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Full text of "The Loyolan"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

CARL!: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/loyolan1960unse 




THOMAS M. HANEY 

Editor-in-Chief 

NICHOLAS MOTHERWAY 

Business Manager 



REV. THOMAS T. BRYANT, S.J. 

Faculty Moderator 





L Y L A N 

The 1960 LOYOLAN is the 24th in a long line of all- 
university yearbooks. Its story is the Loyola story, a story of 
students, faculty, and administration, a story of life on the 
campuses of one of Chicago's oldest colleges, a story of progress. 

In the book are pictures and stories of memorable events 
and of memorable people. Here are students and faculty; here 
are dances, lectures, basketball games, elections, and every- 
thing else connected with a vital and growing university. 

Much happened at Loyola during 1959-60, much which 
will fade from your memories in the years to come. The 
LOYOLAN, by recording all events both big and small, hopes 
that it will recall all these pleasant events when you glance 
through it in the years to come. 

What we have strived to present, most of all, are the 
achievements of students, faculty and administrators working 
together to make Loyola even greater, achievements educa- 
tional, social, spiritual . . . 

It is thus with much pleasure that the editors present these 
achievements to you in a permanent record for the future. Here, 
then, is the 1960 LOYOLAN. 



1960 




LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 




CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 




CONTENTS 



Through this door into Cudahy Memorial Library passes a steady 
flow of students, desiring to supplement the knowledge they have 
gained in classrooms and in textbooks. 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 30 



FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES 48 



HONORARIES 94 



ORGANIZATIONS 108 



ATHLETICS 150 



ADMINISTRATION 176 



GOLLEGES 



194 



GRADUATES 264 



ACTIVITIES 314 



LOYOLANS ON THE MOVE 



PANTA BEl— "Everything is on the move!" Thus 
even in ancient times did the Greek sages manifest the fas- 
cination of universal motion and change. What student 
does not remember his first encounter with Zeno's intrigu- 
ing paradoxes: his efforts to understand how "the fleet- 
footed Achilles" could outrace the sluggish tortoise, how 
the speeding arrow could reach its target? Or the charming 
story of Diogenes' "refutation" of Zeno by parading up and 
down before his friends: solvitur ambulando? Or his relief 
at discovering Zeno's puzzles solved at last by "the master 
of them that know" with his doctrine of act and potency? 
Solved— and yet ... 

Even old Heraclitus, looking down from whatever pa- 
gan heaven he inhabits, might be amazed at the fascination 
of motion and change as the fifties of the twentieth century 
merge into 1960. Russian "Sputniks" and "Luniks"— Ameri- 
can "Explorers" and "Project Astronaut"— the "Jet Age" 
coming into flower at Chicago's O'Hare Field— breakfast 
at the Palmer House, luncheon at San Francisco's Mark 
Hopkins, and back to Chicago in time for an evening snack 
at Loyola's own Pump Room— journeys to the moon or 
Mars around the next corner but one! Chicago has long 
been the nation's railway center and highway hub; its Mid- 
way Airport is the busiest in the world; and 1959 saw the 
St. Lawrence Seaway open to bring to the heart of the city 
Britain's reigning monarch and a mighty task force of the 
U. S. Navy. 

In this year, as always, Loyola reflects and shares the 
spirit of Chicago. And so we have chosen for the theme of 
the book which is to be the record of this year, "Loyolans 
on the Move." Not that we shall take it too seriously— a 
theme for a yearbook is not an absolute necessity, but it 
can serve as a pleasant link to unify our appreciation of the 
manifold activities of Loyola's students. For even as the 
beauty of sunrise and sunset lies less in any static quality 
than in the constant change and variation of light and color, 
so too Loyola men and women are most fascinating when 
they are seen "on the move." And how varied and delightful 
their movements are! Theirs is the physical motion of sport 
and drill and dance— the comings and goings, to and from 
class and lecture, play and concert, game and carnival; 
theirs the intellectual motion of learning and scholarship 
and an increasing mastery of all the resources of skill and 
knowledge; theirs the moral and spiritual motion of growth 
as human persons, and the soul's winging on its continuing 
flight toward God; theirs even that perhaps most character- 
istically human motion of all, the motion of laughter at 
the humor and nonsense that are a part of every life. 
In all this we shall try to follow them, try to capture, 
as best we can, the bewildering and ever-chang- 
ing variety of a Loyola which, like its 
city and the world, is "on the move." 






X 



j^ 





skillful counseling is of immense value on the road to At Loyola's Dental School chapel, the students find that prayer is 

spiritual and intellectual maturity. the basic means to progress in the spiritual life. 



"He who eats my flesh and drinks my blood has everlasting life and I will raise him up 
on the last day.". "I am the vine, you are the branches. He who abides in me, and I in him, 
he bears much fruit." 





This freshman French class is among the first to enjoy the benefits of Loyola s new audio- 
visual center at Lewis Towers, which affords them an opportunity to listen to native recordings, 
thus increasing their appreciation of the language. 



Through the "blood, sweat, and tears" of long hours in the library, 
Loyolans achieve mastery of their studies (and incidentally those "B's" 
and "A's"). 



Freshman nurses and pre-med students make their first journeys into the 
world of cells, tissues, and systems. 






At the inter-dorm skating party Anne Reiter, James Reilly, Pauline Zaranka, Dennis Carroll, 
Dorothy Hanson, John Buckley, Mary Lee Graham, Terrence Moore, Ellen McCann, Peter 
Patrick, Sharon Lane, Robert Frenzel, and Bonita Bertaux glide about the ice in a "crack 
the whip." 



Walking is the finest kind ol motion: good for the spirit, the emotions, the body 
especially the walk on Fridays between the Cathedral and Lewis Towers. 





Along Chicago's world-famous Lake Shore Drive, Loyola students move easily and pleasantly 
to Lewis Towers or Lake Shore Campus. 



Shades of Gunsmoke! The Takes (Tau Kappa Epsilon to the uninitiated) now travel by 
stagecoach — at least during the annual Float Parade. 





The Loyola "L" platform is the A.M. end of line and the 
beginning of the ride homeward for the hardworking Lake 
Shore Campus students. 




Through the Chicago Avenue subway thousands of the 
city's best students (Loyola students naturally) move 
daily to Lewis Towers on "the magnificent mile." 
Barbara Bauman, Pamela Sauer, Beverly Cody, and 
Melvyn Segal are trying to appear nonchalant when 
confronted by the photographer. 



Far away lands are but hours away for Loyolans using the jetliners at Chicago's O'Hare 
Field. Alice Farrell, Hannelore Glatt, and Bonita Solzak, it is reported, are going to do 
research work on their Spring term papers. 





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From earliest times men have crossed land and sea in pursuit of an education Here we see 
Nancy Kelly Jo Tomaszewski, Jack Nicholson, Jack Doyle, Monica Kozak, and Jim Matousek 
aboard the schooner Corona in Belmont Harbor about to set out towards Lewis Towers. 



The sea being serene, the Corona sails merrily on 
towards Lewis Towers. 



It seems that Jack Nicholson and Jack Doyle are about 
to throw "Jonah" Nancy Kelly overboard to assure a 
peaceful voyage. 






Male Freshmen attend annual retreat at Madonna della Strada. 
The retreat was cart of this year's Orientation Program. 



Freshmen gather outside Cudahy Science Build- 
ing before beginning guided tours of the Lake 
Shore Campus. 




The school year began at Loyola with Fresh- 
man Orientation Week, in which the entering 
freshmen were acquainted with the University, 
its facilities and its organizations. 

The upperclassmen were on hand to show 
the new students their way around the campus 
and to introduce them to life at Loyola. Tours 
were given by upperclass volunteers to show off 
Lake Shore Campus to students who will (for the 
most part) spend their next four years walking its 
many paths! 

The entering women students were given a 
fashion show by the upperclass coeds, who gave 
the girls hints on what to wear on special occa- 
sions, as well as on ordinary schooldays. 



FRESHMAN ORIENTATION 




ill ! I 




One day was set aside as Activities Day, on 
which the freshmen were welcomed to Loyola 
by the upperclassmen and were introduced to the 
various organizations. In addition, the new stu- 
dents were treated to a jazz concert held outside 
on the campus, an innovation for Orientation 
Week. 

After two days of registration, the students 
returned to the Union House to be officially wel- 
comed by the Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S.J., 
President; Harry IVIcCloskey, Dean of Students; 
George Ireland, Athletic Director; and Rev. 
Thomas Murray, S.J., Student Counselor. 

The annual freshman invitational dance was 
held Friday evening. 

In addition to a Mass held at Madonna della 
Strada chapel during the week, the annual fresh- 
man retreat was moved earlier to provide a fitting 
conclusion for Orientation Week and to show the 
freshmen the importance of the spiritual life on 
campus. 

Upperclass coeds indoctrinate entering girls on Loyola fashion fads. 



One of the principle sights on the tours of the campus 
was Madonna della Strada, the chapel on the Lake. 




A jazz concert was held outside this year to entertain 
the freshmen as they strolled the lawns of Lake 
Shore Campus. 




The social attraction of the year is always the 
Fall Frolic, at which Miss Varsity is selected and 
crowned. 

The competition is always fierce, with frater- 
nities and organizations struggling to get their 
candidate elected. This year eleven girls were 
nominated by various organizations and the com- 
petition was keen. Among those represented were: 
Judy Kruzel, Independents; Maureen Martin, Pi 
Alpha Lambda;. Virginia Zittnan, Veterans Club; 
Jule Swinehart, Alpha Kappa Psi; Rose Piraino, 
Delta. Sigma Pi; Sheila Shanahan, Alpha Delta 
Gamrr^a; Kathleen Monge, Tau Delta Phi; Lor- 
raine Lang, Gamma Delta Phi; Virginia Stift, Tau 
Kappa Epsilon; Diane Dybas, Phi Mu Chi; Lu- 
cille Anichini, Sigma Delta Phi. 

The winner was Sheila Shanahan, the candi- 
date of Alpha Delta Gamma fraternity. Miss 
Shanahan, presently attending LTniversity Col- 
lege, was crowned bv Roxane Slaski, Miss Var- 
sity of 1958-59. 

As Miss Varsity, Miss Shanahan is the repre- 
sentative of the Loyola Union at all University 
activities during the school year. 

This year's Fall Frolic was held in the Grand 
Ballroom of the Palmer House, and music for the 
occasion was provided by Dick Carlton's orches- 
tra and by the Eddie Higgins quintet. 




sheila Shanahan, Miss Var- 
sity, 1959-60. 





Members of the R.O.T.C. keep careful guard 
over the Lewis Towers ballot bo.x during 
voting for the new Miss Varsity. 



Sheila Shanahan, Loyola's new Miss Varsity, 
is crowned by the 1958-59 Miss Varsity, 
Roxane Slaski, as chairman Gene Nelson 
looks on approvingly. 








Miss Varsity and her court. Back row: Judy Kruzel, Maureen Martin, Virginia Zittnan. 
Middle row: Jule Swinehart, Rose Piraino, Sheila Shanahan, Kathleen Monge, Lorraine Lang. 
Front row: Virginia Stift, Diane Dybas, Lucille Anichini. 

FALL FROUC - MISS VARSITY 



Loyola students dance at the annual Union Fall Frolic, one of the highlights of the fall 
social season. 




LOYOLA SPORTS 



No summary of the school year would be 
complete without a mention of its sports life, 
which is considered an integral part of the educa- 
tional program. 

Loyola fields intercollegiate teams in basket- 
ball, golf, swimming, bowling, track, and cross- 
country. 

In addition to the adequate schedule of inter- 
collegiate athletics, Loyola conducts an intramu- 
ral program to meet the physical development 
and recreational needs of both men and women 
students. 

This year's intramurals saw an increasing in- 
terest among the coeds Ijecause of an expanded 
program which includes basketball, swimming, 
volleyball, and ping-pong. 




Loyola opened the basketball season this year by defeating 
Wayne State. This is one of the typical action-packed moments 
which kept Loyolans on their feet cheering. 




16 



Our enthusiastic cheerleaders were an integral part of the basketball season by adding color 
to each game. The girls are Diana Anstett, Glenda McDonald, BeverU- Wilson, John Toole, 
Rlioda Lesko, Jule Swinehart, Maureen McMahon, Kay Stewart, and Carmel Hall. 




HYOU 

34 



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Coeds pause during the volleyball game to 
watch the antics of the male cheerleaders. 



Perfect form plus playing skill com- 
bine to score a basket. 




The members of Alpha Delta Gamma proudly pose in front of 
their fraternity house, which tied for first place with the Men's 
Dorm for house decorations. 



An integral part of any well-run Pow-Wow is a good mud fight, 
and Loyola is no exception. 




Highlighting the fall social calendar was the 
Rambler Pow-Wow held in December. Spon- 
sored by the Loyola Union, the Pow-Wow fea- 
tured a variety of colorful events. Opening the 
weekend's events was a jazz concert in the Union 
House starring Bob Scobey. 

Following the concert a pep rally was held 
on the athletic field to cheer the basketball team 
on to victory. The evening was climaxed with 
Loyola winning the game against Western On- 
tario by a score of 84-60. 

On Saturday the Pow-Wow activities began 
with a float parade. Over twenty floats parti- 
cipated in the parade down Sheridan Road to 
the Lake Shore Campus. The Tau Kappa Epsilon 
fraternity float entitled "Scalp Montana" took 
first prize for the best entry in the float parade. 



UNION POW-WOW 



Typical of the many beautiful floats in the Float Parade is the Sigma Delta Phi float which boasts: "No 
cijjar store warrior can beat us. " 





Seen at the symposium held in March on "Pope Leo XIII and the 
Modern World" are Rev. Gustav Weigel, S.J. (professor of eccle- 
siology at Woodstock College, Maryland), Albert Cardinal Meyer 
(archbishop of Chicago), Archbishop Egidio Vagnozzi (Apostolic 
Delegate to the U.S.), Dr. James D. Collins (professor of history 
at St. Louis University), and Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S.J. 
(president of Loyola). 





"Modern Theories of Art" was the subject of 
a lecture by Rev. Ambrose J. McNicholl, 
O.P., the fifth in a series of "Distinguished 
Professor" lectures. 



Dr. George N. Shuster, former president of 
Hunter College and a specialist in modern 
German history, opened Loyola's Distinguished 
Professor lecture series with a discussion of the 
contemporary German situation. Welcoming 
Dr. Shuster (left) are Rev. Robert W. Mulligan, 
S.J., vice-president of Loyola, and Dr. Fried- 
rick von Lupin, German consul general in 
Chicago. 



20 




Operating on the assumption that education 
may and should go on outside the classroom, 
Loyola University in recent years has presented 
to the public a wide-ranging, multiphased series 
of lectures designed to broaden the intellectual 
life of Loyolans. Thi-ough this lecture program, 
Loyola affords the student, and the community 
at large, an opportunity to sample a wide variety 
of knowledge. Loyola's lecture program truly pro- 
vides a mosaic of thought and culture. 

During the academic year 1959-60, in its 
Distinguished Professor series, Loyola hosted a 
group of seven world-renowned scholars whose 
lecture topics ranged from foreign affairs to the- 
ories of art; participants in this series included 
Rev. Bernard J. Dempsey, S.J., and Dr. George N. 
Shuster, former president of Hunter College. 

The David B. Steinman Poetry Series 
brought to Loyola eminent contemporary poets 
presenting their own works. The Steinman Series 
this year presented Paul Engle, Robert Penn War- 
ren, Mark Van Doren, John Crowe Ransom, and 
Richard Wilbur. 



■I-' 



y... 



tOrOtA LECTURE SERIES 



Mark Van Doren, professor of English at Columbia University and 
distinguished poet and critic, gave a reading of his poetry in 
December, as the first of the David B. Steinman Poets. 



The valile of the Bible in the pastoral work of priests was dis- 
cussed in a symposium in November, as second in a series of 
programs on "The Priest in the Modern World." Taking part in 
the discussion were Rev. J. J. DeVault, S.J. (professor of sacred 
scripture at West Baden), Rev. John L. McKenzie, S.J. (also pro- 
fessor of sacred scripture at West Baden), Rev. Roland E. Murphy, 
O. Cami. (professor of Old Testament at Catholic University of 
America), and Rev. Bruce Vawter, CM. (professor at St. Thomas 
Seminary in Denver and noted author). 




In early spring, Loyola's lecture series pre- 
sented the symposium on the Ancient City; noted 
speakers at the symposium included Dr. Thorkild 
Jacobsen, Dr. William Foxwell Albright, and Rev. 
John C. McKenzie, S.J. 

In cooperation with the Chicago Christian 
Family Movement, Loyola University sponsored 
a series of five lectures dealing with political life 
in America. 

March 18, 1960, saw Loyola pay honor to 
His Holiness the late Pope Leo XIII with a com- 
memorative series of lectures, which attempted to 
analyze the role Leo has had in shaping modern 
Catholic life. 

A special series presented during the past 
year was aimed at the Chicago clergy, in the 
"Priest in the Modern World" Symposium. Loyola 
attempted to provide the archdiocesan clergy 
with some new insight and approaches to the 
priestly vocation. 

One of the year's highlights was the Loyola- 
hosted Conference on Lay Mission Work; it was 
at this conference that the famous Dr. Thomas A. 
Dooley, the jungle doctor, spoke, and was pre- 
sented with an honorary degree by the Univer- 
sity. 

21 



SKI WEEKEND 



In accordance with the Jesuit maxim of edu- 
cating the whole man, physically as well as men- 
tally, Loyola University provides its students with 
an opportunity to acquire new athletic skills and 
further provide an outlet for post-examination 
tensions— a time to forget. 

Sponsored under the aegis of the Coed Club 
and the Loyola Union, the yearly Odyssey to 
Northernaire resort. Three Lakes, Wisconsin, of- 
fers the student a rare opportunity to discover 
muscles and capabilities previously unknown. 

The catalogue of ski-weekend activities 
reads like the decathalon: skiing, toboganning, 
ice skating, snow shoeing, and sleigh riding, as 
well as indoor pastimes ranging from swimming 
to lounging in the luxurious Northernaire apart- 
ments. 

The Loyola Ski-weekend truly offers some- 
thing for everyone, whether he is a lounge lizard 
or the rugged outdoor type. 



The rolling hills of the Wisconsin countryside provided ample 
pitfalls as a stimulation to Loyola's exuberant amateurs. 






i^ 



The scene is gay at Lake Shore Campus as the skiers prepare to 
leave for the wintry wastes of Wisconsin. From right to left the 
merry-makers are George Kollintzas (assistant dean of students), 
Joan Vaccaro (assistant to the dean of women), Fred Green and 
Lenore Quinn (student co-chairmen), Sheila Shanahan, Diane 
Dybas, and Bill Cowan. 



2_JK. 



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'•'i!iiTi.»iiiVi|^;X"'"'^'--^^^ai-'^f]p'''-"'''**' ' 



♦'si trtflPW 




The most charming skier of the weekend was Sheila Shanahan, Loyola's Miss Varsity. 



This scene shows one of the many hills in the area which tested 
the skiing skills of eager Loyolans. 



Lovely Northernaire Resort in Three Lakes, Wisconsin, provided 
the background for the skiing and the setting for the indoor 
activities. 




,; (>. 





23 




The girls of Theta Phi Alpha were honored with a first-place 
trophy on Friday night for their sparkling performance. 



VARIETY SHOW 



Chi Theta Upsilon sorority took the audience on a tour of a 
Chinese tea-house to point out the differences between Chinese 
students and Loyolans. 




"The Small World of Entertainment" was 
the theme of the annual Arts, Commerce, and 
Nursing Variety Show. Playing to the largest 
audiences ever, the Variety Show was a sparkling 
display of student talent which ranged from sing- 
ing and dancing to comedy and farce. 

Dennis Monahan took the first prize on Fri- 
day evening for the best individual act in his very 
humorous portrayal of Liberace. Theta Phi Alpha 
achieved the first place trophy for the best organ- 
izational act, whereas Tau Kappa Epsilon won 
the second place trophy as they took the audience 
to the Folies Bergere in Paris, France. The 
Alumni Association's Tggy" was taken by Phi Mu 
Chi. 

The director of the show was Frank Mustari 
and the producer was Joe Gajewski. 




Alan Jorgensen, who was a thoroughly dehghtful 
emcee, got into the act on several occasions, such 
as this scene wifh Cathy Bandelin. 



Alpha Tau Delta nursing fraternity gave a fanciful picture of a 
coed-dominated Loyola of the future. 





A rendition of folk songs from Jamaica was 
given by duet Bob O'Connor and Micki Leaner. 



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The members of Phi Mu Chi took the coveted "Iggy" award, 
presented by the Alumni Association, for the performance on 
Saturday night. 




Tau Kappa Epsilon, with the help of Ellen Miller, brought the 
Folies Bergere to a grateful Loyola. 



25 



Originally called the Loyola Fair and Frolic 
when it was organized in 1954, the Loyola Fair 
is sponsored annually by the student Union to 
raise funds for the improvement of student rec- 
reational facilities. The Fair has become the 
largest and most successful student undertaking 
in the University. 

Held annually in May, the Fair brings rides, 
tents, raffle booths, and big-name entertainment 
to the Lake Shore Campus. This year saw, on 
May 6, the opening day of the Fair, over thirty 
booths installed in several tents located on the 
athletic field. Special emphasis was placed on 
activity booths rather than on "pick-a-ticket" 
booths. Such popular rides as the ferris wheel, 
merry-go-round, and tilt-a-whirl provided enter- 
tainment for the younger visitors of the Fair. 

This season at the fair, the nationally known 
entertainers, "The Four Freshmen," were fea- 
tured at the annual Fair Concert. 



LOYOLA UNION FAIR 




Loyola Fair Committee. Standing: Gene Nelson (dance); Mike 
Caldwell (grounds), Jerry Atwood (program book), Fred Green 
(student assistant), Hank Tufo (raffle), Don Sprengel (merchan- 
dise), Jack Nicholson (treasurer). Seated: Angelle Alessi (internal 
publicity), Jack Doyle (vice-chairman), Kay Dwyer (faffle assis- 
tant), Mike Serritella (general chairman), Tony Ward (internal 
publicity), Tom Murray (entertainment). Bob McGauley (external 
publicity). 




m'K'^ 




The Commerce Council's Fair Booth asks, "Lemon meringue, 
anyone? " 



Fair-goers go round and round on the ferris wheel. 





The Rambler's Five "strike up the band" for the Loyolans as 
they promenade through the main tent. 



The first prize for the raffle was a gray-white 
1960 Triumph TR-3 with a bright red interior and 
a white convertible top. The displaying of the 
car in the Lake Shore Union during the many 
weeks before the Fair, plus the mailing of the 
raffle books to the students (two new raffle "gim- 
micks") proved to be very successful. 

The chairman of this year's fair was Michael 
A. Serritella. This chairmanship culminated his 
senior year and many important University stu- 
dent-positions. 

Sub-chairmen were: Hank Tufo, Kay Dwyer, 
Bob McCauley, Angelle Alessi, Tony Ward, Mike 
Caldwell, Jerry Atwood, Jack Nicholson, Tom 
Murray, Gene Nelson, Don Sprengel, and Jack 
Doyle. 



27 



The official close of the school year is 
heralded by the commencement exercises held in 
the Granada Theatre. In February, one hundred 
forty-nine degrees were conferred by the Gradu- 
ate School, of which three were doctors of educa- 
tion and four were doctors of philosophy; four- 
teen degrees were conferred by the School of 
Nursing, sixty-nine by the College of Commerce, 
ninety-five by the College of Arts and Sciences, 
and thirty-nine by University College. R.O.T.C. 
commissions were awarded to five men. 



COMMENCEMENT 



Rev. Stewart Dollard, S.J., dean of the Graduate School, helps 
Dr. Frederick D. Rossini into a doctor's hood as Very Rev. 
James F. Maguire, S.J., prepares to confer the degree of doctor 
of science honoris causa on Dr. Rossini at the February com- 
mencement exercises. 




In February, honorary degrees were pre- 
sented to two men in recognition of their con- 
tributions to their respective fields. The Rt. Rev. 
Msgr. Vincent V. Cooke, director of the Catholic 
Charities for Chicago, received the degree of 
doctor of laws honoris causa; and Dr. Frede- 
rick D. Rossini, chairman of the department of 
chemistry at Carnegie Institute of Technology, 
received the degree of doctor of science honoris 
causa. 



The keynote speaker at the Febiniary exer- 
cises was Dr. Norman Burns, professor of educa- 
tion at the University of Chicago and secretary of 
the North Central Association. Dr. Burns, who 
has also held posts as the director of study for 
the Arkansas commission on higher education and 
as educational consultant to the governments of 
Pakistan and Iraq, spoke to Loyolan graduates on 
"The Importance of Higher Learning." 



28 




Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S.J., presents the degree of doctor of laws honoris causa to the 
Rt. Rev. Msgr. Vincent W. Cooke. Handing the degree to Father Maguire is registrar 
EUzabeth McCann; adjusting Msgr. Cooke's hood is Rev. Stewart Dollard, S.J.;, and looking 
on approvingly is Rev. Charles I. Doyle, S.J., who presented Msgr. Cooke for the degree. 




Dr. Norman Burns, professor of education 
at the University of Chicago and secretary 
of the North Central Association, delivered 
the keynote address, "The Importance of 
Higher Learning," at the February com- 
mencement exercises. 



Rev. Ralph A. Gallagher, S. J., director of the Institute of Social 
and Industrial Relations and chairman of the sociology depart- 
ment, stops to chat with graduates Joseph Bamberger, Beverly 
Chandler, and others. 





Candidates for the degrees of bachelor of 
science in education and bachelor of science 
wait in their places in the Granada Theatre 
for the announcement of their names. 



29 



STUDENT 
GOVERNMENT 



LOYOLA UNION 



During the past several years, the Loyola Union Congress and 
Board of Governors have been attempting to revise the Union Con- 
stitution in order to meet the needs of our expanding University. 

Many changes have come about since the reestablishment of the 
Union in 1947. Since that time, the enrollment of the University has 
greatly increased, and there are a greater number of organizations 
and activities which have since been formed on the campus. The role 
which the Union plays in the total picture must be readjusted in order 
to keep up with this growth. 

The new constitution of the Loyola Union was sent to student or- 
ganizations and also to all of the student councils. 

The main changes of this constitution involve the reduced num- 
ber of representatives from student organizations and the addition of 
the Advisory Board composed of faculty and administration. With a 
reduced number of representatives, meetings may be held with greater 
ease while maintaining equal representation from all areas. It is hoped 
that with this new constitution the student activities program can be 
developed to meet the needs of the entire enrollment. 

It is the hope of the Transitional Board of Governors that the 
student body will also adjust to these changes and reevaluate their 
programs in order to keep up with the current trends. 



llnion Board of Go%ernors. Standing: Georffe Kollintzas, John 
Xicliolsoii, SfiitccI: Thomas Haney, John Doyle, John Johns. 




32 



The editorial board of Enosis (Bob Styles, executive editor; Ellen 
Miller, assistant editor; Tom Millard, editor-in-chief) discuss the 
next issue of the Union Newsletter. 





Four Loyolans pause in front of the Lake Shore Union House to 
have their picture taken by Rev. Thomas Bryant, S.J. 



Chess playing, bridge, eating, and 
general conversation (ranging from 
politics to poetry) are the normal ac- 
tivities of the Lewis Towers Lounge. 





The members of the Interfratemity Council gather to discuss 
problems common to their fraternities: Charles Ptacek (Alpha 
Kappa Psi), Maury McCarthy (Alpha Delta Gamma), Robert 
Marlin (Pi Alpha Lambda), Ed Glabus (Tau Kappa Epsilon), 
Tom Murray (Tau Delta Phi), John Doyle (Delta Sigma Pi), and 
Dick Cegielski (Sigma Delta Phi). 



INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 



Richard Labich (Phi Mu Chi), president of the IFC, confers with 
George Kollintzas, moderator. 




All undergraduate fraternities compose the 
Interfratemity Council which deals with the 
problems, activities, and matters concerning these 
fraternities. 

The supervision of both fraternity pledging 
and rushing is the most important duty of the 
Council. In addition, the Council is responsible 
for regulating and studying all undergraduate 
fraternity problems and relations. 

The main purpose of the Interfratemity 
Council is to promote the welfare of the frater- 
nities and the fraternity system at Loyola Univer- 
sity. Furthermore, it helps to develop Christian 
gentlemen of the highest caliber in accordance 
with the standards and ideals of Catholic Educa- 
tion. 

The Interfratemity Council continually 
strives to work in harmony with the government 
of the Loyola Union, and the faculty and ad- 
ministration of Loyola University. 



34 



INTERSORORITY COUNCIL 




Interjiorority Council. Standinp.: Anpelle Alessi, Diane Dybas, Pat Metz, Mary Ann Will. 
Seated: Virginia Zittnan, Judy Kohnke, Marian Enrgiht, Carol Fulgoni, Alice Sobol. 



The Intersorority Council was established to unite in a spirit of 
friendship and good will all undergraduate sororities, so that ideas may 
be exchanged and problems solved for the mutual benefit of all 
sorority members. 

The Council consists of two representatives from each sorority 
and a chairman, secretary, and treasurer chosen from the main body. 
Joan Vaccaro acts as moderator. 

The Intersorority Council acts as a supervisory and mediative 
board for all sorority members; it has the power to regulate rushing 
and pledging methods, and to rule on sorority chapters seeking estab- 
lisliment at Loyola. 

The Council follows a busy schedule, which includes hosting the 
freshmen women at the I.S.C. Welcome Tea, carrying out charitable 
projects, and planning varied activities, the most significant of which 
is Sorority Daze, established by the I.S.C. to better acquaint students 
and faculty with the role of the sorority woman on campus. 



35 



ARTS COUNCIL 




Arts Council Officers. Madeleine Doman, secretary; Patrick CuUiane, president; Maurice 
McCarthy, vice-president; Henry Tufo, treasurer. 



The Student Council, representing two thousand students in the 
College of Arts and Sciences, is composed of an Executive Board, 
including the president, the vice-president, the secretary, and the 
treasurer, elected by popular vote of the entire student body. The 
members of the Council are the president and vice-president of each 
class, and two liaison members, one from the School of Nursing, and 
one from the College of Commerce. 

The Council exists to provide extra-curricular activities for the 
student body. During the year the Council sponsored class parties for 
each of the four classes, produced the 1960 Variety Show and the 
Student Directory, sponsored the Freshman Advisory Program, the 
annual Arts School picnic, and actively participated in the Freshman 
Orientation Week sponsored by the Loyola Student Union. The main 
activity of the Council was the Mardi-Gras Dance held at the Guild- 
hall the Friday before Lent. A success in its first year, largely through 
the efforts of the dance chairman, Maury McCarthy, the Mardi-Gras 
promises to become part of Loyola tradition. 



36 





Senior class officers. Richard Cegielski, vice-president; John 
Moran, president. 



Junior class officers. George Van Ryan, vice-president; Joseph 
Gajewski, president. 



Sophomore class officers. James Murray, president; William 
Savage, vice-president. 



ARTS CLASS OFFICERS 



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Freshman class officers. Harry Dolan, vice-president; Adam 
Lut\nski president 




COMMERCE COUNCIL 




Commerce Council. Slandinp: Ronald Priori, Patrick McWeeny, Hobcrt Wall, James 
Pomvkacz, lames Fitzgerald, Richard Donovan, Nicholas Caputo. Seated: Lawrence Grady, 
Matthew Moran, Arthur Wondrasek. John Nicholson, James Perell. 



The year 1959-60 may be recorded as the most aggressive year the 
Commerce Council has ever enjoyed. From the outset, the Council 
took on the appearance of a well-coordinated group, sure of its goals 
and confident of the way these goals would be reached. The leader- 
ship was brilliant, the membership qualified, the operation effective. 
New ideas to benefit the student body emerged. New and enlarged 
programs designed to supplement the University programs were 
formulated and carried out. The Commerce Council, as never before, 
justified its existence; it operated as a professional, social, and service 
organization whose primary purpose was to benefit every person in the 
Commerce School. 

Many new ideas were initiated throughout the past year in an 
attempt to best serve the changing needs of an ever-growing student 
body. The Commerce News Sheet, Freshmen Counselling, the Panel 
Discussion Program, Job Interview Discussions, the Commerce Council 
mixer, and the Sno-Ball Dance are all characteristic of the success and 
advancement of the Commerce School, through the efforts of its 
legislative body, the Commerce Council. 



38 





Senior class officers. Richard Donovan, secretary-treasurer; James Pomykacz, 
vice-president; Matthew Moran, president. 



Junior class officers. James Fitzgerald, vice-president, 
John Nicholson, president; Patrick McWeeny, secre- 
tary-treasurer. 



COMMERCE CLASS OFFICERS 



Sophomore class officers. Robert Wall, secretary-treasurer; 
Lawrence Grady, president; James Perell, vice-president. 




Freshman class officers. Arthur Wondrasek, vice-president; 
Nicholas Caputo, secretary-treasurer; Ronald Priori, president. 





Basic Nursing Association. Standing: Margaret Schwengler, Judy 
Kosloskus, Pat Mulvihill, Monica Trocker, Cecile Lietjl, Dixie 
Peach, Troy Ehlert, Kathy Hawkins, Judy Ryan, Violet Stasiak, 
Arlene O'Brien. Seated: Mary Ellen Brannigan, Mary Ann Kelley, 
Kay Kocher, Barbara Klinger, Joan Eckman, Ginny Stift, Joan 
Tengblad, Julie Fish, Kathy Marquis. 



NURSING COUNCILS 



The Association of the Basic Students of the 
Loyola University School of Nursing is composed 
of twenty-one members, including the four class 
officers of each class. 

The activities of the Association are planned 
to help develop the mental, spiritual, and profes- 
sional qualities necessary for the practice of nurs- 
ing, and to promote participation in the student 
activities of the University and in the local, state, 
and national Student Nurse Association. 

The students of the supplemental program 
are represented in the School of Nursing Associa- 
tion, which provides activities for its students 
similar to those of the Basic Students Association. 



School of Nursing Association. Stand- 
ing: Mary Ellen Barber, Phyllis Doro- 
ciak. Seated: Barbara Branch (secre- 
tary), Essie Anglum (moderator), Mary 
Ellen Simmons (president), Mrs. 
Esther Jaffe, Mrs. Jean O'Reilly 
(treasurer). 



40 




MEDICAL SCHOOL COUNCIL 




Medical School Council. Standing: Edward Montgomery, Dino Tatooles, Ken Printen, Dom 
AIIocco, Don Dombrowski, Charles Schutt, Bob Walsh, Theodore Kuttner, Rev. John Bieri, 
S.J. Seated: Nort Flanagan, Frank Pedace, Robert Damptz, Dick Gallagher, Don Meccia, Pat 
Scanlon, John Johns, John Kroner. 



The Student Council of the Stritch School of Medicine has 
established from the time of its founding a three-fold purpose which is 
directly related to the students of the school. These purposes are: 
to foster and advance cordial and intra and inter-class harmony, to 
establish a congenial and enjoyable social environment, and to foster 
a high moral tone in student life. These goals are accomplished by 
student participation and co-operation. 

The Council has achieved a student cross-section in the organiza- 
tion of its membership in striving for student betterment. The Medical 
Council is composed of representatives of the student body at large, 
the individual classes, and the two national fraternities. Phi Beta Pi 
and Phi Chi. 

The administration of the majority of the social activities of the 
Stritch School of Medicine is overseen by the Medical Council which 
in turn is a representation of the School's student body. Furthermore, 
many functions, which are of general interest to the student body, are 
sponsored by the Council. 

41 



DENTAL SCHOOL COUNCIL 



The purposes of the Student Council of the School of Dentistry of 
Loyola University are to foster inter-class harmony, to provide a 
congenial social environment, to act as intermediary betvi'een the 
students and the faculty, to supervise all fraternity rushing and pledg- 
ing, and to supervise all student elections held in connection with the 
School of Dentistry. 

The student body is governed by a group of students vi'hich is 
composed of all four class presidents, a representative from the junior, 
sophomore and freshman classes, and one representative from each of 
the existing fraternities. Furthermore, there are four executive officers 
which are elected by the members of the group. 

The president of the Dental Council is elected in the month of 
May, whereas the other officers of the Council are elected at the first 
meeting after regular class elections and elections of the fraternity 
representatives. 

One of the main reasons for the existence of the governing body is 
to foster as well as sponsor various religious and social activities 
throughout the academic year. 



Dental School Council. Top row: David Marcus, James Smith, 
Thomas Paison, Richard Delo. Second row: Karl Nishimura, James 
Brown, James Rota, Charles Tavares, Monte Levitt, William 
Kline. Bottom row: Peter Wall, Frank McCall, Al McManama 
(president), Paul DeFranco, Dr. Marshal Smulson (faculty repre- 
sentative). 





Student Bar Association. Standing: Melvin Kamm, Frank Reynolds, Robert Listen, George 
Groble, James Griffin, Donald McKenzie. Seated: Daniel McKay, Eugene Noonan, Robert 
Lane, Leonard Gerin, Mrs. Janet Wallin. 



STUDENT BAR ASSOCIATION 



Organized to unify the administration of student affairs and extra- 
curricular activity in the School of Law, the Student Bar Association 
of Loyola University furnishes the fledgling attorney with a variety 
of professional outlets as well as providing an area of social life with 
fellow professional men. Every student in the Law School is a mem- 
ber of the association. 

The Student Bar Association is modeled after the American Bar 
Association, and thus it enables the members to acquire professional 
skills and to maintain the dignity of the law profession. 

The organization's government is carried on by a board of gover- 
nors, composed of four, together with the members of a constitutionally 
prescribed committee. Officers are elected at the beginning of the 
academic year, and the newly elected president appoints members of 
the association to the various committees. 

43 



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Social Work Council. Standing.: Patrick Corcoran, treasurer; Robert Bonovich; Ernest Leydet. 
Seated: Mary Raftery; Richard Zembron; Mary E. Begg, moderator; Thomas Dwyer, president; 
Margaret Conlan, secretray 



SOCIAL WORK COUNCIL 



The Student Council of the Loyola University School of Social 
Work is composed of four members elected from each class. The Coun- 
cil meets monthly with a faculty advisor. There are three main 
spheres of activity which are the concern of the members of the 
Student Council: Religious, Professional, and Social. 

The Student Council arranged for the annual day of recollection 
for members of the student body and faculty. This year the day of 
recollection was held at the retreat house of the Helpers of the Holy 
Souls on the city's North Side. The day was conducted by Rev. 
T. V. Purcell, S.J., of Loyola's Psychology Department. The second 
major religious function sponsored by the Council was the annual 
retreat, held this year at Childerly, the retreat house of the Calvert 
Club of the University of Chicago. Rev. Paul Woelfl, S.J., of John 
Carroll University, conducted the retreat. 

Under the sponsorship of the Student Council monthly meetings 
of the first year students are held, to which are invited speakers whose 
topics relate to first year courses. 

The Student Council's social activities range from preparations 
for orientation week for new students to a party for the June graduates. 



44 



UNIVERSITY COLLEGE COUNCIL 

The evening school student through his attendance at University 
College automatically belongs to the Student Association of the Univer- 
sity College of Loyola University. From this association, the University 
College Student Council is formed. Through cooperation with the 
Univeristy Administration, the Student Council seeks to activate the 
evening school student to partake in e.xtra-curricular activity that will 
serve a twofold purpose of interest to both the student and the 
University. In this manner the Council seeks to bring the benefits of 
self-government to the evening school student body. 

The atmosphere of the evening school campus differs vastly from 
any other campus on the University. The Council realizes this dif- 
ference and tries to maintain policies and activities that reflect the 
character of its constituency. The Council tries to bring its points to 
the student through direct contact. It assists Mr. Matre and his staff at 
time of registration. A program called Dean's Night is sponsored yearly. 
The Council invites all new students and anyone else who is interested 
to attend these sessions. The administrative program is presented by a 
representative of the Dean's office. Religious facilities available to the 
evening school student are explained by the chaplain. Social programs 
are presented by the various evening school organizations, and 
privileges of the evening school student as a student of Loyola are 
explained. 



Jniversity College Council. Standing: Jeremiah Horan, John Erickson. Seated: John Ward, 
/irginia O'Rourke, Dean Richard A. Matre, Norman Leilenberg, Vernon Zbylut. 





Winthrop Hall Council. Standing: Marilynn 
Cavender and Glenda McDonald. Seated: 
Roberta Farek and Carmel Hall. 



WOMEN'S DORM COUNCILS 



Delaware Hall Council. Standing: Nancy Slattery, Julia Neuser, Bonita Bertaux, Jolene 
McCaffrey. Seated: Loretta Krozel, Pauline Zaranka, Rachel Riley, Mary Ann Bickel, Mrs. 
Nanette Williams. 




ADEN'S DORM COUNCIL 

The Loyola Men's Dorm Council, the governing body of Loyola 
Hall, was established in 1957. The purpose of this student assembly 
is to guide the residents for their religious, social, and academic welfare 
and to increase the enjoyment as residents and students of' Loyola 
University. 

The effectiveness of the Council's activity was witnessed in the 
fall when the dorm was awarded the trophy for the best house 
decoration during the Pow-Wow week-end. 

The intense concentration upon the social well-being of the 
residents was witnessed throughout the entire acadamic year by the 
appearance of a number of dances in the donnitory. One of the social 
features of the Hall is the invitations sent to co-ed colleges to attend 
the dorm dances. 



Loyola Hall Council. Standing: James Longe, Donald Lapa, John Corcoran, William Senica, 
Joseph Motto, Ken Snyker. Seated: Paul Kasper, John Zeitz, E. J. Lynch, Thomas Bruno, 
John Banks, Thomas Tyler, Al Nuti. 




47 



FRATERNITIES 

AND 
SORORITIES 




A 



\\ 



.\ 




Alpha Delta Gamma. Standing: Frank Sobol, Ed Donahue, Bob Mullenbock, Jim Bush 
John Farrell, Bob Burke, Tom Church, Ed Biesinger, Wally Wyszynski, Dick Sczatkiewicz, 
Joe Siblik, John Lowrey, Bob Carlo, John Mulcrone, John Ippoliti, Bob Shanewise, Rich 
Petrip. Seated: Erv Schmidt, John Keane, Maury McCarthy, Bill Gibbons. 



ALPHA DELTA GAMMA 



Since its inception at Loyola University in 1924, Alpha Delta 
Gamma has become the largest^J^Jational Catholic-College Social 
Fraternity in the United ^at^^jj'^'''''''"'"'''"-^:;;;;-^ 

Qm}^ with a *rareil-fold tinjtoose in mind, 

antakes of a fraternity 'tef^dents of high 

pijp^ing and suppSrting^l activities of 

ecting ^ stronger^ bond among similarly 

_ _ _ _ Jiiiv^sit^\ 

In coordination with theijr ppjtt^f active participation in Univer- 



The f raternitv;^as Ji 
of affording the sc^gli-l 
morals and high idems, 
Loyola University, and o: 
inclined students of the 



sity activities. Alpha Delta 
promote its Annual Orpham^' 
ties and sororities of the Umi\ 
less fortunate. _^ 

In addition to its ma& 
Alpha Delta Gamma spoiw^r^, : 
students of the University. '~b'^(Jff^^^'^F39- 

The fraternity's successes this year began with the award for the 
best house decoration for the Pow-Wow week-end. 



ma initiatedjiand has continued to 

pi:og«ni,"Hn which all of the fraterni- 

e}^4^d thbilj fraternal hand to those 

^rl^ fraternal activities, 
Th^ksgiving Dance for the 



50 




Alpha Delts leave the fraternity house on their way to morning 
classes on Lake Shore Campus. 



Alpha Delta Gamma Officers. Stamping: Bob 
Mundt (house manager), John Lowrey (treas- 
urer), Norb Slowikowski (pledge master), Erv 
Schmidt (intramurals manager). Seated: John 
Keane (excutive secretary), Maury McCarthy 
(president). Bill Gibbons (vice-president). 





Pat Murphy, Bill Gibbons, and Walter \\ y^7\nski discuss 
topics concerning the Lake Shore Book Store with Bob 
Hobn, the Store's manager. 



51 



Alpha Kappa Psi, the first national professional commerce frater- 
nity, was founded in 1904 to unite st^idents in the field of business and 
to instill in them good professionalT^ttitudes. 

The chapter conducts an arii,iualvl)iusiness fair for all Commerce 
sophomores entitled "Alpha Kjkbpit Psi\0av\\ at which leaders in the 
irm tW stiidepts oftl 



business world inform tli^ 
tion in the College of Co 

Another annual evi 
which this year consiste 
gather information about 
fessional meetings and evffll 
benefit of the brothers andTp^ 
the Tribune Building. ^^ 

In keeping with its 
contributes to its members 



N"!^ 




fthe v^vtous fields of concentra- 

i'5 ithe Research Project, 

Qhicago high schools to 

I/the students. Other pro- 

(|.^iluring the year for the 

the recent tour through 

ackground the chapter 
sponsoring a father-son 
to further illustrate its 



Communion breakfast each s 

versatility. Alpha Kappa Psi has won the Ugly Man contest twice in 

the last three years. 



AtPHA Kk??k PSI 



Alpha Kappa Psi. Standinfi: Richard Gannon, Jame.s Johnson, W'ilham Kraft, Robert Wall, 
John Brown, James Sandner, James Blake. Middle row: Robert Kayer, John Marshall, Joseph 
O'Neill, Thomas Flatley, Ralph Korn, Donald Ritter, John Payne, Ronald Przybyl. Seated: 
Charles Ptacek, Kenneth Fedorka, James Fitzgerald, John Grimes, Paul Gauvreau, Jame.s 
Talamonti. 



?'~T" 




52 




Merrimakers at the AKPsi convention, Jim Johnson, Tom Flatley, 
John Grimes, Richard Gannon, Ralph Kom. 



Jack McKenna, an alumnus; Joseph McCul- 
lough, the chapter advisor; John Tevenan and 
Charles Ptacek, two past presidents, converse 
at the year's convention. 





Alpha Kappa Psi Officers. Standing: James 
Blake (assistant treasurer), Paul Gauvreau 
(treasurer). Seated: Patrick Conlon (vice-presi- 
dent), James Fitzgerald (president), Kenneth 
Fedorka (pledge master), John Grimes (secre- 
tary). 



53 




The members of Alpha Ome^a. 



ALPHA OMEGA 



This national dental fraternity was founded in 1908 to unite 
students of dentistrv and to uphold the highest standards of the pro- 
fession. Alpha Lambda chapt^,^w<i!> established at the Loyola School 
of Dentistry in 1932 V ( 

That ideal which Alpha-^Om^a^.-tlfe bi st national Jewish dental 
fraternity, endeavoi^ to achieve is-^best e\pi(?ssed by its motto: "Har- 
monia, Amor, et Veiitas,4 Hairironx'^JLove and Truth. These words 
were the inspiration of ^' small t!;ioup of piooecis who founded Alpha 
Omega at the Penn6\l\aTiia~C!;alieg,e, of Dental Surgery. 

From a frateinit\ nurttl)eJ4ri|^fouf "members, Alpha Omega has 
grown into an organi/dtion b<)astini^Sjgi.6nty-five chapters with over 
five thousand membeis It has J>een a welcomed addition to the field 
of dentistry. / _ 

Each year, the ftatei nitic^lills its-eal^dar with events such as 
smokers, a Halloneen DadBe,"^d.faitb^piil dinner-dance. It also 
sponsors many activities appeMil%& both the cultural and professional 
interests of all its members. 



54 




;; 



Alpha Omega Officers. Alan Lauter, Dr. Marshall Smulson, Max Berman, Dave Marcus. 




Brothers of Alpha Omega Dental 
Fraternity pose for the Loyolan pho- 
tographer in one of the classrooms of 
the Dental School. 



/^ 



i v.. 



Three members of Alpha Omega 
leave the Dental School after a 
strenuous day of classes. 




Xi Chapter of Alpha Tau Delta National Fraternity for women in 
nursing was organized at Loyola irL^956 and was officially installed on 
campus in 1957. 

The purposes of Alpha TaT\^"©felta are to promote higher pro- 
fessional standards in the field df^lmrsing; to develop the profession 




through an improved progr 
bond of friendship, fellows 
women in the nursing pro 

Chapters of Alpha Tau 
colleges which offer a basi^ 
The fraternity was founded 
in 1921. Since that time, the 
the five-year nursing progr^ 
time, this program has been reduced to rour years 

Among the activities undei&l<€h3iy the fraternity during the past 
year were participation in the 1959-60 Pow-Wow, Loyola Fair, and 
Variety Show. 



ducation; and to form a close 
, and understanding among 

ted at those universities and 

ursing on the college level. 

rsity of California at Berkeley 

has been active in promoting 

rosn^ctive nurses; at the present 



ALPHA TAU DELTA 



Alpha Tau Delta. Standing: Monica Trocker, Karen Nead, Jean Jankovec, Joan Tengblad, 
Joan Eckman, Maureen Martin, Gerry McCarter, Mary Muskus, Kathy Hawkins, Esther 
Deszes. Seated: Nancy Zinimemian, Pat Metz, Kereen Forster, Caroline Medl, Mary Anne 
Will, Kay Jahnke, Margie Malone, Jane Donovan, Freddie Pach, Peggy Fischer. 




56 








Alpha Tail Delta. Standing: Emily Wills, Ginny Louden, Cele 
Liebl, Mary Poduska, Judy Ryan, Rita Rauen, Verna Christian. 
Seated: Mary Anne Hopkinson, Mary Kay Bussert, Nancy Swieton, 
Ellie McCann, Peggy MacAndrews. 



Alpha Tau Delta. Standing: Lita Grabovv, Joan Zaharski. 
Seated: Kay Kocher, Ginny Stift, Cathy Monco. 





Alpha Tau Delta Officers. Standing: Nancy Zimmerman (treasurer), 
Mary Anne Will (president), Monica Trocker (pin custodian), Pat Metz 
(vice-president). Seated: Verna Christian (custodian), Ginny Louden 
(secretary), Rita Rauen (pledgemistress), Kay Jahnke (historian). 



57 




Chi Theta Upsilon. Standing: Joan Reese, Joan McCabe, Sharon Keinath, Mary Laskowski. 
Seated: Jo Tomaszewski, Pat Podraza, Judy Kohnke, Joyce Moreth, Laureen Dupre, Ann 
Roehrich. On floor: Geraldine Murphy, Claire Hardman. 



CHI THETA UPSILON 



Chi Theta Upsilon, a local sorority now concluding its second year 
on the Loyola scene, may look.back on the undertakings of its begin- 
ning years with a well-earnect glpw of achievement. 

Among its successes, spciaAv speaking, Chi Theta made news 
when it presented a "first/ in^^k formal induction of pledges from 



Lake Shore Campus. Acti 
and SAL programs, a r/obL 
Christmastime party at th 
tion of an act in the Varr 
Maytime Fair earned 
recognized Greeks on c 

Scholastic-wise, the 
award program to give r 
scholarship. 

No self-respecting sorority 
Chi Theta fulfilled this requi 




n in both the Maroon & Gold 
the Pow-Wow festivities, a 
ement House, the presenta- 

the madcap merriment of the 
mfortable niche among the 

tly introduced an academic 
those members who excel in 



plete without its share of queens, 
t when Jo Tomaszewski became a 
nominee for the Sweetheart of Tau Kappa Epsilon, and Joyce Moreth 
reigned as the Queen of the 1960 Notre Dame Mardi Gras. 



58 




Chi Theta Upsilon Officers. Standing: Mary Laskowski 
(chaplain), Carol Fulgoni (historian), Geen Kizior 
(treasurer). Seated: Jo Tomaszewski (vice-president and 
(pledgemistress) Judy Kohnke (president), Carol Rogalski 
(secretary). 




The coeds of Chi Theta put on an act at one of their rushing teas 
in the Rambler Room. 



Chi Theta Upsilon. Standing: Stella 
Stasulaitis, Joan Schildknecht, Carol 
Fulgoni. Seated: Mary Lou Kelly 
Chris Szostecki, Jan Hamilton, Geen 
Kizior, Carol Rogalski, Mary Kattner. 
On floor: Aurelia Rutecki. 




The purpose of Delta Sigma Delta, a national dental fraternity, 
moderated by Dr. John M. Coady, are the maintaining of high pro- 
fessional standards and the f^|«fe^ of scientific, ethical and pro- 
fessional progress. Beta ch^ptar^was organized at the Loyola School 
of Dentistry in 1885. Its house i_§|K8^1:e<l at 710 S. Ashland Boulevard. 

Delta Sigma Delta canf^Jajfil t^e ^onor of having had members 
of the fraternity in administrative^ capacities within the School of Den- 
tistry from its beginning to the^pfejSgpt time. It is very proud of this 
record. \-(\ 'r:^, %^ \, 

As part of its social pragrams'fft^e fraternity sponsors an all-school 
picnic, as well as a Christupis p^arty an(|^ St. Patrick's Day party. 

Delta Sigma Delta existft^er its^^mbers, and its members, realiz- 
ing this fact, have continually (I'evoted themselves to maintaining the 
honor of the fraternity. 



DB.lk S/GA4A \^B.lk 



The members of Delta Sigma Delta. 




6U 




Delta Sigma Delta Officers. Back row: Karl Nishimura, 
George Takahashi, Jim Rota. Front row: Ron Olen, Larry 
Coyne, Tim Schneider, Gil Winter. 



Two brothers of Delta Sigma Delta seem to have found 
a very interesting and amusing piece of literature. 



V*^"^ 





Members of Delta Sigma Delta Fraternity gather to- 
gether for some informal conversation about the latest 
news. 



61 




Delta Sigma Pi. Standing: John Billimack, James Alex, Peter Marchi, James Matousek, Michael 
Casserly, Martin Corrigan, Nicholas Motherway, Richard Lucas. Seated: Jerry Casey, Donald 
Jakalski, Donald Fortney, James McGrath, Tony Mastro, Charles Harrison, Norb Florek, 
Herman Becker, Ronald White. On floor: Michael Sullivan, David O'Neill, Dale Granacki, 
John Nicholson, Terry Notari. 



DELTA SIGMA PI 



The fraternity of Delta Sigma Pi is a professional commerce 
fraternity established at New York X^niversity in 1907. Gamma Pi 



Chapter, installed at Loyola i 
graduate chapters. 

The purpose of Delt 
in uniyersities and to 
its members. The brot 
thi-ough an extensive 
speakers from the busine^ 
dustries. 

The fraternity's soci 
Dinner Dance each semester,'*^ 
of Delta Sigma Pi is crowned, a 
numerous other social gath^ij 
in athletics has won it numei'* 

The fraternity offers its 
profesional and social deyelopmentr' 
for which Delta Sigma Pi is noted 




iO, is one of 106 under- 



study of business 

al activity among 

byola achieve this 

ch includes guest 

to Chicagoland in- 



d by an Initiation 

' at which the Rose 

'ay Commemoration, and 

S/the chapter's interest 

' nners and trophies. 

ong bond of friendship, 

cultivation of the leadership 



62 




Delta SiRiTia Pi. Standing: John Drill, William O'Neill, Dr, Sylves- 
ter M. Frizol, Joseph Lang, Arch Johnston, Patrick McWeeny. 
Seated: John Sullivan, Stephen Perry, Lawrence Grady, J. J. Sulli- 
van, Charles Papish, Ray Hartman, William Schmitt, Donald 
McLean. On floor: Richard Donovan, John Doyle. 



The board of officers of Delta Sigma Pi present their new Rose 
of Delta Sig, Monica Kozak. The officers are John Nicholson 
(senior vice-president), Herman Becker (treasurer), John Doyle 
(president), Terry Notari (junior vice-president), David O'Neill 
(secretary). 





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Bill O'Neill, Jim Perell, Ray Hartman, and 
Larry Grady stop to chat with a coed as they 

leave the elevator at Lewis Towers. 



63 



Approved by the University in September, 1959, Delta Zeta Chi 
is the newest sorority at T .nynia Tt is nppn tn wnmpn students on both 



campuses. 

Members of Delta Zeta 
Coed Club, the Historic: 
Associates of Loyola, and. olh(!r stude; 

The sorority sponsors three annii^ 
dance is held in May /at some; well 
two affairs are the Snowm 



Contest 
game. 

As other new org^nizattobs are doing, D^ltla Zeta Chi is meeting 




Chihold positions of responsibility in the 
s|3c5H|', The Loyol'^ews, the Student 
organize ti^s. 

affairs . ' "he sorority-sponsored 
)wn Chi(;ago hotel. The other 
ai^ thi; Dads' Day Basketball 



the needs of the growing Ufiilversit 
Delta Zeta Chi has aIso\ 
founded arts and sciences 

The moderator of the 
charter members are: Joan Thiry> 

Lucas, Barbara Cadero, Mary DeVlieger, Terri Lucchetti, Kathleen 
Peet, Kay Fish, and Christine Ciesla. 



ig student body, 
(e Shore Campus- 



aine Koprowski. The 
ybas, Alice Sobol, Mary 



DELTA ZETA CHI 



Delta Zeta Chi. Standing: Cathy Peet, Barbara Cadero, Terri Lucchetti, Christine Ciesla. 
Seated: Mary DeVlieger, Elaine Koprowski (moderator), Alice Sobol, Kay Fish. On floor: Joan 
Thiry, Diane Dybas. 




64 




Delta Zeta Chi Officers. Standing: Kay Fish (treasurer), Mary 
DeVlieger (vice-president). Seated: Alice Sobol (president), Diane 
Dybas (secretary). 



Barabara Cadero and Mary Lucas study in the Lake Shore 
Union House, showing that the impossible is possible! 





Barbara Cadero, Joan Thiry, Terri Lucchetti and Alice Sobol leave the 
Lake Shore Union House on their way to their afternoon classes. 



65 




Kappa Beta Gamma. Standing Carol Kuna, Carolyn Dovichi, Geri Tripp, Dolores Zablotny, 
Eleanor Geiger, Eva Nickolicli, Marlene Capparelli, Joan Coscioni, Nancy McCarthy, Jeanette 
Sperka, June Antonucci, Mary Kay Loess, Rita VVagner. Seated: Eileen Dobosz, Bernadine 
Nowak, Carolyn Mattern, Nina Mansfield, Monica Kozak. On floor: Sheila O'Carroll, Angelle 
Alessi, Virginia Zittnan, Mary Ann Bamberger. 



KAPPA BETA GAMMA 



The strong bond of friendship existing among the sisters of Kappa 
Beta Gamma begins during pledgj^!§;^nd lasts a lifetime. Since its 
founding at Loyola in 1954, Ep^^TMapter of this national social 
sorority has been one of the mostVagtu^ijrganizations on campus. 

Highlights of Kappa's social calendar are the two traditional 
formal dances, the Kappa KifigKF'SoSt^i-SSS party, teas for prospec- 
tive members, and many cither parties. Also included are many sum- 
mer activities and the bi-annual coji^ntions held in different cities. 



Kappa is always well 
year Kappa won the Outsta 
SAL Drive and an aw 
also merited praise for 
Club Fashion Show. Ind 
held offices in such org; 
Society, the ISC Council, the 
Circumference. One Kappa g 




and another was crowned as "Miss Sorority. 



iversity functions. This 

Award for work in the 

at Parade. Kappans 

a Fair and the Coed 

for Miss Varsity and 

d Club, the Historical 

, the Curtain Guild, and 

^en "Rose of Delta Sigma Pi " 







i"'^p*r- 



aiMt-Mb 







Kappa Beta Gamma's "Cheer" float wins a third place trophy for 

their mastenvork in the annual fall Pow-Wow. 



Kappa Beta Gamma Officers. Eva Nickolich (pledge mistress), Sheila 
O'Carroll (historian), Jeanette Sperka (corresponding secretary), Dolores 
Zablotny (treasurer), Viginia Zittnan (vice-pesident), Nancy McCarthy (re- 
cording secretary), Angelle Alessi (president). 





' J**- 



Carol Mattern, Angelle Alessi, Carolyn Do- 
vichi, Eleanor Geiger, Carol Kuna, and Monica 
Kozak leave Lewis Towers for a brief interlude 
at the Interlude. 



67 



Phi Alpha Delta's predecessor, Lambda Epsilon, was aptly named: 
Lambda for law and Epsilon for equity. 

When it was seen that .th^ire' were serious defects in the original 
constitution of the fraternity, a convention was held in South Haven, 
Michigan, which eventually dissolved Lambda Epsilon and drew up 
a new set of articles for a new fraternit\' which was to be named Phi 
Alpha Delta. On Novembfr 8, 1902, the constitution and by-laws of 
Phi Alpha Delta were formally adopted. 

The Webster chapter was established at Loyola University School 
of Law in 1935. The chapter has been extremely active ever since its 
establishment, except for a period during \\'orld War II when law 
school operations were temporarily suspended. 

The present chapter»is,composed of approximately 70 active mem- 
bers from both day and evening divisions. To be eligible for member- 
ship in this national legal fratejnite^^|^ent must have completed his 
first year of legal studies. 



PHI ALPHA DELTA 



Phi Alpha Delta. Standing: Frank Bouska, John Hartigan, Patrick Hughes, Paul Stinneford, 
Walter Snioluch, Bruce Golden, Calvin Sparrow, Robert Bransley. Seated: Daniel McKay, 
Edward Keavy, Paul Piety, Leonard Gerin, William Page. 




68 




Phi Alpha Delta Officers. Robert Bransley, Paul Stinneford, Patrick 
Hughes (president), Bruce Golden, Edward Keavy. 



Dean John Hayes joins the fraternity brothers for a cup 
of coffee in the Law School lounge. 



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if 


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Phi Alph.s meet to plan their .spring party. 



69 




Phi Beta Pi. Standing: John Picken, Larry Brown, George Hogan, Al Timperman, Marty 
Klenda. Seated: Michael Orth, Donald Dombrowski, Jerry Kessler, Joseph Misulonas, Joseph 
DiFiore, Ronald Kornack, Charles Baldwin, Karl Frankovich, Ed Neira, Donald Miezio, 
Charles McCarthy. On fhor: George Brodmerkel, Robert Hynduik, John Johns. 



PHI BETA PI 



Phi Beta Pi dates back tp'1891, when its Alpha Chapter was 
organized at the University lw"2gittsburgh Medical School. Alpha 
Omega Chapter was brought ^^|foyola's Stritch School of Medicine 
in 1921. At present, the frat^rji^i^^as thirty-two chapters in medical 
schools throughout the Ignited States. 

The history of tlr^ Alpha Onioga qM^ter is as illustrious as that 
of the fraternity itself ParticiilaiK ]]i;^ifworthy is the fact that Dr. 
L. D. Moorehead, one of the cliaiiter1^)unders and former Dean of 
Loyola's Medical School, achieved greatness in the medical profession. 
Today this medical oenius is coiniuemoraled in the annual Moorehead 
lectureship of Phi Beta Pi, <>* 

Alpha Omega niaiiitaiu.s a chapter hous&^fyr its members at 6341 
North Sheridan rW^]j.4I^^^K||^lMEdcns <H"medical school life are 
alleviated by the C()ngt^kl r^^m^sTuiJ^i^likh exists within the ranks 
of the fraternity. It is ^^S^g&Ttig^siQafe 110 members gather at the 
various professional and social events- sponsored by the fraternity for 
a few moments of well-earned relaxation. 



70 




Phi Beta Pi. George Heiinbach, Floyd Okada, John Carroll, Ben 
Jagodzinski, John Behnonte, John Gnapinski, Frank Bresnahan, 
Ted Kuttner, Phil MorelU, Thomas DiSilvio, Rudolph Maier. 



Phi Beta Pi Officers. Donald Dombrowski (treasurer), George Brodmerkel 
[archon), John Johns (vice-archon), William Tansey (secretary). 





Joe Misulonas, Tom DiSilvio, Jim Mullen, and 
Don Dombrowski lounge in their comfortable 
living room at the fraternity house. 



71 



Phi Sigma Chapter of Phi Chi National Medical fraternity dates 
from 1907 when it was founded as. a local medical fraternity. Shortly 
after its inception, the membei-5^\jfjH:his small but active group ex- 



pressed a desire to affiliate 
of Phi Chi. The Chapter 
vention of Phi Chi held th 

At present, the fratern 
mately one hundred and fi. 
quarters at 712 S. Ashland 
houses, two of wnich ha 
where a bulk of its activitie 

In spite of the large 
Phi Chi show an unusual elds 
friendship naturally acquired 




th the national organization 
at the twelfth national con- 
r in Baltimore, 
ive membership of approxi- 
h is housed in the fraternity 
rters are composed of three 
d into one fraternity unit 



'ganization, the members of 
is spirit is motivated by the 
the fraternity system, as well as 
the constant sharing of personal interests in the medical profession. 



PHI CHI 



Phi Chi. Standing: Joseph Yurkanin, George May, Patrick De Gennaro, John Ambre, Thomas 
Meirink, Robert Picchiotti. Seated, middle row: Hank Holmes, Daniel Kott, Leonard Kut, 
Myles Walshe, VVilham McKenna, Ron Hammond, Charles Schutt. Seated, front row: James 
Rascher, William Tamawski, Richard Connelly, Matthew Flanagan, William LeMire, Joseph 
Mazza. 




72 



— - *. ^ -"^ 




On a typical night at the Phi Chi house, members Daniel Kott, 
Robert Picchiotti, Dick Connelly, Bill Sullivan, George May, Leonard 
Kut, Joe Mazza, and Myles Walshe spend long hours gaining culture 
via television ("Gunsmoke," etc.) 



Phi Chi Officers. Standing: Stephen Birskovich, James 
O'Malley, James Rascher. Seated, middle row: William 
Cappaert, Gene Kuhl. Seated, front row: Patrick Scanlon, 
John LeMire, Robert DeVito. 





Doing k.p. duty at the fraternity house are Jim Rascher, Hank Holmes, 
and Bill Sullivan. 



73 




Phi Mu Chi. Standing: Leonard Molander, Richard Oldenburg, Peter Wagner, Stanley 
Wyszynski, William Bell. Standing, middle row: Walter Welninski, Paul Hoernig, Quintin San 
Hamel, Thomas Vogt, Thomas Murphy. Seated: Patrick Smith, Dennis Hillenbrand, Richard 
Labich, Ronald Wadle, Alan Schoen. 



PHI MU CHI 



Founded in 1922, Phi Mu Ghi is the oldest fraternity on campus. 
Doctor Meade, founder of ^ybie organization, purposed Phi Mu Chi to 
foster an interest in higfe^educatio%and to promote a moral and 
social culture among science students.' 

Phi Mu Chi is presei**!**' a»^|Hid«|^raduate social fraternity. The 
social aspect is obvious bv_tne ^fesenreof the many social affairs dur- 
ing the past year such ass the tlHi^Hbsed formal dinner dances; a Hallo- 
ween party which was dpen.il) the fratets and their friends; an open 
New Year's Eve party; a ttllxer held after one of the Loyola basketball 
games which was open to the' e^ire student body. 

During the 1959-60 acade:^ year, the Phi Mus won the "Iggy" 
for the best overall ac|j»the ^nilal 1/ari^ty Show; they entered a 
contestant in the annual -^Jau Kapg[^'nEiisilon. "Ugly Man Contest"; 
assistance was given for the OtnharilJ' Day; they also had a booth in the 
Loyola Fair and a float enteVmliM^re Pow-Wow. 



74 




Phi Mu Chi's float at the Pow-Wow Float Parade looked forward 
to the Duquesne game by heralding "Cook the Dukes." 



Phi Mu Chi Officers Standing: Alan Schoen (corresponding secretary), 
Quintin San Hamel (historian), Dennis Hillenbrand (recording secretary). 
Seated: Thomas Murphy (pledgemaster), Richard Labich (president), Patrick 
rick Smith (treasurer), Ronald Wadle (vice-president). 





Fete Brusca, Paul Hoernig, Tom Vogt, Pete 
Wagner, and Ralph Antonelli are caught in an 
informal pose at their Lake Shore Union table. 



75 



Pi Alpha Lambda is the second oldest and the largest social 
fraternity on Loyola s two campuseJI^The history of this fraternity has 
been one of spiritual, scholastic, sg&f;, and athletic success. 

Pi Alpha Lambda was fo!i(yic^.mirty-seven years ago by Rev. 
James J. Mertz, S.J., to help"' s#w|fcunds for the construction of 
Madonna della Strada Chapel. Xh&ffSjffrnity shield is mounted above 
the main entrance of the chap^to corrtmemorate their success. 

Since its foundati(>u in 1923, Pi .'\lpha Wimbda has displayed an 
active interest in all .Itf'o'^l organizations antPtunctions. To attest to 
this fact, for the past thiee years a Pi Alpli lias'*)een president of the 
Blue Key Honor Fraternity and ralfle chain nan of the Loyola Fair, 
respectively. This year the Pi \Iplis won the Inter-Fraternity Sing, 
sponsored the Third Annual Intercollegiate Dance, and held a closed 
retreat for its members.^ ■* j ' ^ 

Pi Alpha Lambd^^i^^ess as a sociaffi^priity can be attributed 
to the fact that this fraternifv'^JfeTSfxIlaecl m the highest ideals of 
Catholic manhood. 



PI ALPHA LAMBDA 



Pi Alpha Lambda. Back row: Jim Smith, Andy Symanski, Bob Donley, Joe Garvey, Mike 
Caldwell, Pete Kane, Mike Ryan. Middle row: Jim Laurie, Joe Moorhead, John O'Keefe, 
Greg Griffin, Bill Towne, Tim Sheehan, Jerry Ring, George Ryne. Frortt row: Bruce Knowles, 
Jack Moustakis, Bob Marlin, Dave Bresnahan, Hank Tufo. 





Henry Tufo, chairman of the raffle book committee for the 1960 
Loyola Fair, engages the assistance of fellow Pi Alphs (and a helpful 
nurse) in sending out his raffle books to Loyolans. In the picture are 
Peter Kane, James Laurie, Tufo, Robert Marlin, and Joan Tengblad. 



Pi Alpha Lambda Officers. Standing: Henry Tufo (house 
steward), James Laurie (treasurer), John Moustakis (sergeant 
at arms). Seated: Bruce Knovvles (secretary), Robert Marlin 
(president), David Bresnahan (vice-president). 





Pi Alpha Lambda. Tom Tyler, Barry McGraith, George W'ynier, Dave 
Manning. 



77 







PSI OMEGA 



The members of Psi Omega. 



Psi Omega dental fraternity has a two-fold purpose: first, to 
develop membership devoted tectts ^of?ssion, school, and fraternity; 
second, to aid its members^T^^yij'sisjag their professional, social, and 
cultural desires. Psi Omegfr^&^^^Jspi^-jff boasting the accomplish- 
ment of its ambitions. \ \zi;Er ^"^^F^^^^^^/ 

The fraternity has beaope aii^S^raLjprt of the Loyola School 
of Dentistry. Academically its members havei shown their excellence 
by maintaining a consistently hi<fh fejei ofvscholastic achievement. 

In addition to cultivating the pKJff^sioniil, aspirations of its mem- 
bers, Psi Omega maintains a piograni of sccial events which begin 
with those functions at whip j' the fraternity welcomes incoming fresh- 
men into the School of'i^^^ntlstry^jThe freshman open house, freshman 
smoker, and freshman aj^tiSge^baHqu^^re-^^weafling events on the 
social calendar of the ^^^R'^i^-~^X^;^^^^^-^i^r;\^ 

Psi Omega is proud of~rts^^^ail^^^^^TOHlrernbers look confidently 
to the future. @^^=^ 




Psi Omega Officers. Back row: Ron Borer, Terry Moriarty, Bill Todd, Jim Maniatis, Jim 
Carter. Front row: Jim Smith, Everett Shafer, Harvey Vieth. 



Ed Givins dishes out the nightly meal (?) to Jack Meyer. 



Ed Givins, Pete Bunosky, Jim Smith, Bill Todd, Ron Borer gather 
together in the Psi Omega living room. 





79 



The youngest social fraten«y 
of the more active fraternities onta' 
in 1958, Sigma De^^.Phi 
brothers. Througl 
academically, socr 
success in its exist 
was founded, along 
become characteristics 

Sigma Delta Phi has 
such as the Pow-Wow a 
brothers have served on 
tions, have acted as commit 
members of many academ 

The fraternity has als 
ous parties, picnics, bask 




yola, Sigma Delta Phi is one 

Founded as a local fraternity 

oasts a nfcmbership of forty 

it (<W:«vnembers morally, 

la^Delga Phi has found 

ich the fraternity 

to'^lne University, have 



ed in all student affairs, 

the past year. Several 

ouncils, school publica- 

school functions, and are 

embers through numer- 
lides. 



SIGMA DELTA PHI 



Sigma Delta Phi. Standing: Jacob Jachna, James Burns, Dennis Johnson, Jerald Bums, Henry 
Wisniewski, Daniel Kotek, Robert Singler. Seated: Donald Sprengel, Paul Davis, James Caron, 
John Gaspers, Richard Bezdick, Gene Voltolina, Dale Elenteny. 




80 




Sigma Delts jam into the phone booths to get a date for the annual 
Blue Key Dance. 



Sigma Delta Phi Officers. Standing: Stephen Cenek (treasurer), 
Karl Youtsey (secretary). Seated: Richard Cegielsld (president), 
Michael Carbine (vice-president). 





Dan Kotek, Jack Jachna, Dick Cegielski, Dale 
Elenteny, Paul Didzerekis, and George Wentz 
show their school spirit as they prepare to leave 
on Sigma Delt's trip to the Wisconsin game. 



81 




Sigma Lambda Beta. Standing: Raymond Bums, Joseph Ameson, Jeremiah Horan, Earl Olsen, 
John Acke, Gerald Albrecht, Joseph Jindrich. Seated: Peter Quinn, Vernon Zbylut, John 
Erickson, Norman Lellenberg, John Ward. 



SIGMA LAMBDA BETA 



While Sigma Lambda Beta is today one of Loyola's smallest 
fraternities it is likewise one of the oldest. The fraternity was chartered 
and incorporated on February ^|^^^, by a group of undergraduate 
students from the College of (^M^rce, then located on Franklin 
Street. 

However, the gro«*fe«at-tl*^|S3tSHiit*^evealed that its strictly 
local status was not fulmling the needs of its liembers nor the College 
of Commerce. Thus in the spring t|t l!53S/§igmia Lambda Beta applied 
for and received recognition as a ©ki^Jter of ^pha Kappa Psi, National 
Commerce Fraternity. ^ , ^ ^ ^ , 

reputation of being one of 

rions. In recent years, past 

highest office in the 

5on positions. 

lave served in offices of 

and have been verv in- 



Today, Sigma Lamb 
the very active under 
officers of the fratern 
Loyola Union, as well 

Repeatedly, mem 
the University College 



strumental in helping to fulfill t 
University College. 




s of an expanded and growing 



82 




The members of Sigma Lambda Beta help counsel evening stu- 
dents on registration days. 



A committee of members, consisting of, seated: Vern Zbylut, Earl 
Olson, John Ward, Jerry Horan, (standing) Pete Quinn, and John 
Acke, discuss plans for their annual St. Patrick's Day party. 




83 



A local social fraternity, Sigma Pi Alpha was founded in 1933 to 
promote intellectual and social interest among its members and to 
provide for their developn^^nt, bqth spiritually and physically, in an 



atmosphere of friends 
only for students of 
ship has been open to a' 
Although the frat< 
this school year, durin 
a vigorous reorganizatioC 
successful smokers an 
nity with some new r 
return the fraternitv 




t was originally intended 
er, since 1947 member- 
rsity. 

ing the first semester of 
the members initiated 

6m this plan were a few 
ich provided the frater- 
pn the reactivation and 
n which it once held at 



Loyola. 

Annually Sigma Pi Alpha^^p^S^fT its "Spring Nocturne" dance, 
open to the whole university, at which the fraternity presents their 
"Fraternity Man of the Year" award to the fraternity man who best 
exemplified the aims and ideals of his fraternity. 



SIGMA PI ALPHA 



Sigma Pi Alpha. Standing: Louis Ray (vice-pre.sident), Dennis Eagan (secretary). Seated: 
Stanley Cabanski (moderator), Thomas Feeley (treasurer), Thomas Brennan (president). 





The Sigma Pi's gathfr with friends and alumni at their second 
semester smoker which proved to be both gay and exciting. 



Louis Ray, pledgemaster, gives two pledges, 
Robert Agaare and Robert Kaftan, some words 
of advice about pledging. 





Dennis Eagan, Tom Brennan (president), and 
Bill Pales sit at their fraternity table in L.T.'s 
"Black Hole of Calcutta." 



85 




Tau Delta Phi. Standing: John Klein, William Powell, Al Goldin, James Harris, Michael Malec, 
James Potuznik, Larry Gerber, Robert Silich. Seated: John Drechy, Richard Roch, William 
Sieger, David Willson. 



TAU DELTA PHI 



A national social fraternity. 
College of the City of New YorJ 
moderated by Harold B. Murphs 
in 1949. Being a national socialj 
Phi to be a member of t he Na^ 

This year's success^Was lmar| 
fraternity house located an 6)0 SO 
close association with thei: • ^4lui 
their second house since they 
the credit can be attribut 
president, and to Mr. Har( 

One of the highlights 
sing which is the main f( 
fraternity. The winner 
Pi Alpha Lambda fraternity: 



lu Delta Phi was founded at the 

the year 1914. Tau Eta chapter, 

^as organized at Loyola University 

jrnity has also enabled Tau Delta 

iterfraternity Council. 

the acquiring of a new 
leridan Road. Due to their 
Tau Delts have purchased 
n campus. The majority of 
house to Thomas Murray, the 
Wthe moderator. 

the annual Inter-fraternity 

^nsored by Tau Delta Phi 

sing this year was the 



86 




Tau Delta Phi Officers, Standing, hack group: David Willson, 
John Drechny (historian), William Sieger (house manager), Law- 
rence Vonckx (recording scribe), George Van Ryan (correspond- 
ing scribe), Richard Roch (alumni scribe), Michael Morawey 
(chairman of committees). Standing, front group: Harold Murphy 
(moderator), Thomas Murray (president), Barry Cullinan (vice- 
president), William Harlan (treasurer). 



Larry Gerber, Bill Bovvell, and Dan Troves pose for a picture in the living 
room of their new fraternity house on Sheridan Road. 





Larry Gerber and Bill Sieger discuss their 
recent trophies as they imbibe of "the Nectar." 



87 



The Epsilon Kappa Chapter of Tau Kappa Epsilon National 
Fraternity enjoys a prominent position among the organizations of the 
University. Founded in 1938 a^KeUniversity Club, the Chapter has 

M^^^^SJdday . 

oved into a fifteen-room 



progressed to the dyna: 
In the fall semeste 

house adjoining the L 

years. The fraternity 

Wisconsin, which aff 
Among the TEK 

Halloween Ugly Man 

of the Fatna Missions, 

the TEKE Sweetheart 

at the fraternity house 

Among its awards for t 

the best float. Included _ 

at Loyola were the director^ 




illing a dream of many 

tage at Power's Lake, 

year-round activity. 

he year are the annual 

17 Contest for the benefit 

nee in conjunction with 

ed Tea, and faculty lectures 

ES won first prize for 

sitions held by TEKES 

of the Variety show, chair- 



man of the Fair and Frolic, and junior class presidency. 



TAU KAPPA EPSILON 



Tau Kappa Epsilon. Standing, back row: Martin Klest, Ronald Ohlhabber, Kenneth Vahren- 
hdld, Richard Rogan, Brian Crowe, Michael McConnell, William Merrill, Rocco Romano, 
Frank Barcy, Robert Beaton. Standing, middle row: Rev. Francis X. Grollig, S.J., William 
Schultz, Richard Kropp, Jerry Ray, Kenneth Potocki, George Wehrle, Paul Amidei, Frank 
Dentzer, Frederick Herzog, Joseph Gajewski, Thomas Lavelle. Seated: Robert Dooley, David 
Swinehart, Butch Blau, James LaPeaux, Lee Roy Cieslak, Peter Stare, Philip Augustine, Allen 
Busa, Ron Paulson, Robert Styles. 





rhe TEKE officers congregate in their living room. Ed Glabus, 
president. Jim Bishop, vice-president; Ed Murray, secretary; Jim 
Szwed, historian; Fred Green, house financial manager; Bob 
Styles, steward; Tom Millard, chaplain and house manager; Taft 
Roe, sergeant-at-arms. 



[oe Gajewski, producer of the Variety Show 
ind Alumni Secretary of TEKE, looks on as 
Vlike Kutza and Jim Szwed receive the 2nd 
place trophy from Pat Culhane, Arts Council 
President. 





'»>-( 




% 




•ma 




M 





Bob Styles presents Tom Millard with a tradi- 
tional TEKE paddle as Phil Augustine grins for 
the camera man and an alumnus (Steve Luzbe- 
tak) views the situation. 







Theta Phi Alpha. Standing: Toni Kurpiel, Roxane Slaski, Nancy Dower, Eikiii O'Connor. 
Seated: Anna Stau.ss, Marian Enright, Maureen Conroy, Mary Ellen Haye.s, Mary Gill, Carol 
Au.stin, Bonnie Solzak, Maureen Fitzpatrick. On floor: Marge Kneer, Corene Cowperthwait. 
Geraldine Klopack. 



THETA PHI ALPHA 



Upsilon chapter of Theta Phi Alpha became the first sorority at 
Loyola University in 194 2, and it is the only Pan-Hellenic on campus. 



The moderator of the chCpter is 

Last spring, Theta Phi pr^ 
social organization of ihe 
members preceeeded to 

The sorority toasts 
semester rush was helc 
took second place as 
November, Theta Phis 
more creative member; 
ing of the float for the I ow 
sales ability with Chris m> 

Loyola and Marque 
the Night" Party after the 
trophy for his efforts aithe stafli mftT -gh Febni 

In May, the Spring p l e gdes weie fuini "gn\ 



was climaxed with the White Rose Ball. 



y Louis^McPartlin. 
ccepted the Blue Key award for 
With tlii^ award as an incentive, the 
calendar. . 
(! "September Sip." First 
l-at-all ugly Pat Culhane 
Ugly Man Contest. In 
iiterfraternity Sing. The 
w their skills in the build- 
'ation while the others practiced 
the Glenmary Missions, 
dec! Theta Phi's "Player of 
yer on each team received a 
ary 13. 
y initiated, and the year 




90 




Theta Phi Alpha Officers. Carol Schwind (recording secretary), 
Roxane Slaski (pledgemistress), Marge Kneer (treasurer), Joyce 
McAuliffe (vice-president), Nancy Dower (president), Marian En- 
right (historian). 



Theta Phi Alpha. Standing: Lana Doman, Angie Castiglia, Terry Tamburrino, Bobbie Mirek, 

Rachel Riley, Pat Cordan. Seated: Ellen Huck, Carol Schwind, Kay Dyer, Donna Suida, 

Joan Duffy, Joyce McAuliffe, Marybeth McAuliffe. On floor: Judy Kruzel, Denise Moor- 
head, Rose Piraino. 




Lambda chapter of Xi Psi Phi national professional dental frater- 



nity was established at the LoyoL 
Lambda chapter is under the ven^^ 
Allison. '?; 

Among its puagoses is the 
tional advanceme^^^ier^s 
professional and 

The frateiwfi^ 
house parties, le^ 
outing which is oj 

The fraternir 
posed of the wi\ 
ternity by 
and provic 

encouragement and ideas for 
nity, and the school. 



j^chool of Dentistry in 1896. The 
moderatorship of Dr. John R. 

)tion of intellectual and educa- 

tives'^fj^ paternity are both 

g V^th^Jl^ater school unity. 

njiil'fn^^ functions are 

iQ the yearly golf 

eiVt body. 

v^gmn JJp,y7ipppHp«; " COm- 

|.t>^bfi:?l^y serve the fra- 

activities, 

n'jne^s^. jjie alSjUBLja^^ien provides 

anent of the meml^ers, the frater- 



XI PSI PHI 



The members of Xi Psi Phi. 




92 




Xi Psi Phi Officers. Al McManama, Bob Nolan, Dr. John Alhson, Jim 
Moran, Pete Wall. 



Walter Lacs, Bob Misiewicz, John Foley, Frank 
O'Bo.sky, Frank Macias, and Bill Kline, watch television 
in the Xi P.si Phi fraternity house. 



Boll Kendall and Don Gordon watch the same television. 
What's on TV? The reflection of the photographer's 
liRhts. 





The current officers and members of Blue Key. Standinf!,: Alfred McManama, Andrew Kelly, 
William Tansey, Edmund Glabus. Seated: Charles Ptacek (recording secretary-treasurer), James 
Gorman (president), Thomas Haney (vice-president). 



BLUE KEY NATIONAL HONOR FRATERNITY 



Blue Key National Honor Fraternity was founded at the Univer- 
sity of Florida in 1924. Presently boasting a total membership of 
more than 35,000, Blue Key h^^^^^frne to be regarded as a worthy 
counterpart of scholarly Phi Be«*Ka|)pa. 

Loyola's chapter of Blue K3Jtwas established in 1926 through 



the efforts of Rev. Robert 
and Dr. Paul S. Lietz. 

Blue Key represents 
students who help make 
presidents of most underg: 
the Union, various counci 
Loyola's many organizatio 

In 1955 the Loyola ch 
signed to assist the admr 




.J., Dr. William P. Schoen, 

ola's student leaders, those 
membership includes the 

aternities, the president of 
the recognized leaders of 



nized as a service group de- 

aculty and to support and 

n accord with its motto of service, 

marshals at all convocations and 



encourage all student organizatio 

Blue Key members serve as stud 

commencements, and have represented the Dean of Admissions office 

in its Chicago-wide recruitment program. 



96 




Each year the members of Blue Key assist the Dean of Admissions 
by representing Loyola at various local high schools. Rev. John 
C. Malloy, S.]., expresses his gratitude to the group by giving a 
banquet for them at Old Cathay restaurant. Seen above with 
Father Malloy are Michael Serritella, Thomas Haney, James Gor- 
man, Dr. Kenneth Jackson, and Andrew Kelly. 



The new members of Blue Key, inducted into the group in April, are, standing, back row: 
Eugene Nowak, Henry Tufo, Norbert Slowikowski, Gerald Atwood, John Ward. Standing, 
middle row: James Fitzgerald, Michael Hartman, Matthew Moran, Eugene Nelson, John 
Plotz, Nicholas Motherway, Richard Donovan, George Van Ryan, Thomas Murray, Patrick 
Culhane. Seated: Joseph Gajewski, Robert Kayer, James Brown, Harold Aral, Paul Connelly, 
John Doyle, Philip Augustine. 



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WHO'S WHO AMONG STUDENTS 

Who's Who Among Students in American Universities and Col- 
leges was first published for the school year 1934-35. This year marks 
the second time that Loyola University has participated in this national 
recognition organization. 

Selection for the organization is based upon a student's scholar- 
ship, his leadership, his cooperation in educational and extracurricular 
activities, and his promise of future usefulness. Each institution partici- 
pating is assigned a separate quota large enough to give a well- 
rounded representation of the student body but small enough to con- 
fine nominations to an exceptional group of students. 



Who's Who. Standing: Maurice McCarthy, John Doyle, Robert Marhn, Richard Donovan, 
Patrick Culhane. Seated: John Moran, Virginia Stift, Peter Wagner, Barbara Klinger. 




98 



IN AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES 



who's Who. Back row: Richard Stalzer, John Nichele, D. Jerome White. Middle row: James 
Walsh, Robert Lane, Karl Nishimura. Front row: John Hauch, Donald Meccia, Thomas Haney. 

1^' If 1 " ' 





rr "PT 
■ II 





who's Who. Standing: Daniel McKay, James Gorman, Alfred McManama. Seated: Eugene 
Nowak, Lucille Anichini, Mary Ann Kelley, Edmund Glabus. 



100 



ALPHA SIGMA NU 



Alpha Sigma Nu, the national Jesuit honorary fraternity, was 
founded in 1915 and opened its Loyola chapter in 1939. At the present 
time there are thirty Jesuit colleges and universities in membership. 
Since its inception at Loyola, some three hundred men chosen by the 
President of the University on the nomination of the Deans and ASN 
members have been inducted into the organization. Selection for 
membership in ASN is based almost entirely on the highest academic 
excellence joined with some cultural or intellectual service to the 
University. 

The officers of the organization durmg the current year were 
John F. O'Keefe, Commerce, president; Peter J. Wagner, Arts, vice- 
president; Thomas M. Haney, Arts, secretary; and Richard Donovan, 
Commerce, treasurer. ^ In addition, the non-alumni membership in- 
cludes: Rudolph Maier and Kenneth Jamison, Arts; Jack Akamine 
and Sam Liaros, Dental; Richard Blair and Richard Stalzer, Medical; 
Robert Lane and John Nichele, Law; Donald Klein, ISIR; Paul Davis, 
Graduate. The current chairman of the ASN Board of Sponsors is 
Dr. Nicholas A. Ferri of Elmwood Park. 



Alpha Sigma Nu. Richard Donovan (treasurer), Thomas Haney (secretary), Peter Wagner 
(vice-president), John O'Keefe (president), Rev. John A. Kemp, S.J. (moderator), Robert Lane, 
Paul Davis. 



V 






Circumference. Standing; Angelle Alessi, Cathy Monco, Mary Anne Will, Barbara Klinger, 
Mary Ann Kelley, Virginia Stift, Nancy Dower. Seated: Maureen Kaveny (chairman). Marietta 
LeBlanc (moderator), Virginia Zittnan, Jeanette Sperka. 



CIRCUMFERENCE 



Circumference, the women's leadership honor society, was initi- 
ated at Loyola in 1958. The purpose of Circumference is to give recog- 
nition to junior and senior women students who have contributed 
significant service to the University. In accordance with this purpose, 
the organization conducts no social activities, aside from formal initia- 
tion which is held once each year, but seeks to render further service to 
Loyola. During the past year this has been accomplished by the mem- 
bers serving as hostesses at receptions given in honor of distinguished 
visitors to Loyola. 

The members of Circumference are nominated by the current 
membership of the organization and the moderators of the various 
campus organizations; the current membership makes the final decision 
as to whom will be petitioned for membership. There are forty-one 
members at present, thirty-one of whom are currently enrolled in the 
University. 



102 



Delta Sigma Rho is a national honorary forensic fraternity whose 
purpose is to encourage effective public speaking and to honor those 
who excel in public speaking. This national fraternity was founded 
here in Chicago in 1906 and now includes over eighty chapters in 
colleges and universities throughout the country. 

The Loyola chapter is new on campus, having been installed only 
this year. Although only in its incipient stages, the chapter is already 
forming into an active unit on campus. The fraternity is preparing to 
enter into a two-fold sphere of activity by sponsoring and encouraging 
forensic excellence not only in the university itself, but also in the high 
schools in the area — many of tomorrow's Loyolans. 

In its very organization as well as in its activities, Delta Sigma 
Rho here at Loyola is a distinctive organization of distinguished men 
and women who constantly reaffirm these qualities. 



DELTA SIGMA RHO 



Delta Sigma Rho. Standing: John Plotz, Leroy Blommaert, Tom Dienes, Kay Dwyer, Bar- 
ry Cullinan, Philip Augustine, Alan Jorgensen. Seated: Richard Bock, Patricia Kubistal, Har- 
old T. Ross (national president), Donald Stinson, Elaine Koprowski, William Hegan. 




103 




LOYOLAN Awards Committee. Standing: Dr. Kenneth Jackson, Michael Hartman, Rev. 
Thomas J. Bryant, S.J. Seated: Alan Jorgensen, Ellen Miller, Thomas Millard, Joan Vaccaro, 
Nicholas Motherway. 



ANNUAL LOYOLAN AWARDS 



PATRICK J. CULHANE 
College of Arts and Sciences 



JOHN H. DOYLE 
College of Commerce 



KATHLEEN E. DWYER 
College of Art.s and Sciences 




104 




THOMAS M. HANEV 

College of Arts and 

Sciences 



ROBERT C. LANE 
School of Law 



ALFRED J. McMANAMA 
School of Dentistry 



Recognizing the great demands made upon student leaders and 
the value of the services which such students perform for Loyola, the 
LOYOLAN last year inaugurated the practice of presenting awards to 
nine graduates who have distinguished themselves by their leadership 
in the university. 

To select the recipients of the awards, an independent committee 
of students and faculty was selected on the basis of impartiality and 
wide knowledge of the student body. To help the committee in its 
selection, the moderators of the various student organizations, the 
deans of the university, and certain administrators were asked to sub- 
mit nominations for students they considered for the awards. 

The editorial board of the LOYOLAN presented the awards at 
the annual yearbook banquet. 




DONALD L. MECCIA 
Stritch School of Medicine 



VIRGINIA STIFT 
School of Nursing 



D. JEROME WHITE 
College of Arts and Sciences 



105 




Phi Sigma Tau Officers. Giedre Griskenas (vice-president), Richard Donovan (president), Rev. 
Robert W. MuUigan, S.J. (moderator), Robert Kessler (secretary) 



PHI SIGMA TAU 



Phi Sigma Tau is the official honor society for college men and 
women interested in philosophy. It contains twenty-five chapters, 
Loyola having the distinction of being the only Catholic university 
represented in this group. 

Established at Loyola in 1955, Phi Sigma Tau is designed to serve 
as a means of awarding distinction to students having high scholarship, 
to promote student interest in research and advanced study, to provide 
opportunities for publication of student research papers, and to 
popularize interest in philosophy among the general student body. 
Membership is open to students who have maintained a B average in 
at least three courses in philosophy. 

The Society meets four times a year; each meeting features a 
lecture by a professor from Loyola or some other university to speak on 
a subject related to philosophy. Among the speakers this year were 
Rev. F. Torrens Hecht, S.J., and Rev. Paul Caplice, S.J. 

106 




Pi Delta Epsilon. Standing: Philip Augustine, Lawrence Kaufman, Thomas Haney, D. Jerome 
White. Seated: Nicholas Motherway, Anthony Ward, Richard Cegielski, Ellen Miller, Thomas 
Millard, Stanley Dunnetski. 



PI DELTA EPSILON 



Pi Delta Epsilon, founded at Syracuse University in 1909, is an 
honorary fraternity designed to reward the student journaUst for his 
efforts, services, and accomphshments. 

In the school year of 1958-59, a group of students on the staffs 
of the LOYOLAN, Cadence, and The Loyola Neivs formed an organi- 
zation to petition Pi Delta Epsilon to establish a chapter at Loyola. 
On May 29, 1959, final arrangements were concluded with the 
national headquarters, and a Loyola chapter of Pi Epsilon was of- 
ficially established. 

The year's officers were: Thomas Haney, president; Robert Marlin, 
vice-president; Robert Ryba, treasurer; Kenneth Klein, secretary. 

The members inducted in April, 1960, were: Philip Augustine, 
Richard 'Cegielski, Stanley Dunnetski, Lawrence Kaufman, Thomas 
Millard, Ellen Miller, Nicholas Motherway, Robert McCauley, An- 
thony Ward, and Jerome White. 

The fraternity's moderator is Rev. Thomas J. Bryant, S.J. 



107 



ORGANIZATIONS 



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ACCOUNTING CLUB 

Founded at Loyola in 1949, the Accounting 
Club strives to bridge the gap between account- 
ing theory and its practical application. The club 
accomplishes this aim through speakers; repre- 
sentatives of public of public accounting firms, 
industry, and banking; field trips; and the distri- 
bution of literature. 

For the past four years, the Accounting Club 
has been affiliated with the Illinois Conference of 
Accountancy Clubs. As a member of this organi- 
zation, Loyola actively participates in presenting 
an Opportunity Conclave, an entire day devoted 
to acquainting the accounting student with the 
opportunities available for employment, training, 
and advancement in the business world. 




Accounting Club Officers. Standing: Donald Gavin (vice-presi- 
dent), John Sullivan (treasurer). Seated: John Plotz (president), 
Dolores Zablotny (secretary). 



Accounting Club. Standing: James Pomykacz, Clement Stegman, Richard Lucas, Norbert 
Florek, John Schaefer, Nicholas Motherway. Seated: Henry Wisniewski, Matthew Bryant, 
James Caron, Michael Sullivan, WilUam Schmitt, Robert Kaczorowski, David O'Neill. 




110 




American Chemical Society Officers. Donald Janninck, vice-presi- 
dent; Dr. Frank Cassaretto, moderator; Juliana Kaczor, secretary- 
treasurer; Anthony Scafidi, pesident. 



American Chemical Society. Standing: Lawrence De Chatelet, 
William Hessel, Jerilyn Kozlowski, Russell Starzyk, James Henes, 
Leonard Piszkiewicz. Seated: Marie Pindok, Marilyn Cavender. 



AMERICAN CHEMICAL 
SOCIETY 

In May, 1950, a student affiliate branch of 
the American Chemical Society was established 
at Loyola, absorbing the former Chemistry Club. 
The student affiliate is designed for those stu- 
dents who manifest a firm and sincere interest, 
via their academic program, in the science of 
chemistry. Among its purposes are the fostering 
among its members of a professional spirit and 
the instilling of a professional pride in chemistry. 

The Society has bi-monthly meetings which 
are aimed at gathering together students of 
chemistry and other interested individuals, in 
order to increase and enrich their knowledge of 
the science. Guest lecturers, films, demonstra- 
tions, and other interesting highlights are fea- 
tured at these meetings. 

The Society also publishes a monthly paper, 
entitled The Loyola Chemisphere, which has re- 
placed a former publication of the organization. 




Ill 




A. U.S. A. Standing: Thomas Flatley, David Swinehart, Dominic Fabbri, Ralph Kownacki, 
Larry Grady, Dan Croke, Steve Perry, George Wentz, John Sullivan, Thomas Stumpf, Jerry 
Flens. Seated: Ed Ptaszek, Lt. Col. James L. McCrorey, Martin O'Donnell, Thomas Reynolds. 

ASSOCIATION OF THE 
UNITED STATES ARMY 



A. U.S. A. Officers. Thomas Flatley, Ed Ptaszek (president), Lt. 
Col. James L. McCrorey (moderator), Stephen Perry. 




In September, 1957, in response to a long felt 
need for an organization to function as an auxili- 
ary to the R.O.T.C, Lt. Col. James L. McCrorey 
set himself to the task of founding the Loyola 
chapter of the Association of the United States 
Army. 

The A. U.S. A. is both a professional and so- 
cial organization which draws its membership 
from both civilian and military personnel as well 
as college R.O.T.C. units. 

As a national organization the A. U.S.A. 
works to promote the role of the Army in Na- 
tional Defense. At the company level its goals 
are 1) to promote professional excellence in the 
cadets of the Corps and 2) to provide a social 
atmosphere in which the cadet may associate with 
professional military men and with their fellow 
students. 

To accomplish these aims the Association 
employs a multiphase attack. At the national level 
the Association carries on a broad program of 
educating the public of the importance of a 
strong military establishment. 

Here at Loyola the A. U.S. A. sponsors a wide 
variety of activities, ranging from military discus- 
sions to the annual Military Ball, the high point of 
the military social season. 



112 



BELLARMINE PHILOSOPHY CLUB 

The Bellarmine Philosophy Ckib was estabhshed on the Lake 
Shore Campus in 1930. This Club gives Loyola University students, 
who have an active interest in philosphy, an opportunity to meet and 
disucss philosophical problems. 

The Club is organized into two divisions, the Lake Shore division 
and the Lewis Towers division. The L.S.C. division is moderated by 
Dr. Richard Hinners and the L.T. division is moderated by Mr. Ernest 
Currey. Both divisions meet regularly. 

The Bellarmine Philosophy Club is open to any student who is 
seriously interested in philosophy and who has a desire to discuss 
current philosophic problems. The main purpose of the Club is to give 
students an opportunity to become acquainted with the various sys- 
tems of philosophy and, in addition, to lead them toward a better 
knowledge and appreciation of Scholastic philosophy. 

One of the main programs sponsored by the Club is a series of 
informal talks which are delivered by members of the faculty. These 
intercourses aim both at broadening the knowledge of members and 
also at promoting a closer student-faculty relationship. 



Bellarmine Philosophy Club. Standing: Walter Erwers, Kobert Murray, icatea: Kichard Hinners 
(moderator), Peter Amberson (president), lohn McMahon. 





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JAMES D'ANNA 
Editor 




CADENCE 



Cadence, the Loyola literary quarterly, exists to provide a stimulus 
for fine writing on the part of the student body. Each year, Cadence 
publishes a wide selection of articles on the arts, philosophy, political 
science, history, and current events. In addition, Cadence attempts to 
publish the best fiction and poetry written at Loyola, as well as reviews 
of notable books and recordings. 

Above and beyond its function as a vehicle for fine writing by the 
students of Loyola, Cadence attempts to convey an attitude: a belief 
that the role of the Catholic university is a vital one in our time; that 
the pages of any Catholic university publication should reflect, with 
all the articulateness at its command, the Christian humanistic point of 
view; that it should, at all times and in all its writings, impart a vigorous 
belief in the principles that underlie Catholicism and a strong objection 
to those beliefs and attitudes that contradict or ignore the humanistic 
viewpoint. Cadence attempts this by reflecting the fruits of Catholic 
university training in true perspective: free from pious moralizing and 
too great a reliance on the apologetic tradition of the Catholic univer- 
sity in America. 

114 



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Members of the Choral Society present Faure's Requiem at Madonna Delia Strada Chapel 
as their fall program. 



CHORAL SOCIETY 



Choral Society Officers. Robert Meger, president; Roberta Alfrey, 
vice-president; Joseph Gartner, secretary-treasurer. 



Founded in 1926, the Loyola Choral Society 
provides an opportunity for students who are in- 
terested in music to publicly display their talents. 
This aim of the organization is achieved quite 
satisfactorily through the presentation of such 
musical expressions as the opera, concert, and 
various other musical productions and programs 
prepared for the public. 

The highlight of this year was the Lenten 
musical production. This production enabled the 
members of the Choral Society to participate in 
a musical production which was composed of a 
Lenten musical theme. The success of the pro- 
gram was evident by the analyzing of the response 
of the audience which attended the program. 

As in the past years. Dr. Graciano Salvador 
moderated the Loyola Choral Society during the 
1959-60 academic year. This year's membership 
totaled approximately seventy-five members. 

The Loyola Choral Society is an all-univer- 
sity organization which is open for membership 
to any and all students possessing the requisite 
ability and interest. 




115 




'J 



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Coed Club. Standing, hack row: Joyce McAuliffe, Maureen Conroy, Mary Gill, Eileen O'Con- 
nor, Elizabeth Cesna, Pat Cordan, Bernadine Bednarz, June Antonucci. Standing, middle row: 
Mary Beth McAuliffe, Kay Dyer, Dawn Svetich, Barbara Houser, Judy Pacer, Mary Ann Bani- 
berfier. Sheila O'CarroU, Eleanor Geifier, Betty Prochrasta, Corene Cowperthwait, Maureen 
Fitzpatrick. Seated: Carol Austin, Jule Swinehart, Mary Lee Cullen, Anne Marie Stauss, Mary 
Ellen Hayes, Marian Hagen, Geen Kizior, Jo Tomaszewski. 



COED CLUB 



This year the Loyola Coed Club celebrated 
its eleventh anniversary. Founded in the spring 
of 1949, the Club has laecome one of the largest 
social organizations on campus. 

The aims of the Coed Club are to unite the 
women students in the undergraduate day divi- 
sions of Loyola University in social, academic 
and religious life. The emphasis is upon an e.x- 
tensive program of diversified social activities. 

Through the "Big Sister" plan the Coed Club 
assists new coeds to orient themselves to life at 
Loyola. Li addition the club sponsors numerous 
activities throughout the year. At the beginning 
of each semester a welcoming tea is held in honor 
of incoming freshmen and transfer students. At 
this tea, the freshmen coeds are able to view the 
Club in one of its main activities; furthermore, 
the coeds are able to become well acquainted 
with the women who attend the University as 
well as with the organization itself. 

Other highlights of the year are: Christmas 
Formal, the Ski-week-end, the Fashion Show, 
and the Card Party. 

116 



A group of fashionable models line up to display their finery at a 
Coed Club modelling party: Joan Schildknecht, Jo Tomaszewski, Judy 
Dorini, Audrey Moore, Marcia Dopke, Diane Dybas, Pat Culhane, 
Adele Roszkowski, Tom Waldron, Fred Green, Marilyn Cavender, 
Margaret DeVito, Troy Ehlert, Chris Kaub. 






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Coed Club. Standing, buck row: Mary Jo Lu.shek, Lorraine Rintz, Mabel Blizzard, Alice 
Trellis, Virginia Bomba, Arlene Fonte, Mary Ann Pikrone, Anne Reiter, Lucille LaPlante, 
Judy Kohnke, Lillian Smrha, Dorothy Simunek, Judy Bachner, Virginia Zittnan. Standing, 
middle row: Alice Farrell, Ellen Malin, Virginia Zigghetti, Christine Kaub, Virginia Becker. 
Paiiu'la Putnam, Laureen Dupre, Ann Shannon, Hannelore Glatt, Mary Martin, Sandra 
W'alieski, JoAnn Hosteny. Seated: Sally Byrne, Ann Young, Helen Slattery, Monica Kozak, 
Lenore Quinn, Lucille Anichini, Rose Piraino, Judy Kruzel. 



Coed Club Joint Board (LT and LSC Officers). Standing: Rose Piraino, Marilyn Lo Brillo, 
Pat Cordan, Helen Slattery, Hannelore Glatt, Joan Tengblad, Joan Vaccaro, Kay Cutler, Diane 
Dybas, Beverly Wilson. Seated: Jane Donovan, Ginny Zittnan, Lucille Anichini, Judy Ireland, 
Corene Couperthwait. Mary Kay Bussert, Monica Kozak. 




117 




CURTAIN GUILD 



Highlighting the Curtain Guild's twenty- 
second season were four major productions. 
Wonderful Town was the first production and the 
first success of the year as the residents of Green- 
wich Village did the Congo across the Loyola 
Community Theatre stage. Joanne Roman 
played the leading role of Ruth for the Guild's 
first play. In January, Judith Zeman and Spence 
Cosmos occupied the spotlight in Ibsen's drama, 
Rosmershohn. Thornton Wilder's, The Match- 
maker, starring Alan Jorgensen, was the second 
comedy directed by Mr. Morris during the year. 
The final play of the season. The Power and the 
Glory, was a drama which was directed by Mr. 
Dickinson, the moderator of the Curtain Guild. 

The Loyola Curtain Guild was organized in 
1936 to foster the interest of University students 
in the drama and to afford opportunities for its 
members to develop their talents in the theatre 
arts. As the other non-fraternal, non-honorary 
organizations of the University, the Loyola Cur- 
tain Guild is open to any Loyola student. 



Curtain Guild Officers. Mary Devine, president; John Marquette, 
secretary. 




Larry Kirk, star of West Side Story, shows Joanne 
Roman, star of Wonderful Town, some techniques of 
the theatre. 



118 




Joanne Roman, who played Ruth Sherwood in Wonderful Town, enchants 
residents of Greenwich Village who were played by Teri Mulkem, Norman 
Morton, Rosalie O'Hanley, Tom Waldron, and Kathy Bandelin. 




Tom Waldron, Rosalie O'Hanley, 
Joanne Roman, Bill Hale, Bob Spych- 
alski, and Teri Mulkern entertain the 
the rest of the cast in the nightclub 
scene, the finale in Wonderful Town. 



The residents of Greenwich Village welcome the audience to 
their town in the overture of Wonderful Town. 




119 




The Brazilian Cadets of Wonderful 
Town, played by Bob Styles, Fred 
Green, Jeff Block, Tom Millard, and 
Vince Daley, catch Joanne Roman as 
she falls from exhaustion because of 
too much Congoing. 



Joanne Roman, who plays Ruth, a 
journalist from Ohio, watches with 
amazement the Greenwich Villagers 
(Rosalie O'Hanley, Nomian Morton, 
Teri Mulkern, Kathy Bandelin, and 
Tom Waldron) as tliey swing to 
"Swing" in Wonderful Town. 





Larry Kirk and Leila Martin, the stars 
of West Side Story, show the cast of 
Wonderful Town the techniques used 
to do the Congo. 




Marianne Rempala and Alan Jorgensen, the stars of The Match- 
maker. 




Some of the members of the cast of Thorton Wilder's The Match- 
maker, rehearse the final scene. 



Leila Martin, who played Maria in the Chicago pro- 
duction of West Side Story, sings a song from 
Wonderful Town with Bill Hale. 




DEBATING SOCIETY 

The 1959-1960 season was full of activities 
and honors for the Loyola Debating Society. One 
of the highlights of their outstanding record for 
the year was the University of Illinois at Navy 
Pier Tournament, in which four Loyola debaters 
worked their way to a first-place tie with a record 
of seven wins and one loss. The most important 
tournament of the year for the Society was held 
at Harvard University, where the team of Mary 
Lee CuUen and Barry Cullinan earned a semi- 
finalist trophy for Loyola. 

The Society again sponsored the "All Jesuit 
College Debate Tournament," a tradition estab- 
lished several years ago in honor of the Jesuit 
Centennial. 




Debating Society Officers. Mary Lee Cullen, Donald J. Stinson 
(moderator), Thomas Dienes, Richard Bock (president). 



Debating Society. Standing: Leroy Blommaert, Tim Materer, Donald J. Stinson, Jerry Swick, 
Ken Feit, Richard Gillis, James Harris. Seated: Eleanor Sigborn, Mary Lee Cullen, Richard 
Bock, Tom Dienes, Virginia Becker. 




122 



ECONOMICS- FINANCE 
SOCIETY 

A member of the American Finance Associa- 
tion, the Loyola Economics and Finance Society, 
which was reorganized in 1946, is moderated by 
Dr. Sylvester Frizol. The Loyola chapter is de- 
signed to supplement its members' education in 
finance and economics with an interesting and 
informative program of speakers and profession 
tours. 

The Economics and Finance Society is open 
to any Loyola University student who has in- 
terests in the fields of economic and finance. This 
year, this extra-curricular society sponsored a 
number of lectures and tours related to these 
fields to the members and guests of the Society. 

Prior to the beginning of a semester, the 
society's program committee formulates a profes- 
sional program. A typical semester's program in- 
cludes speakers, tours, forums, and movies on 
both current and related topics of interest. 

The only requirements for membership in the 
society are that the student have at least one 
semester at Loyola and be in good standing with 
the universitv. 




Econ-Finance Society Officers. Joseph Matulis (secretary), Richard 
Lucas (president), Nicholas Motherway (treasurer), Anthony Mastro 
(vice-president). 



Econ-Finance Society. Standing, back row: Richard Rotunno, Matthew, Moran, Frank Mc- 
Nichols, Wilham Finnegan, Henry Wisniewski Standing, middle row: Maury Kalinzus, 
Richard Carroll, John Rillimack, Joseph Russo, Ray Hartman, Charles Papish. Seated: Frank 
Milani, William O'Neill, James McGrath, David O'Neill, Gerald Casey. 



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The Loyola Education Society was founded in 1955. The purpose 
of this organization is to bring together students and alumni of Loyola 
University who are interested in the problems and current issues of 
education; to explore, in a Catholic atmosphere, these issues to a 
greater extent than is done in an academic classroom; and to promote 
a closer relationship between students, alumni, and education depart- 
ment faculty. 

Informal in its organization, the work of the society is planned by 
a group committee consisting of alumni, graduate, and undergraduate 
students and the moderator. Dr. J. J. Valenti. The society meets four 
times a year, providing each time a program consisting of a lecture, 
discussion, or a panel. 

The Education Society is an academic and social organization of 
students who intend to teach, and of graduate students in the Depart- 
ment of Education; furthermore the organization is open to all gradu- 
ate and undergraduate students, and the alumni of the Department of 
Education. 



EDUCATION SOCIETY 



Dr. Jasper J. Valenti, moderator of the Education Society, gives 
Secondary School Teaching" to members of the Society. 



lecture on "Methods of 




124 




Epsilon Pi Rho. Back roiv: William Strong, James Kunzer, Thomas Jablonski, Leonard Lesko, 
Rev. Anthony Vanderloop, O.S.M., Margaret Conroy, Loretta Krozel, Eva Nickolich, Dawn 
Svetich, Gloria Forte, Leonard Sopka. Second row: Friar Dittburner, O.F.M., Anthony 
Florek, Zinja Federovics, Kathleen Keogh, Loretta Picucci, Janet Delia, Harold Kelly, Mary 
Lee Graham, Cheryl Williams, Thomas Hudacek, Matthew O'Brien, Robert Juliano, Ralph 
Conone. Front row: Richard Shemetulskis, Michael Kelly, Michael Berthold, Daniel Ryan 
(quaestor), Mary Martin (scriba). Dr. D. H. Abel (moderator), Kathleen Staunton (counsul), 
William Creed (consul), Henry Janka, Ed O'Hayer, Barbara Gongol, Patrick Keleher. 



EPSILON PI RHO 



One of the largest and most prominent academic organizations at 
Loyola is Epsilon Pi Rho, the Loyola University Latin Club. 

The antecedents of a civilization are no less important than the 
civilization itself; things are inevitably more meaningful when con- 
sidered in terms of that from which they came than when examined 
solely in themselves. 

With this in mind, Epsilon Pi Rho was established to help its 
members explore the impact of the civilizations of Greece and Rome 
upon our own, and in so doing, to better appreciate the achievements 
of both the modern and ancient worlds. 

To be eligible for membership a student must be taking or have 
successfully completed one college course in Latin Literature. 

Under the able leadership and guidance of Dr. D. Herbert Abel, 
moderator of Epsilon Pi Rho, the Club sponsors lectures and programs 
on classical culture. The officers of the Club are: William Creed and 
Kathleen Staunton, co-consuls; Mary Martin, scriba; and Daniel Ryan, 
quaestor. 

125 




Fine Arts Club Officers. Pauline Zaranka, Jerry Ring, John O'Reilly (president), and Dr. Paul 
Hummert (moderator). 



FINE ARTS CLUB 



Founded in January of 1954, the purpose of the Fine Arts Club 
is to develop in its members an appreciation of the utility of the fine 
arts by group attendance at the theatre, symphony, opera, ballet, art 
exhibits and other displays of fine art. 

The club has made a considerable contribution to the cultural 
development of its members and of the student body in general. By 
introducing the students to the many cultural activities in Chicago, the 
organization has produced many rewarding accomplishments, not the 
least of which is its annual increase in membership, which now includes 
students in most of the various colleges at Loyola. 

This year, under the moderatorship of Dr. Paul Hummert, the 
club took advantage of the many diversified cultural attractions in 
Chicago. Two of its most successful projects were its attendance at the 
popular stage production, "West Side Story," and at the opera produc- 
tion of Bizet's "Carmen." 

126 




Foreign Students Association Standinf{ Patrick Opara (Nigeria), secretary-treasurer, Philip 
Kaylil (India)," vice-president Seated Marcel Fredericks (British Guiana), president. Dr. 
Margaret M. O'Duyer, moderator, Paz Garcia (Phihppines), member of executive committee. 



FOREIGN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION 



With over a hundred foreign students enrolled in the under- 
graduate divisions, the Graduate School, and the professional schools, 
the Foreign Students Association was formed to serve as a medium 
through which students from various countries could become acquain- 
ted with each other and with American students. It is the hope of the 
organization that through such contacts, social and educational, fellow- 
ship and understanding can be promoted. 

Among its activities the association sponsors lectures, discussions, 
and other social events. An annual attraction is a panel discussion with 
members of the Chicago Junior Chamber of Commerce. Each year the 
group also produces its Spring Festival, at which the members of the 
club entertain the spectators with national songs and dances. 



127 




Pat Culhane, president of the Histori- 
cal Society, leads the discussion group 
composed of Don Sprengel, Lana 
Doman, George Van Ryan, and Jim 
Caron. 



HISTORICAL 



Kay Marren, Lucille Anichini, and Marlene Capparelli, secretaries 
of the Historical Society, discuss the next lecture. 




The Historical Societ>', the largest under- 
graduate organization at Loyola, has consistently 
enjoyed the support of the student body. In keep- 
ing with its aim of serving the University, the 
Hi^stor\' Department, and its own members, the 
Society presents a lecture series each year. History 
is brought to life in these lectures, open to all 
Loyola "students, by prominent local and national 
figures. 

In the last >'ear, the Historical Society pre- 
sented a lecture on the "Berlin Crisis" liy the 
Consul-General of the German Consulate, im- 
mediately before the supposed deadline in Berlin. 
Dr. William M. McGovern lectured to the mem- 
bers on "American Foreign Policy." The Society 
presented a slide lecture on "Guatemala" by 
Father Grollig of Loyola's History Department, 
as well as a lecturer from the Civil War Round 
Table. 

The Society also presented an Interest Day 
program, in conjunction with the Office of the 
Dean of Admissions, for high school seniors in 
the Chicagoland area who might be interested in 
attending Loyola and majoring in History. 



SOCIETY 



Historical Society Officers. Standing: Lucille Anichini, Maurice 
McCarthy, Roxane Slasld. Seated: Thomas Lavelle. Corene 
Cowpertliwait, Thomas Murray. 




Rev. Francis X. Grollig, S. J., the second speaker in the Historical 
Society's lecture series, spoke to the group on Guatemala. 



Pat Culhane, president, and Dr. Kenneth M. Jackson, faculty 
moderator. 






Members of the Gerard Manley Hopkins Society meet informally with Mark Van Doren, the 
first of the visiting poets. 



GERARD MANLEY HOPKiNS SOCIETY 



The Gerald Manley Hopkins Society is an organization designed 
to act as a supplement to Loyola students' regular English courses, by 
increasing their appreciation and understanding of works of literary 
merit. 

This year, the club has varied its program to complement the 
David B. Steinman Visiting Poets. Noted speakers, drawn mainly from 
the English department, have been called on to acquaint students with 
the works of the Visiting Poets, so that when such poets speak at 
Loyola, the student body will be able to appreciate their work to a 
greater degree. 

Dr. E. John Clark, the club's moderator, spoke on the poetry of 
Mark Van Doren, accompanying his lecture with recorded selections 
of Mr. Van Doren's works. Dr. Martin Svaglic later in the year spoke 
on John Crowe Ransom, and other speakers took as their subjects Paul 
Engle, Richard Wilbur, and Robert Penn Warren. 

In addition to providing speakers on the various poets, the Hop- 
kins Society arranged informal meetings at which the student body 
could meet with the various poets, talk with them, and ask them 
questions concerning their life and works. 



130 



HUMAN RELATIONS CLUB 

111 a growing university such as Loyola there 
is an unquestional^h' important need for the entire 
student liody to be ipade aware of both positive 
and negative factors of present-day society. This 
is the purpose of HRC. The most important re- 
quirement for membership is a reahstically ma- 
tin-e Cathohc eagerness to know and understand 
the people and reasons behind present world af- 
fairs. 

HRC is divided into four sections: Delin- 
quency, The Family, Lalior and Industry, and 
Intergroup Relations. Each group has elected a 
chairman who leads discussions and projects 
within that group. 

Once a month there is a general meeting 
wherein each group reports its progress. In 1959 
the club held an informative lecture by Dr. John 
McDermott on "The Social Implications of Nar- 
cotic Addiction." Because of the demands of the 
members, a trip to the Illinois State Penitentiary 
at Joliet was realized. 




HRC Officers. Dr. Francis A. Cizon, moderator, Pat Geoghagen, 
president, Cecilia Schmuttenmaer, Russ Circo. 

HRC. Back row: Bill Honroth, John Henning, Bob Silich, Raymond Kelly, Ralph Amelio, 
Jerry Janowicz, William Boyle. Middle row: Bonnie Smith, Diane Dangles, Laureen Dupre, 
Sally Byrne, Sheila Collins, Wanda Kwan, Dorothy Simvmek, Kathy Monge, Helene Zaum. 
Front row: Virginia Liss, Russ Circo, Pat Georghagen, Bill Moorhead, Cecilia Schmuttenmaer, 
Mike Berthold, Sheila O'Carroll. 




131 




LOYOLA NEWS 



LARRY KAUFMAN, Executive Editor 
STANLEY DUNNETSKL Managing Editor 





ELLEN MILLER 

News Editor 



JERRY WHITE 
Editor-in-Chief 



Loyola News Editorial Board. Standing: Tony Ward, Larry 
Kaufman, Ellen Miller, Stan Dunnetski. Seated: Jerry White. 



TONY WARD 
Co-Editor 



The Loyola News serves all the schools and 
campuses of Lo)'ola University, printing news 
and features of interest to University students. 
Under the direction of editor-in-chief Jerry White 
for the second consecutive year, the Neivs serves 
as a sounding board for students and faculty 
opinion. 

A new feature inaugurated this year was 
"Speak Up, Professor!," a column written by a 
different member of the faculty each week, en- 
abling him to express his views on current matters 
or any subject which strikes his fancy and which 
is of interest to the students. 

The entire staff is indebted to the Neios 
moderator, Rev. Charles E. Ronan, S.J., for the 
many pains he has taken on their behalf. 

132 




The Loyola Neivs lost three seniors this year 
in the 1960 graduation: Jerry White; Larry Kauf- 
man, Executive Editor; and Stanley Dunnetski, 
Managing Editor. Each has been a part of the 
News for the past two years and will be missed. 
During the year, the News also lost Bob Marlin, 
who resigned as Sports Editor due to a heavy 
study schedule. 

Ellen Miller, News Editor, and Tony Ward, 
Co-Editor, were members of the Editorial Board 
that also included the three graduating seniors 
mentioned above. 

The returning staff is already making plans 
for the improvement of the 1960-61 Loyola News, 
and expresses the hope that the paper will be 
able to serve Loyolans in an even greater capacity 
than in the past. 




Loyola News Staff. Rae Rutecki, Ed Pajak, Marguerite Wiedlin, 
Jim Harris. 



Loyola News Staff. Mary Bergan, Dave Swinehart, Nora O'Brien, 
Vicki Melowitz, Mary Ellen Bahl. 





133 




KEN KLEIN and MARY LEE CULLEN 
Staff of the Senior Editor 



THE LOYOLAN 



KAY DWYER 

Senior Editor 



DICK CEGIELSKI 

Managing Editor 




Tom Haney discvisses the literary format of the 
yearbook with Tom Millard, Ellen Miller, and 
Judy Kohnke. 



NICK MOTHERWAY 
Business Manager 




134 



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TOM MILLARD 

Lake Shore Campus Editor 




BOB STYLES, Copy Editor 
JUDY KOHNKE, Assistant Copy Editor 




This, the 1960 LOYOLAN, is the twenty- 
fourth LOYOLAN to be produced. The book, as 
indicated by its name, is designed to include the 
entire University in its coverage. 

A yearbook is intended for students, for fac- 
ulty, for the administration, for people outside 
the University. With such a large reading audi- 
ence, the editors are always faced with the prob- 
lem of which group the book should primarily aim 
to please. We on the LOYOLAN this year have 
redesigned our book to please the student body 
foremost, for these are the people who will treas- 
ure the book in the years to come and who have 
given us the most support in our difficult task of 
producing the book. 

With this in mind, the 1960 LOYOLAN has 
been altered in its component sections to provide 
this extra coverage for the student body. The 
section near the beginning of the book describing 
the big events of the school year has been in- 
creased, and a new section to feature the smaller 
(but no less important to the individuals who 
participated) events has been added. 

Thus, here it is; read it and enjoy it, and may 
you always treasure it. 



135 



MARKETING CLUB 

The aim of the Marketing Ckili is to broaden 
student interest in the wide field of merchandis- 
ing. 

Monthly speeches by business leaders give 
members a practical insight into the business 
world. Discussion of the problems raised by these 
men provides a valuable supplement to classroom 
knowledge by providing a clearer picture of the 
economic forces at work in today's world. 

The Club also publishes a monthly news- 
letter which contains news of the marketing field. 

Membership in the Marketing Club carries 
with it membership in the Amecian Marketing 
Association, a nationwide organization. 




Marketins Club Officers. Robert L. Spero, President; 
Peter J. Marchi, Vice-President; Thomas A. Rubel, 
Treasurer. 



Marketing Club. Standing; Charles A. Reitenbach, William L. Poole, Martin S. Kielty, 
James Ryan, Donald J. Judy, Gregory T. Griffin, Frank A. Sobol, David C. Bresnahan, 
Robert T. Hawley, Thomas Church, Michael Wallczek. Seated: Richard H. Bezdek, Roger 
Galassini, Lawrence W. Parks, James F. Caron, Peter J. Marchi, Robert L. Spero, Thomas A. 
Rubel, Francis A. Philipp, Noel Whitney, Irving Schmitt, Daniel R. McLean. 




136 




MATHEMATICS CLUB 

Fostering an appreciation of mathematics 
among the meml:)ers of the student l)ody is the 
aim of the meml^ers of the Mathematics Ckib 
founded in 1958. 

During the past year, under the direction of 
its moderator. Dr. Roliert Reisel, the ckib has 
attempted to achieve this aim through a series 
of lectures and special classes. 

One series of lectures was given by promi- 
nent guest speakers on Career Opportunities in 
Mathematics. Other lectures were given by stu- 
dents on Special Topics in Mathematics. In addi- 
tion to these lectures, the club conducted a special 
counseling program during which members were 
available weekly to answer questions or resolve 
difficulties which students had concerning mathe- 
matics. 



Math Club Officers. Conrad Polk, Dr. Robert B. Reisel, 
Pat Carey, Joseph Wojcik, president. 



Math Club. Standing Fred O'Donnell, Thomas Gillespie, Robert Styles, Larry Gray, Denis 
Ciesla, Joe Siblik. Giace Griskenas Jerrv' Ochota, Robert Sinder, Ken Hartman, Tom 
Millard." Seated: John \UFad\en ^nton Bri\ lolin Marsliall, Thomas Gelinas. 










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MODERN LANGUAGES CLUB 

The Modern Language Club was organized 
in 1956 as both an academic and social organiza- 
tion whose purpose is, first, to promote interest 
in and instill a knowledge and appreciation of the 
various cultures of the nations of the three main 
contingent language groups— Spanish, German, 
and French— and also the three other language 
departments of the university— Russian and Polish 
of the evening school and Italian of the home 
study division. 

Secondly, it aims at helping beginning stu- 
dents of languages obtain a correct pronunciation 
and speaking knowledge of the particular lan- 
guage that they are studying. This is accom- 
plished through* its conversation groups which 
meet informally once a week under the direction 
of one whose native tongue is that language. Be- 
sides the use of the leader, the students supple- 
ment the conversations with language records, 
songs, and films to help themselves further. The 
Club also meets once every month for a general 
business meeting at which travelogues, slides, or 
lectures are presented. 




Modem Language Club Officers. Standing: Elly Cesna, 
Antoinette Mariella, Michael Haiiser, Pauline Zaranka, 
Marcelo Canelas. Seated: Charlotte Collins, Dr. Gringas, 
moderator, Sandra Waljeski, president. 



Modem Language Club. Standing: Mary Meade, Laszlo Boesze, Dale Brunelle, Joanna 
Hosteny, Teresa Whitten, Loretta Krozel, Koko Burke. Michael Berthold, Marilyn Russell, 
Patricia Jones, Ellen Malin, Julius Camerini, Sheila O'Neil, Dorothy Simunek, Cecilia San 
Felippo, Barrett O'Hara. Seated: Charlotte Collins, Elly Cesna, Marcelo Canelas, Dr. 
Gringas, Dr. Michael J. Flys, Sandy Waljeski, Antoinette Mariella, Michael Hauser, Pauline 
Zaranka. 





PHYSICS CLUB 



Established in 1953 by a group of under- 
graduate physics majors, Loyola University Phy- 
sics Club provides a common meeting ground for 
students interested in the physical sciences and 
their application. 

The offering of tutorial service for physics 
students in the lower courses has been the main 
function of the club this past year. Through this 
service the members hope to encourage students 
to continue into the higher physics courses. In 
addition several films have been shown to keep 
the members informed about the most recent de- 
velopments in the field of physics. Field trips to 
different laboratories have also been part of their 
activities. 

The club's moderator. Rev. J. Donald Roll, 
S.J., has plans of expanding their seismographic 
station which detects and supplies information on 
earthquakes. 



physics Club Officers. George Bart, Rev. J. Donald 
Roil, S.J., Ken Potocki, John McFadyen, president. 



Physics Club. Larry Gray, John Zeitz, Marjo Andrews, James Sikora, Denis Ciesla. 







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PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH SOCIETY 

After approximately ten years of inactivity, a progressive group 
of psychology majors channeled their collective efforts toward re- 
organization and brought the society into active participation in cam- 
pus activities. Better than one hundred students, both graduate and 
undergraduate, interested in education and particularly psychology, 
have, with the help of Dr. Robert C. Nicolay, made the organization 
one of the leading academic groups at Loyola. 

Among the many interesting innovations to make meetings well 
attended, the societs' has shown films and invited speakers prominent 
in their fields to address the membership. Rev. Michael J. O'Brien, 
C.S.V., gave a very fine talk during and immediately after the viewing 
of a special film entitled "Out of Darkness" which covered the subject 
of schizophrenia. 

Dr. Charles Elliott, a well-known speech therapist, presented a 
most interesting evening when he discussed the causes, effects, and 
cures of stuttering. During another meeting. Dr. Halmuth H. Schaefer 
discussed "Introduction to Scientific Psychology." 

In general, all members have benefited greatly from their member- 
ship in, and attendance at meetings of, the group during the past year. 



Dr. Robert C. Nicolay meets with the officers of the Psychological Research Society to discuss 
plans for the coming year. In the picture are Dr. Robert C. Nicolay, moderator, Jean 
Rupany, Roger Lundborg, and Jerry Moses, president. 




140 




"Recent Decisions" Staff. Standing; 
John J. McHugh, J. F. Bransfield, 
James M. Hannan, editor. Seated: 
Honore K. Zenk, Vincent F. Vitullo, 
faculty moderator, William M. Mad- 
den. 



"RECENT DECISIONS" 

"Recent Decisions," a section of the Illinois 
Bar Journal, is written and edited by students of 
the Loyola University School of Law, and pub- 
lished monthly November through June. The 
Illinois Bar Journal is a legal periodical of wide 
circulation, having a readership of over eight 
thousand judges, lawyers, and law students. The 
"Recent Decisions" section consists of several 
case comments, each comment being essentially 
an accurate and informaitve report for practicing 
lawyers, with comment sufficient to indicate why 
a case deserves their attention. 



RES IPSA LOQUITUR 

Res Ipsa Loquitur is a fortnightly publica- 
tion of the Law School, written by and for law 
students. Keeping the students up to date on the 
activities sponsored by the Student Bar Associa- 
tion, such as talks by noted guest speakers at 
monthly luncheons, panels devoted to various 
aspects of legal practice, and traditional social 
functions which afford a bit of diversion, is the 
chief function of Res Ipsa. Res Ipsa is sponsored 
by the S.B.A. and is now in its sixth year of 
publication. 




Res Ipsa Loquitur Staff, James A. 
Gill, Gary D. Friedman, James T. N. 
FitzGibbon, editor. 



141 



SOCIETY FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF MANAGEMEt\ 



The Society for the Advancement of Man- 
agement is a national professional organization 
devoted to the development of the field of man- 
agement. 

This year the Loyola Chapter, under the 
guidance of its moderator Dr. Peter T. Swanish, 
was again the recipient of the Chicago Area 
Trophy as the outstanding chapter in the city. If 
the .chapter wins this trophy a third time, they 
will retain permanent possession of it. 

In addition to this, the national chapter of 
SAM awarded the Loyola group $125 for placing 
fourth in its national contest. This prize money 
will be used for the education of students in 
management and other related fields. 

The Loyola Chapter also sponsored several 
tours of prominent Chicago corporations for a 
closer look at management in operation. The so- 
cial aspect of the chapter's activities did not go 
unneglected, however, as several mixers and par- 
ties were held during the year. 




SAM Officers. Standing: Martin Kielty, Robert Raniere. 
Seated: Jerry Mulcahy, James Heath, Paul Dentzer, 
Robert Kayer, Jerry O'Brien, Leon Zaffer, Gene Nowak. 



SAM. Back row: James Heath, James Peterson, John Mulcrone, George Drew, Don Ritter, 
Louis Bertaux, John Schaeffer. Third row: Paul Dentzer, Richard Ratunno, Ed Watkowski, 
Jerry Mulcahy, Thad Gissel, Leon Zaffer, Jerry O'Brien, Tom Flatley, Ed Downs, Dick 
Dunne, Paul Gewartowski. Second row: Gene Nowak, Jerry Nichols, Joon K. Kim, 
Tom Ochal, Bill Werner, Jim Aagar, Bill Fleckenstein, Bob Raniere, Tom Casey, Marty 
Kielty. Seated: Bob Kayer, Jim Aiello, Christine Busek, Linda Esnault, John Gaspers, Chuck 
Papish, Ron Spina, Bob Killacky, Paul Maranto. 




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SAINT APOLLONIA GUILD 



Forty years ago, in 1920 to be exact, a dedicated group of promi- 
nent dentists in the greater Boston area, after conferring with and 
getting the approval of His Eminence Cardinal O'Connell, founded 
the Saint Apollonia Guild. 

The purpose of the Guild was of an extremely charitable nature, 
since the basic reason for its formation was to provide dental service 
for over forty thousand poor children in the area, who would otherwise 
be without this very necessary health protection. 

The Guild chose for its name that of a third-century virgin martyr 
for the reason that, during her persecution, repeated blows had broken 
every one of her teeth. 

The Alpha chapter was organized at Loyola University in the 
College of Dentistry four years later. In 1928 the Guild became inactive 
at Loyola and remained so until 1934, when it was reorganized under 
the direction of Dr. Jerome Vik by a group of senior dental students. 

The Guild has been quite active in sponsoring many activities 
which have added much to the social, intellectual, and religious life 
of its members. At the present time it is one of the more important 
extracurricular activities at the Loyola College of Dentistry. 



St, Apollonia Guild. Mike Kizior, Joe Madonnia, Walter Lichota, Al McManama, Tim 
Schneider, Rev. Francis Vaughn, S.J. 




143 



SAINT LUKE'S GUILD 



Several years ago, a group of medical students, with Rev. John W. 
Bieri, S.J., as their moderator and adviser, banded together to form 
the Alpha chapter of St. Luke's Student Guild. The organization was 
formed to ensure the students' own spiritual development as well as a 
proper understanding of typical moral problems. 

To accomplish its twofold goal, the Guild sponsors regular spiritual 
execcises and bi-monthly meetings. A lecture by a guest speaker or a 
movie is usually featured at one meeting of the month and the other 
is devoted to the business of the organization and to discussion of med- 
ical, moral, and social issues of general interest. 

The professional life for which the medical student prepares him- 
self is one filled with moral crises. The men of the St. Luke's Guild 
realize that, by supporting the organization they will better be able 
to become good Catholic physicians. 



Saint Luke's Guild Officers. John Saletta. secretary; John McDonald, president; Gregory 
Matz, treasurer; and Jerry Herbison, vice-president. 




144 



STUDENT AMERICAN 
DENTAL ASSOCIATION 



The objects of the Student Americal Dental 
Association, under the moderatorship of Dr. 
Kenneth E. Nowlan, are to advance the profes- 
sion of dentistry and to give the students experi- 
ence in pubhc speaking, preparing table clinics, 
and writing on subjects in dentistry. This organi- 
zation is open to all dental students. 

Patterned after the American Dental Asso- 
ciation, the Student A.D.A. of Loyola is designed 
to promote dental education among its members. 
Each class has four representatives on the execu- 
tive council, which is the governing body setting 
the program of events for the year. 

Two of the annual events are the Clinic Day 
which presents original student displays on parti- 
cular phases of dentistry; and the closing year 
program, the Honors Banquet, which witnesses 
the bestowing of academic and clinical awards 
to the top students. 




Student ADA Officers. Standing: Monte Levitt, Pete Cunningham. 
Seated: Bob Calderwood, Ken Robison, Jim Brown (president). 



Student ADA. Standing: Karl Nishmiura, Paul Connelly, Chuck Giroux, Russell ElRin, Carl 
Freednian, Monte Levitt, Dick Delo Seated: Ken Robison, Jim Brown, Pete Cunningham. 






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145 



STUDENT AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSO. 

The objects of the Student American Medical Association, 
moderated by Dr. George F. O'Brien, are to advance the profession 
of medicine, to contribute to the welfare and education of medical 
students, to familiarize its members with the purposes and ideals of 
organized medicine, and to prepare its members to meet the social, 
moral and ethical obligations of the profession of medicine. 

The Association is the largest student medical group in the world. 
Founded in December, 1950, 72 schools constitute its membership 
today. 

The Loyola Chapter of the Student American Medical Associa- 
tion conducts monthly meetings highlighted by motion pictures con- 
cerning various areas of reasearch and the diagnosis and treatment 
of disease entities. During the year, current medical literature was 
circulated to the Association members. Also, this year saw much stu- 
dent activity and Association participation. Being an organization of 
the Stritch School of Medicine, the Association is open to all medical 
students. 



Student American Medical Association Officers. Ken Printen, president; Dick Ulmer, vice- 
president; Dom Allocco, secretary; John Johns, treasurer. 




Veterans Club Officers. Thomas Lavelle (sec- 
retary), Eugene Nelson (president), Warren 
Wessel (vice-president), Jerry Fitzpatrick (trea- 
surer), Marty Ryan (sergeant-at-arms). 



VETERANS CLUB 



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Besides fulfilling its primary function as a social organization 
providing an outlet for veterans at Loyola, the Veterans Club also 
serves to provide information pertinent to veterans' affairs both at 
Loyola and in personal matters. This latter service is made available 
through the cooperation of the Loyola representative of the Veterans 
Administration, Eugene Knight. 

Social events, however, are the club's main function. Besides 
supporting general university activities, the organization sponsors its 
own smokers, parties, and dances, as well as an annual Communion 
Breakfast for its members. The highlight of the year for the Veterans 
Club is its annual Veterans Dance, at which Miss Veteran is presented 
with a bronze combat boot. 



At their first party of the year, the members of the Vets Club take time out from their 
socializing to say "Hello" to the LOYOLAN photographer. 



^' 




WASMANN BIOLOGICAL 
SOCIETY 



The Wasmann Biological Society was foun- 
ded at the University of San Francisco in 1936 
for the purpose of fostering interest and active 
participation in the biological sciences. It is 
particularly fitting for this organization, for Rev. 
Erich Wasmann, S.J., after whom the society was 
named, was one of the outstanding cleric-scien- 
tists of the world. 

The society's chapter at Loyola was founded 
in November, 1940, under the leadership of Rev. 
Charles Wideman, S.J. In its early days at Loyola, 
the organization concentrated on faculty semi- 
nars and student symposiums. Its tremendous 
growth is best shown by the activities that the 
society has undertaken during this academic year: 
a mixer; various parties; an initiation ceremony 
at which numerous new members were inducted 
into the organization; bi-monthly meetings which 
were highlighted by student research papers, 
films, and seminars; the publication of its news- 
letter. The Probe; Communion-breakfasts for its 
members and their families; and, most important 
in these days when the world is seeking trained 
scientists, its annual Biology Fair attended and 
participated in by high school and college stu- 
dents throughout the Chicagoland area. 



Members of the Wasmann Biological Society watch special movies 
as part of the Society's program. 




Bob Kesslcr, Wasmann Society president, and Lorraine Lang, 
the Society's treasurer, point out interesting features of the earth- 
worm to two Lake Shore freshmen. 





John W. Hudson describes the stages of the frog to his 
students Richard Murphy, George Motto, and Lorraine 
Lang. 








Karl Sanzenbacher instructs a member of the Wasmann Biological 
Society. 



Wasmann Biological Society Officers. Standing: John Hudson, 
moderator; Eugene Koziol, vice-president. Seated: Lorraine Lang, 
treasurer; Robert Kessler, president; Kathleen Stewart, secretary. 




LOYOLA SPORTS 

Writing in the first century after Christ, the 
Roman satirist Juvenal wrote that the truly for- 
tunate man commands mens sana in corpore sano, 
a sound mind in a sound body. 

Juvenal's statement, truly, is reflected in the 
Jesuit educational ideal, which aims at the edu- 
cation of the whole man, mind, body and soul, 
intellect and will. This concern for complete edu- 
cation is demonstrated by Loyola University's 
comprehensive program of both intramural and 
intercollegiate athletics. Thru the program 
Loyolans are given the opportunity of self- 
development, of the perfection of physical talents 
and skills. 



JEROME WEILAND 
Coach, Track 





GEORGE IRELAND 
Athletic Diector; Coach, Basketball 



WILLIAM SHAY 

Coach, Freshman Basketball 



DONALD CHALMERS 
Coach, Swimming 



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Intraiiuiral football ]il 
athletic program. 



ilii;i,il pall III Loyola University'; 



The intramural program offers something 
for everyone from dart-throwing to track and for 
all degrees of prowess. For Loyolans with greater 
proficiency the intercollege program allows the 
student to represent his school in a variety of 
athletic struggles. 

Athletics, moreover, is a social activity. To 
the spectator, the tension of the athletic conflict 
with the outcome to be determined before his 
eyes separates him from the preoccupations of 
ordinary life, giving him what psychologists call 
release. 



The hij;h-.steppinK cheerleaders led the Ramblers on to victory. 





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VARSITY 



Mini goes up, up and away. 




Well just don't stand there, Verwey! 



A study in concentration. 



154 




BASKETBALL 




Two cheerleaders, Rho-da Lesko and Jule Swinehart, are 
filled with uncontrollable glee as Clarence Red chalcks 
up another two-pointer. 



As preseason reports indicated, the future of 
Loyola's Ramblers looked bright. A strong team 
of experienced veterans led by Clarence Red, 
plus a group of promising sophomores led by 
Mike Gavin and Jerry Verwey, predicted suf- 
ficient experience and bench strength to com- 
pensate for the height deficit and youthful in- 
experience which plagued previous Rambler 
squads. Also the return of Jim Gorman to assist 
at the pivot, and the addition of Jim Mini in the 
backcourt, added great experience to the team. 

As the season progressed, things became 
darker on the Loyola baketball horizon, and the 
Ramblers closed the season with a disappointing 
10 won — 12 lost record. 

However, in the final analysis Loyola's squad 
did fairly well considering the setbacks suffered 
during the season. The loss of 6'6" Jim Gorman 
and 6'7" Greg Griffin at mid-year greatly weaken- 
ed our strength on the boards. Secondly, another 
player who was seeing plenty of action, Ron 
Reals, left school at the mid-way mark of the 
campaign. 

In looking to the future it must be noted that 
the return of players like Red, Mini, Dawson, 
Gavin, and Verwey provides a promising out- 
look for next season. With these experienced men 
plus members from Loyola's most outstanding 
freshman team in years, the varsity should pro- 
vide plenty of excitement next year. 





Buzzy O'Connor upsets a potential basket for Bowling Green. 



LOYOLA'S VARSITY 
TEAM RECORD '59-'60 

Loyola 82 Wayne State 59 

Loyola 84 Western Ontario 60 

Loyola 69 Creighton 62 

Loyola 67 Wisconsin 85 

Loyola 68 Canisius 73 

Loyola 45 Notre Dame 67 

Loyola 62 Missouri 71 

Loyola 85 Montana State 73 

Loyola 60 Marquette 63 

Loyola 50 Air Force 63 

Loyola 85 Colorado 76 

Loyola 65 Xavier 63 

Loyola 74 Washington U. 69 

Loyola 59 St. John's 74 

Loyola 64 Loyola (N. O.) 66 

Loyola 95 Western Michigan 82 

Loyola 66 Marquette 79 

Loyola 58 Duquesne 87 

Loyola 64 Western Michigan 76 

Loyola 82 Manhattan 80 

Loyola 67 Bowling Green 70 

Loyola 89 John Carroll 75 

Total 1540 Total 1573 
Won 10 Lost 12 



Varsity Basketball Team. Back roiv: Manager Fran Kelly, Greg Griffin, Jim Gorman, Marty 
Norville, Nick Hriljac, John Crnokrak, Past Head Manager Jim Hogan. Middle row. Coach 
Bill Shay, Bub Dawson, Al Denenberg, Dr. Dan Danles, Tom O'Connor, Clarence Red, Coach 
George Ireland. Front row: Manager Pete Swanfield, Jerry Verwey, Ron Schwingen, Kenny 
Brandt, Ron Reals, Jim Mini, Mike Gavin, Head Manager Tim Hawkins. Missing is Howie 
Falk. 




Marty Norville, after faking a pass to John Crnokrak, 
blindly flips the ball behind him to the trailing Jim 
Gorman. 



John Crnokrak leaps high in the air in 
a frantic effort to block the one 
handed shot of a determined Mus- 
keteer, as Buzzy O'Connor prepares to 
battle for the rebound. 




Sophomore guard, Mike Gavin, is 
pictured driving in towards the basket 
for a lay-up as three Bowling Green 
University defenders keep their eyes 
glued on the ball to see if it goes in. 



After opening the season by rolling over two 
comparatively easy foes and taking a hard fought 
battle from Creighton, the Ramblers met their 
first defeat at the hands of a fast-breaking Wis- 
consin squad which hit better than 60% from 
the floor. Subsequent games found the Ramblers 
suffering defeats to Canisius, Notre Dame, and 
Wisconsin before again entering the winners 
column by defeating Montana State. 

Although plagued by injuries which allowed 
Marquette and the Air Force Academy to beat 
Loyola, Coach Ireland's boys bounced back to 
win three in a row including a two point decision 
over a fine Xavier group. 

Hoping to continue their winning ways, 
Loyola entered the Chicago Stadium to meet a 
strong St. Johns team. Led by All-American 
Tony Jackson, St. John's broke the Rambler string 
at three. The team then traveled south to Loyola 
of New Orleans only to return with a heartbreak- 
ing two point loss. 

Loyola then downed Western Michigan but 
lost their second game to Marquette. Two more 
successive losses were encountered at the hands 
of Duquesne and Western Michigan. Entering 
the Chicago Stadium again, the Ramblers edged 
a strong eastern quintet, Manhattan. In the last 
home game of the season the boys lost a thriller 
to highly rated Rowling Green by three points. 
The final game of the season ended on a happy 
note with a victory over John Carroll. 

158 



Being the Ramblers' three tallest players and thus top rebounders, 
Greg Griffin, Clarence Red, and John Crnokrak do not have much 
of a chance to dribble during a game, but nevertheless they still 
have to practice this part of the game, as shown by this photo. 





Loyola's championship Drill Team is shown going through one 
of its variety or formations during halftime of the Loyola-Bowling 
Green basketball game at the Alumni Gym. 



Loyola's No. 32, Greg Griffin, jumps high in the air to tip in a 
basket while teammate Jim Gorman prepares himself for a possi- 
ble rebound. 



The outstretched arms and high jumps of these defenders aren't 
enough to stop our star forward, Clarence Red, from laying up 
another two-pointer. 





FRESHMAN BASKETBALL 



On February 29, 1960, the Loyola freshman 
basketball team wound up one of the finest sea- 
sons in the University's history. The team, de- 
veloped by Coach Shay, accomplished the amaz- 
ing feat of winning eight games while dropping 
only one. The superb team won each of its games 
by at least fourteen points. The only defeat that 
they suffered was to Jamaco who went to the 
National Industrial League playoffs two weeks 
later. Previously the Ramblers had beaten them 
by a score of 93-79, but in the rematch the 
Ramblers were upset 77-73. Their victories were 
over Wright Junior College, twice. Crane, twice, 
Jamaco, Valpariso, Wheaton, and Wilson Junior 
College. 

The team's success was due to fine team 
spirit and e.xcellent bench strength. If individual 
players were to be mentioned, the highest praise 
would have to go to Jerry Harkness, Jim Reardon, 
and Herman Hagan. These three in particular 
will figure greatly in the plans for next year's var- 
sity squad. 



A successful block by the Frosh Team; one of many which gave 
them a total of 8 wins and only 1 loss. 



Take it from us, Loyola will make the basket. 






LOYOLA'S FRESHMEN 
TEAM RECORD '59-'60 

Loyola 72 Wright Jr. College 36 

Loyola 96 Wilson Jr. College 61 

Loloya 87 Crane Jr. College 68 

Loyola 93 Jamaco 79 

Loyola 61 Valpo U. 40 

Loyola 77 Wheaton Col. Frosh. 60 

Loyola 70 Wright Jr. College 42 

Loyola 73 Jamaco 77 

Loyola 84 Crane Jr. College 43 

Total 713 Total 506 

Won 8 Lost 1 



Only five minutes and nineteen seconds left in the ^ame, and the 
score is tied 36 to 36. 



The Freshman Team. Standinfi: Herm Hagan, Ken Sorensen, John 
Griffin, Paul Anderson, Vic Kapetanovic, Jim Reardon. Kneeling: 
Doug Bybee, Art King, Pat Parelli, Rich DriscoU, Jerry Harkness. 







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SwimniinR Team. Standing: Coach Don Chalmers, Richard Stavely, 
Robert Dring, Donald Schmidt, John Banks, Dennis Spirek, John 
Deutsch, Frank Forde. Seated: Michael Jolivctte, James Kelly, 
William Bishop, Len Vertuno, Patrick Pierce, Butch Blau, Peter 
Trunimer. 



SWIMMING 



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Pete Trnmnu'r starts an 
the Ahnnni pool. 



)ther fine race in the backstroke event at 




While the 1959-60 swimming team had a 
below-average season, they finished their season 
in true Rambler form by winning the Chicago 
Intercollegiate Championship. 

The team had a record of six victories and 
eight defeats. According to Coach Don Chalmers, 
this was one of the strongest teams that he has 
ever had at Loyola; due, however, to the tougher 
schedule and the loss of a few important swim- 
mers, the outcome of the season was not too as- 
tonishing. 

The high point of the season, up to the 
Chicago Intercollegiate meet, was the upset vic- 
tory over Northwestern. After the Northwestern 
meet, the finmen lost six in a row. Two of these 
defeats were by three points, and the other four 
were within ten points. 



The strength of this year's team can be seen 
in the fact that several varsity records were bro- 
ken. The medley relay, composed of Peter Tram- 
mer, Bernard Blau, Dick Stavely, and Michael 
Jolivette, set a new team record of 4:09. Peter 
Trummer set new records in the 440-yard free- 
style with 5:04.6, the 200-yard individual medley 
with 2:19.2, and the 200-yard backstroke with 
2:18.3. William Bishop broke the 200-yard but- 
terfly record with 2:21.7. Although Bernard Blau 
did not go under his record from last season, he 
completed the season undefeated in dual-meet 
competition. Finally, the 400-yard freestyle relay 
unofficially went under the previous record time. 

This quote from Coach Chalmers concerning 
the Chicago Collegiate meet could probably sum- 
marize the entire season: "This was an all-out 
team victory in which every member did his 
share." He considered the results of this meet to 
be a good indication of an eventful season for next 
year. For the first time in five years, however, 
Coach Chalmers sent two of his swimmers to the 
National Collegiate Swimming and Diving Cham- 
pionship: Peter Trummer and Bernard Blau. 





Coach Chalmers gives Len Vertuno a few last-minute instructions 
before the meet. 

Sophomore Bill Bishop stretches his hands way back in an exhibi- 
tion of the butterfly stroke. 




John Deutsch executes a beautiful 
front dive in a layout position (com- 
monly called a swan dive). 




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The medley relay team, consisting of 
Pete Trummer, Butch Blau, Dick 
Stavely, and Mike Jolivette, set a new 
school record for the 400-yard medley 
relay of 4:09. 



164 



Bowling Team. Standing: Roland 
Madden, Roland Geretti, Walter 
Draus, John Brown, James Handy. 
Seated: Dennis Suder, Richard Baum, 
Coach Charles Greenstein, Earl Cro- 
vedi, Tony Licata. 




BOWLING 



The Loyola bowling team coached by Charles Greenstein took 
fourth place this year in the five team Midwestern Collegiate Bowling 
League. 

The team had five returnees from last year. Jack Brown, Den 
Suder, Tony Licata, Wally Draus, and captain Dick Baum. They were 
aided by Jim Handy, Rol Madden, Earl Crovedi, and Rol Geretti. 

In a strong conference with twenty bowlers averaging over 180, 
Jack Brown was tenth with a 184 average. 

An innovation this year was a tournament for individuals in which 
the winner was sent to New York by the conference to face the top 
bowlers from the eastern conference. 



Jack Brown .show.s his form on the alleys. 



Denny Suder aims for another straight 
strike in his search for that perfect 
game. 



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Pictured above are track coach, Jerry Weiland, and his star ath- 
lete, Ernie Bilhips, whose sights are set on the 1960 summer 
Olympics in Rome. Ernie's specialty is the 1000-yard run. 



Loyola's indoor track team had a most suc- 
cessful and record-breaking season as they tra- 
veled to the major mid-west meets. The Ramblers 
started burning up the boards during the semes- 
ter break. First, the mile relay team of Ernie Bill- 
ups, Ed Alexjun, Ed Flores, and Hal Brownlee 
set a record of 3:24.1 at Michigan State. At the 
same meet Billups took first in the 1000-yard 
run. The team continued its winning ways at 
North Central College. Billups set a fieldhouse 
record of 1:59 flat in the 880-yard run. In that 
meet we captured seven of twelve firsts while 
gathering two complete sweeps of first, second, 
and third. 

Next, at the Western Michigan meet, Billups 
set a record in the 1000-yard run with a time of 
2:12.2. At the Milwaukee Journal Relays a relay 
team composed of Ed Alexjun, Henry White, Hal 
Brownlee, and Tom Flanagan set a meet record 
in the eight-lap relay of 2:20.5, chopping 2.2 
seconds off the old one. With Ed Flores replacing 
Brownlee on that team they took first in the mile 
relay of the college division at the Chicago Daihj 
News Relays. In the same meet Billups finished 
a close second to Pan-American champion Tom 
Murphy in the 1000-yard run. This performance 
made him a top prospect to represent the United 
States in the 1960 Olympics. 

The climax of the indoor season was second 
place in the Central AAU meet which was like 
first to the Loyola boys, for they were beaten by 
the Chicago Track Club, which is composed of 
graduate runners and Olympic veterans. 



TRACK 



Jim Bush, Ed Flores, Ernie Billupc, and Norb Slowikowski show 
off their new warm-up suits for the LOYOLAN photographer at 
the LSC track. ' ^ 



166 




Coach Jerry Weiland started off the 1959-1960 
track season by adding Don Amidei to his team as 
assisant coach. The two of them then started to shape 
up the Ramblers' cross-country team. Although the har- 
riers dropped their first two meets— the first one to 
Wheaton and the second one a triangular meet with 
Eastern Illinois and Illinois Normal— they came back 
to claim the Chicago area championship by whipping 
the University of Chicago, IIT, and De Paul. They 
wound up the season with good performances at the 
State Meet at Normal Illinois and the Center Intra- 
college meet at Chicago. 

The standout runner in cross-country was Ernie 
Billups, but strong support was given by Norb Slowikow- 
ski who practically equaled Billups' times. One of the 
bright spots on the team was the development of fresh- 
man Jerry Koehler, who should become the backbone of 
the team for the next three years. Other members were 
Tony Lenart, Matt Wheeler, Doug Balen, and Tom 
Flanagan. 




Henry White, Hal Brownlee, and Tom Flanagan with tensed 
niuscles await the sound of the Run to start the lOO-yard dash. 



Norb Slouikowski and Ernie Billups, two of Loyola's 
cross-country runners, consistently finished first and 
second for coach Weiland's 1959 harrier team. 




167 




Coac'li Jerry Weiland jjives an approving smile 
as he looks at his relay team of Ed Alexjun, 
Ernie Billups, Hal Brownlee, and Henry White. 
Alexjun, Brownlee, and White teamed with 
Tom Flanagan ih March to knock off 2,2. sec- 
onds in the eight-lap relay at the Milwaukee 
Journal Relays. 



The mile-relay team composed of Henry 
White, Ed Alexjun, Ed Flores, and Ernie 
Billups are shown trotting around the track 
during a warm-up session before the race. 





L. M. Minor is shown passing the baton to Ernie Billups in a 
practice session at the Lake Shore Campus track. 



Coach Jerry Weiland's stopwatch must be bringing good news to members of the track team, 
who are captain Ernie Billups, Henry White, Jerry Koehler, Hal Brownlee, Tom Flanagan and 
Jim Bush. 




169 



Innovations in the uptown intramural pro- 
gram during the 1959-1960 seasons were all 
aimed at improving team competition and run- 
ning a well-rounded program. The three major 
sports in which organized leagues were formed 
were: football, basketball, and baseball. Monty's 
Monks, a combination of beef in the line and 
speed and sure hands at the backs and erids, re- 
sulted in a undefeated season in the twelve-team 
football league. The Comets continued their 
domination of the hardcourt and whipped the 
Viatorians, 54-35, in the playoff game for the 
championship. Sixteen teams competed in the 
two league set-up that concluded in a double 
elimination tournament. 

The program in the future will definitely be 
improved as the gym facilities are modernized. 
The addition of an adequate weight and exercis- 
ing room this year is the first step that has been 
taken in an effort to improve Loyola's athletic 
facilities. While no Sweepstakes points were tab- 
ulated this year, such a well-rounded program 
has been made possible next year due to these 
additional facilities and organizational improve- 
ment that we have made this year. 

The downtown intramural program has been 
built around a successful sweepstakes program 
and numerous individual tournaments. Delta 
Sigma Pi again appears to be the Sweepstakes 
Winners. Handicapped by facilities, the Lewis 
Towers intramural board has still done every- 
thing in its power to present a well-balanced 
program and give the downtown student an op- 
portunity to work off his pentup energies. 



MEN'S 



Near-profesMonal skill is 
ball teams. 



stratcd by tbe Intramural basket- 




Intramural football gives everyone a chance to show his skill with the pigskin. 





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INTRAMURALS 







The Pi Alphs and Phi Mu Chi are shown in a battle which 
resulted in an overtime victory for the Pi Alphs. 



"Are you protected by an invisible shield?" 




Brother Shelangouski, Fred Lindsey, 
and Brother Snodgrass battle for re- 
bound while (far right) Jim McSvveen 
looks on. 




Intramural Champs. Standing: Wally Udziela, J. J. Sullivan, Bill Rouse, Bob Perticara, Dan 
Duick, Jim CuUeran, Mike Curran. Kneeling: Bill Cowling, Fred Lindsey, Jim McSween. 



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The IM football champions, Dorm I, better known as Monty's 
Monks. Standing: Tom Kipfstuhl, Jerry Nelson, Tim O'Neill, Rev. 
Edmund Montville, S.J., Rich Cahill, Bill Freeman, Gene Voltilina. 
Kneeling: Mike Hniura, Tom Tyler, Tom Bruno, John Corcoran, 
Dale Elenteny, Jacob Jachna. 



Ed Rasch, custodian of Alumni Gym, 
is presented with a pin for thirty years 
of service to Loyola by vice-presidents 
Thomas Hawkins and Rev. Robert 
Mulligan, S.J. 





The second-place winners in the coed 
volleyball tournament proudly pose 
with the winning ball in front of the 
trophy case in the Alumni Gym. 



WOMEN'S INTRAMURALS 



what form! What precision! What grace! 




Coed Intramurals was established because 
physical development is an integral part of a 
well-balanced system of education and because 
participation in athletics is essential to physical 
and moral training. 

The intramural program for coeds is com- 
posed of a board of Loyola undergraduate 
women from Lewis Towers and Lake Shore who 
direct and control all intramural activities. 

The board encourages the organization of 
teams each semester to partake in the various 
tournaments throughout the school year. The 
board also arranges and schedules various games 
and play days with other colleges. 

Coed Intramurals uses a merit point system 
to determine award winners. This system has 
been founded in order to give credit to those 
coeds who show outstanding enthusiasm in intra- 
murals by being active in all its phases— volley- 
ball, basketball, ping pong, badminton, and 
swimming. 



174 




First place winners: Monica Trocker, Peggy Fischer, Pat Metz, 
Marlene Capparelli, Jean Jankovec, Verna Christian, Joan Eckman. 



She may not be able to get her man, but she can sure get that 
volley ball. 



Where's our back defense? 



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ADMINISTRATION 




VERY REVEREND JAMES F. MAGUIRE, S.J. 

President of Loyola 



178 



UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT 

Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S.J., was appointed to the presidency 
of Loyola University in 1955, succeeding the Very Rev. James T. Hus- 
sey, S.J. Before coming to Loyola, Father Maguire had been president 
of Xavier University, Cincinnati, for .six years, and president of West 
Baden College, the Jesuit seminary affiliated with Loyola. 

Born on the West Side of Chicago in 1904, Father Maguire at- 
tended St. Ignatius High School. After graduation in 1922, he entered 
the Jesuit order and was ordained in 1937; he received his bachelor's 
and master's degrees from St. Louis University. 

At the completion of his training after ordination, he taught for 
a year at the University of Detroit High School; he then became 
president of St. Xavier High School in Cincinnati, Ohio. 




VICE PRESIDENT AND DEAN OF FACULTIES 



The Rev. Robert W. Mulligan, S.J., was 
named Vice-President and Dean of Faculties of 
Loyola in July, 1958. Father Mulligan was born 
on October 11, 1916, and was a member of St. 
Margaret Mary Parish in Chicago. He is a gradu- 
ate of both Loyola Academy and Loyola Univer- 
sity, and furthered his educational training by 
studying abroad. 

Father Mulligan was ordained to the Priest- 
hood in September of 1937 and later joined the 
Philosophy Department at Loyola. He was ap- 
pointed Chairman of that department in 1955, 
and is also active in many areas of University 



VICE PRESIDENT IN CHARGE OF DEVELOPMENT 

W. Daniel Conroyd, Vice-President for De- 
velopment and Public Relations, coordinates and 
directs the University's fund raising, public rela- 
tions, and alumni activities. Mr. Conroyd has 
been with Loyola since 1945, serving first as 
Director of Public Relations and then as Adminis- 
trative Assistant to the President; in 1957 he was 
named Assistant to the President for Develop- 
ment, Public Relations, and Alumni Relations. 

A graduate of Loyola and DePaul Univer- 
sities, Mr. Conroyd previously was associated 
with the Federal Bureau of Investigation and 
Montgomery Ward and Company. 




VICE PRESIDENT AND BUSINESS MANAGER 

Thomas F. Hawkins was promoted to Vice- 
President of Loyola in 1956 after serving as the 
University's Business Manager for over five years. 

A graduate of Northwestern and Loyola Uni- 
versities, Mr. Hawkins has previously been em- 
ployed as Treasurer and Comptroller of the Nach- 
man Corporation, Assistant Comptroller of Es- 
quire, Inc., and Assistant Treasurer of the H. A. 
Brassert Company, consulting engineers. 



179 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Board of Trustees Standing: Rev. T. J. Tracy, S.J.; Rev. S. E. Dollard, S.J.; Rev. F. P. Biestek, 
S.J.; Rev. F. C. Fischer, S.J.; Rev. R. W. Mulligan, S.J. Seated: Rev. J. A. McEvoy, S.J.; Rev. 
J. \V. Bieri, S.].; Very Rev. J. E. Maguire, S.J.; Rev. R. E. Tischler, S.J. 




Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S.J. 
Rev. Felix P. Biestek, S.J. 

Rev. Stewart E. Dollard, S.J. 

Rev. Franklin C. Fischer, S.J. 

Rev. Jerome V. Jacobsen, S.J. 
Rev. John A. McEvoy, S.J. 

Rev. Robert W. MuUigan, S.J. 

Rev. Richard E. Tischler, S.J. 

Rev. Theodore J. Tracy, S.J. 



180 



ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL 

Administrative Council. Standing: J. Raymond Sheriff, W. Daniel Conroyd, Harry L. Mc- 
Closkey, John C. Fitzgerald (on leave), Richard A. Matre, Rev. Hugh B. Rodman, S.J., Dr. 
William P. Schoen. Seated: Elizabeth A. McCann, Thoma.s F. Hawkin.s, Rev. Robert W. 
Mulligan, S.J., Dr. John F. Sheehan, Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S.J., Gladys Kiniery, Rev. 
Stewart E. Dollard, S.J., Matthew H. Schoenbaum, Rev. Richard E. Tischler, S.J. Missing: 
John C. Hayes and James C. Cox. 




Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S.J. 



W. Daniel Conroyd 
James C. Cox 

Rev. Stewart E. Dollard, S.J. 
John C. Fitzgerald (on leave) 
Thomas F. Hawkins 
John C. Hayes 
Gladys Kiniery 
Richard A. Matre 



Elizabeth A. McCann 

Harry L. McCloskey 

Rev. Robert W. Mulhgan, S.J. 

Rev. Hugh B. Rodman, S.J. 

Dr. WiUiam P. Schoen, Jr. 

Matthew H. Schoenbaum 

Dr. John F. Sheehan 

J. Raymond Sheriff 



Rev. Richard E. Tischler, S.J. 



181 





BOARD OF 



C. B. Bissell 



Louis H. G. Bouscaren 



Augustine J. Bowe David F. Bremner, Sr. 




H. J. Buckley 



James O. Burke 



WUliain R. Carney Henry T. Chamberlain Edward A. Cudahy Walter J. Cummings 




'^m^l :^rf^% 





T. A. Dean 



Querin P. Dorschel 



Edward J. Farrell Matthew J. Hickey, Jr. Charles M. Hines Samuel Insull, Jr. 



John Denby Allen 
H. Leslie Atlass 
Charles A. Bane 
Gerald A. Barry 
O. D. Bast 
Thomas H. Beacom 
Robert L. Bemer 
Dr. Otto L. Bettag 
John M. Bireley 
Cushman B. Bissell 
Andrew R. Bopp 
Louis H. G. Bouscaren 
Augustine J. Bowe 
Wilham J. Bowe 
A. J. Bremner 
David F. Bremner, Sr. 
C. M. Brerman 
James G. Brerman 
James J. Brerman 
John E. Brennan 
Ralph D. Brizzolara 
Howard A. Brundage 
Clemens H. Bruns 
Homer J. Buckley 
Francis J. Burke 
James O. Burke 
Robert E. Burke 
Thomas B. Burke 
Leo Burnett 
C. J. Bumy 
Thomas J. Byrne, Jr. 
W. J. Byrnes 
Julien J. Caestecker 
Richard D. Cagney 



William E. Cahill 
Dr. James J. Callahan 
Douglass Campbell 
Hon. William J. Campbell 
Andrew R. Carlson 
William Roy Carney 
Wallace E. Carroll 
Anthony E. Cascino 
Joseph J. Cavanagh 
Thomas J. Cavanagh 
Leo D. Cavanaugh 
Henry T. Chamberlain 
John A, Clark 
John W. Clarke 
James W. Close 
John E. Colnon 
Philip Conley 
Timothy J. Connelly 
D. V. Considine 
Francis M. Corby 
Walter R. Costello 
Louis J. Cross 
Patrick F. Crowley 
Colonel Henry Crown 
Edward A, Cudahy 
Martin A. Culhane 
Walter J. Cummings 
Walter J. Cummings, Jr. 
Henry J. Curran 
A. J. Cusick 
Andrew J. Dallstream 
J. Francis Dammann 
Thomas A, Dean 
Donald Defrees 
Charles W. DeCryse 
William J. Donahoe 



James L. Donnelly 
George T. Donoghue 
James F. Donovan 
James A. Dooley 
Richard F. Dooley 
William G. Dooley 
Ouerin P. Dorschel 
Edward J. Doyle, Sr. 
Leo J. Doyle 
Hon. R. P. Drymalski 
John J. EKmn, Jr. 
Edward W. Dunne 
Hon. Robert J. Dunne 
Raymond W. Durst 
Joseph F. Elward 
Raymond Epstein 
Alexander Eulenberg 
John W. Evers 
Lawrence S. Fanning 
Edward J. Farrell 
Peter V. Fazio 
Edward Fenner 
Edwin J. Feulner 
George Fiedler 
George J. Fitzgerald 
Matthew J. Fitzgerald 
Frank Flick 
Leonard S. Florsheim 
John J. Foley 
Clarence E. Fox 
Arthur J. Gallagher 
Charles J. Gallagher 
Paul V. Calvin 
James L. Garard 
Lee J. Gary 



CITIZENS 



Frank J. Gillespie 
Joshua B. Glasser 
John S. Gleason, Jr. 
Louis Glunz 
Maurice Goldblatt 
Richard Goodman 
Robert F. Graham 
Thomas A. Grant 
Thomas D. Griffin 
Charles J. Haines 
George S. Halas 
William J. HalUgan, Sr. 
Dr. Eugene A. Hamilton 
R. Emmett Hanley 
Feli-x E. Healy 
Joseph E. Henry 
Matthew J. Hickey, III 
Thomas J. Higgins 
Raymond M. Hilliard 
Charles M. Hines 
Brigadier General 
Jeremiah P. Holland 
John B. Huarisa 
James T. Igoe, Jr. 
Michael L. Igoe 
Samuel Insull, Jr. 
B. Raymond Jogor 
Clarence B. Jennett 
Howard J. Johnson 
Murray Joslin 
Walter J. Joy, Jr. 
Robert E. Joyce 
Frank Kartheiser 
John S. Kavanaugh 
Joseph S. Kearney 



My TRUSTEES 




Arthur Keating Charles H. Kellstadt 



Charles C. Kerwin 



W. Kirkland 




Frank J. Lewis John L. McCaffrey Charles F. Murphy John F. OTCeefe 




William J. Sinek 



John F. Smith, Jr. Frederick W. Specht William J. Stebler 




BOARD 



Arthur Keating 
Edward Keating 
Paul A. Keim 
Peter M. Kelliher 
Charles H. Kellstadt 
John J. Kelly 
Hayes Kennedy 
W. McNeil Kennedy 
John E. Kenney 
Charles C. Kerwin 
Edward M. Kerwin 
John P. Kiley 
John J. Kinnare 
Weymouth Kirkland 
John S. Knight 
Hon. Win G. Knoch 
J. B. Kolko 
Leonard O. Krez 
Anthony J. Kueber 
Francis H. Kullman, Jr. 
Hon. Walter J. LaBuy 
Dr. Paul E. Lawler 
William J. Lawlor, Jr. 
Russell J. Leander 
William A. Lee 
Arthur T. Leonard 
Frank J. Lewis 
Thomas A. Lewis 
Stuart List 
Park Livingston 
Edward C. Logelin 
Maior Lenox R. Lohr 
Eugene K. Lydon 
Bernard W. Lynch 
Frank J. Lynch 



Richard 


Lynch 


William 


J. Lynch 


John Madden 


Walter J. Madigan 


Joseph 


E. Magnus 


John J. 


Maher 


James R. Martin 


Howard 


G. Mayer 


John L. 


McCaffrey 


James B. McCahey, Jr. 


Edwin 1 


B. McConville 


Hon. John V. McCormick 


Morgan 


F. McDonnell 


John J. 


McDonough 


William 


L. McFetridge 


William 


J, McGah 


John P. 


McGoorty 


John B. 


McGuire 


John F. 


McGuire 


Ivan A. 


McKenna 


H. V. McNamara 


John E. 


McNulty 


Henry W. Meers 


Joseph '. 


E. Merrion, Jr. 


Robert 


L. Meyers 


John T. 


Moran 


Michael 


F. Mulcahy 


Edward 


F. Mulhem 


Paul L. 


MuUaney 


Charles 


F. Murphy 


Herbert 


F. Murphy 


Joseph ] 


D. Murphy 


Leo T. 


Murphy 


Morgan 


Murphy 


John A. 


Naghten 



Cyrus H. Neuses 
T. Clifford Noonan 
Harry J. O'Haire 
James L. O'Keefe 
John F. O'Keefe 
William P. O'Keefe 
Patrick L. O'Malley 
William F. O'Meara 
Robert A. O'Reilly 
Marcellus M. Oshe 
Michael F. Peckels 
Howard V. Phalin 
James M. Pigott 
Paul M. Plunkett 
Robert A. Podesta 
Harry W. Pucetti 
Tames R. Quinn 
William J. Quinn 
Frank C. Rathje 
Ben Regan 
Henry Regnery 
Thomas A. Reynolds 
John H. Riley 
G. Gale Roberson 
Burke B. Roche 
Tohn Pierre Roche 
Charles J- Roubik 
Anthony J, Rudis 
Morris B. Sachs, Jr. 
George F. Salerno 
Toseph P. Savage 
Tohn Schmidt 
Dr. Herbert E, Schmitz 
Dr. William M. Scholl 
Barnabas F. Sears 
Thomas W. Sexton 



Admiral D. F. J. Shea 
Edward D. Sheehan 
T. Glenn Shehee 
Leo J. Sheridan 
Vincent I. Sheridan 
Robert Sargent Shriver, 

Jr. 
William J. Sinek 
Tackson W. Smart 
Tohn F. Smith, Jr. 
Tohn M. Smyth, Jr. 
Fred B. Snite 
F. W. Specht 
A. L. Starshak 
William J. Stebler 
Toseph D. Stockton 
Bolton Sullivan 
Tohn P. Sullivan 
Toseph F. Sullivan 
Hon. Philip L. Sullivan 
William B. Traynor 
Hon. William T. Tuohy 
Frank H. Uriell 
Dr. Arkell M. Vaughn 
Charles S. Vrtis 
Tames F. Wade 
Herman Waldeck 
Tohn T. Waldron 
Irwin N. Walker 
Donald T- Walsh 
T. Harris Ward 
Frank M. Whiston 
Philip White 
Elmer J. Whitty 
Tames C. Worthy 
Eugene R. Zacher 
R. A. Zimmermann 



ESTATE PLANNING EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

The Estate Planning Executive Committee was fonned to interest 
alumni and friends of the University in the bequest opportunities 
available at Loyola. Through a gift or bequest, a person can direct a 
portion of his resources to an enduring purpose, assuring the education 
of our youth for generations to come. The university offers donors 
several plans in which they can invest: by wills, gifts from capital, 
revocable trusts, irrevocable trusts, and testamentary trusts. In addi- 
tion, the bequest may be unrestricted or directed to scholarships, 
buildings, professorships, research, or cultural activities. This is truly 
the creation of a Living Estate. 








Cushman B. Bissell 



Augustine J. Bowe 



Andrew J. Dallstream 



J. Francis Dammann 



Donald Defrees 






Alexander Eulenberg 



Louis A. Kohn 



Morris I. Leibman 




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i 



Ik 







John P. McGoorty 

184 



]. Alfred Moran 



Thomas A. Reynolds 



Charles J. Roubik 



Jonn J. Waldron 



BUSINESSMEN FOR LOYOLA 

Founded in the fall of 1955, the purpose of BMLU is to enlist 
financial cooperation from Chicago corporations. Since its inception, 
the organization has presented the University with more than $830,000. 
Directed by Mr. William Stebler, President of General American 
Transportation Corporation, this year's drive anticipates contributions 
totaling $375,000. 

Funds made available by BMLU are used for annual teachers' 
salary increments and the creation of new professorships. According 
to W. Daniel Conroyd, Vice-President, Businessmen for Loyola Uni- 
versity have already made definite salary raises possible. In so doing, 
they have distinguished themselves as outstanding servants of the 
University. 



Gerald A. Barry 
Stephen M. Bailey 
Dr. Otto L. Bettag 
John M. Bireley 
Cushman B. Bissell 
Louis H. G. Bouscaren 
Augustine J. Bowe 
Hon. Charles A. Boyle 
Clarence J. Bredemann 
A. J. Bremner 
David F. Bremner 
Edward G. Bremner 
Tames G. Brennan 
Terrence Brennan 
Ralph D. Brizzolara 
Homer J. Buckley 
Alexander Burke 
Francis J. Burke 
Tames O. Burke 
Thomas B. Burke 
C. T- Bumy 
William E. Cahill 
James J. Callahan 
Andrew R. Carlson 
Wm. Roy Carney 
Tohn W. Carroll 
George L. Carstens 
Anthony E, Cascino 
Thomas T- Cavanagh 
Henry T. Chamberlain 
Fred E. Chambers 
Frank W. Chesrow 
Tames W. Close 
Harry H. Comstock 
Timothy T. Connelly 
W. Daniel Conroyd 
Francis M. Corbv 
Philip H. Cordes 
Walter R. Costello 
F. X. Courtney 
Tosenh W. Cremin 
William A. Cremin 
T onis T. Cross 
Piitrick F. Crowley 
Edward A. didahy 
Martin A. Culhane 
Walter T. Cummings 
Walter T- Cummings, Jr. 
A. T. Cusick 
Dr. August F. Daro 
Thomas A, Dean 
Charles W. DeGryse 
Sidney L. DeLove 
Toshua D'Esposito, Jr. 
Angelo Dicello 



James L. Donnelly 
James A. Dooley 
Richard F. Dooley 
William G. Dooley 
Querin P. Dorschel 
Leo J. Doyle 
William J. Drennan 
Tliomas F. Duffy 
John J. Dunn 
Edward W. Dunne 
Herman J. Eckrich, Jr. 
Leonard B. Ettelson 
Alexander Eulenberg 
Edward J. Farrell 
Peter V. Fazio 
Edwin J. Feulner 
Edward H. Fieldler 
George Fiedler 
George J. Fitzgerald 
Joseph T- Fitzgerald 
Peter Fitzpatrick 
Tohn J. Flanagan 
Fahey Flyim 
Maurice B. Frank 
Charles J. Gallagher 
Frank A. Gallagher 
Paul V. Galvin 
William J. Garvy 
W. P. Gensert 
J. Jay Gerber 
Louis Glunz 
Tohn P. Goedert 
Thomas A. Gonser 
George W. Grace 
Thomas D. Griffin 
Thomas J. Haggerty 
Tames J. Haines 
William J. Halligan 
R. Emmett Hanley 
Felix E. Healy 
Toseph E. Henry 
Charles M. Hines 
Tohn P. Hoffmann 
Martv Hogan 
Ralph M. Tsacksen 
Bruce R. Tagor 
Howard J. Tohnson 
Murray Toslin 
Robert E. Joyce 
Tohn S. Kavanaugh 
Joseph S. Kearney 
Arthur Keating 
Joseph W. Kehoe 
Paul A. Keim 
Charles H. Kellstadt 



W. McNeil Kermedy 
John E. Kenney 
Edmund J. Kermey 
Charles G. Kerwin 
Edward M. Kerwin 
John J. Kinnare 
Weymouth Kirkland 
Frank P. Knoll 
W. S. Knox 
Leonard O. Krez 
Anthony J. Kueber 
Alexander X. Kuhn 
Francis H. Kullman 
George A. Lane 
Vincent D. Lane 
Earl S. Lathrop, Jr. 
Robert B. Latousek 
William J. Lawlor 
Elmer F. Layden 
Frank J. Lewis 
Thomas A. Lewis 
Edward W. Liphardt 
Fred G. Litsinger 
Edward G. Logelin 
Eugene K. Lydon 
Frank T- Lynch 
William T. Lynch 
William C. MacDonald 
Tohn Madden 
Maurice D. Mangan 
Tames R. Martin 
Howard G. Mayer 
Robert B. Mayer 
Tohn L. McCaffrey 
Tames B. McCahey, Jr. 
Arthur J. McConville 
Edwin B. McConville 
Morgan F. McDonnell 
Tohn T. McDonough 
Tohn B. McGuire 
Clarence W. Mcintosh 
H. v. McNamara 
Edward A. Menke 
Robert L. Meyers 
Mark T. Mitchell, Jr. 
Tim Moran 
Edward T. Morrissey 
Hon F. Emmett 

Morrissey 
Richard G. Muench 
Paul L. Mullaney 
Charles F. Murphy 
Herbert F. Murphy 
Lewis C. Murtaugh 
Tohn A. Naghten 
T. Clifford Noonan 



Frank B. O'Brien 
Tohn F. O'Keefe 
WiUiam P. O'Keefe 
WiUiam F. O'Meara 
J. E. O'Shaughnessy 
Thomas W. 

O'Shaughnessy 
Raymond A. Pape 
Howard I. Potter 
Tames R. Quinn 
Ben Regan 
Thomas W. Reilly 
WiUiam H. Remien 
Harlan Richards 
Tohn H. Riley 
Burke B. Roche 
Tohn Pierre Roche 
G. Gale Roberson 
Charles T- Roubik 
Charles Rozmarek 
Anthony J. Rudis 
M. L. Samson 
Dr. Herbert E. Schmitz 
Thomas W. Sexton 
Fred R. Sextro 
Martin F. Shanahan 
Edward D. Sheehan 
T. Glenn Shehee 
Vincent J. Sheridan 
William T. Sinek 
Tohn L. Sloan 
Tackson W. Smart 
Tohn F. Smith, Jr. 
Tohn M. Smyth, Jr. 
F. W. Specht 
Carlos A. Spiess 
A. L. Starshak 
Clarence L. Steber 
W^illiam T. Stebler 
Nelson D. Stoker 
Bolton Sullivan 
Tohn P. Sullivan 
Toseph F. Sullivan 
W. K. Traynor 
Tohn T. Trutter 
Frank H. Uriell 
T. W. VanGorkom 
Charles S. Vrtis 
Donald T. Walsh 
Frank Wetzel 
Frank M. Whiston 
Tohn G. White 
William P. WTiite, Jr. 
Elmer J. Whitty 
Albert T. Wilkins 
Tohn C. Wright 
Eugene R. Zacher 



185 



OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF STUDENTS 




HARRY L. McCLOSKEY 
Dean of Students 



MARIETTE LeBLANC 
Dean of Women 




GEORGE N. KOLLINTZAS 
Assistant Dean of Students 



186 






J. DAVID SMITH 

Assistant to the Dean of Students 



JOAN VACCARO 

Assistant to the Dean of Women 



This year, the Dean of Students Office, under 
Harry L. McCloskey, has taken great steps 
towards increasing student-University relation- 
ship. During the summer of 1959, the Dean of 
Students estabHshed a permanent office on Lake 
Shore Campus. The fact that the Dean of Students 
was now more accessible to the student body 
caused a closer union between the organizations 
on that campus and the office. The benefits 
which Lake Shore Campus has derived from this 
situation are noticeable. 

The function of the Dean of Students is to 
set and administer the official policy of Loyola 
in the matters of all student organizations. To do 
this, Mr. McCloskey has the able assistane of 
George Kollintzas, Assistant Dean of Students; 
J. David Smith, Assistant to the Dean; Mariette 
LeBlanc, Dean of Women; and Joan Vaccaro, 
Assistant to Miss LeBlanc. This office also han- 
dles the general supervision of student conduct 
and appearance with the thought in mind that all 
Loyola students will adhere to the standards of 
Christian ladies and gentlemen, both on and off 
campus. 

The University Committee on Student Acti- 
vities and Welfare, under the chairmanship of the 
Dean of Students, is the general policy-making 
body of student organizations, having supervision 
over student conduct throughout the University. 



Committee on Student Activities and Welfare. Pearl Heffron, 
James Forkins, Mariette LeBlanc. Rev. Gerard Grant, S.J., Harry 
McCloskey, George Kollintzas, Essie Auglum. Absent from pic- 
ture; Joseph McCuIlough, William Meyer, Dr. Gustav Rapp, Rev. 
J. Donald Roll, S.J., Rev. Joseph Small, S.J., Dr. Clarence N. Peiss. 




187 



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REV. JOHN C, MALLOY, S.J. 
Dean of Admissions 



MARY R. MANZKE 
University Examiner of Credcntiah 



JOHN F. BOWMAN 
Director of Development 





188 



ELIZABETH A. McCANN 
'Registrar 





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RICHARD BARRY 
Director, Public Relations 




EUGENE KNIGHT 
Director, Veterans' Affairs 



NANCY GALLAGHER 
Editor, The Alumrtus 



LAWRENCE J. SLAJCHERT 
Director of Placement 





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REV. JOHN P. DOWNEY, S.J. 



REV. JOHN J. BECKMAN, S.J. 




STUDENT COUNSELORS 




REV. THOMAS F. MURRAY, S.J. 
REV. J. DONALD HAYES, S.J. 




190 



Under the head Hbrarian, James C. Cox, the 
Loyola Library Department is embarking on a 
program to meet the needs of a growing Univer- 
sity. The Hbrary has been one of the most prog- 
ressive departments at Loyola during the past 
year. It has grown since its founding both in 
quantity and quality; and, with a view towards 
the future, this growth is just beginning. 

The University contains five libraries: the 
Elizabeth Cudahy Library on Lake Shore Cam- 
pus; the Lewis Towers Library, and the Medical, 
Dental, and Law Libraries. Outstanding is the 
fact that all the libraries serve all the students, 
which provides an unlimited field in the realm of 
research. During 1960, it is expected that the en- 
tire collection will be increased by approximately 
10,000 new books. 



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JAMES C. COX 

University Librarian 



UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 



Lake Shore Library Staff. Ruth Ann Pfeifer, 
Yvonne Damien, Thomas Yort, Helene Stoudt, 
Roslyn Failla, Mary Jo Wolfe, Genevieve 
Delana, James C. Cox, Eleanor Kennedy. 




Lewis Towers Library Staff. Lucille Anichini, 
Philip Martin, Christine Saletta, Ruth Carney, 
Virginia Zittnan. 



191 



PARENTS ASSOCIATES OF LOYOLA 



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Executive Board of PAL. Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Pallasch. Mr. and Mrs. Harold Kelly, Mr. and 
Mrs. Dennis Sullivan, Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Skriba, Mr. and Mrs. Maurice McCarthy, 
Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Pierce, Mr. Maxfield Weisbord, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Parker, Mr. and 
Mrs. Chester Koziol, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Hayes. 



Under the general chairmanship of Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Pierce, 
the Parents Associates of Loyola, in its third year of existance, operated 
under a three-fold program. 

The social program, under the chairmanship of Mr. and Mrs. 
Maurice McCarthy, included three annual events: a Christmas party, 
a reception for freshmen parents, and a dinner party in April. The 
reception, attended this year by 1200 persons, consisted of an orienta- 
tion given to the freshmen parents along with a panel discussion, a 
movie on Loyola, and talks by Fr. Maguire, Mr. McCloskey and Dr. 
Kennedy. A tour of Lake Shore Campus followed. 

The fund-raising program comprises the soliciting of funds in 
order to make up the difference between the cost of a Loyola education 
and the tuition paid from fellow parents. This is necessary since the 
cost exceeds tuition paid by 40%. This committee is headed by Mr. 
and Mrs. Bernard Pallasch. 

The final segment of the three part program is the admission 
program, headed by Mr. and Mrs. Maurice McCarthy, and considered 
by President Maguire as being greatly responsible for the unprecented 
increase of L3% in the fulltime undergraduate colleges of Loyola. 
It is evident that the Parents Associates of Loyola has met with great 
success. 



192 




Students Associates of Loyola. Ralph Palicld, Kay Dwyer, Don Sprengel, Ellen Huck, Jerry 
Moses, Tom Eberl, Marv Stolarz, Mike Hawkins (chairman), Jim Potuznik, Ed Hester, Joan 
Coscioni, Jack Doyle, Nora O'Brien, Paul Hoemig, Jim Fitzgerald, Carol Rogalsld. 



STUDENTS ASSOCIATES OF LOYOLA 



This year, under the general chairmanship of Michael Hawkins, 
and with Ed Walsh as administrative director, the Student Associates 
of Loyola program was completely reorganized so as to make the work 
of participating Loyolans as simple and as pleasant as possible. 

The SAL program was organized in 1956 to enable college stu- 
dents to counsel graduating high school seniors and, if possible, to 
interest them in Loyola. 

Under the new program, Chicago was divided into six sections, 
which were broken down into 202 areas of one square mile each. Each 
suburb was considered as another section. High school seniors whose 
records indicated that they were capable of doing college work were 
listed for contact, according to the section in which they resided. The 
Loyolans of the SAL program were also divided into the same geo- 
graphical divisions as those of the high school seniors and the groups 
were matched. Thus the SAL volunteers contacted only those students 
living in their own neighborhood. 

From the results of the campaign, the reorganization seems to 
have fuUfilled the expectations of its designers completely, and future 
years will reap great benefits from this year's efforts. 

193 







n??!!!'i|!!IMII 'in 




GRADUATE SCHOOL 




REV. STEWART E. DOLLARD, S.J. 
Dean 

The graduate student is an individual in- 
terested in obtaining further education in his 
specific field and consequently it is important that 
he be well-grounded in the elementary courses 
of his study to provide the necessary basis for 
future learning. Such background, along with 
broad intellectual curiosity, produce success and 
satisfaction to the graduate student. 

The Graduate School is a school of arts and 
sciences. The Master of Education degree and 
the Master of Arts degree in Classics, Education, 
English, History, Mathematics, Philosophy, Psy- 
chology, Sociology, and Spanish may be secured. 
The Master of Science degree may be obtained 
in Anatomy, Biochemistry, Chemistry, Microbio- 
logy, Oral Anatomy, Pharmacology, and Physio- 
logy. Doctoral programs in most fields are offered 
as well. Equipped with fundamental and spe- 
cialized knowledge in their particular areas, 
those who have experienced graduate training are 
prepared to make worthwhile contributions in 
many fields. 

196 



On August 15, 1946, Rev. Stewart E. Dollard, 
S.J., becarne the Dean of the Graduate School, 
the fourth dean to hold that office since the estab- 
lishment of the Graduate School in 1926. Dr. Paul 
Kiniery, assistant dean, was appointed in Septem- 
ber, 1932. Since its inception, the objectives of the 
Graduate School have not changed. They are 
naturally the same as those of the University as a 
whole: to integrate scientific, literary, and cul- 
tural training with a sound philosophy of life 
based on Catholic principles of correct thinking 
and correct living. The secondary objectives are 
to give further, highly specialized training to stu- 
dents in their particular fields. The desired end 
product of the Graduate School is a thinking, 
well-oriented scholar. 



Mike Apartipilo and Dorothy Larney are assisted in their graduate 
course schedule by a Graduate School assistant, Francene Olech, 
while Robert Meyer discusses his graduate work with Susan 
Schoeben, another Graduate School assistant. 





KAY SMITH 
Secretary to the Faculty 




DR. PAUL KINIERY 
Assistant Dean 



Paul Davis discusses his graduate course with another dormitory 
resident. 





Kay Stewart, Glenn Phillips, Lorraine 
Lang, and Jere Brophy, members of 
the Honor Program, discuss the phi- 
losophy of Sartre. 



HONORS PROGRAM 



The Honors Program offers special oppor- 
tunities for intellectual achievement on an in- 
dividual basis to those students who have high 
academic qualifications, as well as the ambition 
and time to devote themselves to an intensive 
program of studies. The program provides more 
personal contact with the faculty and friendly 
association with other superior students who 
share similar intellectual interests and objectives. 

The lower-division curriculum contains the 
same subjects as any of the regular curricula in 
the college. But the honors students are given a 
fuller course of study and a special class section in 
English, history, speech, logic, and metaphysics 
in the freshmen and sophomore programs. The 
upper-division curriculum is determined by the 
major subject which the student has chosen. 

Entering freshmen and other lower-division 
students are admitted to the honors curriculum by 
invitation of the dean or of the director of honors 
students, or by their own request if they have the 
proper academic qualifications. 

198 





Dr. Joseph J. Wolff, the Lewis Towers director of the Honors 
Program, instructs Bob Kaftan and Vicki Melowitz, two honor 
students. 





Rev. Carl Burlage, S.J., director of the Honors Program, discusses 
Descartes early views on philosophy with two Lake Shore Honors 
student, Paul Amidei and Charles Hart. 



Members of the Honors Program. Bob Austin, Jim 
Harris, Ken Feit, Ellen Miller, Paul Amidei, Lorraine 
Lang, Bill Nico, Kay Stewart, Jere Brophy, and Glenn 
Phillips pose for the LOYOLAN photographer on the 
Lewis Towers stairway. 



199 




REV. RICHARD E. TISCHLER, S.J. 
Dean 



COLLEGE OF ARTS 
AND SCIENCES 



The significance of these arts is that they are 
most truly equipped to prepare leaders of society 
by integrating general education, cultural im- 
provement, and professional excellence with 
Catholic philosophy. 

United with Christian ideals, the liberal arts 
possess the ability to mold the individual into the 
"whole man," physically, socially, and spiritually 
perfect. The characteristics of this type of forma- 
tive curriculum necessarily stress the basic and 
Christian disciplines. 

Liberal arts training is of tremendous value. 
It gives people trained for the professions know- 
ledge beyond the particular interests of their spe- 
cialties. The liberal arts, indeed, enable the indi- 
vidual to "evaluate life with the wisdom of the 
ages and of eternity." 

One of the important student improvements 
during the past years, at the College of Arts and 
Sciences, was the inauguration of the accelerated 
registration system. This system allows the stu- 
dent to avoid the previously tedious and annoy- 
ing registration procedure. 



"The true Christian product of Christian edu- 
cation," Pope Pius XI stated, "is the supernatural 
man who thinks, judges, and acts constantly and 
consistently in accordance with right reason il- 
lumined by the supernatural light of Christ's ex- 
ample and teaching." 

The function of Loyola University's College 
of Arts and Sciences is to form the type of in- 
dividual spoken of by Pope Pius XL The aims of 
the College are to enable students to better know 
and understand the principles of which they are 
composed: soul, body, and mind; to be able to 
distinguish between the erroneous and true; and 
to fully develop the student's capacities for later 
happiness, success, and perfection. The liberal 
arts college forms the core of the Jesuit plan of 
education. 

200 





REV, HUGH B. RODMAN, S.J. 
Associate Dean, Lewis Towers 



A semi-annual ordeal for Lake Shore Arts students is registration in the Union House, 

a never-to-be-forgotten situation. ,, i,.i.^., , ,i , i 

Loyolans at the Mardi Gras Masque thoroughly enjoy themselves 
at the annual formal dance sponsored by the Arts Council. 



ARTS 

& 

SCIENCES 

DEPARTMENT 

CHAIRMEN ' 



REV. THEODORE J. TRACY, S.J. 
Classics 





REV. WALTER P. PETERS, S.J. 
Biology 




DR. JOHN M. WOZNIAK 
Education 





DR. RAYMOND P. MARIELLA 
Chemistry 




DR. JOHN S. GERRIETTS 
English 




DR. PAUL S. LIETZ 
History 



REV. CHARLES H. RUST, S.J. 
Mathematics 



LT. COL. JAMES L. McCROREY, JR. 

Military Science 



202 




DR. MICHAEL J. FLYS 
Modern Languages 




REV. J. DONALD ROLL, S.J. 
Physics 





DR. LLOYD L. ARNOLD 
Natural Science 




DR. JOSEPH F. MENEZ 

Political Science 









REV. F. TORRENS HECHT, S.J. 
Philosophy 




REV. VINCENT V. HERR, S.J. 
Psychology 




REV. RALPH A. GALLAGHER, S.J. 
Sociology 



DONALD J. STINSON 
Speech 



REV. FRANCIS L. FILAS, S.J. 
Theology 



203 




Biology Faculty. Standing: Dr. Edward 
Palincsar, Rev. Walter Peters, S.J. Seated: 
Dr. Frank Halleck, Dr. Kenichi Hisaoka, 
Virginia Kuta, Dr. Benedict Jaskoski, Dr. 
Boris Spiroff. 



Chemistry Faculty. Standing: Dr. Carl 
Moore, Dr. James Wilt, Dr. John Reed, 
Dr. Frank Cassaretto, Dr. Harvey Posvic. 
Seated: Dr. John Huston, Dr. Charles 
McCoy, Dr. Raymond Mariella, Dr. Ed- 
ward Lim. 





Classics Faculty. Standing: Rev. Joseph 
F. Prendergast, S.J., Rev. Theodore Tracy, 
S.J. Seated: Charles Weisbrod, Dr. Leo 
Kaiser, Rev. James Mertz, S.J., Dr. D. Her- 
bert Abel. 



^^'^m.lMjJ':.': ^ 



o p 




Education Faculty. Standing: Douglas VanBramer, Arthur O'Mara, Dr. Henry Malecki, Eliza- 
beth Mollahan, Carter Frieberg, Dr. Ernest Proulx, Dr. Harry Wellbank, Dr. Samuel, Mayo, 
William Meyer, Dr. John Wellington. Seated: Dr. Jasper Valenti Rosemary Donatclli, Dr. 
John Wozniak, Margaret Dagenais. 




English Faculty. Standing: James Kulas, Ed- 
ward Morin, Harold Murphy, John Brennan, 
Dr. James Barry, Julius Kuhinka, Dr. George 
Engelhardt. Seated: Rev. Car! Stratman, 
C.S.V., Joyce Gutzeit, Rita Clarkson, Dr. Ligeia 
Gallagher, William Dempsey. 



English Faculty. Standing: Dr. Joseph Wolff, 
Dion Wilhelmi, Thomas Gorman, Dr. Martin 
Svaglic, Dr. Earl John Clark. Seated: Dr. Pat- 
rick Casey (on leave), Mary Kearney, Marilyn 
DeMara, Ruth McGugan, Rev. Edward Surtz, 
S.J. 




History Faculty. Standing: Dr. Kenneth Jack- 
son, Dr. Franklin Walker, Dr. William Trimble. 
Seated: Dr. Robert McCluggage, Dr. Margaret 
O'Dwyer, Rev. Louis Zabkar. 



History Faculty. Standing: Rev. Francis 
Grollig, S.J., Dr. Edward Gargan. 
Seated: Rev. John Kemp, S.J., Dr. 
Paul Lietz, J. Michael Hayden, Dr. 
John Reardon. 



Mathematics Faculty. Dr. Richard DriscoU, John Miller, Dr. Joseph Zajdel, John Hudson, 
Rev. Charles Rust, S.J., John Connelly, Dr. Robert Reisel. 





Military Science Faculty. Standing: M/Sgt. Melvin Wagner, M/Sst. Fred Massaglia, M/Sgt. 
Walter Jorgensen. Seated: Capt. John Gagin, Lt. Col. James McCrorey, Capt. Robert Gallagher, 
Capt. John Sanderson. 



Modem Languages Faculty. Standing: 
Joseph Wandel, Dr. Albin Liaugmi- 
nas. Seated: Dr. Mario Federici, Val- 
erie Laube, Dr. Michael Flys, Dr. 
Graciano Salvador. 




207 



Natural Science Faculty. Dr. Evelyn Klinck- 
raann. Dr. rUchard W. Balek, Mrs. Marjorie 
C. Andre. 




Philosophy Faculty. Standing: Robert 
Amiamentos, Ralph C. Nelson, Dr. 
Richard C. Hinners, Rev. Robert W. 
Mulligan, S.J. Seated: Thomas J. 
Buckley, Dr. James Cannon, Rev. F. 
Torrens Hecht, S.J., Gerard Egan. 




Philosophy Faculty. Standing: Rev. Lothar L. Nurn- 
berger, S.J., Rev. John J. Beck-man, S.J., Rev. J, Don- 
ald Hayes, S.J., Rev. Leo J. Martin, S.J. Seated: Rev. 
J. Vincent Kelly, S.J., Rev. William M. Magee, S.J., 
Rev. Gerard G. Grant, S.J„ Rev. John P Noonan, S.J. 




Physics Faculty. Standing: George Bart, 
Larry Gray. Seated: Dr. Theodore G. Phil- 
Hps, Dr. John M. Melchiors, Rev. J. Don- 
ald Roll, S.J. 



Political Science Faculty. Standing: Dr. Francis Schwarzenberg, Dr. Gordon M. Patric. 
Seated: Rev. Joseph F. Small, S.J., Dr. Joseph F. Menez, Rev. Robert C. Hartnett, S.J. 



^^ o 



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Psychology Faculty. Standing: Rev. William J. Devlin, S.J., Joseph R. Devane, John J. 
Flanagan, D. Robert N. Trai.sman. Seated: Dr. Halmuth Schaefer, Dr. Horacio J. Rimoldi, Dr. 
Robert C. Nicolay, Rev. Michael J. O'Brien, C.S.V., Dr. Magda B. Arnold, Marcella A. 
Twomey, Rev. Charles I. Doyle, S.J. 



Sociology Faculty. Standing; Joseph F. Gensert, Dr. Paul Mundy. Seated: Rev. Sylvester A. 
Sieber, S.V.D., Rev. Ralph A. Gallagher, S.J., Dr. Gordon C. Zahn, Dr. Francis A. Cizon. 




210 



Speech Faculty. Pearl M. Heffron, Donald J. 
Stinson, William C. Morris, Henry M. Bus- 
sey II, Catherine M. Geary, Elaine G. Kop- 
rowski, Donald H. Dickinson. 




Theology Faculty Back group, top row: Rev, Leander Troy, O. Carm, Rev. Mattias E. 
Fischer, Rev. John J. Beckman, S.J. Second row: Rev. Edward F. Maher, S.J., Rev. John E. 
Mullin, S.J., Rev. William A, Dehler, S.J., Rev. Cornelius J. Bresnahan, C.S.V., Rev. John 
J. Fahey, Rev. Thomas F. Murray, S.J., Rev. Thomas J. Bryant, S.J, Front row: Rev. George V. 
Wormser and Rev. George A Slominski. Front group, left to right: Rev. Edmund Schreiber, 
Rev. Jacob Chakiamury, Rev. Francis L. Filas, S.J., Rev. Fred F. Bergewisch, S.J., Rev. 
Marcellus Monaco, Rev. Francis B. Emmerick, C.S.V, Rev. Robert J. Fox, S.J., Rev. John 
Felice, S.J. 








REV. WALTER L. FARRELL, S.J. 
Rector 



WEST BADEN COLLEGE 



The Chicago Province of the Society of Jesus 
acquired the West Baden Springs Hotel on June 
28, 1934, and transformed it into West Baden 
College, an affiliate of Loyola University reserved 
exclusively for the education of Jesuit semina- 
rians. 

This "Eighth Wonder of the World," which 
for decades had been a favorite vacation resort 
for Chicagoans and whose circular structure 
boasted the world's widest unsupported dome, 
soon was stripped of its finery and fitted out with 
the more austere raiment of an institution dedi- 
cated to prayer and study. With its School of 
Philosophy and School of Theology, West Baden 
College has become the training center for most 
of the Jesuits working in the Chicago area. 

212 



In the past twenty-three years West Baden 
College has assumed its proper place among the 
divisions of Loyola University. On July 31, 1945, 
the school was constituted a Pontifical Institute 
and was empowered to grant the canonical degree 
of Licentiate in Philosophy. 

Special courses in other fields such as history, 
sociology, English, and mathematics go hand in 
hand with the regular philosophy courses. The 
School of Theology has authority from the Sacred 
Congregation of Seminaries and University Stu- 
dies to grant the degrees of licentiate and doc- 
torate in sacred theology. 

Today at West Baden College there are 
approximately one hundred Jesuits enrolled in the 
School of Theology and ninety in the School of 
Philosophy. In the past score of years Jesuits from 
all over the world have come to West Baden, to 
study at the new "Eighth Wonder of the World." 



REV. MICHAEL J. MONTAGUE, S.J. 
Dean of Philosophy 




H II •• 
I M il 



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Seen at night, West Baden College, located among the rolhng liills of southern Indiana, is the 
Chicago Province's house of studies for pliilosophy and theology. 



REV. WILLIAM P. LeSAINT, S.J. 
Dean of Theology 



213 




This winter scene of the main entrance of ^\'est Baden College 
reveals the picturesque surroundings of the pleasant Indiana 
countryside. 



The focal point of West Baden College is the atrium in the center 
of the building, here shown with its Christmas decorations. 



The wayside cross on the way to 
the St. Ignatius Shrine offers the 
members of the community a 
place of solitude for a moment's 
meditation. 




214 





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Philosophy students Michael Diicey, S.J., Allan Kirk, S.J., Richard 
Polowski, SJ., Patrick McManamon, SJ., and Philip Quinn, S.J., 
sort cancelled stamps for the Patna mission. 



Fathers Gregory Foote, S.J., Ralph Bastian, S.J., Edward 
Mulhern, S.J., and Ralph Talkin, SJ,, are seen walking 
through the archway leading to the Italian Gardens. 



West Baden College houses a community of 250 Jesuits, 
of whom about two hundred are students in the Schools 
of Philosophy and Theology. 




21c 



COLLEGE 

OF 

COMMERCE 




J. RAYMOND SHERIFF 
Dean 



Since its inception in 1922, the College of 
Commerce has had as its objective the develop- 
ment of a businessman who is not only capable of 
meeting the challenge of the modern world of 
business, but also those challenges of his personal 
and religious life. The college has maintained this 
position over its short life span only by constant 
watchfulness over, and revision of, the curricu- 
lum. However, the swiftly changing world con- 
ditions of the last 15 years have made a thorough 
study of the program almost impossible. But the 
need for such an appraisal was realized by Dean 
J. Raymond Sheriff, and through his efforts, a 
committee was formed to evaluate the present 
situation and to make recommendations for im- 
provement. 

The results achieved by this committee have 
been shown this year with the most completely 
revised program of studies ever had in the Com- 
merce School. 



Under the capable supervision of the Assis- 
tant to the Dean, Thomas L. Borrelli, the tran- 
sition from the old curriculum to the new was 
made smoothly, with a minimum of student and 
administrative effort. 

Under the new plan, one-half of the student's 
education will be devoted to providing him with 
a background in the traditional liberal arts and 
sciences. The importance of this aspect of his 
education cannot be stressed enough. In his pur- 
suit of truth every student must become ac- 
quainted with the areas of general knowledge in 
order to help him achieve a higher intellectual and 
spiritual development. The college has a respon- 
sibility to educate him both for effective living 
and eternal salvation. 

The other half of the four-year program aims 
to provide the student with a mastery of the 
underlying principles common to all business. The 
l:)asic principles of contemporary business are pre- 
sented through a core program of required theore- 
tical and analytical studies. Specialization will be 
held to a minimum so as not to destroy the 
breadth of this type of education. 

It is hoped that with the program, the Col- 
lege of Commerce will be able to provide its stu- 
dent body with a desire for continuing self-im- 
provement so necessary to the modern American 
executive. 




THOMAS L. BORRELLI 

Assistant to the Dean 



216 




DR. ROBERT A. MEIER 

Chairman. Accounting Department 





JOHN A. ZVETINA 
Chairman, Business Law Department 



DEPARTMENT 
CHAIRMEN 



DR. THEODOSI A. MOGILNITSKY 

Chairman, Economics and Finance 
Department 





DR. PETER T. SWANISH 

Chairman, Management 

Department 



DR. ORANGE A. SMALLEY 
Chairman, Marketing Department 



217 




Accounting Faculty. Rev. Dumas L. McClcary, C.S.V. Richard F. Kusck, Dr. Robert A. Meier, 
Adams P. Stach, Martin E. Drebin 



Business Law Faculty. John A. Zvetina, John R. Jozwiak, Management Faculty. Dr. Peter T. Swani.sh, Joseph V. McCullough, 

John D. O'Malley. Dr. Walter H. Peterson. 









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Marketing Faculty. Standing: Lloyd G, Allen, Rev. Raymond C. Jancauskas, S.J., Dr. Gilbert C. 
Klose, Dr. George J. Niarehos. Seated: Dr. Orange A. Smalley. 



Economics and Finance Faculty. Dr. Francis Murans, Dr. Joseph O. Englet, Dr. Sylvester M. 
Frizol, Dr. Theodosi A. Mogilnitsky, Dr. Helen C. Potter, Dr. Charles W. Anrod, J. David 
Smith, Alfred S. Oskamp. 




219 



UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 




RICHARD A. MATRE 
Dean 



The history of University College has been 
one of constant expansion and growth. Originally 
founded to supplement the education of teachers 
and others who could not otherwise attend col- 
lege during the day, University College at present 
offers a selection of courses of special interest to 
students who are not working for degrees but who 
are seeking to broaden their education in cultural, 
business, and generally avocational fields. 

Recently, the College has attracted many 
students with a series of courses designed pri- 
marily for personal satisfaction and advancement. 

The average University College student is, 
in many respects, a contrast to his day school 
counterpart. He is determined, purposeful, seri- 
ous. He is definitely aware of his desire to receive 
an education, and bases his actions on the fulfill- 
ment of that desire. He realizes, moreover, that 
his purpose for attending college is his own im- 
provement and growth. 

220 



Although University College operates only 
during late afternoons, evenings, and on Satur- 
days, it offers students complete curricula toward 
baccalaureate degrees. 

University College is, in a sense, Loyola 
University in miniature. The College of Arts and 
Sciences is represented by courses in humanities, 
mathematics, social studies, and education; the 
College of Commerce by accounting, finance, 
economics, and management. It is, in effect, an 
independent academic world, liberal in the scope 
of its activities, forceful in its resolve to present 
education of the highest competence to as great a 
number of students as possible. Its success is a 
tribute to it own dedication and the quality of its 
students. 

University College is a very important part 
of Loyola. It extends the facilities of the Univer- 
sity to the city in a way which is most important. 
It makes possible the benefits of a college educa- 
tion to people who can be extremely influential in 
the community. It provides cultural, business, and 
avocational courses to those who are unable to 
attend school full time. 




CAMILLO VOLINI 
Assistant to the Dean 



:^A 




After a hard day's work and before a long evening's classes, University College students enjoy 
a cup of coffee in the lounge while meeting old friends and preparing for class. 



Economics students in University College are trained in the use of automatic calculators as a 
part of their classroom work. 



BIP 



fiiim 



lOIOIItllC («1(UUI0I1 






DR. WILLIAM P. SCHOEN 
Dean 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 



As a Catholic Dental school, the Loyola Uni- 
versity School of Dentistry strives to prepare its 
students to be competent in the general practice 
of dentistry, and to impart to them a sound ap- 
preciation of the moral, social, and spiritual val- 
ues of life. To realize these broad objectives, the 
faculty of the School endeavors to provide an in- 
tellectual atmosphere which is conducive to the 
presentation of faith and morals, and undertakes 
to train students in the responsible diagnosis, 
treatment, and prevention of oral diseases. 

Situated in the heart of the West Side Medi- 
cal Center, the Dental School is housed in a five- 
story building which contains all the facilities 
needed for the four-year dental program. 



Significant among these facilities are two 
amphitheaters seating 275 and 150 students re- 
spectively; a reference library equipped with text 
and reference volumes, as well as current dental 
and medical journals; and a closed circuit tele- 
vision system. The School, in fact, was the first 
in the nation to integrate television techniques 
into its curriculum. As a result, operations and 
techniques performed by an instructor can be 
clearly shown to an entire class simultaneously, 
each student receiving an unobstructed view of 
the procedure being described in any type of 
demonstration. 

The Loyola University School of Dentistry's 
record of service to the Chicagoland community 
is impressive. Half of the dentists of the area, for 
instance, are graduates of the School. In addition. 
Dental School students and faculty staff the Loy- 
ola Dental Clinic— the School's teaching labora- 
tory. The Clinic provides service for people of 
moderate means seeking expert dental care. Dur- 
ing the past year, the staff handled 70,000 patient 
visits. 




DR. FRANK M. AMATURO 
Secretary of the Facultu 

DR. JOHN R. ALLISON 
Director of Clinics 





Loyola University's School of Dentistry is located in a tall gray 
structure in Chicago's West Side Medical Center 



JOHN E. BLICKENSTAFF 
Director of Audin-Visual Education 




MARY JO WOLFE 
Librarion 




REV. FRANCIS A. VAUGHAN, S.J. 
Student Counselor 



223 





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DEPARTMENT 



DR. HARRY SICHER 

Anatomy and Histology 



DR. THOMAS L. GRISAMORE 

Bacteriology 
Director, Post Graduate School 




DR. GUSTAV W. RAPP 
Chemistry and Physiology 



DR. E. JAMES BEST 
Endodontics 



DR. GEORGE J. MATOUSEK 
Fixed Prothesis 



DR. PAUL T. DAWSON 
Operative Dentistry 




CHAIRMEN 





DR. PATRICK D. TOTO 
Oral Diagnosis 



DR. VIGGO B. SORENSON 

Oral Surgery 




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DR. JOSEPH R. JARABAK 
Orthodontics 



DR. WILLIAM P. BURGH 
Pedodontics 



DR. FRANK M. WENTZ 

Periodontics 
Director, Graduate School 



DR. ARTHUR J. KROL 
Prosthetics 





Anatomy and Histology Faculty. Dr. 
Harry Sicher, Dr. Nicholas Brescia, 
Dr. John O'Malley, Dr. Kenneth Now- 
lan. 





Bacteriology and Pathology Faculty. 
Dr. Kenneth E. Nowlan, Dr. Frank 
M. Lucatorto, Dr. Thomas L. Grisa- 
more. 



Chemistry Faculty. Mrs. Pruitt, Al- 
dona Prapoulenis, Dr. Gustav Rapp. 



226 




Endodontics Faculty. Dr. Marshall Smulson, 
Dr. E. James Best, Dr. William Holahan, grad- 
uate student Dr. Guillermo Gervasio from Peru. 





Fixed Prothesis Faculty. Dr. Robert Flynn, 
Dr. George Matousek. Dr. Raymond Henneman, 
Dr. John Allison. 



Operative Dentistry Faculty. Dr. Thomas Rus- 
sell, Dr. Rolf Gruber, Dr. Paul Dawson, Dr. 
John Coady. 




Oral Diagnosis Faculty. Dr. Pat- 
rick Toto, Dr. Mario SantanKelo, 
Dr. Larry Chase, Mrs. Maria 
Gylys, Dr. Charles Reeve, Dr. 
Kenneth Nowlan, Mrs. Danute Au- 
gius. 





Oral Surgery Faculty. Graduate students Dr. 
William Schoenheider, Dr. Gokul Ojha. 



Orthodontics Faculty. Dr. Joseph 
Jarabak, Dr. Eugene Zylinski, Dr. 
Richard Shanahan, Dr. Bernard 
Widen, Dr. Pat Gantt, Dr. Dave 
Edgar, Dr. Bernard Pawlowski, 
Dr. Steve Asahino, Dr. Tom Flem- 
ing, Dr. Don Hilgers, Dr. Ken 
Kemp. (Patient is Barbara Fur- 
maniak.) 




Pedodonfics Faculty. Dr. }oanna Baranovskis, 
Dr. William Burch, Dr. Ronald NierenberR. 




P 




Periodontics Faculty. Dr. Malbern 
Wilderman, Dr. Charles Reeve, Dr. 
Anthony W. Gargiulo, Dr. Harry 
Staffileno. 



Prosthetics Faculty. Dr. Thaddeus Restarski, 
Dr. John Magon, Dr. Jackson Fletcher. 





Instructors in the operative clinic supervise work done on a patient by a student. Seen here 
are Dr. M. M. Irans, Dr. Thomas Russell, Dr. Rolf Gruber, and student Bud White. 




This panoramic view of the second-floor opera- 
tive clinic shows students busily at work on 
patients. 




Sophomore students Ted Sudinsky, Dick Tannyhill, and Gerry Tarsitano confer with Dr. 
Raymond Henneman on crown and bridge work. 




Dr. John R. Alhson, director of clinics, discusses 
clinical procedures with students Thomas Sch- 
neider, Matthew Lombardi, Harvey Veith, and 
Alfred McManama. 

231 



V I 



In the sophomore technique laboratory, Ken Goljan poUshes a 
fixed bridge. 




Dr. PhiHp Schoen confers with freshmen students in the 
dental materials laboratory. 



N^^-^ 



In the freshman laboratory in dental materials, Dr. Philip Schoen 
instructs Stan Kazala, Pete Lofendo, and Bob Lawler in process- 
ing acrylic. 



232 




iKJiiL 



J 



SCHOOL OF LAW 




JOHN C. HAYES 
Acting Dean 



The School of Law offers instruction de- 
signed primarily to prepare students for the prac- 
tice of law in any jurisdiction where the common 
law prevails. Currently educating approximately 
300 students in the intricacies of the field of law, 
the Law School had humble origins in 1908 with 
a total enrollment of 30 under the direction of 
William Dillon, the first dean. The year 1921 
marked a milestone in the history of the Law 
School: a full-time Day Division was established 
with a three-year course of study; the Evening 
Division course was expanded to four years; and 
women were admitted to both Divisions. In 1924 
it became a member of the Association of Ameri- 
can Law Schools, and the following year was 
placed on the approved list of the American Bar 
Association. 

In the pleading, practice, and procedure 
courses, close, but by no means exclusive, atten- 
tion is paid to the law of IlUnois. 

234 



The School aims at alerting the consciences 
of its students to the fulfillment of their civil, 
social, and religious duties, especially in their 
professional aspects. The faculty endeavors, 
wherever possible, to evaluate the positive law 
in relation to scholastic natural-law principles. 
The rules, standards, and principles of law are 
treated not as ends in themselves but as rational 
means to the attainment of objective justice. The 
School of Law, as a department of the University, 
is dedicated to the philosophy that there is an 
ideal and objective order of justice, based upon 
the natural law, by which human beings are 
endowed with certain inalienable rights and ob- 
ligations, to enable them to realize in human dig- 
nity the divine destiny decreed by their Creator; 
that the natural law respects and governs all 
human actions and therefore the actions of man 
in a civil society which is subject to constantly 
changing political, social, and economic forces; 
that by the recognition and application of natural 
law to the positive civil law, human society can 
approach the ideal and objective order of justice 
intended for human beings. 





FREDERIC D. DONNELLY 
Law Librarian 



Law Faculty. Standing: James M. Forkins, Rev. William J. Kenealy, S.J., Richard V. Car- 
penter, Francis C. Sullivan (on leave), Arthur M. Scheller. Seated: William L. Lamey, John 
C. Fitgerald, (on leave), John A. Zvetina, John C. Hayes. 





WILLIAM L. LAMEY 
Acting Associate Dean 



235 





An important segment of a law student's training is his meeting 
with other law students to discuss their various cases. 



Loyola's Law Library houses over twenty-five thousand volumes 
in its quarters on the second floor of the school. 



The Robert R. McCormick Lecture Hall was 
dedicated in September by the Very Rev. 
James F. Maguire, S.J., who is shown exhib- 
iting a bronze bas-relief plaque of Col. Mc- 
Cormick to Dean John C. Fitzgerald, Chesser 
M. Campbell (president and publisher of 
the Chicago Tribune), J. Howard Wood 
(vice-president of the Tribune Company), 
and Stuart D. Owen (managing editor of 
the Chicago Tribune). 





236 




The law building is located at 41 East Pearson Street, affording its students an excellent op- 
portunity to observe sessions of the many law courts in Chicago. 



A law student demonstrates his court technique in the Law School's Moot Court Room. 





••K-.r/r^r^OMi-^') 



Law students can take advantage of the many reports, digests, 
and cases available for legal research in the Law Library. 




238 




A break between classes affords students a chance for a cup of 
coffee before returning to their books. 





Even lunchtime at the Law School resembles a deliberating jury 
session. 



Professor Janie'. M. Forkins lectures to one of his law classes. 




Seen at a reunion of administrative officers of the Law School 
are William L. Lamey, current acting associate dean; the Hon. 
John V. McCormick, former dean; John C. Fitgerald, currently 
on leave of absence as dean; and John C. Hayes, current acting 
dean. 





STRITCH SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 




DR. JOHN F. SHEEHAN 
Dean 



The Stritch School of Medicine at present is one of the leading 
Catholic medical schools in the world. A growing and expanding arm 
of the University, the fundamental objective of the School is to provide 
an opportunity for education in sound medical science and to fit the 
qualified student for the practice of medicine. An additional respon- 
sibility, and one which goes hand in hand with this objective, is that 
of extending, through the research effort of teacher and student, the 
knowledge and methods of control of the physical and mental afflic- 
tions of man. 

To accomplish its objectives, the School must select from its many 
applicants those men and women who by reason of social and emotional 
maturity seem prepared to begin the arduous study of medicine. These 
selected applicants are exposed, throughout their course of study, to 
the finest education obtainable. 

In connection with the aim to encourage advanced study and 
research, the Board of Graduate Studies of the 'University approved, 
in 1947, the graduate programs of the departments of Anatomy, Bio- 
chemistry, Microbiology, Pharmacology, and Physiology. 

Medical faculty members are engaged in research in heart disease, 
geriatrics, and infant care. Their findings form part of the fund of 
medical knowledge being uncovered in Chicago's great Medical Cen- 
ter. 



DR. THOMAS P. GALARNEAULT 
Assistant Dean 




240 




The home of the Stritch School of Medicine is its laboratory 
building opposite the Cook County Hospital in the West Side 
Medical Center. 





REV. JOHN W. BIERI, S.J. 
Student Counselor 



DR. FREDERICK M. SELFRIDGE 
Head of Mercy Hospital Clinic 



HELEN P. HUELSMAN 
Librarian 





James Nowlan, Leo Roberts, Jose 
Zieglschmid, Frank Puc, and Dr. Irvin 
Strub are seen in the process of diag- 
nosing the stomach aihnent of their 
patient. 



Joseph Hiebel, Ronald Hoffman, and Dr. Frederick Selfridge use the audio-visual sound 
recorder to obtain a complete picture of a cardiac condition. 





Dr. Leslie Emniert of the Anatomy Department endeavors to impress upon 
his students the importance of correct interpretation of microscopic studies. 




The waiting room at the Mercy Hospital CHnic 
provides a constant flow of experience for Loyola's 
medical students. 



Attention is focused on the cutting table as the mysteries of anatomy are disclosed. 





Junior medical student Miles Lynch practices techniques of taking blood pressure on 
freshman Donna Stupar. 



A section of the junior class is seen here attentively listening to 
a lecture on obstetrics as a part of their medical studies. 



) / 





Dr. Walter Randall instructs graduate students Robert Rawson and 
Thomas Akers in the examination of records of a four-channel 
polygraph. 



Shades of the LT lounge! Med School students relax between classes 
with a friendly game of pinochle. 





Dr. Louis Blanchet of the Biochemistry 
Department is seen here demonstrating 
his electro-chemograph machine. 




245 




Mr. Holmquist of the Med School demonstrates the oxygenation of blood 
to seniors Henry Dold and Joseph Di Lallo. 




Medical Students turn to God frequently for their needs. 



Daily mass is held at the Stritch School of Medicine Chapel. 




247 



Mrs. Esther Bregman operates a 
scintillation counter, used extensively 
in the radio-activity field. 




248 




Dr. R. M. Behki, of the biochemistry laboratory, teaches the use 
of the colorimeter to freshmen James Jannotta, Albert Timperman, 
Tassos Nassos, Charles Baldwin. 



In the biochemistry laboratory, Henry Dold and Joseph DiLallo, 
seniors, are instructed in the techniques of the oxygenation of 
blood by Mr. Holmquist of the Med School. 






Helen Jackson operates a spectrophotometer, a device which 
determines the amount of sodium and potassium contained in the 
body. 



A Med student takes time out for the pause 
that refreshes. 




Graduate student K. V. Jose examines embryo specimens in the 
gross anatomy lab, explaining each to freshman students Sister 
Divina and Sister Amala. 




249 




Nursing School Administration. Cecelia M. Fennessy (chairman, nm-sing), Essie Anglum 
(chairman, public health nursing), Gladys Kiniery (dean), Sarah H. Zeeman (chairman, gen- 
eral nursing program). 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



The Loyola School of Nursing is one of the youngest colleges of 
the University, and at the same time one of the most remarkable. It 
offers, for example, one of only four collegiate nursing programs in the 
state of Illinois; thirty-two per cent of Illinois students enrolled in 
collegiate nursing programs during the last academic year were study- 
ing at the Loyola School of Nursing; and more than 600 graduates of 
the School hold staff positions in Chicago hospitals, welfare agencies, 
public schools, and industries. 

The School of Nursing first granted University degrees in 1935. 
It now offers two degree programs: a basic program designed primarly 
for the high school graduate, combining nurses' training with college 
academic work; and a supplemental academic program for the pro- 
fessional nurse, as well as a course of study in Public Health Nursing. 

Graduates of the School of Nursing receive experience in the 
surgical, medical, obstetrical, pediatric, psychiatric, tuberculosis, and 
public health fields. Twenty Chicago area hospitals and welfare 
agencies cooperate in providing professional training under Loyola 
faculty supervision. 



250 



Nursing Faculty. Mrs. Martha Goodrich, Sarah Zeeman, Constance Ferris, Mrs. Mary Sloan, 
Theresa Petrone, Essie Anglum, Mary Cortell, Gladys Kiniery, Margaret McDemiott, Shirley 
Boettger, Marie Arreguin, Marjorie Kaepplinger, Mary O'Neill, Leona Smolinski, Cecilia Fen- 
nessy. 




251 



^ 




Mary Jane Marquis and Margaret Tierney per- 
form tlieir nursely duties on a recuperating 
patient. 



Nurses Sharon Simon, Caroline Medl, and Eleanor Zabiaka relax in the nurses' lounge after 
a hard day of work in a hospital. 




252 




The idea that a nurse's job is to make a patient's life brighter is put into practice by 
Judy Laurenzana and Jane Kennedy. 



At the close of a day's work in the hospital, 
nurses Nancy Hazard and Jean Jankovec pre- 
pare their daily reports. 





Nurse Rita Rauen carefully prepares a hypo 
for an unsuspecting patient. 



Nurses Joan Tengblad, Virginia Stift, and Gerry McCarter welcome guests to the annual 
Nursing Council mixer. 




254 



In the fall of the year, the upperclass nurses 
take freshmen nurses on tours of Lake Shore 
Campus. Shown above is senior Barbara Klinger 
with her group of entering students. 




Mary Rose Diehl, a senior nurse, stops to chat with the children of a west-side patient while 
on duty with the Visiting Nurses Association. 





Under the direction of Rev. Ralph Gallagher, 
S.J., a two-year program leading to a master's 
degree is offered. The training combines theoreti- 
cal studies and practical experience. The pro- 
gram is founded on the principles of Christian 
ethics and philosophy. 

Early in its history, the Institute inaugurated 
a plan for providing the individual student with 
practical experience in his field. At that time the 
Institute sought and received the full cooperation 
of organizations in the Chicago area which 
are involved in industrial relations. Various 
companies, unions, and government agencies 
regularly devote time and energy to introduce 
Institute students to the actual operation of that 
phase of industrial relations in which they are 
engaged. This plan is called the Internship Pro- 
gram (cooperative training program). 

All part-time students who cannot take the 
Internship are required to attend five informal 
seminars during their academic residency. These 
meetings give the student an opportunity to dis- 
cuss the problems and practices of the various 
organizations with top-level men, and to sup- 
plement theoretical knowledge the student has 
gained in the classroom. 



REV. RALPH A. GALLAGHER, S.J. 
Director 



INSTITUTE OF SOCIAL 

AND 
INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS 



Loyola University, recognizing the strategic 
importance of employer-employee relationships 
in modern industrial society, founded the In- 
stitute of Social and Industrial Relations in 1941. 
By this pioneer action, Loyola became the first 
institution of higher learning in the Middle West 
to offer a comprehensive program of study in the 
area of industrial relations. Starting with but a 
few students, the Institute has, over a period of 
years, grown into one of the largest institutes of 
this type in the United States. 

The purpose of the Institute has been to give 
thorough training on the graduate level to men 
and women in expanding fields of labor relations, 
personnel management, and public administra- 
tion. 

256 



LISAIR Faculty. Dr. Julius Rezler, Ronald E. Haydanek, Rev. 
Ralph A. Gallagher, S.J., John M. Heneghan. 





Rev. Ralph Gallagher, S.J., director of LISAIR, 
meets with his students at Christmastime to 
offer them encouragement on their projects 
and to wish them a happy holiday season. 



John M. Heneghan, assistant professor of social and industrial relations, conducts an informal 
seminar, giving his students a chance to discuss the problems and practices of various 
organizations. 




257 




MATTHEW H. SCHOENBAUM 
Dean 



SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 



Throughout the Judeo-Christian Era, the concept of fraternal 
charity, as a virtue and obhgation has been universally recognized. 
Poverty, abandonment, physical, mental, and emotional problems, and 
changing social conditions have created an awareness and a need to 
develop more scientific methods of service. In modern times, social 
work is recognized as a profession which requires a high degree of 
knowledge, skill, and selfless devotion. 

Loyola University has long been a leader in the professional train- 
ing of social workers. It boasts the oldest Catholic school of social work 
in the country. Rev. Frederic Seidenburg, S.J., planted the seed 
of the present school of social work in 1913 with the establishment of 
the Loyola University Lecture Bureau. In 1938 the Loyola University 
School of Social Work was established as a distinct professional school 
offering a two-year program of theory and a degree of Master of Social 
Work. 

Over 4,000 social workers from the continental U.S.A., Alaska, 
Hawaii, the Phillipines, and the Orient have received their professional 
training at Loyola. Present enrollment of full and part time students 
is 163. 



258 



Social Work Faculty. Standing: Rev. Felix P. Biestek, S.J., Margaret M. Dwyer, Cathleen 
O'Donophue, Myra Carney. Seated: Margaret Crossen O'Byrne, Mary Alice O'Laughlin, Betty 
Begg, Mattliew H. Schoenbaum, Shirley M. Anderson, Martha L. Urbanowski. 




259 



As a part of their studies. Social Work students 
engage in probation work, such as talking over 
problems with men on probation. 





First year students spend much of their time 
working on their research projects in the 
various fields of social work. 



260 



Ernest Leydet conducts a program of family 
guidance for married couples as a part of his 
training. 




An important aspect of social work studies is the seminar, where students meet with faculty 
members to discuss various problems of social work; seen here is a group meeting with 
Margaret Dwyer, an instructor in the School of Social Work. 




CHILD GUIDANCE 
CENTER 



Established in 1941 and located at Lewis 
Towers is the Loyola Center for Child Guidance 
and Psychological Service. Four full-time clincial 
psychologists and a staff of trained assistants 
direct the work of the Center and cooperate 
closely with pastors, judges, and physicians. 

The Center gives child-guidance service of 
a psychological (non-psychiatric) nature, dealing 
with behavior problems, school adjustment, aca- 
demic remedial measures, vocational guidance, 
interpretation of retardation and mental defi- 
ciency, pre-school training, and counseling on 
special-school placement. It also provides per- 
sonal counseling of children, adolescents, and 
adults, with emphasis on the counseling of 
parents and the treatment of children's emotional 
problems, by psychological therapy. 

The Center provides excellent facilities for 
the training of clinical psychologists. The clinical 
training is academically affiliated with the Grad- 
uate School. There are many sound-proofed test- 
ing rooms, one-way view screens, tutoring rooms, 
a play-therapy room, a staff-room, and a sound- 
recording room. 



Child Guidance Counselors. Standing: Frank A. Dinello; Rev. 
Charles I. Doyle, S.J., director. Seated: Mrs. Donald Forst; Fran- 
ces L. Even; Dorothy B. Auw. 



^y 



*A 





MARY LOU McPARTLIN 
Director 



HOME STUDY 
DEPARTMENT 



Home Study, aptly described as "the depart- 
ment which brings the University to the student, " 
was estabhshed at Loyola in 1921, and has 
achieved recognition as a most useful means of 
spreading widely the benefits of academic train- 
ing. Home Study is the system by which students 
study courses by mail and receive full college 
credit upon completion of a course. 

Correspondence is activated by a prosepctive 
student's application, accompanied by a fee; in 
turn, the Home Study office sends this student his 
lesson plan, a sheet of instructions, and his in- 
structor's name and address— the rest is between 
the student and his instructor. Forty lessons later, 
the student notifies the Home Study Office, and 
arrangements are made for the final exam. 

Students registered in Home Study courses 
are located not only throughout the United States 
including Alaska, but others, among them service- 
men and religious, correspond from such dist- 
ances as Africa and Russia to obtain the benefits 
of this unique service. 



INSTITUTE OF JESUIT HISTORY 



The Institute of Jesuit History of Loyola 
University is integrated academically with the 
Graduate School of the University. 

The purpose of the Institute is the promotion 
of the study of American Jesuit history by 
research and publication in this field and by 
teaching history in the Graduate School of the 
University. 

An executive committee appointed by the 
President of the University regulates the aca- 
demic activity of the Institute. Coordination 
with the Graduate School is arranged between 
the Director of the Institute and the Dean. 

The Institute has published a number of 
monographs on Jesuit history, several texts in 
history, and conducts a quarterly, Mid-America. 

Membership in the Institute is open to Jesuits 
and non-Jesuits who possess a doctorate in philo- 
sophy in the field of history and are qualified for 
research in the fields of special interest to the 
Institute. 



Rev. Jerome V. Jacobsen, S.J., is con- 
gratulated on the approaching twenty- 
fifth anniversary of the Institute by 
Very Rev. Wilham J. Schmidt, S.J., 
provincial of the Society of Jesus. 








w 






^^^^^r^^^tc 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Recipients of the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 



Sister MARY CANISIA (MAJEWSKA), C. S.F.N. , Education 

(B.S., DePaul University; M.S., DePaul University) 

Dissertation: A Study of Mathematical Ability as Related to Reasoning and Use of Symbols. 

JOSEPH R. DEVANE, Psychology 

(Ph.B., Loyola University; M.S., Illinois Institute of Technology) 

Dissertation: A Comparison of a Factorial and a Multidimensional Approach to the Scaling of 

Psychological Data. 

JAMES LAWRENCE FINNERTY, S.J., Chemistry 

(B.S., Marquette University; M.S., University of Illinois) 

Dissertation: The Mechanism of the BBB-Triarylpropionic Acid Rearrangement in the Huns- 

diecker Reaction. 

LEO EDMUND REICHERT, JR., Biochemistry 

(B.S., Manhattan College; M.S., Loyola University) 

Dissertation: Studies on Human and Rat Plasma Parathyroid Hormone Activity. 



Recipients of the Degree of Doctor of Education 



NORMAN ROY HAFMEISTER 

(B.S., Milwaukee State Teachers College; M.Ed., Milwaukee State Teachers College) 
Dissrtation: Attitudes of Parents of Trainable Mentally Retarded towards Their Children after 
Group Orientation. 

MARGUERITE O'CONNOR 

(B.E., Northern Illinois State Teachers College; M.S., Northwestern University) 
Dissertation: A Professional Sequence in the Education of Elementary School Teachers. 

JUNE M. VERBILLION 

(A.B., DePaul University; A.M., Loyola University) 

Dissertation: A Critical Analysis of the Educational Theories of Edith Stein. 



266 



Recipients of the Degree of Master of Arts 



Mother M. Anastasia (O'Connor), 

I.B.V.M. 
Thomas Francis Ankenbrandt, SJ. 
Reverend James F. Belzcr 
Joseph Andrew Bracken, S.J. 
Edward Joseph Carter, S.J. 
Jerome P. Carvajal 
Matthew Daniel Cook. S.J. 
Sister Daniel (Hannefin), D.C. of 

St. V. de P. 
John Timothy Dillon, S.J. 
Joseph R. Disselhorst, S.J. 
Michael Henry Ducey, S.J. 
Jack E. Friedheim 
Thomas Edward Gafney, S.J. 
Ke\'in E. Gallagher, S.J. 
Pliilip Randolph Garrett 
Sister Mary Getulia (Miotke), 

C.S.S.F. 
Frank Joseph Granzeier, S.J. 
Frank Louis Grdina, S.J. 



Helen Lenore Groetsema 

John V. Haley 

Henry Edward Harrington 

Francis Joseph Houdek, S.J. 

Vincent Waldemar Howard 

Sister Irma (Dreger), S.C.C. 

Ann Marie Janiee 

William Paul Johnson, S.J. 

Si.ster Joseph Maria (Pizarek), C.S.A. 

Sister Mary Judith Teresa (McNulty), 

B.V.M. 
John Francis Keating, S.J. 
John Joseph Kilgallen, S.J. 
Elizabeth Anne Kloman 
Sister Leo Germaine (Cowley), O.P. 
Sister Mary Liam (Gallagher), B.V.M. 
Peter John Livorsi 
George P. Louris 
Diane Mahoney 
Arthur Francis McGovern, S.J. 
Reverend Christe Anthony Melone 



Sister Michael Helene (Royal), O.P. 

Brother Luke Paul Nichols 

Bernadette H. Perham 

Lien Phung 

Philip Francis Quinn, S.J. 

Herbert Joseph Ryan, S.J. 

John David Ryan, S.J. 

Richard Stanley Rzeszut 

James William Sanders, S.J. 

Howard Bernard Schapker, S.J. 

Reverend Norbert Anthony Shadeg, 

S.V.D. 
Frederick Victor Simunich, S.J. 
Sister Mary Soledad (Juarez), S.S.N.D. 
Patricia Bunning Stevens 
Jeanne Strauss 
Sister Mary Thomasine' (Novakovich), 

O.S.F. 
Sister Mary Timothy (Bintz), C.S.A. 
Charles Albert Weisbrod 
\Valter Jared Wicks, S.J. 



Recipients of the Degree of Master of Science 



Leonard Jerome Banaszak 
John C. Colla 



John W. Elder, S.J. 
Wilhelm Guschlbauer 



Mary Ann Hurley 
Joseph Francis Zawadzki 



Recipients of the Degree of Master of Education 



Sister Mary Angelene (Ogden), S.C.C. 
Sister Mary Ann Geraldine 

(Manemann), B.V.M. 
Sister Mary Augustine (Kogut), S.S.J. 
Sophia Catherine Banks 
Vera L. Beasley 
Kathrun Jane Beglen 
Lennart I3enson 
Martin Frank Berklan 
Joan Carol Boscia 
Orpen W. Bryan 
William Robert Buikema 
Sister Mary Casimira (Smaqda), C.S.C. 
Clyde L. Chappell 
Eurydice Chentes 
Wilbur James Conroy 
John Hugh Coussens 
Jerome Richard Czocher 
Ray F. Darga 
Gerald Henry Decker 
Beatriz Correia de Meyrelles 
Mildred T. De Vilbiss 
Sister Mary Devota (Pankauskas), S.S.C. 
Mary Cabrini Doherty 
Harry Thomas Earls 



Sister Mary Finbarr (James), O.S.F. 

Jerrold R. Friedman 

Brotlier William J. Geenen, C.S.C. 

Irene C. Gregg 

Charles N. Haverly 

Donna Mae Hecht 

Lorraine Marie Hills 

Nguyen-Dinh Hoan 

Sister Marv John Therese (Ryan), 

B.V.M. 
Sidney Erwin Kaz 
Emily Alvina Kloc 
Diane Marie Lewandowski 
James Elliott Lewis, Jr. 
Maude E. Lightfoot 
Albert P. Lokanc 
Helen Naminski Marcyan 
Nancy Catherine May 
Roberta Sue Metz 
Mary Dorothy MoUoy 
Arlene Anne O'Brien 
Arlene O'Donnell 
Marion C. Omiatek 
Daniel James O'Neill 



George Orlich 

Elizabeth Ann O'Rourke 

Sister Mary Paraclita (Keane), B.V.M. 

Reverend Maximin Joseph Parapalil 

Sister Mary Pierre (Howell), LB.V.M. 

Ssiter Mary Pierre Noel (Wagner), 

S.B.S. 
Joanne Alice Pittel 
Helen V. Quinn 

Sister Mary Regina (Kelly), O.P. 
Sister Mary Roselma (Mindak), 

S.S.N.D. 
Martin Joseph Rupe 
Jeanne Schlaek 
Robert Edward Schneider 
Joan Marie -Smith 
Jean B. Turnbull 
Edwin Carl Tyska 
Thomas Richard Varecha 
Jerome John Wachter 
Milton Weiner 
Esther Elisabeth Wey 
Dorothy Ann Whelan 
Richard Anthony Wysocki 
George Theodore Zimmerman 

267 



INSTITUTE OF SOCIAL AND 
INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS 

Recipients of the Degree of Master of Social and 
Industrial Relations 

DONALD PATRICK KLEIN 

(B.S., Marquette University) 

Thesis: A Study of the Labor Philosophy of George M. Harrison. 

JAMES C. KOCH 

(A.B., Conception Seminary, The Catholic University of America) 

Thesis: Supplemental Unemployment Compensation in a Situation of Permanent Lay-off 

(A Case Study). 

REVEREND JAMES ALOYSIUS MOHLER, S.J. 

(Litt. B., Xavier University; Ph.L., West Baden College; S.T.L., West Baden College) 
Thesis: ACLI, Catholic Associations of ItaUan Workers. 



268 



SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 



Recipients of the Degree of Master of Social Work 



Jane Archibald 

LaVerne Bagley 

Carmen Camara 

Mrs. Lucy Chappell 

Margaret M. Conlan 

Edward J. Corcoran 

Mrs. Dora Craig 

William R. DeVries 

Daniel Figiel 

Rev. Cletus Gillson, M.S.SS.T. 

M. Elizabeth Heverin 

Nicholas M. Hyser 

Mrs. Bobbie N. Jason 

William A. Jones 

Anita J. Kahn 

Elizabeth A. Kane 

Helen Karrer 



Peggy Keeley 
Mercida Krips 
Sister Mary Laurice 
Rufus Lyons 
Mary C. Mulgrew 
Joseph P. Murphy 
Susan Payne 
Gladys F. Phillips 
Madeleine Rivard 
Sister Mary Ronald, R.S.M. 
Beatrice A. Rudolph 
Mrs. Barbara Schiltz 
Rev. Joseph F. Semancik 
Mrs. Rosemary Shaw 
Anthony R. Susin 
Rose P. Winter 
Richard, S. Zembron 



269 




A "home away from home" to many Lewis Towers coeds is 
Delaware Hall. 




ROBERT J. ADLER 
D.D.S. 



THOMAS R. AHERN 
B.S.C. 





PETER D. AMBERSUN CAROLE E. ANDERSEN 

A.B. B.S. (Hum.) 




RONALD ]. BAKER 
B.S. (N.S.) 



TERRANCE W. BAKER 
D.D.S. 



EDWARD F. BALIUS 
M.D. 



JOSEPH F. BAMBERGER 
A.B. 



270 




JOHN C. AIELLO 
B.S.C. 



ANGELLE R. ALESSI 
A.B. 



DANIEL S. ALKOVICH 
B.S.C. 



ANTHONY J. ALLEN 
B.S. (Hum.) 




ALBERT C. 

APCELAUSKAS 

B.S. (B.A.) 



JOHN W. ARNOLD 
B.S.C. 



RITA A. BACIANS 

B.S.N, 



ROBERT C. BAILEY 
J.D. 




GERALD J. BANNON 

B.S. (S.S.) 



LAWRENCE F. BARNET 
M.D. 



JULIO A. BATTISTONI 
D.D.S. 



ROBERT A. BEATON 
B.S. (Hum.) 



271 




HERMAN J. BECKER 


ROBERT A. BELL 


ANTHONY S. 


SISTER 


B.S.C. 


B.S. (Hum.) 


BELMONTE 


M. DOLORITA (BIEGEL) 






B.S. (S.S.) 


B.S.N. 




EDWARD L. BOTNIK 
M.D. 



JEREMIAH F. 

BRANSFIELD 

J.D. 






DAVID C. BRESNAHAN 
B.S.C. 



JAMES W. BROWN 
D.D.S. 



BROTHER RICHARD S. DALE D. BRUNELLE 

BRUMLEVE, C.S.V. A.B. 3,5. (Hvun.) 



272 




RICHARD J. BLAIR 
M.D. 



BERNARD P. BOBBER 
B.S.C. 



CHARMAINE C. 

BOJKOWSKI 

B.S. (S.S.) 



CHARLES S. BORDEN, JR. 
D.D.S. 




Elizabeth Cudahy Memorial Library, 
on Lake Shore Campus, is one of tlie 
most noted landmarks of the Univer- 
sity. 




LEO R. BRENNAN 
B.S.C. 



GERALD M. BRENNOCK 
B.S. (N.S.) 




MARIONNE L. BURKE EMMETT L. BURNS, JR. 

B.S. (Hum.) B.S.C. 



FRANK L. BUTLER 
B.S.C. 



ALLEN J. CAHILL 
M.D. 



273 




JOHN H. CALOON 
D.D.S. 



WAYNE J. CAMPBELL 
B.S. (S.S.) 



JAMES D. CANNON 
D.D.S. 




ANGELO J. CAPOZZI 
M.D. 




JAMES F. CARON 
B.S.C. 



MARY P. CARROLL 
B.S. (Hum.) 



THOMAS J. CASEY THOMAS P. CAWLEY 



B.S.C. 



J.D. 




ATHANAS J. CHIPPAS 
B.S. (B.A.) 



JACK P. CHIVATERO 
B.S.C. 



JAMES F. CHRISTIE 
D.D.S. 



MYRON CHUBIN 
D.D.S. 



274 



GERALD W. CARA DALE E. CARLSTROM 
M.D. D.D.S. 





The annual ordination at West Baden College portrays the 
fulfillment of the spiritual life at Loyola. 



SALVATORE A. 

CHINIGO 

M.D. 




PAUL C. COLLIGAN 
M.D. 



SISTER 

M. FRANCIS COLLINS 

B.S.N. 



JOSEPH R. COLUCCI 
B.S. (S.S.) 



M. SHAWN 

CONCANNON 

A.B. 



275 



1^- 




Two smiling faces familiar to all Lewis Towers students are those 
of Nora Kramer and Maureen Gavin, secretaries of the Dean of 
Students. 




MARGARET L. CONROY CHARLES H. COOPER 



A.R. 



D.D.S. 




BARRY J. CULLINAN EUGENE G. CURRAN 

B.S. (S.S.) B.S.C. 




DIANE T. DANGLES 
B.S. (S.S.) 



DONALD J. DANIEL 
M.D. 



WILLIAM R. DASTIC 
B.S. (N.S.) 



FRANCIS J. DEGA 
M.D. 



276 




EDWARD T. COSTELLO 


CORENE M. 


WILLIAM E. CREED 


PATRICK J. CULHANE 


B.S. (N.S.) 


COWPERTHWAIT 
B.S. (Ed.) 


A.B. 


B.S. (S.S.) 





MARILYN R. CURTIS 


BARBARA R. CYSEWSKI 


GREGORY A. CZARNIK 


ROBERT E. DAMPTZ 


B.S.N. 


B.S. (Ed.) 


B.S. (Ed.) 


M.D. 




BARBARA J. DENBY 


PAUL P. DENTZER 


LOUIS A. DE PORTER 


JOHN G. DE RYDT 


B.S. (Ed.) 


B.S.C. 


M.D. 


B.S. (N.S.) 



277 




RAYMOND DES 

HOSIERS 
M.D. 



ANTHONY R. 

DiBENEDETTO 

J.D. 



MARY ROSE DIEHL 
B.S.N. 



SISTER 

M. CLEMENT 

(DIEBOLD) 

B.S.N. 




HENRY J. DOLD 

M.D. 



CLARITA R. DOMINE 
B.S.N. 






RICHARD O. DONOVAN 
B.S.C. 



ROBERT J. DOOLEY 
B.S. (Hum.) 



MARCIA J. DOPKE 
B.S. (Ed.) 



JUDY L. DORINI 
B.S. (Ed.) 



278 



■ Tysa^.i.'isvjjujt'''. 





RAYMOND J. DIETER JOSEPH A. DiLALLO 







M.D. 



M.D. 



EILEEN M. DOBOSZ 
B.S. (Ed.) 



JOHN J. DOHERTY 
A.B. 




Coeds and their dates take advantage 
of an intermission at the Coed Club 
dance to renew old acquaintances. 



f^ 



•K^ 




WILLIAM J. DONNELLY JOSEPH J. DONOVAN 

B.S.C. D.D.S. 




PHYLLIS A. DOROCIAK 
B.S.N. 



NANCY A. DOWER 
B.S. (Ed.) 



JAMES E. DOYLE 
M.D. 



JOHN H. DOYLE 
B.S.C. 



279 





«9 ^a^B 



THOMAS J. DOYLE 
D.D.S. 



WAYNE A. DOYLE 
A.B. 



GEORGE B. DREW 
B.S.C, 




ati 



JOHN C. DRILL 
B.S.C. 




FRANCIS A. DWaN 
M.D. 


KATHLEEN E. DWYER 
B.S. (S.S.) 


LEO E. DWYER 
D.D.S. 


ELAINE P. DYBAS 
B.S.N. 


v^ *'*jS 


e 


V^^ 


n 

^«^'^ 








M 


DONALD J. EDWARDS 
B.S.C. 


RUSSELL C. ELGIN 
D.D.S. 


THOMAS P. EMMETT 
A.B. 


MB 

ERNEST P. FAITH 
D.D.S. 



280 




DONNA J. DRONEY 
B.S. (Ed.) 



LEONARD R. DUNAJ 
B.S.C. 





The center of undergraduate science activity for pre-medical 
students and science majors is Cudahy Science Building, 
located on Lake Shore Campus. 



MARY ANN DZIK 
B.S.N. 



DENNIS M. EAGAN 
B.S.C. 




THOMAS M. FEELEY 
B.S. (Ed.) 



RONALD P. FELDNER 
M.D. 



JAMES T. FERRINI 
B.S. (S.S.) 



SISTER 

FIDELIS (THALIATH) 

MX). 



281 




Mary Ellen Bahl and Donna CoUinson of Delaware Hall sign 
out for housemother Nanette Williams before they leave the donn. 




MARGARET G. FINLEY 
B.S. (Ed.) 




GLORIA M. FORTE 
A.B. 



MICHAEL E. FRANCIS 
B.S.C. 




BROTHER 

ALBERT GALLEGOS 

A.B. 



EARUNE F. GATES 
B.S.N. 



282 




THOMAS M. FLATLEY 
B.S.C. 



WILLIAM 

FLECKENSTEIN 

B.S.C. 




ELLIOTT B. FOLBE 
D.D.S. 



DAVID J. FORD 
B.S. (S.S.) 




CARL I. FRISINA 
M.D. 



BARBARA A, FRITZEN JAMES P. GALLAGHER 

B.S. (Hum.) B.S. (S.S.) 



ROBERT A. 

GALLAGHER 

D.D.S. 




ROBERT A. 


M. PATRICIA 


ROLAND J. GERETTI 


LEONARD H. GERIN 


GALLAGHER 


GEOGHEGAN 


B.S. (N.S.) 


J.D. 


D.D.S. 


B.S. (S.S.) 







283 




THOMAS J. 


CHARLES W. GIROUX 


SUZANNE M. GLADER 


LITA M. GRABOW 


GESIAKOWSKl 


D.D.S. 


B.S. (Ed.) 


B.S.N. 


B.S. (S.S.) 










GREGORY T. GRIFFIN 
B.S.C. 



GIEDRE M. 

GRISKENAS 

A.B. 





ADRIENNE I. GURDAK 
B.S.N. 



RICHARD J. HACKETT 
B.S.C. 



ROBERT J. HALLSTEIN 
B.S.C. 



THOMAS M. HANEY 
B.S. (Hum.) 



284 




RONALD J. GRASON 
B.S. (N.S.) 



MELITTA GRATZER 
M.D. 



LAWRENCE J. GRAY 
B.S. (N.S.) 



THOMAS D. GREEN 
B.S.G. 




Faces on the sidelines betray Loyo- 
lans' emotions as they watch the 
Ramblers ramble on to another vic- 
tory. 



,\ 





HAROLD E. GRUPE 
D.D.S. 



WILLIAM J. GULIELMI 
B.S.C. 




JAMES M. HANNAN 
L.L.B. 



CHARLES W. HART 
B.S. (Hum.) 



EDWARD J. HARTIGAN 
B.S. (Hum.) 



JOHN W. HAUCH 
A.B. 



285 




ROBERT T. HAWLEY 
B.S.C. 




JOSEPH P. HILL 
B.S.C. 



DENNIS G. 

HILLENBRAND 

B.S. (N.S.) 



JEROME P. 

HOCHSTATTER 

D.D.S. 



JERRY I. HOFFMAN 
D.D.S. 




MICHAEL A. HOWARD 
M.D. 



LEAH L. HUGHES 
B.S.N. 



JUDY A. IRELAND 
B.S.N. 



ROBERT J. IRELAND 
D.D.S. 



286 




RICHARD A. HEYD 
B.S. (S.S.) 



EDWARD C. HILDER 
D.D.S. 





An important facet of student life in the Institute of 
Social and Industrial Relations is the frequent student- 
faculty counselling session. 



EREMIAH A. HORAN 
B.S. (B.A.) 



JOHN P. HOWARD 

M.D. 




EDWARD B. JAROS 
D.D.S. 



THOMAS F. JESCHKE 
B.S. (Hum.) 



CAROLYN D. JESEN 
B.S.N. 



ROBERT P. JONES 
D.D.S. 



287 







DONALD J. JUDY 
B.S.C. 



ROBERT J. 

KACZOROWSKI 

B.S.C. 



The Loyola College Store in the LSC Union House 
provides not only a wide assortment of books, cards, 
and academic supplies, but also a convenient meeting 
place for students. 





JOHN E. KEANE 
B.S. (Hum.) 



HUGO A. KEIM 
M.D. 




JAMES R. KENNEDY 
M.D. 



KATHLEEN R. 
KERROTT 
B.S. (Hum.) 



ROBERT T. KESSLER 
B.S. (N.S.) 



JAMES P. KIELTY 
A.B. 



288 




PAUL B. KANCHIER MAUREEN K. KAVENY 

B.S.C. B.S. (S.S.) 



THOMAS J. KAWKA 
A.B. 



ROBERT A. KAYER 
B.S.C. 




MARY-ANN KELLEY 
B.S.N. 



MARY LOUISE KELLY 
B.S. (Ed.) 



MARY THERESE KELLY 
B.S. (Hum.) 



RITA M. KERKHOVE 
B.S. (Ed.) 




ANDREW J. KIENER THOMAS P. KILBANE 

B.S.C. B.S. (Hum.) 



JOON K. KIM 
B.S.C. 



JOHN M, KIRSCH 
B.S. (N.S.) 



289 




KENNETH A. KLEIN 


BARBARA A. KLINGER 


GERALDINE H. 


BRUCE M. KNOWLES 


B.S.C. 


B.S.N. 


KLOPACK 
B.S. (Ed.) 


B.S.C. 




DALE K. KOSTIWA 
D.D.S. 



LORETTA KROZEL 
A.B. 







JOHN D. KUHN 


CAROL A. KUNA 


ANTOINETTE C. 


WANDA MARIA H 


B.S.C. 


B.S. (Ed.) 


KURPIEL 


KWAN 






B.S. (S.S.) 


B.S. (S.S.) 



290 




KAY M. KOCHER 
B.S.N. 



MARY F. KOESTNER 
B.S. (Ed.) 



RALPH A. KORN 
B.S.C. 



PAUL J. KOSTER 
B.S. (S.S.) 



The voices, though not always the 
faces, of Jane Hayes and Kay Egan, 
Lewis Towers switchboard operators, 
are famiUar to all. 




EDWARD C. 
KRVSZAK 
B.S. (B.A.) 



JOHN K. KUCENAS 
B.S. (Hum.) 




RICHARD A. LABICH 


JOHN S. LACZYNSKI 


ARLENE JENSEN 


PEGGY J. LaPLANTE 


B.S. (Hum.) 


D.D.S. 


(LAGERSHAUSEN) 
B.S.N. 


A.B. 



291 




RONALD N. LORENZINI 
M.D. 



MARY E. LEABEATER 
M.D. 



ALFRED LeBLANC 
M.D. 



ROBERT L 

LECHOWSKI 

M.D. 





EDWARD L. LESLIE 
M.D. 



WALTER A. LICHOTA 
D.D.S. 



DOUGLAS D. LINTON VIRGINIA M. LIS 

B.S.C. B.S. (S.'S.) 




AUDLEY E. LOUGHRAN 
M.D. 



EDWARD J. LUZWICK 
D.D.S. 



SISTER M. LYDIA 

(TOPOREK), C.S.F.N. 

B.S. (Ed.) 



JOHN E. LYNCH 
B.S. (Hum.) 



292 







r 




* (ttS 



ANTHONY J. LENART 
B.S.C. 





THEODORE C. 

LESCHER 

M.D. 







yk^ 



Cudahy Memorial Library, on Loyola's Lake Shore 
Campus, provides an afternoon "hangout" for students 
who take their studies seriously. 



RICHARD P. 

LOGULLO 

D.D.S. 



ROBERT A. LOLL 
B.S.C. 




JOSEPH A. MALEK 
J.D. 



293 




Barry Cullinan and Mary Lee CuUen proudly display 
the trophy they won for achieving third place at the 
Harvard National Invitational Debate Tournament. 




JAMES N. MANIATIS 
D.D.S. 



PATRICIA D. MANIOCHA 
B.S. (S.S.) 




JOSEPH J. MARHEWICZ ROBERT E. MARLIN 

D.D.S. B.S. (Hum.) 




S. JOSEPH MAURICE 
M.D. 



ROBERT S. MAY 
D.D.S. 



JOYCE M. McAULIFFE FRANK J. McCALL 

B.S. (Ed.) D.D.S. 



294 




PAUL A. MARANTO 
B.S.C. 



ANTONIETTA M. 
MARIELLA 
B.S. (Hum.) 



LEON D. MARINELLO 
B.S. (S.S.) 



MARLENE MARINI 
B.S.N. 




GEORGE H. MARTENS MARION J. MARTIN 

J.D. B.S.C. 



PHILIP K. MARTIN 
B.S. (S.S.) 



ANTHONY J. MARTIRE 
B.S.C. 




CARTER w. McCarthy 


LAURENCE L. 


MICHAEL T. 


NANCY J. McCarthy 


B.S.C. 


McCarthy 


McCarthy 


B.S. (Ed.) 




D.D.S. 


B.S. (Hum.) 





:295 





DANIEL R. McLEAN 
B.S.C. 





FRANK McNICHOLS 
B.S.C. 



MARILEE A. McRAE 
B.S.N. 



JAMES M. McSWEEN 
B.S. (Hum.) 



GEORGE M. 

McWALTER 

D.D.S. 



296 




JAMES P. McGROGAN 
A.B. 



PAUL V. McHUGH 
B.S. (Hum.) 




An annual event of the School of 
Nursing is the tea held early in the 
year to welcome freshmen nurses to 
Loyola. 




JOSEPH H. McNALLY 
B.S.C. 



KAY M. McNEIVE 
B.S. (Hum.) 




MARY R. MEADE 


DONALD L. MECCIA 


JOHN F. MEERSMAN 


ROBERT D. J. MEGER 


B.S. (S.S.) 


M.D. 


B.S.C. 


B.S. (S.S.) 



297 




RICHARD F. MELKA 

B.S.C. 



JAMES A. MEUCCI 
M.D. 



JOSEPH A. MICHIELS 
D.D.S. 



DULY P. MILANI 
B.S.C. 




PHILIP J. MIOLLIS 
D.D.S. 



CATHERINE M. MONCO 
B.S.N. 



A.B. 



BARBARA V. MORAN 
B.S. (Hum.) 




MATTHEW J. MORAN 
B.S.C. 



JAMES T. MORENO 
B.S. (S.S.) 



TERRENCE J. 

MORIARTY 

D.D.S. 



CLIFTON Y. 

MOROMISATO 

D.D.S. 



298 




LAURENCE W. MILLER ANDREW MINAUDO 

B.S. (S.S.) B.S. (N.S.) 





Margaret Dagenais' art class pauses in the midst of its 
ceramics to pose for the LOYOLAN photographer. 



JAMES L. MORAN 
D.D.S. 



JOHN MORAN 

B.S. (N.S.) 




JOHN S. MOSS 
D.D.S. 



JAMES T. MULCAHEY 
B.S.C. 



THOMAS J. MULCAHEY 
B.S.C. 



THOMAS E. MURRAY 
B.S. (S.S.) 



299 




Mike Hartman ruefully asks, "What's a fellow going 
to do for a parking space when he's late for class?" 




THOMAS J. NAPOLI 

B.S. (S.S.) 



ERICK C. NEHLS 
D.D.S. 




THOMAS P. NOLAN 

B.S. (B.A.) 



DALIA M. NOREIKA 
B.S. (Hum.) 




RICHARD A. NUTILE 
D.D.S. 



GERALD F. O'BRIEN 
B.S.C. 



JOSEPH S. O'CONNOR THOMAS J. O'CONNOR 

M.D. B.S. (Hum.) 



300 




JOHN B. NICHELE 
J.D. 



EVA J. NICKOLICH 
A.B. 



HELENA L. 

NIEKRASZEWICZ 

B.S. (Hum.) 



KARL K. NISHIMURA 
D.D.S. 




TERRY E. NOTARI 
B.S.C. 



PAUL P. T. NOTO 
D.D.S. 



JOSEPH J. NOVELLE 
B.S.C. 



BERNADINE A. NOWAK 
B.S. (Ed.) 




MARTIN T. O'DONNELL HENRY J. OPILKA 

B.S. (N.S.) D.D.S. 



CHARLES OSADJAN 
B.S. (N.S.) 



JAMES S. O'TOOLE 
B.S.C. 



301 





JAMES J. PARDI 
D.D.S. 



JOHN F. PASTER, JR. 
B.S.C. 



FRANCIS J. PEDACE 
M.D. 



WILK B. PEERY 
D.D.S. 




JAMES S. PHENICIE FRANCIS A. PHILIPP 

D.D.S. B.S.C. 





JAMES J. POMYKACZ 
B.S.C. 



JOHN E. POWERS 
A.B. 



CHARLES T. PTACEK 
B.S.C. 



JOHN M. QUIGLEY 
L.L.B. 



302 




THOMAS K. PETERS 
B.S. (Hum.) 



JOHN W. PETERS 
M.D. 



JAMES G. PETERSON 
B.S.C. 



GERALD J. PETERKA 
B.S.C. 




Lucille Anichini, president of the 
Coed Club, and other officers of the 
organization meet with their Jesuit 
guests at the Coed Club tea. 




CHARLES E. PINTOZZI ROBERT E. POLCYN 

B.S. (Hum.) M.D. 




PATTI JO QUILLINAN 
B.S. (Hum.) 



RICHARD P. RADD 
J.D. 



ROBERT A. RANIERE 
B.S.C. 



D.D.S. 



303 




JEREMIAH J. RING 
B.S. (Hum.) 



DONALD 

ROMANAGGI 

M.D. 






JOSEPH A. 


LOUIS S. RAY 


CHARLES A. 


JEANEITE A. 


RAPAGNANI 


B.S.C. 


REITENBACH 


RESTAGNO 


M.D. 




B.S.C. 


B.S. (S.S.) 




MARTHA ROBINSON 

B.S.N. 



JOYCE R. RODECK 
B.S.C. 



ROBERT M. ROWDEN 
M.D. 



TAFT W. ROE 
B.S. (N.S.)- 




SALLY S. SALVAGGIO ALBERT J. SAMANDER 

B.S. (Ed.) M.D. 



304 




BRYAN P. REYNOLDS ARMAND J. RIGAUX 





Members of Loyola's ROTC Drill Team demonstrate 
their skill to the basketball fans at half-time. 



DONALD E. ROEDER JOANNE F. ROMAN (Rzymski) 

D.D.S. B.S. (Hum.) 




DANIEL D. SANDERS KARL E. SANZENBACHER AL R. SCALA 

D.D.S. B.S. (N.S.) B.S. (Hum.) 



LILLIAN A. SCHELL 
B.S.N. 



305 




General Biddle crowns Jeanette Mama as Cadet Queen 
of the ROTC's annual Military Ball. 




SISTER MARY ELIZABETH ANN 

(Schildmeyer), O.S.F 

B.S.N. 



SISTER MARY PAUL 

(SchuItz),C.R 

B.S. 



CECILIA M. 

SCHMUTTENMAER 
B.S. (S.S.) 




A. SCHULTZ, JR. 
A.B. 




FRANCES SEVERTSEN 
B.S. (Hum.) 



EVERETT E. SHAFER 
D.D.S. 



DANIEL C. SHANNON 
M.D. 



BROTHER ROY J. 

SHELANGOUSKI, C.S.C. 

B.S. (N.S.) 



306 




JEREMIAH E. 

SCHOEN 

D.D.S. 



PAUL R. 

SCHOENENBERGER 

D.D.S. 



DONALD H. SCHUDE 
D.D.S. 



RICHARD E. SCHUTH 
B.S. (N.S.) 




ROBERT A. SCODRO 
B.S.C. 



ROBERT C, SEELMAN 
M.D. 



HERBERT E. SEIDEL 
D.D.S. 





/i 



\ 



I 



ERNEST J. 

SESSELMANN 

D.D.S. 




ANTHONY J. SILLA 
D.D.S. 



JOSEPH V. SIMONE 
M.D. 



ROXANE D. SLASKI 
B.S. (Ed.) 



HELEN F. SLINGSBY 
B.S.N. 



307 




RONALD A. SLOVICK 


NORBERT S. 


BERNARD J. SMITH 


BONITA M. SMITH 


D.D.S. 


SLOWIKOWSKI 
B.S. (S.S.) 


B.S.C. 


B.S. (S.S.) 




JEANETTE M. SPERKA 
B.S. (Hum.) 



ROBERT L. SPERO 
B.S.C. 





RAYMOND R. STANIS 


LAWRENCE T. 


RICHARD C. 


ROBERT L. STECKBECK 


B.S. (S.S.) 


STANNER 


STALZER 


M.D. 




B.S. (S.S.) 


M.D. 





308 








"■^5 




SISTER MARY STEPHEN 


PATRICK SMITH 


RITA M. SMITH 


JOHN C. SOKOL 


ANN (Smith), O.S.F. 


B.S. (Hum.) 


B.S.N. 


B.S.C. 


B.S.N. 










Members of Sigma Delta Phi pass 
many hours in the Lewis Towers 
lounge playing cards, a pastime they 
take quite seriously. 




DONALD P. 


ROBERT 


SPRENGEL 


SPYCHALSKI 


B.S. (S.S.) 


B.S. (N.S.) 




CLIFFORD J. STEINLE VIRGINIA L. STIFT 

D.D.S. B.S.N. 



THOMAS L. STONE 
M.D. 



JOHN A. STRENK 
B.S.C. 



309 




DENNIS C. SUDER 


DONALD S. SUGES 


MICHAEL F. 


THOMAS M. 


B.S.C. 


D.D.S. 


SULLIVAN 


SULLIVAN 






J.D. 


D.DrS. 




JOSEPH H. TAYLOR 
B.S. (Hum.) 



CHARLES E. 

THOMPSON 

B.S.C. 




D J. VACCO 


ROBERT 


RONALD J. 


LAWRENCE G. 


D.D.S. 


VANDERPLOW 


VAN PUTTEN 


VONCKX 




B.S. (N.S.) 


D.D.S. 


B.S. (Hum.) 



310 




BROTHER HILARY 

SWISS, O.S.M. 
A.B. 




ROBERT H. TIETSEN 
D.D.S. 



WILLIAM R. TODD 
D.D.S. 



PHILLIP A. TREVENER 
B.S.C. 



GERALDINE A. TRIPP 
B.S. (Ed.) 




PETER WAGNER 
B.S. N.S.) 



STANLEY A. WALENT 
B.S. (S.S.) 



FRANCIS P. WALL 
D.D.S. 



JOHN C. WALL 
M.D. 



311 




Sr 



JANET L. WALLIN 
L.L.B. 




MARY ANNE WILL 
B.S.N. 



THEODORE J. WILL DAVID J. WILLSON 

M.D. B.S. (N.S.) 




WILMA B. WOOD 
B.S.N. 



THADULUS S. 

WYROSKI 

B.S.C. 



JOSEPH D. YOUNG 
M.D. 



JOSEPH G. YOUNG 
M.D. 




GREGORY O. 


MARION W. ZIELINSKI 


NANCY A. 


ZEMAN 


B.S. (N.S.) 


ZIMMERMAN 


M.D. 




B.S.N. 



312 



/5 






SYLVIA F. WEIDE 
B.S.N. 



VIRGINIA M. 
ZITTNAN 
B.S. (S.S.) 




D. JEROME WHITE 
B.S. (Hum.) 



NOEL E. WHITNEY 
B.S.C. 



RICHARD J. WITEK JOSEPH J. WNUK 

D.D.S. B.S.C. 




JOSEPH T, WOJCIK 
B.S. (N.S.) 



JOHN P. ZVETINA 
B.S. (S.S.) 



MARTIN V. ZYDELL 
fi.S.C. 



THEODORE L. 

WIERSMA 

D.D.S. 




313 




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Members of the LOYOLAN and the 
Loyola News exist in an atmosphere 
of peace and harmony in the Lake 
Shore Publications' Room ... a far 
cry from last year. Staff members 
pictured are the LOYOLAN staff 
(foreground): Tom Millard, Lake 
Shore Campus editor; Bob Styles, 
copy editor; Phil Augustine, special 
assistant; Tom Haney, editor-in-chief. 
The Loyola News staff (background): 
Dave Suinehart, Lake Shore Campus 
editor; Marguerite Wiedlin, assistant 
to the editors. Greg Czarnik, photog- 
raphy consultant; Tony Ward, co- 
editor. 




316 



AcKaiKx- publicity for the annual Tau Kappa 
Epsilon "Ugly Man Contest" is given by Ed 
Murray, Ellen Miller, and Bob Styles. 



f 

~ — 


1 






1 


^^^^fc_^"^--^ ^3P* 






1 



The Halloween costume party at Loyola Hall brought together an interesting (and different) 
array of characters. 




317 



Rev. Vincent V. Herr, S.J., chairman, psy- 
chology department, proudly exhibits the 
equipment in the new animal behavioral 
laboratory which opened in the fall at Lake 
Shore Campus. 




Seven leading Chicagoans were honored in a Founders' Day convocation marking tlie 89th 
anniversary of Loyola's founding. Receiving citations from Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S.J., 
were Virgil W. Peterson (executive director, Chicago Crime Commission), Samuel A. Gold- 
smith (executive vice-president, Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Chicago), Milburn P. Akers, 
(editor, Chicago Sun-Timei], Dr. Paul E. Lawler (chairman, obsterics. Little Company of 
Mary Hospital), Rt. Re\'. Msgr. John W. Barrett (director, archdiocean hospitals), Raymond 
M. Hilliard (director. Cook County department of welfare), and Philip R. Clarke (chairman, 
1959 Crusade of Mercy fund appeal). 




The annual Coed Club welcoming tea 
for freshmen coeds was held this yeai 
in the Glass Hat room of the Pick- 
Congress Hotel and attracted one of 
the largest crowds of the past few 
years. 




Coeds in Delaware Hall use their lunchtime to read letters from home and to catch up on the 
latest gossip. 




319 




The coeds of Delaware Hall gladly assemble for the LOYOLAN photographer. Standing: 
Audrey Moore, Lenore Fiorenza, Romaine Bocianski, Sandra Waljeski, Virginia Becker, 
Sharon Lane, Pamela Putnam, Irene Tarloski, Judy Blankenheim, Joline McCaffrey, Mary 
Ellen Bahl, Elaine Oberland, Ann Reiter. Seated, middle row: Mary Koestner, Mrs. Nanette 
Williams, Loretta Krozel, Pauline Zaranka, Rachel Riley, Terry Tamburrino, Katherine Gib- 
bons, Sandra Smith, Bonita Bertaux. Seated, front rote: Julie Neuser, Pat Zimmerman, Susan 
Conway, Cathy Silvagni, Romaine Bocianski, Kitty Schaab, Marie Czerneda, Adele Roskowski, 
Mary Ann Bickel. 




In addition to their classroom time, Arts stu- 
dents find time to help cheer the Ramblers on 
to victory. 



The magic of King Winter turns Lake Shore 
into a land of crystal and fire, but it makes 
walking rough. 



320 




Mike Hawkins, chairman of SAL, 
displays the activities of his volunteers 
to Joan Coscioni and Ellen Huck, as 
Ed Walsh looks on approvingly. 



Jim Fitzgerald, Mart Moran, and Jack Nicholson look on proudly 
at the three lucky men who won orchids for their dates at the 
annual Commerce Council dance. 





At the annual Delta Sigma Pi Bal Rose dance, Jack Doyle announces Monica Kozak (fourth 
from the left) as the new Rose of Delta Sig. Included in the Rose's court are Joyce Allard, 
Joan Duffy, Barbara Gongol, Monica Kozak, Ursulla Muszynski (partially hidden), Kathy Sil- 
vagni, Darlene O'Brochta, Anne Reiter, Arlene Tijan, Adele Roszkowski, Jacki Schmelter, Don- 
na Suida. 




Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S.J., pre- 
sents an honorary doctor of science degree 
to Dr. Thomas A. Dooley at a special con- 
vocation held in November. _ Dr. Dooley, 
the famed "jungle doctor" of South- 
eastern Asia, is the co-founder of MEDI- 
CO (Medical International Cooperation 
Organization). 



323 



In December a Nativity scene on the rear of Madonna della Strada 
Chapel was dedicated. The ceremonies included a concert of 
carols by the Choral Society, solemn Benediction in the chapel, 
a candlelighting ceremony, a procession, and the blessing of the 
outdoor crib. 




324 




In a typical Lewis Towers scene, elevator operators Bert, Jim, 
and Zip (in their freshman beanies) fight to give customers serv- 



The members of SAM proudly pose for the 
LOYOLAN photographer at their annual ban- 
quet after wanning fourth place in a nation- 
wide contest among the hundred SAM chap- 
ters. 



r-L 



lOYDUIlltiVEllsmOfCHlCra 

4TH PUCE 

1958-1959 

SOCIETY FOR MVAMEIIEIIT 

OF MAHAEEMEHI 





325 




Jeanette Marna is crowned Cadet Queen by General Biddle at the ROTC's annual Military 
Ball. 



Joan Vaccaro, Assistant to the Dean of Women, displays the first prize for the Loyola Fair, 
the Triumph. 







^ 




Dennis Monahan and Al Busa receives information from Marguer- 
ite Wiedlin, a University College student, who is employed in the 
Lake Shore Dean of Students' Office. 





Eileen McNulty, Martina Panoczo, and Elly McCann discuss the 
history test which was taken early in the afternoon in the living 
room of Winthrop Hall. 



In February, Dr. William Foxwell Albright, a 
Johns Hopkins University archeologist, was 
awarded an honorary doctor of letters degree 
by the Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S.J., at a 
special convocation in the Grand Ballroom of 
Lewis Towers. 





Theta Phi Alpha's "Milwaukee" float is in position on the Lake Shore 

Campus for the parade's beginning . . . one of the many events of this 
year's Pow-Wow. 



Donald Zbylut and Gemma Conforti type a 
tenn paper in the Lake Shore Union House 
... a unique achievement at Loyola. 




The members of Pi Alpha Lambda sing "Kentucky Babe" which won them 
first prize in Tau Delta Phi's Interfraternity Sing. 





Janet Parker, Linda McDonald, Jeff Block, and Joan Thiry leave Dumbach Hall after the 
completion of a mid-temi examination. 



Lewis Towers students lament the passing of the Blue Angel, a noted landmark. 




329 



"HORIZONS FOR THE CENTURIES' 



On December 10, 1959, Loyola University 
disclosed plans for a $92 million "Horizons for the 
Centuries" forty-year expansion program which 
will develop three existing Chicago educational 
centers and one new area. 

Major projects scheduled for completion dur- 
ing the next decade include: (1) an $18 million 
medical center (teaching hospital and medical 
school) in northwest Chicago on the Skokie bor- 
der; (2) a $3.25 million university center-class- 
room building at Lewis Towers; (3) a $5 million 
dental school and clinic in the west side medical 
center, Congress St. and Hoyne Ave.; (4) a $1.5 
million science classroom building on Lake Shore 
Campus; (5) a $1.5 million university center on 
Lake Shore Campus. 

Funds for the new buildings of the next ten 
years will come primarih' from corporate and in- 
dividual donors, as well as foundations and fed- 
eral funds. In the case of the dental school, the 
annual dental alumni fund will be reserved for the 
school's construction. 




The proposed University Center for Lake Shore Campus will 
contain student dining and recreational facilities. 




The proposed Dental School and Clinic in the West Side Medical 
Center will be a modern air-conditioned four-story structure. 



330 




A three-story University Center containing student dining and service facilities is scheduled 
for completion at Lewis Towers by September, 1961. By 1970 seven additional stories with a 
total of forty-eight classrooms will be added to the top of the structure. 



In addition to the six new buildings in the 
first phase, Loyola's projected $19,625,000 de- 
velopment program dming the second phase, 1970 
to 2000, includes construction at both Lewis 
Towers and Lake Shore Campus. 

Among the new facilities planned for Lewis 
Towers are a 1500-seat auditorium, a school of 
commerce, two residence halls, a library building, 
and a gymnasium. The university's present nine- 
building Lake Shore Campus will be expanded to 



include the following buildings and possibly 
others: an administration building, two residence 
halls, a Cudahy Memorial Library wing, a women's 
gymnasium, an Alumni Gymnasium wing, a fine 
arts center, an auditorium, and an ROTC armory. 
The Verv Rev. James F. Maguire, S.J., 
Loyola's president, has predicted that by 1980 an 
estimated 21,500 students will be studying in 
Loyola's nine colleges and schools. 



The new Science Classroom building which the university proposes to construct by 1970 at 
Lake Shore Campus will, provide classrooms and laboratory facilities for some 2100 students. 




331 



SENIOR DIRECTORY 



ADLER, ROBERT J. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1,2,3,4, Senior Page 4. 

AHERN, THOMAS R. 
Marketing Club 1,2,3,4. 

AIELLO, JOHN C. 
Sigma Pi Alpha 1,2,3,4, Pledge Master 2, 
Athletic Director 2,3,4, Vice-Pres. 3; Stu- 
dent Council 4; S. A. M. 3,4. 

ALESSI, ANGELLE R. 
Kappa Beta Gamma 1,2,3,4, President 4, 
Inter-Sororitv Council 4; Circumference 
4; Epsilon Pi Rho 1,2; Coed Club 2,3,4, 
Big Sister Chairman 3; Historical Society 
1; Sodality 1,2,3; Junior Advisor 3. 

ALKOVICH, DANIEL S. 
Marketing Club 2,3,4; Econ-Finance Soc- 
iety 2; Gold Torch Club 1; Fine Arts 
Club 4; Association of United States Army 
3,4, Vice-Pres. 4. 

ALLEN, ANTHONY J. 
LOYOLA NEWS 2; Gold Torch Club 1; 
Human Relations Club 2. 

AMBERSON, PETER D. 
Alpha Delta Gamma 2,3,4; Bellarmine 
Philosophy Club 2,3,4, Pres. 4; Fine Arts 
Club 3; Historical Society 2; Human Re- 
lations Club 1; Loyola Men 4; The Father 
James J. Mertz Classical Award 3. 

ANDERSEN, CAROLE E. 
Coed Club 2,3, Float Chairman 4; Fine 
Arts Club 3; Historical Society 2,3. 

APCELAUSKAS, ALBERT C. 

ARNOLD, JOHN W. 
Pi Alpha Lambda 1,2,3,4; S.A.M. 3,4. 

BACIANS, RITA A. 
S.N. A. I. 2,3,4; Assoc, for Basic Students 
2,3,4; Nursing Council 3; Junior Class 
Secretary. 

BAKER, RONALD J. 
Wassman Society 2. 

BAKER, TERRANCE W. 
Xi Psi Phi 1,2,3,4, Sergeant-at-Arms 3,4. 

BALIUS, EDWARD F. 
Phi Chi 2,3,4. 

BAMBERGER, JOSEPH F. 
LOYOLA NEWS 1,2,3; Epsilon Pi Rho 
2; Pi Gamma Mu 4; Junior Advisor 3; 
Modern Language Club 1,2; Human Re- 
lations Club 3; Historical Society 1,2,3,4. 

BANNON, GERALD J. 
Arts Council 3, Publicity Chairman 3; 
Loyola Psychological Society 4; Loyola 
Choral Society 2,3; Loyola Variety Show 
3,4. 

BARNET, LAWRENCE F. 

BATTISTONI, JULIO A. 
Psi Omega 1,2,3,4; Student A.D.A. 1,2,3,4. 

BEATON, ROBERT A. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 2,3,4, Pledgemaster 3, 
Sergeant-at-Arms 4; R.O.T.C. 1,2,3,4; In- 
tramurals 1,2,3,4. 



BECKER, HERMAN J. 
Delta Sigma Pi 3,4, Treasurer 4. 

BELL, ROBERT A. 
Loyola Historical Society 3,4. 

BELMONTE, ANTHONY S. 
Human Relations Club 4; Loyola Men 4. 

BIEGEL, SISTER M. DOLORITA 

BOBBER, BERNARD P. 

Accounting Club 2,3,4, Vice-Pres. 3. 

BOJKOWSKI, CHARMAINE C. 
Coed Club 1,2,3,4; Human Relations Club 
3,4; Bellarmine Club 2,3; Historical So- 
ciety 2,3,4. 

BORDEN, CHARLES S., JR. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1,2,3,4. 

BOTNIK, EDWARD L. 
Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4; Student A.M.A. 1,2, 
3,4. 

BRANSFIELD, JEREMIAH F. 
Student Bar Assoc. 1,2,3,4, Class Rep. 2, 

BRENNOCK, GERALD 

Phi Mu Chi 1,2,3,4; Wasmann Society 1; 
Historical Society 1. 

BRESNAHAN, DAVID C. 
Pi Alpha Lambda 2,3,4; Social Chairman 
3,4, Vice-Pres. 4; LOYOLAN 2; Fine Arts 
Club 3,4; Variety Show 3,4; Loyola Fair 
Grounds Committee 3,4; Marketing Club 
2,3,4. 

BRODMERKEL, GEORGE J., JR. 
Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4, Pledgemaster 2, Vice 
Pres. 3, Union Congressman 2,3, Blue Key 
4, Student A.M.A. 1,2,3,4. 

BROWN, JAMES W. 
Psi Omega 1,2,3,4, Junior Master 3; Stu- 
dent Council 3,4; Student A.D.A. 1,2,3,4, 
Pres. 3,4; Dental School Choir 2,3; Who's 
Who 4. 

BRUMLEVE, BROTHER 
RICHARD S., CSV. 

BRUNELLE, DALE D. 
Coed Club 1,2; Sodality 1,2,3; Modern 
Language Club 1,2,4; Historical Society 
1,2,4. 

BURKE, MARIONNE L. 
Arts Council 2; Sophomore Class Vice- 
Pres.; Dormitory House Council 1,2,3,4; 
Secy.-Treasurer 1; Alpha Kappa Delta 4; 
Phi Sigma Tau 4; Modem Language Club 
2,4; Junior Advisor 3; Union Congress 
woman 3; Loyola Women 4; Sodality 1,3; 
Historical Society 1,2; Honors Program 
1,2,3,4. 

BURNS, EMMETT L., JR. 
Alpha Delta Gamma 1,2,3,4; Vice-Pres. 3, 
Steward 4, Sgt.-at-Arms 2; Blue Key 4; 
Loyola Union 1,2,3; Marketing Club 1,2, 
3,4, Pres. 4, Union Rep. 1,2,3; LOYOLAN 
3; Historical Society 2,3; Loyola Fair 1,2,3; 
Intramurals 1,2,3,4; Econ-Finance Society 
1,2; S.A.L. 1,2,3; Fine Arts Club 3,4. 



CALOON, JOHN H. 
Xi Psi Phi 1,2,3,4. 

CAMPBELL, WAYNE J. 
Honors Program 1; Loyola Men 4; Modern 
Language Club 1; Historical Society 1, 
2,4; Human Relations Club 1,2,3. 

CANNON, JAMES D. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1,2,3,4. 

CAPOZZI, ANGELO, JR. 
Phi Chi 1,2,3,4; Student A.M.A. 2,3,4. 

CARA, GERALD W. 

Phi Chi 1,2,3,4; Student A.M.A. 1,2,3,4; 
St. Luke's Guild 1,2,3,4. 

CARLSTROM, DALE E. 
Xi Psi Phi 1,2,3,4. 

CARROLL, MARY P. 

Historical Society 4; Sodality 4. 

CASEY, THOMAS J. 

S.A.M. 2,3,4. 

CAVANAGH, JAMES G. 
Phi Beta Pi 2,3,4. 

CAWLEY, THOMAS P. 
Phi Alpha Delta 3,4; Blue Key 3,4; Board 
of Governors 3,4; Union Congressman 3,4. 

CEGIELSKI, RICHARD S. 
Sigma Delta Phi 2,3,4, Vice-Pres. 2,3, 
Pres. 4; Arts Council 4, Senior Class Vice 
Pres.; Interfratemity Council 2,3,4; Pi 
Delta Epsilon 4; Historical Society 1,2; 
Marketing Club 3,4; Econ-Finance 3,4; 
LOYOLAN 4, Managing Editor 4; Loyola 
Union 2,3. 

CHINIGO, SALVATORE A. 
Phi Chi 1,2,3,4. 

CHIPPAS, ATHANAS J. 
Dean's Honor List 1,2,3,4. 

CHIVATERO, JACK P. 
Accounting Club 1,2,3,4. 

CHRISTIE, JAMES F. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1,2,3,4. 

CHUBIN, MYRON 
Alpha Omega 2,3,4, Vice-Pres. 2, Vice- 
Pres. and Treasurer 3. 

COLLIGAN, PAUL C. 

COLUCCI, JOSEPH R. 
Choral Society 1; S.A.L. 2. 

CONCANNON, M. SHAWN 
Debating Society 2; Sodality 2,3, Treasurer 
3; Historical Society 3,4; Loyola Men 4. 

CONROY, MARGARET L. 
Epsilon Phi Rho 2,3,4; Coed Club 2,4; 
Historical Society 2; Sodality 1,2. 

COOPER, CHARLES H. 
Psi Omega 1,2,3,4, Pledgemaster 3; Dental 
Choir 1,2,3,4, Vice-Pres. 4; Freshman, 
Sophomore Class Office. 

COSTELLO, EDWARD T. 
Sigma Pi Alpha 1,2,3,4. 



332 



SENIOR DIRECTORY 



COWPERTHWAIT, CORENE M. 

Theta Phi Alpha 1,2,3,4, PubHcity Chair- 
man 4; Coed Club 1,2,3,4, Big Sister 
Chairman 4; Union Congresswoman 3; 
S.A.L, 1,2,3,4; Historical Society 1,2,3,4; 
Junior Advisor 3; Variety Show 2,3; Cir- 
cumference 4. 

CREED, WILLIAM E. 

Epsilon Pi Rho 2,3,4, Pres. 4; Junior Ad- 
visor 3; Historical Society 1,3; Sodality 1. 

CULHANE, PATRICK J. 

Arts Council 1,4, Pres. 4; Freshman Class 
Pres.; Loyola Union 2, Executive Secy. 
2; Veterans Club 2,3,4; Historical Society 
2,3,4, Union Rep. 2, Pres., 4; WHO'S 
WHO; Blue Key 4. 

CULLINAN, BARRY J. 

Tau Delta Phi 2,3,4; Alumni Secy 3, Pres. 
3,4, Vice-Pres. 4; Debating Society, 1,2, 
3,4; Delta Sigma Rho 4; Blue Key 3,4; 
Loyola Union 3, Congressman 3, Vice- 
Pres. 3, I.F.C. Congressman 3; Charity 
Day Chairman 2; Confraternity of Frater- 
nity Pres. Chairman 4; LOYOLA NEWS 1. 

CURRAN, EUGENE G. 

Veterans Club 1,2,3,4; Acounting Club 
2,3,4. 

CURTIS, MARILYN R. 
Nursing Association 4. 

CYSEWSKI, BARBARA R. 

Theta Phi Alpha Sorority 3,4, Correspond- 
ing Secy. 4; Historical Society 3,4. 

CZARNIK, GREGORY A. 
Sodality 1; LOYOLA NEWS 3; Associa- 
tion of the United States Army 4. 

DAMPTZ, ROBERT E. 
Senior Class Treasurer; Student A.M. A. 
1,2,3,4. 

DANGLES, DIANE T. 
Coed Club 1; Human Relations Club 3,4; 
Psychological Research Society 4; Histo- 
rical Society 1. 

DANIEL, DONALD J. 
Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4; Varsity Basketball 
Team, Trainer 1,2,3,4. 

DEGA, FRANCIS J. 
Phi Chi 1,2,3,4; Student A.M.A. 1,2,3,4. 

DENBY, BARBARA J. 

DENTZER, PAUL P. 
Union Congressman 3; Sodality 1,2,3,4, 
Social Chairman 3; S.A.M. 1,2,3,4, Secy. 
4; Head Usher 3. 

DePORTER, LOUIS A. 
Phi Chi 1,2,3,4. 

DeRYDT, JOHN G. 
Gamma Delta Chi 2,3,4; Wasmann Club 
1,2,3,4. 

DesROSlERS, RAYMOND J. 
Phi Chi 2,3,4; St. Luke's Guild 1,2,3,4. 



DIEBOLD, SR. M. CLEMENT 

DIEHL, MARY R. 

Alpha Tau Delta 1,2,3,4, Historian 3; 
Nursing Council 1,2,3,; Assoc, of Basic 
Students 1,2,3,4; S.N.A.L. 1,2,3,4; Sodality 
1,2; S.A.L. 2; Freshman Class Secy.; Junior 
Class Treasurer. 

DiLALLO, JOSEPH A. 
Phi Chi 1,2,3,4; Student A.M.A. 3,4. 

DOBOSZ, EILEEN M. 

Kappa Beta Gamma 3,4; Historical Society 
1,2; Sodality 1,2. 

DOLD, HENRY J. 

Phi Beta Pi 2,3,4; Student A.M.A. 1,2,3,4; 
St. Luke's 2,3,4. 

DOMINE, CLARITA R. 
School of Nursing Association 3,4. 

DONNELLY, WILLIAM J. 
S.A.M. 3,4. 

DONOVAN, JOSEPH J. 
Dental Choir 1,2,3,4. 

DONOVAN, RICHARD O. 

Delta Sigma Pi 3,4; Alpha Sigma Nu 3,4, 
Treasurer 4; Econ-Finance Society 3,4, 
Treasurer 3; Phi Sigma Tau 3,4, Pres. 
4; Commerce Council 4; Secy. -Treasurer 
4; Loyola Union Congressman 3; Veterans 
Club 3,4; WHO'S WHO 4; Blue Key 4. 

DOOLEY, ROBERT J. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1,2,3,4; S.A.L. 3,4; 
Historical Society 3,4; Wasmann Society 1. 

DOPKE, MARCIA J. 

Coed Club 1,2,4; Sodality 1,2,3, Union 
Congresswoman 2; Historical Society 2,3; 
Cheerleader 1,2. 

DORINI, JUDY L. 

Coed Club 3,4; Historical Society 3; Psy- 
chological Research Society 4; Loyola 
Fair 3. 

DOWER, NANCY A. 
Theta Phi Alpha 2,3,4, Rush Chairman 3, 
Pres. 4; Circumference 4; Intersorority 
Council 4, Chairwoman 4; Historical So- 
ciety 1,2; S.A.L. 2,3,4; WHO'S WHO 4. 

DOYLE, JAMES E. 
Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4. 

DOYLE, JOHN H. 
Delta Sigma Pi 2,3,4, Pres. 4; Commerce 
Council 2, Secy-Treasurer 2; Loyola Union 
2,3,4, Congressmen 2,3, Executive Secy. 3, 
Pres. 4; Marketing Club 1,2,3,4, Secy.- 
Treasurer 4; Loyola Fair Committee 3,4; 
Interfraternity Council 4; S.A.L. 1,2,3,4; 
WHO'S WHO 4, Blue Key 4; LOYOLAN 
Outstanding Senior Award 4. 

DOYLE, THOMAS J. 

DOYLE, WAYNE A. 
Human Relations Club 3,4. 



DREW, GEORGE B. 

S.A.M. 3,4; Accounting Club 4. 

DRILL, JOHN C. 
Delta Sigma Pi 1,2,3,4, Professional Chair- 
man 4; Accounting Club 2; Econ. -Finance 
Society 4; Gold Torch Club 1,2; Intra- 
murals 1,2,3,4; Historical Society 1; S.A.L. 
3,4. 

DRONEY, DONNA J. 
Coed Club 3. 

DUNAJ, LEONARD R. 

DWAN, FRANCIS A. 
Phi Chi 1,2,3,4. 

DWYER, KATHLEEN E. 
Chi Theta Upsilon 3,4, Treasurer 3; 
Loyola Union 2,3, Rep. 2,3, Co-Chairman 
Fair Raffle 4; Delta Sigma Rho 4; Debate 
Club 1,2,3,4, Pres. 3; LOYOLAN 2,3,4, 
Senior Editor 4; Maroon & Gold 3, Chair- 
man 3; LOYOLAN Outstanding Senior 
Award 4; Carter Harrison Gold Key 1; 
Coed Club 1; Historical Society 1,2. 

DWYER, LEO E. 

DYBAS, ELAINE P. 
Alpha Tau Delta 1,2,3,4; Nursing Council 
2, Board Member 2; Sophomore Class 
Secretary; Student Nurses Assoc, of 111. 
1,2,3,4; Assoc, of Basic Students 1,2,3,4; 
SAL 2; Coed Club 1,2,3; Historical Society 
1; Wassmann Society 1; Sodality 1,2. 

DZIK, MARY ANN 
Alpha Tau Delta 1,2,3,4; Asso. For Basic 
Students 1,2,3,4; SNAI 1,2,3,4, Historical 
Society 1; Coed Club 3; Sodality 1,2,3, 

ELGIN, RUSSELL C. 
Psi Omega 1,2,3,4, Treasurer, 3; ADA 
1,2,3,4, Class Rep. 1,2,3,4; Blue Key 4; 
WHO'S WHO 3; St. Apollonia Guild 1,2,3; 
Dental School Choir 3,4. 

EWING, GERALD A. 
Psi Omega 1,2,3,4. 

FAITH, ERNEST P. 
Psi Omega 1,2,3,4, Guardian 4. 

FELDNER, RONALD P. 

FERRINI, JAMES T. 
Alpha Delta Gamma 2,3,4, Sgt.-at-Arms 
3,4; Debate Club 3; Fine Arts Club 3; 
Historical Society 2,3. 

FIESSINGER, JAMES J. 
Student ADA 1,2,3,4. 

FINLEY, MARGARET G. 

FLATLEY, THOMAS M. 
Alpha Kappa Psi 1,2,3,4, Asst. Treasurer 
4; Asso. of U.S. Army 3,4, Treasurer 4; 
R.O.T.C. 1,2,3,4; S.A.M. 3,4. 

FLECKENSTEIN, WILLIAM D. 
Veteran's Club 2,3,4; Intramural 2; S.A.M. 
2,3,4; Wassmann 2; Mission Guild 1,2,3,4; 
Loyola Men 3,4; Historical Society 3,4. 



333 



SENIOR DIRECTORY 



FOLBE, ELLIOTT B. 
Alpha OmcKa 1,2,3,4, President 3; Student 
Council 3,4; Junior Class Secretary; Blue 
Key 3,4; A.D.A. 1,2,3,4. 

FORTE, GLORIA M. 
Latin Club 1,2,3,4. 

FRISINA, CARL I. 

FRITZEN, BARBARA A. 
Sigma Alpha Rho 2,3; Modern Language 
1,3,4. 

FORD, DAVID J. 
Historical Society 1; Intramurals 1,2,3,4; 
Glee Club 3. 

GALLAGHER, ROBERT A. 
Psi Omega 1,2,3,4; Student A.D.A. 1,2, 
3,4; Dental Choir 2,3. 

GARRUTO, ANTHONY R. 
Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4; Freshman Class 
Treasurer. 

GARTNER, JOSEPH WM. 
Choral Society 3,4, Secr.-Treas. 4; Glee 
Club 3,4; Historical Society 1,2,4; Modern 
Language Club 4; Spanish Club 3; Poli- 
tical Science Club 2; Fine Arts Club 4; 
Loyola Men 4. 

GEARY, ROBERT M. 

GEOGHEGAN, M. PATRICIA 
Human Relations Club 1,2,3,4, Secy. 3, 
Pres. 4; Historical Society 1; Choral So- 
ciety 2; Psychological Research 4; S.A.L. 
2; Coed Club 1,2; Sodality 1,2,3; Variety 
Show 1,2,3,4. 

GERETTI, ROLAND J. 
Wasmann 1,2; Intramurals 1,2,3,4; Bowl- 
ing Team 3,4; 

GERIN, LEONARD H. 
Phi Alpha Delta 3,4; Student Bar Asso. 
1,2,3,4, Class Rep. 3, Vice-Pres. 4. 

GESIAKOWSKI, THOMAS J. 
Phi Alpha Delta 3,4; Historical Soicety 1,2; 
Human Relations Club 1,2,4. 

GIROUX, CHARLES W. 
Psi Omega 1,2,3,4; Student Council 3, 
Secretary 3; Student A.D.A. 1,2,3,4, Class 
Rep. 1,2,3,4. 

GRABOW, LITA M. 
Alpha Tau Delta 1,2,3,4, Pledge Mistress 
3,4; S.N.A.I. 1,2,3,4; Coed Club 1,2,3. 

GRASON, RONALD J. 
LOYOLA NEWS 4; Modern Language 
Club 4; Intramural 1,2,3. 

GRATZER, MELITTA 
Student A.M.A. 3,4. 

GRAY, LAWRENCE J. 
Union Rep. 2,3; Arts Council 3; Phi Sigma 
Tau 2,3,4; M.F.C.C.S. 2,3, Region Pres. 
3; Physics Club 2,3,4, Treasurer 3; Math 
Club 3,4; Intramural 2,3,4; Intramural 2,3, 
4; Interracial Council Director; Choral So- 
ciety 2,3; Sodality 2,3,4, Prefect 3. 



GREEN, THOMAS D. 
Veteran's Club 1,2,3,4; S.A.M. 1,2,3,4; 
Historical Society 1,2,3,4; Intramural 1,2, 
3,4; Rambler Rousers 3,4. 

GRIFFIN, GREGORY T. 
Pi Alpha Lambda 2,3,4; Varsity Basketball 
2,3,4; Marketing Club 3,4. 

GRISKENAS, GIEDRE M. 
Phi Sigma Tau 3,4, Vice-Pres. 4; Debate 
Club 2; Modern Language Club 1,2, 
Secry. 2; Historical Society 2; Mathematics 
Club 3,4; Sodality 1. 

GURDAK, ADRIENNE I. 
Alpha Tau Delta 1,2,3,4, Treasurer 2, 
Pledge Mistress 3; S.N.A.I. 1,2,3,4; Assoc, 
of Basic Students. 

HALLSTEIN, ROBERT J. 
Sodality 1,2,3; Loyola Men 4; S.A.L. 2; 
Accounting Club 3,4; Historical Society 1. 

HANEY, THOMAS M. 

LOYOLAN 3,4, Asst. Editor 3, Editor-in- 
Chief 4; Loyola Union 2,3,4, Chairman 
Public Relations Committee 3,4, Chairman 
Pow-Wow Publicity Committee 3,4, Fair 
Program Book Committee Chairman 3, 
Board of Governors 3,4; Hopkins Society 
2,3,4, Pres. 3,4; Historical Society 1,2,3,4, 
Union Rep. 3; LOYOLA NEWS 2, Asst. 
News Ed. 2; S.A.L. 2,3; Epsilon Pi Rlio 2; 
Junior Advisor 3; Blue Key 3,4, Vice- 
Pres. 3, 4; Alpha Sigma Nu 3,4, Secy. 4; 
Phi Sigma Tau 3,4; Pi Delta Epsilon 3,4, 
Pres. 3,4; WHO'S WHO 4; Honors Pro- 
gram 1,2,3,4; LOYOLAN Outstanding 
Senior Award 4; First Place— Historical 
Essay Contest 2; First Place— Philosophy 
Essay Contest 3; Dean's Scholarship 
Award 2,3. 

HAUCH, JOHN W. 
Alpha Sigma Nu 4; WHO'S WHO 4. 

HAWLEY, ROBERT T. 

Historical Society 1,2; Marketing Club 
2,3,4; Independents 1,2,3,4, Secy. 1,2,3,4. 

HEHEMANN.WILLIAM V. 
Phi Chi 1,2,3,4, Judge Advocate 3,4; Stu- 
dent A.M.A. 1,2,3,4. 

HENDRICKS, RICHARD J. 

Student _ 1,2,3; Student A.M.A. 1,2,3,4; 
St. Luke's Guild 2,3,4; Vice-Pres., Sopho- 
more and Junior Class. 

HESTER, EDWARD J. 
Human Relations Club 3; Historical So- 
ciety 3; Psychological Research Society 4; 
Modern Language Club 4; Fine Arts Club 
4. 

HEYD, RICHARD A. 

HILDER, EDWARD C. 
Delta Sigma Delta 2,3,4. 

HILLENBRAND, DENNIS G. 
Phi Mu Chi 1,2,3,4, Rec. Secy. 4; Was- 
mann Society 1,2,3,4; Historical Society 1. 

HOCHSTATTER, JEROME P. 
Psi Omega 1,2,3,4. 



HOFFMAN, JERRY 1. 
Alpha Omega 1,2,3,4. 

HORAN, JEREMIAH A. 
Loyola Union Congressman 1,2,3, Board 
of Governors 3; Sigma Lambda Beta 1,2, 
3,4, Pres. 4; Student Council 2,3,4, Vice- 
Pres. 4; Blue Key 4; Dean's Key 2. 

HOWARD, JOHN P. 

Phi Beta Pi 2,3,4; Student A.M.A. 1,2,3,4; 
St. Luke's Guild 1,2,3,4. 

HUGHES, LEAH L. 

Nursing Association 2,3,4. 

IRELAND, JUDY A. 
Nursing Council 1,2, Vice-Pres. 1, Treas- 
urer 2; Coed Club 1,2,3,4, L.S.C. Pres. 
3,4; S.N.A.I. 1,2,3,4; S,A,L, 3; Rifle Club 
2; Founders Day Committee 4; Assoc, of 
Basic Students 1,2,3,4. 

IRELAND, ROBERT J. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1,2,3,4. 

JESEN, CAROLYN D. 
As.soc. of Basic Students 2,3,4; S.N.A.I. 
2,3,4. 

JONES, ROBERT P. 
Psi Omega 1,2,3,4; Dental Choir 2,3. 

KACZOROWSKI, ROBERT J. 
Accounting Club 2,4; Historical Society 
4; Fine Arts Club 4. 

KAVENY, MAUREEN K. 
Arts Council 3, Secretary 3; Sodahty 2,3; 
Coed Club 2,3,4, Treasurer 3; Circum- 
ference 4 ,Chairman 4; Pi Gamma Mu 4; 
WHO'S WHO 4. 

KAWKA, THOMAS J. 
Sigma Delta Phi 2,3,4, Vice-Pres. 4; Intra- 
murals 2,3; Human Relations Club 2; 
LOYOLA NEWS 2; Bellarmine Club 3; 
Hopkins Society 2,3,4; Historical Societv 
1,2; German Club 1,2; Epsilon Pi Rho 
1,2; S.A.L. 3. 

KAYER, ROBERT A. 
Alpha Kappa Psi 2,3,4; S.A.M. 2,3,4, Pres. 
3,4; WHO'S WHO 4. 

KEIM, HUGO A. 
Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4, Librarian 2; Student 
A.M.A. 1,2,3,4. 

KELLEY, MARY ANN 
Nursing Council 2,4; Sophomore Class 
Vice-Pres.; Senior Class Vice-Pres.; S.N. 
A.I. 1,2,3,4; Choral Society 1,2, Secretary 
2; Coed Club 1,2,3,4; Historical Society 1; 
Sodality 1,2,3; Variety Show 1,2; Curtain 
Guild 2; S.A.L. 2; Circumference 4. 

KELLY, MARY L. 
Chi Theta Upsilon 2,3,4, Founder 2, Pres. 
3; Coed Club 1,2,3,4, Membership Chair- 
man 3; Maroon and Gold 3; Variety Show 
2,4; Historical Society 1,3,4. 

KELLY, MARY T. 
Sodality 2,3; Historical Society 3; Coed 
Club 3; S.A.L. 4. 



334 



SENIOR DIRECTORY 



KERROTT, KATHLEEN R. 
Kappa Beta Gamma 2,3,4; Fine Arts Club 
2, Secretary 2; Coed Club 1. 

KESSLER, ROBERT T. 
Wasmann Society 2,3,4, Pres. 4; Phi Sigma 
Tau 3,4, Secretary 4. 

KIELTY, JAMES P. 
Intramurals 2,4; Modern Language Club 
1,2,3; Epsilon Pi Rho 1,2,4; S.A.L. 2,3. 

KILBANE, THOMAS P. 

Pi Alpha Lambda 1,2,3; Dorm Council 1; 

Basketball Team 1; Historical Society 4; 
Fine Arts Club 4. 



KIM, JOON K. 



S.A.M. 4. 



KIRSCH, JOHN M. 
Alpha Delta Gamma 1,2,3,4; Sodality 1,2; 
Wasmann Society 1,2; Human Relations 
Club 1; Cheerleader 2; Pi Gamma Mu 3,4. 

KLEIN, KENNETH A. 
LOYOLA NEWS 1,2, Business Manager 2; 
LOYOLAN 3,4, Business Manager 3, 
Senior Editor 4; Acounting Club 4; Pi 
Delta Epsilon 3,4, Secretary-Treasurer 4. 

KLINGER, BARBARA A. 
Alpha Tau Delta 1,2,3,4; Sophomore Class 
Pres.; Senior Class Treasurer; Union Con- 
gresswoman 2; Nursing Council 2,3,4, 
Treasurer 2; Assoc, of Basic Students 
1,2,3,4; S.N.A.I. 1,2,3,4; Coed Club 1,2; 
Sodality 1,2; Army R.O.T.C. Drill Team 
Hostess 2; Circumference 4; WHO'S 
WHO 4. 

KLOPACK, GERALDINE H. 
Theta Phi Alpha 2,3,4; Coed Club 1,2,3,4; 
Historical Society 1,2; Maroon and Gold 
3; S.A.L. 2,3,4; Variety Show 2,3. 

KOESTNER, MARY F. 
Chi Theta Upsilon 2,3,4, Chaplain 3; 
Dorm Council Vice-Pres. 2; Woman's In- 
tramural Board 2; Historical Society 1,2, 
3,4; Coed Club 1; LOYOLA NEWS 3; 
Variety Show 3; S.A.L. 3; Loyola Fair 
3,4; Maroon and Gold 3. 

KOCHER, KAY M. 
Alpha Tau Delta 2,3,4, Recording Secre- 
tary 3; As,soc. of Basic Students 2,3,4; 
S.N.A.I. 2,3,4; S.A.L. 4; Nursing Council 
3. 

KORN, RALPH, A. 
Alpha Kappa Psi, 1,2,3,4, Treasurer 4; 
Accounting Club 3, 4. 

KOSTER, PAUL J. 

KOSTIWA, DALE K. 
Psi Omega 1,2,3,4. 

KROZEL, LORETTA 

Sodality 1,2,3, Recording Secretary 2; His- 
torical Society 3,4; Choral Society 1; 
S.A.L. 4; Psychological Research Society 
4; Epsilon Pi Rho 1,2,3,4; Modern Lan- 
guage Club 4; Coed Club 1. 



KRYSZAK, EDWARD C. 
Pi Gamma Mu; Dean's Honor List. 

KUCENAS, JOHN K. 
Philosophy Club 3,4. 

KUHN, JOHN D. 
S.A.M. 4. 

KUNA, CAROL ANN 
Kappa Beta Gamma 2,3,4; Coed Club 1,2, 
3,4; Maroon and Gold 3; S.A.L. 1,2,3,4; 
Sodality 1,2; Variety Show 3. 

KURPIEL, ANTOINETTE C. 
Theta Phi Alpha 2,3,4; Coed Club 1; 
Historical Society 1,2,4; Modern Language 
Club 1,2. 

KWAN, WANDA M. 
Foreign Students Assoc. 4, Executive 
Committee 4; Dorm Council 2,4, Pres. 4; 
Judiciary Representative 2. 

LABICH, RICHARD A. 
Phi Mu Chi 2,3,4, Pres. 4, Pledgemaster 
3; Inter-Fraternity Council 4, Chairman 
4; S.A.L. 4; Historical Society 1. 

LACZYNSKI, JOHN S. 
Psi Omega 1,2,3,4. 

LA PLANTE, PEGGY J. 
Sodality 1,2,3, Spiritual Co-Chairman 2,3; 
Epsilon Pi Rho 1,2,3,4, Treasurer 2,3; 
Bellarmine Club 3; Coed Club 1,2,3. 

LEABEATER, MARY E. 

LE BLANC, JOSEPH A. 
Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4. 

LECHOWSKI, ROBERT I. 
Student A.M.A. 2,3,4. 

LENART, ANTHONY J., JR. 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 1,2,3,4; Monogram 
Club. 

LESCHER, THEODORE C. 
St. Luke's Guild 1,2,3,4; Student A.M.A. 
1,2,3,4. 

LESLIE, EDWARD L., JR. 
Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4, Historian 3, Chaplain 



LICHOTA, WALTER A. 

Student Council 3,4, Vice-Pres. 4; St. 
Apollonia Guild 1,2,3,4. 

LINTON, DOUGLAS D. 
Accounting Club 4. 

LIS, VIRGINIA M. 
Sodality 2,3; Coed Club 2,3; Historical 
Society 2,3; Human Relations Club 3,4; 
Alpha Kappa Delta 4. 

LOGULLO, RICHARD P. 
Psi Omega 1,2,3,4. 

LOLL, ROBERT A. 
Accounting Club 2,3,4; Independents 1,2, 
3,4, Co-Chairman 4. 

LORENZINI, RONALD N. 
Student A.M.A. 1,2,3,4; St. Luke's Guild 
1,2,3,4. 



LOUGHRAN, AUDLEY E. 
Student A.M.A. 1,2,3,4; St. Luke's Guild 
1,2,3,4. 

LUZWICK, EDWARD J. 
Psi Omega 1,2,3,4. 

LYNCH, JOHN E. 

MADIGAN, DANIEL M., JR. 
Phi Chi 1,2,3,4, House Manager 3. 

MAHONEY, DONAL F. 

MALECKI, ISABELLA S. 
Modern Language Club 1,2,3,4; Historical 
Society 1,2; Human Relations Club 1; Phi 
Sigma Tau 4. 

MANIATIS, JAMES N. 
Dental Choir 2,3,4, Director 2,3,4; Psi 
Omega 1,2,3,4, Editor 3,4. 

MANIOCHA, PATRICIA D. 
Sodality 1,2,3, Treasurer 3, Union Con- 
gresswoman 2; Coed Club 1,2; Historical 
Society 1,2; Psychological Research So- 
ciety 4; Alpha Kappa Delta 4; Pi Gamma 
Mu 4; Phi Sigma Tau 4. 

MARANTO, PAUL A. 
S.A.M. 3,4; Accounting Club 4. 

MARINELLO, LEON D. 
Human Relations Club 3,4; Psychological 
Research Society 4. 

MARLIN, ROBERT E. 
Pi Alpha Lambda 1,2,3,4, Pres. 4; Director 
of Intramurals 4; LOYOLA NEWS 2,3,4, 
Sports Editor 2,3; LOYOLAN 3; Fine 
Arts Club 3,4, President 4; Golf Team 
1,2,3; Hopkins Society 4; Blue Key 3,4, 
Union Congressman 4; Pi Delta Epsilon 
3,4. 

MARTENS, GEORGE H. 
Student Bar Assoc. 1,2,3,4; Illinois Student 
Bar Assoc. 1,2,3,4. 

MARTIN, MARION J. 
Coed Club 4; Accounting Club 4. 

MAURICE, S. JOSEPH 
Student A.M.A. 1,2,3,4; St. Luke's Guild 
1,2. 

MAY, ROBERT S. 
Xi Psi Phi 1,2,3,4. 

McAULIFFE JOYCE M. 
Theta Phi Alpha 2,3,4, Vice-Pres. 4, Union 
Congresswoman 3, I.F.C. Representative 
3; Arts Council 1; Freshman Class Vice- 
Pres.; Interfraternity Council 3, Secretary 
3; Union Pow Wow 3, L.T. Chairman 3; 
Coed Club 1,2,3,4; Historical Society 1,2; 
S.A.L. 2,3,4, Section Leader 3; Variety 
Show 2,3. 

McCALL, FRANK J. 
Xi Psi 1,2,3,4. 

McCarthy, carter w. 

Historical Society 1; Accounting Club 
3, 4; Freshman Advisor 4. 

McCarthy, laurence l. 

Senior Class President; Sophomore Class 
Secretary; Xi Psi Phi 2,3,4. 



335 



SENIOR DIRECTORY 



McCarthy, nancy j. 

Kappa Beta Gamma 1,2,3,4, Historian 3, 
Recording Secretary 4; Historical Society 
1; S.A.L. 2,3,4; Coed Club 1,2,3,4; Soda- 
lity 1,2. 

McDonald, Elizabeth 

Coed Club 3,4; Historical Society 3,4. 

McFADYEN, JOHN H. 

Physics Club 1,2,3,4, Pres. 4; Matli Club 

2,3,4; Dorm Council 1,2,3; Fine Arts 
Club 3. 

McGROGAN, JAMES P. 

McHUGH, PAUL V. 
Choral Society 1,2,3; Fine Arts Club 2,3; 
Intramurals 3; S.A.L. 2. 

McKAY, DANIEL C. 
Student Bar Assoc. 1,2,3,4, Treasurer 4; 
Phi Alpha Delta 4. 

McKENZIE, DONALD W. 
Student Bar Assoc. 1,2,3,4. 

McLEAN, DONALD DAVID 
Delta SiE;ma Pi 3,4; Accounting Club 2, 
3,4; Econ-Finance Club 2,3. 

McMANAMA, ALFRED J. 
Xi Psi Phi 1,2,3,4, Social Chairman 2,3,4; 
Student Council 1,2,3,4, Pres. 4, Vice- 
Pres. 3; Sophomore Class President; Junior 
Class President; Dental Choir 2,3; Student 
A.D.A. 1,2,3,4; St. Apollonia Guild 1,2.3,4. 
Treasurer 3,4; Blue Key 3,4; WHO'S 
WHO 4. 

McNALLY, JOSEPH H. 

Accounting Club 2,3,4; Loyola Men 4; 
Independents 1,2,3,4, Treasurer 4; Stu- 
dent Counsellor 4. 

McNEIVE, KAY M. 
Coed Club 3; Fine Arts Club 3,4; Curtain 
Guild 3,4; Loyola Women 4. 

McRAE, MARILEE A. 
Alpha Tau Delta 1,2,3,4, Social Chairman 
3,4; Freshman Class Treasurer; Nursing 
Council 1,2, Arts Council Representative 
2; Assoc, of Basic Students 1,2,3,4; Soda- 
lity 1,2; S.N.A.I. 1,2.3,4; Coed Club 1,2,3; 
S.A.L. 2,3; Founders Day Committee 4. 

McSWEEN, JAMES M. 

McWALTER, GEORGE M. 
Xi Psi Phi 1,2,3,4. 

MEADE, MARY R. 
Coed Club 1,2; Historical Society 1,2,3; 
Sodality 1,2,3; Human Relations Club 3,4. 

MECCIA, DONALD L. 
Phi Chi 2,3,4, Social Chairman 4; Student 
Council 1,2,3,4, President 4; Loyola Union 
2,3, Congressman 2,3; Senior Class Vice- 
Pres. 4; Blue Key 3,4; Student A.M.A. 
2,3,4, Treasurer 3; St. Luke's Guild 1,2, 
3,4. 

MEERSMAN, JOHN F. 

MEGER, ROBERT D. 
Choral Society 3,4, President 4; S.A.L. 4. 



MELKA, RICHARD F. 
S.A.M. 2,3,4. 

MEUCCl, JAMES A. 
Student A.M.A. 1,2,3,4; St. Luke's Guild 
1,2,3,4. 

MICHIELS, JOSEPH A. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1,2,3,4. 

MILANI, DULY P. 
Veterans Club 2,3,4; Econ-Finance Club 
3,4. 

MILLER, LAURENCE W. 
Arts Council 1; Freshman Class Pres.; 
Loyola Men 4; Psychology Club 4. 

MIOLLIS, PHILIP J. 
Psi Omega 1,2,3,4, Social Chairman 3; 
Student Council 3,4, Treasurer 3,4; Class 
Officer 3,4, Blue Key 4. 

MONCO, CATHERINE M. 
Alpha Tau Delta 2,3,4, Secy-Treasurer 3; 
Circumference 4; Coed Club 2,3,4, Secy. 
3; S.N.A.I. 1,2,3,4; Sodality 1,2,3; Rifle 
Team 2. 

MOORHEAD, WILLIAM J. 

Union Congres.sman 3,4; Sodality 3,4, Pre- 
fect 4; Human Relations Club 3,4, Chair- 
man 3, Vice-Pres. 4. 

MORAN, BARBARA V. 
Theta Phi Alpha 3,4; Pi Gamma Mu 3,4; 
Coed Club 3,4; Historical Society 3,4. 

MORAN, JAMES L. 
Xi Psi Phi 1,2,3,4, Treasurer 3,4. 

MORAN, MATTHEW J. 
Senior Class Pres.; Commerce Council 
Pres. 4; Pi Gamma Mu 3,4; Econ-Finance 
Club 3,4, Vice-Pres. 3; S.A.M. 4; Historical 
Society 1. 

MORENO, JAMES F. 
Tau Delta Phi 2,3,4, Editor Historian 2, 
Corresponding Secy. 2,3, Social Chaimian 
4; LOYOLAN 2; LOYOLA NEWS 2; 
Curtain Guild 1,2,3,4, Publicity 2; S.A.L. 
2,3,4; Historical Society 2,3,4; Camera 
Club 3; Sodality 1,2,3, Publicity Chair- 
man 2, Treasurer 3; Sodality Gold Key 2; 
Indi\idual Act Trophy, Variety Show 2; 
Union Congres.sman 4. 

MORIARTY, TERRENCE J. 

Psi Omega 1,2,3,4, Historian 4. 

MOROMISATO, CLIFTON Y. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1,2,3,4. 

MOSS, JOHN S. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1,2,3,4, Tyler 4. 

MULCAHEY, JAMES T. 
S.A.M. 3,4, Newsletter Editor; Historical 
Society 1,2. 

MURRAY, EDWARD R. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 2,3,4, Secy, 4; Union 
Congressman 4; LOYOLA NEWS 3; 
LOYOLAN 4; Variety Show 2,3,4; Math 
Club 2,3,4; Sodality 1,2. 



MURRAY, THOMAS E. 
Tau Delta Phi 2,3,4, Pres. 4, Alumni 
Secy. 3, Corresponding Secy. 3, Recording 
Secy. 2, Social Chairman 2; Union Con- 
gressman 4; Blue Key 4; I.F.C. 4; Human 
Relations Club 2,3; Historical Society 
1,2,4; Modern Language Club 1; Psy- 
chological Research Society 4; S.A.L. 2,3, 
4; Maroon & Gold 3. 



NEHLS, ERICK C. 
Psi Omega 1,2,3,4; DENTOS 
Choir 2,3,4. 



Dental 



NICKOLICH, EVA 
Kappa Beta Gamma 2,3,4, Parlimentarian 
3, Historian 4, Pledge Mistress 4; Circum- 
ference 4; Epsilon Pi Rho 1,2,3,4; His- 
torical Society 4; S.A.L. 2,3,4; Maroon 
and Gold 3; Coed Club 1,2,3,4; Variety 
Show 3, 

NISHIMURA, KARL K. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1,2,3,4, President 4, 
Treasurer 3; Student Council 4; Blue Key 
3,4; WHO'S WHO 3,4; Dental Choir 
2,3,4, Co-Chairman 2; DENTOS 1. 

NOLAN, THOMAS P. 

NOTARI, TERRY E. 
Delta Sigma Pi 1,2,3,4, Vice-Pres. 4, 
Chancellor 3; Union Congressman 3,4; 
I.F.C. Treasurer 3, S.A.M. 2. 

NOVELLE, JOSEPH J. 
S.A.M. 4; Accounting Club 4. 

NOWAK, BERNADINE A. 
Kappa Beta Gamma 3,4; Coed Club 1,2, 
3,4; S.A.L. 4; Junior Advisor 3. 

NUTILE, RICHARD A. 
Class Treasurer 1,2,3,4. 

O'BRIEN, GERALD F. 
Alpha Kappa Psi 1,2,3,4; Union Congress- 
man 3,4; I.F.C. 3,4; S.A.M. 2,3,4, Vice- 
Pres. 3,4. 

O'CONNOR, JAMES J. 

O'CONNOR, JOSEPH S. 

Senior Class Secretary. 

O'CONNOR, THOMAS J. 
Varsity Team 1,2,3,4; Monogram Club 
3,4. 

O'DONNELL, MARTIN T. 
A.U.S.A. 4; Bellarmine 4; Math Club 2,3,4; 
Loyola Men 4. 

OPILKA, HENRY J. 

O'TOOLE, JAMES S. 
Independents 1,2,3,4; Accounting Club 
2,3,4. 

PARDI, JAMES J, 

PASTER, JOHN F., JR. 
Veterans Club 2,3,4; S.A.M. 2,3,4; Histo- 
rical Society 3,4. 

PASTIKA, CHARLES W. 
Phi Chi 2,3,4; S.A.M.A. 3,4. 



336 



SENIOR DIRECTORY 



PEDACE, FRANCIS J. 
Class President 1,2,4; Blue Key 4; WHO'S 
WHO 4. 

PEERY, WILK B. 
Xi Psi Phi 2,3,4. 

PETERKA, GERALD J. 
Intermurals 1,2; S.A.M. 3,4. 

PETERS, JOHN W. 
S.A.M.A. 1,2,3,4. 

PETERSON, JAMES G. 
S.A.M. 3,4. 

PHENICIE, JAMES S. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1,2,3,4. 

PHILIPP, FRANCIS A. 
Marketing Club 2,3,4; S.A.M. 1; Drama 
Club 1. 

PINTOZZI, CHARLES E. 
POLCYN, ROBERT E. 
POMYKACZ, JAMES J. 
Senior Class Vice-Pres.; Founder and 
Editor of COMMERCE NEWS SHEET; 
Historical Society 1; Econ-Finance Club 
2; Accounting Club 1,2,3,4. 

POWERS, JOHN E. 
Phi Sigma Tau 3,4; Epsilon Pi Rlio 1,2; 
Historical Society 1,2,3,4. 

PTACEK, CHARLES T. 
Alpha Kappa Psi 2,3,4, President 3,4, 
Alumni Secy. 2; Class Vice-Pres. 2,3; 
Commerce Council Rep. 2,3; I.F.C. 3; 
Blue Key 3,4, Secy. -Treasurer 4; Market- 
ing Club 2,3, Vice-Pres. 3; Accounting 
Club 2,3,4. 

QUIGLEY, JOHN M. 
Student Bar Assoc. 1,2,3,4, Class Rep. 4. 

QUILLINAN, PATTI J. 
Phi Sigma Tau 3,4; Coed Club 1,2,3; 
Historical Society 1,2. 

RADD, RICHARD P. 
Student Bar Assoc. 1,2,3,4. 

RAGAUSKAS, LEONIDAS J. 
Xi Psi Phi 1,2,3,4; Dental Choir 2. 

RANIERE, ROBERT A. 
Alpha Kappa Psi 2,3,4, Pledgemaster 3; 
Vice-Pres. 4; Union Board of Governors 4; 
Blue Key 4; S.A.M. 3,4, Treasurer 4; 
Human Relations Club 3; Historical So- 
ciety 2. 

RAPAGNANI, JOSEPH A. 
Phi Beta Pi 2,3,4. 

REITENBACH, CHARLES A. 
Marketing Club 3,4. 

RESTAGNO, JEANETTE A. 
Modern Language Club 1,2,4; Human 
Relations Club 3,4; Historical Society 2 3; 
Coed Club 1,2,3. 

REYNOLDS, BRYAN P. 
Veteran's Club 1,2,3,4; Marketing Club 
3,4. 



RIGAUX, ARMAND J. 
Phi Chi 1,2,3,4; Student A.M.A. 1,2,3,4. 

RING, JEREMIAH J. 
Pi Alpha Lambda 2,3,4; Pi Gamma Mu 4; 
LOYOLA NEWS 3; Historical Society 1,2, 
3,4; Fine Arts Club 3,4, Secy. 

RITTENHOUSE, RALPH A. 
Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4. 

ROBINSON, MARTHA 

Nursing Assoc. 1,2,3,4. 

RODECK, JOYCE R. 
Coed Club 2,3,4; Accounting Club 1,2,3, 
4, Corresponding Secy. 4; LOYOLA 
NEWS 3; Loyola Women 4. 

ROE, TAFT W. 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 1,2,3,4, Sgt.-at-Arms 
4; Blue Key 3,4; LOYOLA NEWS 2,3; 
I.F.C. 3; Union Congress Representative 
3. 

ROEDER, DONALD E. 

Xi Psi Phi 1,2,3,4, Editor 4. 

ROMAN (RZYMSKI), JOANNE F. 
Curtain Guild 1,2,3,4, Secy. 2; Historial 
Society 2; Fine Arts Club 4; Junior Ad- 
visor; Variety Show 2,3,4, Iggy Winner 4, 
Mistress of Ceremonies 3; S.A.L. 1,2,3; 
Coed Club 1,2,3; Circumference 4. 

ROMANAGGI, DON V. 
Phi Chi 1,2,3,4, Treasurer 3,4. 

ROWDEN, ROBERT M. 
Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4; Student A.M.A. 1, 
2,3,4; St. Luke's Guild 1,2,3,4. 

SALVAGGIO, SALLY S. 
Theta Phi Alpha 1,2,3,4; Coed Club 1,2, 
3,4; Historical Society 1,2; LOYOLAN 1, 
2; Variety Show 1,2; Fair Committee 1,2. 

SAMANDER, ALBERT J. 
Phi Chi 1,2,3,4. 

SANDERS, DANIEL D. 
Xi Psi Phi 1,2,3,4. 

SANZENBACHER, KARL E. 
Alpha Delta Gamma 1,2,3,4, Historian 2, 
Asst. House Manager 3; Sodality 2,3; Bel- 
larmine Philosophy Club 3,4; Wasmann 
Society 1,2,3,4; Loyola Men 4; American 
Chemical Society 2. 

SCALA, AL R. 

SCHELL, LILLIAN A. 

SISTER MARY ELIZABETH ANN 
(Schildmeyer), O.S.F. 
B.S.N. 
S.N.A.I. 2,3,4; Assoc, of Basic Students 
2,3,4. 

SCHMUTTENMAER, CECILIA M. 
Human Relations Club 3,4, Secy. 4; Alpha 
Kappa Delta 4; Historical Society 1,2,4; 
Modern Languages Club 2; Sodality 1,2; 
Coed Club 1; Psychological Research So- 
ciety 4. 

SCHOEN, JEREMIAH E. 
Delta Sigma Delta 3,4. 



SCHOENENBERGER, PAUL R. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1,2,3,4. 

SCHUDE, DONALD H. 
Psi Omega 1,2,3,4; Student A.D.A. 1,2, 
3,4; Gold Foil Club 4. 

SISTER MARY PAUL 

(Schultz), C.R. 
B.S. 

SCHULTZ, WILLIAM A., JR. 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 3,4, Corrseponding 
Secy. 4; House Manager 3,4; LOYOLA 
NEWS 1,2, Copy Editor 2; Assoc, of U.S. 
Army 2,3, Publicity Director 2,3; Gold 
Torch Club 1; Human Relations Club 3. 

SCODRO, ROBERT A. 
Accounting Club 2,3,4; Historical Society 
1,2,3,4; Fine Arts Club 1,2,3,4. 

SEELMAN, ROBERT C. 
Student A.M.A. 1,2,3,4; St. Luke's Guild 
1,2,3,4. 

SESSELMAN, ERNEST J. 
Psi Omega 1,2,3,4. 

SHAFER, EVERETT E. 
Psi Omega 1,2,3,4, Secretary 4. 

SHANNON, DANIEL G. 
Phi Chi 1,2,3,4, Pledge Chairman 3. 

SHELANGOUSKI, BROTHER ROY J., 

C.S.V. 
Intramurals 1,2,3,4. 

SIMONE, JOSEPH V. 
Student A.M.A. 1,2,3,4; St. Luke's Guild 
2,3,4. 

SLASKI, ROXANE D. 
Theta Phi Alpha 1,2,3,4, Rush Chairman 
2, Corresponding Secy. 3, Pledgemistress 
4; Historical Society 1,2,3,4, Secy. 4; Coed 
Club 1,2,3; Junior Advisor 3; LOYOLAN 
1,2; Miss Varsity 3. 

SLINGSBY, HELEN K. 
Alpha Tau Delta 2,3,4; Nursing Council 
3,4, Vice Pres. 3, Union Rep., 3,4; Presi- 
dent Junior Class; S.N.A.I. 1,2,3,4; Sodal- 
ity 1. 

SLOWIKOWSKI, NORBERT S. 
Alpha Delta Gamma 1,2,3,4, Pledgemast- 
er 3, Intermurals Manager 3; Pi Gamma 
Mu 3,4, Vice Pres. 4; Track Team 1,2,3,4, 
Captain 4; Monogram Club 2,3,4; Fine 
Arts Club 3, Vice Pres. 3; Psychological 
Research Society 4; Loyola Man 4; S.A.L. 
4. 

SMITH, BERNARD J. 
Historical Society 1; Marketing Club 2; 
Accounting Club 2,3,4. 

SMITH, BONITA M. 
Modern Language 1; Coed Club 1; His- 
torical Society 1,2,3; Human Relations 
Club 2,3,4, 

SISTER MARY STEPHEN 
ANN (Smith), O.S.F. 

B.S.N. 

SMITH, PATRICK A. 
Phi Mu Chi 2,3,4, Treasurer 4. 



337 



SENIOR DIRECTORY 



SMITH, RITA M. 

Nurses' Association. 

SPERKA, JEANETTE M. 
Kappa Beta Gamma 2,3,4, Corresponding 
Secy. 4, TRIANGLE editor 3; Coed Club 
1,2,3; Junior Advisor 3; Historical Society 
1,2; Circumference 4; S.A.L. 1,2,3,4. 

SPERO, ROBERT L. 
Marketing Club 2,3,4, Pres. 4; Dean's 
List 4. 

SPRENGEL, DONALD P. 
Sigma Delta Phi 3,4, Pledgemaster 3, 
Board Director 4, Chief Justice 4; Loyola 
Union Fair Committee 4 ;S.A.L. 4, Execu- 
tive Board 4; Historical Society 2,3,4. 

STALZER, RICHARD C. 
Blue Key 2,3,4; Alpha Sigma Nu 3,4; 
Junior Class Pres.; Student Council 2,3,4, 
Vice Pres. 4; St. Luke's Guild 1,2,3,4. 

STECKBECK, ROBERT L. 

STEINLE, CLIFFORD J. 
Xi Psi Phi 1,2,3,4; Student Council 3. 

STIFT, VIRGINIA L. 
Alpha Tau Delta 1,2,3,4, Editor 4; Nurs- 
ing Council 2,3,4, Social Chairman 2,3, 
Pres. 4; Coed Club 1,2,3,4; Union Con- 
gresswomen 2; S.N. A. I. 1,2,3,4; Women's 
Rifle Club 2; Assoc, of Basic Students 
1,2,3,4; Senior Class Pres.; Variety Show 
2; Circumference 4; .Historical Society 1, 
LOYOLAN Outstanding Senior Award 4. 

STONE, THOMAS L. 

STRENK, JOHN A. 
Accounting Club 4. 

STUCHLY, ANDREW J., JR. 

SUDER, DENNIS C. 
Accounting Club 3,4; Monogram Club 2, 
3,4; Bowling Team 1,2,3,4, Captain 3; 
American Chemical Society 1,2,3, Vice 
Pres. 3; Intramural 1,2. 

SUGES, DONALD S. 

SULLIVAN, THOMAS M. 
Xi Psi Phi 1,2,3,4; Loyola Union 1; Stu- 
dent Council 2; Sophomore Class Vice 
Pres.; Gold Foil Society 4; Vice Pres. 
Senior Class; St. ApoUonia Guild 1,2,3,4, 
Secretary 3. 

SULLIVAN, WILLIAM G, 

SURGES, LLOYD W. 
Sophomore Class Treasurer; St. Luke's 
Guild 1,2,3,4, Vice Pres. 3. 

SZTERNAL, MARTHA M. 
Historical Society 1,2,3,4; Modern Langu- 
age Club 2; LOYOLA NEWS 1. 

TAKAHASHI, GEORGE Y. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1,2,3,4, Secretary 3, 
Vice Pres. 4; St, Apollonia 1. 

TAYLOR, JOSEPH H., JR. 
Alpha Delta Gamma 1,2,3,4, Pledgemast- 
er 2; Veteran's Club 1,2,3,4, Pres. 3; His- 
torical Society 1,2,3; Modern Language 
Club 1,2. 



THALIATH, SISTER FIDELIS, S.D. 

TIETJEN, ROBERT H. 
Student A.D.A. 1; St. Apollonia 3. 

TREVENER, PHILLIP A. 
Accounting Club 3,4. 

TODD, WILLIAM R. 

Psi Omega 1,2,3,4, Pres. 3, Pledgemaster 
4, Student Council 2,3; Dental Choir 2, 
3,4, Pres. 4; Blue Key 3,4. 

TOPOREK, SISTER MARY LYDIA, 
C.S.F.N. 

TRIPP, GERALDINE A. 
Kappa Beta Gamma 3,4; Coed Club 1,2, 
3,4; Curtain Guild 1,2. 

VACCO, ALDO J. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1,2,3,4; St. Apollonia 
Guild 1,2. 

VAN PUTTEN, RONALD J. 

VONCKX, LAWRENCE G. 
Tau Delta Phi 3,4, Recording Scribe 4; 
Historical Society 1,2,3,4; S.A.L. 3,4; 
Variety Show 3. 

WAGNER, RITA M. 
Kappa Beta Gamma 2,3,4, Pledgemistress 
4; Union Congresswomen 3; Coed Club 1, 
2,3; Sodality 1,2; Circumference 4; S.A.L. 
2,3,4; Junior Advisor; I. E.G. 3; Historical 
Society 2,3. 

WALENT, STANLEY A. 
Loyola Men 4; Historical Society 4; Hu- 
man Relations 3,4. 

WALL, F. PETER 
Xi Psi Phi 1,2,3,4, Pres. 4, Athletic Chair- 
man 2; Student Council 3,4, Editor 4; St. 
Appolonia Guild 1,2,3,4; Board of Govern- 
ors 3; Gold Foil Study Club 4; Track 
Team 1, Captain 1; Student A.D.A. 1,2, 
3,4. 

WALLSECK, JOHN M. 
Marketing Club 2,3,4. 

WATKINS, BEVERLY A. 
Coed Club 3; Historical Society 3,4; 
Loyola Woman 4. 

WATKOWSKI, EDWIN B., JR. 
Veteran's Club 3,4; S.A.M. 3,4. 

WEIDE, SYLVIA F. 
Nursing Assoc. 3,4. 

WHITE, D. JEROME 
LOYOLA NEWS 3,4, Editor-in-Chief 3,4; 
Pi Delta Epsilon 4; Loyola Union Fair 3, 
Publicity Chairman 3; WHO'S WHO 4; 
Historical Society 3. 

WHITNEY, NOEL E. 
Marketing Club 3,4; Loyola News 3; 
Freshman Counselor 4. 

WILL, MARY ANNE 
Alpha Tau Delta 1,2,3,4, Corresponding 
Secy. 2, Vice Pres. 3, Pres. 4; Coed Club 
1,2; S.N.A.I. 1,2,3,4; S.A.L. 3; I.S.C. 4; 
Circumference 4. 



WILL, THEODORE J. 
Phi Chi 1,2,3,4, Secy. 3; Student A.M.A. 
1,2,3,4. 

WILLSON, DAVID J. 
Tau Delta Phi 3,4, Editor-Historian 3; 
S.A.L. 3,4. 

WITEK, RICHARD J. 
Psi Omega 1,2,3,4; Dental Choir 2,3,4, 
Secretary 2. 

WNUK, JOSEPH J. 
S.A.M. 3,4; Marketing Club 1,2,3,4; S.A.L. 
4. 

WOJCIK, JOSEPH T. 
Math Club 2,3,4, Pres. 4; Physics Club 
1,2,3. 

WOOD, WILMA B. 
Student Nursing Assoc. 3,4. 

WYROSKI, THADDEUS S. 
S.A.M. 2,3,4; Econ-Finance Society 2,3,4; 
Historical Society 2,3,4; Vets Club 2,3,4; 
Camera Club 3. 

YOUNG, JOSEPH D. 
Phi Chi 1,2,3,4. 

YOUNG, JOSEPH G. 

Student A.M.A. 1,2,3,4. 

ZAHARSKI, JOAN D. 
Alpha Tau Delta 2,3,4; Coed Club 1,3; 
S.N.A.L 1,2,3,4. 

ZAJACZKOWSKI, JOSEPH 

ZAUG, RITA J. 
Sodality 1,2,3; Human Relations Club 
2,3,4. 

ZEMAN, GREGORY O. 
Phi Chi 1,2,3,4; Student A.M.A. 1,2,3,4. 

ZIELINSKI, MARION W. 
Gamma Delta Chi 2,3,4, Vice-Pres. 4; 
Wasmann Society 1,2,3. 

ZIMMERMAN, NANCY A. 
Alpha Tau Delta 2,3,4, Custodian 3, 
Treasurer 4; Assoc, of Basic Students 
2,3,4; Nursing Council 3; Circumference 
3,4; S.A.L. 3; Junior Class Vice-Pres.; 
S.N.A.I. 2,3,4. 

ZIRBEL, GRACE H. 

ZITTNAN, VIRGINIA M. 
Kappa Beta Gamma 2,3,4, Vice-Pres. 3,4; 
Coed Club 2,3,4, Treasurer 4; I.S.C. 4, 
Secy. 4; Sodality 2; Circumference 4; 
S.A.L. 3,4; Pi Gamma Mu 4; Human Re- 
lations Club 2,3,4. Historical Society 2; 
Junior Advisor; Variety Show 3. 

ZVETINA, JOHN P. 
Econ-Finance Society 3,4; Human Rela- 
tions Club 3; Fine Arts Club 3. 

ZYDELL, MARTIN V. 
Tau Delta Phi 2,3,4, Treasurer 4; Ac- 
counting Club 3,4; S.A.L. 3; S.A.M. 2. 



338 



PHOTOGRAPHY INDEX 



Aagar, Jnmes 142 

Abel, Dr. D. Herlicrt 125, 204 

Acke, John 82, 83 

Adler, Robert J. 270 

Asaare, Robert 8.5 

Ahem, Thomas R. 270 

Aiello, James 142 

Aiello, John C. 271 

Akers, Milbum P. 318 

Akers, Thomas 245 

Albrecht, Gerald 82 

Albright, Dr. William F. 327 

Alessi, Angelle 26, 35, 66, 67, 102, 271 

Alex, James 62 

Alexjun, Edward 168 

Alfrey, Roberta 115 

Alkovich, Daniel S. 271 

Allard, Jovce 323 

Allen, Anthony J. 271 

Allen, Lloyd G. 219 

Allison, Dr. John R. 93, 222, 227, 231, 233 

AUocco, Dominic 41, 146 

Amala, Sister M. 249 

Amaturo, Dr. Frank M. 222 

Amberson, Peter D. 113, 270 

Ambre, John 72 

Amelio, Ralph 131 

Amidei, Paul 88, 199 

Anderson, Carole E. 270 

Anderson, Paul 161 

Anderson, Shirley M. 259 

Andre, Mrs. Marjorie C. 208 

Andrews, Marjo 139 

Anglum, Essie 40, 187, 250, 251 

Anichini, Lucille 15, 100, 117, 128, 129, 191, 
303 

Anrod, Dr. Charles W. 219 

Anstett, Diana 16 

Antonelli, Ralph 75 

Antonucci, June 66, 116 

Apartipilo, Michael 196 

Apcelauskas, Albert C. 271 

Arai, Harold 97 

Armamentos, Robert 208 

Ameson, Joseph 82 

Arnold. John W. 271 

Arnold, Dr. Lloyd L. 203 

Arnold, Dr. Magna R. 210 

Arreguin, Marie 251 

Asahino, Dr. Stephen 228 

Atwood, Gerald 26, 97 

Augius, Mrs. Danute 228 

Augustine, Phillip J. 88, 89, 97, 103, 107, 
316, 346 

Austin, Carol 90, 116 

Austin, Robert 199 

Auw, Dorothy 262 

fiachner, Judy 117 

Bacians, Rita A. 271 

Bahl, Marv Ellen 133. 282, 320 

Bailey, Robert C. 271 

Baker, Ronald J. 270 

Baker, Terrance 270 

Baldwin, Charles 70, 248 

Balek, Dr. Richard W. 208 

Balius, Edward F. 270 

Bamberger, Joseph 29, 270 

Bamberger, Marv Ann 66, 116 

Bandclin, Kathleen 25, 119, 120 

Banks, John 47, 162 

Bannon, Gerald J. 271 

Baranovskis, Dr. Joanna 229 

Barber, Mary Ellen 40 

Barcy, Frank 88 

Barnet, Lawrence F. 271 

Barrett, Rt. Rev. Msgr. John W. 318 

Barr>', Dr. James 205 

Barrv, Richard 189 

Bart, George 139, 209 

Bastian, Rev. Ralph, S. J. 215 
.Battistoni, Julia A. 271 
Baum, Richard 165 
Bauman, Barbara 10 
Reals, Ronald 156 
Beaton, Robert A. 88, 271 
Becker, Herman J. 62, 63, 272 
Becker, Virginia 117, 122, 320 
Beckman, Rev. John J., S. J. 190, 208 
Bednarz, Bemadine 116 
Begg, Mary E. 44, 2.59 
Behki, Dr. R. M. 248 
Bell, Robert A. 272 
Bell, William 74 
Belmonte, Anthony S. 272 
Belmonte, John 71 
Bergan, Mary 133 

Bergewisch, Rev. Fred F., S. J. 211 
Berman, Max 55 
Bertaux, Louis 142 
Bertaux, Bonita 8, 46, 320 



Berthold, Michael 125, 131, 138 

Best, Dr. E. James 224, 227 

Bezdek, Richard 80, 136 

Bickel, Mary Ann 46, 320 

Biddle, General 306, 326 

Biegel, Sister M. Dolorita, B. S. N. 272 

Bieri, Rev. John W., S. J. 41, 180, 241 

Biesinger, Edwin 50 

Biestek, Rev. Felix P., S. J. 180, 259 

Billimack, John 62, 123 

Billups, Ernest 166, 167, 168, 169 

Birskovich, Stephen 73 

Bishop, James 89 

Bishop, William 162, 163 

Bissell, Cushman B. 182, 184 

Blair, Richard J. 273 

Blake, James 52, 53 

Blanchet, Dr. Louis 245 

Blankenheim, Judy 320 

Blau, Bernard 88, 162, 163, 164 

Blickenstaff, John E. 223 

Blizzard, Mabel 117 

Block, Jeffrey 120, 329 

Blommaert, Leroy 103, 122 

Bobber. Bernard P. 273 

Bocianski, Romaine 320 

Bock, Richard 103, 122 

Boesze, Laslo 138 

Boettger, Shirley 251 

Bojkowski, Charmainc C. 273 

Bomba, Virginia 117 

Bonovich, Robert 44 

Borden, Charles S. 273 

Borer, Ronald 79 

Borrelli, Thomas L. 216 

Botnik, Edward L. 272 

Bouscaren, Louis H. G. 182 

Bouska, Frank 68 

Howe, Augustine J. 182, 184 

Bowell, William 87 

Boweu, Robert 87 

Bowman, John F. 188 

Bovle, William 131 

Branch, Barbara 40 

Brandt, Kenneth, 156 

Brannigan, Mary Ellen 40 

Bransfield, Jeremiah F. 141, 272 
Bransley, Robert 68, 69 
Bregman, Mrs. Esther 248 

Bremner, David F. 182 

Brennan, Leo R. 273 

Brennan, John 205 

Brennan, Thomas 84, 85 

Brennock, Gerald M. 273 

Brescia, Dr. Nicholas 226 

Bresnahan, Cornelius J., C. S. V. 211 

Bresnahan, David 76, 77, 136, 272 

Bresnahan, Frank 71 

Brey, Anton 137 

Brodmerkel, George 70, 71 

Brophy, Jere 198, 199 

Brown, James W. 42, 97, 145, 272 

Brown, John 52, 165 

Brown, Larry 70 

Brownlee, Harold 167. 168, 169 

Brumleve, Brother Richard S., C. S. V. 2' 

Brunelle, Dale 138, 272 

Bruno, Thomas 47, 173 

Brusca, Peter 75 

Bryant, Matthew 110 

Bryant, Rev. Thomas J., S.J., 104, 211 

Buckley, Homer J. 182 

Buckley, John 8 

Buckley, Thomas J. 208 

Bunoskv, Peter 79 

Burch, Dr. William P. 225, 229 

Burke, Robert 50 

Burke, James O. 182 

Burke, Marionne 138, 273 

Burlage, Rev. Carl, S. J. 199 

Burns, Emmett L., Jr. 273 

Burns, James 80 

Burns, Jerald 80 

Burns, Dr. Norman 29 

Burns, Raymond 82 

Busa, Allen 88, 327, 346 

Busek, Christine 142 

Bush, James 50, 166, 169 

Bussert, Mary Kay 57, 117 

Bussey, Henry M. 211 

Butler, Frank L. 273 

Bybee, Douglas 161 

Byrne, Sally 117, 131 

Cabanski, Stanley 84 

Cadero, Barbara 64, 65 

Cahill, Allen J. 273 

Cilhill, Richard 173 

Calderwood, Robert 14.5 

Caldwell, Michael 26, 76 

Caloon, John H. 274 



Camerini, Julius 138 

Campbell, Chesser M. 236 

Campbell, Wayne J. 274 

Canclas, Marcelo 138 

Cannon, Dr. James 208 

Cannon, James D. 274 

Cantafio, Dr. Joseph 233 

Capozzi, Angelo J. 274 

Cappacrt, William 73 

Capparelli, Marlene 66, 128, 175 

Caprini, Rita 233 

Caputo, Nicholas 38, 39 

Cara, Gerald W. 275 

Carbine, Michael 81 

Carey, Patricia 137 

Carlo, Robert 50 

Carlstrom, Dale E. 275 

Carney, Myra 259 

Carnev, Ruth 191 

Carney, William R. 182 

Caron, James 80, 110, 128, 136, 274 

Carpenter, Richard V. 235 

Carroll, Dennis 8 

Caroll, John 71 

Caroll, Mary P. 274 

Carroll, Richard 123 

Carter, James 79 

Casey, Gerald 62, 123 

Casey, Dr. Patrick 205 

Casey, Thomas 142, 274 

Cassaretto, Dr. Frank 111, 204 

Casserly, Michael 62 

Castiglia, Angeline 91 

Cavender, Marilyn 46, 111, 116 

Cawley, Mary 233 

Cawley, Thomas P. 274 

Cegielski, Richard S. 34, 37, 81, 107, 

134, 275 
Cenek, Stephen 81 
Cesna, Eleanor 116, 138 
Chakiamury, Rev. Jacob 211 
Chalmers, Donald 152, 162, 163 
Chamberlain, Henn' T. 182 
Chandler. Beverly 29 
Chase, Dr. Larry 228 
Chinigo, Salvatore A. 275 
Chippas, Athanas J. 274 
Chivatero, Jack P. 274 
Christian, Verna 57, 175 
Christie, James F. 274 
Chubin, Myron 274 
Church, Thomas 50, 136 
Ciesla, Christine 64 
Ciesla, Denis 137, 139 
Cieslak, Lee Roy 88 
Circo, Russell 131 
Cizon, Dr. Francis A. 131, 210 
Clark, Dr. E. John 205 
Clarke, Philip R. 318 
Clarkson, Rita 205 
Coady, Dr. John 227, 233 
Cody, Beverly 10 
Colligan, Paul C. 275 
Collins, Charlotte 138 
Collins, Dr. Emma 246 
Collins, Dr. James D. 20 
Collins, Sister M. Francis 275 
Collins, Shelia 131 
Collinson, Donna 282 
Colucci, Joseph R. 275 
Concannon, M. Shawn 275 
Conforti, Gemma 328 
Conlan, Margaret 44 
Conlon, Patrick 53 
Connelly, John 206 
Connelly, Paul 97, 145 
Connelly, Richard 72, 73 
Conone, Ralph 125 
Conroy, Margaret 125, 276 
Conroy, Maureen 90, 116 
Conroyd, W. Daniel 179, 181 
Conway, Susan 320 

Cooke, Rt. Rev. Msgr. Vincent W. 29 
Cooper, Charles H. 276 
Corcoran, John 47, 173 
Corcoran, Patrick 44 
Cordan, Patricia 91, 116, 117 
Corrigan, Martin 62 
Cortell, Mary 251 
Coscioni, Joan 66, 193, 322 
Costello, Edward T. 277 
Cowan, William 22 
Cowling, William 172 

Cowperthwait, Corene 90, 116, 117, 129. 
Cox, James C. 191 
Coyne, Larry 61 
Creed, William 125, 277 
Crnokrak, John 156, 157, 158 
Croke, Daniel 112 
Crovedi, Earl 165 



339 



PHOTOGRAPHY INDEX 



Crowe. Brian 88 

Ciidahv, Edward A. 182 

Culhanc, Patrick 36, 89, 97, 98. 104, 116, 

128, 129, 277 
Cullen, Mary Lee 116, 122, 134, 294 
CuUeran, James 172 
Cullinan, Barry 87, 103, 176, 294 
CumminES, Walter J. 182 
ClinninKham, Peter 145 
Curran, Eugene G. 276 
Curran, Michael 172 
Curtis, Marilyn R. 277 
Cutler. Kathryn 117 
Cysewski. Barbara R. 277 
Czamik. Greeory A. 277, 316 
Czemeda, Marie 320 
Dagenais, Margaret 205, 299 
Daley, Vincent 120 
Dallstream, Andrew J, 184 
Damien, Yvonne 191 
Dammann, J. Francis 184 
Damptz, Robert 41, 277 
Dangles, Diane 131, 276 
Daniel, Donald J. 276 
Danles, Daniel, 156 
D'Anna, James 114 
Dastic, William R. 276 
Davis, Paul 80, 101, 197 
Dawson, Bub 156 
Dawson, Dr. Paul T. 224, 227 
Dean, Thomas A. 182 
DeChatelet. Lawrence 111 
DeFranco. Paul 42 
Defrees. Donald 184 
Dega, Francis J. 276 
Dehler. Rev. Wm. A.. S.J. 211 
DeGannard, Patrick 72 
Delana, Genevieve, 191 
Delia. Janet 125 
Delo, Richard 42. 145 
DeMara, Marilyn 205 
Dempsey. William 20.5 
Denby. Barbara J. 277 
Denenberg, Alan 156 
Dentzer. Frank 88 
Dentzer. Paul 142, 277 
DePorter, Louis A. 277 
DeR>dt. John G. 277 
DesRosiers, Raymond 278 
Deszes, Esther 56 
Deutsch, John 162, 164 
Devane, Joseph R. 210 
DeVaull, Rev. J. J.. S.J. 21 
Devine, Mary 118 
DeVito, Margaret 116 
DeVito, Robert 73 
DeVlieger, Mary 64, 65 
Devlin, Rev. William J., S.J, 210 
DiBenedetto, .\nthonv R. 278 
Dickinson. Donald ji. 211 
Didzerekis, Paul 81 
Diehl, Marv Rose 277, 278 
Diebold, Sister M. Clement 278 
Dienes, Thomas 103, 122 
Dieter, Raymond J. 279 
DiFiore, Joseph 70 
DiLallo, Joseph A. 247, 248, 279 
Dinello, Frank A. 262 
DiSilvio, Thomas 71 
Dittburner, Friar, O.F.M. 125 
Divina, Sr. M. 249 
Dobosz. Eileen M. 66, 279 
Dohert^■. John J. 279 
Dolan. Harold 27 
Dold, Henry J. 247, 248, 278 
Dollard. Rev. Stewart E., S.J. 28, 29, 180, 

181. 196 
Doman, Madeline 36, 91, 128 
Dombrowski, Donald 41, 70, 71 
Dominc, Clarita R. 278 
Donahue, Edward 50 
Donatelli, Rosemary 20.5 
Donlev, Robert 76' 
Donnelly, Frederic D. 235 
Donnelly, William J. 279 
Donovan, Jane -56, 117 
Donovan, Joseph J. 279 
Donovan. Richard 38, 39, 63, 97, 98, 101, 

106, 278 
Doolev, Robert 88, 278 
Doolev, Dr. Thomas A. 323 
Dopke, Marcia J. 116, 278 
Dorini, Judith L. 116, 278 
Dorociak, Phvllis A. 40, 279 
Dorschel, Querin P. 182 
Dovichi. Carolyn 66. 67 
Dower. Nancy 90, 91, 102, 279 
Downey, Rev. John P., S.J. 190 
Downs, Edwarcl 142 
Doyle, Rev. Charles I., S.J. 29, 210, 262 



Doyle, James E. 279 

Dovle, John 11, 26, 32, 34, 63, 97, 98, 104, 

i93, 279, 323 
Dovle, Thomas J. 280 
Doyle, Wayne A. 280 
Draus. Walter 165 
Drebin, Martin E. 218 
Drechny, John 86, 87 
Drew, George 142, 280 
Drill. John C. 63, 280 
Dring, Robert 162 
DriscoU. Dr. Richard 206 
Dnscoll, Richard 161 
Dronev, Donna J. 281 
Ducey, Rev. Michael, S.J. 215 
Duffv, Joan 91, 323 
Duick. D.aniel 172 
Dunaj, Leonard R. 281 
Dunne, Richard 142 
Dunnetski, Stanley 107, 132 
Dnpre, Laureen 58, 117, 131 
Dwan, Francis A. 280 

Dwyer, Kathleen 26, 103, 104, 134, 193, 280 
Dwyer, Leo E. 280 
Dwyer, Margaret M. 259, 261 
Dwver, Thomas 44 

Dvbas, Diane 15, 22, 35, 64, 65, 116, 117 
Dvbas, Elaine P. 280 
Dver, Kathleen 91, 116 
Dzik, Marv Ann 281 
Eagan, Dennis M. 84, 85, 281 
Eberl, Thomas 193 
Eckman, Joan 40, 56, 175 
Edgar, Dr. David 228 
Edwards, Donald J. 280 
Egan, Gerard 208 
Egan, Kay 291 
Ehlert, Troy 40, 116 
Elentenv, Dale 80, 81, 173 
Elgin. Russell 145, 280 
Emmerick, Rev. Francis B., C.S.V. 211 
Emmert, Dr. Leslie 243 
Emmett, Thomas P. 280 
Engelhardt, Dr. George 205 
Englet. Dr. Joseph O. 219 
Enright, Marian 35, 90, 91 
Erickson, John 45, 82, 83 
Esnault, Linda 142 
Eulenberg, Alexander 184 
Even. Frances L. 262 
Ewers. Walter 113 
Fabhri. Dominic 112 
Fahev. Rev. John J. 211 
Failla, Roslvn 191 
Faith, Ernest P. 280 
Farek. Roberta 46 
Farrell. Alice 10, 117 
Farrell, Edward J. 182 
Farrell. John 50 

Farrell. Rev. Walter L.. S.J. 212 
Federici. Dr. Mario 207 
Fcderovics. Zinja 12-5 
Fedorka, Kenneth 52. .53 
Feelev, Thomas M. 84. 281 
Feit. Kenneth 122. 199 
Feldner. Ronald P. 281 
Felice, Rev. John, S.J. 211 
Fennessy. Cecelia 250, 251 
Ferrini, James T. 281 
Ferris, Constance 251 
Fiessinger, James J. 282 
Filas. Rev. Franc's L., S.J. 203. 211 
Finley, Margaret G. 282 
Finnegan, William 123 
Fiorenza, Lenore 320 
Fischer, Rev. Franklin C. S.J. 180 
Fi.scher, Margaret -56, 17.5 
Fischer. Rev. Matthias E. 211 
Fish, Juliana 40 
Fi.sh, Kav 64, 65 
Fitzgerald, James 38, 39, 52, 53, 97, 193, 

322 
Fitzgerald, John C. 181. 235, 236, 239 
Fitzgibbon, James T. 141 
Fitzpatrick, Gerald 147 
Fitzpatrick, Maureen 90, 116 
Flanagan, John J. 210 
Flanagan, Matthew 72 
Flanagan, Nort 41 
Flanagan, Thomas 167, 169 
Flatley, Thomas 52, 53, 112, 142, 283 
Fleckenstein. William 142, 283 
Fleming, Dr. Thomas 228 
Flens, Gerald 112 
Fletcher, Dr. Jackson 229 
Florek. Anthonv 125 
Florek, .N'orbert 62, 110 
Flores, Edward 166, 168 
Flvnn, Dr. Robert 227 
Flys, Dr. Michael J. 138, 203, 207 



Folbe, Elliott, B. 283 

Folev, John 93 

Fonte, Arlene 117 

Foote, Rev. Gregorv. S.J. 215 

Ford, David J. 283 

Forde. Frank 162 

Forkins, James 187, 235, 239 

Forst, Mrs. Donald 262 

Forster, Kereen .56 

Forte. Gloria 125. 282 

Fortney, Donald 62 

Fox, Rev. Robert J., S.J. 211 

Francis. Michael E. 282 

Frankovich, Karl 70 

Freedman, Carl 145 

Fredericks, Marcel 127 

Freeman, William 173 

Frenzel, Robert 8 

Friehcrg, Carter 205 

Friedman, Gary D. 141 

Frisina, Carl I. 283 

Fritzen, Barbara A. 283 

Frizol. Dr. Svlvester M. 63, 219 

Fulgoni, Carol 35, 59 

Furmaniak, Barbara 228 

Gagin, Capt. John 207 

Cajewski, Joseph 37, 88, 89, 97 

Galameault, Dr. Thomas P. 240 

Galassini, Roger 136 

Gallagher, James P. 283 

Gallagher, Dr. Ligeia 205 

Gallagher, Nancy 189 

Gallagher, Rev. Ralph A., S.J. 29, 203, 

210, 256, 257 
Gallagher, Richard 41 
Gallagher, Capt. Robert 207 
Gallagher, Robert A. 283 
Gallegos, Bro. Albert 282 
Gannon, Richard .52 
Gantt, Dr. Patrick 228 
Garcia, Paz 127 
Gargan, Dr. Edward 206 
Gargiulo, Dr. Anthony W. 229 
Garruto, Anthonv R. 282 
Gartner, Joseph W. F. 115, 282 
Garvev, Joseph 76 
Gaspers, John 80, 142 
Gates, Earline F. 282 
Gauvreau, Paul 52, 53 
Gavin, Donald 110 
Gavin. Maureen 276 
Gavin. Michael 156, 158 
Gear\', Catherine M. 211 
Geary, Robert M. 283 
Geiger, Eleanor 66, 67, 116 
Gelinas, Thomas 137 
Gensert, Joseph F. 210 
Geoghegan, Patricia 131, 283 
Gerher, Larry 86, 87 
Geretti, Roland J. 165, 283 
Gerin, Leonard H. 43, 68, 283 
Gerrietts, Dr. John S. 202 
Gervasio, Dr. Guillermo 227 
Gesiakowski. Thomas J. 284 
Gewartowski, Paul 142 
Gibbons, Katherine 320 
Gibbons, William 50, 51 
Gill, James A. 141 
Gillespie, Thomas 137 
Gillis, Richard 122 
Gill, Mar^' 90, 116 
Giroux, Charies 145. 284 
Gingras, Dr. George E. 138 
Gissel, Thaddeus 142 
Givins, Edward 79 
Glabus, Edmund 34, 89, 96, 100 
Glader, Suzanne M. 284 
Glatt, Hannelore 10, 117 
Gnapinski, John 71 
Golden, Bruce 68, 69 
Goldin, Allan 86 
Goldsmith, Samuel A. 318 
Goljan, Kenneth 232 
Gongol, Barbara 125, 323 
Gonnon, Richard 53 
Goodrich, Mrs. Martha 251 
Gordan. Donald 93 

Gorman, James J. 96, 97, 100, 156, 157, 159 
Gorman, Thomas 205 
Grabow, Lita 57, 284 
Gradv, Lawrence 38, 39, 63, 112 
Graham, Mary Lee 8, 125 
Granacki, Dale 62 

Grant, Rev. Garard G., S.J. 187, 208 
Gra-son, Ronald J. 285 
Gratzer. Melitta 285 
Grav, Lawrence 137, 139, 209, 285 
Green, Frederick 22, 26, 89, 116, 120, 346 
Green, Thomas D. 285 
Greenstein, Charles 165 



340 



PHOTOGRAPHY INDEX 



Griffin, Oregon 76, 136, 156, 158, 159, 284 
Griffin, James 43 

Griffin, John 161 

Grimes, John 52, 53 

Grinsted, Albert 325 

Grisamore, Dr. Thomas L. 224, 226 

Griskenas, Giedre 106, 137, 284 

Groble. George 43 

Grolling. Rev, Francis X., S.J. 88, 129, 206 

Gruber, Dr. Rolf 227, 230 

Grupe, Harold E. 285 

Gulielmi, William J. 28S 

Gurdak, Adrienne I. 284 

Gutziet, Joyce 205 

Gylys, Mrs. Maria 228 

Hackett, Richard J. 284 

Hagan, Herman 161 

Hagen, Marian 116 

Hale, William 121 

Hall, Carmel 16, 46 

Halleck, Dr. Frank 204 

Hallstein, Robert J. 284 

Hamilton, Janet 59, 346 

Hammond, Ronald 72 

Handy, James 165 

Haney, Thomas M. 32, 96, 97, 99, 101, 105, 
107, 134, 135, 284, 316, 346 

Hannan, James M. 141, 285 

Hanson, Dorothy 8 

Hardman, Claire 58 

Harkness, Gerald 161 

Harlan, William 87 

Harris, Dr. Al 233 

Harris, James 86, 122, 133, 199 

Harrison, Charles 62 

Hart, Charies W. 199, 285 

Hartigan, Edward J. 285 

Hartigan, John 68 

Hartman, Michael 97, 104, 300 

Hartman, Raymond 63, 123 

Hartmann, Kenneth 137 

Hartnett, Rev. Robert C, S.J. 209 

Hauch, John W. 99, 285 

Hauser, Michael 138 

Hawkins, Kathleen 40, 56 

Hawkins, Michael 193, 322 

Hawkins, Timothy 156 

Hawkins, Thomas F. 173, 179, 181 

Hawley, Robert 136, 286 

Haydanek, Ronald E. 256 

Hayden, J. .Michael 206 

Hayes, Rev. J. Donald, S.J. 190, 208 

Hayes, Jane 291 

Hayes, John C. 69, 234, 235, 239 

Hayes, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 192 

Hayes, Mary Ellen 90, 116 

Hazard, Nancy 253 

Heath, James 142 

Hecht, Rev. F. Torrens, S.J. 203, 208 

Heffron, Pearl 187, 211 

Hegan, William 103 

Hehemann, William V. 286 

Heimbach, George 71 

Hendricks, Richard J. 286 

Heneghan, John M. 256, 257 

Henes, James 111 

Henneman, Dr. Raymond 227, 231 

Henning, John 131 

Herbison, Gerald 144 

Herr, Rev. Vincent V., S.J. 203, 318 

Herzog, Frederick 88 

Hessel, William 111 

Hester, Edward 193, 286 

Hevd, Richard A. 287 

Hickey, Matthew J., Jr, 182 

Hiebel, Joseph 242 

Hilder, Edward C. 287 

Hilgers, Dr. Donald 228 

Hill, Joseph P. 286 

Hillenbrand, Dennis G. 74, 75, 286 

Hilliard, Raymond M. 318 

Hines, Charles M. 182 

Hinners, Dr. Richard C. 113, 208 

Hisaoka, Dr. Kenichi 204 

Hmura, Michael 173 

Hochstatter, Jerome P. 286 

Hoemig, Paul 74, 75, 193 

Hoffman, Jerry 1. 286 

Hoffman, Ronald 242 

Hogan, George 70 

Hogan, James 156 

Holahan, Dr. William 227 

Holm, Robert 51 

Holmes, Henry 72, 73 

Holmquist, Harold 247, 248 

Honroth, William 131 

Hopkinson, Mary Anne 57 

Horan, Jeremiah 45, 82, 83, 287 

Hosteny, Joanna 117, 138 

Houser, Barbara 116 



Howard, John P. 287 

Howard, Michael A. 286 

Hriljac, Nick 156 

Huck, Ellen 91, 193, 322 

Hudacek, Thomas 125 

Hudson, John W. 148, 149 

Hudson, John 206 

Huelsman, Helen P. 241 

Hughes, Leah L. 286 

Hughes, Patrick 68, 69 

Hummert, Dr. Paul 126 

Huston, Dr. John 204 

Hynduik, Robert 70 

Insull, Samuel, Jr. 182 

Ippoliti, John 50 

Irans, Dr. M. M. 230 

Ireland, George 152, 156 

Ireland, Judy A. 117, 286 

Ireland, Robert J. 286 

Jablonski, Thomas 125 

Jachna, Jacob 80, 81, 173 

Jackson, Dr. Kenneth M. 97, 104, 129, 206 

Jacobsen, Rev. Jerome V., S.J. 263 

Jaffe, Mrs. Esther 40 

Jagodzinski, Benjamin 71 

Jahnke, Kathleen 56, 57 

Jakalski, Donald 62 

Jancauskas, Rev. Raymond, S.J. 219 

Janka, Henry 125 

Jankovec, Jean 56, 175, 253 

Janninck, Donald 111 

Jannotta, James 248 

Janowicz, Jerry 131 

Jarabak, Dr. Joseph R. 225, 228 

Jaros, Edward B. 287 

Jaskoski, Dr. Benedict 204 

Jeschke, Thomas F. 287 

Jesen, Carolyn D. 287 

Jindrich, Joseph 82 

Johns, John 32, 41, 70, 71, 146 

Johnson, Dennis 80 

Johnson, James 52, 53 

Johnston, Arch 63 

Jolivette, Michael 162, 164 

Jones, Patricia 138 

Jones, Robert P. 287 

Jorgensen, Alan 25, 103, 104, 121 

Jorgensen, M/Sgt. Walter 207 

Jose, K. V. 249 

Jozwiak, John R. 218 

Judy, Donald 136, 288 

Juliano, Robert 125 

Kaczor, Julianna 111 

Kaczorowski, Robert J. 110, 288 

Kaepplinger, Marjorie 251 

Kaftan, Robert 85, 199 

Kaiser, Dr. Leo 204 

Kalinzus, Maurice 123 

Kamm. Melvin 43 

Kanchier, Paul B. 289 
Kane, Peter 76, 77 

Kapetanovic, Victor 161 

Kasper, Paul 47 

Kaub, Christine 116, 117 

Kauchak, Philip 246 

Kaufman, Lawrerce 107, 132 

Kaveny, Maureen K. 102, 289 

Kawka, Thomas J. 289 

Kaver, Robert 52, 97, 142, 289 

Kaylil, Philip 127 

Kazala, Stanley 232 

Keane, John 50, 51, 288 

Kearney, Mary 205 

Keating, Arthur 183 

Keavy, Edward 68, 69 

Keim, Hugo A. 288 

Keinath, Sharon 58 

Keleher, Patrick 125 

Kelley, Mary-Ann 40, 100, 102, 289 

Kellstadt, Charies H. 183 

Kelly, Andrew P. 96, 97 

Kellv, Francis 156 

Kellv, Harold 125 

Kellv, Mr. and Mrs. Harold 192 

Kelly, Rev. J. Vincent, S.J. 208 

Kelly, James 162 

Kelly, Mary Lou 59, 289 

Kelly, Mary Therese 289 

Kelly, Michael 125 

Kelly, Nancy 11, 346 

Kellv, Raymond 131 

Kemp, Rev. John A., S.J. 101, 206 

Kemp, Dr. Kenneth 228 

Kendall, Robert 93 

Kenealy, Rev. William J., S.J. 235 

Kennedy, Eleanor 191 

Kennedy, James R. 288 

Kennedy, Jane 253 

Keogh, Kathleen 125 

Kerkhove, Rita M. 289 



Kerrott, Kathleen R. 288 

Kerwin, Charles C. 183 

Kessler, Gerald 70 

Kessler, Robert T. 106, 148, 149, 288 

Kielty, James P. 288 

Kielty, Martin 136, 142 

Kiener, Andrew J. 289 

Kilbane, Thomas P. 289 

Killackv, Robert 142 

Kim, Joon K. 142, 289 

King, Arthur 161 

Kiniery, Gladys 181, 250, 251 

Kiniery, Dr. Paul 197 

Kipfstuhl, Thomas 173 

Kirk, Allan, S.J. 215 

Kirk, Lawrence 118, 120 

Kirkland, Weymouth 183 

Kirsch, John M. 289 

Kizior, Eugenia 59, 116 

Kizior, Michael 143 

Klattner, Mary 59 

Klein, John 86 

Klein, Kenneth 134, 290 

Klenda. Martin 70 

Klest, Martin 88 

Klinckmann, Dr. Evelyn 208 

Kline, William 42, 93 

Klinger, Barbara 40, 98, 102, 255, 290 

Klopack, Geraldine 90, 290 

Klose, Dr. Gilbert C. 219 

Kneer, Margaret 90, 91 

Knight, Eugene 189 

Knowles, Brvice M. 76, 77, 290 

Kocher, Kathrvn 40, 57, 291 

Koehler, Gerald 169 

Koestner, Mary F. 291, 320 

Kohn, Louis A. 184 

Kohnke, Judith 35, 58, 59, 117, 134, 235 

Kollintzas, George N. 22, 32, 34, 186, 187 

Koprowski, Elaine 64, 103, 211 

Kom, Ralph A. .52, 53, 291 

Komack, Ronald 70 

Kosloskus, Judith 40 

Koster, Paul J. 291 

Kostiwa, Dale K. 290 

Kotek, Daniel 80, 81 

Kott, Daniel 72, 73 

Kownacki, Ralph 112 

Kozak, Monica 11, 63, 66, 67, 117, 323 

Kozakiewicz, Dr. Jerry 233 

Koziol, Mr. and Mrs. Chester 192 

Koziol, Eugene 149 

Kozlowski, Jerilvn 111 

Kraft, William 52 

Kramer, Mrs. .\ora 276 

Krol, Dr. Arthur J. 225 

Kroner, John 41 

Kropp, Richard 88 

Krozel, Loretta 46, 125, 138, 290, 320 

Kruzel, Judith 15, 91, 117 

Kryszak, Edward C. 291 

Kubistal, Patricia 103 

Kucenas, John K. 291 

Kuhinka, Julius 205 

Kuhl, Eugene 73 

Kuhn, John D. 290 

Kulas, James 205 

Kuna, Carol A. 66, 67, 290 

Kunzer, James 125 

Kurpiel, Antoinette 90. 290 

Kusek, Richard F. 218 

Kut, Leonard 72, 73 

Kuta, Virginia 204 

Kuttner, Theodore 41, 71 

Kutza, Michael 89 

Kwan, Wanda Maria 131, 290 

Labich, Richard 34, 74, 75, 291 

Laczynski, John S. 291 

Lagershausen, Arlene Jensen 291 

Lamey, William L. 235, 239 

Lane, Robert 43, 99, 101, 105 

Lane, Sharon 8, 320 

Lang, Joseph 63 

Lang, Lorraine 15, 148, 149, 198, 199 

Laos, Walter 93 

Lapa, Donald 47 

La Peaux, James 88 

La Plante. Lucille 117 

La Plante, Peggy J. 291 

Lamey, Dorothy 196 

Laskowski, Mary 58, 59 

Laube, Valerie 207 

Laurie, James 76, 77 

Lauter, Alan 55 

Lavelle, Thomas 88, 129, 147 

Lawler, Robert 232 

Lawler, Dr. Paul E. 318 

Leabeater, Mary E. 292 

Leaner, Micki 25 

Le Blanc, Alfred 292 



341 



PHOTOGRAPHY INDEX 



Le Blanc. Mariette 102, 186, 187 
Lechowski, Robert I. 292 
Lellenberg, Norman 45, 82 
Le Mire, John 72, 73 
Lenart, Anthony J. 293 
Le Saint, Rev. William P., S.J. 213 
Lescher, Theodore C. 293 
Lesko, Leonard 215 
Lesko, Rhoda 16, 155 
Leslie, Edward L. 292 
Levitt, Monte 42, 145 
Lewis, Frank J. 183 
Leydet, Ernest 44, 261 
Liaugminas, Dr. Albin 207 
Licata, Tony 165 
Lichota, Walter 143, 292 
Liebl, Cecile 40, 57 
Liebman, Morris I. 184 
Lietz. Dr. Paul S. 202, 206 
Lim, Dr. Edward 204 
Lindsey, Fred 172 
Linton, Douglas D. 292 
Lis, Virginia 131, 292 
Liston, Robert 43 
Lo Brillo, Marilyn 117 
Loess, Mary Kay 66 
Lofendo, Peter 232 
LoguUo, Richard P. 293 
Loll. Robert A. 293 
Lombardi, Matthew 231 
Longe, James 47 
Lorenzini, Ronald X. 292 
Louden, Virginia 57 
Loughran, Audley E. 292 
Love, James 325 
Lowrey, John 50, 51 
Lucas, Richard 62, 110, 123 
Lucas, Mary 65 
Lucatorto, Dr. Frank M. 226 
Lucchetti, Terri 64, 65 
Lundborg, Roger 140 
Luschek, Mary Jo 117 
Lutynski, Adam 37 
Luzbetak, Stephen B. 89 
Luzwick, Edward J. 292 
Lynch, E. J. 47 
Lynch, John E. 292 
Lynch, Miles 244 
McAuliffe, Joyce 21, 116, 294 
McAuliffe, Marybeth 91, 116 
.McCabe, Joan 58 
McCaffrey, John L. 183 
McCaffrey, Joline 46, 320 
McCall, Frank J. 42, 294 
McCann, Elizabeth A. 29, 181, 188 
McCann, Ellen 8, 57, 327 
McCarter, Gerry 56, 254 
McCarthy, Carter W. 295 
McCarthy, Charles 70 
McCarthy, Laurence 295 

McCarthy, Maurice 34, 36, 50, 51, 98, 129 
McCarthy, Mr, and Mrs. Maurice 192 
McCarthy, Michael T. 295 
McCarthy, Nancy J. 66, 67, 295 
McCauley, Robert 26 
McCleao', Rev. Dumas L.. C.S.V. 218 
McCloskey, Harry L. 181, 186, 187 
McCluggage, Dr. Robert 206 
McConnell, .Michael D. 88, 346 
McCormick, John V. 239 
McCoy, Dr. Charles 204 

McCrorey, Lt. Col. James L. 112, 202, 207 
McCullough, Joseph V. 53, 218 
McDermott, Margaret 251 
.McDonald. Elizabeth 296 
.McDonald, Glenda 16, 46 
.McDonald, John 144 
.McDonald, Linda 329 
.McDonnell, John J. 296 
.McEvoy, Rev. John A., S.J. 180 
.McFadyen, John 137, 139, 296 
.McGoorty, John P. 184 
.McGraith, Barry 77 
McGrath, James 62. 123 
.McGrath, Michael P. 296 
McGrogan, James P. 297 
McGugan, Ruth 205 
-McHugh, John J. 141 
.McHugh, Paul V. 297 
McKay, Daniel C. 43, 68, 100. 297 
.McKenna, John 53 
.\lcKenna. William 72 
.McKenzie, Donald W. 43, 297 
.McKenzie, Rev. John L., S.J., 21 
McLean. Daniel 136. 296 
.McLean, Donald 63 
.McMahon, John 113 
.McMahon, Maureen 16 
.McManama, Alfred 42, 93, 96, 100, 105, 
143. 231. 296 



McManamon, Rev. Patrick S.J. 215 

McNally, Joseph H. 297 

McNeive. Kathleen M. 297 

McNicholl, Rev. Ambrose J., O.P. 20 

McNichols, Frank 123, 296 

McNulty. Eileen 327 

McPartlin. Mary Lou 263 

McRae. Marilee A. 296 

McSween. James M. 172. 296 

McWalter, George M. 296 

McWeeny, Patrick 38. 39. 63 

Mac Andrews, Margaret 57 

Macias, Frank 93 

Madden. Roland 165 

Madden. William M. 141 

Madigan. Daniel M. 293 

Madonnia. Joseph 143 

Magee. Rev. William M,. S.J. 208 

Magon. Dr. John 229 

Maguire. Very Rev. James F., S.J. 20, 28 

29, 178, 180. 181. 236, 318, 323, 327 
Maher, Rev. Edward F., S.J. 211 
Mahoney. Donal F. 293 
Maier, Rudolph 71 
Malec, Michael 86 
Malecki, Dr. Henry 205 
Malecki. Isabella S. 293 
Malek. Joseph A. 293 
Malin. Ellen 117. 138 
Malloy. Rev. John C. S.J. 97. 188 
.Malone. Margaret 56 
.Maniatis. James N. 79, 294 
Maniocha, Patricia D. 294 
.Manning, David 77 
Mansfield, Nina 66 
Manzke, Mary R. 188 
.Maranto, Paul 142, 295 
Marchi, Peter 62, 136 
Marcus, David 42, 55 
Mariella, Antonietta 138, 295 
Mariella, Dr. Raymond P. 202, 204 
Marinello, Leon D. 295 
Marini, Marlene 295 
Markiewicz, Joseph J. 294 
Marlin, Robert 34, 76, 77, 98, 294 
Mama, Jeanette 306, 326 
Marquette, John 118 
Marquis, Katherine 40 
Marquis, Mary Jane 252 
Marrin, Katherine 128 
Marshall, John 52. 137 
Martens. George H. 295 
Martin. Leila 120. 121 
Martin. Rev. Leo J.. S.J. 208 
Martin. Marion J. 295 
Martin, Mary 117, 125 
Martin, Maureen 15, 56 
Martin, Philip K. 191, 295 
Martire, Anthony J. 295 
Massaglia, M/Sgt. Fred 207 
Mastro. Anthony 62. 123 
Materer. Timothy 122 
Matousek. Dr. George 224, 227, 233 
Matousek, James 11, 62 
Matre, Richard A. 45, 181, 220 
Mattern, Carolyn 66, 67 
Matulis, Joseph 123 
Matz, Gregory 144 
Maurice, S. Joseph 294 
May, George 72, 73 
May, Robert S. 294 
Mayo, Samuel 205 
Mazza, Joseph 72, 73 
Meade, Mary 138, 297 
Meccia, Donald L. 41, 99, 103, 297 
Medl, Caroline 56, 252 
Meersman, John F. 297 
Meger, Robert D. J. 115, 297 
Meier, Dr. Robert A. 217, 218 
.Meirink, Thomas 72 
Melchiors, Dr. John M. 209 
Melka, Richard F. 298 
Melowitz, Vicki 133, 199 
Mencz, Dr. Joseph F. 203, 209 
Merrill. William 88 
Mertz. Rev. James J.. S.J. 204 
Metz. Patricia 35. 56. 57, 175 
Meucci, James A. 298 
Meyer. Albert Cardinal 20 
Meyer, John 79 
Meyer, Robert 196_ 
Meyer, William 205 
.Vlichiels, Joseph A. 298 
Miezio, Donald 70 
.Milani. Duly P. 298 
Milani. Frank 123 
Millard. Thomas 33. 89. 104. 107. 120. 134. 

135. 137. 316. 246 
Miller. Ellen 25, 33. 104. 107. 132. 134, 

199. 317 



Miller. John 206 

Miller, Laurence W. 299 

Minaudo. Andrew 299 

Mini. James 154. 156 

Minor. L. M. 169 

MioUis. Philip J. 298 

Mirek. Roberta 91 

Misiewicz. Robert 93 

Misulonas. Joseph 70. 71 

Mogilnitsky. Dr. Theodosi A. 217. 219 

Molander. Leonard 74 

MoUahan. Elizabeth 205 

Monaco. Rev. Marcellus 211 

Monahan. Dennis 327 

Monco. Catherine 57. 102. 298 

Monge. Kathleen 15, 131 

Montague, Rev. Michael J., S.J. 212 

Montgomery, Edward 41 

Montville, Rev. Edmund, S.J. 173 

Moore, Audrey 116, 320 

Moore, Dr. Carl 204 

Moore. Terrence 8 

Moorhead. Denise 91 

Moorhead, Joseph 76 

Moorhead. William 131. 298 

Moran, J. Alfred 184 

Moran. Barbara V. 298 

Moran. James L. 93. 299 

Moran. John 37. 98. 299 

Moran. Matthew 38. 39. 97. 123. 298. 322 

Morawey. Michael 87 

Morelli, Philip 71 

Moreno. James T. 298 

Moreth. Joyce 58 

Moriarty. Terrence J. 79, 298 

Morin. Edward 205 

Moromisato, Clifton Y. 298 

Morris. WUliam C. 211 

Morton. Norman 119. 120 

Moses. Gerald 140, 193 

Moss, John S. 299 

Mothenvay, Nicholas 62, 97, 104, 107, 110, 

123, 134 
Motto, George 148 
Motto, Joseph 47 
Moustakis, John 76, 77 
Mulcahey, James T. 299 
Mulcahy. Jerome 142 
Mulcahy, Thomas J. 299 
Mulcrone, John 50, 142 
Mulhern, Rev. Edward, S.J. 215 
Mulkem. Teri 119. 120 
Mullen. James 71 
Mullenbock. Robert 50 
Mulligan. Rev. Robert W.. S.J. 20. 106. 173, 

179, 180, 181, 208 
.Mullin, Rev. John E., S.J. 211 
Mulvihill, Patricia 40 
Mundt, Robert 51 
Mundy, Dr. Paul 210 
Murans, Dr. Francis 219 
Murphy. Charles F. 183 
Murphv. Geraldine 58 
Murphy. Harold 87. 205 
Murphy. Patrick 51 
Murphy. Richard 148 
Murphy. Rev. Roland. O. Carm. 21 
Murphy. Thomas 74. 75 
Murray. Edward R. 89, 317 
Murray, James 37 
Murray, Robert 113 

Murray, Rev. Thomas F., S.J. 190, 211 
Muskus, Mary 56 
Muszynski. Ursulla 323 
Nagle. Richard 246 
Napoli. Thomas 300 
Nassos. Tassos 248 
Nead. Karen 56 
Nehls. Erick 300 
Neira. Edward 70 
Nelson. Eugene 14. 26. 97. 147 
Nelson. Gerald 173 
Nelson. Ralph C. 208 
Neuser. Julia 46. 320 
Newstead. Robert 246 
Niarchos. Dr. George J. 219 
Nichele. John B. 99. 301 
Nichols. Gerald 142 
Nicholson. John 11. 26, 32, 38, 39, 62, 63, 

322 
Nickolich, Eva 66, 67, 125, 301 
Niekraszewicz, Helena L. 301 
Nico, William 199 
Nicolay, Dr. Robert C. 140, 210 
Nierenberg, Dr. Ronald 229 
.\ishimura. Karl 42, 61, 99, 145, 301 
Nolan, Robert 93 
Nolan, Thomas P. 300 
Noonan, Eugene 43 
Noonan, Rev. John P., S.J. 208 



342 



PHOTOGRAPHY INDEX 



Noreika, Dalia M. 300 

Norville. Martin 156, 157 

Notari, Terrv E. 62, 63, 301 

Nolo. Paul P. T. 301 

Novelle, Joseph J. 301 

Nowak, Bernadine 66, 301 

Nowak, Eugene 97, 100, 142 

Nowlan, James 242 

Nowlan, Dr. Kenneth 226, 228 

Nurnhercer. Rev, Lothar L., S.J. 208 

Nuti, Albert 47 

Nutile, Richard A. 300 

Oberland. Elaine 320 

O'Bosky. Frank 93 

O'Brien, Arlene 40 

O'Brien, Gerald 142. 300 

O'Brien. Matthew 125 

O'Brien. Rev. Michael J., C.S.V. 210 

O'Brien. Nora 133, 193 

O'Brochta, Darlene 323 

O'Bvrne, Margaret Crossen 259 

O'Carroll. Shelia 66, 67, 116, 131 

Ochal, Thomas 142 I 

Ochota, Jerome 137 | 

O'Connor, Eileen 90, 116 

O'Connor, Joseph S. 300 

O'Connor, Robert 25 

O'Connor, Thomas J. 156. 157, 300 

O'Connor, William T. 346 

O'Donnell, Frederick 137 

O'Donnell, Martin T. 112, 301 

O'Donoghue, Cathleen 259 

O'Dwver, Dr. Margaret M. 127, 206 

O'Hanley, Rosalie 119. 120 

O'Hara, Barrett 138 

O'Haver, Edward 125 

Ohlhabber, Ronald 88 

Ojha, Dr. Gokul 228 

Okada, Floyd 71 

O'Keefe. John F. 76, 101, 183 

O'Laughlin, Mary Alice 259 

Oldenburg, Richard 74 

Olech, Francene 196 

Olen, Ronald 61 

Olson, Earl 82, 83 

O'Malley, James 73 

O'Mallev. John D. 218 

O'Mallev, Dr. John 226 

O'Mara. Arthur 205 

G'Neil, Shelia 138 

O'Neill, David 62, 63, 110, 123 

O'Neill, Joseph 52 

O'Neill, Mary 251 

O'Neill, Timothy 173 

O'Neill, ■William 63, 123 

Opara, Patrick 127 

Opilka, Henry J. 301 

O'Reilly, Mrs. Jean 40 

O'Reilly, John 126 

O'Rourke, Virginia 45 

Orth. Michael 70 

Osadjan, Charles 301 

Oskamp, Alfred S. 219 

O'Toole, James S. 301 

Owen. Stuart D. 236 

Pacer, Mrs, Joan 233 

Pacer, Judith 116 

Pach, Alfreda 56 

Page, William 68 

Paison, Thomas 42 

Pajak. Edward 133 

Pales, William 85 

Palicki, Ralph 193 

Palincsar, Dr. Edward 204 

Pallasch, Mr, and Mrs. Bernard 192 

Panoczo. Martina 327 

Papish, Charles 63, 123, 142 

Pardi, James J. 302 

Parelli, Patrick 161 

Parker, Janet 329 

Parker. .Mr. and Mrs. Walter 192 

Parks. Lawrence 136 

Paster, John F., Jr. 302 

Patric. Dr. Gordon M. 209 

Patrick. Peter 8 

Paulsen, Ronald 88 

Pawlowski, Dr. Bernard 228 

Payne, John 52 

Peach, Dixie 40 

Pedace. Frank 41. 320 

Peery. Wilk B. 302 

Peet, Kathleen 64 

Perell, James 38, 39, 63 

Perrv, Stephen 63, 112 

Perticara. Robert 172 

Peterka, Gerald J. 303 

Peters, John W, 303 

Peters, Thomas K. 303 

Peters. Rev. Walter P., S.J. 202, 204 

Peterson, James G. 142, 303 



Peterson, Virgil W. 318 

Peterson. Dr. Walter H. 218 

Petrip, Richard SO 

Petrone. Theresa 2.51 

Pfeifer, Ruth Ann 191 

Phenicie, James S. 302 

Philipp, Francis 136, 302 

Phillips, Glenn 198, 199 

Phillips, Dr. Theodore G. 209 

Picchiotti, Robert 72, 73 

Picken, John 70 

Picucci, Loretta 12.5 

Pierce, Mr. and Mrs. Gerald 192 

Pierce. Patrick 162 

Piety, Paul 68 

Pikrone, Mary Ann 117 

Pindok. Marie 111 

Pintozzi, Charles E. 303 

Piraino, Rose 15, 91, 117 

Piszkiewicz, Leonard 111 

Plotz, John 97, 103, 110 

Podraza, Patricia A. 58 

Poduska, Mary 57 

Polcyn, Robert E. 303 

Polk. Conrad 137 

Polowski, Rev. Richard, S.J. 215 

Pomvkacz, James 38, 39, 110, 302 

Poole, William 136 

Posvic, Dr. Harry 204 

Potocki, Kenneth 88, 139 

Potter, Dr. Helen C. 219 

Potuznik, James 86, 193 

Powell, William 86 

Powers, John E. 302 

Prapouienis, Aldona 226 

Prendergast, Rev. Joseph F., S.J. 204 

Printen, Kenneth 41, 146 

Priori, Ronald 38, 39 

Prochrasta, Betty J. 116 

Proulx, Dr. Ernest 205 

Pruitt, Mrs. 226 

Przybyl, Ronald 52 

Ptacek, Charles 34, 52, 53, 96. 302 

Ptaszek, Edward 112 

Puc, Frank 242 

Putnam. Pamela 117, 320 

Quiglev, John M, 302 

Quillinan, Patti Jo 303 

Quinn, Lenore 22, 117 

Quinn, Peter 82, 83 

Quinn, Rev. Philip, S.J. 215 

Radd, Richard P. 303 

Raftery, Mary 44 

Ragauskas, Leonidas J. 303 

Randall. Dr. Walter 245 

Raniere, Robert A. 142, 303 

Rapagnani. Joseph A. 304 

Rapp, Dr. Gustav W. 224, 226 

Rasch, Ed 173 

Rascher, James 72, 73 

Ratunno, Richard 142 

Rauen, Rita 57, 254 

Rawson, Robert 245 

Rav, Gerald 88 

Ray, Louis S. 84. 85, 304 

Reardon, James 161 

Reardon, Dr. John 206 

Red. Clarence 156, 158, 159 

Reed. Dr. John 204 

Reese, Joan 58 

Reeve. Dr. Charles 228, 229 

Reilly, James 8 

Reisel. Dr. Robert B. 137, 206 

Reitenbach, Charles A. 136, 304 

Reiter, Anne 8, 117, 320, 323 

Rempala, Marianne 121 

Restagno, Jeanette A. 304 

Restarski. Dr. Thaddeus 229 

Reynolds, Bryan P. 305 

Reynolds, Frank 43 

Reynolds, Thomas A. 112, 184 

Rezler, Dr. Julius 2.56 

Rigaux, Armand J. 305 

Rilev, Rachel 46, 91, 320 

Rimoldi, Dr. Horacio J. 210 

Ring, Jeremiah J. 76, 126, 304 

Rintz, Lorraine 117 

Ritter, Donald 52, 142 

Roberts, Leo 242 

Robinson, Martha 304 

Rohison. Kenneth 145 

Roch, Richard 86, 87 

Roche, John Pierre 183 

Rodeck, Joyce 304 

Rodman, Rev. Hugh B., S.J. 181, 201 

Roe, Taft W. 89. 304 

Roeder, Donald E. 305 

Roehrich, Ann .58 

Rogalski, Carol 59, 193 

Rogan, Richard 88 



Roll, Rev. J. Donald. S.J. 139, 203, 209 
Roman (Rzymski). Joanne F. 118, 119, 120, 

305 
Romanaggi, Donald 304 
Romano, Rocco 88 
Ross, Harold T. 103 
Rossini. Dr. Fredrick D. 28 
Roszkowski, Adele 116, 320, 323 
Rota, James 42, 61 
Rotunno, Richard 123 
Roubik, Charles J. 184 
Rouse, William 172 
Rowden. Robert M. 304 
Rubel, 'Thomas 136 
Rupany, Jean 140 
Russell, Marilyn 138 
Russell. Dr. Thomas 227. 230 
Russo. Joseph 123 

Rust, Rev. Charies H., S.J. 202, 206 
Rutecki. Aurelia 59. 133 
Ryan. Daniel 125 
Ryan. James 136 
Ryan, Judith 40, 57 
Ryan, Martin 147 
Ryan, Michael 76 
Ryne, George 76 
Saletta, Christine 191 
Saletta, John 144 
Salvador, Dr. Graciano 207 
Salvaggio, Sally S. 304 
Samander, Albert J, 304 
Sanders, Daniel D. 305 
Sanderson, Capt. John 207 
Sandner, James 52 
San Felippo, Cecilia 138 
San Hamel, Quintin 74, 75 
Santangelo, Dr. Mario 228 
Sanzenbacher, Karl E. 149. 305 
Sauer. Pamela 10 
Savage. William 37 
Scafidi. Anthony HI 
Scala. Al R. 305 
Scanlon. Patrick 41. 73 
Schaab, Kittv 320 
Schaefer. Dr. Halmuth 210 
Schaeffer. John 110. 142 
Schell. Lillian A. 305 
Scheller. Arthur M. 235 
Schildknecht. Joan 59. 116 

Schildmever. Sr. M. Elizabeth Ann. O.S.F. 306 
Schmelter, Jacki 323 
Schmidt, Donald 162 
Schmidt, Erwin 50, 51 
Schmidt, Very Rev. William J., S.J. 263 
Schmitt, Irving 136 
Schmitt, William 63, 110 
Schmitz, Dr. Herbert E. 183 
Schmuttenmaer, Cecilia M. 131. 306 
Schneider. Timothy 61. 143 
Schneider. Thomas 231 
Schoeben. Susan 196 
Schoen. Alan 74. 75 
Schoen. Jeremiah E. 307 
Schoen. Dr. Philip 232 
Schoen, Dr. William P. 181, 222 
Schoenbaum, Matthew H. 181, 258, 259 
Schoenberger, Paul R. 307 
Schoenheider, Dr. William 228 
Schreiber, Rev. Edmund 211 
Schude. Donald H. 307 
Schultz, Sr. M. Paul, C.R. 306 
Schultz. William A. 88, 306 
Schuth, Richard E. 307 
Schutt, Charles 41, 72 
Schwarzenberg, Dr. Francis 209 
Schwengler, Margaret 40 
Schwind. Carol 91 
Schwingen. Ronald 1.56 
Scodro. Robert A. 307 
Sczatkiewicz. Richard 50 
Seelman. Robert C. 307 
Segal. Melvyn 10 
Seidel. Herbert E. 307 
Selfridge. Dr. Frederick M. 241. 242 
Senica. William 47 
Serritella. .Michael 26. 97_^ 
Sesselmann. Ernest J. 307 
Severtsen. Frances 306 
Shafer. Everett E. 79. 306 
Shanahan. Dr. Richard 228 
Shanahan. Sheila 14. 15. 22, 23 
Shanewise, Robert 50 
Shannon, Ann 117 
Shannon, Daniel C. 306 
Shay William 152. 156 
Sheehan. Dr. John F. 181, 240 
Sheehan, Timothy 76 

Shelangouski, Bro. Boy J., CS.V. 172. 306 
Shemetulskis. Richard 12.5 



343 



PHOTOGRAPHY INDEX 



Sheriff. J. Raymond 181, 126 

Shiister, Dr. GeorRe N. 20 

Siblik, Joseph SO, 137 

Sicher, Dr. Harry 224, 226 

Sieher Rev. Sylvester A., S.V.D. 210 

Sieser, William 86, 87 

Sigborn, Eleanor 122 

Sikora, James 139 

Silich, Robert 86, 131 

Silla, Anthony J. 307 

Siivagni, Catherine 320, 323 

Simmons, Mary Ellen 40 

Simon, Sharon 252 

Simone, Joseph V. 307 

Simunek, Dorothy 117, 131, 138 

Sinek, William J. 183 

Singler, Robert 80, 137 

Skriba, Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph 192 

Slaichert, Lawrence J. 189 

Slaski, Roxane D. 14, 90, 91, 129, 307 

Slattery, Helen 117 

Slattery, Nancy 46 

Slingsbv, Helen F. 307 

Sloan, Mrs. Mary 251 

Slominski, Rev. George A. 211 

Slovick. Ronald A. 308 

Slowikowski, Norbert 51, 97, 166, 167, 308 

Small, Rev. Joseph F.. S.J. 209 

Smallev, Dr. Orange A. 217, 219 

Smith, Bernard J. 308 

Smith, Bonita M. 131, 308 

Smith, J. David 187, 219 

Smith. James (dent) 42, 79 

Smith. James (comm! 76 

Smith, John F., Jr. 183 

Smith, Kay 197 

Smith, Sr. M. Stephen Ann, O.S.F. 309 

Smith, Patrick 74, 75, 309 

Smith, Rita M. 309 

Smith, Sandra 320 

Smolinski, Leona 251 

Smoluch, Walter 68 

Smrha, Lillian 117 

Smulson, Dr. Marshall 42, 55, 227 

Snodgrass, Bro. Ralph. C.S.V. 172 

Snvker. Kenneth 47 

Sobol. Alice 35, 64, 65 

Sobol, Frank 50, 136 

Sokol, John C. 309 

Solzak, Bonita 10, 90 

Sopka, Leonard 125 

Sorensen, Kenneth 161 

Sorenson, Dr. Viggo B. 225 

Sparrow, Calvin 68 

Specht, Frederick W. 183 

Sperka, Jeanette 66, 67, 102, 308 

Spero, Robert L. 136, 308 

Spina, Ronald 142 

Spirek, Dennis 162 

Spiroff, Dr. Boris 204 

Sprengel, Donald P. 26, 80, 128, 193, 309 

Spychalski, Robert 119, 309 

Stach, Adam P. 218 

Staffileno. Dr. Harry 229 

Stalzer. Richard C. 99. 308 

Stanis. Raymond R. 308 

Stanner. Lawrence T. 308 

Stare, Peter 88 

Starzyk, Russel 111 

Stasiak, Violet 40 

Stasulaitis, Stella 59 

Staunton, Kathleen 125 

Stauss, Anna Marie 90, 116 

Stavely, Richard 162, 164 

Stebler, William J. 183 

Steckbeck, Robert 308 

Stegman, Clement 110 

Steinle. Clifford J. 309 

Stewart. Kathleen 16. 149, 198, 199 

Stiff, Virginia 15, 40, 57, 98, 102, 105, 

254, 309 
Stinneford, Paul 68. 69 
Stinson, Donald J. 103, 203, 211 
Stolarz, Mary 193 
Stone, Thomas L. 309 
Stoudl, Helene 191 
Stratman, Rev. Carl. C.S.V. 205 
Strenk. John A. 309 
Strong, William 125 
Strub, Dr. Irvin 242 
Stumpf, Thomas 112 
Stupar, Donna 244 
Styles, Robert B. 33, 88, 89, 120, 135, 137, 

316, 317 
Suder, Dennis C. 165, 310 
Sudinsky, Theodore 231 
Suges, Donald S. 310 
Suida, Donna 91, 323 
Sullivan, Bolton 183 
Sullivan, Mr. and Mrs. Dennis 192 



Sullivan, Francis C. 235 

Sullivan, John 63, 110, 112, 172 

Sullivan, Michael F. 62. 110. 310 

Sullivan. Hon Philip L. 183 

Sullivan. Thomas M. 310 

Sullivan. William G. 73, 311 

Surges, Lloyd W. 311 

Surtz, Rev. Edward, S.J. 205 

Svaglic, Dr. Martin 205 

Svetich, Dawn 116, 125 

Swanfield, Peter 156 

Swanish. Dr. Peter T. 217. 218 

Sweetnam. George B. 311 

Swick, Gerard 122 

Swieton, Nancy 57 

Swinehart. David 88. 112, 133, 316 

Swinehart, Jule 15, 16, 116, 155 

Swiss, Bro. Hilary. O.S.M. 311 

Symanski, Andrew 76 

Sztemal. Martha M. 310 

Szostecki, Christine 59 

Szwed, James 89 

Takahashi, George Y. 61. 310 

Talamonti. James 52 

Talkin. Rev. Ralph. S.J. 215 

Tamburrino. Mary (Terry) 91. 320 

Tannyhill, Richard 231 

Tansey, William 71, 96 

Tarloski, Irene 320 

Tamawski, William 72 

Tarsitano, Gerald 231 

Tatooles, Dino 41 

Tavares, Charles 42 

Taylor, Joseph H. 310 

Tengblad. Joan 40, 56, 77, 117, 254 

Tevenan, John 53 

Thaliath, Sister Fidelis 281 

Thiry, Joan 64, 65, 329 

Thompson, Charles E. 310 

Tiemey, Margaret 252 

Tietsen, Robert H. 311 

Tijan, Arlene 323 

Timperman. Albert 70, 248 

Tischler. Rev. Richard E., S.J. 180, 181, 200 

Todd. William R. 79. 311 

Tomaszewski. Josephine 11, 58, 59, 116 

Toole, John 16 

Toporek, Sister M. Lvdia, C.S.F.N. 292 

Toto. Dr. Patrick D. 225, 228 

Towne. William 76 

Tracy, Rev. Theodore J., S.J. 180, 202, 204 

Traisman, Dr. Robert N. 210 

Trellis, Alice 117 

Trevener, Phillip A. 311 

Trimble, Dr. William 206 

Tripp, Geraldine A. 66, 311 

Trocker, Monica 40, 56, 57, 175 

Troves, Daniel 87 

Troy, Rev. Leander, O. Carm. 211 

Trummer, Peter 162, 164 

Tufo, Henry 26, 36, 76, 77, 97 

Tumosa. Mrs. Stase 233 

Twomey. Marcella A. 210 

Tyler. Thomas 47, 77, 173 

Udziela, Walter 172 

Ulmer, Richard 146 

Urbanowski, Martha L. 259 

Vaccaro, Joan 22, 104, 117, 187, 326 

Vacco, Aldo J. 310 

Vagnozzi, Archbishop Egidio 20 

Vahrenhold, Kenneth 88 

Valenti, Dr. Jasper J. 124, 205 

Van Bramer, Douglas 205 

Vanderloop, Rev. Anthony, O.S.M. 125 

Vanderplow, Robert 310 

Van Doren, Mark 21, 130 

Van Putten, Ronald J. 310 

Van Rvan, George 37, 87, 97. 128 

Vaughan. Rev. Francis. S.J. 143, 223 

Vawter. Rev. Bruce. CM. 21 

Veith, Harvey 79, 231 

Vertuno, Leonard 162. 163 

Verwey. Gerald 154, 156 

Vitullo, Vincent F. 141 

Vlazny, Dr. Adalbert 233 

Vogt, Thomas 74, 75 

Volini, Camillo 220 

Voltolina, Gene 80, 173 

Vonckx, Lawrence G. 87, 310 

Von Lupin, Dr. Friedrick 20 

Wadle. Ronald 74, 75 

Wagner. M/Sgt. Melvin 207 

Wagner. Peter 74, 75, 98, 101, 311 

Wagner. Rita M. 66 

Waldron. John J. 184 

Waldron, Thomas 116, 119, 120 

Walent, Stanley A. 311 

Waljeski, Sandra 117, 138, 320 

Walker. Dr. Franklin 206 

Wall, Francis P. 42, 93, 311 



Wall, John C. 311 

Wall, Robert 38, 39, 52 

Wallin, Mrs. Janet L. 43, 312 

Wallczek. Michael 136 

Wallseck, John M. 312 

Walsh, Edward 322 

Walsh, James 99 

Walsh. Robert 41 

Walshe. Myles 72. 73 

Wandel. Joseph 207 

Ward. Anthony 26, 107, 132, 316 

Ward, John 45, 82, 83, 97 

Watkins, Beverly A. 312 

Watkowski, Edwin B. 142, 312 

Wehrle, George 88 

Weide. Sylvia F. 313 

Weigel. Rev. Gustav, S.J. 20 

Weiland. Jerome 152. 166. 168, 169 

Weisbord, Maxfield 192 

Weisbrod, Charles 204 

Wellbank, Dr. Harry 205 

Wellington, Dr. John 205 

Welninski, Walter 74 

Wentz, Dr. Frank M. 225 

Wentz, George 81, 112 

Werner, William 142 

Wessel. Warren 147 

White. Bud 230 

White. D. Jerome 99, 105, 107, 132, 313 

White, Henry 167, 168, 169 

White, Ronald 62 

Whitney, Noel E. 136, 313 

Whitten, Teresa 138 

Widen, Dr. Bernard 228 

Wiedlin, Marguerite 133, 316, 327 

Wiersma, Theodore L. 313 

Wilderman, Dr. Malbem 229 

Wilhelmi, Dion 205 

Will, Marv Ann 35, 56, 57, 102, 312 

Will, Theodore J. 312 

Williams, Cheryl 125 

Williams, Mrs. Nanette 46, 282, 320 

Wills, Emily 57 

Willson, David J. 86, 87, 312 

Wilson. Beverly 16. 117 

Will. Dr. James 204 

Winter. Gil 61 

Wisczynski. Walter 50. 51 

Wiseniewski. Henry 80, 110, 123 

Witek, Richard J. 313 

Wnuk, Joseph J. 313 

Wojcik, Joseph T. 137, 313 

Wolfe, Mary Jo 191, 223 

Wolff, Dr. Joseph 199, 205 

Wondrasek, Arthur 38, 39 

Wood, J. Howard 236 

Wood, Wilma B. 312 

Wormser, Rev. George V. 211 

Wozniak, Dr. John M. 202, 205 

Wymer. George 77 

Wyroski, Thaddeus S. 312 

Wyszynski, Stanley 74 

Yort, Thomas 191 

Y'oung, Ann 117 

Young, Joseph D. 312 

Young, Joseph G. 312 

Youtsey, Karl 81 

Yurkanin, Joseph 72 

Zabiaka, Eleanor 252 

Zabkar, Rev. Louis 206 

Zablotny, Dolores 66, 67, 110 

Zaffer, Leon 142 

Zaharski, Joan D. 57. 313 

Zahn. Dr. Gordon C. 210 

Zaiaczkowski. Joseph 313 

Zajdel, Dr. Joseph 206 

Zana, Judv Lauren 253 

Zaranka. Pauline 8, 46, 126, 138, 320 

Zaug, Rita J. 313 

Zaum, Helene 131 

Zbylut, Donald 328 

Zbylut, Vernon 45, 82, 83 

Zeeman, Sarah H. 250, 251 

Zeitz, John 47, 139 

Zeman. Gregory 312 

Zembron, Richard. 44 

Zenk. Honore K. 141 

Zieglschmid, Jose 242 

Zielinski. Marion W. 312 

Zigghetti, Virginia 117 

Zimmerman. Nancy A. 56, 57, -312 

Zimmerman, Patricia 320 

Zipse, Kismet (Zip) 325 

Zirbel, Grace H. 313 

Zittnan, Virginia 15, 35, 66, 67, 102, 117 

Zvetink, John A. 217. 218, 235 
Zvetina, John P. 313 
Zydell, Martin V. 313 
Zylinski, Dr. Eugene 228 



344 



EDITOR'S PAGE 



The yearbook is finished; now the editor can sit 
back and review the past year leisurely. In the rush of 
work to produce the book on time (a rare accomplish- 
ment), the editor is quite apt to think of his staff as paid 
workers who are willing to give up their time to work on 
the book. Give up their time the staff did, but unfortun- 
ately they were not paid for their services. Their pay, 
I am afraid, will have to be their satisfaction at seeing 
the finished product of their efforts-the 1960 LOYOLAN. 
To all of them I owe my deepest appreciation. 

The Lake Shore Campus details of the yearbook 
were handled by Tom Millard, who helped in virtually 
every area of the book— copy, scheduling, photography, 
etc. Tom certainly is the staff member most responsible 
for the book's being published on schedule. 

The graduates' section of the book was headed by 
Kay Dwyer. The job is really monumental, and Kay 
worked almost singlehandedly to complete it on time. 
Not the least important of her contributions was her 
cheerful personality, which managed to make a lot of 
hard work quite enjoyable. 

Dick Cegielski did the scheduling of all the pictures. 
One of the main reasons for the book's being published 
on schedule was Dick's efforts in asking, persuading, 
hounding, and bullying the various organizations, student 
and faculty, into meeting for the LOYOLAN photogra- 
pher. 

The copy was written and edited by Bob Styles and 
Judy Kohnke. Bob and Judy worked wonderfully, at op- 
posite campuses, to secure and write copy on quite a few 
rather obscure organizations. 

The business end of a yearbook is, to a great extent, 
a behind-the-scenes operation, though its importance 
to an expensive project like the LOYOLAN is apparent. 
Nick Motherway, as business manager, never saw his 
work become tangible in pictures or in copy, but had 



the satisfaction of seeing the LOYOLAN bought by many 
students. 

In addition to the main bulk of the staff were a 
group of students, largely anonymous, who handled 
specialized, temporary, or miscellaneous jobs. By offer- 
ing to help out whenever help was needed, they took a 
great burden from the shoulders of the editors. Mention 
must be made in particular of three such people. The 
first, Mary Lee Cullen, compiled the entire photography 
index, an innovation for LOYOLANs. Phil Augustine 
gave to the yearbook the most literary copy it has had 
in many years. Ellen Miller was one of those staff mem- 
bers who handled a variety of functions and performed 
each task with speed and precision. 

Our work in the professional schools (with which 
we were professedly unacquainted) was made infinitely 
simpler by the efforts of students in the schools who took 
time out from their own studies to help the LOYOLAN. 
Among them are Al McManama of Dent School; Virginia 
Stiff of Nursing School; Frank Pedace, Don Meccia, and 
Robert Damptz of Med School. 

At the head of the list of "professionals" who gave 
us the technical advice we so urgently needed was BiU 
O'Connor, representative of the Hunter Publishing Com- 
pany. In addition there was Tony Communale of Mar- 
shall Stddios, the official yearbook senior protographer; 
Dick Dwyer of S. K. Smith Company, who designed and 
manufactured our cover. 

Before I close, special mention must be made of 
Rev. Thomas J. Bryant, S.J., our moderator, who devoted 
a great deal of his personal time to taking our pictures. 

If anyone has been ommitted from this list, it is 
merely through the editor's oversight. To all those people 
mentioned above and below, and to all the students who 
gave us cooperation and encouragement— THANKS. 

T.M.H. 



THOMAS M. HANEY Editor-in-chief 

THOMAS J. MILLARD Lake Shore Associate Editor 

KATHLEEN E. DWYER Senior Editor 



RICHARD S. CEGIELSKI Managing Editor 

NICHOLAS J. MOTHERWAY Business Manager 

ROBERT STYLES, JUDY KOHNKE Copy Editors 



Special Assistants 

Philip J. Augustine 
Mary Lee Cullen 
Ellen Miller 

Copy Staff 
Laureen Dupre 
Janet Hamilton 



Sports Staff 

Butch Blau 
Allen Busa 
Robert Marlin 
Michael McConnell 
Joan Tengblad 



Senior Staff 

Nancy Kelly 
Kenneth Klein 
Edward R. Murray 

Business Staff 
Walter Hanson 
George Motto 



Photography Staff 

Ray Clennon 
Greg Czamik 
Frederick Green 
Larry Powers 
Kurt Wahle 



345 



Nancy Kelly of the senior staff and 
Jan Hamilton of the copy staff con- 
tributed their efforts to the last stages 
of the book's production. 




Discussing the photos to be used in 
the 1960 LOYOLAN are Fred Green, 
photographer, Tom Millard, L.S.C. 
editor, Tom Haney, editor, and Phil 
Augustine, special assistant. 



THE STAFF TALKS BACK 

Thomas M. Haney, the editor-in-chief of the 
1960 LOYOLAN, acquired the affectionate nick- 
name from the staff of "Simon Legree." To re- 
assure Tom, it must be said that irony was the 
only basis for the nickname. 

Tom produced a very fine book under a great 
number of handicaps. His term as editor began 
with a total of one staff member, Kay Dwyer, who 
had only typed a bit the previous year. Tom not 
only edited a yearbook but also trained a com- 
plete staff. Of course the completeness of this 
staff was limited to about six people. 

Yet Tom's activity this past year was not 
limited to the yearbook. He was a member of the 
Union Board of Governors, president of Pi Delta 
Epsilon Honorary Journalism Fraternity, and 
vice-president of Blue Key. 

Over and above these activities Tom has 
made many friends here at Loyola. There are 
many good reasons for this. One is remarkable 
patience, an example of which is the fact that he 
has never complained or exploded during the en- 
tire year of work, even when we missed our final 
deadline. I cannot recall any student leader dur- 
ing the past years who has accomplished so much 
for the University and the students and who has 
been so deservedly well-liked. 

Tom Millard 

346 



The sports staff (including Bill O'Connor, advisor, Mike McCon- 
nell, and Al Busa) spent long hours planning the layout of the 
basketball section. 




ORGANIZATION AND ACTIVITY INDEX 



Accounting Club 110 

Alpha Delta Gamma 50 

Alpha Kappa Psi 52 

Alpha Omega 54 

Alpha Sigma Nu 101 

Alpha Tau Delta 56 

American Chemical Society Ill 

Arts Class Officers 37 

Arts Council 36 

Association of the U.S. Army 112 

Basic Nursing Association 40 

Bellarmine Philosophy Club 113 

Blue Key Honor Fraternity 96 

Cadence 114 

Chi Theta Upsilon 58 

Choral Society 115 

Circumference 103 

Coed Club ' 116 

Commencement 28 

Commerce Class Officers 39 

Commerce Council 38 

Curtain Guild 118 

Debating Society 122 

Delta Sigma Delta 60 

Delta Sigma Pi 62 

Delta Sigma Rho 102 

Delta Zeta Chi 64 

Dental School Council 42 

Economics-Finance Society 123 

Education Society 124 

Epsilon Pi Rho 125 

Fall Frolic 14 

Fine Arts Club 126 

Foreign Students Association 127 

Freshmen Orientation 12 

Historical Society 128 

Honors Program 198 

Hopkins Society 130 

"Horizons for the Centuries" 330 

Human Relations Club 131 

Interfraternity Council 34 

Intersorority Council 35 

Kappa Beta Gamma 66 

Loyola Fair 26 

Loyola Lecture Series 20 

Loyola News 132 



Loyola Sports Highlights 16 

Loyola Union 32 

LOYOLAN 134 

LOYOLAN Awards 104 

Marketing Club 136 

Mathematics Club 137 

Medical School Council 41 

Men's Dorm Council 47 

Miss Varsity Contest 14 

Modern Language Club 138 

Phi Alpha Delta 68 

Phi Beta Pi 70 

Phi Chi 72 

Phi Mu Chi 74 

Phi Sigma Tau 106 

Physics Club 139 

Pi Alpha Lambda 76 

Pi Delta Epsilon 107 

Pow-Wow and Homecoming 18 

Psi Omega 78 

Psychological Research Society 140 

"Recent Decisions" 141 

Res Ipsa Loquitur 141 

Saint ApoUonia Guild 143 

Saint Luke's Guild 144 

School of Nursing Association 40 

Sigma Delta Phi 80 

Sigma Lambda Beta 82 

Sigma Pi Alpha 84 

Ski Weekend 22 

Social Work Coimcil 44 

Society for Advancement of Management 142 

Student American Dental Association 145 

Student American Medical Association 146 

Student Bar Association 43 

Tau Delta Phi 86 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 88 

Theta Phi Alpha 90 

University College Council 45 

Variety Show 24 

Veterans Club 147 

Wasmann Biological Society 148 

Who's Who Among Students 98 

Women's Dorm Councils 46 

Xi Psi Phi 92 






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