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Full text of "The Loyolan"

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973 LOYOLAN 



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Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2011 with funding from 

CARL!: Consortium of Academic and Researcii Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/loyolan1973unse 



Ill III 



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There is a proverb that there are two 
ways to help a hungry man: you can give 
him a fish or you can teach him how to 
fish. The faculty, staff, and administra 
tion of Loyola University have, by their 
career choice, opted for the second way. 
They have taught you how to study, how 
to learn, how to serve your neighbor. 
They have also helped you to understand 
why such knowledge is important. 

I propose that you, having been 
graduated from this largest Catholic 
Church-related university in this coun- 
try, have a responsibility for active 
leadership in American society. That you 
have an obligation to those of us who 
will live where you live, who will work 
with you, who will be your fellow 
members in civic or social organizations. 
You have a responsibility to us, your 
neighbors, to be leaders. 

Why do I think so? Because you are 
privileged. Not one in ten of the worlds 
citizens goes to college. Even in our 



affluent and relatively educated country, 
not one in four persons earns a college 
degree. You are talented, intellectually 
able. That is the fact. Because you have 
been given this gift by God, have been 
helped by your teachers and others to 
develop this gift, both your God and 
your neighbor reasonably expect you to 
use your knowledge generously in the 
service of others. Loyola University, an 
institution with a century of educational 
tradition, testifies by the degree it has 
given you that you can be a leader. 

I refer especially to a leadership of ser- 
vice. Jesus said, "whoever among you 
wants to be a leader must be the servant 
of all." And he practiced what he preach- 
ed. My experience suggests that 
leadership of service in most 
organizations requires: I) standing up 
when others are sitting: 2) looking 
toward tomorrow when others are recall- 
ing yesterday: 3) working when others 
are resting: 4) cleaning up when others 
have gone home. It seems to you that 



most of the world's work is done by 
leadership of this kind. 

You have seen examples of such 
leadership among your fellow students. 
This 1973 icijolan is one result. Without 
the leadership of its editor, Marlene Pap- 
pas it would not exist. Other universities 
have stopped publishing a yearbook, 
Here the yearbook's budget was greatly 
reduced. Yet you are reading a Loyolan 
which compares favorably with all its 
predecessors. Marlene led: many other 
helped. 

You. too. can be a leader. Not a world- 
beater, perhaps. But one who brings love 
and knowledge to bear on every person 
and institution with whom you associate. 
One who leads by serving others. 

May the reading and re-reading of this 
Loycilan recall good memories. May it 
also remind you of the hope I have that 
you will be a leader, serving your 
neighbor and making this a better 
world." 

Raymond Baumhart. S.J. 
President 




One of the most satisfying facets of the 
Chancellor's activity is the opportunity 
to meet Loyola alumni and alumnae 
almost daily. 

The occasions for these pleasant en- 
counters are many: the annual 
homecoming dinners of the professional 
schools, the annual all-University alumni 
Valentine Ball and the preview reception 
in November: the annual alumnae 
luncheon and fashion show: the 
meetings of the workers in the annual 
alumni fund programs in the several 
schools of the University; the alumni 
gatherings each year in several cities 
across the country: The 25th anniversary 
class reunion each fall and the half- 
century club dinner in the spring. 

Within a few years of graduation, after 
establishing contacts with the graduates 
of other universities, Loyola alumni can 
assess objectively what this University 
has meant to them. That assessment, 
quite largely, is most favorable as their 



response to the alumni annual-giving 
programs attest. Loyola alumni give 
generously to continue Loyola 
educational opportunity for today's 
students. 

Today's student is tomorrow's alumnus. 
The University Chancellor, whoever he 
may be (but myself. I hope, for some 
years to come) will be happy to meet 
you. Loyola's alumni and alumnae of 
tomorrow, at alumni gatherings in 
Chicago. New York, Miami, Cleveland or 
Los Angeles. 

James F. Maguire, S.J. 
Chancellor 



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Activities 



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Presidents Ball 6-9 

Basketball Benefit 10-11 

McGaw Hospital Dedication ... 12 

Stritch Medal 13 

Sword of Loyola 14-15 

Carnival 16-17 

Radio Conference 18-19 

Founders Day 20 

Blood Drive 21 

Military Ball 22 

The Storm 23 



/ 



President's Ball 







The President's Ball of Loyola University 
is held every October, near the end of the 
month, to honor the outstanding 
students, faculty, and administration of 
Loyola University. Each year Father 
Baumhart attends and honors those In- 
dividuals that have worked hard 
throughout the year to promote the ex- 
cellence in academics and social life 
here at Loyola. It is his way of saying 
thank you to those who are so very 
special to him. 





Basketball 
Benefit 



November IBth marked the date of the 
benefit basketball game held to supple- 
ment the budget of the Loyolan. The 
arrangements for the game were made 
thanks to the generosity and kindness of 
Coach George Ireland. While attendance 
was poor, spirit was high, and the small 
crowd cheered heartily as SAB was 
defeated by the Faculty team, this 
despite the fact that the cheerleaders 
were asked to play with the Faculty. It 
was also a momentous occasion In that it 
was the only time the Loyola Ramblers 
played at the Alumni Gym before the 
beginning of the regular basketball 
season. 





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McGaw 

Hospital 

Dedication 



The Dedication of the Foster G. McGaw 
Hospital of Loyola University of Chicago 

More than 300 dignitaries attended the 
November 17 dedication of the 451-bed 
hospital at Loyola's Maywood Medical 
Center Complex, in the name of Foster G. 
McGaw, founder and chairman of the 
American Hospital Supply Corporation, 
who made an unrestricted pledge of $7 
million to the University. 

Mr. and Mrs. McGaw were honored 
guests at the ceremony, which featured 
the unveiling of architect's plans for a 
25-foot tall pylon bearing McGaw's 
name and which will be built in front of 
the Medical Center. 

Keynote speaker at the event was John 
A.D. Cooper. M.D.. president of the 
Association of American Medical 
Colleges. He told the assembly that 
"medical schools are a convenient target 
on which to vent the hostility that has 
grown out of the frustration of society in 
achieving their aspirations for better 
health. " 



12 





The Stritch 
Medal 



The recipient of the 1972 Stritch Medal, 
for excellence in the field of medical 
research, was Michael J. Brennan. M.D., 
professor of Medicine at Wayne State 
University School of Medicine and presi- 
dent and scientific director of The 
Michigan Cancer Foundation. Dr. Bren- 
nan is an internationally known medical 
oncologist whose research in breast 
cancers and creation of special cancer 
wards in hospitals have won wide atten- 
tion. In fact, he is credited with inventing 
the term, "medical oncology." to 
describe the chemotherapy treatment of 
cancer patients. 



The Sword of 
Loyola 



In November. 1972. the renowned Sword 
of Loyola Award was given to the man 
who introduced it. the Rev. James F. 
Maguire. S.J., first Chancellor of Loyola 
University and ninth recipient of the 
award. 

It was the first time that the award was 
given to a Chicagoan and to a leader in 
the field of education. It was established 
nine years ago by Father Maguire 
because he believed that special honor 
should be paid in today's world to per- 
sons who have exhibited to a high degree 
the age-old ideals of courage, dedica- 
tion, and service. 

The year of 1972 was an especially fitting 
time for Father Maguire to be honored, 
for it marked his 50th anniversary in the 
Jesuit Order. 



"For my fifty years as a Jesuit and for 
this Sword of Loyola, my response is the 
same — my deepest thanks, for so many 
years of companionship with my brother 
Jesuits whose dedication to God and our 
feliowmen has inspired and sustained me 
at all times, I am grateful to God and the 
Jesuit order." 



13 




Carnival 



Many years ago in an Indian village 
located at the corner of Sheridan Road 
and Loyola Avenue, there lived a wise 
old Indian named Chief Sabsab. Now 
Sabsab was a kindly old Indian who was 
always trying to make his people happy, 
but alas, no matter what or how hard he 
tried, he just couldn't seem to make his 
people happy. For it seemed that even if 
he could plan some type of rite or 
festival for his people that he thought 
they would like, they either ignored it or 
the gods would frown on his efforts by 
cursing them with bad weather. 

These set-backs did not stop old Sabsab, 
and one day after much thought and 
consultation with the elders and 
members of the tribe, Sabsab decided to 
change the annual festival that was 
celebrated in the Spring of the year to 
the Fall. He thought that this would be a 
better time for his people and the 
peoples of the neighboring village to 
take part in his festival. Sabsab, being a 
wise old Indian, knew that in the Spring 
of the year, many of the Braves were busy 
getting ready to take the tests which 
would initiate them to become wise, 
respected members of the tribe. He also 
knew that by the Spring of the year, most 
of the members of the tribe would have 
exhausted their store of supplies and 
those of their elders. 

But it seemed that again the gods were 
not smiling on Sabsab, for when the time 
came for the new Fall Festival, the only 
ones who came were Sabsab and his 
elders. Now this Sabsab did not unders- 
tand, so he asked the members of his 
tribe why none of the other tribes or 
those of the neighboring village had not 
come. When they gave him their answer, 
he was even more bewildered. For it 
seemed that the reasons they sighted 
were the very same ones that had made 
him change the time of his festival in the 
first place. 

And so, poor old wise, but bewildered, 
Chief Sabsab, after some contemplation, 
decided that the only ones who truly 
knew the minds of his people were the 
gods, the people themselves, and (he 
hoped) the next chief of the tribe. 

As told to the Loyolan 

by the wise old storyteller, 

Frank Giambrone. 



Radio Conference 



For the third time, WLUC and Loyola 
hosted a Regional Conference for 
College Radio. It was held on Loyola's 
Lake Shore Campus the weekend of 
November 17th - 19th. College radio staff, 
record company personnel and 
professionals from all over the country 
participated in the conference, allowing 
the attendance total to peak at 500. 

Future conferences and workshops can 
only lead to a greater sharing of ideas, 
knowledge, and eventual preparation for 
the radio/music world. 




J3 '■ • * WKfM 



18 



Founders' Day 




A total of 12 Loyola students received 
medallions during the 14th Annual 
Founders' Day ceremonies on Friday, 
October 27, 1972. The medallions, which 
were presented by the Rev. Raymond 
Baumhart, S.J., recognized student con- 
tributions to Loyola, the community and 
outstanding academic achievement. 

This marks the 14th consecutive year 
medallions were given to outstanding 
students from Loyola's various colleges 
and schools on the undergraduate and 
graduate levels. The students awarded 
medallions were: Donald King, Joseph 
Wolfe, Lawrence Kurdek, Alberto Garcia, 
S.J., Mary Ellen O'Donnell. Jerome 
Larkin. Jean Lubeckis, John Doli, Lance 
Weesner, Rev. Stefan Mokrohisky, 
Harvey Blanchett II, Ronald Hirst. 



Blood Drive 




On December 12th and 13th. the brothers 
of Alpha Phi Omega, the national service 
fraternity of Loyola, conducted a blood 
drive for Mark Carey, a 26-year old law 
student from De Paul. Mark is a 
hemophiliac who will shortly undergo 
surgery to correct paralysis of the arms 
and legs. 




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The paralysis which occurred after a 
previous operation is due to an infection 
which set into the joints. It damaged the 
nerves and muscles, so Mark has been 
confined to a wheel chair for the past 
two years. 

The blood that was collected was taken 
to the Beverly Blood Center where it was 
processed and stored for distribution 
when needed. 




21 




The Military Ball 



The Storm 



The Military Ball is one of the major 
social events of the year. It is sponsored 
by the Military Science Department for 
the Loyola R.O.T.C. Battalion of Cadets. 
It is a time when the cadets, their dates, 
the cadre and the VIPs of Loyola come 
together for a night of dancing, good 
food, good company and in short good 



fun. This year's Military Ball was held at 
the Fort Sheridan Officers Club on 
December 8, 1972. Among the celebrities 
were Major General Ward Ryan, Deputy 
Commander of Fifth Army and Father 
Donald Hayes. Vice-President of Cam- 
pus Ministry. 



Michael Keane, a Loyola student, drown- 
ed early Tuesday November 14 while try- 
ing to rescue a friend who had been 
swept into Lake Michigan by high waves 
moments before. 

Keane's older brother, John, also from 
Loyola, went into the water after him in 
an unsuccessful rescue attempt. 




The drowning took place off the Pratt 
Avenue pier where Keane and nine other 
members of the Alpha Sigma Phi frater- 
nity had gathered to watch the 26-foot- 
high-waves. 

According to a witness from the fraterni- 
ty. Michael O'Neil, a sophomore, was the 
first student washed off the pier. 
Another student. Daniel Fitzpatrick, 
attempted to rescue him, but a wave 
knocked them both into the lake. The 
waters carried Fitzpatrick towards shore, 
and he was brought to safety by fellow 
students as he washed onto a sand bar. 



Meanwhile. Keane was among those try- 
ing to fish O'Neil out of the lake. As he 
reportedly let go of the pier railing to get 
a better grip on O'Neil he was pulled un- 
der by the waves. Keane was swept 
immediately away from shore and 
disappeared from sight in a matter of 
seconds. 

Out of the ten students on the pier, a 
total of six were in the water at sometime 
during the rescue attempt. Three of the 
number were non-swimmers. A witness 
estimated that the entire action took 
place inside of five minutes. During that 



time the students were hit by "at least 15 
monster waves." 

After the drowning, approximately 70 
Loyola students kept watch on the shore 
off which Keane disappeared. His body 
has since been recovered. 

Keane. 19, was a sophomore psychology 
major from Cleveland. He was a resident 
of the Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity house 
at 1062 W. Columbia. 



23 




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Spirit of Loyola 

Father Merlz 26 

Don King 

Frank Giambrone 27 

Jim Lanahan 

Earl Otto 28 

Terry Sullivan 

Leon Saladino 29 

Sylvia Zastrow 30 

Juanita Grozdiak 31 

Luann Zanzola 31 

Dale Bespalec 32 

Marlene Pappas 33 

Father Festle 

Bill Savier 34 

Father Grollig 

Dr. Rosemary Hartnett 35 

Al Gray 

Dr. Maziarz 36 

Nicholas Patricca 37 



25 




James J. Mertz, SJ. 



This is November, 1972. I look back on 
fifty years to that September day in 1922 
when I came to the North Shore Campus 
of Loyola from St. Ignatius High School 
where I had been teaching for four years. 
Father William Agnew. with whom I was 
ordained in 1915, was Rector, now called 
President. Many changes have taken 
place in personnel, in buildings, in 
courses offered today, in familiar faces, 
in the general makeup of the University, 
So, too, there are changes in the at- 
titudes of minds and hearts. Students 
have about the same characteristics. 
They come to study, do so according to 
their capacities which are somewhat cur- 
tailed by the common mode of life which 
has taken over and which has brought on 
a greater liberty of life and freer expres- 
sion of thought and feeling. This is all to 
the good if they are open to the direction 
of those who do the teaching and who 
have more experience In life, the source 
of finer and more accurate judgments. 



Fifty years ago, the student body was 
smaller, each one knew his neighbor and 
there was a universal camaraderie 
between teachers and those who sat on 
the benches to learn. Life is more diver- 
sified today, but with all the changes I 
find the students friendly and loyal in 
the Loyola tradition. Fifty years ago, 
there was more joy, the fruit of a deep 
seated faith in God. This seems to be 
lacking today. The result is that there is 
an absence of personal responsibility, in 
a goodly number, in fulfilling the duties 
and obligations we owe God. In contrast, 
there are those who, in spite of the 
smoggy atmosphere, are genuinely 
spiritual and generous in their service of 
God. This is as it should be in Jesuit 
education at Loyola University. 



26 




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Don King Frank Giambrone 



It's been worth it. The frustrations, the 
disappointments, the aggravations, and 
the failures have been outweighed by the 
growth I've experienced as a person 
thanks to the new people and ideas I've 
encountered here at Loyola. There have 
been very unique and beautiful people 
here as well as trying disagreeable ones. 
There have been very creative and 
liberating ideas nourished here, as well 
as overemphasized trivialities. But I can 
say without a doubt that my life is 
different now from when I came to 
Loyola, and in many ways that I had 
never anticipated, thanks to those new 
ideas and people. 

I suppose that when a person can say 
that he has encountered new things 
which have carried his life to a point that 
he had not anticipated, that person has 
been engaged in an adventure. I like to 
think of my years here at Loyola as an 
adventure. I like to think of life as an 
adventure too. Maybe that's what makes 
everything worth it. 



When I was asked to write something 
about my experiences at Loyola for the 
yearbook, a series of events flashed 
through my mind — events both en- 
joyable and otherwise that I will never 
forget. 

My first two years at Loyola were spent 
like those of most other students: going 
to an occasional class, going to work, 
and going out to date and drink. But 
after those two years. I was able to come 
Into contact with the other Loyola, the 
Loyola that unfortunately, few students 
get to know. 

I believe my experiences with the SAB 
will be invaluable to me. For example, 
how many people can say they have been 
able to persuade a Congressman to 
swallow a goldfish? If the opportunity 
ever arises again. I shall be ready, fish in 
hand and phone booth nearby. (The 
glories of a well-rounded education are 
endless.) 



Later. I was fortunate to become chair- 
man of the SAB. an honor rivaled only by 
the fact that I was lucky to be classified 
l-A three times in two years. In the role 
of chairman, my horizons widened con- 
siderably, and dotting those horizons 
were the problems I encountered. There 
were for example, the (yech) ARA. I'm 
sure there are words somewhere that 
would adequately and fittingly describe 
the Loyola food service organization, but 
it Is better perhaps that they be left un- 
written. And there was registration (the 
day the earth stood still); finals (a 
belated Merry Christmas to all); and 
finally, basketball (a study in losing as 
taught by the coach). But above all else, 
there were the close friendships and 
more enriching experiences that have 
made the whole thing worthwhile. 



27 



Jim Lanahan Earie W. Otto 



Who's the keeper of the keys that's plea- 
sant as can be? 

J— I— M L— A— N^A— H— A— N 

Hey there, Hi there. Ho there, he's Mertz 
Hall's celebrity! 

J— I— M L— A— N— A— H— A— N 

Lanahan! Lanahan! 

Forever let us hold our ID's high! 

Come along and sing our song join 
Mertz's family! 

J— I— M L— A— N— A— H— A— N 

Yeah Jimmy! Yeah Jimmy! Yeah Jimmy 
Lanahan! 



Earle Otto is the Superintendent of the 
Physical Plant. In his domain are the care 
of the power house, which supplies both 
heat and air-conditioning to all Lake 
Shore Campus buildings, the custodial 
services, maintenance of both grounds 
and buildings, as well as all new con- 
struction and remodeling. Approximate- 
ly one hundred of the staff personnel 
report to Mr. Otto. The preparation and 
administration of all projects pertaining 
to the Physical Plant, except security, are 
in his charge. 

Mr. Otto is a family man, married to 
Paula in 1942. He has two married 
daughters who live in Glenview, Illinois 
and Southport, North Carolina. 

He brings broad experience to his work 
at Loyola which began in June of 1970. 
After five years of service In the U.S. 
Army Engineers Corps, terminated In 
1946, he went to Northwestern Universi- 
ty, Chicago Campus, Building and 
Grounds Department. He stayed there 
until 1952 when he joined the staff of NT. 



As for his contacts with Loyola faculty 
and students, he feels that they have 
been on a high and human level. He has 
tried to be available to expressions of 
needs and service, although his 
resources are not unlimited and so has 
occasionally had to work out some kind 
of compromise between the desires of 
faculty and students and the realities. He 
finds the Loyola students and faculty 
hard-working and dedicated to im- 
proving the school, with his cooperation, 
by all the means at their disposal. He 
takes great satisfaction in his contribu- 
tion to the efforts that build up the 
Loyola University community and lead 
to the goals that the community is work- 
ing for. 

In 1972, he and Mr. James Lanahan were 
the recipients of service awards from 
SAB. He was both surprised and 
delighted, as was his wife. 





28 



Terry Sullivan 



Leon L Saladino 



Sometime ago I was told that the 
problem with Lewis Towers is that it is 
composed of so many people with 
altogether different Interests. It occurred 
to me then, and still occurs to me upon 
occasion (like now) that if that were not 
the case we wouldn't need to be here 
together. Several thousand similar peo- 
ple with similar interests can have a 
great time together, but it's unlikely that 
they'll teach each other much of 
anything. Large groups of people with 
divergent interests make assumptions 
difficult — which seems to mean that 
you have to learn to measure individuals, 
and that, I suppose, is what student ac- 
tivities are about. 



Working for Loyola University has been 
both a privilege and an opportunity for 
growth and joy. Growth in sharing the 
wide spectrum of views and insights 
from staff, faculty, and students. The joy 
in becoming involved in the lives of the 
community of students working for and 
sharing in their growth. To all who have 
been a part of this, I extend my gratitude. 




29 



Syivia V. Zastrow 



When I recall my six years at Loyola, I 
have persistent memory of the way some 
students sought to find purpose and zeal 
in their undergraduate years, and the 
way the faculty and administration tried 
to find the clues to harmony with no 
stars to steer by and no easy resolution 
in sight. The seeking reached a peak 
around the time of the Kent/Jackson 
State-Cambodia incidents. There was 
much violence elsewhere in the country, 
some pure exhibitionism and tantrums 
unfortunately encouraged by a few 
faculty mentors, with a consequent 
backlash of resentment. After a while 
came the awareness that many were 
playing into the hands of those who 
would foster stubborn, repressive action, 
and the year that followed brought dis- 



illusionment and apathy. However, the 
enthusiasm and sympathy that were 
profoundly at the core of much of the 
activism on our own campus had an 
effect. With selflessness and sacrifice, 
rather than egotism and self-indulgence, 
with political action through established 
channels, rather than methods that 
brought out the worst of those involved, 
and with understanding on the part of 
faculty and administrators, there have 
been important changes, even if no ul- 
timate goal has been reached. 

There were some surprisingly stimulating 
results effected by the relevantists and 
the Do-your-own-thing cult. Sensitive 
educators began to examine the 



significance of what they were teaching 
as the students searched for more en- 
during satisfaction in everything they 
did. We all began to reap the benefits of 
a closer relationship with our students. 
This was the "Spirit of Loyola" at its very 
best, a spirit of dedication to the student 
and his needs a spirit of cooperation 
among all. Relevantism and in- 
dividualism strengthened, and became a 
part of the cultural tradition. 

These have been six provoking, exciting, 
and challenging years. I am grateful to 
have been here at a time when there has 
been so much constructive change and 
to have seen the beginning of something 
that is potentially superb. 




Juanita Grozdiak 



30 



It isn't easy to sum up in a few words a 
lifetime of four years at Loyola. So very 
much happens to a person in that short 
and full span of time, and so very much 
can be lost or won. 
Yet you can only profit, for you have a 



chance to work with people both alike 
and different from yourself. Some may 
remain friends for life: some may forget 
you as quickly as you forget them; but 
neither you nor they leave empty- 
handed. 



I guess I'm lucky. I appreciate every 
aggravation, insight, enjoyment, and 
association I have experienced here. It's 
been long. It's been hard. It's been fast. 
It's been fun. It's been HAPPY. 



Luann Zanzola 



Dear Marlene, 



I tried to write something humorous 
about Loyola for your book, except I 
can't really recall anything too funny 
about the place. I kept remembering all 
I'd hoped to learn at Loyola after 
transferring here for my sophomore year. 
First, my "crisis of faith" must be resolv- 
ed; then, the business of learning must 
be begun. I felt certain that I'd benefit 
from the "personlized" approach to 
education which Loyola promised. 

These expectations were fulfilled In a 
rather perverse way. Convenience seems 
to be the solution to the spiritual crisis 
of most students I know; perhaps I'll 




solve my dilemma after I graduate when 
there's time to think. My dreams of lear- 
ning have turned into nightmares of 
"mechanized " education: the bulk of my 
study time has been spent in cramming 
my head full of facts to help me pass 
tests and move on to another semester. 

At last, there's only one semester left. 
Though my "faith" hasn't exactly been 
fulfilling. I have learned to respect those 
who do feel religious commitments. 
Though much of the course material I've 
covered hasn't stuck in my mind, at least 
I've been exposed to some thought- 
provoking Ideas. Its very hard to learn 
and go to school at the same time. I think 
I'll learn more about academic subjects 
after I graduate. 

What made Loyola worthwhile for me 
were the people I met here. My friends, 
fellow-students, instructors, and the ad- 
ministrators I've met have all been con- 
cerned and understanding, and as 
aggravated with the learning situation as 
I've been. Of course, there are some 
weirds around (I'm sure you've met them 
too.), but then there are weirds 
everywhere. 

Ten years from now (or maybe twenty), I 
may be proud to say that I was educated 
at Loyola University of Chicago. In June, 
however, when the graduation festivities 
are finished. III think, "Thank goodness 
it's over." And III remember the people 
at Loyola who have taught me what I 
must know in order to begin learning. 

Good luck on your book. Im looking 
forward to the next volume. 

Luann. 



31 




Dale A- Bespalec 



I believe that Loyola University is not the 
chamber of horrors that so many 
students make it out to be. Within the 
structure of this university is great op- 
portunity for all students to achieve a 
multitude of goals, and learn a wide 
assortment of talents and skills. The 
question I pose to the school at large, is 
whether we are fostering a facilitating 
atmosphere for these goals to be 
achieved? I ask of the administrators, do 
you honestly feel that at all times you 
have your product, the successful 
student, in mind? I believe that the com- 



plex system of committees and 
bureaucratic procedures hinder involve- 
ment, or at best frustrate it. To the 
students I pose the question, do you 
really believe that the administrators are 
so naive? If so, I believe that you un- 
derestimate their intentions, as well as 
their intelligence. If not, I think that 
sound and responsible channels are 
open. To the faculty, I bid the query. 
Have you forgotten that you are the base 
of the university, and that the ad- 
ministration exists only to help to 
organize the workings, and the students 



to come and pursue knowledge through 
you? Yours is one of the greatest respon- 
sibilities. Finally I ask everyone in this 
university, is Loyola an ideal school? I 
think it is an obviously correct response 
to return a negative answer. In that case, 
I think it is time to stop fighting each 
other in power struggles, and learn to 
fonder an atmosphere of growth and un- 
derstanding oriented toward greater 
education. 




---C-'^'-^^ 
**1**-1**<^' 




Marlene Pappas 



I don't want to sound trite and I don't 
want to sound sarcastic, but Loyola has 
given me many pleasures and many 
sorrows over the past four years. 

I suppose when I look through my past 
experiences, I realize that they were all 
part of a learning experience called 
growing up. 

Other students and faculty were sincere 
and helpful, even at times when they told 
me things that I didn't really want to 
hear. But most of all. Loyola was a 



challenge to me. I became involved in an 
organization, the Loijolan, for which I 
felt personally responsible. To me the 
successes or failure of this publication 
meant my own success or failure. 

Fortunately for me. I was not alone in the 
struggle. Faculty, the staff, and other 
students as well as friends, fought to 
make this year a success. To them. I say 
thank you for enabling me to graduate 
from Loyola somewhat more mature than 
when I came here, and having succeeded 
in my most critical goal in college. 




J- E* Festle, SJ- 



Bill Savier 



Personal reflections under the rubric of 
"spirit" should hardly sound dispirited. If 
they do so, let it be a measure of my faith 
in the seriousness of the academic com- 
munity in which I claim membership. 

"Knowledge in the Service of Man" was 
the University's 1970 centennial motto — 
and postmark. Voices galore inside and 
outside Loyola are heard proposing, 
sometimes (where funding is involved) 
dictating, the nature of that service or 
more often, those services. At least one 
faculty member awaits the voice that will 
proclaim to us corporately the vital com- 
ponents of the fcnoiuledijc best calculated 
to generate true, lasting service, not 
merely sops or stopgaps. 

Failing that voice, the centennial post- 
mark will perhaps have fittingly been 
superseded by the one reading "Illinois' 
Largest Private University." 



In my four years at Loyola I always felt I 
was but a small part of a large communi- 
ty. I guess I can't feel any different now. 
A special thanks should be given to the 
entire LSGA staff who have made great 
sacrifices in time and effort in making 
Loyola a better place for growth as a true 
person. 



34 




Francis X. Grollig, 
SJ.. Ph.D. 



Loyola University has been good to me. 
In thirteen years I have received en- 
couragement with academic and finan- 
cial help to do my work; to "create" and 
to establish the Department of 
Anthropology and to add a "third world" 
(long before that term became so pop- 
ular) dimension to our University with 
the annual Peru Program. This program, 
in turn, has provided me with some 
materials (in archeology and ethnology) 
for the papers I presented at the sessions 
of the International Congress of 
Americanists in Vienna. Mexico, Madrid, 
Buenos Aires. Lima, and Rome (and in 
my anthropology classes, too!). 

As a result of associating with 
colleagues and students as a teacher at 
L. T. and L. S. C. (going back to the days 
when there were 115 students in ANTH- 
101 sections on each campus): as 
moderator of the T K E Fraternity (when 
collecting trophies was as easy for us as 
going on "Pro"!) and the Chardin 



Anthropological Society (which is also 
numbered among the Blue Key 
Organization-of-the-Year plaque 
holders); as advisor to undergraduate 
and graduate Anthropology majors; as a 
member of the Academic Council of the 
College of Arts and Sciences (and by no 
means always on the winning side!) and 
the Board of Graduate Studies — as a 
result of these contacts I have many 
friends here and around the world. For 
all of whom I am most grateful, and for 
this honor I am deeply appreciative. 

Dr. Rosemary 
Hartnett 

As I review the nine years that I have 
been associated with the University, it is 
the idea of continual growth which com- 
es most readily to mind. As does every 
teacher, I have learned a good deal from 
my students and often in the most un- 



likely classrooms in the gym, in the dor- 
mitories, and even in the CINEMA 
MOVIE THEATRE where in the frosty fall 
of 1965, one hundred and fifty sleepy- 
eyed freshman English students would 
sink down into the comfort of the 
theatre seats and gallantly struggle to 
stay awake for this 8:30 class. 

Much more dramatic than the physical 
growth of the university have been the 
expansion of the academic curriculum 
and the increasing involvement of 
students in department and university 
planning. In working with several stu- 
dent groups over the years I have been 
deeply impressed by the generosity of 
our students who are so willing to give of 
their time and talents for the betterment 
of their fellow students and of the 
university as a whole. To me, these 
students represent the spirit of Loyola: 
the willingness to work together because 
they care about education and about 
each other. 



35 



Ian Gray 



One of the sillier questions in the English 
language is that two-word expression of 
cynicism phrased, "Why bother." The 
natural response, of course, is "Why not 
bother?" This comes to mind because 
many of my colleagues in professional 
journalism remain sorely perplexed over 
my motives for remaining at Loyola as a 
part-time faculty member. Why take the 
time, the trouble, and the effort, they 
ask? Their very question makes it im- 
possible to give them an answer they 
would accept. 

For one finds in the so-called 
professional world that it is far too easy 
to fall prey to parochialism, to focus 
one"s entire attention on what one does 
for a living. The job becomes omnipre- 
sent, economically, socially, and intellec- 
tually. And as a past member of just that 
sort of parochialism, I know whereof I 
speak. So if I contribute anything to 
Loyola as an instructor, as chairman of 
the Student Publications Board, or as 
consultant to the Phoenix, I gain 
something far more important: access to 
a world of diverse, interesting, and I 
think exciting people who teach me far 
more than I could hope to teach them. 



Edward A. Maziarz 



During the last seven years, the Loyola 
community has stirred in its sleep and 
has beggn to have a new awakening and 
a critical self-consciousness. It is true 
that the lures of power, prestige, money 
and of ecclesiastical and national securi- 
ty still lurk strongly in its phantasies of 
what makes for a good university. Also, 
the dangers of concentrating all its ef- 
forts on means and immediacy that bear 
little relevance to the goals of a universi- 
ty still prevail in many of Its major 
decisions and procedures. But there are 
many signs that the Loyola citizenry has 
begun to move towards some new goals: 
an incipient espousal of intellect, a 
broader sharing of power and decision- 
making and open confrontations among 
its membership that may well be the 
signs of a new vision and a deeper faith. 
Loyola's new motto may well turn out to 
be: Knowledge AND Kit' Service of Man. 




36 




Dr Nicholas A- Patricca 




M 




■t-',t»^ ,' 







A teacher is only as good as his 
students and colleagues allow him to be. 
I wish to publicly thank you my students 
and friends who have made possible 
whatever good there has been in my 
work here at Loyola. From my first day at 
Loyola, my constant concern has been to 
contribute to the teaching effectiveness 
of the theology program, in that concern 
I have fought hard for a program of 
studies and methods of education that 
relate to the needs and interests of the 
students. My single educational objec- 
tive has been to allow the individual stu- 
dent to think for himself the great issues 
of our religious tradition and the ques- 
tion of religion as such. In my opinion, 
the theology program faces a very uncer- 
tain future because of the inability of the 
students and the members of the 
theology faculty to exercise their proper 
role in the determination of its character 
and purpose. Your own education 
depends upon your own interest and 
your own will to make Loyola responsive 
to its educational duties; it is this Spirit 
which makes education possible for you 
and for those who come after you. 



37 




f 



38 




Departments 



Accounting 40 

Anthropology 41 

Athletics 42 

Biology 43 

Business Law 44 

Chemistry 45 

Classics 46 

Communication Arts 47 

Economics 48 

Education 49 

English 50 

Finance 51 

Fine Arts 52 

History 53 

Honors Program 54 

Marketing 55 

Mathematics 56 

Military Science 57 

Modern Language 58 

Natural Science 59 

Philosophy 60 

Physics 61 

Political Science 62 

Psychology 63 

Sociology 64 

Theatre 65 

Theology 66 

Nursing 67-69 

Niles College 70-71 

Rome Center 72-73 

Dental School 74-77 

Medical School 78-8! 

Law School 82-83 



39 




Accounting 

The objectives of the Accounting 
Department are two-fold: (I) to provide 
a general understanding of the nature 
and scope of accounting principles for 
all students, (2) to teach the generally 
accepted principles of accounting and 
auditing to the students who choose to 
prepare themselves for a career as an ac- 
counting executive or a professional 
public accountant. Students who are 
primarily interested in executive accoun- 
ting positions in industrial, service, or 
commerical enterprises should take the 
core concentration of accounting 
courses, and omit the additional courses 
required for the CPA exam. Courses in 
accounting cover the fields of theory, 
practice, managerial techniques, cost, 
auditing, and taxation. 



40 






Anthropology 



The Science of Man in the Arts and 
Sciences curricula is an integrating fac- 
tor. Anthropology borrows from and 
contributes uniquely to most of the other 
arts and sciences. The two introductory 
survey courses. Anthropology 101-102. 
are designed to introduce non-science 
majors to anthropology and the scien- 
tific method. The curriculum for 
anthropology majors aims to build a 
solid foundation is the fields of physical 
anthropology, archeology, ethnology, 
and linguistics as a preparation for 
graduate studies, teaching, entrance into 
professional schools, or work in fields of 
applied anthropology. 

The chairman of the Department of 
Anthropology is Rev. Francis X. Grollig. 
S.J. 



41 



Athletics 



Loyola's Physical Ed. Department has 
been said to be very poor, due to its lack 
of facilities, limited variety of courses 
and primarily team oriented sports. Upon 
hearing this Mrs. Monforti, Director of 
Women's Phy. Ed., commented that, 
'Most people tend to forget that six 
years ago when I came here, there was no 
program at all. The woman's program is 
now six years old while the male courses 
were only in existence for two years. We 
are still in a developing stage in com- 
parison to schools like Illinois and other 
institutions of Loyola's size or larger. " 



Since the time that the Phy. Ed. program 
was added to the L. U. curriculum great 
advancements have been made, yet there 
is still a pressing need for further expan- 
sion. This change which consists of a 
greater amount and variety of COED and 
life sports offered is very near at hand. 
Life sports being described by Mr. Pat 
Hanley, director of intramurals and P.E. 
instructor here at Loyola, as those sports 
geared more toward individual rather 
than team participation. In fact, hopeful- 
ly by Fall 1973 several new courses in- 
cluding; coed fencing, tennis, bowling. 



gymnastics and wrestling for men and 
also more swimming classes, will be 
offered. Presently such courses as bad- 
minton, modern jass dance, basketball, 
Softball, to name a few, are offered at 
LU. 

Hopefully though we will soon have 
many more. This however lies heavily on 
the continuation of student interest and 
active support for Phy. Ed. is not re- 
quired for any major at L. U. 




Biology 



The Biology Department has been 
affected greatly by an explosive student 
population growth. This is due, in large 
measure, to an increased number of 
transfer students from both four-year in- 
stitutions and local two-year junior 
colleges. The total number of Biology 
majors in 1970 was 488. in 1971 it rose to 
765. and in the current academic year it 
is 971. The increase in staff has not kept 
pace with this increased enrollment. Dr. 
Cardona was replaced by Mr. Vener and 
a new Chairman was added to the 
department. The size of the lecture sec- 
tions of necessity has increased and can 



no longer be considered intimate. The 
current professor to student ratio is 130- 
I. Although this would indicate to many 
people a completely formalized type of 
education, such is not the case. The large 
lecture sections are offset by more in- 
dividual instruction in such courses as 
research methods. In addition, each stu- 
dent is currently assigned a faculty ad- 
visor who counsels with him throughout 
the four years of his training. 

The character of the Biology Department 
has also changed. Although most 
students are still training for medical 



and dental careers, there are a growing 
number of students who are training for 
professional careers in Biology. This is 
undoubtedly related to the increased 
awareness of environmental problems. 
Research has also been on the upswing 
with most of the faculty now publishing 
on a regular basis. The faculty research 
labs are not closed but open for instruc- 
tional purposes and form the core of the 
undergraduate and graduate research 
problems. 

The Chairman of the Department of 
Biology is Dr. Harold Manner. 




43 



isiness Law 



While the Department of Business Law is 
one of the oldest departments in the 
School of Business, there is nothing 
static about it. With a dynamic faculty, 
the course offerings have undergone a 
shift in orientation from the traditional 
"rule of law" presentation to one which 
emphasizes the interplay of social as well 
as economic and political forces in the 
structuring of complex legal system. The 
courses offered both in undergraduate 
and graduate divisions are designed to 
reveal the individuals role in varied 
relationships with other persons, 
material things and authority. Specializ- 
ed courses investigate the American 
legal system, social responsibilities of 
business, officers' and directors' per- 
sonal liability, and government regula- 
tion of business. 

Students who take undergraduate law do 
so, according to Professor John 
O'Malley, chairman of the department, 
because the course is required or 
because they are either trying to uncover 
a latent interest in the legal field as a 
profession or else they are experiencing 
difficulty in recognizing their obligations 
in society as in distinguishing between 
the screw-or and the screw-ee in the 
legal context. According to recent 
remarks of Father Baumhart, Mr. 
O'Malley led the first non-violent protest 
march of Loyola University students — 
way back in 1961 before organized 
protests were popular! 




mamm 








Chemistry 



The Department of Chemistry has twelve 
full-time faculty, all with Ph.D's. Over 
one hundred chemistry majors take 
courses in either the B.S. or A.B. 
programs. The Department also offers 
course Instruction to over seven hundred 
non-majors. Graduate Instruction 
leading to the M.S. or Ph.D. degree is 
also offered. 

There are three items of "News" this year 
in the Department of Chemistry: new 
faculty, new courses and new facilities. 

New Faculty. Professor F. P. Cassoretto 
retired in July. 1972. after forty years of 
service to the University. He is now 
professor emeritus. Beginning their ser- 
vice to the University are Dr. Dauid 
Crumrine and Dr. Albert Herlinger, both 
assistant professors. Dr. Crumrine is an 
organic chemist with additional com- 
petence in physical chemistry. He receiv- 
ed his doctorate from the University of 
Wisconsin. Dr. Herlinger is an inorganic 
chemist with additional competence in 
analytical chemistry. He received his 
doctorate from the Pennsylvania State 
University. 

New courses. In the second semester 1972- 
73. Chemistry 100. Liberal Arts Chemistry 
will be inaugurated. The course is a 
general education course with no 
prerequisits. It is intended to satisfy the 
core science requirement for students in 
the College. On the graduate level, new 
courses in organic synthesis on car- 
bocycles and inorganic synthesis have 
developed. These will also be In- 
augurated in the second semester 1972- 
73. 

Nt-ui facilities. The Cudahy Science Hall 
plumbing has been totally replaced this 
year. New laboratories for research are 
being completed in rooms 12 and 215. In 
Dumbach Hall, room 13 has been 
remodeled into a graduate research 
laboratory. New equipment soon to be 
ready include an EM-360 NMR Spec- 
trometer and an EM-600 Mass Spec- 
trometer. There new Instruments will 
enable both undergraduate and 
graduated students to develop their in- 
strumental skills. 



The Department of Classical Studies 
offers courses that illustrate the "glory 
that was Greece and the grandeur that 
was Rome" with the latest technological 
methods. 

The programs of the Department are 
primarily intended to bring the student 
into contact with the sources of our 
Western civilization and culture, both 
pagan and Christian. Consequently, in 
addition to the traditional majors in 
Greek and Latin, a new major in Classical 
Cultures in English has been developed 
and is finding itself a popular program 




Classical Studies 



with the undergraduate liberal arts stu- 
dent. 

The Department offers one of the most 
widely diversified programs in ancient 
civilization that can be found anywhere 
in the United States. Courses in classical 
art and archaeology, classical mythology 
and philosophy, classical political theory 
and patristic thought, classical epic and 
theatre, and classical linguistic influence 
are part of the departmental offerings. 
The Department's large collection of 
slides, films, and dual-track language 
tapes reinforce conventional teaching 



methods. 

Two faculty members of the Department 
teach in Rome itself each year. During 
the past year some 40,000 volumes, 
most of them in classical studies, have 
been added to the library of the Rome 
Center. These English books facilitate the 
study of ancient culture for the English 
speaking student in the capital of the an- 
cient world. 

Father Joseph S. Pendergast, S.J. has 
been Chairman of the Department of 
Classical Studies since September, 1972. 



46 




Communication Arts 



Communication Arts at Loyola has not 
progressed to such areas as the opera- 
tion of the Semaphore, interpretation of 
smoke signals or translation of dolphin 
drivel, but we are enthusiastically in- 
volved with the fascinating function of 
face-to-face communication as well as 
those processes that create effective 
communication through the mass media. 
Whether the student is sulking from peer 
criticism in Interpersonal Communica- 
tion or sneaking a handful of popcorn in 



film class (cinema study, if you insist), 
whether he is nervously laughing at his 
upside-down title card in TV Production 
or recovering from his latest blooper on 
WLUC: whether he just been reprimand- 
ed for an inadequate analysis in Oral 
Interpretation or is horrified at discover- 
ing that he prepared the wrong side in 
Debate, he is still learning about the 
development and interrelationships of 
the media and their vital importance in a 
modern society. 



Fortified with this great knowledge, the 
major in Communication Arts is ex- 
pected to go forth and solve (with 
humility, of course) the pressing 
problems of a complicated and confused 
world. In time, with the background of a 
proposed course. "Interplanetary Com- 
munication", the alumnus will extend his 
problem-solving prowess to the 
Universe. 

The Chairman of Communication Arts is 
Dr. Donald Stinson. 



47 



Economics 



The twelve Economics department facul- 
ty members teach in five programs: the 
School of Business Administration, the 
College of Arts and Sciences, University 
College, the Graduate School of 
Business, and the Institute of Industrial 
Relations. Their interests reflect the wide 
range of topics encompassed by modern 
economics. All twelve are engaged in 
some form of scholarly research, and this 
research is consistent with their multi- 
faceted interests. One faculty member is 
studying the work of an important six- 
teenth century Italian economist; 
another is studying the nineteenth cen- 
tury Chicago economy. One is interested 
in the monetary arrangements of Soviet- 
type economies; another is interested in 
the use of the dollar as the international 
reserve currency. Several are experimen- 
ting with quantitative, theoretical 
techniques to explain contemporary 
economic problems; others are concern- 
ed with theoretical approaches to the 
various institutional arrangements 
which permeate the economy. 

Many faculty members involve 
themselves with Chicago's complex 
economic problems. Some courses are 
offered through University College in 
conjunction with the Chicago Mercantile 
Exchange. Another faculty member 
works in close association with the 
Chicago Association of Commerce and 
Industry: another is one of the city's 
leading arbitrators: and yet another is in- 
volved with a consumer education pro- 
ject for secondary schools. 

Students majoring in economics study 
basic theoretical and quantitative 
techniques and then apply these in 
several elective areas. The elective 
courses are typically small enough to be 
conducted on a seminar basis. Generally 
speaking, there is good rapport between 
economics majors and faculty; student 
opinion is solicited on such matters of 
student concern as which elective 
courses they would prefer. Loyola has a 
chapter of Omicron Delta Epsilon, inter- 
national honor society in economics, 
which sponsors a faculty-student "get 
together" each semester. The interest 
manifested by faculty and students has 
made the Economics department a lively 
place to teach and to learn. 

The Chairman of the Department of 
Economics is Robert Aduddell. 



48 




Education 




The School of Education offers programs 
which quahfy participants for careers as 
professional educators. Majors in educa- 
tion follow curricula leading to a degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Education with 
specialization at the Kindergarten- 
Primary level and at the Intermediate- 
Upper level. 

Students preparing to teach in high 
schools must complete eighteen 
semester hours of professional educa- 
tion. Since secondary students must be 
prepared to teach a specific subject. 

Student teaching is the culminating ex- 
perience in a program of teacher educa- 
tion, interrelating the theoretical 
knowledge of the college classroom with 
the practical aspects of the school situa- 
tion. Student teaching is offered in the 
following subjects: history. English, 
mathematics, modern language, and 
science. Under certain circumstances, it 
may be possible to provide student 
teaching in political science, classical 
languages, speech, drama, or art. 

The Dean of the School of Education is 
Dr. John M. Wozniak. 




49 



fc— I K^ 







English 



The Department of English has been con- 
stituted in 1972-73 of thirty-nine full- 
time faculty, as well as thirty-three part- 
time. Of the full-time members, thirty- 
four held doctorates from twenty 
different universities, including the most 
prestigious in the country. Furthermore, 
the full-time members included in- 
dividuals who have had full-time ap- 
pointments at over thirty other colleges 
before coming to Loyola. Thus, in 
educational background and in prior ex- 
perience there has been a basis for great 
cross-pollination. 

The Department works on three distinct 
levels. It offers courses in writing and in 
literature to students in all of the un- 
dergraduate colleges. It offers the major 
in English in both the Lake Shore and 
Lewis Towers divisions of the College of 
Arts and Sciences as well as in University 



College. Thirdly, the Department has a 
substantial number of students working 
for the M.A. and Ph.D degrees. 
The most striking new development of 
1972-1973 has been the introduction of a 
substantial number of new courses in the 
core curriculum of the un- 
dergraduates — topics as diversified as 
"Belief and Disbelief in Literature" and 
"Modern Science Fiction." With the in- 
creased flexibility in the A.B. curriculum 
there has been increased opportunity to 
offer a greater variety of courses, as well 
as greater opportunity for majors to pur- 
sue stronger programs. Further, student 
representation in Department 
deliberations has been growing in effec- 
tiveness on both the graduate and un- 
dergraduate levels. 

The Chairman of the Department of 
English is Dr. John Gerrietts. 



50 



finJ 




Finance 



The program in finance is designed for 
those who realize that success in 
business is greatly facilitated by an ade- 
quate knowledge of finance and for 
those who wish to specialize In finance 
as a vocation. The objectives of finance 
are to: 

1. Develop the power of analytical 
reasoning. 

2. Prepare students to become respon- 
sible citizens. 

3. Teach students how to manage per- 
sonal and family finances. 

4. Prepare students to become in- 
telligent and moral leaders in their 
profession. 



5. Develop the ability of students to 
administer the financing of 
business organizations — financial 
planning, methods of financing and 
financial control. 

6. Teach students to understand in- 
vestment principles, policies and 
procedures. 

7. Lay the foundation for those 
students who wish to pursue ad- 
vanced studies. 

The Chairman of the Department of 
Finance is Dr. Mary Hamilton. 



51 



Fine Arts 



A persistent stream has become a 
torrent. For years, Loyola's Fine Arts 
offerings were limited to quietly list of 
electives. But two forces linked - the 
enthusiasm of Professor Margaret 
Dagenais and her Fine Arts staff and the 
growing interest of Loyola students. 

In 1970. Fine Arts became a "program" 
offering a major concentration. This year 
the Trustees confirmed the Academic 
Council's unanimous recommendation 
and the Fine Arts Department Of Loyola 
University is a lively reality. With the ex- 
panding course offerings, the faculty too 
has been enlarged to five full time and 
seventeen part time members. Their 
qualifications cover an impressive range 
of specializations and recognized 
productiveness. With Professor Dagnais 
are Jean Morman Unsworth, author of 
two art education textbooks, Juliet Rago. 
painter: Ralph Arnold, graphics artist, 
and Dr. Barbara Stafford, art historian. 
Most of the part time faculty are produc- 
ing artists in their individual specialties. 

With the financial assistance of a 
Graham Foundation grant of $90,000, 
Fine Arts is attaining a visual identity. 
Housed at the Lake Shore campus, in the 
lower level of the ROTC building, it will 
have that area transformed into a gallery 
(the entire hallway) and studios for 
Ceramics. Painting and Drawing, Metal 
Sculpture and Photography. 

On the Lewis Towers campus, its 
facilities will be moved to a newly ac- 
quired building at 836 North Wabash. 
Here two floors will become Graphics 
studio. Drawing and Painting studio. 
Design and Seminar room. Sculpture 
Studio and offices. Room 1700 will be 
retained for the Departmental office and 
Art Education classes. The re-floored 
running track of the gymnasium is now a 
ceramics work area, library and storage 
space. Room 1600 will function as lec- 
ture hall for music and art history 
classes. 

Finally, the most evident expansion is in 
the exhibit space. The Santa Clara 
Lounge of Marquette Center is now add- 
ed to the Cudahy and Lewis Towers 
library displays. 



52 







History 




Thirty one history department faculty 
memhers offer courses to Loyola 
students on the B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. 
levels. Most of the department's efforts 
are directed toward undergraduate 
education. Every year over four thousand 
students are enrolled in history courses. 
There are close to five hundred history 
majors in the University, and many other 
students take history courses to satisfy 
intellectual interests and to support their 
work in related disciplines. Over the 
years, the Loyola history department has 
offered a comprehensive coverage of 
areas and periods in the history of 
Western Civilization. Recently, however, 
the department has added a new dimen- 
sion to its program. Consistent with 
Loyola's role in the urban environment, 
the history department emphasizes the 
culture of the Catholic ethnic minorities 
who live in urban America. A number of 
talented scholars with expertise in ethnic 
studies have been added to the history 
faculty. And in developing and 
strengthening the ethnic studies feature 
of its program, the Loyola history depart- 
ment had entered a consortium with the 
history faculty at Northeastern Illinois 
University. This alliance involves faculty 
and student exchange. The ethnic 
studies emphasis in the history depart- 
ment has increased intellectual oppor- 
tunities for its own majors and advanced 
the progress of the interdisciplinary 
urban-ethnic degree program in the 
Liberal Arts College. 

The chairman of the Department of 
History is Dr. Lawrence J. Mc Caffrey. 



53 



Honors 




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The Loyola University Honors Program 
dates back to 1936. and represents one 
of the oldest programs in the state of 
Illinois. The Reverend W.A. Finnegan, 
S.J.. Dean of the College at that time, and 
the Reverend Allen Farrell, S.J.. are two 
names responsible for inaugurating and 
developing Loyola's first honors 
program. (1936-1949). Professor John S. 
Gerrietts. currently Chairman of the 
English Department, served as Director 
of the program from 1949-58. and was 
succeeded by the Reverend Carl J. 
Burlage. S.J.. who held the post from 
1958 72. The new Director of the 



program is Edward A. Maziarz, C.PP.S.. 
Professor of philosophy. 

In the spring semester of the 1971-72 
school year, the Academic Council of the 
College of Arts and Sciences adopted a 
new Honors Program. The aim of the new 
program is to give the student as wide a 
selection of courses as possible within 
the framework of his own interests and 
goals. Before entering his sophomore 
year, the honors program student is ask- 
ed to write up the courses that he wants 
to take for his degree, along with the 
reasons for taking these courses. Except 



for fulfilling the 128 hour minimum, com- 
pleting the requirements for an academic 
major, and showing credit for three 
theology courses or their equivalent, the 
Honors Program Students makes up his 
own program within the framework of a 
liberal arts degree. Also new in the 1973 
Honors Program is an Honors Program 
Council of seven students and seven 
faculty members as consultive to the 
program. In the thirty-six years of its ex- 
istence, the Honors Program has 
graduated 459 students. 



54 



Marketing 

■ill "i^H 




The general objectives of the Department 
of Marketing are tO: (I) provide a basis 
for understanding and utilizing the 
American system of distribution in 
relationship to our productive 
mechanism: (2) provide an understan- 
ding of and the skills needed for. market 
research and analysis; (3) offer un- 
derstanding, knowledge, and skills in the 
training and management of marketing 
personnel: (4) train in the identification, 
evaluation, and solution of marketing 
problems. 



Mathematics 



Ode to Epsilon and Delta 

There was a young fellow named Ken 

Who could count only modulo ten 

He said when I go 

Past my last little toe 

I shall have to start over again. 

The binary system is fun 

For with it strange things can be done 

Since a two as you know 

Is a one and an oh 

And a five is one hundred and one. 



A freshman was striving to see 

where the critical values should be 

After logic and rigor 

He said with all vigor: 

"At the zeros of f prime of t." 

Geometry's Genius, Descartes 

Found the means to make everyone smart 

For his simple equation 

Provides the persuasion 

That a cardioid look like a heart. 

A function from feeling inferior 



Felt life monotonically drearier 

With a hell of a yell 

That jumped into L 

It converged to the limit superior. 

The marvelous things a computer can do 

Makes an idiot out of the highest \Q 

But there's one consolation 

In this observation 

The C.P.U. can't even add up to two. 

Nicholas Bourbaki 




56 



Military Science 



The Military Science Department com 
bines academic instruction with prac- 
tical military training in a unique 
curriculum open to both men and 
women. Academic credit is extended for 
each military science course and all 
students are eligible to pursue the first 
two years of instruction which are con- 
cerned with World History and National 
Security Problems. 



Each course taught by the department 
must undergo the same scrutiny for 
academic excellence as any other 
academic department in the university. 
The courses of Instruction are taught by 
professional military officers that 
possess graduate degrees in the ap- 
propriate disciplines and are personally 
approved and accepted by the university. 



The chairman and professor of the 
military science department. Colonel 
Thomas B. Coughlin. feels that Loyola 
University's ROTC program is one of the 
finest In the country. 




57 



Modern Languages 



A liberal arts education is one dedicated 
to increasing the student's sensitivity to 
intellectual, aesthetic and ethical values. 

The Department of Modern Languages at 
Loyola University of Chicago offers to all 
students the opportunity both of 
strengthening the international dimen- 
sions of their general education, and of 
deepening their understanding of ethnic 
heritages through the study of languages 
and cultures. 

The student who majors in Modern 
Languages will find a core area through 
which his studies in the fields of art, 
history, philosophy, and the other 
human sciences can be correlated. To 
majors in other disciplines who are seek- 
ing to broaden their linguistic and 
cultural horizons, the department offers 



a wide variety of options. 

The following is a description of the 
various programs and courses offered by 
the Department of Modern Languages: 

1. Beginning and advanced language 
study. 

2. The major program. 

3. Elective courses in literature and 
culture given in the language and 
available to majors and non-majors. 
These may satisfy core requirements 
or serve as a second field of 
specialization for non-majors. 

4. Courses on Literature in Translation 
available to students with no reading 
knowledge of a foreign language. 
These courses satisfy core curriculum 
and provide a wide variety of elec- 
tives. 







58 



Natural Science 



The Department of Natural Science 
offers interdisciplinary science courses 
to non-science majors. The current trend 
in science education is to emphasize 
those aspects of science that are impor- 
tant for the educated citizen and the 
future of society. The needs of the non- 
scientist differ in several respects from 
those of the prospective science major, 
and the Department of Natural Science 
was established in the early 1950s in 
recognition of this distinction. The 
Department was initially located at the 
Lake Shore Campus, subsequently moved 
to Lewis Towers, and has offered classes 
on both campuses since 1968. 

At many universities, courses offered for 
the non-science major are simplified ver- 



sions of the courses offered for science 
majors. This is not the case at Loyola 
University. The Natural Science courses 
are quite distinct from those offered for 
majors in both content and emphasis, 
and it would be a mistake to expect them 
to be "easier" because they are different. 
Students are expected to ready challeng- 
ing essays, including the original obser- 
vations of scientists such as Darwin, 
Pasteur, Newton, Galileo, Watson, and 
Crick. Classes are small and discussion is 
welcome. The faculty are ready and will- 
ing to help individual students. 

The chairman of the Department of 
Natural Science is Dr. Alice Hayes. 




59 




Philosophy 



The department seeks to acquaint all 
students with the major problems of 
philosophy and a systematic approach 
toward their resolution: to stimulate 
their talents for speculative knowledge 
and constructive criticism on fundamen- 
tal issues; to offer them a rational foun- 
dation for the arts and sciences; to assist 



them through a reasoned appreciation of 
the dignity of human nature to formulate 
a philosophy of life mindful of the 
traditions of the Christian West. 

The chairman of the Department of 
Philosophy is Dr. Francis Catania. 



60 




Physics 



The Physics Department has recently in- 
augurated a new program for its ma- 
jors — one which is broader in scope than 
the previous one and which continues to 
give the student a rigorous exposure to 
theoretical and experimental physics. All 
majors will gain extensive laboratory ex- 
perience in the newly expanded elec- 
tronics, laser-optics, and nuclear physics 
laboratories. The new program has op- 
tions which, when executed, permit 
students to prepare for advanced studies 
In medicine, environmental engineering, 
computer science, oceanography, as well 
as the more traditional areas of physics. 



In addition to increasing the quality of 
its program for science majors, the 
department has also expanded its 
offerings to include two courses. 
Astronomy and Liberal Arts Physics, 
which have been designed for non- 
science majors. Such courses will permit 
the department to communicate both the 
"spirit of science" and the "necessity for 
science" to the non-science community. 
The student response has been excellent. 

The Chairman of the Department of 
Physics is Dr. Ronald Harris. 



61 



Political Science 



Political Science has grown remarkably 
in the past five years, and now has five 
hundred and fifty undergraduate majors 
and eighteen full-time faculty. Almost all 
geographical areas are included in the 
curriculum; Europe. Soviet Union. East 
Asia. South Asia. Africa, and Latin 
America. 

Approaches to the study of politics vary 
from empirical political sociology and 
psychology to normative political 
philosophy. More importantly, the big 
growth in faculty came at a time when it 
was possible to attract scholars from the 
country's best schools, Columbia, 



Cornell, Chicago, Northwestern. 
Syracuse and Illinois are represented 
along with the great Catholic schools: 
Fordham. Georgetown. Notre Dame, and 
Catholic University. 

The department has built concentration 
areas that give it a distinct character. 
There are ten professors in American 
politics and courses such as 
Constitutional Law, Civil Rights, Judicial 
Process, Legislatures, Presidency. 
American Parties and Electoral Behavior 
have been added. 

The Political Philosophy faculty numbers 
four — twice as many as in most big 



schools. That concentration, along with 
the emphasis on policy studies, is ap- 
propriate in a college that bills itself as 
"Christian." 

There is still a lot of development to 
come — not surprisingly, since more than 
half the faculty have been at Loyola 
three years or less. But in this most 
political of all times, Loyola has given 
the department the resources to do the 
job. The chairman of the Political 
Science Department is Dr. Thomas J. 
Bennett. 



4«WAW«wli««^>»h'C««M«»Mt»»M(««vk«»» 





Psychology 



The total staff of the Psychology Depart- 
ment consists of 31 full-time PhDs and a 
large supportive group of part-time 
faculty, secretaries, assistants and 
technicians. This composite group serves 
approximately 990 undergraduate ma- 
jors in psychology, a large number of 
nonmajors faking psychology courses as 
electives. 101 graduate students in three 
doctoral programs, and 49 graduate 
students in special counseling program. 

During the past decade there has been a 
steadily increasing number (and percen- 
tage) of Loyola undergraduates who 



major in psychology. This increase is 
reflected in the number of bachelor's 
degrees in psychology conferred for the 
years 1955 (19) to 1972 (235). While this 
increase may be attributed, in part, to a 
general increase in interest in psy- 
chology, we believe that the present high 
enrollment levels also reflect the quality 
of the course offering and the faculty's 
interest and dedication in teaching un- 
dergraduates. It may be noted that only 
two of the full-time faculty do not 
regularly teach undergraduate courses 
since their administrative duties and 
assigned involvement with the graduate 



programs preclude it. 

The undergraduate major is designed to 
assure that all students have preparation 
in research and basic courses requisite 
for a broad understanding of psychology 
and to the pursuit of graduate work. This 
approach seems appropriate since ap- 
proximately 40 percent of the bachelor's 
recipients in psychology continue their 
education on a full-time basis in 
graduate work in psychology or other 
professions. Another 30 per cent of 
those receiving their bachelor's degree 
continue their education on a part-time 
basis. 





t 



Sociology 



The Sociology Department is one of the 
larger departments of the College of Arts 
and Sciences. Under its chairman. Rev. 
Thomas M. Gannon. S.J., il has a full- 
time faculty of 16 members whose in- 
terests and competences span the field 
of sociology from mathematical models 
to research into the patterns of drug 



abuse. This year the Department 
numbered about 300 majors and offered 
degree programs on Lake Shore Campus. 
Lewis Towers, and University College, in 
addition to special courses provided for 
the School of Nursing, the Afro- 
American Studies Program, and the 
Program in Urban-Ethnic Studies. The 



year also saw the inauguration of the 
Sociology Club on the Lake Shore Cam- 
pus — a complement of the club for ma- 
jors at Lewis Towers. 



64 




Theatre 



The objectives of the department are (I) 
to combine the advantages of a liberal 
education with a thorough preparation 
in theatre. (3) to qualify the student for 
work or further training in professional, 
educational, community, or amateur 



theatre. (3) to provide a solidly adequate 
and at the same time flexible course 
structure so that, after the student has 
acquired a broad basic knowledge of 
theatre, he can pursue his interests in 
particular areas of the subject. 



65 




Theology 



The Department of Theology is one of 
the largest and most active departments 
of the college of Arts and Sciences. It 
also teaches those students attending 
other schools of the University when 
these schools participate in the Arts and 
Sciences program. The department is 
charged by the University with a very im- 
portant task, one closely allied to the 
specific character of Loyola University of 
Chicago, to supply the possibilities of 
theological development for Loyola 
students. 

The Department of Theology fulfills its 
function not only directly, by teaching 
its students in the classroom, but also in- 
directly by engaging in dialogue with the 
other departments, schools, and in- 
stitutes of the University. It feels that 
theology has something important to say 
to philosophy, law and medicine, for in- 
stance, that cannot be said by other 
departments. 



The undergraduate majors in the Depart- 
ment of Theology have been on the in- 
crease for a number of years. There are 
about 65 majors in the department, 
which has its own majors organization, 
informal meeting lounge, and newspaper 
- The Grapevine. The editor this year was 
Carlos M. Nieto. He was assisted by a 
staff consisting of Thomas Heywood, R. 
Mark Styczynski, and Sister M. Nadine 
Manchester, C.S.S.F. 

At the graduate level the number of 
students working for the M.A. in 
theology has undergone a remarkable in- 
crease. Some students from Loyola's 
famed Institute of Pastoral Studies also 
opt for courses in the graduate theology 
program. The Rev. Joseph T. Mangan, S,J. 
is the Director of the Graduate Program. 
The Rev. Earl A. Weis, S.J,, the Dogmatic 
Theology Editor of New Catholic En- 
cyclopedia, is the Chairman of the 
Department, 



66 




School of Nursing 



Since its inception in 1935. the School of 
Nursing has continued to provide out- 
standing leaders in nursing to com- 
munities throughout the Midwest area. 
The faculty continues to perceive its 
responsibilities to include not only 
teaching but service and research as 
well. 

The academic year 1972-1973 has been a 
full and rewarding one for both faculty 
and students. Progress toward achieving 
an upper division major in nursing for 
the fall of 1974 has been evidenced by 
the tremendous amount of work ac- 
complished by the Planning Committee 
for the revised undergraduate 
curriculum. 



within the class that has endeared them 
to administration and faculty for their 
splendid cooperation, interest and 
eagerness to assist faculty in curricular 
matters, particularly trends in nursing 
affecting the new curriculum. 

The School of Nursing is divided into 
three departments; Medical-Surgical 
Nursing. Mrs. Eriinda Simunek. chair- 
man; Maternal-Child Health Nursing. 
Mrs. Mary Ann Mc Dermott, chairman; 
and Psychiatric-Public Health Nursing. 
Dr. Mary Grace Connolly, chairman. 

The dean of the School of Nursing is 
Sister Margaret Mary Moloney, R.S.M.. 
Ph.D. 



The class of 1973 has been unusually 
cooperative and highly motivated to 
become skillful nurse practioners. Strong 
leadership on the part of their class of- 
ficers has resulted in an esprit de corps 



67 



Nursing 




68 



Niles College 










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70 




Niles College is an affiliate school of 
Loyola University of Chicago which 
prepares young men for the priesthood. 
Located at 7135 Harlem Avenue, it oc- 
cupies what was formerly St. Mary of the 
Lake Seminary. Niles students attend 
classes at both the Lake Shore and Lewis 
Towers Campuses. After completing their 
studies at Niles, the seminarians go on to 
St. Mary's in Mundelein and when they 
are ordained they assist in the parishes 
of the Chicago archdiocese. 



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71 



Rome Center 



Of old, when Rome reformed the world, 
she showed two suns to lighten the twin 
ways that went one with the other; 
world's road and God's road . . . 

DANTE 

The purpose of the Loyola University 
Rome Center is to provide an academic 
program in which the close integration 
of study and travel enables the student 
to achieve maximum growth - both 
academic and personal - during his year 
abroad. 

Founded in 1962, the Rome Center oc- 
cupies a wooded campus with a spacious 
building to provide classrooms, ad- 
ministrative facilities and student hous- 
ing. Both European and American faculty 
offer courses pertinent to the Italian and 
European setting. With a present enroll- 
ment of 300 the Rome Center is able to 
offer a variety of courses, yet the faculty- 
student ratio is low. Interaction between 
student and professor is not limited to 
the classroom, for frequent contact con- 
tinues - on campus, on day excursions 
and holiday travels. 

In addition, an English language program 
sponsored for Italians allows ample op- 
portunity for American students to meet 
with Iheir counterparts. 

As a branch campus of Loyola Universi- 
ty, Chicago, the Rome Center is a fully 
accredited program directed toward the 
junior. Students attending the Center 
truly do discover "the grandeur that was 
Rome. " 




72 




73 



School of Dentistry 



Loyola University School of Dentistry is 
very proud of its history as the oldest of 
the three existing dental schools in 
Illinois. The school has an outstanding 
record in academic growth, having 
graduated approximately 9.000 dentists, 
many of whom are in responsible 
positions throughout our nation and the 
world. Founded on February 20. 1883. as 
the Chicago Dental Infirmary, the 
school originally followed a policy of 
accepting only those individuals who 
already had an M.D. degree and wished 
to become dentists. However, a year later 
this policy was changed. Also, the school 
was renamed the Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery at this time. The first 
location was on Adams Street in what is 
now the Chicago "Loop." As the student 
body increased, the school was forced to 
move to larger rented quarters at various 
locations in the Loop. Finally, in the 
summer of 1893, the school was moved 
to its own building at Wood and 
Harrison Streets. 

In 1899 the Dental School became af- 
filiated with Lake Forest University as its 
dental department. This continued until 
1903, when a new affiliation was made 
with Valparaiso University. Indiana, 
which stayed in effect until 1920. The 
three greats of dental education. Dr. 
Truman W. Brophy, Dean Emeritus: Dr. 
William H. G. Logan. Dean of Students; 
and Dr. C. N. Johnson, Dean of the 
Faculty, of 1920. Late in 1923, the 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery was 
incorporated as a part of Loyola Univer- 
sity under the present name, and the 
school has since been a college of that 
growing University. 

The Dean of the School of Dentistry is 
William P. Schoen, Jr. 






75 




76 



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77 



Stritch School of Medicine 



The Autumn Quarter, 1972, at Loyola's 
Medical Center campus in Maywood 
opened with record enrollments — 130 
freshmen (29 were women) in the Stritch 
School of Medicine; and 137 freshmen in 
the Dental School (including 3 women) 
— and a new three year Medical School 
Program. 

The new curriculum requires students to 
take classes for 44 weeks each year 
(instead of the previous 36 weeks a year) 
and has reduced the basic science course 
load from 5 quarters to 4 quarters, with 
the clinical courses occupying primarily 
the last two years. This year's Stritch 
freshmen (chosen from more than 4,200 
applications) includes eleven Blacks, 
one American-Indian, and two Spanish- 
speaking students. 

The big news of the season was the open- 
ing of the Medical Center gymnasium 
made possible by an initiating grant of 
$10,000 from the Loyola Board of 
Trustees to begin repairs on the former 
Mines V.A. facility. 

The traditional St. Luke's day dinner was 
held on October 18, where more than 
400 witnessed the presentation of the 
Best Teacher awards to Gordon 
Plummer, Ph.D., professor Microbiology 
(Pre-clinical Teaching Award), and to 
Luis Yarzagaray, M.D., clinical assistant 
professor of Neurosurgery (Clinical 
Award). 

The Dean of The Stritch School Of 
Medicine is Dr. Joseph Wells. 





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81 




School of Law 



The School of Law was the first 
professional college estahlished by 
Loyola University, having admitted Its 
first class in 1908. The School now oc- 
cupies its own building on the Lewis 
Tc>wers Campus of the University, which 



is located approximately one mile north 
of the heart of Chicago's Loop on north 
Michigan Avenue. This location is con- 
venient to the courts and public offices 
of the city, and is ideally located to per- 
mit students to participate to the fullest 



82 




in the cultural, educational and 
recreational life of a great city. 

The School has always had as its central 
purpose the preparation of men and 
women for the practice of law in any 



jurisdiction where the common law 
prevails. The curriculum is designed to 
achieve that purpose, and faculty 
members have been selected on the basis 
of their competence to impart, not only 
academic knowledge of legal rules, but 



also deep and intimate understanding of 
the legal process by which the in- 
stitutions of government develop the 
rules and practices that collectively are 
referred to as the law. 



83 




84 






Organization 

Alpha Delta Gamma 86 

Alpha Kappa Lambda 87 

Alpha Phi Omega 88 

Alpha Sigma Alpha 89 

Alpha Sigma Phi 90 

Alpha Tau Delta 91 

Beta Alpha Psi 91 

American Comic Crusaders . .92-93 
American Chemical Society .... 94 

Beta Beta Beta 95 

Beta Gamma Sigma 96 

Blue Key Honor Society 96 

Circumference 96 

LT-SOB 97 

Cadence 98-99 

Debate Club 100 

Chardin 

Anthropological Society 101 

VIPs 102 

WLT Radio 103 

Delta Sigma Phi 104 

Delta Sigma Pi 105 

Pi Alpha Lambda 105 

Gamma Phi Delta 106 

Coed Club 106 

German Club 107 

Delta Omega Gamma 108 

Panhellenic Association 109 

IFC 109 

Italian Club 110 

Ukranian Club NO 

Kappa Beta Gamma Ill 

Kappa Delta Epstlon 112 

Loyola College Republicans .... 113 

LUASA 114 

LASO 114 

Theta Phi Alpha 115 

LSGA 116 

Math Club 117 

Loyolan 118-123 

Phoenix 124-127 

The Adventurers 128 

Readers Circle 129 

Pom-Pom Squad 130 

Cheerleaders 13! 

Sigma Pi 132 

TKE 133 

SAB 134 

Student Personnel 135-137 

WLUC Radio 138-141 

Fr. Edward Surtz 142 

50th Anniversary Loyolan 143 

Editors Page 144 



Alpha Delta Gamma 




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Alpha Delta Gamma, National Social 
Fraternity, was founded at Loyola in 
1934. The member of Alpha chapter is 
representative of a cross-section of peo- 
ple' from all over the country. 
Throughout the years, the values and 
opinions of the group have and still vary, 
bus the main emphasis remains as the 
development of the whole person. To this 
end. academics and social life is stress- 
ed, aided by the individual background 
and experience of each brother. Despite 
the diversity of Alpha Delta Gamma, a 



unified spirit is exhibited when co- 
operation is required. 

Members: Don O'Donoghue. President; 
Jim Bachner. Ron Bazar, Mike Carreon. 
Dave Chrzanowski, Kevin Clarke, Bill 
Cook, John Corcoran. Bruce D'Amour. 
Tom Donlon. John Doyle, Bob Einhorn, 
Don Fitzgerald, Larry Folk, Mark Foster, 
Harold Hallbom, Tom Hart, Jeff Iwai, 
Mike Johnson, Frank Knoll, John Kolb, 
Ken Krewer, Dennis Kulczyk, Larry 
Laronca, Dave Leeman. Neil Linehan. 



Don Lipskis. Ed Lipskis, Mike Liston, Dan 
Lyons. Hugh Mackinnon, Larry Marshall, 
Bill Miller, Mark McDermott, Ray 
McDermott, Jack Murphy, Bill O'Brien, 
Joe Parson, Frank Prestipino, John Red- 
mond, Lewis Reick, Jeff Robinson. Ted 
Rockwell. Dave Roucek. Tom Shannon. 
Rick Schwind. Arch Stella. George 
Todisco. Trig Urbanczyk, Rick Wenger, 
Jeff Wilson. Fr. Ed Mulhern. Moderator. 



86 



Alpha Kappa Lambda 




The fraternity of Alpha Kappa Lambda, 
Beta Alpha chapter was established as a 
colony In 1968. Being the newest frater- 
nity on campus, we are in keeping pace 
with the image of a modern day fraterni- 
ty. The stress is on scholastics. Our 
fraternity had the second highest overall 
average last year. Physical hazing is 
strictly outlawed, but instead a promo- 
tion of brotherhood and lasting 
friendship is instilled in our pledges. We 
participate in all intramural sports ac- 
tivities, last year taking first place in ten- 



nis. Our social function include 
anywhere from just plain get togethers to 
semi-formal dinner parties along with 
many other open and closed parties. 
Since we are now thirty-three strong, we 
participate in University as well as com- 
munity projects. Among these have been 
food and blood drives, taking orphans to 
a Cub's baseball game, and clean up 
projects in the neighborhood. 

Members: Bill Coughlin, President; Den- 
nis Bartasis, Mark Bataska. Robert Borris, 



Jeff Beyda, John Chips, Dennis 
Chubinski, Dale Dembski, Anthony 
Delach. Norman Eskoz, Pedro Falcon, 
Jeff Fromm, Dan Funk, Anton Giger, 
Alfred Chow Shu Kwing. Ramon Ibarra, 
Dave Jacobson, Paul Kelley, Kenneth 
Ludwig, Bob Luft, Jeffery Mazzanti. Reid 
Newman, Dan O'Reily, Greg Onorat, Paul 
Pluchino, Tony Puczkowsky. Richard 
Soska. Jay Sperber, Craig Tomass. Randy 
Tomass, Bill Troccoli. Jerry Zienty, Greg 
Yakota. Mr. Wayne F. Tinkle, Moderator. 



Alpha Phi Omega is a fraternity which 
offers membership to both men and 
women. It is unique in its blending of a 
fraternity and a service organization. As 
a fraternity the bond of brotherhood 
betters our service program by making 
service to campus and community more 
united, efficient and spirited. As a ser- 
vice organization, we dedicate ourselves 
to helping others through various tem- 
porary service projects and other perma- 
nent programs. Such service also 
develops a spirit of self-sacrifice in our 
brothers, helping us to mature and 
develop a sound character, and further 



drawing us together into a closer bond 
of brotherhood. 

As a fraternity, we have never indulged 
in physical hazing. Within the past two 
years all mental hazing has been 
eliminated. Our pledge program is 
geared toward the development of a 
spirit of brotherhood and service in our 
pledges. Pledges are equal to brothers 
and not subordinate to them in any way. 
Traditional fraternity pledging has no 
place in developing a mature and balanc- 
ed character. 



John Powell, S.J., our moderator, leads 
us periodically in days of self-evaluation, 
geared toward a growth and improve- 
ment in interpersonal relationships. Mr. 
Larry Zentz, the Administrative Assistant 
to the Vice-President, Dean of Students, 
is our chapter advisor and helps us grow 
as an efficient and smoothly-functioning 
organization. 




88 



Alpha Sigma Alpha 



Alpha Sigma Alpha was founded in 190! 
at Longwood College in Farmville. 
Virginia. Its aims are to foster intellec 
tual. spiritual, physical, and social 
development in its members. 

The Gamma Lambda Chapter of the 
sorority was instituted at Loyola in 1964. 
From its founding to the present. ASA 
has encouraged its aims through in- 
volvement in both University and Com- 
munity life. Alpha Sigma Alpha has been 
involved in almost every major Universi- 
ty function. Members of the sorority are 
involved in Circumference, the Phoenix. 
Cheerleading. Pom-Pom. LSGA. 
Panhellenic and S.A.B. Many sisters have 



worked on various Orientation Weeks in 
the past along with working on ASA 
booth and the ticket booths at the S.A.B. 
Carnival. Alpha Sigma Alpha was award- 
ed "The Sorority of the Year" title for 
1971-1972 by Blue Key. 

It is the aim of the sorority to continue to 
expand their active involvement in both 
the life of Loyola University as well as 
the life of the Rogers Park Community. 

Members: Kathy Fillichio. President; 
Joan Bak. Sonya Bernardi. Marylois Do 
Curro. Denise Dziopek. Mary Pat Doyle. 
Barb Farbotko. Diane Farbotko. Margie 
Faut. Mary Faut. Berni Firlit. Cassie Flam- 



bouras, Margo Gordes. Rose Greco, Elly 
Hennessy, Anne Marie Hoversen. Barb 
Hudek. Mary Johnson. Renee Kampman, 
Melody Kas. Pammie Kass, Mary Ann 
Konopka, Tess Kudia, Leslie La Belie, 
Mary Lou Lawless. Diana Marczuk. Kathy 
Miller, Ann Mueller. Debbie Myers, 
Charlene Occhino, Sherry Owens. Mary 
Petruchuis. Jeannie Powers. Kathy 
Powers. Mary Ann Powers. Jeanette 
Sopkiewicz. Donna Smith. Mary io Stack. 
Laura Tharo. Concetta Tharo. Sandy 
Vross. Debbie Winn. Mary Jane 
WIeklinski. Mary Ann Zatopa. Mrs. 
Lorayne Banta. Moderator. 




89 




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Alpha Sigma Phi 



Alpha Sigma Phi. the tenth oldest 
national social fraternity in the country, 
was founded in 1845 at Yale University. 
Our history at Loyola began in 1958 with 
the foundation of Sigma Delta Phi. In 
1968 we became the Delta Alpha chapter 
of Alpha Sigma Phi. 

The most important part of our fraternity 
is our house located at 1062 West 



Columbia Avenue. It is here that we live 
in every sense of that word, for it is the 
Sig house where we have our parties, our 
friends, our meals, our lives. 
Members: Robert Bleser. President; 
James Balvich. Kevin Black. Robert 
Brandstatter. Vincent Cesaro. James 
Corrigan. Thomas Doherty. Joseph 
Dragoo. Donald Falls, Daniel Fitzpatrick, 



James Froberg. Howard Kahan. John 
Keane, Michael Keane, Daniel Kozubal. 
Robert Larson, William LeBlanc, Thomas 
Lennon, Russell Lodarek, John Mann, 
James Neuses, Jeffrey Noll, Michael 
O'Neill. Steven Phillips. Michael Riordan, 
Albert Romito. Bruce Sakiewicz, Glenn 
Scheive. John Schulz. Michael Smajd, 
John Toljanic. Michael Tootooian. 



90 



Alpha Tau Delta 



Beta Alpha Psi 



A sense of belonging is needed by every 
individual at any age level. Basically, a 
person joining a group, whether it be a 
sorority, a radio club, or a Senior 
Citizen's group, to realize himself and his 
capacities or insufficiancies. The group 
he chooses to join will have a quality 
that he is interested in. The group 
benefits by the individual's contributing 
his uniqueness to it; the individual 
benefits by others accepting his uni- 
queness. 

Our purposes and goals as a nursing 
sorority are professional and academic. 
However, we combine these with our 
own personal goals and reasons for be- 
ing in Alpha Tau Delta. This creates a 
group in which everyone tries to accept 
and appreciate the other's uniqueness. 
The acceptance of each other is fine 
while we are together during our college 
years, but what about after college and 
other groups, other individuals? This is 
when the transference from the in- 
dividual Alpha Tau Delta member to 
society and other persons is necessary. 
Open-minded and non-judgemented 
attitudes are hopefully cultivated here 
and used not only in the field of nursing 
but everywhere. 



Members: Fran Jaeger, President; Lois 
Bediek, Dedra Bethany, Sheila Campbell, 
Alice Kaczinowski, Patty O'Grady, Maria 
Romo, Pam Stainer, Stephanie Wojenik, 
Mrs. Joan Mathews, Moderator. 



Beta Alpha Psi is the national honorary 
accounting fraternity. Founded in 1919 at 
the University of Illinois, the association 
recognizes those business students who 
have attained high scholastic standing 
specifically in accounting and 
cumulatively in all areas of study. Beta 
lota, the Loyola chapter, was chartered 
in I960. It offers its members an ex- 
cellent opportunity to become ac- 
quainted with leaders in professional ac- 
counting through both lecture and infor- 
mal discussion. Throughout the year 
Beta lota is involved in varied projects 
ranging from field trips and joint chapter 
and national conventions to the 
scheduling of speakers on public ac- 
counting, taxation, and related matters. 

Members: Joseph Wolfe, President; 
Edward Antognoli, Kenneth Brooks, 
James Burns, Robert Gransee, Paul 
Havrilka, Barry Jung, Steve Kerkstra, 
Nancy Lang, Mary Mackin. Donald 
Magnuson. Curtis Milks, Mark Valentine. 
Mr. Richard Kusek, Moderator. 



91 



American Comic Crusaders 





We can all look back now. and breathe 
a sigh of relief. At the outset there was 
much doubt as to whether the Crusaders 
would exist. Membership was severely 
decreased by graduation. In fact, there 
was only one returning letterman from 
last year's squad. Linda Puko. 
Nevertheless, hoping against hope, first, 
to reestablish A. C.C. as a major campus 
organization and second, to maintain 
previous standards of excellence set 
forth by the original founders. Linda 
sought to bring in the leadership needed 
to recruit and train new members and to 
instill in them a sense of discipline which 
cannot be attained in today's permissive 
and abhorrently promiscuous society. 
And so. after months of searching. Linda 
named Reed Richards as Chief Censor 
and Exultant Viceroy of the American 
Comic Crusaders. Reed was given a free 
hand in choosing his executive staff. He 
sought those whose qualities of courage, 
magnanimity, and humility could only be 
excelled by his own. Thus. Art Gizmo 
(seem with Reed at top. left.) became 
Director of Personnel. Flossie Streator 
and Lamont Cranston (see bottom, left) 
assumed a new position, that is. Direc- 
tors of Propaganda. Linda retained her 
position as Spiritual Leader and Con- 
fidante to the Censor. 




in his inaugural address. Reed noted that 
since A. C.C. is not a university-funded 
organization, operating expenses would 
have to be paid with funds derived from 
outside sources. He suggested, from his 
previous business, an insurance com- 
pany formed for the protection of small 
businessmen in the area. 

However, he noted that the A. C.C. must 
look to the future. Past personal vendet- 
tas should not be allowed to enter into 
the organization because they can only 
weaken the bonds, which unite all 
members of the A. C.C: truth, justice, and 
the American way, 

MEMBERS: Linda Puko. Art Gizmo. 
Flossie Streator. Lamont Cranston, 
George Papyanagos. Uncle Bruce. Mario 
Torpedo. Reed Richards, Annette F.. 
Mickey F.. and the late Nanook of the 
North. 



93 



American Chemical Society 




The ACS Student Affiliate is an organiza- 
tion consisting of Chemistry Students in- 
terested in Chemistry and related fields. 
The members are mainly Chemistry Ma- 
jors sponsored by the faculty to join. Ac- 
tivities include: Films, field trips, lec- 
tures, and starting in the Academic Year 
(1972-73), a Chemistry Symposium for 
Research Students is planned. 

Members: Frank Molinaro. President: 
Cathy Arcus, Anne Coyle. Mary Ellen 
Kearne. Paul Kurek. Robert Malocha, 
Elmer Neurauter, Daniel Peplinski, John 
Sikorski. Susan Schlough, Patricia 
Thrash, John Walton. Dr. Harvey Posvik. 
Moderator. 



94 



Beta Beta Beta 




Beta Beta Beta Biological Society is an 
organization whose members share a 
common interest in academic achieve- 
ment and the appreciation of the life 
sciences. It is a national honorary socie- 
ty with chapters in colleges and univer- 
sities across the United States, in Canada 
and Puerto Rico. The Lambda Omega 
Chapter of Loyola University received its 
charter in 1969. Tri-Beta attempts to 
sponsor academic and social events in 
many areas. Within the past few years 
the society has conducted tours to 
medical and research facilities, 
presented films ranging from the ever 
popular "Birth of Triplets" to a midwest 
premiere of "Kes," and judged in several 
local science fairs. Social events have in- 
cluded Christmas parties, picnics, con- 
certs and a trip to the circus. Tri-Beta 
also sponsors members in research pro- 
jects both at the university and at the 
various summer institutes across the na- 
tion. Members agree that there is much 
more to the study of the life sciences 
than classroom participation. 

Members: Gary Karl, President: Ava 
Adams. Louis Arocha. Roland Barnes. 



Dennis Bartasis. Robert Bartelone. 
Howard Beck. William Bergmann. 
Richard Bernard Jr., Nowell Blecha, 
Thomas Brammeier, Alan Brongiel, 
Robert Brunnetti, Vincent Bufalino, Joe 
Buttner, Cristina Casas. Katherine 
Castree. John Chips. Dennis Chubinski. 
Alfred Cisneros, John Cravata, Peter 
Cutrera, Terry Davis. William DeLord, 
Glenn Doering. Steven Dronen, Stephen 
Ebrom. Arthur Engel, John Fairbairn. La 
Deane Fattore. Denise Figlewicz. Dianne 
Figlewicz. Michael Flisak. Rick Foley. 
Philip Frystak. Mary Dru Gallagher. 
Joseph Goodreau. John Grieco. Todd 
Hewell, Zenko Hrynkiw, Eileen Hund. 
Cecilia Hutchcraft, James Hynes. George 
Iwaszek. Cynthia Janeliunas. Christine 
Jarosik. Kathy Kapica. Peter Kiefer. Don- 
na Kocim. Pam Kolanski. Thomas 
Korosec. Mark Kozubowski, Frank 
Kuhajda. Don Lavelle, Daniel Linert. 
Roger Little. William Lojkovic. Adele 
Luck. Gary Magistrelli. Eduardo 
Monteagudo. Marcia Murry. Joseph 
Musso. Roman Mycyk. William 
McCarthy. Konrad Nagatoshi. Micheal 
Niemiec. Janet Nikolich. Robert O'Keefe. 
Gregory Onorato. Teresa Opiawski. 



Michael Oster, Andrew Owsiak, Robert 
Pary. Richard Patelski. Joseph Paulsen. 
James Pisarczyk. Micheal Podlusky. 
Anthony Poletti. Adrienne Politowski. 
Pamela Porembski, Marguerite Pozzi, 
Dagmar Pressling. Larry Purpura. Charles 
Rebesco. Kathleen Reinhart. Robert 
Ryan. Priscilla Salzar. Patricia Santare. 
Albert Segler. Robert Shaw. Adrian 
Sheremeta, Thomas Shimoda. John 
Sikorski. Berta Silva. Irene Silva. Dennis 
Smith. Carleton Solarski. Joseph Soiek, 
Steven Soltes. Kathleen Somos, George 
Sosenko, John Stabein, Matthew Strelc- 
zyk. Thomas Sullivan, Jane Swedlund. 
Frederick Tomera. Charles Tribbey, Alan 
Trimakas, Kathryn Varelzes. James Velt- 
man, Edmund Vizinas. Kerry Waldee. 
Carol Waldock, Dan Walters, Laurie 
Wanat, Ronald Waryjas, Gerald Wegner. 
Donna Wegrzyn. Robert Will. Dr. B.E.N. 
Spiroff, Moderator. 



95 



Beta Gamma 
Sigma 



Founded February 26, 1919, Beta 
Gamma Sigma is a national 
scholastic honor society for men 
and women in schools of com- 
merce and business administration. 
The Loyola chapter was founded in 
1961, and is open for membership 
to qualified students in the School 
of Business Administration. 



Blue Key 



Blue Key is Loyola's foremost honor 
society. It is a national honorary 
fraternity limited to males. 
At the end of each academic year, 
Blue Key sponsors a formal induction- 
dinner for its new members. The 
members are honored at this event for 
their academic achievement and for 
service to the University. For these 
reasons, the fraternity is limited to an 
honorary role at Loyola. 
Last year, the fraternity admitted 
sophomores for the first time. This 
change may help the group in the 
future because it creates a longer ac- 
tive membership for its undergraduate 
members. 

Members: Kevin Conway. President: 
Gonzolo Balton-Tanda, Dale Bespalec, 
Tim Cornille, Paul Hoppe, Don King, 
Angelo Leventas, John Lopatka, Tim 
Martin, Mike Moran, James Mueller, 
George Mui, Mike Oster, Joe Pollini, 
Mike Riordan, Rick Sikora, Ron 
Skwarek, Joe Wolff, Bob Williams. Mr. 
Wayne Tinkle, Moderator. 



Circumference 



Circumference was organized in 1958 
for the dual purpose of giving 
recognition to women students of the 
junior and senior classes who excel in 
leadership and scholarship, and to be 
of service to the University, principal- 
ly in acting as official hostesses at 
various University functions. These 
two purpose are represented by the 
torch of learning and the gavel of 
leadership on the Circumference key 
each member receives. Membership 
requirements consist of a 3.0 or above 
cumulative average and an office or a 
major chairmanship in at least two 
other university organizations. 
Members: Margaret T. Kane, Presi- 
dent; Jane Anne Bolin, E. Anne 
Brandstetter, Janile M. Clennon, 
Cathleen E. Conway, Kathleen A. 
Fillichio, Maureen Rose George, 
Juanita Anne Grozdiak, Margaret 
Leclair Hall, Carol Sue Heath. Colleen 
Marie Langson, Marlene G. Pappas, 
Sharon Ann Renkosiak, Linda 
Stomper, Patricia F. Tomasik, Carol 
Ann Venus, Carol Jean Waldock. 




96 





Student Operations Board 



The Student Operations Board is the ac- 
tivities board for the Lewis Towers Cam- 
pus. Begun in the fall of 1971. SOB was 
formed independently of SAB to answer 
the needs of the downtown campus. SOB 
gears most activities towards the com- 
muter's schedule, and also plans evening 
activities throughout the year. The main 
goal of SOB is to shatter the myth that LT 
students do not know how to have fun. 
Consequently, we offer them a schedule 
they can't refuse. 

Utilizing the lunch period and early 
afternoon, SOB sponsors programs 
which appeal to as many interests as 
possible. Folksingers. such as Aliota. 
Haines, and Jeremiah; Ed and Fred Hols- 
tein; Tom Dundee; and Jim Haydon give 
LT students a chance to see professional 
Chicago entertainers for free. Movies, by 
a Warner Brothers contract, also enable 
students to see excellent flicks for free 
during the afternoons. 

SOB is also interested in community in- 
volvement. The Halloween Party, for the 



Cabrini Green children, was a success 
only due to the generous donations and 
hard work on the part of LT students. The 
Christmas Benefit brought both Santa 
Claus and holiday gifts to forgotten peo 
pie all over Chicago. SOB's Success is 
due only to the entire student body and 
administrational support. 

SOB believes any idea is worth in- 
vestigating, anything fun is worth doing. 
Drop is our office in the gameroom any 
time. We have a good time. 

Members; Kathy O'Hara. President; 
Cheryl Dust. Rick Erickson, Barry Jung, 
Mary Beth Hickey. Bill Kelly. Vera 
Kitselman. Bill Lawson. Paul Lynch, Bob 
Lyons. Martha Maggiore, Bob Meier, 
Barabara Mc Donald. Michael Moran. 
Phyllis Nagy, Steve Napleton, John 
Nerren. Dawn Overends. Joe Pollini. 
Maureen Quick, Ed Recke, Marilou 
Rinella, Roni Sacony. Geri Slaby. Gordon 
Stiefel, Jay Taussig. Carole Trucco, Rich 
Wawryzniak. Mr. Art Eichlin, honorary 
member. Mr. Terry Sullivan, Moderator. 




97 



CADENCE 



CADENCE is Loyola's literary magazine 
which publishes twice yearly the creative 
efforts of Loyola Students. Poetry, prose, 
art. photography, graphics and essays in 
the social sciences and humanities are 
all solicited and carefully evaluated. 
Only the best of creative thought is final- 
ly printed in CADENCE, which is dis- 
tributed to the students free of charge. 
CADENCE also corresponds with many 
other colleges throughout the world and 
thus provides a widespread publicity 
base for the university. 

This year has been a very active and in- 
novative one for CADENCE. For the first 
time, separate staffs were established at 
both campuses. Also the CADENCE 
radio program on WLUC continued to 
provide an additional outlet for creativi- 
ty and source of cultured entertainment. 
One of the most encouraging new areas 
entered into by CADENCE this year was 
the production of a series of short plays, 
poetry readings, etc. This provided still 
another outlet for Loyola's vast reserve 
of creativity. 

In new ways as well as old ones, 
CADENCE continues to fulfill its tradi- 
tional function. It provides an open 
forum for the expression of any and all 
forms of creative thought at Loyola. 

Members; James Adducci, Editor-in- 
chief: Kathy Badura, Dale A. Bespalec, 
Nowell Blecha, Jim Blaney. James Boveri, 
Charles Burnett, Kathy Christen, Liz 
Clark, Werner Hintz, Eileen Hund, 
Deborah Kmiecik, Bob Kosin, Joan 
Kowalski, Neilmyer, Terry Newman, Mike 
Niemiec, Kevin O'Connor, Terry Piraino, 
Bob Pontarelli, Mark Riley, Mike Schnit 
zius, Eileen Schultz. Kathy Varelzes, Jim 
Veltman. Steve Yadlovski. Dr. Michael 
Masi, Moderator, 




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99 



Debate Club 




The Loyola University Debate Society is 
the oldest academic organization at the 
University. Each year the debate club 
participates in intercollegiate debate 
tournaments sponsored by universities 
throughout the country. A topic is 
chosen and it is on this proposition that 
the debators will be asked to speak 
throughout that academic year. The 
topic for the 1972-1973 season is "that 
the federal government should provide a 
program of comprehensive medical care 
for all U.S. citizens." The debators must 
analyze, research, and formulate 
arguments both for and against this 
proposition. 

The purpose of intercollegiate debate is 



to teach individuals to analyze issues in 
greater detail, to organize their thoughts 
clearly and logically, to support them 
with documentation, and to com- 
municate these ideas in a rational and 
persuasive manner. 

It is basically an educational experience 
although it also gives individuals an op- 
portunity to travel to and meet students 
from other universities and an oppor- 
tunity to learn to work with other in- 
divuals as a team. It allows for creativity 
in formulating different approaches to 
issues. Debating also aids individuals in 
learning to think clearly under pressure 
and to become fluent and effective 
speakers. 



Members: Sue Barton. President; Tony 
DiVincenzo. Vince Follert, Marty Green, 
Joe Jirasek. Mike Jirasek. Michelle Jor- 
dan. Laurie Laurinjan. Mike Matson, 
Katie Newsham. Bill Piper, Ed Recke. Jeff 
Stroka. Ray Sullivan, Vicki Wells. Emile 
Lippe, Assistant Coach, Elaine 
Bruggemeier, Coach. 



100 



The Chardin Anthropological Society 



NO TRESPASSING 



THIS ISA 
P^ATE BEACH^ 




The Chardin Anthropological Society 
was founded at Loyola in 1965 as an 
academic and social organization with 
the purpose of increasing an interest in 
anthropology. The Society was named 
after Pierre Teilhard de Chardin. the 
Jesuit philosopher-palaeontologist who 
did much of the work on the famous Pek- 
ing man finds in China in the I930's. The 
Society is open to all faculty and 
students at the University, both un- 
dergraduate and graduate, the only 
necessary requirement being an interest 
in anthropology. 

As an academic organization, the Society 
sponsors films of interest, lectures in 
seminar fashion by members of our 



faculty as well as by visiting professors, 
and occasional field trips to museums, 
institutes, and actual sites in the field. 

As a non- academic social organization 
the C.A.S. also has another function: if 
serves to integrate into one whole those 
with the common shared interest of 
anthropology. The C.A.S. does this 
through parties at Christmas and again 
at the end of the year, sales of goods on 
campus to earn revenue for the Society, 
and other frequent "get-togethers" in the 
museum on the second floor of Damen 
Hall. The museum (a collection of bones, 
fossil casts, and artifacts) in Room 235 is 
also taken care of by the C.A.S. The dis- 
plays are regularly changed and repre- 



sent a unique contribution to the 
cultural and scientific environment of 
the University. 

This, then, is the C.A.S.: a viable 
organization on campus seeking 
academically and socially to further in- 
terest in the science of man, 
anthropology. 

Members: Barbara Plafcan, President; 
Clarita Boldt. Kathy Christon, Ellen 
Clickman, David Keene. Tom Keough, 
Madeline Keiling, Diana Marczuk. 
Konrad Nagatoshi. Sharon Ann 
Renkosiak. Marilyn Shulz. Joy Sperber. 
Tom Zimmerman. Fr. Francis X. Grollig, 
S.J. Moderator. 



101 





wOrseandsunset- 
' an cppcrtimty, 

an dea. a chance. 

rewards offered- 

Nm€ THEY ARE 
• GONE FOREVER. , 





Volunteers Interested in People 



Loyola Volunteers Interested in People 
(V.I.P.s) is a service organization which 
was started by two graduate students in 
1971, therefore we are the newest 
organization on campus. 

V.I.P.s tries to serve as a meeting ground 
for Loyola students and the surrounding 
community. It tries to provide projects 
which relate to the student's area of 
study or interest. In this way students 
can take an active part in the community 
while getting practical experience in 
their field. For those ecology nuts, 
there's Citizens for a Better Environment 
(CBE). Loyola day school for the 
emotionally disturbed children provides 
psychology majors with an opportunity 
to put the theories into practice. Educa- 
tion and Math majors can put their 
knowledge to use tutoring at Angel 
Guardian. Kilmer School, and the Loyola 
Guidance Center. Language majors find 
their skills are greatly needed, teaching 
English as a second language to the 



foreign-speaking kids at Kilmer and to 
adults at St. Ignatius. For students who 
can't afford to give time on a regular 
basis, there's the Emergency Task Force 
which works on short term projects such 
as the Blood Brothers Drive, Uptown 
Community Pantry (at Thanksgiving 
time) and Easter Seals. V.I.P.s would like 
to make it clear that those who volun- 
teer NEED NOT have to major in the 
areas mentioned, just be INTERESTED in 
the programs. In the future. V.I.P.s will be 
expanding to work in other communities 
and hopefully start a program at LT. 

V.I.P.s tries to be more than just a place- 
ment service. It tries to bring the 
volunteers and the community agencies 
together to exchange ideas on and im- 
prove community projects and volunteer 
action. 

V.I.P.s is a member of the Illinois Coali- 
tion for Volunteer Student Action 
(ICVSA). Through it, V.I.P.s works with 



other university volunteer programs to 
promote volunteer action in Illinois. 

BUT most important, V.I.P.s is PEOPLE. 
People interested in other people. The 
close to 200 members give their time and 
talents to bring Loyola and the surroun- 
ding community together in understan- 
ding and involvement. 

Officers: Mary Weinzirl, President; Jim 
Huenink, Joni Neuerburg, Marilyn 
Grossmayer. Dr. Jim Johnson, 
Moderator. 



102 




WLT Radio 



WLT Radio is the student operated radio 
service at the Lewis Towers Campus. 
Now in its third year of operation, WLT 
plays music for the students at LT on a 
five hour daily schedule. Programs are 
based on each student's preference of 
music. Soul, Classics, Jazz, and Country 
music balance out a predominant rock 
music. 

WLT operates through the Communica- 
tion Arts Department with the help and 
advice of Dr. Sammy Danna. Dr. Danna's 
expertise with the fields of Radio and TV 
are put to good use in helping disc 
jockeys prepare more professional 
programs. 

One of the aims of WLT is to offer 
students, interested in the field of radio 
broadcasting, an opportunity to further 
their skills with on-the-air experience. 
WLT also offers the student body at 
large, pertinent announcements about 
life at Lewis Towers and Loyola. In addi- 



tion to programming, the different types 
of new and old music that otherwise 
might escape the ears of its listeners, are 
played for the student audience. 
Students can hear announcements of 
frat parties, movies, concerts and lec- 
tures, and they can sell their own goods 
over the air through free want ads. 

Although WLT has been operating out of 
the Student Personnel Office (MC 304) 
for the past three years, the staff of WLT 
is looking forward to a move into bigger 
and better quarters in the near future, 
allowing for a higher quality of service. 

The Governing Body is now comprised 
of: a General Manager, a Program Direc- 
tor, a Public Relations Director, a Music 
Director, a Business Manager. 

WLT. once a group of five business 
students interested in playing music for 
the students of LT is now a group of over 
twenty-five people interested in building 



a lasting organization for student ex- 
pression at LT. 

At present. WLT is approaching other 
radio stations, professional and college, 
and record companies seeking help in 
improvement of services. WLT also is 
eager to work with WLUC, on the Lake 
Shore Campus, in building a system of 
communications which can prove 
beneficial to all Loyola students. 



Members: Don Rienke, General Manager; 
Mike Brown, Tony Cavaiea. Jim Fleming, 
Mike Fleming, Marty Green, Jim Gray, 
Linda Harrison, Joe Hennessey, Joe 
Jirasek. Mike Jirasek, Bob Kubiak, 
Marian Kuzma, Glen Loane. Rob Lyons, 
Maryanne Mertes. Meho Midjah, Jim 
Moore, Andy Plucinski, Tony Raddick, 
Tom Sheehan, Gordon Steiffel, Joe Suiek, 
Carole Trucco, Hosmer Wheat, Kathy 
Yore, Ken Zenkus, Al Zeienski. Dr. Sam- 
my Danna, Moderator. 



103 



Delta Sigma Phi 



Delta Sigma Phi is the international 
fraternity of "engineered leadership." 
We have been at Loyola University since 
1967 and have been progressively grow- 
ing. 

This fraternity is like a family: living, 
working, and having a good time 
together. The goal of our fraternity is 
happiness and this is what we strive to 
achieve. 

The most important and unique aspect of 
our fraternity is "brotherhood." We 
achieve our goal of happiness through 
this brotherhood with each other. It 
makes us very happy to know that we 
have fifty brothers we can depend on if 
we should ever need them in any way. 



On campus we are known as "The Bond" 
which emphasizes the strong ties that ex- 
ist between us. 

The Delta Sigma Phi's fraternity house is 
at 6922 N. Lakewood. so please feel free 
to drop in. If happiness and a good time 
are important to you. look into "the 
Bond" and see what we have to offer you 
as an individual. 

Members: Tony Zielinski and Joe 
Morano, Presidents: John Buechner, 
Shannon Burke, Tom Boyce, Richard 
Cieslukiewicz, Bob Cummuta. Ted 
Cushing, George Czykowski, Leon Di 
Biasio, Mario Di Benedetto, James Elipas, 
Rick Espinosa, George Firlit. Frank Giam- 
brone, George Gerimas, John Gierum, 



Ron Girgbocello, Tom Geiger, Joe 
Hagberg. George Hovany, Glenn Howski, 
Marty Herbert, James Jurczak, Angello 
Leventis, Mike Lapmar. Jim Lehmann. 
Lance Lee. Al Mercure, Jeff Madden. 
Mike Nowak, Bill O'ConneJI, Bill Pevitts, 
James Poulsom, James Rhodes, David 
Requena, Frank Sapporito, Bill Specht, 
Wayne Sherman, John Sikorski. Mel 
Tomeszco, Paul Tortorello, George Truc- 
co, Mark Turner, Al Ursini, Lloyde Voo 
hees. Bill Wandel, Ron Weiss. Phil Yee, 
Norm Zienty, John Zipparo. Fr. 
Prendergast, Fr. Schwartz, and Fr. 
Vandevelde, Moderators. 




104 



Delta Sigma Pi 




Phi Alpha 

Lambda 



Delta Sigma Pi has over ISO un- 
dergraduate chapters. 78.000 active 
members, 38 alumni clubs, and over 65 
years of experience in the fraternity 
world. So what? To all of the brothers, 
membership in Delta Sigma Pi means 
much more than impressive facts and 
figures. Fraternities and sororities aren't 
dying and probably never will. What is 
happening, however, is change. To insure 
that Delta Sigma Pi doesn't become just 
another fraternity, which it used to be, 
we've adjusted and changed along with 
the changing needs of today's college 
student. Delta Sigma Pi is dynamic and 
flexible in nature. Since our origin in 
1907 at New York University, we have 
been fortunate enough to have as 
brothers, men who were not so narrow- 
minded as to lock Delta Sigma Pi into in- 
flexible and unchanging programs that 
could not satisfy the people with whom 
they dealt. 

The Greek movement today still has 
much to offer to those open-minded 
enough to give it a chance. The respon- 
sibilities of fraternities are many. At 



Delta Sigma Pi, we have added another 
dimension to this responsibility. Besides 
giving the student an atmosphere where 
he can develop himself socially, we offer 
to him the opportunity to become 
familiar with the professional business 
world into which he will soon enter. 

Delta Sigma Pi is many things to each in- 
dividual brother, but common to all of us 
is the feeling of friendship that is evident 
throughout the fraternity. 

Members: Len (Hoagey) Carmichael. 
President! Richard (Crayola) Adamson, 
Barry (Dough Boy) Barth, Stan (Gumper) 
Boychuck, Bob (Rev. Moose) Bubak, Rich 
(Fido) Fiedorowicz. Carl (?) Gocial. John 
(The Foot) Hickey, Pete (Two Can) Huck, 
Steve (Sleazy) Itkin, Mike (Bo) Klimas, 
Harry (JC.) Kuck, John (Lumpy) Laricy, 
Bob (Bobba) Loos, Marty (Mac) 
McManus, Mike (Mickey) Mulcahy, Bill 
(Injun) Niemasz, Gary (Motormouth) 
Pearson, Jim (BEN) Prescott, Cliff (Clif- 
ton) Purdom, Onofrio (SCIDS) Scid- 
durlo, Tom (Smoothie) Storer, Joe (Teen 
Angel) Tuccori, Rick (The Rock) Warner. 



Pi Alpha Lambda is the oldest fraternity 
on campus, chartered in 1925 under the 
leadership of Fr. James J. Mertz. The Pi 
Alph's uphold the fraternal traditions of 
friendship and brotherhood, while trying 
to adapt to the changing times. As one of 
the smallest fraternities on campus, we 
feel that we can cultivate a deeper 
friendship and unity that extends 
beyond the physical limits of the univer- 
sity. 

Members; Terry Moran, President; Pat 
Beattie, Tom Bryant, Rick Eckert, Sig 
Lisowski, Kent Martzan, Tim Meyer, Mike 
Mc Adams. Brian Mc Mahon, Richard 
Roche. Ralph Zarada, Frank Podraza, 
John Steffy. 



105 



Coed Club 



What is Coed Club? After being asked 
this question so very often our members 
decided to write a story telMng people 
who we are and what we are like. 
Twenty-three years ago. in 1949. the 
Coed Club was established. It is. as it was 
then a busy association of dynamic, in- 
terested Loyola coeds who comprise a 
service/social organization. Upholding 
the same traditions as when first formed, 
namely friendship and service. Coed 
Club has nevertheless grown in size and 
has updated to sponsor activities which 
appeal to the woman student of today. 
Among our special interests are service 
projects involving the school and the 
community as well as social outings 
which provide a pleasant diversity within 
the demanding routine of college life. 
Our service projects include particular 
programs designed by our club members 
as well as special requests from the 
University. We actively participate in 
such things as the Freshman Orientation 
events, ushering and hostessing at 
Loyola affairs, visiting the sick and elder- 
ly at Great Lakes Naval Hospital and 
several area nursing homes, addressing 
invitations to the President's Ball, and 
exclusively sponsoring the Big-Little 
Sister program for Loyola Freshmen and 
transfer students. 

When our work is done we still find time 
for socializing, and this we do in a varie- 
ty of ways. Members and their friends 
attempt to ice skate, ski, bowl, sing 
Christmas carols, and even run a carnival 
booth. Coed Club provides these and 
many more opportunities to enjoy life at 
Loyola and to make new acquain- 
tances — and friends. 
Members: Juanita Grozdiak. President; 
Teresa Anesinas, Chris Baglio, Ann Ban- 
ta. Barb Bellomo. Judy Beluch, Connie 
Campbell. Susan Candiotti. Margarita 
Casas, Susan Catanzaro, Marilyn Cum- 
mings, Judy Cwik, Maureen Daly, Maria 
DiPrima, Sheri Doniger, Roberta 
Gotches, Mary Hahn, Gail Hutchins. Jen- 
nie Jones. Susan Kiszka. Toni 
Krawkowski, Carolyn Lopez, Kathy 
Mallen, Maria Mayol. Joan McDonald. 
Maria Mykytka, Carol Ostruska, Jan 
Pietka, Barbara Plafcan, Debbie Plafcan. 
Donna Plumb, Kathleen Reinhart. Sharon 
Renkosiak. Paula Ryan. Patricia Salazar, 
Faith Salsburg. Christine Shirakawabe. 
Mary Lee Sullivan. Sue Tassone. Carol 
Waldock, Marjorie Weaver. Nancy 
Wikarski, Marcia Wilson, Judith 
Wlodarczyk, Louise Zahorak, Marge 
Zegan. Joan Steinbrecher. Moderator. 



Gamma Phi 
Delta 



Gamma Phi Delta Sorority. Inc. is a 
national sorority of business and 
professional women dedicated to con- 
tinued educational endeavors and the 
rendering of services to the youth of 
America was established in 1943. Gamma 
Phi Delta is a service and non-profit 
organization. The Loyola chapter was 
founded May 25, 1970. There is a present 
membership fo thrity-nine. 
The goals are: I. To promote Sisterhood 
among women of all races. 2. To render 
service to the Black Community and the 
Loyola Community at large. 3. To provide 
financial aid in the form of scholarships 
to all who wish to continue their educa- 
tion. 

Beta Chi. the Loyola Chapter of Gamma 
Phi Delta, through educational enter- 
prises and community awareness 
endeavors to create a vital and thriving 
nucleus of strong and dedication young 



women who in the future will reflect not 
only the influences of Gamma Phi Delta, 
but the educational values instilled by 
Loyola University. 

Members: Norvella. Reid, President; 
Shelline Grigsby, Arlene Harvey, Corolyn 
Hathorne, Cassandra Johnson. Willa 
Mae Jackson, Audrey Winters, Patricia 
Waite, Barbara Saunders, Delores 
Mingard, Gloria Moore, Vera Smith, 
Dorothy Lewis, Tajuana Parker, Karen 
Thomas, Deborah Martin, Deborah 
Young. Ludella Gilmore. Regina Woods, 
Barbara Deton. Joyce Waite, Debra 
Matlock, Frances Jones. Jo Ann Brooks, 
Geraldine Terry, Tommi Scott, Sandra 
Miller. Yvonne Levison, Muriel L. Faltz, 
Girtha Kidd. Gloria Miles, Patricia Easter, 
Shelah Henderson, Alice Smith, Angela 
Morris, Jessie Pollard, Jill McDonald, 
Veotia Flowers, Francine Davis. 



106 




The German Club 



The German Club of Loyola is one of the 
oldest organizations on campus. After 
being inactive for three years, the club 
gained new life in 1970 and has been 
continuing ever since. The purpose of the 
German Club is to further an interest in 
German language, literature, culture, and 
indirectly to encourage an interest in the 
activities of the German-speaking com- 
munity here in Chicago. 

The German Club provides many services 
to the University. Chiefly, it publishes its 
monthly newspaper Fliegeruie Bloetler. 
This entertaining bit of journalism is 
written half in German and half in 
English, with the students taking German 
being encouraged and given the oppor- 
tunity to write articles in the German 
language. Contents of the paper are 
highly eclectic: poems, jokes, short 
stories, polemics, comics, an equivalent 
of "Dear Abby," and last, but not least, 
announcements of upcoming events 
concerning Germans in the Chicago 



area. Also, the German Club provides 
free cultural, artistic and travel films for 
viewing several times in the semester in 
the Audio-Visual Aids Room of the 
library: all of these are in English. In ad- 
dition, the German Club provides a free 
tutoring service for those German 
students who need help, given by the 
generosity of the upper-class German 
majors. 

Other than these services, the Club 
manages to have three regular parties 
throughout the year: Christmas. 
Fasching, and Abschieds (End of Year). 
In all of these, the German element is 
always emphasized. Finally, in order to 
provide money for the Club and have 
some fun at the same time, the German 
Club has sponsored such activities as a 
Candle Sale. Bake Sale, and avidly par- 
ticipated in the Annual School Carnival. 

Members: Sherry Simon, President; Terry 
Belinski, Mike Bolanos, Ted Dvoracek, 



Diana Marczuk. Jeanne Mathis. Konrad 
Nagatoshi, Claudia ODonoghue, 
Charlene Page, Marilyn Schuiz, Pat 
Sullivan, Kathi Szettele. Dale Ulaszek. Dr. 
S. Sue Nebel. Moderator. 



Hi^W 




Delta Omega Gamma 



Delta Omega Gamma is not recognized 
as a viable sorority by either Panhellenic 
or any national sorority organization. 
For this reason, we are a self-realized 
sorority. We, the members, recognize 
that Delta Omega Gamma does exist and 
can serve Loyola as well as any other 
campus organization. Yes, we are new; 
yes, our membership is very small; yes. 
we know that student interest in 



sororities has been declining, both here 
at Loyola and throughout the nation. 
Although these circumstances appear to 
be serious disadvantages, they can also 
be seen in the light of advantages. Being 
new, we have no stereotypes to fill; and 
we are not bogged down in tradition. Be- 
ing small, we can develop interpersonal 
relationships and really get to know each 
other. 



Being caught in the maelstrom of declin- 
ing Greek organizations and student 
apathy, we believe that we can rise up 
and overcome both oppositions and 
emerge as a vital student organization. 

MEMBERS: Betty Jo Bialowski, Gigi Fren- 
dle, Audrey Farber, Brandy Pappas, Nan- 
cy Haber, Susan Underhilt. 





^ "%:.. 



1 






1 



Pan Hellenic Association 



Loyola's Pan Hellenic Association is 
composed of all of the sororities on cam- 
pus. Each sorority sends delegates who 
make up the Pan Hellenic Council. The 
council formulates rules for Rush. Pledg- 
ing and Induction. 

The purpose of Pan Hellenic is to 
strengthen the lines of communication 
between sororities and establish a Greek 
community full of friendship. 
We are a group of women involved in the 
business of learning: learning to live and 
work with people, learning to share ex- 
periences and ideas, learning principles 
of leadership and human relations, lear- 
ning tolerance and consideration. 



Loyola's Pan Hellenic Association is an 
extension of sisterhood. 
Members: JoAnn Brooks (Gamma Phi 
Delta). President; Alpha Sigma Alpha - 
Sonya Bernardi, Margaret Faut, Anne 
Hoversen; Alpha Tau Delta - Fran Jaeger. 
Maria Roma; Gamma Phi Delta - 
Norvella Reid. Geraldine Terry; Kappa 
Beta Gamma - Cheryl Corrado, Fran 
Manno. Margo Swieca; Kappa Delta Ep- 
silon - Cathy Eddy, Jean Lubeckis; 
L.S.G.A. Representative - Kathie 
Brezovec; S.A.B. Representative - Zori 
Fedunysszyn. Joan Steinbrecher. 
Moderator. 



Interfraternity Council 



The Interfraternity Council is the gover- 
ning body of all fraternities on campus. 
Each member fraternity selects one in- 
dividual to sit on the council and it is 
their job to coordinate various campus 
and community sponsored events such 
as ecology drives and Greek Week. All 
fraternal problems concerning individual 
fraternities are handled by the judicial 
branch of IFC known as the J-Board. The 
Vice President presides over the 
meetings of the J-Board. whose members 
are other than those who sit on IFC. All 
member fraternities, of which there are 
nine, (Sigma Pi, Alpha Delta Gamma, Tau 



Kappa Epsilon, Alpha Kappa Lambda, 
Alpha Kappa Psi, Delta Sigma Phi, Delta 
Sigma Pi, Alpha Sigma Phi, Pi Alpha 
Lambda), pay dues that are used for 
various advertisements for upcoming 
events or used for IFC parties usually 
held at one of the members houses. The 
IFC meets once every two weeks and the 
J-Board meets only when their presence 
is dictated by a matter concerning 
judicial legislation. 

Officers: Frank Johnson, Jerome 
Kadlech, Frank Modica. Fr. Leon 
Saiadino, Moderator. 




^^r"- 



Italian Club 



Ukrainian Club 



The Italian Club Is an organization under 
the Direction of the Department of 
Modern Languages. The purpose of the 
Club is to stimulate interest in Italian 
culture. The way we do this is through 
movies, lectures, slide programs, and 
social activities. The movies are usually 
correlated with the study of Italian. 
However, the works of prominent Italian 
producers are also viewed since they are 
main sources of Italian culture. Our slide 
shows and guest speakers try to depict 
the scenery and the life of people in Italy, 
The social activities also stress Italian 
culture by the consumption of food 
prepared the Italian way plus dancing to 
current Italian music. All of these func- 
tions by the Club are eventually sup- 
posed to introduce Italian things to non- 
Italians, thus preparing them for future 
travel in beautiful, sunny Italy. 
Members: Paul Bellisario, President; Rose 
Allocco, Linda Bal, Maria Cabrera, Mike 
Cozzi, Gladys Cruz, Paula Daleo, Vito 
Evola, Henry Gawlik, Roma Luin, Carol 
Lindini, Frances Manno, Lucille Manno, 



Jim Mariani, Carmela Martino, Pete 
Minerva, Luciano Panici, Rosario Pesce, 
Laura Puccini, Anita Quish, John 
Ranieri, Tim Redman, Gladys Saavedra, 
Joet Schlro. Bertica Silva. Irene Silva, 
Nick Stisco. Laura Villardi, Valeria Ward, 
Mary Wenziol. Dr. Laube, Moderator, 




The Ukrainian Club offers an exciting 
glimpse of ethnic culture. Its purpose 
and recurrent theme centers around ex- 
ploring pseudo-ethno-sexual mysticism. 
Its members vary from Anglo-Saxon to 
Austrian to Italian to Cuban to Ukrai 
nian. The club's meetings and 
membership are open to everyone. Our 
activities vary from pizza parties to folk- 
blues jam sessions. We plan field trips to 
ethnic centered museums, lounges, and 
restaurants. Our members manifest to 
the extreme the essence of free spirit and 
idealism. 

Members: Adrian Sheremeta, President; 
Robert F. BIyth, Marta Bahacz, Mark 
Demus, Rudyard A, Guido, Zenko 
Hrynkiw, Gregg Hrynko, George 
Hubchak, Darka Ivachiw, Peter Krafcisin, 
Roman Mycyk. Neil Myer, Myron 
Panchuk, Dagmar Pressling, Steve Pressl- 
ing, John Roccosanto, Perry Smith, Alex 
Sosenko, George Sosenko, George 
Stasula, Thomas C, Swiontek, Steve 
Szewczyk, Irene Zabytko, Jerry Zwier- 
zycki. Alfred Stewart, Moderator. 




110 



Kappa Beta Gamma 



Our Kappa Beta Gamma is a national, 
social sorority, originally founded at 
Marquette University in 1917. Epsilon's 
chapter has been in existence at Loyola 
since Spring. 1954. Now in 1973. we have 
a membership of thirty-two sisters ma- 
joring in many different fields, coming 
from a variety of social and ethnic 
backgrounds and possessing diversified 
but not unyielding opinions. Yet we 
share the special bond of friendship. 

We attend classes at both the Lake Shore 
and Lewis Towers campuses and are ac- 
tive in many university and community 
energies. Each individual ability has 
found an outlet as well as support in 
Kappa. Our sorority provides a feeling 
that each one belongs and has the moral 
support of the group in any worthwhile 
endeavor or undertaking. This feeling of 
confidence often makes it possible to 
succeed. 

By working together KBG's develop and 
maintain a close relationship. Kappa 



offers us many things and we. in return, 
offer our enthusiasm time, energy and 
love. By working with others, we ex- 
perience with others and learn. None of 
us can forget the Bushel Basket Throw 
booth in the Fall Carnival, or the pledge 
kidnapping sister scheme and then the 
sister kidnapping pledge scheme, the 
Halloween Drive for UNICEF. the rush 
parties, talent shows, song fests. Christ- 
mas caroling, the induction ceremonies, 
the parties, the charity projects and so 
much more. Oh yes, the hard work, the 
anxieties, the tears, the rewards, the fun, 
the laughter, and the remembering. 

We participate in Orientation Week, 
S.A.B. and SOB. activities. The Big-Little 
Sister Get Together. Greek Week, 
national and local candidate campaign 
drives. Voter Registration and poll 
watching. Student Advisory Board 
meetings, and other projects on our own 
and in conjunction with others. 

We live in the world with others. We en- 



joy and share close friendships. Yet we 
have become more than friends — we 
became sisters. The Greek letters K B G 
stand for "Friendship Life's Treasure." 
Kappa Beta Gamma really is a wonderful 
life. 

Members: Margo Swieca. President; Gin- 
ny Bohn. Kathie Brezovec. Susan Byrne. 
Marianne Concepcion. Cheryl Corrado, 
Ginny Crawford. Wendy Decker. 
Rochelle DiMaso, Eileen Driscoll. 
Maureen Duffy. Zori Fedunyszyn. Angela 
Henderson. Colette Holiday. Maria 
Jimenez. Peggy Kane. Joet Katz, Patty 
Kelly. Valerie Lipski, Mary Pat Mackin, 
Fran Manno, Lucille Manno, Joan 
McDonald. Paula Neri. Carol Ostruska. 
Rosemary Ryback. Veronica Sacony, 
Joanne Stefanowicz. Sheila Swieca, 
Susan Tassone, Pat Ward, Roseann 
Zahara. Bonnie Ozuk. Moderator. 




Ill 



Kappa Delta 
Epsilon 



Kappa Delta Epsilon is the Professional 
Education Sorority at Loyola. It was 
founded in 1933 as an extension of the 
Professional Education Fraternity, Kappa 
Phi Kappa. Since its organization, the 
sorority has been represented by 51 
chapters in 21 states. Beta Gamma, 
Loyola's chapter, has been in existence 
since November, 1968. In April, 1972, we 
were honored as the "Professional 
Organization of the Year" by the Blue 
Key National Honor Fraternity. 

KDE's primary purpose is to better 
prepare women for their future career in 
teaching. We also act as a service 
organization to Loyola and the com- 
munity. In regard to teacher preparation, 
the organization accomplishes this 
through our activities and our 
friendships with Sisters sharing one 
common goal — to teach. Our activities 
include such things as: Student Teaching 
Seminars, films, tours to various schools 
representing diverse educational envi- 
ronments, guest speakers from schools, 
representatives from the Chicago Board 
of Education, respected leaders in field 
of Education. Coffee House for faculty 
and students in the School of Education, 
charity drives and serving on committees 
for various purposes. In addition to our 
Individual projects, we have participated 
in and worked on projects of various 
organizations and departments at Lewis 
Towers. 

Kappa Delta Epsilon is based at the Lewis 
Towers Campus. Meetings and activities 
take place at this campus because most 
members attend classes at LT only. 
However, membership is open to women 
of either campus who are un- 
dergraduates with a minimum 
cumulative average of 2.2. Members need 
not be Education majors, although for 
obvious reasons, most are entering either 
elementary or secondary education. 

Members; Jean Lubeckis, President; 
Cheryl Corrado, Regina DeCaro, 
Catherine Eddy, Patiricia Grimes, Julie 
Jung, Roxanna Ordzowialy, Peggy Osko, 
Mary Ouska, Mary Pearce, Diana 
Rohlman, Sally Sawyer, Patricia Smith, 
Judy Sowa, Christine Stasiak. Christine 
Tremback, Theresa Tunzi, Maria Vaccara, 
Marlene Wilczynskl. Dr. Rosemary V. 
Donatelli, Moderator. 




112 




Loyola Collegi 
Republicans 



The object of the Loyola College 
Republican Club is to create an at 
mosphere of political interest on the 
Loyola campus by sponsoring interesting 
state and national speakers and by 
presenting pertinent information concer- 
ning the aims of the two parties and the 
views of their candidates. This Club 
provides an opportunity for students to 
find political expression and recognition 
not only on campus but in the local com- 
munity. During election years we con- 
centrate on working for Republican can- 
didates and during the non-election 
years we sponsor various speakers 
throughout the school year. We par- 
ticipate in annual state wide College 
Republican Conventions. Midwest con- 
ventions; as well as the social events the 
Club has during the year. 

Members: Phil Gilbert, President: Maria 
Almanza. Casimir Bartnik. Anne 
Beauregard. James R. Boveri. Mary 
Theresa Bragg. Michael Brown. Tom 
Bryant. Robert Burger. Tom Burke. Terry 
Burns. Pat Callahan. Tony Cavalea. 
Diane Christiansen. Tim Cullinan, Daryl 
Cushing. Brendan Duffy. Mary Lou 
Fehlen. Mary Ellen Fitzgibbons. John 
Foley. Joseph Folisi, Steve Foy. Margo 
Gordes. Steven Handler. Gary Hanline. 
Dan Healy. Jim Heller. Mary Beth Hickey. 
Ted Hoard. Lois Rutt Kay. Scott Keller, 
Kevin King. Thomas Kiolbassa, Deborah 
Kmieck. Robert Krupp, John Limanowski. 
Richard MadI, James Maher, Kenneth 
Mannen, Hank Marino. Verona Marx, 
John McShea, Jill Meyers, Ed Murphy, 
Louis Nemecek, Joe O'Halloran, Ed 
Recke, Lewis Rieck, Mario Romano. 
Veronica Sacony, Don Schlueter. Mary 
Schmidt. Karl Schuiz, Rick Scoglio. 
George Senyk. Walter Skowronski, Tom 
Skwarek, Arch Stella. Susan Sullivan. 
Carol Tarrant, Paul Trimble. John Trout. 
James Unger, Marilyn Unger. Kathy 
Valentine, Mark Valentine, Nancy Van 
Leuven. Carles Walloschek. Jane Weyker. 
Michael Wheeler. Steve Wilson. Joe 
Wolfe. Allen Zielinske. Norm Zienty. Mr. 
Kroll. Moderator. 



113 



LA.S.O. 



LUASA 



L.A.S.O. (the Latin American Student 
Organization) is composed of primarily 
of Latino students from both Loyola and 
Mundelein. The organization strives to 
develop and foster pride in Latino 
culture. L.A.S.O. is an integral part of the 
"Latin experience" here at Loyola. 
L.A.S.O. is dedicated to bringing about 
change, both within the student and the 
university. The desire for "change" is to 
make the university more relevent to the 
needs of Latinos whether it be 
academically, socially or personally. 
Within the Latin community there is a 
growing awareness of the need for 
higher education. L.A.S.O. is concerned 
with attracting more Latino students to 
Loyola. 

Members: Carlos Salazar, President; 
Felipe Aguirre, Jose Baricatos, Juan 
Calamin, Victor Cintron, Alfredo 
Disemos. Margie Crespo, Maria Diaz, 
Lupe Duran, Victor Escovedo, Tom 
Flanagan. Don Gonzalez. Denise Hutson, 
Henry Ibarra. Ramon Ibarra. Peter Mun- 
tanes. Arty Rimando, Sylvia Reyes. Angel 
Rodriguez. Victor Ruiz. Ed Torres. 
Frances Villafane. Rudy Villafane, Efrain 
Villerreal. Mr. Pedro Suarez, Moderator. 



The Loyola University Afro-American 
Student Association is an organization 
dedicated primarily to aiding interested 
Black students to get into school 
through school, and successfully out of 
school. Although LUASA is basically a 
campus organization. It has managed to 
maintain close ties with the Black com- 
munity. It also is not unusual to find 
LUASA members involved in many other 
facets of university life such as having 
representatives on most university com- 
mittees. Luasa cares enough — how about 
you? Check us out. 

Members: Merv Gould, Chairman: Deb- 
bie Brown. Tony Lane, Larry Lewis, Jerry 
Mc Donald, Carl Reynolds, Marcella 
Thomas, Deborah Turner, Jeff Williams. 



^ 



laAS 






1 mi 

9^ 



Theta Phi Alpha 



"Man's existence can only begin with 
other men." 

Unknown 

"It hath been taught from the primal 

state, 

That he which is. was wished until he 

were." 

William Shakespeare 

It is the harmonic union of two powerful 
forces that helps us become the best per- 
sons we are capable of being. By sharing 
our experiences with each other, we 
hope that we can help our sisters to in- 
deed become the individuals that they 
wish. 



Members; Leslie Pope, President; Cathy 
Coles, Cathy Conway, Kay Cunningham. 
Katie Donoval. Kathy Ebert. Mary 
Gatsch. Maureen George, Collette Jage. 
Judy Kroll. Andi Krzysko, Paula Leist. 
Maggie Lehayne, Dolores Mac Donald, 
Rita Nash, Rita O'Brien, Val Scaramella, 
Diane Sepulveda, Nada Simonovic, 
Helene Slobodian. Cindy Strawa, Renee 
Stroud, Judi Taylor, Laurie Ambrose, 
Nancy Backus. Sue Bajer, Kathy 
Borkalow, Randy Clinton, Denise 
Dayton. Mary Lou Fehlen. Kathy Hen- 
ning. Joann Johnson. Ann Martinez. Cin- 
dy Taylor. 




115 




LSGA 



116 



It's been fashionable for many of us to 
view student government as a farcical 
exercise in frustration or ego-tripping, 
much the same way it was once was 
fashionable for us to point out Mickey 
Mouse as the leader of the band. But 
then there always were those of us who 
felt ol' gravel-voiced Donald Duck would 
one day get his due. and so it seems 
there always will be some of us who feel 
that student government just might be 
worth the criticisms, joys, heartbreaks. 



achievements, challenges, cynicisms, and 
experiences that come inextricably en- 
tangled with the involvement. 
"A Vocal Majority" is the ticket-name of 
the executive board that took office in 
November. 1972 yet it is really always 
quite evident that accomplishments can- 
not be measured by the decibel count of 
a shout, but rather by the amount of 
listening going on. 

It takes an awful lot at the beginning to 
say "Its gonna be a good year, I can feel 



it." and it takes a lot more nine months 
later to still smile when you hear that 
quoted back to you. 
Members: Bill Savier, President; Stan 
Boychuck. Greg Dieter. Maria DiPrima. 
Dave Dwyer. Marc Fenton. Linda Catsch, 
Jose Izquierdo, Constantine Kokonas, 
Toni Krakowski, Mike Maciekowich. Tim 
McCormick, Mike Morison, Jim O'Con- 
nor, Mike Ortyl. Jim Slattery, Mike 
Woolf. Mr. Thomas O. Adams, 
Moderator. 




Math Club 



The Math Club tries to make a student 
feel less like a number. We have both a 
serious and a funny side — yes, there's a 
humorous dimension in mathemaSics. 
We try to be your friend, to help you with 
that sleep robbing problem, to inform 
you about how 

MATH B.S. + GRADUATION = $$$ 
On the serious side, L.U.'s Math Club has 
a free tutoring program. At our biweekly 
meetings our list of speakers rivals Dick 
Cavett's: IBM. Chicago Board of Educa- 



tion, Federal Civil Service Commission. 
Loyola University Math Faculty. 

And not-so-seriously, when all the 
proofs and problems are completed, we 
might take you on a hayride, share a poz- 
za with you. go bowling or have a party. 

Members: Linda Stomper. President: 
Larry Amato, Pam Babler, Thomas Ger- 
mino. Cheryl Graczyk, Geroge Hubchak, 
Michael Kadziela, Patrick Kallaus, 



Maryann Kaminski. David Klebba, 
Michael Koob, Paul Kott. Art Krumrey. 
Ken Ludwig. Maria Lupetini. Maggie 
Mamsch, Jim O'Connor. Randy 
Podoszwa. Elaine Salandino. Eileen 
Schultz. Bob Shaw. Joan Von Laven. 
Patricia Walsh. Michael Widmaier. Dr. 
Maher. Moderator. 



117 



The Loyolan 



Editor-in-Chief Marlene Pappas 

Photography Editor Art Krumrey 

Assistant Photography Editor . Phil Yee 

Photographers Dale Bespalec, 

Paul Collins. Randi Klein, Bill Mondi. 

Jack Murphy, Bruce Ritchie, 

Glenn Wattenberger 

Layout Editor John Steger 

Layout Staff Dan Clay, 

Mondi, Pappas, Lou Piccoll, 
Eileen Schultz 

Copy Editor Allen Lentino 

Assistant Copy Editor Bill Frantz 

Copy Staff Connie Campbell, 

Ingrid Hermann, Gregg Szul, 

Tom Zimmerman 

Board of Advisors . . Dr. Sammy Danna, 

Mr. Allan Gray, 

Rev. Francis X. Grollig. S.J., 

Dr. Rosemary Hartnett 

LT Advisor Terry Sullivan 

LSC Advisor Leon Saladino 

Publishing Walsworth Publishing 

Co., Inc. 

Graduate Photos Campus Photo 

Van Owner Mark Beehner 

Other Contributors Phoenix 

A very special thanks to all of the 
departments, organizations, and in- 
dividuals who contributed their own 
copy to this volume, proving that people 
are definitely a part of their yearbook. 




118 




119 




'Underneath I'm Tyrone Power" 



"Sic-em" 




"Layout is trying to get a piece of the 



action" s 



Is that how they do it? 




"Who SAYS we don't get along? 




122 



1 




123 



The Phoenix 



---Teeming throngs of Loyolans, anx- 
ious for their weekly copies of the 
Phoenix, crowd around campus news 
stands hoping to catch a glimpse of 
Loyola's world-renowned student 
newspaper. 

-Intellectually starved medical and 
dental students await the Phoenix 
hungrily. Scalpels in hand, they are 
prepared to wreak vengence upon any 
dastardly messenger who dares to 
deliver the newspaper late. 
---Solemn law students armed with 
gavels and Bibles stand ready to 
prosecute the wicked people who 
malign the Phoenix. 
Perhaps this is a slightly exaggereated 
account of the weekly reception the 
Phoenix receives. But we like to think 
it's not too far from the truth. 
Working on the Phoenix sounds like 
fun and it is. However to produce a 
consistently excellent newspaper on a 
regular basis requires dedication, 
work, and perseverance. 
With an insane and competent staff, 
some considerate supervisors, and a 
little beer, we manage to print the 
news and print it well. 
Members: Lu Ann Zanzola, Editor-in- 
Chief; Felipe Aguirre, Tom Allison, 
Teresa Anesinis, Chris Baglio, Barbara 
Baul, Judy Benson, Anne Brandsetter, 
Susan Jo Candiotti, John Cannon, 
Paula Carney, Tom Cekay, Kevin 
Conway, William Darley, Mark 
Dembski, Steve Dittmann, Rochelle Di 
Maso, Mary Donners, Katie Donaval, 
Linda Engel, Jim Froberg. Eileen Gen- 
tile, Nick Greanias, Steve Handler, 
Colin Hara, Bill Hartray, Jean 
Hellman, Mike Hess, Marian Johnson, 
Chris Johnston, Janet Keleher, Randi 
Klein. Debbie Kmiecik, Rich Kowalc- 
zyk, Mike Lebak, Tom Lenz, Jim LI 
Sacchi, Jim Littwin, John Lopatka, 
Michael Madsen, Kathy Mallen, Bill 
Mc Gee, Neil Mc Laughlin, Kathy Mc 
Nichols, Debbie Meehan, Sue 
Merkner, Cathy Miller, Jim Mueller, 
Bernie O' Connor, John O' Dwyer, 
Kathy O'Leary. Tom Van Cost, Bob 
Otter, Joe Orlick, Dawn Overend, 
Daryl Ramsey, Tom Regelin, Ron 
Rulkowski, Mary Schmidt. Gregory 
Siemanowski, Norine Shum, Helene 
Slobodian, Bobbi Steuert. Rae 
Terrones, Cindy Vukits, Bernie Weiler, 
Nancy Wikarski, Rosemary Zanzola, 
Liz Zavodny, Marge Zegan, Allan 
Gray, Editorial Consultant. Dr. 
Rosemary Hartnett, Moderator. 





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127 



The Adventurers 



Unlike other organizations whose 
achievements and goals are abstractions, 
such as friendship, brotherhood, or 
spiritual fulfillment. The Adventurers are 
involved in the concrete, in real life 
situations. We are the club that goes 
places and does things. Whether it is 
scuba diving in the placid waters of Lake 
Michigan or experiencing the Eskimo 
lifestyle, the Adventurers seek action. 

Once a month we gather around the 
fireplace and relate our tales of the ex- 



illarating and the bizarre over a cup of 
warm Ovaltine. Who could forget the 
time we placed one of our members in a 
state institution on the eve of his wed- 
ding night? Yes, we are a fun-loving 
bunch. Our tastes and interests are very 
diversified, but we are drawn together by 
our own common lust for adventure. 

MEMBERS: Howie Roberts, Mike Nelson, 
Red Motlow, Howie Kaplan, Flossie 
Streator. 




Readers' Circle 



Readers' Circle is a coeurrieular 
organization whose members are in- 
terested in becoming better acquainted 
with the world's best literature through 
Oral Interpretation. Readers' Circle also 
provides us with a vehicle for self expres- 
sion in literature through com- 
municating to others what we have felt 
ourselves in reading literature. 

Reading hours provide experience in the 
sharing of such works as: Under Milkwcod 
by Dylan Thomas. John Brown's Bodij by 
Stephan Vincent Benet, U.S.A. by John 
Dos Passos and Tht' World of Carl Sand- 
burg by Norman Corwin. A special 
"Childrens' Hour " is presented at Christ- 
mas. 

Festivals and tournaments afford oppor- 
tunities for intercollegiate exchange of 
ideas with students and helpful com- 



ments by critics. An annual Readers' Ralhj 
is sponsored for Chicago Area High 
Schc>ols and also a contest is held for 
Loyola students. The winner of the latter 
is presented an award at Honors 
Convention. 

Special programs have included: 
"Chicago U.S.A." at Expo '67. Tdt' Fan- 
tastiks by Tom Jones and Harvey Schmidt 
at the Allied Arts Conference, "Ses- 
quicentennial Salute ". honoring Illinois 
authors at the National Contemporary 
Theater Convention. "An Odyssey of 
American Sounds" for the Friends of 
American Writers and Tliis is the 
Amenean Earth by Ansel Adams and Nan- 
cy Newhall celebrating the centennial 
National Parks. "Poetry in Crystal" 
presented in coordination with the 
Steuben Corporations Chicago Exhibi- 
tion and "Loyola Internationale" were 



televised on CBS Vista Programs. 

Members: Bea Oloroso. President; Ray- 
mond Bandusky. Robert Benton. Sue 
Candiotli. kathy Cassidy, Paula 
Coughlin. Rc)berl Erickson. Margaret 
king. Joanie kowalczyk. Bessie Makris, 
Jenny Marwig, Leslie Mermall. Siro Pieri. 
Chantima Punolai. Judy Rebuck. 
Catherine M. Geary, Moderator. 




Pom-Pom Squad 



Pom-pom pom-pom pom-pom pom-pom 
pom-pom pom-pom pom-pom pom-pom 
pom-pom pom-pom pom-pom pom-pom 
pom-pom pom-pom pom-pom pom-pom 
pom-pom pom-pom pom-pom pom-pom 
pom-pom pom-pom pom-pom pompom 

Members: Claudia Anderson. Anita 
Crittenden. Denise Dayton. Margie Faut. 
Mary Faut, Maureen Gregory. Leslie 
LaBelle. Diane Paone. Linda Scaramella, 
Jeanette Sopkiewicz. Frances Villafane. 
Sandy Vross, Sherry Werrline. Mrs. Jean- 
nine Monforti. Moderator. 

Pom-pom pom-pom pom-pom pom-pom 
pom-pom pom-pom pom-pom pom-pom 
pom-pom pom-pom pom-pom pom-pom 
pom-pom pom-pom pom-pom pom-pom 
pom-pom pom-pom pom-pom pom-pom 
pom-pom pom-pom pom-pom pom-pom 





130 



Cheerleaders 








The cheerleaders for the 1972-73 season 
have been working to perfect cheers and 
stunts so that they might gain more 
audience support. 

The girls practice four hours a week on 
old and new cheers, mounts, acrobatics, 
and chants to arouse the spectators' 
enthusiasm to cheer on the team. They 
have a remarkable amount of school 
spirit, and are willing to try any cheering 
technique to get YOU to yell along with 
them. 

This year you will see the cheerleading 
squad along with the pom-pom squad 
ushering for the basketball games. They 
are doing this additional work to earn 
the money to pay for their new uniforms. 

Show these girls you approve of their ef- 
forts and stand up and yell along with 
them! 

Members: Melody Kas, Captain: Sonya 
Bernardi. Mary Casey. Marilyn Guszaki. 
Kitty Laub. Leslie Norskog. Marlene Pap- 
pas. Mary Ann Powers. Mrs. Jeanine 
Monforti. Moderator. 



131 




Sigma Pi 



Sigma Pi — a national fraternity. Perhaps 
more importantly, a Loyolan fraternity. 
The oldest. The Brothers of Sigma Pi 
carry on a tradition which demands that 
they strive to make real the ideal of 
brotherhood, within and without the 
fraternity. 

The fraternity is made up of individuals 
who confess that there are freaks, jocks 
and ROTC nuts — all in this one family. 
They have found Sigma Pi an opportunity 



to grow. The diverse membership con- 
tributes to the tolerance, understanding 
openness of the members. Chivalry may 
be dead, but idealism is not. The Sig Pi's 
have pledged themselves to service, to 
Brotherhood in the fullest meaning of 
the word. And after all. isn't that what 
it's all about? 

Members: Mike Kudia. President: Bob 
Barranco. Dominic Boffa. Joe Cailles. 
Jack Cummings. Phil Duchin. Bill Elling. 



Rich Garay. Jim Heller. Tom Herried. Jim 
Jasper, Jerry kadleck. Jim Kail. Jim Kraft, 
Mike Kuzlik, Tom Mikalauskas. Frank 
Modica. Joe McCone. Mike Mysza, Ber- 
nie O'Connor, Dave Rinella, Craig San- 
tolin, Greg Schulz. John Sutula, Jim 
Thout, Bill Tully, Jim Tully, Tom Tully, 
Mark Valentine. Brother Michael Grace. 
Moderator. 



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Tau Kappa Epsilon 



Tau Kappa Epsilon. the largest fraternity 
in the world, celebrates its 75th anniver- 
sary this year. Epsilon Kappa chapter 
here at Loyola has been an active 
member of the student body ever since 
Its inception in 1956. 

There are many other aspects of fraterni- 
ty life which go unnoticed by the majori- 
ty of Loyola students. However, we ex- 
perience these things daily. It is the good 
times and the bad, the everyday life that 



we shall all remember. It is our intent to 
live these four years here to our fullest 
capacity. Anything else would be a 
betrayal of ourselves. 

Members: Frank Lippa. President; Jeff 
Augustine. Jim Burch. Larry Canoff. Dave 
Causey. Don Christiansen. John Clark, 
Dan Curran. Bob Dahms. Ed Deninger, 
Todd Histor Dolan, Rich Dux. Gerry 
Fiset. Bob Gallery. Jose Gato. Paul 
Hogan. George Hyland. Pat Jage. Frank 



Johnson. Greg Jollivetle. John Paul 
Jones. Al Kanabay. Joe Karas. Jim 
Mariani, Jack McCarthy. Mike Millick III. 
Gary Nolah. Tim Okal. Dan Palicki. John 
Hegemon Pflaumer. Fred Romano. Joe 
Richards. Steve Rochford. Gary Rolsch. 
Stan Salabura. Bruce Shmway. Bob 
Williams. 



133 



Student Activities Board (S.A.B.) 



The make-up of S.A.B. is unique. 
Membership involves going to the Info. 
Center and saying you want to sign up. 
Your participation is what you make it. 

Members: Frank Giambrone. Chairman; 
Tom Ahnger, Jack Alberts, Mark 
AuBuchon, Chris Baglio. Bob Bartolone. 
Barb Bellomo, Judy Beluch, Charlene 
Benza, Kathy Boyle, Charlie Brown. Con- 
nie Campbell. Margarita Casas, Tom 
Ceglarek, Steve Charniak, Tony Chereck, 
Dan Clay, Steve Colompos, Jo De Maria, 
Mark Dembski, Colleen Devitt, Greg 
Dieter, Darlene Diguida, Bob Doig, Mike 
Dooley, Pat Dooley, Alan John Eodie, 
Zori Fedunyszyn, Marc Fenton, Carol 
Fitt. Maria Garcia, John Gauer, Mary 
Chris Gawenda, Tom Germino. Mary 
Grace Gordon, Alice Gazdziak. Tim 
Grady, Ms. Rusty Greene. Maureen 
Gregory, Susan Grigg, Juanita Grozdiak, 
Joe Hall, Avis Hamilton. Ellie Ham- 
marlund. Gary Hanline, Rhonda Harris. 
Ronald Hay, Ingrid Herman, Kevin 
Hickey, Scott HIady, Bobbi Houndt, 
George Hubchak, Wayne Jancik, Libby 
Janesy, Geraldine Johnson. Pam John- 
son, Chris Johnston, Cathy Judge, Frank 
Keen. Soozi Kehoe, Frank Knoll. Jerry 
Klobutcher, Dennis Krawczak, Bill 
Drichbaum, Marty Kroll, Jim 
Kuzynowski. Mary Lanier, Roy Laube, 
Rita Lewandowski, Bettye Lockett. Jim 
Lynch. Ed Maiek, Sue Malone. Mary Ann 
Marynczak, Peg Matre. Marty McDonald, 
Mary Messner, Sue Merkner, Kathy 
Miller, Bill Mondi, Kathy Montonera. 
Wendy Morgan, Ed Morley, Nancy Mor- 
ton. Marge Mueller. Claudia Nickele. 
Mary Alice Noone. Jim O'Brien, Mike 
Oste. Patricia Pajak, Chris Paszko. 
Richard Paz, Al Perez, Debbie Plafcan, 
Donna Plumb. Judie PoznanskI, Ross 
Quattrochi, Nancy Rago, Rich Piper, 
Daryl Ramsey. Dave Render, James 
Robinson, David Roucek, Terri Ryan, Pat 
Santare. Frank Saporito, Bill Savier, Tom 
Scherer, Vic Scoudius, Diana Secco. 
Diana Sepulveda. Mike Shulock. Debbie 
Smith. Kathryn Smith. Gary Soltys. 
Ginger Sourea, Mike Spread. Steven 
Springer, Bobbi Steuert, Mary Such, Gail 
Sulchlns, Mary Lou Sullivan, Thea Sventy, 
Margo Swieca. Kathi Szettele, John 
Szopa. Anna Maria Tate, Gary Troccoli. 
Tom Van Cost. Carol Waldock, Patricia 
Walsh, Mike Wayne. Nancy Wikanski. 
Mary Wilke, Vive Williams, Jeff Wilson. 
Leonard Wise, Liz Zauadny. Tony 
Zielinski. Diane Zimmerman. John Zip- 
parro. Cheryl Frerck, Moderator. 




Student Personnel 





J OPPOSITE , 
M DIRECTION Ik 



135 




13G 









Loyola Students are sometimes correct in 
stating that the university is unrespon- 
sive to the needs of the students. It is 
easy to cite the parking problem at both 
campuses for a ready example. But when 
we use the term "university" we must be 
careful not to include one specific area 
of the university as being unresponsive 
to the students needs. Student Per- 
sonnel, headed by Wayne Tinkle, is the 
most responsive office within the univer- 
sity. We all know that classroom learning 
Is only a small part of our college ex- 
perience and that our interaction with 
people is the most valuable asset that we 
attain at college. The staffs at the LT and 
LSC realize this and they strive hard to 
bring a large university, to the students. 
The staff is available for counseling or 
vocational guidance. The Deans are in- 
terested in students and are instrumental 
in formulating policy that effects 
students. A Black Student Advisor meets 
the particular needs of the Afro- 
American student by creating oppor- 
tunities and by Innovating programs to 
meet their needs. The Director of Student 
Activities is responsible for coordinating 
all student activities, and advising stu- 
dent groups when help is needed. The 
Housing Office evaluates all levels of 
residential living and tries to make living 
at Loyola enjoyable. 

It Is quite obvious the Student Personnel 
tries to supply the student with the other 
half of college life. In the three years I 
have dealt with the staff and secretaries 
of the Office of Student Personnel I have 
yet to see a student pushed aside by 
anyone, administrator or secretary. It 
can be easily explained why this is so. 
there are in positions of authority, peo- 
ple who see the needs of students and 
are sincere in their desires to help them. 
For the students with problems or need 
advice or counselors the Student Per- 
sonnel Office will be the most helpful of 
any office in the University. 



137 



WLUC Radio 



138 





WLUC Radio is the college radio station 
of Loyola University and Mundelein 
College. The station has been established 
and organized to promote the benefits of 
educational radio, and to supply a means 
of broadcast training: other functions in- 
clude the provision of entertainment and 
campus-community service. Membership 
of the WLUC staff is open to all students 
of both campuses, subject to successful 
participation of WLUC internship 
program. ELF after the names of certain 
members indicates that they are con- 
sidered esoteric laudable frequencies. 

Members: Judy Mullen. General 
Manager: Jack Alberts (elf). Marty 
Anderson. Maria Barbatano (elf). Hector 
Barrera III. Brian Barrett, Tony Bartolotta 
(pd) (elf). Barbara Baul. Bob Bensdorf, 
Jim Benz (md) (elf). Dale Bespalec. 
Wayne (Uncle) Brucar, Chuck Burnett, 
Susan Jo Candiotti. Larry Canoff. Gloria 
Costillo, Dan Durbin (elf), Roy Filson, 
Ken Flack (the parrot). Bill Frantz (elf), 
Roxanne Gesualdo, Howard Gold, 
Richard Gors, Tom Goska, Linda 
Harrison (ad) (elf). Larry Heisler (aad), 
Ingrid Hermann (prd) (elf). Art Krumrey 
(elf), Roy Laube (lumpy tuna). John 
Lebetski (elf), Jay Lefkovitz. Allen Len- 
tino (nd) (elf). Gary Lipinski (elf), 
Lawrence Lucido, Charles Lyie, Kathy 
Mallen (elf), Betty Mc Cormick (rl) (elf), 
Bill Messina, Bill Mondi (td) (elf), Jay 
Nolan, Susanne Pazak (td) (elf), Gary 
James Pearce (elf), Al Perez, Diann 
Proud (elf), Tom Roblson (elf), Nancy 
Rago. Ted Rockwell. Philip Rodman. Beth 
Seaman. Howard Seaman. Wayne Sher- 
man. Kathryn Smith. Pete Soraparu (sd) 
(elf). Steven Springer. John Steger (psd) 
(elf). Linda Stomper (ad) (elf). Mike 
Suhajda (elf). Pat Summers. Mary Sue 
Tambone. Tom Tambone. Tom Van Cost. 
Dale Vecchio (elf), Steve Yadlovski. Dr. 
Samuel Danna. Moderator (elf). 



Father Edward Surtz 



Bibiiography: 

!909 Birth in Cleveland, Ohio, July 5, 
1909. 

1915 1923. Private Grammar School. 
Cleveland. 

1923-27. The Cathedral Latin School, 
Cleveland, Valedictorian, class of- 
ficer, editor-in-chief of the yearbook, 
etc. 

1927-1931. John Carroll University. A.B. 
cum laude, June 1931. President of the 
Glee Club feature editor of the Carroll 
News, intramural and intercollegiate 
awards and medals in English, Latin, 
French, and Theology. 

1931-1933. Milford Novitiate of the 
Society of Jesus. Teaching of Greek 
and French in Milford Division of 
Xavier University. 

1933-34. Milford Juniorate. M.A. in 
English, Xavier University, Cincinnati, 
June 1934. 

1934-1936. Ph.L, June 1936. Thesis; A 
comparison of the Theories of Suarez 
and Rousseau on the Origin and 
Nature of the State. 

1936-1939. Instructor in English and 
Latin to juniors and seniors at Loyola 
Academy, Chicago Dramatic Director, 
Debating Coach. 

1939-1943. Ordained to the priesthood 
on June 17, 1942. S.T.L. June 1943. 
Thesis: Scripture and the Evolution of 
the Human Body. 

1944-48. Elizabeth Allen Olmsted 
Scholarship, 1945-46. Winthrop 
Sergent Prize for Shakespeare Essay, 
1947 M.A., June 1946. Ph.D., March 
1948. Dissertation: Philosophy and 
Education in More's Utopis. 

1954-1955. John Simon Guggenheim 
Fellowship for research in archives 
and libraries in America and Europe. 
Project: The Intellectual Milieu of 
Thomas More's Utopia. 

1959-1960. Fellowship for year of 
research at Yale University to co-edit 
the Utopia. 

1961. Summer grant in aid from Loyola 
University for completion of work on 
the scholarly edition of Utopia. 

1962. Summer grant in aid from the 
American Council of Learned 
Societies for the work on the follow- 
ing lopic: The Relation of John 
Fischer (1469-1535) to the English 
Renaissance and the Reformation. 

1963. Summer grant from the More Pro- 
ject at Yale University for competion 
cf work on the selected works edition 
of Utopis. 



1964. Summer Fellowship granted by the 
Frank Weil Institute for Studies in 
Religion and the Humanities for con- 
tinuation of the work on St. John 
Fisher. 

1964-1965. Fellowship awarded by the 
American Council of Learned 
Societies for completion of the work 
on St. John Fisher through study and 
research in British archives and 
libraries. 

1968. Grant by the American 
Philosophical Society for research in 
Rome, London, and Paris. 

1970-1971. Senior Fellowship awarded by 
the National Endowment for 
Humanities, which embodied all the 
materials gathered since 1968 in 
Vatican City, Rome, Paris, and Lon- 
don. As well as, Naples, Florence, 
Bologna, Padua, and Venice. 

Membership in learned and Professional 
Societies. Modern Language Associa- 
tion of /America, Renaissance Society 
of America, Renaissance Seminar of 
the University of Chicago, Amici 
Thomae Mori, Milton Society of 
America, Conference on British 
Studies, College English Association, 



National Council of Teachers of 
English, Catholic Commission on 
Intellectual and Cultural Affairs, and 
the American Association of Universi- 
ty Professors. 
July 1971. Father Surtz was elected as an 
Outstanding Educator in America for 
1971. This annual award program 
honoring distinguished men and 
women for their exceptional service, 
achievement, and leadership in the 
field of education. Each year those 
chosen are featured in a national 
awards volume: Outstanding Educators 
of America. 



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The Loyolan's 50th Anniversary 



The 1973 Loyolan marks the Golden An- 
niversary of the founding of the Loyola 
yearbook. Morton Zabel is the founding 
advisor of the Loyolan, in 1923 (Isl 
volume published in 1924) and faithfully 
remaining as faculty director of not only 
the yearbook, but the newspaper, then 
called Loyola News, for nearly 20 years. 
It was through his almost single-handed 
efforts that the yearbook survived as 
long as it did. Unfortunately, no 1924 
Loyolan was available for reference 
when this was being written. However. 
Volume 2. 1923. indicates that Volume I 
was born under very shakey cir- 
cumstances. From all indications 
Volume 2 was an experiment that had 
finally solidified into something perma- 
nent. The 1925 Loyolan staff complained 
that it experienced innumerable dif- 
ficulties which hurt the quality of the 
volume somewhat. "The widespread 
nature of the campus, the intramural 
friction, the amount of traveling and 
messenger work which must be done, 
and the generally complicated aspect of 
annual work combined to make enough 
work for all concerned." the staff com- 
plained . . 

The 1926 Loyolan also complained about 
its problems with the following state- 



ment relating to the pioneering days of 
the yearbook's beginnings and what such 
means: "Every year sees particular 
problems and them alone are enough to 
give occupation to a staff, without hav- 
ing added the necessity of trail-blazing." 
The 1927 Loyolan staff felt it was at least 
in the shape to make additions, in- 
novations and other advances not possi- 
ble in the first three years. Good recep- 
tion of the 1926 book was the signal for 
expansion and revision in 1927. The 1928 
Loyolan staff says that the 1926 year- 
book was the turning point in getting the 
annual on a substantial footing with the 
training of experienced staffers for the 
future then possible. The 1929 staff was 
small but systematized and better 
organized in its routine work. Thus, the 
Loyolan continued to grow in age, size. 
quality and stability. . The 1936 volume 
was increased in format size from the 
original 8x11 to the present 9x12 standard 
size book. The series ended in 1942 and 
from 1943 to 1946, inclusive, no 
Loyolans were published, presumedly 
because of the war years and post-war 
reorganization. . The 1947, the 20th 
volume produced, edition met heavy 
problems such as generally inexperienc- 
ed staffers, paper shortages, and 




regrettably delayed delivery of the year- 
book, .lohn Gerrieits of the English Depl. 
served as moderator; Gerrietts was a 
former Loyolan editor. There were no 
1948 or 1949 editions of the Loyolan 
because of numerous unspecified dif- 
ficulties experienced on the 1947 
volume. . The 1950 yearbook, the 21st 
volume, printed a page at the very end of 
the book, entitled: "Thr Last Word". The 
following was written: "The students 
cried for a yearbook. The faculty 
demanded a yearbook. The 1950 Loyolan 
in being printed, and the proof of that is 
in the fact that this last word' is being 
written .... The 1950 Loyolan can 
boast of three 'firsts.' This yearbook is 
the first to be published after a gap of 
three years (two volumes); it is the first 
to have coeds on the staff; and it is the 
first to have a Queen and her court . . . 
Yes. the 1950 Loyolan is much more than 
just a history of the school year, it is the 
story of each and every student at 
Loyola. ." 

The Loyolan was absent from student life 
from 1951 to 1957. inclusive. The 1958 
volume, the 22nd. returned in time to 
feature the celebration of the lOOth an- 
niversary of the Jesuits in Chicago. The 
only explanation given for the return of 
the Loyolan was this that in September, 
1957 "the Loyolan was brought back to 
the confines of the University." Nothing 
was said about the missing seven 
volumes from 1951-57. inclusive. Quite 
naturally, the reasons include multitudes 
of difficulties that have beset past 
volumes, ranging from finances, staff in- 
terest, student and faculty interest in the 
yearbook, itself, and the like. 
With the re-introduction of the 1958 
volume, the Loyolan has been published 
every year thereafter to the present, but 
for the past four years, the Loyolan has 
been under stiff attack relating to its lack 
of sales to the general student body and 
to some extent its representation of the 
broad spectrum of university activities. 
The great costs of the books and their 
comparatively smaller income returns 
constitute a major problem that has 
plagued the annual for at leas! several 
years. Last year, the entire Loyolan 
budget was killed, but through the per- 
sistent efforts mainly of this years 
editor, the book returns with about a 
third of the funds available in recent 
years. This year's book, the 37th volume, 
is truly on trial, a trial for its life, as the 
Loyolan celebrates the Golden Anniver- 
sary of its founding. 



WALSWORTH 

Marcfhnr. Mo I S A 



143 









This year ha$ been a trial year for the 
Loyolan. Not only did we have to sell 
enough books to supply our printing 
budget with enough money to publish, 
but we also attempted to involve more 
students than ever before. Father 
Baumhardt was kind enough to supply us 
with a five-thousand dollar budget for 
printing and the Phoenix added to the 
cause to the tune of twenty-eight hun- 
dred dollars. This gave us enough money 
to put out volume one of the 1973 
Loyolan. The success of the second 
volume now depends on the sales of this 
book. 




Students, faculty, and organizations have 
assisted the copy staff this year by sub- 
mitting their own copy. Too often in the 
past, the Loyolan was short-sided to the 
views of the students. . . now however, it 
has become the voice of the students, 
faculty and organizations of the year. For 
their cooperation, as well as the unen- 
ding cooperation and enthusiasm of the 
staff, I would like to say thanks; without 
it the book never would have succeeded. 
It is my hope that this book wilt provide 
you with a guide to the semester past 
and an enthusiasm for the next book 
representing the semester to come. 



Marlene G. Pappas, Editor 




;"• • ■■■« - 



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WALSWORTH 

Marceline, Mo., U.S.A. 



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146 




Dorms 



Campion Hall 148-149 

Chamberlain Hall 150-151 

Delaware Hall 152-153 

Gonzaga Hall 154-157 

Mertz Hall 158-161 

Stebler Hall 162-163 



Campion Hall 



Campion Hall is a three story building 
adjacent to Mertz Hall. Its 349 residents 
are situated in six separate wings of 
about sixty men. These wings take part in 



hall government, intramurals and other eluding head resident, resident 

university activities. Campion Hall has a assistants, and chaplains to assist the 

full residence hall advisory staff, in- residents in any way possible. 






149 



Chamberlain Hall 







151 



Delaware Hall 




152 




153 



Gonzaga Hall 



Gonzaga Hall is governed and managed 
by Loyola students with the assistance 
and cooperation of Loyola University. 
The aim of Gonzaga Hall is to establish a 
feeling of respect and responsibility in 
the resident, both Individually and com- 
munally. These ideals can be pursued 
due to the self governing nature of Gon- 
zaga; the men living at Gonzaga are 
directly responsible for the well-being of 
the Hall and its members. Each member 
must be willing to contribute his per- 
sonal time and effort in order to main- 
tain the community spirit. Although the 
commitment to the hall may seem 
challenging, most members will testify to 
the fact that the rewards far outweigh 
the investment. These rewards exhibited 
in the physical, mental, academic, and 
spiritual growth of the student, con- 
tribute to the total development of the 
Individual. 










155 







11 



^^4^ 



UNFOHmSHEDilFARTMEN 

FOR RENT 

IN THIS BUILDING 



156 




FORINSPECIin"' 
MR.Ror 



STAN 
32 



ii "■ ,?'^rt^^^ H~'^. ■"■■ ■■ 




Mertz Hall 



Mertz is ... 

an air conditioned room with a lake 
view, 3 meals a day. and a roommate 
that drives you up the walls, 
"ditching it" cause the R.A.s com- 
ing. 

an elevator that stops on every floor 
but your own. 

Merge Meeting, Monday, 10 p.m.. be 
there, ok. T. M. 

Brian Kaulig making the rounds in 
the cafeteria. 

taking phone messages for a suite- 
mate who's never in but gets a lot of 
calls anyway. 

hot water that's freezing cold, 
discovering that your long lost best 
friend from grammar school lives 
next door. 

sleeping on the suite couch cause 
roomie got a friend, 
apathy 
caring 

going across the street to the laun- 
dromat because the machines 
downstairs are broken, 
getting thrown in the shower on 
your birthday. 



pain-in-the-neck linen exchanges on 

Wednesday and Thursday nights. 

dumping water on the pedestrians 

walking along Loyola Avenue. 

being glad you don't live in another 

dorm. 

wishing you didn't live in a dorm at 

all. 

Keeping your dead "comparative" 

cat in the suite shower. 

sitting in the cafeteria and staring at 

countless numbers of residents and 

wondering "does she or doesn't 

she?", "will he or won't he?" 

having everyone know the latest 

gossip about you. 

knowing the latest gossip about 

everybody else. 

studying all night in the elevator 

lobby. 

windows that leak. 

having a crush on the good looking 

associate hall director 

nearly 700 men and women living 

together, some liking it some hating 

it, but all learning from it. 

my home, man. Don't knock it. 




158 




159 




161 



Stebler Hall 



Slebler Hall is a constantly changing 
dormitory. When new faces enter this 
women's residence each fall, the building 
takes on a new face of its own. This year, 
Stebler is full of noise - not always loud, 
but always there, happy or sad. Living 
among smiles becomes contagious, as 
any Stebler girl will tell you. Stebler 
becomes a home, where lives are shared, 
rather than just a place to sleep. Housing 
72 girls in its 3 stories, life at Stebler is a 
personal encounter, one long- 
remembered by its residents. 




162 




163 




164 




Sports Round-up 

Hockey 166-169 

Basketball 170-175 

Track 176-177 

Water Polo 178-181 



Club Hockey 1972-73 



Loyola University 1972-73 Varsity Hockey Club Roster 



Player 

Carl Andrews 
Tom Calandrielleo 
Jim Cooney 
Chris Emerle 
Mike Flaws 
George Hyland 
Tom Janecke 
Mike kowalski 
Jeff Krol 
John Kwasny 
George McCarthy 
Joe Mclnerney 
Mike Mclnerney 
Bob Molina 
Bruce Pernicka 
Dave Pomierski 
Mike Rice 
John Stanek 
John Winkler 
Bob Wrobel 
Mark Gillette 



Pos. 


Age 


Class 


F 


18 


Fr. 


F 


21 


Sr. 


D 


20 


Sr. 


G 


18 


Fr. 


F 


19 


Soph. 


D 


21 


Sr. 


D 


18 


Soph. 


F 


21 


Sr. 


F 


17 


Fr. 


F 


19 


Soph 


F 


21 


Sr. 


F 


18 


Fr. 


G 


19 


Jr. 


D 


21 


Jr. 


D 


19 


Soph 


D 


18 


Fr. 


F 


17 


Fr. 


F 


19 


Jr. 


F 


19 


Soph 


G 


21 


Sr. 



Mgr. 20 Jr. 



Hometown 



Chicago, 

La Grange, 

Chicago. 

Morton Grove, 

Chicago, 

Evanston. 

PalosPark. 

Chicago, 

Park Ridge, 

Chicago. 

Wilmette, 

Niles, 

Elmwood Park, 

Lincolnwood, 

Lyons. 

Mundelein. 

Buffalo Grove. 

Berwyn. 

La Grange, 

Chicago, 

Chicago, 




166 



1972 73 Hockey Club Varsity Record 

i U. Illinois (Urbana) 2 

5 U. Illinois (Urbana) 4 
7 III. Benedictine 6 
2 U. Wisconsin (Parkside)3 

2 Western Michigan 16 

6 Indiana 3 
5 Lewis College 4 

3 Marquette U. 4 
2 Lewis College 3 
2 Northern Illinois 6 
2 Western Michigan 18 

4 Northern Illinois 4 



Loyola 


2 


Indiana U. 


6 


Loyola 


2 


Purdue U. 


5 


Loyola 


3 


Purdue U. 


4 


Loyola 


2 


U. Illinois (Circle) 


9 


Loyola 


3 


U. Illinois (Circle) 


2 


Loyola 


3 


Northwestern U. 


5 


Loyola 


7 


U. Wise. (Parkside) 


5 


Loyola 


5 


Niles Juv. All Stars 


3 


Loyola 


4 


Western Michigan 


9 


Loyola 




III. Benedictine 




Loyola 




Chicago State 




Loyola 


S 


Marquette U. 


3 


Loyola 


5 


Marquette U. 







flj^l. 



"•""WstelS . liiiStiM^IBi* 




167 




f»»»( 








169 



Basketball 1972-73 



Loyola University 1972-73 Varsity Basketball Roster 



No. Player 


Pos. Ht. 


Wt. 


Age 


Ltt 


s. Class 


Hometown 


3 Lloyd Winston 


C 6-8 


210 


18 





Fr, 


Chicago, III 


5 JohnWilley 


G 6-1 


171 


19 





Fr. 


Michigan City, Ind 


10 Pat Compobasso 


F 6-5 


210 


21 


2 


Sr. 


Chicago, III 


II Lou Lovett 


F 6-4 


195 


19 





So. 


Dearborn, Mich. 


12 DaneEdley 


G 6-2 


165 


18 





Fr. 


Washington, D.C. 


14 Frank Sanders 


G 6-1 


157 


20 


1 


Jr. 


Chicago, III 


20 Ken Lee 


F 6-3 


170 


19 





So. 


Chicago, III 


21 Brian Hayden 


G 6-2 


183 


20 





Sr. 


W, Milford. N.J 


22 Jim Sexton 


F 6-3 


185 


20 





Jr. 


Chicago, III. 


23 Mike Law 


G 6-1 


180 


20 





Jr. 


Highland, Ind 


24 John Foley 


G 6-0 


165 


19 





So. 


Burbank. Ill 


25 FoyHart 


F 6-5 


195 


20 





So. 


Chicago, III. 


30 Garvey Walker 


G 5-11 


155 


21 


1 


Sr. 


Chicago. III. 


31 Bruce Ellsberg 


F 6-3 


175 


19 





So. 


Peru. Ill 


33 JackMcShea 


6 5-11 


170 


19 





So. 


Rockville, Md 


34 Ernie Lewis 


F 6-6 


190 


24 


2 


Sr. 


Washington, DC. 


35 BillDurkin 


G 6-1 


177 


20 





So. 


Evergreen Pk.. III. 


40 Nate Hayes 


F 6-4 


175 


21 


2 


Sr. 


Washington, DC 


41 Paul Cohen 


C 6-8 


240 


20 


1 


Jr. 


Boston, Mass 


44 Don Demkiw 


F 6-6 


210 


18 





Fr. 


Waukegan,lll. 


45 Ted Wallendorf 


F 6-4 


190 


18 





Fr. 


Brooklyn, N.Y. 






170 




172 




Basketball 

1972-73 



1972-73 Rambler Record 



12-1-72 








Loyola 


S6 


St. John's (Minn.) 


51 


12-4-72 








Loyola 


79 


Loras 


65 


12-6-72 








Loyola 


92 


St. Marys (Cal.) 


88 


12-9-72 








Loyola 


82 


Arizona State 


85 


12-11-72 








Loyola 


91 


St. Norberts 


79 


12-16-72 








Loyola 


SI 


Minnesota 


87 


12-18-72 








Loyola 


88 


Ohio 


95 


12-20-72 








Loyola 


86 


Wichita State 


79 


1-3-73 








Loyola 


77 


Detroit 


68 


1-6-73 








Loyola 


103 


Macmurray 


79 


1-9-73 








Loyola 


77 


Marquette 


82 


1-13-73 








Loyola 


79 


Valpraiso 


98 


1-22-73 








Loyola 


81 


Western Michigan 


71 


1-25-73 








Loyola 


73 


UCLA 


87 


1-27-73 








Loyola 


54 


Marquette 


73 


1-31-73 








Loyola 


83 


Missouri Western 


84 


2-3-73 








Loyola 


87 


Dayton 


110 


2-10-73 








Loyola 


78 


Northwestern 


97 


2-13-73 








Loyola 


80 


Western Michigan 


92 


2-17-73 








Loyola 


83 


Denver 


115 


2-21-73 








Loyola 


48 


Detroit 


69 


2-24-73 








Loyola 


89 


Wichita State 


101 


2-28-73 








Loyola 


79 


Bowling Green St. 


98 



173 



174 





%».. 

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175 



Track 1972-73 



Loyola University 1972-73 Track Roster 



Player 




Event 


Class 


Hometown 


Isaac Austin 




Middle Distance 


Fr. 




East St. Louis, III. 


Brian Barnett 




Middle Distance 


Fr. 




Palatine. III. 


Kevin Bikus 




Middle Distance 


Fr. 




Oak Lawn, III. 


Raymond Ditchie 




Sprinter 


Fr. 




Palos Park, III. 


James Enlund 




Distance 


Soph. 


Downers Grove. III. 


Sylvester Gould 




Hurdler 


Sr. 




Toledo, Ohio 


Louis Guardiola 




Shot Put Discus 


Soph. 


Detroit, Michigan 


Joseph Kallas 




Middle Distance 


Jr. 




Riverdale, III. 


John Keane 




Manager 


Sr. 




No. Olmstead, Ohio 


Thomas Korosec 




Middle Distance 


Jr. 




Chicago. III. 


Kenneth Kraudell 




Sprinter 


Fr. 




Decatur, III. 


Lawrence Krause 




Middle Distance 


Fr. 




Mayville, Wise. 


Richard Manion 




Distance 


Fr. 




Chicago, III. 


Thomas McDermott 




Middle Distance 


Fr. 




Chicago, III. 


Thomas Mclntee 




Middle Distance 


Fr. 




Waterloo, Iowa 


Garret McKenna 




Manager 


Fr. 




Chicago, III. 


David Miro 




Distance 


Fr. 




Chicago, III 


Michael Murzyn 




Distance 


Jr. 




Park Ridge, III 


Thomas Newman 




Sprints 


Fr. 




Suffern, New York 


Richard Runtz 




Distance 


Fr. 




Deerfield, III 


Perry Smith 




Distance 


Fr. 




Chicago, III 


Joseph Smyka 




Middle Distance 


Fr. 




Detroit, Mich 


Keith Trexler 




Middle Distance 


Fr. 




Elmhurst, III. 


Hank Vera 




Middle Distance 


Jr. 




Chicago, III 


JackVick 




Middle Distance 


Fr. 




Chicago, III. 


Dennis Ziomek 




Sprints 


Jr. 




Chicago, III 


Loyola U. Track Team 


Record 1972-73 (partial) 


Loyola 


70 


Morton Jr. 


Loyola 74 Illinois Circle 45 


Loyola 


23 


Eastern Illinois 81 


Loyola 74 lllino 


s Benedictine 20 


Loyola 


23 


. Bradley 35 


Loyola 70 North Central 68 


Loyola 


75 


U. of Chicago 70 


Loyola 70 lllino 


s CI 


rcle 66 


Loyola 


47 


Loyola Alumni 21 


Loyola 70 Morton J 


r. 32 









176 















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Swimming and Water Polo 




178 





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179 



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17 . 




Water Polo 1972-73 



Loyola University 1972-73 Water Polo Roster 




Player 


Ht. 


Wt. 


Age 


Ltrs. 


Class 


Hometown 


Steve Brinkmeyer 


5-11 


170 


20 


2 


Jr. 


Quincy.lll 


John Clark 


6-1 


190 


21 


3 


Sr. 


Chicago. Ill 


Dan Curran 


6-0 


190 


21 


3 


Sr. 


Wilmelte. Ill 


Bob Dahms 


6-1 


185 


21 


3 


Sr. 


Alamo. Calif 


Richard Dux 


6-1 


190 


19 


1 


Soph. 


Chicago, III 


Don Fitzerald 


6-2 


200 


20 


1 


Jr. 


Hammond. Ind 


Ron Haak 


6-1 


185 


20 


1 


Jr. 


Chicago. Ill 


Al Kanabay 


6-1 


175 


21 


1 


Sr. 


DesPlaines, III 


Hugh MacKinnon 


5-1! 


185 


20 


2 


Jr. 


Chicago. Ill 


Pat Murphy 


5-1! 


175 


21 


1 


Sr. 


Evergreen Park. Ill 


David Nurnberger 


5-10 


160 


19 


1 


Soph. 


Indianapolis. Ind 


John Pflaumer 


5-10 


160 


21 


3 


Sr. 


Skokie. Ill 


Terry Seamans 


6-2 


185 


2! 


3 


Sr. 


Chicago, III 


Ben Haak 


5-11 


170 


18 





Fr. 


Chicago. Ill 


JoeOrlIck 


6-0 


175 


18 





Fr. 


Glenview, III 


Bob Wadman 


6-0 


180 


18 





Fr. 


Niles, III. 



1972-73 Water Polo Record 






'1^' 



.•^r~'*f 




Loyola 


18 


Wisconsin University 


8 


Loyola II 


Indiana University 


5 


Loyola 


18 


Purdue University 


6 


Loyola 22 


Northwestern 


6 


Loyola 


18 


U. Illinois (Circle) 


6 


Loyola 7 


Univ, of Michigan 


8 


Loyola 


21 


Western Illinois Univ. 


3 


Loyola 24 


Michigan State 


1 


Loyola 


II 


Indiana University 


6 








Loyola 


22 


Geo. Williams College 


8 


Midwest Conference Championships, 




Loyola 


22 


Western Illinois Univ. 


8 


Loyola 12 


U. Illinois (Circle) 


8 


Loyola 


12 


Purdue University 





Loyola 4 


Indiana University 


6 


Loyola 


18 


U. Illinois (Circle) 


6 








Loyola 


8 


Univ. of Michigan 


5 


NCAA Cham 


pionship at Albuqurque 




Loyola 


1 


Wisconsin 





Loyola 14 


Univ. of New Mexico 


18 


Loyola 


24 


Geo, Williams College 


8 


Loyola 6 


San Jose State 


22 


Loyola 


22 


Michigan State 


1 










■\ 




18i 




182 




Theatre and 

Activities 

Review 



Peter Pan 184-185 

Servant of Two Masters 186-187 

Madams Late Mother 188-189 

Roshomon 190-191 

The Entertainer 192-193 

Henry IV 194-195 

Charles Percy 196 

Spencer Davis/George Gerdes . . 197 
Urban Environmental Art . . 198-199 

Upward Bound 200-201 

To Mom and Dad 202-205 



, <• ' , i ^ 



183 



Peter Pan 



Wendy Eileen Dolan 

John Jim Buckley 

Michael Patti Petroselli 

Nana and The Crockodile 

Sheila Landahl 

Mrs. Darling and The Kangaroo 

Jean Scott 

Mr. Darling and the Lion 

Dennis Hart 

Peter Pan Mary Beth Miller 

The Twins Natasha Detmer 

and Jean Russick 

Slightly Jackie Taylor 

Tootles Karia DeVito 

Captain Hook Peter Martin 

Smee Mike Saad 

Starkey Ronald Nicholas 

Mullins Tom Pool 

Jukes John Kenny 

Tiger Lily Regina O'Brien 

Walking Bull and The Ostrich 

Brian Faracy 

Standing Bull John Capizzi 

Kneeling Bull John Redmond 

Crawling Bull Jim Mariani 



Peter Pan by J. M. Barrie 

May 5. 6. 7. 12. 13 & 14. 1972 
Directed by Dennis Zacek. Ph.D. 

Loyola's final production of the 1971-1972 
theatre season was aimed at the young at 
heart of all ages. When the play was 
originally produced on Broadway, it 
smashed all previous attendance 
records. And no wonder, since the selec- 
tion combines the charm of Barrie with 
the embellishment of song. The lyrics by 
Mark Charlop and the music of Jule 
Styne are sheer delight. The audiences in 
the Mullady Theatre took the journey to 
"Never. Never Land" and met. once 
again, such unforgettable characters as 
Peter Pan, Tinker Bell and Captain Hook. 
And they loved every minute of it. 



184 





185 



The Servant of Two Masters 




Beatrice Maureen O'Brien 

Florindo Jim Marian! 

Pantalone Kevin O'Brien 

Lombardi Brian Faracy 

Clarice JoAnn Galluzzi 

Silvio John Capizzi 



Truffaldino Michael Saad 

Smeraldina Barbara Sansone 

Brighella Donald Brown 

First Waiter Mark Mueller 

Second Waiter John Reynolds 



186 




The Servant of Two Masters by Carlo 

Goldoni 

November 3, 4. 5, 10, II. 6 12. 1972 

Directed by Christine Sharer 

The Servant of Two Masters. Carlo 



Goldoni's silly splendid farce, brought 
up the curtain on Loyola's 1972-73 
season. This mad situational comedy 
follows in the best of the Italian corn- 
media tradition. Its plot is a knot of in- 
sane complications and a tribute to the 



perrennial success of the visual slapstick 
explosion of Goldoni's imagination. The 
lead-off production promised laughter, 
entertainment and sheer theatrical fun. It 
fulfilled its promise, to the obvious 
delight of the audiences. 



187 



adam's Late Mother 



Lucian Jim Buckley Joseph 

Yvonne Lucy Brodzik 



Mark Nutter Annette Patty Den 




188 



Madams Late Mother by Georges 

Feydeau 

November 3. 4. 5. 10, II. 6 12. 1972 

Directed by John T. Trahey. Ph.D. 
This one act farce served as a curtain 



raiser for Servant of Two Masters. 
Translated from the French, it concerns a 
weak and not very intelligent husband 
who has fallen prey to a relentlesslv 
domineering bourgeois housewife. They 



argue non-stop, discuss interminably, 
and suffer continually the tiny but ex- 
cruciating agonies of two people living 
together only because of habit. 




189 



Roshomon 



Priest Bob Scarola 

Woodcutter John Rocks 

Wigmaker Mike Fijoiek 

Deputy Patrick Summers 

Bandit Gerald James 

Husband Tom Pool 

Wife Annette Jops 

Mother Marianne Duarte 

Medium Barbara Schroeder 




Rashomon by Ryumosuke Akutaqawa 
December I, 2. 3. 8, 9. & 10. 1972 
Directed by Raoul Johnson, Ph.D. 

Rashomon is primarily the retelling of an 
ancient story in terms of modern psy- 
chology. It revolves around the concept 
of the relativity of truth. We hear four 
different versions of a crime that has 
been commited in the forest by Ta- 
jomaru. the bandit. Just how each ver- 
sion differs is the device that the author 
uses for revealing the actions and the 
characters. 



190 




The Entertainer 



Charlie (The Piano Player)Bernie Hirsch 

Billy Rice Gordon Cameron 

Jean Rice Joyce Nicholas 

Phoebe Rice Randi Klein 

Archie Rice Ronald Nicholas 

Chorus Girls Donna Martin. 

Nancy Seitz, Marianne Duarte, 
Maureen O'Brien 

Frank Rice Bob Burgert 

William (Brother Bill) RiceBernie Weiler 

Graham Dodd Richard Duslack 

The Negress Salome Shelby 



The Entertainer by John Osborne 
February 16. 17. 18. 23. 24. & 25. 1973 
Directed by Dennis Zacek. Ph.D. 

John Osborne originally burst upon the 
theatre world with Look Back In Anger. It 
was as if the civilized people of two con- 
tinents were gathered together to hear a 
gigantic belch. The same voices raised in 
fury can be heard in The Entertainer. The 
music hall is dying, and with it. a signifi- 
cant part of the theatre is dying. Archie 
Rice — the entertainer — expresses the 
utterly desperate frustration of this 
death, the same frustration that made 
you feel you'd never forget Look Back In 
Anger. 




192 




193 



Henry IV 




Henry Tom Cunningham 

Belcredi Mark Major 

Doctor Ken Flack 

Matilda Mary Wonderlick 

Frida Jane Miller 



Charles Bob Scarola 

Landolph Mark Nutter 

Ordulph Gerald James 

Berthold Kevin O'Connor 



Harold Rob Bronstein 

John Mike Dwyer 

Men at Arms Michael Folliard 

William Englehaupt III 



194 




Henry IV by Luigi Pirandello 
March 16. 17. 18. 23. 24. & 25, 1973 
Directed by John T. Trahey. Ph.D. 
In Henry Pirandello achieves his finest 
confrontation of illusion and reality. The 
movement is from deception to outrage 



and finally to remedy by larger deceit. 
The spatial pattern is a center of suffer- 
ing with a periphery of busybodles. 
Henry is a spectacle for his friends, 
enemies, and servants. The theme is 
theatre and life. Henry offers you a fun- 



ny, shocking, and exciting evening of 
theatre as he becomes the prisoner of 
his own illusions: are you a prisoner of 
any illusions? The audience pondered 
that question while they were brought 
back to the times of Henry IV. 



195 




In the homeslrelch of campaign '72 Sen. 
Charles Percy paid a visit to all in- 
terested and newly enfranchised Loyola 



U. voters in the Tranquility Lounge. 
Rather than relying on the tactics of a 
Polish fish eater. Sen. Percy used his own 



polished technique. The event was spon- 
sored by the Loyola College Republicans. 



196 



Spencer Davis and George Gerdes 




These two United Artists recording stars 
came to Loyola early in October as part 
of a free concert tour to many university 
campuses throughout the United States. 
The less than full capacity crowd seemed 



to enjoy the strains of accoustic guitar 
music that traveled from within the 
Rambler Room. High point of the evening 
was Gerdes' parody of Neil Young's Heart 
of Gold, which he retitled Disc of Gold. It 



went something like this: "I'm just a 
singin' for that disc of gold, and I'm get- 
tin' old." The event was co-sponsored by 
United Artists and WLUC Radio. 



197 



Urban Environment Art 



The Urban Art program was started in 
February. 1972 under Urban-Ethnic 
Studies. The goal of the program is the 
development of "community action pro- 
jects and laboratories in the city in order 
that we might more directly participate 
in the solutions to urban problems." In 
1973. the program is focusing on seeking 
sponsors for off-campus projects; 
transforming the depressing environ- 
ment of institutions via colorful painted 
super-graphics; and designing bus-stop 
sculpture benches, sidewalk patterns and 
mosaics. Among its plans for the future, 
Urban Art hopes to form a research 
center for Art at Work in the Urban En- 
vironment; design and construct sculp- 
tured mini plazas with inner-city youth; 
and initiate graduate groups of working 
experts accepting commissions from 
government and private business, thus 
forming an Urban Art Corps. The Urban 
An program is headed by Patricia 
Watters and Urban-Ethnic Studies is un- 
der the direction of Dr. Lance Blakesley. 



T 




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198 




199 



Upward Bound 



Upward Bound is a precollege 
preparatory program designed to 
generate the skills and motivation 
necessary for success in education 
beyond high school among young people 
from low-income backgrounds and in- 
adequate secondary school preparation. 



Projects include arrangements to assure 
cooperation among one or more in- 
stitutions of higher education and one or 
more secondary schools. They include a 
curriculum designed to develop creative 
thinking, effective expression, and 
positive attitudes toward learning need- 



ed for post-secondary educational 
success: necessary health services; com- 
prehensive counseling services; and such 
recreational and cultural and group ac- 
tivities as the Project Director deter- 
mines may be appropriate. 



200 












201 







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203 








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204 



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205 



Loyola University Graduates 



Bachelors of Arts, 
Sciences. Education and 
Business Administration 



School Of Nursing 225-227 

School Of Dentistry 228-231 



207-224 



School Of Medicine 232-23 




206 






Loyola University — Undergraduates 1973 




JOSEPH ADAMCZYK 
TIMOTHY ADAMS 
JAMES ADDUCCI 
MICHAEL ALBERTI 
JOHN ALBERTS 



DAVID ALLEN 
RENEE ALLES 
LORETO ALONZI 
DONALD AMELSE 
DONALD AMFIELD 



BARBARA ANDREWS 
EDWARD ANTROBUS 
MARK AUBUCHON 
DEBBI BABICZ 
PAMELA BABLER 



JAMES BALCERAK 
GONZALO BALLON-LANDA 
PETER BALOGH 
BARBARA BANICH 
RONALD BANKS 



DORIS BARNETT 
MARY BARRINS 
MARY ANN BATTAGLIA 
SHARON BELL 
TOM BERRY 



DALE BESPALEC 
BOB BIAGE 
BRIAN BIANCO 
KEVIN BLACK 
DOMINIC BOFFA 



207 



MARY BOHR 
WILLIAM BOKOS 
CLARITA BOLDT 
ESTHER BOOTH 
MARY BORGE 



THOMAS BOTHEN 
CHRISTOPHER BOTTI 
GREG BOUSSIS 
STANLEY BOYCHUCK 
ELIZABETH BOYLE 



ANNE BRANDSTETTER 
ANNETTE BRASIC 
RICHARD BRAVIERI 
MICHAEL BROADUS 
ALAN BRONGIEL 



ALFRED BROWN 
MARGE BROWN 
PAULA BROWN 
THEON BRUEMMER 
ROBERT BRUNETTI 



EDWARD BRUUN 
ROBERT BUBAK 
ROBERT BUESS 
ROBERT BULGER 
CHRISTINE BYCZEK 



MARIA CABRERA 
FRIAR BILL CALLAHAN 
EILLEN CAMEROTA 
PAT CAMPBELL 
ALLAN CAMPIONE 



JOHN CANNELL 
EVA CAREY 
FRANK CARUSO 
MARY CASTANUELA 
VINCENT CESARO 



208 





NONA CHASE 
JOHN CHIPS 
JIM CHMURA 
ANNE CHORBA 
WILLIAM CHRIST 



DENNIS CHUBINSKI 
GERALD CIEBIEN 
DALE CIESLA 
MIKE CIESLAK 
CARL CIESLIK 



THOMAS CISZEK 
ANDREA CLARK 
JOHN CLARK 
SR. MICHELLE CLARKE 
FREDERICK CLAUSER 



DIANE CLEMMENS 
RICHARD CLEYS 
JOHN COLT 
CATHY COLES 
PAUL COLLINS 



THOMAS CONNELLY 
DOROTHY CONWAY 
KEVIN CONWAY 



PAUL CONWAY 
CHERYL CORRADO 
ROBERTA CORTES 



WILLIAM COUGHLIN 
VIRGINIA CRAWFORD 
DANIEL CROWE 
GLADYS CRUZ 
FRANK CUNNIFF 



209 



MICHAEL CZECH 
BRUCE DAMOUR 
DONALD DAMSZ 
CAROL DAVIDSON 
ROSALIND DAWSON 



GERALD DECICCO 
ANITA DELA CRUZ 
ANTHONY DELACH 
JANET DENNHARDT 
FRIAR EDMOND DESFORGES 



LEON Dl BIASIO 
PAUL Dl DOMINICK 
ANN DICKSON 
MARY DIFFENDAL 
GEORGE DITOLA 



DONNA DIXON 
KATHRYN DONAVAL 
KATHLEEN DOROBA 
DENISE DOUGLAS 



THOMAS DROGOS 
PHILLIP DUEHIN 
KATHLEEN DUNNE 
ALFRED DURBAND 



MARRON DYER 
MARY DYLLA 
ALICE DZIALO 
DENISE DZIOPEK 
PAUL EBERHACH 



210 



CATHERINE EDDY 
EILEEN EDWARDS 
ALMA EILAND 
RODOLFO ELIAS 
JAMES ELIPAS 





MARLENE EMBER 
BARRY ENNESSY 
JAMES ERICKSON 
RICARDO ESPINOZA 
DONALD FAHRENBACH 



BRIAN FARACY 
JOHN FAUS 
DIANA FECAROTTA 
PETER FECZkO 
THOMAS FECZKO 



RICHARD FIEDOROWICZ 
RICHARD FIGLEWICZ 
DIANE FILBIN 
KATHY FILLICHIO 
GERALD FISET 



BERNARD FITZPATRICK 
KENNETH FLACK 
MICHAEL FLANNIGAN 
JOHN FLASKA 
MICHAEL E. FLYNN 



SUSAN FOY 
EDWARD ERASER 
P. FRENCH 
WAYNE FRIGO 
RITA FRY 



JOHN GAIB 
DONNA GALL 
RITA GANEY 
MARY ELLEN GARCIA 
MARY GATSCH 



EILEEN GENTILE 
MAUREEN GEORGE 
NANA GHASE 
FRANK GIAMBRONE 
WILLIAM GIELOW 



211 



RONALD GIGLIOUILLO 
MARK GILLETTE 
CARL GOCIAL 
WAYNE GOGOLEWSKI 
JULIO GOMEZ MAGORGA 



TERESA GONZALES 
BENJAMIN GORDON 
SYLVESTER GOULD 
CHERYL GRACZYK 
BEN GRANBERG 



JAMES GRASS 
ROSE GRECO 
BETTY GREEN 
JOHN GREENFIELD 
JOHN GRIB 



THOMAS GRIFFIN 
JUANITA GROZDIAK 
BARBARA GUDEN 
RONALD GOGLIOCIELLO 
ALFRED GUICHARD 



KEN HABEZ 
JOSEPH HAGBERG 
PHELPS F. HAINES 
TERRANCE HAKE 
JAMES HALEAS 



MARY HANRAHAN 
ED HARTGRAVES 
BRIAN HAYDEN 
KEVIN HAYS 
MAURICE HEALY 



GARY HEINIS 
JEAN HELLMAN 
ELLEN HENNESSY 
LEE HENSEL 
MICHAEL HERMES 





NANCY HEROD 
MICHAEL HESS 
JOHN HICKEY 
FRIAR EDWARD HILGER 
MARY HIMMES 



MARY HOFHERR 
KATHLEEN HOHMANN 
MICHAEL HOREIS 
GLENN HOWSKI 
EDWARD HOY 



GEORGE HUBCHAK 
BARBARA HUDEK 
TANVIR UL NISA HUSAIN 
JANICE JAROSZ 
M DALIA JASAITIS 



JAMES JASPER 
ED JEDLICkA 
RANDALL JENSEN 
ROBERT JOHNSON 
ANNETTE TOPS 



JOSEPH JORDAN 
PATRICIA JORGENSON 
MICHAEL JOZWIAK 
JULIE JUNG 
JEROME KADLECK 



MARYANN KAMINSKI 
RENEE KAMPMAN 
MARGARET KANE 
REV. PHILIP KANICKI 
JOHN KAPICA 



DENISE KAPLAN 
JOSEPH KARAS 
MELODY KAS 
LYNNEA KASMAR 
JOET S. KATZ 



213 



ROSEMARY KEATON 
SUSAN KEHOE 
MADELINE KEILING 



PATRICIA KELEHER 
MICHAEL KELLER 
CAROL KELLY 



JOHN KENNEALLY 
DONALD KENNEDY 
MARY KENNEDY 
KENNETH KERBER 
STEVEN KERKSTRA 



GIRTHA KIDD 
KATHERINE KILCOYNE 
DONALD KING 
MARGARET KING 
MELANIE KNAPIK 



ADRIAN KOCUREK 
NANCY KOLB 
MARY ANN KONOPKA 
RICHARD KOPONEN 
MELVIN KOSTALIK 



PAUL KOTT 
DANIEL KOZUBAL 
MARY KRAMER 
THOMAS KRISSEK 
JUDY KROLL 



214 



SR. RENATA KRUKOWSKI 
MICHAEL KUDIA 
DONNA KURLEY 
KATHLEEN KUTA 
MICHAEL KUZLIK 





VLADIMIR kUZMA 
SUSAN kWASNIEWSKI 
JAY LA RONCA 
THOMAS LASkOWSKI 
ROY LAUBE 



MICHAEL LAXNER 
EDWARD LEAHY 
BRYAN LEBLANC 
WILLIAM LEBLANC 
LAWRENCE LECH 



PATRICIA LENNON 
THOMAS LENNON 
EILEEN LEWANDOWSKI 
.10 ELLEN LEYSER 
PIERRE LHEUREUX 



NEIL LINEHAN 
VALERIE LIPSKI 
JOHN LIPTAk 
MICHAEL LIST 
JAMES LITTWIN 



ANTONIO LOLLINO 
DAVID LOMBARD-kOY 
CLARENCE LONGLEV 



ROBERT LOOS 
CAROLYN LOPEZ 
JEAN LUBECkIS 



WILLIAM LUkSHA 
PAUL LUPO 
kENNETH LYLLUDWIG 
DAVID LYNAM 
JAMES LYNCH 



215 



RAYMOND LYONS 

DANIEL McCarthy 
JILL McDonald 

DAVID McFEGGAN 
THOMAS McGINN 



KEVIN McGIRR 
JOHN McGRATH 
ELIZABETH McGREEVY 
GERALD McHUGH 
JAMES McKINZIE 



MARY McLaughlin 

PATRICIA McMAHON 
JOHN MacNAMERA 
MARTHA McNICHOLS 
JACQUELINE McWILLIAMS 



JOHN MACHOTA 
EVELYN MACKEL 
MARY MACKIN 
JEFF MADDEN 
RITA MALINOWSKI 



CONNIE MANAK 
JOHN MANN 
FRANCES MANNO 
CELESTE MARCH 
D. MARCZUKI 



HERMAN MARINO 
HAROLD MARTEN 
DEBORAH MARTIN 
DONNA MARTIN 
JOHN MARTIN 



TIMOTHY MARTIN 
SUSAN MASLOV 
WILLIAM MAURER 
GERALDINE MEE 
PAULA MERI 



216 





GEORGE MIETELSKI 
CATHERINE MILLER 
LINDA MILLER 
SANDRA MILLER 
PETER MINERVA 



GAIL MITCHELL 
TIMOTHY MITCHELL 
FRANK MODICA 
ANTHONY MONTEGNA 
MARY MORAN 



TERRANCE MORAN 
JOSEPH MARANO 
HELEN MOUKAS 



ANN MUELLER 
GEORGE MUl 
THOMAS MULCRONE 



GEORGE MYERS 
THOMAS MYERS 
KONRAD NAGATOSHI 

EDWARD NAPLETON 
RITA NASH 



PEGGY NELIS 
LINDA NELSON 
JOEL NEMIROW 
WILLIAM NEMMER 
PAULA NERI 



RONALD NETTER 
CHRIS NEUMAN 
JOYCE NICHOLAS 
RONALD NICHOLAS 
JAMES NICHOLS 



217 



RUTH NICOLAI 
ANDREW NIEC 
MICHAEL NIEMIEC 
CARLOS NIETO 
MICHAEL NOWAK 



CHARLENE OCCHINO 
WILLIAM ODONOGHUE 
C. ODONOGHUE 
DANIEL ODONOGHUE 
JULIANNE OELERICH 



KATHLEEN OHARA 
ROBERT O KEEFE 
WALTER O KEEFE 
ROXANNA ORDZOWIALY 
JULIANNE ORTH 



PEGGY OSKO 
MICHAEL OSTER 
KRISTA OSWALD 



MARY OUSKA 
SHERRY OWENS 
MICHAEL PANOZZO 



MARLENE PAPPAS 
ROBERT PARA 
ROBERT PARY 
GEORGE PASSERI 
ROBERT PAVLIGA 



MARY PEARCE 
SUSAN PECHOUS 
DANIEL PEPLINSKI 
CLIFFORD PERRY 
JOHN PFLAMER 





HENRY PHILLIPS 
KENNETH PIAESCHI 
RICHARD PIAZZA 
RONALD PICH 
JANE PIRSIG 



RICHARD PLACHTA 
BARB PLAFCAN 
ANDREW PLUCINSHI 
CHERYL POCUS 
JOSEPH POMEROY 



MARIA PONCE DE LEON 
KAREN POPE 
LESLIE POPE 
GLORIA PORTELA 
MARY ANN POWERS 



CHARLENE PRATT 
LLOYD PRICE 
JOAN PRIES 
DIANNE PRISCO 
MARK PUCHALSKI 



THOMAS RACHUBINSKI 
KATHLEEN RANSFORD 
PATRICIA RAMAN 
SHEILA RAWLINGS 
KATHLEEN REINHART 



SHARON RENKOSIAK 
JAMES RHODES 
MICHAEL RIDRDAU 
DAVID RINELLA 
RICHARD RISNER 



GEORGE RISTOFF 
DAVID RITTER 
THOMAS ROBISON 
JOHN ROCCOSANTO 
ROBERT ROEMER 



219 



ALFRED ROGERS 
DIANA ROHLMAN 



SHELLIE ROSENTHAL 
JOHN ROSSI 



DAVID RYAN 
ROSEMARY RYBAK 
TIMOTHY SAMOLITIS 
ALLEN SANDUSKY 
BARBARA SANSONE 



DANIEL SANTUCCI 
JOHN SASIADEK 
BARB SAUNDERS 
WILLIAM SAVIER 
SALLY SAWYER 



MILDRED SCANLON 
VALERIE SCARAMELLA 
GLENN SCHEIVE 
JOHN SCHNEIDER 
REINHOLD SCHETZ 



GREG SCHULTZ 
EILEEN SCHULTZ 
FRANKLIN SCOTT 
TERRENCE SEAMANS 
BERNARD SEAR 



ALBERT SEGLER 
NANCY SEITZ 
ROBERT SELES 
DIANE SEPKOWSKI 
DIANE SEPULVEDA 





THEA SEVENTY 
PATRICIA SEXTON 
BETTY SHAW 
THOMAS SHIMODA 
FRANK SHOCK 



JEFFERY SHOVEIN 
JOHN SIKORSKI 
BERTHA SUVA 
LORRAINE SIMMONS 
MARY SIMON 



SHERRY SIMON 
DANIEL SIRRIDGE 
WILLIAM SISTO 
MARY SKUMMER 
JAMES SLATTERY 



MICHAEL SMAJD 
CRAIG SMITH 
CRAIG SMITH 



DONNA SMITH 
JAMES SMITH 
JACQUELINE SOLON 



GARY SOLTYS 
JUDITH SOWA 
CHARLES SPINDLER 
•XRMINTHA SPRINGFIELD 
CHUCK STACK 



MARY JO STACK 
CHRISTINE STASIAK 
MELVIN STASINSKI 
JOANNE STEFANOWICZ 
LINDA STOMPER 



221 



LOUISEA STOREY 
RICHARD STYCZYNSKI 
RONALD SUGAR 



MICHAEL SUHAJDA 
EVELYN SUMMERS 
PATRICK SUMMERS 



PAUL SUREK 
JOHN SUTULA 
LESLEY SWEITZER 
JEROME SZARNYCH 
LAWRENCE SZATkOWSKI 



KATHERINE SZETTELL 
GREGORY SZUL 
ISABELLA SZYMANSKI 
WALTER SZYMCZAk 
RICHARD TAGLTERI 



ALWIN TAMOSIUS 
CONCETTA THARA 
LAURA THARA 
PATRICIA THARASH 
MARILYN THETHEKAM 



ANTOINETTE THOMAS 
JULIA THOMAS 



KAREN THOMAS 
PATRICIA THRASH 



222 





MARY TOBIN 
PAUL TOkARZ 
JOHN TOLANICZ 
PATRICIA TOMASIk 
CRAIG TOMASSI 



MELVIN TOMECZKO 
MICHAEL TOOTOOIAN 
PAUL TORTORELLO 
PEG TRAPP 
CHRISTINE TREMBACk 



CHARLES TRIBBEY 
THOMAS TUULY 
WILLIAM TULLY 
TERESA TUNZI 



CARL VACCARO 
kATHY VALENTINE 
MARk VALENTINE 
NANCY VAN LEUVAN 



JAMES VELkAVEH 
JAMES VELTMAN 
SUSAN VILCHES 
JEROME VINCENTE 
DIANE VLIEM 



MARTIN VOLPE 
SANDRA WAAS 
SHIELA WADE 
FRIAR DAVID WAGNER 
CAROL WALDOCk 



GARVEY WALTER 
MARY PAT WALSH 
RICk WARNER 
RONALD WARYIAS 
THERESA WASMER 



223 



BRENDA WATKINS 
RICHARD WAWRZYNIAS 
RANDALL WEBB 
GERALD WEGNER 
MARIA WEINZIRL 



CONRAD WEJNER 
JOHN WESTLY 
MARILYN WETHEKAM 
MARSIE WHITE 
MICHAEL WIEGAND 



ROGER WIKLUND 
ROBERT WILLIAMS 
WANDAK WILLIAMS 
STEVE WISHER 
CONRAD WOJNAR 



MARY WONDERLICK 
THADDEIS WOZNIAK 
URSULA WOZNIAK 
SANDRA WYLIE 
STEVE YADLOVSKI 



PHILIP YEE 
ALAN YOUNG 
ROBERT ZABIELSKI 
LUANN ZANZOLA 
MARY ANN ZATOPA 



GEORGE ZEHAK 
JOHN ZIPPARRO 
MARGARET WAUCK 




Loyola School of Nursing — Graduates 




MARY ANN ALLEN 
MARTHA BACSIK 
LOIS BEDLEK 
DEDRA BETHANY 
DONNA BILKA 



JANET BLUMTHAL 
PATRICIA BOLIN 
MARIE BOYLE 



LINDA BRAAN 
GERIANNE BRENNAN 
MARY ANN BUETTNER 



PATRICE BUSCH 
SUZETTE BUSHRACHER 
JEANNA CAMARGO 
JANET CHOUkAS 
BARBARA CUMMINGS 



ELLA DAGEN 
NADINE DAMITZ 
MARY DeVANON 
MARIETTA DIDIER 
BARBARA DOERR 



BARBARA FISLI 
SHARON GATTFIELD 
CATHERINE GAWRON 
VALERIE GORSKI 
MARY HAHN 



ALANE HARRIS 


JPS 


kl 


MARY HAWKINS 


m ^ 


w 


KATHY HOHMANN 


wM-nm tmi 


JANET HOLZHAUER 


»-^J 


m 


FRANCES JAEGER 


f 



GWENDOLYN JAEGER 
JUANITA JANECZKO 
MARY JOHNSON 
BETTY JOSEPH 
PATRICIA JOSLYN 



DENISE KALINOWSKI 
DENISE KAPLAN 



MAUREEN KELLY 
CHRIS KILLEAN 



ANDREA KOFL 
KATHY KRISTENSEN 
THERESA KUDIA 
PAULA LEIST 
CATHY LITTEL 



JAMES McCARTY 
BARBARA McFALL 
CATHY McKAY 
DOLORES MacDONALD 
KATHERINE MATAS 



PEGGY NELIS 

SUSAN NOWAK 

ANN ODONNELL 

MARY ELLEN ODONNELL 

PATRICIA OLEARY 





MARY ORBAN 
IRENE OlISkA 
JAN POLZIN 
MICHELLE POTERAKI 



CHRISTINE PYTLARZ 
EILEEN ROSENBERG 
MARY LOU RZECZKOWSKI 




DONNA SAGLE 
MARY SCHRAMER 
MARILYN SLIEPkA 
VERA SMITH 
ELIZABETH SUS 



CYNTHIA SZCZYGIEL 
JUDITH TAYLOR 
CECILIA WACHDORF 
PATRICIA WAITES 
PATRICIA WALDRON 



AUDREY WAYNE 
MARLENE WEITH-JOHNSON 
BENNA WHYTE 
BARBARA WILSON 
MARY JANE WLEKLINSKI 



JUDI WLODARCZYK 
CAROLYN ZAJAC 



SR MARGARET ZALECHI 
SR. M. LUCILLE ZELVYS 



227 



Loyola University School of 
Dentistry — 
GRADUATES 



ED ABROMAITIS 
DAVID ADAMSON 
FRANK AMATURO 
JOSEPH ANTONUCCI 
GARY A. ARNSTEIN 



ROBERT BACCI 
ALFRED BERLEY. JR. 
JOHN BERRYMAN 
RICHARD BERTOGLIO 
HAROLD BLACK 



GERALD BLISS 
HARVEY BLANCHE! Ill 
DENNIS BIRCH 
LOUIS J. BLANCHE! 
MICHAEL S. BORZELLO 



ROBER! BRANDS!A!!ER 
RAND D. BROWN 
JAMES BUKOVAC 
WILLIAM BURCH 
JOHN E. BURKE 



MICHAEL CARPENJER 
CHARLES K. CHEW 
LOUIS CHRIS!ENSEN 
SJEPHEN H. CLARK 
JOHN M. COKE 



WILLIAM CONNORS 
EDWIN CRANDALL 
RANDALL CROOK 
ROGER CULLEN 
BRUCE B. CROW!HER 





DR. WILLIAM P SCHOEN. DEAN 
REED A. DANA 
DONALD DOEMLING 
GREG PL DOERFLER 
STEPHEN DRISCOLL 
ROBERT DISABATINO 
WILLIAM J. DVORAK 



DONALD G. ELITT 
THOMAS EMMERING 
HARRY ENSING 
REV LESTER S. EVETT 
JOHN F. FRASCO 



PAUL GABRIEL 
STEPHEN E. GADIENT 
GERG P. GALLAGHER 



JOSEPH GAWGIEL 
TERRENCE k. GILMAN 
WILLIAM E. GIPSON 



PATRICK M. GORMAN 
LARRENCE L. GRAFF 
EUGENE R. GRANDEL 
JOHN P. GRIGUS III 
RAYMOND S. GROSZEK 



RICHARD A. HACK 
JOHN E. HACKBARTH 
JAMES M. HARLOW 
JAMES O. HEY. JR. 
RODERICK K. HOGAN 



JOHN W. HUBBACH 
BYRON N. HURST 
DAN M. JANOWSKI 
LOUIS R JENSON 
MICHAEL J KELLEY 



229 



R. PAUL KELSON 
KENNETH L. KITE 
ROBERT KLAFETA 
EDWARD R KLINGEBIEL 
JOHN E. KONKOL 



ROBERT KOSOBUCKI 
MICHAEL J. KOWALIK 
ROBERT J. kREMPL 
PAUL .1. KRISPINSKY 
THOMAS A. KRYGIER 



ALAN S. KUSHNER 
LEWIS LANDSMAN 
LAWRENCE E. LIBUSER 
MICHAEL J. LIM 
GARY LINDSEY 



JOHN MADONA 
SCOTT K. MALAN 
WILLIAM F. MALONE 
BRUCE R. MATHER 
JOHN C. MATUNAS 



HAROLD MILLER 
DENNIS M. MONDO 
WILLIAM M. MOON 
GEORGE H. MUELLER 
DAVID MUNRO 



G. LARRY McDowell 

ELIZABETH McNABB 
THOMAS H. NADING 
JOHN NERWINSKI 
DONALD NIEMANN 



STEPHEN ODELL 
W. JAMES ONGENA 
FRANK R. ORLAND 
TED OS r ROM 
JAMES D. PACE 





JACK PALUMBO 
DONALD F PARkMANN 
HAROLD J. PELZER 
STANLEY PETERSON 11 
THOMAS PIETRUSINSKI 



ROBERT POLLOCK 
ROBERT C. POULSOM 
ROBERT J. PRICE 
WAYNE B. PURSELL 
G. W. RAPP 



STEVEN A. ROSE 
LARRY D ROTHENBERGER 
ANTHONY SAVASTANO 
JONM M. SAWICKI 
JAMES SCAPILLATO 



STEVEN W SEGALL 
JAMES H. SEIB 
LEE M. SKAALEN 
LYNN W. SKINNER 
MARSHALL SMALSON 



JAMES F. SOLTES 
JEFF F. SOV(/LE 
ROBERT T. STANUCH 
WILLIAM F STARSIAK 
STEPHEN SUTLEY 



ALFRED J THEIS 

DR THORPE 

JOHN E. TILLNER 

PATRICK TOTO 

EDMOND VAN BELLINGHEN 



MARK C. WATERS 
MICHAEL M WERTH 
PHILIP J. WIEGAND 
THEODORE F. K. WONG 
NORM WOOD 



231 



Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine 
Graduates 



JAMES W. BASTA 
TOM BEAMEK 
ROBERT BLOOM 
RONALD BORDEAUX 
RICHARD M. CARROLL 



ELMER CASEY 
JAMES CHORBALA 
THOMAS CHORBA 
ROBERT CINEFRO 
ROBERT COOK 



NICHOLAS DANIAk. JR. 
HANSEL DEBARTOLO 
DONNA DECAMORA 
FRED DIETZ 
JOSEPH DIPIETRO 



WILLIAM DOBOZI 
MARFIN DOOT 
TOM DORSCH 
PETER EABRI 
RICHARD FELL 



ROBERT FILICE 
ROBERT FIRLIT 
JLIDITH FROEHLICH 
STAN FRONCZAK 
ANTHONY FLIRLAN 



THEODORE GABIG 
ANTHONY GIEFER 
GARY GOOOENOW 
EDWARD GULLING 
ELIAS HADDARD 





MICHAEL HINZ 
JAMES HUMMEL 
DONALD LEE IDEN 
JEAN JACKSON 
PHILIP JANICAk 



CHARLES M. JOHNSON 
CHRISTOPHER JORDAN 
JOSEPH kANNANKERIL 
ROBERT KAZAN 
PATRICK KELLEY 



GEOFFREY KEYES 
MERRILL KIES 
ANN KINNEALEY 
JAMES KISTNER 
MICHAEL KLAMUT 



RUSSELL kOOY 
GERALD KOZUH 



MICHAEL LARSON 
EDWARD W. McAULIFFE 



PAULA McBRINE 
JOSEPH McFARLAND 



233 



LOUIS McKEEVER 
JOHN MAGGIAMO 
GERALD MAIDA 
TOM MARTIN 
STEFAN MOKYOHISKY 



MARK MOLESKI 
CHARLES MULLENIX 
MICHAEL MYERS 
NOEL NARUT 
JOSEPH NEIWEEM 



ROBERT NELIMARK 
RUSSELL NESS 



RICHARD O'CONNOR 
JOSEPH OLSZEWSKI 



EARL PHILLIP OW 
THOMAS OUISH 
RALPH PAGANO 
PASCHAL PANIO 



ANTHONY PARENTI 
IRMA PARHAD 
DENNIS PATENA 
CHARLES PAULY 
KARL PENNAU 



STUART PERLIK 
JOHN POGGI 
GEORGE PSARRAS 
JOSEPH PTASINKI 
ROBERT A RAFAEL 





GREGORY REAMAN 
JOANN RICHMOND 



THOMAS RIESER 
CRAIG ROGERS 



ROBERT ROSENBLOOM 
FRANK ROSSO 
RICHARD ROUSE 
JOHN W. SAGE 
LEONARD SCICUTELLA 



JOHN SHOWALTER 
BRUCE SILVER 
MARK SINIBALDI 
S. DAVID SPIRA 
PHILIP C. STIFF. JR. 



NANCY STREITMALTER 
RAY STURDEVANT 
PAUL TOMICH 
JAMES VOELKER 
MARK WESTPHAL 



H. RICHARD WIEMkE 
CHARLES WINGET 
DONALD WROBLEWSKI 



ROBERT ZADYLAK 
ED ZAWADA 
DAVID ZUCKER 



235 



Index 

Accounting 35 

The Adventurers - 128 

Alpha Pelta Gamma 86 

Alpha Kappa Lamda 87 

Alpha Phi Omega 88 

Alpha Sigma Alpha 89 

Alpha Sigma Phi 90 

Alpha Tau Delta 91 

American Chemical Society 94 

American Comic Crusaders 92 

Anthropology "*' 

Athletics 42 

Basketball 170-175 

Raskethall'Benefil 10-11 

Baumhart. Fr Raymond 3 

Bespalec, Dale J2 

Beta Alpha Psi 91 

Beta Beta Beta 95 

Beta Gamma Sigma 96 

Biology 43 

Blood Drive 23 

Blue Key National Honor Frat 96 

Business Law 44 

Cadence 98 

Campion Hall 148 149 

Carnival If '^ 

Chamberlain Hall 150 151 

Chardin Anthropological Soc 100 

Cheerleaders 131 

Chemistry 45 

Circumference 96 

Classical Studies 46 

Club Hockey 166 169 

Coed Club 106 

Communication Arts 47 

Davis, Spencer 197 

Debate Club 100 

Delaware Hall 152 153 

Delta Sigma Phi 104 

Delta Sigma Pi 105 

Delta Omega Gamma 108 

Dental School 74 77 

Economics 48 

Editors Page 144 

Education 49 

English 50 

The Entertainer 192 193 

Festle. J E , S J 34 

Finance ■ ^' 

Fine Arts -2 

Founders Day 

Gamma Phi Delta 106 

Gerdes. George '97 

German Club 107 

Giambrone. Frank 27 

Gonzaga Hall 154-157 

Grpdiiules. College oj Arts S Sci.. 
Schoel cf Ediicatiiin, 

Scheol e/ Business Aifmn 307-224 

Adamczyk. Joseph 207 

Adams. Timothy 207 

Adducci. James 207 

Alberti. Michael 207 

Alberts. John 207 

Allen, David 207 

Alles. Rene 207 

Alonzi. Loreta 207 

Amelse. Donald 207 

Amfield. Donald 207 

Andrews. Barbara 207 

Antrobus. Fdward 207 

Aubuchon. Mark 207 

Rabicz. Debbi 207 

Babler. Pamela 207 

Balcerak. James 207 

Ballon Landa. Gonzalo 207 

Ralogh. Peter 207 

Banich. Barbara 207 

Banks. Ronald 207 

Rarnett. Doris 207 

Barrins. Mary 207 

Baltaglia. Mary Ann 207 

Bell. Sharon 207 

Berry, lorn 207 

Bespalec. Dale 207 

Riage. Bob 207 

Bianco. Brian 207 

Black. Kevin 207 

Roda, Dominic 207 

Bohr, Mary 208 

Bokos William 208 

Boldt, DIarita 208 

Booth. Esther 208 

Borge. Mary 208 

Bolhen. Thomas 208 

Botli. Christopher 208 



Bc>usis. Greg 208 

Boychuck. Stanley 208 

Boyle. Elizabeth 208 

Brandstelter. Anne 208 

Brasic. Annete 208 

Braveieri. Richard 208 

Broadus. Michael 208 

Brown. Alfred 208 

Brown. Marge 208 

Brown. Paula 208 

Bruemmer. Theon 208 

Brunelti. Robert 208 

Brunn. Edward 208 

Buhak. Robert 208 

Buess. Robert 208 

Bulger. Robert 208 

Byczek. Christine 208 

Cabrera. Maria 208 

Callahan. Friar Bill 208 

Camerola. Eillen 208 

Campbell. Pat 208 

Campione. Allan 208 

Cannell. John 208 

Carey. Eva 208 

Caruso. Frank 208 

Caslanuela. Mary 208 

Cesaro. Vincent 208 

Chase. Nona 209 

Chips. John 209 

Chmura. Jim 209 

Chorba. Anne 209 

Christ. William 209 

Chubinski. Dennis 209 

Cieben. Gerald 209 

Ciesla. Dale 209 

Cieslak. Mike 209 

Cieslik. Carl 209 

Ciszek. Thomas 209 

Clark. Andrea 209 

Clark. John 209 

Clarke. Sr. Michelle 209 

Clauser. Frederick 209 

Clemmens. Diane 209 

Cleys. Richard 209 

Colt. John 209 

Coles, Cathy 209 

Collins. Paula 209 

Connely. Thomas 209 

Conway. Dorothy 209 

Conway. Kevin 209 

Conway. Paul 209 

Corrado. Cheryl 209 

Cortes. Roberta 209 

Coughlin, William 209 

Crawford. Virginia 209 

Crowe. Daniel 209 

Cruz. Glayds 209 

Cunnitf. Frank 209 

Czech. Michael 210 

Damour. Bruce 210 

Damsz Donald 210 

Davidson. Carol 210 

Dawson. Rosalind 210 

Decicco, Gerald 210 

Dela Cruz. Anita 210 

Delach, Anthony 210 

Dennhardt. Janet 210 

Desforges. Friar Edmond 210 

Di Biasio. Leon 210 

Di Dominick. Paul 210 

Dickson. Ann 210 

Ditfendal. Mary 210 

Ditola. George 210 

Dixon. Donna 210 

Donaval. Kalhryn 210 

Doroba. Kathleen 210 

Douglas. Denise 210 

Drogos. 1 honias 210 

Duehin Phillip 210 

Dunne, Kathleen 210 

Durband, Alfred 210 

Dyer, Marron 210 

Dylla, Mary 210 

Dzialo, Alice 210 

Dziopek. Denise 210 

Eberhach, Paul 210 

Eddy, Catherine 210 

Edwards, Eileen 210 

filand Alma 210 

Elia.i, Rodollo 210 

Elipas James , . . ■ 210 

Ember, Marlene 211 

Ennessy, Barry 211 

Erickson James 211 

Espinoza, Ricardo 211 

Fahrenbach, Doanid 211 



Faracy, Brian 211 

Fans, John 211 

Fecarotla, Diana 211 

Feczko, Peter 211 

Feczko. Thomas 211 

Fiedorowicz. Richard 211 

Figlewicz Richard 211 

Filbin Diane 211 

Filhchio. Kathy 211 

Fisel. Gerald 211 

Filzpalrick. Bernard 211 

FlacI,. Kenneth 211 

Flannigan. Michael 211 

Flaska. John 211 

Flynn. Michael E 211 

Foy. Susan 211 

Eraser. Edward 211 

French. P 211 

Frigo. Wayne 211 

Fry. Rita 211 

Gaib. John 211 

Gall. Donna 211 

Ganey. Rita 211 

Garcia. Mary Ellen 211 

Gatsch. Mary 211 

Gentile. Eileen 211 

George, Maureen 211 

Ghase, Nana 211 

Giambrone, Frank 211 

Gielow, William 211 

Gigliouillo. Ronald 212 

Gillette. Mark 212 

Gocial. Carl 212 

Gogolewski. Wayne 212 

Gctmez Marorga. Julia 212 

Gonzales, Teresa 212 

Gordon. Ben|amin 212 

Gould. Sylvester 212 

Graczyk. Cheryl 212 

Granberg. Ben 212 

Grass. James 212 

Greco. Rose 212 

Green. Betty 212 

Greenfield. John 212 

Grib. John 212 

Griffin. Thomas 212 

Grozdiak. Juanita 212 

Guden. Barbara 212 

Gogliociello. Ronald 212 

Guichard. Alfred 212 

Habez. Ken 212 

Hagberg. Joseph 212 

Haines Phelps F 212 

Hake, Terrance 212 

Haleas, James 212 

Hanrahan, Mary 212 

Hartgraves. Ed ' 212 

Hayden, Brian 212 

Hays, Kevin 212 

Healy, Maurice 212 

Heinis, Gary 212 

Hellman, Jean 212 

Hennessy, Ellen 212 

Hermes, Michael 212 

Herod. Nancy 213 

Hess. Michael 213 

Hickey. John 213 

Hilger. Friar Edward 213 

Himmes. Mary 213 

Hofherr. Mary 213 

Hohmann. Kathleen 213 

Horeis. Michael 213 

Howski. Glenn 213 

Hoy. Edward 213 

Hubchak. George 213 

Hudek. Barbara 213 

Husian. Tanvir UlNlsa 213 

Jarosz. Janice 213 

Jasaitis. M. Dalia 213 

Jasper. James ''3 

Jedhcka Ed 213 

Jensen. Randall 213 

Johnson Robert 213 

Tops. Annette 213 

Jordan, Joseph 213 

Jorgenson, Parlicia 213 

Jozwiak, Michael 213 

Jung, Julie 213 

Kadleck Jerome 213 

Kaminski Maryann 213 

Kampman, Rennee 213 

Kane. Margaret 213 

Kanicki, Rev Phillip 213 

Kapica, John 213 

Kaplan. Denise 213 

Karas. Joseph 213 



Kas. Melody 213 

kasmar. Lynnea 313 

kalz, Joel S 213 

keaton. Rosemary 214 

kehoe. Susan 214 

keiling. Madeline 214 

keleher. Patricia 214 

kelly. Carol 214 

Kenneally. John 214 

kennedy. Donald 214 

kennedy. Mary 214 

kerher. kenneth 214 

kerkslra, Steven 214 

kidd. Girtha 214 

kilcoune, kalherine 214 

king, Donald 214 

king, Margaret 214 

knapik, Melanie 214 

kocurek Adrian 214 

kolh, Nancy 214 

konopka, Mary Ann 214 

koponen, Richard 214 

kostalik. Melvin 214 

kotl. Paul 214 

kozuhal, Daniel 214 

kramer. Mary 214 

kriasek. Thomas 214 

kroll, Judy 214 

krukowski, Sr Renata 214 

kudia. Michael 214 

kurley. Donna 214 

kuta, kalhleen 214 

kuzlik. Michael 214 

kuzma. Valdimir 215 

kwasniewski. Susan 215 

La Ronca. Jay 215 

Laskowski, Thomas 215 

Laube. Roy 215 

Laxner. Michael 215 

Leahy, Edward 215 

Lebainc, Bryan 215 

Leblanc. William 215 

Lech, Lawrence 215 

Lennon, Patricia 215 

Lennon. Thomas 215 

Lewandowski. Eileen 215 

Leyser, Jo Ellen 215 

LHeureux. Pierre 215 

Linehan. Neil 215 

List. Michael 215 

Liltwin. James 215 

Lollino, Antonio 215 

Lombard koy. David 215 

Longley, Clarence 215 

Loos, Robert 215 

Lopez. Carolyn 215 

Lubeckis, Jean 215 

Luksha, William 215 

Lupo, Paul 215 

Lyiludwig, kenneth 215 

Lynam, David 215 

Lynch, James 215 

Lyons. Raymond 216 

McCarthy. Daniel 216 

McDonald. Jill 216 

McFeggan. David 216 

McGinn. Thomas 216 

McGirr. kevin 216 

McGrath. John 216 

McGreevy. Elizabeth 216 

McHugh. Gerald 216 

Mckinzie. James 216 

McLaughlin. Mary 216 

McMahon, Patricia 216 

MacNamera, John 216 

McNichols. Martha 216 

McWilliams. Jacqueline 216 

Machota. John 216 

Mackel. Evelyn 216 

Mackin, Mary 216 

Madden. Jeff 216 

Malinsowski. Rita 216 

Manak. Connie 216 

Mann. John 216 

Manno. Frances 216 

March. Celeste 216 

Marczuki. D 216 

Marino. Herman 216 

Marten. Harold 216 

Martin, Donna 216 

Martin, John 216 

Martin. Timothy 216 

Maslov, Susan 216 

Maurer. William 216 

Mee, Geraldine 216 

Meri. Paula 216 



Mietelski, George 217 

Miller. Catherine 217 

Miller, Linda 217 

Miller, Sandra 217 

Minerva. Peter 217 

Mitchell. Gail 217 

Mithchell, Timothy 217 

Modica. Frank 217 

Montegna. Anthony 217 

Moran. Mary 217 

Moran. Terrance 217 

Morano, Joseph 217 

Moukas, Helen 217 

Mueller. Ann 217 

Mui. George 217 

Mulcrone, Thomas 217 

Myers. Thomas 217 

Myers. George 217 

Nagaloshi, konrad 217 

Napleton, Edward 217 

Nash, Rita 217 

Nelis, Peggy 217 

Nelson, Linda 217 

Nemirow. Joel 217 

Nemmer. William 217 

Neri. Paula 217 

Netter, Ronald 217 

Neuman, Chris 217 

Nicholas, Joyce 217 

Nicholas. Ronald 217 

Nichols. James 217 

Nicolai, Ruth 218 

Neic, Andrew 218 

Neito, Carlos 218 

Nowak, Michael 218 

Occhino, Charlene 218 

O Donoghue, Daniel 218 

O Donghue. Daniel 218 

Oelerich, Julianne 218 

OHara. kalhleen 218 

Okeffe. Robert 218 

O keffe. Walter 218 

Ordzowialy. Roxanna 218 

Orlh. Julianne 218 

Osko, Peggy 218 

Osier. Michael 218 

Oswald. Krista 218 

Ouska, Mary 218 

Owens. Sherry 218 

Panozzo, Michael 218 

Papas, Marlene 218 

Para. Robert 218 

Pary. Robert 218 

Passeri. George 218 

Pavilga. Robert 218 

Pearce, Mary 218 

Pechous, Susan 218 

Peplinski, Daniel 218 

Perry. Clifford 218 

Pflamer. John 218 

Phillips. Henry 219 

Peaeschim, kenneth 219 

Piazza, Richard 219 

Pich, Ronald 219 

Pirsig. Jane 219 

Plachta. Richard 219 

Plafcan, Barb 219 

Plucinshi. Andrew 219 

Pocus, Cheryl 219 

Pomeroy, Joseph 219 

Ponce de Leon. Maria 219 

Pope. Karen 219 

Pope. Leslie 219 

Porlela. Gloria 219 

Powers. Mary Ann 219 

Pratt Charlene 219 

Price, Lloyd 219 

Pries, Joan 219 

Prisco. Diane 219 

Puchalski 219 

Rawlings. Sheila 219 

Reinharl. kalhleen 219 

Renkosiak. Sharon 219 

Rhodes. James 219 

Ridrdau. Michael 219 

Rinella. David 219 

Risner, Richard 219 

Ristoff, George 219 

Rilter. David 219 

Robison, Thomas 219 

Roccosanto, John 219 

Roemer, Robert 219 

Rogers, Alfred 220 

Rohlman, Diana 220 

Rosenthal. Shellie 220 

Rossi. John 220 



Ryan. David 220 

Rybak. Rosemary 220 

Samolilis. Timothy 220 

Sandusky, Allen 220 

Sansone. Barbara 220 

Stnlucci, Dainiel 220 

Sasiadek, John 220 

Saunders. Barb 220 

Savier William 220 

Sawyer. Sally 220 

Scanlon. Mildred 220 

Scaramella. Valerie 220 

Scheive. Glenn 220 

Schneider. John 220 

Schetz, Reinhold 220 

Schullz, Greg 220 

Schultz, Eileen 220 

Scott, Franklin 220 

Seamans, Terrence 220 

Sear Bernard 220 

Segler. Albert 220 

Seitz, Nancy 220 

Seles, Robert 220 

Sepkowski, Diane 220 

Sepulveda. Diane 220 

Seventy. Thea 221 

Sexton, Patricia 221 

Shaw, Betty 221 

Shimoda, Thomas 221 

Shock. Frank 221 

Shovein, Jetlery 221 

Sikorski, John 221 

Silva Bertha 221 

Simmons. Lorraine 221 

Simon. Mary 221 

Simon, Sherry 221 

Sirridge Daniel 221 

Sisto, William 221 

Skummer, Mary 221 

Slattery, James 221 

Smajd, Michael 221 

Smith. Craig 221 

Smith. Craig 221 

Smith, Donna 221 

Smith, James 221 

Solon. Jacqueline 221 

Solyls. Gary 221 

Sowa. Judith 221 

Spindler, Charles 221 

Springfield, Armintha . : 221 

Stack, Chuck 221 

Stack. Mary Jo 221 

Stasiak Christine 221 

Stasinski. Melvin 221 

Slefanowicz. Joanne 221 

Slomper Linda 221 

Storey, Louisea 222 

Styczynski, Richard 222 

Sugar, Ronald 222 

Suhajda Michael 222 

Summers, Evelyn 222 

Summers. Patrick 222 

Surek, Paul 222 

Sulula, John 222 

Sweitzer, Lesley 222 

Szarnych, Jerome 222 

Szatkowski, Lawrence 222 

Szymczak, Walter 222 

Taglteri, Richard 222 

Tamosius. Alwin 222 

Thara, Laura -222 

Tharash, Patricia 222 

Thethekam. Marilyn 222 

Thomas, Antoinette 222 

Thomas. Julia 222 

Thomas, karen 222 

Thrash. Patricia 222 

Tohin, Mary 223 

Tokarz. Paul 223 

Tolanicz. John 223 

Tomasik, Patricia 223 

Tomassi, Craig 223 

Tomeczko, Melvin 223 

Tootooian. Michael 223 

Tortorello. Paul 223 

Trap. Peg 223 

Tremhack. Christine 223 

Tribbey, Charles 223 

Tully. Thomas 223 

Tully, William 223 

Tunzi. Teresa 223 

Vaccaro. Carl 223 

Valentine, kathy 223 

Valentine. Mark 223 

Van Leuvan. Nancy 223 

Velkaveh. James 223 



Vellman. James 323 

Vilches. Susan 333 

Vincenie, Jerome 333 

Vliem. Diane 333 

Volpe. Martin 333 

Waas. Sandra 333 

Wade. Shiela 333 

Wagner, Friar David 333 

Waldock, Carol 333 

Waller. Garvey 333 

Walsh. Mary Pal 333 

Warner, Rick 333 

Waryias, Ronald 333 

Wasmer, Theresa 333 

Walkins, Brenda 334 

Wawrzynias, Richard 334 

Webh, Randall 334 

Wegner, Gerald 334 

Weinzirl, Maria 334 

Wejner, Conrad 334 

Weslly, John 334 

Welhekam. Marilyn 334 

While. Marsie 334 

Weigand. Michael 334 

Wiklund, Roger 334 

Williams, Robert 334 

Wandak, Williams 334 

Wisher, Steve 334 

Wojnar, Conrad 334 

Wonderlick, Mary 334 

Wozniak, Thaddeis 334 

Wylie, Sandra 334 

Yadlovski, Steve 334 

Yee, Philip 334 

Young, Alan 334 

Zabielski, Robert 334 

Zanzola, Luann 224 

Zaiopa, Mary Ann 324 

Zehak, George 334 

Zipparro, John , 334 

Graduates. School of 

Pcntislrt/ 338-331 

Abromailis, Ed 338 

Adamson, David 338 

Amaluro, Frank 228 

Antonucci, Joseph 228 

Arnslein, Gary A 228 

Bacci, Robert 228 

Berley, Alfred Jr 338 

Berryman, John 228 

Berlogllo, Richard 228 

Black. Harold 228 

Bliss, Gerald 228 

Blanchet, Harvey III 338 

Blanchet, Louis J 228 

Borzello, Michael S 228 

Brandstatter, Robert 228 

Brown, Rand S 228 

Bukovac, James 228 

Burch. William 228 

Burke, John E 228 

Carpenter. Michael 338 

Chew. Charles K 328 

Christensen, Louis 338 

Clark, Stephen H 228 

Cole, John M 238 

Connors, William 328 

Crandall, Edwin 338 

Crook, Randall 338 

Cullen, Roger 338 

Crowther, Bruce B 338 

Schoen, Dr, William, Dean 339 

Dana, Reed A 339 

Doemling, Donald 339 

Doerder, Greg P 339 

Driscoll, Stephen 229 

Disabatian, Robert 229 

Dvorak. William J 229 

Elitl Donald G 239 

Emmering, Thomas 229 

Ensking, Harry 239 

Evelt. Rev Lester S 329 

Frasco. John F 339 

Gabriel, Paul 339 

Gadient. Stephen E 339 

Gallagher. Greg P 339 

Gawgiel Joseph 339 

Gilman, Terrence K 339 

Gipson, William W 339 

Gorman, Patrick M 339 

Graft, Terrence L 339 

Grandel, Eugene R 339 

Grigus, John P III 339 

Groszek, Raymond S 339 

Hack. Richard A 239 

Hackbarth, John E 339 



Harlow, James M 339 

Hey, James O Jr 229 

Hogan, Roderick K 229 

Hubbach, John W 229 

Hurst, Byron N 339 

Janowski, Dan M 229 

Jenson, Louis R 229 

Kelley, Michael J 229 

Kelson. P Paul 230 

kite, Kenneth L 230 

Klafeta, Robert 230 

Klingebiel, Edward R 230 

Konkol, John E 230 

Kosubucki, Robert 230 

Kowalik, Michael J 230 

KrempI, Robert J 230 

Krispinsky, Paul J 230 

Krygier, Thomas A 230 

Kushner, Alan S 230 

Landsman, Lewis 230 

Libuser, Lawrence E 230 

Lim, Michael J 230 

Lindsey, Gary 230 

Madona, John 230 

Malan, Scott k. 230 

Mather, Bruce R 230 

Matunas, John C 230 

Miller, Harold 230 

Mondo, Bennis M 230 

Moon, William M 230 

Mueller, George H 330 

Munro, David 330 

McDowell, G, Larry 330 

McNabb, Elizabeth 330 

Nading, Thomas H 330 

Nerwinski. John 330 

Niemann, Dcinald 230 

Odell. Stephen 230 

Ongena. W. James 230 

Orland, Frank R 230 

Ostrom, Ted 230 

Pace, James 230 

Palumbo, Jack 231 

Parkmann, Donald F 231 

Pelzer. Harold J 231 

Peterson, Stanley II 231 

Pietrusinski, Thomas 231 

Pollock, Robert 231 

Poulsom, Robert C 231 

Price, Robert C 231 

Pursell, Wayne B 231 

Rapp, G, W 231 

Rose. Steven A 331 

Rothenberger, Larr D 331 

Savastano, Anthony 331 

Sawicki, John M 331 

Scapillato. James 331 

Segall, Steven W 331 

Seib, James H 331 

Skaalen. Lee M 331 

Skinner. Lynn W 331 

Smalson. Marshall 331 

Soltes. James F 331 

Sowie, Jeff F 331 

Stanuch. Robert T 231 

Slarsiak, William F 231 

Sutley, Stephen 231 

Theis. Alfred J 231 

Thorpe, Dr 231 

Tillner, John E 231 

Toto, Patrick 231 

Van Bellinghen. Edmond 231 

Waters, 231 

Werth, Michael M 231 

Wiegand, Philip J 231 

Wong, Thodore F. K 231 

Wood, Norm 231 

Griiiliiulcs School of 

Medicine 232-235 

Basta. James W 333 

Beamek, Tom 333 

Bloom, Robert 333 

Bordeaux, Ronald 333 

Carroll, Richard 333 

Casey, Elmer 333 

Chorba, Thc>mas 332 

Cinefro, Robert 333 

Cook, Robert 232 

Daniak, Nicholas Jr 233 

Bartolo, Hansel 232 

Decamora, Donna 232 

Dietz, Fred 232 

DiPieIro, Joseph 232 

Dobozi, William 333 

Doot, Martin 333 

Dc>rsch, Tom 333 



Fabri, Peter 232 

Fell, Richard 232 

Filice, Robert 232 

Firlit. Robert 232 

Froelich, Judith 232 

Frnoczak, Stan 232 

Furlan, Anthony 232 

Gabig, Theodore 232 

Giefer, Anthony 232 

Goodenow, Gary 232 

Gulling. Edward 232 

Haddard, Elias 232 

Hinz. Michael 233 

Hummel. James 333 

Iden, Donald Lee 233 

Jackson. Jean 233 

Janicak, Phillip 233 

Johnson, Charles M 233 

Jordan, Christopher 333 

Kannankeril, Joseph 333 

Kazan. Robert 233 

Kelley. Patrick 233 

Keyes, Geoffrey 333 

Kies, Merrill 333 

Kinnealey, Ann 333 

Kistner. James 233 

Klamut, Michael 233 

Kooy, Russell 233 

Larson, Michael 233 

McAuliffe, Edward 233 

McBrine, Pauls 233 

McFarland, Joseph 233 

McKeever, Louis 334 

Maggiamo. John 334 

Maida, Gerald 334 

Martin, Tom 334 

Mohyohisky, Stefan 234 

Moleski, Mark 234 

Mullenix, Charles 234 

Myers, Michael 234 

Narut, Noel 234 

Neiweem, Joseph 234 

Nelimark. Robert 234 

Ness. Russell 234 

O'Connor, Richard 234 

Olszewski, Joseph 234 

Opeike, Frank 234 

Phillip, Earl 234 

Quish. Thomas 234 

Pagano, Ralph 234 

Panio, Paschal 234 

Parenti. Anthony 234 

Parhad, Irma 334 

Patena, Dennis 334 

Pauly, Charles 334 

Pennau. Karl 334 

Perlik. Stuart ^ 334 

Poggi. John 334 

Psarras. George 334 

Ptasinki. Joseph 234 

Rafael. Robert A 234 

Reaman. Gregory 235 

Richmcind. Joann 335 

Rieser. Thomas 335 

Rogers. Craig 335 

Rosenbloom, Robert 235 

Rcisso, Frank 235 

Rouse, Richard 235 

Sage, John W 235 

Scicutella. Leonard 235 

Showalter, John 235 

Silver, Bruce 235 

Sinibaldi, Mark 235 

Spira, S. David 235 

Stiff, Philip C, Jr 235 

Strietmalter, Nancy 235 

Sturdevant, Ray 235 

Tomich, Paul 235 

Vc>elker, James 235 

Westphal, Mark 235 

Wienke, H Richard 235 

Winget. Charles 235 

Wroblewski. Donald 235 

Zadylak. Robert 235 

Zawada. Ed 235 

Zucker. David 235 

Graduates. Schoo\ of 

Niirsinci 225-227 

Allen. Mary Ann 335 

Bacsik. Martha 225 

Bediek, Lois 235 

Bethany, Dedra 235 

Bilka, Donna 225 

Blumthal. Janet 225 

Bolin. Patricia 235 

Boyle, Marie 225 



Braan. Linda 235 

Brennan. Gerianne 235 

Bueltner. Mary Ann 325 

Busch. Patrice 335 

Bushracher. Suzette 225 

Camargo. Jeanna 225 

Choukas. Janet 225 

Cumminjs. Barbara 225 

Pagen. Ella 225 

Damilz. Nadine 225 

DeVanon. Mary 225 

Didler, Marietta 225 

Poerr. Barbara 225 

Fisli. Barbara 225 

Gattfield. Sharon 235 

Gawron. Catherine 335 

Gorski. Valerie 335 

Hahn. Mary 335 

Harris. Alane 226 

Hawkins. Mary 226 

Hohmann. Kathy 226 

Holhauer. Janet 226 

Jaeger. Frances 226 

Jaeger. Gwendolyn 226 

Janeczko. Juanita 226 

Johnson. Mary 226 

Joseph. Betty 226 

Joslyn. Patricia 226 

Kalinowski. Penise 226 

Kaplan. Penise 226 

Kelly. Maureen 226 

Killean. Chris 336 

Kofi. Andrea 336 

Kristensen. Kathy 336 

Kudia. Theresa 336 

Leist. Paula 336 

Littel. Cathy 336 

McCarty. James 336 

McFall. Barbara 336 

McKay. Cathy 336 

MacPonald. Pelores 336 

Matas. Katherine 336 

Nelis. Peggy 336 

Nowak. Susan 226 

OPonnell. Mary Ellen 226 

Oleary. Patricia 336 

Orban. Mary 227 

Ouska. Irene 227 

Polzin. Jan 227 

Poteraki. Michelle 227 

Pyllarz. Christine 227 



Rosenberg. Eileen 227 

Rzeczkowski. Mary Lou 227 

Sagle. Ponna 237 

Schramer. Mary 227 

Sliepka. Marilyn 237 

Smith. Vera 337 

Sus. Elizabeth 337 

Szczygiei. Cynthia 337 

Taylor. Judith 237 

Wachdorf. Cecilia 337 

Waites. Patricia 337 

Waldron. Patricia 227 

Wayne. Audrey 227 

Weith-Johnson. Marlene 227 

Whyte. Benna 227 

Wilson. Barbara 227 

WIeklinski. Mary Jane 227 

Wlodarczyk. Judi 227 

Zajac. Carolyn 227 

Zaiechi. Sr. Margaret 227 

Zelvys. Sr. M. Lucille 227 

Henry IV 194-195 

History 53 

Hockey Club 166-169 

Honors 54 

Interfraternity Council 109 

Italian Club 110 

Kappa Beta Gamma Ill 

Kappa Pelta Epsilon 112 

King. Don 27 

Lanahan. Jim 28 

LA.S.O 114 

School of Law 82-83 

Loyola College Republican 

Club 113 

Loyola Student Government 

Association 116 

Liiyulcin 118 

Loyolan. 50th Anniversary 143 

The Loyolan Staff 240 

LU.A.S.A 114 

Foster G. McGaw Hospital 12 

Madam s Late Mother 188-189 

Maguire. Fr. James S.J 3 

Marketing 55 

Math Club 117 

Mathematics 56 

Maziarz. Pr 36 

Mertz. Fr. James S.J 13. 36 

Mertz Hall 158-161 

Military Ball 22 



Military Science 57 

Modern Languages 58 

Natural Science 59 

Niles College 70-71 

Nursing 67-69 

Otto. Earl 28 

Pan Hellenic Association 109 

Pappas. Marlene 33 

Patricca. Nicholas 37 

Percy. Charles 196 

Peter Pan 184-185 

Philosophy 60 

Phocni-v 124 

Physics 61 

Pi Alpha Lambda 105 

Political Science 62 

Pom Pom Squad 130 

President Ball 6-9 

Psychology 63 

Radio Conference 18-19 

Reader s Circle 129 

Rome Center 72 

Roshomon 190-191 

Saladinc>. Leon 33 

Savier. Bill 

Servant of Two Masters 186187 

Sigma Pi 133 

Sociology 64 

Slebler Hall 162 163 

Storm 23 

Sirilch Medal 13 

Sirilch School of Medicine 78-81 

Student Activities Board . 134 

Student Operations Board 97 

Sullivan. Terry 29 

Sword of Loyola 14-15 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 133 

Theatre 65 

Theology 66 

Theta Phi Alpha 115 

To Mom and Dad 202 205 

Track 176-177 

Ukranian Club 110 

Upward Bound 200-201 

Urban Environment Art 198-199 

Volunteers Interested in 

People 102 

Water Polo 178-181 

WLT Radio 103 

WLUC Radio 138141 

Zanzola. Luann 30 



239 





n Steger 

Mark Beehner 

1. 
-~-|iy Danna 

tes" Department, Mr. Bill Davis, 
In, Phoenix. Theatre Department. 
Urban Ethnic Studies Department 

L ^^ Campus Photo 

Isworth Publishing Co., Inc. 



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Marcelini-, Mo . I SA, 



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WALSWORTH 

Marceline, Mo., U.S.A.