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Full text of "The Loyolan"

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Loyola University does not discriminate on 
the basis of race, color, sex. or national ethnic 



origiin. Qualified persons are not subject to 
discrimination on the basis of handicap. 
Loyola University is an Illinois not-for-profit 
corporation. 



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Since Loyola was founded in 1870, it has 
seen the darkness and the lig,ht, the g,ood and 
the bad times. From that time on Loyola has 
watched society J,row while still remain the 
same. This book is dedicated to all the facul- 
ty, staff and students past, present and 
future, who have made this world what it is, 
was and will be. 




Make no little plans. They have no ma^ic to stir 
men's blood and probably themselves will not be 
realized. Make big, plans; aim hi^h in hope and work, 
remembering that a noble logical diagram once record- 
ed will never die but lon^ after we are ^one will be a 
living thing, asserting, with g,rowth intensity. 

Daniel Burnham 





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Althou^ vision is often attributed to poets and pro- 
phets, it is wise men who can foresee and even wiser 
ones have enterprising foresi^t. With "major vision" 
as their guideline, turn of the century city planners 
undertook the desi^rnfe of a blueprint for the burgeon- 
ing city. The result was the Chicago Plan of 1909, a 
model for the 20th century urban centers, an inspira- 
tion to many and a major influence on the city's 
character. 

Daniel Burnham, the principal architect of the plan, 
envisioned a dynamic and thriving metropolis with 
wide boulevards Uned with imposing edifices reminis- 
cent of Imperial Rome, Classical Greece and Bourbon 
Paris. He anticipated the congestion of urban living by 
allocating twenty miles of the city's lakeshore strictly 
for recreational and cultural activities while also 
recommending an extensive ring of forest preserves. 
He foresaw the improvement of transportation in the 
widening of major throughfares, double decking part 
of Michigan Ave., constructing Union Station, 
building piers, new bridges as well as straightening 
the South Branch of the Chicago River. 






The Urbs in Horto flourished and ^rew rapidly in- 
corporating many of his suggestions. But Chicago is 
not Metropolis and thus far from bein^ a concrete 
copy of the Burnham model. New obstacles had to 
be confronted. 

The city changed as did its needs and physical ap- 
pearance. Imperial Rome and Classical Greece ^ave 
way to 20th century Chicago which found expres- 
sion in the skyscraper. 
The sturdy yet ornamen- 
tal exterior of the 
Rookery was replaced 
by the sleek rectangular 
movement of the Board 
of Trade Building. The 
Depression and war 
slowed major construc- 
tions yet did not impinge 
upon the dynamic 
Bauhaus whose Mies 
van der Rohe was at the 
drawing board concep- 
tializin^ modernism. 
Less became more, reti- 
cent simplicity was the 
norm. The whole became 
continuous; the modern 
disjointed society saw 
unity in its architecture. 








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In the 60's, structures such as Bertrand Goldberg's Marina 
City reestablished Chicago's architectural innovativeness. The 
city has renewed its architectural audacity. The end of that 
decade and the early 70' s saw Chicago rising towards the 
heavens. Babel was not to be anticipated, for the city already 
spoke many tongues. 

The 80' s are seeing renewed growth. Post-modernist beginn- 
ing to reestablish the soft curve in the city's downtown area. 
Helmut Jahn, this decade's "Baron von High-Tech " is synthesiz- 
ing ideas with practical reality in his many new structures such 
as Xerox, State of Illinois building and the addition to the Board 
of Trade. 




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Outdoor sculptures brighten the concrete garden while lobbies 
become atria which allow the sun to filter through. The year 
1981 saw the unveiling of Miro's rooster-woman by Mayor Jane 
Byrne. The structure was soon thereafter christened with red 
paint by a citizen. 

Burnham would surely not have anticipated a Picasso 
sculpture in front of the civic center he suggested. His plans for 
Navy Pier did not include Chicagofest, nor was "Loop Alive" an 
integral part of his plans. His transportation scheme did not envi- 
sion a transit system as "efficient" and "taxing" as today's CTA, 
nor did he foresee the evolution of the Chicagoan into condoman. 
Yet his guiding principal was to make a city that was alive and 
liveable, and in that sense he wouldn't be very dissappointed. 
Although Bumham's vision has not been fully realized, it has 
been adapted to the changing needs of the personality of the city. 

In the same year, 1909, that Burnham was diagramming the ci- 
ty, the Reverend Alexander J. Burro wes was preparing for the 
formation of the present Loyola University. It was during this 
tenure that the school founded by Reverend Arnold Damen and 
chartered as St. Ignatius College was incorporated under the 
new name of Loyola University. Those new articles of incorpora- 
tion broadened the scope of Jesuit higher education by authoriz- 
ing the granting of professional and graduate degrees. 







The formal organization of the University in 1909 was 
largely due to the enterprising vision of Father Burrowes. 
The university expanded and broadened by establishing 
and incorporating many professional departments. In 1908 
the Lincoln School of Law became affiliated with the 
University while in the same year of the charter the Univer- 
sity founded the Stritch School of Medicine. The Medical 
Center expanded through the years and acquired the Dental 
School in 1923. 





In 1914 the Reverend Fredrick Siedenbur^ 
established the School of Social Work, the first of its 
kind under Catholic auspices. It was from this 
school that the first graduate degree was awarded 
in 1915. With time the Graduate School was formed 
and offered advanced degrees in five fields, while 
today it offers twenty. 

In the 1960's the university established the School 
of Education and saw the addition of two new cam- 
puses. Niles College became affiliated with the 
University while, the Rome Center became an addi- 
tional campus under the direction of the College of 
Arts and Sciences. 

The Loyola University of the 1980s is not the fine- 
ly ordained Renaissance style university an- 
ticipated in the 1920's plans. In 1909 Fr. Burrowes 
realized that the time for expanding Jesuit education 
had come, yet his vision surely did not anticipate the 










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"Metroversity" of the 80's and the possibility of com- 
muting between the Universtiy's four major campuses 
or learning from the book of the world in Roma. Even 
while it has expanded and flourished, the University 
still upholds the ideals of Jesuit education on which it 
was founded. It still strives to educate the whole in- 
dividual in order to enable him to be a contributing 
member of his community. 

Without that individual the University would be a 
very empty place, the city a very quiet one. As the 
nucleus of both, the growth of a person is equally 
designed by expectation and dynamic changes. We 
entered this year anticipating to learn specific subjects, 
to acquire certain experiences. Our year is guided by 
our visions but tempered by circumstances, changes 
and imagination. 

This year each of us furthered our ^oals a bit, 
modified them or completely replaced them. Yet we are 
continously helping to create who we, the university 
and city, will become. Though not every pre-med will be 
a doctor, nor every philosopher a king; though not 
every department will have a Nobel scholar, nor every 
building built, some recent visitors to Chicago put it 
quite well "You don't always get what you want, but if 
you try some time you might find, you get what you 
need." 





The Loyola University Medical Center 
is composed of the Stritch School of 
Medicine, a teaching hospital and the 
School of Dentistry as well as a dental 
clinic. The major schools are part of an ex- 
tensive complex which also contains the 
John Madden Mental Health Center, the 
Hines Veterans Administration and the 
Burke Ambulatory Care Center. This ex- 
pansive, 300 acre health facility is located 
in Maywood, Illinois, the "village of eter- 
nal li^ht", a pleasant suburb just west of 
Frank Lloyd Wright's Oak Park. 







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The Medical Center represents Loyola's 
longstanding involvement with profes- 
sional health education which dates back 
to 1909 when the University assumed 
operation of the Illinois Medical College. 
The university's second professional 
school was initiated during the presidency 
of the Rev. Alexander Burrowes, S.J.. In 
the following year Bennet Medical School 
became affiliated with Loyola, while in 
1917 the Chicago College of Medicine and 
Surgery became part of the Stritch School 
of Medicine. In 1923, the Chicago College 
of Dental Surgery, the state's oldest dental 
school having been founded in 1883, 
became the Dental School of Loyola 
University. 



The present Medical Center continues 
the tradition of training physicians, den- 
tists, and other health profesionals while 
also providing a wide range of medical 
services to the conununity. These services 
include a burn center, prenatal center, 
mobile intensive care networks as well as 
primary health care and dental clinics. 






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Loyola News 
May 13, 1948 

Med Facilities Named after his Eminence 

"The Stritch School of Medicine" is the new name of Loyola's 
medical teaching facilities. Very Rev. James T. Hussey, S.J., Presi- 
dent of the University, made this announcement at a notification 
ceremony which was held in the Archdiocese of Chicago Chancery 
Office on Monday, May 10. 

In making the presentation to His Eminence, Samuel Cardinal 
Stritch, Father Hussey said, "This action by the board of trustees of 
Loyola University is in recognition of the deep interest shown by 
Your Eminence in preserving and strengthening the principals of 
Catholic medical education, and providing the best possible training 
for the physicians who safeguard the health of the people of Chicago 
and the nation." 

Cardinal Stritch, in accepting this honor from the University, said 
that he was, "very much honored," that the University should name 
this institution which has played so vital a part in the history of the 
community after him, and that he could think of no other institution 
which he would rather have bear his name. 



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John Felice is the director of 
Rome Center, as he has been since 
he first guided forty American 
students on a summer-lonfe tour of 
Europe in 1961. Now the program 
has its own campus and enrolls 
some 200 students per semester. 

The Rome Center offers on-site 
courses in ancient, Baroque, and 
Renaissance art and architecture 
for the student with a limited 
knowledge of, or opportunity for 
knowledge of, the Italian 
lan^ua^e; the student who mi^t 
otherwise be unqualified to enroll 
in a European program. Socializ- 
ing with the natives is left up to the 
individual. It's not easy but it can 
be done. 









But Rome Center is not only for 
gun^-ho classicists or art en- 
thusiasts. American students who 
simply want to see Europe (or even 
the occasional European student 
who wants to ^et a gander at 
Americana) can benifit just as 
much from Rome Center as the 
budding aesthete. Life in Europe 
educates in unanticipated ways. 
"GuUtless inactivity 101" is team- 
taught by Roman experts, who ad- 
vocate long evening walks, 
necessarily without destination. 
"Urban skills for Non-Majors" is 
another popular course. Forded to 
navigate in unfamUliar cities while 
simultaneously tackling the 
language barrier, Rome Center 
veterans need never again be in- 
timidated by the CTA or by 
weekend trips to Moline. 



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As previously intimated, Rome 
Center offers on-site lecture 
classes, and knowing how to ^et 
from Monte Mario to Santa Maria 
in Trastevere before anyone else 
does is a sure way to win friends. 
Althou^ the first Italian lesson 
teaches how to ask where the bus 
stop is, finding out just where to 
^et off of the bus is an independent 
study. Perhaps the especially dis 
oriented student should plan to ar- 
rive in Rome a few days before the 
others, just to ^et a head start on 
learning the city. Finally, cautions 
as the possibility of eyes in the 
frutta mare elicit eternal gratitude. 

Rome Center, fish eyes and 
goats' eggs intact, is an un- 
forgetable experience. So take on 
the additional part-time job or 
adopt some wealthy parents and 
get going. Vito and Domencio are 
waiting for you. 



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75 to Journey to Rome 



Seventy-five students from several 
American universities will embark 
for Rome on February 21 to com- 
mence a semester of study in the new- 
ly established Branch Center there. 
Included on the faculty are Rev. John 
Felice, S.J., Rev. John L. McKenzie, 
S.J., Rosemary Donatelli, of the 
education department and George 
Szemler, specialist in ancient history. 
These four will be supplemented by 
visiting lecturers from Universities in 
Rome. 

Situated in the heart of Rome, a 
scant 45-minutes walk from Vatican 
City, the new branch offers students a 
good oppertunity to absorb European 
culture and possibly acquire a 
language or two while pursuing 
courses in history, classics, educa- 
tion, modern languages, philosophy, 
and theology.- 



Loyola News 
Jan. 11, 1962 

Ample time will be allowed for 
sight-seeing and excursions. Mean- 
while, students may enjoy the 
privileges of the swimming pool, 
reading rooms, theater, and recrea- 
tion rooms provided at the center. 








40 





The northernmost campus of 
Loyola university has changed con- 
siderably since its acquisition in 
1906. The empty site at Devon and 
Sheridan alon^ the shore of Lake 
Michigan was developed as the 
university flourished throu^ the 
years. The eclectic style of its 
buildings is a most visable reflection 
of the continous growth of Loyola. 



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The first structure built on the 
Rogers Park tract was Dumbach Hall 
which housed Loyola Academy until 
1957. The mission style in which it 
was built continues in nearby 
Cudahy Science Hall and the Jesuit 
Residence, all built in the teens of the 
century. 






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By the time Cudahy Libary was 
dedicated, the smooth lines of Art 
Deco anticipated the architectural in- 
novations of Madona Delia Strada. 
The chapel, built in 1936, is an in- 
spired edifice synthesizing rec- 
tilinear movement, pronounced 
curves with a basilic interior. 

The vertical thrust of the 60's is 
embodied in the ten story Damen Hall 
as well as in Mertz Hall. The Thomas 
U. Planner buUdinfe is an undeviatinfe 
structure whose acronym aptly 
describes students sentiments con- 
cerning the science classes held in- 
side. Presently the George S. 
Hallas,Jr. Sports Center is bein^ con- 
structed opposite the old Alumni 
Gym. Its rising will leave lasting im- 
pressions on those who attend 
classes in the fall. 

Today's Lake Shore Campus is the 
site of the Marcella Niehoff School of 
Nursing and houses a majority of the 
departments in the College of Arts 
and Sciences. Here one meets the ubi- 
quitous Biology major, the Green 
Room Thespians, as well as the ocas- 
sional Art Historian. The many dif- 
ferences add variety to the sizable 
student community which calls Lake 
Shore and its dormitories 'home'. 



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Loyola News 
Oct. 6, 1955 

Loyola Hall Opens Doors to 
New Residents 

'With the opening of Loyola Hall, the new 
men's dormitory, this university has 
entered a new era of expansion and 
development,' said Harry L. McCloskey, 
dean of students and moderator of the 
Loyola Union. 

The modern, three-story, fireproof 
building constucted at a cost of $1,500,000, 
will house 360 male students and several 
Jesuit counselors. 

Shaped in a capital 'E', the hall faces 
Sheridan Road on the east side of the street. 
The interior contains lounges, recreational 
rooms, a cafeteria, chapel, and modern 
laundry facilities. Bedrooms are double 
size and are furnished with two single beds, 
two desks and two chairs. 

Each resident is entitled to room and 
board six days a week for the academic 
year, lasting from September to May. The 
cost to each resident is $760 a year. Both 
Chicago area and out-of-town students are 
eligible for residence in Loyola Hall. 

Editors note: 

Loyola Hall was renamed Campion hall. 






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A modest release from the athletic publicity 
bureau of the university via Dan Calibrao 
states innocently: 'Loyola University's 
freshmen and sophomore classes will hold their 
17th annual pushball contest Friday Nov. 4 at 



LU Pushball an Ancient Art 

3:30 p.m. on the North Side Campus. The 
frosh won last year's sloppy brawl, and they 
hold an 1-5 edge in the series. 

'Freshman will be fighting for the right to 
discard their traditional green caps. Defeat 



Loyola News 
Nov. 1948 

means they must wear the caps until Loyola's 
first basketball game... against Ripon Nov. 26. 
Object of the game is to push a seven-foot ball 
over the goal.' 





Phoenix 
November 13, 1981 

Reconstruction at 

Lakeshore nears 

completion 

Loyola's Lake Shore Campus has 
undergone major reconstruction. Includ- 
ed in the "rebirth" are new sewers, 
lighting, concrete sidewalks and curbs 
on both sides of a new black top. Also 
landscaping, a small motorcycle lot, and 
the George S. Halas Sports Complex. All 
facets of the job are complete except 
lighting and the sports complex. The 
lighting will be completed as soon as the 
poles arrive. The poles are due at the end 
of November. The George S. Halas 
sports complex was expected to be 
finished about May 2. According to 
Father Denis Schmitt, Loyola University 
project director of the new building con- 
struction, the complex might be com- 
pleted on April 1, one month earlier than 
scheduled completion. 






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Loyolai 12 




Sink the Tink" 

On Wednesday, October 6, 1971, a 
group of student leaders calling 
themselves "The Wayne F. Tinkle 
Retirement Corporation" called for the 
resignation of the Vice-President and 
Dean of Students. The annoucement was 
made at an outdoor concert sponsored by 
the organization. Buttons printed with 
the slogan "Sink the Tink" were 
distributed. 



The movement was seen as important 
if only for the fact that the Vice- 
President of the University was per- 
sonally attacked and asked to retire by 
students. But it also caused mixed feel- 
ings among the student body. Some of 
the issues raised were important, valid 
indicments of the state of student ser- 
vices at Loyola; others were contrived, 
specious issues which the Dean's office 
refuted adequately. 





56 




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Loyola News 
March 31, 1949 




Senate Praises Loyola Ramblers 

Praising the powers of Loyola's basketball team, 
Senator William J. Walsh, Republican of Chicago, in- 
troduced last week in the State Senate and secured the 
passage of a resolution commending the university's 
cagers for their success in the National Invitational 
Basketball Tournament. 
Senate Resolution No. 37 

WHEREAS, the basketball team of Loyola Universi- 
ty of Chicago made a magnificent showing in the Na- 
tional Invitation Basketball Tournament, held last 
week in New York City, covering itself with glory and 
bringing fame and honor to the State of lUinios ; and 

WHEREAS, In its victorious march toward the 
championship game, the mighty men of Loyola bowled 
over the highly touted cagers of the University of Ken- 
tucky and defeated a highly regarded Bradley five; 
and 

WHEREAS, The impressive exhibition of athletic 
prowess displayed by the Loyola players demonstrated 
conclusively that Illinios has one basketball team that 
is equal of any in the Nation; therefore, be it 

Resolved, By the Senate of the Sixty-sixth General 
assembly of the State of Illinios, that we commend 
and congratulate the administration, the coaching 
staff and the members of the basketball squad of 
Loyola University of Chicago, whose splendid 
achievements have brought honor to our state; and be 
it further 

Resolved, that a suitable copy of this resolution and 
its preamble be forwarded to the President of Loyola 
University of Chicago. 



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Lewis Towers, acquired in 
1946, forms the nucleus of 
Loyola University's Downtown 
campus. Its seventeen stories 
house classrooms, offices, a five 
story library, chapel, bookstore, 
^ym and pool. This stucture 
with its neo-^othic ornamenta- 
tion is linked to the Pere Mar- 
quette center. The campus has 
acquired various buildings in 
the area to accomodate the 
many schools located 
downtown. 

Situated along the Magnifa- 
cent Mile, facing the old Water 
Tower, WTC is in the heart of 
the city's commercial sector, of- 
fering many opportunities to 
students. Though strictly a com- 
muter campus, its location of- 
fers many extracurricular ac- 
tivities unique to its location. 
Students particapate in such 
extra-mural sports as Bargain- 
Hunting at Sacks, the in- 
vigorating Sun-Bathing at the 
beach as weU as the very 
popular People- Watching at 
Water Tower Place. 






After having exhausted their energy with intense 
studying and having expended their energy in con- 
centrated contemplation, students sometimes 
recharge themselves at various generator stations 
in the area. Thus they are better prepared to con- 
front the evening struggle which awaits them. 
Students realize that the CTA includes stamina as a 
prerequisite, as well as a doUer in change. 




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Loyola News 
Oct. 18, 1946 



Lewis Tower 

Takes in 
2500 Pupils 



Through the generosity of 
Frank J. Lewis, well-known 
Chicago manufacturer, Loyola 
relieved the critical shortage of 
space in this boom year of 
enrollment at the university. 
The first nine floors of the mam- 
moth Lewis Tower, containing 
110,484 square feet of floor 
space, were donated to Loyola 
by Mr. Lewis and is at 820 N. 
Michigan Avenue. 

The new building comprises 
the downtown division of Loyola 
University. In addition to class 
rooms, the building will house 
the libraries of Law and Com- 
merce Schools, scientific 
laboratories, and a chapel. 
Besides these features, the of- 
fices of the president, the Dean 
of Men, the Dean of Women, and 
the Student Counsellor, in addi- 
tion to other administrative of- 
fices are located in the building. 




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The School of Law found- 
ed in 1908 and inspired by 
five Chicago lawyers who 
asked Father Dumbach, the 
President, to consider 
creating a department of 
law, was the first profes- 
sional school at Loyola. 
The first class of thirty 
students attended night 
classes in the Ashland 
Block Building at Clark 
and Randolph Streets 
across from courts and 
many law offices including 
that of Clarence Darrow. 
The close proximity of the 
Law School to the major 
State and Federal Courts in 
Chicago continues to be an 
attractive advantage of the 
Loyola School of Law to- 
day. Day classes in law did 
not begin until 1922. 
Loyola's Law School gain- 
ed membership in the 
Association of American 
Law Schools in 1924 and 
accreditation by the 
American Bar Association 
in 1925. 



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The Law School oc- 
cupied several locations 
over the years, moving in 
1927 to 28 N. Franklin, in 
1946 to the ninth floor of 
Lewis Tower, in 1954 to 41 
E. Pearson Street, and 
finally to the newly built 
$5.1 million Rev. James F. 
Mafeuire, S.J. Hall at 1 E. 
Pearson Street in 1980, the 
permanent home of the 
Law School and 85,000 
volume Law Library. From 
the original 30 students of 
1908, the Law School has 
grown to 250 students in 
1954, to 650 students in 
1982, 430 of whom are 
enrolled in the three year 
day school division and 
220 of whom take the four 
year night division. 





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Loyola News 
January 13, 1949 



Students to Ask 

for Cut in 
'El,' Car Fares 



students of Loyola, in a cam- 
paign to regain a reduction in 
transportation costs of students go- 
ing to and from school aboard 
facilities of the Chicago Transist 
Authority, will join with students 
from the other colleges of the 
Chicago area in signing a petition 
on January 18-19. The petition will 
be available to students of the Lake 
Shore Campus and Lewis Towers. 
During the same time the other 
schools of the area will be signing 
similar petitions. 

The project is being sponsored by 
the National Student Association, 
and it is the aim of the drive to 
secure the same privileges for col- 
lege students which are now 
available to high school students. 
Such students now are given a 50% 
reduction in street car, bus, and 
elevated fares. 




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Phoenix 
January 29, 1982 



Student org. offices finished 



In a ribbon cutting ceremony 
held Tuesday, Father Raymond 
Baumhart, president of Loyola; 
Mariette LeBlanc, vice president 
for student services; and Nancy 
Lakowski, president of the Water 
Tower Government (WTG), of- 
ficially opened the new student 
organization offices on the 16th 
floor of Lewis Tower. 



"The feedback on the 16th floor 
has all been very positive and very 
exciting", said Gordon Stiefel, the 
director of student activities for the 
Water Tower Campus. "Even 
though some organizations still 
share a space, it's still somewhere 
to put their hats." 





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Niles College was 
established by the Chicago 
Archdiocese in 1961 to func- 
ton as the undergraduate sec- 
tion of the seminary system. 
Niles College became a part 
of Loyola in 1968. 

Students live on the campus 
located at Harlem and Touhy 
in Niles, IL, and commute to 
Loyola for courses during 
their final two years. This 
setup provides many diver- 
sified experiences as students 
prepare themselves intellec- 
tually and spiritually for the 
future roll of ordained 
ministry to people throughout 
the Archdiocese of Chicago. 







The faculty at Niles is 
dedicated to this task. Niles 
College continues to provide 
a wealth of guidance and in- 
formation to young men who 
are interested in serving the 
people of Chicago as parish 
priests. 



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Apostolate means caring. Since 
men who come to Niles are consider- 
ing priesthood, apostolate should be 
a very natural part of their college 
life. In an attempt to realize the needs 
of, the people of the Chicago area, 
apostolates vary from teaching 
Catechism classes to visiting old 
people. In every instance, the 
apostolate recognizes a human digni- 
ty, though at times ignored by the 
world at large. This special dignity is 
emphasized at Niles. 

Priesthood is a life of dedicated ser- 
vice to God's people; the Niles 
apostolate is one small step toward 
that life of service. 





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Ever since Loyola opened its first dorm 
Loyola Hall(now called Campion) students 
have had the opportunity to experience dorm 
life. Students have a wide variety of 
resident halls to live in, from a hig,h rise to a 
converted apartment building,, from a male or 
female dorm to a coed living, experience, from 
a sing,le to apartment style living,. In all the 
variety there is one thing, common and that is 
the people. Dorm students have the oppor- 
tunity to find some of the closest friends they 
may ever have. When it is time to leave there 
is joy but also sorrow, for these students are 
leaving, the place they called home. 




Campion ob 

Chamberlin 

Gonzag,a '^^ 

Lakefront "2 

Mem % 

Shendian Place ''8 

Stebler 100 

Winthrop North, South and Apts 102 




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Fr. Connery is loved and remembered 



r. Connery was a great man and we will miss 
im. For all the help and guidance he has given to 
le residence hall students, we are thankful. To 
low our thanks we are dedicating this resident 
all section to him. Mark Miller summed up the 
?e//ngs of many Loyola students in an article he 
'rote for the Sept. Ilth issue of the Loyola 
'hoenlx. 




Fr. Thomas Conpery, S.J., a university chaplain 
nee 1971, died on Thursday, August 13 of 
incer. 

Born in Chicago on August 22, 1912, he attend- 
i Blessed Sacrament Grammar School of Quigley 
eparatory Seminary and St. Mary of the Lake 
!minary in Mundelein, Illinois where he spent 
ree years before entering the Jesuit novitiate in 
ilford, Ohio in 1933. 



Ordained a priest in 1942, at West Baden Col- 
lege, West Baden Springs, Indiana, he went on to 
teach at the University of Detroit High School, 
John Carroll University in Cleveland and St. Mary 
of the Lake Seminary, where he also became 
spiritual director. In 1967, Fr. Connery entered the 
Milford novitiate as an assistant to the rector and 
treasurer. 

These facts do not distinguish Fr. Connery as 
having been very much different from many other 
Loyola University chaplains. What made him 
special, the qualities that strongly influenced those 
he came in contact with, was his gentleness and his 
genuine interest in the spiritual well-being of the 
students he ministered to. These qualities are 
remembered even though the man who embodied 
them is no longer here. 

One resident of Campion Hall, the residence hall 
Fr. Connery last ministered to, describes him as be- 
ing like a grandfather. Gentle and patient, he was 
always there to help with a problem whether 
academic or personal. In fact, it is said that he 
seemed to have a sixth sense for those in need of a 
willing ear, stopping by one's room just when he 
was needed most. 

By associating with the residents he made the 
freshmen feel at home and everyone realize that 
there was someone at Loyola who sincerely cared 
about their well-being, spiritual and otherwise. 

Even when ill with cancer, he put aside his own 
pain and went around trying to alleviate some of 
the pain of others, counseling, consoling, guiding, 
which is what he loved to do most. 

Though from a different age, a generation of 
more and stricter rules, Fr. Connery was very 
tolerant. As times changes, he changed with them, 
and thus came to accept and understand the 
students. Instead of insisting that all old things are 
good and new things are bad, he took new ideas 
and attitudes and used them to help the student 
gain a deeper understanding of his values and to 
gain an appreciation and respect for the traditional. 



One student says that, although many at Loyola 
stress the importance of a Jesuit education and the 
work involved in making oneself a well-rounded 
and perceptive individual, few actually try to get 
the student to understand why he is here and why 
he should want to strive for a deeper comprehen- 
sion of the world around him. Fr. Connery did just 
this. 

He asked what a student's goals were and tried 
to get the student to understand his goals within the 
context of the university community and as a per- 
son. To him the ordering of ones academic and 
personal expectations toward the one, most impor- 
tant goal of serving God, was just as important, if 
not more so, than achieving intermediate goals. 

Even a failure was important to him. As long as a 
lesson was learned and resulted in being closer to 
God, a failure was to be valued. 

In his own quiet and thoughtful way he caused 
the student to think about himself and his relation- 
ship with God and the goals he had set. 

Because of his gentleness and devotion to his 
work, he was probably one of the most revered and 
loved men on campus. The quality of his life, his 
deep interest in others, quickly impressed those 
who worked with him. 

They knew him as a calm man who radiated 
peace, happy in being who he was and in what he 
did. His suffering came mostly from wanting to do 
more but being forced to do less by his physical 
condition. 

In the words of Brother Chuck St. James, a 
friend and fellow Campion minister, "Fr. Connery 
was a giant in that he made a significant difference - 
he touched hearts." 



105 



What makes Loyola is the people. The janitors 
who keep it clean, the administrators 
who take the time to help the students, the 
security guards who keep us safe, the 
secretaries who do all the work, and the 
professors who take the time to talk to the 
students, these are the people who make 
Loyola a worthwhile place to g,o. For without 
them Loyola would just be a lot of real estate 
with a bunch of buildings on it. 





Father Baumhart 108 

Administration 110 

Department heads 124 



Father Raymond C Baumhart, SJ. 




i 



Can you recall what you were like, how you thought, how you acted 
when you first registered for classes at Loyola University? Perhaps the 
same question can be phrased this way: How are you, graduate of 
1982, different from the person you were when you left high school? 

A number of surveys have been made on this topic, and with striking 
similarity they describe the kind of persons who emerge from college, 
degree in hand. 

For one thing, according to the surveys, you know more about a lot of 
things -- and much more about a few things -- than you did four years 
ago. You communicate better, and you are able to think more logically, 
critically, and independently. You have learned how to organize and 
integrate knowledge, how to think creatively, and to a certain degree 
how to solve problems. Or at least you have learned to do these things 
better than if you had not attended Loyola LJniversity. 

Your university education has heightened your perception and ap- 
preciation of the arts and literature. You are more likely than non- 
college persons to browse in a bookstore and attend plays, concerts, 
public lectures, and art exhibits. Depending on your talents and taste, 
you might also enjoy listening to classical music, reading poetry, visiting 
museums, painting, or playing a musical instrument. 

In studies of students' intellectual tolerance, the findings indicate that 
graduating seniors tend to be less authoritarian, less dogmatic, and less 
prejudiced than incoming freshmen, more open to ideas, and more 
able to deal with complexity, ambiguity, and change. 

The surveys state that higher education raises the standard of mass 
entertainment and information by creating an audience for more 
serious popular journals and magazines. The college-educated read 
more than other persons. You and your college-educated peers have a 
basic understanding of the humanities, science and technology, and 
therefore are comfortable discussing religious, philosophical, cultural 
and political issues. 



According to the surveys, college alumni are less addicted to televi- 
sion than other persons, and the viewing they do is we'ghted more 
heavily toward news, documentaries and programs on public TV. They 
also see more motion pictures than the rest of the population. More im- 
portant is the fact that college seems to wet the appetite for learning. 
You will be more constantly curious and ready to embark on intellec- 
tual explorations - self-study projects and adult education courses, for 
instance. 

So much for the benefits you have received from your college educa- 
tion. What can you as a college graduate contribute to society? 

You will be an efficient user of knowledge. This fits in with the Loyola 
goal of graduating men and women imbued with Judaeo-Christian 
priciples who will use their talents in the service of their neighbor. 

With the education you have received, at the very least you should 
be a productive and responsible citizen. You can work dilligently and 
effectively at a job or in a profession which will be meaningful to both 
yourself and to other persons. You can contribute to society while living 
an enriched and satisfying life intellectually, emotionally, and spiritual- 
ly. This means using knowledge creatively, always searching, always 
learning. It means becoming involved in efforts to promote justice and 
to alleviate the problems to society. It means living your faith, exercis- 
ing your values, sharing your goods and your self. 

There is no doubt that you are different from the person that you 
were four years ago. Your Loyola years have made you a more compe- 
tent, complete and interesting person, one who can fashion and enjoy a 
richer and more relevant life. Now it is up to you to reach and realize 
that potential. You have my prayers and best wishes as you try. 

Raymond Baumhart, S.J. 



University Officers 




Rnh^d A Mdtfi-, /Vovosl ol the McdiL.il Center 



lohn P. Murray. Vice President tor Personnel 



Stephen Kasbeer. Sen/or Vice President for Management 




Donald f Walker PhD, Senior Vice President & Dean of Facult. 



Donald I. Hayes. S.I., Vice President for University Ministry 






IfHtlll 




r. William Oiuj/d, Vice President and i.eneui i nun-ei „,r the Unners:t' 



lohn P Finley. Associate Vice President tor Finance and Controller 



033^ 




Fernado Arizti, S.I.; Rev. Raymond Baumhart, S./.; Bennard T Brennan; William j. 
Byron, S.I.; lames C. Carter, S.I.:loseph R. Christian, M.O.; Rev. David M. Clarke, S.I.; 
Frank W. Considine; Frank M. Covey, jr.; Eugene R. Crosiant; H. Joseph Curl; Mrs. Mary 
Loretto Dillon; Ronald I. Ferguson, S.j.; Rev. Danial L. Flaherty, S.].; James M. 
Fuman:Robert P. Heaney, M.D.; Mrs. Mary Townsrnd Kimton; H. Dunley Murphy; 
Robert P. Neuschel; Samual L. Nolan; William J. Quinn; John J. 0'Callaghan,S.J.; Rev. 
John W. O'Mally, S.J.; Earl E. Pollock; M. Lawrence Reuter, S.J.; William R. Surman; 
Mrs. I. Albin Yokie 





Deans of Graduate 
Schools 




Francis }. Catania, Dean. Graduate School 



'■\ \furdock. Dean, School of Law 




Roland R. Cross. M.D- Clinical Professor o( Urology, Associate Dean for Admissions 




Michael L. Rainey, M.D., Associate Dean for Sludem Affairs 



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St r itch School 
of Medicine 




Clarence N. Peiss, PhD , Dean. Stritch School of Medicine 




John F /mine, Jr.. Assoc/.ite Dean lor Ho^pitjl Administration 



Robert C. Frazier, M.D., Senior .-W^KiMe Dean for Academic Programs 



School of Dentistry 




Raffaele Suriano, D.DS., Dean, School of Denistry 



lames I- Koebl, D.DS.. Assistant Director tor Clinical Atfain 



Niles College 




Rev. Lawrence I. Dunn. Dean o( formations Mr. Charles Cerace. Dean of Students 



mmammm 



School of Nursing 




Dr. Avis McDonald, Chairperson & Assistant Professor 



Dt Kay Wiley, Chairperson & Assistant Professor 



Undergraduate 
Deans 



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Chicago 
WaterTower 



Visitor 

Information 

Center 




Rev lohn Murphy. 5-1., Freshmen Dean 



Rev. IE Fettle. S.I., Assoc. Dean, Colllege oMrts and Sciences. WTC 




Dr. Henry R. Malecki. Dean. University Co//ege 




Dr. Donald Meyer. Dean. School of Business 



n^' 



student Services 




lohn Felice. Dean of Students. Rome Center Campus Ur. loan Steinbrecher. Dean of Students, WTL 



-rr?!! 




iDan/e/ Barnei, Ph.D.. Univenily Counseling Center Director 




Donna Dorl. Assistant Dean of Students, Director of Student Activities, L5C 



Robert L. MiMeli, Director Physica/ Plant and Grounds, WTC 




Don Mayo, Director of Security and Safety, WTC LSC 




ACCOUNTING 



The Accounting Department is pleased to issue a favorable report for 
e year. Loyola graduates continue to distinguish themselves by pass- 
ng the CPA Exam and receiving national recognition for their high 
scores. Accounting firms, banks, and businesses of all sizes continue to 
actively recruit Loyola accounting graduates. The Loyola chapter of 
Beta Alpha Psi, the national honorary fraternity for accounting, again 
received an award for its excellent activities record. 

The department has added several faculty members this year, all with 
distinguished backgrounds. An advanced accounting course vv'ill be 
added to the curriculum in response to the ever expanding body of 
accounting knowledge. The CPA Review Course is undergoing a 
reorganization. The Accounting Department feels that these changes 
will help Loyola's accounting students to continue to be recognized as 
the best in the Chicago area. 





Dr Carol L Adams, Director 



AFRO-AMERICAN 
STUDIES 



Afro-American Studies is, by definition, interdisciplinary. Thus, a ma- 
jor charge of the Afro-American Studies Program is to coordinate and 
develop departmental offerings in a variety of academic disciplines. 
Another purpose of the program is to strive to make visible to the entire 
University community the accomplishments and aspirations of Afro- 
Americans. The Afro-American experience has been a central theme in 
the evolution of American society. Black people have been givers as 
well as takers, actors as well as reactors. Finally, the program provides a 
support service for the Afro-American community at Loyola. 



lohn W. Koslolamky, Ch:iirman and Assistant Protcssor 




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ATHLETICS 



The departmi-'nt of Athletics and Physical Education encourages all 
full-time students, faculty and staff of Loyola University to take part in its 
programs, and to take advantage of the facilities on the Lake Shore and 
Water Tower campuses. The two departments sponsor and supervise 
numerous programs in the areas of inter-collegiate, intramural, jikI 
recreational sports, as well as courses in physical education which carry 
a one-hour credit. FliII time students may refiresent the University in 
inter-collegiate sports; trai k, cross-country, volleyball, water polo, '-oc- 
eer, swimming, golf, bowling, tennis and btisketball. 




'in R. Shack, Director 



APPLIED 
PSYCHOLOGY 



Perhaps the most unique quality of the Applied Psychology Program 
is the integration of practical "how to" helping skills, training into the 
core of theory and method courses. Several of these courses are uni- 
que to an undergraduate education. One of the best aspects of the pro- 
gram is its small size, which attows students and faculty to get to know , 
owjl^nother. 





Loyal l\trk, Diirrtor 



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BIOLOGY 



All courses in biology are offered uniquely at the Lake Shore Campus. 
The Department of Biology aims to present biology students with the 
basic principles of the biological sciences and to prepare these students 
for graduate studies, teaching, or entrance into applied and profes- 
sional schools of science. 



iA,Tf*- 




CHEMISTRY 



the Department of Chemistry, chaired by Dr. Patrick M. Henry,, in- 
cludes 14 full-time tenured faculty and 4 full-time non-tenured faculty ' 
member, all of whom have Ph.D.'s. All tenured faculty members are ^ 
actively engaged in research as well as teaching. Each members of the ^ 
faculty serves as a research director for both graduate and 3 
undergraduate students in chemistry, and each faculty member takes a ; 
personal interest in the success of his or her students, making \ 
themselves readily available for consultation and discussion. 

Two degree program options are offered to the undergraduate 
chemistry major. The bachelor of science degree program is intended ^ 
for those undergraduates who have career goals in chemistry. The ■ 
bachelor of arts program is for those whose career goals are in 
medicine, dentistry, patent law, and other fields which require a strong 
background in chemistry. 

The Department currently has an enrollment of 158 undergraduate ; 
Chemistry majors who are receiving high quality instruaion in both the 
classroom and laboratory. To further benefit the student, there is also 
the opportunity to work as a laboratory teaching assistant for faculty • 
members. 

The Chemistry Department maintains its reputation largely through 
the efforts of its dedicated faculty. Each faculty member devotes a great 
deal of his time to a full teaching load to assure both the undergraduate 
and graduate student the personalized, quality instruction and attention 
he deserves. 




Dr. Patrick M. Henry, Chairman & Professor 





6ICAL 



The Department of Classical Studies combines the traditional with the 
contemporary. The Latin and Creek languages and literatures, t^ 
stance, have been the cornerstone of a liberal education for cent 
They remain the department's primary interest; nevertheless, to 
the needs and interests of today's students, the clrpartment also 
over 25 courses in such diverse areas as ancient art, drcheology, dr, 
philosophy, computer science, law, history, and numismatics. TJ 
courses, taught in English, illustrate the department's commitmei 
the past in the light of contemporary requirements and developmi 





COMMUNICATION 
ARTSr 



The study of communication enables the student to acquire a better 
understanding of the process of human communication as well as to 
improve his or her own communicative skills in a wide variety of 
human interactions. The major in Communication provides students 
with the opportunity to concentrate their studies in six areas; broad- 
casting, interpersonal communication, journalism, mass communica- 
tion, or public and professional communication. Specialized course 
work, creative activity and practical experiences also help prepare the 
communication major for careers and further graduate or professiona 
study. ^_ 



lames C. Keenan, Chairman & Professor 







CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

This interdisciplinary program is able to call on the faculty and 
resources of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Graduate School, the 
School of Business Administration and the professional schools of Law, 
Social Work, and Eduation based at Water Tower Campus. In addition, 
faculty members with special competence and experience in law en- 
forcement, correctional administration, the courts, probation and 
parole agencies offer courses. Students are thus exposed to educators 
with direct knowledge and involvement in the criminal justice system. 
In this manner, established theory and current practices are merged in 
the classroom. 



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Dr. Kathlyn C. MCEIIiott, Chairman arid Associate Frotessor 



DENTAL HYGIENE 



The dental hygiene program at Loyola University are designed to 
prepare the student for the total preventative aspects of providing the 
opportunity to build a solid foundation of dental knowledge and profes- 
sional skills that will allow each student to become actively involved in 
society as a professional health educator. 

The professional dental hygienist has attained the skills and educa- 
tional background necessary to participate in all facets of society in 
which preventative dentistry is needed. These areas could include 
private dental practices, dental hygiene student programs, community 
health agencies, hospital settings, public school settings, research foun- 
dations, or Armed Services. 

All courses of instruction contribute to the preparation of a socially 
conscious dental hygienist who can serve m ankin d through health in- 
struction. ■ " 




«»:*■- 



Dr. Paul Mundy, Chairman 







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Dr. David B. Mirza, Chairman and Assistant Professor ■-. 

i 1 1 1 V i i 
ECONOMICS- 



The purpose of the Economic Department is to train students to solve 
problems and make correct management decisions. The theory and ap- 
plication of both are important. One of the strengths of the Loyola 
M.B.A. program is the unique vvcU it stresses the role of business in 
American society and the responsibility of business leaders to society. 




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Largest of the academic departments at Loyola, the English Depart- 
ment offers the two-semester writing sequence for freshmen and ad- 
vanced courses in expository and creative writing, including specializ- 
ed courses in writing for pre-law and nursing students. The department 
also offers a large number of courses in literature intended for non- 
majors. Students who major or minor in English take a structured se- 
quence of courses in English and American literature from the Middle 
Ages to the present time. All courses in English include training in 
organization and clarity of writing. The English Department sponsors 
lectures by visiting scholars and writers, and is host to the annual Loyola 
Festival of Chicago Poets., ^ 




■ i f l ltl# -A> 



Dr. John S. Shea, Chairman 



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FINANCE 



The Department of Finance is one of the smaller departments of the 
School of Business, yet it is the most popular area of concentration of 
graduate students in the MBA program. 

The finance major receives broad training in the financial manage- 
ment aspects of business, the area of investments, and financial institu- 
tions and markets. Graduates typically persue careers within the 
treasury departments of firms, or with banks, security brokerage 
houses, and other financial institutions. 



E.O.P. 



Loyola's Educational Opportunity Program has been operative since 
1969. Through several supportive services provided by the E.O.P., 
freshmen who are determined inadmissible through the traditiona 
University standards are encouraged to complete a four-year degree 
program at Loyola. It is hoped that students, with the help of E.O.P.'s 
support, develop more self-confidence, strengthen certain academic 
skills, and gain more insight into the expectations of higher education. 





Dr. Nicholas A. Lash, Chairman and Associate Professor 



FINE ARTS 



the Fine Arts Department offers a very flexible program so that ma- 
jors may concentrate in Studio Art, Art Education, Art History, Medical 
Illustration, Communications Design or Art Therapy. These courses can 
lay the foundation for a career in the arts or for personal enrichment. 
Exhibitions of student work and that of contemporary artists are 
displayed in the Lewis Towers Gallery or Cudahy Library. 

There is no major offered in music but a variety of classes are 
available. 





alter D Cray',1 




HISTORY 



History complements other liberal studies. It develops special insights j 
into culture and helps a student view life through the perspectives of 
time and change. History helps discipline the mind through 
methodology of historical analysis and synthesis. It encourages a stu- 
dent to develop and refine values which give him balance and judge- 
s;ment for a Christian life. 



■ Dr. Mary S. Lawton, Chairman & Associate i'rolessor 



-X 



HONORS 




Since 1937 the College of Arts and Sciences has sponsored an Ho] 
Program. At present, membership numbers over 200 from the t' 
campuses at Lake Shore, Niles, and Water Tower. All students are can 
didates for the Honors Degree. Requirements for the degree include 
special coursevvork in all areas of the curriculum and a minimum grade 
point average. In addition, honors students join together for social and 
cultural activities, especially through the Honors Students Association. 
Direction of the program is in the hands of a student-faculty council, the 
director and associate director. 








7/v"T7mofhy R. Austin. Director & Associate 



LINGUISTICS 



Linguistics is the name given to the scientific study of language. As the^ 
physicist studies the movement of atomic particles, so the linguist 
analyzes the behavior of human beings as they engage in perhaps their 
most common communal activity - spoken or written communication. 

The newest academic program in the College of Arts and Sciences, 
the program in Linguistics Studies draws on courses offered by seven 
different departments. Students enrolled for the Major or the Minor can 
choose from such classes as Language, Myth, and Symbol (Philosophy), 
Modern American English (English), and Psycholinguistics (Psychology). 

The goal of the Program is to equip students for careers in diplomacy 
or translation, in business or community service; and, at the same time, 
to make them more aware of the richness of the communicative en- 
vironment in which they live. 



Dr. Thomas E. Ranck, Director & Associate Professor 





MANAGEMENT • 



The Management Department strives to instill in students the impor- 
tance of viewing organizations as social systems whose el^ectiveness 
depends upon satisfaction of both individual and group goals. The 
department offers a major in personnel administration. This program is 
designed to prepare students for general management careers as well as 
entry positions in various personnel specialties. 



I 




Dr. Allen I. Fredian, Chairman 



H" INDUSTRIAL 
RELATIONS 



The Institute of Industrial Relations is a professional program in 
Graduate School which prepares people for careers in the fields uf per- 
sonnel management, industrial relations, and organizational develop- 
ment. The Institute was founded in 1941 by Father Ralph CaliSgher, 
and continues today under the direction of Dr. Alan J. Fredian, to be a 
significant educational force in human resource management and 
development. 





Dr. Michael Keeley, Chairman 



^S^ 




MARKETING 



The Marketing Department seeks to provide a basis for understanding 
the American system of distribution of the output of our production 
mechanism. The department teaches the skills needed for market 
research, training and management of marketing personnel, and train- 
ing in the identification, evaluation and solution of marketing problems. 



■^sf-pi S-> *;>:*-! — 



Dr. Samuel D. Ramenotsky, Chairman and Assistant Protesor 

MANAGEMENT 
SCIENCE 



The Management Science Department offers the business administra- 
tion student courses in production management, computer systems, 
and quantitative methods. The department now includes ten full-time 
faculty and five adjunct instructors representing many areas of business 
and industry. 

Continued emphasis on the systems aspect of business has resulted in 
an excellent reception from students enrolled in the advanced com- 
puter course, COBOL-Business Computer Programming, and the ad- 
vanced systems course, Project Management. These courses are open 
to all business majors. 






Dr. Allen F. lung. Chairman & Professor 



MATHEMATICAL 
SCIENCES 



The Department of Mathematical Sciences offers B.S. and M.S. 
degrees in Computer Science and Mathematics. The department seeks 
to give its majors the practical and theoretical knowledge needed for 
further work in mathematics, careers in government, business, in- 
dustry, and teaching. Through its many service courses, the department 
seeks to illustrate both the impact and the application of mathmatics. 





LTC. Arnold R DuPont, Ccay/ma/i i Pinft'-wr 




-3^ 



MILITARY SCIENCE 



The Military Science Program is designed to complement all of 
Loyola's academic disciplines, and promotes the qualities traditionally 
displayed by successful leaders and managers in all walks of life. This 
program is unique in the college curriculum because it offers instruc- 
tion as well as practical working experiences in leadership and manage- 
ment. What the student learns in Army R.O.T.C. is directly applicable 
to any career, military or civilian: the principles of personnel manage- 
ment, a ready acceptance of responsibility and the desire to achieve, 
and the ability to work in harmony with others. Military science 
.courses, open to all students, are offered at both Lake Shore and Water 
Tower Campuses. Students incur no military obligation by enrolling in 
the freshmen or sophomore courses. 




Richard f. Maher, Chairman & Associate Professor 



M 




MODERN 
LANGUAGES 



the importance of a knowledge of a foreign language in today's 
world cannot be overemphasized. With the belief that all college 
students should be familiar with other languages, literatures and 
cultures, the Department of Modern Languages has expanded its offer- 
ings over the past years to include a wide variety of pragrams and 
courses for both majors and non-majors. The major, offered in French, 
German, Italian and Spanish, aims to build a solid foundation in 
■language, literature, culture and linguistics. The M.A. degree is offered 
i-in French and Spanish, while basic and intermediate language courses 
are also offered in Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, Modern Creek, Polish 
and Russian. For majors in (.)tlier fields, minors are available ilLsev 
areas depending ufjon the needs of the students. 





Dr. Raymond W. Nackoney, Chairman 



NATURAL SCIENCE 



The Department of Natural Science is an interdisciplinary science 
department that aims to increase knowledge of the contributions of 
science to our understanding of man and the universe. As scientists, 
man accepts responsibility for communicating and increasing scientific 
knowledge. The educational function of the department is liberal learn- 
ing, as distinct from pre-professional training in the sciences. 






Dr. Mercedes M. Robles,, Chairman 




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PHILOSOPHY 



The Department of Philosophy seeks to aquaint students with the ma- 
jor problems of philosophy and a systematic approach toward their 
resolution; to stimulate their talents for speculative knowledge and con- 
structive criticism on fundamental issues; to offer them a rational foun- 
dation for the arts and sciences; to assist them through a reasoned ap- 
preciation of the dignity of human nature to formulate a philosophy of 
■life mindful of the traditions of the Christian world. 



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lerorne A. 0'Leary,OP, Director 



PASTORAL STUDIES 



This program of the Department of Theology provides students with 
resources for the analysis of religion, for the investigation of its sources, 
historical development, and contemporary practice. The Core Cur- 
riculum and concentrations in Theology aim at a critical appropriation 
of personal faith and a sympathetic appreciation of the beliefs of others. 
The department includes 29 full-time teachers, who offer courses on 
the Lake Shore, Water Tower, Medical Center, and Rome Center cam- 
puses of the university. In addition, the department offers extension 
programs at the University of Northern Illinois and the University of 
Southern Illinois. The department offers a Master's degree, an 
undergraduate major, and three different forms of undergraduate 
minors in Theology. 




Robert F. Harvanek, S.j. Chairmdn & Professor 





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Dr. Richard R. Bukrey, Chairman & Associate Professor 



PHYSICS 



The physics department offers courses for Physics majors, related ma- 
jors, and for non-science majors. Laboratory courses include basic 
physics, optics, electronics and observational astronomy. 

The department maintains an electronics laboratory, a machine shop, 
a seismology station and research facility for experimental atomic and 
solid state physics. Experimental efforts center around studies of solids 
and liquids. This includes magnetic resonance, X-ray diffraction, 
Mossbauer Effect and laser radar. All of these projects involve a great 
deal of student participation. In addition, some students work on in- 
dividual projects. 



POLITICAL 
SCIENCE 



Political Science is the study of man and his efforts to create and 
maintain political order. As such, the department hopes to aid each stu- 
dent in understanding the nature of political life, the functions of 
governmental institutions, and the behavior of individual political ac- 
tors and groups. In addition, it attempts to develop in Loyola students a 
concern for ethics and an appreciation of the demands of justice and 
social responsibility. 

The department offers courses which lead to a B.A. in Political 
Science and a B.S. in Public Affairs. At the graduate level, it offers both 
an M.A. and a Ph.D. 

In addition to its varied classroom presentations, the department 
sponsors a number of individual lectures by invited guests and ad- 
ministers the annual Loyola Lectures in Political Analysis. 



Dr. lames L. Wiser, Chairman & Associate Professor 



PSYCHOLOGY 



Psychology is a science that seeks to understand basic principles of 
oehavior and human experience, and to apply those principles to solv- 
ing individual and social problems. With 34 full-time faculty, more than 
500 undergraduate majors and 200 graduate students in five advanced 
degree programs, psychology is one of the largest and most active 
departments at Loyola. The majority of our undergraduates pursue ad- 
k/anced training in graduate school in psychology or other professional 
programs such as law, social work, medicine, and business. Other 
graduates directly enter the job market in a wide range of fields in- 
cluding law enforcement, personnel, advertising, social work and men- 
tal health work. 



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Margaret M. Dwyer, Chairman & Associate Professor 



SOCIAL WORK 



The primary objective of the undergraduate major in social work is to 
prepare students entering the profession of Social Work as beginning 
practitioners. The secondary objectives are designed: 1) to contribute 
to the student's knowledge and understanding of human needs and 
social functioning problems; 2) to provide an enriched preparation for 
entry into other human service "fields and occupations; 3) to provide a 
base level for moving into graduate Social Work education; 4) to 
develop socially conscious and responsible citizens who have an in- 
telligent grasp of social welfare issues and social delivery systems; and 
5) to enhance the self actualization of the individual student. 



Dr. Jeanne M. Foley, Chairman & Professor 



SOC I O LOGY- 
ANTHROPOLOGY 



Loyola's Sociology Department is one of the leading departments in 
the midwest, and over the past several years it has expanded significant- 
ly in its areas of specialization and the number of faculty members ac- 
tively engaged in teaching and research. In introducmg students to 
sociology, the department seeks to develop a critical understanding of 
the ways organizations influence our lives. By gaining this insight, 
students are better able to make mature judgements about society's 
problems. The department also hopes that sociology students will 
assume more serious responsibility in the world which is being built to- 
day. 





Dr. lohn D. O'Malley, Chairman & Professor 

SOCIO-LEGAL 
STUDIES 



The objective of the Department of Socio-Legal Studies is to provide 
the student with an understanding of individual legal responsibilities 
arising from the interaction of persons, property, and government, and 
to create an a' /areness of the legal environment in which executive 
decisions are n- ade. 



Dr. Kdthleer. McCourt. Acting Chairman 
140 




THEATRE 



The goal of the Theatre Department is to provide training for the pro- 
fessional community and the academic theatres within the framework 
of a liberal arts education. Many theatre students pursue theatre as a 
profession after graduation, but a broad liberal education is designed to 
widen horizons and build inquiring minds. 

Whether on stage as an actor or backstage on production, the theatre 
major learns independence and dependence on fellow students. 



Dr. Don Norwood, Director 



TElfCOMMUNKATIONS 



On Wednwesday Oct. 7, 1981, Loyola offically announced the ex- 
istence of its newly created Office of Telecommunications, which was 
formed six months earlier. The office will seve to determine how the 
latest telecommunications technology can assist Loyola. 




John H. Brooks, Ir., Chairman 



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URBAN STUDIES 



An evening program offered at the Water Tower Campus, the 
Graduate Program in Urban Studies provides interdisciplinary course of 
study that increases the student's awareness of urban problems and 
prepares them for decision-making in a rapidly changing urban world. 
It is designed for students who desire an early or mid-career broaden- 
ing, or for students who have not yet found employment in an urban- 
related field. 

The program attempts to train professionals to plan more effectively 
in an urban setting and to solve problems in a creative and practical 
manner. 



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I. Patout Burns S.j., Chairman 



THEOLOGY 



Theology is the study of Cod and man's relationship to Him; it is, in 
the ancient formula, FIDES QUAERENS INTELLECTUM - faith seeking 
understanding. 

Loyola University teaches theology to about 3000 undergraduate 
students each semester, with about TOO undergraduate theology ma- 
jors. Theology courses range through a variety of offerings which in- 
clude the study of systematic and historical theology. Sacred Scripture,^^3 
moral theology and comparative religion. There are 27 full-time'«!™H 
teachers active in the department, the majority are members of the ' 
Society of Jesus. There are also 12 part-time lecturers. Courses are 
taught on four of Loyola's campuses. In addition to its undergraduati 
program, there is an M.A. program and a proposal before the University 
administration to introduce doctoral studies. i 



S5^ 





WOMEN'S STUDIES 



Women's Studies is the academic discipline that examines the lives, 
experiences, and culture of women. Courses in Women's Studies ex- 
plore such topics as the creation of traditional sex roles, the economic 
position of women, women's contributions to the arts, and different 
theological and philosophical attitudes towards women. The Women's 
Studies program offers its own introductory course, as well as some on 
more specialized subjects, and cross-lists courses from other depart- 
ments. Students may take individual courses as electives or complete a 
minor sequence of five courses. 







^^jiJu^fine Cosset, Director &v\5soc/ate Professor of Eriglish 



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Several events occur throughout the year. 
These events ran^e from a band in the 
Rambler Room or Georg,etown Room to a 
stimulating, intellectual discussion. There are 
rallies, dances, ma^ic shows, concerts, 
fashion shows, fairs, lectures and tournaments, 
just to name a few of the many activities that 
^o on at Loyola. There are events that are as 
traditional as P-Ball or as new as Spring 
Hoopla. What ever the event thoug,h, a 
person can be sure that it is enjoyable. 




First Semester Events 146 

Second Semester Events 1^2 

Theatre W8 




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V^e\come Week '81 . was held August 30 ■ 
Seotember 5. 1981.The event included Small 
Group Exercises, an Ethnic Fair, an ice cream 
social a rock band, a mouie, an organ.zahon 
a- , a transfer student partv, and the tradifona, 
Welcome Week Banquet and Grand Fmale P.c^ 
nic. A fun time was had by all that attended 
Welcome Week events. 




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Leaders from various organizations met for a 
weekend at Elkhorn, Wisconsin to learn skills 
essential to help run these various organizations 
smoothli^. Along with learning leadership skills, 
the students were able to meet other leaders. 
This enabled them to discuss problems they had 
experienced between each other and also a 
chance to make new friends. An educational 
and fun weekend was had by all. 





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With the words "On the occasion of mi; com- 
mitment to nursing I pledge to devote myself to 
advancing my human wisdom and human com- 
petence," one hundred seventy one nursing 
students of the class of 1 983 began the Marcella 
Niehoff School of Nursing Class Pledge. 

The Pledge was the culmination of the tradi- 
tional commitment to the Profession ceremony 
held in Lake Shore's Madonna della Strada 
Chapel on Sunday Sept. 27th. 1981 

Surprised by their guest speaker Anne Zim- 
merman who devoted her time, the newly cap- 
ped nurses held candles flickering with the flame 
of knowledge and insight as they pronounced 
their pledge to devote their lives to the relief of 
human suffering. 



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New students at the Water Tower campus 
were welcomed by the school, staff ar^d 
students. There were several events in this week 
long gala. An organization fair, a band, a pic- 
nic, a mime group were just a few of the manij 
activities the new students took part in. 





Rich Lalich. Jim Suliuan and Bill Sauage at- 
tended the American Writer's Congress in New 
York with funding from Loi^ola Uniuersit\^. 

Their mission to this gathering was successful: 
they returned with valuable imformation for 
Loi^ola students wishing to write pro/essiona//y, 
and published this imformation in the fall issue 
of Cadence. 

The^i learned many; things: that Leftest 
Politics Are not Dead, That an author 
sometimes sells himself as well as his work, that 
New York is dirtier than Chicago, that (when a 
conseruatiue on a censorship panel was hooted 
down and insulted) writers can be as pett\j and 
stupid as antjone else, and where the onl\j de- 
cent diner in White Plains. Pennsylvania is 
located. 





03^ 




In keeping with the Uniuersitij's motto-ad ma- 
jorem dei g/oriam, for the greater glory of God, 
Loyola held the Mass of the Holy Spirit at both 
the Lake Shore and Water Tower campuses. 
The mass, which commemorates the beginning 
of a new academic year was held at Holy Name 
Cathedral for the Water Tower community and 
in the Madonna Delia Strada Chapel for the 
Lake Shore Campus. 

The Reverend Raymond C. Baumhart, S.J. 
was the principal celebrant at both masses, 
which were attended by many clergy, faculty, 
staff and students of the community as well as 
members of the community. 







During the weekend of October 9-11, the 
Lo\jola-DePaul ROTC batallion conducted a 
field training exercise at the Joliet Arsenal. A 
detachment from the Universit\j of Illinois 
Chicago Circle Campus also took part in the 
training. 

The training consisted of basic militar]^ skills, 
such as tactics, radio communication, first aid. 
and land navigation. Freshman cadets got their 
first taste of C-rations. and drill and ceremonies. 
The purpose of the training was to prepare the 
cadets for careers as Army officers. 

The exercise was successful. Not onli; did all 
the cadets complete the training, but the\; 
managed to have a good time on the wa);. 




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The Lo\^ola National Radio Conference XII, 
The nation's oldest and largest radio conference 
run entirely/ b\i students was held October 30 
through November 1st at the H\)att Regency 
Hotel. 

The Conference offered over fifty sessions 
dealing with uarious aspects of broadcasting. 
Operated in a fashion that gave students a 
chance to ask questions of the guest speakers, 
participants could attend sessions pertaining to 
the news, sales, writing, research and per- 
sonalities in broadcasting as well as demonstra- 
tions of the latest in broadcasting equiptment. 

The opening ceremonies featured WJR- 
Detroit's all night man Jay Roberts as the 
keynote speaker. They were followed by the 
LNRC-CBS Masquerade Ball at which uampires 
and roller skating chickens saw the the Pilsbury 
dough-boy awarded the First-prize-Dead Ruger 
prize. 

Though folks at WKRP did not attend, guest 
speakers included Ken Davis, WBEZ News 
Director; Charlie Myerson, reporter for WXRT, 
and Bob Collins, WGN Program Host. Four- 
teen record companies attended providing 
hospitality suites and premiere video tapes. 

The conference was made possible thanks to 
the efforts of Joe Messinger, Sue Caui, Susan 
Welsh, Mike LaVaccare, Carol Steele, Julie 
Franz, Maria Semedalas and Prof. Sammy R. 
Danna. 





As part of the Founder's Day celebration 
which commemorates the beginning of Jesuit 
higher education in Chicago, the President's 
Ball was held October 30th, 1981 in the 
Chicago Room of McCormick Place. Hosted bi/ 
the President of the University; in the name of all 
the presidents of all student organizations of 
Loyola Uniuersity of Chicago, the ball honored 
the students who continue the tradition of 
leadership, scholarship and service begun on 
September 5th, 1870. 

At approximatel]j 10:00 the official receiving 
line was formed allowing guests to congratulate 
the 12 medallion winners, outstanding students 
from Loyola's various colleges and schools on 
the undergraduate and graduate levels. The 
students awarded medallions were: Mr. An- 
thony Gregg. College of Arts and Sciences 
LSC: Mr. David John Allasio, College of Arts 
and Sciences WTC; Mr. Nikola Duric, School of 
Business Administration: Mr. Timoth J. 
Loughran, School of Dentistry: Mr. Thomas 
Francis Lucas, School of Education; Ms. Teresa 
Dombrowski, Graduate School; Mr. Kevin 
Thomas Keating, School of Law: Mr. Michael J. 
Caron, Stritch School of Medicine: Mr. Robert 
C. McCarthy, Niles College: Ms. Mary Kay 
Bingen, School of Nursing: Mr. Ronald Froem- 
ming. School of Social Work; Ms. Darlyne 
Case. University College. 

Formal ball dancing followed with the strings 
of the John Kenny Orchestra. The many ruffled 
'Lady Di's' geided along the dance floor only to 
pogo to the beat of Synod at P-Ball. 








^ 




"Reach out and feed someone" was the plea 
of Loi;ola's eighth annual Hunger Week, which 
took place November 12-19. Sponsored by the 
University Ministry and student organizations, 
Hunger Week hosted activities which helped 
deepen people's awareness of the reality of 
hunger in the world while also raising funds 
toward alleviating that hunger. 

The ways of reaching out were many. 
Students donated their steak night meals, while 
the housing staff held an auction. Some 
donated change to "Pennies for People" , while 
others walked for Hunger or pledged a friend 
that was fasting. The most active participants 
were those who fasted, learning the pains of 
hunger engendered by the absence of food, 
which left many lasting impressions. The 50 
hours surpassed the hunger of cosmetic dieting 
and allowed students to emphathize in a small 
way with the world's hungry. 

The week closed with a "Thursday Night 
Live" talent show which was covered by the 
cable television station from Atlanta Georgia, to 
be shown on the program "Nice People. " 

Those nice people not only reached out and 
fed someone through funds for self help projects 
in India, the Philippines, and El Salvador as well 
as in the neighborhood parties, they also reach- 
ed out and tried to understand some 800 
million starving ones. 







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Students emploij a uarietii of means to forget 
about classes, homework, exams, etc. These 
excursions from the hassles of being a student 
can be as short as a moment to as long as a 
weekend. Some of the manx; wa\/s students take 
time out is b]j taking a walk fay the lake, pla^iing 
a game of softball or football, making a trip to 
one of the rec centers, talking to a friend, par- 
ticipating in intramurals, and going out to eat. 






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Musical events at Lo[;ola range from classical 
to punk, including other forms as jazz, country, 
and different shades of rock. They can be en- 
joiied on a weekend evening or during lunch 
break in the commuter lounge. The groups 
which tour our school, some of which are 
shown here, attract enthusiastic outsiders as 
well as Loyola fans. 










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/( has been said that there is nothing to do at 
Lo\)ola, but this is not the case. Students can 
participate in over a hundred organizations, 
which sponsor numerous events throughout the 
year. These events include educational activities 
such as symposiums, entertainment, such as 
events as magic shows, and helpful events like 
blood drives. Pictured here are just a few of the 
numerous events things that occurred at Loyola 
this first semester. 



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After a long wait, students at Water Tower 
Campus finally; got the offices they have been 
waiting for. The offices, which are on the six- 
tenth floor of Lewis Towres, were officially 
opened with a open house. After the ribbon cut- 
ting ceremony there was coffee and cake for 
everyone. 




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Eueri; year Loyola's department of Military 
Science holds a ball to honor its outstanding 
cadets. ROTC students and their dates are 
welcomed by the Student BatalHon Com- 
mander and the Dean of Arts and Sciences, as 
well as other members of university administra- 
tion. Dinner is serued following the traditional 
toast to the United States Army and the 
Commander-in-Chief. Afterwards. LTC Du- 
pont presents the awards and certificates to the 
honored cadets, following which the "Cor- 
porate Staff" formally opens the ball 



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This year three Chicago poets were inuited to 
the annual Poetry Festival sponsored by the 
English department. Although previously an all 
day affair presenting the work of six or seven 
poets, this year's shorter event was as 
stimulating and controversial as former ones. As 
usual. Dr. Casey opened the festival and in- 
troduced the poets, who read their own works. 
A wine and cheese break followed during which 
students, faculty, Loyola staff members, and 
poetry loving outsiders present at this event had 
an opportunity to meet the poets. Miss Hayes 
took the names of members of the audience 
who wished to participate in the open reading, 
which ended the evening in an atmosphere of 
general hilarity. 




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On March 24th. 1982. Loyola held it's 2nd 
Annual International Festival as students from a 
uarietii of countries shared their cultural 
background. Music and movement filled the 
Rambler Room as songs and dances from a 
dozen ethnic groups were performed. Spec- 
tators were dazzled b].i Noushin's Persian pulse 
while grace and sublt^/ of a \;oung Indian girl 
charmed them. For the Pre-Meds the Greeks 
danced the "Marry a Doctor" and the Argenti- 
nians were already worring about sheep. During 
intermission representative gastronomic delights 
were provided by the Korean and Polish Club. 



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All bets are final! Black Jack! We have a win~ 
ner! Loyola had the thrill of Las Vegas for two 
nights as Campion Hall was converted into a 
Casino. Students were able to play at the Royal 
Casino or the Silver Dollar Gambling Em- 
porium and, for those over twenty one. 
Bogie's offered simultaneous drinking and 
gambling. There were also snacks and dancing 
for the tired and the losers. The lucky gamblers 
were able to bid for prizes at the Grand .4 uc- 
tion. Even with play money, students felt the 
thrill of winning big and of losing it all, and 
their enthusiasm made Casino Vlll a great suc- 
cess. 



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Afro-American Mor^th at Loiiola Uniuersitt; of 
Chicago ujas marked fay a variefy of activities 
and events sponsored b]; the Department of 
Afro-American studies and LUASA. the Loijola 
Uniuersit\; Afro- American Student Association. 
The goal of Afro-American Month at Loi)o!a 
was to make the Loijola Community; more 
aware of Afro-American culture and issues 
through a series of lectures, concerts and films 
which presented various aspects of Afro- 
American life. 





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The law students at Loijola are able to get in- 
volved in various actiuites. One wap that theij 
get involved is to join one of the mani; organiza- 
tions for law students such as the Student Bar 
Association. These groups put on several ac- 
tivites throughout the [/ear. The school also has 
several events the students can particapate in. 
One of the biggest events for law students is 
Holiday; Frolic. 







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Students were able to enjoi) the latest in 
sports fashion at a fashion show held in tirie 
Rambler Room. Fellow students fashioned the 
latest in sporting apparel, making the event a 
memorable experience . 




Under sunny skies and with over 100 miles 
before them, twenty-five runners from five area 
Tau Kappa Epsilon (TKE) chapters began their 
keg roll out of Water Tower Park on April 23rd. 
The brothers worked in relay teams as they roll- 
ed their kegger to Waukesha. Wisconsin while 
sponsors and well wishers supported the social 
fraternity's efforts to raise $10,000 for St.Judes 
Children's Research Hospital in Memphis Ten- 
nessee. Their flawless run ended with their 
earlier than expected arrival after twelve hours 
of rolling out the barrel. 





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Loi^ola Uniuersify has a commitment to the 
spirititual, moral religious and human develop- 
ment of its students. One department which 
specifically deals with this commitment is 
Uniuersiti^ Ministri;. Uniuersitii Ministers en- 
courage the development of an athmosphere in 
which students, faculty) and staff can grow in 
mutual respect and deepen their life in faith. 

Hunger Week. Soup and Substance, various 
masses, several retreats. Cellar, and Ap- 
palachian Outreach Program are just a few of 
the man\,i activities Universitt; Ministry; is involv- 
ed with. 

At Lo\;ola. University Ministry is an integral 
part of the entire uniuersitp. The increasing par- 
ticpation in academic life and other areas of the 
school, with the faculty; and staff as well as with 
students, is evidence of the central place 
Universitij Ministry; has at Loi;ola. The goal of 
University Ministry is to facilitate the ministry of 
service to one another, to all people who make 
up. and are Loyola. 



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It wasn't dark Cable, nor was it Fred Astaire. 
This time it was the small dorms of Lo\;ola "Put- 
tin' on the Ritz" at their annua! spring semi- 
formal dance held a the Sovereign Ballroom. 
Couples decked out in their ritziest fashions 
danced the night awai; to the tunes of a live 
band. On the whole it was a liueltj, fun-louing 
evening that will not be soon forgotten fay the 
lucky Loijolans who attended this memorable 
and flashy function. 






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At Lo\^ola. Spring's madness had cometh the 
week of April 19-23 during Hoopla' 82^ The 
Week long activities challenged students as they 
were preparing for exams . The "Crazy Parade" 
wound around campus honored the maddest. 
Physics majors excelled in the centripetal force 
of the hoopla hoola contest as well as the 
aerodynamics of kite flying. "Musical Chairs for 
Charity" was a study in the competitive social 
structure, while roller skates exalted the in- 
dividual's free spirit. Loyola had it's own 
"Chariots of Fire" as the Creek Olympics in- 
spired cooperative achievement. 

Entertainment included the photosynthesiz- 
ing "Penthouse Plants" as well as the antics of 
the "Roving Performers. " While James Bond 
was entertaining in "For Your Eyes Only" 
students were "Boppin on the Beach Party" and 
having fun in the "sun" with music, limbo and 
volleyball. 





Lo\jola honors its student organizations at an 
annual Awards Banquet presided b\; Mariotte 
LeBlanc, and attended b\; the staff resonsible for 
student activities. This year the reception took 
place at the Conrad Hilton. It was opened by 
Father Baurnhart, who spoke of the contribu- 
tions made by student organizations to the 
school, and of the opportunities for the self 
development these offer to their dedicated 
members. Cadence. Loiiolan, Phoenix. 
LUASA. LASO. SAB. SOB. BCC, WTC. and 
LSCA were some of the organizations honored. 
The coveted Vice-President for Student Service 
Award was given hi/ Ms. LeBlanc to several 
recipients chosen from a large group of 
dedicated members of organizations nominated 
fay these groups or the student service staff. The 
evening ended with a dance. 









For those with musical tastes that weary 
quickly of radio programs burdened with the 
inevitable current release of Journey, or even 
more inevitable music collaboration a'la Bar- 
bra Streisand or Stevie Nicks, Loyola's Cellar 
provides much needed respite. Located in the 
basement of the Assist Center, the Cellar is a 
true Coffee House, where students can gather, 
in a decidedly "intime" setting, to enjoy live 
music and not-so-live popcorn. 

Each semester, the cellar opens its season 
with an Open Mike night featuring, according 
to that nice Dan Rebek, "a spectrutn of stu- 
dent talent. " Reminded that the rare deviation 
from the standard guitar or piano act scarcely 
comprises variety enough to be labeled a 
"spectrum", chairman Rebek conceded say- 
ing: "I can't help myself. I'm just too nice. " 
Open Mike serves as an audition, and the best 
student performers earn the opportunity to do 
their own shows later on in the semester, thus 
gaining valuable stage experience in an un- 
threatening environment. And, as a veteran 
student performer Dan ("The Sultan of the 
Strum") Lupo adds: "It's a good way to meet 
members of the clergy, what with the 
ministerial setting and all. " 

Along with the many student acts scheduled 
throughout the year, the Cellar also books pro- 
fessional, if small-time, folk singers. But in all 
cases, admission is free, which is a reason in 
itself why the Cellar is and should be one of 
Loyola's most popular social institutions. 




Almost a da\) does not go by that Loyola 
students have a chance to buy something from 
one of the sales offered by the many organiza- 
tions here at Loyola. A student can nourish his 
growling stumach with such thing as tacos. pop- 
corn, baked goods, taffy apples and a variety of 
ethnic foods. 




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General Eve 



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Second semester events, like those of the first 
semester, range from the aesthetic to the 
ridiculous, from movies and concerts to mock 
fashion-pageants and pizza eating contests. 
These are organized, but imformal, get- 
togethers where students meet with one another 
to escape from the pressures of universiti; life. 
Whether sports or dances, contests or comedi^ 
routines, second semester events are among the 
sweetest moments of a student's free time. 



.■j^^lTi^'fiaa-^i'i': 







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Loyola did not have an official Department of Theatre 
until 1969. Before that time, there were assorted 
Candelight Players and Thespian Leagues, but a theatre 
was not yet part of the curriculm. There were occasional 
bursts of ambition--as in the Choral Society's production 
of Verdi's Requiem in Madonna dclla Strada in 
1957-with 75 voices and a 30 piece orchestra. They 
returned the next year with Bizet's Carmen beginning with 
the ballet company of the North Shore Academy of Arts. 

Our Department is built around 100 full and part time 
students, many of whom embrace theatre as one cannot 
any other major. Working together, students and faculty 
develop close relationships and students learn by observ- 
ing and by doing-a very demanding and exhausting 
method, especially since they follow a normal academic 
program. The Theatre Department is unique in its in- 
tegration of practical experience and classroom instruc- 
tion, and in its intense personal involvement and familial 
athmospherc. 






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The Studio Production, A Vera Old Man With Enor- 
mous Wings, was a humorous and innovative experiment 
in story theatre and improvisation. Directors Betsy Tucker 
and Sue Applebaum started with three stories — "The 
Kaha Bird," a folk tale; "Cinderella," an Anne Sexton 
Poem; and "A Very Old Man...," a 'tale for children' writ- 
ten by Gabrial Garcia Marquez. Each story revolves 
around a winged creature, cither benefactor or nuisance. 
Wings become symbols of man's potential for change, 
salvation and folly. Winged creatures indicate the involve- 
ment of the miraculous in the mundane, the possiblity of 
sudden reversal which makes human beings both hopeful 
and insecure. By means of wings, men can assert their 
dignity and ascendance over the tyranny of circumstance. 
Greed is the darker side of man's desire for change, and 
his optimism. All three stories juxtapose avarice and 
aspiration. 

The improvisational exercises interspersed with the 
stories set the tone of the evening- a blend of irrevence 
and wonder. In all three stories we accept outrages and 
improbable happenings because they make sense in the 
world the story creates, which is founded on entirely new 
rules of probability and possibility. 

The charming and talented cast included: Kevin 
Bry,Paul Deboo, Leighton Edmondson, William Elward, 
Carol Kobler, Teri Mcevoy, Gerry Reynolds and Tim 
Tracy. 





Top Hat, a one act play by Paul Caerter Harrison, was 
the Loyola Black Theatre Workshop production. The 
satirical and uneven play was directed by Carl Morrison 
and featured only three charecters: a mime, played by 
Gordon Brumfield; a women, played by Katrinka Tate; 
and a musician, played by EdWilkerson. 





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In the 1981-82 season, the department chose an enter- 
taining, predictable, crowd-pleasing line-up. Ar\qe\ Street 
was the first offering, a campy melodrama with a greasy, 
menacing villain and a blustering hero, with murder, dark 
secrets, hidden rubies and good humor. Mr. Mann- 
ingham, played by Paul Kritikos, is attempting to con- 
vince his wife, played by Freshman Lynne Magnavite, 
that she is losing her mind. Magnavite delivered what may 
have, been the performance of the season, developing 
from a fidgeting and fearful child to a woman who con- 
trols her own life and is whole, strong, and sane. Fully ex- 
ploiting Magnavite's personal magnetism. Director Betsy 
Tucker deserves the credit for such impressive and engag- 
ing character development, and for the overall polish and 
cohesion of the production. 

Paul Deboo played Inspector Rough, the man of pater- 
nal warmth and exuberant extravagence who restores 
Bella Manningham's confidence and helps her to uncover 
the mystery of the flickering gaslights. Those gaslights, 
designed (almost choreographed) by Susan Christiensen, 
illuminated Raoul Johnson's glorious Victorian set and 
John Brooks' rich, glowing costumes. The cast was com- 
pleted by Becky Messbarger, as the "impudent and 
pretty" maid Nancy, Jean Schneider as Elizabeth and 
Glenn Fahlstrom and Walter Bombka as bobbies. 





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The second play of the season, The Country Wife, is a 
restoration comedy depicting the decadent sexual capers 
of the upper classes in the 17th century England and the 
disparity between the appearance of virtue and its reality, 
the play was an ambitious choice. The plot is complicated 
and the dialogue obtuse, since euphemisms and 
dissimulation were central to the society recreated. 

As in Angel Street, the set and costumes were miracles 
of economy and creativity. Susan Christenson designed 
the spare, graceful set, which created a sense of elegance 
and opulence while allowing the large, elaborately dress- 
ed cast to move about freely and change location with 
ease. Those colorful and contrived costumes, typical of 
the 17th century, were the witty work of Julie A. Nagel, 
who approached her task with accuracy and a sense of 
humor. Occasionally a bosomy soubrette bounced 
perilously close to frontal exposure, but other than (or 
because of) that, the costumes were a great success, ob- 
jective correlatives for the society's general obsession with 
the superficial. Freshman Larry Little, as Sparkish, was 
the ultimate fop, the ruffled and beribboned represen- 
tative of obsessive vanity. 




Donald R. Mayo played Mr. Horner, a man so in- 
famous for his sexual exploits that no woman would dare 
to be seen with him. With a cooperative and bewildered 
surgeon's help, Horner claims that he has contracted a 
venerial disease and is consequently impotent. Horner 
circulates this unflattering rumor about himself so that 
woman may again be seen with him without danger to 
their reputations. 

Eileen Niccolai played Margery, the young country wife 
eager to experience urban corruption. Niccolai was ap- 
pealing, vivacious and funny in her childlike interpreta- 
tion, cleverly developed by director John T. Trahey, who 
paid careful attention to stage business, choreography, 
and expressive, formal movement. The attention to 
character interaction was especially effective between 
diminutive Margery and her husband, played with ursine 
tenderness and gruffness by Michael Brennan. 

Danielle Glassmeyer, one of the Department's most 
talented and versatile actresses, delivered one of the finest 
performances in the production and controlled the tone 
of the play by her skillful handling of the most decisive 
theme statments. Other members of the huge cast include 
Dale Wray Eaton, John Kenneth Sabo, Donald Bender, ; 
Jerry Sigman, Tim Tracy, Pat O'Brien, John Wolfe, 
Jeanette Montgomery, Laura Fisher, Cheryl Baran. Julia 
Rose Curtis, and Gail Strejc. 





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(2at On c4 J^ot "Jin J^oof 




Cat on a Hot Tin Roof was the overwhelming success 
of the season as an intense, exhausting but richly rewar- 
ding production of an exceptional play. Director Arthur 
Bloom managed to draw spectacular and explosive per- 
formances from his leads while coaxing them to submit to 
overall effect. Once again, the theatre department did 
best when shooting highest. 

The supporting roles were clearly defined and 
developed, yet not intrusive or distracting. Gail Strejc was 
gloriously obnoxious and indescreet as Big Mama. While 
capturing all that is irritating and funny in Big Mama's 
meddling and tasteless propriety, Strejc managed to con- 
vey her pitiful sense of her own failures, making her of- 
ficious yet cowering. 

Christine Steiner's, giddy threats and excessive fecun- 
dity with her constantly wrinkled nose was an annoying 
and skillful May. Steiner had May's iron willed, 
manipulative Southern charm down perfectly. Dave Din- 
colo, as the slick and untrustworthy Gooper, and Ed 
Godula as the ineffectual Rev. Tooker, also gave im- 
pressive and controlled performances. 

Danielle Glassmeyer did an amazing job as Maggie (the 
title character) , in a very sympathetic interpretation. Mag- 
gie is a tricky character, requiring stubborness and 
strength, temper and tenderness. The posessor of 
desperate truth, Maggie is honest in a world of deception. 
She is a survivor who can still appreciate "weak beautiful 
people who give up with such grace." Maggie does not 
have " the rare charm of the defeated," but she does have 
a mission to hand her husband's life back to him "like 
something gold (he) let go of." Glassmeyer managed to 





integrate all the elements of Maggie the cat, making us 
understand and like her. She conveyed both sexual and 
maternal feelings toward her husband. Brick, and always 
convinced the audience that she indeed posesses 
desperate truth and valiant life. 

Mark Anderson played Brick, with whom Maggie 
shares a cage. Through most of the play, Anderson had 
to react rather than act. His outbursts of anger, frustration 
and disgust built up gradually and were well balanced by 
his determined indifference and impatient longing for the 
click that makes him peaceful. 

Raoul Johnson was explosive, imposing and im- 
pressive as Big Daddy, the irascible and failing patriarch. 
He was both rude and charming, positive and unsure. 

The script's concern with interminable circles(getting 
nowhere, talking around things, going in circles, etc.) was 
represented in the set and blocking. The aimless move- 
ment conveyed frustration as well as intimidating oppres- 
sion. The patterns of image and theme in Tennessee 
William's script are consistent, creating a framework in 
which all actions and characters must be interpreted. 
Bloom and set designer Susan Christiansen, lighting 
designer Timothy Roznowski and costume designer John 
Brooks all contributed to the controlling design. 

The quiet moments in "Cat" were delicately and 
memorably handled. The tension built to chaotic climaxes 
of fireworks and thunderstorms, but supported the frenzy 
and stridence with the hushed, husky power heard in the 
whisky and smoke delivery of Glassmeyer, Johnson and 
Anderson. 





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The Theatre Department finished up an uneven season 
with Grease, a 50's rock and roll high school musical. The 
concept sacrifices polish to unrefined and unconfined 
energy. But the change was refreshing, especially after 
such controlled and sophisticated endeavors as Angel 
Street and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. 

Music Director Michael Berkley did a fine job of helping 
his singers overcome their own weaknesses and working 
within their limitations, the musicians-Berkley, Russ 
Burgos and Cameron Pfiffner-were teriffic and essential 
to pulling the whole show together. 

Jim Corti's choreography stole the show-especially in 
the muscular, masculine, innovative and vulgar work of 
the Burger Palace Boys. Corti filled the show with sur- 
prises and exuberance, even doing his own spin as a truly 
heavenly Teen Angel. 




Miriam Sanchez's lighting, and Christine Steiner's 
Beauty School Drop-out make-up contributed to the 
tacky and tasteless effect. The technical production was 
crowned by the miraculous ascension of the Teen Angel 
and Keneckie's Greased Lightning. 

The young lovers at the center of the plot were James 
Teevans and Adriana Izavanaru. John Sabo did a spec- 
tacular job as Doody in his solo, "Those Magic Changes." 
Once again, Eileen Niccolai used her wonderful squeeky- 
Munchkin voice to great comic effect, here as Frenchy. 
Stacey Kostes used her smokey, streetwise voice as Rizzo. 

Other cast members were: Rita Brown, Julianne Mar- 
tin, Ed Godula (who may have a career as a nerd), 
Catherine Rogers, Lynne Magnavite, Kenneth Hartman, 
Dale Wray Eaton, Peter Kritikos, John Leigdon, Dan 
Renaud, Terri Sue Westerland, Leonard Allen, Little 
Tom Jackson, and Donald R. Mayo as a velvety vocal 
trio. 




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Tommy 


William Dineen 


Androclcs 


Stephen Ksioszk 


Megaera 


Jackie Shadinger 


Captain 


Patrick Stack 


Lavinia 


Alice Pisan 


Ferrovius 


John McNulty 


Spintho 


Anthony Englert 


Centurion 


John Hehl 


Metellus 


Darius Balzaras 


Lentulus 


Keith Erickson 


Christian Man 


Joseph Byrne 


Christian Man 


Angelo Comeaux 


Christian Man 


Noel Manley 


Menagerie Keeper 


Todd Schipplick 


Gladiator Manager 


James Presta 


Secutor 


Gerald Chenski 


Retiarius 


James McHale 


Gladiator 


Adrian Delgado 


Gladiator 


Patrick Mitchell 


Caesar 


David Kaczmarek 


Roman Soldier, Attendant 


Michael Mullane 


Roman Soldier, Attendant 


Phillip Allen 


Roman Soldier, Attendant 


James Delegatto 


Beggar, Attendant 


Ralph Sprague 


Lentulus Servent, Attendant 


Michael Byrd 


Lentulus Servent. Attendent 


Robert Schout 




4 





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Stage Manager 

Dr. Gibbs 

Joe Crowell 

Howe Newsome 

Mrs. Gibbs 

Mrs. Webb 

George Gibbs 

Rebecca Gibbs 

Waliy Webb 

Emily Webb 

Professor Willard 

Mr. Webb 

1st Women in Auditorium 

Man in Auditorium 

2nd Woman in Auditorium 

Simon Stimson 

Mrs. Soames 

Constable Warren 

Si Crowell 

Baseball Players 

Sam Craig 

Joe Stoddard 

Assistant Stage Managers 

People of Town 



Stephen Ksiosk 

John Hehl 

Michael Mullane 

Gerald Chenski 

Fran Schnitzius 

Judy O'Mally 

Joseph Byrne 

Gale Goodfriend 

Jerome Gainer 

Tracey Lowing 

David Kaczmarek 

Robert Hadley 

Millie Slane 

Anthony Englert 

Megan Path 

Keith Erickson 

Kate Ryan 

James Donavan 

Jay Feld 

Philip O'Reilly 

John Swanson 

Robert McCarthy 

Noel Manley 

Michael Byrd 

Anthony Englert 

Peter Jarosz 

John McNulty 

Kevin Quilty 

Debbie Schnitzius 

Bob Schout 

Ralph Sprague 



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Athletics at Loyola is a vital part of colleg,e 
life. If it is being, on a team, watching, a game, 
participating in intramurals or just using the 
facilities, students get great pleasure out of 
the athletic department. The high point of 
Loyola's athletics has to be the 1%3 NCAA 
basketball championship. Throughout the 
years Loyola has seen changes in its 
athletics. Loyola has lost such great teams as 
their football team and hockey team but they 
have gained some even better ones like the 
women's teams. 





Men 's Basketball 



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Record 


: 17-12 




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LU 




OP 


80^^ 


S!- 


EVANSVILLE 


84 


76 


AlB FOHCE 


65 


98 




Butler 


73 


83 


Illinios 


87 


83 




Xavier 


67 


84 


Valpahasio 
Minnesota 


59 


86 




Detroit 


81 


60 


61 






76 




Oral Roberts 


79 


97 


Northern Illinios 


75 


78 




Oklahoma City 


91 


80 


Creighton 


78 


80 




DePaul 


98 


79 i;. ■ 


.1! Toledo 


70 


82 




Xavier 


80 


68 • 


_^^— Sgthern Illinios 


57 


73 




Evansville 


79 


75 


Northwestern 


71 


78 




Butler 


60 


61 


Bradley 


74 


80 




Detroit 


74 


69 


Marquette 


81 


88 




Butler 


71 




Oral Roberts 


77 


77 




Xavier 


69 




jf Oklahoma City 
,gt ^ Dayton 


58 
88 


72 

Loyola 


wins 


Evansville 


81 


iQyVf" 


the Chicagoland Cage Classic. 




1^ 


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83 


Loyola 


comes in second in MCC Tournament. 





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STATISTICS \ 

Field goals: Sappleton 238 .-SS^ 
Field goal %: Sappleton 53.7%"^ 
Free Throws: Sappleton 162 
Free Throws %: Young 92.3% 
Rebounds: Sappleton 376 k -% 
Assists: Clemmons 287 -•' c 
Points: Sappleton 638 C ■ " 
Points average: Sappleton 22 




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Women's Basketball 




Illinios 

Mabychest 

St. Francis 

DePaul 

Northeastern Illinios 

Wisconsin-Green Bay 

Northeastern Illinios 

Carthage 

Illinios Circle 

Dayton 

Xavier 

ILORAS 

Trancis ii 
Lewis 
North Central 
Northern Illinios;; 
Northeastern Illinios 
Wisconsin-Milwaukee 
Toledo 
£1^ St. Francis 
DePaol 
Marquette 
Eastern Illinios 
Z?" Bradley 



81 


• 


-- ' Chicago StAjXE 


76 


« 


Quincy ;>' 


88 


"" 


j^ . Lewis « 


70 




Eastern Illinios _^ 


59 




Xavier 


Loyola 


wins 


Chicago State Tournament. j^^^^ 




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Statistics" 

Field goals: Schoenhoff 239 

Field goal %: Bauwens 66.7% 

Free Throws: Schoenhoff 136 

Free Throw %: Schoenhoff 76.4% 

Rebounds: Schoenhoff 318 ' 

Assists: Mimnaugh 213 

Points: Schoenhoff 614 

Points Average: Schoenhoff 20.5 





Cheerleaders 







— Men's Cross Country and Track — 



Loyola's Cross Country team takes second Place in MCC meet. 
Individual Results 
7 Tim Shannon 
1 1 Steve Doran 

17 Rich Eber 

18 Tom Maloney 
26 Gary Donzelli 
29 Joe Budz 1; i» 




218 




Woman's Cross Country and Track 






<^- ^>: 





lAIAW State Cross Country Championships 

(divisions II AND III) LoYOLA TAKES FiFTH. 

Individual Results 
19 Ann Weber 
28 Mary Doak 
30 LoRiNDA Cooke 
34 Windy Pease 
36 Lisa Pope 
38 Patricia Cahew 

Mile relay record broken. Relay team consists of: Lisa 
i. Pope, Patricia Carew, Lorinda Cooke and Andrea 
'. Lawrence. 




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Lakefront Invitational 






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Men's Results 

1 1 Rich Eber 

14 Steve Dohan 

16 Tom Maloney 

23 Gahy Donzelli 

36 Geeg Birch 

66 Joe Budz 

Loyola takes second place. 




Woman's Results 
15 Ann Weber 
20 LoRiNDA Cooke 
23 Lisa Pope 

26 Wendy Pease 

27 Patricia Careew 
Loyola tales fourth place 





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Soccer — 




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Recohd 7-11-4 




LU 




OP 


4 


Xavier 


1 


5 


St. Joseph 





3 


Roosevelt 


3 





Notre Dame 


7 


2 


Illinios Tech 


1 





Bradley 


4 


1 


Lewis 


4 


1 


North Park 


1 





Wheaton 


6 


3 


Roosevelt 








Illinios State 


9 


4 


Valparaiso 


1 


1 


Illinios Benict 





2 


Northern Illinios 


6 


1 


Chicago 


1 





Marquette 


6 


1 


Olivet Nazarene 


1 


1 


Judson (Elgin) 





2 


Wisconsin-Whitewater 


3 





Illinios 


2 


1 


Northwestern 


1 


4 


DePaul 


6 




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Men's Swimming 












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Women's Swimming 




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Record 37-14 "^ "' - , 
Loyola Finishes third in lAIAW State Championships. 
Loyola wins Laketront Volleyball Invitational. 


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Volleyball 





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' Record 12-3 **• ' 
LU 

23 Illinios 
26 ■»» mm Purdue 
16 '^bH^ Iowa State 


OP 

4 



13 

9 

OS 2 

flBUt: 5 

11 

2 

7 

9 

12 

4 

los 2 

9 

ts including Illinios 


18 Missouri 
23 Sothern Illini 
22 Prinicipia 
.18 Indiana 
' 10 Peppehdina 
,16 '■ Utah 
9 Frenso State 
7 Air Force 
9 Indiana 
14 Kentucky 
18 Southern Illin 
18 Indiana 
Aquaramlers win three tournamen 
Tourney and Loyola Invitational. 




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Intramural Basketball 



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Intramural Football 





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Intramural Volleyball 





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From the time Loyola first became a colleg,e 
to the present, students have become involved 
in org,anizat!ons. These organizations 
have a broad ran^e of activities such as 
social, political, educational, or ethnic. The 
organizations have several purposes to ^et 
the student's mind off school, to learn more 
about a particular topic, to discover more 
about ones heritaj!,e, to g,et a job done. What 
ever the pupose these orf-,anizations have, 
they enable the students to meet new people 
and to ^row. 



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Ethnic 240 

Publications 24'-> 

Service 234 

Social 258 

Special Interest 264 



Black Cultural 
Center(LSC) 








Cregurv Cldfk, Lfonafd Ailcn, Ehzabt^lh Porler, Gregory 
Garner, Retina Robertson, Michael Orr, Dentse Bradley, 
Kanm A. Lai! 



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A//on50 Holley, Leota lackson, Anita /ones, Lawandrea 

/n//v, /\nfon/a Hudson, Christopher Iheiirika 



Black Cultural 
Center(WTC) 



«ffj>t« rjifj 




German Club 




Front: Bob Smith, luhe Tatko. Mary Anne Urban, Lisa 
KowariPresident), Rose Palmer. Back:Patncia Kuper, 
Shela O'ShaughnessytCo-Editor}, Kathy Krieg, Heidi 
Merle, Erie Sonntag, Paul DeBoo(Co-Editor) 
Missing: Kathv Stadler, Barbera Ruby, lacqueline 



Bradley, Anne Mane Stephan, Mark Annmer, George 
Kleanthis, Renee Schiifels, Bob Smith, Frank Weilbam- 
mer. Margarete Zielinski, Al Mikloyas. Marianne Da- 
mianides, Michael Koeler, Ceralyn Fallon, Marianne 
Ruby 



Mi^»r - 







International 

Student 
Organization 



The l.S.O. is dedicated to the service of cultural, 
social, and intelectual interchange among all the 
students of Loyola University. The organization has 
been re-activated in Sept. ,1979 and has participated in 
and sponsored events such as the bi-annual Ethnic Fair, 
a series of lectures on the American Presidency, 



Christmas Party, Orientation for incoming international 
students, the Visitors' Center Program of Chicago, etc. 
The executive committee has been advised and strong- 
ly supported by Helen Lavella 1.5. advisor and Judith 
Fjorendo. 





Row 1: Anton Fakhouri (Treasurer), Adnana Izvananu 
(President), Cevork Boudaghians (Vice President), Sopiah 
Suid (Secretary). 
Row 2: Hamid Kohanfars. Helen iavelle (Moderator), 



Ksenja Maicen. Cita Mirchandani, Sophia Unzawalla. 
Row 3 Ignacio Vazquez. Se loon Ok. Sol Bukingolls, 
Noushin Hadjivazin, Judith Florendo 



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Italian Club 




Row J Tony Giannini (President), Carmen Rocco, Son- 
ny Raguso (Jreas.), Umberto Ficaretia, Maurice Russo, 
William L- Bortolotn. loe Baldassano, Angela Em, 
Michael Pendola. 

Row 2: Cathie Palumho (Sec), Diane Scatchell (Vice 
Pres-), iuz Elena Cano, Mary Ann Galassini, Sharon 
Campauilo, Isabella Sacca, Vita Russo, Rita Baghdass 
Arian, Frank Fokta, Chris Disalvo, Rose Collins, 



Row 3: Tim Galassini. Vince iombardi, Nancy Naddy, 

Angela Ponterio, Tony Grande, lim DeRingo, Linda Luc- 

chesi. Donate Perretta, Tammy lohnson, Mike Gattuso, 

Darcy Dulbis, 

Row 4: Rich Divito, Dave Allasio, lohn Zimmerman, 

Steve Wodka, Frank Faico, Fred Rothenberger, Dennis 

Pedrally. 



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Irish Club 




Kapwa 




The Name KAPWA as it exists today was suggested by 
the first hCAPWA president, Reynaldo Nepomuceno. 
KAPWA means each other helping each other out m 
Tagalog (the mam dialect in the Philipines). The first 
Filipino Club of LU, Nara Society had disbanded when 



its members graduated. So a couple of years later a 
group of Filipino upperclassmen decided to assemble 
and form another Filipino club. It was on Nov 14, 1979 
that members of KAPWA met as a group for the first 
time. 




Row 1: Shirley llagan (Vice Pres). Liz Rodenas. Dennis 
Tablizo, Fredelyn Medrano, Dione Talla, los-ephme Fer- 
rer. Alecia Talavera, Hanna Talla. 

Row 2: Patricia Dong, Flora Orpano, David Fscalante. 
Gigi Gonzalez, Shiela llagan. Michelle Tedde. 



Row 3" lerry Spyratoos, Mano Garcia. Gary Dong, Ken 
Yo'yhida, Blancia DeLaPaz, Manssa Balinegit. 
Not Pictured: Fernando Garcia, lose Ignacio. Butch 
Fvangihsh. Ethyl Magnao. ludy Navaro. 




Latin American Student 
Organization LSC 





Row 1 : Edgardo Martinez, Manbel f/ores. Zayda Cordero, Row 2: Luis Duran, Anton Baragas. 

Teresita Aceuedo. Laura Lopez, William Cruz, Cesar Lara. Row 3: Anton Ortiz, Lisa Cruz, Dave Escalante. 



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Latin American Student 
Organization WTC 




Loyola Hellenic 
Association 




low 1: Maria Faklaris(Treasurer). Penny CianaraMVice 
='res), 5teve Ballis(President). Helen Barounis(Rec. Sec). 
-Jem Palamidis(Corr. Sec). 

Row 2: Kathy Karalekas, George Kounabalis. Ethel 
jtathas, Tasos Eliades, Patty Bonos. Joanne Liakouras, 
Zeorgia Michaels. Frances Boudovas. 



Row 3: Angela Tsagalis, Dean Arapidas, Anne Kencos. 
John Michellettis, Chns Chulos. 

Row 4: George Mandas, John Kontos, Angela Panos. 
Stella Koudonis. Eoanna Merikis, Georgia Karuntzos, 
lean Garbolski. Mana Zevwos. Sandy Poulos- 



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Loyola Jewish 

Student 
Organization 





Row 1: Laura K Levin, jodi Nevers. Rikt Lippitz. Sheila 

Comen 

Row 2: Kevin fay Long, Steve Moses, Burton Kopulsky. 

Missing: Carey Smolensky 




One of the main purposes ot LUASA is to develop 
educational resources for black students at Loyola. Also 
with this, the development of an athmosphere which 
includes social interaction, psychological support and 
political enlightenment. 




Loyola University 

Afro-American 

Student Association 

LSC 





Row 1: Laverne Braxton, Angela Burks. Nedra White. 

Row 2: Leonare Allen, Susan Wright, Sharon Franklin, 

Michael Brooks (Pres), Rhonda i Yauhedreas.j, Cualaini 

Francis, 

Row 3: Victor Adams, Denise Bradlev, Derrick Lyons, 

Ida Washington. 




"^« ^" "" «" "^" 



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Oriental Student 
Organization 



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TUDENT 



Dr^ A K 11^. 



The Oriental Student Organization (050) was formed by 
and for those students who are interested in the various 
Oriental cultures, this is the only criterion of members. One 
of the main objectives of OSO is to participate in Oriental 
cultural and social activities and through this participation 
allow the Loyola community to become more aware ot the 
different Oriental cultures. Any student interested and will- 
ing to work toward the objectives of the Organization is 



eligible for membership. 

In return OSO offers a chance for students with similar in- 
terests and or similar backgrounds to meet and learn more 
about themselves and about each other. OSO will also try 
to keep open more channels for communication and social 
interaction, to show that Loyola has more to offer than just 
academics. 




Row 1: ludy Baniqued. Linda Lau, lean Nakamoto, Lynette 
5. Ferrer, Marie Nepomuceno. 



Row 2: Audrey Jan, Maria Payomo, Linda S. Chan, Don 
Henson. Tran Quang Loy. 




Polish Club 




Members include: Shirley //agan. Ana Parkow, Eilu Szauin- 
ski. Therese Kozlowski, Cheryl Boyle, laurie Pmrowski, loan 
Hawiki. Monika Barwicki, lustie Cignor, Diana Ducke, 
Konrad Marie Sokolowsk. Professor Mocha, Walter 
Maskowski, lerry Pecherek. Chris Bienek. Ralph Price, Bob 



Placzek. George Corecki, Regina Bracamanski. Tom Cauza. 
Donna Chlclack, Mark Kadzida, Dorthy Kamrski, let'f Hynek, 
Karen Kail. Karen Kope. Leo Lech, Steve Urban, Rich Osmar- 
did. lohn Mikos. 



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llllllillfllliliiillll Spanish Club 

OCOOOCOCOGOOOCOOOOOOOCOOOOCCOCCCOOOSCCOod 




Row /: Xaviar Parento. Isabel Vera (sec), Al'ma Fer- 
nandez (Vice-Pres.), fuan Carlos Fernandez, Dr. Lilia Fer- 
nandez (Moderator), Fernando Castillo (Pres). Diana 
Garcia (Jreas.), Ana L Carcia- 

Row 2: Carlos Correa, Dejuana Diffay, Norma Seledon. 
Patti Dreas, Lydia Adame. Volanda Bautista. Donna 
Cmlebek, isabela Sacca, Elizabeth Surak. Tony Bravo, 



Joaquin Meng, Ausehcio Nunez. 

Row 3: Arthur Cudino, Maria Chaidez. Joanne Diaz. 
Peter Vitulli, Marcos Izo, ALfonzo Saballett. lulio Tellez. 
Row 4: Alicia Lara. Maria Teutli, Rosa Terrones, Fernan- 
do Figueredo. Bianca DeiaPaz, Ana Miranda, Carmen 
Mendoza, Rocio Hernandez, Cilda Perdon, Martha 
Gomez, Suzy Perdon, Maria Robles. 



The Vietnamese Students' Organization was formed in 2. To share our traditions with the Loyola community 

1980 with the following purposes: through activities that will promote a mutual understanding 

1. To keep in touch with our culture by making it a part of of both cultures. 

our lives. 



Vietnamese Students' 
Organization 





From left to right: Iran Hao, Hung Nguyen, Tung Van, Linh 
Nguyen, 6 members missing. 



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Cadence 




Above left; Associate Editor 


im Sul 


ivan at 


work. 




Above right: Editor 


in-Chief Rich La 


Ich at 


work. 




Right: Poetry Editor 


Bill Sava 


^e at work. 






Below left: Joan da 


Ponte at 


work. 








Lower left: Savage, 


Sullivan, 


Lalich 


Kevin 


O'Reilly, 


and Kelly 


Ryan take a break. 












Not pictured: Dennis Tablizc 


and 1 


m Tvvyman. 






^ 




Cover: Design Alyce Deakin; Photo John Deakin; Artwork John Deakin. 
End Sheets: Design Alyce Deakin; Photos Bill Grant, Marty Cerza, old pictures. 
Title Page Design Alyce Deakin; Photo John Deakin; Artwork John Deakin. 

Division pages: Design Alyce Deakin; Photos Bill Grant, Emil Velez, John Deakin, Marty Cerza, Jerry 
Heimoski, Anna Gonzalez-Marin, Sue Degan, Peter LeTourneau, old pictures; Copy Alyce Deakin; 
Artwork John Deakin. 

Introduction: Design Scott Flodin; Photos Marty Cerza, John Deakin, Emil Velez, Alyce Deakin, Fran 
Glowinski, Keith Branic, old pictures; Copy Monique Barwicki. 

Campuses: Design Scott Flodin; Photos Marty Cerza, John Deakin, Emil Velez, Bill Grant, Alyce 
Deakin, Sue Degan, Fran Glowinski, John Hehl, A. Loriguzzo, old pictures; Copy Monique Barwicki, 
Jeanne Rattenbury. 

Dorms: Design Scott Flodin, Photos Bill Grant, Sue Degan, Jerry Heimoski, Peter LeTourneau, John 
Deakin; Artwork Dan Grosso. 

Faculty: Design Scott Flodin, Mary Beth Roman, Photos Emil Velez, Marty Cerza, Bill Grant, Sue 
Degan, Alyce Deakin. 

Events: Design Annette Jackowiak, Alyce Deakin (Theatre); Photos Bill Grant, Sue Degan, Emil Velez, 
Marty Cerza, Liz Graydan, Alyce Deakin, John Deakin, Sue Welsch, Rich Lalich, Anna Gonzalez- 
Marin, Mike Okamoto; Copy Monique Barwicki, Jeanne Rattenbury, Alyce Deakin, Joan DaPonte, 
Fran Dolan (Theatre). 

Sports: Design Paul Ciciora, Mo Cahill, Alyce Deakin; Photos Bill Grant, Marty Cerza, Emil Velez, Sue 
Degan, John Deakin, Liz Graydan, Alyce Deakin; Copy Sports Department, Alyce Deakin. 
Organizations: Design Scott Flodin; Photos Bill Grant, Sue Degan, Emil Velez, Marty Cerza, Liz 
Graydan, Jim Bindon, Pete LeTouneau, Alyce Deakin, Carey Smolensky; Artwork and Designs Alyce 
Deakin, Arthur J. Kubin, Jr. 

Seniors: Design Peggy Santelli, Alyce Deakin, Photos Ricci Photography. 

Ads: Design Mary Jackowiak, Alyce Deakin; P/iofosJohn Deakin, Bill Grant, Alyce Deakin, Marty Cer- 
za, Emil Velez. 

Production: Alyce Deakin, John Deakin, Emil Velez, Marty Cerza, Mary Jackowiak, Scott Flodin, 
Ralph Price, Bill Grant, Sue Degan, Liz Graydan, Kathy Kadlec. 

Special thanks to: The Theatre department, O'Day/Gunty (for shuttle Picture, Photo By Mike 
O' Day), The Archives, Phoenix, Cadence, Keith Branic, The Sports Department, Previous Loyolans, 
Loyola News, Cadences, Phoenixes, Northwestern University, and Centennial Forum Staff. 



^|e ^opulin frarlbswfe 





Co-Editor-in-Chief Alyce Deakin 

Co-Editor-in-Chief Emil Velez 

Business Manager Mary Jackowiak 

Photography Editor Marty Cerza 

Production Manager Ralph Price 

Layout Editor ^cott Flodin 

Senior Editor Peggy Santelli 

Events Editor Annette Jackowiak 

Sports Editor Paul Ciciora 

Copy Editor Monique Barwicki 

Public Relations Anne Wicker 

Assistant Photography Editor Bill Grant 

Assistant Photography Editor Sue Degan 

Ad Manager James Karagianes 

Faculty Advisor Brother Michael Grace, SJ. 

Budget Administrator Charles Taylor 

Staff: Joan DaPonte, Liz Graydan, Peter 
LaTourneau, John Deakin, Sue Welsch, Kathy 
Kadlec, Jim Bindon, Carey Smolensky, A. 
Loriguzzo, Mike Okomoto, Anna Gonzalez- 
Marin, Mary Beth Roman, Fran Dolan, Jeanne 
Rattenbury. 




^S^ 




Loyola Phoenix 





Editorial Board 

Editor in Chief Kelly Ryan 

Business Manager Mary Ann Galassini 

Copy Editor Pamela Standley 

Copy E-'itor Robyne Robinson 

LSC News Dave Brambert 

WTC News Dave Jordan 

Co-Feature Editor Bill Mahoney 

Co-Feature Editor Jim Twyman 

Sports Editor ' Marge Bjomson 

LSC Photography Editor Dave McCormack 

Production Manager Paul Zomchek 

AdvertisiM Manager Debbie Wallace 

News Production Manager Karen Sorensen 

Forum Production Manager Russell Game 

Classifieds Editor John Luce 

Art EMitor Marty McCormack 

Circulation Manager Jim Lentino 

Faculty Advisor G«orge Winchester, S.J. 

Budget Moderator Judith N. Becker 



""T^ 




Staff 



Chris Alfrievic. Christina Bilek, Jeff Black, Kevin Brady, Joan Bul- 
zileni, Carl Burlage. S J , Chris Chucos, Chris Chulos, Lorinda Cooke. 
Fran Dolan. Sophia Drivales, Darcy Dulbis, Eve Dziadek, Steve 
FUipiak, Tim Galassmi. Jean Garbolski. Mike Garcia, Anthony 
Gargiulo, Eileen Geary, Laura Gillis, Chris Golonka, Dan Grosso, Bob 
Healy. Val Haddon. Steve Hogan, Noreen Ho!t. Anne Jaskowiak, Mary 
Johnst<Hi, Chris Juris, Eve Kirkos. Rich Lalich, Laura Lampe, 
Marybeth Lore, Gita Mirchandani, Mark Miller, Diane Najar, Janis 
Nearing, Kathy Nelson, Jason Nirgiotis, Michael Nolan, Eileen 
O'Bnei, Karen O'Brien, Tim Olenek, George Pappas, Jim Pauwels. 
Marc Perpone, Diane Poloczek, Tom Purcell. Robyne Robinson, Ed 
Robles, Anna Rojek, Bill Savage, Mary Pat Seery, Walter Simpson, 
Debbie Singer, Stuari Shea. Matt Smith, James T. Sohn, Nanette 
Soltys, Karen, Diane Srebro, Hector Tellez. Andy Thinnes, Sandy Tro- 
jak, Mary Urhausen, Jo Anne Wallace, Leslie Whited-Pasewark, Heidi 
Wolff, Gerard Wozek, Don Zuhn 




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Loyola Student 
Government 
Association 




Row ;, Angle Bert, Pete Dantmi, Bob Van Boven, Sharon Ray Moccio, Brian Monks. 

Franklin. Sy/vij Builron. Row 3: Dave Szum. Mark Miller. Dennis Crammenos. Craig 

Row 2 Mitly George. Carey Smolenski, Mary 6e(h Sullivan, Wronski. 



Loyola University 

School of Dentistry 

Student Congress 






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Top Row Left To Right: Tom Carr. Mark Eldred (Treasurer}. 
lerry Crawford, Angela Maltezos. Iim Mills, Bob McNicholas 
(Newspaper Editor). Mike Burns. Dr Thomas Emmenng 
(Moderator) 

Second Row From Top: Tom SulTivan (Delta Epsilon Delta 
Rep.). Gary LaMond (A.S.D.A. Rep). Tom Newman (Senior 
Dental Class President), Denise Moore (Psi Omega Rep), 
Linda Weinfield (Alpha Omega Repj, Larry Lenz (Sophmore 



Dental Class President! 

Third Row From Top. Robert Staib (A.A.DS. Rep.). Helen 
Geanon, Mary Pizzo (Senior Hygene Class Pres.). Steve 
Logan (Secetaryj 

Bottom Row: Tony Hirschenberger (Congress Vice-PresJ, 
Paul DiFranco (Congress President), Terry Voshikane (Soph. 
Dental Vice-Pres.) 



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The council is composed of six voted members from each 
class plus at least one appomted representative with a facul- 
ty advisor. The individual class groups are responsible for 
fund raisers, class projects, and class functions. The classes 
publish a short new/sletter which keeps the students inform- 
ed on current nursing and class events. The four main 
groups function collectively during the bi-monthly 



meetings. The group serves as a link between the ad- 
ministration and the students. The council sponsors school 
fund raisers, a career night and continuing education pro- 
grams. The council is also responsible for integration and 
promotion of the nursing profession into the university set- 
ting. 



Nursing Council 




?ow 1: Theresa Lara. Mary Teresa O'Malley, loan Lindauer. 
Waureen Gregory, Doreen Walega, Charlette Canella. 
^ow 2: lulie Coddington, Renee Marker. Mary Lou Wysacki, 
"^aryAnn Pinkowski, Karen Welsh, MaryBeth Schleflick, Pat- 
y May. 



Row 3: Mrs. L. Banta, Mary Beth Sullivan, Tern Westerlund. 
lune Kasiak. Kathy Bergtalk. Mrs. Starziak. 
Row 4: Patty Kentgen, Patty Reynen, Carol Hackett, Mary 
O'Loughlin. Sue Geoghegan. 




^it-i^!^ '^''ii^^'fhi^7:i^J^^dM^. 



student Activities 
Board 





Row /; Paul Kantwill. Walter Kosch, Maria Rohles. Nick 

Gavrel, Nohra Sanclemente, lean Schneider, Ann Surmac- 

zynski, Sean Greitiin, Salvaiore Storniolo. 

Row 2: Ancet\a Margoiles, Barb Barney, Monique Gillbanks. 

Kevin Nedved. Rati Kuper. 

Row 3: Denise Menelis. Donna Fontana, )ose Teinhotd. 

Cabi Strack, Ada Laszlo. Evelyn Perez, ludy Navarro. 



Ru 



-J. Cldrn_ed Lake. }u \\dl>h, MarUnt' Kuu^>eau. Vn 



Herhener, Mary Wilson, Marleen Manley. 

Row 5: jean Carhohki, lim Collins. Chris Heinley, Susan 

Brokis. Pat Hotfrogge. lanet Skuza. Dan Rebek. 

Row 6. Don Kipper. Ed King, Rose Collins. Rich Markowski. 

Doug Henson. Bill Grant, lanet Pass. 




Row I: Thad Mikula(Gameroom). }im AlrothlPres). Dolores 

Hargrave(Community Serv.}. Catherine iindhlude(Spectal 

Events). Carol Kendzior(Sec.K Lome LoikutziV.P.j. Paul 

Calani$(Jres.). 

Row 2: Marie Aimazan, lili Pierce. Bernie Kawalski. Calvin 

Darling. Chris Zolp. Rita Svalbe. Ruby Ninan. 



Row 3: Melanie Cray, Cordon Stiefel. Valerie Panozzo. John 
McHatton. Annete Kilian. lim Nolan, Crystal Calloway. 
Samuel Gray, lulie Ecimovich Missing: Lydia BrowniEnter- 
tainment). Sandy SorichfP.R.). Olivia Colaris. lim Bindon. 
John Riddle. Dominic Mattucci. Lynn Kaczmarek. Sandra 
Adams. 



Student Operations 
Board 




\ 



Water Tower 
Government 




mbers Include. Mark Suszko, Nick Dunc(VP), Laura 










oerski, lean Nakamoto, Domingo Vargas, Becky Rupe 











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WLUW Radio 











Front Row: Roger Newsun, Russ Came, Cathy Cabi, Carey 












Smolensky, Tncia Maher, Mary Moreau, Mary Kelly- 
Back Row: Roger Lotti, Tom Crowley, lohn Kosiba, Wayne 














Magdziarz, Chru Skrundz, Brian Krachmbault. 









Alpha Delta Gamma 




Row /: Chuck Simpson. Mike Mora. Vince Petrucci, (^ 
Rick Scully, Kevin Casey (Vice Pres)- 
Row 2: Rich Osmanski. Bill Loutfy, Bill Dwyer (Presi- 
dent), Paul Dubnck, Duncan McLean, Frank Ditranco, 
Mike Mnrnscne. John Luce (Sec and Co-Treas). Dennis 



Alpha Kappa 
Lambda 



a 



"'^ 




Missing: Brian Connors, Frank Licari, Fred Cilhams, 
Frank Goppert, left George 



BrothersAngieo Ern, Emil Velez, )ohn Anderson, |ohn 

Swam, Mike Sizor, Tony Gianni, Dan Fadden, )oe 

Wat kins 

Little Sisters: Mary Wilson, Sue Switzer 

nftiiiiiiiiiimi iiiiiiin 



Interfraternity 
Council 




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P i ^ i M ^ M M 



Le/"! to Right: lohn Zimmerman (TKE). Frank bean (Presi- 
dent. AKU. Bob Sutton (Secretary). Michael Mornsroe 
(ADC). Boh Anderson (AOE). Jeff George (AKL) 
Missing: Brad Crubb (Treasurer), lamie Cabaltah (Vice- 
President) 



Alpha Sigma Alpha is a leader among Loyola's social 
iororities. Besides its own social, philanthropic, and in- 
ramural activities, the members ot A. 5. A. participate in 



many ol Loyola's activities such as the new-student 
Welcome Week' program, the Dance-A-Thon, LSCA, 

SAB, dorm governments, etc. 



Alpha Sigma Alpha 




Row /■ Teri Thompson (Pres.), Anne Surmaczynski. 
Stephanie Gallios, Susie Angelini, Mary Kaye Lindhloom 
(Vice Pres). Cail Peters. 

Row 2: Teresa Yang, Chns Prekezes. Maryellen Thielen. 
Row 3: Patty Nelson. Sue Sciacqua, Susan bndbloom, 



Cunta Oenaus. 

Row 4: lean Hillenbrand. Angte Tsiribas. Sandy Poulos. 
Anne Mane Robinson. Cina Pristo, fulie Houskos. Mary 
Anne Vena, ludy Luft. Evonne Demetrakis. lanice Velis. 



Delta Sigma Phi 




This, the Epsilon Kappa chapter of Delta Sigma Phi 
has been at Loyola since 1968. Our brotherhood is a 
unity of men having certain ambitions, attributes and 
abilities in common, we are a growing chapter compris- 
ed mainly of pre-professional people. We have been 
honored by Loyola as the fraternity with the highest 
grade point average for the past three years. 

Delta Sigma Phi is the fraternity of engineered leader- 
ship. This past year, a little sisters program has been 



reinstituted. Our formal dance with them was held at 
the Hyatt-Regency O'Hare. Another social success was 
this year's Bond Ball, our year's end party, where alum- 
ni and actives annually meet. 

We look forward to continuing our honorable reputa- 
tion in academics and felowship. we also hope to see 
the white carnation, our symbol, around for many 
years. 




Row /.■ lames PelletiereiPresident). Henhert Vergara, 
lames Huston, Ron Mersch. 

Row 2: Lou Villa, Keith Camacho, Roscoe Monks. 
Row 3: Robert iongo(5argeant at Arms), lames Morse, 



lohn Kamiriski, Bill McDowell. 

Row 4: Mark Miliani(Vice President), Mark 

Tatara(Treas.). Herb, lohn Vaikutis, 



DIIC 



DiH HIC 



Little Sisters of 
Delta Sig 




Row /, Dave Clomski(moderalor), Anita PierotKsec), 

Viki Roth(Prey), Diane Pmvenzano. Kale Doolan, 

Murph. 

Row 2: Debby Deuerman, Diane Srebro. June Kasiak. 

iyn Roney, Marlene Mohan 



eii 






Epsilon Zeta Epsilon 




)fficers 

lyron Franklin - Secretary 
jreg Garner ■ Vice President 
Hregory Clark - President 
.enace Watson - Treasurer 



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Kappa Beta Gamma 




Kappa Beta Gamma is a national, social sorority with 
chapters at Catholic Universities throught the US . Our 
sorority was founded at Marquette University in 1917 and 
in 1954 Epsilon chapter was installed at Loyola University ot 
Chicago. 

Membership in KBC includes active undergraduates, 
alumnae, faculty and honorary members. Our chapter con- 
sists of approximately fifty members accepting new 
members each semester. 

Kappa Beta Gamma's membership is split between 
Loyola's Water Tower and Lake Shore campus'. Conse- 
quently we are very involved at both campus' 

Our sorority stresses diversity in its members. We en- 



courage involvement in the University. Sisters of KBG can 
be found working in student government, SOB, SAB, 
departmental clubs, and honorary societies. Outside the 
University we sponsor fund raisers and charity projects. 
Holidays will find KBG's caroling to the aged or orphaned. 

Although It may seem that we don't have time, we also 
study hard. Yearly the KBG with the highest CPA is honored 
with a national schlorship award. 

Through all our activities and especially through our 
friendship, Kappa Beta Gamma strives to uphold its long 
standing purpose: to improve its members, morally, social- 
ly, and intellectually. 




Row 1: Francis Boudovas. Maria Elena Robles. Dehra In- 
graham, Rose Collins. Maryellen Comeau. 
Row 2 Mary Eileen McCormick. Mary Cianfncca. Dawn 
Cerchar. Suzanne Vandenburg, Sara Chase, Christine 



DiSalvo, Barbara Bies. 

Row 3 Marianne Koziol. loanell DiSalvo, Lori Biiek. Judith 

Lehman, Eileen Kelly, Sandy Parra. 



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Sigma Pi 



Sigma Pi is a social fraternity composed of students from 
both the Lake Shore and the Water Tower Campuses. We 
are proud to be one of the oldest organizations on campus 
with our roots dating back to 1922 when our chapter was 



first founded as a local fraternity by the name of Phi Mu Chi. 
In 1961 ourchapter joined a national fraternity and became 
the Beta Chi Chapter of Sigma Phi Fraternity. 




Row 3: lohn C. Latall, lerry Heimoski. David Bryk. loe 
Morgan. Den Tassone. Blank Nanael, let! Came, Brother 
Kabookie. Kenn Quinn. 



Row 1: Larry Briudtse, lim Steigmeyer (President), Armondo 
Talancon, Dan Sullivan, Rob Romolo, Chuck Mascari. 
Row 2: Frank Weilhammer, Edward L Slushu. Bob Sutton 
(Treas-), lim Alherp. Rud\ Paoluca (Vice Pres.l. Gary Benn. 



Theta Phi Alpha 




••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 

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Row /. Wendy Creenberg (President). 
Row 2: Cheryl OIker-Patnck, Betsy Bellano, Adnenne Co/s- 
tem (Historian). 

Row 3: Paft/ Solomon. Judy Molotskt. Pau Calabrese. Kathy 
Sutor (Marshal). 

Row 4: Cindy Peca (Vice Pres.i. Beth Proko. Mope Pope, 
Maggie O'Keete. Sara Balderas, Lid)a Lyskanowski. 
Row 5 \3nc\ Fnlduar\, Kafie Murph\ 

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Theta Xi 




Row / Suresh Pai. Steve Bunson. Tom CiH. Dan Henson, 

Dave Bradshaw. 

Row 2: Ken Spina, loe Sullivan, Ken Vercelli. Willie Cruz. 



George Kounabalis. 

Row 3. lerry Sonnefeldt. Pete lacmo. foe Donofno. Fred 

Ciacoma, Bill Newren 



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Alpha Epsilon Delta 




Alpha Epsilon Delta is an international, pre-health protes- 
bional honor society. It is an official member of the Associa- 
tion of College Honor Societies and is affiliated with the 
American Association for the Advancement of Science. 

On April 28, 1926, fifteen premedical students at the 
University of Alabama met with Dr. )ack P. Montgomery, 
Chairman of the Premedical Committee, and Professor of 
Organic Chemistry, to formalize the organization of a new 
premedical honor fraternity. From these modest beginn- 
ings, Alpha Epsilon Delta has today become the world's 
largest body divoted to premedical education. Membership 
exceeds 64,000 m 132 chapters, of which about 6,000 are 
in active chapter and about 7,500 in professional school. 



On April 2, 1977 Alpha Epsilon Delta installed its 121 
chapter at Loyola University. Fifty-six students and fou 
faculty members were initiated as members of the lllinoi 
Eta chapter. 

The object of the Society Is to encourage and recogniz 
excellence in premedical scholarship; to stimulate an a\ 
preciation of the importance of premedical education in th 
study of medicine: to promote cooperation and contai 
between medical and premedical students and to develo 
an adequate program of premedical education; to brm 
together similarly interested students; and to use the bod 
of knowledge that is gained for the benefit of the healt 
organization, charities, and the community. 




Ofiicers sitting: Charisa Spoo (Secretary), Steve Armhurst 
fPre.s/denO, Dr. laskowski (Moderator). Lisa Kowar (Vice 
Pres.l, John Ringo (Treasurer). Steve Bielski (Historian, not 
pictured) 

Row ]: Thao Doan, lane Wong, Rosemary Yanong. lane Pin- 
da. Bob Van Boven Sue Biiek. Anton Fakhoun. Thomas Kim. 



lose Montes, Noeila Acosta. 

Row 2: Diane Drugas, Marguerite Barbagallo. Rose Diakos, 

Wayne Brearly. Charles Mascari. Dan La Voie. Hector Tellez. 

Row 3: Robert Nagle, Ravender Raju, Kevin lay Long, Chuck 

Cambla. 



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Alpha Kappa Psi 




Row /; lose Ve^j. Cameron Pon, Mike Ryan, Laura 

R.iwur. Dnnnj Lip!n:L.: I'ji < . t.'w- .'.r'-- ' '. ii;-in 



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Riiw z Id Cassin. Mike Francis. Don Peters. Steve 
Presmyk. Tom O'Connor, Bill Martin, Chris jedynak.joe 




American Society 
for Personnal 
Ad mi nitration 




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Applied Psychology 
Club 




Chardin 

Anthropology 

Society 




leannie Weber, )im Cwain, Nicholas Kiizer(VP). Cevork 
Boudaghian(Treas). Edie Van Steen. Dennis Gram- 
menos(Pres), Fr. Crollig, S.}., Mel Neville, Anne Wicker- 
Names in no particular order. 



Circle K 




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What IS Circle K ? 

Circle K International is the largest collegiate 
organization in North Annerica. The objective of Circle 
K IS to provide College Students with a means by which 
those individuals interested in helping others and being 
of service m society can exprees this concern. Our mot- 
to IS 'WE BUILD,' and in practice this means genuinely 
constructive involvement in the community and on 
campus 




Sifting Elvin Cornier, Vince ObrzuL Bob Van Buven. 
Row 2: Terry Severa, Cyndi Kasper. Ricky Sermio 
Margaret Obrzut. fanesta Denton. George .A/pogiams 
Br Chuck Sr /ames, Bob Smith 







Communicalion Unlimited is an organization of com- 
munication majors and miners. Our purposes are to pro- 
vide members with information on careers in communica- 
tion and to enable students, faculty and administrators to 
meet outside the classroom. 

Each Spring we hold our Annual Communication Week, 
which includes workshops, exhibits, a career day and 
special guest speakers, 

In February, 1981, the Chicago Chapter of the Interna- 
tional Association of Business Communicators (lABC) decid- 
ed to form a student chapter at Loyola. This lABC student 
chapter operates as part of Communication Unlimited. 



Communication 
Unlimited 







Back Row: Sheila Carter, Joanne Contino. Liz Schindler, 

Mark Suszko. Amy Wells. Linda Tincher, Cita Mirchandani. 

Amy Muniz. 

From Row : Rosa Rizzato, Becky Rupe, lanel Temple, Cathy 

fame. 



Debating Team 




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Finance and 
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Row I /oe T/lo, far) Smith, Steve Kroegen, Tom frech 
Michael Montague. Keith Esentmer 



Row 3: Cerry Tobm. Mark Schroder. Paul Murphv. Chrii 
Cachat. jim Maltaliano. Mark Dreyer 



L. 



Row 2: Micheal Tang, /ose Calyan. Richard Soo. lack 1^°"''' Dan Sinnon, Michael Class. Tim Clancy. Ruaell Con- 
Jhanueu. Tim Mier. Chris Holden. Urn Krupa 



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Row 1: Susanne Degan, Leonard Allen, David McCormick, 
Mike Evans, Pat Mulroe, Gloria Monaghan, Cathy Bellann, 
Gloria Conforti. 
Row 2: Carey Smolen<.ki. Bill Grant, jerry Klat'ta. Leo Agoita. 



f 



Mike Egan. Francis Ferrer, Nich King, Phillip Saigh. 

Row 3: Mike Borovik, Al Ciudice, Paul Petrougaro, Steve 

Potts, Ayleen Llerena, Len VerVers, Michael Rydei 




Math Club 



The Loyola University Math Club is a highly respected 
organization in the University. The purpose ot the Math Club 
is two fold: to widen mathematical awareness among the 
students and to provide interaction between the students and 
the faculty. This purpose Is achieved through the tutoring 
available to all math students and through the various social 
activities available to its members. 



The Math Club participates in various University activities 
such as Welcome Week and Hunger Week. More recently, 
the members have shown interest in the MDS Dance 
Marathon and other future activities. The Math Club hopes to 
remain active within the University under the supervision of 
Dr. Ann Hupert (Moderator). 




Row I: Al Moreno (PresJ, Gary Ten Hoven (Vice Pres.). Den- 
nis Grammenos (Sec.), Keith Kalmanek (Tres, not shownl. 
Row 2: Dr. Anne Hupert (Moderator), teffrey Mueller, Linda 
Mekhitarian. Carolyn Dalporto, Zaia Parchem, Millen Agasi. 
Bob Smith. 






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Pax Christi 




Row 1 lohn Neafsey. Twanna Boiling, Mark Dwyer, 

Stephen Kroeger 

Row 2 lim Sullivan, lim Hart, Tina Cosentino, 



Row 3: Eillen Campe, Kane Schau. Karen Walih. Mary 
Walib. 




Rangers 




Tri Beta 



Beta Beta Beta Biological Honor Society is a nationally 
recognized society of students who share a common in- 
terest in the biological sciences. Loyola's Lambda Omega 
chapter has been actively involved in sponsoring special 
speakers and movies, a tutoring service, tours to 



laboratories, zoos and other places of scientific interest 
adopting an animal, tree planting and classifying, as well a^ 
several social events. Two types of membership , 
available to eligible students: associate and national 





Row 1: Marion Cilbanks, Boh Sutkowski. Rita Brown. Diana 
Lawcewicz. Paul Cillhanki 

Row 2: Dan Ciaccia, Vince Lombardi. Georgia Michaels, 
Chnsline DiSalvo, loanel! DiSalvo, Mary Eileen McCormick. 
Carol Lilly. Al Moreno, Meg Know/es, 

Row 3: Bob Framzinski, Monique Cilbanks, BUI Holder. An- 
thony Gregg, Rich Hayek, Christ Kardasis, Rose Diakos, 
Frank Ondrey, Enrique Flores, Kevm lay Long. Paul Duhrick 
Christ Damas. 







Volunteer Action 
Program 



Row ;. Dennis Croth (Treasurer), Sue Pecoraro. Kim 5ieben- 

tritt, Karen Rudman. Mary Reilly. 

Row 2: lulia OInera. bz Rodertai. lermiler Bowman. Shie/a 

llagan, Nina Clark, Cwen Zeise/. 

Row 3: Cay/e Canline//a, Debbie Harlman fVite Prendent), 

Shirley llagan fSecrelaryh Theresa Divar (Pre'.idenll. 



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student Education 
Association 






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After four years of preparing, and learning,, 
Loyola graduates are ready to take on the 
world. They have grown both spiritually and 
intellectually. Past graduates have been 
quite successful. There are many sucessful 
Loyola doctors, lawyers, dentists, scientists, 
businessmen and teachers in Chicago and 
around the world. The Loyola staff would 
like to wish this years graduates the best of 
luck in what ever they do. 




*- 



Undergraduates 




Ralph Abt 
Political Science 



Sandra Adams 
Communication Arts 



Neda Andjelkovic 
Biology 




Damian Adugu 

Anthropology 



William Andreoni 
Accounting (Executive) 



Denise Aird 

Psychology 





Linda Anderson 

Accounting (Public) 




Yong Ann 
Chemistry 




William Arendt 
Political Science 



Steve Armbmsl 
Psychology 



Gina Amieri 

Chemistry 




Valerie Amos 
Marketing 



Lizzette Baez 

Special Education 



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Monique Barwicki 

Biology 



All Aziz 
Computer Science 



Christina Babakitis 
Political Science 



Deborah Banks 

Communication Arts 



Kareen Baranowski 
Biology 



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Brenda Barker 

Political Science 




Patricia Barkyoumb 
Accounting (Public) 





Dean Battistella 

Psychology 



Kathy Backe 
Fme Arts 




Marguerita Barbagallo 
Political Science 




Michael Baumhart 
Accounting (Public) 




Timoihy Bayneb 
Communication Arts 




Rosa Bellido 
Biology 



ludith Betzold 
Elementary Education 



Cindy Beahout 
Psychology 



Scott Beallis 

Chemistry 



Susan Beauegard 



Richard Bennett 
Biology 



Gregory Berger 

Political Science 



Steven Bielski 
Biology 



Susan Bilek 

Biology 



Gregory Beabout 
Theology 




David Behrens 
Producation Management 




Richard Berger 




James Bindon 

Finance 




Virginia Bishop 
Biology 



Alexander Bisset 
Economics 




Sonjia Blumenberg 

Accouutinq (Puhlic) 



Frances Boudouvas 
Personnel Management 



Peter Brennan 
Finance 



Timodiy Brennan 
Finance 



Earlene Bowdry 

Education 




Sheryl Brewer 
Applied Psychology 




Joan Blake 
English 




Lydia Brown 

Communication Arts 




Rita Brown 
Biology 



Thomas J. Brown 
Communications 



Joseph Brumley 
Psychology 



02^ 




Kathleen Bucaro 

Communication Arts 



Diane Bunse 
Producation Management 



Louis Canonaco 
Finance 



Marcia Budziak 
Communication Arts 



Fred Buettner 
Biology 



Susan Burden 

Marketinc) 



Steve Bunneister 
Fine Arts 



Rachel Busch 

Accounting 



Mary Cain 
Biology 




Brian Carlson 

Communication Arts 



Mary Bulka 
Psychology 




Adele Bums 
Communication Arts 




Catherine Campbell 

Psychology 




Joyce Carpenter 

Applied Psychology 




Victoria Carrera 
Biology 



Fernando Castillo 
Biology 



Sarah Chase 
Criminal Justice 



Darlyne Case 

Communication Arts 



Liam Casey 
Physics 



Mitchell Cerrone 
Psychology 



Diana Chan 

Pohtn-til ^nfnc< 




Gerald Chenski 
Communication Arts 



Anthony Chioda 
Biology 




Sheila Casey 
Computer Science 




John Charles 
Biology 




Kathy Chirbas 

Production Management 



Margie Chirbas 
Personnel Management 



Jacquelin Cieslak 
Political Science 



03^ 




Michael Clark 
Marketing 



Steven Conlon 
Accounting (Public) 




Darius Clemons 
Sociology 



Gertrude Coit 
Accounting 



Dennis Connolly 
Physics 



Margaret Cunningham 
Theatre 



Mary Cunningham 

History 



Mary Ellen Comeau 
Personnel Management 



Cathleen Coghlan 
English 




Brian Connors 
Computer Science 



Diane Curry 

Criminal Justice 



Elizabeth Conklin 
Dental Hygiene 




Donna Conie 
Social Work, Criminal justice 




Russ Curry 
Political Science 




James Cwan 
Anthropology 



Bemadeti D'Amico 

Accounting (Public) 



Andrew Darwell 
Finance 



Alyce Deakin 
Biology 



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Rajeev Daga 

Biology 




Tim D 'Anza 
Accounting (Public) 



James Dash 
Political Science 



Tony Deany 

Public Administration 



Glenn Darlington 
Biology 



Neil Davidson 
Communication 



Stephen Deasey 
610/05/ 



Diane Dahlbom 
Communication Arts 




Eileen Davis 
Biology 




Anna Demacopoulos 
Communication Arts 




Paul Demes 
Computer Science 




Thomas Dimitroff 

Philosophy 



David DeRamos 
Biology 



Patricia Dickmann 

Social Work 



Dennetie Derezoteb 
Psychology 



Paola Didomenico 

Accounting (Public) 



Miriam Di Nunzio 
Communication Arts 



Dean DeSantis 
Political Science 




Lynn Oilier 
Criminal Justice 




Joanell Disalvo 
Biology 




Estelle Dobbins 
Accounting (Public) 



Thomas Dufficy 
History 



Nikola Duric 
Finance 



Meg Eckert 
Political Science 



David Dolniak 

Psychology 



Olga Dultz 

Marketing 




Else Ebert 
Accounting 




Thomas Educate 

Accounting (Public) 



Michael Donnelly 
Chemistry 



Cheryl Dunn 
Communication Arts 



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Rosie Eck 

Accounting (Executive) 



Caron Drolet 

Dental Hygiene 




Kim Duranty 
Elementary Education 




Ellen Ehrhart 

Marketing 




tSB 



Suzhanna Elam 
Psychology 




Dean Elger 

Accounting (Puhlic) 



Gladys Enriquez 

Personnel Management 




Ana Epelbaum 
Political Science 



Anton Fakhouri 
Biology 



Geralyn Fallon 
History, Political Science 




Lillian Feden 
Communication Arts 



James Feeney 

Marketing 



Beth Feiden 
fine Arts 



Loren Feldner 
Biology 




Joseph Fernandez 

Marketing 



James Fidler 

Psychology 



Mary Filkins 
English 



Sheila Flood 
Finance 




Timothy Foley 

Psychology 



Thomas Freeh 
Sociology 



Susan Froula 
Biology 



Paul Galanis 
Accounting (Public) 




Diana Franciski 
Personnel Management 



Sharon Fran ken 
Social Work 




Elizabeth Frecska 
Finance 



Brad Freitag 
Criminal Justice 




David Gabrovich 
Computer Science 



Patricia Gaffney 
Marketmg 



Patrick Gainer 
Accounting (Public) 




Mary Ann Galassini 
Production Management 



David Gambia 
History 



Kathy Canity 

Marketing 




Catherine Gau 

Psychology 



Andrew Gauder 

Finance 



Annette Gauthier 
Dental Hygiene 





Gregory Gauthier 






Biology 




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Helen Georgaras 
English 




Markus Giacomuzzi 

Psychology 



Geri Gaughan 

English 




Sharon Gaull 

Psychology 




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Michael Gehrman 
Political Science 



Jeff George 
Bio/otjy 



Penny Gianaras 

Psyc/io/atjy 



Therese Gens 

Theatre 




Henry Giancinto 
Biology 




Marjon Gillbanks 
Biology 




Nicholas Giardini 
Chemistry 



Theodore Gleason 
Biology 



Phil Gorski 
Marketing 



Anthony Gregg 
Biology 





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Nikki Giftos 
Accounting 



Joe Gill 
Political Science 



Delfi Gomez 

Social Work 



Gigi Gonzales 

Political Science 




Mike Grand] 
History 



Judith Grant 
Political Science 




■.^^'»> W;*/^ 



Alison Grusauskas 
Psychology 



Christopher Glancy 
Sociology 




Frank Goppert 
Psychology 




Al Guidice 
Accounting 




Wessley Gunchick 

Finance 



Mark Hastings 
Marketing 



Thomas Hendrick 
2'00 \ Accounting 




Brian Guzy 

Production Management 




Marie Halpin 
Accounting (Public) 



Joan Haluska 
Biology 



Mary Hatzis 

Biology 



Vince Hayes 

Sociology 



Jerald Heimoski 
Accounting (Public) 



Mary Hien 
Finance 



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Naushin Hadji vaziri 


Math & Computer 


Science 


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Lyn Handy 

Psychology 




Mari Heavey 

Communication Arts 




Mark Henry 

Criminal Justice 




Douglas Henson 

Biology 




Ana Hernandez 
English 





Carmen Hernandez 
Biology 



Juan Hernandez 

Communication Arts 



Sanford Herzon 

Communication Arts 



Karen Heyn 
Social Work 




Mary Hickey 
Accounting (Public) 



Dawn Hoessler 

Psychology 



William Hickey 

Production Management 



Mary Ann Hilden 

Communication Arts 



Donna Hoessler 

Psychology 



Thomas Hogan 
Psychology 



Hillock Jodi 
Accounting (Public) 




William Hoijer 
Biology 



83^ 




Jane Holmes 
Political Science 



Jim Hunt 
Psychology 



Yvonne Holte 

Philosophy 



Stephen Hopkins 
Political Science 



Thomas Hunt 
Political Science 



Frank Hutton 
Biology 



Gary Hover 

Communication Arts 




Johnathan Hutul 
Finance 







Annette Jackowiak 
Communication Arts 




Thomas lannucci 

Biology 



Jane Icenogle 

Math & Computer Science 



George Jackson 
Economics 



Dave I to 

Accounting (Public) 




Waukanee Jackson 
Social Work 




Janice Jakubco 

Social Work 



James Jaworski 
Accounting 




June Johnson 
Communication Arts 




Mary Jones 

Biology 



Anthony Janiga 
Biology 




Christine Jedynak 
Communication Arts 




Linds 


Johnson 


Productiot 


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Kathleen Jordan 
Communication Arts 



Gregory Jansyn 
Biology 


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Robin Jeffries 
Biology 




LaWandrea Jolly 
Personnel Management 



Thomas Jaselskis 
Chemistry 




Debra Jennings 

ersonnel Manaqement 




Theresa Juncer 
Communication Arts 




Chris Juris 
Finance 



Ronald Karabowicz 
Math & Computer Science 



Dave Kelch 
Socioioqy 




Kathleen Kadlec 
Marketing 



Keith Kalmonek 
Chemistry 



Thomas Kane 
Production Management 



James Karagianes 
Political Science 



Katherine Karalekas 
Biology 



Eileen Keller 
History 



Marie Kelly 
Personnel Management 



Sharon Kadlubowsld 

Psychology 




Sharon Kappel 
Social Work 




Cindy Kaspor 
Spanish 




Bruce Kijeuski 
Personnel Management 




Annette Kilian 
Accounting 



Edward King 

Biology 



Elizabeth Kiss 


Biology 


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Ellen Knowles 
Accounting (Public) 



Patrick Killean 
Criminal Justice 



Donald Kipper 

Bioloqv 



Miki Kitahata 
Psychology 





Nicholas Kirkeles 
Criminal justice 



Paula Klafta 
Biology 



Scott Knox 
Personnel Management 



Michael Koehler 
Chemistry 



Thomas Kii 
Biology 




Annette Knitter 
Communication Arts 




Bhasini Kongsamut 

English \ \ 295 ' 




Paul Kontrimas 

Biology 



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Michelle Kozlowski 
Psychology 




Lois Kusy 
^;^~ « C/i(?mi5(ry, Biology 



Louis Korompilas 

Biology 



Judy Kralovic 
Biology 



Steven Kiause 

Psychology 



Helen Koutroulakis 

Accounting (Executive) 



Marian Kramer 

Special Education 



Charles Kroll 



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Biology 




Robert Krause 
Chemistry 




Mark Kurkul 

Accounting (Public) 




Nancy Lakowski 
Communication Arts 



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Biology 



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Computer Science 



Frank Lipuma 

Criminal Justice 




Brian Liston 

Marketing 



Juhe Llorens 

French 



Tom Laurie 

Political Science 




Steven Leonardi 
Accounting 




Peter Lopez 
Psychology 




Joseph Lucas 
Accounting (Public) 



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Computer Science 



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Biology 




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Sociology 



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Finance 



Phillip Masterston 
Communication Arts 



Frank Matos 
Political Science 



Keith Mathews 
Accounting (Public) 




Kathryn Mattingly 

Accounting (Public) 



Dominic Mattucci 
Marketing 



Sylvia Maxey 

Psychology 



Mary Eileen McCormick 

Biology 



Mary McGee 

Theatre 



Edward McGinn 

Math & Computer Science 





Siamac Mashood 
Biology 




Anthony McCormack 
Biology 




John McHatton 
Marketing 




Michael McNally 
Chemistry 



Ronald Mersch 
Biology 



Susan McNamara 
Criminal Justice 



Joseph Messinger 
Communication Arts 



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Biology 




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Mari Jil! Mirowski 

Criminal Justice 



Lourdes Medina 

Communication Arts 




Stephanie Meyers 
Applied Psychology 



Juan Mir 
Accounting (Public) 



Fredelyn Medrano 
Biology 




Michael Mijan 
Criminal justice 




Donna Jo Mirabella 

Sociology 




Gregory Molley 

Accounting (Public) 



Daniel Monaco 

Theatre 




Eric Moore 
Accounting iPuhlic) 



John Mrozek 
Psychology 



Mary Mulroe 
Finance 



Wanda Moragne 
Education 



Steven Moses 
Marketing 



John Muldoon 
Economics 



Eugenia Mulhem 
Applied Psychology 




Tina Mundy 
Political Science 



Michelle Munford 
Personnel Management 




Amy Muniz 
Communication Arts 



Alexander Murfey 
Computer Science 



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Psychology 




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Accounting (Public) 




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Biology 



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Accounting (Public) 




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Accounting (Executive) 



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Biology 



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Finance 



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Personnel Management 




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Biology 




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Psychology 



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Computer Science 



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Political Science 




Kenneth O'Brien 
Biology 



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Biology 



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Biology 




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Accounting {Executive) 



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Marketing 



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Sociology 




Catherine Ott 

Biology 



Tim Owen 

Chemistry 



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Accounting 




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Biology 



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Biology 



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Psychology 




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Biology 



Paul Ponzo 

Accounting (Executive) 



James Pranger 
History 




Ralph Price 

Biology 



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Social Work 



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Personnel Management 




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Biology 



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Chemistry 




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Finance 



Thomas Pyzik 
History 




Mitchel Rabir 
Biology 



Tomas Radtke 

Political Science 




Thaddeus Radziwiecki 
Biology 



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Applied Psvchology 



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Production Management 




Randall Rathmell 
Criminal histice 



Roger Rathunde 
Chemistry 



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Accounting (Public) 



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Catherine Rogers 
Theatre 



Phyllis Reed 
Personnel Management 




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Biology 



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Biology 



Barbara Romz 
Computer Science 



John Rooney 
Communication Arts 




James Reid 

Economics 




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English 



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Judith Rube 
English 



Amy Rubenstein 
English 



Gelsys Rubio 
Psychology 



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Accounting (Public) 



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Biology 



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Criminal Justice 



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Accounting (Public) 




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Marketing 



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Theatre 



Edward Rubio 
Communication Arts 




Rebecca Rupe 
Communication Arts 




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Accounting (Public) 




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Accounting (Public) 



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History 



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Math & Computer Science 



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Biology 



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Psychology 



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Chemistry 



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English 



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Psychology 




Yolanda Santiago 
English 



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Accounting (Public) 



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Political Science 



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Biology 



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Chemistry 




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Theatre 





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Communication Arts 



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Political Science 



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Nursing 



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Chemistry 




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Latin 



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Biology 



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Marketing 



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Personnel Management 



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Psychology 




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Finance 




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Accounting (Executive) 




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Social Work 



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Communication Arts 



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Psychology 




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Communication Arts 



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Communication Arts 



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English 



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Applied Psychology 



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Political Science 




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Math & Computer Science 



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Biology 



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Communication Arts 




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Communication Arts 




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Finance 




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Marketing 



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Production Management 



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Computer Science 



James Steigmeyer 
Biology 



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Criminal Justice 



Stanley Sulek 
Personnel Management 



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English 



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Computer Science 




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Political Science 



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Applied Psychology 




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Biology 




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Psychology 




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Susan Tarchala 
Biology 



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Biolocfv 



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Psychology 



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Personnel Manaqement 




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Sociology 



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Linguistics 



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Communication Arts 



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Social Work 



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Computer Science 




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Political Science 



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Communication Arts 




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Psychology 



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Political Science 



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Accounting (Executive) 



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Biology 




Carol Tucker 
Communication Arts 



Frank Ungari 
Accounting 



Leonard VerVers 
Chemistry 



Michael Volmi 
Communication Arts 



Michael Vosnos 
Finance 



Thomas Voss 
Marketing 



Rose Marie Tully 
Marketing 




Christopher Unger 
Political Science 




Thomas Voldrich 
Accounting (Executive) 




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Chemistry 




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Biology 



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Histor\' 




Sheila Wallensack 
History 



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Communication Arts 



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Philosophy 



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Accounting (Executive) 



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Accounting (Public) 




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Political Science 



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Criminal Justice 



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Political Science 




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Computer Science 




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Marketmg 




Arlene Weiss 
Nursing 




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Philosophy 



Chris Werwicki 
Pohtical Science 



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Communication Arts 



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Communication Arts 



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Biology 



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Criminal Justice 



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Marketing 



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Sociology 



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Finance 




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Communication Arts 




Greg Wohlleber 
Criminal Justice 




Jane Wong 
Chemistry 



Dominic Zanftrdino 
Biology 



John Zimmermann 
Political Science 




Camille Zumpano 
Communication Arts 



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Chemistry 



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Psychology 




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Dental Hygiene 



Judy Wyandio 
Dental Hygiene 




Richard Zelvis 
Accounting 



Timothy Yueill 



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Diana Burda 



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Kathleen Burkhart 



Mary Byrne 



Mary Ellen Campbell 



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Elizabeth Doemiing 



Cynthia Donka 



Theresa DonnaMaria 



Renata Dooley 




Elizabeth Drezek 



Nancy Drong 



Judith Dwyer 



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Gina Marie Juliano 




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Carrie Klima 




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Vicki Landry 



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Kathleen Selwa 




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Kathryn I. Allocco 

Andreas Anthony Antoniou 

Dennis J.Aukstik 

Arthur W. Aufman 

Ulana M. Baransky 

Andrea Becker 

Bruce Erwyn Bell 

Beth Louise Beucher 

Linda D. Bielitzki 

Michael S. Blazer 

Kenneth Lee Block 

Jospeh Anthony Bosco 

Dennis E. Both 

David Joel Bressler 

Thomas P. Bums 

Richard Louis Burton 

Victoria L. Bush 

Dwight Patrick Campbell 

Anne Therese Casey 

Richard H. Chapman 

Sofia E. Chrusciel 

Peter Reynolds Coladarci 

Brian F. Collins 

Susan Kate Collins 

Eric Paul Cooper 

Steven A. Crifase 

Catherine T. Crowley 

James E. Cushing, Jr. 

Anita M. D'Arcy 

Robert Joseph Dargus 

Rhonda Kellly Davis 

Ronald Richard Dietrich 

Vasilios Demetriou Dossas 

Carol Ann Doyle 

Jeanne F. Doyle 

Mark L. Dressel 

Amy Starr Drew 

Gail Beesen Dwars 

Sofia K. Echeverria 

Matthew James Egan 

Debra Oswald Elder 

Lawrence Adam Elster 

Diana Kathleen Fisher- Woods 

Stephen P. Fitzell 

Katheryn L. Fleischer 

George William Foster 

Sam Joseph Fratantoni 

Stephen P. Fromhercz 

Scott Allen Fromm 

Peggy Sue Gelman 

Allen Bruce Glass 

Michael Glickman 

Karen L. Grandstrand 

Marc F. Greene 

Maria N. Greenstein 

Joseph John Griseta 

Bruce S.Hainsfurther 

Martin Steven Hanley 



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Mary Beth Powers Hannigan 

David Carr Hannum 

Kathleen Michele Hechinger 

Brenda Porter Helms 

Don Seth Hershman 

Doris K. Heuer 

Douglas Gordon Hewitt 

Ronald M. Hill 

Daniel P. Hogan 

Jeffrey Donald Jeep 

Maria M. Kaiden 

Judith S. Kaleta 

Kevin T. Keating 

Mary Pat Kerns 

Victoria Marie Klekamp 

Daniel J. Kohnen 

Rebecca Kidwell Kolleng 

Albert S. Krawczyk 

Nicholas J. Kritikos 

Thomas Edward Lacny 

Karen Lamping 

Michael H. Leichenger 

Steven H. Lewis 

Catherine Elizabeth Long 

Jacqueline H. Lower 

Lawrence Hayden Lucey 

Tom Henry Luetkemeyer 

Diane MacArthur 

Thaddeus Stephen Machnik 

Mary Brinas Manzo 

Sheryl Ann Marcouiller 

Jeffrey Edward Martin 

Susanne Summer Matlin 

Kevin P. McAuliffe 

David O. McCarthy 

Kathleen Ann McCarthy 

Edward Joseph McGillen 

Michael Edgar McGoey 

Daniel William McGrath 

Pamela K. Mckenna 

Danial J. McNamara 

Sheri H. Mecklenburg 

Thomas Edward Mueller 

Michael Jeremiah Murray 

Richard Ross Murray 

Patricia Anne Needham 

Therese Marie Obringer 

Erin Marie O'Connell 

Francis Patrick O'Connor 

Judith Williams Olson 

Ulo Ago Ormiste 

Nancy Tordai O 'Shaughnessy 

Eileen Marie O 'Sullivan 

Kristen K. Palencia 

Kathleen M. Pantle 

Lilli Ann Papesh 

Deborah Susan Pardini 

Paul George Peterson 

Gail Sears Petrich 

Michael Gerard Phillips 

Sandra L. Ragusi 



Michael Gerard Phillips 

Sandra L. Ragusi 

Mary J. Raleigh 

Julie Ann Ramson 

Craig Joseph Randall 

Charleen A. Reinhold 

Gail M. Rineberg 

Lawrence Richard Robins 

Robert G. Robinson 

Arnold Edward Rubens 

Barbara L. Rubens tein 

Sharon Ruth Rudy 

Maureen Russell 

Priscilla Ryan 

Mark S. Saperstein 

Cheryl Louise Sama 

Judy A. Saslow 

Susan Kay Spurgeon Scarcelli 

Mark A. Schramm 

Baruch M. Schur 

Paul Michael Scoma 

Richard C. Shady ac, Jr. 

James Kevin Shaw 

Kathleen Mary Sheahan 

Kenneth Stuart Shiner 

Raymond Matthew Simon 

August L. Sisco 

Michael C. Slajchert 

Joseph J. Solberg 

Kevin J. Stankewicz 

Lauren Ann Stoery 

Mary Jo Strusz 

Richard Paul Sulkowski 

Edmimd M. Tobin 

Hugh Francis Toner III 

Elizabeth Anne Vranicar Tanis 

David Anthony Upah 

Raul Vega 

Eileen Theresa Walsh 

Hollis Lee Webster 

Laurie Coleman Weintraub 

Charles Nelson Wheatley Jr. 

Janet H. Winningham 

Gary Neil Worcester 

Vicki R. Wright 
Brenda Eileen Yore 




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Barbara Lise Abrams-Kudan 

Michael Paul Anderer 

Emily Moore Axelrod 

Marie Michelle A. Batacan 

Cherie L. Bemdt 

Dale Alsop Billeter 

Susan Hayden Black 

Linda Bliwas 

Elaine M. Brady 

Karen Susan Browning 

April N. Budney 

Patricia R. Burke 

Sharon M. Butterfield 

Barbara E. Casey 

Barbara G. Chalkley 

Theresa Stepniewski Chamberlin 

Jerry J. Ciffone 

Barbara J. Collinson-Pautz 

Emily Jean Cooper 

Anna M. Corbett 

Susan Sharp Cornelius 

Abner T. Kuschel Cunningham 

Anne M. Dahm 

Elizabeth L. Dering 

Catherine Marie Devitt 

Peggy Ann Deichstetter 

Karen Joyce Erlind 

Margaret Weber Everhart 

William M. Flood 



Lisa Ann La Forge 

Lynn Lutz Friend 

Ronald D. Froemming 

Joan Greenberg Goldman 

Carol H. Goren 

Jeanne A. Green 

Nancy Jo Gutner 

Katherine Jones 

Judith Kilpatrick 

Barbara June Koppel 

Russell LeBlanc 

Mary Taylor Lentine 

Ellen Annette Leon 

Jay S. Lewkowitz 

Dorthy Catherine Lyall 

Joanne M. Magoc 

Robyn L. Mandell 

Thereas A. McDonough 

Carol Chrisman Mclntyre 

Valerie Ann McKinney 

Susan A. McFarland Muha 

Arlene Miller 

Karen Frell Murphy 

Nan Leslie Nader 

Roslyn Newman 

Barbara Marie Noeth 

Sandra Sanabria Nothegger 

Susan Elizabeth Nowacki 

Dorothea Pater 



Susan A. Petermann-McDaniels 

Carol A. Petrakis 

Jerome Pietrusiak 

K. Lynn Pittges 

Hannah Lasse Poremba 

Anne B. Powell 

Janet E. Rassenfoss 

John Nicholas Rekas 

Fran L. Riley 

George Stephen Ritter 

Shirlee S. Rubenstein 

Karen R. Schmeissing 

Jill Elizabeth Schrier 

John Michael Sellers 

R. Dennis Shelby 

Doug Sherman 

Barbara Roselyn Silver 

Joanne G. Simon 

Nancy Sherman Smith 

Brenda T. Thompson 

Denise Marie Turean 

Eric A. Turner 

James D. Van Doren, Jr. 

Mary Jo Wasilew 

Suzanne Mehler Whiteley 

Sharon Lynne Wier 

Carol A. Young 

John Michael Zarlengo 




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Andreas A. Antoniou 
Alfred & Ann Marie Asciutto 
Mr. & Mrs. Jack Bethke 
E. W. Beutel M.D. 
Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence Bilek 
Cassadra Sendziol Blazer 
Mr. & Mrs. Robert C. Blum 
John & Barbera Bochniak 
James P. Bouchard 
Mr. & Mrs. James Boyer 
Mrt & Mrs. Keith Branic 
Mr. & Mrs. Robert G. Brambert 
Mr. & Mrs. Carl A Bruns 
Cathie Smeal Burkhart 
Constance J. Cacinppo 
Anita R. Chandarana 
Luciano Chemello 



Nicholas Chionis 

Angela Cichocki 

Mark Joseph Cidlek 

Marlene Clancy 

Cathleen Coghlan 

Mr. & Mrs. Roy R. Cone 

Mr. & Mrs. Bruno Cortopassi 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Cox 

Mr. & Mrs. Jim Crane 

Mark F. Curcio 

Holly Alison Curtiss 

Mr. & Mrs. John Deakin 

Alyce Deakin 

W. G. Dearhammer Family 

Sylvia Diaz 

Patricia L. Dickmann 

The Dlutowski Family 

Edward A. Dobbins 

Edna M. Dobbins 

Frances Ann Dobins 

Francis X. Dowd 

Mr. & Mrs. M. P. Durco, Sr. 

Michael Farhi 

Joan G. Fickinger 

Hal T. Filian 

Kathleen Flood 

Rose Florez 

Debra C. Freeman 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Galassini 

Mr. & Mrs. Andrew A. Galich 

Mr. & Mrs. William Gilbert 

Mr. Malik Gillani 

Nora A. Gillespie 



Laura Giorgolo 

Danielle Glassmeyer 

William P. Gleason 

Emma Luz Gomez 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul N. Greico 

Mr & Mrs. Raymond N. Grejczik 

Mr. & Mrs. Tibor Gyore 

Drs. A. & I. Helenowski 

Nancy Hernandez 

Rosemary Highland 

Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Huston 

Mary T. lozzi 

Robert A. Jackman 

Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Jackowiak 

Annette Jackowiak 82 

Mary Jackowiak 83 

John Peter Jackowiak 82 

Roseann Jackowiak RN 78 

Patricia Jackowiak 81 

Leonard Jackowiak 

Margaret Jackowiak 

Daniel J. Janik 

Mr. & Mrs. K. W. Jenkins 

Evelyn Jesski 

Linda F. Johnson 

Peter Jordan 

Mr. & Mrs. John Kail 

Mr. & Mrs. George Kaschube 

Kimberly Ann Klein 

The Knowles Family 

Judge Maria Korvick 

Mr. & Mrs.M. W. Koscielny 

William J. Kost 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward Krope 

William D. Kuehn 

The Kuper Family 

Barbara Kutchin 

Edward A. Laga 

Marlene C. Lancy 

Diane M. Landow 

Dr. & Mrs. R. Latall 

Dr. & Mrs. Robert E. Lee and Family 

Morris I. Leibman 

Marie Nicole Lembessis 

Teri Lescher 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Liakas 

Heidi Lindhorst 

Maria Anne LoTempio 

The Howard J. Long Family ' 

F. G. Loutfy M.D. 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph L. Lucas, Jr. 



Joseph J. Lund 

Frank Mahony 

Mr. & Mrs John Marron 

Mr. & Mrs James Marion 

Judge & Mrs. Edward H. Marsalek 

Thoreau D. May 

Susan McAllister 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert B. Mcgee 

David J. & Sheila M. McLaughlin 

The McManus Family 

Blanca Melendez 

M -. & Mrs. Mikrut 

Col. & Mrs. John Milani 

Gerald Milkeris and Family 

Mr. & Mrs. William Montgomery 

Hon. & Mrs. James E. Murphy 

Mr. & Mrs. James K. Murphy 

Nancy L. Naddy 

Gerald R. Nagel II 

Mr. & Mrs. George Nedved 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward C. Novak 

Patricia A. O'Connor 

Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Olszak 

Peter J. Panapoulos 

Joseph M. Partipilo 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Pecoraro 

Mr. & Mrs. Zack Perovich 

Mr. & Mrs. C. Raymond Peterson 

Mr. & Mrs. Sam Petrungaro & Paul 

Mrs. Kattie L. Pollard 

Kathleen M. Polnik 

Mr. & Mrs. S. Porada 

Kathryn Marie Potocek 

Mary Beth Prochotsky 

Kathryn Ann Pry or 

Mr. & Mrs. George M. Quinn 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony H. Radetic 

Janardan K. Reddy 

Mr. & Mrs. Murray Resnik 

Delores DeJesus Reyes M.D. 

Dr. & Mrs. Jesus C. Rodenas 

Michael Rodriguez 

Mrs. Bernyce M. Rogers 

Mr. & Mrs. Stefan Rupp 

Gregg M. Rzepczynski 

Letterio Sacca 

Tony& ValSadowski 

Lori Ann Scharrer 

Mr. & Mrs. R.M. Schiffels 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter T. Schultz 

Dr. & Mrs. Antonio Scommegna 



Mr. & Mrs. Louis Semedalas 

Mr. & Mrs. Norman E. Shoff 

Tom Sheehy ^s^^- 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Skryd 

Maribeth Squier 

Mrs Jean Stachowski 

Eleanore L. Stopka 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank M. Sullivan, Jr. 

Marc A. Suty 

Mr. & Mrs. Gerald Swatzina 

Mr. & Mrs.Antoni Szymanski 

Audrey W. Tan 

The Teichman Family 

Shawn Tokunaga 

Dr. K.S. Tom W^ 

Patrick J. Tuohy 

Patrick James Ulie 

Geoff frey Urban 

Edith D. VanSteen 

Dr. & Mrs. Elio G. Vento 

Michele Vilimek 

Mr. & Mrs. L. Vincolese 

Mrs George Walker 

Mr. & Mrs. William L. Wallace 

Mr. Harry J. White 

Mr. & Mrs. George Witik 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Wolfe 

Rick Wroble, Jr. 

Susan M. Wroble 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Yueill 

Mr. & Mrs. John Zablotney 

Dolores Zbacnik 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard Zeisel 

Michael J. Zimbrick 




The 1982 Loyolan Staff gives very 
special thanks to the following 
patrons. Their generosity is 
gratefully acknowledged by our 
staff. 

Mr. & Mrs, Stan Bojan 

The Craddock Family 

Mr, & Mrs, Harry Deakin 

Mr, & Mrs, E, T, Evans 

Mr, & Mrs, Elmer T, Evans 

Umber to D, Ficarella 

Sinon M, Galvin 

John J, Hardek 

Mr, & Mrs, Leonard Jackowiak 

Mr, & Mrs, James Marion 

Mr, & Mrs, J, Matusiak 

Bob Moorhead 

Dr, & Mrs, Robert Lee Muldoon 

Mr, & Mrs, A Ibert H, Novak & A ,J, 

Jan & Helen Olifirowicz & Mike 

Mr, & Mrs, Nathan Pass 

Prestige A dvertising 

George Ricci 

Mr. & Mrs, Otto Schemmel 

Dr, Thomas J, Schorsch 

Mr, & Mrs, Edward Smiejkowski 

Mr, & Mrs, Donald Sodora 

Mr, & Mrs, Roy Soger 





Any business who 
advertises in 
our yearbook 



A 
^NINNER! 




IS 



ANNETTE JACKOWIAK 

1982 ...»c «Mn ^. 1982 



COHGft^^^^ 



M\OHS 



AND 



OOOo 



Gram, Mom, Dad, 



lUc,( 




Roseann 78, Patricia '81, Mary '83, and John Peter '82 



^o^ttc 9*t do^4t*i to. mc ... 




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Snack Shop 

open 7 Ikp A Week 

300 West 26fh St. • Chicago, II 60616 

PHONE 842-0702 



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CASH CHECKS • MONEY ORDERS • NOTARY PUBLIC 

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Friday Saturday and Sunday 11 ajn. to 2 a.m. 
We honor Diner's Oub, American Express, and Carte Blanche Credit Cards 



m 



CENTER FOR URBAN POLICY 

OUR 3RD YEAR 

OF 

PUBLISHING LOYOLA FACULTY RESEARCH 
ON CHICAGO 

Best Wishes to Graduating Seniors of 1982 






-■^-»^ 



W^^m- 






r- v.- #■"»— - . 



WALSWORTH 
PUBLISHING CO., INC. 
Marceline, MO 64658 



BOB MOORHEAD 
Graphic Sales Consultant 



Quality 
Yearbooks 



Northfield, IL 60093 
312-441-6131 




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Congratulations and Warm Wishes 
to 
the Senior Qass of 1982 and their potential disciples 
may you continue to strive and excel 



from 



Loyola University of Chicago Bookstores 



(your kind of book store) 



274-3000 

6525 North Sheridan Road 

Chicago, Illinois 60626 



670-2880 

820 North Michigan Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60611 



'' Matriculating in Fortitude '' 





Photography 




312-897-4272 




217 South Lincoln way 
North Aurora, Illinois 60542 



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CELEBRATE 
BACCHUS STYLE 


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► WITH THIS COUPON 


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6445 N. SHERIDAN 
. 262-2041 

9 PARKING AVAILABLE AFTER 5. 



Official Photographer For Loyola University 

Water Tower 
Lake Shore 

Marcella Niehof f 
School Of Nursing 



ftBBiaBiHBHiBil. 




6590 Sheridan Road 
Chicago, Illinois 60626 
743-2281 

4522 N.Broadway 
Chicago, Illinois 60640 
784-7963 



The 
Loyola 

Phoenix 




Congratulates 
Its Sister Publication, 

The Loyolan Yearbook 
On Its 45th Volume 

and the Graduating 

Class of 1982 



BRUNO'S 
Produce & Gardening 
Center 

411 W. 31st St. 
Chicago, Illinois 60616 





BONNIEBROOK 




5343 S. Ashland 436-3200 

Chicago, Illinois 60609 



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PAT MARCY & ASSOC. 






65 S. Water Street 

Chicago, Illinois 

60601 

346-9835 



^e<it o-( ^ccc^ (o- de J9^2 ^%<icCuii6i^ 





James Karagianes 



Congratulations on Your Graduation 




Sic^ So(ACCfUa^ Sen^aice, 'Pete/i ^. ^ci/icc^o^, 'P%c4^cdc»tt 




(^ 



Color, B&W and Special Techniques. 



Quality Custom 
Hand Enlargements 

Photographic enlargements professionally 
hand printed to your exact specifications. 



P.O. Box 1216 
North Riverside, IL 60546 



(312)795-6370 
(312)764-4128 



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LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 



THIS BUDS 
FQRYCHJL 





CHICAGO SOUTH WHOLESALE OPERATION 



KJNGOF BE[RS®-ANHEUSER BU5CH, INC -ST LOUIS 








The book is finally finished. The tape and windows are put away for a couple of days till it 
is time to start next year's book. Being editor was quite an experience, and I learned a lot 
from it. 

I would like to take the time to thank a few very special people, for without them there 
would be no yearbook. First of all, I would like to thank Brother Grace and Valerie Gerard 
Brown from the Archives. They were instrumental in helping find material for our theme 
"Old and New". I would also like to thank Bob Moorehead, for without his understanding 
and patience there would not have been a book. For all the people in student services, the 
theatre department , and the athletic department who put up with the staff and helped in 
any way they could, the staff thanks you. In particular, I would like to thank Catherine Mul- 
queen of the theatre department for her cooperation. I would also like to thank George and 
the staff at Ricci Photography for putting up with our screaming staff. Also I would like to 
thank Darkroom Images for doing the copying and emergency darkrooming. 

I would like to thank all the people on the staff who contributed to the production of the 
book. First I want to thank any one who actually worked on production, unlike 
photographers and writers who can show off their work, these people can not say look I cut 
this window or pasted up this. Without their efforts there would be no where for the 
photographers and writers to show off their work. I would like to mention a few who did 
their work above and beyond the call of duty. First, I would like to thank Mary Jackowiak 
for keeping the records straight and for putting up with my complaining; Scott Flodin for 
doing what I asked (and even more), and for getting it done on time; Joan daPonte from 
Cadence, who stopped by so often to help me; Marty Cerza, Bill Grant, and Sue Degan for 
taking all those pictures; and James Karagianes for getting all those ads. To Emil Velez(the 
other Co-Editor): I would like to thank you for always being there and knowing what was go- 
ing on. Finally, I would like to thank my husband for being understanding when I came 
home tired and late. I would also like to thank him for all the extra work he did on the year- 
book. 

One last thing: Mary and Scott, good luck with next year's book. 

fflrst liiisks. 



"Jiiil Jfelf2, ^Igrp Ptakin 
"lilbr-i!!=|I)irf "luiwlcn 13.82 




Uli 



'WALSWORTH 
PUBLISHING 
kCOMPANY 

MARCELINE M1B80LR1 USA 





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