseph Schneider, S.M. 

Sister Mary Theresita ( Polczynski ) , S.S.J. 

Sister Mary Wilbur (Pepple), S.N.D. 



Catherine Therese Wilson 
Edward C. Wojciechowski 
James Raymond Brockman, S.J. 
Edward Patrick Echlin, S.J. 
Howard Joseph Gray, S.J. 
Edward Joseph Heavey, S.J. 
Patrick J. Henry, S.J. 
Lawrence Paul Hurley, S.J. 
Richard Emmett Kelly, S.J. 
Thomas Patrick Kennealy, S.J. 
John Leo Klein, S.J. 
John Fabian Kramer, SJ. 
James Gerald McCann, S.J. 
Caspar James Miller, S.J. 
John Kennedy Mott, S. J. 
Joseph Carl Pilot, S.j. 
Paul Vincent Robb,' S.J. 
Thomas Lynde Seibert, S.J. 
Donald Raymond Scliskar, S.J. 
Edmund Robert Skrzypczak, S.J. 
Jerome Patrick Slattery, S.J. 
Ernest Stanislaus Sweeney, S.J. 



Recipients of the Degree of Master of Science 



Anthony William Gargiulo 



Lilita Straumanis 



Thomas John Tclinski 



Recipients of the Degree of Master of Education 



Marie Blackburn Anderson 

Margaret Mary Balla 

Clifford Albert Boland 

Raymond Joseph Boucher 

Charles Walter Burns, Jr. 

Nancy Patricia Cotter 

Kathleen A. Crosby 

Shirley Mae Dailey 

Bruna Marie Danese 

Dalward J. Debruzzi 

Martha G. De Gryse 

Dominic L. Del Vecchio 

Julien Doyle Drayton 

Agripina C. Fernandez 

Silvio Anthony Ferrara 

Dolores Kurent Fitzgerald 

Genevieve Carey Fogarty 

Sister M. Frarcis (Keilen), S.C.C. 

M. Helen Halladay 



Richard Michael Hanisits 

Reverend Daniel Joseph Hartigan, OS. A. 

Marcita Adele Hecht 

William Phillip Horn 

Ivah K. Tinker Hugnagel 

Sister M. Irene (Rukas), S.S.C. 

William Francis Kretz 

Janet Mary Kulszynski 

Maura Patricia Lacey 

Catherine Sheila Lucey 

Thomas Eccles McCaig 

Mary A. Meagher 

Joann Amelia Myslowski 

Oliver Kenneth Nilson 

Dorothy Mae O'Brien 

Agnes Mary O'Connell 

Julia L. O'Malley 

Jeanne Patricia O'Reilly 

Frances S. Paul 



Harriet Viola Peterson 

Marion Eleanor Reding 

Mary Louise Rodger 

Frank R. Santelli 

Potenciana Cruz Santos 

Imogene R. Sauber 

Reverend Otto G. Shelly, S.V.D. 

Glenn Daniel Stober 

Sister M. Susanne (Simpkin), I.B.V.M. 

Jayne A. Swiatek 

John Lawrence Swider 

Anderson Thompson 

Reverend Bernard Topfer, S.V.D. 

Albert Edward Trock, Jr. 

Sister M. Vircenza (Nauman), F.S.P.A. 

Ralph Peter Warner 

Cecilia A. Wixted 

Judith Detina Wolf 

Edward Leonard Zoltowski 



279 




One of the most welcome sights to incoming 
freshmen and to visitors to the University 
is the Lake Shore Campus directory. 



Joseph E. Add'jci 
M.D. 



Gerald S. Ahern 
B.S.C. 



Jack S. Akamine 
D.D.S. 



Gene R. Ala 
B.S. (Hum.) 



Stuart M. Allen 
B.S.N.S. 




N?5^ ^£ v 





Patrick Ambler 
B.S. (Hum.) 



Catherine Andersen 
B.S.N. 



L k_ 

Carol R. Anderson 
B.S.N. 



'* **' f -* *' 



Frank S. Arostegui 
D.D.S. 



Clifford J. Audette 
D.D.S. 



Enver O. Avdich 
B.S.N.S. 



Charles J. Baldwin 
B.S.N.S. 




Mary Kay Ball 
B.S.N. 




feiiJ 



John L. Ballack 
D.D.S. 



Mary Anne Banahan 
B.S. (Educ.) 



Paul Bernard Bannon, Jr. 
B.S.C. 



John H. Baratka 
B.S.N.S. 



David N. Beauregard 
B.S. (Hum.) 





n3H **' 


*<^ ^6B^ ■ 


\s 


""■*• / 




^ 'luWW 






i^^T 









Ronald S. Bednar 
B.S.S.S. 



Melvin C. Bell 
D.D.S. 



Stephen G. Bell 
D.D.S. 



Daniel R. Bennett 
B.S. (Hum.) 



William M. Bercik 
D.D.S. 



Gerald R. Beranek 
A.B. 



Thomas S. Bernat 



Joseph G. Bicek 
B.S.N.S. 




Edwin C. Biesineer 
B.S. (Hum.) 



Jerome B. Biranowski 
B.S.N.S. 



Eleanor D. Bitten 
B.S.N. 



James C. Black 
M.D. 



Millard M. Blackburn 
D.D.S. 



Richard M. Blaine 
M.D. 



Gerald R. Blake 
D.D.S. 



Kenneth I. Blake 
B.S.C. 



Joseph G. Bock 
' B.S. (Hum.) 




±. I 



># 



Carol A. Booth 
B.S.S.S. 




Thomas M. Bowler 
B.S.S.S. 



Sheila A. Boyd 
B.S.N. 



Neil F. Bracht 
B.S.S.S. 





Robert J. Brandt 
D.D.S. 



Philip P. Brankin III 
B.S.C. 



Peter V. Brask 
D.D.S. 




Students share a moment of relaxation on the Lake 
Shore Campus in spite of the warning to "keep off 
the grass." 




Donald W. Bredemann 
B.S.C. 



Jerome J. Brosnan 
B.S.N.S. 



Paul E. Brockbank 



Ronald H. Brown 
B.S.N.S. 



Richard H. Brownheld 
D.D.S. 



Norman C. Brunner 
B.S.N.S. 



Theresa A. Bruno 
B.S. (Educ. i 





Evelyn J. Buckley 
B.S.N. 




Overenthusiastic sophomores at the Pow-Wow rush to greet the LOYOLAN photog- 
rapher with open arms. (The camera was insured but the photographer was not.) 



Mildred E. Buckley 
B.S.N. 



Robert L. Buckley 
B.S.C. 




David G. Burden 
B.S. (Hum.) 



James ]. Burden 
M.D. 



^ 



Joseph M. Burke 
B.S.C. 



Michael J. Burke 
B.S.C. 



James E. Burroughs 
B.S.N.S. 




lames C. Byrne 
J.D. 





James P. Cahi 
M.D. 



John S. Capocy 
B.S.C. 



James A. Calder 
D.D.S. 



Patrick I. Caraher 
J.D. 



Eugene J. Callahan 
B.S. (Hum.) 



David F. Carey 
A.B. 



James V. Callahan 
J.D. 



Joseph B. Carini, Jr. 



Thomas M. CamJen 
B.S.S.S. 




fALU^MiM 



Theodore J. Carney 
D.D.S. 



David B. Cauble 
M.D. 



Raymond P. Carroll 
B.S. (Hum.) 



John J. Caulfield 
D.D.S. 



Sheila M. Carroll 
B.S.S.S. 



John J. Caulheld 
D. 



Gregory Catrambone 
D.D.S. 



Maruaret T. Centrala 
M.D. 



lulius J. Chepey 
M.D. 




-^— — — _ 




Catherine A. Corcoran 
B.S.N. 



Th: distinguished-looking gentleman in the center of the above picture is Tony 
Giannini, who was crowned Loyola's Ugly Man of the Year in the annual TEKE 
contest, which might jokingly be described as the most "unpopular" contest at 
Loyola. 



Katherine Cottrell 
B.S. (Hum.) 



Thomas J. Coughlan 
B.S.S.S. 



Donald R. Crain 
A.B. 




Bonita J. Crawford 
B.S.N. 




dMmi 






Eugene R. Croisant 
B.S.C. 




Gary W. Crow 
B.S.C. 



George J. CuIIen 
J.D. 



William J. Cully, Jr. 
B.S.N.S. 



James T. Cushing 
B.S.N.S. 



Edward S. Dahlquist 
B.S.C. 



John E. Dalidowicz 
B.S.N.S. 



Martin G. Danforth 
B.S.N.S. 



Claude J. Davis 
B.S. (Hum.) 




Philip A. De Gregorio 
D.D.S. 



Robert J. DeLaCruz 
B.S.C. 



Christian F. DeLeeuw 
B.S.C. 



James H. DeLiefde 
D.D.S. 



ames E. Del Giorno 
B.S.C. 



John L. Dentzer 
A.B. 



Rosemarie A. Deppert 
B.S. (Educ.) 



Erich M. Derken 
B.S.C. 



Raymond J. Devereux, Jr. 
B.S. (Hum.) 





lames J. Dowd 
B.S.N.S. 



Thomas A. Dowd 
B.S.C. 



Edward D. Doyle 
B.S. (Hum.) 



Russell C. Drago 
M.D. 




Harry T. Drayson 
B.S.C. 




Leona M. D.idas 
B.S.N. 



Fernando D. Dulay 
M.D. 



Blaine R. Dunn 
D.D.S. 



James P. Dunne 
B.S. (Hum.) 






^? 



«*- 





Loyola students, their dates, and friends crowd the Union's Fall Frolic Dance to cheer 
on their candidates for the Miss Varsity contest. 



liam D. Du Sold 



Jacqueline M. Eliardt 
B.S. (Educ.) 



Harold E. Enerson 
B.S.C. 



Joseph R. Eraci 
M.D. 





Rev. William Finnegan, S.J., distributes 
Holy Communion to students at weekly 
Mass, which is an integral part of 
Loyola's spiritual life. 



Donald J. Evers Kenneth J. Fabian 

A.'B. B.S.N.S. 



Lawrence A. Fanarason 
M.D. 



Janis A. Fahrbach 
B.S.N. 



Maddalena F. Fared 
M.D. 









Thom.:s W. Farley 
D.D.S. 



Ronald J. Farmer 



B.S.N.S. 



■mart P. Farmer 
B.S.C. 



Marie - e F. Feaster 



Frark E. Feeney 
B.S.S.S. 



Thomas L. Fencl 
B.S. (Hum.) 



Lucille Ferrara 
B.S. (Educ.) 



Joseph Ferretti 
B.S.N.S. 



Carole G. Feurer 
B.S.N. 




Louis J. Filiatrau.lt 
M.D. 



Carl R. Fischer 
D.D.S. 



Rosemarie F. Fitzek 
B.S.N. 



Constance A. Fitzgerald 
B.S. (Hum.)' 



Sheila A. Fitzgerald 
B.S.N. ' 



John F. Fitzpatrick 
B.S.C. 



John F. Flanr.ery 
D. 



Patrick J. Flannery 
B.S.C. 





Frank J. Gavin Jerome E. Gawlick 

D.D.S. B.S.C. 



John T. Gaydos 
J.D. 



Thomas F. Geary 
J.D. 



Jeanette M. Gebhardt 
B.S. (Hum.) 



Hans E. Geissler 
M.D. 



Anthony A. G 




Senior Larry Bruozis, chairman of the Students As- 
sociates of Loyola, counsels high school senior as part 
of the SAL's program of recruitment. 




Maureen A. Gibbs 
B.S.N. 



Warren W. Giddens 
M.D. 



rbara M. Gilsdorf 
B.S.S.S. 



John B. Gobby 
B.S.C. 



Francis E. Goodman 
J.D. 



Martin O. Gora 
B.S.S.S. 



Joseph L. Gordon 
D.D.S. 





These avidly-interested students in the Alumni Gym are watching Loyola's Ramblers 
ramble to victory over Denver University in a spectacular 90-63 victory. 



Edward R. Gran 
B.S.C. 



Vincent I. Grant 
B.S.S.S. 



Eugene L. Griffin 
JD. 



Richard J. Grisius 
D.D.S. 



Bernard J. Grothaus 
D.D.S. 



August A. Grundei 
ID. 




£*Gm 





i 




James M. Gubbins 
A.B. 



?rnard L. Harmon, Jr. 
B.S.C. 



Maurice C. Hack, Jr. 
D.D.S. 



Olivia B. Harrell 
B.S.C. 



Phyllis E. Halada 
B.S.N. 



3r. George G. Harris, 
C.S.V. 
A.B. 



John E. Hannan 
B.S.C. 



Evelyn G. Harrigan 
B.S.N. 



Arrhur D. Harman 
B.S.N.S. 







John M. Hasrings 
J.D. 



Jerry L. Heflin 
B.S.C. 



David L. Hartendorf 



William M. Hegan 
A.B. 



Ronald E. Haydanek 
J.D. 



Graham M. Heikes 
A.B. 



Howard E. Haynie, Jr. 
J.D. 



George F. Heimbach 
B.S.N.S. 



Roberr T. Hess 
B.S.C. 





I*** 




Frar.k J. Hildner 
M.D. 



James R. HoJur 



D.D.S. 



Theodore F. Hoss, Jr. 
B.S. (Hum.) 




Joseph J. Hossbacher 
D.D.S. 



Cornelius J. Houtsma, Jr 
L.L.B. 



Frank J. Hosan III 
B.S.S.S. 



Melba A. Hompertz 
B.S.C. 



Roy J. Horton 
A.B. 




Loyola's D.ntal School makes use of the modern invention of television as an 
integral feature of its educational program. 



Robert Q. Hoyt 
B.S. (Hum.) 



Thomas P. Hughes 
B.S. (H-m.) 



Jo M. Humphrey 
~.S. (H-m.) 



William R. Hutchins 
B.S.S.S. 





Thomas C. Hyncs 
B.S.S.S. 



Leonard J. Infrarca 
M.D. 



D.D.S. 



Robert L. Takopin 
M.D. 



Gerald A. Jamnik 
B.S.C 



Emily E. [anovi.es 
B.S.N.S. 



Cynthia M. Jason 
M.D. 



Gloria Favor 
B.S.C. 




Edward S. Jennings 
B.S.N.S. 



Chandler T. Joe 
B.S.S.S. ' 



Stewart F. Johnsen 
B.S. (Hum.) 



Arvid C. Johnson, Jr. 
J'.D. 



Fred L. Johnson 
J.D. 



Robert P. Johnson 
B.S.C. 



Gerald A. Joyce 
B.S. (Educ. ) 



Donald L. Kaider 
B.S.C. 




h 



■ 




Carl L. Kalbhen 
D.D.S. 



Ralph J. Kalinowsk 
B.S.N.S. 



John f. Kamer, Jr. 
B.S.C. 



Melvin J. Kamm 



Bertha Mae Kane 
B.S.N. 



Robert A. Kane 
B.S.C. 



William F. Kansas, Jr. 
D.D.S. 



Danute Kantautas 
B.S.C. 



Robert F. Kapolnek 
B.S. (Hum.) 




William J. Kaukialo 
B.S.N.S. 



Lloyd R. Kavana^h 
M.D. 



Michael P. Kaye 

M.D. 
M.S. ( Physiology ) 



Thomas E. Kean 
B.S.C. 



James V. Keefe 
B.S.C. 



H. Ravmord Kelly 
B.S.C. 



Mary Sue Kelly 
B.S. (Educ.) 



Michael P. Kelly 
B.S.C. 



Raymond E. Kelly 
B.S.C. 






■••^wa 



fcfc^ 




Robert K. Kelty 
J.D. 



Paul T. Kennedy 
D.D.S. 



James S. Kerrigan 
D.D.S. 



Jerome J. Keser 
B.S.N.S. 



fa 



/ 




Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S.J., president of Loyola, presents awards to representatives 
of Chi Theta Upsilon and Alpha Tau Delta in recognition of their leadership in the 
Students Associates of Loyola's recruitment program. 



Ronald P. Kiefer 



Rita L. Kindahl 
B.S.S.S. 



William H. Kin fi 
D.D.S. 



Richard E. Klinubeil 
B.S.S.S. 



Robert J. Klovstad 
L.L.B. 





In the midst of the intense activity of 
Loyola's Dental School, the students find 
time for peaceful meditation in the 
quiet of their chapel. 



Joan E. Koepcke 
S.N. 



Frank T. Koiicek 
B.S.N.S. 





Felix A. Krock 
M.D. 



Helen B. KrofI 
B.S. (Educ.) 



Mary Ann Kro 
B.S.N. 



Patricia B. Kubistal 
A.B. 



acqueline L. Kueber 
M.D. 



Robert O. Kujala 
B.S.N.S. 



Louis G. Kujawinski 
B.S.S.S. 



Robert E. Kulik 
B.S.C. 



Daniel W. Kummet 
B.S.C. 





Eugene L. Kusek 
B.S.C 



Bruce L. Kwarta 
D.D.S. 



Theresa R. Lash 
B.S.N. 



Yolanta P. Latkowski 
B.S.S.S. 



John L. Lavrich 
B.S.C. 



Sally A. Lawrence 
B.S. (Hum.) 



John J. Lee 
B.S.S.S. 



George J. Lempke 
B.S.S.S. 




John E. Lempkowski 
A.B. 



Therese M. Lesiak 
B.S. (Educ.) 



Robert M. Lev 



Rhoda M. Lewis 
B.S.N. 



Sam P. Liaros 



Richard F. Lisk 



Antoinette L. Litkowski 



John F. Littau 



George L. La.sorio 





Arthur G. Lorr Wayne S. Lowe 

B.S.S.S. B.S.C. 



Gay Lee Luhrs 
B.S.C. 



Stephen B. Luzbetak, |r. 
B.S.S.S. 



David G. Lynch 
B.S.S.S. 



Daniel J. Lyons 
A.B. 



lames P. Lyons 
B.S.C. 



«»» 


M H-- M »iffiff«^ 






$ 0- — ^^-a 


S3 > 





The lounge of the Men's Dormitory affords the stu- 
dent residents a place of relaxation and a chance to 
engage in casual conversation with other students. 




Campbell C. MacArthur, 
Jr. 
J.D. 



Frank J. Macchitelli 
B.S.S.S. 



Carl J. Maier 
D.D.S. 



Ronald L. Maksym 
B.S.S.S. 



Sr. Mary Gertrude 

(Malczewska), C.S.F.N. 

B.S. (Ed'jc.) 



Helen P. Maloney 
B.S. (Educ.) 





Patricia C. Maloney 
B.S. (Hum.) 



Ma'-ireen A. Marley 
B.S. (Hum.) 



Robert W. Martin 
B.S.C. 



Theresa S. Matait 
B.S.N. 




* rm 



0H§v 



1 




1 



David T. McCann 




Patricia A. McCarter 
B.S.N. 



Frank McCune, Jr. 
B.S. (Hum.) 



Robert H. McDonald, Jr. 

M.D. 

M.S. (Physiology) 



Mrs. Lucille McDonough 
J.D. 



artin E. McDonough Daniel C. McEachran 

.ID. J.D. 



Guy A. McGarry 
D.D.S. 



Ronald P. McGovern 
B.S.C. 




rrence P. McGovern 
B.S.C. 



Edmund J. McGrath 
B.S.C. 



James T. McGrath 
B.S.C. 



Joseph H. McLaughlin 
D.D.S. 



Eileen A. McNulty 
B.S.N.S. 



James J. McPolin 



John W. McReynolds, Jr. 
B.S.C. 



Mary Virginia McVane 
S. (Educ.) 



Valentin F. Mersol 



JVC 





Michael J. Metzger 
B.S.C. 



Mary Ann Michor 
B.S.N. 



Loren F. Mills 
D.D.S. 




Delphine A. Migacz 
B.S. (Educ.) 



John A. Miller 
B.S.N.S. 



Richard A. Miller 
B.S. (Hum.) 




A group of students in the Cudahy Library at Lake Shore Campus spend many 
delightful afternoons by poring over weighty volumes in the hope of getting 
that yearned-for "A." 



Robert J. Mison 
B.S.C. 



Paula M. Mrvosh 
B.S. (Hum.) 



Clemens F. Mueller 
B.S.C. 





John M. O'Brien III 
B.S.C. 



John P. O'Brien, Jr. 
B.S.C. 



Patrick I. O'Brien 
B.S.S.S. 



Ronald J. O'Brien 
B.S.N.S. 



Robert M. O'Bryan 
M.D. 



Joseph A. Ochab 
D.D.S. 



Joseph T- Oletti 
B.S.C. 



Edwin R. Olson 
A.B. 



Joseph J. O'Malley 
B.S. (Hum.) 




Timothy J. O'Nei 
B.S.N.S. 



Raymond F. Orlosk 
B.S.N.S. 



Edward M. Osetek 
D.D.S. 



Tames M. O'Shau^hness 
B.S. (Hum'.) 



William M. Ostaski 
D.D.S. 



Neil O'Sullivan 
B.S.C. 



John J. O'Toole 
J.D. 



Hubert E. Owens 
B.S.C. 






A group of Tau Delts in the Lewis Towers Lounge spend many hours of politicking and 
sampling their cups of steaming hot Union coffee. 



Donald Patrick 
B.S.C. 



Louis W. Pattan 
D.D.S. 



Robert J. Pauletti 
D.D.S. 



Patricia Pauncho 
B.S.N. 



William K. Pederson 
B.S. (Hum.) 



Dolores A. Persha 
B.S. (Educ.) 





His Excellency Albert G. Meyer, Arch- 
bishop of Chicago, addresses the graduates 
and their guests at Loyola's mid-year 
convocation. 



Robert J. Perticara 
B.S.N.S. 



Ronald E. Peterson 
B.S.C. 



Bernard W. Petosa 
A.B. 



lohn D. Petrich 
D.D.S. 







la* I 



ocratcs J. Philopoulos 
D.D.S. 



Richard L. Philpott 
B.S.N.S. 



Joseph J. Picciuca, )r. 
B.S.C. 



Rosalie A. Piedmont 
B.S. (Hum.) 



James L. Pittacora 
D.D.S. 



Florence Plaisance 
B.S. (Hum.) 



Thomas W. Planek 
A.B. 



William M. Plante 
B.S. (Hum.) 



Donald F. Pochyly 
M.D. 




Michael T. Polelle 
A.B. 



Johnnie M. Pope 
B.S.P.H.N. 



Robert J. Porter 
M.D. 



Walter J. Powers, Jr. 
B.S.C. 



Donald J. Provenzale 
B.S.N.S. 



Donald T- Racky 
A.B. 



Mary T. Raftery 
B.S.S.S. 



Gerald E. Ragan 
J.D. 



Paul J. Raglow 
M.D. 





Ameel G. Rashid 
M.D. 



Casimir E. Rasilewicz 
B.S.N.S. 



Thomas R. Redden 
J.D. 



Robert T. Reed 
B.S.S.S. 



Charles W. Roache 
B.S.C. 



Herbert A. Reschke 
B.S.S.S. 



Eugenie A. Richard 
B.S.P.H.N. 



Edna P. Roache 
B.S.N. 



Herbert J. Rohr 
M.D. 



Austin F. Rinella 
B.S. (Hum.) 




Margaret M. Rooney 
A.B. 



Barbara A. Ross 
B.S. (Educ. ) 



Francis M. Rubin 
B.S.S.S. 



John F. Ryan 
M.D. 



Tohn V. Ryan 
M.D. 



Michael \V. Ryan 
B.S.C. 





One of the most important daily functions of student 
life is checking the bulletin boards for notices about 
assemblies, as well as for the dreaded notes to "please 
report to the Dean's office." 



Harvey C. Sanders 
M.D. 



Sigurd C. Sandzen, Jr. 

M.D. 

M.S. (Anatomy) 



Michael S. Sapienza 
B.S.N.S. 



Ronald D. Sarbieski 
B.S.C. 



Victor J. Sawko 
D. 



Anthony A. Scafidi 
B.S.N.S. 




Marilyn Scavone 
B.S.N. 




John H. Scheid 
A.B. 



Raymond F. Schendl 
M.D. 



Beverly B. Schmidt 
B.S.N. 



0^' 



S/i 



Lawrence J. Schn 
M.D. 



Albert Schonbe 
D.D.S. 




Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S.J., president of Loyola, awards degrees to the graduates 
at the mid-year convocation. 



•a* m 




% I 



James B. Schram 
D.D.S. 



Bernard R. Schroeder 
B.S.S.S. 



Sr. Paul Schultz 
B.S.N. 



Patrick J. Scullion 
B.S.C. 



Philbert E. Seals 
I.D. 



Atrnes C. Sebastian 
B.S. (Educ. ) 







_ 


|fe 








IV 


MB 

A 1 


mfm 



Hui?h E. Smith 



Nancy A. Smyth 
B.S.N. 



Trinidad S. Soledad 
B.S.N. 



Anthony J. Somora 
B.S.N.S. 



Richard J. Sonka 
B.S.N.S. 



Alex J. Spadoni 
- M.D. 





Dennis E. Spillane 
B.S. (Hum.) 



Mr. James C. Cox, Lake Shore Campus librarian, acquaints four Loyola coeds with 
the vast store of knowledge available to them. 



Anthony F. Spina 
B.S.S.S. 



Robert L. Starck 
D.D.S. 



John T. Starzec 
B.S.N.S. 



Ronald H. Stefani 
M.D. 



Mary Ann T. Steinle 
B.S.N. 




lymond C. Stensrud 
B.S.C. 




Jerome V. Stephonic 
B.S.C. 



Edward M. Stermer 
B.S.C. 



Charles |. Sternhagen 
M.D. 



Michael J. Stortz 
M.D. 



Edith E. Strom 
B.S.N. 



Sheila A. Sullivan 
B.S. (Educ.) 



George B. Sweetnam 
D.D.S. 




itk&± fe 






life Alt 




Michael C. Szott 
D.D.S. 



Eugene F. Tarka 
B.S.N.S. 



Thomas P. Tarpey 
B.S.S.S. 



Albert Taymans 
B.S.S.S. 



John J. Terry 
B.S.C. 



Arnold R. Tetens 
B.S.C. 



John C. Tevenan 
B.S.C. 



James A. Thielen 
B.S.C. 



Raymond C. Thomsen 
B.S.C. 





liAliA 




Thomas C. Tomasik 



Nicholas G. Tompulis 
B.S.C. 



Richard Triska 
B.S.S.S. 



John J. Toomey 
D.D.S. 



Charmaine C. Tortorello 
B.S. (Educ.) 



Frank A. Tuma 
B.S.N.S. 



George S. Tovarek 
M.D. 



John O. Tuohy 
.D. 




Philomena R. Vallar 
B.S. (Educ.) 



Donald Van Dyke 
A.B. 



Brian R. Van Vlierbergen 
B.S.S.S. 



Donna Rae Vero 
B.S.S.S. 



r. Robert A. Vade 

Bon Coeur, C.S.V. 

A.B. 



John M. Veto 
A.B. 





Students of the Nursing School take advantage of the snowy weather to go mountain 
climbing on the Lake Shore Campus. 



v-illiam H. Wahl 
M.D. 



Mark A. Waldron, Jr. 
B.S.C. 



Gene J. Walkowiak 
D.D.S. 



Sr. M. Stanislaus Kostka 

(Walkowska), C.S.F.N. 

B.S. (Educ.) 



Elizabeth J. Wall 
B.S. (Educ.) 



Maureen B. Walsh 
B.S.N. 





Miss Agnes Sebastian presents Theta 
Phi Alpha's Player-of-the-Night awards 
to Marquette's Walt Mangham and 
Loyola's Greg Griffin after the Mar- 
quette-Loyola game in the Chicago 
Stadium. 



Thomas R. Walsh 
B.S.C. 



Michael R. Walton 
B.S.S.S. 



James J. Ward Donald Weggeman 

LD. B.S. (Hum.) 





Leonard Weiss 
D.D.S. 



Jerome C. Weitzel 
B.S. (Hum.) 



John R. Welsh 
D.D.S. 



Alfred R. Wenzel 
D.D.S. 



William F. Wentland 
B.S.C. 



lohn M. Whalen 
' B.S. (Hum.) 



Patrick Whalen 
B.S.C. 



Stanley P. Wiencek 
B.S.S.S. 




John M. Wierz 
B.S.N.S. 



Rodger F. Williams 
DD.S. 



Edward E. Winchester 
B.S.C. 



Ronald J. Winters 
M.D. 



Jerome J. Wisneski 
B.S.N.S. 



Richard G. Wittry 
J.D. 



Judith M. Wolfgram 
B.S.S.S. 



Conrad A. Wolski 
B.S.S.S. 



Robert M. Woods 
B.S.N.S. 





Patricia A. Wozniak 
B.S.N. 



lames J. Wright 
M.D. 



Edward M. Wydra 
D.D.S. 



Richard R. Yetter 
B.S.C. 



Barbara A. Zigler 
B.S.N. 



322 



Bernadette O. Zaker 
B.S. (Educ.) 



Rocco R. Zic 
B.S.C. 



Jack A. Zimmer 
B.S.C. 



Paul S. Zumbakis 
B.S.C. 



Casimir R. Ziemba 
D.D.S. 




INSTITUTE OF SOCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS 

Recipients of the Degree of Master of Social and Industrial Relations 



REVEREND MAURUS BARRENECHEA, S.J. 

(A. B., Colegio S. Bartolome, Bogota, Colombia; M.A., Universidad 

Javeriana, Bogota, Colombia) 

Thesis: American Catholic Clergy on Labor Education. 



GERALD JAMES CARAHER 
(A.B., De Paul University) 
Thesis: IRRA Members on Pending Labor Legislation. 



WILSON WEN-CHIH KO 

(B.S., Marquette University) 

Thesis: A Study of Occupational Status of the Foreign-Born Chinese 
College Graduates. 



BERNADETTE CURRY LOWUM 
(B.S., Loyola University) 

Thesis: An Analysis of the Objections Filed to Representation Elections 
under the Labor Management Relations Act: August 22, 1947 
to August 21, 1957. 



THOMAS FRANCIS MILLER 
(B.S., Loyola University) 

Thesis: A Survey of Current Labor Problems Involving Scheduled Air- 
line Flight Crews: Should the Present Flight Engineer's Position 
be Replaced with a Third Pilot or Remain Oriented toward 
Mechanical Specialization. 



JOSEPH JOHN PACHOLIK 
(Ph.B., Loyola University) 

Thesis: An Analysis of Problems in Defining Total and Complete Dis- 
ability with Special Reference to Disability Insurance Benefits 
and the Disability Freeze under Title II of the Social Security 
Act. 



ISAM TAJI 

(B.B.A., Western Michigan University) 

Thesis: Labor Legislation and Conditions of Industrial Workers in 
Egypt after World War II. 



323 



SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 



Recipients of the Degree of Master of Social Work 



BARBARA BLACKWELL 

MICHELE BRADLEY 

ALMERA BROOKS 

MYRA CARNEY 

JOHN EGAN 

EVELINE FINNEGAN 

MARY C. FLANIGAN 

JULIA GIUNTOLI 

ELIZABETH GREIG 

MARY ANN HALLOW 

CONSTANCE HARDIMAN 

RALPH H. HERMSEN 

LORELEI KELESKE 

HELEN M. KELLER 

JANET KNIGHT 

ROSA KNIGHT 

JOANNE LEALI 

ELIZABETH MAJORS 



JOAN O'CONNOR 

ELLEN QUINN 

ANNIE L. ROBINSON 

WALTER ROGERS 

FRANCES ROSS 

MADELYN SCHULTE 

DIANNE SMITH 

CELIA SUMINSKI 

MARY K. TRACY 

JAMES TURNER 

REMEDIOS VARIAS 

MARIAN WACLAWEK 

GLORIA WALKER 

JEANORE WALKER 

ALMA WEISS 

MARY WODARCZYK 

REV. WILLIAM E. ZUIDEMA 



324 



Ill 






• 












fe%l .^ 


. X 


«*»..> ^H 


•+ 






^T^^^^'^Bj 



-"«»:-«C. 






iM 


1 


r 


T..IT. | 

■ - - I . 




*sL '■; 


* OM 






it wttsm 




S "- 


Ik~ — ~*^ 




1 

i ■ 
> 


•■ i - . 










• ; .*< 


r"£ 




hmm ! ■ ^^ __. 


: 


«.«£&" ''. • 


r 


KA 



*§il* 



JOURNEY'S END 



The current school year now draws to its close. For 
the seniors it is the journey's end — the conclusion 
of four eventful but difficult years. Life's stern reali- 
ties — the business world, the professions, marriage, 
and parenthood — lie just ahead. For the underclass- 
men each June marks a milestone in their college 
careers. 

The events of April, May, and June annually com- 
prise the most enjoyable activities and the most memor- 
able months of the year. This was the time of the 
Loyola Union Fair, comprehensive examinations, honors 
award nights, recognition days, military reviews, sodal- 
ity receptions, and the Curtain Guild's annual musical. 
The memories of "Hell Night" are lost in the pleas- 
ures of fraternity inductions and elections. The class 
elections and the Council elections are finished, and the 
victors and losers are again friends. How many dances, 
how many banquets, how many parties were crowded 
into these last months! Phi Mu Chi's Easter Queenship 
Ball, Sigma Pi Alpha's Spring Nocturne, the Military 



Ball, and the Veterans Club's dance were just a few 
of these many events. 

For the senior, however, the month of June was the 
most memorable of all. This was the time of Senior 
Week. It began with a picnic in Harms' Woods on 
Saturday, June 6. On Sunday, June 7, the graduates 
marched into Madonna della Strada Chapel for Mass 
and the baccalaureate address. Several hours later they 
assembled at the Michigan Room of the Edgewater 
Beach Hotel to toast one another at the Cocktail Party. 
Then came Monday evening — the night of the glit- 
tering Senior Ball in the Guildhall of the Ambassador 
West. Finally, on commencement day, the graduates 
gathered in the Granada Theatre to receive their degrees 
and to be congratulated by their equally happy parents 
and friends. 

The 1959 LOYOLAN in the next eight pages will 
help you to recapture some of those unforgettable 
moments. 



On the inviting lawns of Lewis Tower's historic campus, students enjoy a btief period of 
relaxation before taking their final exams. 






Gene Callahan receives, on behalf of Pi Alpha Lambda, the 
Organization of the Year Award from Frank Hogan, president 
of Blue Key Fraternity. 



Miss Troy Ehlert, queen of the Military Ball, is pictured with 
her escort, Cadet Lieutenant Colonel John Dentzer, in the 
traditional military-dress sword ceremony. 



The R.O.T.C. drill team brought renown to Loyola with its 1959 success in national 
competition. 




327 



Scene from The Major and the Millionaire, Curtain Guild musical. The band sets off 
from Salvation Army shelter for a great prayer meeting in Albert Hall. 





The cast of The Major and the Millionaire beams with pleasure at the applause given 
their singing of "She Wears a New Look in Her Eyes." 



328 




Fathers Lester Evett, S.J., and Joseph Hogan, S.J., moderators, receive new members into 
Lewis Towers and Lake Shore Sodalities. 



Junior nurses on Recognition Day receive navy blue bands fc 
their caps. 



At the Recognition Day program, sophomore nurses proudly 
wear their nursing caps the first time. 





ztr.Ojzv 



1 ff : 






329 





Mary Kay Ball, sorority woman of the year, and Frank 
Hogan, fraternity man of the year, receive their 
trophies from Tom Brennan at Sigma Pi Alpha's 
annual presentation dance. 



The newly inducted members of Kappa Gamma Pi, 
national scholastic honorary society for women, are, 
standing, Christine Nahnsen, Dorothy Feigl, Patricia 
Kubistal, and, seated, Mary Ann Krol, Kay Cottrell, 
and Donna Rae Vero. 



The Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S.J., president of Loyola, is pictured with the new 
members of Alpha Sigma Nu, national Jesuit honor fraternity; Sam P. Liaros, Dr. Joseph 
Cantafio, John B. Nichele, Donald P. Klein, Robert C. Lane, Richard Stalzer, Richard C. 
Blair, John P. O'Keefe, Peter J. Wagner, Rudolph J. Maier, Richard Donovan, Thomas 
M. Haney, Kenneth C. Jamison, Paul Davis. 




330 



Graduates of 1959 march past the Jesuit residence hall before entering Madonna della 
Strada for the Baccalaureate Services. 




331 




Enjoying the Senior Week cocktail party at the Edge water Beach Hotel are Kay Cottrell, 
Stella Stasulaitis, Frank Gorecki, George Lempke, Gloria Javor, Jim Dunne, and Marge 
Rooney. 



Highlighting the Senior Week was the glittering Senior Ball at the Ambassador West 
Hotel. Among those present were: standing, Dan Matuszewski, Carol Friend, Mary 
Chidester, George Nix; seated, Tom Camden, Barbara Klinger, Dick Miller, Diane Lich, 
Vince Intrivici. 




332 




Photographer John Karklin is caught in the act of catching the mirrored splendor of the 
whirling dancers at the Senior Ball. 



Graduates assemble near the university gymnausium before proceeding to the Granada 
Theatre for commnecement. 




GRADUATE DIRECTORY 



ADDUCCI, JOSEPH E. 
Phi Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Council Repre- 
sentative 3, 4; Student A.M. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

AHERN, GERALD S. 
Vets Club 3, 4; Accounting Club 3, 4. 

AKAMINE, JACK S. 
Delta Sigma Delta 3, 4; Student A.D.A. 1, 2, 
3, 4, Treasurei 3, Vice-President 4; Class 
Treasurer 4; Blue Key Honorary Fraternity 
3, 4. 

ALA, GENE R. 
Historical Society 1, 3, 4; S.A.L. 3; Sodality of 
Our Lady 1. 

ALLEN, STUART M. 

AMBLER, PATRICK A. 

Historical Society 1, 2, 3; Human Relations 
Club 1, 2. 

ANDERSEN, CATHERINE 

ANDERSON, CAROL R. 
Coed Club 1, 2; Alpha Tau Delta 3, 4. 

AROSTEGUI, FRANK S. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4. 

AUDETTE, CLIFFORD J. 

St. Apollonia Guild 1, 2, 3, 4; Junior A.D.A. 

1, 2, 3, 4; Gold Foil Study Club 4; Xi Psi 
Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, House Manager 3, 4. 

AVDICH, ENVER O. 
Wasmann Biological Society 2, 3, 4. 

BACH, JOHN H. 

BALDWIN, CHARLES J. 
Wasmann Biological Society 1, 2, 3, 4, Presi- 
dent 4; Loyola Choral Society 3, 4, Vice- 
President 4; S.A.L. 3, 4; Union Congress 4; 
Curtain Guild 2; Yearbook 2; Historical Society 
3, 4; Photography Club 4; Fine Arts Club 4. 

BALL, MARY KAY 
Nursing Council 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 2; 
Coed Club 1, 2, 3; Sodality 1, 2; Wasmann 
Biological Society 1; Alpha Tau Delta 2, 3, 4, 
Vice-President 3, President 4; Cheer Leadet 

2, 3, 4, Captain 4; Women's Honorary Society 

3, 4; S.A.L. 4; Union Congress 1, 2, 3; Inter- 
fraternity Council 2, 3. 

BALLACK, JOHN L. 

Xi Psi Phi 2, 3, 4. 

BANAHAN, MARY ANNE 
Kappa Beta Gamma 2, 3, 4; Arts Council 
Secretary 3; Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Social 
Chairman 3; Loyola News 1; Modern Language 
Club 2; Historical Society 2; Human Relations 
Club 2; S.A.L. 2; Fine Arts Club 1,2 3, 4. 

BANNON, PAUL B., JR. 
Vets Club 2, 3; S.A.M. 3, 4. 

BARATKA, JOHN H. 

BARRON, JOHN 
Xi Psi Phi 2, 3, 4. 

BART, EDWARD D. 

Maroon & Gold 2, 3; Gold Torch 1, 2, 3; 
Math Club 4; Tau Delta Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Re- 



cording Secretary 3, Corresponding Secretary 
2, Treasurer 1; A.U.S.A. 4. 

BART, ROBERT J. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; 
Historical Society 2, 3, 4; S.A.L. 2, 3; Gold 
Torch Club 2, A.U.S.A. 3; Loyola Choral 
Society 2; Variety Show 2, 3; Intramurals 1, 

2, 3, 4. 

BARTO, THOMAS 
BEAUREGARD, DAVID N. 

BEDNAR, RONALD S. 

Historical Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Vets Club 3, 4; 
Phi Sigma Tau 3, 4. 

BELL, MELVIN 

BELL, STEPHEN G. 
Delta Sigma Delta 2, 3, 4, President 4, Tyler 

3, House Treasurer 3, 4; A.D.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

BENNETT, DANIEL R. 

Historical Society 2, 3, 4. 

BERCIK, WILLIAM M. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, 
Historian 4. 

BERANEK, GERALD R. 
Epsilon Pi Rho 3; Historical Society 3- 

BERNAT, THOMAS S. 
Phi Beta Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 
3, 4. 

BEZARK, FRED 

Student Bar Assn. 1, 2, 3. 

BICEK, JOSEPH G. 

Wasmann Biological Society 3, 4; Sigma Delta 
Phi 3, 4, Vice-President 3, 4. 

BIESINGER, EDWIN C. 

Alpha Delta Gamma 3, 4, Steward '3, 4; Mono- 
gram Club 3, 4; Loyola News 1, 2; Track 
Team 1, 2, 3, 4; Gold Torch Club 1, 2; 
A.U.S.A. 3, 4; Fine Arts Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Historical Society 3, 4; Bellarmine Philosophy 
Club 3, 4; Intramurals 3, 4; LOYOLAN 4, 
Co-Senior Editor 4. 

BIRANOWSKI, JEROME B. 

Phi Mu Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Sigma Tau 3, 4; 
Historical Society 1, 2, 3, 4. 

BITTEN, ELEANOR D. 

BLACK, JAMES C. 
Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

BLACKBURN, MILLARD M. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4; Dentos 2, 3. 

BLAINE, RICHARD M. 
Phi Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

BLAKE, GERALD R. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4. 

BLAKE, KENNETH J. 

Accounting Club 4; Historical Society 1. 

BOCK, JOSEPH G. 

Sodality of Our Lady 3, 4; Historical Society 



3, 4; Physics Club I, 2; Philarets 3, 4, Treas- 
urer 3, 4; Gerard Manley Hopkins Society 4. 

BOOTH, CAROL A. 

Wasmann Biological Society 1; Historical 
Society 2; Psychology Club 3. 

BOWLER, THOMAS M. 

Human Relations Club 3, 4; Psychology Club 
3, 4. 

BOYD, SHEILA A. 
Loyola School of Nursing Assn. 2, 3, 4, Vice- 
President 4; Historical Society 2. 

BRACHT, NEIL F. 

Phi Sigma Tau 3, 4; Sodality of Our Lady 3, 
4; Historical Society 3, 4; Bellarmine Phil- 
osophy Club 3, 4; Fine Arts Club 4. 

BRANDT, ROBERT J. 

St. Apollonia Guild 1, 2; Delta Sigma Delta 

1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; Dentos 2, 3, Editor 

2, 3. 

BRANKLIN, PHILIP P., Ill 

Blue Key Honorary Fraternity 3, 4, U. C. Rep 
resentative 4; Sigma Lambda Beta 2, 3, 4 
President 3; Tau Kappa Epsilon 3, 4; Univer 
sity College Council 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 2 
President 3; Student Union 2, 3, 4, I.F.C 
Chairman 2, Vice-President 2, President 3 
Board of Governors 4; Senior Gift Fund 4 
University College Representative 4; Loyola 
News 1; Dean's Key 4. 

BRASK, PETER V. 
Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4. 

BREDEMANN, DONALD W. 

BROSNAN," JEROME J. 

BROCKBANK, PAUL E. 

Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Sgt.-at-Arms 4. 

BROWN, RONALD H. 

BROWNFIELD, RICHARD H. 

BRUNNER, NORMAN C. 

Phi Mu Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, Pledgemaster 3; Was- 
mann Biological Society 1; Intramurals 1, 2, 

3, 4. 

BRUNO, THERESA A. 
Theta Phi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, Pledgemistress 
4; Coed Club 3, 4. 

BRUOZIS, LAWRENCE S. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 
3; Historical Society 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; 
Arts Council 4; Senior Class Vice-President 4; 
S.A.L. 2, 3, 4, General Chairman 4; Modern 
Language Club 2, 3, Treasurer 2; Economics- 
Finance Club 3, 4; S.A.M. 1; Senior Gift Com- 
mittee 4. 

BRYAN, SHERWOOD D. 

BRZECZEK, GERALD J. 

S.A.M. 3, 4. 

BUCKLEY, EVELYN J. 
Student Nursing Assn. 3; Council Member 3. 

BUCKLEY, MILDRED E. 

Loyola School of Nursing Assn. 3, 4. 



334 



BUCKLEY, ROBERT L. 
Commerce Student Council I, 2, 4, Secretary 
1, 2, Vice-President 4; Accounting Club 3, 
4, Treasurer 4; Fine Arts Club 4, Secretary 4; 
Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Blue Key Honorary 
Fraternity 4; Who's Who Amo.ig Students in 
American Colleges and Universities 4; Variety 
Show 4, Business Manager 4; Leadership 
Awards 1, 2, 3, 4. 

BURDEN, DAVID G. 

Maroon & GoM 3; Historical Society 1, 2; 
Pi Alpha Lambda 2, 3, 4; Fine Arts Club 3; 
Arts Yearbook 3, Photo Editor 3. 

BURDEN, JAMES J. 
St. Luke's Guild 1, 2; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 
3, 4, Treasurer 2; Class President 1; Student 
Council 1, 2. 

BURKE, JOSEPH M. 
S.A.M. 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; A.U.S.A. 
3, 4, President 4; Gold Torch 1, 2; Historical 
Society 1; Economics-Finance Society 3, 4; 
Union Congress 3. 

BURKE, MICHAEL J., JR. 

Pi Alpha Lambda 2, 3, 4; Track Team 1, 2, 
3, 4; Sodality of Our Lady 1, 2; Monogram 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Marketing Club 2, 3, 4; 
S.A.L. 3, 4; Maroon & Gold 3, 4. 

BURROUGHS, JAMES E. 

American Chemical Society 3, 4, Editor of 
"Chemisphere" 4; Philosophy Club 3, 4. 



BYRNE, JAMES C. 

CAHILL, JAMES P. 

Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

CALDER, JAMES A. 
Delta Sigma Delta 2, 3, 4. 

CALLAHAN, EUGENE J. 
Pi Alpha Lambda 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; 
S.A.L. 1, 2, 3, 4; Historical Society 2, 3, 4; 
Loyola Hall Student Council 2, 3, Secretary 2. 

CALLAHAN, JAMES V. 

CAMDEN, THOMAS M. 
Tau Delta Phi 4; Sodality of Our Lady 1, 2, 
3, 4, Counsellor 1, 2, 3, Editor 2, 3; R.O.T.C. 
Drill Team 1, 2, 3, 4; Rifle Team 4; Gold 
Torch Club 1, 2; A.U.S.A. 3, 4; LOYOLAN 
3; Loyola News 3, 4, Photo Editor 4; Arts 
Council 4; Human Relations Club 2, 3, 4; 
Historical Society 1, 2. 

CAPOCY, JOHN S. 

Sodality of Our Lady 1, 2, 3, 4, Prefect 3, 
Publicity Chairman; Intramurals 2, 3; Sigma 
Pi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, President 3; S.A.L. 3; 
Interfraternity Council 3; Union Congress 3; 
Blue Key Honorary Society 3, 4; Commerce 
Leadership Award 3. 

CARAHER, PATRICK 

CAREY, DAVID F. 
Sodality of Our Lady 3, 4. 

CARINI, JOSEPH B., JR. 

Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4. 



CARNEY, THEODORE J. 

CARROLL, SHEILA M. 
Sodality of Our Lady 1, 2, 3, 4, Social Chair- 
man 2, Co-Prefect 3; Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Modern Language Club 2; Human Relations 



Club 3, 4; Intramurals 2, 3; Maroon tk Gold 
i; Junior Representative 3. 

CATRAMBONE, GREGORY 
Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3. 

CAUBLE, DAVID B. 
Phi Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

CAULFIELD, JOHN J. 
Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4. 

CAULFIELD, JOHN J. 

Student Bar Assn. 1,2, 3, 4; Phi Alpha Delta 
3,4. 

CENTRALA, MARGARET T. 
Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

CHEPEY, JULIUS J., JR. 
Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Beta Pi 1, 2, 
3, 4. 

CHRASTKA, JOEL W. 

S.A.M. 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Historical Society 
3, 4, Treasurer 4; Alpha Kappa Psi 3, 4; 
Interfraternity Council 4. 

CICCIARELLI, FRANCIS E. 
Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

COMITO, JOHN N. 
Phi Beta Pi 2, 3, 4; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

CONDON, RITA I. 
Theta Phi Alpha 3, 4; Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Union Representative 3, 4; Historical Society 

1, 2, 3, 4; Human Relations Club 1, 2, 3; 
Yearbook 2, 3; Modern Language Society 1, 
2; Sodality of Our Lady 1, 2, 3, 4; Maroon 
& Gold 3; Psychology Club 3; Variety Show 
2; Junior Representative 3; S.A.L. 3, 4. 

CONRAD, MICHAEL J., JR. 

Vets Club 3, 4; Marketing Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

CONSIDINE, RICHARD H. 

St. Luke's Guild 3, 4; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 
3, 4. 

CORCORAN, CATHERINE A. 
Loyola School of Nursing Assn. 3, 4. 

COTTRELL, KATHERINE 
Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Sodality of Our Lady 3, 
4; Modern Language Club 2, 3, 4, President 4; 
Historical Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Human Relations 
Club 3; Phi Sigma Tau 3, 4. 

COUGHLAN, THOMAS J. 

Sigma Delta Phi 3, 4, Sgt.-at-Arms 3, 4; 
Human Relations Club 2, 3, 4; Historical 
Society 2, 3, 4. 

COX, JAMES R. 

Phi Alpha Delta 3, 4; Student Bar Assn. 3; 
Class Representative 3. 

CRAIN, DONALD R. 

Sodality of Our Lady 1, 2, 3, 4. 

CRAWFORD, BONITA J. 
Loyola School of Nursing Assn. 3, 4, Secretary 
3, Treasurer 4; Council Member 3, 4, Presi- 
dent 3. 

CROISANT, EUGENE R. 
Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; S.A.M. 

2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; Dean's Leadership Key 3; 
A.U.S.A. 3, 4, Vice-President 3; R.O.T.C. 
Colonel 4. 

CROW, GARY W. 

Vets Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Marketing Club 2, 3, 4; 
S.A.M. 2, 3, 4. 



CULLEN, GEORGE J. 

CULLY, WILLIAM ]. 
Math Club 2, 3. 

CUSHING, JAMES T. 

Union Congress Representative 1; Physics 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 2, President 
3; Alpha Sigma Nu 3, 4, President 4. 



DAHLQUIST, EDWARD S. 
S.A.M. 3, 4; Vets Club 4. 

DALIDOWICZ, JOHN E. 

American Chemical Society 3, 4; Philarets 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 2, 3; Gold 
Torch Club 2; Drill Team 2, 3, 4; A.U.S.A. 4. 

DANFORTH, MARTIN G. 

Math Club 3, 4, Secy.-Treas. 3; Epsilon Pi 
Rho 1, 2, 3, 4; Human Relations Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; S.A.L. 3, 4; Historical Society 2, 3, 4. 

DAVIS, CLAUDE J. 
Bellarmine Philosophy Club 3, 4, Secretary 4; 
Fine Arts Club 3, 4. 

DEGREGORIO, PHILIP A. 
Xi Psi Phi 2, 3, 4. 

DELACRUZ, ROBERT J. 
Accounting Club 3, 4; S.A.M. 4; Historical 
Society 4. 

DELEEUW, CHRISTIAN F. 

DELIEFDE, JAMES H. 

DELGIORNO, JAMES E. 
Sigma Pi Alpha 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3, 
Asst. Pledgemaster 2. 

DENTZER, JOHN L. 

Loyola News 1, 2; Historical Society 1, 2, 3, 
4; Sodality of Our Lady 1, 2, 3, 4, Prefect 3, 
Vice-Prefect 4; Drill Team 1, 2, 3, 4; Tau 
Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Union Congress 3; 
Arts Council 3, 4, President 4; A.U.S.A. 3, 
4, Secretary 4; Blue Key Honorary Fraternity 
4; S.A L. 3, 4; Senior Gift Committee 3, 4. 

DEPPERT, ROSEMARIE A. 
Kappa Beta Gamma 3, 4; Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; Historical Society 3; S.A.L. 3. 

DERKEN, ERICH M. 

S.A.M. 4. 

DEVEREUX, RAYMOND J., JR. 
Alpha Delta Gamma 2, 3, 4, Pledgemaster 3; 
Historical Society 2, 3, 4. 

DIDOHA, MICHAEL 

DIPPEL, WILLIAM F. 

Phi Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

DIVANE, JOHN J. 

Alpha Delta Gamma 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Blue 
Key Honorary Fraternity 4; Modern Language 
Club 4; Human Relations Club 3; Economics 
Finance Society 3, 4, Secretary 4; Union Rep- 
resentative 3, 4. 

DIVITO, GINO L. 

Modern Language Club 1; Human Relations 
Club 3; Sodality of Our Lady 3, 4; Philosophy 
Club 3, 4. 

DOCHTERMAN, DAVID F. 

St. Luke's Guild 2, 3, 4; Student A.M.A. 1, 
2, 3, 4; Student Research 3, 4. 

DOCKENDORFF, RITA R. 

Alpha Tau Delta 2, 3, 4; Nursing Council 
1, 2, 3, 4. 



335 




1 





■H^^l 




J - - r 






DOHERTY, ROBERT F. 

Alpha Lambda 2, 3, 4, Union Reprcsenta- 
e 3; Blue Key Honorary Fraternity 3, 4; 
mmercc Student Council Ptesident 4, Mem- 
ber 3, Secretary 1; Senior Class President; 
unior Class Secy.-Treas.; Freshman Class 
'resident; LOYOLAN 3, 4, Editor-in-Chief 3, 
advisory Editor 4; Loyola Union 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Vice-President 4, Board of Governors 4; Inter- 
fraternity Council 3, 4, Chairman 3, Advisor 
4; Pi Delta Epsilon 4; Historical Society 1, 2, 
3; Loyola Fair 1, 2, 3, 4; Variety Show 3, 4; 
Marketing Club 2, 3, 4; Commerce Yearbook 

1, 2; Loyola News 2; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Leadership Award 1, 2, 3, 4; Who's Who In 
American Universiries and Colleges 4; Dean's 
Key 4. 

DOLAN, JAMES J. 
i'hi Chi 2, 3, 4; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

DOLCE, JOHN L. 
Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; Union 
Congress 1, 2, 3, Board of Governors 2; 
Student Council 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 1, Vice- 
President 3; Student A.D.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

DONNELLY, JOHN J. 
Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

DONOHOE, MARY M. 
Theta Phi Alpha 2, 3, 4, Historian 4; Coed 
Club 1,2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3, President 4 
Sodality of Our Lady 1, 2, 3, 4, Counsellor 2 
Modern Language Club 1, 2, 3, Secretary 3 
LOYOLAN Staff 3; Maroon & Gold 3; S.A.L. 

2, 3,4. 

DONOVAN, BARBARA J. 

Alpha Tau Delta 2, 3, 4, Recording Secretary 
2; Nursing Council 1, 2, 3, 4; Coed Club 2, 
3; Fine Arts Club 1, 2; S.A.L. 4. 

DORAN, THOMAS R. 
Phi Alpha Delta 2, 3, 4; Student Bar Assn. 
1, 2, 3, 4, Chairman 4. 

DOWD, JAMES J. 
Physics Club 3, 4. 

DOWD, THOMAS A. 

Accounting Club 3, 4. 

DOYLE, EDWARD D. 

Alpha Delta Gamma 2, 3, 4; S.A.L. 2, 3; Fine 
Atts Club 2, 3, Union Represenrative 3; Mod- 
ern Language Club 4; Historical Society 1; 
Human Relations Club 4. 

DRAGO, RUSSELL C. 
Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

DRAYSON, HARRY T. 
Delta Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4; Economics-Finance 
Society 2, 3, 4, President 4; S.A.M. 2, 3, 4; 
R.O.T.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Gold Torch 1, 2; Market- 
ing Club 4. 

DRISCOLL, JACK F. 
Phi Beta Pi 1, 2, 3, 4. 

DUDAS, LEONA M. 

Loyola Nursing Associarion 3, 4. 

DULAY, FERNANDO D. 
Phi Beta Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 

3, 4. 

DUNN, BLAINE R. 

DUNNE, JAMES P. 
Loyola News 1, 2, 3; Modern Language Club 
3, 4, Vice President 4; Cadence 4; Pi Delta 
Epsilon 4. 

DUPUIS, Br. WAYNE G., C.S.V. 



DUSOLD, WILLIAM D. 

Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

EGAN, ROBERT J. 
Phi Alpha Delta 3, 4. 

EHARDT, JACQUELINE M. 

Historical Society 3, 4; Coed Club 4. 

ENERSON, HAROLD E. 

Accounting Club 4. 

ERACI, JOSEPH R. 
Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Beta Pi 1, 2, 
3, 4, Sgt.-at-Arms 4; Class Officer 3, 4, Presi- 
dent 3, 4; Student Council 3, 4, President 4; 
St. Luke's Guild 3, 4, Chairman of Program 
3, 4. 

ERNST, JUDITH A. 

Coed Club 4; Education Society 4. 

EVERS, DONALD J. 

Historical Society 3, 4. 



FABIAN, KENNETH J. 
Sodality of Our Lady 2, 3, 4, LSC Prefect 4, 
Vice-Prefect 3; Physics Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 
3; Wasmann Biological Society 1. 

FAGARASON, LAWRENCE A. 
Phi Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 
4; St. Luke's Guild 3, 4. 

FAHRBACH, JANIS A. 
Alpha Tau Delta 3, 4, Pledgemistress 3 
Nursing Council 1, 2, 3, 4; Coed Club 1, 2 
Nursing Class Officer, Secretary 4; Fine Arts 
Club 1; S.N.A.I. 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Intra- 
murals 1, 2. 

FARELLI, MADDALENA F. 

FARLEY, THOMAS W. 

FARMER, RONALD J. 

Sigma Pi Alpha 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3; Physics 
Club 2, 3, 4; Math Club 2, 3, 4; Historical 
Society 1 . 

FEASTER, MARLENE F. 

Human Relations Club 3, 4; Historical Society 



FEENEY, FRANK E. 
Psychological Research Society 1, 2, 3, Busi- 
ness Manager 2; Loyola Choral Society 2, 3, 
Vice-President 2. 

FENCL, THOMAS L. 
Historical Society 3, 4. 

FERRARA, LUCILLE 

Theta Phi Alpha 2, 3, 4; Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; Variety Show Student Director 3; His- 
torical Society 1, 2, 4; Loyola News 4; Modern 
Language Club 1, 2. 3, Secretary 2; S.A.L. 2, 
3; LOYOLAN 3. 

FERRETTI, JOSEPH 

Alpha Delta Gamma 2, 3, 4. 

FEURER, CAROLE G. 

Wasmann Biological Society 1, 2; Alpha Tau 
Delta 3, 4; Coed Club 2. 

FILIATRAULT, LOUIS J., JR. 

Phi Beta Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Union Congress 2; 
Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

FIORITE, FRANK 

FISCHER, CARL R. 

Delta Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4; Dental School 
Choir 3. 



FITZEK, ROSEMARIE F. 

Loyola Nurse's Association 3. 

FITZGERALD, CONSTANCE A. 
Fine Arts Club 2, 3, 4; Gerard Manley Hop- 
kins Society 2, 3, 4; Maroon & Gold 3. 

FITZGERALD, SHEILA A. 

Coed Club 1, 2, 3; Nursing Council 3, Vice- 
President 3, 4. 

FITZPATRICK, JOHN F. 

FLANNERY, JOHN F. 

FLANNERY, PATRICK J. 

FLETCHER, WILLIAM M. 
Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4. 

FOGARTY, JOSEPH C. 

FOLEY, JAMES T. 

FORESMAN, JAMES L. 

Alpha Sigma Nu 4; St. Luke's Guild 1, 2; 
Phi Chi 1, 2; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

FOX, THOMAS E. 

Physics Club 3, 4, Secretary 4; S.A.L. 3. 

FRANK, ANTHONY C. 

Xi Psi Phi 1. 

FREIDHEIM, JERE E. 

Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

FRIEND, CAROL L. 

Theta Phi Alpha 3, 4; Modern Language 
Club 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3; Epsilon Pi Rho 
1, 2, 3, 4; Coed Club 1, 2, 3; Sodality of 
Our Lady 2, 3, 4; Gerard Manley Hopkins 
Society 3, 4; Historical Society 2. 

FRISZ, JOHN M. 

Cadence 3, 4, Assistant Editor 3, 4; Modern 
Language Club 4; Gerard Manley Hopkins 
Society 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Loyola News 3. 

FROST, RONALD J. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 3, 4; Historical Society 
1, 2, 3, 4; S.A.L. 3, 4. 

FRUIN, JOHN W. 



GAFFKE, JOHN E. 

Tau Delta Phi 3, 4; Historical Society 2, 3, 4; 
S.A.L. 3, 4; Maroon & Gold 3; Variety Show 3. 

GALANTI, LEO F. 

Historical Society 4; Loyola Hall Judiciary 
Council 3. 

GALLAGHER, DONALD M. 

Phi Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

GALLAGHER, KATHLEEN W. 
Coed Club 3, 4; Sodality of Our Lady 3, 4. 

GALLAGHER, RICHARD F. 

GAMBLA, ANTHONY R. 
Xi Psi Phi 2, 3, 4. 

GARRITANO, NICHOLAS J. 

St. Luke's Guild 2, 3, 4; Student A.M.A. 1, 
2, 3, 4. 

GAVIN, FRANK J. 
Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Student 
Council 4; Interfrarernity Council 4; St. 
Apollonia Guild 4; A.D.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

GAWLICK, JEROME E. 
S.A.M. 3, 4. 

GAYDOS, JOHN J. 



337 



GEARY, THOMAS F. 

Phi Alpha Delta 2, 3, Treasurer 3; Student 
Bar Assn. 1, 2, 3. 

GEBHARDT, JEANETTE M. 
Phi Sigma Tau 4; Coed Club 3, 4; Historical 
Society 4; Hopkins Society 3, 4. 

GEISSLER, HANS E. 
Phi Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

GIANNINI, ANTHONY A. 
Alpha Kappa Psi 3, 4; A.U.SA. 4; S.A.M. 

1, 2, 3. 

GIBBS, MAUREEN A. 
Alpha Tau Delta 2, 3, 4, Pledgemistress 3; 
Coed Club 1, 2, 3; Nursing Council 1, 2, 3, 
4; Wasmann Biological Society 1, 2. 

GIDDENS, WARREN W. 

Phi Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; Student A.MA. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

GILSDORF, BARBARA M. 
Human Relations Club 3, 4; Historical Society 
3; Sodality of Our Lady 4; Women's Residence 
Hall Council 4; Coed Club 3. 

GOBBY, JOHN B. 

GOODMAN, FRANCIS E. 
Student Bar Assn. 1, 2, 3, Representative 1, 

2, President 3; Blue Key Honorary Fraternity 
3; Phi Alpha Delta 1, 2, 3; Recent Decisions 
3; Res Ipsa Loquitur 1, 2, 3, Editor 2. 

GORA, MARTIN O. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 2, 3, 4, Pylortas 4; Intra- 
murals 1, 2, 3, 4; Maroon & Gold 3; Choral 
Society 2, 3, Vice-President 3; Junior Repre- 
sentative 3; S.A.L. 4. 

GORDON, JOSEPH L. 
Alpha Omega 1, 2, 3, 4; A.D.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

GORDON, WILLIAM P., JR. 

Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

GORECKI, FRANK J. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3; 
Historical Society 3, 4; Gold Torch Club 1, 
2; Economics-Finance Society 3, 4; Variety 
Show 1, 2; S.A.L. Section Leader 4. 

GORMLEY, BARBARA A. 
Coed Club 2, 3, 4; Sodality of Our Lady 

2, 3, 4; Human Relations Club 3; Historical 
Society 4; Kappa Beta Gamma 3, 4, Historian 
4; Fine Arts Club 4. 

GOWGIEL, THOMAS M. 

GRAMATA, DONALD 

Pi Alpha Lambda 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; 
Intramurals 1, 2; Fine Arts Club 3; S.A.L. 

3, 4; Dorm Council 2. 

GRANT, DANIEL J. 
Sigma Delta Phi 3, 4, Secretary 4; Historical 
Society 1; Accounting Club 4. 

GRANT, EDWARD R. 
Alpha Sigma Nu 4; Vets Club 2, 3, 4; Eco- 
nomics-Finance Society 3, 4. 

GRANT, VINCENT J. 

Junior Representative 3, Maroon & Gold 3. 

GRIFFIN, EUGENE L. 
Student Bar Assn 1, 2, 3; Phi Alpha Delta 2, 3. 

GRISIUS, RICHARD J. 
Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4. 

GROTHAUS, BERNARD J. 
Delta Sigma Delta 3; Gold Foil Club 1. 



GRUNDEI, AUGUST A. 
GUBBINS, JAMES M. 



HACK, MAURICE C, JR. 
Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4; Student A.D.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

HALADA, PHYLLIS E. 
Sodality of Our Lady 4; Residence Hall 3, 
4, Vice-President 3; Nursing Council 3, 4; 
Alpha Tau Delta 2, 3, 4. 

HANNAN, JOHN E. 

Tau Delta Phi 3, 4, Alumni Secy. 3, Treasurer 
3, Vice-President 4, President 4; S.A.L. 3, 4; 
Vets Club 3, 4; S.A.M. 3, 4, President 4, 
Treasurer 3. 

HARMAN, ARTHUR D. 
Gold Torch Club 1, 2; Historical Society 1. 

HARMON, BERNARD L, JR. 

HARRELL, OLIVIA B. 

Coed Club 3; Marketing Club 4; Human Rela- 
tions 4; Loyola News 4. 

HARRIS, Br. GEORGE G., C.S.V. 

HARTIGAN, EVELYN G. 

Loyola Nurses' Association 2, 3, 4. 

HASTINGS, JOHN M. 

HATTENDORF, DAVID L. 
Junior A.D.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Delta Sigma Delta 

3, 4. 

HAYDANEK, RONALD E. 

HAYNIE, HOWARD E., JR. 

Blue Key Honorary Fraternity 3, 4; Phi Alpha 
Delta 2, 3, 4, Clerk 3, Vice-Justice 4. 

HEFLIN, JERRY L. 
S.A.M. 3, 4; Vets Club 3, 4; Economics- 
Finance Society 3, 4. 

HEGAN, WILLIAM M. 
Cadence 2; Epsilon Pi Rho 1, 2; Arts Council 
4; Loyola Debating Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Loyola 
News 2, 3, News Editor 3, Managing Editor 
3; Gerard Manley Hopkins Society 3, 4, Treas- 
urer 3, President 3, 4; S.A.L. 2;. LOYOLAN 

4, Editor-in-Chief 4; Union Congress 2, 3, 4 
Executive Secretary 3, Bd. of Governors 3, 4: 
Loyola Fair 1, 2, 3, 4, Program Book Chair 
man 3, Vice-Chairman 4; Maroon & Gold 3 
Historical Society 3, 4; Loyola Publications 
Board 4; Blue Key Honorary Fraternity 3, 4, 
Arts Council Delegate 4; Who's Who in 
American Colleges and Universities 4; Alpha 
Sigma Nu 4; Phi Sigma Tau 3, 4; Pi Delta 
Epsilon 4; Dean's Key 4. 

HEIKES, GRAHAM M. 
Pi Alpha Lambda 2, 3, 4; Fine Arts Club 2, 
3, 4; Bellarmine Philosophy Club }, 4; Curtain 
Guild 4. 

HEIMBACH, GEORGE F. 

Wasmann Biological Society 1, 2, 3, 4. 

HESS, ROBERT J. 
Accounting Club 3, 4; Historical Society 1; 
A.U.S.A. 3, 4; Delta Sigma Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Gold Torch Club 2. 

HILDNER, FRANK J. 
Phi Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; St. Luke's Guild 1, 2, 3, 
4; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

HODUR, JAMES R. 
Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4. 



HOGAN, FRANK J., Ill 

Blue Key Honorary Fraternity 3, 4, President 
4; Pi Alpha Lambda 1, 2, 3, 4, Pledgemaster 
4; Basketball Team 1, 2, 3, 4; Monogram 
Club 2, 3, 4, President 4, Union Representa- 
tive 3; Sophomore Class President; Arts Coun- 
cil 2; Union Congressman 2, 3; Interfraternity 
Council 2, 3; General Chairman of Loyola 
Homecoming 4; Maroon & Gold 2, 3; His- 
torical Society 4; Gold Torch 1, 2; A.U.S.A. 
3, 4; Variety Show 1, 2; S.A.L. 2, 3, 4; Intra- 
murals 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's Leadership Award 
1; Who's Who Among Students in American 
Universities and Colleges 4. 

HOMPERTZ, MELLA A. 
S.A.M. 4; Marketing Club 2, 3, 4; Coed Club 
2, 3, 4. 

HORTON, ROY J. 

Alpha Delta Gamma 3, 4, Historian 4; Mono- 
gram Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; Track Team 

1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Sigma Tau 3, 4. 

HOSS, THEODORE F., JR. 

HOSSBACHER, JOSEPH J. 
Dectos 3, Art Editor; Junior A.D.A. 1, 2, 3, 
4; St. Apollonia Guild 3, 4. 

HOUTSMA, CORNELIUS, J., JR. 
Student Bar Assn. 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Alpha Delta 

2, 3, 4; Blue Key Honorary Fraternity 2, 3, 4. 

HOYT, ROBERT Q. 

HUGHES, THOMAS P. 

HUMPHREY JO M. 
Theta Phi Alpha 2, 3, 4; Coed Club 2, 3, 4, 
Social Chairman 4; Modern Language Club 2, 

3, 4, Treasurer 3; Loyola News 2; Phi Sigma 
Tau 3, 4. 

HUTCHINS, WILLIAM R. 

Human Relations Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Historical 
Society 1, 2, 3, 4. 

HYNES, THOMAS C. 

Sigma Pi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, Pledgemaster 2; 
Human Relations Club 1,2; Historical Society 
1, 2, 3, 4; S.A.L. 3, 4. 

INFRANCA, LEONARD J. 
Phi Beta Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 3; 
Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

INTRIVICI, VINCENT 

Sigma Delta Phi 3, 4, Director 3, 4; Human 
Relations Club 4; Epsilon Pi Rho 1, 2, 3; 
Drill Team 1, 2, 3, 4. 

JABCON, JEROME J. 
Xi Psi Phi 2, 3, 4. 

JAKOPIN, ROBERT L. 
Phi Beta Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 
3, 4. 

JAMNIK, GERALD A. 
S.A.M. 3, 4. 

JANOVICS, EMILY E. 

Sodality of Our Lady 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; 
Math Club 3, 4; Physics Club 4; Coed Club 
1, 2, 3; Historical Society 1; Human Relations 
Club 2. 

JASON, CYNTHIA M. 
Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

JAVOR, GLORIA 

Theta Phi Alpha 2, 3, 4; Accounting Club 
3, 4; Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

JENNINGS, EDWARD S. 



338 













<*# v--;,' 



' i ^ l F*-^mi 



mb. •#$ 



JOB, EDWARD J. 
Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Beta Pi 2, 3, 
4; Class Treasurer 2, 3. 

JOE, CHANDLER T. 
Historical Society 3; A.U.S.A. 3, 4. 

JOHNSEN, STEWART F. 
Historical Society 4. 

JOHNSON, ARV1D C, JR. 

Student Bar Assn. 1, 2, 3, Treasurer 3; Phi 
Alpha Delta 2, 3, Union Representative 3; 
Recent Decisions 2, 3. 

JOHNSON, FRED L. 

JOHNSON, ROBERT P. 

JOYCE, GERALD A. 
Vets Club 2, 3, 4; Human Relations Club 3. 



KAIDER, DONALD L. 
S.A.M. 2, 3, 4. 

KALBHEN, CARL L. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4. 

KALINOWSKI, RALPH J. 

KAMER, JOHN J., JR. 

Accounting Club 3, 4. 

KAMM, MELVIN J. 
Arts Council 4, Vice-President 4, Chairman of 
Miss Varsity Contest 4; Senior Gift Fund 
Chairman 4; Variety Show 2, 3, 4, Promotion 
Chairman 3, 4; Historical Society 4; Assistant 
Chairman of Float Parade 2, 4; Who's Who 
Among Students in American Universities and 
Colleges 4; Maroon and Gold 3; Epsilon Pi 
Rho 1, 2; S.A.L. 4; Blue Key Honorary Fra- 
ternity 4; LOYOLAN 4. 

KANE, BERTHA MAE 
Loyola School of Nursing Association 1, 2, 3, 
4, Council Member 3, 4. 

KANE, ROBERT A. 
Sigma Delta Phi 3, 4, Social Chairman 3, 4. 

KANGAS, WILLIAM F„ JR. 

KANTAUTAS, DANUTE 
Economics-Finance Society 4; Loyola News 4. 

KAPOLNEK, ROBERT F. 

Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Historical Society 3, 
4; S.A.L. 3; Fine Arts Club 3. 

KAUKIALO, WILLIAM J. 

KAVANAGH, LLOYD R. 
Phi Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3; Student 
A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

KAYE, MICHAEL P. 
Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; St. Luke's Guild 
2, 3, 4; Student Council 3, 4; Class Vice- 
President 3. 

KEAN, THOMAS E. 
Accounting Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Historical Society 
1, 2, 3, 4. 

KEEFE, JAMES V. 
Marketing Club 2, 3, 4. 

KELLY, CHARLES E. 

Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

KELLY, H. RAYMOND 

KELLY, MARY SUSAN 
Theta Phi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, President 3; 
Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Loyola Union 3, 4, 



Secretary 3, 4; Variety Show 1, 2, 3; Pow 
Wow 1, 2, 3, 4; S.A.L. 3, 4; LOYOLAN 3; 
Historical Society 1, 2; Loyola Fair Secretary 
4; Fine Arts Club 3; Women's Honorary 
Society 3, 4; Who's Who Among Students in 
American Universities and Colleges 4. 

KELLY, MICHAEL P. 

Marketing Club 4; Management Club 4. 

KELLY, RAYMOND E. 

S.A.M. 3; Vets Club 3; Accounting Club 1. 

KELTY, ROBERT K. 

KENNEDY, PAUL T. 

Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3. 

KERRIGAN, JAMES S. 

Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4. 

KESER, JEROME J. 
Psychology Club 1; Wasmann Biological So- 
ciety 1, 2, 3, 4; Bellarmine Philosophy Club 
4; Photography Club 4. 

KESLING, DAVID L. 

KESSIE, JAMES J. 
Accounting Club 3, 4; Vets Club 3, 4. 

KIEFER, RONALD P. 

Recent Decisions 4, Editor-in-Chief 4; Alpha 
Sigma Nu 3, 4. 

KINDAHL, RITA L. 

Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Historical Society 1, 
2; Human Relations Club 2, 3, 4; Maroon & 
Gold 3; Phi Sigma Tau 3, 4; Modern Language 
Club 2. 

KING, WILLIAM H. 

Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4. 

KLINGBEIL, RICHARD E. 
Historical Society 4; Human Relations Club 4. 

KLOVSTAD, ROBERT J. 

Recent Decisions 2, 3, Associate Editor 3. 

KNOWLES, RICHARD A. 

Phi Beta Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 
3, 4. 

KNUDSEN, DAVID J. 
Modern Language Club 2; Historical Society 
3; S.A.L. 3; Maroon & Gold 3; Junior Rep- 
resentative 3; Human Relations Club 3, 4, 
Vice-President 4. 

KOENIG, THOMAS A. 
Phi Beta Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; St. Luke's Guild 2, 3, 4. 

KOEPCKE, JOAN E. 

Loyola School of Nursing Assn. 3, 4. 

KONICEK, FRANK J. 

Alpha Delta Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Intramural 
Manager 2, 3, Union Representative 3, 4; 
Intramural Board LSC 1, 2, 3, Chairman LSC 
3; Arts Council 3, 4; Senior Class President; 
Union Congress 3, 4; Wasmann Biological 
Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Blue Key Honorary Fra- 
ternity 4; Interfraternity Council, Chairman 4; 
Union Representative 3. 

KOPAS, ANTHONY R. 

KOPSIAN, HARRIET G. 
Epsilon Pi Rho 1, 2, 3, 4; Gerard Manley 
Hopkins Society 1, 2, 3; Historical Society 1; 
Loyola News 2; Fine Arts Club 3, 4; Phi 
Sigma Tau 3, 4; S.A.L. 2; Coed Club 4. 

KOSCIELSKI, ELIZABETH H. 

Graduate Nursing Assn. 3, 4; Graduate Nurs- 
ing Council 3, 4, Secretary 4; Women's Resi- 
dence Hall 3, 4, Secretary 3; Sodality of Our 
Lady 3. 



KOSTICK, JOAN 

KOZAKIEWICZ, JEROME J. 

Delta Sigma Delta 2, 3, 4; Choral Group 3, 4. 

KOZIOL, STANLEY J. 

Accounting Club 2, 3, 4. 

KRAMER, DAVID T. 
KRAMER, FREDERICK T. 

KRIPPNER, GEORGE E. 

Sodality of Our Lady 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 2, 
3; Sigma Pi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4. 

KROCK, FELIX A. 

Phi Beta Pi 2, 3, 4; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

KROFL, HELEN B. 

Kappa Beta Gamma 3, 4; Coed Club 1, 3, 4- 
S.A.L. 2, 3, 4. 

KROL, MARY ANN 

Sodality of Our Lady 1, 2; Coed Club 2; 
Nursing Council 4, Treasurer of Senior Nurs- 
ing Class; Alpha Tau Delta 2, 3, 4, Social 
Chairman 3; S.A.L. 2; Women's Honorary 
Society 4. 

KUBISTAL, PATRICIA B. 

Phi Sigma Tau 3, 4; Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4: 
Epsilon Pi Rho 1, 2, 3, 4, Union Representa 
five 3, 4; Gerard Manley Hopkins Society 2 
Loyola Debate Society 1, 2, 3, 4, Secy.-Treas. 
2, 3, 4; LOYOLAN 4; Sodality of Our Lady 

1, 2, 3, 4; S.A.L. 2, 3, 4, LT Chairman 3, 
General Co-Chairman 4; Historical Society 1, 

2, 3, 4. 

KUEBER, JACQUELINE L. 

Freshman Medical Class Secretary 1; Student 
A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Epsilon Iota 1, 2, 

3, 4, Vice-President 2. 

KUJALA, ROBERT O 

Math Club 3, 4, Vice-President 3, President 
4; Bellarmine Philosophy Club 3, 4; Physics 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Sigma Tau 3, 4; Student 
Union Congress 4. 

KUJAWINSKI, LOUIS G. 

Monogram Club 2, 3, 4; Track Team 1, 2, 
3, 4, Co-Captain 4. 

KULIK, ROBERT E. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; S.A.M. 3, 4; 
A.U.S.A. 3, 4; Gold Torch Club 1, 2. 

KUMMER, DANIEL W. 
Historical Society 1; Vets Club 2, 3, 4; Eco- 
nomics-Finance Society 3, 4. 

KUSEK, EUGENE L. 

Economics-Finance Society 3, 4; Vets Club 3, 4. 

KWARTA, BRUCE L. 
Delta Sigma Delta 4; St. Apollonia Guild 1. 



LAGORIO, GEORGE L. 

Phi Beta Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 
3, 4. 

LASH, THERESA R. 

Loyola School of Nursing Assn. 4; Union 
Congress 3, 4. 

LATKOWSKI, YOLANTA P. 

Kappa Beta Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Parliamentarian 
3; Alpha Tau Delta 2, 3, 4; Historical Society 
3; Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4, LSC Vice-President 
2; Student Nurse Association 1, 2. 



340 



LAVRICH, JOHN L. 
Accounting Club ^, 4; Historical Society 1; 
A.U.S.A. }; Delta Sigma Pi 1. 2, 3, 4; Gold 
Torch Cluh 2. 

LAWRENCE, SALLY A. 

Cadence 3, 4, Associate Editor 4; Modern 
Language Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 2; 
Phi Sigma Tau 3, 4; Coed Club 1, 2, 3; 
Human Relations Club 4; Hopkins Society 
1, 2, 3, 4; S.A.L. 3, 4. 

LEE, DAVID F. 

Union Congress 1, 2; Maroon & Gold 3; 
Loyola News 1; Historical Society 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Hopkins Society 2, 3; Wasmann Biological 
Society 1; Bellarmine Philosophy Club 3; 
Variety Show 1, 2. 

LEE, JOHN J. 
Human Relations Club 4; Sodality of Our 
Lady 4. 

LEMPKE, GEORGE J. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; 
Intramural Bowling 3, President 3; Maroon & 
Gold 3; Historical Society 1, 2, 4; Human 
Relations Club 3. 

LEMPKOWSKI, JOHN E. 
Loyola Debate Society 1, 2; Epsilon Pi Rho 

1, 2, 3, 4, President 3; Loyola News 1, 2, 3; 
Cadence 3, 4, Music Editor 3, Associate Editor 
4; Blue Key Honorary Fraternity 3, 4; Alpha 
Sigma Nu 3, 4; LOYOLAN 4, Copy Editor 
4; Gerard Manley Hopkins Society 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Treasurer 4. 

LESIAK, THERESE M. 
Kappa Beta Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Corresponding 
Secretary 3, Vice-President 4; Coed Club 1, 

2, 3, 4; S.A.L. 2, 3, 4. 

LEVIN, ROBERT M. 
Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

LEWIS, RHODA M. 
Loyola School of Nursing Assn. I, 2, 3, 4; 
Council of Loyola Nurses' Association 3, 
Secretary 3. 

LIAROS, SAM P. 

LISK, RICHARD F. 
Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; 
Blue Key Honorary Fraternity 3, 4; Loyola 
News 3, 4. Business Manager 3, 4; LOYOLAN 

3, 4, Business Manager 3; Yearbook 2, Co- 
ordinating Editor 2; Leadership Award 2, 3, 
4; Marketing Club 2, 3, 4; Union Congress 
3; Pi Delta Epsilon 4; Who's Who Among 
Students in American Universities and Col- 
leges 4. 

LITKOWSKI, ANTOINETTE L. 

Historical Society 1; Coed Club 1, 2, 3; Alpha 
Tau Delta 2, 3, 4, Pledgemistress 3; Nursing 
Council 1, 2, 3, 4; Fine Arts Club 1, 2; 
S.A.L. 4; S.N.A.I. 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Intra- 
murals 1, 2. 

LITTAU, JOHN F. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 3, 4. 

LORR, ARTHUR G. 
LOWE, WAYNE 

LUHRS, GAY LEE 

Theta Phi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4, 
Social Chairman 3; Commerce Class Vice- 
President 1, President 1; Commerce Council 
Secretary 1; Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Commerce 
Representative 3; Marketing Club 2, 3, 4, 
Secretary 3; Historical Society 1; S.A.L. 4; 
Women's Honorary Society 3, 4; Who's Who 
Among Students in American Universities and 
Colleges 4; Leadership Award 1, 4. 



LUZBETAK, STEPHEN B., JR. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; S.A.L. 1, 2; 
Historical Society 1; Phi Sigma Tau 3, 4; 
Choral Society 1, 2. 

LYNCH, DAVID G. 

Pi Alpha Lambda 1, 2, 3, 4, Historian 4; 
Fine Arts Club 2, 3, 4; A.U.S.A. 3, 4, Vice- 
President 4; Drill Team 1, 2, 3, 4, Executive 
Officer 4. 

LYONS, DANIEL 

LYONS, JAMES P. 
Accounting Club, Executive Board 4; Histori- 
cal Society 1. 

MACARTHUR, CAMPBELL C, JR. 

Blue Key Honorary Fraternity 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi 
Alpha Delta 4. 

MACCHITELLI, FRANK J. 

A.U.S.A. 3, 4; Historical Society 4. 

MADAJ, ARTHUR 

Accounting Club 4. 

MAIER, CARL J. 

MAKSYM, RONALD L. 

v ets Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Economics-Finance 
Society 3, 4. 

MALCZEWSKA, Sr. M. GERTRUDE, 
CS.F.N. 

MALONEY, HELEN P. 

Coed Club 3, 4; Historical Society 3, 4. 

MALONEY, PATRICIA C. 

Historical Society 3; Bellarmine Philosophy 
Club 3, 4; Human Relations Club 4. 

MARLEY, MAUREEN A. 
Coed Club 1, 2, 4; Variety Show 2, 3, 4; 
Pow Wow 2, Vice-Chairman 2; LOYOLAN 
3, 4; Loyola Union 2, 3, Recording Secretary 

2, 3, Board of Governors 2, 3; S.A.L. 2; Loyola 
Fair Secretary 3; Senior Gift Fund 4; Gerard 
Manley Hopkins Society 3, 4; Historical So- 
ciety 1, 2; Fine Arts Club 3; Cadence 4, Union 
Representative 4. 

MARTIN, Br. JOHN J., C.S.V. 

MARTIN, JOHN L. 

MARTIN, ROBERT W. 
Vets Club 3, 4, Sgt.-at-Arms 4, Union Repre- 
sentative 4. 

MATAITIS, THERESA S. 

MATES, ARTHUR J. 
Xi Psi Phi 3. 

MATUSZEWSKI, DANIEL C. 

Gerard Manley Hopkins Society 2, 3, 4; Mod- 
ern Language Club 3; Epsilon Pi Rho 1, 2, 

3, 4; Sodality of Our Lady 2, 3, 4, Social 
Chairman 3; Historical Society 3, 4. 

MAURICE, Sr. MARY, O.S.F. 

MAXEY, MARITA J. 

MAY, GEORGE E. 

Historical Society 2, 3, 4; Maroon & Gold 
3; S.A.L. 3. 

MAZZUCCHELLI, LOUIS J. 
Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4. 

McCANN, DAVID T. 
Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 



McCARTER, PATRICIA A. 

Nursing Council 1,2, 3, 4, President 4, Sec- 
retary 2; President of Sophomore Nursing 
Class; Alpha Tau Delta 2, 3, 4; Coed Club 
1, 2; Women's Honor Society 4; S.A.L. 4; 
Board of Governors in Union Congress 3; 
Fine Arts Club 1, 2; S.N.A.I. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

McCUNE, FRANK 

Mcdonald, robert h., jr. 

Phi Beta Pi 2, 3, 4; Student Research 3, 4; 
Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Mcdonough, Mrs. martin e. 
Mcdonough, martin e. 

McEACHRAN, DANIEL C. 

McGARRY, GUY A. 

Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4. 

McGOVERN, RONALD P. 

Accounting Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Historical Society 

1, 2. 

McGOVERN, TERRENCE P. 

S.A.M. 2, 3, 4, Activities Chairman 3; Sigma 
Delta Phi 3, 4, Social Chairman 4; S.A.L. 4; 
Intramurals 3, 4; Human Relations Club 4. 

McGRATH, EDMUND J. 
Delta Sigma Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Com- 
merce Council 4; Senior Class Secy.-Treas.; 
S.A.M. 3, Sgt.-at-Arms 3; Economics-Finance 
Society 3, 4; Historical Society 1; Senior Gift 
Committee 4; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Loyola 
Leadership Award 3, 4; LOYOLAN 3; Variety 
Show 3, 4, Business Staff 4; Interfraternity 
Council 4; Who's Who Among Students in 
American Universities and Colleges 4. 

McGRATH, JAMES T. 

Marketing Club 2; S.A.M. 3, 4; Sigma Delta 
Phi 3, 4. 

Mclaughlin, joseph h. 

Xi Psi Phi 4. 

McNULTY, EILEEN A. 
Kappa Beta Gamma 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Coed 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Historical Society 1, 2, 3, 4; 
S.A.L. 3, 4, LSC Chairman; Phi Sigma Tau, 

2, 3, 4. 

McPOLIN, JAMES J. 

Student Bar Assn. 1, 2, 3; Phi Alpha Delta 

2, 3, Justice 2, 3. 

McREYNOLDS, JOHN W. 

Pi Alpha Lambda 3, 4; Marketing Club 3, 4. 

McVANE, MARY VIRGINIA 

Theta Phi Alpha 3, 4; Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Historical Society 3, 4. 

MERSOL, VALENTIN F. 
Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Beta Pi 1, 2, 3, 
4, Treasurer 2. 

METZGER, MICHAEL J. 
Pi Alpha Lambda 2, 3, 4; Vets Club 3, 4; 
S.A.M. 3, 4. 

MICHOR, MARY ANN 

Nursing Council 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3; 
Secretary of Class 2, Presidert of Class 3; 
Coed Club 2, 3; Sodality of Our Lady 1, 2, 

3, 4, Secretary of Graduate Sodality 4; Alpha 
Tau Delta 2, 3, 4. 

MIGACZ, DELPHINE A. 
Coed Club 1; Sodality of Our Lady 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Corresponding Secretary 2, 3, Co-Prefect 4; 
Maroon & Gold 3; Historical Society 4. 



341 




\ 




m 



\ 




\ 





< 




MILLER, JOHN A. 
Phi Mu Chi 1. 2, 3, 4; Math Club 2, 3, 4. 

MILLER, RICHARD A. 

Sodality of Out Lady 1; Human Relations 
Club 2, 3; Historical Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Gold 
Torch 1; Sigma Delta Phi 3, 4. 

MILLS, LOREN F. 
Student A.D.A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, 4; 
Delta Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4. 

MISON, ROBERT J. 
Alpha Delta Gamma 2, 3, 4; Marketing Club 
2, 3, 4, Union Representative 4; Gold Torch 
Club 2; A.U.S.A. 3, 4, Sgt.-at-Arms 3; S.A.L. 

2, 3, 4; Maroon & Gold 3. 

MOFFAT, MILLEN A. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4; A.D.A. 1, 2, 

3, 4. 

MONIGHAN, BOBETTE F. 
Theta Phi Alpha 2, 3, 4; Coed Club 1. 2; 
Historical Society 1, 2, 3; S.A.L. 2. 

MORELLI, FLORA T. 
Theta Phi Alpha 3, 4, Social Chairman 4; 
Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Modern Language Club 
2, 3, 4, Union Representative 3, 4; Curtain 
Guild 3, 4; Historical Society 1, 2, 3; Loyola 
Union 3, 4; Maroon & Gold 3; Gerard 
Manley Hopkins Society 2, 3; Variety Show 3. 

MRVOSH, PAULA M. 

Coed Club 1, 2; Human Relations Club 3; 
Historical Society 1, 2, 3, 4. 

MUELLER, CLEMENS F. 
Vets Club 2, 3, 4; Accounting Club 3, 4. 

MULDOWNEY, FRANK E. 

MULDOWNEY, WILLIAM J. 
Vets Club 2, 3 ,4; Accounting Club 3, 4. 

MULKERN, TERESE R. 
Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Board of Governors 1, 

2, 3; Kappa Beta Gamma 2, 3, 4; Curtain 
Guild 3, 4; Women's Residence Hall Council 

4, Social Chairman 4; Maroon & Gold 3; 
Junior Representative 3; Loyola News 1, 2; 
Fine Arts Club 3; Historical Society 2; Year- 
book Business Staff 2; Variety Show 1. 2, 3, 4. 

MULTZ, CARTER V. 
Phi Beta Pi 1,2, 3, 4; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 

3, 4; Research Fellowship 2. 

MURPHY, HAROLD E. 

Delta Sigma Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Gold Torch Club 

1, 2; A.U.S.A. 3, 4, Treasurer 3; Marketing 
Club 2, 4; Historical Society 1. 

MUSTARI, FRANK T. 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 2, 3, 4, Historian 4; 
Loyola News 4, Feature Editor 4; LOYOLAN 
3; Loyola Hall Council 2; Human Relations 
Club 3. 

MYALLS, WALTER 

Phi Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, Alumni Chairman 4; 

Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Courcll 

2, 3. 

NAHNSEN, CHRISTINE T. 
Sodality of Our Lady 3, 4; Historical Society 

3, 4; Coed Club 3, 4; Gerard Manley Hopkins 
Society 4; Honors Program 3, 4. 

NAPOLEON, ROBERT R. 

Student Bar Assn. 1, 2, 3; Res Ipsa Loquitur 
2, 3. 

NAVICKAS, Sr. M. LAMBERTA, S.S.C. 



NEBEL, MARY A. 

Kappa Beta Gamma 2, 3, 4; Coed Club 1, 2, 
3, 4; S.A.L. 3, 4; Historical Society 1. 

NELSON, WILLIAM ]. 
Phi Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

NIKLIBORC, EUGENE B. 

NIX, GEORGE E. 

Epsilon Pi Rho 1, 2, 3, 4, President 3, 4. 
NOLAN, ROBERT A. 
NOLAN, WILLIAM F. 

Accounting Club 3, 4. 

NOVAK, ROBERT J. 
St. Luke's Guild 1, 2, 3, 4, President 2; 
Student Council 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, Vice- 
President 4; Phi Beta Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Student 
A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

NOVELLO. SAMUEL J. 
Pi Alpha Lambda 1, 2, 3, 4; Maroon & Gold 
2; Variety Show 1, 4. 



O'BRIEN, JOHN M., Ill 
Pi Alpha Lambda 3, 4, Vice-President 4; 
Marketing Club 3, 4; A.U.S.A.; LOYOLAN 
3, Engraving Editor 3. 

O'BRIEN, JOHN P., JR. 

O'BRIEN, PATRICK J. 

Historical Society 1; Human Relations Club 4. 

O'BRIEN, RONALD J. 
Physics Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Math Club 4. 

O'BRYAN, ROBERT M. 

Phi Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, President 
4; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

OCHAB, JOSEPH A. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4; A.D.A. 1, 2, 3, 



OLETTI, JOSEPH J. 
Accounting Club 2, 3, 4. 

OLSON, EDWIN R. 
Phi Sigma Tau 3, 4; Bellarmine Philosophy 
Club 3, 4; S.A.L. 4; Historical Society 4. 

O'MALLEY, JOSEPH J. 

Phi Sigma Tau 3, 4; Bellarmine Philosophy 
Club 3, 4; Math Club 3, 4; Historical Society 
1, 3, 4; Modern Language Club 2, Vice- 
President 2. 

O'NEILL, TIMOTHY J. 

Choral Society 2. 

ORLOSKI, RAYMOND F. 

American Chemical Society 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice- 
President 3, President 4; Sodality of Our Lady 

1, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Medal 1, 2, 3; Phi 
Sigma Tau 4; Loyola Union Congressman 1, 

2, 3; Fine Arts Club 1; Psychology Club 1, 2; 
Physics Club 2, 3. 

OSETEK, EDWARD M. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4; A.D.A. 1, 2, 3, 
4. 

O'SHAUGHNESSY, JAMES M. 
Pi Alpha Lambda 2, 3, 4; Historical Society 
1, 4; Maroon & Gold 3; S.A.L. 4; Intramurals 
1, 2, 3, 4. 

OSTASKI, WILLIAM M. 
O'SULLIVAN, NEIL 

O'TOOLE, JOHN J. 
Phi Alpha Delta 2, 3, 4; Student Bar Assn. 



1, 2, 3, 4, Class Representative 4. 

OWENS, HUBERT E. 

OWENS, JOHN J. 
S.A.M. 2; Vets Club 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 
4; Accounting Club 4, Vice-President 4; Intra- 
mural Athletic Board 2, 3, 4, Senior Manager 
3, 4. 

OWENS, THOMAS M. 
Vets Club 3, 4; Accounting Club 3, 4. 

PACE, RITA 
Nursing Council 1, 2, 3, 4; Coed Club 2, 3; 
Alpha Tau Delta 2, 3, 4. 

PALUMBO, ANAROSE L. 

PARKER, Mrs. LORRAINE 
Loyola News 1, 2, 3; Gerard Manley Hopkins 
Society 1, 2, 3, 4. 

PARRISH, CHARLES M. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 1, 2, 3, 4, Warden 2, 3; 
Blue Key Honorary Fraternity 3, 4; Historical 
Society 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Human 
Relations Club 1, 2, 3; Economics-Finance 
Society 2, 3, 4; Commerce Council 2, 3, Vice- 
President 3; Sophomore Class Vice President; 
Junior Class Presidenr; Variety Show 2, 3, 
Publicity Chairman 2, Business Chairman 3. 

PASSALINO, CASIMER A. 

PATRICK, DONALD 

PATTAN, LOUIS W. 

PAULETTI, ROBERT J. 

PAUNCHO, PATRICIA 

PEDERSON, WILLIAM K. 
Alpha Delta Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, 
Vice-President 4, President 4; Blue Key Honor- 
ary Fraternity 3, 4, Alumni Secretary 4; Was- 
mann Biological Society 1, 2; LSC Intramural 
Board 1, 2, 3, 4, Manager 3, 4; Arts Council 
3, 4; Junior Class Vice-President; Maroon & 
Gold 3, 4, Co-Chairman 3; Loyola Union 
Congressman 3, 4; Variety Show 3, 4, Assistant 
Producer 3; Fine Arts Club 1, 2; Loyola News 

1, 2; Historical Society 1. 2; S.A.L. 3, 4; 
LOYOLAN 4; Imerfraternity Council 3, 4, 
Sgt.-at-Arms 3; Union Fair 2, 3, 4. 

PERSHA, DOLORES A. 
Coed Club 2, 3, 4. 

PERTICARA, ROBERT J. 
American Chemical Society 4; Intramurals 1, 

2, 3, 4. 

PETERSON, RONALD E. 
Sigma Pi Alpha 3, 4, President 4; Human 
Relations Club 3; Historical Society 2, 3, 4; 
Interfraternity Council 4; S.A.L. 4; S.A.M. 
2, 3, 4; Marketing Club 3, 4; Economics- 
Finance Society 3, 4; Scholarship Award 4. 

PETOSA, BERNARD W. 

Sodality of Our Lady 1, 2, 3, 4, First Vice- 
Prefect 4; Epsilon Pi Rho 1, 2; Modern Lan- 
guage Club 2; Math Club 3, 4, Secretary 4; 
Phi Sigma Tau 4; Fine Arts Club 4. 

PETRICH, JOHN D. 

Psi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Chaplain 3, House 
Manager 4; A.D.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

PHILLIPS, MARY 
Theta Phi Alpha 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Coed 
Club 1, 2, 3; Modern Language Club 1, 2, 3, 
President 2; S.A.L. 4. 



343 



PHILOPOULOS, SOCRATES J. 

Psi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 3; 
Dental School Chorus 3, 4, President 3; 
A.D.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

PHILPOTT, RICHARD L. 
Loyola Hall Council 1; Wasmann Biological 
Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramurals 1, 2. 

PICCIUCA, JOSEPH J., JR. 

Accounting Club 1; Vets Club 2. 

PIEDMONT, ROSALIE A. 

Loyola News 1, 2, Feature Staff 1, 2; Coed 
Club 1, 2, 3; Modern Language Club 2. 

PITTACORA, JAMES L. 
A.D.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

PLAISANCE, FLORENCE 

PLANEK, THOMAS W. 
Sodality of Our Lady 3, 4; Human Relations 
Club 3; Philosophy Club 4. 

PLANTE, WILLIAM M. 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Loyola Union 2, 
3, 4, President 4; Blue Key Honorary Fra- 
ternity 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Interfraternity 
Council 2, 3, Chairman 3; Loyola Fair 3, 4, 
Chairman 3, 4; Historical Society 2, 3, 4; 
Loyola News 1, 2, Fraternity Editor 2; Fine 
Arts Club 3, 4; Dean's Key 4. 

POCHYLY, DONALD F. 

Phi Chi 1, 2, 3. 4; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

POLELLE, MICHAEL J. 

Loyola Debate Society 1, 2, 3, 4, President 2, 
Vice-President 3; Historical Society 1, 2, 3. 4, 
Vice-President 3, 4; Fine Arts Club 3, 4; Tau 
Delta Phi 3, 4; Alpha Sigma Nu 3, 4, Treas- 
urer 4; Phi Sigma Tau 3, 4; Blue Key Honor- 
ary Fraternity 4. 

POPE, JOHNNIE M. 

PORTER, ROBERT J. 

Phi Beta Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 
3,4. 

POWERS, WALTER J., JR. 

Historical Society 1; Gold Torch Club 1, 2; 
S.A.M. 2; Sodality of Our Lady 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Union Representative 2, Social Chairman 3, 
Prefect 4. 

PROVENZALE, DONALD J. 
Sigma Pi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; 
Maroon & Gold 3; Class Officer 3. 

RACKY, DONALD J. 

RAFTERY, MARY T. 
Coed Club 3; Historical Society 3; Human 
Relations Club 4. 

RAGAN, GERALD E. 

RAGLOW, PAUL J. 
Phi Beta Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2; Student 
A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

RASHID, AMEEL G. 

Phi Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

RASILEWICZ, CASIMIR E. 

Historical Society 1; Wasmann Biological 
Society 2, 3; Philarets 1, 2. 

RAST, PATRICIA D. 

Loyola School of Nursing Assn. 2, 3, 4, 
President 4; Loyola Union Congressman 3, 4, 
Board of Governors 4; Historical Society 4. 

REA, LEE A. 
Wasmann Biological Society 1, 2, 3; Alpha 
Delta Gamma 2, 3, 4. 



REDDEN, THOMAS R. 

Student Bar Assn. 1, 2, 3; Phi Alpha Delta 2, 
3; Blue Key Honorary Fraternity 1, 2, 3. 

REED, ROBERT J. 

RESCHKE, HERBERT A. 

Historical Society 3; Phi Sigma Tau 4. 

RICHARD, EUGENIE A. 

Loyola School of Nursing Assn. 2, 3, 4. 

RINELLA, AUSTIN F. 
Historical Society 1,2, 3, 4; Human Relations 
Club 2, 3, 4. 

ROACHE, CHARLES W. 
Vets Club, 1; S.A.M. 1. 

ROACHE, EDNA P. 

ROHR, HERBERT J. 
Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

ROONEY, MARGARET M. 

Cadence 2, 3, 4; Loyola News 1, 2, 3; Gerard 
Manley Hopkins Society 1, 2, 3, 4. 

ROSS, BARBARA A. 

Theta Phi Alpha 2, 3, 4, Recording Secretary 
4; Coed Club 2, 3, 4, Publicity Chairman 4; 
Cheerleader 4; S.A.L. 3, 4; Maroon & Gold 
3; Modern Language Club 2; Historical Society 

2, 3, 4. 

RUBIN, FRANCIS M. 

RYAN, JOHN F. 

Phi Beta Pi 1,2, 3, 4; Vice-President Sopho- 
more Class; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Student 
Research 3, 4. 

RYAN, JOHN V. 

Phi Chi 1,2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 4; Student 
A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

RYAN, MICHAEL W. 

Pi Alpha Lambda 2, 3, 4; Historical Society 
1; Economics-Finance Society 4. 

RYAN, RICHARD T. 

Phi Alpha Delta 2, 3; Student Bar Assn. 

1, 2, 3. 

SABOCIK, ANN M. 
ST. LAWRENCE, FRANKLIN R. 

Bellarmine Philosophy Club 3, 4; Phi Sigma 
Tau 3, 4; Historical Society 3, 4; Epsilon Pi 
Rho 3, 4. 

SALETTA, CHRISTY F. 
SAMMONS, THOMAS E. 

Phi Beta Pi 1, 2, 3. 4; St. Luke's Guild 2, 

3, 4, Vice-President 2; Student A. M. A. 1, 

2, 3, 4. 

SAMPSON, PAUL J. 

Phi Mu Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Sec- 
retary 4. 

SAN HAMEL, JANE M. 
Nursing Council 1, 2, 3, 4; Secretary of 
Junior Class 3. 

SANDERS, HARVEY C. 
Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Council 

3, Representative 3- 

SANDZEN, SIGURD C, JR. 

Vice-President of Class 1; Phi Beta Pi 1, 2, 
3, 4, Vice-President 3, President 4; Student 
A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

SANTSCHI, DON R. 

Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 



SAPIENZA, MICHAEL S. 
Choral Society 2, 3, 4. 

SARBIESKI, RONALD D. 

Accounting Club 3, 4. 

SAWKO, VICTOR J. 

SCAFIDI, ANTHONY A. 

American Chemical Society 3, 4; Physics 
Club 4. 

SCAVONE, MARILYN 

SCHEID, JOHN H. 

Sodality of Our Lady 2, 3, 4; Pi Alpha 
Lambda 2, 3, 4. 

SCHENDL, RAYMOND F. 

Phi Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; St. Luke's Guild 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

SCHMIDT, BEVERLY B. 

SCHMIT, LAWRENCE J. 
Phi Beta Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 
3, 4; Student Council 2. 

SCHONBERG, ALBERT 

Alpha Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2. 

SCHRAM, JAMES B. 

Psi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3- 

SCHULTZ, SR. PAUL 

SCHROEDER, BERNARD R. 

Alpha Delta Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 
3, House-Treasurer 3; Fine Arts Club 3, 4; 
Gold Torch Club 2, Sgt.-at-Arms 2; A.U.S.A. 
3, 4, Union Representative 3; Arts Council 3, 
Treasurer 3; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 
2, 3, 4; American Chemical Society 1, 2. 

SCULLION, PATRICK J. 

SEALS, PHILBERT E. 
Phi Alpha Delta 2, 3, 4; Student Bar Assn. 
2, 3, 4. 

SEBASTIAN, AGNES C. 
Theta Phi Alpha 2, 3, 4; Coed Club 2, 3, 4; 
Sodality of Our Lady 2, 3, 4; Historical Society 
2; Human Relations Club 2, 3, 4; Modern 
Language Club 3; Maroon & Gold 3- 

SEBASTIAN, JOSEPH G., JR. 

S.A.M. 3, 4; Intramurals 1,2, 3, 4; Historical 
Society 1. 

SEIBEL, JOHN A. 

SERES, LAWRENCE H. 

Accounting Club 3, 4, Executive Board 4; 
Commerce Council 1; Freshman Class Secy.- 
Treas.; S.A.L. 3, 4; Tau Delta Phi 3, 4. 

SGITCOVICH, BEULAH MAE 
Nursing Council 1, 2, 3, 4; Kappa Beta 
Gamma 1, 2, 3. 

SHARKEY, PATRICK M. 
Vets Club 2, 3, 4. 

SHEA, ANTOINE M. 
Theta Phi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, Union Represen- 
tative 3; Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's In- 
tramurals 1, 2, 3, 4, Board of Directors 2, 3, 4; 
Fine Arts Club 2, 3, 4; Loyola Union Board of 
Governors 3, 4; Interfraternity Council 3; 
Maroon & Gold 3; Loyola Fair 3, 4, Entertain- 
ment Chairman 4; LOYOLAN 3; Senior Gift 
Fund 4; Historical Society 1, 2, 3, 4; S.A.L. 
3, 4; Variety Show 1, 2; Modern Language 
Club 2. 



344 



i 



SHEEDY, PAUL J. 
Basketball Team 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 4; Mono- 
gram Club 2, 3, 4; Pi Alpha Lambda 3, 4; 
Intramurals 2, 3, 4. 

SHEEHAN, THOMAS J. 
Vets Club 2, 3, 4; Sodality of Our Lady 1, 

2, 3, 4; Human Relations Club 2. 3, 4; His- 
torical Society 2, 3. 

SHEEHY, MICHAEL J. 

SHIVE, OWEN G. 

SHPIKULA, TARAS W. 

SIMONAITIS, JOHN J., JR. 
Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

SIMONE, VINCENT A. 

SKLAR, BARRETT D. 
Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

SKOFF, EUGENE J. 
Tau Delta Phi 3, 4, Recording Scribe 3; His- 
torical Society 2; Human Relatio~s Club 2. 

SKUPIEN, JANINE M. 
Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Historical Society 1, 3; 
Modern Language Club 2; Human Relations 
Club 2, 4. 

SMITH, DAVID J. 
Drill Team 1, 2, 3, 4, Commander 4; Sigma 
Delta Phi 3, 4, Pledgemaster 4; Phi Sigma 
Tau 3, 4; A.U.S.A. 3, 4. 

SMITH, FRANCIS W. 

Pi Alpha Lambda 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; LOY- 
OLAN 3, 4, Production Editor 3, Managing 
Editor 4; Student Union 4; Pow-Wow 4; 
S.A.M. 3, 4; Gold Torch Club 1; Loyola Fair 
4, Grounds Chairman 4; Intranrirals 1, 2, 3, 
4; S.A.L. 4; Variety Show 3; Pi Delta Epsilon 
4; Blue Key Honorary Fraternity 4. 

SMITH, HUGH E. 

Phi Beta Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, Pledge Chairman 2; 
Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4, President 3; Fresh- 
man Class Treasurer; Sophomore Class Presi- 
dent; St. Luke's Guild 1, 2; Alpha Sigma Nu 

3, 4. 

SMYTH, NANCY A. 

SOLEDAD, TRINIDAD S. 
Loyola Foreign Student Association 3, 4; 
Loyola School of Nursing Assn. 3, 4. 

SOMORA, ANTHONY J. 

American Chemical Society 4; Intramurals 1, 

2, 3, 4. 

SONKA, RICHARD J. 

Sodality of Our Lady 1, 2, 3; Wasmann Bio- 
logical Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Historical Society 

1, 2; Psychology Club 1, 2. 

SPADONI, ALEX J. 
Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Beta Pi 1, 2, 

3, 4. 

SPILLANE, DENNIS E. 
Historical Society 2, 3, 4; Choral Society 3; 
Loyola News 4. 

SPINA, ANTHONY F. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Pledgemaster 

2, Historian 3, Presldert 4; Variety Show 3, 

4, Producer 3, Advisor 4; Junior Class Repre- 
sentative 3; Blue Key Ho~orary Fraternity 3, 
4, Union Representative 4; Fire Arrs Club 3; 
Economics-Finarce Club 2; Psycho'ogy Club 1; 
Maroon & Gold 2, 3; LOYOLAN 3; S.A.L. 
2, 3. 



A.D.A. 1, 



STARCK, ROBERT L. 



STARZEC, JOHN T. 
Physics Club 2, 3, 4. 

STEFANI, RONALD H. 
Phi Beta Pi 1,2, 3, 4; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 
3. 4. 

STEINLE, MARY ANN T. 
Alpha Tau Delta 2, 3, 4, Historian 3; Nurs- 
ing Council 1, 2, 3, 4, Class Treasurer 3; 
Coed Club 1. 

STENSRUD, RAY C. 

Marketing Club 2, 3, 4. 

STEPHONIC, JEROME V. 
American Chemical Society 1, 2; Physics Club 
2; Fine Arts Club 2; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Economics-Finance Society 3, 4; Senior Gift 
Fund 4. 

STERMER, EDWARD M. 

STERNHAGEN, CHARLES J. 

Senior Class Vice-President 4; Student A.M.A. 
1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President & Delegate 3; Stu- 
dent Council 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 2; St. Luke's 
Guild 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 2; Freshman Class 
Student Council Representative. 

STINE, JAY C. 
Student A.D.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 
3, 4. 

STORTZ, MICHAEL J. 

Phi Beta Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 
3, 4. 

STROM, EDITH E. 

Loyola School of Nursing Assn. 4. 

SULLIVAN, SHEILA A. 
Theta Phi Alpha 2, 3, 4; Historical Society 
1, 2, 3, 4; Loyo'a News 1, 2, 3; Coed Club 

1, 2, 3, 4. 

SWEETNAM, GEORGE B. 
Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4. 

SZOTT, MICHAEL C. 

Delta Sigma Delta 1, 2, 3, 4. 



TARKA, EUGENE F. 

TARPEY, THOMAS 
Gold Torch Club 1, 2; Sodality of Our Lady 
1, 2, 3; Rifle Team 1, 2, 3, 4. 

TAYMANS, ALBERT D. 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 2, 3, 4; Drill Team 2; 
Sodality of Our Lady 2, 3, 4; Gold Torch 
Club 2; Loyola Hall Judiciary 3. 

TERRY, JOHN J. 

Delta Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Eco- 
nomics-Finance Society 2, 3, 4; Accounting 
Club 2, 3, 4, Union Representative 3; Sodality 
of Our Lady 2, 3; Loyola Union 3, 4, Board of 
Governors 3, 4; Leadership Award 2, 3, 4; 
Variety Show 3, Promotion Manager 3; S.A.L. 
3, 4; LOYOLAN 3. 

TETENS, ARNOLD R. 
A.U.S.A. 3, 4. 

TEVENAN, JOHN C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 1, 2, 3, 4, Alumni Secy. 2 
Secretary 3, President 4; Loyola Union 3 
Loyola Fair 2, Merchandise Chairman 3 
Interfraternity Council 3, 4; S.A.L. 4; S.A.M 
3. 

THIELEN, JAMES A. 
Vets Club 3, 4; Marketing Club 4. 

THOMSEN, RAYMOND C. 
Vets Club 2, 3, 4; Accounting Club 3, 4. 



TOMASIK, THOMAS C. 
Phi Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; St. Luke's Guild 2, 3, 4; 
Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

TOMPULIS, NICHOLAS G. 

TOOMEY, JOHN J. 

Xi Psi Phi 4. 

TORTORELLO, CHARMAINE C. 

Coed Club 3, 4; Historical Society 3, 4; 
Kappa Beta Gamma 3, 4, Pledgemistress 4; 
Sodality of Our Lady 3, 4; S.A.L. 3, 4. 

TOVAREK, GEORGE S. 
Phi Beta Pi 1,2, 3, 4; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 
3, 4. 

TRISKA, RICHARD E. 

Sodality of Our Lady 3, 4. 

TULLY, JOHN J. 

Alpha Delta Gamma 3, 4; Economics-Finance 
Sociery 3, 4. 

TUMA, FRANK A. 
Sodality of Our Lady 1, 2; Historical Society 
1, 2, 3, 4; Math Club 4; Physics Club 1, 2, 
3, 4, Treasurer 2, 3, President 4. 

TUOHY, JOHN O 

Moot Court Commissioner 3; Parliamentarian 
Loyola Union 1, 2, 3; Alpha Sigma Nu 2, 3, 
Vice-President 2, 3- 

TWOHIG, MARY 
Human Relations Club 3, 4, Treasurer 4; 
Sodality 3, 4; Loyola Women's Residence Hall 
3, 4, President 4, Judiciary Council Junior 
Representative 3, Chairman 4; S.A.L. 4. 

TYLKA, DANIEL J. 
Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4; A.D.A. 1, 2, 3 ,4. 



UDVARE, ROSEMARIE A. 
Kappa Beta Gamma 3, 4, President 4; His- 
torical Society 3, 4, Secretary 3, 4; Phi Sigma 
Tau 3, 4; Loyola Women's Honor Society 3, 
4; Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; S.A.L. 2, 3, 4. 



VADE BON COEUR, Br. ROBERT A., 
CSV. 

VALLAR, PHILOMENA R. 
Coed Club 1, 2, 3; Maroon & Gold 3. 

VAN DYKE, DONALD 
Alpha Delta Gamma 2; Sodality of Our Lady 

2, 3; Epsilon Pi Rho 3, 4. 

VAN VLIERBERGEN, BRIAN R. 
Blue Key Honorary Fraternity 3, 4, Secretary 

3, 4; Interfraternity Council 3, Chairman 3; 
Arts Council 1; Freshman Class Vice-President; 
S.A.L. Chairman 3; Union Congressman 1, 2, 
3, 4; Gold Torch Club 1, 2; A.U.S.A. 3, 4; 
intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Pi Alpha Lambda 2, 

3, 4, Union Representative 3; Maroon & Gold 
3; Loyola News 3; Fine Arts Club 2, 3, 4; 
Historical Society 4; Variety Show 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Make-up Director 2, 3, 4; Union Fair 1, 2, 3, 
4. 

VERO, DONNA RAE 

Kappa Beta Gamma 3; Coed Club 2, 3, Pub- 
licity Chairman 3; Phi Sigma Tau 3, 4; So- 
dality of Our Lady 2, 3, 4. 

VETO, JOHN M. 

Epsilon Pi Rho 3. 

VICEK, THOMAS C. 

Honors Class 1, 2, 3, 4; Accounting Club 3, 

4, Executive Board 4. 



316 



VITAIOLI, NICHOLAS R. 
Alpha Kappa Psi 3, 4; Accounting Club 3, 4. 

VOI.INI, CAMII.I.O F. 

VOLINI, FRANCIS A. 

Pi Alpha Lambda 3, 4. 

VRUBLE. BENEDICT M. 
Marketing Club 2; S.A.M. 3. 



WAGNER, FREDERIC A. 
Rifle Team 1, 2; Physics Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Secretary 2. 

WAHL, WILLIAM H. 

Phi Beta Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Council 3; 
Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

WALDRON. MARK A., JR. 
Accounting Club 2, 3, 4; Marketing Club 2. 

WALKOWIAK, GENE J. 

Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4; A.D.A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

WALKOWSKA, Sr. M. STANISLAUS 
KOSTKA, C.S.F.N. 

WALL, ELIZABETH JANE 

Cheerleader 1, 2, 3; Junior Class President 3; 
Maroon & Gold Chairman 3; Coed Club 1, 
2, 3, 4. 

WALSH, MAUREEN B. 

Nursing Council 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 1; 
Alpha Tau Delta 2, 3, 4; Coed Club 2. 

WALSH, ROGER E. 

Bellarmine Philosophical Society 4; Choral 
Society 4. 

WALSH, THOMAS R. 

Marketing Club 3, 4; Vets Club 3, 4. 

WALTON, MICHAEL R. 
Phi Mu Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, Historian 3, President 
4; Choral Sociery 1. 

WARD, JAMES J. 

WEGGEMAN, DONALD L. 

Historical Society 4; Fine Arts Club 3, 4; 
Phi Sigma Tau 3, 4. 

WEISS, LEONARD 
Blue Key Honorary Fraternity 3. 4, De-tal 
Representative 4; Executive Council of A.D.A. 
1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 



2, President 3; Student Council 4; St. Apollnnia 
Guild 2, 3, 4; Freshman Class Treasurer. 

WEITZEL, JEROME C. 

Historical Society 2, 3, 4; Loyola News 1; 
Gerard Manlcv Hopkins Society 2, ^; Fine 
Arts Club 2. 

WELSH, JOHN R. 
Delta Sigma Delta 4. 

WELTY, PAUL J. 

WENZEL, ALFRED R 
Delta Sigma Delta 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4. 

WENTLAND, WILLIAM F. 
Historical Society 1; S.A.M. 3, 4; Economics- 
Finance Society 3, 4. 

WHALEN, IOHN M. 
Historical Society 3, 4; Curtain Guild 3. 

WHALEN, PATRICK 

Pi Alpha Lambda 2, 3, 4; Manageme~t Club 4. 

WIENCEK, STANLEY P. 
Pi Alpha Lambda 3, 4; Historical Society 2, 
4; S.A.L. 4; Ir.tramurals I, 2, 3, 4. 

WIERZ, JOHN M. 

Wasmann Bio'o;:caI Society 3, 4. 

WILLIAMS, RODGER F. 

WINCHESTER, EDWARD E. 

WINTERS, RONALD J, 
Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; St. Luke's Guild 
I, 2, 3, 4; Phi Beta Pi 1, 2, 3, 4. 

WISNESKI, JEROME J. 

Wasmann Bio'ogical Society 1, 3, 4; Sodality 
of Our Lady 3, 4; Ir.tramurals 1, 2. 

WITTRY, RICHARD G. 

Student Bar Assn. 1, 2, 3, Secretary 3; Res 
Ipsa Inquitur 1, 2; Recent Decisions 3. 

WOLFGRAM, JUDITH M. 

Theta Phi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, Pledgem-stress 3, 
Vice-President 4; Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Union 
Representative 2, 3, Vice Preside - t 4; Histori- 
cal Society 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2. 3, 4; Modern 
Language Club 2, 3; Gerard Manley Hopkins 
Society 3; LOYOLAN 4, Co-Senior Editor 4; 
Women's Honorary Society 3, 4; Human Re- 
lations Club 3; Maroon & Gold 3; I-terfra- 
ternity Council 3; Loyola Union 2, 3; S.A.L. 

3, 4; Senior Gift Furd 4; Variety Show 1, 2, 3, 



4; Who's Who Among Students in American 
Universities and Colleges 4. 

WOLSKI, CONRAD A. 

Gold Torch Club 1, 2; Choral Society 3. 

WOODS, ROBERT M. 

Physics Club 3, 4; Intramurals I, 2, 3, 4. 

WOZNIAK, PATRICIA A. 

Nursing Courcil 1,2, 3, 4; Alpha Tau Delta 
2, 3, 4; Coed Club 1, 2; Wasmann Biological 
Society 1; Graduate Sodality 4. 

WREN, JOHN L. 
Riflle Team 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Sigma Tau 3, 4; 
Historical Society 3, 4. 

WRIGHT. BARBARA N. 
Historical Society 2; Sodality of Our Lady 

2, 3, 4. 

WRIGHT, JAMES J. 

Phi Beta Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Student A.M.A. 1, 2, 

3, 4. 

WYDRA, EDWARD M. 
YETTER, RICHARD R. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 1, 2, 3, 4, Historian 2, 3, 
Treasurer 4; Blue Key Honorary Fraternity 3, 

4, Recording Secy. -Treasurer 4; Alpha Sigma 
Nu 3, 4, Secretary 4; Junior Class Vice- 
Presidenr; Commerce Courcil 3; Loyola Union 
4; Variety Show 3, Financial Manager 3; Ac- 
counting Club 3, 4; A.U.S.A. 3, 4; Gold Torch 
Club 1, 2; Fair Committee 3; S.A.L. 3, 4 
Historical Society 1; Intramirals 1, 2, 3, 4 
Senior Gift Fund 4, Commerce Chairman 4 
Who's Who Aracg St'dents in American 
Universities and Colleges 4. 

ZAKER, BERNADETTE 

ZIC, ROCCO R. 
Accounting Club 3, 4; S.A.M. 4. 

ZIEMBA, CASIMIR R. 

Xi Psi Phi 1, 2, 3, 4; Go'd Foil Study Club 4. 

ZIGLER, BARBARA A. 

ZIMMER, JACK A. 
Accounting Club 3, 4, Secretary 4; S.A.L. 4; 
Intramurals 3, 4; Ecoromics-Finance Society 
3, 4. 

ZUMBAK1S. PAUL S. 
Drill Team 1, 2; Eco-om'cs Finance Society 
4; Bellarmine Philosophy Club 4. 



347 



Graessle* Mercer 
company 

printers and binders 



SEYMOUR, INDIANA 



9 



548 



Engravings by 



J A HIV & OLLIER Zwyuwinq, G&mpumf 



CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



349 



OUR THANKS 



As the last and most pleasant act of the 1959 LOY- 
OLAN, it is befitting that OUR THANKS be extended 
to all who have been a part of the success of this book. 
Although it would be impossible to thank everyone 
by name who has helped to make the LOYOLA N a 
reality, the following deserve our gratitude for their 
efforts and encouragement: 

The Very Reverend James F. Maguire, S.J., President 
of Loyola University, who, by his interest, his encjura;e- 
ment, and his generous confidence, is most responsible 
for the publication of the yearbook. 

Mr. Harry L. McCloskey, Dean of Students, who has 
continually worked to build the LOYOLAN into a 
tradition on campus. 

Rev. Thomas J. Bryant, S.J., our moderator, whose 
untiring efforts on behalf of the yearbook have been 
a cornerstone of the book's success. We proudly hail 
him as the best of moderators and the most loyal of 
staff members. 

Our thanks also go to the following for their co- 
operation and technical advice: 

Jahn & Oilier, our engravers, and especially to Bill 
O'Connor and John Hancock. 

The Graessle-Mercer Company, our printer, and es- 
pecially to George Graessle and H. Toms Graessle. 

Marshall Studio and Benar Studio, our professional 
photographers, and especially to Tony Comunale. 

S. K. Smith Company, our cover manufacturer, and 
especially to Dick Dwyer. 

As to the staff itself, my deepest and sincerest grati- 
tude belongs to Tom Haney, my assistant editor. He 
has been my right hand, my second head, my co editor, 
and, above all, my friend. His energy and devotion to 
the yearbook will always remain in my memory. It has 
been his book, as well as mine. 

John Karklin, our photographer, accomplished the 



monumental task of taking most of the pictures in the 
book, with the exception of the senior portraits. His 
efforts deserve a monumental "thank you." 

Our managing editor, Frank Smith, is another to 
whom the success of the book must be credited. His 
efforts in organizing and completing the yearbook will 
always be appreciated. 

The task of writing the copy for the LOYOLAN 
was given to John Lempkowski, our copy editor. The 
best tribute to him can be paid by saying that his Muse 
was inspired. 

Bob Ryba, our business manager, is most worthy of 
praise for his efficient and capable management of the 
financial operations of the yearbook. 

Judy Wolfgram and Ed (Whitey) Biesinger, our 
senior editors, deserve credit for their outstanding work 
in completing the senior section of the LOYOLAN. 

The success of the sports section must be credited 
to Charlie Vygantas, our sports editor, whose efforts 
were most appreciated. 

And last but not least, my sincere thanks to the staff 
members listed below who have contributed a major 
share in the book's success. W. M. H. 

EPILOGUE FROM THE MODERATOR: It is meet 
and just that as moderator of the LOYOLAN I say a 
few special words of praise for William Hegan, our 
editor-in-chief; Thomas Haney, our assistant editor; 
and John Karklin, our photographer. Without their 
contributions of work and leadership the yearbook 
would not have come out. Their efficiency and loyalty 
were without measure. 

On my own behalf and speaking for the student 
body, I say a thousand thanks to these three gentlemen 
who have given us an annual of which we are all truly 
proud. Thomas J. Bryant, S.J. 



William M. Hegan Editor-in-Chief 

Francis W. Smith Managing Editor 

John E. Lempkowski Copy Editor 

Judith M. Wolfgram Senior Editor 

Robert F. Doherty Advisory Editor 



Thomas M. Haney Assistant Editor 

Robert W. Ryba Business Manager 

Charles M. Vygantas Sports Editor 

Edwin Biesinger Senior Editor 

Rev. Thomas J. Bryant, S.J Moderator 



PHOTOGRAPHY 
John Karklin 



COPY 

Kay Cottrell 
Christine Nahnsen 



SPORTS 
Len Vertuno 
Jerry Atwood 
Roy Horton 



BUSINESS 
Ken Klein 
Hank Tufo 
Barb O'Brien 
Emmett Burns 



ART 

Karen Lester 
Jan Finsen 



ASSISTANTS 
Maureen Marley 
Mel Kamm 



Walt Hanson 
Joan Leister 



Tom Maloney 
Joe Colangelo 



Pauline Zaranka 
Kay Dwyer 



■350 



Two miscellaneous LOYOLAN staff members, Maureen Marley and 
Kay Cottrell, do their usual miscellaneous jobs. 




LIST OF ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS; 



Blue Key National Honor Fraternity, Loyola Chapter 

The Chicago American and Mr. Edward P. Doyle 

The Chicago Daily News 

The Chicago Sun-Times 

The Chicago Tribune and Mr. Anthony Marcin 

The Netv World and Miss Lillian Ryan 

Mr. Richard Barry 

Miss Deal and Miss Higgins of the Illinois Catholic 

Women's Club 
Rev. Fred M. Henley, S.J., of West Baden College 
Mr. W. Daniel Conroyd 
Rev. Francis A. Vaughan, S.J. 
Rev. John W. Bieri, S.J. 
Dr. Thomas P. Galarneault 
Mr. Joseph Eraci 
Mr. Sam Liaros 
Mr. Frank Goodman 
Dean John C. Fitzgerald 
Mr. Nick Hyser 
Dr. Paul Kiniery 
Mr. Curt Richter 
Miss Patricia McCarter 
The Members of the President's Council 



And the publicity departments of the following 

organizations and institutions: 
Continental Can Company 
Board of Trade 
Swift & Company 
Northwestern University 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad 
Chicago White Sox 
Argonne National Laboratory 
The Greyhound Corporation 
United Air Lines 
Chicago Park District 
Merchandise Mart 
Wrigley Building 
Mundelein College 
Adler Planetarium 
First National Bank 
Art Institute 

Fifth Army Headquarters 
Inland Steel Company 



351 



ORGANIZATION INDEX 



Accounting Club 148 

Alpha Delta Gamma 202 

Alpha Kappa Psi 204 

Alpha Omega 206 

Alpha Sigma Nu 248 

Alpha Tau Delta 208 

American Chemical Society 149 

Arts Council 75 

Association of the United States Army 150 

Basic Nursing Association 117 

Bellarmine Philosophy Club 151 

Blue Key Honor Fraternity 210 

Cadence 152 

Chi Theta Upsilon 212 

Choral Society 153 

Coed Club 154 

Commerce Council 87 

Curtain Guild 156 

Debating Society 158 

Delta Sigma Delta 214 

Delta Sigma Pi 216 

Dental School Council 98 

Economics-Finance Society 160 

Education Society 161 

Epsilon Pi Rho 162 

Fine Arts Club 163 

Foreign Students Association 164 

Gerard Manley Hopkins Society 165 

Historical Society 166 

Honorary Society for Women 249 

Honors Program 168 

Human Relations Club 169 

Interfraternity Council 200 

Kappa Beta Gamma 218 

Lake Shore Sodality (Sodality of the Blessed Virgin Mary) 170 
Lewis Towers Sodality (Queen of the Most Holy Rosary) 171 

Loyola Fair 144 

Loyola Hall 172 

Loyola News 174 

Loyola Union 176 

1959 LOYOLAN 178 

LOYOLAN Awards 134 



Marketing Club 180 

Mathematics Club 181 

Medical School Council Ill 

Miss Varsity Contest 140 

Modern Languages Club 182 

Monogram Club 183 

Phi Alpha Delta 220 

Phi Beta Pi 222 

Phi Chi 224 

Phi Mu Chi 226 

Phi Sigma Tau 250 

Physics Club 184 

Pi Alpha Lambda 228 

Pi Delta Epsilon 251 

Pow-Wow 138 

Psi Omega 230 

"Recent Decisions" 185 

Res Ipsa Loquitur 185 

Saint Apollonia Guild 186 

Saint Luke's Guild 187 

School of Nursing Association 119 

Sigma Alpha Rho 232 

Sigma Delta Phi 234 

Sigma Lambda Beta 236 

Sigma Pi Alpha 238 

Social Work Council 126 

Society for the Advancement of Management 188 

Student American Medical Society 189 

Student Bar Association 105 

Student Dental Association 190 

Tau Delta Phi 240 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 242 

Theta Phi Alpha 244 

University College Council 89 

University College Sodality 

(Madonna della Strada Sodality) 191 

Variety Show 142 

Veterans Club 192 

Wasmann Biological Society 194 

Who's Who Among Students in American Colleges 

and Universities 132 

Women's Dorm 196 

Xi Psi Phi 246 



352 



A .11 i | \ 





3 1631 1QQ12BH 



| ^ 






*" ll -CAH 





-■-. ."■■=■-,:. ... 



; >vfe