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Full text of "The Loyolan"

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lOy o laUniversiTy 

Chicago , Illinois 



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Contents 



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Time and tide, it is said, wait for no man. And the 
Loyola tide, like the chameleon-hued lake that is 
the University's mirror, relentlessly surges on. We 
ourselves barely stop to note the changes time brings 
or the memorials of the past it has preserved for 
us: old and new stand together in serene equality, 
while the rhythmic splashing of todays carries in 
the dreams, the plans and the programs of which 
tomorrow is made. 





Crashing, smashing, raising, building — All sum- 
mer long, there gradually arose a new building. A 
new center, a new place for students to come together. 
Joined to the old Lewis Towers building by a passage- 
way christened the "umbilical cord," the new Uni- 
versity Center symbolized the constant change, the 
constant striving for excellence in all things which 
must characterize every vital, dynamic organization. 
Not a culmination, but only a beginning, the new 
University Center portrays the "get ahead" atmos- 
phere permeating the University's future. 




Among the new features embodied in the new 
University Center is a bookstore where the students 
can actually see the books they're buying. Again, 
the center doesn't give the impression of an Army 
PX, with a rather harried supply sergeant passing 
out ill-fitting uniforms and surplus weapons. There 
is sort of a refreshing atmosphere in the new store, 
one which almost (almost, but not quite) makes 
the student willing to bleed out his summer long 
accumulation of cash for books. 




Perhaps even more noticeable, however, is the 
cafeteria. Long accustomed to cold sandwiches and 
burned hot-dogs, LT students were for quite a while 
unwilling to believe that those hot lunches were 
really food, and not a mirage brought about by 
gradual starvation. The only danger, of course, was 
the fact that students, now being able to obtain good 
food at a reasonable price, might begin to conduct 
their own expansion program, resulting in a 
tremendous inflation which will probably prove a 
boon to the clothing industry. 




But the greatest improvement, beyond any doubt, 
is the new lounge. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors, 
astounded by the brilliance of electric lights that 
worked, emerged blinking from their first encounter. 
It took most of them more than a month to accustom 
themselves to coming to school without their gas 
masks, and more than rwo to leave home their hip- 
boots. Despite the loss of card-playing privileges, the 
gift of fresh air was one so unexpected and so 
appreciated, that the change has to be regarded as 
one eminently fair. 





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Dr. Edward O. Willoughby of Hines 
conducts a staff meeting, essential to 
the advancement of residents in their 
practical duties. 



Governor Otto J. Kerner commends 
federal and state agencies and Loyo- 
la University for their close co-opera- 
tion in this new venture. 




In the shadow of the Hines Veterans Adminis- 
tration Hospital and the State of Illinois mental health 
hospital clinic which will open in three years, a 
dream is focusing itself into reality: a dream of 
expanded medical facilities, , so far expanded as to 
prove a most valuable contribution to the health of 
the city, and, in the long run, the world. 

The new Medical Center planned by Loyola will 
embody the four-century old academic tradition of 
the Society of Jesus, nearly half-a-century of medical 
and research activities in Chicago, and the care of 
the sick in a privately-supported University hospital. 




mmmm 




Loyola meets with representatives of 
the Veterans Administration, medi- 
cal organizations, State of Illinois 
Mental Health Program and com- 
munity leaders to discuss plans for 
the proposed Medical Center. 



The future (above left) of medical education at Loyola — repre- 
sented by an artist's conception of the 300-bed hospital to be built 
on the newly acquired 61-acre site in suburban Maywood — is antici- 
pated by the present (below left) Medical School officials at a 
benefit dinner for the Medical Expansion Program. 




11 



LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 

'63 ABROAD 

f SUMMER 
iV STUDIES 




Loyola may expand with the passage of time, 
but it also expands in space. By this, of course, is 
meant the tours sponsored by the Institute of 
Foreign Studies. Summer tours, combined with 
academic programs, were conducted in Mexico, 
Peru, Europe and Japan last year, along with the 
more establisHecf Rome center for study during 
the academic year. <.<i|HI< I'M \< I 

Under the direction of the Rev. John Felice, 
S.J., these foreign study-tours are developing as 
one of the key factors in the rise of an urban 
university into an internationally-known one. 



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Bettine Zizzo photographs Mexican water beetles in 
genetic research program. 





Summer brings an air of informality to the physics laboratory. 




Philosophy absorbs Dr. Catania and some of 
his students in a post-class discussion. 



To most Loyola students, the last days of May 
symbolize a release of sorts, a time for a change of 
scenery. The physical plant of Loyola, however, re- 
mains behind, though somehow strangely changed. 
There seems to be a musty informality spreading 
through the halls and seeping into the short-sleeved 
classrooms, and their sense of informality sometimes 
more closely approximates the true feeling of Uni- 
versity life than is ever apparent during the "regular" 
school year. Taken all together, summer days at 
Loyola are a lesson in sweat, study, and camaraderie. 



Parasitology calls for a group effort by 
Stan Matusik, Marilyn Samis, and Marilyn 
Link. 

17 




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Rev. James J. Mertz, S.J. and Mr. and Mrs. 
Norbert McDonough enjoy an informal 
lunch. 



Very Rev. James F. Maguire S.J. 
cuts the Alumni cake for two 03 
grads. 



"Home is the sailor, home from the sea." 
And home, too, were the Loyola alumni, as 
the first annual Alumni Day was held on 
June 9 and the surrounding weekend. Home, 
too, were all those memories of times gone 
by, grateful remembrances of too-long for- 
gotten friendships, and, most of all, a sense 
of communion with the past. 






Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S.J. accepts a watch 
from those responsible for Alumni Day, represented 
by Fred Sexto, Winifred O'TooIe, and Norton O'Meara. 



Alumni find Dumbach Hall un- 
changed. 



18 



Flying by on "bright clouds of music," 
summer dances are passports to a land of the 
sublime, a sort of unreal existence where 
the only thoughts are dreams, the only la- 
bors are those of love, and the girl on your 
arm is the most beautiful one in the world. 



Cha cha cha . . . Maureen . . . cha cha cha . . . 
Gannon . . . cha cha cha . . . Marty . . . cha cha 
cha ... Melody. 





Having a "Summer Ball" are, left to right: 
Terry Robinson, Jane Welsh, Sandy Las- 
kowski, Frank Sulita, Bill Clune, Connie 
Stemberk. 




Marian Welsh asks Gus 
Caporusso, "Are you sure 
this is a "Bossa Nova'?" 



19 



Bonita Miller exemplifies the backbone of 
collegiate bureaucracy . . . the secretary. 




The "luxury" of the working 
class . . . salesgirl-model Carol En- 
nis ( right ) . 



"Lift that barge, tote that bale." Summertime is 
the boon of the student and the bane of the em- 
ployer, as thousands of job-hungry Loyola students 
descend upon the shops, the factories and the streets 
of Chicago, ruthlessly unstabilizing the economy and 
padding their burgeoning little bank accounts. 




The grounds must be kept in repair; foreign 
student Kamaal Kahzen helps during the 
Summer. 











.•*!*-^:. 



52^ 





Father Louis Zabkar, S.J., a famed Egyptologist, spent the 
majority of last summer in the realms of his specialty. {Left) 
At the end of the summer's work. Father traveled in the Sudan 
to a village festival. (Above) Later, Father Zabkar looked 
again . . . perhaps for the last time ... at the historic Abu 
Simbul temple which will soon be a part of a monument to the 
future, the Aswan Dam. 



20 




Rev. Charles Rust, S.J. prepares to usher a group of art lovers on Loyola's latest "fly by night" journey. 




Isabel Lombardo and Betty Thacker do not seem 
as impressed by the uniformed Horse Guardsman 
in London as the Londoner at the far right seems 
with them. 



Cameras click quickly as Loyola students 
capture the beauty of another European 
city. 




Summer is a time for seeing and learning, for 
seeking and finding, the time to "enjoy, 
enjoy." 



21 



The glitter of the footlights knows no seasons: 
the summer months, too, demand their share of the 
wit, the poetry, the warm-hearted humor of theatre, 
bringing enjoyment to those on both sides of the 
boards — whether in a professional tent theatre or 
in Loyola's drama workshop. 




The cast of Shaw's Man and Superman takes a 
curtain call with a typical Victorian pose; John 
Potye, Lee Faust, Toni Kosinski, Mary Fran Cog- 
ger, Maureen Doherty, Jim Fabian, Barb Phil- 
lips, Adam Lutynski, Ronn Toebaas, Ron Cincinelli. 



All eyes are on Adam Lutynski in a tense scene from MacLeish's This Mu- 
sic Crept by Me upon the Waters. Cast (I to r) : Mardee Sheen, Ron 
Cincinelli, Larry McCauIey, JoAnn Henner, (and r to I) : Lutynski, Dick 
Bandera, Lucy Redmon, Nancy Pruneau (seated), Judy Moberly and Ronn 
Toebaas. 



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Newlyweds John Marquette and 
JoAnn Henner are in a giddy 
mood in this scene from The 
Fourposter. 






Sitting on a stool ((all stage managers sit on stools), 
Mike Kelly holds the script of Thornton Wilder's 
Pullman Car Hiawatha for Lee Faust, Lucy Redmon, 
and Ron Toebaas. 




Anne Brandt visits Pullman car passengers Paul Barrett, Sandy 
Weinstein, Cecile Conrad, Glen Phillips, and Sandy Weaver. 



"So this is Stebler!" Sue Trimble 
pauses to admire her new home. 



The first, no matter what it is, is always 
memorable. The first love, the first heart- 
break, the first day on a job, all these leave 
lasting impressions. One of the "firsts" 
which nearly all Loyola students have in 
common is Welcome Week, formerly call- 
ed Orientation Week. For most of us, it was 
the first contact with the institution which 
was to be one of the focal points of our 
existence for four long, sometimes overlong, 
years. 

Most of the speeches may now be forgot- 
ten, most of the advice may never be re- 
membered again, all of the pain of filling 
out registration forms may be subdued by 
anesthetic time; but the single lingering 
memory of the first confrontation with an 
(dma mater, an "other mother," can never 
be forgotten. 




Ten shirts, two suits and 2000 cigars-that should do it. 





Frosh get all the luck: free books! 

No, it's not a basket- 
ball game; it's regis- 
tration day. 





What freshman doesn't want sunshine on a 
picnic. 



"Who says we can't dance in the parking lot?" 



Father Murray, S.J.: "And now a word from our 
sponsor." 



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First college dance gets freshmen started 
on the right social foot. 





Albert Cardinal Meyer blesses the University Center at the Union Dedication ceremony. 



26 




The first giant step in Loyola University's 
expansion plans was taken on September 22, 
1962, as Albert Cardinal Meyer officiated at 
the dedication of the new University Center. 
The result of more than a year of construc- 
tion, this new Union will play a key part 
in improving the image of Loyola, as well 
as in providing much needed classroom 
space. 

Replete with two cafeterias, a student 
lounge, a faculty lounge and several seminar 
rooms, the new University Center offers the 
students, faculty and administration of Lewis 
Towers modern facilities to implement their 
various activities. 



Father Maguire slices a cake molded 
in the form of the new University 
Center. 




Charles C. Kerwin con- 
gratulates the University. 



Representatives from the Jesuit 
colleges of America gather before 
the mural of Jesuit education. 




To Theta Phi Alpha Greek Week is 
a time to build the sorority "image." 




Taking advantage of early October's fine 
weather, the annual Loyola Greek Week, 
sponsored by the Inter-fraternity Council, 
provides students with a glimpse at the role 
fraternities play in Loyola's social and athle- 
tic life. Making use of convocation, discus- 
sion and a revival of the ancient Greek 
Olympiad, Greek Week starts off the year 
by keeping alive the tradition of fraterna- 
lism at Loyola. 



Athletic events are one of the 
high points of Greek Week activ- 
ties. 




Two thousand four hundred and fifty-two years have passed since the battle of Marathon, but Greeks are still running in honor of it. 





Delta Zeta Chi's abstract pixies lampoon fraternities: 
Pam Mocarski, Be«y Dominic, Sue McDonald, Mary 
Kent. 



Alpha Delt charioteers get their sec- 
ond wind after a foray to Mundelein. 




29 



Above: The Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S. J., with Civic Award winners John J. Sheinin, 
M.D.; John F. Smith.; Fairfax M. Cone; Franklin J. Lunding; C. Virgil Martin; Mrs. Edison 
Dick; Stuart List; Douglas F. Van Bramer. Below. Student Medallion recipients were 
{standing) James Janotta, Anne Simons, John Puljung, Juliana Fish, Stephen Gilmour; 
(seated) Joseph Wcislo, John Lewis, Nancy Sheahan, Charles Murdock, James Rasmusson. 




Heralding the end of the fall season at 
Loyola is the tri-partite celebration known 
as Founders Day. In keeping with the ideal 
of service upon which it was founded, Loyo- 
la annually renews this dedication on Found- 
ers Day by awarding citations to those alxim- 
ni and faculty outstanding for their service 
to the city, state and nation. At an after- 
noon convocation student medallions, signi- 
fying service to the school, are also present- 
ed to members of each of the University's 
nine colleges. Capping the day is the Presi- 
dent's Ball, held in honor of the student 
leaders of the University. 




Fr. Mulligan presents a Founder's Day a- 
ward to senior nursing student Julie Fish. 



COLONEL CHARLES J. MURPHY 

Chaplain, Fifth U. S. Army 

Founder's Day Address 





Student Presidents Committee. Standing: James Reilly Maurice McCar- 
thy, John Sullivan, Nancy Sheahan, Robert Constable, Joseph Wcislo, 
Michael Sullivan. Seated: Edward Montgomery, Suzanne Dupre, Very 
Rev. James F. Maguire, S.J., Darlene O'Brochta, John Puljung. 



31 




"Miss Loyola" candidates. Standing: Pat Topping, Nancy Pru- 
neau, Bonnie Bertaux, Sheila Walsh, Diane Wcislo. Seated: 
Camille Savage, Darlene O'Brochta, Connie Sowa. On the floor: 
Margie Stacy, Eddy Krol. 



November's national elections were only an inci- 
dental to the main electoral attraction here: the 
annual Miss Loyola contest. Ten candidates (and 
their managers) swept through four weeks of hand- 
bills and handshakes at the University's undergrad- 
uate and professional school campuses, then held 
their breath until the results of the balloting re- 
vealed the winner to be Eddy Krol, candidate of 
Loyola Hall. The new queen was enthroned, with 
appropriate pageantry, at the Union-sponsored Fall 
Frolic. 



Edwina Krol, Miss Loyola 
1962-63. 




32 




The Miss Loyola Court, shown here 
on a Pow-Wow float, was composed 
of Bonnie Bertaux, Margie Stacy and 
Camille Savage. 



Edwina Krol, Miss Loyola of 1962-63, dances 
with her escort Paul Stewart at the Fall Frolic. 




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A judiciously dropped match, and 
the Pow-Wow bonfire becomes a 
reality. 



Some of the team and the cheerleaders pose before the Pow-Wow bonfire. Standing: Paul 
Robertson, Dan Connaughton, Ron Miller, Jerry Harkness, John Egan, Les Hunter, Chuck 
Wood. Cheerleaders Kneeling: Sue Williams, Candy Oliver, Kathy Carey, Kathy Ireland, 
Marilyn Norek, Noreen Raia. 




34 



Exuberant cheerleaders wave happily 
while Les Hunter's roommate and 
other Arts Council members somberly 
consider political overtones. 





Loyola Hall chose a Lil' Abner theme 
for its prize-winning house decorations. 




There is nothing more exciting than a carnival for 
every girl and boy up to the age of 95, and perhaps 
even beyond that. While Loyola does not really have 
an annual carnival, it does have the next best thing — 
an annual Pow-Wovif Weekend. Signifying the begin- 
ning of the basketball season, Pow-Wow is a com- 
bination of many things — a float parade, a jazz festi- 
val, a dance, a homecoming, and, coincidently, a 
basketball game. 

Pow-Wow is perhaps the one time in the year 
when the "collegiate fever" takes hold on both cam- 
puses as decorations come flying out of nowhere, 
bonfires start up in a blaze of warm conviviality, 
and all those carping comments about a commuter 
mentality are, if not forgotten, at least less remember- 
ed. 



35 





Sharon McArdle and Jay Rotello will tell you 
that three legs are better than four — that is, 
for winning the three-legged race. 



A new face made its appearance in the Union 
during Pow-Wow. 




The New Wine Singers added their own unique 
style of folk singing to the Pow-Wow festivities. 



36 




The Theme: Cartoon Characters Come to Loyola. The Float: Cinderella, 
by Tau Kappa Epsilon. The Prize: First. 




A full repast refreshes Pow-Wow revelers. 




Dennis Slepak brought his 
poles but forgot his skis. 





Bettine Zizzo shows the safe way 
to use skis — she carries them. 



"Some come here to ski and keep fit; 
I have come here this scarf to knit." 



Lou Bouguennec, Dennis Slepak, Jo Ellen Tomsic (Kneeling), Nancy Sheahan, Mary Riley, 
and a ski instructor display their creative ability in an impromptu fashion show. 




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The annual mid-winter madness settled on 
Loyola students again this year, as a covey of 
maroon and gold snowbirds descended upon the 
glistening white slopes of Arapaho, Colorado, 
with skis, ski goggles and splints. Slipping, slid- 
ing, tripping and otherwise transporting them- 
selves downward, Loyola students proved once 
again that raw courage is not diminished by a 
liberal education. Headed by Assistant Dean of 
Students George Kollintzas, Loyola's contingent 
of crystal cut-ups kept alive a tradition of reck- 
less carnage and just plain fun as they si>ent 
their semester break on the annual Ski-Week. 





"And my group had 25 per cent fewer fractures with Brand X." 



George Kollintzas: 
as splints?" 



"Can skis be used 



Lou Bouguennec seems completely una- 
ware of what the sign above the door says. 




39 




Monica Gilmore, Margaret Benson, and 
Diane Wcislo of Kappa Beta Gamma at- 
tend inter-sorority publicity booth in 
Xavier grill. 




Judy Ivins, Alice Kutas, Susan Di Masi, and Karen Torme (far 
right) display Chi Theta Upsilon's scrap book and trophies 
to prospective rushees Nancy Gracyk, Candy Oliver, Sue Wil- 
liams, Madge Hartnett, and Peggy McCarthy. 




Bettine Zizzo (second from 
right). Miss Sorority of 1963, 
grins as she is congratulated 
by Barbara Chorvat, Georgia 
McNamara, Bobbi Lenz, Kar- 
olyn Brannon, Celeste Renier, 
and Sandy Domes. 



Peggy McCarthy, Kitty Mac- 
ken, Kathy O'Keefe, Bobbi 
Lenz, Sandy Domes, Joan 
Liscarz, Pam Mocarski, Mar- 
ge Billings, and Kathy Swie- 
ton serenade an apprecia- 
tive group of Sigma Delts. 






The girls of Kappa Beta Gamma, wearing 
their striking white blazers, eagerly await the 
arrival of their prospective pledges. 

Bill Gardiner draws his date from a 
box as amused Inter-Sorority Council 
president Darlene O'Brochta awaits 
the results. 



The second semester is traditionally the time when 
the female element of Loyola becomes involved in 
an annual round of partying, playing, and pledging, 
all contained under the rather conservative title of 
the Intersorority Greek Week. The ISC Greek Week, 
however, does much more than merely provide a 
party atmosphere. It demonstrates the essential 
character which sorority activities imprint upon the 
spirit of the University. 

This year, the activities carried on during Greek 
Week included a splash party, a taffy apple sale, a 
"Miss Sorority" mixer, a raffle (a date with Bill 
Gardiner was the "prize".' ) and an "Open House" 
held at the St. Clair Hotel. 




The members of Delta Zeta Chi exhibit 
the trophies they won in the past year to the 
prospective pledges. 




The praises of Alpha 
Tau Delta are sound- 
ed by Mary Miller 
and Julianna Fish 
while they display 
their sorority sweat 
shirt. 




Wasmann's poker-playing bureaucrats are also prize-winning per- 
formers, as evidenced by their Best Group Act trophy. 




Striking a Judy Garland pose, Bar- 
bara Gongol exhibits the talent which 
won her the Best Individual Act 
trophy. 



Dress rehearsal finds Director Kutza and Choreographer Nicholson 
calling for "just one more" run-through. 




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Variety Show staff: (standing) Den- 
nis Dernbach, Assistant Producer; 
Michael J. Kutza, Director; (Seated) 
John Van Bramer, Producer; Midge 
Schalke, Secretary. 



Swirling out in a red, white and blue, apple- 
pie eating, home and mother loving explosion, 
this year's Variety Show proved to be one of 
the most exciting, if not aesthetically perfect, 
events on campus. Revelling in the pure 
patriotic joy of living in a great country, 
but recognizing the fact that there are things 
to be laughed at in that country, the main 
theme of the Variety Show demonstrated itself 
in an exuberant acceptance of the good things 
of life and a healthy sense of humor 
in pointing out those conditions not so desir- 
able. 




Cigarette girl Bettine Zizzo provides a pleasant 
distraction from stage action. 




Winners of the IGGY and Audience Favorite trophies 
were the hearty and humorous Society Three: Lyie 
Rausch, Alan Kaplan and Jim Parker. 



43 




What could be more American than a Hollywood starlet and her director? Jackie 
Marski and Al Kaplan take the featured roles in the show's finale. 




Delaware's Mary Kay Kapetanovic pre- 
sents the "Great Losers" trophy. 




Three members of the Glee Club sing out in 
favor of "Flag Waving." 



The girls of Delaware Hall prove that, in spite of 
their clowning, they are "Oh so pretty." 






Jack Carollo and Dennis Szymczak prove 
it's a spherical land mass. 



Jim Dorn leads a band of hostile Sigma Delts- 
er, Indians — to greet Columbus. 




Bob Kolek extols the superhuman virtues of Adlai Stevenson before Alpha Kappa Psi's "Mr. President" and his cabinet. 



45 




Jo Ellen Tomsic threatens to destroy the mood by tickling Bob Mataya 
with her long black plume. 




The Readers Circle presents a new and modern version 
of Shakespeare's immortal Hamlet. 



46 



The switchboard operators of Theta 
Phi Alpha connect the audience to 
life in the 30's. 





Hyperbole, King of the Verbs, speaks to his 
subjects in the Curtain Guild's presentation of 
"Dramatica Grammatica." 




The Nursing Council pays a satirical tribute to the 
hotels of Las Vegas. 



Sue Oakes is held in high esteem by 
the cast of the first act finale. 

47 





Jack McCarthy, as Senator Ted Kennedy, clowns it up in A, K, Psi's version of "Mr. 
President." 



"It's Mutiny, Chris!" cries King Ferdinand to admiral Columbus in Sigma Delta Phi's 
spoof "Round, Round World." 





The academic life of a university, like the breath of a 
human being, generally draws little attention to itself despite 
its indispensability. The exception at Loyola is the annual 
lecture series, which this year provided many well-known 
speakers and emphasized man's religious beliefs in the light of 
the Ecumenical Council. 



LECTURE SERIES— Dr. Schmandt 
outlined the history of the Ecumenical 
Councils. 



DR. REGINALD HORACE FULLER 
offered "an Anglican's view of Roman 
Catholicism and the Council." 





REV. J. J. KILGALLON lectured on 
probable liturgical decrees of the 
Council. 



REV. JOHN HONDRAS'S topic was 
the Greek-Orthodox view of Roman 
Catholicism and the Council. 




RABBI DAVID POLISH gave "a 
Rabbi Looks at Roman Catholicism 
and the Vatican Council." 




i 



49 




By virtue of the immortal 60-58 overtime victory over the 
University of Cincinnati, Loyola's Ramblers swept to the 
1963 NCAA championship. But the road wasn't easy. After 
setting an NCAA single-game scoring record against a badly 
outmatched Tennessee Tech, the Ramblers faced and con- 
quered four of the top ten teams in the country: Mississippi 
State, #7; Illinois, #5, Duke,#2; and top-ranked Cincinnati. 

After disposing of Tennessee Tech 111-42, the Ramblers 
took on Mississippi State. The Bulldogs, having gone through 
the trouble of dodging a court order prohibiting play with 
integrated teams, found more trouble at East Lansing and fell, 
61-51. 

Next came Illinois, for the unofficial championship of the 
state. Big Ten championship and all, the Illini were stomped 
79-64 as Ail-American Jerry Harkness tossed in 33 points. The 
Ramblers had taken the Mid-East Regional. 

Moving on to Louisville, LU took on the nation's then- 
regarded second-ranked team, Duke. The Blue Devils had All- 
American Art Heyman and Jeff Mullins as well, but the 
Ramblers proved that two players could not beat a true team 
and won 94-75 going away . . . 



50 




. And then there was a lad named Victor Rouse. 




Joy reigns in the north parking lot as a 
Cincinnati bearcat is burned. 




It was all over except the shouting — but oh that 
shouting! Once the Ramblers' NCAA title had been 
won, the most logical thing to do seemed to be to 
tell the world about it. Never ones to take half-w^ay 
measures, the Loyola students bent to their task with 
a will. Dogs barked, women fainted, and strong men 
wept as the cavalcade of shouting, leaping students 
filled the night air with their cries. 

Sunday's dawn, for those who remained awake to 
see it, was more rosy-fingered than usual. The 
Ramblers really had won — the morning newspapers 
said so — and they were coming home. That noon 
an unbelievably long and loud motorcade escorted 
the team from the airport back to the campus (who 
said being a city school doesn't have its advantages? ) , 
and out of the impromptu victory celebration which 
followed arose a cheer which will echo around 
campus for years: WE'RE LOYOLA, WE'RE NUM- 
BER ONE. 

The following week saw a civic parade, a Loyola 
News extra, a student mixer/pep rally and countless 
lunchtime discussions devoted to the Ramblers; but 
who could forget that first mad moment of triumph 
as all of Loyola Hall poured out onto Sheridan Road.' 



With energy and enthusiasm to 
spare, these merrymakers con- 
gregate between Stebler and 
Chamberlain Halls and prepare 
to trumpet the Loyola victory 
cry throughout all of Rogers 
Park. 




52 




The Ramblers show their tro- 
phy to some of the 2,000 stu- 
dents greeting the team at ^ 
O'Hare airport. 




NCAA SPECIAL 



-y 




A raid on the rockgarden 
by some midnight maraud- 
ers is the cause of this pleas- 
ant sight. 






We're home. 



Deep within the dimly lit cellar of the Madwoman of Chaillot the Ragpicker has been 
elected to defend the "hucksters" of the world, who are on trial for lives. 




Half of Take Me Along's happy ending is 
provided by Mary O'Gallagher and Lee 
Brady, who overcome great obstacles 
before meeting in this bashful kiss. 




\ 




Denny Sherman, a most dignified villain, approaches 
the Madwomen of Paris: Jo Ellen Tomsic, Mary Fran 
Cogger, Sandra Weaver, and Mary Pat Shelley. 



A tense moment enacted by JoAnn Henner, Bob Carney, 
and Ronald Toebaas forgets the Holiday spirit. 




lift^ 



Take Me Along's curtain line for its chorus line 
is "and some ladies with a liberal point of view." 




Life may be a poor player who frets and struts 
his hour upon the stage, but the Curtain Guild 
believes in making that hour at least a bit more 
enjoyable, a bit more amusing, a bit happier. The 
representatives of human action as seen from the 
comic point of view, but with a definite message 
to communicate, keynoted the majority of the 
Guild's productions this year. The Madwoman 
of Chailiot, Holiday, and Take Me Along all in- 
jected this needed humor into the University 
scene, while Richard III recalled the magnificence 
of the talent of the past, and the enduring heri- 
tage which the theater passes on to its patrons. 



The toast of Holiday is the "mad quartet" 
of the playroom: Bob Carney, Judy Papp, 
Mary Fran Cogger, and Rudy Schmitz. 




The best is yet to be, 

The last of life, for which the first was made. 

These words of Browning may perhaps best sym- 
bolize that one moment of fruition for the University 
student, the one moment for which he has undergone 
seemingly unbearable tortures, for which he has 
nearly segregated himself from the world for four 
years, for which he has passed up the overwhelming 
temptation of the easy job at good pay. That moment 
is his moment of graduation. Commencement it is 
called, and to commence means to begin. And so, even 
if there seems to be a finality about the ceremony, 
an ending, there is also a beginning. A beginning to 
use the background obtained in education to fit him, 
not for a job in life, but rather for the job of life. 

A beginning and an end, a starting and a stopping, 
all contained in the brief moment when one hand 
passes over a printed piece of parchment to another. 



56 





The final act of a Loyolan's career is the reception of a degree from the Very Reverend 
James F. Maguire, S. J. 



Massed faculty and guests witness graduation exercises at McCormick Place — Loyola's 
launching pad. 





^dmtntstratian 






THE PRESIDENT 



VERY REV. JAMES F. MAGUIRE, SJ. 
President 



The Very Reverend James F. Maguire, S.J. has served as 
rector or president of institutions of higher learning for more 
than 22 years. Prior to assuming his position at Loyola, he 
was president of Xavier University and rector of West Baden 
College. Since his appointment in 1955, Father Maguire has 
been responsible for the "Horizons for the Centuries" develop- 
ment program, which aims to provide more educational, social, 
and communal services for Chicago. During Father Maguire's 
tenure, he has also instituted the Businessmen of Loyola, the 
Board of Lay Trustees, Women's Board, the Citizen's Board, 
and the Alumni Advisory Council. He has also encouraged and 
supported the work of both PAL and SAL. Other innovations 
include a new University Center and a program of studies in 
Rome. 



60 




THE VICE-PRESIDENTS 



A variety of interests and duties keeps 
ROBERT W. MULLIGAN, S.J., VICE-PRES- 
IDENT AND DEAN OF FACULTIES, busy. 
He works at improving faculty-administra- 
tion relations, has also been instrumental in 
extending and improving the Loyola semi- 
nar series. Former chairman of the philoso- 
phy department, he is editor of Dialogue 
and president of Phi Sigma Tau, national 
philosophy honor society. 




\ \ 



^irf 



W. DANIEL CONROYD, VICE-PRESI- 
DENT FOR DEVELOPMENT AND PUBUC 
RELATIONS, is the man most responsible for 
keeping the image of the "new Loyola" before 
the public eye. Previously an administrative as- 
sistant, he now directs Loyola's fund-raising 
programs, alumni affairs and public relations 
activities. 





The financial aspects of ad- 
ministering Loyola University 
are in the care of THOMAS 
F. HAWKINS, VICE-PRESI- 
DENT AND BUSINESS MAN- 
AGER since 1956. His responsi- 
bilities include supervising the 
activities relating to accounting, 
purchasing, personnel adminis- 
tration, maintenance and con- 
struction, long-range planning 
and other business and finance 
areas. 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



The actual governing body of Loyola University is com- 
posed of the Jesuit Fathers who make up the Board of Trus- 
tees. Under the general chairmanship of the University Presi- 
dent, the Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S.J., the Board is the 



principle policy formulator and the source of authority for 
all the various administration agenda in the University and 
acts as the singly most important agency of the University. 



Left to Right: Rev. Stewart E. Dollard, S.J.. Rev. Felix P. Biestek, S.J., Rev. Laurence 

Henderson, S.J., Rev. Franklin C. Fischer, S.J., Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S.J., Rev. 

Robert W. Mulligan, S.J., Rev. Joseph S. Pendergast, S.J., Rev. John W. Bieri, S.J., Rev. 
John A. McEvoy, S.J. 




THE ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL 



One of the principle sources of advice for the University 
President on matters of academic and administrative policy, 
the Administrative Council is composed of the University's 
Vice-Presidents, Deans, and Administrative personnel. 



Among its other functions, the Administrative Gjuncil 
integrates the various schools and colleges of the University, 
sets up admission procedures, and determines the tuition struc- 
ture, besides supervising production of the University catalog. 



Standing: Harry L. McCloskey, W. Daniel Conroyd, Rev. Hugh B. Rodman, S.J., John 
C. Fitzgerald, Matthew H. Schoenbaum, James C. Cox, Rev. Joseph S. Pendergast, S.J., 
J. Raymond Sheriff, John C. Hayes, Dr. William P. Schoen. Seated: Elizabeth A. McCann, 
Gladys Kiniery, Rev. Roben W. Mulligan, S.J., Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S.J., Rev. 
Stewart E. Dollard, S.J. 




63 



THE BOARD 

OF 

LAY TRUSTEES 



The President of the University, involved as he 
so often is with problems outside the realm of 
strictly academic procedure, often finds it helpful 
to have a storehouse of practical knowledge to 
fall back upon when faced with such a problem. 
To supply this necessary storehouse, the Board 
of Lay Trustees came into existence. Specifically, 
the Board advises the President on matters relat- 
ing to education, campus planning, public rela- 
tions, and finance. 





Cushman B. Bissell 




James O. Burke 




William Roy Carney 




Walter J. Cummings 




John D. deButts 



Charles C. Kerwin 
Chairman 



64 



Louis H. G. 
Bouscaren 




Edward A. Cudahy 




Walter J. 
Cummings, Jr. 




Querin P. Dorschel 



W^^ 

%^*^ ^ 

jy 



Hon. Augustine J. 
Bowe 




Dr. James J. 
Callahan 




Michael Cudahy 




Thomas A. Dean 




Frederick M. Gillies 



dN 



Joseph E. Guilbault 














Matthew J 
Hickey. Jr. 



Charles M. Hines Patrick H. Hoy Samuel Insull, Jr. 







Owen Barton Jones Robert E. Joyce Arthur Keating Charles H. Kellstadt Weymouth Kirkland 







^>w» 




■m 




Sidney R. Korshak Arthur T. Leonard John L. McCaffrey Joseph E. Merrion 









Joseph D. Murphy John F. O'Keefe William J. Quinn William J. Sinek John F. Smith, Jr. 



Bolton Sullivan Richard L. Terrell 



T. M. Thompson 



65 



THE WOMEN'S BOARD 



Loyola University proudly includes the Wo- 
men's Board in its circle of friends. 

Four times a year, luncheons are held to ad- 
vance the three-fold aims of the Board: to con- 
tribute to the intellectual enjoyment; to learn 
about the numerous opportunities found in the 
University's various schools; to familiarize the 
members with Loyola's contributions to our city 
and nation. 

This nevk'ly-formed Board is composed of wo- 
men known for their civic, cultural, and social 
leadership. Loyola is proud to have some of the 
most prominent members of Chicago's society 
representing an extension of the University's in- 
fluence. 




Mrs. Querin P. Dorschel, Chairman. 




Mrs. Frank J. Lewis, Honorary Chairman. 



66 



Mrs. Thomas Amberg 
Mrs. Thos. Stanton Armour 
Mrs. William H. Arnold 
Mrs. George J. Aste 
Mrs. Charles A. Bane 
Mrs. Bi Edward Bensinger 
Mrs. Richard Bentley 
Mrs. Robert Lee Berner 
Mrs. Arthur E. Biddle 
Mrs. John M. Bireley 
Mrs. Cushman B. Bissell 
Mrs. Leigh B. Block 
Mrs. Louis H. G. Bouscaren 
Mrs. Augustine J. Howe 
Mrs. William J. Bowe 
Mrs. Harry C. Boysen 
Mrs. John B. Bremner, Jr. 
Mrs. James G. Brennan 
Mrs. Britton I. Budd 
Mrs. John R. Burdick 
Mrs. James O. Burke 
Mrs. Thomas B. Burke 
Mrs. Thomas J. Byrne, Jr. 
Mrs. Wm. Jerome Byrnes 
Mrs. Julien J. Caestecker 
Mrs. James J. Callahan 
Mrs. Charles B. Cannon 
Mrs. Wm. Roy Carney 
Mrs. John D. Casey 
Mrs. John A. Cassin 
Mrs. Joseph J. Cavanagh 
Mrs. Henry T. Chamberlain 
Mrs. Henry L. Charlton 
Mrs. John W. Clarke 
Mrs. Stuart Colnon 
Mrs. Fairfax M. Cone 
Mrs. Timothy J. Connelly 
Mrs. Thomas J. Coogan 
Mrs. Thomas E. Cooke 
Mrs. James C. Corbett 
Mrs. William A. Cremin 
Mrs. Patrick F. Crowley 
Mrs. Edward A. Cudahy 
Mrs. Walter Cummings, Jr. 
Mrs. John F. Cuneo 
Mrs. Richard J. Daley 
Mrs. Andrew J. Dallstream 
Mrs. Thomas A. Dean 
Mrs. John D. de Butts 
Mrs. James M. Delaney 
Mrs. Louis A. de Smet 
Mrs. Terrance Dillon 
Mrs. William G. Dooley 
Mrs. Harry L. Drake 
Mrs. Lyman Drake 
Mrs. R. Jerome Dunne 
Mrs. Paul F. Elward 
Mrs. John N. Estabrook 
Mrs. John J. Fahey 



Mrs. George Fiedler 
Mrs. Jerome K. Flaherty 
Mrs. C. Larkin Flanagan 
Mrs. Augustine A. Flick 
Mrs. Frank Flick 
Mrs. Robert M. Foley 
Mrs. J. Dennis Freund 
Mrs. Charles J. Gallagher 
Mrs. Paul V. Galvin 
Mrs. Joel Goldblatt 
Mrs. Robert F. Graham 
Mrs. Joseph E. Guilbault 
Mrs. Henry Hafer 
Mrs. Donald H. Haider 
Mrs. Emil D. Hauser 
Mrs. Kenneth B. Hawkins 
Mrs. Harris Haywood 
Mrs. Matthew J. Hickey, Jr. 
Mrs. Charles J. Holland 
Mrs. Charles J. Hough 
Dr. Helen Howe 
Mrs. Patrick H. Hoy 
Mrs. Neil C. Hurley, Jr. 
Mrs. Michael L. Igoe 
Mrs. Samuel InsuU, Jr. 
Mrs. Christian E. Jarchow 
Mrs. Frank W. Jenks 
Mrs. Owen Barton Jones 
Miss Ann Joyce 
Mrs. Joseph T. Joyce 
Mrs. Robert E. Joyce 
Mrs. William Joyce 
Mrs. Frank L. Kartheiser 
Mrs. Joseph S. Kearney 
Mrs. John A. Kennedy 
Mrs. W. McNeil Kennedy 
Mrs. Otto Kerner 
Mrs. Charles C. Kerwin 
Mrs. Edward M. Kerwin 
Mrs. Weymouth Kirkland 
Mrs. Sidney R. Korshak 
Mrs. John R. Laadt 
Dr. Anne Lally 
Mrs. William J. Lawlor, Jr. 
Mrs. Eugene M. Lennon 
Mrs. Arthur T. Leonard 
Mrs. Frank J. Lewis 
Mrs. James J. Lewis, Jr. 
Mrs. John R. Lewis 
Mrs. Thomas A. Lewis 
Mrs. Edward C. Logelin 
Mrs. Lenox R. Lohr 
Mrs. John L. McCaffrey 
Mrs. James J. McCarty 
Mrs. Edwin B. McConville 
Mrs. Eugene T. McEnery 
Mrs. Charles L. McEvoy 
Mrs. John F. McFeatters 
Mrs. John P. McCoorty, Jr. 



Mrs. Clarence W. Mcintosh 
Mrs. Robert C. McNamara 
Mrs. James J. McNulty, Jr. 
Mrs. Henry W. Meers 
Mrs. Joseph T. Meyer 
Mrs. Robert J. Migely 
Mrs. John S. Miller 
Mrs. John A. Morrissey 
Mrs. John T. Moss 
Mrs. Paul L. Mullaney 
Mrs. Aidan I. Mullett 
Mrs. Joseph D. Murphy 
Mrs. Lewis C. Murtaugh 
Mrs. John A. Naghten 
Mrs. Conrad E. Niehoff 
Mrs. Leonard J. O'Connor 
Mrs. John F. O'Keefe 
Mrs. Eric Oldberg 
Mrs. John J. O'Shaughnessy 
Mrs. Bernard Pallasch 
Mrs. William F. Petersen 
Mrs. Robert A. Podesta 
Mrs. William J. Quinn 
Mrs. Thomas W. Reedy 
Mrs. Ben Regan 
Mrs. Thomas A. Reynolds 
Mrs. Frank J. Rothing 
Mrs. Arthur Rubloff 
Mrs. William J. Schmitt 
Mrs. Herbert E. Schmitz 
Mrs. J. Donald Scott 
Mrs. Richard W. Sears II 
Mrs. William Sexton 
Mrs. Thomas W. Sexton 
Mrs. Vincent D. Sill 
Mrs. William J. Sinek 
Mrs. Walter Byron Smith 
Mrs. John M. Smyth, Jr. 
Mrs. Frederick W. Specht 
Mrs. Walter A. Stuhr, Jr. 
Mrs. Bolton Sullivan 
Mrs. Harold W. Sullivan 
Mrs. Joseph F. Sullivan 
Mrs. Carlos A. Spiess 
Mrs. Hampden M. Swift 
Mrs. Edwin R. Talbot 
Mrs. J. Thomas Taussig 
Mrs. Richard L. Terrell 
Mrs. Thomas M. Thompson 
Mrs. Reuben Thorson 
Mrs. William Tuohy 
Mrs. Frank J. Turk 
Mrs. Walter A. Wade 
Mrs. John J. Waldron 
Mrs. Maurice Walk 
Mrs. Hempstead Washburne 
Mrs. Harold M. Williams 
Mrs. Lynn A. Williams, Jr. 
Mrs. Eugene R. Zacher 



67 



THE CITIZENS BOARD 



■ 

I 



To mark the 75th Anniversary of Loyola's service 
to Chicago, the Citizens Board was established sixteen 
years ago. Since that time, the Board has enabled the 
University to increase its scope of service to the com- 
munity. A more informal group than the Board of 
Lay Trustees, the Citizens Board serves as a public 
relations body for the University by extending the 
influence of Loyola in the business and professional 
circles of Chicago. The Board consists of business 
and professional men who are in a position to ac- 
quaint Chicago with the unique character of Loyola's 
educational program, thereby enabling the Univer- 
sity to become a powerful force in the shaping of 
Chicago's community life. 




Mr. Thomas A. Dean, Chairman. 



68 



Norbert F. Armour 
Charles A. Bane 
Gerald A. Barry 
O. D. Bast 
Robert L. Berner 
Dr. Otto L. Benag 
John M. Bireley 
Cushman B. Bissell 
Thomas J. Boodell 
Andrew R. Bopp 
Louis H. G. Bouscaren 
Augustine J. Bowe 
William J. Bowe 
Jacob M. Braude 
A. J. Bremner 
C. M. Brennan 
James G. Brennan 
James J. Brennan 
John E. Brennan 
Ralph D. Brizzolara 
Clemens H. Bruns 
James O. Burke 
Robert E. Burke 
Thomas B. Burke 
Leo J. Burnett 
C. J. Burny 
Thomas J. Byrne, Jr. 
Jerome W. Byrnes 
Julien J. Caestecker 
Richard D. Cagney 
William E. CahiU 
Dr. James J. Callahan 
Douglass Campbell 
Hon. William J. Campbell 
Andrew R. Carlson 
William Roy Carney 
Wallace E. Carroll 
George L. Carstens 
Anthony E. Cascino 
Joseph J. Cavanagh 
Thomas J. Cavanagh 
Leo D. Cavanagh 
Fred E. Chambers 
Frank W. Chesrow 
John A. Clark 
John W. Clarke 
James W. Close 
John E. Colnon 
Philip Conley 
Timothy J. Connelly 
Philip H. Corboy 
Francis M. Corby 
Walter R. Costello 
Louis J. Cross 
George D. Crowley 
Patrick F. Crowley 
Colonel Henry Crown 
Edward A. Cudahy 
Michael Cudahy 
Martin A. Culhane 
Walter J. Cummings 
Walter J. Cummings, Jr. 
Henry J. Curran 
A. J. Cusick 
Francis J. Dammann 
Thomas A. Dean 
John D. de Butts 
Donald Defrees 
Charles W. DeGryse 
William J. Donahoe 
James L. Donnelly 
George T. Donoghue 
James F. Donovan 
James A. Dooley 
Richard F. Dooley 
William G. Dooley 
Querin P. Dorschel 
Leo J. Doyle 
R. P. Drymalski 
Thomas F. Duffy 
Richard G. Duncan 



John J. Dunn, Jr. 
Edward W. Dunne 
Hon. Robert J. Dunne 
Raymond W. Durst 
Joseph F. Elward 
Hon. Robert E. English 
Raymond Epstein 
Alexander Eulenberg 
Dr. Joseph P. Evans 
John W. Evers 
Lawrence S. Fanning 
Peter V. Fazio 
Edward Fenner 
Edwin J. Feulner 
Edward H. Fiedler 
George Fiedler 
George J. Fitzgerald 
John C. Fitzgerald 
Joseph J. Fitzgerald 
Peter Fitzpatrick 
John J. Flanagan 
Frank Flick 
Leonard S. Florsheim 
John J. Foley 
Ray Foley 
Arthur H. Forbes 
Clarence E. Fox 
ZoUie S. Frank 
Stephen J. Frawley 
Arthur J. Gallagher 
Charles J. Gallagher 
Adm. William O. Gallery 
James L. Garard 
Lee J. Gary 
Dr. Francis J. Gerty 
Frank J. Gillespie 
Frederick M. Gillies 
Joshua B. Glasser 
John S. Gleason, Jr. 
Louis Glunz 
John P. Goedert 
Maurice Goldblatt 
Richard Goodman 
George W. Grace 
Donald M. Graham 
Robert F. Graham 
Thomas A. Grant 
Thomas D. Griffin 
Joseph E. Guilbault 
Donald H. Haider 
Charles J. Haines 
George S. Halas 
William J. Halligan, Sr. 
Dr. Eugene A. Hamilton 
Philip Hampson 
Emmett R. Hanley 
Felix E. Healy 
Joseph E. Henry 
Harry P. Heuer 
Matthew J. Hickey, Jr. 
Matthew J. Hickey, III 
Thomas J. Higgins 
Raymond M. Hilliard 
Charles M. Hines 
John P. Hoffmann 
Brig. Gen. J. P. Holland 
Michael Hewlett 
Patrick H. Hoy 
James T. Igoe, Jr. 
Hon. Michael L. Igoe 
Samuel InsuU, Jr. 
Bruce R. Jagor 
Albert E. Jenner 
Clarence B. Jennett 
Edward J. Jennett 
Howard J. Johnson 
Owen Barton Jones 
Murray Joslin 
Walter J. Joy, Jr. 
Robert E. Joyce 
Frank Kartheiser 



John S. Kavanaugh 
Joseph S. Kearney 
Arthur Keating 
Edward Keating 
Joseph W. Kehoe 
Paul A. Keim 
Peter M. Kelliher 
Charles H. Kellstadt 
John J. Kelly 
Hayes Kennedy 
W. McNeil Kennedy 
John E. Kenney 
Charles C. Kerwin 
Edward M. Kerwin 
John P. Kiley 
John J. Kinnare 
Weymouth Kirkland 
Hon. Win G. Koch 
Raymond J. Koch 
Sidney R. Korshak 
Leonard O. Krez 
Anthony J. Kueber 
Francis H. Kullman, Jr. 
Irv Kupcinet 
Hon. Walter J. LaBuy 
William J. Lancaster 
Dr. Paul E. Lawler 
William J. Lawlor, Jr. 
Russell J. Leander 
William A. Lee 
Morris I. Leibman 
Arthur T. Leonard 
Thomas A. Lewis 
Robert J. Ley 
Stuart List 
Park Livingston 
Edward C. Logelin 
Major Lenox R. Lohr 
Eugene K. Lydon 
Bernard W. Lynch 
Richard Lynch 
William J. Lynch 
Jack Mabley 
John Madden 
John Madigan 
Walter J. Madigan 
Joseph E. Magnus 
David B. Maher, M.D. 
John J. Maher 
James R. Martin 
Harold Maser 
Howard G. Mayer 
John L. McCaffrey 
James B. McCahey, Jr. 
Edwin B. McConville 
Hon. John V. McCormick 
Morgan F. McDonnell 
William L. McFetridge 
William J. McGah 
John P. McGoorty 
John B. McGuire 
John F. McGuire 
Clarence W. Mcintosh 
Ivan A. McKenna 
Harley V. McNamara 
Robert C. McNamara, Jr. 
John E. McNulty 
Henry W. Meers 
Edward A. Menke 
Joseph E. Merrion 
John T. Moran 
Michael F. Mulcahy 
Edward F. Mulhern 
Walter F. MuUady 
Paul F. MuUaney 
Charles F. Murphy 
Herbert F. Murphy 
Joseph D. Murphy 
Leo T. Murphy 
Morgan Murphy 
John A. Naghten 



Cyrus H. Neusos 
T. Clifford Noonan 
Frank Nugent 
Harold P. O'Connell 
Harry J. OHaire 
James L. O'Keefe 
John F. OKeefe 
William P. O'Keefe 
William F. O'Meara 
Robert A. O'Reilly 
John E. O'Shaughnessy 
Marcellus M. Oshe 
Michael F. Peckels 
Howard V. Phalin 
James M. Pigott 
Paul M. Plunkett 
Robert A. Podesta 
Howard I. Potter 
Harry W. Pucceni 
James R. Quinn 
Leonard Kaniw 
Frank C. Rathje 
Ben Regan 
Joseph J. Regan 
Henry Regnery 
James P. Reichmann 
Thomas A. Reynolds 
John H. Riley 
G. Gale Roberson 
Burke B. Roche 
Arthur Rubloff 
Anthony J. Rudis 
Morris B. Sachs, Jr. 
George F. Salerno 
Joseph P. Savage 
John Schmidt 
Dr. William M. Scholl 
Gilbert H. Scribner 
Barnabas F. Sears 
Thomas W. Sexton 
Martin F. Shanahan 
Edward D. Sheehan 
J. Glenn Shehee 
Donald T. Sheridan 
Leo J. Sheridan 
R. Sargent Shriver, Jr. 
Vincent D. Sill 
William J. Sinek 
Jackson W. Smart 
John F. Smith, Jr. 
John M. Smyth, Jr. 
Fred B. Snite 
Frederick W. Specht 
Carlos A. Spiess 
A. L. Starshak 
Clarence L. Steber 
Bolton Sullivan 
John P. Sullivan 
James E. Thompson 
T. M. Thompson 
Reuben Thorson 
William B. Traynor 
William K. Traynor 
Hon. William J. Tuohy 
Francis H. Uriell 
Arkell M. Vaughn, M.D. 
Charles S. Vrtis 
John J. Waldron 
Irwin N. Walker 
Donald J. Walsh 
J. Harris Ward 
Tony Weitzel 
Frank M. Whiston 
Elmer J. Whitty 
Albert J. Wilkins 
James C. Worthy 
Lloyd E. Yoder 
Eugene R. Zacher 
Russell A. Zimmermann 



BUSINESSMEN FOR LOYOLA 



Businessmen for Loyola and Great Teach- 
ing is the title of a publication put out by the 
Businessmen for Loyola, and, in essence, it 
sums up the tremendous role played by the 
organization in helping to support Loyola 
in the continual drive for excellence. One of 
the most basic factors in any great under- 
taking, such as the Great Teaching Program, 
is the financial support necessary to under- 
take that program. 

The B.M.L.U., through their varied fund 
raising activities, attempt to insure the con- 
tinued success of programs like the above- 
mentioned. In essence, this organization, 
founded in 1956 with a membership of for- 
ty-two, is a fund-raising group, and their 
method is one of personal contact. Now 
grown to a total membership of 280, the 
B.M.L.U. has secured more than two million 
dollars on behalf of the Great Teaching Pro- 
gram, and have high hopes of securing even 
more in the future. 




Mr. Charles S. Vrtis, Chairman. 




Mr. John F. O'Keefe, Vice-Chairman. 



70 



, 



T. Loyal Anderson 
Henry W. Angsten, Jr. 
Norbert F. Armour 
Stephen M. Baily 
Gerald A. Barry 
Charles R. Beauregard 
Edward J. Bennan 
Joseph N. Beucher 
John M. Bireley 
Cushman B. Bissell 
Bernard J. Blommer 
Thomas J. Boodell 
Louis H. G. Bouscaren 
Hon. Augustine J. Bowe 
Paul C. Bowman, Jr. 
A. J. Bremner 
James G. Brennan 
James J. Brice 
Clemens H. Bruns 
James O. Burke 
Robert E. Burke 
Thomas B. Burke 
C. J. Burny 
John D. Byrnes 
William E. CahiU 
John H. Cain 
Frank C. Callahan 
Dr. James J. Callahan 
Raymond N. Carlen 
Andrew R. Carlson 
Wm. Roy Carney 
Eugene J. Carroll 
John W. Carroll 
Anthony E. Cascino 
Joseph J. Cavanagh, Jr. 
Thomas J. Cavanagh 
John H. Chamberlain 
Fred E. Chambers 
Frank W. Chesrow 
James W. Close 
Robert M. Cole 
John E. Colnon 
Stuart Colnon 
Harry H. Comstock 
Timothy J. Connelly 
W. Daniel Conroyd 
Francis M. Corby 
Philip H. Cordes 
Walter R. Costello 
Joseph W. Cremin 
William A. Cremin 
Louis J. Cross 
George D. Crowley 
Patrick F. Crowley 
Edward A. Cudahy 
Michael Cudahy 
Stuart G. Cullen 
Walter J. Cummings 
Walter J. Cummings, Jr. 
A. J. Cusick 
John J. Dahm 
Dr. August F. Daro 
Thomas A. Dean 
John D. deButts 
Charles W. DeGryse 
Philip A. Delaney 
George Tuman Demetrio 
Angelo Dicello 
William S. Dillon 
James L. Donnelly 



James A. Dooley 
Richard F. Dooley 
William G. Dooley 
Querin P. Dorschel 
Edward J. Doyle, Jr. 
Leo J. Doyle 
William J. Drennan 
George E. Driscoll 
Raymond P. Drymalski 
Thomas F. Duffy 
Edward W. Dunne 
William Q. Egan 
Alexander Eulenberg 
David B. Fallon 
Robert E. Fanning 
Joseph F. Fasano 
Edwin J. Feulner 
Edward H. Fiedler 
George Fiedler 
Richard G. Finn 
George J. Fitzgerald 
Joseph J. Fitzgerald 
Peter Fitzpatrick 
John J. Flanagan 
A. H. Forbes 
Donald S. Forst 
Maurice B. Frank 
Stephen J. Frawley 
Charles J. Gallagher 
Admiral William O. Gallery 
Leo F. Garrity, Jr. 
William J. Garvy 
W. P. Gensert 
J. Jay Gerber 
Frederick M. Gillies 
Louis Glunz 
Thomas A. Gonser 
Carl Gorr 
George W. Grace 
Donald M. Graham 
James T. Griffin 
Joseph E. Guilbault 
William J. Halligan, Sr. 
R. Emmett Hanley 
Paul Hassett 
Thomas W. Havey 
Thomas F. Hawkins 
Wallace Hawley 
John T. Hayes 
Joseph E. Henry 
Matthew J. Hickey, Jr. 
Paul B. Higdon 
Raymond M. Hilliard 
Charles M. Hines 
Patrick H. Hoy 
Samuel Insull, Jr. 
Bruce R. Jagor 
Edward J. Jennett 
Howard J. Johnson 
Owen Barton Jones 
Robert E. Joyce 
John S. Kavanaugh 
Joseph S. Kearney 
Arthur Keating 
Joseph W. Kehoe 
Paul A. Keim 
Charles H. Kellstadt 
W. McNeil Kennedy 
John E. Kenney 
Edmund J. Kenny 



Charles C. Kerwin 
Edward M. Kerwin 
Eugene M. Kinney 
H. Norbert Kirchdorfer 
Weymouth Kirkland 
Lawrence E. Klinger 
Frank P. Knoll 
Louis A. Kohn 
Sidney R. Korshak 
Anthony J. Kueber 
Alexander X. Kuhn 
Francis H. KuUman, Jr. 
George A. Lane 
Earl S. Lathrop, Jr. 
Robert B. Latousek 
Elmer F. Layden 
William A. Lee 
Nathaniel P. Leighton 
Arthur T. Leonard 
Robert P. Leroy 
John R. Lewis 
Thomas A. Lewis 
Fred G. Litsinger 
Park Livingston 
Samuel V. Lizzo 
Warren A. Logelin 
Eugene K. Lydon 
Richard V. Lynch 
William J. Lynch 
William C. MacDonald 
David S. Mackie 
John Madden 
Maurice D. Mangan 
James R. Martin 
Howard G. Mayer 
John L. McCaffrey 
J. Warren McCaffrey 
James B. McCahey, Jr. 
Arthur J. McConville 
Edwin B. McConville 
Frank H. McCracken 
Henry J. McDonald 
Morgan F. McDonnell 
John B. McGuire 
Clarence W. Mcintosh 
Bernard F. McNamara 
H. V. McNamara 
Henry W. Meers 
Edward A. Menke 
Joseph E. Merrion 
William Mesick 
Jim Moran 
Edward J. Morrissey 
Richard G. Muench 
Walter F. Mullady 
Aidan L Mullet 
Charles F. Murphy 
Charles F. Murphy, Jr. 
Herbert F. Murphy 
Joseph D. Murphy 
Lewis C. Murtaugh 
John A. Naghten 
Edward W. Nicewick 
T. Clifford Nonnan 
Robert O'Boyle 
Frank B. O'Brien 
Frank E. O'Dowd 
John F. O'Keefe 
William P. O'Keefe 
William F. O'Meara 



C. Roderick O'Neil 
Eugene T. O'Reilly 
Eugene J. O'Riley 
John E. O'Shaughnessy 
Thomas W. O'Shaughnes 
Bernhard Pallacsh 
Howard V. Phalin 
Roy J. Pierson 
James M. Pigott 
Donald A. Potter 
Howard L Potter 

James R. Quinn 
William J. Quinn 
J. W. Reedy 
Ben Regan 
Charles J. Regan 
Joseph J. Regan 
Henry Regnery 
Harlan Richards 
John H. Riley 
William H. Roberts 
Burke B. Roche 
Dwyer Roche 
Edwin Rowland 
Anthony J. Rudis 
Albert V. Sadacca 
Peter J. Salvato 
Robert E. Samuels 
Charles F. Scholl 
Robert B. Scott 
Thomas W. Sexton 
Martin F. Shanahan 
Thomas J. Sheahan 
Edward D. Sheehan 
J. Glenn Shehee 
Donald T. Sheridan 
Vincint D. Sill 
William J. Sinek 
John L. Sloan 
John F. Smith, Jr. 
John M. Smyth, Jr. 
Frederick W. Specht 
Carlos A. Spiess 
A. L. Starshak 
Clarence L. Steber 
Nelson D. Stoker 
Bolton Sullivan 
John P. Sullivan 
Edwin M. Taber 
James E. Thompson 
T. M. Thompson 
Reuben Thorson 
Harry J. Trainor 
William K. Traynor 
Ralph R. Trimarco 
John C. TuUy 

Frank H. Uriell 
Doran Unschuld 
Charles S. Vrtis 
John J. Waldron 
Thomas F. Waldron 
George J. Weinrich 
Frank J. Wetzel 
Frank M. Whiston 
Elmer J. Whitty 
Albert J. Wilkins 
Eugene R. Zacher 
E. A. Zegers 



71 



THE PARENTS ASSOCIATES OF LOYOLA 



The Parent Associates of Loyola was established in the 
spring of 1957, with the specific purpose of encouraging the 
parents of high school seniors to advise their sons and daugh- 
ters of the benefits of a Jesuit education at Loyola University. 
This is done by way of appointing parents of present Loyola 
students to contact the parents of high school seniors. 

PAL operates under a three-fold program: social activities, 
fund-raising drive, and admissions program. The social pro- 
gram includes three annual events; a reception for freshman 
parents, a Christmas party, and a dinner party in April. 

To raise faculty salaries and insure first class education 
for their sons and daughters, PAL members have solicited funds 
from fellow Loyola parents. 

The key features of the admissions program is personal 
counseling; through this, the members of PAL aim to increase 
the number of qualified students who apply for admission to 
the University. 



Above: Mr. and Mrs. John Budz, Mr. and Mrs. William Harper, Mr. and Mrs. Ellsworth 
Finnell, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Weiner, Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Pierce, Mr. and Mrs. Bernhard 
Pallasch, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Veith, Mr. and Mrs. William Buhl. 

Below. Mrs. Maurice McCarthy, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Hayes, Mr. and Mrs. J. Arthur Mc- 
Ginnis, Mr. and Mrs. John McCarthy, Mr. and Mrs. Michael Phelan, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
Farrell, Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Bilodeau, Mr. and Mrs. Maxfield Weisbrod, Mrs. Harold 
Allard. 




■^^ 







L 




Standing: John Gerding, Richard Calabrese, Paul Stewart, Dennis Zbylut, Bob Rud- 
nick; Seated — second row. Dennis Broderick, Ernest Skowron, John Williams, Sandy 
Weinstein, Tom Guerra; Seated — third row. Joanne Caruso, Nancy Riley, Keith Cook, 
Chester Lockwood. 



THE STUDENTS ASSOCIATES OF LOYOLA 



Since its establishment in 1956, the Student Associates of 
Loyola has matured into one of the most important organiza- 
tions in the University. SAL has one principal goal: the ad- 
vancement of Loyola University. Representatives from the so- 
rorities, fraternities, academic societies and independents from 
both campuses constitute the Executive Committee which is the 
governing body of SAL. 

Due to the large measure of success with which it has met, 
SAL has increased its scope of contact. By including the men's 
and women's dormitories in its membership, SAL has inaugura- 
ted new procedures, giving it the opportunity to reach stu- 
dents from other cities by employing the efforts of the out- 
of-town students living in the dorms. More than any organiza- 
tion at Loyola, SAL gives its members an opportunity to render 
direct services to the University. 



73 




Cusbman B. Bissell 
Chairman 



ESTATE PLANNING COMMISSION 

"Your influence on tomorrow" is the hard-hitting 
slogan of the Estate Planning Commission. Under 
the management of Mr. Thomas K. Sanders, director 
of development, and the Estate Planning Executive 
Committee, the Commission has organized for the 
University several plans to offer for investment: wills, 
gifts from capital, revocable trusts, irrevocable trusts, 
testamentary trust, and memorials in the form of 
scholarships, buildings, professorships, research pro- 
jects, and cultural activities. 

The Estate Planning Executive Committee is dedi- 
cated to the future needs of educational progress. Its 
formation holds the assurance of education of our 
youth. 

Mr. Sanders reminds: "All testamentary gifts to 
Loyola University are tax deductible." 



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John J. Waldron 

Vice-Chairman 



Augustine J. Howe 



Alexander Eulenberg 






Louis A. Kohn 



Morris I. Leibman 



John P. McGoorty 



Thomas A. Reynolds 



74 




Charles H. Kellstadt 
Chairman 



THE MEDICAL CENTER COUNCIL 



Enthusiasm and dedication guide an impressive 
Medical Center Council in their campaign for funds 
for the new Loyola University Medical Center to be 
erected near Maywood, Illinois. Definite plans for 
this "house of medicine for mid-America" were for- 
mally announced by the newly appnainted board. 

The Very Rev. James F. Maguire gives a glowing 
commendation to the new appointees: "By advising 
the university in the development of the new Loyola 
University Medical Center in Maywood, these men 
and women will play a key role in the education of 
physicians, the promotion of research, the rendering 
of superior level of medical care in the university 
hospital and out-patient department of the new Medi- 
cal Center." 




James O. Burke 




Charles C. Kerwin 



Robert W. Galvin 



Robert E. Joyce 



Mrs. Frank J. Lewis 





Michael R. Notaro 



John F. Smith Jr. 



Fred B. Snite 



75 



THE 

ALUMNI 
COUNCIL 



New this year to Loyola is the Alumni Council, 
whose formation was announced at the first annual 
Alumni Day last June. The council is composed of 
outstanding alumni who will assist the President 
and the University in the continuing effort to serve 
alumni more effectively, to further communication 
and co-operation between the alumni and the Uni- 
versity and to maintain and develop alumni interest 
in the institution. The Council will meet four times 
a year to recommend programs to Father Maguire 
who will in turn advise the alumni on how they can 
be of service. 





Frank J. Hogan 



Theodore E. Smart 




William M. Gibbons 




John J. Waldron 



Monica T. Haffler 





lii^vik 



Edward W. Dunne 



Raymond H. Conley, M.D. 



76 






Norton O'Meara 



Carl J. Madda, D.D.S. 



Joseph S. Kearney 






Robert C. Keenan 



Timothy J. Connelly 



Fred R. Sextro 





John L. Keeley, M.D. 



Raymond P. Ganey 





Winifred A. O'Toole 



A. J. Biemner 



77 





Thomes J. Dyba, Assistant to the Dean. 



REV. JOHN C. MALLOY, S.J. 
Dean of Admissions 



THE OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS 



The Office of the Dean of Admissions, under the 
direction of the Rev. John C. Malloy, S.J., operates under 
the almost painfully obvious, yet often overlooked princi- 
ple that the quality of a school depends upon the quality 
of its students. In keeping with this principle of opera- 
tion, the Dean of Admissions finds his fields of endeavor 
in two distinct areas: the evaluation of the credentials 
of incoming students and the recruitment of top high 
school students for the University. 

The latter function of the office is conducted through 
a series of informative discussions and seminars conducted 
through the city's high schools, in which both Loyola 
students and members of the administration participate. 




Joan Steinbrecher of the Admis- 
sions Office checks over a pros- 
pective student's credentials. 



John E. Hannan, Assistant to the Dean. 




78 




THE STUDENT COUNSELORS 



Rev. John Felice, S.J. 




Rev. Thomas F. Murray, S.J. 



Rev. Ralph H. Talkin, S.J. 





Rev. J. Donald Hayes, S.J. 





Rev. Mark Hurtubise, S.J. 



Rev. Robert J. Fox, S.J. 



79 




Members of the Committee on Student Activities and Welfare are (Standing): Rev. J. 
Donald Roll, S.J., Richard Kusek, James Forkins, Kenneth Nowland; (Seated) Rev. Carl 
Burlage, S.J., Mariette LeBIanc, Harry L. McCloskey, Constance Ferris. 



THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF STUDENTS 



The Office of the Dean of Students is the arm of the 
administration most apparent to the student in his day to 
day activities. Under the direction of Mr. Harry McCloskey 
at Lewis Towers and his assistant Mr. George Kollintzas 
on Lake Shore Campus, the office coordinates all the 
various student activities and regulates all student organi- 
zations except those of a religious nature. The Dean of 
Women, Miss Mariette LeBIanc and her assistant on Lake 
Shore Miss Patricia McGrady supervise and coordinate the 
activities of the undergraduate women students. In addi- 
tion to its other duties, the Office of the Dean of Students 
puts into action the plans and recommendations of the 
Committee on Student Activities and Welfare. 



80 



Counseling is one of the functions of Walter 
Block. Assistant to the Dean of Students. 





HARRY L. McCLOSKEY 
Dean of Students 



MARIETTE LeBLANC 

Dean of Women 




PATRICIA McGRADY 
Assistant Dean of Women 



GEORGE KOLLINTZAS 
Assistant Dean of Students 



EILEEN WALSH 
Director of Housing 






81 



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K^Hl 



THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 



JAMES C. COX 
Director of Libraries 



Lake Shore Library Staff. James Cox, 
Genevieve Delana, Mrs. James Cox, Yvonne 
Damien, Mrs. Mary McGrath, Eleanor 
Kennedy, Mrs. Helen Wieland. Mary Davis. 



Lewis Towers Library Staff. Standing: Jerry Flynn, Emil Basiuk, 
Romuald Misiunas. Seated: Melanie Zittnan, Donna Marlin, 
Christine Saletta, Violet Bilick. 





THE ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 



JAMES L. ANDERSON 
Administrative Assistant to the President 




ROBERTA A. KLOVSTAD 
Secretary to Mr. Conroyd 



FRANCES M. STUHMILLER 

Secretary to the President 





MARY R. MANZKE 
Examiner of Credentials 




WILLIAM P. MALONEY 

Director of Development 
Stritch School of Medicine 



THOMAS R. SANDERS 
Director of Development 





RICHARD A. BARRY 

Director of Public Relations 




EDWARD A. ENGEL 

Asst. Director of Alumni Relations 




ELIZABETH McCANN 
Registrar 



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THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 




Mary Ann Hill(right) 
asks Kay Smith, secretary 
to Fr. Dollard, how to 
deal with a graduate trans- 
cript. 




REV. STEWART E. DOLLARD, S.J. 
Dean 



86 




The Lewis Towers library . . . second 
home of many a graduate student. 



Founded in 1926, The Graduate School 
of Loyola, as an advanced school of liberal 
arts and sciences, has the function of award- 
ing master's degrees in arts and sciences and, 
furthermore, offers several programs leading 
to the doctorate degree in both areas. Under- 
neath the hackneyed phrase, "Turning stu- 
dents into scholars" lies a great deal of signi- 
ficant insight into the actual purposes and 
operations of the Graduate School. 

Devoted to the ideal of producing the 
"professional" in his field, and, coinciden- 
tally as the training ground for nearly all 
future higher-level teachers, the general func- 
tion of a graduate school lies in preparing its 
students in the areas of research, scholarship, 
and close examination of particular theories, 
times, and trends. To be a recipient of a 
Master's or doctorate, the student must make 
a definite contribution to his field of endea- 
vors, and it is in the production of these 
contributions that the graduate school often 
serves as a center-point for academic writing. 

In an attempt to draw top students in their 
prospective fields, the Graduate School, oper- 
ating in close connection with other schools 
in the University, offers assistantships and 
fellowships to outstanding candidates. Be- 
sides providing its students with some prac- 
tical experience (especially insofar as pros- 
pective teachers are concerned) programs of 
this sort serve as a definite aid to the Uni- 
versity as a whole. 



DR. PAUL KINIERY 
Assistant Dean 




THE COLLEGE 
OF ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 





REV. JOSEPH S. PENDERGAST, S.J. 
Dean 



REV. HUGH B. RODMAN, S.J. 
Associate Dean 



88 



J. DENNIS LAMPING 
Assistant to the Dean (LSC) 



DION J. WILHELMI 
Assistant to the Dean ( LSC ) 





The "whole man," seems to be gradually falling into dis- 
repute as the scientifically-oriented view of education gains more 
and more precedence. Nevertheless, the production of the whole 
man has been, is, and will continue to be the primary goal of 
any Jesuit institution, which Loyola proudly confirms it is. 
The College of Arts and Sciences attempts to make its primary 
aim that of providing its students with a solid background in 
those areas most beneficial to the formation of the Christian 
man. 

In its attempt to provide the student with a basically life- 
oriented education, seeking to prepare the student not for the 
job in life, but rather for the job of life, the College of Arts 
and Sciences sees the role of the educator as one of an integra- 
tive and preparatory nature, providing the basic principles upon 
which the students emerging from it will base the decisions and 
attitudes they must form in later life. 

Established with the founding of the University and repre- 
sented on both campuses, the College of Arts and Sciences has 
continued to fulfill its role as a positive force in the molding 
of the ideal of education, the Christian man. 




THOMAS P. ANDERSON 
Assistant to the Dean {LT) 



89 




Mathematics major Audrey Gineman lectures to an honors seminar composed of the other 
senior honors math students and advisors: Diane Szarowicz, Jack Quinnert, Bro. Robert 
Erickson, C.S.V., Steve Gilmour, Dr. Robert Reisel, Dr. Richard Driscoll, John Wanat. 




REV. CARL J. BURLAGE, S.J. 

Honors Program Director 
Lake Shore Campus 




THE HONORS PROGRAM 



DR. JOSEPH WOLFF 

Honors Program Director 

Lewis Towers 



A standard description of the Honors Pro- 
gram at Loyola mentions that it "offers 
special opportunities for intellectual achieve- 
ment on an individual basis to those students 
who have high academic qualifications, as 
well as the ambition and time to devote 
themselves to an intensive program of 
studies." 

While this perhaps inaccurately depicts 
the honors student as living in the best of 
all possible worlds, the program does offer 
many tangible rewards to its participants: 
a broader background in the humanities, 
gained during the first two years; two years 
of advanced work, with varying degrees of 
independence, in one's major field; and the 
opportunity for friendships with other kin- 
dred spirits in the program. 

That the Honors Program as presently con- 
stituted has gained a measure of success may 
be readily seen from the achievements of its 
alumni in graduate schools all over the coun- 
try, as well as by the leadership many of its 
members assume in all phases of University 
life. 



Fr. Burlage condu«s a discussion with philosophy honors students. 




91 




CHEMISTRY FACULTY 



Front Row. Dr. Frank Cassaretto, 
Dr. Bruno Jaselskis, Dr. John Reed, 
Dr. John Huston, Dr. James Wilt, 
Dr. Raymond Mariella, chairman; 
Second Row: Dr. Harvey Posvic, Dr. 
Carl Moore, Dr. Charles McCoy, Dr. 
Edward Lira. 




BIOLOGY FACULTY 



Front row: Dr. Naomi Lemkey, 
Rev. Walter Peters, S.J., chairman, 
Virginia Kuta; Second Row: Dr. 
John Rippon, John Hudson, Dr. 
Benedict Jaskoski, Dr. Kenichi Hisao- 
ka. Dr. Taszlo Szijj, Dr. Edward 
Palincsar. 



92 




CLASSICS FACULTY 



Standing: Dr. Leo Kaiser, Rev. Theodore Tracy, S.J., chairman; Rev. John Festle S.J., Rev. 
Raymond Schoder S.J., Charles Weisbrod; Seated: Dr. D. Herbert Abel, Rev. James Mertz 
S.J., Rev. Laurence Henderson, S.J. 



EDUCATION FACULTY 



Standing: Dr. Henry Moughamian, 
Dr. James Russell, Dr. Arthur 
O'Mara; Sitting: Dr. Samuel Chide- 
kel, Margaret Dagenais, Mr. Douglas 
Van Bramer, Elizabeth Murphy. 





1 



Standing: Dr. Jasper Valenti, Carter Frieberg, 
Dr. John Wellington, Dr. Ernest Proulx; 
Sitting: Dr. Samuel Mayo, Dorothy Larney, 
Dr. John Wozniak, Dr. Henry Malecki. 




Top row. Dr. Agnes Donahue, Anthony Lala, Dr. James Kulas, Edward Babowicz, William 
Cavanaugh, Roger Geimer, Harold Murphy; Middle Row: Dr. Joseph Wolff, Rev. Paul 
Kimmich, O.F.M., Catherine Cook, Rita Clarkson, William Dempsey, Robert Davis, John 
Brennao, Dr. E. John Clark, Rev. Carl Stratman, C.S.V.; Seated: Elsie Panakal, Dr. Patrick 
Casey, Dr. James Barry, Thomas Kemme, Dr. Ligeia Gallagher, Carol Trapp. 



ENGLISH FACULTY 



Top row: Dr. John Gerriets, Chairman, Paul Baity, Bernard Bernatovich, Rita Gallagher, 
Edmund Napieraiski; Middle Row: John Mclnerny, Pat Tichener, Dr. David Spencer, Dr. 
Stanley Clayes, Dr. George Englehardt, Robert Bator, Beverlee Smith; Seated: Dr. Thomas 
Gorman, Dr. Paul Hummert, Kathleen Toomey, Mary Jane Kearney, Mary Devine, Jean 
Comiskey. 




94 




MATHEMATICS FACULTY 



Standing: Rev. Charles Rust, S.J., Chairman; Gail Hamilton, Mary White, Mary Murphy, 
John Connelly. Seated: Thomas Roelle, Joseph Zoydel, Rev. Francis Gerst, S.J., Dr. Joel 
Georges, Dr. Robert Reisel. 



Standing: Dr. John Reardon, Rev. 
Louis Zabkar, S.J., Dr. Franklin 
Walker, Dr. Edward Gargan, Dr. 
Arnold Daum, Rev. Francis Grollig, 
S.J., Dr. Raymond Schmandt, Dr. 
William Trimble, Dr. George Szem- 
ler. Seated: Dr. Robert McCluggage, 
Rev. Jerome Jacobsen, S.J., Dr. Paul 
Leitz, chairman; Dr. Joseph Gagliano, 
Rev. John Kemp, S.J., Rev. John 
Mc Kenzie, S.J. 





HISTORY 
FACULTY 



Standing: Louis Spitznagel, 
Vincent Howard, James West- 
brook, Richard Boldes, Jere- 
my Barker, James Strassmier, 
Richard Gruber. Seated: David 
Scavoner, Sr. M. Carita, Allan 
Reinerman, Paul Davis, David 
Trainor, Laurence Daily. 




SSgt. Conrad Carnduff, SFC Bankston Adams, SSgt. Edward Minehan, Capt. Richard Phalen, 
Walter Smiley, Lt. Col. Matthew Giuffre, chairman. Maj. John Gagin, Capt. Frank Gartman, 
SFC Robert Lloyd, Sgt. Morgan Murphy. 



MILITARY SCIENCE 
FACULTY 



MODERN LANGUAGE 
FACULTY 



Standing: Paul Wood, Elizabeth Cesna, Dr. Albin Liaugminas, Mrs. Evelyn Mickevicius, Dr. 
Mario Federici, Rev. Manuel Ortiz, S.J., Joseph Wandel, Mrs. Ann Janda, Dr. Charles Lom- 
bard, chairman: Seated: Mrs. Aldona Walker, Mrs. Patricia Neate, Dr. Philip Doherty, Flora 
Losacco, Dr. Marie Schiller. 




96 




Dr. Lloyd Arnold, chairman, Marjorie Andre, Alice Hayes, Bernard Seskine. 



NATURAL SCIENCE FACULTY 




Standing: Nelson LaPlante, Rev. 
Joseph Loftus, S.J., Rev. Joseph 
Walsh, S.J., Thomas Dolan, Rev. 
William Dehler, S.J., Rev. Lothar 
Nurnberger, S.J.; Seated: Rev. Vin- 
cent Kelly, S.J., Dr. Francis Catania, 
Rev. Torrens Hecht, S.J., chairman, 
Dr. George Connelly, Rev. Stanley 
Tillman, S.J. 



PHILOSOPHY 
FACULTY 



Standing: Philip Moore, Rev. Ger- 
ard Grant, S.J., Thomas Buckley, 
Dr. John Bannan, Rev. Donald 
Hayes, S.J., Dr. Donald O'Grady; 
Seated: Rev. John Nota, S.J., Theo- 
dore Kondoleon, Rev. Carl Burlage, 
S.J., Rev. Leo Martin, S.J., Dr. Ro- 
berto Apostol. 





PHYSICS FACULTY 



Standing: Kenneth Hennig, Christine Petroski, William Nellis, Henry 
Puszko, Brother Vaginis; Seated: John Melchiors, Dr. Abraham Hoffer, 
Rev. J. Donald Roll, S.J., chairman, Dr. Theodore Phillips, Dr. Albert 
Claus. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 
FACULTY 

Standing: Dr. Francis Schwarzen- 
berg, George Wray; Seated: Rev. 
Joseph Small, S.J., Dr. Joseph Menez, 
chairman, Rev. Robert Hartnett, S.J. 




PSYCHOLOGY FACULTY 




Standing: Dr. Ronald Walker, Dr. Richard Maier, Dr. John Flanagan; Seated: 
Dr. Thomas Kennedy, Rev. Vincent Herr, S.J., chairman, Dr. Ann Heilman, Dr. 
Robert Nicolay. 



99 




SOCIOLOGY FACULTY 



Standing: Dr. Francis Cizon, Dr. Gordon Zahn, Dr. Paul Mun- 
dy, chairman; Seated: Joseph Manak, Richard Smolar, Dr. John 
Lennon. 




SPEECH AND 
DRAMA FACULTY 



Standing: Henry Bussey, William 
Morris, Donald Stinson, chairman, 
Dr. Donald Dickinson; Sealed: Cath- 
erine Geary, Pearl Heffron, Elaine 
Koprowski. 



100 



THEOLOGY FACULTY 



Top row: Rev. Matthias Fischer, Rev. Robert Fox, S.J., Rev. Ralph Talkin, S.J., Rev. Philip 
Weller, Rev. Harold Thompson, C.S.V. /Middle Row. Rev. John Fahey, Rev. Stephen Varga, 
Rev. Edward Rapp, Rev. Edward Coffey, Rev. Ralph Bastian, S.J., Rev. Edward Peters, 
C.S.P., Rev. Edward Maher, S.J., Rev. Thomas Bryant, S.J., Rev. Marcellus Monaco; Seated: 
Rev. Raymond Bellock, S.J., Rev. William Dehler, S.J., Rev. George Slominski, Rev. Francis 
Filas, S.J., chairman: Rev. Mark Hurtubise, S.J., Rev. Fred Bergewisch, S. J., Rev. John 
Mullin, S.J. 




101 



) 





REV. WILLIAM P. LESAINT, S.J. 
Dean of Theology 



VERY REV. WALTER L. FARRELL, S.J. 
Rector 



WEST BADEN COLLEGE 



West Baden College, alias West Baden Springs 
Hotel, was acquired on June 28, 1934 by the then 
financially depleted Jesuit province of Indiana and 
the surrounding territory. This building and the ad- 
joining land covers nearly 500 acres, all of which was 
donated by Edward Ballard to the Rev. C. H. Cloud, 
S.J., head of the Jesuit province. 

This one-time hotel, which had a capacity of 1000, 
now houses approximately 280 people from all over 
the world, including 110 philosophy students, 100 
theology students, 40 faculty members, and 30 lay 
brothers. The mosaic floor, located in the atrium, 
contains 12 million marble mosaics, and the 6th floor 
is decorated with 48 symbolic figures done by the 
muralist Arthur Young. 

The average day at West Baden consists, according 
to a former student, of study, study, study, philosophy 
in the morning and theology in the evening, with a 
few well-spaced intervals devoted to breathing and 
other extra-curricular activities, such as eating. 




REV. MICHAEL M. MONTAGUE, S.J. 
Dean of Philosophy 



102 



Missa coram populo occupies part of the 
Jesuit community's study of the liturgy. 




Joe Sweeney finds an endless 

flow of periodicals to be read. fe. 



After days, months, years 
of preparation — ordination. 





A star is born 
to Hugh Creedon. 




Filipino Jesuits Ben Carlos, Glicerio Abad, Rafael 
Borromeo, and Jesus Fernandez plan a "snow job." 






The West Baden 


Hotel has gone 




from room-service 


to Rome-service. 


1 'W- ^^,(Jf*^ 






|ft^l''^"'^ip4|S|f 






PW^KT^T^ 


i^Mk*'jfuB 








H^HhI^ y j^^^B 








^^^r ^'^'^tPPS^' ^^^^P^P' 








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• 


sisr 






Members of the band's brass section believe that 
man can be like the angels, preferably Gabriel. 



Studies are temporarily abandoned 
as seminarians turn to football. 




Probing philosophy becomes simpler 
in Fr. Wulftange's small classes. 



Dave Peebles reads bedtime stories 
at the nearby old folks' home. 





Fr. James Serrick and Mr. Joseph Aguerre make minor adjust- 
ments on the electronic pipe organ they built on campus. 



Fr. Joseph Pilot demonstrates "the rite way" 
to Jesus Fernandez of the Philipines. 





PRE-SEMINARY 

LATIN PROGRAM 



REV. LAURENCE E. HENDERSON S.J 
Director 



Top Row: Bob Murphy, Jim McGinty, Vern Korchinski, Harry Menz, 
Fred Lutz, Jack Orr, John Keleher. Second Row.Bro. Donald Daebel- 
liehn, C.S.V., Bill Rich, Ben Bachmeier, Dick Hallihan, Joe Greskiewicz, 
Art Hartin, John Kelly, Jim Runyon, Jack Lynch, Ed Corbett. Third 
Row. Terry Davidson, Carm Gallegos, Len Iverson, Jack Winter- 
lin, Hugh Monahan, Dave Molnar, George Ziener, Ed Malkiewicz, Dick 
Weston. Bottom Row. Rev. Laurence E. Henderson, S.J., Frank Ander- 
son, Jim Weiland, Ken Kopydlowski, Ed McNamara, Jack Holt, Dick 
Senneway, Tony de Mello, Mike Durbin, Dave Duran. 




The Pre-Seminary Latin Program was established fifteen 
years ago to aid potential priests whose vocations were hindered 
by a lack of training in the Latin language. Today the Pro- 
gram is primarily oriented toward veterans desiring to enter the 
priesthood. Most of the students enrolled in the Program al- 
ready have their degrees, some graduate and professional de- 
grees. 

Loyola is the only school in the country in which students 
can obtain enough Latin credits to enter the seminary in six 
months. This year there are forty-two students enrolled in the 
Program, which consists of one semester of fifteen hours of 
Latin. The five courses are Fundamentals, Caesar, Cicero, Vir- 
gil, and Syntax. 



106 



1 • 




THE SCHOOL OF 

BUSINESS 

ADMINISTRATION 



The world of modern business, becoming more and 
more complex as the advances of automation, mechani- 
zation, and technology become more apparent, carries 
with it an added responsibility to its leaders, a respKjn- 
sibility in the moral and ethical as well as the economic 
level. 

To meet these increasing pressures upon the busi- 
ness leaders of the future, Loyola University's College of 
Business Administration attempts to provide all its stu- 
dents with a solid grounding in the liberal arts, enabling 
them to make their decisions upon solid philosophical 
principles. 

Under the leadership of Dean J. Raymond Sheriff, the 
College of Business Administration fulfills the Univer- 
sity's aim of service to the community by providing ethi- 
cally motivated business leaders. 



"s^-V ■ 





DR. J. RAYMOND SHERIFF 
Dean 



JOHN R. JOZWIAK 
Assistant to the Dean 




108 



^ 



ACCOUNTING FACULTY 



Standing: Richard Cusek, Charles Caufield, Adam Stach. Seated: H. Richard Collins, Rev. 
D. L. McCleary, C.S.V., Dr. Robert Meyer, Martin Drebin. 




109 




John O'Malley, Dr. John Zvetina, chairman, John Jozwiak. 









!B i>"^:-i ^ 



BUSINESS LAW 
FACULTY 



ECONOMICS- 
FINANCE 
FACULTY 



Standing: Dr. Francis Murans, Donald 
Meyer, Dr. Sylvester Frizol; Seated: Dr. 
Theodosi Mogilnitsky, chairman, Dr. He- 
len Potter. 




110 




Dr. Gerhard Ditz, Dr. O. A. Smalley, chairman, George 
Niarchos, Donald Meyer. 



MARKETING FACULTY 




Standing: Rev. Raymond Baumhart, S.J., Joseph McCuUough; Seated: Dr. Joseph Englet, 
Dr. Raymond Mayer, chairman, Rev. Raymond Jancauskas, S.J. 



MANAGEMENT FACULTY 



111 



THE UNIVERSITY 
COLLEGE 



University College is, in a sense, Loyola University 
in miniature. Through the years it has become a 
distinct undergraduate and graduate college of the 
University, administered by its own dean. 

The student body is comprised of high school grad- 
uates interested in completing a college program on a 
part-time basis in the evening and others who are in- 
terested in subjects which will broaden their educa- 
tion in cultural, business, and generally avocational 
fields. 

Although University College operates only during 
late afternoons, evenings and on Saturdays, it offers 
students complete curricula toward baccalaureate de- 
grees. It seeks to carry out the Jesuit educational 
plan in all programs. 

The College of Arts and Sciences is represented by 
courses in humanities, mathematics, social studies, 
and education; the College of Commerce is repre- 
sented by courses in accounting, finance, economics, 
and management. It is, in effect, an independent 
academic world, liberal in the scof>e of its activities, 
forceful in its resolve to present education of the 
highest quality to as great a number of students as 
possible. Its success is a tribute to its own dedication 
and the quality of the students who represent it. 





JOHN P. DONOHUE 
Assistant to the Dean 



RICHARD A. MATRE 
Dean 




Many solutions to University College Student Council problems come out of informal 
bull sessions like this. 



Fr. Loftus explains the intricacies of metaphysics to a University College class. 




113 




DR. FRANK M. AMATURO 
Assistant Dean 



DR. WILLIAM P. SCHOEN 
Dean 



REV. LESTER EVETT, S.J. 
Chaplain 



THE DENTAL SCHOOL 



As a Catholic dental school, the Loyola 
University School of Dentistry strives to 
prepare its students to be competent in the 
general practice of dentistry, and to impart 
to them a sound appreciation of the social, 
moral, and spiritual values of life. The fac- 
ulty undertakes this objective and thorough- 
ly trains the student in the diagnosis, pre- 
vention, and treatment of oral diseases and 
disorders of a direct dental relationships. 

The Loyola University School of Dentis- 
try's record of service to the Chicagoland 
community is impressive. Half of the den- 
tists of the area are graduates of the School. 
In addition. Dental School students and fac- 
ulty staff Loyola's Dental Clinic — the 
school's teaching laboratory. The Clinic 
provides services for people of moderate 
means seeking expert dental care. During 
the previous year the Clinic staff handled 
over 70,000 patient visits. 



DR. JOHN R. ALLISON 

Director of Clinics 



JOHN E. BLICKENSTAFF 
Director of Audio-Visual Education 

114 




DEPARTMENT CHAIRMAN 






DR. ARTHUR KROL 
Prosthetics 



DR. PAUL DAWSON 

Operative Surgery 



DR. PATRICK TOTO 

Research and Oral Pathology 



DR. WILLIAM BURCH 

Pedodontics 






DR. JAMES BEST 

Endodontics 



DR. GUSTAV RAPP 

Chemistry and Physiology 



DR. NICHOLAS BRESCIA 

Anatomy 



DR. JOSEPH JARABAK 

Orthodontics 




f fm} 




DR. JOHN O'MALLEY 

Histology 



DR. ANTHONY GARGIULO 

Periodontics 




DR. GEORGE MATOUSEK 
Fixed Prosthesis 




<^ 




DR. NICHOLAS CHOUKAS 
Oral Surgery 



115 




Students in the Orthodontics Department view a patient's X-rays under the 
supervision of Dr. Thomas Cavanaugh, Teaching Fellow (right). 




Dr. Nicholas Brescia and Dr. Marshall Smulson of the 
Department of Anatomy give a visual aid TV demon- 
stration. 



Dr. Vincent Sawinski, Dr. Louis Blanchet, and Dr. Gus- 
tav Rapp check a reading on the Warburg Respirometer 
while an eager student peers intently over their 
shoulders. 




116 




Dr. Joseph Krajewski, Dr. Anjena Joglekar, and Dr. 
Anthony Gargiulo of the Periodontics Department 
stage an oral hygiene demonstration for a captivated 
patient. 



The Histology Department's Dr. Robert Pollock, Dr. Marshall Smulson, Dr. Kenneth Now- 
lan, and Dr. John O'Malley are literally surrounded by their uniformed dental students. 





"That's right, student" assures Dr. Ronald 
Nierenberg, Dr. William Burch, and Dr. Mar- 
vin Koslov of the Pedodontics Department. 



'^ % 



In the Research Department we see Maria 
Gylys, Danute Augius, Birute Prapuolenis, 
Stase Tumosa and Dr. Patrick Toto. 





Dr. Norman Smith remains seated while in- 
serting a burr. Mr. EJavid Haas, Dr. Peter 
Wall, Dr. Paul Dawson, Dr. Thomas Russell, 
and Mr. Alphonse Dioguardi of the Depart- 
ment of Operatives stand to watch. 




Dr. Richard Delo, Dr. Walter Beck- 
er, Mr. Vincent Simone, and Mr. 
Robert Frigoletto of the Department 
of Oral Surgery join forces to pre- 
pare a patient for some dental work. 



In the Department of Prosthodontics we find Dr. Ar- 
thur Krol, Mr. Jackson Fletcher, Dr. Keith Young, Mr. 
Renert Gerhard, and Mr. Jesse Soltysiak. 




119 




Microscopic analysis is done by Dean William Schoen, 
Dr. Philip Schoen, John Coughlin and Dr. Norman Smith 
in the Dental Materials lab. 



Tongue-depressor-in-cheek, Bur- 
ton Miller tests new equipment 
as Dr. James Pascente,. Ruth 
Morris, Dr. Mario Santangelo, 
William Pakosz and Donald 
Miller of the Diagnosis depart- 
ment look on. 




120 




The Ceramics department may never recover from the 
feminine atmosphere introduced by Dorothy Zojauskas 
and Barbara Jarabak. 



Action in the Endodontics department grips Richard 
McBride, Dr. James Best, Urban Hermann, Dr. Mar- 
shall Smulson, Joseph Clawson, Dr. John Sowle and 
Dr. Benjatnin Gurney. 




121 



THE SCHOOL 
OF LAW 



The School of Law of Loyola University, founded in September, 1908, and 
approved by the American Bar Association in 1905, confers the degrees of Juris 
Doctor and Bachelor of Laws. It offers instruction designed primarily to prepare 
students for the practice of law in any jurisdiction where the common law pre- 
vails. 

The School aims at aletring the consciences of its students to the fulfilment 
of their civil, social, and religious duties, esfjecially in their professional aspects. 
The faculty endeavors, wherever possible, to evaluate the positive law in relation 
to scholastic natural-law principles. The School of Law, as a department of the 
University, is dedicated to the philosophy that there is an ideal and objective 
order of justice, based upon the natural law, by which human beings are endowed 
with certain inalienable rights and obligations to enable them to realize in human 
dignity the divine destiny decreed by their Creator; that the natural law respects 
and governs all human actions and therefore, the actions of man in a civil society 
which is subject to constantly changing political, social, and economic forces; that 
by the recognition and application of natural law to the positive civil law, human 
society too can approach the ideal and objective order of justice intended the 
human beings. 

The standards and principles of law are treated not as ends in themselves, 
but as the rational means to the attainment of objective justice. 




JOHN C. HAYES 
Dean 





Standing: Robert Burns, Francis Sullivan, James 
Forkins, Rev. William Kenealy, S. J. Seated: John 
Zvetina, John Hayes, Dean, Richard Carpenter. 



The Law Library is seen in one of 
its quiet moods — the statue of Tho- 
mas More basks in it. 





Professor Robert E. Burns engages in 
an after-class discussion with students. 



There's method to Bud Murdock's madness, as a "Mur- 
dock's mess " is the only way to become a top law student. 





i 



The Moot Court is in session with Thomas Mahoney, Wil- 
liam Creed, and Maurice McCarthy. 






Law students Gus Athas, Thomas Crisham, and John 
Kneafsey pour over the legal wisdom of the ages. 




These law students almost look 
as if they're studying for an exam. 



Law secretary Kathleen Kenealy to student James 
Atten: "Sorry, the office closed five minutes ago." 



125 



! 



THE STRITCH SCHOOL 
OF MEDICINE 



The high value placed on personal integrity, Christian ethics, 
and human charity, coupled with an education in sound medical 
science are the primary reasons for the Stritch School of Medicine 
being ranked high among the leading medical schools in the 
world. 

Founded in 1915 as the Loyola University School of Medicine, 
and renamed the Stritch School of Medicine in April, 1948, it 
employs the most modern principles of medical education. The 
School advises advanced study and research, and in connection 
with this aim, the Board of Graduate Studies of the University 
approved in 1947 the graduate departments of Anatomy, Bio- 
chemistry, Microbiology, Pharmacology, and Physiology. 

For professional research and educational purposes, Stritch 
operates main clinics at Mercy Hospital, Loretto Hospital, Lewis 
Memorial Maternity Hospital, and Cook County Hospital. 



DR. JOHN F. SHEEHAN 
Dean 




126 



liT^ 





DR. FREDERICK M. SELFRIDGE 

Assistant Dean 



REV. JOHN W. BIERI, S.J. 
Student Counselor 




It's a long way from the anatomy 
lab to the surgeon's table, but pre- 
paration must start early. 




This operating room drama is all in a day's work. 



These are X-Rays. Color them transparent. 




"I 



128 




Dr. Stanislaw Maslanka has some- 
thing in his bag for both the patient 
and the student. 








n^ 




Dr. Einar Leifson, chairman of Microbiology dept., uses the Bunsen burn- 
er to test the contents of the test tubes and then to light his pipe. 






Dr. Lincoln Dorrnn, Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Anatomy, pauses over endless reports. 



Dr. Harvey Wong inspects the work 
of his students before grading. 




^ 



Something under that microscope makes 
this student rise quickly from his seat. 



This technician in a Microbiology laboratory takes care to keep 
these cultures fresh and usable for research. 







Dr. Norton Melcior makes another entry into his own 
secret journal. 



"Let's see, two grams of sulfur, one gram of copper, 
some water and 'bottoms up." 




131 




Aha, so this is where they keep that stuff. 



"Cream, sugar, coffee — I think 1 shall have tea," says Dr. Alex- 
ander Karczmar, Chairman of Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 




»"* ■■«* 







^ ;,j^,?_--^ 



132 




No, that is not embroidery work that Dr. 
Walter Randall, Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Physiology, is doing, it only looks 
that way. 





Making out his report sheets is all 
in a day's work for this student. 



If medical progress begins in the classroom, 
there is promise in these intent students. 




133 



SCHOOL 
OF NURSING 

The Loyola School of Nursing is one of 
the most popular schools of the University. 
It has the honor of being one of only four 
collegiate nursing programs in the state of 
Illinois. 

The School of Nursing offers two degree 
programs. It has designed a program for 
high school graduates which combines nurse's 
training with liberal arts studies. It also 
has a supplemental degree program which 
allows registered nurses to acquire a degree 
by supplementing their three year hospital 
program with college academic work. 

Graduates of the school of Nursing receive 
practical experience in surgical, medical, ob- 
stetrical, pediatric, psychiatric, and public 
health fields. 

It is not only professional training that the 
women receive in the nursing program, but 
also training in the understanding of them- 
selves, their patients, and God. 





DR. IMOGENE KING 

Chuirman, Basic Nursing Program 



GLADYS KINIERY 
Dean 



ESSIE ANGLUM 
Assistant Dean 




134 





Char Popp diverts her bedridden 
patient by a ride thru the halls. 



Sandy Kattner demonstrates skill and precision in hand- 
ling functional medications at Weiss Hospital. 




Nursing faculty are, (Standing) Mary Kartel, Bernice Carroll, Constance Ferris, Mrs. Mary 
Sloan, Marjorie Kaepplinger, Avis Nieman, Marion Corcoran, Susan Dudas, Angela Del- 
Vecchio, Frances Geddo, Leona Smolinski, Martha Goodrich; (Seated) Shirley Boettger, 
Sarah Zeeman, Imogene King, Gladys Kiniery, Essie Anglum. 



135 




Helen Hershinow and Ruth Ann Brinkman put their 
training to practical use in the emergency room at 
Weiss Hospital. 




"One box of red ones and two boxes of green 
ones" — Mary Jane Skvier tells the hospital phar- 
macist. 




136 





Sheila Walsh and Kathy Zelesko assist a crutch 
bound patient in rehabilitation therapy center. 



Student nurses compare notes during coffee break 
at L.T. 



One day students, the next day Pub- 
lic Health nurses: Maureen McMa- 
hon, Nancy Mysyk, and Diane Kelly. 




137 




Annette Garnello and Pat McAleese demon- 
strate blood pressure technique in O.P.D. 




138 



The underlying principles of sterile technique 
are put into practice by Mary Ann Slivka in 
the medicine room at Weiss Memorial. 




^k-.:^- 




Charlotte Popp and Sandra Kattner shown in 
the Weiss conference room: to confer, na- 
turally. 



Mary Ann Barnett, Mary Lou Hurley. Barbara 
Lemley look up from their rather gory toys. 



Recognition Day means that caps will be add- 
ed to the slightly windblown coiffures of 
nursing students. 





139 



INSTITUTE 

OF SOCIAL AND 

INDUSTRIAL 

RELATIONS 



One of the increasingly important areas of national interest 
is found in the field of industrial relations. With the increasing 
complexity of employer-employee relationships being foreseen 
by Loyola University as far back as 1941, the Institute of Social 
and Industrial Relations was founded. 

The Institute finds its primary outlet in the provisions for 
courses on the graduate school level offered in the fields of per- 
sonnel administration, industrial relations, and public adminis- 
tration. Besides these, the Institute offers additional courses for 
students training as sociologists in industry or government or 
in the social sciences. 

Outside the strictly class-room academic functions, the In- 
stitute has also initiated an Internship Program, which provides 
for personal contacts for its students with various officials of 
industrial concerns, union organization, and governmental agen- 
cies. These various contacts provide the participating students 
with concrete practical experience in the fields into which they 
intend to enter. Besides this more or less formalized program, 
there is also a series of seminar lectures for those students who, 
for some reason or other, are not able to participate in the in- 
ternship program. These seminars deal in much the same areas 
as does the Internship Program, but on a less formalized, more 
voluntary basis. The combination of these programs insures at 
least some practical experience in their fields for the students of 
the I.S.I.R. 





Dr. Rubben Fleming delivers the keynote 
address during the labor-management 
seminar. 



REV. RALPH A. GALLAGHER, S.J. 



140 




I.S.I.R. instructors, John Heneghan, Philomena Mullady, Paul Grant and Dr. Julius Rezler. 



Mr. Larry Heptic, Asst. Labor Counsel for Olin Matheson 
Corp. of New York City, tenders an opinion to the assembl- 
age as the procedings of the labor-management seminar get 
under way in the Water Tower Inn. 





Dr. Julius Rezler (left) and Mr. Edward T. 
Carroll ( right ) look on as Dr. Fleming con- 
cludes his address. 



141 




Quyntin Andrews, Marilyn Campbell, George Rittmanic and Eliza- 
beth Duncan share the joy of Karl Kauffmann {third from left) 
as he stares unbelieving at a high grade he received on a major 
term paper. 



THE SCHOOL 

OF SOCIAL WORK 

One of the most needed and vital schools in the 
University is the School of Social Work. It has the honor 
of being one of the few schools experienced in the art 
of aiding troubled people in solving problems which 
hamper a productive and satisfying life. 

The Loyola School of Social Work possesses a philos- 
ophy which penetrates its entire curriculum. The concept 
of fraternal charity, as a virtue and obligation, has been 
universally recognized. Poverty, abandonment, physical, 
mental, and emotional problems, and changing social con- 
ditions have created an awareness and a need to de- 
velop a more scientific methods of aid. To be an effec- 
tive social worker, principles must be blended with a 
scientifc knowledge of human behavior, familiarity with 
social service, and an intense interest in people. 

Finally, social work is recognized as a profession 
which has become a necessary part of our society. Over 
four thousand social workers from the continental United 
States, Alaska, Hawaii, the Philippines, and the Orient 
have received their professional training at Loyola. 



'L- 




DR. MATTHEW SCHOENBAUM 
Dean 



Social Work faculty are {standing) Mary OTaughlin, Dr. Mat- 
thew Schoenbaum, Martha Urbanowski, Earline Woods; {seated) 
Margaret O'Byrne, Constance Kellam, Alice Mbran, Margaret 
Dwyer, Shirley Anderson, Rev. Felix Biestek, S.J., Anne Marie 
Lee. 






li 





Some social work students star in a Christmas party 
skit lampooning themselves. Left to right: Peter Toma- 
shek, Margaret Scanlon, Lawrence Lubertozzi, Mary 
Voight, Dorothy Barta. 





Mary Braden and Joseph Cardello are 
in a relaxed mood between classes. 



Sociable social workers are Claire Pelletier, 
Rev. Donald Schmidlin, David Gerwe, Robert 
Constable, Charlotte Hennessey. 



The 1963 graduates: kneeling: Joseph Cardello, Robert Constable, David Gerwe, Dennis 
Duffy, Karl Kauffmann; sitting: Marlene Opara, Ann Simmons, Sister Mary Elizabeth, Cath- 
erine Harris, Anne O'Neil, Rose Nederhiser, Margaret Manella, Darlene Wolf, Vivian Larsen, 
Claire Pelletier, Charlotte Hennessey; stijnding: Marilyn Kamin, Father Thomas Mechten- 
berg, George Preston, David Newman, Lowell Barnett, Howard Wolff, Edward Werner, Rev. 
Donald Schmidlin, George Rittmanic, Quyntin Andrews, Clyde Gehrig, Martin Keeley, 
Maurice Lyons, Mary Braden. 




Person-to-person contaos form 
the cornerstone of the field- 
work program. 





■3 


^ 


^^^ jflHI^Hl^ ''-"'X - (P^ ■ .• ^^ 




^^^^^^^^H 


1 




m 


1 




i 


i 




1 




These instructors guide the second-year Social Work students in their fieldwork experiences: 
{above) Mrs. Mary Fisher, Mrs. Winifred Jones, Mrs. Kathleen Durkott, Frances Cashman, 
Everette Fields, Adele Fricke, Mrs. Margaret Ferkinhoff, William Duncan; (below) 
Theophile Lavizzo, Charlotte Becker, Mrs. Barbara Wickell, Lucille Ish, Mrs. DeLois Scott, 
Nancy Randolph, Elizabeth Rooney. 




■m^ 





HOME STUDY 
DEPARTMENT 

A member of the National University Extension 
Association, Loyola University's Home Study Depart- 
ment endeavors to do exactly what its name implies; 
that is, to provide opportunities for the educational 
advancement of those who, for one reason or another 
are not able to attend regular University classes. 
Active at Loyola since 1921, the Home Study Depart- 
ment is one of only two such organizations at Catholic 
universities offering a program of home studies. 

In fulfilling its role of bringing the University to 
the students, the Home Study Department has en- 
rolled students in every one of the fifty States and 
Canada, as well as serving students in Africa and 
Europe. 



MARY LOUISE McPARTLIN 
Director of Home Study 



The people who stamp the home 
study envelopes; Teresa Lam, Rose 
Szabelski and Christine Chonis. 




145 



Illinois 

Catholic Historical 

Review 



MID-AMERICA 

\n lfi>f.iri.-n| IUm*'« 



cTWID-cylMERICA 

An Historical Review 



cTWID-cylMERICA 

An Historical Review 



JANUARY 19» 



CUNTfcNTS 



~ ASH Ml* BUST or TMK 




n* n^ m <»rbi>i ■ 



n> tj Mf i iM r><>itUB d Oaihrti 






; ,1 ,v (' A K r 

1963 



The change in format of the Institute's review, from Vol. 1. 
rent issue, is pictured above. 



No. 1. (July, 1918) to the cur- 



THE INSTITUTE OF JESUIT 
HISTORY 

To anyone who has been a frequent visitor to the Lake 
Shore library, one of the most arresting features present there 
is the huge mural map over the library counter, denoting the 
history of Jesuit exploration in the early days of the New 
World. This mural, along with other informational and re- 
search projects, is the work of the Institute of Jesuit History. 

Integrated academically with the Graduate School, the 
Institute publishes monographs on Jesuit history, several texts 
in history, and a quarterly, Mid-America, dealing with re- 
search articles on the Jesuit order. 

As for membership requirements, the Institute is open 
to both Jesuits and non-Jesuits holding a Ph.D. in history and 
having qualifications for research in those areas which most 
directly apply to the aims of the Institute. 



- —" ' / 



"1 • 




C«^ 



REV. JEROME V. JACOBSEN, S.J. 
Director 



Pictured below are a few of the many monographs authored by the Institute's members. 




146 



THE LOYOLA GUIDANCE 
CENTER 

Since 1941 when the Loyola Guidance Center was 
founded by Father Charles Ignatius Doyle, more than 
nine thousand disturbed children and parents of all 
ages, economic and educational backgrounds, have 
been assisted by the workers of the Center. Full time 
clinical psychologists plus a group of highly trained 
assistants staff the facilities. The purpose of the 
Center is to restore to the child his birthright to 
happiness and to help his parents to a better under- 
standing of his problems. 

The Center gives child guidance of a psychological 
nature, dealing with behavioral problems, school ad- 
justment, vocational guidance, interpretation of re- 
tardation and mental deficiency, preschool training, 
and counseling on special school placements. It also 
provides personal counseling for children and adoles- 
cents, with emphasis on the counseling of parents and 
the treatment of children's emotional problems by 
psychological therapy. 




Standing: Dorothy Auw, Catherine Potkay, Charles 
Potkay, Virginia Wenzel, Barbara White. Seated: Mar- 
cella Twomey, Sr. Marie Raymond, Dr. Kennedy, Helen 
Pancerz, Judy Hoffman. 



DR. THOMAS M. KENNEDY 
Director 






y^ 



'^ 




h 





Loyola students gladly leave windy city, des- 
tination, sunny Italy. 




I 




llAL. 



ROMA 

ENTE PROVINCIALE PER IL TURISMO DI R( 



LOYOLA ROME CENTER 



"Rome is our classroom and our campus." That is how the American college students liv- 
ing and studying at Loyola's unique Institute of Humanistic Studies in Rome describe the ex- 
perience of earning a year's academic credit at one of the principal sites of Western civilization. 

Undergraduate courses in the History of Art, Classics, History, English, Education, Modern 
Languages, Philisophy, Psychology, Sociology, and Theology are taught in English and maintain 
continuity with the home programs. The Rome Center is staffed by Loyola's own professors, 
European and American Jesuits, and by visiting research professors, notably this year, Dr. Oscar 
Halecki. 

Side trips to museums, churches, monuments and recent excavations offer a personal ex- 
perience of history of more worth than hundreds of sterile classroom hours. 

Loyola's program of studies abroad has been such a success that even the modern, spacious 
quarters of the International Student House which at present Loyola shares with other foreign 
students are not large enough. This problem will find its solution by the fall semester of 1964 
in the new building to be constructed by the Italian government exclusively for Loyola. 

Loyola's Rome Center owes its success to its indefatigable director. Reverend John Felice, 
S.J., who spares no effort to make the European stay profitable for every person. 



148 



i 





Even in Rome, the laundry must be done. 



Fr. Felice and Mike Norkett talk over a day's 
work. 



Sandy Wandelb, Hilary Hanman, Olga Bur- 
zio, Dave Harrden find that libraries are for 
learning. 



Students at the coffee bar: "It's not Hamilton's, 
but it'll do." 





149 



v.y 



SJ>f|H 




Getting into the social whirl, 
meet the president of Italy. 



the Roman Loyolans 




Dr. Schwarzenburg, Professor of Political Science, en- 
gages in after class discussion with Sail Hailing and 
Mike McGraw. 



150 



I 



A balcony photographer catches Lo- 
yola students in a relaxed mood. 



'iRr' '^-^ if. ^ 

1 

Americanos O'Conner, Poynton and Schmitz play 
football under the eyes of the greats in Mussolini's 
Foro Halico. 








CIVIS, the Loyola Hall of Rome. 







-■'^x 
~ -N 




>., 



\ 



i,ii 



Si. '^ ^ 1 




Standing: John Barnes, Stephen Gilmour, John Puljung, Richard Kosek, Charles Murdock, Dennis Lissak, 
Rev. Donald Schmidlin, Maurice McCarthy, Gerald Albrecht. Seated: William Clune, Charles Freuhe, Rich- 
ard Keller, Rev. John Kemp, S.J., Dr. Thomas Collins, Dr. Albert Petrulis. 



ALPHA SIGMA NU 

A national Jesuit honor fraternity, embodying in its 
essence those principles of the whole man toward which 
the Jesuits have long directed themselves, Alpha Sigma 
Nu was founded in 1915 and established its Loyola chapter 
in 1939. Presently, membership is extended to thirty 
Jesuit colleges and universities, while Loyola's ranks in- 
clude 350 inductees. The involved process of selection 
insures that only students fulfilling the high ideals of the 
organization are inducted. 

The individual students are nominated by the campus 
deans and chapter members, after which nomination the 
final selection is made by the President of the University 
on the basis of academic excellence, consistent with cultural 
and intellectual service to the University. 



154 




BETA ALPHA PSI 

One of the newer honorary organizations on campus, 
the Beta Iota Chapter of Beta Alpha Psi was established 
at Loyola November 10, I960. As the National Honorary 
Accounting Fraternity, Beta Alpha Psi selected its members 
on the basis of scholastic achievement in general business 
subjects as well as accounting courses. 

The activities which Beta Alpha Psi concerns itself 
with lie among three basic lines. First, it provides its mem- 
bers with many opportunities to become aware of the 
niceties of the accounting professions. Second, it provides 
service to the University by assisting the Accounting 
department in many of its extracurricular projects. Finally, 
the Chapter also publishes a journal presenting current 
accounting problems to accounting students. 



Michael Brown, Treasurer; Theodore Wierbow- 
ski, Vice-President: Gerry Governile, President. 



Standing: Michael Brown, Edward Cunningham, Robert Schurer, John Brady, Michael Ward, 
Kenneth Nykiel, Gerry Governile, Jay Rotello, Theodore Wierbowski. Seated: Mary Cassidy, 
Anne Donahue. 




155 




John J. Puljung, Vice-President: John R. Jozwiak, Secretary: Gerald L. Gov- 
ernile, President: Ronald F. Gniadek. 



BETA GAMMA SIGMA 

Beta Gamma Sigma entered its second year of existence 
on April 21, 1963. A National Honor Commerce Fraternity, 
was established on the Loyola campus by Dr. Raymond 
Mayer, head of the Management department at Loyola's 
School of Business Administration, then enabling Loyola 
to become a part of an organization represented in every 
Big Ten university. 

Membership requirements for Beta Gamma Sigma 
state that a commerce student wishing to join must be in 
attendance at Loyola for three years and be in either the 
upper ten per-cent of the Senior class or the upper five 
per-cent of the Junior class. 



156 




Standing: Jerry Woynerowski, Secretary: Kael Kennedy, Treasurer, 
Seated: Warren Bracy, President; Donald Stinson, Moderator; Nan- 
cy Klickman, Vice-President, 



Admiring their "trophies" are Dr. Paul Hummert, Nancy Klickman, 
Jerry Woynerowski, Mary Lee CuUen, Kael Kennedy, Donald 
Stinson. 




DELTA SIGMA RHO 

Loyola's recent emergence into national prominence as 
a school noted for its fine debate teams has necessitated the 
founding of an organization to honor those responsible for 
the emergence. Thus chapter of Delta Sigma Rho, National 
Honorary Forensic Fraternity, was begun at Loyola four years 
ago. An old organization, founded in Chicago in 1906, Delta 
Sigma Rho now includes over eighty chapters nationally. 

At Loyola, Delta Sigma Rno has attempted to promote 
forensics on the college level by providing opportunities for 
students to display their speaking talents. On the high school 
level, it contributes to the Chicago Catholic Debate League 
by providing referees for debaters, among other activities. 



157 




PHI SIGMA TAU 

Founded at Loyola in 1955, the local chapter of Phi 
Sigma Tau has the distinction of being the first chapter 
of the national established at a Catholic University. As the 
National Honor Society of Philosophy, Phi Sigma Tau 
considers among its aims the encouragement and rewarding 
of scholarship, the promotion of research and advanced 
study in Philosophy, and the popularization of philosophy 
among the student body. In fulfilling these aims. Phi Sigma 
Tau yearly participates in a nationwide essay contest, con- 
tributes to a Society publication, and sponsors various 
lectures throughout the school year. Requirements for mem- 
bership include the maintainence of a "B" average in at 
least three philosophy covirses. 



John Barnes, President: Penny Luback, Treasurer; 
Gilmour, Vice-President. 



Stephen 



Back row: Therese Tumosa, Diane Darling, James Serwatka, Tony Cutiletta, Bob Bergstrom; 
Middle row. Mark Scott, Margaret Eiler, Patricia Sullivan, Rosemary Lukacevich, Richard 
MuUer; Front row. Joan Klinowski, Penny Luback, John Barnes, Stephen Gilmour, Frances 
Gutschick, Diane Szarowicz. 




158 



PI DELTA EPSILON 

Ideas without the suitable means of communication are 
among the most useless entities possible. It is the realization 
of this fact which makes Pi Delta Epsilon, a national honor- 
ary journalism fraternity, as necessary as it is. Serving as a 
form of recognition for the student journalist's efforts, 
services, and accomplishments, Pi Delta Epsilon was founded 
at Syracuse University in 1909. 

In 1959, a group of students on the staff of the Loyolan, 
Cadence, and Loyola News formed an organization to 
petition Pi Delta Epsilon to establish a chapter at Loyola 
University. On May 29, 1959, the Loyola chapter of Pi 
Delta Epsilon was officially established. 




Pi Delta Epsilon members John Van Bramer, Cecile 
Conrad and Paul Conarty find a peaceful corner of the 
publications office . . . 



. . . and Jim Masek, Kael Kennedy 
and Mike Dessimoz pore over the 
latest edition. 





. . . while Bob Bassi, Ed Rice and 
Jerry Woynerowski engage in some 
typewriter antics . . . 



159 



I 













Mrs. Frances Dunning (center). National Chapter 
Treasurer, meets with Alpha Beta chapter officers: Alice 
McHugh, Vice-President; Celeste Renier, Secretary; Mrs. 
Lucile Broadwell, President; Mrs. Helen Grace, Treas- 
urer; Barbara Rivan, Archivist; and Sarah Zeeman, 
Counselor. 



Standing: Martha Goodrich, Lucile Broadwell, Helen Grace, Pa- 
tricia Jahnke, E. Mae Mayer, Julianna Fish, Frances Geddo, Jan- 
ice Dittrich, Angela Ambrosia, Shirley Boettger, Essie Anglum, 
Leona Smolinski, Virginia Stift, Joan Stavros, Catherine Leahy, 
Sarah Zeeman, Kathleen Loftus, Mary McCann, Sue Witt, Mary 
Ann Micher. Seated; Kathleen Hawkins, Marie Arreguin, Jean- 
ette Adolphson, Monica Haffler, Ida Boikan, Alice McHugh, 
Barbara Losinski, Kathleen Zelenko, Caroline Manderfeld. 

SIGMA THETA TAU 

The Alpha Beta chapter of Sigma Theta Tau was 
established at Loyola on March 17, 1963. An honor 
society of nursing, its purposes are to provide infor- 
mation and guidance concerning programs of higher 
education and other professional opportunities; to 
assist students in the School of Nursing in attaining 
or maintaining scholastic achievement; to assist in 
the development of a deeper bond of unity between 
students and alumni of the general and basic prog- 
rams; to stimulate interest and promote an active 
membership in professional nursing organizations; to 
provide opportunities for faculty-student cooperative 
activities; to aid in the provision of additional edu- 
cational media for the School of Nursing; to en- 
courage interest and participation of the members in 
nursing research. 



Standing: Dorothy Petrowski, Edna Roache, Mary Kay Bussert, Barbara 
Rivan, Sister M. Nicholas, Marjorie Kaepplinger, Mary Deneen, Olive 
Schneider, Mary Kovac, Mary Jan Skvier, Norma Kubash, Bernice Klein- 
gall, Sister Dolores Kane, Avis Nieman, Imogene King, Celeste Renier. 
Seated: Marilyn Smith, Mary Sloan, Mary Corcoran, Gladys Kiniery, 
Sharon Chwierut, Virginia Keller, Muriel Kaufman, Marianne Muno, 
Nancy Mysyk. 

m 



■^ 




BLUE KEY 

As the National Leadership and Honor Fraternity, Blue 
Key represents one of the most well recognized organizations 
on campus. Dedicated to the ideal of honoring those students 
who have, in their academic accomplishments and extra- 
curricular services, proved themselves distinct and distinguished 
benefits to the University, Blue Key selects its pledges annually 
from the schools of Business Administration, Dentistry, Lake 
Shore and Lewis Towers Arts, Law, Medicine, and the Uni- 
versity College. These students are selected on the basis of 
leadership, service and scholarship. Along with honorary 
memberships, annual awards are presented at the Invitation 
Dinner, at which the Faculty Man of the Year and the 
Organization of the Year are named. 




Conviviality is the keynote of the annual Blue Key dance. 



16; 



Standing: John Van Bramer, Vice-President; John 
Gerding, Secretary. Seated: Stephen Cox, Treasurer; 
Chris Henning, President. 



Back row: Stephen Cox, Thomas Nolan, John Van 
Bramer, Joseph Wcislo, Robert Staskiewicz, Chris Hen- 
ning; Second row: James Kelly, Jack Carollo, Dennis 
Hillenbrand, Raymond Hurm, Mitchael Donahoe, Joe- 
sph O' Callaghan, Jerome Woynerowski, John Puljung, 
Michael Sullivan, Michael Ponticelli, Kenneth Such, 
John Gerding; Third row: Larry Rubin, Richard Bost- 
yan, Richard Schraitz, John F. Sullivan, John Coughlin, 
Peter Brusca, David Raia, John Collins, J. Dennis 
O'Connor; Front row: James Orchowski, Paul Stewart, 
Patrick Brannen, Edward Mann, Joseph Klodzinski, 
Thomas Boland. 





The Very Rev. James F. Maguire, S.J., accepts a check 
for S350 from Michael Connelly, Blue Key President 
for 1962, as Vice-President Michael Lynch looks on. The 
donation will be applied to defraying the cost of furn- 
ishing the Santa Clara Lounge. 




" ■> 



P^vT 



m 




Slat/ding: Celeste Renier, Gay Cook, Sharon Chwierut, Ann Gilligan, Jan Dietrich, Julie 
Fish, Judy Duda, Marion Amidei. Seated: Maureen Doherty, Pat Brown, Marilyn Cavender, 
Edwina Krol, Margaret Stacy, Helen Slattery, Diane Wcislo. 



Three honorary members have been inducted into Circum- 
ference in the last two years: Mary Lou McPartlin, Director 
of the Home Study Division; Mariette LeBlanc, Dean of 
Women; and Gladys Kiniery, Dean of the School of Nursing. 



CIRCUMFERENCE 

Often considered the female counterpart to Blue 
Key, Circumference was founded in 1958 as an organi- 
zation intended to give special recognition to women 
students who excelled in scholarship, leadership, and 
service. Besides performing their always necessary 
extra-curricular activities. Circumference members 
further assist the University by providing hostesses 
for various University functions. 

The candidates for Circumference, nominated by 
the deans of the various colleges, organization 
moderators or Circumference members themselves, 
must belong to at least two extra-curricular activities 
and have held two major offices or chairmanships. In 
addition, they must have a 2.5 cumulative grade point 
average in the semester preceeding their installation. 




164 




Standing: Cecile Conrad, Secretary; Sharon Chwierut, 
Treasurer; Suzanne Dupre, President; Julie Fish, Vice- 
President. 



Standing: Helen Hershinow, Mary Ann Harvey, Barbara 
Rivan, Mary Anglim, Loretta Picucci, Diane Jenkinson, 
Joyce Seidel, Michaele Wapole, Sue Witt, Darlene O'Broch- 
ta. Seated: Kathleen Loftus, Diane Peiniger, Audrey Gine- 
man, Cecile Conrad, Suzanne Dupre, Fran Olech, Bettine 
Zizzo, Pat Mroczek. 




z:^ 








Serving on the committee to select 
recipients of LOYOLAN Awards 
were (Standing) Mike Donahoe, 
Margie Stacy, Paul Conarty, chair- 
man; (seated) Bill Gardiner and 
Gerry Wolski. 



In order to give recognition to the efforts and con- 
tributions to the University and to student life which 
have been made throughout the years by the student 
leaders, the Loyolan, in 1959, began the practice of 
giving Loyolan Awards to nine outstanding graduates. 
Various systems of allotment have been tried in the 
past few years and it was felt that the system instituted 
last year was the most representative. The awards 
given, then, were distributed in the following cata- 
gories: fraternity man, sorority woman, independent 
man, independent woman, student government man, 
student government woman, scholarship, publications 
and athletics. 

The awards committee this year was composed of 
prominent members of the Loyolan staff, other 
selected student leaders, and prominent members of 
the administration, thus insuring impartial and 
representative selection. 

The awards were presented at the annual Blue 
Key dance, held this year at the Lake Shore Club. 



THE LOYOLAN 

AWARDS 




DIANE WCISLO 
Sorority Woman 



RICHARD DUNNE 
Fraternity Man 




166 




JOHN BARNES 
Scholarship 





PETER STEINFELS 
Publications 





JERALD HARKNESS 
Athletics 



THOMAS PHILPOTT 

Independent Man 



CECILE CONRAD 

Independent Woman 




MICHAEL LYNCH 

Student Government Man 



CELESTE RENIER 

Student Government Woman 




167 



dM ' ^J. 



t* 



*•'••«., 





tud^nt dotternment 



THE LOYOLA UNION ACTIVITIES BOARD 



Traditionally devoted to "the promotion 
of student unity in each school and college 
of the University," the Loyola Union Activi- 
ties Board took a closer look both at itself 
and at its aim during the past year, and many 
of its noteworthy functions were carried out 
in the spirit of that re-examination. 

The Union Board is comprised of one mem- 
ber of each graduate and undergraduate col- 
lege as well as representatives from various 
student organizations. The Chairman, Vice- 
Chairman and Secretary-Treasurer of the 
Board are elected from this group. 

Rather than a glib re-assurance of its abil- 
ity to learn the attitudes and problems of 
the student body, however, the Board has 
encouraged increased communication be- 
tween the two groups by awarding perma- 
nent membership to the Student Opinion 
Commission. 

More significant in its consequences for 
the University as a whole were the two Lead- 
ership Workshops sponsored by the Union. 
These conferences ( the first restricted to in- 
vited student leaders and the second open to 
all, with guests from the faculty and from 
other colleges ) explored local problems con- 
fronting the active student and possible 
means of effecting their solution. 

A final special measure undertaken by the 
Board was a comprehensive Self-Study, con- 
centrating on the scope and exercise of power 
by the Board in recent years. 




/ 


fm^' 


* 






ANNE P. GILLIGAN 
Chairman 



.. .v;...Ai-'tevSv*-?.*^Bi;jC'::-v ■ 



MICHAEL E. DESSIMOZ 
Secretary-Treasurer 



PETER D. ROBERSON 

Vice-Chairman 




GEORGE N. KOLLINTZAS 
Director 



170 




Problems brought up at the 
Union's Leadership Workshop 
I are discussed after the confer- 
ence by Barb Juskiewicz, Jim 
Reilly, Ann Gilligan, John 
Tosto and George Kollintzas 
( back to camera ) . 



Members of the Union Activities Board are (standing) 
Donald Hanley, Sue Dupre, Adam Lutynski, Peter Rober- 
son, Frank Cihiar, Rick Novy, Steve Cox, Helen Hershinow, 
Gerry Smith; (seated) Nancy Sheahan, Mike Promen, Pat 
Nobilio, Anne Gilligan, Mike Dessimoz, Joe Wcislo, Mary 
Braden. 





Keeping in step are Richard Bulger, 
Treasurer; Margie Stacy, Secretary; 
John Tosto, Vice-President; Jim Reil- 
ly. President. 



THE ARTS COUNCIL 



The unification of 3,200 students in the Ojllege 
of Arts and Sciences is the major purpose for which 
the Arts Student Council exists. Presided over by a 
President, Vice-President, Treasurer, and Secretary, 
the Council is comprised of the elected President 
and Vice-President of each class and a Nursing, Com- 
merce, and Union Board representative. 

A Council Mixer, class parties. Freshman Orienta- 
tion Week, and participation in the Variety Show 
were the major events promoted by the Council. A 
new activity, the Cabrini Project, was organized to 
tutor high school students to prevent the discontin- 
uance of their education. 

This year the promotion of student welfare has 
been intensified by additional committees of the 
Council. The new Committee System, dealing with 
academic, judiciary, economic, publicity, and social 
affairs, has contributed to the furthering of the stu- 
dent voice and the enforcement of genuine student 
government. 



Solving the council's problems are James Schnei- 
der, Senior Class President; and John Collins, 
Vice-President. 





Junior Class Officers: John Van Bramer, 
President; Dennis Dernbach, Vice-President. 




Sophomore Class Officers: Barbara Juskiewicz, 
Vice-President; Lyle Rausch, President. 




Freshman Class Officers: Patrick Rattigan, 
President; Joseph Walsh, Vice-President. 



173 




Members of the Business Adminis- 
tration Council confer: John Puljung, 
President; Steve Cox, Vice-President; 
Tom Marcet, Secretary. 



i 



THE BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION COUNCIL 



To achieve its purpose of mediating between the 
administration and students of the School of Busi- 
ness Administration, the Business Ad Council this 
year has continued in its endeavors for successful co- 
hesion among its students. 

The Council is comprised of the officers of each 
class; the senior, junior, sophomore and freshman 
class Presidents serve as Council President, Vice- 
President, Secretary and Treasurer, respectively. 

Throughout the year, speakers have been ob- 
tained to guide the business student toward his chos- 
en career. For those students seeking particular di- 
rection, special counselling was furnished. 

The major social event sponsored by the Council 
was the annual Sno-Ball Dance, held at semester's 
end in January. 

This year, in an attempt to obtain complete par- 
ticipation in Council activities, an advertising com- 
mittee was formed to publicize all major activities 
among the student body, and the resulting Busi- 
ness Ad Newsletter has proven more than adequate. 



Higher level conference among Senior Business 
Ad officers Don Barrett, Secretary-Treasurer; 
Michael Lynch, Vice-President; John Puljung, 
President. 




174 




Junior Class Officers: Jack Wiaduck, 
Secretary; Steve Cox, President; 
Tom Blanchfield, Vice-President. 



Sophomore Class Officers: Jerry 
O'Malley, Vice-President; Tom Mar- 
cet. President; Pat Carey, Secretary. 



Freshman Class Officers: Dennis, 
Carroll, Vice-President; Charles Chi- 
anelli. Secretary. 






Senior Class Officers in a rare moment of repose are: 
(clockuise from left) Kathy Loftus, Secretary; Celes- 
te Renier, President; Kathy Farrell, Vice-President; 
Barbara Phillips, Treasurer. 




THE NURSING COUNCILS 



Junior Class Officers: Carol Sebastian, Vice- 
President; Barbara Hayes, Treasurer; Annette 
Garnello, Secretary; Sheila Walsh, President. 





Sophomore Class Officers, Standing: Pat 
O'Rourke, Vice-President; Anita Wojcik, 
Treasurer. Seated: Mary Cook, Secretary; 
Pat Miller, President. 



Freshman Class Officers: Pat Carroll, Secre- 
tary; Mary Gieren, Treasurer; Sharon Divyak, 
Vice-President; Eileen Mulqueeney, President. 



176 




Day Nursing Council. Standing: Helen Hershinow, Dotty Merkle, Anne Gilligan, Connie 
Sowa, Barbara Dane. Seated: Eileen Mulqueeny, Miss Margaret McDermon, Moderator, 
Sheila Walsh, Celeste Renier, President, Pat Miller. 



Evening Nursing Council. Standing,: Ei- 
leen Cleary, Marian Alich, Helen Kenne- 
dy Grace, Mary Ann Pugh. Seated: Rose- 
marie Doherty, Martha Ann Carey, Carole 
Schiavone, Nancy Sheahan. 




The Nursing Councils, with the formal titles 
of the Association of the Basic Students of the 
Loyola University School of Nursing, and the 
Supplementary Nursing Council, endeavor to 
encourage unity and cooperation among the 
members of the Association. The former is com- 
posed of twenty-one members, including the four 
class officers of each class, while the latter has 
six members from the General (evening) Pro- 
gram. 

The activities of the Association are planned 
to help develop the mental, spiritual, social, and 
professional qualities necessary for the practice 
of nursing, and to promote participation in the 
student activities of the University and in the 
local, state, and national Student Nurse Asso- 
ciation. These activities include the building of 
a float for the annual Pow-Wow weekend, a 
mixer at the beginning of each year, a Valen- 
tine's Day party, a Spring prom, and several 
charity projects. 

The students of the Supplemental program are 
represented in the School of Nursing Associa- 
tion, which provides activities for its students 
similar to those of the Basic Students Association. 



177 




Top row: John Belmonte, Ed Montgomery, President, Charles McCarthy, Dennis Gates, 
Thomas Gay, Paul McEnery, Thomas Norton, Albert Timperman. Middle row. James 
Janotta, Edward Vogel, Raymond Hurm, James Migala, John Hrinda. Seated: Martin Roach, 
Gary Ruoff, Charles Dietschel, Treasurer, John Fitzpatrick, John Ward. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOL COUNCIL 

Although basically concerned with the field of medicine, 
the student council of the Stritch School of Medicine seeks to 
fulfill the needs of students in every phase of university life. 
The members of the Council are guided in their efforts by the 
principles of a congenial and enjoyable social environment, and 
the fostering of a high moral tone in student life. 

The membership of the Council represents a true cross- 
section of the Medical School, being composed of representa- 
tives of the student body at large, the individual classes, and 
the two national fraternities, Phi Beta Pi and Phi Chi. 

The administration of the majority of the social activities 
of the Stritch School of Medicine is overseen by the Medical 
Council, which, in turn, is representative of the School's stu- 
dent body. Furthermore, many functions of general interest to 
the student body are sp)onsored by the Council. 



178 



The Student Council serving the students at Loyola's Den- 
tal School acts to foster inter-class harmony and assume the posi- 
tion of intermediary between the students and faculty. In ac- 
complishing this end it sponsors activities which develop a 
broader cultural, social and moral atmosphere in the School. 

The Council is composed of all four class presidents; a rep- 
resentative from each of the junior, sophomore and freshman 
classes; and one representative from each of the dental fra- 
ternities. The group also elects four executive officers from its 
own members. 

Presiding over all class elections, fraternity rushing, and 
pledging, and all organized student activities, the Council ful- 
fills many positive social functions as well. The Winter Formal, 
the annual Christmas Show, the Dental School News and the 
Dental School Choir are all under its sponsorship. 



THE DENTAL SCHOOL COUNCIL 



Back row: Lee Jess, William Dastic, Richard Bostyn, Robert Sommerfield, Emile Gelinas, 
Treasurer, Peter Roberson, Leo Finley, James Evans, Jack Wierz, Leonard Navrat. Froni row: 
William Foote, Gerald Jeffry, Jerry Gerorgen, Vice-President, John Sullivan, President, 
Dennis Hillenbrand, Secretary, John Coughlin, Charles Bend, Ken Pinner. 




179 



THE STUDENT BAR ASSOCIATION 

The Student Bar Association of Loyola University was or- 
ganized to unify the administration of student affairs and 
extra-curricular activities in the School of Law. This organi- 
zation furnishes the budding attorney with a wide variety of 
professional outlets as well as providing an area of social con- 
tact with others of his own profession. Every student in the 
Law School is a member of the association. 

Because the Student Bar Association is modeled after the 
American Bar Association, it furnishes a firm foundation in 
practical law and enables the members to acquire professional 
skills and to maintain the dignity of the law profession. 

The organization's government is carried on by a board of 
four governors, together with the members of a constitutionally 
prescribed committee . Officers are elected at the beginning of 
the academic year, and the newly elected president appoints 
members of the association to the various committees. This 
group is responsible for the professional and social activities 
provided for the members. 



Standing: Michael Leyden, Thomas Strubbe, Jerome Devane, Robert Coyne, James Milliard, 
John Lewis, Dennis Horan, William Connell, William Creed. Seated: Thomas Crisham, 
Ronald Maksym, Vice-President, Maurice McCarthy, President, William Quinlan, Secretary, 
Fredric Novy, ShirleyMae Howe. 




180 




Standing: Robert Smith, Casimir Zantek, Edward Werner, Robert Constable; Sealed: Mar- 
lene Opara, Ann O'Neill, Margaret Dwyer, Mary Voigt. 



THE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK COUNCIL 



Their end objective rather closely identified with those 
of the other school councils, the Social Work Council acts as 
a representative body for the School of Social Work. Composed 
of one representative from each class, the Council meets reg- 
ularly and concerns itself with projects dealing with the three 
main areas of student life: religious, professional and social. 

In the religious field, the Social Work Council arranges 
a yearly retreat and an annual day of recollection. As for social 
aspects, the Council provides for Orientation Week preparations 
and a party for June graduates. In their final field of endeavor, 
a series of guest lecturers are invited in to bring home the 
problems and difficulties which the members of the School of 
Social Work may exf)ect to face in the future. 



181 




Standing: Edwin Glunz, Joseph Barney, James 
Kelly; Seated: Patricia Marz, Charles Fruehe, 
Joseph Wcislo, Patricia Witt. 



THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE COUNCIL 

The evening school student, through his attendance at 
University College, automatically belongs to the Student Asso- 
ciation of the University College of Loyola University. The 
University College Council is formed from this association. It 
seeks to activate the evening school student to partake in extra- 
curricular activities that will serve a two-fold purpose of inter- 
est to both the student and the University. 

Realizing that the evening school campus differs signifi- 
cantly from any other campus on the University, the Council 
tries to maintain policies and activities that reflect the character 
of its constituency. 

"Our primary interest is to encourage University College 
students to devote themselves to cultural activities as well as 
to their studies," says Joseph Wcislo, president of the University 
College Council. The annual UCC functions are the Dean's 
Coffee Hours, held two weeks after the beginning of each se- 
mester, at which the Dean's Key, leadership awards, and schol- 
arships are awarded. 

The Council also assists Dean Richard A. Matre and his 
staff at the time of registration. 



182 




Standing: Lyle Rausch, Paul Stewart, Bob Richardson, Chuck Thill, Jerry Harkness, Jack 
Downs, Frank Marsico, Mike Saldana, Joe Maggio, Jack Baker, Al Del Guidice; Seated: 
Ed Husek, Gerry Blassage, Bill Herr, Mike Clegg, Barney Mason, Joe Giacherio, Ed Szczurek. 



THE LOYOLA HALL COUNCIL 



To guide the social and academic welfare of its residents 
as well as to increase their enjoyment as residents and students 
of Loyola University is the dual purpose of the Loyola Men's 
Dorm Council. This governing body of Loyola Hall, which 
was established in 1957, actively participates by supf>orting a 
candidate in the popular "Ugly Man" and "Miss Loyola" con- 
tests. In addition to these, the Council also gives extensive sup- 
port to the Pow-Wow Weekend festivities and other annual 
activities of the University. 

A "Get Acquainted Mixer" to honor freshmen during Orien- 
tation Week as well as a special supper for the freshman and 
varsity basketball teams at the end of the season are pro- 
grammed by the Loyola Hall Council. 

Aside from these social functions, there are also political 
activities which the Council engages in. The spiritual element 
in the Council's work includes a nightly rosary and a Sunday 
benediction in the Chapel. 



183 




Members of the Stebler Hall Council take a break from working on house decorations 
for Pow-Wow. Standing: Penny Rapp; Mary Kent; Jane Srotyr, Vice-President; Eliza- 
beth Bassek, Treasurer: Marge Procyk, Social Chairman. Seated: Chris Vallee, Secre- 
tary; Mickey Dooling, President; Sue Kubiak. 



THE WOMEN'S DORM COUNCILS 



The three women's residences — Delaware, Stebler 
and Chamberlain Halls — are each governed by an 
Executive Board and a Judiciary Committee. The 
Executive Board plans all activities and presides at 
all house meetings, while the Judiciary is responsible 
for initiating and enforcing all house regulations. 

The purpose of each council is to represent the 
resident to the administration and to encourage the 
academic, cultural, religious and social development 
of the residents. 

To promote greater co-operation amoung the 
dorms, an Inter-Hall Council was created this year. 
Composed of the president, vice-president, secretary, 
treasurer and social chairman of each hall, the new 
council has initiated several projects; among these 
are working with the children at Angel Guardian 
Orphanage and publishing a bi-monthly newsletter. 






The officers of Chamberlain Hall 
pose in the living room of the new 
dorm. Standing: Mary Ann Harvey, 
President; Miss Virginia Webb, Di- 
rector. Seated: Marilyn Gadya, Secre- 
tary; Marcia Stachyra, Vice-President; 
Audrey Gineman, Social Chairman; 
Olga Velez, Treasurer. 



184 



Serving the residents of Delaware 
Hall are (standing) Sara Brindle, 
Treasurer, Reggie Poskus, Secretary, 
Mrs. Margaret Barrett, Director; 
(seated) Lois McKinnon, President, 
Sharon Mekus, Vice-President Ann 
Reiter, Social Chairman. 




\ 




THE INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 



The Interfraternity Council provides a forum for 
the discussion of mutual problems as well as the 
coordination of those activities in which fraternities 
engage in friendly competition. The Council also 
sponsors social functions designed to bring together 
all the fraternity members. 

In its present form the Council is a relatively new 
addition to student government at Loyola. Originally 
a part of the Union Board, the Council split with this 
body in 1958 and set up an independent governing 
body. Since its independence the Council has evolved 
slowly setting up its governing machinery and 
amending it as experience dictated. 

In the past year the Council has succeeded in ini- 
tiating several new policies. Perhaps the most sig- 
nificant was the printing and mailing of the IPC's 
first rush booklet to all incoming freshmen. Other 
innovations include an independent intramural pro- 
gram entirely under the Council's supervision, the 
running of an IFC Smoker in conjunction with Wel- 
come Week, and the distribution of food baskets to 
needy families. In addition, the Council welcomed 
its first new fraternal organization since 1958 — Psi 
Delta Phi. 







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Alpha Kappa Psi displays a colleaion of its awards to 
attract the attention of freshmen during Orientation 
Week. 



Standing: John Gerding, Jim Orchowski, Gerald Smith, John Sobota, Mike Lynch, Mike 
Sullivan, chairman, Mike Dessimoz, Union Board Representative, Dave Raia, George Lang, 
Mike Sorvillo, Medard Narko; Seated: Jack Fahrenbach, Bob Boyack, Secretary-Treasurer, 
Mike Connelly, Marty O'Grady, V ice-Chairman, John Manin. 



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Julie Fish extols sororities to prospective rushees. 



THE INTERSORORITY 
COUNCIL 



The Intersorority Council, composed of two repre- 
sentatives from each sorority, was created to unite 
all undergraduate sororities in a spirit of friendship 
and good will for the benefit of all sorority members. 

The council acts as a supervisory and mediative 
board for all sorority members, regulating rushing 
and pledging methods, besides ruling on Sorority 
chapters seeking establishment at Loyola. 

The council consists of the two representatives, a 
secretary, a treasurer, and a chairman, all of whom 
are chosen from the main body. 

Once again the council sponsored two successful 
Greek Weeks, starting the 11th of February. The 
main purpose was to show the good will between 
the sororities to the Rushees. Serenading of the Frat 
Houses and the election of Miss Sorority were two 
of the main events during the week. 

The council's most significant achievement this 
year was the publication of a handbook which out- 
lined in detail the work of the Inter-sorority Coun- 
cil and gave prospective Rushees a glimpse of so- 
rority life at Loyola. 



Standing: Bettine Zizzo, Bobbi Lenz, Sandra Domes, Val Valiant. Seated: Darlene O'Brochta, 
Maureen Doherty, Diane Wcislo, Joyce Seidel, Pat Nobilio. 




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Standing: James Orchowski, Lawrence Schmidt, Russ Bielak, Dave Shanahan, 
Marty Mayer, William Leisten. Seated: Michael Ward, Ed Cunningham, Patricia 
Cassidy, Sandra Triner, Louis LaGilia, Arden Inda. 



Sandra Triner, Secretary; Edward Cunning- 
ham, Vice President. 




THE ACCOUNTING CLUB 



The Accounting Club, numbering about twenty- 
five members, conclucts approximately three meetings 
each semester. The highlight of the meetings is the 
presentation of a speaker from one accounting firm 
in Chicago or perhaps a debate between two account- 
ing firms. 

The only requirement for membership is one course 
in accounting. The club seeks to acquaint the stu- 
dent with the various firms and job opfKJrtunities in 
accounting. 



190 




Standing: Dr. Frank Cassareto, Bob Knobloch, Ken Goze, John Klube, George MacDonald, 
Mike Skowronski, Ed Mrozek. Seated: Gerald Roth, Arlene Fleischfresser, Marie Biel, Tom 
Mortel. 



THE AMERICAN 
CHEMICAL SOCIETY 



The American Chemical Society is open to under- 
graauate students, whether majoring in the subject 
or not. At present there are 45-50 members. The dues 
are $3.00 per year, and, each member receives a week- 
ly magazine called Chemical and Engineering News. 

The group meets about every three weeks and in 
addition to these regular meetings, they occasionally 
visit a pharmaceutical house such as Cyril or Abbott 
Laboratories, or tour the Argonne National Labora- 
tory. 

Orbitals, the newssheet printed by the Loyola 
American Chemical Society, features humorous or 
interesting stories on chemical topics. 

The society at Loyola is affiliated with the national 
American Chemical Society and gives the aspiring 
chemist a head start in this professional association. 



Standing: Ed Murphy, Treasurer; Dr. Cassareto, Moderator: 
Tom Mortel, President. Seated: Ken Goze, Vice-President: 
Eileen Schotz, Secretary. 




191 




Standing: Thomas Boring, Dennis Minnice. Sealed: Brother Jerome McBride, CSV; 
Dr. John Bannon, John Barnes, Frank Fitzgerald, Susanna Strom. 



THE BELLARMINE 
PHILOSOPHY CLUB 



The Bellarmine Philosophy Club is one of the two 
philosophy-oriented groups at Loyola and currently claims 
about 20 members. 

This Club is open to philosophy majors and any stu- 
dent interested in attending informal discussions on a 
philosophical topic determined by the group. The meetings 
are held every two weeks and the topics are discussed in 
plain and simple language. By conducting these discussions, 
the Bellarmine Philosophy Club complements Phi Sigma 
Tau, the honorary philosophy fraternity, which sponsors 
guest lectures. 

The moderator of the Club is Dr. Bannan and the 
officers are: John M. Barnes, President; Susanne Strom, 
Vice-President; and Brother J. McBride, C.S.V., Secretary- 
Treasurer. 

The Bellarmine Philosophy Club encourages and pro- 
motes competition of students in the annual philosophy 
essay contest, which awards the winner a gold key for the 
Honors Convocation. 

Active at Loyola for over four years, this year has seen 
the improvement of scheduling these interesting meetings 
on a regular bi-weekly basis. 




Standing: Dr. John Bannon, Moderator; Brother Jerome McBride, 
CSV, Secretary-Treaurer. Seated: John Barnes, President; Susan 
Strom, Vice-President. 



192 




Standing: Pat Brown, Membership Chairman; Melissa 
Doman, Big Sister Chairman: Sharon Ramljak, Secre- 
tary: Irene Wizniak, Treasurer; Joyce Seidel, LSC Board 
Member. Seated: Marion Amidei, Publicity Chairman: 
Pat Mroczek, Vice-President; Patricia McGrady, Mod- 
erator; Anne Yourg, President; Nancy MuUenix, LSC 
Board Member. 



THE COED CLUB 



This year the Coed Club celebrated its fourteenth 
anniversary. Since its founding in the spring of 
1949, the Coed Club has become one of the largest 
and most active groups on campus. Its moderator is 
Miss Patricia McGrady. Its director is Miss Mariette 
LeBlanc. 

The club operated under a joint board this year, 
with officers from both of the campuses. The aim of 
the club is to unite the women students of the Uni- 
versity in social, academic, and religious life. In keep- 
ing with this aim, each semester the club sponsors a 
welcome tea in honor of incoming freshmen and 
transfer students. This year it was held at the Edge- 
water Beach Hotel. Included in this is the Big Sister 
program. The Coed Club Dinner is held soon after 
this to welcome new members to the club. 

In the fall it presented the annual Card Party- 
Fashion Show, with Maggie Daly as commentator. 
The Christmas Formal was held at the Sheraton- 
Chicago Hotel. Other activities include: distributing 
food and clothing to the needy at Christmas time; a 
regular program of volunteer work in the Rehabili- 
tation Center of Hines Hospital, the annual Spring 
Dance; the Mother-Daughter Communion Break- 
fast; the Spring Mixer, and the Senior Farewell Cere- 
mony. The Coed Club participates in all University- 
sponsored activities, and also provides hostesses for 
the Pow-Wow and Variety Show. 



Pillars outside the Boulevard Room of the Sheraton- 
Chicago Hotel provide the background for these Coed 
Club members and their dates attending "Fantasy in 
Frost." 




The Coed Club floats a full house in honor of 
the Ramblers. 




LAKE SHORE COED CLUB 



Standing: Joyce Seidel, Mary Kate Zimmerman, Joan Mills, Sandy Domes, Catherine Macken, 
Zita Svitra, Theresa Leplick, Bonnie O'Shea, Janice Vogel; Seated: Dorothy Traynor, 
Alexandra Ilkiw, Elaine Gansior, Alice Cheman, unidentified guest, Pat Radzik, Mary 
Ann Gilmour; Seated on Floor; Nancy MuUenix, Joan Spicci, Sharon Genelly, Ann 
Lundgren. 





Top row. Patricia Toussaint, Diane Toussaint, Kathleen O'Donovan, Diane Dillon, Arlene 
Macek, Sharon McNamara, Margaret Farrell, Mary Roache, Patricia Crane, Barbara Buren, 
Elizabeth Kutza; Second row. Bonita Bertaux, Cheryl Schnobelen, Geraldine Pacanowski, 
Cheryl Vacula, Pauline Ziemba, Sandy Triner, Candace Oliver, Sue Williams, Edwina 
Horning, Marilyn Kolton, Donna Elvikis, Sharon Kolton, Nancy Gracyk, Joan Amendala; 
Third row. Emmy Lou Mahalak, Winnie Gill, Margaret Larsen, Junemary Jones, Barbara 
Drum, Mary Tiernan, Mary Nash, Patricia Rafferty, Charlene Parker, Helene Biegel, Anne 
Morrissey; front row. Mary Anne O'Hara, Dana Patka, Anna Angelsano, Joan Smith, Lee 
Faust, Judy Schutt, Nancy Pruneau, Rose Anne Burke, Sally Bobernac, Diana Pruyn, Marie 
Dooley, Sharon King, Helen Karash. 

Top row. Barbara Ward, Anne Connell, Diane Wcislo, Frances Siemianowski, Marcia 
Cerveny, Monica Gillmore, Judy Duda, Eileen Pawlowski, Dorothy Kmiotek, Mary Kowalski, 
Connie Karos; Second row. Kathleen Berggrew, Lucille LaPlante, Margaret Filer, Patricia 
Curylo, Judith Vanalek, Frances Caraher, Bernadette Javor, Sharon Canfield, Florence 
Juraszewski, Claudia Barrett, Arlene Dovichi, Geraldine Suski; Third row. Irene Wizniak. 
Nancy O'Brien, Diane Jenkinson, Francine Olech, Charlene Jacobs, Pat Kwasniewski, Joanne 
Dudek, Diane Darling, Carolyn Bochmann, Linda Weinbrecht, Jackie Stigman, Gail O'Hara, 
Rosemary Madeja; front row. Pat Kett, Peggy McCarthy, Maureen Hogan, Marion Amidei, 
Patricia Brown, Patricia Mroczek, Rosemary Kenny, Eunice Richter, Diane Grygiene, Melissa 
Doman, Sharon Ramljak, Susan Magoon. 




THE CURTAIN GUILD 




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"Another opening, another show" 
begins with a conference between 
Curtain Guild directors. 



"Let there be light" marks the 
start of a technical rehearsal. 



The Curtain Guild is a unique organization. Be- 
cause of the infrequency of their productions, the size 
and scope of the group is often overlooked. Yet be- 
hind every spectacular production is the planning, 
working, and co-ordinating of more than one hundred 
students with varying degrees of affiliation. The 
Guild is not just a club — it is almost a way of life. 



"He doth bestride the narrow world lilce a Colossus,' 
energy is turned into choreographic grace. 



as awkward 




196 





"In the theater the hood sometimes makes the monk, " but the 
costumes must fit the actors as well as Ghelderode's maxim. 



"To dust thou shalt return" before 
the opening of every show. 




"Speak the speech, I pray you, as I pronounced it to you, trippingly 
on the tongue" Director William Morris gives post-rehearsal notes. 



"We are such stuff as dreams 
are made on" — and the dream 
becomes a reality. 



"But that's all one, our 
play is done," and still 
another show is history. 




THE DEBATE SOCIETY 



The Loyola University Debaters concluded a most suc- 
cessful year of debating the proposition, "Resolved: that the 
non-Communist nations should form an economic com- 
munity." Across the nation from the University of Rochester 
to Mobile's Spring Hill College, Loyola's speakers gleaned 
a harvest of shiny gold trophies and medals. Each tourna- 
ment helps build Loyola's reputation as one of the leading 
debate schools in the country. 

Highlighting this year was Loyola's sponsorship of its 
annual Jesuit College of America Tournament. In addition, 
the school played host to the Illinois State Championship 
Tournament and the Chicago Area Forensic Association Meet. 
All this is simply living up to the tradition that has been 
established by the university's oldest extracurricular activity. 




Standing: Jim Fletcher, Treasurer; Jerry Woynerowski, 
Vice-President. Seated: Donald Stinson, Moderator; Pat 
Brown, Secretary; Kael Kennedy, President, 



Standing: Lou Rundio, Pat Manning, Henry Engelman, Robert Hoffmeister, Bob Denham, 
Elaine Koprowski, Assistant Moderator; Jim Crummy, Donald Stinson, Moderator; Michael 
Smith, Nancy Klickman, Joe Lamas, John Dykla. Seated: Nancy Amidei, Diane Berek, Jim 
Fletcher, Kael Kennedy, Pat Brown, Jerry Woynerowski, Nancy Prete, Warren Bracy. On 
floor: Celeste Stachnik, Ellen Kane. 





Edward Halle, Secretary-Treasurer; Brother John Dodd, President; Joseph 
Klodzinski, Vice-President. 



THE ECONOMICS 
FINANCE SOCIETY 



Though drawing its membership primarily from 
the College of Business Administration, the Eco- 
nomics-Finance Society holds membership open to any 
student in good standing in the University who has 
been in attendance for at least one full semester. As 
a member chapter of the American Finance Associa- 
tion, the Economics-Finance Society has determined 
its main interest to be in the area of making the 
complex world of economics and finance less formi- 
dable to those students contemplating careers in the 
business world. 

Beyond this, perhaps, is the recognition that even 
those students who will not be directly concerned 
with the business world need an over-all view of 
that world's structure. To fulfill both these ends, 
the Society endeavors to supplement the academic 
program in finance and economics by presenting a 
yearly series of guest speakers and movies. 



The brokerage office will be the home of members of the Econ-Finance Society. 





Top row. Curtis Lowe, Richard Brady, Gerald Urbancik, Salvatore Mangione, George 
Ortenzo, Benedict Amar, James Palatine, Thomas Pokropinski. Second row: Ellen Brusky, 
John Glass, John Sheahin, Vincent Schall, Casimir Ostrowski, Mark Fedota, Richard Neri, 
Arthur Waddy, Mary Carr; Front row. Dr. D. Herbert Abel, Mary Louise Pongetti, Jacqueline 
Melvin, Vito Volino, Ronald Sipowich, Michael Leahy, Jeannette Caruso, Janine Konauka, 
Joanne Caruso, Diane Ehrman, Kathleen Dvorak. 



EPSILON PI RHO 



Standing: Joanne Caruso, Vox Editor: Michael Leahy, Treasurer; 
Janine Konauka, Secretary. Seated: Dr. D. Herbert Abel, 
Moderator: Jeannette Caruso, Consul; Ronald Sipowich, Consul. 




A classically orientated education gives one the quality 
which the Romans called hutnanitas. The man who had 
hiimanitas was considered highly civilized and liberally edu- 
cated. That the classics can highly civilize and liberally edu- 
cate, and that the most noteworthy aspect of hutnanitas in the 
Roman mind was the dignity and worth of the human person, 
certainly more than justify a penetrating and thorough study 
of them. 

With this in mind, Epsilon Pi Rho was established to 
help its members become more familiar with classical civili- 
zation, and thus they, by their increased classical studies, might 
civilize and liberalize themselves to a greater degree than the 
average student. 

To help accomplish its ends, Epsilon Pi Rho sponsors 
lectures and panel discussions. The club also sponsors an annual 
Christmas party and banquet in an effort to mix business with 
pleasure. The small classical journal, called the Vox, which 
the club publishes, is typical of this organization's operations. 

Epsilon Pi Rho has become one of the largest academic 
organizations on campus under the leadership of its moderator. 
Doctor D. Herbert Abel. 




Seated on Horse: Mary Marosits, Judy Birnbaum, Georgia Borchardt, Lawrence Patterson, 
Madonna Dara, Alberta Matulis, Dorothy Trop. Standing: June Mary Jones, Gerry Boril, 
Patricia Pindras, Gay Cook. 



THE EQUESTRIAN CLUB 



Madonna Dara, Treasurer, Georgia Borchardt, Vice- 
President, Lawrence Patterson, President, Patricia Pind- 
ras, Secretary. 



In keeping with the general trend of more diversified 
student activities, the Loyola Equestrian Club is unique 
in that it combines social and recreational activities with 
academic classes. Besides its role as an extra-curricular 
organization, it offers Physical Education credits for 
active participation. 

Weekly instructions in the art of riding are given 
at the Nu-Fashion Club Stables, supplemented by outings 
in Lincoln Park and along the Lake Michigan shoreline. 
Periodic club dinners and similar engagements round out 
the social activities of the members. 



201 





officers of the Fine Arts Club discuss the forthcoming spring lecture program: Bill 
Fahrenbach, Treasurer: Penny Luback, Vice-President: Bob Egan, President; Mary Anglim, 
LSC Secretary. 



THE FINE ARTS CLUB 

It is impossible, of course, for the University to in- 
clucle sufficient coverage in all fields of academic en- 
deavor which might interest its students. As a result, 
extra-curricular organizations which fulfill these needs 
have arisen on campus. One of the most active of these 
organizations is the Fine Arts Club. 

Dedicated to -the ideal that an appreciation of the 
fine arts is essential to the development of the whole 
man, the Fine Arts Club, by sponsoring film classics, 
discussions on the arts, and group attendance at Good- 
man Theater and Theater First productions, has attempted 
to foster this appreciation. In this way it is hoped that 
the void in the student's education may be at least 
partially filled. 







"A thing of beauty is a joy forever. 



THE FOREIGN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION 



Loyola University numbers among its students some 
who are immediately recognizable from their sf)eech, 
dress, or appearance as representing the international 
element of Loyola's student body. To afford these 
foreign students the opportunity to more easily com- 
municate with the American students, the Foreign 
Students Association was established. 

Main avenues of this communication are the social 
and intellectual functions of the Association, all of 
which play an important role in achieving mutual 
understanding between the two groups of students. 
There is an annual Spring Festival featuring enter- 
tainment by members. There are also several informal 
receptions. In addition, the association sponsors a 
panel discussion on the role of the foreign student 
in America. 




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p. Uzo Opara, President. 



Loyola's foreign students are hosts at 
a tea for some visiting members of 
the National Convention. 



203 




GERARD MANLEY HOPKINS 
SOCIETY 

The Gerard Manley Hopkins Society at Loyola, founded 
here in 1931, honors in its name and ideals the Irish Jesuit 
poet whose superb talent created in his verse magnificent 
hymns of praise to his God. 

This Victorian Jesuit, whose personality and vision are 
as significant as his brilliant poetic technique is one of a small 
group of religious who is known first as a poet, and then as 
a poet-priest. 

Not only has this "eccentric" and ""obscure" Victorian 
priest attained the once unheard of distinction of being widely 
read, discussed, and lectured on, but we can now reasonably 
assume that he himself has been raised to what might be 
called, in his own idiom, that "higher cleave" of posthumous 
being — the status of a classic. 

The Loyola organization is aimed at the fuller develop- 
ment and expression of student interest in literature as an 
art. To this end, the Society has sponsored student and faculty 
lectures on literature and music as temporal arts, on contem- 
porary musical theater, on English in the Liberal Arts curri- 
culum, and, added this year, the reading and discussion of the 
students' own poetic endeavors. 



Penny Luback, Vice-President; Bob Egan, President; Jim 
Fletcher, Secretary; Judy Trotta, Treasurer. 



Dr. Dickinson (far right) discusses the theory of playwriting with Peter Bartlett, Larry Hin- 
man, Ed Kuntztnan, Dennis Dooley, Jerry Woynerowski and Bob Bassi. 




204 




THE GLEE CLUB 



Judy Van Klaveren, Mary Anne Bunda, Lois O'Hanley, Ken Disch, 
and Bill Rapp sing along with Don Finegan, who is at the piano. 



Among those very necessary organizations which have 
as their main purpose sheer entertainment rather than edu- 
cation, the Glee Club of Loyola University must take a 
prominent place. The Glee Club's first appearance this scho- 
lastic year was at the Founder's Day Program at Lewis 
Towers. It also participated in the dedication of Chamberlain 
Hall, the Blessing of the Crib ceremonies at Madonna della 
Strada chapel, and the Alumni Banquet. In conjunction 
with the Readers' Circle, it presented a Christmas Program 
at the Loyola Community Theater. On January 8th, the 
organization traveled to Milwaukee and performed between 
halves at the Loyola-Marquette basketball game. The Glee 
Club again took part in the Variety Show, also entertaining 
the Bronson's Circle and other groups and organizations 
which have shown their interest and friendliness to the 
University. 



Back row. Sue Winkeljohn, Peggy McCarthy, Nancy Peer, Margo Bruegge, Sue Kamp, Mary 
Kay Bolsenga, Ann Maria Tomal, Marie Mabey, Cathy Green, Lee Faust, Rosemary Mindock, 
Pat Miller, Gerry Boril, Jo Anne Ryan, Kathy Swieton, Mary Jane Stevens, Carol Knes, 
Joyce Reddington, Sally Brozenec, Judy Van Klaveren, Judy Rogers. Front row: Jerry W-oj- 
tanowski. Drew Trapani, Ed Vitu, Dick Bandera, Mary Anne Bunda, Joan Walsh, Sue Kolle, 
Ken Disch, Bob Billimack, Mike Garvey, Bill Rapp. 




GOLD TORCH 

The Gold Torch is a military organization whose 
purpose is to unite the cadets of the Loyola University 
ROTC program, and to create wholesome relations 
and lasting friendships among the cadet members 
through professional aids and instructions and active 
participation in the Association's social functions. 
Besides publishing its own paper, The Bugler, the 
Gold Torch in the last year has sponsored the Loyola 
University Military Ball, a bus trip to the Purdue 
National drill team meet, and a series of films and 
professional military lectures on current news topics. 
In the Spring a dance is held at which trophies and 
service awards are presented to the officers and cadet 
members who have distinguished themselves as 
leaders in the cadet corps. 




Standing; J. Anthony Klodzinski, Treasurer; Jim Rappel, Secretary. 
Seated: J. Michael Griffard, Brigade Commander; Jim Gust, Vice- 
President; Ed Cunningham, President. 



Back row. Marty O'Grady, Jim Ritt, Kevin Burke, Bob Kepner, Terry Quinn, Larry Antoine, 
Marty Lane, Jack Carollo. Third Row: T. Burne, Bob Schurer, Dino Pranzarone, Joe Klemm, 
Frank Maranto, Dennis Urban, Bob Sheriff, Gene Ruffolo. Second row: Ken Carobus, Jim 
Francis, Bill Buhl, Richard Devitt, Joe O'Callaghan, Bohdan Kecala, John Cannon, Dave 
Shanahan. First row: John Griffard, Jim Gust, Joe Klodzinski, Jim Rappel, Lt. Col. M.R.J. 
Giuffre, Ed Cunningham, C. P. Dipietropaolo, Jim Roberts. 



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Gemma Cassaretto is crowned Queen of this year's Military Ball as Lt. Col. M. R. J. Giuffre 
and her escort, Marty Lane, look on. Other contestants were Darlene O'Brochta, Sue Oakes, 
Mary Kay DiGiacomo and Lynn Crane. 



The ROTC's famed Drill Team is shown reponing in at the beginning of a drill team 
sequence. 




207 



THE LOYOLA HISTORICAL 
SOCIETY 

Now completing its fourteenth year on campus, 
the Loyola University Historical Society is the larg- 
est student academic organization of the University. 
As such, it feels even more than the normal re- 
sponsibility to provide its members with interesting 
and informative programs. Seeking to achieve the 
fulfillment of this responsibility, the Society spon- 
sors numerous lectures, discussions, and seminars, all 
dealing with some topic of historical importance, 
either past or present. 

Supported totally by the one-dollar membership 
fee which is collected at the beginning of the year, 
the Historical Society in the past year has sponsored 
such things as the annual History Symposium and 
the Historical Essay Contest, and has co-sponsored 
such activities as the Dirksen-Yates speeches held in 
anticipation of last November's elections. 

In all its activities, the Historical Society has at- 
tempted to fulfill its obligation to present to the 
student body timely discussions on matters of im- 
mediate concern to that student body. 




Dr. Gordon C. Zahn was one of the featured speakers 
of the Historical Society lecture series. 



Standing: Jack CaroUo, Janet Gallagher, Marie Dooley, Colleen Conroyd, Fran Caraher, 
Mary Anne Lynch, Frank Cihlar, Kate Campfield, Thomas Nolan, Charlene Parker, Mary 
Janco, Diane Jenkinson, Robert Burke, Patricia Sullivan, Thomas Berg, Anna Marie Scalise, 
Dianna Pruyn. Sitting: Anne Brandt, Diane Darling, Christian Henning, John McManamon, 
Francine Olech, Maureen Reilly. 




208 




Atonism in ancient Egypt is one of the many subjects covered by the History Symposium. 



Carol Duffy, Secretary; Katy Campfield, Secre- 
tary; Chris Henning, President; Diane Jenkinson, 
Treasurer. 




209 



The Human Relations Club of Loyola University 
was founded with the purpose of promoting an 
awareness of contemporary social conditions and 
the Christian perspective of them by means of par- 
ticipation, investigation, and discussion. The Human 
Relations Club is designed to bring about in the 
student an awareness of the world in which he 
lives and to provide opportunities for its members 
to grow and develop through this awareness. Spe- 
cifically, those areas to be considered include crime 
and delinquency, international situations, interracial 
problems, family problems, and other matters bear- 
ing upon social interaction and the common good. 
The major program during the past year was "Who's 
Meredith.'" — a panel discussion, composed of Dr. 
Paul Mundy, Rev. Francis Powers, C.S.V., and Rev. 
William Marone. An introduction was provided by 
Jack Ahern, co-editor of the Scholastic of Notre 
Dame. Examples of direct investigation are the trips 
to the sessions of the Juvenile Court and the Cook 
County Jail. 



THE HUMAN RELATIONS 
CLUB 




Standing: Bill Schaefer, Vice-President; John Buczek, 
Treasurer. Sitting: Elizabeth Corns, Publicity; James 
Conniff, President. 



Back, Standing: John Slosar, William Schaefer, John Buczek, Thomas Riggs, James 
Conniff, George Ortenzo, Jack Ongemach. Standing: Nancy Kirklove, Lisa McGinnes, 
Kathy Smyth, Florence Juraszewski, Bernadette Javor, Marilyn Huyghebaert, Elizabeth 
Corns, Cynthia Mrazek. Sitting: Marlene Panebianco, Margaret Stacy, Diane Erdman, 
Cynthia Troyke, Sylvia Troyke, Phyllis Noble, Mary Scott. 





INQUIRY 



Inquiry is a group dedicated solely to discussion 
among students. The variety of subjects discussed 
at Inquiry meetings is illustrated by the highlights 
of this year's discussions — Shostakovitch's Fifth Sym- 
phony, the natural law, the effects of prejudice and 
C. Wright Mills' book The Causes of World War 
Three. Inquiry's discussions are open to students 
who have something to say in any area of interest: 
theology, the fine arts, philosophy, science, politics, 
current world affairs and literature. 

Inquiry was originally organized by Dr. Thomas 
Gorman. The present officers of Inquiry — founder 
George Schultz, Ed Kuntzman and Jim Fletcher — are 
confident that Inquiry will continue to expand in 
its activities and grow in its support because its 
purpose is inherent in the purpose of Loyola Univer- 
sity — the development of the "whole man." 



The Founding Fathers of Inquiry meet: Ed 
Kuntzman, George Schultz, Jim Fletcher. 



An inquiry may take the form of a book re- 
view, as presented by Jim Fletcher. 




211 



LOYOLA MEN 

An organization open to all Loyola male students, 
the Loyola Men attempts to provide a dynamic spir- 
itual force on campus. Its membership is divided 
into first, second, and third degrees, with the third 
degree forming the hard core of the organization. 
Under the leadership of the Reverend J. Donald 
Hayes, S.J., the Loyola Men conduct regularly sched- 
uled cell-meetings discussing some aspect of Chris- 
tian living; they also conduct weekly half-days of 
recollection. As a university organization, Loyola 
men ask only that its members inject themselves 
whole-heartedly into the life of the campus, playing 
down any attitude that they are "holy Joes." 



Rev. J. Donald Hayes, S.J., moderator 
of Loyola Men, makes a pomt during 
a counseling session. ^ 




The Rev. Glenn Williams, S.J., gives some spiritual pointers to the Loyola Men. 




21; 




The distinction which is often made between 
members of the academic world and members of the 
business world holds that the former are concerned 
with impractical theory, while the latter are equally 
obsessed with a pragmatic philosophy which ignores 
principles and ideals. 

One of the primary functions of the Marketing 
Club is to help dispel these equally erroneous at- 
titudes by a "meeting of the minds" between stu- 
dents interested in the world of marketing and the 
foremost businessmen in the Chicago area. This aim 
is accomplished by means of various speeches, din- 
ners, and conferences conducted throughout the year. 

Though not directly affiliated with the American 
Marketing Association, members of the Club are in- 
vited by the Association to attend its meetings. By 
aiding students in planning their own futures, and 
by providing them with an insight into the business 
world while still students, the Marketing Club per- 
forms an invaluable service for Loyola. 



Ed Cunningham, Treasurer; Bob Meyer, 
Membership Chairman; Ed Strons, Pres- 
ident; Joe Tomaszewski, Vice-President; 
Jim Enright, Secretary; Joe Klodzinski, 
Professional Chairman. 



THE MARKETING CLUB 



Journal of Marketing staff members are: Terry Hos- 
kins, Joe Klodzinski, Editor; Bob Meyer, Dan Tobinsld, 
Gerald Casey, Joe Lewandowski. 




Standing: Gerald Casey, Terry Hoskins, Joe Klodzinski, Joe Lewandowski, Wally Wells, 
Bob Meyer, Joe Tomaszewski, Dan Tobaski, Ed Cunningham, Pat Ryan, Gerald Gebhardt, 
Tom Daly, Bob Weiner, Ron Dilger, Larry Galvanaskas, Dick Lenehan. Seated: Ed Strons, 
Rich Pedi, Jim Enright, Gerry Crokin, Mike Donahue, Tom Evans, Rich Dvorshak, Dan 
Marsh. 





THE MATHEMATICS CLUB 



The Mathematics Club, moderated by Dr. Robert 
Reisel, was founded in 1951 for the diffusion of information 
about the study and application of mathematics, and to 
provide a cultural and social outlet for its members. Any- 
one who is interested in mathematics and has completed, 
or is in the process of completing, the second course in cal- 
culus is eligible for membership. 

The Math Club generally presents lectures to the mem- 
bers on various topics in mathematics by faculty members 
and students. One major activity of the Math Club is the 
tutorial service it operates twice weekly for any student 
in the University who needs help in mathematics. This 
service helps those deficient in math and gives the tutors 
a chance to review and keep fresh in their minds material 
they have learned, as well as giving them some teaching 
experience. 



Standing: Steve Gilmour, Vice-President: John Wanat, President. 
Sealed: Diane Szarowicz, Secretary-Treasurer; Dr. Robert B. Rei- 
sel, Moderator. 



Top row: Joan Spicci, Theresa Leptich, Audrey Gineman, Ron Warwick, Theresa Holzer, 
Friar Remy O'Connor, John Yakimisky, Jerry Karlak, Georgie Lang, Joe Taylor, Bill Madsen. 
Second row: Charlene Piekareyyk, Bob Tarjan, George Bravos, Rimantas Repsys. Jack Quim- 
nert. Dick Bandera, Ed Signatur, Roger Finnell, Mike Clavin, Tom Francl. Third row: Janina 
Radvila, Eddy Krol, Pat Heany, Mary Hanrahan, Ted Lackland, Peggy Effa, Mike Skowron- 
ski, Mary Anne Bunda, Kathy Till, Pat Somers, Elaine Bertolozzi, Joe Wilson. Front Row: 
Brother Edward Fitzpatrick, John Dwyer, Steve Gilmour, Diane Szarowicz, Dr. Robert 
Reisel, Moderator: John Wanat, Kathy Swieton, Richard Mullet. 




^^. 



Jl 



It 



II 



u i ] 




I 





Standing: Robert Eagle, Michael Leahy, Mary Roache, Louizette Bouguennec, Joan Cvito- 
vich, Eileen Dalle Molle, Marilyn Huyghebaert, Charlene Parker, Mary Alice Brunod. 
Seated: Curtis Lowe, Patricia Pindras, Anne Luzwik, Kathleen Waljeski, Lee Faust, Donald 
Senese, Benedict Aniar. 



THE MODERN LANGUAGE 



CLUB 

The Modern Language Club of Loyola University is both 
a cultural and a social organization. In cooperation with the 
Modern Language Department, the Club seeks to stimulate a 
deeper interest in foreign countries, peoples, languages, and 
customs among the students at Loyola. The Club's activities 
include language conversation groups and movies, lecturers, 
international dinners, symposiums and interest days. 

The Club establishes language conversation groups, which 
are informal get-togethers under the direction of a student ma- 
joring in a language. These groups give the student the vital 
chance to practice his fluency in the language outside the 
classroom atmosphere. Conversation groups are regularly set 
up in Spanish, French, and German. This year Italian and 
Hebrew groups were also set up. For those students with a 
preference for French, the Club showed two French movies: 
"Traveling through France" and "The Development of French 
Literature." 

In seeking to bring about a more thorough understanding 
of different peoples, countries, cultures, and institutions, the 
Modern Language Club played host in December to Father 
William Saelman, O.S.A., of Cochabamba, Bolivia, who. serves 
as president of both a teachers' college and the only Catholic 
high school with technical training in Bolivia. Father Saelman, 
on a two-week visit to Chicago to recruit more teachers for his 
rapidly expanding schools discussed "The Church and Education 
in South America." 



Standing: Donald Senese, Publicity Chairman; Lee Faust, Co- 
Secretary; Patricia Pindras, Secretary. Seateds Anne Luzwick, 
Treasurer; Kathleen Waljeski, President. 




215 



THE MONOGRAM CLUB 

One of the most exclusive organizations on campus, 
yet one which finds its members' achievements one of the 
most frequently discussed topics on campus, Loyola's Mon- 
ogram Club is composed of those athletes who have dis- 
tinguished themselves in competition in Loyola's three ma- 
jor sports: basketball, swimming, and track. Though their 
accomplishments in their individual athletic specialties 
would seem to leave little time for any other extra-curricular 
activities, the members of the Monogram Club attempt to 
maintain a year-long program of social and educational ac- 
tivities. 

Among these activities are a mixer in the beginning 
of the year to introduce the varsity team to the students, 
victory parties, and periodical visits to orphanages to teach 
the youngsters the proper techniques of various sports. 
The year is concluded with an Annual Communion Break- 
fast at which the new members are inducted into the group. 




Jim Reardon, Les Hunter, Andy 
Barry, John Pendergast, Jerry Hark- 
ness. Jack Egan, officers of the Mon- 
ogram Club. 







Standing: Gerald Sapienza, Jim Rear- 
don, Andy Barry. Seated: Jack Egan, 
Jerry Harkness, Les Hunter, Chester 
Lockwood, John Pendergast. 



THE PHYSICS CLUB 

The Physics Club of Loyola University provides an op- 
portunity for those interested in physics to become more 
informed about this particular science and its applicants. 

The club was established in 1953 by a group of under- 
graduate physics majors. In I960 it became affiliated with 
the American Institute of Physics, which has provided it with 
more speakers, access to films, a wider variety of trips and 
more information about the opportunities for advancement 
educationally and occupationally in physics. 

The club has sponsored various field trips, including those 
to Argonne National Laboratory and Armour Research Q)m- 
pany. It has also sponsored lectures by members of the faculty 
and guest speakers, and has shown films dealing with various 
topics in physics. Again this year, the Physics Club has of- 
fered a weekly tutorial service at Lake Shore Campus for those 
who might need such assistance. 




Ronald Repka, President; Aukse Liulevicius, Vice- 
President; Bro. Carl Vangsness, C.S.V., Secretary. 



Standing: Rev. Donald Roll, S.J., Randy Wade, William Nellis, Dennis Garvey, Dennis 
Broderick, Bernard Kelly. Seated: James Ritt, Ronald Repka, Aukse Liulevicius, Bro. Carl 
Vangsness, C.S.V., Kenneth Klein, Janina Radvila. 




THE YOUNG DEMOCRATS 



THE UNITED WORLD 
FEDERALISTS 

The world we live in is one which constantly grows 
smaller, with more and more interaction among nations. 
Realizing the responsibilities and also the possible dangers 
stemming from this closeness, the United World Federalists 
endeavor to maintain world peace through the United 
Nations. 

One of the leading figures in the UWF movement is 
Father Gerard Grant, S.J., who, through his connection as a 
teacher with Loyola, has given Loyola students the oppor- 
tunity to join this organization. Thus, those at Loyola re- 
alizing the necessity of some sort of international control, 
and believing the United Nations to be the most suited 
agency of that control, have joined the United World Fed- 
eralists to support that opinion. 



Rev. Gerard Grant, S.J., director of the United 
World Federalists, shows some of the latest UWF 
literature to Nancy Riley and Sue Grams. 






Three years ago, the Young Democrats at Loyola Uni- 
versity came into existence just in time to join the I960 
presidential campaign. Not stopping here, however, the 
YD's have gone into the Chicago and state-wide political 
scene with a vengeance. This year, for instance, the YD's 
sponsored a speech by Sidney Yates, in his try for election 
to the Senate. 

Beyond their active political status, however, the Young 
Democrats seek to do much more. They attempt, most im- 
portantly, to preserve a spirit of liberal thought at Loyola, 
a spirit in keeping with the political ideology which was 
endorsed in the last general election, and which they hope 
to keep alive as a vital force in the future of the United 
States. 



POLITICAL 

ACTION 

CLUBS 



THE YOUNG REPUBLICANS 

Chartered in 1959, Loyola University's Young Republi- 
cans exhibit the realization on the undergraduate level of the 
necessity for social commitment, the necessity to take a stand 
and a viewpoint from which one may judge the activities of 
the present in relation to the lessons of the past. 

Displaying a strong sense of the conservative trend of 
thought in American politics, a trend which has been called 
"The Thankless Persuasion," Loyola's Young Republicans 
regard as one of their basic objectives the continuance of the 
American social and legislative traditions which they believe 
have contributed most to the making of a strong nation. 




Standing: William Schaefer, Anthony Travis, Thomas Rowan, Thomas Bartholomew, Presi- 
dentijl Assistant: Jeanne Cosgrove, Corresponding Secretary: Edward HuUinger. Seated: 
Martin Lane, Membership Director: Dennis Kazmerski, Treasurer: John Jennings. President: 
Kenneth Pogwizd, Vice-President: Judy Fleming. Recording Secretary. 




Standing: Dick Schmidt. Mike Le- 
Coney. Seated: Mary Ann Pi- 
krone, President: Bob Richardson, 
Joseph Two. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE SOCIETY 



Realizing the tremendous powers and responsibilities of 
the free citizen in the world today, the Political Science 
Society attempts to delineate and underscore the most press- 
ing problems facing man as citizen. To help Loyola's stu- 
dents become more aware of these problems, the Society 
employs frequent group discussions, as well as arranging 
for guest speakers. Among the more specific activities of 
this year was a series of talks dealing with the local political 
situation, with particular emphasis on the aldermanic races. 

But, beyond this, the Political Science Society attempts 
to come up against the basic problems and controversies 
which must arise within any society, and by discovering 
what is, make more apparent what should be. But Aristotle 
put it much better: "The ability to raise searching difficul- 
ties on both sides of a subject will make us detect more easily 
the truth and error of the several points that arise." 




Officers of the Political Science Club are: Jim Heath, Vice-President; 
Kathy O'Mara, Secretary-Treasurer; John Gorgone, President. 



Standing: Bob Daggit, Mike Williams, Don Senese, Dennis Urban, Tom Rowan. Seated: 
Celeste Stachnik, Kathy O'Mara, Jim Heath, John Gorgone. 




THE READERS CIRCLE 



Readers Circle, the oral interpretation organization of the 
Speech and Drama Department, as the name denotes, is a coterie 
of young collegiates pursuing aesthetically orientated activities 
in the quest of the Jesuit ideal — the development of the whole 
man. 

This year has produced many "firsts" for this unique and 
relatively new organization. On November l6th they sponsored 
the "Frost Theatre Party," a memorable occasion for members 
and guests who attended the last Chicago appearance of the late 
poet. Combining their talents with the choral organization of 
the University, the Circle incorporated the media of art, music, 
and poetry in the Christmas program, "Tidings of Great Joy." 
Several members appeared, December 23, in a thirty-minute 
nation-wide telecast entitled, "And It Came to Pass." Another 
first, "Readers' Rally," a high school workshop in the art of in- 
terpreting literature from the printed page, was greeted with 
enthusiasm by the seventeen who participated. 




Standing: John Fitzgerald, President: Noreen Raia, Recording 
Secretary: Michael Erickson, Vice-President. Seated: Ann Mor- 
rissey. Corresponding Secretary: Miss Catherine Geary, Mod- 
erator. 



Standing: Ron Toebaas, Paul Maes, John Fitzgerald, Miss Catherine Geary, 
Moderator: Michael Erickson, Richard Calabrese. Seated: Anna Carlo, 
Regina Rauwolf, Charlene Staerk, Junemary Jones, Noreen Raia, Ann 
Morrissey. 








Seventh row: Urban Hermann, Gerald Jeffry, Joseph McGuill, John Coughlin, Thomas Mc- 
Gowan, David Dunagan. Sixth row. Dennis Hillenbrand, Leonard Navrat, James Reilly, 
George Burbach, Larry Crarnecki, Gerald Georgen, Terrence Gorman, Syl Furmanek. Fifth 
row: Emile Gelinas, John Collins, Richard Madura, Jay McMahon, Henry Jensen, Donald 
Steere, James Lofky, Louis Antonacci, Jerome Schoen, Robert Novotny, Scott Shore, Ralph 
Delmonico. Fourth row: Richard Blass, Dominic Trumfio, Joe Monte, Steve Martin, P. 
Smith, Glenn Bruner, Hugo Bertagni, Jerome Fisher, James Kwasek, Edward Santa. Third 
row: Robert Chavez, James Lynott, Paul Del Carlo, Dennis Manning, Albert Mategrano, 
Joseph Catarello, Harold Soudah, Al Dioguardi. Second row: Frank Hann, Michael Rosinia, 
David Houston, Ronald Powell, James Vrasic, Lawrence Wiatr. Front row: Clifford Mollsen, 
Fr. Lester Evett, S.J., D. Vlazny, Lonnie Tiner. 



Back row: Leonard Navrat, Student Council Represen- 
tative: John Collins, Secretary. Front roiv: Joseph Ca- 
tarello, Treasurer: Rev. Lester Evett, S.J., Moderator: 
Gerald Jeffry, President. 




ST. APOLLONIA GUILD 

Formed in Boston in 1920, and first organized at 
Loyola in 1924, the St. Apollonia Guild was re- 
vived under the direction of Dr. Jerome Vik in 1934. 
As one of the Dental College most important or- 
ganizations, the Guild sees as its primary purpose 
the wedding of professional interests and social re- 
sponsibility. 

In keeping with this purpose, one of the most im- 
portant functions of the Guild was providing dental 
service for poor children of the city unable to obtain 
such treatment elsewhere. In addition to this laud- 
able undertaking, the Guild sponsored several activi- 
ties for their own membership in social, intellectual, 
and religious areas. 



TFT FT ITT ff=r WT 




[ATF^lAjik- G;^vri^> ?iiiip.- ijoo:\. \ y: r^cyi, 







SAM officers: Edward Mann, President: Ronald Lentz, Vice- 
President: Felicia Kula, Corresponding Secretary: Pat Cassidy, 
Recording Secretary: David Cichy, Program Chairman: Birger 
Nyborg, Treasurer. 



THE SOCIETY FOR THE 
ADVANCEMENT OF 
MANAGEMENT 

Chartered here in 1950, the Society for the Advancement 
of Management has rapidly risen to become one of the Uni- 
versity's most active, influential organizations. As the recog- 
nized national professional organization of managers in in- 
dustry, commerce, government, and education, the Society is 
dedicated to the advancement of management and manage- 
ment men. 

The Loyola day school chapter of this national organiza- 
tion has, in the comparatively short period of its existence, 
become one of the leading chapters in the country. Constantly 
winning the Chicago Area Annual Travelling Trophy and 
many other signs of national as well as local accomplishment, 
such as the Remington-Rand National Performance Award, 
the Society has become a definite credit to the University. 

The Society fulfills its basic aims by sponsoring a va- 
riety of speakers, films, dinners, and field trips to several 
industriaT plants in the area, such as United States Steel and 
the Dresden Atomic Energy Plant. 



Standing: George Schirmer, Donald Derma, Joseph Klodzinski, William McArdle, Lawrence 
Keefe, Patrick Ryan, Bruce Vance. Seated: Ronald Lentz, Felicia Kula, Edward Mann, Charles 
Seriano, David Cichy, Pat Cassidy, Birger Nyborg. 



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University College SAM officers: 
Daniel Croke, Historian; Joseph 
Wcislo, Treasurer; Gene Patterson, 
President; Charles Fruehe, Vice-Pres- 
ident. 





The 1963-64 S.A.M. officers plan future activities: Bill McArdle, Joe 
Klodzinski, David Cichy, President: George Schirmer and Mike Keefe. 



225 



STUDENT AMERICAN 
DENTAL ASSOCIATION 



The Student American Dental Association of Loy- 
ola University has a two-fold purpose: to familiarize 
student members with the purposes and ideals of 
dentistry; and to give them experience in public 
speaking, preparation of table clinics, and writing on 
subjects in dentistry. 

The general object of the American Dental Asso- 
ciation of Loyola, which was modeled after the Amer- 
ican Dental Association, consists of the promotion 
of dental education outside the classroom. The gov- 
erning body, which has four representatives from 
each class, is the body which sets the program of 
events for the year. 

Student activities throughout the year consist of 
dinner meetings with guest speakers and the yearly 
Clinic Day, where students display original projects 
in the field of dentistry. The academic year is ended 
with the annual honors banquet. At this event, the 
bestowing of academic and clinical awards takes 
place. 






f 






Michael Rosinia, Pat Reilly, Peter Roberson, President; Jim Evans, 
and Larry Rubin, S.A.D.A. officers. 



Top row: James Carter, F. Celata, F. Oswalt. Second row. L. Jones, Charles Evans, Dr. 
Walter Becker, and Irv Tishler. Front row: Jim Evans, Larty Rubin, Peter Roberson, Pat 
Reilly, and Mike Rosina. 




^ S^Z' 



>> 



STUDENT AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION 

The Student American Medical Association, a student branch of the well 
known A.M. A., was organized in December of 1950, and is open to all medical 
students. The purposes of the Association are four-fold: to advance the medical 
profession, contribute to the welfare and education of medical students, famil- 
iarize its members with the purposes and ideals of organized medicine, and pre- 
pare its members to meet the social and ethical obligations of the medical pro- 
fession. 

The Association carries out these objectives by various means, all of which 
are promoted at the monthly meetings which the Association holds. At these 
meetings, medical information is conveyed to the membership and problems con- 
cerning the academic difficulties involved in studying medicine are discussed. 
Also, motion pictures featuring various branches of medical research are pre- 
sented, along with occasional guest speakers. 



Senior members of the Student American Medical Association attending a lecture. 




227 




Stttnditig: Stephen Pietsch, Eddie Nowak, Mary Kate Zimmerman, Bev Adams, Lou Bouguen- 
nec; Eva Herbstroffer. Seateii: Maggie May, Barbara Pleva, Dennis Stepak, Andrea Longo, 
Mary Riley, Jo Ellen Tomsic. Seated on floor: Mary Gieren, Marilyn Faford. 



THE SKI CLUB 



Photographing the photographer? Barb Pleva must 
have found it a dull excursion. 



A brand new organization made its appearance on the 
campus scene this year. Heralded by a swath of flying band- 
ages and second-hand splints, the Ski Club burst out full- 
grown from the snowy peaks where numerous Loyola stu- 
dents have left testimonials of, if not their skill, at least their 
raw courage. Germinating from the ski trips annually spon- 
sored by the Coed Club, the Ski Club this year emerged as 
an organization in its own right, sponsoring their own ski 
trip over the semester break. The primary purpose of the 
Club, as the name would seem to indicate, is to gather together 
those individuals in the University interested in the sport of 
skiing, and to provide these individuals with an atmosphere 
conducive to the proper appreciation of the sport. 




228 



THE WOMEN'S RIFLE 
TEAM 

The Loyola University Women's Rifle Team is 
now completing its fourth year. The Loyola crest 
on the breast pocket, and the team emblem of crossed 
rifles, identify each member of the team. The honor 
of wearing the team cord is awarded to top shooters 
and is a sign of firing in meets. 

The Coed Rifle Team, under the sponsorship of 
the Military Science Department, is safely super- 
vised and taught by a member of the Military Science 
Staff. 



Kneeling: Sgt. Minehan, Bonnie 
Kusmirek, Mary Kay Shannon, Con- 
stance Stack. Prone: Kathy Williams, 
Jean Adler. 




Standing: Bonnie Kusmirek, Constance Stack, Mary Kay Shannon, Sgt. Minehan. Lower row: 
Kathy Williams, Jean Adler, Capt. Gartman. 





f 



THE 

W ASM ANN BIOLOGICAL 

SOCIETY 

A statement of purpose is often an indiscriminate, 
obscure piece of theoretical abstraction, but, rarely, 
there occurs one which sharply delineates policy and 
function in an organization. Such a statement of 
purpose is the one made by the Wasmann Biological 
Society. The purpose of the Society is to promote an 
interest in the biological and allied sciences through 
a program presenting as much social activity as pos- 
sible. Independent organizations at Loyola must 
serve the function of uniting the students. Because 
of the size and character of the University, these or- 
ganizations, along with fraternities and sororities, 
are necessarily the basic framework of activity with- 
in the University. This basic statement of policy is 
realized through events such as lectures, films, field 
trips, dinners, parties, and picnics. 



The award won by Wasmann Biological Society's Var- 
iety Show Act leaves Jim Parker in need of support by 
Bruce Gach, Robert Shearin, Gerald Slattery, and 
Glenn Schweitzer. 



Top row: Bob Lund, Charles Jenkins, Frederick Schram, John H. Niece, Allen Lubanowski, 
Robert Shearin, William Walsh; Middle row: Loretta Nesseth, Janet Peterek, Mary Nikola, 
George Kearn, Sharon Silverwood, John Mitchell. Front row: Dorothy Mitchells, Mr. 
Hudson, Dr. Randall, Philip Cacioppo, Robert Huebner, Thomas Marr. 




230 



Seated: Mr. J. Hudson, Faculty Advisor: Dorothy Mit- 
chells, Secretary; Thomas Marr, President; Standing: 
Robert Shearin, Treasurer; Robert Huebner, Vice- 
President. 




Back row:. Paul Schulz, Lance Wrobel, Norbert Wujek, Bill Scott, Mike Schwartz, Tim 
Sveg, Gordon Dammann, Tom Regan; Middle row: John Ruffolo, Bruce Gach, Cathy 
Talano, Mary Ann Bandala, Kathy Bender, Joan Mills, Bill Schmitt, James Piala; Front row: 
Edna Nowak, Pat Miller, Regina Cesas, Jian Ivan, Ramona Jurkunas, Olga Velez, Marilyn 
Faford, Penny Rapp. 




231 




CADENCE 



Cadence in Loyola Thought is Loyola's quarterly maga- 
zine. Most of its material is original student work: fiction, 
poetry, criticism, essays and articles dealing with problems 
in the various disciplines. The job of the editors is pri- 
marily one of collecting and selecting copy and making 
from it a magazine. This includes the technical aspects of 
a layout, et cetera. 

The primary objective of the Cadence staff lies in its at- 
tempts to make a significant contribution to student life, to 
encourage the full participation on the student's part in the 
exchange of ideas, and to reflect honestly the best of the 
thinking and writing which is being done in the Loyola 
community. 



Janice Grippando, Contributing Editor, Janet Delia, Editor, 
and Mary Anglim, Contributing Editor discuss the layout of 
the spring issue. 



Loretta Picucci, Janice Grippando, Janet Delia, Michael Leahy, Benedict Amar and Mary 
Anglim prepare the final pasteup for Cadence. 




The first or tissue layout is prepared 
by Janet Delia, Ben Amar, Michael 
Leahy and Loretta Picucci. 




Mike Leahy, Loretta Picucci and Ben Amar seem to 
enjoy the painstaking work involved in putting out 
Cadence. 








JANET DELIA 
Editor 




233 



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IWt IvOi lanrtu 



THE LOYOLA NEWS 

The purpose of a newspaper is to inform. The 
purpose of a college newspaper is to inform and 
lead. Throughout the year the Loyola News has 
maintained a high standard of intellectual activity, 
frequently appealing to administration, faculty, and 
students to assume their responsibilities to the world, 
to the university, and to themselves. The editorial 
page of the News has been used to maintain a voice 
of sanity in every aspect of university life. The num- 
ber of features has been enlarged to provide greater 
human interest to balance the heavy intellectual 
content. The special supplements have explored areas 
vital to every student — from basketball to religion. 

In these and other ways the News has contributed 
to the maturing of Loyola as an urban university. 
Typical of this was the first issue of the News dedi- 
cated to incoming freshmen. This spirit was con- 
tinued through the last issue, traditionally dedicated 
to seniors. Despite several major turnovers in the 
staff, the 1962-63 Netcs has continued to report and 
analyze the news of Loyola and the city surrounding 
it. Its coverage has broadened and deepened in a 
continuing effort to both appeal to and help shape 
the whole university. 




SUSAN STROM 
Editor, Second Semester 





PETER STEINFELS, Editor, First Semester; BARRY HILLEN- 
BRAND, Managing Editor, First Semester. 



Helen Hershinow jots down a story 
brought in by a News reporter. 



JAMES MASEK 
Managing Editor, Second Semester 



Sue Strom presides over the actual 
layout of the paper. Clockwise from 
left: Dick McGlynn, Pat Carroll, 
John Carobus, Dennis Dinger, Ed 
Rice, Helen Hershinow, Ed Kuntz- 






EDWARD KUNTZMAN 
Feature Editor 




IRVIN ROGER 
Sports Editor 



JOHN CAROBUS 

Cartoonist 




236 





JAMES HALLORAN, Circulation Manager; MARCIA GON- 
DECK, Business Manager. 



Pat Luetkemeyer, LT Sews Editor and Martin 
Lane, LSC News Editor, confer with Thomas 
Siebert, News Editor. 



Marty Lane keeps his typists well supplied 
with copy. From the foreground: Ida Parlanti, 
Mary Ann Pikrone, Betty Ward. 




237 



THE LOYOLAN 

Any historian will tell you that his most difficult 
task is to make history alive, vivid and interesting. 
In a sense the LOYOLAN is a history book. It is a 
history of the pulse of life at Loyola University dur- 
ing the past year. 

The production of the yearbook must not only 
incorporate verbal history, but must be able to bring 
to its readers a fluid visual history. That picture 
which is "worth a thousand words" is a difficult and 
elusive thing. 

The yearbook follows an evolutionary process. 
Here is the result of years of trial and error, and our 
humble attempts to be historians. 




CECILE CONRAD 

Editor-in-Chief 




PAUL CONARTY 

Assistant Editor 




MICHAEL DONAHOE 

Business Manager 




CONNIE STEMBERK 
Assistant Editor 





JERRY WOYNEROWSKI 

Captions Editor 



LYLE RAUSCH 
Scheduling Editor 



DICK McGLYNN 
Sports Editor 





* - % 






RICHARD FOYS 

Copy Editor 




IDA PARLANTI 

Graduate Editor 





Captions staffer Bob Bassi gathers strength to 
strike with another awful pun. 



Bob Bennett and Joe Walsh will share the blame for 
whatever caption they are plotting. 



Captions staff is cornered at last: Standings Jim Dorn, 
Bob Shearin, Jim Parker, Seated: Dennis Szymczak, 
Carl Moore. 







240 





Bob Miles and Cindy Mrazek of the business staff 
happily plan the financial end of the LOYOLAN. 



Ann Goggins, the LOYOLAN's elite typist, is the 
vital link between illegible first drafts and finished 
copy. 





A handy girl to have around is Gerri 
Wolski, who works on the graduate sec- 
tion, captions, and anything that is handed 
to her. 



Bernard W. Cullen, Moderator; William T. O'Connor, 
Technical Adviser; and Rev. Thomas J. Bryant, Photo- 
graphy Adviser; drinking a toast to another LOYOLAN. 




Diane Kelly sighs with re- 
lief that her work on the 
LOYOLAN is done for the 
day. 



241 





Standing: Thomas Mahoney, Joseph Sorota, Robert Coyne, Thomas Crisham. 
Seated: Frank Van Bree, James Atten, Sue Hendricks, Walter Pyle. 



Lawyers are, by their natures, social beings. The pres- 
sing contingencies of their jobs, however, often make them 
less aware of the important role in society they are required 
to play by reason of their knowledge of the law. To help 
remind the lawyers produced by the Loyola Law School 
of their obligations, the Loyola Law Times was founded 
in November of I960. 

Published quarterly, the Loyola Law Times is distributed 
to every alumnus of the Loyola School of Law. Contained 
in it are articles dealing with problems of varied natures 
on the local, national, and international level, but all shar- 
ing this one similarity — all of them find their ultimate solu- 
tions in the correct and courageous application of legal prin- 
ciples. The Times is dedicated to stimulating the social and 
cultural consciousness of the lawyer so that he might 
achieve the highest degree of self-fulfillment. 



LOYOLA LAW TIMES 



242 



Recent Decisions, while not a University publication in 
the normally accepted sense of the word, nevertheless is one 
of the literary barometers by which the acumen of Loyola stu- 
dents is measured. Published as part of the Illinois Bar Journal, 
the official monthly publication of the Illinois Bar Association, 
Recent Decisions consists of contemporary significant cases 
decided by the Illinois and Federal Courts, accompanied by 
case commentary. Each commentary is essentially an accurate 
and informative analysis for practicing attorneys, with rea- 
sons demonstrating why a particular case deserves the special 
attention. 

Included in the Journal since 1949, Recent Decisions has 
recently augmented the routine publishing of cases and com- 
mentary with the practice of re-publishing past commentary 
and seeing how far they correlate with cases subsequently 
detailed. 



RECENT 
DECISIONS 



Robert Burns, Faculty Advisor, Kevin Forde, William Schmitt, William Quinlan, Maurice 
McCarthy, James Ferrini. Thomas Mahoney, Charles Murdock, Donald Gavin, Michael 
Caldwell. 



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-^"■^vs^i^iSi-,- 




Newly elected officers for 1963-64. Standing: Jeff 
Seeberger, Rushing Chairman; Brian McDonnell, Steward; 
Tom Cusack, Historian; Alan O'Connor, Pledgemaster; 
Hugh Bell, Intramuruls Chairman; Kevin Burke, Record- 
ing Secretary; Jack Kelly, Sergeant-at-Arms; John 
Walsh, Treasurer. Seated: Ray Janecki, Executive Secre- 
tary; Dick Mayday, President: Jack Wols, Vice-President. 



Mike Dessimoz, Pat Hetrick and Dave 
Raia reach for the heights at the IFC Sing. 





ALPHA DELTA GAMMA 



In 1924, fourteen Loyola students founded Alpha Delta 
Gamma fraternity, the only national Catholic social fraternity 
in the United States. Since 1957, the Alpha Delts have been 
one of the few fraternities at Loyola to possess a fraternity 
house. Among the annual activities of Alpha Delta Gamma are 
the Thanksgiving Eve Dance and participation and support of 
all of the Loyola sponsored social functions. Currently, ADG 
has won the Loyola Union Board Sweepstakes trophy, the fra- 
ternity football league championship for two successive seasons, 
the fraternity league basketball and baseball championships, and 
also the Greek games and the Greek track meet. In the past 
semester the brothers of ADG have contributed their time to 
charitable organizations, the most outstanding of which is the 
yearly Alpha Delts "Orphans Day." Alpha Delta Gamma is also 
spiritually active, as evidenced by brother-parent Communion 
breakfasts and weekly Mass and the Rosary. 





The Alpha Delts offered Yogi Bear as 
their Pow-Wovif contribution to aviation. 







Standing: Jack Kelly, Norbert Lasky, James Vanaria, 
Joe Sevick, AI O'Connor, Ken Chistian, Tom Riley, Jim 
Sullivan, Tom McGinnis, Bob Schultz; Seated: John Walsh, 
Bob Beleckis, Mike Gibbons, Mike Dessimoz, Pete Patrick, 
Jim Gardner, Larry Devitt, John Williams; Seated 
on floor: Brian McDonnell, Art Wondrasek. 



Standing: Bob Byrne, Kevin Burke, Dick Mayday, Tom 
Fritzgerald, Hugh Bell, Tom Cusack, Harry Dolan, Kei- 
th Killacky; Seated: Jeff Seeberger, Ray Jarecki, Jack 
Wols, Tom Durkin, John McCarthy, Jay Sabath. 





ALPHA KAPPA PSI 




W.-v 



Taking a cue from the Clancy Brothers, Dave Jones, Jack 
McCarthy and Bob Rudnick go ethnic at the IFC sing. 




First vertical row (top to bottom): Denny Kozlowski, Mike Donahoe, Jim Bradford, Jack 
Wiaduck, Ed Fitzgerald, Mike Lynch; second row, Frank Mandarine, Tom Marcet, Les Spin- 
ner, Bob Kolek, Jack McCarthy; third row, Keith Cook, Dan Casey, Bob Boyack, Paul Fisch- 
er, Joel Widman, Pat Carey; fourth row, Tim Guiheen, George Moravcik, Tom Stephens, 
Bob Rudnick, Bob Van Uum; fifth row. Dick Dunne, Pat Brannen, Mike Saracini, Bob 
Blecha; sixth row, Ed Oakey, Bill Egan, Vic Fasano, Jim Rappel, Steve Cox, Bill Morris. 



248 




^/-«-# "^WTK^ 



A noted Harvard alumnus, looking remarkably like Tim 
Guiheen, starred in A K Psi's Variety Show act. 



Alpha Kappa Psi was founded in 1904, the first 
national professional business fraternity . Gamma 
Iota Chapter of Alpha Kappa Psi was established at 
Loyola in 1952. Today the present membership is 
above forty. Alpha Kappa Psi is designed for the 
business student interested in commerce, accounting 
or finance. 

Alpha Kappa Psi encourages professional, athletic, 
scholastic, social, and leadership activities. The main 
social event of the year is the annual A.K.Psi New 
Year's Eve Party which, in the past, has been highly 
enjoyable. Many leaders in business and in the com- 
munity speak at the fraternity's professional meet- 
ings. Alpha Kappa Psi tries to supplement the 
work in the classroom by giving the individual an 
opportunity to demonstrate whatever ability he may 
have in practical pursuits. 



Seated: Steve Cox, President. Standing: Jim Rap- 
pel, Assistant Treasurer: Tom Marcet, Master of 
Ritual; Pat Carey, Secretary; Ed Fitzgerald, Vice- 
President; Bill Egan, Treasurer. 




Happy Yew Near! 





Back Row. Irv Tishler, Sam Baral, Jack Lieberman. Front Row. Bob Sommer- 
field, Larry Rubin, Andy Forman, Steve Sanders. 



ALPHA OMEGA 



A little light reading occupies the leisure time of Sam Baral, Steve Sanders, 
and Andy Forman. 




250 



ALPHA OMEGA 




The common bond of Alpha Omegans is founded upon three 
cardinal principles — Fraternalism, Judaism, and Professionalism. 

Fraternalism preaches friendship. The friendship which 
binds Alpha Omegans is one of benevolence and understanding. 

In regard to Judaism, the brothers are all members of a deno- 
mination which has always fought to retain its identity. For this 
reason, they are proud of their people and their heritage. 

Professionalism indicates the members' belief that they are 
in an important segment of the healing arts and an integral 
part of the community. 

Alpha, the first, and beginning — Omega, the last, and end. 
To Alpha Omegans these letters symbolize fraternalism from ini- 
tiation to the end of life — from Alpha to Omega. 



Top Row. Howard Hoffman, Ron Kaplan, Howard Warady, Shelly Shapiro, Sam Libman, 
Irv Tishler. Second Rote: Warren Avny, Marv Broder, Stan Noskin, Evan Goodman, Jack 
Lieberman, Bert Isaacs, Jack Rizman. Third Row. Bruce Harris, Andy Forman, Larry Rubin, 
Bob Gordon, Steve Arnstein. Fourth Row: Bob Green, Pete Fagan, Lou Sommerfield, Don 
Osten. 








•v^v 



^i 



'"s^fc^'P* 



Si£i«>-W- 



Standing: Jill Zderadicka, Pat Topping, Julie Fish, Mary Ann Bar- 
nett, Sharon Chwierut, Bea Bouchonville, Eileen Long, Sue CoUe, 
Kathy Loftus. Seated: Janice Majka, Jan Dittrich, Mary Lou Hur- 
ley, Celeste Renier, Barbara Lemley, Darleen Majka, Elaine Berube. 
Kneeling: Nancy Kerrigan, Barbara Dane, Mary Ellen Imlay. 



ALPHA TAU DELTA 




Alpha Tau Delta, a national nursing fraternity, establish- 
ed its Xi chapter at Loyola in 1957. The chapter, dedicated to 
Mrs. Frank J. Lewis, was instituted to further higher profes- 
sional and educational standards for women in the nursing 
profession, to inaugurate projects that enrich the specific field 
of nursing, and to form a close bond of friendship, fellowship, 
and mutual helpfulness and understanding among college wo- 
men in the nursing profession. Since its establishment, Xi 
chapter has striven to fulfill its purposes through various so- 
cial, philanthropic, and professional activities organized with- 
in university life. Besides participation in its own campus acti- 
vities, Xi chapter participates in the activities of the Profes- 
sional Panhellenic Association. 

Activities for this year have included professional meet- 
ings open to all nursing students, charity baskets distributed at 
Thanksgiving and Christmas, orientation of junior nursing 
students to Cook County Hospital, a Communion Breakfast in 
honor of graduating seniors, a mixer, and a parent-daughter 
dinner. 



252 



Standing: Mary Ann Harvey, Recording Sec- 
retary: Pat Topping, Junior Social Chairman: 
Janice Majka, Custodian: Mary Miller, Pledge- 
mistress: Celeste Renier, Historian, Seated: 
Georgia MacNamara, Editor: Jan Dietrich, 
Treasurer: Elaine Berube, Corresponding Sec- 
retary: Sharon Chwierut, Pledge Marshal: 
Bea Bouchonville, Social Chairman: Julie 
Fish, President. 




Standing: Barb Phillips, Alberta Lukowitz, Mary Beth Mulcahy, Georgia Mac- 
Namara, Carol Wacek, Mary Ann Slivka, Mary Ann Harvey; Seated: Char 
Popp, Maureen Doherty, Margie Malone, Judy Brinkman, Nancy Mysyk, Sue 
Middleton; Seated on floor: Mary Jane Skvier, Mary Miller, Maureen Mc- 
Mahon. 




Chi Theta members hungrily await a flaming Rambler 
victory over Christian Brothers in the Homecoming game. 



In 1962 Chi Theta Upsilon entered its fifth year of 
existence as a social sorority open to women on both 
Lake Shore and Lewis Towers campuses. 

In addition to participation in a variety of school 
activities, Chi Theta holds the usual number of closed 
parties, and also participates in the activities of the 
Intersorority Council. In order to encourage aca- 
demic achievements among its members, the sorority 
presented its Ignatius and Aquinas awards at the end 
of the year to members distinguishing themselves in 
scholastic work. 




Standing: Georgiann Butvilas, Alice Kutas, Marian Alich, Fran Subai- 
tus, Mary Corr, Phyllis Bova, Anne Marie Donahue; Seated: Alexandra 
Ilkiw, Maggie Hippler, Barb Juskiewicz, Deonn Fiedor, Sandy Van Goethem. 




254 




Standing: Arlene Macek, Joanne Phillips, Alice Parelli, 
Darlene O'Brochta, Joanne Golec, Roberta Olson, Bar- 
bara Shipman, Mary Anne Brooks; Seated: Judy Irvins, 
Sandra Triner, Elaine Gonsior, Carlyn Schuttler, Karen 
Torme, Naomi Sidell, Juanita Sattler, Marlene Giusti. 



CHI THETA UPSILON 




Standing: Phyllis Bova, Corresponding 
Secretary; Alice Parelli, Recording Secre- 
tary; Darlene O'Brochta, President; Bar- 
bara Shipman, Chaplain. Seated: Joanne 
Phillips, Social Chairman; Anne Marie Don- 
ahue, Treasurer; Judy Ivins, Historian, 




DELTA SIGMA DELTA 



Delta Sigma Delta, organized as a Beta Chapter at the 
Loyola School of Dentistry in 1855, is a national dental fra- 
ternity dedicated to upholding the highest possible dental 
standards and to the fostering of progress, science, ethics, 
and professional training. It is one of four Loyola dental 
fraternities. 

Delta Sigma Delta combines in its functions both social 
and fraternal activities. During the past year, it has present- 
ed to its members and the school such functions as a pledge 
banquet, Monte Carlo Party, and Senior Farewell. Delta 
Sigma Delta's fraternity house is located at 710 S. Ashland 
Avenue. 




Front Row. Ralph Swainson, Herb Stanton, Jack Vogel, Lee Jess, Walter Udzela, Jerry 
Libera; Second Row. Peter Terry, Jack Spritzer, Ron Doering, George Rooney, Art 
Spagnola, Damion Jelso; Third Row: Joe Sciarra, Sam Baral, Elmer Takenishi, Dave Hae- 
ger. Rod Kim, Ernie Dovidio, John Evans. 



256 



Mike Tannyhill, Ron Doering, Lee 
Jess, Ralph Swainson, George Ro- 
oney, Jerry Libera, Jim White, Jack 
VogeL 




Jack Vogel, Lee Jess. 





DELTA SIGMA PI 




Art Inda, Bob Zwarycz, Klodzinski, and Bill Bonland 
display some of Delta Sig's most prized trophies. 



Delta Sigma Pi is an international professional- 
social fraternity in the field of commerce and busi- 
ness administration. Founded at New York Univer- 
sity in 1907, Delta Sigma Pi draws its membership 
solely from commerce students who display the quali- 
ties of leadership, integrity and scholastic ability in 
such a degree as is deemed acceptable by the under- 
graduate chapter. 

Delta Sigma Pi at Loyola has an extensive social 
program made up of parties, picnics, hayrides, and 
beach parties, the Rose of Delta Sig contest and Bal 
Rose, Initiation Dinner Dance, Communion Break- 
fast, and National Fraternity Convention. The fra- 
ternity maintains a house at 832 North Wabash, used 
for meetings as well as a place for the brothers to 
spend their leisure time, whether in recreation or in 
study: the house is well adapted for both. This is the 
only facility of its kind maintained by any fraternity 
on the Lewis Towers campus. 




The ingenuity of the Delta Sigma Pi float leaves 
a Christian Brothers' player tongue - tied. 





Jim Orchowski, center, re- 
calls his own pledge days as 
he leafs through a fraternity 
scrapbook with John Sobota 
and Larry Schmidt. 



258 




Jim Orchowski, President: Larry Schmidt, 
Secretary; Dan Herber, Senior Vice-Presi- 
dent; John Sobota, Treasurer, Warren 
Fuller, Professional Chairman. 



Standing: Bob Bruun, Mike Keefe, Joe Bajko Bob Dubsky, Tom 
Lyons, Tom Moloney, Larry Schmidt, Joe Klodyinski, Jack O'Neill, 
Ed Strons, Ed Cunningham, Don Mastro, Tom Freeburg, Bill Borland, 
John Sobota. Kneeling: Jim Marra, Bob Zwarcyz, Dennis Manion, Art 
Inda, Lou Lagiglia, Rus Bielak, Terry Hoskins, Jim Orchowski. 









• # 




Standing: Mary Kent, Dotty Cizek, Kitty Macken, Pam Mocarski, Sharon 
Risser; Seated: Sue McDonald, Dolores Baker, Sandy Domes, Joan Liscarz, 
Bobbi Lenz, Chris Petroskey; On floor: Kathy O'Keefe, Margaret Billings. 



DELTA ZETA CHI 




Approved by the University in September, 1959, Delta Zeta 
Chi is the youngest social sorority at Loyola, open to women of 
both campuses. It is the purpose of Delta Zeta to stimulate and 
promote an active school spirit by participation in all University 
activities and functions, as well as to nurture leaders and scholars 
in all fields of study. 

Delta Zeta participates in all University functions, and all 
Greek-sponsored activities. The sorority's own social calendar 
provides for monthly parties including such things as a Monte 
Carlo night, Christmas tree-trimming party, sleigh ride, etc. Its 
founding is commemorated each year with a Mother-Daughter 
Communion breakfast. The year is climaxed with a formal closed 
dinner dance in a loop hotel or country club and a moonlight 
cruise along Lake Michigan. 

The sorority offers awards to the members having the high- 
est cumulative average over the previous semester, and also "most 
valuable member" and "most valuable pledge" citations. 



260 



Standing: Bobbi Lenz, ISC Representative: Sandy 
Domes, President: Pam Mocarski, Secretary; Sue 
McDonald, Chaplain. Seated: Dolores Baker, Vice- 
President; Margaret Billings, Treasurer. 





WINNERS OF INTER - FRATERNITY 
SING. Back row: Carole Wroble, Bobbie 
Lenz, Sandy Domes, Carolyn Mack, Pam 
Mocarski, Ann Van Riemsdyk; Front row: 
Dolores Baker, Mary De Vlieger, Margaret 
Billings, Kathy O'Keefe, Joan Liscarz. 



"What — Me Worry?" 
The whole float parade 
idea is "Mad, Mad Mad," 
agrees Delta Zeta Chi. 





Greek Week finds members of Kappa Beta Gamma exhibiting the awards their so- 
rority has won. Displaying their trophies are Sue Duda, Judy Duda, Carol 
Leuer, Nancy Olson, Marion Amidei, Carol Shimkus, Diane Wcislo, Barb Chorvat, 
Pat Nobilio, Connie Jung, Irene Wizniak, Sharon Kot, Helen Slattery, Pat Brown. 



KAPPA BETA GAMMA 



Awaiting the selection of this year's 

Kappa Knight (Seated) Jeanette Caruso, 

Pat Brown; (Standing) Irene Wizniak, 

Diane Wcislo, Marian Mizutowicz. 





Epsilon Chapter of Kappa Beta Gamma national sorority 
was established at Loyola in 1954 and is open to women on 
both campuses. A strong bond of friendship existing among 
the sisters begins with pledging and lasts a lifetime. The chap- 
lain is Rev. Thomas Murray, S.J., and the moderator is Dr. 
Ligeia Gallagher. 

Highlights of Kappa's social calendar are the two tradi- 
tional formal dances, the Kappa Knight Party, teas for pros- 
pective members, a Parent-Daughter Communion Breakfast, 
and many other parties. 

As in the past, Kappa is well represented in University 
functions, beginning with work on the Student Committee for 
Orientation and the Leadership Workshop in September. This 
year, the group achieved 100 per-cent in SAL, participated in 
the IPC Sing, and won a trophy in the Ugly Man Contest and 
the Float Parade. During the Christmas holidays the Kappa 
girls were hostesses at an annual Orphan's Party at Illinois 
Institute of Technology; they also filled Christmas stockings 
in conjunction with the Illinois Catholic Women's Club. 

Members of the sorority hold positions in the Coed Club, 
Debate Society, the Intersorority Council, Union Board, Loyola 
News, the LOYOLAN and Circumference. 




Standing: Monica Gillmore, Pledgemistress; Judy 
Duda, Vice-President: Pat Nobilio, ISC Representative. 
Seated: Irene Wizniak, Treasurer: Diane Wcislo, 
President: Melanie Zittnan, Recording Secretary. 



Top i?ou':Thea Ostrowski, Joanne Caruso, Judy Duda, Monica Gillmore, Jeanette Caruso, 
Ann Moore, Mary Ann Santucci, Cami Winiecki, Toni Sobota, Pat Nobilio, Joyce Jaskulski, 
Chris Formanek; Middle Roic: Nancy Olson, Susan Duda, Helen Slattery, Connie Jung, Pat 
Brown, Carol Shimkus, Sharon Kot, Carole Zmina, Ann Cascio; Front Row: Carol Leuer, 
Barb Chorvat, Melanie Zittnan, Diane Wcislo, Irene Wizniak, Marion Mizutowicz. 




263 




Phi Alpha Delta law fraternity was founded in Chicago, 
Illinois on November 8, 1902. Its name was taken from the 
Greek "philos adelphos," which means brotherly love. Within 
a month, five Chicago law schools formed its first active 
chapters. The Daniel A. Webster chapter of the Chicago Law 
School, predecessor of the Loyola University School of Law, 
has been active since that time. 

From this small beginning, a nation-wide organization 
has developed which includes over ninety active chapters and 
fifty alumni chapters. The purposes of the fraternity are: 
to provide professional and social contacts, both during and 
after law school; to establish a wide spread exchange for 
the dissemination of business placement information and 
matters of common interest to the fraternity; and, generally, 
to foster those principles which will improve the legal 
profession. 




Back Ron: Thomas Mahoney, William Moran, John Powers, Maurice McCarthy, 
William Quinlan, John Rice, Joseph Erwin, Paul Carelli, Arthur PoUman, 
Paul Cronin, Peter Cowles; Center Row. James Daubach, Walter Pyle, Howard 
Miller, W. James Shimon, Ronald Walle, Ronald Neubauer; Front Row. Frank 
VanBree, Andrew Leahy, James Atten, Thomas Dowd, Thomas Strubbe. 



264 




Stiinding: Thomas Strubbe, Marshal: Frank 
^^anBree, Treasurer: Seated: Thomas Dowd. 
Vice-Justice: James Atten, Justice: Andrew 
Leahy, Clerk. 



PHI ALPHA DELTA 



Students and grads reminisce about twenty- 
five years of law. 





A Phi Alpha Delta smoker finds members 
and prospects in informal shop-talk. 



PHI BETA PI 




Tom Tyler, Dick Thorne and Paul Mahoney 
read a Dr. Kildare script in preparation for 
TV auditions. 



The Alpha Omega chapter of Phi Beta Pi, na- 
tional medical fraternity organized in 1841 at the 
University of Pittsburgh's Medical School, takes its 
place as one of the outstanding professional fra- 
ternities at Loyola University. Operating from the 
Stritch School of Medicine, the chapter house is lo- 
cated near the Medical School. There its members 
gather for various professional and social events. 
Here, too, moments of relaxation and fellowship are 
enjoyed and the burdens of medical life are set aside 
for brief periods of fun and companionship. 

One of Alpha Omega's founders, Dr. L. D. 
Moorehead, former Dean of Loyola's Medical school, 
is commemorated in the annual Morhead Lecture- 
ship of Phi Beta Pi. The history of the Alpha 
Omega chapter, beginning with Dr. Morhead, has 
been an illustrious one — a credit, to the entire fra- 
ternity. 




The Executive Council. Standing: Mike Stevens, Larry 
Mazzarella, John Ward. Seated: Bob Sladek, Fred 
Whittier, Treasurer; Dean Sorenson, President; Karl 
Scharbel, Secretary; Behmal Persaud, House Manager; 
Al Timperman. 





Sometimes life is just too com- 
plicated for intern John Ward. 



266 




Standing: Ken Judy, Marty Roach, Gene 
Voltolina, John Angel, John Ward. 
Seated: Tom Tyler, Mike Lavelle, Tony 
Rippo, Les Coley, Jim Drynan, Lee Schell. 



Top row: Steve Herman, John Hubanks, Dick Thorne, Charles MacCarthy, Ron Drauer, 
Paul Mahoney, Behmal Persaud, Rudy Maier, Fred Whittier. Second row: Ken Judy, Dean 
Sorenson, George Hogan, Marty Klenda, Dennis Jurczak, Mike Stevens, John Belmonte, 
George Heimbach, Al Timperman, Marty Roach, third row: Les Coley, Tom Tyler, Gene 
Voltolina, Joe Misalunas, Larry Mazzarella, Bob Sladek, Karl Scharbel. Bottom row: 
John Ward, Mike Lavelle, Tony Rippo, Jim Drynan, John Angel, Lee Schell. 





Bijck row. Denis Carroll, Joseph Flynn, William Petrando, John Goncher, Donald Macaluso, 
George Campbell, Albert Shiu. Second rote: Robert Sullivan, Alphonse Brown, Chester 
Mateja, Thomas Reedy, Eric Ritterhoff, John Henderson, Marion Hood, James Migala. 
Seated: Dennis Weisbrod, Frank Barnett, Ronald Garavona, James Killean, Carl Rankl, 
Raymond Hurm. Seated on floor: John Fitzpatrick, Wilbur Holley, Edward Vogel, Curtis 
Kurtz, Stephen Schumack. 



PHI CHI 



Fifty-seven years ago, a local medical fraternity requested 
affiliation with the national medical fraternity, Phi Chi. Thus 
was born the Phi Sigma Chapter of Phi Chi at Loyola University. 

With a present membership of approximately one hundred 
medical students — about half of whom live at the fraternity's 
house at 712 S. Ashland — Phi Chi still manages to maintain a 
close spirit of brotherhood, aided, no doubt, by the academic 
trials its members commonly share. 

The formal aim of Phi Chi is to foster among its members a 
spirit of academic and medical interest, as well as to provide 
social contacts for medical students. 



268 





Phi Chi's trophy-winning basketball team. 
Standing: Marion Hood, James Migala, 
Eric Ritterhoff. Kneeling: Joseph Flynn, 
Robert Sullivan, John Fitzpatrick. 



James Killean, John Henderson and Donald Mac- 
aluso are engaged in an intense game of Pinochle 
as Raymond Hurm and Ed Vogel offer their sage 
advice. 




269 




Standing: Tim Hawkins, Historian: Pat Ryan, Ser- 
geant-at-Arms; Seated: Mike Connelly, President; 
Bob Tufo, Treasurer; Frank Baukert, Secretary. 



Great believers in interscholastic fraternization, the 
Pi Alphs bring Kelly School to Loyola's float parade. 





Stand in g: Jim Walsh, Charles Owen, Andy Barry, Jay Kramer, Bob 
Tufo, Bill Kerr,, Jim Reilly, Pat O'Farrell, Frank Baukert, Terry 
Moritz, Steve Richardson, John Conley. Seated: Gene Muskus, John 
Anderson, Tim Hawkins, Mike Connelly, Pat Ryan, George Laughlin. 




PI ALPHA LAMBDA 



Pi Alpha Lambda Social Fraternity, founded in 1924 by 
Father Mertz, S.J., has become the largest local fraternity at 
Loyola University. Founded originally as an organization to 
provide funds for the building of Madonna Delia Strada cha- 
pel, it has accomplished this goal and has grown to the dyna- 
mic organization it is today. 

Maintaining strength in athletics, the Pi Alpha teams 
have always posed a threat in the intramural leagues, placing 
third in football and second in basketball in the past year. 

The Pi Alphs has also been very active in school activi- 
ties over the past year, sponsoring a candidate in the Miss 
Loyola contest and a float in the Pow-Wow weekend parade. 
The Phi Alph booth in the annual Lpyola Fair was awarded 
the first place trophy for the most money received. 

The Pi Alph communion breakfast on Mother's Day, and 
the monthly Pi Alph Mass serve to enhance the religious spirit 
which marked the Pi Alph's founding. 



271 



PSI OMEGA 




Psi Omega, the largest fraternity holding membership 
in the Loyola School of Dentistry, has as its objectives the 
cultivation of social qualities, the assistance of its members 
in all laudable undertakings, the advancement of the dental 
profession, and the cementing of lifetime friendships through 
which members may obtain advice and assistance. 

The fraternity has become an integral member of the 
dental community. Academically, its members have shown 
their caliber by maintaining a high level of scholastic achieve- 
ment. Socially, Psi Omega begins the year with functions 
welcoming freshmen. Some of these activities are the Open 
House, an annual Smoker, and Pledge Banquet. 




Top row. Mike Rosinia, Robert Von Kaenel, Emil Gelinas, George Olson, Chuck Vieth, 
Jim O'Donnell, Pete DeBruin, Dave Huston, Vern Sanna, Dave VanHorn, Phil Smith, Ken 
Nielsen, Leonard Navrat, Bob Burke, Harold Soudah; Second row. John Solis, Dick 
Bostyan, Charles Judge, Matt Mardesich, Frank Rastigue, Cleighton Wong, Pete Wright; 
Seated: Jim Stanger, Julius Guccione, Leo Finley, Jim Rasmusson, Dawson Burns, Al Fry; 
Seated on floor: Joe Keane, Joe Catarello, Jim Kwasek, Eric Hohenwald, Richard Schmitz. 



272 



Julius Guccione 
Leo Finley, President 
Jim Rasmusson 
J. Dawson Burns 





Taking time out for the pause that 
refreshes: Matt Mardesich, Frank 
Rastigue, Jim Kwasek, Phil Smith, 
Chuck Vieth, Dave Huston, Leo 
Finley. 




Sunday afternoon at the Psi 
Omega house finds members 
taking a respite from their 
studies. 



SIGMA DELTA PHI 




Hopes for a full season of Rambler piracy 
are reflected in the Sigma Delt float. 



Standing: Bob Shearin, Alumni Secretary; Jim Palanchar, Secretary; Ed 
Knych, Pledgenuster: Marty O'Grady. Sergeant-at-Arms. Seated: Jack 
CaroUo, Vice-President: Gerry Smith, President; Bill Hansen, Treasurer. 




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Sigma Delta Phi, the youngest undergraduate social fraterni- 
ty at Loyola, entered its fifth year of University activities this 
year. Maintaining their own fraternity house at 5947 North 
Kenmore, Sigma Delta Phi attempts, through its various social, 
academic, and religious activities, to fulfill its basic goals of 
moral, physical, academic, and social betterment for its members. 

The fraternity participates in the intramural program, holds 
dances, presents opportunities for participation in religious serv- 
ices, and provides an over-all rtiilieu of healthful activity for its 
membership. 



5947 N. Kenmore — The 
Sigma Delts call it "Home." 



Top Roil-. Ed Bankman, Guy Schnabel, Fred Mausolf, Ed Mrozek; Second Row: Bob Lund, 
Glen Schweitzer, Bob Moll, Joel Yaffa, Lou Bielekowski, Rich Baranczuk, Jim Dorn, Jim 
Read, Bruno Ociepka; Third Ron-: Terry Anderson, Don Schrack, Lyle Rausch, Carl Offut, 
Kamal Khazen, John Schulien, Denny Zbylut, Andy Tellis, Mike Cullinan, Ed Giarrett, 
Denny Kaiser, Vince Cipolla, Cam Tomson, Tom Boring; Fourth Row: Paul Owens, Paul 
Davis, Bob Shearin, Bill Hansen, Jack Carrollo, Gerry Smith, Jim Palanchar, Marty 
O'Grady, Ed Knych; Bottom Row: Karl Scheribel, Pat Luberda, Mike Sinsko, Carl Moore, 
Denny Szmczak, Dave Martinelli, John Henning, Tom Francl, Ernie Skowron, AI Mclnerny. 



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Standing: John McCafferty, John Calderini, Robert Lydon, Charles Fruehe. Sitting: 
Peter Quinn, Joseph Wcislo, James Kelly. 



SIGMA LAMBDA BETA 



Chartered in 1927 by a group of undergraduate students 
from the College of Commerce, Sigma Lambda Beta has grad- 
ually developed into the most important single organization 
contributing to the effectiveness of student government in the 
University College. It works to promote such activities as the 
Dean's Coffee Hour and the Graduates' Honor Banquet. Its 
members also try to further the interests of Loyola among the 
night school students, and many individual members have initi- 
ated new projects for student benefit while serving in the Uni- 
versity College Student Council. 

For the past two years, Sigma Lambda Beta has also done 
the University service in providing aid and encouragement to 
the two new night school organizations, the University College 
Club and the Society for the Advancement of Management. 



276 



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Kenneth Anderson, Treasurer: Joseph 
Wcislo, President: James Kelly, Vice- 
President. 



With the rush of work and night-time 
classes, Sigma Lambda Beta members 
Jim Kelly and Joe Wcislo are thankful 
for a little tutoring. 



Lewis Towers night school students take advantage of 
the Santa Clara Lounge's quiet, pleasant atmosphere to 
review their notes and socialize before classes begin 
for the evening. 






Standing: John Mickus, Secretary; William 
Parazin, Past President, Seated: Kenneth 
Henning, Vice-President; Georse Lang, 
President; John Martin, Sergeant-at-Arms. 



Bill Nellis, Bill Hannon, John Mickus, and Bill Parazin make a deter- 
mined effort to bring the IFC Sing trophy to Sigma Pi. 





Back Row. Jim Karwowski, Larry Pelka, Terry McCarthy, Bill Nellis, John Adams, 
Bill Hannon, Dennis Broderick. Second Row. John Mickus, Jerry Bielak, Tom 
Wanat, Tom McLaughlin, Joe Demeo, Tony VituUo, Bill Parazin. Seated: Don 
Waddell, Ken Henning, George Lang, John Martin, Tom Marsh, Al Adams. 



SIGMA PI 




Representing the welding of an old and time- 
honored Loyola institution with a highly respected 
national organization, Sigma Pi of Loyola takes its 
place as the cornerstone of Loyola fraternalism. 

The oldest social fraternity at Loyola, the former 
Phi Mu Chi, is now entering its forty-first year as an 
organization, but only its second under its new desig- 
nation. The former Phi Mu Chi was responsible for 
many firsts at Loyola. It was the first social fraterni- 
ty on campus and also sponsored the first off-campus 
dance, thus establishing a precedent which other fra- 
ternities have followed. Today, off-campus dances are 
the backbone of Loyola's social life. 

The present Sigma Pi, due to the energetic organi- 
zation with which it affiliated itself tw^o years ago, 
has now become an even stronger force in the Uni- 
versity's social make-up. 



279 



SIGMA PI ALPHA 



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Sigma Pi Alpha is one of the oldest local fraternities 
on campus. Since its beginning in 1933, the fraternity has 
striven to develop its members intellectually and socially, 
physically and spiritually, in friendship and cooperation. 
This year Sigma Pi Alpha will celebrate its thirtieth anni- 
versary. During the past year the fraternity participated in 
most of the major activities of the university. Sigma Pi Al- 
pha has nineteen active members and over one hundred 
members in its alumni association. Future goals for the 
fraterity include increasing its membership on the Lake 
Shore campus, so that the fraternity can play a more vital 
role in campus life, and acquiring a fraternity house. Scho- 
larship is very important to Sigma Pi Alpha members. The 
group has one of the highest academic averages on campus 
for total membership. Many alumni are successful in their 
chosen fields, and they are available to the brothers for 
advice and encouragement. 




Back Row. Rich MazzuUa,, Jerry Snyder, Zenon Myszkowski, Les Balick, Jack Ongemach, 
Mike Lawson; Middle Row: Barrett Henning, John O'Leary, Jim Conniff, Rich Pozdol, Bob 
Getz; Front Row. Medard Narko, Rich Calabrese, Art Waddy, Marty Jarzembowski. 



280 




Jack Ongemach strings along with three of his 
brothers as Sigma Pi Alpha makes a determined 
bid for victory at the IFC Sing. 



Standing: Zenon Myszkowski, Serge- 
ant-at-Arms; John O'Leary, Pledge- 
master; Barrett Henning, Treasurer: 
Rich Mazzulla, Athletic Director, 
Seated: Medard Narko, President; 
Rich Calabrese, Vice-President; Jerry 
Snyder, Secretary. 




281 



TAU DELTA PHI 




Harold Murphy, Bob Rokos, Ron 
Veselsky, Bob Conradi, and Toby 
Darkins hold some of the Tau Delts 
cherished trophies. 



As the oldest national social fraternity at Loyola, 
Tau Delta Phi has inaugurated many "firsts" since its 
founding in 1950. It was the first fraternity to do away 
with physical hazing of pledges, to buy a house, to buy a 
second house, to hire a full time house mother, to hire a 
full-time cook; it has recently inaugurated through the 
I. F. C. the policy of Greeks running their own athletic 
program. 

The members of Tau Delta Phi realize the impor- 
tance of a good relationship with the school and the com- 
munity. They participate in many school organizations 
and have received recognition for their help in the March 
of Dimes drive. Catholic Charities drive, and an or- 
ganized donation to St. Francis Hospital Blood Bank. 

Tau Eta Chapter has received national recognition 
for its outstanding participation in extra-curricular acti- 
vities as well as for being the top scholastic chapter in the 
United States. 



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Left to Right: Bill Gardiner, Consul: Mike 
Sullivan, Vice-Consul: Dick McCloskey, 
Quaestor: Ed Poliak, Recording Scribe; Rich 
Lang, Corresponding Scribe: Jim Carlson, Al- 
umni Scribe: Barry McCarthy, Editor-Histor- 
ian: Randy Chiostri, Custos. 




"You can't win, Charley Brown," is 
Tau Delta Phi's answer to Christian 
Brothers College. 



282 





Mike Sullivan cracks a yoke for Ron 
Velesky, Dick McCloskey and Al 
Tuchten. 



Back Roil-. Don Walsh, Gerry Werderitch, Ray Wright, Toby Darkins, Frank Larkin, 
Denis Potuznik, Ed Ginnan, Larry Kisha, Stan Deresinski, Dan Cosick, Ken Groze, Bob 
Rokos, John Driscol, Ed Jacobson, Denis Walsh, Harold Murphy, Faculty Advisor. Middle 
Row: Jim Carlson, Pete Camodeca, Barry McCarthy, Bill Gardiner, Mike Sullivan, Dick 
McCloskey, Ed Poliak, Randy Chiostri, Louis DeLeonardis. Front Row. Bob Conradi, Al 
Tuchten, Ron Velesky, Rich Lang. 





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Tau Kappa Epsilon this year continues its recent 
float- building superiority by winning the Pow-Wow 
Float Award for the fourth straight year. To this 
achievement, the fraters added sponsorship of the 
Ugly Man Contest and Halloween Mixer, and the 
Sweetheart Contest on St. Patrick's Day. Lectures were 
also scheduled at the Teke house, located at 6215 
N. Kenmore. 

Before their association with the National Tau 
Kappa Epsilon Organization, the present Tekes were 
known as the University Club. Since that affiliation 
in 1956, the fraternity has rapidly grown to its present 
strength and influence. 

The fraternity's motto, "Not for wealth, rank, or 
honor, but for p>ersonal worth and character", sums 
up its sims and the goal towards which all its varied 
activities are directed. 



TKE's promote the spendin' of the green for 
their St. Pat's dance. 



TAU KAPPA EPSILON 



Standing: Dick Bulger, AI Steiskal, Jack Taub, Marty Mayer, Phil O'Connor, Al Landt, Jim 
Burke, Ray Morrissy, Bill Bart, Mike Greco, Den Gravey, Dan Cox; Sitting: Matt Camp- 
ball, Spence Malecha, Jerry Wahl, Dick Fossier, Jim Kopp. 




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Standing: Ed Jaszczalc, Alumni Histor- 
ian: John Van Bramer, Secretary; Dave 
Shanahan, Treasurer: John Frantonius, 
Sergeant-at-Arms: Bob Mataya, Corres- 
ponding Secretary: Sitting: Mike Ponti- 
celli, Vice-President: Jack Fahrenbach, 
President; Ed Kaleta, Historian. 




Standing: Bob Kraus, Jim Biggins, Pat McNamara, Bob Staszkiewicz, Tom Zimmerman, Stan 
Schardon, Joe Wehrle, Jack DuFon, Pete Hurley, Jim Skorey, Colie Connolly; Sitting: Joe 
Tomaszewski, Jim Butzek, Bob Glowacki, Den Gathman, Jack McWalter. 



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THETA PHI ALPHA 




Theta Phi Alpha celebrated its twentieth anniversary at 
Loyola on March 7. Sorority life began at Loyola University 
in 1943 with the establishment of Upsilon Chapter. 

Today, Theta Phi can lay claim to being not only the 
oldest but also the only Pan-Hellenic sorority at Loyola. 
It has as its ideals scholarship, leadership, and friendship. The 
chapter's moderator is Miss Mary Louise McPartlin, director 
of Loyola's Home Study program. 

Welcome Week-End began this year over the Labor 
Day holidays. Efforts were directed toward the Miss Loyola 
contest. Bonnie Bertaux, vice-president, was elected to the 
court. The Inter-fraternity Sing and Float Parade ground the 
Theta Phi's enthusiastic participants. Christmas week saw 
them selling cards for the Glenmary Missions. 

Second semester Greek Week was highlighted by the 
crowning of Miss Sorority, Bettine Zizzo. Variety Show 
practice filled February and March. 

April was the scene of Upsilon Chapter's 20th anniversary 
and Founder's Day celebration. The year was climaxed with 
the annual White Rose Ball. 



Theta Phi Alpha's contribution to the Variety Show, a look at the 
Depression, resolves itself into a chorus line instead of a bread line. 




Surrounded by rocks, Fred Flintstone marches bravely into the 
Pow Wow Week-end float parade. 




1 



Interfraternity Council Sing 
for a moment takes on the ap- 
pearance of a Greek tragedy's 
chorus. 



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286 





Standing: Jean Bluhm. Recording Secre- 
tary; Bettine Zizzo, Corresponding Secre- 
tary: Diane Jenkinson, Treasurer: Patri- 
cia Mroczek, Pledgemistress. Seated: Bon- 
nie Bertaux, Vice-President: Francine Olech, 
President: Suzanne Freko, Marshal. 



Top row: Joyce Seidel, Sharon Ramljak, Melissa Doman, Sharon Burke, Mary Lou 
Hewlett, Gail O'Hara, Mary Lou Kiley, Gay Bowers, Diane Pruyn, Sheila Haverty. 
Second row: Helene Biegel, Sally Bobernac, Patricia Smith, Marie Dooley, Ann Morris- 
sey, Mary Ann Lynch, Lynda Griswold, Therese Makowski, Frances Caraher, Sandra 
Weinstein, Judy Lofthouse. Third row: Emmy Lou Mahalak, Jean Bluhm, Cheryl 
Schnoeblen, Maureen Hogan, Bernadette Donlon, Winnie Gill, Winnie Boylan, Joyce 
Liput, Carol Ann Stitzer, Janet Gallagher, Mary Riley, Nancy O'Brien, Natalie 
Tessari. Fourth Row: Barbara Jo Chesna, Cathy Podlasek, Patricia Janke, Char- 
lene Parker, Patricia Mroczek, Diane Jenkinson, Francine Olech, Bonnie Bertaux, 
Suzanne Freko, Bettine Zizzo, Eve Friend, Margaret Larson, Eileen McNulty. 





Base rz-u: Steve ST-zima. Pii: Levor. Joiiz ±. Sr 1 ih-zji. srtti Ehckason. T - riimf rBBiiCEfr-r; 
Molisen. Joiin Cosrella John Korbaids. Thiri rou : Terry MnrpiiT. Da-rid T Vi i mgjm I>e-r_.; 

Manning. John Sullivan. John Mjcka. Tom Carney. Ralph Delmonico. Larry Carlsen. 
Richard Towerton. Ed-srard 'Walsh. Joseph Van Cnra. Robert Carter. Jerry Dosza. Fourth 
rou: Donald Miller, ^"ince Simone. 'Walr Laos. Gerald Gambia. Dominic Tromfio. Barbara 
Jarabak. Ronald Magnnson. John CNeilL Richard Cambell. Richard 0"Ne£lL Richard 
Prendergasi. Frank Celata. Fifth rou: Salvarore Recnpera Jim Fnlbright. Jar McMabon. 
Pete Lofendo. Frank 'Wilke. 



XI PSI PHI 




The Lambda Chaptjer of Xi Psi Phi, esniHWied it 
L(>5X>ia in 1930, has a rwo-fold pBrpose: first, to develop i. 
isenibeisliip devoted ro its professkm, sdiooL and fratjerniiv 
and seoood, va aid its members in pmrsning their professional 
cahnral, and social desires. 

A dental baienuiy, this acgaiuzaiiaa''s coany functions. 
SDch as boose parties, an mmnal fbcmaL and a yearly golf 
oodng, faave airtacied moie pledges to Xi Psi Phi than any 
otber Etental School f r a teiiiiiy. 

An auxiliary di-rision to die fraternity, composed erf 
wires and fiances oi the membets, is known as the "2jp- 
pjerettes." They serse the Iiat etnity by arranging refresh- 
ments and decorations for social activities and by providing 
clerical ■work for reviews. 

Tbe A>" Fs-i Phi Oxuzrterh unifies all cL ap tets dt tbe lia- 
tional fiaxemity and gives each grocp d»e oj^sonnnity to 
publish the remits of its activities. 



2SS 




"* John Korhakis and Dominic Trumfio do 
cleanup chores. 



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Gerald Dusza. President: Francis Celata, 
\'>ce-President: Don Miller, Treasurer: 
Paul Neary, Editor. 





Who minds scrubbing the floor, says Sam 
Dickason. when Barbara Jarabak is there 
to help? 



Sam Dickason, Lawrence Carlsen. Bar- 
bara Jarabak, and John Korbakis raid 
the fraternity's icebox for a snack. 



289 




Taking advantage of Sunday's late Mass, students from Loyola's 
dorms receive a blessing from Father Bergewisch. 




Keeping rhythm atop a stage of tables, "The Frustrations," 
a combo composed of dorm men, provide the life for a 
Union social. 



LOYOLA HALL 



Loyola Hall, after a period in which it was merely 
a place to live, has become one of the most influential, 
interesting, and productive bodies of students on cam- 
pus. Living as they do in the ideal campus atmosphere, 
the students at the dorm are most likely and most able 
to be infected by that disease known as school spirit, 
which manifests itself in an interest and participation 
in school activities. 

Sponsoring the winning candidate for Miss Loyola, 
organizing bus trips to various basketball games, and 
providing a solid block of partisan fans for all Loyola 
events, Loyola Hall has now emerged as one of the dom- 
inant forces in campus activities. 




290 



With trophies bespeaking the prowess of organized 
dorm efforts are: Ed Szczurek, Jerry Blassage (victor- 
ious Ugly Man candidate), Eddy Krol (victorious Miss 
Loyola candidate), Jack Downs and Paul Stewart. 



Closely piled aboard a sometime tow truck, LSC dorm students 
take deserved pride in their Pow-Wow float. 





'refects at Loyola Hall are: (stand- 
ng) Donald Schmitt, William Creed, 
!.awrence McCauIey, James Erdmann, 
Charles Murdock; {seated) Rev Ral- 
>h Talkin, S. J., Rev. Fred Berge- 
visch, S. J., Mr. William Taylor, 
lirector. 




The Rev. Robert Hartnett, S. J., hosts some of the dorm residents who 
were treated to a night on the town (!) as guests of the Jesuits: 
{Clockwise, from /e//) Jerry Kuhns, Penny Luback, Teri Holzer, Jim 
Ritt, Wally Brooker, Loretta Lucek, Audrey Gineman, Peter Gilmour 
and Marilyn Lewandowski. 




Displaying the sundry semblances concocted for All 
Hallow's Eve are Bill Schmitt, Vicki Julian, Jerry 
Draski and Madonna Casey. 





Jerry Skaja (center) celebrates his birthday caked with 
leaves, as Jerry Draski and Jim Bukovac carry out a time- 
honored Loyola Hall tradition. 



Representing every corner from Rome to Tahiti with even 
a few representatives from Ringling Brothers, spirited 
dorm students celebrate Halloween. 





Suavely dressed in their "go to meet- 
ing" garb, dorm students indulge in 
their Sunday repast. 



All eyes face front during a tense 
scene in one of the monthly movies 
at Loyola Hall. 




Stomping away with hopes of stifl- 
ing Wichita are John Clare, Ed Hul- 
linger, Nancy Olson, Judy Peterson, 
Jerry Draski, and Don Nowinski. 




293 



DELAWARE HALL 



Once you get behind the grim, fortress-like exterior 
of Delaware Hall, and somehow manage to pry open the 
three-ton iron door guarding the entrance, the dominant 
atmosphere becomes one of warmth and friendliness, full 
of the high spirits and excited curiosity always found in a 
girls' dorm. In the heart of the city, at 196 E. Delaware, 
the girls at the Hall have almost unequalled opportunities 
for academic, cultural, and social activities. 

Primarily attending the Lewis Towers Campus, the girls 
at Delaware sponsor the usual number of parties and dances, 
as well as participating in the Variety Show this year. Be- 
yond this, girls from Delaware have volunteered, in the past 
year, to provide hostesses for the Ecumenical Forum Lec- 
tures. 





Standing: Margaret O'Hara, Joan Adams, Elizabeth Corns, Donna Roland, Mary Jane 
Finkl, Diane Byrd, Mary Kay Kapetanovic, Cathy Smyth, Patricia Murphy, Diane Erdman, 
Marcia Gondeck, Reggie Paskus. Sitting: Mary Heller, Sharyn Mekus, Emmy Lou Mahalak, 
Cynthia Lewis, Sara Brindle, Margaret Whalen. Kneeling: Lois McKinnon, Margaret Drazine, 
Nancy Slattery, Suzanne Freko, Penny Riddiford, Judy Golden. 



294 



Floor Counselors at Delaware Hall are: Emmy 
Lou Mahalak, Margaret Whalen, and Margaret 
O'Hara. 





Chicken wire+napkins+many hands=:Delaware Hall's con- 
tribution to the Float Parade. 



Standing: Mary Riley, Susan Swed, Margaret True, Nijole Norkus, Joan Cvitkovich, 
Mary Glaser; Sitting: Margaret Schalke, Joyce Liput, Carol Sititzer, Rosemary Min- 
dock, Marilee Skuble, Catherine Green; Kneeling: Ellen Malin, June Bienik, Eileen 
Dalle MoUe. 




STEBLER HALL 



Located at 1101 Loyola Avenue, Stebler Hall was 
the first women's dorm actually established on Lake 
Shore Campus. As such it seeks to contribute to the 
total campus atmosphere by participating to the full- 
est in all campus activities. Indicative of the interest 
in University affairs was the fact that Edwina Krol, 
a resident of Stebler, was crowned Miss Loyola at this 
year's Fall Frolic. 

Inside Stebler itself, regularly held parties and teas 
established an almost home-like atmosphere, leading 
to a relaxed feeling among the residents, a feeling 
often difficult to maintain in a dormitory atmos- 
phere. As a "home away from home" Stebler is, of 
course, not perfect, but it comes very near to provid- 
ing the relaxed warm atmosphere so necessary to ev- 
ery home. 




Stebler Hall tried to feather its nest for Pow Wow, but all it got 
was the bird. 



Top Row. Mary Anne Miller, Miss Hronec, Dorothy Stanek, Jane Srotyr, Irene Gaughan, 
Delores Baker, Mickey Dooling, Eddy Krol, Jane Donoghue, Chris Vallee, Julie Gallagher, 
Marilyn KuUa, Cathy Musich, Sue Coldeway; Second Ron-. Char Bogaerts, Sue Kubiak, Pat 
Reibling, Mrs. Dawson, Marge Procyk, Barb Rivan, Val Valient, Judy VanKlavern, Maggie 
Schultz; Front Row. Margo Vigil, Karen Dannenhauer, Colette Stack, Gayle Aubry, Lynn 
Martin, Mary Kent, Flo Kowalzyck. 




Stebler staffers stop, stand still, smile — still stuffing. 



Sharon McArdle and Sue Trimble pen financial appeals 
to home. 





Top Row. Jeanne Hinderscheid, Rosemarie Sochor, Diane Kusmider, Sherri Hannah, Rose 
Ann Burke, Anne Roney, Vicki Tammen; Second Row. Rita Bartosz, Sue Fenton, Barb 
Davies, Anita Guzior, Sue Trimble, Maggie Coppock, Sharon McArdle, Shari Adam; Front 
Row: Mary Anne Haidacher, Mary Jo Frontczak, Marilyn Faford, Penny Rapp, Eddie Nowak, 
Sue Tracy. 





Top Row. Camille Zarontonello, Mary Groeber, Mary Kaye Bolsenga, Peggy Effa, Pat Hea- 
ney, Jean Moloney, Linda Burns, Sandra Wiencek, Mary Ellen Imlay, Peggy McDonald, Mary 
Jo Hazlett, Janice Krozel. Second Row. Betty Ann Glass, Sharon Burke, Teresa Makowski, 
Karen Sandrick, Eileen Schotz, Jackie White, Nancy Kerrigan, Barb Dane, Joan Thinnes, Sue 
Raikovitz. Third Row. Judy Rogers, Mary Vlahos, Cheryl Vacula, Carol Spence, Terry Loda,' 
Cathy Talano, Lolly Griffin, Marie Mabey, Carol Knes, Miss Webb, Olga Velez, Marie 
Mazeika. Front Row. Ann Tomal, Pat Byrne, Andrea Longo, Marilyn Engel, Peggy Buckheit, 
Joan Rapp, Teri Holzer, Audrey Gineman, Marilyn Lewandowski, Pat Baylock, Mary 
Thinnes. 



CHAMBERLAIN 



Chamberlain Hall, the newest and largest womens' resi- 
dence at Loyola, houses approximately 95 women majoring in 
nursing, biology, math, sociology, history and psychology. 
Residents are afforded numerous opportunities for broaden- 
ing their social horizons. This year the girls displayed house 
decorations for Pow-Wow, held open house, and had casual 
rec room parties. Informal house parties for the residents 
were also held, such as the annual Christmas party. All the 
residents participated in the closed retreat held at Cham- 
berlain. 





The Rev. Henry T. Chamber- 
lain, S.J., officiates at the bless- 
ing of the new dorm. 




HALL 



Top Row. Marilynn Gayda, Jo Golec, Gaye Bowers, Mary Kaye Van Buren, Beth Homan, 
Carol Wolfe, Connie Fico, Kathy Carey, Kathy Cleary, Julie Adams. Second Row: Terry 
Sattler, Mari Hirtzel, Marion Sandiford, Miss Gambol, Ann Morgan, Phyllis Krzyzek, Kathie 
Bender, Dorothy ""Janie" Turek, Mary Brummond, Judy Peterson, Mickie Clabots. Third 
Row: Vicki Julian, Carol Nahnsen, Diana Sowinski, Miss Sullivan, Mary Gieren, Barb Hoess, 
Lucy Gabriel, Gloria Mathews, Jackie Specht. Front Row: Karen Stolfi, Sandy Hidalgo, Mar- 
gie Kretz, Jeanne Cosgrove, Mary Ann Rakoczy, Marcia Stachyra. 





Members of Chamberlain's Judiciary Board are: (.standing) Betty Ann Glass, Peggy 
McDonald; (seated) Peggy Effa, Gaye Bowers, Paula Colandrea, Gloria Mathews. 



Chamberlain girls find that many 
hands make light work of putting 
up house decorations for Pow- 
Wow weekend. 



299 




"Something for me, Santa?" ask Terry Loda, Jo 
Anne Golec, Lucy Gabriel, Christine Formanek, 
Marie Mabey and Terry Sattler. That's Vicki 
Julian with the beard. 





Cheryl Vacula, Sharon Burke, Mary Groe- 
ber. Rose Reyno and Camille Zarantonello 
prepare to serve refreshments at the Cham- 
berlain Christmas party. 



Entertainment committee members Julie 
Adams, Joan Thinnes, Pat Byrne, Andrea 
Longo, Betty Ann Glass and Mary Jo 
Hazlett present their own version of "The 
Little Angel." 




The tale of Beauty and the Beast is related by 
Carol Spence, Cheryl Vacula, Judy Rogers, Mary 
Vlahos, Karen Sandrick and fuzzy friends. 



300 



GONZAGA HALL 



Gonzaga Hall presents a new concept in retreat 
houses. It is the only student operated Retreat house 
in the nation. This situation is made possible by the 
wonderful co-operation which Father J. Donald 
Hayes, S.J., director of Gonzaga, has received from 
the students who live at Gonzaga during those times 
it is not being used for retreats. 

Located on North Sheridan Road near Lake Shore 
Campus, Gonzaga is run almost completely by the 
students residing there. They order the food, pay the 
bills, cook the meals, and handle maintenance chores. 
As Father Hayes says "Gonzaga Hall is an alcove in 
the midst of the city, given directly to God." 



It's not much, but it's home — where 
Gonzaga 's heart and ping-pong table 
are. 




Father Hayes and the house committee discuss administrative details of running Gonzaga 
Hall. 




301 





Mrs. George Ireland wears the 
NCAA Victory net. 



GEORGE IRELAND 

Athletic Director and 
Head Basketball Coach 



In his twelfth year as head basketball coach, George 
Ireland, a former All-American at Notre Dame, led 
his team to Loyola's first national championship. It 
was the high point of the 27 year coaching career of 
"the Man" who has now compiled a won-lost record 
of 174-120. He has served as Loyola's athletic director 
for four years — a period which has seen both basket- 
ball and track rise to national prominence. Before 
coming to Loyola, Ireland spent 15 years at Marmion 
Military Academy. 

Both former players under Ireland, Jerry Lyne and 
Paul Krucker served as his assistants this year. The 
latter guided the freshman team to a successful 5-1 
season in his first year. 

Former St. Philip coach and Loyola graduate, Al 
Wagner coached the swimming team to the central 
AAU championship. Wagner, Loyola's most valua- 
ble swimmer in 1955, swam for the United States in 



international competition and in the Olympic Trials 
in Los Angeles. 

Jerry Weiland, head cross-country and track coach, 
has been at Loyola for thirteen years. A graduate of 
Southern California, Weiland set the National Cath- 
olic League record in the 220-yard low hurdles. He 
assumed the cross-country mentorship this year after 
an absence of one season. 

Charles Greenstein, a Loyola alumnus and Chicago 
lawyer, is Loyola's bowling coach. Now in his twelfth 
season, the coach is the founder of the Midwest In- 
tercollegiate Bowling Conference. While at Loyola, 
he captained the team for three seasons, and in 1948 
rolled a 300-game. 

John Stevens, a graduate of DePaul, coached Loy- 
ola's golf team for the fifth season this year. During 
the summer, Stevens is the assistant pro at the Edge- 
water Beach club. 



304 




JERRY WEILAND 

Track and Cross-Country Coach 




JERRY LYNE 

Assistant Basketball Coach 



AL WAGNER 

Swimming Coach 




PAUL KRUCKER 

Freshman Basketball Coach 



DENNIS QUINLAN 
Sports Publicity Director 







{ 




V 




BASKETBALL 



Rated from the very start as a national threat, the 62-63 
Ramblers swept through a rugged thirty-one game schedule with 
only two losses and brought home the NCAA championship. 
The story of this, the greatest of all to Loyola squads over the 
past forty-seven years, is the story of a blitzing fast-break offense, 
balanced scoring, and a hit-and-run defense. 

AU-American captain Jerry Harkness led the "iron five" 
with a record setting 662 points for an average of 21.4 points 
per game. Center Les Hunter (17.0), John Egan (13.7), Vic 
Rouse (13.5), and Ron Miller (13.3) round out a balanced team 
which loses only Harkness for next year. 

On December 2nd Christian Brothers College of Memphis 
served as the sacrificed lamb, while the Ramblers opened the 
season with a 114-58 triumph — the first in a string of 21. In 
the next two weeks the point-happy Ramblers decidedly stomped 
North Dakota (110-56), Wisconsin (Milw.) (107-47), and South 
Dakota (105-58). The squad's first real test came against tra- 
ditional rival Western Michigan. The hot shooting Ramblers 
forecast some things to come as they shot 61^ and downed the 
Bronco's 123-102. 

In the season's first road game Hunter notched 27 points 
and Harkness 25 as the Ramblers came from 11 points behind to 
whip Indiana 106-94. Three days later Loyola blew a 22 point 
lead, but closed with a rush to defeat 10th ranked Seattle 93-83. 



306 




Loyola University of Chicago Varsity Basketball Team — Top 
Row. Earl Johnson, Billy Smith, Vic Rouse, Leslie Hunter, 
Jim Reardon, Rich Rochelle; Middle Row. Paul Krucker, 
Assistant Coach: Ron Miller, Chuck Wood, Jerry Harkness, 
Captain: George Ireland, Head Coach and Athletic Director: 
Front Row. John Gabcik, Manager: Dan Connaughton, Jack 
Egan, Pablo Robertson, Dennis McKenna, trainer. 





Hawk-eyes can do nothing but watch as Hunter scores 
in Iowa rout. 



Egan learns Bossa-Nova New Orleans style. 



307 



The Ramblers, then ranked No. 2 nationally, 
moved to Oklahoma City for the annual All-College 
Tournament. Here they had little trouble in dis- 
posing of Arkansas (81-62), Memphis State (94-82), 
and Wyoming (93-82) to bring home the season's 
first trophy. Back in the Stadium two days later, 
a tired Loyola squad squandered a 15 point lead, but 
defeated Dayton 74-69. 

Welcomed back to Alumni gym by 2,000 scream- 
ing fans, the Ramblers put on another run and shoot 
show and downed Marshall 103-58. Loyola of the 
South led through most of the first half, only to be 
shot down in the second as the Chicagoans won 88-53. 

Loyola's l4th straight victory, a sweet one, came 
at the expense of Marquette (87-68) in Milwaukee. 
Rouse and Harkness sparked a 15 point second half 
spree that put the Warriors away. In Kalamazoo, 
the Ramblers played one of their best games in ob- 
literating Western Michigan by an unbelievable 107- 
69 score. 

The Ramblers walked over Kent 96-55, but were 
slowed down in edging Ohio U. 80-72 before return- 
ing to Chicago to play in the season's biggest double- 
header. That night Loyola overwhelmed Santa Clara 
92-72 and Cincinnati, defending NCAA champs and 
favorites to repeat, beat Illinois (32-53. The 23,000 fans 
went home buzzing about a possible Rambler-Bearcat 
clash. 

The Ramblers then eased past Washington (St. 
Louis) 118-58, and Iowa 86-68. It was at this time 
that the Ramblers lost the services of their two top 
reserves through scholastic difficulties. 

Marquette's visit to the Stadium provided a scare 
for the Ramblers. Ball-hawking Harkness stole the 
ball and Miller stole the show with 28 points as the 
Ramblers won 92-90 in overtime. On February l6th 
hopes for an undefeated season were shattered 92-75 
at Bowling Green by a fast-starting, vengeful Falcon 
squad. 

Traveling to New York, the Ramblers bounced 
back by trimming St. John's 70-47. Houston slowed 
the Ramblers to a stand-still, but came out on the 
short end of a 62-58 score. In the season's final home 
game, Ohio U. saw its 54-47 first-half lead disappear 
in a flourish of Rambler points and fell 114-94. Jerry 
Harkness bid farewell to Alumni Gym with 32 points 
while Les Hunter promised to return with 34. 

For the second year in a row Loyola lost its final 
regular season encounter, this time 73-72 to Wichita 
before 19,000 non-partisans in Chicago Stadium. Foul 
trouble proved fatal in the final minutes, as the Ram- 
blers dropped their second of the season. 

And then, the march to the championship! 

Loyola's first appearance in the N.C.A.A. tourna- 
ment was marked by a record setting 111-42 triumph 
over Tennessee Tech, champion of the Ohio Valley 
Conference. The win advanced the Ramblers to the 
Med-east Regionals at Michigan State. 




Rouse's tip concludes L.U's fast break. 



"Excuse me for a moment," pleads Vic Rouse. 



308 




^ 





Foul on Egan? John and Wichita's Ernie 
Moore collide in a crucial last minute 
play. 



Deliberate Mississippi State, 6th 
ranked nationally, broke into a 7-0 
lead, but Loyola led by Harkness' 20 
points, methodically put down the 
southern revolt 61-51. One night 
later, Loyola captured the mythical 
state championship by downing 5th 
rated Illinois 79-64 on the strength 
of Harkness' 33 points. At one f>oint 
the Ramblers led 75-47 in capturing 
the Regional championship. 

In the national semi-finals at Louis- 
ville, the Ramblers disposed of 2nd 
rated Duke 94-75 by building up an 
early lead of 20-5 and closing with a 
flourish when the Blue Devils threat- 
ened. Les Hunter scored 29 points to 
lead the attack. 

Finally, the match with Cincin- 
nati! The Ramblers trailed from the 
start, trailing 29-21 at the half, trail- 
ing 39-30, and then 45-30 with four- 
teen minutes left. Then followed the 
greatest comeback in the history of 
the tournament: 45-33. 47-36, 48-39, 
48-45, 50-48, and 54-54 as Harkness 
swished a jump shot with five sec- 
ond of regulation time remaining. 
Finally, with one second left in the 
overtime period. Rouse did it — and 
Loyola owned the National Champi- 
onship. 

Egan outleaps Dayton! 




Loyola carries off the NCAA regional trophy. 





A fallen Hawkeye doesn't seem to real- 
ize that basketball is predominately a 
running game. 



Smith and Harkness team up to frus- 
trate Iowa's Riddle. 



Les takes one on the jaw behind the 
cover of a basketball. 





"Eyes right!" seems to be the unspoken com- 
mand as the action is carried away from the 
Ramblers' bench. 






Johnson leaps high to block a Wisconsin scoring 
attempt. 



The ball eludes both Loyo- 
la's Rouse and Mississippi 
State's W. D. Stroud. 




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SEASON'S RECORD 



LOYOLA 

114 
110 
107 
105 

123 

106 

93 

81 

94 

93 

74 
103 

88 

87 
107 

96 

80 

92 
118 

86 

92 

75 

70 

62 
114 

72 

Ill 

61 

79 

94 

60 



WON 29 LOST 2 

OPPONENT 

Christian Brothers 58 

North Dakota 56 

Wisconsin (Milw.) . 47 

South Dakota 58 

Western Michigan 102 

Indiana 94 

Seattle 83 

Arkansas 62* 

Memphis State 82* 

Wyoming 82* 

Dayton 69 

Marshall 58 

Loyola of South 53 

Marquette 68 

Western Michigan 69 

Kent State 55 

Ohio University 72 

Santa Clara 72 

Washington (Mq.) 58 

Iowa 68 

Marquette 90(o) 

Bowling Green 92 

St. John's (N. Y.) 47 

Houston 58 

Ohio University 94 

Wichita 73 

Tennessee Tech. 42** 

Mississippi State 51** 

Illinois 64** 

Duke 75** 

Cincinnati 58 ( o ) * * 

All College Tourney Oklahoma City 
NCAA Tourney 




Looking for elbow room is Ken Ryan of "the other Loyola" 
as he assists teammate in grabbing rebound from Les Hunter. 



LOYOLA'S 



Jerry Harkness shows his All-America award from The Sporting News to Coach 
George Ireland. 



ALL-AMERICAN 



The holder of every major scoring record at 
Loyola, Jerry Harkness was named to the first 
string of virtually every Ali-American team this 
year. The 6-2 forward from the Bronx scored 
1,749 points in three years eclipsing the old career 
mark of 1556 points set by Jack Kerris in four 
years. For three consecutive years also, he was 
named the squad's most valuable player averaging 
22.4, 21.0, and 21.4 points per game. 

Despite his great scoring power, Loyola's first 
Ail-American since 1949 is known as a great de- 
fensive player as well as an unselfish team player. 
Over his career he averaged only 16 shots per 
game, and this year connected on over 50% of 
them. 

Jerry closed out his fabulous career in the 
NCAA tournament which the Ramblers won. In 
the regionals he led the team both nights with 
20 and 33 points, but the biggest basket of his life 
was the ten foot jump shot that tied the score 
of the Cincinnati game with 5 seconds left on the 
clock. 



"Harkness" 




313 





The famous three-lane fast break ends in another basket for the 
Ramblers. Miller Tallies here. 



'But they put the basket out front this year. Jack.' 



Kathy Ireland, Kathy Carey, Marilyn Norek, Candy Oliver, Sue 
Williams, Noreen Raia. 





Number 1 5, now retired, is worn by Jerry Harkness 
as he and Ron Miller look on while Coach Ireland 
counsels John Egan. 






Vic Rouse soars high for a basket 
against Mississippi State in Regional 
Semi-finals. 



Like father to son. Coach Ireland encour- 
ages Les Hunter during half-time. 




^ 



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FRESHMAN BASKETBALL 



Although playing one of the shortest schedules 
in years, the 62-63 "Little" Ramblers, under Paul 
Krucker, finished with a fine 5-1 record. The "Mag- 
nificent Seven" amassed 641 points during the season 
for a remarkable 90.1 points per game average while 
holding the opposition to 70. 

Jim Coleman, with a deadly shooting and surpris- 
ing rebounding ability, led team scoring with 118 
points for 19.6 points per game average. Close behind 
him were a pair of quick-moving forwards, Frank 
Perez (17.5 on 105 points) and Leroy Watson (15.5 
on 93 points). Perez and Watson, coupled with Tom 
Markey ( 14.6 on 88 points), gave the Frosh virtually 
complete control of the backlsoards. Ed Manzke (7.8 



on 47 ) completed the starting lineup with Bill 
Murtha ( 10 on 60) and Clarence Watson (8.0 on 40), 
providing a very adequate bench. 

Again the Frosh took on Jamaco in the season 
opener, but an injury to Manzke and the hot- 
shooting Saints proved their undoing 104-70. Bounc- 
ing back, the freshmen trounced undermanned Coca- 
Cola 78-37 and smothered Fort Sheridan 108-59. After 
drubbing Duncan Y.M.C.A. 95-58 and hitting the 
century mark again ( 101-75) against Lewis, the squad 
played perhaps its best game of the year against 
Second Federal. Trading baskets with the Bankers in 
the second half, the team kept its poise and pulled it 
out in the last nine seconds to win 89-87. 



Standing: Bill Murtha, LeRoy Watson, Frank 
Perz, Tom Markey. Kneeling: Clarence Watson, 
James Coleman, Ed Manzke. 





;.i.. '. .i.Caf 



The cloudy sky above goes unnoticed as all concentrate on the sound of the starting gun. 



CROSS-COUNTRY 



Standing: Coach Jerry Weiland, Dick Cochran, John Pendergast, John 
Kolovich, Tom O'Hara, Assistant Coach Bob Radchffe. Kneeling: Bob 
Knobloch, Pat Mitten, Jim Mooney, Tom Matulis. 



Loyola's Cross-Country team had a very successful 
season. After winning its early meets the team took 
time out to get in shape for the Illinois State, Notre 
Dame, Central Collegiate, and National Cross-country 
meets. 

The words "to get in shape" should not be taken 
lightly. To a cross country runner it means running 
almost a hundred miles a week plus a weekend test 
(about eighteen miles) to Oak Street Beach and back. 
To an ambitious few, like Tom O'Hara and John 
Pendergast it means getting up at seven o'clock to get 
that "needed" extra running. 

The team did get in shape; they won the State 
meet and obtained high places in the others while 
Tom O'Hara won the National. 

Even though it takes a team effort to win, still 
there are exceptional stand outs. Junior Tom O'Hara 
is Loyola's exceptional. He won every collegiate cross- 
country race he has entered save one — and that was 
two years ago. His victory in the National proved 
him to be the outstanding collegiate cross-country 
runner and won him selection as an All-American. 




317 




MikeQuinlan, Ed LeMire, Gordon Dammann, John Schmitz, Tom Fahey and Claude Sasso — 
members of the varsity golf team. 



GOLF 



Ed LeMire prepares to tee off on the Lake Shore Golf Club 
fairway. 



The Loyola golf team, under the direction of Edgewater 
Country Club professional John Stevens, started its 1963 
season on April 3 hoping to improve on their impressive 
record of last year. The 1962 campaign saw Loyola triumph 
over five opponents while losing only to De Paul. This 
loss, however, was avenged as Loyola defeated the Blue 
Demons to capture the Chicago Area Intercollegiate Golf 
Championship. 

This spring Loyola participated in a quadrangular meet 
in which it defeated LLT. and St. Procopius and achieved 
a tie with De Paul. This auspicious start, combined with 
the presence of three lettermen and several impressive 
underclassmen on the squad, promised great golf successes 
for the season. 



318 s-^v 





Standing: Bill Waddell, Mike Panzarella, Charles Greenstein (Coach), 
Joe Silliman; Kneeling: Ted Lipinski, Don Kaczor, George Hill, 
Frank Lawlor. 



BOWLING 



The 1962-63 varsity bowlers finished third iti 
the field of the Midwest Intercollegiate Bowling 
Conference. The keglers compiled a record of 
19 games won and 31 lost in winning six of ten 
matches. 

Leading the squad this year was sophomore 
Mike Panzarella, who averaged 189. Next were 
Bill Waddell with 182, Frank Lawlor and Joe 
Silliman (181), and George Hill (175). Sub- 
stitutes Ted Lipinski (180), Don Kaczor (176) 
and Frank Manczko (175) filled in adequately 
throughout the year. 



Captain Joe Silliman aims for a strike. 




319 



SWIMMING 



The 1962-63 Aqua-Ramblers had one of 
the most successful seasons in Loyola's 
swimming history. The most impressive 
factors of the season were a 5-3 record; the 
capturing of the Chicago Intercollegiate 
Swimming title: the taking of the Central 
AAU Championship; the breaking of every 
Loyola Varsity record; and the qualification 
of three team members for the NCAA 
championship in North Carolina. 

The action got under way Pow-Wow 
Week-end at Alumni Pool with the Ramblers 
trouncing Illinois Normal by the largest 
margin of the season 73-23. Five records fell 
as the swimmers started the season with a big 
splash. The next two meets, equally impres- 
sive, saw the Ramblers roll past Illinois 
Institute of Technology and the University 
of Illinois (Chicago), by the scores of 73- 
28 and 52-41 respectively. 

On Friday, January 4th, the finmen ran 
up against one of the best college squads in 
the country, North Central. The spirited 
Ramblers came closer to North Central than 
ever before, losing by only five points, 50- 
45. The meet was so close, in fact, that the 
outcome was determined by a few feet. 




Bill Bishop, Captain and Al Wagner, Coach of Loyola's Aqua-Ramblers. 



Heinz Brauner, Jim Daly, Dave Musich, Al Saalfeld, Joe Grever, Tom 
Karels stand poised for a fast get-away. 




320 




The starting gun finds Heinz Brauner, Ed Wallen, Ron Koehler in a bit of a hurry. 



Dave Musich — going . . . 




going 




321 



, gone. 



* 



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University of Wisconsin (Milwaukee) next fell prey to 
the Ramblers, losing by the score of 56-38. Then came the 
week-end of February 15-16. Bowling Green, obviously on a 
"stomp the Ramblers" weekend (the basketball team lost there 
that week-end) skimmed past the swimmers, 51-43. The next 
night, Western Michigan, sporting a 9-0 record, also managed 
to pull a victory over the Ramblers. The final meet of the 
year saw the finmen best Detroit Tech 58-36 to finish the 
season with a 5-3 record. 

Once the regular season was over, the post-season 
championship meets began. The first event was the Chicago 
Intercollegiate Swimming and Diving Championship. The 
defending Champion Ramblers routed all competition, bring- 
ing the crown to Loyola for the fourth straight time. Teams 
engaged in the competition were: Loyola with 118 points; 
University of Chicago with 55; University of Illinois — 51; 
George Williams — 24 and Illinois Institute of Technology — 4. 

The next title event was the Central AAU Championship 
held at Harrison Park Pool in Chicago. Loyola took its first 
AAU title in history, defeating the top teams in the state. 
This meet officially ended Loyola's swimming season, and the 
elated finmen threw coach Al Wagner into the pool to cele- 
brate the end of a fine year. 

Three of Loyola's finest swimmers. Captain Bill Bishop, 
Andy Barry, and Ron Koehler received invitations to the 
NCAA championship held at North Carolina University. All 
three, although they didn,'t come in first, finished with re- 
spectable times in the meet. 

Records broken this year were: 

400 yd. Medley Relay— ()im Daly, Andy Barry, Bill 
Bishop, Ron Koehler)— .3:58.2. 

200 yd. Freestyle— Ron Mokos— 1 :57.6. 

200 yd. Individual Medley— Ron Koehler— 2: 11.6. 

200 yd. Butterfly— Bill Bishop— 2:09.1. 

200 yd. Backstroke— Jim Daly— 2.17.4. 

500 yd. Freestyle— Ron Koehler— 5.23. 

200 yd. Breaststroke— Andy Barry — 2:19.7. 

400 yd. Freestyle Relay — (Ron Mokos, Heinz Brauner, 
Dave Musich, Ron Koehler) — 3:30.9. 




'ii —II III II 




Tom Karels: "O K, coach, now what.'" 



322 




Standing: Dave Musich, Ron Koehler, Jim Daly, Andy Barry, Heinz Brauner. 
Seated: Al Wagner, Coach; Tom Karels, Joe Grever, AI Saalfeld, Ed Wallen, Bill 
Bishop. 

The medley relay team: Jim Daly, Andy Barry, Ron 
Koehler, Bill Bishop. 

Jim Daly, Andy Barry, Bill Bishop and Ron Koehler are caught 
loafing. 




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TRACK 



Coach Jerry Weiland with Pat Mitten, Tom 
O'Hara, John Kolovich, John Pendergast, the 
two mile relay team. 



To run in any of the bigger track meets across the country 
a track team has to be invited. Loyola's track team was invited! 
This year the team with its crop of middle distance runners 
attended many of the nations bigger meets, and won at most 
of them. The team was requested to run in New York twice: 
The Milrose Games and the New York Athletic Club meet; 
and in Canada twice: the Telegram Maple Leaf Games and 
the Canadian Indoor Championships. Other meets attended 
were the Cleveland K.C. Meet, the Chicago Daily News Meet, 
Western Michigan University Relays, Central A.A.U. Indoor 
Championships, Michigan State Relays, and the Central Col- 
legiate Outdoor Meet. 

Loyola's track team specializes in the middle distance 
events. These events include any distance from a quarter mile 
race to the mile run. With such outstanding quarter milers as 
Jerry Drozd, Henry White, Pete Waldron, Rich Anglickus, Carl 
Powell, Stan Drab, and Pat Brannigan, the team could enter 
anything from individual quarter mile races to a 440 yard 
relay to a 880 yard relay to a mile relay and finally, with the 
help of a half-miler, the sprint medley relay. In most meets, 
like the Bradley Relays this group runs at least three of the 








mentioned events. The other half of this middle distance group 
is composed of the half-milers and milers. Under this category 
fall Patrick Mitten, John Kolonick, Dick Bade, John Pender- 
gast. Jack Solbrig, Bob Knobloch and Tom O'Hara. Four such 
runners could also run a variety of events. Besides their own 
unique events they could enter a two mile relay, a four mile 
relay, and with the help of a quarter-miler a distance medley 
relay. 

To make a complete track team it also takes sprinters, 
and field event men such as: hurdlers, shot putters, broad 
jumpers, high jumpers, pole vaulters and some other odd 
events like the javelin. Events like these cause nightmares for 
coaches. It is almost impossible to tell if a graduating high 
school sprinter or field-eventer will improve or not. So Loyola's 
head coach, Jerry Weiland, carefully and economically picks 
athletes for these events. Coach Weiland picked wisely! Senior 
Bob Schurer and Sophomore Jim Vanaria both placed in the 
State hurdles last year. They are both being pushed by fresh- 
man Jack Solbrig. Jack also high jumps. Henry White and 
Jack O'Neill broad jump, while Bob Malcolm handles the 
weight events — shotput, discus, and javelin. 



Henry White seems airborne as he takes off for the 
broad jump. 





The mile relay team: Jerry Drozd, Stan Drab, Henry White, Pete Waldron. 



325 




Tom O'Hara breaks the tape in 4:01.5 in the 
Wanamaker Mile at the Milrose Games in 
New York. 



ALL-AMERICAN 
TOM O'HARA 



A victory in the national cross-country meet and a sub- 
four minute mile highlighted the 1962-6.^ season for Tom 
O'Hara. The slender Loyola runner earned All-American 
honors for the second year by running the Michigan State 
cross-country course of four miles in 19:20.3 to gain his 
victory. It marked a complete sweep for the junior harrier, 
as he won every meet he ran this season. 

The indoor track season saw "Big Red" racing against 
the four-minute mile. In the Wanamaker mile of the Mil- 
rose games, he turned in a time of 4:01.5. Three weeks 



later in New York's Baxter mile, he ran the distance in 
3:59.2 only to lose to Jim Beatty who ran 3:58.6. Tom's 
second sub-four minute mile came before 16,700 fans at 
Chicago Stadium as he won the Banker's mile of the Daily 
News relays. 

For his age, the young Loyolan has to be considered 
the best distance man in the United States. The 1964 
Olympics should see Tom O'Hara, a Loyola All-American 
carrying the colors of the U. S. 



326 





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Stan Drab passes the relay baton to Jerry Drozd. 



Bob Schurer displays perfect hurdle form, "really reaching." 




INTRAMURAL PROGRAM 

The intramural program at Loyola is a University-sponsored, student-run 
program that depends for its success upon the integrated cooperation of its partici- 
pants. The purpose of the program is to encourage the entire student body to 
take part in organized athletic events and to enjoy the benefits of active recreation. 
Intramural sports are conducted on a voluntary basis, the aim of the athletic 
department being to make participation in the intramural programs as attractive 
and satisfying for a large number of students as intercollegiate participation is 
for a more select group. 

The intramural program is headed by Intramural Managers at Lewis Towers 
and Lake Shore campus who direct the entire program. They are assisted in case 
of protest by an intramural board consisting of members of the faculty. The 
directors and board members are responsible for scheduling, playoffs and all 
other phases of the intramural program. 

This year the program consists of 25 independent teams and ten fraternity 
teams, with a total of roughly 1,000 possible participants. This is the largest prog- 
ram undertaken at Loyola since the beginning of the intramural system and only 
begins to show the possibilities of an ever-expanding program of student partici- 
pation. This year the sports included football, basketball, baseball, swimming, 
track and a basketball free throw contest for individuals. 

The directors of the Intramural program recognize the desirability of a sound 
mind and a healthy body, and they hope that every student at the University 
will want to compete as a member of at least one intramural team. 



Graham McClean (right), LSC Intramural Manager, shows a copy of the season's schedule 
to Dr. D. Herbert Abel of the Intramural Board. 




328 




The Independent All-Stars take time out from a rugged scrimmage session. Standing: Hugh 
Bell, Mike Daley, Bob Penn, Don DePinto, Bob Bruun, Tom Hausam, Bill BIyth, Denpis 
Bond, Jim Larson, Bob Sebesta; Kneeling: Pat Davey, Mike Panzarella, Ed Bauernfreund. 
Mike McCarthy, Tom Boland. 



The Huns show the spirited determination which made them touch football champions. 
Standing: Tom Lanigan, Bill BIyth, Terry MuUer, Jack McWalters, Pete Brusca; Kneeling: 
Bob Lappin, Emmett Gantz, Tom Hallett, Jim Vlazny, Hugh Bell, Mike Daley. 







The Buckeyes reigned as All-Independent 
basketball champs. Standing: John Morris- 
sey, Dan McQuade, Mike Richer, water boy 
John Egan; Kneeling: Tom DeMayer, Jim 
Schilling, Bob Sebesta. 



The Southern independent champions of 
intramural basketball were the Beavers. 
Standing: Terry Maguire, Guy Nottoli, 
John Schoen; Kneeling: Denny Depcik, 
Doug Davidson, Don Ronin, Tom Ward. 




"^ 



330 




The Padels won the basketball title in 
the Western league of independents. Stand- 
ing: Bill Scott, Mike Pope, Dennis McDon- 
nell, Tom Regan; Kneeling: Ed Bauern- 
freund, Joe Reinhart, Pat Davey. 



Winners of the basketball crown in the 
fraternity league were the TEKEs; Back 
row: Tom Zimmerman, Ken Such, Stan 
Schardon; Front row: John Frantonius, 
Dennis Garvey, Joe Tomaszewski, Bob 
Gordon. 




.o 





The Coed Club team was runner-up in the Women's Intra- 
mural Basketball competition. Standing: Alice Ehemann, 
Virginia Hopkinson, Peggy McCarthy; Kneeling: Joan Mills, 
Barbara Drum. 



The Intramural Basketball championship was won by the 

Nursing Council. Standing: Kathy Zelesko, Sheila Walsh, 

Laurie Chiarmonti, Laura Bernard, Pat O' Rourke; Kneel- 
ing: Jean Olesky, Marilyn Samis, Mary Cook. 



WOMEN'S INTRAMURALS 

In keeping with the growing spirit of the Uni- 
versity, the Women's Intramural organization has 
also done its share of expanding. This year's volley- 
ball and basektball tournaments were the largest ever 
held, with more organizations and individuals partici- 
pating than ever before. The Nursing Council was 
victorious in both events and received an award for 
outstanding organization participation. Coeds 'turned 
out in large numbers for the all-new judo classes. 
(The response to this event was met with some amaze- 
ment by the male members of the student body. ) 
Classes for novice and more advanced golfers were also 
begun. Another first this year was Loyola's par- 
ticipation in the Mundelein badminton tournament. 

The coeds had an opportunity to match wits with 
the men's strategy in basketball and volleyball on the 
four Coed nights which were held during the year. 

The Loyaqnins, Loyola's aquatic arts team, partici- 
pated in a swim workshop and water show. Life 
saving classes were conducted during the second 
semester, as were learn-to-swim sessions. 

Additional events are being discussed for next year's 
calendar. If anyone is interested in a fifty mile hike — 
we will supply new laces for your gym shoes! 




Members of the victorious Intramural Volleyball team 
are: (standing) Betty Larke, Sharon Diuyak, Barb 
Washington, Mary Cook, Pat Miller, Judy Bucsa, Pat 
O'Rourke; (kneeling) Eileen Mulqueeny, Gerry Boril, 
Marilyn Samis, Laura Bernard, Joyce Reddington, 
Andreen Byrne, Kris Sabalas. 




Ready to "proceed with vigah" is the 
newly-formed Women's Intramural Board: 
Pat Luetkemeyer, Marge Billings, Peggy 
McCarthy, Jean Olesky, Mary Cook, Martha 
Daczszyn, Sharon Genelly and Diane Peini- 
ger. 



Judo instructions require concen- 
tration on the part of participants 
and observers alike. 





Members of the coed swim club, the Loya- 
quins, pose with their coach Diane Peini- 
ger (seated): Ann Whelan, Martha Daczs- 
zyn, Barbara Miller and Elaine Stallas. 



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Time steals by in its petty pace — sometimes. Some- 
times it races and roars, tearing by with a suddenness 
which leaves a sinking feeling in the pit of your 
stomach when you realize that your time is up and 
the book hasn't been read, the paper hasn't been 
written, or the test hasn't been finished. But mostly 
we appreciate the leisure time when we can just 
sit back and perhaps dream a little — or, more likely, 
become human once again and cease being technologi- 
cal entities emitting facts, figures and theories. 

336 









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339 






340 





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CHICAGO 
l^ PLAYBILL 

BLACKSTONB THCATNK 



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a u'ukly magaztne Jot theatref^.tm 





345 





■ ni Mnuru um h doct. nin h niato. coon ofju. cm » ORUi 









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PAY THIS FINE BY MAIL 

USE SCHEDUli 0^ fINES 

SHOWN ON INSIDE OF fLAP 

OF THIS ENVEIOPE 

|0.«| 

D DANGEROUS VIOLATION 

ll no) pttJ by mai' 



NOTla-THIS ft A COMPLAINT FOR * PARKING VIOLATION 

IT (1) par row lin* by msii w ai iha TfbHk VK>lAl>an] fturaau at tt", 

• dayi pnor lo you' coun data, or |2I you nuy coritatl thii compL 

( Couil, 321 North La SalU Srtaei, Ctuujo. on dai* and hma Ml (o> youi 

aranca Your Failur* lo comply «in reiull 'n addrhonal coiH Hid anat) 

IIAO INSTHUaiONS ABOVE AND ON INSIW OF ENVtlOPt FlAP 



C 987504 



_5?.,»__ 



.-^jj/a, 



THIS NOIICE 
X ISSUED BY 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 
an OF CHICAGO 



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346 






347 






348 



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349 










draduat^g 





MID-YEAR DEGREES AWARDED BY THE GRADUATE 

SCHOOL 

DOCTOR OF EDUCATION 

Raymond Paul Clouthier 

Henry Moughamian 

Anthony Thomas Sola 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Albert Avery Halls 

William Gregory Klett 

Thomis Francis McDonald 

Thomas Leo Quinn 

Thomas Anthony Robinson 

John V. P. Stewart 

George William Swenson, S.J. 

Donald J. Tyrell 

Reverend Glenn Francis Williams, S.J. 



352 



MASTER OF SCIENCE 

Everett Nelson Bowser 

Joan Mary Cormack 

Howard John Humecki 

James Quinn Kissane 

Robert Nichols Morris 



MASTER OF SOCIAL INDUSTRIAL 
RELATIONS 



Marlon H. Cohn 

Gerald George Gotsch 

Charles Jerome Hartnett, Jr. 

James F. Heuel 

Max D. Hochanadel 

James M. McAuliff 

James Joseph McCurdy 

Francis J. McVeigh 

John R. O'Connor 



Ernest V. Yancey 



Brahma Parkash 

Thomas A. Pawolwski 

Puthenpurackel Zachariah Philip 

Melvin Robertson 

Theodore Roland Sares 

P. H. Mathew Tharakan 

Virginia Thatcher 

Norman E. Van Maldegiam 

Edward J. Vondrasek 



MASTER OF ARTS 



Reverend Felix M. Bak, O.F.M. CONV. 

Robert Joseph Bator 

Reverend Victor E. Bertrand, C.S.V. 

Robert Lee Bireley, S.J. 

William Seaborn Boylan, S.J. 

James Nicholas Brichetto, S.J. 

James Edward Burns 

Thomas V. Busse 

Lawrence Jerome Carlino, S.J. 

Hannah W. Choldin 

John Patrick Cullen 

Ligia Cecilia de Perez 

Norman Joseph Dickson, S.J. 

Sister Mary Dion (O'Brien), I.B.V.M. 

Mother Mary Dorothea ( Harkenrider ) , I.B.V.M. 

Gerard Egan 

Sister Mary Elia (Rolfs), O.P. 

Bernard Daniel Fletcher, S.J. 

Arlene Mary Foley 

James Patrick Godar 

Edmund Gronkiewicz 

Jack H. Grossman 

Francis Vincent Hillebrand, S.J. 

Kathleen Marie Hotton 

Harold Charles Howard 

Sister Mary Imelda (Pilotte), O.S.F. 

Marie Rose Indurante 

Sister Mary Jacinta (Ivers), O.P. 

Austin Richard Johnston, S.J. 

Sister Mary Joseph (Carton), B.V.M. 

Reverend John Edward Keegan, M.M. 



Theodore Paul Klammer 

Richard Thomas Lambert, S.J. 

Robert Edward Larkin, S.J. 

Sister Mary Loretta (Kunjappu) 

James Andre Luotto 

Daniel Joseph Lyons 

Michael Joseph Madden 

Ronald J. Marcotte, C.S.V. 

Reverend Hubert V. McGinn 

George Joachim McKenna III 

Brother Paul Eugene Metzger, S.M. 

Frank Armstrong Molony, S.J. 

L. Charles Murtaugh, S.J. 

Jerome Anthony Nadratowicz, S.J. 

Eva J. Nickolich 

Patrick Joseph O'Halloran, S.J. 

Joanne Gertrude Osmond 

Sister Mary Paul Kathleen (Hansen), O.P. 

Reverend John Patrick Reid, O.P. 

Sister Mary Robertelle (Franklin), B.V.M. 

Charles Evans Sherman 

Eugene John Skoff 

Mother Mary St. Germaine (Germain), I.B.V.M. 

Reverend Lawrence M. Stauder, O.S.M. 

James F. Strassmaier 

Mother Mary Syra (Galvin), B.V.M. 

David Wilson Thompson 

George William Traub, S.J. 

Reverend Gerald Walling, S.J. 

Ellen Mary West 



353 



MASTER OF EDUCATION 



Sister Mary Agnita (Sabockis), S.S.C. 

Stuart Marshall Allen 

Reverend Earl A. Ambre 

Alice Harriet Anthony 

Sister Mary Antona (Rauch), S.C.C. 

Sister Mary Benjamin (Bulak), C.S.S.F. 

Bernice Katherine Brady 

John Joseph Broderick 

Ollie Sutton Bruner 

John Stephen Capocy 

Sister Mary Catherine (Lynch), O.S.B. 

Rita Mary Cooney 

Robert Martin Detloff 

Helen Dahlstrom Disch 

Reverend Charles Edward Doyle 

Lucille Ann Dzwonkiewicz 

Fernanda Erum Evangelista 

Catherine Joyce Felzan 

Mary Louise Ford 

Guy Paul Galley 

Elizabeth Ann Gonciar 

Curt Frederick Hennecke 

Helen Marie Hooker 

Sister Mary Joanna (McGrath), C.S.C. 

John David Jungemann 

Donald Francis Kimball 

Rita Mary Knueven 
Kenneth K. Kobukata 
Lorraine Irene Kubick 

Floy M. Latimer 

Dorothy Louise Lawshe 

John Lementavich 

Reverend Reynaldo Lorredo, S.J. 

Richard Francis Lynch 

Violet R. Martino 

Ella Mae Mayer 

Katherine H. Mcjohn 

Therese Bridget McManamon 

Anne Agnes Meighan 

Charles George Meschler 

Helen B. Minard 

Petronilla Monbrod 

William John Moorhead 

Ruth M. Murphy 



Patrick Dennis Noonan 

Reverend Alfredo Bastos Norena, S.J. 

Elizabeth Ann O'Connor 

John Thomas Ohlendorf 

Sister Mary Paul (Schultz), C.R. 

David Raymond Peaslee 

Sister Mary Philip (Winter), S.C.C. 

Erwin W. Pollack 

Thomas J. Powers 

Sister Mary Presentice (Quane), B.V.M. 

Edward John Rachford 

Ludivina Cajigal Rana 

Margery Rose Ratcliff 

Lillian Reding 

Donald Richard Reimer 

Josephine Maria Ricci 

Mary C. Rohan 

James Vincent Rokaitis 

Thomas L. Ryan 

Ann Marie Sabocik 

John Myron Sanderson, Jr. 

William Joseph Serne 

Stephen R. Sexton 

Daniel Michael Schab 

Reverend Benno Schluterman, O.S.B. 

Elaine M. Stark 

Lillian J. Stephens 

Ronald Norbert Strahanowski 

Richard Erwin Tarczynski 

Alyce Catherine Teemer 

Sister Teresa Ambrose ( Vithayathil) 

Sister Mary Timothena (Burke), B.V.M. 

Joanne Katherine Tracy 

Paul Adrian Van Someren 

Samuel Newland Vickery 

Sister Mary James Vincent (Gillespie), B.V.M. 

Alfred Anton Wagner 

Myrtis Wells Whiteside 

Donald J. Wixted 

Margaret Helen Wysocki 

Flemme Mae Zagone 

Thomas Richard Zale 

Miron Zelman 
Lorraine Leona Zintak 






354 



'^jK|jS . 







ROSA E. M. AGUILAR 
B.S.(Hum.) 




JOSEPH N. ALMALEH 
D.D.S. 

MARJO M. ANDREWS 

B.S.(N.S.) 




/ 




DANIEL ADAMS 
A.B. 




MARION A. ALICH 

B.S.N. 




JOHN J. AMBRE 
M.D. 

LOUIS E. ANTONACCI 
D.D.S. 








KAREN E. ADAMO 
B.B.A 




DANIEL ALLEGRETTI 
D.D.S. 




MARION C. AMIDEI 

B.S.(Hiim.) 
SISTER AMALA S. D. 
OTTAPLACKEL 
M.D. 




( 



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TEPHEN J. ATSAVES 
D.D.S. 




GEORGE J. AUGIUS 

B.S.(N.S.) 





JAMES D. ATTEN 
L.L.B. 




DOUGLAS W. BABYCH 
B.B.A. 





University Center in transition — out of the chaos of razing 
comes a sign of progress, the installation of the boilers. 



RONALD E. BAIUTZ 
B.B.A. 



JOSEPH E. BAJKO 
B.B.A. 



DOLORES M. BAKER 

B.S.(N.S.) 



LESTER L. BALICK 
B.S.(Hum.) 



FRANK J. BALOG 

B.S.(N.S.) 







RICHARD J. BANDERA 

B.S.(N.S.) 




JOHN M. BARNES 
B.S.(Hum.) 



4 



O 



MARY ANNE BARNET: 
B.S.N. 




Mike Brophy and Gil Horst are among the many scholastics who make a point of 
visiting their West Baden neighbors and influencing them by personal contact. 




MORTON D. BARNETl 
M.D. 




FRANK P. BAUKERT 

B.S.(N.S.) 



BARBARA A. BAUMAN 
A.B. 



ROBERT F. BAVA 

B.S.(S.S.) 



CAMILLA A. BEIERLE 
B.S.(Hum.) 






^ 



RAYMOND J. BELLOCK 
B.B.A. 




JUDITH W. BERGREN 
B.S.(Hum.) 





JOHN V. BELMONTE 
M.D. 



^plRK^HMPPM^ 




JAMES L. BERNERO 
D.D.S. 





CHARLES E. BEND 
D.D.S. 




ROBERT T. BERNSTEIN 
B.B.A. 




BONITA M. BERTAUX 
B.S.(Ed.) 



ELAINE G. BERTOLOZZI 

B.S.(N.S.) 



BERNARD B. BERTSCHE 
B.B.A. 



ELIZABETH J. BETONTI 
B.S.(Hum.) 



ELAINE M. BERUBE 
B.S.N. 



WILLIAM F. BEVAN 
D.D.S. 






r3. 




"One more fire drill and I transfer to Northwestern." 




JAMES A. BIGGINS 

B.S.(N.S.) 




RAYMOND J. BILODEAU, JR. 

B.S.(Hum.) 






MARCELLA T. BILEK 
B.S.(Ed.) 




ELLEN M. BLIE 


JEAN B. BLUHM 


B.S.(Hum.) 


B.S.N. 


MARY E. BIRKHOLZ 


WILLIAM L. BISHOP 


B.B.A. 


B.B.A. 




« 



THOMAS M. BOLAND 

B.S.(S.S.) 




JOHN F. BRADY 
B.B.A. 





BEATRICE L. 

BOUCHONVILLE 

B.S.N. 




JOSEPH R. BRANDL 
B.B.A. 





PHYLLIS A. BOVA 
B.B.A. 




r 



JANET A. BREHM 
B.S.(S.S.) 




m 



FRANCIS B. BRESNAHAN 
M.D. 



JUDITH M. BRINKMANN 
B.S.N. 



DONALD A. BROOKS 
D.D.S. 



JAMES J. BROPHY 
B.S.(S.S.) 





MICHAEL J. BROWN 
B.B.A. 




LAWRENCE W. BROWNE 
M.D. 





PETER A. BRUSCA 

B.S.(N.S.) 





GEORGE E. BURBACH 
D.D.S. 






>-»^ 




JAMES C. BUTZEK 

B.S.CN.S.) 

DAVID E. BYRNES 

B.S.(Hum.) 




JOHN R. BUCKLEY 
A.B. 




DENNIS BURKE 
B.B.A. 




ANTHONY T. BYRNE 
B.S.(Hum.) 

RICHARD J. CALABRESE 
B.S.(Hum.) 




WILLIAM E. BUHL 
B.S.(Hum.) 




JOHN D. BURNS 
D.D.S. 


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JAMES J. BYRNE 

B.S.(N.S.) 

GAY L. COOK 

B.S.(Ed.) 





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CHAEL T. CALDWELL 
L.L.B. 







.VID N. CAMPEOTTO 
B.B.A. 




DMAS J. CARDELLINO 
M.D. 

ROBERT A. CARLSON 
B.B.A. 






ROBERT S. CALVIN 
B.S.(Hum.) 



AUGUST R. CAMPEOTTO 
B.B.A. 




The angelic smiles on the faces of Fathers Talkin, 
Mertz, and Murray reflect the peace of the moment. 



JOSEPH B. CARNEY 
D.D.S. 



KENNETH F. CAROBUS 

B.S.(S.S.) 






The Nursing Council's hare-raising float puts the 
bite on the Christian Brothers' c a g e r s. 




JAMES R. CARTER 
D.D.S. 




MARY P. CASSIDY 
B.B.A. 




ROBERT CHALIFOUX 

B.S.(S.S.) 

CHRISTINE S. CHONIS 
B.S.(S.S.) 



364 




'^my 




MARILYNN M. CAVENDE 

B.S.(N.S.) 




GABRIEL E. CHAN 
M.D. 

SHARON L. CHWIERUT 
B.S.N. 



LEE J. CIESLAK 
B.B.A. 




MARY E. COLLINS 
B.S.(Hum.) 




JOHN CONNEELY 

B.S.(N.S.) 

JACK COPE 
D.D.S. 





JOHN J. COLLINS 

B.S.(S.S.) 




ROSEMARY COLLINS 
B.S.N. 




MICHAEL P. CONNELLY 

B.S.(Hum.) 

JOHN W. COUGHLIN 
D.D.S. 





JOHN M. COLLINS 
D.D.S. 




JOANNE M. COMO 

B.S.(S.S.) 




CECILE B. CONRAD 

B.S.(S.S.) 

WILLIAM E. CREED 
L.L.B. 





BARTEL R. CRISAFI 
M.D. 




SHEILA CURRY 
B.S.(Ed.) 





PAUL J. CRONIN 
L.L.B. 




MICHAEL J. CURTIN 

B.S.(N.S.) 




EDWARD J. 

CUNNINGHAM, JR. 

B.B.A. 




ANTHONY F. CUTILLETTA 
B.S.(N.S.) 





LARRY C. CZARNECKI 
D.D.S. 



JOHN J. DATTILIO 
M.D. 



DIANE M. DARLING 

B.S.(Hum.) 



GORDON R. DARNELL 
D.D.S. 



JAMES L. DAUBACH 
J.D. 



JOSEPH C. DE FIORE, JR. 
M.D. 






miCK J. DE GENNARO 
M.D. 




[CHAEL E. DESSIMOZ 
B.S.(Hum.) 




.RGARET A. DE VITO 
B.S.(Ed.) 

ARY KAY DE VLIEGER 

B.S.(N.S.) 







> 



i 




JANET DELIA 
A.B. 



E— '1^^ -*. «'yW!* S ^*iMfc.*_ ' ^ 



F. E. DENTZER 

B.S.(N.S.) 




"And for our next upbeat selection we will Rachmaninoff." 



ANTHONY J. DI MEO 
B.B.A. 



THOMAS V. DI SILVIO 
M.D. 



"^^ ^ 






Checking patients' bills by means of a modern charge plate, 
this efficient student nurse works at Weiss Memorial Hospital. 




ALPHONSE DIOGUARDl 
D.D.S. 




LOLITA A. DI STEFANO 

B.S.(Ed.) 




GINO L. DI VITO 
L.L.B. 

J. PATRICK DOHERTY 
J.D. 



368 





JANICE M. DITTRICI 
B.S.N. 






'"^ 




BRO. JOHN J. DODD, C.J 
B.B.A. 

MAUREEN P. DOHERT 
B.S.N. 





HARRY L. 


DOLAN 


B.S.(S.S.) 


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ELIZABETH M. DOMINICK 

B.S.(N.S.) 




SHARRYN M. DONN 
B.S.(Hum.) 

DENIS B. DRENNAN 
M.D. 





DENNIS L. DOLL 

B.S.(N.S.) 




ANNE MARIE DONAHUE 
B.B.A. 




MARIE ELIZABETH 

DORETTI 

B.S.(Hum.) 

ROBERT J. DUBSKY 

B.B.A. 





ALEXANDRA L. DOMES 

B.S.(N.S.) 




MICHAEL C. DONAHOE 
B.B.A. 




THOMAS A. DOWD 
JD. 

JUDY M. DUDA 
B.S.(Hum.) 





JOHN J. DU FON 

B.S.(S.S.) 




RICHARD J. DUNNE 
B.B.A. 




WILLIAM H. EGAN 

B.S.(N.S.) 

RONALD J. ENGLAND 
D.D.S. 



JOHN C. DUMARS 
D.D.S. 




SUZANNE K. DUPRE 
B.S.(Hum.) 




MARGARET M. EILER 

B.S.(S.S.) 

CAROL A. ENNIS 
B.S.(S.S.) 




DAVID D. DUNAGAN 
D.D.S. 




JOHN P. DWYER 

B.S.(N.S.) 




JAMES R. EISENMANN 

B.S.(Hum.) 

BRO. ROBERT ERICKSON, 

C.S.V. 

A.B. 






)MAS A. EVANS, JR. 
B.B.A. 





GERALD FACCHINI 
J.D. 



BRO. F. FALCO, O.S.M. 
A.B. 




aOWARD FALK 

B.S.(S.S.) 




OBERT J. FALK 
B.S. (S.S.) 

TILEEN A. FARRELL 
B.S.N. 





"Okay, heads she's yours, tails she doubles with us.' 



ROBERT J. FASHINGBAUER 
B.S. (Hum.) 



GARY A. FEHRMAN 
M.D. 




371 . 





Rehearsals were not in vain for the Debate 
Society as their float solemnly portrays the fu- 
neral of the Christian Brothers basketball team. 




THOMAS B. FELHABER 
D.D.S. 




LEO R. FINLEY, JR. 
D.D.S. 








JAMES T. FERRINI 




ROGER A. FINNELL 

(B.S.(N.S.) 




JULIANNA M. FISH 
B.S.N. 



DAVID T. FITZGERAL] 
M.D. 



THOMAS R. FLINT 
D.D.S. 



JOHN A. FOCHTMAN 
M.D. 





KEVIN M. FORDE 
J.D. 




KARL 


F. FRANKOVITCH 




M.D. 








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KENNETH V. FORTMAN 
D.D.S. 




SUZANNE M. FREKO 
B.S.(Ed.) 






JAMES A. FRANCIS 
B.S.(Hum.) 




ROBERT FRIGOLETTO 
D.D.S. 




CHARLES W. FRUEHE 


ALLEN D. FRY 


PAUL F. FRYMARK 


B.B.A. 


D.D.S. 


D.D.S. 


MICHAEL E. FURLONG 


SARAH M. GALBO 


JAMES GALLAGHER 


A.B. 


B.S.(Ed.) 


B.S.(N.S.) 







JOHN M. GALLUS 
M.D. 



WILLIAM F. GARDINER 

B.S.(S.S.) 



KEVIN J. GARVEY 

B.S.(S.S.) 






JOHN C. GASPERS 
B.S.(B.A.) 



J. D. GATHMAN 
B.B.A. 



ROBERT V. GAUTHIER 
D.D.S. 




CHARLES S. GEIGER 
M.D. 

JOHN P. GIBBONS 
B.B.A. 





EMIL R. GELINAS 
D.D.S. 

ANNE P. GILLIGAN 

B.S.N. 





GERALD J. GEORGEN 
D.D.S. 

MONICA J. GILLMORE 

B.S.(S.S.) 




1 



s 



■sr 







RALDINE A. GIRMSCHEID 

B.S.N. 



STEPHEN C. GILMOUR 

B.S.(N.S.) 




AUDREY H. GINEMAN 

B.S.(N.S.) 




iNIEL V. GIRZADAS 
M.D. 




JDITH M. GOGLIN 

B.S.(N.S.) 

RBARA L. GONGOL 
A.B. 





Sigma Alpha Rho, a night school sorority, makes a rare daylight 
appearance to take part in Pow-Wow Weekend's float parade. 



JOHN J. GNAPINSKI 
M.D. 



RONALD F. GNIADEK 
B.B.A. 






"And from the contents of this one little beak- 
er, our caterers can make seven hundred ham- 
burgers or four thousand cups of coffee." 




TERRENCE P. GORMAN 
D.D.S. 



r^OfiWi^ 




JAMES D. GREEN 
D.D.S. 





GERALD L. GOVERNILI 
B.B.A. 




JOHN M. GRIFFARD 
B.B.A. 




JANICE L. GRIPPANDO 

B.S.(Hum.) 



JULIUS M. GUCCIONE 
D.D.S. 



THOMAS D. GUERRA 
B.B.A. 



JAMES J. GUZIK 
M.D. 




JT^^ 



V- 




JAMES W. HACKETT 
B.S.(S.S.) 




FRANK M. HANN 
D.D.S. 




I 

DONALD D. HARRIES, JR. 
J.D. 

MARTIN J. HARTY 

B.S.(S.S.) 





^^ *^p•~^i 




EDWARD J. HALLE 
B.B.A. 



SIfe 




FARREOL L. HANSEN 
B.S.(S.S.) 




RUBY L. HARRIS 
B.S.N. 

RONALD C. HARTZER 

B.S.(N.S.) 





RONALD G. HAMMOND 
M.D. 




JERALD L. HARKNESS 

B.S.(S.S.) 




RAYMOND HARTMAN 
B.B.A. 

DOLORES E. HARWAS 
B.S.N. 



/;#^'^ 


Lv 


1 


^p*^> j||P*^B 


1 

i 


1 

4 




L 


J 


i 


fe'l 


ki 




T. F. HAWKINS, JR. 

B.S.(S.S.) 




JAMES E. HEATH 
B.B.A. 




URBAN L. HERMANN 
D.D.S. 

BECKY A. HOGAN 

B.S.(S.S.) 




7 /" 



I 




DAVID J. HAYDEN 
M.D. 




GEORGE F. HEIMBACH 
M.D. 




GEORGE HILL 

B.S.(S.S.) 

GEORGE F. HOGAN 
M.D. 




r 



, *"- 






^' 



PATRICIA A. HAYDEN 
B.S.(S.S.) 




JAMES R. HEMES 

B.S.(N.S.) 




JOHN D. HOFFENKAMP 
B.S.(S.S.) 

THERESE M. HOLZER 

B.S.(N.S.) 





DANIEL P. HUBER 
B.B.A. 




vIARY L. HURLEY 
B.S.N. 





BARBARA A. HUNT 
B.S.(Ed.) 




JOHN T. HUNT 
B.B.A. 




The dedication of the University Center finds students trying 
out the new bridge, as they cross Rush Street the easy way. 



OHN P. lAFRATE 
M.D. 



lTRICIA a. jahnke 
B.S.N. 




£ y 



JAMES C. JANNOTTA 
M.D. 



GERALD J. JEFFRY 
D.D.S. 





"But I thought I was supposed to pin her!' 





ALEXANDER J. JENKINS 

B.S.(N.S.) 




THOMAS E. JOHNSON 

B.S.(N.S.) 




JOHN E. JUNG 
B.B.A. 

STANLEY J. KACZALA 
D.D.S. 



380 





HENRY J. JENSEN 
D.D.S. 




DAVID E. JONES 
M.D. 




HYMAN J. JUSTMAN 
JD. 

MARYANN R. KALATA 
(B.S.(N.S.) 





EDWARD KALETA 

B.S.(S.S.) 




CHARLES D. KEENLEY 
B.B.A. 





MARY I. KATTNER 
B.S.(Ed.) 




MICHAEL J. KEELING 
B.B.A. 





THEODORE C. KAUSS, JR. 
B.B.A. 




DIANE E. KELLY 

B.S.N. 




JAMES J. KELLY 
B.S.(B.A.) 



JOHN KELLY 
M.D. 



THOMAS K. KELLY 
B.B.A. 



KAEL B. KENNEDY 
B.S.(Hum.) 




MARY M. KENT 

B.S.(N.S.) 




KATHLEEN KEOGH 
A.B. 



..00*% 



s< 



^4l 






LESLEY KILLOREN 
B.B.A. 



DENNIS J. KINSELLA 
A.B. 



KATHLEEN M. KIRK 
B.S.(Ed.) 






MEL P. KISSANE 

B.S.CS.S.) 



JOHN D. KLARICH 

B.S.(N.S.) 



MARTIN B. KLENDA 
M.D. 






DANIEL C. KLOC 
D.D.S. 



HOWARD D. KLOSTERMAN 
M.D. 



STEVEN J. KOLANOWSKI 
D.D.S. 



FRANK J. KONICEK 
M.D. 



JAMES W. KOPP 

B.S.(S.S.) 



RONALD W. KORNAK 
M.D. 





:^<?*» 



^ 



•\ 




OSEPH KOTZMAN 
A.B. 







JAN F. KRAWIEC 

B.S.(S.S.) 




GEORGE F. KRESAK 
M.D. 




LICHARD L. KOSEK 
B.B.A. 





"Of course St. Thomas has a point, but I personally feel" . . . 
"But 1 don't give a damn about student apathy" . . . "Now if / 
was Dean of Students, I'd" . . . "You're drinking scotch and what.'" 



DANIEL F. KOTT 
M.D. 



RGE A. KOURVETARIS 
B.S.(Ed.) 



RONALD E. KOZAN 
D.D.S. 



JOHN F. KOZLOWICZ 

B.S.(S.S.) 






Lewis Towers looms above its equally noted neighbors, Quigley 
Preparatory Seminary and the Cathedral of the Holy Name. 




ALLAN P. KRIPPNER 

B.S.(S.S.) 




JOHN F. KUHN, O.S.M. 
A.B. 




384 





JOSEPH C. KULIS 
A.B. 




LEONARD J. KUT 


ROBERT LAMPING 


M.D. 


B.B.A. 


.ONALD D. LANDA 


JUDITH M. LANSER 


B.S.(Hum.) 


B.S.N. 





WALTER W. LAOS 
D.D.S. 




RITA A. LAUZON 
B.S.(Hum.) 




JOHN LEGET 

B.S.(S.S.) 

GEORGE E. LE MIRE 

B.S.(S.S.) 





LUCILLE J. LA PLANTE 

B.S.(Hum.) 




MICHAEL L. LAWSON 

B.S.(S.S.) 




i' 



I 



ELIZABETH LEISNER 
B.S.(Huni.) 

BARBARA T. LEMLEY 
B.S.N. 





BOHUMIL LASTUVKA 
B.S.(Hum.) 




ANDREW LEAHY 
J.D. 




ARTHUR G. LEISTEN 
A.B. 

ROBERT K. LENTZ 
D.D.S. 





MARILYN L. 
LEWANDOWSKI 

B.S.(N.S.) 




D. ANN LINSKEY 
B.S.(Hum.) 





<^' 



JON L. LILJEQUIST 
J.D. 




ERNEST H. LIPPE 
D.D.S. 






RICHARD J. LINEHAN 
B.B.A. 




DENNIS F. LISSAK 
B.S.(Hum.) 




^UKSE J. LIULEVICIUS 


WAYNE N. LO BUE 


PETER F. LOFENDO 


B.S.(N.S.) 


A.B. 


D.D.S. 


KATHLEEN LOFTUS 


JAMES W. LONG 


ALBERTA A. LUKOWITZ 


B.S.N. 


B.S.(Ed.) 


B.S.N. 




.J 




JAMES M. LYNCH 
M.D. 




MICHAEL J. LYNCH 
B.B.A. 




THOMAS J. LYONS 
B.B.A. 




RLES F. MacCARTHY 
M.D. 





"Quick, catch it before it demolishes the Union!" 



.RLENE A. MACEK 






B.S.(Ed.) 






>NALD J. MACKINAC 


RICHARD W. MADURA 


RUDOLPH J. MAIER 


D.D.S. 


D.D.S. 


M.D. 



-rf- 






"Two on the aisle" for The Madwoman of Chaillot is a simple 
request for usherette Sue Oakes to fill, as she seats early playgoers. 




RONALD P. MAHONEY 
M.D. 




ROBERT H. MAJKRZAK 

B.S.(S.S.) 





1 


. ^^ 


a%»- 


*w^ 


QL 




ELLEN B. MAUN 
B.S.(Hum.) 

CAROLINE M. MANDERFELD 

B.S.N. 



388 




THOMAS F. MAHONE 
L.L.B. 




■4 



MARGARET R. MALON 

B.S.N. 

EDWARD J. MANN 
B.B.A. 



J^v 




THOMAS B. MANNARD 

B.S.(S.S.) 



THOMAS E. MARZULLO 
B.B.A. 





LESLIE V. MARTENS 
D.D.S. 




FRANK A. MASSl 
B.B.A. 





STEPHEN R. MARTIN 
D.D.S. 




ANDREW J. MATUGA 

B.S.(N.S.) 




PATRICIA M. MATUSZEK 

B.S.N. 
JAMES P. McCABE 

B.S.(S.S.) 



EDWIN G. MAY 

M.D. 

GERALD M. McCARTHY 

B.S.(S.S.) 



RICHARD A. MAZZULA 

B.S.(Hum.) 

MAURICE McCarthy 

L.L.B. 






VALERIE L. McDARRAH 

B.S.N. 




JOHN J. McDonnell 

B.S.(Hum.) 




RONALD A. McDonald 

B.S.(Hum.) 




WAYNE M. McDonnell 

B.B.A. 





SUSAN McDonald 

B.S.(N.S.) 




THOMAS J. McGOWAN 
D.D.S. 




MAUREEN M. McGRATH 
B.S.(Ed.) 



JOSEPH C. McGUILL, JR. 
D.D.S. 



AUCE J. McHUGH 
B.S.N. 



EDWARD P. McHUGH, JR. 

B.S.(N.S.) 




RICHARD Mclaughlin 

B.S.(N.S.) 




THOMAS P. Mclaughlin 

B.S.(S.S.) 



m 





JAY A. McMAHON 
D.D.S. 




» 



i 

ILEEN B. McNULTY 

B.S.N. 



s 






MAUREEN L. McMAHON 
B.S.N. 



CHARLES J. McMANMON 
B.B.A. 




With due respect for traffic regulations, LT students re- 
solutely march up the front stairs during change of classes. 



'AMELA A. McPIKE 
B.S.(Hum.) 



MARY L. MEANY 
A.B. 




JERRY A. MEJORICH 
B.B.A. 



DOROTHY C. MERKLE 
B.S.N. 






"I knew they tried to influence guys at frater- 
nity smokers, but this is really pushing it." 




JOHN H. MEYER 
D.D.S. 




BARBARA J. 
MIEDZIANOWSKI 




DAVID F. MILLER 

B.S.(S.S.) 

DANIEL V. MIROBALLI 
B.B.A. 







THOMAS J. MICHAL.(^ 
B.S.(S.S.) 




DONALD S. MIEZIO 
M.D. 




HOWARD M. MILLER 
J.D. 

JOSEPH R. MISULONA 
M.D. 



392 





RICHARD T. MIYAJI 
D.D.S. 




REV. ROGER J. MOAG 
M.A. 





PAMELA MOCARSKI 
B.S.(Hum.) 




■^ fRS^ f^j 




ANGELO P. MONTELEONE 

B.S.(Hum.) 





CYNTHIA A. MRAZEK 
B.S.(S.S.) 




EDWARD F. MONTGOMERY 
M.D. 




JAMES E. MOORMAN 
M.D. 



MARY SUE MORAN 

B.S.(Ed.) 



WILLIAM MORAN 
L.L.B. 



FEDELE MORELLI 
M.D. 



RICHARD H. MORTARA 

B.S.(N.S.) 



OSWALD V. MOWATT 
M.D. 







MARY E. MULCAHY 

B.S.N. 




MARIANNE A. MUNO 
B.S.N. 




RICHARD C. MULLER 

B.S.(N.S.) 








CHARLES W. MURDOCK 
L.L.B. 




DANIEL F. MULVIHILL 

B.S.(S.S.) 




RICHARD A. MURPHY 

B.S.(N.S.) 




THOMAS E. MURPHY 
B.B.A. 



ANTHONY J. MURRAY, JR. 
B.S.(Hum.) 



KATHRYN M. MUTH 
B.S.N. 



NANCY J. MYSYK 
B.S.N. 




ZENON F. MYSZKOWSKI 
A.B. 




RICHARD C. NAGLE 
M.D. 



'•^^9^ 






i)^l» 



ROBERT A. NAPOLI 

B.S.(S.S.) 




MEDARD M. NARKO 

B.S.(Hum.) 




TASSOS P. NASSOS 
M.D. 





lONARD F. NAVRAT 
D.D.S. 





A Rambler steps to the charity line on the Alpha Kappa Psi float. 



VMOND J. NELLIGAN 
B.B.A. 



VIICHAEL J. NELSON 
B.S.(Hum.) 



ROBERT R. NEWSTEAD 
M.D. 



JOHN S. NICHOLS 
D.D.S. 







This medical student seems to be having trouble tuning in WLS. 




'^^m > 



KENNETH NIELSEN 
D.D.S. 




RONALD W. NOSAL 

B.S.(Hum.) 




KENNETH J. NYKIEL 
B.B.A. 

FRANCIS J. O'BOSKY 
D.D.S. 



396 




PATRICIA A. NOBILIC 

B.S.(S.S.) 




BIRGER C. NYBORG 
B.B.A. 



U^m^^ 




ROBERT E. OBACH 
A.B. 

DARLENE A. O'BROCHT. 

B.S.(Hum.) 





JOHN OCALLAGHAN 

B.S.(N.S.) 




PAUL O'CONNOR 
M.D. 





J. DENNIS O'CONNOR 

B.S.(N.S.) 




PHILIP T. O'CONNOR 
B.S.(Hum.) 





JEROME M. O'CONNOR 
B.S.(Hum.) 




JOHN O'FARRELL 

B.S.(S.S.) 




MARY O'GALLAGHER 
B.S.(Hum.) 



JOSEPH C. OGAREK 
B.S.CHum.) 



EDWARD J. O'HAYER 
B.S.(Hum.) 



FRANCINE M. OLECH 

B.S.(Hum.) 



ROBERTA J. OLSON 

B.S.(Ed.) 



WILLIAM O'MEARA 
A.B. 







SHEILA O'NEILL 
B.S.(Hum.) 




MICHAEL ORTH 
M.D. 




f^ '9J 





JACK ONGEMACH 
B.S.(Hum.) 




KENNETH S. ORTH 
B.B.A. 






JAMES G. ORCHOWSKI 
B.B.A. 




CASIMIR T. OSTROWSKI 
A.B. 




CHARLES OWEN 


WILLIAM A. PALES 


JAMES T. PALOUCEK 


B.B.A. 


B.S.(Hum.) 


M.D. 


JONATHAN C. PARKER 


FRANK J. PATONAI 


KATHLEEN A. PEET 


D.D.S. 


D.D.S. 


B.S.(N.S.) 




o' 




ETER P. PATRICK 

B.S.(Hum.) 




PETER PAUL 

B.S.(N.S.) 




JAMES E. PETERS 

B.S.(N.S.) 




ILLIAM H. PETERS 

B.S.(S.S.) 




)WARD P. PETRAK 
B.S.(Ed.) 

DRONE V. PETRULIS 

B.S.(N.S.) 




An orchid corsage adorns the midnight sky at the Pow-Wow fireworks display. 



MALVIN P. PETTERSEN 

B.S.(N.S.) 



PATRICK M. PIERCE 

B.S.(N.S.) 




msTfi 






A brief encounter on a one-way street — and the 
whole cafeteria line is snarled up for hours. 




BARBARA L. PHILLIPS 
B.S.N. 




RICHARD PHILPOTT 
M.D. 




JOANNE L. PHILLIPS 
A.B. 




THOMAS L. PHILPOTT 
B.S.(Hum.) 




ROBERT PICCHIOTTI 
M.D. 



LORETTA L. PICUCCI 
A.B. 



400 



MARY ANNE PIKRONE 

B.S.(S.S.) 




MARIE T. PINDOK 

B.S.(N.S.) 




L^ 




PATRICIA L. PINDRAS 
B.S.(Huni.) 





BARBARA PLEVA 

B.S.(S.S.) 





ARTHUR POLLMAN 
L.L.B. 




JOHN E. POWERS 
L.L.B. 



BRO. JOHN POWLKOWSKI 
A.B. 



RICHARD J. POZDOL 
A.B. 






ROBERT PRECZYSKI 
D.D.S. 



DONALD F. PRICCO 
D.D.S. 



MARILYN PROBST 
B.S.(Ed.) 



MARY ANN PUGH 
B.S.N. 



VILJO J. PIIKKILA 
D.D.S. 



JOHN L. PULJUNG 
B.B.A. 






BRIAN J. PURCELL 
D.D.S. 




JANINA RADVILA 

B.S.(N.S.) 





MARY ANN PUTERA 

B.S.(N.S.) 




DAVID P. RAIA 

B.S.(S.S.) 





JAMES M. RASMUSSON 
D.D.S. 




THOMAS J. RATHZ 
B.B.A. 



JAMES J. REARDON 

B.S.(S.S.) 



SALVATORE RECUPERO 
D.D.S. 



JAMES A. REILLY 
B.S.(Hum.) 



SHIRLEY R. REINHART 

B.S.N. 



ANNE C. REITER 
B.S.(Huni.) 






CELESTE C. RENIER 

B.S.N. 




LA.THLEEN M. RICHARDS 
B.S.(Hum.) 






JOHN B. REYNOLDS 
D.D.S. 



EDWARD F. RICE 
A.B. 




As the Alpha Delts reassure visiting alumni that all is well in the "South 
Building," they assure the audience that Ezio Pinzas they are not. 



JAROSLAV K. RICHTER 
M.D. 



JAMES P. REILLY 
D.D.S. 




JAMES P. RIGNEY 
B.B.A. 




ALAN W. ROBELLO 
D.D.S. 








These little piggies went to Marquette, as the bus 
carrying Loyola fans prepared to leave the Towers. 




PETER D. ROBERSON 
D.D.S. 




ROBERT S. ROHDE 

B.S.(N.S.) 





SHIRLEY A. ROBINSO^ 
B.S.(Ed.) 




JUAN F. ROJAS 
M.D. 




ROBERT ROKOS 

B.S.(N.S.) 



RONALD J. ROSSATE 
B.B.A. 



ANTHONY R. ROSSI 
B.B.A. 



JASPER A. ROTELLO 
B.B.A. 






MARILYNN J. ROTH 

B.S.(N.S.) 





ALBERT ROTHENBERG 
M.D. 




ROBERT J. RUSSELL 
B.B.A. 



\ 
JUDITH A. RYAN 

B.S.(N.S.) 




PAUL J; RUBINO 
M.D. 



X 




ROBERT J. SALETTA 
J.D. 




BRO. J. H. SANDER, C.S.V. 
A.B. 




MICHAEL J. SARACINI 
B.B.A. 





DANIEL F. SCHLORF 
J.D. 



JAMES B. SCHNEIDER 
B.S.(S.S.) 



RICHARD J. SCHMIDT 
B.B.A. 



WILLIAM J. SCHMITT 
L.L.B. 







RUDOLF A. SCHMITZ 

B.S.(N.S.) 






CAROL J. SCHULTZE 

B.S.(Hum.) 




ROBERT A. SCHURER 
, B.S.(B.A.) 



MARY L. SCHWENGLER 

B.S.(Ed.) 



PATRICIA SCOTT 

B.S.(Hum.) 






GARNET E. SEIFFERT 
D.D.S. 



CHARLES H. SERIANO 
B.B.A. 



WILLIAM T. SHEEHY 
M.D. 



BARBARA V. SHIPMAN 
B.S.N. 




BRO. N. M. SHUERT, O.S.M. 
A.B. 




JUDITH ANN SHYLIN 
B.S.(Hum.) 







PAUL JOSEPH SIBLEY 
B.B.A. 




DONALD J. SIDOR 
D.D.S. 




EDWARD P. SIGNATUR 

B.S.(N.S.) 




JOSEPH T. SILLIMAN 

B.S.(N.S.) 





Participating in the dedication of recently-acquired Chamberlain Hall, 
the Loyola Glee Club entertains guests who attended the ceremony. 



CATHERINE SILVAGNI 

B.S.(Ed.) 



lARON A. SILVERWOOD 

B.S.(N.S.) 



JOSEPH E. SIMONAITIS 
B.S.(Hum.) 



VINCENT A. SIMONE 
D.D.S. 







With voices together, Chi Theta sings. 




THOMAS M. SKAHEN 

B.S.(N.S.) 




HELEN SLATTERY 

B.S.(S.S.) 





BRUCE J. SKRYDLEWSl 
B.B.A. 




JOHN J. SOBOTA 


WILLIAM T. SODER 


B.B.A. 


B.B.A. 


JOHN T. SOUS 


PATRICK W. SOMERS 


D.D.S. 


B.S.(N.S.) 




ROBERT SOMMERFIELD 
D.D.S. 




R. A. STASZKIEWICZ 
B.B.A. 





JEAN SOWA 
B.S.(S.S.) 




PAUL H. STEWART 

B.S.(S.S.) 





C. W. STAPLEMAN 

B.S.(S.S.) 




RICHARD M. STOJAK 

B.S.(S.S.) 




ROBERT S. STRACKO 

B.S.(S.S.) 



FRANK D. STRAMA 
B.B.A. 



EDMOND J. STRONS, JR. 
B.B.A. 



DONNA STUPAR 
M.D. 




KENNETH G. SUCH 

B.S.(S.S.) 



JOHN F. SULLIVAN 
D.D.S. 






DIANE J. SZAROWICZ 
A.B. 




GERALDINE M. TABER 

B.S.(Ed.) 




JOSEPH R. TAYLOR 

B.S.(N.S.) 

REV. CHRISTOPHER J. 

THAYIL 

M.A. 





EDWARD V. SZCZUREK 

B.S.(S.S.) 




BRO. DONALD J. TALKEN, 
C.S.V. 

B.S.(N.S.) 




WILLIAM G. TAYLOR 

B.S.(N.S.) 

MARY ANN THINNES 

B.S.(N.S.) 





MICHAEL J. SZPAJER 

B.S.(N.S.) 




WILLIAM TARNAWSKI 
M.D. 



^^ ^# 




JANICE R. TENNERT 
B.S.(Hum.) 

ALBERT TIMPERMAN 
M.D. 




^ 



RONALD L. TOEBAAS 
B.S.(Hum.) 




TERRY TOMALAK 
B.B.A. 




JOSEPH G. TOMASZEWSKI 
B.B.A. 




FRANK G. TOMASIK 
M.D. 





spending a few moments of quiet in the old chapel at L.T. 



)BERT J. TOMASZKIEWICZ 

B.S.(S.S.) 



MARY F. TORRES 

B.S.(Ed.) 



JOHN A. TOSTO 

B.S.(S.S.) 



SANDRA TRINER 
B.B.A. 







Anyone for sailing?" 




JUDITH J. TROTTA 
B.S.(Hum.) 




ALAN R. TUCHTEN 

B.S.(N.S.) 







I. 



THERESE L. TUMOSA 
B.S.(Hum.) 

BARBARA A. UNDERWOOD 

B.S.(Hum.) 



412 




^Sra^k ^» 




PAUL J. TRUSCHKE 
B.B.A. 




ROBERT P. TUFO 

B.S.(N.S.) 




MARY C. TURPINAT 

B.S.N. 

FRANK E. VAN BREE 
L.L.B. 



I; 



^~ ^^ 




,*^ 



ANN K. VAN RIEMSDYK 
B.S.(S.S.) 




CHARLES VAN WINKLE 
D.D.S. 




NICHOLAS W. VEITH 

B.S.(N.S.) 




JOHN C. VIDOLOFF 

B.S.(Huin.) 






EUGENE L. VIGIL 

B.S.(N.S.) 






FRANCIS J. VISALLI 
D.D.S. 




JOHN O. VOGEL 


KARL WALLACE 


DENIS P. WALSH 


J.D. 


D.D.S. 


B.S.(Hum.) 


JOHN J. WALSH 


WILLIAM WALSH 


JOHN A. WANAT 


B.B.A. 


B.S.(Hum.) 


B.S.(N.S.) 







MICHAEL WARD 
B.B.A. 



JAMES B. WATERS 
B.B.A. 



ROBERT J. WAYMA^ 
B.B.A. 




There'll be a lot of A's this semester. 




DIANE WCISLO 
B.S.(Ed.) 




ROBERT M. WEINER 
B.B.A. 



JAMES E. WELTER 
L.L.B. 



WILLIAM WERNER 
B.B.A. 



FRANCIS G. WEST 
B.S.(Hum.) 







MAURICE WEXLER 
J.D. 




FRANK J. WILKE 
D.D.S. 






CAROLYN A. WHEELER 
B.S.(Ed.) 




JOSEPH F. WILSON 

B.S.(N.S.) 






JOHN M. WIERZ 
D.D.S. 




PHILIP WINSKUNAS 
M.D. 




JEROME WISNESKI 


SUSANNE M. WITT 


WALTER C. WROBEL 


M.D. 


B.S.N. 


M.D. 


JAY M. YOUNG 


ANNE E. YOURG 


JOSEPH D. YURKANIN 


M.D. 


B.S.(S.S.) 


M.D. 







ROBERT J. ZAKOFF 
D.D.S. 



DOROTHY A. ZALE 

B.S.(N.S.) 



JAMES J. ZELKO 
M.D. 




Newly formed Business Administration Coed Club. 



PATRICIA J. ZIMMERMAN 
B.S.N. 




416 




DENNIS E. ZIELINSKI 
D.D.S. 




MARY K. ZIMMERMAN 

B.S.(N.S.) 

BETTINE D. ZIZZO 

B.S.(N.S.) 






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GRADUATE DIRECTORY 



AAGAARD, ROBERT J. 

4231 N. Leavitt 

Chicago, 111. 

Blue Key 3,4; SAM 1,2,3,4, Program 

Chm. 1, V.P. 2, Pres. 3; YD's 1. 

AGUILAR, ROSA E. 

3135 N. Oakley 
Chicago, 111. 

ALICH, MARIAN A. 
Rt. 1 Box 69 

Nazareth, Pa. 
Chi Theta Upsilon 3,4; Nursing Council 
3,4, V.P. 4. 

SISTER AMALA S.D. OTTAPLACKEL 

Sisters of the Destitute 
Chunangumvely, Alwaye 
Kerala State, South India. 

AMBRE JOHN J. 
702 Reba 
Evanston, III 
Phi Chi 1,2,3,4. 

AMIDEI, MARION C. 
1528 N. Lorel 
Chicago, III. 
Circumference 4; Coed Club 1,2,3,4, Pub. 
Chm. 4; Freshman Orient. Com. 3,4; 
Kappa Beta Gamma 1,2,3,4, Treas. 3, 
Rec. Sec. 4; Loyola News 1; SAL 1,2,3; 
Women's Intramurals 1. 

ANDREWS, MARJO M. 
2667 S. Ellendale 
Los Angeles, Calif. 
Physics Club 3,4, Sec. 4; Wasmann Biologi- 
cal Soc. 2,3,4. 

ANGLIM, MARY T. 

8435 S. Dante 
Chicago, 111. 
Cadence 3,4, Contributing Ed. 4; Cir- 
cumference 4; Fine Arts Club 2,4, Sec. 4; 
Historical Soc. 3,4, Sec. 4; Phi Sigma Tau 
3,4, Sec. 4. 

ANTONACCI, LOUIS E. 

8652 S. Kildare 
Chicago, 111. 
Dent. School Choir 1,2,3,4; Psi Omega 1, 
2,3,4, Sgt.-At-Arms 4; St. Apollonia Guild 
1,2,3,4; Tamoishnik Study Club 3,4, Pres. 
4. 

ATSAVES, STEPHEN J. 
4913 N. Talman 
Chicago, 111. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1,2,3,4, Treas. 4; Soph- 
omore Class Sec; Tamoishnik Study Club 
3,4, V.P. 4. 

ATTEN, JAMES D. 

Wiesbrook Rd. RR 2 Box 47 

Wheaton, 111. 

Blue Key 2,3; Loyola Law Times 2,3, 

Ed. 3; Phi Alpha Delta 1,2,3, Marshal 2, 

Justice 3; Student Bar Assoc. 1,2,3, 

AUGIUS, GEORGE J. 

6508 S. Talman 
Chicago. 111. 
Chem Club 2,3,4. 

BABYCH, DOUGLAS W. 

1742 N. Lotus 

Chicago. 111. 

Delta Sigma Pi 3,4; Econ-Finance Soc. 3,4; 

St. Thomas More Club 2,3. 

BAJKO, JOSEPH E. 

5435 W. Iowa 

Chicago, 111. 

Accounting Club 3,4; Econ-Finance Soc. 2; 

Delta Sigma Pi 1,2,3,4, Parliamentarian 

3,4. 



BALICK, LESTER L. 

7757 S. Shore Dr. 
Chicago, 111. 
Historical Soc. 1,4; Sigma Pi Alpha 1,2,3,4, 
Sec. 2, V.P. 3. 

BANDERA, RICHARD J. 

9724 S. Houston 

Chicago, III. 

Curtain Guild 3,4; Fine Arts Club 3,4; 

Glee Club 3,4; Math Club 3,4; Physics 

Club 3,4. 

BARNES, JOHN M. 

2644 N. Mason 
Chicago, III. 
Alpha Sigma Nu 3,4; Bellarmine Philoso- 
phy Club 3,4, V.P. 3, Pres. 4; Fine Arts 
Club 1,2; Loyola Men 1,2; Loyola News 
3; Phi Sigma Tau 3, Pres. 4. 

BARNETT, MARY A. 

3712 N. Oriole 

Chicago, 111. 

Alpha Tau Delta 2,3,4; Coed Club 1; 

SNA! 2,3. 

BAUMAN, BARBARA A. 

728 Dee Rd. 

Park Ridge, 111. 

Epsilon Pi Rho 1,2,3,4, Newsletter Asst. 

Ed. 3. Ed. 4; Fr. Mertz Latin Award 

3; Modern Language Club 4. 

BEIERLE, CAMILLA A. 

6901 N. Mendota 
Chicago, 111. 

BELMONTE, JOHN V. 

1101 N. Euclid 

Oak Park, 111. 
Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4, Sec. 2; St. Luke's Guild 
1,2,3,4; SAMA 1,2,3,4, V.P. 3; Student 
Council 3,4. 

BERANEK, JAMES C. 

6253 S. Whipple 
Chicago, 111. 

BERNSTEIN, ROBERT T. 

1515 Touhy 
Chicago, 111. 

BERTAUX, BONITA M. 
1117 E. Tripp 
Peoria, 111. 
Circumference 3,4; Coed Club 2,3,4; Dela- 
ware Hall Dorm Council 1; Equestrian 
Club 2; Historical Soc. 1,2,3,4, Sec. 3; 
Loyola Women 1,2; SAL 2,3; SAM 2; 
Theta Phi Alpha 2,3,4, Soc. Chm. 3, V.P. 
4. 

BERTOLOZZI, ELAINE G. 

856 N. Lawndale 
Chicago, 111. 
Coed Club 3,4; Math Club 3,4; Loyola 
Women 3; Swimming Club 3. 

BERUBE, ELAINE M. 
1762 Campbell 
Des Plaines, 111. 
Alpha Tau Delta 1,2,3,4, Chm. of Profes- 
sional Com. 3, Corr. Sec. 4; Coed Club 
1,2; Nursing Council 2; Class Secy. 2; 
SAL 2,3,4; SNAI 1,2,3. 

BILODEAU, RAYMOND J., JR. 

5613 N. Nottingham 

Chicago, 111. 

Historical Soc. 3,4; Wasmann Biological 

Soc. 2. 

BIRKHOLZ, MARY E. 
1112 Lake Shore Dr. 
Chicago, III. 
Glee Club 2; SAM 2. 



BISHOP, WILLIAM L. 

1407 Glenlake 
Chicago, III. 
Monogram Club 4; Swimming Team 1,2, 
3,4, Capt. 4. 

BLIE, ELLEN M. 

5710 Rockwell 

Chicago, 111. 

Coed Club 1,3,4; Historical Soc. 1,2,3,4; 

Miss Loyola Contest 2; SAL 3,4. 

BLUHM, JEAN B. 

3831 N. Kildare 

Chicago, III. 

Coed Club 4; Fine Arts Club 1; Loyola 

Glee Club 1,2; SAL 2,3,4; SNAI 1,2,3; 

Theta Phi Alpha 3,4, Rec. Sec. 4; YD's 2. 

BOVA, PHYLLIS A. 

373 W. 4th 
Chicago Heights, 111. 
Chi Theta Upsilon 3,4, Corr. Sec. 4; 
SAM 2,3,4, Corr. Sec. 3,4. 

BRADY. JOHN F. 
2519 W. 70th 
Chicago, 111. 
Beta Alpha Psi 4. 

BRANDL, JOSEPH R. 

729 S. Greenwood 
Park Ridge, 111. 
SAM 1,2; Econ-Finance Soc. 3,4. 

BRESNAHAN, B. FRANCIS 

4970 N. Marine Dr. 
Chicago, 111. 
Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4. 

BRINKMANN, JUDITH M. 

9401 S. 55th 

Oaklawn, 111. 
Alpha Tau Delta 2,3,4; Dorm. Council 2, 
3, Sec. 2, Judiciary Board 3; Cheerleader 
1,2; Jr. Class Treas.; Loyola Women 1,2; 
Nursing Council 3. 

BROPHY, JAMES J. 
3715 N. Oleander 
Chicago, III. 
Blue Key 3,4, Corr. Sec. 4; Interfraternity 
Council 3; Historical Soc. 1,3; LOYOLAN 
2,3, Co-Ed. 3, Chm. Awards Com. 3; Pi 
Delta Epsilon 3,4; Pi Gamma Mu 3,4; 
Pow-Wow Weekend General Chm. 3; 
SAL 2,3; Tau Kappa Epsilon 1,2,3,4, Corr. 
Sec. 3; House Mgr. 3; Union Board 3; 
Variety Show 2; Wasmann Biological Soc. 
1; YD's 1. 

BROWN, MICHAEL J. 

1726 N. Mitchell 

Arlington Heights, III. 

Accounting Club 3,4; Beta Alpha Psi 4, 

Treas. 4; Bus. Adm. Newsletter 4; Loyola 

Men 1,2,3,4; SAM 1. 

BROWNE, LAWRENCE W. 

811 Strada Vecchia 
Los Angeles, Cal. 
Alpha Sigma Nu 4; Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4, 
Historian 3; Pre-Clinical Honor Soc. 3,4; 
Sr. Class Pres.; SAMA 1,2,3,4; Student 
Council 2,4. 

BRUSCA, PETER A. 
10621 W. Preston 
Westchester, III. 
Bon-Fire Com. Chm. 3; Co-Chm. Pow- 
Wow Weekend 4; Dorm. Council 2,3, So- 
cial Chm. 3; Epsilon Pi Rho 4; Intramurals 
1,2,3,4; Historical Soc. 1; Wasmann Bio- 
logical Soc. 1,2. 



418 



GRADUATE DIRECTORY 



BUCKLEY, JOHN R. 

8838 Justine 

Chicago, III. 
Arts Council Academic Com. Chm. 4; 
Fine Arts Club 2,3; Human Relations 
Club 3,4; Loyola Men 1,2,3,4, Treas. 2,3. 

BUHL, WILLIAM E. 

5018 W. Balmoral 

Chicago, 111. 

AUSA 2,3; Curtain Guild 1,2,3; Arts 

Council Judicial Com. 4; Gold Torch 4; 

Loyola News 3,4. 

BURKE, DENNIS P. 
113 S. Scoville 
Oak Park, 111. 
Marketing Club 3,4. 

BUTZEK, JAMES C. 

2643 N. Mango 
Chicago, 111. 
Amer. Chem. Soc. 1; Tau Kappa Epsilon 
2,3,4; Wasmann Biological Soc. 1,2. 

BUYER, JUDITH A. 
6801 Paxton 
Chicago, 111. 
Coed Club 1. 

CALABRESE, RICHARD J. 

2734 N. 73rd 

Elmwood Park, 111. 

Historical Soc. 3; Readers' Circle 4; SAL 

3,4, Exec. Bd. 4; SAM 1,2; Sigma Pi Alpha 

2,3,4, V.P. 4. 

CALDWELL, MICHAEL T. 

1139 N. Ridge 

Evanston, 111. 

Phi Alpha Delta 2,3; Recent Decisions 2, 

3; Student Bar Assoc. 1,2,3. 

CALVIN, ROBERT S. 
7321 S. Shore Dr. 
Chicago, 111. 
Historical Soc. 1,2,3. 

CAMPEOTTO, AUGUST R. 
2429 W. Huron 
Chicago, 111. 
Accounting Club 3; SAM 3. 

CARLSON, ROBERT A. 

1609 N. Lockwood 

Chicago, 111. 

CARTER, JAMES R. 

506 N. Ardmore 
Villa Park, 111. 
SADA 1,2,3,4, Exec. Council 1,2,3,4; Psi 
Omega 1,2,3,4. 

CASSIDY, MARY P. 

1848 N. Sayre 
Chicago, 111. 
Accounting Club 4; Beta Alpha Psi 4; 
Bus. Ad. Newsletter 4, Copy Ed. 4; 
Loyola News 3,4; Professional Women's 
Club 4, Pres. 4; SAM 3,4; Rec. Sec. 3,4. 

CA VENDER, MARILYNN M. 
3742 U.S.A. Nuclear Medical Research 
Det. 
APO 180, New York, N.Y. 
American Chemical Soc. 2; Circumfer- 
ence 4; Coed Club 2,3; Senior Memorial 
Gift Fund, Distria Chm. 4; Stebler Hall 
Executive and Judicial Council, Pres. 3; 
Winthrop Hall Council, V.P. 2; Women's 
Rifle Team 2,3; University Week-end 3, 
Fri. night Chm. 3. 

CHAN, GABRIEL E. 
2520 N. Lake view 
Chicago, 111. 
SAM 1,2,3,4. 



CHONIS, CHRISTINE S. 
426 W. Surf 
Chicago, 111. 

CHWIERUT, SHARON L. 
2654 W. 43rd 
Chicago, 111. 
Alpha Tau Delta 2,3,4, V.P. 3, Pledge 
Mistress 4; CSNC 2,3,4; Circumference 3, 
4, Treas. 4; Coed Club 2,3, Treas. 2; 
Loyola Women 1,2,3, Pres. 2,3; SAL 2,3; 
SNAI 2,3,4. 

CIESLAK, LEE J. 
2941 N. Luna 
Chicago, 111. 
Commerce Council 1; Econ-Finance Soc. 
2,3; Fine Arts Club 2,3; Freshman Class 
V.P.; Historical Soc. 3; Jr. Member, Illi- 
nois State Bar Assoc. 4; Phi Alpha Del- 
ta 4; Student Bar Assoc. 4; Tau Kappa 
Epsilon 2,3,4. 

CIZEK, DOROTHY T. 

7143 S.Albany 
Chicago, 111. 
Coed Club 1,2,3,4; Delta Zeta Chi 1,2,3,4; 
Loyola Women 1; Pow-Wow Float Com. 
2,3; SAL 1,2,3,4; Wasmann Biological 
Soc. 1,2; Women's Intramurals 1,2,3,4. 

COLLINS, JOHN J. 
616 N. Latrobe 
Chicago, 111. 
Historical Soc. 1,2,3,4; International Fair 
Chm. 3; Pow-Wow Publi. Com. 3; SAL 1; 
Senior Gift Fund Chm. 4; Senior Class 
V.P.; Undergrad Newsletter 2; Univ. 
Weekend Dance Com. 3. 

CONNELLY, MICHAEL P. 

3822 W. 81st 

Chicago, 111. 
Blue Key 3,4, Pres. 4; Loyola Hall Council 
1; Pi Alpha Lambda 2,3,4, Pres. 4; Arts 
Council 1; Sophomore Class V.P.; Student 
Presidents Com. 4; Union Board 3. 

CONRAD, CECILE B. 
1410 N. Long Ave. 
Chicago, 111. 
Cadence 3,4, Bus. Mgr. 3; Circumfer- 
ence 3,4, Sec. 4; Curtain Guild 2,3; Histori- 
cal Soc. 2,4; LOYOLAN 2,3,4, Editor-in- 
Chief 4; Loyola Fair Pub. Com. 1; Loyola 
News 1,2, Asst. to Ed. I, Feature Ed. 2; 
LT News Ed. 2; Orient. Week Com. 4; Pi 
Delta Epsilon 2,3,4; Political Science Club 
3,4, Sec.-Treas. 4; Pow-Wow Pub. Com. 4; 
SAL 1,4; SAM 2,3, Newsletter Ed. 2,3, 
Curtain Guild liaison 3; Senior Gift Com. 
4; Student Opinion Commission 3,4; Union 
Leadership Workshop Publications Com. 
4; Variety Show Pub. Com. 2, Costumes 4, 
YR'S 2,3. 

COOK, GAY L. 

5241 N. Oriole 

Chicago, 111. 

Circumference 4; Riding Club 4; Rifle 

Team 1,2; United World Federalists 2,3,4, 

Chm. 3,4; YD's 4. 

COSCIONI, WILLIAM J. 

4840 N. Neva 
Chicago, 111. 

COUGHLIN, JOHN W. 

1636 N. McVickers 

Chicago. III. 

Delta Sigma Delta 1,2,3,4; Senior Class 

Pres.; Dent. Student Council 4. 



CREED, WILLIAM E. 

8218 S. Christiana 

Chicago, 111. 

National Moot Court Team 3, Moot 

Court Commissioner 3; Rep. to Student 

Bar Assoc. 3- 

CRISAFI, BARTEL R. 

28 Piatt 

West Haven, Conri. 

CUNNINGHAM, EDWARD J., JR. 
7212 N. Hamilton 
Chicago, 111. 
Accounting Club 3,4, Treas. 4; AUSA 
3,4, Treas. 3; Drill Team 1,2,3,4, Exec. 
Officer 4; Delta Sigma Pi 1,2,3,4; Econ- 
Finance Soc. 2; Marketing Club 3,4, Treas. 
4; SAL 2,3,4; SAM 1; Senior Gift Fund. 

CURTIN, MICHAEL J. 

3810 N. Alta Vista Terrace 

Chicago, 111. 

Fine Arts Club 3,4; Phi Sigma Tau 3,4; 

Wasmann Biological Soc. 1,2,4. 

CUTILLETTA, ANTHONY F. 

6731 S. Kolin 

Chicago, 111. 

Intramural Program 1,2,3,4; Phi Sigma 

Tau 3,4; Wasmann Biological Soc. 1,3,4. 

DARLING, DIANE M. 

7044 N. Greenview 

Chicago, 111. 

Coed Club 3,4; Gerard Manley Hopkins 

Soc. 2,3,4; Historical Soc. 2,3,4; Phi 

Sigma Tau 3,4. 

D'ATTILIO, JOHN J. 

128-65 St. 
West New York, N. J. 
St. Luke Soc. 1,2,3. 

DAUBACH, JAMES L. 
213 N. Kolmar 
Chicago, 111. 
Phi Alpha Delta 2,3,4. 

DeFIORE, JOSEPH C. 
620 Ely 
Pelham Manor, N. Y. 
Alpha Sigma Nu 4; Junior Class V.P.; 
Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4, Hist. 2, Exec. Com. 3; 
Pre-Clinical Honor Society 3; SAMA 1,2, 
3,4, Sec. 2, Pres. 3; Student Council 3,4, 
V.P. 4; Union Board 4. 

DeGENNARO, PATRICK J. 

207 Salem Street 
West Pittston, Pa. 
SAMA 1,2,3,4. 

DELIA, JANET 

1024 S. Austin 

Oak Park, 111. 
Cadence 3,4, Co-ed. 3, Ed. 4; Coed 
Club 1; Fine Arts Club 2,3; Historical 
Soc. 1,2; Phi Sigma Tau 3,4; YR's 2,3,4. 

DESSIMOZ, MICHAEL E. 

6018 N. Nassau 
Chicago. 111. 
Alpha Delta Gamma 1,2,3,4, Hist. 1,2, 
House Mgr. 3, Pres. 4; Blue Key 3,4; IFC 
3,4; Union Bd. Rep. 4; Loyola Men 1,2, 
3,4; Loyola News 2,3, Business Mgr. 
2,3; Loyola Union Activities Bd. 4, IFC 
Rep. 4, Sec.-Treas. 4; Pi Delta Epsilon 
2,3,4; Publicity Chm. Loyola Union Pow- 
Wow 3; Senior Gift Fund Com. 4. 

DeVITO, MARGARET A. 

902 South Marshfield 

Chicago, 111. 

Coed Club 1,2,3,4, Co-chm. fashion models 

3; Hist. Soc. 1,2; Loyola News 1; Loyola 

Women 2,3,4; Poll. Sci. Club 3,4. 



419 



GRADUATE DIRECTORY 



DITTRICH JANICE M. 
7011 W. Cornelia 
Chicago, 111. 
Alpha Tau Delta 1,2,374, Chm. Finance 
Com. 4, Treas. 4; Circumference 4; Coed 
Club 1; Nursing Council 2; SAL 2,3; 
SNAI 1,2,3; Sigma Theta Tau 4; Sopho- 
more Class V.P. 

DODD, C.S.V., BROTHER JOHN J. 

6231 N. Sheridan Road 
Chicago 26, 111. 
Econ-Finance Soc. 3,4, Pres. 4. 

DOHERTY, MAUREEN P. 

3619 N. Mozart 
Chicago, III. 
Alpha Tau Delta 2,3,4; CSNC 3.4; Circum- 
ference 4; Coed Club 1,3; Curtain Guild 
1,2,3,4; ISC 4, Rules Com. Chm. 4, Treas. 
4, Rep. 4; Hist. Soc. 1; SAL 2,3; SNAI 1,2, 
3; Variety Show 2,3,4. 

DOLL, DENNIS L. 

7946 S. Sangamon St. 
Chicago, 111. 
Fine Ans Club 1; YR's 2,3; Wasmann 
Biol. Soc. 2,3. 

DOMES, ALEXANDRA L. 

4845 W. Warner 
Chicago, 111. 
Circumference 3,4; Coed Club 1,2,3,4, 
Variety Show Chm. 1; Delta Zeta Chi 
1,2,3,4, Pres. 4, Pledge-mistress 2; ISC 
Rep. 2, Treas. 3, Sec. 4; Fine Arts Club 
3,4; Greek Week Comm. 2,3,4, Co-Chm. 
2, Dance Chm. 3, Chm. 4; Hist. Soc. 1; 
Loyola Women 1; Miss Loyola Contest 
2; SAL 2,3,4, Exec. Bd. Member 3; Senior 
Class Memorial Fund 4; Ski Club 4; Wo- 
men's Intramurals 1,2,3,4. 

DONAHUE, ANNE MARIE 
542 Sheridan Road 
Evanston, III. 
Accounting Club 4; Beta Alpha Psi 3,4; 
Chi Theta Upsilon 2,3,4, Treas. 4; Coed 
Club 1; Hist. Soc. 1; SAM 1,2,3, Program 
Chm. 3. 

DONNELLY, MICHAEL B. 
5359 W. Drummond 
Chicago, 111. 
Latin Club 2; Psychology Club 4. 

DORETTI, MARIE E. 

1753 W. Barry Ave. 
Chicago, 111. 
Curtain Guild 3,4; Glee Club 3; LOYO- 
LAN 4; Psychology Club 2; Readers' 
Circle 3,4; United World Federalists 3, 
4; Women's Rifle Team 4. 

DUDA, JUDITH M. 

3357 N. Newland 
Chicago, 111. 
Circumference 3,4; Coed Club 1,2,3,4; 
Coed Orientation Program 2,3,4, Chm. 3; 
Kappa Beta Gamma 1,2,3,4, Pari. 2, Pledge 
Mistress 3, V.P. 4; Pi Gamma Mu 3,4; 
SAL 1,2,3,4, Exec. Bd. 2,3; Women's 
Intramurals 2. 

DUFFAS-MOWATT, OSWALD V. 

2735 W. 25th 
Chicago, 111. 
SAMA 1,2,3,4. 

DUNNE, RICHARD J. 

1714 W. Wallen 
Chicago, 111. 
Alpha Kappa Psi 1,2,3,4, Master of Rit- 
ual 3, Sec. 4; Blue Key 3,4, Sec.-Treas. 4; 
Fall Frolic Dance Chm. 3; Loyola Union 
Activities Board 3, V. Chm. 3; SAM 1,2; 
SAL 2,3. 



DUPRE, SUZANNE K. 

7554 N. Claremont 
Chicago, 111. 
Arts Council 3,4, Sec. 3; Chi Theta Upsi- 
lon 2,3,4, V.P. 3, Pledge Mistress 4; Cir- 
cumference 3,4, Pres. 4; Union Board 4. 

DWYER, JOHN P. 
2521 W. 69th 
Chicago, 111. 
Math Club 2,3,4. 

DYRA, VIRGINIA I. 

2700 N. Mason 

Chicago, 111. 

Fine Arts Club 1; Sigma Alpha Rho 3; 

UC Student Council 2,3, Rec. Sec. 2, 

Exec. Sec. 3. 

EGAN, WILLIAM H. 

1346 Keystone 
River Forest, 111. 
Bonfire Com. 4; Phi Sigma Tau 3,4; Was- 
mann Biol. Soc. 1. 

FILER, MARGARET M. 
941 N. Drake 
Chicago, 111. 
Alpha Kappa Delta 4; Coed Club 4; 
Human Relations Club 3; Loyola Women 
3; Phi Sigma Tau 4; Pi Gamma Mu 4; 
Senior Memorial Gift Fund 4. 

EISENMANN, JAMES R. 

1 177 Lyman 

Oak Park, 111. 

Pol. Sc. Club 1,2; St. Thomas More Pre- 

Law Club 3. 

ENNIS, CAROL A. 
5439 S. Claremont 
Chicago, 111. 
Coed Club 1,2,3; Curtain Guild 1; Histori- 
cal Society 1,2; Human Relations Club 3. 

ERICKSON. ROBERT E., C.S.V. 

6231 N. Sheridan 
Chicago, 111. 

FALK, HOWARD 

5817 N. Kenmore 
Chicago, 111. 
Freshman Basketball 1; Varsity Basket- 
ball 2,3,4; Monogram Club 3,4. 

FALK, ROBERT J. 

3653 N. Marshfield 
Chicago, 111. 

FARRELL, KATHLEEN 

5528 N. Olcott 

Chicago, III. 

Coed Club 1,3; SNAI 2,3; Wasmann Biol. 

Soc. 1; Historical Society 1; Nursing 

Council 4, V.P. 4. 

FELHABER, THOMAS B. 
453 N. Princeton 
Villa Park, III. 
Psi Omega 1,2,3,4. 

FERRINI, JAMES T. 
3204 N. Nottingham 
Chicago, 111. 
Blue Key 3,4; Recent Decisions 3,4. 

FINLEY, LEO R., JR. 

600 Legion St. 

Maywood, III. 
Dental School Choir 1,2,3,4, Sec. 4; Dental 
School News 3,4; Psi Omega 1,2,3,4, 
Treas. 3, Pres. 4; St. Apollonia Guild 
1,2,3,4; Student Council 4. 

FINNELL, ROGER A. 

4500 S. Home 

Berwyn, 111. 

Math Club 2,3,4; Phi Sigma Tau 3,4; 

Loyola Men 1. 



FISH, JULIANNA M. 
2645 W. Morse 
Chicago, 111. 
Nursing Council V.P. 1; Coed Club 1,2, 
3, Publicity Chm. 2, Pres. 3; Alpha 
Tau Delta 1,2,3,4, Cust. 3, Pres. 4; Cir- 
cumference 3,4, V.P. 4; Sigma Theta Tau 
4; SNAI 1,2,3; ISC 4; SAL 2,3. 

FITZGERALD, DAVID T. 

9204 S. Oakley 
Chicago, 111. 
St. Luke's Guild 1,2,3,4, Treas. 2,3; SAMA 
1,2,3,4. 

FOCHTMAN, JOHN A. 
100 Kilborn 
Petoskey, Mich. 
Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4; SAMA 1,2,3,4. 

FORDE, KEVIN M. 
5807 S. Laflin 
Chicago, 111. 
Student Bar Assoc. 1,2,3, Treas. 2; Ameri- 
can Law Students Assoc. 1,2,3, Rep. 2; 
Recent Decisions, Contrib. Ed. 2; As- 
soc. Ed. 3; Blue Key 2,3; Student Bar 
Leadership and Service Award 2. 

FRANKOVITCH, KARL F. 

5320 W. 22nd 

Cicero, 111. 

SAMA 1,2,3,4; St. Luke's Guild 1,2,3,4; 

Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4. 

FREKO, SUZANNE M. 
6520 N. Ponchartrain 
Chicago, 111. 
Theta Phi Alpha 2,3,4, Marshal 4; Dela- 
ware Hall Dorm Council, Soc. Chm. 3; 
Coed Club 1,3; SAL 2,3,4; Hist. Soc. 1,3; 
Gerard Manley Hopkins Soc. 2; Senior 
Gift Fund Memorial 4; IFC Sing 3; Fine 
Arts Club 3. 

FRUEHE, CHARLES W. 

802 E. Washington 

Lombard, III. 

SAM 3,4, Hist. 3, V.P. 4; Sigma Lambda 

Beta 3,4, Pledge Master 4; Alpha Sigma 

Nu 4; Student Council V.P. 4. 

GALLAGHER, JAMES G. 

2933 N. Lotus 

Chicago, III. 

Fine Arts Club 3,4; Hist. Soc. 1; Wasmann 

Biol. Soc. 1,2,3. 

GARDINER, WILLIAM F. 

6000 N. Sheridan 
Chicago, III. 
Blue Key 3,4; IFC 3,4; Hist. Soc. 2,3; 
LOYOLAN 3; Loyola Psychological Soc. 
3,4; Pres. 3; SAM 1,2; Tau Delta Phi 1,2, 
3,4, Treas. 2,3, Pres. 4. 

GASPERS, JOHN C. 
440 S. Lombard 
Oak Park, III. 
Commerce Council 1; Freshman Class Sec.- 
Treas.; Loyola Union Board Rep. 2; Sigma 
Delta Phi 2,3,4; SAM 2,3; Ed. Newsletter 
3; Veterans Club 1,2,3,4, Treas. 3. 

GATHMAN, J. DENIS 

3245 New Castle 

Chicago, 111. 

Econ-Finance Club 3,4; Fine Arts Club 3; 

Marketing Club 4; SAM 4; Tau Kappa 

Epsilon 1,2,3,4. 

GAUTHIER, ROBERT V. 

2660 Maple 
Longview, Wash. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1,2,3,4; Dental Study 
Club 3,4. 



420 



GRADUATE DIRECTORY 



GEIGER, CHARLES S., JR. 
6721 N. California 
Chicago, 111. 
SAMA 1,2,3,4. 

GELINAS, EMILE R. 
850 W. 32nd St. 
Chicago, 111. 
Dental School Choir 1,2,4; Dental School 
Council 1,4; Psi Omega 1,2,3,4; St. Apol- 
lonia Guild 1,2,3,4, Sec. 3; Fresh. Class 
Pres.; Senior Class V.P. 

GEORGEN, GERALD J. 

1619 W. Foster 
Chicago, 111. 
Blue Key 3,4; Dental School Choir 1; 
Dental School Student Council 1,2,3,4, 
V.P. 4; Soph. Class Pres.; St. Apollonia 
Guild 1,2,3,4, Student Council Rep. 1,2, 
Treas. 3. 

GIBBONS, JOHN P. 

5645 Campbell 
Chicago, 111. 

GILLIGAN, ANNE P. 

6314 N. LeMai 

Chicago, 111. 

Circumference 4; Coed Club 1,2; Nursing 

Council 4; SNAI 2,3; Union Activities 

Board 4, Chra. 4. 

GILMOUR, STEPHEN C. 
2526 W. 110th St. 
Chicago, 111. 
Alpha Sigma Nu 3,4; Founders Day 
Award 4; Loyola Hall Council 2,3, Sec. 
2,3, Pres. 3; Math Club 2,3,4, V.P. 4; 
Phi Sigma Tau 3,4, V.P. 4. 



GINEMAN, AUDREY H. 

8795 Buckskin Dr. 

Union Lake, Mich. 
Chamberlain Hall Council 4, Soc. Chm. 4 
Circumference 4; Loyola Glee Club 2 
Loyola Women 1,2; Math Club 2,3,4; Phi 
Sigma Tau 3,4; 1043 Council 3, Judiciary 
Board 3. 

GIRMSCHEID, GERALDINE A. 
8110 S. Kenwood 
Chicago, 111. 
SNAI 1,2,3; Wasmann Biol. Soc. 1. 

GIRZADAS, DANIEL V. 

2324 W. 71st 
Chicago, 111. 
SAMA 1,2,3,4; St. Luke's Guild 1,2,3,4. 

GNIADEK, RONALD F. 

2800 S. Tripp 
Chicago, 111. 
Beta Gamma Sigma 3,4. 

GONGOL, BARBARA L. 

3132 Euclid 

Berwyn, 111. 
Cadence 1; Curtain Guild 3,4; Epsilon 
Pi Rho 1,2,3,4, Consul 3,4; Readers' Cir- 
cle 1,2, Sec. 2. 

GOVERNILE, GERALD L. 

6141 W. Barry 
Chicago, 111. 
Beta Alpha Psi 4, Pres. 4; Beta Gamma 
Sigma 4, Pres. 4. 

GRIFFARD, JOHN M. 

1335 S. Wenonah 

Berwyn, 111. 

Gold Torch 4, V.P. 4; Loyola Men; AUSA 

1,2,3,4, Brigade Commander 4. 



GRIPPANDO, JANICE L. 

2855 N. Normandy 

Chicago, III. 

Cadence 3,4, Contributing Ed. 4; Hist. 

Soc. 1,2; Gerard Manley Hopkins Soc. 3; 

Modern Language Club 2; SAL 2. 

GUERRA, THOMAS D. 

1521 N.Lotus 

Chicago, 111. 

Delta Sigma Pi 2,3,4, Sec. 3; Hist. Soc. 

1; Marketing Club 3,4; SAL 4, Exec. Bd. 

4. 

HACKETT, JAMES W. 
305 N. Franklin 
Polo, III. 
Pi Gamma Mu 3; St. Thomas More Pre- 
law Club 2; YD's 2. 

HALLE, EDWARD J. 

2432 N. Albany 
Chicago, 111. 
AUSA 1,2,3; Bellarmine Club 3; Econ- 
Finance Soc. 2,3,4, Sec.-Treas. 4; Histori- 
cal Soc. 2. 

HAMMOND, RONALD G. 
7206 N. Wolcott 
Chicago, 111. 
Phi Chi 4; SAMA 4. 

HANSEN, FARREOL L. 

Schick Road, RR 1 

Bartlett, 111. 

Historical Soc. 4; Pi Gamma Mu 3,4; 

Political Science Club 3. 

HARKNESS, JERALD L. 

325 E. 143rd 

Bronx, N. Y. 
Loyola Hall Council 4; Monogram Club 
3,4; Varsity Basketball 2,3,4, Captain 4; 
Cross- Country team 1; Loyola News 3,4. 

HARRIES, DONALD D., JR. 
Ward 129, V.A. Hospital 
Hines, 111. 
Blue Key 4. 

HARTY, MARTIN J. 
8113 E. Prairie 
Skokie, 111. 
Pi Gamma Mu 3,4; YD's 2. 

HARTZER, RONALD C. 

6114 W. Dakin 

Chicago, 111. 

HARWAS, DOLORES E. 

5818 Elston 
Chicago, 111. 

HAYDEN, DAVID J. 
1438 Lathrop 
River Forest, 111. 
St. Luke's Guild 1,2,3,4. 

HAYDEN, PATRICIA A. 

329 Park 

Manteno, 111. 

Human Relations Club 3,4; Pi Gamma 

Mu 4; YD's 3,4, Exec. Bd. 3,4. 

HEIMBACH, GEORGE F. 
4408 W. Barry 
Chicago, 111. 
Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4; SAMA 1,2,3,4. 

HENES, JAMES R. 

7812 Hermitage 

Chicago, 111. 

Am. Chem. Soc. 1,2,3,4; Loyola Men 1,2,3, 

4; Phi Sigma Tau 3,4; YR's 2,3,4. 



HENNIG, KENNETH E. 

5408 Jerome 

Skokie, 111. 

Sigma Pi 1,2,3,4, Pres. 3, V.P. 4; YR's 3. 

HILL, GEORGE T. 
1900 Rutherford 
Chicago, 111. 
Human Relations Club 1,3; Varsity Bowl- 
ing Team 1,3,4, Intramurals 1,2,3. 

HILLENBRAND, BARRY R. 

1328 Thorndale 
Chicago, III. 
Cadence 3,4, Art Ed. 4; Fine Arts Club 
3,4; Loyola News 3,4, Layout Ed. 3, 
News Ed. 3, Managing Ed. 4; Hist. Soc. 
3,4; Pi Delta Epsilon 3,4; Wasmann Biol. 
Soc. 1. 

HOGAN, BECKY A. 

200 E. Delaware 

Chicago, 111. 

HOLZER, THERESE M. 

Route 1, Box 79 
South Haven, Michigan 
Coed Club 1; Hist. Soc. 1; Loyola Women 
1,2,3; Math. Club 4. 

HUBER, DANIEL P. 

5329 N. Lockwood 

Chicago, 111. 

Accounting Club 3,4; Delta Sigma Pi 

2,3,4, House Mgr. 3, V.P. 4; Hist. Soc. 1; 

SAL 2,3,4; SAM 1. 

HUNT, BARBARA A. 

5112 W. Monroe 
Chicago, 111. 
University College Club 3,4. 

HURLEY, MARY L. 

1722 Ainslie 

Chicago, 111. 
Alpha Tau Delta 2,3,4; Coed Club 1; 
Memorial Gift Fund 4; SNAI 1,2,3. 

lAFRATE, JOHN P. 

725 S. Ashland 
Chicago, 111. 
Phi Chi 2,3,4; SAMA 1,2,3,4. 

JAHNKE, PATRICIA A. 

3838 N. LeClaire 

Chicago, 111. 

Theta Phi Alpha 4; SAL 4; SNAI 1,2,3; 

Variety Show 1,4. 

JANNOTTA, JAMES C. 

10347 S. Hoxie 
Chicago, 111. 
St. Luke's Guild 1,2,3; SAMA 1,2,3,4; Stu- 
dent Council 2,3. 

JEFFRY, GERALD J. 

5924 W. 37th 
Cicero, 111. 
St. Apollonia Guild 1,2,3,4, Pres. 4; Stu- 
dent Council 4. 

JENKINS, ALEXANDER J. 
9601 S. HamUn 
Evergreen Park, 111. 
Wasmann Biol. Soc. 1. 

JOHNSON, THOMAS E. 

3550 Fremont St. 

Rockford, 111. 

Intramurals 2,3,4; Wasmann Biol. Soc. 

2,3. 

JUNG, JOHN E. 
6701 N. Loron 
Chicago, III. 
SAM 3,4. 



421 



GRADUATE DIRECTORY 



KAUSS, THEODORE C, JR. 
5448 N. Artesian 
Chicago, 111. 
EcoD-Finance Soc. 3,4. 

KEENLEY, CHARLES D. 

1434 W. Balmoral 

Chicago, III. 

Marketing Club 3; Econ-Finance Soc. 3. 

KELLING, MICHAEL J. 

1506 Lincoln St. 

Evanston, III. 

Marketing Club 4; SAL 4; U.W.F. 3,4; 

SAM 4; Human Relations Club 4. 

KELLY, DIANE E. 

6145 N. Winthrop 
Chicago, 111. 
Curtain Guild 1,2,3,4; Coed Club 1,2; 
SNAI 1,2,3; 1043 Dorm Council 3; Glee 
Club 1,2,3, Pres. Pro-Tem 3; Variety Show, 
Sec. to Producer 3; SAL 2,3; LOYOLAN 4. 

KELLY, JAMES J. 

3419 N. Springfield 

Chicago, 111. 

Sigma Lambda Beta 2,3,4, Pres. 4; Student 

Council 2,3,4, Treas. 3; Senior Memorial 

Gift Fund Chm. 4. 

KELLY, JOHN M. 

38132 Kimbro 

Fremont, Calif. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1,2,3,4; St. ApoUonia 
Guild 4; Junior Class Treas. 

KELLY, THOMAS K. 

6110 N. California 
Chicago, 111. 

KENNEDY, KAEL B. 

1101 Ridge 

Evanston, III. 

Debate Soc. 3,4, Treas. 3, Pres. 4; Delta 

Sigma Rho 3,4, Treas 3,4; Hist. Soc. 4; 

Student Council Welfare Com. 4. 

KENT, MARY M. 

1427 N. Leavitt 

Chicago, 111. 

Delta Zeta Chi 2,3,4, Hist. 3, Float Chm. 

3; Circumference 4; Stebler Judiciary Bd. 

3,4, Class Rep. 3,4. 

KEOGH, KATHLEEN A. 

4919 W. Chicago 

Chicago, III. 

Chi Theta Upsilon 2,3.4, Soc. Chm. 3; 

Epsilon Pi Rho 1,2,3,4; Coed Club 1,2,3,4. 

KINSELLA, DENNIS J. 

1058 N. Kedvale 
Chicago, 111. 
Loyola Men 2,3,4. 

KISSANE, MEL P. 
601 Wisconsin 
Oak Park, III. 

KLARICH, JOHN D. 

6315 N. Kenmore 
Chicago, 111. 
Wasmann Biol. Soc. 1,4. 

KLOSTERMAN, HOWARD D. 
1221 Larriwood 
Dayton, O. 
Phi Chi 1,2,3,4; SAMA 1,2,3,4. 

KOPP, JAMES W. 
1030 N. Keystone 
Chicago, 111. 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 2,3,4; Pi Delta Epsilon 
2,3, Treas. 3; LOYOLAN 2,3; Enosis 2, 
Managing Ed. 2; Psychological Soc. 2,4, 
V.P. 4; IFC 3,4; Arts Council Public Re- 
lations Com. 4; Variety Show, Pub. 4. 



KOSEK, RICHARD L. 

10810 S. Calumet 
Chicago, 111. 
Alpha Sigma Nu 3,4; Beta Gamma Sigma 
3,4; Beta Alpha Psi 3,4, Sec. 4; Delta 
Sigma Pi 1,2,3,4; Accounting Club 2,3, 
V.P. 3. 

KOZLOWICZ, JOHN F. 

2632 Westbrook 

Franklin Park, III. 

Hist. Soc. 1,2; YR's 2,3; Pi Gamma Mu 4. 

KRAWIEC, JAN F. 
2452 N. Kedzie 
Chicago, 111. 
Pi Gamma Mu 2. 

KRIPPNER, ALLAN P. 
1502 S. Highland 
Berwyn, 111. 
SAL 1,2,3,4; Phychological Soc. 3,4; Loy- 
ola News 1,2; Choral Soc. 1; Loyola Men 
1; SOC 3, Human Relations Club 4; 
Senior Class Memorial Gift Fund 4. 

KRITKOS, ALEX E. 
2154 N. Halsted 
Chicago, 111. 
Accounting Club 2,3; SAM 1,2. 

KUT, LEONARD J. 
5559 S. Francisco 
Chicago, 111. 
Phi Chi 1,2,3,4; Student Council 3. 

LANDA, RONALD D. 
1427 S. 16th 
Maywood, 111. 
Hist. Soc. 3,4; Mother Cabrini Tutor- 
ing Project 4; Phi Sigma Tau 3,4. 

LANSER, JUDITH M. 

5815 N. Merrimac 
Chicago, 111. 
Coed Club 1; SNAI 2,3; Wasmann Biol. 
Soc. 1. 

LaPLANTE, LUCILLE J. 

822 N. Ridgeway 
Chicago, 111. 
Coed Club 1,2,4; Hist. Soc. 1; Loy- 
ola Women 1,2,3,4; SAL 1. 

LAUZON, RITA A. 

5005 W. Potomac 

Chicago, 111. 

LAWSON, MICHAEL L. 

6040 N. Sheridan 
Chicago, 111. 
Gonzaga Hall 3, Asst Mgr. 3; Hist. Soc. 
4; Human Relations Club 2,3,4, Pres. 4; 
Loyola Men 2,3,4, Pres. 3; Psychology 
Club 2; Sigma Pi Alpha 3. 

LEISNER, ELIZABETH W. 

2218 Maple 
Evanston, 111. 
Equestrian Soc. 4. 

LEMLEY, BARBARA T. 

1366 N. Dearborn 

Chicago, 111. 

Alpha Tau Delta 2,3,4; Coed Club 1; 

SNAI 1,2,3. 

LEWANDOWSKI, MARILYN J. 
1707 S. Meyers 
Lombard, III. 
Glee Club 2,3,4; Loyola Women 2,3; Was- 
mann Biol. Soc. 1,2,3,4. 

LINEHAN, RICHARD J. 
928 Ashland 
Wilmette, 111. 
Accounting Club 2; Loyola Men 2; Mar- 
keting Club 2,3,4; Tau Kappa Epsilon 
1,2,3,4; Wasmann Biol. Soc. 1. 



LISSAK, DENNIS F. 

425 E. Maple 

Lombard, III. 
Alpha Sigma Nu 3,4; Phi Sigma Tau 3,4; 
SAL 3. 

LIULEVICIUS, AUKSE J. 

6540 S. Campbell A 

Chicago, III. 

Math Club 3,4; Physics Club 1,2,3,4, Sec. 

3, VP-Treas 4. 

LOFTUS, KATHLEEN A. 

5253 N. Winthrop 

Chicago, 111. 

Circumference 4; Alpha Tau Delta 2,3,4, 

Ed. 3; Nursing Council, Sec. 4; Sigma 

Theta Tau 4; LOYOLAN 4. 

LONG, JAMES W. 
3914 N. Paulina 
Chicago, 111. 
Pi Gamma Mu 4. 

LUKOWITZ, ALBERTA A. 

5039 W. Roscoe 

Chicago, 111. 

Alpha Tau Delta 4; Loyola Women 2; 

SNAI 1,2,3. 

LYNCH, DENNIS M. 
1833 W. Greenleaf 
Chicago, III. 
Econ-Finance 3,4. 

LYNCH, MICHAEL J. 
4524 N. Claremont 
Chicago, 111. 
Alpha Kappa Psi 2,3,4, Pres. 3,4; Blue 
Key 3,4, VP 3,4; Commerce Council Soc. 
Chm. 3; IFC 3,4, VP 3; Intramurals 1,2,3, 
4; LOYOLAN, Co-Business Mgr. 3; LOY- 
OLAN Awards Com. 3; Marketing Club 
4; Pow-Wow Weekend Financial Chm. 3; 
Junior Class Pres.; Senior Class VP; Bus. 
Adm. Student Council 3,4, VP 3; SAL 
1,2,3,4; YD's 3,4. 

LYONS, THOMAS E. 
7235 N. Bell 
Chicago, III. 
Accounting Club 2,3,4; Bus. Adm. News- 
letter 4; Commerce News Sheet 1; Delta 
Sigma Pi, 1,2,3,4; Econ-Finance Soc. 2,3,4; 
SAL 1,2,3,4; Senior Class Memorial Gift 
Fund. 

MacCARTHY, CHARLES F. 

2100 W. Ainslie 
Chicago, III. 
Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4; SAMA 1,2,3,4; Senior 
Class VP; Student Council 4. 

MACEK, ARLENE A. 

1334 Wenonah A 

Berwyn, 111. 

Chi Theta Upsilon 3,4; Coed Club 3,4; Pi 

Gamma Mu 3,4. 

MADURA, RICHARD V. 

3239 N. Linder 

Chicago, 111. 

Psi Omega 1,2,3,4; St. ApoUonia Guild 

3,4. 

MAHONEY, RONALD P. 
203 Washington 
Oak Park, III. 
SAMA 1,2,3,4. 

MAIER, RUDOLPH J. 

413 Bohland 
Bellwood, III. 
Alpha Sigma Nu 1; Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4, 
Sec. 2; SAMA 2. 



422 



GRADUATE DIRECTORY 



MAJKRZAK, ROBERT H. 

501 N. Central 
Chicago, III. 
Human Relations Club 3,4, Treas. 4 

MAKSYM, RONALD L. 

529 North Avenue 
Harrington, 111. 
Phi Alpha Delta 2,3,4; SBA Class Rep. 3, 
VP 4. 

MALIN, ELLEN B. 
6242 S. Troy 
Chicago, 111. 
Coed Club 1,2,3,4; Foreign Students Assoc. 
3,4; Gerard Manley Hopkins 2,4; Loyola 
Women 1,2,3,4, VP 4; Modern Language 
Club 1,2,3,4, Membership Chm. 4. 

MALONE, MARGARET R. 

103 S. Kensington 

LaGrange, IlL 

Alpha Tau Delta 2,3,4; Coed Club 1,2; 

Loyola Women 1; SNAI 1,2,3; Women's 

Intramurals 1,2. 

MANDERFIELD, CAROLINE M. 
RR#2 

Fairbault, Minn. 
Coed Club 1, Equestrian Club 2; Sigma 
Theta Tau 4; Loyola Women 2,3. 

MANN, EDWARD J. 

2114 Lake Ave. 

Wilmette, 111. 

Econ.-Finance Club 4; Marketing Club 4; 

SAM 3,4, VP 3, Pres. 4. 

MARZULLO, THOMAS E. 
4704 N. Opal 
Norridge, 111. 
Accounting Club 3,4. 

MASSI, FRANK A. 
2312 W. Harrison 
Chicago, 111. 
Accounting Club 3,4. 

MASTERS, ALLAN W. 

8546 Constance 

Chicago, 111. 

Human Relations Club 4; Phi Sigma Tau 

2,3,4. 

MATUGA, ANDREW J. 
3823 Pulaski 
East Chicago, Ind. 
Psychological Soc. 2,3. 

MATUSZEK, PATRICIA M. 
630 S. Humphrey 
Oak Park, 111. 
Coed Club I; Nursing Council Float Com. 
1,2,3; Nursing Council, Treas. 2; SNAI 
1,2,3; Sophomore Class Pres.; Variety 
Show Publicity Com. 3,4. 

MAZZULLA, RICHARD A. 

3202 Elder Lane 

Franklin Park, 111. 

AUSA 1,2,3,4; Gold Torch 4; Hist. Soc. 

3,4; Sigma Pi Alpha 3,4, Athletic Direaor 

4. 

McCABE, JAMES P. 
416 Whitney 
Joliet, III. 
Glee Club 3,4; Psychological Soc. 3,4. 

McCarthy, maurice j. 

2745 N. Oak Park 
Chicago, III. 
Moot Court 1,2,3; Phi Alpha Delta 1,2,3; 
Recent Decisions 1,2,3, Contributing Ed. 
2, Associate Ed. 3; Student Bar Assoc. 
1,2,3; St. Thomas More Club 2, Chm. 2; 
Student President's Com. 3. 



McDARRAH, VALERIE L. 

1827 N. Neva 
Chicago, III. 
Nursing Council 3; Junior Class Sec. 

McDonald, susan 

801 S. Scoville 

Oak Park, 111. 
Coed Club 2; Delta Zeta Chi 2,3,4, Chap- 
lain 4; SAL 2,3,4. 

McDonnell, john j. 

3926 N. Oakley 
Chicago, 111. 
Hist. Soc. 4; Loyola Men 4. 

McDonnell, wayne m. 

7130 Oakton Ct. 
Niles, 111. 
AUSA 2,3,4; The Bugler 3,4, Student Ad- 
visor 3,4; Tracer Magazine 2,3, Assistant 
Ed. 2,3; Loyola Men 2; SAM 2. 

McGRATH, MAUREEN M. 

11127 St. Lawrence 

Chicago, 111. 

Coed Club 1,2,4; Equestrian Club 3; Hist. 

Soc. 1; Pi Gamma Mu 3. 

McGUILL, JOSEPH C, JR. 

284 Snell St. 
Fall River, Mass. 
Delta Sigma Delta 1,2,3,4; St. Apollonia 
Guild 2,3,4. 

McHUGH, EDWARD P., JR. 

6624 Keota 
Chicago, lU. 

Mclaughlin, james f. 

6316 N. Rockwell 
Chicago, 111. 
LOYOLAN Photography Ed. 3. 

McLaughlin, thomas p. 

2218 W. Addison 
Chicago, 111. 
Loyola Men 1,2,3,4; Sigma Pi 2,3,4. 

McMAHON, MAUREEN L. 

840 N. Prospect 

Park Ridge, 111. 
Alpha Tau Delta 1,2,3,4; Cheerleader 1; 
Coed Club 1,2; SAL 2,3; SNAI 1,2,3; Steb- 
ler Hall Council, Soc. Chm. 2; YD's 2,3; 
LOYOLAN 4. 

McMANMON, CHARLES J. 

8052 Marshfield 
Chicago, III. 

McNULTY, EILEEN B. 

738-1 1th St. 

LaSalle, III. 
Coed Club 2; Curtain Guild 3; Gerard 
Manley Hopkins Soc. 1; Theta Phi Alpha 
2,3,4; SAL 2,3,4; SNAI 1,2,3. 

MEANY, MARY LOU 
8948 S. Laflin 
Chicago, 111. 
Epsilon Pi Rho 3,4. 

MERKLE, DOROTHY C. 

6808 N. Loron 
Chicago, 111. 
Coed Club 1; Nursing Council 2,3,4, Soc. 
Chm. 2,3, Arts Council Rep. 4; SNAI 
1,2,3; Nursing Council Float Com. 2,3,4; 
Variety Show Publicity Chm. 4. 

MICHALAK, THOMAS J. 

4027 N. Pontiac 

Chicago, 111. 



MIEDZIANOWSKI, BARBARA J. 

1720 Main 

Evanston, 111. 

Alpha Tau Delta 1,2,3,4; Coed Club 1; 

Loyola Women 1; SAL 2,3; SNAI 1,2,3. 

MIEZIO, DONALD S. 
6109 W. 25th 
Cicero, 111. 
Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4. 

MILLER, DAVID F. 
2850 W. CuUom 
Chicago, 111. 
Readers' Circle 1. 

MILLER, HOWARD M. 

419 E. 73rd 

Chicago, 111. 
Phi Alpha Delta 2,3,4; Student Bar Assoc. 
Class Rep. 1. 

MIROBALLI, DANIEL V. 

9412 N. Kildare 
Skokie, 111. 
Marketing Club 1,2,3,4. 

MISULONAS, JOSEPH R. 

1303 N. 16th 
Melrose Park, 111. 
Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4; SAMA 1,2,3,4. 

MOCARSKI, PAMELA M. 

2116 N. Latrobe 
Chicago, 111. 
American Chem. Assoc. 2,3; Coed Club 1; 
Delta Zeta Chi 2,3,4, Soc. Chm. 2, Pledge 
Mistress 2, ISC Rep. 3, Sec. 4; ISC Union 
Board Rep. 3; Union Activities Board 3; 
YD's 2. 

MONG, REV. ROGER J. ' 
1921 N. Kedvale 
Chicago, 111. 

MONTELOENE, ANGELO P. 
5459 W. Pensacola 
Chicago, 111. 
Hist. Soc. 4; YR's 3,4. 

MONTGOMERY, EDWARD F. 

2745 W. 63rd 
Chicago, 111. 
Medical School Student Council 1,2,3,4, 
Treas. 2,3, Pres. 4; Fresh. Class Pres. 

MOORMAN, JAMES E. 

1444 W. 94th 

Chicago, 111. 

SAMA 1,2,3,4; St. Luke's Guild 1,2,3,4, 

VP2. 

MORTARA, RICHARD H. 

2560 Deerfield Rd. 

Deerfield, III. 

Pow-Wow Weekend Com. 4; Loyola Men 

1,2,3,4; Wasmann Biol. Soc. 1,4. 

MRAZEK, CYNTHIA A. 

1210 Robinhood Lane 

LaGrange Park, 111. 

Coed Club 1; Hist. Soc. 1,2,3; Human 

Relations Club 4; Ramblerettes 2,3,4, 

Pres. 2,3,4; YR's 4. 

MULCAHY, MARY E. 

1 104 Scoville 

Oak Park, 111. 

Alpha Tau Delta 1,2,3,4; Pledge Marshal 

3; Coed Club 1,2; Nursing Council, Treas. 

2; SNAI 2,3. 

MULLER, RICHARD C. 
6467 N. Oxford 
Chicago, 111. 
Math. Club 2,3,4; Phi Sigma Tau 4. 



423 



GRADUATE DIRECTORY 



MUNO, MARIANNE A. 

6144 W. Warwick 

Chicago, 111. 

Coed Club 1; Loyola Women 1,2,3,4; 

Nursing Council 3, VP 3; SNAI 1,2,3; 

Student Welfare Com. 3. 

MURPHY, RICHARD A. 

9400 S. Green 
Chicago, III. 
Gamma Delta Chi 1,2, Pres. 2; Hist. Soc. 
1; Loyola Men 1,2,3,4; SAL 2; Wasmann 
Biol. Soc. 1,2,3,4, Newsletter Ed. 3; YR's 
2,3,4. 

MURPHY, THOMAS E. 

7043 N. Hiawatha 
Chicago, 111. 
Accounting Club 2,3,4; Delta Sigma Pi 
2,3,4, Dramatics Chm. 4; Econ.-Finance 
Soc. 4; Marketing Club 4; IFC Sports 2,3, 
4; SAL 3; Variety Show, Adv. Mgr. 2,3,4. 

MURRAY, ANTHONY J., JR. 
1442 W. Norwood 
Chicago, 111. 
Pi Gamma Mu 3; YDs 3. 

MUTH, KATHRYN M. 

2215 Giddings 

Chicago, III. 

Coed Club 1; Senior Memorial Gift Fund 

4; SNAI 1,2,3. 

MYSYK, NANCY J. 

Hebron, 111. 

Alpha Tau Delta 1,2,^,4; Coed Club 1,2; 

SAL 2,3; Sigma Theta Tau 4; SNAI 1,2,3; 

Wasmann Biol. Soc. 1,2; YDs' 2,3. 

MYSZKOWSKI, ZENON F. 

4623 S. Keeler 
Chicago, 111. 
Epsilon Pi Rho 3; Human Relations Club 
4; Sigma Pi Alpha 3,4, Sgt. at Arms 4. 

NAGLE, RICHARD C. 

1407 W. North Shore 

Chicago, 111. 

Sophomore Class VP; Junior Class Pres. 

NAPOLI, ROBERT A. 

1 12 E. Kensington 
Chicago, 111. 
Political Science Club 3,4, VP 3. 

NARKO, MEDARD M. 

2914 W. 82nd St. 
Chicago, 111. 
Foreign Students Assoc. 3; Historical So- 
ciety 1,2,3; Human Relations Club 3,4, 
VP 4; Loyola Men 3,4; Pi Gamma Mu 
3,4; IFC 4; Sigma Pi Alpha 2,3,4, Pledge- 
master 2, VP 3; Pres. 4. 

NASSOS, TASSOS P. 
211 N. Kilbourn 
Chicago, 111. 
SAMA 1,2,3,4. 

NAVRAT, LEONARD F. 

2023 N. 72nd Ct. 
Elmwood Park, III. 
American Pedodontic Assoc. 2,3,4; Psi 
Omega 1,2,3,4; Student ADA 1,2,3,4; St. 
Apolloia Guild 1,2,3,4, Union Rep. 2, 
Pres. 3; Student Council 3,4. 

NELLIGAN, RAYMOND J. 

10342 S. Calumet 
Chicago, 111. 

NEWSTEAD, ROBERT A. 
6916 Clyde 
Chicago, 111. 



NICHOLS, JOHN S. 
905 Ashland 
Chicago, 111. 
Xi Psi Phi 1,2,3,4. 

NIELSEN, KENNETH 

834 S. Ashland 

Chicago, 111. 

Dental School Choir 1; Psi Omega 1,2,3,4, 

House Manager 3- 

NOBILIO, PATRICIA A. 

6643 S. Komensky 
Chicago, 111. 
Coed Club 1,2,4; Equestrian Society 2; 
Historical Society 1; Human Relations 
Club 3; ISC Council 4, Union Board Rep. 
4; Kappa Beta Gamma 1,2,3,4, Corrs. Sec. 
ISC Rep. 4; Loyola News 1; YD's 2,3. 

NOSAL, RONALD W. 
5755 S. Bishop 
Chicago, 111. 
YD's 4; Senior Gift Fund 4. 

NYBORG, BIRGER C. 

5319 N. Damen 

Chicago, 111. 
Curtain Guild 2,3, Business Manager 2; 
SAM 2,3,4, VP 3, Treas. 4. 

NYKIEL, KENNETH J. 

5844 W. Cornelia 

Chicago, 111. 

Accounting Club 2,3; AUSA 1,2,3,4; Beta 

Alpha Psi 4; Gold Torch 4; SAM 1. 

O'CONNOR, JEROME M. 

332 S. Michigan 
Chicago, III. 
Curtain Guild 1,2,3,4; Sec. 2, Pres. 3; Fine 
Arts Club 1,2; Historical Society 2; Read- 
ers Circle 3; SAM 3,4; Vet's Club 1; YD's 
3,4. 

O'CONNOR, PAUL C. 
9205 S. Oakley 
Chicago, 111. 
Phi Chi 2,3,4; Senior Class Treas. 4. 

O'CONNOR, PHILIP T. 
915 Ashland 
Wilmerte, 111. 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 1,2,3,4. 

OGAREK, JOSEPH C. 

5334 S. Richmond 

Chicago, 111. 

OLECH, FRANCINE M. 

1732 N. Lawndale 
Chicago, III. 
Academic Comminee of Arts Council 4; 
Circumference 4; Coed Club 2,4; Histori- 
cal Society 1,2,4; ISC 2,4, Sec. 2; Miss 
Loyola Candidate 2; Pow Wow Dance 
Committee 4; Theta Phi Alpha 2,3,4, Pres. 
4. 

O'NEILL, SHEILA F. 

7710 S. May 
Chicago, 111. 
Gerard Manley Hopkins 1,2; Historical 
Society 1,2,3,4; Modern Language Club 
1,2,3,4, Sec. 2. 

ONGEMACH, JACK T. 

639 S. Harvey 

Oak Park, 111. 
Epsilon Pi Rho 1; Historical Society 3,4; 
Loyola Men 1; Pi Gamma Mu 4; Sigma 
Pi Alpha 3,4. 

ORCHOWSKI, JAMES G. 

8411 S. Burnham 

Chicago, 111. 

Accounting Club 2,3,4; Delta Sigma Pi 

2,3,4, VP 3, Pres. 4; IFC 4. 



ORTH, KENNETH S. 
4333 S. Talman 
Chicago, 111. 
Beta Alpha Psi 3,4; SAM 2. 

ORTH, MICHAEL W. 
306 Washington 
Oak Park, 111. 
Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4. 

OSTROWSKI, CASIMIR T. 

2724 S. Kildare 
Chicago, 111. 

PALES, WILLIAM A. 

844 N. Monticello 

Chicago, 111. 

Historical Soc. 2,3,4; Loyola Men 2; 

Modern Language Club 1; Sigma Pi Alpha 

1,2,3,4, Historian 3, Treas. 3. 

PALOVEEK, JAMES T. 

1525 S. Ridgeland 

Berwyn, 111. 

PEET, KATHLEEN A. 

5233 Wolfram 

Chicago, 111. 

Coed Club 1,2,3,4; Delta Zeta Chi 2,3,4; 

Historical Society 1; SAL 3,4; Wasmann 

Biological Society 1. 

PETERS, JAMES E. 
957 Dobson 
Evanston, 111. 
Curtain Guild 1,2,3,4; Glee Club 3; LOY- 
OLAN ; Loyola Men 3,4. 

PETRULIS, AUDRONE V. 

6406 S. Sacramento 
Chicago, 111. 

PETTERSEN, MALVIN P. 

3511 S. Lombard 

Cicero, 111. 

Pi Gamma Mu 4; Wasmann Biological 

Society 1. 

PHILLIPS, BARBARA L. 
1448 W. Farragut 
Chicago, 111. 
Alpha Tau Delta 2,3,4; Catholic Student 
Nurses Council 2,3,4, Treas. 3; Coed Club 
1; Curtain Guild 1,2,3,4; Freshman Class 
Pres.; Nursing Council 1,2,3,4, Sec. 1, 
Chmn. Alumni Com. 4; SAL 3; SNAI 
1,2,3; Senior Class Treas; Wasmann Bio- 
logical Soc. 1. 

PHILUPS, JOANNE L. 
6662 N. Central 
Chicago, 111. 
Chi Theta Upsilon 2,3,4, Rush Chmn. 3, 
Soc. Chmn. 4; Coed Club 3,4, Soc. Chmn. 
3; Epsilon Pi Rho 1,2,3,4; Equestrian So- 
ciety 2; Human Relations Club 3,4; SAL 
3,4. 

PHILPOTT, RICHARD L. 

355 Ridge Ave. 
Evanston, 111. 

SAMA 1,2,3,4. 

PHILPOTT, THOMAS L. 
6946 Paxton 
Chicago, 111. 
Blue Key 3,4; Historical Soc. 2,3, VP 
4; Pi Gamma Mu 3,4; SAL 1; Sophomore 
Class Pres.; Student Opinion Commission 
2,3. 

PICUCCI, LORETTA L. 

5137 S. Newscastle 
Chicago, 111. 
Cadence 3,4; Circumference 4; Epsilon Pi 
Rho 1,2,3,4, Sec. 3; Newsletter Staff 4; 
Foreign Students Assoc. 3; Modern Lan- 
guage Club 2,4, VP 4. 



424 



GRADUATE DIRECTORY 



PIERCE, PATRICK M. 
1933 Balmoral Ave. 
Westchester, 111. 
Math Club 3,4; Swimming Team 1,2. 

PIKRONE, MARY ANNE R. 
5720 N. Lansing 
Chicago, 111. 
Coed Club 1,2; Historical Soc. 1,4; Loy- 
ola Women 1,2,3,4; Loyola News 3,4; 
PoUtical Science Club 3,4, VP 3; Pi Gam- 
ma Mu 3,4; YR's 2,3,4, Exec. Bd. 2,3, Pres. 
4. 

PINDRAS, PATRICIA L. 

8914 Central Ave. 

Morton Grove, 111. 

Historical Soc. 1,2,3,4; Modern Language 

Club 3,4, Sec. 4. 

PLEVA, BARBARA K. 
5127 S. Luna 
Chicago, 111. 
Coed Club 2,3,4; Equestrian Society 2; 
Loyola News 2; Pi Gamma Mu 4; Psy- 
chology Club 3,4; YD's 2. 

POTUZNIK, JAMES J. 
1322 Ruddiman Dr. 
No. Muskegon, Mich. 
Econ.-Finance Society 3,4; IPC 4; Loyola 
Men 2; SAM 3,4; Tau Delta Phi 2,3,4, 
Ed.-Historian 2, Corres. Sec. 3, Rec. Sec. 3, 
Pres. 4, Wasmann Biological Society 1,2; 
YR's 1,2. 

POZDOL, RICHARD J. 

15601 S. Halsted 
Harvey, 111. 

PROBST, MARILYN 

3457 Milwaukee 
Chicago, 111. 

PULJUNG, JOHN J. 
3143 Oak 
Brookfield, 111. 
Alpha Sigma Nu 3,4; Beta Gamma Sigma 
3,4, VP 4; Bus. Ad. Council Pres. 4; 
Econ.-Finance Soc. 3,4, Program Chmn. 4; 
SAM 1,2; Senior Class Pres. 

PUTNAM, PAMELA A. 
1033 W. Loyola 
Chicago, 111. 
Coed Club 1; Historical Society 2,3; Loy- 
ola Women 2; Theta Phi Alpha 1,2,3,4. 

RACETTE, PHILLIP M. 

1002 S. Austin 
Oak Park, III. 

RADVILA, JANINA 

3456 W. 64th 

Chicago, 111. 

American Chem. Soc. 1,2,3,4; Math. Club 

4. 

RAIA, DAVID P. 

6233 N. Winthrop 
Chicago, 111. 
Alpha Delta Gamma 1,2,3,4, I.M. Mgr. 2, 
Sec. 3, V.P. 4; Bellarmine Club 2,3; Blue 
Key 4; Dorm Council 1; IPC 3,4, I. M. 
Chairman 4; Loyola Men 1; Loyola News 
1; Pow Wow Pub. Chm. 4; SAL 2,3,4; 
YD's 1,2. 

RASMUSSON, JAMES M. 

Osnabrock, North Dakota 

Blue Key 3,4; Junior Class Pres.; Psi 

Omega 1,2,3,4, Junior Grand Master 4; 

Social Chm. 4; Student Council 3,4. 

RATHZ, THOMAS J. 
2923 S. Loomis 
Chicago, 111. 
Econ.-Finance Soc. 3>4. 



REILLY, JAMES A. 

8132 S. Sawyer 

Chicago, III. 
Junior Class Pres; Arts Council Pres. 4; 
Bellarmine Philosophy Club 3,4; Blue 
Key 3,4; Loyola News 3; Pi Alpha Lamb- 
da 2,3,4; Psychology Club 1,2; Senior 
Class Gift Fund, Ex. Com. 4; Student's 
President's Com. 4; Variety Show Pro- 
ducer 3. 

REINHART, SHIRLEY R. 

1119 Ave. B. No. 
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada 

REITER, ANNE C. 

341 Kathleen 

Des Plaines, III. 

Coed Club 1,2; Delaware Hall Council 4, 

Social Sec. 4; Equestrian Soc. 3; Historical 

Soc. 1,2,3,4; Modern Language Club 1. 

RENIER, CELESTE C. 
5070 W. Balmoral 
Chicago, 111. 
Alpha Tau Delta 2,3,4, Rec. Sec. 3, His- 
torian 4; Circumference 4; Coed Club 1; 
Freshman Class Sec; Miss Sorority 3; 
Nursing Council 1,4, Pres. 4; Senior Class 
Pres.; Sigma Theta Tau 4; SNAI 1,2,3,4; 
Student President's Committee 4. 

RICHARDS, KATHLEEN M. 

932 N. Waiola 

La Grange Park, 111. 

Cadence 3,4; Coed Club 1,2; Historical 

Soc. 1; LOYOLAN 4; Phi Sigma Tau 3,4; 

YR's 2,3,4, Sec. 3, Exec. Bd. 3,4; SAL 2,3. 

RIGNEY, JAMES P. 
16 S. Lotus 
Chicago, 111. 
Marketing Club 4; SAM 2. 

ROBELLO, ALAN W. 
3117 S. Lituanica 
Chicago, 111. 
St. Apollonia Guild 2,3,4. 

ROBERSON, PETER D. 

112 Elmwood 

Wilmete, 111. 
Blue Key 3,4; Delta Sigma Delta 1,2,3,4, 
VP 4; Dental School Choir 1; Student 
ADA 1,2,3,4, Treas. 3, Pres. 4; St. Apol- 
lonia Guild 4; Student Council 2,3,4; 
Union Activities Bd. 3,4. 

ROBINSON, SHIRLEY A. 
228 E. 89th 
Chicago, 111. 
Coed Club 1; Historical Soc. 1,2. 

ROJAS, JUAN F. 

1431 N. Claremont 

Chicago, 111. 

ROKOS, ROBERT G. 

715 Wolf Rd. 

Des Plaines, 111. 

Fine Arts Club 3; Psychology Club 1; Tau 

Delta Phi 2,3,4, Ed. Historian 3, Custodian 

4; Wasmann Biological Soc. 1. 

ROSSI, ANTHONY R. 
9810 Ave. J 
Chicago, 111. 
Accounting Club 2,3,4, Pres. 4; YD's 2,3. 

ROTH, MARILYNN J. 
RR#1 Box 236 
Naperville, 111. 

RUBINO, PAUL J. 
5125 W. Deming 
Chicago, 111. 
SAMA 1,2,3,4. 



RUDNICKI, EUGENE J. 

1119S. Mitchell 
Arlington Heights, 111. 
Tau Delta Phi 1,2. 

RUSSELL, ROBERT J. 

7828 S. Euclid 

Chicago, 111. 

Accounting Club 3,4; Loyola Men 1,2,3,4. 

SAMEC, JAMES R. 
8146 S. Wood 
Chicago, 111. 

SANTUCCI, RAYMOND D. 

1246 William 

River Forest, III. 

Intramural Athletics 1,2,3,4; Loyola Men 

1; Wasmann Biological Soc. 1,2,3; YR's 

2,3,4. 

SCHMIDT, RICHARD J. 

113 S. Evergreen 
Arlington Heights, 111. 
Fine Arts Club 1; SAM 2; YR's 1,2,3,4, 
Sec. 4. 

SCHMITZ, RUDOLF A. 
5439 W. Washington 
Chicago, 111. 
Curtain Guild 3,4. 

SCHNEIDER, JAMES B. 

1239 S. 59th 
Cicero, 111. 
Arts Council 4; Blue Key 3,4, Alumni Sec. 
4; Cabrini Proje« Co-Chm. 4; Fine Arts 
Club 3; LOYOLAN Awards Com. 3; 
LOYOLAN 2,3, Sports Ed. 3; Loyola Men 
1,2; Loyola News 2,3,4, Sports Ed. 2, 
News Ed. 3; Feature and Editorial Editor 
3; Pi Delta Epsilon 3,4; Pi Gamma Nu 
3,4; Publicity Chm. International Fa:ir 
3; Senior Memorial Gift Fund Advisory 
Bd. 4; Senior Class Pres. 4; YD's 2,3,4, 
Treas. 2, Pres. 3. 

SCHULTZE, CAROL J. 

2139 N. Tripp 
Chicago, 111. 

SCHULTZ, GEORGE E. 

Box 31 E. Coolspring 
Indiana 
Curtain Guild 1; Dorm Council 2; Glee 
Club 1; Loyola Men 1,2,3; Loyola News 
3,4; Psychology Club 2,4; Student Opin- 
ion Commission 3. 

SCHURER, ROBERT A. 

2136 Warner 

Chicago, III. 
Accounting Club 2,3,4; Beta Alpha Psi 4; 
Monogram Club 2,3,4; Track Team 
1,2,3,4. 

SCOTT, PATRICIA M. 
9944 S. Cook 
Oaklawn, III. 
Reader's Circle 3,4. 

SHIPMAN, BARBARA V. 

8407 Normal 

Niles, 111. 

Chi Theta Upsilon 3,4, Chaplain 4; Coed 

Club 1,2, Membership Chmn. 2; Glee 

Club 1,2; SNAI 1,2,3,4. 

SHYLIN, JUDITH A. 

1128 Wesley 

Oak Park, 111. 

SIBLEY, PAUL J. 
2215 S. 58th 
Cicero, 111. 
Wasmann Biological Soc. 1; SAM 2. 



425 



GRADUATE DIRECTORY 



SIGNATUR, EDWARD P. 

2506 W. Walton 

Chicago, 111. 

Curtain Guild 3,4; Fine Arts Club 3,4; 

Math Club 3,4. 

SKAHEN, THOMAS M. 

4656 W. Adams 

Chicago, 111. 

Historical Soc. 4; Psychology Club 4; 

YD's 3. 

SKRYDLEWSKI, BRUCE J. 

1515 Hull 

Westchester, 111. 

SLATTERY, HELEN M. 
6856 N. Knox 
Lincolnwood, 111. 
Circumference 3,4; Coed Club 1,2,3,4; 
Historical Soc. 1,2,3,4; ISC 3; Kappa Beta 
Gamma 1,2,3,4, ISC Rep. 3; Greek Week 
Chmn. 3; Political Science Club 3,4; SAL 
1,2,3,4; Senior Gift Fund Com. 4. 

SLATTERY, NANCY E. 

441 Serpentine 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Coed Club 1,2; Delaware Hall Council 
1,2,3,4, Treas. 1, Judiciary 2, Pres. 3; Fair 
Decorations Cora. 3; Historical Soc. 1; 
Pow Wow Pub. Com. 2; SAL 1,2,3,4; 
Senior Gift Fund Com. 4. 

SOBOTA, JOHN J. 

3045 N. Central Park 
Chicago, 111. 
Accounting Club 3,4, Sec. 4; Beta Alpha 
Psi 4; Delta Sigma Pi 2,3,4, Social Chm. 
3, Treas. 4; Historical Soc. 1; SAL 2,3,4; 
Senior Gift Fund 4. 

SOLDENWAGNER, MARILYN J. 

3531 N. Leavitt 

Chicago, 111. 

SOMERS, PATRICK W. 
4739 W. Monroe 
Chicago, 111. 
Intramurals 2,3; Math Club 3,4. 

SOW A, JEAN OGIELA 

5354 W. Leland 

Chicago, 111. 

Modern Language Club 4; Pi Gamma Mu 

3,4. 

STEIN, WILLIAM C. 

146 N. Humphrey 
Oak Park, 111. 

STEPHENSON, THOMAS W. 

351 N. Wolf 
Des Plaines, 111. 
SAM 1,2,3,4. 

STEWART, PAUL H. 
Galesburg, III. 
Fine Arts Club 4; Freshman Orient. Com. 
2,3; Glee Club 2; Loyola Hall Council 
2,3,4, Sec. 4; Historical Soc. 2,3; Pi Gamma 
Mu 3,4; Senior Gift Fund 4; SAL 2,3,4, 
Exec. Bd. 4; Student Welfare Com. Chm. 
4; YD's 2,3. 

STOJAK, RICHARD M. 

394 E. 160th PI. 

Harvey, 111. 

Human Relations Club 4; Historical Soc. 

3; Sigma Pi Alpha 3,4. 

STRAMA, FRANK D. 
3712 N. Southport 
Chicago, 111. 
Historical Soc. 1; Marketing Club 4. 



STUPAR, DONNA M. 

18536 Walter 

Lansing, III. 

AMWA 2,3,4; Junior Class Sec; SAMA 

1,2,3,4; Senior Class Sec; Sophomore Class 

Sec. 

SZAROWICZ, DIANE J. 
4150 W. 25th 
Chicago, 111. 
Epsilon Pi Rho 2,3,4; Fine Arts Club 2,3,4; 
Loyola Women 1,2,3,4; Math Club 2,3,4, 
Sec.-Treas. 4; Modern Language Club 2,4; 
Phi Sigma Tau 3,4. 

TAYLOR, JOSEPH R. 
401 E Street 
LaPorte, Ind. 
Math Club 3,4; YR's 2,3. 

TAYLOR, WILLIAM G. 

8 S. Mayfield 
Chicago, 111. 

THAYIL, REV. CHRISTOPHER J. 

3455 S. Wabash 
Chicago, 111. 

TIMPERMAN, ALBERT L. 

4762 Loretta 

Cincinnati, O. 

Phi Beta Pi 1,2,3,4, Pldge. Chmn. 2,4, Vice 

Archon 3; St. Luke's Guild 2,3,4, Pres. 4; 

Medical School Council 2,3,4. 

TOEBAAS, RONALD L. 

824 Judson 

Evanston, 111. 

Curtain Guild 3,4, VP 4; Reader's Circle 

4; Senior Memorial Fund 4. 

TOMASZKIEWICZ, ROBERT J. 

5646 W. 35th 

Cicero, 111. 

Historical Soc. 4; Pi Gamma Mu 4; Was- 

mann Biological Soc. 1. 

TORRES, MARY F. 

1014 S. Humphrey 

Oak Park, 111. 

Chi Theta Upsilon 2,3,4; Equestrian Soc. 

2; Fine Arts 1; Historical Soc. 1,2; SAL 

2,3. 

TOSTO, JOHN A. 
1239 S. 59th Ct. 
Cicero, 111. 
Arts Council, VP 4; Cabrini Program, Co- 
Chm. 4; Orient Com. 3,4; Pi Gamma Mu 
3,4; Psychology Club 4, VP 4; Reader's 
Circle 1,2,3,4; International Fair Prize 
Chm. 3. 

TUFO, ROBERT P. 

1453 W. Elmdale 

Chicago. III. 

Loyola Men 1,2,3,4; Pi Alpha Lamba 

1,2,3,4, Treas. 3,4; Pi Gamma Mu 3,4. 

TURPINAT, MARY C. 

2519 Central St. 

Evanston, III. 

Coed Club 1,2; Senior Memorial Fund 

Com. 4; SNAI 1,2,3,4; Variety Show 1. 

VAN BREE, FRANK E. 

6439 N. Newgard 

Chicago, 111. 

Phi Alpha Delta 2,3, Soc Chm. 2, Treas. 

3; Student Bar Assoc. 1,2,3. 

VEITH, NICHOLAS W. 
3624 W. 60th 
Chicago, 111. 
Dorm Council 3; Fine Arts Club 4; Intra- 
murals 1,2,3,4; Wasmann Biological Soc. 
1,2. 

VIDOLOFF, JOHN C. 

5139 W. 22nd 

Cicero, III. 

American Chem. Soc. 3; Sigma Delta Phi 

4. 



VIGIL, EUGENE L. 

2221 W.Winona 
Chicago, 111. 
Bellarmine Philosophy Soc. 3,4; Was- 
mann Biological Soc. 1,2,3,4. 

WALSH, DENIS P. 

12 S. Merrill 

Park Ridge, 111. 

AUSA 1,2; Glee Club 1,2; Historical Soc. 

4; Human Relations Club 2; Tau Delta 

Phi 4. 

WALSH, WILLIAM P. 
7013 N. Ridge 
Chicago, 111. 
Pi Gamma Mu 3,4. 

WANAT, JOHN A. 

5315 Melrose 

Chicago, 111. 

Fine Arts Club 4; Glee Club 2,3,4, Pres. 3; 

Math Club 3,4, Pres. 4. 

WARD, MICHAEL G. 

1321 Ardmore 

Chicago, 111. 

Accounting Club 3,4; Beta Alpha Psi 4; 

Bus. Adm. Newsletter 4; Loyola Men 1,2, 

3,4; Senior Gift Com. 4. 

WARD, WILLIAM L. 

1017 S. Monitor 
Chicago, 111. 

WCISLO, DIANE A. 
4937 S. Loomis 
Chicago, 111. 
Circumference 4; Coed Club 2,3,4; Greek 
Week Co-Chm. 4; Gerard Manley Hop- 
kins Soc. 1,2; ISC 4; Kappa Beta Gam- 
ma 2,3,4, Historian 3, Pres. 4; Marketing 
Club 4; Miss Loyola Contestant 4; SAL 
2,3,4; Senior Gift Fund 4; YD's 3. 

WEINER, ROBERT M. 
6625 Sheridan 
Chicago, 111. 
Marketing Club 3,4. 

WERNER, WILLIAM P. 

10115 S. Oglesby 

Chicago, 111. 

Accounting Club 1,2,3,4; Delta Sigma Pi 

1,2,3,4; Political Science Soc. 2,3, Treas. 2; 

SAM 1,2. 

WIERZ, JOHN M. 
3702 N. Nora 
Chicago, 111. 

YADRON, LORRAINE M. 

14415 LaSalle 
Riverdale, 111. 
Equestrian Soc. 3. 

YOURG, ANNE E. 
223 S. Albert 

Mount Prospect, 111. 
Coed Club 1,2,3,4, VP 3, Pres. 4; Eques- 
trian Soc. 3; Glee Club 2; Historical Soc. 
1,2,3,4, Sec. 3; Miss Loyola Contestant 3; 
SAL 1,2,3,4; Exec. Bd. 3,4, Sec. 3. 

YURKANIN, JOSEPH K. 
4926 W. Medill 
Chicago, 111. 
Phi Chi 1,2,3. 

ZELKO, JAMES J. 

925 N. Broadway 

Joliet, III. 

American Chem. Soc. 1,2,3,4; SAMA 

1,2,3,4. 

ZIMMERMAN, MARY K. 
746 S. East Ave. 
Oak Park, 111. 
Coed Club 1,2,3,4, VP (LSC); Fine Arts 
Club 1,3,4; Glee Club 2, Sec 2; Math 
Club 2,3,4; Ski-Week Co-Chairman 4; 
Swim Club 3,4; YD's 2,3. 



426 



ilK Ml 



■i ■ 






PHOTO 



AAGAARD, ROBERT 356 

ABEL, DR. D. HERBERT 93, 200. 328 

ADAM, SHARl 297 

ADAMO, KAREN 356 

ADAMS, SFC BANKSTON 96 

ADAMS, BEVERLY ANN 228 

ADAMS, DAN T. 356 

ADAMS, JOAN 294 

ADAMS. JULIE 300 

ADOLPHSON. JEANETIE 161 

ADLER, JEAN 229 

AGUERRE, JOSEPH 105 

AGUILAR, ROSA E. M. 356 

ALBRECHT. GERALD 154 

ALICH. MARIAN ANN 177. 253. 356 

ALLARD. MRS. HAROLD 72 

ALLEGRETTI. DIANE 356 

ALLISON. DR. JOHN R. 114 

ALMALEH. JOE N. 356 

AMALA. SR. S. D. OTTA PLACKEL 

356 
AMAR, BENEDICT 200. 215. 232. 233 
AMATURO, DR. FRANK M. 114 
AMBRE. JOHN J. 356 
AMBROSIA. ANGELINE M. 161 
AMIDEI. MARION 164. 193. 195. 262. 

356 
AMIDEI. NANCY J. 198 
ANDERSON. FRANK 106 
ANDERSON. JAMES 83 
ANDERSON, JON 271 
ANDERSON, KENNETH W. 277 
ANDERSON. TERRY 275 
ANDERSON. THOMAS P. 89 
ANDRE. MARJORIE 97 
ANDREWS, MARJO 356 
ANDREWS. QUYNTIN D. 143 
ANGEL JOHN 257 
ANGLESANO. ANNA MARIE 195 
ANGLIM. MARY T. 165. 202, 232 
ANGLUM. ESSIE 134, 161 
ANTOINE, LAWRENCE 206 
ANTONACCI, LOUIS 222, 356 
APOSTOL, DR. ROBERTO 97 
ARNOLD. DR. LLOYD 97 
ARNSTEIN. STEVE 251 
ARREGUIAN. MARIE 161 
ATHAS. GUS 125 
ATSAVES. STEPHEN 357 
ATTEN. JAMES 125. 264, 265, 242, 357 
AUBRY, GAYLE, 296 
AUGIUS, DANUTE 118 
AUGIUS. GEORGE 357 
AUW, DOROTHY 147 
AVAY. WARREN 251 



B 



BABOWICZ. EDWARD 94 

BACHMEIER. BEN 106 

BAILITZ, RONALD 357 

BAJKO. JOSEPH 259. 357 

BAKER. DOLORES 260. 261. 296. 357 

BAKER, JOHN 183 

BALICK, LESTER 280. 357 

BALOG. FRANK 357 

BALTY. PAUL 94 

BANDERA. RICHARD 22. 205. 214 

BANKMANN. EDWARD 275 

BANNON. DR. JOHN 97. 142 

BARANCZUK, RICHARD 275 

BARKER. JEREMY 95 

BARNES. JOHN 91, 154. 158, 167. 192. 

358 
BARNETT. FRANK 268 
BARNETT, LOWELL 143 
BARNETT. MARY 1.39, 252, 358 
BARNEY, JOSEPH 182 
BARRETT. CLAUDIA 195 
BARRETT. DONALD FRANCIS 174 
BARRETT. MARGARET 185 
BARRETT, PAUL 23 
BARRY. ANDREW 216. 271. 323 
BARRY, DR. JAMES 94 
BARRY. RICHARD 83 
BART. WILLIAM 284 
BARTA. DOROTHY 143 
BARTHOLOMEW. THOMAS 219 
BARTLETT, PETER 204 
BARTOSZ, RITA 297 
BASIUK. EMIL 82 
BASSAK, ELIZABETH 184 
BASSI. ROBERT 159. 204. 240 
BASTIAN. REV. RALPH. S.J. 101 
BATOR, ROBERT 94 
BAUERNFREUND. EDWIN 329. 331 
BAUKERT, FRANK 270. 271. 358 
BAUMAN. BARBARA 358 
BAUMHART. REV. RAYMOND. S.J. 

Ill 
BAVA. ROBERT 358 
BAYLOCK, PATRICIA 298 
BECKER. CHARLEOTTE 144 
BECKER. DR. WALTER 119, 126 
BEIERLE. CAMILLA 358 
BELECKIS. ROBERT 247 
BELL, HUGH 246, 247, 329 
BELLOC REV. RAYMOND, S.J. 101 
BELLOCK, RAYMOND 359 
BELMONTE, THOMAS 359 
BELMONDE, JOHN 178, 267 
BEND, CHARLES 179, 359 
BENJAMIN. ADAM 264 
BENNETT. ROBERT 240 
BENSON. MARGARET 40 
BEREK. DIANE 198 
BERG. THOMAS 208 



BERGEWISCH. REV. FRED. S.J. 101, 

290. 291 
BERGGREW. KATHLEEN 195 
BERGREN. JUDITH 359 
BERGSTROM. ROBERT 158 
BERKSON. EDWARD 264 
BERMAN. STEVE 267 
BERNARD. LAURA 332 
BERNATOVICH. BERNARD 94 
BERNERO. JAMES 359 
BERNSTEIN. ROBERT 359 
BERTAGNI. HUGO 222 
BERTAUX. BONITA 32. 33. 195. 287. 

354 
BERTOLOZZI. ELAINE 214. 354 
BERTSCHE. BERNARD 352 
BERUBE. ELAINE 252. 255. 359 
BEST. DR. JAMES 115 
BETONTI. ELIZABETH 359 
SEVAN. WILLIAM 359 
BIEGEL, HELENE 195. 287 
BIEL. MARIE 191 
BIELAK. RUSSELL 190. 254 
BIELAKOWSKI. LOUIS 275 
BIENIEK. JUNE 295 
BIERI. REV. JOHN. S.J. 62. 127 
BIESTEK, REV. FELIX. S.J. 62 
BIGGINS. JAMES 285, 360 
BILEK. MARCELLA 360 
BILICK. VIOLET 82 
BILLIMACK, ROBERT 205 
BILLINGS, MARGARET 40. 260, 261. 

333 
BILODEAU. MR. AND MRS. RAY- 
MOND 72 
BILODEAU. RAYMOND 360 
BIRKHOLZ. MARY 360 
BIRNBAUM. JUDY 201 
BISHOP. WILLIAM 320. 323. 360 
BISSEL. CUSHMAN 64. 74 
BITNER. LELAND 360 
BLACHOWICZ. JAMES 91 
BLANCHET. DR. L. 116 
BLANCHFIELD. THOMAS 175 
BLASS. RICHARD 222 
BLASSAGE. GERALD 183. 291 
BLECHA. ROBERT 248 
BLICKENSTAFF. JOHN 114 
BLIE. ELLEN 360 
BLUHM. JEAN 287. 360 
BLYTH. WILLIAM 329 
BOBERNAC. SALLY 195, 287 
BOCHMANN, CAROLYN 195 
BOETTGER, SHIRLEY 161 
BOGAERTS, CHARLENE 296 
BOIGT, MARY 181 
BOIKAN. IDA 161 
BOLAND, THOMAS 163. 329, 361 
BOLDES. RICHARD 95 
BOLSENGA. MARY 205. 298 
BOND. DENNIS 329 
BOUSCAREN. LOUIS 64 
BORCHARDT. GEORGIA 201 
BORIL, GERALDINE 205. 207. 332 
BORING. THOMAS 192. 275 
BORLAND. WILLIAM 258. 259 
BOSTYAN. RICHARD 179. 272 
BOUCHONVILLE. BEATRICE 252. 253, 

361 
BOUGUENNEC. LOUIZETTE 38. 39, 

215, 228 
BOVA, PHYLLIS 254, 255, 366 
BOWE. HON. AUGUSTINE 64, 74 
BOWERS, ALICE 287 
BOYACK, ROBERT 186. 248 
BOYLAN. WINIFRED 287 
BRACY. WARREN 157. 198 
BRADEN. MARY 143. 171 
BRADFORD. JAMES 248 
BRADY. JOHN 155, 361 
BRADY, LEE 54 
BRANDL, JOSEPH R. 360 
BRANDT, ELIZABETH 23, 208 
BRANNEN, PATRICK 248 
BRANNON, KAROLYN 40 
BRAUNER, HEINZ 320, 321, 323 
BRAVOS, GEORGE 214 
BREHM, JANET 361 
BREMNER, A. J. 77 
BRENNAN, JOHN S. 94 
BRESCIA, DR. NICHOLAS 115, 116 
BRESNAHAN. FRANCIS 361 
BRINDLE, SARA 185, 294 
BRINKMAN, RUTH 136 
BRINKMANN, JUDITH 253, 361 
BROADWELL, LUCILLE 161 
BRODER, MARVIN 251 
BRODERICK, DENNIS 73, 217 
BROOKER. WALTER 292 
BROOKS, DONALD 361 
BROOKS, MARY 255 
BROPHY, JAMES 361 
BROWN, ALPHONSE 268 
BROWN, MICHAEL 151, 361 
BROWN. PATRICIA 164, 193, 198, 

262, 263 
BROWNE, LAWRENCE 361 
BROZENEC, SALLIE 195, 205 
BRUEGGE, MARGO 205 
BRUNER, GLENN 222 
BRUNOD, MARY 215 
BRUSCA, PETER 163, 329, 362 
BRUSKY, ELLEN 200 
BRUUN, ROBERT 329, 359 
BRYANT, REV. THOMAS, S.J. 101 
BUCHHEIT, MARGARET 298 
BUCKLEY, JOHN 362 
BUCKLEY, DR. THOMAS 97 
BUCSA, JUDY 332 



BUCZEK, JOHN 210 

BUDZ, MR. AND MRS. JOHN 72 

BUHL, MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM 72 

BUHL, WILLIAM E. 206, 362 

BUKOVAC, JAMES 292 

BULGER, RICHARD 172, 284 

BUNDA, MARY 205, 214 

BURBACH, GEORGE 222, 362 

BURCH, DR. WILLIAM 115, 118 

BUREN, BARBARA 195 

BURGMAN, JON 362 

BURKE, JAMES A. 284 

BURKE, JAMES O. 64, 75 

BURKE, KEVIN 206, 246, 247 

BURKE, ROBERT S. 272 

BURKE, ROBERT W. 208 

BURKE, ROSEANN 195, 297 

BURKE, SHARON 287, 298, 300 

BURLAGE. REV. CARL, S.J. 80, 91, 97 

BURNS, J. DAWSON 272, 273, 362 

BURNS, LINDA 298 

BURNS, ROBERT 123, 124, 243 

BUSSERT, MARY 161 

BUSSEY, HENRY 100 

BUTVILAS, GEORGIANN 254 

BUTZEK, JAMES 285, 362 

BYRD, DIANE 291 

BYRNE, ANDREEN 332. 362 

BYRNE. JAMES 362 

BYRNE. PATRICIA 298. 300 

BYRNE. ROBERT 247 

BYRNE. THOMAS 206 

BYRNES. DAVID 362 



CACIOPPO. PHILLIP 230 
CALABRESE. RICHARD 73. 221. 280. 

281. 362 
CALDERINI. JOHN 276 
CALDWELL, MICHAEL 243, 264, 363 
CALLAHAN. DR. JAMES 64 
CALVIN. ROBERT 363 
CAMODECA. PETER 283 
CAMPBELL. GEORGE 268 
CAMPEOTTO. AUGUST 363 
CAMPEOTTO. DAVID 284. 363 
CAMPFIELD. MARY KATE 208, 209 
CANFIELD, CHARLES 109 
CANFIELD, SHARON 195 
CANAVONA, RONALD 268 
CANNON, JOHN 206 
CAPORUSSO, GUS 19 
CAPPELLINO. THOMAS 365 
CARAHER, FRANCES 195. 208, 287 
CARDELLO. JOSEPH 143 
CARELLI. PAUL 264 
CAREY, KATHLEEN 34, 314 
CAREY, MARTHA 77 
CAREY, PAT 175. 248. 249 
CARITA. SR. MARY. B.V.M. 95 
CARLO. ANNA 221 
CARLSEN. LAURENCE 289 
CARLSON. JAMES 282, 283 
CARLSON. ROBERT 363 
CARNDUFF. SGT. CONRAD 96 
CARNEY. JOSEPH 363 
CARNEY. ROBERT 55 
CARNEY. WILLIAM ROY 64 
CAROBUS. JOHN 235. 236 
CAROBUS, KENNETH 206, 363 
CAROLLO, JACK 145, 163, 206, 208. 

275 
CARPENTER, RICHARD 123 
CARR, MARY 200 
CARROLL, DENNIS 268 
CARROLL DENNIS J. 175 
CARROLL, EDWARD 141 
CARROLL, PATRICIA 176 
CARTER, JAMES 226, 364 
CARUSO, JEANETTE 200, 262, 263 
CARUSO, JOANNE 73, 200 
CASCIO, ANNE 263 
CASEBOLT, STEPHEN 364 
CASEY. DANIEL 248 
CASEY. GERALD 213 
CASEY. MADONNA 292 
CASEY. DR. PATRICK 94 
CASHMAN, FRANCIS 144 
CASSARETTO, DR. FRANK 92, 191 
CASSARETTO, GEMMA 207 
CASSIDY. MARY 155. 190, 224 
CATANIA, DR. FRANCIS J. 17, 97 
CAVANAUGH, DR. THOMAS 116 
CAVANAUGH, WILLIAM 94 
CAVENDER, MARILYNN 164. 364 
CELATA. FRANCIS 226, 289 
CERVENY, MARCIA 195 
CESNA, ELIZABETH 96 
CHALIFOUX, ROBERT JOSEPH 364 
CHAMBERLAIN, REV. HENRY 298 
CHAN, GABRIEL 364 
CHAVEZ, ROBERT 222 
CHEMAN, ALICE 194 
CHESNA, BARBARA 287 
CHIANELLI, CHARLES 175 
CHIARAMONTE, LAURIE 332 
CHIDEKEL, DR. SAMUEL 93 
CHIOSTRI, RANDY 282, 283 
CHONIS, CHRISTINE 145, 364 
CHORVAT, BARBARA 40, 262, 263 
CHOUKAS, DR. NICHOLAS 115 
CHRISTIAN, KENNETH 247 
CHWIERUT, SHARON 161, 164, 165, 

252, 253, 364 
CICHY, DAVID 224 
CIESLAK, LAURENCE 364 
CIHLAR, FRANK 171, 208 
CINCINELLI, RONALD 22 



428 



INDEX 



aPOLLA, VINCENT 275 

CIZEK, DOROTHY 260 

CIZON, DR. FRANCIS 100 

CLARE, JOHN 283 

COLLINS, ROSEMARY 365 

CLARK, DR. E. J. 94 

CLARKSON, RITA 94 

CLAUS, DR. ALBERT 98 

CLAVIN, MICHAEL 214 

CLAYES, DR. STANLEY 94 

CLEARY, EILEEN 177 

CLEGG, MICHAEL 183 

CLUNE, WILLIAM 19, 154 

COCHRAN, RICHARD 317 

COFFEY, REV. EDWARD 101 

COGGER, MARY FRANCES 22, 54, 55 

COLDEWEY. SUSAN 296 

COLEMAN, JAMES 316 

COLEY, LES 267 

COLLE, SUE 252 

COLLINS, FRANK 365 

COLLINS, H, RICHARD 109 

COLLINS, JOHN 163, 172, 222 

COLLINS, DR. THOMAS 154 

COMISKEY, JEAN 94 

COMO, JOANNE 365 

CONARTY, PAUL FRAN 159, 166, 

238 
CONE. FAIRFAX 30 
CONLEY, JOHN ARMSTRONG 271 
CONLEY, RAYMOND H. 76 
CONNAUGHTON, DANIEL 34, 306 
CONNELLY, JOHN 365 
CONNELL, ANNE 195 
CONNELL, WILLIAM 180 
CONNELLY, DR. GEORGE 97 
CONNELLY, JOHN 95 
CONNELLY, MICHAEL 163, 186, 270, 

271, 365 
CONNELLY, TIMOTHY 77 
CONNIFF, JAMES 210, 280 
CONNOLLY, COLEMAN 285 
CONRAD, CECILE 23, 159, 165, 167, 

238, 365, 401 
CONRADI, ROBERT 280, 283 
CONROYD, COLLEEN 208 
CONROYD, W. DANIEL 63 
CONSTABLE, ROBERT 31, 143, 181 
COOK, CATHERINE 94 
COOK, GAY 164, 201, 362 
COOK, KEITH 73, 248 
COOK, MARY 176, 332, 333 
COPPOCK, MARGARET 297 
CORBETT, EDWARD 106 
CORCORAN, MARY 161 
CORNS, ELIZABETH 210, 294 
CORR, MARY 254 
COSGROVE, JEANNE 219 
COSICK, DAN 283 
COUGHLIN, JOHN 120, 179, 222 
COWLES, PETER 264 
COX, DANIEL 284 
COX, JAMES C. 63, 82 
COX, MRS. JAMES 82 
COX, STEPHEN 163, 171, 174, 175, 

248, 249 
COYNE, ROBERT 180, 242 
CRANE, LYNN 207 
CRANE, PATRICIA 195 
CREED, WILLIAM 125, 180, 264, 291 
CREEDON, HUGH, S.J. 104 
CRISAFI, BARTEL 366 
CRJSHAM, THOMAS 125, 180, 242 
CHOKE, DANIEL 225 
CROKIN, JEROME 213 
CRONIN, PAUL 264, 366 
CRUMMY, JAMES 198 
CUDAHY, EDWARD 64 
CUDAHY, MICHAEL 64 
CULLEN, MARY LEE 157 
CULLINAN, MICHAEL 275 
CUMMINGS, WALTER J. 64 
CUMMINGS, WALTER J., JR, 64 
CUNNINGHAM, EDWARD 155, 190, 

206, 213, 259, 365 
CURRY, SHEILA 365 
CURTIN, MICHAEL 365 
CURYLO, PATRICIA 195 
CUSACK, THOMAS 246, 247 
CUSEK, RICHARD 109 
CUSICK, DAN 28 3 
CUTILLETTA, ANTHONY, 158, 365 
CVITKOVICH, JOAN 215, 295 
CZARNECKI. LAWRENCE 222, 366 

D 

DATTILLIO, JOHN 366 
DE PINTO, DON 329 
DACZYSZYN, MARTHA 333 
DAGGIT, ROBERT 220 
DAILEY, MICHAEL 329 
DALLE, MOLLE 295 
DALY, CAROLE 320, 323 
DALY, THOMAS 213 
DAMMANN, GORDON 318 
DANE, BARBARA 177, 252, 298 
DANNENHAUER, KAREN 296 
DARKINS, TOBY 282, 283 
DARLING, DIANE 158, 195, 208, 365 
DARNELL, GORDON 366 
DAUBACH, JAMES 264, 366 
DAVEY, PATRICK 329, 331 
DAVIDSON, DOUGLAS 330 
DAVIES, BARBARA 297 
DE BRUIN, GERARD 272 
DE FLORE, JOSEPH 366 
DE GENNAROW, PATRICK 367 
DE LEONARDIS, LOUIS 283 
DE MAEYER, THOMAS 330 



DE VITO, MARGARET 367 
DEL CARLO, PAUL 222 
DEL GIUDICE, ALEXANDER 183 
DEL MONICO. RALPH 222 
DELIA, JANET 232, 233, 367 
DENHAM, ROBERT 198 
DENTZER, FRANK 367 
DEPCIK, DENNIS 3.30 
DERESINSKI, STANLEY 283 
DERMA, DONALD 224 
DERNBACH, DENNIS 43, 73 
DESSIMOZ, MICHAEL 171, 186, 191, 

246, 247, 367 
DEVANE, JEROME ISO 
DEVITT, LARRY 247 
DEVITT, RICHARD 206 
DE VLIEGER, MARY 261, 367 
DI GIACOMO, MARILYN 207 
DI MASI, SUSAN 40 
DI MEO, ANTHONY 367 
DI PIETROPAOLO, CELEST 206 
DI SILVIO, DOMINICK 367 
DI STEFANO, LOLITA 368 
DI VITO. GINO 368 
DIDZEREKIS, PAUL 264 
DILGER, RONALD 213 
DILLON, DIANE 195 
DINGER, DENNIS 235 
DIOGUARDI, ALPHONSE 368 
DISCH, KENNETH 205 
DISPENSA, JEROME 368 
DITTRICH, JANICE 161, 164, 252, 

253, 368 
DIVYAK, SHARON 176, 332 
DODD. JOHN J., BRO. C.S.V. 199, 368 
DOHERTY, J. PATRICK 368 
DOHERTY, MAUREEN 22, 164, 187, 

253. 368 
DOHERTY, ROSEMARIE 177 
DOLAN, HARRY, JR. 247, 369 
DOLL, DENNIS 369 
DOMAN, MELISSA 19.3, 195, 257 
DOMES, ALEXANDRA 40, 187, 194, 

260, 261, 369 
DOMINICK. ELIZABETH 29, 369 
DONAHOE, MICHAEL 163, 166, 238, 

248 
DONAHUE, ANNE 155, 254, 255, 369 
DONAHUE, MICHAEL 213, 369 
DONLON, BERNADETTE 287 
DONN, SHARRYN 369 
DONOGHUE, JANE 296 
DOOLEY, DENNIS 204 
DOOLEY, MARIE 195, 208, 287 
DOOLING, MARY 184, 296 
DORETTI, MARIE 369 
DORN, JAMES 45, 240, 275 
DOWD. THOMAS 264, 265, 369 
DOWNS. JOHN 183. 291 
DRAB. STANLEY 325. 327 
DRASKI, GERALD 292. 293 
DRAZINE, MARGARET 294 
DRENNAN, DENIS 369 
DRISCOLL, JOHN 283 
DROZD, GERALD 325, 327 
DRUM, BARBARA 195, 332 
DUBSKY, ROBERT 259. 369 
DUDA. JUDITH 164. 195. 262, 263. 

369 
DUDA, SUSAN 262, 263 
DUDEK, JOANNE 195 
DUFFY, CAROL 209 
DU FON, JOHN 285, 370 
DUMARS, JOHN 370 
DUNAGAN, DAVID 222, 370 
DUNNE, RICHARD 166, 248, 370 
DUPRE, SUZANNE 31, 165, 171, 370 
DURKIN, THOMAS 247 
DUORCHAK, RICHARD 213 
DVORAK, KATHLEEN 200 
DWYER, lOHN 214, 370 
DW^'ER, MARGARET 181 
DYKLA, JOHN 198 



EAGLE, ROBERT 215 

EFFA, PEGGY 214, 298 

EGAN, JOHN 34, 216, 306, 314, 330 

EGAN, ROBERT 202, 204 

EGAN, WILLIAM 248, 249. 370 

EHEMANN. ALICE 332 

EHRMAN. DIANE 200 

EILER, MARGARET 158. 195. 370 

EISENMANN. JAMES 370 

ELIZABETH. SR. MARY 143 

ELVIKIS. DONNA 195 

ENGEL. EDWARD 83 

ENGEL, MARILYN 298 

ENGELMAN, HENRY 198 

ENGLAND, RONALD 370 

ENGLEHARDT. DR. GEORGE 94 

ENGLET, DR. JOSEPH 111 

ENNIS, CAROL ANN 20, 370 

ENRIGHT, JAMES 213 

ERDMAN. DIANE 210. 294 

ERDMANN, JAMES 291 

ERICKSON, MICHAEL 221 

ERICKSON, ROBERT EARL, C.S.V. 370 

ERWIN, JOSEPH 264 

EULENBERG, ALEXANDER 74 

EVANS, CHARLES 226 

EVANS, JAMES 179, 226 

EVANS, THOMAS 213, 371 

EVETT, REV. LESTER, S.J. 114, 222 



FABIAN, JIM 22 

FACCHINI, GERALD, JR. 371 



FAFORD, MARILYN 228, 297 
FAGAN, PETER 251 
FAHEY, REV. JOHN 101 
FAHEY, THOMAS 318 
FAHRENBACH, JOHN 186, 285 
FAHRENBACH, WILLIAM 202 
FALCO, FRANCIS M, OSM 371 
FALK, ROBERT 371 

FARRELL, MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH 72 
FARRELL, KATHLEEN 176, 371 
FARRELL, MARGARET 195 
FARRELL, VERY REV. WALTER, S.J. 

102 
FASANO, VICTOR 248 
FASHINGBAUER, ROBERT 371 
FAUST, ELIZABETH 22, 23. 195. 205, 

215, 235 
FEDOTA. MARK 200 
FEHRMAN. GARY 371 
FELHABER, THOMAS 372 
FELICE, REV. JOHN, S.J. 79 
FENTON, SUSAN 297 
FERKINHOFF, MRS. MARGARET 144 
FERMAN, ANDY 251 
FERNANDEZ, JESUS 105 
FERRINI, JAMES 243, 372 
FERRIS, CONSTANCE 80 
FESTLE, REV. JOHN. S.J. 93 
FIEDOR. DEE ON 254 
FIELDS. EVERETT 144 
FILAS, REV. FRANCIS, S.J. 101 
FINEGAN, DONALD 205 
FINKL, MARY 294 
FINLEY, LEO 179, 272, 273, 372 
FINNELL. MR. AND MRS. 

ELLSWORTH 72 
FINNELL. ROGER 214, 372 
FISCHER, REV. FRANKLIN, S.J. 62 
FISCHER, REV. MATTHIAS 101 
FISCHER, PAUL 248 
FISH, JULIANNA 30, 31, 41, 161, 164, 

165, 187, 252, 25.3, 372 
FISHER, JEROME 222 
FISHER, MRS. MARY 144 
FITZGERALD, DAVID 372 
FITZGERALD, EDWARD R. 248, 249 
FITZGERALD, FRANK 192 
FITZGERALD. JOHN C. 63 
FITZGERALD. JOHN M. 221 
FITZGERALD, THOMAS R. 247 
FITZPATRICK, EDWARD M., O.S.M. 

214 
FITZPATRICK, JOHN 178, 268, 269 
FLANAGAN, DR. JOHN 99 
FLEISCHFRESSER, ARLENE 191 
FLEMING, JUDY 219 
FLEMING, DR. RUBEN 140 
FLETCHER, JACKSON 119 
FLETCHER, JAMES 198, 204, 211 
FLINT. THOMAS 372 
FLYNN. JEREMIAH 82 
FLYNN, JOSEPH 268. 269 
FOCHTMAN, JOHN 372 
FOOTE, WILLIAM 179 
FORDE, KEVIN 243, 373 
FORKINS, J. 80, 123 
FORTMAN, KENNETH 373 
FOSSIER, RICHARD 284 
FOX, REV. ROBERT. S.J. 79. 101 
FOYS. RICHARD 239 
FRANCIS. JAMES 206. 373 
FRANCE, THOMAS 214, 375 
FRANKOVITCH, KARL 373 
FRANTONIUS, JOHN 285, 331 
FREBORG, THOMAS 259 
FREKO, SUZANNE 287, 294. 373 
FRICKE, ADELE 144 
FRIEBERG, CARTER 93 
FRIEND, EVE 287 
FRIGOLETTO. ROBERT 119, 373 
FRIZOL, DR. SYLVESTER 109 
FRONTEZAK, MARY 297 
FRUEHE, CHARLES 154, 182, 276, 373 
FRY, ALLEN 272, 273, 373 
FRYMARK, PAUL 373 
FULLER, REV. REGINALD 49 
FULLER, WARREN 259 
FURLONG, MICHAEL 373 
FLTRMANEK, SYLVESTER 222 



GABCIK, JOHN 306 
GABRIEL, LUCY' 300 
GAGIN, MAJ. JOHN 96 
GAGLIANO, DR. FRANK 95 
GALBO, SARAH 373 
GALLAGHER, JAMES 373 
GALLAGHER, JANET 208, 287 
GALLAGHER, JUUE 296 
GALLAGHER, DR. LIGEIA 94 
GALLAGHER, REV. RALPH, S.J. 140 
GALLAGHER. RITA 94 
GALLEGOS, CARM 106 
GALLUS, JOHN M. 374 
GALVANAUSKAS, LAWRENCE 213 
GALVIN, ROBERT W. 75 
GANEY, RAY'MOND P. 77 
GANNON, MAUREEN 19 
GANTZ, EMMETT 329 
GARDINER, WILLIAM 41, 166, 282, 

283, 374 
GARDNER, JAMES 247 
GARGAN, DR. EDWARD 95 
GARGIULO, DR. ANTHONY 115, 117 
GARNELLO. ANNETTE 138. 176 
GARRETT. EDWARD 275 
GARTMAN, CAPT. FRANK 96, 229 
GARVEY, DENNIS 217. 284, 331 
GARVEY, J. KEVIN 374 



429 



PHOTC 



GARVEY, MICHAEL 205 

GASPERS. JOHN 374 

GATES, DENNIS 178 

GATHMAN, JAMES 285, 374 

GAUGHAN, IREENE 296 

GAUTHIER, ROBERT 374 

GAVIN, DONALD 243 

GAY, THOMAS 178 

GEARY, CATHERINE 100, 221 

GEBHARDT, GERALD 213 

GEDDO, FRANCES 161 

GEHRIG, CLYDE 143 

GEIGER, CHARLES 374 

GEIMER, ROGER 94 

GELINAS. EMIL 179, 222, 272, 374 

GENELLY, SHARON 194, 353 

GEORGEN, GERALD 179, 222, 374 

GEORGES, DR. JOEL 95 

GERDING, JOHN 73, 163, 186 

GERHARD, REINERT 119 

GERST, REV. FRANCIS, S.J. 95 

GERWE, DAVID 143 

GETZ, ROBERT 280 

GIACHERIO, JOSEPH 183 

GIBBONS, JOHN 374 

GIBBONS, MICHAEL 247 

GIBBONS, WILLIAM 76 

GIEREN, MARY 176, 228 

GILL, WINIFRED 195 

GILLIES, FREDERICK 64 

GILLIGAN, ANNE 164, 171, 177, 287, 

374 
GILLMORE, MONICA 40, 195, 263, 

374 
GILMORE, MARY ANN 194 
GILMOUR, PETER 292 
GILMOUR, STEPHEN 30, 154, 158, 

214, 375 
GINEMAN, AUDREY 165, 194, 214, 

292. 298, 375 
GINNAN, EDWARD 283 
GIRMSCHEID, GERALDINE 375 
GIRZADAS, DANIEL 375 
GIUFFRE, LT. COL. MATTHEW, R.J. 

96, 206, 207 
GIUSTI, MARLENE 255 
GLASER, MARY 295 
GLASS, BETTY' ANN 298, 300 
GLATZ, JOHN 200 
GLOWAKI, RICHARD 285 
GLUNZ, EDWIN 182 
GNADINSKl, JOHN 375 
GNIADEK, RONALD 156, 375 
GOGGINS, ANN 241 
GOGLIN, JUDITH 375 
GOLDEN, JUDITH 294 
GOLEC, JOANNE 255, 300 
GONCHER, JOHN 268 
GONDECK, MARCIA 2 37, 294 
GONGOL, BARBARA 42, 375 
GONSIOR, ELAINE 194, 255 
GOODMAN. EVAN 251 
GOODRICH. MARTHA 161 
GORDON, ROBERT 331 
GORDON. ROBERT W. 251 
GORGONE, JOHN 220 
GORMAN, TERRENCE 376 
GORMAN, DR. THOMAS 94 
GOVERNILE, GERALD 155, 156, 376 
GOZE, KENNETH 191, 283 
GRACE, HELEN 161, 171 
GRACYK, NANCY 40, 195 
GRAMS, SUSAN 218 
GRANT, REV. GERARD, S.J. 97, 218 
GRECO, MIKE 284 
GREEN. CATHERINE 205. 295 
GREEN. JAMES 376 
GREEN, ROBERT 251 
GREENSTEIN. CHARLES 319 
GRESKIEWICZ, JOSEPH 106 
GREVER, JOSEPH 320, 323 
GRIFFARD, JOHN 376 
GRIFFIN, LORRAINE 298 
GRIPPANDO. JANICE 232, 376 
GRISWOLD, LYNDA 287 
GROEBER, MARY 298, 300 
GROLLIG, REV. FRANCIS. S.J. 95 
GRUBER. RICHARD 95 
GRYGIENE. DIANE 195 
GUCCIONE, JULIUS 272, 273, 376 
GUERRA, THOMAS 7 3, 376 
GUIHEEN, TIMOTHY 248, 249 
GUILBAULT, JOSEPH 65 
GUST, JAMES 206 
GUTSCHICK, FRANCES 158 
GUZIOR, ANNETTE 297 
GUZIK, JAMES 376 
GYSLYS, MARIA 117 

H 

HAAS. DAVID 118 
HACKETT. JAMES 377 
BAFFLER. MONICA 76. 161 
HAIDACHER. MARY ANNE 297 
HALLE. EDWARD 199. 377 
HALLETT. THOMAS 329 
HALLIHAN. DICK 106 
BALLING. GAIL 150 
BALLORAN. JAMES 237 
BAMILTON. GAIL 95 
BAMMOND. RONALD 377 
BANLEY, DONALD 171 
BANN, FRANK 222, 377 
BANNAH, MARY 297 
BANNAN, JOBN 78 
BANRAHAN, MARY 214 
HANSEN, FARREOL 377 
BANSEN, WILLIAM 274, 275 



HARKNESS, JERALD 34, 167, 183, 

216, 306, 310, 314, 377 
HARPER, MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM 

72 
HARRIS. BRUCE 251 
HARRIS, CATHERINE 143 
HARRIS, DONALD 377 
HARRIS, RUBY 377 
HARTNETT. MARGARET 40 
HARTNETT, RAYMOND 377 
HARTNETT, REV. ROBERT, S.J. 98, 

292 
HARTY, MARTIN 377 
HARTZER, RONALD 377 
HARVEY, MARY ANN 165, 184, 253 
BARWAS, DOLORES 377 
BAUSAM, TBOMAS 329 
HAVERTY, SHEILA 287 
HAWKINS, KATHLEEN 161 
HAWKINS, THOMAS 270, 271, 378 
HAYDEN, DAVID 378 
BAYDEN, PATRICIA 378 
BAYES, ALICE 97 
HAYES, BARBARA 176 
HAYES, REV. J. DONALD. S.J. 79. 97. 

212. 301 
HAYES. JOHN C. 63, 122 
HAYES, MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH 72 
HAZLETT, MARY JO 298, 300 
HEANY, PATRICIA 214, 298 
HEATH, JAMES 220, 378 
HECHT, REV. TORRENS, S.J. 97 
HEFFRON, PEARL 100 
HEILMAN, DR. ANN 99 
BEIMBACH. GEORGE 267. 378 
HENDERSON, JOHN 268, 269 
HENDERSON, REV. LAURENCE, S.J. 

62, 93, 106 
HENDRICKS, SUE 242 
HENES. JAMES 378 
HENNER. JOANN 22, 23, 55 
HENNESSEY. CHARLOTTE 143 
HENNIG. KENNETH 98 
HENNING. BARRETT 280. 281 
HENNING. CHRISTIAN 163. 208. 209 
HENNING, JOBN 275 
HERBSTHOFER, EVA 228 
HERMANN, URBAN 222. 378 
HERR, REV. VINCENT, S.J. 99 
HERR, WILLIAM 183 
HERSBINOW, HELEN 136, 165, 171, 

177, 235 
BERVER, DAN 259 
BETRICK, PATRICK 246 
BICKEY, MATTHEW 65 
HILL, GEORGE 319, 378 
HILL, MARY 86 
HILLENBRAND, BARRY 234 
HILLENBRAND, DENNIS 163, 179, 

222 
HILLIARD, JAMES 180 
HINES, CHARLES 65 
BINDERSCBEID, MARY 297 
BINMAN. LAWRENCE MICHAEL 204 
HIPPLER. MARGARET 254 
HIRTZEL. MARI 91 
HISIOKA. DR. KENICBI 92 
HOFFENKAMP. JOHN 378 
BOFFER. DR. ABRAHAM 98 
HOFFMAN. HOWARD 251 
HOFFMAN. JUDITB 147 
BOFMEISTER. ROBERT 198 
HOGAN. BECKY 378 
HOGAN, FRANK 76 
HOGAN, GEORGE 267. 378 
HOGAN. MAUREEN 195. 287 
HOHENWALD. ERIC 272, 273 
HOLLEY, WILBUR 268 
HOLZER, TBERESE 214, 292, 298, 378 
BONDRAS, REV. JOHN 49 
BOOD. MARION 268. 269 
HOPKINSON. VIRGINIA 332 
HORAN. DENNIS 180 
HORNING. EDWINA 195 
HOSKINS. THOMAS 259 
HOUSTON, DAVID 222, 272, 273 
HOWARD, VINCENT 95 
HOWE, SHIRLEY MAE 180 
HOWLETT, MARY 287 
HOY. PATRICK 65 
BUBANKS. JOBN 267 
HUBER. DANIEL 379 
HUDSON, JOHN 92, 230 
HUEBNER, ROBERT 230 
HRINDA, JOHN 178 
HULLINGER. EDWARD 219, 293 
HUMMERT, DR. PAUL 94, 157 
HUNT, BARBARA 379 
HUNT, JOHN 379 
HUNTER, LESLIE 34, 35, 216, 306 
HURLEY, MARY 139, 252, 379 
HURLEY, PETER 285 
HURM, RAYMOND 178, 268, 269 
HURTUBISE, REV. MARK, S.J. 79, 101 
KUSEK, ED 183 
HUSTON. DR. JOHN 92 
HUYGHEBAERT. MARILYN 210. 215 

I 

lAFRATE. JOBN 379 
ILKIW. ALEXANDRA 194. 254 
IMLAY, MARY ELLEN 252. 398 
INDA. ART 190, 258, 259 
INSULL, SAMUEL, JR. 65 
IRELAND, GEORGE 304. 306 
IRELAND, MRS. GEORGE 304 
IRELAND, KATBY 34, 314 
ISAACS, BERT 251 
ISB, LUCILLE 144 



IVERSON, LEONARD 106, 401 
IVINS, JUDITB 40, 255 

J 

JACOBS, CBARLENE 195 
JACOBSEN, REV. JEROME, S.J. 95, 

146 
JACOBSON, EVERETT 283 
JABNKE, PATRICIA 161, 287, 379 
JANCAUSKAS, REV. RAYMOND, S.J. 

Ill 
JANCO, MARY 208 
JANDA, ANN 96 
JANOTTA, JAMES 30, 178, 379 
JARABAK, BARBARA 289 
JARABAK, DR. JOSEPH 115 
JARECKI, RAYMOND 246, 247 
JARZEMBOWSKI, MARTIN 280 
JASELSKIS, DR. BRUNO 92 
JASKOSKI, DR. BENEDICT 92 
JASKULSKI, JOYCE 263 
JASZCZAK, EDWIN 285 
JAVOR, BERNADETTE 195, 210 
JEFFRY, GERALD 222, 379 
JENKINS, ALEXANDER 380 
JENKINS, CHARLES 230 
JENKINSON, DIANE 165, 195, 208, 

209, 287 
JENNINGS, JOHN 219 
JENSEN, HENRY 222, 380 
JESS, LEE 179 
JOGLEKAR, ANJANA 117 
JOHNSON. EARL 306 
JOHNSON, THOMAS 380 
JONES, DAVID 248 
JONES, DAVID E. 380 
JONES, JUNEMARY 195, 201, 221 
JONES, OWEN BARTON 65 
JONES, MRS. WINIFRED 144 
JOYCE, ROBERT E. 65, 75 
JOZWIAK, JOHN 108, 110, 156 
JUDGE, CHARLES 272 
JUDY, KENNETH 267 
JULIAN, VICTORIA 292, 300 
JUNG, CONSTANCE 262, 263 
JUNG, JOHN 380 
JURASZEWSKI, FLORENCE 210 
JURCZAK, DENNIS 267 
JUSKIEWICZ, BARBARA 171, 173, 254 
JUSTMAN, HYMAN 380 



KACZALA, STANLEY 380 

KACZOR, DONALD 319 

KAISER, DENNIS 275 

KAISER, DR. LEO 93 

KALATA, MARY ANN 380 

KALETA, ED 380 

KALETA, KENNETB 285 

KAMIN, MARILYN 143 

KAMP, SUSAN 205 

KANE, SR. EH3LORES 161 

KANE, ELLEN 198 

KAOPPLINGER. MARJORIE 161 

KAPETANOVIC, MARY KAY 44, 294 

KAPLAN, ALAN 43, 44 

KARASH. HELEN 195 

KARCZMAR, DR. ALEXANDER 132 

KARELS, THOMAS 320, 322, 323 

KARLAK, JEROME 214 

KAROS, CONNIE 195 

KATTNER, MARY 381 

KATTNER, SANDRA 135, 139 

KAUFFMANN, KARL 143 

KAUFMAN. MURIEL 161 

KAUSS, THEODORE 381 

KAZMERSKI, DENNIS 219 

KEANE, JOSEPH 272, 273 

KEARN, GEORGE 230 

KEARNEY, JOSEPH S. 77 

KEARNEY. MARY JANE 94 

KEATING, ARTHUR 65 

KECALA, BOBDAN 206 

KEEFE, LAWRENCE 224, 259 

KEELEY, DR. JOHN 77 

KEELEY, MARTIN 143 

KEELING, MICHAEL 381 

KEENAN, ROBERT 77 

KEENLEY, CHARLES 381 

KELEHER, JOBN 106 

KELLER, RICHARD 154 

KELLER, VIRGINIA 161 

KELLY, BERNARD 217 

KELLY, DIANE 137, 241, 381, 401 

KELLY, JAMES 276, 277 

KELLY, JOHN 106 

KELLY, JOBN J. 381 

KELLY, JOBN PATRICK 246, 247 

KELLY, JOHN THOMAS 182, 381 

KELLY, MICHAEL 23 

KELLY, THOMAS 381 

KELLY, REV. VINCENT, S. J. 97 

KELSTADT, CHARLES 65, 75 

KEMP, REV. JOHN, S. J. 95, 154 

KEMME, THOMAS 94 

KENEALY, KATHLEEN 125 

KENEALY, REV. WILLIAM, S. J. 123 

KENNEDY, ELEANOR 82 

KENNEDY, KAEL 157, 198, 381 

KENNEDY, DR. THOMAS 99, 147 

KENT, MARY 29, 184, 260, 296, 381 

KEOGB, KATBLEEN 381 

KEPNER, ROBERT 206 

KERNER, GOV. OTTO J. II 

KERR, WILLIAM 271 

KERRIGAN, NANCY 252, 298 

KERWIN, CBARLES C. 64, 75 

KETT, PATRICIA 195 



430 



INDEX 



KHAZEN, KAMAAL 20, 275 
KILEY, MARYLOU 287 
KILGALLON, REV. JAMES 49 
KILLACKY, KEITH 247 
KILLEAN, JOYCE 268, 269 
KILLOREN, LESLIE 382 
KIMMICH. REV. PAUL, O. F. M. 94 
KING, IMOGENE 134, 161 
KING, SHARON LEE 195 
KINSELLA, DENNIS 382 
KINIERY, GLADYS 63, 134, 161, 164 
KINIERY, DR. PAUL 97 
KIRK, KATHLEEN 382 
KIRKLAND, WEYMOUTH 65 
KIRKLOVE, NANCY 210 
KISHA, LAURENCE 283 
KISSANE, MEL 382 
KLARICH. JOHN 382 
KLEIN, KENNETH 217 
KLEINGALL, BERNICE 161 
KLEMM, JOSEPH 206 
KLENDA, MARTIN 267, 382 
KLICKMAN, NANCY 157, 198 
KLOC, DANIEL 382 
KLODZINSKI, JOSEPH 163, 199, 206, 

213, 224, 258, 259 
KLONOWSKI, JOAN 158 
KLOSTERMAN, HOWARD 382 
KLOVSTAD, ROBERTA 83 
KLUBE, JOHN 191 
KMIOTEK, DOROTHY 195 
KNEAFSEY, JOHN 125 
KNES, CAROL 205, 298 
KNOBLOCH, ROBERT 191, 317 
KNYCH, EDWARD 275 
KOEHLER, RONALD 321, 323 
KOHN, LOUIS A. 74 
KOLANOWSKI, STEVEN 382 
KOLEK, ROBERT 45, 248 
KOLLE, SUSAN 205 
KOLLINTZAS, GEORGE 39, 81 
KOLOVICH, JOHN 317, 324 
KOLTON, MARIL\'N 195 
KOLTON, SHARON 195 
KONAUKA, JANINE 200 
KONDOLEON, THEODORE 97 
KONICEK, FRANK 382 
KOPP, JAMES 284, 382 
KOPROWSKI, ELAINE 100, 198 
KOPYDLOWSKJ, KEN 106 
KORBAKIS, JOHN 289 
KORCHINSKI, VERN 106 
KORNAK, RON 382 
KORSHAK, SIDNEY R. 65 
KOSEK, RICHARD 154, 383 
KOSINSKI, ANTOINETTE 22 
KOSLOV, DR. MARTIN 118 
KOT, SHARON 262, 263 
KOTT, DAN 383 
KOTZMAN, JOSEPH 383 
KOURVETARJS, GEORGE 383 
KOVAC, MARY 161 
KOWALCZYK, FLORENCE 296 
KOZAN, RONALD 383 
KOZLOWSKI, DENNIS 248 
KOZLOWICZ, JOHN 383 
KRAJEWSKl, DR. JOSEPH 117 
KRAMER, JAY 271 
KRAUS, ROBERT 285 
KRAWIEC, JAN 383 
KRESAK, GEORGE 383 
KRIPPNER, ALLAN 384 
KRITIKOS, ALEX 384 
KROL, DR. ARTHUR 115, 119 
KROL, EDWINA 32, 33, 164, 214, 291, 

296 
KROZEL, JANICE 298 
KRUCKER, PAUL 305, 306 
KUBASH, NORMA 161 
KUBIAK, SUE ELLEN 184, 296 
KUHN, JOHN OSM 384 
KUHNS, JERRY 292 
KULA, FELICIA 224 
KULAS, DR. JAMES 94 
KULIS, JOSEPH 384 
KULLA, MARILYN 296 
KUNTZMAN, EDWARD 204, 211, 235, 

236 
KURTZ, CURTIS 268 
KUSEK, RICHARD 80 
KUSMIDER, DIANE 297 
KUSMIREK, BONITA 229 
KUT, LEONARD 384 
KUTA, VIRGINIA 92 
KUTAS, ALICE 40, 254 
KUTZA, MICHAEL 42, 43 
KWASEK, JAMES 222, 272, 273 
KWASNIEWSKI, PATRJCIA 195 



LA GIGLIA, LOUIS 190, 259 

LA PLANTE, LUCILLE 195, 385 

LA PLANTE, NELSON 97 

LACKLAND THEODORE 214 

LALA, ANTHONY 94 

LAMAS, JOSE 198 

LAMB, TERESA 145 

LAMPING, J. DENNIS 89 

LAMPING, ROBERT 384 

LANDA, RONALD 384 

LANDT, ALLAN 284 

LANE, MARTIN 206, 207, 219, 237 

LANG, GEORGE 186, 214 

LANG, RICHARD 282, 283 

LANIGAN, THOMAS 329 

LANSER, JUDITH 385 

LAOS, WALTER 385 

LAPPIN, ROBERT 329 



LARKE, BETTY 332 

LARKIN, FRANCIS 283 

LARNEY, DOROTHY 93 

LARSEN, MARGARET 195, 287 

LARSEN, VIVIAN 143 

LARSON, JAMES 329 

LASKOWSKI, SANDY 19 

LASKY, NORBERT 247 

LASTUVKA, BOHUMIL 385 

LAUGHLIN, GEORGE 271 

LAUZON, RITA 385 

LAVELLE, MICHAEL 267 

LAVIZZO, THEOPHILE 144 

LAWLOR, FRANK 319 

LAWSON, MICHAEL 280, 385 

LE BLANC MARIETTE 80, 81, 164 

LE CONEY, MICHAEL 219 

LE MIRE, GEORGE 318, 385 

LE SAINT, REV. WILLIAM, S.J. 102 

LEAHY, ANDREW 264. 265, 385 

LEAHY, CATHERINE 161 

LEAHY, MICHAEL 200, 215, 232, 233 

LEGET, JOHN 385 

LEIBMAN, MORRIS I. 74 

LEISNER, ELIZABETH 385 

LEISTEN, ARTHUR 385 

LEISTEN, WILLIAM 190 

LEMKEY, DR. NAOMI 92 

LEMLEY, BARBARA 139, 252, 385 

LENNON, JOHN 100 

LENTZ, ROBERT 386 

LENTZ, RONALD 224 

LENZ, ROBERTA 40, 187, 260, 261 

LEONARD, ARTHUR 65 

LEPTICH, THERESA 194, 214 

LEUER, CAROLE 262, 263 

LEWANDOWSKI, MARILYN 292, 

298, 386 
LEWIS, CYNTHIA 294 
LEWIS, MRS. FRANK J. 66, 75 
LEWIS, JACK 30 
LEWIS, JOHN 180 
LEYDEN, MICHAEL 180 
LIAUGMINAS, DR. ALBIN 96 
LIBMAN, SAMUEL 251 
LIEBERMAN, JACK 251 
LIEFSON, DR. EINAR 129 
LIETZ, DR. PAUL 95 
LILJEQUIST, JON 386 
LIM, DR. EDWARD 92 
LINK, MARILYN 17 

LINSKEY, ANN 386 

LIPINSKI, THADDEUS 319 

LIPPE, ERNEST 386 

LIPUT, JOYCE 287, 295 

LISCARZ, JOAN 40, 260, 261 

LISSAK, DENNIS 154, 386 

LIST, STUART 30 

LIULEVICIUS, AUKSE 219, 386 

LLOYD, SEC. ROBERT 96 

LO BUE, WAYNE 384 

LOCKWOOD, CHESTER 73, 216 

LODA, TERESA 298, 300 

LOFENDO, PETER 386 

LOFKY, JAMES 222 

LOFTHOUSE, JUDITH 287 

LOFTUS, REV. JOSEPH, S.J. 97, 113 

LOFTUS, KATHLEEN 161, 165, 176, 
252, 386 

LOMBARD, DR. CHARLES 96 

LOMBARDO, ISABEL 21 

LONG, EILEEN 252 

LONG, JAMES 386 

LONGO, ANDREA 228, 298, 300 

LOSACCO, FLORA 96 

LOSINSKI, BARBARA 161 

LOWE, CURTIS 200, 215 

LUBACK, PENNY 158, 202, 204, 292 

LUBANOWSKI, ALLEN 230 

LUBERDA, ANDREW 275 

LUBERTOZZI LAWRENCE 143 

LUCEK, LORETTA 292 

LUETKEMEYER, PATRICIA 237, 333 

LUKACEVICH, ROSEMARY 158 

LUKOWITZ, ALBERTA 253, 386 

LUND, ROBERT 230, 275 

LUNDGREN, ANN 194 

LUNDING, FRANKLIN J. 30 

LUTYNSKI, ADAM 22, 171 

LUTZ, FRED 106 

LUZWICK, ANNE 215 

LYDON, ROBERT 276 

LYNCH, JACK 106 

LYNCH, JAMES 387 

LYNCH, MARY ANNE 208, 287 

LYNCH, MICHAEL 163, 167, 174, 
186, 248, 387 

LYNN, JERRY 305 

LYNOTT, JAMES 222 

LYONS, MAURICE 143 

LYONS, THOMAS 259, 387 

M 

MABEY, MARIE 205, 298, 300 
MAC CARTHY CHARLES 387 
MACALUSO, DONALD 268, 269 
MAC DONALD, GEORGE 191 
MACEK, ARLENE 195, 255, 387 
MACK, CAROLYN 195 
MACKEN, CATHERINE 40, 194, 260 
MACKENZIE, REV. JOHN 95 
MACKINAC, DONALD 387 
MADAY, RICHARD 246, 247 
MADDA, DR. CARL 77 
MADEJA, ROSEMARY 195 
MADSEN, WILLIAM 214 
MADURA. RICHARD 222, 387 



MAES, PAUL 221 
MAEYER, MAE 161 
MAGGIO, JOSEPH 183 
MAGUIRE, VERY REV. JAMES, S.J. 

18, 27, 30, 31, 57, 60, 62, 63, 163 
MAGUIRE, TERRANCE 330 
MAHALAK, EMMY LOU 195, 287 

294, 295 
MAHER, REV. EDWARD. S.J. 101 
MAHONEY. PAUL 266, 267 
MAHONEY, THOMAS 125, 214. 243, 

264, 388 
MAHONEY, RONALD 388 
MAIER, DR. RICHARD 99 
MAIER, RUDY 267, 387 
MAJKA, JANICE 252, 253 
MAJRZAK, ROBERT H. 388 
MAKOWSKI TERESE 287, 298 
MAKSYM, RONALD 180, 264, 388 
MALECHA, SPENCER 284 
MALECKI, DR. HENRY 93 
MALIN, ELLEN 295, 388 
MALKIEWICZ, ED 106 
MALLOY, REV. JOHN, S.J. 78 
MALONE, MARGARET 253, 388 
MANAK, JOSEPH 100 
MANDARINO, FRANK 248 
MANDERFELD, CAROLINE 161, 388 
MANELLA, MARGARET 143 
MANGIONE, SALVATORE 200 
MANION, DENNIS 259 
MANN, EDWARD 163, 224, 388 
MANNARD, THOMAS 389 
MANNING, DENNIS 222 
MANNING, PATRICK 198 
MANZKE, EDWARD 316 
MANZKE, MARY 83 
MARANTO, FRANK 206 
MARCET, THOMAS 174, 175, 248, 249 
MARDESICH, MATTHEW 272, 273 
MARIELLA, DR. RAYMOND 92 
MARKEY, THOMAS 316 
MARLIN, DONNA 82 
MAROSITS, MARY 201 
MARQUETTE, JOHN 23 
MARR, THOMAS 230 
MARRA, JAMES 259 
MARSH, DANIEL 213 
MARSICO, FRANK 183 
MARSKI, JACQUELINE 44 
MARTENS, LESLIE 389 
MARTIN, JOHN 186 
MARTIN, LYNN 296 
MARTIN, STEPHEN 222, 389 
MARTIN, C. VIRGIL 30 
MARTIN, REV. LEO, S.J. 97 
MARTINELLI. DAVID 275 
MARZ. PATRICIA 182 
MARZULLO. THOMAS 389 
MASEK, JAMES 159, 235 
MASLANKA, DR, STANISLAW 129 
MASON, BARNEY 183 
MASSI, FRANK 389 
MASTRO, DONALD 259 
MATAYA, ROBERT 46, 285 
MATEGRANO, ALBERT 222 
MATEJA, CHESTER 268 
MATOUSEK, DR. GEORGE 115 
MATRE, DR. RICHARD 
MATUGA, ANDREW 389 
MATULIS, ALBERTA 201 
MATULIS, THOMAS 317 
MATUSIK, STANLEY 17 
MATUSZEK, PATRJCIA 389 
MAUSOLF, FRED 275 
MAY, EDWIN 389 
MAYE, DR. RAYMOND 111 
MAY, MARGARET 228 
MAYER, MARTIN 190, 284 
MAYO, DR. SAMUEL 93 
MAZEIKA. MARIA 298 
MAZZARELLA. LARRY 266, 267 
MAZZULLA, RICHARD 280, 281, 389 
MC ALEESE, PATRICIA 138 
MC ARDLE, SHARON 36, 297 
MC ARDLE, WILLIAM 224 
MC BRIDE, BRO. JEROME E. 192 
MC CABE, JAMES 389 
MC CAFFERY, JOHN 65, 276 
MC CANN, ELIZABETH 63, 83 
MC CANN, MARY FRANCES 161 
MC CARTHY, BARRY 282, 283 
MC CARTHY, CHARLES 178, 267 
MC CARTHY, GERALD 389 
MC CARTHY JACK 241, 248 
MC CARTHY, MR. & MRS. JOHN 

92 
MC CARTHY, MARGUERITE 40, 195, 

205, 332, 333 
MC CARTHY, MAURICE 31, 125, 154, 

180, 243, 264, 389 
MC CARTHY, MRS. MAURICE 72 
MC CARTHY MICHAEL 329 
MC CAULEY LAWRENCE B 22, 291 
MC CLEAN, GRAHAM 328 
MC CLEARY. REV. L.L., CSV 109 
MC CLOSKEY, HARRY 63, 80, 81 
MC CLOSKEY, RICHARD 282, 283 
MC CLUGGAGE, DR. ROBERT 95 
MC COY, DR. CHARLES 92 
MC CULLOUGH, JOSEPH HI 
MC DARRAH. VALERIE 390 
MC DERMOTT, MARGARET 177 
MC DONALD, MARGARET 298 
MC DONALD, RONALD 390 
MC DONALD, SUSAN 29, 260, 261, 

390 
MC DONNELL, DENNIS 331 



431 



PHOTO 



MC DONNELL, BRIAN 246. 247 
MC DONNELL, JOHN 390 
MC DONNELL, WAYNE 390 
MC DONOUGH, MR. & MRS. 

NORBERT 18 
MC ENERY, PAUL 178 
MC EVOY JOHN. S.J. 62 
MC GINNES. LISABETH 210 
MC GINNESS, MR. & MRS. J. ARTHER 

72 
MC GINNIS, THOMAS 247 
MC GINTY'. JIM 106 
MC GLYNN RICHARD 235, 239 
MC GOORTV'. JOHN 74 
MC GOWAN. THOMAS 222, 390 
MC GRADY. PATRICIA 81. 193 
MC GRATH. MRS. MARY 82 
MC GRATH. MAUREEN 390 
MC GRAW, MICHAEL 150 
MC GUILL. JOSEPH 222, 390 
MC HUGH, ALICE 161, 390 
MC HUGH, EDWARD 390 
MC INERNEY, ALLEN 275 
MC INERNEY, JOHN 94 
MC KENNA, DENNIS 306 
MC KINNON, LOIS 185, 294 
MC LAUGHLIN, RICHARD 390 
MC LAUGHLIN, THOMAS 390 
MC MAHON. JAY 222, 391 
MC MAHON, MAUREEN 137, 253, 391 
MC MANAMON, JOHN 208 
MC MANMON, CHARLES 391 
MC NAMARA, EDWARD 106 
MC NAMARA, GEORGIA 40, 253 
MC NAMARA, PATRICK 285 
MC NAMARA, SHARON 195 
MC NULTY, EILEEN 287, 391 
MC PARTLIN. MARY LOU 145. 164 
MC PIKE. PAMELA 391 
MC QUADE. DANIEL 330 
MC WALTER JOHN 285, 329 
MEANY, MARY LOU 391 
MECHTENBERG, REV. THOMAS J. 

143 
MEJDRICH. JERRY 391 
MEKUS. SHARYN 185, 294 
MELCHIOR, DR. NORTON 131 
MELCHIORS. DR. JOHN 98 
MELODY. MARTIN 19 
MELVIN. JACQUELINE 200 
MENEZ, DR. JOSEPH 98 
MENZ. HARRY' 106 
MERKLE. DOROTHY 177. 391 
MERRION. JOSEPH 65. 75 
MERTZ. REV. JAMES. S.J. 18. 93 
MEYER. ALBERT CARDINAL 26 
MEYER. DONALD 111 
MEYER. JOHN 392 
MEYER. DR. ROBERT 109. 110 
MEYER. ROBERT 213 
MICHALAK, THOMAS .392 
MICHER. MARY ANN 161 
MICKEVICIUS. MRS. EVELYN 96 
MIDDLETON. SUSAN 253 
MIEDZIANOWSKI. BARBARA 392 
MIEZIO. DONALD 392 
MIGALA. JAMES 178. 268, 269 
MILES, ROBERT 241 
MILLER, BARBARA 333 
MILLER, BONNIE 20 
MILLER, BURTON 119, 120 
MILLER, DAVID 392 
MILLER, DONALD 119, 120, 289 
MILLER, HOWARD 264, 392 
MILLER, MARY 41, 296 
MILLER, MARY RITA 253 
MILLER, PATRICIA 176, 177, 205, 332 
MILLER, RONALD 34, 306, 314 
MILLS, JOAN 194, 332 
MINDOCK, ROSE MARIE 205, 295 
MINEHAN, SGT. EDWARD 96, 229 
MINNICE, DENNIS 192 
MIROBALLI, DANIEL 392 
MISALUNAS. JOSEPH 267 
MISIUNAS. ROMUALD 82 
MISULONAS. JOSEPH 392 
MITCHELLS. DOROTHY 230 
MITTEN, PATRICK 317, 324 
MIYAJI, RICHARD 393 
MIZUTOWICZ, MARION 262, 263 
MOAG, REV. ROGER 393 
MOBERLY. JUDY 22 
MOCARSKI. PAMELA 29. 40. 260. 

261, .393 
MOGILNITSKY, DR. THEODOSI 110 
MOLL, ROBERT 275 
MOLLE, EILEEN 215 
MOLLSEN, CLIFFORD 222 
MOLNAR. DAVID 106 
MOLONEY. JEAN 278 
MOLONEY. THOMAS 259 
MONACO, REV. MARCELLUS 101 
MONAHAN, HUGH 106 
MONTAGUE, REV. MICHAEL. S.J. 102 
MONTE. JOSEPH 222 
MONTELEONE, ANGELO 393 
MONTGOMERY, EDWARD 31, 118, 

393 
MOONEY, JAMES 317 
MOORE, CARL 240, 275 
MOORE. DR. CARL 92 
MOORE. MARY ANN 263 
MOORE. PHILIP 97 
MOORMAN. JAMES 393 
MORAN, MARY SUE 393 
MORAN, WILLIAM 264, 393 
MORAVCIK, GEORGE 248 
MORELLI, FEDELLE 393 



MORITZ, TERRY 270, 271 
MORRIS, JOHN 248 
MORRIS, RUTH 119 
MORRIS, STET 100, 197 
MORRISSEY, ANNE 195, 221, 287 
MORRISSEY, JOHN 330 
MORRISSY, RAYMOND 284 
MORTARA, RICHARD 393 
MORTELL, THOMAS 191 
MOUGHAMIAN, DR. HENRY 93 
MOWATT. OSWALD 393 
MRAZEK. CYNTHIA 210, 241, 393 
MROCZEK, PATRICIA 165, 193, 195, 

287 
MROZEK, EDWIN 191, 275 
MULCAHY. MARY 253, .394 
MULLENIX. NANCY 193, 194 
MULLER, RICHARD 158, 214, 394 
MULLIGAN, REV. ROBERT, S.J. 31. 

62, 63 
MULLIN, REV. JOHN. S.J. 101 
MULQUEENEY, EILEEN 176, 177, 332 
MULVIHILL, DANIEL .394 
MUNDY, DR. PAUL 100 
MUNO. MARIANNE 161, .394 
MURANS, DR. FRANCIS 110 
MURDOCK, CHARLES 30, 124, 154, 

201, 243, 264, 394 
MURPHY, BOB 106 
MURPHY, COL. CHARLES 31 
MURPHY, EDMUND 191 
MURPHY. ELIZABETH 93 
MURPHY. HAROLD 94, 282, 283 
MURPHY, JOSEPH 65 
MURPHY, MARY 95 
MURPHY, SGT. MORGAN 96 
MURPHY, PATRICIA 294 
MURPHY, RICHARD 394 
MURPHY, THOMAS E 394 
MURRAY, ANTHONY 394 
MURRAY, REV. THOMAS. S.J. 25, 79 
MURTHA, WILLIAM 316 
MUSICH, CATHERINE 296 
MUSICH, DAVID 320, 321, 323 
MUSKUS, EUGENE 271 
MUTH, KATHRYN 394 
MYSYK, NANCY 137, 161, 253, 394 
MYSZKOWSKI, ZENON 280, 281, 394 

N 

NAGLE, RICHARD 394 

NAPIERALSKI, EDMUND 94 

NAPOLI, ROBERT 395 

NARKO, MEDARD 186, 280, 281, 395 

NASH, MARY 195 

NASSOS, TASSOS 395 

NAVRAT, LEONARD 179, 222, 272, 

.395 
NEATE, MRS. PATRICIA 96 
NEDERHISER. ROSE 143 
NEILSEN. MARY 91 
NEIS. JOHN 230 
NELLIGAN, RAYMOND 395 
NELLIS. WILLIAM 98, 217 
NELSON, MICHAEL 395 
NERl, RICHARD 200 
NESSETH, LORETTA 230 
NEUBAUER, RONALD 264 
NEWMAN, DAVID 143 
NEWSTED, ROBERT 395 
NIARCHOS, GEORGE 111 
NICHOLAS, JOHN 395 
NICHOLAS, SR. MARY PHJC 161 
NICHOLSON. TOBY 42 
NICOLAI, DR. ROBERT 99 
NIELSEN. KENNETH 272. 396 
NIEMAN. AVIS 161 
NIERENBERG. DR. RONALD 117 
NIKOLA, MARY 230 
NOBILIO, PATRICIA 171, 187, 262, 

263, .396 
NOBLE. PHYLLIS 210 
NOLAN. THOMAS 163, 208 
NOREK, MARILYN 34, 314 
NORKETT, MICHAEL 149 
NORKUS, NIJOLE 295 
NORTON, THOMAS 178 
NOSAL, RONALD 396 
NOTA, REV. JOHN. S.J. 97 
NOSKIN. STAN 251 
NOTARO. MICHAEL 75 
NOTTOLI. GUY 330 
NOVOTNEY. ROBERT 222 
NOVY. RICHARD 171,180 
NOWAK, EDNA 228, 297 
NOWINSKI, DON 293 
NOWLAN, DR. KENNETH 117 
NOWLAND. KENNETH 80. 117 
NURNBERGER, REV. LOTHAR, S.J. 

97 
NYBORG. BIRGER 244, 396 
NYKIEL, KENNETH 155, 396 

O 

OBOSKY, FRANCIS 396 
O'BRIEN, NANCY 195, 287 
OBROCHTA, DARLENE 31, 32, 41, 

165, 187, 207, 255, 396 
OCALLAGHAN, JOHN 397 
O'CALLAGHAN, lOSEPH 163, 206 
OCONNELL, JOSEPH 264 
O'CONNOR, ALAN 246, 247 
O'CONNOR, JOHN 163, 397 
O'CONNOR, PAUL 397 
O'CONNOR, PHILIP 284, 397 
ODONNELL, JAMES 272 
O'FARRELL, JOHN 397 
OFARRELL, PATRICK 271 



OGALLAGHER, MARY 54, 397 
OGRADY, DONALD DR. 97 
O'GRADY, MARTIN 186, 206, 274, 

275 
OHANLEY, ALYCE 205 
OHARA, GAIL 195, 287 
O'HARA, MARGARET 294, 295 
OHARA, MARY ANN 195 
OHARA, TOM 317, 324, 326 
O'HAYER, EDWARD 397 
OKEEFE, JOHN 65 
O'KEEFE, KATHY 40, 260, 261 
G'LEARY, JOHN 280, 281 
OMALLEY, GERALD 175 
OMALLEY, JOHN 110, 115, 117 
OMARA, ARTHUR DR. 93 
O'MARA. KATHLEEN 220 
O'MEARA, NORTON 18 
OMEARA, WILLIAM 397 
O'NEIL, ANNE 143, 181 
O'NEILL, JOHN 259 
O'NEILL SHEILA 398 
O'ROURKE, PATRICIA 176, 332 
OSHEA, BONNIE 194 
O'TOOLE, WINFRED 18, 77 
OAKES, SUE 47, 207 
OAKEY, EDWARD 248 
OBACH, ROBERT 396 
OCIEPKA, BRUNO 275 
OFFUTT, CARL 91, 275 
OGAREK, JOSEPH 397 
OLECH, FRANCINE 165, 195, 208, 

287, 397 
OLESKY, JEAN 332, 333 
OLIVER, CANDACE 34, 40, 195, 314 
OLSON, GEORGE 272 
OLSON, NANCY 262, 263, 293 
OLSON, ROBERTA 255, 397 
ONGEMACH, JACK 210, 280 281, 398 
OPARA, MARLENE 143, 181 
OPARA, P. UZO 203 
ORCHOWSKI, JAMES 163, 186, 190, 

258, 259, 398 
ORR, JACK 106 
ORTENZO, GEORGE 200, 210 
ORTH, KENNETH 398 
ORTH, MICHAEL 398 
ORTZ, REV. MANUEL, S.J. 96 
OSTEN, DONALD 251 
OSTROWSKI, CASIMIR 200, 398 
OSWALT, JOHN 226 
OWEN, CHARLES 271, .398 
OWENS, PAUL 275 



PAKOSZ, WILLIAM 119, 120 
PALANCHAR, JAMES 274, 275 
PALATINE, JAMES 200 
PALES, WILLIAM 398 
PALINESAR, DR. EDWARD 92 
PALLASCH, MR. & MRS. BERNNARD 

72 
PALOUCEK, JAMES 398 
PANAKAL, ELSIE 94 
PANCERZ, HELEN 147 
PANEBIANCO, MARLENE 210 
PANZARELLA, MICHAEL 319, 329 
PAPP, JUDITH 55 
PARKER, CHARLENE 195, 208, 215, 

287 
PARKER, JAMES 43, 230, 240, 401 
PARKER, JONATHAN 398 
PARLANTI, IDA 237, 239 
PARRILLI, CARLA 255 
PASCENTE, DR. JAMES 119, 120 
PATKA, DANA 195 
PATONAI, FRANK 398 
PATRICK, PETER 247, 399 
PATTERSON, LAWRENCE 201 
PAUL, PETER 399 
PAWLOWSKI, EILEEN 195 
PEDI, RICHARD 213 
PEEBLES, DAVID 105 
PEER, NANCY 205 
PEET, KATHLEEN 398 
PEETERS, JOHN BRO 91 
PEINIGER, DIANE 165, 333 
PELLETIER, CLAIRE 143 
PENDERGAST, REV. JOSEPH S., S.J. 

62, 63, 88 
PENN, ROBERT 329 
PEREZ. FRANK 316 
PERSAUD, BEHMAL 266, 267 
PETEREK, JANET 230 
PETERS, REV. EDWARD, C.S.P. 101 
PETERS, JAMES 399 
PETERS, REV. WALTER, S.J. 92 
PETERS, WILLIAM 399 
PETERSEN. lUDITH 293 
PETRAK, EDWARD 399 
PETRANDO, WILLIAM 268 
PETROSKEY, CHRISTINE 98, 260 
PETROWSKI, DOROTHY 161 
PETRULIS, DR. ALBERT 154 
PETRULIS, AUDRONE 399 
PETTERSEN, MALVIN 399 
PHALEN, CAPT. RICHARD 96 
PHELAN, MR. & MRS. MICHAEL 72 
PHILLIPS, BARBARA 22, 176, 253, 

400 
PHILLIPS, GLEN 23 
PHILLIPS, JOANNE 255, 400 
PHILLIPS, DR. THEODORE 98 
PHILPOTT, RICHARD 400 
PHILPOTT, THOMAS 167, 400 
PICCHIOTTI, ROBERT 400 
PICUCCI, LORETTA 165, 232, 233, 

400 



432 



INDEX 



PIEKARCZYK. CHARLENE 214 
PIERCE, MR. & MRS. GERALD 72 
PIERCE, PATRICK ^99 
PIETSCH. STEPHEN 228 
PILKKILA, VILJO 401 
PIKRONE, MARY ANNE 219, 237, 

400 
PILOT, REV. JOSEPH 401 
PINDOK, MARIE 400 
PINDRAS, PATRICIA 201, 21 S, 401 
PITTNER, KENNETH 179 
PLEVA. BARBARA 228, 401 
PODLASEK, CATHERINE 287 
POGWIZX), KENNETH 219 
POKROPINSKI, THOMAS 200 
POLIAK, EDWARD 282, 283 
POLISH, RABBI DAVID 49 
POLLMAN, ARTHUR 264, 401 
POLLOCK, DR. ROBERT 117 
PONGETTI, MARY 200 
PONTICELLI, MICHAEL 163, 285 
POPE, MICHAEL 331 
POPP, CHARLOTTE 135, 139, 253 
POSKL'S, REGINA 185, 294 
POSVIC, DR. HARVEY 92 
POTKAY. CATHERINE 147 
POTKAY, CHARLES 147 
POTTER, DR. HELEN 110 
POTUZNIK, DENIS 283 
POT\'E, JOHN 22 
POWELL, RONALD 222 
POWER. JOHN 264 
POWERS, JOHN 401 
POWLKOWSKI, BRO. JOHN 401 
POZDOL, RICHARD 280, 401 
PRANZARONE, GALDINO 206 
PRAPUOLENIS, BIRUTE 118 
PRECZISKl, ROBERT 401 
PRESTON, GEORGE 143 
PRETE, NANCY' 198 
PRICCIO, DONALD 401 
PROBST, MARILYN 401 
PROO'K, MARGARET 184, 296 
PROMEN, MICHAEL 171 
PROULX, DR. ERNEST 93 
PRUNEAU, NANCY 22, 32, 195 
PRUYN, DIANNA 195, 208, 287 
PUGH, MARY ANN 177, 401 
PULJUNG, JOHN 30, 31, 154, 156, 

163, 174, 401 
PUSZKO, HENRY 98 
PUTERA, MARY ANN 402 
PUTNAM, PAMELA 402 
PYLE, WALTER 242, 264 



QUINLAN, DENIS 305 
QUINLAN, MICHAEL 318 
QUINLAN, WILLIAM 180, 243, 264 
QUINN, PETER 276 
QUINN, TERRENCE 206 
QUINN, WILLIAM 65 
QUINNERT, JOHN 214 



RADCLIFFE, BOB 317 
RADVILA, JANINA 214, 217, 402 
RADZIK, PATRICIA 194 
RAFFERTY, PATRICIA 195 
RAIA, DAVID 163, 186, 246, 402 
RAIA, NOREEN 34, 221, 314 
RAIKOVITZ, SUSAN 298 
RAMLJAK. SHARON 195, 195, 287 
RANDALL, DR. WALKER 133, 230 
RANDOLPH, NANCY 144 
RANKL, CARL 268 
RAPP, REV. EDWARD 101 
RAPP, DR. GUSTAV 115, 116 
RAPP, JOAN 298 
RAPP, WILLIAM 205 
RAPPEL, JAMES 206, 248, 249 
RASMUSSON, JAMES 30, 272, 273, 402 
RASTIGUE, FRANK 272, 273 
RATHZ, THOMAS 402 
RATTIGAN, PATRICK 173 
RAUSCH, LYLE 35, 43, 173, 183, 239, 

275, 401 
RAUWOLF, REGINA 221 
RAYMOND, SR. MARIE, R.S.M. 147 
READ, JAMES 275 
READON, DR. JOHN 95 
REARDON. JAMES 216, 306, 402 
RECUPERO, SALVATORE 402 
REDDINGTON, JOYCE 205, 332 
REDMON, LUCY 22, 23 
REED, DR. JOHN 92 
REEDY, THOMAS 268 
REGAN, THOMAS 331 
REIBLING, PATRICIA 296 
REILLY, JAMES A. 31, 171, 172, 271, 

402 
REILLY, JAMES P. 222, 403 
REILLY, MAUREEN 208 
REILLY, PAT 226 
REINERMAN, ALAN 95 
REINERT, JOSEPH 331 
REINHART, SHIRLEY 402 
REISEL, DR. ROBERT 95, 214 
REITER, ANNE 185, 402 
RENIER, CELESTE 40, 161, 164, 167, 

176, 177, 252, 253, 403 
REPKA, RONALD 217 
REPSYS, RIMANTAS 214 
REYNO, ROSE ANN 300 
REYNOLDS, JOHN 403 
REYNOLDS, THOMAS 74 
REZLER, DR. JULIUS 141 
RICE, EDWARD 159, 235, 403 
RICE, JOHN 264 
RICH, BILL 106 
RICHARDS, KATHLEEN 401, 403 



RICHARDSON, ROBERT 183, 219 

RICHARDSON, STEPHEN 271 

RICHER, MICHAEL 330 

RICHTER, EUNICE 195 

RICHTER, JAROSLAV 403 

RIDDIFORD, PENNY 294 

RIGGS, THOMAS 210 

RIGNEY, JAMES 403 

RILEY, MARY 228, 287, 295 

RILEY, NANCY 38, 73, 218 

RILEY, THOMAS 247 

RIPPO, TONY 267 

RIPPON, DR. JOHN 92 

RISSER, SHARON 260 

RITT, JAMES 206, 217, 292 

RITTERHOFF, ERIC 268, 269 

RITTMANIC, GEORGE 143 

RIVAN, BARBARA 161, 165, 296 

RIZMAN, JACK 251 

ROACH, EDNA 161 

ROACH, MARTY 178, 264, 267 

ROACHE, MARY 195, 215 

ROBELLO, ALAN 403 

ROBERSON, PETER 171, 179, 226, 404 

ROBERTS, JAMES 206 

ROBERTSON, PAUL 34, 306 

ROBINSON, SHIRLEY 404 

ROBINSON, TERRY 19 

ROCHELLE, RICHARD 306 

ROCK, PHILIP 264 

RODMAN, REV. HUGH, S.J. 63, 88 

ROELLE, THOMAS 95 

ROGER, IRVIN 236 

ROGERS, JUDY 205, 298, 300 

ROHDE, ROBERT 404 

ROJAS, JUAN 404 

ROKOS, ROBERT 282, 283, 404 

ROLAND, DONNA 294 

ROLL, REV. DONALD, S.J. 80, 98, 217 

RONEY, ANNE 297 

RONIN, DONALD 3 30 

ROONEY, ELIZABETH 144 

ROSINIA, MICHAEL L. 222, 226, 272 

ROSSATE, RONALD J. 404 

ROSSI, ANTHONY' 404 

ROTELLO, JAY 36, 155, 404 

ROTH, GERALD 191 

ROTH, MARILYNN 405 

ROTHENBERG, ALBERT 405 

ROUSE, VICTOR 306 

ROWAN, THOMAS 220 

ROWAN, WILLIAM 219 

RUBIN, LAURENCE 226, 151 

RUBINO, PAUL 405 

RUBOFF, GARY 178 

RLIDNICK, ROBERT 73, 248 

RUFFOLO, EUGENE 206 

RUNDIO. LOUIS 198 

RUNYAN, JIM 106 

RLISSELL, DR. JAMES 93 

RUSSELL, ROBERT 405 

RUSSELL, DR. THOMAS 118 

RUST, REV. CHARLES, S. J, 21, 95 

RY'AN, JO ANNE 205 

RYAN, JUDITH 405 

RYAN, PATRICK 213, 224, 270, 271 



SAALFIELD, ALAN 320, 323 
SABALAS, KRISTINA 3« 
SABATH, JAY 247 
SALDANA, MIKE 183 
SALETTA, CHRISTINE 82 
SALETTA, ROBERT 405 
SAMIS, MARLIYN 17, 332 
SANDER, BRO. JOSEPH, C.S.V. 405 
SANDERS, THOMAS 83 
SANDRICK, KAREN 298, 300 
SANNA, VERN 272 
SANTA, EDWARD 222 
SANTANGELO, DR. MARZO 119, 120 
SANTUCCI, MARIANNE 263 
SAPIENZA, GERALD 216 
SARACINI, MICHAEL 248, 405 
SASSO, CLAUDE 318 
SAWINSKI, DR. VINCENT 116 
SATTLER, JUANITA 255, 300 
SAVAGE, CAMILLE 32, 33 
SCALISE, ANNA 208 
SCANLON, MARGARET 143 
SCAVONER, DAVID 95 
SCHAEFER, WILLIAM 210, 219 
SCHALKE, MARGARET 43 
SCHARDON. STANLEY 255, 331 
SCHELL, LEE 267 
SCHERIBEL, KARL 266, 267, 275 
SCHILLING, JAMES 330 
SCHIRMER, GEORGE 224 
SCHLORF, DANIEL 405 
SCHMANDT, DR. RAYMOND 49 
SCHMIDLIN, REV. DONALD 143, 154 
SCHMIDT, LAWRENCE 190, 258, 259 
SCHMIDT, RICHARD 219, 405 
SCHMITT, DONALD 291 
SCHMITT, WILLIAM 243, 292, 405 
SCHMITZ, JOHN 318 
SCHMITZ, RICHARD 272, 273 
SCHMITZ, RUDOLF 55, 406 
SCHNABEL, GODFREY 275 
SCHNEIDER. JAMES 172, 405 
SCHNEIDER, OLIVE 161 
SCHILLER, DR. MARIE 96 
SCHODER, REV. RAYMOND, S.J. 
SCHNOEBELEN, CHERYLE 195, 287 
SCHOEN, JEROME 222 
SCHOEN, JOHN 330 
SCHOEN, DR. PHILIP 120 
SCHOEN, DR. WILLIAM 63, 114, 120 
SCHOENBAUM, MATTHEW 63 
SCHOTZ, EILEEN 191. 298 
SCHRACK, DONALD 275 



SCHRAM, FREDERICK 230 

SCHULMAN, JEFFREY 275 

SCHULTZ, GEORGE 211, 406 

SCHULTZ, MARGARET 296 

SCHULTZ, ROBERT 247 

SCHULTZE, CAROL 406 

SCHURER, ROBERT 155, 206, 327. 406 

SCHUTT, JUDITH 195 

SCHUTTLER, CARLYN 255 

SCHWARZENBERG, DR. FRANCIS 98 

SCHWEITZER, GLENN 230, 275 

SCHWENGLER, MARY 406 

SCOTT, MRS DE LOIS 144 

SCOTT, MARY 210 

SCOTT, PATRICIA 405 

SCOTT, WILLIAM 331 

SEBASTIAN, CAROL 176 

SEBESTA, ROBERT 329, 330 

SEEBERGER, JEFFREY 246, 247 

SEIDEU JOYCE 165, 187, 193, 194, 287 

SEIFFERT, GARNET 406 

SELFRIDGE, DR. FREDICK 127 

SENESE, DONALD 215, 220 

SENNEWAV, RICHARD 106 

SERIANO, CHARLES 224, 406 

SERRICK, REV. JAMES 105 

SERWATKA, JAMES 158 

SESKINE, BERNARD 97 

SEVICK. JOSEPH 247 

SEXTO, FRED 18, 77 

SHANAHAN, DAVID 190, 206, 285 

SHANNON, MARY 229 

SHAPIRO, SHELLY 251 

SHEAHAN, NANCY 38 

SHEARIN, ROBERT 230, 240, 274, 175 

SHEEHAN, NANCY 30, 31, 171, 177 

SHEEHAN, DR. JOHN 126 

SHEEHY, WILLIAM 406 

SHEEN, MARDEE 22 

SHEINAN, DR. JOHN 30 

SHELLEY, MARY 54 

SHERIFF, J. RAYMOND 63, 108 

SHERIFF, ROBERT 206 

SHERMAN, DENNIS 54 

SHIMKUS, CAROL 262, 263 

SHIMON, WENCEL 264 

SHIPMAN, BARBARA 255, 406 

SHIV, ALBERT 268 

SHORE, SCOTT 222 

SHUERT, NORMAN, OSM 406 

SHYLIN, JUDITH 406 

SIBLE'^', PAUL 407 

SIDELL, NAOMI 255 

SI DOR, DO.NALD 407 

SIEBERT, THOMAS 237 

SIGNATUR, EDWARD 214, 407 

SILLIMAN, JOSEPH 319, 407 

SILVAGNl, CATHERINE 407 

SILVERWOOD, SHARON 230, 407 

SIMONAITIS, JOSEPH 407 

SIMONE. VINCENT 119, 407 

SIMONS, ANN 30, 143 

SINEK, WILLIAM 65 

SINSKO, MICHAEL 275 

SIPOWICH, RONALD 200 

SITITIZER, CAROL 295 

SKAHEN, THOMAS 407 

SKAJA, JEROME 292 

SKORY, ANDREW 285 

SKOWRON, ERNEST 7.3, 275 

SKOWRONSKl, MICHAEL 191, 214 

SKR'iDLEWSKl, BRUCE 407 

SKUBLE, MARILEE 295 

SKVIER, MARY JANE 136, 1.39, 161, 

253 
SLADEK, ROBERT 266, 267 
SLATTERY, GERALD 230 
SLATTERY, HELEN 164, 262, 263, 407 
SLATTERY, NANCY 294, 407 
SLEPAK. DENNIS 38, 228 
SLIVKA, MARYANN 138, 253 
SLOAN, MARY 161 
SLOWINSKI, REV. GEORGE 101 
SMALL, REV. JOSEPH, S.J. 98 
SM ALLEY, DR. O. Ill 
SMART, THEODORE 76 
SMILEY, WALTER 96 
SMITH, BEVERLEE 94 
SMITH, GERALD 171, 184, 274, 275 
SMITH, JOHN 30, 65, 75 
SMITH, KATHLEEN 86 
SMITH, MARILYN 161 
SMITH, MICHAEL 198 
SMITH, DR. NORMAN 118, 120 
SMITH, PATRICIA 287 
SMITH, PHILIP 2^2, 273 
SMITH, PHYLLIS 222 
SMITH, ROBERT 181 
SMOLAR, RICHARD 100 
SMOLINSKI, LEONA 161 
SMYTH, CATHY 210, 294 
SMOLAR, RICHARD 100 
SMULSON, DR. MARSHALL 116, 117 
SNITE, FREDRICK 75 
SNYDER, JEROME 280, 281 
SOBOTA, ANTOINETTE 263 
SOBOTA, JOHN 186, 258, 259, 408 
SOCHOR, ROSEMARIE 297 
SODER, WILLIAM 408 
SOLIS, JOHN 2''2, 408 
SOLTi'SIAK, JESSE 119 
SOMERS, PATRICK 214, 408 
SOMMERFELD, LOUIS 251 
SOMMERFELD, ROBERT n9. 409 
SORENSON, DEAN 266, 267 
SOROTA, JOSEPH 266, 267 
SOROTA, JOSEPH 242 
SORVILLO, MICHAEL 186 
SOW A, CONSTANCE 32, 177 
SOWA, JEAN 409 
SOUDAH, HAROLD 222, 272 



SPENCE, CAROL 298, 300 

SPENCER, DR. DAVID 95 

SPITZNAGEl, LOUIS 95 

SPICCI, JOAN 194, 214 

SPINNER, LESLIE 248 

SRO'n'R, JANE 184, 296 

STACHNIK, CELESTE 198, 220 

STACHYRA, MARCIA 184 

STACK, MARCIA 184 

STACK, COLETTE 296 

STACK. CONSTANCE 229 

STACY, MARGARET 32, 33, 164, 166, 

172, 210 
STAERK, CHARLENE 221 
STALLAS, ELAINE 333 
STANEK, DOROTHY 296 
STAPLEMAN, CHARLES 409 
STASZKIEWICZ, ROBERT 163, 285, 

409 
STEERE, DONALD 222 
STEINBRECHER, JOAN 78 
STEINFELS, PETER 167, 234 
STEISKAL, ALLEN 284 
STEMBERK, CONSTANCE 19, 238 
STEPHENS, THOMAS 248 
STEVENS, MICHAEL 266, 267 
STEVENS, MARY JANE 205 
STEWART, PAUL 33, 73, 163, 183, 

291, 409 
STIGMAN, JACQUELINE 195 
STINSON, DONALD 100, 157, 198 
STITZER, CAROL 287 
STOJAK, RICHARD 409 
STRACKO, ROBERT 409 
STRAMA. FRANK 409 
STRANGER, JAMES 272, 273 
STRASSMAIER, JAMES 95 
STRATMAN, REV. CARL, C.S.V. 94 
STROM, SUSANNE 192, 234, 235 
STRONS, EDMOND 213, 259, 409 
STRUBBE, THOMAS 180, 264, 265 
STUHMILLER, FRANCES 83 
STUPAR, DONNA 409 
SUBAITIS, FRANCES 254 
SUCH, KENNETH 163, 331, 409 
SULITA, FRANCIS 19 
SULLIVAN, BOLTON 65 
SULLIVAN, FRANCIS 123 
SULLIVAN. JAMES 247 
SULLIVAN. JOHN 179, 409 
SULLIVAN. JOHN 31 

SULLIVAN. MICHAEL 31. 163, 186, 

282, 283 
SULLIVAN, PATRICIA 158, 208 
SULLIVAN, ROBERT 268, 269 
SUSKI, GERALDINE 195 
SVITRA, ZITA 194 
SWED, SUSAN 295 
SWEENEY, JOSEPH 103 
SWIETON, KATHLEEN 40, 205, 214 
SZABBLASKI, ROSE 145 
SZAROWICZ, DIANE 158, 214, 410 
SZCZUREK, EDWARD 183, 291, 410 
SZEMLER, DR. GEORGE 95 
SZPAJER. MICHAEL 410 
SZYMCZAK, DENNIS 45, 240, 275 



TABER, GERALDINE 410 
TAMMEN, VICKI 297 
TALKEN, BRO. DONALD, CSV 410 
TALKIN, REV. RALPH, S.J. 79, 101, 

291 
TARJAN, ROBERT 214 
TARNAWSKL WILLIAM 410 
TAUB, JACK 284 
TAYLOR, JOSEPH 214, 410 
TAYLOR, WILLIAM 291, 410 
TELLIS, ANDREW 275, 401 
TENNERT. JANICE 410 
TERRELL, RICHARDS 65 
TESSARI, NATALIE 287 
THACKER, BETTY 21 
THAYIL. CHRISTOPHER 410 
THILL, CHARLES 183 
THINNES. JOAN 298, 300 
THINNFS. MARY 298, 410 
THOMPSON, REV. HAROLD, CSV 101 
THOMPSON, T. M. 65 
THOMSON. CAMERON, 275 
THORNE, RICHARD 266, 267 
TICHENOR. PATRICIA 94 
TIERNAN, MARY 195 
TILL, KATHERINE 214 
TIMPERMAN, ALBERT 178, 266, 267. 

410 
TINER, LONNIE 222 
TISHLER, IRVING 226, 251 
TITTLE, VINCENT 264 
TOEBAAS, RONALD 22, 23, 55, 221, 

411 
TOMAL, ANN MARIA 205, 298 
TOMALAK, TERRY 411 
TOMASHEK, PETER 143 
TOMASIK, FRANK 411 
TOMASZEWSKI, JOSEPH 213, 285, 331. 

411 
TOMASZKIEWICZ. ROBERT 411 
TOMSIC, JO ELLEN 38, 46, 54, 228 
TOOMEY, KATHLEEN, 94 
TOPPING, PATRICIA 32, 252, 253 
TORME, KAREN 40, 255 
TORRES, MARY 411 
TOSTO, JOHN 171, 172, 411 
TOTO, DR. PATRICK 115, 118 
TOUSSAINT, MARY 195 
TOUSSAINT, PATRICIA 195 
TRACY, REV. THEODORE, S.J. 93 



PHOTO INDEX 

TRACY, SUE 297 
TRAINOR, DAVID 95 
TRAPANI, ANDREW 205 
TRAPP, CAROL 94 
TRAVIS, ANTHONY 219 
TRAYNOR, DOROTHY 194 
TRIMBLE, SUSAN 24, 297 
TRIMBLE, DR. WILLIAM 95 
TRINER. SANDRA 195, 198, 255, 411 
TROP, DOROTHY 201 
TROTTA, JUDITH 204, 412 
TROYKE, CYNTHIA 210 
TROYKE, SYLVIA 210 
TRUE, MARGARET 295 
TRUMFIO, DOMICIC 222, 289 
TRUSCHKE, PAUL 412 
TUCHTEN, ALAN 283, 412 
TUFO, ROBERT 270, 271, 412 
TUMOSA, THERESE 158, 412 
TUMOSA, STASE 118 
TURPINAT, MARY 412 
TWO, JOSEPH 219 
TWOMEY, MARCELLA 147 

U 

UNDERWOOD, BARBARA 412 
URBAN, DENNIS 206, 220 
URBANCIK, GERALD 200 



VACULA, CHERYL 298, 300 
VAGINIS, BROTHER 98 
VALENTI, JASPER 93 
VALIENT, VALENTINE 187, 296 
VALLEE, CHRISTINE 184, 296 
VAN BRAMER, DOUGLAS 30, 93 
VAN BRAMER, JOHN 43, 159, 163, 

173, 285 
VAN BREE, FRANK 242, 264, 265, 412 
VAN EYCK, JEROME 254 
VAN KLAVEREN, JUDITH 205, 296 
VAN RIEMSDYK, ANN 261, 413 
VAN UUM ROBERT 248 
VAN WINKLE, CHARLES 413 
VANALEK. JUDITH 195 
VANARIA, JAMES 247 
VANCE, BRUCE 224 
VANGSNESS, BRO. CARL, CSV 217 
VARGA. REV. STEPHEN 101 
VEITH, MR. & MRS. JOSEPH 72 
VEITH. NICHOLAS 413 
VELEZ. OLGA 184, 298 
VESELSKY, RONALD 282, 283 
VIDOLOFF, JOHN 413 
VIETH, CHARLES 272, 273 
VIGIL, EUGENE 413 
VIGIL, MARGUERITE 296 
VISALLI. FRANCIS 413 
VITU, EDWARD 205 
VLAHOS, MARY 298, 300 
VLAZNY, D. 222 
VLAZNY, JAMES 329 
VOGEL. JANICE 194 
VOGEL. EDWARD 178, 268, 269 
VOGEL, JOHN 413 
VOIGT, MARY 143 
VOLINO, VITO 200 
VOLTOLINA, GENE 267 
VON KAENEL, ROBERT 272 
VRASIC, JAMES 222 
VRTIS, CHARLES 70 

W 

WACEK. CAROL 253 

WADDELL, DANIEL 

WADDELL, WILLIAM 319 

WADDY, ARTHUR 200, 280 

WADE, RANDELL 217 

WAGNER, AL 305, 323 

WAGNER, BARRY 320 

WAHL, GERALD 284 

WALDECK, DENNIS 264 

WALDRON, JOHN 74, 76 

WALDRON, PETER 325 

WALKER, DR. RONALD 99 

WALJESKI. KATHLEEN, 215 

WALKER, DR. FRANKLIN 95 

WALKER, MRS. ALDONA 96 

WALL, DR. PETER 118 

WALLAC. KARL 413 

WALLE. RONALD 264 

WALLEN. EDWARD 321, 323 

WALSH, DENIS 283, 413 

WALSH, DONALD 283 

WALSH, EILEEN 81 

WALSH, JAMES 271 

WALSH, REV. JOSEPH, S.J. 97 

WALSH, JOAN 205 

WALSH, JOHN 413 

WALSH, JOHN 246, 247 

WALSH, JOSEPH 240 

WALSH, SHEILA, 32, 137, 176, 177, 332 

VCALSH. WILLIAM 413 

WANAT. JOHN 214, 413 

WANDEL. JOSEPH 96 

WAPOLE. MICHAELE 165 

WARADY. HOWARD 251 

WARD. BARBARA 195 

WARD. ELIZABETH 237 

WARD. JOHN 178, 266, 267 

WARD, MICHAEL 155, 190, 414 

WARD. THOMAS 330 

WARWICK, RONALD 214 

WASHINGTON, BARBARA 332 

WATERS, JAMES 414 

WATSON, CLARENCE 316 

WATSON, LEROY 316 

WAYMAN, ROBERT 414 



WCISLO, DIANE 32, 40, 164, 187, 195 

262, 263, 414 
WCISLO, JOSEPH 30, 31, 163, 170, 173. 

182, 276, 277 
WEAVER, SANDRA 23, 54 
WEDB. VIRGINA 184, 298 
WEHRLE, DONALD 285 
WEILAND, JAMES 106, 324 
WEILAND. JEROME 305. 317 
WEINBRECHT, LINDA 195 
WEINER, MR. & MRS. LOUIS 72 
WEINER, ROBERT 213, 414 
WEINSTEIN, SANDRA 23. 73. 287 
WEISBROD, CHARLES 93 
WEISBROD, MR. & MRS. MAXFIELD 

72 
WEISBROD. DENNIS 268 
WELCH, JANE 19 
WELLER, REV. PHILIP 101 
WELLINGTON, DR. JOHN 93 
WELLS, WALTER 213 
WELSH, MARIAN 19 
WELTER, JAMES 414 
WENZEL, VIRGINIA 147 
WERDERITCH, JEROME 283 
WERNER, EDWARD 143 
WERNER, WILLIAM 181. 414 
WEST, FRANCIS 414 
WESTBROOK, JAMES 95 
WESTON, RICHARD 106 
WEXLER, MAURICE 415 
WHALEN, ANN 333 
WHALEN, MARGARET 95, 294 
WHEELER, CAROLYN 415 
WHITE, HENRY 325 
WHITE, JACQUELINE 298 
WHITE, MARY 95 
WHITY, BARBARA 147 
WHITTIER, FRED 266, 267 
WIADUCK, JOHN 175 
WIATR, LAWRENCE 222 
WICKELL, MRS. BARBARA 144 
WIDMAN, JOEL 248 
WIELAND, MRS. HELENE 82 
WIEM, JOHN 415 
WIENCEK. SANDRA 298 
WIERBOWSKI. THEODORE 155 
WIERZ, JOHN 179 
WILHELM, DION 89 
WILKE, FRANK 415 
WILLIAMS, REV. GLEN 212 
WILLIAMS, JOHN 73, 247 
WILLIAMS, KATHLEEN 229 
WILLIAMS, MICHAEL 220 
WILLIAMS, SUELLEN 34. 140. 195, 314 
WILLOUGHBY, DR. EDWARD 11 
WILSON, JOSEPH 214, 415 
WILT, DR. JAMES 92 
WINIECKI, CAMILLE 263 
WINKELJOHN, SUE 205 
WINSKUNAS, PHILLIP 415 
WINSWESKI, JEROME 415 
WINTERLIN, JACK 106 
WITT, PATRICIA 182 
WITT, SUSANNE 161, 165, 415 
WIZNIAK, IRENE 193, 195, 262, 263 
WOICIK, ANITA 176 
WOJTANOWSKI, JEROME 205 
WOLF, DARLENE 143 
WOLFF. HOWARD 143 
WOLFF. DR. JOSEPH 91, 94 
WOLS, JOHN 246, 247 
WOLSKI, GERALDINE 166, 241 
WONDRASEK. ARTHUR 247 
WONG, CLEIGHTON, 272 
WONG, DR. HARVEY 130 
WOOD, CHARLES 34, 306 
WOOD, PAUL 96 
WO'\'NEROWSKl, JEROME 157, 163, 

191, 204, 239 
WOZNIAK, DR. JOHN 93 
WRIGHT. PETER 272 
WRIGHT, RAYMOND 283 
WROBEL, CAROLE 261 
WROBEL, WALTER 415 
WULFTANGE, REV. 105 



YAFFA, JOEL 275 
YAKIMISKY, JOHN 214 
YOUNG, JOY 415 
YOUNG, DR. KEITH 119 
YOURG. ANNE 193, 415 
YURKANIN, JOSEPH 415 



ZABKAR, REV. LOUIS, S.J. 20, 95 
ZAKOEF, ROBERT 416 
ZALE, DOROTHY 416 
ZANTEK, CASIMIR 181 
ZARANTONELLO, CAMILLE 298, 300 
ZBYLUT, DENNIS 73, 275 
ZDERADICKA, JILL 252 

ZEEMAN, SARAH 161 
ZEINEK, GEORGE 106, 401 
ZELESKO, KATHY 137. 161, 332 
ZELKO, JAMES 416 
ZIELINSKI, DENNIS 416 
ZIEMBA, PAULINE 195 
ZIMMERMAN, MARY 194, 228, 416 
ZIMMERMAN, PATRICIA 416 
ZIMMERMAN, THOMAS 285, 331 
ZITTNAN. MELANIE 82. 263 
ZIZZO, BETTINE 17, 38, 40, 43. 165, 

187, 287, 416 
ZMINA, CAROLE 263 
ZOYDEL, JOSEPH 95 
ZVETINA, DR. JOHN 110, 123 
ZWARYCZ. ROBERT 258. 259 



ORGANIZATION INDEX 



Accounting Club 190 

Alpha Delta Gamma 246 

Alpha Kappi Psi 248 

Alpha Omega 250 

Alpha Sigma Nu 154 

Alpha Tau Delta 252 

American Chemical Society 191 

Arts Council 172 

Bellarmine Philosophy Club 192 

Beta Alpha Psi 155 

Beta Gamma Sigma 156 

Blue Key 162 

Business Administration Council 174 

Cadence 232 

Chamberlain Hall 298 

Chamberlain Hall Council 184 

Chi Theta Upsilon 254 

Circumference 164 

Coed Club 193 

Curtain Guild 196 

Debate Society 198 

Delaware Hall 294 

Delaware Hall Council 185 

Delta Sigma Delta 256 

Delta Sigma Pi 258 

Delta Sigma Rho 157 

Delta Zeta Chi 260 

Dental School Council 179 

Economics-Finance Society 199 

Epsilon Pi Rho 200 

Equestrian Club 201 

Fine Arts Club 202 

Foreign Students Association 203 

Gerard Manley Hopkins Society 204 

Glee Club 205 

Gold Torch 206 

Gonzaga Hall 301 

Historical Society 208 

Honors Program 190 

Human Relations Club 210 

Inquiry 211 

Interfraternity Council 186 

Intersorority Council 187 

Kappa Beta Gamma '. 262 

Loyola Hall 290 

Ix>yola Hall Council 183 

Loyola Law Times 240 

Loyola Men 212 



Loyola News 234 

Loyola Union Activities Board 170 

LOYOLAN 238 

LOYOLAN Awards 166 

Marketing Club 213 

Mathematics Club 214 

Medical School Council 178 

Modern Language Club 215 

Monogram Club 216 

Nursing Councils 177 

PAL 172 

Phi Alpha Delta 264 

Phi Beta Pi 266 

Phi Chi 268 

Phi Sigma Tau 158 

Physics Club 217 

Pi Alpha Lambda 270 

Pi Delta Epsilon 159 

Political Science Club 220 

Psi Omega 272 

Readers Circle 221 

Recent Decisions 241 

St. Appolonia Guild 222 

Sigma Delta Phi 274 

Sigma Lambda Beta 276 

Sigma Pi 278 

Sigma Pi Alpha 280 

Sigma Theta Tau 161 

Ski Club 228 

Social Work Council 181 

SAM 224 

Stebler Hall 296 

Stebler Hall Council 184 

Student American Dental Assn 226 

Student American Medical Assn 227 

SAL 73 

Student Bar Association 180 

Tau Delta Phi 282 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 284 

Theta Phi Alpha 286 

United World Federalists 218 

University College Council 182 

WaSmann Biological Society 230 

Women's Rifle Team 229 

Xi Psi Phi 288 

Young Democrats 219 

Young Republicans 219 



435 



If it is true that the most enjoyable part of a yearbook 
editor's job is when the work is done, then the next greatest 
pleasure stems from the co-operation received from many, 
many people throughout the year. There were more than a 
few days when a scheduling would fall through, several pages 
would have to be redrawn and/or renumbered, pictures would 
be returned as identified with at least one-half of the names 
missing and, in general, the four hundred thirty-six page year- 
book would seem at least four hundred pages too large; yet, 
miraculously, someone would save the day with a cheerful quip 
and several hours of time to spend straightening things out, 
and the crisis would pass. I would like to devote these last 
words, then, to mentioning some of the people who, by their 
cooperation, were largely responsible for the production of 
the 1963 LOYOLAN. 

Thanks in particular: To Mr. Bernard Cullen, our 
moderator, who "lived" the yearbook at least as much as any 
of us, drawing layouts, cropping pictures and giving the book 
an allover artistic unity. 

To Bob Bassi, hardest-working member of the hard- 
working captions staff. 

To Lyle Rausch, who scheduled pictures with a tact and 
an efficiency that would put a diplomat to shame. 

To Rick Foys, who took the responsibility for delivering 
a staggering amount of copy and stayed late on many an 
evening polishing off a piece or two that we had neglected 
to assign. 

To Dick McGlynn, a real AU-American sports editor. 

To our "professionals" — Bill O'Connor from Hunter 
Publishing Company and Ray Jordan, who drew the layout 
of the book — and our indispensable photographers, the Rev. 
Thomas J. Bryant, S.J., Steve O'Shaughnessy, Frank Sulita and 
Jim Kilcoyne. 

To Austen Field Studios, which did an excellent job of 
taking senior portraits. 



To the Associated Press and United Press International 
for some of the photos in the basketball and track pages. 

To other photographers who provided us with pictures: 
Jim Peters, George Ziener, Mike Kutza, Thomas Dyba and the 
Rev. Thomas Royce, S.J. 

To Mr. McClockey, Miss LeBlanc, Miss McGrady, Mr. 
KoUintzas and the patient secretaries in the Dean of Students 
offices at both campuses. 

To the inspiring leadership of the Loyola News and its 
staff in accuracy, promptness and all other journalistic virtues. 

To the Public Relations department for sharing an interest 
in (and their pictures with) the LOYOLAN. 

To the members of Sigma Delta Phi, who consistently 
demonstrated their willingness to help with the small tasks 
that are so vital to the production of a yearbook. 

To Miss Higgins of the Illinois Catholic Women's Club 
for her cooperation in making the Club's facilities available 
to our photographers. 

To Mrs. Nomura of the Dental School and Miss Kribales 
of the Law School, who could always be counted upon for 
prompt and correct identifications of all the photos we sent 
to them. 

To Diane and Kay, who helped the yearbook in count- 
less ways at all hours of the day and night. 

Once, again, thanks to all who gave of their time to help 
with the LOYOLAN. I hope that all our efforts will be enjoyed 
for years to come by the students who bought the book. 



CECILE CONRAD 

Editor-in-Chief 



ASSISTANT EDITORS Paul Conarty, Constance Stemberk 

BUSINESS MANAGER Michael Donahoe 

SCHEDULING Lyle Rausch 

CAPTIONS Jerome Woynerowski, Editor 

Bob Bassi, Bob Bennett, Bob Bergstrom, Jim Dorn, Bob Lund, Carl Moore, Nancy Olson, Jim Parker, Dennis 
Szymczak, Joe Walsh, Geri Wolski. 

COPY Richard Foys, Editor 

Sally Bobernac, Marie Doretti, Bob Flanagan, Lucyna Migala, Cynthia Troyke, Sylvia Troyke. 

SPORTS Richard McGlynn, Editor 

Denny Doud, Ed LeMire, Graham McClean, Pat Mitten, Diane Peiniger, Lyle Rausch, Chuck Thill. 

GRADUATES Ida Parlanti 

PROMOTION AND SALES Bob Miles, Cindy Mrazek, Bob Rodnick 

INDEX Janet Delia, Diatie Kelly, Kamaal Khazen, Mike Myslieviec, Jim Palanchar, Bob Shearin, 

Paul Zilic 

TYPING Ann Goggins, Janice Grippando, Diane Kelly, Rosemary Lukacevich, Kay Richards 

MODERATOR Bernard W. Cullen 



436 




University center on a quiet Sunday morning. 



Oumbach Hall in a Spring setting. 







437 




An incredible saloon, with everything — piano, roulette wheel, card game, bar, and personnel, won first 
prize for A. K. Psi at the Wild-West weekend. 



;iT . "1 



Chi Theta Upsilon's "General Store" 

second place winner. 





Forces of law and order prepare for a possible showdown. 



438 



"^tssisa^i^^Tssx^sua 




A.T.D's cowgirls Sue KoUe and bileen Long laugh at Nancy Turner's futile efforts to lasso the steer. 



A marvelous money maker (for L. U. ) was the Arts 
Council's dime pitch. 




An old fashioned horseshoe game was the Coed Club's gimmicks to take 
your quarters. 



439 



I 



— — :^ C. COMPANY y 



Phone 725-8361 



COLLEGE AND HIGH SCHOOL PUBLICATIONS 
333 INDIANA AVENUE-WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



i WILLIAM T. O'CONNOR 

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Phone CLearbrook 3-3794 



440 



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