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Full text of "The Loyolan"

LOYOLA SP 




:AKS OUT 





LOYOLAN 1983 

Volume Forty Six 

Loyola University of Chicago is an equal opportunity educator and employer. Loyola 
University of Chicago admits students without regard to their race, color, sex, or national or 
ethnic origin to all of the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or 
made available to students at the school. Loyola University of Chicago does not discriminate 
on the basis of race, color, sex, or national origin in administration of its educational policies, 
admissions policies, scholarship and loam programs, and athletic and other school 
-administrered programs. Qualified persons are not subject to discrimination on the basis of 
handicap. 



Copyright 1983 Loyola University of Chicago 




..ilShfctev. 




Chicago is many 
things put together to 
form one unique city. 
Such things as the 
lake, Lake Shore 
Drive, the Loop, State 
Street, Michigan Ave 
and the many dif- 
ferent Ethnic 
Neighborhoods com- 
bined make Chicago 
one of the most 
beautiful and cultural- 
ly rich cities in the 
United States. 

Thomas J. Hennessey 



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There's so much to do, to 
see, to hear in Chicago. 
You can play or watch 
almost every imaginable 
sport; you can see fantastic 
works of art, science and 
nature or you can just sit 
on the lakefront and look at 
the beauty of the skyline; 
you can listen to the 
ridiculous antics of 
Chicago's politicians or 
you can listen to some of 
the most talented comics 
mimicking the ridiculous 
antics of those politicians. 
Chicago is simply a 
fascinating experience. 

Eileen M. O'Brien 



6 Loyolan 1983 





Loyolan 1983 7 






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Loyolan 1983 9 





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The Water Tower Campus, with the 
17-story Lewis Towers building since 
1946, is a focal point of Loyola Univer- 
sity. This campus also contains 
facilities for the College of Arts and 
Sciences. The School of Business Ad- 
ministration is another faculty of the 
campus. Among these facilities are 
others located at the Water Tower 
Campus. Included in these are the 
School of Education, established in 
1969 and offers the bachelor, master 
and doctorate degrees; the graduate 
School, which also conducts classes 
at the Lake Shore and Medical Center 
campuses; the Institute of Industrial 
Relations; the School of Law, housed 
in the James F. Maguire, SJ. Hall and 
was Loyola's first professional college 
with the first class admitted in 1908; 
the School of Social Work, organized 
as a distinct professional school in 
1938; and the University College, 
which began in 1914 as a downtown 
unit of the university, and now offers 
part-time degree programs at both cam- 
PUSES. The University College offers 
22 undergraduate degree programs, 
and includes the correspondence 
Study Division. 




12 Loyolan 1983 





Loyolan 1983 13 




The one thing about 
Loyola University that 
makes me appreciate it the 
most is the people who 
make the campus run. I've 
never had a teacher yet 
who was not willing to help 
me on his or her time. I 
always recieve a smile and 
a "good day" from the 
security guards and even 
the maintenance people 
here are great. 




14 Loyolan 1983 




Loyolan 1983 15 



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16 Loyolan 1983 





My experiences at the Water Tower Cam- 
puslWTC) have been nothing short of 
wonderful. Being new to the Chicago area 
was rather intimidating, but the climate 
here helped me feel at home before very 
long. I find the faculty very helpful and ge- 



nuinely concerned in their students, and 
the staff in general are cheerful and per- 
sonable. All the fellow students I have met 
here have also been great, and I feel very 
happy and content here. 

Regina McElwain 



Loyolan 1983 17 




18 Loyolan 1983 




Loyolan 1983 19 



Loyola's Law School 




20 Loyolan 1983 




Having just com- 
pleted my first year 
at Loyola Law 
School, my general 
reaction to the school 
is positive. The pro- 
fessors showed con- 
cern for students and 
were accessable out- 
side of class. The 
students did not 
seem to display any 
negative com- 

petitiveness but in- 
stead were ea&er to 
form friendships. Co- 
operation rather 
than competition 
seemed to prevail. I 
have not had any 
problems with the 
school 

bureacracy(althou£h 
this could change 
when I have to select 
my courses in the 
cominfc years). The 
workload was 

manageable, and I 
must say the year 
went more smoothly 
than I had an- 



Loyolan 1983 21 





22 Loyolan 1983 




Loyolon 1983 23 




24 Loyolan 1983 




Loyola University's 
Lake Shore Campus 
is the oldest of the 
University's cam- 
puses. This campus, 
which is located 
along the northern 
shoreline of lake 
Michigan, contains 
the central offices, 
classrooms, and 
labortories for the 
College of Arts and 
Sciences, the 

largest division of 
the University. 
Facilities for the 
Marcell Niehoff 
School of Nursing, 
which was Illinois' 
first accredited col- 
legiate School of 
Nursing, also 

highlights Loyola's 
Lake Shore Campus. 
Other facilities 
located at this cam- 
pus are the Doyle 
Guidance Center 
and Day School, the 
Parmly Research In- 
stitute, which 
engages in basis 
research in 

auditory, sensory 
processes, and the 
newly constructed 
George S. Halas, Jr. 
Sports Center. 




Loyolan 1983 25 




26 Loyola.™ 1983 



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yola's Lake Shore Campus offers students a chance to excel in 
ir capabilities. The often rigorous program here, refines a stu- 
it completely. It makes me believe that if you can stick it out at 
■ one of Loyola's Campuses especially the Lake Shore Campus, 
a can make it anywhere. I learned at this campus that gold shines 
d when its tested; to make a dull person into a gleaming jewel. 

Cindy Panek 




SOUND 

LOYOLA UMIV1MITY OP CHICAGO 



Loyolan 1983 27 




28 Loyolan 1983 




Loyolan 1983 29 




30 Loyolan 1983 




Loyolan 1983 31 



The Medical Center, which was completed 
in 1969, is contiguous to the hlnes 
Veterans Administration Hospital and 
State of Illinois John J. Madden Mental 
Health Center. 

The Medical Center houses the Strich 
School of Medicine, where research is be- 
ing conducted in heart disease, multiple 
sclerosis, myasthenia gravis and other 
diseases. There are also facilities for the 
Loyola University School of Dentistry, 
which is the oldest and largest in Illinois. 
Also included is the Foster G. McGraw 
Hospital, one of the five regional trauma 
centers in Metropolitan Chicago, one of 
the area's six perinatal centers, and a 
resource hospital for mobile intensive 
care-paramedic system. The McGraw 
Hospital is a leading center for the study 
and care of cardiovascular illinesses. 
The Medical Center contains the Outpa- 
tient Center, which was constructed in 
1981. There are special medical clinics 
arranged around 10 major areas including 
Medicine, Surgery, Pediatrics, Obstetrics 
and Gynecology, Psychiatry, Or- 
thopedics, Opthalmology; Ear, Nose and 
Throat; Neurology; Urology. The Out- 
patient Center provides a Computerized 
Multephasic Health Testing Unit which 
provides a fast and efficient means of 
diagnosis. The Medical Center also 
houses the Burke Pavilion. 
Affiliated Schools of Loyola University 
are Niles College, since 1968, and the 
Erickson Institute for Early Education, 
since 1967. 





34 Loyoian 1983 




Loyola n 1983 35 




Loyola offers the opportunity for students to 
develop their own ideas and bring, these 
ideas to fruition. Gone is the classic "p re_ 
med" syndrome. Instead, students work .. 
together toward a common g,oal-completing, pi 
their decree. 

Westby G. Fisher *-' 



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36 Loyolan 1983 




Loyolan 1983 37 




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Loyola n 1983 41 





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42 Loyolan 1983 




a division of the college of arts and 
Sciences, the Rome Center in Rome, 
Italy, provides American Students 
with the cultural advantage of stu- 
DYING aboard. The Center's faculty 
is composed of Loyola professors, and 
other American and European 
scholars who are specilaists residing 
in Rome. 

Each year, the Center accepts some 
300 students from any accredited 
college or university in the U.S. OR 
abroad. The students studying in 
Rome have the choice of attending a 
full academic year, or a fall or spr- 
ing semester. these students live and 

STUDY IN A CAMPUS ON THE VlA MaSSINI 

in Monte Mario, located four miles 

FROM DOWNTOWN ROME. The CENTER 

also sponsors study trips to other 
parts of Italy and Europe. 





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The city of Rome cannot be put into words. One 
must g,o to Rome, experience Rome, and live as a 
Roman. Loyola's Rome Center offers this unique op- 
portunity. Rome offers Everything, from CaesaT to 
the art and architecture of Michaelang,elo and Ber- 
nini. We cannot understand our present and future 
unless we understand the past, and Rome has in a 
larke way paved the way for future fenerations 
such as ours. 

Bryant Deifchan 



Loyolan 1983 45 




46 Loyolan 1983 










Loyolan 1983 47 




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Loyolan 1983 53 



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56 Fr. Raymond C. Baumhart S.J. 
58 University Officers 

60 Board of Trustees 

61 Deans of the Graduate Schools 

62 Undergraduate Deans 

64 Niles 

65 Nursing 

66 Student Services 

Academic Departments 
70 Water Tower 
90 Dental School 
100 Medical School 



Loyolan 1983 55 




Rev. Raymond C. Baumhart, S. J. 



Four years ago as Loyola's Class of '83 was registering for 
its first university courses, an interesting survey was taken. 
Some 17,000 June high school graduates- you may have 
been among them— were queried about their life goals. 
The survey indicated that the students' primary goals were 
finding steady work and being good at it; discovering pur- 
pose and meaning in life; having a good marriage and 
family life; and developing strong friendships. 
At the time, I felt that if these indeed were your life goals, 
you had come to the right place, because at Loyola the em- 
phasis is on teaching students to learn, to discuss, to ques- 
tion, and to live with understanding. 
Furthermore, throughout your Loyola years it was our 
hope that you would take major strides toward becoming 
men and women who are aware of history and of the major 
problems of our time. We also tried to form persons of 
reflection and judgement, persons who would think 
logically and communicate clearly, persons who could en- 
joy a concert, a museum and a poem. The Core Cur- 
riculum, we stated, was our way of helping to prepare you 
for all of life, not just for making a living. 



56 Loyolan 1983 



Were we successful? Or perhaps the question should bt 
rephrased: Were you successful, during your years a 
Loyola, in using the University's resources to achieve wha 
you sought in your professional and personal lives? Am 
what of our goals for you? Were you able to fashiot 
yourselves into whole human beings, competent in you, 
professional field; able to organize, analyze and ust 
knowledge; willing to reach out to others, especially tht 
needy? Most of all, do you to show signs of joining thost 
who are always searching, always learning, always con 
cerned and when appropriate, compassionate? 
Now, degree in hand, is the time to look both backwan 
and forward. Backward, to see how far you have com 
toward becoming an intellectually, culturally and emo 
tionally mature person. Forward, to redefine your lif 
goals as you matriculate for the next period in the universi 
ty of life. May each of you receive God's choicest blessing, 
during your never-ending quest. 

Raymond C. Baumhart S.J. 




Loyolan 1983 57 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 




Bernard T. Brennan 




Frank M. Covey, Jr. 




Daniel L. Flaherty S.J. 




Robert P. Neuschel 





William J. Byron S.J. 




Eugene R. Crosiant 




James M. Fuman 




Samuel L. Nolan 





James C. Carter S.J. 







Mrs. Mary Loretto Dillon 





William J. Quinn 






Fernando Arizti S.J. Raymond C. Baumhart S.J. 




Frank W. Considine 




Ronald J. Ferguson S.J. 




Dr. Robert P. Heaney Mrs. Mary Townsend Kimton H. Dunley Murphy 




John J. O'Callaghan S.J. John W. O'Mally S.J. 




Earl E. Pollock 



M. Lawrence Reuler S.J. 



William R. Surman 



Theodore J. Tracy 



Mrs. J. A /bin Yokie 



58 Loyolan 1983 




Francis J. Catania, Dean - Graduate School 




Charles R. Puree!/, Acting Dean- Law School 



Charles T. O 'Reilly, Dean - School of Social Work 



Loyolan 1983 59 



UNIVERSITY 





Paul G. McFarland, Vice President for 
Finance 



John H. Reinke S.J., Chancellor 




Stephen Kasbeer, Senior Vice President for 
Management 



James D. Barry, Vice President and Assis- 
tant to the President 



Dr. Alice B. Hayes, Associate Acadet 
Vice President 




60 Loyola n 1983 



Richard A. Matre, Provost of the Medical 
Center 



John P. Murray, Vice President for Person- 
nel 



OFFICERS 




Dr. Ronald E. Walker, Senior Vice Presi- 
dent and Dean of Faculties 



Mariette LeBlanc, Vice President for Stu- 
dent Services 




John F. Langdon, Vice President for Ad- 
ministration 



W. Daniel Conroyd, Vice President for Donald J. Hayes S.J., Vice President for 

Development University Ministry 




Dr. William Oswald, Vice President and John P. Finley, Associate Vice President 

General Counsel for the University for Finance and Controller 



Loyolan 1983 61 





■ 



Lawrence Biondi S.J., Dean - College of Arts and Dr. Patricia H. Werhane, Associate Dean 



Sciences 



College of Arts and Sciences 



UNDERGRADUATE DEANS 



. ■ - .,'. 




John Murphy S.J., Freshmen Dean, 



62 Loyolan 1983 



Richard Vande Velde, S.J., Dean of Dr. Ralph Pearson, Dean University Col 
Mathematical and Natural Sciences 























^ 






Dr. Donald Meyer, Dean - School of Business 



Dr. Gerald L. Gutek, Dean - School of Education 




Louise Kerr, Associate and Senior 



Francis Fennel/, Dean of Humanities 



Dr. Sloan T. Letman, Dean of Social 
Sciences 



Loyolan 1983 63 




Rev. John G. Vlazny, President and Rector 



NILES 



Rev. Martin N. Winters, Academic Dean 




Mr. Charles Gerace, Dean of Students 



Rev. Lawrence J. Dunn, Dean of Formations 



64 Loyolan 1983 




Dr. Marilyn Bunt, Chairperson and Assistant Professor 



NURSING 



Dr. Julia A. Lane, Dean - School of Nursing 




Dr. Kay Wiley, Chairperson and Assistant Professor 



Dr. Avis McDonald, Chairperson and Assistant Professor 



Loyolan 1983 65 



STUDENT SERVICES 




OFFICE HOURS 

i-i2coRM 

HMD 







James E. Whitehead, Dean of Students, MCC 



John Felice, Dean of Students, RCC 




Thomas Adams, Dean of Students, LSC 

66 Loyolan 1983 



Dr. Joan Steinbrecher, Dean of Students, WTC 



1000* ' 




Bernard M. Pleskoff, Associate Dean of 
Students. Director of Housing 




Irv Merek, Director Career Planning and Placement 



Valerie Farrell, RN, BSN, Student Health Ser- 
vices Director 




James Dwyer, Financial Aids Director 



Dr. Daniel Barnes, University Counseling Center 

Director Loyolan 1983 67 




Gary L. Soltys, Assistant Dean of Students, 
Director of Centennial Forum 



III 








Michael J. Lambesis, Asstistant Dean of Student, 
MCC 



Gordon P. Stiefel, Assistant Dean of Students, 
Director of Student Activities, WTC 




68 Loyolan 1983 



Donna Dorl, Assistant Dean of Students, Direc- 
tor of Student Activities, LSC 



Charles A. Taylor, Assistant Dean of Students, 
Black Student Advisor 




Angeles Eames, Assistant Dean of Student, 
Hispanic Student Advisor 



Helen Lavelle, Assistant Dean of Students, Inter- 
national Student Advisor 



OTHER SERVICES 




Robert L. Michiels, Director Physical Plant and 
Ground, WTC 



Don Mayo, Director of Security and Safetv, 
WTC, LSC 



Loyolan 1983 69 



Vi 



ACCOUNTING 



The Accounting Department is pleased to issue 
a favorable report for the year. Loyola graduates 
continue to distinguish themselves by passing the 
CPA Exam and receiving national recognition for 
their high scores. Accounting firms, banks, and 
businesses of all sizes continue to actively recruit 
Loyola accounting graduates. The Loyola chapter 
of Beta Alpha Psi, the national honorary fraterni- 
ty for accounting, again received an award for its 
excellent activities record. 

The department has ladded several faculty 
members this year, all with distinguished 
backgrounds. An advanced accounting course 
will be added to the curriculum in response to the 
ever expanding body of accounting knowledge. 
The CPA Review Course is undergoing a 
reorganization. The Accounting Department feels 
that these changes will help Loyola's accounting 
students to continue to be recognized as the best 
in the Chicago area. 



^ 



Dr. John Kostolansky, Chairperson & Assoc. 
Professor 



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AFRO - 
A MERICA N 




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Afro-American Studies is, by definition, intiejy. 
disciplinary. Thus, a major charge of "the Affo^i 
American Studies Program Is to coordinate and 
develop departmental offerings in a variety of 
academic disciplines. Another purpose of the pro- 
gram is to strive to make visible to the entire 
University community the accomplishments and 
aspirations of Afro- Americans. The Afro- 
American experience has been a central theme in 
the evolution of American society. Black people 
have been givers as well as takers, actors as well as 
reactors. Finally, the program provides a support 
service for the Afro-American community at 
Loyola. 



Dr. Carol L. Adams, Director 



70 Loyolan 1983 



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APPLIED 
PSYCHOLOGY 

/ 

Perhaps the most unique quality of the Applied 
Psychology Program is the integration of prac- 
tical "how to" helping skills, training into the 
core of theory and method courses. Several of 
these courses are unique to an undergraduate 
education. One of the best aspects of the program 
is its small size, which allows students and faculty 
to get to know one another. 



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Dr. John R. Shack, Director 




A THLETICS 

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The Department of Athletics at Loyola Univer- 
sity of Chicago conducts intercollegiate sports for 
both men and women as well as running the in- 
tramurals and recreation program for members of 
the University community. Seven men's, six 
women's, and two coeducational sports are of- 
fered by the Department. 

Facilities at Loyola's Lake Shore Campus 
where the Department is headquartered include 
the Alumni Gymnasium, the George Halas, Jr. 
Sports Center and a natural turf soccer-athletecs 
field surrounded by an artificial surface running 
track. 




Loyal K. Park, Director 



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Loyolan 1983 71 




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BIOLOGY 



All courses in biology are offered uniquely at 
the Lake Shore Campus. The Department of 
Biology aims to present biology students with the 
basic principles of the biological sciences and to 
prepare these students for graduate studies, 
teaching, or entrance into applied and profes- 
sional schools of science. 




Dr. A. J. Nappi, Chairman 



CHEMISTRY 




Our Department of Chemistry has earned and 
maintained a reputation for excellence over the 
years. Since more than 65 percent of those have 
received degrees in chemistry from Loyola have 
gone on to graduate studies in the field, and near- 
ly 50 percent have earned Ph.D's. the department 
has been proven to have a consistently strong 
undergraduate program. 

About 150 undergraduates are currently enrolled 
as chemistry majors and are receiving instruction 
in both the classroom and the laboratory. In ad- 
dition, a few of the most qualified are working as 
laboratory teaching assistants and tutors. 




• 



Dr. Patrick M. Henry, Chairman & Professor 



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72 Loyolan 1983 




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CLASSICAL 
STUDIESim 




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The Department of Classical Studies combines 
the traditional with the contemporary. The Latin 
and Greek languages and literatures, for instance, 
have been the cornerstone of a liberal education 
for centuries. They remain the department's 
primary interest; nevertheless, to meet the needs 
and interests of today's students, the department 
also offers over 25 courses in such diverse areas a: 
ncient art, archeology, drama, philosophy, com 
puter science, law, history, and numismatics 
These courses, taught in English, illustrate the 
department's commitment to the past in the light 
of contemporary requirements and developments. 





r. James G. Keenan, Chairperson & Professor 



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ARTS 




CONMUNICATION 



I 









The study of communication enables the stu- 
dent to acquire a better understanding of the pro- 
cess of human communication as well as to im- 
prove his or her own communicative skills in a 
wide variety of human interactions. The major in 
Communication provides students with the op- 
portunity to concentrate their studies in six areas: 
broadcasting, interpersonal communication, jour- 
nalism, mass communication, or public and pro- 
fessional communication. Specialized course 
work, creative activity and practical experiences 
also help prepare the communication major for 
careers and further graduate or professional 
study. 





Dr. Michael Cornell, Chairman 



Loyolan 1983 73 





CRIMINAL 
JUSTICE 



This interdisciplinary program is able to call on 
the faculty and resources of the College of Arts 
and Sciences, the Graduate School, the School of 
Business Administration and the professional 
schools of Law, Social Work, and Eduation based 
at Water Tower Campus. In addition, faculty 
members with special competence and experience 
in law enforcement, correctional administration, 
the courts, probation and parole agencies offer 
courses. Students are thus exposed to educators 
with direct knowledge and involvement in the 
criminal justice system. In this manner, establish- 
ed theory and current practices are merged in the 
classroom. 





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DENTAL 
HYGIENE 



The Dental Hygiene program at Loyola Univer- 
sity is designed to prepare the student for the total 
preventative aspects of providing the opportunity 
to build a solid foundation of dental knowledge 
and professional skills that will allow each student 
to become actively involved in society as a profes- 
sional health educator. 

The professional dental hygienist has attained 
the skills and educational background necessary 
to participate in all facets of society in which 
preventative dentistry is needed. These areas 
could include private dental practices, dental 
hygiene student programs, community health 
agencies, hospital settings, public school settings, 
research foundations, or Armed Services. 

All courses of instruction contribute to the 
preparation of a socially conscious dental 
hygienist who can serve mankind through health 
instruction. 



Janis Griel, Director & Assistant Professor 



■ ' '. .S 



74 Loyolan 1983 



ECONOMICS 



Economics provides the framework and con- 
cepts necessary in understanding the economic 
forces which shape our lives. Emphasizing theory 
and the application of theory, our courses are 
designed to provide the student with the 
analytical tools which are needed to meet the 
challenges and opportunities of a changing 
economic environment. Many of our students 
enter the business world directly upon graduation. 

Other students find their background in 
Economics helpful in earning MBA, M.A., J.D. 
and Ph.D. degrees. 



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Dr. David B. Mirza, Chairman and Assistant Pro- 
fessor 





ENGLISH 



Largest of the academic departments at Loyola, 
the English Department offers the two-semester 
writing sequence for freshmen and advanced 
courses in expository and creative writing, in- 
cluding specialized courses in writing for pre-law 
and nursing students. The department also offers 
a large number of courses in literature intended 
for non-majors. Students who major or minor in 
English take a structured sequence of courses in 
English and American literature from the Middle 
Ages to the present time. All courses in English in- 
clude training in organization and clarity of 
writing. The English Department sponsors lec- 
tures by visiting scholars and writers, and is host 
to the annual Loyola Festival of Chicago Poets. 



■ MM 




Dr. John S. Shea, Chairman 




Loyolan 1983 75 



E. 



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| Loyola's Educational Opportunity Program 
his been operative sinceli969. Through several 
supportive services provided by the E.6.P., 
Freshmen who are- determined ; inadmissible 
through the traditional University standards are 
encouraged to complete a four-year' degree pro- 
gram at Loyola. It is hoped that students, with, the 
|l<elp of E.O.P.'s support, develop more self- 
iei3nfidence, s strengthen qjjftaki aqademic skills, 
and gain more insight in|p the expectations of 
higher education. 




Tillman Terry, Director 



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ANCE 



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The Departments pf Finance is One of the 
smaller departmentsklf the School of Business, yet 
it is the most popular area of concentration of 
graduate students in the, MBA program. 

The finance rnajof receives broad training in the 
financial management aspects of business, the 
area of investments, and; financial institutions and | 
markets. Graduates typically pursue careers 
within the treasury departments of firmSj or with 
banks, security brokerage houses, ilnd other 
financial institutions. 



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Dr. Nicholas A, Lash Chairman & Associate 
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76 Loyolan 1983 




FINE ARTS 




The Fine Arts Department offers a very flexible 
program so that majors may concentrate in Studio 
Art, Art Education, Art History, Medical Illustra- 
tion, Communications Design or Art Therapy. 
These courses can lay the foundation for a career 
in the arts or for personal enrichment. Exhibitions 
of student work and that of contemporary artists 
are displayed in the Lewis Towers Gallery or 
Cudahy Library. | 

There is no major in music but a variety of 
classes are available and concerts of choral and 
orchestral music are presented each semester. 



W 




Dr. Mary S. Lawton, Chairperson & Associate 
Professor 



HISTORY 



The study of History develops precisely those 
skills of evaluation and analysis which will pro- 
vide a firm foundation for any professional 
career. The work of the historian is to present 
analyses and conclusions based on evidence 
gathered and evaluated on the basis of established 
principles. No other undergraduate discipline will 
provide more practical training in presenting writ- 
ten and oral arguments, and defending those 
arguments. While other disciplines develop 
writing skills, or understanding of political 
behavior, history combines the skills of these 
other disciplines with the added dimensions of the 
vast time span of human experience, and the 
breadth of view of a global perspective. 




^ 



Dr. Waiter D. Gray, Chairman 



J 



Loyolan 1983 77 



HONORS 



Since 1937 the College of Arts and Sciences has 
sponsored an Honors Program. At present, 
membership numbers over 200 from the three 
campuses at Lake Shore, Niles, and Water Tower. 
All students are candidates for the Honors 
Degree. Requirements for the degree include 
special coursework in all areas of the curriculum 
and a minimum grade point average. In addition, 
honors students join together for social and 
cultural activities, especially through the Honors 
Students Association. Direction of the program is 
in the hands of a student-faculty council, the 
director and associate director. 



^ 




Dr. Thomas E. Ranck, Dii 

fessor 






f 



^ 



LINGUISTICS 



Linguistics is the name given to the scientific 
study of language. As the physicist studies the 
movement of atomic particles, so the linguist 
analyzes the behavior of human beings as they 
engage in perhaps their most common communal 
activity — spoken or written communication. 

The newest academic program in the College of 
Arts and Sciences, the program in Linguistics 
Studies draws on courses offered by seven dif- 
ferent departments. Students enrolled for the Ma- 
jor or the Minor can choose from such classes as 
Language, Myth, and Symbol (Philosophy), 
Modern American English (English), and 
Psycholinguistics (Psychology). 

The goal of the Program is to equip students 
for careers in diplomacy or translation, in 
business or community service; and, at the same 
time, to make them more aware of the richness of 
the communicative environment in which they 
live. 



V. 



Dr. Timothy R. 
Professor 



Austin, Director & Associate 



78 Loyolan 1983 







f 



INDUSTRIAL 
RELA TIONS 

The Institute of Industrial Relations, a profes- 
sional program in the Graduate School, offers the 
degree of Master of Science in Industrial Rela- 
tions. This program prepares people for careers 
in the fields of personnel management, industrial 
relations, and government employee relations. 
The Insitute was founded in 1941 by the Rev. 
Ralph A. Gallagher, S.J. and today, under the 
direction of Dr. Alan J. Fredian, continues to be a 
significant educational force in human resource 
management and development. M 



L 



Dr. Allen J. Fredian, Director 




MANAGEMENT 




The Management Department strives to instill 
in students the importance of viewing organiza- 
tions as social systems whose effectiveness 
depends upon satisfaction of both individual and 
group goals. The department offers a major in 
personnel administration. This program is design- 
ed to prepare students for general management 
careers as well as entry positions in various per- 
sonnel specia 





Loyolan 1983 79 




.■*^s»Msiiw **•'; ■< r-m 



MARKETING 



The Marketing Department seeks to provide a 
basis for understanding the American system of 
distribution of the output of our production 
mechanism. The department teaches the skills 
needed for market research, training and manage- 
ment of marketing personnel, and training in the 
identification, evaluation and solution of 
marketing problems. 




V. 



Dr. Allen F. Jung, Chairman & Professor 



J 



f 






MAN A GEMENT 
SCIENCE 



The Management Science Department offers 
the business administration student courses in 
production management, computer systems, and 
quantitative methods. The department now in- 
cludes ten full-time faculty and five adjunct in- 
structors representing many areas of business and 
industry. 

Continued emphasis 6n ? the systems aspect of 
business has resulted in an excellent reception 
from students enrolled in the. advanced computer 
course, COBOL-Business Computer Programm- 
ing, and the advanced syttems course, Project 
Management. These courses Ire open to all 
business majors. i^MiMilttH^fe 




NM*K 



80 Loyolan 1983 




M41HEM417CAL 
SCIENCES^ 



\ 



1g| 
partment of Mat hem 



The Department 



W 3 

athemutical Sciences of -a 
fers B.S. and M.S. degrees in Computer Science 
and Mathematics. The department seeks to give 
its majors the practical and theoretical knowledge 
needed for further work in mathematics, careers 
in government, business, industry, and teaching. 
Through its many service courses, the department 
seeks to illustrate both the impact and the applica- 



t 



tion of mathmatics. 



L. 






Dr. Richard J. Maher, 
Professor 




airman and Associate 



J 





f 



A 



",1k 



MILITARY 
SCIENCE 



The Military Science Program is designed to 
complement all of Loyola's academic disciplines, 
and promotes the qualities traditionally displayed 
by successful leaders and managers in all walks of 
life. It offers instruction and practical working ex- 
periences in leadership and management as well as 
the opportunity to participate in a variety of ex- 
tracurricular activities. Knowledge gained in 
ROTC is applicable to any career, military, or 
civilian. Completion of the program leads to a 
commission in the United States Army. Military 
Science courses, open to all students, are offered 
at both Lake Shore and Water Tower Campuses. 
Students incur no military obligation by enrolling 
in freshman or sophomore courses. 







LTC. Arnold R. DuPont, Chairman & Professor 




Loyolan 1983 81 



nun 




MODERN 
LANGUAGES 




The importance of a knowledge of a foreign 
language in today's world cannot be overem- 
phasized. With the belief that all college students 
should be familiar with other languages, 
literatures and cultures, the Department of 
Modern Languages has expanded its offerings 
over the past years to include a wide variety of 
programs and courses for both majors and non- 
majors. The major, offered in French, German, 
Italian and Spanish, aims to build a solid founda- 
tion in language, literature, culture, and 
linguistics. The M.A. degree is offered in French 
and Spanish, while basic and intermediate 
language courses are also offered in Arabic, 
Chinese, Japanese, Modern Greek, Polish and 
Russian. For majors in other fields, minors are 
available in several areas depending upon the 
needs of the students. 



Dr. Mercedes M. Robles, Chairman 



J 



NA TURAL 
SCIENCE 



The Department of Natural Science is an inter- 
disciplinary science department that aims to in- 
crease knowledge of the contributions of science 
to our understanding of man and the universe. As 
scientists, man accepts responsibility for com- 
municating and increasing scientific knowledge. 
The educational function of the department is 
liberal learning, as distinct from pre-professional 
training in the sciences. 






f 



Dr. Raymond W. Nackoney, Chairman 



82 Loyolan 1983 



"\ 



PASTORAL 
STUDIES 

n 

This program of the Department of Theology 
provides students with resources for the analysis 
of religion, for the investigation of its sources, 
historical development, and contemporary prac- 
tice. The Core Curriculum and concentrations in 
Theology aim at a critical appropriation of per- 
sonal faith and a sympathetic appreciation of the 
beliefs of others. The department includes 29 full- 
time teachers, who offer courses on the Lake 
Shore, Water Tower, Medical Center, and Rome 
Center campuses of the university. In addition, 
the department offers extension programs at the 
University of Northern Illinois and the University 
| of Southern Illinois. The department offers a 
Master's degree, an undergraduate major, and 
three different forms of undergraduate minors in 
Theology. 



Jerome A. O'Leary.OP, Director 



J 



PHILOSOPHY 



The Department of Philosophy seeks to aquaint 
students with the major problems of philosophy 
and a systematic approach toward their resolu- 
tion; to stimulate their talents for speculative 
knowledge and constructive criticism on fun- 
damental issues; to offer them a rational founda- 
tion for the arts and sciences; to assist them 
through a reasoned appreciation of the dignity of 
human nature to formulate a philosophy of life 
mindful of the traditions of the Christian world. 





Robert F. Harvanek, S.J. Chairman & Professor 



& Profe. 
I I 




Loyolan 1983 83 



r 



PHYSICS 



The physics department offers courses for 
Physics majors, related majors, and for non- 
science majors. Laboratory courses include basic 
physics, optics, electronics and observational 
astronomy. 

The department maintains an electronics 
laboratory, a machine shop, a seismology station 
and research facility for experimental atomic and 
solid state piysics. experimental efforts center 
around studies of solids and liquids. This mcludes 
magnetic resonance, X-ray diffraction, Mossbaur 
Effect and laser radar. All of these projects in- 
volve a great deal of student participationrin ad- 
dition, som§ students work on individual pro- 
jects. 




mm 




Dr. Richard ' R.'Bukrey, Chairman & Associate 
Professor 





PmlTICAL 
SCIENCE 




Pol -iencc is the study of man and his ef- 

forts to create and maintain political order. As 
such, the department hopes to aid each student in 
: - standing the nature of political /iifi 
■ ;tions of governmental instit 
behavior of individual political ac 
In addition, it attempts to develop in Loyola 
ncern for ethics and an appreciati 
ds of justice and social responsibi 




B.A. 




tie department offers courses which lead to 
in Political Science and a B.S. in Public A 
m. At the graduate level, it offers bot 
nd a Ph.D. 
addition to its varied classroom presenta- 

dividual lectures by invited guests and administers 
the wfcaljBJyola Lectures in Political Analysis. 



;er, Chairman & Associate Pro- 





Dr. Jan 

fessm 




84 Loyolan 1983 




PSYCHOLOGY 



Psychology is a science that seeks to understand 
basic principles of behavior and human ex- 
perience, and to apply those principles to solving 
individual and social problems. With 34 full-time 
faculty, more than 500 undergraduate majors and 
200 graduate students in five advanced degree 
programs, Psychology is one of the largest and 
most active departments at Loyola. The majority 
of OUr undergraduates pursue advanced training 
in graduate school in psychology or other profes- 
sional programs such as law, social work, 
medicine, and business. Other graduates directly 
enter the job market in a wide range of fields in- 
cluding law enforcement, personnel, advertising, 
social work and mental health work. 





SOCIAL 
WORK 



Dr. Je, 

aj 



>r. Jeanne M. Foley, Chairman & Professor 



m 



The primary objective of the undergraduate 
major in social work is to prepare students enter- 
ing the profession of Social Work as beginning 
practitioners. The secondary objectives are 
designed: 1) to contribute to the student's 
knowledge and understanding of human needs 
and social functioning problems; 2) to provide an 
enriched preparation for entry into other human 
service fields and occupations; 3) to provide a 
base level for moving into graduate Social Work 
education; 4) to develop socially conscious and 
responsible citizens who have an intelligent grasp 
of social welfare issues and social delivery 
systems; and 5) to enhance the self actualization 
of the individual student. ■-■ 




Margaret M. Dwyer, Chairman & Associate Pro- 
fessor 



Jf 



Loyolan 1983 85 




SOCIOLOGY 
ANMROPOWG? 



In 198lfthe Departments of Sociology and Anil 
thropology joined together and became a singl|| 
departme&t with a shared focus on the study el 
human behavior. Anthropology combines the;, 
sub-disciplines of archaeology, linguistics, 
physical anthropology and cultural anthropology 
to look at the origings of human societies, ttse 
ways in which animal behavior sheds light ong 
human behavior, and the varied ways in whichf 
human groups have organzied their attitudes,! 
values, and behaviors into distinct cultures. 

Sociology stSdies the characteristics, changes, 1 
causes, and consequences of different forms of j 
group life. It combines scientific and humanistic! 
perspectives in the study of such topics as urban 
life, family relationships, social class, mass media, 
health care, intergroup relations, social; 
movements, and community. 

The Sociology and Anthropology Department 
has 23 full-time faculty members and offers ma- j 
jors in Anthropology, Sociology, and a combined 
Anthropology-Sociologylconcentration. 





SOCIO- 

4& E G A L 
STUDIES 



The objective of the Department of Socio-Legal 
Studies is to provide the student with an 
understanding of individual legal responsibilities 
arising from the interaction of persons, property, 
and government, and to create an awareness of 
the legal environment in which executive decisions 
are made. srf.C' 



1 




. John D. O'Malley, Chairman & Professor 

ni 



86 Loyolan 1983 




f 






^THEATRE , 

1 | ^fl 

e goal of the Theatre Department is to pro- 
vid :raining for the professional community and 
academic theatres within the framework of a 



> 







the 

liberal arts education. Many theatre students pur- 
sue theatre as a profession after graduation, but a 
broad liberal education is designed to widen 
horizons and build inquiring minds. 

iietherofi stage as an actor or backstage on 
jction, -the theatre major learns in- 
iPPer^jsncejiiwd dependence on fellow students. 




TELECOM- 




% 



MUMCATIONS 

On Wednesday Oct. 7, 1981, Loyola offically 
announced the existence of its newly created Of- 
fice of Telecommunications, which was formed 
six months earlier. The office will serve to deter- 
mine how the latest telecommunications 
technology can assist Loyola. 



- 1 •_ 



'" — t 



V. 



Dr. Don Norwood, Director 



John H. Brooks, Jr., Chairman 



J 




Loyolan 1983 87 





THEOLOGY 



/|||rfin academic discipline, Theology reflects 
upcla the human experience of God revealing 
himself and upon the human response to God's 
presence and call. Theology attempts to discover 
the suppositions of particular religious beliefs and 
practices, to detail their implications, and to 
shape them into a reasoned system of thought. 
Loyola's Theology curriculum focuses on Roman 
Catholicism, but includes a variety of courses 
which explore other religious traditions as well, 
The major in Theology provides both an 
academic program and professional training. 



^ 



J. Patout Burns S.J., Chairman 



A 




URB 
STUDIES 



An evening program offered at the Water 
Tower Campus, the Graduate Program in Urban 
Studies provides interdisciplinary course of study 
that increases the student's awareness of urban 
problems and prepares them for decision-making 
in a rapidly changing urban world. It is designed 
for students who desire an early or mid-career 
broadening, or for students who have not yet 
found employment in an urban-related field. 

The program attempts to train professionals to 
plan more effectively in an urban setting and to 
solve problems in a creative and practical manner. 



1 









Michael E. Schiltz, Director 



J 



88 Loyolan 1983 




WOMEN'S 
STUDIES 



Women's Studies is the academic discipline that 
examines the lives, experiences, and culture of 
women. Courses in Women's Studies explore such 
topics as the creation of traditional sex roles, the 
economic position of women, women's contribu- 
tions to the arts, and different theological and 
philosophical attitudes towards women. The 
Women's Studies program offers its own in- 
troductory course, as well as some on more 
specialized subjects, and cross-lists courses from 
other departments. Students may take individual 
courses as electives or complete a minor sequence 
of five courses. 



^ 



Ju. 



stine Wantz, Chairman 






Loyolan 1983 89 



Loyola School of Dentistry 




Dr. Raffaele Suriano, Dean - School of Dentistry 



90 Loyolan 1983 



r 







/ 







The ^Bartmertllff Anatomy, School (fl Dentistry teaches 
gross anatomy to freeman dental students and advanced head 
and neckanatomy and neuroanatomy to graduate students. The 
freshmen dissect and study all parts of the body except the lower 
extremity. One whole quarter is spent onfflb head and neck. 
The neuroanatomy course covers the organization of the central 
nervous system and its pathways. The trigeminal nerve and pain 
theories are emphasized. _ 

The faulty of the Department are actively epgaged in research 
either inHidually conducted or with a graduate student. The 
researches in ar m! of the l|§j*minal complex, pulp and 
periodontal ligament innervatiotti tooth eruption and the 
periodoBJW ligament . 



1 I 




% 



BIOCHEMISTRY 



The Biochemistry Department is responsible for teaching a 
course in basic Biochemistry to the dental students, as well as a 
Nutrition Course. In addition, we participate in the graduate 
course of Oral Pathology and also participate by teaching 
courses in Biochemistry at the Medical Center. 

Research is an integral part of the Biochemistry Department 
and in collaboration with the Departments of Preventive Den- 
tistry and Microbiology, the Department of Biochemistry is 
presently conducting research regarding the function and 
mechanism of action of glucosyltranferase, and emzyme central- 
ly invloved in the production of dental caries. 




Dr. Ioannis S. Scarpa 





Loyolan 1983 91 











DENTA 
MA TERIALS 

The Department of Dental Materials is a unique academic seg- 
ment of the School of Dentistry at the Medical Center. It is a 
multidisciplinary department which functions to teach the 
physical sciences of metallurgy, materials science, and chemistry 
to undergraduate dental students, and to integrate these sciences 
with the student's clinical experience. The student becomes 
familiar with those mechanical and physical properties of 
materials that dictate safety and efficacy in the oral environ- 
ment^ ■,_, *T> 

The department's research interests lie in the applied areas of 
mechanical testing of metals, ceramics, and elastomers. These 
efforts result in publications of a practical nature providing the 
demist with sound scientific data to help support use of 
materials with the greatest efficacy and utility to the patient. 








ENDODONTICS 



Patients who come to the Loyola School of Dentistry with a 
toothache and want to avoid the extraction forceps, may be 
treated in the Department of Endodontics if the tooth is restored 
Hko function. 
™ Endodontics is a discipline of dentistry concerned with the 
treatment of diseases of the dental pulp and the tissues around 
the root end (periapex). jsL^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

Although the term 'root canal treatment' is commonly 
and is a correct one, the practice of endodontics also includes the 
use of root surgery to save the affected teeth. Complete and par- 
tial removal of roots, replanting traumatized teeth, and 
bleaching discolored teeth are examples of other treatment pro- 
cedures this department renders. 

Sometimes the source of dental pain is not always apparent 
and is difficult to locate or diagnose. Here too, the Department 
of Endodontics is called upon to render its expertise. 

The undergraduate dental students are capable of providing 
most of the basic endodontic services of Loyola's patients, but 
resolution of more complex problems is provided yy our 
postgraduate students. 



92 Loyolan 1983 




FIXED 
PROSTHODONTICS 




The Department of Fixed Prosthodontics i? responsible for 
restoring damaged teeth with cast metal or procelain restoration; 
and of replacing missing teeth with fixed, or cemented pro- 
stheses. As such, the department is responsible to the student 
for providing technical information, and of assisting in the 
development of cognitive and psycomotor skills. Diagnostic 
treatment and judgment skills along with digital dexterity are the 
challenges of this discipline. The effort is four years in duration. 

In the fourth year the judgment skill objective is emphasized. 
The student is expected to be familiar with diagnostic informa- 
tion and be able to exercise treatment skills with the following 

criteria: ^^^^^^^^^^^~__^J 

1) How to prevent as much treatment as possible by early 
recognition of clinical conditions that deviate from the normal 
aging processes. ^^^^^^^^ 

2) Render treatment procedures which do not contribute to 
premature pathologic conditions. 

3) Render only those treatment prcedutes necessary to 
achieve and maintain optimal dental health for the patient 






f 



HISTOLOGY 



The teaching duties of the Department include the following 
courses: Freshman Dental General and Oral Histology, 
Sophomore Dental Hygiene General and Oral Histology, 
Graduate courses in Histology, Pre-Pathological courses in Oral 
and Maxillofacial Surgery, and Physical Diagnosis for junior 
dental students. The Histology Department is the home of the 
First Institute established in the Medical Center. 

The Research Institute for the Healing of Oral and Somatic 
Wounds under the direction of Dr. Anthony N. Silvetti, is doing 
extensive research in the Field of healing decubitus ulcers. The 
Institute established an embryonic tissue and cell bank. The 
faculty is well-balanced consisting of Ph.D's. dentists and physi- 
cians. The main research interest of the faculty is reproduction, 
piezoelectricity, and tissue regeneration. 




Lovolan 1983 93 



MICROBIOLOGY 



The Department of Microbiology is actively involoved in the 
areas of undergraduate and graduate teaching, continuing 
education, research and service to Clinical departments. The 
department offers to dental and hygiene students, courses en- 
compassing general microbiology, immunology and oral 
microbiology, especially in the areas of caries and periodontal 
disease. Laboratory courses include applied concepts in steriliza- 
tion, asepsis, disinfection, caries control, treatment of oral in- 
fections, endodontic culture techniques and oral hygiene. In ad- 
dition, graduate lectures in microbial oral diseases and their con- 
trol and treatment are provided to general practice and surgery 
residents. 

The faculty is also involved in active research programs and 
graduate training. These programs include the study of the 
mechanisms of microbial plaque formation in the oral cavity and 
the development of substances which are inhibitory jo these pro- 
cesses, with Jhe ultimate goal of controlling caries formation. In 
addition, research is being conducted in the identification of 
micobes involved in periodontal disease and the specific 
mechanisms of action of some anaerobic microbial agents in 
causing this disease state. This department also prvides service to 
clinical departments such as endodontics and oral surgery in the 
microbial identification of clinical samples for the determination 
of proper treatment 



Dr. Andrew M. Chludzinski 



*\ 





OPERA TIVE 
DENISTRY 



The Department of Operative Dentistry is the largest depart- 
ment in the School of Dentistry. The faculty consists of seven 
full-time and twenty-two part-time teachers. One full-lime 
secreatary is assigned to the department, and.: seven fulktime 
dental assistants wiirk in the departrrient's clinical area. 

The clinical facilities in Operative Dentistey include sixty 
clinical cubicles in We undergraduate clinic area, one private 
operatory, and six chairs in the Dental Assistant Utilization are 
where Junior and Senior dental students have tile opportunity to 
work with trained dental assistants. 

laddreioh toils clinicaljteaching duties, which are conducted 
yearsround, the Operative Department conducts Freshman lec- 
tures and laboratory courses in the first and third .quarters, 
Sophomore lectures and laboratory courses in the first arid' se- 
cond quarters, Junior lectures in the first and third quarters, and 
various Senior board reviews, clinical seminars and ejective 
courses throughout the year.^ -^*-.. 



Dr. James J. Koelbl 





94 Loyolan 1983 







■y 




IStSRSffig 



/S^ 





ORAL DIAGNOSIS 



The Department of Oral Diagnosis is structured to screen all 
prospective patients who come to the Dental School Clinic. Pa- 
tients with dental needs facilitating the clinical instructional 
undergraduate and graduate programs are accepted. In this 
way, the Department serves as the admitting wing of the Dental 
clinic. In addition, patients with emergency needs are cared for 
in this department. 

The Oral Diagnosis faculty gives lectures and clinical instruc- 
tion in 1) Medical and Dental history taking 2) Physical ex- 
amination of the face, neck, oral cavity and pharynx 3) 
Diagnosis of oral conditions 4) Charting 5) Treatment planning 
and patient management. The faculty supervise these aspects of 
clinical work for all undergraduate patients in the dental clinic. 

Lectures and clinical instructions are given in Oral Medicine 
and Clinical Oral Pathology. Consultations in these fields are 
done throughout the Medical Center. Patients with such 
disorders are referred in from various parts of the city for 
diagnosis and management of their special oral conditions. 

Publication anS|:iesearch efforts are carried out on behalf of 
the faculty. To-date, five books have been published by the pre- 
sent Oral Diagnosis Faculty, and some of these have been 
translated into several foreign laguages. 



Dr. Norman K. Wood 



ORAL AND 

GENERAL 

PATHOLOGY 



The Department of Oral Pathology is responsible for the 
teaching of general pathology to sophomore dental students and 
oral pathology to sophomore dental students, graduate and 
post-graduate students and dental hygiene students. 

The faculty participates in the teaching of oral biology to 
graduate students and offers special graduate courses in the 
pathology of the oral mucosa, the hard tissues, and advanced 
seminars in oral pathology. In addition to the teaching services, 
research is conducted in the field of experimental oral cancer and 
clinical peridontology. This is supported and conducted in- 
dependently and also in the direction of graduate students seek- 
ing advanced degrees. The faculty also consults dental students, 
faculty and graduate dentists in the clinical and histopathologic 
diagnosis of oral diseases. 



Dr. Patrick D. Toto 



J 



Loyolan 1983 95 




ORTHODONTICS 

B B 1 $i *'* 

The Orthodontic Department at Loyola was started by W . 
Calvin Case and is currently chaired by Dr. Lewis Klapper. The 
graduate Orthodontic Program takes students from Loyola and 
schools around the world and enjoys a reputation for turning 
out highly skilled clinicians as well as many academicians. 



It Hi 



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ORAL AND j3g 

MAXILL OF A CIAL 
1 SURGERY 



The Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery is an in- 
tegral part of the School of Dentistry. Its primary responsibility 
is to teach dental students, conduct a Residency program and 
treat patients at the dental school and its affiliated hospitals. 
Dental students are given lectures and seminars to cover all 
aspects of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. These lectures are 
supplimented with lectures in Pain Control, Anesthesiology and 
Internal Medicine. Students actively participate in the surgical 
treatment of patients in the dental clinic. They are also en- 
couraged to observe more complex surgical procedures at Hines 
V.A. Hospital and Foster G. McOaw Hospital. 

The Residency program is a four calendar year program struc- 
tured to meet the requirements of the American Board of Oral 
and Maxillofacial Surgery. 




*, 



Dr. Nicholas C. Choukas 



96 Loyolan 1983 




f 



PEDIA TRIC 
DENTISTRY 



During the past few years the Pediatrics Department has ex- 
panded both in size and expertise. All important pediatric- 
subspecialties are now represented on the fulltime faculty. This 
has led to considerable improvement in the quality of teaching of 
both medical students and residents. ^ 

Expansion has also occurred in the pediatric surgical 
specialties. All of the Loyola Faculty who care for children are 
now united in our Children's Center. A team approach is used 
in developing programs to care for many serious disorders of in- 
fancy and childhood. Loyola can now offer western Chicago 
and the western suburbs the type of pediatric care that is general- 
ly expected from superior university hospitals. 



1 



I M 



PP 




Dr. William McElroy 





r 






y* : 



PERIODONTICS 



The Department of Periodontics teaches the practice of 
prevention and control of periodontal diseases as well as the 
development of new procedures for diagnosis' and treatment. 

The department is actively engaged in both clinical and 
laboratory research related to the etiology, pathogenesis and 
treatment of periodontal disease. 









^tf^N. 












JH 












Loyolan 1983 97 







PHYSIOLOGY 
PHARMACOLOGY 



The Department is comprised of 4 full-tine faculty, 8 part- 
time lecturers and or laboratory instructors, a secretary and 2 
part-time laboratory technicians; The general objective of the 
physiology courses is to have denial, dental hygiene and 
postgraduate students develop knowledge and understanding of 
the normal functioning of the human body which can serve as 
I the foundation for professional diagnosis and treatment. Phar- 
miicolQgslispurses develop an understanding of how drugs s^ 
stimulate or iilepress bodily functions and thus enable students to s 
use drugs properly in dental treatment as well^ai modify dental 
treatment in those patients tailing drugs for medfcal reasons. 

All systems of the body and all categories of drugs are covered 
but special emphasis is placed on those physiological and 
pharacologicaJ aspects which are .of special importance in den- 
tistry. In addition the faculty has- a major responsibility for 
teaching courses in research methods, biostatistics, and car- 
diopulmonary resusciatation (GPK). Individual faculty 
members teach in various graduate and postgraduate courses 
and conduct research in such; areas as, Proprioceptive 
mechanisms concerned with mandibular movements and posi- 
tioning, Effect of high speed dental instrumentation on hearing, 
Systemic effects of methyi-methacrylate vapors, Changes in 
composition of saliva induced by diurectics, and the Effects of 
vasoconstrictors in local anesthectics. 



Dr. Donald B. Doemling 



PREVENTIVE 
mNTISTRY- 
COMM. HEALTH 



The Department of Preventive Dentistry and Community 
Health places and emphasis on community health problems, in- 
cluding dental preventive strategies and health education. The 
community health actiyites involve students, in direct contact ; 
with school age children (public and private schools), the han- 
dicapped and the aged. These student requirements are in con- 
cert with the aim to teach the affective portion of professional 
life. ! '\ \ ' ';; r 

Research is done to develop new procedures to prevent tooth 
decay and gum disease. Also studies are conducted in methods 
to improve doctor - patient relationships. These research efforts 
5 have yielded effective means of controlling and reducing the in- 
cidence of oral disease and ah expanded understanding of com- 
munication between the doctor and. his patient. Each faculty 
member, 3 full time and 6 part time, is involved in the research 
as well as teachingand supervision of students in the communi- 
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98 Loyolan 1983 





PROSTHODONTICS 

The student-dentists provide removable prosthodontic ser- 
vices for clinical patients with the aid of competent clinicians in 
the department. The clinical atmosphere provides the necessary 
experience to become proficient in the treatment of removable 
prosthodontic patients based on accepted current theories, con- 
cepts, and techniques related to removable prosthodontic treat- 
ment. Didactic and technique courses are taught during all four 
years of the dental student's education. Clinical experience 
begins in the spring quarter of the sophomore year and con- 
tinues during the junior and senior years. 




Dr. Robert Sommerfeld 



RADIOLOGY 



The Department of Dental Radiology, Loyola University 
School of Dentistry is a multi-faceted department with specific 
responsibilities in teaching, patient services and research. 
Teaching responsibilities include didictic and clinic courses for 
sophomore, junior, and senior dental students, sophomore and 
junior hygifene students and graduate and post graduate students 
at all levels. \ 

The Department provides the clinical radiographic services 
necessary for afi patients receiving treatment by the various 
departments within the School of Dentistry, In addition ,dental 
radiographic services are provided for Foster G. McGaw 
Hospital and Burke Ambulatory Care Center. Research projects 
are offered in both clinical and didactic areas. 



J \ 




Loyolan 1983 99 



Stritch School of Medicine 




Dr. John R. Tobin Jr., Dean - Stritich School of Medicine 



100 Loyolan 1983 




— 



M 



ANESTHE, 



Ti 





Anesthesiology has grown from a technical task H»a broadly 
based specialty of medicine. The Department of Anesthesiology 
of Loyola's Stritch School of Medicine deals not only with the 
relief of pain for surgical operations, not only with support of 
life functions under stress, not only with the management and 
protection of the unconscious, not only with the perioperative 
preparation and convalescence of patients, but with car- 
diopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for victims of accident and 
heart attacks, witn adaptation to chronic disability and pam, 
and with the aquisition arid dissemiation of new knowledge 
related to these applications. Anesthesiology stands at 8ie inter- 
face of scienee,(particularly physiology, physics and phar- 
macology), medicine and humanism, where modern concepts, 
drugs and equipment are employed in support of suffering pa- 
tients and varied procedures*"!"*- — 

At Foster G. McGaw Hospital, the forty odd memjSiers'of the 
Department of Anesthesiology are busily engaged ia the Univer- 
sity functions- research, teaching and patient care. 





N ATOMY 






1.1. 



UtKOffl 



The ideals of the Anatomy Department are excellence in 
teaching and research . A hallmark of the department is the con- 
genial environment in which these ideals are pursued by faculty, 
by staff, and by the graduate students. Anatomy itself com- 
prises several subdisciplines, all being pertinent to the structure 
of the body, whether this structure is apparent to the naked eye, 
or has to be resolved by electronic means. Foremost amongst the 
different branches of the subject are gross anatomy as met 
within the dissecting room, histology as studied through the 
microscope, neurobiology which encompasses all approaches to 
the study of the nervous system, embryology-the science of our | 
development, and cell biology in which the fundamental unit of 
our being is examined. 

The department's teaching responsibilities he in the medical 
and graduate schools. Courses are given to students of these 
schools in gross anatomy^ histology, embryology and neuros- 
cience. These courses'sely heavily upon laboratory learning 
because anatomy is a visual subject- it should be pictured rather 
than memorized by the student. More specialized courses are of- 
fered to graduate studeits enrolled in the Master's or the Doc- 
toral Program. 

The faculty is funded for their research by extramural and in- 
tramural grants. The major emphasis is on cell biology and 
neuroscience, and how structure relates to function in these two 
fields. 



Dr. Charles C.C. O'Morchoe 




Loyolan 1983 101 



r 



BIOCHEMISTR 



General and Medical Biochemistry: This course, which con- 
sists of lectures and demonstrations, is based on an integrated 
approach to biochemistry with emphasis on biochemical, prin- 
ciples which underlie the various topics to be discussed, 

Six-week research eleciives are offered in ongoing research 
projects in the following areas: chemotherapeutic agents; 
(etrahydroisoquinolines; tissue proteinases and protein-protein 
interaction; CNS myelin and synaptic membranes, thrombolytic 
and fibrinolytic inhibitors; membranes; nutrition; synaptic 
structure; myoblast development; restriction enzymes; enzyme 
mechanism, fetal alcohol syndrome, viral-host interactions, and 
the enzymology of.DNA metabolism. 



31 





Dr. Abraham Rosenberg 



? 






COMMUNITY 
AND FAMIL Y 
MEDICINE 



The major themes of the Department include the structured 
areas of clinical preventive medicine, epidehiiology, and medical 
care programs. The latter particularly inctt»ies?Famiry Practice 
an|i Occupational Medicine. 

The major effort of the Department includes the following 
elective programs; Geriatric Health Care - includes active par- 
ticipation in several community clinics in addition to the Burke 
Ambulatory Care Center; Epidemilology (three, six or twelve 
weeks). Efforts Jh these areas combine practical introductory 
clinical experience as well as research orientation. f 






Dr. Walters. Wood 



102 Loyolan 1983 




f 







X 



\ 



V 






MEDICINE 







To provide comprehensive medical care to the population, all 
physicians need a strong background in internal medicine. 
Towards this end, the Department of Medicineat Loyola strives 
to educate students to become physicians who are mature, em- 
pathic, skilled and knowledgeable in internal medicine. The 
Department implements programs which provide students with 
opportunities to develop a professional- attitude, acquire basic 
knowledge and skills necessary for excellent patient care, and 
understand the need to continually search for new medical 
knowledge. Every medical student must complete and pass three 
courses within the Department. 

In addition to the required courses, the Department offers a 
variety of four, eight or twelve-week elective clerkships. These 
electives give students concentrated clinical, research, and 
laboratory experience ijasthe subspecialty areas. 

• ' * it. a 



I 



Dr. RolfM. Gunnar 




/ 



MICROBIOLOGY 

The two major functions of the Department of Microbiology 
at the Medical Center are teaching, in both the Graduate and^ 
Medical Schools, and research. j^k 

There are approximately 15-20 graduate students in the 
department at any one time. It takes approximately two years 
for students to receive their M.S. degrees, and four to five years 
after the receipt of the bachelor's degree for students to receive 
their Ph I) degrees ^fl 

In addition to graduate students, the Microbiology faculty in- 
structs approximately 130 Sophomore Medical Students each 
year from early August through December and smaller groups of 
upper-class students in special classes. 

Major research is being conducted in the Department of 
Microbiology in the following general areas: animal virology 
and its relationship to oncology, the induction of plant tumor 
formation by Agrobacierium, the mechanism and control of 
genetic recombination and DNA repair, carbohydrate 
metabolism in microbes, the ultrastructure and function of 
microbial organelles, oral microbiology, drug control of host 
defenses against microbial infection, the immunochemistry of 
membranes, and modulation of the immune response by specific 
jllular factors. WJ 






i \ 




Loyolan 1983 103 






-\ 



NEUROLOGY 



The Department of Neurology is active in all years of the 
Medical School curriculum. At the freshman level, it directs the 
Neuroscience and Behavior course with participating faculty 
from the departments of Anatomy, Biochemistry, Neurology, 
Pharmacology; Physiology and Pathology. During the course, 
students are g$v£n the opportunity to make actual clinical rounds 
on the Neurology unit in the hospital in order to relate then- 
didactic experience to actual clinical situations. 

In subsequent years of the curriculum, Neurology offers four- 
week elective clerkships in Adult Clinical Neurology. Pediatric 
Neurology, and Electroencephalography-Electromyography. 
Following any of these, a student may elect to take a clinical 
preceptorship with an individual faculty member in hospital and 
ambulatory care experience or EEG-EMG. 




V 



Dr. Frank A. Rubino, Acting Chairman 



(T OBSTETRICS 
GYNECOLOGY 



J 




K 



The Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology has established 
itself as a major resource for the community in both the 
Perinatal and Gynecologic Oncology area. Over 50 percent of 
our obstetrical service is formed by high risk pregnancies and 
17.9 percent of our deliveries come from maternal transfers to 
our- Center from our Perinatal Network. The inpatient and out- 
patient oncology services offer the entire complex spectrum of 
modern cancer fnraSpy: diagnosis, surgery, chemotherapy, 
radiation and long term follow-up. The section of Maternal- 
Fetal Medicine and Gyne Oncology also provide for advanced 
physician training through approved Fellowship Programs.^ 

The OB-GYN ambulatory care services have expanded our 
capabilities by offering evening Office hours to accommodate 
such patient requests. The specialized areas of colposcopy-laser 
and infertility add to the dimension of available services in am- 
bulatory care in addition to regular OB-GYN consultations. In 
addition, the availability of the Ambulatory Surgi-Center at 
Loyola has considerably added to our patient load capability, 
decreasing hospitalization costs while increasing the number of 
much needed hospital beds and operating room time for our in- 
patient services:*, , 

Our educational programs provide for our staff, residents, 
and students, the opportunity to interact with prominent 
speakers on the national scene through the Visiting Professor 
Series. 



Dr. Silvio Aladjem 




104 Loyolan 1983 



fo 



~- 



•\ 



PHTHALMOL OGY 



The department of Ophthalmology provides medical and 
srugical care for patients with eye problems. - — _^— . 

It includes General Ophthalmology and 13 subspecialties such 
as: retina, vitreous, glaucoma, uveitis, neurophthalmology 
pediatric ophthalmology, ophthalmic plastic surgery, low vi: 
contact lens, ultrasonogrSpliy, fluorescein angiography and elec 
trophysiology, also cornea. . ^T 

The department has the responsibility for teaching Lhese s; 
jects to medical students, eye residents arjd practicing ph 
cians. Research is also carried on by the department in basic 
clinical matters related to the eye. , ^ g^ «■ 






ORTHOPEDIC 
SURGERY 




^ \ 1 \ i 

epartment of Orthopaedics aid RAabilitation provides 
careEjTThe patients wnt boneV nV\| and jfcscle diseases or in- 
juries. The spectrum of problems ranjie from automobile <k 
cidents to congenital deformities, from industrial injuries to 
degenerative arthritis. The diversity of care is r epresented in our 
subspecialties: trauma, joint reconstruction, pediatric, spine, 
hand, rehabilitation, and sports medicine. 

Medical students gain experience in all of these areas or 

selected segments, depending on their practice goals. Following 

this experience, those interested in an orthopedic career have no 

difficulty obtaining residencies at the best institutions in all parts 

ountry. 





Dr. Wilton H. Bunch 






r 



i 



i 



O TOLA R YNGOL OG Y 



Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery covers a broad spec- 
trum of clinical and surgical interests during the two-four week 
electives, available to juniors and seniors. The student is taught 
techniques essential in comprehensive head and neck examina- 
tion. A large outpatient population insures a wide variety of 
clinical experience. Participation in major head and neck 
surgery is encouraged. The latest methods in laryngeal 
reconstructive technique are demonstrated. Paranasal sinus 
surgery may also be encountered. Microsurgery of the ear and 
temporal bone and endoscopic techniques of laryngo-broncho- 
esophagology are viewed via TV monitoring. 

The elective also includes allergy, audioiogy, speech 
pathology, neurotology, rhinology and reconstructive surgery of 
the head and neck. The student participates in all department 
activities, including conferences, formal and informal teaching 
sessions and daily patient care. 

The Department offers a five-year residency training program 
in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. 



PATHOLOGY 



The course in Pathology is presented during the first semester 
of the second year. The course covers general pathology, cell in- 
jury and death, inflammation and repair, neoplasia, genetic 
disorders, circulating disturbances, pathophysiology of coagula- 
tion disorders, chemical injury including radiation effects as well 
as systemic diseases and clinical pathological correlations. Small 
group sessions are conducted in laboratories covering gross and 
microscopic pathology. 

Elective courses are offered in Clinical Pathology(Clinical 
Chemistry, Hematology and Clinical Microbiology). Electives 
are also offered in Anatomic Pathology and Neuropathology. 
Various conferences are available to students in the third and 
fourth years. 

The Department runs the diagnostic laboratories of the Foster 
G. McGaw Hospital, including Surgical Pathology and the 
Autopsy Service. 



Dr. Edward W. Bermes, Jr., Acting Chairman 



J 




jiu» **■- iw 



Dr. William M. Gatti, Acting Chairman 



J 



106 Loyolan 1983 







~~ 



PEDIA TRICS 



V 



oncerned wit 



( 



Pediatrics is the medical specialty concerned with child health 
from conception through adolescence. The specialty has two 
major aims. The first is the prevention of disease, both organic 
and emotional, both during childhood and future adulthood. 
The second aim is to diagnose and treat the diseases of 
childhood in such a way that detrimental effects on a developing 
human being are minimized. 

During the six week pediatric clerkship all medical students 
are exposed to those portions of pediatric knowledge which are 
of importance to all physicians. 

The pediatric department offers electives in such areas as inpa- 
tient care, ambulatory care, neonatology, cardiology, pediatric 
neurlogy, endocrinology-metabolism and hematology-oncology. 




Dr. Lewis E. Gibson 



J 









PHARMACOLOGY 



The primary course of Pharmacology is presented during the 
second year of the Medical Curriculum. A brief description of 
the course follows. 

Pharmacology Fundamentals: This is a two-quarter course 
consisting of lectures, demonstrations, and conferences. The 
objectives of the course concern: specific understanding of the 
basic pharmacology and pharmaceuticals of individual drugs 
of reference and-or current clinical importance with respect to 
their use in a clinical setting; acquisition of pharmacological 
vocabulary and terminology; appreciation of the complexity of 
drug actions and interactions; general chemical, phar- 
macodynamic and pharmacokinetic understanding of the main 
categories of drugs of clinical importance; ability to interpret 
and utilize basic pharmacologic data and literature for the ra- 
tional use of drugs and evaluation of new drugs. Conferences 
and demonstrations are presented in a small group format to en- 
courage discussion and exchanges between faculty and students. 
Demonstrations serve to visualize experimentally concepts 
related to mechanisms of drug action that may be difficult to 
understand; other demonstrations and discussions concern 
presentation of therapeutic problems in combined clinical and 
basic setting that involves patients. 

The Department offers research electives in basic Phar- 
macology and diverse research programs in collaboration with 
the Departments of Anesthesiology, Neurology, 
Ophthalmology, Surgery, and Medicine. 



l 



*3 



Dr. Alexander G. Karczmar 



J 



Loyolan 1983 107 



r 



PHYSIOLOGY 



The Department of Physiology has as its purpose of being, three 
facets: 

1) To teach medical physiology to first year medical students 
with both didactic and laboratory experiences. 

2) To direct a graduate training program in Physiology for the 
development of creative, independent and highly competent pro- 
fessional medical physiologists with a deep personal commit- 
ment to research and education. I ... . 

3) To cultivate active research programs dealing mainly with 
regulation of the cardiovascular system and its various aspects. 

There are currently nine full-time faculty members that are ac- 
tively involved in all three of the above segments. In addition, 
there are twelve part-time faculty members that contribute to 
one or more aspects of our program; 




Dr. James P. Filkins 



t 



PSYCHIATRY 




s The department is responsible for coordinating and teaching 
in the first year an introduction to Human Behavior. The objec- 
tive of the course is to introduce students to the psychological 
aspectsof.the patient, and includes topics such as the dying pa- 
tient, child development, the physician as a patient, alcoholism, 
drug abuse, human sexuality, psychological-aspects of medical 
illness and introduction to psychopatholagy. Teaching methods 
consist of lectures! videotapes, live patients interviews, films,' 
and panel discussions. 

The required full-time six week clerkship in Psychiatry is 
scheduled for the third year. Students: are assigned to the inpa- 
tient unit at Foster G. McGaw Hospital, where they are involved 
in daily rounds with psychiatric patients with the Chairman of 
the Department of Psychiatry. 

In addition to patient care, students participate in patient 
meetings, case presentations and staff conferences. The con- 
sultation service provides liaison with other departtaents in. the 
general hospital with correlation of emotional and physical pro- 
blems. 



Dr. Robert A. deVito 




108 Loyolan 1983 








it, 






Radiology Depanment a( Loyola University Medical 
:er is an active ultra-modern department performing 125,000 
s per year. These examinations include conven- 
logy, ultrasound, computerized axial tomography of 
d body, angiography, hysterosalpingography and 
y among others. Nuclear Medicine procedures and 
c RadioUJ^' for the treatment of cancer patients also 
the eruBite yet compassioned eye of the Department 
Chairman, Leon Love, M.D. Professor of Radiology. 
These procedures benefit patients from every clinical department 
of the Medical Center, and also serve to educate medical 
students at all levels as well as interns and residents-in-training to 
become radiologists. 

I? b 










Dr. Leon Love 



..Will J U 

SURGERY 



The Department of Surgery consists of the Divisions of Car- 
diovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Neurosurgery, Plastic and 
Reconstructive, and General Surgery. The Depanment strives 
to educate students and residents to become physicians who are 
mature, emphathetic, skilled and knowledgeable in surgery. 

Junior medical students are required to complete a twelve 
week clerkship, and the seniors are offered six week electives 
under the direct supervision of faculty members. 

The aim of the five year residency program and the Depart- 
ment of Surgery is to graduate competent clinical surgeons with 
a broad knowledge of srugical anatomy, physiology and 
pathology Residents are supported to the fullest extent possible 
in their research endeavors. The wide variety of patients found 
in the University and affiliated hospitals ensures an excellent en- 
viroment for all phases of medical education. 




Dr. Herbert B. Greenlee, Acting Chairman 



Loyola n 1983 109 






UROLOGY 



Teaching of the surgical specialty of urology to medical 
students logically covers those phases of the subject which are a 
part of a well-rounded general medical education. Instruction 
aims at providing the student with a definite routine plan of pro- 
cedure in examining a urologic patient. It acquaints him in a 
general way with the highly technical procedures of urologic 
diagnosis and treatment, and places special emphasis on the in- 
dications for these procedures. It arms him with a thorough 
practical knowledge of the office routines in urology of interest 
to the general practitioner. Special interest is aroused in a few 
students to do investigative work in this field, or to take advanc- 
ed training after graduation with specialization as the objective. 

Students are encouraged to take part in the twelve-week 
Junior Surgical Clerkship on the Urology service where they are 
nurtured on a one-to-one basis in all aspects of urology. In addi- 
tion, a three or six-week Senior elective in Clinical Urology, 
designed to give the student a broad acquaintance with this 
specialty, and a six to twelve-week elective in clinical research in 
Urology, are offered by the Department. 



& 






■ 



Dr. John R. Canning 





110 Loyolan 1983 










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S P I T A L 




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Loyolan 1983 111 




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114 First Semester Events 
144 Second Semester Events 
168 Theatre 



Loyolan 1983 113 




114 Loyolan 1983 







,*»• 'ji, *- 



Loyolan 1983 115 




116 Loyolan 1983 




RADIO CONFERENCE 



Loyola n 1983 117 



HALAS DEDICATION 




118 Loyola n 1983 



A new dimension that has been added to Loyola University's Lake Shore Campus this year is 
the George S. Halas Jr. Sports Center. The new building opened on September 2, 1982 at a 
dedication ceremony by George S. Halas, Sr., owner ot the Chicago Bears. 
The athletic facilities offered at the Sports Center are located on three floors. On the top level, 
there are three basketball courts, which can also be used for badminton, volleyball, and floor 
hockey. An indoor track surrounds this area. The main floor consists of a swimming pool, 
saunas, and the locker rooms for wrestling and other contact sports are found on a concession 
irea located in the center. 

The George Halas, Jr. Sports Center contains athletic facilities to satisfy everyone's needs, 
whether they are Students, Faculty, Staff, Jesuits or Alumni. 

All of the students here have either experienced or will experience the excitement of seeing old friends, the pressure of 
jxams, the need for relaxation, and the desire to achieve... As a student, George Halas Jr. understood the need for a 
weak from studies and a means of lessening tensions. One of the best ways of satisfying both these needs is physical ex- 
>rcise...We strive to learn attitudes that will make us better people as well as practical knowledge that will hopefully 
ead us to a successful career... Keeping fit keeps one healthy and improves one's self image... 

Mark Miller 




Loyolan 1983 119 




The new academic year at Loyola was begun with the Mass of 
the Holy Spirit, held on Thursday September 9, 1982 at Holy 
Name Cathedal. Students, faculty, and staff were invited to at- 
tend. This Mass is a tradition of Jesuit schools to bring the school 
community together to ask for God's blessing for the year ahead. 

After the Mass a reception was held in the Georgetown Room at 
the Water Tower Campus. 




MASS OF THE 
HOLY SPIRIT 



120 Loyolan 1983 






Loyola University's 
Criminal Justice Depart- 
ment sponsored a con- 
ference on the Cook 
County's Criminal Justice 
System 's role in combating 
sexual abuse of children. 
The conlerence was held 
on November 23, 1982 at 
Loyola's Law School. Pro- 
lessors Thomas M. Frost 
and Gad J. Bensinger, 
Ph.D. hoped the Con- 
ference would stimulate 
recommendation as to the 
future actions which must 
be taken to resolve the 
dilemma associated with 
the abused child. 

The speakers at the 
Conference included 
Cook County Sheriff, 
Richard J. Elrod; Roger 
Keats, an Illinois Senator; 
Lenora T. Cartright, Com- 
missioner of the Chicago 
Department of Human Ser- 
vices; and Catherine 
Ryan, Supervisor of the 
Juvenile Division of the 
Cook County State's At- 
torney Office. 



CONFERENCE ON THE ABUSED CHILD 



Loyolan 1983 121 




Loyoian 1983 123 



Hunger Week at Loyola is an annual 
event as an eiioit to raise money to aid 
self-help projects and relief programs. 
These events, which took place from 
November 11-18, were organized by the 
University Ministry and student 
volunteers. The purpose of Hunger Week 
is to create an awareness of hunger in the 
world, and what can be done about it, as 
well as raising money. 

The theme of this year's Hunger Week 
was "Weave a Network for the Hungry. " 
As many as three dozen events took place 
during the Week. These included a five- 
kilometer run at the Lake Shore Campus, 
campus liturgies, an auction, Soup and 
Substance Day, a 50-hour fast, and a 
Faculty-Staff-Student Benefit Talent 
Show. Also, there were "Pennies for Peo- 
ple" jars available at specified locations 
throughout the week. 

The funds from Hunger Week are given 
to carefully selected organizations. The 
chosen groups emphasize development of 
the skills for self-sufficiency, or provide 
emergency relief. This year the proceeds 
went to four Chicago parites and to 
refugee relief agencies overseas. As 
always, Hunger Week was great success! 



124 Loyolan 1983 




HUNGER WEEK 







Loyolan 1983 125 






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PRESIDENT'S BALL 




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On October 29, 1982 thirteen Loyola students 
were acknowledged lor their outstanding 
academic achievement, leadership, and ser- 
vice to the community at the annual 
President's Ball held at Mc-Cormick Place. 
One student from each college of the universi- 
ty was chosen to receive the award. The 
students were: Paul DeBoo, College of Arts 
and Sciences-LSC; Sister Mary Guadalupe 
Paulton, B.G.S., College of Arts and 
Sciences-WTC; Mary Ann Pinkowski, 
Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing; Ann L. 
Shartt, School of Education; Anthony Englert, 
Niles College; Bobert Arndt, University Col- 
lege; Kathleen Murphy, School of Social 
Work; Irene Sheridan, School of Law; Paul 
DiFranco, School of Dentistry; and Laurie 
Haight, Graduate School. 



Loyolan 1983 127 




MARDI GRA< 



128 Loyolan 1983 




130 Loyolan 1983 



HALLOWEEN 




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Loyolan 1983 131 




CONCERTS 



132 Loyolan 1983 







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j^S*lg*K*a* 




134 Loyolan 1983 



SOUL FOOD DINNER 




Loyoian 1983 135 




136 Loyolan 1983 



NURSES CAPPING 




Loyolan 1983 137 




50s /60s DANCE 



138 Loyolan 1983 






\ 



Kisste 



On November 13, 1982, SAB, 
Campion, and Chamberlain col- 
laborated to present the tirst dance 
ol the year. It was a 50's-60's Dance 
with the theme of "Twistin the Night 
Away." The musical entertainment 
was provided by a disc jockey from 
Windy City Disco. There were 
prizes awarded to participants in 
categories such as best costume, 
best twister, best hula hoop exhibi- 
tionist, and others. There were also 
female and male kissing booths, 
and graffiti walls. Refreshments and 
pizza were served. 



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4 



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Loyolan 1983 139 



t\Ml 



OUR LADY OF 

GUADALUPE 

MASS 




140 Loyolan 1983 



On December 6, 1982 the Latin 
American Student Organization(LASO) 
it the Water Tower Campus held a mass 
:ommerating the Feast of Our Lady of 

uadalupe. This Mass, honored the first 
appearance of our Blessed Mother to the 
Mexican Indian Juan Diego, was held in 
he Sacred Heart Chapel at the Water 



Tower Campus. The celebrant for this 
religious holiday was Bishop Nevin W. 
Hayes of the Archdiocese of Chicago. 
Bishop Hayes is a prominent figure in the 
Hispanic religious community. A 
Mariachi Band which played traditional 
religious music added a special touch to 
the mass. 



Jaime Contreras 
LASO-WTC President 




Loyolan 1983 141 




SPEAKER* 



142 Loyolan 1983 




UESDAY ENTERTAINMENT 



AFRO-AMERICAN WEEH 




144 Loyolan 1983 







%*~K 




Loyolan 1983 145 



NCAA CHAMPS OF 1 963 



To commerate the 20th anniversary of winning the 1963 NCAA national basketball 
championship, Loyola University honored the 1963 Ramblers with a weekend of 
celebration on January 7 and 8. The ceremonies began with a testimonial banquet in 
the Alumni Gym. Members of the 1962-63 team present included the "iron five" starters 
- Jerry Harkness, John Egan, Les Hunter, Ron Miller, and Vic Rouse. Also present was 
head coach George Ireland and Jerry Lyme, his assistant. The highlight of the evening 
came when a representative from the Illinois Secretary of State's office presented 
Ireland with a pair of "NCAA 63" hcense plates. On January 8, the festivities continued 
with a rematch of the two schools from the 1963 title game. Loyola was still victorious 
over Cincinnati with a 82-78 win at the Pavilion. 








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146 Loyolan 1983 




IYPNOTIST 




Loyola n 1983 147 




MARTIAL ARTS 



148 Loyolan 1983 



:OMMUNICATIONS WEEK 



The Third Annual Communication Week was held 
on April 4-7 at the Water Tower Campus. This 
event was sponsored by Communication 
Unlimited. Each day examined a different aspect of 
communication, ranging from technology to 
public relations to corporate communication and 
broadcasting. The purpose of the Communication 
Week was to make people aware of the com- 
munication explosion, and its effects on everyone's 
future. 




Loyolan 1983 149 




BUDWEISER HORSES 




Loyolan 1983 151 



CASINO NIGHT 




152 Loyolan 1983 



In 1974 the men of Campion Hall held 
their tirst Casino Night. Nine years later 
on February 25th and 26th the tradition 
continued. The event, however, has pro- 
gressed from the initial one gambling 
room and small restaurant to two gambl- 
ing rooms, a restaurant, a bar, and a 
dance room. 

The gambling rooms featured games 



played in Las Vegas casinos, for example 
roulette wheels, dice tables, and card 
games. At the Italian restaurant, 
waitresses in Roman togas served a varie- 
ty of foods ranging from Italian sausage to 
pizza. The Bogie's Bar was modeled after 
the film, "Casablanca. " In the dance 
room there was a band and a disc jockey 
playing everyone's favorite songs. 




Loyolan 1983 153 



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AWARDS BANQUET 



154 Loyolan 1983 



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Over 25 student organizations were 
honored at the "1983 Metro Awards" held 
on April 23, 1983 at the Conrad Hilton 
Hotel. The Vice-President's Office for 
Student Services sponsors this annual 
event which give each student organiza- 
tion the opportunity to present awards to 
outstanding members. 

The highlight of the evening was the 
presentation of the " Vice-President's 
Award for Leadership" and the 
"Moderator of the Year Award." This 
year's receipients were: Mark Miller, 



LSGA president; Jaime Contreras, WTC- 
LASO president; Theresa Krafcisin, DAC 
vice-president; Gregory Clark, EZE 
president; and Kevin Nedved, SAB presi- 
dent. These six members of student 
organizations have shown outstanding 
leadership qualities. 

The "Moderator of the Year" was 
Thomas O. Adams, Dean of Students at 
the Lake Shore Campus. He was honored 
for his outstanding dedication and sup- 
port to a student organization. He was 
moderator of LSGA. 



DEMOCRATIC 

MAYORAL 

CANDIDATES 




156 Loyolan 1983 




Chicago politics has always been unique since the days of Richard J. Daley 
and the "The Machine. " But no primary has brought as much national at- 
tention as the 1983 Democratic Mayoral Primary. The conflicting per- 
sonalities and backgrounds of the three major candidates has turned all 
eyes toward Chicago. Incumbent Mayor Jane M. Bryne, States Attorney 
Richard M. Daley and Harold Washington, Congressman from the first 
Congressional District of Illinois, are the three candidates facing off in the 
primary. The candidates visited both the Lake Shore and Water Tower 
Campuses so they could make themselves available to the maximum 
number of students. The candidates consider Loyola a great educational 
institution and they have a great respect for the student body. They realize 
that Loyola students are a viable constituency and necessary to the success 
of their campaigns. 




Loyolan 1983 157 



1 




HOOPLA 



158 Loyolan 1983 




Once again the Student Activities 
Board(SAB) and other organizations presented 
to Loyola's Lake Shore Campus, "Hoopla", a 
week-long fund raising event from April 25-29. 
All proceeds went to a scholarship which was 
to be awarded to the student who had 
demonstrated high academic achievement and 
outstanding participation in student activities. 

Some of the events featured were an ice 
cream social, a frisbee-golf tournament, a con- 
cert by the funk band "Amusement Park", 
organizational athletic competitions, roller 
skating rentals, an A.R.A. cookout, a car- 
naval, a Jazz Fusion Concert, a dance 
marathon and much, much more. 



Loyolan 1983 159 




160 Loyolan 1983 



Once again the Student Activities Board(SAB) and other 
organizations present to Loyola's Lake Shore Campus, "Hoopla", 
a week-long fund raising event from April 25-29. All proceeds 
went to a scholarship which was to be awarded to the student who 
had demonstrated high academic achievement and outstanding 
participation in student activities. 

Some of the events featured were an ice cream social, a frisbee- 
golf tournament, a concert by the funk band "Amusement Park", 
organizational athletic competitions, roller skating rentals, an 
A. HA. cookout, a carnaval, a Jazz Fusion Concert, a dance 
marathon and much, much more. 




Loyolan 1983 161 



PARENTS' WEEKEND 



The Second Annual Parents' Weekend was held on February 
11-13 at the Lake Shore Campus. This event was co-sponsored by 
the Loyola Student Government Association(LSGA), Residence 
Hall Association(RHA), and Student Activites Board(SAB). The 
theme tor this year was 'A Parent's Ticket to Loyola, Co-Starring 
Parents and Students. " 

The weekend itinerary was planned in an effort to acquaint the 
parents with life on campus as well as to give them the opportunity 
to take advantage of the benefits available to students due to 
Loyola's location in the city of Chicago. The weekend's festivities 
included two showings of On Golden Pond, campus tours, and 
concluded with a special family mass on Sunday. 




Blue Key, the Na- 
tional Honor 
Society here at 
Loyola, held its 
annual induction 
ceremony on Fri- 
day April 15, 
1983 at the 
West in Hotel. 
Each new Blue 
Key member must 
have met the 
basic criteria of a 
3. grade point 
average and must 
have been involv- 
ed in a student 
organization. 




3LUE KEY HONORS NIGHT 



Loyolan 1983 163 



SALE! 




164 Loyolan 1983 






SOCIAL WORK 
LUCHEON 



On April 22, 1983, Loyola's Social 
Work Department honored their 
graduating seniors and their Held 
instructors with a lucheon held in 
Boom 30 of the Marquette Center at 
the Water Tower Campus. Sister 
Ann Elizabeth Poulton, a senior and 
recipient of various awards in- 
cluding the Founder's Day award 
spoke on behalf of the graduating 
class. 




Loyolan 1983 165 



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USINESS 
SCHOOL 
AWARDS 




On Saturday, April 9, 1983 the School oi Business Administration held its thirty-second annual honors banquet 

in the grand ballroom of the Knickerbocker Chicago Hotel. Nearly lour hundred undergraduate students and 

their portents, Loyola faculty and administrators gathered to recognize the outstanding scholars and leaders of 

the School of Business Administration. 

Scholarship certificates were awarded to ninety-three students who attained a minimum 3.4 grade point 

average for the previous two consecutive semesters. 

Nine individuals received leadership certificates for their involvement in extracurricular activities and for their 

outstanding leadership qualities. 

Departmental keys were awarded to the graduating seniors who demonstrated outstanding ability in their 

respective field of study. 

Recipients of these keys were: 

Catherine Wozniak (Accounting Key), Michael Evans (Economics Key), Barry McDonald (Legal Studies 

Award), Angela Ponterio (Marketing Key), Gregory Hoffman (Personnel Management Key), Maureen Twardos 

(Production Management Key), Kathleen Lucas (Finance Key). 

Also, Mr. Kevin McGirr, instructor of accounting was designated faculty person of the year. 

Finally, the Dean's key, awarded to a senior who has made the most outstanding contributions in leadership 

and scholarship to the school, was received by Teresa Krafcisin. 



Loyolan 1983 167 



INTERNATIONAL 
FESTIVAL 




168 Loyolan 1983 




The Student Activities Board in conjunction with the ethnic groups in 
and around the Loyola community presented the Third Annual Inter- 
national Festival on Wednesday April 6th. 

The performances included: a traditional Indian dance known as the 
"Jatishwaram"(it is a dance of devotion). The Vietnamese club per- 
formed a folk song and demonstrated marital arts. KA WPA, the 
Philippino Club, performed a dance of Spanish influence and a 
traditional ballroom dance. The International Student Organization 
performed a modern Persian dance. The Polish Club presented the 
PNA youth dancers. They performed three National Dances 
orgmating during the 17th century. The Indian Students of Loyola 
performed a folk dance from Western India which was devotional m 
nature. 

There was a brief intermission at which time ethnic foods were 
available to the audience 

Marilyn Marturano 





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Loyolan 1983 169 



Play it Again, Sam 



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Play it Again, Sam focuses on Allan Felix, a 
Woody Allen alter-ego. Allan 's wife has jusf 
left him and, being an obsessive film buff, he 
appeals to the ghost of his idol, Humphrey 
Bogart, for advice on attractive women. With 
the help of his best friend, Dick, and his wife 
Linda, Allan attempts to re-enter social life. 
With each chaotic date, the hilarity increases 
and culminates when Allan and Linda realize 
they have more in commom than neuroses. 



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170 Loyolan 1983 




Macbeth 



In its most ambitious undertaking of the 
season, the Theatre Department staged William 
Shakespeare's Macbeth, the momentous tragedy 
of a man whose unbridled ambition spurs him to 
commit treason, and to perpetrate murders of 
unspeakable violence. Under the direction of Dr. 
Arthur Bloom, whose novel but convincing inter- 
pretation pitted the civilizing influences of 
medieval Christianity against the barbaric prac- 
tices and seething passions of Scotland's 
primitive tribal cults, the production intimated, 
on its most profound level, how the process of 
establishing culture--which yet continues among 
individuals and socities today-clashes with 
forces both powerful and primal which well up 
from humanity's darker side and take their origin 
from the very dawn of human evolution. Because 
human nature is so imbued wit these forces, 
there must abide, concerning the possibility of 
ever purging them (which is to say, concerning 
the possibility of mankind ever becoming wholly 
good, wholly civil, and wholly just), considerable 
doubt. Don Bender performed commendably in 
the title role, portraying with abmirable courage 
and energy a man in whom the fits of ambition 
were unmistakeable from the very first. Sheila 
Hansen, a freshman, likewise delivered a fine 
performance as the mature, seductive, and sub- 
tle Lady Macbeth who, nonetheless, could not 
"stop up the access and passage to remorse", 
who, yielding to the indictment of her own guilty 
conscience, went completely insane. But the pro- 
duction was, above all, a spectacle, awesome 
and gripping, replete with swordfights, appari- 
tions, and the rough cut of leather, and set on a 
coldly expansive and sharply raked stage hemm- 
ed in by a circle of austere, towering monoliths. 

Paul H. DeBoo 




Loyola n 1983 171 



THE SHADOW BOX 

The Shadow Box is set on the grounds of a hospital for the terminally ill 
where the lives of three patients are explored. Only through the love of 
these people and their families does the reality of their conditions surface. 
This reality is death. Unexpectedly, the Shadow Box celebrates life, and 
uplifts the spirit. 




172 Loyolan 1983 




CHICAGO 



Chicago, in the late 20' s, was a time of late nights, loud music and leggy women. It 
was an era of flamboyant youth and flappers, gangsters and gin, hi-jinks and hilarity. 
The story of Chicago begins with Velma Kelly setting the tone and atmosphere of the 
period singing ' 'All That Jazz. ' ' During the song, Roxie Hart enters and fires three 
shots into her lover 




Loyolan 1983 173 





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176 Ethnic 

182 Service 

186 Special Interest 

191 Sororities-Fraternities 

198 Dorm Governments 

202 RA's 

205 Publications 



Loyolan 1983 175 





Oriental Student Association 
Row 1: Jean Nakamoto (President), Maria Payomo (Vice-President) Row 2: Lynette Ferrer, Linda Lai 
(Secretary), Linda Chan (Treasurer). Audrey Tan Row 3: Kathy Lynch, Don Henson, Tina Mourikes 
Not Pictured: Judy Baniqued, Marie Nepomuceno, Kevin O'Reilly 



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Oriental Student Organization (WTC) 

The Oriental Student Organization at Water Tower was 
formed in 1979 for students interested in various oriental 
cultures. Unlike many other ethnic organizations, our 
members came from both oriental as well as non-oriental 
backgrounds. OSO gives studnets a chance to meet and 
work together. 

Tina Mourikes 




BCC 

The Black Cultral Center is a funded 
organization whose objectives are to pro- 
vide an instrument of Liason among the 
students, faculty, administration. As well 
as promote academic and cultural interest 
to the entire university. 

Karim Lati 



BCC 




Black Cultural Center LSC 

Row 1: Cyrenthia Daniels, Nedra White, Corren Evens, Denise Bradley, Gloria Bridgemon Row 2: 

Karin Lati, Jay Yancy. Michael Quails, Gregory Garner, Terrell Calhoun, David Smith. 

Not Pictured: George Lampkins, Bernard Hackney, Leonard Allen, Joe Lawrence 



176 Loyolan 1983 










International Student Organization 

Row 1: Linoxy Eakis, Elizabeth Marrie, Hanid Kuhantars, Hiromi Akiyama, Yuen-Kum Ng {Vice- 
President), Boudaghian Geuork (President) Row 2: Sopiah Suid, Sachiko Kitamina, Michelle Teape, 
Kathleen Leim, Fiona Lam, Kent Chiu, Mok Thu, Noushin Hadjivaziri, Georgeanna North Row 3: Nail 
Ibrahim, Fernando Dellano, Blanca Dellano, Leonardo Marturano, Marilyn Marturano, Alfred Chow, 
Rosana Li. Mike Duggan (Secretary), Helen Lavelle 



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Italian Club 








Da Italia con 


Amore 


(From 


Italy with 


Love)! 






Vita Russo 




Italian Club 




Row 1: Tony Giannim (President). Carmen Rocco, Sonny RagusofTreas), Umberto Ficarella. Maurice 
Russo. William L Bortolotti. Joe Baldassano. Angelo Ern. Michael Pendola Row 2: Cathie Palumbo 
(Sec). Diane Scatchell (Vice Pres ). Luz Elena Cano, Mary Ann Galassini. Sharon Campauilo. Isabella 
Sacca, Vita Russo, Rita Baghdass Arian, Frank Fokta. Chris Disaivo. Rose Collins Row 3: Tim 
Galassini, Vince Lombard!, Nancy Naddy, Angela Ponterio, Tony Grande. Jim DeRingo, Linda Luc- 
chesi. Donato Perretta, Tammy Johnson, Mike Gattuso, Darcy Dulbis Row 4: Rich Divito. Dave 
Allasio, John Zimmerman. Steve Wodka. Frank Falco, Fred Rothenberger, Dennis Pedrally 

Loyolan 1983 177 



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Polish Club 

It's important for people to be proud of their heritage, to 
know the history of their ancestors, and to preserve the 
language and customs established long ago. The Polish 
Club gives us the chance to share these things with the 
Loyola Community and to have a wonderful time while 
we're at it. 

Margie Kokot 



Polish Club 

Row 1: Mark Ciocek, Ted Gauza, Mark Kadziela, Tom Gauza, James Wisniewski Row 2: Mawek Kur- 
tyka, Liz Huczynski, Emily Motyl, Margie Kokot, Renata Plussa, Diana Dziuba, Karen Kail, Peter Waia 
Row 3: Greg Taraszkiewicz (Treasurer), Regina Brachmanski (Vice-President), Danuta Chlebek 
(President), Eva Dziadek (Social Chairperson), Dr. Frank Mocha (Moderator), Steve Van Spankeren, 
Stan Kazlowski 



Polish Club 






LASO 

The past year was a very successful and 
rewarding experience for LASO at Water 
Tower, Our expansion into campus wide 
events, while remaining faithful to our 
traditional activities has shown our dedica- 
tion to excellence in service and spirit. We 
hope that God will shine his grace on 
another fine year of events in 1983-84. 

Jaime Contreras 




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LASO WTC 

Row 1: Celia Alcala, Margarita Jaquez, Sandra Loyola Row 2: Tony Gonzalez, Jaime 

Contreras, Domingo Vargas 



178 Loyolan 1983 



LUASA 

Working with LUASA for the past four years has been an 
experience I'll never forget. LUASA is an important 
organization on campus and has been working hard to 
meet the needs of the students on campus. 

Denise Bradley 





LUASA 

Row 1: Victor Adams(Educational Chairman) Row 2: Denise Bradley(President). Lloyd 
McKinney(Social Chairman), Jessica Talbert, Sherry Chambers(Publicity), Tina Johnson. Nedra 
White(Treasurer), Leonard Allen(Vice-President) Row 3. Debra Carlton. Antionett Hudson, Vera 
Talberl. Mr X, Artelia Lewis, Kathy Mack Row 4; Allison Jackson, David K. Smith. 



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Row 1: Ray Ramanathan. Gene Tanquinit, Eric Ondoy, Leon Santayana, Dennis 
Tablizo, Ethel Magrianao, Lyoia Basilgo, Virginia Dominguez: Row 2: Alex Bernardino, 
Shirley llagan(President), Sheila llagan(Secretary), Lorraine Evaristo, Carole Garcia, 
Rina Patriarca, Vina Maniquis, Judie Villarias, DionieTalla, Dahlia Festin; Row 3: Keith 
Galloway, Ken Yoshida(Vice-President), Dave Escalante, Butch Evangelista, and Gary 
Dong(Treasurer). 




KAPWA 

KAPWA is a Filipino Organization of 
Loyola University of Chicago, created to 
establish communication among Filipino 
students as well as among the entire 
Loyola community. It hopes to develop and 
awareness of the Filipino culture. KAPWA 
has been actively involved in Welcome 
Week, Hunger Week, and the Ethnic Fair. 

Shirley llagan 



Loyolan 1983 179 




Loyola Jewish Student Organization 

LJSO tries to provide our members with a 
sense ot unity, identification and pride. Our 
programs include Shabbat dinners, along 
with educational and social programs. 

Carey Smolensky 



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Loyola Jewish Student Organization 

Row 1: Lisa Lieberman, Jeft Zeller(Treasurer), Shamai Rockov, Carey Smolensky(Presi 
dent), Shari Trilling, Irina Kheyfets, Arthur Raff(Secretary); Row 2: Matt Kantor(Vice 
President), Janine Cin, and Dr. Goldman. 



LJSO 




German Club 





German Club 

Joan Bagley, Helen Bidawid, Marianne Damianides, Karina Danner, Paul DeBoo, Geralyn Fallon, 
Mary Jane Fallon, Michelle Jochum, Christina Knaup, Joe Kowar, Lisa Kowar, Kathy Krieg, Babara 
Kronau, Heidi Merle, Georgia Michaels. Al Moreno. Sheila O'Shaughnessy, Cindy Panek, Ken Singer, 
Bob Smith, Kathy Stadler, Pat Storto, Julie Tatko, Mary Ann Urban. Names in no particular order. 




German Club 
Comprising students of German 
Language, students of Germanic language 
and students who otherwise simply share 
an interest in the language and cultural 
traditions of Germany and Austria, the 
Loyola University German Club engages in 
social activities exploring that heritage. 

Paul DeBoo 



180 Loyolan 1983 




The goals of the Vietnamese Student Organization are, 1. To 
keep in touch with our culture by making it a part of our lives. 
2. To share our traditions with the Loyola community through 
activities that will promote a mutual understanding of both 
cultures. Members of the V.S.O. must be enrolled at any of 
Loyola's four campuses. All students of Loyola University are 
invited to become members of the Vietnamese Association. 



Vietnamese Students' Association 

Row 1: Tien Nguyen, Ha Truong. Row 2; Tung Van. Hao Tran, Hung Nguyen. 






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Lithuanian Club 



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Lithuanian Club 
Labas Lietuviai (We 


are 


proud to be Lith 


janians)! 


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Lithuanian Club 

Row 1: Helen Zalatorius (President), Romas Peleckas (Secretary). Augustinas Aviza 
(Vice-President) Row 2: Vida Pocius, Daine Kerels, Sylvia Slecas, Daine Tijuneiis Row 
3: John Vaikutis, Linas Kazlauskas, Kestutis Stanilinas 



Loyolan 1983 181 




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Activities Programming Board 

Row 1: Sam Gray, Carol Kendzior, Dolores Hargrave, Crystal Calloway, Sue Prosia, John Riedl Row 
2: Alexandra Stankovich, Anna Augelli, Laurie McLean, Carolyn Lotton, Ruby Ninan, Regina Ward, 
Jody Sacks, Eva Rupp, Kathy Lynch Row 3: Mary Beauregard, Maria Ruffulo, Catherine Linblade 
Row 4: Thad Mikula, Lawrence Snowsden, Tom Hanrahan 



6 P B 



Water Tower Government 

As the Student Government for WTC, our main goal is to 
enhance both academic and social growth of the students. 
To achieve this goal, the Government enlists the help of all 
the student organizations, faculty and staff. By doing this, 
WTG this year has promoted efficent open lines of com- 
munication between students and the administration. 

Greg Rzepczynski 






APB tries to provide a refreshing change 
from the rigors of school life. We provide 
every Tuesday for the student entertain- 
ment a Tuesday spotlight in the 
Georgetown Room. In addition, we try to 
provide at least one big event each month 
off-campus, such as Loyola Nite at Second 
City, APB Annual Hayride, etc. 

Crystal Calloway 



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182 Loyolan 1983 




Water Tower Government 

Chris Golonka, Laura Ramm (Treasurer), Anita Jones (Recording Secretary), Mark Suszki 
(President), Joseph Seminetta (Publicity Director), Wendy Powers, Teddy Young, Mary Carol Lacey, 
James Hoya, Sandy Przybyszewski, Brian Broski, Jean Nakamoto, Kathleen T. Lynch, M. Kozoel 
Jaime Contreras, Gregg Rzepczynski 





Criminal Justice Organization 

Row 1: Michael J. Koziel {Vice-President and WTG Representative). Catherine Carnllo (Treasurer), 

Dan Schmidt (President), Row 2: William Cruz, Stephanie Cole, Veronica Alva, Cynthia Jacobson, Dr. 

Bensinger Row 3: Anthouv Burrell, Bill Bresnahan, Ed Dombrowski, Michael Anthony Garcia, Doc 

Struckhott 

Not Pictured: Mary Jackovviak, Renee Ayala (Secretary), James Jelinski. John Zavitzaos, Diane 

Botica, Tim Danher, Jim Saitourous 



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Criminal Justice Organization 

The Criminal Justice Organization is an 
educational organization which exists to 
help out the second largest group of ma- 
jors in the School of Arts and Sciences. We 
sponsor speakers such as Former Gov. 
Walker, and other professionals who are 
related to the field. We work with the Dept. 
of Criminal Justice's cooperation. 

Michael J. Koziel 



RHA 

RHA is an organization for Resident Halls, it was 
created two years ago to unite individual residents halls 
and identify with the common needs and concerns of the 
resident students. RHA provides services and programs 
for all residents. 



r h e 




Row 1: Marion Jelcz (P.R. Chairperson), Cathie Palumbo (Policy Review. Long Range Planning), Sue 
McGregor (Executive Secretary), Juliann Hlavin (President), Agi Hason (Finance Chairperson), Liz 
Pupavatz (Programming) Row 2: Nilsa Rivera, Alma Evespo, Tina Davis, Elaine Lee, Mary Deye, 
Caroline Grund, Lisa Morris Row 3: Lisa Rapace, Nidal Haddad, Jim Collins, Jack Carney, Ann 
Puisis, Cathy Valente, Patrice Dougherty Row 4: Steve Forlunskl, Allsa Amoff, Crystal Smith, Barb 
Kronau, Dave Philipps, John Highland, Sue Howicz Row 5: Mike DuPont, Claire Brugger-Walls (Ad- 
visor), Mark Salamone 




Loyolan 1983 183 





WLUW 

Row 1: Bob Newsum, Tom Crowley, Carey Smolensky: Row 2: Sandy Milkeris, Denisi 
Jerger, Russ Game, Paul Dizadji; Row 3: Tab Washington, Matt Smith, Tom Brennan 
and Wayne Madgziarz. 



WLUW 



.and thats what's happening!! 



Carey Smolensky 




L.S.G.A. 
L.S.G.A., the student government of the 
Lake Shore Campus, offers many services 
to the students as well as to the rest of the 
Loyola community. Through the hard work 
of its members, it tries to keep the students 
informed about issues that concern them, 
and presents student's to the administra- 
tion. 

Mark Miller 



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LSGA 

Kneeling: Michael K. Siebenhaar, Tim Zimianitis, Peter Dantini; Row 2: Sue Kochlef, Meg Knowles, 
Georgia Michaels, Sharon Franklin, Kelly Walsh, Maria Mourousias, Jeff Kinzler; Row 3: Alice Hlavin, 
Mark Miller, Stacy Karcasis, Stephen Meissler, Carey Smolensky, Mark Sorrentino. 




184 Loyolan 1983 




Row 1: Donna Dorl, Moderator; Sue Belisle, Gabi Strack, Maria Robles, JoAnn Grindle, JoAnn Walsh, 
Jean Smolen, Roberta Cwiertuia Row 2: Pete LeTorneau, Carlos Reynes, Pat Hoffrogge, Sandy 
Woods, Melanie Molloy Row 3: Joan Bagley. Ellen Rooney, Ada Laszlo, Kevin Nedved, John Ferenzi. 
MaryBelle Mittenthal Row 4: Donna Fontana, Karen Papa, KathyO'Brien, Dan Rebek, Jackson Yang, 
Marty Matus, Doreen Wascow, Ted Constantine, Bill Grant Row 5: Paul Forcier, Gunta Denvas, Kevin 
Hogge, Patrice Dougherty, Stan Gonslaves, Pete Vitulli, Denise McNelis. 



s a b 




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Communications Unlimited 
Communications Unlimited introduces 
Loyolans to the fun, excitement, and oppor- 
tunites available in the Communications 
field. With Guest speakers like Linda Yu, 
activities like Communications Week, plus, 
special seminars, "C. U." opens the door to 
the world of communications. 

Mark Suszko 





SAB. 
S.A.B. makes it happen!! 

Kevin Nedved 



CMUN Unlimited 




Communication Unlimited 

Row 1: Christy Harrison-Teich, Kathie Doolan, Gita Mirchandani, Barb Austerd, 
Benette Blinaver, Anita Collins, Chris Alfireviz Row 2: Jim O'Connell, Ried Knapp, 
Mary Carberry.Mark Suszko. Joe Ungari, Lynn Steffen 



Loyolan 1983 185 




Loyola Pan-Hellenic Assocation 

The Loyola Pan-Hellenic Assocation is composed of all 
the sororities on campus, whether on the national or local 
level. It compiles rules governing rushing, pledging, and in- 
itation, and cooperation with the university administration 
in maintenance of high social standards. 

Evonne Demetrakakis 



Loyola Pan-Hellenic Association 

Row 1: Barb Bies(KBG), Ginger Lottes(KBG); Row 2: Evonne Demetrakakis(ASA), Anita Saleh(ASA). 

Julie Housakus(ASA). and Rose Collins(KBG). 



Pan-Hellenic 




D e C 



The School of Business Dean's Advisory Council works in 
a dual role of service to the Business Dean and to the 
business students. It is the only organization of its kind at 
Loyola and members are elected annually by the business 
school undergraduate students. In the fall the Council 
sponsored various coffee hours and guest speakers on 
several different topics such as career choices and inter- 
viewing among others. In the Spring the Council assumes 
full responsibility of presenting Honors Night. 




Dean's Advisory Council 

Sitting: Gregg Rzepczynski (President), Teresa Krafcisin (Vice-President); Standing: Rebecca 
Babowice. Tony Cononaco, Kim Shipla, Mark Ramljak. Teri Lee Ferro, Tony Scaletta, Joe Grendys 
Nick Alexopouleos. Gail Gutraj (Corresponding Secretary), D'ea Scarsella, Suzanne Barnitz. 



186 Loyolan 1983 



Economics Club 

The Economics Club is important to me because it lets 
me focus on major issues and their ramifications 
throughout a national economy. As I learn to spot trends 
and issues, I have a better understanding of my world. 

Art Henry 




ROTC Rangers 



Economics Club 

Sitting Brad Grubb (President). Dr. Peter Alonzi (Moderator); Standing: Art Henry (Secretary), Tom 

Mucha, Lisa Dubrock, Betsy Beliano. Teresa Sjllivan, Gregg Rzepczynski (Vice-President). 



Economics Club 





ROTC Rangers 

Marianne Raimonde, Keith Tomashiro. Carol Clarke, Sue Ficek, Mary Clark, Lou Slepka, Greg Guest, 

Dave Bradshaw, Regie Brown. Emil Velez. Tom Osh, Mike Marlanka 



Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr!!! 



Loyolan 1983 187 





English Club 
In the English Club, Art is more than just a 
man's name. 

David B. Gorski 



Row i* Kevin O'Reilly; Row 2: Louis Skordas, Dav.d B. Gorski, Jonathan Noyes Sherwell. Allan J 
Frantzen (Faculty Advisor), Jeffrey Coleman; Row 3; Brain O'Laughlin, Mary Lynch, Sue Kelly 
Sharon L Pedote, Jeanne Rattenbury. 



English Club 





Candids 




188 Loyolan 1983 



Nursing Council 

The Nursing Council is a group of class officers who have 
worked together to provide activities and leadership for 
students within the School of Nursing. This group has 
demonstrated friendship, leadership, love, dedication and 
motivation this past year to members within the council, 
peers, faculty, and the community 

Mary Ann Pinkowski 












Candids 



P0M / 

S * 



Nursing Council 

Bottom Row Valerie Kosinski, Annette Borman, Kathie McCarthney. Sharon Burlak, Kim Salach; 
Middle Row: Ms Mary Brodenck, Ms Sandy Sojka. MaryBeth Sullivan, Monica Karasch, Patty 
Reynen. Roberat Czaja, Karen Meier, Jean Ratajik, Lauren Faxel. Mrs Lorayne Banta, Top Row: Tern 
Westelund, June Kasiak, Jan-Marie Olsen, Angela Del Medico, Gina Petruzzelli, Patty May, Mary 
Ann Pinkowski 

Nursing Council 






Loyolan 1983 189 



Rifle Team 
















Don't shoot 


until 


you 


see 


the 


whites 


of their eyes 
Mike Coler, 


Capt. 







4»-, 



**v , 




Sailing Club 




Rote Rifle Team 

Members include: Mike Coler (Captain), Mike Speth (Co-Captain), Jim MacMlllan, Kevin Foster, Mark 

Sotos, John Protesevich, John Harris, Sue Ficek, Sgt. Ma). Campbell (Coach). 



Rifle Team 





Sailing Club 

Row 1: Tom Figler, Ruthe Kunst, Margaret Naughton, Pete Lorenz, Roma Advaney Row 2: Dan 
Leslei, Daina Tijurelis, Mary Samerdyke. Susan Folkers, Ann O'brien, Mary Kane.Renee Gramont 
Row 3: Paul Marx, K, Tomas Stevens (Secretary), Annette deChaud {Vice President), Kevin 
Kavanaugh (Fleet Captain), Helen Zalatorius (President), Bob King (Treasurer), Greg Gambia, Ramon 
Manglano, Brian Gambia, 



Sailing Club 

The Sailing Club affords the students of Loyola the op- 
portunity to take full advantage of Lake Michigan in an 
educational and fun-filled manner. 

Brian Gambia 



190 Loyolan 19S3 




Finance and Investment Club 

The Finance Club gives students an opportunity to 
associate with their fellow students. It also gives students 
an opportunity to expand their horizons by listening to 
noted speakers in the Finance world. 

Thomas Mucha 



Finance and Investment Club 

Row 1: Jim Moen (Vice-President), Matt Zaker (Vice-President), Kim Shipla (President), Russell 
Nicholson (Secretary), John Galich (Treasurer) Row 2: Liz Levin, Bob Graff, Demetna Papadopoulos, 
Elouise K Kouimelis, Lynn Wawrzyniak, Charles G. Rummel Row 3: Dan Nolan, Linda Willford, Carol 
Mary. Roslyn Miles, Nicholas Alexopoulos, Sharon Parker, Andrew W Pappas, Darlene Hardaway, 
Lasoyce Hall Row 4: Tim Blum, Bart Zuurdeeg, Jeff Urban, Thomas Mucha, Raul Rosano. Tom 
Nelson, Carl Beckman, Larry Fredette. Jim Lentino 

Finance Club 





filpha Delta Gamma 



,(,_ ; U- HA 



Alpha Delta Gamma 
We are the few, the proud, the Delts! 

Duncan McLean 




Alpha Delta Gamma 

Row 1 : Vic Cimino, Ron Carontl, John DeFranco, Bob Rudman, Mike Dwyer Row 2: Kevin Brady, Mike 

Trombetta Row 3: Tom McMahon, Duncan McLean, Mike Mora. John Sullivan Row 4 (kneeling) Steve 

Baginski 



Loyolan 1983 191 




Alpha Kappa Lambda 

Row 1: Mary Wilson, Sue Schweitzer, Angelo Erri, Ed Thorpe Row 2: Dave King, Tom Bonk, Joe 
Baldassano Row 3: Louis Skordas Row 4; Mark Amidei, Tony Giannini (President), John Swain 
(Treasurer), John Chiappetta Row 5: John Anderson, Dan Fadden (Vice President), Mike Watkins 
Not Pictured: Bob King, Mike Seiser, Emil Velez, Vito Atberga, Steve Uidil, Gina Mrozek, Cindy 
Zoller, Heidi Lindhorst 



a k l 




Delta Sigma Phi 

This, the Epsilon Kappa chapter of Delta 
Sigma Phi, has been at Loyola since 1968. 
Our brotherhood is a unity of men having 
certain ambitions, attributes and abilities 
in common. We are a growing chapter com- 
prised mainly of pre-professional people. 
We have been honored by Loyola as the 
fraternity with the highest grade point 
average for the past three years. 






Alpha Kappa Lambda 

A.K.L., we're proud as hell! 



Mike Watkins 



Delta Sigma Phi 




Delta Sigma Phi 

Row 1 Pledges Steve Holman, Don Campbell, Jambs Lee, Ferris Oweimrin, John Frenzel Row 2: 
Sean Redford' Griffin, Mike 'Hawg - Coler. Tex the Sphinx (A.K.A. Arnoli) Row 3: 'Ed Collins', 'Chimp' 
Comacho, 'Murph', Ed Bito' Vereara, Siggy' Row 4: John 'Roid' Kaminski, Pat Stri' Mazzone, Bob 
Pimp' Longo Row 5: Jim Chubby' Morse, Greg Clutch' Cazolas, Ben 'Dex' Mazzone Row 6: Dave 
Abe' Glowski, Bart 'Herb' Kostrubala. Jim Buck' Buckley, Roscoe 'Hulby' Monks, Bill 'Wildman' 
McDowell, Pat 'Fud' Curran, Simon 'Mahrty' Galvin 



192 Loyolan 1983 



UST 30 

CENNFOmim 



-- 





Kappa Beta Gamma 

Row 1: Barbara Bies. Ginger Lattes, Rose Collins. Betsy Evenson, Mary Cianfrocca, Deborah In- 
graham Row 2: Sue Guevara, Chris Disalno, Lisa Hasbert, Pamela Giermak, Jodi Nevers, Lisa Ander- 
son, Row 3: Mary Ellen Cosgrove. Wendy Powers. Sandy Przybysyerski, Linda Dzuibla, Cindy 
Carlson, Judy Lehman, Haliny Janik 



Kappa Beta Gamma 




Kappa Beta Gamma 

Kappa Beta Gamma is an National, 
Social Sorority with chapters at Catholic 
Universities throughout the U.S. In 1954, 
our epsilon chapter was installed at Loyola 
University of Chicago. Kappa Beta Gamma 
has members at both Lake Shore and 
Water Tower Campuses. 

Pamela Giermak 




Our Purposes: 1) Education- To en- 
courage College Education as a means to 
reach personal advancement 2) 
Socialization- To maintain Social and 
Business ties within a define group of in- 
dividuals via fraternity membership 
qualification. 3) Humanitarians- To 
perpetuate the self-help ideology of work- 
ing in the comminity through social service 
intervention. Gregory A. Clark 



Epsilon Zcta Epsilon 




Epsilon Zeta Epsilon 

Row 1: Andre R. DeBonnet, Bryon A. Franklin (Advisor) Row 2 Joseph Grant (Vice President) 
Dwight Middleton (Chairman of Activities), Kenneth A. Harring, Gregory A. Clark (President) Row 3: 
Lenace Watson, Bernard D. Hackney, George E. Lampkin, Jr (Secretary) 



Loyolan 1983 193 





KneelinglRow 1): Angelo Panos, John Burke; Row 2: Brad Brubb, Jay Vandervort, Dan Gehr, Pete 
Janeke. Bill Ward, Kevin Kenny. Dan Cunningham, Tom Maron, Zoran Zivkovic; Row 3: John Manion, 
Dave Kendzior; Row 4: Tom Piazza, Dave Wagner, Jerry Garder, Ray Wallace, Hall Filian, Dan Kaiser] 
Missing: Dave Gurdy, Joe Voelker, Bob Seiser, Fred Luvich, Bob Anderson, TomlT.K.) Kelley, Russ 
Scott, Dan Curley. Greg Standard, Bill Madigan, Steve Theodosis, Mike McGuire, Ed Gogon Tim Ho- 
wie, Ted(Theo) Vega, 

filpha Sigma Phi 




Alpha Sigma Phi 
Welcome to the Sig House... 

Zoran Z 



Members of the Interfraternity Council promote friendship, 
understanding, and cooperation among the various frater- 
nities and between fraternities and other segments of the 
University;to provide fraternities with an official, represen- 
tative student organization having power to investigate frater- 
nity problems; pass legislation relative to fraternities, and to 
represent fraternity opinion to the Student Goverment, facul- 
ty administration officers, official university committees, and 
others; and to stimulate a heightened concern among frater- 
nities and their members for serious scholarship. 




Inter-Fraternity Council 

Row 1: Dan Sullivan, Dave Wagner; Row 2: Bob Conway, Mike Morrisroe, John Spina, Lou Mini; Row 

3: Bart Kostrubala, Tony Giannini, Jeff Kinzler. 



194 Loyolan 1983 




Row 1: Sue Jason, Yvonne Sherman, Kathy Elsen, GAM Peters, Gina Pristo; Row 2: Dawn Coolidge, 
Joanie Geary, Julie Zakoff. Anne-Mane Robinson; Row 3: Chris Tsitsis. Elaine Malleris. Rosie Calan- 
dra, Tammi Trayes, Evonne Demetrakakis, Row 4: Collen Geary, Loretta Ardaugh, Susan Limdbloom. 
Lori LaVaccave. Janice Velis; Row 5: Julie Housakus, Synovce Rubalcaba, Julie Miller, Sue Saccone, 
Mary Heyda; Row 6: Anita Saleh, Tammy Walker, Mary Kay Willis, Kim Klein; Row 7: Cindy 
Splihgerber, Georgia Karuntzos, Ann Surmaczynski, Laura Krol. Alice Hlavin 



a s a 






Alpha Sigma Alpha 

Besides being the largest sorority on 
campus, Alpha Sigma Alpha has provided 
the opportunity for many girls to find 
sisterhood and friendship while involving 
them in the intricate network of the univer- 
sity - guiding them through the college 
years and later in life. 

Gunta Densvs 



T K E 



* 




Row 1: Jeff Hofer, Tee Goldberg, Tony Schiavone, Sam Garnello, Jim Bertini, Dennis Skiba Row 2: 
Jim Andukopolous, Scott Brady, Len Gambia. Dan Cozzo Rich Sloan, Carl Tyburg Gjede, Tony Cec- 
chin, John Spina Row 3: Brendan Carney. Dan O'Connell, Bob Beckerl Row 4: Marc Schmsty, Nick 
Litsos, Bill Vastis, John Giannopolos. Pete Vaselopolous, George Semeros Row 5: Drew Reynolds, 
Mike Zimmerman, Pete Fet, Sam Mancini, Ed Agasi, Greg Klovens. 

Loyolan 1983 195 





Theta Xi 

Theta Xi is a social organization which of- 
fers a chance to create long-lasting friend- 
ships and develop other interests including 
Athletics and Community Service. Theta Xi 
offers a person a chance to develop other 
areas of their personality besides the 
academic areas which are enhanced by the 
school itself. 

Fred Giacoma 



Theta Xi 

Row 1: Jerry Sonnefeldt, Dave Bradshaw, Tom Considine, Pat Elward, Joe Caruso. Joe Albanese, 
Bill Muriel, Ernie Hernandez Row 2: Steve Bunsen. Joe Sullivan, Tom Gill, Dan Gosse, Luke Castro 
Giovanni, Ken Vercelli, Max Menacher, Joe Donofrio, Bill Newren Row 3: John Meyers, Fred 
Giacoma, Joe Keating 



Theta Xi 





S fi E 



Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Fraternity teaches. From a fraternity, the member can 
learn much that supplements the instruction he receives in 
the classroom, and what is learned is by no means 
frivolous. For in addition to encouraging good scholarship, 
a fraternity helps the member to understand more about 
human relations and about himself. The lessons learned in 
this laboratory of social education can serve man for a 
lifetime. Dave Mayer 



196 Loyolan 1983 




Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Row 1: Scott Kwidzinski, Michael Cotton, Rich Divito, Robert Rojas, Bob Malhotra, Tom Hennessey, 
Don Allen, David Stack, Kevin Brekba, Jim Casson, Chris Krub, Ben Pastika Row 2: Dan Herro, Lou 
Mini (Recorder), John Leligdon, Jim Sohn, Barry Feldner, Dan Janik, Tom Farley, Jim Karubas, Ray 
Mucelo, Dave Ungram, John Charles (Treasurer), Steve Sarussl, Joe Britz, Vince Lombardi Row 3: 
Karl Paullus, Dave Mayer, Mike Carney, Mike Predey, Jim Peyton, Jeff Kinzler (President), Mike 
Ochoa, Joe Alblan, Steve Houle, Dan Lehenbauer (Vice-President), Dean Conomikes, Al Lescher, 
Mike Neville 



Delta Sigma Phi 

The Little Sisters Organization of Delta Sigma Phi has been in existence 
for the past three years. 1982 proved to be an exciting and eventful year with 
a strong pledge program and the addition of many new members. We 
organized activities such as fund raisers, an annual Christmas party for the 
brothers, and a semi-formal dinner dance. We also helped in the formation 
of a Little Sisters Program for the Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity. Participation 
inour Little Sisters Organization has lead to lasting friendships and un- 
forgettable memories. Joan Vrielink President 

Diane Provenzano Treasurer 









Little Sisters 

Row 1: Julie Pesce, Mary Kay Barron, Chris Burdyn, Maureen Hughs Row 2 Sue Christiansen, Ann 
Moga, Carol Nugent, Cathie Palumbo (Pledge Mistress). Martina Blank Row 3: Diane Provenzano 
(Treasurer), Anita Pierotti, Mary Beth Brunke. Monica Karasch, Mary Pembroke, Annette deChaud 
Row 4: Debbi DeVeirman, Julie Seaver. Donna Michaliska (Pledge Mistress), Shelly Coleman, 
Maureen McGregor, Joan Vrielink (President) Not Pictured: Vlcki Roth (Vice President), Debbie 
Mazurek (Treasurer), Sidney Strickfaden, Mary Wisniowicz, Donna Haugh 

Little Sisters of DSP 



POL 





Pi Omicron Lambda 

Row 1: Ted Gauza, Tom Gauza, Sue Kurzydlo, Halina Janik, Joe Slevnik, Rita Nagy Row 2: Bill Grant, 

Frank Kokosyka, Joe Kokosyka, Jeff Hynek, Layne Novak 



Pi Omicron Lambda 

The pre-professional, co-ed, Polish 
fraternity's motto is Education, Unity and 
Prosperity for those interested in the con- 
tinuation of Polish tradition at Loyola 
University of Chicago 

Rita Nagy 



Loyoian 1983 197 




Gonzaga Ha 


II 




Do not pray for 


easy lives. Pray to be 


strong men! 


Do not pray for tasks equal to 


your powers 


Pray 


for powers equal to your 


tasks. 




Andrew Witik 



li* 




S. Campus Govt. 





mm ' > 

*J c 



South Campus Government 

Row 1: Joe Seligmann, Mary Wolte, Sue Barry, Rosemary Donovan, Barb Walter. 



198 Loyolan 1983 




) i i I i 



\ f 

\ ft 




Gonzaga Hall 

Row 1: Andy Witik, Liz Scarano, Mike Unti Row 2: Paul Golan, Ben Jankowski. 



Gonzaga Hall Govt 





South Campus Government 
Could this face really intimidate so- 
meone? 

Rosemary Donovan 




Chamberlain Hall Government 
"And in the sweetness of friendship let there be laughter 
and sharing of pleasures-Kahlil Gibran." 

Julie Ninan 



Chamberlain Hall Government 

Row 1: Maureen Caroll. MaryBelle Mittenthal, Cathy Valente; Row 2: Deb Stone. Julie Ninan. Elise 
Myers. Mary Catrambone. Lisa Morris; Row 3: Laurel Nugent, Mariza Marcilli, Mary Rompala, and 
Cathl Mahon. 



Chamberlain Govt. 





Lakefront Govt. 



Lakefront Government 

When I first came to Lakefront, I was impressed by the 
differences, both good and bad, between Lakefront and 
Campion, where I lived last Year. Participating in govern- 
ment has brought me closer to the people, both good and 
bad, in Lakefront. 

David Gecic 



Row 1. Vince Obrzut. John Bodhane, Kathy Muldoon. Gunta Denaus. Kelly Maloney. Ann Connelly; 
Row 2: Jenny Zaroslinski, John Kamlnskl, John Swain. Laura Schaefer, Julie Balzarmi, Mary Therese 
Koska; Row 3: Mary Pat Eraci. Alisa Arnoff. Lidya Gonzales, Karen Magid, Fran Daly (Hall Director), 
Andi Margolis, Mary Pat; Row 4; Mary Kay Willas. Maria Neibr. Sava Trajcevska, Andrea Siraki. Sue 
Jason, Row 5 Mike Brown. Jetl Hynek. Sue Jagodzmski, Dave Wagner 



Loyolan 1983 199 




- : 



Candids 





Candids 



nvi 



H9SHH 




HUM&FR Lie 



200 Loyolan 1983 




MERGE 

Row 1: Nancy Morgan, Kathleen Quinn, Sieve Urban Row 2: Se-Joon Ok, David Phillips, Martin Kelly 

Row 3: Sheila Byrne, Noreen LeGare, Jams Nearing 



MERGE 



MERGE 

The Mertz Edgewater Residential Government Establishment known as MERGE is the 
dormitory government of Mertz Hall, MERGE follows an established plan of purposes 
and objectives, and these include: 1, To provide services and activities to meet the 
needs of resident and community life; 2. To approve, coordinate and sponsor educa- 
tional, social, recreational, and spiritual activities for the residents of Mertz Hall; 3. To 
establish a channel of communication between residents of Mertz Hall and the ad- 
ministration of Loyola University, and, 4. To positively represent the Loyola community 
in all our activities and communications 

David J. Phillips 




Campion Government 
Growth, .energy. ..good times... encourage- 
ment. ..perseverence... cooperation. ..develo- 
pment. ..spirit. ..and most of all friendship 
were all part of the campion senate 
presidency. Any one sho was able to ex- 
perience even one of these, shared in 
these, shared in the success that the 
1982-1983 Campion Hall Senate was. 

Martin M. Mafus 



Campion Govt. 




Campion Government 

Front row: Marty Matus(President), Chris Shoff(Vice-President), Jerry Kennedy, Nidal Haddad, Dan 
Maksimovich, Corona Tucker, Tony Somese, Bruce Taylor; Back row: Bill SullivanfTreasurer), Ned 
Burke, Steve Furtunski, Bill Brozovich, Paul Czech, Dave Wurzbach(Secretary), Pat Brooks, Stan 
KabatfHall Director), Sid McCrayfAssoc. Hall Director). 




Loyola n 1983 201 





Campion Hall RA's 

Row 1; Joe Morgan, Mike Evans, Dave McCormick, Brad Grubb, John Klick, Sta,n Kabat, Sid McCray, 

Clay Canaday, Greg Osberg. 



Campion Hall Rfi 



Campion Hall RA's 

The men of the Campion Hall Staff represent several 
academic areas with the Loyola Community. Our make up 
is as follows: Hall Director, Associate Hall Director and 
eight resident assistants. We work with over 300 male 
residents daily. Five Chaplains assist us in developing an 
atmosphere of community. When most people say "Cam- 
pion" they think spirit. We feel our staff exemplifies the 
tradition of camaraderie known only to Campion Hall. 




South Campus RA's 

Remember, There's no such place as far 
away. 



S. Campos Rfi 




South Campus RA's 

Row 1: Deb Schmidt, Beth Elliott, Rick Calderon, Liz Dye Row 2: John Winkelmann, Mike Flaherty, 

Tom Andreshak. 



202 Loyola n 1983 








Small Halls RA's 

Row 1: Luanne Luebker Row 2: Judy Johnson, Joan Vrielink, Rita Brown Row 3: Kathy Glavin, Diane 

Provenzano Row 4. Deb Stone. 



Small Halls Rfi 




Mertz RA's 

Through all the lessons, joyful and painful, 
with unending responsibilities to residents 
and fellow staff, through memories 
created, challenges met, sucesses 
celebrated, we stand proud of our home, 
mertz hall... still walking tall. 






Small Halls RA's 
Some people say: Don't tell your daughter 
to marry a doctor or lawyer, tell her to be 
one. Others advise: Don't tell your son to 
be a doctor or lawyer, tell him to marry one. 
Small Halls say: Don't tell your sons or 
daughters to be doctors or lawyers, tell 
them to be RA's. 



Mertz Rfi 




Mertz RA's 

Row 1: Gwen Zeisel, Julie Dwyer, Georgia Petroponlos, Bill Dahlbom, Daisey Davis, Jo Walsh, Pete 

Lane, Bill O'Brien Row 2: Tom Vece, Noreen LeGave, Bob Kenter, Linda Mahalko, Anne Bannister, 

Maureen Riley, John Sullivan, Mary Mokete, Kathy Weber, Lora Allen, Mary Cianfracca, Karen 

Williams. 



Loyolan 1983 203 




204 Loyolan 1983 




itting: Dr. L. Peter Alonzi, Asst Professor of Economics; Ms. Laura Ramm, WTG Delegate, Ms. 
lary Jackowiak, Loyolan Yearbook Editor-in-Chief; Rev. Peter Fox, S.J.; Dr. Ruth McGugan, 
irector of Correspondence Studies and Chairperson of the Publications Board; Angeles 
ames, Asst. Dean of Students; Standing: Dr. Alan Hager; Kevin 0;Reilly, Cadence Editor; 
rother Michael Grace, S.J., Loyolan Faculty Moderator, Archivist at Cudahy Library; Gordon 



Stiefel, Asst Dean of Students. Cadence Budget Administrator; Charles A Taylor, Loyolan Year- 
book Budget Administrator, Asst Dean of Students; Edmund Rooney, Asst. Professor of Com- 
munication Ans; Not Pictured: Rev. George Winchester, S J , Phoenix Faculty Moderator; Susan 
Fitch, Housing Office; R. Scott Flodin, Loyolan Yearbook Editor-in-Chief; Greg Garner, Peter 
LeTorneau; Kelly Ryan, Phoenix Editor-in-Chief 



Publications Board 




Loyola University of Chicago is the publisher of the three 
student publications, Cadence, Loyolan and Phoenix. As 
publisher, the University has established the Publications 
Board as a resource for the good of all three publications. 
The Publications Board is a university committee compos- 
ed of the editors of the three student publications, two 
directors of Student Activities, the Budget Administrators 
and Faculty Advisors for each publication, and students 
and faculty-at-large. All of the members are appointed by 
the Vice-President for Student Services. 

The role of the Publications Board is to recommend 
editors to the Vice-President for Student Services, print 
policies for the Cadence, Loyolan and Phoenix and to 
review proposed budgets before they are forwarded to the 
Committee on Student Life and finally to the Vice- 
President who has the ultimate decision. 

The various publications are expected to reflect the 
Judeo Chrisian ethic of the University. 



Loyolan 1983 205 



Cadence 




Cadence is the University's 
creative arts magazine. 
1982-1983 saw some big changes 
in the magazine-most notably its 
size-it became a "little" 
magazine, only five and one half 
by eight and one half inches. 

Seniors Kevin O'Reilly and Daria 
Zvetina served as Editor and 
Associate Editor, respectively. 
The notorious Bill Savage, a 
junior, was Poetry Editor. 

Kevin M. O'Reilly 



Cadence 

Row 1: Bill Savage, Lori Mancillas, Kevin O'Reilly, Dania Zvetina, John Wolfe Row 2: Sue Saocone, Trish Lenzini, Ingrid 

Duerme, Joan O'Reilly, Judie Villanias, Tom Purcell 




206 Loyolan 1983 



LOYOLA PHOENIX 




On Thursday nights, if one ventures into the far reaches 
of Centennial Forum, one may encounter a chaotic scene 
which resembles a Dionysian rite Actually they have 
stumbled into the Phoenix offices where a dedicated 
staff frantically works to beat a 2 a.m. deadline. Working 
at the Phoenix has given ne some of my most rewarding 
college experiences. Because of the paper, I have been 
able to meet so many friends, understand the workings of 
the University, and enjoy a good college life. Even though 
times at the Phoenix aren't always harmonious. I know 
we all desire to make this paper the most effective form 
of commuication for Loyola University. I don't know if in 
my four years I'll see the Phoenix attain the standard of 
perfection that we would like it to have, but I am confident 
that because of the sincere determination of the Phoenix 
staff, the goal will be attained. 

Marty McCormack 



Bottom: Mike Cismersia, Gunnar Berg, Dan Grosso, MaryLou Oarrow. Marty McCormack, Carla Herrmann, Bill Mahoney, Nan- 
cy Morgan, Steve Filipiak; Top: Jean Garbolski, Eileen O'Brien, Diana Najar. Dave Jordan, Karen Sorensen, Melanie Molloy, 
Debbie Wallace, Myron Antoniw. 




Loyolan 1983 207 



p:. : & 








L 

Y 

L 
A 






S 
P 
E 
A 
K 
S 







U 

T 






L 

Y 





o 


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A 

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P 




o 


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A 
K 
S 




3D 


u 

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L 



Y 


i 




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A 

S 

P 
E 
A 
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S 


210 Chamberlain 





U 


212 Gonzaga 




T 


214 Graduate 




L 



216 Lakefront 




Y 



218 Loyola 




L 
A 


220 Mertz 




S 


222 Sheridan Place 




P 
E 

A 


224 Stebler 




A 

K 

<5 


226 Winthrop 







228 Campion 



Loyolan 1983 209 




Chamberlain 
Hall consists of a 
special £,roup of 
women working, 
studying, and 
krowmg, together. 
We are committed 
to developing, a 
caring community 

in which we sup- 

Eort each other 
oth in our strug,- 
kles and in our 
dreams. I will 
never forget the 
laughter shared, 
the friendships 
formed, and the 
spirit present in 
Chamberlain 
Hall. 

Karen O'Brien 



210 Loyolan 1983 



Chamberlain 




Loyolan 1983 211 



Gonzag,a Hall 
celebrated its twenty- 
first birthday this 
year in style! This 
year, however, it was 
not an all male occa- 
sion as the retreat 
house and residence 
on Kenmore Avenue 
went co-ed. Opening 
its doors to women 
residents proved 
rewarding, as an ex- 
perience, and 
beneficial in regards 
to the basic concept 
of Christian and 
cooperative living,. 
This welcome addi- 
tion surly has helped 
to both enhance as 
well as fulfill that 
special understan- 
ding, which we know 
as the Gonzag,a ex- 
p e r i e n c e . 

Nick Grapsas 





212 Loyolan 1983 






Iti 



Gonzaga 




Loyolan 1983 213 



Graduate Dorm 




214 Loyolnn 1983 




• 






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I like the privacy 
and the atmosphere 
here at the graduate 
dorm; It is very 
close to school. 

Nancy Kline 




Loyolan 1983 215 



Lakefront 




216 Loyolan 1983 




I like the apart- 
ment style living; 
you have bicker 
rooms. Also the 
privacy is nice, 
especially the 

Er i v a t e 
athrooms. The 
people here are 
real friendly. I 
really like the 
lake view. 

Tammy Trayes 



Loyolan 1983 217 




218 Loyolan 1983 



Loyola 





Living, at Loyola 
Hall is just like 
living, in your 
own apartment. It 
is not like living, 
on campus, yet 
you still have 
security. 
Lory Lavaccare 



Loyolan 1983 219 



Mertz 




The view is nice 
from our room. I 
like Mertz too, 
because it is close 
to classes. Also 
it's big, enough to 
g,et to know a lot 
of people 

Cheryl Cepuran 
and Cara Keck 




220 Loyolan 1983 




": : :* 

SS SB! 

H is 

■ 



■I 




Loyolan 1983 221 




It is just like liv- 
ing in an apart- 
ment without pay- 
ing, the bills and if 
anything, breaks 
we just call 
maintenance and 
they fix it in a few 
years. I also like 
the community 
spirit. 

Leslie Marshall 




222 Loyolan 1983 



Sheridan Place 




Loyolan 1983 223 




••■ #z 



224 Loyolan 1983 



Stebler is very 
homey; it's 

quieter and the 
people here g,et to 
be very close. The 
RA's £et along, 
well with the 
other residents. I 
like the rooms 
because they are 
big,. 

Justine Gascor 










Loyola n 1983 225 




1983 

Financial Aid / 
Are Avail! 



.-'* s.. :j'. ,;;.<,;i. 



3MPLE 



226 Loyolan 19S3 



Winthrop 





Winthrop is one of the 
better places to live on 
campus. Its set off from the 
rest of the dorms but it is 
still close to loyola life. It 
offers a more mature and 
independent environment 
for upperclassmen. Win- 
throp also gjves one a g,ood 
taste of apartment life 
before being, out on ones 
own. 

Mike Sapienza 



Loyolan 1983 227 



Campion ' 




Since Campion Hall is the only male dorm on 
campus and the rooms are all within close 
proximity of each other, strong friendships 
are usually formed between the guys. This 
makes for a very spirited dorm and adds 
another dimension to student life aside from 
academics. 

The strong point of Campion is its . well 
organized government. The reps, of Cam- 
pion Government are active throughout the 
year, not only in their own dorm but in other 
organizations on campus 

Steve Fortunski 




228 Loyolan 1983 





Loyolan 1983 229 





L 







Y 













L 






A 






S 






P 






E 






A 






K 






S 













U 






T 






L 













Y 











CO 


L 
A 

S 




■D 


P 
E 
A 
K 
S 




O 



U 

T 




30 


L 

Y 

L 




CO 


A 

S 

P 
E 
A 
K 
S 






i 

232 Men's Basketball 
236 Women's Basketball 




U 

T 


240 Waterpolo 




L 


242 Women's Swimming 





Y 


243 Men's Swimming 






L 


244 Men's Cross Country and Track 




A 


246 Women's Cross Country and Track 




S 
P 


248 Soccer 




E 
A 

K 


250 Volleyball 




r\ 

s 


252 Cheerleaders 







253 Intramural Sports 




u 






T 





Loyolan 1983 231 



Basketball 



Men's 



Date LU OP 

11-27 82 at Bradley 90 

12-4 86 ... . Pennsylvania .... 78 

12-6 80 at LSU 97 

12-11 71 Colorado 72 

12-13 69 Valparaiso 58 

12-18 56 ... . Northwestern .... 64 

12-21 75 California 67 

12-27 90 No. Illinois 73 

72-37 72 at Illinois 73 

1-8 82 Cincinnati 78 

7-72 82 DePaul 76 

7-76 83 at ORU 67 

7-78 77 at OCU 57 

7-22 73 St. Louis 62 



7-24 


78 .. 


... at Xavier .... 


84 


7-29 


84 . 


. . . Evansville . . . 


73 


7-37 


84 .. 


. . . at Butler .... 


73 


2-4 


58 ... 


. . . . Dayton 


65 


2-7 


74 ... 


. . . at Detroit .... 


69 


2-10 


86 .. 


. Oklahoma City . 


. . 53 


2-12 


90 .. 


. . Oral Roberts . . 


. . 76 


2-75 


85 


. . at Marquette . . 


. . 97 


2-79 


66 ... 


. . at St. Louis . . . 


fi? 


2-27 


86 .. 


Xavier 


85 


2-26 


77 .. 


. . at Evansville . . 


. . 78 


2-28 


83 .. 


Butler 


7? 


3-5 


98 ... 


.... Detroit 


83 


3-70 


80 . 


. . . Evansville . . . 


66 


3-77 


76 .. 


Xavier 


8? 




(Top Row):Mike Cenar, Gerry Mundt, Chris Rogers, Mike Watkins, Tim Nolan, Daryl Bushrod, 

Alfredrick Hughes 

(Bottom Row):Calvin Young, Greg Williams, Paul Downer, Andre Battle, Dan Burich 

232 Loyolan 1983 





Loyolan 1983 233 



aker err 

ipURMAMEN 

ADELPH1I 

963 




234 Loyolan 1983 



Why do you feel that you have improved so 
much this year from last year— 
I have worked hard at it. I lifted weights and 
played in a summer league at Triton. This years 
team has a better team concept than last 
year's and so you look better if you are a team 
player. 

Why did you decide to transfer to Loyola- 
It is a good school with good media attention. 
Channel 9 gives you good exposure by broad- 
casting in 38 states. We play good competi- 
tion. 

Chris Roges, Center 




Loyolan 1983 235 




236 Loyolan 1983 



Women's 




STANDING: Head Coach Marty Hawkins, Jackie Huszti, Maureen McNerney, Lisa Kasprowicz, Sandy Couet, Sue 

Busiel, Kathy Anderson, Kathy Meyers, Student Manager Mary Smythe. 

KNEELING: Sandy Bauwens, Colleen Monckton, Terese Coulon, Faith Mimnaugh, Eileen McMahon, Kathy Leyden 

Mary Ellen Trychta. 

MISSING: Asst. Coach Mary Schoenhoff 



Basketball 



Lovo Ian 1983 237 




Date 


LU 


OP 


12-3 


66 Purdue 


76 


12-4 


86. . . . Indiana State. . . . 


71 


12-12 


94 St. Louis 


51 


12-18 


60 Southern III 


75 


12-19 


74 Northern III 


73 


12-22 


66 ... . Wisconsin .... 


68 


1-8 


67 Detroit 


54 


1-10 


S3 ... . Illinois Chicago . . . 


68 


1-12 


63. . . DePaul 


54 


1-15 


84. . North Dakota. . . 


65 


1-18 


68 ... . Eastern Illinois . . . 


59 


1-21 


70 . . Northern Michigan . 


. 58 


1-28 


57 Loras 


62 


0000 


69. . . St. Ambrose. . . . 


72 


0000 


80. . . . Bradley. . . . 


94 


2-4 


61 . . . Notre Dame. . . 


80 


2-10 


73 Northeastern III.. 


59 


2-12 


63. . . Dayton. . . . 


65 


2-15 


75...SL Frances. . . . 


70 


2-17 


58 Butler 


78 


2-18 


76. Kentucky Wesley an . 


68 


2-19 


68 Evansville 


. 67 


2-21 


86 Xavier 


. 48 


2-24 


81 Western III 


. 71 


2-27 


76. . SW Missouri State. . 


. 54 


3-2 


70. . . . Illinois-Chicago . . . 


. 58 


3-12 


59 DePaul 


67 




238 Loyolan 1983 




What has been the main difference between 
playing high school and college basketball- 
In college the game is more physical. Also the 
pace is quicker. You are always playing with 
and against good players instead of playing 
some good and some average players. 

Kathy Leyden, Guard, 



Polo 



Water 



LU 




OP 


14 


Pepperdine 


13 


12 


UL San Diego 


8 


18 


Bucknell 


6 


8 


Brown 


7 


24 


Northwestern 


1 


19 


Noter Dame 


8 


29 


Iowa State 


9 


25 


Illinois 


6 


22 


Iowa State 


9 


18 


Missouri-State 


7 


20 


Principia 


3 


15 


Indiana 


1 


15 


Kentucky 


4 


29 


Florida 





22 


Queens 


3 


14 


Missouri-Rolla 


9 


7 


New York 


8 


8 


Olympic 


11 


15 


Malibu 


15 


27 


Principia 


4 


21 


Kentucky 


7 


20 


Missouri-Rolla 


8 


22 


Richmond 


4 


17 


Bucknell 


5 


11 


Brown 


7 





(Top Row):Brian Yeager, Roy Mosczinski, Mike Greenwald, Mike Fernstrom, Mark Menis, Terry Burns, Frank Brool 
Carl Tybring-Gjedde, Tony Korvick, Gunnar Berg, 

(Bottom Row):Jeff Hofer, Dan O'Connell, Eric Kettleson, Mike Fendler, Andy Bosko, John Hinkle, Frank Schimmel, 
Gambia, Thad Kush. 



240 Loyolan 1983 




ow good will Loyola be in water polo next year— 
le loss of Mark Menis, Terry Bums and Mike Fernstrom will 
! a tough one to overcome. However, I think you'll see many 
: our present players improve dramatically and with one or 
to recruits, Loyola will not be a team to take too lightly at the 
CAA's playoffs next year. 

Andrew Bosko, Water Polo 



- «t 



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c 



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iV • 




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Loyolan 1983 241 



Women's Swimming 




242 Loyolan 1983 



Men's 







Swimming 






^ 






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■ 









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I 



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Loyolan 1983 243 



«» 




Cross Country and Track 



244 Loyolan 1983 





I; HI 

II M B I 

.'[II II II 

M » I i 

i r ii » 

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H II II B 


















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II II B B 

II C B B 

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Ii til B B 

II PI II $ II B 

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(Top Row):Dan McGehee, Gary Donzelli, Steve Doran, Bill Lockwood. 
(Bottom Row):Joe Budz, Chris Krob, Rich Eber. 

Why do you run- 

We are crazy. I probably wouldn 't excel in any 

other sport as much as track. 

Joe Budz, Track 





",;. 



Loyola n 1983 245 




Women's 




Cross Country and Track 



Loyolan 1983 247 



. 




(Top Row):Gregory Barry, Justin Erbacci, Todd Wielgos, John Kin 

ney, Mike Mulligan, Dave Theiszmann, Jonathan Zepeda. 

(Middle Row):John Egan, Steve Iniquez, Tom Sheehy, Jack Cannon 

John Spitza, Steve Lavrisa. 

(Bottom Row):Dave Shack, Peter Wilkie, Tommy Boland, Joe Cap 

puccitti, Mike Kenny, Raul Lasso, Gregg Klovens. 




|S^* 



248 Loyolan 1983 




lIlPlHi 



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What is the most difficult thing about playing 
soccer- 
Making the adjustment to a sport that involves 
hand-foot coordination rather than hand-eye 
coordination. Soccer is the up and coming 
sport in the country right now. 

Steve Iniquez, Soccer 




Date 


HI 




. OP 


9-06 


1 .. 


Trinity 


...0 


9-11 


? 


Bradley 


.. 1 


9-75 





. UW-Milwaukee.. 


. . 4 


9-18 


4 


I.I.T. 


.. 1 


9-20 


5.. 


. Olivet Nazarene . 


.. 3 


9-28 


1. .. 


. . . Notre Dame . . . 


.. 3 


10-01 


9 


Carthage 


.. 2 


1002 


1? 


.... Elmhurst 


.. 


1004 


3 


Rosevelt 


.. 3 


1006 


? 


. . North Central. . 


.. 


1009 


7 .. 


.... Valparaiso . . . 


.. 


10-13 


1 . . 


Wheaton 


.. 4 


10-16 


1.. . 


. Northern Illinois . 


.. 3 


10-17 


3 


. . Illinois State. . . 


.. 3 


10-22 





. . . . Evansville 


. . 4 


10-24 





Illinois 


.. 1 


10-31 


3 


Judson 


.. 1 


1103 


4 


. . . North Park 


.. 2 


1106 


3 


. . . . Roosevelt 


.. 1 


1109 


5 


Depaul 


.. 1 


11-11 





. . Northwestern . . . 


1 



Loyolan 1983 249 







Date 


Opponent 


Loyola 


9-25 


University of III. Chicago 


Loss 


70-75 


Western fff. U. 


Loss 


9-10 


Cleveland State 


Loss 


9-28 


Northeastern III. University 


Win 


70-76 


Wisconsin-Milwaukee 


Win 


9-19 


University of Pittsburgh 


Win 


9-30 


DePaul U. 


Win 


70-76 


Western III. U. 


Win 


9-17 


Northern Michigan 


Win 


70-7 


St. Xavier 


Win 


70-76 


Eastern III. U. 


Loss 


9-17 


Central Michigan 


Loss 


70-1 


Loras College 


Win 


70-22 


College of St. Francis 


Loss 


9-77 


Central Michigan 


Loss 


70-2 


St. Ambrose 


Win 


70-22 


DePaul U. 


Win 


9-74 


Purdue-Calumet 


Win 


70-2 


Southeast Missouri State 


Win 


70-22 


Dayton 


Win 


9-74 


Lake Michigan College 


Win 


70-5 


Wisconsin-Milwaukee 


Loss 


70-22 


Loras 


Win 


9-77 


Northern Kentucky 


Win 


70-6 


Marquette 


Win 


70-23 


Dayton 


Win 


9-77 


Indiana-Purdue-Ft. Wayne 


Win 


70-6 


Eastern III U. 


Loss 


70-23 


Lewis 


Win 


9-78 


Xavier U. 


Win 


70-8 


Lewis U. 


Loss 


70-26 


St. Xavier 


Win 


9-78 


Franklin College 


Win 


70-8 


Northeastern III. U. 


Win 


70-29 


Ohio U. 


Win 


9-78 


Wright State 


Loss 


70-8 


Western III. U. 


Win 


70-29 


IUPUI 


Win 


9-78 


Lake Superior State 


Win 


70-8 


Kent State 


Win 


70-29 


Alabama-Burmingham 


Win 


9-79 


Cincinnati! 


Loss 


70-9 


Drake U. 


Loss 


70-29 


Ball State 


Loss 


9-27 


University of III. Chicago 


Win 


70-72 


College ol St. Francis 


Win 


10-30 


Indiana Central 


Win 


9-25 


Wisconsin 


Loss 


70-75 


University of Evansville 


Win 


10-30 


Wright State 


Loss 



250 Loyolan 1983 



What gets you psyched during a volleyball match-- 
The fan support at home really helps a lot. I wish that there were more tans 
there because it really gets you more into a match. 

Mary Kay Oskielunas, Volleyball 




(Top Row):Carolyn Vellos, Mary Kay Oskielunas. Kathy Anderson, Beth Rancic, 

Cheryl Bielawski, Susan Laitsch, Manager Danette Coogan. 

(Bottom Row):Alda Pleirys, Kathy Meyers, Colleen Monckton, Diane Moran, Carol 

Slowinski 






i 





Loyolan 1983 251 




252 Loyolan 1983 



Softball 




Loyolan 1983 253 





■ 

. -. 

.... 






Intramural 



Football 



254 Loyolan 1983 



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Intramural 




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Loyolan 1983 255 





Tennis 



Intramural 



256 Loyolnn 1983 





Intramural 



Loyola n 1983 257 





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262 Nurses 




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318 Dental Hygiene 




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322 Medical School 




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Loyotan 1983 259 



Commencement 




This year, Joseph L. Bernardm, archbishop of Chicago delivered the commencement address 
at Loyola's mid-year convocation on Saturday, January 15, in Medinah Temple. He also receiv- 
ed an honarary Doctor of Laws degree. Approximately 900 degrees were conferred on 
undergraduate and graduate students by Loyola's president, the Rev. Raymond C. Baumhart, 
S.J. 

Honorary degrees were also conferred on Howard T. Markey, chief judge, U.S. Court of Ap- 
peals for the Federal Circuit, and Sister Claudia Carlen, IHM, scholar-in-residence at St. John's 
Provincial Seminary, Plymouth Michigan. Judge Markey received the Doctor of Law, and Sister 
Claudia received the Doctor of Humane Letters. 

The ceremony began at 3:00 p.m. and lasted about an hour and a half. 



260 Loyolan 1983 



Ceremonies 




Loyola University's 130th annual commencement was held on May 28, 1983. A total 
of approximately 1,800 students graduated in two commencement ceremonies. Dr. 
Julia Lane, dean of the School of Nursing, delivered the commencement address for the 
morning ceremony. Sister Susan Rink, B.V.M., president of Mundelein College and Fr. 
Purcell, S.J., professor of management science at Georgetown University received doc- 
tor of laws degrees. 

At the afternoon ceremony, Dr. Ronald E. Walker, senior vice-president and dean of 
faculties delivered the commencement address. At this convocation, Paul M. Plunkett 
received an honorary doctor of laws degree and Dr. Franz Kaspar received an honorary 
doctor of humane letters degree 



T 






Loyolan 1983 261 



Niehoff School of Nursing 



Eva Arvay 

Donna M. Babich 

Martha E. Bagby 



Theresa A. Bahr 



Debra D. Barnes 



Barbara A. Barron 
Jeanne M. Barry 
Susan M. Bednar 



Laura E. Beglin 

Joseph L. Behrman 

Christine Besler 

262 Loyolan 1983 





Margrette Bittenbinder 



Debra A. Bogosh 



Virginia Bongiorno 



Domenica Bourus 
Kathy A. Boyer 
Susan F. Brown 



Laura E. Byrk 



Kerin A. Burgess 



Cynthia K. Buzard 
Sharon J. Campanile 
Joanne M. Cibula 



Julie A. Coddington 
Eileen B. Colleran 
Karen Collin 



Loyolan 1983 263 



Maryann Cronin 

Margaret M. Daley 

Angela F. Delmedico 



Theresa L Digangi 

Christine Dryjanski 

Deborah A. Duncan 



Chandra Dunmars 



Annemarie Durco 



Sheila Edens-Aiello 
Susan ). Edmiston 
Deborah L. Ferris 



lean A. Flaws 
Maureen Fleege 
Vicki M. Frazier 

264 Loyolan 1983 





Pamela Gierke 



Sharon L. Gilbert 



Rene N. Ginex 



Antonette Giovannoni 
Corinne Golon 
Lynn A. Gorski 



Marylou Gorski 
Wendy ). Greenberg 
Marie Gremo 



Donna 5. Hale 
Julie Halla 
Deborah Hayes 



Patricia Healey 
Maureen E. Heffernan 
Andrea M. Heinz 

Loyolan 1983 265 



Rosario Henao 

Theresa A. Heneghan 

Ellen A. Hogan 



Janet M. Jasen 

Chris /ones 

Kathleen M. Jones 



Susan R. Kaminski 



Mary Jo Kaminsky 



Noreen C. Keane 

Mary T. Keenan 

Julie Kelly 



Maureen Kenny 



Katherine Kerrigan 



Lucinda Kil 



266 Loyolan 1983 





Carol A. Korpics 
Margaret Kurtz 
Cynthia A. Kutchins 



Mary Pat Lanagan 



Ramon A. Lara 



Carolyn T. Latz 



lennifer M. Leszkowicz 



Donna Lettieri 



Cynthia Lewis-Gentuso 



Linda M. Lisowski 



Daine M. Litwin 



Annie Maiden 
Andria K. Margolis 
Karen M. Marich 

Loyolan 1983 267 



Jacquelin Marion 

Renee Marker 

Maria S. Martinez 



Mary K. Massart 

Roberta M. Massey 

Margaret M. Masterson 



Barbara A. Matusiak 

Patricia A. May 

Lisa M. McCarthy 



Maureen McCarthy 

Donna McGregor 

Kathleen A. McNeela 



Valentine Medrano 



Mary Mokate 



Florence A. Molinaro 



268 Loyolan 1983 



«,—*——_■ 





Marie E. Monhardt 
feanne E. Moran 
Doris Moy 

Paulette Mueller 
M. Tandy Murray 
Mary T. Murtaugh 



Cheryl Myers 
Sally G. Nawrocki 
Kimberly A. Novak 



Diana M. Odenbrett 
Debra A. O'Donnell 
Marianne O'Keeffe 
Susan ). Olson 
Laura M. Oosterbaan 
Sophia Pasko 

Loyolan 1983 269 



Cynthia M. Peca 

Elizabeth Perryman 

Maria Pieper 



Anita M. Pierotti 

Mary Ann Pinkowski 

Dawn J. Reck 



Colleen M. Reidy 



Donna Resnik 



Michele B. Robinson 



Noemi Romero 



Angela I. Rossi 



Colleen B. Rotolo 



Christinia Savaglio 



Marybeth Scheffler 



270 Loyolan 1983 





Margaret E. Schneegas 



Susan Schweitzer 



Patricia S. Senesac 



Anne E. Shelven 
Nancy L. Silva 
Gloria L. Silver stein 



Linda S. Skinner 
Julie A. Skokna 
Cheryl L. Smedley 



Jacquelyn Smith 
Carolyn Snow 
Laura A. Soens 



Debra A. Sopko 
Julie A. Sorenson 
Amy H. Stout 

Loyolan 1983 271 



Lori L. Swanson 

Pamela C. Thomas 

Carol A. Thorn 



Kathleen M. Timmers 

Maria E. Valdes 

Barbara A. Wadas 



Karen M. Walsh 



Karen M. Welch 



Julie M. White 

Patti A. Wille 

Laura R. Willis 



Stephanie Wolski 



Mary L. Wysocki 



Darleen V. Zeckser 



272 Loyolan 1983 




Undergraduates 




Basem Abdullah 

Biology 

Lydia Adame-Santini 

Computer Science 

Millen Agasi 

Mathmatical Sciences 



James Ah I rep 

Chemistry 



Margaret Albarran 

Marketing 



Mark ). Albian 

Finance 

Christopher ). Alfirevic 

Communication Arts 

Michele A. Aljinovic 

Finance 



Cris Ambrose 

Political Science 

Thomas G. Andreshak 

Biology 

fames G. Angelica 

Finance 



Loyolan 1983 273 



Piero Anichini 

Political Science 

Diane M. Arnold 

Finance 

Paula L. Atanus 

Finance 



Andrea D. Austin 

Accounting (Public) 

August in as K. Aviza 

Marketing 

Renee Ayala 

Criminal Justice 



Renee Anne Bachner 

Psychology 

Sara A. Balder as 

Political Science 



Mark L. Banakis 

Biology 

fed T. Banas 

Accounting (Public) 

David W. Bang 

Biology 



Michael Barry 

Linguistics 
English 

Joan T. Batchen 

History 
English 



274 Loyolan 1983 



Dean Battistella 

Psychology 





Ruth E. Battles 

Biology 

Ann M. Baumhart 

Social Work 

Catherine M. Baunach 

Computer Science 



Cunnar E. Berg 

Finance 

Janice L. Berman 

Psychology 

Lisa M. Berrettini 

Psychology 



Peter ). Betzelos 

Biology 

Anna A. Bianchi 

Finance 



Paul J. Bied 

Biology 

Bruno A. Bilotta 

Accounting (Public) 

Angela I. Birazzi 

Biology 



Deeadra A. Blake 

Dental Hygiene 

Cassandra Blazer 

Management (Personnel) 

Benette A. Blindauer 



Communication Arts 



Loyolan 1983 275 



Kevin /. Blindauer 

History 

Sharon D. Blount 

Social Work 

Kelly K. Blum 

Sociology 



Tim C. Blum 

Finance 

Celene M. Bochat 

Dental Hygiene 

Erika Bokor 

Psychology 



Anita L. Bolognani 

English 



Martin J. Boyer 

Biology 



Margaret A. Boyle 

Sociology 

Christa Boznos 

Philosophy 

Denise M. Bradley 

Communication Arts 



Pamela M. Brahos 

English 

Marleen M. Brand 

Chemisty 

Scott R. Brand 

Mathematical Sciences 
Computer Science 



276 Loyolan 1983 





Antonio ). Bravo-Velaquez 

Psychology 

Adrian Breef 

Communication Arts 

Kathleen C. Brennan 

Communication Arts 



Christopher R. Brodersen 

Political Science 

Thomas S. Brosnan 

Political Science 

Jocelyn Brown 

Psychology 



Michael L. Brown 

Biology 



Mary Bryant 

Management (Personnel) 



Nina Brynjolfsson 

Marketing 

Mirta L. Bucheli 

Psychology (Applied) 

Savely Bukingolts 

Biology 



Gregory W. Burkett 

Psychology 

Terrance M. Burns 

Marketing 

Arthur R. Bushonville 

Accounting (Public) 

Loyolan 1983 277 



Laureen A. Cahill 

Sociology 

Ricardo /. Calderon 

Biology 

Thomas J. Callahan 

Psychology 
Economics 



Liza Gracia-Camilo 

Business 

Clay A. Canaday 

Biology 

Gregory R. Cannizzo 

Biology 



Alice Cano 

Philosophy 

Aimy Caraballo 

Communication Arts 



Fernando A. Carballo 

Biology 

Mary F. Carberry 

Communication Arts 

David J. Carini 

Political Science 



Ann Carlisle 

Physics 

Anthony J. Carone 

Finance 

Renato Carrara 

Accounting (Public) 



278 Loyolan 1983 





L. Victoria Carrera 

Biology 

Michael F. Carroll 

Fine Arts 

Eric Carter 

Communication Arts 



Barry Cash 

Psychology 

James M. Casson 

Political Science 

John J. Castaneda 

Political Science 



Sandra L. Cello 

Fine Arts 



Linda Soon-Yu Chan 

Accounting (Managerial) 



John Charles 

Biology 

Paul A. Chemella 

Biology 

Kathy D. Chernoff 

Dental Hygiene 



Gina A. Chorak 

Communication Arts 

Carol L. Chrisos 

Biology 

Tiiana Chuk 

Accounting (Public) 



Loyolan 1983 279 



Geralyn Cieply 

Mathematical Sciences 

Susan M. Ciezki 

Accounting (Public) 

Mary K. Clancy 

Special Education 



£ee Anne Clarbour 

Marketing 

Gregory Clark 

Philosophy 

Kevin P. Cliff 

Management (Production) 



Roosevelt Cobb 

Finance 



Ann M. Coglianese 

Dental Hygiene 



Edward Colaianni, )r. 

Management(Personnel) 

Jeffrey Coleman 

English 

Anita C. Collins 

Communication Arts 



Mark W. Collins 

Accounting 

Dean J. Conomikes 

Psychology 

Theodore Constantine 

Biology 



280 Loyolan 1983 





My experience at 
Loyola have been 
enhanced by a vast ar- 
ray of loves, friendships, 
and also sorrows, 
though it all I have 
learned that the life of a 
Christian is this/To see 
the possibility of the 
kingdom of Cod 
everywhere, and to have 
the faith necessary to 
build it. 

Gregory A. Clark 





Ann V. Corcoran 

Theatre 

Susan Anne Cottrell 

Political Science 

John L. Crema 

Marketing 



Thomas B. Crowley 

Communication Arts 

William Cruz 

Criminal Justice 

Beatriz Cueva 

Social Work 



Efthymia Dallas 



Finance 



Carolyn M. Dalporto 

Mathematical Sciences 
Computer Science 



Maribeth Danko 

Psychology 

Margaret A. Debnar 

Chemistry 

William P. Defean 

Biology 



Jeffrey A. Dencek 

Management (Personnel) 

Laura Derezynski 

Finance 

Xeny Despotopoulos 



Political Science 



Loyolan 1983 281 



Sandra Diaz 

Accounting (Public) 

RoseAnn M. DiStasio 

Communication Arts 

Catherine A. Doherty 

Accounting (Public) 



Carol M. Dolack 

Finance 

Kathleen Donahue 

Biology 

Brian G. Donovan 

Computer Science 



Lisa M. Doumanian 

Dental Hygiene 

Robin L. Drews 

Biology 
Psychology 



Paul A. Dubrick 

Biology 

]ohn B. Dungan 

Finance 

Valerie Dunmars 

Accounting 



Michael R. DuPont 

Political Science 

Mary E. Dye 

Political Science 

Daniel R. Edelman 

Finance 



282 Loyolan 1983 





Great People 


& Great 


Times (equals! Loyola 




Liz Dye 




iwm 





/ have found that the 
quality of education 
and concern of the 
educators is superior at 
Loyola. The availability 
for assistance in making 
those important deci- 
sions in one's life, 
deserves commenda- 
tion My experiences 
ascertain a Loyola facul- 
ty that is truly concern- 
ed about its students 
welfare 




Benita Eichenfelds 

Social Work 

Brigitte Elbrecht 

Marketing 

Chris Ennis 

Finance 



Gladys Enriquez 

Management (Personnel) 

Michael S. Evans 

Economics 

Daniel ). Fadden 

Psychology 



Martin J. Fahey 

Philosophy 

Sheri L. Faldner 

Finance 



Michael R. Fernstrom 

Management (Production) 

Elizabeth M. Fetzer 

Political Science 
English 

Umberto D. Ficarella 

Biology 



Susan Ficek 

Mathematical Sciences 
Computer Science 

Christine Fiedler 

English 

Susan F. Finnegan 

Marketing 



Loyolan 1983 283 



Maria Fiore 

Psychology 

Mark A. Fitzgibbons 

Accounting (Managerial) 

Michael B. Flaherty 

History 



Kathleen T. Flood 

Political Science 
Criminal Justice 

Gerri A. Floyd 

Philosophy 

Noreen A. Folan 

English 



Angela A. Ford 

History 



John M. Foresman 

Biology 



Paul J. Fortier 

Mathematical Sciences 

Susan Foundos 

Dental Hygiene 

Geraldine P. Francis 

Sociology 



Julie Franz 

Communication Arts 

Barbara L. Fraser 

Accounting (Public) 

Paul J. Fricke 

Chemistry 



284 Loyolan 1983 





Carol M. Kloc Fritz 

Management (Managerial) 

Sophia Gabrielides 

Management (Personnel) 

Ina E. Gadiauskas 

Psychology 



John Galich 

Marketing 

Kathleen M. Galvin 

Mathematical Sciences 
Psychology 

Charles E. Gambia 

Biology 
Philosophy 



Claire M. Gambia 

Political Science 



Russell L. Game 

Communication Arts 



Adolf ina Garcia 

Management (Personnel) 

Annabel Garcia 

Management (Personnel) 

Donna J. Garcia 

Biology 



Fernando 5. Garcia 

Management (Production) 

Michael Garcia 

Criminal Justice 

Michael \. Gart 

Finance 



Loyolan 1983 285 



Daniel D. Gauthier 

Biology 

Nicole Gavrel 

Communication Arts 

Donna R. Gawell 

Psychology 



Eileen M. Geary 

English 

David j. Gecic 

Biology 
Computer Science 

Constance M. Gekas 

Communication Arts 



Jennie L. Giambastiani 



Political Science 
Spanish 



Anthony F. Giannini 

Biology 



Pamela L. Giermak 

Biology 

Julie A. Gilbertson 

Chemistry 

Thomas M. Gill 

Computer Science 
Chemistry 



Rosemary Ginko 

Education (Elementary) 

John J. Glazier, Jr. 

Accounting (Public) 

William P. Gleason 

Finance 



286 Loyolan 1983 





Scoff C. Glumm 

Communication Arts 

Philip V. Coduco 

Biology 

Zavi Goldstin 

Psychology 



Ana L. Gonzalez 

Management (Personnel 

Fredrica P. Gorr 

Finance 

David B. Gorski 

English 



Louis B. Goudanis 

Biology 



fames A. Gramm 

Biology 



Anthony ]. Grande 

Physics 
Biology 

Peter G. Green 

Biology 
Psychology 

William J. Gries 

Biology 



Dennis P. Groth 

Computer Science 

William E. Grow 

Marketing 

Bradley S. Grubb 

Economics 



Loyolan 1983 287 



Caroline A. Grund 

English 
History 

Gregory Guest 

Management (Production) 

Stephen Gulyas 

Marketing 



Lori L. Guzzo 

Political Science 

Maria A. Gyore 

Accounting (Public) 

Cindy S. Haertle 

Accounting (Managerial) 



Chong A. Han 

Math 
Computer Science 



Mary E. Hanrahan 

Marketing 



Patrick Hanrahan 

Marketing 

Cheryl L. Harcar 

Fine Arts 

Darlene L. Hardaway 

Finance 



John ). Hardek 

Psychology 

Gary A. Hardina 

Management (Personnel) 

Veronica Hardnick 

Biology 



288 Loyolan 1983 








jock L. Hardy 

Sociology 

Peter C. Hareas 

Sociology 

loan Harmon 

Communication Arts 



George Harris 

History 

Mary Anne Harris 

Psychology 

Michael D. Hartigan 

Communication Arts 



Maribeth A. Hartman 

Communication Arts 



Nancy Henig 

Communication Arts 



Greg Herdzina 

Accounting (Public) 

Yasmeen Hermiz 

Education (Special) 

Daniel Herro 

Psychology 



James Hester 

Marketing 

Pamela Hester 

Education (Special) 

Harold J. Hicks 

Accounting (Public) 



Loyolan 1983 289 



\ 



John B. Highland 

Computer Science 

Jean C. Hillenbran 

Political Science 

Tanya D. Hines 

Anthropology 



Thomas Hinsdale 

Management (Personnel) 

Lauren E. Hock 

Dental Hygiene 

Christine Hoday 

Mathematical Sciences 
Computer Science 



David I. Hoelscher 



Finance 



Deborah Hoffman 

Marketing 



Ellen Holmgren 

Finance 

Noreen Holt 

Communication Arts 

Daniel M. Homuth 

Biology 



Joan Hong 

Psychology 

Gary Allen Hosters 

Biology 

David Howley 

Biology 

290 Loyolan 1983 





My senior year has 
\iven me the happiest 
and saddest memories 
oi my tour years at 
Loyola University of 
Chicago. Happy 

because of all the 
friends I made, and sad 
because the friends I've 
made will soon go their 
separate ways I will 
cherish these memories 
always. And no matter 
where I go a piece of 
Loyola will go with me 
Mary (ackowiak 




Peter Hrycyk 

Biology 

Antonia Hudson 

Political Science 

James Huston 

Biology 



Jeffrey J. Hynek 

Biology 

William J. lacullo, )r. 

Management (Production) 

Janet M. lannotta 

Marketing 



Christopher Ihejirika 

Accounting (Public) 



Shirley J. Illagan 

Biology 



Deborah L. Ingraham 

Political Science 

Lisa Ingram 

English 
History 

Robert J. Jackman 

History 



Mary Jackowiak 

Criminal Justice 
Political Science 

Gregory Jackson 

Political Science 

Cynthia Jacobson 

Accounting (Managerial) 

Loyolan 1983 291 



Roger L. Jaklin 

Finance 

Vesna Jancic 

Psychology 

Milan Jerkan 

Political Science 



Mark T. fesski 

Management (Production) 

Judy Jewell 

Biology 

Judith L. Johnson 

Psychology 



Lenora Johnson 

Pyschology 

Randall Johnson 

Psychology 



Anita L. Jones 

Finance 

Rebecca Jones 

Education (Elementary) 

William A. Jones 

Management (Production) 



Catherine A. Juern 

English 

Mary Kadlec 

Psychology 

Daniel Kaiser 

Political Science 



292 Loyolan 1983 





Katherine Kalesperis 

Psychology 

Kimberly Kalis 

Accounting (Public) 

Karen Kail 

Political Science 



Stanley Kaminski 

Accounting (Public) 

Donna Kampner-Simon 

Elementary Education 



Paul Kantwill 

Political Science 



Violet Kapsalis 

Accounting (Public) 



James Karabas 

Finance 



Jelena Karagic 

Management (Personnel) 

Sanford Z. Karoll 

Accounting (Public) 

Peter J. Karutz 

Accounting (Public) 



Theresa L. Kaufman 

History 

Kevin J. Kavanaugh 

Biology 

Sherry A. Kavanaugh 

Economics 



Loyolan 1983 293 



Brian Keady 

Accounting (Public) 

Judy M. Keating 

Accounting (Public) 

William Keating 

Accounting 



Theresa A. Keil 

Management (Personnel) 

Thomas E. Kelley 

Mathematical Sciences 
Computer Science 

Anna T. Kellum 

Psychology 



James ). Kelly 

Biology 



Caryl A. Kenney 

Biology 



Simeon /. Kerr 

Accounting (Managerial) 

Billy Key 

Communication Arts 

Nicholas V. Kilzer 

Anthropology 



Harold E. Kim 

Biology 

Hyunsoon Kim 

Education (Elementary) 

Yoon Kim 

Biology 



294 Loyolan 1983 





During my years at 
Loyola, I've had the 
most pleasurable ex- 
periences that one 
could have during their 
college stmt. I've had 
the pleasure of working 
at Radio Station WLUW 
"Metrosound" , the 
new George S. Halas 
Sports Center and ac- 
compolished a very well 
rounded Jesuit educa- 
tion. 

Billy Lee Key 





Nicholas F. King 

Biology 

Jeffrey J. Kinzler 

Biology 

Judy Kitzer 

Marketing 



Karen M. Klichowski 

Marketing 

Carol D. Kobler 

Communication Arts 

Burton J. Kopulsky 

Computer Science 



Walter T. Kosch 

Political Science 

Marsha A. Kosiek 

Accounting (Public) 



Melissa S. Kostial 

Social Work 

Lea M. Kovatsis 

Political Science 
English 

Joseph A. Kowar 

Finance 



Timothy Kozelsky 

Biology 

Teresa M. Kozlowski 

Economics 

Michael E. Kryza 

Marketing 



Loyoian 1983 295 



Suzanne Kuhn 

Finance 

Marc Kunis 

Economics 

Priscilla Kyros 

Psychology 



Laura A. Lampe 

Political Science 

Pelagia Lempropoulos 

Psychology 

Alfonso LaPelusa 

Psychology 



Connie H. Lara 

Philosophy 
Political Science 



Dori Anne LaVaccare 

Education (Elementary) 



Leo M. Lech 

Chemistry 

Margaret H. Lech 

Biology 

Marie Lembessis 

Political Science 



fames V. Lentino 

Finance 

Steve Leonardi 

Accounting 

Amy A. Lesser 

Dental Hygiene 



296 Loyolan 1983 





Peter A. LeTourneau 

Communication Arts 

Lee Anne Lewis 

Psychology 

Susan J. Lindbloom 

Political Science 



JoAnn M. Lisikiewicz 

Dental Hygiene 

Karen Litwin 

Dental Hygiene 

Dianne Lopez-Lystlund 

Accounting (Public) 



Stella M. Lucente 

Marketing 

Judith Luft 

Education 



Donna Lyon 

Management (Production) 

William Mahoney 

Communication Arts 

Leonard Maida 

Psychology 



Frank Mancari, )r. 

Psychology 

George /. Mandas 

Political Science 

Ramon Manglano 

Biology 



Loyoian 1983 297 



John G. Mannion 



Finance 



Lori A. Marasovich 

Mathematical Sciences 
Computer Science 

Lynn M. Marasovich 

Marketing 



Michael Maratea 

Accounting (Public) 

Patrick /. Marron 

Psychology 

Gregorio Martin III 

Computer Science 



Michael J. Martin 

Biology 

Michael H. Maslanka 

Philosophy 



Regina May 

Marketing 

David D. Mayer 

Biology 

Debra Mazurek 

Biology 



Beniamino Mazzone 

Marketing 

Pasquale Mazzone 

Marketing 

Shawn M. McCauley 

Psychology 
Theology 



298 Loyolan 1983 





John D. McGeever 

Political Science 

Patricia A. McLaughlin 

Psychology 

Duncan McLean, Jr. 

Political Science 



Eileen M. McMahon 

Finance 

Martin G. McManus 

Accounting (Public) 

Camille O. McTeer 

Psychology (Applied) 



Jeffrey M. Meacham 

Accounting (Public) 



Linda L. Mekhitarian 

Mathematical Sciences 
Computer Science 



Heidi K. Merle 

Biology 

Daniel D. Mikol 

Chemistry 

Cynthia M. Mikrut 

Accounting (Public) 



William G. Milani 


Mathematical Sciences 


Computer Science 


Roslyn M. Miles 


Finance 


Sandra Milkeris 


Communication Arts 


Loyolan 1983 299 



Gerre Miller 

Marketing 

Julie A. Miller 

Education (Elementary) 

Gita G. Mirchandani 

Communication Arts 



Can dice Mitchell 

Criminal Justice 

Collen A. Monckton 

Marketing 

Donna Lynn Moore 

Accounting (Public) 



K at harm a Morikis 

Marketing 

Michael J. Morrisroe 

Political Science 



John Moskal 

Mathematical Sciences 

Daniel J. Moss 

Psychology 

Christiana Mourikes 

Political Science 



Clayton W. Moushon 

Criminal Justice 

John K. Moy 

Psychology 

Kathleen A. Muldoon 

Biology 

300 Loyolan 1983 





Raymond M. Muldoon 

Political Science 

Carol Ann Murphy 

Accounting (Public) 

Sharon Murray 

Psychology 



Philip M. Mussari 

Mathematical Sciences 

Michael W. Myers 

Accounting (Managerial) 

Nancy L. Naddy 

Accounting (Managerial) 



Jean Nakamoto 

Accounting (Public) 

Vimal I. Nanavati 

Biology 



William F. Napleton 

Economics 

Elizabeth M. Narea 

Biology 

Michael C. Natali 

Marketing 



Kevin G. Nedved 

Political Science 
History 

Linda Nelson 

Accounting 

Marie E. Nepomuceno 

Accounting (Public) 

Loyolan 1983 301 



Joan E. Neville 

Psychology 

Tien L. Nguyen 

Biology 

Russell L. Nicholson 

Finance 



Eva Niewiadomski 

Accounting (Public) 

Julie A. Ninan 

Mathemathical Sciences 

Carol A. Nolan 

English 



Mark J. Noll 

Biology 

Albert J. Novak 

Chemistry 



Layne A. Novak 

Biology 

Dennis H. Nowotarski 

Accounting (Public) 

Ellen M. Oberhart 

Marketing 



Karen M. O'Brien 

Sociology 
Biology 

Susan A. O'Brien 

Accounting (Public) 

Vincent R. Obrzut 

Mathematical Sciences 
Computer Science 



302 Loyolan 1983 





Michael W. Ochoa 

Finance 

Joan M. O'Connell 

Computer Science 

Kelly L O'Connor 

Biology 



Michael Olifirowicz 

Math 

Computer Science 

Frank G. On drey 

Biology 

Marie Onesto 

Biology 



Kevin M. O'Reilly 

History 



Jay R. Orlowski 

Accounting (Public) 



Ronald Orrico 

Finance 

Sheila K. O'Shaughnessy 

Biology 
German 

Rosamond N. Palaggi 

Communication Arts 
History 



Carl Palffy 

Biology 

Rosemarie Palmer 

Biology 
Chemistry 

Paul M. Palz 

Accounting (Public) 

Loyolan 1983 303 



Rudolph C. Paolucci 

Chemistry 

Sharon R. Parker 

Finance 

Bennett j. Pastika 

Biology 



Ann M. Patkowski 

Biology 

Thomas E. Pavlick 

Accounting (Public) 

Mary Pawl 

Psychology 



Margaret M. Pawlowski 

Education (Elementary) 



Maria S. Payomo 

Accounting (Public) 



Darryl S. Payton 

Psychology 

J an is F. Peavy 

Psychology (Applied) 

Michael H. Pendola 

Biology 



Susana Perdomo 

Political Science 
Spanish 

lean M. Pereda 

Chemistry 

Ed Perez 

Communication Arts 



304 Loyolan 1983 





Barry E. Per I'm 

Biology 

Stevan Perovich 

Marketing 

Charles W. Perry 

Mathematical Sciences 
Computer Science 



Mark P. Pezzati 

Communication Arts 

Lawrence J. Pichler 

Political Science 

Gregory \. Piggot 

Management (Production) 



jatin Pit h ad i a 

Biology 



Thereasa A. Pivar 



Biology 



Richard L. Pomykala 

Physics 

Angela Ponterio 

Marketing 

Peter G. Pontikis 

Biology 



Mary Ann Pontoriero 

Biology 

Dina M. Pontrelli 

Dental Hygiene 

Steven D. Pooley 



Mathematical Sciences 



Loyolan 1983 305 



Kevin E. Posen 

Political Science 

Sister Ann Elizabeth Poulton 

Social Work 

Judy Ann Powers 

Marketing 



Laura A. Predley 

Psychology 

Steven M. Prinz 

Psychology 

jeannie Prohny 

Accounting (Public) 



Kimberly S. Purnell 

Accounting (Managerial) 



Timothy G. Purpura 

Psychology 
Biology 



Judith A. Pyke 

Political Science 

Kevin G. Quinn 

Mathematical Sciences 
Physics 

Adrienne L. Racanelli 

Chemistry 



Joyce J. Radville 

Accounting (Public) 

Laura B. Ramm 



Finance 



Jeanne A. Rattenbury 



English 



306 Loyolan 1983 






Th 


e learning 


ex- 


periences 1 have ga 


ined 


hen 


at Loyola, in 


and 


out 


of the classroom. 


are 


nvaluable to me 1 


will 


carry Loyola 


with 


me 


forever. 






Karen G. Reaves 








Paul Rauzi 

Psychology 

Karen C. Reaves 

Accounting (Public) 

Daniel C. Rebek 

Psychology 



Colleen M. Reppen 

Accounting (Managerial) 

Elizabeth A. Rettenmaier 

Accounting (Public) 

Carlos M. Reynes 

Psychology 



Richenia Rhodes 

Psychology 



Maureen A. Riley 

Psychology 



Mary C. Rimsans 

Social Work 

Anne-Marie Robinson 

Psychology 

Maria Elena Robles 

Biology 



Carmen A. Rocco 

Psychology 

Michael Roche 

Communication Arts 

Lizabeth A. Rodenas 

Biology 

Loyolan 1983 307 



Terrsita Rodriguez 

Curriculum and Instruction 

Kathryn /. Rohde 

Finance 

Marie E. Ronan 

Accounting (Public) 



Victoria Roth 

Mathematical Sciences 

Karen A. Rudman 

Chemistry 

Eva M. Rupp 

Management (Personnel) 



Maurice D. Russo 

Biology 

Patricia M. Ryan 

Biology 



Raquel M. Ryan 

Communication Arts 

Tiina A. Saar 

Biology 

Lawrence S. Sabatini 

Psychology 



Emma M. Saez-Benito 

Public Administration 

Mark /. Salamone 

Political Science 
History 

Kathy R. Sales 

Political Science 



308 Loyolan 1983 





Miriam Sanchez 

Theatre 

Gregory Sanders 

Accounting (Managerial) 

Carol A. Santangelo 

Chemistry 



Margaret-Jean Santelli 

Psychology (Applied) 

Bruno W. Santi 

Psychology 

Hector Santos 

Physics 



Peter A. Santucci 

Biology 

Diane S. Scat ch el I 

Psychology 



Melissa Schemmel 

Communication Arts 

Michael J. Schieble 

Management (Production) 

Mark H. Schimmelpfenning 

Biology 



Daniel /. Schmidt 

Criminal Justice 

William Schneider 

Management ( Personnel) 

Keith Schroeder 

Marketing 



Loyolan 1983 309 



Christina Schultz 

Accounting (Public) 

Linda J. Schultz 

Biology 

Frank B. Schuster 

Communication Arts 



Catherine L. Scott 

Political Science 

Russell J. Scott 

Accounting (Public) 

Mary Scourletos 

Accounting (Public) 



Mary P. Seery 

Communication Arts 

Maria Semedalas 

Accounting (Public) 



Martha Sepulveda 

Marketing 

Vila M. Shaw 

Finance 

John M. Sier 

Communication Arts 
Political Science 



Charles W. Simpson 

Biology 

Marc Skopec 

Management (Personnel) 

David A. Skryd 

Criminal Justice 



310 Loyolan 1983 





Joseph ). Slevnik 

Biology 

Sylvia Slezas 

Psychology (Applied) 

Edmund J. Smiejkowski 

Political Science 



Laura D. Smith 

Accounting (Public) 

Patrick J. Smith 

Psychology 

Robert J. Smith 

Mathematical Sciences 



Maryteres Smythe 

Marketing 

Alice Sodora 

Communication Arts 



Eric Sonntag 

Communication Arts 

Richard P. Sora 

Psychology 

Andrew J. Sosnowki 

Political Science 



Katina A. Spandoni 

Biology 

Mary E. Spillman 

Theology 

Kenneth M. Staral 

Education (Special) 



Loyolan 1983 311 



Deborah A. Stone 

Political Science 

Barbara L. Stopka 

Psychology 

Linda M. Hofferica Stovall 

Accounting (Public) 



Naeem Sufi 

Marketing 

Ann M. Sullivan 

Marketing 

Mark P. Suszko 

Communication Arts 



Maria Dana Sutkus 

Biology 

John P. Sutor 

Communication Arts 



Robert W. Sutton 

Biology 

Steven E. Suvada, Jr. 

Criminal Justice 

Robert C. Swanson 

Accounting (Public) 



Annamarie Sweeney 

Accounting (Public) 

Carey U. Symanski 

Biology 

Nancy A. Szymula 

Marketing 



312 Loyolan 1983 






Th 


e years can teach to 


you 


the 


happines 


(here 


wai 


ing 


lor the 


open- 


mm 


ded 










Martin ) 


Tiech 




Cecilia C. Talavera 

Biology 

Darrell L. Tarr 

Economics 

Martin J. Teich 

Philosophy 



Hector Teliez 

Biology 

Daphne Threlkeld 

Social Work 

Ralph W. lite, jr. 

Accounting (Public) 



Marilyn E. Toner 

Dental Hygiene 



Laura M. Tovar 

English 



Scoff G. Toy 

Marketing 

Pamela C. Tracey 

Communication Arts 

Marianne M. Trocher 

Mathematical Sciences 



Sandra A. Trojak 

Education (Elementary) 

Mary Ann Trynzolyn 

Psychology 

Anthony G. Tsapralis 

Political Science 



Loyolan 1983 313 



Pamela Tsokolas 

Accounting (Public) 

John R. Tucki 

Communication Arts 

Lisa Russ Tuggle 

Accounting (Public) 



Joyce Turley 

Psychology 
Biology 

Barbara Tuzzolino 

Marketing 

Maureen A. Twardos 

Management (Production) 



Mary N. Urbanczyk 

Theology 
Political Science 



Carol Anne Vankast 

Biology 



Jacqueline Vargas 

Marketing 

E mil K. Velez 

Computer Science 

Annette M. Vento 

Psychology 



Lee V. Vincolese 

Accounting (Public) 

Vincent Volante 

Communications 

Joan M. Vrielink 

Biology 



314 Loyolan 1983 





Dan M. Waadt 

Marketing 

Robert]. Waldmann 

Finance 

Diane C. Walsh 

Political Science 



Julie A. Walsh 

Marketing 

Margaret M. Walsh 

Political Science 

William Ward 

Chemistry 



Lynda R. Warren 

Criminal Justice 



Debra Washington 

Psychology 



Lynn M. Wawrzyniak 

Finance 

Linda M. Welden 

Biology 

Stephen Wenzel 

Marketing 



Anne F. Wicker 

Political Science 

Robert J. Wild 

Accounting (Public) 

Kathy A. Wildner 

Accounting (Public) 

Loyolan 1983 315 



LaRita R. Wilson 

Education (Special) 

Mary Wilson 

Political Science 

Mary L. Wisniowicz 

Psychology 



Mary G. Witek 

Accounting (Public) 

Andrew C. Witik 

Communication Arts 

Nancy C. Wolff 

Sociology 



Frank Wol finger 

Accounting (Public) 

Lea Wolfram 

Management (Production) 



Sze Kin Wong 

Biology 

Debra R. Wood 

Communication Arts 

Norma S. Wood 

Sociology 



Catherine S. Wozniak 

Accounting (Public) 

Dawn M. Wozniak 

Education 

Richard Wroble 



Fine Arts 



316 Loyolan 1983 



L . 






My college experience 




at Loyola University was 




unforgetable. It gave me 




the chance to test my 




own values and motiva- 




tions before entering 




the real world. 1 am 




thankful for this ex- 




perience 




Name Unknown 









-9% I 




GeeHyun Yang 

Accounting (Public) 

Rosemarie E. Yanong 

Psychology 

Kenneth J. Yoshida 

Mathematical Sciences 
Computer Science 



Michael J. Zablotney 

Biology 

Raymond W. Zahrobsky 

Political Science 

Matthew L. Zaker 

Finance 



Anthony C. Zalduendo 

Biology 



Carmela Ziccarelli 

Management (Personnel) 



Valerie L. Zonsius 

Accounting (Public) 

Barbara L. Zuber 

Accounting (Public) 

Bart H. Zuurdeeg 

Finance 



Daria Zventina 

Political Science 



Loyolan 1983 317 



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Uyolan 1983 323 



School of Social Work 



Marie Denise Angelico 



Mark A. Frey 



Richard Nudelman 



Mary Carol Anthony 



Ana Delia Navarro Freytes 



Mark C. Parr 



Judy H. Barry 



Judith Frances Gorski 



Margaret E. Pettigrew 



Suzanne G. Behr 



Mary P. Hartung 



Lawrence Patrick Porretta 



Sandra Epstein Berg 



Kimberly Ann Jensen 



Merle A. Premack 



Gloria E. Bialek 



Julie A. Jeter 



Jenny M. Reynolds 



Michele Ann Birkey 



Vanessa Johnson 



Barbara Veirs Ro 



Jill Blank 



Jonathan Kaplan 



Jenneine S. Rowley 



Susan Haendle Bowker 



Carol W. Kemp 



Nanette K. Rybak 



Barbara Frances Burrell 



Cheryl R. Klaub 



Susan M. Schwartz 



Diane Matuszek Burton 



Mary Dennise Klein 



Paul Newell Seaman 



Betty Ann Buttala 



Kevin Anthony Komosa 



Angela Leigh Smith 



Claire Marie Carlstedt 



Marilyn Ann Carolan 



Melissa Susan Kostial 



Barbara Ellen Krumsee 



Lynn Anne Smith 



Karen Ruth Sommers 



Maureen M. Clarke 



John Michael Lagen 



Phyllis M. Spinal 



Catherine Mary Cotter 



Barbara Ada LeVine 



Maryann Grometer Strain 



Romelle Dejohnette 



Linnea Lonergan 



Jacqueline Walker-O'Keefe 



Sheila Dixon 



Mona Eden Losk 



Avon Alexander Walton 



Patricia Ann Dunne 



Lauren Marshall 



Caryn llene Weiner 



Thomas A. Dworniczek 



Judith H. Fargo 



Beverley Hardy McTigue 
Albert Minzer 



Suzanne C. Wieseneck 



Lynne R. Weston 



Gail Eileen Feuerhaken 



Denise K. Mueller 



Sheri M. Zaban 



Janet Michaelson Flynn 



Kathleen E. Murphy 



Carolyn Maria Zafiris 



Laurie E. Ford 



Gregory L. Nooney 



Einat Zurr 



Valerie Franz 



324 Loyolan 1983 



Law School 



Gustavo Oscar Abello 
Benjamin E. Alba 
Mary Frances Andreoni 
Alice Jean Atlas 
Thomas Michael Battista 
Jami Everett Bay 
Cinda L. Berry 
Kathryn A. Bettasso 
Thomas David Bilyk 
Steven A. Bloomberg 
Mark D. Bogen 
Heidi ). Brachmansky 
Thomas ). Bran it 
Cynthia Yvonne Brim 
Lorine Brown 
Edward Michael Burns 
Susan Kay Burzawa 
Robert R. Byrne 
Carol Anne Cachey 
Louis Carmen Cairo 
Elizabeth H. Cameron 
Carmen David Caruso 
Pai-Pai Cheng 

Kathryn Pusateri Cinquegrani 
Ellen Rae Cohen 
Charles Dean Connor 
Colleen Karen Connors 
Carol L. Costello 
Lawrence Jay Crain 
David Cuomo 
Robert Hillard Dachis 
Maureen Anne Dahlke 
James Joseph Daly 
James R. Daubach 
Ellen Mannix Davidson 
Deidre Bridget Derrig 
John Blake Dillon, Jr. 
Laureen Joan Dunne 
Robert J. Egan 
Mark Edward Enright 
Kathryn D. Farmer 
Mary Ellen Feldman 
Donna P. Felton 
Cain Beaubien Ferbend 
Maria Robin Fine 
Leon I. Finkel 
Valerie J. Fisher 
David Sander Fishman 
David J. Fitzpatrick 
Joseph Thomas FitzSimmons 
Cynthia Joanne Flaa 
William J. Floriano II 
Patrick J. Foley 



Mary Ann Fontana 

Alan Fortini-Campbell 

Elizabeth J. Frederick 

Timothy John Frenzer 

Demetra T. Getti 

June K. Ghezzi 

Donald J. Gibson, Jr. 

Carl Gigante 

Mary Catherine Gilhooly 

Frances Sue Glushakow-Smith 

Patrick J. Gorman 

Mary Jo Greene 

Virginia W. Gregg 

Nancy Hunter Griffin 

Donna Lynn Head 

Roger Kent Heidenreich 

Patrick David Henry 

Lawrence Alan Herst 

Mitchell Mayer Iseberg 

Victoria A. Janovetz 

Erin Joan Jennings 

David B. Johnson 

Avila Judelson 

Michael John Kalkowski 

Cynthia Noriko Kawakami 

Patricia Dillon Kelly 

Roger Joseph Kelly 

Yolanda M. Kielar 

Mary Louise Wehman Kiernan 

Karen Lee Kincaid 

Celeste Marie King 

Mary Elizabeth Kopko 

Grace Keslin Kraus 

Robert Oleg Kristufek 

Mary A. Lambert 

Diane J. Larsen 

Mark LeRoy LeFevour 

Howard Louis Lieber 

Laura J. Lodawer 

Thomas James Long 

Kathleen Marie Maicher 

Alice Anne Malleris 

Louis R. Marchi 

William F. Martin 

James Bryan McCarthy 

Stephen J. McDaniel 

William G. McGarr 

Christine Schaack McGoey 

Jacqueline L. McKay 

Mary Katherine Margaret McMahon 

Cathleen Ellen Meegan 

Gregory Peter Melnyk 

Kenneth R. Menzel 



Terence J. Moran 

James Michael Morphew 

Bryan E. Mraz 

Francis Joseph Murnane, Jr. 

Tracy S. Nicholas 

Thomas A. Nolan 

Kevin Michael O'Brien 

Terri Ruther Olian 

Sandra Prochaska Oliszewicz 

Daniel George Pappano 

Maureen A. Perry 

Regina Kwan Peterson 

Richard Franklin Pollack 

Kathleen Mary Prendergast 

Susan Ann Marie Prester 

Donna J. Pugh 

Francesca Joanne Robertson 

Ellen N. Roche 

Patricia J. Rosen 

Ronald Rosenblum 

Sharryn Sanger 

Peter Lawrence Schaefer 

John Charles Schneider 

Marvin Jerome Schwarz 

Thomas Joseph Shanahan 

Courtney C. Shea 

Irene Maria Sheridan 

Pamela A. Sheridan 

Rosslyn Suzanne Smith 

Linda Eileen Spring 

Lawrence Richard Stack 

Denise Andrea Streff 

Patrick J. Sullivan 

Peter D. Sullivan 

Edmund M. Tobin, Jr. 

Thomas F. Tobin III 

Kenneth Neil Traisman 

Fern D. Trevino 

Sherwin Howard Trubnick 

Vincent J. Vigil 

Kathleen Marie Viglione 

Nathan A. Waxman 

Gilbert Aaron-Webb 

A. Leo Weil IV 

Thomas Richard Weiler 

Debra F. Weiner 

Kathleen Joyce Wharton 

Jody Wilner 

Timothy M. Wilson 

Stanley Warren Wojciechowski 

Karen Parks Wright 

Susan M. Zucker 

Kenneth Paul Zurek 



Loyolan 1983 325 



iwiim i in— 



- a» s ~c3»' ««v^y < 



This year's staff gives special recognition to the 
following people who contributed to the success of 

the 1983 Loyolan Yearbook. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Flodin Bob Moorhead 

Nick Grapsas Prestige Advertising 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Jackowiak George Ricci 



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( 



326 Loyolan 1983 



Mr. & Mrs. Sam Agasi 

Christopher J. Alirevic 

Leonard J. Allen 

Mark J. Amidei 

Georgia Argyropoulous 

Scott Allen Arne 

Wayne K Augie 

Andrea D. Austin 

Charlene Barlett 

Gunnar E. Berg 

Maribeth G. Bialko 

Celene M. Bohart 

Mr. & Mrs. Stan Bojan 

Born Industries 

Sharon I. Brahm 

Robert G.Brambert 

Gary R. Brigham 

Michael A. Brooks 

William C. Brozovich 

Kerin A. Burgess 

Terance M. Burns 

Ronald J. Burton 

Lauren A. Cahill 

Uriel Campos 

Mr. & Mrs. Caraballo 

Renato Carrara 

John C. Cossarek 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Cox 

Mary H. Craddock 

Michael A. Crist 

Holly Allison Curtiss 

Mr. & Mrs. Peter Dantini 

Robert Day 

William P. Dejean 

Sandra Diaz 

George C. Dietrich II 

Vince & B.j. Dojchak 

Mr. & Mrs. Antoni Dlutowski 

Andrew Dziuba 

Karen M. Eckhoff 



( 
I 
\ 

I 

\ 



PATRONS 



Fay 



Mr. & Mrs. Donald M. 

fohn M. Ferenzi 

Michael R. Fernstein 

Mrs. Grace Flodin 

Mr. & Mrs. Ronald B. Flodin 

Noreen A. Folan 

John M. Foresman 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert E. Galassini 

Simon M. Galvin 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles W. Gambia 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard A. Game 

Peter Gancer 

Nick Gangas 

John f. Garvey 

Thomas M. Gill 

Nora. A. Gillespie 

Maria Glowacki 

Phillip V. Goduoo 

Ana L. Gonzalez 

Mr. & Mrs. James D. Guest 

Steven Gulyas 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas M. Hanley 

Yasmeen M. Hermiz 

Nancy Hernandez 

James P. Hester 

Gerldine R. Hicks 

Tanya Denise Hines 

Pat Hoban 

Dr.& Mrs. A.T. Houed 

Mr. & Mrs. William J. lacullo 

Mary lozzi 

Annette Jackowiak 

John Peter Jackowiak 

Leonard Jackowiak 

Margaret Jackowiak 

Mary Jackowiak 

Patricia Jackowiak 

Roseann Jackowiak RN. 

April Jenkins 

Mrs.V. Phyllis Jenkins 



PATRONS 



Evelyn Jesski 

Kathleen M. Jones 

Rebecca Jones 

Kevin J. Kavanaugh 

Theresa A. Keil 

Mrs. Maryann Kelly 

Mr. & Mrs. James C. Kiley 

Tom Kolschowsky 

Gust, Georgia, Elouise Kouimelis 

Jackie Kowaleski 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward Krope 

Michael E. Kryza 

Mr. & Mrs. William D. Kuehn 

Bianca Coronei Laborie 

Anne Judith Lambert 

Anne Marie Lampariell 

Diane M. Landow 

Connie H. Lara 

Bill Laskaris 

James Jaejoon Lee 

Dr. & Mrs. Robert E. Lee 

Sarah ludgin 

Mr. & Mrs. Daniel P. Lydon 

Donna Lyon 

Diana L. Madrzyk 

William M. Mahoney 

Michael G. Malone 

Judge & Mrs. Edward H. Marsalek 

Roberta Marie Massey 

Martin M. Matus 

Mr. & Mrs. Fred Mayer 

Tom & Judy McCartney 

Melanie McGee 

Martin C. McManus 

Rosezena & Muriel McTeeter 

Heidi Merie 

Christine Mescher 

Donald E. & Beverly A. Mikol 

Arthur Mimnaugh 

Lisa M. Moore 

Gita Griseila Sehwani Mirchandani 

Lisa M. Moore 

Honorable & Mrs. James E. Murphy 

Mr. & Mrs. James K. Murphy 

Jean Nakamoto 

Marie E. Nepomuceno 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Novotny 

Michael J. OHfirowicz 

Marie I. Onesto 

Mr. & Mrs. Adam Oskielunas 

Rudy C. Paoiucci 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry Para 

Kim (Bo) Para 

Scott R. Partyka 

Marie S. Payomo 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert Pay ton Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. George R. Pearce 

John William Perozzi 



Kimberly K. Peters 

Mr. & Mrs.C. Raymond Peterson 

Bernard & Jane Phillips 

Sister Ann Poulton 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul Prohny 

Judith A. Pyke 

Mr. & Mrs. George M. Quinn 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony H. Radetic 

Joyce J. Radville 

Eugene J. Rankin 

Karen Reaues 

Claudia Rettore 

Kathryn J. Rhode 

Kathryn Riordan 

Lizabeth A. Rodenas 

Allen A. Rodiguez III 

A. Rossi 

Mrs. Elsie Rudman 

Tony & Val Sadowski 

Mary Samerdyke 

Peggy Santelli 

Liz Scarano 

Mark Schmitz 

Christina Schultz 

Joseph Seminetta 

Yvonne llene Sherman 

Mr. & Mrs. Norman I. Shoff 

Mr. & Mrs. Donald Sodora 

Donna Soger 

Anthony Spina 

Odysseaus J. Stamos 

Kenneth M. Staral 

Steven E. Suvada 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles A. Taylor 

Scott G. Toy 

Marianne M. Troher 

Patrick James Ulie 

Dr. & Mrs. Elio G. Vento 

Daniel Venuti 

Peter A. Vitulli 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward D. Waadt 

Terri S. Westerland 

Jennie E. Wilber 

Kathy A. Wilder 

Mrs. Katherine Withaar 

Wendy A. Witt 

Mary Lynn Wolfe 

John Wolfe 

Sze K. Wong 

Dehor a R. Wood 

William J. Wright 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard S. Wroble 

Richard Wroble Jr. 

Susan Wroble 

Rosemarie Embudo Yanong 

Mr. & Mrs. Shea Tong Yu 

Ronald C. Zahlman 

Gwen Zeisel u>yoian 1983 



327 



Ibe leyela 
PricenK 




6590 Sheridan Road 
Chicago, Illinois 60626 
743-2281 

4522 N. Broadway 
Chicago, Illinois 60640 
784-7963 









Congratulates 

Its §Ister 
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Ire leyelari 

yearbook 

or its 

Vclume 



328 Loyolar. 1983 



1 



V 




WALSWORTH 
PUBLISHING CO., INC. 
Marceline, MO 64658 



BOB MOORHEAD 
Graphic Sales Consultant 



Quality 
Yearbooks 



Northfield, IL 60093 
312-441-6131 







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Loyolan 1983 329 



o. ji. a. 





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Loyolan 1983 331 



Congratulations and Warm Wishes 

to 
thJenior Class of 1983 and their potential disiples 
may you continue to strive and excel 



from 



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(your kind of book store) 



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332 Loyolan 1983 




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Photography 




217 South Lincolnway (Rt. 31) 

North Aurora, Illinois 60542 

312-897-4272 



Official Photographer 



for 



Loyola University 



Water Tower 

Lake Shore 

Maracella Niehoff 
School of Nursing 




Loyolan 1983 333 



I he Jackowiak ramily Salutes 
Their 1983 Graduate - Loyolan Co-Editor 

Mary Jackowiak 




Roseann(School of Nursing, 1978), PatriciafArts and Sciences-Lake Shore, 
1981); Annette(Arts and Sciences-Lake Shore, 1982); and Mary(Arts and 
Sciences-Water Tower, 1983). 

Dear Mary, 

As you were sitting down to compile your editor's notes in order to give written acclaim to those you thought were so helpful to you this 
year, I realized that a great crime would be perpetrated, (oh, that is the law school in me talking), if I didn't take the opportunity to let 
everybody know just what type of person is needed to fill the shoes of a Loyolan Editor. This repertoire should not discourage anyone who 
wants to get involved in campus activities. And, as an authority in such extra-curricular involvement which I always subjected myself to, I 
have concluded that my participation was 'Mickey Mouse' when compared to Mary's overzealous leadership at the helm of the Loyolan. 

And if anyone has the audacity to dismiss this adulation as a product of nepotism, I challenge anyone who thinks that he or she would be in 
a better position to reveal to the world the secret life of Mary Jackowiak after she became Editor. First of all Mary abandoned her residence 
in Chicago's finest neighborhood(Bridgeport, of course) and established permanent residence in the yearbook office. Sometimes, Mary 
would get time off for good behavior and no offense Mar, but those times were rare and few. Yes, cleaning ladies that was my sister pulling 
an all-nighter the day before graduation. I was surprised to see her sitting so patienly at Medinah Temple (Cod Bless you, Mr.L), knowing 
that she was mentally organizing the million and one tasks that she had left unfinished at THE OFFICE. 

And very often (especially near deadlines) my only association with Mary was her portrait hanging in our 'Rogue's Gallery'. Our neighbors 
began to wonder what happened to you during the week, but their fears were always pacified when the saw us every Sunday Morning on 
the way to teach our catechism classes (By the way does your staff ever call you Miss Mary?) just kidding! 

And of course there were frantic phone calls at all hours. 
CALLER: Oh, Mary we're just sitting around doing nothing, do you have any work for us to do?. 
MARY: Well, there are 10,000 envelopes to stuff, copy to be written, windows to be pasted... 
CALLER: Ok Mar, we get the message. 

CALLER: Oh, Mary, the typesetter just broke down for the fifteenth time today. 
CALLER: Oh, Mary, Charles called and said we can only have two color pages- so get more ads!!! 
CALLER: Oh, Mary, the studio never got the package I mailed. 
Mary-it's no wonder your staff decided that you were the perfect candidate for the 'Calgon take me away' commercial. 

All of this havoc continued even into the summer months amidst Mary's 'paying job' at APRT (for you non-racing buffs the translation is Arl- 
ington Park Race Track). Why the surprised look on your faces? You mean that you thought Mary's editorial position was a full-time salaried 
career opportunity? Luckily we have the world's best boss who allowed Mary to work around her hectic schedule. (We love you, Papa Al). 

And now, if I may digress momentarily, I would like to tell your staff something that I've wanted to say for a long time- 'I think you guys are 
just great and I want to thank you for your loyalty and dedication in completing this monumental project. Unlike the other university 
publications, you only get one chance at glory and fame. But I want you to know that your achievements cannot be disparaged for that 
reason. While everyone else has been enjoying their summer vacation, you have literally been 'sweating it out' at THE OFFICE. And when 
the book is finally finished and all of your faithful subscribers (BLESS THEM) receive their copies, I ask you to respect their praise and their 
criticism. But, I also challenge them to have done a better job. And you know the old saying about the loudest complainers- they are usually 
the ones never want to get involved. Oh well! Enough! Except for one last thing- about those complainers-invite them to join your 1984 staff. 
I doubt it if they are aware that you guys are a part of Loyola history-not simply because of your participation, but for the reason that never 
before has such a small staff produced a Loyolan yearbook. Furthermore, it is remarkable that such a small staff has had such a high rate of 
meeting their deadlines. 
KUDOS TO EACH AND EVERYONE OF YOU!!! 

And for those of you who think that the Jackowiak tradition at Loyola ended with Mary's graduation, don't be suprised when Marge & Len- 
ny Jackowiak make their annual calls for pledges to the University for the Parents Associates of Loyola. Many of the parents contacted by 
mom and dad do try and make a pledge. Their motivation factor? They can't believe that mom and dad financed the college education of 
four Loyolans in such a short period of time. 

You didn't hear this as often as you're supposed to, but we love you mom and dad and we thank you for all that you have done for us. 
Oops- I almost forgot our other Loyolan Little John has just completed his first year at St. Ignatius College Prep. 

Well Mary, I want you to know how proud we are of your accomplishments and in honor of your achievements, we confer upon you the 
jackowiak Family Award for the family member who has individually made the single most contribution to the community. 

We love you and wish you the best of luck in the future. May you soon become financially able and self-sufficient. 

Love 
334 Loyolan 1983 Your Sister 

Patricia 



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Loyolan 1983 335 



Serving as Co-Editor of the Loyolan Yearbook has been a truly illuminating 
experience. Not only have I gained a knowledge of the clerical skills necessary 
for the book's production, but more importantly, I have learned how to 
diplomatically interact with my staff and the administration. I have also con- 
cluded that managing a yearbook is comparable to operating a small business. 
Many of the skills necessary for operating a successful business can be found 
in the publishing of a yearbook. 

As is any major task, the production of a yearbook is not without its dilem- 
mas, and ours was no exception. Occasional discouragement though was 
always met by a drive for achievement. In pursuit of this drive many hours were 
spent in the thoughtful preplanning stage to eliminate confusion and general 
dissatisfaction later on. 

This years theme ' ' Loyola Speaks Out' ' was incorporated into each section of 
the book to give a representative selection of students an opportunity to express 
their sincere views on Loyola life. As a result, Mary and I hope we have per- 
sonalized the book for patrons. As can be determined by skimming the quotes, 
most students display a positive attitude toward Loyola University Life. 

Although I would like to thank each and every individual who has contributed 
his/her time and effort to the production of the yearbook, there are a handfull of 
individuals who I feel warrant mentioning; those who have willingly extended 
their efforts beyond their designated obligations. First and most importantly, I 
would like to thank Mary Jackowiak my Co-Editor. I must admit I was proud to 
have such a competent and dependable individual producing the book with me. 
Although many were concerned about the potential power struggle which could 
have developed as a result of a Co-Editorship, Mary and I worked extremely 
well together, both realizing that the final publication reflected our efforts as a 
team. Again I emphasize, I couldn't have had a more enthusiastic and genuine- 
ly concerned partner. 

Second, I would like to thank April Jenkins our events editor. Although I can 
not rightfully call her an events editor alone. April has taken the initiative to gain 
experience in all aspects of the book. April, I thank you for your devotion. 

Third, I would like to recognize our Production Editor, Cindy Panek. Cindy 
spent extensive hours typesetting for us. She has not worked for us begrudg- 
ingly, but has considered the yearbook a personal concern. It is not often one 
encounters such a conscientious worker 

Forth, I would like to acknowledge the efforts of Bob Moorhead, our 
Walsworth Publishing Co. representative. His honest and experiential advice 
positively accents this years book. From my perspective, Bob is one of the most 
knowledgeable men in the Business. 

Fifth, I find it important to congratulate Charles Taylor our budget ad- 
ministrator. I've considered it a pleasure working with Charles. His relaxed, yet 
conscientious disposition put me at ease during many urgent crises. 

Sixth, I would like to commend Emil Velez for executing his computer 
knowledge in the simplification of yearbook records. Emil was always inquiring 
as to what he could do to simplify our bookkeeping through intricate programm- 
ing. In addition, Emil also did quality photography work for us. 

Last, but by all means not least, I would like to thank my parents for being 
most supportive in this adventure of mine. Among other miscellaneous con- 
tributions, most importantly, they were always there to listen to my grievances 
as well as my exaltations. 

Overall, I feel very grateful to have been given the opportunity to exhibit and 
preserve a year of my most concerted efforts in a University Publication, and I 
hope to continue next year as an advisor to Chris Strzalkowski. Good luck 
Chris, and I wish you all the best. 



Sincerely, 





R. Scott Flodin 

Co-Editor-in-Chief 

Loyolan Yearbook 1983 



336 Loyolan 1983 






ARCEL1NE. MISbO 



Well, my reign as Co-Editor-in-Chief of the 1983 Loyolan Yearbook is almost over. Looking 
back, I can honestly say that it was fun. I knew it was going to be a great year because it 
started off on the right foot with our trip to the Walsworth Publishing Plant. Rick, Loretta, 
Scott and myself were the lucky ones. I'm glad someone suggested we rent-a-car instead of 
taking the never-dependable AMTRAK. You would think that after nine hours in a compact car 
tempers would begin to flare. But that wasn't the case. Everyone was still speaking to each 
when we pulled into Marceline Missouri. Loretta Kaczmarczyh, remember when we wanted to 
go exploring and chose that deserted dark street. We sure had some good times on that trip 
Thanks for being there when I needed some extra help or just someone to listen to me. This 
year's staff was not only one of the smallest but had more newcomers than any other staff its 
size. This made the victory even sweeter when the Loyolan was finally finished. I would like to 
thank those who have done an excellent job and have earned a place of honor in my editor's 
notes. Rick Wroble our Layout Editor was a newcomer to our staff but he didn't let a little 
thing like that handicap him. He went down to the Walsworth Plant with us and came back an 
expert in layout design. As you flip through the pages of this yearbook look closely at the dif- 
ferences in the styles from one section to another and you'll know that Rick spent hundreds of 
hours perfecting his own technique. Thanks Rick, everyone will be able to enjoy looking at the 
Loyolan for years to come. Another one of our editors who has done an outstanding job is Cln 
dy Panek. She was this years Production Manager and a newcomer to our staff as well. I want 
to thank you for giving all of your free time to learn how to operate the typesetting equipment 
As for our friendship you have shown me, what can I say. I will remember all the good times 
we had wherever I go. I am better person to have known you. And that's not an easy thing for 
me to say after you lost files and exposed film during our December deadline days. The way to 
go far in this organization is to just remember everything I taught youljust kidding). Bill Grant, 
Photography Editor, has done a good job in improving the quality of pictures being sent down 
to the plant this year. Thanks Bill for being able to adapt to the constant pressure to get a 
photographer at all the important events. You were always(or at least most of the time) a 
gentleman when I would yell at you. Good luck in your future endeavers. Another staff 
member I would like to thank is Donna-Jo Mlrabella our Copy Editor. Anytime I needec 
something written up in a hurry I could always depend upon Donna-Jo to get it done and on 
time too. Thank you for not only working on the yearbook but for driving me to school every 
day. If it wasn't for you I would never had left the office at night. Your friendship has meant a 
lot to me and I wish you luck at the University of Illinois. Emil Velez, 1982 Loyolan Co-Editor-in- 
Chief stayed with the staff one more year to help us. Putting his computer knowledge to the 
test he developed a program that would assure that every subscriber would recieve a copy of 
the yearbook. Thanks for all your help with the yearbook and my computer class. I would have 
never been part of the yearbook if you hadn't dragged me down there four years. Thanks!!! 
April Jenkins, our Events Editor, became an invaluable and indespensible member of our staff 
because of her overall dedication and commitment to the 1983 Loyolan.( Attention next year's 
staff- all you have to do to keep April happy is to keep her well-supplied with dipped cones 
from Tasty-Freeze). 

Through the course of the year I have come in contact with many people in different depart 
ments at Loyola who have gone out of their way to help us. From the Medical Center Campus, 
I would like to thank Paf Xavler, Public Relations Director, who was instrumental in helping us 
complete the newly expanded faculty section. Another person I would like to thank is Jim 
Cockerill, the Dental School Photographer who was a great help to us when we needed pic 
tures of the chairmen of departments for the Dental School. Finally, I would like to thank Jim 
Whitehead, Dean of Students and his assistant Michael Lambesis. When we came there to 
take pictures of the campus for the book, Jim and Mike took us around and pointed out those 
places that make the Medical Center a unique part of Loyola. They made us feel welcomec 
and were always willing to lend a hand when it came to getting anything done at the MCC. At 
the Lake Shore Campus I would like to thank Tom Adams the Dean of Students and Gary 
Soltys who had to put up with me calling them to tell of the breakdown of the typesetting 
equipment again and again. I would also like to thank ail the secretaries in the Dean of 
Students office and especially Joyce Karlson who always greeted me with a smile. The last 
person I would like to thank at the Lake Shore Campus is Marlette LeBlanc, Vice-President for 
Student Services. Thank you for having the confidence in both Scott and I. Your door was 
never closed to us and that meant a great deal to me. Very few people make a lasting impres 
sion on someone in a short time, but be assured, you have succeeded where others have fail 
ed. The Water Tower Campus is not short on exemplary personnel. The first person I woulc 
like to thank is our Budget Advisor, Charles A. Taylor His business savvy kept the Yearbook 
from financial ruin. Another person who as gone out on limb for us is Gordon Stiefel. I will 
never forget when we came down to the WTC with the pages for our first deadline the day 
before they were suppose to be at the plant. You loaded the pages in your car and drove them 
to delivery company even though it would make you late for a speaking engagement in In- 
diana. Our sincerest thanks for all you have done this year. Joan Steinbrecher, Dean of 
Students at WTC has also earned a place in my editor's notes. Whenever I had a problem she 
would be there to listen and advise me. I would also like to thank floss Lisberg, secretary to 
the Chairman of the Board of Trustees for supplying us with the pictures for the Board of 
Trustees. The last people I would like to thank are the secretaries at the Dean of Students Of 
fice who were always willing to help me with any problems. 

And to Sod Moorhead, Sales Representative from the Walsworth Publishing Co., thanks for 
all your guidance during the past year. At the beginning when we unsure of ourselves yoi 
helped us through the first angonizing moments and had more confidence in us then we did 
in ourselves. It was a great day for the Loyolan when you took over the publishing of our year 
book. May you have our contract for the next twenty years. Next I would like to thank my Co- 
Editor fl. Scoff Flodin for his friendship and constant assistance. Usually when two people 
share a top position, there are personality conflicts. But we very well together and we hope 
that you enjoy the 1983 Loyolan and appreciate the long, tireless hours which our staff 
devoted to this project. Last, but not least, I want to thank my family for their unwavering love 
and support while I was Co-Editor. Thanks for understanding my moods and my anxiety at- 
tacks while I tried to meet my deadlines and to deal with the other problems at the "The Of- 
fice". Finally I want to express my sincerest good wishes to the next year's editor, 
Christopher Strzalkowski who has a big job ahead of him, but with the willingness and the 
humility of a great leader, he will do a fine job. 

It is almost inevitable that I have forgotten someone who has performed above and beyond 
the call of duty. Please accept my apology for not publicly acknowledging your efforts, but 
you know who you are and you know how valuable your contribution was in the completion of 
the 1983 Loyolan. 



With Love and Gratitude, 



LOYOLA SP 




EAKS OUT