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Full text of "The Loyolan"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

CARL!: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/loyolan1977unse 



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_oyola University 

hicago, Illinois 
Volume 40 



Cover photograph by George Rivera. Artwork by Daniel Lupo. 

lopyright ® Loyolan 1977 



''■'■■'■ "'- ' ' '■"" 




Contents 
Introduction 
Administration 
Academics 
Organizations 
Student Life 
Sports 
Graduates 





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A sudden sun bursts upon me: I am offered new life. 




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It may easily be taken to be a blinding force, 
a threat, opposition. 

But I prefer to experience the light as a fresh 
awakening, a cue to start up again in an 
explosion of energy. 



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The awakening requires acknowledgement of 
what was, an acceptance of my past, the 
history I am continuing. 





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The awakening further requires realization of 
each encounter as a challenge to begin anew 
and multiply my own talents, of each moment 
as an opening to a new world, a world of 
unlimited possibilities to be explored and 
actualized. 





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The awakening finally requires responsibility 
to that which is truly me, to that world which 
allows my development by its very otherness. 



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10 






I am given this new birth with each daybreak's 
death of self. My life is dynamism and I cannot 
help but surge forward, rebuilding, ever 
stepping out of the trappings of my failings 
and into the light of new life. 





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Reverend Raymond Baumhart, S. J., President 



Roots are in fashion this year, possibly because roots are 
truly fascinating whether they are familial, intellectual, 
biological or cultural. 

An obvious case in point is the television film, "Roots," 
based on the best-selling book by Alex Haley. Judging by 
its impact and record number of viewers, "Roots" is the 
television event of 1977. In eight dramatic segments, 
"Roots" told the story of some American Blacks (and 
Haley's own ancestors) from their African beginnings. It 
also gave many Blacks a past to which they could relate and 
from which they could draw inspiration and cultural 
identity. It did this by showing the rebirth and adaptation 
of a Black family through several generations. 

Roots and rebirth. The theme of this Yearbook is rebirth, 
and rebirth involves change. So do roots, and Loyola, and 
its students. 

Loyola University is part of the root system of society. And 
this root system, by causing change, forces a continual 
process of rebirth and renewal. The roots of a tree send 



up the nutriments which make it possible for the saplingi 
to grow, adapt to the elements, and take its final shape asl 
a tree. In much the same way, the university— thisl 
university — provides the intellectual, cultural and spirituall 
nutriments which help make it possible for its students tol 
grow, adapt to a changing society, and become full, whole| 
persons. 

One of Loyola's goals has been to assist in the self-renewal| 
of its students so that when they leave the University they 
can take their places as educated, articulate, competent] 
and ethical members of society. 

When you graduate this spring and begin to make youtl 
contribution to society, I have three hopes for you: 1) thaJ 
your intellectual rebirth at Loyola has prepared you well 
for the further changes and challenges of your life; 2) thaj 
in the coming years you not only remember your Loyola 
roots but are proud of them; 3) that your service of youn 
neighbor reflects the Jesuit, Judaeo-Christian roots o\ 
Loyola University. 



14 




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16 



Jniversity Officers 







stees ABOVE, STANDING (left to right): Mr. Joseph B. Lanterman, Mr. H. 
dley Murphy, General James A. McDivitt, Charles F. Donovan, S. J., Mrs. 
Ibin Yokie, Mr. Bernard T. Brennan, Mr. John W. Moutoussamy, Theodore 
racy, S. J., Brian A. McCrath, S.J., Charles T. McEnery, S.J., Mr. Frank W. 
isidine. SEATED: Mrs. Terrence J. Dillon, Francis X. Quinn, S.J., Miss Dora 



B. Somerville, Raymond Baumhart, S.j., Mr. John F. Smith, Jr., Edward J. 
Drummond, S. J., Mrs. John E. Molony, David M. Clarke, S.J. Board members 
NOT PICTURED: John S. Hirschboeck, M.D., Mr. Morris I. Leibman, William 

C. Mclnnes, S.J., and Mr. William J. Quinn. 




OPPOSITE PACE: John H. Reinke, S.J., Chancellor (TOP LEFT), John 
F. Langdon, Vice President for Administration (TOP RIGHT), Richard 
A. Matre, Vice President & Dean of Faculties (CENTR RIGHT), Karl 
Zeisler, Vice President for Finance (BOTTOM), Mariette LeBlanc, 
Vice President for Student Services (CENTER LEFT). Donald J. Hayes, 
S.J., Vice President for Campus Ministry (LEFT), W. Daniel Conroyd, 
Vice President for Development, Public Relations, Alumni Relations 
(ABOVE). 



17 




David B. Tribble, Dean of Natural Sciences (RIGHT); Jeanne M. 
Foley^Dean of Social Sciences (FAR RIGHT); Virgil F. Boyd, Dean, 
School of Business Administration (BELOW RIGHT); John E. Festle, 
S. J., Freshman Dean (BOTTOM RIGHT); Francis J. Catania, Dean of 
Humanities (BOTTOM LEFT); Henry R. Malecki, Dean, University 
College (BELOW). 




Deans of Undergraduate Schools, Departments 



18 



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Ronald E Walker, Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 
(BELOW); Merle S Lufen, Assistant to the Dean (BOTTOM 
RIGHT); lulia A. Lane, Dean, School of Nursing (BOTTOM 
LEFT); William H, Hogan, S. J., Senior Dean (BELOW LEFT); 
)ohn M. Wozniak, Dean, School of Education (LEFT). 





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Lorraine P. Monthei, Assistant Dean of Students and Internationa 
Student Advisor (ABOVE), Bernard Pleskoff, Director of Housing and 
Associate Dean of Students (ABOVE RIGHT), Keith A. Patrick, 
Assistant Dean of Students and Director of Student Activities 
(RIGHT). 



20 



Student Services Personnel 




Thomas O. Adams, Dean of Students Lake Shore 
Campus (ABOVE LEFT), Gary L. Soltys, Activities 
Program Advisor (ABOVE), Cheryl Lee Altany, 
Assistant Director of Student Activities (LEFT). 



21 



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Peggy Meskin (ABOVE), Linda Johnson (TOP LEFT) Eileen Toofan (TOP 
RIGHT), Gordon Stiefel, Assistant Dean of Students and Director of 
Student Activities (RIGHT). 



22 





Carol Molick (LEFT), Joan Steinbrecher, Dean of Students, Lewis Towers 
Campus (TOP LEFT), Paula Cluck (TOP RIGHT), Charles Taylor, Assistant 
Dean of Students and Black Student Advisor (ABOVE). 



23 



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Economics 



The Economics Department offers a major in the 
College of Arts and Sciences, the School of Business 
Administration, and University College. It strives to lay 
the foundation for graduate studies for those who plan 
to enter the profession of teaching and research; to 
equip students with a knowledge of the principles, 
theories and problems of economics and business 
which will help them to become responsible leaders in 
their chosen fields; to prepare students who are 
seeking careers in government service. 

Tassos G. Malliaris, Chairman and Assistant Professor, 
Economics Department (ABOVE); R. Carson Cox, 
Chairman & Associate Professor, Accounting 
Department (OPPOSITE PAGE, TOP); George S. 
Goodell, Professor & Chairman, Finance Department 
(OPPOSITE PAGE, BOTTOM). 



26 




\ccounting 



he objectives of the Department are: to provide 
tudents with an understanding of the nature of 
ccounting principles, and to teach the generally 
ccepted principles of accounting and auditing to the 
tudents who choose to prepare themselves for a 
areer as an accounting executive or a professional 
ublic accountant. 




Finance 



The Department of Finance is one of the smaller 
departments of the School of Business, yet it is the most 
popular area of concentration of graduate students in 
the MBA program. 

The finance major receives a broad training in both the 
financial management aspects of business and in the 
area of investments and the securities market. 
Graduates typically pursue careers within the treasury 
departments of firms, or with banks, security brokerage 
houses, and other financial institutions. 



27 



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Marketing 



The Marketing Department seeks to: 1) provide a basis 
for understanding the American system of distribution 
of the output of our productive mechanism; 2) provide 
an understanding of, and the skills needed for market 
research and analysis; 3) offer understanding, 
knowledge and skills in the training and management 
of marketing personnel; 4) train in the identification, 
evaluation, and solution of marketing problems. 




28 




Organizational Behavior & Policy 

Befitting the theme of "new life" for this year, the 
Department of Organizational Behavior & Policy was 
developed in the fall, formerly a part or the 
Management Department of the School of Business 
Administration. 

The Department provides a major focus in personnel 
administration. Tne goals set for this year include 
improvement of course content and sequencing, 
offering the student optimal opportunity to explore 
various quantitative methods and concepts from the 
behavioral sciences as they relate to business 
management. 




Socio-Legal Studies 

The objectives of the Department of Socio-Legal 
Studies are to provide the student with an 
understanding of individual legal responsibilities arising 
from the interaction of persons, property and 
government, and to create an awareness of the legal 
environment in which executive decisions are made. 



len F.Jung, Chairman & Professor, Marketing Department 
1 PPOSITE PAGE, TOP); Robert L. Malone, Chairman & Associate 
lofessor. Organizational Behavior & Policy Department 
IjPPOSITE PACE, BOTTOM); John D. O'Malley, Professor & 
iiairman, Socio-Legal Studies Department (ABOVE). 



29 




30 



Francis X. Crollig, S. ). Chairman & Professor (TOP LEFT); Christine L. 
Fry, Assistant Professor (TOP RIGHT); Margaret A. Hardin, Instructor 
(ABOVE); lames W. Porter, Assistant Professor (OPPOSITE PAGE, 
TOP); Paul S. Breidenbach, Assistant Professor (OPPOSITE PACE, 
BOTTOM). 




Anthropology 



The Science of Man in the Arts and Sciences curricula 
is an integrating factor. Anthropology borrows from 
and contributes uniquely to most of the other arts and 
sciences. The two introductory survey courses are 
designed to introduce non-science majors to 
anthropology and the scientific method. The 
curriculum for anthropology majors aims to build a 
solid foundation in the fields of physical anthropology, 
archeology, ethnology, and linguistics as a preparation 
for graduate studies, teaching, or work in fields of 
applied anthropology. 



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31 








Sociology 



32 



The Department of Sociology seeks to give the students 
an understanding of the nature of social relationships, 
social institutions, society and culture and of the 
influence of these on social behavior; to help the 
student become more sophisticated in his judgments 
about contemporary social problems and to encourage 
keener interest in and more serious responsibility 
toward the community in w/hich he lives. 

in addition to its normal programs, the Department this 
year inaugurated a community study of the Rogers Park 
neighborhood surrounding the University's Lake Shore 
campus. Faculty-student research projects also 
included studies of criminal homicide patterns in 
Chicago, changing features of American religion, and 
political involvement of women. 



Paul Mundy, Professor, and Director of Criminal Justice Program 
(TOP LEFT); Ross P. Scherer, Associate Professor (TOP RIGHT); 
Tfiomas M. Gannon, S.)., Chairman & Associate Professor 
(RIGHT); Katfileen McCourt, Assistant Professor (ABOVE). 




pecial Study Programs: 
^fro-American, Urban-Ethnic Studies 



he Afro-American Studies Program and 
le Urban-Ethnic Studies Program are 
iterdisciplinary programs. 

he Afro-American program has three 
rinciple objectives: 1) to make known 
le many contributions of Black people 
1 all aspects of American life; 2) to 
evelop and carry out meaningful 
?search into some of the current 
roblems confronting Afro-Americans; 
to participate in community action 
rograms. 



The Urban-Ethnic Program attempts to 
provide an understanding of the 
urbanization process, as well as the 
history, problems, needs, and potentials 
of urban areas. The program emphasizes 
the need for in-depth exposure to the 
human as well as physical needs and 
roblems confronting urban areas. In 
eeping with this emphasis, it seeks to 
foster a realistic awareness of ethnic 
group culture in the United States. Dr. 
Charles W. Hart was this year's Director. 



I 




ilton A. Gordon, Director, Afro-American Studies. 



33 



Psychology 



The Psychology faculty currently numbers thirty-four 
full-time, doctoral level faculty. Unlike many schools, it 
is the rule rather than the exception that Loyola 
students take all of their psychology courses from 
Ph.D.'s. 

While course offerings in psychology are many and 
varied, the program has some specific goals. They 
include: development of a basic understanding of 
fundamental theory and principles of psychology, 
progression to a sopnisticated level of understanding of 
classical and contemporary theory and research, 
creation of an understanding and an appreciation of 
basic research and research methodology in 
theoretical and applied psychology, establishment of a 
psychological orientation from which to view and 
understand human behavior whether it be abnormal or 
normal behavior. 

Also varied are the ways a student can study 
psychology. The Department offers lecture courses 
covering a wide array of content ideas, psychology 
laboratories where students actually carry out their own 
original research projects, experimental courses aimed 
at developing tneir own interpersonal skills and 
learning how to foster these skills into others, and 
supervised field work experience in mental health 
settings. 











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James E. Johnson, Associate Professor (TOP RIGHT); David J. De 
Palma, Assistant Professor (RIGHT). 




34 



June H. Pruitt, Secretary (BELOW); Paul J. Von Ebers, Assistant Professor 
(BOTTOM RIGHT); Mark S. Mayzner, Professor (BOTTOM LEFT); 
Tfiomas P. Petzel, Associate Professor (BELOW LEFT); Homer H. 
Johnson, Chairman (TOP LEFT). 





36 



Richard A. Maier, Associate Profesor (ABOVE), Emil J. Posava 
Associate Professor (ABOVE LEFT). 





Child Development Center, 
Guidance Center Day School 

The Child Development Center, a project sponsored 
by the Psychology Department, opened for the first 
time in September of 1976. Conceived by Dr. Jeanne 
Foley, Dean of Social Sciences, and Dr. Debra Holmes, 
Assistant Professor of Psychology, the facility provides 
low-cost child care for cnildren of Loyola students and 
community members. 

Besides offering a non-profit day care facility, the Child 
Development Center provides Loyola students in 
developmental psychology an opportunity to work 
with and observe normal children. 

Another program that experienced a rebirth this year 
is the Day School of the Guidance Center. Directed by 
Dr. Patricia Barger, Professor of Psychology, the 
Guidance Center provides community mental health 
treatment and referral services. The Day School is a 
division for severely emotionally disturbed children 
aged 3-12 years. It vacated its 1041 West Loyola building 
in December to move into two mobile units installed 
just east of Damen Hall on the Lake Shore campus. The 
Day School has been in existence since 1970 and will be 
maintained indefinitely in the mobile units until a more 
permanent facility is acquired. 



atricia M. Barger, Director, Guidance Center, 
rofessor (TOP RIGHT); Day School mobile units 
OP LEFT); Loyola students at Child Development 
enter (ABOVE, ABOVE RIGHT, CENTER LEFT). 



37 





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Mary Lee Fahey, Secretary (LEFT); Rev. 
Richard Vandevelde, S.J., Chairman 
(ABOVE LEFT); Lawrence P. Jensen, 
Assistant Professor (ABOVE); John C. 
McCann, Associate Professor (ABOVE 
RIGHT); Joseph H. Mayne, Associate 
Professor (RIGHT). 



38 



Mathematical 
Sciences 



The Department of Mathematical Sciences offers a B.S. 
in both Mathematics and Computer Science. Both 
programs provide an adequate background both for 
advanced study in several areas and for the uses of 
mathematics in business, government service and 
teaching. 

The training of majors is not the only function of the 
Department of Mathematical Sciences. Courses in 
statistics, finite mathematics, calculus, and computer 
science are also offered to meet the needs of other 
departments as w^ell as to allow students to meet their 
Core requirements. 

In addition to its teaching functions, the Department 
supervises the calculator room, 329 Damen Hall. This 
room contains a variety of electronic calculators, 
including programmable models, along with key 
punches and teletype terminals. Free tutoring service 
for Loyola students is provided by the undergraduate 
Mathematics Club. 






Sonia J. Ringstrom,, Assistant Professor 
(LEFT); Marjorie C. Andre, Assistant 
Professor (BELOW LEFT); Raymond W. 
Nackoney, Assistant Professor, and 
student (LEFT); Alice B. Hayes, 
Chairman (ABOVE). 




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Natural Science 



The Department of Natural Science is an interdisciplin- 
ary science department that aims to increase 
knowledge of the contributions of science to our 
understanding of man and the universe. As scientists we 
accept our responsibility for communicating as well as 
increasing scientific knowledge. Interdisciplinary 
studies require not only active participation in the 
individual sciences but also the ability to see 
relationships, appreciate historical and philosophical 
dimensions, and to recognize the human significance of 
scientific thought. The educational function of the 
department is liberal education as distinct from 
pre-professional training in the sciences. 

This year the department planned something that may 
indeed represent a rebirth. In addition to the traditional 
focus on the natural science core, a program in 
Environmental Studies will be proposed to the 
Academic Council as a new minor for the fall '77 
semester. Also, this year for the first time the 
department offered a wide range of courses at both the 
Lewis Towers and Lake Shore campuses. 



39 



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40 




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Physics 



The Physics Department offers courses for physics 
majors, related majors and for non-science majors. 
Laboratory courses include basic physics, modern 
physics, optics, electronics and observational astronomy. 

The Department maintains an electronics laboratory, a 
machine shop, a seismology station and research facilities 
for experimental atomic and solid state physics. 
Experimental efforts center around studies of solids and 
liquids. This includes magnetic resonance, x-ray 
diffraction, Mossbauer effect and laser radar. All of these 
projects involve a great deal of student participation. In 
addition, some students work on individual projects. 




ohn J. Dykia, Assistant Professor (TOP LEFT); Richard R. Bukrey, 
Chairman, Associate Professor (CENTER RIGHT); Donald J. Roll, S. J., 
Professor (LEFT); )erry Saxon, Assistant Professor (OPPOSITE PACE, 
CENTER LEFT). 



41 



Chemistry 



The programs in Chemistry aim to lay a firm foundation 
for the chemistry majors and to give other students a 
cultural background in chemistry, the upper division 
courses are designed to train the chemistry major 
adequately for entering graduate studies or industrial 
work. 

Two tracks for the chemistry major are available: the 
B.S. program and the A. B. program. The former is 
intended explicitly for those undergraduates who have 
career goals in chemistry such as an industrial or 
academic chemist. The latter program is intended for 
those undergraduates who have career goals in areas 
other than chemistry but for which a strong chemistry 
background is desirable, such as medicine, dentistry, 
patent law. 





42 



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OPPOSITE PACE: David S. Crumrine, Associate Professor (LEFT:) 
lohn L. Huston, Professor and Bruno jaselskis, Professor. 
(RIGHT). 



43 



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GOGGLES 

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AT ALL TIMES 





44 



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nes W. Wilt, Chairman & Professor (ABOVE). 



45 



46 




Biology 



The major and all courses in biology are offered on the 
Lake Shore campus only. 

The aims of the Department of Biology are to present 
to students the basic principles of the biological 
sciences and to prepare majors in biology for graduate 
studies, teaching, or entrance into applied and 
professional schools of science. 

This year a new dimension was added. The proximity of 
Loyola University to Lake Michigan provides an 
opportunity to be unique in offering lake-oriented 
courses through developing a Great Lakes Biology 
Station. 




(OPPOSITE PAGE) Robert W. Hamilton, Associate Professor 
(CENTER LEET); Mark Coldie, Assistant Professor (TOP). Benedict 
Jaskoski, Professor (TOP); Amrik S. Dfialiwal (LEFT). 



47 









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yde Robbins, Assistant Professor (OPPOSITE PACE); Walter P. 
iters, S. J., Professor (TOP LEFT); Harold W. Manner, Chairman & 
ofessor (ABOVE); Jan Savitz, Associate Professor (ABOVE RICHT). 



49 









50 



Donna Rankin, Assistant Professor, Chairperson (TOP LEFT); Mary A. 
McDermott, Chairman & Associate Professor (RIGHT); Avis 
McDonald, Assistant Professor (ABOVE); Julia Lane, Dean, School of 
Nursing (OPPOSITE PAGE RIGHT). 




School of Nursing 

The School of Nursing reflects the purpose and 
philosophy of Loyola University by locating Professional 
Nursing Education within the context of Judeo- 
Christian values. 

t is believed that every person is created by God and 
has the right to live witn dignity, to be accepted for his 
inherent worth as an individual and to make decisions 
about his life. Nursing is thus concerned with those 
social conditions which affect opportunities for human 
fulfillment. 



Health is the condition of wholeness arising from the 
interaction of physical, psychological, social and 
spiritual well-being. Nursing is service oriented. Its 
members promote health, prevent illness, and care for 
the ill. Professional Nursing is further committed to 
theorizing and research, developing professional 
standards of competence in education and practice, 
participating in inter-disciplinary efforts to improve the 
health delivery system and supporting social issues 
which promote conditions of wholeness for every man. 



51 




School of Education 



The School of Education is in its seventh year of 
operation, including the Institute of Pastoral Studies, 
and is composed of four departments: Administration, 
Curriculum and Instruction, Foundations and Guidance 
and Counseling. The faculty is supplemented by 
adjunct professors in the affiliated Erikson Institute for 
Early Childhood Education and the Institute of Pastoral 
Studies in religious education, both nationally 
reknowned, and a corps of lecturers, mainly 
practitioners from the field. 

While consolidating in some areas, due to inflation and 
increased significant competition from the public 
sector and an expected cyclical decline in traditional 
undergraduate teacher education, it is confidently 
expected that newer avenues of development will 
grow, namely, teachers for the emotionally disturbed 
and socially maladjusted, a school psychologist program 
and continuing education programs for teachers, 
administrators and counseling personnel in the school 
sector. 




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Barney M. Berlin, Associate Professor and Chairman, Curriculum ar i 
Instruction (TOP); Ernest 1. Prouix, Professor (ABOVE). 




52 




anuel S. Silverman, Associate Professor and Chairman, Guidance 
d Counseling (TOP LEFT); Jasper J. Valenti, Associate Dean (TOP 
GHT); Jack A. Kavanagh, Assistant Professor and Chairman, 
undation of Educaton (ABOVE). 



53 



English 



The Victorian poet and critic Matthew Arnold 
defined literature as the "best that has been thought 
and said in the world." In so defining it, Arnold 
justified the important place that the study of 
literature holds at universities. And it may be that the 
literature written in the language of Arnold— and 
Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Donne, Dryden, 
Pope, Wordsworth, Keats, Dickens, Whitman, Yeats, 
Eliot, Faulkner — and of ourselves, is the richest 
literature^of all. 

The primary aim of the English Department is to help 
students to reap that part of their cultural heritage 
which is contained in the works of literature written 
in English from the 1400's to the present time. 
Although such a task may seem awesome, the 
Department strives to translate this goal into practical 
reality by 1) training students in literary analysis; 2) 
providing a view of the backgrounds which helped to 
shape British and American literature; and 3) helping 
students to organize and write clearly and effectively. 




Michael Masi, Assistant Professor 
(ABOVE); Francis L. Fennel, Associate 
Professor (TOP); Bernard P. McElroy, 
Associate Professor (ABOVE RIGHT); Ross 
Talarico, Assistant Professor (BELOW). 



54 




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56 




Modern Languages 



Knowledge of a foreign language is a necessary part of 
liberal education and an invaluable asset for many 
occupations. In the first semester course of the 
Language Program, the structure of simple sentences 
serves to introduce students to reading skills and to 
illustrate fundamental concepts about language. In the 
second semester, expository prose serves as a vehicle to 
introduce students to the thoughts and customs of 
another culture, as well as to some more complex 
concepts about language. 

Beyond the basic program, the student has several 
options open to him. He may enroll in linguistics 
courses to pursue an interest in the structure of 
language and its relation to ethnic studies. He may take 
courses which develop fluency in oral and written 
expression. He may choose literature courses to 
continue the study of a cultural heritage through 
reading and discussion of original texts. 




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(OPPOSITE PACE, CLOCKWISE) Ann C Bugliani, Visiting Professor 
(TOP LEFT); )oseph Wandel, Assistant Professor (TOP RIGffT); Anne 
M. Callahan, Chairman & Associate Professor (BOTTOM). Mercedes 
M. Robles, Assistant Professor (TOP); Lawrence Biondi, S, |., Assistant 
Professor (LEFT), 



57 




Classical Studies 



The Department of Classical Studies combines in its 
province things traditional with things contemporary. 
Its offerings are courses that were for centuries the 
cornerstone of a liberal education, the Latin and Greek 
languages and literatures. Within recent memory, the 
Department has added offerings in the ancient 
literatures and civilizations taught exclusively in English, 
several of which satisfy the core requirement for study 
of a literature originally written in a foreign language. 

In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest 
in the original languages and the Department has taken 
steps to meet that interest. For example, Roman Law 
and Computer Analysis of Language are additions to 
Classical Studies offerings that indicate the 
Department's commitment to the past in light of 
contemporary requirements, developments and 
interests. 



Joseph S. Pendergast, S. )., Chairman (TOP); John P. Murphy, S. 
Assistant Professor (RIGHT). 



58 




3hn E. Festle, S. J., Assistant Professor (TOP LEFT); Joann M. Stachnlw 
.ssistant Professor (TOP RIGHT). 



59 



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Barbara H. Rosenwein, Assistant Professor (BELOW); Paul S. Lietz, 
Professor Emeritus (BOTTOM); James L. Penick, Jr., Professor (LEFT)' 




History 




History complements other liberal studies, it develops 
special insights into the cultural in which the student 
has to live and helps him to view it through the 
perspective of time and change. It helps to discipline 
his mind through the methodology of historical analysis 
and synthesis. It stimulates him to develop and refine 
the values which give him balance and judgment for a 
Christian life. 



61 




What is "good" government? What is political order? 
Is there such a thing as ethical man? Is the American 
political system a good system? 

Man, politics, and government have always been at the 
center of intellectual inquiry of the political scientist. 
While the study of these subjects range from theory to 
behavioralism and from local politics to international 
affairs, the contemporary and enduring need is to study 
our own American republic and the relationships 
between individuals, people, and the political system. 
These are some of the crucial questions and concepts 
that are examined through the Department of Political 
Science. 



Phyllis Oman, Lecturer (ABOVE LEFT); Allan Larson, Professor 
(TOP LEFT); Thomas S. Engeman, Assistant Professor (TOP 
RIGHT); Sam C. Sarkesian, Chairman & Professor (ABOVE). 



62 



Military Science 



^s a regular University academic department, the 
Military Science Department offers courses in military 
history, political science, leadership and management, 
ppen to all interested students. 

Under its other name. Reserve Officer's Training Core, 
he Department fulfills its obligations to train officers 
or the United States Army. A good part of the activities 
)f the Department center around this latter purpose 
md include Leadership, Drill and Command classes, 
veekend bivouacs, and the Military Ball. 




'lajor Dennis M. Meredith, Associate Professor; Captain 
homas M. Molino, Assistant Professor; Sergeant Denzel F. 
k'alker, Lecturer; Sergeant Major Cordon V. Weber, Chief 
istructor; Sergeant Ronald E. Wells; Captain Craig Silcox, 
ssistant Professor. 



63 



Philosophy 



The Department of Philosophy seeks to acquaint 
students with the major problems of philosophy and a 
systematic approach toward their resolution; to 
stimulate their talents for speculative knowledge and 
constructive criticism on fundamental issues; to offer 
them a rational foundation for the arts and sciences; to 
assist them through a reasoned appreciation of the 
dignity of human nature to formulate a philosophy of 
life mindful of the traditions of the Christian West. 



Robert M. Barry, Professor (RIGHT); Kenneth F. Thompson, Chairman 
& Associate Professor (CENTER RIGHT); Richard J. Westley, Associate 
Professor (BOTTOM RIGHT); Suzanne M. Cunningham, Associate 
Profesor, Thomas J. Sheehan, Assistant Professor, Peter J. Maxwell, 
Assistant Professor (BOTTOM LEFT); David Schweickart (CENTER 
LEFT). 






Theology 



The Department of Theology is one of the largest 
departments in the College of Arts and Sciences. A 
broad spectrum of courses is taught, ranging through 
Sacred Scripture, Systematic, Moral and Comparative 
Religion. 

The Department endeavors to present the life, 
personality, and teaching of Jesus Christ as the organic 
principle of unity for Catholic thought, worship, 
culture, and holiness. 

Louis P. Rogge, O. Carm., Instructor (LEFT); Anthony Petani, Assistant 
Professor (CENTER LEFT); Charles ). Brannen, S. )., Assistant Professor 
(TOP LEFT); Richard M. Mackowski, S. J., Assistant Professor (TOP 
RIGHT); Brendan McGrath, O.S.B., Professor (CENTER RIGHT). 



65 



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Fine Arts 



Ralph M. Arnold, Chairman 
Assistant Professor (ABOVE); Willii 
Hoffman, Lecturer (TOP, OPPOSI 
PAGE). 



A major in Fine Arts is offered at botfi the Lake Shore 
and Lewis Towers campuses. Department courses range 
from art appreciation and art history to introductory 
and advanced levels of art skills in music, sculpture, 
painting, drawing, design, and photography. The 
emphasis is on exploring and working with a large 
variety of media in each of these areas. 



66 




67 




.*^:/o:> 




Ann Inskip, Secretary (ABOVE); Arthur W. Bloom, Chairman (ABOVE 
RIGHT); )ohn H. Brooks, Director, University Theatre (RIGHT); Raoul 
F. Johnson, Technical Director, Associate Professor (OPPOSITE 
PAGE). 



68 




I 




Theatre 



It is the goal of the Theatre Department to provide 
training for the professional, community and academic 
theatres within the framework of a liberal arts 
education. Many drama students will pursue the 
theatre as a profession after graduation. 

Theatre and drama, which are ultimately concerned 
with all aspects of man's experience, have special 
relevance to a liberal education. The more the theatre 
major in a liberal arts program understands about 
mankind, the more experiences he has entered into 
imaginatively and projected to others from the stage, 
the more he will be able to order, clarify, and 
understand his own life and the world in which he lives. 
Of all the disciplines in a liberal arts program. Theatre 
may be the one most clearly related to the patterns of 
man's life and normal experience. 



69 



Physical Education 



The Department of Physical Education offers a variety 
of courses for men and women students at the 
undergraduate level. Courses are taught both for men 
and women separately as well as coeducationaiiy. The 
Department was developed to satisfy the State of 
Illinois Certification requirements of Education, but 
enrollment is open to all students. 



Thomas G. Cooney, Track & Cross Country 
Coach (ABOVE); Ralph D. Erickson, Swim & 
Water Polo Coach (FAR RIGHT); Jeannlne C. 
Monforti, Director, Women's P.E. & Intramur- 
als (RIGHT); Patrick J. Hanley, Director, Men's 
P.E. & Intramurals (OPPOSITE PACE). 



70 





71 



Communication Arts 



The study of Communication Arts enables the student 
to acquire a better understanding of the processes of 
human communication as well as to improve his or her 
own communicative skills in a wide variety of human 
interactions. The major in Communication Arts 
provides students with the opportunity to concentrate 
their studies in either Speech Communication or Mass 
Communication. Specialized course work and creative 
activity help prepare the Communication Arts majors 
for careers and further graduate or professional study. 



SS^iSS^^SBS^SSBSS^SS^lfsiSSiSiSS^^Sp?! 





Educational Opportunity Program 



Loyola's Educational Opportunity 
Program (EOP) has been operative since 
1969. Through several supportive 
services provided by the EOP, freshmen 
who are determined inadmissable 
through traditional University standards 
are encouraged to complete a four-year 
degree program here at Loyola. 



It is the intention and hope of thij 
Educational Opportunity Program tha 
the student, with the help of EOP' 
supports, develops more self 
confidence, strengthens certain basii 
academic skills, and gains more insigh 
into the expectations of highe 
education. 



Sammy R. Danna, Associate Professor, Commun 
ication Arts (TOP); Tillman Terry, Director 
Educational Opportunity Program (ABOVI 
RIGHT); Candace Bowsky, Secretary, EOF 
(ABOVE LEFT). 



72 



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'■''t" '?r "v: 




Paul Messbdr({or, Associate Professor & Director, 
Honors Program (ABOVf LRU); Al Cini, Associate 
Director, Honors Program (ABOVh) 



Honors Program 



he Loyola University Honors Program numbers For those who have spent at least three years of 

pproximately 200 undergraduates. Students in the membership in the Program and have completed the 

rogram have access to a number of special experiences, requirements, the capstone of their Honors experience 

hey take courses in all areas of their program of stucJies is the award of an Honors Degree. The first "Honors" 

pecially designed for them. In adcJition these student stucjents at Loyola graduated in June, 1937, making this 

njoy the use of an Honors Lounge at the Lake Shore the fortieth anniversary year for the Honors Program at 

ampus and membership in a student association that Loyola, 
elps make policy for the Program, and special social 
nd cultural activities. 



73 



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74 






75 



76 





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77 






79 




Senate at Lewis Tower: 



The role of any student government is to persuade t 
administration to implement the ideas and work for thf 
needs and desires of the student body. This is t 
purpose of the Senate at Lewis Towers, and its reas^ 
for existence. The Senate has brought students in 
closer contact with their government, and, in turn, wit| 
the University. 

Following is the Executive Board of the Senate at Lew 
Towers: Joe Dynowski, Chairperson; Glenda Whit< 
Vice Chairperson; Carol Jozwiak, Treasurer; Olg 
Dilette, Secretary. 



80 



Loyola Student Government Association 




The Loyola Student Government Association racked up 
another successful year in 1976-77— and was wracked 
by controversy at tne end of it. 

LSGA was in the forefront of the athletic revival at 
Loyola, co-ordinating the Homecoming Week at Lake 
Shore, co-sponsoring Intramural Football playoffs with 
Campion Hall, organizing a beer blast at the end of the 
basketball season, and helping found an athletic 
board to continue these projects and related ones for 
the future. 

LSGA also worked with the Academic Council in an 
attempt to reduce the number of hours in the core 
curriculum, worked with the committee on Student 
Life to help revise the school alcohol policy, conducted 
yet another Teacher Course Evaluation, in addition to 
their annual participation in state wide higher 
education lobbying groups and policy making boards. 

LSGA members helped build Loyola's entry in the St. 
Patrick's Day Parade, as well as participating in 
Orientation, the Ail Niter, the Dance Maratnon, etc. 

Despite election controversy, LSGA continued to be a 
leading university organization, dedicated to the 
proposition that there is life after classes. 

LSGA executive board, 1976-77: Jack Leyhane, 
President; Luanne Schneider, Vice President for 
Student Life; Neil Winston, Vice President for 
Academic Affairs; Mark Boyle, Vice President for 
Budget and Finance; Sue Boyle, Vice President for 
Public Relations. 



Student Activities Boari 




The Student Activities Board, a voluntary association 
of students, is responsible for programming a 
majority of the social and educational events hela on 
the Lake Shore campus. These events include 
weekend movies, monthly dances, bi-weekly 
nite-lites and coffee houses, concerts, speakers, 
workshops and a variety of special events such as the 
Dating Game. 

Operating out of its office in Centennial Forum, SAB 
strives to provide a variety of activities for all 
members of the Loyola community. During the 
1976-77 school year SAB programmed over 100 
events. This had been accomplished through the hard 
work of its four integral committees: Entertainment, 
Fine Arts, Promotions, Movies. 

LHighlights of this year include films such as "Man of 
LaMancha" and "The Godfather," the St. Valentine's 
Day Dance, the True of America concert, and 
performances and workshops by magician Peter 
Samelson. 

SAB is open to all Loyola students who are interested 
in programming events of an entertaining and 
educational nature. No prior programming 
experience is necessary. The only requirements are a 
willingness to lend a hand and a clesire to program the 
best events possible. 

The SAB Executive Board for the 1975-77 year is: 
Christopher Pfannkuche, Chairman; Joseph Kras, 
Vice Chairman/Treasurer; Linda Arsenijevic, 
Secretary; Debbie Ulaszek, Hillary Schneider, 
Entertainment Chairmen; Joan Vougis, Fine Arts 
Chairman; Barb Nucske, Promotions Chairman; Tad 
Jennings, Movies Chairman. 



82 




83 



Student Operations Board 



The Student Operations Board is an all-student 
organization which functions as the coordinator of 
most of the Lewis Towers Campus activities and as 
promoter for the involvement of students. Its success 
in these tasks brought the Blue Key Award for the 
1976-77 Organization of the Year to SOB. This was the 
third straight year that the Board has won, something 
unprecedented in its category. Events were increased 
in number to almost two a week, including the very 
successful "Top Drawer" entertainment showcase. 
Other activities run by the Board include a hay ride, 
TGI1/2O and TCIO mixers, a concert by Corky Siegal, 
the play, "Feelin' Good," a Megan McDonough 
Concert, the Annual Children's Christmas Benefit, Las 
Vegas Nite, and the annual SOB Lewis Towers Talent 
Show. 

SOB membership lists the following: John Vail, 
Chairman; Arvydas Valiukenas, Vice-Chairman; Sharon 
Wantroba, Treasurer; Maria Martinez, Secretary; Phil 
Adamowski; Sam DeFranco; Richard Vail; Tina Soltys; 
Joe Dynowski; Tim D'Anza; Tad Jennings; Joe Scodius; 
Jack Hartmann; Brian Clucas; Sam Conforti; John 
Medrys; Glenn Lezon; Joe Parma; Dan Bylica; Gordon 
Stiefel, Moderator. 




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84 



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85 




Interfraternity Counc 



86 



The Interfraternity Council is the governing body o 
fraternities on campus. Its job is to coordinate varic' 
campus and community-sponsored events and i 
judicial branch handles fraternal problems. 




Mpha Kappa Lambda 



Vlpha Kappa Lambda is a progressive fraternity 
emphasizing the Christian principles of morality and 
ervice, a devotion to scholastic excellence and a 
eriousness of purpose. The fraternity seeks to foster 
nature relationships among members based on 
cademic pursuits and friendship. 



87 



II 



Alpha Delta Gamma 



The purpose of the Alpha Delta Gamma fraternity is to 
unite congenial-minded men in a brotherhood of love 
and high respect, to develop the highest Christian 
ideals of manhood among its members, to foster the 
interests of the University and to promote scholarship 
among its members and fellow students. 

Founded in 1924 on the Lake Shore campus. Alpha 
Delta Gamma is the largest of the small national 
fraternities and prides itself in community involvement 
with such activities as the March of Dimes and UNICEF 
drives. 




88 



i 



Mpha Phi Omega 



Ipha Phi Omega is a national service fraternity. 
!rvice, ranging from that rendered to the campus all 
16 way to that given to the community, can offer an 
quaily fulfilling advantage both to those being served 

well as to those willing to offer their time and help. 

addition to providing all the benefits afforded by 
her fraternities, Alpha Phi Omega gives members an 
Dportunity to increase the value of their education by 
labling them to receive the great satisfaction of 
wiping other people. 

Ipha Phi Omega seeks a special kind of person: one 
illing to donate time to discover the true meaning of 
otherhood and thus, willing to help himself by 
;lping others. In cooperation with the little sisters of 
Eta, these aims are achieved. 

embers include: Otto Dube (pres.), Dave Jencen 
ice-pres.), Jim Johnson (sec), Gabe Leon (treas.), Alan 
ochot (vice-pres. in charge of rushing), Mark Pusateri, 
ik Muraskas, Peter Uher, Raul Diaz, James Gheradini, 
Ties Grimm, James Gregory, George Tautz, Len Zaiik, 
)m Kucharzak, Arsenio Galicia, Satish Sandhi, Edward 
lak, James McGowan, Ed Richards, Isa Dilegge, Chris 
vek, Carmel Denis, Linda Freres, Diane Daus, Maggie 
ipelinski. 




89 



Alpha Sigma Pm 



The goals of Alpha Sigma Phi are to unite a body of m 
on whose continuous achievements will rest tl 
foundation for the future and to benefit its brothe' 
academically, morally, physically and socially. It is tl 
philosophy of Alpha Sigma Phi members to be led I; 
principle rather than to be governed by special intert 
and to promote truth, wisdom and brotherly love 




90 



1 



Delta Sigma Pi 

Delta Sigma Pi is a professional business fraternity, 
ounded in 1950. Since its inception, the Fraternity has 
)een a dominant academic, business and social 
nstitution on the Lewis Towers campus of Loyola. 

,1976-77 members of Delta Sigma Pi are: Joe Mancuso, 
•"resident; Mike Long, Vic President for Professional 
Activities; Jerry Rodell, Vice President for Pledge 
iducation; Jim Huck, Senior Vice President; Jim 
Jrennan, Secretary; Les Poole, Treasurer; Paul Smith; 
<en Michaels; Dave Dieling; Bill Ahmer; Dennis 
ianahan; Gary Pierson; Jeff Elston; Steve Josenkoski; 
(evin Kirkland; Paul Otter; Rich Drinane; Bill Simon. 



91 



ill 

to 
III 

ii 



Beta Alpha Psi 



Beta Alpha Psi is an honorary and professional fraternity 
for the top students majoring in accounting. The 
members are very active at the Lew/is Towers campus 
and sponser such activities as tours of accounting firms 
guest lecturers, accounting seminars and financia 
planning assistance to other campus organizations. 

Members this year are: Rich Agostinelli, Tom Moriarty, 
Dan Horton, Eileen Woods, Ernie Balogh, John Blazina, 
Don Brauch, Rich Ferrari, Marie Froeling, Tom 
Geoffroy, Demetra Getty, Bob Herscher, Nancy Hess, 
Randy Horst, Mike Janda, Harry Jones, Carol Jozwiak 
Gerry Kaminski, Raj Lalsur, Joe Lunkes, Deidre Martin, 
Rick Martin, Debbie Maslowski, Bill Merkle, Joe 
Murphy, Elaine Pesavento, Nancy Schwarz, Beth 
Smetana, Geri Sullivan, Mike Sullivan, Bob Viernum, 
Gary Benhart, Diane Bravos, Mark Chaberski, Hector 
Cuellar, Judy Czechowski, Sue Eng, Tom Fraw/ley, Cathy 
Goulet, Bob Herzfeld, Tom Huitink, Larry Hund, Mary 
Ippolito, Tim Kelly, Larry Kloc, Carole Krier, Terry 
McMahon, Gail Plomin, Lynn Skwarek, Chris 
Szatkowski, Randy Trunk, Larry Visak, Millie 
Wojkowski. 



a 



92 



rau Kappa Epsilon 



au Kappa Epsilon attempts to provide the programs 
nd activities sufficient to develop those qualities which 
AW make each member a good fraternity brother, 
/(embers endeavor to be true friends and make every 
ffort to give the benefit of their experience as students 
nd as men in order to help one another attain that 
3vel of scholarship, that degree of maturity and that 
mount of awareness that will make truly-well-rounded 
nen. 

cholastic efforts this year have yielded a fraternity 
rade point average of 2.8 with five men qualifying for 
he Dean's List and two men for the Blue Key Honor 
ociety. 



Aside from periodic parties at the Tau Kappa Epsilon 
House, activities over the year include a fraternity 
Christmas Party and a pig roast with Theta Phi Alpha 
Sorority. 

Active Tau Kappa Epsilon Fraternity members are: Dan 
Fernitz, Dave Fernitz, Sal Torres, Jim Rennie, Rick 
Marsh, Rick Carbonera, Bob Campbell, Pete Zeman, Jim 
Powell, Larry O'Connell, Greg Merci, Jim Holton, Paul 
Balacz, Dan Zee, Art Maina, Tom Syverson, Steve Kafka, 
Bill McNulty, Karl Costello, Jim McLaughlin, Tom 
Griffin, Chad Castro, Larry Kuhlman. Fraternity Officers 
are; Art Frese, President; Gary Radville, Vice President; 
Ray Bianchi, Secretary; Chris Emerle, Treasurer; Joe 
Frascati, House Manager; Father F. Grollig, Moderator. 




93 




94 




The main philosophy of theTheta Xi fraternity is a stress 
of the purpose of attending college, namely to learn. 
Theta Xi has one of the highest grade point averages of 
any fraternity on campus. 

The Loyola Chapter of Theta Xi was instituted in 
December of 1973 with twelve brothers and February 
of 1976 marked the brothers' installation as the Gamma 
Delta Chapter of the National Theta Xi Fraternity. 

The 1976-77 Fraternity officers are: Mike Bernacki, 
President; Mike Murphy, Vice President; John 
Morroni, Treasurer; John Walsh, Secretary; R. J. 
Angerame, Sergeant of Arms; Paul Marnul, Scholarship 
Chairman; Joe Biggins, Joe Matula, Jose Martinez, Phil 
Manno, Pledge Masters. 



95 



Kappa Beta Gamrr 




Kappa Beta Gamma is a social sorority founded 
Marquette University in 1917. Epsilon Chapter has be 
active at Loyola since 1954. Kappa stresses sisterhoc 
cooperation and helping its members to grow 
individuals. Through its variety of projects, soc! 
philanthropic and university-oriented, Kappas aim( 
promote friendship among members and uphold tj 
interests of the University and community. 

Kappa Beta Gamma membership lists the following: E| 
Adier, Linda Arsenijevic, Karen Cavelle, Ma 
Chiaruttini, Judy Czechowski, Marianne Dailey, Peg 
Sue Derbas, Vicki Dziedzic, Cathy Fatina, Ellen Flyr 
Bridget Gallogly, Donna Gibbons, Julie Hamann, Kar 
Hansen, Ann Holmes, Marianne Holmgren, Cai 
Jevorutsky, Soon Ai Kim, Mary Kwasny, Mary Kuchr 
Mary Jo Leon, Sylvia Loboyko, Kathy Lewis, Lean 
Lantz, Marsha Markey, Sophia Matsas, Debbie Mel 
Carol Morgan, Barb Nelson, Helene O'Hara, Kim Or 
Helen Paspalas, Katherine Proyce, Karen Rack 
Marianne Regucra, Candy Santy, Joyce Siniawski, Ly 
Skwarck, Mary Kate Smith, Tina Soltys, Bonr 
Stangarone, Maureen Tyrrell, Debbie Uiaszek, Lore 
Walsh, Glenda White, Debbie Goldman, Moni 
Hickey, Sophia Phillips, Mary Ann Schaber, Bur 
Todd, Karen Wencka. 



96 



lKi( 

'(is 

k 

bir 
«ir, 




Mpha Sigma Alpha 



dpha Sigma Alpha is a national social sorority founded 
T 1901; the Loyola chapter was added in 1964. The 
isters of Alpha Sigma Alpha strive to fulfill a four-fold 
ibjective which entails a physical, intellectual, spiritual 
nd social development. The Sisters aim to work with 
•ne another, the University and the surrounding 
ommunity. 

)uring the year, Alpha Sigma Alpha participated in a 
ealm of activities including the Welcome Weekend, 
linois State Day, Steak and Champagne Dinner Dance, 
pring Formal, Mother-Daughter Communion Breakfast 
nd the Senior Farewell. Members also serve as VAP 
lembers. Ski Club members, and are active in 
itramura! Sports. 

ilpha Sigma Alpha officers are: Gail Wielontek, 
resident; Alexis Zemunski, Vice President; Irene Sonta, 
reasurer; Mary Lou Novak, Recording Secretary; 
• ebbie Zekich, Corresponding Secretary; Ellen 
itzgerald. Membership Director; Joye Sarkesian, Rush 
hairman; Mary Duffy, Chaplain; Maureen Reap, Social 
chairman; Cathi Kern, Fund Raising Chairman; Barb 



Cernak, Marcia Burrell, Pledge Trainers, Cindy 
LaMantia, Lorraine Lattan, Pledge Trainers. 

Members are: Pam Amato, Mary Anne Bellar, Judy 
Berrigan, Kathy Berrigan, Kathy Bezemes, Marcia 
Burrell, Nancy Byrne, Stephanie Cappas, Cindy Carlin, 
Lynette Castner, Diane Cavanaugh, Barb Cernak, Kathy 
Chartier, Karen Copp, Eva Courialis, Regina Darley, 
Marty Devereaux, Robin Downing, Lynne Dubin, Mary 
Duffy, Ellen Fitzgerald, Pat Gerbanas, Mary Rose Gresk, 
Kathy Gordon, Janice Gries, Sarah Hoeschen, Erin 
Jennings, Kathy Kennedy, Kathy Killoran, Cathi Kern, jo 
Kosar, Tracy Kubitschek, Kay Knoll, Caryl Kumbalek, 
Corrine Kunciewicz, Cindy LaMantia, Lorraine Lattan, 
Cathy Looby, Elise Loverski, Dianna Lui, Mary Anne 
Luce, Lydia Malanchuk, Darlene Matius, Cindy Matus, 
Sandy Mazzucchelli, Pat Mikrut, Sue Nolan, Mary Lou 
Novak, Linda Nuzzarello, Grace O'Malley, Pat Pashuku, 
Connie Ptak, Maureen Reap, Carita Riffner, Vicki 
Rochoviak, Jamie Ryan, Joye Sarkesian, Julie Segraves, 
Irene Sonta, Debbie Stem, Denise Swanson, Mary Anne 
Thometz, Eileen Urban, Margo White, Marrea Winnega, 
Gail Wielontek, Debbie Zekich, Alexis Zemunski. 



97 



French Club 



The French Club is a newly formed organization of 
students interested in French culture and language. 
With Dr. Andrew McKenna as the Moderator, the Club 
participated in the Ethnic Day Fair and held a French 
Banquet in the spring. 

Members are: Joan L. Vougis, Chairperson; Morris 
Haynes, Treasurer; Cathy Lee; Kathy Lagattuta; Jean 
Brennan; Frantz Simon; Marie Dejean; George 
Raymond. 



Italian Club 



The Italian Club is an organization under the direction 
of the Department of Modern Languages. The purpose 
of the Club is to stimulate interest in Italian culture 
among the Loyola community. The Club's activities 
highlight this purpose through such events as field trips, 
movie programs, and its annual St. Joseph's Day Table. 
The ultimate goal of the Italian Club is to introduce and 
share with non-Italians a bit of the heritage, the prides 
and joys, of the Italian culture. 

Club members are: Lina Zaccardelli, President; Xavier 
Conenna; Ralph Rodriguez; Angelo DiMartino; 
Marianna Guerra; Bonnie Stangarone; Lillian Muccini; 
Dario Giunta; Marian Wroblowski; Joanne Yello; Vivian 
Reali; Rosa Giammona; Mike Vosicky; Pasquale Capriati; 
Carmela Mallardi; Angelo Miele; Paul Banas; Jan Puetz; 
Anna Cuomo. 




Lithuanian Club 



The goal for the 1976-77 year for the Lithuanianian Cid 
was to increase its level of involvement and activi 
from earlier years. It succeeded in this effort and tl| 
Club officially became chartered by the University. 

Highlights of the year for the Lithuanian Club indue 
its annual Christmas party, participation in the Ethn 
Day festivities, and a two week Cudahy Library exhib 
commemorating the anniversary of Lithuania 
independence with a display of beautiful amber jeweli 
and woodwork exemplifying traditional Lithuania 
folklore and culture. 

The Club roster lists the following members: Anr/ 
Aviza, Jonas Aviza, Alois Baltrusaitis, Regina Bieiku 
Asta Grinis, Gedas Grinis, Kathy Jaselskis, Rita Keksta 
Jolita Leonas, Ramune Maciejauskas, Marius Nari 
Gintaras Oslappas, Arthur Pankus, Regina Plikaitis, Johil 
Rimkus, Aldona Silenas, Loreta Stoncius, Debby Theis 
Vitas LJnderys. 



98 



ijerman Club 



is the tradition of the German Club to be a producer 
the Loyola community. The Club regularly provides 
!e cultural, artistic and travel films for interested 
idents and faculty throughout the year. Another club 
rvice is the newsletter FLIEGENDE BLAETTER which 
nsists of poems, short stories, jokes, comics and 
nouncements of events involving Germans in the 
licago area. The paper is written in a half- 

:|!rman-haIf-English style to encourage students to 

;ntribute and read it. 

1 

nong this year's activities of the German Club were 
Oktoberfest celebration, bake sales. Ethnic Fair 
rticipation and a dinner at Schwabenstube. 

!rman Club officers for the 1976-77 year are: Hilda 
hneider. President; Peter Schultz, Vice-President; 
me O'Shaughnessy, Treasurer; Jeffrey Puscher, 
cretary. 




Spanish Club 



The Spanish Club at Loyola invites membership from 
among Spanish majors and all students interested in the 
Spanish culture and language. The Club's activities 
foster and promote such cultural interest. This year's 
events include a slide show on Spain, a Christmas party 
and slide show of Argentina, a wine and cheese party 
honoring 1000 years of the Spanish language, and 
participation in the Ethnic Day Fair. 

This year's officers are: Xiomara Ranero, President; 
Maritza Maceo, Vice President; Olga Pombo, Secretary; 
Denise Perea, Treasurer; Dr. Lidia Fernandez, 
Moderator. Other members of the Spanish Club are: 
Javier Andino, Rosa Carsi, Magda Contreras, Gema 
Costa, Elias Dabul, Gregory Gebbia, Enrique 
EHernandez, Otilio Melero, Jorge Policarpides, Gail 
Rasmussen, Mario Rodriguez, Amel Sanchez, Teresa 
Santana, Luis Couret, Roberto Diaz, Jose Guerro, 
Raphael Rodriguez, Toby Fried, Vivian Warrens, Violeta 
Maceo, Virginia Mesa, Maria Mesa, Ana Pol, Glenn 
Englenis. 



99 



Latin American Student Organizatio; 



The Latino Students of Loyola University believe that 
Latino unity and cooperation are essential in an 
environment that limits them because of their status as 
a minority. Therefore, they are determined to seek 
strength in union for the purpose of gaining solutions 
to problems. 

The Latin American Student Organization is dedicated 
to the pursuit of excellence in eoucation to develop the 
capacities of each of each member to the fullest 
potential; and the Club acknowledges that the richness 
of a Latin cultural background serves as a cultural 
identity that should aid in achieving academic and 
social goals. 

LASO members are: Beatriz Arroyo, Hector Aviles, 
Maria Barraza, Grace Carranza, Sherry Cecil, Edwin 
Colon, Fred Crespo, Ivan Del Rio, Cynthia Del Valle, 
Teresa Galarza, Nelson Gill, Domitila Gonzalez, 
Antonio Herrera, Valerie Hewitt, Dick Jimenez, 
Dariene Laffitte, Herbert Leon, Frank Lopez, Luis 
Monzon, Abby Narvaez, Sonia Perez, Luz Rodriguez, 
Milady Rodriguez, Madeline Roman, Bob Simon, Jose 
Santiago, Catalina Soto, Debbie Szczesniak, Edwin 
Reyes. 



fi;??^^T^"-Tr^ ■*"■'"!''■ 



::SSB 




100 





Blue Key 



Blue Key is an honor and service society with chapters 
on over 120 campuses throughout the United States. In 
its 52 years of existence, the Society has inducted over 
80,000 members nationwide. 

Blue Key sponsors projects which are educational and 
beneficial to the University and the community. This 
year's list of events include "December Sunday," a day 
with Rogers Park senior citizens, a "Stop Smoking 
Clinic," classes in meditation, and a "Day with 
Orphans." The Blue Key Induction Dinner and Dance 
is held in the spring semester. Michael J. Martin is the 
1976-77 Blue Key President. 



101 



"&'*•© 





LUASA 



The Loyola University Afro-American Association is an 
organization that considers the academic growth of its 
members as a primary goal related to the development 
of personal integrity and social well-being. As a campus 
group, LUASA also tries to keep close ties with the black 
community. Among the events of the year which aimed 
to carry out these intentions were the several LUASA 
dances, Soul Food Night, and a special orientation 
program for black freshmen. 

The LUASA membership list is: Neil Winston, President; 
Julia Mills, Vice President; Mickey Johnson, Treasurer; 
Anita Washington, Secretary; Gilbert Webb; Shelly 
Fanning; Marcellus Walker; Mary Miller; Byron 
Franklin; Joyce Jones; Mary Downer; Gladys Horton; 
Juanita Smith; Tony McCowen; Sabrina Dudley; Joyce 
Simmons; Pat Johnson; Everett Hill, LT Chairman; 
Loretta White, Phylistine Chambers; Elliott Berry, Vice 
Chairman; Leniel Scott; Donna Betts, Secretary; 
Katherine Leslie; Dorothy Chew, Treasurer; Andre 
Coleman; Dwight Stewart; Leiah Morris; Diane Boston; 
Moderator, Charles Taylor. 



L„.^ss 




102 










Black Cultural Center 



The purpose of the Black Cultural Center is to provide 
an instrument liaison among the students, faculty and 
administration, to provide a means of developing a 
sense of integrity and responsibility to the community, 
and to maintain an atmosphere conducive to the 
enlightenment of all persons to a very distinctive 
culture which is unique to black people. 

Black Cultural Center Executive Board members are: 
Vicki Chambers, Cynthia Hardy, Adjora McMillan, Neil 
Winston, Julia Mills; Tillman Terry is the Moderator, 
Charles Taylor is Budget Administrator. 



iisters of Ekwefi 



ne Sisters of Ekwefi, through fundraising activities, 
tempt to promote social activities on campus to 
2nefit the Loyola community and to provide financial 
sistance to those who are in need. A social and service 
ub, Ekwefi further seek to provide assistance to 
coming freshmen concerning scheduling and the 
'ailability of university resources. 



103 




Volunteer Action Prograrr! 



The Volunteer Action Program is a student organizatio 
whose main purpose is to give service to the Loyoll 
Community and various government and independen 
service agencies throughout Chicago. Services rang 
from interviewing food stamp candidates an- 
educating retarded adults in Uptown, to interviewin 
parole candidates at Cook County Jail, to working a 
suburban youth drop-in centers and tutoring averag 
children in Chicago public schools. Among its mos 
popular activities is VAP's senior citizens parties and it 
Red Cross Blood Drives here at Loyola. 

This year's members numbered around seventy 
Executive Board members are: Cheryl Swanson, Offic 
Director; Jennifer Stebbing, Acting Director; Scot 
Danahey, Volunteer Director; Darlene Kowakzyk 
Financial Director; Mary Ann Shaffer, Blood Driv 
Coordinator. 



» 



\ 



104 




105 




Debat 





I 






106 




-oyola Jazz Band 

'nder the direction of Paul ]. Zibits, the 1976-77 Loyola 
izz Band lists the following members: on trumpets, 
ent Faust, Wayne Wegmann, Paul Pesavento; on 
ombones, Jerry Lietz, Len Potempa, Bill Ruggero, Paul 
urkey, Ed Colon; on saxophones, Roy Cavazos, alto, 
uss Tonkovic, alto, George Milanez, tenor, Kathy 
ewers, tenor, Sam Barone, baritone; on clarinet, Paul 
ieske; on pianos, Mario Tse, Ken Pederson; on bass, 
heila Kornegay; on guitar. Ken Kellner; on drums, Jim 
hode, Mike Latza. 



107 




Loyola/Mundelein Chess Association 

Chess is basically a fight in which two opposing players 
pit all their knowledge and experience in the game 
against each other across the checkered playing field. 
The purpose of the Chess Club is twofold: first, to 
provide an opportunity for people to compete against 
new opponents in a pleasant atmosphere; second, to 
encourage and improve members' playing ability. The 
Club plans tournaments as well as matches with other 
schools, informally and in a league. Meetings are 
weekly and a newsletter is available to all members. 

Loyola's Chess Association lists the following members: 
L. Anthony Tcmpske, President; Christopher E.K. 
Pfannkuche, Vice President; Martin Sexton, Bob 
Campbell, Rick Lutzke, Dave Toch, David Zucker, 
Henry Hobscheid. 



108 




Cadence 



CADENCE is the literary magazine of Loyola University. 
Its purpose is, "to teach and delight" its readers by 
publishing the finest work of its contributors. Cadence 
is also a student organization that seeks membership 
from all three campuses. The members develop an 
appreciation of literary criticism as well as learn the 
intricacies of publishing a magazine. CADENCE is the 
forum for artistic expression at Loyola, and as such 
endeavors to promote student interest in the arts. 

The CADENCE 76-77 staff members are: M. C. Rydel, 
Phil Saigh, Editors-in-Chief, Lynn Rachiis, Joseph 
Wheeler, Sandy Jester, Phyllis Detloff, Michael Baggot, 
Olivia Kona, Kevin McCaffrey, Sally Shirley, Sue Feret, 
Mary Banas, Elaine Grossman. 







109 




■ .«*>" 



-*^v^V 



110 





Loyolan 



The LOYOLAN is the University yearbook covering the 
three undergraduate campuses, Lake Shore, Lewis 
Towers and Niles College. It is the intention of the 
editors to represent as rairly and fully as possible the 
various facets of the University life in order to compile 
a memory/reference book appealing to the general 
Loyola community. 

This year's LOYOLAN follows the theme of a new life, 
encompassing both the Christian message of hope and 
rebirth as well as the goals of the editorial staff to 
expand and rejuvenate the book. The major innovation 
is the added division on Academics displaying the most 
important aspect of the University, namely, the 
educational aspect. 

The editorial staff of LOYOLAN 77 is: Donna Lupo, 
Editor-in-Chief; Beth Brachmanski, Production Editor; 
Alan Prochot, George Rivera, Photography Editors; 
Barb McMiilen, Lewis Towers Editor; David Walker, 
Niles Editor; Mike Baggot, Lake Shore Editor; Jerry 
Boyle, Business Manager. Rosemary Hartnett is the 
Faculty Consultant, Charles Taylor, the Budget 
Administrator. 



Ill 



i^m 



Phoenix 



The PHOENIX is the weekly student newspaper of Loyola. The 
paper features coverage of university and community events, 
reviews of local entertainment, weekly columnists, sports 
coverage of intramural and varsity games, advertising, news 
analysis and editorial comment. 

New this year was the additional fold of the paper to a tabloid size 
with the top page bearing a full sized black and white 
photograph. Another innovation was the staff's success in 
producing the Phoenix on time most of the year, namely on 
Friday of each week. 

PHOENIX Editorial Staff for the 1976-77 year is: Mark Hryniewich, 
Editor-in-Chief; Pat Barry, Lakeshore Editor; Mary Banas, Lewis 
Towers Editor; Tom Luetkemeyer, Copy Editor; Cathy O'Connell, 
Features Editor; Kenneth Riesterer, Photography Editor; John 
Wisse, Sports Editor; Pam Young, Production Editor; Sam Boytor, 
Advertising Editor; Javier Andino, Business Manager. 




112 



WLUC Radi) 



"You are listening to WLUC, 640 AM, Progressive Radio 
for Loyola and Mundeiein." This is the station 
identification that echoed through the Lake Shore 
campus all year. WLUC Radio is a student organization 
that has been established to promote the benefits of 
educational radio, to supply a means of broadcast 
training, and to provide entertainment and community 
service to the Lake Shore campus. The station transmits 
its signal through telephone cables to the major dorms 
on campus. 

Staff membership is open to all students, subject to 
successful participation in the WLUC internship 
program. Air personalities were trained this year within 
thelimits of Progressive Music — the finest in rock, jazz, 
blues, folk, country, soul and classical — and a specific 
format was developed to establish continuity over the 
air. In January, 1977, the Federal Communications 
Commission granted a permit to Loyola University for 
construction of a 10-watt educational FM station, 
WLUW to be broadcast on 88.7 Mhz with an 
approximate five mile radius. 

WLUC executive staff members are: jon Winke, General 
Manager; Ed Bartlett, Program Director; Joe Bianco, 
Music Director; John Donoval, Technical Director; 
Cathy Hein, Public Relations Director; Kenneth R. 
Heinemann, Advertising Director; Pat Kelley, 
Co-Program Director; Mary Kay Kulka, News Director; 
Mary Margaret Marx, Public Service Director; Dan 
McCee, Sports Producer. 



RNADO 








WLT Radio 



WLT Radio is the student-run radio station serving the 
Lewis Towers campus. Under the auspices of the 
Communication Arts Department, WLT plays an active 
role in student affairs through its extensive public 
service department, its incisive editorials and its bodily 
support of student activities. WLT offers its listeners 
progressive rock and jazz music as well as news and 
commentary, information on student activities and 
original student drama and comedy productions. 



lis 



.^t^ 



Accounting Clu 



) 




The Marketing Club is alive and thriving. The Club, just 
within the last two months of the 76-77 academic year 
established itself with thirty signed members, an 
organized charter and six elected officers who will lead 
the Club next year. 

It is the intention of the Marketing Club to provide 
exposure into the vast opportunities and creativity of 
the field of marketing by offering speakers and lecturers 
from many aspects of marketing. Areas of interest 
include industry, retailing, service organizations, and 



The primary endeavor of the Accounting Club is 
explore the career possibilities of the account 
profession. This goal is attained by hosting toi 
through corporate offices and public accounting firr 
It is further the intention of the Accounting Club 
maintain a social side along with a business side throu 
contact with both faculty and professional people in t 
accounting field. 



Marketing Clu 

advertising. The Club also provides tours and field tri 
for a first hand study of work operations. 



The membership list includes: Sandy Watkins, B( 
Digrais, Jim Waddich, Debbie Jarvis, Jim Pulby, 
McEnavey, David Meyer, Bob Rosenberger, Maril 
Scoietta, Tom McKee, Ed Forsberg, James Huck, Jams 
Waffle, Kathy Marshall, David Dieling, Bill Sincy, J( 
Mancuso, Steve Josenkoski, Lee Gilbert, Tom Patt, B| 
Harton, Simeon Abadin, Debra Wilson, Tim Travers, L( 
Scott, Jim Benny. 



116 



Zo\i Team 



he Loyola Golf Team once again finished a successful 
Ijason. This year's team, led by 2nd and 3rd place 
'nishes of Jim Orbon and Joe Misunas, defended its 
rown and won the Chicagoland Golf Conference for 
18 second straight year. The Team exhibited strong 
lay from all its members. In the spring, the Team won 
le Lakeland Invitational in which twelve teams 
articipated. Over the past three years, the Team has 
ompiled a winning percentage of over .800. 



his year's team members are: Jim Orbon, Captain, John 
onesh, Joe Misunas, Tom Drodz, Don Sujack, Chris 
imm. Bob Shields. Jeff Varda is the coach. 



le^; 




117 



^ 




Cheerleaders 



Jnder the direction of Ms. Jeannine Monforti, the 
oyola Cheerleaders follow the University teams 
hrough all their competitions with other schools, 
ousing team and fan spirit at each game. This year's 
nnovation was to include male cheerleaders in the 
quad enabling additions to its gymnastic repetoire. 

Iheerleader Captain and Co-captain are Gayle Krarup 
ind Bonnie Boho. Other squad members are: Marilee 
icaletta, Rosanne Propati, Sandi Slovick, Cyndi Hardy, 
Vanda Martin, Gayle Rink, Mark Boyle, Gary 
lampione, Tom Wright, Bill Duffy, Don Morando, 
eroy Hearon. 



119 



i^-m 




"fc'S*:-\; 



ROT( 



Army ROTC has been an institution at Loyola sine 
1948. With more than 100 members involved, it is or 
of the largest activities on campus. The progra 
consists of a combination of academic courses ar 
practical field-type training spread over a two to foi 
year period, which culminates in a commission as 
lieutenant at the same time the baccalaureate degree 
conferred. Students from virtually every major fie 
participate in ROTC, and Loyola graduates serve 
virtually every branch of the Army. 



120 



LDC 



Leadership, Drill and Command training sessions are 
conducted monthly during the school year, on campus 
and at such distant field sites as Fort McCoy, Wisconsin 
jnd Joliet Ordinance Depot. The training gives the 
students a chance to serve in leadership positions as 
they learn skills associated with serving as Army officers, 
such as orienteering, rappelling and living in the field. 
Ml ROTC students attend these LDC periods. 




121 



^ 



Rifle Teanr 



The Rifle Team is an organization which has th 
responsibility of training interested individuals in th 
proper use and handling of the rifle. Its mission is t(j 
teach the cadet range safety, basic aspects of the .2 
caliber rifle, military small bore marksmanshid 
procedure, and fire in competition. Cadets als( 
become familiar with the rules of competition ii 
intercollegiate ROTC matches. The goal of the Loyol 
Rifle Team is to build leaders through the learning o 
practical skills. All of these objectives are facilitated b 
numerous activities and matches held throughout thi 
year in Chicagoland and across the country. This year' 
high point was participation in a major ROTC rifii 
match in New Orleans during Mardi Gras. 

Team members are: Monica Lukaszewicz, Captain 
Brett Nila, Jerry Janousek, Peggy Melican, Chris Smart 
Bill Crewe, Phil Anderson, Joe Trimble. 



122 




3. ^# ^^-'^ 




Scabbard and Blade 



kabbard and Blade is a national military science 
honorary society for members of th Advanced Course 
and scholarship students. The fraternity is designed to 
Dromote good will, leadership, and responsibility in 
^OTC and the university at large. The primary objective 
af this organization is to encourage leadership in 
service to the community and within Loyola. Scabbard 
and Blade concerns itself with many campus and 
rommunity programs during the year and continues to 
3e one of the most active organizations on campus. 

scabbard and Blade members are: Mike Dedio, Captain, 
Bill Crewe, Mark Kraig, Ron Miller, Bill Dean, Peggy 
Vielican, Dan Sherlock, Dale Warton, John Beutlich, 
George Nelson, Joan Crewe, Dave Gryska, Jane 
Hutchins. 



123 



J 



%^f 




Ranger Company 



The Ranger Company is an organization whose missior 
is to train cadets in physical fitness, small unit tactics 
and leadership. To be a Ranger, a cadet must volunteer 
be accepted, and successfully complete a six week 
"boot" training period, which is designed to get the 
cadet into shape and to familiarize him with the Ranger 
program. During the school year, the Rangers hole 
training sessions three times a week at the Lake Shore 
campus. Field training exercises are held during the 
year in order to give the cadets a chance to work in a 
field environment and to test leadership capabilities 

The objectives of the LU Ranger Company are to better 
prepare cadets for Advanced Summer Camp, develop 
and improve physical fitness and leadership abilities, 
show the cadet that he/she has the ability to operate 
and serve under adverse conditions, and build 
self-confidence. 

Ranger Company members for the 1976-77 year are: 
Dale Dirkes, Commander, Dan Sherlock, Mike Dedio 
Jerry Janousek, Joe Trimble, Dave Gryska, Bill Crewe, 
Joan Crewe, Rick Crewe, Luis Rolon, Jim Burke, Kurt 
Linden, Alex Orban, Ron Miller, Hans Toecker, John 
Beutlich, Peggy Melican, Curt Potts, Tom Bobowski, 
Phil Anderson, Cindy O'Connell, Monica Lukaszewicz, 
Chris Von Jacobi, Brett Nila, Julie Hern, Akos Ador. 



124 



Loyola Drill Team 



An extra-curricular organization, the Loyola Drill Team 
teaches drill proficiency, leadership, coolness under 
pressure, and instills esprit de corps. In order to be a 
member of the team, a student must volunteer, be 
accepted, and go through an initial training period in 
which he/she is taught drill fundamentals, along with 
the team's sequence. The Loyola Drill Team is famous 
for the "silent sequence" in which an absolute 
minimum of commands is given. 

The University Drill Team has been particularly 
successful in representing Loyola in various meets all 
around the country for the past 25 years. This year the 
Women's Team competed in meets at Champaign, 
Illinois, Cincinnati, Ohio, and won a First Place trophy 
at Ames, Iowa. 

Team members are: Joan Crewe, Commander, 
Cerrianne Faulhaber, Shiela Johnson, Peggy Melican, 
Dale Warton, Marty Devereux, Mary Szarzynski, Cathy 
Looby, Mary McManamon, Sally Shirley, Rosalie Wiess. 




125 



^ 




Military History Club 

A fledgling organization, the Military History Club is fc 
students interested in the study of military history. Th 
club views movies, review/s books and papers, and visit 
sites of historical interest such as the museum at For 
Sheridan in an effort to explore the past. 

Club members are: Jerry Janousek, George Nelson, Vine 
Hitchock, Mike Palliser. 



126 




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127 



Organization Life 





130 





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131 



Lake Shore Campus 



132 




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146 





tev. William Ceodert, President of Niles (TOP LEFT), Charles Gerace, 
3ean of Students (OPPOSITE PACE, CENTER LEFT). 



147 




->&.. 



148 



Rev. John P. Finnegan, Academic Dean (LEFT), Eileen 
Tracy, Assistant Academic Dean (BELOW). 




149 




152 




153 



Lewis Towers Campus 




154 




155 




157 




Denise Cafaro, Assistant to the Director (TOP LEFT), Edwin P. Menesi 
Associate Director (TOP RIGHT), Loretta Walsh, Mari O'Brien, Donnij 
Lupo, Rome Center Office Staff (ABOVE). OPPOSITE PACE, Thoma; 
L. Hogan, S.)., Director. I 



160 




Rome 
Center 



161 



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162 




163 



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165 



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166 




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Freshman Orientation 




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Campus Sales 




170 



Royal Lichtenstein Circus 



172 





173 




174 




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Awards Banquet 



175 



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Dance Marathon 



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177 



^Zl2 




Campus Ministry 

"Spiritual rebirth" is the goal of the campus ministry 
and the best possible description of what its members 
hope to accomplish. Loyola University's commitment 
to rebirth both of individuals and of institutions is 
symbolized in providing a campus ministry staff on each 
of its campuses. The aim of the campus ministry staff is 
to work for and with all those in the University who 
seek spiritual rebirth. To this end the campus ministry 
personnel sponsor a variety of activities throughout the 
year including celebration of daily and weekend 
liturgies, spiritual direction and counseling, weekend 
retreats, orientation programs, a Christian Life 
Community, Thursday evening entertainment and 
get-togethers at the Lake Shore Campus's Cellar, a 
World Hunger Drive during Lent, and penance 
services. 



PICTURED ABOVE, left to right: Lucien T. Roy, Assistant to the 
V'\ce President for Campus Ministry, Anne D. Wente, R.S.C.J., 
Assistant University Chaplain, T. Jerome Overbeck, S.]., 
University Chaplain, T. Jerome Overbeck, S.J., University 
Chaplain, Maureen Fuechtmann, Director of Campus 
Ministry, Thomas C. Fuechtmann, University Director of 
Liturgy. 



179 



I 



Theatre 



BLITHE SPIRIT 
by Noel Coward 



THE INTERVIEW 




180 





ALICE IN 
WONDERLAND 
by Lewis Carroll 



181 



Hid 







MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING 
by William Shakespeare 



182 



fejitAVTi ONCE UPON A MATTRESS 
^^ * * F'Ti^A^ by Thompson, Barer, Fuller 




183 



Elections 1976 




184 





(f hicago (Tribune ss.,^\ 



•. •*/ 



Carter vows 'new spirit 




;59th U.S. 
President 
is sworn in 




jihoveraKti The bluck bag — a somber reminder 

innuffural ) , s^bL,.... .,,.,„,„ ,.,, ., ~~^ 



185 








Student Life 



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187 



JM 




189 



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190 





191 



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192 




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194 





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McDonald's 

McDotuld's Restiunnii -. de mue Art,preinnrl ni tisen. 



196 





197 



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198 









200 



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202 



Varsity Basketball 



NAME 


POS. 


HT. 


YR. 


HOMETOWN 


Rodney Callahan 


C-F 


67 


3 


Washington 


Jeffire Elmore 


F 


66 


3 


Omaha 


Haywood Campbell 


G-F 


6'5 


2 


Waukegan 


John Lybch 


G 


60 


3 


Riverforest 


Gary Feiereisel 


C-F 


65 


3 


Chicago 


Steve Goebel 


G 


6'2 


3 


Morton Gr. 


Tony Parker 


G-F 


65 


4 


Chicago 


Tad Dufelmeier 


G 


62 


4 


Des Moines 


Tom O'Halloran 


C 


6'1 


2 


Chicago 


Houston Lloyd 


F-C 


67 


3 


Milwaukee 


)ohn Hunter 


C 


68 


3 


Chicago 


Andre Wakefield 


C 


6'3 


3 


Chicago 





203 



Basketball Record 



LOYOLA 

91 St. Norbert 

69 St. John's (MINN.) 

83 Loras 
62 Butler 

75 Bradley 
68 Wisconsin 

61 Northern Illinois 

59 Toledo 

68 Central Michigan 

71 Air Force 

87 St. Mary's (MINN.) 

72 DePaul 
74 Xavier 

78 Valparaiso 
81 Creighton 

67 Western Michigan 

70 Georgetown 
74 Ohio 

71 Marquette 

76 DePaul 

68 Bowling Green 

84 Western Michigan 

72 Indiana State 
86 Notre Dame 
71 Dayton 

79 Detroit 




204 



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205 




206 




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Women's Volleyball 




208 





A/omen's Basketball 



209 




Leading Scorers' 





GOALS 


ASSISTS 


POIN 


Al Moustakis (18) 


37 


27 


64 


Paul Scott (12) 


19 


35 


54 


Tom Koziol (9) 


8 


17 


25 


Jim Griffin (2) 


5 


■14 


19 


Glen Menoni (21) 


8 


7 . 


15 



210 



Hockey 



Hockey Team 
Record 



The 1976-77 Loyola Rambler Hockey Team combined 
the experience of several veterans and the fresh young 
look of rookies to finish with a 10/12 mark for the year. 
The Ramblers started the season winning its first seven 
of ten games, but could not sustain this type of effort 
the rest of the way. This year's team was sparked by the 
"Most Valuable Player" Jim Griffin and "Leading 
Scorer" Al Moustakis. Moustakis finished the year with 
37 goals and 27 assists. He also tied for leading scorer 
in the Illinois Collegiate Hockey League with 20 goals 
and 16 assists. Moustakis became the 2nd player in 
Loyola's history to achieve 100 career goals. Paul Scott, 
standout sophomore from Moosejaw, Saskatchewan, 
was runner-up in scoring on the team wit 19 goals and 
35 assists. He placed 4th in the league scoring with 9 
goals and 26 assists. 

As a team, Loyola finished 4th in the ICHL with a record 
of 5 wins and 5 defeats. Loyola's somewhat dismal 4th 
place finish could be traced to the vast number of 
young players on the team. Led by Wayne Orchowski, 
Jim Foley, and Brian Griffin, this year's freshmen left the 
team with the hope of a promising 1977-78. 



GAME 


LU 






SCORE 


OPPONENT 
SCORE 


Marquette 


6 


3 


Illinois State 


7 


4 


Marquette 


7 


4 


Illinois (Champaigne) 


7 


1 


Chicago State 


5 


10 


Illinois State 


2 


3 


Lewis 


6 


2 


Iowa State 


3 


10 


Iowa State 


6 


5 


Purdue 


6 


1 


Iowa State 


2 


8 


Iowa State 


7 


4 


Lake Forest 





9 


Dearborn 


1 


2 


Illinois (Circle) 


5 


7 


Lewis 


7 


1 


Chicago State 


7 


12 


Lake Forest 


1 


7 


Illinois (Champaign) 


1 


11 




2^^ 




212 



Track Team 



TRACK ROSTER 
ohn Beutlich 
Steve Boblak 
Ihris Devine 
iich Foiko 
Tracy Freman 
Jill Gabriel 

]reg Germino 

arry Gnapp 

Jill Harte 

^hil Hennessey 

d Kolasinski 



John Malone 
John McCabe 
Larry Mennes 
Bob Morrelli 
Bob O'Brien 
Greg Prestipino 
Jim Reielmann 
Rim Riley 
Dave Trepina 
Randy Van Vieck 
Mike Urbancic 




213 



Women's Swim Team 



Women's Swim Team members are: Sue Bruce, Anita 
Grisard, Virginia Tyrral, Helga Floak, Pat Leuhrs, Linda 
Flasnik, Marianne Mullins, Mary Barry, Meg Mould, 
Laura Bartzowicz, Julie Kleptsch, Lynn Cunningham, 
Joan Kram, Sue Stoy, Ginny Wehling, Pam Amato, 
Denise Hynes, Mary Ann Luce, Sue Schmader, Alice St. 
George, Julie Hamann. Ben Haak, Coach. 




214 




Swimming Team Roster Swimming Results 



'name 


INDIVIDUAL POINTS 


LOYOLA 


OPPONENT 


Martin, Mike 


102 


68 


Lake Forest 


44 


Kafka, Steve 


90 


87 


North Park 


24 


Marsh, Rick 


88 


67 


University of Wisconsin 


46 


Radville, Gary 


81 


43 


Northwestern 


62 


Castro, Chad 


57 


48 


Northern Michigan 


65 


Zonsius, Ed 


56 


42 


Northern Illinois 


71 


Rennie, Jim 


53 


63 


Northeastern Illinois 


25 


O'Connell, Larry 


50 


43 


Eastern Illinois 


69 


Oldin, King 


45 


71 


University of Illinois 


42 


Tentler, Bob 


31 


53 


Western Michigan 


60 


Gorman, Mike 


19 


38 


Bradley 


75 


Fernitz, Dave 


18 


70 


University of Wisconsin 


38 


Kuhlman, Larry 


13 








Merci, Greg 


11 


Northern Illinois Conference Champions 




Fernitz, Dan 


8 








Casner, Warren 


7 








Barth, Ed 


7 









215 



Water Pole 




216 







-,^ :y<ip^^rH'*^i^, 



217 



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Water Polo Scoring Results 





GOALS 


ASSISTS 


POINTS VoSHOO 


Martin, Mike 


117 


17 


134 


65 


Radville, Gary 


45 


26 


71 


62 


O'Connell, Larry 


36 


33 


69 


51 


Kafka, Steve 


13 


25 


38 


48 


Kussmann, John 


39 


15 


54 


52 


Marsh, Rick 


25 


24 


49 


54 


Kuhlman, Larry 


10 


7 


17 


47 


Castro, Chad 


19 


7 


26 


54 


Casner, Warren 


11 


1 


12 


37 


Gorman, Mike 


10 


4 


14 


45 


Fernitz, Dan 


3 


1 


4 


75 


Tentler, Robert 


2 





2 


100 


Merci Greg 
Zonsius, Ed 


7 





7 


70 


7 


2 


9 


87 





218 




Midwestern Conference Results 



LOYOLA 

19 Northeastern 

20 Minnesota 

12 U. of Kentucky 

12 George Williams 

14 U. of Michigan 

22 Northeastern 

12 Purdue 

17 Indiana 

11 U. of Michigan 

n U. of Illinois (Circle) 

11 U. of Illinois (Circle) 



OPPONENTS 
9 

8 
2 
7 
9 
4 
13 
10 
8 
9 





219 



Tennis 




220 




v&^T?^^^^ Soccer 







221 



Basketball 




222 





Water Polo 



223 



5I*-*'i 




224 




225 



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226 



Softball 




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Sports Action 



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Daniel Abrams 


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Ganiyu Adebayo 

Accounting 
Richard Agostinelli 




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Peter Alesi 
Psychology 


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Josephina Alvarez 

Psychology 
Gregory Amarantos 

Biology 
John Ambrosia 

Biology 








232 



ludith Anderson 
Biology 



Maureen Andres 
Social Work 



Robert Angerame 
Biology 



Dennis Armandi 
Marketing 




George Arteaga 
Political Science 

William Ashley 
Biology 




Catherine Avery 

Communication Arts 
Hector Aviles 

Sociology 
lames Avramopoulos 

Biology 




Rachel Babani 

Biology 
Salomon Babani 

Biology 
Rose Ballenger 

Education 




Ernest Balogh 
Accounting 



A. Baltrusaitis 

Physics & German 



Christine Barclay 
History 



Connie Bastian 
Accounting 



2 33 



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Noel Bateman 
Dental Hygiene 

Lance Baumgarten 
Biology 





Catherine Becker 
Psychology 

Norbert Becker 
Biology 

Greg Belback 
Psychology 




Elba Bell 

Psychology 
Judy Berrigan 

Education 
MIchele Bieniek 

Nursing 





234 



Guy Blaszak 

Political Science 



Francine Blazowski 
Political Science 



Russell Boehm 
Personnel 



Mary Boorem 
Psychology 




Kathleen Boyle 
Political Science 

Mark Boyle 
Political Science 




Susan Boyle 

Political Science 
Allen Bradley 

Psychology 
Carl Brasic 

Psychology 




Michael Bresnahan 

Biology & Mathematics 
Carow Brick 

Biology 
Donald Bridwell 

English 




Pavia Marie Broski 
Education 



Carol Brown 
Sociology 



M. L. Brown 
Psychology 



Michele Brown 
Psychology 



235 



John Bryant 
Accounting 




William Burgess 

Accounting 
Irene Burney 

Communication Arts 





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Cindy Busse 

Nursing 
OIlie Cameron 
Christine Cantieri 

Nursing 




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236 



Pasquale Capriati 
Italian 



John Carney 
Psychology 



Nancy Casey 
Chemistry 



Mary Ann Casper 
Biology 




Diane Cavanagh 
Education 




Jeanne Cecchin 
Psychology 

David Charnota 
Biology 





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Kristine Charnowski 

Sociology 
Alexandra Chelos 

Education 
Julian Cheng 

Accounting 



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Doris Clark 



Kathleen Clifford 
Psychology 



Judith Coates 
History 



Susan Coleman 
Political Science 



237 



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Bernadette Collins 

Nursing 
Mary Collins 

Biology 




Patrice Collins 
Political Science 

Michael Coogan 
Theology 

Gary Copp 
Personnel 



Sharon Cothran 

Social Work 
Christine Crinion 

Psychology 
Christopher Crinion 

History 





238 



Joann Crowe 
Political Science 



Jean Cunniff 
Political Science 



Richard Dalitto 
Psychology 



Steven D'Andrea 
Marketing 




Rita Daniel 

Biology 
Sarah Darring 

Psychology 




B. Daskolias 
Psychology 

Roseline Dauphin 
Biology 

Diane Daus 
Biology 




Denise Dayton 

English 
Alan DeAngelo 
Celeste DelGiudice 

Psychology 





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Joyce Deptula 
Mathematics 



Theresa DeVeno 
Psychology 



Charles DIFranco 
Biology 



Diane DImaggio 
Biology 



239 



Nicolas DiMaso 

Edward B. Dizon 

Accounting 




Harriet Doheny 

Biology 
Paul Dombrowski 

Chemistry 
S. Donahue 

Political Science 




Candace Dornquast 

Psychology 
Bob Duch 

Biology 
Zenon Duda 

Biology 





240 



Rick Dutkiewicz 
Accounting 



Maureen Dyer 
English 



)oseph DynowskI 
Criminal Justice 



Cheryl Fabian 
History 




Robert Favaro 

Biology 
Sharon Feld 

Dental Hygiene 




Leslie Fissinger 
Criminal Justice 

Paul Flaherty 
Psychology 

Melissa Fleming 
Biology 




Kevin Flood 
Sociology 

Maria Fohr 
Nursing 

Glen Francis 
Accounting 




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Deborah Frayzier 
Psychology 



Joseph S. Fricano 
Political Science 



Peter Fries 
Chemistry 



Mane Froehling 
Accounting 



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Dorothy Fujimura 
Mathematics 




Mary Gabriel 
Sociology 
Kenneth Garcia 




Leo Geurtz 
Accounting 

Mary Giuffre 
Math 

Dan Glitto 
Biology 




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242 



Barbara Goedderz 
Nursing 



Norma Gonzalez 
Personnel 



Gerard Goryl 
Biology 



Barbara Grabowski 
Mathematics & Computer 
Science 




Patricia Crams 
Sociology 




Joanne Gregorio 

Biology 
Mary Rose Gresk 

Political Science 




William Grewe 

History 
Mary Cruenthaler 

Nursing 
Mark Hodhazy 

Biology 




Donna Hagemaster 
Nursing 



Cynthia Halinski 
Nursing 



Marna Halsted 
Psychology 



Sandra Ham 
Psychology 



243 



*«• 



James Hannigan 

Biology 
Karen Hansen 

Psychology 




Patricia Havis 
Social Work 

Gary Hejna 
Accounting 

Brian Henry 
History 




James P. Hcrdman 

Accounting 
Enrique Hernandez 

Biology 
Fernando Hernandez 

Biology 





244 



Robert Herscher 
Accounting 



Joseph Higgins 

Communication Arts 



Robert Hines 



John Hinkle 
Psychology 




^' !' 


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Michael Hornbrook 
Politcal Science 

Randy Horst 
Accounting 




Daniel Horton 

Accounting 
|ohn Hosteny 

Political Science 
Mark Hryniewich 

Biology 




Mary Lynn Huber 

Psychology 
Lisa Hughes 

Criminal justice 
Leslie Jacobs 

Psychology 




Thomas ladrich 
Personnel 



Michael )anda 
Accounting 



Debra Janis 
Social Work 



Gerard Janousek 
Psychology 



245 



Genevieve Jarmola 

History 
John Jarzen 

Biology 




Anne Marie Jaskula 

History 
Jan Jastrzebski 

Psychology 
Joseph Javorski 

Biology 




Trudy Johansen 
Social Work 

Jeffrey Johnson 
Business 

Kathryn Johnson 
Biology 





246 



Thomas Johnston 
Psychology 



Charles Jones 
Biology 



Harry Jones 
Accounting 



Patricia Jones 
Psychology 




Carol Jozwiak 
Accounting 

Nancy Juris 
Accounting 





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Wesley Kaihara 


Biology 


Karen Kamsler 




Accounting 


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Mary Kane 


Biology 


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Anita Kamchins 

Nursing 
S. Karas 

Nursing 
David Karwackl 

Biology 




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Eugene Kawakanni 
Biology 



Helen Kehoe 
Psychology 



William Kelley 
Political Science 



John Kelly 
Biology 



247 



S, 



Linda Kelly 
Nursing 




James Kenton 
Accounting 

Margaret Kinney 
Hiitory 




Diane Ki/ior 
Jan Klein 

Nursing 
Sandy Klein 

Psychology 



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Mi(hael Klinenbcrg 
tnglish 



Denise Knuth 
Biology 



Robert Knoerzer 
Biology 



Robert Kolimas 
Biology 




Helen Koncza 
English 




Ola Kondratiuk 

Nursing 
Theresa Korycki 

Political Science 



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Tom kouba 

Political Science 
William koulias 

History 
Darlene Kowalczyk 

Psychology 



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Mary Kowalczyk 
Mathematics 



Theresa Kowalski 
Finance 



John Krstenansky 

Chemistry & Philosophy 



Andrea Krzysko 
Nursing 



249 



Karen Kukura 

Education 
Christine Kusiak 

Personnel 




Mary Kwasny 

Biology 
Julie LaHood 

Classics 
David Lanzola 

Biology 




Ramon Lara 
Psychology 

Mike Latza 
English 

Christine Laucius 
German 



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250 



Larry Leaks 
Accounting 



Frances Leap 
Theology 



)udith Lechert 
Psychology 



Donald Lesher 
Philosophy 




Katherine Leslie 

Criminal Justice 
D. Veronica Lewandowski 

Psychology 




kathy Lewis 
Accounting 

Jack Leyhane 
History 

Lisa Lippert 
Biology 




Jeanette Lisak 

Nursing 
Brian Lisowski 

Psychology 
Jane Loyda 

Dental Hygiene 




Patricia Luehrs 
Psychology 



Donna Lupo 
Psychology 



Cheryl Lynch 
Nursing 



Michael Lynch 
Biology 



251 



Ji 



Kathleen Lyons 
Maritza Maceo 
Spanish 




Judy Maedge 

Political Science 
Carmela Mallardi 

Italian 
M. Maloney 

Nursing 




John Manderscheid 

Marketing 
Jerry Magnuson 

Personnel 
Lawrence Mah 

Biology 




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John Mahoney 
Accounting 



Mary Ann Majer 



Livia Majogam 
Psychology 



Debra Majewski 
History 




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Martin Mares 
Mark eting 

Sandra Marshall 
Theatre 




Paul Marnul 

Biology 
Kathleen Marshall 

Marketing 
Fidel Martinez 

Social Work 




Jose Martinez 

Psychology 
Julie Marzinelli 

Communication Arts 
Deborah Maslowski 

Accounting 




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Jill Mason 
Nursing 



Ira Massing 
Accounting 



Joseph Matula 
Biology 



Cheryl May 
Accounting 



253 



Roy Mazza 
Accounting 




Susan McAuliffe 

Nursing 
George McCormack 

Psychology 



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Kate McFadden 
Chemistry 

Daniel McCee 
Biology 

Mark McGrath 
Physics 




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254 



Kevin McLaughlin 
Biology 



Adjora McMillan 
Theatre 



James McNerney 
Personnel 



Margaret Melican 
Political Science 




Julie Mennella 
Biology 



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Mary Mennella 

Biology 
Michael Merriman 

Political Science 




Jean Moise 
Psychology 

R Moon 
Biology 

Lillian Moore 
Sociology 




Wendy Morgan 
Political Science 



Frederick Morgenthaler 
Marketing 



John Morroni 
History 



Albert Moustakis 
History 



255 



Jj^ 



Karin Msall 
Psychology 

Lillian Muccini 
Italian 




Thomas Mullin 
Accounting 

Michael Murphy 
Political Science 

Irma Murray 
Political Science 




James Murray 

History 
Maureen Murry 

Mathematics 
Vicki Musial 

History 





256 



Linda Myrcik 
Psychology 



Victoria Nation 
Sociology 



Barbara Nelson 
Accounting 



Denise Nelson 
Political Science 



•'ir"'|-"iifivv 




R. Nero 

Psychology 
Kent Neupert 

Political Science 




Ira Nevel 

Political Science 
Richard Newman 

Accounting 
Laura Nicia 

Biology 






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Robert Ncedzwiecki 

Psychology 
Daryl W. Norman 
Kenneth Nowak 

Accounting 




William Nutini 



Terri Obos 
Psychology 



Steven Obrochta 
Biology 



Cathy O'Donnell 
Psychology 



257 



Brian O'Hara 

Political Science 
Mary Beth O'Holleran 

Nursing 




Olu Ojehomon 
Political Science 

John Oldershaw 
Biology 

Kathleen O'Leary 
Political Science 




Robert OIker 

Psychology 
Kathleen Olp 

Dental Hygiene 
Catherine O'Meara 

Dental Hygiene 





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Greg Oosterbaan 



258 



lames Orbon 
Biology 



Theresa O'Shea 
Fine Arts 



Raymond Otte 
Biology 




Phillip Owens 

Sociology 
Burton Padove 

Political Science 




Leonard Pal 

Psychology 
Joanna Paliutis 

Education 
William Parker 

Political Science 




William Parrilli 
Accounting 

Raksha Patel 
Biology 

Lynda Patterson 
Biology 




Lee Paulino 
Psychology 



Ceraldine Paulus 
Psychology 



Deborah Pause 
Psychology 



Amy Perrin 
Nursing 



259 



Daniel Pesavento 
Production 







Elaine Pesavento 
Accounting 

Katherine Peshek 
Biology 




Bonnie Peterson 

Economics 
Simon Petravick 

Psychology 
Christopher Pfannkuche 

Political Science 





Christopher Phillips 
Theatre 



260 



Gary Piehl 
Finance 



)eff Plewa 
Psychology 



Al Poronsky 
Biology 



BHUUKseAsMkWiiWBailHMii 




Mark Pusateri 
Chemistry 

Paul Puschautz 
Philosophy 




Maria Presta 

Biology 
Constance Ptak 

Political Science 
Diane Quagliani 

Psychology 




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Kurt Raichart 



Randy Rak 
Physics 



Rey Ramos 



X. Ranero 
Spanish 



261 



Marlyn Redoble 

Biology 
Sherlynn Reed 

Psychology 




Margie Reichert 
James Reilly 
Susan Reilly 
English 




Charles Reinhardt 
Criminal Justice 

Kathleen Rewers 
Biology 

Deborah Robinson 
Biology 





262 



Maria Teresa Rojas 
Psychology 



Ronald Rosen 
Biology 



Karen Roth 

Communication Arts 



Nancy Rotroff 
Biology 




lames Russell 

^ Physics 

Mary Russell 
Fine Arts 




Tim Ryan 

Psychology 
Michael C. Rydel 

English 
Dave RzepczynskI 

Physics 



Phil Saigh, Jr. 

English 
Michael Scalise 

Chemistry 
Linda Schaefer 
German 




Maryellen Schmid 
Nursing 



Myron Schreiber 
Social Work 



Betty Schveren 
Sociology 



Victor ). Scodius 
Marketing 



263 



Barbara Scully 

Education 
Sharon Seabrook 

Theatre 




Cheryl Seard 

Communication Arts 
John Seely 

Political Science 
Dave Segler 




Keith Segler 
Sociology 

Katy Sellenko 
Nursing 

Edward Siege! 
Theatre 





264 



John Semik 

Political Science 



Nancy Shotas 
Biology 



Robert Simons 
Psychology 



Joyce SiniawskI 
Biology 




Paul Smith 

Communication Arts 
)udy Sohm 

Sociology 




Carmen Solo 
Psychology 

Thad Soprych 
Mathematics 

Nicholas Sotiros 
Biology 




Barry Speijel 

Political Science 
lames Stadnik 

Marketing 
Lea Stajduhar 

Psychology 




Thomas Stanfa 
Political Science 



Bonnie Stangarone 
Psychology 



Daniel Stanton 
Political Science 



Patricia Stater 
History 



265 



miiifiniiiTni 



Dave Steiger 

Physics 
Dwight Stewart 

Criminal Justice 
Nino Strickling 

Sociology 




Rhonda Sturgess 

Nursing 
Mark Sullivan 

Communication Arts 
Mary Ann Sullivan 




Laura Ann Sunkel 

Theatre 
Mary Ellen Szafranski 
Joanne Szewczyk 

Nursing 





266 



Marolyn Taiwo 
Psychology 



Debora Taylor 
Sociology 



Lawrence Tempske 
Chemistry 



Gerard Thometz 
Psychology 



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Tim Tiernan 

Mathematics 
William Tkachuk 

English & Philosophy 
Jeanine Toedt 

Nursing 




Paula Tolan 

Political Science 
Mirka Tomei 

Marketing 
Stephen Tompkins 

Biology 




Helene Trapper 

Psychology 
Gregory Trexler 

Biology 
Mary Fran Trucco 

Sociology 




Kenneth Unterberg 
Political Science 



John Vail 

Political Science 



Arvydas Valiukenas 
Communication Arts 



Thomas Vallely 
Accounting 



267 



Charles VanderVennet 
Political Science 

Jacqueline Vechlola 
Accounting 

Kathy Virgo 
Fine Arts 





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Michele Vizard 
Carol Voda 

Biology 
George Voulgarakis 

Biology 




John Vrbauer 

Biology 
Carol Waitches 

Mathematics 
Carolyn Waldron 

Fine Arts 





268 



Valerie Waller 
History 



Sharon Walls 
Sociology 



John Walsh 

Political Science 



Ian Waterman 




Edward Wavak 
Accounting 

John Wazio 
Accounting 

Conte Webb 
Accounting 




Barbara Wedoff 

Engliih & Theology 
Robert Wermes 

Political Science 
Monica Werner 

Biology 









Thomas Wersto 
Political Science 

Paul West 

Loretta White 
Fine Arts 



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Kevin Wilkerson 
Psychology 



Christina Williams 
Political Science 



)on Winke 

Communication Arts 



Neil Winston 
Biology 



269 



» i t i iT i MT Bi i r i nr i i mM b 



Robert Wolf 



Alec Wolff 
English 



Eileen R. Woods 
Accounting 



Janet Wright 
Nursing 





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Josephine Wright 
Psychology 

Thomas Wright 
Mathematics 

Theresa Wrona 
Social Work 



Paul Wykowski 
Chemistry 

Mariann Yacullo 
Psychology 

Debra Yore 
Biology 








270 



Pauletta Young 
Biology 



Susan Yuska 
Nursing 



John Zielinski 
Biology 



Dennis Zizzo 



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