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Full text of "The Loyolan"

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LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER 

Maywood, Illinois 



EISENHOWER EXPRESSWAY 



ROOSEVELT ROAD 



JOHN J MADDEN 

MENTAL HEALTH 

N J I CENTER 



mines VETERANS 

ADMINISTRATION 

HOSPITAL 







MILLER MEADOW 
FOREST PRESERVE 



LEGEND 

1 . Stritch School of 
Medicine 

Foster G. McGaw 

Hospital 

James and Irene Burke 

Ambulatory Care Center 

School of 
Dentistry and 
Clinic 




3. Primary Health 
Care Center 



Parking Facilities 



WATER TOWER CAMPUS 

820 N. MICHIGAN AVE. 




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HICAC 

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CHICAGO AVE 



Lake Michigan 2 Blocks East 



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LEGEND 

1. Lewis Towers, 
Julia Deal Lewis Library, 
Development Office 

2. School of Law 

3 Marquette Center 

4 Bridge 

5 Water Tower 

6. President's Office, 
Placement Bureau 



7. School of Social Work 

8. Graduate School of Business 

9. Construction Site for 

the James F. Maguire, S.J. 
Hall (future home of the 
Loyola School of Law) 



■g. Assigned Parking 



LAKE SHORE CAMPUS 

6525 N SHERIDAN ROAD 




LEGEND 

1 Cudahy Memorial Library and 
the Martin O'Arcy Gallery ot Art 

2 Jesuit Residence 

3 Madonna della Strada Chapel 

4 Damen Hall 
5. Cudahy Science Hall 
6- Dumbach Hall 
7. Power Plant Maintenance 

8 Student Activities Annex 

9 Educational Opportunity Program 

10 Theology Department Building 

1 1 Chamberlain Hall (Women's Residence) 

12 Stebler Hall (Women's Residence) 

13. Lewis Hall (Jesuit Residence) 

14. Bremner Hall (Jesuit Residence) 

15. Mertt Hall — Centennial Forum 
(Student Center) — Mullady Theater 

16 Campion Hall (Men's Residence) 

17 Assisi Center 

18. Loyola Hall (Women's Residence) 

19. Alumni Memorial Gymnasium 

20. ROT C Ritle Range 
21 R.O.T.C. Armory 
22. Wilson Hall 
23 Science Building 
24. Gonzaga Hall (Men's Residence) 

25 6301 N Winthrop (Co-Ed Residence Kali) 

26 6336-38 N. Winthrop 
(Co-Ed Residence Hall) 



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LAKE SHORE CAMPUS 
6b25N. SHERIDAN RD 



.EAST-WEST TOLLWY 




MAP OF 

LOYOLA UNIVERSITY'S CAMPUSES 

IN THE CHICAGO 

METROPOLITAN AREA 






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Nineteen Hundred and Seventy Nine 

Loyola University of Chicago 
Volume 42 



© 1979 Loyolan 



Cover Photos by John Baworowsky Loyola University is an equal opportunity educator and employer. 



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Table of Contents 


Rev. James J. Mertz, 


S.J. 


page 4 


A Moment in Time 




page 6 


Student Life 




page 28 


Events 




page 96 


Organizations 




page 142 


Sports 




page, 1 88 


Administration/Acad 


emicspage 218 


Graduates 




page 250 




This Book is Dedicated 

to the Memory of 
Father James J. Mertz, S.J. 






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Sign Me- Just Father Mertz 





Ground-breaking for Madonna Delia Strada 



Fr. James J. Mertz, S.J. died 
peacefully Monday, January 29, at 10:50 
pm after a long illness. 

Fr. Mertz was born in Toledo, Ohio, 
in 1882. On August 31, 1900, he entered 
the Society of the Jesuits after gradua- 
tion from Canisius High School in 
Buffalo. He was ordained as a Roman 
Catholic priest June 30, 1915 and 
completed his seminary studies at St. 
Louis University in 1916. He taught the 
Classics in both high school and college 
for ten years, four of them at St. 
Ignatius College Prep in Chicago, before 
joining the small staff who founded 
Loyola's College of Arts and Sciences 
when it reached its new home, the 
present Lake Shore Campus in Rogers 
Park, in 1922. Fr. Mertz had been the 
sole survivor of that original faculty for 
many years. 

For fifty years he taught the Classics 
at Loyola (mostly Latin Literature, 
graduate and undergraduate). He also 
served as chairman of the department 
from 1929 until 1960. He was a past 
president of the Chicago Classical Club 
from 1940 to 1942 and of the Illinois 
Classical Conference from 1941 until 
1945. As well as these activities, Fr. 
Mertz organized the Pi Alpha Lambda 
fraternity. 

A small chapel in Rome where Saint 
Ignatius and the first Jesuits used to 
gather bore the name 'Madonna Delia 
Strada,' translated as 'Our Lady of the 
Way.' When the Pope granted the 
Jesuits their first chapel, the tiny 
Madonna Delia Strada was kept as the 
core of the larger church. These first 
Jesuits built around it, enveloping it 
within the new and larger Church of 
Jesus, a beautiful Baroque style church. 



In 1925 Father Mertz began, single- 
handedly, to rally financial support to 
build a new Madonna Delia Strada 
Chapel for Loyola's students on the 
lakefront. This venture was completed 
in 1937. In 1975, at ninety-three, he 
published a paperback explanation of 
the chapel's art. 

In the 1920s and 1930s, Fr. Mertz 
ranked as one of the most sought-after 
preachers and retreat-masters in the 
Midwest. In 1926 he preached at the 
International Eucharistic Congress held 
in Soldiers Field. Even in his nineties 
he could still hold a congregation in rapt 
attention. His voice remained remark- 
ably strong until death neared. 

The duration of his physical and 
mental strength was phenomenal. He 
taught classes at the Lake Shore Campus 
until he was ninety years old. And, 
according to Fr. Donald J. Hayes, 
Vice-President-Campus Minstry, 'he 
never forgave Fr. Baumhart for making 
him leave.' 

Well into his eighties he was the first 
swimmer to plunge into Lake Michigan's 
chilly waters at Loyola. He swam there 
regularly until last summer. Fr. Mertz 
also cared for all of the gardens behind 
Madonna Delia Strada and the Jesuit 
Residence until last spring. Three or 
four years ago, at a party in Mertz Hall, 
when students asked him if he re- 
members their fathers, he remembered 
their father and their grandfathers, what 
they looked like, and where they were 
seated in his classes. 

In his early nineties he suffered a 
fractured hip, but even at that he 
volunteered to do chaplain work at the 
hospital during his stay. 

When he was eighty-nine years old, 



Fr. Mertz walked through the recently- 
built residence hall bearing his name on 
the Lake Shore Campus and commented 
on its messy appearance. He began to 
clean it up. If something had his name 
on it, he did not want it to be a mess, 
according to Fr. Hayes. 

His intellectual powers and interests, 
especially his memory and his taste for 
serious reading, amazed his colleagues. 
The ninety-six year old man 'exhausted 
everyone... no one could keep up' with 
him, Fr. Hayes related. With the 
various changes in the Church after 
Vatican II, Fr. Mertz reportedly adapted 
easier than many of those clergymen 
twenty or thirty years younger than he. 
In 1973, at the age of ninety-one, he 
traveled to Rome with a group from the 
Loyola Medical Center and met Pope 
Paul VI along with the Jesuit General. 

In early December of 1978, however, 
his leg weakened until he was confined 
to a wheelchair. But Fr. Mertz still said 
mass every day until one week before 
his death when he became too weak. 
After that, he satisfied his devotion to 
the Mass by having it said in his room. 

Until his death, Fr. Mertz constantly 
teased two of the faculty nurses who 
cared for him. When he was fed soup 
-his last nourishment- by Anita Butler 
(one of the nurses), he mumbled 
something incoherent. When those 
present finally deciphered what he said, 
it was: 'you're supposed to take the 
soup out of the side of the spoon.' 

The humility of this great man was 
evidenced by a letter he wrote to junior 
Robert Moen. Moen commented it was 
one of the sincerest, well written letters 
he ever recieved, and it was signed- 
'Just Father Mertz'. 




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Morning Means. 



Scrambled Eggs. 



Toast and Coffee. 



8/Intro 






A Little Jogging. 



.and Morning Classes. 



Intro/9 



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Afternoon Is... 



Bake Sales, Art Sales 



A Little Research 



12/Intro 



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Lunch in the Elegant Surroundings of the Lake Shore Dining Room (?) 



Intro/ 13 



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Afternoon Classes 



Even a Little Relaxation 



Intro/ 15 





The First Afternoon the Freshmen even had a Picnic. 



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The Night Life Begins 



Intro/23 



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And Even Drinking 



Intro/27 



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Student Life 
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The Water Tower Campus 



Water Tower Campus on down- 
town Chicago's "Magnificent Mile," 
offers programs in business admini- 
stration, industrial relations , educa- 
tion, liberal arts, and houses the 
Graduate School, Law School, School 
of Education, School of Social Work, 
University College; School of Busi- 
ness Administration and Graduate 
School of Business Administration. 







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W.T. Student Activities 

















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Lake Shore Campus 



The Lake Shore Campus is Loyola's 
largest campus located nine miles north 
of downtown Chicago in a residential 
area on the shores of Lake Michigan. 
The Lake Shore Campus hosts 4,000 
undergrads in the College of Arts & 
Sciences and the School of Nursing. 






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Campus 




School of Dentistry 
Foster G. McQaw Hospital 

Strich School of Medicine 



54/Student Life 



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Student Services 
Dean of Students 

Office 



Rhonda Veloz 
Secretary 




Bernie Opila 




James E. Whitehead, M.S. 
Dean of Students 



Dean of Students 



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56/Student Life 




Phillip Davenport 




Health Services 
Financial Aid 
International Student 

Advisor 
Hispanic Student 

Advisor 
Black Student 

Advisor 







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Mary Rhey Student Health Coordinator 






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John W. Bornhoeft 




Robert E. Carlson, M.D. 





John Kenney, D.D.S. 



Yvonne Balthazar, D.D.S. 



James Kouracos, D.D.S. 



Student Life/57 



First Hall - Women's Dorm 






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Campus Ministry 




Lester J. Evett. S.J.. M.A. 



Fr. John M. Fahey, S.J.. M.A. 



Student Life/59 



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School of Dentistry 




William Hanko Business Manager 




Secretaries 



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John V. Madonia, D.D.S., Ph.D. 
Associate Dean 




Marie Jacobs, D.D.S. 
Associate Dean - Clinical Affairs 




Raffaele Suriano, D.D.S. , Dean 



Gerald R. Guine, D.D.S. 
Assistant Dean 



60/Student Life 




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Marjorie Cletcher CD. A. Supervisor Dental Assisting Program 

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Rita C. Khouri, Acting Supervisor Dental Hygiene Program 



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School of Nursing 




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Student Life/63 



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Stritch 
School of 
Medicine 




Clarence Peiss, Ph.D. Dean 




Anthony Barbato, M.D. Senior Associate 
Dean for Academic Programs 




Roland R. Cross, M.D. Associate Dean for Professional Affairs and 
Chief of Statf, Foster G. McGaw Hospital 







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Jodie Root Admissions 
64/Student Life 



Dorothy Wactor Financial Aid 




Gwynne R. Winsberg Ph.D. Associate 
Dean for Student Affairs 




John F. Imirie, Jr. 
Associate Dean for Hospital Administration 





Terri Wronski Registrar 



Geraldine Coats Bursar 





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Niks 
College 



There is a part of the Loyola 
community which is nestled peace- 
fully on a few acres of land bordered 
by Harlem, Touhy, and Milwaukee 
avenues. Niles College of Loyola 
University is a school community of 
about 160 men who look into the 
possibility of diocesan priesthood 
while getting a college education at 
Loyola. 

There's more to Niles than just 
being a seminary. This is evidenced 
in the interest Niles students take in 
Loyola as a whole. "The Niles block" 
of votes has been known to decide 
LSGA elections. Junior Mike Hogan 
was elected Vice President for Public 
Affairs for 79-80. The TKE Boxing 
Tournament saw a five-man Niles 
team capture the team trophy, with 
Al Ponce De Leon surpassing the rest 
of his weight class. In the Intramural 
Track Tournament, Niles again ran 
away with the team victory, with ten 
men entering the competition. 

Even while Niles students take an 
active interest in Loyola activities. 
Niles own intramural program, vars- 
ity and junior varsity sports, shows, 
plays, and concerts have as much as 
one third to one half of the student 
involved in the same project. 

In addition to all these other 
activities, there's always STUDYING. 
A spacious 50,000 volume library 
affords room and facilities for aca- 
demic pursuits. 

After the studying hours, the 
dorms provide a unique living exper- 
ience. Friends are made easily and 
the atmosphere gives people a chance 
to get to know each other well. And 
the community that prays together, 
stays together. The freshmen and 
sophomores experience living in cubi- 
cles in Meyer and Stritch Halls, 
respectively. Juniors dwell in bliss in 
Chardin Hall and the seniors learn 
the joys of apartment living in 
Kennedy, Tobin, and Merton Halls. 
All in all, Niles is a good place to 
play, pray, study, and live. 







72/Student Life 









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Student Life/73 



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76/ Student Life 



Rome, the eternal city, the font of 
western civilization: what better place to 
house a liberal arts college. The Loyola 
Rome Center opened the doors of a new 
campus for the 1979-1980 school year. 
Monte Mario, the highest hill in Rome, 
is the ideal setting for this 19th century 
villa and its more modern additions. 
Housing nearly 200 students, all offices, 
classrooms, dining hall, library and 
more are under its roof, the campus is a 
thriving and close community. The 
neighborhood surrounding the Center 
gives the student an immediate view 
into Italian life and prepares him for 
further exploring. Moving among the 



Romans and their monuments, the 
colosseum, the forum, St. Peter's, from 
day to day - ending it all with a hot, 
foamy capuccino in the afternoon gives 
the Rome Center student the feeling of 
Rome as his home. And once at home 
there, adventurous individuals begin 
expanding their experiences by includ- 
ing new and diverse territories, from 
Italy to England, Russia to Greece. The 
Rome Center offers the opportunity for 
Loyola students, as well as those from 
other universities, to expand beyond the 
traditional boundaries of a college 
education. 




Rome Center 



Student Life/77 



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STADIO DI DOMIZIANO) 



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Standing 19 stories high, Mertz 
Hall is the largest dormitory on 
the Lake Shore Campus. The 17 
residence hall floors house 673 resid- 
ents in single and double rooms. This 
year, floors seven and thirteen housed 
both men and women in alternating 
suites as an experiment in community 
living. 

Mertz Hall provides students with 
the opportunity to live and grow 
together in a comfortable relaxed 
environment, while pursuing an un- 
dergraduate education. 







84/Student Life 




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ANDIES 



John L. O'Brien, President; Mike Teuscher, 
Vice President; John Connoly, Treasurer; 
Howard Killian, Secretary; Tom Cole, Moder- 
ator; Senators & Alternates- Rick Wedepohl, 
Joe Zizzo, Bill Hickey, John Boufis, Ken 
Lisen, Larry Collins, Chris Unger, Dominic 
Cimino, Curtis Potts, Dave Matusiak, Chris 
Vournazous, Mike Harvey, Dean Sana, Dave 
Matusiak, James Reid, Bob McCaulley, Paul 
Rivard, Greg Rothstein, Bill Scott. 




86/ Student Life 




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Campion Hall 






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Gonzaga Hall 



Gonzaga Hall has been the home 
for fifty-five men this year, and is a 
unique living experience. Our pri- 
mary objectives are three-fold. They 
are: (1) to foster academic excellence 
and integrity. (2) to expand Christian 
spiritual horizons, and (3) to promote 
social maturity. In our home atmos- 
phere, deeply rooted and lasting 
friendships are made that help to gain 
a sense of community at the Hall. We 
are proud to participate in Loyola 
University sponsored events and acti- 
vities, and Gonzaga has proven to be 
an instrumental tool in building the 
Loyola University as a whole. 












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Loyola Hall is a small dorm and relatively 
new. The girls are anxious for recognition and 
this year they achieved it. The "Water Bugs" 
took first place in Women's Innertube Water 
Polo. Also "Dimples", their volleyball team 
took first place in Flight II for Women's 
Volleyball. 

The Hall has held sales this year. Profits 
have gone to Hunger Week and Casino Night. 
Other activities include the Spring Semi-For- 
mal, co-sponsored with Chamberlain Hall, a 
Mother-Daughter Luncheon, Progressive Din- 
ners, Pizza, Halloween and Christmas Parties. 



Student Life/91 



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This year, due to an overflow of 
dorm students, the housing office 
placed many female students in 
Mundelein College dorms, Northland 
and Coffie Halls. 



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Welcome Week LSC 




Once again, the first week of 
school, September 4 - 9, was 
Welcome Week at the North 
Shore Campus. 

The theme of Welcome Week 
'78 was 'A Term for the Better' 
and was carried out well in a 
variety of forms. Among the 
highlights of the week were 
several concerts, a movie, squ- 
are dance, and disco for some 
late-night fun, and guest perfor- 
mers and lecturers between 
events. The Activities Fair and 
Fraternity/Sorority Displays int- 
roduced students to the many 
school organizations outside the 
classroom. The exhausting but 
successful week was then 
topped off with a picnic at the 
Cook County Forest Preserve 
filled with plenty of food, sports, 
and laughter... before the onsl- 
aught of hard-core studying 
these new faces would soon get 
to know. 






Events/99 



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The 108th Annual President's Ball 
was held October 21, 1978 at McCor- 
mick Place. Student leaders of organi- 
zations and academics attended the 
formal event by personal invitation of 
the president. Each year the Presid- 
ent's Ball, an evening of music and 
dancing, is held in the fall as an 
anniversary celebration of the found- 
ing ol Loyola University in 1870. 

The evening's program included 
recognition of the 1978 Student 



Medallion Awardees from each of 
Loyola's campuses, who were then 
greeted and congratulated by their 
fellow students in a special receiving 
line. A total of 13 students were 
selected to earn the President's 
Medallion distinction, a special honor 
based on the recipients' high qualities 
in academics and performance in 
various fields of study. 



Events/ 103 



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The Boyzz were definately too wild to 
tame when they put on a high powered 
rock concert in the Rambler Room on 
February 3, 1979. A sell-out crowd of 
over 600 people saw the S.A.B. spon- 
sored show. Many Loyola students 
considered it the best concert Loyola 
ever had. 




The Boyzz 
The Boyzz 
The Boyzz 
The Boyzz 
The Boyzz 




104/Events 





Oh, The Snow! 

It snowed and snowed and snowed, 
and snowed. In other word, Loyola was 
buried by the blizzard or '79. In Loyola's 
history the school has only been closed 
for three days. One of those days was 
because of the late John F. Kennedy's 
funeral. This year Loyola set a new 
record with a school closing of three 
consecutive school days. 






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50's Dance 







106/Events 




The evening of Saturday, November 
18th saw the fourth annual Campion- 
Chamberlain Fifty's Dance. This year it 
featured a live band and an Elvis 
look-alike contest. This year $200 was 
collected for 'Hunger Week' charities. 







Events/ 107 



Dance, Dance, Dance, 






108/Events 








Nearly every Friday and Saturday 
evening a dance is sponsored in the 
Rambler Room. This year most of the 
dances were Disco oriented, but among 
the groups that performed are The 
Grateful Dead, Pez Band, and The Pearl 
Handle Band. 



Events/109 



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A day never goes by with out some 
kind of sale in Centennial Forum. 
Everything from Taffy Apples to donuts 
can be purchased from various organiza- 



110/ Events 




New Law School! 



James F. Maguire Hall 



A topping out ceremony was held 
December 29, 1978 for the James F. 
Maguire, S.J. Hall, located on the 
southwest corner of State and Pearson 
streets. When completed, the building 
will serve as a new home for the School 
of Law of Loyola University of Chicago. 

Construction of the $4.5 million 
five-story, free-standing facility began 
last summer. Completion of the 
structure is expected later this year. 
The architectural firm of Graham Ander- 
son Probst and White has developed the 
design and is handling the construction. 






Events/111 



Blood Drives 





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Loyola's V.A.P. (Volunteer Action 
Program) sponsors various blood drives 
throughout the year. At both the 
Lake shore and Water Tower campuses 
there was a generous turnout of both 
students and faculty. The blood drives 
were once again a success. 



11 2/ Events 




THE 
SERMAN 
CLUB 




Where do you find lively folk 
dances, colorful costumes, and deli- 
cious foods? Answer: At the Ethnic 
fair. This year groups from Poland, 
Germany, Mexico, Lithuania, Italy, 
and Israel were represented. Each 
group was wearing its ethnic dress 
and displayed its country's music, 
art, and food. Visitors especially 
enjoyed watching the dancing and 
sampling of the delicacies. From 
gyros to tostdads to anisette cookies, 
the ethnic fair had it all. 



Events/ 11 



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WLUW On the Air ! 







Loyola started the year off right with 
the inaugration of WLUW, Loyola's own 
FM radio station. Under the direction of 
Dr. Robert W. Pierson, chairman of the 
Commnication Arts department, WLUW 
began broadcasting on September 12th. 
with coverage by the local media. Since 
WLUW's first program it has been well 
recieved by the University and the 
surrounding communities in serves. 
WLUW features a wide varity of 
alternative programming ranging from 
news and sports to classical and jazz 
music. 



114/ Events 




FTOWU8BBKS 




Jim Post 






On the evening of April 19th, a 
large crowd welcomed Jim Post to the 
Rambler Room. Jim Post preformed 
his own style of music and comedy for 
over two hours to an enthusiastic 
audience. 



Events/115 



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Casino Night V was held Feb. 23 
and 24. Large crowds turned out to 
dance, drink in a Casablanca-type 
bar, and to gamble in hopes of 
winning enough money to bid on one 
of the prizes at the end of the 
evening. All night long there was 
various entertainment ranging from 
vocal groups to the smooth talking of 
the dealers. As in the past, Casino 
Night V proved to be a great event. 




116/Events 



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Campion Casino Night 











The weekend of March 30th signal- 
ed the start of Dance-a-Thon '79. For 
30 hours students danced and partici- 
pated in various events to raise money 
for muscular dystrophy research. 
Although sore feet and blisters were 
common, the $10,000 raised elimina- 
ted the pain and brought on smiles. 



118/Events 




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Awards Banquet 







"It Was A Very Good Year," was the 
theme for the 1979 Student Activities 
Awards Program held on April 21 in the 
M & M Club of Merchandise Mart. This 
year twenty organizations attended. 
After an opening prayer by Fr. Fox and 
remarks by Fr. Baumhart, dinner was 
served and awards were presented. 

The recepient of The Advisor of the 
Year Award was Ms. Donna Dorl, LSC 
Director of Student Activities and SAB 
Advisor. Ms.Mariette LeBlanc pres- 
ented the Vice President's Award for 
Leadership. Recepients this year were 
Mary Erlenborn, Starnetta Green. Mark 
Lauer, George Martinez. Mike Mc- 
Gowan, and Denise Williams. 

Following the awards was dancing with 
music provided by Chicago Heater. 



Events/121 



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Graduation 






122/Events 



Loyola University holds it's gradua- 
tion ceremonies for both the January 
and May graduates at Medinah Temple. 
Graduates from all of Loyola's under- 
graduate and graduate schools partici- 
pate in the ceremony. 








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Misalliance 







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'Misalliance' opened with a bright 
country scene, the estate of the Tarleton 
family. Little did the audience know, but 
this seemingly simple setting would 
erupt into a battleground of wits, 
questioning the traditional sanctuaries 
of love, marriage, social classes, and life 
in general. The playwright, George 
Bernard Shaw, used this play as his tool 
to comment on the trivialities of the 
social strata of the early 20th century as 
was evidenced in the audience's reation, 
the Loyola' cast of 'Misalliance' handled 
their roles well and produced the impact 
just as Shaw had intended. The student 
night performance was especially pack- 
ed and well-received. 

The play began with a light conversa- 
tion between the boyish, prissy Bently 
'Bunny' Summerhays and his friend 
Johnny Tarleton, an overly-confident 
young man ready to enjoy the world. 
Soon the audience is introduced to the 
remaining members of the two families: 
Hypatia Tarleton, Bunny's flirtatious 
fiancee; Mrs. Tarleton, the prim, high- 
class hostess type; John Tarleton, Sr., a 
proud underwear salesman who keeps 



well read on the latest intellectual 
following; and Bunny's bewildered and 
somewhat apathetic father, Lord Summ- 
erhays. 

All is calm on the homefront until Joey 
Percival, Bunny's dashing pilot friend, 
and Line Szczepanowska, a mysteriously 
beautiful Polich countess 'drop in' for a 
surprise visit. The light-hearted air is 
suddenly interrupted as the truth about 
each character comes to light under 
these strange circumstances. 

Perhaps the most likeable character to 
surface is the gunner, alias John Brown, 
who adds humerous touches as he tries 
to get revenge against the upper crust. 
The irony of the entire situation makes 
things startlingly amusing yet real. 

CAST OF CHARACTERS 



David Dillon 




Michael Obrzut 






Mrs. Tarleton 


Elizabeth Marquis.. 




..Lord Summerhays 




..John Tarleton, Sr. 




Joey Percival 


Donna Sue Reiter .. 


Lina 


Steve Lundquist .... 


Gunner 




A Taste of Honey 










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Luigi Dirandello's A Taste of Honey is 
the bittersweet melodrama of a young 
girl, Jo, and the pain and lonliness she 
faces in her every day life. Through a 
series of arrivals and departures of 
various people in Jo's life, the play 
illustrates the pain she must deal with. 

As the curtain opens we meet Helen, 
Jo's mother. The relationship between 
Helen and Jo is one of sarcasm and 
bitterness, based on necessity rather 
than love. Next the audience meets 
Peter, Helen's husband to be. Peter's 
constant insulting of Jo and his calling 
her an unwanted child further instill in 
her feelings of lonliness and neglect. Jo 
then meets a black sailor who gets her 
pregnant but later deserts her. Finally, 
Geoffrey is introduced. -Geoffrey is a 



homosexual art student who moves in 
with Jo to help her thru her pregnancy. 
Geoffrey becomes the only mother Jo 
has ever known, until he was tricked 
into leaving by Jo's mother. 

Loyola's presentation of A Taste of 
Honey was a moving portrayal of Jo's 
story. The audience was brought direct- 
ly into Jo's emotional whirlpool. From 
the firstr moment to the last, A Taste of 
Honey was a success. 

CAST OF CHARACTERS 

J° Janet Harpham 

Helen Dianne Wawrzyniak 

Jimmy Smith David Barge 

Geoffrey Steven Rupsch 

Peter Smith Mike Reynolds 



Events/ 125 



Six Characters in Search of an Author 





CAST OF CHARACTERS 



Father Harry Ross 

Mother Barbara Lovick 

Step-Daughter CerinaG. Tolbert 

Son Rollie Wells 

Boy Marcus Tolbert 

Child CheriseLee 

Madame Pace Angella Caldwell 

ACTORS OF THE COMPANY 

Manager Mark Mastin 

Leading Lady Mary E. McGee 

Leading Man Cameron Pfiffner 

•Director James F. Radloff 

Actors and Actresses: Mark Brown, 
Larry Caza, Larry Collins, Eileen Conn- 
olly, Collene Crimmons, Timothy Math- 
is, Patti Interrante, Mary Ann Galgano, 
Fred Smothers, Mary Mogan. 




Few plays can make the audience as 
active as a part of the drama as are the 
actors. Luigi Pirandello's Six Charac- 
ters In Search of an Author is an 
exception. The audience becomes 
imvolved not in terms of role playing, 
but rather in terms of emotional 
involvement. 

The audience enters the theatre to see 
the stage, not any kind of setting, only 
the real Mullady Theatre. As the play 
begins, a group of quarrelsome actors 
are in the middle of a somewhat chaotic 
rehersal. In the midst of this confusion 
enter six characters. These characters 
confront the manager of the company 



with a plea to present their drama. 
Frustrated with the progress of his own 
company, the manager agrees to view 
their efforts in hopes of finding a new 
play. 

As the characters' story unfolds the 
company of actors is sarcastic towards 
what looks like a misguided troup of 
performers. On the other hand, the 
audience begins to sense the true nature 
of these characters. They are not just 
another group with a play to present, 
they are characters trapped within a 
living hell, which they must live over and 
over again. 



126/ Events 





The Lion in Winter 






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The Lion in Winter by James Goldman 
is the humorous yet dramatic portrayal 
concerning succession to the English 
throne under Henry II. The battle for 
the throne involves Henry's three sons: 
John, the naive and wimpering youngest 
son, Richard the Lionhearted, a head- 
strong, powerhungry personality, and 
Geoffrey, an opportunist whose intelli- 
gence proves to be Henry's greatest 
threat. 

In addition to his sons, three other 
characters contribute to Henry's dilem- 
ma. Henry's young mistress, Alais, is a 
major influence on Henry's personality. 
However, her insight into the state of 
affairs of the royal family lead her to an 
awareness of her own tragic situation. 
Next is Philip, the King of Fance, a man 
who is purely self-invested. He schemes 
between Henry's sons to further his own 
goals. Finally, there is Eleanor of 



Aquitaine, Henry's wife. She has a 
brilliant political mind but her tragic 
flaw, that of her manipulative qualities, 
impairs any chance of a relationship with 
Henry other than that of a political 
adversary. 

Presented with a beautiful set and 
realistic costumes, Loyola's perfor- 
mance of The Lion in Winter was well 
done and well received by its audiences. 
CAST OF CHARACTERS 

Henry II Michael Obrzut 

Alais, a French Princess Cathy Lee 

John Jerry Courshon 

Geoffrey Steve Lundquist 

Richard the Lionhearted Paul Lees 

Eleanor Donna Sue Reiter 

Philip, King of France Gary Ramsey 

Events/127 



The Mikado 






Before the action begins, Nanki-Poo has fled from 
the court of his father, the Mikado, to escape 
marriage with an elderly lady, named Katisha. 
Assuming the disguise of a musician, he falls in love 
with a fair maiden, Yum-Yum, but is prevented 
from marrying her because her guardian, Ko-Ko, 
wants her for himself. Ko-Ko, however, has been 
condemned to death for flirting; and as Act I opens, 
Nanki-Poo is hastening to Titipu to find out whether 
Yum-Yum is now free to be his bride. 

From Pooh-Bah (a corrupt official) and Pish-Tush 
(a nobleman), Nanki-Poo learns that Ko-Ko has 
become Lord High Executioner, thus preventing his 
own decapitation. Ko-Ko, in fact, plans to marry 
Yum-Yum that very afternoon. 

Everything goes well for Ko-Ko until a letter 
arrives from the Mikado ordering him to execute 
someone or lose his position as Lord High 
Executioner. Nanki-Poo appears and Ko-Ko promi- 
ses him a month of marriage to Yum-Yum if he will 
become the subject of a public execution. Everyone 
rejoices in the apparent solution to the problem, 
marred only by the unexpected appearance of 
Katisha , in quest of Nanki-Poo. Members of the 
court drive her away, but she threatens to go to the 
Mikado about the matter. 



Act II opens with Yum-Yum preparing for her 
marriage with Nanki-Poo. As all are singing a 
"merry madrigal", Ko-Ko enters with the news that 
he has discovered a law stating that when a married 
man is executed his wife must be buried alive. To 
save Yum-Yum from this fate, Nanki-Poo decides to 
kill himself at once and magnanimously offers 
himself for immediate decapitation. Ko-Ko, how- 
ever, has nobody to practice on and solves this 
sticky problem by having Pooh-Bah make a false 
affidavit that Nanki-Poo has been executed. 

The Mikado soon appears, Ko-Ko, thinking that 
the Mikado is making his visit in order to verify that 
an execution has taken place, produces the affidavit 
and describes with great gusto. the beheading. But 
the Mikado has actually come at the prompting of 
Katisha in search of his lost son. When it is 
discovered that the person Ko-Ko has supposedly 
executed is really the Mikado's son, Ko-Ko and his 
accomplices are declared guilty of "compassing the 
death fo the Heir Apparent." Their only hope is to 
admit the affidavit's falsehood and produce Nanki- 
Poo. But, as Nanki-Poo has already married 
Yum-Yum and so cannot marry Katisha, Katisha 
will surely insist on the execution of Nanki-Poo and 
Yum-Yum. Ko-Ko solves this problem by wooing 



Katisha himself and she accepts his suit. The opera 
ends happily with Nanki-Poo's discovering himself 
as the son of the Mikado. 

CAST OF CHARACTERS 



The Mikado of Japan 


John Bliss 


Sanki-Poo 


His Son 


..Wolfgang Dittrich 


Ko-Ko, Lord High Executioner. 


Timothy Mathis 


Pooh-Bah. 




...Michael Brennan 


Pish-Tush, 


A Noble Lord 


Mike Reynolds 


Yum-Yum. 




Vicki Podgorski 


Pitti-Sing. 




..Monica Migliorino 


Peep-Bo .. 




Jean Schneider 


Katisha... 




..Elizabeth Marquis 


A Nun 




...Catherine Jarrott 



Gentlemen of Titipu. ...Theodore Hall, Gary Ramsey 
Larry S. Piscador, Stephen Rupsch, Jerry Sigman 
Chorus of Schoolgirls.... Tammy Arnold, Rita Brown 
Sheila P. Burke. Mary Kay Coronelli, Sharon Frei, 
Renie Miles, Pamela Muss, Cathy Rogers, Sandy 

Sanborn 

Kurumbo Timothy Mineo, James F. Radloff, Jr. 

David Tallman 

Auxiliary Chorus ....David Barge, Kathy Foley, Ken 

Hartman, David Wisniewski 








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Events/ 129 





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Events/131 






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Greek Week 



The week of April 16th was Greek 
Week. The frats and sororities cele- 
brated with a Nite at the Races, a 
Talent Show, the Jim Post Concert 
and various games in the Ramber 
Room. 






Events/133 



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Since 1978 and 1979 were big years for 
elections, at the Lake Shore Campus we 
had several political speakers. Sheriff 
Richard Elrod and the Young Democrats 
had a party in the Rambler Room. 
Senator Charles Percy and Senator 
Jacob Javits (R-N.Y.) came to get stu- 
dents to register to vote. The highlight 
of the year was a speech and question 
and answer forum featuring future 
mayor Jane Byrne and her opponents 
Wallace Johnson and Andrew Pulley. 



134/Events 





Mertz Pub Night 



Mertz Hall sponsored three Pub Nites 
in the East-West Lounge. The third Pub 
Nite, pictured here, featured a talent 
show with a variety of acts from comic 
performances to dancing and music. 







Events/ 135 



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At the Marriott Hotel on Nov. 3-5, the 
Loyola National Radio Conference once again 
proved to be a success. Nearly one thousand 
students, teachers, and others from all over 
the country gathered for the 9th annual 
conference. During the three day, there were 
concerts, sessions, guest speakers, and other 
various activities. 







136/Events 



Loyola National Radio Conference 








Events/137 



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The Fantasticks 













The Niles College Theatre Com- 
pany, under the direction of Mr. 
Charles Gerace, presented two fine 
productions this year. Fall saw The 
Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Will- 
iams capture the hearts and emotions 
of six audiences. The music of The 
Fantasticks filled the auditorium as 
the spring production. 

Even though both of these plays 
has relatively small casts, the Theatre 
Company still involved many of Niles 
160 students. The stage crew built 
the Wingfield apartment on stage for 
the fall and also constructed a sturdy 
set for The Fantasticks. The lighting 
crew hung and operated a total of 130 
lights for both productions and 
worked under a new designer, Niles 
Frank Hall, for the spring production. 



As this school year comes to a 
close, the Niles Theatre Company is 
already preparing for its fall produc- 
tion for 79-80. On November 2,3,4,9, 
10, and "11, Gerace's troupe will 
present the Chicago premiere of Wild 
Oats. 

THE FANTASTICKS 
CAST OF CHARACTERS 



Doug Pryor 


El Gallo 


Dora Carrizales 


Luisa 


Charles LaChance 


Matt 


Bill Danaher 


...Hucklebee 


William G. McCarthy... 


Bellomy 


Kenneth S. Baker 


Henry 


Olen Henry 


.... Mortimer 


Ed Garza 


....The Mute 



THE GLASS MEN A GERIE 
CAST OF CHAR A CTERS 

Kaye Peet Amanda Wingfield 

Remee Reade Laura Wingfield 

Bart Winters Tom Wingfield 

Doug Pryor Jim O'Connor 



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Events/ 139 




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143 



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Student Activities Board LSC 

Pat Rocks Chairman 

Joe Canino Treasurer 

Carol Kuhlman Secretary 

Mark Hieber Entertainment 

John Sawczenko Films 

Maureen Sullivan Fine Arts 

Paul Domanchuk Publicity 

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Student Operations Board WTC 




The Student Operations Board is an 
all-student organization which functions as the 
coordinator of most of the Water Tower 
Campus activities and as promoter for the 
involvement of students. This year the Board 
expanded the variety of its Tuesday 'entertain- 
ment showcases'. Events ranged from a five 
man acappella vocal group, to acts from 
Ringling Bros. Barnum & Bailey Circus, to the 
Silver Star Steel Drum Band. Other events 
included speaker Billy Hayes, author of 
'Midnight Express', a hayride, Pub Nites, a 
Las Vegas Nite, a sleighride, and the annual 
Christmas Benefit. In addition, SOB coordi- 
nated a student trip to the Bahamas over 
spring break. 

SEATED: Kathy Farrell, Joyce Fong. FIRST 
ROW: Dina Marchiori, Annette Kilian, Rita 
Svalbe Nancy Lakowski, Joe Scodius, Sam 
Cannizarro, Bert Rivera, Laura Whittemore. 
SECOND ROW: Tom Moretti, Jim Japczyk, 
Nina Halaska, Kevin Duffin, Sharon Want- 
roba, Pete Gerlikaus, Rose Bruno, Mike 
Dinanno, Bruce Leska, Rich Vail, Gordon 
Stiefel. 





146/Organizations 



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Organizations/ 147 



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Loyola Student Government Association 




FRONT ROW: Alicia Alvarez. Rich Zak. 
John Pelrine, Kathy Mills, Terry Mahonoy. 
BACK ROW: John, Bruce Perlin, Jay Kir/lor, 
Char Reinhold, Dawn Midkiff. John Roth. 
Hugh Devlin. Roz lasillo, Mike Corrigan. 



Water Tower Government 




148/Organizations 



Cadence 




Photos from the first semester of Cadence. 

Jim Sullivan, Beverly Stewart, Ken Trais- 
man, Robert Reyes, Bob Moen, Pat McGinty 




by Don Winter 



by Rich Rolke 



Organizations/149 



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John Baworowsky, Jerry Heimoski, Lea Ann 
Kopczewski, Frank Winters, Marie Kelly, Don 
Sadowski, Luan Nguyen, Mike Lavezzorio. 

Mike O'Dea-Night Photography -* 




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maregacanra 



Marie Kelly-Copy Editor 



Mike Lavezzorio-Lake Shore Campus Editor 
Lea Ann Kopczewski-Introduction Editor 



Jerry Heimoski-Production Editor 






Organizations/ 151 



WTC Staff: Valerie Evans, Tom Moretti, 
Don Sadowski, Nina Halaska 

Mark H. Williams-Sales 
Charles Taylor-Budget Advisor 








152/Organizations 



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Vernon Hesier-Photographer 



Organizations/ 153 



11 







Tom Luetkemeyer Editor in Chief 

Carol O'Brien Associate Editor 

Ken Riesterer Managing Editor 

Nancy Rich LSC News Editor 

Mary Erlenborn WT News Editor 

Gil Webb Features Editor 

Claire Harrison Copy Editor 

Dan Senderak Editorial Page Editor 

Mike O'Dea Photography Editor 

Bill White Sports Editor 

John Wisse Community News Editor 

Eileen Kelly Production Editor 

Wayne Wegmann... Classified/Update Editor 

Joan Vougis Art Editor 

Roxanne Buzbee Ad Manager 

Julie Farkas Business Manager 

John Baworowsky Circulation 

Dr. Barbara Bardes Faculty Moderator 

KNEELING: Mike O'Dea, Gil Webb, Claire 
Harrison, Eileen Kelly. STANDING: Bill 
White, Roxanne Buzbee, Wayne Wegmann, 
Ken Riesterer, Tom Luetkemeyer, Nancy 
Rich, Mary Erlenborn, Dan Senderak, Carol 
O'Brien. 





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154/Organizations 











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Organizations/ 155 | 



LUASA - LSC 




Loyola University Afro-American Student 
Association is a fast growing liaison between 
the entire body of Loyola and minority 
students. We have over 30 dues-paying 
members and 11 executive positions. Our 
functions this year are as follows: Soul Food 
Dinner, 1st and 2nd semester Ethnic Fair 
participants. Soul Session, High School Over- 
night Program, Christmas Program, pizza 
party, three dances. Old Chicago trip, Black 
Awareness Day, and group study sessions. 

SITTING: Arlene Crawford, Rodney Alford, 
Joyce Jones, President, Janet Griffin, Andre 
Copeland. STANDING: Sonia Lewis, Valerie 
Davis, Mike Brooks, Sharon Jennings, Sharon 
DuBois, Lynnette Jones, Zyra Gordon, Linda 
Johnson, LaRona Jefferson, Cynthia Miller, 
Sylvia Maxey. 
BCC 

Denise Williams, Mazie Burgess, Darrell 
Leonard, Karen Williams, Larry Watkins. 



BCC - LSC 







156/Organizationr 



BCC - WTC 




LUASA - WTC 



ROW ONE: Vickie Burns, Katheryn Will- 
iams, Stacia Stewart. ROW TWO: Conrad 
Gilbert, Greg Moorehead, Herbert Singleton. 



Carleen Paramore, Vickie Burns, Katheryn 
M. Williams, Carolyne Haywood, Stephanie 
Meyers. ROW TWO: Carlos Greer, Conrad M. 
Gilbert, Starnetta Green, Thomas Saxton, 
Stacia Stewart, Andre Phillips. STANDING: 
Herbert Singleton, Dennis Boyland IV, Greg 
Moorehead. 




Organizations/157 



LASO - LSC 




The Latin American Student Organization is 
a club which is open to everyone. The main 
goal of the organization is not to be recognized 
as a minority group but as a part of a vibrant 
student community at Loyola. The club has 
sponsored various activities for the enjoyment 
and betterment of its members. 

ROW ONE: Mary Narvaez, Teresita rodri- 
guez, Dorcas Rodriguez, Madeline Roman. 
ROW TWO: Miguel Soto, President, Maribel 
Alvarado, Dausy Santiago. ROW THREE: 
Maria Barraza, Hector Valdes, Virginia Bish- 
op, Edgardo Martinez, Maureen Fierick, 
Willie Cruz, Gabriela Franco. 




158/Organizations 



Irish Club 




German Gub 



FRONT ROW: Mary Ann Galassini. Anne 
Duff, Kathy Witry, Cabrini Costello, Mary Pat 
Shanahan, Tom Galassini, Paul DeRosa. ROW 
TWO: John Madden, Paul Fischer, Tom 
Browner, Jeff Larsen, Tom McCarthy, John 
Garvey, Chris Juris, Mike Fahey, Chris 
Metzinger. ROW THREE: Ken McNowakow- 
ski, Jack Hartman, Scott Campbell, John 
Foran, Kevin Bulman. 

FRONT ROW: Alice Kaniff, Bob Winiecki, Al 
Moritz, Sylvia Milanez, Rose Tremmel. ROW 
TWO: Stavros Alexopoulos, Mary Ann Weiss- 
mann, Irene O'Shaughnessy, Lisa Kowar. 
ROW THREE: Arnulfo Vargas, Geralyn 
Fallon, Monica Soehn, Marianne Ruby. ROW 
FOUR: Sheila O'Shaughnessy. 




Organizations/ 159 



Greek Gub 




SEATED: Arnulfo Vargas, Vivian Maniates, 
Yianoula Alexakis, Stavros Alexopoulos. 
ROW 2: John Kritsas. Steve Ballis, Sophie 
Simeakis, Tom Dimitroff, Danielle Mostert, 
Maelen Munoz, Sophia Matsos. ROW 3: John 
Vavilis, Josophine Geanakoplos, Mike Dom- 
rese, Manfred Borges. 

ROW 1: Rose Zawierucha, Monique Bar- 
wicki, Regina Brachmanski, Joanne Cygan, 
Maria Gruca, Marek Rzadkowski, Dr. Frank 
Mocha. ROW 2: Stan Stokiosa, Robert 
Bramski, Konrad-Mark Sokolowski, Andrew 
Brachmanski, Ralph Price, Alan Stevens, Geo- 
rge Ragus. 



Polish Club 




160/Organizations 



Management Science Qub 




Marketing Qub 



This professional organization gives the 
opportunity to get better acquainted with 
production managers and the corporations 
they represent, other production majors and 
management science faculty. 

ROW 1: Mirella Campoli, Carol Kloster, 
Deborah Beanarz. ROW 2: (Not Pictured) 
Professor John Nicholas, Lawrence Fyock. 
Professor Samuel Ramenofsky, Richard Black. 

Marketing Club 

Colleen O'Dwyer, John Theodasakis, Tom 
Moretti. Leda Melone. Steve Otter, Val Ficek. 
ROW 2: Deboran Burklund. Marguerite Fox, 
Nancy Johnson, Sue Weissert, Mary Moy 
Terri Sepulueda, Gail Gormly Kim Buiemel. 
ROW 3: Mike Dieschbourg, Jim Corbett, 
George Holly, George Senick, Brian Griffin, 
Rich Black Tim Powers, Mike Chiesa, Brian 
Regan Phil Gilmore, Tim Jung. 




Organizations/161 



WLUC 



WLUC Radio 640 is a carrier current radio 
station that covers most of the Lake Shore 
Campus area. WLUC's format is progressive 
album oriented rock with some speciality 
programming. This successful student activ- 
ity enables involved students to experience the 
many aspects of radio. WLUC supplies the 
Loyola community with music, news, and 
information. 

ROW ONE: Mike Hogeorges, Carol Patrizi, 
Sue Kezon, Maribeth Meno, Mark Williams. 
ROW TWO: Delany Walker, Joe Messinger. 
Dave Konopacz, Jerry Brief, Geoff Warda. 
ROW THREE: Mike Kessler, Larry Evinger. 
Orvin Kacprysk, Joe DeStefano, Lou Reis, 
Jack Donoval, Burney Bailey. 





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162/Organizations 










Organizations/ 1 63 







164 




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165 



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KNEELING: Ray Allori, Sam Cannizzaro, Jan 
Paulsen. STANDING: Vic Scodius, Olga 
DiLegge, Laurie Adamski, Fred Gross, Julie 
Thieda, Mark Zienty, Tom Navitsky, Len 
Kozinski, John Pinkowski, Bob Callahan, 
Kitty Wegner, Lance Bertolli. 



Foosball Club 




166/Organizations 



Inter-Fraternity Council 




Pan-Hel 




FRONT ROW: Jerry Malloy, Frank Lagattu- 
ta, Mike Loiacono, Greg Berger, Tasso 
Flamburis. ROW TWO: Dave Matusiak, Tom 
Yonchak, Mike Fedyna, Tony Greco, David 
Ito, Diane Banse. 

Pan Hel is the unifying block between the 
four sororities on campus: Alpha Sigma 
Alpha, Kappa Beta Gamma. Phi Kappa 
Omega, and Theta Phi Alpha. 

SEATED: Kathy Magiera. Patti Salmon, 
June Johnson Anita Seibold. KNEELING: 
Sharon Minx. Laura Riordan, Mary Kay 
Machak, Mary Kaye Lindbloom. Lynn Cun- 
ningham, Juli Oberweis. STANDING: Ellen 
Harast, Cheryl Meerbrey, Sophia Matsas, 
Mary Kurtti, Mary Beth Murphy. 



Organizations/167 



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ThetaXi 




Theta Xi, a young and growing social 
fraternity on campus, has set two very 
important landmarks this year. As of the 
1978-1979 school year, Theta Xi's Gamma 
Delta Chapter at Loyola University has been 
on campus five years, and in that short five 
years, over 100 members have been inducted 
as Theta Xi's at this chapter. Our years of 
growing are over, and with the 19 pledges we 
had second semester (more than any other 
fraternity on campus) the Loyola community 
now must regard us as one of its major 
organized forces. Our chapter is a small 
portion of a large national organization linking 
our brothers with a wide, diversified group of 
individuals across the country. 

ROW 1: E. Paleckas. J. Reilly, E. Martinez, 
A. Potts, B. Torchia, J. Walsh, T. Yonchak. 
ROW 2: B. Gay, D. Hensen, R. Hatch. M. 
Gillis, B. Schwab, D. Gosse, K. Reilly, G. 
Sulise, D. Monks, M. Merry. ROW 3: D. 
Lachajewski, P. Pedlos, L. Padilla, E. Kuhn, 
T. Hussey, A. Nowak, M. Videka. ROW 4: 
Gus Soulides, B. Beitles, M. Ward, J. Folk, R. 
Schoenstedt. 

Alpha Delta Gamma 

(Not pictured in any particular order): Mark 
Maloney, Mike Affatato, John Rimkus Jerry 
Malloy, Tom McCarthy, Tom Cunniff, Rich 
Jobski, Steve Johnson, Bob Lamantia, Frank 
McGrail. Tony. Hirschenberger, Bill Dwyer, 
Paul DiFranco, Mark Brown, Mike Koehne, 
Paul Fischer, Frank Catino, Dino Nicholas, 
Frank Kentra, Bob McAuley, Rich Nichlas. 
Jim Waters, Tom Moss, Ed McGonigal. 



Alpha Delta Gamma 




168/Organizations 



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Theta Phi Alpha 




Phi Kappa Omega 



Among Theta Phi Alpha's accomplishments 
include the organization of the Pan-Hel 
Council at Loyola, constructive participation in 
Greek Week, as well as Welcome Week, not to 
mention having the only sorority house on 
campus. In addition, sisters actively partici- 
pate in a national philantropic project in 
Georgia known as Glennmary Homes Miss- 
ions. The on campus philanthropic projects 
include the Ronald MacDonald Blood Drive 
and dancing in the Muscular Dystrophy 
Dance-a-Thon. 

FRONT ROW: Kathy Magiera, Laura 
Williams, Debbie Fuentes. ROW TWO: Patti 
Salmon, Wendy Ellen Winter, Anita Seibold, 
Lenore Zajdel, Alice Cano, Stacy Zuhr. ROW 
THREE: June Johnson, Mary Kay Maehak, 
Maria Besbeas, Sara Balderas, Helga Flock, 
Lynn Cunningham. Marianni Corrieri, Heidi 
Gabriel. 



ROW ONE: Ann Allegro, Annette Jackow- 
iak, Ellen Harast, Sandy Artisuk, Shiela 
Walsh. ROW TWO: Colleen Downey, Kathy 
Downey, President, Cathy Ekstrom, Anne 
Wente. RSCJ-Adv. ROW THREE: Betty 
Haberkamp, Julie Bomba, Maria Zalduendo, 
Jame Icenogle, Alyce Sumita. ROW FOUR: 
Diana Yocum, Shiela Medisky, Irene O'Shau- 
ghnessy, Linda Schoab. ROW FIVE: Cheryl 
Meerbrey, Dianne Pajor, Pat Jackowiak, 
Sylvia Milanez, Maureen Hanrahan, Ann 
Dusevic, Cathy Icenogle. 




Organizations/ 169 



Delta Sigma Phi 




FRONT ROW: Julie Garbaczyk, Carla 
Molotsky. ROW TWO: Bob Tanner, Frank 
Zubricki, President, Joon II Haan, Steve 
Guzier, Dean Bezzano, Tom Evoy, Kathy 
Kadlec, Diane Bunse. ROW THREE: Karen 
Lipan, Jim Chmara, Glenn Rolbiecki, Wayne 
Skwarek, Jerry Skiba, Kevin Michalik, Frank 
Bonilla, Dave Ito, Kurt Mrowicki, Tony Greco. 
ROW FOUR: Chuck Scmirara, Steve Otter, 
Bob Baumhart, Curt Hyzy, Joe Karqzewski, 
Jim Udoni, Bob Schumann, Mark Kurkel. 
ROW FIVE: Paul Otter, Bill Ahmer, Dennis 
Rannahan, Ken Michaels, Mike Long, Gary 
Pierson, Tom Croke. 




170/Organizations 



Alpha Phi Omega 




Alpha Sigma Alpha 



(Members in no particular order) Kim 
Bennett, Jerry Breef, Pete Calabrese, Peggy 
Geary, Carmel Denis, Isa DiLegge, Eileen 
Donahue, Linda Freres, Jim Gheradini, 
Wayne Hilty, Jim Johnson, Paul Klein, Rose 
Maltese, Jim McGowan, Keith Nebel, Mary 
O'Sullivan, Mike Palliser, Paul Palliser, John 
Petrucci, Ed Richards, Kathe Schmidt, Dan 
Senderak, Judi Sharlot, Amit Srivastava, 
Dennis Stalzle, Peter Uher, Jung Yoo, Len 
Zalik, Beth Zurek. 

ROW 1: Kathy Berrigail, Kathy Killoran, 
Joan Schouten. ROW 2: Teri Thompson, Mary 
Kaye Lindbloom, Mary Kurtti, Mary Cough- 
lin. Irene Sonta, Mary Beth Murphy. Linda 
Nuzzarello. ROW 3: Eileen Urban, Mary Ann 
Bellar, Stephanie Cappas. Alexis Zemunski, 
Karen O'Keefe, Debbie Zekich. ROW 4: 
Kathy Kennedy, Dawn Mitchell, Pam Du- 
mond, Juli Oberweis, Colleen Considine. 
ROW 5: Chris Prekezes, Mary Ann Luce, 
Donna Ujiiye, Debbie Stemm, Diana Hart, Pat 
Gerbanas. ROW 6: Debbie Cichon, Joan 
Nawrocki. 




Organizations/171 



Alpha Kappa Phi 




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AKP 

Kneeling: Chris Jedynak, Julie Hackel, Lori 
Husman, Terri Sepulveda, Angela Assensi, 
Sandy Sendziol. Row 1: Conrad Gilbert, Bill 
Wasswann, Tom Brown, Vince Volante, Larry 
Wika, Jack Hartman, Ron Ford, Mike Blazer, 
Paul DeRosa, Brian Clucas, Mike Fahey, Scott 
Widen, Bernie Castro. Row 2: Joe Madia, 
Dwight Campbell, George Hollywood, Chuck 
Dushane, Tony Urban, Tom O'Conner, Jack 
Larsen, Barry Babish, Bill Martin, John 
Garvey. Missing: George Martinez, Jeff 
Larsen, Mike Francis, Mike Meenan, Came- 
ron Pon, Pat Gainer, Bill Jones, Mike Campe, 
Dan Desio, Ron Kapolnek, Dave Lakowski, 
Joe Evans. 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 




172/Organizations 



Alpha Kappa Lambda 




Kappa Beta Gamma 



LAYING DOWN: John Twardos, Scott 
Cinel. STANDING: Brian Connors, Greg 
Gerdeman Tasso Flamburis Dave Arreguin. 
Bob King, Marc Brown, Jeff George, Frank 
Licari, Ron Weszely, George Ragus, Gary 
Kaszubowski. NOT PICTURED: Ray Geiger, 
Jerry Courshon, Frank Goppert, Greg Wag- 
ner, Rich Garnek. 

SEATED: Vera Anjelcovich, Pat Tyne, Debbie 
Gawaluch, Peggy Sue Berbas, Joan Vougis. 
Niki Mourikis. STANDING: Mary Ann Scha- 
ber, Joanell DiSalvo, Gena Russo, Maureen 
Tyrell, Maryann Jadczak, Anne Ryan, Colleen 
Thrun, Sharon Minx, Mary Eileen McKormick 




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Organizations/ 1 73 



Scabbard & Blade 



The Scabbard and Blade Honor Society is 
the national military fraternity dedicated to 
service. At Loyola, its main function is to plan 
and organize the annual military ball. Scab- 
bard and Blade also gives special assistance to 
its members preparing to attend ROTC 
Advanced Camp, by sharing the training, 
experiences and insights of members who've 
already completed Advanced Camp. 

ROW 1: Don Metz, Kurt Linden, John 
Mroszczak, Julie Hern. ROW 2: Mary 
McManamon, Tom Bobowski, Bill Zolp, Brett 
Nila, Adam Wojtowich. 

RIFLE TEAM 

FRONT ROW: Chris Smrt, John Spreitzer, 
Jim Jaworski. ROW TWO: John Nge, Andy 
Milani, Jim Mullrone, Joe Rose, Brett Nila, 
Phillip Anderson, Coach MSG McKinney. 




Rifle Team 




174/Organizations 



Rangers 



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Karate Club 




Due to the extensive military training, the 
physical conditioning, and the spirited dedica- 
tion of its members, the Ranger Company is 
Loyola ROTC's elite unit. But aside from the 
military aspect, Ranger training is also 
valuable to personal growth, for it develops 
leadership abilities while instilling loyalty, 
self-confidence, and a sense of pride. 

KNEELING: Julie Hern, Ramon Nieves, 
J.J. Mroszczak, Howard Killian, Mary Mc- 
Manamon, Don Metz, Dan Gehr, Tom Adams. 
LEANING: Andy Milani, Greg Hadley, Mark 
Schimmelpfennig, Curt Potts, Jim Powell, 
Rich Alden, Steve Walter. BACK ROW: Akos 
Ador, Dale Dirkes, Brett Nila, Joe Rose, Rick 
Grewe, Bill zolp, Steve DeVito. MISSING: 
Tom Bobowski, Joe Trimble. 



FRONT ROW: Tom Scaletta, Manda Plaza, 
Terry Feldman, Alina Tyl. ROW TWO: Julie 
Hern, John Charles, Don Jones, Bill Kinzler, 
Milon Pastuovid, MSG Lloyd McKinney, Inst. 
ROW THREE: Curt Potts, Phil Fijal, Al 
Torres. 



Organizations/ 175 



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Loyola Jazz Band 







176/Organizations 







Organizations/177 



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Perhaps the most unique quality of the 
Applied Psychology Program at Loyola is the 
integration of practical 'how to' helping skills 
training into the core of theory and method 
courses. Several of these courses are unique 
to undergraduate education. One of the nicest 
aspects of the program is it's small size. 
Everyone gets to know everyone else. 

We, the members of the Applied Psycho- 
logy Club, have formed this organization in 
order to: 1) increase the knowledge of all 
Loyola students about the Applied Psychology 
major; 2) get to know students and faculty 
engaged in the Applied Psychology program; 
3) enhance knowledge of career opportunities 
andinternships utilizing Applied Psychology 
skills; 4) upgrade the Applied Psychology 
program through the exchange of ideas; 5) 
encourage the pursuit of honors and the 
acquirement of practical skills within the 
Applied Psychology program. 




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1978 Aqua Ramblers 




SITTING: Rich Marsh, Larry O'Connel, Jim Rennie. Gary Radville. 
Charles Haak, Larry Kuhlman, Chad Castro. STANDING: Henry. 



Steve, Mark Michalek. Jeff Anderson. Ron Katula, Tom O'Connell 
Dan O'Conner, Ed Zonsuis. MISSING: Russ Curry, Mike Gorman 



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Cheerleaders 




GIRLS: 

Gladys Owens 
Cindy Donka 
Wanda Martin 
Kim Duranty 
GUYS: 

Johnny Heller 
Wayne Meyer 
Matt Harte 
Rich Oravec 
Rich Wasik 
IN BACK: 
Leroy Hearon, Jr. 
Shari Kuzel 
MISSING: 
Bill Duffy 
George Boleslav 
Merak Kajian 
Milton Pile 





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The season was dubbed "A Come- 
back Year". For the first time in a 
decade Loyola was considered a national 
power. Optimism was rampant on 
campus and it was emblazened in the 
spirit of the "Comeback Player" John 
Hunter. Hunter, the man who was 
involved in a near fatal auto accident but 
through sweat and hard work had 
worked his way back into playing shape, 
was the catalyst for this talented team. 
The days of glory were to return to the 
little gym on the "el" tracks. 

The press called Loyola "the team to 
watch" and "a Cinderella story". The 
Ramblers turned the experts into geni- 
uses when they crushed Loras 133-69 in 
the season opener. No Loyola team ever 



scored so many points or won by such a 
margin. 

The Ramblers had a genuine all-Am- 
erican in Larry Knight. The 6ft. 8in. 
senior could be stopped by no mortal 
once he got the ball inside. And Chicago 
was captured by the reckless play of a 
6ft. 4in. California beach boy, Tim 
Shaw. The fans were mesmerized by his 
long hair and bushy moustache as much 
as his constant hustle on the court. 

The Ramblers could not be stopped or 
so it seemed. But like all dreams they 
have a tendency to turn into a nightmare 
and Loyola was no exception. It started 
with a double-overtime loss to Minne- 
sota and continued as the Ramblers 



dropped nine of their next twelvf 
games. 

Two of Loyola's most promising 
players were lost for the year. Hunte 
once again was once again the victim o 
injury as the 6ft. 8in. senior suffered < 
severe knee injury and 6ft. 8in., Ro< 
Callahan fell victim to the books and wai 
declared academically ineligible. 

Loyola regrouped, but they couldn' 
quite beat the likes of Notre Dame 
Marquette, and DePaul. But the futun 
of Rambler basketball is bright, as nex 
year Pete Brennan, Darius demons 
LeRoy Stampley, Kevin Sprewer an< 
Shaw return. And it will be time fo: 
another "Comeback Year". 



196/Sports 



Loyola Ramblers - Pom Pom Girls 




Marita Marques 
Dorothy Luz 
Nancy Creath 
Kathy Gresik 
Cassandra Mays 
Marianne Gibbs (Captain) 
Camille Zumpano 
Susan Burden 
Donna Seals 
Gena Campbell 
Lynne Lazzara 






Sports/ 197 



1978 Ramblers 




KNEELING: Mgr. Rich Pinelli, Dan Bush, Leroy Stamply, Darius' 
Clemons, Tom Hitch. STANDING: Milan Djordgevich, Tim Shaw, 
Rodrick Floyd, Pete Brennan. Brian Liston, Jerry Lyne, Teddy James. 



BACK ROW: Larry Knight, John Hunter, Wayne Sappleton, LaRue 
Martin, Rodney Callahan, Kevin Sprewer. 




ports 




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Sports/ 199 



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SFATED: Nancie Gautier, Anna Marsiglio. Gina Ragonese. Eileen Mellon. 
STANDING: Joe Kallas. Teri Weber. Elizabeth Shack. Patty O'Brien. 



Sports/201 









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KNEELING: Jim Mazurowski, Pat McNerney, Matt Cappooise, Joe Newbauer, Harvey Fellman. MISSING: 

Berrafto, Brian Griffin, Bob Broda, Duke Johnson. Wayne Orchowski, Paul Woerl, Jim Henry, Jim Foley, Eric 

STANDING: Sam Blistein, Asst. Coach, Bob Bandyk, Russ Smyth, Tom Hackerman, John Haggeny. 
Canizzo, Paul Holtgrieve. Ed Hoffman, Mark Henry, Bill 




ST 




Sports/203 



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Despite excellent records in the past, 
this was a rebuilding year for the Loyola 
hockey program. With many area 
colleges dropping varsity hockey, Loyola 
is forced to compete with higher level 
programs. This year's new coach, Don 
Menoni, believes there is enough talent 
in the Chicago area to form a good team. 
Menoni stresses defense, passing and 
positional play in contrast to the 
physical hockey played in the past. 
Freshmen Bob Bandyke, Eric Smith, 
and "Duke" helped to compensate for 
heavy graduation losses. Bill Capoolsi 
and Matt Berafatto transferred in to join 
with Wayne Orchowski, Tom Ackerman, 
Russ Cannizzo. Jim Foley, Paul Werhle 
and Mike Deishberg to make up the 
defensive corp of defensemen and 



goalies. Don Hetzle combined with 
veterams Jim Mazorowski, Brian Griff- 
en, Pat McNerny, Jim Henry, Bob 
Broda, Joe Newbauer, and Paul Holtgr- 
eive to provide the offense. 

After some early season losses to U of 
I, Champaign, and St. Norberts, the 
Ramblers defeated Marquette and later 
avenged the earlv season losses. Capt- 
ain Wayne Orchowski said, "We play- 
ed our best games in a big win over St. 
Norberts (8-2) and a close loss to U. of 
Michigan, Dearborn (6-4), a top level 
team with fifteen scholarship players. 

Jim Mazowoski, Brian Griffen, and 
Don Hetze were the leading scorers. 
Russel Cannizzo spent the most time in 
the penalty box. 



204/Sports 



Icettes 




Inge Spindola 
Mary Cox 
Sally Cruz 
Janice Shepro 
Olga DiLegge 
Isa DiLegge 
Debbie Wyshel 
Mary Zayia 
Michaelene Curley 






Sports/205 




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KNEELING: Clemont Rose, Al Delgado, Vinnie Rigler, John Coach, Ercument Arktay, Mike King, Fausto Filice, Frank McGowan, 
Venturini, Marco Aleman, Steve Byrne. STANDING: Dave Trace, Bill Berry, Kevin O'Mara, John Meir, AH Tekdogan. 




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206/Sports 






Soccer 









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Sports/207 



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208/sports 




SITTING: Rich Folke, Mark Edwards, Dean Scourtos, 
Jim Rhode, Tracy Freenan, Greg Germino, Lyndon 
Johnson. KNEELING: Rick Ramirez, Ced Wacker, Jon 
Williams, Chris Heroux, Kamlesh Amin, Mark Kovcic, 



Tom Dolan. STANDING: Coach Tom Cooney. Coach 
Joe Kallas, Mgr. Mike Gutzeit, Marty Biernat, Mike 
Vrzancic, Tom Hogan, Mark Veldman, Dave Trtlovich, 
Mark Kadowaki, Chris Kolb. 






Sports/209 



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210/Sports 




Women's Basketball 






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Sports/211 



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Third in Illinois Private College Championships 



ROW ONE: Dan O'Conner, Jeff Anderson, 
Mike Gorman, Charles Haak, Jim Rennie, 
Tom O'Connell, Ed Zonsius. ROW TWO: 
Coach Ralph D. Erickson, Larry Kohlman, Rus 
Curry, Gary Radville, Larry O'Connell, Chad 
Castro, Rick Marsh, Ron Kotuio. 



BELOW: Rick Marsh 

BELOW, RIGHT: Tom O'Connell 






212/Sports 



4 and 4 Duel Meet Record 





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ABOVE, LEFT: Russ Curry 
ABOVE, RIGHT: Mike Gorman 
LEFT: Jim Rennie 
ABOVE: Dan O'Conner 



Sports/213 



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214/Sports 





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Sports/215 



Women's Swimming 




SITTING: Andrea Clark, Coach, Ginni Smith, Mary Jekot, Annette Gauthier, Erika Bokor, Alice St. George. STANDING: Lynn Cunningham, 
Therese Carbonara, Wendy Ruddy, Vicki Lannon, Caron Caselli. 





Sports/217 



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Administration 

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Reverend Raymond Baumhart, S. J., President 





220/ Administration 




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John H. Reinke, S.J. Chancellor 



Mariette LeBlanc, Vice President for Student Services 




Richard A. Matre, Vice President for Faculties 



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Karl Zeisler, Vice President for Finance 






W. Daniel Conroyd, Vice President for Public Relations 



John F. Langdon, V.P. for Administration 



Dr. James Barry, Vice President for Academi 



University Officers 






Fr. Donald Hayes, V. P. for Campus Ministry 



William Walsh, Vice President for Personnel 



Administration/223 



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Deans of Undergraduate Schools & Departments 




Ronald Walker. Dean of Arts & Sciences 





Jeanne M. Foley, Dean of Social Sciences 



Don Meyer. Assoc. Dean, School of Business 




Henry R. Malecki, Dean, University College 



224/ Academics 





John M. Wozniak, Dean, School of Education 



Sue Nebei, Dean of Humanities 




Fr. John Murphy, S.J. Freshman Dean 



Fr. William Hogan,*S.J. Senior Dean 



Academics/225 






^'V'JAlti''.-^H < 



Board of Trustees 



1. William Quinn, Chairman 

2. Rev. Fernando Arizti, S.J. 

3. Rev. Raymond Baumhart, S.J. 

4. Bernard Brennan 

5. David Clarke, S.J. 

6. Frank' Considine 

7. Mrs. Terrence Dillon 

8. Charles Donovan. S.J. 

9. Joseph Lanterman 

10. Morris Leibman 

11. James McDivitt 

12. Brian McGrath, S.J. 

13. William Mclnnes, S.J. 

14. Mrs. John Molony 

15. John Moutoussamy 

16. H. Dudley Murphy 

17. Robert Neuschel 

18. Frank .Newell, M.D. 

19. John O'Malley, S.J. 

20. Rev. M. Lawrence Reuter, S.J. 

21. Miss Dora Somerville 

22. Theodore Tracy, S.J. 

23. Mrs. J. Albin Yokie 




9 



14 










226/ Administration 



Student Services 





Thomas Adams. Dean of Students, LSC 



Joan Steinbrecher, Dean of Students, WTC 




James E. Whitehead, Dean of Students, Medical Center Campus Bernard Pleskoff, Assoc. Dean of Students, Director of Housing 



Administration/227 



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Student Services 



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Gordon Stiefel, Asst. Dean of Students, Director of Student Activities Donna Dorl, Asst. Dean of Students, Director of Student Activitie 





Charles A. Taylor, Asst. Dean of Students, 
Black Student Advisor 



Emily Santiago, Assistant Dean of Students, 
Hispanic Student Advisor 



228/ Administration 




Gary Soltys, Director of Centennial Forum 




Fran Hawkins, Administrative Assistant to the V.P. for Student Services 








Dr. Galler, Student Psychiatrist 



Dr. Raymond Bailey, Assoc. Director, Student Counseling 



Administration/229 



Campus Ministry 



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The Campus Ministry Staff is 
responsible for working with stud- 
ents, faculty, and staff to facilitate the 
development of a Christian atmos- 
phere within the University. The 
Campus Ministry team is made up of 
several full time priests, sisters, and 
Catholic lay-men and women. The 
part-time staff includes two Protest- 
tant Chaplains, a Jewish Rabbi, and 
priests who function as Chaplains for 
most of the residence halls. 




Tom Fuechtman 










Fr. Bob Arnone, S.J. 




Fr. Peter Fox, S.J. 





Fr. Joseph Boel, S.J. 







Fr. Donald Hayes, S.J. 




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Dr. Gerald McCulloh 



Fr. Jerry Overbeck, S.J. 



Dr. Thomas Ranck 



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Fr. Paul Clifford, S.J. 



Fr. John Dillon, S.J. 



Maureen Fuechtman 







Fr. Tim Kaufaman, S.J. 



Fr. Ed Konat, S.J. 



Fr. Paul Macke, S.J. 










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Lucien Roy 



Fr. Vincent Towers 



Sr. Anne Werte 



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Accounting 



During the past year, the Account- 
ing Department has begun planning 
a new management accounting prog- 
ram, equal in rigor to the public 
accounting program, to prepare grad- 
uates to assume top level postions as 
controller or chief accountant within 
major business firms. As a by 
product of the program, graduates 
should be will prepared to success- 
fully complete the recently introduced 
Certified Management Accountant 
Exam. 

The Accounting Department is one of 
the largest departments within the 
School of Business, with thirteen full 
time faculty and six part time staff. 
Many of the faculty have considerable 
professional experience through 
maintaining their own accounting 
practices and through consulting 
work with major American corpora- 
tions. This background enables the 
faculty to bring practical experience 
to the classroom. 



- 




R. Carson Cox, Chairman and Associate Professor 



Afro-American Studies 



Afro-American studies is, by defi- 
nition, interdisciplinary. Thus, a 
major charge of the Afro-American 
Studies Program is to co-ordinate and 
develop relevant departmental offer- 
ings in a variety of academic discipl- 
ines. A second purpose of the 
Program is to strive to make visible to 
the entire University community the 
accomplishments and aspirations of 
Afro-Americans. The Afro-American 
experience has been a central theme 
in the evolution of American Society: 
Black people have been givers as well 
as takers, actors as well as reactors. 
Thirdly, the Program provides a 
support service for the Afro- American 
Community at Loyola. 



232/Academics 




Anthropology 




Francis X. Grollig, Chairman 



Chemistry 



Anthropology is both a humanistic 
and scientific study of mankind, 
human society, and culture. While 
other sciences and history could make 
a similar claim, anthropology above 
all other such disciplines has had a 
long tradition distinctively its own. 
The tradition is one of inclusiveness 
in considering man and his works 
through actual field work all over the 
globe. The data of anthropology 
include all known human groups from 
simple hunting and gathering bands 
to large complex urban societies. 



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The department of Chemistry at 
Loyola University has, over the years, 
earned and maintained a reputation 
for excellence. With over 65 percent 
of the department's undergraduates 
pursuing graduate programs in chem- 
istry, and nearly 50 percent going on 
to earn Ph.D.'s, the chemistry depart- 
ment has proven to have a consistent- 
ly strong undergraduate program. 

The department currently has an 
enrollment of 142 undergraduate 
chemistry majors who are receiving 
high quality instruction in both the 
classroom and the laboratory. To 
further benefit the student, there is 
also the opportunity for qualified 
undergraduates to work as lab teach- 
ing assistants for faculty members. 



Dr. Carl E.Moore, Chairman and Professor 



Academics/233 



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Biology 




Jan Savitz, Chairman 

The major and all courses in 
biology are offered on the Lake Shore 
Campus only. The aims of the 
Department of Biology are to present 
to students the basic principles of the 
biological sciences and to prepare 
majors in biology for graduate studies 
teaching, or entrance into applied and 
professional schools of science. 




Dr. Harold Manner, Professor 



234/Academics 




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Child Development Center 




The Child Development Center, a 
project sponsored by the Psychology 
Department, opened for the first time 
in September 1976. The facility 
provides low-cost child care for 
children of Loyola students and 
community members. 

Besides offering a non-profit day 
care facility, the Child Development 
Center provides Loyola students in 
developmental psychology an oppor- 
tunity to work with and observe 
normal children. 

Another program that experienced 
a rebirth two years ago is the Day 
School of the Guidance Center. The 
Day School is a division for severely 
emotionally disturbed children aged 
3- 12 years. 



J. Clifford Kaspar, Director 



Classical Studies 



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The Department of Classical Stud- 
ies combines in its providence things 
traditional with things contemporary. 
The Latin and Greek languages and 
literatures, for instance, have been 
the cornerstone of a liberal education 
for centuries. They remain the 
Department's primary interest; nev- 
ertheless, to meet the needs and 
interests of today's students, the 
Department also offers over 25 cour- 
ses in such diverse areas as ancient 
art, archeology, drana, philosophy, 
computer science, law, history, and 
numismatics. These courses, taught 
in English, illustrate the Depart- 
ment's commitment to the past in the 
light of contemporary requirements 
and developments. 



Fr. Joseph S. Pendergast, S.J. Chairman 



Academics/235 



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Communication Arts 



The study of Communication Arts 
enables the student to acquire a 
better understanding of the processes 
of human communication as well as to 
improve his or her own communica- 
tive skills in a wide variety of human 
interactions. The Major in Commun- 
ication Arts provides students will the 
opportunity to concentrate their stud- 
ies in either Speech Communication 
or Mass Communication. Specialized 
course work and creative activity help 
prepare the Communications Arts 
majors for careers and further grad- 
uate or professional study. 




Robert W. Pirsein, Chairman 



Economics 



The purpose of the Economics 
Department is to train students to 
solve problems and make correct 
management decisions. The theory 
and application are both important. 
One of the strengths of the Loyola 
MBA program is the unique way it 
stresses the role of business in 
American society and the responsibil- 
ity of business leaders to society. 




David Mirza, Chairman 



236/Academics 



English 




Largest of the academic depart- 
ments at Loyola, the English Depart- 
ment offers the two-semester writing 
sequence for freshmen and advanced 
courses in writing, as well as a large 
number of courses in literature inten- 
ded for non-majors. Students who 
wish to major or minor in English are 
trained in English and American 
Literature from the Middle Ages to 
the present time. All courses in 
English include training in organizat- 
tion and clarity of writing. 



John S. Shea, Chairman and Assoc. Professor 



Educational Opportunity Program 




Loyola's Educational Opportunity 
Program has been operative since 
1969. Through several supportive 
services provided by the EOP, fresh- 
men who are determined inadmiss- 
able through traditional University 
standards are encouraged to complete 
a four-year degree program here at 
Loyola. It is the intention and hope of 
the Educational Opportunity Program 
that the student, with the help of 
EOP's supports, develops more self- 
confidence, strengthens certain basic 
academic skills, and gains more 
insight into the expectations of higher 
education. 



Tillman Terry, Director of EOP 



Academics/237 



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Finance 



The Department of Finance is one 
of the smaller departments of the 
School of Business, yet it is the most 
popular area of concentration of 
graduate students in the MBA pro- 
gram. 

The finance major receives broad 
training in both the financial manag- 
ment aspects of business and in the 
area of investments and the securities 
market. Graduates typically pursue 
careers within the treasury depart- 
ments of firms, or with banks, 
security brokerage houses, and other 
financial institutions. 




George S. Goodell, Chairman and Professor 



Fine Arts 



The Fine Arts Department of 
Loyola University is one of the various 
departments that make up the three 
colleges of Arts and Sciences in the 
University. We offer courses that 
lead to a B.A. degree with a major in 
Art History, Art Education, or Studio 
Art. 

The major areas of instruction 
include Art History, Ceramics, Com- 
ercial Art, Drawing, and Painting, 
Jewelry Making, and Metal Design, 
Sculpture, Photography, and Print- 
making, plus significant and experi- 
mental courses which are offered 
whenever the department deems it 
desirable. Some courses are cross- 
listed with other departments and are 
team taught for maximum benefit to 
both the departments and the stud- 
ents. In addition, there is an Honors 
Program for the student who accepts 
the challenge. 



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Mary Lawton, Acting Chairperson 



238/ Academics 



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History 




Dr. Robert McCluggage, Chairman 



Honors Program 



History complements other liberal 
studies. It develops special insights 
into the culture in which the student 
has to live and helps him to view it 
through the perspective of time and 
change. It helps to discipline his 
mind through the methodology of 
historical analysis and synthesis. It 
stimulates him to develop and refine 
the values which give him balance 
and judgement for a Christian life. 




Dr. Paul Messbarger, Director 



Since 1937 the College of Arts and 
Sciences has sponsored as Honors 
Program. At present the membership 
numbers over 200, from the three 
campuses at Lake Shore, Niles, and 
Water Tower. All students are 
candidates for the Honors Degree, 
the requirements of which include 
special coursework in all areas of the 
curriculum and a minimum grade 
point average. In addition, the 
students join together for social and 
cultural activities, especially through 
the Honors Student Association. 
Direction of the Program is in the 
hands of a student-faculty council, the 
Director and the Associate Director. 
The graduating class of 1979 will 
number 52 students majoring in 14 
different departments. 



Academics/239 



Institute of Industrial Relations 



The Institute of Industrial Relations 
is a professional program in the 
Graduate School which prepares peo- 
ple for careers and advancement in 
the fields of personnel management, 
industrial relations, and organization- 
al development. The Institute was 
founded in 1941 by Father Ralph 
Gallagher and continues today under 
the direction of Dr. Alan J. Fredian to 
be a significant educational force in 
human resource management and 
development. 




Dr. Allan J. Fredian, Director 



Management 



The Management Department stri- 
ves to instill in students the import- 
ance of viewing organizations as 
social systems, whose effectiveness 
depends on satisfaction of both 
individual and joint goals. The 
Department offers a major in person- 
nel administration. This program is 
designed to prepare students for 
general management careers as well 
as entry positions in various person- 
nel specialties. 



240/ Academics 



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Management Sciences 




The Management Science Depart- 
ment continues to offer the business 
administration student courses in 
production management, computer 
systems, and quantitative methods. 
The Department now includes ten 
fulltime faculty and five adjunct 
instructors representing many areas 
of business and industry. 

Continued emphasis on the sys- 
tems aspects of business has resulted 
in excellent reception by students 
enrolling in the advanced computer 
course, COBOL- Business Computer 
Programming, and the advanced 
systems course, Project Manage- 
ment. These courses are open to all 
business majors. 



Melvin I ehman Chairman and Professor 





The Department of Mathematical 
Sciences offers a BS. in Computer 
Science, a B.S. in Mathematics, and a 
combined B.S. in Mathematics and 
Computer Science. At the graduate 
level, the department offers an M.S. 
in Computer Science and an M.S. in 
Mathematics. The Department seeks 
to give its majors the theoretical and 
practical knowledge needed for fur- 
ther work in mathematics, for careers 
in government, business and indust- 
try, and for the teaching profession. 
Through its many service courses, the 
Department seeks to illustrate both 
the impact and the application of 
mathematics. 



Fr. Richard Vandevalde. S.J. Chairman 



Academics/241 



Military Science 



The Department of Military Science 
Program is designed to complement 
all of Loyola's academic disciplines 
and promotes those qualities tradi- 
tionally displayed by successful lead- 
ers and managers in all walks of life. 
This program is unique in the college 
curriculum because it offers instuct- 
ion as well as practical, working 
experiences in leadership and man- 
agement. What the student learms in 
Army ROTC is directly applicable to 
any career, military of civilianrthe 
principles of personnel management, 
a ready acceptance of responsibility, 
the desire to achieve, personal confi- 
dence and the ability to work in 
harmony with others. Military Sci- 
ence courses, open to all students, are 
offered at both The Lake Shore and 
Water Tower campuses; students 
incur no military obligation bv enroll- 
ing in freshmen or sophomore cour- 
ses. 




Col. John Milani, Detachment Commander 



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Modern Languages 



The Department of Modern Lang- 
uages offers courses in French, 
German, Italian, and Spanish lang- 
uage, literature, and culture, and in 
the field of linguistics. It also offers 
basic languages courses in Polish and 
Lithuanian. Beginning and advanced 
Spanish language courses are avail 
able for students planning careers in 
an urban community. 




Lawrence Biondi, S.J., Chairman 



242/Academics 



Natural Science 




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The Department of Natural Science 
is an interdisciplinary science depart- 
ment that aims to increase knowledge 
of the contributions of science to our 
understanding of man and the uni- 
verse. As scientists we accept our 
responsibility for communicating as 
well as increasing scientific know- 
ledge. The educational function of 
the department is liberal education as 
distinct from pre-professional train- 
ing in the sciences. 



Ray Nakoney, Chairman 



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Philosophy 




The Department of Philosophy seeks 
to acquaint students with the major 
problems of philosophy and a system- 
atic approach toward their resolution; 
to stimulate their talents for specula- 
tive knowledge and constructive criti- 
cism on fundamental issues; to offer 
them a rational foundation for the arts 
and sciences; to assist them through a 
reasoned appreciation of the dignity 
of human nature to formulate a 
philosophy of life mindful of the 
traditions of the Christian world. 



Dr. Kenneth F. Thompson, Chairman and Assoc. Professor 



Academics/243 



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Nursing 



The School of Nursing reflects the 
purpose and philosophy of Loyola 
University by locating professional 
Nursing Education within the context 
of Judeo-Christian values. 

Nursing is service oriented. Its 
members promote health, prevent 
illness, and care for the ill. Profess- 
ional Nursing is further committed to 
theorizing and research, developing 
professional standards of competence 
in education and practice, participat- 
ing in inter-disciplinary efforts to 
improve the health delivery system 
and supporting social issues which 
promote conditions of wholeness for 
every man. 




Julia Lane, Dean, School of Nursing 





V 







Dr. Ryan, Chairperson 



ijv 



Mary McDermott, Chairperson 




244/Academics 



Physics 




The Physics Department offers 
courses for physics majors, related 
majors, and for non-science majors. 
Laboratory courses include basic phy- 
sics, optics, electronics, and observ- 
ational astronomy. 

The Department maintains an elec- 
tronics laboratory, a machine shop, a 
seismology station and research facil- 
ities for experimental atomic and 
solid state physics. Experimental 
efforts center around studies of solids 
and liquids. This includes magnetic 
resonance. X-ray diffraction, Moss- 
baur effect, and laser radar. All of 
these projects involve a great deal of 
student participation. In addition, 
some students work on individual 
projects. 



Richard R. Bukrey. Chairman and Assoc. Professor 



) 



Physical Education 




Gene Sullivan, Athletic Director 



The Departments of Athletics and 
Physical Education encourage all full 
time students, faculty, and staff of 
Loyola University to take part in the 
programs, and take advantage of the 
facilities which they operate on both 
Lake Shore and Water Tower Cam- 
puses. The two Departments sponsor 
and supervise numerous programs in 
the areas of inter-collegiate, intra- 
mural, and recreational sports as well 
as courses in Physical Education 
which carry a one-hour credit rating. 

Full-time students with suitable 
scholastic records may represent the 
University in inter-collegiate competi- 
tion in basketball, swimming, water 
polo, track, cross country, bowling, 
golf, and volleyball. 

Facilities available on the Lake 
Shore Campus include: Alumni Gym 
and pool and athletic field; facilities 
on the Water Tower Campus include 
the 16th floor gym and the 17th floor 
pool in the Lewis towers Building. 



Academics/245 



Political Science is the study of 
man, politics, and government and 
provides students with the knowledge 
of how the American government 
functions and his or her role in the 
democratic system. The Department 
provides a range of courses leading to 
the A.B. and a program which leads 
to the B.S. in Public Affairs. 

To expand the dimensions of the 
classroom experiences, a number of 
guest speakers are invited from 
outside the Univeristy. Some speak- 
ers in the past were James Wilson, 
Anthony Downs, and General Robert 
Gard. 

The Political Science Department 
hopes to aid each student in under- 
standing the political behavior of 
individuals, the nature of politics, and 
the functions of government, and 
attempts to develop in Loyola stud- 
ents a concern for order, justice and 
peace. 



■ r 




Sam C. Carkesian, Chairman and Prof. 



Psychology is a science that seeks 
to understand basic principles of 
behavior and human experience and 
to apply those principles to solving 
individual and social problems. With 
over 30 full-time faculty, more than 
500 undergraduate majors and nearly 
200 graduate students in five advanc- 
ed degree programs. Psychology is 
one of the largest and most active 
departments at Loyola. The majority 
of our undergraduates pursue advan- 
ced training in graduate school in 
psychology or other professional pro- 
grams such as medicine, law, educat- 



ion, social work, and business. 
Other graduates directly enter the job 
market in a wide range of fields 
including police, personnel, advertis- 
ing, social work, and mental health 
work. 

Each year the department and its 
various organizations and interest 
groups sponsor many activities such 
as guest speakers, career planning 
programs, films, sporting contests, 
and parties. A primary goal for 
faculty through course evaluations, 
improved advising, and student input 
to course planning. 




Dr. Homer H. Johnson, Chairman 



246/ Academics 





The Marketing Department seeks 
to provide a basis for understanding 
the American system of distribution 
of the output of our productive 
mechanism. The Department pro- 
vides an understanding of, and the 
skills needed for market research and 
The Department also offers under- 
standing, knowledge and skills in the 
training and management of market- 
ing personnel and training in the 
identification, evaluation, and solut- 
ion of marketing problems. 



Allen F. Jung. Chairman and Professor 




Fr. Thomas M. Gannon, S.J. Chairman 



Loyola's Sociology Department is 
one of the leading departments in the 
midwest, and over the past several 
years has expanded significantly in its 
areas of specialization and the num- 
ber of faculty members actively 
engaged in teaching and research. In 
introducing students to sociology, the 
department seeks to develop a critical 
understanding of the ways organiza- 
tions influence our lives. By gaining 
this insight, students are better able 
to make mature judgements about 
society's problems. The department 
also hopes they will assume more 
serious responsibility for the world we 
are building. 



Academics/247 



Socio-Legal Studies 



The objective of the Department of 
Socio-Legal Studies are to provide the 
student with an understanding of 
individual legal responsibilities aris- 
ing from the interaction of persons, 
property, and government, and to 
create an awareness of the legal 
enviornment in which executive 
decisions are made. 




John D. O'Malley. Chairman and Professor 



Theatre 



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The goal of the Theatre Depart- 
ment is to provide training for the 
professional, community, and aca- 
demic Theatres within the framework 
of a liberal arts education. Many of 
our students will pursue the theatre 
as a profession after graduation, but a 
broad liberal education is designed to 
broaden horizions, break down pre- 
judices, and build inquiring and 
open minds. The theatre major deals 
with the societal aspects of mankind 
as reflected in the creation of an art 
form. These aspects are the interper- 
sonal and intrapersonal relationships 
that are created through total invol- 
vement. Through work on a product- 
ion, whether on stage, as an actor, or 
backstage, in a supportive role, the 
theatre major must learn independ- 
ance from, as well as dependence on, 
his fellow students. 

During the 1978-79 academic year, 
the department's main stage product- 
ions were: Misalliance, A Taste of 
Honey, Six Characters in Search of an 
Author, The Lion in Winter, The 
Mikado. 




n 



Arthur W. Bloom, Chairman 



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Theology 




Fr. Earl A. Weis, S.J. Chairman 



The Department of Theology num- 
bers 29 full-time members and about 
one dozen part-time. In addition to an 
M.A. program in Theology, the 
department also sponsors numerous 
workshops and institutes for the 
benefit of Chicago area residents. 
Notable among these are workshops 
on the religious life and workshops on 
the theology of the charismatic re- 
newal. The Theology Department is 
the largest in the Chicago metropo- 
litan area and one of the largest in the 
U.S. 



Urban Studies 




An evening program offered at the 
Water Tower Campus, the Graduate 
Program in Urban Studies provided 
an interdisciplinary course of study 
that increases the students' aware- 
ness of urban problems and prepares 
them for decision-making in a rapidly 
changing urban world. It is designed 
to serve students who desire an early 
or mid-career broadening as well as 
students who have not yet found 
employment in an urban related 
field. The Program attempts to train 
professionals to plan more effectively 
in an urban setting and to solve 
problems in a creative and practical 
manner. 



Michael E. Schlitz 



Academics/249 



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Graduates 




Maurice Aaron Personnel Management 



Akos Adbr Psychology 



Clem Acitelli Biology 



Bart Aiello Accounting 



Loren Adelman Biology 





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Rodney Alford Bio. & Psyc. 




Ann Marie Allegro Biology 



Marie Almanza Education 



Kamlesh Amin Chemistry 



250/Graduates 



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Class of 1979 




Phillip Anderson Communication Arts 





Elizabeth Anderson Biology 





Matthew Anderson Biology 




Steven Anderson Biology 



William Andrews, Jr. Accounting 





Donald Andreys Political Science 



Andrew Annes Accounting 



David Arreguin Biology 



Graduates/251 



Graduates 




Alexandra Artisuk Chemistry 



Deno Arvantis Political Science 



Chistopher Baker Philosophy 




Richard Balcerak Biology 



Edward Balderas Biology 



Yvonne Baldwin Bus. Admin. 




Kathleen Banke Psychology 



Gloria Barrera Sociology 



Terrence Bartolini Biology 



252/Graduates 



Class of 1979 



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Jacquelyn Bausal Biology 




Eva Bergant Chemistry 






Deborah Bednarz Management Science 




Christine Berger Biology 




Mary Benz Sociology 




Mark Bernhard Biology 



Lance Bertolli Marketing 



Olga Besbeas Accounting 




Cynthia Bespalko Accounting 



Graduates/253 



VgBmBHSB8ffSBBMWB)S!SBIBSgem!M88>m6&lf!^ 







Cynthia Brown Sociology 



Sandra Blakley Communication Arts 



Michael Blazer Hist. & Crim. Jst 



Cynthia Blindauer Accounting 



David BNdy Accounting 



Renee Boeche Biology 



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Andrea Boehm Education 



David Bohn Biology 



Isabel Bolt Marketing 



254/Graduates 



Class of 1979 




Kevin Brill Econ. & PISc 



Robert Broda Accounting 



Keith Brown Psychology 



Graduates/255 



;raduates 




Kevin Brown Math & Comp. Sci. 



Patricia Brown Sociology 



Raymond Brullo Biology 




Pamela Brunner Chem. & French 



Eva Bruno Applied Psychology 



Jerome Buch Accounting 




Stephen Buchenot Marketing 



William Bucki Biology 



Kristen Buel Marketing 



256/Graduates 



Class of 1979 




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Accounting 




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Joe Buoscio Chemistry 





Anna Burger Biology 

















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Paul Burkey Biology 



Robin Byrne Social Work 



Daniel Cacich Biology 






Charles Cafaro Classical Civilization 



Grace Cahill Spanish 



Flavio Cajiao Biology 



Graduates/257 



Graduates 




James Calcagno Accounting 



Dennis Callaghan Biology 




Edward Callen Biology 




Dwight Campbell Political Science Mirella Campoli Production Management 



Richard Carbonara Psychology 




Stephanie Carpenter Biology 



Gloria Caruso Biology 



Jorge Celis Criminal Justice 



258/Graduates 



Class of 1979 




Paul Cetrone English 




John Chaput Economics 



Dorothy Chew Elem. Education 



Christine Cioromski Communication Arts 




Alphonse Clay Business Administration 



Dean Cohen Biology 



J. Barry Cohen Psychology 



Graduates/259 



Graduates 




Nancy Colby Marketing 



Mary Connelly Psychology 



William Connolly Psychology 




Linda Consolo Political Science 



Connie Cope Special Education 



MaryJo Corbett Biology 




Raymond Coronado Theatre 



Jerome Correa Biology 



Gema Costa Biology 



260/Graduates 



Class of 1979 




Cathy Cotter Theatre 




Telly Courialis Criminal Justice 




Donna Crowley Biology 




Susan Cotter Biology 




Anna Cuomo Ital. & Span. 




John Cruickshank Biology 




Eva Courialis Accounting 




Thomas Couston Biology 




Dirck Curry Biology 



Graduates/261 

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Graduates 





Michael Danek Accounting 



Thaddaeus Daniels Criminal Justice 



Anita D'Arcy Political Science 




Richard Davis Communication Arts 



Lemuel Day Sociology 



Joseph Deniz Theology 





Andrew Derwin Biology 



i Mark DeVience Accounting 



Hugh Devlin Mathematics 



262/Graduates 



Class of 1979 



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Elizabeth Dhein Biology 




Mark Dickman Psychology 





Christopher Diaz Philosophy 




Michael Dieschbourg 





Gilbert Diaz Biology 




Paul DiFranco Biology 




Isa DiLegge Biology 



Oiga DiLegge Accounting 



Angelo DiMartino Account. & Market. 



Graduates/263 



Graduates 




Rosemary DiNardo Special Education 



Michael Domrese Biology 



Rainer Dittert Theology 




Lisa Dorn Biology 




Robert Dombrowski Accounting 







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Mark Dressel PISc & Latin 




Thomas Drozdz Chemistry 



Lynne Dubin Marketing 



Anne Dudley Applied Psychology 



264/Graduates 



Class of 1979 




E Jude Duffy Political Science 



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Geneva Dunlop Sociology 





Maureen Durkin Math & Comp. Sci. 




Sofia Echeverria History 



William Eck Philosophy 



Jerry Edwards Psychology 











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Arlene Engert Biology 



Marie Ewers Education 



Issa Fakhouny Biology 



Graduates/265 



Graduates 




Anthony Feiza Applied Psychology 



Andrew Feng Bio. & Psyc. 



Maura Fenlon Political Science 






Donna Fitzgerald Art 



Ken Flisak Communication Arts 



Sam Flosi Biology 




Glen Fortier Afro-Studies 



Claude Fortin Bio. & Chem. 



Susan Fortunato Accounting 



266/Graduates 



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Class of 1979 




Marguerite Fox Marketing 




Arthur Frese 





Joseph Frascati Criminal Justice 




David Fumo Biology 





Gerald Fraser Chemistry 




Lawrence Fyock Production Management 




Dean Galanopoulos Political Science 



Thomas Galassini Accounting 



Jorge Gallegos Finance 



Graduates/267 



Graduates 





Ralph Gallegos Political Science 



Mary Gauer Commercial Art 



Canella Gekas PISc & Latin 





David Geocaris History 



Gregory Germino Biology 



Phillip Gilmore Marketing 



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Ralph Ginn. Biology 



James Glynn History 



Letha Mahadevan 



268/Graduates 



Class of 1979 






Carla Goldlen Communication Arts Christine Gonko Primary Education 



Andrew Gosik Accounting 




Renato Graziano Marketing 











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Wesley Gustafson Criminal Justice Maggie Guy Elementary Education 



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Betty Haberkamp Chemistry 



Thomas Hall Finance 



Lynn Hansen Spanish 



Graduates/269 



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Graduates 




Francine Hareas 


Psychology 


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Janet Harpham Theatre 




Judy Hart 




Cherie Harris Accounting 





Linda Hartney Psychology 




William Harton Marketing 



Bruce Haugh Engl. & PISc 



Morris Haynes French 



270/Graduates 



Class of 1979 




Johnny Heller Political Science 




Jo Etta Henry Special Education 





Patricia Hempel Math & Comp. Sci. 



Phil Hennessy Marketing 




John Herrera Theatre & Comm. Arts 





Jennifer Hickey Political Science 




Judith Higgins Psychology 



Ronald Hill Criminal Justice 



James Hillman, Jr. Accounting 



Graduates/271 



Graduates 




Anthony Hirschenberger Biology 




Kristine Hoff Biology 



Daniel Holbrook Marketing 




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Paul Holtgreive Mathematics 



David Hong Biology 



Stanley Houston Personnel 





Moita Howorth Political Science 



Thomas Jagor biology 



Gregory Jalowiec Biology 



272/Graduates 



Class of 1979 




Katherine Jamieson Criminal Justice 




Don Jastrebski History 





John Janiga Accounting 




Michae 


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;ience 


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Laura Japczak Communication Arts 




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Vanessa Johnson Psyc. & Soc. Wk. 



Barbara Jones Social Work 



Renata Justkowski Applied Psychology 



Graduates/273 



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Graduates 




Steven Kaczmarek Mathematics 



Richard Kalinski Communication Arts 



Steven Kappel PISc & Crim. Jst. 




John Kasper Personnel 



Anna Kazakos Accounting 



Kenneth Kellner Biology 




Gary Kenzer Social Work 



Ruby Kimble Psychology 



Laura Kimmel Political Science 



274/Graduates 



Class of 1979 




Thomas Kinasz Math & History 


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Richard Kita Biology 




Michael King Economics 




JoAnn Klak Accounting 




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Ellen Kinney Economics 




Paul Klein Psyc. & Comm. Arts 



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Robert Kolbusz Biology 



Robert Kolodziej Mathematics 



Frances Konar 



Graduates/275 



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Christine Koska Speech Comm. 



Mark Kovacik Biology 



Robert Kowalski Psychology 





John Kozojed Hist. & Theo. 



George Kramer Biology Honors 



Otto Kramer Biology 





Hillard Krause Biology 



Elizabeth Kubacki 



Albert Krawczyk Criminal Justice 



276/Graduates 



Class of 1979 




Kathleen Kubic Accounting 





Donald Kucharzyk Bio 


logy 


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Roy Kudla Accounting 




Leonard Kuhr Accounting 



Marv Kay Kulka Communication Arts 



Michael Kurley Biology 






Doreen Kuse Psychology 



Pamela Kuzniar Biology 



Kenneth KwiatkowsKi Biology 



Graduates/277 



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Graduates 




Joan Lackowski Communication Arts 



Julie LaHood Classical Civilization 



Frances Langdon Biology 




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Teresita Lara Biology 




Dikran Leblebijian Biology 





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James Lee Psychology 




Charles LeHouillier Applied Psychology 



Nancy Leonard Sociology 



Mark Levin Chem. & Psyc. 



278/Graduates 



Class of 1979 




Sebrena Lewis Psyc. & Socio. 




Cheryl Lorenz Accounting 





Wayne 


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Steven Lundquist Theatre 







Karen 


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Carol Madeja Communication Arts 




Gilbert Madriles Criminal Justice 



David Magoon Psychology 



Terence Mahoney Math & Comm. Sci. 



Graduates/279 



Graduates 





Joyce Ann Majchrowski Comm Arts 



Nancy Malek Theatre 



Varghese Maliekiel Accounting 





Richard Manabat 



Gregory Mandolini Marketing 



Rasa Markulis Biology 




Frank, Martini Biology 



John Mathis Marketing 



Darlene Matias Communication Arts 



280/Graduates 



Class of 1979 






Daniel McCormick Criminal Justice Robert McCarthy Political Science 




Daniel McGrath English 





Maria Mesa Communication Arts 




Mary McDonnell History 




Fabian Mithelic 




Mark Mlsna Biology 



Mark Mlynski Biology 



Margaret Modglin Psychology 



Graduates/281 



Graduates 






Micheal Mora Psychology 



John Moran Math & Comm. Sci. 



Thomas Moretti Marketing 




Russell Morgan Psychology 



Angela Moss Applied Psyc. 



Mary Moy Marketing 




Raymond Moy Chemistry 



Mary Mulligan Communication Arts 



Maelen Monoz Biology 



282 /Graduates 



Class of 1979 




Michael Murray Accounting 






Brian Nagawiecki Bk 


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William Murray Business 



Pauline Mysliwiec Biology 




George Nelson Hist. & Poli. Sci. 



Joseph Neubauer Accounting 





Nancy Neuman Biology 



Lee Nevison Socio. & Theo. 



Luan Nguyen Math & Comp. Sci. 



Graduates/283 



Graduates 




Dean Nichols Biology 



Kevin Niezgoda Bio. & Psyc. 



Brett Nila Political Science 




Donna Nowak Biology 



George Nowak History 



Emmanuel Nwatah Economics 



284/Graduates 



Class of 1979 





Jody Nye Communication Arts 



Patricia Oakleaf Sociology 



John O'Brien. Jr. Communication Arts 






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Michael Obrzut Theatre 



Larry O'Connell Accounting 



Katie O'Connor Special Ed. 





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Kevin O'Connor Biology 



Daniel Oliver III Biology 



Rhonda Nowry-Orman 



Graduates/285 



Graduates 




Mary Ovcharchyn Social Work 



Shirley Paige Production Mgt. 



Michael Palliser Biology 




Jocelyn Pamintuan Accounting 



Kathleen Pantle Criminal Justice 



Tom Papadopoulos Political Science 



286/Graduatcs 



Class of 1979 





Lilli Papesh Political Science David Papworth Biology 











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Robert Parrino Political Science 





Mike Partridge Biology 





Mark Paredes Biology 




Thomas Patt Marketing 




Christine Pavek Biology 



Stephen Peca Accounting 



John Pelrine Political Science 



Graduates/287 



Graduates 




Denise Perea Spanish 



Charlotte Perry Communication Arts 



Charlton Peter Biology 




Carol Peters Political Science 



Scott Peterson Psychology 



Marilyn Phillips 






Sophia Phillips Marketing 



James Pilarski Personnel Mgt. 



Ed Pindelski Personnel Mgt. 



288/Graduates 



Class of 1979 




Cynthia Piskor Psychology 




Jorge Policarpides Biology 





Vicky Podgorski Criminal Justice 




Constantine Politis Biology 





Joe Polak, Jr. Biology 




Tracy Pollard Political Science 




Leonard Potempa Chemistry 



Laura Potthoff Psychology 



John Principe Biology 



Graduates/289 



MSffias 



Graduates 




James Pritzker History 



Steven Rabin Biology 



Gary Radville Accounting 




George Ragus Biology 



Barbara Randall Psychology 



John Reilly Biology 






Timothy Reilly Hist. & Th 



Charleen Reinhold Psychology 



Cynthia Repa Communication Arts 



290/Graduates 



Class of 1979 




Sara Rhey Psychology 





James Ribikawskis 


Accounting 


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RoseMary Rivera Biology 





Paul Rietz Mathematics 




Mario Rodriguez Biology 




James Roelofs Psychology 



Vicki Rogers Political Science 



Carol Rogus Marketing 



Graduates/291 



Graduates 




Zayda Rojas Psychology 



Brenda Rolark Social Work 



Leonard Roman Accounting 




Jairo Romero Biology 



Mary Ruffolo Accounting 



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Joan Rupsis Fine Arts 





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Suzanne Ryerson Psychology, 



Mark Rzepczynski Economics 



Hani Saleh Biology 



292/Graduates 



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Class of 1979 




Rodney Samodral Chemistry 




Aldo Sbigoli Biology 





J. Robert Sandoval Political Science 




Joseph Scaccia Marketing 





Joyce Santor Psychology 




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Marilee Scaletta 




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Maureen Scallon Social Work 



Thomas Scherer Biology 



Susan Schmader Criminal Justice 



Graduates/293 



Graudates 




Rita Schmarje Political Science 



Julie Schornack Bio. & Engl. 



Walter Schultz Psychology 



Gregory Schwartz Accounting 




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Peter Schulz Biology 




Jennifer Schwartz Finance 




Joyce Scott Criminal Justice 



Paul Scott Sociology 



George Senick Marketing 



294/Graduates 



Class of 1979 




Judith Sharlot PISc & Comm. Arts 




Ronald Silich Personnel Mgt. 





Matthew Simon Political Science 




Barbara Sims Social Work 




Herbert Singleton Political Science 



Michael Sinopoli Biology 



Joseph Skibinski Fin. & Ace. 



Graduates/295 



Graduates 




Conrad Skonieczny History 



Paul Skryd Political Science 



John Slania Comm. Arts & Engl. 




Dyhan Slaughter Business 




Maria Slobodian Chem. & Bio. 



Gary Smagala Accounting 




Mary Smith Biology 



Tina Soltys Marketing 



Roxanne Sora Psychology 



296/Graduates 



Class of 1979 




Michael Spear Accounting. 





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Kevin Stankewicz PISc & Hist. 





Monica Spence Social Work 




Linda Stellato Finance 





George Stalling Theatre 




Abigail Stern Social Work 




Alice St. George Criminal Justice 



Franz Stockmann Biology 



Stanley Stoklosa Biology 



Graduates/297 



Graduates 






Catherine Straub Social Work 



Paula Strupeck French 



Mary Jo Strusz PISc & Hist. 




Robert Stude Biology 




Richard Sulkowski PISc & Phil. 




John Sullivan Biology 




Laura Sullivan History 



Margaret Sullivan Biology 



Scott Suva Marketing 



'Graduates 



Class of 1979 




Lawrence Szymanski Marketing 





Richard Talentowski Accounting 





Frank Tannura Accounting 




Walter Tatarowicz Biology 



Decpina Tavoularis Economics 



John Theodosakis Marketing 






James Thommes Biology 



David Toch Economics 



William Tolan Political Science 



Graduates/299 



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Russ Tonkovic Biology 



Leonard Tragas Biology 



Joseph Trimble Criminal Justice 





Hung Truong 



Robin Turpin Psychology 



Joseph Tylka 




Franco Vaccaro Biology 



Joseph Vallowe Philosophy 



Eva Varga German 



300/Graduates 



Class of 1979 




Susana Velez Biology 




Christian Von Jacobi History 












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Richard Vercillo Psychology 




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Joan 


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Rita Villafria Psychology 




Christ Vournazos Biology 




James Waffle 



Gail Walker Dental Hygiene 



Ann Wallyn 



Graduates/301 



Graduates 




John Walsh Biology 



James Wareham Communication Arts 



Dale Warton Mathematics 




Wayne Wegmann Biology 



Kathryn Wegner Finance 



Elaine Weinskin Psychology 






Susan Weiss Accounting 



Susan Weissert Marketing 



Charles Wilkinson Criminal Justice 



302/Graduates 



Class of 1979 




John Wilson Applied Psychology 




Patricia Wozol English 





Lawrence Winters Accounting 




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Jan Wrightsell Biology 





Raymond Wojtylewski Political Science 




Alexakis Yianoula Bio. & Psyc. 




Richard Zak Biology 



Cindy Zalesiak Elementary Education 



Cheryl Zalewski Marketing 



Graduates/303 



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Graduates 




Donald Zaraza Biology 



Mary Zayia Biology 



Deborah Zekich 






Therese Zeman Bio & PISc 



Mary Ziebell Economics 



Mark Zienty Marketing & Ace. 




Kenneth Zimm Psychology 



JoAnne Zitella Accounting 



Edward Zonsius Marketing 



304/Graduates 



ALWAYS 

REMEMBER 

ARBY'S 




of America's 
Favorite Roast 
Beef Sandwich 



Arby's is always there... 

whether you need a study break snackT 

a great place to meet friends, 

or a delicious meal that fits your budget. 

Arby's... a good meal with good friends 

for a good price. 



2 Near North Locations 



N. 



1602 
WELLS STREET 



(AT PIPER'S ALLEY) 



115 
E. CHICAGO AVE. 

(CONVENIENT FOR LEWIS TOWERS CAMPUS) 



Turn that extra time on your hands into extra money in your pocket. We're looking for people 
like you to work at Arby's. The hours are flexible and the pay is good. So spend a few 
hours a day being one of the friendly people behind Arby's counter. It'll pay off. 








mm&b®®®k.<&SBi 



School of Nursing 





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Susan M. Adams 



Celeste M. Amadei 



Judy Archambault 









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Marie Baietto 



Marie Peon - Ball 



Maureen A. Ball 





Patricia L. Barbaro 



Anne P. Barth 



Patricia Beatty 



306/Graduates 



Class of 1979 




Judith A. Biel 





Janice Block 





Nancy L. Benes 




Bonnie A. Boho 




Julie L. Bomba 



Mary Ann Bonner 



Theresa A. Brennan 



Graduates/307 



School of Nursing 




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Damans Ciara 



Julie A Cornell 



Karen A. Copp 




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Mary Jo Crotty 



Deborah A Coppin 







Micheline A Daoud 




Joan M. Dapper 



Edna Davis 



Julia R. DeJesus 



'Graduates 



Class of 1979 




Naomi Dodson 




Katherine A. Downey 



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Carol J. Dubin 



Sharon Kay Dolce 


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Diane J. Dombrowski 



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Mary Lynn Dulla 




Debra E. Durham 



Marie Einarsen 



Susan Lois Elliott 



Graduates/309 



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School of Nursing 




Marion E. Flaherty 




Ruth A. Forgue 




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Diane R. Foster 




Chris R. Frommelt 



Debra Garcia 



Marie Gibbons 




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Christine M. Gilbertsen 



Frances S. Goi 



Tobey B. Golden 



310/Graduates 






Class of 1979 



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Bridget Gollogly 




Cathy M. Holmgren 





Denise A. Haney 











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Mary Ann Healy 




Mary Therese Hurley 




Sarah Ann Hutchins 



Catherine J. Icenogle 



Merrie A. Isquith 



Graduates/311 



School of Nursing 






Jayne M. Jakubco 



Erin M. Jennings 



Julia A. Kamradt 





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Margaret R. Kapelinski 



Colleen A. Keegan 



Lisa A. Kennedy 




Eileen Kilbane 



Karen M. Kinsella 



Louise A. Knasko 



'/Graduates 



Class of 1979 




Lorna K. Kobetz 




Maraaret M. Kraft 




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Nanciann M. Kolasinski 



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Maureen L. Kreisel 



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Linda L. Kordzinski 




Anita M. Krolczyk 





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Marianna Kykta 



Catherine E. Latza 



Mary E. Lembo 



Graduates/313 



School of Nursing 




Marijb Letizia 



Sylvia E. Loboyko 







Rosemary Link 




Regina C. Luczak 




Evelyn L. Littleton 



Anne L. Maciejewski 




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Jeanne C. Magalotti 



Kathleen A. Manella 



Elaine Markus 



/Graduates 



Class of 1979 






Margaret A. Martin 



Jeanne E. Mathis 



Wendy M. Mehis 






Maryann C. Melone 



Paula J. Merlak 



Kathy Moser 




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Diane Mrozek 



Marianne Mullins 



Madonna T. Murry 



Graduates/315 



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Diane M. Nechi 




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Mary A. Nicholas 




Valerie A. Nosek 





Paulette C. Nowack 



Myrtle S. Nunn 



Kathleen P. O'Brien 



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Margaret J. O'Grady 



Elizabeth O'Meara 



Michelle L. Palazzetti 



'6/Graduates 



Class of 1979 












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Mary K. Palutsis 



Barbara L. Pancratz 



Raksha N. Patel 





Kimberly P. Paulino 



Mario V. Paulino 




Karen L. Peiffle 












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Paulette M. Pikul 



Regina A. Plikaitis 



Anthony B. Poletti 



Graduates/317 



.'; ■,, 



-chool of Nursing 








Mary Ann Posko 



Suzy Radzinowicz 



Gail E. Rasmussen 





Mariann Rebenson 



Margaret M. Regan 



Kathleen M. Reynen 




Karen Ringl 



Gayle M. Rink 



Josephine Rogers 



Graduates 



Class of 1979 




Marie Rolon 





Donna M. Ronan 



Eugene E. Ryan 



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Carol A. Rooks 





Mary C. Ryan 




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Margaret M. Sajdak 



Cynthia Sandahl 



Mary Sue Sandrik 



Graduates/319 | 



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Cynthia J. Schaper 



Nancy A Schleifer 



Margaret Ann Schmitz 




Miram Seleski 



Joan Siegmund 



Karen A. Slezak 





Donna M. Sloma 



Susan D. Smith 



Irene Y. Sonta 



*jZ\)/ KjT3.Q 


uates 


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Class of 1979 






Kathleen M. Stanton 



Roger A. Stone 



Joan C. Sullivan 




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Nadine M. Switaj 



Mary L. Szarzynski 



Laura L. Ulatoski 






Eileen C. Urban 



Mary P. Uttermohlen 



Cynthia A. Valetti 



Graduates/321 



School of Nursing 




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Virginia Vergara 



JoAnn K. Waldee 



Margaret M. Walsh 




Anita Washington 



Janet C. Watts 




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Mary Werner 



Joyce A. Weishaar 


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Suzanne I. White 



Katherine A. Winter 



322/Graduates 



Class of 1979 




■ 



Mary F. Witt 




Maryann Zaborsky 





Anne M. Wolfe 





Debbie L. Wyshel 




Barbara A. Zeiler 




Kathleen A. Zold 



Mary M. Zurek 



Debra M. Zuro 



Graduates/323 




Ladies Night Every Wed. 

1st Drink Free 
50* Drinks / 25* Beers 

Happy Hour Daily 4:00 til 8:00 

All Drinks Are 2 For 1 
25* Vienna Hot Dogs With All The Trimmings 

Sunday Nights 9:00 til 12:00 

25* Beers / 50* Schnapps 



We Serve the Best Burgers, 


Brats, & Sandwiches On Campus 


Chicago - Rush 

Currency Exchange, Inc. 


ROUND 


62 East Chicago Avenue 


V 


Chicago, Illinois 60611 


Phone: 944 - 4643 


^V 


Cash Checks Money Orders Notary Public 

Pay Utility Bills Travelers Checks 

Licence Service Food Stamps 


RECORDS 

6560 N. Sheridan Rd. 
Loyola's Full Services Record Store 


All New... 

Cindy Sue's Rambler Inn 

"Just Across Mertz Hall" 


A place for friends and family 


Wishes All Our Student Friends 


- dining and drinking in a 
pleasant atmosphere. 


Good Luck. 


"Since 1952" 






6439 N. Sheridan Rd 338-1262 



Celebrate At Hamilton's 

6343 N. Broadway 

Loyola's Number One Friend 
For Over 120 Years ! 



JOE PIERCE'S 
RUSH STREET DELI 



BOOKSTORE 




Put Our Pastrami Where Your Mouth Is 

Home of the Growing Boy 
Corned Beef Sandwich 

743 N. Rush St. 




WE HAVE YOUR BOOKS ! ! ! 

6501 Sheridan Rd. 

Chicago, III. 60626 

743 - 2281 

56 E. Chicago Ave. 

Chicago, III. 60611 

944 - 7685 



vj e J^ "3 welcome 

as the flowers 

in I nay. at 




Sandwiches Daily 



congratulations and good luck 



class of 1 979 



from your friends at 



?\w//?> Pippin's 



787- 5435 



Loyola Phoenix 

Congratulations to the Graduating 

Class of 1979 




art***' 











Root uses Kodak paper . . . 



Root helps you to remember . 



Kodak paper. For a good look at the times of your life. 



ROOT photographers ■ 1 131 W. Sheridan ■ Chicago 







JM 

YSABOOC 
CONR^NY 



aw 



je record 8000 

school /ears 

ever/ twelve months. 

that's a 
\j\jhole lot of history 

for a 
M^hole lot of people - 

a responsibility 
M\je handle \i\iith pride., 



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Compliments Of 

DENNIS EDER f 



SLYER SPUR SHOES 
6548 IN. SHERIDAN RQ 
2W-7025 




FOR GUYS APO GALS 



CHICAGOLAND'S LARGEST SELECTION 

OF FRYE BOOTS 

PULL ONS, ZIPPERS. LACE UPS, 

STITCHING. TANS. BROWNS, 

CHESTNUT AND RUSSET, 





TRUST and SAVINGS 

JBAIVK 

Comer Rush and Oak Streets 
Telephone: 312/440 - 4000 

Congratulations 
Loyola University Class of 7979 



The Loyolan Yearbook Staff would like to thank 

the many advertisers and patrons 

who helped to make this a great Loyolan 



j;ii;i-i^ 



Mr. & Mrs. Robert Abbott 

Accurate Plumbing & Heating Co. 

Mr. & Mrs. Pierre M. Adams 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael Affatato 

Mr. & Mrs. Sam Agins 

Mr. & Mrs. Victor Alfirevic 

Franco Alvarez 

Dr. & Mrs. B. Amador 

Ken & Pal Anderson 

Mr. & Mrs. George J. Andrews 

Yong Ann 

Ralph Arendt 

Randall & Genevieve Armstrong 

Valeric Amos 

Dario I. Arqvilla 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward Balderas 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Bandyk 

Judith A. Barad 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles D. Barkyoumb 

Dr. & Mrs. James D. Barry 

Zbigniew Basinski 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael Baworowsky 

Mr. & Mrs. Wm. Beallis 

Mr. & Mrs. Andrew Bcbcj 



Mr. & Mrs. Walter E. Behles 

Mr. & Mrs. Andrew B. Bernas 

Dr. & Mrs. Thomas Bernat 

Mr. & Mrs. Jack Bethke 

Richard & Dolores Biarnesen 

Lawrence A. Bilek 

Richard Black 

Laslo Boker 

Mr. & Mrs. Martin Boland 

Mr. & Mrs. John G. Bomher 

Mrs. Helen H. Boone 

Mr. & Mrs. H.S. Boras 

Mr. & Mrs. Arthur Born 

Mr. & Mrs. Roy W. Borresen 

Sharon Renee Bowman 

Mr. & Mrs. John Boyd 

Dr. & Mrs. A. Bozzano 

Adrian G. Breef 

Bernard T. Brennan 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Brown, Sr. 

Paul W. Brumley 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry V. Brus 

Walter Burden 

Gabor Bushv 



Deborah E. Byer 

Dr. & Mrs. John J. Callahan 

Mr. & Mrs. A. Campanaro & Family 

Cathy Campbell 

Mr. & Mrs. J.S. Canino 

Joseph Cano 

carpe diem 

Victor & Eleanor Carr 

Frank Castro, Jr. 

Jerome Camila 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas P. Cawley 

Mr. & Mrs. Harvey G. Caza 

Carmen M. Cesario 

Dr. & Mrs. Myroslaw Charkewycz. 

Chemello Luciano 

George R. Christine 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony J. Christofaro 

Mr. & Mrs. W. Christy 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry Ciolkosz. 

Mr. & Mrs. Pat Cleary & Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert S. Coley 

Department of Communication Arts 

Mr. & Mrs. M. Coniglio 

W. Daniel Conroyd 



The entire contents of this book are copyright 1979 
Loyola University. 



Kin»WiWwK™tf?miW^*£^ 



Mrs. Richard Corbett 

Mr. & Mrs. LeRoy M. Corradino 

Mr. & Mrs. Terrence Costello 

Mr. & Mrs. J.B. Courshon, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward F. Cousineau 

Lee Duncan Cranmer 

Thaddaeus Daniels 

Palricia Ann Decker 

Mr. & Mrs. James P. Delaney 

Mr. & Mrs. D. Del Toro 

Mr. & Mrs. Ted Demetralis 

Mr. & Mrs. S.J. Derezynski 

Dean DeSantis 

Gloria Cezar-Desiongco 

Mr. & Mrs. Harold Dever 

Dr. Nicholas J. DeVito, M.V. 

Mr. & Mrs. James Diamond 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter C. Diehl 

Dr. & Mrs. L. Dimitroff 

Mr. & Mrs. Antoni-Deutowski 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas P. Doherty 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter Domanchuk 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank Donnamaria 

Mrs. Sally Doppelt 

John & Dorothy Doyle 

R. Drake Family 

Mr. & Mrs. George Droysen 

Mr. & Mrs. Maurice Dufficy 

Howard Duncan 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles Duranty 

Mrs. Marjory A. Dwyer 

Alexi & Helen Dziedzic 

Mr. & Mrs. Leonard J. Dzielski 

F. S. Eberts 

Robin Elliott 

Mr. & Mrs. Allen Elsey & Family 

Dr. & Mrs. Thomas Emmering 

Mr. & Mrs. G. Engels 

Department of English 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Entwistle 

Mr. & Mrs. Wilton Erlenborn 

Mr. & Mrs. L. EvingerAnton Fakhouri 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Favia 

Mr. & Mrs. Donald M. Fay 

Mr. & Mrs. D.J. Fedyna 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph A. Feldner 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul Ferbend 

Dr. & Mrs. E.J. Fesco 

Hugo W. Feugen 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Finch 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert H. Flaws 

Mr. & Mrs. Don Foertsch & Family 

Richard P. Folke 

Mrs. Bessie A. Fong 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry Fong 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward Forrest 

Mr. & Mrs. Ugo Fucak 

Mr. & Mrs. Emo Furfori 

Mrs. Jean Furmanek 

Mr. & Mrs. William M. Galants 

Bob & Caryl Galassini 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles W. Gambia 

Mr. & Mrs. R. J. Gangi 

Dionicio C. Garcia 

Dr. Nenita S. Garcia 



Mr. & Mrs. J. Gatlone 

Dr. & Mrs. Fred C. Gau 

Mr. & Mrs. George Gauthier 

Dr. & Mrs. Joseph Gehrman 

Jeffrey Gentile 

Mr. & Mrs. Arthur George 

Mr. & Mrs. Peter Gerlikas 

James H. Gherardini 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank Gilhams 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard Gillen 

Nick Ginali 

Mr. & Mrs. Matthew Glaszer 

Frank T. Goppert 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert A.Gorski 

Mr. & Mrs. I. Grabowski 

Tim Grafft 

Mrs. John P. Granhan 

Mrs. Mildred E. Grant 

Vincent J. Greci 

Mr. & Mrs. James P. Greenan 

Mr. & Mrs. Romaine Gregg 

Clo A. Gregori 

James Grider 

Mr. & Mrs. Al Gienko Sr. 

John D. & Helen R. Griggs 

Mr. & Mrs. John Grunauer 

Steven Gryzlo 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Hackel 

Mr. & Mrs. Byron Hadley Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Donald F. Hall 

Harmony Hamburgers 

Eleanore D. Hansen 

Mr. & Mrs. Ralph R. Harast 

Mr. & Mrs. William Harden 

Mr. & Mrs. Harold A. Harty 

Mary Hatzis 

Mr. & Mrs. William P. Hayes 

Mr. & Mrs. Douglass D. Hearne 

Kevin Heffernan 

Dr. & Mrs. David L. Hegg 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Heimoski 

Mr. & Mrs. Ken Heinze 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert N. Heisey 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Henry 

Mr. & Mrs. Jack Henson 

Mr. & Mrs. Andrew Hepnar 

Alexandru Herbert 

John & Dorothy Herman & Family 

Dr. Emanuel M. Herzon, M.D. 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert E. Hielscher 

Charlene Hild-Gunn 

George L. Hoffmann Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Gordon W. Hoijer, Jr. 

Dana & Orest Horodyskyj 

Mrs. Virginia Hussey 

Mr. & Mrs. James N. Hyland 

Mr. & Mrs. Claude J. Hyzy 

Dr. & Mrs. Thomas M. Iannucci 

Mrs. Lucille C. Iasillo 

Sumiko Imai 

Mr. & Mrs. Sam Incardona 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph D. Jacob 

Roy Jasinski Family 

Karen M. Jedlowski 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank W. Jencen 

Kenneth W. Jenkins 



Evelyn P. Jesski 

Mr. & Mrs. John K. Johnson 

Mr. & Mrs. William Johnston, Jr. 

Olga Jovanovic 

Mr. & Mrs. G.M. Kabakovich 

Mr. & Mrs. John Kadlec 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul Kadowaki 

Mr. & Mrs. Jhn Kail 

Mr. & Mrs. Rudolph Kappel 

E. Karabowicz Family 

Richard P. Kazan 

David Kelch 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas A. Kelly 

Patrick Kevin Killean 

Dr. & Mrs. Robert W. King 

Mr. & Mrs. H. Kipper 

Mrs. James M. Kirkley 

Mr. & Mrs. Laszlo Kispal 

Ambrus Kiss 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph T. Kivland 

Audrone Kizys 

R. Knitter Family 

Leo A. Knowles 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael Knytler 

Mr. & Mrs. William W. Koehne 

Mr. & Mrs. V. Kontrimas 

George & Nancy Korzeniewski 

Joseph Maria Kowar 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter Kozikoski 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard Kozinski & Son 

Todd Kramer 

Mr. & Mrs. O.R. Krause 

Charles J. Krohm 

Mr. & Mrs. John Kuchy 

Paul Kuczerepa 

Ed & Anne Kushibab 

Patrick A. Kut 

Mr. & Mrs. S. LaBarbera 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Lalich 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Lamprecht 

Mr. & Mrs. Don Lasheff 

Mr. & Mrs. Rocco F. LaSpisa 

Dr. & Mrs. Robert E. Lee 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph W. Licari 

Mr. & Mrs. Wayne Limbert 

Mr. & Mrs. N. Lipan 

Edward Lisowski 

Dr. F.G. Loutfy, M.D. 

Mr. & Mrs. Dominick Lupo 

Mr. & Mrs. Wm. Luttmer 

Hosea Lyles 

Mr. & Mrs. James M. Lynch 

Michael J. Mack 

Joseph L. Madia, Jr. 

Loretta A. Maestranzi 

Kathy M. Magiera 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter Magiera, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Hector Magnanao & Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Majercik 

Dr. Henry R. Malecki 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard A. Malik 

Dan Malina 

Mr. & Mrs. John Malocha 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Mantyck 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Markett 

Mary Marland 



Mr. & Mrs. James W. Martin 

Michael H. Maslanka 

Spartico V. Mastro II 

Francisco Matos 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Matusiak 

Mrs. Ralph V. May 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert E. McCarthy, Sr. 

Bridget McGowan 

Mr. & Mrs. James E. Mcllvain, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Sheridan McMahon 

Byron L. McNally 

sharon M. McNuIty 

Ismael Melendez 

Mr. & Mrs. Norman C. Mellin 

Georgia Menegas 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph P. Meno 

Mr. & Mrs. John F. Merry 

Bev & Don Mikol 

Col. & Mrs. John A. Milani 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas E. Milani, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. C. C. Milbourne 

Military Science Department 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Mitacek 

Ted Mizera 

Mr. Arnold Moore 

Charles F. Moore 

Michele M. Moore 

Mrs. Joseph P. Moran 

Mr. & Mrs. Dino A. Moretti 

Estella Morris 

Emo R. Moschini 

Mr. & Mrs. Harold Moskovitz 

John J. Mroszczak 

Mr. & Mrs. Harry J. Mulac 

Jim & Charmaine Murphy 

G. Terence Najder 

Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth C. Naslund 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Nawrocki 

Spiney Norman 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles Norton 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert H. Novak 

Annette L. Novak 

Louis & Irene Novak 

Paul S. Novak 

Thomas Nutting Family 

Mr. & Mrs. John Oberweis 

Sheila O'Callaghan 

Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth O'Connor 

Mary Odegard 

Mr. & Mrs. George Ogorek 

Dr. & Mrs. Wm. Onak 

Mr. Godfrey Oravec 

Charles T. O'Reilly Family 

Mrs. Victoria Orentas 

Drs. F.J. & P.T.M. Orland 

Donald Orlowski Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Wilmer W. Osborne 

Mrs. Christine Owens 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph J. Paluch 

Mr. & Mrs. Herminio Y. Panlilio 

Mr. & Mrs. Chester P. Patronski 

Mr. & Mrs. Leslie S. Pauls, Jr. 

P-B Auto Service Inc. 

Mr. & Mrs. John Perkovich 

Mr. & Mrs. F. Perry 

Mr.>& Mrs. George Perry 

C. F. Petrucci 

Mr. & Mrs. Emil Pfenninger 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Pikowski 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward Piszczek 

Mr. & Mrs. Andrew J. Pitluck 

Robert E. Placzek 



Mr. & Mrs. Elmer Plath 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Pohl 

Philip A. Politowicz 

Mr. & Mrs. Herman Ponzo 

Mr. & Mrs. S. Porada 

Mr. & Mrs. C.L. Porges 

M. Porto 

Joseph P. Postilion 

Ralph M. Price 

James N. Pritzner 

Mr. & Mrs. E. Prochaska 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Pusateri 

Dr. & Mrs. N. Radhakrishna 

Vitas Radzevicius 

Mr. & Mrs. Ted Radziwiecki 

Gina Ragonese 

Marlene Rasmussen 

Richard R. Rathunde 

Mr. & Mrs. Stanley L. Regula 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Rehak 

James "Lou" Reid 

John A. Rhode 

Dr. & Mrs. Carlos Rignes 

Mr. & Mrs. Ronald E. Rimkus 

Mr. & Mrs. JOhn T. Rogers 

Mr. & Mrs. Roger Rohde 

Mr. & Mrs. E. Romz 

Mr. & Mrs. Jose Rubio 

Thomas & Carole Ruddy 

Mr. & Mrs. Harry Rugis 

Mr. & Mrs. George F. Russell 

Michael Rutkowski 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Ryan 

Mr. & Mrs. Donald Sadowski 

Mr. & Mrs. Jack Sakai 

Clyde & Lori Sana & Family 

Dr. & Mrs. Fernado Santaella 

Mrs. Genevieve Savage 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Scheffler 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Schierholz 

Mr. & Mrs. Crosby Schmidt 

George & Mary Schnitzius 

Dr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Schorsch 

June L. Schouten 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Scodro 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Scumaci 

Ed Segreti 

Sandy Sendziol 

Wally & Florence Sendziol 

Laura Serpico 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph P. Shaw 

Mary G. Sheehan 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul S. Shepro 

Janice Marie Sich 

Mr. & Mrs. Herman Sieben 

Mr. & Mrs. Donald Simon 

Dr. & Mrs. Richard Sinclair 

Mr. & Mrs. Bruno R. Sirus 

Jerry Skiba 

Mr. & Mrs. Leonard W. Smentek 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond R. Smessaert 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Smid & Son 

ISociology Department 

Apollo C. Solecki 

Mr. & Mrs. Reyes T. Solis 

Alexandra J. Sopocko 

Raymond & Judy Sorensen 

Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Sostak 

Mrs. J. Stachowski 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael Stathos 

Steger Flower Shop, Inc 

Mr. & Mrs Jackson H Stevens 



George W. Stone, Jr. 

Barth & Mary Sugrue 

Mr. & Mrs. Patrick Sullivan 

Mr. & Mrs. Steve Sunday 

Mr. & Mrs. James Sutera 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Tatara 

Julio Tellez 

Department of Theology 

Mrs. Lilla Thode 

Dr. & Mrs. Jerome Timm 

Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence Tisoncik 

Mr. & Mrs. Peter C. Tomas 

Josephine Tracey 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph B. Tremback 

Conni Tucci 

Joseph & Kathleen Tyrrell 

Vladiplain Ungerheyer 

Mr. & Mrs. Harold Unger 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis C. Urban 

Jose M. Urizarri 

Mr. & Mrs. John Vail 

Family Varga 

Arnulfo Vargas 

Desiderio & Gloria Vargas 

Mr. & Mrs. Merton M. Vele 

Dr. & Mrs. Elio G. Vento 

Glen & Judith Verhey 

Mr. & Mrs. Lester G. Ver Vers 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul Vidal 

Mr. & Mrs. L. Vincolese 

Mr. & Mrs. Albirio Vittorini 

Mr. & Mrs. James C. Vournazos 

Mr. & Mrs. W. R. Wagner 

Mr. & Mrs. Alfred Wahid 

Mr. & Mrs. Gene Walega 

Eugene & Doreen Walega 

Mr. & Mrs. Wm. P. Walsh 

Mr. & Mrs. John Ward 

Mr. & Mrs. Wm. G. Waschow 

Mrs. R. B. Wedepohl 

Mr. & Mrs. J. V. Wegrzyn 

Mr. & Mrs. Ted Wenecki 

Mr. & Mrs. Floyd D. Westfield 

Mr. & Mrs. John Weszely 

Dr. & Mrs. J.A.L. White 

Dr. & Mrs. Michael S. White 

Paul T. Wiggins 

Mr. & Mrs. Herbert Williams 

Mark Williams & Friends 

Dr. & Mrs. Perry Williams 

Mr. & Mrs. Edwin H. Wilson 

Theda L. Winnega 

Mr. & Mrs. Dick Wittbrot 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond E. Wright, Sr 

Mr. & Mrs. D. Wronski 

Mr. & Mrs. E. P. Wurtzebach 

Mr. & Mrs. Emil Wysiatko 

Mr. & Mrs. John D Yadgir. Sr 

Ralph A. Yaniz 

Delbert W. Yocum 

Joyce F. Yocum 

Tim Yueill 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Zagone 

Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Zalik 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank Zapolis 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Zawicki 

Mr & Mrs F A Zell 

Mr. & Mrs. Leo J Zelvis 

Eugene Zlobin 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond Zuhr 

John Zumpano Family 

Mr & Mrs Richard Zyrkowski 



flfflSlffiWffiiefflW.'A'.i v (..'' ",r"' - '•;«<;,: ■',.'■, :i',.vtUi-.Mii 



Editor's Notes 







i 



Having just finished the 1979 Loyolan I feel 
relieved that it is finally done. Before I attempt to 
thank the many people who put in a great deal of 
hard work and time, I'd like to recap the events 
and high points of the year. 

In September, I started out with two other 
people, Mike Lavezzorio, our LSC Editor and Don 
Sadowski, our WTC Editor, to recruit a staff. After 
Freshmen Orientation, about ten talented new 
students joined the staff. Frank Winters, Vern 
Hester, Lou Coubillios, and myself began taking 
the many pictures needed for the new expanded 
yearbook. October and November saw our bulk 
mailing to the entire student body. We hand 
folded and stuffed five thousand letters. Thanks to 
many students and faculty we sold 1400 year- 
books. In November, Root Studios shot our senior 
portraits. We had a record number this year, 650 
seniors. 

With increased sales, we were able to expand 
the size and scope of the book. We did 332 pages, 
72 pages of color. The most obvious change was 
the cover, it is made of silver mylar material with 
special dies and silkscreen photos. This book also 
saw the addition of the Medical Center, thanks to 
the efforts of their Dean of Students, Mr. James 
Whitehead. We also added color sports, and 
events pages, and for the first time, the book 
follows a logical order. 

The day before Christmas break we made our 
first deadline of 66 pages. In January, February, 
and March we made similar deadlines. April saw a 
slump because the photographing of organizations 
was going slowly, but by the last day of finals we 
made our last deadline of 84 pages. 

At this time I would like to thank the people who 
helped make Loyolan 1979 a reality: Mike 
Lavezzorio, LSC Editor, whose patience in putting 
up with me and his dealing with Root Studios 
made everything run smoothly. Jerry Heimoski, 
Production Editor, who did most of the tedious 
work. Frank Winters, who took pictures at odd 
hours of the day and night without complaining. 
Vern Hester, who shot most of the faculty portraits 
after making repeated appointments with our hard 




to find professors and administrators. Lea Ann 
Kopczewski, Introduction Editor, whose talent 
really brightened up the book. Marie Kelly, Copy 
Editor, who faithfully wrote about every event we 
covered. A special mention must be made about 
Ken Riesterer, the Phoenix's Managing Editor. 
Ken spent a great deal of time explaining how the 
typesetting machines work, how the university 
system works, and generally just being someone 
to count on. Since I was just a sophomore, I had a 
great deal to learn about Loyola University. 

The most important person to thank is you, the 
subscriber. Without you none of this would be 
possible. So many of you bought the book that we 
were able to make a great book. A few years ago 
the administration was saying that the yearbook 
would die, but you proved them wrong. I thank 
each and everyone of you for your support and I 
hope I can do a pleasing job for you next year. 



Best Regards, 




John BjTworowsky 
Editor-in-Chief 
1979 Loyolan 

1979 Loyolan Staff 

John M. Baworowsky Editor-in-Chief 

Mike Lavezzorio Lake Shore Campus Editor 

Don Sadowski Water Tower Campus Editor 

Jerry Heimoski Production Editor 

Lea Ann Kopczewski Introduction Editor 

Marie Kelly Copy Editor 

Valerie Evans WTC Advertising Editor 

Mark Williams Sales Manager 

Lloyd Tennison Niles College Editor 

Sue Bonczyk Senior Editor 

Photographers; John Baworowsky, Vernon Hes- 
ter, Frank Winters, Marco Aleman, Mike O'Dea, 
Tom Moretti, Mike O'Malley, Rieny Cualoping, 
Helpers; Marjon Gillbanks, Sue Stanciewski, 



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LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER 

Maywood, Illinois 

EISENHOWER EXPRESSWAY 




i > j-- /-> J 

MILLER MEADOW 
FOREST PRESERVE 






LEGEND 

1 . Stritch School of 
Medicine 

Foster G. McGaw 

Hospital 

James and Irene Burke 

Ambulatory Care Center 

2. School of 
Dentistry and 
Clinic 

3. Primary Health 
Care Center 

.; 1 Parking Facilities 



WATER TOWER CAMPUS 

820 N. MICHIGAN AVE. I 




L 
[ 



ai^ &[ 



CHICAGO AVE 



Lake Michigan 2 Blocks East 



: 

ISt 

r 



LEGEND 

i Lewis Towers . 
Julia Deal Lewis Library, 
Development Office 

2 School of Law 

3 Marquette Center 

4 Bridge 

5. Water Tower 

6. President's Office, 
Placement Bureau 



School of Social Work 
Graduate School of Business 
Construction Site for 
the James F. Maguire, S.J. 
Hall (future home of the 
Loyola School of Law) 



g . Assigned Parking 



LAKE SHORE CAMPUS 

6525 N SHERIDAN ROAD 




LEGEND 

1 Cudahy Memorial Library and 
the Martin DArcy Gallery of Art 

2 Jesuit Residence 

3 Madonna della Strada Chapel 
4. Damen Hall 

5 Cudahy Science Hall 

6 Dumbach Hall 

7 Power Plant Maintenance 

8 Student Activities Annex 

9 Educational Opportunity Program 
10 Theology Department Building 

1 Chamberlain Hall (Women's Residence) 

12 Stebler Hall (Women's Residence) 

13 Lewis Hall (Jesuit Residence) 

14 Bremner Hall (Jesuit Residence) 

1 5 Mertz Hall — Centennial Forum 
(Student Center) — Mullady Theater 

16 Campion Hall (Men's Residence) 

17 Assisi Center 

18. Loyola Hall (Women's Residence) 

19. Alumni Memorial Gymnasium 

20. R.O.T.C Rifle Range 
21 ROT C. Armory 
22. Wilson Hall 
23 Science Building 
24. Gonzaga Hall (Men's Residence) 

25 6301 N Winthrop (Co-Ed Residence Hall) 

26 6336-38 N Winthrop 
(Co-Ed Residence Hall) 




5 EAST-WEST TOLLWY 



LAKE SHORE CAMPUS 

6b25N SHERIDAN RD, 



LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER 

STRITCH SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

FOSTER G MC GAW HOSPITAL 

JAMES AND IRENE BURKE AMBULATORY CARE CENTER 

PRIMARY HEALTH CARE CENTER 

SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY AND CLINIC 

MAYWOOD. ILLINOIS 




MAP OF 

LOYOLA UNIVERSITY'S CAMPUSES 

IN THE CHICAGO 

METROPOLITAN AREA