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Full text of "The Loyolan"

Loyola University 
Chicago, Illinois 
Volume 36 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



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http://www.archive.org/details/loyolan1972unse 



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Father Baumhart Ansv^ers Student Questions 



Have you enjoyed your job as Presi- 
dent of Loyola University! 

It is a lot of satisfaction. You've got 
to get satisfaction out of solving 
problems, and seeing hoM/ the de- 
cisions you make have a favorable 
impact or favorable influence on the 
lives of students, faculty, commu- 
nity and that you think what you are 
doing is worthwhile. Some days are 
not like that. It's not unrelieved sat- 
isfaction; it's a very complex job. 
It's more complex than I'd thought 
it would be. In some of these things, 
it's impossible to please everybody, 
so you either make enemies or at 
least disenchant people. 



Have you had very much personal 
contact with students! 

I presume that if they really dis- 
liked what I was doing I'd have heard 
about it in letters or editorials or 
things of this sort. I've met quite a 
few students in the length of time 
I've been in office. I'm used to meet- 
ing in small groups and that's the 
best way to talk about things, to get 
something accomplished. But. . .al- 
most of necessity most of my com- 
munication with people is by paper 
or by telephone. However, I would 
like very much to talk with them 
more if I could also get other jobs 
done that I think are more impor- 



tant. The reason I don't talk to them 
more is not because I find it diffi- 
cult, boring or unpleasant, but sim- 
ply because there are so many 
things that I have to do, that, it 
seems to me, nobody else can do. I 
don't have the time. My job has been 
divided recently. We've got Father 
Maguire. He had to devote less time 
to things. I am able, because of this 
division of work, to spend a little 
more time, at least, with students 
and with faculty and with other 
groups than Father Maguire was 
able to do. He had to spend so much 
time outside the university, working 
with or doing fund-raising activities. 
I have to spend relatively little time 





doing that. 

Do you like being president of a 
large universHy or would you like 
to be president of a small college! 

This is where I am. I like Chicago. 
Chicago is my kind of town. I think 
it's very important that the Presi- 
dent of a university know the city 
and state he's in and more particu- 
larly, the people and the flavor of 
the place. You can go pretty far 
wrong in your first year if you don't. 

Do you have plans for any new 
buildings for Loyola! 

The only thing that is really on the 



books is completing the ninth and 
tenth floors of Damen Hall. If we 
can, and I'm sure we can, get the 
planning and construction done, it 
will be ready for the next academic 
year. 

If the PLUS campaign is going to 
be successful, and there aren't any 
major changes in student attendance 
at Loyola; that is, if Mre continue to 
fill the Lake Shore Campus and so 
on and the need for parking space 
continues, wfhat I can see in. . .no 
longer than three years is a high- 
level or six story, seven story, or 
eight story parking facility on the 
Lake Shore Campus. 



What about downtown! 

I can't see it. We can't afford it 
here. The ground is too expensive. 
I'll give you a couple of parameters 
of a decision like that. Elevators for 
cars are out. They have not worked. 
Nobody is putting up a parking fa- 
cility with elevators. About the high- 
est you can go is about eight sto- 
ries. Given the cost of land and the 
cost of construction, especially in 
this neighborhood, if you put up an 
eight story parking facility, you have 
to get about S4.00 per space a day 
to break even. 




Lewis To vipers: LT is People 



by Corinne Fanelli 

As a graduating senior who has 
spent all of her four years at Lewis 
Towers campus, I would like to 
share with you my impressions and 
experiences over how this campus 
has changed and altered while I have 
been here. For one, the enrollment 
has been declining visibly; where 
once you had to search to find a 
table to sit at in either the Xavier 
Grill or the Georgetown Room, now 
you can pick and choose. So in a 
sense, the character of the school 
has become more that of a small 
college. The advantage of a smaller 
student body is a smaller student- 
faculty ratio and a greater amount 
of interaction in the learning proc- 
ess. But the attractive dimension 
missing in other small colleges that 
LT has is its central location — cen- 
tral to the downtown business dis- 
trict for the many students who work 
there part-time, central to libraries 
and art galleries, Lincoln Park Zoo 
and the Chicago Historical Society, 
fine restaurants and small 
delicatessens. 

Physically the undergraduate cam- 
pus is just two buildings linked by a 
bridge. So already we do not fit into 
the traditional definitions of a col- 
lege. But this limit of space gives 
us our most distinctive character. 
Since we must spend so much time 
with the other students, semester 
after semester, and literally bump 
into our professors, fellow class 
members at least once a day, one 
has the choice to either ignore them 
or talk to them. In its deepest sense, 
then, LT is people. While at the 
elevators two strangers waiting can 
develop a true spirit of friendship. 



Since there is such an easy recog- 
nition of faces, familiarity deepens. 

Because most of the students come 
here by choice or at least freely 
decide to stay on, there is a concern 
felt by all for this campus. Over the 
years I can honestly state that there 
has been a growing feeling of identity 
as an LT student rather than a Loy- 
ola students. With the university 
split in two physically, and most of 
the campus "leaders," activities 
and organizations up at Lake Shore, 
I felt distinctly in my first year 
especially that as a division of the 
College of Arts and Sciences we 
were unimportant or at best an 
adjunct to the "real" Loyola at 
Lake Shore. This unhealthy condi- 
tion would induce people into a rein- 
forcing situation of inferiority, 
apathy and the tendency to put the 
blame on something outside our- 
selves and beyond our help. Through 
one very loosely structured, student- 
led group, CULT (Community for 
Unity at Lewis Towers) which was 
formed last year, there has been a 
growing unity and identity among 
LT students. This group, whose 
members are all students in attend- 
ance at this campus, invited speak- 
ers such as Father Baumhart, 
President of the University, and 
Father IMcNamara, Dean of the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences, Dr. 
Charles Hart, Associate Dean of the 
College of Arts & Sciences at Lewis 
Towers, and Dr. F. Virgil Boyd, 
Dean of the School of Business Ad- 
ministration to speak to students and 
answer their questions. These ver- 
bal encounters were vital to clear 
up misconceptions, articulate our 



frustrations because of years of 
"benign neglect" and to have a DI- 
RECT source of communication to 
persons in responsible positions. 
This forthrightness and clarity is so 
important at a time when the uni- 
versity is "decompartmentalizing" 
into finer and finer branches of 
limited focus. The student can so 
easily be forgotten in the pursuit of 
doing things for him institutionally 
that personally he may be neglected. 
LT has come to maturity now and 
accepted the reality that Lake Shore 
and LT are two distinct entities, 
"separate but equal." Though a long 
time coming, this cleavage has en- 
abled us to grow. There is now an 
office of the school newspaper with 
a staff writing about what is hap- 
pening here; also there is a newly 
formed LT Student Operations 
Board, with a budget to be spent on 
activities for students attending this 
campus. When you consider that our 
student activities funds would all go 
for movies, concerts and lecturers 
held at Lake Shore, the depth and 
reason for our anger is understood. 
Ironically, the Lake Shore Student 
Activities Board had to vote to give 
us money which has rightfully been 
ours all along. 

LT stands or falls on the quality of 
the relationships among the students, 
faculty, administrators, mainte- 
nance workers, etc. On that cri- 
teria, I invite you to judge how much 
Loyola has changed. 



LT Doesn't Want to be the Tall on the Lake Shore Dog 



(Art Eichlin, Assistant Dean of Stu- 
dents, as interviewed by Terry Shee- 
han) 

The LT-SOB (Lewis Towers Stu- 
dent Operations Board) began this 
year with a $1600 allotment from 
SAB. With business majors watch- 
ing the money, they have sponsored 
many activities: Apathy Day, mov- 
ies, a Christmas Benefit raising 
$500 for charity, ping-pong tourna- 
ments, TGIF parties, a Las Vegas 
night, a newsletter listing events 
and an information booth. 

Why was LT-SOB started? Accord- 
ing to Art Eichlin, "Up until this 
year, there was one SAB for the 
whole university. Theoretically, it's 
possible, but it just didn't work out. 
Most of the people were at Lake 
Shore — no criticism or anything — 
they were just there. Ours had to 
go up there Sunday nights when the 
meetings were and they didn't al- 
ways show and that was our fault for 
not going. But there were two of 
them and there just wasn't the feel- 
ing. This way, having the money 
here has made a real difference. 
The people know they can spend it. 
They've got their account and they 
can plan it. If they goof up on some- 
thing, it's their fault. Just the physi- 
cal fact of having the money and not 
having to go for it on bended knee 
makes a difference. 



"It came out of CULT (Community 
United for Lewis Towers), which 
started first semester. Student gov- 
ernment down here was nothing. 
People just didn't care about it. We 
got a group of people together — no- 
body was elected — to work on mu- 
tual problems like parking and not 
having enough classes. What we 
want is to get the kids together with 
us and with the administration to 
find out what has been done over the 
last couple of years and to find what 
more can be done without making 
minutes and the whole yuk. 

"It worked out pretty well. People 
at least found out what was going on. 
Any issue that came up we could at 
least sit down and talk about with 
people that hopefully had some 
answers. 

"I think they are or what I hope they 
will be is a sort of coordinating 
agent for this campus. There are a 
lot of things going on that nobody 
knows about and they could co- 
ordinate or at least publicize them. 
I don't know what the student gov- 
ernment set-up is going to be at 
this point; I don't think they know. 
They had many votes for a separate 
student government at LT but there 
is some really strong feeling on the 
part of some of the people here that 
maybe that isn't the total answer. 
They're trying to work out some- 



thing that's agreeable to all of them. 
If student government is totally 
separate, then who makes the ap- 
pointments for all those committees 
that affect LT! Student representa- 
tion on significant committees can 
be important, as important as any- 
thing the student government can do, 
in my opinion. It would be nice to 
have a student government down 
here. I think for most things, we 
want to be separate. 

"We don't have a resident popula- 
tion that's coming back at night. So 
we have to do things for these people 
who are here when they're here." 

What is the purpose! As Mr. Eich- 
lin says: ". . .to find an identity, to 
not always be the tail-end of the 
Lake Shore dog. It's just to find 
things that they can do themselves, 
to have the money they're paying in 
tuition, that portion of it for student 
activities, being spent here. It's to 
get their fair share of things, to 
create something here for them- 
selves. Having money makes the 
difference. It's being able to spend 
money for things you want to do to 
make this a campus. It's trying to 
build a sense of community down 
here." 




Knowledge in the Service? 







''-■■ ^ 



.*•" 



The SS Loyola Victory, which was 
one of 414 Victory ships built during 
World War II, was named after 
Loyola University of Chicago. 

Built and commissioned in 1945, the 
SS Loyola Victory after service in 
World War II was laid up as part of 
the National Defense Reserve Fleet 
until 1950 when she was reactivated 
to meet the demands of the Korean 
War. 



the ship was returned to the Na- 
tional Defense Reserve Fleet at 
Suisun Bay, Calif., until 1965 when 
it was again placed in the service of 
the U.S. to meet her country's mili- 
tary requirements in Vietnam. 

Since being recalled to duty under 
the Military Sea Transportation 
Service, the SS Loyola Victory has 
made more than a dozen voyages to 
Southeast Asia. 



At the end of the Korean conflict. 



MM 



Off the Record — 50 Great Memories" 



Side 3 

1 ) Ringo Starr 

2) Frigjiz Fubar 

3) Richard Friedman 

4) IVIayor Richard J. Daley 

5) Pat Paulsen 

6) Carole King 

7) Tom Peterlin 

8) Dan Tracy 

9) Wm. F. Buckley & Tom Hart (Round One) 

10) Art Eichlin 

11) Thom Clark 

12) Allard Lowenstein 

13) Jesse Jackson 

14) The Jefferson Airplane 

1 5) Tom Peterlin & Dennis Christensen 

1 6) Sword of Loyola 

17) Tom Chocolate 

18) Tom Hart 

19) Richard Friedman 

20) Pat Paulsen 

21) Dan Tracy 

22) Tom Hart 

23) The Rolling Stones 

24) Mike Law 

25) Student Opinions on China & UN 



Other Side 

1 ) Rod Stewart 

2) U.S. Rep. Don Riegal 

3) State Rep. Julian Bond 

4) U.S. Rep. Bella Abzug 

5) Tom Peterlin 

6) Isaac Hayes 

> 

7) LaRue Martin 

8) Hart, Buckley, & Jackson (Round Two) 

9) Tom Kling 

10) Cornelius Bullock 

11) Rev. Raymond C. Baumhart 

1 2) Tom Peterlin 

13) Don McLean 

14) Pat Paulsen 

15) TS& Tricky 

16) U.S. Rep. Don Riegal 

17) State Rep. Julian Bond 

18) U.S. Rep. Pete McCloskey 

19) Allard Lowenstein 

20) U.S. Sen. Alan Cranston 

21) Daniel Ellsberg 

22) Jesse Jackson 

23) Paul McCartney 

24) Dan Tracy 

25) Wm. F. Buckley 



Any use of the descriptions and accounts of this record without the expressed written consent of WLUC 
and the Loyolan is inhibited. 



Not available on eight track tape carts or cassettes. 



This record was previously recorded. 




"1037": Symphony House 



About three years ago, Wilson Hall 
used to house the Union, ARA, the 
LSC bookstore. Student Activities, 
WLUC, The Loyola News. The 
Loyolan. Cadence, the Afro-Ameri- 
can Society and LSGA. With the 
opening of Mertz Hall, the Union 
and food service, the bookstore. 
Student Activities, the newspaper 
and student government were suc- 
cessfully relocated. 

But the radio station, yearbook, 
literary magazine and the Afro- 
Americans — all four organizations 
having very large memberships — 
needed more room than Mertz could 
provide. The Afro-American So- 
ciety (now LUASA) asked that the 
university-owned building east of 
the Coffee House be given to them 
for a black cultural center, but were 
told the building Mras to be demol- 
ished and the land was to be used 
for parking. Loyola's Latin Ameri- 
can students organized to form LA 
SO and were also looking for a home 
base. 

Former director of Student Activi- 
ties James Robinson saw these 



problems and proposed Symphony 
House as the solution. The univer- 
sity-owned two-flat at 1037 West 
Loyola Avenue was rennovated to 
accommodate student groups and 
named "Symphony House", in hopes 
that its occupants Mrould coexist in 
harmony. The creation of "1037" is 
one of the most successful of the 
university's recent projects. 

The university supplied "1037" oc- 
cupants with old office furniture 
from university storerooms and 
paint. Members of the individual 
groups decorated and personally 
supplied whatever else was needed — 
partly because of budget austerity 
and partly because of pride in having 
something to call their own. The uni- 
versity maintenance staff made it- 
self available for cleanup, carpentry 
work and plumbing and electrical 
repairs. 

All offices in "1037" serve as 
places to hold meetings and carry 
on the normal production work of 
the groups. WLUC broadcasts 
from its studios in Symphony House 
and has its own record library there. 



LASO, during the Conference for 
New Voters, served as headquar- 
ters for the Chicano caucus and 
meeting place for conference or- 
ganizers. LUASA has used part of 
its space for tutoring purposes. The 
yearbook processes its own film and 
prints its own pictures in the fa- 
cilities it has set up. Cadence maga- 
zine holds weekly meetings for sub- 
mission and discussion of student 
and faculty poetry and graphics. 

The spirit of cooperation does exist 
at Symphony House. Some of the 
groups, especially WLUC and The 
Loyolan. share many members. 
"1037" 's organizations all agreed 
to give WLUC the proceeds from 
the building's coke machine as a 
small help toM>ard the station's drive 
to go FM. And plans are now being 
made to provide a large meeting 
room/lounge to be used by all 
building occupants. 




What Ever Happened to the Coffee House? 



The Coffee House vwas once a place 
where you could hear some good stu- 
dent entertainment, hold a meeting 
or have a party, attend Free Uni- 
versity courses, meet with admin- 
istrators, or just sit around to read 
or talk. 

What used to be the Coffee House is 
now called the Assisi Center. And 
the name is not all that has changed. 
The Center is slowly becoming the 
headquarters for "campus ministry". 

Father Donald Hayes, SJ, newly ap- 
pointed Vice President, Campus 
Ministry, and director of the Assisi 
Center, explains that the Coffee 
House's functions as a social cen- 
ter and place of entertainment will 
be taken over by the proposed Cam- 
pion Hall Rathskeller. Campion's 
basement is well equipped for food 
service. The Coffee House was not 



and couldn't afford the costs of sup- 
plying it adequately for this purpose. 
Father Hayes also feels that poor 
attendance of weekday Coffee House 
programs also justifies the Assisi 
Center's new orientation. 

The building at 1132 West Loyola 
Avenue is still the site for meetings, 
however. Several of Loyola's serv- 
ice organizations, the Christian Life 
Community, Pentacostal groups and 
the Volunteers Interested in People 
have used the facilities for their 
work. Drug talks have been given 
there, and discussions of important 
student issues are slated for the 
future. 

The Coffee House - Assisi Center 
transition is a slow, deliberate one. 
Father Hayes holds a position which 
did not exist at Loyola until this 
year. He returns here after a year 



of teaching at the Rome Center, and 
it is taking him some time to assess 
the campus situations at LSC, LT 
and the medical-dental centers. 

Father Hayes hopes to survey the 
Loyola student body and to establish 
service and counseling programs 
for students, faculty and staff. His 
biggest problem right now is that of 
making the potentials of the center 
known to the Loyola community. 
Father feels that a "missionary 
approach" might be necessary and 
is considering contacting resident 
students door-to-door. 



11 



University Turns a Deaf Ear to WL VC-FM 



July 1, 1970 



July 21, 1970 



First application sent to the Federal 
Communications Commission (FCC) 
for a permit to construct an FM 
station on Loyola's Lake Shore 
Campus. 

First application returned by the 
FCC due to possible interference 
with existing stations on the same 
frequency. 



December 1 7, 1 970 The second request to the FCC for 
a construction permit was filed and 
accepted in Washington, D.C. by the 
FCC. 



February 22, 1971 



February 26, 1971 



March 25, 1971 



April, 1971 



May 10, 1971 



Junel, 1971 



FCC assigns the proposed FM 
station its call letters: WVLC-FM. 

Staff members of WLUC meet with 
the President of the university to 
inform him of plans to build the 
FM station. 

WLUC attempted to secure funding 
via grants to the university. 

WLUC receives letters of support 
from all student organizations, 
local community groups, and de- 
partment heads of Loyola and 
Mundelein. 

A meeting was requested with the 
President of the university to dis- 
cuss the further developments to- 
ward the FM station. The President 
postpones the meeting until the fall. 

A one-time expenditure of $13,644.92 
requested in WLUC's yearly budget 
to pay for the equipment of FM 
station. 



July 15, 1971 



August 19, 1971 



Septembers, 1971 



September & 
October, 1971 



The Board of Trustees deny WLUC 
any budget requests whatsoever. 

A budget amendment is granted 
WLUC for $1,368 to operate the 
AM station per Mr. Tinkle. 

Office of the President sets FM 
meeting for September 27th. 

President of University asked some 
questions about possible problems 
of operating an FM station. The 
President received documented 
replies to all of his questions by 
staff members of WLUC. 



November 17, 1971 A budget amendment request for 
emergency funds of $6,000 to build 
the FM station unanimously ap- 
proved and recommended by the 
Committee on Student Life. 

November 30, 1971 Budget amendment request refused 
by the University Budget Committee. 



January, 1971 



February 9, 1972 



February 22, 1972 



A loan for $2,000 to save the FM 
station by buying minimal amount 
of equipment was requested. The 
University Budget Committee re- 
fused to grant WLUC the loan which 
would have been paid back by the 
station at the end of the fiscal year. 

FCC permit to build WLVC-FM 
expired. 

FCC extended the permit to build the 
FM station until August 9, 1972 when 
WLVC-FM must be on the air or 
risk losing the only available fre- 
quency in Chicago to another uni- 
versity more eager to build a 
station. 



12 




Larry Logman 



Past and present members of 
WLUC Radio have formed a non- 
profit educational corporation called 
Community Educational Broadcast- 
ing (ComCast) to construct and 
operate the FM station which WLUC 
applied for in the name of Loyola 
University. According to Larry 
Logman, president of Comcast, and 
other members of the corporation, 
it has become apparent that the Uni- 
versity does not wish to support an 
FM station and does not intend to 
act on the permit. ComCast hopes 
to obtain the permit from Loyola 
and begin construction on the station. 

If ComCast does obtain the permit, 
the new FM station would be sepa- 
rate from WLUC radio, both legally 
and physically. It would be estab- 
lished at a different site than the 
WLUC station and would serve a 
wider area. In addition to serving 
Loyola and Mundelein, as WLUC is 
now limited to doing, WLVC-FM 
would reach Edgewater, Rogers 



WLUC Forms 

Educational 

Corporation 

Park, Evanston and Uptown, with a 
heavy emphasis to public affairs 
programming for these communities. 

The new station would be largely, 
but not totally, staffed by present 
members of WLUC. Members of 
the surrounding communities would 
be encouraged to join WLVC-FM. 
Training courses are planned to en- 
able these people to become effec- 
tive members of the station. 

ComCast's purpose is not to dis- 
credit the University or to harm 
WLUC. Rather, its purpose is to 
establish an FM educational station 
to serve the needs of the North Side 
communities. WLUC will still be 
the Loyola University radio station 



and will be staffed by members of 
the Loyola station. WLUC will be 
helped by the establishment of the 
FM station — many people would be 
staff members of both stations and 
would gain from the great experi- 
ence involved. 

Constructing a 10-watt FM station 
is an expensive affair. Thus WLUC 
has initiated a fund-raising drive to 
aid the new corporation in its proj- 
ect. The goal of the drive if $20,000. 



13 



Loyola and Mundelein Merge Physics Departments 
Beginning of a Trend? 



"The merger of Loyola's and Mun- 
delein's physics departments was 
prompted, in large measure, by the 
closeness of the two schools, a re- 
newed interest in the physical sci- 
ences by liberal arts students not 
majoring in physics, and the feeling 
that the quality of academic pres- 
entation would be improved," ac- 
cording to Rev. Robert J. McNamara, 
S.J., dean of Loyola's College of Arts 
and Sciences. 

The recent merger of the physics 
departments of the two schools con- 
tinues a national trend toward the 
sharing of university and college 
academic facilities when the result 
improves the curriculum content 
and spurs the educational and re- 
search process. 

Specifically, the merger of the two 
physics departments increases the 
joint physics faculty to seven mem- 
bers, expands the number of course 
offerings and research opportunities, 
and increases the amount of availa- 



ble physics equipment, classrooms, 
and laboratory space. 

Physics students from both schools 
have the benefit of using a laser 
laboratory located in the Learning 
Resource Center of Mundelein Col- 
lege. The laboratory, which is used 
primarily to teach the principles of 
physical optics, is furnished with the 
latest laser equipment from Loyola. 

The new department is charged with 
the responsibility of meeting the 
needs of both institutions, explained 
Dr. Ronald W. Harris, chairman of 
the joint physics departments. Har- 
ris continued that every attempt will 
be made to see that the philosophical 
approach and the structure of the 
courses offered are in keeping with 
the wishes of Loyola University and 
Mundelein College. Harris said that 
the requirements for a physics ma- 
jor are to be identical at both schools 
and that registration for all physics 
courses is to be done at the parent 
institution of each student. 




14 



New Core Curriculum: 

Number of Hours Required Drops from 75 to 48 



The 1971-72 school year marks an 
important change in the College of 
Arts and Sciences core curriculum, 
implementing a proposal made by 
Dean Robert McNamara, S. J., the 
Academic Council has reduced re- 
quired courses to a total of 48 hours. 

The core curriculum is organized 
into four major areas: natural sci- 
ence, behavioral science, humani- 
ties, and the expressive arts. These 
components represent the position 
that man relates intellectually to 
natural and human phenomena 
through these four modes of thought 
and expression. 

Courses in the natural science 
CORE are aimed at the non-science 
major. Briefly, they attempt to show 
man's relation to the environment, 
his understanding of the relation- 
ship, how he controls the environ- 
ment and the rationale for the 
methods he has used in this continu- 
ing effort. 



Behavioral sciences, relative new- 
comers to the academic scene, focus 
the student on studies of modern 
cities, primitive societies, economic 
functions, political structures, the 
human psyche and how specific 
situations are investigated and 
classified. 

In the humanities core, as with the 
others, survey or introductory 
courses have been substituted by 
more substantive courses. English 
101, for example, has been dropped 
as a requirement unless it is de- 
termined that the student needs 
work in this area. 



The expressive arts have expanded 
at Loyola to include creative writ- 
ing, drawing, painting, sculpture, 
music, theatre, speech and film. In 
the new core, students are required 
to take any two courses as long as 
they are actively engaged in the 
making of art products. 



Father McNamara contends that no 
student has the right to call himself 
a bachelor of arts or of arts science 
"unless he has tried — and, to some 
extent succeeded— to think, to feel 
and to express himself as a scientist 
does, as a philosopher does, as a 
theologian does, as a historian does, 
and as a literary author or artist does." 



NEW CORE CURRICULUM 



FORMER REQUIREMENTS 



Natural Science 

Behavioral 
Science 



Humanities 



Expressive Arts 



Mathematics, Chemistry, 




Mathematics, Natural 


Physics, Biology, Natural 




Science or 


Science or Anthropology 


6 hours 


Anthropology 


Sociology, Political Sci- 






ence, Economics, Psy- 




Classics, History or 


chology, or Anthropology 




Social Science 


English 


6 hours 




(Literature courses may 






be selected from the De- 


9 hours 


English 


partments of English 






Classical Studies, or 






Modern Languages. Three 






hours must be in a course 






treating literature origi- 






nally written in a language 






other than English) 






Philosophy 


9 hours 




Theology 


9 hours 




(effective September, '72) 




Philosophy 


History 


6 hours 


Theology 



Expressive Arts, i.e.. 
Communication Arts, Fine 
Arts, Theatre, English 
(creative writing) 



3 hours 



Foreign Language 
Political Science 
Sociology 



not required 
not required 
not required 



History 
Speech 



Foreign Language 
Political Science 
Sociology 



6 hours 



6 hours 



12 hours 



1 5 hours 
12 hours 

6 hours 

3 hours 



12 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 



15 



TyifO Neyif Programs for Loyola Arts & Sciences: 
Afro-American Studies Program 



During the spring of 1971, Loyola 
University created its Afro-Ameri- 
can Studies Program. The goals of 
this program are : 1) to make known 
the many contributions of Black 
people in all aspects of American 
life; 2) to develop and carry out 
meaningful research into some of 
the current problems confronting 
Afro-Americans; and 3) to partici- 
pate in community action programs. 

At the present time, the program 



works in conjunction with the de- 
partments of Anthropology, English, 
Fine Arts, History, Sociology and 
the Urban- Ethnic Studies Program. 
The program offers the following 
courses: in Anthropology we have 
The Peoples of Africa and Afro- 
Americans; in English we have 
Black Authors since 1914: in Fine 
Arts we have Afro- American Art 
History; in History, Afro-American 
History before 1865 and Afro- 
American History since 1865; and in 



Sociology, we have Sociology of the 
Afro-American. These courses are 
offered at both the Lake Shore and 
Lewis Towers campuses and also in 
the University College. 

Being an interdisciplinary program, 
it offers a unique opportunity to all 
of the students to learn about a 
large segment of society which 
heretofore they may have had very 
little or no contact. 



Urban Etimic Studies Program 



Loyola's Program for Urban- Ethnic 
Studies aims to facilitate under- 
graduate teaching, research and ac- 
tion involving urban problems and 
ethnic group life by initiating ac- 
tivities not easily accomplished 
within the traditional university/ 
school/department structure. It 
directs its attention not only towards 
the structures, processes and prob- 
lems of urban society but also to- 
wards the widely varied ethnic cul- 
tures found in the United States. 

The Program's goals are: 1) to co- 
ordinate throughout the undergradu- 



ate divisions of the University those 
scholarly activities focusing on ur- 
banization, urbanism and the life 
styles and cultures of those ethnic 
groups which have tended to con- 
centrate in cities; 2) to cross dis- 
ciplinary lines and initiate new ur- 
ban-ethnic teaching, research and 
policy studies to broaden and 
strengthen the undergraduate cur- 
riculum; 3) to sponsor university- 
community conferences examining 
ethnic group life; and 4) to develop 
community action projects and com- 
munity laboratories in the city in 
order that we might more directly 



participate in the solutions to urban 
problems. 

Courses in the Urban- Ethnic Stud- 
ies Program are cross-referenced 
with many of those in the depart- 
ments of Education, Political Sci- 
ence, Sociology, Economics, History, 
Fine Arts, Communication Arts, 
Philosophy, Psychology and the 
Afro-American Studies Program. 
Since September of 1971, the Pro- 
gram has offered a major to Loyola 
students in Urban- Ethnic Studies. 



17 




18 






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Division- Campuses 

LSC 20 

LT 28 

Maywood 36 

Rome Center 40 

Miles 41 

Surroundings 44 

Directory 48 











19 



Lake Shore Campus 




20 





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21 




22 






23 




24 




25 




26 







27 



Lews Tovsfers Campus 




28 



/ / 




29 



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31 




32 




33 



34 









35 



The Mayy\fOod Complex 



36 




The Mayy\fOod Complex 




38 




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y^ 






5 . -r^r^-*^ 







NILES COLLEGE 



OF LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 

ARCHDIOCESAN SEfllNARY ,, 






41 



Neysf Location for Rome Center 



The University has signed a nine- 
year lease at a new location for its 
Rome Center of Liberal Arts. The 
large, seven-level building, pre- 
viously operated by the Daughters 
of the Holy Cross as a hospital and 
retirement home, will serve as a 
self-contained facility for the entire 
academic program. 

It is anticipated by Dr. Richard A. 
Matre, Vice President and Dean of 
faculties who signed the contract, 
that the classrooms, offices, li- 
brary, and all other areas will be 
ready for the 1972-73 academic 
year by August 15, 1972. "The sign- 
ing of this long-term agreement 
makes it possible for Loyola to 
plan a much more adequate program 
than has been possible in the past 
few years," Dr. Matre explained. He 
said that the director of the Rome 
Center, Rev. John Felice, S.J., will 
continue in his oresent nnst anH 



report to the Dean of the College of 
Arts and Sciences, Rev. Robert 
McNamara, S.J., under whose juris- 
diction the Rome Center's academic 
program falls. 

Located on Monte Mario, highest of 
Rome's seven hills, Loyola's new 
Rome Center will accommodate 282 
students at one time. Besides class- 
rooms and library facilities, the 
new Rome Center at Via Trionfale 
8062 will have faculty offices, dining 
facilities, administrative offices, 
student recreational areas and bed- 
rooms. 

Loyola's Rome Center was started 
in 1962 and is the largest American 
study program conducted by a U.S. 
university in Europe. Besides Loy- 
ola students, there are students 
from 75 U.S. colleges and universi- 
ties enrolled. 







' , — . — ilifcf 111 



38 



Niles College 

Niles College is an institution dedi- 
cated to producing the ideal semi- 
narian. In order to accomplish this 
task, Niles has attempted to produce 
a greenhouse atmosphere in which 
future priests can grow. The stu- 
dents were provided with a Polish 
orphanage converted into a seminary, 
seven by seven cubicles for living 
quarters, a refurbished cafeteria, 
snack bars, and even a chapel. To 
further the training of the ideal 
seminarian, Niles College has affili- 
ated itself with the great powers of 
Loyola University. 




ii IS a 




1 ' 




NILES COLLEGE 



OF LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 

ARCHDIOCESAN SEMINARY 



^■:?;?r^ii:'^ 






41 




42 





43 



Surroundings 





45 




THi'-Jt 








46 



k 



High Life 




47 



As the years pass by following 
graduation, and the typical alumni 
overcomes his withdrawal symptoms 
from Loyola, he will look back with 
fond memories on such hangouts as 
the student union, tranquility lounge, 
Huey's, Little King's, Joker's, Ham- 
ilton's, Cindy Sue's, Charmets', and 
numerous other eateries, drink- 
eries, sleeperies, make-outeries, 
and scenes for ail type of college 
oriented discussions. He will also 
wonder why. 

But the average Loyolan will be un- 
able to probe his clouded memories 
to remember some architectural de- 
lights which abound on the Lake 
Shore Campus, but are tragically 
ignored, i speak of such wonders as 
the Chem Annex Building (with its 
practical design of four walls and a 
roof), the ROTC rifle range (which 
lacks Bucky Fuller's geodesic gen- 
ius, but tries hard nonetheless), and 
the boathouse which stands brave 
witness to Loyola's location on the 
lake (far better witness than the 
beach which is unavailable to stu- 
dent use.) 

But one of the great hot spots around 
campus is the basement of the Jesu- 
it Faculty Residence Building (early 
American penal design) where, just 
around the beginning of each semes- 
ter, students would wait in line to 
hear someone in the Financial Aids 
Office tell them go to the Bursar's 
Office where they would wait In line 
in order to be directed to go to the 
Financial Aids Office where they 
would wait in line to find out they 
should be at the Bursar's Office. . . 

And then for all you nostalgic lovers 
of verse, there is a tree near the 
Jesuit Faculty Residence Building 
with a plaque on it commemorating 
it as the Joyce Kilmer tree. Perhaps 
a student looking at this tree, and 



the plaque that adorns it and who it 
is dedicated to, will finally realize 
something about Loyola and its con- 
nection with culture and civilization. 

And there is also the library to 
consider. It's there — not much, but 
it's there. 

The student union is not very mem- 
orable for its architectural splendor, 
but who can forget the great, big 
gobs of gastrometric goulash served 
with nary an apology by our heroes 
(you can tell that they're the good 
guys — they wear white uniforms) 
who are employed by ARA. Their 
appeal is universal around the uni- 
versity community — Lake Shore and 
Lewis Towers, student and faculty 
member, resident and commuter 
alike. 

The repasts prepared by these ex- 
perts are uniform in design for all 
campuses — they believe that each 
student is endowed by his Creator 
with certain unalienable rights, and 
that among these are Ptomaine, In- 
digestion, and the pursuit of Pepto 
Bismol. 

But the student union and resident 
cafeteria aren't the only highlights 
in Mertz Hall. There is the small 
courtyard in the middle of Centen- 
nial Forum, locked so that the stu- 
dents don't inadvertantly Meander in 
there and get high on fresh air. Also 
in the courtyard is the Tree of Life, 
planted during the first anti-war 
moratorium, which is slowly dying 
of neglect. 

Around the Forum are the LSGA 
(who?) Office, the SAB Office (from 
whence come those witty announce- 
ments over the PA system), and the 
Office of Student Personnel — the less 
said about it, the better. Also is the 
tranquility lounge where students go 



to do all sorts of things without the 
hindrance of anonymity. 

In the basement of Mertz are the 
game room with its pool tables, 
ping-pong tables, and coin operated 
diversions, the Phoenix Office (con- 
veniently tucked away in the bowels 
of Mertz where they can do the least 
harm), and the bookstore where you 
can buy a $9.00 textbook for $12.00, 
and resell it back to them for $2.10. 

Upstairs are all those residents 
(male and female)who have to show 
passports, undergo stop-and-frisk, 
and take lie detector tests to enter. 

Mertz Hall's prime rooms overlook 
the Loyola University parking lot 
and the Athletic Field, it is on this 
field that the bravest and most noble 
of Loyolans venture forth for touch 
football, it is also the same field 
that from which the bravest and 
most noble Loyolans are carried to 
awaiting ambulances. 

As we continue our progress south- 
ward, we find the ROTC building 
(home of the Sociology and Fine 
Arts Departments, and in 1970, a 
molotov cocktail) and the Wilson 
Hall of former student union fame. 
Just in front of Wilson is a stretch 
of grass (in the summer it's almost 
green) and a couple of token trees. 

Circling around and heading back 
north, we find the impressive (?) 
Damen Hall, the main classroom 
building on campus. Its most dis- 
tinctive features are the smell of 
dead lab animals in the basement 
and the smell of decaying students 
who passed out during the registra- 
tion on the tenth floor and haven't 
been revived, in lietween is the smell 
of most teacher's lectures and most 
students' test answers. 



48 



Cudahy Science Hall stands just 
north of Damen Hall as testimony 
to Loyola's dedication to the hard 
sciences. How it stands after all 
these years is anybody's guess. The 
building is known throughout the 
world for its sickly green dome 
which houses a defunct observatory. 

Cudahy's brother building, Dumbach 
Hall, lies just north. For the non- 
science student, it is a good example 
of pre-Columbian slum architecture 
and the scene of many theology and 
English courses. For the science 
student, it is just another example 
of pre-Columbian slum architecture 
and the scene of many of his the- 
ology and English courses. 

Hidden away on Loyola Avenue (and 
rightfully so) are the Theology Build- 
ing and the 1037 House or Symphony 
House (whatever you want to call it). 
At 1037, the leaders of many student 
organizations, among them the year- 
book, the literary magazine, the 
radio station, and LUASA, learn 
valuable lessons in substandard 
housing conditions and how to pay 
off the city inspectors, besides 
sitting around doing their thing, 
which is sitting around. 

Then just east of all this is the lake. 
During the spring and summer, 
many students go to sit on the grass, 
smoke it (ha-ha, just kidding, that 
sort of stuff doesn't happen at a 
Catholic school), and watch the 
alewife float in (now that's the type 
of excitement at a Catholic school 
which students partake in). 

Heading west now, we come to 
Alumni Gym. This is home of the 
1963 NCAA champs. It is also the 
home of the last two years' teams 
which have managed to win twelve 
games between them. Club football 
has almost won that many games 



in the past two years. 

Outside the door and heading off 
campus we come to Sheridan Road 
and its diversity of shops, restau- 
rants, and taverns. Directly across 
Sheridan are two old Loyola institu- 
tions, Cindy Sues and Loyola Jewel- 
ers. The former, realizing the great 
profits they have realized over the 
years by selling meals and Bromo 
in package deals and ala carte, have 
opened up a bar to attract customers 
who would rather drink their way to 
an upset stomach. The latter does 
a booming business in fraternity 
and sorority pins, engagement rings, 
and diamond studded, aluminum 
plated medallions and chains of 
Arnold Damen. 

For those who like foreign food (for- 
eign to the human digestive tract), 
there is Ming's Chinese food and El 
Taco Loco's Spanish cuisine. At both 
spots there is the added thrill of try- 
ing to communicate in sign language, 
pig Latin, Chinese, and Spanish. 

I can't think of anything nasty to say 
about My Pi pizzeria, so I won't say 
anything at all. 

Little King's boasts of their sand- 
wiches as being equivalent to a 
complete meal. Their prices are 
equivalent to my complete weekly 
income. 

Cleanliness is next to godliness, and 
in search of grace, Loyola students 
flock to many nearby laundromats 
where for just pocket change, you 
could get your whole wash not just 
clean, not just white, but all the way 
to bright! Many a romance has 
sprung from arguments about the 
relative merits of Salvo and Clorox — 
if you don't believe me, just watch 
daytime television. 
For many students, the only way to 



wade through the trying four, five, 
or six years they spend here is to 
drink themselves to oblivion after 
every school day. To serve this 
purpose, Huey's, Jokers', Hamil- 
tons', and Bruno's are the favored 
therapeutic centers for Loyola stu- 
dents. Jokers' has its infamous 25c 
beer night every Wednesday and 
Panama red chile. Bruno's has the 
most accessible package liquor 
store to campus. Huey's has live 
music most of the time and inflated 
prices. Hamiltons' has tradition and 
Pabst. But for the serious drinker, 
Don's Hideaway has all that one 
could ask for — a 4:00 am liquor li- 
cense, squalid surroundings, and the 
most interesting clientel this side 
of Cook County Jail. 

But all the truly memorable places 
are not surrounding Lake Shore, 
Lewis Towers has its share. For 
nature lovers, there is the umbilical 
cord connecting Lewis Towers and 
the Marquette Center. For those 
who like crowds, there are the ele- 
vators in Lewis Towers. And for the 
thrifty, there are the city parking 
lots which charge only twrice as 
much as the cost of a parking ticket. 
For the eaters and drinkers, there 
are such places as Charmets, the 
Red Garter, and Jack-in-the-Box. 

By no stretch of the imagination is 
this a complete guide of all the won- 
ders of our two campuses, whether it 
be the twenty-odd (they certainly 
are) acres of grass, concrete, and 
an assortment of infected ivy and 
trees of Lake Shore, or the simplistic, 
compact concrete, steel, and glass 
jungle of Lewis Towers. It would be 
a monumental task to make a com- 
plete guide. But it is an incomplete 
guide. So when you read this section 
twenty years after matriculation and 
pause to remember the good old days, 
you will know better. 



49 




Division-A ativities 



Basketball 52 

Football 60 

Hockey 68 

Track 72 

Swimming 73 

Concerts 74 

Plays 78 

Speakers 84 

Orientation 94 

Voter's Conference 98 

Registration 104 

President's Ball 106 

LT Apathy Day 108 

Greek Week 112 

Voter's Registration 114 

Dorm Week 115 

"Sink the Tink" 116 




51 



Basketball 




52 




53 



It's true the '71-72 Ramblers won 
twice as many ball games as last 
season's club, but the feeling 
around campus in mid-January 
was that this team had all the tools 
needed to make a post-season 
tournament. As it stands, the 
Ramblers settled for a dismal 8- 
14 win-loss record. Plus a great 
deal of personal pride was lost in 
losing 8 of their last 9 games. 

It's also true the Ramblers faced 
as demanding a schedule as any 
college team can face. UCLA, 
Marquette, and Long Beach State 
can turn the basketball season in- 
to a long winter for any basketball 
squad. But this doesn't excuse lost 
ball games. It just makes the pain 
a little more justifiable. 

That's not to say there were no 
bright spots for the Ramblers. 
LaRue Martin finished his senior 
year as the all time Rambler 
scoring leader. He also finished 
his second straight season as one 
of the top ten rebounders in the 
country. LaRue is a blue chip col- 
lege player who should go high in 
the pro basketball draft. But more 
importantly, he's a real gentleman 
and a credit to the university. 

Another source of Rambler pride 
was the improved backcourt 
strength. For the first time in 
several years, steady Rich Ford 
had some help getting the ball 
down court. Forward Nate Hayes 
improved his dribbling as well as 
shooting. But even more of a sur- 
prise was the work of guards 
Garvey Walker and Frank Sanders. 
Garvey got his chance to play and 
make the most of it. In the last 
five games. Walker earned his 
role as quarterback and playmak- 
er. Sanders, on the other hand, 
still has to prove himself. But 
there were moments on the court 
when he showed true signs of 
greatness. It's also nice to know 
that both Hayes, Walker, and San- 
ders will be back next season. 

However, the man who really holds 
the key for Rambler ventures next 
season is Paul Cohen. Cohen, 6'9", 
245 lbs., has the muscle and de- 
sire plus a fine tip shot to fill the 
big shoes of graduating LaRue 
Martin. All Paul has to do is take 
off a little weight and get a little 
more floor time. The rest is up to 
him. 





I 







55 



>- 



56 





57 




i8 



i 





1971-72 VARSITY BASKETBALL ROSTER 



Player 




Pos. 


Ht. 


Wt. 


*?» 


Ltrs. 


Class 


Hometow/n 


No. 


Cohen, Paul 




C 


6-8 


249 


19 





Sophomore 


Boston 


41 


Compobasso, Pat 


F 


6-5 


200 


20 


1 


Junior 


Chicago 


10 


Ford, Rich> 




G 


6-0 


178 


23 


1 


Senior 


Washington, D. C. 


35 


Glover, Isadore 




F 


6-6 


201 


22 





Senior 


Chicago 


25 


Hayden, Brian 




G 


6-1 


181 


19 





Junior 


W. Milford, N.J. 


21 


Hayes. Nate 




F 


6-3 


168 


19 


1 


Junior 


Washington, D. C. 


40 


Kendall, Alan 




F 


6-6 


184 


21 





Sophomore 


Falls Church, Va. 


31 


Law, Mike 




G 


6-1 


180 


19 





Sophomore 


Highland, Ind. 


23 


Martin, La Rue* 




C 


6-10 


200 


21 


2 


Senior 


Chicago 


20 


Sanders, Frank 




G 


6-0 


148 


19 





Sophomore 


Chicago 


14 


Schneiderman, Mike 


G 


5-11 


170 


21 





Senior 


Chicago 


24 


Sexton, Jim 




F 


6-3 


202 


19 





Sophomore 


Chicago 


22 


Walker, Chris 




G 


6-0 


159 


21 





Junior 


Chicago 


34 


Walker, Garvey 




G 


5-11 


152 


20 





Junior 


Chicago 


30 


Co- Captains* 




















Home UnKorms: 


White 


















Away Uniforms: 


Gold 



















59 




60 




Football 



^A '' 



■ -» ■»?■-*' 






-4 



/•^*-.^.Hh^- »«%, 



Great strides were made at Loyola 
for an atmosphere of "real" varsity 
football in the 1971 gridiron cam- 
paign. Labelled as one of the best 
Club football squads in the country, 
the Ramblers compiled an impres- 
sive 7-1-1 record and won its first 
Mid- Central Collegiate Conference 
Championship. All of this was ac- 
complished in only its second year 
of operation. 

With a year of experience under his 
belt. Coach Dick Blackmore was 
able to concentrate his talents more 
toward the coaching aspect of foot- 
ball than the administrative end. 
Blackmore along with able assist- 
ants, Nick Rassas and Frank Anetti, 
turned the 4-4 1970 season around 
and came up with a winner! The 
highlight of the season was the 
Rambler victory at Three Rivers 
Stadium over the nationally ranked 
Duquesne University. 

On offense. . . veteran quarterback 
Joe Leppert changed from a thrower 
to a passer . . . Gnatbacks Mike 
Egan, George Ditola and Bill Wien- 
ke received backfield help from a 
195 pound "rookie" senior Bill 
Dunne. Charlie Byrne, and Keith 
Smith developed into two of the most 
respected pass receivers around. 

On defense. . . Defense lineman Al 
Brown, linebackers Joe Payne and 
Chris Markey led an experienced 
defensive group that was the strong- 
est crew in the conference against 
rushing on the ground. Defensive 
backs Gene Rak, Mike Stanzak, and 
Rick Schwinn became a solid unit 
that stopped giving up the long bomb 
and started intercepting. 



'^'-^-^f' >, 



Loyola U. Roster 



No. 


Name 


Pos. 


Height 


Weight 


85 


Gregg Wolfe 


E 


6-3" 


202 


85 


Charles Byrne 


E 


6'2" 


195 


77 


Tom Corcoran 


T 


6'2" 


193 


74 


Stan Salabura 


T 


8-1" 


210 


72 


Wayne Frigo 


T 


SO" 


190 


62 


Chris Markey 


LB 


60" 


210 


66 


John MclMamara G 


S'lV 


190 


56 


John O'Brian 


G 


5'11" 


186 


51 


Barry Ennessey 


C 


6-1" 


204 


60 


Mike Hogan 


LB 


6'2" 


185 


65 


Jack Goldrich 


C 


6'1 " 


196 


12 


Joe Leppert 


QB 


62" 


210 


14 


Tom Machey 


QB 


6-2" 


195 


41 


Mike Egan 


HB 


S'lO" 


160 


21 


George Ditola 


HB 


5'11" 


175 


30 


Charles Galiet 


HB 


5'10" 


162 


31 


Bill Wienke 


FB 


5'11" 


183 


36 


Bill Dunne 


FB 


6'1" 


210 


27 


Kevin King 


FB 


6-2" 


205 


82 


Jonas Leoponis 


DE 


60" 


196 


80 


John Griffin 


DE 


60" 


192 


71 


Joe McCone 


DE 


6'2" 


197 


70 


John Cushing 


T 


6'2 ■ 


209 


75 


Al Brown 


T 


6-1" 


215 


61 


Joe Payne 


LB 


5-11" 


182 


00 


Jerry Guerrera 


LB 


5-10" 


185 


44 


Mike Liston 


S 


5'11" 


176 


40 


Mike Dresnes 


QB 


5'10" 


172 


32 


Gene Rak 


CB 


5-11" 


175 


10 


Rich Schwinn 


S 


6'2 " 


185 


45 


Mike Stancyak 


S 


5-11" 


173 


25 


Jim Bachner 


LB 


6'1" 


183 


64 


Bruce Jackson 


LB 


5-11" 


185 



Head Coach: 
Assistants: 



Trainers: 



Richard Blackmore 
Nick Rassas 
Jack Annetti 

Ted Rockwell 
Mike Murphy 







I 







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64 




65 





66 




67 




68 



Club Hockey 



What is the Loyola University Hock- 
ey Club? Is the Club the Team? The 
Loyola University Hockey Club is a 
student run organization registered 
with the State as a non-profit cor- 
poration. The Club is composed of 
Loyola students, faculty, alumni and 
friends with the specific purpose of 
fielding and supporting a Loyola 
team in inter-collegiate play. We 
receive no financial support from 
the University. We rely completely 
on donations, advertising, ticket 
sales, and the contributions of our 
players. How much do they love 
hockey? Each player commits him- 
self for a total of $250 for the year. 
The Club, the organization behind 
him, provides him with the fund 
raising opportunities to reach this 
goal. The player who solicited an 
ad from you, who signed you up as 
a booster, received credit for the 
amount he brought into the Club. 
When you buy a ticket for the next 
game, purchase it from a player. 
You not only help the Club, you also 
help that individual player towards 
his goal of $250. The Club itself 
hopes to do far more than provide 
Loyola students with the opportunity 
to play hockey. We hope to be a 
positive influence on the develop- 
ment of amateur hockey in this area. 
We hope to give the eight and ten- 
year-old, the teenage, the oppor- 
tunity to see fast, clean, and exciting 
hockey for a price that he or she 
can afford. Our own financial pic- 
ture is cloudy, but we plan to sup- 
port the youngsters in the Niles 
Hockey Program in every way pos- 
sible. A benefit game for these 
youngsters and a number of free 
hockey clinics are being planned. 



PLAYER 

Pat Barron 
Paul Brice 
Tom Calandriello 
Jim Cooney 
Bob Coughlin 
Steve Dimas 
Mike Flaws 
Ron Giovannini 
Ken Kott 
Mike Kowalski 
John Kwasney 
Chris Martin 
Bob Martinkus 
Pat Matre 
George McCarthy 
Mike Mclnerney 
Bob Molina 
John O'Dwyer 
Dave Pateros 
Mike Payne 
Ted Sarauskas 
John Stanick 
Ken Thomas 
John Winkler 
Bob Wrobel 
Ralph Zarada 
Mike Oliver 
Mark Rybczynski 



YEAR 


AGE 


POSITION 


Jun. 


20 


Defense 


Soph. 


19 


Forward 


Jun. 


19 


Forward 


Jun. 


19 


Defense 


Sr. 


25 


Defense 


Jun. 


19 


Forward 


Fr. 


18 


Forward 


Sr. 


21 


Defense 


Fr. 


18 


Forward 


Jun. 


20 


Forward 


Fr. 


18 


Forward 


Jun. 


20 


Forward 


Sr. 


21 


Goal 


Soph. 


23 


Defense 


Jun. 


21 


Forward 


Soph. 


18 


Goal 


Jun. 


19 


Defense 


Soph. 


19 


Forward 


Soph. 


19 


Forward 


Fr. 


18 


Forward 


Jun. 


20 


Forward 


Soph. 


19 


Forward 


Jun. 


20 


Goal 


Fr. 


18 


Forward 


Jun. 


20 


Forward 


Soph. 


19 


Forward 


Fr. 


18 


Manager 


Fr. 


18 


Manager 



Who are the people in the Club? 
Simple! Individuals who love the 
game of hockey and want to see 
amateur hockey grow in the Chicago 
area. We hope you'll enjoy the game, 
and we look forward to seeing you 
at many more. 



69 




70 




71 



Track 



The 1971-1972 Loyola Track Team 
got off to a fast start with a winning 
Cross Country season, compiling an 
excellent 6-2 dual meet record under 
new head coach Tom Cooney. Led by 
senior Jim Newman and sophomore 
Hank Vera, the only losses were 
incurred in the Rambler's first dual 
meet at the hands of Eastern Illi- 
nois and Illinois State, both peren- 
nial powers in the NCAA cham- 
pionships. Among the teams defeated 
were Northern Illinois, Marquette, 
Wayne State, Wheaton and Univer- 
sity of Illinois Circle. The team 
also captured the first place trophy 
Wampum Lake Turkey Trot. 



Members: Jim Newman (Captain), 
Mike Damitz, Dennis Ziomek, Jim 
Ediund, Keith Trexler, Rich Lang, 
Jo Kallas, Hank Vera, Jim Lucas, 
Merv Gould, Jim Williams, Jack 
Murphy, Tom Germino, Tom Koro- 
sec, Jo Barrett (manager). Coach: 
Tom Cooney. 



Working hard through November and 
December, Rambler Rich Lang and 
Joe Kallas were rewarded by an in- 
vitation to compete in the Phila- 
delphia Track Classic on January 
22. Lang won his heat easily in 
1:11.9 to place third overall, while 
Kallas received the fourth place 
medal. Other bright sports in the 
team's early indoor races include 
Captain Jim Newman's 1 :54 half 
mile at Michigan State February 12, 
senior Mike Damitz's .22 220 at 
Western Michigan February 4, jun- 
ior Merv Gould in the low hurdles, 
sophomores Hank Vera and Jim 
Williams in the Mile Relay, Denny 
Ziomek in the 220 and Jim Lucas 
in the steeplechase. 



f^ 



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Smmming 



The Loyola water polo and swim- 
ming teams are comprised of the 
same athletes, in the fall the water 
polo team competes in the Midwest- 
ern Intercollegiate Conference which 
includes such teams as the Univer- 
sity of Michigan, Indiana U., Michi- 
gan State, Ohio State, Purdue, the 
University of Kentucky, Western 
Illinois U., and Illinois Circle. The 
Aqua Ramblers finished the season 
with an 18 and 4 record. Although 
defeating the University of Michigan 
in regular season play, Loyola lost 
to them by one goal during the Cham- 
pionship play. Indiana U. also defeated 
Loyola in the Championship play by 
the same one goal margin, giving the 
Aqua- Ramblers a third place finish. 

As in water polo, the swimming 
team competed against top flight 
competition, but with a smaller 
compliment of 12 athletes. The 
season ended one victory short of 
an even season. The outstanding 
Aqua- Ramblers, all who will be re- 
turning next season are: Tom Zim- 
merman, diver, captain John Clark, 
butterfly, Pat Murphy, free styler, 
and Ron Haak, free-style sprinter. 

Members: Coach Ralph Erickson, 
Assistant Coach Tony Schimpf, Bob 
Dahms, Dan Curran, John Pflaumer, 
John Clark, Hugh MacKinnon, Terry 
Seamans, Rich Dux, Alan Kanaby, 
Tom Zimmerman, Ronald Haak, Pat 
Murphy, Dave Nurnberger, Steve 
Brinkmeyer, Mark Zapalak. 






Concerts 




74 




75 






76 












77 




. 



78 



Roar of the Greasepaint 



"Never take advantage of an op- 
ponent unless the opportunity pre- 
sents itself." 



"Wait for it. Wait for it. 




79 



80 





Barefoot in the Park 



"There are two type of people in 
this world, there are the doers and 
there are watchers. Well, tonight I 
did and you watched." 

"Oh yea? Well, it was a lot easier 
for you to do what I was watching 
than it was for me to watch what 
you were doing." 



81 



Romeo and Juliet 



"A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life; 
Whose misadventures piteous overthrows 

Doth with their death bury their parents' strife. 
The fearful passage of their death-marked love. 

And the continuance of their parents' rage. 
Which, but their children's end, naught could remove. 

Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage;" 

(Prologue, 6-12) 

"Many a morning hath he there been seen. 
With tears augmenting the fresh morning's dew. 
Adding to clouds more clouds with his deep sighs;" 

(i, i, 134-136) 

Mercutio: 

"No, 'tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church 
door; but 'tis enough, 'twil serve. Ask for me tomor- 
row, and you shall find me a grave man." 

(Ill, i, 97-100) 

Romeo: 

"Tybalt, Alive in triumph, and Mercutio away to heaven 
respective lenity, slain? And fire-eyed fury be my 
conduct now!" 

(Ill, i, 124-126) 




82 




83 



Buffalo Bob 



'Do you know what time it is?' 



84 




Pat Paulsen 



"It's exciting to be here in Rogers Park — if you happen to be a monk." 

"I've heard about your Coke parties and kids going up at night, 
shooting up on Preparation H." 




X ^ 




Julian Bond 



'The selection of the President on one level is incredibly simple. Anyone besides the incumbent will do!' 
'Men may not get ail they pay for in this world, but they certainly must pay for all they get." 



// 






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Pete McCloskey 



"The goal on the part of all of us should be to learn again to disagree without hatred." 

"You are the only group in America who have the time and the numerical strength to inform and educate the 
voters of America. . ." 





Bella Abzug 



"As young people you have the most 
at stake. . . You have the longest to 
live, if the rulers of this country 
will let you." 

"By his words and actions. Presi- 
dent Nixon, who has represented 
himself as a law and order advocate, 
is actually a law-breaker residing 
in the White House." 



88 



f^r^ 




Jesse Jackson 



"Take the romance out of revolution!" 

"We are going to live together like 
brothers and sisters or die apart as 
damn fools!" 



89 




Eugene McCarthy 



"In the nearly 200 years since the 
American Revolution, we have moved 
from George Washington to Richard 
Nixon, from John Adams to Spiro 
Agnew, from Thomas Jefferson to 
William Rogers, from the remarka- 
ble Edmund Randolph of Virginia to 
John Mitchell, from Alexander Ham- 
ilton to John Connally, from John 
Jay and John Marshall to Warren 
Burger and William Rehnquist. This 
is not exactly progress." 



"When the Nixon administration an- 
nounced its policy of Vietnamization, 
I warned that it was a bare disguise 
for continuing a cruel war with other 
means: Asians would still be dying, 
crops destroyed, villages decimated, 
refugees 'generated.' This, of 
course, has proven to be so. . . .We 
need a President who, we can be 
certain, will as his first act bring 
this war to an end." 



90 




Don Riegal 

"If the people who died in Vietnam 
are ever going to be heard again, 
they're going to have to be heard 
coming from us!" 

"There are 25 million other young 
people that President Nixon hasn't 
heard from yet that he's going to 
hear from next year." 



91 



Shirley M. 



92 





A Hard L o ysfenstein 



93 




94 




Orientation: Welcome to thie Big -Time 



95 




Orientation is the honeymoon part 
of your marriage to Loyola. You are 
initiated into the mysteries of being 
big-time college material by ad- 
ministrators and profs who tell you 
that college life is what you make it. 
Upperclassmen are on hand to give 
you the benefits of their experience. 
But you discover all too soon that the 
honeymoon is over when you attend 
your first college mixer and your 
first class in Dumbach Hall. 



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96 






97 



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98 



Conference for Nevsf Voters 




In December, Loyola students shed 
their traditional apathy and politi- 
cal conservatism by hosting a three- 
day conference of voter registration 
groups from across the country. The 
result was the formulation of the 
National Youth Caucus, which vcas 



sponsored by a number of student 
governments. 

Over 2,600 delegates came to Loyo- 
la on short notice, an unprecedented 
phenomena that demonstrates the 
young voter determination to affect 
the future direction of America. 



99 




Conference speakers and delegates 
emphasized that they did not Intend 
to throw their support behind any 
particular candidate for public of- 
fice. Rather, they would support 
those candidates who best reflect 
their own positions. Many of those 
attending felt one of the best ways to 
voice their opinions and show their 
power would be to send delegates to 
the 1972 National Conventions. 




100 




101 



t 



p 



The tone was anti- Nixon, pro-peace, 
pro-economic stability, and pro- 
racial equality. 

Representatives of political minor- 
ities — the blacks, Chicanos and La- 
tinos, and "the ladies" — in some 
cases struggled to be heard. 



rSp 




Registration : 
Loyola's 
IVIaxy^/eU Street 



Lines at the science tables can talk 
more than a half-hour to get through. 
Fine Arts and Phys Ed courses 
close out during the first hours. 
And seniors are no longer assured 
of getting into classes necessary 
for graduation. 

But registration, the University's 
last holdout against automation, has 
improved this year in spite of itself. 
Departmental pre-registration has 
prevented many students from being 
closed out of courses in their ma- 
jors. And during Second Semester 
registration, one only had to fill out 
three forms before beginning the 
grand table-tour. 




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104 











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106 





President's 
Ball 



Father Baumhart again hosted the 
President's Ball, the annual social 
event of Loyola University which 
honors students excelling in aca- 
demics and service to the school. 
The formal event was held Friday, 
October 29, at the Sheraton-O'Hare 
Hotel in Rosemont. Its formality, 
however, was a bit shaken as some 
students appeared in costumes dat- 
ing from the 1450's, 1600's and 
1890's, and as a long chain of danc- 
ers formed, kicking off their shoes 
and laughingly hopping around the 
room. 



107 







Apathy Day 



"Many times when administrators 
or student leaders tali« about student 
apathy, all they mean is that students 
will not do what they want them to 
do. That does not necessarily mean 
that the students are apathetic. Thai 
simply means that they are inter- 
ested in something else." 
(from an interview with Robert Mc- 
Namara S.J.) 



"The student now is realigning him- 
self with many newr positions. One 
cannot assume they are apathetic, 
merely because they are not react- 
ing with stress." 

(from an interview with Mariette 
LaBlanc) 



108 



ill 




109 





110 













.f. 



■ST- - I 




111 



Greek Week 



Halloween was doubtlessly an ap- 
propriate day for Loyola's frater- 
nity and sorority members to begin 
the bizzare antics of Greek week. 
Normally enough, the week began 
with a Halloween party at ADG's 
house, though the costumed maraud- 
ers who were there might contest 
its normalcy. On Tuesday, the 
Greeks challenged the wisdom and 
knowledge of innocent LT and LSC 
students whose peaceful lunches 
were interrupted by a trivia contest 
(eg. What color was Napolean's 
white horse? Answer: grey). 

Later, several students mustered 
enough self control to forstall eat- 
ing ARA's dilectable delicacies in 
order to participate in Wednesday's 
pie eating contest. ("Only one pie 
at a time, guys." "Have whipped 
cream, will travel!") 

Women's lib freaks among the so- 
rority members had a chance to 
show their true strength to all male 
chauvenist pig fraternity members 
during the tug-of-war held Thurs- 
day noon. The pigs won an appro- 
priately muddy victory. However, in 
the talent contest, the ladies of KBG 
sewed up (as all good women 
should) the competition against the 
swastika-bellied dancers of SPi. Eat 
your shirts, guys. 

Later in the week, Loyola's intel- 
lectuals piled on top of coke ma- 
chines and each other to protect 
themselves and yet be able to view 
the flying pies and shaving-cream- 
garnished students — Friday's activi- 
ties were highlighted by the pie 
throwing contest. Splat. Squwoosh. 
The day slid smoothly into All Star 
Football at 2 PM and the TKE house 
party in the evening. 

Margo Swieca and John Hickey be- 
came the Greek Week royalty at the 
Saturday night dance that concluded 
the week. KBG was named best so- 
rority in the competition; TKE tied 
ADG in the competition for best f rat. 

Attendance at many Greek week ac- 
tivities was notably poor. Many 
blamed poor publicity, bad timing, 
and apathy, on the part of both 
Greeks and independents. Only 150 
showed for Saturday night dance that 
was plagued by several relocations. 
To be sure, enthusiasm and spirit 
was in plentiful supply among those 
who attended the social activities of 
the week. 





113 



Voter's Registration 




114 





Eligibitity For kegistratioi. 

1 UNTITD STATIS OTIZB^SHIP 

r AGE 18 YEARS -ON Ott &EfO« MARCH 21 
1972. 

3 RtSfDEHCE 'Permar*enrr 
STATE 6 MOKTMS 
f>ltta^♦CT 30 DAYS 

AS OF MARCH 21 1972. 

NOTICE 



115 




1 16 




"Sink the Tink" 

On Wednesday, October 6, 1971, a 
group of student leaders calling 
themselves "The Wayne F. Tinkle 
Retirement Corporation" called for 
the resignation of the Vice-Presi- 
dent and Dean of Students. The an- 
nouncement was made at an outdoor 



concert sponsored by the organiza- 
tion. Buttons printed with the slogan 
"Sink the Tink" were distributed. 

The movement wras seen as impor- 
tant if only for the fact that a Vice 
President of the University was 
personally attacked and asked to re- 
tire by students. But is also caused 



mixed feelings among the student 
body. Some of the issues raised were 
important, valid indictments of the 
state of student services at Loyola; 
others were contrived, specious 
issues which the Dean's office re- 
futed adequately. 



117 




Dan Tracy took charge of the second 
public meeting of the Retirement 
Corporation. He began by citing 
their five primary grievances 
against Mr. Tinkle: the firings of 
James Robinson, Director of Student 
Activities, and Bill Svrluga, Hous- 
ing Director; the handling of the 
Search Committee to fill the vacan- 
cies created by the firings; negli- 
gence of the heroin problem on 
campus; refusal to allow Playboy to 
be sold in the SAB store; and the 
fact there were no doctors at the 
student health service. 




With the clarification and/or reso- 
lution of some of these issues by 
the Dean's office, the "Sink the 
Tink" movement seems to have 
died. But the participants consider 
themselves partially successful 

now that some asked-for improve- 
ments have been made and plan to 
re-organize if the need arises. 



121 



122 






Division- Organizations 



Alternative Student Movement 124 

Loyola Student Government Association 125 

Student Operations Board 126 

Student Activities Board 127 

Blue Key 128 

Circumference 129 

American Chemical Society 130 

Math Club 131 

Cadence 132-33 

Phoenix 134-37 

Loyolan 138-43 

WLUC 144-147 

Cheerleaders 148 

Pom Pom Squad 149 

American Comic Crusaders 150 

Organ Squad 151 

Coed Club 152 

Christian Life Community 153 

Latin American Student Organization 155 

Brigade of Cadets 156-157 

Italian Club 158 

German Club 159 

The LT Connection 160 

Mime 161 

Reader's Circle 162 

Debate Club 163 

Honors Council, Chardin Anthropoligical Society 164 

Business Council 166 

Nursing Government 167 

Bowling Team 168 

Stage Band 169 

Inter- Fraternity Council 170 

Panhellenic 171 

Kappa Delta Epsilon 172 

Alpha Tau Delta 173 

Alpha Phi Omega 174 

Phi Alpha Lambda 175 

Gamma Phi Delta 176 

Sigma Pi 177 

Alpha Kappa Lambda 178 

Delta Sigma Pi 180 

Kappa Beta Gamma 181 

Theta Phi Alpha 182 

Alpha Delta Gamma 183 

Alpha Sigma Alpha 184 

Phi Mu 185 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 186 

Beta Beta Beta 187 

Alpha Sigma Phi 188 

Alpha Kappa Psi 189 

Budgeted Organizations: Do or Die! 190-91 



123 





Alternative Student Movement 



Webster defines frustration as "to 
cause to have no effect; bring to 
nothing; counteract; nullify;" as, 
"he frustrated our plans." ASM 
defines it as beating a dead horse. 

Members: Tom Hart (President), 
Dan Tracy, Sue Olenski, Mary Ann 
Peter, Roy Skibbe, Steve Graci, 
Mike Moran, Carol Heath, Rudolph 
Harper, Walter Harper, Peg Gib- 
bons, Paul Driscoll, Ron Shwarak, 
Dave Leeman, James Slatery, Bill 
Cook, Walter Szymczak. 



124 




Loyola Student Government Associaton 



It takes faith, in a way, to really 
work at it, to endure the frustra- 
tions, to look at the meager results, 
and to feel that it is all worth while. 
There is very little recognition, a 
great deal of criticism, and far too 
few helping hands. The only thing 
that can prevent one from becoming 
cynically dependent in the face of it 
all is a belief in certain ideals of 
service and in oneself that says, "I 
can make a slight impact upon this 
University that will somehow make 
things better for some people." 



All in all, student government is a 
valuable experience, especially if 
the commitment one makes to it is 
bolstered by one's personal ideals 
and a firm determination to live 
up to them. 

Members: Don King (President), 
Carol Venus, Ron Skwarek, Tim 
Cornillie, Frank Zeman. 



But, of course, there are the people 
one meets, the very unique and 
beautiful people as well as the try- 
ing disagreeable ones. There is the 
knowledge that one acquires of what's 
happening where and when, and who 
to see about it. These do provide a 
very rich sense of personal satisfac- 
tion at times, and a feeling of pride 
that ones life is rather busy and full. 



125 



Student Operations Board 



You may not know it now but you're 
going to become aware as time goes 
on. . .The Lewis Towers Campus of 
Loyola University has a daytime 
undergraduate enrollment of 1560 
students. As everyone knows the 
predominant number of these stu- 
dents are commuters. Their time 
at Loyola begins at 8:00 am and ends 
anytime from 2:00 to 5:00 pm. Dur- 
ing these hours they are either in 
class or in the union trying to eat 
lunch and breakfast. There should be 
more to this university life than just 
food and academics. 

Colleges and universities normally 
have mixers, concerts and the like 
to occupy idle student time after 
classes and in the evenings. Lewis 
Towers students do not have idle 
time that needs occupation. What 
Lewis Tow/ers students do need and 
now have is an operation to bring 
the students together, make them 
feel a part of the university and 
their school and show them a good 
time during the one to eight hours 
they may spend here. 

This time has finally come. Lewis 
Towers has their own student board 
for activities: the Lewis Towers 
Student Operations Board — LT-SOB. 
The LT-SOB is a group of approxi- 
mately 20 students who are voting 
members and 1560 students who 



have a direct voice in the decisions 
by merely showing up at the meet- 
ings and airing their views. Students 
are encouraged to come to these 
meetings. They are held every Tues- 
day at 1 1 :30 am somewhere at the 
downtown campus. Student Personnel 
(MC 304) always knows where the 
meeting is being held. If you can't 
make the meetings put your views 
in writing. The letters, ultimatums, 
suggestions and complaints will be 
read at the meetings. You can re- 
main annonymous if you wish. There 
is a mailbox in MC 304, a sugges- 
tion box outside MC 304, a mail 
slot in the door of their office LT 
706 or mail or deliver your thoughts 
to LT-SOB, Delaware Hall, 196 East 
Delaware, Chicago. There are 20- 
some members and a faculty mod- 
erator you can contact: Arthur Eich- 
lin (Moderator), Len Cisek, Paul 
Duggan, Corinne Fanelli, Tony Ge- 
lish. Peg Gibbons, Mike Jordan, 
Steve Kerkestra, Paul Lynch, Micki 
McBurney, Kevin Murray, Kathy 
O'Hara, Don Schlueter, Dave St. 
Pierre, Chris Tremback, Vera Kit- 
selman, Andy Plucinski, Mike Mo- 
ran, Joe Pollini, Joe Nerren, Jim 
Gira, Bill Kelly. 

LT-SOB has been in existence only 
a short time but things have been 
happening. First semester they co- 
ordinated the L.R.H.C. popsicle 



eating contest at Lewis Towers, 
sponsored a tri-cycle race, held a 
T.G.I.F. party with Armadillo 
and have brought the Warner Broth- 
ers Film Festival to Lewis Towers 
on Fridays with free admission. 
SOB is at present involved with 
setting up the Xavier Grill Annex as 
an arcade and are looking for a 
place to have a daytime coffee house 
at LT. They have taken over the job 
of letting LT know about LSC ac- 
tivities and telling LSC about LT 
activities. A highly successful Chil- 
drens Christmas Benefit was held 
netting charity $400. In the future 
they plan more films, speakers 
from Loop area businesses and 
schools, a Las Vegas Night, more 
T.G.I.F. parties, toad races, foos- 
ball tournaments, the Dating Game, 
a pinochle tournament, a monthly 
schedule of upcoming events, a 
bi-weekly newsletter and more. 
There are only two restrictions on 
what happens: 1) what the students 
want; and 2) the small operating 
budget ($1600) — but with enough 
support even that could be changed 
for next year. Let these people know 
what you want, come to the meet- 
ings and join in the activities. 







Student Activities Board 



Once upon a time, in a far, far 
away land called Che-car-go by the 
natives, the Founding Fathers of the 
world, or the Jesuits, founded Loy- 
ola University. After many years of 
frustrations and delights these fine 
men decided to let students into 
their largest Catholic University. So, 
they built a gym and hired George 
Ireland to be a coach. And, George 
went out and found some students to 
be athletes and had a team — in 1963. 

The fathers then incorporated God 
into the structure, and hired Fr. 
Hayes to be in charge of God, and 
Fr. Dillon sat on his right and Fr. 
Maguire sat on his left, and Fr. 
Baumhart sat on his lap. And the 
fathers looked around and said, 
"This is good; pass the wine." But 
Fr. Mertz said, "We have to get 
these tents off our land, so let's 
build a dorm and call it Mertz." 
Mr. Strachota, the financial wizard, 
bit his tongue as dollar signs flashed 
in his eyes. But, Fr. Baumhart 
soothed him when he decided to 
raise tuition and charge an amazing 
amount for room and board. Stra- 
chota sighed a sigh of relief and he 
began looking for an A.R.A. rep- 
resentative. So Mertz Hall was built, 
the tents removed, the Basketball 
team started, God was incorporated 
and the students were bored. But the 



students were always bored. 

However, a few years before Mertz 
was built, an active bored student 
named Smelty decided to do some- 
thing. So, he removed his clothes 
and stood on a rock in Lake Michi- 
gan. A bunch of students and Jesuits 
gathered to watch. The students 
weren't bored for awhile, the Jesuits 
hired security guards and had Smelty 
arrested. This was the start of the 
active bored students, later to be- 
come the Student Activities Board. 

When Mertz was built, the students 
got an office from their leader, Mr. 
Tinkle. Then they started a few 
stores, an information center, a 
paging system and tried to get bored 
students active. They are still try- 
ing and Loyola is still the largest 
Catholic University, thanks to Smelty 
and a bunch of active bored students, 
the Student Activities Board. 

Members: Steve Graci (Chairman), 
Val Bojczuk, Nancy Hamill, Ken 
Buehlman, Larry Yunker, Mark 
Holmes, Bob Daig, Muriel von Al- 
bade, John Zipparro, Frank Giam- 
brone, Mike Dooley, Bobbi Houndt, 
Jim O'Brien, Karia de Vito, Donna 
Plumb, Tom Germino, Bill Troc- 
coli, Pat Santare, Gary Soltys, Scott 
HIady, Cindi Rieck, Pat Dooley, 



Dave Render, Cat Milord, Cathy 
Judge, Tony Chereck, George Hub- 
chak, Zori Fedunyshyn, Joanne Pa- 
risi, Roberta Mason, Marianne Ar- 
nold, Pat Kennally, Chris Noto, Tom 
Hopkins, Brian Oye, Mark Schu- 
macher, Bill Conway, Annette Kwak, 
Julie Orth, Kathy Ransford, Pus- 
tauer, Paul Driscoll, Karen Parilli, 
Cheri Goldy, Carol Birger, Wayne 
Kupferer, Eileen Toofan, Larry 
Zentz, Dave Palen, Joan Steinbrech- 
er, Tom Adams, Wayne Tinkle, 
Leon Saladino, Jean Pekarek. 



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Blue Key 



Blue Key National Honor Fraternity 
annually recognizes those male stu- 
dents who have distinguished them- 
selves in the areas of service, 
leadership, and scholarship. Blue 
Key members are from the College 
of Arts and Science, the School of 
Business, the Graduate Schools, the 
Law School, the Medical School, the 
Dental School, and the School of So- 
cial Work. Blue Key has been a 
member of the Loyola Community 
since 1926. The Loyola Chapter is 
one of more than 140 located 
throughout the United States. 

This year, for the first time in Its 
history, Loyola Blue Key is honor- 
ing distinguished sophomores. 

Members: James Benka, Ken Buehl- 
man, Dennis Christensen, Paul Dug- 
gan, Marty Glista, Paul Guistolise, 
Mike Jordan, Tom Kling, Don Lieb- 
entritt, Kevin McGirr, Joe Payne, 
Mike Petersen, John Talbot, Frank 
Zeman. 




128 



Circumference 



Circumference, the leadership honor 
society for junior and senior women 
students of the undergraduate col- 
leges, was founded in 1959. Mem- 
bership is limited to women of high 
academic standing who are recog- 
nized as outstanding leaders in 
extra-curricular activities. 

The specific requirements for ad- 
mission to Circumference are: a 
minimum cumulative average of 
3.00, membership in at least two 
campus organizations, and two of- 
fices of major chairmanships in 
one or more campus organizations 
or University committees. 

Members: Nancy Creagh, Mary Do- 
heny, Silvana Filippello, Elaine Greg- 
ory, Janet Hickey, Beverlee Jancy, 
Mary Susan King, llze Klavins, Bar- 
bara Piekarczyk, Antoinette Sodin, 
Mary Kris Sopocko, Beverly Stastny, 
Judith Szilak, Bonnie Zarling (Presi- 
dent), Miss Mariette Le Blanc 
(Moderator). 




129 




American Chemical Society 



In order to meet the needs of to- 
day's chemist and of the field of 
chemistry itself, the American 
Chemical Society was founded as a 
unifying force in the field of chemis- 
try. The Society is the world's larg- 
est organization devoted to the ad- 
vancement of a single science. 

The function of the student affiliate 
program is to acquaint prospective 
chemists with all aspects of their 
profession. The Loyola Student Af- 
filiation Chapter was founded in 1950 
to compliment the existing depart- 
mental curriculum. Under the di- 
rection of faculty moderator Dr. 
Harvey Posvic, the Student Affiliates 
are currently involved in widely 
varied activities. These activities 



presently include tours of local in- 
dustrial complexes and research 
facilities, presentations by faculty 
members and guest speakers, and 
sponsoring a tutoring service avail- 
able to all chemistry students. The 
society also sponsors social events 
for its members, including their 
annual picnic, an opportunity for the 
students and faculty to get together 
in an informal and ungraded setting. 

Members: Frank Rogers, James 
Pomen, Frank Rotella, Andrew Baj- 
kowski, Marty Joseph, Wally Ra- 
Pacz, Ken Fivizzani, Bill Koch, Pete 
Schlake. 




Math Club 



The Loyola University Math Club 
has been formed to foster unity 
among math students. The club at- 
temps to do this through a mixture 
of social and academic activities 
designed to bring the students to- 
gether. 

At its biweekly meetings, the Math 
Club has tried to bring to Loyola a 
variety of speakers whose talks 
could be beneficial to the club and 
the student body at large. These 
speakers have included representa- 
tives of the IBM Corporation, the 
Chicago Board of Education, the 
United States Civil Service Com- 
mission, and the American Society 
of Actuaries. Members of the facul- 
ty have also delivered talks which 



could assist the members in choosing 
a career or graduate school. 

The members participated in a 
voluntary tutoring program for all 
math students. Other club activities 
included a fall hay ride, a Christmas 
party, participation in a math con- 
test for high school students and a 
gym night. 

Members: Ted Boris (President), 
Linda PratI, Maryann Kaminski, 
Linda Stomper, Janet Murphy, Frank 
Nussbaum, Juan Garza, Eileen 
Schultz, Art Krumrey, Dr. Richard 
Maher (Moderator). 



131 



Cadence 



CADENCE is Loyola's fine arts 
magazine which publishes twice 
yearly the best efforts of Loyola's 
students in the fields of poetry, 
prose, essays, art, photography and 
graphics. CADENCE is Loyola's 
only outlet for creativity in all of 
these fields and is distributed free 
to all of the students. CADENCE 
also corresponds with many other 
colleges across the nation and is 
therefore a solid publicity base. 
Some of the past members of the 
CADENCE staff have gone on to 
be editors, associate editors, and 
staff personnel of many leading na- 
tional magazines, professional photog- 
raphers, and distinguished artists. 

Members: Dale A. Bespalec (Edi- 
tor-in-chief), Jim Adducci, Anne 
Schultz, James Alsop, Kathy Dabura, 
Jim Clark, Karia DeVito, Phil Dey, 
Eileen Hund, Pat McCaskey, Cat 
Milford, Neil Meyer, Eileen 
Schwartz, Jim Veltman. 





133 



Phoenix 



What do you know about Loyola that 
you haven't learned from reading the 
Phoenix? Chances are. very little. 

The Phoennc is more than just 
words arfd dots on paper that appear 
on campus about once a week. 
Rather it is a group of between 40 
and 60 people who believe that it's 
fun to put out a weekly college news- 
paper that they and the school can 
be proud of calling their OMrn. 

Some weeks everything seems to fall 
into place all by itself (almost); 
other Mreeks everything seems to be 
working against everything else, and 
it's a miracle that the damn thing 
gets printed at all. 

But it alw/ays got printed, even 
though sometimes it was delivered 
a bit late, or had no picture cap- 
tions {fegends. to those of you with 
degrees in Library Science); and 
the inevitable uncorrectable typo- 
graphical errors. a ways were ag- 
gravating. But above and beyond 
these problems, the Phoenix pro- 
vided the best, most comprehensive 
coverage of campus happenings in all 
shapes and forms of any college pa- 
per in the Chicago vicinity. 

The function of the Phoenix, as seen 
by the editors who determine it, is 
to provide fair and accurate accounts 
of all university news, to give ex- 
pression to carefully thought-out 
opinions of not only the editors and 
staff but also university faculty and 
administrators, and to serve as the 
most effective billboard for an- 
nouncements of deadlines and com- 
ing events in the University. 

But the Phoenix is even more than 
that. It is five different deadlines 
every iweek. It is impromptu middle- 
of-the-afternoon parties for no par- 
ticular reason except the staff feels 
like it. It is taping an hour-and-a- 
half interview with Fr. Baumhart 
and discovering that the recorder 
didn't work. It is learning more 
about printers, budgets, and bu- 
reaucracy than most of us really 
Mfant to knoMT. It is the tremendous 
satisfaction of seeing "your baby" 
delivered each ^eek and people 
reading it, while you are already 
halfway into the next issue. 

The Phoenix is about you, for you 
are the university. 

Staff: Marty Glista (Editor-in-Chief), 
Luann Zanzola, Jim Mueller, Steve 
Sanford, Pat Driscoll, Marge Ladd, 
Ron Rutkowski, Cindy Vukits, Kevin 
Conway, Tom Cekay, Elly Hennessy, 
Mikki Agins, Pat Matre, Steve Hand- 
ler, John Lopatka, Bob Nelson, Tom 
Byke, Mike Lebak, Ken Glowacki, 
Bill McGee. Val Bojchuck, Mike 
Goode, Neil McLaughlin, Scott Hamill, 
Mike Galvin, Debbie Kmiecik, Theresa 
Anesinis, Randi Klein, Cheryl Plaza, 
Mickey McBurney, Barb Plafcan, 
Sharon Renkosiak. Bernie O'Connor, 
Jamie Schuh, Bernie Weiler, Ellen 
Hopkins. Debbie West, Bobbi Steuert, 
Helen Slobodian, John Anthony. Bill 
Stanton. Mike Norman, Dave Delano, 
Claudia Slotkowski, Joe Horbacjewski, 
John Ostrowski, BIaz Brown, Tom 
Kurtz, John O'Dwyer, John O'Brien, 
Bob Kubiak, John Cannon, Maury 
Possley, Rich Hren, Cathy Miller, 
Pat McGrath, Paul Hoppi, Jim Fro- 
berg, Tim McGinness, Mike Hess, 
Jean Hellman, Rosemary Zanzola, 
Renee Heneghan. 











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140 





Loyolan 





Editors-in-Chief Bonnie Zarling, Dave Schaab 

Photo Editor Larry Logman 

Associate Editors Celeste March, Marlene Pappas 

Photographers Rick Espinoza, Phil Yee, Bill Mondi, Pat 

iVIatre, Gary Boyce, Scott Grabinger, Gerry Martin, Art 
Krumrey, Judie Janellunas, Dale Bespalec 

Layout Zariing, Schaab, Pappas, John Stager 

Copy Gregg Szul, Jim Mueller, Jim Froberg, 

Marty Glista, Val Bojchuck, Tom Peterlin, 

Walter Paas, Corrine Fanelli, Dr. Milton 

Gordon, Dr. David Tribble, Loyola University 

student organizations 

Production March, Peggy Taylor, Linda Stomper, Linda 

Aykroid, Frank Paukert, Denny Christiansen, 
Marty McNicholas, Terry Sheehan, Sisters of 

Kappa Delta Epsilon 

Interviewers Pappas, Stromper, Sheehan, Dale Bespalec 

Other Contributors Dave Wilke, Dan Tracy, Dick Menges, 

Dr. Rosemary Hartnett, Loyola Phoenix, 

Loyola World, Loyola Today, Public 

Relations Office, Athletic Department Office 

Moderator Dr. Catherine Jarrott 

LT Advisor Art Eichlin 

Publishing Walsworth Publishing Co., Inc. 

Graduate Photography Root Studio 

Cover Durand Manufacturing Co. 

WLUC Record Terry Sheehan 

Colors Black & Blue 

Patron Saints Jude and Fiacre 

Song Shaft 

The Loyolan is published annually by and for the undergraduate students of 
Loyola University except in case of fire, pestilence, radiation poisoning or 
other cases of national emergency. 




141 




143 




WLUC 




WLUC Radio is an independent 
student organization serving the 
students of Loyola and Mundelein. 
The radio station provides practical 
experience for students wishing to 
work in the broadcasting industry 
after graduation. WLUC's air- 
waves give the "super-jocks" their 
chance to be heard, as well as the 
super-relevant announcer who wants 
to "commoonicate" with his audi- 
ence. WLUC Radio continues to 
offer air time to students and facul- 
ty members who would like to pro- 
duce shows on issues of current in- 
terest to our audience. 

This year WLUC broadcasts 98 
original hours per week, including 
live sports broadcasts, news and 
entertainment. Thanks to a staff of 
72 students, WLUC has been able 
to expand its departments and offer 
better service to its audience. 
WBBM-FM is rebroadcast over 
our AM channel (600 on the dial) 
when we are not originating our own 
programs at 1037 West Loyola 
Avenue. 

Members: Tony Adams, John Al- 
berts, Barbara Banich, Maria Bar- 
batano, Tony Bartolotta, Jim Benz, 
Dale Bespalec, Pamela Beutler, 
Wayne Brucar, Marc Burnett, Larry 
Canoff, Denny Christiensen, Tom 
Cornille, Denise Curry, Sammy 
Danna (Moderator), Dan Durbin, 
Kathy Dohrmann, Tom Evans, Zori 
Fedunyszen, Ken Flack, Rebecca 
Forester, Bill Frantz, Bob Gallery, 
Paul Gelardo, Tom Giger, Jack 
Gleason, Linda Harrison, Larry 
Heisler, Ingrid Hermann, Marie 
Howell, Kathy Hunn, Harvey Hunt, 
Kevin Killion, Noreen Krewer, By- 
ron Lassiter, Roy Laube, John Le- 
betski, Allen Lentino, Gary Lipin- 
ski, Larry Lee Logman, Dave Lom- 
bard- Koy, Treva McClellan, Betty 
McCormick, Bill Messina, Bill 
Mondi, Judy Mullen, Walter Paas 
(Station Manager), Marlene Pap- 
pas, Frank Paukert, Bob Pavliga, 
Suzanne Pazak, Gary Pearce, Walter 
Perkins, Tom Peterlin, Diann Proud, 
John Radke, Tom Robinson, Philip 
Rodman, Frank Scott, Jeff Shovein, 
Debbie Smoli, Terry Sheehan, Pete 
Soraparu, John Steger, Linda Stomp- 
er, Patrick Summers, Mary Sue 
Tambone, Tom Tambone, Jeff Var- 
da. Bob Warhover, Roger Wright, 
Bonnie Zarling, Dianne Zimmerman. 



145 




146 




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Cheerleaders 




Loyola's lack of attendance at bas- 
ketball games is slowly becoming 
past history. Among the regulars in 
attendance at the games are the 
cheerleaders and pom-pom squad. 
The moderator for the pom-pom 
squad is Mrs. Monforti, who helps 
assist the girls in choreographing 
their routines and practicing for 
precision. This squad performs at 
half-time and must practice four 
hours a week. The cheerleaders, 
battling bravely on their own, started 
out the year enthusiastically and 



made an energetic showing. This 
squad of seven have cheered through- 
out all of the home games with un- 
yielding zest, accompanied by the 
yells of the pom-pom girls from the 
sidelines. The cheerleaders must 
also practice at least four hours a 
week. These squads have partici- 
pated in two clinics at Loyola's 
gym this year. The cheerleaders 
have also cheered at football games, 
an activity sponsored by the stu- 
dents themselves. They are an active 
group who reach out individually to 



bring spirit to Loyola. These squads 
give their time and energy to sup- 
port their team, the Loyola Ram- 
blers, and to them it is important 
that the crowd gives of their time 
and energy. CHEER at the next 
game — don't be a spectator; be a 
participant! 

Members: Marlene Pappas, Mary 
Casey, Mary Ann Powders, Kitty 
Laub, Sonya Bernard!, Therese 
O'Brien, Melody Kas. 



148 



Pom- Pom Squad 



fsm 




Members: Bea Halmay, Debbie 
Myers, Sue Gesell, April Dahi, 
Kathy Miller, Denise Carlson, Sandy 
Vross, Leslie LaBelle, Mary Faut, 
Claudia Weathersby, Margie Faut, 
Nadine Ancel. 



149 



American Comic Crusaders 



The American Comic Crusaders 
pride themselves on being the only 
student organization to willingly ad- 
mit that they are not "relevant". 
Nor will they agree to "rap" with 
administrators or any other self- 
appointed deities. 

Their activities include: existential 
breathing contests, phlegm collec- 
tion, watching the radio, finger- 
popping, sock hops and top-40 par- 
ties. Features at their recent Film 
Festival and Slide Show included 
such greats as: "Mary Poppins 
Keeps 'Em Hoppin'", "Gristle 



Whistle" and "Squanto in Toronto". 

Aided in their efforts by those mem- 
bers of the student body who will 
swallow anything, the Crusaders this 
year have sponsored their most 
successful Guano Recycling Drive 
to date. 

Members: Dinky Dunstall, Meat 
Harp, Mr. Natural, Jim Shoe, Tim- 
my Twaddle, Isadore Fist, Ramsey 
Rococo, Ramrod Runkle, the Double- 
mint Twins, Ziggy the Wonder- 
Chimp and Natasha the Gorilla Girl. 



150 




Organ Squad 



The Organs. Who are they? Why are 
they? What does "Organ mean? No- 
body knows. Nobody cares. 

An Organ is a cool guy. An Organ is 
a straight hippie. An Organ is an 
athlete. An Organ is a drinker. An 
Organ is a name. An Organ is a 
friend. An Organ is a figment of 
someone's imagination. An Organ is 
all of these and none of these. 

An Organ is someone you know or 
don't know. So if you know what an 
Organ is, you do; if you don't, you 
don't. Like I said: Why is this pic- 
ture in here? Nobody knows, nobody 
cares. 



But it's here, 
"So it goes." 



so there. Naaaaaa!! 



Members: John "June" Allen, Bill 
"Fibber" McGee, Paul Driscoll, 
Ralph Anderson, Mike Druiding, 
Mike Matre, Pat Matre, Mike Doo- 
ley, Steve "Skip" Graci, "Jungle 
Jim" Mueller, Marty McMorrov\f, 
Tom "Farky Norton" Hart, Bob 
Blinn, Bob Blurpthal, Phil Dussel, 
Terry Conway, Jim "Batman" Ba- 
tastoni, Mario DiPopalo, Neil Young, 
Albert Finney, John Karamanski, 
Bill Trocalli, Steve Venn, Brian 
"Fat Mac" Mclntyre, Isaac Jogues 
(Patron Saint). 




151 







Coed Club 



<< 



The Coed Club, established in 1949, 
is the oldest vwomen's independent 
organization on campus. Its mem- 
bers are undergraduate women in- 
terested in social and service ac- 
tivities sponsored by the club. 
These are projects which help to 
integrate the lives of Coed Club 
members into the life of the Uni- 
versity and of the community. 

The service projects include acting 
as usherettes and hostesses at Loy- 
ola's functions. Our members ac- 
tively participated in the 1971 
Freshman Orientation Weekend and 
provided a special opportunity for 
incoming freshman girls to get 
acquainted at the annual Big- Little 
Sister Party. The girls enjoyed 
visiting and socializing with the 
elderly in the Rogers Park Area, 
and have traveled to Great Lakes 
Naval Hospital to chat with the boys 
who are patients there. 



The atmosphere of the group is con- 
genial. Everyone participates in 
planning the club's programs and in 
carrying out the plans. Our activity 
is not restricted to work projects 
only. We enjoy sharing new experi- 
ences together as we learn to ski, 
roller skate, and bowl. The group 
provides a situation in which to 
converse and socialize. The cul- 
mination of our activities brings us 
closer together as friends. 

Members: Juanita Grozoiak (Presi- 
dent), Barbara Piekarczyk, Judith 
Wlodarczyk, Antoinette Krakowski, 
Maureen Daly, Carolyn Lopez, Mary 
Hahn, Teresa Anesinas, Judy Cwik, 
Carol Ostruska, Marilyn Cummings, 
Maria Mykytka, Miss Joan Stein- 
brecher (Moderator). 



152 




Christian Life Community 



Loyola Christian Life Community is 
a group of Loyola students who have 
united to evaluate the spiritual-so- 
cial climate of our lives. As an ex- 
pression of our analysis and evalua- 
tion, we make an effort through mu- 
tual encouragement and support to 
"Christianize" our responses in 
every situation in life and thus im- 
prove every situation in which we 
live. 

We are guided in spiritual develop- 
ment by principles we find in Sacred 
Scripture. We realize the importance 
of help from God in our efforts and 
use prayer and Eucharistic liturgies 
as important means of obtaining this 
help. 

There is no "group project" which 
functions as a unifying objectives for 
our community. Each member works 
in the already existing responsi- 
bility of his life-context. Our basic 
assumption is that there is no single 
Christ-like approach to the joy and 
sorrows of life. Each of us attempts. 



especially in our interactions with 
each other, to deepen his own Chris- 
tian awareness and commitment to 
a life of concern for others. 

Loyola students interested in mem- 
bership should contact Father John 
Dillon, S. J. in Mertz Hall or a 
member of LCLC. We accept new 
members at the beginning of each 
semester when we determine the 
size of our group and the content of 
our meetings. Our meetings are 
quasi-Christian-encounter groups so 
far as candid discussion of our faith 
committment is concerned. We have 
deep trust in one another in our com- 
mon search for genuine religious 
experience. That is what makes us 
Christian community rather than a 
group. Join us? 

Members: John Anthony, Kathy Bart- 
nicki, John Farrell, Mike Kidder, 
Andy Plucinski, Cathy Ryan, Dolores 
Shefcik, John Wikoff, Father John 
Dillon, S. J. 



153 




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154 




Latin American Student Organization 



The Latin American Student Organ- 
ization has been in existence for five 
and one half semesters, its accom- 
plishments have been numerous and 
beneficial to the Latinos here at 
Loyola and throughout the burrios 
of Chicago. 

Ever since its founding, the organi- 
zation's guiding ideology has been 
one of progressive change in order 
to serve the Latino community rele- 
vantly. In the spring of 1970 the 
organization sponsored a world-wide 
festival, with the participation of 
more than fifty consulates. Plans 
were then formulated for the first 
Mid-West Latin American Students' 



Conference. This plan was realized 
in the Spring of 1971, with repre- 
sentation numerous Latino clubs, 
and various community leaders, 
Samuel Betances, publisher of the 
Rican, and Professor Isidro Lucas 
of the U. of i. Circle campus were 
among those featured. 

From this conference emerged an 
important awareness; an awareness 
which prompted Loyola's Latino stu- 
dents to question the role that the 
University plays in their present and 
future. Particularly, "Does Loyola 
truly serve the Latino Community?". 
After all, is not the role of the Uni- 
versity to serve man and the com- 



munity? 

Members: Migdalia Garlarza, Dru 
Gallagher, Felipe Aquirre, Dino Di- 
Martino, IMella Ferrara, Milica 
Govedarica, Maria Gritz, Vicky Val- 
lejo, Deborah Washington, Ed Tor- 
res, Art Rimando, Jose Vargas, 
Henery Cisneros, Al Cisneros, 
Alice Diaz, Carlos J. Salazar 
(President), Denise Hutson, Kathy 
Somos, Carol Mikos, Carmen Cin- 
tron, Elia Lopez, Rosalie Sanchez, 
Mirrya Guerrero, Glady Saavedra, 
Alfonso Perez, Maria Diaz, Lucy 
Perez, Gerry Bjurman, Juan Garza 
Carmen Franco, Emelia Rosada. 



155 



The Loyola Brigade of Cadets 



Loyola Drill Team 



Members: R. Bartalone, R. Baylock, 
J. Casey, T. Dreilinger, D. Hansen, 
W. Hughs, E. Janak, J. Jones, L. 
Kaplan, W. McGrath, J. Noll, C. Poe, 
E. Pullum, E. Ramos, W. Schwie- 
kert, F. Scott, M. Smadj, L. Stark, 
R. Van Hooser, Cadre Advisor Ma- 
jor Perino. 



Ranger Company Roster 

Members: David Benjamin, Dean 
Brock, Steve Colompos, Douglas 
Combs, Philip Duchin, B. Daniel 
Fitzpatrick, Ray W. Francis III, 
William Havelic, Lee K. Hensel, 
Patrick J. Keane, John Kolb, Greg- 
ory B. Konze, Leonard Leffner, 
Larry K. Lewis, Edward T. Martin, 
Brian O'Connor, Max O'Hearn, Ran- 
dy Podeszwa, Ted S. Podradik, Ed- 
ward A. Putis, Chester Rocko, Peter 
Schlake, Ted Schlake, Peter Vozas, 
Philip M. Yee, Alan Young, Cadre 
Advisor SFC Donald Crain. 



The largest men's organization on 
campus is composed of students en- 
rolled in the Reserve Officer Train- 
ing Corps program. As the Brigade 
is comprised of young men with a 
wide variety of interests, numerous 
and diverse extra-curricular ac- 
tivities are sponsored by the Mili- 
tary Science Department. Many of 
these organizations are open to non- 
ROTC membership. 

Scabbard and Blade 
Scabbard and Blade is a national 
honorary fraternity dedicated to 
furthering civil-military relations. 
Scabbard and Blade has been cited 
on numerous occasions for its serv- 
ices to Loyola and the greater com- 
munity of which we are a part. 

Military History Club 
The Military History Club's purpose 
is to further the interest in Military 
History among ROTC and non- 
ROTC students. Members meet 
once a month to hear guest lectur- 
ers speak on various topics of in- 
terest and to conduct games in 
strategy and tactics appropriate to 
different historical eras. 

Loyola Drill Team 

The drill team is composed of 
ROTC and non-ROTC students. 
The team has actively participated 
in local, regional and national drill 
meets each school year as Loyola's 
representative in intercollegiate ex- 
hibition drill competition. 



Loyola Men's Rifle Team 

Members: Dan Fitzpatrick, Paul 
Kempf, SSG Jack Majors, Edward 
T. Martin, James Matz, Tom Mik- 
iauskas. Major William Moldachel, 
Joe Noferi, Brian O'Connor, Randy 
Podeszwa, Robert Zabielski. 



Ranger Company 

Ranger company is dedicated to 
raising the physical fitness and 
technical proficiency of future junior 
officers. The company conducts ex- 
tensive training in Counterinsur- 
gency operations, self-defense, 
scuba diving, rapelling and small- 
unit tactics. 

Rifle Team 

Loyola's representative in inter- 
collegiate rifle team marksmanship 
competition is also composed of 
ROTC and non-ROTC students. 
Members compete annually in the 
Chicagoland Rifle League and travels 
to campuses across the nation to 
enter regional and national-level 
competition. 



157 




Italian Club 



The Italian Club is an organization 
under the direction of the Depart- 
ment of Modern Languages. The 
purpose of the club is to stimulate 
interest in Italian culture. The way 
we try to do this is through movies, 
lectures, slide programs and social 
activities. The movie programs are 
usually correlated with the study of 
Italian. However, the works of 
prominent Italian producers are al- 
so viewed since they are main 
sources of Italian culture. Our slide 
shows and guest speakers try to de- 
pict the scenery and the life of 
people in Italy. The social activities 
also stress Italian culture by the 



consumption of food prepared the 
Italian way plus dancing to current 
Italian music. 

All of these functions by the club 
are eventually supposed to introduce 
Italian things to non- Italians, thus 
preparing them for future travel in 
beautiful, sunny Italy. 

Members: Pete Minerva, Paul Belli- 
sario (President), Carmela Mar- 
tino. Bertha Silva, Maria Weinzirl, 
Lucille Manno, Fran Manno, Henry 
Gawlik, Joet Schiro, Irene Silva, 
Maria Cabrera, Luciano Panici, 
Mike Cozzi, Gladys Cruz. 



158 



Mime 



The Loyola University Mime Com- 
pany was formed during 1970-1972. 
IhTThe original twelve members of the 
^kompany were the original cast of 
Hihe 1971 production of "An Evening 
^of Mime". Those twelve members 
' went on to form the Mime Company 
and began touring shows to local 
Universities and High Schools. In 
May of 1971 the company was in- 
creased to eighteen members. These 
^eighteen have continued study in the 
rt on Mime and the Company has 
ontinued to tour. The Company is 
under the direction of Bud Beyer, 
Artist in Residence in the Theater 
Department. Members of the Com- 
pany are chosen by audition. 




Members: Bud Beyer (Director), 
John Cannell, Jim Corti, Natasha 
Detmer, Mary Filice, JoAnn Gal- 
luzzi, Douglas Guthrie, Annette 
Jops, Shelia Landahl, Tom McKeon, 
Graziano Marcheschi, Donna Mar- 
tin, Peter Martin, Joyce Nicholas, 
Ronald Nicholas, Jackie Pipitone, 
Augustine Ripa, Phil Sandstrom, 
Noreen Tobin, Mary Wonderlick. 



161 



Readers ' Circle 



Readers' Circle is a co-curricuiar 
organization whose members are 
interested in becoming better ac- 
quainted with the worlds' best liter- 
ature through Oral Interpretation. 
Under the direction of Miss Cather- 
ine Geary of the Communication Arts 
Department, the members develop 
not only a knowledge of the skills 
involved in the art, but also a great 
appreciation of the art itself as they 
appear around Chicago. As repre- 
sentatives of Loyola University, the 
members participate in intercol- 
legiate speech tournaments and oral 
interpretation festivals around the 
country. The organization also runs 
annual Readers' Rally for Chicago 
area high schools which affords 
these students the opportunity of 
working with graduates qualified in 



the field of oral interpretation. Spe- 
cial programs are also presented 
for clubs and organizations around 
the Chicago area. 

Within the University, Readers' Cir- 
cle sponsors reading hours for the 
student body, and an oral interpre- 
tation contest for Loyola students. 
The winner of this contest receives 
an award at the Honors Convocation. 
A major production is presented by 
the organization every Spring. 

Members: Miss Catharine M. Geary 
(Moderator), John Gibbons, Kathy 
Madsen, Paula Mar, Beatrice Olor- 
oso, Bob Rybicki, Virginia Sheridan. 



162 




Debate Club 

The Debate club is the oldest or- 
ganization on campus. Founded in 
1875, the Loyola squad participates 
in inter-scholastic tournaments all 
over the country. This year the 
topic has called for greater controls 
on government investigations of 
United States' citizens. This topic 
involves a wide range of policy 
questions which requires constant 
research. In general, the debate 
program is designed to teach mem- 
bers the fundamental elements of 
reasoning, argumentation and advo- 
cacy, and to give them practical 
opportunities to implement these 
skills. Tournament debating gives 
the student the opportunity to de- 



velop analytical skills which prove 
helpful not only in college but also 
later in life. 

Members: Jerry Angst, Sue Barton, 
Hank Marino, John McChurch, Je- 
rome Olszowka, Bill Piper, Ed 
Recke, Jeff Stroka, Elaine Brugge- 
meier (Coach). 




163 



Honors Council 



The Honor Student Council is an or- 
ganization composed of senators 
elected from among the two hundred 
members of the Loyola Honors Pro- 
gram. Each senator represents hon- 
or students majoring in a different 
academic field. Several major fields 
are represented by more than one 
senator because of the large number 
of honor students enrolled in these 
majors. 

The main functions of the Honors 
Council are to present a continuous 
evaluation of the Honors Program, 
to serve as a liaison between the 
honor students and the Honors Pro- 
gram Director, Fr. Carl Burlage, 
and to encourage honor students to 



take an active role in the formation 
of the Honors Program. 

Members: Steve Dronen, Biology; 
Juanita Grozdiak, Psychology; Mary 
Jo Bohr, English; Linda Heller, 
History; Jim Laski, Political Sci- 
ence; Pam Dronen, English; George 
Hubchak, Math; Bill Koch, Chemis- 
try; Anne Dickson, Psychology; Da- 
vid Kubiak, Classics; llze Klavins, 
Biology; Bob Jannotta, Psychology 
(President); Rich Reeb, Philoso- 
phy; Thomas Joyce, English; Gloria 
Portela, Modern Languages; Albert 
Saenz, Physics; Konrad Nagatoshi, 
Anthropology; Katie Schuler, His- 
tory; Jerome Vincente, Biology. 



Chardin Anthropological Society 



<^ 



The Society was founded at Loyola 
in 1965 as an organization designed 
to promote an active interest in the 
science of Anthropology among all 
interested parties on campus. It 
takes its name from the great Jesuit 
theologian palaeoanthropologist 

Father Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, 
who was famous for his work with 
the Peking Man fossil discoveries 
of the 1930's. The society is largely 
an academic body by nature, and as 
such frequently presents slide lec- 
tures, films and guest speakers. Al- 
so, in order to stimulate future in- 
terests, the society sponsors field 
trips, visits to museums, institutes 
and research centers. 



The Society also sponsors many 
non-academic activities as well. 
Among these activities are Christ- 
mas parties, mixers, museum open 
houses (with coffee), and various 
get-togethers. The society is open 
to all students, both graduate and 
undergraduates, as well as faculty 
and interested alumni and alumnae. 
The only requirement is an interest 
and desire to learn more about the 
science of anthropology. 

Members: Fr. Grollig, S.J., Sharon 
Renkosiak, Barb Plafcan, Clarita 
Boldt, Conrad Nagatoshi, Phil Dey, 
Marty Preze, Madeline Keiling. 



I 



164 




165 



Business Council 



Organized in 1968, the Dean's Ad- 
visory Council of the School of 
Business Administration serves as 
a liaison between the administration 
and the students of the school of 
Business. All students of the school 
are encouraged to attend the infor- 
mal monthly meetings. The Council 
acts upon proposals of the student 
members and recommendations may 
be made to the School of Business 
Administration Faculty Council. 



Current activities of the Council 
have included, among other, evalua- 
tion of various curricular require- 
ments, publication of The Business 
Journal. sponsorship of monthly 
faculty-student coffee hours, an 
MBA seminar, and organization of 
the Business School's annual Honors 
Night. 




Members: Kevin McGirr (Chair- 
man), Rick Warner, Ed Recke, 
Mike Jordan, Bob Bubak, Ed Piesz- 



chala, Joe Wolf, Bill O'Brien, Len 
Carmichael, Mike Geisler, Ron 
Biesiada, Tom Krissek. 



166 



Nursing Government 



The Nursing Council was formed as 
a representative off-shoot of LS 
GA in 1970. As a relatively new or- 
ganization, the constitution of the 
Nursing Council was drawn up to 
represent and deal with the spe- 
cific needs of the Nursing students. 
Additionally, it was written to pro- 
mote the profession more compre- 
hensively to the Lake Shore Campus 
and to the Medical Center. 



attempts to be flexible, creative and 
vital within the framework of the 
School. In order to maintain its 
availability, the Council depends on 
the responsive commitment of its 
elected representatives, and the 
concern, understanding, and support 
of the faculty and the student body. 



The Council is committed to re- 
sponsible student leadership which 




Members: Mary Klatz (President), 
Julie Darrow, Marilyn Kieffer, Ce- 
cilia Wachdorf, Tess Kudia, Chris 
Crane, Barb Wilson, Shelia Camp- 
bell, Pat Halleran, Terri Olp, Becky 
Corzine, Jane Visel, Lori Findorff, 



Ann Kaick, Elaine Gregory, Mary 
Ellen O'Donnell, Mary Ellen Wheel- 
er, Pam Jadwinski, Sue Primm, Jan 
Nosek, Marilyn Guzaskie, Norreen 
Shum, Lynn Gordon. 



167 



Loyola University Bovsfling Team 




The Loyola University Bowling 
Team was engaged this season in its 
24th year of competition in the Mid- 
west Intercollegiate Bowling Con- 
ference. At the time of this printing 
the team was in first place with a 
42-13 record and three matches re- 
maining. The season has been high- 
lighted by the victories over North- 
ern Illinois University and U.I.C.C. 

The M.I. B.C. is made up of Loy- 
ola, Northern III., Loras, College, 
De Paul, Chicago State, Roosevelt, 
University of III. -Medical Center 
and University of III. -Chicago Cir- 
cle, and l.l.T. Under the guidance 
of Coach Greenstein, who helped 
found the Conference when he was 
a student. The Bowling Ramblers 



have become perennial high finishers. 

Competition consists of five game 
matches, two points are awarded for 
winning each game and one point on 
the series. Each member meets the 
other once a year with the site al- 
ternated. Loyola is one of the few 
MIBC members who is not 
blessed with having campus bOMrling 
facilities. The home lanes for the 
team are at Marigold Arcade, 828 
W. Grace St. in Chicago. 

Members: Chuck Greenstein (Coach), 
Dan Lyman, Al Dutton, Brian Bi- 
anco, Joe Cotugno (Captain), Gary 
Gebis, John Flaska, Wes Jett, Ron 
Kondziolka, Tom Peterman, Don 
Damsz. 



168 



Stage Band 




The Loyola Stage Band consists of 
Loyola students from various 
schools within the University. They 
have given of their time and talents 
to bring the contemporary music of 
today to the level of the big band 
sound. The Stage Band was formed 
six years ago and exists primarily 
for the entertainment of the Loyola 
Community. If any thanks are forth- 
coming they should be directed to 
the members themselves, their 



loyalty, effort, and patience which 
makes this Loyola Stage Band pos- 
sible. 



Members: David DeGroh, Steve Eb- 
rom, John Felkins, Dan Funk, Dave 
Geier, Todd Hewell, Jim Mayes, 
Jim McShane, Jim Pomis, Ross 
Quattrochi, John Sikorski, Mike 
Spread, Paul Tokarz, Pete Vac- 
carella, Mike Weishaar. 



169 



inter- Fraternity Councii 



The Inter- Fraternity Council (IFC) 
is the governing body for all men's 
undergraduate Greek organizations 
on both Lake Shore and Lewis Tow- 
ers campuses. The Council is com- 
posed of all presidents of the fra- 
ternities together with an alternate 
delegate. All officers must be se- 
lected amongst the members of the 
council, thus insuring that council 
officers have the necessary experi- 
ence. 

The purpose of the council is three 
fold. First, it insures fairness among 
all fraternities. Secondly, it serves 
as a liaison between the fraternities 
and the Administration regarding 
any conflicts which might arise. 
Thirdly, it is responsible to the 
Rogers Park community as a repre- 
sentative of the fraternities. 

The consistency of the I.F.C. in ful- 
filling these three obligations has 
long marked this organization as 
one of the outstanding representa- 
tive bodies on Loyola's campus. 

Members: Sean Seman (President, 
Pi Alpha Lambda), Frank Johnson 
(Tau Kappa Epsilon), Rich Mara- 
viglia (Sigma Pi), Steve Weber 
(Alpha Delta Gamma), Dave Le- 
man (Alpha Delta Gamma), Ziggie 
Lisowski (Pi Alpha Lambda), Joe 
Marano (Delta Sigma Phi), John 
Keane (Alpha Sigma Phi), Father 
Leon Saladino (Moderator). 




Panhellenic 

Membership in sororities offers 
many opportunities. It provides a 
better academic atmosphere, broad- 
ens and enriches one's education, 
and contributes to social and intel- 
lectual development. 

Going Greek can be one of the most 
important decisions of a lifetime. 
The reasons for joining are many 
and varied and the benefits of mem- 
bership are as diverse as the indi- 
viduals who make up the sorority 
system. The Loyola Panhellenic As- 
sociation is the self-governing body, 
established to promote sisterhood 
and assure orderly procedure among 
its member sororities. 

We are a group of women involved 
in the business of learning: learning 
to live and work with people, learn- 
ing to share experiences and ideas, 
learning principles of leadership and 
human relations, learning tolerance 
and consideration. 

We interrelate our individual goals, 
talents, and personalities with that 
of each chapter. The bonds of sister- 
hood go beyond the individual sorori- 
ties and extend to all the members 
of the other sororities. 

We communicate — we understand, 
we're Greek life — a new Dimension. 

Members: Sherry Owens (Presi- 
dent), Rita O'Brien, Thea Sventy, 
Jo DeMaria, Susan Nessler, Maria 
Zajac, Jo Alesi, Joet Schiro, Margie 
Faut, Anne Marie Chorba, Geraldine 
Terry, Joan Steinbrecher, (Moderator). 




171 



Kappa Delta Epsilon 



Kappa Delta Epsilon, professional 
education sorority, was founded in 
1933 as an extension of the profes- 
sional education fraternity. Kappa 
Phi Kappa. Since its inception, the 
sorority has been represented by 
fifty-one chapters in twenty-one 
states. Beta Gamma, Loyola's chap- 
ter, has been in existence since 
November, 1968. 

Kappa Delta Epsilon provides the 
opportunity for undergraduate wom- 
en to become involved in the future 
of education through an increasing 
knowledge of the profession. It also 
provides an advantage common to all 
sororities — friendship with sisters. 

Some of the projects and activities 
KDE has sponsored are: student 
teaching seminars, tutoring pro- 
grams, a speaker from St. Gertrude 
Undergraduate School, a speaker 
from a Montessori school, a teach- 
er who spoke on "open classrooms", 
a representative from the Chicago 
Board of Education discussing teach- 
er placement, tours to various 
schools and learning centers, and 
faculty-student coffee hours for the 
School of Education. 

In addition to sponsoring their own 
educational activities, KDE has 
acted as a service organization to 
Loyola and Loyola-affiliated events. 
Its members have assisted at sev- 
eral reading conferences, the Na- 
tional Council for Teachers of Math 
Conference, LT-SOB projects, and 
others. 

Membership is open to undergradu- 
ate women interested in Education; 
it is not necessary to be an educa- 
tion major. Although it operates 
from Lewis Towers, KDE welcomes 
Lake Shore students. 




172 





Alpha Tau Delta 



Alpha Tau Delta Nursing Sorority 
has been a viable part of Loyola 
University since 1957. Over the 
years we have been witnesses to 
many changes, both within the Uni- 
versity and in ourselves. At Loyola, 
the evolution of the modern student 
from the passively educated person 
of by-gone days has been very slow 
in coming. As students we have been 
faced with changes wherever we turn, 
and this is good. To be alive is to 
change and grow. That which does 
not undergo some revision in life is 
stagnant and dead. 

As a Greek body we too have been 
faced with a changing student attitude 
towards Greeks. Each year we have 
watched the number of pledges de- 
crease not only here at Loyola, but 
at colleges and universities across 
the nation. This we also feel to be a 
part of the student/university evo- 
lutionary process. 

As nurses, however, there is one 
aspect where we have not noticed 
any alteration; the love and pride 
which our members have for the 
nursing profession. It is this love 
which has held us together as a 
single body since our first chapter 
came into existence. This is the 
living gift which we as an organiza- 
tion, and to those M>ho wish to join 
us this is the treasure that we will 
share. 

Members: Lois Bediek, Dedra Beth- 
any, Donna Bilka, Nancy Broerman, 
Marian Brown, Marietta Didier, Bar- 
bara Doerr, Anita Grandt, Elaine 
Gregory, Fran Jeager, Ann Kaick, 
Joan Moorehouse, Alane Repa, Kath- 
leen Rous, Renee Stroud, Jane Visel, 
Denise Uotucha, Shelia Campbell, 
Mary Klotz, Patricia O'Grady, Joan 
Scully, Stephanie Wojenik. 



173 



Alpha Phi Omega 



Alpha Phi Omega is unique in its 
blending of a fraternity and service 
organization. As a fraternity the bond 
of brotherhood betters our service 
program by making service to the 
campus and community more united, 
efficient, and spirited. As a service 
organization we dedicated ourselves 
to helping others through various 
temporary service projects and other 
permanent programs. This service 
also develops a spirit of self-sacri- 
fice in our brothers, helping us to 
mature and develop a sound charac- 
ter and furthering the close bond of 
brotherhood that joins us. 

Some of our service projects in the 
past have included collecting on 
campus for various charities, usher- 
ing at concerts and football games, 
rehabilitating a mental health center 
and a day care center, filling in the 
chuck-holes in the unpaved parking 
lot at LSC, and working with Settle- 
ment House children. Our service 
programs include the SAB-APO 
Commuter Program, a campus oms- 
budsman, annual recruiting for Ac- 
tion — Peace Corps and Vista, sup- 
porting an adopted child in Thailand, 
and operating a recycling center. 

As a fraternity we have never in- 
dulged in physical hazing. Within the 



past two years all mental hazing 
has been eliminated. Our pledge 
program is geared toward the de- 
velopment of a spirit brotherhood 
and service in our pledges. Pledges 
are equal to brothers and are not 
subordinate to them in any way. 
Traditional fraternity pledging has 
no place in developing a mature and 
balanced character. 

John Powell, S.J., our moderator 
leads us periodically in days of 
self-evaluation, geared toward a 
growth and improvement in inter- 
personal relationships. Mr. Larry 
Zentz, the Administrative Assistant 
to the Vice-President and Dean of 
Students, is our chapter advisor and 
helps us grow as an efficient and 
smoothly functioning service organi- 
zation. 

Members: Val 'bouncing Polish baby' 
Boychuck, Bucktown Fats Krawczak, 
Al 'Rev.' Tomosius, Bill Savier, 
Sarge Vozas, Tom Myers, Steve Co- 
lompos. Grease Banks, Dobi Mc- 
Hugh, Pete Fetzer, Barf Star Janak, 
Frank Rotella, Bill McGrath, Jerry 
Wiencek, Beaver Zabielski, Tom 
Dreilinger, Don Uczen, John Nac- 
zas, Greg Konze, Tom Kleban, Jim 
Zubko, Frank Cannon, Thunderbolt 
Siemianowski, Jim Sasparilla O'Shea. 




Pi Alpha Lambda 



Pi Alpha Lambda is the oldest fra- 
ternity on campus, chartered in 1925 
under the leadership of Fr. James J. 
Mertz. The Pi Alph's uphold the fra- 
ternal traditions of friendship and 
brotherhood, while trying to adapt to 
the changing times. As one of the 
smallest fraternities on campus, we 
feel that we can cultivate a deeper 
friendship and unity that extends be- 
yond the physical limits of the 
university. 



Members: Sam Condella (Presi- 
dent), Richard Roche, Terry Mo- 
ran, Ralph Zarada, Larry Szatkow- 
ski, Frank Padraza, Pat Beattie, 
Roman Papierz, Jeff Roche, Sean 
Seman, Kent Martzan, Sigmund Li- 
sowski, Tim Meyer, Tony Savaglio, 
Bill Morley, Rick Eckert, Pat Scan- 
Ian, Tom Bryant, John Steffy, Tom 
Du Plesis, Brian McMahon, Mike 
McAdams. 





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Gamma Phi Delta 



Gamma Phi Delta Sorority incorpo- 
rated, a nationai sorority of business 
and professional women dedicated to 
continued educational endeavors and 
the rendering of services to the 
youth of America, was established 
in 1943. There are 61 graduate 
chapters throughout the United 
States. Gamma Phi Delta accepts 
women of all races, creeds and 
religions. 

Gamma Phi Delta has expanded 
their scope to establish undergradu- 
ate chapters on major college and 
university campuses. The Loyola 
chapter was founded on May 25, 1970. 
It has a present membership of 35. 
The goals of this chapter are : 1 ) To 
promote sisterhood among all wom- 
en; 2) To render service to the 
Black Community and the Loyola 
Community-at-large; 3) To provide 
financial aid in the form of Scholar- 
ship to all who desire to continue 



their education. 

The Beta Chi Chapter of Gamma Phi 
Delta Sorority Inc., is a service so- 
rority. Our service projects for the 
year include the donation of toys for 
Christmas to St. Frances Cabrini 
Youth Center, Christmas Basket 
Project, volunteer service to Cook 
County Hospital, and a June Schol- 
arship Program. We are members 
of the United Negro College Fund 
and associate sponsors of the Ebony 
Fashion Show. 

Gamma Phi Delta Sorority Inc. is a 
non-profit organization. PEACE AND 
HARMONY is our motto, REFINE- 
MENT AND CULTURE our aim. 

Gamma Phi Delta, a national sorori- 
ty of business and professional wom- 
en, is interested in broadening its 
scope by establishing new under- 
graduate chapters. New chapters 



which are dedicated to educational, 
professional, economical, and so- 
ciological development of its mem- 
bers. There are many opportunities 
for rendering service to the youth 
of America through membership in 
Gamma Phi Delta Sorority. 

Aside from the civic and community 
services that might be afforded, the 
sorority offers an opportunity of 
working with knowing women in all 
the professional and businesses. 

Beta Chi, the Loyola Chapter of Gam- 
ma Phi Delta, through educational en- 
terprises and community awareness 
endeavors to create a vital and 
thriving nucleus of strong and dedi- 
cated young women; who in the future 
will reflect not only the influences of 
Gamma Phi Delta, but the educational 
values instilled by Loyola University. 













Members: Joann Brooks, Francine 
Davis, Barbara Deton, Patricia Eas- 
ter, Veotia Flowers, Nuriel L. Fultz, 
Shelline Grigsby, Arlene Harvey, 
Carolyn Hathorne, Willa Mae Jack- 
son, Cassandra Johnson, Frances 



Jones, Girtha Kidd, Delores Latti- 
more, Yvonne Levison, Deborah 
Martin, Debra Matlock, Jill McDon- 
ald, Gloria Miles, Sandra Miller, 
Gloria Moore, Tajuana Parker, Nor- 
vella Reid (President), Barbara 



Saunders, Tommi Scott, Vera Smith, 
Dorothy Stanton, Lu Delia Taylor, 
Geraldine Terry, Karen Thomas, 
Joyce Waite, Patricia Waites, Aud- 
rey Wiaters, Regina Woods, Debo- 
rah Young. 



176 



Sigma Pi 



Sigma Pi Fraternity of Loyola Uni- 
versity was established on February 
11, 1961. The brothers of Phi Mu, a 
local fraternity at Loyola at that 
time, decided to apply for accept- 
ance into one of the largest national 
fraternities in the United States. 
Subsequently, Beta Chi chapter be- 
came one of the more than 110 chap- 
ters in this large national organiza- 
tion. 

Through its many years here at Loy- 
ola, Sigma Pi has grown from a 
small chapter into a large and ac- 
tive part of the academic and social 
life of the University. Sigma Pi 
boasts brothers in every field of 
academic life and also many alumni 
in professional schools and promi- 
nant social positions in every intra- 
mural sport found at Loyola. 



Greek life is a unique and rewarding 
experience, and Sigma Pi stands 
alongside all of the other Greek or- 
ganizations on campus in an attempt 
to promote a suitable atmosphere 
for both learning and growing. Col- 
lege life can be one of the most re- 
warding of all experiences. Sigma 
Pi offers the student during this 
time a chance to contribute some- 
thing to the University and, more 
important, Sigma Pi offers the stu- 
dent a chance to grow and develop 
with other young men who share his 
same goals and objectives. 




Members: Chris Abbinante, Bob Bar- 
ranco. Jay Basalay, Sam Boffa, 
John Bellino, Jack Cummings, Tom 
Cirincione, Frank DeLuca, Phil Du- 
chin, Tom Einikis, Bill Elling, Fred 
Fagan, Joe Greunig, Al Hess, Jim 
Heller, Mike Hinchey, Rich Garay, 



Wally Jakubas, Jim Jasper, Jerry 
Kadleck, Jim Kail, Mike Kudia, Mike 
Kuzlik, Carl Laudando, Bob Lesnak, 
Pat Liska, Tom Mikalauskas, Frank 
Marmo, Frank Modica, Joe McCone, 
Rich Maraviglia (President), Mike 
Mysza, Joel Ostrander, Lou Or- 



lando, Don Pogorzelski, Ron Porten, 
Dave Rinella, Grey Schuiz, John Su- 
tula, Chet Swiat, Dave Towech, Bill 
Tully, Jim Tully, Tom Tully, Mark 
Valentine, Chris Ward, Bro. Michael 
Grace (Moderator), Fr. Victor 
LaMotte (Advisor). 



177 



Alpha Kappa Lambda 



Alpha Kappa Lambda is the youngest 
fraternity on campus. It has been a 
leader among national fraternities in 
the elimination of hazing and the de- 
velopment of a new, progressive 
look for the American College Fra- 
ternity. Loyola's Beta Alpha chap- 
ter has been among the top schol- 
astically and was the first in grade 
point average for the Spring of 1971. 
The fraternity also develops the 
ideals of an overall Christian em- 
phasis, campus leadership, and in- 
volvement. The pledge classes are 
known for their service projects to 
the community which include such 
activities as volunteer work at Angel 
Guardian Orphanage. 



Members: Bill Coughlin (Presi- 
dent), Bob Borris, Dennis Barta- 
sis, Mark Bataska, Ken Boneela, 
Ted Borris, Eric Connor, John 
Chips, Dennis Chubinski, Mike 
Coulmen, Dale Dembski, Dave de- 
Groh, Tony Delach, Stanely Diaz, 
Rich DeAngelo, Rich Eilts, Norman 
Eskoz, Jeff Fromm, Pedro Falcon, 
Jim Funk, Tony Giger, Donald Gas- 
paretti, Sam Haik, Paul Kelly, Ken 
Ludwig, George Marx, Jeff Mazzanti, 
Greg Onorato, Bob Pasciak, Gerry 
Parker, Tony Puczkowsky, Bill Quin- 
lan, Ron Sage, Gary Stantor, Paul 
Stralka, Rich Soska, Jay Sperber, 
Craig Tomassi, Bill Troccoli, Greg 
Yokota, Little Sister: Cindi Cline. 




Delta Sigma Pi 



Delta Sigma Pi has over 175 under- 
graduate chapters, 76,000 active 
members, 38 alumni clubs, and over 
64 years of experience in the fra- 
ternity world. So what? To myself 
and everyone of my brothers, mem- 
bership in Delta Sigma Pi means 
much more than impressive facts 
and figures. Fraternities and sorori- 
ties aren't dying and probably never 
will. What is happening, however, is 
change. To insure that Delta Sigma 
Pi doesn't become just another fra- 
ternity that used to be, we've ad- 
justed and changed along with the 
changing needs of today's college 
student. Delta Sigma Pi is dynamic 
and flexible in nature. Since our 
origin in 1907 at New York Univer- 
sity, we have been fortunate enough 



to have as brothers men who were 
not so narrow-minded as to ever 
lock Delta Sigma Pi into inflexible 
and unchanging programs that could 
not ever satisfy the people with 
whom they dealt. 

The Greek movement today still has 
much to offer to those open-minded 
enough to give it a chance. The re- 
sponsibilities of fraternities are 
many. At Delta Sigma Pi we have 
added another dimension to this re- 
sponsibility. Besides giving the stu- 
dent an atmosphere where he can 
develop himself socially, we offer to 
him the opportunity to become fa- 
miliar with the professional business 
world into which he will soon enter. 

Delta Sigma Pi is many things to 



each of my brothers, but common 
to all of us is the feeling of friend- 
ship that is evident throughout the 
fraternity. 

Members: Jim Neurauter, Jim Gian- 
forte, Ed Pieszchala, Joe Giglio, 
Pete Huck, Gary Pearson, Bill Liva, 
John Alvino, Len Carmichael, Kevin 
Clancy, Bill Howard, John Hickey, 
Bob Loos, Larry Hickey, Bill Read, 
Mike Klimas, Paul Brunzie, Barry 
Barth, Steven Przybylo, Len Cisek, 
Bill IMiemasz, Tom Hudson, Joe 
Tuccori, Harry Kuck, Marty Mc- 
Manus, Bob Bubak, The Gumper, 
The Rock, The Lump, Greg Grisko, 
Onofrio Sciddurlo. 





179 



Kappa Beta Gamma 




/Vappa Beta Gamma 
SocMI Sorority 
HapPy People 
GrouP of 26 Members 
Ch4rity Projects 

filue and Gold 
Frifndship: "Life's Treasure' 
CooperaTlve 

Academic excellence 

Best Overall Sorority of Greek Week 

National Sorority 
Unforgettable Memory 
University and Co/ifmunity Activities 
Kappa Beta Gamnv4 



Members: Jo Alesi (President), 
Marianne Conception, Valerie Dar- 
di, Wendy Decker, Maureen Duffy, 
Collette Holiday, Peggy Kare, Mary 
Anne Kelly, Valerie Lipski, Mary 
Pat Mackin, Fran Manno, Maureen 
McNamara, Dusty Miller, Bonnie 
Ozeck, Karen Phelan, Joet Schiro, 
Margo Swieca, Mary Torp, Rose- 
■mary Ryback. New Sisters: Kathy 
Brezouec, Cherye Corrado, Genny 
Crawford, Zori Fedunysyn, Patty Kel- 
ly, Paula Neri, Joanne Stefanowicz. 



180 



i 



Theta Phi Alpha 




JLA 




regarding a door 
its open and shut 
but it is less open and shut than a 

wall 
a wall is something to lean on 
and its unwise to lean on a door 
regarding a door 
you can take it in hand 
turning the knob of a door you can 

open it and step through 
then its no longer a door 
now in the case of a wall 
its a wall wherever you are 
which is evident and consoling 
with a wall you always know where 

you are 
while a door is only a door from 

outside 
there is also something substantial 

about walls 
maybe its the materials from which 

theyre made 
the bricks and the plaster 
but more likely its the absence of 

hinges 
the hinges in a door are like hidden 

conditions 



upon which everything turns 
theyre like the small print in 

contracts 
a door depends on its hinges 
but it also depends on a wall 
there is no thing unusual about a wall 

without doors 
a door without a wall is rediculous 
also a door is usually visible in all 

of its limits 
but you cannot see the other side of 

a wall 
and a door is always suggesting 

another side 
so doors seem ambiguous and appear 

to be forever flapping in the wind 
a revolving door seems to be always 

changing its mind 
but regarded from whatever angle 
it is always offering you the same 

proposition 
there are so many unanswered 

questions about doors 
why is it that there arent circular or 

elliptical doors 
what is it that frightening about 

sliding doors 



and what about the color of doors 
green doors in brick walls 
white doors in black walls 
or black doors in any walls 
this will lead you to suspect that i 

am talking about symbols 
rather than about doors and walls 
whats all this talk about doors and 

walls anyway 
why not talk about something real 
like strainers 

Members: Marianne Arends, Cathy 
Coles, Cathy Conway, Kay Cunning- 
ham, Jo deMaria, Kathy Ebert, Kathy 
Donoval, Judi Taylor, Rita O'Brien, 
Terese O'Brien, Audrey Krzysko, 
Tina Halleran, Marcia Grobeck, Nel 
Pope, Thea Sventy, Helen Slobodian, 
Dolores MacDonald, Cathi Michel, 
Maureen George, Val Scaramella, 
Judy Kroll, Renee Stroud, Mary 
Gatsch, Sue Wazniak, Paula Leist, 
Diana Sepulveda, Andi Krzysko, Cin- 
dy Strawa, Cecilia Trampota. 



181 



Alpha Delta 
Gamma 



Some say that fraternities are 
dying— and in a sense they 
might be. The days of paddling 
pledges and swallowing gold- 
fish are on the way out, while 
the enduring values, bonded 
by a spirit of brotherhood, 
remain. 

Fraternities today are under- 
going a process of transition, 
where fraternity life is not all 
centered around parties and 
sports, but are also concerned 
with a constructive social ac- 
tion. The fraternities at Loy- 
ola do hold much potential in 
that they do allow the indi- 
vidual to grow— if the indi- 
vidual is willing to accept the 
responsibility. 




Since its inception at Loyola in 1924, 
Alpha Delta Gamma has become the 
largest fraternity on campus. It was 
founded with a three-fold purpose 
in mind: To afford the social ad- 
vantages of a fraternity to students 
of a High moral standard and ideal, 
to promote and support all activities 
of Loyola University, and to effect 
a stronger bond among similarly 
inclined students of the University. It 
considers the development of per- 
sonal integrity and honesty of social 
responsibility vitally important to 
the education of the whole man. It 
strives to be a neat entanglement 
of all the aspects of college life — 
intellectual, social, recreational, 
and spiritual. It presents to the col- 
lege student not a mere ideal but a 



clear cut way of life. 
Those within the fraternity learn to 
respect what is unique in each in- 
dividual member of the group. 

The fraternity is a human institu- 
tion with human imperfections, yet 
with the capacity to confer on its 
members benefits and values that 
will last through the years. 

Members: Jim Bachner, Bob Blinn, 
Bob Blumthal, Dave Chrzanowski, 
Frank Cioppettini, Kevin Clarke, 
Terry Colwell, Bill Cooke, John 
Corcoran, Bruce D'Amour, Tom 
Donlon, Ron Dougherty, John Doyle, 
Bob Einhorn, Don Fitzgerald, Larry 
Folk, Mark Foster, Kevin Gallagher, 
John Gibbons, Barry Gold, Mike 



Goode, Frank Granacki, Harold 
Hallbom, Tom Hart, Mike Johnson, 
Bob Kenny, Frank Knoll, Ken Krew- 
er, Dennis Kulczyk, Larry LaRonca, 
Dave Leeman, Neil Linehan, Don 
Lipskis, Ed Lipskis, Dan Lyons, 
Chris Markey, Larry Marshall, Bill 
Miller, John Mitterer, Mark McDer- 
mott, Paul IMowicki, Dan O'Donoghue, 
Bob Pandel, Joe Paron, Gene Rak, 
John Redman, Tom Riordan, Jeff 
Robinson, Ted Rockwell, Dave Rou- 
cek. Rick Schwind, Greg Szlak, Tom 
Titone, George Todisco, Trig Ur- 
banczyk, Steve Weber, Rick Wenger, 
Jeff Wilson, Jack Wygnat, Fr. Leon 
Saladino (Chaplain), Mr. Dennis 
McKenna (Moderator). 



182 




.^^^jV-'** 




Alpha Sigma Alpha 



Alpha Sigma Alpha was founded in 
1901 at Longwood College in Farm- 
ville, Virginia. Its aims are to 
foster intellectual, spiritual, physi- 
cal, and social development in its 
members. 

The Gamma Lambda Chapter of the 
Sorority was instituted at Loyola in 
1964. From its founding to the present 
ASA has encouraged its aims through 
involvement in both University and 
Community Life. Alpha Sigma Alpha 
has been involved in almost every 
major University function. Members 
of the sorority are involved in Cir- 
cumference, the Phoenix, Cheerlead- 
ing. Pom- Pom, Panhellenic, LSGA 



and SAB. Many sisters in the sorority 
have worked on various Orientation 
Weeks in the past. 

It is the aim of the sorority to con- 
tinue and expand their active involve- 
ment in both the life of Loyola Uni- 
versity as well as the life of the 
Rogers Park Community. 

Members: Jan Bak, Lynda Bernacki, 
Sonya Bernardi, Debbie Bukas, Anne 
Marie Chorba, Pegge Connolly, Mary 
Ann Cotter, Jean Coveny, April Dahl, 
Trisha DelGuidice, Cathy DiLegge, 
Denise Dziopek, Barb Farbotko, Da- 
nuta Farbotko, Margie Faut, Mary 
Faut, Kathy Fillichio, Cassie Flam- 



bouras, Kathy Gillies, Margo Gor- 
des. Rose Greco, Marcia Harris, 
Elly Hennessy, Carolyn Hesotian, 
Barb Hudek, Mary Johnson, Renee 
Kampman, Melody Kas, Pammie 
Kass, Diane Kaye, Sue King, llze 
Klavins, Mary Ann Konopka, Tess 
Kudia, Jan Luetkemeyer, Diana Mar- 
czuk, Joan Matz, Ann Mueller, Deb- 
bie Myers, Charlene Occhino, Sher- 
ry Owens, Paula Peterson, Kathy 
Powers, Mary Ann Powers, Jeanne 
Powers, Silvana Richardson, Sue 
Reynolds, Donna Smith, Kathy Stach, 
Mary Jo Stach, Laura Thara, Con- 
cetta Thara, Marilyn Wagner, Mary 
Jane WIeklinski, Mary Ann Zatopa. 



183 



Phi Mu 



Phi Mu, one of Loyola's smaller so- 
rorities, has been on Loyola's cam- 
pus for the past six years. During 
this time. Phi Mu has participated 
in many of the campus activities, 
such as Greek Week, spring and 
winter carnivals. Rose Queen candi- 
dates, and various fund-raising ac- 
tivities. Phi Mu also participates in 
Loyola's Panhellenic Association 
along with Loyola's four other so- 
rorities, as well as joining other 
sororities and fraternities in vari- 
ous public service projects. 



Phi Mu has also established certain 
traditions within its chapter, re- 
flective of its national background. 
Our national philanthropic project 
is raising money for the hospital 
ship Hope. We have done this through 
various projects such as selling 
pumpkins and making flowers, which 
have been supported by the students 
on campus. 

Phi Mu also has established tradi- 
tions that we have followed as a 
close bond and sisterhood. We have 



a scholarship dinner every semes- 
ter. In the winter, we have a dinner 
party called Winterfest, when we 
take our provisional members out 
to celebrate the end of pledging 
period. In the spring, we have a 
formal dinner dance. 

Members: Mary Barrins, Lydia Kon- 
schok, Susan Nessler, Linda Nelson, 
Nancy Oenning, Sandy Plewa, Mari- 
lyn Rogawski, Dolores Swiergul, 
Denise Tatka, Denise Weymans, 
Maria Zajac. 



184 







-»»*#' 



«'* 



.-lAnU* 



^•Nkt^. 



::Mr'*>. 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 



This is what is left of us. The Loy- 
ola chapter of Tau Kappa Epsilon is 
sharing in the national crisis of the 
American Social Fraternity. It is at 
such times that structure betrays 
itself. Beneath the din of loud par- 
ties and football games we were ac- 
tually people crying out for help in 
those Golden Days of The Fraterni- 
ty but the band just kept on playing. 
Status and security were the stuff- 
ings of a "thing" called the fra- 
ternity which distanced us from re- 
sponsibility to love and to be real. 
It attracted new members for awhile. 



but today's college student can 
clearly hear the creaks in the hol- 
low of the body. 

Now is the time for renewal. Each 
serious reflection upon an unhealthy 
past, each bright hope for tomorrow 
can be shared as fraters to cele- 
brate a crisis which has sent every- 
one of us back to the idea of fra- 
ternity, and to ourselves, to find 
out what we are all about. 

Perhaps the chapter will die. The 
inevitable purge of The Campus Lie, 



which feeds on small talk, will then 
have claimed just another casualty. 
But if our energy level can match 
an ancient dream, the house on Ken- 
more can well be the setting for the 
happy renewal of Christian life at 
Loyola University. 

Members: Tim Okal, Bruce Shum- 
way, Frank Johnson, Alan Kanabay, 
Frank Lipa, Greg Jolivette, Todd 
Dolan, Jim Mariani, John Clark, 
Jose Gato, John Ryan. 







X 




Beta Beta Beta Biological Society 
is a society whose members share 
a common interest in academic 
achievement and the appreciation of 
the life sciences. Tri-Beta is a na- 
tional honorary organization with 
chapters in colleges across the 
United States, in Canada, and in 
Puerto Rico. Loyola's chapter. 
Lambda Omega, received its char- 
ter in 1969. It had 29 members and 
has since grown to a membership 
of 82. The chapter tries to sponsor 
activities in many areas of biology 
whether it be pure or applied. With- 
in the last year the society has 
sponsored turtle races in the Stu- 
dent Union, toured three medical 
schools, visited Argonne National 
Laboratories, and judged a gram- 
mar school science fair. The mem- 
bers have a chance to socialize at 
get-togethers like the all-you-can- 
eat pizza party or the annual 
Christmas party. The research- 
oriented student can come to Tri- 
Beta to ask for sponsorship of his 
project. The national organization 
has a journal, "Bios", in which the 
researcher can have his papers 
published. Tri-Beta has much to 
offer students who are interested in 
the life sciences. They have the 
opportunity to see biology in a dif- 
ferent light than in the classroom 
and meet more people with their 
interests. 

Members: Andrew Antonczyk, Sam 
Aprile, Louis Arocha, Dennis Bar- 
tasis, Robert Bartolone, Thomas 
Blasco, Roger Bonascorsi, Al Bron- 
giel, Robert Bruce, Robert Brunetti, 
Vincent Bufalino, Joseph Buttner, 
Dennis Chubinski, Al Cisneros, 
Tom Cozzi, Nancy Creagh, Don Cy- 
borski, Terry Davis, Dave DeGroh, 
William De Lord, James Desnick, 
Steven Dronen, J. Stephen Ebrom, 
John Fairbairn, Denise Figelwicz, 
Dianne Figelwicz, Richard Foley, 
Terry Graham, John Grieco, Zenko 
Hrynkiw, Kathy Kapica, Gary Karl, 
Peter Kiefer, llze Klavins, Larry 
Klolentcha, Donna Kocin, Thomas 
Korosa, Carl Laudanda, Bill Loj- 
konic, Adele Luck, William McCar- 
thy, Joseph Musso, Konrad Nago- 
toski, Mike Niemic, Robert O'Keefe, 
Olga Obradwick, Gregory Oronata, 
Mike Oster, Bonnie Ozuk, Robert 
Pary, Joseph Pauli, Joseph Paulsen, 
James Pisarczyk, Pamela Porgn- 
bela, Marguente Pozzi, Larry Pur- 
pura, Charles Rebesca, Kathleen 
Reinhart, Robert Ryan, Albert Seg- 
ler, Adrian Sheremata, John Sikor- 
ski, Dennis Smith, Jo Soiek, Steven 
Soltes, Kathleen Sonnes, George So- 
senko, John Stablein, Matthew Strel- 
czyk, Beverly Stastny, Fred Tomera, 
Steven Trobrani, James Veltman, 
Edmund Vizinas, Carol Waldock, 
Daniel Walters, Ronald Warzjas, 
Eleanor Williams, Ronald Williams, 
Ted Zamirowski, Gene Zdenek. 




186 




Alpha Sigma Phi 

Alpha Sigma Phi was founded on 
December 6, 1845, at Yale Univer- 
sity, making it the tenth oldest so- 
cial fraternity in the United States. 
It was organized as a Sophomore 
Class society, but being blessed with 
superior leadership and other out- 
standing qualities. Alpha Sigma Phi 
not only was able to expand at Yale, 
but also to establish chapters at 
other Universities, notably Harvard 
in 1850, Amherst in 1854, and 
Marietta, in 1860. This trend has 
continued so that as of January, 
1972, there are sixty-one active 
chapters across the country. 

Primarily the Alpha Sig's at Loyola 
are a social fraternity. The center 
of activity is located at the Chapter 
House at 1062 West Columbia. In the 
years since its acquisition in 1964, 
the Alpha Sig House has undergone 
much internal improvement. These 
improvements have gone a long way 
in making this not only a social 
gathering place, but, with the rising 
cost of university residence, a de- 
sirable place to live. 

Other activities that the Alpha Sigs 
engage in are athletics, (finishing 
second in the fraternity football 
league with a 7-1 record), and serv- 
ice projects such as the Fund Drive 
held for the Michael Reese Hospital 
last year, and tag day. 

Thus, contrary to much that has 
been said about fraternities in gen- 
eral. Alpha Sigma Phi will continue 
to play an important part in the 
Loyola scene for many years to 
come. 

Members: Jim Balovich, Kevin 
Black, Bob Bleser, Bob Branstatter, 
Tom Buzzanca, Bob Cassato, Vince 
Cesaro, Steve Chamnes, James 
Corrigan, Joe Cotugno, Ken Crann, 
Joe Dragoo, Tom Doherty, Don 
Falls, Dan Fitzpatrick, Mark Gjo- 
vik, Ron Harris, Al Jawny, Howard 
Kahan, Mike Keane, John Keane, 
Chet Klos, William Korinek, Bill 
LeBlanc, Tom Lennon, Don Lieben- 
trit, Russell Lodarek, Jim Lynch, 
John Mann, Glen Merker, Mark 
McDonnald, Jim Morrill, Jim Neu- 
ses, Jeff Noll, Terry Nykiel, Kevin 
O'Connor, Mike O'Neill, Pat Quinn, 
Mike Riordan, Al Romito, Glen 
Shelve, John Shultz, Bruce Sakie- 
wicg, Mike Smajd, Dan Strizak, Jack 
Toljanic, Frank Zeman, Mike Zadel, 
Mike Tootooian. 



187 




Alpha Kappa Psi 



Alpha Kappa Psi is the oldest and 
largest professional fraternity in 
the nation. Gamma lota Chapter 
was initiated at Loyola University 
in 1952. 

At Loyola, Alpha Kappa Psi is a 
professional business fraternity 
which is primarily fraternal and 
secondarily professional. In addition 
to our professional activities which 
we feel help our members in their 
business education. Alpha Kappa Psi 
also fully participates in all social 
phases of the university, as well as 
fielding teams in all intramural 
sports. 

Alpha Kappa Psi is unique in that we 
limit membership to males from the 
Lewis Towers Campus; in this way 
we feel that we offer the best op- 
portunity for brotherhood at Lewis 
Towers. 

Alpha Kappa Psi has also established 
itself as a leader in membership in 
student government and other as- 
pects of student activities in addition 
to a vigorous involvement in com- 
munity and university service proj- 
ects. It was for these accomplish- 
ments that Alpha Kappa Psi was 



named "Fraternity of the Year" for 
1970-71. 

Members: James Betczynski, 
George Buchheit, Ross Cucio, Wil- 
liam Dempsey, Richard Diaz, Paul 
Duggan, David Dwyer, Donald Fi- 
gura, Edward Garstka, Timothy 
Golden, Brian Hill, James Aubleerts, 
Michael Jordan, Michael Kamka, 
Dennis Kowalski, Stephen Knorst, 
Constantine Kokonas, Phillip Kra- 
wiec, Michael Lambesis, Gerard 
Leon, Michael Maledon, Kenneth 
Mach, Kevin McGirr, Peter Mel- 
choir, John Menzer, James Mise- 
rendino, Michael Moran, Charles 
Mammoser, John Marzinelli, Pat- 
rick Murphy, Edward Napleton, 
Stephen Napelton, James Nichols, 
Felix Niespodziewanski, Frank O'Con- 
nor, David Okoniewski, Robert Pe- 
trancosta. High Pollard, Joseph Pol- 
lini, Thomas Schoewe, Ronald 
Skwarek, Leonard Seivert, Michael 
Sluka, Paul Sosa, Dave Spagnola, 
Stefan Swiezy, James Trapp, Joseph 
Tiemback, Martin F. Voipe, Stephen 
Winkler, Stefan Zaczenko, Richard 
Piasecki, Edward Welch. 



188 




,/ 



Delta Sigma Phi 



kS 



\ 



h 






i^-H 



;)■ 



if*?* 



* 




There are three aspects of brother- 
hood in Delta Sigma Phi. The first 
responsibility is to the International 
Fraternity Of Delta Sigma Phi which 
was founded at the City College of 
New York in 1899. Today Delta 
Sigma Phi claims over one hundred 
and forty chapters, and more than 
twenty colonies making it the fastest 
growing national in the country. We 
are very proud of our national and 
the many famous alumni who wear 
the pin of Delta Sigma Phi. 

The second aspect of brotherhood 
is on the local level and in this 
particular case Epsilon Kappa chap- 
ter at Loyola University. The let- 
ters Epsilon Kappa refer to us as 
the 134th chapter of Delta Sigma 
Phi. We were founded at Loyola in 
1965 and became a chapter on De- 
cember 4, 1967. Last year two of 
our brothers Joe Morano and John 
Silkorski served the i.F.C. as 
vice-president and treasurer re- 
spectively. This year three of our 
brothers are on the Student Activi- 
ties Board: Frank Giambrone, John 
Zipparo, and Tony Zielinski. 



We are as unique a group as any at 
Loyola. We have acquired our house 
and this year we are under the 
leadership of two presidents. Aca- 
demically, we are third among so- 
cial fraternities with a 2.61 average. 
Athletically speaking our basketball 
team is 2-0 and we took second 
place in the swimming tournament. 
Ever since 1968, Loyola Karate 
Club has been composed of mostly 
Delta Sigma Phi brothers. They 
have made up most of the Loyola 
Karate Competition team. The mem- 
bers are; Philip Yee, Rick Espinoza, 
John Silkorski, Jim Elipas and 
George Czakowrski. 

Regardless of your interests there 
is room for the individual in Delta 
Sigma Phi. We compete and cooper- 
ate in every aspect of university 
life, but our primary interest is in 
the social. 

The third aspect of brotherhood is 
the individual. This is the most im- 
portant, because you yourself must 
decide ultimately how college life 
will affect you. A fraternity offers 



responsibility and a challenge to 
the individual. It is a preparation 
for life. A fraternity is unity and 
loyalty and if every individual is not 
loyal to the group the success of a 
fraternity is threatened. 

Members: Tom Boyce, John Buech- 
ner. Shannon Burke, Richard Cies- 
lukewicz, Robert Cummuta, Ted 
Cushing, Mario Debenedetto, George 
Czajakowski, Leon DiBasio, Jim 
Elipas, Ricardo Espinoza, George 
Firlit, Frank Giambtone, George 
Goumas, Ronald Gugliociello, Jo- 
seph Hagberg, Glen Howski, Martin 
Herbert, George Hovany, Michael 
Laxner, Jim Jurzza, Lance Lee, 
Jime Lehmann, Angelo Leventis, Joe 
Morano (President), Mike Nowack, 
Jeff Madden, Bill O'Connell, Bell 
Pevitts, Jim Poulsom, Fr. Joseph 
Pendergast S.J., Jij Rhodes, David 
Requena, John Silkorski, Wayne 
Sherman, Fr. Robert Schwartz S.J., 
Mark Turner, Albert Ursine Jr., 
Lloyd Voorhees, Bell Wandel, Ron- 
ald Weiss, Philip Yee, Norm Zienty, 
Frank Zapparito, Tony Zelinsky 
(President), John Zipparro. 



189 



Budgeted Organizations: Do or Die? 



Adaptability is the primary requisite for the 
continued existence of any organization: 
adaptability to people, circumstances, life- 
styles, ideologies — all that is constantly 
changing, growing and expanding. However 
any change implies a question of direction, 
the possibility of a Mfrong move, and con- 
sequently the danger of instability. Often it 
is deceivingly safer to be firmly entrenched 
in a tradition, an irrectractable way of doing 
things. But such a position is not only ulti- 
mately insecure in a world that must change 
in order to stay alive and pulsating, but it is 
also extremely suffocating to human freedom 
and the rejuvenating spirit of inquiry. 

Both eventually wane and die causing a fear 
of new ideas, a fear of change and the re- 
fusal to rearrange priorities. Doesn't a fear 
of change and the consequent, possible in- 
security severely restrict the rovings of 
human freedom to the status quo? Doesn't 
tradition limit the scope and view of re- 
juvenation inquiry, declaring certain areas 
as sacred or top-priority and therefore ir- 
refutable and unchangeable? 

Someone once said: "The man who is willing 
to give up freedom for security doesn't de- 
serve either." Perhaps we can say that any 
university resisting change doesn't deserve to 
change. Let it die a long with its traditions. 

Loyola University is the heir not only of the 
stifling and damnable American concept of a 
colege diploma being only a ticket for higher 
paying and more prestigious jobs. This 
Jesuit institution also inherits all the asphyx- 
iating and iron-clad, but subtle traditions of 
Catholic schooling. This coupling of two ma- 
terialistic, self- oriented, and reactionary 
traditions means the gradual extirmination of 
creative expression and student priorities. 

Which is more important for the development 
of a human being: scientific inquiry or crea- 
tive expression? Perhaps both are necessary. 
Is each stressed at Loyola? The Sciences 
certainly are. What about the Arts? The top 
two floors of Lewis Towers and the base- 
ment of the LSC Armory answer that ques- 
tion only too painfully. Net result? A subtle 
testament to the Jesuit and Loyolan ethic that 
the arts don't program students as well as 
the sciences. 

It's difficult Of not impossible) to grade 
creative expression in art. And grades are 
the backbone of the subtle programming stu- 
dents get to fit into the role of a capitalist 
stereotype. Afterall, "healthy" competition 
for grades (the "I'm better than you, cuz 
I got a better grade" type) operates on the 
same principle of a "healthy" competition 



in this capitalist society after money, prop- 
erty, and prestige (the "I got to be better 
than the Jones' " type). 

The educational process of a university takes 
place in the relationship between student and 
teacher. Why the hell do we need academic 
Deans and their hoardes of assistants and 
secretaries to drain financial resources, 
push students around and stifle the educational 
process by coming in between teacher and 
student! 

How often is a student allowed to disagree 
with a teacher and not get punished or be- 
littled somehow? Sure you can usually discuss 
a point with a teacher concerning the subject 
matter, but what if a student takes exception 
with the way the class is run or the means 
for grading or the teacher's attitude or the 
axioms that are supposed to be taken for 
granted? 

Can a student go to class only to learn? No, 
he has to also prove himself to the teacher 
by taking tests or writing papers, which can 
often be a demeaning experience because of 
haughty teachers. Do any teachers approach 
the class as a mutual-learning process? HAI 
They're usually too smart to learn anything 
from free and open inquiry into subject mat- 
ter. Rather they have a divine command of 
their material and the student is expected not 
to judge for himself but rather to regurgitate 
the teacher's knowledge back at him on a test 
or a paper — thus gratifying the teacher's 
ego. Can a student make his own decision to 
withdraw from a class if he fails to see its 
worth, assuming that a given class is worth- 
while? No, some funky academic dean has to 
approve withdrawls. A student isn't re- 
sponsible enough to do so by himself. 

The criticisms made here imply changes in 
very solidly entrenched notions of "higher" 
education. Can these necessary changes be 
made at Loyola? Is Loyola open to con- 
structive criticism? Yes, if it involves super- 
ficial change. Any other change (even if 
necessary) is too radical and might threaten 
Jesuit sentimentality. Catholic tradition or 
capitalist ideology. These are the sacred 
areas that are unapproachable because they 
are omnipotent and eternal. Human freedom 
does not extend here and the rejuvenating 
sprit of inquiry dies here. 

Can the student be a top priority in the face 
of this refusal to adapt to changing times? 
Of course not! The proper priorities must 
include the preservation of the status quo. 
Arxl as more and more machination become 
necessary to preserve the system against 
increased criticisms, the student drops lower 



aiKl lower on the hierarchy of priorities. 

How do the Jesuit Overlords and their cronies 
within the university bureaucratic octopus 
stifle the criticism? Kill individual creative 
expression which kindles human freedom and 
inquiry. Make the educational system so 
subtly strangling to individuality, critical 
thinking and freedom that the students won't 
notice that they're being programmed for 
conformity to a capitalist-American-Catholic 
stereotype. They'll be too busy fighting for 
grades to worry about losing their human 
freedom — clearly the greatest gift that a man 
can ever have. 

What about the students involved in positions 
of non-academic leadership? Keeping them 
silent and uncritical is important in order 
to contaiiKliscontent and maintain the status- 
quo. Therefore, don't give them any real 
po^er. Keep their budgets lowf and decrease 
them if possible. Don't give student govern- 
ment any decision-making authority. Slowly 
eliminate student publications. Keep the 
organizations "on the red carpet" as often 
and as long as possible. Don't show any 
gratitude. Don't be encouraging in any way. 
Let them be on committees to pacify them 
and pretend to listen to them. Or start a 
sham committee with no power but lots of 
students. And above all keep communication 
within the bureaucratic octopus as poor as 
possible. "Your left tentacle should not know 
what your right tentacle is doing." (from the 
Holy Bible, or is it Loyola's By-Laws?) 
The ultimate veto should be retained by only 
Jesuits. All Matters dealing with student 
organizational funds or responsibility should 
be filtered through as many committees and 
bureaucrats as possible to waste time and 
discourage student leaders. Thus eventually 
the breed of student leaders mil disappear 
from the face of Loyola — if effect, though 
maybe not in appearance — and they can then 
be replaced by faithful Jesuit lackeys. 

And so, in the academic world stifle creative 
expression! Who cares if human freedom and 
integrity is warped: grind the student under 
the heal of the Dean and his cohorts with a 
myriad of rules and regulations and discip- 
linary grades. In the non-academic world, 
slowly and subtly strangle student organi- 
zations and eliminate the pesky vermin 
called student leader. And thus, Loyola won't 
have to change because it wfon't have to adapt 
to anybody since everybody will be pro- 
grammed to adapt to it. 

And how much longer can such a Jesuit fief- 
dom exist? 



190 



Whoever it was who purchased this 
copy of the 1972 Loyolan is to be 
congratulated. Since as of this writing 
the 1973 Loyolan has been allotted 
no printing budget, this may be the 
last yearbook produced at Loyola 
University of Chicago, and will doubt- 
less be a collector's item in another 
102 years. 

It is a unique experience to be the 
leader of a University-budgeted 
organization here at Loyola, and it 
draws all of us together into the 
never-ending battle of "us" vs. 
"the administration." We feel like 
La Rue Martin, fouling out of his last 
home game at Loyola, frustrated by 
bad officials and a season-long lack 
of support ftom the student body at 
large. We have all worked hard to- 
gether to try to make Loyola some- 
thing to be proud of, something most 
students wouldn't be ashamed to 
matriculate at, something that sen- 
iors wouldn't feel so relieved (and 
nothing else) to escape after four 
years of despairing that someday, 
somehow, Loyola will care that they 
are individuals instead of numbers 
on the bursar's billing list. 

We have put up with major and minor 
aggrevations throughout our years 
at Loyola, but this last year has to 
have been the worst. During midterm 
week of the first semester, we were 
asked to produce budget proposals 
for next year's organizations, when 
most of us had no idea what we would 
be spending this year. At finals time 
of first semester, we were required 
to give to the administration detailed 
accounts of why we should continue 
to exist. 

These and many other petty aggre- 
vations, like waiting two months 
for checks to be sent to printers by 
the business office (or to be stopped. 



as in the case of the Buddy Miles 
fiasco for SAB), Purchase orders, 
lost deposits, not being able to know 
what our final budgets will be until 
the middle of the summer, and being 
required to produce complete finan- 
cial records for four previous years 
of the organizations' existence to the 
office whose job it is to keep those 
records, has made it difficult for us 
to function, to say the least. 

Besides these problems with the ad- 
ministration, we have problems with 
you, the dear students for whom we 
work. You revile us for late news- 
papers, yearbooks and literary mag- 
azines; concerts that you don't like; 
or legislation which either costs you 
money or makes it harder for you 
to graduate with the least amount of 
work. You forget so often that we 
are the people you search out to ex- 
plain the intricacies of Loyola bu- 
reaucracy, supply information on 
various university policies, provide a 
little pleasure in the form of music 
or humor, and do all the legwork on 
projects in academic and disciplinary 
fields. Whether you like it or not, 
you count on us to provide you with 
services that were they not provided, 
you would scream bloody murder 
until you got. 

Why do we do it? Why bother to get 
involved in a struggle between 
academics and activities in your 
own head and between what you think 
and what most other people think? 
Contrary to popular belief, it's not 
for pay, it's not (for the most part) 
to feed our gluttonous egos, and it's 
certainly not because we are all 
masochists. 

We do it because we must. We can't 
stand by and watch passively while 
we and all Loyola students are 
dogged around by administrators 



who are out to make a buck and look 
out for themselves. We can't stand 
by passively while those few fac- 
ulty and administrators who really 
care about students are fired (or 
worse, ignored) by the people in 
power. We can't complain that col- 
lege is no fun when we haven't tried 
to enjoy it. We wrack our brains, 
pull all-nighters, and regularly re- 
solve to commit suicide next week 
because sometimes that is what is 
necessary to get a job done, or to 
realize that it is impossible to do. 
But we have to know for ourselves, 
we must say "No!" to those who 
would tell us that something is really 
not worth the effort until experience 
gives us the answer. 

All of us know the University motto: 
Knowledge in the service of man. 
We know it because we feel that we 
can only be satisfied by the knowl- 
edge that we are providing services 
in the best interests of all members 
of the university community, and 
each of us knows that he or she is 
doing all that can be done by an in- 
dividual leading a group to accomp- 
lish a betterment of Loyola Univer- 
sity in some way. 

"It little profits an idle king" to sit 
at a typewriter and give an apology 
for that particular, distinctive brand 
of abberant behavior known as the 
role of "student leader," especially 
when he is one himself. Perhaps 
Tennyson's Ulysses captures the 
real essence of why we have become 
what we are, for like that famous 
wanderer, we have all been 

Made weak by time and fate, but 
strong in will 

To strive, to seek, to find, and not 
to yield. 



191 



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Wayne F. Tinkle 




"The two things in my life are my 
family and my job. They compete 
with each other in terms of time, so 
I try to involve my family with the 
University. 

"As Vice-President, Dean of Stu- 
dents, I don't have as much contact 
wKh the students as I would like to. 
In earlier days of administrative 
work, I enjoyed the student trips. 
Student Personnel people are work- 
ing here because we enjoy students 
and want to improve student life. 
My biggest concern when I became 
Dean was whether could I get along 
without student contact. As Dean of 
Men at Marquette, I went to fra- 
ternity parties every weekend. As 
Vice-President, I lost personal con- 
tact, but I gained the opportunity to 
help the student." Dean Tinkle en- 
joys family outings and recreation. 
When in school he was a recreation 
major and started out as a coach. 
At present, he is also the Chairman 
of the Northeast Council of Ex- 
plorers, for Boy Scouts. 



As another pastime, he refinishes 
furniture, which, he says, "I do out 
of necessity. I bought an old library 
table from Cudahy and now we use 
it as a dining room table to seat the 
fourteen of us." 

As one last comment, he added: 
"Students say, 'let's deal with 
people'. Remember, administration 
are people too." Dean Tinkle ex- 
plained to us that in his position he 
must relay to the students the de- 
cisions made by committees and 
hence is considered to be the one to 
blame. But in actuality he likes to 
help the students if they'd only come 
to him and help to create a better 
understanding of their needs. "The 
enjoyable part of this job is dealing 
with people involved. The admin- 
istration must always keep in mind 
that times are always changing and 
at no time will any problem ever be 
the same! They must each be handled 
as individually important." 
(Interviewed By Marlene Pappas) 



194 



Father Maguire 




Father Maguire, Chancellor of Loy- 
ola University, immediately gives 
one the impression of being a quiet, 
calm but staunch executive. How- 
ever, throughout our interview he 
expressed sincere warmth and in- 
terest in the students and their edu- 
cation, both academic and social. 

Fr. Maguire is proud of the progress 
Loyola has made over the years, 
and mentioned that the new office 
of Chancellor was one aspect of this 
progress. Such schools as Loyola 
in L.A. and Northwestern and DePaul 
in Chicago, he noted, have already 
had this post for several years. 
When asked why this office was 
created he said, "It was created to 
make the Presidency a bearable 
assignment. The President's job is 
too complex with too many demands 
and this is a new effort to try to 
meet the responsibilities of the 
Presidency." Fr. Maguire has a 
great understanding of how de- 
manding the Presidency is because 
he had occupied that post for 15 
years. As the division of the two 
offices now stands, the President 
deals with the inner workings of the 
university while the Chancellor 
deals with the public, such as the 
alumni, corporations, and foundations. 
In addition to his work throughout 
the city, Fr. Maguire is responsible 
for greeting alumni throughout vari- 
ous other cities, such as Phoenix, 
San Diego, and Palm Desert. When 
asked if the new office required as 
much activity as the old office of 



President, he said that it required 
as much activity, but where it was 
previously dispersed due to so many 
different demands, it was now more 
centralized. 

Fr. Maguire's main task as Chancel- 
lor is the PLUS program: Prog- 
ress for Loyola University in the 
Seventies. It is a 10 yr. program 
with an objective of $150 million. 
When asked how he relates the im- 
portance of Loyola to foundations 
and alumni, he said, "I stress the 
involvement of the University in the 
Metropolitan area; unfortunately the 
tremendous work done in the classes 
is hidden from the public." The 
PLUS program's several phases 
will deal with such things as im- 
provement of physical facilities, and 
student financial assistance, Fr. 
Maguire said that the prospectus 
for making their deadline looks very 
hopeful. 

Fr. Maguire feels a great pride in 
Loyola. "It is the largest privately 
supported school with 16,602 stu- 
dents enrolled this year and has 
been the largest Catholic University 
for over 10 years." 

Well, time was up and a warm, 
friendly and informative interview 
ended like a business meeting, as 
Fr. Maguire rushed off to an alumni 
meeting, where he would once again 
promote Loyola's needs and urge 
people to go out and help support us. 
(Irrterviewed by Marlene Pappas) 



195 



Dr. Charles Hart 




Dr. Hart both represents Fr. Mc- 
Namara on Lewis Towers Campus as 
well as teaches the Victorian Novel. 
Besides this, he is responsible to 
sit on many committees. He loves 
every aspect of his job equally. "\ 
can come to an administrator's job 
with a faculty point of view." Dr. 
Hart was an undergraduate at Lake 
Shore Campus but says that he 
really likes both campuses. As a 
faculty member he prefers Lewis 
Towers because the classes are 30- 
50% smaller and the teachers get 
to know the students better. He feels 
that Lewis Towers has ample space 
for more students; in fact he says, 
"We could use more students to 
enhance the quality of education." 



Dr. Hart commented on the Jesuit 
ideal of the full man in saying that 
"each campus lacks one part of it." 
LT lacks the social aspect while 
LSC lacks the academic pressure. 

However, he reminded us that LT 
and LSC are one school. "The 
only difference are questions of 
emphasis." He pointed out that the 
LT campus is within 5 minutes of 
major galleries, antique shops, li- 
braries and other assets which LSC 
does not have. "LT is not an after- 
thought — they are a part of Loyola 
Total. " 
(Interviewed by Marlene Pappas) 



196 



Dean Robert McNamara 




Are you satisfied with the progress 
you have made as Dean of the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences, that is 
like the changes in the core cur- 
riculum? 

Anybody who's completely satisfied 
with a job he's doing can't be doing 
it very well. As for the core cur- 
riculum. . .1 was delighted that we 
were able to get it changed in one 
year. But we were able to change 
it because the faculty was willing to 
work hard to cooperate and to bring 
their own imagination to the change. 
Actually the core curriculum is a 
huge advisory system and it's in- 
stituted so that students can really 
see and deal with a philosopher, a 
scientist, a theologian in his own 
native habitat. The student can learn 
Mfhat it is to think like a poet, ex- 
press like an artist, think like a 
scientist, a humanist, a philosopher 
etc. and then go on from there as he 
plans his own major and his owrn 
elective courses. 

What are your plans for the future 
in the College of Arts and Sciences? 

My two major plans right now are 
these: first, continuing work on the 
core to make it as imaginative and 
flexible as possible. Secondly, to 



institute what I call freshman learn- 
ing groups. A freshman learning 
group will be a group of ten incom- 
ing freshmen and one faculty mem- 
ber meeting together in the first or 
second semester of the freshman 
year. If ten freshmen and one faculty 
member get together on a subject in 
which they are all really interested, 
whether that subject is Lake Michi- 
gan, Bach or the Easter Rebellion, 
it makes no difference. If they all 
work together on such a project, 
my hope is that we'll have eleven 
interested people, interested in a 
subject, interested in each other. 

Do you think that the students here 
at Loyola are apathetic? 

I refuse to speak in generalities 
about students. All I can say is that 
many, many students will work long 
and hard at their academic lives if 
you give them an interesting chal- 
lenge. Loyola students I have met 
are very friendly M/ith a sense of 
humor and are willing to work. Many 
times when administrators or stu- 
dent leaders talk about student 
apathy, all they mean is that stu- 
dents will not do what they want 
them to do. 

If you could change anything you 



wanted without red tape, what would 
you change? 

First, I'd increase the faculty by 
50%. Second, I'd change all the 
dorms to apartment-style living. 
Third, I'd refuse to pay a faculty 
member's salary unless he took part 
in one interdisciplinary team-taught 
course per semester. Fourth, I'd 
build another building devoted al- 
most exclusively to faculty offices 
and small-size seminar and meet- 
ing rooms. Fifth, I'd set up student 
study areas, plenty of them, in which 
the primary rule would be that if 
you spoke, you'd immediately be 
executed. Lastly, I'd abolish every 
course that couldn't prove that it was 
giving students a real challenge. 

(Interviewed by Linda Stomper) 



197 




Mariette LeBlanc 



An unusual and interesting interview 
tool< place in the office of Mariette 
LeBlanc, the Associate Dean of Stu- 
dents down at Lewis Towers cam- 
pus. We asked her to tell us some- 
thing personal that would interest 
our readers, and here is what she 
came up with: 

Miss LeBlanc has tried to learn to 
ride a bicycle for the past two sum- 
mers, and not succeeded. She would 
have to walk the bicycle to the park 
before she could attempt to ride it. 
"This shows my concern for my fel- 
low man," she said. She decided 
after many black and blue marks to 
give up on that project and decided 
to buy a three wheeler. Now Miss 
LeBlanc has a bright red, three 
198 wheel bicycle, which she has cau- 



tioned us not to call a tricycle I 



Mariette LeBlanc also likes the 
peace and quiet of a fishing trip. 
"Whatever gets on the end of my 
hook is exciting. The first day I 
don't bait the hook, I just sit there 
and rest and no one talks to me be- 
cause they think that I'm fishing. 
Once I had a big battle and got a 
tennis shoe! I didn't know whether 
I should cook it, fry it, or steam it." 
Besides these activities. Miss Le- 
Blanc is an avid gallery hound, 
especially fond of lithographs. 

We asked Miss LeBlanc what her 
opinion of the students today was, 
"College students are citizens and 
have rights and responsibilities." 



This she referred to as the positive 
approach of the Student Personnel 
Office. "We are not the parent and 
it has taken a while to educate the 
society to this. The student now is 
realigning himself with many new 
positions; they aren't apathetic be- 
cause they aren't reacting with 
stress! They are very deep and 
very involved." 

Miss LeBlanc is a second generation 
Loyolan. Her father was the chair- 
man of the Modern Language De- 
partment for twenty-eight years. 

(Interviewed by Marlene Pappas) 




Art Etc hit n 



Art Eichlin is the Assistant Dean of 
Students at Lewis Towers Campus of 
Loyola. He has traveled, especially 
in Europe, and also enjoys fishing. 
However, his favorite hobby is col- 
lecting items from or about rail- 
roads. "I'm a railroad nut". Mr. 
Eichlin collects old time railroad 
stock certificates, lanterns, depar- 
ture signs, time tables and likes to 
ride trains whenever possible. He 
belongs to the National Association 
of Railway Passengers. In passing 
he said, "There is a whole flock of 
us! I encouraged my friends to ride 



trains, and I read time tables for 
pleasure. People aren't afraid to 
talk on trains; there's more romance 
to a train than to an airplane. My 
secret ambition is to own my own 
railway passenger car. I'm really 
going to do it too. . . then I'll just 
sit in it and enjoy it." 

Some items from his hobby which 
he keeps around his office are an 
okJ Pullman sign, "Dining car in 
opposite direction,", and a New 
Haven Railroad Book of Rules. Mr. 
Eichlin also refers to himself as a 



family history nut, particularly when 
it relates to railroads!" When we 
asked what his favorite sport is he 
replied, "The Green Bay Packers 
are the only pro football team!" 

Mr. Eichlin is very interested in the 
student and his involvement in school 
activities. As he sees it now, "More 
people at Lewis Towers are getting 
involved." 

(Interviewed by Marlene Pappas) 



199 




Dr. Richard Metre 



200 



"I'm a teacher. I just happened to 
have gotten sidetracked into admin- 
istration." Dr. Matre began to talk 
about his ideals as a good teacher 
and how he personally tries to fill 
them. "In speaking you have to get 
people to listen — make them friendly 
and benevolent and then stick the 
needle in! A good teacher can tell 
if his class is learning by looking 
at them. Teaching is an art. I'd 
rather be a teacher, but someone 
has to be an administrator." He 
further believes that the job of an 
administrator is to get the teacher 
and student together. "My job is to 
get good teachers together with good 
students. Ultimately education is 
seK-education; no one can make you 
learn anything you don't want to 
learn." 

When asked about his size prefer- 



ence for a university he replied, "I 
don't go by size — I'd rather be the 
best than the largest! I think you 
get a better overall academic cli- 
mate in a complex climate." 

Dr. Matre stressed his belief that 
one goes to school to develop oneself. 
"You go to college to be self-edu- 
cated no matter what job you'll 
eventually have. I think in the future 
you'll see more college graduates in 
the trades and that's good. I think 
the present equation with school is 
going to change." 

Upon asking him of any future plans 
that he might have. Dean Matre re- 
plied, "By the time I'm fifty-five, I 
hope to be back teaching and I'm 
fifty this week!" 

(Interviewed by Marlene Pappas) 




portance. "A teacher should be in- 
terested and capable of empathizing 
with students; must be a good com- 
municator, especially if he is an 
undergraduate instructor; should 
know his material and more (for 
the undergraduate teacher, breadth 
is more important than depth). We 
need more synthesizing and less de- 
partmentalizing; and we must recog- 
nize the difference between technical 
scholarship and the scholarship 
which promotes good teaching." 

One problem which upsets Fr. Bur- 
lage is that "no one goes to a uni- 
versity. . .they go to a college. We 
have no sense of a college. Maybe 
we are just too big. A university is 
multiple, with different objectives, 
whereas a college is one thing. 
Canada keeps its colleges at a defi- 
nite size. When one gets too big, 
they found another, so as to keep the 
small college identity and morale. 
There is very little sense of loyalty 
here, except to one's own little 
group. Once something gets too big it 
loses its identity and close-knit 
quality." Father was speaking above 
about the university in general, but 
he admits, regretfully, that he has 
also noticed these problems in his 
own Honors Program: "The Honors 
Program too has grown and lost its 
closeness." 

JH| (Interviewed by Marlene Pappas) 



Father BuHage 



"Once I counted all the motors in 
this office and I came up 29; this 
includes the air conditioner, the 
tape recorder, fans, etc. The curious 
and interesting man who said this 
was Father Carl J. Burlage. Known 
to many because of the Honors Pro- 
gram which he directs, he is inter- 
ested in art and philosophy, as evi- 
denced by the multitude of books 
stored in his cozy little office in the 
basement of Dumbach. "Art and 
philosophy come together. I'm very 
interested in the medieval world. I 
like photography of architecture, 
too — mainly local and domestic 
examples." 

Father Burlage has been at Loyola 
for 15 years and has seen many 
changes: "Classes have grown 
larger, and this makes it more dif- 
ficult for the student and teacher. . . 



it leads to a marked passivity in the 
student. There is also an increased 
rate of absenteeism today." We 
asked Fr. Burlage about views on 
teaching. "Teaching has gotten tough- 
er. I judge how good a class was at 
the end of a semester by how much 
I learned. Students don't always learn, 
but I should! I like to teach elusively 
and sideways. . .1 don't like to follow 
a rigid outline." He then went on to 
discuss the students and their changes. 
"I am seeing more openness in the 
students. Their minds aren't made 
up already. College ought to be a 
period of broadening; I like the Eng- 
lish ideal of the learning community 
twhere there is genuine cooperation 
and respect for one another." 

Fr. Burlage then told us about his 
concept of an ideal teacher, stress- 
ing that all parts are of equal im- 



201 



Dave Wilke 



Dean F, Virgil Boyd 



Tom Adams 



202 




A jovial, very personal sort of fel- 
low is Dave Wilke of the public re- 
lations department. His job in par- 
ticular entails special projects, 
publications, writing and producing 
news releases, media contacts, fea- 
ture stories, and academic cata- 
logues. When asked who his depart- 
ment serves, he answered, "We are 
here to serve the students as well 
as the faculty and the administra- 
tion." His department is interested 
in keeping the channels of communi- 
cation open. We then asked Dave how 
he attempted to reach the students. 
"Through news releases to the 
Phoenix, as well as putting students' 
news in the Loyola World, pre- 



viously used chiefly as a faculty 
publication. 

"We ask that students let us know 
of events. We can't assess what the 
student wants unless we have contact 
with the students." Dave Wilke's 
department is also called on by out- 
side agencies requesting press re- 
leases, publication, slides, films 
and material dealing with the uni- 
versity. 

He is truly personable and highly 
anxious to help the students publi- 
cize their activities. It is only up 
to the student to utilize this asset 
and meet a truly interesting person. 
(Interviewed by Marlene Pappas) 



Meeting us with a smile at the door 
of his office in Lewis Towers was 
Virgil Boyd, Dean of the School of 
Business. His character proved to 
be efficient, helpful, and straighfor- 
ward. His primary interests are his 
students, faculty and the business 
community with which they work. 
"We must meet the needs of the 
students with new programs. The 
individual course requirements were 
done away with for two main rea- 
sons: it is hard to say which courses 
are best for the students, and it 
helps to aid the transfer students in 
their move to our school. We have 
internship programs, community in- 
volvement is available, and a schol- 
arship program which is not based 



on need." 

The Business School has a coffee 
hour once a month so that the stu- 
dents will have a chance to meet the 
faculty on a basis other than the 
classroom. As for his faculty, he 
feels that it is his responsibility to 
provide opportunities for them to 
develop. "There is a heavy empha- 
sis on teaching and the search for 
the most effective methods of teach- 
ing. We must keep the faculty in- 
volved with the business community; 
it helps to keep realism in the 
classroom. We must also check to 
see that we are keeping up with 
meeting the needs of that community." 
Dean Boyd commented that the great- 



est problem that the business school 
faces is that the students are forced 
to work a great deal on the outside 
of school to finance their education, 
and this makes their schooling more 
difficult; but to this he added, "The 
students are great. They are oriented 
toward business and are very sup- 
portive." 



"Up until this year, it was difficult 
to be alone — you'd always fill up the 
vokis with sound. Now I'm trying to 
do more thinking and planning. Time 
has become a valued commodity. . . 
hard to find enough time to be alone." 

Tom Adams bought a motorcycle 
last summer and has greatly enjoyed 
it ever since. "I feel two feelings 
when I get on my motorcycle, fear 
and exhilaration." He enjoys taking 
his seven year old son, Jeff, with 
him on it. "The motorcycle makes 
me feel as if I am developing my 
own self-identity. I've been experi- 
menting with myself, and I grew 
this moustache. I'm also taking 
courses back at school and encoun- 



tering people on a different level, a 
level where I feel a sense of equal- 
ness and camraderie." 

He stressed the point that personal 
contact with people is a very signifi- 
cant experience, not just being an 
administrator and dealing with things. 

When asked if he likes to collect 
anything, he replied, "I'm a hat 
freak! I buy them, I collect them, 
but I hardly ever wear them. . .1 
have a lot of old hats." 

As another pastime, Tom enjoys 
camping with his family, "in the 
purest form", a tent. "It is a real 
switch from urban living, as I've 



lived in Chicago most of my life. 
Through moving around, I've found 
that I like the city but I also like to 
get away. I must admit that it's hard 
for me to talk about myself without 
talking about my family and the 
things we do." 

(Interviewed by Marlene Pappas) 



203 




J. Donald Roll, S.J- 



By profession he is a physicist 
specializing in seismology. In fact, 
Fr. Roll is the earthquake authority 
in the Midwest, and is sought by 
reporters from the Chicago news 
media every time a major geological 
disturbance occurs. 

However, he is also an Admiral in 
the Texas Navy and was elected 
president of the Marine Navigation 
and Training Association. At the time 
of our interview he shied away from 
discussing Loyola's seismograph, 
preferring to talk about his experi- 
ences at sea. 

How did you get interested in boat- 
ing Fr. Roll? 



"In the summer of 1952 1 was in 
New York studying electronics. When 
I returned, Fr. Schmidt, former 
Chairman of the Physics Depart- 
ment, told me that he had signed me 
for a long Labor Day cruise on a 
former sub-chaser as a chaplain. It 
was a wonderful cruise, and I served 
as a deck hand as well as a chaplain. 
At the conclusion I iwas invited to 
join the Marine Navigation and Train- 
ing Association. To be eligible for 
full membership I had to be a mem- 
ber of the U.S. Coast Guard Aux- 
iliary. To join the latter I had to 
take an examination, so I attended 
classes given by the Chicago Power 
Squadron which were then in prog- 
ress. The Chicago P.S. was looking 



for a chaplain and I was asked to 
join, which I did. I then took the U.S. 
Coast Guard Auxiliary Exam and 
passed it, thus joining them. I then 
became a full member of the Marine 
Navigation and Training Association, 
and was elected president of it for 
three years." 

As one can see, Fr. Roll is active 
and energetic in attaining his goals, 
not only as a physicist and seismol- 
ogist, but also as a boating enthusiast. 

(Interviewed by Marlene Pappas) 



204 




George Ireland 

Coach Ireland greeted the yearbook 
staff with jovial, helpful enthusiasm 
and offered any information that he 
had access to. He took eager inter- 
est in our questions, and provided us 
with abundant facts and figures. 

We first asked Coach Ireland to 
comment on this season in relation 
to next year: "We are one player 
away from being a winner, and this 
player would be either a guard or a 
forward." He pointed out that the 
Ramblers beat Southern Methodist, 
who are now the Southwest Confer- 
ence champions, and lost by only two 
points to Marquette. Questioned 
about our recruiting program for 
basketball players, he commented, 
"The recruiting situation up to this 
year was difficult. We didn't get to 
recruit until after the season was 
over, and by that time the prospec- 
tives were all "bridesmaids" (they 



had all been wined and dined by other 
colleges). This year, we have been 
out recruiting since summer and 
have quite a few players to choose 
from." When Coach Ireland speaks 
of "we" he is referring to Tom 
O'Connor from Notre Dame, who is 
helping him with the recruiting. 

When asked why Loyola's schedule 
is so tough he said, "We drive the 
kids hard to get the most out of 
them. We've been on the mountain 
and we've been in the valley — we'll 
be on the mountain again; I'm not 
pessimistic." 

Coach Ireland has been at Loyola for 
21 years. Prior to his coaching po- 
sitions at Loyola and Marmion 
Military Academy, he was a jour- 
nalism student. He M/as one of the 
first coaches in the country to play 
five blacks at the same time. As he 



says, "I believe in playing the best. 
They players know that they will get 
a fair shake." 

He believes in a strict training 
regimen. "Practices are tough, and 
the games are easy. No missed 
practices are allowed and the boys 
are driven to be in top physical con- 
dition." Some players will even take 
tap dancing for more agility as part 
of next season's training program. 

"I've got good kids. I'm tough on 
them, but I wouldn't want to coach 
any others." The sincerity, fairness, 
and enthusiasm which he holds for 
the sport and his players was very 
evident. 

(Interviewed by Marlene Pappas) 



205 



Rob Queries 



Dean Quarles has been with Loyola 
University for three years and will 
be leaving here the first week of 
June, never to return. His explana- 
tion for this is that he has been here 
long enough and he is no longer job 
orientated. Here at Loyola, he has 
worked with upward bound, taught 
classes and is also the graduate 
assistant in the Education Depart- 
ment. Dean Quarles describes him- 
self as being a "nut about being with 
people while they grow" and it 
doesn't matter what the settings are. 



He "digs Loyola" because he un- 
derstands what it is. Dean Quarles 
only regrets that he doesn't have an 
opportunity to reflect with people 
on what he has picked up at Loyola. 
"It is a good place to go to put one's 
head together". When asked if he is 
ever bored, he replied, "People's 
lives are important — there is no 
way could I get bored doing this." 

Dean Quarles has three children and 
actively writes stories with them at 
the piano, or as he passes through- 



out the day. To best express Rob 
Quarles, we would like to print one 
of his favorite and recent writing. 

"Would you say you've more the 
aspects of Miller or Durrell in this 
correspondence? Am thrashing thru 
crowds of Freshmen with my 7- 
league boots, rediscovering in 
swiftly moving sojurns with so many 
individuals their utter uniqueness, 
the curious terrain of their student 
lives, merrily whistling over hill 
and dale with the increasingly false 




Stelae Graci 



206 



"Yesterday my world was blown 

apart. 
My heart farted!" 

The above words of wisdom were 
written by Steve Graci, an English 
major, as well as an active par- 
ticipant in Loyola's student activi- 
ties. In reference to his work on 
the Student Activities Board, he 
said, "The only thing that I wanted 
to do was to take SAB away from 
the entertainment idea and make 
it more of a meaningful activity. We 
dkl this with the art Co-op, but our 



biggest problem there were the in- 
visible w/alls in the University Struc- 
ture. The worse thing that happened 
to SAB in some people's minds was 
that they thought it was a clique. In 
reality it was open to everyone." 

Steve might like to be a carpenter 
some day. . ." I like to do things 
wKh my hands." He paints eyes 
mostly, and added that he usually 
looks at people's eyes first. "I dig 
Christ!" Graci believes that you can 
be like Christ by being yourself. . . 



"some sort of Christian like per- 
son". "I enjoy being on an ego trip 
and I know it. If you don't have it 
you can't keep yourself going. I 
figure Christ had an incredible ego: 
he couldn't accomplish 
admit I have a strong 
ego! That's why i like this inter- 
view. . .but. . .other people do a lot 
of good things too." 

Steve was at one time called the 
"free lance SAB". . .he did the jobs 
that no one else would. As he put it. 



if he didn't, 
what he did. 



notes of terror as the unknown for- 
ests of the future come into the 
horizon of our melding perspectives. 
Hoo, boy. Everyone I see is so real, 
and usually so alone, the innocent 
Goldilocks, leaving home for the 
wrong reasons, and wandering into 
most of those who realize they've 
been slumbering in the wrong bed, 
howefer comfortable, do not opt for 
the window. The few who do . . .well, 
I live with all those things that go 
bump in the night, and a few day- 
mares as well (you don't wake up 



from daymares)." 

Interviewed by Marlene Pappas 



I- 




nil 






"Then I eventually got this thing — 
Chairman — notice, I sit in this chair!" 

(Interviewed by Marlene Pappas) 



207 



Tom Hart 



The Censor of Loyola 

The Censor of Loyola sits 

Somewhere between 

The scenes to be seen 

And the books to be read 

With his scissor purpose poised 

Watching the human stuff 

That will sizzle through 

The magic words 

And light up 

Like welding shops 

The ho- hum rooms of America 

And with a Kindergarten 

Arts and Crafts concept 

Of moral responsibility 

Snips out 

The rough talk 

The unpopular opinion 

Or anything with teeth 

And renders 

A pattern of ideas 

Full of holes 

A doily 

For your mind 

-The Poem Mason Williams should have 
written. 

FOR USE IN THE VIP SECTION OF 
THE 1972 LOYOLAN FOR FARKY 
NORTON I.E. T. HART. 




208 



Walter Paas 




The vast majority of Arts and Science 
courses at Loyola do not have any prac- 
tical application to experiences outside 
the university. Philosophy, Language, and 
History courses did not help me develop 
anything other than boring, wasted, hours 
in class. 

Most of my psychology and communication 
arts courses, however, were quite practi- 
cal and their contents will be helpful in 
my future work. I wish Loyola would add 
a few "University without walls" type 
classes; I gained a hell of a lot of practi- 
cal experiences while attending Loyola. 
90% of these experiences were outside 
of classes and class-related work. I 
worked fanatically at the radio station all 
four years. I truly feel that my dealings 
with university administrators as well as 
entertainment corporations while at 
WLUC will be of the greatest value to 
me in making a smooth transition to the 
"real world" at United Artists. 

If you'd like a taste of that "kick-in-the- 
face" cruel world awaiting you: get in- 
volved with a student organization and try 
to initiate changes that serve the students 
better. The trying experiences will raise 
your frustration level ever so high. 

Loyola was a great experience with some 
fantastic people but I'm just as eager to 
be moving on. 



209 



Marty Glista 




I'm just a poor country boy who 
made good by changing his phylum 
to become a disillusioned fish in a 
small pond. 

Seriously, though, I would rather be 
at Loyola than any other college that 
I know of because of the opportuni- 
ties for student input to the decision- 
making process. The trouble we 
have with the administration here is 
rooted in the nature of the bureau- 
cratic beast. 

it seems that most people around 
here are afraid to make decisions 
according to what they feel is right. 
One of President Baumhart's favor- 
ite excuses when turning down a 



student proposal (which has al- 
ready been considered, debated, ap- 
proved and shuffled on to the next- 
higher committee in the chain of 
"proper channels") is that, before 
he can make a decision, he must 
consider how it will affect the dozens 
of different publics he has to deal 
with. Weil if there is one thing that 
I have learned as editor of the Phoe- 
nix, it is that the only way to make 
a decision is to do what pleases you 
alMve all. That is why you are in a 
position of authority in the first 
place: to make decisions. You are 
not in a position of authority unless 
people have confidence in you to do 
the right thing, and thus the right 
thing is what you choose to do, as 



long as you are willing to accept the 
consequences. 

Life is a series of taking risks, and 
the biggest risks a person can take 
are those which reveal who he is, 
"warts and all," to other people. 
These are the building-blocks of 
friendships and all other forms of 
love. And without friendship, with- 
out love, my life at Loyola would not 
have been worth the price of the 
ink in the period that ends this 
sentence, i have been fortunate to 
make a lot of friends and not too 
many enemies; therefore i consider 
my four years here worth all the 
headaches. 



210 



J 



Bonnie Zarling 




Dear Housing Office: 

Why did you rob me of a co-editor 

for five months? 

Love, 

Bonnie 

Dear Maiiroom: 

How can our account with you be 

overdrawn by $4 as of the end of 

January because of a $149 charge? 

We have not mailed anything since 

November. 

Love, 

Bonnie 

Dear Committee on Student Life: 
Please let me know the date of your 
next meeting so that I can write up 
another justification for the 
existence of the yearbook as an 
organization. 

Love, 

Bonnie 

Dear Public Relations Office: 
We will trade you two pictures of 
Father Baumhart for three pictures 
of graduation. Is it a deal? 

Love, 

Bonnie 

Dear Business Office: 
Why did you delay processing the 
down-payment for the publishing of 
our book from October 1 until Janu- 
ary 31? As a result, we have lost our 
place in production at the yearbook 
plant. If our book is delivered late 
it will have to be mailed to those 
students who have purchased it, at a 
cost of more than $1000. This is 
impossible since our postage budget 
is now overdrawm by $4. 

Love, 

Bonnie 

Dear Budget Committee: 
You have a well-deserved reputation 
for being able to stretch a dollar, so 
perhaps you can help me with this 
problem. How do we pay for our 
$350 enlarger with the $120 equip- 
ment budget you gave us? 

Love, 

Bonnie 



Dear Academic Council: 
Is it possible to get credit for extra- 
curricular-activities experience? The 
copy submitted by most of our stu- 
dent VIP's seems to indicate that 
their experiences have been outside 
of class. Please let me know your 
answer as soon as possible. Maybe 
some of us have already graduated 
without knowing it. 

Love, 

Bonnie 



211 










212 




Dave Schaab (Loyolan) 
Walt 



Wrth the end now in sight I have 
begun to slowly organize my re- 
actions to my four years here at 
Loyola. I must admit that it has been 
an education, although not in the 
academic sense. The fact that I will 
finally receive my degree is to me 
not as amazing as the fact that I 
have survived this long. There has 
been a good deal of valuable experi- 
ences in my college experience, but 
the sad part is that they were ac- 
cidental, at least in terms of the 
university. This is probably the 
single most upsetting aspect of 
Loyola; the fact that for a student to 
gain anything personally from his 
four years here he must struggle 
constantly with a university that 



Dan Tracy 



makes no real effort to reach and 
affect him. This is a hindrance to 
all students, but especially to those 
students who need support and at- 
tention inorder to grow at all. The 
largest mistake Loyola ever made 
can be found in the fact that Loyola 
fails to aid its students to develop 
to their full potential. 

The one thing I would like to thank 
Loyola for is the opportunity that it 
provided for me to meet and learn 
so much from so many different 
people. Simply put, it was the people, 
not the place, and not the place's 
people, that made Loyola worth it 
for me. 



213 





Elaine Gregory 



Kathy Sheridan 



Recipient of the President's Medal- 
lion from the School of Nursing 
comments on: 

Her feelings about life - It's a chal- 
lenge if you can live with it. Ma- 
turing is an earthshaking process. 
Mistakes will be made but they of- 
fer an opportunity for even greater 
personal growth and development. 
Friends are a gift from God how- 
ever like most things of this world, 
they too change and pass away. 
Loyola has brought me many and 
though we now separate we carry 
the memory of one another with us. 

Her feelings about Loyola- With all 
of its faults, short-comings, in- 
adequacies, and tangled proper chan- 
nels of communication- I love 
Loyola and will miss it fiercly. It's 
been my thing for four years, my' 
stomping ground, and my haven 
against a nutty world of status quos. 
I will forever be grateful to it for 
providing me with the one thing in 



this world that no one can ever take 
from me-my education. 

Her future in Nursing- Even more 
than Loyola, I love Nursing. Pediat- 
rics as a specialty area particularly 
interests me because I am most fond 
of children. To me, they are the 
most real and believable of all 
people. I see areas within Nursing 
that I can really latch on to and 
make some positive changes. One 
which I am eager to attack is the 
recruitment of minority students for 
careers in nursing and the related 
health professions. I must say that 
the School of Nursing has helped me 
get my thing together as a nurse 
through their emphasis on Inter- 
personal Relations and Wholistic 
Patient Care. These are areas in 
which I have seen many nurses fall 
short. The first quality needed in 
any nurse is humaness- if you do 
not have this then you're not really 
alive. 



214 





Naomi Weissteivsf 



Kevin IVIcGirr 



Kevin McGirr, an accounting major 
at Lewis "Towers, has an extensive 
background of service to the Uni- 
versity. In recognition of this he has 
received the President's Medallion 
from the Business School, been 
elected Vice President of Blue Key 
and Chairman of the Dean's Advisory 
Council for 1971-72, and served as 
Treasurer of Alpha Kappa Psi. In 
addition, Kevin also found the time to 
represent Loyola on Esquire's 
College Advisory Board. 



Towers as vital in establishing and 
maintaining communication between 
the Lake Shore and downtown 
campuses. 

In contrasting Loyola to a large state 
school Kevin stated that although the 
advantages of a large university are 
readily available there is more of a 
small campus atmosphere and a stu- 
dent doesn't necessarily have to be 
"just a number." "You meet people 
you know in the halls." 



Talking about Lewis Towers, he 
feels that it is too often known as 
"Loyola's other campus" and the 
downtown students frequently feel 
short-changed. An increase in en- 
rollment and greater student in- 
volvement are definitely necessary. 
The implementation of this should 
include more adequate housing to 
attract out of state students and 
possibly coed dorms. Kevin also 
advocates the continuation of the 
orientation program at Lewis 



Advice on getting your money's worth 
from college: Take advantage of all 
the counseling and extracurricular 
activities available to you and "get 
involved as much as you can." 

(Interviewed by Marie Howell) 



215 



Walter Harper 



"Though the rain of malice and disarray 
wii forever fall upon us during our earthly 
existence, the bond of our love for each 
other can keep anew the unending struggle 
toward self-realization, truth and freedom." 



Mary Ann Peter 



College is supposed to be a memorable 
experience. There is no doubit that Loyola 
will be a memorable experience for me. 
I'll remember it because of all of the good 
people I have met here. People who cared 
not only about one another, but about their 
school and what was happening to it. I'll 
remember it because it toughened me and 
made me realize that no matter how much 
someone cares sometimes it just doesn't 
make any difference. In a w>ay it made me 
grow older the hard way and I'm not sure 
that was the best way. i have some things 
to thank Loyola for and others which make 
me hate this school. A friend of mine 
once summed up my experiences beauti- 
fully. This quote in particular can apply 
to me and Loyola. 
"My friends and I touched each other- 
ears, eyes, noses, lips, necks- 
not sure these years had touched us 
for better or worse." 

"Celebration" Johnny Baranski 



216 





Jim Mueller 



"Any formal institution of learning tends 
to be a place which trains people 'to go to 
the appropriate place, at the appropriate 
time, and do what they're told.' 

"Loyola tends to this more than other 
schools. A large part of my education has 
been involved in saying 'No!' to those who 
would fit me in that mold. A student must 
take an active part in his education — not 
merely react to the grade point average 
stimulus. 

"It is only in a continual struggle against 
the people here who try to form you into an 
image of their own ideas at the expense of 
your own identity, and the beginning of a 
process of formulate ideas of your own that 
Loyola loses its absurdity." 

Jim has been Copy Editor for the Loyola 
Phoenix, worked for the Loyolan, served 
on a number of university committees, and 
been a counselor for freshmen. He is also, 
in his own words, "friend of all, enemy of 
many, and treated indifferently by most." 



Stelae Sand ford 




"Whatever you do, no matter what courses 
you find yourself in, no matter what pro- 
fessors stuck with, never let academics 
stand in the way of your education. 

"Academics and grades, in my opinion, are 
but a very small part of the total learning 
experience which goes on in a university 
community. 

"It's only the experiences you have, the 
community life you form, the communica- 
tion with and understanding of other people — 
this is where the education comes in." 

Steve has been the Production Editor of the 
Loyola Phoenix for twro years. 



217 



LaRue Martin 



Walking into the Yearbook Office 
on a Thursday night came a six 
foot ten and a half inch basketball 
player. Joking about his height and 
avoiding doorways, he retorted, 
"it's fun being tall- you look down 
on people, they look up to you." Re- 
calling incidents related to his 
height, he told us," Anytime I went 
to a show or on a bus, i had to take 
a birth certificate with me to prove 
my age." LaRue also commented 
that he would like a big dog ... a 
great dane . . . "The tallest one I 
could get!" He also enjoys such 
activities as swimming, table ten- 
nis, cards, roller skating, horse- 
back riding, and dancing. When 
asked about his view of the future, 
he replied, "I want to play basket- 
ball and I want to get married I am 
going to have to learn how to accept 
it wherever I HAVE TO GO TO 

PLAY BASKETBALL I 

just want to play! I also really love 
kkls. I worked with them at the park 
where I was a supervisor for 
counselors." 

Fond memories which LaRue has of 
Loyola include Father Loftus and 
Bill Davis, two people whom he de- 
scribes as people who understand 
you when you have a problem.", 
and sincere respect for Coach 
Ireland who always tells his players 
to do their best. 

Interviewed by Marlene Pappas 



Joseph Joyce 



218 





Jerry Angst 



"Loyola has a lot to offer but It 
does not reach a large enough seg- 
ment of the student body. With more 
backing by the administration, par- 
ticularly of residence hails, and 
more interest by the students, the 
campus could really come alive." 




Wally 



219 



Mary Doheny 



Nancy Hamill 




"People at Loyola have made it en- 
joyable," said Mary, the assistant 
head resident to Women at Mertz. 
She is a Psychology major who 
hopes to go into clinical psychology 
after she graduates. "Most of my 
free time is taken up in the dorm." 
She describes her job as being fairly 
diverse, noting that she deals mainly 
with disciplinary measures. "This 
job affords you a lot of exposure, 
you must meet People". Mary told 
us that her exposure to counseling 
through referrals in the dorm has 
reinforced her interest in clinical 
psychology. She is also taking a 
graduate psychology course this se- 
mester, where they get their own 
patients. "I've grown at Loyola per- 
sonally- not in terms of academic 
exposure but meeting people and 
trying to understand myself. That's 
one good thing about living in a 
dorm-getting involved-one has to 
grow themself." Mary claims that a 



lot of facets of herself have surfaced 
that she didn't know she had. 

"People at Loyola have made it 
enjoyable." 

When asked about her greatest con- 
tribution to Loyola, Nancy Hamill 
cites parietal hours, drinking pro- 
posals and especially the merging 
of the two resident hall govern- 
ments, LRHC and MIHC. Con- 
cerning the merging of the two gov- 
ernments she says, "It makes dorm 
government more cohesive than it 
was. Split into two groups you're not 
as apt to get things passed in the 
university because there are too 
many splinter groups like that, 
whereas now/ the dorm students are 
a little more cohesive. Dorm stu- 
dents play a major role in the uni- 
versity. Most of your student lead- 
ers started here living in the dorm 
or were active in dorm activities. 



They're more involved with the uni- 
versity because they're here. 
They're not here part of the day and 
not the rest of the day which makes 
a difference. Probably if i had lived 
at home, I wouldn't have been half 
as active." 

Asked whether more dorms are 
needed she says, "More dorms are 
needed, but not big dorms, more 
like Campion or the way Edgewater 
was. In big dorms you lose all sense 
of community." 

Nancy also says "Loyola is advanc- 
ing slowly. There are apathetic stu- 
dents, faculty and administrators. I 
don't think apathy is confined to stu- 
dents. It's a big problem. You just 
don't know how to handle it. There 
are certain people within the uni- 
versity trying to solve the problem 
but they just don't know where to 
start." 



220 



First Laywomen Elected to University Board of Trustees 




Winifred D. Molony 



Valerie T. Berghoff 



Two women, both alumnae, have been 
elected to the Loyola University 
Board of Trustees. They are Mrs. 
Winifred D. Molony, an attorney in 
the Midwest Office of the General 
Counsel of the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture and Miss Valerie T. 
Berghoff, Dean of Women and As- 
sociate Dean of Students, George- 
town University, Washington, D. C. 
This is the first time in Loyola's 
101 -year history that women will be 
serving on the Board of Trustees 
which now numbers twenty-four, 
consisting of ten lay persons and 
fourteen Jesuits. 



221 




222 




Student Personnel 
Services 



The Student Personnel Program at Loy- 
ola University is conceived as the educa- 
tional complement to the student's formal 
learning. In addition to his intellectual 
development, it comprises his physical, 
emotional, social, and spiritual growth. 
While the focal points of the academic 
program are the classroom, the lecture 
hall, and library, the Student Personnel 
Program operates in whatever forum of 
student life that exists outside the class- 
room. Each aspect tries to emphasize the 
individual's total growth as a person. 

The individuals pictured in this section 
are administrators and staffs of the Stu- 
dent Personnel Offices at the Lewis 
Towers and Lake Shore Campuses. In 
addition to those services represented by 
the individuals pictured, there are others 
listed elsewhere in this yearbook repre- 
senting additional departments and func- 
tions that are also a part of Student Per- 
sonnel Services. These departments are: 
Student Counseling Service, Placement 
Office, Financial Aids Office, Athletic 
and Intramurals Department, Student 
Health Service, Student Residence Office, 
Student Activities Office, Black Student 
Advisor, Foreign Student Advisor, and 
Centennial Forum Manager. 

Each department's goal is to provide the 
necessary resources, support, and direc- 
tion in order to make the educational ex- 
perience as valuable and manageable as 
possible. In the final analysis, however, 
it is the student who fashions the scope of 
his college experience. The resources of 
other students, the faculty, and adminis- 
trators are available, but the key to par- 
ticipation and growth in university life 
lies within one's own motivations. The 
scope of this yearbook graphically points 
out the breadth of some student's efforts, 
it is the realization that our education is 
everywhere that is the beginning of 
knowledge. 



Helen Hayes Receives 
The Sysford of Loyola 



"This Star of Her Land, Fortune 
Has Made His Sword." 

"it is a beautiful object, isn't it? it's 
so clean and so powerful. It makes 
you feel brave just to hold it, and I 



want to keep right on holding it to 
see if I can work up some of that 
courage that I'm being awarded for. 
"I don't know that I have ever be- 
fore had anything happen to me that 
moved me as much." 



Walter C. Randall: 

Winner of 1971 Stritch Medal 



The Stritch Medal, emblematic of 
the high ideals and accomplishments 
of medicine, is presented to a phy- 
sician or medical researcher who 
exhibits to a high degree profes- 
sional competence, resourcefulness, 
benevolence, and dedication. It is 
named after the late Samuel Cardinal 
Stritch whose support led to the re- 
naming of the school in 1948 as the 
Loyola University Stritch School of 
Medicine. 



Walter C. Randall, Ph.D., professor 
and chairman of physiology at Loy- 
ola's Medical School, was named the 
1971 winner of the Stritch Medal. 
Internationally-known for his re- 
search on the nervous control of the 
heart and cardiodynamics. Dr. Ran- 
dall coordinates a million dollar 
inter-departmental program of cardio- 
vascular research at Stritch. 



224 




225 



\9im* 




226 




..^-^-.a-:: 



^-imJ^ 




Division- Residences 

Campion 228 

Chamberlain 232 

Delaware 234 

Gonzaga 236 

Kenmore 238 

Mertz 240 

Stebler 246 

Winthrop 248 



227 



Campion Hall 




228 



^ 




229 



Welcome to Campion Hall, that 
beautiful red brick building across 
the street from Mertz. You know, 
the one with the alley in back where 
we often see Chicago's finest dish- 
ing out those parking tickets? 

Yes, that's Campion Hall, or at least 
the outside of it. Inside there are 188 
rooms where approximately 340 guys 
live and argue together for nine 
hellish yet somehow beautiful months 
each year. 

Yet Campion is more than that. Sixty 
per cent of the residents are fresh- 
men, so it is a place where many 
students get their first taste of col- 
lege life. It can start out very lonely, 
but you would have to work at it to 
stay lonely for long. Before you 
know it, you're sharing six showers 
for sixty guys, you've got a room- 
mate, and you've got your ever- 
present and cheerful R.A.(?). 

This year brought a few innovations 
in Campion. The switchboard ex- 



panded its service to 24 hours a 
day to help keep alive the residents' 
okl ties and to foster the develop- 
ment of new ties. Female operators 
were hired for the first time. Both 
of these innovations proved very 
successful. 

But along with the innovations came 
the traditional: Campion's orienta- 
tion week hootenanny for the resi- 
dents. Campion's first place award 
in the Dorm Week Spirit judging, 
and of course let's not forget the 
traditional panty raids. 

Of course it is impossible to men- 
tion everything about Campion in a 
short piece such as this, but for as 
many residents as can be touched 
upon, here goes: Kaos, the Coalition, 
the Nads, the Cowpunchers, 5-10 and 
under. Jokers, Gus in Romeo and 
Juliet, Ramblers, Craig's smashing 
ping-pong serve — right into the 
oven. New Voters Conference, Black 
Cultural Center, 2-center birthday 
celebrations, J.V., E.J., etc. 




230 







231 



Chamberlain Hall 



Take eighty-five women from dif- 
ferent geographical areas, mix well 
in quads, triple, doubles, and singles 
and you have Chamberlain Hall. The 
people living at 1059 West Loyola 
are the important part of Chamber- 
lain Hall. It is not just the poor 
plumbing, peeling ceilings, or squeak- 
ing floor boards. 

The feeling of community is what 
makes Chamberlain worth living in. 
On first arriving in September, 
many freshmen's first thought is to 
leave because it looks like a tene- 
ment. Yet almost everyone stays. 
Some people certainly do not stay 



for the luxury. They stay because 
of the love felt throughout the build- 
ing not the outer shell. 

People here are very considerate 
taking accurate messages for one 
another is one way of showing this. 
They talk and solve many problems 
among themselves. People learn 
what it is like to live in a small 
town like Walnut, Illinois or in cities 
like Washington, D.C. 

In short, the women of Chamberlain 
care about one another. Eighty-five 
women working together and caring — 
that is Chamberlain Hall. 



232 








233 



Delavsfare Hall 



234 





235 



Gonzaga Hall 

Father Hayes really didn't know 
what he was doing when he founded 
Gonzaga Hall as a student-run re- 
treat house a number of years ago. 
The two buildings at 6235 N. Ken- 
more have become a unique resi- 
dence experience, something that 
the University Housing Office calls 
experimental because they don't 
quite know what to make of it. 

But the men who live at Gonzaga 
know what to make of it — they'd 
better, because they run the Hall 
completely on their own. The resi- 
dents decide who their director will 
be each year. They prepare their 
own meals, do their own dishes, 
clean up their own garbage, make 
their own rules. And they have a lot 
of fun doing it. 

You must have two letters of recom- 



mendation and a personal interview 
to become one of the 65 residents, 
mainly to prove that you are re- 
sponsible enough to take care of 
yourself and willing to do your share 
of the work expected of every man. 
It's not difficult, but part of the life 
of the Hall is working together. 

Another, more important part, is 
playing together. House Parties, 
exchanges, exorcisms, O's Casino, 
the House Risk game. Circle J, 
Lost Cause, Lance's mother at the 
football rallies, Gonzaga Beach, the 
Townhouse Turtleheads, pouring con- 
crete (!), Yak-Zies for cocktail 
Hour, and many other official and 
traditional activities are participated 
in fully by the residents. And ath- 
letics must not be left out of the 
picture — Gonzaga fields 5 intra- 
mural basketball teams, a champion- 



ship football team, and all other 
sports in Loyola competition. 

Gonzaga has been the home of a 
disproportionately large number of 
Loyola's student leaders over the 
years, and it is no mystery why this 
is so. The brotherhood, the spirit of 
unity in the residents, complemented 
by the responsibility that each man 
has toward his fellow residents, 
naturally develops self-confidence 
and leadership. As one of the re- 
cent House officers has said, "If a 
guy isn't a leader, if he can't accept 
responsibility in the first place, then 
he doesn't belong here. Pride is the 
thing that really keeps us going." 




236 



J 




237 



Ken more Hall 



238 





239 



Mertz Hall 



Loyola in microcosm. 

A hint of the future Shackled to the past; 

People facing backwards, looking into mirrors. 

A living symbol, the "whole man": 

On the outside, pure white and solid. 

But muted gray and plastic 

With random splatches of color 

Where it counts. 

You've had the power all along. 

Just click your heels together three times and say, 

"There's no place like Mertz." 




240 




241 



242 





243 





244 




245 



Stabler Hall 



The quiet exterior belies its inside activity 

serious students taking the eternal study break- 

the closeness of its occupants provides ground 
for friendships between real people. 




246 




247 



Winthrop Hall 



The sound of the el at 2:30 in the morning. 
Talking on the phone with the sound 

of Grand Central Station in the background. 
The kitchen sink leaking. 
Elevator repairs. 

Home made (possibly burned dinners). 
Weekend Parietals 

Parties & 
Anything you can think of by 

having your own apartment. 



248 





250 







Division- Graduates 

LSC Arts and Sciences 252 

LT Arts and Sciences 271 

Niles College 276 

School of Business 277 

School of Dentistry 283 

School of Education 289 

School of Medicine 293 

School of Nursing 298 

University College 302 




". . .One would have to be blind not 
to realize that the challenging and 
interesting occupations that have 
traditionally been associated with 
those who have received college de- 
grees have not been increasing even 
at the rate of those who do graduate. 
As long as we continue to profess 
that a college education is primarily 
acquired as an entree to a career, 
then we are going to find ourselves 
in trouble. Perhaps the difficulties 
faced by those who have recently 
acquired undergraduate and advanced 
degrees in fields that are at least 
temporarily experiencing an over- 
supply, will cause us to reconsider 
and review the purpose of college 
education and hopefully, cause us to 
see it primarily as a way to grow in 



self-knowledge and human develop- 
ment rather than as simply a train- 
ing for a particular job or career. 

Our American tradition has long 
been rooted in the fact that no one 
should be limited in development 
except by his own ability. Education 
has existed to develop and assist 
that ability. Many think that educa- 
tion, therefore, is the key to suc- 
cess. They forget that education 
cannot replace ability. If therefore, 
education can serve as a humanizing 
means to the self-development of an 
individual, then there is no reason 
why important and valuable tasks 
and services that have traditionally 
been performed by those without the 
advantages of college education 



could not be upgraded and made 
more meaningful by the recruitment 
of those who possess a liberal un- 
dergraduate education. 

"Perhaps the time has come to get 
rid of any educational distinctions 
when speaking of white-collar, blue- 
collar, hard hat, executive, and the 
like. Perhaps we are on the thresh- 
old of an America which will see 
college education as the Ideal goal 
of every Individual, no matter what 
job or career he may pursue." 

(from February, 1972 Commence- 
ment Address by Dr. Richard A. 
Matre, Vice-President and Dean of 
Faculties) 



251 



1972 Graduates 

Lake Shore Arts and Sciences 




CHRISTOPHER ABBINANTE 
JOHN W. ALLEN 
MARGARET M. ALLEN 
MARIANN E. ALYEA 



GERARD A. ANASZEWICZ 
DAVE P. ANDERSON 
RALPH G. ANDERSON 
GERALD L. ANGST 



JOSEPH A. APRILE 
MARIANNE E. ARENDS 
THOMAS WILLIAM ARMSTRONG 
M. ATKINSEN 



KATHRYN BADURA 
ANDREW S. BAJKOWSKI 
SUZANNE M. BARNES 
JOSEPH T. BARRETT 



FRANCES A. BARSANO 
LEONA ANN BARTKOWICZ 
JOHN J. BASALAY 
MARUIN ORRIN BATES III 



252 




GINGER M. BAULER 
THOMAS A. BEACH 
KATHERINE L. BELLI 
JOHN P. BELLINO 



PATRICIA E. BENDER 
DAVID J. BENJAMIN JR. 
GRAGORY E. BERNACKI 
NIVES BERNARDI 



ROBERT G. BIAGE 
MARLENE B. BINDER 
CHRISTOPHER R. BIRREN 
PATRICIA E. BLINN 



ROBERT J. BLUMTHAL 
BRUNO R. BOCHENEK 
JOHN M. BOHR 
THEODORE J. BORRIS 



ROBERT W. BOSSIE S.C.J. 
PAMELA J. BRABANT 
MARY S. BRAUN 
DEAN J. BROCK 



GEORGE V. BRUSZER 
KENNETH W. BUEHLMAN 
FREDERIC V. BUHRKE 
DEBORAH BUKAS 



253 



DENNIS P. BUKOVEC 
PATRICK J. CALLAGHAN 
GEORGE F. CAREY 
CONNIE CAMDEN 



DEBORAH L. CARSON 
CRISTINA M. CASAS 
JoANN CASEY 
LAWRENCE E. CASEY 




ROBERT J. CHESSER 
DENNIS S. CHRISTENSEN 
CAMILLE T. CIESLIK 
LINDA ELLEN COFFEY 









'dw 






A^^^^ 



254 



)ONNA MARIE GLaLOS 
MARTIN DAVID GLUIN 
tONALD G. GLOSNI>0RD 
lEIMARD SCOTT GRA 



JOHN T. CRONIN 
DONALD L. CYBORSKI 
JOHN E. DALTON 
RITA M. DALY 



KATHLEEN A. DAVIS 
DAVID L. deGROH 
DANILE DEL CAMPO 
FRANK W. DeLUCA 



DIANE M. DENK 
DENNIS J. DERDA 
JAMES E. DERVISHIAN 
JAMES L. DION 



MARY DOHENY 
KATHERINE M. DOHRMANN 
THERESA DOLASINSKI 
JOHN C. DOMKE 



BILL DONOGHUE 
DEBORAH J. DONOVAN 
PAUL M. DRISCOLL 
NANCY M. DROGOSZ 




255 



JANE M. DUFFY 
WILLIAM H. DUNNE 
SUZANNE A. EHRHARDT 
PATRICIA NOREEN ELSON 



JOSEPH P. ENGELN 
BERNARD L. ENGELS 
JOHN PAUL ENNENBACH 
MARY J. FANELLI 



BARBARA A. FEELY 
MARCIA A. FIALKOWSKI 
HELEN V. FINLEY 
LEONARD J. FLOOD 



ANN K. FOX 
TERESA B. FRANCZAK 
WILLIAM J. FRERE 
GILDA FRIAS 



GLENN A. FROMME 
LUIS R. GARCIA 
WAYNE R. GENERAL 
JOSEPHINE S. GERACI 



CYNTHIA G. GERISCH 
JOSEPH M. GIANGRASSO 
WILLIAM E. GILBERT 
OLAF MARK GJOVIK 




256 



DONNA MARIE GLASS 
MARTIN DAVID GLISTA 
RONALD G. GLOSNIAK 
RENARD SCOTT GRABINGER 



STEPHEN J. GRACI 
JOHN J. GRASHOFF 
TIM W. GRENNAN 
JOSEPH F. GREWENIG JR. 



WILLIAM D. GRIFFIN II 



DANIEL J. GULINSKI 



PAUL G. GUISTOLISE 
ANDREA M. GUNIA 
DOUGLAS J. GUTHRIE 
JOAN A. HABSCHMIDT 



SAMUEL J. HAIK 
BARBARA L. HALERZ 
CHRISTINE A. HALLORAN 
NANCY ANNE HAMILL 




257 






PATRICIA A. HANEY 
THOMAS JOSEPH HART 
TANYA E. HASTINGS 
PETER HAUPERS JR. 




KERMIT J. HAYES 
LYNN C. HEJNA 
MICHAEL E. HENDRIKSEN 
CATHERINE L. HERSCHER 



DANA L. HEUER 
JANET L. HICKEY 
WILLIAM G. HIMMELMANN 
ALBERT J. HLINAK 



JOHN C. HOULIHAN 
ROBERT C. HOYLER 
HARVEY J. HUNT 
KATHLEEN M. HYMA 



258 



WILLIAM D. ILLION 
JORGE E. INDACOCHEA 
LOUELLA IZMER 
STEPHEN C. JACKSTADT 



CECILIA M. JACKWIC 
STEVEN C. JAEGER 
ROBERT J. JANNOTTA 
MARIA D. JANOUSEK 



WALTER MICHAEL JAKUBAS 
ALEX F. JAWNY 
JOHN JEDZIMAK 
LOIS M. JENSEN 



JANET M. JESTICE 
J. JEZIERSKI 
CLAUDIA M. JOHNSON 
EDMUND J. JUNG 



KATHLEEN KALLAN 



PHILIP J. KALAS 




259 




ROBERT JOHN KAROLAK 
LOUIS R. KAVANAUGH JR. 
DOUGLAS L. KAY 
MARION L. KEEFE 



MARY A. KELLY 
TIMOTHY R. KELLY 
MARY SUSAN KING 
KATHY KIRCHBERGER 



CHARLES P. KITZMAN 
ILZE I. KLAVINS 
CHERYL R. KLAUB 
ELOiSE M. KLEBBA 



TOM KLING 

MARGARET L. KLINGENBERG 
CHESTER P. KLOS 
WALTER T. KRAMER II 



GEORGE W. KREDICH 
MARY KNUSKA 
WILLIAM F. KOCH 
MICHAEL S. KOLACKI 



LYDIA L. KONSCHUK 
WILLIAM G. KORINEK 
ALEX L. KOZIA 
CONSTANCE KRAGON 



260 




JACK JULIAN KRISBERG 
CHARLES KRUSLING 
RAYMOND E. KRYCH 
ELIZABETH A. KUBIK 



JOHN S. KUDLACH 
PETER J. KUPSELAITIS 
MARY A. KURNS 
GANIATA ADEOIA LAGUDA 



RICHARD L. LANG 
GREGORY L. LAMBERTY 
JAMES E. LASKI 
CARL J. LAUDANDO 



JOHN J. LAUSAS 
THOMAS LAWRENCE 
DIANE E. LEAMY 
ANGELO J. LEVENTIS 



ROBERT G. LEWANOOWSKI 
DONALD J. LIEBENTRITT 
JOHN M. LIMANOWSKI 
VICTOR LINAS JR. 



MARYELLEN LiSACCHI 
KATHLEEN LISOWSKI 
JOSEPH M. LOCASCIO 
ANGEL L. LOPEZ 



261 



DONALD E. LOREK 
NANCY A. LOTTINVILLE 



LAWRENCE S. LUCIDO 
SANDRA L. MADDIGAN 



GARY C. MAGISTRELLI 
SHARON J. MAHER 



MARY L. MALANCHE 
BRIDGET T. MALINOWSKI 



CAMILLE M. MALINOWSKI 
CHRISTINE S. MALOCHA 



JOHN J. MALONE 
JOSEPH MANGIARDI 



262 




RICHARD MARAVIGLIA 
MARY J. MARCHLEWSKI 
BARBARA A. MARIN 
BARRY D. MARKS 



EDWARD T. MARTIN 
KENT H. MARTZAN 
GREGORY J. MAUTNER 
HALINA M. MAZIK 



BARBARA J. McCARTHY 
WILLIAM DEVLIN McCARTHY 

MARTHA J. McDonnell 
MARTIN G. McDonald 



KATHLEEN L. McGRATH 
BRIAN P. MclNTYRE 
MARK E. McKEIGHE 
SUZANNE McKEIGHE 



CHARLES R. MEEHAN 
MARY JANE MERRITT 
MARGARET A. MIESEN 
RONALD J. MOLICK 



DEAN A. MONCO 
JAMES E. MORRILL 
JAMES R. MUELLER 
MAUREEN D. MULVANEY 




263 



JANET T. MURPHY 
KATHERINE F. MURPHY 
CAROL ANN MYSZA 
EARL H. NAGEL 



VICKI L. NEUERBURG 
RICHERD L. NORRIS 
HENRY NOWAK 
OLGA L. OBRADOVICH 



LINDA M. OCHSENFELD 
KEVIN M. O'CONNOR 
WILLIAM J. O'CONNOR 
LUCIA J. O'REILLY 



LOUIS R. ORLANDO 
SANDRA L. OSLAGER 
TERRI L. OSTAPOWI 
TIMOTHY J. O'TOOLE 



MICHAEL J. OTTO 
BRIAN T. OYE 
BONNIE A. OZUK 
WALTER H. PAAS 



CHARLENE PAGE 
DIANNE M. PALMER 
ROBERT A. PANDEL 
JEROME C. PASK 




264 



GLENN R. PAUSTIAN 
JOSEPH M. PAYNE 
FRANCIS X. PEASE 
CHARLES R. PERCIC JR. 



PAULA MARGARET PETERSON 
EDWARD M. POCIUS 
JAMES R. PUMPLUN 
LINDA L. PRATL 



MARTIN P. PREZE 
ROSALYN C. QUATTROCHI 
JOSEPH B. QUIGLEY 
WILLIAM J. QUINLAN 




265 






ROBERT J. RAUCH 
ANTHONY J. RECCHIA 
BARRY A. REDFORD 
CATHERINE G. REEDY 




JANCE E. REYNOLDS 
CAROL J. RITCHELL 
JAMES E. RITTER 
KATHERINE RIXNER 



MARILYN VIRGINIA ROGAWSKI 
FRANK L. ROGERS 
PATRICK E. ROHAN 
FRANK J. ROTELLA 



MARY T. ROTH 
ERICA E. RUNDELL 
PAMELA J. RUYTER 
BERNARD E. RYAN 



266 




NANCY S. SAUBER 
JAMES A. SBARBORO 
DAVID M. SCHAAB 
MARY B. SCHIFFMANN 



STEPHEN J. SCHMITT 
MICHAEL F. SCHUBERT 
MARK THOMAS SCHUSTER 
ANNE E. SCHULTZ 



MICHAEL J. SHEA 
JAMES SHEFCIK 
LINDA S. SILIANOFF 
WALTER I. SMULSON 



267 



ANTOINETTE M. SODIN 
MARY KRIS SOPOCKO 
JOAN R. SPIOTTO 
ROBERT F. SPOERi 



SHARON A. STACHOWIAK 
KENNETH ROBERT STACHOWICZ 
GREGORY A. STAINER 
TERESA A. STANCHER 



GARY G. STANTON 
BEVERLY A. STASTNY 
MERLE A. STEPHENS 
ELIZABETH A. STILES 



PAUL J. STRALKA 
MARK E. SULKIN 
MARY J. SULLIVAN 
RAYMOND A. SUSKO 



CHESTER A. SWIAT 
DOLORES J. SWIERGUL 
JUDITH M. SZILAK 
GREGORY SZLAK 



TIMOTHY SZWED 
THOMAS J. TAFELSKI 
JOHN F. TALBOT 
MARIE L. TALLANT 




268 



JOSEPH W. TAYLOR 
MARGARET A. TAYLOR 
JEROME H. TEPPERMAN 
LAWRENCE J. THOMAS 



DOROTHY J. THORNTON 
ROSEMARY TODASCO 
FRED M. TOMERA 
JANE F. TRACY 



STEVEN TROBIANI 
THOMAS N. TUDRON 
DALE A. ULASZEK 
GLENN E. URBANSKI 



JUDITH A. USELLIS 
IRENE M. VARA 
BARB VAN BUREN 
DAVID ANTHONY VARNAU 



AGUSTIN C. VELARDE 
STEVEN C. VENN 
LOUIS J. VERA 
GRACIAN VITAL 



ROBERT R. VONORAK 
RICHARD J. VONDRUSKA 
LINDA E. WALKER 
PHILLIP E. WALKER 




269 




ALICE ANNE WALSH 
THOMAS J. WALSH 
RICHARD E. WARD 
MICHAEL P. WEIDMAN 



DENISE WEYMANS 
DAVID T. WILBER 
RICHARD A. WILBER 
MICHAEL A. WINCEK 



STEPHEN D. WOLF 
EILEEN M. WOODS 
PHILIP M. YEE 
LAWRENCE J. YUNKER 



THADDEUS A. ZAMIROWSKI JR. 
ANDREW ZARTOLAS JR. 
NEAL ZAWISTOWSKI 
PAMELA A. ZAWISTOWSKI 



MICHAEL J. ZDEB 
GENE W. ZDENEK 
JOSEPH P. ZFLENKA 
FRANK J. ZEMAN 



NANCY ZIZZO 



1972 Graduates 

Lems Toysfers Arts and Sciences 




SUSAN AGREST 

CONSTATINE ANGNOSTOPOULOS 

LINDA ANDERSON 

WILBERT BAPTISTE 



DALE BEATTY 
RICHARD BECKMANN 
RUSSELL BISKUP 
MAYNARD BLANCHETTE 



MARY JANE BLANKENHEIM 
ROSEMARIE BOGAL 
PATRICIA BOYD 
WALTER BUFORD 



MARK BUCH 
HELEN CALLEWAERT 
CONSTANCE CAMDEN 
DELLA CAPONIGRI 



JAMES CAPPARELLI 
ROMAN CIAPALO 
DANIEL CIESLIK 
MATTHEW CRNKOVICH 



271 




ROSS CUCIO 
CHRISTINE DELORT 



JOYE DOMINSKI 
AGNES DRABIK 



CORRINE FANELLI 
STEPHEN FOURIE 



TIMOTHY FOX 

MARY ANN GALLAGHER 



MICHAEL GAUTIEK 
KATHLEEN GDOWSKI 



THOMAS GREEN 
WALTER HARPER 




ALANDA HAYES 
OSCAR HEARN 
BERNADETTE IVERS 
JOHN JANAVICIUS 



LORRAINE JOHNSON 
JORDAN JAMES 
THOMAS KAMPNER 
ALLEN KNOX 



VICTOR KOZINSKI 
DIANE KRYZANOWSKI 
MARY LASKOWSKI 
WILLIAM LaSORELLA 



MARLENE LISS 
JEAN LONG 

LINDA McCarthy 

MARY McGINNIS 



JOHN McNALIS 
ANTHONY MANGANO 
JANET MARK 
ROSS MARSALA 



JEANNETT MARWIG 
ROBERT MURPHY 
LINDA NALEPKA 
VICKI NEURBURG 



273 



JOHN NORTON 
JOSEPH NOWACKI 
RICHARD O'BRIEN 
JANE O'CONNOR 



MARY ANN ORTALDO 
ANTHONY PACINI 
MARIA PACOCHA 
JOSEPH PAWLIKOWSKI 



THOMAS PAWLIKOWSKI 
MICHAEL PERLSTEIN 
THOMAS PETELLO 
EDWARD PUTIS 



MITCHELL RADYCKI 
VYTAUTAS RAMONIS 
JOSEPH RIOTTO 
LARRY ROARK 



DAMIAN SANTIAGO 



ROBERT SAYLOR 




274 




VALERIE SEARCY 
BRUCE SHIVLEY 
PENELOPE SILKOWSKI 
SYLVIA SMITH 



LEE STALMASEK 
CHARLES STANISLAO 
MARK STAUBER 
JOSEPH STEADMAN 



NANCY SULLIVAN 
GERALDINE TRANDICOSTA 
MARY ANNE TURCZA 
MARCY TURLEY 



SHARON TYMA 
JACQUELINE WARNOCK 
DAVID WATRACH 
STEPHEN WATTS 



LEO WISTER 



THOMAS WONG 



275 



JOSEPH ALTMAN 
THOMAS BROMANN 
VINCENT COSTELLO 
KENNETH FIVIZZANI 



KENNETH FLECK 
GERALD GUNDERSON 
JOHN HANNIGAN 
RONALD KONDZIOLKA 



TIMOTHY KOWALSKi 
RONALD KUTKA 
GRAZIANO MARCHESCHI 
JERROLD SZOSTAK 



DANIEL TOMICH 



DENNIS ZALECKI 



1972 Graduates 
Niles College 




276 



FRANK BAJEK 
ALAN BALCERZAK 
RONALD BANASZAK 
WILLIAM BARRON 



EDWARD BARYS 
MICHAEL BENSMAN 
WILLIAM BLINN 
JOHN BRADOR 



VERA BRODZKI 
THOMAS BYKOWSKI 
LEONARD CISEK 
JANET CIVELLO 



ROBERT CONKLIN 
JAMES COUGHLIN 
MICHAEL DAMITZ 
STANLEY DAVIS 



JAMES DeROSE 
THOMAS DOKMAN 
JANET DONNELLY 
PATRICK DRISCOLL 



1972 Graduates 
School of Business 




277 



GLENN DULSKI 
GREG ENG 

PATRICK FITZGERALD 
EVERETT GARE 



THOMAS GABER 
MARY GALLERY 
MICHAEL GEISLER 
ANTHONY GELISH 



JAMES GIANFORTE 
JOSEPH GIGLIO 
GREGORY GLAZAR 
EDWARD GOLOM 



THOMAS GRADY 
GREGORY GRISKO 
JAMES GUSTAFSON 
WILLIAM HALL 



JAMES HANSON 
LAURENCE HICKEY 
DAVID HOAK 
MICHAEL HOGAN 




1 








JOSEPH HORBACZEWSKI 
THOMAS HUDSON 
ALVIN JACKSON 
WILLA JACKSON 



278 



DANIEL JANOSEK 
JOHN JAREMA 



DIANE KAYE 
PAMELA KAYE 



LEO KILCOYNE 



WILLIAM KISTNER 



NORBERT KOTSCHA 
DENNIS KOWALSKI 
RALPH KOWSKI 
RICHARD KRYSTYN 



JOHN KUHN 
THOMAS KURTZ 
RICHARD LAMUG 
ALBERT LANDINI 




^^i^ 



DANIEL LASKOWSKI 
ALCEE LAWRENCE 
ROBERT LEWIN 
DIANE LOMBARDO 




279 




WALTER LUCAS 
KEVIN McGIRR 



JOHN MANCINI 
ROBERT MAPLE 



ROBERT MAGUIRE 
BARBARA MAXWELL 



*^. 



THOMAS MEEHAN 
THOMAS MIERZYCKI 



ROBERT MOLARCO 
JAMES MULFORD 
ROBERT NELSON 
JAMES NEURAUTER 



JEROME NOGA 
GARY PACILIO 
JOHN PAKEL 
JEFFERY PANDO 



280 




EDWARD PIESZCHALA 
PAUL PONSOT 
JORGE PRIVAT 
DOROTHY RAGSDALE 



LEON REHAK 
CYNTHIA REZETKO 
MICHAEL ROHAN 
MAGGIE RODRIGUEZ 



JAMES ROSE 
MARK RUBERT 
JAMES RUMCZIKAS 
THOMAS SCHEIB 



DONALD SCHLUETER 



MICHAEL SCHNEIDERMAN 



STEVEN SEALIN 



RONALD SEKENSKE 



HARRY SHEA 
DANIEL SIMKOWSKI 
MICHAEL SKIBICKI 
STEPHEN SMIERCIAK 



ALFRED SMITH 
GEORGE SOUKUP 
LORETTA STANEK 
PATRICK SULAK 



281 




FLORIAN SZMURLO 
RICHARD SZUDZINSKI 
RONALD THOMPSON 
THOMAS TIERNEY 



THOMAS TYLUTKI 
JOHN ULASZEK 
EILEEN VanPATTEN 
KATHLEEN WALKER 



CHET WAZIO 



WINSLOW WEGRZYN 



JAMES WIERTPLAK 



GARY WILEWSKI 



EILEEN WILL 
THOMAS WLEZIEN 
RONALD WOJEWODA 
WALTER ZUBRZYCKI 



RICHARD ADAS 



282 



1972 Graduates 
School of Dentistry 



JOE ABDELNOUR 
JAMES ALEY 
JOHN AMBARIK 
PATRICK BANNON 



GOEFFREY BEAVER 
WAYNE BELLEN 
GUY BILEK 
THOMAS BONUSO 



MICHAEL BOTT 
DOUGLAS BOYD 
JOHN BRACKETT 
RALPH BRANCH 



JAMES BROPHY 



NOEL BURNS 



CLARENCE BURTON 



PHILIP CAMPAGNA 



RODNEY CHANG 
L. GRANT CHRISTENSEN 
DONALD CLELAND 
GEORGE COZZOLINO 




283 



DENNIS CULLEN 
LOWELL DAWSON 
KENT DECKER 
WILLIAM DILIBERTO 



WILLIAM DREIBELBIS 
RAY DUNCAN 
JOSEPH DuROSS 
WAYNE ERICKSON 



CRAIG FLEURY 
GEORGE FUTRIS 
GREGORY GAZDA 
DANIEL GEWARTOWSKI 



KINNETH GIEDT 
JAMES GOLDMAN 
ALLAN GRABOWSKI 
RICHARD GRIFFIN 



WILLIAM GRIPPO 
JOSEPH HAKE 
GEORGE HALTOM 
MILTON HANSON 



DON HARSCH 
ALAN HAUSSERMANN 
JAMES HEGYI 
HAROLD HICKS 




284 





RICHARD HOARD 
TIMOTHY HOFFMAN 



RICHARD HOGAN 
JAMES HOOPER 



GERALD HOPE 



STEPHEN HORN 



GREGORY HOWARD 
ANDREW JACKSON 



GARY JARRETT 
PETER KAHLHAMMER 



WAINO KAIHLANEN 
FRANK KEELER 



285 




TIMOTHY KICZENSKI 
MATHIAS KILL 
ALOYSIUS KLESZYNSKI 
JOHN KLISH 



PAUL LAZAZZERA 
TRUSTEN LEE 
MICHAEL LEHNERT 
DAN LEIMANN 



LONNIE LOVINGIER 
JOSEPH LOW 
JAMES LUCAS 
FRANK MADDA 



"<K.. 



MICHAEL MASSE 
ROBERT MEMSIC 
RICHARD MEYER 
DENNIS MOONEY 



GARY MOSS 



BUDDY MURRAY 



JAMES NELSON 



THOMAS NYKIEL 



ROBERT OEHLBERG 
DAVID PESAVENTO 
BURKE PETERSON 
WILLIAM PETTY 



286 




^^i^ 





'h 




JEROME PISANO 
ROBERT PIZZURRO 
ROBERT POSEK 
THOMAS PRYBYL 



RALPH RADER 
PAUL RIGALI 
MORRIS RIZMAN 
JOSEPH ROMANO 



JOSEPH SANTANELLO 
FLOYD SEKIYA 
DAVID SHELBY 
FRANK SIKORA 



ROBERT SINCLAIR 
RONALD SMITH 
MARVIN SPEER 
MICHAEL SUTLEY 



287 



RONALD SVOBODA 
OTTO TOR 

RICKY VAN SWEDEN 
WAYNE WAGNER 



ROGER WAHLMAN 
TERRY WEBBER 
GARY WEBER 
JAMES WEEKS 



JOHN WESTERMEYER 
RICHARD WREN 




7972 Graduates 
School of Education 




DIANE ADAMS 
JOSEPHINE ALESI 
CAROL ANGLICKIS 
KATHY ANNAS 



ANNAMARIE BIERNAT 
BARBARA BOCHENKO 
ANNE BRESSON 
KAREN BROWN 



NANCY CHERESO 
JEAN CHESSARE 
KARIN CHRISTOPHERSON 
MARGARET CONNOLLY 



JEAN COVENY 
JOHNNIE CRAVENS 
WRENNETTA DAVIS 
GERARD DEGNAN 



PEGGY DOBYNE 
CAROL DOMBEK 
MARILYN DRENNAN 
GAYLE DYER 



289 



SUE DYHRKOPP 
PEGGY EDISON 
MARY FERREIRA 
LAURA FRANCONE 



LINDA GADDIS 
SANDRA GARNCASZ 
CORRINE GRENS 
BARBARA HALL 



SHARON HANRAHAN 
KATHY HARPER 
KATHERINE HIERA 
MARY HITPAS 




290 




DREAM KLAILAT 
MARTHA KNOLL 
CHRISTINE KOLECKI 
CHERYL KRAFT 



JANE KULINSKI 
MARY ELLEN LEZON 
CONSUELO LOPEZ 
MARGARET LORENZ 



MAUREEN McNAMARA 
CAROLE McWILLIAMS 
FLORENCE MAURER 
KATHLEEN MAYER 



CHRISTINE MEADOWS 
WALTER MIKOL 
JANET MISHKE 
CARMELLA PARRILLI 



GEORGIA PERDIKARIS 
KAREN PHELAN 
LILLIAN PIECHOTA 
EILEEN PYRZIK 



MARTIN RUKIN 
CELESTE SCHUSTER 
GERY SETTINERI 
MICHAELINE SKIBA 



291 




GLORIA SMITH 
BARBARA STRAUCH 



BERNADETTE TOMASZEWSKI 
MARILYN TRZECIAK 



JACQUELYN WATSON 
CATHERINE WOODS 



292 



VINCENT ALVAREZ 
ALAN ANSEL 
BARRY ATLAS 
DONALD BAKER 



TERENCE BANICH 
DONALD BATTS 
RICHARD BELKENGREN 
LOUIS BIGLIANI 



RICHARD BELCHA 
CARL BORACA 
PHILIP BOSSUNG 
ROBERT BOWLES 



GARY BOWMAN 
THOMAS BRADY 
ROBERT BRODNER 
GEORGE BRUZZA 



JOHN CACIOPPO 
THOMAS CARRASQUILLO 
BADER CASSIN 
DANIEL CHAMBERLAIN 



1972 Graduates 
School of Medicine 







293 




DAVID CHRISTENSON 
ROBERT CHURCHILL 
ANTHONY COSTARELLA 
MICHAEL CLUYBA 



JAMES CUTTONE 
STEPHEN DAMM 
DAVID DEETS 
ROBERT DEMKE 



JOHN DePERCZEL 
MARY DiFILIPPO 
PHILIP DiTELLA 
GREGORY DUiCK 



JERROLD FALK 
RANDALL FIRLING 
HELGE FRANK 
PETER GAILIUNAS 



MICHAEL GARCIA 



PAUL GEKAS 



MICHAEL GERBERI 



CARL GETTO 



ROBERT GIBULA 
GLEN GOLBUS 
RICHARD GREENE 
JOSEPH HARTMANN 



294 



i 




LAWRENCE HAWKINS 
KARL HEINE 
WILLIAM HULESCH 
MICHAEL JANOWAK 



RICHARD JEFSON 
DAVID JOHNSON 
ANDREW KANT 
JOHN KEANE 



ARTHUR KEATING 
PATRICK KELLEY 
LYNN KERN 
ALAN KOGAN 



JULES KOVELISKI 
JOHN KREUL 
JOHN KUCAN 
LAWRENCE KUHN 



GEORGE LA ROCCO 
RONALD LEW 
THOMAS LINDOW 
HENRY MARCINIAK 



JAMES McCOY 
STEPHEN MERRILL 
PAUL MILLING 
BRIAN MULLIGAN 



295 




NICKOLA NOVOSEL 
GARY OBERG 
PHILIP O'KEEFE 
JAMES PAWLIKOWSKI 



JEROME PETERS 
GERALD PFLUM 
RICHARD PRINZ 
RAYMOND RASPACZ 



HERBERT REISEL 
ROBERT RIVERS 
LAWRENCE RODICHOK 
LENARD RUTKOWSKI 



RUSSELL RUZICH 
RAYMOND SACHS 
VINCENT SACKETT 
LAWRENCE SADOWSKI 



JACOB SALOMON 
MICHAEL SPAK 
ROBERT SPRINGER 
ELIZABETH STROPNICKY 



JAMES TSUJI 
PAUL VAKSELIS 
CHARLES VOSS 
RONALD WARREN 



296 



JOHN WHITE 
CAROLE WINTERS 



GREGORY WYATT 
FREDRICK YUHAS 




297 



1972 Graduates 
School of Nursing 




CLARA ARMSTRONG 
AGNES BAUMAN 
LOUISE BOSWELL 
VIRGINIA BRACKETT 



LINDA BRINKMANN 
MARIAN BROWN 
CYNTHIA BUDDE 
PATRICIA BURT 



CARLOTTA CAMPEOTTO 
KATHLEEN CAMPIONE 
BERNADINE CIESLAK 
KATHLEEN COFFEY 



APRIL DAHL 
JULIE DARROW 
PATRICIA DelGUIDICE 
NANCY FEE 



CLARE FREEMAN 
CONSTANCE GEHRKE 
THERESA GORMAN 
ANITA GRANDT 



298 



ELAINE GREGORY 
MARCIA GROBECK 
WENDY GROSS 
LINDA HAGAN 



CHRISTINE HANSEN 
SHEILA HAYES 
MARCIA HOFFMAN 
THERESE HUGHES 



GLORIA JENKINS 
SR. BERTHA JODWALIS 
JANET KANTOR 
MARILYN KIEFFER 



JANINE KILEY 
MARY KLOTZ 
KORINNE KOBOLD 
LINDA KONET 



CARLEN KOPEC 
DIANE KUCYNSKI 
JUDITH KUESTER 
BARBARA KUNSTMAN 



JANETTE LEE 
CAROL LEINEWEBER 
DENISE LENAU 
KATHLEEN LUCAS 




299 



JANET LUETKEMEYER 
BARBARA MARINO 



JOAN MATZ 
KATHARINE McAULIFFE 



JUDY McCANN 

JAMIE Mcculloch 

MARY McGARR 
CAROL MICEK 



JOAN MOOREHOUSE 
NANCY MORONEY 
CATHLEEN MOYNAHAN 
GAIL MURISON 



MAUREEN MURPHY 
PATRICIA NELIS 
SUSAN NESSLER 
KATHY OGATA 



MARY JO OUNIK 
DIANE OSTROWSKI 
MARILYN PETROW 
MARY PHELPS 




30O 




fir 1 

A 
mi 







BONNIE PHILLIPS 
BARBARA PIEKAREZYK 
PHILOMENA PISCOPO 
SANDRA PLEWA 



SILVANA RICHARDSON 
MARY ROTH 
KATHLEEN ROUS 
SHELLY RUBENSTEIN 



DONNA SCHUCH 
VIRGINIA SIPP 
LINDA SKRYDLEWSKI 
MICHELLE STONECIPHER 



PHYLLIS TAYLOR 
VICKI VENTIMIGLIA 
JANE VISEL 
CATHERINE WAKEFIELD 



RITA WALTER 
DEBORAH WARD 
EILEEN WARD 
THERESA WOLANZYK 



MARIA ZAJAC 



301 



CAROLINE BEDNAR 
JAMES BRATKO 
LEONARD BRESCI 
DONALD FENGER 



MARY FERREIRA 
BYRDIE FINCH 
JOHN FINGL 
MICHAEL GILLESPIE 



JOSEPH GLIM 
THOMAS HALLIGAN 
JOHN HAROLD 
GEORGE HARVEY 



WAYNE HUNTER 
JOHN JEDZINIAK 
MAURICE KUSHNER 
GERALD LEWANDOWSKI 



ROBERT MAGUIRE 

ROBERT MAPEL 

SISTER MARY CYNTHIA 
MOLINE. C.S.S.F. 

JOSEPH NIEMASZ 



1972 Graduates 
University College 




302 



J 




JAMES PALKA 
NINA PELLETTIERI 



DANIEL PRESTLER 



JOHN RIORDAN 



CHARLAINE SHACK 
HELEN SHAP 



ADRIENNE STEADMAN 



FRED VERTUCCI 



ROBERT WARDA 



303 



Abbinanta, Chris 177,252 

Abdelnour, Joe 283 

Abajg, Bella 88 

Adams, Diane 289 

Adams, Thomas 202,203 

Adams, Tom 127 

Adams, Tony 145 

Adas, Richard 282 

Afro American Studies 17 

Agins, Mikki 134 

Agrest, Susan 271 

Aguirre, Felipe 155 

Aborts, John 145 

Alesi, Josephine 171,180,289 

Aley, James 283 

Allen, John 151,252 

Allen, Margaret Allen 252 

A^ha Delta Gamma 182 

A^ha Kappa Psi 188 

A^ha Phi Omega 174 

Alpha Kappa Lambda 178 

A^ha Sigma Alpha 183 

A^ha Sigma Phi 187 

Alpha Tau Delta 172 

Aharnative Studem Movement 124 

Ahman, Joseph 276 

Alveraz, Vincent 293 

Ahrino, John 179 

Alyea, Mariann 252 

Ambarik, John 283 

American Chemical Society 130 

American Comic Crusaders 150 

Anaszewicz, Gerard 252 

Ancal, Nadine 149 

Anderson, Dave 252 

Anderson, Linda 271 

Anderson, Ralph 151,252 

Anesinas, Teresa 134,152 

Anglickis, Carol 289 

Angnostopoilos, Constatine 271 

Angst, Jerry 163,210,252 

Annas, Kathy 289 

Ansel, Alan 293 

Anthony, John 134,153 

Antonczyk, Andrew 186 

Apathy Day 108 

Aprile, Joseph 292 

Aprile, Sam 186 

Arands, Marianne 181,252 

Annstrong, Clara 298 

Annstrong, Thomas 252 

Arnold, Marianne 127 

Aioche, Louis 186 

Assissi Center 11 

Atkinson, M 252 

Atlas, Barry 

Bachne, Jim 182 

Badura, Kathryn 252 

Bqek, Frank 277 

Baikowski, Andrew 130,252 

Bak, Jan 183 

Balcarzak, Alan 277 

Balovich, Kim 187 

Banaszak, Ronald 277 

Banich, Terence 293 

Banks, Grease 174 

Bannon, Patrrek 283 

Baptists, Wilbert 271 

Barbartano, Maria 145 

Barefoot in the Park 81 

Barnes, Suzanne 252 

Banich, Barbara 145 

Barranco, Bob 177 

Barrett, Brian 160 

Barrett, Joseph 72,252 

Barrins, Mary 184 

Barron, Pat 69 

Barron, William 277 

Barsano, Frances 252 

Barth. Barry 179 

Bartkowicz, Laona 252 

Bartnicki, Kathy 153 

Bartasis, Dennis 178,186 

Bartolone, Robert 157,186 

Bartblotta, Tony 145 



Barton, Sua 163 

Barys, Edward 277 

Basalay, Jay 177,252 

Basketball 52 

Bataska, Mark 178 

Batastoni, Jim 151 

Bates, Maruin 252 

Batts, Donakl 293 

Bauman, Agnes 298 

Baumhart, Raymond S.J 4,5 

Bdock, R 157 

Baular, Ginger 253 

Beach, Thomas 253 

Beattie, Pat 174 

Beatty, Dale 271 

Beaver, Geoffret 283 

Backmann, Richard 271 

Bediek, Lois 172 

Bednar, Caroline 302 

Belcha, Richard 293 

Belinski, Terrance 159 

Belkengren, Richard 293 

Bellen, Wayne 283 

Belli, Katharine 253 

Bellino, John 177,253 

Bellisario, Paul 158 

Bender, Patricia 253 

Berqamin, DavM 157,253 

Benka, James 128 

Bensman, Michael , . . . . 277 

Benz, Jim 145 

Berghoff, Vareriet 221 

Bernacki, Gregory 253 

Bernacki, Lynda 183 

Bernardi, Nives 253 

Bernardi, Sonya 148,183 

Bespalec, Dale 145 

Beta Beta Beta 186 

Bethany, Dedra 172 

Beutler, Pamela 145 

Beyer, Bud 161 

Biagi, Robert 253 

Biernat, Annamarie 189 

Biesiada, Ron 166 

Bigliani, Louis 293 

Bilek, Guy 283 

Bika, Donna 172 

Binder, Marlene 253 

Biskup, Russell 271 

Biiger, Carol 127 

Biiren, Christopher 253 

Biurman, Gerry 155 

Black, Kevin 187 

Blanchette, Maynard 

Blankenheim, Mary Jane 

Blasco, Thomas 186 

Blesse, Bob 187 

BInn, Bob 151,182,277 

Blinn, Patricia 253 

Blue Key 128 

Blumthal, Bob 182,253 

Bhirpthal, Bob 151 

Bochanek, Bmno 253 

Bochenke, Barbara 289 

BoHa, Sam 177 

Bogal, Rosemaria 271 

Bohr, Mary Jo 164 

Bohr, John 253 

Boiczok. Val 127 

BoMt, aarita 164 

Bonascorsi, Roger 186 

Bond, Julian 86 

Boneela, Kan 178 

Bonusa, Thomas 283 

Boraca, Carl 293 

Borris, Bob 178 

Boris, Ted 131,178,253 

Bossie, Robert 253 

Bossung, Philip 193 

Boswall, Louisa 298 

Bolt, Mnhael 283 

Bowles, Robert 293 

Bow m an, Gary 293 

Boychuck, Val 134,174 

Boyd, Douglas 283 



Boyd, F. Virgil 202,203 

Boyd, Patricia 271 

Brabant, Pamela 253 

Brackett, John 298 

Brackett, Virginia 298 

Bradoe, John 277 

Brady, Thomas 293 

Branch, Ralph 283 

Brinkman, Linda 298 

Brophy, James 283 

Brandstatter 187 

Bratka, James 302 

Braun, Mary 253 

Bresci, Leonard 302 

Bresson, Anne 289 

Biezovec, Kathy 180 

Brice, Paul 69 

Brinkmeyer, Steve 73 

Brock, Dean 157,253 

Brodner, Robert 293 

Brodzki, Vera 277 

Broman, Thomas 276 

Brongiel, Al 186 

Brooks, Joann 176 

Brown, BIaz 134 

Brown, Marian 298 

Bmcar, Wayne 145 

Biuca, Robert 186 

Bnierman, Nancy 172 

Biuggemeir, Elaine 163 

Brown, Karen 289 

Brunetti, Robert 186 

Bmnzie, Paul 179 

Bmszer, George 253 

Biuzza, George 293 

Buch, Mark 271 

Budde, Cynthia 298 

Buahman, Kenneth 253 

Buford, Walter 271 

Buhrka, Frederic 253 

Bukas, Deborah 183,253 

Bukovec, Dennis 254 

Burlage, SJ. Carl J 201 

Burnett, Marc 145 

Burns, Noel 283 

Burt, Patricia 298 

Birtan, Clarence 283 

Buzzanc», Tom 187 

Bryant, Tom 175 

Bubak, Bob 166,179 

Buehlman, Ken 127,128 

Bufalino, Vincent 186 

Buffalo, Bob 84 

Business Council 166 

Buttner, Joseph 186 

Byke, Tom 134,160 

Bykowski, Thomas 277 

Cabrera, Maria 158 

Cacioppo, John 293 

Cadence 132 

Calandriello, Tom 69 

Callaghan, Patrnk 254 

Callewaert, Helen 271 

Camden, Connie 254,271 

Campagna, Philip 283 

Cvnpbell, Shelia 167,172 

Campeotto, Carlotta 298 

Campion 228 

Campione, Kathleen 298 

Cannell, John 161 

Cannon, Frank 174 

Cannon, John 

Cmoff. Larry 145 

Caponigri, Delia 271 

Capparelli, James 271 

Carey, George 254 

Carlson, Denisa 149 

Carmichael, Lan 16,179 

Carraaquillo, Thomas 293 

Carson, Deborah 254 

Casas, Christina 254 

Casey, J 157 

Casey, JoAnn 254 

Casey, Mary 148 

Cassato, Bob 187 



304 



1 



Cassini, Bader 203 

Cekay. Tom 134 

Casaro, Vinca 

Chamberlain 232 

Chamberlain, Daniel 293 

Chamnes, Steve 187 

Chang. Rodney 283 

Chardin Anthropological Society 164 

Chasser, Robert 254 

Cheerleaders 148 

Cherakc, Tony 127 

Cherese. Nancy 289 

Chessare, Jean 289 

Chips. John 178 

Chorba, Anne Marie 183 

Christenson. David 194 

Christensen. Dennis 128,145,254 

Christensen, L. Grant 183 

Christian Life Community 153 

Christophersen, Karin 289 

Chrzanowski. Dave 182 

Chubinski. Dennis 178.186 

Churchill. Robert 194 

Ciapapo. Roman 271 

Cieslak. Bernadine 298 

Cieslik. Camilla 254 

Cieslik. Caniel 271 

Cintron. Carmen 155 

Cioppettini, Frank 182 

Circumference 129 

Cirincione, Tom 177 

Cisek, Len 126,179,277 

Cisneros, Al 155,186 

Cisneros, Henry 155 

Civello, Janet 277 

Clancy, Kevin 179 

Clark, Tom 73.185 

Clarke. Kevin 182 

Cleland. Donald 283 

Cline. Cindy 178 

Chiyba. Michael 294 

Coed Club 152 

Coffey. Unda 254 

Coffey. Kathleen 298 

Cohen. Paul 59 

Cole. Mwhaal 254 

Cdlingar. Michael 254 

Colompos. Stever 174 

Coles. Cathy 181 

Colompos. Stave 157 

Colwell. Terry 182 

Combs. Douglas 157 

Compobasso. Pat 59 

Conception. Marianne 180 

Concerts 74 

Condella, Sam 175 

Conklin. Robert 277 

Connolly. Margaret 289 

Connolly. Pegge 183 

Connor, Eric 178 

Connors, Maureen 254 

Conway, Bill 127 

Conway, Cathy 181 

Conway, Kevin 134 

Conway, Terry 151 

Cook, Bill 124.182 

Coonay. Jim 69 

Coonay. Tom 72 

Corcoran, Jaronfo 254 

Corcoran, John 182 

Core Curriculum 15 

Cornilla, Tim 125,145 

Corredo, Cherya 180 

Corrigan, Jamas 187 

Corti, Jim 161 

Coatarella, Anthony 294 

CoMalla. Vincent 276 

Coatopoulos. Vivian 255 

Cottes, Mary Ann 183 

Cotugno, Joe 187 

Coughlin, James 277 

Coughlin, Robmt 69,255 

Couimen. Mike 178 

Covany, Jean 183,289 

C<Bzi, Mike 158 



Cozzi, Tom 186 

Cozzoline, George 283 

Crain, Donald 157 

Crane, Chris 167 

Crann, Ken 187 

Cravens, Johnnie 289 

Crawford, Genny 180 

Crawford, Rosemary 255 

Creagh, Nancy 129,186.255 

Cmkovich. Matthew 271 

Cronin. John 255 

Cruz, Gladys 158 

Cucio. Ross 272 

Cullen. Dennis 284 

Cummings. Jack 177 

Cummings. Marilyn 152 

Cunningham. Kay 181 

Curran. Dan 73 

Civry. Denise 145 

Cuttone, James 194 

Cwik, Judy 152 

Cyborski, Don 186,255 

Dahl, April 149,183,298 

Dahms, Bob 73 

Daig, Bob 127 

Baker, Donald 293 

Datton, John 255 

Daly, Maureen 152 

Daly, Rita 255 

Dvnitz, Mike 72,277 

Damm, Stephen 294 

D'amour, Bruce 182 

Danna, Dr. Sammy 145,160 

Dardi, Valerie 180 

Darrow, Julie 167,298 

Davis, Francine 176 

Davis, Kathleen 255 

Davis, Stanley 277 

Davis, Terry 186 

Davis, Wrennatta 289 

Dawson, Lowell 284 

DeAngelo. Rich 178 

Debate 163 

Decker, Kent 284 

Decker, Wendy 180 

Deets, David 294 

Degnan, Gerard 289 

DeGrogh, Davkl 169,178,186,255 

Delach, Tony 178 

Deland, Dave 134 

Deleware 234 

DelCampo, Daniele 

DelGuidice, Patricica 198 

DelGuklice, Trisha 183 

Delord, William 186 

Delort, Christine 272 

Delta Sigma Phi 189 

Delta Sigma Pi 179 

DeLuca, Frank 177,255 

deManio, Jo 171.181 

Dembski. Dale 178 

Demke. Robert 295 

Denk. Diane 255 

DePerczel, John 

Perdu, Dennis 255 

Dershian. Jantes 255 

DeRose, James 277 

Desnick, James 186 

Detmer, Natasha 161 

Deton. Barbara 176 

deVrto. Karia 127 

Day, Phil 164 

Diaz. AIko 155 

Diaz. Marie 155 

Diaz. Stanley 178 

Dickson 164 

Didiar. Marietta 172 

DiFilippo. Mary 294 

DiLagge. Cathy 183 

Diiberto, William 284 

DiMartino. Dino 155 

Dimes. Stave 69 

Dnn. Jamas 255 

DiPopalo. Mario 151 

Dractory 49 



DiTella. Philip 294 

Division — Activities 50 

Division — Campuses 81 

Division — Graduates 252 

Division — Organizations 122 

Division — People , . 192 

Division — Residences 226 

Dobyne, Peggy 289 

Doerr, Barbara 172 

Doheny. Mary 129.220,255 

Doherty, Tom 187 

Dohm, Kathleen 159 

Dohrmann, Katharine 145,255 

Dokman. Thomas 277 

Dolan. Todd 185 

Dolininski. Theresa 255 

Dombeck. Carol 289 

Dominski, Joyce 272 

Domke. John 255 

Donlon. Tom 182 

Donnelly, Janet 277 

Donoghue, Bill 255 

Donoval. Kathy 181 

Donovan. Deborah 255 

Dooley, Mike 127.151 

Dooley, Pat 127 

Dorm Week 115 

Doublemint Twins 150 

Dougherty. Ron 182 

Doyte. John 182 

Drabik. Agnes 172 

Dragoo. Joe 187 

Dreibelbis. William 284 

Dreilinger, Tom 157,174 

Drennan, MarHyn 289 

Driscoll, Pat 134.160,277 

Driscoll, Paul 124,127.151.255 

Drogosz. Nancy 265 

Oronen. Pam 164 

Dronen. Steve 164.186 

Druiding, Mike 151 

Duchin, Philip 157.177 

Duffy, Jane 256 

Duffy, Maureen 180 

Duggan, Paul 126,128 

Duick, Gregory 294 

Dulski, Glenn 278 

Duncan, Ray 284 

Dunne, William 256 

Dunstall, Dinky 150 

DuPtesis, Tom 175 

Dirbin, Dan 145 

DuRoss, Joseph 284 

Dussal, Phil 151 

Dut, Rich 73 

Dyer, Gayle 289 

Dyhrkopp, Sue 290 

Dziopek, Denise 183 

Easter. Patricia 176 

Ebert, Kathy 181 

Ebrom. Steve 169,186 

Eckart, Rick 175 

Edison, Peggy 290 

Edhind, Jim 72 

Ehrhardt. Sue 159.255 

Eichlin. Art 7.126.199 

EilU, Rfch 178 

Einhorn. Bob 183 

Einikis. Tom 177 

Eling. Bill 177 

Elson. Patricia 256 

Eng. Greg 278 

Engeln. Joseph 256 

Engels. Bernard 256 

Eimanbach, John 256 

Erickson, Ralph 72 

Erickson, Wayne 284 

Eskoz. Norman 178 

Evans. Tom 145 

Fagan. Fred 177 

Fairbain. John 186 

Fdco. Pedro 178 

Falk. JerroM 294 

Fdls. Don 187 

FwMlli, Corinna 6.126.272 



305 



Fanelli, Mary 256 

Fa-botke, Barb 183 

Fwbotho, Danuta 183 

Fwrell, John 153 

Faut, Margie 149,183 

Fedunyshyn, Zori 127,145 

Fee, Nancy 298 

Feely, Barbara 256 

Felkins. John 169 

Fenger, Donald 302 

Ferrara, Nalla 155 

Ferreira, Mary 290,302 

Fetzer. Pete 174 

Fialkowski, Marcia 256 

Figalwicz, Denise 186 

Figerricz, Diane 186 

Finch, Byrdie 302 

Fingi, John 302 

Finley, Helen 256 

Finney, Albert 151 

Filce. Mary 161 

Fiippello, Silvana 129 

Filichio, Kathy 183 

Findorff. Lori 167 

Firiing, Randall 294 

Fist, Isadora 150 

FitzgeraM, Don 182 

Fitzgerald, Patrick 278 

FitzpatrKk, B. Daniel 157,187 

Fivizzani. Ken 127,130,276 

Flack, Ken 145 

Flambours, Cassia 183 

Flaus, Mike 69 

Fleck, Kenneth 159,276 

Flemming, Mike 160 

Fleuty, Craig 284 

FkKKj, Leonard 256 

Fknwers, Veotia 176 

Foley, Richard 186 

Folk, Larry 182 

Football 60 

Ford, Rich 59 

Forester, Rebecca 145 

Forrie, Stephen 272 

Foster, Mark 182 

Fox, Ann 256 

FoK, Timothy 272 

Francis, Ray 157 

Franco, Juan 155 

Francone, Laura 290 

Franczak, Teresa 256 

Frank, Helge 294 

Frantz, Bill 145 

Freeman, Clare 298 

Frsre, William 256 

Fries, Dikia 256 

Froberg, Jim 134 

Fromm, Jeff 178 

Fromme, Glenn 256 

Fultz, Muriall 176 

Funk, Dan 169 

Funk, Jim 178 

Futris, George 

Gaber, Thomas 278 

Gaddis, Unda 290 

Gailliunas, Peter 294 

Gallagher, Dru 155 

Gallagher, MaryAnn 272 

Gallery, Bob 155 

Gallery, Mary 278 

Galluzzi, JoAnn 161 

Galvin, Mike 134 

Gamma Phi Delta 176 

Garcia, Luis 256 

Garcia, Michael 295 

Gare, Everett 278 

Garlarza, Migdalia 155 

Garncasz, Sandra 290 

Garza, Juan 133 

Gaaparetti, Norman 178 

Gate, Jose 185 

Gatsch, Mary 181 

Gautiek, Michael 272 

Gawlik, Henry 158 

Gszda, Gregory 284 



Gdowski, Kathleen 272 

Geary, Catherine 162 

Gehrke, Constance 298 

Geier, Dave 169 

Geisler, Mike 166,278 

Gekas, Paul 295 

Gelando, Paul 145 

Gelish, Tony 126,278 

General, Wayne 25 

George, Maureen 181 

Geraci, Josephine 256 

Gerberi, Michael 294 

Gerino, Tom 127 

Gerisch, Cynthia 256 

German Club 159 

Germino, Tom 72 

GeseH, Sue 149 

Getto, Carl 294 

Gewartowski, Daniel 284 

Giambrone, Frank 127 

Gianforte, Jim 179,278 

Giangrasso, Joseph 256 

Gibbons, John 162 

Gibbons, Peg 124,126 

GiNjIa, Robert 294 

Giedt, Kenneth 284 

Giglio, Joe 179,278 

Giger, Tom 165 

Giger, Tony 168 

Gibert, William 256 

Gilespie, Michael 302 

Gilies, Kathy 183 

Gibn, Joseph 302 

Gnvanni, Ron 69 

Gra, Jim 126 

Gjivik, Mark 187,256 

Glass, Donna 257 

Glazar, Gregory 278 

Gleason, Jack 155 

Glista, Marty 128,134,210,257 

GkMoiak, Ronald 257 

Ck>ver, Isadora 50 

Glowacki, Ken 134 

Golay, Cheri 127 

Golbus, Glen 294 

Goldman, James 284 

Gdom, Edward 278 

Gonzaga Hall 236 

Goode, Mike 134 

Gardes, Margo 183 

Garden, Lynn 167 

Gorman, Theresa 298 

GouM, Merv 72 

Goverarica, Milica 155 

Grabinger, Scott 257 

Grabowski, Allan 284 

Grace, Bro. Michael 177 

Graci, Steve 124,127,151,206,257 

Grady, Thomas 278 

Graff, Peter 159 

Graham, Terry 186 

Granacki, Frank 182 

Grandt, Anita 172,298 

Grashoff, John 257 

Greco, Rose 183 

Greek Week 112 

Green, Thomas 272 

Greene, Richard 294 

Gregory, Elaine 129,167,172,214,289 

Grannen, Tim 257 

Grons, Corrina 290 

Grewenig, Joseph 177,257 

Greico, John 186 

Griffin, Richard 284 

Griffin, William 257 

Grigsby, Shelline 176 

Grippo, William 284 

Grisko, Greg 179,278 

Gritz, Maria 155 

Grobeck, Marcia 181,299 

Fr. Grollig 164 

Gross, Wendy 299 

Grozdiak, Juanita 152,164 

Guerrero, Mirrya 155 

Guistolisa, Paul 128,257 



Gunderson, GerakI 276 

Guina, Andrew 257 

Gulinski, Daniel 257 

Gustafson, James 278 

Guthrie, Douglas 161,257 

Guzaskie, Marilyn 

Haak, Ronald 73 

Habschmidt, Joan 257 

Hagan, Linda 299 

Hahn, Mary 152 

Haik, Sam 178,257 

Hake, Joseph 284 

Halerz, Barbara 257 

Hall, William 278 

Hallbom, HaroM 182 

Halligan, Thomas 302 

Halloran, Tina 181,257 

Haitom, George 284 

Hamill, Nancy 127,220,257 

Hamill, Scott 134 

Handler, Steve 134 

Haney, Patricia 258 

Hannigan, John 276 

Hanrahan, Sharon 290 

Hansen, Christine 299 

Hansen, D 157 

Hanson, James 278 

Hanson, Milton 284 

Harold, John 302 

Harp, Meat 150 

Harper, Kathy 290 

Harper, Rudolph 124 

Harper. WaKer 124,216,272 

Harris, Marcia 183 

Harris, Ron 187 

Harrison, Unda 145 

Harsch, Donakl 284 

Hart, Charles 196 

Hart, Tom 124,151,182,208,258 

Hartmann, Joseph 294 

Harvey, Arlene 176 

Harvey, George 302 

Hastings, Tanya 258 

Hathorne, Carolyn 176 

Haupers, Peter 258 

Haussermann, Alan 284 

Havelic, William 157 

Hawkins, Lawrence 295 

Hayden, Brian 59 

Hayes, Alanda 273 

Hayes, Donakl S.J 11,236 

Hayes, Helen 224 

Hayes, Kermit 258 

Hayes, Nate 59 

Hayes, Shelia 299 

Hoarn, Oscar 273 

Heath, Carol 124 

Hegyi, James 284 

Heine, Karl 295 

Heisler, Larry 145 

Heller, Jim 177 

Heller, Unda 164 

Hellman, Jean 134 

Helmay, Bea 149 

Helna, Lynn 258 

Hendricsen, Michael 258 

Heneghan, Renee 134 

Hennessy, Elly 134,183 

Hensel, Lee 157 

Hermann, Ingrid 145 

Herscher, Catherine 258 

Hesotian, Carolyn 183 

Hess, Al 177 

Hess, Mike 134 

Haver, Dana 258 

Hewel, Todd 169 

HKkey, Janet 129,258 

Hickey, Larry 179,218 

Hickey. John 179 

Hicks, HaroM 284 

Hisra, Katharine 290 

Hsnmelmann, William 258 

Hinchey, Mike 177 

Hitpas, Mary 290 

HIady, Scott 127 



306 



HIinak, Albert 258 

Hoak, Davki 278 

Hoard, Richard 285 

Hodorek. Russell 187 

Hoeschen, Edith 290 

Hoffman, Timothy 284 

Hogan, Michael 278 

Hogan, Richard 285 

Holiday, Collette 180 

Holmes, Mark 127 

Honors Council 164 

Hooper, James 285 

Hope, GeraM 285 

Hopkins, Ellen 134 

Hopkins, Tom 127 

Hoppi, Paul 134 

Horbaczewski, Joseph 134,278 

Horn, Stephen 285 

Horn, Stephen 285 

Houlihan, John 258 

Houndt, Bobbi 127 

Howard, Bill 179 

Howard, Gregory 285 

Howell, Marie 145 

Hoyler, Robert 258 

Hren, Rich 134 

Hrynkiw, Zenko 186 

Hubchak, George 127,164 

Muck, Pete 179 

Hudek, Barb 183 

Hudson, Tom 179,278 

Hughes, Therese 299 

Hughs, W 157 

Hulesch, William 295 

Hunn, Kathy 145 

Hum, Harvey 145,258 

Humer, Wayne 302 

Hutson, Denise 155 

Hyma, Kathleen 258 

lllkin, William 259 

Indachchea, Jorge 259 

Ireland, George 204 

Italian Club 158 

Ivers, Bernadette 273 

Izmer, Louella 259 

Jackson, Alvin 278 

Jackson, Andrew 285 

Jackson, Jesse 89 

Jackson, Willa Mae 176,278 

Jackstadt, Stephen 259 

Jackwic, Cecilia 259 

Jadwinski, Pam 167 

Jaeger, Steven 259 

Jakubas, Wally 177,259 

James, Jordan 273 

Janak, E 157 

Janak, Barf Star 174 

Janavicius, John 273 

Jancy, Beverlee 129 

Janiszewski, Linda 290 

Jannotta, Bob 164,259 

Janosek, Daniel 279 

Janousek, Maria 259 

Janowak, Michael 295 

Jarema, John 279 

Jarrett, Gary 285 

Jasper, Jim 177 

Jawng, Alex 187,259 

Jeager, Fran 172 

Jedziniak, John 259,302 

Jefspm, Richard 295 

Jenkins, Gloria 299 

Jogues, Isaac 151 

Johnson, Cassandra 176 

Johnson, Claudia 259 

Johnson, Davkl 295 

Johnson, Frank 170,185 

Johnson, Lorraine 273 

Johnson, Mary 183 

Johnson, Mike 182 

Jolivette, Greg 185 

Jones, Frances 176 

Jones, J 157 

Jops, Annette 161 

Jordan, Mike 126,128,166 



Joyce, Thomas 164 

Judge, Cathy 127 

Jung, Edmund 259 

Kadleck, Jerry 177 

Kahan, Howard 187 

Kahlhammer, Peter 285 

Kail, Jim 177 

Kahlanen, Waino 285 

Kdlan, Kathleen 259 

Kdas, Philip 259 

Kaick, Ann 167,172 

Kaminski, Margann 131 

Kampman, Ranee 183 

Kampner, Thomas 273 

Kaiab, Alan 73,185 

Kant, Andrew 295 

Kantor, Janet 299 

Kapica, Kathy 186 

KMan, L 157 

Kappa Beta Gamma 180 

Kappa Delta Epsilon 172 

Karamanski, John 151 

Kara, Peggy 180 

K»l, Gary 186 

Kwolak, Robert 260 

Kas, Melody 148,183 

Kass, Pammi 183 

Kavanaugh, Louis 260 

Kay, Douglas 260 

Kaye, Diane 183,279 

Kaye, Pamela 279 

Keane, John 170,187,295 

Keane, Mike 187 

Keane, Patrick 157 

Keating, Arthur 295 

Keefe, Marion 260 

Keeler, Frank 285 

Keiling, Madeline 164 

Kelly, Bill 126 

Kelly, Mary Anne 180,260 

Kelly, Maribeth 290 

Kelly, Patty 180 

Kelly, Paul 178 

Kelly, Timothy 260 

Kelley, Patrick 295 

Kempf, Paul 157 

Kendall. Alan 59 

Kenmore 238 

Kennally, Pat 127 

Kenny, Bob 182 

Kerkastra, Steve 126 

Kern, Lynn 295 

Knzenski, Timothy 286 

KkkJ, Girtha 176 

Kidder. Mike 153 

Kieffer, Marilyn 167,299 

Kiefer, Peter 186 

Kik^yne, Leo 279 

Kiteoyne, Linda 290 

Kiley, Janine 299 

Kil, Mathias 286 

Kilion, Kevin 145 

King, Don 125 

King, Mary Susan 129,260 

King, Sue 183 

Kirchberger, Kathy 260 

Kristner, William 279 

Kitselman, Vera 126 

Kitsman, Charles 260 

Klailat, Dream 291 

Klatz, Mary 167 

Klaub, Cheryl 260 

Klavins, llze 129,164,183,186,260 

Kleban, Tom 174 

Klebba, Eloise 260 

Klein, Kevin 134 

Klescynski, Aloyskis 286 

Klsnas, Mike 179 

Kling, Tom 128,260 

Klingenberg, Margaret 260 

Klish, John 286 

Kk>s, Chester 187,260 

Kk>tentchu. Harry 186 

Kkrtz, Mary 172,299 

Knoll, Frank 182 



Knoll, Martha 291 

Knopku, Mary Ann 183 

Knox, Allen 273 

Knuska, Mary 260 

Koch, Bill 130,164,260 

Kocin, Donna 186 

Kogan, Alan 295 

Kolacki, Michael 260 

Kdecki, Christine 291 

Kdb, John 157 

Kondziolka, RonaM 276 

Konet, Linda 299 

Konschok, Lydia 184,260 

Konze, Gregory 157,174 

Kopec, Carlen 299 

Kopczk, John 160 

Korinek, William 187,260 

Korosa, Thomas 186 

Korosec, Tom 72 

Kotscha, Norbert 279 

Kott, Ken 69 

Koveliske, Jules 295 

Kowalczyk, Andrew 159 

Kowalski, Dennis 279 

Kowalski, Mike 69 

Kowalski, Timothy 276 

Kowski, Ralph 279 

Koy, Dave Lombard 145 

Kozia, Alex 260 

Kozinski, Victor 273 

Kraft, Cheryl 291 

Kragon, Constance 260 

Krakowski, Antoinette 152 

Kramer, Walter 260 

Krawczak, Bucktown Fats 174 

Kredich, George 260 

KrevI, John 295 

Krewer, Ken 182 

Krewer, Noreen 145 

Krisberg, Jack 261 

Krissek, Tom 166 

Kroll, Judy 181 

Kfumrey, Art 131 

Knisling, Charles 261 

Krych, Raymond 261 

Krystyn, Richard 279 

Kryzanowski, Diane 273 

Kizysko, Andi 181 

Kfzysko, Audrey 181 

Kubajak, Mark 159 

Kubiak, Bob 137,160 

Kubiak, David 164 

Kubik. Elizabeth 261 

Kucan, John 295 

Kuck, Harry 179 

Kucynski, Diane 299 

Kudia, Mike 177 

Kudia, Toss 167,183 

Kudlach, John 261 

Kuester, Judith 299 

Kuhn, John 279 

Kuhn, Lawrence 295 

Kulczk, Dennis 182 

Kulinski, Jane 291 

Kunstman, Barbara 299 

Kupferer, Wayne 127 

Kiqiselaitis, Peter 261 

Kurtz, Thomas 134,279 

Kushner, Maurice 302 

Kuta, Ronakl 276 

Kuzlik, Mike 177 

Kwak, Annette 127 

Kwasney, John 69 

LaBelle, Leslie 149 

Ladd, Marge 134 

Laguda, Ganiata 261 

Lake Shore Arts artd Sciences Graduates 252 

Lake Shore Campus 29 

LaMotte, Victor 177 

Lamug, Richard 279 

Landahl, Sheila 161 

Landini, Albert 279 

Lang, Rk:h 72,261 

LaRocco, George 295 

Laski, Jim 164,261 



307 



Laskowski, Mary 273 

Laikowski, Daniel 279 

LASO 152 

LaSorella, William 273 

Lassiter, Byron 145 

Lattimora, Delores 176 

Laub, Kitty 148 

Laube, Roy 145 

Laudando, Cari 177,186,261 

Lausas, John 261 

Law, Mike 59 

Lawrence, Alcee 279 

Lawrence, Thomas 261 

Lazazzera. Paul 286 

Leamy, Diane 261 

Lebak, Mike 134 

Lebetski, John 145 

LeBlanc, Bill 187 

LeBlanc, Mariette 198 

Lee, Janet 299 

Lee, Trusten 286 

Leeman, Dave 124,170 

Leffner, Leonard 157 

Lehnert, Michael 286 

Leimann, Dan 286 

Leineweber, Carol 299 

Leist, Paula 181 

Lenau, Denise 299 

Lennon, Tom 187 

Lentono, Allen 145 

Lesnak, Bob 177 

Leventis, Angelo 261 

Levinson, Yvonne 176 

Lew, RonaM 295 

Lewandowski, Gerakl 302 

Lewandowski, Robert 261 

Lewin, Robert 279 

Lewis, Larry 157 

Lems Toiwers Arts and Sciences Graduates 

271 

Lewis Towers Campus 28 

Lezon, Mary Ellen 291 

Liebentritt, Don 128,187,261 

Limanowski, John 261 

Lines, Victor 261 

Lindow, Thomas 295 

L^a, Frank 185 

L4>inski, Gary 145 

Lipski, Valerie 180 

Ljpskis, Ed 182 

LJSacchi, Mary Ellen 261 

Uska, Pat 177 

Lisowowski, Kathleen 261 

Lisowski, Sigmund 170,175 

Liss, Marlene 273 

Uva, Bill 179 

Lotucha, Denise 182 

Loane, Glen 160 

Locascio, Joseph 261 

Logman, Larry Lee 145 

Loikonio, Bill 186 

Lombardo, Diane 279 

Long, Jean 273 

Loos, Bob 179 

Lopatka, John 134 

Lopez, Angel 261 

Lopez, Carolyn 152 

Lopez, Consuelo 291 

Lopez. Elia 155 

Lorek, DonaM 262 

Lorenz, Elanor 159 

Lorenz, Margaret 291 

Lottenvale, Nancy 262 

Louvingier, Lonnie 286 

Low, Joseph 286 

.\^ Loyola Brigade of Cadets 157 

Loyola Drill Team 157 

Loyola Mens Rifle Team 157 

Loyola Student Govemmam Assoaation . . 125 

Loyolan 138 

Lucas, Jim 72,286 

Lucas, Kathleen 299 

Lucas, Walter 280 

Lucido, Lawrence 262 

Luck, Adele 186 



Ludwar, AdoH 159 

Ludwig, Ken 178 

Luetkemeyer, Jan 183,300 

Lynch, Paul 126 

Lynch, Jim 187 

Lyons, Dan 182 

LT Connection 160 

McAdams, Mike 175 

McAuliffe, Katharine 300 

McBurney, Mk:ki 126,134 

McCann, Judy 300 

McCarthy, Barbara 263 

McCarthy, George 69 

McCarthy, Linda 273 

McCarthy, William 263 

McChurch, John 163 

McClellan, Treva 145 

McCloskey, Pete 87 

McCone, Joe 177 

McCormick, Betty 145 

McCoy, James 295 

McCulloch, Jamie 300 

McDermott, Mark 182 

McDonaM, Jill 176 

McDonaM, Mark 187 

McDonald, Martin 263 

McDonnell, Martha 263 

McGarr, Mary 300 

McGee. Bill 134,151 

McGinnis, Mary 273 

McGinness, Tim 134 

McGirr, Kevin 128,166,214,280 

McGrath, Bill 157,174 

McGrath, Kathleen 263 

McGrath, Pat 134 

McHugh, Dobie 174 

Mclnerney, Mike 69 

Mclntyre, Brian 263 

McKeigue, Mark 263 

McKeigue, Suzanne 263 

McKenna, Dennis 182 

McKeon, Tom 161 

McLaughlin, Neil 134 

McMahon, Brian 175 

McManus, Marty 170 

McMorrow, Marty 151 

McNamara, Robert J. S.J. . . . 14,15,196.197 

McNalis, John 273 

McNamara, Maureen 180.291 

McShane, Jim 169 

McWilliams, Carol 291 

MacDonald, Dolores 181 

MacKin, Mary Pat 180 

MacKinnon, Hugh 73 

Madda, Frank 286 

Maddigan, Sandra 262 

Madsen, Kathy 162 

Magistrelli, Gary 262 

Maguire, James Rev 194 

Maguire, Robert 280,302 

Maher, Richard 131 

Maher, Sharon 

Majors, Jack 157 

Malanche, Mary 262 

Malinowski, Bridget 262 

Malinowski, Camilla 262 

Malocha, Christine 262 

Malone, John 262 

Mancini, John 280 

Mangano, Anthony 273 

Mangiardi. Joseph 262 

Mann, John 187 

Manno, Fran 158,180 

Manno, Lucille 158 

Maple. Robert 280.302 

Mar. Paula 162 

Moreno. Joe 170 

Maraviglia. Rk:h 170.177.263 

Maroheschi, Graziano 161,276 

Marchlewski, Mary 263 

Marciniak. Henry 295 

Marczuk. Diana 159,183 

Mariani, Jim 185 

Marin, Barbara 263 

Marino, Barbara 300 



Marino, Hank 163 

Mark, Janet 273 

Markey, Chris 182 

Marks, Barry 263 

Marmo, Frank 177 

Marsala. Ross 273 

Marshall, Larry 182 

Martin. Chris 69 

Martin, Deborah 176 

Martin, Donna 161 

Martin, Edward 157,263 

Martin, LaRue 59,219 

Martin. Peter 161 

Martinkus. Bob 69 

Martino. Carmela 158 

Martzan, Kent 175.263 

Marwig. Jeanett 273 

Marx. George 178 

Mason, Roberta 127 

Masse, Michael 286 

Math Club 131 

Mathis, Jeanne 159 

Matlock, Debra 176 

Metre, Mike 151 

Metre, Pat 134,151 

Metre, Richard 200,251 

Matz. Jantes 157 

Matz. Joan 183,200 

Maurer. Florence 291 

Mautner, Gregory 263 

Maxwell, Barbare 280 

Mayer, Kathleen 291 

Mayes, Jim 169 

Maywood Complex 36 

Mazik, Halina 263 

Mazzanti, Jeff 178 

Meadows. Christine 291 

Meehan, Charles 263 

Meehan, Thomas 280 

Memsic. Robert 286 

Merker. Glen 187 

Merrill. Stephen 296 

Merritt, Mary 63 

Mertz 240 

Messina, Bill 145 

Meyer, Tim 175 

Meyer, Rkihard 286 

Micek. Cerol 300 

Michel, Cathi 181 

Mierzycki, Thomes 280 

Miesen, Mergeret 263 

MMauskas, Tom 157,177 

Mhol, Walter 291 

Mhos, Carol 155 

Mies, Gloria 176 

Miler, Bill 182 

Mller, Dusty 180 

Mller, Sendra 176 

Mller, Kathy 134,149 

Miling, Paul 295 

Miord, Cat 127 

Mane 161 

MinervB, Pete 158 

Mishke, Janet 291 

Mitterer, John 182 

Modica, Frank 177 

Molarco. Robert 280 

MoMachel. Williem 157 

Molick. RonaM 263 

Molina. Bob 69 

Molina, Sr. M. Cynthia, C.S.S.F 302 

Molony, Winfred 221 

Mondi, Bill 145 

Monoco, Oeen 263 

Mooney, Dennis 286 

Moore, Gloria 176 

Moorehouse, Joan 172,300 

Moran, Mike 124,126 

Moran, Terry 172 

Morgan, Steve 160 

Morley, Bill 175 

Moroney, Nancy 300 

MornI, James 187,263 

Moss, Gary 286 

Moynahan, Cathloen 300 



308 



Mueller, Ann 183 

Mueller, James 134,151,217,263 

MuHord, James 280 

Mullet, Judy 145 

Mulligan, Brian 295 

Mulvaney, Maureen 263 

Murison, Gail 300 

Murphy, Jack 72 

Murphy, Janet 131,264 

Murphy, Katherine 264 

Murphy, Maureen 300 

Murphy, Mike 160 

Murphy, Pat 73 

Murray, Kevin 186.286 

Murphy, Robert 273 

Musso, Joseph 186 

Myers, Debbie 149,183 

Myers, Tom 174 

Mykytka, Maria 152 

Mysza, Carol 264 

Mysza, Mike 177 

Naczas, John 174 

Nagel, Earl 264 

Nagotoski, Konrad 164,186 

Ndepka, Unda 273 

Natasha 150 

Natural, Mr 150 

Nebel, Dr 159 

Nelson, Bob 134 

Nelson, James 286 

Nelson, Unda 184 

Nelson, Robert 280 

Neri, Paula 180 

Nerren, Joe 126 

Nessler, Susan 184 

Neurauter, James 280 

Neuerburg, Vk:ki 264,273 

Neusis, Jim 187 

Newman, Jim 72 

Newrauter, Jim 179 

Nicholas, Joyce 161 

Nicholas, Ronald 161 

Niemasz, Bill 179 

Niemasz, Joseph 302 

Niemic, Mike 186 

Niles College 41 

Niles College Graduates 276 

Noferi, Joe 157 

Noga, Jerome 280 

Noll, Je« 157,187 

Norman, Mike 134 

Norris, Richard 264 

Norton, John 274 

Nosek, Jan 167 

Noto, Chris 127 

Novosel, Nickola 296 

Nowacki, Joseph 274 

Nowak, Henry 264 

Nowicki, Paul 182 

Nurnberger, Dave 73 

Nursing Government 167 

Nussbaum, Frank 131 

Nykiel, Thomas 286 

Nykiel, Terry 187 

Oberg, Gary 296 

Ofaradovich, Olga 186,264 

O'Brien, Bill 166 

O'Brien, Jim 127 

O'Brien, John 134 

O'Brien, Richard 274 

O'Brien, RKa 171,181 

O'Brien, Therese 148,181 

Occhino, Charlene 183 

O'Connor, Bernie 134 

OchsenfeM, Unda 264 

O'Connor, Brian 157 

O'Connor, Jane 274 

O'Connor, Kevin 187,264 

O'Connor, William 264 

O'Donnell, Mary Ellen 167 

O'Donoghue, Dan 182 

O'Dwyer, John 69,134 

OeMberg, Robert 286 

Oenning, Nancy 184 

O'Grady, Patricia 172 



O'Hara, Kathy 126 

O'Hearn, Max 157 

Okal, Tim 185 

O'Keef, Philip 296 

O'Keefe, Robert 186 

Olenski, Sue 124 

Okinski, Sue 124 

Oliver, Mike 69 

OkKOse, Beatrice 162 

Olszowka, Jerome 163 

O'Neill, Mike 187 

Onorato, Greg 178,186 

O'Reilly, Uicia 264 

Organ Squad 151 

Orientation 95,96 

Oriando, Louis 177,264 

Ortaldo, Mary Ann 274 

Orth, Julie 127 

O'Shea, Jim 174 

Oslager, Sandra 264 

Ostapowi, Terri 264 

Oster, Mike 186 

Ostrander, Joel 177 

Ostrowski, John 134 

Ostruska, Carol 152 

Ottole, Timothy 264 

Otto, Mnhael 264 

Owens, Sherry 171,183 

Oye, Brian 127,264 

Ozeck, Bonnie 180,186,264 

Ozuk 

Paas, Waher 145,209,264 

Pacilio, Gary 280 

Pacine, Anthony 274 

Pacocha, Maria 274 

Padraza, Frank 175 

Page, Charlene 159,264 

Palka, James 303 

Pdcel, John 280 

Palen, Dave 127 

Palmer, Dianne 264 

Pamplun, James 265 

Pwdel, Robert 180,264 

Pando, Jeffrey 280 

Panhellenic 171 

Panici, Luciano 158 

Papierz, Roman 175 

Pappas, Marlene 145,148 

Pwilli, Karen 127 

Parisi, Joanne 127 

Paron, Joe 182 

Parker, Gerry 178 

Parker, Tajuana 176 

Parrilli, Carmella 291 

Pary, Robert 186 

Pasciak, Bob 178 

Pask, Jerome 264 

Pateros, Dave 69 

Paukert, Frank 145 

Pauli, Joseph 186 

Paulsen, Joseph 186 

Paulsen, Pat 85 

Paustian, Glenn 265 

Pavliga, Bob 155 

Pawlikowski, James 296 

Pawlikowski, Joseph 274 

Pawlikowski, Thomas 274 

Payne, Joseph 128,265 

Payne, Mike 69 

Pazak. Susanne 145 

Pearce, Gary 145 

Pearson, Gary 179 

Pease, Frances 265 

Pekared, Jean 127 

Pellettieri, Nina 303 

Percile, Charles 265 

Perdikaris, Georgia 291 

Perez, AHonso 155 

Perez, Lucy 155 

Perino, Major 157 

Perkins, Walter 145 

Perlstein, Mkshael 274 

Pesavento, Davkl 286 

Peter, Mary Ann 124,216 

Peterlin, Tom 145 



Peters, Jerome 296 

Peterson, Burke 286 

Petello, Thomas 274 

Petersen, Mike 128 

Peterson, Paula 183,265 

Petty, William 286 

Pflacan, Barb '.134 

Pflaumer, John 73 

Pfkim. Gerakl 296 

Phelan, Karen 180,291 

Phillips, Bonnie 301 

PM Mu 184 

Phoenix 134 

Pi Alpha Lambda 175 

Piechota, Ullian 291 

Piekarczyk, Barbara 129,152,301 

Pieszchala, Ed 166,179,281 

Piper, Bill 163 

P«>itone, Jackie 161 

Pisano, Jerome 287 

Pisarczuk, James 186 

Piscopoo, Philomena 301 

Pizzurro. Robert 287 

Plafcan, Barb 164 

Plaza. Cheryl 134 

Plewa, Sandra 301 

Plewa, Susan 184 

Pkicinski, Andy 126,153 

Pkimb, Donna 127 

Pocius, Edward 265 

Podeszwa, Peter 157 

Podradik, Ted 157 

Poe, C 157 

Pogorzelski, Don 177 

Pollini, Joe 126 

Pcmen, Jantes 130 

Pomis, Jim 169 

Pom-Pom Squad 149 

Ponsot, Paul 281 

Pope, Nel 181 

Porgnbela, Pamela 186 

Portela, Gloria 164 

Porten, Ron 177 

Posek, Robert 287 

Possley. Maury 134 

Powell. John S.J 174 

Powers, Kathy 183 

Powers, Jeane 183 

Powers, Mary Ann 148,183 

Pozzi, Marguerite 186 

Pratl. Unda 131.265 

Presidents Ball 107 

Ptestler. Daniel 303 

l>reze. Martin 164.265 

Primm. Sue 167 

Prnz, Rkihard 296 

Privet, Jorge 281 

Proud, Diann 145 

Prybyl. Thomas 287 

Przybylo, Steven 179 

Puczkowsky, Tony 178 

Pirilum E 157 

Purpura, Larry 186 

Putis, Edward 157,274 

Pyrzik, Eileen 291 

Quartos, Rob 207 

Quattrochi, Rosalyn 265 

Ouattrochi. Ross 169 

Quigtoy. Joseph 265 

Quintan. PatrkA 178.182.187 

Quish. Anita 265 

Rader. Ralph 287 

Radkee. John 145 

Radycke, Mitchell 274 

Ragsdato, Dorothy 281 

Rak, Gene 182 

Ramion, Michael 265 

Ramonis, Vytautas 274 

Ramos, E 157 

Rmdall, Walter 224 

Ranger Company 157 

Rwisford, Kathy 127 

Rapace. Walter 265 

Rapacz, Raymond 296 

RaPaz, Wally 130 



309 



Rauch, Robert 266 

Read. Bill 179 

Reader's Circle 162 

Rebesca, Charles 186 

Racchia, Anthony 266 

Recke. Ed 162,166 

Redford. Barry 266 

Redman, John 182 

Reeb, Rich 164 

Reedy, Catherine 266 

Registration 204 

Pehak, Leon 281 

Raid, Norvella 176 

Reinhart, Kathleen 186 

Reisel, Herbert 296 

Render, Dave 127 

. Reinke, Don 160 

'Renkosiak, Sharon 134,164 

Repa, Alane 172 

Reynolds, Janca 266 

ReynoMs, Sue 183 

Rezetko, Cynthia 281 

Rich, Gary 177 

Richardson, Silvana 183 

Rigali. Paul 287 

Rimando, Art 155 

Rinella, Dave 177 

Riordah, John 303 

Riordan, Mike 187 

Rkirdan, Tom 182 

Rkmo, Joseph 274 

Ripa, Augustine 161 

Ritchell. Carol 266 

Ritter, James 266 

Rivers, Robert 296 

Rixner, Katharine 266 

Rizman, Morris 287 

Roark, Larry 274 

Roar of the Greasepaint 79 

Robinson, Jeff 182 

Robinson, Tom 145 

Roche, JoH 175 

Roche, Richard 175 

Rocko, Chester 157 

Rococo, Ramsay 150 

Rodichock, Lawrence 296 

Rodman, Philip 145 

Rodriguez, Maggie 281 

Rogawski, Marilyn 184,266 

Rogers, Frank 130,266 

Rohan, Michael 281 

Rohan, Patrick 266 

Roll, Donakl 205 

Romano, Joseph 287 

Rome Center 40 

Romeo and Juliet 82 

Romiro, Al 187 

Rosada, Emelia 155 

Rose, James 281 

Rotella, Frank 266 

Roth, Mary 266,301 

Rous, Kathleen 172,301 

Rubenstein, Shelly 301 

Rubert, Mark 281 

Rukin, Martin 291 

Rumczikas, James 281 

Rundell, Erica 266 

Runkle, Ramrod 150 

Rutkowski, Lenard 296 

Rutkowski, Ron 134 

Ruyter, Pamela 266 

Ruzk:h, Russell 296 

Ryan, Bernard 266 

Ryan, Catherine 153,266 

Ryan, Denise 267 

Ryan, John 185 

Ryan, Robert 186 

Rybak, Rosemary 190 

Rybczynski. Mark 69 

Rytricki, Bob 162 

Saavedra, Gladys 155 

Sabatini, David 267 

Sachs, Raymond 296 

Sackett, Vincent 296 

Sadowski, Lawrence 296 

Saenz, Albert 164 



Saga, Ron 178 

St. Pierre 126 

Sakiewicz, Bruce 187 

Saiadino, Leon 120,127 

Salazar, Carlos 255 

Salomon, Jacob 296 

Sanchez, Rosalie 155 

Sanders, Frank 59 

Sandstrom, Phil 161 

Sanfilippo, John 267 

Sanford, Steve 134,217 

Santanello, Joseph 287 

Santare, Pat 127 

Santiago, Oamian 274 

Sarauskas, Ted 69 

Savaglio, Tony 175 

Savier, Bill 174 

Saubar, Nancy 267 

Saunders, Barbara 176 

Saylor, Robert 274 

Sbarboro, Jantes 267 

Scanlan, Pat 175 

Scaramella, Val 181 

Schaab, David 213,267 

Schaib, Thomas 281 

Schiffmann, Mary 267 

Schimpf, Tony 73 

Schiro, Joet 158,171,180 

Schlake, Pete 130.157 

Schlake, Ted 157 

Schlueter. Don 126,281 

Schmitt, Stephen 267 

Schneiderman, Michael 58.281 

Schohes. Walter 218 

School of Business Graduates 277 

School of Dentistry Graduates 283 

School of Education Graduates 289 

School of Medicine Graduates 293 

School of Nursing Graduates 298 

Schubert. Michael 267 

Schuch, Donna 301 

Schuj, Jamie 134 

Schuler. Katie 164 

Schultz, Anne 268 

Schultz. Eileen 131 

Schuiz, Grey 177 

Schuster, Celeste 291 

Schuster, Mark 267 

Schwiekert. W 157 

Sciddurlo, Onofrio 179 

Scott, Frank 145,157 

Scott, Tommi 176 

Scully, Joan 172 

Sealin, Steven 281 

Seamans, Terry 73 

Searcy, Valerie 275 

Segler, Albert 186 

Sekenske, Ronald 281 

Sekiya, Floyd 287 

Soman, Sean 170,175 

Sepulveda, Diana 181 

Settiner, Gery 291 

Sexton, Jim 59 

Shack, Charlaine 303 

Shap, Helen 303 

Shea, Harry 281 

Shea, Michael 267 

Sheehan, Tarry 145 

Shefcik, Dolores 153 

Shefcik, James 267 

Shelve. Glen 187 

Shelby, David 287 

Sharemata, Adrian 186 

Sherklan, Kathy 215 

Sheridan, Virginia 162 

Shivley, Bruce 275 

Shoe, Jim 150 

Shovein, Jeff 145 

Shuetz, John 187 

Shum, Noreen 167 

Shumway, Bruce 185 

Shwarak, Ron 124 

Siamianowski, ThunderboH 174 

Sigma Pi 177 

Sicora, Frank 287 

Skorski, John 169,186 



Siianoff, Linda 267 

Sikowski, Penelope 275 

Silva, Bertha 158 

Sihfa, Irene 158 

Simkowski, Daniel 281 

Sinclair. Robert 287 

"Sink the Tink" 117,121 

Sipp, Virginia 301 

Skiba, Michaeline 291 

Skibbe, Roy 124 

Skibicki, Michael 281 

Skrydlewski. Linda 301 

Skwarek. Ron 125 

Slatery. James 124 

Stobodian. Helen 134.181 

Stotkowski. Claudia 134 

Smaja. Mike 157,187 

. Smierciak, Stephen 281 

Smith, Alfred 281 

Smith, Dennis 186 

Smith, Donna 183 

Smith, Gloria 292 

Smith, Ronald 287 

Smith, Sylvia 275 

Smith, Vera 176 

Smoli, Debbi 145 

Smulson, Watter 267 

Sodin, Antoinette 129,268 

Soiek, Joe 186 

Soltes, Steven 186 

SoHys, Gary 127 

Samos, Kathy 152 

Sonnes, Kathleen 186 

Sopocko, Mary Kris 268 

Soraparu, Pete 145 

Soska, Rich 178 

Sosenko, George 186 

Soukup, George 281 

Spak, Michael 296 

Spartz, Jim 160 

Speer, Maevin 287 

Spiotto, Joan 268 

Spoeri, Robert 268 

Spread, Mike 169 

Sperver, Jay 178 

Springer, Robert 296 

Stablein. John 186 

Stach. Kathy 183 

Stach. Mary Jo 183 

Stachowiak. Sharon 268 

Stachowicz. Kenneth 268 

Stage Band 169 

Stainer. Gregory 268 

Stalmasak, Lee 275 

Stancher, Teresa 268 

Stanek. Loretta 281 

Stanick. John 69 

Stanislao. Charles 275 

Stanton. Bill 134 

Stanton. Dorothy 176 

Stanton, Gary 268 

Stark, L 157 

Stastny, Beverly 129,268 

Stauber, Mark 275 

Stabler Hall 246 

Stager, John 145 

Steadman, Adreinne 303 

Steadman, Joseph 275 

StefanoMricz, Joanne ISO 

Staffy, John 175 

Steinbrecher, Joan 127,152,171 

Stephens, Merle 268 

Stevert. Bobbi 134 

Sties. Elizabeth 268 

Stomper, Linda 131,145 

Stonecipher, Michelle 301 

Stralka, Paul 178,268 

Strawch, Barbara 292 

Strawa, Cindy 181 

Stralczyyk, Matthew 186 

Strizak, Dan 187 

Stroke, Jeff 163 

Stropnicky, Elizabeth 296 

Stroud, Renee 172,181 

Student Activities Board 127 

Studem Operatkins Board 126 



310 



Student Personnel Services 222 

Simnters, Patrick 145 

Sulak, Patrick 281 

Sulkin, IMark 268 

Sullivan, Mary 268 

Sullivan, Nancy 275 

Susko, Raymond 268 

Sutley, Michael 287 

Sutula, John 177 

Sventy, Thea 171,181 

Svoboda, Ronakl 288 

Swiat, Chester 177,268 

Swieca, Monica ISO 

Swiergul, Dolores 184,268 

Swimming 73 

Szatkowske, Larry 175 

Szettale, Katharine . 159 

Szilak, Judith 129,268 

Szlak, Gregeory 268 

Szmurlo, Florian 282 

Szostak, Jerrokl 276 

Sudzinski, Richard 282 

Szweo, Timothy 

Szymczak, WaKer 124 

Tafelski, Thomas 268 

Talbot, John 128,268 

Tdlant, Marie 268 

Tambone, Mary Sue 145 

Tambone, Tom 145 

Tamosius, Al 174 

Tatka, Denise 184 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 185 

Taylor, Joseph 269 

Taylor, Judi 181 

Taylor, LuDella 176 

Taylor, Margaret 269 

Taylor, Phillis 301 

Tepperman, Jerome 269 

Terry, Geraldine 176 

Thara, Concetta 181 

Thara, Laura 183 

The Gumper 179 

The Lump 179 

The Rock 179 

Theta Phi Alpha 181 

Thomas, Karen 176 

Thomas, Ken 69 

Thomas, Lawrence 269 

Thompson, Ronakl 282 

Thorton, Dorothy 269 

Tierney, Thomas 282 

Tnkle, Wayne 127,195 

Tobin, Noreen 161 

Todasco, Rosemary 269 

Todisco, George 182 

Toljanic, Jack 187 

Tomera, Fred 186,269 

Tomassi, Craig 178 

Tomaszewski, Bernadette 292 

Tomich, Daniel 276 

Tokarz, Paul 169 

Toofan, Eileen 127 

Tootolian, Mwk 187 

Tor, Otto 288 

Torp, Mary 180 

Torres, Ed 155 

Towich, Dave 177 

Track 72 

Tracy, Dan 124,212 

Tracy, Jane 269 

Trantpofa, Cecilia 181 

Trandicosta, Geraldine 

Trembach, Chris 126 

Trexler, Keith 72 

Trobrani, Steven 186,269 

Tioccoli, Bill 127,151,178 

Trzeciak, Marilyn 292 

Tsuji, James 296 

Tuccori, Joe 179 

Tudron, Thomas 269 

Tully, BUI 177 

Tully, Jim 177 

Tully, Tom 177 

Turcza, Mary Anne 275 

Tirley, Marcy 275 

Twaddle, Timmy 150 



Tylwtki, Thomas 282 

Tyma, Sharon 275 

Uczen, Don 174 

Ulaszek, John 282 

Ulaszek, Dale 269 

University College Graduates 302 

Urtunczyk, Trig 182 

Urban Ethnic Studies 17 

Urfoanski, Glenn 260 

Usellia, Judith 269 

Vaccarella, Pete 169 

VAselis, Paul 296 

Vdentine, Mark 177 

Vdlejo, Vicki 155 

VanRuren, Barb 269 

VanHooser, R 157 

VanPatten, Eileen 282 

VanSweden, Ricky 288 

Vwa, Irene 269 

Varda, Jeff 145 

Vargas, Jose 155 

Varnau, Davkl 269 

Velarde, Augustin 269 

Veltman, James 186 

Venn, Steve 151,269 

Ventimiglia. Vicki 301 

Venus, Carol 125 

Vera, Hank 72 

Vertucci, Fred 303 

Visel, Jane 172,301 

Vital, Grecian 269 

Vizinas, Edmund 186 

VonAlbade, Muriel 127 

VoiKlruska, Rnhard 269 

Vonorak, Robert 269 

Voss, Charles 296 

Voters Conference 99 

Voters Registration 114 

Vozas, Peter 157 

Vozas, Sarge 174 

Vross, Sandy 149 

Vincente, Jerome 164 

Vukits, Cindy 134 

Wachdorf, Cecilia 167 

Wagner, Marilyn 183 

Wagner. Wayne 238 

Wahlman, Roger 288 

Waite, Joyce 176 

Waites, Patricia 176 

WakefieM, Catherine 301 

WaMock, Carol 186 

Walter, Daniel 186 

Walker, Chris 59 

Walker, Garvey 59 

Walker, Kathleen 282 

Walker, Unda 269 

Walker, Phillip 

Walsh, Alice 270 

Walsh, Thomas 270 

Waher, Rita 301 

Ward, Chris 

Ward, Eileen 301 

Ward, Deborah 301 

Ward, Richard 270 

Warda, Robert 303 

Warhover, Bob 145 

Warner, Rick 166 

Warnock, Jacqueline 275 

Warren, Ronakl 296 

Waryjas, Ronakl 186 

Washington, Deborah 155 

Watrach, Davkl 275 

Watson, Jacquelyn 292 

Watts, Steve 159,275 

Wazio, Chet 282 

Wazniak, Sue 181 

Weathersby, Oaudia 149 

Webber, Terry 288 

Weber, Gary 288 

Weber, Steve 170,182 

Weeks. James 288 

Wegrzyn, Winslow 282 

Weklman, Michael 270 

Weiler, Bernie 134 

Weinzirl, Maria 158 



Weishar, Mike 169 

Weisstein, Naomi 215 

Wenger, Rick 182 

West, Debbie 134 

Westermeyer, John 288 

Weymans, Denise 270 

Wheeler, Mary Ellen 167 

White, John 297 

Wiaters, Audrey 176 

Wiencek, Jerry 174 

Wierplak, James 282 

Wkoff, John 153 

Wlber, DavW 270 

Wilber. Richard 270 

WIewski. Gary 282 

Wlke, Dave 202,203 

Wai, Eileen 282 

Wlliams, Eleanor 186 

Wiliams, Reggie 160 

Wlliams, Ronakl 185 

Wlson, Barb 167 

Wlson. Jeff 182 

Wincak. Michael 270 

Winkler. John 69 

Winters. Carole 297 

Wister. Leo 275 

Winthrop Hall 258 

WIeklinski. Mary Jane 183 

WIezien. Thomas 282 

WkKlarczyk. JudKh 152 

WLUC Radio 145 

Wojenik. Stephanie 172 

Wojewoda. Ronakl 282 

Wolarzyk, Theresa 301 

WuH. Joe 166 

WoH. Stephen 270 

Wiliams, Jim 72 

Wong. Thomas 275 

Wonderlick. Mary 161 

Woods, Catherine 292 

Woods. Eileen 270 

Woods. Regina 176 

Wren. Richard 288 

Wright, Roger 145 

Wrobel, Bob 69 

Wyatt, Gregory 297 

Wygnat, Jack 182 

Wymans, Denise 184 

Yee. Philip 157.270 

Yokota, Greg 178 

Young, Alan 157 

Young, Deborah 176 

Young, Niel 151 

Yuhas, Fredrick 297 

Yunker, Larry 127,270 

Zabielski, Beaver 174 

Zabielski, Robert 157 

Zadel. Mike 187 

Z^ac, Maria 171,184 

Zaiecki, Dennis 276 

Zanirowski, Ted 186,270 

Zanzola, Luann 134 

Zanzola, Rosemary 134 

Z^alak, Mark 73 

Zwada, Ralph 69,175 

Zwiing, Bonnie 129.145.211 

Zwtolas. Andrew 270 

Zatopa. Mary Ann 183 

Zawistowski. Neal 

Zawistowski, Pamela 270 

Zdeb. Michael 270 

Zdenek. Gene 186.270 

Zeck. Robert 297 

Zeman. Frank 125,128.187.270 

Zentz, Larry 127,174 

Zflenka, Joseph 270 

Ziggy 150 

Zimmerman, Dianne 

Zkxnek, Dennis 72 

Zimmerman, Tom 73 

Zipparro, John 127 

Zizzo, Nancy 270 

Zubrzycki, Walter 282 

Zubko, Jim 174 

Zygmunt, Michael 297 



311 



m 



WALSWORTH 

Marceline, Mo., L.S.A. 



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