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Full text of "The Loyolan"

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JOSEPH C. SCULLY 
JUDITH J. KOHNKE 

Co-Editors 



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LOYOLA 









dedicAiion 




To Father James J. Mertz, S.J., on the occasion of his 
sixtieth year as a Jesuit, his fiftieth year in the classroom, 
the forty-sixth year of his priesthood, and his thirty- 
eighth year at Loyola University, the stafT joyously and 
proudly dedicates the twenty-fifth volume of The Loyolan. 

During those years. Father Mertz almost singlehandedly 
procured the funds for and planned the University's 
lovely and widely praised Mado7ina della Strada Chapel. 
In the classroom his unfailing liveliness, charm, and wit 
have endeared him to many generations of students of the 
classics. As a preacher, retreatmaster, and counselor his 
name is widespread in the midwest. To countless others 
he is known as a charming and loyal friend. 

There is no one who so completely symbolizes and 
brings to mind Loyola University as Father James J. Mertz. 
May we witness his seventy-fifth anniversary as a Jesuit. 





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tde moment 



The swift, fleeting measure of time by which men record the memories 

to cherish for a lifetime. These are the long-to-be remembered moments 

of a Loyola lifetime . . . 

The academic moments of inquiry, understanding, intellectual fulfillment. 

The spiritual moments when the heart instinctively seeks for God. 

The cultural moments when great literature, art, and music contribute 

to the elevation of the soul. 

The happy moments of good will, merriment, conviviality; the sad 

moments of shared disappointments, sorrows, and unexpected failure. 



9 








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ntents 



ADMINISTRATION 8 

FACULTY AND COLLEGES 28 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 98 

HONORARIES 118 

FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES 132 

ORGANIZATIONS 178 

PUBLICATIONS 218 

ATHLETICS 236 

HIGHLIGHTS 266 

GRADUATES 308 





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STRATfON 




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From his youth, the Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S.J. has been influenced by 
Jesuit ideals. Born in 1904 on Chicago's West Side, across the street from St. 
Ignatius High School, he later received his secondary education at that school. 

Following his graduation in 1922, Fr. Maguire entered the Jesuit novitiate at 
Florissant, Missouri; after being ordained in 1935, he received his A.B. and M.A. 
degrees from St. Louis Universit)'. After a year of teaching at the University of 
Detroit High School, he held a number of administrative positions, including the 
presidency of St. Xavier High School, the rectorship of West Baden College, and 
the presidency of Xavier University. 

In 1955, Father Maguire returned to Chicago to assume the presidency of 
Loyola University. 





vice president And 
deAn of ^Acuities 

Returning also, not only to his city, but also to the 
school from which he graduated, is the Rev. Robert W. 
Mulligan, S.J. Father Mulligan was born on October II, 
1916, and was a member of St. Margaret Mary parish in 
Chicago. His educational training includes graduation 
from both Loyola Academy and Loyola University, 
followed by study abroad. 

Father Mulligan was ordained to the priesthood in 
September, 1937. After joining the Philosophy Depart- 
ment at Loyola, he was appointed Department Chairman 
in 1955. In 1958, he was named Vice-President and Dean 
of Faculties, his present position. 



vice pvesideni in 
:(i2ivge of development 

After attaining degrees from both Loyola and DePaul 
Universities, W. Daniel Conroyd, was associated with 
the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Montgomery 
Ward and Company. In 1945, he returned to Loyola as 
Director of Public Relations and then as Administrative 
Assistant to the President. 

In 1957, he was named Vice-President for Develop- 
ment and Public Relations. In this capacity he coordinates 
and directs Loyola's fund-raising drive program, public 
relations program, and alumni activities. 






Vice president and 
business manager 

Thomas F. Hawkins, a graduate of Northwestern and 
Loyola Universities, was promoted to Vice-President in 
1956. Previously, Mr. Hawkins served as Loyola's Business 
Manager for over five years. 

Besides his educational training in business administra- 
tion, Mr. Hawkin's practical experience includes employ- 
ment as Treasurer and Comptroller of the Nochman 
Corporation. In addition, he served as Assistant Comp- 
troller of Esquire, Inc. and Assistant Treasurer of the 
H. A. Brassert Company. 



11 



Sitting as the Board of Trustees, these nine Jesuit Fathers guide the destinies of 
Loyola University. Chaired by the University President, the Very Reverend 
James F. Maguire, S.J., the Board is the governing body of the institution. Its 
principal duties include the making of contracts and affiliation agreements, 
formulation of University policy, appointment of officers of the school, setting 
of fees and tuition, and the conferring of certificates, honors and academic degrees. 



i(ie SoAvd of ivustees 



Board of Trustees. Standing: Rev. Felix P. Biestek, S. J., Rev. Franklin C. Fischer, S J., Rev. Hugh B. Rod- 
man. S. J., Rev. Robert W. Mulligan, S. J. Seated: Rev. John A. McEvoy, S. J., Rev. John W. Bieri, S. J., 
Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S. J., Rev. Stewart E. Dol lard. S. J. (Rev. Theodore J. Tracy, S. J., on leave of 
absence.) 




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Administrative Council. Slunding: J. Raymond Sheriff, W. Daniel Conroyd, Harry L. Mc- 
Closkey, John C. Fitzgerald, Richard A. Matre, Rev. Hugh B. Rodman, S. J., Dr. William 
P. Schoen. Seated: Elizabeth A. McCann, Thomas F. Hawkins, Rev. Robert W. Mulligan, S. 
J., Dr. John F. Sheehan, Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S. J., Gladys Kiniery. Rev. Stewart 
E. DoUard, S. J., Matthew H. Schoenbaum, Rev. Richard E. Tischler, S. J., Missing: John C. 
Hayes and James C. Cox. 



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Composed of the University's Vice Presidents, Deans, and other key administra- 
tive officers, this group advises the President on the formulation of administrative 
and academic policy. The Council reviews matters pertaining to curricula, the 
integration of the various schools and colleges within the University, accredita- 
tion, admission procedures, tuition structure, the University calendar and catalog. 



13 




ide SoAvd oj l^y ivustees 

The members of this group represent hundreds of years of business leadership 
in many of the nation's largest corporations. These distinguished executives and 
professional men advise the University President in matters relating to education, 
campus planning, public relations, development, and finance. Charles C. Kerwin, 
prominent Chicago investment executive and distinguished Catholic layman, is 
Chairman of the Board. 



Charles C. Kerwin 
Chairman 




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Cushman B. Bissell 



Louis H. G. 
Bouscaren 




William Roy 
Carney 





Henry T. 
Chamberlain 





Augustine J. Bowe 




Edward A. Cudahy 





David F. 
Bremmer, Sr. 




Michael Cudahy 





James O. Burke 




Walter J. 
Cummings 




Thomas A. Dean 


Querin P. 


Edward J. 


Frederick M. 


Joseph E. 




Dorschel 


Farrell 


GilUes 


Guilbault 


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Matthew J. 


Charles M. Mines 


Patrick H. Hoy 


Samuel Insull, Jr. 


Frank W. Jenks 


Hickey, Jr. 











14 




Owen Banon Jones 




Arthur Keating 




Charles H. 
Kellstadt 





Weymouth Kirkland 





Arthur T. Leonard 




Joseph E. Merrion 




Joseph D. Murphy 




William J. Quina 


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William J. Sinek 




Frederick W. Specht 




Bolton Sullivan 



Atlass, H. Leslie 
Bane, Charles A. 
Barry, Gerald A. 
Bast, O. D. 
Beacom, Thomas H. 
Berner, Robert L. 
Benag, Dr. Otto L. 
Bireley, John M. 
Bissell, Cushman B. 
Bopp, Andrew R. 
Bouscaren, Louis H. G. 
Bowe, Hon. Augustine J. 
Bowe, William J. 
Bremner. A. J. 
Brennan, C. M. 
Brennan, James G. 
Brennan, James J. 
Brennan, John E. 
Brizzolara, Ralph D. 
Brundage, Howard A. 
Bruns, Clemens H. 
Burke, Francis J. 
Burke, James O. 
Burke, Robert E. 
Burke, Thomas B. 
Burnett, Leo 
Burny, C. J. 
Byrne, Thomas J., Jr. 
Byrnes, W. Jerome 
Caestecker, Julien J. 
Cagney, Richard D. 
CahiU, William E. 
Callahan. Dr. James J. 
Campbell, Douglass 
Campbell, Hon. William J. 
Carlson. Andrew R. 
Carney, William Roy 
Carroll, Wallace E. 
Carstens, George L. 
Cascino, Anthony, E. 
Cavanagh, Joseph J. 
Cavanagh, Thomas J. 
Cavanaugh, Leo D. 
Chamberlain, Henry T. 
Chambers, Fred E. 
Chesrow, Frank W. 
Clark, John A. 
Clarke, John W. 
Close, James W. 
Colnon, John E. 
Conley, Philip 
Connelly, Timothy J. 
Corby, Francis M. 
Costello, Walter R. 
Cross, Louis J. 
Crowley, Patrick F. 



Crown, Colonel Henry 
Cudahy, Edward A. 
Cudahy, Michael 
Culhane, Martin A. 
Cummings, Walter J. 
Cummings, Walter J., Jr. 
Curran, Henry J. 
Cusick, A. J. 
Dallstream, Andrew J. 
Dammann, J. Francis 
Dean, Thomas A. 
Defrees, Donald 
DeGryse, Charles W. 
Donahoe, William J. 
Donnelly, James L. 
Donoghue, George T. 
Donovan, James F. 
Dooley, James A. 
Dooley, Richard F. 
Dooley, William G. 
Dorschel, Querin P. 
Doyle, Edward J., Sr. 
Doyle, Leo J. 
Drymalski, R. P. 
Dunn, John J., Jr. 
Dunne, Edward W. 
Dunne, Hon. Rob>ert J. 
Durst. Raymond W. 
Elward, Joseph F. 
Epstein, Raymond 
Eulenberg, Alexander 
Evers, John W. 
Fanning, Lawrence S. 
Farrell, Edward J. 
Fazio, Peter V. 
Fenner, Edward 
Feulner, Edwin J. 
Fiedler, Edward H. 
Fiedler, George 
Fitzgerald, George J. 
Fitzgerald, Joseph J. 
Fitzgerald, Matthew J. 
Fitzpatrick, Peter 
Flanagan, John J. 
Flick, Frank 
Florsheim, Leonard S. 
Foley, John J. 
Fox, Clarence E. 
Frank, Zollie S. 
Frawley, Stephen J. 
Gallagher, Arthur J. 
Gallagher, Charles J. 
Garard, James L. 
Gary. Lee J. 
Gillespie, Frank J. 

Gillies, Frederick M. 




JOHN J. WALDRON 

Chairman 

Glasser, Joshua B. 
Gleason, John S., Jr. 
Glunz, Louis 
Goedert, John P. 
Goldblatt, Maurice 
GcK)dman, Richard 
Grace, George W. 
Graham, Donald M. 
Graham, Robert F. 
Grant, Thomas A. 
Gregory, Tappan 
Griffin, Thomas D. 
Guilbault, Joseph E. 
Haines, Charles J. 
Halas, George S. 
Halligan, William J., Sr. 
Hamilton, Dr. Eugene A. 
Hanley, R. Emmett 
Hansen, Z. C. R. 
Healy, Felix E. 
Henry, Joseph E. 
Heuer, Harry P. 
Hickey, Matthew, J., Jr. 
Hickey, Matthew J., Ill 
Higgins, Thomas J. 
Hilliard, Raymond M. 
Hines, Charles M. 
Hoffmann, John P. 
Holland, Brig. Gen. J. P. 
Hoy, Patrick H. 
Igoe, James T., Jr. 
Igoe, Hon. Michael L. 
InsuU, Samuel, Jr. 
Jagor, Bruce R. 
Jenks, Frank W. 
Jennett, Clarence B. 
Jennett, Edward J. 
Johnson, Howard J. 
Jones, Owen Barton 
Joslin, Murray 
Joy, Walter J., Jr. 



16 



citizens SoAvd 

For the past 15 years these 300 
corporation executives, physicians, 
attorneys and other professional men 
have effectively interpreted Loyola 
University's contributions to the 
Chicago Community and the nation. 
The members, under the Chairman- 
ship of John J. Waldron, meet at 
quarterly luncheons to hear addresses 
by faculty members. 
Joyce, Robert E. 
Kartheiser, Frank 
Kavanaugh, John S. 
Kearney, Joseph S. 
Keating, Arthur 
Keating, Edward 
Keim, Paul A. 
Kelliher, Peter M. 
Kellstadt, Charles H. 
Kelly, John J. 
Kennedy, Hayes 
Kennedy, W. McNeil 
Kenney. John E. 
Kerwin, Charles C. 
Kerwin, Edward M. 
Kiley, John P. 
Kinnare, John J. 
Kirkland, Weymouth 
Knight, John S. 
Knoch, Hon. Win G. 
Kolko, J. B. 
Korshak, Sidney R. 
Krez, Leonard O. 
Kueber, Anthony J. 
Kullman, Francis H., Jr. 
LaBuy, Hon. Walter J. 
Lawler, Dr. Paul E. 
Lawlor, William J., Jr. 
Leander, Russell J. 
Lee, William A. 
Leonard, Arthur T. 
Lewis, Frank J. 
Lewis, Thomas A. 
List, Stuart 
Livingston, Park 
Logelin, Edward C. 
Lohr, Major Lenox R. 
Lydon, Eugene K. 
Lynch, Bernard W. 
Lynch, Frank J. 
Lynch, Richard 
Lynch, WilUam J. 
Madden, John 



Madigan, Walter J. 
Magnus, Joseph E. 
Maher, John J. 
Martin, James R. 
Mayer, Howard G. 
Meers, Henry W. 
Menke, Edward A. 
Merrion, Joseph E. 
Meyers, Robert L. 
Moran, John T. 
Mulcahy, Michael F. 
Mulhern, Edward F. 
Mullady, Walter F. 
Mullaney, Paul L. 
Murphy, Charles F. 
Murphy, Herbert F. 
Murphy, Joseph D. 
Murphy, Leo T. 
Murphy, Morgan 
McCaffrey. John L. 
McCahey, James B., Jr. 
McConville, Edwin B. 
McCormick, Hon. John V. 
McDonnell, Morgan F. 
McDonough, John J. 
McFetridge, William L. 
McGah, William J. 
McGoorty, John P. 
McGuire, John B. 
McGuire, John F. 
Mcintosh, Clarence W. 
McKenna, Ivan A. 
McNamara, Harley V. 
McNulty, John E. 
Naghten, John A. 
Neuses, Cyrus H. 
Noonan, T. Clifford 
Nugent, Frank 
O'Connell, Harold P. 
O'Haire, Harry J. 
O'Keefe, James L. 
O'Keefe, John F. 
O'Keefe, William P. 
O'Meara, William F. 
O'Reilly, Robert A. 
O'Shaughnessy, John E. 
Oshe, Marcellus M. 
Peckels, Michael F. 
Phalin, Howard V. 
Pigott, James M. 
Plunkett, Paul M. 
Podesta, Robert A. 
Potter, Howard 1. 
Puccetti, Harry W. 
Quinn, James R. 
Quinn, William J. 



Rathje, Frank C. 
Regan, Ben 
Regam, Joseph J. 
Regnery, Henry 
Reynolds, Thomas A. 
Riley, John H. 
Roberson, G. Gale 
Roche, Burke B. 
Roubik, Charles J. 
Rudis, Anthony J. 
Sachs, Morris B., Jr. 
Salerno, George F. 
Savage, Joseph P. 
Schmidt, John 
Scholl, Dr. William M. 
Sears, Barnabas F. 
Sexton, Thomas W. 
Shanahan, Martin F. 
Shea, Admiral D. F. J. 
Sheehan, Edward D. 
Shehee, J. Glenn 
Sheridan, Leo J. 
Sheridan, Vincent J. 
Shriver, Robert Sargent, Jr. 
Sinek, William J. 
Smart, Jackson W. 
Smith, John F., Jr. 
Smyth, John M., Jr. 
Snite, Fred B. 
Specht, Frederick W. 
Spiess, Carlos A. 
Starshak, A. L. 
Steber, Clarence L. 
Sullivan, Bolton 
Sullivan, John P. 
Sullivan, Joseph F. 
Thompson, James E. 
Thorson, Reuben 
Traynor, William B. 
Traynor William K. 
Tuohy, Hon. William J. 
Uriell, Francis H. 
Vaughn, Dr. Arkell M. 
Vrtis, Charles S. 
Wade, James F. 
Waldron, John J. 
Walker, Irwin N. 
Walsh, Donald J. 
Ward, J. Harris 
Whiston, Frank M. 
White, Philip O'Connell 
Whitty, Elmer J. 
Worthy, James C. 
Yoder, Lloyd E. 
Zacher, Eugene R. 
Zimmermann, Russell A. 



17 



estate phnning executive committee 



The Estate Planning Executive Committee is dedicated to the future needs of 
educational progress. It is evident that in its formation was held the assurance of 
education of our youth for generations to come. It has for its purpose the task 
of making known to alumni and friends of Loyola University the bequest 
opportunities available. For example, the committee has organized for the 
University' several plans to oflfer for investment: wills, gifts from capital, revocable 
trusts, irrevocable trusts, and testamentary trusts. In addition, the bequest may 
be unrestricted or directed to scholarships, buildings, professorships, research, or 
cultural activities. It is then, truly the creation of a Living Estate ever concerned 
with an advancing Loyola. 



Cushraan B. Bissell, 
Chairman 



Augustine J. Bowe 



Andrew J. Dallstream 






J. Francis Dammann 

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Siil' ■■'■■ 




Donald Defrees Alexander Eulenbe 



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Louis A. Kohn 



Morris I. Leibman 



John P. McGoorty, Jr. 







J. Alfred Aforan 



Thomas A. Reynolds 



Charles J. Roubik 



John J. Waldron 







18 



5 



for loyol 



usinessmen jor 

Without such assistance as is currently being rendered 
by Businessmen for Loyola University, no private educa- 
tional institution such as ours could long survive. 
Through its operations, BMLU has successfully enlisted 
the financial support from many Chicago corporations 
since its inception in 1955. 

Over the years more than 81,100,000 has been channeled 
into added funds for teachers' salaries. This years goal, 
under the direction of Robert E. Joyce, President of the 
Chicago Seven-Up Bottling Company, is to secure con- 
tributions totaling 3400,000. The vice-chairman of BMLU 
is John M. Smith Jr., president of Inland Steel. Certainly 
the activities and accomplishments of BMLU are a vital 
asset to Loyola life. 



Stephen M. Bailey 
Gerald A. Barry 
John M. Berent 
Dr. Otto L. Bettag 
John M. Bireley 
Cushman B. Bissell 
Louis H. G. Bouscaren 
Augustine J. Bowe 
A. M. Bowyer 
Clarence J. Bredemann 
A. J. Bremner 
David F. Bremner, Sr. 
John B. Bremner, Jr. 
James G. Brennan 
R. D. Brizzolara 
Alexander Burke 
Francis J. Burke 
James O. Burke 
Thomas B. Burke 
C. J. Burny 
William E. CahiU 
Frank C. Callahan 
Dr. James J. Callahan 
Andrew R. Carlson 
Wm. Roy Carney 
John W. Carroll 
George L. Carstens 
Anthony E. Cascino 
Thomas J. Cavanagh 
Henry T. Chamberlain 
Fred E. Chambers 
Frank W. Chesrow 
James W. Close 
Harry H. Comstock 
Timothy J. Connelly 
W. Daniel Conroyd 
Francis M. Corby 
Philip H. Corboy 
Philip H. Cordes 
Walter R. Costello 
Joseph W. Cremin 
William A. Cremin 
Louis J. Cross 
Patrick F. Crowley 
Edward A. Cudahy 
Michael Cudahy 
Martin A. Culhane 
Walter J. Cummings 
A. J. Cusick 
Dr. August F. Daro 
Thomas A. Dean 
Charles W. DeGryse 
Angello Dicello 
Burton E. Doherty 
James L. Donnelly 
James A. Dooley 
Richard F. Dooley 
Wilham G. Dooley 
Querin P. Dorschel 
Leo J. Doyle 
William J. Drennan 



Thomas F. Duffy 
William J. Dunn 
Edward W. Dunne 
Herman J. Eckrich, Jr. 
William Q. Egan 
Leonard B. Ettelson 
Alexander Eulenberg 
Edward J. Farrell 
Peter V. Fazio 
Edwin J. Feulner 
Edward H. Fiedler 
George Fiedler 
Richard G. Finn 
George J. Fitzgerald 
Joseph J. Fitzgerald 
Peter Fitzpatrick 
John J. Flanagan 
Maurice B. Frank 
Stephen J. Frawley 
Dodge H. Freeman 
Frank A. Gallagher 
Charles J. Gallagher 
William O. Gallery 
Leo F. Garrity 
William J. Garvy 
W. P. Gensert 
J. J. Gerber 
Frederick M. Gillies 
Louis Glunz 
John P. Goedert 
Thomas A. Gonser 
George W. Grace 
Donald M. Graham 
Robert F. Graham 
Thomas D. Griffin 
Joseph E. Guilbault 
James J. Haines 
William J. Halligan, Sr. 
R. Emmett Hanley 
Thomas W. Havey 
John T. Hayes 
Felix E. Healy 
Joseph E. Henry 
Matthew J. Hickey, Jr. 
Charles M. Hines 
Harry Hofherr 
John P. Hoffmann 
Patrick H. Hoy 
Samuel InsuU, Jr. 
Ralph M. Isacksen 
Bruce R. Jagor 
Frank W. Jenks 
Edward J. Jennett 
Howard J. Johnson 
Owen Barton Jones 
Murray Joslin 
Robert E. Joyce 
Donald V. Kane 
John S. Kavanaugh 
Joseph S. Kearney 
Arthur Keating 




ROBERT E. JOYCE 

Chairman 



Joseph W. Kehoe 
Paul A. Keim 
Charles H. Kellstadt 
Hayes Kennedy 
W. McNeil Kennedy 
John E. Kenney 
Edmund J. Kenny 
John E. Kenny, Jr. 
Charles C. Kerwin 
Edward M. Kerwin 
John J. Kinnare 
Weymouth Kirkland 
Lawrence M. Khnger 
Frank P. Knoll 
W. S. Knox 
Sidney R. Korshak 
Leonard O. Krez 
Anthony J. Kueber 
Alexander X. Kuhn 
F. H. Kullman, Jr. 
George A. Lane 
Vincent D. Lane 
Earl S. Lathrop, Jr. 
Robert B. Latousek 
William J. Lawlor, Jr. 
Elmer F. Layden 
Arthur T. Leonard 
Frank J. Lewis 
Thomas A. Lewis 
Fred G. Litsinger 
Edward C. Logelin 
Eugene K. Lydon 
Frank J. Lynch 
William J. Lynch 
William C. MacDonald 
John Madden 
Maurice D. Mangan 
James R. Martin 
Howard G. Mayer 
Robert B. Mayer 
John L. McCaffrey 
James B. McCahey, Jr. 
Arthur J. McConville 
Edwin B. McConville 
Henry J. McDonald 
Morgan F. McDonnell 
John J. McDonough 
John B. McGuire 
Clarence W. Mcintosh 
H. V. McNamara 
Edward A. Menke 
Joseph E. Merrion 
Robert L. Meyers 
Mark J. Mitchell, Jr. 
Jim Moran 
Edward J. Morrissey 
Richard G. Muench 
Charles F. Murphy 
Charles F. Murphy, Jr. 
Herbert F. Murphy 
Joseph D. Murphy 




JOHN M. SMITH JR. 
Vice-Chairman 



Lewis C. Murtaugh 
John A. Naghten 
T. Clifford Noonan 
Frank B. O'Brien 
John F. O'Keefe 
William P. OKeefe 
William F. O'Meara 
John E. O'Shaughnessy 
T. W. O'Shaughnessy 
James M. Pigott 
Howard 1. Potter 
James R. Quinn 
William J. Quinn 
Ben Regan 
Joseph J. Regan 
Henry Regne;ry 
Harlan Richards 
John H. Riley 
Burke B. Roche 
G. Gale Roberson 
William H. Roberts 
Charles Rozmarek 
Anthony J. Rudis 
Roben B. Scott 
Thomas W. Sexton 
Fred R. Sextro 
Martin F. Shanahan 
Thomas J. Sheahan 
Edward D. Sheehan 
J. Glenn Shehee 
Vincent J. Sheridan 
William J. Sinek 
John L. Sloan 
Jackson W. Smart 
John F. Smith, Jr. 
John M. Smyth, Jr. 
Frederick W. Specht 
Carlos A. Spiess 
A. L. Starshak 
Clarence L. Steber 
Nelson D. Stoker 
Bolton Sullivan 
John F. Sullivan 
Joseph F. Sullivan 
James E. Thompson 
J. Donald Thor 
W. K. Traynor 
John C. Tally 
Frank H. Uriell 
Charles S. Vrtis 
John J. Waldron 
Frank Wetzel 
Frank M. Whiston 
John G. White 
Elmer J. Whirty 
Albert J. Wilkins 
Eugene R. Zacher 



19 



if ■ 



The Office of the Dean of Students represents the Uni- 
versity Committee of Student Activities which is headed 
by the Dean of Students, Harry L. McCloskey. This 
committee sets and regulates policies pertaining to all 
student organizations with the exception of religious 
organizations and the over-all student organization of 
the individual colleges and schools. 

In addition to being chairman of this committee, Harry 
McCloskey acts as coordinator of the various programs 
of the Office of the Dean of Students which includes the 
student welfare program. 

Mariette LeBlanc, the Dean of Women, supervises the 
activities and welfare pertaining to all women students 
of the university. Besides serving as secretary to the 
Committee on Student Activities, Miss LeBlanc is con- 
cerned with counseling women students, assisting them 
in the formation of new activities, and administering the 
women's residence hall. 

Joan Vaccaro, the Assistant Dean of Women, assists 
Miss LeBlanc in the counseling of women students and 
coordinates undergraduate women's activities. She is also 
the Director of the Coed Club and housing director for 




HARR-i- L. McCLOSKEY 
Dean of Students 



ojjice of tde dan of students 



MARIETTE LeBLANC 
Dean of Women 




GEORGE N. KOLLINTZAS 
Assistant Dean of Students 




20 





J. DAVID SMITH 
Assistant to the Dean of Students 

women's residence halls, off-campus approved housing, 
and faculty housing. 

The position of Assistant Dean of Students and Di- 
rector of the Loyola Union is filled by George Kollint- 
zas, who assists in the promotion and coordination of 
the programs of the Office of the Dean of Students. As 
the Director of the Loyola Union, Mr. KoUintzas handles 
the business operations and activities of the Union which 
include Freshman Orientation, Charity Day, Pow-Wow, 
and Senior Week. 



Committee on Student Activities and Welfare. Richard F. Kusek, 
Mariette LeBlanc (Secretary). George N. KoUintzas, Harry L. 
McCloskey, Essie Anglum, James M. Forkins, Pearl Heffron, 
Dr. Gustav Rapp. 



JOAN VACCARO 
Assistant to the Dean of Women 




21 




ELIZABETH A. McCANN 
Registrar 




REV. JOHN C. MALLOY, S. J. 
Dean of At/missions 



aJminisfrafipe 

sfaff 




^ 




THOMAS R. SANDERS 
Director of Development 



MARY R. MANZKE 

University Examiner of Credentials 




22 




/ 





NANCY GALLAGHER 

Editor, The Alumnus 
Director of Alumni Activities 



RICHARD BARRY 
Director, Public Relations 



EUGENE KNIGHT 

Director, Veterans' Affairs 





LAWRENCE J. SLAJCHERT 

Director of Placement 



23 




REV. THOMAS F. MURRAY, S. J. 



student 



counselovs 




REV. JOHN FELICE, S. J. 



REV. ROBERT J. FOX, S. J. 




REV. J. DONALD HAYES, S. J. 



24 





unwevsi 



xAvxes 



The library has been one of the most progressive de- 
partments at Loyola during the past year. Under the 
head librarian, James C. Cox, it has grown since its 
founding both in quantity and quality; and, with a view 
towards the future, this growth is just the beginning. 

The University contains five libraries: the Elizabeth 
Cudahy Memorial Library on Lake Shore Campus, the 
Lewis Towers Library, and the Medical, Dental, and Law 
Libraries. Salient is the fact that the libraries serve all 
the students, which provides an unlimited field for re- 
search. During 1961, the library's accumulation of books 
has grown rapidly. 




JAMES C. COX 

University Librarian 



Lewis Towers Library Staff. Daniel 
Saletta. Violet Bilick, P. K. Chacko. 



Devitt, Christine 



Lake Shore Librar> Staff. Peggy Dillon, Yvonne Damien, 
Mrs. James C. Cox, James C Cox, Helen Stoudt, Ruth Ann 
Pfeifer, Eleanor Kennedy, Martin Molnar. Seated in Front: 
Roslyn Failla, Genevieve Delana. 




yiAvents associafes oj /oyo/a 



Established in the spring of 19S7, the specific purpose 
of Parents Associates of Loyola is to encourage the par- 
ents of high school seniors to talk to their sons and 
daughters about Loyola and the benefits of a Jesuit edu- 
cation. PAL accomplishes its end by appointing parents 
of present Loyola students to contact the parents of high 
school seniors. The Parents Associates contend that many 
questions of a personal nature, questions regarding Loy- 
ola's tuition, its educational programs, and its facilities, 
can be answered most effectively informally; hence PAL's 
determination to develop a personal touch through the 
home visits of its workers. 

L'nder the general chairmanship of Mr. and Mrs. Ger- 
ald Pierce, PAL operated under a three-fold program: so- 
cial activities, fund-raising drive,and admissions program. 

The social program, directed by Mr. and Mrs. Mau- 
rice J. McCarthy, included three annual events: a re- 
ception for freshman parents, a Christmas party, and a 



dinner party in April. To help make up the difference 
between the tuition paid by students and the actual cost 
of education, PAL members have solicited funds from 
fellow Loyola parents for the specific purpose of rais- 
ing faculty salaries. Last spring, 257 PAL couples re- 
ceived 630 pledges totaling over S20,500. By means of 
this annual program, headed this year by Mr. and Mrs. 
Bernard Pallasch, Loyola will continue to maintain faculty 
salaries at a scale comparable to that of larger universities. 
The final function of PAL is the admissions program, 
this year under the chairmanship of Mr. and Mrs. Mau- 
rice McCarthy. Its key feature is personal counseling, 
and through this the members of PAL aim to increase 
the number of qualified students who apply for admis- 
sion to the University. This year over 3,100 parents were 
contacted. This program must receive at least partial 
credit for an astonishing 44% increase in freshman en- 
rollment this year. 



Parents Associates of Loyola. Standing: William Buhl, Everett Diehl, Bernard Pallasch, 
Gerald Pierce, Mrs. Maurice McCarthy. Dennis O'Brien, Harold AUard. Maxfield Weisbrod, 
Joseph Hayes, Foster Swierkowski. Seated: Mrs. Joseph Hayes, Mrs Foster Swierkow- 
ski, Mrs. Bernard Pallasch, Mrs. Gerald Pierce, Mrs. Dennis O Brien, Mrs. Harold Allard. 




iliRECT 








Vri 



y 



"TS 



J 




^s^ 



■Cjh*.: 



■^ 



*:; 



Students Associates of Loyola. John Frey, Monica I rocher, Ann Roehrich, Anne Yourg, 
Ken Henning, Jim Talamonti, Christine Petrosky, Larry Gerber, Jack Billimack, Ray Hart- 
niann, Joan Coscioni, Art Wondrasek, Ann Stauss, Kathy Silvagni, John Banks, George 
Wentz. 



studenis associates oj loyola 



Organizec] in 1956, the Student Associates of Loyola 
has matured into one of the most important organiza- 
tions in the University. SAL has one goal: the advance- 
ment of Loyola University. The work of SAL is gi- 
gantic, but its results are productive. 

This year's program has progressed to unprecedented 
heights in accomplishment, for it has resulted in a 100% 
increase over last year's total contacts of Chicagoland's 
high school seniors. This means that better than 2,800 
persons at the secondary education level have been in- 
formed of the many opportunities vt'hich the University 
can offer to its students. More than any other organi- 
zation at Loyola, SAL gives its members an opportunity 
to render direct service to the University. 

The Executive Committee, the governing body, is com- 
posed of representatives from the sororities, fraternities, 



academic societies, and independents from both cam- 
puses. Embodied in this group is the spirit, diligence, 
and perseverance that has made SAL what it is today. 

Because of the large measure of its success, SAL is 
beginning to enlarge its scope of contact. With the 
adoption of the men's and women's dorms into its mem- 
bership, SAL has inaugurated new procedures, giving 
it the facilities of reaching students in distant places 
by employing the efforts of out-of-town students in their 
home towns. 

According to Larry Gerber, the general chairman of 
SAL this year: "SAL has become firmly established as 
a key student organization. The importance of its goals 
is self-evident, but these goals could never have been 
reached without the great support which it received from 
students and organizations." 



27 



COUEG 




■1^ 







i FACULTY 



■' ^fai,'t^---->v'V»r?i -feet ■ 



■S" ;*" "-'^-'""- ''^"v?'^^::.'?^'^^^ ■' 





gv3idu2ite scdool 



REV. STEWART E. DOLLARD, S. J. 
Dean 



Graduate students gather in the hbrary to discuss classroom 
techniques and the development of new theories in education. 



The primary end of a school is the education of the 
student; the primary end of the Graduate School is the 
metamorphosis of the student into a scholar. To achieve 
this development, the graduate must unite a sense of 
independence with an unquenchable intellectual thirst 
stemming from a deep love of and a compelling interest 
in knowledge, especially for its own sake. 

On August 15, 1946, the Rev. Stewart E. DoUard, S. J. 
became the dean of the Graduate School, the fourth dean 
to assume that office since its inception in 1926. Dr. Paul 
Kiniery, the assistant dean, was appointed to that po- 
sition in 19.^2. From the establishment of the Graduate 
School, its objectives have not changed: the integration 
of scientific, literary, and cultural training with a sound 
philosophy of life based on Catholic principles of cor- 
rect thinking and correct living. 

The Graduate School is a school of arts and sciences. 

The Master of Education and the Master of Arts degrees 
are awarded in classics, education, English, history, math- 
ematics, philosophy, psychology, sociology, and Spanish. 



30 





DR. PAUL KINIERY 
Assistant Dean 




KAY SMITH 

Secretar\ to the faculty 

The Master of Science degree may be obtained in anat- 
omy, biochemistry, chemistry, microbiology, oral anat- 
omy, pharmacology, and physiology. In addition, pro- 
grams in most fields are provided, leading to the doctor- 
ate degree. Equipped with fundamental and specialized 
knowledge in their particular areas, those who have 
experienced graduate training are able to make worth- 
while contributions in many areas. 





31 



college of arfs 
And sciences 




32 



Under the direction of the Rev. Richard A. Tischler, S.J., the Loyola Univer- 
sity College of Arts and Sciences has maintained its purpose of developing its 
students through a broad Christian education forming them into the ideal 
stated by Pope Pius XI: "The true christian product of Christian education 
is the supernatural man who thinks, judges, and acts constantly and consistently 
in accordance with right reason illumined by the supernatural light of Christ's 
example and teaching." 

The aims of the college are to enable students to better know and under- 
stand the principles of which they are composed: soul, body, and mind; to be 
able to distinguish between the erroneous and the true; and to fully develop 
the student's capacity for later happiness and success. 

The Jesuit plan of education centers about the Liberal Arts College. This plan 
most truly prepares leaders of society by integrating general education, cultural 
improvement, and professional excellence with Catholic philosophy. 

The Liberal Arts College in union with Christian ideals possess the ability 
to develop the "whole man," physically, socially, and spiritually. The basic 
Christian disciplines are stressed by this type of formative curriculum. 

Liberal Arts training gives students training for a particular profession with 
knowledge beyond the particular interests of their field. It enables them to 
properly evaluate their own lives and to have the proper perspective in rela- 
tion to their roles in our present culture. 

In an effort to better serve the student body, the College of Arts and Sciences 
has expanded its staff. This expansion has brought greater efficiency in handling 
problems of the student body. 



Personnel in the Dean's office are always ready to help students 
solve the many problems which arise during registration. 





REV. JOSEPH S. PENDERGAST, S. J. 
Assistant Dean 



a 



onovs pvogv2im 



The Honors Program, under the direction of Rev. Carl Burlage, S.J., was 
established at Loyola University to provide students having high academic qual- 
ifications with the opportunities for intellectual achievement on an individual- 
ized basis. These students, through this program, enjoy personal contact with 
the members of the faculty and friendly association with students sharing 
similar intellectual interests and pursuits. 

The honor students are given a fuller course of study and a special class 
section in English, histor\-, logic, and metaphysics in the freshman and sopho- 
more years. As upperclassmen, these students are provided with a fuller course 
of study in the major subject which each student has chosen. 

Students may enter this program by invitation of the dean or of the director 
of honors students, or by their own request if they fulfill certain academic re- 
quirements. An augmentation to this year's program is the honors seminar. In 
this area scholarly discussions are held, delving into various controversial sub- 
jects with an eye toward an astute and logical evaluation of the problem under 
consideration. 

This supplement to education reaches approximately 135 of the more gifted 
students of Loyola University, enabling them to attain the full fruits of an 
intensified and complete college education. 




REV. CARL J. BURLAGE, S.J. 

Director, Honors Program 

Lake Shore Campus 



DR. JOSEPH J. WOLFF 

Director. Honors Program, 

Lewis Towers Campus 









Kay Richards and Jan Delia, members of 
the Honors Program, take time out from 
studies to pose for our photographer 



Lorretta Picucci and Janice Grippando arc- 
surprised by our photographer while dis- 
cussing a recent test. 




Members of the Lewis Towers Honors Prograin. Sharryn Donn, Cecile Conrad, Robert 
Kaftan, Judith Pacer, Elizabeth Cesna. 




35 




REV. WALTER P. PETERS, S.J. 
Biology 




REV. CHARLES H. RUST, S.J. 
Mathematics 



Avis And sciences depAviment c^Aivmen 



DR. RAYMOND P. MARIELLA 
Chemistry 




36 





DR. JOHN M. WOZNIAK 
Education 



REV JAMES J. MERTZ, S.J. 
Classics 




DR. PAUL S. LIETZ 
History 



DR. JOHN S. GERRIETTS 
English 






COL. MATTHEW R. GIUFFRE 
Military Science 



DR. MICHAEL J. FLYS 
Modern Languages 



AU _nf 20«9., -207.2^.209*00. 210. 2 








DR. LLOYD L. ARNOLD 

Natural Science 



REV. J. DONALD ROLL, S.J. 
Physics 




REV. F. TORRENS HECHT, S.J. 
Philosophy 




38 



ARTS AND SCIENCES DEPARTMENT 
CHAIRMEN 



REV. VINCENT V. HERR, SJ. 
Psychology 



DR. JOSEPH F. MENEZ 

Political Science 





REV. RALPH A. GALLAGHER, S.J. 
Sociology 




DONALD J. STINSON 
Speech 



REV. FRANCIS L. FILAS, S.J. 
Theology 






39 




Dr. Edward E. Palinscar, Dr. Thomas 
E. Malone, Dr. Kenichi K Hisaoki. 
Virginia A. Kuta, Dr. John W. Rjppon. 
Rev. Walter P. Peters, S. J., John W 
Hudson, Dr. Benedict Jaskoski, Dr. 
Boris Spiroff. 



Biology majors spend a Saturday after- 
noon in the Cudahy Science Building 
boning up for a practical examination. 




Dr James Wilt, Dr. Charles McCoy, Dr. 
John Huston, Dr. Raymond Mariella, 
Dr. John Reed, Dr. Carl Moore, Dr. 
Edward Lim, Dr. Harvey Posvic, Dr. 
Frank Cassaretto. 



BIOLOGY FACULTY 



CHEMISTRY FACULTY 




40 




Stundiiig: William Meyer, John Wellington, Henry Malecki, Samuel Mayo, Carter Frie- 
berg, Arthur O'Mara, Max Englehart. Seated: Ernest Proulx, Elizabeth Mollahan, Margarei 
Dagenais, John Wozniak, Rosemary Donatelli, Dorothy Larney. 



EDUCATION FACULTY 



CLASSICS FACULTY 



Standing: Charles A. Weisbrod, Rev. 
Raymond V. Schoder, S. J., Seated: 
Rev. Laurence E. Henderson, S.J., Rev. 
James J. Mertz, S.J , Dr. D. Herbert 
Abel. 





Standing: Dr. James D. Barry, James 
E. Kulas, Edward B. Babowicz, David L. 
Kubal, Rev. Edward L. Surtz, S.J., 
Sealed: Dion J. Wilhelmi, Susan G. 
Schroeder, Dr. John S. Gerrietts, Dr. Paul 
A. Hummert. 



ENGLISH FACULTY 



HISTORY FACULTY 



Standing: Ann McGarry, Dr. Franklin A. Walker, Rev. Louis Zabkar, Dr. Robert W. 
McCluggage, Rev. Francis X. GroUig, S J., Alan Reinerman, Louis Spitznagel, Thomas 
.\nderson, Vincent Howard, Dr Arnold Daum, Dr. Edward T. Gargan, Dr. Raymond 
H. Schmandt. Seated: Dr. Kenneth M. Jackson, Rev John A. Kemp, S.J., Rev. Jerome V. 
Jacobsen, S.J., Dr. Paul S. Leitz, Dr. John J. Reardon, Dr. Margaret O'Dwyer, Rev. John V. 
Mentag, S.J. 




42 



StanJing: Thomas R. Gorman, David 
Spencer, Harold B. Murph)'. Joseph Wolff, 
James Clarke. Seated: Martin J Svaglic, 
Julius V. Kuhinka, Rev. Carl J. Stratman, 
C.S.V., Dr. Patrick J. Casey. 




ENGLISH FACULTY 



MATHEMATICS FACULTY 



Standing: Dr. Robert Reisel. John Connelly, Dr. Richard Driscoll, 
Dr. Joseph Zajdel. Sealed: Mary Ann Schaefer, Rev. Charles Rust, 
S. J., Kathleen Hotton. 





Francis Sullivan, Alyce Bettag, and Jan 
Smoluch pause for a brief moment in 
their discussion of American history. 



43 




Stuiidiiig: MSgt. Harold Tovatt, M-Sgt. Fred Massaglia, M-Sgt. Melvin Wagner, Sgt. 1st 
Class Boyde Simpson, Seated: M-Sgt. Walter Jorgensen, Capt. John Sanderson, Lt. Col. 
Matthew Giuffre, Capt. John Gagin, Capt. Frank Gartman. 

MILITARY SCIENCE FACULTY 



MODERN 
LANGUAGE FACULTY 



Standing: Dr. Graciano Salvador, Dr 
George Gingras, Joseph Wandel. 
Seated: Dr. Mario Federici, Dr. 
Michael Flys, Dr. Valeria Laube, Dr. 
Albin Liaugminas. 



NATURAL 
SCIENCE FACULTY 



Robert Pearson, Dr. Lloyd L. Arnold, 
Dr. Yog Aauja, Dr. Philip Seitner. 





Don Gavin looks on as Dr. Francis J. 
Catania and Dr. John F. Bannan dis- 
cuss a passage in St. Thomas. 



PHILOSOPHY FACULTY 



Standing: Robert Armamentos, Rev. Lothar Nurnberger, S.J., Rev. Francis J. Powers, 
C.S.V., Rev. Leo J. Martin, S.J., Dr. John Bannan, Dr Richard Hinners, Dr. Francis J. 
Catania, Dr. James J. Cannon Jr., Rev. J. Donald Hayes, S.J., Charles A. Kelby, Gene Mc- 
Carney. Seated: Rev. William A Dehler, S.J., Rev. James V. Kelly, S.J., Rev. Torrens Hecht, 
S.J., Thomas J. Buckley, Gerard Egan, Rev. Carl J. Burlage, S J. 




45 




PHYSICS 
FACULTY 

George Bart, John M. Melchiors, Dr. 
Albert C. Claus, Rev. J. Donald Roll, 
S.J., Dr. Theodore G. Phillips, Conrad 
Polk. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 
FACULTY 

Standing: Dr. Gordon M. Patric, Rev. 
Robert C. Hartnett, S.J., George A. 
Wray, Seated: Rev. Joseph F. Small, 
S.J., Dr. Francis Schwarzenberg, Ur. 
Francis J. Powers, C.S.V. 



Standing: Vincent A. Pizani. John J. 
Haley. Seated: Rev. Vincent V. Herr, 
S.J., Marcella A. Twomey, Paul J. Von 
Ebers, Rev. Charles 1. Doyle. S.J., Dr. 
Horacio J. Rimoldi. 



PSYCHOLOGY 
FACULTY 



Standing: Burton Siegel, Dr. Joseph 
Devane. John Flanagan, Dr. Thomas 
Kennedy. Seated: Dr. Robert Nicolay, 
Dr. Edmund Marx, Dr Frank Kobler, 
Dr. Henry Lambin. 





SOCIOLOGY 

FACULTY 

Standing: Dr. Francis A. Cizon, John 
J. Lennon, Dr. Gordon C. Zahn. 
Seated: Rev. Sylvester A. Sieber, 
S.V.D., Rev. Ralph A. Gallagher, S.J., 
Dr. Paul Mundy. 



SPEECH 
FACULTY 

Standing: William C. Morris, Donalri 
J. Stinson, Donald H. Dickinson, Henry 
M Bussey II. Seated: Catherine M. 
Geary, Pearl M. Heffron^ Elaine G. 
Koprowski. 



Standing: Rev William A. Dehler, S.J., 
Rev John E. Mullin, S.J., Rev. Thomas 

E. Murray, S.J., Rev. Raymond F. Bel- 
lock, S.J., Rev. Thomas J. Bryant, S.J., 
Rev. John Felice, S J., Seated: Rev. Fred 

F. Bergewisch, S.J., Rev. Francis L. Filas, 
S.J., Rev. Robert J. Fox, S.J., Rev 
Edward F. Maher, S.J. 



THEOLOGY 
FACULTY 



Standing: Rev. Phillip T. Weller, Rev. 
Cornelius J. Bresnahan, C.S.V., Rev. 
Anthony R. Spina, Rev. Louis V. Zabkar, 
Rev. Matthais E. Fischer. Seated: Rev. 
Marcellus Monaco, Rev. Robert E. 
Henely, Rev. Thomas I. Healy, Rev. 
George A. Slominski. 





REV. WALTER L. FARRELL, S.J. 
Rector 



west S^iden college 



West Baden College is an undergraduate college of 
Loyola University located in West Baden Springs, In- 
diana. With its School of Philosophy and School of The- 
ology, West Baden College has become the training cen- 
ter for most of the Jesuits working in the Chicago area. 

The School has been constituted a Pontifical Institute 
and is empowered to grant the canonical degree of Li- 
centiate in Philosophy. The School of Theology has 
authority from the Sacred Congregation of Seminaries 
and University Studies to grant the degrees of Licentiate 
and Doctorate in Sacred Theology. 

The main building at West Baden College is known 
as the "Eighth Wonder of the World." For decades it 
had been a favorite vacation hotel whose circular struc- 
ture boasted the world's widest unsupported dome. Since 
then it has become a community of 254 Jesuits from many 
nations. Today, there are 111 Jesuits enrolled in the 
School of Theology and 85 in the School of Philosophy, 
along with an administration and faculty of 41 Jesuit 
priests and 18 lay brothers. 





REV. MICHAEL J. MONTAGUE, S.J. 
Dean of Philosophy 



REV. WILLIAM P. LeSAINT, S.J. 
Dean of Theology 



48 




Jesuits gather in the West Baden chapel for the annual commu- 
nity retreat. The retreatmaster is Rev. William J. Donaghy, S.J., 
former president of the University of the Holy Cross. 



The serenity and tranquility of an Indiana sun- 
rise mirror the dawn at the West Baden campus. 




Extensive gardens frame the West Baden Gjllege Building. 



49 





WEST BADEN 

Father Gary Godoy from Brazil retreats to a quiet corner of 
the library to do research for an advanced philosophy course. 



Advanced studies in Theology require the Jesuit scholastic 
to spend much of his leisure time in the well-stocked library. 




These West Baden scholastics represent the countries of Boli- 
via, Spain, Brazil, Uruguay, Venezuela, Japan, Cuba, Germany, 
Malta, India, Africa, Ecuador, Lithuania, and Poland. 




Jesuits take a break from studies 
and head for the hillside for a 
picnic and welcome relaxation. 





A close play at third base seems to 
have captured the interest of Jim 
Edwards as he anxiously awaits his 
turn in the batting circle. 





This secluded hilltop offers Tom Radloff and other scholastics 
a place to come and view the handiwork of the Creator. 




For fourteen years, these men have centered their every action 
toward the moment of ordination and formal consecration. 



51 




DR. RAYMOND J. SHERIFF 
Dcuii 



college o\ commevce 

Loyola University, realizing the trend toward spec- 
ialization in education, established the College of Com- 
merce as a separate and distinct unit in 1922. Under the 
capable supervision of Dean J. Raymond Sheriff and 
the Assistant to the Dean, Thomas L. Borrelli, the curric- 
ulum is constantly under supervision to see that it meets 
the requirements of rapidly changing world conditions. 

The professional objective of the College is the devel- 
opment of a student who will effectively meet the chal- 
lenge of the business world. This development is carried 
out in the latter portion of the Commerce program. The 
basic principles of contemporary business are presented 
through a core program of required theoretical and ana- 
lytical studies. The first half of the student's education 
is devoted to providing him with a background in the 
traditional liberal arts and sciences. The importance of 
this aspect of his education cannot be stressed enough. In 
his pursuit of truth every student must become acquainted 
with the areas of general knowledge in order to help him 
achieve a higher intellectual and spiritual development. 

With such a program, the College of Commerce pro- 
vides its students with a desire for continuing self- 
improvement so necessary for today's executive. 



DR. THOMAS BORRELLI 

Assistant to the Dean 




52 




JOHN A. ZVETINA 
Business haw 



DR. ORANGE A. SMALLEY 
Murketiiig 



DR. ROBERT A. MEIER 
Accountitig 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 
DEPARTMENT CHAIRMEN 



DR. THEODOSl A. MOGILNITSKY 

Economics and finance 



DR. RAYMOND A. MAYER 
Mu)iagement 






Staiiiliiig: Adam P. Stach, Richard F. Kusek Seuted: Rev. 
Dumas 'l. McCleary, C.S.V., Dr. Robert A. Meier, Martin t. 
Drebin. 



ACCOUNTING FACULTY 




John D. O'Malley, John A. Zvetina, John R. Jozwiak. 



MANAGEMENT FACULTY 



BUSINESS LAW FACULTY 




Dr. Walter H. Peterson, Dr. Raymond 
R. Mayer, Dr. Peter T. Swanish. 



54 




Standing: Alfred S. Oskamp, Dr. Joseph O. Englet, J. David Smith, Edwin H. Draine, 
Dr. Francis Murans. Seated: Dr. Sylvester M. Frizol, Dr. Theodosi A Mogilnitsky, Dr. 
Helen C. Potter. 



ECONOMICS AND FINANCE FACULTY 



MARKETING FACULTY 



Standing: Dr Gerhard W. Ditz, 
Gilbert C. Klose, Rev. Raymond C. 
Jancauskas, S.J., Seated: Dr. George J. 
Niarchos, Dr. Orange A. Smalley. 





RICHARD A. MATRE 
Dean 



University College began its educational activities as 
a downtown unit of Loyola in 1914. Through the years 
it has become a distinct undergraduate and graduate 
college of the University, administered by its own dean. 

The student personnel comprises high school grad- 
uates interested in completing a college program on a 
part-time basis in the evening, teachers in service who 
desire to earn credits towards a degree or a certificate, 
individuals seeking to develop their cultural or intel- 
lectual interests who are not necessarily working to- 
wards a college degree, men and women who wish to 
increase their value in employment and who seek ad- 
vancement in business, and students not interested in 
college credit who attend classes to satisfy their particular 
educational and cultural interests. 

The faculty of the University College includes the 
members of the day school faculty and is also supple- 
mented by professional men and women for the purpose 
of offering to the students the best instruction available. 

University College seeks to carry out the Jesuit edu- 
cational plan in all programs. Whether in liberal arts, 
business administration, education, or science, the cur- 
riculum aims to form the many sides of human nature 
into a whole and complete man. 



univevsiti) college 



Old Man Winter's icv blasts cannot prevent these determined University College 
students from attending night classes at Lewis Towers after a hard day's work. 





JOHN P. DONAHUE 
Assistant to the Dean 



56 




Students use the card catalogue in the Lewis Towers library. 



Marion Blake, Jill Cannon, and Linda Richards watch Marcele 
Canelas demonstrate the College's new Thermofax machine. 




A part of the Lewis Towers tradition is the elevator rush. 




scdool oj deniistvy 




DR. WILLIAM P. SCHOEN 
Dean 



The Loyola University School of Dentistry, the Chi- 
cago College of Dental Surgery founded in 1883, pres- 
ently takes a commanding position among the dental 
schools of the world. The primary objective of the 
School is to educate the student in the general practice 
of dentistry combined with an education in the social, 
moral, and spiritual values of life. The faculty under- 
takes this objective and thoroughly trains the student 
in the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of oral dis- 
eases and disorders of a direct dental relationship. 

The faculty endeavors to expand the knowledge of den- 
tal science through research. Placing an important value 
on graduate study, both graduate and postgraduate pro- 
grams are offered. Degrees in the field of periodontics, 
orthodontics, or oral surgery are offered in the graduate 
department. 

Because of the School's location in the heart of the 
Chicago Medical Center, clinical material for the va- 
rious departments is always sufficient to assure the stu- 
dent of a large and varied experience. The clinic pro- 
vides services for those people who require professional 
dental care but are experiencing financial difficulties. 

With more than seven thousand graduates, the School 
has an outstanding record. This fact is supported in the 
Chicagoland area where one out of every two dentists 
is a graduate of the Loyola University School of Den- 
tistry. The School, with its present calibre of faculty 
and students, is building on its previous achievements in 
its efforts to fulfill the School's objectives. Thus, the 
School will continue its excellent tradition of leadership. 



DR. FRANK M. AMATURO 

Secretary of the Faculty 




58 








DR. JOHN R. ALLISON 
Director of Clinics 



MARY JO WOLFE 
Librarian 





REV. FRANCIS A. VAUGHAN, S.J. 
Stuiient Counselor 







JOHN E. BLICKENSTAFF 
Director of Audio-Visual Education 



59 



^'1^ 



<»■ 



* 



( 




DR. HARRY SICHER 
AiiJlomy und Histology 




DR. GUSTAV W. RAPP 
Chemistry and Physiology 





DR. THOMAS L. GRISAMORE 

Bacteriology 
Director, Postgraduate School 



depAvtment 




DR. E. JAMES BEST 
Endodontics 




DR. GEORGE J. MATOUSEK 

I'ixed Prothesis 



DR. PAUL T. DAWSON 

Operative Dentistry 



60 



fiai 



etiAivmen 





DR. PATRICK D. TOTO 

Oral Diagnosis 




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DR. VIGGO B SORENSON 
Oral Surgery 



DR. JOSEPH R. JARABAK 
Orthodontics 



DR. WILLIAM P. BURCH 

Pedodontics 



DR. FRANK M. WENTZ 

Periodontics 
Director, Postgraduate School 



DR. ARTHUR J. KROL 

Prosthetics 






Dr. Harry Sicher, Dr. Nicholas Brescia, Dr. 
John O'Malley, Dr. Kenneth Nowlan. 



X 



Freshman dental students watch a 
graphic demonstration in a laboratory. 



ANATOMY AND HISTOLOGY FACULTY 




Dr. Kenneth Nowlan, Dr. Frank Luca- 
torto, Dr. Thomas Grisamore. 



62 




CHEMISTRY FACULTY 



Mrs. Pruitt, Aldona Propoulenis, Dr. 
Gustav Rapp. 



ENDODONTICS FACULTY 



Dr. Marshall Smulson, Dr. E. James Best, Dr. William Holahan, graduate student Dr. 
Guillermo Geruasio from Peru. 




Joseph Kizior examines occlusion on 
a model of a full denture setup. 






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OPERATIVE 
DENTISTRY 



Dr. Paul Dawson, Dr. Dale Kostiwa, Dr. 
John Coady, Dr. Thomas Russell. 



FIXED 
PROSTHESIS 



Dr. George Matousek, Dr. Henneman 
Glasso, Dr. Christensen, Dr. John Alli- 
son, Dr Handschu. 



Bill Ryan and Brian Koukal watch as Dr Restarski 
gives some pointers in the full denture laboratory. 




Dr. Patrick Toto, Dr. Mario Santangelo, 
Dr. Larry Chase, Maria Gylys, Dr. 
Charles Reeve, Dr. Kenneth Nowlan, 
Danute Augius. 




ORAL DIAGNOSIS FACULTY 



ORAL SURGERY FACULTY 



Students perform extractions in the oral surgery room. 





Dr. Becker, Dr. Sanders, and Dr. Ghosh 
discuss a case in the oral surgery lab. 



65 




ORTHODONTICS 

FACULTY 



Dr. Joseph Jarabak, Dr. Eugene Zylin- 
ski, Dr. Richard Shanahan, Dr. Bernard 
Widen, Dr. Patrick Gantt, Dr. David 
Edgar, Dr. Bernard Pawlowski, Dr. 
Steven Asahino, Dr. Thomas Fleming, 
Dr. Donald Hilgers, Dr. Kenneth Kemp. 



PEDODONTICS FACULTY 



Ronald Olen and Donald Gianoli examine a clinical patient in 
the Crown and Bridge Department of Loyola's Dental School. 



Dr. Joanna Baranouskis, Dr. William Burch, Dr. Ronald Nie- 
renberg. 






Bill Smith, Bill Misischia, and Ron Borer trim models. 



PERIODONTICS 
FACULTY 



Dr. Anthony Gargiulo, Dr. John KoUar, 
Dr. Rodriego Eiseman, Dr. Louis Oroz- 
lek. Dr. Fred Farcione. 



PROSTHETICS 
FACULTY 



Dr. Arthur KroU, Dr. Gerald Meyer, Dr. 
Fred Pacer. 




The School of Law of Loyola University, founded in 
September, 1908, and approved by the American Bar 
Association in 1925, confers the degrees of Juris Doctor 
and Bachelor of Laws. The method of instruction em- 
ployed by the School enables the student to thoroughly 
prepare for the practice of law. The School's courses 
yield primary attention to the law of Illinois but do not 
treat it exclusively. The Law School strives to enlighten 
the minds of its students in regard to their professional 
and Christian duties. Not only civil but also social and 
religious duties must be fulfilled by the student both as 
a lawyer and as a man. 

The School conducts both a day division and an eve- 
ning division and has a present enrollment of over 300 
students. 

The fine education offered by the School of Law of 
Loyola University is made possible through continuous 
survey and revision of courses offered by the faculty and 
through their employment of the most proficient and 
most recent studies in law. 




Law students can take advantage of the many reports, digests, 
and cases available for legal research in the Law Library. 




JOHN C. HAYES 
Dean 



sc 



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aiu 



FREDERIC D. DONNELLY 

Laif Librarian 




68 



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Standing: Vincent F. Vitullo. Richard V. Carpenter, Frederick D. Donnelly, John A. Zvetina. 
Seated: Francis C. Sullivan, John C. Hayes, William L. Lamey, Rev. William J. Kennealy, S.J.. 



WILLIAM L. LAMEY 
Associate Dean 




"And then Perry Mason turned to Tregg and said 




69 




Leisure time is spent discussing current events 
of legal import with one's classmates. 



SCHOOL OF LAW 



The Law School's Moot Court Room gives law students a chance to develop court techniques. 




Located on the Near North Side, the Law 
Building affords its students an opportunity 
to observe sessions of Chicago's law courts. 




A remote conference room provides students a place to prepare briefs for the next day. 




71 





Law students relax and have a cigarette after early classes. 



William L. Lamey instructs sophomore law students on an 
important subject concerning the jargon used at an inquest. 



The law library finds it's most frequent use between twelve and one o'clock on weekdays 
when students rush from early classes. 




72 




A familiar sight to the law student is Lewis Towers as seen from the Law Building. 




Cheerful secretaries are eager to assist the 
faculty and students whenever possible. 



SCHOOL OF LAW 



Tired feet and a weary mind are refreshed 
by this law student in the reference stacks 
of the Law Schools well-equipped library. 



73 





DR. JOHN F. SHEEHAN 
Dean 



sfrifcfi school 
o\ medicine 



The School advises advanced study and research which 
is accomplished through the postgraduate program. At 
the present, a significant research program is being con- 
ducted by the Pharmacology and Therapeutics Depart- 
ment and by the Biochemistry Department. Anatomy, 
microbiology, and physiology constitute the remainder 
of the School's extensive graduate program. 

For professional, research, and educational purposes, 
Stritch operates main clinics at Mercy Hospital, Loretto 
Hospital, Lewis Memorial Maternity Hospital, and Cook 
County Hospital. 

The high value placed on Christian ethics coupled with 
a medical education distinguishes Stritch School of Medi- 
cine from other medical schools. The faculty's ability to 
harbor this ideal in its students is the primary reason for 
the School's high rank among the leading medical schools 
of the world. 



An integral part of the University, the School of Medi- 
cine has risen to the point of being one of the finest 
Catholic medical schools in the world. Founded in 1915 
as the Loyola University School of Medicine and renamed 
the Stritch School of Medicine in April, 1948, it employs 
the most modern principles of medical education. Stritch 
not only strives for providing the student with a sound 
medical education but also attempts to foster in its 
students the ideals of high personal integrity, Christian 
ethics, and human charity. 

The Medical School develops the student into a doctor 
who will practice his profession in the field of teaching, 
research, or community service. Since its establishment 
forty-five years ago, the School has trained over 6,700 men 
and women. Today, in the Chicagoland area, one out of 
four doctors is a graduate of Stritch. 



One of the treasured possessions of the Medical School Library- 
is this photograph of the late Cardinal Stritch. 




74 




HELEN P. HUELSMAN 
Librarian 



DR. FREDERICK M. SELFRIDGE 
Head of Mercy Hospital Clinic 





DR. THOMAS P. GALARNEAULT 
Assistant Dean 



REV. JOHN W. BIERI, S J. 

Student Counselor 




7S 




STRITCH SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



Dr. Callahan checks on a patient's 
progress in the orthopedics ward. 



Edward Moorhead, Dr. Wladimir Liberson, Dr. Y. T. Oester, 
and Charles Marrow observe Dr. Alexander Karczmar's instruc- 
tions on the use of the Medical School's new Dynograph. 




Dr. Frederick Selfridge demonstrates the use of a fluorscope to 
senior medical student Thomas Rodda at Mercy Hospital. 




77 




Senior medical students James Quinn and Roderick Malone 
conduct a physical examination at the Mercy Hospital Clinic. 



STRITCH SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



Dr. Hugh J. McDonald examines a reprint with graduate stu- 
dent Leonard Banaczak in the cluttered biochemistry laboratory. 





1^ 



fW*<^A 



78 





Dr. Thomas Galarneault, Jr. demonstrates an important point 
in microbiology to graduate student James Halkias. 



Mr. Clawson shows John Gmelich the elbow. 



79 




Dr. Lincoln V. Domm chats with freshman medical students in 
the Gross Anatomy lab as an unidentified spectator looks on. 



STRITCH SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



Dr. T. P. Galarneault transfers viruses in an iso- 
lation hood. 



Junior med student Edward Moorhead discusses Organic Chem- 
istry with Drs. W. T. Liberson and Y. T. Oester. 








o 



I 



I 



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Ray Lynch examines a patient's record as Greg Matres, Bill 
LeMire, and Tom Meirink watch Dr Tobin gives a physical. 




/ 



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Dr. Madden and Dr. De LaTorre together with a nursing sister 
at Loretto Hospital consider a rather unusual case history. 




scdool oj nursing 



Now entering into its twenty-sixth year of training 
and educating young women to assume their places in 
a world clamoring for help in its battle against sickness 
and disease, the Loyola School of Nursing has good rea- 
son to be proud of its nursing program. 

This College, as all of the colleges of the University, 
endeavors to imbue its students not only with the tech- 
nical skills necessary in the nursing profession, but also 
strives to instill in each individual a knowledge of her- 
self, God, and her fellow man. This latter goal is 
achieved through the realization that in addition to the 
specialized concentration in nursing studies, a knowl- 
edge of the intellectual and philosophical aspects of man 
will prepare the future nurse more fully for a life de- 
voted to the welfare of others. Having learned to know 
herself, she then enters into the service of her fellow 
man with a well-founded assurance of her capabilities 
and a deep Christ-like concern for the mentally and phy- 
sically handicapped. 




GLADYS KINIERY 
Dean 





ESSIE 


ANGLUM 


Che 


lirman, Public Health Nursing 


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The School of Nursing offers two degree programs: a 
basic program designed for high school graduates which 
combines nurses' training with liberal arts studies, and 
a supplemental degree program which allows registered 
nurses to attain a degree by supplementing their three- 
year hospital diploma with college academic work. 

Loyola's prominence as one of four collegiate nursing 
programs in Illinois is well substantiated when one con- 
siders the keen competition aspiring Nursing School ap- 
plicants endure when seeking admission into the basic 
program. 




Standing: Marjorie Kaepplinger, Leona Smolinski, Margaret McDermott, Martha Goodrich, 
Marie ArregUin, Angelina Ambrosia, Frances Gedde, Mary Oneill, Theresa Petrone, Shirley 
Boettger, Lucille Flater. Stjnding: Mary Sloan, Cecelia Fennessy, Gladys Kiniery, Essie 
Anglum, Sarah Zeeman. 



Sarah H Zeeman (Chairman, General Nursing Program) and Cecilia M. Fennessy (Chair- 
man, Nursing) 




83 




Ann Zercher assists Frances Geddo in the hospital nursing orientation of Bernadette Breen, 
Helen Canning, Eleanor Terry, Barbara Rice, Claire Lareau, Jo Ann Evaskus, Alice Gerrity, 
Elizabeth Kenan, students in the General Nursing Program. 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Junior nurses Joan Schmidt and Cathy Marquis assist a patient 
at St. Francis hospital where the nurses take field training. 



Mary Muskus and Mary Poduska check patient's records, a part 
of the in-service training program at St. Francis Hospital. 





84 







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Sophomore nurses enter Madonna della Strada Chapel for the annual capping ceremony. 



Junior nurses await the presentation of their blue cap stripes. 




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Nurses Kathryn Cutler and Mary Poduska prepare an injection. 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 




Jerry McCarter, Peggy Fischer, the late Rev. William Devlin, Miss 
Rice, Mary Jane Marquis, and Peggy Tierney chat at the 25th 
anniversary breakfast. 




86 



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Arlene Lavinovich cheers up a young patient at St. Francis. 



In November the student nurses conduct a guided tour of the 
Loyola campus for prospective nurses and their parents. 



It's almost fun to be sick when Judy Kosloskus and 
Kereen Forster gives you all this attention. 





REV. RALPH A. GALLAGHER, S.J. 
Director 



institute o^ sociAl 

And 
inJusfrial relations 

In 1941, Loyola University founded the Institute of So- 
cial and Industrial Relations which offers courses on a 
graduate level to students seeking preparation and ad- 
vancement in the field of personnel administration, in- 
dustrial relations, and public administration. It also offers 
courses to students seeking training as sociologists in in- 
dustry or government, or as teachers of the social sciences. 

Such a program recognizes the strategic importance 
of employer-employee relationships in modern indus- 
trial society. Practical experience in various fields is 
available to the student through the cooperation of com- 
panies, unions, and governmental agencies which devote 
their time and energy to introducing the students to 
the actual operation of various phases of industrial re- 
lations. This plan is called the Internship Program. 

Five informal seminars are conducted for the part- 
time students who cannot take the Internship. These 
meetings give the student an opportunity to discuss the 
problems and practices of the various organizations with 
top-level men, and to supplement theoretical knowledge 
gained in the classroom. 



Dr. Julius Rezler discusses thesis possibilities in the field of social and industrial relations 
with graduate students Aloysius Memmel and Mathew Tharakan. 





Mrs. Mullady counsels I.S.I.R. students in the field of personnel administration. 



John M. Henegham, Dr. Julius Rezler, Rev. Ralph A. Gallagher, S.J., Paul B. Grant. 





MATTHEW H. SCHOENBAUM 
Dean 



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01 SOCIAL WOV 



I wov^ 



Social Workers seem to enjoy a case work lecture by Betty Begg. 




Social workers aid troubled people in solving diffi- 
culties which stand in the way of a productive and 
satisfying life. 

The Catholic social worker, in helping the underpriv- 
ileged, the needy, the physically and mentally ill, recog- 
nizes the essential dignity of man and appreciates both 
his natural and supernatural qualities. He applies moral 
and ethical principles in freeing individuals from the 
obstacles which impede their continued growth. The so- 
cial worker, then, assists in God's own work — the bet- 
terment of mankind. 

But to be an effective social worker, principles must 
be blended with a scientific knowledge of human be- 
havior, familiarity with social services, and, most im- 
portant, an intense, warm interest in people. 

The Loyola School of Social Work possesses a philoso- 
phy which permeates its entire curriculum. Using a 
framework of scholastic philosophy and Catholic theol- 
ogy the School integrates high professional comf)etence 
with the ideals of Christian life. 

The 179 students enrolled maintain a Student Council 
and school publication and, in addition, contribute ar- 
ticles to the other University publications. 




An important aspect of social work studies is the seminar, where students meet with faculty 
members to discuss various problems of social work; seen here is a group meeting with 
Margaret Dwyer, one of the leading instructors in the school of social work. 




Standing: Dr. Charles T. O'Reilly, Rev. Felix P. Biestek, S.J., Shirley Anderson, Mary A. 
O'Laughlin, Margaret Hviyei.Seated: Margaret O'Byrne, Mary E. Begg, Matthew H. Schoen- 
baum, Earline Woods, Martha Urbanowski. 



91 




Social workers use the informal discussion as an informal aid in ironing out minor problems. 




J. D. Zittler and Virginia O'Rourke discuss social work areas. 




92 





Daniel Behnke, James Underdown, Raymond Turner, Agnes 
Piszczek, and Sister Mary of St. Gabriel, pause in one of their 
frequent roundtable discussions for the Loyolan photographer. 



SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 



Racial Realtions, a prime factor in the field of social work, are 
discussed by this informal round table discussion group. 



93 




cdud guidance 
centev 



REV. CHARLES I. DOYLE, S.J. 
Director 



Established in 1941 and located at Lewis Towers is 
the Loyola Center for Child Guidance and Psychological 
Service. Six full-time clinical psychologists and a staff 
of trained assistants serve the Center and cooperate close- 
ly with schools, pollsters, judges, and physicians. 

The Center gives child guidance service of a psycho- 
logical (non-psychiatric) nature, dealing with behavior 
problems, school adjustment, academic remedial meas- 
ures, vocational guidance, interpretation of retardation 
and mental deficiency, pre-school training, and counsel- 
ing on special-school placement. It has served more than 
eight thousand clients and their families, providing per- 
sonal counseling of children, adolescents, and adults, with 
emphasis on the counseling of parents and the treatment of 
children's emotional problems by psychological therapy. 

The Child Guidance Center provides excellent facili- 
ties for training of clinical psychologists. Clinical train- 
ing is academically affiliated with the Graduate School. 
There are many soundproofed testing rooms, one-way 
view screens, tutoring rooms, a play therapy room, staff 
room, and recording room. 



Child Guidance Center Facult>'. Stjiii/iiig: Rev. Charles I. Doyle 
S.J., Dr. Frank A. Dinello, Rev. Gerald Grant, C.Ss.R., Rev 
Clyde B. Kelly, S.J. Seuted: Dr. Helen K Pancerz, Marcella 
A. Twomey, Frances L. Even, Susana Jimenez, Dorthy B. Auw. 




94 




Children enjoy playing with the many educational toys shown 
them by the instructors in the large Child Guidance Center. 



An encouraging look offers the child the incentive to continue 
on the path towards personal psychological adjustment. 




95 



dome study 
depAviment 



Home Study, aptly described as "the department which 
brings the University to the student," was established 
at Loyola in 1921 and has achieved recognition as a 
most useful means of spreading widely the benefits of 
academic training. Home Study is the system in which 
students study courses by mail and receive full college 
credit upon completion of a course. 

Correspondence is activated by a prospective student's 
application; in turn, the Home Study office sends this 
student his lesson plan, a sheet of instructions, and his 
instructor's name and address. The rest is between the 
student and his instructor. 

As a member of the National University Extension 
Association, Loyola's Home Study courses are widely ad- 
vertised through the N.U.E.A, Guide to Correspondence 
Studies. This makes it easy for the student to learn of 
the Home Study program. It also accounts for the fact 
that students from every state in the Union and some 
from the northernmost regions of Canada are enrolled 
in Home Study. Also among the students registered are 
servicemen who have received many benefits from this 
program. 

Loyola University is one of only two Catholic uni- 
versities offering a program of Home Study. 



1^ 





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MARY LOU McPARTLIN 
Director 



Karliene Mostek and Christel Cross are the secretaries in the Home Study Department, 

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REV. JEROME V. JACOBSEN, S.J. 
Director 



The Institute of Jesuit History of Loyola University is 
integrated academically with the Graduate School of 
the University. 

The purpose of the Institute is the promotion of the 
study of American Jesuit history by research and pub- 
lications in this field and by teaching history in the 
Graduate School of the University. 

An executive committee appointed by the President of 
the University regulates the academic activity of the In- 
stitute. Coordination with the Graduate School is ar- 
ranged beween the Director of the Institute and the 
Dean. 

The Institute has published a number of monographs 
on Jesuit history, several texts in history, and publishes 
a quarterly, Mid-America. 

Membership in the Institute is open to Jesuits and 
non-Jesuits possessing doctorates in philosophy in history 
and having qualifications for research in fields of special 
interest to the Institute. 



institute oj Jesuit (listovy 



This mural denotes the 
various paths of the early 
Jesuit missionaries 




UDENT 





OVERNMENT 



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GEORGE N. KOLLINTZAS 
Director 



JAMES F. FITZGERALD 
Chairman 



ide loyo/a union 



Pictured below is the new student union to be erected on the Lake Shore Campus. 




tL 





MADELEINE B. DOMAN 

Secretary-Treasurer 



WILLIAM M. MADDEN, JR. 

V ice-Chairman 



Faculty Advisory Board. Pearl M. Heffron. Rev. Robert J. Fox, S.J., Dr. William R. 
Trimble, Paul B. Grant, Joan Vaccaro. 




The Loyola Union, as stated in its Constitution, func- 
tions: "To unify the student body of Loyola University, 
to promote student unity in each school and college of 
the University, to provide liaison between the student 
body and the University, to support the religious pro- 
gram of the University, to encourage student academic 
and social societies, to govern itself according to sound 
principles of self-government, to form and uphold tra- 
ditions, to voice student opinion, to create wholesome 



relations among student organizations, to enlarge uni- 
versity life for succeeding generations of students, and 
to meet the need of a greater Loyola student body and 
of a greater Loyola University." 

The governing body of the Union is the Union Activi- 
ties Board. This is a permanent, continual, and repre- 
sentative body which meets seven times a year. It is 
composed of representatives from each of the schools 
and colleges, and also represents the various student or- 



union Activities 




LEO DHONT 

Representative, School of Social Work 



JOAN DUFFY 

Representative, Inlersorority Council 



KATHY HAWKINS 
Representative, Nursing Council 




JAMES MURRAY PAUL HOERNIG 

Representative, Arts Council Representative, Interfraternity Council 



PAUL DAVIS 
Representative, Graduate School 



EARL OLSEN 

Representative, University College 



102 



ganizations found on the campus. From this group a 
chairman, vice-chairman, and secretary-treasurer are chos- 
en. In addition to the students who are represented 
on this Board, a group of advisory members to the Board 
are chosen annually who represent the faculty and ad- 
ministration of Loyola University. 

Each year the Loyola Union plans major activities for 
the entire student body. Its first program is that of the 
Freshman Invitational Dance, held in honor of all new 



students of the University. The Pow-Wow is the next 
event to take place and officially marks the beginning 
of the basketball season. This weekend is filled with the 
float parade, dances, a jazz concert, and a pushball 
contest. Between semesters, the Ski Trip was held. 

The second semester brings on such activities as Charity 
Day, Orphan's Day, the Spring Festival, and, finally, the 
Senior Week program which is the highlight for all 
graduating seniors. 



5oar(J 



oara memoevs 



6, 




MELVIN KAMM 

Representative, Law School 



RONALD PAULSEN 
Representatiie. Organizations 



ROBERT WALSH 

Representative, Medical School 




LAWRENCE GRADY 

Representative, Commerce Council 



MONTE LEVITT 

Representative, Dental School 



JOHN O'REILLY BEULAH GINGRICH 

Representative, Religious Organizations Representative, Graduate Sursing 



103 




Michael Morawey (Tau Delta Phi), presi- 
dent of the Inter-Fraternity Council, and 
George KoUintzas, moderator. 



The Interfraternity Council unites all of the under- 
graduate fraternities for the purpose of working con- 
junctively with the University and for undertaking the 
fraternities' problems and relations. The Interfraternity 
Council promotes the welfare of fraternities and helps 
to develop the Christian gentleman and his education. 

The Council stresses the importance of fraternity rush- 
ing and pledging. This year it produced and sponsored 
the first Greek Week ever held at Loyola University. 
Greek Week serves as a general introduction to the fra- 
ternity system. The purpose of the activity was to ac- 
quaint freshmen with the various fraternities on campus 
in regard to who they are and what they do. Because of 
its success, the Interfraternity Council hopes to make 
Greek Week an annual event at Loyola. 

The Council strives for harmony among its members 
and works for close association with the Loyola Union 
and the administration of the University. 



intevjvAtevnity council 



Interfraternity Council. Standing: Thomas Brennan, James Szwed, Thomas Raclaw, Dennis 
Johnson. Seated: John Ansboro. Michael Morawey, Patrick Conion, Paul Hoernig. 




104 



The Intersorority Council was established to unite in 
a spirit of friendship and good will all undergraduate 
sororities, so that ideas may be exchanged and problems 
solved for the mutual benefit of all sorority members. 

The Council acts as a supervisory and mediative board 
for all sorority members, with the power to regulate 
rushing and pledging methods, and to rule on sorority 
chapters seeking establishment at Loyola. 

The Intersorority Council is composed of two repre- 
sentatives from each sorority and a chairman, secretary, 
and treasurer chosen from the main body. Joan Vaccaro 
acts as moderator. 

The Council's busy schedule includes the I.S.C. Wel- 
come Tea for freshmen women held each fall, and carry- 
ing out the activities of Greek Week and the joint rush- 
ing tea in early spring to better acquaint students and 
faculty with the role of the sorority woman on campus. 




Sheila O'Carroll (Kappa Beta Gamma), 
president of the Intersorority Council, and 
Joan Vaccaro, moderator 



intevsovoviiy council 



Intersorority Council Standing: Judith Kruzel, Ginny Louden, Alexandra Domes, Monica 
Kozak, Patricia Carney, Dianne Dybas. Seated: Joan Duffy, Sheila O'Carroll, Katharine 
Marrin, Pat Metz. 




105 




Arts Council Officers, Andrew Symanski, treasurer; Madeline Doman, vice-president; Michael 
Hartman, president; Monica Kozak, secretary. 



arfs council 



The Student Council of the College of Arts and Sciences is composed of rep- 
resentatives elected from a student body of approximately 3,000. It has as its 
purpose, as stated in its constitution: to initiate, organize, correlate, and support 
student activities. The Council acts to preserve student traditions and customs 
of the College and provides for effective means of cooperation between the fac- 
ulty and students. 

The Council is composed of fifteen students, presided over by a president, 
vice-president, treasurer, and secretary. In addition to the four Council officers, 
each class elects a president and vice-president to sit on the Council. A Nursing 
and Commerce student are appointed by their respective Councils to sit on the 
board. 

Aside from the parties, speaker meetings, and other class-sponsored programs 
which are under the direction of resp)ective class officers, the Student Council as 
a whole sponsors: Freshman Orientation, the Beanie Bounce, the Arts Council 
Mixer, the Student Directory, production affairs for the Variety Show, and the 
Mardi Gras Masque. In cooperation with the Commerce Council, the Arts 
Council publishes The Vndergrad, 

These activities are the efforts of the Council which have led to its advance- 
ment and success. 



106 




ARTS COUNCIL OFFICERS 



Junior Class Officers. James Harris, president; James Alex, 
vice-president. 



Senior Class Officers. James Laurie, vice-president: Thomas 
Raclaw, president. 



Sophomore Class Officers. Thomas Philpott, president: Michael 
Connelly, vice-president. 




107 



commevce counci 



ii 



This past year has been a most successful one for the Commerce Council. The 
Council, as a mediator between the administration of the University and the 
students of the College of Commerce, has held a series of programs and organized 
activities designed to fulfill its purposes. 

The officers of the Council include the presidents of the four classes who be- 
come president, vice-president, treasurer, and secretary according to class priority. 

Under the direction of these officers the Council sponsors: freshman counseling, 
panel discussion programs, the Commerce Council Mixer, the Sno-Ball Dance, 
class parties, the Honors Night Dinner Dance, Freshman Orientation, the Stu- 
dent Directory, and the business areas of the Variety Show. In cooperation with 
the Arts Council, the Commerce Council publishes The Vndergrad. The Com- 
merce Council has, this year, instituted its newest program, a get-together for 
recent graduates of the College of Commerce. 

These activities are evidence of the wishes of the Council to achieve and main- 
tain its purposes. 



Commerce Council Officers. Standing: Andrew Bourke, secretary: Arthur Wondrasek, 
treasurer: Robert O'Tolle, vice-president: John Nicholson, president: J. Raymond Sheriff, 
Dean of College of Commerce. 




108 




Senior Class Officers. James Fitzgerald, vice-president: John 
Nicholson, president: Dennis Johnson, secretary-treasurer. 





"^' it' #1.'%. 



A E 



COiMMERCE COUNCIL OFFICERS 



Junior Class Officers. Lawrence Gerber, vice-president; Robert 
O'Tolle, president: Robert Wall, secretary-treasurer. 





Sophmore Class Officers. John Burke, vice-president; Arthur 
Wondrasek, president: Donald Barrett, secretary-treasurer. 



Freshman Class Officers. Stephen Cox, vice-president; Andrew 
Burke, president; Patrick Brannen, secretary-treasurer. 



109 



nuvsing councils 

The Association of the Basic Students of the Loyola 
University School of Nursing, better known as the Nurs- 
ing Council, endeavors to encourage unity and cooper- 
ation among the members of the Association; to help 
members of the Association to develop the mental, spir- 
itual, and professional qualities necessary for the prac- 
tice of nursing in today's society; to promote participa- 
tion in the student activities of the University and local, 
state, and national student nursing associations; to aid 
members of the Association in the formation and de- 
velopment of skills in student government and encour- 
agement of student affairs. 

The Council schedules various events throughout the 
year to develop necessary qualities for the student nurse 
in supplementing her basic training. These include: a 
spring prom. Nursing Council Valentine Party, and va- 
rious charity projects. 

Through these programs the Council aims to serve the 
more than 200 Loyola student nurses. 




School of Nursing Association. Stuiitling: Margaret Stafford, 
Elizabeth Kenan, Mary Barber, Mary Ann Atkins, Essie Anglum 
(advisor). Seated: Mrs. Esther Jaffe, Margaret Mary Corrigan, 
Beulah Gingrich, Mary Frechette. 



Basic Nursing Association Standing: Janice Dittrich, Diane Peiniger, Beatrice Bouchon- 
ville, Mary Beth Mulcahy, Elaine Berube, Olive Schneider, Mary Bresingham, Kathleen 
Hawkins, Ann Whalen, Dorothy Merkle, Patricia McAleese, Theresa Petrone, Karen Sue 
Nelson. Seated: Geraldine McCarter, Margaret Fischer, Rita Rauen, Judith Kosloskus, 
Kathryn Cutler, Mary Kay Bussert, Patricia Matuszek, Marp Jane Marquis. 




110 




Medical School Council. Standing: Donald Kubino, Dominic AUocco, Donald Schrandt, 
Richard Kiley. Seated: Ronald Nemickas, Nort Flanagan, Robert Severino, Robert J. Walsh, 
Robert Hyndiuk. 



Jica/ school 



meaicAi scnooi counci 



ii 



The Student Council of Stritch School of Medicine of Loyola University as a 
student governing body encompasses four basic purposes. These are: to estab- 
lish unity between the students and the administration, to encourage extra- 
curricular activities, to act as liaison between students and administration, and to 
foster and maintain the principles of the medical profession in the student body. 

The composition of the Council, which is moderated by Fr. John Bieri, S.J., 
consists of representatives from the student body, the individual classes, two 
fraternities, the Student American Medical Association, and St. Luke's Guild. 

The Council's primary activity is St. Luke's Day which is celebrated annually 
on October 18th. At a morning convocation outstanding students are recog- 
nized and at the evening faculty-student dinner dance, deserving faculty members 
are given awards. 

Ahhough the Council is basically interested in the field of medicine, it suc- 
ceeds in fulfilling the needs of the students in university life. 



Ill 



dental scdool council 



The Student Council of the School of Dentistry was created by the student body 
with the aid and cooperation of the faculty, and approved by the president and 
trustees of the Loyola Union for the purpose of developing a broader cultural, 
social, and moral atmosphere and closer unity among the members of the Dental 
School. It is composed of fourteen members: two representatives from each class 
and one representative from each of the fraternities. 

The Student Council presides over class elections, fraternity rushing and 
pledging, and all organized student activities. It also sponsors the Winter Formal 
Dance, the Dental School Christmas Show, the Dental School News, and the 
Dental School Choir under the direction of Mr. Carter Francis. 

These activities sponsored by the Council are manifestations of the efforts of 
student leaders to fulfill the goals set for the Student Council. 



Dental School Council. Buck Row. Harold Hammond, John Madonia, Gerald Georgen, 
John Sullivan, Peter Roberson. Front Row: Richard Delo, Monte Levitt, Peter Cunning- 
ham, James Smith, Edmund Cataldo, Thomas Poison, 




112 




Student Bar Association. Standing: Conrad Fleeter, Gerald Dorf, Thomas Curoe, Denis 
Conlon, Melvin Kamm, John Philbin, Walter Smoluch, Ronald Neubauer, Clement Dern- 
bach. Seated: Thomas Kearns, Frank Reynolds, Frank McNamara, Thomas Haynes, Edmund 
Sajewski. 



student 6ar Association 



Organized to unify the administration of student affairs and extra-curricular 
activity in the School of Law, the Student Bar Association of Loyola University 
furnishes the fledgling attorney with a variety of professional outlets as well 
as providing an area of social life with fellow professional men. Every student 
in the Law School is a member of the association. 

The Student Bar Association is modeled after the American Bar Association, 
and thus it enables the members to acquire professional skills and to maintain 
the dignity of the law profession. 

The organization's government is carried on by a board of governors, 
composed of four, together with the members of a constitutionally prescribed 
committee. Officers are elected at the beginning of the academic year, and the new- 
ly elected president appoints members of the association to the various committees. 



113 




Social Work Council. Standing: Julius Zilttes, Ernest Leydet, Leo Dhont, Rev. Edward 
Erbe. Seated: Mary Berg, Darcy Reynolds, Robert Bonovich, Vivian Farsen. 




i work 



social woiR counci 



\\ 



The Student Council of the Loyola University School of Social Work is 
composed of four members elected from each class. The Council meets monthly 
with a faculty advisor. There are three main spheres of activity which are the 
concern of the members of the Student Council: religious, professional, and social. 

The Student Council arranges for an annual day of recollection for mem- 
bers of the student body and faculty. Another major religious function spon- 
sored by the Council is the annual retreat. 

Under the sponsorship of the Student Council monthly meetings of the 
first year students are held. Various speakers are invited to discuss topics re- 
lated to first year courses. 

The Student Council sponsors a wide range of social activities. These 
include preparations for orientation week and a party given for the June graduates. 



114 




University College Student Council. Stunding: John Erickson, Peter Quinn, Robert Fitz- 
gerald. Seated: Nancy Donahue, Virginia O'Rourke, Earl Olsen, Mary Jo Shannon. 



linipersity college counei 



II 



ii 



The evening school student through his attendance at University College 
automatically belongs to the Student Association of the University College of 
Loyola University. From this association, the University College Student Coun- 
cil is formed. Through cooperation with the University Administration, the 
Student Council seeks to activate the evening school student to partake in extra- 
curricular activity that will serve a two fold purpose of interest to both the stu- 
dent and to the University. In this manner the Council seeks to bring the bene- 
fits of self-government to the evening school student body. 

The atmosphere of the evening school campus differs significantly from 
any other campus on the University. The Council realizes this difference and 
tries to maintain policies and activities that reflect the character of its constit- 
uency. The Council tries to bring its points to the student through direct contact. 
It assists Dean Richard A. Matre and his staff at the time of registration. A 
program called the Dean's Coffee Hour is sponsored by the Student Council at 
the beginning of each semester. The Council invites all new students and any- 
one else who is interested to attend this social orientation program. The ad- 
ministrative program is presented by a representative of the Dean's office. Re- 
ligious facilities available to the evening school student are explained by the 
chaplain. 

Social programs are presented by the various evening school organizations, 
and privileges of the evening school student as a student of Loyola are explained. 



115 




Steblcr Hall Council. Slaiiilini;: Mar\ Anne Doolc>. Marie 
Pindok. Martina Panozza, Karen Sue Nelson. Seated: Maureen 
McMahon, Missy Cavender, Mary Pierce, Judy Brinkman, 
Dorothv Zale. 



women s dovmitovy 
councils 



Representing students in the two University residence 
halls are the Delaware and Stebler Dorm Councils. These 
both work to enforce dormitory regulations and plan so- 
cial activities. 

Delaware Hall has been a Loyola dorm since 1956 and 
at present has sixty residents. Donna CoUinson, who is 
from Canada, is Dorm Council President, and Mary Ber- 
gan is the Vice-president. Charlene Rettig is Secretary; 
Stephanie Siu, a native of Hawaii, is Treasurer. Social 
Chairman is Mary Fran Cogger. Delaware students can 
boast of a dormitory average of 2.7. 

Opened only this past September, Stebler Hall has 
accommodations for eighty girls. Officers of the Stebler 
Dorm Council are: Missy Cavender, President; Dottie 
Zale, Vice-president; Judy Brinkman, Secretary; and 
Mickey Dooling, Treasurer. Maureen McMahon is So- 
cial Chairman. The average grade point for Stebler Hall 
residents is 2.6. 

Both dormitories have participated in University so- 
cial activities, including decorations for Pow-Wow, 
entrance of a candidate in the Miss Loyola Contest, 
and a between semester "Final Fling" party. 



/ 

Delaware Hall Council. Sealed, back row: Ann Linskey, Charlene Rettig, Stephanie Siu, 
Mary Bergan, Judy Gergren. Seated, front row: Mary Fran Cogger, Donna CoUinson, Nancy 
Slattery. 




116 



loyola d^ill council 




Loyola Hall Council. Standing: Jim Morkunas, Tom Minogue, John Zeitz, Bill Senica, 
Robert Egan, Mike Camino, Bill Curren, Bob Frenzel, Al Deliguidice. Seated: Chuck 
Olech, Peter Trummer, Joe Two, Steve Gilmour, Denny Alexander, Jim Mini, Bill Nico. 



The Loyola Hall Dorm Council is the student govern- 
ing body of the 360 residents of the Hall. The Council's 
function is to do all that it can to provide the residents 
of the Hall with those conditions which will make their 
stay more beneficial to themselves and, in turn, more 
beneficial to the University. With this in mind, the 
Council provides an active social schedule which this 
year included more than a half dozen mixers with the 
girls of area schools as well as Loyola coeds as guests. 

In order to become as closely united with the Uni- 
versity's functions as possible, the Council for the first 
time this year, participated in the popular "Ugly Man" 
and "Miss Loyola" contests. The spirit of the dorm resi- 
dents became evident as the year progressed and came to 
a peak the night before the Pow-Wow celebration, when 
the hall's animated house decoration developed a short 
circuit and was destroyed by fire. The Hall residents, 
under the leadership of their Council, quickly came to 
the rescue and in less than twelve hours of continuous 
work, managed to put together a new house decoration 
which won first place in the Pow-Wow judging. At the 
same time, members of the Council handled the bonfire 
for Pow-Wow weekend, which for the first time in three 
years, came off as scheduled. 

The dorm spirit continued through the basketball sea- 
son and brought about the inauguration of the bus trips 



to the stadium basketball games, which became one of 
the most successful programs of this year's Council. 

Inside the dorm, the Council acts as a liaison between 
those various groups which service the dorm and at the 
same time serves as an opinion group for the admini- 
stration. However, all the programs sponsored by the 
Council are completely under its jurisdiction and control. 

In the interest of its students, the Council is presently 
waging a campaign to allow for the seating of a Dorm 
Council member on the Union Activities Board. The 
Council members have also spent a considerable amount 
of time this year campaigning for more workable sched- 
ules regarding vacations and retreats in the future school 
calendars. 

Besides the social programs mentioned, the Council 
presents a program during freshman week for new resi- 
dents which includes a get-acquainted mixer and a special 
supper. A special supper honoring the freshman and 
varsity basketball players and the annual dorm picnic, 
which this year was held at the Indiana Dunes, rounds 
out the school calendar. But the Loyola Hall Council 
is not entirely involved in politics and social activities. 
A nightly rosary and Sunday benediction in the dorm 
chapel is held under the auspices of the Council, and, 
in the academic realm, the first semester average of all 
residents was a healthy 2.77. 



117 



'!.*» 




Slue ^ey national donor jvAtevniiy 



Blue Key National Honor Fraternity was founded at the University of 
Florida in 1924. Since that time, it has come to be accepted as the leadership 
equivalent of scholarly Phi Beta Kappa. The organization now boasts a total 
membership of more than 35,000. 

Loyola's chapter of Blue Key was established in 1926 through the efforts 
of the Rev. Robert C. Hartnett, S.J., Dr. William P. Schoen, and Dr. Paul S. Lietz. 

Five years ago, the local chapter was reorganized as a service group designed 
to assist the administration and faculty, and to support and encourage all stu- 
dent organizations. Blue Key members have been appointed permanent student 
marshals for all Convocations and Commencements, and have represented the 
Dean of Admissions in the Chicago area high schools for the recruitment of 
new students. 

The fraternity represents the elite of Loyola's student leaders. Its mem- 
bership includes the presidents of most undergraduate fraternities, the presi- 
dent of the Student Union, various council presidents, and the recognized leaders 
of Loyola's many organizations. 

Each year the Blue Key chapter selects and bestows an award on the Faculty 
Man of the Year and the student groups which have most distinguished them- 
selves in the social, academic, and cultural fields. 

The new members were initiated at the Pick-Congress Hotel this year. 
Among those initiated was the Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S.J., President of 
the University. 



Blue Key Officers. Standing: 
Michael Hartman, Alumni Secre- 
tary; James Fitzgerald, Recording- 
Secretary - Treasurer; E u gene 
Nowak, Correpsonding Secretary. 
Seated: Joseph Gajewski, Presi- 
dent; Nicholas Motherway, Vice- 
president. 




120 




Blue Key Members. Standing, hack rou-. Peter Cunningham, II, William Bird, Bernard 
Blau, Michael McConnell, Ronald Olech, Joseph Scully. Standing, third rou-. Kenneth 
Robison. James Harris, Thomas Paison, Paul DiFranco, David Marcus, Patrick Conlon, 
Larry Gerber, Dennis Johnson, Michael Morawe>, John Billimack, George Hostert, James 
Murray, Vernon Zbylut. Seated, second row: John Chisholn, John Erickson, Norman 
Lellenberg, Earl Olsen, John Sullivan, James Alex, Michael Sullivan. Kneeling, front row: 
Richard Delo. Carter Francis, Robert Wall, Anthony Ward II, Thomas Raclaw, Alan 
Jorgenson, Robert O'Toole. 



The Initiation Dance in honor of 
the new Blue Key members was 
held in the handsome Gold Room 
of the Pick-Congress Hotel in the 
latter part of March. 




V 



^•^-^r^-' 



\s!St^ 



™*»*'^^-^^: 






Who's Who. Standing: Donald Gavin, Alan Jorgensen, Judith Kohnke, Eugene Nowak. 
Seated: James Fitzgerald, Michael Sullivan, Dennis Johnson, Thomas Raclaw. 



lufio's lufio Among students in 
am^rican universities And colleges 



Who's Who Amotig Students in American Universities and Colleges 
was first published for the school year 1934-35. This year marks the 
third time that Loyola University has participated in this national rec- 
ognition organization. 

Selection for the organization is based upon a student's scholarship, 
his leadership, his cooperation in educational and extracurricular ac- 
tivities, and his promise of future usefulness. Each institution partici- 
pating is assigned a separate quota large enough to give a well-rounded 
representation of the student body, but small enough to confine nomi- 
nations to an exceptional group of students. 



122 



w 



do's wdo 



Who's Who. Standing, buck rou': Ronald Severino, Robert Walsh, John Ward, Robert 
Bonovkh. Standing, middle row. John Nicholson, Harold Aral, Earl Olsen, Nick Mother- 
way, Ernest Leydet, James Smith. Seated: Virginia Louden, Peggy Fischer, Barbara Rice, 
Patricia Metz. 




nmHiiiitr r TTtfn 



123 




Whos Who. Standing: Philip Augustine, Michael Morawey, Anthony Ward, Joseph 
Gajewski. Seated: Michael Hartman, Paul Davis, James Szwed. 



lufio's lufio Among students in american 
colleges And univevsities 



Those students chosen for Who's Who for 1961 are: 
Harold R. Arai, School of Dentistry; Philip J. Augustine, 
College of Arts and Sciences; Robert C. Bonovich, School 
of Social Work; Paul J. Connelly, School of Dentistry; 
Paul H. Davis, Graduate School; Madeline B. Doman, 
College of Arts and Sciences; Margaret L. Fischer, School 
of Nursing; James F. Fitzgerald, College of Commerce; 
Joseph J. Gajewski, College of Arts and Sciences; Donald 
D. Gavin, College of Commerce; Michael J. Hartman, 
College of Arts and Sciences; Dennis D. Johnson, Col- 
lege of Commerce; Alan C. Jorgenson, College or Arts and 
Sciences; Judith J. Kohnke, College of Arts and Sciences; 
Judith A. Kruzel, College of Arts and Sciences; Ernest E. 
Leydet, School of Social Work; Virginia M. Louden, 
School of Nursing; William M. Madden, Stritch School 
of Medicine; John J. McHugh, Stritch School of Medi- 



cine; Frank J. McNamara, Stritch School of Medicine; 
Patricia A. Metz, School of Nursing; Michael R. Mor- 
awey, College of Arts and Sciences; Nicholas J. Mother- 
way, College of Commerce; John F. Nicholson, College 
of Commerce; Eugene F. Nowak, Jr., College of Com- 
merce; Earl C. Olsen, University College; Kenneth J. 
Printen, Stritch School of Medicine; Thomas S. Raclaw, 
College of Arts and Sciences; Barbara S. Rice, School of 
Nursing; Ronald M. Severino, Stritch School of Medi- 
cine; Mary E. Simmons, School of Nursing; James A. 
Smith, School of Dentistry; Michael D. Sullivan, Col- 
lege of Commerce; James J. Szwed, College of Arts and 
Sciences; Robert J. Walsh, Stritch School of Medicine; 
Anthony G. Ward, College of Arts and Sciences; John J. 
Ward, University College. 



124 



a/pfia sigma nu 



Alpha Sigma Nu was founded at Marquette Univer- 
sity in 1915 by the Rev. John A. Danihy, S.J. The Society 
continued as a local organization until 1921 when Creigh- 
ton University was invited to join, and a chapter was 
installed there on December 18, 1921. 

The organization opened its Loyola Chapter in 19.^9. 
At the present time, there are thirty Jesuit colleges and 
universities in membership. Since its beginning at Loy- 
ola, over 300 alumni of the fraternity have filled positions 
which reflect the high esteem of their colleagues in the 
professions and in the world of business. 

A student, to be eligible for membership in the fra- 
ternity, must rank in the upper twenty-five per cent of 
his class, and must, in addition, demonstrate a devotion 



to scholarship, a loyalty to principle, and a capacity for 
service of the highest order. Men are inducted into the 
organization after having been chosen by the President 
of the University on the nomination of the Deans and 
Alpha Sigma Nu members. 

The officers of the organization during the current 
year were Richard W. Bock, President; John J. McHugh, 
Vice-president; Daniel W. Placzik, Secretary; and Robert 
Williams, Treasurer. 

Alpha Sigma Nu, in addition to giving recognition to 
the outstanding qualities of its members, actively assists 
their continued development both within the University 
and the world beyond it. 



Alpha Sigma Nu. Standing: Robert Williams, Alec A. Lazur, Dr. Robert Walsh, John 
W. Hauch, James P. Chambers, Robert V. Serauskas, Daniel W. Plaszek. Seated: John F. 
Nicholson, Richard W. Bock, Rev. James F. Maguire, S. J., John J McHugh, 
James F. Fitzgerald. Missing from picture. Dr. Alfred McManama, Dr. Karl Nishimura. 




125 



cncumievenee 






Circumference, the Women's Leadership Honor sorority, was established 
at Loyola in 1958 and has approximately forty members. Primarily a service 
organization, Circumference is intended to honor those students who have dem- 
onstrated their leadership, scholarship, and service to the University. 

In order to be eligible for nomination to Circumference, a girl must be a 
junior. She must have at least a 2.5 cumulative average, be a member of two or 
more Loyola organizations, and hold office in at least two organizations. She 
must be nominated by an academic dean or a moderator of a student organi- 
zation, and must then be voted in by a minimum of three-fourths of the mem- 
bership. 

Members of Circumference include students in all undergraduate divisions of 
the University; Arts, Commerce, and Nursing — both regular and supplemental. 
The girls often serve as hostesses or usherettes at University functions. 

The emblem worn by Circumference members is a key faced with two inter- 
twining circles; one containing the torch of knowledge, the other the gavel of 
leadership. 

Moderator of Circumference is Miss Mariette LeBlanc, Dean of Women. 




Circumference Standing: Judy Kohnke, Patricia Podraza, Lana Doman, Lenore Quinn, 
Rose Piraino, Patricia Metz, Lucille Anichini, Joan Eckman, Kathy Hawkins, Joan Duffy, 
Virginia Louden, Monica Trocker, Rita Rauen, Patricia Carney. Seated: Margaret Near, 
Judy Kruzel, Donna CoUinson, Patricia Cordan, Pauline Zaranka, Marian Enright, Mary 
Lee CuUen, Marybeth McAuliffe, Ellen Miller, Elizabeth Cesna, Mary Kay Bussert, Loraine 
Lang, Juliana Kaczor, Monica Kozak. 



mi!. .rftt^Jtv^fj 




126 



deli 



sig 



ma rno 



fi, 



Delta Sigma Rho was founded in Chicago, Illinois, in 1906. It is the oldest 
honorary fraternity in the speech field in the United States. Itsr purpose was and 
still is to give recognition to those students outstanding in forensic ability. The 
five-pointed star found on the Delta Sigma Rho key symbolizes those qualities 
which are necessary for a fine public speaker: thought, conviction, self-control, 
truth, and courage. 

Delta Sigma Rho is relatively new at Loyola University, a chapter having 
been installed February 14, I960. Its newest members were inducted on Sunday, 
March 12, 1961. They include: the Rev. Robert C. Hartnett, S.J., Andrew Leahy, 
Frank Covey, John Fernandez, Mary Lee Cullen, Kenneth Feit, and Timothy 
Mater er. 

Delta Sigma Rho is at present developing a plan to support public speaking 
in many different areas at Loyola University. 



Delta Sigma Rho. Standing: Richard Bock, Kenneth Feit, Mary Lee Cullen, Tim Materer, 
Thomas Dienes. Seated: Philip Augustine, Donald Stinson, moderator; Leroy Blommaert. 




127 




Loyolan Awards Committee. Standing: 
Robert Mullenback, Dr. Kenneth M. 
Jackson, Robert Wall, Rev. Thomas 
J. Bryant. Seated: Mary Lee CuUen, Miss 
Joan Vaccaro, Frederick Green, chair- 
man; Patricia Mulvihill. 



annua 



1 loyol 



an aiuaras 



J; 



JAMES A. SMITH 
School of Dentistry 






ROBERT J. WALSH 

Stritch School of Medicine 



WILLIAM J. MARTIN 

School of Law 





128 



MICHAEL J. HARTMAN 

College of Arts and Sciences 



LUCILLE C. ANICHINI 

College of Arts and Sciences 







L,'w-*> 




^5^ w 



,--^ 



jm 1 *"2^ 



JAMES F. FITZGERALD 
College of Commerce 




JOSEPH J. GAJEWSKI 

College of Arts and Sciences 



Recognizing the great demands made upon student leaders and the value of 
the services which such students perform for Loyola, the Loyolan inaugurated, 
in 1959, the practice of presenting awards to nine graduates who have distin- 
guished themselves by their leadership in the university. 

To select the recipients of the awards, an independent committee of stu- 
dents and faculty was selected on the basis of impartiality and wide knowledge 
of the student body. To help the committee in its selection, the moderators of 
the various student organizations, the deans of the university, and certain ad- 
ministrators were asked to submit nominations for students they considered 
eligible for the awards. 

The editorial board of the Loyolan presented the awards at the annual 
Blue Key Dinner Dance at the Pick-Congress Hotel. 



VIRGINIA M. LOUDEN 

School of Nursing 



ANTHONY G. WARD. II 

College of Arts and Sciences 




129 




Phi Sigma Tau. Stjriding: Thomas Dienes, Michael Carbine, Judith Pacer, Raymond Farrell, 
Rev. Robert W. Mulligan, S. J , moderator; Kenneth Feit, Geen Kizior, Leroy Bloomaert, 
Dan Henny, Jerry Hozvierz. Seated: John Kottra, Dennis Gates, Lori Lang, John O'Reilly, 
Pauline Zaranka, Paul Pravolone, Carl Cavanotch. 



pfii sigma fau 



Phi Sigma Tau Officers. Dennis Gates, Pauline Zaranka, John 
O'Reilly, president; Paul Provolone. 




Phi Sigma Tau is the national honor society for col- 
lege men and women interested in philosophy. It is com- 
prised of twenty-five chapters. Loyola University is one 
of only two Catholic universities to have a chapter. 

Loyola's chapter of Phi Sigma Tau was established in 
1955. Its membership today is comprised of fifty students 
who have been invited to join the society by the Deans 
of Loyola's colleges. 

The organization is designed to serve as a means of 
awarding distinction to students having high scholar- 
ship and to promote student interest in research and ad- 
vanced study. These students are provided with the op- 
portunity to have research papers published in the so- 
ciety's journal, Dialogue. 

Moderated by Father Mulligan, who is also the Na- 
tional Vice-president, the society meets four times a 
year. Each meeting features a lecture by a professor from 
Loyola or another university. These lectures are open to 
the public. This year's speakers included Fr. Martin 
D'Arcy of Oxford University, and Rev. Francis J. Powers 
of Loyola University. 



130 




Beta Alpha Psi is the National Honorary Accounting 
Fraternity. Its members are selected from among the 
accounting majors on the basis of scholastic achievement 
both in general business subjects and in accounting. 
This fraternity provides its members with professional 
recognition for their achievements. 

The Beta Iota Chapter was installed on the Loyola 
campus on November 10, I960. Since its installation, 
it has provided its members with many opportunities to 
become acquainted with the accounting profession. It 
also provides service to the University by assisting the 
accounting department in many of their extra-curricular 
projects. The Beta Iota Chapter also publishes a journal 
which presents current accounting problems to the ac- 
counting students for their own advancement. 

Included in the membership of Beta Alpha Psi are the 
accounting faculty and Loyola alumni who have received 
honorary memberships for their professional achievements. 



Beta Alpha Psi Officers. Standing: Michael Sullivan, Donald 
Gavin, Terry Kucharski, Henry Wisniewski, President. 



6efa alpfia psi 



Beta Alpha Psi. Standing: Michael Sulli\an. Ronald Olech, Donald Gavin, Henry Wisniew- 
ski. Sealed: Jack Kelly, Dale Granacki, James Fitzgerald, Terry Kucharski, William Quinland. 




131 




-"-•^ 



s* - — • 



ijr ^ ^:^rs.. ■ 



*i£:^^». .-,-.-,?', 



e^]SjS 




a/pfia deltA gAmrriA 



Alpha Delta Gamma is a unique organization in that it is the only one 
which can lay claim to being a national. Catholic college, social fraternity. 
Alpha Delts, as they are usually called, pride themselves in being both national 
and Catholic, and their pride extends to their participation in Loyola activities 
as well. 

Alpha Delta Gamma is the oldest chapter of any national and social fra- 
ternity here at Loyola, originating in 1924, and has traditionally emphasized and 
promoted competition among school organizations, with the hope of producing 
a school spirit not yet realized. 

Alpha Delta Gamma maintains and repeatedly improves a fraternity house, 
probably the most distinctive building on Kenmore Avenue. 

One of the greatest achievements of this fraternity during the past year 
consisted in sponsoring its 36th annual Thanksgiving Eve Dance. This dance, 
along with a Chicagoland Catholic College Queen Contest originated by Alpha 
Delta Gamma two years ago, has proved to be a great social success at Loyola. 
Chicagoland inter-school relationships have also been strengthened and improved 
as a result of this Queen Contest. 

In the past year, an innovation has come to Loyola in the form of an 
Interfraternity Greek Week, composed of various types of Greek games such 
as discus throwing. The winning team, composed of Alpha Delts, is pictured 
above. One of the now traditional accomplishments of Alpha Delta Gamma 
has been first place in the Interfraternity Sing Contest, having taken first place 
four times in the contest's five year existence. 

However, apart from all its trophies and winnings. Alpha Delta Gamma 
takes pride in the main function of its existence, which is the fostering of 
manly Christian ideals among its members. 



Alpha Delta Gamma Standing: Mick Donahue, Frank Sobel, Mike Barry, Jay Sullivan, 
Phil Smith, Jim Bush, John Mulcrone, Bob Shanewise, Joe Siblik, Fred Ludwig, Walt 
Wysznski, Pat Murphy, Peter Wisniewski, Jim Murray, Tom Raclaw. Seated: Bob Mullen- 
bach, Dave Raia, Bob Genova, Tony Ward, Bob Mundt, Art Wondrasek, John Farrell, 
Mike Naughton, Bob Burke. 




134 





Alpha Delts George O'Reilly, Pat Murphy, and Jim Murray 
relive the year's events at the fraternity's summer formal. 



Officers. Standing: Ed Donahue, Robert Shanewise, Jay Sullivan, 
Recording secretary; Robert Mullenback, pledgemaster; James 
Bush, Sergeant-at-arms; Michael Naughton, Steward. Seated: 
John Mulcrone, Vice-president; Frank Sobol, L. T. Intramurals; 
Thomas Raclaw, President; Peter Wisniewski, Treasurer; Joseph 
Siblick, Historian. 



The victorious Alpha Delts gather together after their triumph 
in the Greek Week track meet held during the first semester. 




135 




Alpha Kappa Psi. Standing: Michael L>nch, Kdward Downes, John lewis, James Sandner. 
Seated: Robert Filip, Patrick Conlon, James Fitzgerald, John Payne, Joseph O'Neill. 



alpfia ^appa psi 



Gamma Iota chapter of Alpha Kappa Psi national fraternity in Commerce 
has enjoyed a most active and successful year. Starting in October with the win- 
ning of the Intramural Tennis Championship through the ability of Paul 
Gauvreau, the fraternity made many significant contributions to the University. 
Pat Conlon was one of the major contributors to Greek Week as Chairman of 
the General Smoker. Pat later was to perform a similar task as Chairman of the 
Fall Frolic. The SAL program saw Jim Talamonti pushing the members to a 
1009f return. Jim Fitzgerald and Bob Wall, through their efforts on the Com- 
merce Council, also helped toward a better Loyola. 

One of the major highlights of the first semester was the induction dinner 
at which Dr. Raymond Mayer was installed as a faculty member of Alpha Kappa 
Psi. Jim Sandner received the "Man of the Year" award for his services to the 
organization. 

The major social function of the fraternity is the New Year's Eve party 
which this year was, according to the members, the best in recent years. With 
the coming of exams, things quieted down somewhat, but upon completion, a 
skating party was held at Bass Lake, Indiana. 

Elections were held in January, and the new officers installed were: Bob 
Wall, President; John Grimes, Vice-president; Ron Rosseate, Secretary; John 
Johlic, Treasurer; Mike Donahoe, Assistant Treasurer; and Dick Dunne, Pledge- 
master. These new officers are hopeful of a bigger and better year and many 
professional and social activities have already been scheduled. 



136 




Richard Dunne, Pledgemaster, points out some of the rules and 
procedures of Alpha Kappa Psi to four of the spring pledges. 




Alpha Kappa Psi Officers. Standing: Richard Dunne, Master 
of Ritual; John Johlic, Treasurer; Michael Donahue, Assistant 
Treasurer. Stjtecl: John Grimes, Vice-president; Robert Wall, 
President; Ronald Rossate, Secretary. 



John Johlic, Bob Wall, and Dick Dunne along with one of 
their pledges, engage in a little close harmony at a party. 




137 



a/pfia omegA 



In order to unite the students of dentistry and to live up to the standards 
of their profession, Alpha Omega National Fraternity was founded at the Penn- 
sylvania College of Dental Surgery in 1908. 

"Harmonia, Amor, et Veritas" Harmony, Love, and Truth are the guide 
posts to Alpha Lambda Chapter of Loyola, which was established in 1932, fol- 
lowing in the footsteps of their founding brothers. This motto has inspired the 
members of Alpha Omega over the years in such a fashion that the membership 
of this national fraternity has advanced to between four and five thousand. The 
fraternity also boasts of seventy-five national chapters in various dental schools 
throughout the country. 

This first national Jewish fraternity has provided a tradition of which its 
members are indeed proud. It attempts to carry on this tradition through adult 
activities which appeal to the level of the members. 

Each year the fraternity fills its calendar with events such as smokers, a 
Halloween Dance, and an April Dinner Dance. It also sponsors many activities 
appealing to both the cultural and professional interests of its members, such as 
informal lecture discussions with members of the faculty, and guest lecturers 
speaking on topics concerning various fields of dental surgery. 



Alpha Omega. Slaniiing: Dr. .Mian Klein, Dr. Marshall Smulson. Dr. Richard Nierenberg, 
Larry Rubin, Harold Kessler, Anthony Mandel, Joseph Lieberman, Sam Libman, Sam 
Noskin. Seated: David Marcus, Stanley Kantor, Michael Feinberg, Alan Lauter, Max 
Berman. 




138 






Alan Lauter, Joe Lieberman, and Tony Mandel seem to be 
amused as they examine and comment upon the drug exhibit. 



~y 



Officers of Alpha Omega. Max Herman, Michael Feinberg, and 
Stanley Kantor. 



Members of Alpha Omega take a few minutes after classes to 
discuss current dental literature found in the dental library. 




139 




Alpha Tau Delta. Standing: Geraldine McCarter, Eleanor Zabiaka, Monica Trocker, 
Patricia Metz, Rita Raven, Rosemary Fraser, Jean Jankovec, Margaret McAndrews, Jane 
Donovan, Kay Jahnke, Joan Tengblad, Ellen McCann, Mary Ann Hopkinson. Seated: 
Alfreda Pack, Caroline Medl, Verna Christian, Virginia Louden, Violet Stasiak, Mary Kay 
Bussert, Emma Lee Wills. Kneeling: Katherine Cutler, Mary Ellen Kovac, Maureen Martin, 
Margaret Fischer, Cecile Liebl, Nancy Swieton, Diane Anstett. 



alpfia fau de/fa 



Alpha Tau Delta, National Professional Fraternity for Women in Nursing, 
was founded February 15, !921 at the University of California, Berkeley. Chap- 
ters are found at colleges and universities where there are basic collegiate pro- 
grams in nursing. Xi Chapter, the largest sorority at Loyola, was formed at 
Loyola University in 1957. 

The purposes of Alpha Tau Delta are to promote higher professional stand- 
ards in the field of nursing education; to develop the field of nursing through 
a more thorough preparation of its members; to inaugurate specific projects that 
enrich the field of professional nursing; and to form a close bond of friend- 
ship, fellowship, and mutual understanding among college women in the nurs- 
ing profession. 

Alpha Tau Delta sponsors four professional meetings, participates in the 
Variety Show, the Float Parade, Interfraternity Sing, Intramural Sports, and in 
charity projects which include thanksgiving baskets, helping a needy family 
at Christmas time, and supplying two first communicants with clothes. For the 
last three years. Alpha Tau Delta has won the Outstanding Award from Student's 
Associates of Loyola in contacting high school seniors. 

This year the members were able to participate in the Silver Anniversary 
of Loyola University's School of Nursing. Alpha Tau Delta also sponsors a 
communion breakfast for seniors, a parent-daughter dinner, a Christmas dance, 
Faculty Tea, Founder's Day Dinner, and a closed retreat. They are also respon- 
sible for the orientation of students in new clinical areas. 



140 




Alpha Tau Delta. Standing: Mary Lou Horley, Mary Ann 
Barnett, Barbara Miedzianoski, Mary Beth Mulcahy, Julie Fish, 
Jan Dittrich, Mary Poduska, Judith Ryan, Kathleen Hawkins, 
Nancy Mysyk. Seated: Barbara Lemley, Bea Bouchonville, 
Celeste Renier, Elaine Berube, Barbara Phillips, Maureen 
Doherty, Kereen Forester. Kneeling: Maureen McMahon, 
Kathleen Loftus, Esther Deszcz, Sharon Chwierut. 




Alpha Tau Delta Officers. Standing: Judy Ryan, Social Chair- 
man; Mary Kay Bussert, Custodian; Nancy Swieton, Historian; 
Kathy Hawkins, Recording Secretary. Seated: Caroline Medyl, 
Treasurer; Mary Poduska, Pledge Marshall; Virginia Louden, 
President; Mary Ann Hopkinson, Vice-president; Rosemary 
Frazier, Social Chairman. Kneeling: Pat Metz, Pledge Mistress; 
Peggy Fischer, Editor; Monica Trocker, Corresponding Secretary. 



Alpha Tau Delta's members and rushees gather around the re- 
freshment table at the sorority's first semester Rushing Tea. 




141 



edi ffiefa upsilon 



Chi Theta Upsilon, a local sorority on both campuses, is celebrating its 
third anniversary this year. Founded to give its members close and lasting friend- 
ships, diversified academic, religious, and social activities, and to contribute to 
Loyola's traditions, the sorority has made many advancements in these areas 
during the past year. 

The year-old Committee for Improvement is responsible for these activities. 
This committee has sponsored theater parties to see Harry Belafonte and A 
Raisin in the Sun; lectures including one by Lucille Anichini and Dianne Pal- 
lasch speaking about their European tour; a bowling party; a visit to the Art 
Institute; and other activities to appeal to all types of interests. Most of these 
activities have been for members only, but some were open to all, and in the 
future, more activities will be opened. 

The sorority participated in the SAL program, Interfraternity Sing, Ugly 
Man Contest, ISC Greek Week, and other events on campus. As a part of its 
yearly calendar the sorority had a Christmas party for the orphans at St. Vin- 
cent's several off-campus parties, and finally, this spring, a mormal dinner dance 
to celebrate Founder's Day and the induction of its new members. 

The members have also been very active in other organizations, and several 
have received recognition this year for their efforts. Judy Kohnke, former presi- 
dent of Chi Theta Upsilion, is not only the first woman Co-Editor of the 
Loyolan, but was also chosen for Who's Who Among Students in American 
Colleges and Universities. Three of the members, Patricia Carney, Ellen Miller, 
and Patricia Podraza, were this year inducted into Circumference, the Women's 
Leadership Honor Society. 



Chi Theta Upsilon. Statniing: Margaret Schneider, Katherine O'Leary, Mary Fran Torres, 
Katleen Keogh, Laurence Dupre. Seated: Ellen Miller, Darlene O'Brochta, Mary Kattner, 
Josephine Tomaszewski, Judy Kohnke, Ann Roehrich. 




142 







Sue Dupre, Karen Kearns, Joan Reese, Lorrie Rintz, Sharon 
Keinath, Farida Dzinich, and Marge Lowe take time from 
rushing activities to glance through the sorority scrapbook. 



Chi Theta Upsilon Officers. Standing: Jo Tomaszewski, Histor- 
ian; Mary Laskowski, Corresponding Secretary; Pat Podraza, 
Recording Secretary. Seated: Mary Kattner, Vice-President; Pat 
Carney, President; Laureen Dupre, Treasurer. 



Chi Theta Upsilon. Standing: Peggy Greubel, Claire Hardraan, 
Carol Fulgoni, Mary Jo Luschek, Mary Laskowski, Stella 
Stasulaitis, Joyce Moreth Seated: Kay Marrin, Pat Podraza, 
Pat Carney, Rae Rutecki, Geen Kizior, Gerry Murphy. 




143 




Delta Sigma Delta. Standing: Gordon Thorell, Larry Coyne, David Esser, Robert Velligan, 
Paul Polydoran, Kenneth Wacker, Ronald Zamarin, Joseph McGuill, Peter Roberson, 
Frank Visalli, Peter Atsaves, Robert Gauthier, William Bevan, Daniel AUegretti, James 
Green, Dennis Zielinski, Ralph Madonna, Ray Nowak. Seated, third roic: Floyd Rashid, 
Robert Berquist, Peter Cunningham, Bruce Boke, Ken Robinson, Velton White, James 
Pride, L>nn Lunde, Thomas Hauff. Seated, second rou-. William Whitcomb, Ralph Earnest, 
Paul Connelly, Ronald Errico, George Cuonzo, Matthey Lombardi. Seated, first row. 
Harold Arai, Paul Di Franco, Joseph Carney, Charles Bend, James Rota, Gilbert Winter, 
Robert Calderwood, Joel Divin. Seated, lower left earner: Steve Chantos, Pat Spilotro. 



deli 



si^ma 



deli 



The purposes of Delta Sigma Delta, a national dental fraternity, moderated by 
Dr. John M. Coady, are to maintain high professional standards and to foster 
scientific, ethical, and professional progress. Beta Chapter was organized at the 
Loyola School of Dentistry in 1885. Its house is located at 710 S. Ashland 
Boulevard. 

Delta Sigma Delta can claim the honor of having had members of the frater- 
nity in administrative capacities within the School of Dentistry from its beginning 
to the present time. It is very proud of this record. 

As part of is social programs, he fraternity sponsors al all-school picnic, as 
well as a Christmas party and a St. Patrick's Day party. 

Delta Sigma Delta exists for its members, and its members, realizing this fact, 
have continually devoted themselves to maintaining the honor of the fraternity. 



144 




Delta Sigma Delta Officers. Standing, hack row. Gordon 
Thorell, Gilbert Winter, Larry Coyne. Standing, front row. 
Paul DiFranco, James Pride, Thomas Hauff. 




John Reynolds, Frank leruUi, and Chuck Tavares watch as 
Hu Scott attempts to beat the never-ending game of solitaire. 



Thomas Hauff, Frank Boylon, and Leonard Bitner relax in 
the comfortable living room of the Delta Sig House. 




145 



deli 



a sigrriA pi 



Gamma Pi Chapter of the International Fraternity of Delta Sigma Pi was 
installed at Loyola in the fall of 1950. It is one of 110 undergraduate chapters 
which has grown from the fraternity's origin at New York University in 1907. 
As a professional commerce fraternity, Delta Sigma Pi has as a prominent pur- 
pose providing a supplement to a business education through guest speakers and 
industrial tours. At the same time, it gives its members an active and diversified 
social calendar. 

During this year. Delta Sig became proud owners of a fraternity house one 
block from Lewis Towers, the first fraternity house in that area. It houses a 
membership which at mid-year numbered 67 active members, making it the 
largest undergraduate fraternity. 

Delta Sig has held the Blue Key Award as "Social Organization of the Year" 
during the last two semesters. Its social program includes a Founder's Day 
Commemoration, an Initiation Dinner-Dance each semester, the annual Bal Rose 
at which the Rose of Delta Sig is crowned, and numerous other parties through- 
out the year. 

The members of Delta Sigma Pi have also established a bloodbank for the 
use of whomever they may designate. They also won the L.T. Intramural Banner 
for the third year in succession. The fraternity points with great pride to the 
leadership its members have shown in student government, organizations, and 
publications. 

An important objective of the Delta Sigs is the promotion of a fraternal 
bond which joins its members in the ideals of brotherhood. 



Delta Sigma Pi Thomas Murphy, Jim Marra, Dan Huber, Joe Bajko, Tom Guerra, Ed 
Strens. Larry Kerstern. Steve Perry, Tom Lyons, Larry Grady, Tom Moloney, Erich 
Lademann, Gerry Kucera, Tony Mastro, Arch Johnston, Tom Lyons, Ron Priore, John 
Billimack, Mike Casserly, Rich Kosek, Dave O'Neill, Ray Hartman, Mike Sullivan, Norb 
Florek, Ed Cunningham, Conrad Ulz, Rich Carroll, Jack Connolly, Terry Guilfoyle, Bert 
Matousek, John Sobota, Dale Granacki, Nick Motherway, John Sullivan, Don Fortney, 
Jim Alex, Dick Lucas. Jack Nicholson. 



-41 



y\ 



o P 



'J 



I 



V! 



-s>^. 





Delta Sigma Pi Officers. John Sullivan, Treasurer; Nick Mother- 
way, President; Don Fortney, Sr. Vice-president; John Billimack, 
Secretary; and Michael Sullivan, Vice-president, stand before 
their newly acquired fraternity house located at 832 N. Wabash. 



Nick Motherway, president of Delta Sigma Pi, and Dale 
Granacki accept the award for their float from Jackie Schmelter. 



Delta Sigma Pi. Standing, back row. Karl Dash, Don Ridge, 
Bill Werner, Chuck Harrison, Mike Fitzpatrick, Joe Lang, Tom 
Stump, Peter Karambalas. Standing, middle row. Tom Ockal, 
Gerry Casey, Jim Santo, Bob Killarcky, Don Jakalski, Chuck 
Papish. Seated: Ron White, Jack Conley, Don Hanley, Jack 
Burgman. 




147 




Delta Zeta Chi. Standing: Barbara Cadero, Kathleen Peet, Mary Deulieger, Carolyn Mack, 
Pamela Mocarski. Seated: Jeri Kozolwski, Marianne Bower, Carol Wrobel, Jackie Rattay, 
Sue Troglia. Kneeling: Sue Rotta, Betty Dominic. 



delta jefa c^\ 



The sisters of Delta Zeta Chi believe that pledging is not a period of sub- 
jection and punishment, but a set duration of time in which the sorority and 
its prospective members get to know each other better. This concept is carried 
out as each new pledge class is inducted. To complete their pledge program, the 
Delta Zetas hold a formal Induction Dinner-Dance each spring. 

Delta Zeta Chi was founded to promote a unifying force among the under- 
graduate women of Loyola University. It is the purpose of this sorority to stimu- 
late an active school spirit by participation in all University functions and ac- 
tivities, as well as to nurture leaders and scholars in all fields of study. This is 
accomplished by the bond of friendship existing among the sisters by which 
they strive to become better individuals spiritually, mentally, and socially. 

Approved by the University in September, 1959, Delta Zeta Chi is the newest 
sorority at Loyola. In accordance with their policy of active participation in 
University activities. Delta Zeta has participated in such functions as the Inter- 
fraternity Sing, Ugly Man Contest, SAL program, the ISC Greek Week, and all 
Pow-Wow festivities. Sorority members are also represented in such organiza- 
tions as the Coed Club, SAL, the Intersorority Council, Wasmann Biological So- 
ciety, American Chemical Society, Historical Society, Young Democrats Club, and 
the Math Club. 

Last October, Delta Zeta sponsored an open Halloween dance, "The Bone 
Orchard Bounce." Other social events include rushing teas for prospective mem- 
bers, as well as various closed parties. Delta Zeta also has its share of beauty 
as exemplified by the candidacy of one of its members in the Miss Loyola Contest. 



148 




The sisters of Delta Zeta Chi display their ingenuity and talent 
in the IFC Sing by winning first place in the sorority com- 
petition with the "Trolley Song" from "Meet Me in Saint Louis." 




Diane Dybas, Kathleen Peet, Ann Vanriensdyk, Pamela Mocarski, 
and Carol Wrobel duck through the wind on Lake Shore. 



Delta Zeta Chi Officers. Standing: Ann Vanriensdyk, Treasurer; 
Dorothy Cizek, Publicity Chairman; Dolores Baker Secretary. 
Seated: Christine Petroskey, Vice-president; Alexandra Domes, 
Pledgemistress; Diane Dybas, President; Mary Kent, Historian. 




149 



^appa Set3i gAmruA 



Epsilon Chapter of Kappa Beta Gamma Sorority, since its establishment at 
Loyola in 1954, has held as its purposes: to promote a spirit of fellowship and 
service among the members, to uphold the interests of the University, and to 
encourage higher scholarship. In pursuance of these goals, Kappa has become 
a group proud of its accomplishments, traditions, and ideals. 

To fill the prescription for a healthy campus life, the members engage in 
many and varied activities. Highlights of Kappa's social calendar are their two 
traditional formal dances, the Kappa Knight Contest and Party, teas for pros- 
pective members, and closed gatherings. Also included are many summer ac- 
tivities and the bi-annual conventions held in different cities. 

Kappa's accomplishments number many. This year Kappa won recognition 
for its outstanding work in the SAL drive, and an award for its entry in the 
Loyola Union Pow-Wow Float Parade. Kappans won third prize in last year's 
Loyola Fair, and two of its members were entered in the Miss Loyola contest. 
Individuals hold offices in the Coed Club, Intersorority Council, and the Arts 
Council. The Kappas also took part in the Interfraternity Sing and Variety 
Show. As their charity project for 1961, the members assisted in a clear-up 
party at Marillac House. 



Kappa Beta Gamma. Standing: Bernadine Bednarz, Lilfian Smrha, Eleanor Geiger, Mary 
Ann Bamberger, Sheila OCarroU, Mary Kay Loess, Barbara O'Brien, Pat Nobilia, Joan 
Coscioni. June Antonucci. Seated: Diane Wcislo, Carrie Douichi, Joyce Allard, Judy Duda, 
Marion Amidie, Darlene Pietraszewski, Monica Kozak, Helen Slattery, Monica Gillmore. 




150 





The IFC Sing gave the sisters of Kappa Beta Gamma a chance 
to display their musical talents to their fellow students. 



Kappa Beta Gamma Officers. Standing: Joan Coscioni, Pledge- 
mistress; Monica Kozak, I.S.C. representative; Carrie Dovichi, 
Treasurer. Seated: Mary Ann Bamberger, Historian; Sheila 
O'Carroll, President; Mary Kay Loess, Recording Secretary; 
Eleanor Geiger, Corresponding Secretary. 



Members of the Kappa Beta Gamma Fall Pledge Class, Barbara 
O'Brien, Lillian Smrha, Diane Wcislo, Bernadine Bednarz pose 
with their Pledgemistress, Joni Coscioni, at their induction. 




151 




Phi Alpha Delta. Standing: Thomas Dowd, Frank Petro, Kenneth Ditkowsky, William 
Moran, William Page, Andrew Leahy, Joseph Tuohy, Ronald Maksym, James Griffin, Daniel 
Radocha, William Nellis, Dennis (^onlon. Sealed: Thaddeus Wyroski, Edmund Sajewski, 
Phillip Piety, Edward Keavy, Richard Brennan, Bruce Golden, Thomas Kearns, Gerald 
Dorf, Howard Miller, Walter Smoluch, Gene Ediin. 



phi a/pfia deltA 



Housed in the gray-walled building known as the Loyola Law School, there 
is an assemblage of students dedicated to binding together the various classes 
of the Law School and linking inseparably alumni and present students. Most 
important of their goals is the desire to create and maintain a feeling of pride 
and devotion to law, the profession, and the school. This association is the Phi 
Alpha Delta Law Fraternity. Their aim is to the future, and so the accomplish- 
ments of their goals are measurable only by reference to the successful growth 
of the individual members of the fraternity, and, in turn, the growth of the school. 

Phi Alpha Delta measures amongst its accomplishments, individuals who 
attained greatness in the service of country and profession such as: former Presi- 
dent Harry S. Truman; former Vice-president Richard Nixon; Senator John 
Sparkman; former President Woodrow Wilson; and Supreme Court Justices 
William O. Douglas, Thomas C. Clark, and Charles E. Wittaker. 

At Loyola, Phi Alpha Delta is headed by Justice Bruce E. Golden, Vice- 
justice Thomas P. Hickey, Jr., Clerk Gerald L. Dorf, Treasurer Edward P. Keavy, 
and Marshal Walter J. Smoluch. The success of the present members and of the 
Law School will be the means by which to measure the fraternity's current 
accomplishments. 

The conception of PAD was the result of the Illinois Supreme Court case 
of hi Re Day, 181 111. 73, wherein the admission requirements for the bar of the 
day were challenged. This controversy nurtured the formation of the "Law 
Students' League," which gave rise, at Loyola and three other schools, to the em- 
bryo of the largest legal fraternity in the world. There are 83 active and 45 alumni 
chapters, including Loyola's Daniel Webster Chapter, which has 30 active members. 



152 




Members of Phi Alpha Delta bide their time in the Law School 
lounge during one of the breaks between night school classes. 




Phi Alpha Delta Officers. Standing: Walter Smoluch, Marshall; 
Edward Keavy, Treasurer; Bruce Golden, Justice; Gearld Dorf, 
Clerk. 



Bruce Golden, Justice of Phi Alpha Delta, opens one of the 
weekly meetings while other officers and members listen. 




153 



pfii Seidi pi 



Phi Beta Pi dates back to 1891 when its Alpha Chapter was organized at 
the University of Pittsburgh Medical School. Alpha Omega Chapter was brought 
to Loyola's Stritch School of Medicine in 1921. At present, the fraternity 
has thirty-two chapters in medical schools throughout the United States. 

The history of the Alpha Omega chapter is as illustrious as that of the 
national fraternity itself. Particularly noteworthy is the fact that Dr. L. D. 
Moorhead, one of the chapter's founders and former Dean of Loyola's Medical 
School, achieved greatness in the medical profession. Today this medical genius 
is commemorated in the annual Moorhead lectureship of Phi Beta Pi. 

Alpha Omega maintains a chapter house for its members near the Medical 
School. Here, the burdens of medical school life are alleviated by the congenial 
fellowship which exists within the ranks of the fraternity. It is also here that 
the members gather at the various professional and social events sponsored by 
the fraternity for a few moments of well-earned relaxation. 



Phi Beta Pi. Standing: John Belmonte. Paul Morrow, Paul Mahoney, Dick Hollacraft, John 
Ballus, Nick Burriesci, Dick Thorn, Tom DeSilvio, Al Timperman, John Johns, Seated: 
Bhemud Persaud, John Fochman, Larry Brown, Dean Sorensen, Micky Geiss, Frank Tucci, 
Marty Klenda, Greg Fisher. 




154 





Dick Thorn, Paul Mahoney, and Dean Sorenson review the 
day's assignments in their room at the Phi Beta Pi House. 



Phi Beta Pi Officers Standing: Tom DeSilvio, Treasurer; John 
Johns, President. Seated: Bhemud Persaud, House Manager; 
John Belmonte, Secretary. 



Frank Tucci, Larry Brown, Greg Fisher, and Mickey Geiss take 
a break from studies for a relaxing game of Bridge. 




155 




Phi Chi Members. Standing: Pat Scanlon, Taft Roe, Greg Louvieaux. William Keenan, 
Raym Ponce, John Fennell, Chas Smith, William Gatti. Seated, middle row: Yoshio 
Hosobucki, Raym Romanus, Bernard Palus, Joseph Sutley, Kenneth Herfkens, Fred Udekwu. 
Seated, front row: Nicholas Burik, Raym Hurm, Michael Curtin, Jack Henderson, Joseph 
Lombardo, John Sobut, Victor Joe. 



fii cfii 



Phi Sigma Chapter of Phi Chi National Medical fraternity dates from 1907, 
when it was founded as a local medical fraternity. Shortly after its inception, 
the members of this active group expressed a desire to affiliate themselves with 
the national organization of Phi Chi. The Chapter was installed at the twelfth 
national convention of Phi Chi held the following year in Baltimore. 

At present, most of the members of the fraternity are housed in quarters at 
712 S. Ashland Boulevard. These quarters are composed of three houses, two of 
which have been consolidated into one fraternity unit where the bulk of its ac- 
tivities are centered. 

In spite of the large size of the organization, the members of Phi Chi show 
an unusual closeness. This spirit is motivated by the friendship naturally acquired 
under the fraternity system, as well as the constant sharing of personal interests 
in the medical profession. 



156 




John Fennell, Fred Udekwu, William Gatti, Leonard Kut, and 
Raym Hurm are served in the Phi Chi House by Victor Joe. 




Phi Chi Officers. Richard Conley, John Ambre, Leonard Kut, 
Joseph Kurkanin, Pat Scanlon, Charles Schutt, Daniel Kott. 



Nicholas Burik and Joseph Sutley are the first ones to the 
mail box at the Phi Chi House to see if they have mail. 




157 



pi a/pfia lambda 



Pi Alpha Lambda, one of the oldest social fraternities at Loyola, has been 
for thirty-six years an integral part of the University. 

The members of Pi Alpha Lambda continue the fraternity tradition of enter- 
ing into University activities with enthusiasm, competing vigorously in inter- 
fraternity competitions, both athletic and social, and by excelling in their many 
endeavors. Such activities as the sponsorship of the seventh annual Intercollegiate 
Dance, the crowning of the Pi Alph candidate as "Miss Loyola" for the sixth 
time, the intramural football championship, and the annual Summer Formal have 
afforded just pride to the members of the fraternity. 

Pi Alpha Lambda is not overly interested in stressing the social side of 
college life. Since its founding, the fraternity has increased its scope of activities 
to the point where every organization at Loyola — athletic teams, honorary societies, 
student government, chairmanships and committees — will usually contain the 
names of two or three Pi Alphs who are distinctly prominent in the activities of 
those organizations. 

Examples of fraternity activity in these fields include the President of the 
Senior Class, and, for the fourth consectutive year. Treasurer of the Arts Council. 
Fraternity members are actively engaged in Loyola's major athletic attractions, 
the basketball, track, and swimming teams. Such honorary societies as the Blue 
Key Fraternity et al, include within their organization members of this fraternity. 
This brief enumeration is only one indication of the varied interests, activities, and 
participation of the membership of Pi Alpha Lambda. 



Pi Alphia Lambda. Slundiug: Jack Moustakis, Jack Ansbro, Tom Tyler, Andy Symanski, 
Frank Bauergert. Barry McRaith, Mike Haves. Jimy Meagher. Seat'jd: Frank Neidhart, 
Tom Flanagan, Bob Donnelly, Pete Kne Jim Nettleton. 




158 





ii5sim«^S 




Pow-Wow Weekend saw the members of Pi Alpha Lajnbda 
assemble a float with the theme "He's Got the Whole World." 



Pi Alpha Lambda Officers. Standing: Barry McRaith, Vice-presi- 
dent; John Crnokrak, Sergeant at Arms; Jim Laurie, Treasurer. 
Seated: Jack Moustakis, Pledgemaster; Jack Ansbro, President; 
Tom Coffey, Secretary. 



Pi Alpha Lambda. Standing: Tom Coffey, Bob McDermott, 
Ray Broderick, Jim Laurie, Mike Jolivette, Bob Tufo, Jim 
Reilly. Seated: Tim Hawkins, Dennis O'Connor, John Crnokrak, 
Jack O'Farrell, Jim Mulcrone. 




159 




J^ p (^ 



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Psi Omega.. Bi^ck row: J. Carter, J. Smith. K. Nielson, M. Levitt, J. Buznas. Sixth row: N. 
Griesen, F. Goheen, P. Stimson, B. Purcell, R. Hedquist, W. Randolf, I. Rysdan, J. Vernero, 
T. Flint, D Burns, G. Darnell, A. Fry, E. Gelinas, T. MuUaney, G. Dumke, L. Finley, 
T. Gorman, G. Swenson. Fifth row: G. Boatwright, B. Grunath, M. Francis, C. Francis, 
R. Grenda, L. Brady, E. Givens, N Marchelya, T. MuUan, T. Farrant, R. Kozal, R. 
Podwika, P. Caras, M. Kirkwood, T. Cavanaugh, L. Antonacci. Fourth row: G. Seiffert, 
J. Rasmusson, D. Mackinac, J. Asterino, R. Madura, H. Jensen, L. Navrat. Third row: 
T. Felhaver, K. Goljan, R. Baginski, T. Carroll, W. Kohler, J. Kizior, L. Koch, P. Bennett, 
T. Tucker. Second row: R. Borer, E. FoUico, H. Vieth, T. Paison. First row: E. Cataldo, 
R. Collins, R. Chrisholm, Dr. Dale Kostiwa, G. Tarsitano, W. Smith. 



psi omegA 



Psi Omega is the Loyola School of Dentistry's largest fraternity. The 
fraternity has as its objectives to cultivate the social qualities of its members; to 
assist its members in all their laudable undertakings; to exert its influence for 
the advancement of the dental profession; and lastly, to surround each member 
vv'ith friends to whom he may turn for advice and assistance. 

The fraternity has become an integral part of the School of Dentistry. 
Academically, its members have shown their excellence by maintaining a consis- 
tently high level of scholastic achievement. In addition to cultivating the profes- 
sional aspirations of its members, Psi Omega maintains a program of social events 
which begin with those functions at which the fraternity welcomes incoming 
freshmen to the School of Dentistry. The Freshmen Open House, Freshmen 
Smoker, and Freshmen Pledge Banquet are the leading events on the social 
calendar of the fraternity. 

Psi Omega is proud of its past record; its members look confidently to 
the future. 



160 





Richard Bostyan and William Thomas, president of the fresh- 
man class, compare notes in one of the freshman dental courses. 



Psi Omega Officers. Stumiiiig, hack roti-: Dr. Dale Kostiwa, 
Faculty Moderator; Ronald Borer, Harvey Vieth, Gerald Dumke, 
Frank Goheen. Stuiidiiig, front row. Edmund Cataldo, Grand 
Master; Ridhard Collins, Junior Grand Master; Rod Chrisholm, 
Secretary; Ernest FoUico, Treasurer. 



Norman Greisen, Jerome Fisher, James O'Donnell, and Vernon 
Sanna relax after dinner with the newspaper in the House. 




161 



sigruA Je/fa pfii 



Sigma Delta Phi is Loyola's youngest fraternity. It is also one of the 
University's most vigorous groups, as proven by its winning of third place in 
the Greek Week field games. 

The fraternity's social calendar includes its Kampus Kaucus Mixer held in 
conjunction with Loyola's mock election. During the past year they have 
sponsored open-guest parties and closed parties. Sigma Delta Phi's annual father- 
son Communion breakfast is held every May. 

Because the Sigma Delts believe that service to the University is important, 
they can claim participation as ushers for the Curtain Guild, ushers for the Leo 
XIII Symposium, and originators of Greek Week at Loyola. Sports are an integral 
part of any fraternity, and Sigma Delta Phi fielded teams in the Intermural 
League and Fraternity League. 

One factor that is important to any fraternity is the number of people it has 
active in school organizations and activities. During the past year, Sigma Delta 
Phi has had members of the fraternity elected to both the Commerce Council and 
Arts Council, and to the chairmanship of the Interfraternity Council. Its 
members were also active in numerous social and academic clubs at Loyola. The 
President of Beta Alpha Psi, Vice-President of S.A.M., News Editor of the 
Loyola Netvs, and Managing Editor of the Loyolan are all examples of positions 
their members hold in these organizations on campus. 

It is the belief of the fraternity that this past year has aptly exemplified 
the fraternity's purpose and goals. These are: to unite a body of men into a living 
creed upon whose continuous achievements rest the foundation of the future; to 
benefit its brothers academically, morally, and physically, as well as socially; to be 
led by principale rather than by special interest; and to promote brotherly love 
and advancements among its brothers. 



Sigma Delta Phi. Standing: Robert Ingersall, Daniel Kutek, Gene Valtolina, Jack Carollo, 
Ralph Wydra, George Wentz, James Shwatal, Lazlo Boesze, Robert Singler. Seated: John 
Gaspers, Jerry Burns, Paul Davis, Howard Warchal, Richard Bezdek. 



lUi*^ 




162 





Sigma 
Arms; 
Seated: 
dent. 



Delta Phi Officers. Stuudiiig: James Burns, Sergeant at 

Michael Caroine, Secretary; Henry Wisniewski, Treasurer. 

Karl Youtsey, Vice-president; Dennis Johnson, President. 



The agenda of the Kampus Kaucus is being prepared by Ralph 
Wydra, Gene Voltalina, Jim Burns and Jerry Burns. 



George Wentz, Lazslo Boesze, Michael Carbine, Paul Davis, 
Dennis Johnson, and Richard Bezdek talk over rushing plans 
and pledging techniques for the coming semester. 



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163 




Sigma Lambda Beta. Stjiidhii;: Murph\ Stanton, Earl Olsen. Al Naples, John Ward, Norman 
Lellenberg, Bob McCulla, Raymond Burns, Joseph Jindrich, Joseph Arneson. Seated: 
Henry Kauke, Gerald Albrecht, Peter Quinn, John Erickson, Jerome Sullivan. 



sigma /am^Ja 6efa 



Sigma Lambda Beta Fraternity is a business fraternity operating in the 
University College. Throughout the year, the fraternity tries to further the 
interests of Loyola among the night school students. Individual members of Sigma 
Lambda Beta serve on the University College Student Council and are constantly 
initiating new projects for student benefit. 

The fraternity traditionally has been the right arm of student government 
in the University College. In this capacity, it works hand in hand with the U.C. 
Student Council in promotion of such activities as the Dean's Coffee Hour and 
the Graduate's Honor Banquet. 

This year the fraternity has taken an active part in the initial formation of 
two new organizations in night school, the University College Club and the 
Society for the Advancement of Management. 

Within its own organization, Sigma Lambda Beta annually holds an initiation 
dinner which is an appreciation function for both newcomers and graduates. 

The officers of Sigma Lambda Beta are: President, Peter Quinn; Vice-presi- 
dent, John Erickson; Secretary, Earl Olsen; Treasurer, Norm Lellenberg; and 
Pledgemasters, Gerald Albrecht and Joseph Jindrich. 



164 




Sigma Lambda Betta Officers. John Erickson, Bob McCulla, Earl 
Olsen, Peter Quinn, President. 




John Erickson, Bobb McCulla, Jerome Sullivan, Norman Lellen- 
berg, and Raymond Burns ride to the eighth floor for a meeting. 



Jerome Sullivan, Raymond Burns, Norman Lellenberg, and 
John Ward draw up plans for the next party. 




165 




Sigma Pi. Standing: Thomas McLaughlin, William Parazin, Thomas Casey, Fred Todd, 
Chester Stanley, William Nellis, Kenneth Hennig, George Obermaier, Dennis Parent, 
Robert Heuser, Alan Schoen. Seated: Walter Welninskt, Thomas Vogt, Paul Hoernig, 
William Bell, Leonard Molander, Richard Oldenburg. 



Sigma pi 



After long standing as Loyola's oldest fraternity, Phi Mu Chi this year 
became Loyola's newest fraternity. It has achieved this paradox by leaving the 
local status of Phi Mu Chi and joining the national ranks of Sigma Pi. By becom- 
ing Beta Chi chapter of Sigma Pi fraternity, the chapter was enabled to strengthen 
its internal organization, while gaining the prestige enjoyed by a fine national 
fraternity. The nationalization of Phi Mu Chi, then, has become a definite advan- 
tage to its members, to its alumni, and to its prospective members. But outside of 
its own ranks, Sigma Pi also brings a stronger look to the fraternity system at 
Loyola, thus benefitting the entire school. 

The step forward taken by the fraternity during the past year should not, 
however, be regarded as an end in itself; for, by becoming Sigma Pi, the fraternity 
has provided itself with an excellent means of being able to provide more for its 
members in the way of social activities, organization, and perhaps, housing. 

By beliving that a fraternity is a strong dynamic organization on the campus 
of a university, while representing an important aspect of student life, the entire 
membership of Sigma Pi has been able to achieve outstanding accomplishments 
in areas such as extra-curricular activities, academic pursuits, and social activities. 

The chapter looks back over the past year as a milestone in its history. Al- 
thoiirrh it was difficult to leave the long-established traditions and memories of 
Phi Mu Chi behind, it can now look optimistically forward to new aims and goals 
in the coming years as Sigma Pi. 



166 





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The Sigma Pi's display the three towers of Spirit, Sports, and 
Scholastics by their float entered in the I960 Pow-Wow. 



Sigma Pi Officers. Standing: Leonard Molander, Recording 
Secretary; Thomas Vogt, Corresponding Secretary; Richard 
Oldenburg, Pledgemaster. Seated: Walter Welninsld, Treasurer; 
Paul Hoernig, President; William Bell, Vice-President. 











Members and 
at their favor 


pledges of Sigma Pi National Fraternity gather 
ite table in the Southeast corner of the Union. 


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167 




Sigma Pi Alpha. Stjnding: Tom Keevers, Medard Narko, Ken Firling, John Durkin, Dan 
Adams, William Pales. Seuted: Walter ZeMans, Lester Balick, Jim Healy, Dennis Lamping, 
Robert Kaftan, Michael Murphy. 



si^ma pi aipna 



lp£ 



The spring I960, pledge class of Sigma Pi Alpha was the first to join the 
newly reorganized and rejuvenated fraternity. After a short period of of in- 
activity, Sigma Pi Alpha reentered the ranks of Loyola fraternities and within a 
few months in the fall of I960 went on to win first place in the TEKE-sponsored 
Ugly Man Contest. 

Founded in 1932, Sigma Pi Alpha has had a distinguished record of service 
to Loyola, and it includes among its first members many noted professional men, 
a number of whom now serve the city of Chicago. 

During last year's reorganization, the Alumni Association was formed. All 
past members were encouraged to join, and now, a year later, 110 brothers are 
actively participating in the Association. This number makes it the largest Alumni 
fraternity organization in the University. 

The fraternity feels that it has to offer prospective pledges both the vigor of 
a young organization and the solid foundation of more than twenty-eight years 
participation in the life of Loyola University. 



168 




Sigma Pi Alphas and their dates try their luck in the Congo 
Line at one of the fraternity's closed date parties off campus. 



[1 pni 




Sigma Pi Alpha Officers. Standing: Lester Balick, Secretary; 
William Pales, Treasurer. Seated: Thomas Keevers, Pledgemas- 
ter; Dennis Lamping, President; John Durkin, Vice-President. 



Sigma Pi Alpha pledges perform a skit, to the delight of the 
membership, as part of their lengthy pledge training program. 




faii deltA pfii 



During the past year at Loyola, Tau Eta Chapter of Tau Delta Phi has again 
been able to achieve its purpose of aiding the University and the students. 

On the social scene, the Tau Delts sponsored their regular "Drop-Ins" at the 
fraternity house and presented, for the first time, a lecture series. The inauguration 
of the Tau Delts' lecture series was prompted by the Chapter's realization of the 
advantages of a teacher-student relationship springing from informal discussions 
at the fraternity house. As an aid to the Greek system at Loyola, the Tau Delts 
also sponsored an Interfraternity Stag Night to create a firm bond among the 
fraternities on campus who possess a house. 

The Tau Delts this year participated in all University-sponsored activities 
open to them. In athletics, the Tau Delts won second place in the Greek Week 
festivities. Vice-President Larry Gerber was the General Chairman of the Student 
Associates of Loyola, and in its program the Tau Delts, represented by their 
Treasurer Bill Gardiner, were presented the Outstanding Participation Award. 
As to scholarship, the Tau Delts placed second among the Greeks on campus. 

The Tau Delts have shown excellent group action, but they also possess 
individual leaders such as Jim Harris, President of the Junior Class of the College 
of Arts and Sciences; Bill Sieger, President of the Historical Society; Larry 
Gerber, Junior Class officer in Commerce; and President Mike Morawey, past 
President of the Interfraternity Council. Morawey, Harris, and Gerber were also 
honored by their acceptance into Blue Key National Honor Fraternity. 

The Tau Delts have evidenced the results of a unified fraternal group and 
will continue to do so in the future. 



Tau Delta Pfii. Standing: Larry Lubertozzi, Michael Coffey, Joseph Alessanorini, Robert 
Rokos, Daniel Cusick, Daniel Dores, Michael Sullivan. Seated: Herbert Theisen, John Morris, 
Joseph Wcislo, Thomas Hoover, Gerald Mozdierz, Walter Hansen. 




170 





Sunday afternoon finds junior members of the Tau Delts re- 
laxing in their fraternity house located on Sheridan Hoad. 



Tau Delta Phi Officers. Standing: Michael Malec, Sergeant at 
Arms; James Potuznik, Corresponding Secretary; Harold Mur- 
phy, Moderator; WiUiam Powell, Editor-Historian; James Har- 
ris, Alumni Secretary. Seated: William Gardiner, Treasurer; 
Larry Gerber, Vice-president; Michael Morawey, President; 
Bruce Harris, Recording Secretary. 



"Winter Wonderland" was the theme of the Tau Delta Phi 
Fraternity float which entered in competition for the Pow-Wow. 




171 




Tau Kappa Epsilon. Standing, back yow. Austin Rigney, Dennis Gathman, Frank West, 
Richard Stremski, Allen Steiskal, James Kopp, Peter Paul, Joseph Tomaszewski, Richard 
Kenny. Standing, middle row. Dominic Ingrando, Ray Morrissey, Kenneth Such, Peter 
Stare, Michael Ponticelli, Phillip O'Connor, James Brophy, William Merrill, Robert Rhode, 
Jack Fahrenbach. Robert Wayman, Frederick Green, Robert Staskiewicz, Allen Busa, Ed- 
ward Kaleta, William Joost, Phil Augustine, Dan Trozak. Seated: Michael Cummins, Wil- 
liam Sherry, Frank Dentzer, Ronald Ohlhaber, Rev. Francis Grollig, S.J., moderator, Kenneth 
Vahrenhold, Marty Klest, George Wehrle, David Swinehart. 

fan ^appa epsi/on 



The Epsilon Kappa Chapter of Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity was original- 
ly founded as the University Club in 1938. The Club joined the ranks of the 
National Fraternity in 1956 and has, in the past five years, risen to top position 
among the fraternities on campus as recognized by the National College Survey 
Bureau. 

The Tekes sponsor many activities throughout the year. Among these are 
the Halloween Ugly Man mixer, with its Ugly Man contest for the benefit of 
the Patna Missions; the St. Patrick's Day Dance in conjunction with the Teke 
Sweetheart contest; the Coed Tea; and various faculty lectures held at the 
fraternity house. 

Among its awards this year, the Tekes won first place trophies for best 
fraternity float and best float in general competition in the Pow-Wow Float 
Parade contest. The fraternity has won these awards for the past two years. 

The Tekes hold a prominent position among the organizations of the 
University. For the year 1959-1960, the fraternity received the title of "Best 
Organization of the Year," as presented by the Blue Key Honorary Fraternity. 
The Epsilon Kappa Chapter also received recognition from the National Inter- 
fraternity Council for top academic achievement among the national fraternities 
on campus. 

All activities of the fraternity are oriented towards developing in its 
members a spirit consistent with its motto: "Not for wealth, rank, or honor, 
but for personal worth and character." 



172 





Joe Tomaszewski, Kevin Martin, Bob Staskiewicz, and Austin 
Rigney pause before the Coat of Arms in the Teke House. 



Tau Kappa Epsilon Officers. Standing: Joe Scully, Historian; 
Ken Potocki, Pledgemaster; Mike McConnell, Secretary; Butch 
Blau, Sergeant-at-Arms. Seated: Kevin Martin, Alumni Histor- 
ian; Ron Olech, Treasurer; Jim Szwed, President; Joe Gajewski, 
Vice-President; Dick Rogan, Chaplain. 



Jackie Schmelter joins in the applause as Teke's, Al Busa and 
Jim Szwed, accept the trophy of the best homecoming float. 




173 



tdetA pfii alpfia 



With the establishment of Upsilon chapter of Theta Phi Alpha in 1943, 
Loyola University witnessed the beginning of sorority life. From this start, the 
strength of women's fraternities on campus has grown consistently. Theta Phi 
Alpha can today lay claim to being the oldest and only Pan-Hellenic sorority 
at Loyola. It has as its ideals: scholarship, leadership, and most important, 
friendship. The chapter's chaplain is the Rev. Leo Martin, S.J., and their mod- 
erator is Miss Mary Louise McPartlin. 

The members of Theta Phi Alpha strive to enjoy both the fun and respon- 
sibilities of college life. This year's activities began with an example of this. 
In September, just before the fall term, Theta Phi held a Sorority Weekend in 
Wisconsin. Rushing was held in October, which kept the Theta Phis busy right 
up to their participation in the Ugly Man Contest. In November, they got in 
tune for the Interfraternity Sing, while the more creative members were al- 
ready designing the second place winner in the Float Parade for December's 
Pow-Wow celebration. December also witnessed Theta Phi's philanthropy pro- 
ject of a Christmas card sale for Glenmary Missions. Along with these school 
activities, Theta Phi Alpha also includes close dinners and parties. In addition, 
during the semester break, an open party was held jointly with the Theta Phis 
from DePaul. 

The second semester began, and with it came the added attraction of the 
Variety Show. With the incentive of two consecutive wins behind them, Theta 
Phi Alpha again took this year's best organization award, with the added "Iggy" 
from the Alumni Association. 

The remaining months in spring were kept for private parties and activities. 
In May, the spring pledge were formally initiated and the year was climaxed 
with the annual White Rose Ball. 



Theta Phi Alpha. Standing: Carmel Partipilo, Marge Kneer, Bettine Zisso, Ann Stauss, 
Joan Duffy, Sheila Curry. Seated: Bonnie Solzak, Linda Doman, Maureen Conroy, Mary 
Beth McAuliffe, Kathy Silvani, Pat Cordan, Pam Putnam, Ginni Becker, Eileen O'Connor. 
Kneeling: Bobbi Mirek, Donna Siuda, Mary Gill. 




174 




Theta Phi Alpha Officers. Standing: Bobbi Mirek, Treasurer; Marge Kneer, Pledgemistress. 
Seated: Maureen Conroy, Corr. Secretary; Rose Piraino, President; Patricia Cordan, Histor- 
ian, Marybeth McAuliffe, Rec. Secretary. 



Theta Phi Alpha. Standing: Janice Olech, Sheila Burns, Fran 
Olech, Eileen McNulty, Rita Gallagher, Rachel Riley, Irmg Cou- 
las. Seated: Marie Dean, Arelene Fonte, Marion Enright, Rose 
Piraino, Sue Frecko, Sandy Jerz, Karen Major. Kneeling: Mau- 
reen Fitzpatrick, Bonnie Berteaux, Terry Tambourrino. 





Xi Psi Phi. Standing, back row. Jim O'Bosky, Steve Kolanowski, Paul Frymark, Joe Matz, 
Bob Lentz. Standing, middle row. Jack Wierz, Stan Kaczala, Vince Simone, Frank Wilke, 
Walt Laos, Don Pricco, Ron England, Ken Pittner, Tom Pogue, Pete Lofendo, Yen Jew, 
Sal Recupero, J. Fred Oswalt, Gene Nikliborc, Bob Nolan. Seated, middle row: Jack Jacko- 
lich, John Nichols, John Sullivan, Bud Kline, Emmet Dennington, Frank Macias, Bert Gall, 
Dave Dunagau. Seated, first row. Loren Hofer, Don Gordon, Jay McMahon, Bob Frigoletto. 



XI psi p 



fii 



Lambda chapter of Xi Psi Phi national professional dental fraternity was 
established at the Loyola School of Dentistry in 1896. The Lambda chapter is 
under the very able moderatorship of Dr. John R. Allison. 

Among its purposes is the promotion of intellectual and educational ad- 
vancement; whereas the objectives of the fraternity are both professional and 
social development along with greater school unity. 

The fraternity's functions are many. Among these are house parties, lectures, 
the annual formal dance, and the yearly golf outing, which is open to the entire 
faculty and student body. 

The fraternity also has an auxiliary division, the "Zippettes," composed of 
the wives and fiancees of its members. They serve the fraternity by arranging 
refreshments and decorations for social activities, and providing clerical work for 
reviews. The alumni division provides encouragement and ideas for improve- 
ment of the members, the fraternity, and the school. 



176 







^ n 




Xi Psi Phi. Standing: Jack Lich, Paul Neary, Dick O'Neil, 
Gerald Duza, William Kline, JMisiewicz, Frank Celata. Kneel- 
ing: John Sullivan, Sal Recuppero, Jim O'Bosky, Frank 
Macias. 



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Xi Psi Phi members Paul Neary, Gerald Dusza, and Robert 
Frigolotto discuss new dental techniques as Frank Macias reads. 



One chief and two Indians, not a bad ratio— for the chief. 




177 




o£fr£oRc 




Accounting Club. Slaiit/iiig. luck you: Wayne Storz, Lc-onard Novotny, Ronald Olech, 
Robert Steffens, Paul Gauvreau. Standing, miitdle row. John Kelly, Michael Casserly, 
Conrad Viz, Richard Carroll, James Matousek, William Werner, James Fitzgerald. 
Seated: Joseph Russo, Donald Jakalski, Gerald Salotti, Carole Ascherl. Donald Gavin, 
John Marshall. 



Accounting cluS 



Accounting Club Officers. Standing: Ronald Kubacki, Henry 
Wisniewski, Richard Roberts. Seated: John Sullivan, president, 
Edward Kusek, Michael Sullivan. 




Founded at Loyola in 1949, the Accounting Club strives 
to bridge the gap between accounting theory and its 
practical application. This aim is accomplished through 
speakers; representatives of public accounting firms, in- 
dustry, and banking; field trips; and the distribution of 
literature, encompassing many and varied aspects of the 
accounting field. 

As an affiliate of the Illinois Conference of Accountancy 
Clubs, the organization actively participates in presenting 
an Opportunity Conclave, an entire day devoted to ac- 
quainting the students with the opportunities available 
for employment, training, and advancement in the busi- 
ness world. 

Through the activities of this organization, those 
students having interests in accounting and all of its 
phases are given the opportunity to take active participa- 
tion in the various programs which it sponsors. This 
practical application of theories is an invaluable comple- 
ment to their learning. The members are given the 
opportunity to discuss the programs and ideas of 
accountants employed in many of the outstanding Chicago 
area business firms. 



180 



The student affiliate branch of the American Chemical 
Society replaced the former Chemistry Club at Loyola in 
May of 1950. The Society is open to students enrolled 
in the chemistry curriculum and other individuals who 
are interested in expanding their understanding of science 
beyond the classroom lecture. The primary purpose of 
the Society entails the developing of a professional atti- 
tude among its members toward the field of chemistry. 

The organization holds its meetings twice a month. The 
regular meetings are composed of motion pictures per- 
taining to research and experiments recently conducted 
in this science. Also, guest speakers from other universi- 
ties and demonstrations supplement and broaden the 
prospective chemist's knowledge. 

Besides its regular meetings, the organization spon- 
sored many social events. This year's social calendar was 
highlighted by the Christmas party for the membership. 

"The Loyola Chemisphere" is the monthly publication 
produced by the Society which further supplements and 
fulfills the purposes of the organization. 




American Chemical Society Officers. Standing: William Hessel, 
Leonard Piszkiewicz, Dr. Frank P. Cassaretto, moderator, 
Seated: Juliana Kaczor, Mary Kawal. 



AmevicAU caemicA 



d 



1 society 



American Chemical Society Standing, hack loiv: John Vidoloff. James Reinowski, Leonard 
Piszkiewicz, Jay Sabath, Charles Gawronski, Kenneth Reinert. Standing, middle row: 
Robert Berstrom, Theodore Mittskus, Charmaine Hilkovitch, Margaret Schultz, Edward 
Pieklo, Loretta Lucek. Seated: Julianna Kazor, Marie Pindok, Marilynn Cavender, Valerie 
DiFonso, Mary Therese Kawal. 




181 




A.U.S.A. Stj)idlug: Jerry Farenga, Jim Burns, Dominic Fabbri, 
Frank Sobol, Tom Kunhart, Al Craig, James Dawson, Steve 
Perry, Don Kunath. Seated: Michael Cummings, Jerry Burns, 
Gerald Flens, George Vondruska, Ken Bresley, G. Peter Stare, 
Dennis Crean, Bill O'Neill. 



In September, 1957, in response to a long-felt need for 
an organization to function as an avixiliary to the 
R.O.T.C., Lt. Col. James L. McCrorey founded the Loyola 
chapter of the United States Army. It is both a profes- 
sional and social organization composed of civilian and 
army personnel as well as college R.O.T.C. units 

As a national organization, the A.U.S.A. works to 
promote the role of the army in National Defense. Its 
goals are to promote professional excellence in the cadets 
of the Corps and to provide a social atmosphere in which 
the cadets may associate with professional military men 
and with their fellow students. The Association brings 
to Loyola prominent military men to address the Cadet 
Corps, which, as a result, gains a close contact with army 
personnel and army life in general. 

To accomplish its goals, the Association employs a 
multiphase attack. At the national level, the Association 
carries on a broad program of educating the public of 
the importance of a strong military establishment. 

The A.U.S.A. hosts a variety of events from military 
discussions to the annual Military Ball. 



association o\ tde united siddes army 



A.U.S.A. Standing: Jerald McCarthy, James Francis, John Arnoske, Frank Baukert, Ralph 
Kownocko, John Sullivan, Laszlo Boesze, Robert Rhode, Frank Dentzer. Seated: Lt. Col. 
Matthew R. Giuffre, Howard Worchal. 




182 




Dr. John Bannan conducts an informal philosophical discussion in the Cudahy Library. 



SellAvmine pdilosopfiy cluS 



An opp>orrunity to meet and to discuss philosophical 
problems was given Loyola students in the establishment 
of the Beiiarmine Philosophy Club. It was begun on the 
Lake Shore campus in 1930, and is now organized into 
two divisions, the Lake Shore division and the Lewis 
Towers division. 

The purpose of the Philosophy Club is to give students 
an opportunity to become acquainted with the various 
systems of philosophy, and, in addition, to lead them 
toward a better knowledge and appreciation of Scholastic 
philosophy. T6 fulfill this purpose, then, the club is open 
to any student who is seriously interested in philosophy 
and who has a desire to discuss current philosophic 
problems. 

This year the club has sponsored a series of discussions 
integrating psychology with the philosophical sciences to 
coordinate their interests. The value of this endeavor has 
been advantageously realized by the participant members 
in the program. 



Beiiarmine Philosophy Club Officers. Robert Genova, Dr. 
Richard C. Hinners, moderator, and John Lyons. 




183 




Recognizing the n^ed for a University Glee Club and 
the active response of Loyola's student body for such an 
organization, plans which began in May, I960 actualized 
in the formation of the Loyola University Glee Club in 
September, I960. 

Under the capable direction of Robert Sutter, and 
J. David Smith, the moderator, the Glee Club has proven 
its talent before the student body and faculty on many 
occasions. Its membership, totalling about forty students 
is representative of both the Lewis Towers and Lake 
Shore campuses. 

The Glee Club made its successful debut at the 
Founders Day activities, and since that time has per- 
formed at many University functions, including the 
Christmas Crib Ceremony, the PAL Dinner, the Palm 
Sunday Lenten Concert, the Fine Arts Concert, and a 
concert held before the Bronson Circle Club. 



Loyola Glee Club Officers. Standing: John Drechny, Bruce 
Harris. Scaleds Mary Kate Zimmerman, Robert Sutter, director; 
Diane Kelly. 



glee c/ii6 



Loyola Glee Club. Fint row. Bruce Harris, Frances Kovarik, Annette Vigeant, Martina 
Panozzo, Marilyn Lewandowski, Jeanne Kraus, Molly McGlaughlin. Second row: Dennis 
Walsh, Bill Hessel, John Ruane. Kathleen Mueller, Diane Kelly, Cecelia Kozak, Robert 
Sutter, director; Jeanne Bluhm, Barbara Shipnian, Mary Anglim, Marie Leaner, Dolores 
Michells, Elaine Onderisin, Julia Gallagher. I'biid row: John Drechny, John Wanat, Don 
Cusick, Sue York, Mary Kate Zimmerman, Emmy Lou Mahalek, Beth Birkholg, Valentine 
Valient. 




184 



Two years ago, the Monogram Club compiled a com- 
plete list of letter-winning members from the good old 
days of raccoon skin coats and football teams until the 
present. Last year, however, the club was inactive; but 
this year under the direction of president James Kelly 
and fellow officers James Mini and Bernard Blau the club 
got off to a fine start by having its first dance in about 
six years. 

The Monogram Club which is composed of varsity 
letter winners in Loyola's three major sports of basketball, 
swimming, and track, has a currently active under- 
graduate membership of seventeen. 

The purpose of the organization is to promote athletics 
on the intercollegiate level and to exert its best efforts 
toward placing Loyola on top in the field of sportsman- 
ship. The club welcomes visiting teams and helps them 
in any way to make theirs an enjoyable and memorable 
stay at Loyola's campus. 




Monogram Club Officers. Standing: Butch Blau, vice-president; 
James Mini, secretary-treasurer; James Kelly, president. 



mono (^v Am c 



luS 



Monogram Club. Standing: Donald Schmitt, John Banks, John Crnokrak, Gerry Verwey. 
Seated: Peter Trummer, James Mini, James Kelly, Butch Blau, Marty Norville. 




185 




Lake Shore Coed Club Officers. 
Staiiiliiig: Joan Vaccaro, moderator; 
Mary Ellen Kovac, Mary Anne 
Hopkinson. Seated: Joan Tengblad, 
Barbara Shipman, Diane Spellman, 
Joanne Cwikla. 



\dike sfi 



ore coe 



d cluS 



The Loyola Coed Club is celebrating its twelfth anniversary this year. Organized 
in the spring of 1949, this club has one of the largest and most active memberships 
at Loyola. Its membership is open to all women students in the undergraduate day 
division who wish to participate in the organization's extensive program of 
diversified social activties. 

The uppermost objective of this organization is to unite Loyola's women 

students in their social, academic, and religious life. Functioning on both 

campuses. Lake Shore and Lewis Towers, the Coed Club sponsors numerous 

activities throughout the year designed to promote lasting friendships among its 

members and to provide them with activities which will malse their college life an 
active one. 

Through its "Big Sister " program, each semester the incoming freshmen and 
transfer students are given the opportunity to become acquainted with the 
organization and the women students of the University. In this way, these coeds 
are assisted in orientating themselves to Loyola student life. 



186 




Coed Club. Standing: Kathryn Cutler, Mary Bresingham, Beatrice Bouchonville, Janice 
Dittrich. Seated: Judy Kosloskus, Mary Elizabeth Mulchay, Elaine Berube, Julianna Fish. 



Coed Club. Standing: Nancy Swieton, Mary Kovac, Beverly Wilson, Joan Schmid, Kareen 
Forster. Seated: Olive Schneider, Barbara Shipman, Joan Trandel, Sharon Chwierut, Diane 
Kelly. 




187 



The Coed Club's present membership stands at 325 undergraduate women 
students. The moderator of this extensive organization is Miss Joan Vaccaro, 
who was also one of the founders of the Club. 

The program of activities presented for its members starts at the beginning of 

each semester with the Welcome Tea for new women students. It is at this tea 
that the "Big Sister" program begins. 

The annual Chirstmas formal, held in I960 at the Bismarck Hotel, highlighted 
the Christmas vacation. Other activities include the fashion show, the card party, 
the Spring Dance, which is usually held at the Columbia Yacht Club, the Senior 
Farewell Dinner, and the Ski-Weekend which is sponsored jointly by the Loyola 
Union and the Coed Club. 

In the past the two divisions of the Club were operated under one head by the 
Coed Club Joint Board which consisted of the officers from both of the campuses. 
But because of the particular needs of each campus, the two segments of the club 
now act as distinct entities with a joint treasury. 



lewis towers coed cluS 



L. T. Coed Club Officers. Standing: 
Joan Vaccaro, moderator; Bonnie 
Solzak, Marie Dean, Ann Yourg, 
Pat Cordan. Seated: Lenore Quinn, 
Helen Slattery, Monica Kozak, Lori 
Glatt, Judy Pacer, Elly Cesna. 




188 




Coed Club Members. Stai/iliui;: 1 l.innclorc larrcll. Marie Dean, Mary Beth McAuliffe, 
Maureen Fitzpatrick, Linda Doman, Mary Martin, Joanne Hosteny, Peggy Geffinger, 
Maggie Stac\, Donna Vieth. Seated: Peggy Gallagher, Judy Pacer, Ann Yourg, Lenore 
Quinn, Lori Glatt, Carol Ennis, Judy Connors, Mary Lee Gross. 



Coed Club Members. Standing, hack rou-; Carol Ascherl, June Openheimer, Marilyn 
Mansfield, Judy Dupke, Joan Connors. Standing, middle row: Patricia Nobilio, Mabel 
Blizzard, Joan Ashley, Fran O'Riley, Mary Lee Cullen, Mary Gill, Pat Cordan, Ann 
Brown. Seated: Judy Duda, Fran Olech, Linda Law, Erin Clifford, Jan AumuUer, June 
Ward. 




189 




curfain guild 



Budding thespians John Finn, Joyce Moreth, Mike Kelly, Judy 
Moberly, Jim Peters and Mary Ann Kiedrowsld read the 
script of one of the productions staged by the Curtain Guild. 



Curtain Guild. Stamping, buck row. Ron Cincinelli, Toni 
Giarratano, Sharon Donn, Glen Phillips, Jerry O'Connor, 
Harry James, Dennis Alexander, Judy Burrill, Don DePrima, 
Joyce Moreth. Staiidiug. middle row. John Madonia, Jim 
Chambers, Kay Ruane, Mary Riley, Jan Heberstreit, Joan 
Como, Richard Crook, Mary O'Gallagher Seated: Tom Murphy, 
Bill Buhl, Maureen Dougherty, John Schaller, Belinda West- 
brook, Judy Moberly, Mary Ann Kudrows, Jim Peters, Mike 
Kelly, Ken Carobus, Rachel Riley. 





The Loyola Curtain Guild was established in 1936 to foster the interest of 
University students in drama and to afford opportunities for its members to 
develop their talents in the theatre arts. 

Highlighting the Guild's twenty-fifth season were three major productions. 
During the first semester, the Guild presented a musical, "Annie Get Your 
Gun." The leading roles of Annie Oakley and Frank Butler were played by 
Belinda Westbrook and Harry James. With few minor exceptions, the actors 
were making their first Guild appearances. This. ho\\e\cr. was not detectable 

forma^nHQj^^^n^nie," which was direct* 
Morris of the Speech department, was hailed as one of the finest productions 
the history of the Curtain Guild. 

Shortlj' after the second semester began, the Guild presented Moliere's, "The 
Miser," starring Ronald Cincinelli. The play was directed by Mr. Dickinson, 
moderator of the Curtain Guild. In April the final play of the season, "Othello," 
was produced. This play, a Shakespereain tragedy, was directed by Mr. Morris. 

In addition to the Guild's major productions, the students of the organization 
have the opportunity to produce a series of workshops held on Sunday after- 
non. These are held in the assembly hall at the Lake Shore campus in months 
where there are no regular productions scheduled. 

The officers of the Guild are John Marquette, president; James Chambers, 
vice-president; and Jerry O'Connor, secretary. Membership in the Curtain 
Guild is open to any Loyola student interested in the dramatic arts. 




Curtain Guild Officers and Directors. John Marquette, president; 
Donald H. Dickinson, director; William C. Morris, director. 




Alan Jorgenson applies make up to Joan 

Henner for the Curtain Guild production 

of "Annie Get Your Gun" staged this 
fall. 




191 




Debate Society. Stai/diiig. buck roii: Bill Ford, Frank Galvin, 
Jim Dixon, Tim Materer, Mr. Donald Stinson (mod.), Jerry 
Woynerowski, Thomas Dienes, Leroy Blommaert, Ken Feit. 
Seated, middle row. Nancy Klickman, Eleanor Sigborn, Warren 
Bracy, Darlene O Brochta, Diane Jenkinson Seated, front row: 
Mary Ellen Dienes, Mary Lee Cullen, Phil Augustine, Richard 
Bock, Peggy Geffinger. Pat Brown. 



deSditing society 



Debate Society Officers. Donald Stinson, moderator; Richard 
Bock, Phil -Augustine, president; Mary Lee Cullen. 




The Loyola University Debating Society, the oldest 
extracurricular organization on campus, has enjoyed an- 
other successful year. Its members traveled from Harvard 
University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, to Springhill 
College in Mobile, Alabama in order to meet, and in 
many instances, defeat, the top debate squads in the nation. 
Other tournaments included those at Bradley University, 
Miami University of Ohio, Illinois State Normal Univer- 
sity, Purdue University, Marquette University, Augustana 
College, Notre Dame University, Xavier University, and 

Northwestern University. 

These events have offered members of the Society the 
opportunity to express themselves on a question of 
national interest, "Resolved: The United States should 
adopt a program of compulsory health insurance for all 
citizens." These tournaments also encourage the exchange 
of ideas on various subjects among college students from 
all sections of the United States. 

Besides actual debating, the Society sponsored the 
Annual Jesuit Collegiate Debate Tournament at Loyola 
University. The members also supported such activities 
as the Miss Loyola Contest, the Ugly Man Contest, the 
Variety Show, and the Union Pow Wow. 



192 




Econ-Finance Socict>. Slainliiig: Richard Rogan, Lee Roy Cieslak, Joseph Bajko, Anthony 
Licata, Thomas Guerra, Richard Carroll, Thomas Church. SetJted: Edward Cunningham, 
Frank Butler, Carol Ascherl, Joseph Matulis, Thomas Hanson, Raymond Hartman, Thomas 
Lyons, Richard Lucas, Nicholas Motherway, Norbert Nagy. 



economics- jiuAnce society 



The Economics-Finance Society, a member chapter of 
the American Finance Association, is designed to supple- 
ment its members' education in finance and economics 
with an interesting and informative program of speakers 
and professional tours. 

Membership in the society is open to all students who 
are in good standing with the University and have been 
in attendance at least one semester at Loyola. The Society 
is moderated by Dr. Sylvester Frizol. 

Prior to the beginning of a semester, the Society's 
program committee formulates a professional program. 
A typical semester's program includes speakers, tours, 
forums, and movies on both current and related topics 
of interest. 

The programs presented for the benefit of the Society's 
members this year included speakers from the United 
States Bureau of Labor Statistics and a seminar which 
enabled both faculty members and students to participate 
in a discussion of ideas pertinent to contemporary finance 
and economics. 



Econ-Finance Society Officers. Bruno Marczyk, Joseph Lang, 
Anthony Mastro, Ronald Paulsen. 




193 




Dr. Ernest I. Proulx, faculty member of the Education Society, lectures to his students 
on the objectives of the teacher in secondary education. 



educ2ition society 



The primary objective of the Loyola Education Society, 
founded in 1955, is to unite students and alumni of the 
University in a directed effort at the study of contem- 
porary difficulties, shortcomings, and achievements of the 
field of education. The Society acts as an extension of the 
classroom's area of discussion, and also serves to promote 
and foster a greater harmony between students, alumni, 
and education department faculty. 

Meeting twice each semester under the direction of 
Dr. J. J. Valenti, moderator, the Society's spring program 
was augmented by addresses delivered by Dr. James 
Smith, Associate Superintendent of Chicago Public 
Schools, and also an alumnus of the department; and by 
Dr. George N. Shuster, noted Catholic layman. President 
Emeritus of Hunter College, and former diplomat. 

The general pattern for the Society's meetings include 
lectures such as those mentioned above, debates on con- 
troversial educational topics, or open discussion of a 



pertinent question, followed by a social. With an ex- 
pansive viewpoint provided by such a program, the 
Education Society strives to increase an awareness of the 
problems modern education most often encounters. With 
such an organization to act as a sounding board for 
potential theory and future practices, the benefits which 
accrue to the members of the Society through its activities 
are wide. Under the watchful eye and careful guidance 
of the department, those students comprising its member- 
ship are correctly directed to their future vocation. 

The Education Society, as both a social and a scholastic 
organization, is particularly of interest to those who have 
aspirations to teach. Membership is also open to those 
graduate students in the Department of Education; and is 
further extended to encompass all graduate and under- 
graduate students, as well as alumni of the Department 
of Education. 



194 




Epsilon Pi Rho Officers Dr. D. Herbert Abel, moderator; 
Lawrence Brooks, Daniel Ryan, Loretta Picucci, Anthony Florek. 



epsilon pi vdo 



Epsilon Pi Rho, the Loyola University Latin Club, 
follows the tradition of a true Jesuit education. The 
scholars of Western Christendom have long realized the 
benefits which can flow freely from learning based on the 
classic heights reached by the founders of our civilization. 

With this in mind, Epsilon Pi Rho was established to 
help its members explore the impact of the civilizations 
of Aristotelian Greece and Virgilian Rome upon our own 
culture, and in so doing to better appreciate the achieve- 
ments of both the modern and ancient worlds. 

Of prime concern is the developing in its members an 
awareness that the antecedents of a civilization are no less 
important than the civilization itself; that things are 
inevitably more meaningful when considered in terms of 
that from which they came than when examined solely in 
themselves. 

In order to be eligible for membership, a student must 
be taking or have successfully completed one college 
course in Latin. 

Under the able leadership and guidance of Dr. D. 
Herbert Abel, the moderator of Epsilon Pi Rho, it has 
blossomed into one of the larger and more prominent 
academic organizations on the University's campus. 

As a means of fulfilling its aims, the Club sponsors a 
series of lectures and slide programs on classical culture. 
The last event of the year, their annual banquet, was held 
at the Kungsholm Restaurant. 



Epsilon Pi Rho. Staiii/iiig: Veronica Tijunelis, Edward Kuntzman, Martin Costello, 
Salvatore Mangione, Richard McMahon, Barbara Kozik, Daniel Adams, John Kula, Eve 
Friend, Anthony Fontana, Patricia Brown, Michael Berthold, John Glatz, Leonard Sopka. 
Seated: Christine Smith, Judith Krynicki, Judy Ori, Zinya Federovicz, Richard Shemetulskis, 
Kathleen Staunton, Mary Martin, Jeanette Caruso, Barbara Baumann. 




195 




Lawrence Patterson accepts a first place award in the Nu- 
Fashion Horse Show from the Rev. Hugh B. Rodman, S.J. 



The recently re-organized Equestrian Society has taken 
great strides to become integrated in the Loyola social 
curriculum. The original club became inactive due to a 
lack of membership, but re-birth has to its advantage an 
enthusiastic group of about thirty riders. 

Under the moderation of Father Hugh Rodman, S.J., 
and the teaching skill and leadership of Bill BuUe of Nu- 
Fashion Stables, the club has fulfilled two necessary roles: 
it is not only an extra-curricular activity, but also ful- 
fills the requirements for physical education credits of 
would-be teachers. 

The students from L.T. and L.S.C. attend classes during 
the week and receive instructions from Mr. Budde, an 
acclaimed horseman and trainer. At this year's annual 
horse show, one of the events was a competition among 
the beginner's class of Loyola University. 

Due to the enthusiasm of the student riders, the deter- 
mination of their teacher, and the encouragement of their 
moderator, the club has ambitions of becoming one of our 
most active organizations. 



equestviAn society 



Equestrian Club. Lillian Smrha, Christine Kaub, Mary Martin, Larry McCann, Marcella 
Bilek, Mary Jane O Brien, Linda Doman, Joanne Hosteny, Ann Shannon. Seated: Bonnie 
Berteau, Patricia Nobillis, Phyllis Leski, Loretta Martin, Elizabeth Leisner. 




196 



IP 




Fine Arts Club. Staiidiiig: Patrick Joyce, John O'Reilly. Seated: 
Mary Bergan, Dr. Paul Hummert. moderator; Dolores Baker, 
Pauline Zaranka. 



fine ads c\u^ 



Since its inception here at Loyola University in January 
of 1954, the Fine Arts Club has made a considerable and 
lasting contribution to the cultural growth of its many 
avid members and of the student body in general. 

The purpose of the Fine Arts Club is to foster and 
develop in each of its members a deep appreciation of the 
beauty and utility offered by the fine arts through group 
attendance at the theatre, symphony, opera, ballet, art 
exhibits, and other displays of fine art. 

By affording the students of the University an oppor- 
tunity to witness and partake of the many and diversified 
cultural activities presented in the Chicago area, the 
organization has produced many rewarding accomplish- 
ments; not the least of which is its annual increase in 
membership, which includes at the present students in all 
the undergraduate colleges and many at the graduate 
level. 

These past two semesters, the Club undertook a 



vigorous program of activities designed to view the variety 
of cultural life in the vicinity. Under the direction of Dr. 
Paul Hummert, moderator, the season began by atten- 
dance at a performance of Marcel Marceau, and cul- 
minated with the seeing of "A Raisin in the Sun." 
Interspersed between these two memorable productions 
were journeys to "A Midsummer Night's Dream" and 
Harry Belafonte's Civic Opera House program. 

The club reports that this year they have had no 
difficulty selling tickets to the various productions at 
which they sponsor group attendance, and that for "La 
Boheme" the demand exceeded the supply. That apprecia- 
tion of culture is certainly not dormant on Loyola's 
campus is evidenced by these facts. 

In the future, plans are being laid to renew a former 
custom of inviting a guest lecturer after seeing a show to 
discuss the merits of the offering. 



197 



joveign students association 



Because of the ever increasing enrollment of foreign 
students at the University, the Foreign Students As- 
sociation is becoming more valuable in its purpose. It 
was formed to serve as a medium of association for the 
foreign students themselves and also to acquaint these 
students with American students. Only in these social 
and educational contacts through the Association can 
fellowship and understanding be prompted. 

In return, the benefit of foreign students to Loyola is 
immeasurable. They contribute more to world under- 
standing by their jjersonalities and attitudes than is 
realized. That they have organized among themselves 
their own club is a direct example of their initiative and 
educational endeavor. They realize that only through such 
an organization can human contacts be promoted and 
valuable understanding be experienced. The association's 
strength, of course, is in its enrollment, and each year the 



number of foreign students at Loyola University in- 
creases so that they now number over one hundred. 

Of course, the association also realizes the needs of the 
members within itself. The members provide for them- 
selves an atmosphere of home enjoyment while in Chicago 
so that they can appreciate each other's culture and also 
understand the American way of life. The Foreign 
Students Association is more than a club made up of 
foreign students of Loyola; it is an attempt to promote 
meaning and understanding among the cultures of the 
world. 

The association provides this social contact through 
its activities. Among tham are lectures, discussions, and 
other social events. They have held annually a panel dis- 
cussion with members of the Chicago Junior Chamber of 
Commerce. Also each year, the group produces its Spring 
Festival, at which the members entertain with national 
songs and dances. 



Foreign Students Association. Stamliiig: Donna Chaker, secretary-treasurer; Midori Yamaha, 
executive member. Seated: Dr. Margaret O'Dyer, moderator; Patrick Uzo Opara, president; 
Emma Sartaguda, executive member. 




198 



The purpose of the Gerard Manley Hopkins Society is 
to vitalize literary studies outside the classroom. The 
Society, acting as a supplement to the students' regular 
English courses, is made up of English majors at the 
University and also those students interested in our lit- 
erary heritage. 

The club was founded here at Loyola in 1931 and 
received its name from the Jesuit who was then becoming 
known as one of our greatest modern poets. 

Noted speakers, drawn mainly from the English depart- 
ment, have been called upon to acquaint the students with 
the great people in the literary world. This year's speakers 
included Dr. Gerrietts, who spoke on Henry James; 
Dr. Wolff, who discussed the works of Leonard Wolfe; 
Dr. Hiunmert, who analyzed Ibsen; and Dr. Gorman, 
criticizing Dos Passos. 

The primary purpose of the Society is the attainment 
of greater appreciation and understanding for English 
majors of noted works of literary merit. 




Gerard Manley Hopkins Officers, Standing: Tim Materer, Mary 
Bergan. Seated: Donna Collison, Dr. Earl J. Clark. 



gev2ivd manley fiop^ins society 



Gerard Manley Hopkins Society. Fourth row: Tim Materer, Paula Pravalone, Sue Freko, 
Mary Gerard. Third Rote: Rita Gallagher, Maureen Conroy, Linda Doman, Bob Foys, 
Marie Tate. Second Row: Sheila O'Neill, Ellen Marlin, Barbara Underwood, Sheila 
Burns, Sandra Jerz. Seated: Donna Collinson, Diane Darling, Diane Weislo, Harry Hopkins, 
Mary Bergan. 




199 




WILLIAM SIEGER 
President 

DR. KENNETH M. JACKSON 
Moderator 



fiisforical society 



FRED GREEN .\ND RON OLECH 

Treasurers 



The Loyola Historical Society is completing its twelfth 
year as the University's largest student academic organiza- 
tion. During these years, it has also been one of the most 
active. Its annual membership averages approximately 
400, and the members are drawn from all the under- 
graduate schools and colleges of the University. 

The Society's foremost function is the sponsoring of 
monthly lectures throughout the school year by local, 
national, and international authorities in the fields of 
political science and history. 



NICHOLAS MOTHERWAY 

Leuis Towers Vice-president 






Historical Society Secretaries. Patricia Cordan, Linda Doman, 
Lucille Anichini, Monica Kozak. 



During the fall semester, it sponsored a tecbinicolor 
motion picture and lecture on Africa given by the Rev. 
R. F. McCoy, a member of the White Fathers missionaries, 
who had just returned from the Congo. The following 
month the Rev. R. V. Schoder, S.J., who had just pub- 
lished his well-received volume. Masterpieces of Greek 
Art. gave a colored slide lecture on the same subject. For 
its December program, the Society gave its support to 
the Blessing of the Crib ceremony held at Madonna Delia 
Strada Chapel on December 19, i960. Subsequent lectures 
were of like nature. 

Some of the most outstanding speakers of the past 
have been the Rev. John Fitzgerald, Civil War specialist; 
the Rev. Gordon Albion, prominent English Catholic 
clergyman; Dr. Herbert Kuhle, German Consul-General; 
Sen. Paul H. Douglas; Sen. Everett M. Dirksen; Mayor 
Richard J. Daley; Dr. K. C. Wu, former governor of 
Formosa; the Rev. Francis X. Grollig, S.J., anthropolo- 
gist; and the Hon. Robert W. Mason, British Consul- 
General. 

The Historical Society sponsors annually an essay con- 
test open to all students of history in the Univerity and 
awarding fifty dollars in prizes. 

Society projects are financed entirely by student mem- 
bership fees. This fee is one dollar for the entire year. 
No other subsidies are accepted. 



JOHN LOWREY 

Lake Shore Vice-president 




201 




Members of Loyola Men discuss the retreat schedule with 
their moderator, Rev. John C. Hayes, S.J., prior to their 
departures. 



Loyola Men is an organization built on the conviction 
that the Catholic way of life is a full-time vocation. Yet 
by a method of degrees of membership, Loyola Men 
respects the individual needs, aspirations, and graces of 
particular persons. Under the direction of the Rev. J. D. 
Hayes, S.J., Loyola Men coordinates and integrates the 
programs of the Apostleship of Prayer and the Men's 
Sodality of Our Lady into a spiritual program which can 
appeal to the modern collegian. 

While still in the beginning stage, Loyola Men has al- 
ready begun to make its influence felt around the campus. 
The members are urged to work through their various 
other organizations rather than directly as a group apart 
from the general student body. 

During the semester vacation, the organization spon- 
sored a seven-day retreat for over forty students and plans 
to run a second retreat for another forty men at the end 
of the current school year. 



loyol 



a men 



Loyola Men relax in Loyola Hall as they await the start of their first annual retreat. 




202 



Under the direction of the Rev. Thomas Murray, S.J. 
and the Rev. John J. Beckman, S.J., Loyola Women strive 
to live up to the high ideals of their Catholic vocation 
through a variety of activities. 

Loyola Women held a Communion breakfast for the 
new freshman women early in the Freshman Week activi- 
ties, and joined with several other Chicago colleges to 
sponsor a joint study day on the work of the lay mis- 
sionaries. A five-day retreat was held for members during 
the between-semester vacation. They also joined with 
the Loyola Men and the women from Mundelein College 
in holding another study day with Xavier University. 
This was held February 18 on the topic. The Spiritual 
Exercises of St. Ignatius, the famed Jesuit retreat begun 
by the founder of the order of St. Ignatius Loyola. 

Loyola Women, too, follow a policy of quiet influence 
on the Catholic life of the students at Loyola by working 
through many other organizations. 




Officers of Loyola Women are seen with Rev. John J. Beckman, 
S.J., director of Loyola Hall, planning for the coming year. 



loyol 



a women 



Members of Loyola Women discuss plans for a Communion 
Breakfast for all freshman coeds before the school year begins. 




203 




Human Relations Club. Standing: Robert Silick, Leroy Auer, Virginia Szigeti, Sheila 
Collins, Jerome Farenga, James Alex. Seated: Zenia Fedorovics, Catherine Staunton, Michael 
Hauser, Kathleen Waljeski, Sandra Waljeski. 



fiuman re/afions c\u^ 



Human Relations Club Officers. Standing: Russell Circo, 
Michael Berthold, Patricia Wilczek, Sirninele Secy. 




An opportunity for all students of Loyola to become 
acquainted with both positive and negative factors of 
present-day society was realized in the organization of 
the Human Relations Club. Its only requirement for 
membership is that the student have a realistically mature 
eagerness to know and understand the people and reasons 
behind present world affairs. 

Under the direction of Dr. Francis Cizon, the present 
moderator, the Club has been organized into various fields 
of social relations: racial relations, social psychology, 
criminology, urban development, labor and industrial re- 
lations, and foreign affairs. It is within the aim of their 
activities to have program' concerning each of these fields 
and thereby focus the place of sociology in community 
life. 

The Human Relations Club meets every two weeks and 
here through general discussion the members bring more 
meaning to present-day social probelms. Also at this time, 
speakers are invited to lecture and lead discussion on cur- 
rent topics of interest. 

Besides sponsoring lectures, the HRC organizes fre- 
quent field trips including visits to the Alcoholic Re- 
habilitation Center, the Joilet State Penitentiary, and the 
DePaul Settlement House. 



204 




Marketing Club, 'ihird row. John Mulchrone, Ray Hartman, Connie Ulz, Bernard 
Doetsch, Steve Perry, Don Jakalski. Second roif. Gerry Kucera, Jim Matousek, Al Mikszta, 
Ken Bresley, Dan Fortney, Ron White, Nick Motherway. First Row. Jerry Burns, Jim 
Owens, Jim Burns, Paul Biernat, Bob Nielson, Dick Lucas. 



mdivketmq c\u^ 



Innovations and progress marked the 1960-61 year for 
the Loyola University Marketing Club. In April of this 
year, a two-day Career Conference vias held in the Palmer 
House in which five hundred students, college seniors and 
graduates, participated in a series of luncheons, speeches, 
and interviews with leading business firms in the Chicago 
area. The purpose of the conference was to acquaint these 
students with opportunities available to them through 
their marketing training. 

In addition, publication of the Loyola Marketing News 
was begun to coordinate the activities of the club with 
other students of marketing. The paper acted as a source 
of information to those interested in contemporary 
marketing procedure. 

While the expressed objective of the Marketing Club 
is to broaden student interest in the field of merchandis- 
ing, this year's program served to make it an integral 
part of the College of Commerce. 



Marketing Club Officers. Jack Billimack, Jim McGrath. Seated: 
Ed Rehberg, Rev. Raymond Jancauskas, S.J., Jim Paster. 




205 




Math Club. Sluiidiiig. hack row: Sam Cipolla, F. Martin Zbylski, George Bart, Denis Ciesla, 
Paul Zwick, Slandhig, Diictdh- roiv: Ken Janowiak, Conrad Polk, Karl Youtsey, Barbara 
Pankos, Thomas Mitchell, Julianna Kaczor, Frank Bellinger, Steve Gilmour, Dave Vaughn. 
Seated: Mary Kattncr, Patricia Carey, Dr. Robert Reisel, moderator; Diane Szarowicz, Ann 
Roehrich. 



m3it(iemAtics cluS 



Math Club Officers. Standing: Conrad Polk, Ken Janowiak. 
Sealed: Patricia Carey, Dr, Robert Reisel, moderator. 




The Mathematics Club of Loyola University is an 
organization designed to stimulate interest in mathe- 
matics and its practical applications. The purpose of this 
club is to diffuse information concerning mathematics, 
and to establish a cultural and social outlet for its mem- 
bers. The organization achieves this purpose by spon- 
soring lectures, given by students as well as professional 
men, and by periodic field trips to various government 
and industrial scientific projects. Membership is open to 
students who have completed or are in the process of 
completing the second course in calculus. 

Due to the increasing demand that mathematics and 
science students be able to efficiently operate a slide 
rule, the club presented a series of lectures pertaining 
to the principles and operation of this instrument. 

An outstanding feature of the Mathematics Club was 
its student tutorial service available to individuals seek- 
ing instruction or advice in mathematics. This service 
enabled upper division mathematics students to famil- 
iarize themselves with student teaching, and to acquaint 
the underclassmen with the organization and its bene- 
ficial activities. 



206 



The Modern Language Club, which»was organized at 
Loyola in 1956, was founded as a social as well as an 
academic organization. Its purpose is to promote inter- 
est in and instill a knowledge and appreciation of the 
various cultures of the languages taught at the Univer- 
sity. In order to achieve this goal, the club has or- 
ganized weekly meetings where students of the various 
languages congregate and converse in that particular 
language. The conversation groups are usually under 
the direction of one of those whose native tongue is 
in use. 

In further pursuit of its goal, the club meets each 
month, at which meetings travelogues, slides, or a lec- 
ture is presented. Recorded concerts are brought to 
these meetings, and faculty members from the language 
department attend to describe the settings in which 
these recordings are presented. 

Social and cultural aspects are combined at least 
three times each year when the members gather at 
one of Chicagoland's famous foreign restaurants. 




iModcrn Laiiguajic Otticers. Stjinliiig: Marcello Canales, Dr. 
George E. Gingras, moderator; Charlotte Collins, James Alex, 
Michael Berthold. Seated: Pauline Zaranka, Sandra Waljeski, 
Sheila O'Neil. 



modevn hnguAge cluS 



Modern Language Club. Standing: Kathleen Waljeski, Zinya Federovich, James Alex, 
Diane Pallasch, Charlotte Collins, Joan English, Ellen Malin. Seated: Marcello Canales, 
Sandra Waljeski, Dr. George Gingras, Pauline Zaranka, Sheila O'Neil, Michael Berthold. 




207 




The Physics Club at Loyola University provides an 
opportunity for students interested in the physical sci- 
ences and their applications. The club was established 
in 1953 by a group of undergraduate physics majors. 

The club has sponsored a series of field trips to vari- 
ous laboratories such as the Armour Research Company. 
Through these activities, much extra-curricular interest 
in physics is stimulated. 

Under the direction of Father Roll, the club this year 
established a weekly tutorial service for freshmen at 
Loyola who have long been in need of such a service. 

Also during this past year, the club has affiliated it- 
self with the American Institute of Physics, which has 
provided more speakers and broader activities for the 
members of the club, thereby creating, fostering, and 
increasing an active interest in the field of physics as 
the dynamic science it is today. 



hysics Club Officers. Standing: George Bart, Kenneth Potocki. 
■ted: Marjo Andrews, Rev. Donald Roll, S.J. 



physics c\u^ 



Physics Club. Seated, hack row: Tom Gelinas, George Obermaier, Frank Bellinger, Fred 
Tatar. Seated, middle rou': Ronald Ohlhaber, Patrick Kenealy, Conrad Polk, Alfred 
Phillips. Seated, front row: George Bart, Kenneth Potocki, Sam Cipolla, Jim Sikora. 




208 




Psychological Research Society. Ray McGrady, 
Rigney, Vice-Chairman. 



Treasurer; Ray Daly, Chairman; Peter 



psycdologicAl vescAvcd society 



The Psychological Research Society provides a very 
broad background in the field of psychology, not only 
for those undergraduate students who are majoring in 
psychology, but also for any student interested in this 
field. 

The Society was founded by a group of psychology 
majors who brought it into active participation in cam- 
pus activities. 

The Society has shown films and invited speakers to 
address the membership as one of the many innovations 
designed to make meetings as interesting as possible. 



These meetings provide the student with information in 
psychology which will act as a supplement to the psy- 
chology courses offered at the University. Membership 
also offers the student much in the way of reviewing for 
his comprehensive examination. 

With these program,s better than 100 students, 
both graduate and undergraduate, interested in edu- 
cation and particularly psychology, have, with the 
help of Dr. Robert C. Nicolay, made the organiza- 
tion one of the leading groups at Loyola University. 



209 




SAM Officers Stuiiiliiig: Edward Duwns, Robert Aagard, 
Thomas Ochal, John Gaspers, Tom Austin. Seated: Christine 
Bazar, Leon Zaffer, Eugene Nowak, James Heath. 



The Society for the Advancement of Management, the 
recognized national professional organization of man- 
agers in industry, commerce, government, and education, 
is dedicated to the advancement of management and 
manageiTient men. 

Under the watchful guidance of Dr. Peter T. Swanish, 
S.A.M. has pursued its ultimate goal of developing human 
resources. 

The chapter at Loyola has progressed to a position of 
eminence among similar clubs throughout North Amer- 
ica by consistently winning first place in national, local, 
and university contests. Among its many awards were 
the Remington Rand National Performance Award won 
in competition with 178 other S.A.M. chapters; receiving 
the Chicago Area Award traveling trophy for the third 
year in succession, thereby becoming permanent pos- 
sessor; and being presented with the coveted Blue Key 
Honor Fraternity Award for best academic organization 
on Loyola's campus. 

The club's activities include field trips to sev- 
eral industrial plants in the area, such as United 
States Steel, and the Dresden Atomic Energy Plant. 



society for tde AdvAncement oj 



Society for the Advancement of Management, loitrth Row: Tom Ochal, Chuck Dolezal, 
Joyce Jussen, Al Kritikos, Barry Kane, Dave Cichy, Bob Mataya, Nick Caputo. Carl 
Cavanotch, Chuck Dvorak, Rich Ostr), Dennis Cipcich. Thud Row: Rich Dunne, Kathy 
Koffman. Ed Cunningham, Carol Ascherl, Bill Lodge, John Schaeffer, Kathy Ireland, 
Anne Marie Donahue, John Puljung, Dan Kisiel. Second Roif: Frank Maska, Jim Flaherty, 
Bob Dombrosk\. Tom Kunhart, Bill Sieger, Valarie Burke. Gerr\ Gebhardt, Dennis 
Johnson, John Henek, Jeanne Mullool>, Tom Coffey. First Ron : John Gaspers, Ed Downs, 
Leon Zaffer, Chris Bazar, Gene Nowak, Jim Heath, Bonnie Berteaux, Bob Aagaard, Connie 
Jung, Al Mikszta. 



mATiAgement 




no 




St. Apollonia Guild. Standing: Bud Kline, Leonard Navart, Gerald Georgen, Joseph Kizidy. 
Seated: John Madonia, Rev. Francis Vaughan, S.J., Thomas Schneider. 



sainf apo//onia qm\^ 



The Saint Apollonia Guild was founded in Boston over 
forty years ago. After conferring with and obtaining 
the approval of his Eminence Cardinal O'Connell, its 
founders, composed of a dedicated group of prominent 
Boston dentists, began this charitable organization in 
the year 1920. 

The name chosen for the Guild is significant in that 
it honors a third-century virgin martyr who, during her 
persecution, suffered repeated blows which occasioned 
the loss of all her teeth. 

The Guild was started with a charitable purpose in 
mind. This purpose was to provide dental service for 
over forty thousand poor and destitute children in the 



area who would otherwise be without this very neces- 
sary health protection. 

The organization was introduced at Loyola Univer- 
sity's College of Dentistry four years later. In 1928 the 
Guild went inactive at Loyola until 1934, when it was 
re-organized. 

A profitable increase in the social, intellectual, and re- 
ligious life of the members of the Guild is the objective 
of the activities which it sponsors during the course of the 
year. Due to the other functions in which the Guild par- 
ticipates, it has become one of the most imf)ortant extra- 
curricular organizations at the College of Dentistry. 



211 




St. Lukes Guild. Albert Timperman, president; James Moorman, vice-president; Dane 
Fitzgerald, secretary; James Jannotta, treasurer. 



sainf lube's guild 



In order to facilitate and guarantee the development 
of the student spiritually and morally, the St. Luke's 
Guild was organized under the direction of the Rev. 
John W. Bieri, S.J., and several enthusiastic medical 
students. 

This initial organization, known as the Alpha chapter 
of the St. Luke's Guild, has progressed due to the mod- 
eration and advice of Father Bieri. Another factor in 
the Guild's rapid growth is the active participation in 
its regular spiritual exercises and bi-monthly meetings. 
These meetings aid in attaining the goals of the mem- 
bership and are usually composed of guest speakers or 
informative motion pictures interspersed with the busi- 



ness of the organization. Discussions of general inter- 
est with regard to the spiritual and moral aspects of the 
medical profession constitute the remainder of these 
sessions. 

In conscientiously fulfilling the goals of the Guild, the 
medical student assures himself of a sufficient prepara- 
tion in dealing with the moral crises of the medical 
profession. 

As a consequence of their practical efficiency in main- 
taining the aims of tha organization, members pre- 
pare themselves to become Catholic physicians who 
adhere to and comply with the tenets of their faith. 



212 




Members of the Student American Dental Association. 



student american dental associafion 



Student ADA Officers, Standing: Patrick Connelly, Charles 
Freedman, Paul Roberson, Frank Oswalt, Norm Marchelya, 
Paul Reilly, Jim Carter. Seated: Monte Levitt, Ken Robinson, 
Bob Childenwood, Pete Cunningham. 



Designed after the American Dental Association, the 
Student A.D.A. of Loyola has a two-fold purpose: to 
familiarize student members with the purposes and 
ideals of dentistry; and to give them experience in pub- 
lic speaking, preparing table clinics, and writing on sub- 
jects in dentistry. 

The general object of the Student A.D.A. of Loyola 
consists of the promotion of dental education outside the 
classroom. Each class has four representatives on the 
executive council, which is the governing body setting 
the program of events for the year. 

Student activities throughout the school year consist of 
dinner meetings with guest speakers, and the yearly Clinic 
Day where students display original projects in the field 
of dentistry. The academic year is brought to an end with 
the annual Honors Banquet. At this event the bestowing 
of academic and clinical awards to students takes place. 




213 




Student AMA. Taft Roc, Ken Herfkens, Charles Osadjan, Karl Sanzenbacher, John Moran, 
Joseph Sutly, Gary Bluemink, George Michas, Ray Hurm, Robert Jarrett, Ron Klimaitis, 
Greg Louviaux, Kenneth McCormick, Victor Joe, Jim Jannotta, Bob Newstead. 



student american medicAl associafion 



Student AMA Officers. Stamiii/g: Joseph DeFiore, Taft Roe. 
Seated: Bob Hyndiuk, Edward Moorhead. 




The Student American Medical Association, open to 
all medical students, was founded in December, 1950. 
Its membership is composed of 72 schools located through- 
out the country. This organization is the largest stu- 
dent medical group in the world. 

The purposes of the Association are fourfold: to ad- 
vance the medical profession, to contribute to the wel- 
fare and education of medical students, to familiarize its 
members with the purposes and ideals of organized medi- 
cine, and to prepare them to meet the social and ethical 
obligations of the medical profession. 

The organization meets every month where current 
medical information is conveyed to the membership and 
academic difiticulties pertair.'ing to medicine are discussed. 
These meetings are highlighted by motion pictures fea- 
turing the various branches of research and the diagnosis 
and treatment of diseases. The organization also pre- 
sents guest speakers throughout the school year who 
relate their medical findings and expound on the ob- 
jectives of the Student A.M. A. 

This academic year was marked with the printing 
and distribution of medical literature which was cir- 
culated to the members of the Loyola Student A.M. A. 



214 



Organized at Loyola in 1956, the Veterans Club of 
Loyola is open to all students and faculty members who 
have served a minimum of twelve months in the Armed 
Forces and who possess an honorable discharge. At its 
regular bi-monthly meetings, the Club conveys informa- 
tion concerning veteran affairs to its members and coun- 
sels them in methods of successfully adjusting to uni- 
versity life. The primary purpose of the organization is 
to acquaint its members with the academic and social 
program of the school. 

Besides meetings, the Club provides social activities 
for its members, and actively supports Loyola Univer- 
sity in its academic, social, and spiritual functions. The 
Club takes pride in its social events, which include 
smokers, parties, dances, and an annual Communion 
Breakfast. 

This year the Veterans Club sponsored a bus trip to 
the Loyola-Marquette basketball game played at Mil- 
waukee. The Club hopes to make this new activity an 
annual date on their social calendar. 

The annual Veteran's Dance held in the spring 
highlights the Club's social program. At this affair 
the Veterans Club selects its Miss Veteran who is 
presented with a bronze combat boot as her award. 




Veterans Club Officers. Standing: Joseph Battaglia, Joseph 
Mclnerny. Seated: Virginia Hajek, Jack Posselt, George Hostert. 



veievAxis c\u^ 



Veterans Club. Standing, back row: Ernie Ryan, Jack Suralski, George Hostert, Cher 
Grondy. Standing, middle rote: Tony Metcaris, Jack Keefe. Joe Battaglia. Jim Abernathy, 
Jack Posselt, Tony Poulos, Ron Sellinger. Seated: John Lammendella, Tom Wonhington, 
Jinny Hajek, Bud O Brien, Tony Lamendetti, Dan Sartoci. 




215 



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Wasmann Bilogical Society Officers. Standing: Richard Ruda, 
John Hudson, moderator. Seated: Joyce AUard, John Kottra, 
Lorraine Lang. 



Founded at the University of San Francisco in 1936, 
the Wasmann Biological Society commemorates the Rev. 
Erich Wasmann, one of the outstanding Jesuit philoso- 
pher-scientists in the world. The primary purpose of 
the organization is to cultivate student research and 
participation in the biological sciences. 

The Loyola chapter of the Society was founded in No- 
vember, 1940, by the Rev. Charles Wideman, S.J. The 
success of the organization is confirmed through the 
various events, both social and academic, that were held 
throughout the academic school year. Bi-monthly meet- 
ings were supplemented with films, seminars, and re- 
search papers by the students. The Society's main event 
is its annual Biology Fair in which students of colleges 
and high schools in Chicagoland take part. 

"The Probe," a newsletter, is the publication of the 
Society and is directed at informing its members of fu- 
ture events and late news of biology. 



luasmann biological society 



Members of the Wasmann Biological Society are seen in one of the classrooms of Cudahy 
Science Building awaiting one of their after-class lectures given by the faculty. 




216 





Students of the Wasmann Biological Society examine 
skeletal structure of a chicken wing in the laboratory. 



the 



Wasmann members spend much of their spare time in the 
labs increasing their knowledge of biological organs and 
structures which they are studying in class. 



The theatrically inclined members of the Wasmann 
Biological Society produced a short skit for the entertain- 
ment of the other members at their annual Christmas party. 





I don't know what's in here, but 
it feels awfully wet and gooey! 



217 



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LICATIQNSa 



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Mumnus 



The Alumnus magazine is a modern representation of 
the world of the alumni; and the faculty, administrative, 
and student efforts of their Alma Mater, Loyola Uni- 
versity. 

It is published five times a year under the editorship 
of Nancy K. Gallagher, assisted by Ethel M. LaPash. 

The purpose of the magazine is to keep the alumni 
informed of the University's events and endeavors as 
well as personal articles which feature prominent and 
outstanding individuals. 

The magazine usually features one lengthy lead story, 
which portrays the more important aspects of current 
and general topics of interest. In carrying out its policy, 
the magazine has widespread apf)€al. Besides this ex- 
tended treatment, the magazine also keeps abreast of 



latest plans with regard to building progress, extension 
of the University, fund drives, and recent activities. 

Action photographs are prominently placed through- 
out to add to the personableness of the magazine as well 
as presenting a "you are there" effect. Another feature 
is the handy calendar, which serves as a listing of the 
latest University events and other pertinent information. 

In order to supply news to alumni all over the world, 
the Alumnus relies upon a news clip service and the 
initiative of students who have graduated to provide in- 
formation for its publication. 

The Alumnus is automatically sent to every stu- 
dent who graduates from Loyola and there is no sub- 
scription fee involved. It is a service of the Uni- 
versity organized for the benefit of its alumni. 



Ethel LaPash, Nancy Gallagher, and Janet Smoluch look over 
the clippings from previous issues of The Alumnus magazine. 




220 




Enosis. Standing: Tony Ward, Fred Green, Jim Kopp, Dave Swinehart. Seated: Ellen 
Miller, Phil Augustine, Butch Blau. 



enosxs 



PHILIP AUGUSTINE 
Editor 




Enosis is the official publication of the Loyola Union. 
Published quarterly, this newsletter is under the direc- 
tion of the Loyola Union Activities Board and is edited 
by the members of Pi Delta Epsilon national honorary 
journalism fraternity. 

The purpose of this publication is to acquaint the 
students, faculty, and administration with the general 
policies and programs which govern the activities of the 
Loyola Union. In addition to its limited circulation 
within the University, Enosis is sent to those unions 
which are members of the National Association of Col- 
lege Unions. Through this medium, ideas, programs, 
and policies are exchanged with the 400 other unions 
associated with this national organization. 

Etiosis, the Greek word meaning Union, has as its 
expressed purpose the unification and expression of 
student thought. Reports of Board meetings are giv- 
en through a condensation of minutes of meetings 
which are conducted once each month. Students are 
asked to submit informative letters for publication. 



221 




d 



CAaence 



PAUL AMIDEI 
Editor 



When Loyola's original literary magazine, The Loyola 
Quarterly, assumed the title of Cadence, its editors saw 
fit to add the phrase, in thought. It is an inconspicuous 
phrase, but very significant in so far as it points up the 
general tenor of all Loyola's education endeavors. Loyola 
University seeks to involve the student in thought. Ca- 
dence exists as a channel through which the individual 
student can express his thoughts and break from pure- 
ly educational realms into the realms of creative self- 
expression. Yet this self-expression is of a pecul- 
iar kind. It is truly Catho'.ic, that is, inclusive. 



Cadence Staff: Stawoniir Harcaj, Elizabeth Cesna, John Stasey, Judy Pacer. 




222 



ROBERT EGAN 
Copy Editor 





Cadence is a tradition 
that has been expanding for over four hundred years. 
Conscious that such a tradition can easily accommodate 
both the radical and the conservative, the student pos- 
sesses a pen that is free to trace the delicate nuances of 
human thought and feeling. 

This freedom of expression is characteristic of all Loy- 
ola publications, but especially of Cadence. It is com- 
pletely organized (if such a term is applicable to any 
student publication) and run by students. The students 
who write for the magazine are not necessarily literary 
esthetes supremely aware of the maxim that literature 
is teacher and delight. They are, however, the people 
who recognize their freedom of thought and take ad- 
vantage of it by laying it before the public eye. 

The most common trait of those who work imme- 
diately with the magazine is their interest in har- 
mony. The staff must coordinate a disperate body of 
material and form it into a whole with at least the 
appearance of symmetry. Surely, this involves work, 
but it is a happy sort of work. This joy in work, 
combined with individuality and freedom of thought, 
are the true factors which go to make up Cadence. 



J 



Paul Amidei and John Stasey eagerly glance through the first issue of Cadence. 




223 




The aims of the Loyola Netvs may best be expressed by this statement, which 
appears in the paper's masthead each week: "With a policy of objectivity and 
intellectual honesty while striving for good technical quality, the Loyola News 
is dedicated to the highest ideals of journalism and the University." 

From its first issue of the year, aimed at the frosh, to its last, traditionally 
dedicated to Loyola's graduates, the 1960-61 Loyola News has tried to do just 
that — to publish news, features and editorials that will be of interest to every 
Loyola student. 

Headlines told of the record freshman enrollment, of the first annual Greek 
Week, of Jackie Schmelter winning the Miss Loyola contest, of Pow-Wow fes- 
tivities, and of the Founders Day convocations. February commencement. Blue 
Key initiation, the Variety Show, Senior Week and the June commencement 
exercises were some of the big stories of the second semester. 

The News also featured excluive interviews with Comedian Bob Newhart 
and TV Personality Ed Sullivan in a report on the memorable day \vhen New- 
hart returned to his Alma Mater to film a sequence for the Ed Sullivan show. 

Political activity at Loyola, inspired by the national elections, was reflected 
in a series of six debates printed in the weekly editions. Each week a member 
of the Young Republicans and one of the Young Democrats discussed a con- 
troversial topic of national importance; medical care for the aged, right-to-work 
laws, national defense, civil rights, the farm program, and foreign policy. These 
debates were widely read and were at least partially responsible for the increase 
in political awareness among Loyola students. 

Perhaps the most significant contribution of the News to the student body 
has been the addition of a more intellectual tone to its fact-filled pages. It is 
still primarily a newspaper, but this year its columns have offered the student 
more opportunity for serious thought and understanding. 



loyola news 



Loyola News Staff. Standing: John Sabath, Pat Joyce, Joe 
Sevick, Martin Costello, Bob Egan, Pete Steinfels. Seated: )Lois 
McKinnon, Helen Hershinow, Nancy Rilev, Mary Bergan. 





ANTHONY WARD 
Editor 



ELLEN MILLER 
Assistant Editor 




DAVE SWINEHART 
Managing Editor 



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I'Ti" 



225 




JOHN FARRELL, Asustaiit News Editor 
MICHAEL CARBINE, Seus Editor 
CECILE CONRAD, Feature Editor 



EDWARD PAJAK, Business Manager 





ifi^S^^'-'' 



BERNARD BLAU. Sports Editor 




,„v» 




226 




Loyola News Editorial Board. Standing: Edward Pajak, Ellen 
Miller, Michael Carbine, Bernard Blau. Seated: Tony Ward, 
Rev. John V. Mentag S.J., moderator; David Swinehart. 



LOYOLA NEWS 



Heading the loyal crew that managed to produce at 
least four pages of news, features, and editorical com- 
ment every week is Tony Ward, Loyola News editor. 
Tony was aided in his job of classifying news stories 
as to importance and placement, as well as formulating 
the general policy of the paper, by the other members 
of the Editorial Board including David Swinehart, Ellen 
Miller, Michael Carbine, Edward Pajak, and Rev. John 
Mentag, moderator. 

News Editor was Michael Carbine and he was as- 
sisted by John Farrell, Lake Shore News Editor; and 
Cecile Conrad, Lewis Towers News Editor. In addition, 
the news staff this year had representatives at three of 
the University's professional schools — Medical, Dental, 
and Law in order to provide better coverage of their 
activities. Another innovation was the weekly "Nite 



Life" column authored by John Ward of University 
College. 

The outstanding features of this years newspaper 
ranged from record reviews by Jack Kramer, to the 
whimsical satires of Pat Joyce. 

Sports Editor Bernard Blau and staff members Mike 
Dessimoz, Jim Kelly, Bill Merrill, Jerry Ray and Jim 
Schneider gave LU sports fans top coverage of all ac- 
tivities from fencing to varsity basketball. 

Final plaudits go to those students who gave vi'illingly 
of their time and effort but seldom had the satisfaction 
of seeing their name in print. Not all of them are 
pictured on these pages, but they merit the sincere grati- 
tude of the editors for making the task of publishing the 
News an easier one. 



227 



F 





JUDY KOHNKE 
Co-Editor 



JOSEPH SCULLY 
Co-Editor 



tde loyohn 



The silver anniversary of the Loyolan marks not only twenty-five years of 
publication, but is also characterized by innovations visible on every page. Per- 
haps the most noteworthy feature is the co-editorship, operative in the hope 
that two heads are more effective than one, and compared ideas will produce 
a more universally pleasing yearbook. 

The thematic art of the division pages is largely the result of the efforts of 
the annual's new moderator, Bernard C. CuUen, who prepared the rough sketches 
for those pages and who encouraged the additional use of color throughout the 
book. This is the main innovation on the 1961 Loyolan. 

Finally, because of the expanded utilization of a variety of publications, an 
entire section has been devoted to them. Each of these publications serves an ever 
increasing number of students, who depend upon their existence as a sounding 
board for student opinion and as a reflection of student tastes and interests. 



228 




The yearbook is the only compilation of a school 
year's history; thus its value increases as the years pass 
by. It serves to furnish the students and the university 
with a permanent pictorial of the year book form. Work- 
ing on the annual acquaints the students with the arts 
of photography, journalism, and various facets of a large 
university such as Loyola. Therefore the student body 
becomes better acquainted with their university. 

It is hoped that the efforts expended for the 1961 
Loyolan will be acknowledge by its pleasurable persual 
not just this year, but for all of the years to come. 



MICHAEL McCONNELL 
Assistant Editor 



FREDERICK GREEN 
Copy Editor 





HENRY WISNIEWSKI 
Managing Editor 



229 





^€*^.- 




'T 



^N^-iKjj^ 



■i 




Copy Staff. StJiiding: James Kopp, James Brophy, Edward 
Kaleta. Seated: Barbara Mirek, Linda Doman, Donna Siuda, 
Cecile Conrad. 



ALLEN BUSA AND JOSEPH OCALLAGHAN 
Captions Editors 






BERNARD CULLEN, Moderator 

WILLIAM O'CONNOR, Technical Advisor 

REV. THOMAS J. BRYANT, S.J., ['acuity Moderator 



BERNARD BLAU 

Sports Editor 



THE LOYOLAN 



RICHARD LUCAS AND MARTIN KLEST 
Business Alanagers 



ALICE FARRELL AND HANNELORE GLATT 
Senior Editors 





veeent d 



ecision 



Since 1949, "Recent Decisions," a section of the Illinois Bar Journal, has been 
written and edited by students of the Loyola University School of Law, and 
published monthly November through June. The Illinois Bar Journal, the of- 
ficial monthly publication of the Illinois Bar Association, is a legal periodical 
of wide circulation, having a readership of over eight thousand judges, lawyers, 
and law students. 

The current "Recent Decisions" section consists of contemporary significant 
cases decided by the Illinois and Federal Courts, accompanied by case comments. 
Each comment is essentially an accurate and informative analysis for practicing 
attorneys, with reasons to demonstrate why a particular case deserves their 
attention. 

During the past three years, the staff has augmented the routine publishing 
of cases and comments with the practice of re-publishing past comments and 
seeing how they correlate with cases subsequently decided. 

The addition of these past comments has been well received by the read- 
ers of the Illinois Bar Journal and has gained widespread acclaim for the 
perceptive efforts expended by the students of law at Loyola University. 



Recent Decisions. Henry J. Close, William J. Nellis, Honore K. Zenk, William M. 
Madden, Mr. Vincent F. VituUo, advisor; Lester A. Bonaguro, James V. Ball, John E. 
Gordon. 




232 




Loyola Law Times. William J. Martin, Thomas M. Carpenter, Martin Gleason, Honore 
K. Zenk, John W. McFadden, William J. Nellis, Robert P. Boyle. 



loyola laiu times 




Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter once said that the "worst public 
servants are narrow-minded lawyers, and the best are broad-minded lawyers." 
With this in mind, the students of Loyola's Law School embarked upon the 
publication of a new quarterly magazine, the Loyola Law Times. The first edi- 
tion was published in November and sent to all the alumni of the Law School. 

Beyond the somewhat bland purpose of establishing contact between alumni 
and school, the Loyola Law Times is a news magazine devoted to responsible 
analysis of local, national, and international issues whose solution lies in the 
application of the Rule of Law. It is dedicated to stimulating the social and 
cultural consciousness of the lawyer so that he can achieve the highest degree 
of self-fulfillment. It is the firm belief of the editors of the Law Times that 
lawyers have a profound responsibility to become part of a creative minorirj- 
dedicated to constructing a more humane civilization. Lawyers are uniquely 
qualified by education, experience, and temperament to assume f>olitical, cul- 
tural, and moral leadership. 

The Law Times attempts to assist lawyers in assuming responsibility by 
such articles as: "Illinois: Consumer Credit Jungle;" "Racism, Law and 
Politics;" "The Lawyer as an Artist;" "Missing Link in Urban Renewal;" 
"Legal SkeletoM in a Literary Closet;" "Eichman, Eisenburg, and Israel. 



233 



The IJndergrad is the most recent publication at Loyola. 
Founded in the fall of I960, it serves to publicize the 
social activities of both the Arts and Commerce Councils. 
By giving these events more school-wide publicity, the 
staff hopes to create added incentive for student participa- 
tion in University events. 

A monthly publication which presents the views and 
opinions of the student body. The Lhidergrad attempts to 
assist the Loyola News in objectively presenting the high- 
lights of the academic year. The paper serves as a sound- 
ing block for questions the students would like to ask 
the administration. 

In order to fulfill the demand to cater to the individual 
in so voluminous an organization. The Vndergrad has 
striven to portray a clearer picture of the functions and 
the "whys" behind the policies of the administrative de- 
partments of Loyola University. 




JOHN BURKE 
and 
JAMES ALEX 




RONALD OLECH and DIANE JENKINSON 



ffie undevgv3id 



MADELEINE DOMAN, JOHN COLLINS, LINDA DOMAN 




234 



Pi Delta Epsilon, founded at Syracuse University in 
1909, is an honorary fraternity designed to reward the 
student journalist for his efforts, services, and accom- 
plishments. 

In the school year of 1958-59, a group of students on 
the staffs of the Loyolan, Cadence, and The Loyola News 
formed an organization to petition Pi Delta Epsilon to 
establish a chapter at Loyola University. On May 29, 
1959, final arrangements were concluded with the na- 
tional headquarters, and a Loyola chapter of Pi Detla 
Epsilon was officially established. 

To the members of this fraternity has been given the 
privilege of staffing the quarterly publication of the 
Union Board, Enosis. 

Under the direction of their moderator, the Rev. 
Thomas J. Bryant, S.J., an annual banquet is given in 
May for new members. 

This year's officers are: Phil Augustine, President; 
Ellen Miller, vice-president; Nicholas Motherway, treas- 
urer; Anthony Ward, Historian-Councilman. 




Pi Delta Epsilon Officers. Ellen Miller, Phil Augustine, Presi- 
dent; Tony Ward, Nick Motherway. 



Pl 



deifa epsilon 



Pi Delta Epsilon. Standing: Joe Scully, Jack Kramer, John Farrell. Tony Ward, Mike 
McConnell, Fred Green, Butch Blau, Allen Busa, John Burke, Mike Dessimoz, Mike 
Carbine, Jim Alex. Seated: Phil Augustine, Cecile Conrad, Ellen Miller, Mary Bergan, 
Nick Motherway. 




235 




GEORGE IRELAND 

Athletic Director 
Head Basketball Coach 



coAcding sfaff 



Former Ail-American from Notre Dame, George Ireland has posted a record 
of 107-106 in ten years of coaching basketball at Loyola. He is now in his 
second year as athletic director. Before coming to Loyola, Mr. Ireland was a 
highly successful prep coach for 15 years at Marmion Military Academy. This 
year he was honored by being elected to the NCAA Basketball Rules Committee. 

Frank Hogan, after playing for Loyola from 1957 to 1959, has taken over the 
duties of Loyola's freshman basketball coach. Before enrolling at Loyola, Frank 
was a cage standout at Loyola Academy. 

Don Chalmers has been swimming coach at Loyola for the last twelve years, 
and, during that time, compiled a record of 89 victories and 63 defeats. In 
addition, his teams have won the Chicago Intercollegiate swim title seven times. 
Mr. Chalmers attended East Orange, New Jersey high school where he was on 
the 1931-32 All-American Team. While at Franklin and Marshall College, he 
swam on two championship relays. 

Jerry Wieland, head cross-country and track coach for eleven years at Loyola, 
is a graduate of Southern California University. While in high school, Mr. 
Wieland set the National Catholic League Record in the 220-yard low hurdles. 
His teams have won the Daily I^etn Relays ten of eleven years and have won 
at every major relay invitational meet in the country. 



238 




DONALD CHALMERS 
Swimming Coach 



JEROME WIELAND 

Cross-Country and Track 
Coach 



FRANK HOGAN 

freshman Basketball 

Coach 



Donald Amidei, in his second year as assistant cross- 
country and track coach at Loyola, is a graduate of De- 
Paul University. He was head coach at St. George High 
School for eleven years where his teams won the cross- 
country title seven out of eight years. 

A coach at Loyola since 1950, Charles Greenstein has 
posted an impressive record at the helm of the bowling 
team. He was a founder of the Midwestern Intercolle- 
giate Bowling Conference which his teams have domi- 



nated for many years. As a student at Loyola, he was 
captain of the bowling team from 1949 to 1950, and in 
1948 he bowled a 300 game. 

A relative newcomer to the coaching staff is John 
Stevens, a graduate of DePaul, who has been golf 
coach at Loyola for three years. Thus far, he has 
posted a record of ten won and seven lost. He 
is also assistant pro at the Edgewater Golf Club. 



Donald Amidei, George Ireland, Jerome Wieland, and Frank Hogan discuss the strategies 
to be employed in the following year's athletic activities. 



p 



uarsify ^Askei^Al 





John Crnokrak (30) out-rebounds AU-American Jerry Lucas of 
Ohio State, as John Havlicek and Mel Nowell of the Buckeyes 
and Rambler co-captain, Clarence Red, look on. The powerful 
Ohio team dealt the Ramblers their first loss of the season. 



240 



Utilizing the two-platoon system, featuring the famed 
"Rattler" and "Cobra" divisions, to effect a fast break 
oflfense and a pressing defense, the Ramblers racked up an 
unprecedented 396 points in their initial home stand, as 
they topped Carroll College, 83-59; Western Ontario, 104- 
63; Wayne State 118-76; and North Dakota, 91-72. 

The Maroon-and-Gold then left the environs of Chicago, 
travelling to Columbia, Missouri, where they upset the 
Tigers, 68-62, in a contest decided in the final 18 seconds 
by the clutch foul shot accuracy of Gerry Harkness. 

Defeat was first tasted via the hands of the nation's 
number one team, Ohio State's Buckeyes, 90-65, in the 
first of a half dozen Chicago Stadium encounters. Sub- 
sequently, the Ramblers beat Loyola of the South, 78-66, 
before more venturing upon the trail. 

After downing Creighton, 86-74, the Ramblers fell to 
Marquette's Warriors, 83-71, at Milwaukee and to upstart 
Western Michigan, at Kalamazoo, 87-80. 

Loyola lashed Loras, 110-53, breaking the century mark 
for the third of five times, before meeting and turning 
back their only Big Ten competitor this season. Coming 
from behind, the Ramblers overcame a 16 point deficit to 
beat the Badgers of Wisconsin, 87-79- 



Journeying to Ohio, Coach Ireland's crew vanquished 
Baldwin- Wallace at Berea, Ohio, 74-69, as Clarence Red 
garnered 23 markers in his best performance of the sea- 
son, point-wise. Two days later, the Ramblers were up- 
set by Bowling Green at Toledo, when with an 11 point 
intermission lead the Chicagoans shifted to a slow, ball- 
control offense. With seconds left, a Falcon tip-in ren- 
dered them winners of a 66-65 decision. 

Back at the Stadium, Loyola managed a thrill packed 
upset triumph over Detroit, 83-82. Trailing by three at 
half, the Ramblers scrapped the taller Titans until Mike 
Gavin's last second foul shot success spelled victory. 
Detroit's Dave DeBusschere connected for 35 tallies. 

New York was nice, but Loyola lost, thwarted by the 
Redmen of St. John's, 98-74, at Brooklyn. Fourteen points 
low at halftime, the Ramblers came on strong in the 
final stanza, but found the Easterners equal to the chal- 
lenge. 

Underdogs twice, the Maroon-and-Gold split a pair of 
Chicago Stadium contests, beating Marquette, 81-78, be- 
fore being defeated by the Bruins of U.C.L.A., 87-82. 
The victory reversed an earlier decision. Despite a ser- 
ious height handicap, LU's running, gunning Rambler's 
hung on until the waning minutes versus the Westerners. 



Clarence Red out-rebounds Tom Gywn (40) of Wisconsin as 
All-Ainerican Candidate, Tom Hughbanks (45), stands ready for 
any unseen mistake. 



Tom Hughbanks (45) and Tom Gywn of Wisconsin battle for 
a rebound with Clarence Red (22) as Herman Hagan and Gerry 
Harkness (15) elbow their way into position for any possible 
play. The game with Wisconsin gave Loyola it's first stadium 
upset, 87-79. 






Clarence Red (22) and John Crnokrak close in for a rebound 
as Gerry Harkness blocks Tom Beazaitis's shot. Loyola broke a 
hundred for the fifth time in an easy victory over JC 108-47. 




Gerry Harkness (15) blocks Tom Villemure's shot with 1:28 
to go to give the Ramblers possession of the ball as they trail 
by a single point. Jim Mini (23), Co-Captain of Loyola, and 
All-American Dave DeBusschere of Detroit, watch the action. 



Clarence Red groans as he receives a knee in a free-for-all in 
the Marquette game. Herman Hagan (21), Marquette's Don 
Kojis (44), and Gerry Harkness (15) are ready to enter. 




'>> 



/ v> 



'1 . 




i 



Larry Hughes (35), Alan Ray (14), and John Morgan (13) 
watch the free throw by Mike Gavin that won the Detroit game 
in the last 26 seconds of play. The score was LU 83 Detroit 82. 



VAVsity ^Askei^dll 



To the consternation of Loyola fans, the Wildcats from across the Lake once 
more proved the nemesis to Rambler hopes. For the second time in the cam- 
paign, Western Michigan spilled the Chicagoans, this time 107-99, spoiling an 
otherwise unblemished home slate. Clarence Red's two tallies boosted him into 
second place among Loyola career scorers. 

The Air Force Academy was shot down by LU, 92-63, suffering their worst 
loss of the season. A devastating second half scoring attack piled 28 points into 
the Rambler's one point intermission margin. Jim Mini and Red played their 
final pair of games in Alumni Gym, scoring 32 and 31 points, respectively, as 
Loyola dumped Washington, 105-77, and John Carroll, 108-47. 

Harkness' 24 points in the Carroll contest established him as the individual 
one-year point-total record-holder, surpassing Jack Kerris' old mark of 488. 

All hopes of a post-season tournament bid were shattered by Xaxier in the 
season finale, as the lads from Cincinnati routed the Ramblers. 



243 





Allan Ray (14) crosses his legs for luck in this shot against 
Western Michigan. Jim Mini blocks out John Hura (21) as 
Mike Gavin comes up for a possible rebound. LU lost the 
game 99-107. 



Jim Mini (23) scores two points in the Western Michigan 
game as Sam Key (23) makes an attempt to block Mini's shot. 



Benefited by strict tryout sessions, more than a dozen preseason practices, and new maroon 
and white uniforms, the Ramblers' cheerleaders spurred the basketball team on to one of 
it's most successful seasons. The girls from left to right are Judy Brinkman, Kathy Ireland, 
Sharon Kerrigan, Mary Ann Harvey, Rhoda Lesko, Diane Anstett, and Sherry Fierst. 




244 



SEASON'S RECORD 

LOYOLA OPPONENT 

83 Carroll College 59 

104 Western Ontario 63 

118 Wayne State 76 

91 North Dakota 72 

68 Missouri 62 

65 Ohio State 90 

78 Loyola (N.O.) 66 

86 Creighton 74 

71 Marquette 83 

80 Western Michigan 87 

110 Loras 53 

87 Wisconsin 79 

74 Baldwin Wallace 69 

65 Bowling Green 66 

83 Detroit 82 

74 St. John's 98 

81 Marquette 78 

82 UCLA 87 

99 Western Michigan 107 

92 Air Force Academy 63 

105 Washington 77 

108 John Carroll 47 

85 Xavier 94 




Gerry Harkness was the Loyola Neu's 
Player of the Week award winner. Each 
week the Neivs staff picked a player, and 
Gerry received the award most frequently. 



VARSITY BASKETBALL 



The Varsity Ramblers. Standing: Alan Ray, Dan Duick, Clarence Red, Jim Reardon, Her- 
man Hagan, Coach George Ireland. Seated: Jerry Verwey, Marty Norville, Rich Driscoll, 
Jim Mini, Mike Gavin, Gerry Harkness, John Crnokrak. 




fresfiman 5as^ef6a/l 




Rich Rochelle rebounds in the freshman game against the Ja- 
maco Saints. Les Miller and Don Kasli watch for any mistake. 




Les Hunter goes high on the boards and hits for two against 
Jamaco. This game was the only loss of the freshman team. 



The freshman season was marked with much excitement as the team won 
their first nine games in a row, under the direction of Coach Frank Hogan. The 
indisputable top thrill came when the squad took on the Jamaco Saints. They 
stayed in the game the whole way only to lose by three points for their only 
defeat of the year. 

The closest any other opponent came was within 29 points, with the largest 
margin a 110 to 17 victory over Roosevelt, as the team finished with a 12 won — 
1 lost record. 

Ron Miller gave the outstanding individual performance when he held 
high scoring Kenny Moses of Wright Junior College to eight points and scored 
25 points himself. 

In their 13 games, the freshman squad averaged 96 points per game and 
held their opposition to half of that. They shot 46.9% from the floor, and 
scored a total of 1,096 points. 

The team's success could be attributed to the fact that seven players aver- 
aged double figures, with Vic Rouse at the top with 14.1. Rouse also led the 
rebound department with 122. He was followed closely by Floyd Bosely and 
Rich Rochelle, with 112 and 108 respectively. Jack Egan took top honors in 
the free throw department with 39 of 46, for an average of 79.6. Chuck Wood 
was noted for his offensive and defensive hustle, and for his floor play. 



246 




The Freshman Ramblers. Standing: Coach Frank Hogan, Les Hunter. Vic Rouse, Floyd 
Bosley, Rich Rochelle, Chuck Wood, Dan McQuade, Jack VanBramer. Kneeling: Lee Miller, 
John Curran, Jack Egan, Tom Waldron, Jim Shilling. 




SEASON'S RECORD 

LOYOLA OPPONENT 

91 Fifth Army 25 

91 First National Bank 56 

96 Lake Forest Frosh 38 

1 10 Roosevelt 17 

93 Illinois (Navy Pier) 59 

113 Glenview 29 

113 Valparaiso Frosh 61 

91 Glenview 32 

85 CYO All Stars 61 

89 Jamaco Saints 92 

102 Harris Trust 58 

83 Father Perez K/C 56 

91 Wright Jr. College ^6 



247 



aqiia-ram6/ers 




Bernard Blau set a new University record when 
he finished undefeated in the 200 yard Breast 
Stroke for the second season in a row. He has 
not lost in this event since his Freshman year. 



Jerry Messineo stretches for the water as he executes an inward 
dive. Jerry was one of the most consistent winners for the Aqua- 
Ramblers, and he placed second in the Chicago Intercollegiate 
swimming and diving Championship. 






'Y~ 


BB»W" .5B38S** Eagpr- m 


4 







Record setters in the 400 yard Medley Relay in the Chicago 
Championship are from left to right Larry Kann, Rick Stave- 
ley, Bernard Blau, and Robert Dring. 



248 




2*V 



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^^««ii««^ 






" ^•iiii ffy. 



Ron Svoboda, Pat Pierce, Andy Barry, Jim Mulcrone, Larry 
Smith, and Don Schmitt go through their paces in a practice. 



Although the 1960-61 swimming team, under the direction of Coach Don 
Chalmers, split even in dual meet competition with six wins and six losses, they 
won the Chicago Intercollegiate Championship for the seventh time and the 
Central AAU Championship for the first time in six years. 

Prior to the Championships, the Aqua-Ramblers lost several close meets. 
They were even closer than the scores would indicate, as several meets were won 
or lost by a flick of the hand. The team seemed to be lacking the sprinter who 
would have made the won-lost record more impressive. 

As the season drew to a close, the team reached its peak. The dual meet 
victory over Grinnell and winning the Championships were the better meets of 
the season. In winning the Championships, the squad defeated such outstand- 
ing teams as North Central, New Trier Swim Club, and Portage Park. 

The strength of this year's team can be seen in the fact that several records 
were broken. Pete Trummer set a new University record in the 200-yard Indi- 
vidual Medley, and the 400-yard Freestyle Relay of Rick Staveley, Bernard Blau, 
Larry Kann, and Mike Jolivette registered a new mark. 

While Jim Mulcrone did not set any records, he was an outstanding swim- 
mer throughout the year. His time in the 220 and the 440-yard freestyle events 
was less than a second off the Univerity records. Jerry Messineo dove extremely 
well in freshman year. He is the best diver Loyola has had in a long time. 

With Bill Bishop returning after a year's absence and the addition of a 
sprinter, the team will definitely increase their victories next season. 



249 



^?1J 



[U^ 



~?r. 







The Freestyle Relay of Larry Kann, Pete Trummer, Rick Stave- 
ley, and Mike Jolivette pose on a line marker after a hard race. 



The Aqua-Ramblers' one-two punch in the 200 yard Butterfly 
are Rick Stavely and Dennis Spirek as they alternated winning 
throughout the year. Dennis, however, was a little camera shy. 




250 




SEASON'S RECORD 

LOYOLA OPPONENT 

40 Detroit Tech 55 

76 Northern Illinois I9 

78 Illinois Tech 17 

68 Chicago Illini 27 

37 Northwestern 54 

80 Augustana 15 

40 North Central 54 

38 Iowa State 57 

65 Wisconsin (Milwaukee) 29 

27 Bowling Green 68 

35 Western Michigan 60 

50 Grinnell 44 



Coach Don Chalmers congratulates captain Jim Kelly on his fine 
four year record. Manager John Morrissey is shown tabulating 
the results. Jim and Bob Dring are the two seniors graduating. 



The winners of the Fourteenth Annual Intercollegiate Championship and the Central Men's 
AAU Championship finished the year with a 6-6 dual meet record: Back row, left to right: 
Coach Don Chalmers, John Banks, Mike Jolivette, Manager John Morrissey. Middle row. 
Bernard Blau, Larry Smith, Jim Mulcrone, Captain Jim Kelly, Bob Dring, Ron Svoboda. 
Seated: Rick Staveley, Jerry Messineo, Larry Kann, and Pat Pierce. Absent when the picture 
was taken was Dennis Spirek. 



m^ 



^Ot 0<<>C 




Bowling Team: Standing: Coach Charles Green- 
stein, Wally Draus, Bob Mars, Jack Brown. 
Bottom row: Joe Sillman, Jack McGuire, Jim 
Handy. 



varsify fowling 



The bowling team coached by Charles Greenstein fin- 
ished one of their better seasons in close contention with 
Notre Dame for the championship of the Midwest In- 
tercollegiate Bowling Conference. 

Competing in a strong conference. Jack Brown and 
Jim Handy led the keglers with averages of 196 and 
191 respectively. Jack Brown has the distinction of hav- 
ing bowled one of the best games of the season with a 
258 game. Jim Handy led with a three game high of 1072. 

The team also led the Conference as they had a 
three game high of 4899 and an average of about 915. 





Coach Charles Greenstein is giving Wally Draus and Jack Mc- 
Guire instruction on the proper method of holding the ball. 



Captain Jack Brown spins one down 
the alley for another strike. Jack led 
the team with a 196 average. 



cross country 

Loyola's Cross Country team this year has begun to 
show more than ever that they will attain national fame 
soon. While having only a mediocre record of six and 
four, several individual performers showed great prom- 
ise. The early season loss of Jerry Koehler, who was 
nineteenth in the state as a freshman last year, hampered 
the team's efifort. They, however, did defeat such power- 
ful opponents as Wheaton State, DePaul, and North- 
western in dual meet competition. 

In the annual State Cross Country meet held at East- 
ern Illinois University, the team finished sixth. Fresh- 
man Tom O'Hara finished second in the meet. His time 
was one tenth of a second slower than the winner. This 
was the closest anyone from Loyola has come to winning 
the meet since Bob Kelly won it in 1952. Special credit 
should be given to Sophomore Jim Mooney who finished 
seventh in the state and was one of the mainstays of the 
team throughout the season. 




Cross Country Team. Stjiiditig: Coach Jerry Wieland, Tom 
O'Hara, John OLeary, John Pendergast, Joe Magno, and Coach 
Donald Amidei. Kneeling: Jim Mooney and Jim Cochran. 



Jogging around the track are left to right: John Pendergast, 
John OLeary, Tom O'Hara, Joe Magno. Jim Mooney, and Jim 
Cochran. 




253 



VAVsity ivAck 



Coaches Don Amidei and Jerry Wieland have said that 
this season's track team was one of the best balanced 
squads that they have ever coached. The prospects for 
the future look even better. 

At the head of the list of stars leading the team to one 
of the best years in the University's history are miler 
Tom O'Hara, middle distanceman John Cherone, and 
sprinter and long jumper Henry White. 

At the start of the indoor season, O'Hara showed that 
he would be a tough man to beat when he won the 
novice mile with a time of 4:13.7 in the Michigan AAU 
relays. Later, he lowered the record to 4:08. O'Hara 
assisted Eddie Alexejum, Tom Flanagan, and Henry 
White in setting a new record in the mile relay at 
Michigan. 

Rudolph Collins, Ed Alexejum, Tom Flanagan, and 
Henry White set an American Indoor Record in the half- 
mile relay with a time of 1:29.5. Henry White ran the 
440-leg, followed by Tom Flanagan and Ed Alexejum 
with 220's. Tom O'Hara ran the final 880 yards to set 
a new University record in the sprint medley relay. 



Peter Fiore and Ray Corbett, along with two other 
freshmen, Tom O'Hara and John Cherone, were among 
the top performers for the team. They won the fresh- 
man mile relay at the University of Notre Dame with 
a time of 3:24.9. In addition, Henry White won the 
300-yard dash at Notre Dame. 

Along with John Cherone and Pete Fiore in the mid- 
dle distance events are Joe Magno, Ray Corbett, and 
Dick Bade. Tom Matulis will be among the top milers 
in the Mid West next year, according to Coach Amidei. 

Doug Balen, Dick Cochran, and Jim Prendergas gave 
strength to the team in the two-mile event. Bob Mal- 
colm led the team in the field events, as he participated 
in the discus and shotput. Bob Schurer had a monopoly 
on the hurdling events. However, Loyola had a definite 
weakness in the field events due to a lack of participants. 

The team moved outdoors the first of April, and was 
just as impressive as it was indoors, if not more so. As 
usual, they ran faster outdoors and more records were 
broken. With many freshmen on the team, the outlook 
for the future is indeed hopeful. 



Tom Flanagan defeats Henry 'White in the 440 at the University 
of Chicago Fieldhouse with both men running under 50 seconds. 




Coaches Donald Amidei and Jerome Wieland check the watch 
for another record set by the harriers. 



254 





Tom O'Hara, Tom Flanagan, Ed Alexejum, and Henry White 
set a new University record in the Sprint Medley Relay. 




Bob Schurer led the track 
team in the hurdling events 
with many victories. 



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Dick Baue, Jim Dwyer, Sherman Beck, and Dick Dvorchak 
were members of the Freshman Sprint Medley Relay. 



Jim Dwyer, followed by Tom Grossman and Sherman Beck, won 
the 60 yard dash at the University of Chicago Fieldhouse. 




256 





Tom O'Hara set a new indoor record when he ran the mile 
in 4:08.8. He also set a record in the 1000 yard run. He is 
without a doubt one of the finest freshmen in the country. 



John Cherone and Tom O'Hara are going thru their paces in 
a practice session at the Lewis Towers Armory. John set a re- 
cord in the 880 at the Michigan AAU meet with a time of 1:58.2. 



varsity track 



Tom Flanagan, Ed Alexejum, Henry White, and Tom O'Hara set a record in the Mile Relay. 



< 



^ 




Left to right: are Jim Kelly, Tom Kiusthul, and Joe Koridek the Independent Intramural 
Managers. These men supervised the entire Lake Shore Campus Intramural Program. 



inframural atnlefics 



ne Fraternity Intramural Board. Standing: Jim Santo, Jim Bush, Bob Singler, Richard 
Idenburg, Bob Silich, Jim Healey. Seated: Jim Talamonti, Past Chairman Joe Scully, 
ice-chairman-Secretary elect Bernard Blau, and President elect Jack Moustakis, 




258 




Tom Tyler and Joe Koridek rush through the line as Bob Mars, 
and Steve Brown try to block them out in the Championship. 
Tim Diazmae, Jim Vlyzni, and Joe Kolanko are the backfield. 



A complete renovation was made in the intramural 
program this year. A separate league for the fraterni- 
ties was instituted apart from the independents, and the 
champs of both leagues played each other for the sweep- 
stake points. Each sport was assigned a certain point 
value which was totalled at the end of the year to de- 
termine the winner. 

Joe Scully was elected Chairman of the fraternity 
board only later to resign. Jack Moustakis was then 
elected Chairman, and Bernard Blau Vice-Chairman- 
Secretary. Jim Kelly and Tom Kipsthul were in charge 
of the independents. 

The boards were set up to rule on all protests, arrange 
the schedules, and, in general, take over all the respon- 
sibilities of the league. Mr. Ireland, Athletic Director, 
was very cooperative in the establishing of the program. 

Jim Bush, Jim Laurie, Pete Patrick, and Dennis O'Connor battle 
for the rebound in the Alpha Delt versus Pi Alph encounter. 





.* i\ 



r- 'Hk 




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8 



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Graham 
for the 
on the 



McClean is calling the signals as Joe Kolanko runs out 
pass. Tom Coffey, Joe Koridek, and Hank Anselmo are 
defense. The Pi Alphs beat the Omagons 12-0. 



259 





The Champions of the Intramural basketball league are the 
Viatorians. The members are from left to right, standing: Bro- 
thers Aceo, Farrelly, Van Weil, Pecaut, Obach. Kneeling: Bro- 
thers Talken, Snodgrass, Schooley. Absent when picture was 
taken were Brothers Lopez and Pisors. 

Ia^c sdove inframura/s 

Sports sponsored by the Intramurals were baseball, basketball, football, 
tennis, and track. The latter two were new this year. 

The tennis tournament was the first sport to be initiated in the newly- 
formed Intramural Program. Paul Gauvreau, representing Alpha Kappa 
Psi fraternity, walked away with final honors by defeating Dick Olden- 
berg of Sigma Pi. Jerry Ray, of Tau Kappa Epsilon, took third. 

When it came to football, no one could stop the Pi Alph's as they 
won eight in a row in the fraternity league. The Alpha Delts and the 
Tekes followed close behind. 

The P.I.D.'s and the Omagons battled for the Independent league cham- 
pionship, with the Omagons earning the right to play the Pi Alphs. 
The Pi Alphs defeated the Omagons in one of the best contested games 
in the intramurals by a score of 12-0. 

The Cowpunchers and the Viatorians won their respective inde- 
pendent league titles, as did the Pi Alphs in the fraternity league. In 
the first round of the championship, the Viatorians defeated the Cow- 
punchers for the right to play the undefeated Pi Alphs. Led by Brothers 
Pecaut and Snodgrass, the Viatorians beat the Pi Alphs 37 to 30 for the 
championship. 

Swimming, track, and baseball rounded out the rest of the Intra- 
mural games. 



Jim Laurie, Pete Patrick, Tom Tyler, and Jack Ansboro battle 
for a rebound of the shot of Bob MuUenback in the Alpha 
Delt versus Pi Alph fraternity Championship game. 



Ed Rasch, Loyola's man behind the cage, 
says that he is going to retire this year 
after thirty-one years of devoted service. 




260 




The Fraternity Basketball Champions, the Pi Alpha are. Stand- 
ing: Dennis O'Connor. Tom Tyler, Tim Hawkins. Jim Dempsey, 
Ed Bell. Frank Neidhart, Tom Coffey, Jim Nettleton. Kneel- 
ing: Pete Kane, Jack Ansboro, Jim Laurie, and Jack Moustakis. 



lewis towers 
intvdimuvAls 



The Lewis Tower's Intramural Program is set up a 
little differently than the Lake Shore campus program 
in that the L. T. arrangement is directed more to the in- 
dividual at the start of the season and gradually more to 
the team events. All the events were held at the Chicago 
Avenue Armory under the direction of senior IM man- 
ager Nate Whitmal and Mr. Leonard Zimny. 

Barry Jackson was the first winner when he won the 
football accuracy throw with 37 out of a possible 50. 
The team of Tom Reckwerdt, Paul Deureaux, Joseph 
Angelone, and Ed Jaseyezak won the four-man rope climb 
with a time of 30.4. They were followed closely by the 
Delta Sigma Pi team of Jim Santo, Rich Carroll, Mike 
Casserly, and Mike Sullivan. 

On Halloween Novelty Day, a wide assortment of ac- 
tivities — singles and some team events — were held, with 
prizes being awarded to the winners. 

The rest of the events were table tennis, badminton, 
turkey trot, three-man basketball, shufHeboard, horse- 
shoes, dart tournament, and chess and Chinese checkers. 



Members and pledges of Tau Kappa Epsilon Fraternit\, the win- 
ners of the baseball division of the Intramurals the last two 
years, are shown posed around home plate. They are from /eft 
to right: Ken Such, Mike Ponticelli, Dennis Singletary, Robert 
Rhode, John Frontonius, and Dick Bulger. 





Participants in the three-man basketball league at Lewis Towers 
are Frank Tasch, Ken Creed, and Larry Walsh. 



Jim Santo and Jim Matousek exhibit the technique they used 
in the rope climbing contest at the Lewis Tower's Armony. 




Warming up for a game of bas- 
ketball in dual fashion are Tom 
Guerra, Jim Matousek, Bob Killac- 
key, Ken Creed, and Frank Tasch. 



262 




Playing volleyball in one of the L.T. intramural activities are: 
Bob Killackey, Jim Matousek, Tom Guerra, and John Sobota. 



John Sobota makes a frantic effort to block Tom Guerra's 
shot in a basketball game at the Chicago Avenue Armory. 





Dale Granacki and Nate Whitmal go up for a jump as Frank 
Tasch and Ken Creed await the unexpected outcome. 



263 









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The champs of the Coeds' Volleyball Tournament captured by 
Stebler Hall are Bottom row: Barbara Rivan, Mimi Duggan, 
Joyce Hall. Back row. Mary Ford, Mary Ann Dooling, Jane 
Donoghue, and Nancy Riley. 



The Women's Intramural Program saw the domination 
of the Nursing Council and Alpha Tau Delta fall to 
Stebler Hall. Stebler Hall, captained by Mimi Duggan, 
was victorious in the volleyball tournament by defeat- 
ing Nameless 21 to 10. At the end of the regular season, 
both teams had five victories and one defeat. 

Volleyball was succeeded by a table tennis tournament 
and basketball tournament. 

An integral part of the women's program this year 
was fencing lessons taught by Voldemar Ruus. Fencing 
was something new and was met with an enthusiastic 
response. 

In addition, the Lewis Towers' girls took gymnastics 
from Mrs. Erna Wachtel at the Lake Shore Park. Mrs. 
Coleman, accomplished pianist, enlivened the bending, 
stretching, and marching with rhythmic numbers. This, 
too, was new in the women's program. 

Marlene Caparelli, director of the intramurals, guided 
the program to the success that it was. 



women s inframurals 



Demonstrating their fencing ability are Diane Baltramaitris, Anne 
Byrnes, Joyce Richards, Mary Sanchez, and Sharon McCabe. 




264 




Barbara Pleva, Pat Luetkemeyer, Nancy Wallenburger, Mare- 
lene Capparelli, Barbara Howe, Diane McLeod, and Kay Can- 
field wait anxiously the center jump that will start another game. 




Diane McLeod, Nancy Wallenburger, and Barb Pleva are set to 
rebound Kay Canfields shot in a game in the Women's I.M.'s. 



Waiting for the serve during the championship volleyball 
game are Beth Ford, Mary Ann Dooling, Ruth Ann Brinkman, 
Jane Donaghue, Barb Rivan, and Mimi Duggan. 




LIGHTS 



\ 



'?aK 








U .'. .i:^'^ -iJg^'^'^^.- *..^^--l> 



Freshmen, especially those from out-of-town, "discover" Lake 
Michigan, Loyola's speaacular campus, during Orientation. 



[resfiman ovientAiion 



Freshman students listen atcentiveh' to a short presentation of 
the athletic program given h\ head-coath George Ireland. 





k-- *»-*. 



After an orientation lecture, new freshmen stu- 
dents gather in front of the Lake Shore Union. 



In its first year of existence, Loyola welcomed thirty- 
five young men who were interested in obtaining a Jes- 
uit education. On September 21, I960, seventeen hun- 
dred freshmen, male and female, crowded their way 
into the Loyola Campus Center to begin that process 
known as Freshman Orientation. 

Starting bright and early Wednesday morning, the 
prospective graduating class of 1964 were praised, fright- 
ened, prodded, and informed by numerous members of 
the faculty concerning drop out rate, spiritual life, sports, 
and R.O.T.C. After a well-deserved break for lunch, the 
group broke up into three sections to be put to the task 
of more listening. In one afternoon they picked up 
knowledge about a library containing one million vol- 
umes, nine fraternities, five sororities, ninety student 
organizations, dormitory life, seventeen honor societies, 
student governments, and the Dean of Students office. 
Finally, refreshments were served, much to the delight 
of the Frosh. 

Thursday found the coeds learning more about the 
University from the Coed Club. Then, to round out 
the week, the first half of the freshman class of male 
students made their annual retreat. After two days of 
ascetic life, these new students were treated to their 
first taste of the University social calendar at the Fresh- 
man Invitational Dance held Saturday evening. The 
week was over; classes were yet to begin. 



Organized confusion seems to be the order of the day during 
freshmen registration at Dumbach Hall, on Lake Shore Campus. 





An introduction to Loyola military lift- was provided freshmen 
who were welcome guests at an R.O.T.C. open house last fall. 




Bonnie Solzak, LT coed, models the proper attire for the Fall 
Frolic for the benefit of an interested freshmen audience. 



The Sheraton-BIackstone Hotel was the secne of 1960's annual 
Coed Club Welcome Tea. "little sisters" met "big sisters" in 
an atmosphere of gaiety, good fellowship, and friendship. 




269 




The Very Reverend James F. Maguire, S.J., Dr. Karl Pfuetze, 
Sister M. Gertrudis, O.S.F., Mr. Mortimer Zimmerman, Miss 
Helen Lyons, and Miss Gladys Kiniery gather on Friday to 
celegrate the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Schol of Nursing. 



The Silver Anniversary Year of the Loyola University 
School of Nursing reached its climax during a three-day 
celebration presented by the faculty, alumnae, and stu- 
dents of the School. 

The theme of the program sponsored by the School of 
Nursing faculty was Education for the Nursing Profes- 
sion. Dean Gladys Kiniery opened the day with an ad- 
dress of welcome. Rev. Edward B. Rooney, S.J., and Dr. 
Mary K. Mullone also presented addresses. 

A Silver Key to a Golden Future was the concept 
which brought together the alumnae members for their 
annual homecoming banquet held in the Sheraton- 
Blackstone Hotel. The Very Rev. James F. Maguire, 
President of Loyola University, extended congratulations 
to Dean Kiniery on the twenty-fifth anniversary of the 
School of Nursing, and told of its great strides, especial- 
ly in the last decade. Marion Etten, Fund Chairman, 
presented a large facsimile of a check for $3,940.50 to 
Miss Kiniery for the school as a Silver Anniversary Gift. 

The main speaker of the day was Mrs. Lucile Petty 
Leone, President of the National League for Nursing 
and Assistant Surgeon General of the United States Pub- 
lic Health Service. 

Activities sponsored by the students began with High 
Mass at the Madonna della Strada Chapel, followed by 
a breakfast held in the Campus Center. Benediction 
brought to a close the third day of the celebration. 

niirsing anniversary 



Sunday was designed as Student's Day in the 2Sth Anniversary 
Celebration as Junior nurses participate in the Holy Mass. 





Miss Marion Etten, Miss Virginia Whalen, and Miss Constance 
Ferris present the silver anniversary check to Loyola University. 



c^LTupus center mixers 



Diane Anstette, Maureen Martin, and Judy Brinkman entertain 
the students as Fred Green, master of ceremonies, presents Kathy 
Loftus with the trophy as "Miss Hypo" at the Nursing Mixer. 




271 




Bill Freeman, Alpha Delta Gamma; Pat Conlon, Alpha Kappa 
Psi; Mike Morawey, Tau Delta Phi; Dennis Johnson, Sigma 
Delta Phi; Boh Rohde, Tau Kappa Epsilon; along with George 
Ireland, athletic director; display their trophies during Greek 
Week Ceremonies. 



ifc gvee^ week 



The Interfraternity Council of Loyola presented the first fraternity Greek 
Week to be held in the University's ninety year history in the fall semester 
of 1960-61. 

The General Chairman of Greek Week, Dennis Johnson, the Chairman of 
the IFC, Michael Morawey, and the other fraternity presidents began the pro- 
gram on a Sunday afternoon with an Orphans' Day. A group of orphans and 
underprivileged children were treated to a day of games, movies, and prizes. 

Sunday evening, a general smoker was held in the Campus Center. Each 
fraternity passed out information on their various activities, and three speeches 
were made on the leadership, brotherhood, and scholarship of fraternity men. 

During the week, printed booklets were passed out to the entire student 
body, containing information on this first Greek Week, a list of the nine par- 
ticipating fraternities, and a succinct history of each of them on campus. 



272 




Greek Week was highlighted by Olympic games 
competition. The climax of the Greek Olympaid 
was the chariot race which was won by the Tekes. 

The following Saturday afternoon, Greek athletic 
events were staged. Among the events were the one- 
mile relay, the hundred-yard dash, shotput, discus throw, 
and the javelin toss. The climax of the meet was a 
chariot race, with fraternity-constructed Greek chariots 
pulled by fraternity brothers. 

That evening, as the final to the first Greek Week, 
the IFC presented a "Roaring Twenties" dance. The high 
point of the evening was the presentation of awards by 
the Dean of Students and the Athletic Department to the 
winning fraternities in the fields of scholastics and 
athletics. Alpha Delta Gamma was first in the athletic 
events. Tau Kappa Epsilon received top honors in the 
field of scholarship. 

Bill Sieger, Pat Conlon, Paul Hoernig, Dennis Johnson, and 
Jim Szwed spoke to the prospective fraternity men on lead- 
ership, scholarship, and fraternalism at the I.F. C. Smoker. 





The l.F.C. turned back the clock to present the Roaring Twen- 
ties Dance. The evening was highlighted by a Charleston Mara- 
thon which gave Fred Green, Carol Fullam, and Wally Welninski 
a chance to cast off a few inhibitions along with their shoes. 

Perhaps the most rewarding part of Greek Week was the party 
held for the orphans. Games, toys, ice cream, and attention 
were heaped upon these children by fraternity men and nurses. 






i 



Members of the Basic Nursing Association gather at their 
annual Christmas party, the highlight of the Yuletide season. 



The Freshman Retreat, included in orientation week, gives the 
incoming freshmen a glimpse of the spiritual education which 
is an integral part of Loyola University's education process. 



The Very Reverend James F. Maguire, S J., Reverend Robert W. 
Mulligan, S.J., W. Daniel Conroyd, and Thomas F. Hawkins greet 
guests at the President's Tea which is held for the faculty. 





Beverly Wilson, Dianne Spellman, Monica Kozak, Lenore Quinn, 
Joan Tengblad, Judy Pacer, Barbara Shipman, Joan Cwikla, 
Barbara Hayes, Pat Cordan, Rita Hayes, Ruth McGuire, Arlene 
Lavrinovich, Hannelore Glatt, and Joan Coscioni await new 
freshman women at the Coed Club Freshman Welcome Tea. 



Members of Alpha Delta Gamma and Delta Zeta Chi assemble 
on stage to accept trophies for winning the inter-fraternity 
sing, which is sponsored each year by Tau Delta Phi. 



A variety of costumes were present at the Halloween 
party which Loyola Hall has made an annual event. 




275 





vesevve ojjicevs 
ivAining corps 

The Loyola University ROTC Brigade of Cadets en- 
joyed its best year in the school's history. This year 
kicked off with cadet participation in Freshman Orien- 
tation Week and the recruiting was so successful that 
it resulted in the largest first year class since 1950. 

The annual Military Ball in December was high- 
lighted by the selection of Miss Patricia Dierberger 
as Military Ball Queen for 1961. Cadet initiative marked 
the outstanding displays presented at the ROTC Open 
House in March. Our military fraternity, the Asso- 
ciation of the United States Army, capjsed the spring 
social season with their Spring dance. The year was 
successfully concluded with the pageantry of the 
Presidential Review and the Annual Formal Inspection. 

In the field of intercollegiate competition, our out- 
standing ROTC Drill Team continued to maintain their 
reputation as one of the nation's top exhibition drill 
teams. The ROTC Rifle Team enjoyed their best year on 
record with participation in the Chicagoland ROTC Rifle 
Team League where they picked up a new trophy for the 
display case. The chatter of feminine voices was heard 
for the first time around the department with the for- 
mation of the new Loyola University Girl's Rifle Team. 



The R.O.T.C Color guard stands at 
attention before the assembled ca- 
dets during the Presidential Review. 







*t- 



j*'t 







Members of the R.O.T.C Rifle team line up on the range prior 
to one of the many intercollegiate meets which they enter 
each year. The marksmen are, Slaiiding: Joan Trandel, (hostess 
of the drill team). Dean Pranzarone, Robert Rohde, William 
Sparks, Ron Ciesielski, Marvin Frake. Kneeling: Ronald 
McDonald, Frank Baukert, Jeff Vertenten, Dennis Spirek, 
Andrew Symanski, M Sgt. Walter Jorgensen (team coach). 



The R.O.T.C.'s crack drill team runs through 
its paces for an assembled group of Loyola 
University students and parents. 





Miss Patricia Bierhergcr was chosen the Honorary Colonel 
of the Loyola University R.O.T.C. Brigade of Cadets at the 
annual Military Ball The Ball, which took place in the 
Fifth Army Officers' Club, was attended by R.O.T.C. cadets 
and guests. George Bell, Master of Ceremonies, looks on. 



277 




Representing Loyola in the "Priest in the Modern World Sym- 
posium," Rev. Robert W. Mulligan, S.J. (far left) discusses 
political, social, and ascetical aspects of modern Catholic 
life with Msgr. Francis J. Lally, Rev. George A. Hagmaier, 
C.S P., and Dr. Frederick J. Crosson. 



Jim Fitzgerald and Jack Nicholson escort the late Frank J. 
Lewis from the annual Mass celebrated in his honor. Mr. 
Lewis was a great benefactor of Loyola University. 



/^^ 



The Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S.J. and Mariette LeBlanc 
guide Mrs. William J. Stebler through the new women's resi- 
dence which was dedicated to the memory of her late husband. 




278 





One of the highlights of the annual Alpha Delta Gamma 
Thanksgiving Eve Dance, was a selection of Miss Ann Marie 
Wenthe, a Mundelein junior as Chicago Catholic College Queen. 



Officers and members of Pi Alpha Lambda gather in the foyer 
of the Belmont Hotel after their Christmas Intercollegiate 
Dance which was held during the holidays on December 23. 




"Annie Get Your Gun," a rollicking musical presented by 
the Loyola University Curtain Guild, drew nothing but praise 
and acclaim from the responsive and enthusiastic audience. 




279 



nafional jesuH colleges 
deS^te touvuAmeni 




Winners of trophies at the Fourth Annual Jesuit College 
Debate tournament representing Boston College, University 
of Detroit, Creighton University, Loyola of Chicago, and 
Rockhurst. Accepting the trophy for Loyola was Tom Dienes. 



On Thanksgiving weekend in 1957, the Loyola Uni- 
versity Debating Society inaugurated a debate tourna- 
ment for the twenty-eight North American Jesuit 
colleges and universities. That year the tournament 
was held in honor of the Jesuit Centennial in Chicago. 

Since 1937 this Jesuit College Debate Tournament 
has become an annual event. This year, college debaters 
from one coast to the other convened at Loyola Univer- 
sity for six rounds of rugged competition. Those schools 
attending included: Boston College, Creighton Univer- 
sity, University of Detroit, Loyola University of Chi- 
cago, Loyola University of Los Angeles, Marquette 
University, Regis College, Rockhurst College, St. Louis 
University, University of Scranton, and Xavier University. 

The ultimate success of such a tournament rests with 
the debaters. Each year, they look forward to this rare 
opportunity to meet with debate colleagues from the 
nation-wide Jesuit student "community." The debaters 
find themselves putting forth their best efforts in 
speaking skills and keen analysis of the debate res- 
olutions in order to win one of the coveted trophies. 

Certainly, many lasting friendships have been born 
at this tournament enabling the participants to de- 
velop closer ties with other Jesuit students. 



Loyola of Chicago welcomes Loyola of Los Angeles to the 
Fourth Annual Jesuit College Debate Tournament November 24 
and 25, I960. The tournament was held on Lake Shore Campus. 





Lake Shore Campus was transformed into a vast television 
studio when Ed Sullivan picked Loyola as a portion of 
his salute to Chicago, telecast in December of I960. 

tv comes to IouoIa 



"A Really Big Shew" came to Loyola University early 
in October of last year when Ed Sullivan, nationally 
known television personality, and Bob "button down 
mind" Newhart, rising young comedian, accompanied 
by a small brigade of technicians and seemingly end- 
less and endless amounts of television equipment, in- 
vaded the Lake Shore campus. 

Until two days earlier, the ten minute video tape of 
Bob Newhart which was to be shown on Ed Sullivan's 
television show featuring Chicago had been scheduled to 
be filmed at Mister Kelly's. But at the last moment, 
the site was changed to Newhart's alma mater, Loyola. 

The two prominent personalities arrived on the campus 
about 12:45 p.m. At a reception immediately following 
their arrival. Bob Newhart was presented with the Dean's 
Key for his outstanding work in the entertainment 
field by Harry L. McCIoskey, Dean of Students. Afterwards 
the activity moved outdoors and several sequences were 
filmed of Newhart in different locales about the campus. 

The bright young comic then returned to the Campus 
Center where he presented thirty-five minutes of refresh- 
ing humor. This ^vas in the form of short monologues, 
fome of which later appeared on Sullivan's November 6th 
show. It was here at the filming of these skits that many of 
the Loyola students received their first behind-the-scenes 
glimpse of the production of a large-scale television show. 



Ed Sullivan, Rev. John J. Beckman, S.J., and Bob Newhart 

stroll across the campus followed by a contingent of eager 

Loyola students. Bob Ne%vhart captivated a Loyola audience 
with several of his hilarious, side-splitting routines. 

Bob Newhart, a former student of Loyola LIniversity, re- 
ceives the coveted Dean's Key from Harry L McCIoskey. 




fa/1 froli 




The social highlight of the opening semester is the annual Fall Frolic, the 
outstanding all-University dance of the year. The Grand Ballroom of the 
Sheraton Towers Hotel provided the background for the crowning of the 
queen for 1960-61, Miss Jacqueline Schmelter, candidate of Pi Alpha Lambda 
fraternity. The ROTC honor guard added an atmosphere of military solemnity 
to the festivities of the evening. 

This year's contest witnessed a revision in the title from Miss Varsity to Miss 
Loyola, the Hostess of Loyola University. As "sweetheart of Loyola University," 
the new name is considered a more distinctive and fitting title for her future 
activities in representing the University. 

The use of IBM cards, one with each student's official number, was an in- 
novation designed to assure a well-planned, honestly regulated election. 



A symphony of lace and wrought iron forms the setting for the 
entrance of this year's "Miss Loyola" contestants. The candidates 
are Cathy Silvagni, Monica Kozak, Bea Bouchonville, Judy Kos- 
loskus, Alexandria Domes, Jacl<ie Schmelter, Darlene CJ'Brochta, 
Francine Olech, June Antonucci, Carol Ennis, Ellen Blie, and 
Patricia Mclntyre. 



The new "Miss Loyola," Miss Jackie 
Schmelter, graciously accepts the 
crown and scepter of her honored 
title from Miss Sheila Shanahan. 








Election officials, Henry Wisniewski, Judy Kruzel, and Jim 
Heath, check balloting for Miss Loyola at Lewis Towers. 





JACKIE SCHMELTER 

Miss Loyola, 1960-61 




The Grand Ballroom of the Sheraton-Blackstone Hotel was the 
scene of the Fall Frolic, one of the highlights of the year. 



283 



poiu 



- wow wecRen 



^end 



The Loyola Union, in cooperation with the Union 
Activities Board, sponsored the annual Pow-Wow early 
in December. The gala festivities began on Friday 
night with Dan Sorkin presenting the Salty Dogs, 
Marx and Frigo Trio, and the Griffiths. Immediately 
following the Jazz Festival, the student body gath- 
ered on the athletic field for a bonfire and pep rally. 

Saturday highlighted the annual float parade with 
eighteen organizations competing for the coveted awards. 
Soon after the float parade a free luncheon was held 
in the Campus Center. Following the luncheon, the 
push ball contest was held on the athletic field pit- 
ting the freshmen against the sophomores for the 
possession of the little red keg. The freshmen were 
victorious and tossed away their green beanies forever. 

Saturday evening found everyone not only exhausted, 
but also tense and excited, as the time for the presenta- 
tion of the awards grew nearer. Jackie Schmelter, Miss 
Loyola 1960-61, declared Tau Kappa Epsilon the winner of 
awards for best float and best fraternity float. Loyola 
Hall was presented with the award for house decorations. 




The energetic committee heads of this years Pow-Wow are 
caught by our photographer on their way to a business meet- 
ing. Left to right: Ellen Miller, Michael McConnell, Donna 
Siuda, Joseph Scully (General Chairman), and Anthony Ward. 



Featured at this year's All Star Jazz Festival was a bril- 
liant dixie-land jazz group from Purdue, The Salty Dogs. 




284 




The victory bonfire blazing in the background casts a warm 
glow on Jackie Schmelter and the assembled student body. 



Tired but elated students gather in the Union House for 
a Pow-Wow Luncheon after the spectacular Float Parade. 






The Freshman Class won the cov- 
eted "little red keg" after narrowly- 
defeating the more powerful Sopho- 
more Class in the well fought Push 
Ball Contest. The Sophomores won 
a dunking in the chilly waters of 
Lake Michigan. 



Accepting the award for Best House Decoration from Jackie 
Schmelter is John Zeitz, President of the Dormitory Coun- 
cil. The Dorm narrowly averted defeat by working all night 
repairing the damage done by fire to their decorations. 




The Nursing Council's colorful Loyola Stein was complete 
to the angel hair foam running down the sides of their float. 



m 






"Victory Over the Waves" was the theme of Tau Kappa Epsilon's 
winning float entry which is seen "sailing" past the judges. 



The Theta Phi Alpha "pirates' made the other contestants 
walk the plank as they sailed to a second place victory. 



POW-\\'OW WEEKEND 



A real gone Alley Oop had his hands full trying to defeat 
a fire-breathing dragon on the Kappa Beta Gamma float. 



Delta Sigma Pi seems to have predicted the outcome of the 
Homecoming Game by placing Western Ontario on a Carousel. 





287 




joundevs d^y 



The Very Reverend James F. Maguire, S.J. extends his con- 
gratulations to R. Wendell Harrison, Edward C. Logelin, 
Mrs. John A. Holabird, Dr. Lon W. Morrey, James H. Gately, 
William D. Maxwell, and Augustine J. Bowe, distinguished 
Chicagoans who received Loyola Founder's Day Civic Awards. 



Loyola University commemorated its ninetieth anniver- 
sary December 12th of last year with an all-day program 
designed to include prominent Chicagoans, outstanding 
Loyola akmini, the faculty of the University, and student 
leaders. 

The morning Founders Day Convocation honored 
eleven Loyola alumni for distinguished service to their 
profession, the Church, the community, the nation, and 
the University, with citations presented by the Alumni 
Association president, John J. Waldron. Civic Awards 
were presented to seven prominent Chicago citizens 
who were cited individually by the Reverend Joseph 
Small for "civic responsibility at its best." 

The afternoon Student Presidents' Convocation was de- 
voted to the role of the student leader in the life of the 
University. After presentation of the flag of 1961, Joseph 
Gajewski, Lucille Anichini, and Kenneth Printen spoke 
of student leadership, service, and scholarship, the quali- 
ties which determined those eleven students who were 
to receive medallions. 

Completing the Founders Day was the first annual 
Presidents' Ball, held in the Crystal Ballroom of the 
Sheraton-Blackstone Hotel. At the Ball the Very Rev. 
erend James F. Maguire extended official greetings of 
the University and Dr. Kenneth Jackson, LIniversity 
Marshal, presented the students who had received awards 
at the Student Convocation. 



A combined audience of civic leaders, faculty, and students 
listens attentively to the Welcoming Address delivered by 
the Very Rev. James F. Maguire S J., President of Loyola. 




288 




Student Presidents' Committee. Standing: Michael Hartraan, 
Tony Ward, John Erickson, Robert Walsh, Frank McNamara, 
Joseph Gajewski, Mike Morawey. Seated: Patricia Metz, Margaret 
Corrigan, James Fitzgerald, Peggy Fischer, Jack Nicholson. 



The 13th floor of Lewis Towers was the scene for the morning 
Founders Day Convocation which honored prominent alumni, 
distinguished Chicagoans, and members of the faculty. 



The 'President 

•/ 

jTo sola Uni've nit v 

and 

[he Presidenti of tin Sludent Orgtimzatioiu 
requist the honor of your presence at the 

Jounders^ 'Day 

Tresidents' 'Ball 

held in recognition of those students 

most distinguished for 

J^adership, Service to the I'niversitv, and Scholarship 

Monday, 'December twelfth 

Nineteen hundred and sixty 

at nine o 'clock 

The Crystal "Ballroom 

SheraiQn-%lach$tonc Hotel 

South Michigan Boulcvdrd at Ralhoa Dri'jf 




Founders Day Award Recipients. Stuiidifig: 
John Ward, William Martin, Paul Davis, 
Robert Bonovich, Robert Walsh, Michael 
Hartman. Seated: James Smith, Barbara Rice, 
Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S.J., president 
of the University; Margaret Fischer, Michael 
Hawkins. 





The Blessing of the Crib Ceremony concluded the Fine Arts 
Lecture Series. Rev. Carl Burlage, S.J., was the celebrant of the 
ceremony, assisted by the Loyola University Glee Club. 



Cinema 



ledu 



ve series 



Miss Dagenais, instructor at Loyola, is seen discussing art with 
Rev. Richard Douaire who lectured in the year on "The Paint- 
ings of Georges Roualt." Below, left: Rev. John Reinke, S.J., 
principal of Loyola Academy, presented a highly entertaining 
lecture on the music of Rodgers and Gershwin. 



Dr. J. Warren Perry introduces Miss Ardis Krainik, 
assistant manager of the Lyric Opera of Chicago. 
Miss Kranik spoke to the students and the public 
on the "Nature of Opera." Below, left: Sister M. 
Thomasita, O.S.F., art director at Cardinal Stritch 
College in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, spoke to a group 
of art enthusiasts on the qualities of the artist. 




Kay Huck and Bob Blair pose for the Loyolan photographer at 
the Coed Club Dance, "Roses in the Snow" during Christmas. 





Jack Nicholson, Joan English, Al Miszka, Mary Granata, and 
Don McManigal gather around as the clock on the wall ap- 
proaches 12:00 at the annual Commerce Council "Sno Ball." 



cfirisfmas dancers 



Carol Duffy, Barbara Kozik, Al Mikst2a, Dave Mannagan, Con- 
nie Jong, and Rosemary Prow are seen at the Coed Club Formal. 





Loyola skiers, dressed in their warm winter togs, 
prepare to board their Trailways bus on route to 
Crystal Mountain Resort in Frankfort, Michigan 
for a fun filled, five-day ski trip. 



s^i wee^ 



Crystal Mountain, Michigan was the site for the January, 1961 Ski Trip, 
jointly sponsored by the Coed Club and the Loyola Union. The newly-opened 
Crystal Mountain Lodge provided a highly congenial and relaxing atmosphere 
for skiing, card playing, ping pong, dancing, and general conviviality. 

The friendliness of the twenty-eight persons on the trip was quite apparent 
in the camaraderie of the group. Each could share the pain of a sudden spill, 
the pleasure in a successful downhill run, and the anguish caused by previously 
unused muscles. 

Excellent snow conditions and certified ski instructors enabled all to be- 
come well acquainted with the variety of slopes. Spills, laughter, weariness, 
mischief, and an eternal bus ride were the combination that made the five-day 
vacation an interlude long remembered. 

The Cr>stal Mountain Resort is seen in the far background 
from the top of the first slope used by the beginning skiers with 
free lessons being provided by experienced resort instructors. 




t 



292 




Mealtime was a most welcome event during the week with all 
of the hungry skiers very well satisfied with the resort's food. 




Skiers begin with the long arduous pull up the rope tow towards 
the far reaching hilltop for a swift and thrilling trip downward. 

Jackie Schmelter, Miss Loyola 1961, wades 
through the deep snow, while onlookers toss a 
few snowballs to make the going tougher. 




isc gvee^ week 



The week of February 13, 1961 the Intersorority Coun- 
cil of Loyola University held their second annual Greek 
Week. The concept and methods used in this general 
rush week were changed significantly from its first year 
under the direction of Co-chairmen Sandy Domes and 
Monica Kozak. 

Registration of interested freshman woman took place 
beginning Monday of that week but the first specific func- 
tion was held Tuesday morning during the 11:30 break 
at Lewis Towers. A discussion was held for rushees by 
members of all sororities concerning various phases of 
sorority life. Miss Mariette LeBlanc, Dean of Women, 
and Miss Joan Vaccaro, Assistant Dean of Women, spoke 
to the assemblage. A similar function took place Wed- 
nesday at 11:30 on the Lake Shore Campus. That same 
day, taffy apples were sold to benefit the missions. 

Sunday a tea was held at the St. Claire Hotel in which 
each sorority had a separate room decorated to individual 
taste. The rushees toured each room viewing skits put 
on by members of the organizations. Closing the Greek 
Week members and prospectives gathered to hear an ad- 
dress by Miss LeBlanc. 




The members of Delta Zeta Chi show the freshman interested in 
their sorority the short but illustrious history of the group. 



The sisters of Kappa Beta Gamma dress up in frolicky cos- 
tumes to show prospective freshman the best of their sorority. 





Theta Phi Alpha, the largest sorority at Loyola, show many of 
their trophies to both Lewis Towers and Lake Shore freshmen. 



The Intersorority Council Open House provided an opportunity 
for the sisters of Chi Theta Upsilon to speak to the various in- 
terested freshman along with displaying their constitution. 




Alpha Tau Delta, professional nursing fraternity, display some 
incidental pictures of their activities to prospective pledges. 






Ronald Cincinelli is the center of attraction as he plays the 
title role of Harpagon in Moliere's "The Miser" presented by Loy- 
ola's Curtain Guild at the Community Theater this spring. 



John Dentzer, Troy Ehlert, Fred Herzog, Joan Zaharski, Marilyn 
McKinnon, Al Busa, Jackie Schmelter, Joe Gajewski, and Mary 
De Orio gather for a picture at the Arts Council Mardi Gras. 



Christine Kaub, Margaret DeVito, Bonnie Bertaux, Diane Spell- 
man, Maureen Martin, Mrs. Ernest Glatt, Rosemary Martucci, 
Barbara Lenard, Diana Pallasch. Lucille Anichini, and Margaret 
Falk were the fashionable coeds who modeled for the Coed 
Club Card Party and Fashion Show in the Lake Shore Union. 





Tom Phillpot, Jim Alex, Jmi Harris, Tom Raclaw, Jim Laurie, 
Moncia Kozal^, Andy Symanski, Lana Doman, and Mike Hart- 
man; officers of the Arts Council, greet the various guests of 
the Mardi Gras Masque Ball held at the Ambassador West Hotel. 



Rev. John McKenzie, S.J., internationally known scholar on 
Sacred Scripture, gave a series of lectures at Mundelein College. 








Rev. Raymond V. Schoder, a member of the Loyola faculty, was 
one of the lecturers during the presentation of the "Distinguished 
Professor Lecture Series" presented this past fall. 



297 



VAviety sdow 



"If you want to take the curtain ofiF the ground," participants in the 1961 
Variety Show learned, you've got to put in a lot of work. Those who watched 
the show quite literally found it out, too, after seeing twenty students, led by 
Fred Green and Rachel Riley, prepare for the performance itself in the show's 
openings. 

With this ingenious prologue, "College Life, U.S.A." — the theme of the 
tenth annual show — was launched into orbit; and no star was brighter than its 
director, Jim Rusk. A senior theater major at Northwestern University, he de- 
voted his entire winter academic quarter to directing and staging the acts com- 
posing the show, as well as writing the music, lyrics, and choreography for the 
opening number. Rusk left for New York shortly after the Variety Show to 
study with Stephen Sondheim, lyricist of West Side Story. As a result of this 
capable direction and also the stiffer competition involved in landing a spot 
in the show this year "College Life, U.S.A." appeared as the finest and most pro- 
fessional Variety Show ever seen by Loyolans. 



Theta Phi Alpha registered a double win in this year's Var- 
iety Show when they walked away with the coveted Organiza- 
tion and 'Iggy" Awards with their entertaining satire on L.U. 




'*'r*' .. . iiii | i»^ p j| i ir > i iFT-i ii^ ijj g t ii . 



298 




Richard Oberuc, Rachel Riley, and Fred Green break into the 
spirited and colorful finale to this year's Variety Show. 



Harry the Hipster (Tom Shanahan) lectures 
to students on the merits of progressive jazz. 
Like he made the scene so well that he grab- 
bed top honors for the best individual act. 





Inspector Fink (Erin Clifford) aids 
the Alumni Association in its search 
for prominent (and wealthy) alums; 
Jan Aumuller, Peggy Geffinger, and 
Diane Shaffer, all members of the 
Coed Club. 




The tremendous success of this year's Variety Show was due to 
the untiring efforts of Mike Kutza, Jim Alex, Jim Rusk, Ellen 
Miller, and Jim Harris. Congratulations, crew!!! 



vdiviety sdow 



Exclusive of the opening and closing, ten acts performed. The famed Dental 
School Choir of Loyola made its annual appearance in the show as a non- 
competitive act; three individuals and six organizations were selected to appear. 

Awards, which heighten the excitement of any performance, were for the 
same categories as last year with one exception. In addition to the Council 
trophies for best individual and best organizational acts, traditionally given on 
Friday night, a new trophy was awarded to the best overall act that evening. 
As usual, the Loyola Alumni Association made its annual award of the "GGY" 
trophy to the best act in the show as selected by a panel of alumni judges. 

Winners of the sweepstakes this year was Theta Phi Alpha sorority, which 
walked away with both the "GGY" and the Council trophy as the best organiza- 
tional act. Entitled "What is College?" the act featured a verse choir balanced 
by a chorus which provided appropriate background songs. 

Smokey Monroe (Monica Kozak) led Briar U. (Kappa Beta 
Gamma) in an entertaining satire on college athletic recruiting. 




This poor little freshman didn't 
stand a chance until the Tekes help- 
ed him through his registration as 
part of their musical survey of pain- 
fully pleasant college memories. 




VAviety sftow 



Sophomore Tom Shanahan was given the best indi- 
•'idual act award for his portrayal of "Harry the Hipster." 

Copping the trophy for best overall act Friday night 
was the Society for the Advancement of Management, 
which presented a musical-comedy version of Nathaniel 
Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter. Jo Ann Henner starred 
as Hester Prynne in this first appearance of SAM in the 
Variety Show. 

The other two individual acts, singers Susiette Little 
and Larry Patterson, delighted audiences with "Without 
a Song" and "Tonight," respectively. 

The Coed Club act, "Alumni Anonymous," featured 
only four persons. Jan AumuUer, Erin Clifford, Peggy 
Geffinger, and Diane Shafer appeared as a detective and 
the alumnae she is hired to hunt down in response to the 
ever.present call for contributions to dear old Loyola. 

Delta Sigma Pi satirized the differences between the 
two undergraduate campuses in their presentation show, 
"College Bowl." The show spoofed a number of campus 
politicians and came to a rousing finish with a commer- 
cial for LU-LU bubble gum. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon treated the audience to "Music, 
Martinis and Memories" as two seniors, aided by some 
magic brew, relived their undergrad years at LU, re- 



membering a class attempting to understand the complex 
of Freud, the freshman-sophomore tug of war, and fresh- 
man orientation. 

The final organizational act was Kappa Beta Gamma's 
offering, "The Smokey Monroe Story," a satire 00 col- 
legiate recruiting practices. 

Following the judging on both evenings was the 
show's rousing finale, "El Sombrero" from the Broad- 
way hit Wildcat. 

Producer of the show was Jim Harris, junior class 
president of the College of Arts and Sciences. The as- 
sistant producer was Jim Alex of LT, junior class vice- 
president. Many others spent long hours laboring on 
the show, including Ellen Miller, costumes; Mike Kutza, 
sets; Bob Moocha, stage manager and props; Al Busa, 
lights; and Dan Trozak, sound. The School of Nursing 
handled publicity, for which Kathy Hawkins was chair- 
man; and Don Barrett of the College of Commerce served 
as business manager. 

From a most inauspicious start in the Union House 
before an audience of a few dozen ten years ago, to a 
crowd of over two thousand in the Mundelein Audi- 
torium — this is the Variety Show success story, and its 
most recent chapter has been its most glorious. 




^ 




How does one sing "Without a Song"? Suzette 
Little shows the audience that it can be done. 



Fred Green talks Rachel Riley into staying in the show after 
she complains about it being too much work and not much fun. 



Downtown Delta Sigs had a field day satirizing Lake Shore 
activities and events in their Lu-Lu College Bowl Quiz. 




m^.,-^'-i,ia!X^^ .. 










. , _-«&: 


r 








303 



European 
trip 



I . !■ . ' II': 



Last June, a group of approximately forty Loyolans boarded the plane 
which was to take them on a twelve-week, ten-country tour of Europe. Led by 
Dr. Michael Fink, tour director, the eager travelers wrote their own version of 
Innocents Abroad as they made their way through England, Holland, Belgium, 
Austria, Switzerland, Spain, and a handful of other countries before returning 
to Chicago, September 1. 

Hightlights of the tour included a public audience with His Holiness Pope 
John XXIII, and a private audience with President Gronchi of Italy. 

In Oberammergau the tourists view a performance of the world-famous 
Passion Play, and while in Munich they managed to attend a session of the 
Eucharistic Congress. 

Their travel bus took the Loyolans to a number of special musical events: 
they attended the famous Salzburg festival; they witnessed a performance of 
Samson and Delilah by the Paris Opera; they saw Aid a performed in an ancient 
open-air amphitheatre in Verone, Italy; and they attended the Mozart festival in 
Aix-en-Provence. 

Members of the tour saw the Stratford players present The Merchant of 
Venice at the beginning of the trip, and just before leaving for home, they saw 
the opening ceremonies of the I960 Olympic Games in Rome. 

Loyola faculty members on the tour were: the Rev. John Felice, S.J.; the 
Rev. Francis Grollig, S.J.; Dr. Boris Spiroff; and Miss Rosemary Donatelli. 

The returning travelers cleared customs with little trouble, and they now 
have watches, perfumes, sweaters, microscopes, jewelry — as well as many happy 
memories — to remind them of their summer in Europe. 

Europe bound Loyola students and friends board a United DC-6 
Mainliner for New York where they will catch an Israel Air- 
lines plane for a twelve-week vacation in far reaching places. 





^ 



Miss Rosemary Donatelli is greeted by Pres- 
ident Gronchi in the president's chamber. 



Loyola students pose with His Excellency Gronchi, President of 
the Italian Republic, in the hallway of the president's palace. 

The Mayor of Italy is surrounded by admiring Loyolans. 




The European group visits 
Quirinale, the palace of the 
president of Italy and seem 
to be amazed at the luxury of 
the hall. 




commencement 



Twice each year Loyola University takes time to honor 
the graduates of its nine schools and colleges in its tra- 
ditional commencement exercises. 

At the ninety-first annual commencement last Feb- 
ruary 1, almost 400 students walked across the stage of 
the Granada Theater to receive their degrees from the 
hand of the Very Rev. James F. Maguire, University Pres- 
ident. The group included: 25 candidates for the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Nursing; 51 for the Bachelor of 
Science in Commerce; a total of 54 University College 
students receiving Bachelor degrees; 109 degrees con- 
ferred on students in the College of Arts and Sciences; 
and a total of 162 candidates for degrees of Master of 
Social and Industrial Relations, Master of Education, 
Master of Science, Master of Arts, Doctor of Science, and 
Doctor of Philosophy. 

Loyola conferred the honorary degree of Doctor of 
Law upon three candidates: the Right Reverend Monsi- 
gnor John W. Barrett, Director of Archdiocese Hospi- 
tals; Mother Mary Gerald, O. P., Mother General of 
the Dominican sisters of Adrian, Michigan; and William 
J. Sinek, Chairman of the City Products Corporation. 



Principal speaker for the February commencement was 
Theodore A. Distler, Executive Director of the American 
Association of Colleges. 

On June 13, Loyola made history by changing the 
location of the graduation exercises from the Granada 
Theater to the auditorium of Chicago's new exposition 
hall, McCormick Place. Present plans are to hold all 
future commencements in the lakefront center. 

Because of the vast seating capacity of the auditorium 
(5,000), Loyola graduates were able, for the first time, 
to distribute an unlimited number of invitations to the 
ceremonies. 

Following the University-wide exercise, a formal re- 
ception was held for the approximately 800 graduates, 
their families and guests, in the handsomely appointed 
V.LP. room overlooking Lake Michigan. 

Ceremonies are annually supervised by members of 
the commencement committee, with the University mar- 
shal presiding. Members of Blue Key National Honor 
Fraternity served as ushers, and in June the members of 
Circumference, Women's Leadership Honor Sorority, also 
assisted. 




The Very Rev. James F. Maguire. nres'rlpnt of I.nvoia TIn'vpr. 
sity, addresses the convocation at the mid-year graduation held 
for the final time at the (jranada Theater near i,a.ve anore. 



V3. 










(T 



*- \, 




' r.^-^ 



^ 






Elizabeth McCann, registrar of the university, presents the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Social Science to Michael Flynn, 
as Very Rev. James F. Maguire prepares to congratulate him. 



306 




Some of the parents and friends of the graduates 
anxiously await the commencement exercises, 
while others page through the attractive program. 



The stage of the Granada Theater is illuminated 
from the chandeliers hanging from the balcony as 
graduates prepare to receive their diploma. 

Graduates enter the Madonna della Strada Chapel for the Bac- 
calaureate Services commencing the June Graduation. 





IT 






*'>lK:,xi» 









^iitt:Sk^ 






gv^iduAte scdool 



Recipients of the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 



BIRUTE MICUTA BALTRUS, Biochemistry 

( B.S., Newton College of the Sacred Heart; M.S., Loyola Uni- 
versity) Dissertation: Effects of Diethylstilbesterol on Pituitary 
Enzymology. 



FRANK ANTHONY DINELLO, Psychology 

( B.S., University of Illinois; A.M. Loyola University) Disser- 
tation: Selective Reinforcers in the Operant Conditioning of 
Normal and Exceptional Children. 



JOHN WEBB MOHRBRACHER, Psychology 

(A.B., College of St. Thomas; A.M., St. Louis University) Dis- 
sertation: The Diagnostic Approach of Three Disciplines to 
Minimal Intracranial Pathology in Children. 



ROBERT ORRIN RAWSON, Psysiology 

( B.S., Lfniversity of Illinois) Dissertation: A Photoelectric 
Plethymographic Study of the Sympathetic Vasomotor Outflow 
to the Hind Limb of the Dog. 

Sister MARY REGINA (WILLIAMS), O.P., English 

( B.S., Marquette University; A.M., Loyola University) Disser- 
tation: Richard Hurrell Froude. 



PAUL JOSEPH von EBERS, Psychology 

( Ph.B , Loyola University; A.M., Loyola University) Dissertation: 
The Effect of Color on the Phenomenal Displacement of Lights 
Seen in Apparent Movement. 



Recipients of the Degree of Dctor of Education 



Sister MARY BONITA ( WIERZBOWSKI), C.S.S.F. 

(A.B., Loyola University; M.Ed., Loyola LIniversity) Dissertation: 
Survey and Appraisal of Organized Guidance Services in the 
Catholic Secondary Schools of the Archdiocese of Chicago. 



Sister MARIE CLAUDIA (STIEHM), O.P. 

( B.S.Ed., De Sales College; A.M., Catholic University of Ameri- 
ca) Dissertation: Christian Concepts in Reading Series. 



BERNARD A. QUISH 

(B.S., Lewis Institute; M.Ed., Loyola University) Dissertation: 
An Analysis and an Appraisal of the Working Relations between 
the Substitute Teachers and the Regular Teachers in the Chi- 
cago Public Elementary Schools. 



REVEREND GEORGE RODERICK YOUNGS 

(A.B., Calvin College; .A.M., Michigan State College) Disserta- 
tion: An Analysis of Some of the Implications of Carl Rogers' 
Hypotheses Concerning Human Nature. 



JOSEPH J. ZBORNIK 

( B.S., University of Illinois; M.S., University of Illinois) Dis- 
sertation: An Evaluation of Prediction of Success in Shorthand. 






i 



Recipients of the Degree of Master of Science 



Jack T. Beuttas 
Jimmy Wallace Hill 



Irene Emily Mersol 
William S. Murphy, Jr. 



Charles Aloysius Schneider 
Harry Staffileno, Jr. 



Recipients of the Degree of Master of Arts 



Joseph Anton Biesinger 

James Henry Bowman, S.J. 

Patrick Joseph Boyle, S.J. 

Leo Peter Cachat, S.J. 

Sister Mary Christa (SchuUer), O.S.F. 

William Thomas Cox, Jr. 

Martin Patrick Coyne, S.J. 

John Richard Crowley, S.J. 

William Charles Cunningham, S.J. 

Jerome M. Dittburner, O.F.M. 

Reverend Patrick M. Donovan, O.S.M. 

Daniel Dennis Dunnigan, S.J. 

Sister Mary Ellen (Rosemeyer), C.S.J. 

Brother H. Dominic Everett, F.S.C. 

Ronald James Farmer 

Reverend Gerald Fraser 



Rosemary Louise Fuerst 

Sister Mary Honorata (Hesse), OS.F. 

Robert Allan Howley 

John H. Hudson 

Sister M. Ignatius (Staley), I.B.V.M. 

Sister Jeanne d'Arc (Barnes), C.S.J. 

Sister Mary Joel (Stier), O.P. 

Sister John Amadeus (Fronke), CSJ. 

Charles Andrew Kelbley 

Reverend Peter W. L. Keng 

Sister Laurence Edward ( Ferguson ), O.P. 

Que Thi Le 

Win field Scott Lenox 

Jerome Anthony Long 

John Alanson Lucal, S.J. 

Elisa Landicho Manez 



Sister Mary Marcellin (Daly), B.V.M. 
Sister Maureen Therese (Connaughton), 

C.S.J. 
John A. Miller 

Sister Mary Modesta (Rauch), O.S.F. 
Coletta Amelia Nelson 
Reverend John Joseph O'Malley 
Michael Anthony Partipilo 
Reverend Leo Francis Petit, M.S.C. 
Sister Mary Rebecca (Rosemeyer), O.S.F. 
Donald Vincent Rogan 
Peter Joseph Roslovich, S,J. 
Reverend Stephen Robert Ryan, O.S.M. 
Thomas Edward Schaefer 
John A. Singer, S.J. 
Eileen Evelyn Stanton 
Patricia Jane Stupka 



Recipients of the Degree of Master of Education 



Marion J. Allen 

Sister Alphonse Marie (Hoffman), 

S.S.C.M. 
Robert Edward Andrewski 
Sister M. Athanasia (Gudaitis), S.S.C. 
Reverend Edward John Baranowski 
Sister Mary Basile (Lueck), F.S.P.A. 
George W. Bauer 
Orlynn Karl Bosse 
Lidia Brancolino 
Sister Mary Brideen, B.V.M. 
Edward F. Brufke 
Mary C. Byrnes 
Yvonne M. Crute 
Mary E. Denneen 
James John Dowdalls 
Sister Mary Elizabeth (Boll), P.H.J .C. 
Nathaniel S. Fichtenberg 
Reverend William Patrick Fisherkeller, 

C.S.V. 
Mary Laurinda Foley 
Maxine Mildred Foley 
Janice Lucille Foster 
Rose Marie Bernadette Giancola 
William Joseph Glennon 
Myrtle Theresa Gould 



Mary J. Greene 
Helen Marie Hart 
Robert Milton Havlan 
Fred Frank Janizek 
Sister Dolores Kane, R. H.S.J. 
Marion Kathleen Krogdahl 
Albert Martin Krueger 
Dorothy Catherine Larney 
Sister Mary Lucinia (Szpak) 
Reverend Joseph Ly 
Redmond Vincent Lyons 
Sister Marie David (Gardner) 
Sister Marie Sarah (Dineen), 
George Edward May 
Maureen Therese McMahon 
Julius Menacker 
Eileen Miesczak 
Pauline Mary Nadovic 
Robert Edward Nelson 
Joan Halloran O'Malley 
Dolores B. Pasowicz 
John James Pauly 
Lorraine Michaelene Pieja 
Renee Adriana Porras 
Marlene Ann Raymond 
Norma Cecilia Reed 



C.S.S.F. 



, O.P. 
O.P. 



Eugene Patrick Reilly 

Sister Mary Rose Esther (MuUin), B.V.M. 

Helen Louise Schneider 

Catherine M. Schultz 

Nancy A. Schwab 

Walter Jerome Sedlacek, Jr. 

Sister M. Seraphine (Krseminski) . O.S.F. 

Mary Elizabeth Shannon 

Marion Grace Shore 

Maryrose Ann Sullivan 

Maureen Patricia Sullivan 

Dolores Vivian Sunter 

Sister Mary Symphorose (Bogdan), 

C.S.F.N. 

Tadeusz Alexander Szalinski 

Sister Mary Theonita (Host\), O.P. 

Arlene Elaine Tufano 

Bernadine Ann Venn 

Sister Mary Viva (Niess), O.S.F. 

Ralph Eric Walberg 

Donald Ernest Westergren, Jr. 

Maureen Hartigan Wetheral! 

Nicholas White, Jr. 

Mary H. West Willis 



311 



instituie oj social And 
indusfrial vehtions 

Recipients of the Degree of Master of Social and Industrial Relations 

FRANK J. BALENO, JR. 

(B.S., Purdue University) 

Thesis: Survey of Non-Supervisory Factory Type Job Evaluation Plans Used by Manufac- 
turers in the Chicago Metropolitan Area Employing over 1,000 Persons. 

MARTIN JOHN BURNS 

(BS.C, Loyola University; J.D., Loyola University) 

Thesis: A Critical Review of the Jurisdictional Standards of the National Labor Relations 
Board Prior to the Enactment of Section 701 of the Labor-Management Reporting and Dis- 
closure Act of 1959. 

RONALD WILLIAM KORAJCZYK 

(A.B., University of Chicago) 

Thesis: The Human Relations Approach and Its Critics. 

JOSEPH J. LaPORTE 

(B.S.C., Loyola University) 

Thesis: A Case Study of the Organization of a Management Development Program. 



JOHN E. McANIFF 
(A.B., University of Notre Dame) 

MICHAEL J. MOLONEY, S.J. 

(A.B., National University, Ireland; Phil. L., St. Stanislaus College, Ireland; S.T.L., Miltown 
Park, Ireland) 

FRANCIS P. O'DONNELL 
(B.S.C., Loyola University) 

AURELLA A. RIEBANDT 
(B.S., Loyola University) 

CHESTER A. RIEBANDT 
(B.S., Loyola University) 

VISHWANATH PRASAD SINGH 
(B.Com., Bihar University, India; M. Com., Patna University, India) 



312 




JEROME M. ALAKSIEWICZ 
B.S. (N.S.) 




DOMINIC J ALLOCCO 
M.D. 





»w 




^^V| 


/ 




^ 



h^yS" 




PATRICK M. ALBANO 
M.D. 





RALPH J. AMELIO 
B.S. (Hum.) 





PAUL G. ALBERTON 
B.S. (N.S.) 




RAYMOND ANDERSON O.S.M. 
A.B. 




JOHN A ANDRZEJEWSKI 
B.S. (Hum.) 



LUCILLE ANICHINI 
B.S. (Hum.) 



JOHN F. ANSBRO 
B.S. (S.S.) 



HENRY P. ANSELMO 
B.S.C. 



HAROLD Y. ARAI 
D.D.S. 



JAMES J. ARNDT 
B.S.C. 









PHILIP J. AUGUSTINE 
B.S. (S.S.) 



DANIEL M. BACA 
A.B. 



BRADLEY A. BAGGARLY 
B.S.C. 






BARBARA BALLUFF 
B.S.N. 



MARY E. BARBER 
B.S.N. 



FRANK W. BARCY 
B.S. (S.S.) 



Mrs. Jane Stebler is being shown by Mrs. Mary Getz, 
housemother, the plaque dedicating the new women's 
residence hall to her and her late husband, William. 





EMILY J. BARNES 
B.S.N. 



JOHN W. BARON 
M.D. 



315 





Mr. George N. KoUintzas and Fr. Joseph Pender- 
gast speak with Sir Arnold Lunn during the widely 
traveled scholar's recent visit to the University. 



ROBERT J. BATOR 
B.S. (Hum.) 




JOSEPH J. BATTAGLIA 
B.S. (Hum.) 






THOMAS J. BAUER 


RICHARD J. BAUM 


CHRISTINE A. BAZAR 


B.S. (Hum.) 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 


WILLIAM P. BELL 


PAUL C. BENNETT 


MAX BERMAN 


B.S. (N.S.) 


D.D.S. 


D.D.S. 







ROBERT A. BERQUIST 
D.D.S. 




RICHARD H. BEZDEK 
B.S.C. 






JEROME W. BERTELL 

B.S. (N.S.) 




WILLIAM F. BIRD 
D.D.S. 







MICHAEL C. BERTHOLD 
A.B. 



D 




JAMES F. BISHOP 
B.S. (S.S.) 





1 



JAMES E. BLAKE 


WALTER F. BLOCK 


LeROY F. BLOMMAERT 


B.S.C. 


B.S. (S.S.) 


B.S. (S.S.) 


ICHARD W. BOCK 


JAMES T. BOLAN 


VIRGINIA BOMBA 


A.B. 


M.D. 


B.S. (Hum.) 




"^ <^ 










LESTER A. BONAGURO 
L.L.B. 



RONALD F. BORER 
DD.S. 



LESTER E. BRADY 
D.D.S. 






BARBARA J. BRANCH 
B.S.N. 



LYNN BRANDENBURG 
B.S. (S.S.) 



CLARE BRENNAN 
B.S. (Hum.) 





ISS^ '*^- \' 





ANTON 


BREY 


B.S. 


(N.S.) 


ANTHONY 


T. 
J.D. 


BUCKUN 



FRANK D. BRONIEC 
B.S.C. 



PETER D. BUNOSKY 
D.D.S. 



AMIDEUS M. BROW 
A.B. 



JERALD C. BURNS 
B.S.C. 






jls»] 




,1^ 0^ r^ 




JAMES E. BURNS 
B.S.C. 




4ft^^ 




RAYMOND E, BURRILL 
M.D. 




FRANK L. BUTLER 
B.S.C. 






ROBERT E. BUTTELL 
B.S. (S.S.) 



ROBERT CALDERWOOD 
D.D.S. 



HOWARD C. CALL 
D.D.S. 




Tom Philpott, president of the sophomore class, along 
with a lucky coed, addresses the freshman students at the 
Arts Council Beanie Bounce, held during the Freshman 
Orientation Program. 



MARCELO CANELAS 
B.S.C. 



MATTHEW A. CANNING 
B.S. (Hum.) 






EDWARD H. CANTIN 
D.D.S. 





Loyola students, traveling to and from Lewis Tow- 
ers, pass the proposed site for the new University 
Center to be erected at Pearson and Rush Streets. 



MARLENE CAPPARELLI 
B.S. (S.S.) 






PETER D. CARAS 
D.D.S. 



MICHAEL E. CARBINE 
B.S. (Hum.) 



PATRICIA CAREY 

B.S. (N.S.) 



ROBERT A. CARLO 
B.S. (S.S.) 



DAVID K. CARLSON 
B.S. (Hum.) 



PATRICIA A. CARNEY 
B.S. (Hum.) 









THOMAS M. CARPENTER 
J.D. 



^'ILLARD A. CASTLE 
D.D.S. 



EDMUND F. CATALDO 
D.D.S. 






THOMAS P. CAVANAUGH 
D.D.S. 



PIERO J. CERRUTI 
M.D. 



ELIZABETH L. CESNA 
A.B. 






JAMES P. CHAMBERS 


STEPHEN J. CHANTOS 


DONALD W CHILL 


B.S. (Hum.) 


D.D.S. 


B.S. (N.S.) 


PEGGY M. CHLOPEK 


VERNA CHRISTIAN 


DENIS G. CIESLA 


B.S. (S.S.) 


B.S.N. 


B.S. (N.S.) 







THOMAS P. CIMINO 
B.S. (S.S.) 




REX J. CLEVELAND 
B.S. (Hum.) 





o 




RUSSELL V. CIRCO 
B.S. (S.S.) 




HENRY J. CLOSE 
J.D. 






ALFRED J. CLEMENTI 
M.D. 




DONALD E. COHEN 
J.D. 




JAMES P. COLE 


CHARLOTTE COLLINS 


SHEILA COLLINS 


M.D. 


B.S. (S.S.) 


B.S. (S.S.) 


JNNA COLLINSON 


DENIS J. CONLON 


PATRICK D. CONLON 


B.S. (Hum.) 


B.S.C. 


B.S.C. 





WILLIAM J. CONNELL 
B.S. (S.S.) 




.\ 



\ 



7 




Father Herr, S.J., speaks to the late Frank J. Lewis 
at the annual President's Tea held at Lewis Towers. 



PAUL J. CONNELLY 
D.D.S. 






JOANNE CONNIOR 

B.S.N. 



DAVID P. CONNOLLY 
M.D. 



MAUREEN R. CONROY 
BS. (Hum.) 



MARGARET CORRIGAN 
B.S.N. 



JOHN P. COUGHLIN 
M.D. 



WILLIAM H. COWLING 
A.B. 







LAWRENCE P. COYNE 
D.D.S. 




MICHAEL J. CUMMINS 
B.S.C. 




JOSEPH DADDINO 
M.D. 



JANET DAHM 

B.S.N. 





( 



fi^ ^-^ 
^ 



KAREN CROTTY 

B.S. (S.S.) 






JOSEPH M. CULLEN 
M.D. 





GEORGE E. CUONZO 
D.D.S. 



DOROTHY DABROWSKl 
B.S. (Hum.) 



The roaring twenties return as Terry Monitz, Bon- 
nie Bennett, Mary Healy, and Fred Mausolf enjoy the 
festivities of the Inter-fraternity Council Greek Week. 




324 



"^T 



RAVMOiND DALY 
B.S. (S.S.) 




i-'RANK J. DE CESARE 
M.D. 




ANN J. DEDAY 
B.S. (S.S.) 






LOUIS P DeFRANK 
M.D. 



JEANNE A. DELANEY 
B.S.N. 



LAURA J. De LAPP 
M.D. 






JULIA DEMPSEY 
J.D. 



ROBERT R. DESMOND 
M.D. 



JOAN M. DESPLENTER 

B.S. (Ed.) 



ROBERT A. DeVITO 
M.D. 



SHIRLEY DEVITT 
B.S.N. 



CHARLES T. DIENES 
B.S. (S.S.) 












PAUL A. DiFRANCO 
D.D.S. 



CARLO DiNELLO 
M.D. 



JOEL O. DIVEN 
D.D.S. 




BERNARD A. DOETSCH 
B.S.C. 




r ^ 






/ 


MADELEINE 


B. DOMAN 


B.S. 


(Ed.) 


MARY M. 


DOODY 


B.S.N. 





ROBERT A. DOETSCH 
B.S.C. 




ROBERT W. DROMBROSKY 
B.S.C. 



CONSTANCE DORYWALSKI 

B.S.N. 





MARY ANN DOMAGALA 
B.S. (S.S.) 




JANE DONOVAN 
B.S.N. 



EDWARD J. DOWNS 
B.S.C. 





Stalagmites and stalactites are the center of attraction 
in this picture of the Coed Club Dance. The picture 
actually is the ceiling of the ballroom. 




MICHAEL L. DOYLE, O.S.M. 
A.B. 




JOHN DRECHNY 

B.S. (S.S.) 






JOSEPH J. DRUGAY 
M.D. 



EUGENE E DUDA 
B.S. (S.S.) 



THOMAS W. DUGAN 
B.S. (S.S.) 



LAUREEN DUPRE 
B.S. (S.S.) 



WILLIAM J. DURKIN 
D.D.S. 



CHARLES J. DVORAK 
B.S.C. 










RALPH R. EARNEST 
DD.S. 



PATRICK E. EBENHOEH 
M.D. 



JOAN M. ECKMAN 
B.S.N. 






J. ROGER EDWARDS 
B.S.C. 



JOHN P. EGAN 
DD.S. 



JAMES D. EGGERS 
M.D. 



Coeds Joan Tarndel, Miss Cavender and Barbara Scav- 
lon demonstrate the skills of the Coed Rifle team as Gay 
Cooks, Sue York and Kathy Sarma encourage them. 





MICHAEL E. ENGLISH 
A.B. 



ROBERT W. EMRICH 
B.S. (N.S.) 



\ 




RONALD N. ERRICO 
D.D.S. 




DOROTHY M. FEIGL 

B.S. (N.S.) 





THOMAS M. ESPOSITO 
B.S.C. 



'V^^^T^ 




PETER M. FEIL, O.S.M. 
A.B. 





JERRY V. FARENGA 
B.S. (S.S.) 




RICHARD J. FIEDLER 
M.D. 




LEROY R. FILES 

B.S. (S.S.) 



CASIMIR F. FIRLIT 
B.S. (N.S.) 



MARGARET FISHER 
B.S.N. 



JAMES F. FITZGERALD 
B.S.C. 



JOHN T. FITZGERALD 
M.D. 



MICHAEL J. FITZGERALD 
M.D. 







SEAN M. FITZGERALD 
A.B. 




JAMES E. FLAHERTY 
B.S.C. 




m 








// 








MAUREEN A. FITZPATRICK MICHAEL T. FITZPATRICK 

B.S. (Ed.) B.S.C. 




RICHARD J. FLEMING 
B.S.C. 




CONRAD F. FLOETER 


ARLENE J. FONTE 


DONALD N. FORTNEY 


J. D. 


B.S. (Ed.) 


B.S.C. 


WILLIAM J. FRANCIONE 


CARTER J. FRANCIS 


ROSEMARY FRASER 


B.S. (Hum.) 


D.D.S. 


B.S.N. 





MARY FRECHETTE 
B.S.N. 





ROBERT J. FRENZER 
J.D. 





ROLF G. FUNER 

B.S. (N.S.) 




DOREEN J. FUNK 

B.S. (Ed.) 



FRANK D. GAGLIANO 
B.S.C. 



JOSEPH GAJEWSKI 
B.S, (N.S.) 



Bob Newhart visited Loyola in the beginning of 
the year. As seen here in the Campus Center, he 
brought much enthusiasm to the University with his visit. 





RITA M. GALLAGHER 
B.S. (Hum.) 



EDWARD J. GARVIN 
M.D. 



331 






ROBERT M. GASIOR 
M.D. 



Jackie Schmelter, Miss Loyola 1961; James Fitzgerald, 
President of the Loyola Union; and Sheil Shannahan, 
Miss Varsity, 1959 pose for the Loyolan photographer 
during the Pow-Wowor Homecoming Weekend, Dec. 2-3. 




PAUL R. GAUVREAU 
B.S.C. 






slALD J. GAVIN 


RICHARD F. GEIMER 


THOMAS A. GELINAS 


B.S.C. 


A.B. 


B.S. (N.S.) 


£RT J GENOVA 


PAUL S. GEWARTOWSKI 


DONALD E. GIANOLI 


B.S. (Hum.) 


B.S.C. 


D.D.S. 







JOHN A. GIBAITIS 
A.B. 




BEULAH GINGRICH 
B.S.N. 





MICHAEL GIBBONS 
B.S. (Hum.) 




ANN M. GIUFFRE 
B.S. (HWM) 





THOMAS J. GILLESPIE 
B.S. (N.S.) 




MARTIN J. GLEASON 
J.D. 




BENSON E. GOLD 
D.D.S. 



BRUCE E. GOLDEN 
J.D. 



JOHN GORDON 
J.D. 



RICHARD L. GORHAM 
B.S. (S.S.) 



EMIL F. GRABOW 
M.D. 



KENNETH F. GRAVELINE 
D.D.S. 







ROBERT H. GRAY 
DD.S. 




CHARLES GROSE 
M.D. 





ROBERT T. GRENDA 
D.D.S. 




THOMAS A. GROSSMAN 
B.S. (Hum.) 





EDMUND J. GRONKIEWICZ 
A.B. 




MICHAEL D. GUBBINS 
L.L.B. 




ALBERT L. GUERRA 
B.S.C. 



B. FRANKLIN GURNEY 
D.DS. 



FRANCIS GUZZO 
M.D. 



MARIAN C. HAGAN 
B.S. (Ed.) 



PATRICK G. HARDY 

B.S. (S.S.) 



WILLL-^M G. HARLAN 
B.S.C. 






MICHAEL J. HARTMAN 
B.S. (S.S.) 




NANCY HAZARD 
B.S.N. 




FREDRICK J. HERZOG 
B.S. (N.S.) 



LOREN K. HOFER 
D.D.S. 






WILLIAM T. HARTNETT 
M.D. 






WILLIAM HAUNROTH 
B.S. (S.S.) 



^^-^ 



'<k 





THOMAS J. HEALEY 
J.D. 



ROBERT D. HELFERTY 
M.D. 



The Society for the Advancement of Management 
presented a display during the Christmas season in 
the lobby display case at the Lewis Towers Campus. 





JULIUS HOVANY 

B.S. (S.S.) 




HENRY B. HUNT 
D.D.S. 




uNiVERSiry 




Members of the Parents Associates of Loyola pose with 
the Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S.J., president of 
Loyola University, at the Founders Day Convocation. 





ANTHONY P. JACONETTI 
B.S.C. 



KAY M. JAHNKE 
B.S.N. 



JEAN JANKOVEC 
B.S.N. 



ROBERT C. JANN 
D.D.S. 




JACK K. JAY 

B.S. (Ed.) 




JOHN T. JOHHC 
B.S.C. 



f|^ ^^B^ 







JOHN C. JOHNS 
M.D. 



DENNIS D. JOHNSON 
B.S.C. 



HARRY JOHNSON 
M.D. 






ALAN JORGENSEN 
A.B. 



GEORGE JOSEPH 
MD. 



THOMAS R. KANE 
D.D.S. 






FRANK Z. KARWATOWICZ 
M.D. 



CHARLES J. KASPER 
M.D. 



DAVID L. KAWIECKI 

B.S. (Hum.) 



THOMAS C. KEARNS 
J.D. 



EDWARD P. KEAVY 
L.L.B. 



JOHN M. KELLY 
B.S.C. 







RAYMOND T KELLY 
B.S. (S.S.) 





JAMES M. KEMP 
B.S. (N.S.) 







PATRICK F. KENEALY 

B.S. (N.S.) 




JANE KENNEDY 
B.S.N. 



HOWARD L. KESSLER 
D. D. S. 



RAYMOND J. KILEY 
M.D. 






FRANK P KILZER 
B.S.C. 



MICHAEL T. KIRKWOOD 
D.D.S. 



EUGENIA A. KIZIOR 
B.S. (Hum.) 



ADRIAN E. KLIMCZAK 
BS.C. 



MARGARET I. KNEER 

B.S. (Ed.) 



NORMAN F. KODIE 
B.S.C. 





^%»S^^4* 





JUDY J. KOHNKE 
A.B. 





Lewis Towers students test the new ceramic oven, 
which Miss Dagenais obtained for her art class. 



JOHN A. KOZAK 
M.D. 






RICHARD A. KOZAL 
D.D.S. 



LANCE N. KRAJACIC 
B.S. (Hum.) 



JOHN A. KR.\MER 
B.S. (S.S.) 



RICHARD KREZO 
B.S. (N.S.) 



DIANE KRUG 
B.S. (S.S.) 



THE()DORE T. KRYSINSKI 
D.D.S. 








Rd'NALD D. KUBACKl 
B.S.C. 



TERRENCE W. KUCHARSKI 
B.S.C. 



JOHN T. KULA 
A.B. 






DAVID LACHANCE 
M.D. 



ROBERT R. LAING 
M.D. 



WALTER F. LAMACKI 
D.D.S. 




The Loyola Dental School Choir provides entertain- 
ment between the halves of one of the University's 
several basketball games at Chicago Stadium. 



DENNIS J. LAMPING 
A.B. 

WILLIAM J. LANCASTER 
B.S. (S.S.) 





340 



JOSEPH W. LANG 
B.S.C. 





CLAIRE A. LAREAU 
B.S.N. 





MARY L. LASKOWSKI 
B.S. (Ed.) 




RONALD J. LATIN 
D.D.S. 



LYNN A. LAUGHLIN 
B.S. (N.S.) 



JUDITH LAURENZANA 
B.S.N. 






CHARLES B. LAURX 
D.D.S. 



WILLIAM LA VERB 
B.S. (Hum.) 



LORETTA LELIS 
B.S. (S.S.) 



JOAN LEMONNIER 
B.S. (Ed.) 



RHODA LESKO 
B.S. (Ed.) 



CECILE LIEBL 
B.S.N. 






% 





^f^^s 



r 



\ ' 



JAMES LINSLEY 
B.S. (S.S.) 



SHIRLEY LISK 
B.S. (Ed.) 



MARILYN LOBRILLO 

B.S.N. 






WILLIAM E. LODGE 
B.S.C. 



VICTOR A. LODOVISI 
D.D.S. 



MATTHEW M. LOMBARDI 
D.D.S. 






VIRGINIA LOUDEN 

B.S.N. 



LAWRENCE F. LOUGHLIN 
B.S. (S.S.) 



MARJORIE T. LOWE 
B.S. (Hum.) 



RICHARD A. LUCAS 
B.S.C. 



LYNN C. LUNDE 
D.D.S. 



MILES W. LYNCH 
M.D. 






Varsity Basketball players Martin Norville, Dan Duick, 
Mike Gavin, Jim Mini, John Crnokrak, Clarence Red, 
Alan Ray, and Herman Hagan along with Freshman coach 
Frank Hogan address a crowd during a pep rally. 




MARGARET MacANDREWS 
B.S.N. 




MARYBETH McAULIFFE 
BS. (Ed.) 






GERALDINE McCARTER 


WILLIAM P. McCarthy 


JOHN W. McFADDEN 


B.S.N. 


B.S. (Hum.) 


L.L.B. 


RAYMOND McGADY 


PHILLIP E. McGEE 


ANSELM M. McGLYNN, O.S.M 


B.S. (S.S.) 


J.D. 


A.B. 










JAMES L. McGRATH 
B.S.C. 



RICHARD F. MACIEJEWSKI 
D.D.S. 



THOMAS J. Mclaughlin 

B.S. (S.S.) 






JOHN R. MacNAMARA 
B.S. (S.S.) 



ROBERT McNAMARA 
B.S. (S.S.) 



JAMES B. McSORLEY 
B.S. (Hum.) 



Eleanor Sigborn, Martin Jones, and Alice Farrell are 
"heaving" a ball with Margie Farrell before the onset 
of the pushball contest on the Pow Wow Weekend. 




--1 





/ -«i^ 



T^^'tr 





BARBARA MAHIEU 
B.S.N. 



KATHERINE P. MARRIN 
B.S. (S.S.) 







-^ •466' 






ROBERT S. MAJESKI 
J.D. 



SALFATORE F MALFITANO 
M.D. 



FRANCIS E. MALLOY, JR. 
M.D. 






RODERICK A. MALONE 
M.D. 



DAVID J. MANNING 
B.S.C. 



NORMAN A. MARCHELYA 
D.D.S. 






DAVID H. MARCUS 
DD.S. 



BRUNO J. MARCZYK 
B.S.C. 



SISTER MARI.AN (HENKE) 
B.S.N. 



MARY JANE MARQUIS 
B.S.N. 



ROBERT E. MARS 
B.SC. 



JOHN J. MARSHALL 
B.S.C. 









JOHN L. MARTIN 
J.D. 



SISTER MARY CLARE 

B.S.N. 



FRANK MASKA 
B.S.C. 






ANTHONY F. MASTRO 
B.S.C. 



JOSEPH E. MATULIS 
B.S.C. 



MARY JANE MATURO 
B.S. (Ed.) 






l^'. 





ADRIENNE MATUSIAK 


TERESE MAURELLA 


SUSANNE MEANY 


B.S.N. 


B.S.N. 


B.S. (Ed.) 


CAROLINE MEDLY 


WALTER J. MERCHUT 


T'HILIP J. MESSINEO 


B.S.N. 


J.D. 


B.S.C. 






PATRICIA METZ 

B.S.N. 



RAYMOND F. MICKUS 
B.S. (S.S.) 





(VILLIAM W. MISISCHIA 
D.D.S. 



RICHARD T. MITCHELL 
M.D. 



Several members of the Lake Shore Coed Club to- 
gether with their dates, pose for our everpresent pho- 
tographer at their annual "Roses in the Snow" dance. 





THOMAS J. MILLARD 
B.S. (S.S.) 




THOMAS A. MITCHELL 
B.S. (N.S.) 




WILLIAM J. MITTERER 
B.S.C. 



MICHAEL MORAWEY 



B.S. (S.S.) 



347 





Alan Jorgensen, Marianne Rempala, and John Mar- 
quette appear in one of the Curtain Guild's frequent 
workshop presentations given during the past year. 




ROBERT E. MORROW 
B.S.C. 




NICHOLAS MOTHERWAY 
B.SC. 






GERALD J. MOZDZIERZ 
B.S. (S.S.) 



RICHARD F. MOZDZIERZ 

B.S. (S.S.) 



ROBERT J. MUCHA 
B.S. (S.S.) 



THOMAS P. MULLANEY 
D.D.S. 



GERALDINE MURPHY 
B.S. (Hum.) 



PATRICK T. MURPHY 
B.S. (Hum.) 





f; 




/ 




ZACHARIAS A. MYLONAS 
B.S.C. 




JOHN W. NEARY 
B.S.C. 





RONALD L. NAGY 
M.D. 




WILLIAM J. NELLIS 
J.D. 



\^ 





KAREN S. NEAD 
B.S.N. 




RIMGAUDAS NEMICKAS 
M.D. 




JOHN F. NICHOLSON 
B.S.C. 



ROBERT F. NOLAN 
D.D.S. 



EUGENE F. NOWAK, JR. 
B.S.C. 



SHEILA OCARROLL 
B.S. (S.S.) 



JEROME J. OCHOTA 
B.S. (N.S.) (HUM.) 



JEROME D. OCONNELL 
M.D. 






I 






RAYMOND P. OCONNELL 

B.S. (HUM.) 



JEROME OCONNOR 
B.S. (HUM.) 



JOSEPH F. OGRADY 
MD. 






FLOYD H. OKADA 
M.D. 



RONALD J. OLECH 
B.S.C. 



RONALD J. OLEN 
D.D.S. 








THOMAS P. OMALLEY 


JOHN P. OREILLY 


STEPHEN J. OSHAUGHNESSY 


MD. 


B.S. (S.S.) 


B.S.C. 


PAUL A. OSKAR, JR. 


PAUL G. OSTENDORF 


JUDY M. PACER 


M.D. 


B.S. (HUM.) 


B.S. (HUM.) 





THOMAS A. PAISON 
D.D.S. 




JOHiN E. PANEK 
B.S. (S.S.) 




JOHN M. PASSMANN 
M.D. 



RONALD E. PAULSEN 
B.S.C. 






RALPH C. PALICKI 
B.S. (S.S.) 



SAMUEL A. PALUMBO 
B.S. (N.S.) 





RAYMOND E. PARYPINSKI 
M.D. 



WILLIAM J. PASSINAULT 
M.D. 



Dr. Donald J. Stinson presents outstanding debaters 
Mary Lee Cullen and Philip Augustine with a tro- 
phy, a token of their achievements in the forensic arts. 




RONALD P. PAWL 
M.D. 





Residents of Delaware Hall, the Lewis Towers wom- 
en's residence hall, gather in the parlor of the hall. 



JOAN PEKAN 

B.S.N. 






WILLIAM B. PENROCK 
DD.S. 



RICHARD A. PETRYS 
B.S. (N.S.) 



GERALDINE PFEIFFER 
B.S. (S.S.) 



ROBERT J. PIHA 
M.D. 



BARBARA PIOTROWSKI 

B.S. (S.S.) 



ROSE M. PIRAINO 
B.S. (Ed.) 







DANIEL W. PLACZEK 
B.S. (N.S.) 




RICHARD A. POLIZZI 
B.S.C. 





PATRICIA A. PODRAZA 
B.S. (S.S.) 




CONRAD J. POLK 

B.S. (N.S.) 




■f 







JOSEPH J. POLICH 
M.D. 




PAUL A. POLYDORAN 
DD.S. 




WILLIAM L. POOLE 
B.S.C. 



MURRAY R. POWELL 
D.D.S. 



ARTHUR E. PRICE 
M.D. 



JAMES R. PRIDE 
D.D.S. 



KENNETH J. PRINTEN 
M.D. 



BETTY J. PROCHASKA 
B.S. (Ed.) 










1^ 





RONALD T. PRZYBYL 
B.S.C. 



WILLIAM J. QUINLAN 
A.B. 



WILLIAM R. QUINLAN 
B.S.C. 






JAMES J. QUINN 


RONALD QUINN, 


O.S.M. 


THOMAS C RACLAW 


M.D. 


A.B. 




B.S. (S.S.) 






WILLIAM T. RANDOLPH 
D.D.S. 



WILLIAM J. RANIERI 
B.S. (HUM.) 



FLOYD J RASHID 
D.D.S. 



JACQUELINE RATTAY 

B.S. (N.S.) 



RITA RAUEN 
B.S.N. 



JOAN REESE 
B.S. (Ed.) 






JOSEPH REUTER 
B.S. (S.S.) 





Dorm students relax in the comfortable atmosphere of 
the dining hall. An unlimited quantity of milk and 
Sunda>' meals were new advantages given to the out- 
of-town students residing in the dorm this year. 



EMMANUEL F. RICCIARDELLI 
M.D. 






JAMES C. RICH 
M.D. 



PETER A. RIGNEY 
A.B. 



RICHARD G. ROBERTS 
B.S.C. 



KENNETH E. ROBISON 
D.D.S. 



RICHARD R. ROCH 
B.S.C. 



THOMAS D. RODDA 
M.D. 







CAROL J. ROGALSKI 

B.S. (S.S.) 





MAUROLYENE M. ROLLINS 

B.S. (Ed.) 





JAMES E. ROTA 
D.D.S. 




DONALD P. RUBINO 
M.D. 



JOSEPH F. RUSSO 
B.S.C. 



ROSEMARY RUTT 
B.S. (Ed.) 




Tony Ward chauffeurs six of the Miss Loyola Contest- 
ants in the float parade held on Pow-Wow Weekend. 



HARRY J. RYAN 
B.S.C. 



WILLL\M T. RYAN 
D.D.S. 





356 



IRWIN J. RYSDAM 
D.D.S. 




GEORGE W. SACHTLEBEN 

B.S. (N.S.) 





FRANCIS X. SADOWSKI 
D.D.S. 





JAMES L. SANDNER, JR. 
B.S.C. 







¥ • -. 






V 


H- 






CAMILLE SCAVONE 




B.S. 


(Ed.) 




JOHN J. SCHAEFER 
B.S.C. 






LOUIS H. SCHERB 
B.S.C. 



JOAN E. SCHILDKNECHT 
B.S.C. 



JAMES M. SCHNEIDER 
B.S. (HUM.) 



THOMAS SCHNEIDER 
D.DS. 



JEROME L. SCHORN 
B.S. (HUM.) 



DONALD L. SCHRANDT 
M.D. 







CATHY SCHWAB 

B.S.N. 





MARGARET SCHWENGLER 
B.SN. 





RONALD M. SEVERING 
M.D. 



WILLIAM SHAMBARGER 
D.D.S. 



JOSEPH T. SHEEHAN 
B.S.C. 






WILLIAM J. SHERRY 


WILLIAM F. SIEGER 


ROBERT SILICH 


B.S.C. 


B.S. (S.S.) 


B.S. (S.S.) 


SHARON SIMON 


DAWN E. SIRANOVIC 


SUSAN C. SIUDZINSKI 


B.S.N. 


A.B. 


B.S. (S.S.) 






^'^ 7::u : m ^jj a '^'^jj)jjshiw» m 







The sweeping lawn beside Cudahy Memorial Library 
and the waters of Lake Michigan give a student a 
moment of peace and quiet before he must again re- 
enter the hectic activity of student life at the University. 








CHARLES SMITH 
B.S. (HUM.) 




JAMES A. SMITH 
D.D.S. 




WILLIAM G. SMITH 


JANET SMOLUCH 


WALTER SMOLUCH 


D.D.S. 


B.S. (Ed.) 


J.D. 


RALPH SNODGRASS, C.S.V. 


VIRGINIA SOKLEY 


RICHARD M. SOURILE, O.S.M. 


A.B. 


B.S.N. 


A. B. 









ANTHONY A. SPAGNOLO 
M.D. 



JAMES SPALDING 
B.S. (S.S.) 





DEANNA SPILLANE 
B.S. (HUM.) 

Coed Club representatives welcome a freshman and ex- 
plain the aims and motives of their organization, 
one of the largest social groups at Loyola University. 



^ 



VIOLET STASIAK 

B.S.N. 



TWfflWi^ 





MARY SPENCE 
B.S. (Ed.) 




STELLA L STASULAITIS 
B.S. (Ed.) 




KATHLEEN STAUNTON 
A.B. 



ANNA STAUSS 
B.S. (Ed.) 






ROBERT J. STEFFENS 
B.S.C. 



MARY KAY STEFFEY 
B.S.N. 



CLEMENT A. STEGMAN, JR. 
B.S.C. 



S^&L. 






WARREN J. STELL 
B.S. (S.S.) 



GEORGE A. STEPANEK 
D.D.S. 



THOMAS W. STEPHENSON 
B.S.C. 




PAUL 


G. STIMSON 




D.D.S. 


JOHN 


V. SUGRUE 


B.S 


. (HUM.) 





GERALD STRANDBERG 
B.S. (N.S,) 



JOHN J. SULLIVAN 
BS.C. 





LAWRENCE H. SUCHOR 
B. S. C. 



JAMES K. SULLIVAN 
A.B. 







MICHAEL SULLIVAN 
B.S.C. 



GREGORY T. SWENSON 
D.D.S. 



FRANK R. SWIDERSKI 
B.SC. 






JOHN SYMOND 
D.D.S. 



JAMES SZWED 
B.S. (N.S.) 



JAMES R. TALAMONTI 
B.S.C. 






WILLIAM J. TANSEY 
M.D. 



VERA TATE 

B.S.N. 



CONSTANTINE J. TATOOLES 
M.D. 



MARGARET TIERNEY 

B.S.N. 



JO C. TOMASZEWSKI 
BS. (ED.) 



MONICA TROCKER 

B.S.N. 





/ 





IC^^ 




iHif 




► ' 




I , 





DANIEL J. VALHA 
D.D.S. 




ROBERT J. VELLIGAN 
D.D.S. 

A bloodthirsty Athenian mob cries "police verso" as 
Retiarius prepares the death stroke for the gallen 
gladiator, as he begs clemency from the onlookers. 



HARVEY R. VIETH 
D.D.S. 




■;.-^,- .-^i;:*: 



,^-^^-- ^r 





GEORGE J. VanRYAN 
B.S. (HUM.) 




JAMES D. VINCI 
B.S. (N.S.) 




WP^^Bfc| 




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^ 




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^«r 


r 


1 


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4 




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1 



JEANNE VIRENE 
B.S.N. 



GEORGE L. VONDRUSKA 
B.S. (HUM.) 



363 




WliJIflJBgg 



^^RS^sscccr 



iiiiiiiiii ii|imiiiuii I iniiii 




Members of the pre-Seminary Latin group instructed 
by Father Henderson assemble for our photographer. 




ROMULUS S. VON 

HAZMBURG, JR. 

M.D. 




KENNETH WACKER 
D.D.S. 






SANDRA WALJESKI 


ROBERT J. WALSH 


HOWARD W. WARCHOL 


B.S. (HUM.) 


M.D. 


B.S. (HUM.) 


ANTHONY WARD 


CHARLES D. WARLOP 


JAMES R. WATSON 


B.S. (HUM.) 


A.B. 


B.S. (N.S.) 






'^Shk 



'V:^ 




BARBARA E. WEBER 
B.S. (HUM.) 




VIRGINIA WENZEL 
B.S. (S.S.) 





ALBERT H. WEINGARI 

B.S.N. 




ELIZABETH WESSELING 
B.S.N. 





JOHN E. WEISENBERGER 
M.D. 




MATTHEW WHEELER 
B.S. (S.S.) 




WILLIAM L. WHITCOMB 
D.D.S. 



RONALD WHITE 
B.S.C. 



TERESA WHITTEN 
B.S. (HUM.) 



EMMA LEE WILLS 
B.S.N. 



GILBERT F. WINTER 
D.D.S. 



HENRY C. WISNIEWSKl 
B.S.C. 









RONALD S. WOS 
B.S. (S.S.) 



WALTER J. WYSZYNSKI 
B.S. (N.S.) 



GENIA YOHANNA 
M.D. 





) 



# 




KARL J. YOUTSEY 
B.S. (N.S.) 



ELEANOR ZABIAKE 
B.S.N. 



DANIEL ZAPP 
B.S. (HUM.) 






PAULINE M. ZARANKA 
B.S. (HUM.) 



HELENE M. ZAUMS 
B.S. (S.S.) 



WALTER ZELENIKA 
B.S. (Ed.) 



.366 






WALTER J. ZEMANS 
B.S. (HUM.) 



HONORE K. ZENK 
J.D. 



MARY JO ZWERS 
B.S. (S.S.) 




Madonna Delia Strada Chapel, on the Lake Shore 
Campus, presents a majestic sight as it is silhouetted 
against the sky and the waters of Lake Michigan. 



MARIAN ENRIGHT 
B.S.C. 





MICHAEL KIRCHOFF 
B.S.C. 



<< 




367 



senior divedovy 



ALAKSIEWICZ, JEROME M. 

Wasmann Biological Society 1,2,3,4. 

ALBERTON, PAUL G. 

Wasmann Biological Society },4. 

ALLOCCO, DOMINIC J. 

Junior Class Secy.; Student A.M.A. 1,2,3,4, 
Secy. 3; Student Council 1,2,3,4; St. Luke's 
Guild 1,2,3,4, Vice-Pres 1. 

AMELIO, RALPH J. 
Human Relations Club. 

ANDRZEJEWSKI, JOHN A. 
Loyola Men 3,4; Young Democrats 4; 
Intramural Sports 3,4; Historical Society 
4. 

ANICHINI, LUCILLE 
Circumference 3,4, Vice-Pres. 4; Who's 
Who; Coed Club 1,2,3,4, Secy. 2, Pres. 3; 
Sodality of Our Lady 1,2; Epsilon Pi Rho 
1,2,3; SAL 3,4; CADENCE 4; Historical 
Society 1,2,3,4, Secy. 3,4; Gerard Manley 
Hopkins Society 2,4; Fine Arts Club 2,3. 

ARAL HAROLD Y. 
Delta Sigma Delta; Blue Key 3; Student 
Union Rep. Christmas Show Chairman 4. 

ARNDT, JAMES J. 

AUGUSTINE, PHILIP J. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1,2,3,4; Blue Key 3,4, 
Parliamentarian 4; Who's Who 4; Debate 
Society 1,2,3,4, Pres. 4; LOYOLA NEWS 
2,3; LOYOLAN 3; ENOSIS 4; Dean's Lea- 
dership Award 2; Delta Sigma Rho 3,4, 
Vice-Pres. 3,4; John Naughten Forensic 
Award 3; Controversy 3,4; College Line 4; 
Pi Delta Epsilon 3,4, Pres. 4; Maroon and 
Gold 3; Fine Arts Club 3,4; Young Dem- 
ocrats 3,4; Historical Society 1,2,3,4; SAL 
1,2,3; Loyola Fair 3; Interfraternity Coun- 
cil 3; Dorm Council, Secy. 2. 

BACA, DANIEL M. 

BAGGARLY, BRADLEY A. 
Marketing Club 3,4; Historial Society 1; 
Intramurals 1. 

BARBER, MARY E. 

Nursing Association 1,2,3,4; Council Mem- 
ber 3,4. 

BARBER, ROBERT G. 

Marketing Club; Intramurals 1,2,3,4. 

BARCY, FRANK W. 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 1,2,3,4; Intramurals 
1,2,3; Choral Society 2. 

BARNES, EMILY J. 
Nursing Association. 

BARON, JOHN W. 

Student A.M.A. 1,2,3,4. 

BATOR, ROBERT J. 
CADENCE 4; Modern Language Club 2, 
3,4; Fine Arts Club 2,3,4; Historical Soc- 
iety 1,2. 

BATTAGLIA, JOSEPH J. 
Vet's Club 2,3,4, Sergeant-at-Arms 4; His- 
torical Society 3,4. 



BAUER, THOMAS J. 

BAUM, RICHARD J. 
Pi Alpha Lambda 1,2,3,4; LOYOLA 
NEWS 1,2; SAM 2; Accounting Club 3,4. 

BAZAR, CHRISTINE, A. 
LOYOLAN 1; Accounting Club 2,3; SAM 
2,3,4, Rec. Secy.; Historical Society 1. 

BERMAN, MAX 
Alpha Omega 1,2,3,4, Vice-Pres. 3; Pres. 

4. 

BERTELL, JEROME W. 

BERTHOLD, MICHAEL C. 

Loyola Men 4; LOYOLA NEWS 1; 
Human Relations Club 2,3,4, Treasurer 
4; Modern Language Club 3, 4; Latin 
Club 2,3; Psychology Club 3,4; Young 
Democrats 4 

BEZDEK, RICHARD H. 
Sigma Delta Phi 3,4; Marketing Club 3, 
4; Historical Society 1,2; R.O.T.C. Drill 
Team, Rifle Team. 

BISHOP, JAMES F. 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 1,2,3,4, Pledgemaster 

2, Vice-Pres. 3; LOYOLA NEWS 1.2; 
Choral Society 1,2,3; Union Congressman 
1,2; Maroon and Gold 2,3,4; Fine Arts 
Club 1,2; SAL 3; Curtain Guild 1,2; In- 
tramurals 1,2,3,4. 

BLAKE, JAMES EDWARD 
Alpha Kappa Psi 1,2,3,4; SAM 2; Intra- 
murals 1,2. 

BLOCK, WALTER F. 

Loyola Men 4; Fine Arts Club 3,4. 

BLOMMAERT, LEROY F 

Debating Society 1,2,3,4; Delta Sigma 
Rho 3,4, Pres. 3; Gamma Mu 4; Phi Sig- 
ma Tau 4; Historical Society 1,2,3,4. 

BOCK, RICHARD W. 

Debating Society 1,2,3,4, Pres. 3, Sec- 
Treas. 4; Delta Sigma Rho, Sec. 3,4; 
Alpha Sigma Nu 3,4; Epsilon Pi Rho 

1,2,3. 

BOMBA, VIRGINIA 

Coed Club 3; Young Republicans 3,4. 

BONAGURO, LESTER A. 
Alpha Delta Gamma 3; Sodality of Our 
Lady 3; Historical Society 2; RECENT 
DECISIONS 2,3. 

BRANCH, BARBARA J 

Nursing Association 3,4; Nursing Council 

3, Secy. 3; Sodality 3; Historical Society 
3; World Federalists 4. 

BRENNAN, CLARE 

Phi Sigma Tau 4; Curtain Guild 1,2,3,4; 
Coed Club 1; Historical Society 1,2,3. 

BREY, ANTON 
Loyola Men 3,4; Wasmann Society 1; 
Math Club 2,3,4; Psych. Club 4. 

BRONIEC, FRANK D. 

BROW, AMIDEUS M. 



BUNOSKY, PETER D. 
Psi Omega 1,2,3,4; Glee Club 1,2,3,4. 

BURNS, JERALD C. 
Sigma Delta Phi 1,2,3,4; Sodality 1,2; 
SAL 2,3^4; Marketing Club 2,3,4; Drill 
Team 1,2,3,4; Association of U.S. Army 
1,2,3,4; Dist. Military Student. 

BURNS, JAMES E. 
Sigma Delta Phi 1,2,3,4, Sgt.-at-Arms 4; 
Sodality 1,2; SAL 2,3,4; Marketing Club 
3,4; Drill Team 1,2,3,4; AUSA 1,2,3,4; 
Dist. Military Student; Marketing Ca- 
reers Conference Committee. 



BURRILL, 

S.A.M.A. 1,2,3,4. 



RAYMOND E. 



BUTLER, FRANK L. 
Phi Sigma Tau; Econ-Finance Society 3,4; 
SAM 4; Intramurals 3,4. 

BUTTELL, ROBERT E. 

CANNING, MATTHEW A. 
Wasmann Society 1,2,3,4; Historical So- 
ciety 3,4. 

CARBINE, MICHAEL E. 
Sigma Delta Phi 2,3,4, Vice-Pres. 3, Secy. 
4; LOYOLA NEWS 3,4, News Ed. 4; 
Sodality 1,2; Young Republicans 3,4; 
Fine Arts Club 1; SAL 2,3,4; Historical 
Society 1,2,3,4. 

CARLO, ROBERT A. 

.Alpha Delta Gamma 3,4; Psych. Club 3, 
4; SAL 3,4; Loyola Men; Human Rela- 
tions Club 4; Intramurals 2,3,4. 

CARLSON, DAVID K. 
Tau Delta Phi 3; AUSA. 

CARNEY, PATRICIA A. 
Chi Theta Upsilon 2,3,4, Pres. 4; Cir- 
cumference 4; LOYOLA NEWS 2; Choral 
Society 2; Historical Society 1,2,3; Mo- 
dern Language Club 1; Coed Club 1; 
SAL 2,3,4; Inter-Sorority Council 4; Ma- 
roon and Gold 3. 

CARPENTER, THOMAS M. 

Phi Sigma Tau 3,7; Bellarmine Phil. Club 
4, Pres. 4; RECENT DECISIONS 6,7; 
LAW TIMES 7. 

CESNA, ELIZABETH L. 

Circumference 3,4; Coed Club 1,3,4, Pub- 
licity Chairman 4; Modern Language Club 
2,3,4, Treas. 4; CADENCE 4; Epsilon Pi 
Rho; Historical Society 3,4. 

CHAMBERS, JAMES P. 

Alpha Sigma Nu 3,4; Phi Sigma Tau 3,4; 
CADENCE 4; Curtain Guild 2,3,4; Fine 
Arts Club 2; Gerard Manley Hopkins So- 
ciety 2,3,4. 

CHARLES, CAROLA 
Modern Language Club; Historical Soc- 
iety. 

CHILL, DONALD W. 

Choral Society 1. 

CHLOPEK, PEGGY M. 



368 



senior divedovy 



CIESLA, DENIS G. 
th Club 3.4; Physics Club 2,3,4. 

CIMINO, THOMAS P. 

CIRCO, RUSSELL V. 

man Relations Club, Pres. 3, Treas. 4; 
idern Language Club 3,4; Historical 
:iety 1,2. 

CLEMENTI, ALFRED J. 
..M.A. 2,3,4; St. Lukes Guild 1,2,3,4. 

CLEVELAND, REX J. 

COHEN. DONALD E. 

i Alpha Delta. 

COLLINSON, DONNA C. 

cumference 4; Gerard Manley Hopkins 
iety 1,2,3,4, Pres. 3.4; Historical Soc- 
', Secy. 1; Dorm Council. Vice-Pres. 
Pres. 4. 

CONLON, PATRICK D. 

>ha Kappa Psi 2.3,4. Vice-Pres. 3, Pres. 
Fall Frolic Chairman 4; IFC, Vice- 
tirman 4. 

CONNELL, WILLIAM J. 

CONNOLLY, DAVID P. 
i Beta Pi 1,2,3,4, Housemanager 2; 
Luke's Guild 1,2,3,4; SAMA 1,2,3,4. 

CONROY, MAUREEN R. 

;ta Phi Alpha 2,3,4, Soc. Chairman 3, 
rr. Secy. 4; Coed Club 1,2.3.4; Loyola 
>men 3,4; SAL 2,3,4; Historical Society 
Fine Arts Club 1,2; Human Relations 
b 4; Variety Show 2,3,4. 

COWLING, WILLIAM H. 

CULLEN, JOSEPH M. 
Beta Pi. 

CUMMINS. MICHAEL J. 

1 Kappa Epsilon; Econ-Finance Society; 
VI. 

DABROWSKI, DOROTHY 

Sigma Tau 3,4; Historical Society 2. 

DADDINO. JOSEPH L. 

dent Council 2,3; S.A.M.A. 2,3,4. 

DeCESARE, FRANK J. 

Beta Pi 2,3,4. 

DELANEY, JEANNE A. 
dent Council 4; Historical Society 4. 

DE LAPP, LAURA J. 
ha Epsilon Iota 1,2,3,4. 

DEMPSEY, JULIA QUINN 
jpa Beta Pi 2,3,4; Student Bar As- 
ation Rep. 2. 

DE VITO, ROBERT A. 

Sigma Phi 1,2,3,4, Housemanager 3- 

DIENES, CHARLES T. 

ta Sigma Rho 3,4, Treas. 3; Phi Sigma 
I 3,4; Pi Gamma Mu 3,4; Debate So- 
y 1,2,3,4, Vice-Pres 3; Young Demo- 
ts 3,4; SAL 1,2,3; Historical Society 
3,4. 



DOETSCH, BERNARD A. 
Marketing Club 3,4. 

DOETSCH, ROBERT A. 
Phi Sigma Tau; Accounting Club. 

DOMAN, MADELEINE B. 
Theta Phi Alpha 1,2,3,4; Coed Club 1,2, 
3,4; Circumference 3,4; Historical Society 
1,2,3,4; Arts Council Secy. 3, Vice-Pres. 4; 
Secy.-Treas. Union Activities Board 4; 
Who's Who 4. 

DOMBROSKY, ROBERT W. 

Society for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment 4. 

DOODY, MARY M. 
Nursing Association 3,4. 

DOWNS, EDWARD J. 
Alpha Kappa Psi 3,4; SAM 3,4, Secy. 3,4; 
SAL 4; Econ-Finance Society 4. 

DRUGAY, JOSEPH J. 

Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4, Treas. 2. 

DUDA, EUGENE E. 

DUGAN, THOMAS W. 

Psychological Society 4. 

DUPRE, LAUREEN M. 

Chi Theta Upsilon 3,4, Treas 4; Coed 
Club 1,2,3.4; Sodality 1.2; Historical So- 
ciety 2,3; SAL 1,4; Human Relations Club 
3.4; Variety Show 1.3; Nursing Class 
Treas. 1; Nursing Council 1; Drill Team 
Hostess 2. 

DVORAK, CHARLES J. 
Accounting Club 4; SAM 3,4. 

EBENHOEH, PATRICK E. 
Phi Sigma Phi 1,2,3,4. 

EGGERS, JAMES D., JR. 

EMRICH, ROBERT W. 

Americal Chemical Society 1,2,3,4; "The 
Chemisphere" 1,2. 

ENGLISH, MICHAEL E. 
Historical Society 1,2,3,4; Fine Arts Club 
3,4. 

ENRIGHT, MARIAN M 



Theta Phi Alpha I, 



..i.i; 



Inter-Sorority 



Council 2; Coed Club 1; Historical So- 
ciety 1; S.A.L. 1,2,3,4; Marketing Club 4, 
Secretary 4; Circumference 4; Variety 
Show 2,4. 

FARENGA, JERRY V. 
Historical Society 1,2,3; Human Relations 
Club 2,3,4; Association of U.S. Army I, 
2,3.4; Drill Team 1.2,3,4, Executive Offi- 
cer 4. 

FEIGL, DOROTHY M. 

Phi Sigma Tau 3,4; Modern Language 
Club 1,2; Kappa Gamma Pi 4; Math 
Club 1; Sodality 1,2; Junior American 
Chemical Society 3,4. 

FEIL, PETER M. 

FIEDLER, RICHARD J. 



FILES, LeROY R 

FILIP, ROBERT P. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 3,4. 

FIRLIT. CASIMIR F. 
Wasmann Biological Society 1,2,3,4. 

FITZGERALD, JAMES F. 
Alpha Kappa Psi 1,2,3,4, Pledgemaster 
2,3, Pres. 3; Blue Key 3,4, Secy.-Treas. 3, 
4; Alpha Sigma Nu 3.4; Beta Alpha Psi 
4; Variety Show 3, Finance Mgr. 3; Com- 
merce Council 1,3,4, Vice-Pres. 1,3,4; In- 
tramural 1,2; Loyola Fair 1,3, Treas. Com- 
mittee 1,3; Union Delegate 1,2,3, Chair- 
man 3,4; Accounting Club 2,3,4; Histori- 
cal Society 1,2,3,4; Interfraternity Coun- 
cil 3, Secy.-Treas. 3; S.A.L. 2,3,4, Area 
Director 3, Board of Governors 3; WHO's 
WHO 4; Founder's Day Executive Com- 
mittee 4. 

FITZGERALD, MICHAEL J. 

FITZGERALD, SEAN M. 

FITZPATRICK, MAUREEN A. 
Theta Phi Alpha 2,3,4; Historical Society 
1,2,3; Coed Club 1,2,3,4; S.A.L. 1,2,3; 
Variety Show 2,3,4. 

FITZPATRICK, MICHAEL T. 
Delta Sigma Pi 3,4; Accounting Club 3; 
S.A.M. 4. 

FLAHERTY. JAMES E., JR. 
Historical Society 1,4; Accounting Club 
3,4; Loyola Men 3,4; S.A.M. 4. 

FLEMING RICHARD J. 
Historical Society 1.2; S.A.M. 4. 

FONTE, ARLENE J. 
Theta Phi Alpha 3.4; Coed Club 3,4; 
Historical Society 3; S.A.L. 4; Loyola Fair 
3; Variety Show 4; Interfraternity Sing 4. 

FORTNEY, DONALD N. 

Delta Sigma Pi 2,3,4, Chancellor 3, Vice- 
Pres. 4; Marketing Club 3,4, Chairman 
4; Accounting Club 3; Econ-Finance Club 
1,2; S.A.L. 3,4. 

FRANCIONE, WILLIAM J. 
Historical Society 3,4. 

FUNER, ROLF G. 

,\merican Chemical Society 3.4; Fine Arts 
Club 2,3,4. 

FUNK, DOREEN J. 
Historical Society 2,3.4; Bellarmine Phi- 
losophy Club 2,3,4, Vice-Pres. 3,4. 

GAGLIANO, FRANK D. 

Accounting Club 3; S.A.M. 4. 

GAJEWSKI. JOSEPH J. 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 1.2,3.4, House Finan- 
cial Manager 2, Pledgemaster 2, Vice- 
Pres. ^; Blue Key 3,4, President 4; Ameri- 
cal Chemical Society 1,4; Junior Class 
President; Intramurals 1,2,3,4, Individual 
Track Award 1; Pow Wow Float Parade 
Chairman 3; Variety Show 2,3, Stage 
Crew 2, Producer 3, Maroon and Gold 
Program 3. Chairman 3; WHO'S WHO 
4; Fall Frolic Ticket Sales Chairman 4; 
Founder's Day 4, Speaker 4. 



369 



senior divedovy 



GALLAGHER, RITA M. 
Theta Phi Alpha 2,3,4; Coed Club 2.4; 
Hopkins Society 4; Human Relations Club 
4; Loyola Women 4; Variety Show 4. 

GASIOR, ROBERT M. 
Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4; St. Luke's Guild 1,2, 
3; Student American Medical Association 

1,2,3,4. 

GAUVREAU, PAUL R. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 2,3,4, Treas. 3,4; Ac- 
counting Club 2,3,4; S.A.L. 3,4; Intra- 
murals 2,3,4. 

GAVIN, DONALD J. 

Accounting Club 3,4, Vice-Pres. 3; Phi 
Sigma Tau 3.4. Treas. 4; Beta Alpha Psi 
4, Secy. 4; Historical Society 1. 

GEIMER, RICHARD F. 

Young Republicans 3,4, Vice-Pres. 3,4; 
Intramural 2,3,4. 

GENOVA, ROBERT J. 
Alpha Delta Gamma 3,4, Parliamentarian 
4; American Chemical Society 1,2; LOY- 
OLA NEWS 2,3; LOYOLAN 1,2. 

GEWARTOWSKI, PAUL S. 
Accounting Club 2,3; S.A.M. 3,4. 

GIANOLI, DONALD E. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1,2,3,4. 

GIBBONS, MICHAEL J. 
Historical Society 1,2; Track Team 1,2,3. 

GILLESPIE, THOMAS J. 
Mathematics Club 3,4. 

GOLDEN, BRUCE E. 
Phi Alpha Delta 2,3,4, Marshall 3, Jus- 
tice 4; Blue Key 4. 

GORHAM, RICHARD L. 

Young Republicans 3,4. 

GRABOW, EMIL F. 
Blue Key 4. 

GRIFFIN, JAMES T. 
Blue Key 3,4; Student Bar Association 
Representative 3. 

GRONKIEWICZ, EDMUND J. 

Phi Sigma Tau 3,4; Modern Language 
Club 4; Equestrian Society 4. 

GROSSMAN, THOMAS A. 
Historical Society 1,2,3,4; Fine Arts Club 
1,2,^,4; LOYOLA NEWS 1; Track Team 

1,2,3,4. 

GUBBINS, MICHAEL D. 

GUERRA, ALBERT L. 
Marketing Club 2,3,4; S.A.M. 2,3,4; Young 
Democrats 4; Economics-Finance Society 
2,3; Loyola Fair Committee 2,3. 

GURNEY, B. FRANKLIN 
Sigma Xi; American Chemical Society; 
American Association for the Advance 
of Science; Am. Dental Assoc. 

HAGAN, MARIAN C. 
Coed Club 2,3; Historical Society 3. 



HARDY, PATRICK G. 

HARLAN, WILLIAM G. 

Tau Delta Phi 2,3,4, Athletic Chairman 
1, Treasurer 2; Accounting Club 2,3,4; 
S.A.M. 2,3; Curtain Guild 2; Intramural 
Athletics 2,3,4. 

HARTMAN, MICHAEL J. 
Arts Council 2,4, President 4; Soph. Class 
President; WHO'S WHO 4; Blue Key 3, 
4, Alumnae Secy. 3,4; Variety Show 1,2, 
3, Prop Manager 2, Stage Manager 3, 
Committee Chairman 2; Loyola Fair 1,2, 
3, Committee Chairman 2; Student Di- 
reaory Committee 2; Choral Society 1,3; 
Historical Society 1,2,3,4; Fine Arts Club 
1,2,3; Fresh. Beanie Bounce Chairman 2; 
Loyolan Award Committee 3; S.A.L. 2,3; 
Founder's Day Award 4; Loyola Men 3,4; 
Student Presidents Committee Chairman 
4; Co-Chairman I960 Founder's Day Pro- 
gram; Co-Chairman I960 Christmas Pro- 
gram. 

HARTNETT, WILLIAM T. 

HELFERTY, ROBERT D. 

Phi Sigma 2,3, Secy. 3; Student Amer. 
Medical Association. 

HERZOG, FREDERICK J. 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 1,2,3,4, Financial Ma- 
nager 2, Co-Chairman Rushing 2; LOY- 
OLA NEWS 1,2; Psychology Club 3,4; 
Biological Society 1,2. 

JACONETTI, ANTHONY P. 

Marketing Club; S.A.M.; Curtain Guild; 
Historical Society; Vets Club; Bowling 
team. 

JAY, JACK K. 
Choral Society 3; Historical Society 3; 
Fine Arts Club 3; Loyola Men 3,4; Edu- 
cation Society 3,4. 

JOHLIC, JOHN T. 
Alpha Kappa Psi 4; S.A.M.; S.A.L.; In- 
tramurals. 

JOHNS, JOHN C. 

Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4, Secy. 2, Vice-Pres. 3, 
Pres. 4; Student Amer. Med. Assn. 2,3,4, 
Treas. 3; Medical School Student Council 
2,3,4, Seer. 3, Vice-Pres. 4; Loyola Union 
Representative 2,3; Blue Key 3,4. 

JOHNSON, DENNIS D. 
Sigma Delta Phi 3,4, Pledgemaster 3, 
President 4; S.A.M. 3,4; Interfraternity 
Council 4; Commerce Council 4; Secr.- 
Treas of Senior Class; Representative to 
Arts Council 4; Intramural 2,3,4; WHO'S 
\vii(j 4, chairman of Greek Week 4; 
Secr.-Treas. Senior Class; Chairman of the 
Senior Gift Fund; Blue Key 4. 

JOHNSON, PETER 
Delta Sigma Pi 3,4; Accounting Club 3, 
4; S.A.M. 3,4; Vet's Club 3,4. 

KAWIECKI, DAVID L. 
Historical Society. 

KEAVY, EDWARD P. 
Phi Alpha Delta 2,3,4, Treas. 2,3,4; Stu- 
dent Bar Assoc. 2. 



KELLY, JOHN M. 
Vets Club; Accounting Club; Beta Alpha 
Psi. 

KELLY, RAYMOND T. 

Sodality 2; Loyola Men 2,3,4; Historical 
Society 2; Human Relations Club 3,4; 
Psychology 3,4. 

KEMP, JAMES M. 
Psychology Club 3,4; Intramurals 1,2,3,4. 

KENEALY, PATRICK F. 

Physics Club 3,4. 

KIRCHOFF, CHARLES J. 

S.A.M. 2,3; Commerce News Sheet Repor- 
ter 3. 

KIZIOR, EUGENIA A. 
Chi Theta Upsilon 2,3,4, Treas. 3, Aca- 
demic Chairman 3,4; Phi Sigma Tau 3,4; 
Loyola Women 3; Historical Society 2; 
Coed Club 2,3; S.A.L. 3. 

KLIMCZAK, ADRAIN E. 

Economic-Finance Club 4; Accounting 
Club 2, 4; Camera Club 1; Historical So- 
ciety 1; A.U.S.A. 1,2. 

KNEER, MARGARET L 
Theta Phi Alpha 1,2,3,4, Treas. 3, Pledge 
Mistress 4; Circumference 3,4, Treas. 4; 
Coed Club 1,2,3; Historical Society 1,2. 

KODIE, NORMAN F. 

Accounting Club 3,4. 

KOHNKE, JUDY J. 

Chi Theta Upsilon 1,2,3,4, Rush Chair- 
man 1,2, President 3; Circumference 3,4; 
WHO'S WHO 4; Modern Language Club 
1,2; Epsilon Pi Rho 1,2; Coed Club 1,2,3; 
S.A.L. 1,2,3; Human Relations Club 3; 
Inter-Sorority Council 3; Fine Arts Club 
1,2,3,4; LOYOLA NEWS 2, News Edi- 
tor 2; LOYOLAN 3,4, Copy-Editor 3, 
Co-Editor 4; Variety Show 1,3,4. 

KOSAR, DENNIS R. 
Vets Club; Accounting Club. 

KOZAK, JOHN A. 
Phi Chi. 

KRAJACIC, LANCE N. 
Historical Society 3,4. 

KRAMER, JOHN A. 
Phi Delta Epsilon 4; S.A.M. 3; Sodality 
1,2, Vice-Prefert 2; Loyola Men 3,4; LOY- 
OLA NEWS 3,4. 

KUBACKI, RONALD D. 
Historical Society 1; Accounting Club 1, 
2,3,4, Seer. 4. 

KUCHARSKI, TERRENCE W. 
Beta Alpha Psi 4, Vice-Pres. 4; Accoun- 
ting Club 1,2,3,4; Marketing Club 1; 
Intramurals 4. 

KUNHART, THOMAS J. 
S.A,M. 3,4. 

KULA, JOHN T. 
Economics-Finance Society; Epsilon Pi 
Rho; Loyola Men. 



370 



seniov dnectovy 



LAMPING, DENNIS J. 
Sigma Pi Alpha 3,4, Vice-Pres. 3, Presi- 
dent 4; Inter-Fraternity Council 4; Loyola 
Men 3,4; Historical Society 2,3,4. 

LASKOWSKI, MARY L. 

Chi Theta Upsilon 2,3,4, Social Chair- 
man 2, Chaplain 3, Seer. 4; Coed Club 1, 
2,4; Historical Society 1; SAL 1,2,3,4. 

LAUGHLIN, LYNN A. 

Fine Arts Club 1,2. 

LODGE, WILLIAM E. 
S.A.M. 3,4; Young Republicans 4; His- 
torical Society 4. 

LOWE, MARJORIE T. 

Chi Theta Upsilon 2,3,4, Chaplin 4, 
Pledge Class Seer. 2; Sodality 1,2; S.A.L. 
3; Historical Society 2,3; Human Rela- 
tions Club 2; Fine Arts Club 2,3,4. 

LUCAS. RICHARD Q. 
Delta Sigma Pi 1,2,3,4, Professional Chair- 
man 4; Econ-Finance Society 1,2,3,4, Seer. 
2, President 3; Historical Society 1; Mar- 
keting Club 2,3,4; Accounting 2,3; Pi 
Delta Epsilon; LOYOLAN 4, Business 
Manager 4. 



S.A.M, 



MASKA, FRANK G. 

2.3,4; Vet's Club 2,3,4. 



St. 



LYNCH, MILES W. 
Luke's Guild 



McAULIFFE, MARYBETH 
Theta Phi Alpha 1,2,3,4, Membership 
Chairman 3, Recording Seer. 4; Circum- 
ference 4; Coed Club 1,2,3,4; Historical 
Society 1,2; Fine Arts Club 1; Variety 
Show 2,3. 

McCARTY', CARTER W. 
Sodality 2,3. 

McCarthy, william p. 

Historical Society 1,4; Pi Gamma Mu 4. 

McGRADY, RAYMOND W.. JR. 

Pi Gamma Mu 4; Psychological Society 
3,4. Treas. 4; Historical Society 3; Intra- 
murals 3,4. 

McGLYNN, ANSELM M. 

McGRATH, JAMES L 
Delta Sigma Pi 2,3,4; Marketing Club 2, 
3,4, President 4; Historical Society 1; Ac- 
counting Club 2; Economic-Finance So- 
ciety 2,3,4. 

MACIEJEWSKI, RICHARD F. 
Xi Psi Phi 1.2,3,4. 

MALLOY, FRANCIS E., JR. 

MALLOY, MICHAEL J. 
Sigma Delta Phi 3,4; Accounting Club 3. 

MANNING, DAVID J. 
Pi Alpha Lamba 1,2,3,4. 

MARS, ROBERT E. 

Beta Alpha Psi 4; Accounting Club 3; 
Bowling Team 4. 

MARSHALL, JOHN J. 
Alpha Kappa Psi 1,2,3,4, Auditor 3,4; 
S.A.L. 4; Accounting Club 3; Historical 
Society 1; S.A.M. 2; Intramurals 3,4. 



MASTRO, ANTHONY F. 
Delta Sigma Pi 1,2,3,4; Economic-Finance 
Society 2,3,4, Vice-Pres. 3, Pres. 4; His- 
torical Society I; Interfraternity Council 
3; Intramurals 1,2,3,4. 

MATULIS, JOSEPH E. 
Economic-Finance Society 3,4; S.A.M. 2, 
3,4; Sodality 1,2; Loyola Men 3,4. 

MATURO, MARY JANE 
Chi Theta Upsilon 2; Historical Society 
1; Coed Club 1. 

MILLARD. THOMAS J. 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 1,2,3,4, Hvpophetes 3, 
4, House Manager 4; LOYOLA NEWS 2, 
3, LSC Editor 2, Managing Editor 3. LOY- 
OLAN 4, Associate Editor 4; Enosis 4, 
Editor 4; Pi Delta Epsilon 4; Union Con- 
gress Representative 3,4; Math Club 2. 

MITCHELL, RICHARD T. 
Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4; S.A.M A. 1,2,3,4, 
Soph. Class Vice-Pres. Medical School. 

MITTERER, WILLIAM J. 
A. U.S. A. 4; Accounting Club 2,3,4; Econ- 
Finance Society 4; LOYOLAN 4, Asst 
Photographer 4. 

MORAWEY, MICHAEL R. 
Tau Delta Phi 1,2,3,4. Alumni Seer, 
Vice-Pres., Pres 3,4. Interfraternity Coun- 
cil S, Chairman 3; Blue Key 3,4; WHO'S 
WHO 4. 

MOTHERWAY. NICHOLAS J. 
Delta Sigma Pi 1,2.3,4, Historian 3, Pres- 
ident 4; Econ-Finance Society 1,2,3,4, 
Treas. 3; Accounting Club 1,2,3,4; Mar- 
keting Club 1,2,3,4; Blue Key 3,4, Vice- 
Pres. 4; LOYOLAN 3, Business Manager 
3; Pi Delta Epsilon 3,4, Treas. 4; Histori- 
cal Society 3,4, Vice-Pres. 4; Political 
Science Club 4; Interfraternity Council 4; 
S.A.L. 2,3,4; Loyola Fair 1,2; Loyola 
Union Congressman 2; WHO'S WHO 4; 
Enosis 4. 

MOUSTAKIS, JOHN R. 
Pi Alpha Lambda 1,2,3,4, Sergeant-at- 
Arms 3. Pledgemaster i. Athletic Chair- 
man 4; Union Representative 3; Pscho- 
logy Club 3,4; Young Republicans 3; 
Pow Wow 3, Chairman Jazz Concert and 
Dance. 

MOZDZIERZ, GERALD J. 
Tau Delta Phi 4; Phi Sigma Tau 3,4; 
Psychological Society 3,4. 

MOZDZIERZ, RICHARD F. 

MULVIHILL, JAMES G. 

S.A.M. 4. 

MURPHY, GERALDINE M. 
Chi Theta Upsilon 2,3,4, Membership 
Chairman 3; Coed Club 2; S.A.L 2,3; 
Variety Show 3,4; Loyola Fair 2,3,4. 

MURPHY, PATRICK T. 



MYLONAS, ZACHARIAS A. 

Foreign Student's Association 1,2,3,4; Phi 
Sigma Tau 4. 

NAGY, RONALD L. 

NEARY, JOHN W. 
Sigma Delta Phi 3; Accounting Club 4. 

NELLIS, WILLIAM J. 
Phi Alpha Delta. 



Phi 



NEMICKAS, 
Chi. 



RIMANUDAS 



NICHOLSON, JOHN F. 
Delta Sigma Pi 2,3,4, Vice-Pres 3; Alpha 
Sigma Nu 3,4; Blue Key 3,4; WHO'S 
WHO 4; Leadership Award 2,3,4; Com- 
merce Council 2.3,4, Treas. 2, Vice-Pres. 
3, President 4; Soph. Class Pres.; Junior 
Class Pres.; Senior Class Pres.; .\ccounting 
Club 2; Marketing Club 2,3,4; Economics- 
Finance Society 2,3,4; Historical Societv 
2,3,4, Vice-Pres. 3; S.A.L. 2,3,4; Loyola 
Union 3; Union Fair 2,3, Finance Chair- 
man 3; Loyola Union Treas. 3, Board of 
Governors 3; Business Mgr. Variety Show 

3, Treas. 4; LT Intramurals 2,3,4; Presi- 
dent's Committee 19''0 Founder's Day; 
Founder's Day Award 4. 

NOWAK, EUGENE F., JR. 
Blue Key 3,4, Corres. Seer. 4; S.A.M. 2, 
3,4, Publicitv Chairman 2, Pres. 3,4; 
WHO'S WHO 3,4; Student Chairman 
1959 Founders Day; Vet's Club 2,3,4; 
Loyola Men 3,4; Marketing Club 2. 

O BRIEN. NORA C. 

S.A L. 4; Psychological Society 4; LOY- 
OLA NEWS 4. 

O'CARROL, SHEILA A. 
Kappa Beta Gamma 2,3,4, Historian 3, 
Pres. 4; Inter-Sorority Council 3,4, Pres. 
4; Coed Club 2.3. Fashion Show Chair- 
man 3; Human Relations Club 2,3.4; Stu- 
dent President's Committee 4. 

OCHOTA. JEROME J. 
Sigma Delta Phi 3.4; Sodality 2,3, Treas. 
3; Physics Club 3; Math Club 4; Histori- 
cal Society 4; Loyola Men 4. 

O'CONNELL. JEROME D. 

O'CONNELL, RAYMOND P. 
Phi Sigma Tau 3,4; Gerard Manley Hop- 
kins Society 4; Historical Society 1,2,3,4; 
Cadence 4. 

OKADA, FLOYD H. 
Phi Beta Pi 2,3,4; S.A.M.A. 2. 

OLECH. RONALD J. 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 1.2.3.4, Treas. 3,4; 
Beta Alpha Psi 4; Historical Society 2,3, 

4, Treas. 4; "The L'ndergrad" Co-Editor 

4. 

O'REILLY, JOHN P. 

Sodality 1,2; Loyola Men 3,4, Pres. 3; 
Fine Arts Club 2,3,4, Treas. 3, Pres. 4; 
Loyola Union 4; Phi Sigma Tau 3,4, Pres. 
4; Pi Gamma Mu 3,4; Alpha Kappa Delta 
3,4; Historical Society 1,2; Human Rela- 
tions Club 4; S.A.L. 2; Variety Show 3, 
4. 



371 



senior divectovy 



O'SHAUGHNESSY, STEPHEN J. 
Historical Society 1,2; S.A.M. 1,2,^,4; Mar- 
keting Club 3,4; LOYOLAN 4, photo- 
grapher. 

OSKAR, PAUL A., JR 
Phi Sigma 1,2,3,4. 

OSTENDORF, PAUL G. 
Historical Society 1,2,3,4; Human Rela- 
tion Club 3,4. 

PACER, JUDITH M. 

Phi Sigma Tau 3,4; Fine Arts Club 1,2,3; 
Modern Language Club 2,3; Coed Club 
2,3,4, Seer. 4; Historical Society 1,2; Ca- 
dence 2,4. 

PALICKI, RALPH C. 
Human Relations Club 3; Psychological 
Society 4. 



PASSINAULT, 
Phi Chi 2,3,4. 



WILLIAM J. 



PAULSEN, RONALD E. 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 1,2,3; Economic-Fi- 
nance Society 1,2,3,4, Vice-Pres. 4; For- 
eign Student Association 1,2,3,4, Board 
of Governors 3; Historical Society 2,3; 
Loyola Union 4. 

PAWL, RONALD P. 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 1,2,3.4; S.A.M.A. 

PIHA, ROBERT J. 

PIRAINO, ROSE M. 
Theta Phi Alpha 2,3,4, Vice-Pres. 4, 
Pres. 4; Inter-Sorority Council 4; Circum- 
ference 3,4, Seer. 4; Psychological So- 
ciety 3,4; Historical Society 2,3; Coed 
Club 2,3,4, Publicity Chairman 3; Var- 
iety Show 2,3,4; S.A.L. 3,4. 

PLAZEK, DANEL W. 
Alpha Sigma Nu 4; Phi Sigma Tau 4; 
Historical Society I; Amer. Chemical So- 
ciety 1,2,3. 



S.A.M.A. 



POLICH, JOSEPH J. 

3,4. 



POLIZZI, RICHARD A. 

Phi Mu Chi 2; Sodality 1,2, Treas. 2. 

POOLE, WILLIAM L. 
Tau Delta Phi 2,3,4; Marketing Club 2,3. 

PRICE, ARTHUR E. 

Phi Chi 1,2,1,4; Student Council 2; S.A. 
M.A. 1,2.3,4. 

PRIDE, JAMES R. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1,2,3,4, Vice-Pres. 4; 
Student Council 4. 

PRINTEN, KENNETH J 
Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4, Pledgemaster 2, Ste- 
ward 3; S.A.M.A. 1,2,3,4, Pres. V, St. 
Luke's Guild 1,2; Blue Key 1,2,3,4; Alpha 
Sigma Nu 1,2,3,4; Student Council 1,2,3, 
Treas. 1,2; Loyola LInion Board of Go- 
vernors 1,2,3. 

PROCHASKA, BETTY J. 
Historical Society 3; Sodality 3; Coed 
Club 3,4. 



PRZYBYL, RONALD T. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 2.3,4, Historian 4; Ac- 
counting Club 1,2; S.AM. 2,3,4; Intra- 
mural 2,3,4. 

PVETZ, JOHN J. 
Delta Sigma Pi; Marketing Club 2,3; His- 
torical Society 2; Loyola Men 4; Soph. 
Class Secr.-Treas.; Loyola Union 2. 

OUINLAN, WILLIAM R. 
Beta Alpha Psi 4; Phi Sigma Tau 3,4. 

OUINLAN, WILLIAM J. 

QUINN, JAMES J. 

S.A.M.A. 1,2,3,4. 

RACLAW, THOMAS S. 
Alpha Delta Gamma 2,3,4, Steward 1, 
Pres. 4; Arts Council 4; Inter-Fraternity 
Council 4; Drill Team 1,2,3,4; Loyola 
Men 4; Fine Arts Club 1,2,3; Charity Day 
Chairman 4; Senior Class Vice-Pres. 

RANIERI, WILLIAM J. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 2,3,4; Intramurals 2, 

3,4. 

RlCCIARDELLl, EMMANUEL F. 

Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4; S.A.M.A. 1,2,3,4. 

RIGNEY, PETER A. 
Pi Alpha Lambda 2,3,4; Psychological 
Society 4, Vice-Chairman 4; Bellarmine 
Philosophy Club 2,3; Epsilon Pi Rho 
l,2,i; Historical Society 1,^; Intramural 
1,3. 

ROBERTS, RICHARD, JR. 
Delta Sigma Pi 1,2,3,4; Econ-Finance 
Society 1,3; Accounting Club 1,2,3,4, 
Treas. 4; Marketing Club 2,3; Historical 
Societv 2; LOYOLA NEWS 2. 

ROBINSON, KENNETH E. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1,2,3,4; S.A.D.A. 
1,2,3,4, Vice-Pres. 3, Pres. 4. 

ROCH, RICHARD R. 
Tau Delta Phi 1,2,3,4, Alumni Seer. 3. 
Social Chairman 3; Econ-Finance Society; 
Intramural. 

RODDA, THOMAS D. 

Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4; S.A.M.A. 1,2,3,4. 

ROGALSKl, CAROL J. 

Chi Theta Upsilon 2,3,4, Seer. 3; Phi 
Sigma Tau 4; Coed Club 1; S.A.L. 1,2; 
Sodality 1,2, Social Chairman 2; Psy- 
chological Society 3.4; LOYOLA NEWS 
2; Bellarmine Philosophy Club 1,2; Wo- 
men's Intramural Board 1; Human 
Relations Club 2; Variety Show 3; Fine 
Arts Club 1. 

RUBINO, DONALD P. 
Senior Class Vice-Pres. 

RUSSO, JOSEPH F. 
Accounting Club 1,2,3.4; Historical 
Society I; Marketing Club 2,4; Econ- 
Finance Society 2,3 



RYAN, HARRY J. 
Alpha Delta Gamma 3,4. Treas. 4; Ac- 
counting Club 3,4; Marketnig Club 3,4; 
S.A.L. 4; Loyola Men 4. 

RYAN, WILLIAM T. 
Psi Omega. 

SACHTLEBEN, GEORGE W. 
Alpha Delta Gamma 2,3,4; Wasmann 
Biological Society 1,2; Orphans' Day 
Chairman 3. 

SADOWSKI, FRANCIS X. 
Xi Psi Phi 1. 

SANDNER, JAMES L 
Alpha Kappa Psi; Intramurals. 

SCHAEFER, JOHN J. 

Beta Alpha Psi 4; Historical Society 3,4; 
Accounting Club 3,4; SAM 3,4. 

SCHERB, LOUIS H. 

SCHILDKNECHT, JOAN E. 
Chi Theta Upsilon; SAM. 

SCHMELTER, JACQUELINE J. 
Coed Club 3,4; Psych. Society 3,4; "Miss 
Loyola" 4. 

SCHORN, JEROME L. 

Sodality 1,2; Historical Society 2,3,4; 
Young Republicans 4. 

SCHRANDT, DONALD L. 
Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4; Class Treas. 4. 

SCHWIND, CAROLYN S. 
Theta Phi Alpha 1,2,3,4, Rec. Secy. 3; 
Coed Club 1,2; Historical Society 1,2,3,4; 
SAL 2,3,4; Sodality 1; Fine Arts Club 1. 

SEDAY, ANN J. 

SEVERINO, RONALD MICHAEL 
Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4; S.A.M.A. 1,2,3,4; 
St. Luke's Guild 1,2,3,4; Class Social 
Chairman 3,4; Preclinical Honors Society 
3. 

SHERRY, WILLIAM J. 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 2,3,4; SAM 4; 
Historical 1; Accounting Club 2; SAL 
2,3,4; Intramurals 1,2,3,4. 

SIEGER, WILLIAM F. 
Tau Deha Phi 1,2,3,4, Vice-Pres. 4; 
Historical Society 3,4, Pres. 4; Fine Arts 
Club 4; SAM 4; Loyola Men 4. 

SIRANOVIC, DAWN E. 
Kappa Beta Gamma 2; LOYOLAN 1 
Coed Club 2,3; Epsilon Pi Rho 1,2,3,4 
Gerard Manley Hopkins Society 2 
Sodality 1,2, Secy. 2. 

SRIDZINSKI, SUSAN C. 
Pi Gamma Mu 4; Econ-Finance Society 
4; Drill Team, Sponsor 4. 

SMITH, CHARLES E. 
Veterans' Club 1,2,3,4; Psych. Club 3,4. 

SMITH, JAMES J. 
Pi Alpha Lambda 2,3,4; Loyola Men 
2,3; Historical Society 2; Swim Team 
1,2; Variety Show 3; Loyola Fair 2. 



372 



senior divedovy 



SMOLUCH. WALTER J. 

Phi Alpha Delta 2.3. Marshal 3; Student 
Bar Association 3; RECENT DECISIONS 
2,3; LAW TIMES 3. 

SPECHT. FRED L. 

Delta Upsilon 2.3; Alpha Beta Phi 4; 
Accounting Club. 

STASULAITIS, STELLA L. 
Chi Theta Upsilon 2.3,4. Secy. 3; Coed 
Club 1.2.3.4; Historical Society 2,3,4. 
Secv. 3; Commerce Council Secy. 1; SAL 
2. 

STAUNTON. CATHERINE B. 
Epsilon Pi Rho 2.3,4; Coed Club 2,3,4; 
Human Relations Club 4. 

STEEPENS. ROBERT J. 
Accounting Club 2.3,4. 

STEGMAN. CLEMENT A. 
Beta Alpha Psi; Historical Society; Was- 
mann Biological Society; Physics Club; 
Sodaltiy; Maroon and Gold; SAM; Ac- 
counting Club; Shutter Club; Student 
Bar Association. 

STELL. WARREN J. 
Young RepubKcans 3,4; Intramurals. 

STEPHENSON. THOMAS W. 
Society for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment 2.3,4. 

STITGEN. JOAN T. 
Kappa Beta Gamma 3- 

STUART, GLENN A. 
Veterans' Club 4; Psych. Club 4. 

SUCHOR, LAWRENCE H. 
R.O.T.C. 1,2,3,4. 

SUGRUE, JOHN V. 

SULLIVAN, JOHN J. 
Delta Sigma Pi 1.2.3.4. Treas. 4; Histori- 
cal Society 1; Marketing Club 3,4; Ac- 
counting Club 2,3,4, Treas. 3, Pres. 4; 
SAL 3.4; Loyola Fair 2.3. 

SULLIVAN, JAMES K. 

Loyola Men 4. 

SWENSON, GREGORY T. 
Psi Omega 1,2,3,4. 

SWIDERSKI. FRANK R. 

Econ-Finance Society 4; Accounting Club 
4; Historical Society 1. 



SZWED. JAMES J. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1,2.3,4. Historian 3, 
Pres. 4; Wasmann Biological Society 
1,2; Fine Arts Club 3,4; Who's Who 4; 
Psych. Club 3,4; LOYOLA NEWS 2; 
Variety Show 2,3,4. 

TALAMONTI, JAMES R. 
SAM 2,3,4; Alpha Kappa Psi 1,2,3,4, 
Secy. 2,3, Vice-Pres. 4; SAL 3,4; Intra- 
murals 1,2,3,4; IFC Rep. 3 

TANSEY. WILLIAM J. 
Phi Beta Pi 2,3.4. Secy. 3; Union Rep. 
2; St. Luke's Guild 1.2.3,4, Treas. 2; 
Blue Key 1,2,3,4; Student Council 2. 
Secy. 2. 

TATOOLES. CONSTANTINE J. 
Student Council 3; S.A.M.A. 1,2,3,4, 
Vice-Pres. 4; Vice-Pres. Junior Class. 

TOMASZEWSKI, JO C. 
Chi Theta Upsilon 1.2.3.4. Treas. 2, 
Vice-Pres. 3, Historian 4; Coed Club 
1.2.3.4, Big Sister Chairman 4; SAL 
2.3; Maroon and Gold 3; Variety Show 
3; LOYOLA NEWS Asst. Ed. 2, Soc. 
Ed. 3. 

ULMER. RICHARD H. 

Student Council 3; S.A.M.A. 1,2,3,4; Class 
Treas. 3. 

VALHA, DANIEL J. 
Xi Psi Phi 1.2.3.4. 

VAN RYAN, GEORGE J. 
Tau Delta Phi 2,3,4, Vice-Pres. 3. Corr. 
Secy. 4; Blue Key 4, Corr. Secy. 4; 
Human Relations Club 2.3.4; Historical 
Society 2.3,4; Student Council 3; Junior 
Class Vice-Pres.; SAL 2,3,4; Charity Day 
Chairman 3; Variety Show 2,3, Asst. 
Producer 3. 

VAUGHN. DAVID A. 

VINCI. JAMES D. 
Sigma Delta Phi 2.3,4. Chief Justice 4, 
Pledgemaster 3; Drill Team 1,2,3,4; 
Math Club 3,4. 

VONDRUSKA. GEORGE L. 
R.O.T.C. 1,2,3,4, Commander 4; Drill 
Team 1,2,3,4. 

VON HAZMBURG. ROMULUS S 

WALSH, ROBERT J. 

Phi Sigma Tau 1,2,3,4, Pres. 2; Blue 
Key 2,3,4; Alpha Sigma Nu 3,4; St. 
Luke's Guild 1.2,3.4, Pres. 2; S.A.M.A. 
1,2,3,4; Pre-Clinicai Honor Society; Who's 
Who 4; Founders' Day Medallion 4 
Student Council 1,2.3. Treas. 2.3, Pres. 4 
Class Pres. 3,4; Board of Governors 3 
Union Activities Board 4. 



WARCHOL. HOWARD W. 
Sigma Delta Phi 2,3,4, Justice 3; R.O.T.C. 
Drill Team 1,2,3,4; Intramurals Manager 
4; Inquiry Pres. 4. 

WARD. ANTHONY CLARK 
LOYOLA NEWS 3,4, Ed.; Alpha Delta 
Gamma 3,4; Historical Society 3,4; Young 
Republicans 3,4; Psychology Club 3; 
ENOSIS 4; Publicity Co-Chairman Loyola 
Fair; Publicity Chairman Pow Wow; 
Pi Delta Epsilon, Historian 4; Who's 
Who 4; Student Pres. Committee 4; 
Blue Key; Traffic Management, 4. 

WATSON, JAMES RICHARD 

WEBER, BARBARA E. 
LOYOLAN 3,4; Coed Club 4; Gerard 
Manley Hopkins Society 4. 

WEISENBERGER, JOHN EDWARD 
Phi Chi 1.2,3,4; S.A.M.A. 1,2,3,4. 

WHITTEN, TERESA A. 

Phi Sigma Tau 3.4; Modern Language 
Club 2,3; Historical Society 2,3,4; Human 
Relations Club 4; Sodality 1,2; Loyola 
Women 3,4. 

WILSON. JOHN J. 
Historical Society 1; Modern Language 
Club 1.2; Econ-Finance Club 4. 

WINTER, GILBERT F. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1,2,3,4, Page 3,4; 
Dental Choir 1,2. 

WISNIEWSKI, HENRY G. 

Sigma Delta Phi 3.4. Treas. 4; Beta 
Alpha Psi 4. Pres. 4; Accounting Club 
2,3,4, Secy. 4; Econ-Finance Club 2.3; 
SAM 3; LOYOLAN 4; Pow Wow 2. 

WOS, RONALD S. 
Loyola Men 3,4. 

WYSZYNSKI, WALTER J. 

Alpha Delta Gamma 3.4; Psych. Club 4; 
Philosophy Club 4; Fine Arts Club 1,2; 
Intramurals 3,4. 

YOUTSEY. KARL J. 
Sigma Delta Phi 2,3,4, Pledgemaster 2, 
Secy. 3. Vice-Pres. 4; Math Club 3,4. 

ZARANKA, PAULINE M. 
Circumference 3,4; Phi Sigma Tau 3,4, 
Vice-Pres. 4; Sodality 1,2; Fine Arts Club 
1,2,3,4, Vice-Pres. 2; Modern Language 
Club 1.2.3,4, Vice-Pres. 4; Coed Club 
1; Historical Society 1,2,4; LOYOLA 
NEWS 1; LOYOLAN 2; Dorm Social 
Chairman 3 

ZEMANS, WALTER J. 

Sigma Pi Alpha 3,4, Pledgemaster 4; 
Historical Society 3,4; SAL 4; Loyola 
Men 3,4; Vet's Club 3,4; Amer. Historical 
Assn. 3,4. 



373 



BALLUFF, BARBARA 
Alpha Tau Delta 1,2,3,4; SAL 3,4; SNAI 
1,2,3,4. 

CHRISTIAN, VERNA 

Alpha Tau Delta 2,3,4, Custodian 3; 
SNAI 1,2,3,4; Coed Club 1; Class Secre- 
tary 2; Nursing Council 2; SNAI 
Representative 4; Recognition Day 
Representative 4; Variety Show 3; SAL 
3, 4. 

CONNOR, JOANNE 
SNAI 1,2,3,4; Coed Club 2,3; Variety 
Show 3. 

DAHN, JANET 
SNAI 1,2,3,4; Sodality 1,2,3; Gerard 
Manley Hopkins Society. 

DEVITT, SHIRLEY 
Alpha Tau Delta 2,3,4; SNAI 1,2,3,4; 
SAL 2,3; Variety Show 1. 

DONOVAN, JANE 
Alpha Tau Delta 2,3,4; SNAI 1,2,3,4; 
Sodality 1,2; Coed Club 2,3, Treasurer 
3; SAL 3,4; Variety Show 1,3. 

ECKMAN, JOAN 
Alpha Tau Delta 1,2,3,4; SNAI 1,2,3,4; 
Variety Show 1,3; Junior Class Presi- 
dent 3; Vice President of Nursing Coun- 
cil 3; Executive Board Member of SNAI 
3; Loyola Representative to SNAI Nation- 
al Convention; Catholic Council of Stud- 
ent Nurses of Chicago 3,4, Board Mem- 
ber 3, Treasurer 4; Circumference 3,4; 
SAL 2,3.4. 

DOEYWALSKI. CONSTANCE 
SNAI 1,2,3,4; SAL 2,3; Variety Show 1. 

FISCHER, MARGARET 
Alpha Tau Delta 2,3,4, Editor and 
Publicity Committee Chairman 4; Fresh- 
man Class President 1; Nursing Council 
Secretary 1; Union Congress Representa- 
tive 1,2; Arts Council Representative 2; 
Wasmann Biological Society 1; Fine Arts 
Club 1; Women's Dorm Judiciary Coun- 
cil 2; SNAI 1,2,3,4; Catholic Council of 
Student Nurses of Chicago 4; SAL 3,4; 
Variety Show 1,3; Senior Class Presi- 
dent 4; Nursing Council President 4; 
Recognition Day Speaker 2; Who's Who 
4; Founder's Day Outstanding School of 
Nursing Student Award 4; University 
President's Committee 4. 

FRASER, ROSEMARY 
Alpha Tau Delta 1,2,3,4; Social Chair- 
man 3,4; SNAI 1,2,3,4; SAL 2,3,4. 

HAZARD, NANCY 
Alpha Tau Delta 1,2,3,4; SNAI 1,2,3,4; 
SAL 1,2,3; Nursing Honors 1,2,3,4; 'Varie- 
ty Show Publicity Committee 4. 

JAHNKE, KAY MARIE 
Alpha Tau Delta 2,3,4, Historian 3; 

SNAI 1,2,3,4; Coed Club 2,3; Variety 
Show 1.3; SAL 3,4. 

JANKOVEC, JEAN 
Alpha Tau Delta 1,2,3,4, Rituals and 
Traditions Committee Chairman 3; SNAI 



nuvsing divedovy 

1,2,3,4; Variety Show 1,3; SAL 3,4; 
Catholic Council of Student Nurses of 
Chicago 4. 



KENNEDY, JANE 
SNAI 1,2,3,4; SAL 2,3; Sodality 1; 
Variety Show 1. 

LAURENZANA, JUDY 
SNAI 1,2,3,4; Variety Show 3. 

LIEBL, CELE 
Alpha Tau Delta 2,3,4; SNAI 1,2,3,4; 
Class Treasurer 3; Coed Club 2,3,4, Social 
Chairman 2; Sodality 2; SAL 2,3,4; 
Variety Show 1; Wassman Biological 
Society 1. 

LO BRILLO. MARILYN 
SNAI 1,2,3,4; Coed Club 1,2,3, Vice 
President 2, Social Chairman 3; Variety 
Show 3; SAL 3; Wassman Biological 
Society 1 . 

LOUDEN. VIRGINIA 
Alpha Tau Delta 2,3,4, Recording Secre- 
tary ^, President 4;; SNAI 1,2,3,4; Variety 
Show 1; Class Vice President 1; Sodality 
1,2, Secretary 2; Coed Club 1,2,3,4; 
Circumference 3,4; Intersorority Council 
2,3,4; Nursing Honors 2; Chicago Catholic 
Nurses Council 4; Loyolan Award 4; 
Who's Who 4. 

MAC ANDREWS. MARGARET 
Alpha Tau Delta 2,3,4; SNAI 1,2,3,4; 
SAL 2,3,4. 

MC CARTER, GERALDINE 
Alpha Tau Delta 1,2,3,4, Treasurer 2; 
SNAI 1,2,3,4; Coed Club 1,2,3; Nursing 
Council 2,3,4, Social Chairman 2,3; Senior 
Class Secretary 4; Variety Show 1,2,3. 

MAHIEU, BARBARA 
SNAI 1.2,3,4; SAL 1,2; Variety Show 1;. 
Wassman Biological Society 1. 

MARY MARION, SISTER 

SNAI 1,2,3,4. 

MARQUIS, MARY JANE 
SNAI 1,2,3,4; Nursing Council 3,4, 
Council Float Committee 3,4; Class Vice 
President 3,4; Student Welfare Committee 
3.4, Chairman 4. 



MARY 

SNAI 1,2,3,4. 



CLARE, SISTER 



MATUSIAK, ADRIENNE 
SNAI 1,2,3.4; Fine Arts Club 1,2; Wass- 
man Biological Society I; Women's Rifle 
Team 1 . 

MEDL, CAROLYN 
Alpha Tau Delta 1,2,3,4, Treasurer 4; 
SNAI 1,2,3,4; SAL 2,3,4; Variety Show 
1,3, Publicity Committee 3. 

METZ, PATRICIA 
Alpha Tau Delta 1,2,3,4, Editor 2, Vice 
President 3; Pledge Mistress 4; SNAI 
1,2,3,4; Intersorority Council 3,4, Treasur- 
er 3,4; Circumference 3,4, President 4; 
SAL 2,3,4; Variety Show 1,3; Wassman 
Biological Society 1 ; Catholic Council 
of Student Nurses of Chicago 4; Coed 



Club 1,2,3,4; University President's Com- 
mittee 4; Who's Who 4. 

NEAD, KAREN 

Alpha Tau Delta 2,3,4; SNAI 1,2,3,4; 
SAL 2,3,4; Variety Show 1; Wassman 
Biological Society 1; Catholic Council of 
Student Nurses of Chicago 4. 

PEKAN, JOAN 
Alpha Tau Delta 1,2,3,4; SNAI 1,2,3,4; 
SAL 3,4. 

RAUEN, RITA 
Alpha Tau Delta 1,2,3,4, Pledge Mistress 
3, Chairman of Membership Committee 
3, Chairman of Professional Aaivity 
Committee 4; Circumference 3,4; SNAI 
1,2,3,4; Coed Club 3; Fine Arts Club 2; 
Nursing Council 4; Senior Class Treasur- 
er 4; SAL 2,3,4; Variety Show 1,3; Wass- 
man Biological Society 1. 

SCHWAB, CATHERINE 

SNAI 1,2,3,4; SAL 1,2,3; Variety Show 
11; Usher for Purdue Glee Club 2. 

SCHWENGLER, NANCY 
SNAI 1,2,3,4; Sodality 1,2,3; Gerard Man- 
ley Hopkins Society 1,2; Junior Class 
Secretary ^; SAL Representative 2,3; 
Coed Club 1. 

SIMON, SHARON 
SNAI 1,2,3,4; Nursing Honors 1,2. 

SOKLEY, VIRGINIA 

SNAI 1,2,3,4. 

STASIAK, VIOLET 
Alpha Tau Delta 2,3,4; SNAI 1,2,3,4; 
Variety Show 1,2,3; SAL 2,3,4; Nursing 
Council Treasurer 2; Sophomore Class 
President 2; Sodality 2; Social Committee 
Chairman 2; Curtain Guild 1,2; Loyola 
Choral Club 2; Fine Arts Club 2; Catholic 
Council of Student Nurses of Chicago 
4. 

TIERNEY, MARGARET 

SNAI 2,3,4; Chairman 25th Anniversary 
Communion Breakfast; Student Speaker 
25th Anniversary Communion Breakfast; 
Coed Club 2; Nursing Honors 2,3,4. 

TROCKER, MONICA 

Alpha Tau Delta 2,3,4, Pin Custodian 
3, Corresponding Secretary 4; SNAI 
1,2,3,4; SNAI Representative 3; Wassman 
Biological Society 1; Variety Show 1,3; 
Nursing Council 2,3; Class Secretary 2; 
Coed Club 4; SAL Executive Board 3,4; 
Circumference 3,4; Assistant Welfare 
Representative 4; Catholic Council of 
Student Nurses of Chicago 4. 

VIRENE, JEAN 
SNAI 1,2,3,4; Sodality 1,2; SAL 2. 

WILLS, EMMA LEE 
Alpha Tau Delta 2,3,4; SNAI 1,2,3,4; 
SAL 2,3,4; Coed Club 1,3; Fine Arts 
Club 2. 

ZABIAKA, ELEANOR 
Alpha Tau Delta 1,2,3,4; SNAI 1,2,3,4; 
Sodality 1,2,3,4; Variety Show 1; Curtain 
Guild I; Coed Club 1; SAL 4. 



3 74 



pdotogvApdy index 



\auga. Dr. Yog 44 

Abel. Dr. D. Herbert 41, 195 

Abernathy, James 215 

Aceto. Brother 260 

Adams, Daniel 168, 195 

Alabano, Patrick M. 31-+ 

Alaksiewicz, Jerome M. 314 

Alberton. Paul G. 314 

Albrechc, Geraid 164 

Alessanorini, Joseph 170 

Alex. James 107, 121, l46, 20-i, 207, 234, 235, 297. 

300 
Alexander. Dennis 117, 190 
Alexjun. Edward 255, 257 
Allard, Mrs. Harold 26 
Allard. Joyce 150. 216 
AUegretti, Daniel 144 
Allison, Dr. John R. 59, 64 
AIlocco. Dom 111. 314 
Amaruro, Dr. Frank M. 58 
Ambre. John 157 
Ambrosia. Angeline 83 
Amelio. Ralph 314 
Amidei. Donald 253. 254 
Amidei, Paul 222. 223 
Amidei. Marion 1 50 
Anderson. Raymond 3 1-* 
Anderson, Shirley M. 91 
Andrews. Marjo 208 
Anglim, Mary 184 
Anglum, Essie 21. 82, 8=1, 110 
Anichini. Lucille 126, 129, 201. 296, 314 
Ansboro, John 104, 260, 261, 314 
Ansbro, John 1 59 
Anselmo, Henry 259. 31-* 
Ansero, John 1 58 
Anstett, Diane l-tO, 2-44, 2~1 
Antonacci, L. 160 
Antonucci. June 150, 282 
Arai, Harold 123, 144, 314 
Arndt. James J. 314 
Arneson, Joseph 1 64 
Arnold, Dr. Lloyd L. 38, 44 
Arreguin. Marie 83 
Asahino, Dr. Steven 66 
Ascherl. Carol 189, 193 
Ashley, Joan 189 
Asterino. J. 160 
Atkins. Slary Ann 110 
Atsaves, Peter 144 
Auer, LeRoy 204 
Augius. Mrs. Danute 65 
Augustine. Philip J. 124, 12^. 172, 192, 221. 235. 

315. 351 
Aumuller, Jan 299 
Auw, Dorothy 94 
Baca, Daniel M. 315 
Bade. Richard 256 
Baggarly, Bradley A. 315 
Baginski. R. 160 
Bajko, Joseph 146. 193 
Baker. Dolores 149, 197 
Balick, Lester 168. 169 
Balluff. Barbara 315 
Ballus, John 154 
Baltramaifris, Diane 264 
Bamberger. Mary Ann 1 50. 151 
Banaczak. Leonard 78 
Banks, John 27, 185. 251 
Bannon. Dr. John F. 45 
Baranovskis. Dr. Joanna 66 
Barber. Mary Ellen UO, 315 
Barcy, Frank 315 
Barnes, Emily J. 315 
Barnett, Mary Ann 141 
Baron, John W. 315 
Barrett. Donald 109 
Barry, Andrew 248 
Barry. Dr. James 42 
Barry. Michael 1 34 
Barry, Richard 23 
Bart, George 206, 208 
Bator. Robert J. 315 
Battaglia, Joseph 215, 316 
Bauer, Thomas J. 316 
Bauerkert, Frank 158. 277 
Baum, Richard 316 
Bauman. Barbara 1 95 
Bazar. Christine A. 316 
Beazaitis, Thomas 242 
Bebusschere. David 242 
Beck, Sherman 256 
Becker. Dr. 65 
Becker, Virginia 174 
Beckman. Rev. John J., S. J. 281 
Bednarz, Bernadine 1 50, 151 



Begp Betty. 90 

Begg. Mary E. 91 

Behnke, Daniel 93 

Bell, Edward 261 

Bell, George 277 

Bell. William P. 166. 167, 316 

Bellinger. Frank 206. 208 

Bellock. Rev. Raymond F.. S. J. 47 

Belmonte. John 1 54, 155 

Bend, Charles 144 

Benier, Celeste 141 

Bennett. Bonnie 324 

Bennett. Paul C 160. 316 

Berg. Mary 1 14 

Bergan, Mary 116, 197. 224. 235 

Bergewisch, Rev. Fred F., S. J. 47 

Bergren. Judy 1 16 

Berman. Max 138. 139, 316 

Berquist, Robert A. 144, 317 

Berstrom, Robert 181 

Bertaux, Bonita ll'y. 296 

Bertell. Jerome \V. 317 

Berthold. Michael 195, 204, 207. 317 

Berubc, Elaine 110, 141, 187 

Best. Dr. E. James 60, 63 

Bettag, Alyce 43 

Bevan, William 144 

Bezdek. Richard 162, 163 

Bierberger, Patricia 277 

Bieri. Rev. John W.. S. J. 12. 75 

Biestek. Rev. Felix P., S. J. 12. 91 

Bilick. Violet 25 

Billimack, John 27, 121, 146, 147 

Bird. William F. 121. 317 

Birkholg, Beth 184 

Bishop. James F. 31" 

Bissell. Cushman B. U, 18 

Bitner, Leonard 145 

Blair. Robert 291 

Blake, James 317 

Blake, Marion 5"" 

Blaii. Bernard 121 1"^, 185. 221, 226, 227. 235, 

248. 251, 258 
Blickenstaff. John E. 59 
Blie. Ellen 282 
Blizzard. Mabel 189 
Block. Walter F. 317 

Blommaert, LeRoy 127, 130. 192, 317 
Bluemink, Gary 214 
Blithm. Jeanne 184 
Boat Wright. G. 160 
Bobota, John I46 

Bock. Richard W. 125, 127, 192. 317 
Boesze, Laslo 162, 163 
Boettger, Shirley 83 
Boke, Bruce 144 
Bolan, James T. 317 
Bomba, Virginia 317 
Bonaguro. Lester A. 318 
Bonovich. Robert ll4, 123, 289 
Borer. Ronald F. 67. 160, 161. 318 
Borrelli. Thomas L. 52 
Bosley, Floyd 247 
Bostyan, Richard 1 6 1 

Bouchonville. Beatrice 110, I4I, 187. 282 
Bourkf, Andrew 108 
Bouscaren, Louis I4. 18 
Bowe, Augustine J. I4, 288 
Bower. Marianne 148 
Boylan, Frank 145 
Bracv. Warren 192 
Brady. Lester E. 160. 318 
Branch, Barbara 318 
Brandenburg. Lynn 318 
Brannen, Patrick 109 
Breen, Bernadette, 84 
Brcmner, David F. 14 
Brennan, Clare 318 
Brennan, Richard 152 
Brennan, Thomas 104 
Brescia, Dr. Nicholas 62 
Bresingham, Mary 110, 187 
Bresnahan, Rev. Cornelius J., C.S.V. 47 
Brey, Anton 318 
Brinkman, Judy 116, 244, 271 
Brinkman. Ruth Ann 265 
Broderick. Ray 159 
Broniec. Frank D. 318 
Brooks. Lawrence 1 95 
Brophy, James 172 
Brow, Amideus M. 318 
Brown. Ann 189 
Brown, John 252 
Brown, Larry 154, 155 
Brown, Patricia 192, 195 
Brown. Steve 259 



Bryant, Rev. Thomas J., S. J. 47, 128 

Buckun. Anthony T. 318 

Buhl, William 26. 190 

Bulger. Richard 261 

Bunosky, Peter 318 

Burch. Dr. William P. 61, 66 

Burgman. John 147 

Burik. Nicholas 156, 157 

Burke, Andrew 109 

Burke, James O. 14 

Burke. John 109. 234, 235 

Burke. Robert 1 34 

Burlage, Rev. Carl. S. J. 34. 290 

Burns. D. 160 

Burns. James E. 163, 319 

Burns. Jerald 162. 163, 318 

Burns. Raymond 164, 165 

Burns, Shelia 175 

Burriesci. Nicholas 154 

Burrill. Judy 190 

Burrill, Raymond E. 319 

Busa, Allen 172. 173. 235. 296 

Bush. James 134. 135, 258. 259 

Bussert, Mary Kay 110. 126, 140, 141 

Bussey, Henry M.. II 97 

Butler, Frank 193, 319 

Buznas, J. 160 

Byrnes, Anne 264 

Cadero, Barbara 148 

Calderwood, Robert 144, 319 

Call. Howard C. 319 

Callahan. Dr. 76 

Camino, Michael 1 17 

Canelas, Marcelo 207, 319 

Canfield, Kay 265 

Canning, Matthew 319 

Cannon. Jill 57 

Caniin, Edward H. 320 

Capparelli, Marlene 265, 320 

Caras. Peter D. 160, 320 

Carbine, Michael 130, 163, 226. Ill, 235, 320 

Carey, Pat 206, 320 

Carlo. Robert ^20 

Carlson. David K. 320 

Carney, Joseph I44 

Carney. Patricia 105. 126, 143. 320 

Carney, William R. 14 

Carobus. Kenneth 190 

Caroine. Michael 163 

Carolla. John 162 

Carpenter. Richard V. 69 

Carpenter, Thomas >L 321 

Carroll, Richard I46, 193 

Carroll, T, 160 

Carter, James 160 

Caruso, Jeanette 195 

Casey, Jerome 147 

Casey. Dr. Patrick J. 43 

Case> , Thomas 1 66 

Cassaretto, Dr. Frank 4O. 181 

Casserly. Michael I46 

Castle, Williard A. 321 

Cataldo, Edmund 112, 160, 161. 321 

Catania, Dr. Francis J. 45 

Cavanaugh. Thomas P. 160, 321 

Cavanofch, Carl 

Cavender, Marilyn 116. 181, 328 

Cerruti, Piero J. 321 

Cesna, Elizabeth 35. 126, 188, 222, 321 

Chacko, P. K. 25 

Chaker, Donna 1 98 

Chalmers. Donald 25 1 

Chamberlain. Henry T. I4 

Chambers, James 125. 190. 321 

Chaning. Helen 

Chantos, Siephan J. 144, 321 

Chase, Dr. Lawrence 65 

Charone. John 257 

Chill. Donald W. 321 

Chisholm, Rod 160, 161 

Chisholn, John 121 

Chlopek, Margaret M. 321 

Christensen, Dr. 64 

Christian, Verna 140, 321 

Church, Thomas 193 

Chwierut, Sharon 141, 187 

Ciesielski, Ronald 2"7 

Ciesla, Denis 206. 321 

Cieslak, LeeRoy 193 

Cimino, Thomas P. 322 

Cincinelli. Ron 190. 296 

Cipolla, Sam 206, 208 

Circo, Russ 204. 322 

Cizek. Dorothy 149 

Cizon, Dr. Francis A. 47 

Clawson, Mr. 79 



375 



pdotogvApdy index 



I 



dementi, Alfred J. 322 

Cleveland, Rex J. 322 

Clifford. Erin 299 

Close. Henry J. 322 

Coady, Dr. John 64 

Coakley, Margaret 189 

Cochran, James 253 

Coffey. Michael 170 

Coffey. Thomas 159. 259. 261 

Cogger. Marv Fran 116 

Cohen. Donald E. 322 

Cole, James P. 322 

Collins. Charlotte 207. 322 

Collins. John 234 

Collins, Richard 160. 161 

Collins. Shelia 204. 322 

Coliinson. Donna 116. 126, 322 

Como, Joan 190 

Conley. John 147 

Conley. Richard 157 

Conlon. Denis J. IH, 152, 322 

Conlon, Patrick 104, 121, 1^6. 272, 273. 322 

Connell. William J. 323 

Connelly, Michael 107 

Connelly. Paul 144, 323 

Connior, Joanne 323 

Connolly, David P. 323 

Connolly, John 43. 146 

Connors. Joan 189 

Connors, Judy 189 

Conrad. Cecile 35. 226. 235 

Conroy. Maureen R. 174. 175. 323 

Conroyd. W. Daniel 11, M, 274 

Cooks, Gay 328 

Corbett. Raymond 107 

Cordan, Patricia 126. l^-i. 175, 188. 189. 201, 275 

Corrigan. Margaret Mary 110, 289, 323 

Coscioni. Joan 27. 150, 151. 275 

Coscello. Martin 195, 224 

Coughlin. John P. 323 

CoLilas, Irma 175 

Cowling, William 323 

Cox. James C. 25 

Cox, Mrs. James C. 25 

Cox, Stephen 109 

Coyne. Lawrence l44, 145. 324 

Creed, Kenneth 262. 263 

Crnokrak, John 159, 185. 240. 242. 245 343 

Crook. Richard 190 

Cross. Christel 96 

Crotty. Karen 324 

Cudahy, Edward A. 14 

Cudahy. Michael 14 

Cullen, Joseph M. 324 

Cullen. Mary Lee 126, 127. 128. 189, 192, 351, 386 

Cummings. Walter J. 14 

Cummins, Michael J. 172. 324 

Cunningham, Edward 146. 193 

Cunningham, Peter 112. 121. 144 

Cuonzo, George E. 144, 324 

Curoe, Thomas 113 

Curran, John 247 

Curren. William 117 

Curry. Sheila 174 

Curtin. Michael 1 56 

Cusick, Daniel 170. I84 

Cutler, Kay 86, 110, 140. 187 

Cwikla. Joanne 186, 275 

Dabrowski, Dorothy 324 

Daddino, Joseph 324 

Dagenais, Margaret 290, 339 

Dahm. Janet 324 

Daily, Raymond 325 

Dallstream. Andrew J. 18 

Damien. Yvonne 25 

Dammann, J. Francis 1 8 

Darnell, G. 160 

Dash. Karl 147 

Davis, Paul 102. 12-4. 162. 163, 289 

Dawson, Dr. Paul 60. 64 

Dean. Marie 175. 188. 189 

Dean, Thomas A. 14 

Decesare, Frank J. 325 

Deday. Ann L. 325 

DeFiore. Joseph 214 

Defrank, Louis P. 32 5 

Defrees. Donald 18 

Dehler, Rev. William A.. S. J. 47 

Deladey, Jeanne A. 325 

Delan. Rev. William 86 

Delana, Genevieve 25 

Delapp. Laura 325 

De Latorre. Dr. 81 

Delia, Janet 35 

Deliguidice, Allen 117 

Delo, Richard 112, 121 

Dempsey, James 261 



Dempsey, Julia 325 

Dennington, Emmet 176 

Dentzer, Frank 172 

Dentzer, John 296 

De Orio, Mary 296 

De Prima, Donald 190 

Dernbach, Clement 113 

De Silvio. Thomas 155 

Desmond. Robert R. 325 

Desplenter. Joan M. 325 

Dessimoz, Michael 2 35 

Deszcz, Esther 141 

Devane. Dr. Joseph 46 

De Vito, Margaret 296 

De Vito. Robert 10 

Devitt. Daniel 25 

Devitt, Shirley 325 

Dhont. Leo 102, 114 

Diazmae. James 25'> 

Dickinson. Donald H. 47 

Diehl, Everett 26 

Dienes. Charles T. 325 

Dienes, Mary Ellen 192 

Dienes, Thomas 127. 130, 192. 280 

Difonso, Valerie 181 

Difranco, P. 121. 144, 145. 326 

Dillon, Margaret 25 

Dinello. Carlo 326 

Dinello. Dr. Frank A. 94 

Di Silvio. Thomas 154 

Ditkowsky, Kenneth 152 

Dittrich, Janice 110, 141, 187 

Ditz. Dr. G. 55 

Diven, Joel A. 144 

Dixon, James 192 

Doetsch, Bernard A. 326 

Doetsch. Robert A. 326 

Doherty, Maureen 1 4 1 

Dollard, Re\ . Stewart E.. S. J. 12. 13. 30 

Domagala, Mary Ann 326 

Doman, Linda 17-4, 189. 201, 2U 

Doman, Madeline 101. 106, 126. 214. 297. 326 

Dombroskey, Robert W. 326 

Domes, Alexandria 105, 149, 282 

Dominic, Betty 148 

Domm, Dr. Lincoln V. 80 

Donaghue, Jane 264, 265 

Donaghy, Rev. William J. 49 

Donahue, Edward 1 35 

Donahue, John P. 56 

Donahue, Michael 1 34, 137 

Donahue. Nancy 115 

Donatelli. Rosemary 305 

Donn, Sharon 15, 190 

Donnelly. Robert 158 

Donnelly, Frederic D. 68, 69 

Donovan, Jane 1-40, 326 

Doody, Mary M. 326 

Dooley. Mary Anne 116 

Dooling. Mary Ann 26^, 265 

Dores. Daniel 170 

Dorf. Gerald 113. 152. 153 

Dorschel, Querin 1^ 

Dorywalski, Constance 126 

Douaire, Rev. Richard 290 

Dougherty, Maureen 1 90 

Doulieger, Mary l-i8 

Dovichi. Carolyn 150. 151 

Dowd, Thomas 1 52 

Downs, Edward 1 36, 326 

Doyle, Rev. Charles L, S. J. 94 

Doyle. Michael L., O. S. M. 327 

Draine. Edwin H. 55 

Draus. Walter 252 

Drebin, Martin E. 54 

Drechny. John 184. 327 

Dring, Robert 2^8. 251 

Driscoll, Dr. Richard 43 

Driscoll, Richard 245 

Duda, Judy 150. 189 

Duffy. Carol 291 

Duffy, Joan 102. 105. 126, 174 

Duggan. Mi mi 264, 265 

Durck, Daniel 245, 343 

Dumke, Gerald 160. 161 

Dunagau. David 176 

Dunne. Richard 137 

Dupke. Judy 189 

Dupre, Laurene 1-42. 143. 327 

Dupre, Susan 143 

Durkin. John 168, 169 

Durkin, William J. 327 

Dvorak. Charles J. 327 

Dvorchak, Richard 256 

Dwyer, James 256 

Dwyer, Margaret M. 91 



Dybas, Diane 105, 149 

Dzinich, Farida 143 

Earnest. Ralph R. 144. 328 

Ebenhoeh, Patrick E. 328 

Eckman. Joan 126, 328 

Edgar, Dr. David 66 

Edlin, Gene 152 

Edwards, James 51, 328 

Egan. John P. 247, 328 

Egan. Robert 117. 223. 224 

Eggers, James D. 328 

Ehlert, Troy 296 

Elseman. Dr. Rodriego 67 

Emrich. Robert W. 328 

England, Ronald 1 76 

Englet. Dr. Joseph O. 5 5 

English, Joan 207. 291 

Ennis, Carol 189. 282 

Enright, Marian 126. 175, 367 

Erbe, Rev. Edward 1 14 

Erickson. John 115. 121, 164, 165, 289 

Errico. Ronald N. 144. 329 

Esposito, Thomas M. 329 

Esser, David 144 

Etten, Marion 270 

Eulenberg, Alexander 18 

Evaskus, Jo Ann 84 

Fahrenbach. John 172 

Failla. Roslyn 25 

Falk. Margaret 296 

Farcione, Dr. Fred 67 

Farenga. Jerome 204, 329 

Farrant. T. 160 

Farrell. Alice 344 

Farrell, Edward J. 14 

Farrell, Hannelore 189 

Farrell. John 134, 226, 235 

Farrell, Raymond 130 

Farrell, Rev. Walter L.. S. J.. 48 

Farrelly, Brother 260 

Farsen, Vivian 1 14 

Federici, Dr. Mario 44 

Federovics, Zinya 195, 204, 207 

Feigl, Dorothy M. 329 

Feinberg, Michael 138, 139 

Feit, Kenneth 127. 130. 192 

Felhaver, T. 160 

Felice. Rev. John, S. J. 24, 47 

Fennell. John 156. 157 

Fennessy, Cecelia 83 

Ferris, Constance 270 

Fiedler. Richard J. 329 

Fierst, Sherry 244 

Filas, Rev. Francis L., S. J. 39, 47 

Files, LeRoy R. 329 

Filip. Robert 136 

Finley. L. 160 

Firling. Kenneth 1 68 

Firlit, Casimir F. 329 

Fischer, Rev. Franklin C, S. J. 12 

Fischer. Margaret 86. 110, 123. 140. 141, 289. 329 

Fischer. Rev. Matthias E. 47 

Fish, Julie 141, 187 

Fisher, Gregory 154, 155 

Fisher, Jerome 161 

Fitzgerald. Dane 212 

Fitzgerald. James 100. 109, 120, 122, 125, 129, 

136, 278, 289. 329. 332 
Fitzgerald. John C. 14 
Fitzgerald, Michael J. 329 
Fitzgerald, Robert 115 
Fitzgerald, Sean 330 
Fitzpatrick, Maureen 175. 189, 330 
Fitzpatrick, Michael T. 147 
Flaherty, James E. 330 
Flanagan, John 46 
Flanagan, Norb 111 

Flanagan, Thomas 158. 254, 255, 257 
Flater. Lucille 83 
Fleming, Richard J. 330 
Fleming, Dr. Thomas 66 
Flint. T. 160 

Fleeter, Conrad F. 113. 330 
Florek, Anthony 195 
Florek, Norb 146 
Flynn, Michael 306 
Elys. Dr. Michael J. 38. 44 
Fochman. John 154 
Follico, Ernest 160, 161 
Fontana, Anthony 195 
Fonte, Arlene 175. 330 
Ford, Beth 265 
Ford. Mary 264 
Ford. William 192 
Forkins. James 21 
Forster, Kareen 87, 141, 187 



376 



pdotogvApdy index 



Fortney. Donald 146, 147. 330 

Fox, Rev. Robert J.. S. J. 24. 47, 101 

Frake, Marvin 277 

Francione, William J. 330 

Francis, Carter J. 121. 160, 350 

Francis. M. 160 

Fraser. Rosemary 140. 330 

Frazier, Rosemary 141 

Frechette, Mary 331 

Frecko. Susan 175 

Freeman. William 272 

Frenzel, Robert J. 117 

Frenzer, Robert 331 

Frey, John 27 

Friend. Eve 195 

Frigoletto, Robert 1"6 

Frizol, Dr. Sylvester M. 5 5 

Frontonius, John 261 

Fr>-. A. 160 

Frymark. Paul 176 

Fulgoni. Carol 143 

Fullman. Carol 273 

Funer. Rolf G. 331 

Funk, Doreen J. 331 

Gagin, Captain John 44 

Gagliano, Frank D. 331 

Gajewski, Joseph 120. 124. 129. 173, 289, 296, 331 

Galarneault. Dr. Thomas, jr. 75, 79. 80 

Gall. Bert 1~6 

Gallagher. Julia 184 

Gallagher. Nancy 2 3 

Gallagher, Rev. Ralph A., S.J. 39, 47, 88. 89 

Gallagher, Rita M. 175 

Galvin, Frank 192 

Gantt, Dr. Patrick 66 

Gardiner, William 171 

Gargiulo. Dr. Anthony W. 67 

Gartman. Captain Frank 44 

Garvin, Edward J. 331 

Gasior, Robert M, 332 

Gaspers. John 162 

Gately. James H. 288 

Gates. Dennis 130 

Gathman, Dennis 1"2 

Gatti. William 156, 157 

Gauthier, Robert 1 44 

Gauvreau, Paul 332 

Gavin, Donald 45, 122. HI, 332 

Gavin. Michael 243. 244. 245, 343 

Gawronski. Charles 181 

Geary, Catherine M. 47 

Geddo, Frances 83, 84 

Geffinger, Margaret 189, 192, 299 

Geiger, Eleanor 150. 151 

Geimer, Richard F. 332 

Geiss, Micky 1 54. 155 

Gelinas, E. 160 

Gelinas, Thomas 208, 332 

Geneva. Robert J. 134. 332 

Georgen. Gerald 112, 211 

Gerber, Lawrence 27. 109, 121. 171 

Gerrietts. Dr. John S. 37. 42 

Gerrity, Alice 84 

Gertrudis, Sister M.. O. S. F. 270 

Geruasio. Dr. Guillermo 63 

Getz, Mary 315 

Gewartowski, Paul 332 

Ghosh, Dr. 65 

Gianoli, Donald 66. 332 

Giarratano. Toni 190 

Gibaiiis, John A. 333 

Gibbons, Michael 33^ 

Gill. Mary 174, 189 

Gillespie, Thomas 333 

Gillies. Frederick H. 14 

Gillmore. Monica 150 

Gilmour, Stephen 117, 206 

Gingerich, Beulah 103, HO. 333 

Gingras, Dr. George E. 44, 207 

Guiffre. Ann M. 333 

Guiffre, Lt. Col. Matthew R. 38, 44 

Givens, Edward 1 60 

Glasso, Dr. Henneman 64 

Glatt. Mrs. Ernest 296 

Glati. Hannelore 188, 189, 275 

Glatz. John 195 

Gleason. Martin 333 

Godoy, Rev. Gary 50 

Goheen. Frank 160. 161 

Gold. Bensone, ^33 

Golden. Bruce 152. 153. 333 

Goljan, Kenneth 160 

Goodrich, Mrs. Martha 83 

Gordon, Donald 1 76 

Gordon, John 333 

Gorham. Richard L. 333 

Gorman, Thomas 43, 160 



J. 94 



229, 235, 271, 273, 299. 



J. 334 



Grabow, Emil F. 333 
Grady, Lawrence 103, 146 
Granacki, Dale 131. 146, 147, 263 
Granaia, Mary 291 
Grant, Rev. Gerard G., S. 
Grant. Paul B. 89, 101 
Graveline. Kenneth 333 
Gray, Robert H. 334 
Green, Fred 128, 172, 221, 

303 
Green, James 144 
Greenstein, Charles 252 
Greisen, Norman 160. 161 
Grenda. Robert T. 160, 334 
Greubel, Margaret 143 
Griffin, James 152 
Grimes, John 137 
Grippando, Janice 35 
Grisamore. Dr. Thomas L. 60. 62 
Grollig, Rev. Francis X., S. J. 172 
Gronche, President 305 
Grondy, Chet 215 
Gronkiewicz, Edmund 
Grose. Charles 334 
Gross, Mary Lee 1 89 
Grossman. Thomas A. 256, 334 
Grunath. B. 160 
Gubbins, Michael D. 334 
Guerra, Albert L. 334 
Guerra. Thomas 146, 193, 262, 263 
Guilbaulc. Joseph E. 14 
Guilfoyle, Terrence l46 
Gurelich, John 79 
Gurney, B. Franklin 334 
Guzzo, Francis 334 
Gwyn, Thomas 24 1 
Gylys. Mrs. Maria 65 
Hagan. Herman 241, 242, 245, 343 
Hagen, Marian 334 

Hagmaier, Rev. George A., C.S.P. 278 
Hajek. Virginia 215 
Halkias. James 79 
Hall. Joyce 264 
Hammond. Harold 1 12 
Handschu. Dr. 64 
Handy. James 252 
Hanley. Donald 147 
Hansen. Walter 170 
Hanson, Thomas 193 
Harcaj. Stawomir 222 
Hardman, Claire 143 
Harkness. J. Gerald 24l. 242. 245 
Harlan. William 334 
Harris. Bruce 171. 184 

Harris. James 107. 121. 171, 297. 300 
Harrison, Charles 147 

R. Wendell 288 
Michael 106. 120. 124, 129, 289. 297, 



Harrison.. 
Hartman. 

335 
Hartman, 
Hartnett 



110. 126, l4l 



274 
61 



S. J. 24 



Ray 27. 146, 19S 
William J. 335 

Harvey, Mary Ann 244 

Hauch, John W. 125 

Hauff, Thomas 144, 145 

Haunroth. William 335 

Hauser. Michael 204 

Haves. Michael 158 

Hawkins, Kathleen 102. 

Hawkins. Michael 289 

Hawkins, Thomas 11, 13 

Hawkins, Timothy 159. 

Hayes, Barbara 275 

Hayes, Rev. S. Donald 

Hayes. John C, 68. 69 

Hayes, Mr, and Mrs. Joseph 26 

Hayes, Rita 275 

Hazard. Nancy 335 

Healy. James 168, 258 

Healy, Mary 324 

Healy. Rev, Thomas 47 

Healey, Thomas J. 335 

Heath. James 283 

Heberstreit. Jan 190 

Hecht, Rev. F. Torrens, S. J. 38 

Hedquist, R. 160 

Heffron, Pearl 21, 47. 101 

Helferty, Robert D. 335 

Henderson. John 1 56 

Henderson, Rev. Laurence E. 

Heneghan. John M. 89 

Henely. Rev. Robert E. 47 

Henning, John 27 

Hennig, Kenneth 166 

Henny. Daniel HO 

Herfkens. Kenneth 156. 214 

Herr, Rev. Vincent V.. S. 

Hershinow, Helen 224 



S. J. 41. 364 



J. 39, 323 



Herzog, Frederick 296, 335 

Hessel, William 181. 184 

Heuser. Robert 1 66 

Hickey, Matthew J., Jr. 14 

Hilgers, Dr. Donald 66 

Hilkovitch. Charmaine 181 

Hines. Charles M. 14 

Hisaoki, Dr. Kenichi 40 

Hoernig, Paul 102, 104. 166. 167, 273 

Hofer. Loren K. 176. 335 

Hogan. Frank 247, ^43 

Holabird, Mrs. John A. 288 

Holahan. Dr. William 63 

Hollacraft. Richard 154 

Hoover, Thomas 170 

Hopkinson, Mary Anne 140, 141, 186 

Hosobuchi, Yoshio 156 

Hosteny, Joanna 1 89 

Hostert, George 121, 215 

Hot ton, Kathleen 43 

Hovany, Julius 336 

Howe. Barbara 265 

Hoy, Patrick H. 14 

Hozvierz, Jerome 130 

Huber. Daniel 146 

Huck, Kay 291 

Hudson. John W. 40. 216 

Huelsman. Helen P. 75 

Hughbanks. Thomas 241 

Hughes, Lawrence 243 

Hummert. Dr. Paul 42, 197 

Hunt, Henry B. 336 

Hunter. Les 246, 24 7 

Hura. John 244 

Hurley, Mary Lou 141 

Hurm. Ray 156, 157, 214 

Huston. Dr. John 40 

Hynduik, Robert 111, 214 

Hynes. Thomas 113 

lerulli. Frank 145 

Ingersall, Robert 162 

Ingrando. Dominic 172 

InsuU, Samuel, Jr. 14 

Ireland. George 238. 245. 272 

Ireland, Kathleen 244 

Jackolich. John 147. 176 

Jackson, Dr. Kenneth M. 128 

Jacobsen. Rev. Jerome V., S. J. 97 

Jaffe. Mrs. Esther 110 

Jahnke, Kay UO, 336 

James. Harry 190 

Jancauskas. Rev. Raymond, S.J. 5 5 

Jankovec. Jean 140, 336 

Jann. Robert C. 336 

Jannotta. James 212. 214 

Janowiak. Kenneth 206 

Jarabak, Dr. Joseph R. 61 , 66 

Jarrett. Robert 2l4 

Jaskoski. Dr. Benedict 40 

Jay, John K. 336 

Jenkinson. Diane 192 

Jensen. H. 160 

Jerz. Sandy 175 

Jew. Yen 176 

Jimenez. Susana 94 

Jinrich. Joseph 164 

Joe. Victor 156, 214 

Fohlic. John T. 137, 

Johns, John 154, 155, .. 

Johnson, Dennis 104, 109. 121. 122. 2~2, 

163. 337 
Johnson, Harry 337 
Johnston, Arch I46 
Jolivette, Michael 159. 250. 251 
Jones, Owen Barton 1 5 
Jong, Connie 291 
Joost, William 1^2 
Jorgensen, Alan 121. 122. 337. 348 
Jorgensen. M-Sgt. Walter 44. 277 
Joseph, George 337 
Joyce, Patrick 197, 224 
Joyce. Robert E. 19 
Kaczala, Stanley 176 
Kaczor, David 206 
Kaczor. Juliana 126. 181 
Kaepplinger, Marjorie 83 
Kaftan, Robert 35, 168 
Kaleta. Edward 172 
Kamm. Melvin 103, 113 
Kane. Peter 158. 261 
Kane, Thomas R. 337 
Kann, Lawrence 248, 250, 251 
Kantor. Stanley 138, 139 
Karambalas. Peter 147 
Karczmar. Dr. Alexander 77 
Karwatowicz. Frank Z. 337 
Kasli, Donald 246 



234 



336 

337 
109. 



377 



pdotogvApdy index 



Kasper, Charles J. 337 

Kattner, Mary 142, 143, 206 

Kaub. Christine 296 

Kauke, Henry 164 

Kawal. Mary 181 

Kawiecki, David L. 337 

Keanss. Thomas 152, 168 

Kearns, Karen 143 

Kearns, Thomas C. 113, 337 

Keating. Arthur 15 

Keavy, Edward 152, 153, 337 

Keefe, John 215 

Keenan, William 156 

Keevers, Thomas 169 

Keinath, Sharon 14 3 

Kellstradi, Charles H. 15 

Kelly, Rev. Clyde B.. S. J. 94 

Kelly, Diane 184, 187 

Kelly, James 185, 251, 258 

Kelly, John M. 131, 337 

Kelly, Michael 190 

Kelly, Raymond 338 

Kemp, James M. 338 

Kemp, Dr. Kenneth 66 

Kenan, Elizabeth 84, 110 

Kcnealy, Patrick 208, 338 

Kenealy, Rev. William J.. S. J. 69 

Kennedy, Eleanor 25 

Kennedy, Jane 338 

Kennedy, Dr. Thomas 46 

Kenny, Richard 172 

Kent, Mary 149 

Keogh, Kathleen 142 

Kerrigan, Sharon 244 

Kerstern, Lawrence 146 

Kerwin, Charles C. 14, 15 

Kessler, Harold 138 

Kessler, Howard L. 3 38 

Kettra, John 216 

Key, Sam 244 

Kiley, Raymond J. 338 

Kiley, Richard 111 

Killacky, Robert l47, 262, 263 

Kilzer, Frank P. 338 

Kiniery, Gladys 13, 82, 83, 270 

Kiniery, Dr. Paul 31 

Kipfstuhl, Thomas 258 

Kirchoff. Michael 367 

Kirkland. Weymouth 15 

Kirkwood, Michael T. 160, 3i8 

Kizidv, Joseph 211 

Kizior, Geen 130, 143, 338 

Kizior, Joseph 6S, 160 

Klein, Dr. Allan 138 

Klenda, Martin 154 

Klest, Martin 172 

Klickman, Nancy 192 

Klimaitis. Ronald 214 

Klimczak. Adrian E. 338 

Kline, Bud 176, 211 

Klose, Dr. Gilbert C. 55 

Kneer, Margaret 174, 175, 338 

Knight, Eugene 23 

Kobler, Dr. Frank 46 

Koch, L. 160 

Kodie, Norman F. 3 38 

Kohler, W. 160 

Kohn. Louis A. 18 

Kohnke, Judith 122, 126, U2 339 

Koiis, Donald 242 

Kolanko, Joseph 259 

Kolanowski, Stephen 176 

Kollar, Dr John 67 

Kollintzas, George N. 20, 21, 100, lO'i, 316 

Kopp, James 172, 221 

Koprowski, Elaine G. 47 

Koridek, Joseph 258, 259 

Korshak, Sidney R. 15 

Kosek, Rick 146 

Kosloskus, Judith 87. 110, 187, 282 

Kostiwa, Dr. Dale 64, 160, 161 

Kott. Daniel 157 

Kottra. John 1 30 

Koukal, Brian 64 

Kovac, Mary Ellen 140, 186, 187 

Kovarik, Frances 184 

Kozak. Cecelia 184 

Kozak, John A 139 

Kozak, Monica 105. 106. 126. 150. 151, 188, 201 

275, 282. 297. 300 
Kozal. Richard A. 160. 339 
Kozik. Barbara 195. 291 
Kozlowski, Jerilyn 148 
Krainik, Ardis 290 
Krajacic, Lance N. 339 
Kramer, John 235, 339 



Kraus, Jeanne 184 

Krezo, Richard 339 

Krol, Dr. Arthur J. 61, 67 

Krug, Diane 339 

Kruzel, Judy 105, 126, 283 

Krynicki, Judith 195 

Krysinski, Theodore T. 339 

Kubal, Davis D. L. 42 

Kucera, Gerry 146 

Kucharski, Terry 131 

Kudrows, Mary Ann 190 

Kuhinka, Julius 43 

Kula, John 195 

Kulas, James 42 

Kuntzman, Edward 195 

Kurkanin, Joseph 157 

Kusek, Richard F. 21, 54 

Kut, Leonard 157 

Kuta, Virginia 40 

Kutza, Michael 300 

Landemann, Erich 146 

Lally, Msgr. Francis J. 278 

Lamendetti, Anthony 215 

Lamey, William L. 69, 72 

Lammendella, John 215 

Lamping, Dennis 168, 169 

Lang, Joseph l47. 193. 341 

Lang. Lorraine 126. 130. 216 

Laos. Walter 176 

Lareau. Claire 84. 341 

Laskowski. Mary 143. 341 

Latin. Ronald J. 341 

Laube. Valerie 44 

Laughlin. Lynn A. 341 

Laurenzana, Judith 341 

Laurie, James 107, 158, 259, 260, 261, 297 

Laurx, Charles S. 341 

Lauter. Alan 138, 139 

Lavere. William 341 

Lavrinovich. Arlene 87, 275 
Law, Linda 189 

Lazur, Alec A, 125 
Leahy, Andrew 152 

Leaner, Micki 184 

Le Blanc, Mariette 20. 21, 278 
Leibman, Morris I. 18 
Leiis, Loretta 341 

Lellenberg, Norman 164, 165 

Le Mire. William 81 

Lemley, Barbara 141 

Lemonnier, Joan 341 

Lentz, Robert 176 

Leonard. Arthur T. 15 

Leonard. Barbara 296 

Le Saint. Rev. William P., S. J. 48 

Lesko, Rhoda 244. 141 

Levitt. Monte 103, 112, 160 

Lewandowski, Marilyn 184 

Lewis. Frank J. 15, 278 

Lewis, John 136 

Leydet, Ernest 114, 123 

Liaugminas. Dr. Albin 44 

Liberson, Dr. Wladmir 77. 80 

Libman. Sam 138 

Licata. Anthony 193 

Lieberman, Joseph 138, 139 

Liebl. Cecile 140. 341 

Lietz, Dr. Paul S. 37 

Lim. Dr. Edward 40 

Linskey, Ann 116 

Linsley, James 342 

Lisk. Shirley 342 

Little. Suzette 303 

I.o Brillo. Marilyn 342 

Lodge. William E. 342 

Lodovisi, Victor A. 342 

Loess. Mary Kay 150. 151 

Lofendo, Peter 176 

Loftus. Kathleen 141. 271 

Logelin. Edward C. 288 

Lombardi. Matthew 144, 342 

Lombardo, Joseph 156 

Louden, Virginia 105, 123, 126, 129, 140, 141, 342 

Loughlin. Lawrence 342 

Louis. Frank J. 323 

Louviaux. Gregory 156. 214 

Lowe. Marjorie 143. 342 

Lowrey. John 201 

Lubertozzi. Lawrence 170 

Lucas. Richard 146. 193. 342 

Lucatorto. Dr. Frank M. 62 

Lucek. Loretta 181 

Ludwig. Fred 134 

Luetkemeyer. 265 

Lunde, Lynn C. 144, 342 



Lunn, Sir Arnold 316 

Luschek, Mary Jo 143 

Lutynski, Adam 37 

Lynch, Michael 136 

Lynch, Miles 342 

Lynch, Ray 81 

Lyons, Helen 270 

Lyons, Thomas 146, 193 

McAleese, Patricia 110 

McAndrews, Margaret 140 

McAuliffe, Mary Beth 126, 174, 175, 189, 343 

McCabe, Sharon 264 

McCaffrey, John L. 15 

McCann, Elizabeth A. 13, 22, 306 

McCann, Ellen 140 

McCarter, Geraldine 86, 110, 140, 343 

McCarthy, Mr. and Mrs. Maurice 26 

McCarthy, William 343 

McClean, Graham 259 

McCleary, Rev. Dumas L., C. S. V. 54 

McCloskey, Harry L. 13, 20, 21, 281 

McConnell, Michael 121, 173, 229, 235, 284 

McCormick. Kenneth 214 

McCoy. Dr. Charles 40 

McCulla. Robert 164, 165 

McDermott, Robert 159 

McDermott, Margaret 83 

McDonald, Dr. Hugh J. 78 

McDonald, Ronald 277 

McEvov, Rev. John A., S. J. 12 

McEadden. John W. 343 

McGady. Raymond 343 

McGee. Phillip E. 343 

McGlaughlin, Molly 184 

McGlynn, Anselm M., O.S.M. 343 

McGoorty. John P.. Jr. 18 

McGrath, James 344 

.McGuill, Joseph 144 
McGuire, John 252 
McGuire, Ruth 275 
McHugh, John J. 125 
Mclnerny, Joseph 215 
Mclntyre, Patricia 282 

McKenzie. Rev. John L., S. J. 297 

McKinnon, Marilyn 296 

McKinnon. Lois 224 

McLaughlin. Thomas J. 166, 344 

McLeod, Diane 265 

McMahon, Jay 176 

McMahon, Maureen 141 

McMahon, Richard 195 

McManigal. Donald 291 

McMann. Maureen 116 

McMannagan, David 291 

McNamara. Frank 113. 289 

McNamara. Robert 344 

McNulty. Eileen 175 

McPartlin. Mary Lou 96 

McQuade 247 

McRaith. Mary 158. 159 

McSorley. James B. 344 

MacAndrews. Margaret 343 

Macarski, Pamela 148 

Macias, Frank 176 

Maciejewski, Richard F. 344 

Mack, Carolyn 148 

Mackinac, D. 160 

MacNamara, John R. 344 

Madden, Dr. 81 

Madden, William M. 101 

Madonia, John 112, 190, 211 

Madonna, Ralph 144 

Madura, R. 160 

Magno, Joseph 2 53 

Maguire, Very Rev. James F., S. J. 10. 12, 13, 

125, 270, 274, 278, 288, 289, 306, 336 
Mahalek, Emmy Lou 184 
Maher, Rev. Edward F., S. J. 47 
Mahieu. Barbara 144 
Mahoney, Paul 154, 155 
Maieski, Robert S. 345 
Major, Karen 175 
Maksym, Ronald 152 
Malec, Michael 171 
Malfitana, Salfatore F. 345 
Malin, Ellen 207 
Malloy, Francis E., Jr. 345 
Malloy, Rev. John C, S. J. 22 
Malone, Roderick 78, 345 
Malone, Dr, Thomas E. 40 
Maloney. Thomas 146 
Mandel. Anthony 138. 139 
Mangione, Salvatore 195 
Manning, David 345 
Mansfield, Marilyn 189 
Marchelya, Norman 160, 345 



378 



pfiofograpfiy index 



Marcus. David 121, 138, 345 

Marczyk. Bruno 193, 345 

Marian, Sister ( Henke ) 34 5 

Mariella, Dr. Raymond P. 36, 40 

Marquette, John 548 

Marquis, Kathleen 84 

Marquis, Mary Jane 86, 110, 345 

Marra, James 146 

Marrin, Kay 105, 143, 344 

Marrow, Charles 77 

Mars, Robert E. 252, 259, 345 

Marshall, John 345 

Martin, John L. 346 

Martin, Kevin 173, 386 

Martin, Mary 189, 195 

Martin, Maureen I4O, 2""1, 296 

Martin, William 128, 289 

Martucci, Rosemary 296 

Marx, Dr. Edmund 46 

Mary Clair, Sister 346 

Mary of St. Gabriel, Sister 93 

Maska, Frank 346 

Massaglia, M-Sgt. Fred 44 

Mastro, Anthony 146, 193, 346 

Materer, Timotliy 127, 192 

Matousek. Bert 146 

Matousek, Dr. George 64 

Matousek, James 60, 262, 263 

Matre, Richard A. 13. 56 

Matres, Gregory 81 

Matulis, Joseph 193, 346 

Maturo, Mary Jane 346 

Matusiak. Adrienne .346 

Macuszek, Patricia 110 

Matz, Joseph 176 

Maurella, Terese 346 

Mausolf, Fred 324 

Maxwell, William D. 288 

Mayer, Raymond R. 53. 54 

Meagher, James 158 

Meany, Susanne 346 

Medl, Caroline 140 

Medly, Caroline 346 

Medyl, Caroline 141 

Meier, Dr. Robert A. 53, 54 

Meirink, Thomas 81 

Memmel, Aloysius 88 

Menez, Dr. Joseph F. 39 

Mentag, Rev. John V., S. J. 227 

Merchut, Walter J. 346 

Merkle, Dorothy 110 

Merrill, William 172 

Merrion, Joseph E. 15 

Mertz, Rev. James J., S. J. 4. 5, 37. 41 

Messineo, Jerome 248, 251 

Messineo, Philip J. 346 

Metcaris, Anthony 215 

Metz, Patricia 105, 123, 126, 140, 141, 289, 347 

Meyer, Dr. Gerald 67 

Michas, George 214 

Michells, Dolores 184 

Mickus, Raymond F. 347 

Miedzianoski, Barbara 141 

Miksaka, Al 291 

Millard, Thomas 347 

Miller. Ellen 126, 142, 221, 225, 227, 235, 284, 

300 
Miller, Howard 152 
Miller, Les 246, 247 

Mini, James 117, 185, 242, 244, 245, 343 
Minogue, Thomas 117 
Mirek, Roberta 174, 175 
Misischia, William 67, 347 
Miszka, Al 291 
Mitchell, Richard T. 347 
Mitchell, Thomas 206, 347 
Mitterer, William J. 347 
Mittskus, Theodore 181 
Moberly, Judy 190 
Mocarski, Pamela 149 
Mogilnitsky, Dr. Theodosi A. 53, 55 
Molander, Leonard 166, 167 
Molnar, Martin 25 
Monaco, Rev. Marcellus 47 
Monitz. Terry 324 
Montague, Rev. Michael J., S. J. 48 
Mooney, James 25 3 
Moore, Dr. Carl 40 
Moorehead, Edward "~. 80, 214 
Moorman, James 212 
Moran, J. Alfred 18 
Moran, John 214 
Moran, William 152 
Morawey, Michael IO4, 121, 124. 171. 272. 289. 

347 
Moreth. Joyce 143. 190 



Morgan, John 243 

Mofkunas, James 117 

Morrey, Dr. Lon W. 288 

Morris, William C. 47 

Morrissey, John 251 

Morrissey, Kay 172 

Morrow, Paul 154 

Morrow, Robert E. 348 

Mostek, Karliene 96 

Motherway, Nicholas 120, 123, 146, 147, 193, 235, 

348 
Moustakis, John 158, 159, 258, 261 
Mozdzierz, Gerald 170 
Mozdzierz, Richard F. 348 
Mucha, Robert J. 348 
Mueller, Kathleen 184 
Mulcahy, Mary Beth 110, 141 
Mulchay, Elizabeth 187 
Mulcrone, James 159 
Mulcrone, John 13-1, 135, 248, 251 
Mullady, Mrs. 89 
Mullan, T. 160 

Mullaney, Thomas P. 160, 348 
Mullenback, Robert 128, 134, 135, 260 
Mulligan, Rev. Robert W., S. J. 11, 12, M 130 

274, 278 
Mullin, Rev. John E., S. J. 47 
Mulvihill, Patricia 128 
Mundt, Robert 134 
Mundy, Dr. Paul 47 
Murans, Dr. Francis 55 
Murphy, Charles F. 15 
Murphv, Geraldine 143, 348 
Murphy, Harold 43, 171 
Murphy, Joseph D. 15 
Murphy, Michael 168 
Murphy, Patrick 134, 135, 348 
Murphy, Thomas 146, 190 
Murray, James 102, 121, 134, 135 
Muskus, Mary 84 
Mylonas, Zacharias A. 349 
Mysyk, Nancy 141 
Nagy, Norbert 193 
Nagy, Ronald L. 349 
Naples. Al 164 
Narko, Medard 168 
Naughton, Michael 134, 135 
Navart, Leonard 160, 211 
Nead, Karen 349 
Nearv, John W. 3^9 
Neidhart, Frank 158, 261 
Nellis, William J. 152, 166, 349 
Nelson, Karen Sue 110, 116 
Nemrckas, Ronald II, 349 
Nettleton, James 158, 261 
Neubauer, Ronald 113 
Newhart, Robert 281 
Newstead, Robert 214 
Niarchos, Dr. George J. 5 5 
Nichols, John 176 
Nicholson, John 108, 109, 123, 125, 146, 278, 

289, 291, 149 
Nico, William 117 
Nicolay, Dr. Robert C. 46 
Nielsen, K. 160 
Nierenberg, Dr. Ronald 66, 1 38 
Nikiliborc, Gene 176 
Nobilio, Patricia 150, 189 
Nolan, Robert 176. 349 
Norris, John 170 
Norvillc, Martin 185, 245, 343 
Noskin, Sam 138 
Nowak, Eugene 120, 122, 349 
Nowak, Ray 144 
Nowian, Dr. Kenneth 62, 65 
Obach, Brother 260 
Obermaier, George 166, 208 
Oberuc. Richard 299 
O'Bosky, James 176 
O'Brien, Barbara 150, 151 
O'Brien, Bud 215 

O'Brien, Mr. and Mrs. Dennis 26 
O'Brien, Erin 189 
O'Brochta, Darlene 142, 192, 282 
O' Byrne, Margaret Crossen 91 
O'Carroll, Sheila 105, 150, 151, 349 
Ochal, Thomas 147 
Ochota, Jerome 349 
O'Connell, Jerome D. 349 
O'Connell, Raymond 350 
O'Connor, Dennis 159, 259, 261 
O'Connor, Eileen 174 
O'Connor, Jerome 190, 350 
O'Connor, Phillip 172 
O'Dwyer, Dr. Margaret M. 198 
Oester, Dr. Y. T. 77, 80 



O'Farrell, John 159 

O'Gallagher, Mary 190 

O'Grady, Joseph F. 350 

O'Hara, Thomas 253, 255, 257 

Ohihabber, Ronald 172 

Okada, Floyd 350 

O'Keefe, John F. 15 

O'Laughlin, Mary Alice 91 

Oldenburg, Richard 166, 167, 258 

O'Leary, John 253 

O'Leary, Katherine 142 

Olech, Charles 117 

Olech, Francene 175, 189, 282 

Olech, Janice 175 

Olech, Ronald 121, 131, 173. 234. 350 

Olen, Ronald 66, 350 

Olhabcr, Ronald 208 

Olsen, Earl 102, 115, 123, 164, 165 

O'Malley, John D. 54 

O'Malley, Dr. John 62 

O'Malley, Thomas P. 350 

Onderisin, Elaine 184 

O'Neil, Sheila 207 

O'Neill, David 146 

O'Neill, Joseph 136 

O'Neill, Mary 83 

Opara, Patrick Uzo 198 

Openheimer, June 189 

O'Reilly, Dr. Charles 91 

O'Reilly, George 135 

O'Reilly, John P. 103, 150, 197, 350 

O'Riely. Fran 189 

Ori, Judy 195 

O'Rourke. Virginia 92, 115 

Orozlek, Dr. Louis 67 

Osadjan, Charles 214 

O'Shaughnessy, Stephen J. 350, 386 

Oskamp, Alfred S. 55 

Oskar. Paul A., Jr. 350 

Ostendorf, Paul G. 350 

Oswalt, J. Fred 176 

O'Tolle, Robert 108, 109, 121 

Pacer, Dr. Fred 67 

Pacer, Judy ^5. 130, 188, 189, 222, 275, 350 

Pach. Alfreda I-iO 

Page, William 152 

Paison. Thomas 121. 160, 351 

Pajak, Edward 226, 227 

Pales, William 168, 169 

Palicki, Ralph 351 

Palincsar, Dr. Edward 40 

Pallasch, Diane 20", 296 

Pallasch. Mr. and Mrs. Bernard 26 

Palumbo, Samuel A. 351 

Palus, Bernard 156 

Pancers, Dr. Helen 94 

Panek, John E. 551 

Pankos. Barbara 206 

Panozzo, Martina 116, 184 

Papish. Charles 147 

Parazin, William 166 

Parent, Dennis 166 

Partipilo, Carmel 174 

Parypinski, Raymond E. 551 

Passinault, William J. 351 

Passman, John M. 551 

Patrick, Peter 259, 260 

Patterson, Lawrence 301 

Paul, Peter I ''2 

Paulson, Ronald 103, 193, 351 

Pawl, Ronald P. 552 

Pawlowski, Dr. Bernard 66 

Payne, John 136 

Pearson, Robert 44 

Pecaut, Brother 260 

Peet, Cathy I48, 149 

Peiniger. Diane 110 

Pekan, Joan 352 

Pendergast, John 255 

Pendergast, Rev. Joseph S., S. J. 35, 316 

Penrock, William B. 352 

Perry, Dr. J. Warren 290 

Perry, Stephen 146 

Persaud, Bhemud 154, 155 

Peters, James 190 

Peters. Rev. Walter P., S. J. 56, 40 

Peterson. Dr. Walter H. 54 

Petro. Frank 152 

Petrone, Theresa 83. 110 

Petroskey, Christine 149 

Petrvs, Richard A. 552 

Pfeifer, Ruth Ann 25 

Pfeiffer, Geraldine 552 

Pfuetze, Dr. Karl 2"0 

Philbin, John 115 

Phillips, Alfred 208 



379 



pfiofograpfiy index 



Phillips, Barbara 141 

Phillips, Glenn 190 

Philpott, Thomas 107, 297, 319 

Picucci, Loretta 35, 195 

Pieklo, Edward 181 

Pierce, Mr. and Mrs. Gerald 26 

Pierce, Mary 116 

Pierce, Patrick 248, 251 

Pietraszewski, Darlene 150 

Piety, Phillip 152 

Piha, Robert J. 352 

Pindoh, Marie 116, 181 

Piraino, Rose 126, 175, 352 

Piszczek, Agnes 93 

Piszkiewicz, Leonard 181 

Pittner, Kenneth 176 

Placzek, Daniel W. 125, 353 

Pleva, Barbara 265 

Podraza, Patricia 126, 143, 353 

Poduska, Mary 84, 86, 141 

Podwika, R. 160 

Pofiue, Thomas 176 

Poison, Thomas 112 

Polich, Joseph J, 353 

Polizzi, Richard A. 353 

Polk, Conrad 206, 208, 353 

Polydoran, Paul A. 144, 353 

Ponce, Raym 156 

Ponticelli, Michael 172, 261 

Poole, William 353 

Posselt, John 215 

Posvic, Dr. Harry 40 

Potocki, Kenneth 173, 208 

Potter, Dr. Helen C. 55 

Potuznik, James 171 

Poulos, Anthony 215 

Powell, Murray R. 353 

Powell, William 171 

Pranzarone. Dean 277 

Pravolone, Paul 130 

Pricco, Donald 176 

Price, Arthur E. 353 

Pride, James R. 144, 145, 353 

Printen, Kenneth 353 

Priore, Ronald 146 

Prochrasta, Betty 353 

Propoulenis, Aldona 63 

Proulx, Dr. Ernest I. 194 

Prow, Rosemary 291 

Pruitt, Mrs. 63 

Przybtl, Ronald 354 

Purcell, B. 160 

Putnam, Pamela 174 

Ouinlan, William J. 131, 354 

Quinlan, William R. 354 

Ouinn, James 78. 354 

Ouinn, Lenore 126, 188, 189, 275 

Ouinn, Peter 115. 164, 165 

Ouinn, Ronald 354 

Ouinn, William J. 15 

Raasch. Edward 260 

Raclaw, Thomas 104 

297, 354 
Radloff, Thomas 51 
Radocha, Daniel 152 
Raia, David 134 
RanHolo, William 160, 354 
Ranieri. William J. 354 
Rapp, Dr. Gustav W. 21, 60, 63 
Rashid, Floyd J. 144, 354 
Rasmussen, J. 160 
Ranay, Jacqueline 148, 354 
Rauen, Rita 110, 126, 354 
Ray, Alan 243, 244, 245, 343 
Reardon, James 245 
Recupero, Sal 176 
Red, Clarence 241, 242, 245, 343 
Reed, Dr. John 40 
Reese, Joan 143, 354 
Reeve, Dr. Charles 65 
Reilly, James 159 
Reinert, Kenneth 181 
Reinke, Rev, John, S. J. 290 
Reinowski, James 181 
Reisel, Dr. Robert B. 43, 206 
Rempala, Marianne 348 
Renier Celeste, 141 
Restarski, Dr. Thaddeus 64 
Rettig, Charlene 116 
Renter, Joseph 355 
Reynolds, Darcy 114 
Reynolds, Frank 113 
Reynolds, John 145 
Reynolds, Thomas A. 18 
Rezler, Dr. Julius 88, 89 
Rhode, Robert 172, 261 
Ricciardelli, Emmanuel F. 355 



107, 121, 122, 134, 135, 



Rice, Barbara 84, 123, 289 

Rice, Miss 86 

Rich, James C. 355 

Richards, Joyce 264 

Richards, Kay 35 

Richards, Linda 57 

Ridge, Donald 147 

Rigney, Austin 172, 173 

Rigney, Peter A. 355 

Riley, Mary 190 

Riley, Nancy 224, 264 

Riley, Rachel 175, 190, 299, 303 

Rintz, Lorraine 143 

Rippon, Dr. John W. 40 

Rivan, Barbara 264, 265 

Roberson, Peter 112, 144 

Roberts, Richard G. 355 

Robinson, Kenneth 121, 144, 355 

Roch, Richard 355 

Rochelle, Richard 246, 247 

Rodda, Thomas 77, 355 

Rodman, Rev. Hugh B., S. J. 12 ,13, 32 

Roe, Taft 156, 214 

Roehrich, Ann 27, 142, 206 

Rogalski, Carol 356 

Rogan, Richard 173, 193 

Roll, Rev. J. Donald, S. J. 38, 208 

Rollins, Maurolyene M. 356 

Rohoe, Robert 272, 277 

Rokos, Robert 170 

Romanus, Raym 156 

Rossate, Ronald 137 

Rota, James 144, 356 

Roubik, Charles J. 18 

Rouen, Rita 140 

Rouse, Victor 247 

Ruane, John 184 

Ruane, Kay 190 

Rubino, Donald 111, 356 

Rubin, Lawrence 138 

Ruda, Richard 216 

Rusk, James 300 

Russell, Dr. Thomas 64 

Russo, Joseph 356 

Rust, Rev. Charles H., S. J. 36, 43 

Rutecki, Rae 143 

Rutt, Rosemary 356 

Ryan, Daniel 195 

Ryan, Ernie 215 

Ryan, Harry J. 356 

Ryan, Judy 141 

Ryan, William 64, 356 

Rysdam, Irwin J. 160, 357 

Sabath, John 181, 224 

Sachtleben, George W. 357 

Sadowski, Francis X. 357 

Sajewski, Edmund 113, 152 

Saletta, Christine 25 

Salvador, Dr. Graciano 44 

Sanchez, Mary 264 

Sanders, Dr. 65 

Sanderson, Captain John 44 

Sandner, James L., Jr. 136, 357 

Sanna, Vernon 161 

Santangelo, Dr. Mario 65 

Santo, James 147, 258, 262 

Sanzenbacher, Karl 214 

Sarma, Kathleen 328 

Sartaguda, Emma 198 

Sartoci, Daniel 215 

Scaffer, Diane 299 

Scanlon, Pat 156, 157 

Scavlon, Barbara 328 

Scavone, Camille 357 

Schaefer, John J. 357 

Schaeffer, Mary Ann 43 

Schalk, Arthur 247 

Schaller, John 190 

Scherb, Louis H. 357 

Schildknecht, Joan E. 357 

Schmelter, Jacqueline 147, 173, 282, 283, 285, 286, 

293, 296, 332 
Schmid, Joan 84, 187 
Schmitt, Donald 185, 248 
Schneider, James F. 357 
Schneider, Margaret 142 
Schneider, Olive 110, 187 
Schneider, Thomas 211, 357 
Schoder, Rev. Raymond V., S. J. 41, 297 
Schoen, Alan 166 
Schoen, Dr. William P. 13, 58 
Schoenbaum, Matthew H. 13, 90, 91 
Schooley, Brother 260 
Schrandt, Donald 111 
Sehorn, Jerome L. 357 
Schrandt, Donald L. 357 



Schroeder, Susan G. 42 

Schultz, Margaret 181 

Schurer, Robert 255 

Schutt, Charles 157 

Schwab, Cathleen 358 

Schwengler, Margaret 358 

Schwind, Carol 358 

Scott, Hugh 145 

Scully, Joseph 121, 173, 228, 235, 258, 284, 287 

Secy, Sirninele 204 

Seiffert, G. 160 

Selfridge, Dr. Frederick M. 75, 77 

Sellinger, Ronald 215 

Senica, William 117 

Serauskas, Robert V. 125 

Sererino, Robert 111 

Severino, Ronald M. 123, 358 

Sevick, Joseph 224 

Shambarger, William 358 

Shananhan, Dr. Richard 66 

Shananhan, Shelia 282, 332 

Shananhan, Thomas 299 

Shanewise, Robert 134, 135 

Shannon, Mary Jo 115 

Sheehan, Dr. John F. 13, 74 

Sheehan, Joseph T. 358 

Shemetulskis, Richard 195 

Sheriff, J. Raymond 13, 52, 108 

Sherry, William J. 172, 358 

Shilling, James 247 

Shipman, Barbara 184, 186, 187, 275 

Shwatal, James 162 

Siblik, Joseph 134, 135 

Sicher, Dr. Harry 60, 62 

Sieber, Rev. Sylvester A., S. V. D. 47 

Siegel, Burton 46 

Sieger, William 273, 358 

Sigborn, Eleanor 192, 344 ' 

Sikora, James 208 

Silick, Robert 204, 258, 358 

Sillman, Joseph 252 

Silvagni, Kathleen 27, 174, 282 

Simon, Sharon 358 

Simone, Vincent 176 

Sinek, William J. 15 

Singler, Robert 162, 258 

Singletary, Dennis 261 

Siranovic, Dawn E. 358 

Siu, Stephanie 116 

Siudinski, Susan C. 358 

Slajchert, Lawrence J. 23 

Slattery, Helen 150, 188 

Slattery, Nancy 116 

Sloan, Mrs. Mary 83 

Slominski, Rev. George A. 47 

Smalley, Dr. Orange A. 53, 55 

Smith, Charles 156, 359 

Smith, Christine 195 

Smith, James 112, 123, 128, 160, 289, 359 

Smith, J. David 21, 55 

Smith, John M., Jr. 15, 19 

Smith, Kay 31 

Smith, Lawrence 251 

Smith, Philip 134 

Smith, William 67, 359 

Smith, W. 160 

Smolinski, Leona 83 

Smoluch, Jan 43, 359 

Smoluch, Walter 113, 152, 153, 359 

Smrha, Lillian 150, 151 

Smulson, Dr. Marshall 63, 138 

Snodgrass, Ralph, C. S. V. 260, 359 

Sobol, Frank 134, 135 

Sobota, John 263 

Sobut, John 156 

Sokley, Virginia 359 

Solzak, Bonita 174, 188, 269 

Sopka, Leonard 195 

Sorensen, Dean 154, 155 

Sorenson, Dr. Viggo B. 61 

Sourile, Richard M., O. S. M. 359 

Spagnolo, Anthony A. 360 

Spalding, James 360 

Specht, Frederick W. 15 

Spellman, Diane 186, 275, 296 

Spence, Mary 360 

Spencer, David 43 

Spilotro, Pat 144 

Spillane, Deanna 360 

Spina, Rev. Anthony R. 47 

Spirek, Dennis 250, 277 

Spiroff, Dr. Boris 40 

Stach, Adam P. 54 

Stacy, Margaret 189 

Stafford, Margaret 110 

Stanley, Chester 166 



380 



p(iotogvAp(iy index 



Stanton, Murphy 164 

Stare. Peter 172 

Stasey, John 222, 223 

Stasiak, Violet 140, 360 

Staskiewicz, Robert 172, 173 

Stasulaitis, Stella 360, 143 

Staunton, Kathleen 195, 204, 360 

Stauss, Anna Marie 174, 360 

Stavely, Richard 248, 250 251 

Stebler, Mrs. William J. 278, 315 

Steens, Edward 146 

Steffens, Robert J. 361 

Steffey, Mary Kay 361 

Stegman, Clement A.. Jr. 361 

Steinfels, Peter 224 

Steiskal, Allen 172 

Stell, Warren J. 361 

Stepanek, George A. 361 

Stephenson, Thomas W. 361 

Stimson. Paul G. 160, 361 

Stinson, Donald J. 39. 47, 127. 192, 351 

Strandberg, Gerald 361 

Stratman. Rev. Carl, C. S. V. 43 

Strauss, Ann 27 

Stremski, Richard 172 

Stumpf, Thomas 147 

Such, Kenneth 172, 261 

Suchor, Lawrence 361 

Sugrue, John V. 361 

Suida. Donna 174, 284 

Sullivan, Bolton 15 

Sullivan, Edward 281 

Sullivan, Francis 43, 69 

Sullivan, James K. 361 

Sullivan, Jay 134, 135 

Sullivan, Jerome 164, 165 

Sullivan, John J. 112, 121, 146, 147, 176, 361 

Sullivan, Michael 121, 122, 131, 146, 147, 170, 362 

Suralski, John 215 

Surtz, Rev. Edward. S. J. 42 

Sutley, Joseph 156, 157, 214 

Sutter, Robert 184 

Svaglic, Dr. Martin 43 

Svoboda. Ronald 248. 251 

Swanish. Dr. Peter T. 54 

Sweittowski. Mr. and Mrs. Foster 26 

Swenson. Gregory T. 160. 362 

Swiderski, Frank R. 362 

Swieton. Nancy 140. 141. 187 

Swinehart. David 172, 221, 225, 227 

Symanski, Andrew 158 

Symond, John 362 

Szarowics, Diane 206 

Szigeti, Virginia 204 

Szwed, James 104, 124. 173, 273, 362 

Szymariski, Andrew 106, 277, 297 

Talamonti, James R. 27. 258, 362 

Talken, Brother 260 

Tamburrino, Terry 175 

Tansey, William 362 

Tarsitano, Gerry 160 

Tasch, Frank 262, 263 

Tator, Fred 208 

Tate, Vera 362 

Tatooles, Constantine 362 

Tavares, Charles 145 

Tengblad, Joan 140, 186, 275 

Terry, Eleanor 84 

Tharakan, Matthew 88 

Theisen, Herbert 170 

Therell, Gordon 145 

Thomas, William 161 

Thomasita, Sister M., O. S. F. 290 

Thorell, Gordon 144. 145 

Thorn. Richard 154, 155 

Tierney, Margaret 86, 362 

Tijunelis, Veronica 195 

Timperman. Albert 154. 212 

Tischler, Rev. Richard E., S. J. 13, 32 

Tobin. Dr. 81 

Todd, Fred 166 



Tomaszewski, Josephine 142 143, 362 

Tomaszewski, Joseph 172, 173 

Tooker, Monica 126 

Torres, Mary Fran 142 

Toto, Dr. Patrick D. 61, 65 

Trandel, Joan 187, 277, 328 

Trimble, Dr. William 101 

Trocker, Monica 27, l40, Ul, 362 

Trozak. Daniel 172 

Trunimer, Peter 117, 185, 250 

Tucci, Frank 155 

Tucker, T. 160 

Tufo. Robert 159 

Tuohy. Joseph 152 

Turner. Raymond 93 

Two, Joseph 117 

Twomey, Marcella A. 94 

Tyler. Thomas 261 

Udekwu, Fred 156, 157 

Ulmer. Richard 363 

Ulza. Conard 146 

Underdown. James 93 

Urbanowski. Martha L. 91 

Vaccaro. Joan 21, 101, 105, 128, 186, 188 

Vahrenhold. Kenneth 172 

Vaiha, Daniel J. 363 

Valient. Valentine 184 

Valtolina. Gene 162. 163 

Van Ryan, George 363 

Vanriendyk. Ann 149 

Van Weil. Brother 260 

Vaugh, David 206 

Vaugh, Rev. Francis, S. J. 59. 211 

Velligan. Robert J. 144, 363 

Vernero, J. 160 

Vertenten, Jeffrey 277 

Verwey, Gerald 185, 245 

Vidoloff, John 181 

Vieth, Donna 189 

Vieth. Harvey R. 160, 161, 363 

Vigeant, Annette 184 

Villemure, Thomas 242 

Vinci, James D. 363 

Virene. Jeanne L. 363 

Visalli. Frank 144 

Vitullo. Vincent F. 69 

Vlyzni. James 2 59 

Vogt. Thomas 166, 167 

Von Bramer, John 247 

Vondruska. George L. 363 

VonHazmburg. Romulus S., Jr. 364 

Wacker. Kenneth 144. 364 

Waldren. John 301 

Waldron. John J. 16. 18 

Waldron. Thomas 247 

Wagner. M-Sgt. Melvin 44 

Waljeski, Kathleen 204. 207 

Walieski, Sandra 204, 207, 364 

Wall, Robert 109, 121, 128, 137 

Wallenburger, Nancy 265 

Walsh, Robert J, 111, 123, 289 

Walsh, Dennis 184 

Walsh, Lawrence 262 

Walsh, Robert 103, 128, 364 

Walsh, Dr. Robert 125 

Wanat. John 184 

Wandel. Joseph 44 

Warchol. Howard W. 162. 364 

Ward. Anthony 121. 124. 129, 134, 221, 225, 

227. 235. 284 289. 356. 364 
Ward. John 123. 164, 165, 289 
Ward. June 189 
Warlop. Charles D. 364 
Watson. James R. 364 
Wyaman. Robert 172 
Wcislo, Diane 150. 151 
Weislo. Joseph 170 
Weber. Barbara E. 365 
Wehrle, George 172 
Weingart, Alberta 365 
Weisbord, Maxfield 26 



Weisbord, Charles 41 

Weisenberger, John E. 365 

Wcller. Rev. Phillip T. 47 

Welninski. Walter 166. 167, 273 

Wenthe, Ann Marie 279 

Wentz, Dr. Frank 61 

Wentz, George 27, 162, 163 

Wenzel, Virginia 365 

Werner, William 147 

Wesseling, Elizabeth 365 

West, Frank 172 

Westbrook, Belinda 190 

Whalen, Ann 110 

Whalen, Virginia 270 

Wheeler, Matthew 365 

Whitcomb, William L. 144, 365 

White, Henry 254, 255, 257 

White, Ronald U7, 365 

White. Velton 144 

Whitmal. Nate 263 

Whitten. Teresa 365 

Widen. Dr. Bernard 66 

Wieland, Jerome 253, 254 

Wierz. John 176 

Wilczek. Patricia 204 

Wilhelmi, Dion 32, 42 

Wilkie, Frank 176 

Williams, Robert 125 

Wills, Emma Lee 140, 365 

Wilson, Beverly 275 

Winter, Gilbert F. 144, 145, 365 

Wisniewski. Henry 131. 135. 163, 229, 283, 365 

Wisniewski, Peter 134, 135 

Wolfe, Mary Jo 59 

Wolff, Dr. Joseph J. 34, 43 

Wondrasek, Arthur 27, 108, 109, 134 

Wood, Charles 247 

Woods, Earline 91 

Worthjngton, Thomas 215 

Wos, Ronald S. 366 

Woynerowski, Jerome 192 

Wozniak, Dr. John M. 37 

Wrobel, Carol 148, 149 

Wydra, Ralph 162, 163 

Wyroski, Thaddeus 152 

Wyszynski, Walter J. 134, 366 

Yohanna, Genia 366 

Yamaha, Midori 198 

York, Susan 27, 184, 328 

Yourg, Ann 188, 189 

Youtsey, Karl 163, 206, 366 

Zabiake. Eleanor 140. 366 

Zabkar. Rev. Louis V. 47 

Zale, Dorothy 116 

Zaharski. Joan 296 

Zahn. Gordon C. 47 

Zajdel. Dr. Joseph 43 

Zamarin. Ronald 144 

Zapp. Daniel 366 

Zaranka. Pauline 126, 130, 197, 207, 366 

Zaums, Helene M. 366 

Zbylski, F. Martin 206 

Zbylur. Vernon 121 

Zeeman, Sarah 83 

Zeita. John 117, 186 

Zelenika, Walter 366 

Zemans. Walter J. 168, 367 

Zenk, Honore K. 367 

Zercher, Ann 84 

Zielinski, Dennis 144 

Zilttes, Julius 144 

Zilttes, Julius 114 

Zimmerman. Mary Kate 184 

Zimmerman. Mortimer 270 

Zisso. Bettine 174 

Zittler, J. D. 92 

Zvetina. John A. 5 3, 54, 69 

Zwers, Mary Jo 367 

Zwick, Paul 206 

Zylinski, Dr. Eugene 66 



381 



aifor'; 



p^ge 



Considering the magnitude of the task undertaken only 
last September, we, the editors of the 1961 Loyolan wit- 
ness its publication with mixed emotions of pride, relief, 
and satisfaction. We take pride in its appearance, for 
we feel that the book mirrors the activities and functions 
of the University more artistically than ever before; re- 
lief because the anxious moments and long hours of 
labor have finally borne fruit; and satisfaction because 
our plans have materialized into the reality for which 
we have striven. 

But the 1961 Loyolan is not simply the product of the 
editors. Were it not for the ever-present, loyal, and hard 
working staff, the annual would never have reached 
publication. 

The moderator of this annual, Mr. Bernard W. Cullen, 
a quiet and thought-provoking gentleman, is most re- 
sponsible for the many artistic touches throughout the 
book. His assistance in redrawing layouts and sizing 
pictures, and his general fatherly advice are deeply ap- 
preciated by not only the editors, but also the entire 
staff. 

The old standby of the Loyolan, as everyone knows, is 
Rev. Thomas J. Bryant, S.J. Again, without his help 
there would be no Loyolan. With over 1000 photo- 
graphs in this annual. Father Bryant kept himself busy 
not only taking 75Cf of these pictures but also devel- 
oping the same amount. A more dedicated member of 
the staff could not be found. 

An Irish sense of humor which made the many long 
hours far less tedious was provided by our representative 
from Hunter Publishing Company, Bill O'Connor. A 
great share of our debt of gratitude goes to him. 

Dean Harry McCloskey also played a vital inspira- 
tional role in this year's annual. Always ready to assist 
in any capacity, Dean McCloskey has always attested a 
deep interest in the Loyolan. 

Students, too, played a major role in the Loyolan' s 
publication. Because every editor must have an assistant 
to aid in his work, we had ours in the person of 
Mike McConnell. His primary task was to know how 
to do everything involved in the yearbook's production, 
while lacking the title reserved to ourselves. 



Writing copy for an annual is a job no one can truly 
appreciate until he has tried to do it. Making shop- 
worn phrases sound fresh and original was an assign- ■ 
ment awarded to Fred Green. This was done without 
question, but Fred also assisted the editors in many 
varied and multiple manners apart from his specific task. 

Henry Wisniewski scheduled pictures for the year- 
book, a job which demands not only time but also a 
generous amount of patience. Very few thanks and very 
many no's characterize this editorial position on the 
Loyolan. 

Under ail pictures are found captions, some merely 
listing those in the pictures, others hopefully descriptive 
of the particular scenes. Responsibility for the accu- 
racy of the captions lies with Al Busa, who took fiendish 
delight in his task. Fitting names to faces was hard 
work, although titling incidental shots provided us with 
much amusement. 

To the senior editors, Lori Glatt and Alice Farrell, 
goes a large measure of gratitude. They alone know the 
difficulties involved in securing degrees to coincide with 
graduate's pictures and in compiling senior activity sheets 
into a readable whole. 

The sports section was the work of Butch Blau, who 
knows well the members of the athletic department and 
who employed his knowledge of Loyola sports with 
systematic accuracy. 

General business and selling of the Loyolan was 
taken care of by Dick Lucas and Marty Klest, along with 
the DOD's, and a few more Lewis Towers enthusiasts. 
Without their joint effort, all the rest of our work would 
be in vain. 

These above mentioned students include only a small 
part of the staff of the 1961 Loyolan. We wish we could 
thank everyone here in this short space, but that would 
be impossible, so we must limit ourselves to the edi- 
torial staff. For the people who were not mentioned 
never let it enter your mind that your work is not 
appreciated. You also may look with pride on this 
year's Loyolan and truthfully state that you were an in- 
tegral part in its makeup. 



JUDITH KOHNKE. JOSEPH SCULLY Co-Editors 

MICHAEL McCONNELL Assistant Editor 

FREDERICK GREEN Copy Editor 

LORI GLATT, ALICE FARRELL Senior Editors 



BERNARD BLAU Sports Editor 

HENRY WISNIEWSKI Managing Editor 

RICHARD LUCAS, MARTIN KLEST Business Managers 

ALLEN BUSA, JOSEPH OCALLAGHAN Caption Editors 



COPY STAFF 



Bobbi 


Mirek 


Kevin 


Martin 


Linda 


Doman 


James 


Brophy 


Ed Kaleta 


Cecile 


Conrad 


Donna 


Siuda 



SENIOR STAFF 

Mary Lee Cullen 
Eleanor Sigborn 
Sue Collins 
Margie Farrell 



TYPISTS 

Judy Kosloskus 
Mary Ellen Branigan 
Carol Fullam 
Patricia Mulvihill 



PHOTOGRAPHERS 

Steve O'Shaughnessy 
Frank Sulita 
Jim Kilcoyne 



.382 



or^anijafion anJ activity index 



Accounting Club 180 

Alpha Delta Gamma 134 

Alpha Kappa Psi 136 

Alpha Omega 138 

Alpha Sigma Nu 125 

Alpha Tau Delta 140 

Alumnus 220 

American Chemical Society 181 

Arts Council 106 

Association of the U. S. Army 182 

Bellarmine Philosophy Club 183 

Beta Alpha Psi 131 

Big Debate 280 

Blue Key Honor Fraternity 120 

Cadence 222 

Chi Theta Upsilon 142 



Cinema Lecture Series 
Circumference 
Coed Club (LSC) 
Coed Club (LT) 
Commencement 
Commerce Council 
Curtain Guild 



290 
126 
186 
188 
306 
108 
1S>0 



Debate Society 192 

Delaware Hall Council 116 

Delta Sigma Delta 144 

Delta Sigma Pi 146 

Delta Sigma Rho 127 

Delta Zeta Chi 148 

Dental School Council 112 

Economics-Finance Society 193 

Education Society 194 

Enosis 221 

Epsilon Pi Rho 195 

Equestrian Club 196 

European Trip 304 



282 

197 

198 

288 

Freshman Orientation 268 

Gerard Manley Hopkins Society 199 

Glee Club 184 



Fall Frolic 

Fine Arts Club 

Foreign Students Association 

Founders Day 



Historical Society 
Honors Program 
Human Relations Club 

Interfraternity Council 
Intersorority Council 
IFC Greek Week 
ISC Greek Week 



200 

34 

204 

104 
105 

272 
294 



Loyola Hall Council WJ 

Loyola Law Times 233 

Loyola Men 202 

Loyola News 224 

Loyola Union 100 

Loyolan 228 

Loyolan Awards 128 

Loyola Women 203 

Marketing Club 205 

Mathematics Club 206 

Medical School Council Ill 

Modern Language Club 207 

Monogram Club 185 

Nursing Anniversary 270 

Nursing Councils 110 

Phi Alpha Delta . 152 

Phi Beta Pi 154 

Phi Chi 156 

Phi Sigma Tau 130 

Physics Club 208 

Pi Alpha Lambda 158 

Pi Delta Epsilon 235 

Pow-Wow and Homecoming 284 

Psi Omega 160 

Psychological Research Society 209 

"Recent Decisions" 232 

R.O.T.C - 276 

Saint Apollonia Guild 211 

Saint Luke's Guild 212 

Sigma Delta Phi 162 

Sigma Lambda Beta 164 

Sigma Pi 166 

Sigma Pi Alpha 168 

Ski Weekend 292 

Social Work Council 114 

Society for Advancement of Management 210 

Stebler Hall Council 116 

Student American Dental Association 213 

Student American Medical Association 214 

Student Bar Association 113 

Tau Delta Phi 1^0 

Tau Kappa Epsilon I'* 

Theta Phi Alpha 174 

TV Comes to Loyola 281 

Vndergrad ^ 

University College Council 115 

Variety Show ^98 

Veterans Club ^ ■' 

Wasmann Biological Society 216 

Who's Who Among Students 122 



Kappa Beta Gamma 150 



Xi Psi Phi 



176 



383 



Mary Lee Cullen, editor of the 
photography index; and Kevin 
Martin, of the copy writing staff, 
work on their respective tasks as 
the deadline for the 1961 Loyolan 
swiftly approaches. 




epilogue from t(ie modevAtovs 



We first extend sincerest apologies to our students, 
faculty, administrators, and public for our errors of omis- 
sion or commission. If we left your picture out, mis- 
spelled your name, or incorrectly described your activity, 
we did it unintentionally. 

From our printer, the Hunter Publishing Company, 
especially }im Hunter, we received understanding, co- 
operation, and excellent assistance. The S. K. Smith 
Company made our covers. Their representative Mr. 
Richard Dwyer, was most helpful. 

A few words about our photographers — the book is 
chiefly their work. Mr. Austen Field did the portraits 
of most of the graduating coeds and some of the ad- 
ministrators. The Marshall Studio, and especially Mr. 
Anthony Communale, photographed most of the men 
graduates and some of the faculty members. Jim. Kil- 
coyne took many of the group pictures and incidentals. 
Steve O'Shaughnessy , our favorite student photographer, 
is responsible for about 1 50 of the better pictures in the 
book. A very special thanks is due to Kev. Robert Kopek, 
S.J., who prepared the entire section on West Baden 
College. Picture credits are due to the Marshall Field 
Enterprises and the Chicago Tribune. 

The innovation of artwork was made possible chiefly 
through the efforts of Ralph Vati Dyke, one of the best 
artists in the area. His talent for bringing the ideas of 
the staff into the reality of a yearbook is one which is 
found in very few people. 

To the officials of the Illinois Catholic Women's Club 
we owe immense thanks for their kindness in letting us 
use club facilities for many of the Lewis Towers pic- 
tures. The various deans aided us in a similar way. We 
received much needed assistance from the various secre- 
taries in arranging for the pictures — especially Miss Ellen 



Nomura of the Dental School; Miss Eugenia Kri bales of 
the Law School; and Miss Virginia O'Rourke of the 
School of Social Work. 

Finally, to our co-editors, Joseph Scully and Judith 
Kohnke, we extend thanks and congratulations for a 
very efficient job. The 1961 Loyolan will speak for their 
talents and efforts. 

Bernard W. Cullen 

Rev. Thomas J. Bryant, S.J. 



Steve O'Shaughnessy, the finest student photographer at Loyola, 
prepares to shoot one of his many pictures for the '61 Loyolan. 





t^i,^ 



5^ 






LOYOLMT 

V.25 

1961