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BEQUEST OF 
' CANON SGADDING, D. D. 
TORONTO, 1801. 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS; 



THE ETYMOLOGY OF CDEIOUS SURNAMES. 



LUDUS PATEONYMICUS; 



THE ETYMOLOGY OF CURIOUS SURNAMES. 



BY 

RICHARD STEPHEN CHARNOCK, PH. DR., 

F.S.A., F.R.G.S., &c. 

-I* 



" Nomen, Numen." 

Naso in Ciceronetn 



LONDON : 
TRIJBNER & CO., 60, PATERNOSTER ROW. 

1868. 



I'lUXTEIi KY 
CHAKI.KS .IOXES, WEST HAKPINf; STKEET. 



MAfiK ANTONY LOWEE, II. A,, P.S.A., 

llutfjor of |);itr0mjmia ^rifannka, 



THIS WO UK IS DEDICATED BY 

A FELLOW-LABOURER IN THE FIELD OF 
ETYMOLOGICAL RESEARCH. 



CONTENTS. 



FAfiE 

AVANT-COURIER ix 



LUDUS PATRONYMICS . 



A SELECT LIST OF PECULIAR SURNAMES, ARRANGED 

ALPHABETICALLY 145 



AVANT-CODRIER. 

THE custom of giving nicknames has been common to all 
nations ; but we have many curious surnames that are not 
nicknames at all. In England and Wales alone the number 
of names that might be termed odd or curious would 
scarcely be credited, without first perusing the Registrar- 
General's List of Peculiar Surnames.* I once showed this 
List to my etymological friend, Aretchid Kooez, who forth- 
with sat down, and struck off some passages of his Life in 
what he calls Patronymic Language. f Gentle and Simple 
Readers must accept this in part payment of a preface. My 
quaint friend begins thus : 

I Wass \ Born In Summersett, Hon a Monday, In July, Hat 
an Early Hour of the Morning, Howlong Back I Forget; Butt 
Long since the Diet of Worms And the Battle of Waterloo. 
Thayer Wass a Comet Hat the Time {Good Hor Bad Omen ?] . 
My Father Wass a Weaver And Had a Pretty Wife, Hoo 
Had a Small Foot And Hand, And wore Herr Hone Hair. 
Th'der Ware Six Children, Arfin Boys, Arfin Girls (Blond 

* Selected from the Indexes of Births registered in the quarter ending 
31st March, 1831, and of Deaths registered in the corresponding quarter 
of 1853. 

f I shrewdly suspect that friend Kooez must have also dived into 
Bowditch's work on American Names. 

% All the words in Italics are found as surnames. 



X AVANT-COUEIER. 

And Dark). I Had Ten Cousins, Many Uncles, And Lots of 
Quaint ances. My Daddy Wass a Jolly Fellow, Wass " fond 
of His Friend And Bottle And Got Mellow /' And, Twice 
Making His Last Will And Test, Dyde Worth a Plum. One 
Uncle Wass a Great Tippler And Dyde of Dropsie; a Second 
a Gamester, a Third a Devil of a Rake. My Father Wass a 
Jew, One Brother a Morman ; the Rest Ether Turks Hor 
Pagans, And Ure Humble Servant a Christian. My Elder 
Brother Wass a Tidy Pecker, And (Honour Bright) didn't 
Drink Water, I Can Tell You. Just Look Hat His Bill of 
Fare for Fruhstuch \_Breake Fast~\ t Tiffin, i. e. Lunch, And 
Dinner. 

Fruhstiick. 

Tea, Coffee (Au Lait) With Milk, Coldham, Hotham, 
Eggs And Bacon, Herrings, Haddock, Muffins, Rolls, Bread 
And Butter, And a Segar. 

Lunch. 

Bitters, Cheese, Butter, Bread, Ham And Chicken, Ale, 
Porter, Stout, Sherry, Ceider, And a Pipe. 

Dinner. 
[Grace Beevor Meals. ~] 

Pea Soup, Mulloy Kit Tauney, Gravy, Turtle, Hare, 
Pheasant, Spring, Westerjield White. 

Salmon, Turbot Au Bechamel, Codd And Oyster Sauce, 
Soles, Skate, Smelts, Sprats, White Bate, Trout in Wine, 
Plaice, Sturgeon, Grey Mullet With Caper Sauce, Whiting, 
Perch, Carp, Jack, Eels. 



AVANT-COURIER. xi 

Roast Beef And Batter Pudding, Mutton With Onion 
Sauce Orr Capers, Lamb, Veal, Hogsflesh And Apple Sauce, 
With Cabbages, Greens, Carrots, French Beans, Spinnage, 
Cow Climbers, Marrows, Kail, And Peas. 

Rabbit, Hare, Leveret, Partridge, Pheasant, Quail, Teal, 
Snipe, Woodcock, Grouse, Goose, Duck, Duckling, And a 
Curry of Fowl. 

Jellies, Custards, Ices, Tarts, Seftons, Lemon Pudding, 
Pies, Apple Charlotte, And Plenty of Sweets. 

Ballade of Mustard And Cress, Lettice With a Clew of 
Gar lick. 

Nuts, Oranges, Olives, Filberts, Apples, Pears, Normandy 
Pippins, Almonds And Raisins, Plums, Cherries, Dates, 
Currants, Melons With Sugar Hor Salt. 

Sherry, Port (Curius Old], Champagne (Clicquot) Ma- 
deira, Hock, Claret, Cape, Beaune, St. George. 

My Wife His a Darling, Such a Duck of a Spouse, Butt 
Hon my Soul, How Much Does Not the Slybody Cost Mee 
for Herr Wardrobe ! Ive to Pay for Beads, Ribbons, Robes, 
Tapes, Tiffany, Cotton, Silks, Cashmeres. By the Dickens ! 
Hat Christmas, Hime Prest Like a Lemon for Bonnet, Gown, 
Shawl, Scarf, Sash, Spencer, Cape, Plume And Feathers ; 
And Every Winter for a Muff, Tippet. And Furss, And a 
Cloak With a Hood ; And Now And Then for Pearls, 
Rubies, Emeralds, And Diamonds. Heavens ! Hime Not 
Ugly, tho' Tall, And my Head Small; Hime Thin, Slim, 
And Rather Smallbyhynd. My Skin His Dark {With a 
Mole Hon my Cheek~\, Beard And Whiskers Black, Eyes 
Brown, Face Round, Neck Short, Skull Thick. My Arm 
His Slight, my Hand Nothard, Butt my Fist Can Plant a 



Xll AVANT-COURIER. 

Good Slow. The Hair lion my Noddle His Grey, Butt my 
Knee His Not Bent, my Ear Still Sharp. Summ Call Mee 
Longfellow, Others (Sans Raison), Greathead. My Heart 
His In the Right Place, Yet Not Hon the Dexter Side. In 
the Early Part of my Life I Wass a Weakly Chap, And Had 
a Deal of Maladies ; Such as Ague, Boils, Fever, Fits, Hic- 
cups, Cramp, Piles, Rash, Rickets, And Once Had a Pimple 
Hon my Nose, a Bump lion my Head, a Whitlow Hon my 
Finger, And Bunyans And Corns Hon my Foot, By Gum ! 
[Phyaick to the Catts ; Heal Ewer Self, Master Pills]. 
Ive a Fancy for Music, Love Harmony And Melody, Sing 
Both Treble And Bass, And Carol Like a Bird. Bugle- 
horn, Drum, Fiddle, Fife, Harp, Horn, Organ, Hor Tabor, Ar 
Aul One to Mee.* Ive Been a Great Fisher Man, Butt Summ 
How Hor Other, I Always Ketch Cold in the Boat [Rather 
Hard Lines'] ; I Like Rowin, Butt Manage Rudder Better 
Then Oar Hor Skull. Ive Noe Love for the Chase ; I Cant 
Jump Hedges And Ditches. Why Breake Neck, Legg, 
Arms, Hor Shoulder Why Knock Down Wheat, Barley, 
Oats, Ore Even Tares? [You Cant Always Cure the Scarlet 
Fever. If You Doe Get Hit, Keep Upp Strength And 
Spirits, Tak Off Blankets, And Hope the Windows']. Hime a 
Great Smoker [Cant I Blow a Cloud!] ; Many a Pipe Daily ; 
Near a Pound of Bird's Eye, Shagg, Hor Returns Every 
Week. Hon Sunday I Tak my Segar, Hor, as Shum Would- 
have Hit, Weed. Ive Been a Great Traveller, And Such a 
Walker ! Ive Trodden Many Lands, And Wass Once a Pilgrim 
to Calvary, Galilee, Nazareth, Jordan, Jerusalem, And Gath, 

* I once heard Kooez sing " Hime a Romcr" the "Rover Sis Free" 
and "Home, Sweet Home" 



AVANT-COURIER. Xlll 

without Firman Hor Pass Port. By Jove I the Weather 
Does Not Stop Mee ; Hit His Aul the Same ; Fineweather, 
Fairweather, Merryweather, Even Foulweather. I Delight In 
Tempest, Snow, Storm, Rain, Shower, Hail, Thaw, Sleet, 
Frost, Dew, Wind, Fog, Mist, Gale. I Wass Always Par shall 
to Gambling, And Wass Clever, And Had Luck, Hat Hazard, 
Faro, Skittles, Billiards, Dice, Chess, Butt Wass Not Once 
a Prigg Hor Swindler. By the Bye, a Short Time Back, 
I Had a Law Suit Hat Westminster, lion Circuit, Hor 
Hat Sessions {Forget Witch'] ; Butt Grant You May have 
a Just Cause, the Best Counsell [And Pay a Heavy Fee'], a 
Good Jury [Not a Common Jury~], And a Learned Judge, Hit 
Does Not Always Folio You Get Justice {Wat Quirks And 
Tricks /*] . If Hit Goes Agin You, Wait Till Term, And Try 
for a Rule Nice Eye, lion Motion, Ore File a Bill ; Dam, 
the Cost /f I Once Went to Church, And the Parson, In 
His Sermon, Said, if One Wass Just, Had Faith And Trust 
In the Gospel, And Wass a Truman, In the Gumming World, 
i. e., Paradise, Hor Kingdom of Heaven, One Might Bee 
a Perfect Man ( Watt Bliss!} ; Butt if One Wass a Badman, 
after Getting Off Our Mortal Coil, Thayer Wass a Good 
Chance of Going to the Devil. Cant Say Hime a Croker, 
Butt Death, Coffins, Churchyards, Graves, Toombs And 
Monuments Air By Noe Means Pleasant Things. 

Amen, Goodby, Farewell, Byby. 

* We certainly have Our Law of Many Colours and sorts ; as Slack- 
law, Whitelaw, Brownlaiv, Greenlaiv, Shillinglaw, Softlaw. 

t When I got thus far, I exclaimed, in Lingua Patronymica, Fie, 
Proiv Pudor ! But on looking at the orthography and punctuation, I 
hecarae satisfied that our autobiographer had merely made use of the 
French peasants' common exclamation, Dame = Bless me ! 



XIV AVANT- COURIER. 

Now, although some of the above surnames really mean 
what they appear to mean, very many of them, like most of 
those to be found in the body of the present work, are gross 
corruptions, and the only way to account for their present 
form is that there is (as Mr. Ferguson justly observes) 
a tendency to corrupt towards a meaning. Thus Pettycot 
will easily become Petty coat, Eyvile Evil; Frick Freak; 
Hanaper Hamper ; Lepard Leopard; Manley Manly; Hugh 
Hue; Sigar Segar ; Bradford Broadfoot ; Kirkbride Cake- 
bread; Playford Play foot, &c. &c. 

It struck me that a small work on the subject might be 
acceptable just now, the more especially as it would enable 
those burdened with objectionable names, instead of assuming 
others, to discover the proper orthography of their own 
names. Thus few would probably change their name from 
Buggin or Simper to Smith, if they thought they were 
justified in writing Bacon and St. Pierre. The same might 
be said of such names as Death, Dearth, and Diaper, 
from D'Aeth, D'Arth, and D'Ypres respectively. Of 
course some of the suggested derivations are but reasonable 
guesses; but good guesses are better than none at all, and 
may often lead to the truth. The title of the work, LUDUS 
PATRONYMICUS, was suggested by my friend, the Rev. S. F. 
Creswell, M.A., Head Master of Dartford Grammar School, 
Kent, and late Scholar of St. John's College, Cambridge, who 
likewise baptized my VERSA NOMINALIA. 

R. S. C. 



GRAY'S INN SQUARE, 
January, 1868. 



WORKS CONSULTED. 

Names, Surnames, and Nicknames of the Anglo-Saxons, 

by J. M. Kemble. London, 1846. 
Codex Diplomaticus Aevi Saxonici, by J. M. Kemble. 

London, 1847. 

Northern Mythology, by B. Thorpe. London, 1851. 
Grimm's Deutsche Mythologie. Third Edition. G-ottin- 

gen, 1854. 

Forstemann's Altdeutsches Namenbuch. Nordhausen, 1 856. 
Outzen's Glossarium der Friesischen Sprache. Copenhagen, 

1837. 
Pott's Personennamen, insbesondere die Familiennamen, 

und ihre Entstehungsarten, &c. Leipzig, 1853. 
Island's Landnamabok, hoc est Liber Originum. Islandias, 

Copenhagen, 1774. 
Worsaae's Danes and Norwegians in England, Scotland, 

and Ireland. London, 1852. 
Ueber Deutsche Vornamen und Geschlechts-namen von 

Tileman Dothias Wiarda. 8vo. Berlin und Stettin, 

1800. 
Vergleichendes etymologisches Worterbuch der gothisch 

teutonischen Mundarten, von Heinrich Meidinger. 4to. 

Francf., 1833. 
Bosworth's Origin of the English and Germanic Languages 

and Nations. London, 1848. 
Latham's Ethnology of the British Islands. London, 

1852. 



xvi \\OKKS CONSULTED. 

Cermanieum, by J. (J. Waehter. Leipzig, 



1737. 

English KtymologioB, by H. Fox Talbot. London, 1847. 

('.linden's Keir.ains concerning Britain. 

\\ r.i's Kesiitmion of UooMynl lulelligonoo in Anti- 

quit ios conoiM-ning our Nation, 1605. 
A Dissertation of the Names of lYi -sons, by J. II. lraly. 

1822. 

Koniarks on the Antiquity ami Introduction of Surnames 

into Kn^huul. Arelurologia, vol. xviii. pp. 1057. 

tleman's Magazine, 1772. 
Kilinlmrgh Kevicw for April, 1860. 
r:tnMiomat'h\iry.:ui Kssay on the Philosophy of Surnames, 

by Kev. C\ W. r,r:ulhy. M.A. 8vo. Baltimore, U.S. 

\\l\y Nomenelature. by M. A. Lower, M.A.. 

F.S.A. Loiulon. 1S49. 
ratronymioa Uritanuiea, a Pietionary of the Family Names 

of the United Kingdom, by M. A. Lower. London, 

18o9. 
English Surnames and their place in the Teutonic Family, 

by Kobert Ferguson. London and York, 1858. 

Society of Northern Antiqu 
Suffolk {Surnames, by N. I. lunvditeh. London, 1861. 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS, 



Af JATIO. From at-the-gate, one living at or near a gate. 

Ml [j 10. Mr. Ferguson thinks this name is probably the same 
as the 0. G. Aigua, Aguus, Agio, of which the root may be tin; 
O. N. of/a, exerceo. Mr. Lower derives it from Fr. aiyu, cor- 
responding with our Sharpe. It may however be same as Agg 
(U. S. Agg and Agge). The English names Agg, Aggas are 
from Agatha. 

AIR. Mr. Ferguson thinks this name may be from 0. J I . < 
<'.!<,. ar, 0. N. an', an eagle. It is rather from Ayr, cap. ot 
hire, Scotland. 

A I UY. Mr. Ferguson compares the names Airy, Air, Arrah 
with the O. (jj. Aro find Ara of the Bcventh century, and th<- 
common Scandinavian name Ari, which IK; dwives from O. II. ( '< 
aro, ar, 0. N. an', an eagle. Lower says the Cumberland family 
of A; ler the name to have bf;':n borrowed Irorn an 

elevated dwelling among the mountains called an eyrie, such 
nations for residences not being uncommon; and he says 
aery also signifies a place for the breeding or training of hawks. 
The name is more probably the same as Harry, Harrie. 
Henry ; or it may even be from Harold. 

A LA liASTKK. The same with Arblaster ; from 0. E. aZfc&z*- 
tere, aero ! ,<;\vman. In the II. I i. it is found in Lit. Albales- 

B 



2 LUDUS PATKONYMICUS. 

tarius. " Several of the distinguished archers at the battle of 
Hastings became tenants in chief under the Conqueror, and are 
entered in Domesday with the surname of Arbalistarius, or 
Balistaretis or Balistarius. Hence the names Alabaster, Blast, 
and others " (Lower). 

ALCOCK. See COCK. 

ALEFOUNDER. The ale-founders were ale-tasters or ale- 
conners. In O. Court Rolls they are called " gestatores cervisi," 
the term commonly used in the records of Court Leet. Lower 
classes this term with " ale-draper," and justly calls it a ridicu- 
lous designation. There is a beer retailer in London of the 
name of Alefounder. The last part of the name may be from 
fundo, to pour out. 

ALEMAN. From root of Almond, q. v. Aleman is the name 
of a German general. 

ALLCARD. The same as the A. S. personal name Alcheard* 
Cod. Dip. 520 ; perhaps the same as the A. S. name Allward, 
and the modern names Ail ward and Aylward. 

ALLCOCK. See COCK. 

ALLENGAME. See WALKINGHAME. 

ALLPENNY. See HALFPENNY. 

ALLWATER. From some local name compounded of " water." 

ALMOND. The same as Almund, Ellmund, and the ^Elmund 
of Domesday ; from G. alf-mund, strong or powerful protector. 
Ferguson also thinks Almond may be from the A. S. name 
Alhmund, O. N. Amundr, from mund, protection. From Almond 
we doubtless have the names Almon, Ellman, Holman, Oldman, 
Element. 

ALOOF. From Alf or Alph, for Alfred. 

ALUM, i. q. ALLUM, ALLOM. The same as Hallam ; from 
Hallam, the name of parishes co. Derby and York. 

ANGER. Some derive this name from hanger, a wooded de- 
clivity ; but Ainge, Ainger, Anger, Angier, Augier, Aunger (some- 
times pronounced Ainger), and Aungier are rather from Anjou, 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 3 

an old prov. of France (now forming dep. Maine-et-Loire, and 
parts of Sarthe, Mayenne, and Indre-et-Loire), whose cap. was 
Angers. Aunger and Aungier are in charters found Latinised 
to Angevinus ; and Angevine is found in H. R. with the 
prefix Le. 

ANGUISH, i. q. ANGWISHE. From some local name com- 
pounded of wich or wick; as Anwick co. Lincoln; or perhaps 
rather from Angus, the ancient name of co. Forfar, Scotland. 

ANVIL. Doubtless from Anneville, name of several villages 
in Normandy. " The English family (of Anneville), according to 
De Gerville, originated from Anneville-en-Saine, a parish in the 
arrondissement of Valognes " (Lower). 

APPLE or APPEL. Ferguson says happel is a word used 
in Silesia for a horse. The name Apple is more probably a 
diminutive of Hab or Hap, in Hapsburg a nickname for Herbert. 
Apfel is however a German name. From Hab or Hap we 
doubtless have the name Happy. 

APPLE JOHN. See APJOHN. 

AEM. A name which is also found in local surnames ; as in 
Armfield, Armsby, Armsworth, &c. It may be the same as Orme. 
See WORM, RAM, RUM. Ferguson gives also the name Arms, 
which he derives from A. S. arm, poor. 

ARMOUR. Lower says this name is a corruption of armourer ; 
and he gives Armorer as a surname. 

ARROW. Ferguson says the names Arrah and Arroh might 
be derived from the weapon, like Shaft and other similar names ; 
but Arrow is the appellation of a parish co. Warwick, and of a 
township co. Chester. 

ASHMAN. Lower says the forms of this name in the H. 
R. are Asscheman, Aschman, and Ashman ; and in Domesday 
Assemannus ; and he thinks the name equivalent to spearman, 
cesc or ash in A. S. poetry being constantly used in the sense of 
spear, because the staff of a spear was usually made of that wood. 
I take it that this name is the same as Asman, Osman, Osmon, 

B 2 



4 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

Osmund (whence doubtless Houseman, Housman), from as, os, 
which in German names signifies excellent (excellens, praestans, 
egregius). Wachter renders Osmund, vir praestans ; and Oswald, 
tutor egregius ; and he says os is the same as the Welsh od. 

AUGER, AUGUR, AUGURS. All three are found in the 
U. S., and the two first in England. Lower says, " Auger, 
Aucher, a Norman name, whence Fitz-Aucher ; also a corruption 
of Alsager, a place in Cheshire. Archseologia, vol. xix., p. 17." I 
should rather derive these names from Algar, Elgar (PL R. Algar, 
Alger ; Domesday, Algar, jElgar. Algar, name of a bishop of the 
E. Angles), contracted from the old name JElfgar, from celf-gar, 
which might variously translate, very helping, very strong, a help 
in war. 

AUGUR, AUGURS. See AUGER. 

AUGUST. From Auguste, the Fr. form of Augustus. 



B. 



BACCHUS. As an English surname, from Backhouse or 
1 iakchouse. 

BACON. In H. R. this name is found Bachun, Bacun, and 
Bacon, and is said to be derived from Bacon, a seigniory in 
Normandy. Lower says in some instances Bacon may be 
a corruption of Beacon, and that, from their connection with 
Bayeux, the Bacons were sometimes Latinised De Bajocis. I 
consider the name a French diminutive of Bach, from G. bach, a 
brook, rivulet. Hence Bacot, another diminutive. Bacon has 
been corrupted to Buggin. 

BADCOCK. See COCK. 

BADGER. Ferguson considers this name the same as the 
O. G. Patager, from leado war, ger spear, it is rather from 
badger, an old word for a hawker ; or from Badger, a parish 
co. Salop. 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 5 

BADMAN. From A. S. b&thman, a bather; perhaps a bap- 
tiser. Hence no doubt the names Batman and Bateman, although 
the two latter may also be from batman, a boatman. 

BAKE. From Bake, name of an estate in St. German's, 
Cornwall. 

BAKEWELL. From Bakewell, a market town and parish 
co. Derby. Doubtless compounded of mile. 

BALAAM. From Bailham, Suffolk ; or Balham, Surrey. 

BALCOCK. See COCK. 

BALM. A corruption of Balsam, or contracted from Balaam, 
q. v. respectively. 

BALSAM. From Balsham, in Cambridgeshire, which Fuller 
characterises as " an eminent village," and the only one in 
England bearing the name. 

BANNISTER, BANISTER, BANNESTER. Perhaps ori- 
ginally Bainster, one who kept a bath ; from 0. Eng. and 0. F. 
bain, a bath. 

BANTAM. Same as Bentham ; from Bentham, a parish in 
Yorkshire. 

BARGE. Lower thinks this name may have been derived 
from an inn sign. It is more probably the same as Burge ; from 
Burgh, name of eleven parishes of England. Hence no doubt 
the name Purge. 

BARKER (H. R. Barcarius and Le Barkere). From the old 
berkere, a tanner, bark being used in tanning. The word barker 
now signifies one who strips trees of their bark. Barkary was 
a law term for a tan-house 

BARNACLE. Ferguson under this name gives "Barna- 
karl, Barnakel, a surname or a nickname given to a celebrated 
Norwegian pirate, named Olver, who, setting his face against the 
then fashionable amusement of tossing children on spears, was 
christened by his companions, to show their sense of his odd 
scruples, Barnakarl, baby's old man." The name is more pro- 
bably from Barnacle, a hamlet co. Warwick. 



6 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

BARNDOLLAR. See CASHDOLLAR. 

BARNFATHER. See PENNYFATHER. 

BARRINGDOLLAR. See CASHDOLLAR. 

BARROW, BARROWS. From Barrow, name of parishes and 
places in at least ten counties in England ; from barrow, a wood 
or grove, from A. S. beara, bearewe, a grove ; or from barrow, a 
hillock or mound of earth intended as a repository for the dead, 
answering to the tumulus of the Latins ; from A. S. beorg a 
hill or hillock, byrgen a tomb. 

BARTER. Lower thinks this name to be from the O. E. 
barratour, one who stirs up strife between the king's subjects, 
either at law or otherwise. Barter, Barters are both found in the 
U. S. They may be the same as Batter, Batters, in Battersby, 
so called from an estate and township co. York. They may also 
be connected with Butter, q. v. 

BAT. A nickname for Bartholomew. Hence Batt, Bate, 
Batts, Bates, Batson, Badkin, Batkin, Badcock, Batcock. 

BATCOCK. See COCK. 

BATMAN. See BADMAN. 

BEAN. Lower says Bean, Beane are Scotch abbreviations of 
Benjamin. I should have otherwise derived it from Gael, beag, 
little, young; W. bechan; Corn, biglian, ivigan. 

BEDALE. From Bedale, a parish in Yorkshire. 

BEDLOCK. See LEGG. 

BEE. From A. S. by, bye, a dwelling, habitation ; Sco. by, a 
village, hamlet ; Dan. by, a city, town, borough. Hence Bradbee, 
Summerbee, &c. 

BEER. Ferguson says Beer is the same as Bear, from A. 
S. bar, a bear, O. N. bera, 0. H. G. bero, D. beer; but this 
name is more probably from Beer- Alston or Beer-Ferris (Ferrers) 
in Devon, or Beer-Hacket or Beer-Regis in Dorset. 

BELCHAMBER, BELLCHAMBERS. A friend assures me 
he knows of a William Chambers, who changed his name to Bill- 
chambers, of which he says Bellchambers is a corruption. 



LUDUS PATKONYMICUS. 7 

BELDAM. From some local name compounded of ham, a 
dwelling. Kennett renders beldam a " woman who lives to see a 
sixth generation descended from her." 

BELLOWS. See BILLOWS. 

BELOVLY. SeeLEGG. 

BERRY. Berry-Pomeroy is the name of a parish co. Devon, 
and Berry or Berri is the appellation of one of the old provinces 
of France. But see BURY and BORROW. 

BICHARD. See HAZARD. 

BICKERSTAFF. See WAGSTAFF. 

BIDGOOD. This name may mean " good or noble in war," 
or " a good counsellor " (A. S. beado, beada, counsellor ; G. god, 
good, noble, kind). The A. S. guth-boda would mean " a war 
messenger." The O. N. bodi is a messenger, and gunn, gunnur, 
gud, 0. H. Gr. gund, gunt, war. 

BIGGIN. A common termination of local names in the 
northern counties and in Scotland, as Dowbiggin, Newbiggin. It 
means a house of a large size, as opposed to a cottage, a building ; 
from A. S. lyggan, to build. In Scotland biggin is sometimes 
used to designate small buildings on the banks of rivers, &c., in 
which night lights are placed to prevent vessels from mistaking 
their course. 

BILKE. Perhaps the same as Bielcke, from Biel, now Bienne, 
in Switzerland ; or a German diminutive of Bill, i. e. Will, for 
William. Bill and Bilo are German names, and Pott gives Bille 
and Bielke as modern German names. 

BILLET. Lower thinks this name a probable corruption 
of the great baronial name Belet. It would rather seem to be 
a diminutive of Bill for William. Belet is doubtless a cor- 
ruption of Bellot, a diminutive of Bel for Isabella. 

BILLIARD. See HAZARD. 

BILLOWS. Ferguson thinks Billows may be the same as 
an O. G. Bilo, quoted by Forstemann, and that Pill and Pillow, 
unless connected with Peel, may be H. G. forms of Bill or Bilo. 



LTJDUS PATEONYMICUS. 

Bellew, Pellew, Bellas, Belliss, and Bowles are also surnames. 
Pellew is said to be of Norman origin, from bel-eau, the beautiful 
water, the designation of some locality [Belleau is the ap- 
pellation of a parish co. Lincoln]. Bowles has been derived from 
Bellovesus, a celebrated name mentioned in Liv., Lib. v., cap. 33, 
said to mean a leader in war (dux belli), from 0. G. vel for 
veld, war. Bowditch says the writer of Britaine's Kemains 
supposes the name Bellows to be a corruption of Bellhouse, and 
he mentions a History of the Bellows Family by the Eev. Henry 
W. Bellows, D.D., of New York. 

BLACKLOCK. See LEGO. 

BLACKMONSTEK. " This repulsive name is a corruption of 
Blanchminster, the White Monastery, the designation of more 
than one religious house. Blancmuster is an ancient alias for 
the town of Oswestry. The name was commonly Latinised De 
Albo Monasterio" Lower. 

BLADE. The name Blade, Blades, Blaides, Blaydes, Bleyds, 
found written Bursblades, Buresblades, Bursebred, or Burse- 
bleyd, is said to be of Danish origin. Wilkinson says the family 
assumed the local name of Burse-blades or Purse-blades, from 
residing at Burs-blade, near Durham. 

BLANKET, BLANKETT. For Blanchett, a diminutive of 
the name Blank or Blanch ; from Fr. blanc, white. " Rear- 
Admiral Blankett was a British officer in the wars against 
Napoleon " (Bowditch). See also Verba Nominalia, under 
" Blanket." 

BLAST. See ALABASTER. 

BLAZE. " An ancient personal name borne by St. Blase or 
Blaise, the patron of the woolcoombers of England," says Lower, 
quoting Brady's Clavis Calend, 1201. Cf. the Sp. Bias (Gil 
Bias, Ruy Bias), the It. Biaggio, L. Blasius ; probably from Gr. 
/?Aacrr>j, bud, shoot, sprout, blossom ; /3Aa<rravo;, to sprout, shoot 
forth, bud. 

BLOOD. Ferguson derives this name from O. N. blaudr, 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

bashful, timid. It may be the same name as Lloyd, Floyd, 
from W. llwyd, brown, grey. The name of General Blood ap- 
peared in Sporting Life in January, 1867. 

. BODKIN. Lower says a younger son of the Fitzgeralds ot 
Desmond and Kildare settled in Connaught in the thirteenth 
century, and obtained, as was not then uncommon, a sobriquet 
which usurped the place of a surname, and so was handed down. 
This was Bawdekin, probably from his having affected to dress in 
the costly material of silk and tissue of gold so popular in that 
age under the name of baudkift; and he says the Bodkins still use 
the " Croom-a-boo" motto of the Fitzgeralds, but that the Bode- 
kin of the H. R. is probably from a different source. Fergu- 
son thinks Bodkin may be from the English word bodkin, which 
in its earliest use signified a dagger ; but he is of opinion that the 
name is more probably a diminutive of A. S. boda, O. N. bodi, a 
messenger, and he gives a Bodecker corresponding with an 0. S. 
Bodic, and a Mod. G. Bodeck, and also an 0. G. Bodeken (A. D. 
1020). The name Bodkin may also be from bodykin, a little man ; 
or, if of Cornish origin, from lod-kyn, the head abode or place ; or 
bod-Jcein, the house on the promontory. 

BODY, BODDY. The same as Bodda, Boda (Latinised Bodus), 
probably from A. S. boda, 0. N. bodi, a messenger. See also 
BODKIN. 

BOGIE. See BUGGY. 

BOILES. Doubtless from the Irish name Boyle. Hence 
probably the name Bolus. But see BILLOWS. 

BOLD. See BOTTLE. 

BOLT. See BOTTLE. 

BOLUS. See BOILES. 

BONE. Same as Bowne, Boone ; and also Bohun, a Norman 
family that came over with the Conqueror, who derived their name 
from Bohon, arrond. St. Lo. The Irish name Bohan is found 
written De Bohn, Bowen, Bone, Boon, Boone, 

BONES. See BONUS. 



10 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

BONUS. The same as Bowness ; from Bowness, a parish co. 
Cumberland ; or Bowness, a village co. Westmoreland. Hence 
doubtless the name Bones. 

BOOT. This name may be the same as Bott (in H. R. De 
Botte) ; from root of Body ; or the same as the surname Booth ; 
from booth, a house or shed built of boards ; from Dan. bod, 
W. bwth, Ir. boith, both, G. bude. 

BOOTY. Lower says there is a prae-Domesday name Boti ; 
and that Gilbert de Boti was a tenant in chief in co. Warwick. 
The name is probably from root of Body, q. v. 

BORROW. From A. S. burh, burcg, dative byrig, a fort, castle, 
city, town, court, palace, &c., which is liable to take the form of 
ber, berry, borough, brough, bury, bur, burg. Hence the sur- 
names Berry, Buiy. 

BOTTLE. From A. S. botl, bold, bolt, an abode, dwelling, 
hall, mansion, house. Hence Pottle, Bolt, and perhaps some- 
times Bold. 

BOTTOM. From A. S. botm, a bottom or valley. Hence the 
names Bottomley, Higginbottom, Longbottom, Oakenbottom, 
Othenbottom, Owlerbottom, Pitchbottom, Ramsbottom, Rose- 
bottom, Rowbottom, Shoebottom, Shufflebottom, Sidebottom, 
Tarbottom, Winterbottom. 

BOULTER. Originally one who bolted, i. e. sifted or sepa- 
rated bran from flour, an occupation formerly distinct from that 
of miller. To bolt came afterwards to signify, to examine by 
sifting, to open or separate the parts of a subject, to find the 
truth and to discuss or argue, as at Gray's Inn, where cases were 
privately discussed or bolted by the students and barristers. 

BOWLES. See BILLOWS. 

BOX. From Bock's, i. e. son of Bock, or from a local name, 
as Box, in Wilts. 

BOYS. From Fr. bois, a wood. Hence De Bosco, Dubois, 
Dubosc, &c. ; Littleboys, Warboys, Worboys, which Lower 
thinks to be from Verbois, near Rouen. 



LUDUS PATKONYMICUS. 11 

BRADBEE. From Bradby, a chapeliy co. Derby. See BEE. 

BRAMBLE. A probable corruption of Brummel or Brummell ; 
perhaps i. q. Broomhall ; from Broomhall co. Berks. 

BRAND. See BRANDY. 

BRANDY. Ferguson seems to think this name, as well 
as Brand, may be from the Scand. brandi, one having a sword, 
and he mentions Brandi as the name of a Northman in the 
Landnamabok. Brand, G. Brandt, and Brandy are probably 
from G. brand, famous, renowned (clarus), a word frequently 
found in German names ; as Childebrandus, Hildebrandus, As- 
prandus, Sigibrandus, Liutprandus. 

BREADCAKE and the U. S. names Bredcake and Bridecake 
are from Bride-kirk, a parish co. Cumberland ; and from the 
inverse, Kirk-bride, we have the name Cakebread. 

BRINE. Ferguson cognates this name with Brown, and sug- 
gests as a derivation A. S. bryne, a burning, which is absurd. 
Lower, with more reason, says it is an Irish corruption of 
O'Brien. 

BROADFOOT. Most probably the same as Bradford ; from 
Bradford, name of places in cos. Devon, Dorset, Lancaster, Nor- 
thumberland, Somerset, Stafford, and York. 

BRUISE. One of the many forms of Braose or Bruce, R. G. 
16. Lower. 

BUCKLER. This name, found variously written, Bokeler, 
Buckeler, Buclier, and Bucler, has been identified with Bacheler 
and Backeler ; and is probably derived from the office of the 
Baclielerii Regis. See Nichol's Topog. and Genealog., Vol. iii., p. 
569 ; Rot. Chart, in Turn Lond., pp. 59 and 102 ; and Sir Harris 
Nicholas's Notes to Siege of Carlaverock. The word bachelor 
(Fr. bachelier) has been variously derived from bas-chevalier, i. e. 
a knight of a lower order ; from L. baccalaureus, from baccd 
laured, from being invested with a crown made of laurel berries, 
or baculus, a staff, from the supposition that a staff, by way of 
distinction, was given into the hands of those who had completed 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

their studies ; or from the old word batalarius, one who entered 
into literary battles or disputes. 

BUDGET. I. B. Budget has just published a treatise on 
tobacco, not on finance (Bowditcli). A diminutive of the name 
Budge ; or perhaps rather a corruption of Paget, Pagett, Padgett, 
or Padgedd, a diminutive of the name Page. 

BUGG. See BUGGY. 

BUGGY. Perhaps from Bugey, a small territory of France, 
in the old prov. of Bourgogne ; or from Le Bogue, a comm. 
and town of France, dep. Dordogne. It may also be the same 
as one of the A. S., 0. G., Dan., and Eng. surnames Bucge, Bega, 
Boge, Bigo, Buggo, Bogi, Bogie, Bogue, Boag, which Ferguson 
derives from A. S. begean, bigan, bogan, bugan, 0. N. beygia, biga, 
boga, buga, to bend or stoop. 

BUMGARTNER. For Baumgartner, a German name, signi- 
fying a tree gardener. 

BURDEN. From some local name ending in den (A. S. den, 
dene, deorn, a plain, vale, dale, valley) ; or from Burdon, name of 
two townships co. Durham. 

BURLEY. SeeLEGG. 

BURLINGAME. A U. S. name ; from Burlingham, name of 
three parishes in Norfolk. But see WALKINGHAME. 

BURY. From Bury, name of parishes, towns, &c., cos. Hants, 
Lancaster, Suffolk, Sussex. But see BORROW. 

BUSS. Lower says that in the south of England this is a 
common nickname of Barnabas. 

BUST. A Mrs. Bust, says Bowditch, is buried in Westminster 
Abbey. I take it to be the same as Buist, which Lower renders 
thick and gross, and the German Beust, name of the Austrian 
statesman. 

BUSTARD. See HAZARD. 

BUTTER. In the U. S. there are both Butter and Butters. 
Butter Crambe, Butterlaw, Butterleigh, Butterley, Buttermere, 
Butterton, Butterwick, Butterworth, are local names in England. 



LUDUS PATKONYMICUS. 13 

There is also Booterstown (in some documents Ballybotter, 
Ballyboother, Butterstown, and Boterstone) near Dublin, which 
some say was originally Freebooterstown, from its being the 
resort of these picturesque desperadoes. Lower says Boterus 
and Botorus are found as personal names in Domesday ; but the 
name Butter may be from G.'bude, a house, mansion, habitation, 
&c. ; or from A. S. bode, a messenger; or perhaps rather from G. 
bod-her, a noble or brave leader. Bod is found in several Ger- 
man names ; as Bauto, Maroboduus, Merobaudes, Genebaudes. 

BUTTON. This is doubtless a local name. The pedigree 
of the Hampshire family is found written De Button, and Lower 
says it was sometimes spelt Bitton, and may be derived from 
the parish of Bitton co. Gloucester ; and that in Sussex Burton 
is often pronounced Button. 

BUZZARD. See HAZARD. 



0. 



CABLE. This name is probably the same as Cabbell, in H. 
R. Cabel, and perhaps with Caple or Capel (in charters Latinised 
De Capelld). 

CAKEBREAD. See BREADCAKE. 

CALF. From calvus, bald. Hence Calvin or Chauvin, Chauve, 
and perhaps Shave. 

CANT. From G. Jcante, a corner, edge, coast. 

CANTER. Same as Chanter and Cantor, no doubt a precentor 
or chanter in a church ; from A. S. cantere, a singer. 

CANTON. Lower renders this name a territorial division or 
district (Fr). Canton is the appellation of four townships in the 
U. S., and is found as a U. S. surname. 

CANTWELL. From some local ending in mile. 

CARD. Lower considers this the same as Caird, which Jamie- 
son renders a gipsy, a travelling tinker, a sturdy beggar. 



14 LUDUS PATKONYMICUS. 

CARELESS. A corruption of Carlos, or its original, Carolus. 

CARRIAGE. See COURAGE. 

CASE. See CHEESE. 

CASEMENT. See CASHMAN. 

CASH. 1. From Cash in Strathmiglo co. Fife. 2. From 
Mac Cash ; or Mac Cosh, Mac Uais. The barony of Moygoish, 
in Westmeath, derived its name from Hy-Mac Uais. [There was 
a Colla Uais, " Colla the noble or well descended."] We have 
also the Gaelic names Coish and Coysh ; whence perhaps the 
name Gush. 

CASHDOLLAR, Barndollar, Barringdollar, Markthaler, and 
Thaler. All found as U. S. names. Bowditch seems to derive 
them from G. thaler, a dollar, but they are rather from some local 
name compounded of G. thai, a valley. Markthaler would there- 
fore signify " one from the Markthal." 

CASHMAN. From O. G. gast-mund, a powerful man (gast, 
potens) ; or from geis-mund, a strong man (gesus, vir fortis). Cf. the 
old German names Adalgis, Gisericus, Vitigis, Wetgisus, &c. It 
may also be from some Scotch name commencing with Mac. If 
the name be of German origin, we may have from it Cheeseman 
and Casement. But see CHEESEMAN. 

CASHMERE. This name and Cashmer are both found in the 
U. S. They are probably from some English local name ending 
in mere or more, from A. S. mcere, a lake, pool, marsh ; or m6r, 
waste land, a moor. 

CAT. From Catherine. 

CATTLE. This may be a diminutive of the surname Cat, for 
Catherine ; or from the Irish name Cahill or Cathail ; from cathal, 
valour. 

CAUDLE. A corruption of Caudwell, from Cauldwell co. 
Derby. 

CHAFF. Probably from Fr. chauve, bald. Lower. 

CHAMPAGNE. From the province of Champagne, in 
France. 






LUDUS PATKONYMICUS. 15 

CHANCE. Originally Chance, i. q. Chauncy, perhaps from 
Chaunceaux, a comm. and town of France, dep. Cote d'Or. 

CHARTER. Lower thinks this name may be derived from the 
town of Chartres, in France. But qu. from Chartre, a comm. and 
town dep. Sarthe. 

CHATAWAY, var. Chattaway, Cattaway. Doubtless the same 
as Hathaway, Hathway, Hadaway, Haduwic ; probably from 0. G., 
hat, high, lofty ; hath, had, chad, war ; wig, strong, warlike, a 
soldier, warrior, hero. Hence the old names Ollovico, Litavicus, 
Merovigus, Ludovicus. 

CHATTING. A patronymic of the name Chad, or from some 
local name compounded of ing, a meadow. Chatt and Chatto are 
surnames, and Chat Moss is the appellation of a district in 
Lancashire. 

CHECK. See CHICK. 

CHEEK. See CHICK. 

CHEESE. Ferguson ranks Cheese, Chase, and Case with Cissa 
(Chissa), king of the S. Saxons, and the Friesic Tsjisse (Chisse), 
a name in use at the present day ; from 0. S. ciasan, ciesen, ciosan, 
A. S. cysan, ceosan, 0. Fries Jciasa, 0. N. Tciosa, to choose ; and he 
thinks Cissa may mean "one chosen or elected." The name 
Chese is found in H. R. 

CHEESEMAN. Lower does not give this name, but " Chees- 
man, a maker of or dealer in cheese, Le Cheseman, Le Chese- 
maker, H. R., analogous to the modern butter-man." He gives 
also Cheesewright and Cheesemonger. The latter is no doubt a 
modern name, but Cheesewright may be compounded of chaise, 
a chair. I find also in Ferguson, Chisman and Chismon, and am 
disposed to derive Cheeseman from 0. G. geis-mund, a strong 
man. See CASHMAN. 

CHEESEWRIGHT. See CHEESEMAN. 

CHERRY. Lower says this name is of Fr. Huguenot origin, 
and said to be descended from the family of De Cheries, seigneurs 
of Brauvel, Beauval, &c., in Normandy ; that Cheris is the name 



16 LUDUS PATRON YMICUS. 

of a place near Avranclies ; and that the name is Latinised De 
Ceraso. There is, however, a parish called Cherry-Hinton co. 
Cambridge. But see SHERRY. 

CHESSMAN. See CHEESMAN. 

CHEW. From Chew Magna, a parish in Somerset. There 
are also Chewstoke and Chewton-Mendip in the same county. 
Lower suggests also Cheux, a village near Caen, in Normandy. 

CHICK. This name may be the same as the French name 
Chicque (Gascon Chicot) and the Spanish name Chico ; from 
chico, little, small. Hence no doubt Check, Cheek, and, as a 
diminutive, the name Chicken. See also Verba Noniinalia, under 
" Chic." 

CHICKEN. See CHICK. 

CHILD (in H. R. Le Child). This name corresponds with the 
German family names Hild, Hilt, and the Danish female Christian 
name Hilda (appellation of one of the maidens of Odin). In 
A. S. names (as in Brunechild, Hildegard, Hiltrut, Adilhilt, 
Reginhilt) child, hilde, &c., are from A. S. did, an infant. In 
German names (as Childeric, Childebert, Hildebrand, Hiltebolt) 
child, hild, means a warrior (bellator, prceliator}, from held, id. 
Hence doubtless the name Child. In some names child, hild, 
means war ; hence hiltiman, a warrior, and the surnames Chill- 
man, Killman, and perhaps sometimes Hillman. In some names 
child, hild, is from alt, noble : hence Hiltiwin, nobilis bellator ; 
Hiltegunt, nobilis virago ; although according to Wachter the 
latter, as a Francic name, may also translate virgo bellatrix, or 
vira belli. 

CHILDREN. Ferguson thinks this name corresponds with an 
O. G. Childeruna for Hilderuna. Both the latter might translate 
" noble friend." See CHILD. 

CHILLMAN. See CHILD. 

CHIN. From Duchene, i. q. Duchesne, Du Cane. Du Quesne, 
" of the oak," " one living near an oak." 

CHIP, CHIPP, i. q. CHEAPE. From some place so called ; 



LUDUS PATRONYM1CUS. 17 

from A. S. ceap, a bargain, sale, business, price ; from ceapian, to 
bargain, chaffer, trade ; whence Cheapside, Chipping Barnet, 
Chipping Norton, Eastcheap, &c. ; hence Chipman, Chapman 
(A. S. ceapman). 

CHIPMAN. See CHIP. 

CHISEL. Ferguson seems to think Chisel, Chessal, and Kis- 
sel diminutives of Cheese, Case, Cissa, Kiss, q.v. There are two 
parishes (great and little) named Chishall in Essex ; and Chisel- 
hampton, Chiselhurst, Chisleborough, Chisledon are local names 
in England. 

CLASS. See GLASS. 

CLAYARD See HAZARD. 

CLEVERLY. See LEGG. 

CLINKARD. See HAZARD. 

CLOAK. If of Cornish origin, from clog, a steep rock, or 
cleggo, a rock, cliff, downfall. Clogg may be the same name. 
Ferguson thinks Cloak and Cloke are from 0. N. klokr, prudent, 
and Clogg from the Mod. Dan. form klog. 

CLOGG. See CLOAK. 

CLOTHIER. See LEATHER. 

CLOUD. From the Gaelic name McCloud, a corruption of 
MacLeod. Hence perhaps the name Clout. 

CLOUT. See CLOUD. 

COAL, L q. COLE, from Nicol or Nichol. Cole is the appella- 
tion of places in cos. Somerset and Wilts. 

COAT. From A. S. cot, cote, cijte (G. koth, D. kot, W. cwt), a 
small house or hut. Hence Middlecoat, Peticoat, Petty coat, 
Taylecoate, Topcoat, Wainscoat, Waiscot, Wescott, Westcoat. 

COCK. This may sometimes refer to the bird (Fr. Le Coq), 
but in composition it is no doubt mostly used in a diminutive 
sense ; thus Alcock or Allcock (Hal for Henry) ; Badcock, Bat- 
cock (Bartholomew) ; Balcock (Baldwin) ; Glasscock (Nicholas) ; 
Hiscock, Hitchcock (Isaac) ; Lovecock, Maycock, Mycock 
(Michael); Slocock, Woolcock. 
/" c 



18 LUDUS PATRON YMICUS. 

COCKLE. A diminutive of the name Cock. Another diminu- 
tive is Cockett (Fr. Cochet), and of patronymics are Cocks, Cox, 
Cocking. 

COFFEE. Lower thinks the names Coffee, Coaffee, Coffey may 
be local, or of common origin with Coffin, Caffin, &c., the root 
being Lat. calvus, bald. Ferguson says, " Coffee I take to be the 
same as Coifi, the name of a converted heathen priest who, on the 
reception of Christianity by the people of Northumbria, under- 
took the demolition of the ancient fanes. It has been asserted 
that this is not an Anglo-Saxon but a Cymric name, and that it 
denotes in Welsh a Druid, but Mr. Kemble has shown that it is 
an adjective formed from cuf, strenuous, and means the bold or 
active one." I take it to be the Irish name O'Cobhthaidh or 
O'Coffey ; from cobhthach, victorious, which O'Reilly says is the 
proper name of a man. Murragh O'Cobhthaidh was Bishop of 
Derry and Raphoe, and lived A. D. 1173. For the latter see 
Annals of the Four Masters. 

COFFIN. The name of one or more medical men. Ferguson 
thinks this name may be corrupted from Kolfinn, from O. N. 
kollr, helmeted, and the proper name Finn ; or that it was 
originally Coffing, a patronymic, formed from cuf, strenuous. 
Lower considers it the same as Colvin or Colvinus, who held 
lands in chief under the Confessor. It may also be the same with 
Caffin, from Fr. chauve, L. calvus, bald ; whence Chauvin or Calvin. 
Coffin and Coffinhal, and Coffinieres or Couffin are found as 
French surnames, and there is a place called Couvin in Belgium, 
and Coffinswell is the name of a parish co. Devon. 

COIN. See QUEEN. 

COLDHAM. From some place compounded of ham, a dwell- 
ing. In surnames and local names the vocables cold, gold, 
wold, wald, wood are " wood." Cf. the surnames Goldham, Cal- 
deron, Goldrun, Waldron. 

GOLDMAN. See GOLDMAN. 

COLLAR. Kollr, Kolli, Koli are the names of several North- 



LUDUS PATKONYMICUS. 19 

men in the Landnamabok, which Ferguson seems to think may 
be from 0. N. kollr, a helmet. I take it that Collar is a cor- 
ruption of Collard, son of Coll, i. e. Nicol. 

COLLARBONE. Lower, with reason, suggests that this sur- 
name may be from Collingbourne co. Wilts. See also SMALL- 
BONE. 

COLLEGE, COLLEDGE. These names have no reference 
to a University. Lower says, in the north of England any court 
or group of cottages having a common entrance from the street 
is called a college. The last syllable however may be from ledge, 
a ridge of rocks near the surface of the sea. Cf. Cumberledge. 
Routledge, &c. 

COLLICK. "Mr. Collick was treasurer of the Middlesex 
Hospital, in England, in 1805 " (BowditcK). " Probably," says 
Lower, "from Colwick co. Nottingham." Ferguson considers 
Collick a diminutive of Cole, Coley, Colla, and the Northern 
names Kollr, Koli, Kolli, found in the Landnamabok ; from A. S. 
col, 0. N. Jcollr, a helmet ; but this name is rather a diminutive 
of Coll, for Nichol, from Nicholas. 

COLT. Ferguson thinks this may be a H. G. form of Gold. 
Lower says it appears in the thirteenth century in its present 
form, and he sees no reason why it should not be derived from 
the animal, especially as Le Colt is found in H. R. He says 
further that the Colts of co. Lanark derive from Blaise Coult, a 
French Huguenot refugee in the sixteenth century. I consider 
it a corruption of Collett, a diminutive of Coll, from Nicoll. 

COMB. From A. S. comb, a low place enclosed with hills, a 
valley (W. cwm). Hence Smallcomb, 

COMELY. See LEGG. 

COMFORT. A Cornish name ; from cum-veor, the great 
valley. 

CONOVER. Name of forty families in the New York Direc- 
tory ; also found in Ohio. From some local name (perhaps 
Condover co. Salop), compounded of over, a bank ; from 

c 2 



20 LUDUS PATRON YM1CUS. 

A. S. q/er, a margin, brink, bank, shore. Hence the surname 
Peckover. 

CONQUEST. From Le Conquet (L. Conquestas), a maritime 
comm. and town of France, dep. Finistere ; or from Conques, a 
small town of France, dep. Aveyron ; or of another, dep. Aude. 

COOL. From Coull, a parish of Scotland co. Aberdeen ; or 
Goole co. York ; or Cole, name of places cos. Wilts and 
Somerset ; or the same as the surname Cooley, Colley, Cowley ; 
or from Cole, for Nicole, Nicol. 

COOT. From Cornish coit, coid, a wood. Cf. the names 
Coode, Code, Goad. 

CORDEROY. Found Corduroy, Cordrey, Cordery, Cowderoy, 
Cowdery, Cowdrey, Cowdray, Cawdrey, Coudray, Coudraie, 
Coudre, Couldery, Couldrey ; from Fr. cuiidraie, a hazel-grove ; 
from coudre, from corylus, a hazel-tree. Lower says the map 
of Normandy exhibits many localities called " Le Coudray, " 
and that there is also an estate called Cowdray, near Midhurst, 
in Sussex ; and he mentions a De Coudray in H. R. Cf. the 
French name Coudrette, signifying a hazel-grove. 

CORK, CORKE. According to some, cork is a term used by 
apprentices and workmen for "master." Ferguson seems to 
think the name Cork may be contracted from Corrick, a diminu- 
tive of Core or Cory. It seems that Core was an ancient Celtic 
personal name, and may be derived from the city of Cork 
(formerly Corkan), or from its root, Ir. core, corcach, a moor, 
marsh. The name Corkett, which would seem to be a diminutive 
of Cork, is a corruption of Caldecott. 
COSTARD. See HAZARD. 

COSTICK. Perhaps the same with Costeker, and the 0. G. 
name Custica, which Ferguson thinks from G. kunst, kust, 0. N. 
konst, skill, art, science ; but it is more probably derived from 
Constantius or Constantine. Costick may also be from Costock 
or Cortlingstock, a parish co. Nottingham. 

COTTON. Forstemann makes Cot, Cotta, Cotuna, Cuotila as 



LTJDUS PATRONYMTCUS. 21 

0. G. names to interchange with god or got ; and Ferguson thinks 
these correspond with our Cott, Cotton, Cottle. The name Cotton 
is probably from Cottun, dep. Calvados, or Cotton, name of 
places in cos. Chester, Stafford, Suffolk, and York. De Cottun 
and De Cotton are found in H. R. 

COUNSELL. From some local name compounded of A. S. 
Sfslj sel, a hall or dwelling (0. N. sel, a summer shed for cattle). 
Counsel!, Countsell are found as U. S. names. 

COUNTERPATCH. Without doubt a corruption of Cum- 
berpatch or Comberbach ; from Comberbach, a township in 
Cheshire. 

COURAGE.' Corrupted from Coulrake ; from the A. S. name 
Ceolric ; or from Coleridge ; from Coleridge, name of a hundred 
and parish co. Devon. Lower thinks Courage may be from Cur- 
rage, a manor in the parish of Cheveley co. Bucks, and he says 
that a family of this name settled here after the revocation of the 
Edict of Nantes. Ferguson compares Courage with the 0. G. 
Gawirich, Goerich, seventh century (0. H. G. gawi, Mod. G. gau, 
a country or district). 
COWARD. See HAZARD. 

COWBRAIN. Lower says this is a known corruption of 
Colbran, Colbrand, a personal name of great antiquity. Fer- 
guson says Colbrand occurs in a charter of 925, and is probably a 
Scandinavian name, and he gives two improbable etymologies. 

CRACKBONE, CRACKBON. Found as U. S. names. See 
SMALLBONE. 

CRAFT. A northern corruption of croft, a little close ad- 
joining a house. Cf. the names Calcraft, Horsecraft, &c. It 
may also sometimes be from A. S. crcefta, a craftsman, or the 
same as the German names Craft, Crafto, Kraft ; probably 
from kraft, strength, force, power. Ferguson mentions an 0. G. 
Crafto as the name of a member of a noble family in the twelfth 
or thirteenth century, and he gives a Ludwig Craft, A. D. 1656. 
CRAM. See GRUMBLE and GRAMMAR. 



22 LUDUS PATRON OIICUS. 

CRAMP. Lower thinks this name may be from Crambe, a 
parish in Yorkshire. I take it to be the same name as Crump. 
See CRUMB. 

CRAVAT. " Mr. and Mrs. Cravat arrived at Boston in Sep- 
tember, 1857 " (BowditcK). Doubtless corrupted from the surname 
Gravatt, Gravett ; probably from the obs. grava, a grove or small 
wood ; grave, a wood, thicket, den, cave ; from A. S. grcef. 

CRAVEN. From Craven, a district of Yorkshire; from W. 
craeg a rock, pen head. 

CREAM. Lower renders Cream " a merchant's booth, a stall 
in a market. Teut. kraem, taberna rerum venalium. Jamieson" 
But see GRUMBLE. 

CRICKET. A diminutive of the name Crick or Creak ; or 
from Cricket, name of two parishes in Somerset. 

CRIMP. According to Halliwell, crimp in Norfolk is used 
for a " dealer in coals." But see CRUMB. 

CRISP. From Crispin. 

CROAK. There are several places in England named Crook 
or Crock, and others compounded thereof; but the name Croak 
may mean crooked or bent ; from Fr. croc, uncus, Med. L. croccus 
(O. Fr. croc defer, a sort of lance ; croque, baton arme d'un croc ; 
Eng. crook, Arm. crocq). Ferguson says Croak is probably from 
0. N. 7tTo/iT (bent or crooked). Lower renders Crocker (Le 
Crockere) a maker of crocs, i. e. earthen jars ; but Crocker, 
Croker, and Croaker may be from the same root as Croak. Cf. 
the names Croake, Croc, Crockett, Crokat, Crook, Crooke, Croke, 
Crookes, Crooks, and the Fr. Ducrocq. 

CROAKER. See CROAK. 

ROOK. See CROAK. 

CROWFOOT. Doubtless the same as Crawford, Crawfurd, 
Craufurd, and Craufuird ; from Crawford, name of two parishes 
in Scotland co. Lanark, and of a parish of England co. Dorset ; 
also the appellation of eight counties in the U. S., and of a town- 
ship New York. But see HAZLEFOOT. 



LUDUS PATRONYMICDS. 

CRUMB. Most probably the same as Crome, Groom, Croome, 
Crum ; from A. S. crumb, crump, crymbig, W. crum, bending, 
concave ; Gael, crbm, bent or bandy-legged ; G. krum, PL D. 
krom, crooked, crumped, curvus. Hence doubtless Groom, 
Groome, Crump, Crimp. 

CUBE. See CUBITT. 

CUBITT. Jamieson gives Cube, Cubbe, as probable abbrevia- 
tions of Cuthbert ; hence perhaps Cubitt ; but this name, as well as 
Cupit, Cupitt, Cobbett, may be a diminutive of Cobb, Copp, Cope, 
O. G. Cobbo, Coppo, Cuppa (whence perhaps, as patronymics, 
Cobbing, Copping, Kopping, Coppin, Coppen, Coppinger, Cop- 
pens, Copas, Copus, Coppard, and the French Copaux, Coppaz, 
Copeau, Copel, Copil, Copin, Coppin, Copinot, Coppeaux) ; from 
A. S. cop, 0. H. G. kopj Mod. G. kopf, D. kop, the head ; 0. Fr. 
cope, copeau, coppe, coupeau, cime, sommet, peage. Cob is also a 
name for the sea-fowl, the sea-cob, and in some parts of England 
for a spider ; from O. D. kop, or koppe, retained in koppespin, 
spinnekop, a spider. Cob is also a close-built strong kind of pony, 
and cob, cop is still used for the top or head. 

CUNNING. Most probably the same name as the German 
Konig, Eng. King. Cf. A. S. cyng, cyning, D. koning. 

CURTAIN. From some local name, perhaps Kirton, name of 
places near Ipswich and Boston, in England ; or from Crediton, 
commonly pronounced Kirton, co. Devon. 

CUSHION. A corruption of MacOssian. It is otherwise 
written Cushin and Cussen, and Anglicised to Cousins, but pro- 
nounced Cuzzen. See Ulster Jour, of Archaeol. No . 2, and LoAver. 
Ferguson thinks Cushion a corruption of Gushing, a patronymic, 
of Cuss, perhaps the same with Kusi, surname of a Northman in 
Ann. Isl. ; from O. N. kusi, a calf, a diminutive of kit, a cow; or 
that Cuss may be from A. S. cusc, pure, clear. 

CUSTARD. See HAZARD. 

CUTBEARD. A corruption of Cuthbert. 

CUTBUSH. SeeTALBOYS. 



24 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

CUTLOVE. See LAW. 

CUTMUTTON. Ferguson thinks this name may be from 
Muatin, an O. G. name (muih, courage), and cuth, known, famous. 
It is much more likely to be corrupted from some local name. 
Catmere is the name of a parish co. Berks, and Catmere-ton would 
easily corrupt to Cutmutton. 

CUTTLE. Lower suggests as a derivation Cuthill or Cuttle, 
a suburb of Prestonpans co. Haddington. The name may also 
sometimes be a diminutive of Cutt, a nickname of Cuthbert. 



D. 



DACE, i. q. DATES. From David. Lower however thinks it 
may come from some continental locality named Ace or Aes with 
the prefix D'. Hence perhaps the name Dais. 

DAILY, DAILEY. See LEGG. 

DAIS. See DACE. 

DAISY, DAISEY. Lower suggests that Daisy may be from 
the ancient barony of Aisie (D'Aisie), now Aisier, arrond. Pont 
Audemer, in Normandy. Dees, or Dease, is an Irish name. The 
tribe of the Deisigh, called also Desii, gave name to Desies,in Ir. 
Deise, an ancient territoiy comprising the greater part of Water- 
tord, with a part of Tipperary. See also Annals of the Four 
Masters. 

DAMPER, i. q. DAMPIER. From Dampierre, name of several 
places in France ; from 0. Fr. dam, dan, don, lord ; Pierre, 
Peter. Cf. Dammartin, i. q. Don Martin, &c., &c. 

DAMSON. From Adamson, son of Adam. Ferguson says 
Damson is the son of Damm ; probably from A. S. dama, a judge. 
Lower says, " Dame's son, but whether the son of Dame, ap- 
parently an old Christian name, or films dominse I know not.'' 

DANCE. Doubtless the same as Dence, Dench, from A. S. 
Danisca, D&nisca, a Dane. 






LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 25 

DANDY. The same as Dendy, found Dendye, Dendy. Dandie, 
Dandy; thought to be originally D'Awnay or Dawndy, which 
Lower thinks is the same as D'Aunai ; and he says there are at 
least seven places called Aunaiin Normandy, one of which, Aunai 
Abbaye, arrond. Vire, was an ancient barony, and from thence 
probably came the family. The name may also be from Dand, 
Dandy, familiarly used in Scotland for Andrew. 

DANGER. From D'Angers, i. e. from Angers, in France, cap. 
of Anjou. Ferguson thinks it may be an inverse of Gordon, from 
Gardene, signifying " Spear-Danes," or " warlike Danes," which 
he says is a common epithet applied to that people in A. S. poetry. 

DARE. Perhaps originally D'Air; from Air, name of two 
towns of France, the one dep. Pas-de-Calais, the other dep. 
Landes ; or from Ayr, in Scotland, cap. co. on the Ayr. It may 
also be the same name as Dear. 

DARK, DARKE. Properly D'Arques. From Arques, a comm. 
and town of France, dep. Seine-Inf., on the Arques. Lower says 
William D'Arques or de Arcis was lord of Folkestone co. Kent, 
temp. William I., having settled in England after the Norman 
Conquest, and that his ancestors were vicomtes of Arques, now a 
bourg and castle four or five miles from Dieppe in Normandy. 

DASH. From D'Ash, or i. q. Tash, from At Ash ; from residence 
near an ash-tree. Hence doubtless the name Dashwood, from 
D'Ashwood, or At Ashwood. Lower says Dashwood would answer 
to the old Latinisation De Fraxineto, a twelfth- century surname, 
with which it is doubtless identical. 

DASHWOOD. See DASH. 

DATE, DATES. See DEATH. 

DAW, DAY. From David. 

DAY. See DAW. 

DAYFOOT. See HAZLEFOOT. 

DAYMAN. Lower says this is a known corruption of Dinan 
(i. e. Dinan, near St. Malo). It may also be the same as Dayment ; 
perhaps from Dagomund, from O. G. dag-mund, a soldier. 



26 LUDUS PATRONYMIC US. 

DEADMAN. Lower says this is a known corruption of 
Debenham (co. Suffolk), and that in Sussex it is further corrupted 
to Deadly. 

DEALCHAMBER. A corruption of the name Delachambre 
or De la Charabre. 

DEARLOVE. See LAW. 

DEARTH. Perhaps from De Arth, i. e. from Arth, Switzerland 
(but see EARTH). Bowditch says Mr. Derth figures in the Direc- 
tory (New York) of 1835 ; and that Mr. Dearth, of a neighbouring 
county, after enduring his name for many years, was at last 
induced to change it, and that a law student at Harvard is named 
Dearth. 

DEATH. Properly D'Aeth, still an English name, and said to 
be from Aeth, in Flanders. This may refer to Ath, a fortified 
town of Belgium, prov. Hainault. The name D'ath is found in the 
U. S. There is a surgeon and also an undertaker named Death. 
"At the Liverpool Police-court, on Friday, the witnesses and 
solicitor in two cases bore the ominous names of Death, Debt, 
and Daggers " (Morning Star). One family of the name of H. E. 
Death, having an objection to the name, changed it to Edeath. 
The U. S. names Date and Datt and the English name Dates may 
be derived from Death, D'Aeth, or D'Ath. 

DECENT. Perhaps the same as Dasent, which, if not an 
Irish name, may be from 0. G. degen-send, a war-messenger 
(degen, en sis, gladius). 

DEED, DEEDS. Doubtless for Daid, Daids ; from David, 
Davids. There is also a Deedy. The Messrs. Deed of Toronto 
and of Philadelphia (says Bowditch) may be regarded as the 
representatives of conveyancing. 

DEEPROSE. See DIPROSE. 

DEMON. Doubtless from the Fr. name Du Mont. Perhaps 
sometimes from Dayman, q. v. 

DEUCE. Probably a corruption of D'Ewes, descended from 
Des Ewes ; from des Eaux, synomym of the English Waters. 






LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 27 

DEVIL. Lower mentions a monk named Willelmus cogno- 
mento Diabolus ; but he seems to think this name may be from 
the French De Ville, commonly written Divall, Divoll, Devall, 
&c., and in records Devol, Devile, Deyvil, &c. I am inclined to 
think the name to be the same with D'Eyville ; from de Davidis 
villa ; but see Cowell's Interpreter. 

DEW. Probably from Eu, in Normandy, commonly called la 
Ville d'Eu. Lower. 

DIAL. Supposed corruption of the Irish Doyle, found in Eng- 
land as Doyle and Doil. According to Mr. Bowditch, there is a 
Mr. Dial living at Davenport, Iowa. 

DIAMOND. In the parish register of Brenchley, co, Kent, 
there is an entry to the effect that in 1612 " John Diamond, son 
of John du Mont the Frenchman, was baptised." The elder Du 
Mont was a Kentish ironmaster, who had settled in that county 
from France. Inf. H. W. Diamond, M.D., F.S.A. Lower. 

DIAPER. From D'Ypres, i. e. from Ypres, in Belgium. 
Hence the figured linen cloth and the towel or napkin so called. 

DINE. Found Dyne, but Dine is the most ancient. In H. R. 
it is De Dine, and it is probably derived from locality ; perhaps 
from Digne (.Di'm'a), a walled town of France, cap. dep. B. Alpes. 

DIPROSE. Said to be a corruption of De Preaux ; from 
Preaux, the name of several places in Normandy. It has been 
corrupted to Deeprose. 

DIVES. Not from the Dives of Scripture, although we 
certainly have the names Rich, La Rich, Le Riche. It seems 
to be from Dives, a comm. and town of France, dep. Calvados, on 
the right bank of a river of the same name. De Dyve and Le 
Dyve are found in H. R., and Uxor Boselini de Dive was a tenant 
in capite under William the Conqueror, co. Cambridge. 

DOE, DOO. From the ancient family of De Ou or D'Eu, from 
Eu, in Normandy. Hence the surnames Eu, Ew, and Ewe. 

DOLL. Ferguson seems to think this name may be from 0. N. 
doll, a woman, or A. S. dolh, a wound. In H. R. the name is found 



LUDUS PATRON YMICUS. 

written Doll, Dolle, De Doll, and is doubtless from Dol, the 
picturesque town in Bretagne, or from Dole in Tranche Comte. 

DOLLAR. From Dollar, a town and parish in Clackmannan - 
shire. 

DOLPHIN. Ferguson thinks Dolphin the 0. N. dolgfinner, the 
Doltin of early English history. Lower says it is an ancient 
personal name, and that one Dolfin was a tenant-in-chief in cos. 
Derby and York at the making of Domesday, and that the family 
were in Ireland before 1307. It may however be the same as 
Godolphin. 

DONE. Name of a celebrated Cheshire family ; from W. dwn, 
dun, dusky, swarthy. Donne, Dunn, and Done are etymologi- 
cally connected. 

DOUBLE. Same as Doubble, Doubell, Doble, Dobell, De 
Dobel, and the Norman name Dobbell ; from some local name 
ending in mile. 

DOUBLEDAY. See SINGLEDAY. 

DOWER. The Prompt. Parv. renders the word dower a rab- 
bit's burrow, cvniculus. The name is more probably from Dower 
in Crowan, or Dower Park in St. Kew, both in Cornwall ; from 
Corn, dower, dour, water. 

DRAWWATER. Bowditch says Thomas Drawwater, of New 
Haven, was fined in 1688 for drinking. The name in H. R. is 
found written Drawater, and is most probably derived from some 
local name. 

DRAY. See DROUGHT. 

DRINK. Perhaps the same as the name Dring ; said to be 
from A. S. dreng, a soldier, a strong man. See Lye (A. S. Diet.) 
Hence perhaps the name Drinkard ; from G. hart, strong. 

DRINKARD. See DRINK. 

DROUGHT. This name may be corrupted from Drewett, 
Druitt ; perhaps diminutive of Drew, Drewe, Dray ; either from 
the early personal name Drogo, or from Dreux, in Bretagne. 
Drewett may also sometimes be a diminutive formed from 






LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 29 

Andrew. Lower says Drew, Drewe is a common nickname for 
Andrew. 

DULHUMPHRY. From some French name, with the prefix 
De or De la. Onfray and Onfroy, Humphrey are found in Firmin 
Didot. There are the surnames Umfraville and Amfreville (found 
Onfreville), i. e. Hunfredi villa, the appellation of. several places 
in Normandy. 

DULL. Bowditch says there are fourteen families of this 
name in Philadelphia. It may be from Dull, a large parish co. 
Perth. 

DULLARD. According to Bowditch, there are four families 
of this name in Philadelphia. See HAZARD. 

DULY. See LEGG. 

DUNNING. A patronymic of the name Dunn ; or the last 
syllable may be ing, a meadow. 



E. 



EARLY. From Early, in the parish of Sonning, Berks. 
Hurley is also the name of a villa, near Marlow, same co. But 
see LEGG. 

EARTH. From St. Erth, formerly St. Earth, a parish in 
Penwith Hundred co. Cornwall ; or corrupted from the surname 
Earith ; from Erith co. Kent. 

EARWAKER, EARWICKER. Perhaps corrupted from 
Her wig ; from 0. Gr. er-wig, strong in war ; or her-wig, noble or 
distinguished warrior. Lower however gives Eureuuacre as the 
name of a tenant in Devon mentioned in Domesday. 

EASY. Corrupted from some local name, perhaps Esse, in 
France, dep. Ille-et-Vilaine ; or from St. Issey, in Cornwall. 
Lower suggests also that it may come, by transposition of letters, 
from Esay, the old form of Isaiah. 



30 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

EATWELL. From Etwall, a parish co. Derby ; or perhaps 
rather from the local name Hatfield. See HATFALL. 

EAVESTAFP. See WAGSTAFF. 

EGG, EGGS. From 0. G. ecke, the'edge or point of a weapon, 
&c. (acies, cuspis); 6. K egg, an edge, sword, war, battle; A. S. 
ecg, an edge, or sharpness applied to the mind, also quickness, 
ability. There is however a De Egge in H. R., co. Salop ; and 
the name may therefore be the same as Hedge, Hague, Haig, 
Haigh (Haigh, a township of Lancashire) ; from A. S. hag, Fr. 
haie, a hedge, and that which it encloses, a field or park. 

EGGBEER. From Egbert, G. Eggbrecht ; from 0. G. ecke- 
brecht, distinguished for quickness or ability. Cf. Huber, from 
Hubert. But see EGG. 

ELEMENT. Lower says of this name, "Possibly a corruption 
of Alihermont, a district containing several parishes in the arron- 
dissemont of Dieppe, in Normandy. Alihermont would readily 
become Alermont, Alemont, Element." I derive it from the 
same root as the name Almond, q. v. Cf. Garment, from Gar- 
mund ; Raiment, from Raymond. 

EMBLEM. From some place compounded of ham, a dwelling. 
Cf. the surname Embleton, also the appellation of parishes, &c., 
in cos. Cumberland, Durham, and Northumberland. 

EMMET, EMMETT. Ferguson says Ernes corresponds with 
A. S. earn, an uncle ; and Emms, Hems, Emson, and the diminu- 
tives Emmens and Emmet, with the old Fries, em, of the same 
meaning. They are more probably from Em or Emm, an abbre- 
viation of Emma or Emily. 

ESSENCE. The name of a black man in the U.S. It may 
come from Assens, a maritime town of Denmark, isl. Fiihnen ; 
or from Hessen (Cassel, Darmstadt, Homburg, &c.), in Germany. 

EVEN. From Evan ; from Iwavvijf, the original of John. 

EVENESS. Doubtless the same as the W. name Evans. It 
may also come from some local name compounded of ness, a 
promontory. 



LUDUS PATKONYMICUS. 31 

EVERHARD. See VERY. 

EVERY. See VERY. 

EVIL. The same as Eyvile, Eyvill, which with the prefix de 
occurs in the H. R. See DEVIL. 

EWE. See DOE. 

EXCELL. Most probably the same as Exall ; from Exhall, 
name of two parishes co. Warwick. 

EXPENCE. A corruption of the names Spence or Spens. 
Lower says spence is a yard or enclosure ; Jamieson renders 
spens, the place where provisions are kept, and also the clerk of a 
kitchen ; and Lower says, in the latter sense it is employed by 
Wyntoun, and that Spens is an ancient surname in Scotland. 
But see SPENCER. 

EYE, EYES. From Eye, a town and parish co. Suffolk ; or 
Eye, the name of parishes cos. Hereford and Northampton. 



F. 



FAGG (in H. R. Fag). See FIG. 

FAIL. From Phail, Gaelic for Paul. Hence MACPHAIL. 

FAIRCLOTH. A corruption of Fairclough ; from Dan. faar 
a sheep, dough a cleft in a hill, also a narrow ravine or glen. 

FAIRFEATHER. See MERRYWEATHER. 

FAIRFIELD. From Fairfield, appellation of places in cos. 
Derby, Kent, Lancaster, and of eleven local names in the U. S. 
The name means sheep-field ; from Dan./aar, a sheep. 

FAIRLAMB. Lower thinks this is from some local name 
ending in ham. It may also be from one ending in Ian. If 
we could suppose a Scand-Celtic compound (faar-lari), the name 
would mean the sheep enclosure. There is, however, a parish 
called Farlan, Cumberland. 

FAIRPLAY. See PLAYFAIR. 

FAIRWEATHER. See MERRYWEATHER. 



32 LUDUS PATKONYMICUS. 

FALL, also Faw, Faa, a celebrated G-ipsy name in the north 
of England ; also found in the London Directory. It is probably 
from locality, as in H. R. we find De Fall. 

FANCY. Doubtless from locality ; some think from Vanchi, 
near Neufchatel, in Normandy. 

FAREWELL. From Farewell, a parish co. Stafford, known 
by the curious designation of Farewell-with-Charley ! The last 
syllable is most probably from ville, and the name may mean the 
" sheep dwelling." See FAIRFIELD. 

FARTHING. This may be the same as Farden, and of local 
origin. " Fardan," says Lower, " occurs as an undertenant in 
Domesday." 

FATHERLY. See LEGG. 

FAWN. The same as Fawnes and De Fawnes ; from Fawns, 
in Northumberland. 

FEAR. The same as Fare (Mac Fare), Phear, Phair, Phaire, 
Phayer, Phairs ; from Gael, fear, a man, hero. It may also some- 
times be from A. S./o#er, fair ; or/ara, 0. N./an, a traveller. 

FEARMAN. See PHARAOH. 

FEARWEATHER. See MERRYWEATHER. 

FEATHER. This name may be from Ice.fridr, A. S.freothe, 
freotho, liberty, peace, love; or from G. frith herr, a protecting 
lord ; but I should rather derive from Feodore, i. e. Theodore. 
Ferguson considers Feather the same with Father, G. Vater, cor- 
responding as it does very nearly with a north of England pronun- 
ciation, as also with feeler, one of the A. S. forms. The name 
Fearby, in Yorkshire, was in Domesday Federbi. Featherstone 
is the appellation of places in cos. Northumberland, Stafford, and 
York ; doubtless from the A. S. name Frithestan, whence pro- 
bably Featherstonhaugh. 

FELON. A U. S. name. Most probably a corruption of 
Fallen, which is also found in the States. Ferguson connects 
Fallon with Fail, and thinks the latter may be from O. N./eiZa, 
pudere ; and the former from feilinn, pudibundus. Fallon is 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 33 

rather from the Irish name O'Fallon, said to be a corruption of 
OThelan ; from Faolan, whose son Mothea was at Clontarf 
in 1014. A district in Roscommon was known as O'Fallon's 
country. O'Connellan gives the O'Faolains or O'Felans, or 
Whelans, among the Irish chiefs and clans of Desies. 

FEVER. From 0. Fr. Lefevre, "the smith." Cf. the U. S. 
names Favor, Lefever, Lefevre, Lefebre, Lefavour, Lefavor. 

FIFE, var. Fyfe and Fyffe, from co. Fife, Scotland. 

FIGG. "A Feg occurs in Yorkshire ante 1086, Domesday, 
and a Figge in Kent, 31 Edw. III. In the latter county, at a 
later period, the Figgs, Faggs, and Foggs flourished contem- 
poraneously, and may have had a common origin ; and other 
kindred forms are Fig, Figes, Figgs, &c." Lower. All these 
names are through the 0. Fr., from L. fagus, a beech-tree. 
Hence also several other French names ; as Fay, Be la 
Fayette, &c. 

FILBERT. The same as the 0. G. name Filiberthus (Philo- 
bertus) ; from viel brecht, very renowned ( prseclarus) . Wachter 
renders viel in composition, weit and laut. 

FILL. See FILLPOT. 

FILLPOT, PHILPOT. A diminutive of Philp from Philip. 
Philpot was the name of a gardener at Highgate, Middlesex, and 
there is a publican at Hammersmith named Phillpott. From the 
first part of the name are Fill and Filkin, and from the last 
syllable, Pot, Pott, Potts. 

FINCH. See WINCH. 

FIPPENY. See PENNY. 

FIRKIN. A diminutive of some Christian name, or of the 
name Phear, or Fear. Ferguson thinks it may be from A. S. 
fir-cyn, race of man, which is absurd. 

FISH. From A. S. fiscere, a fisher (fisherman). Ferguson 
says Fisk and Fish signified a salmon-fisher. 

FLASHMAN. A corruption of the name Flaxman, a dresser 
of flax, or a spinner. Lower, under " Flashman," says "flashes 

D 



34 LUDUS PATKONYMICUS. 

is a word proverbially applied to flood-gates, and that the flash- 
man probably had the care of such gates." 

FLATMAN. From A. S.flotmann, a sailor. "One Floteman 
was an undertenant in Yorkshire before the compilation of 
Domesday." 

FLOAT. From A. S./dta, a sailor. It may also sometimes 
be local ; for, as Lower says, " an Hampshire family wrote them- 
selves De Flote." La Flotte is the name of a comm. and seaport 
town of France, dep. Charente-Inf. 

FLOCK. Perhaps from Floques, near Eu, in Normandy. 
Flockton is the name of a place in Yorkshire. 

FLOOD, i. q. FLOYD, LLOYD. Andrew Borde, in his Boke of 
Knowledge, makes a Welshman say, "I am a gentylman and come 
of Brutus blood ; my name is Ap Pyce, Ap Davy, Ap Flood." 

FLUX. A corruption of Fulkes, Foulkes, Folkes, Fullicks, 
Faulks, Foalkes, Folkes, Fowkes ; from A. S. folc, folk ; G./ofc, 
volk, people, nation, perhaps also used in the sense of " re- 
nowned." Cf. the G. names Fulco, Folcho, Folca, Folchold, 
Folcwar, Folcmar, Folcrim, Folcwin, Folcrad, Folcharat, Folchard, 
Eng. Folkard, Fr. Foucard. Flux might also come from Floques, 
in Normandy. See FLOCK. 

FLY. " A place near Gournay, in Normandy, once famous for 
its great Abbey. It was anciently called Flagi, Chron. of Battel 
Abbey, p. 49." Lower. 

FOLLY. Doubtless the same as Foley ; from the local name 
Foley, anciently Fowleigh. 

FORCE (Fr. De la Force). From force (Dau./ors, 0. N. id.), 
in the north of England, a waterfall or cascade. Hence the sur- 
name Wilberforce, formerly Wilberfosse, from Wilberfoss co. 
York, named from one Williber, or Williberg. 

FORT. From Fr. fort, strong, powerful. Cf. the French 
Le Fort. 

FORTUNE. 1. From Fortunatus. 2. From Fortune co. Had- 
dington. 



LUDUS PATRON YMICUS. 35 

FORTY, FORTYE. From Fuerty, a parish of Ireland, 
Connaught ; or from forty, used by the Scottish poet 
Douglas in the sense of brave. Hence perhaps the name 
Fortyman. 

FORTYMAN. See FORTY. 

FOULFOOT. See HAZLEFOOT. 

FOULLY. See LEGG. 

FOULWEATHER. See MERRYWEATHER. 

FOURAPENNY. See PENNY. 

FOXWORTHY. A U. S. name. See WORTH. 

FREAK. The same as Fricke and Fricker ; from H. S. 
fricca, a preacher. According to Dr. Doran, the word freak, a 
whim or fancy, was derived from the caprices of a Dr. Freake, of 
St. Bartholomew's. 

FREELOVE. Lower gives a H. R. name Frelove, and an A. S. 
name Frealaf. But see LAW. 

FREELY. See LEGG. 

FRESHFIELD. See FRETWELL, 

FRETWELL. From Fritwell, a parish co. Oxon. Camden 
however thinks it a corruption of the Norman De Fresheville 
(Latinised De Frisca-villa) . From the latter we have Freshville, 
and perhaps Freshfield. 

FRIENDLY. See LEGG. 

FRIENDSHIP. A Devonshire name. See HOPE. 

FROM. A name found in the U. S. ; perhaps from Frome in 
Somerset, or Froome in Dorset (England). 

FROST. 1. From the surname Forest, Forrest. 2. From the 
German or Swiss name Fiirst ; from furst, a prince. One Alwin 
Forst was a tenant in co. Hants before Domesday, and Frosti is 
the name of a dwarf in the Scandinavian mythology. 

FRY. 1. From Humphry. 2. Perhaps sometimes from Cor- 
nish fry, a promontory ; literally a nose. 

FUEL, i. q. FUGGLE, FOWELL, FOWLE. From A. S. 
fug el, a fowl, bird. 

D 2 



36 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

FULBORN. From Fulbourne co. Cambridge. But see SMALL- 
BONE. 

FULLALOVE. See LAW. 

FULSOM. A U. S. name ; from root of Fulham (Middlesex) ; 
from/ugl's-ham, the bird's dwelling. 

FUNK, FUNKE. Found as U. S. names. They may be 
corrupted from Fulnecks, a village of England, co. York, or Ful- 
neck or Fulik, a town of Moravia, circ. Prerau. 

FUNNELL. Lower thinks this name may be a corruption of 
Fontenelle, now St. Wandrille-sur-Seine, in Normandy, an ancient 
barony, and the site of a famous monastery, near Carrdebec, and 
that the corruption may have taken place thus : Fontenelle, 
Fonnell, Funnell. 

FURNACE. From Furnace, a village co. Argyle ; or Furness, 
a manorial liberty in the north-west part of Lancashire ; or Furnes, 
a town of Belgium, prov. W. Flanders. Cf. the surnames Furnice, 
Fourniss, Fourness, Furnese, Furness, Furniss. There is also a 
Furneaux, from Fourneaux-sur-Vire, in Normandy. 



G. 



GAB. See GABY. 

GABLE. See GABY. 

GABY. Probably a nickname of Gabriel. Hence no doubt 
Gab, Gabb, Gabay, Gable, Gabel, Gabell. 

GAILY. SeeLEGG. 

GAIN. From the name Eugaine, which gave appellation to 
Colne Eugaine, commonly called Gain's Colne, a parish in Essex ; 
doubtless from Enghien in the Pays Bas, anciently Anguien or 
Enguien, in Lat. Angia. Gane, Gaines, Gainey are doubtless 
from the same root. 

GALE. Lower says Gale signifies a Scottish Highlander, but 
that the Gaels of Charlton-Kings co. Gloucester, have written 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 37 

themselves, at various periods, Galle, Gale, Gael, and originally 
De Gales. This may either refer to Calais or Wales, which latter, 
in Anglo-Norman times, was known as Galles or Gales. In 
local compounds the vocable hall is often corrupted to gale. 

GALLIARD. See HAZARD. 

GALLON. Bowditch says, "In 1844 one Joseph Galliano 
died in Boston, and in our Probate Records he has the alias of 
Joseph Gallon, that having been his popular name." Lower 
gives the H. R. forms " Galien, Galiun, Galion, Galun, and 
Galeyn." Said Joseph may have been from Galliano, a village 
of N. Italy, not far from Como ; but the English name may be 
from Galien, a parish of Ireland, Leinster ; or Galloon, Ulster, 
co. Fermanagh ; or Gaillan, Gaillon, two comms. and towns of 
France, one dep. Gironde, the other dep. Eure. 

GALLOP. See HOPE. 

GALLOWS. Perhaps i. q. Hallows, from Hallow, a parish in 
Worcester, or i. q. Callow, from Callow co. Hereford ; or Callow 
co. Derby. The A. S. calo is bald. 

GAMBLE. Lower says, " Gam el occurs both in Domesday 
and in the H. R. In the latter * Fitz Gamel' is also found. A. S. 
gamol or gamel, old, aged Gamblesby, in Cumberland, pro- 
bably derived its name from a Danish proprietor." Gamla is the 
name of a town of Finland. Gamble may however be corrupted 
from the name Gumboil, q. v. 

GAMBLING. Probably of local origin, and doubtless the 
same as the H. R. Gamelin, De Gameling. Gamlin-gay is the 
name of a parish co. Cambridge. 

GAME. See WALKINGHA.ME. 

GAMMON. From Gaelic ma-ghamuim, a bear; from magh- 
ghabhuin, literally a calf of the plain. 

GANDER. Some derive this name from the bird. Grimm 
also refers the name of the great Vandal chief Genseric to 
g'dnserich, a gander. Gander is more probably from 0. TS.gandr, 
a wolf. Gandr occurs as a surname in the Landnamabok. 



38 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

GARLICK, i. q. the German name Gerlach ; from ger-leich, 
lich, warlike. 

GARMENT. The same name as Garman, Gorman, Jarman, 
German, Jermain ; from the 0. G. name Garmund (0. H. G. 
Germunt ; in the Landnamabok, Geirmundr) ; from ger-mund, a 
defence in war. Hence, perhaps, by inverson the name Manger. 

GEM. A U. S. name. Another form of Jem, nickname for 
James. From Jem we have, as a diminutive, Jemmett. 

GENDER. Perhaps the same as Gander, q.v. Ferguson says 
Gender corresponds with a Mod. G. Genther, compounded of 
here, an army. 

GHERKEN, GERKEN. For Jerkin, a diminutive of Jere- 
miah. Ferguson says Gerken corresponds with a G. Gherken, 
which he classes with the 0. H. G. Gericho, Mod. G. Gericke, 
Gehrke, Gerke, and derives from A. S. gar a spear, 0. N. geir, 
0. S. and 0. Fries, ger. 

GIDDY. An ancient Cornish family, formerly written Gedy, 
Geddey, Gidey, &c. Possibly a nurse name of Gideon. Lower. 

GILDERSLEEVES (in U. S. Gildersleeve, in H. R. Gyldene- 
sleve). An Irish name derived from some local name compounded 
of sliabh (pronounced sleeve), a mountain, moor. 

GILL. A U. S. name. Contracted from Gillet for Willet, a 
diminutive of Will for William. 

GIN. This surname may be from one of the Scottish names 
Mac Gin, Mac Ginn, Mac Genn, Mac Gane, Mac Geehan, Mac 
Giehan, Mac Geachan. Lower thinks Ginn, Gin, may be the 
same as Genn with the G. softened ; and he says the latter is 
Cornish, and is considered to be from the root of Planta-^ew-ista. 

GINGER. From A. S. gingra, a younger, disciple ; from ging, 
young, tender. 

GIRL. Same as Garle, which Ferguson thinks may be another 
form of Carl. It may also be the same as the 0. G. Gerlo, fern. 
Gerla, which he considers diminutives of Gero and Gera, from 
ger, a spear. 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 39 

GLASS. 1. From Glass, a parish in cos. Aberdeen and Banff. 
2. From Nicholas. Cf. Class and the German Glaus ; whence 
Clause, Clausse, Claussen, Classen. 3. From Gael, glas, grey, 
blue, green ; found in Ir., W., Armor., and Corn. 

GLASSCOCK. See GLASS. 

GLAZARD. See HAZARD. 

GLISTER. 1. The same as Glaister. 2. For Lister; from 
the old word lytster or litster, a dyer ; or from listre, a person 
employed to read some portions of the church service. Webster 
renders " lister," " one who makes a list or roll." 

GOAD. See GOAT. 

GOAT. From Corn, goed, a wood. Hence, perhaps, Goad 
and Gout. 

GODSON. See GOODSON. 

GODSPENNY. See PENNY. 

GOLD, i. q. GOLDE, and the Goldus of Domesday; also Waldie, 
Waldo ; from G. wald, a wood, or 0. G. wait, powerful, governing, 
ruling ; also a prefect. 

GOLDHAM. See COLDHAM. 

GOLDMAN. From G. wald-man, woodman. Hence, by cor- 
ruption, Goldman. See GOODMAN. 

GOLIGHTLY. See LEGG. 

GOLLOP. See HOPE. " The Gollops of Strode co. Dorset 
have a tradition of Danish or Swedish descent from a soldier of 
fortune who was living in 1465. B. L. G." Lower. 

GOOD. For Wood. 

GOOD AIR. See GOODYEAR. 

GOODALE. The same as Woodhall ; from Woodhall, name 
of a parish co. Lincoln, and of places in several counties. 

GOODBEER. See GOODYEAR. 

GOODBEHERE. See GOODYEAR. 

GOODBOYS. From some Fr. local name ending in bois, a 
wood. 
GOODCHAP. See GOODCHEAP. 



40 LUDUS PATRON TMICUS. 

GOODCHEAP (in H. R. Godchep). From some local name 
ending in cheap (See CHIP). Hence Goodchap and Goodsheep. 

GOODENOUGH. From some local name, perhaps originally 
Woodknowe, compounded of knowe, a Scotticism equivalent to 
knoll, the top or crown of a hill; but more generally a little 
round hill or mount, a small elevation of earth ; from A. S. cnoll, 
knol, W. cnol. Cf. the name Oldknow. 

GOODFELLOVV. For Woodfellow; from A. S. wuda-felaw, 
a wood companion or follower. 

GOODGROOM. See GOODRUM. 

GOODHEART. Same as Woodward, an officer of the 
wood or forest ; or from Goddard, Goddart, " one strong in 
God." 

GOODLAKE. Same as the surname Woodley, name of 
parishes and places in co. Devon, &c. &c. Hence Goodluck. 

GOODLUCK. See GOODLAKE. 

GOODMAN. 1. The same as Woodman. 2. From the 0. G. 
and A. S. baptismal name Gudmund, " powerful in war." 

GOODRAM. See GOODRUM. 

GOODRUM. Ferguson thinks this name may be a corruption 
of Gothrun or Guthrum ; from guth war, ormr a serpent ; and he 
says Gothrun or Guthrum was the name of the Danish king who 
was baptised by Alfred. It may also be from G. wald-ram, strong 
or powerful prince ; or from Goldrun (Waldron, Calderon) ; from 
wald-run, a powerful friend. Hence the names Goodram, Good- 
groom. 

GOODSHEEP. See GOODCHEAP. 

GOODSIR. Name of a celebrated Scotch anatomist, lately 
deceased. It was perhaps originally Woodseer, one who super- 
intends a wood. Cf. Landseer, which Lower renders " one who 
overlooks or superintends lands for another, a bailiff." 

GOODSON. From the parish of Gooderstone, commonly 
Goodson, co. Norfolk ; from wood and ton. Hence doubtless the 
name Godson. 



LUDUS PATKONYMICUS. 41 

GOODWILL. A corruption of Woodville ; perhaps from Wood- 
ville, near Burton-on-Trent. See also WOODFALL. 

GOOD WINE, GOODWIN. 1. From Godwin, Godwine, " be- 
loved of God "=Theophilus. 2. Same as Goldwin, i. e. Waldwin, 
which may translate both " victorious prince," and " powerful 
friend." 

GOODYEAR. Another form of Woodyer, a woodman. This 
name has been corrupted to Goodair, Goodbeer, and Goodbehere. 

GOOSE. From Corn, gus, a wood. It may sometimes be the 
same with Goss, Gosse, Gass. [There is a Gas in the Landnama- 
bok.] Graff suggests that Goz in 0. G. names is another form of 
Gaud, which is most probably Goth ; to which Forsteman refers 
the 0. G. names Gauso, Gozzo, Gossa, Mod. G. Gause and Goss. 
(See Furguson.) Gas, Gass, Gasse, Gas, Casse may sometimes be 
from Cassandra ; or even from the Dan. gasse, a gander. 

GOOSEMAN. Same as Guzman, Gudmund ; from 0. G, gunt- 
mund, A. S. guth-mund, a warrior. 

GOOSEY. From Goosey, a tithing in the parish of Stanford- 
in-the-vale, Berks. 

GORE. Same as Gower, Goar, Gover ; from Guyr (Gower), in 
Wales, signifying " sloping." Archd. Williams translates gover 
a small stream, and the W. gower is a croft, close ; and gofwr, 
govwr, a strong mound or tower. Verstegan says the name Gower 
is derived from a kind of cake formerly made for children ! 

GOTOBED. Mr. Fox Talbot derives this name from O. G. 
Gott-bet, " Pray to God." Lower gives a Gotobedd and a Gote- 
bedde, and thinks the name may have been given as a sobriquet 
to people more than ordinarily attached to their couch ; and he 
says a similar collocation of words forming a surname occurs in 
the H. R. ; viz., Serlo Go-to-Jcirke. The whole name may be from 
guth-beada, a war counsellor ; or the last part from A. S. boda, a 
messenger. It may also be a compound of two names. Obed is 
a surname at the present day. Cf. Meyerbeer, from Meyer Beer. 

GOUT. See GOAT. 



42 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

GOWN. For Gowan, from Gael, gobhainn, a blacksmith. 

GEAIN, GRAINE, GRANE. From Grain in Kent. 

GRAMMAR. This may be the same as the ancient name 
Grimar ; perhaps from 0. N. gramr, gri?nr, fierce, or grajnr, a king. 
Cf. the surnames Grimm, Graimm, Graeme, Gream, Gryme, 
Graham, &c. The W. gnjmus is powerful, strong, nervous ; grym, 
force, energy, powerful : the Brit, grym, force, energy, power, 
strength : the Gael, grim, griom, war, battle ; gruaim, a gloom, a 
frown or surly look; gruamcij surly, stern, morose; gruaimean, a 
surly man, a man with a frowning visage ; groimh, a grin, a visage, 
a nickname for one with a grinning countenance. The O. G. 
grimm is rigid, vehement, intense anger, furor, cruelty : G. id. 
furious, grim : the A. S. grim, fierce, rough, ferocious ; gram, 
raging, fury ; gremian, to provoke : the D. gram, angry ; grimmen, 
to growl : the Dan. grim, stern, grim, peevish ; gram, grudging, 
hating, peevish. 

GRASS. This name means fat, stout ; from Fr. gras. 

GRAVELLY. A U. S. name, same as Graveley ; from Grave- 
ley, name of parishes cos. Herts and Cambridge. But see also 
LEGG. 

GREENLAW. From Greenlaw co. Berwick. See LAW. 

GREENSWORD. See LONGSWORD. 

GRIEF. Same as Grieve, Greive ; from A. S. gerefa (G. graf), 
a bailiff, a reeve. 

GRIFFIN". Said to have been early used to designate a 
Welshman. 

Godefray of Garlekhithe, and Gryffyn the Walshe. 

Piers Ploughman, ed. Wright, p. 96. 

Another orthography of Griffith. Lower says it is a common 
baptismal name in Wales, and that Domesday shows a Grifin 
in Cornwall, and in Cheshire a Grifin Rex, first a favourite of 
Edward the Confessor, and afterwards a rebel against him. See 
also Notes and Queries, 3rd S. xi. 504. 

GRIFFINHOOFE. A German name introduced into England 



LUDUS PATRONTMICUS. 43 

by one of the physicians of Geo. I. Mr. Fox Talbot says one 
might suppose this to be from the G. grafcn-hof, implying some 
person attached to the court of a count, if there had not existed 
a German family name Greifenklau, or the Griffin's claw ; and 
Lower says, " In mediaeval poems, &c., many references to griffins' 
claws are found. In ' Ruodlieb ' the hero wears, apparently, a hunt- 
ing horn made of such a talon. ' Pendet et a niveo sibimet gripis 
ungula collo.' " The name probably means the " count's yard or 
court." 

GRILLARD. See HAZARD. 

GRIMM. See GRAMMAR. 

GRINDALL. A chapelry in Yorkshire. 

GROOM. See CRUMB. 

GROUSE. There was an 0. G. Grauso, of the sixth century, 
which Forstemann refers to A. S. greosan, horrere ; but this name 
is the same with Grose, Gross, implying great, big in stature ; 
from Fr. gros, L. crassus. 

GRUMBLE. A corruption of the old Frankish name Grim* 
bald ; from grim-laid, fierce and bold ; or the same name as the 
O. H. G. Rumbold, Mod. G. Rumpolt ; from hruom-bold, famously 
bold. 

GUESS. A corruption of the surname Guest. 

GUESSARD. See HAZARD. 

GUISE. Erom Guise, a comm. and town of France, dep. 
Aisne, probably deriving its name from its situation on the Ouse, 
found anciently written Gusia and Gusgia. 

GUM. The same as Gumm, Gomm, the 0. G. Goma, a Dan. 
Gummi in Saxo, a U. S. Gumma [Gommo, Gummoe, Gummow 
are found in Cornwall]. From A. S. guma, Goth, id., 0. H. G. 
goniOj 0. Eng. obs. gom, a man. 

GUMBOIL. Corrupted from the 0. G. name Gumpold or 
Gundbold ; from gund-bold, bold in war. Cf. the old German 
names Gontharis, Guntharis, Giinther, Gundericus, Gundemundus, 
Guntramnus. 



44 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

GUMP. Not from gump, a vulgar word for a foolish person, 
a dolt, but from Gump, in St. Agnes, Cornwall ; from Cornish 
guimp, gump, downhill, in W. ar gioympo. 

GUN. Same as Gunn. From one of the old German names, 
Gundbald, Gundebert, Gundric; or from 0. G. gun, a man 
(which Wachter derives from kennen, to be able). Indeed 
Wachter thinks that from this gun is gund, a heroine (vira, 
virago) ; whence the 0. G. names Adelgunda, Cunigunda, Frede- 
gunda, Gundaberga. 

GUSH. See CASH. 

GUTTER. Corrupted from Gauthier, Gautier, French forms 
of Walter ; from G. waiter, which Wachter renders " negotiorum 
gestor." With the Basque affix es or ez, son, we doubtless have 
the celebrated Spanish name Gutierrez, whence the English name 
Gutteres. 



H. 



HACKSTAFF. See WAGSTAFF. 

HADDOCK. This name has been considered the same as the 
Saxon Hadeca and Hadiko ; probable diminutives of Chad, Head, 
A. S. Hedda, and the 0. G. names Haddo, Hadow, Chatto. I 
take it to be corrupted from Eadwig ; from A. S. ead-wig, fortunate 
in war, or ead-wiga t prosperous warrior. Hence probably the 
name Headache. 

HAGGARD. Same as Hoggart, Huggard ; from hoog-hart, a 
D. G. compound signifying very high or big. 

HAIL. Same as Hale ; from Cornish hdl, hale, a moor ; hdl, a 
hill ; or hail, bountiful ; also a river that runs into the sea. There 
is Hale in Broadoak parish (Cornwall); and Hayle is the name of 
a seaport and town in Penwith hundred. 

HAILSTONE. This is hardly the same name as the Hallstein 
of the Landnamabok ; but is more probably from Helston, in 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 45 

Cornwall, which Pryce derives from hal-las-ton, the hill by a green 
moor. 

HAKE. Same as Haig and Haigh; from Haigh co. Lan- 
caster ; from A. S. hagen, a hay, hedge, meadow. 

HALFPENNY. The names Halfpenny and Twopenny are 
probably from different roots than the names found under " Penny." 
Halfpenny is found written Halpeny and Halpeni ; and Allpenny 
and Alpenny are perhaps the same name. They may be cor- 
rupted from the surname De Albini, D'Aubignie (whence Dau- 
beney), said to be from Aubigny, in Contentin, Normandy. 
Twopenny, found Twopeny, may be the same name. There are, 
however, the French Tubini and Doupenay; and there is also a 
Dobenny, and a Flemish Tupigni ; but some of these may be from 
Piney or Pigney, in Champagne. 

HALSTAFF. See WAGSTAFF. 

HAM. From A. S. Mm, a homestead. Cf. Coldham and Hot- 
ham. 

HAMPER. Corruption of the name Hanaper, one who held an 
office of that name. A Galfridus le Hanaper occurs in H. R. 
The Hanaper Office was a place where writs were formerly 
deposited in coarse baskets called hanapers. See Spelman. 
The common word hamper is a corruption of hanaper. 

HANDYSIDE (Handasyd). See SIDE. 

HANKPENNY. See PENNY. 

HAPPY. See APPLE. 

HARDMAN. The same as Hardiman, Hartman (perhaps the 
inverse of Maynard) ; from G-. hart-mund, a strong man. 

HAREFOOT. Lower thinks this surname had a figurative 
reference to swiftness of foot ; and he says there is an instance of 
this application in King Harold Harefoot, and that at the present 
day the family name Pie-de-lievre exists in France. I consider it 
same as Harford ; from Harford co. Devon ; or from the town of 
Hertford. But see HAZLEFOOT. 

HAT. According to Ferguson, Hatt is the oldest hereditary 



46 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

surname on record. He says it corresponds with the 0. G. names 
Hatto, Heddo, and Chado, signifying " war," and consequently 
with Haddo, Head, Chad, whence perhaps Shade. It is more 
likely from the root of heath, viz. A. S. hath, D. and G. heide, 
Dan. hede. 

. HATFULL. Corruption of the surname Hatfield ; from Hat- 
field, name of several places in England ; from hceth-feld, heath 
field. 

HATOFF. This name is probably of Slavonic origin = son of 
Hat. 

HATRED. Same as Outred, the O. G. name Hadarat, and the 
A. S. personal name Utred or Uhtred ; from 0. G. ot~rat, distin- 
guished in council, or illustrious councillor. 

HAZARD. Ard, art, ert, the termination of several thousand 
names, is generally equivalent to " son," and is derived from G. 
art, kind, species, race. Among other names are Bichard, Billiard 
(Bill), Bustard (Bust), Buzzard, Canard, Caward, Chaffard (Chaff, 
i. e. Chauve), Clayard (Clay), Clinkard, Costard, Covert, Coward 
(Cow), Custard (Cust), Dullard (Dull), Galliard, Glazard (Glaze), 
Grillard, Guessard, Hazard, Izzard, Killard, Klinkheart (Klink), 
Lollard, Mansard, Mustard (Moist, for Moyce, Moyes, i. e. Moses), 
Packard (Pack), Peckard (Peck or Pech), Perchard, Pinchard 
(Pinch), Pirssard, Pissard, Poignard, Pollard (Pol or Paul), 
Popard, Punchard (Punch), Ramard (Ram), Rollard, Spillard 
(Spill), Stoppard, Touchard (Touch), Trenchard (Trench), 
Windard, Woolard (Wool), Workhard, &c. 

HAZLEFOOT or HASLEFOOT. From some local name 
ending in " ford." Hence Crowfoot, Dayfoot, Foulfoot, Harefoot, 
Lightfoot, Playfoot [there is also Playford], Proudfoot, Puddifoot 
Whitefoot. 

HEADACHE. See HADDOCK. 

HEAL. See HELL. 

HEAVEN, HEAVENS. A corruption of Evan, Evans. See 
EVEN. There is however a, German Himmel. 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 47 

HELL. According to Mr. Bowditch the name Holl in the U. S. 
is pronounced Hell ; and Holle, -without prefix, is found in H. R. 
It may also be the same with Hele ; from Hele, Heale, or Heal ; a 
manor in the parish of Bradninch, Devon. Hell however is 
found as a German name ; perhaps from hell, clear, bright. 

HERITAGE (H. R. Heritag). Doubtless of German origin. 
See SINGLEDAY. 

HEROD. Not the classical name ; but the same with Heraud, 
and an 0. G. Herod, which Forstemann derives from heroti, 
principatus. They are probably the same as Harold. 

HERRING. This name may be the same as Hering, from 
some locality compounded of ing, a meadow. Hornsey, Middlesex, 
from the thirteenth to the sixteenth century was called in public 
records Haringee, Haringhee, or Haringay, signifying the meadow 
of hares. Pott however gives Herr and Herring as German names ; 
and the root may be 0. G. herrin, a lady, fern, of herr or from 
A. S. here-rinc, which Dr. Bosworth renders " hostile counsellor ;" 
but which may also mean " war counsellor." 

HIGGINBOTTOM. See BOTTOM. 

HINDER. A U. S. name. Doubtless the same as the Cornish 
name Hender ; originally Hendower, said to be of Welsh origin ; 
from W. hen-dwr, Corn, hean-dower, the old water. 

HINDERWELL. A parish co. York. 

HISCOCK. See COCK. 

HITCHCOCK. See COCK. 

HOG. Same as Hogg, Hogge, Hugh, Hugo; from D. hoog, 
high. 

HOMER. As an English name, not derived from that of the 
Greek poet. Ferguson thinks it to be from Hamer, according to 
Grimm, a name under which traces of Thor are still to be found 
in the popular speech of Germany, and derived, no doubt, from 
the celebrated hammer or mallet wielded by Thor (from A. S. 
hamor, homer, a hammer); or an A. S. form of the 0. N. name 
Heimir ; from 0. N. heim, Eng. home, Sco. hame. He also says 



48 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

Homer may correspond with the German name Homeir ; probably 
from hof-meier, a farm steward. A more reasonable derivation is 
from 0. Eng. and 0. Fr. hiaumer, one who fabricates helms, i. e. 
helmets ; from A. S. helma, a helm. 
HONEBONE. See HONEYBUM. 

HONEYBUM, HONEYBUN, HONEYBONE. From Honey- 
bourne or Cow-Honeybourne co. Gloucester. Hence Honey bun 
and Honey bone. 

HONEYBUN. See HONEYBUM. 

HOOD. A corruption of "Wood. Woodward is often pro- 
nounced Hoodard. 

HOODLESS. Perhaps =" wood leas." See LEGG. 
HOOK. A corruption of Oak, which explains itself. 
HOPE. Name of parishes in cos. Derby, Flint, Hereford, Kent, 
Salop, York, &c. ; and also of two townships in the U. S. Jamie- 
son renders it a sloping hollow between two hills, and Camden, the 
side of a hill. Ferguson gives A. S. hopu, a mound, or O. N. 
hdp, a recess. I find no such word in Saxon. Among other local 
surnames compounded of hope are Friendship, Gallop, Gollop, 
Lightup, Milsop, Milksop, Peasoop, Pickup, Startup, Stirrop, 
Stirrup, Trollope, Walkup. 

HOPELESS. This name may mean " the hop meadows." But 
see 'LEGG. 

HORSECRAFT. See CRAFT. 

HORSNAILL. Same as Horsnell, which in 0. G. might trans- 
late either very quick, or as swift as a horse (ras-schnell, or hros- 
schneir). Cf. the German names Schnell, Schnelle, Snelgar, and 
the Eng. Snell, Snelling, Snelson. 

HOTHAM. From Hotham, a parish co. York; from holt- 
ham, the dwelling in the wood. Cf. the surnames Coldham and 
Ham. 

HOUSEHOLD. Same as Oswald. See ASHMAN. 
HOUSEMAN. See ASHMAN. 
HOVELL. Said to be the same as Havill and Auberville ; 



LUDUS TATRONYMICUS. 49 

from Aubervilliers, a village of France, dep. Seine. Cf. Lower's 
Pat. Brit. 

HOY. Same as Hoey, Mac Hoey, for Mackay, Mac Kay, or 
Mac-Aiodh, the son of Hugh. It may sometimes be from Hoy, 
an island and parish of Orkney. 

HUE. Same as Hugh, Hugo; from D. hoog, high, A. S. 
heah, hig, Sw. hog. Hence Huett, Hewet, Hewett, Hewitt, 
&c. &c. 

HULL. From Hull co. York; or hull, an old word for a 
hill. 

HUM. Same as Hume or Home ; from Hume or Home, a 
parish of Scotland, co. Berwick, which gave title to the once 
powerful baronial family of Home, remains of whose castle still 
exist there. 

HUMAN. Same as Hughman ; from D. hoog-man, a tall man, 
or G. hoh-mund, a great man. 

HUMBER. Not from the river of this name, but from the 
personal name Humbert. 

HUMBLE. 1. Corrupted from the name Humboldt. 2. From 
the manor of W. Humble, parish of Mickleham, Surrey. Fer- 
guson derives the old Danish names Humbl or Humbli from 
0. N. humall, the hop plant ; and he says our name Humble 
occurs chiefly in the old Danish districts of England. 

HUNGER. From Chipping Ongar co. Essex, or from its root, 
the A. S. ing, a meadow, which in German assumes the form of 
ingr. 

HUSSEY is found written De la Hosse or Heuze, De Hosa, 
andDeHoese; and according to Stapleton's Rot. Scacc. Norm, 
was named from le Hozu, a fief in the parish of Grand Quevilly, 
near Rouen ; and Lower says there is a place now spelt 
Heusse", dep. La Manche. The local name is without doubt 
from the Fr. houssaie, a place where much holly grows, a holly 
grove. 



50 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 



I. 



ICEMONGER. An ironmonger ; from A. S. isen, iron, and 
monger. Lower. 

IDLE, IDOL. From Idle, a chapelry co. York, W. R. 

IDOL. See IDLE. 

IMAGE. See MARRIAGE. 

INCH, INCHES. From Inch, name of several parishes and 
places in Scotland. Inch generally signifies an island, but some- 
times level ground contiguous to a river, and is derived from 
Gael, innis, Ir. inis, Corn, ennis, W. ynis, Armor, enes and enesan, 
an island ; from L. insula. 

INKPEN. Formerly Ingepen ; from Inkpen, a parish co. 
Berks. Ingpen is doubtless the same surname, and is perhaps 
the original orthography of the local name. See also PENNY. 

IRON, IRONS, HIRONS. From Hieronymus; whence also 
Jerom, Jerome. Lower thinks Iron, Irons may be from Airan, a 
village near Caen, in Normandy. 

IVORY. Found De Ivery and De Ivri. From the Castle of 
Ivery in Normandy; so called from its situation on the river 
Eure or Evre. Hence the family was entitled " Comes de Iberio." 

IVY. Same as Ive ; corrupted from Iu>awr}s, i. e. John. Cf. 
Mac Ivor, from Mac-Ian-Mohr, pron. Mac-Ia-vor, the son of 
Big John. 

IVYLEAF. From root of Yellow, q. v. 

IZZARD. See HAZARD. 



J. 



JACKET. A diminutive of Jacques, i. e. James. 
JELLY. From root of Yellow, q. v. 



LUDUS PATRON YMICUS. 51 

JOLLY. This name has been derived from Julius. But see 
YELLOW. 

JOY. From Johe, found in old records as a contraction of 
Johanne, Johannes, i. e. John. Jouy is, however, the name of 
many comms. of France, in deps. Eure-et-Loir, Moselle, &c. ; and 
there is Jouy-sur-Morin, a comm. and village dep. Seine-et- 
Marne, on the Morin. 

JUGG, JUGGS. Same as Jeake, Jeakes, Jex ; from Jacques, 
Fr. for James. 

JUMP. A village co. Devon, Roborough Hundred. 

JUMPER. From Jeane Pierre. Lower thinks the name 
means a maker of jumps, a short leather coat or boddice formerly 
worn by women. 

JUNE. From the Fr. name Jeune, " young." 



K. 



KEEL. From Keele, a parish co. Stafford ; or Real, name of 
two parishes co. Lincoln. 

KEEN, KEENE. 1. Same as Kean, O'Kean, from Gael. 
ceann, head, commander ; Ir. ceann, a head, chief, leader, captain. 
2. From Kean or Keyne (St.), a parish co. Cornwall. 

KEEPING. 1. From Kippen, a parish of Scotland, cos. Perth 
and Stirling. 2. A patronymic of the name Keep, or compounded 
of ing, a meadow. 

KETTLE. From Kettle co. Fife. There are however the 
surnames Kettel, Ketell, and Kittle. Chetell occurs as a sur- 
name in Domesday ; and in H. R. are found Ketel and Ketyl ; 
and in old writings Catul or Katel. 

KEYLOCK. See LEGG. 

KILBOY. See KILPATRICK. 

KILBRIDE. Name of several parishes of Ireland, the prin- 

E 2 



52 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

cipal being cos. Cavan, Meath, and Roscommon. But see KIL- 
PATRICK. 

KILLARD. See HAZARD. 

KILLMAN. A U. S. name. See CHILD. 

KILLMARTIN. A U. S. name. Bowditch thinks it a cor- 
ruption of Gilmartin, " follower of Martin." But see KILPATRICK. 

KILLMISTER, KILMASTER, KILLMASTER. From Kil- 
minster, near Wick, in Scotland. But see KILPATRICK. 

KILMANY. From Kilmany, a parish co. Fife. See KIL- 
PATRICK. 

KILMASTER, KILLMASTER. See KILMISTER. 

KILPATRICK. Name of two parishes of Scotland, cos. 
Dumbarton and Stirling ; from Gael, till (Ir. id., L. cella), a cell, 
chapel. Cf. the surnames Kilboy, Kilbride, Killmartin, Kilmany, 
Kilmaster, Killmaster, Killmister. 

KISS. This name may be derived from the last syllable of 
several names ; as from Hotchkiss, Purkiss; for Hodgkins, Perkins. 
Ferguson however thinks Case, Chase, Cheese, Choice, and Kiss 
may be from different forms of verbs signifying to choose, as the 
0. S. ciasan, ciesen, ciosan, A. S. cysan, ceosan, O. Fries, kiasa, 
O. N. kiosa; and that this is the probable etymon of Cissa 
(Chissa), king of the South Saxons, who, according to the A. S. 
chronicle, came over to Britain A. D. 477. He says further that 
in Friesland, where there is a remarkable twofold coincidence 
between the common names of the people, our own names, and 
those of our early Saxon invaders, Tsjisse (Chisse) is a name in 
use at the present day ; and that Cissa may mean " one chosen or 
elected." 

KITCHEN. A diminutive of Kit, nickname of Christopher. 

KITE. 1. From A. S. cot, cote, cyte, W. cwt, a cot ; W. cut, a 
hovel, shed, &c. 2. From Cornish coid, coit, cuit, quit, quite, a 
wood. 

KNEEBONE. See SMALLBONE. 

KNOBLOCK. See LEGG. 



LUDU8 PATRONYMICUS. 53 

KNOCK. From Gael, cnoc, a hillock, knoll, eminence, hill. 
In H. It. we find a De la Knocke. 



L. 



LACE. Same as Lacy, Lacey, De Laci. A Roger de Laci 
came over with the Conqueror. The Itineraire de la Normandie 
mentions a place called Lassi, dep. Calvados (Latinised by Ordericus 
Vkalis to Laceium), which Lower thinks may have been the 
cradle of this renowned name. 

LACK. 1. From A. S. leag, a field, place. 2. From Fr. Du 
Lac, " of the lake." But see LEGG. 

LADYMAN. Same as Laidman, which has been rendered 

1. " A man who has the charge of a horse-load or of a pack- 
horse." 2. The servant belonging to a miln, who has the charge 
of driving the loads to the owners, as well as of lifting them up 
(See Jamieson). Lower suggests also Dan. lade, a barn ; a 
barn-man, perhaps equivalent to Grainger. It may also some- 
times be from G. lad-man, for land-man, a lieutenant of a dis- 
trict ; whence ladscipe, ducatus ; Tilaford, dominus, proprie lad- 
ward, prseses provincise, now lord. 

LAKE. 1. From A. S. leag, a ley, field, place (See LEGG). 

2. From Lake, a parish co. Wilts. 3. One living near a Lake. 
In H. R. the name is found De Lacu, De Lake, De la Lake, Atte 
Lake. 

LAMBKIN. See LAMP. 

LAMP. Corruption of the name Lamb, Lambe. It may some- 
times represent Lampray, Lamprey ; or even Lambert. Hence 
the diminutives Lambkin and Lampkin. 

LAMPREY, LAMPRAY. Not from the fish, but from Lara- 
pridius, name of a Latin historian of the fourth, and of a Latin 
poet and scholar of the sixteenth century. 



54 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

LANCE. This name has been derived from an O. G. Lanzo, 
Lando, Mod. G. Land; from A. S. and 0. N. land, id. Lance, 
Launce, Lancet, Launcelot are more probably from Lawrence. 

LANCET. See LANCE. 

LARK, LARKE. A diminutive of Lawrence. Hence Larken, 
Larkin, Larking. 

LARKING. See LARK. 

L'ARKWORTHY. See WORTH. 

LATE, LAIT. Same as Laity ; from Laity, in Leland, Corn- 
wall ; from lait-ty, the milk-house or dairy. Hence, doubtless, 
Leuty. Laity is however a French name. 

LAVENDER (found Levander). From Fr. lavandier, a washer- 
man (L. lavo, to wash). Hence the O. Eng. word launder, a 
washer, and the surname Launder. 

LAW. From A. S. hlaw, a heap, burrow, or small hill. Hence 
the surnames Low, Lowe, and, among other compounds, Black- 
law, Carlaw, Cutlove, Dearlove, Freelove, Fullalove, Greenlaw, 
Manlove, Marklove, Newlove, Onslowe (hounds), Pursglove, Purs- 
love, Quicklove, Shillinglaw, Spendlove, Spenlove, Sweetlove, 
Truelove, Truslove, Wardlaw, Whitelaw, Whitlow, Younglove. 

LAWLESS. See LOVELESS. 

LAY. See LEGG. 

LEAF. From A. S. leaf, dear, beloved, precious. Ferguson 
says there was a Leof, assassin of King Edmund, who sadly belied 
his name; and that Litifa and Liufina are respectively male and 
female names in the Landnamabok. Hence the name Life. 

LEANING. Compounded of ing a meadow, or ing the patro- 
nymic. Lean (Gael. Mac Lean) is a surname. 

LEARNARD. A corruption of Leonard. 

LEARNED, LARNED. Same as Learnard. 

LEARY. Corrupted from the Ir. name Laeghaire ; from 
laidir, strong, stout, or laghar, prong, fork, toe. 

LEATHER. Same as Lethar, name of a bishop at the time of 
Ethelbert. Forstemann refers the 0. G. names Leither, Lethar, 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 55 

Mod. G. Leder, to 0. H. G. leid, 0. S. led, hostile; but these 
names are more probably from G. letter, leader ; or from O. G. 
laut-her, distinguished lord or leader. Hence the 0. G. Clothar, 
and the names Clothier, Luther, and Clotaire. 

LEDGER. Same as St. Leger and Ledegar, name of a war- 
like king of the Saxons in the Nibelungen Lied, which occurs in 
some local names in A. S. charters, as Ludegarsttin and Lutegares- 
hale, which latter Kemble thinks may be Ludgershall, in Wilts. 

LEECH. From A. S. Icece, a physician. Leach is also a sur- 
name, and is the name of a parish co. Chester. 

LEGG. From A. S. leag, legh, leak, lega, a ley, field, place. 
Hence the surname Lay and the compounds Belovly, Bedlock, 
Blacklock, Bully, Burley, Cleverly, Comely, Daily, Duly, Early, 
Fatherly, Freely, Foully, Friendly, Gaily, Golightly, Gravelly, 
Hoodless (leas), Hopeless (leas), Keylock, Knoblock, Lightly, 
Likely, Lively, Looseley, Loosley, Lovelock, Loveluck, Lovely, 
Manly, Marlock, Mealy, Mealey, Motley, Onely, Only, Parsley, 
Purely, Quickly, Ragless (leas). Reckless (leas), Scratchley 
Shamely, Sharpley, Shiplake, Silverlock, Skinley, Softly, Sorely, 
Timberlake, Truly, Ugly, Weakley, Wedlake, Wedlock, Weekley, 
Weekly, Whitlegg, Whitelock (A. S. hwit, white). 

LEGGING. A patronymic of the name Legg. But see 
WILLING. 

LEMON. 1. Same as the G. name Lehman, said from lehn- 
mann, a vassal or feudal tenant. 2. From A. S. lah-man, a 
lawyer (lah-wita, id.) 

LEOPARD. Same as Leppard, Lepard, and the Italian name 
Leopardi ; from the G. names Leobart, Liebhart, the 0. G. Luib- 
hart, Leopard, Leopart, of the seventh century ; from Hub-hart, 
strong in love. 

LETTER, LETTERS. From Letter, an estate in Scotland, 
near Loch Katrine. Letter is found in other local names ; as 
Letterkenny, in Ireland, co. Donegal ; Letterkenny, U. S. Penn- 
sylvania. There is also Letterston co. Pembroke, S. Wales. 



56 LUDUS PATKONYMICUS. 

LETTICE. From the female name Letitia (Sp. Leticia) ; from 
L. Icetitia, joy, gladness. 

LIBERTY. From Liberty, a village co. Fife; also the name 
of upwards of eight localities in the U. S. 

LICENCE. Same as Lysons, in the sixteenth century written 
Lysans, Leyson, Lison, which Lower thinks may be derived from 
Lison, dep. Calvados, Normandy. 

LIFE. See LEAF. 

LIGHTFOOT. The name Martin with the Light Foot is said 
to have been given to one of the followers of the Saxon hero 
Hereward, on account of his swiftness ; and there is the syno- 
nymous Dutch name Ligtvoet ; but the modern English name is 
probably corrupted from the local name Lydford co. Devon. 

LIGHTLY. See LEGG. 

LIGHTNING (found in R. G.) Doubtless the same as the 
U. S. Lightnin. The name is said to be from Leighton co. Salop, 
also the appellation of parishes in Beds and Hunts. 

LIGHTUP. See HOPE. 

LIGHTWINE. See WINE. 

LIKELY. See LEGG. 

LILYWHITE. From the local name Litelthwaite, L e. the 
little thwaite or piece of stubbled ground. Cf. the surnames 
Applewhite, Applethwaite. 

LIMBER. 1. From Limber, formerly Lymbergh, name of two 
parishes co. Lincoln. Hence the names Limebeer and Lumber. 2. 
From Lambert. Cf. Huber, from Hubert, &c., and the U. S. 
name Limbert. 

LIMEBEER. See LIMBEER. 

LIMEWEAVER. The first part of this name may be a cor- 
ruption of line or linen. 

LINCH, LYNCH. Linch is the name of a parish co. Sussex ; 
and linch has the following meanings in England, viz. a hamlet 
(co. Gloucester); a balk of land (Kent); a small hanging wood 
or thicket (S. Downs) ; a small step, a narrow steep bank, or foot- 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 57 

path (West) ; a small inland cliff, generally one that is wooded 
(South) ; a ledge, a rectangular projection. 

LING. From Ling, name of parishes in Somersetshire and 
Norfolk. 

LINK. Same as Linch, q. v. 

LIQUORICE, LIQUORISH, LICKORISH. From the 
Neapolitan name Liquori, which may mean a native of Liguria. 
Ligorio was the name of a painter and architect of Naples. 

LIST. 1. From root of the 0. G. names Lista, Listhar ; perhaps 
from A. S. list, art, wisdom, science. 2. Connected with Lister, 
which is probably from the old word litster, lytster, a dyer. The 
name of the celebrated musician, Liszt, would seem to be from the 
Hungarian word liszt, flour, but the reason is not obvious. 

LITTLEBOY, LITTLEBOYS. From the French name Lille- 
bois, from bois, a wood. But see BOYS. 

LIVELY. See LEGG. 

LIVING. See LOVING. 

LOAN. From Loan, a township co. Durham. " A Mr. Loan, 
of Missouri, is now (1867) an out-and-out radical in the U. S. 
Congress " (BowditcJi). But see also LONE. 

LOLLARD. See HAZARD. 

LONE. The Lane family are said to have come over with the 
Conqueror. The original name was De Lone, then De la Lone, 
finally Lone and Lane. The name may be from Loon (Laudunum) in 
Picardy ; or from the 0. Fr. loingne, wood, forest (buche, morceau 
debois); from L. lignum. There is still a family named Lone, 
and also a Loneon, which may be a diminutive. 

LONGBOTTOM. See BOTTOM. 

LONGDEN=long valley. 

LONGMAID. See MAID. 

LONGMAN. This name may be derived from stature; but 
Longman is also the name of a village co. Banff. 

LONGMATE. See MAID. 

LONGSTAFF. See WAGSTAFF. 



58 LUDUS PATKONYMICUS. 

LONGSWORD. From some local name compounded of 
worth, q. v. Cf. Longworth, Longworthy, Brownsword, Greens- 
word. 

LOOSE, LOOS. 1. From Loose, near Staplehurst, Kent. 
2. Same as Luce, q. v. 

LOOSELY, LOOSELEY. From Loseley, a hamlet and manor 
near Guildford, Surrey. See LEGG. 

LOSECAMP (U. S. Loskamp). From some local name com- 
pounded of camp (Fr. champ, L. campus)] or from Loscomb, a 
hamlet co. Dorset. 

LOVE. Same as Le Love of the II. R. and the French name 
Le Loup, " the wolf." Hence, as a diminutive, Lovekin. 

LOVECOCK. See COCK. 

LOVEKIN. See LOVE. 

LOVELADY. See TOPLADY. 

LOVELESS. This name and Lawless are corrupted from 
Lovelace. 

LOVELOCK. See LEGG. 

LOVELUCK. See LEGG. 

LOVELY. See LEGG. 

LOVER. From Louviers, anciently Lower, in Normandy. 

LOVING. Compounded of ing, a meadow, or the same as 
Living, A. S. Le6fing, a patronymic of the name Leof; from leof, 
dear, beloved. 

LUCE. 1. From Lucius. 2. Perhaps sometimes from the 
surname Lucy, anciently De Luci; from Luci, a parish of Nor- 
mandy, arrond. Neuf chattel. 

LUCK, LUCKE, LUCKY. I. From Luke. 2. From Lucca, 
in Italy. There is however the G. Gliick. 

LUCKY. See LUCK. 

LUMBER. See LIMBER. 

LUSH. From Lusk, a parish of Ireland, co. Dublin ; or Luss, 
a parish of Scotland, co. Dumbarton. 



LUDUS PATRON YMICUS. 59 

M. 

MACE. From Mace, an 0. Fr. corruption of Matthew. See 
ROQUEFORT. 

MAGGOT. A diminutive of Mag for Margaret. 

MAID. From A. S. made, mcedewe, a meadow. Hence Mead, 
Mudd, and the compounds Longmaid, Longmate, " long-meadow." 

MAIDMAN. The same as Maidment ; from A. S. meed-man, 
a hireling (med, wages); or, perhaps, rather from meed-man, a 
meadow man (perhaps a mower). Medeman was an 0. G. name 
of the ninth century. 

MAKER. From a parish so named near Plymouth. 

MALLARD. 1. From Gael, maol-ard, a high promontory ; 
also a bare hill. 2. From Mai for Mary. See HAZARD. 

MANGER, i. q. MONGER. From A. S. mancgere, a merchant 
of the highest class ; or the inverse of German. See GARMENT. 

MANGLES. From the 0. G. name Managold ; from man- 
wait, a powerful man (wait, potens, dominans, imperans, prse- 
fectus). Cf. Sigivaldus, Dagoaldus, Oswald, Gotwald. 

MANHOOD. From the Hundred of Manhood co. Sussex ; 
compounded of wood. 

MANLOVE. See LAW. 

MANLY, MANLEY. From an estate in the parish of Frod- 
sham co. Chester. But see LEGG. 

MANNERS. Camden and others derive this name from the 
village of Mannor, near Lanchester, co. Durham. The name is 
probably of German origin ; perhaps from Mannhardt (whence 
Maynard) ; from man-hart, a strong or powerful man, or mund- 
hart, powerful protector. Mannersdorf is the name of several 
market towns of Austria. One of these (in Hungary) is also 
called Menharsdorf, in Hungarian Menyhard. Mannhartsberg is 
the name of a wooded mountain range of Austria, which termi- 
nates near the Danube. 



60 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

MANSARD. See HAZARD. 

MANTLE, i. q. MANTELL ; the Domesday Mautel, and the 
Mauntell of the H. R. Probably from Maun-dell, the dale of 
the Maun, whence the town of Mansfield derived its name. 

MANYPENNY. See PENNY. 

MARCH. From March co. Cambridge. 

MARKLOVE. See LAW. 

MARKQUICK (found Mar-quicke). Same as Mark wick. 
From locality. See MARRIAGE. 

MARKTHALER. See CASHDOLLAR. 

MARLOCK. See LEGG. 

MARRIAGE. From some place ending in wich or wick; from 
A. S. wic, wye, a dwelling-place, habitation, village, street. Cf. 
Babbage, Burbage, Image, Markquick, Pillage, Pottage, Prestige, 
Smallage, Spinnage. 

MARTYR. A corruption of Murther, q. v. 

MARVEL, MARVELL. From Marville, a comm. and town 
of France, dep. Meuse. 

MASH. A corruption of the name Marsh, which explains it- 
self. Hence also Maish, Maishman, Mashman, Marshman. 

MATTERFACE. This name has been rendered "modest 
face ;" from A. S. mathie, modest. It is rather a corruption of 
the celebrated Norman surname De Martinvast (found written 
De Martivas) ; from the chateau of Martinvast, near Cherbourg ; 
from G. fest, a fortress. Cf. the surname Standfast ; from stein 
fest, stone fortress. See also Lower, under "Matterface" and 
" Martinvast." 

MATTOCK. There are the O. G. Madacho, Mod. G. Madicke 
and Matticke ; but Mattock, Maddick are probably the same as 
Maddock, Madock, and the Welsh name Madoc ; from mad, good. 

MAUDLIN. A corruption of Magdalen. 

MAXIM, i. q. MAXUM. Both U. S. names ; from some place 
called Macksham ; or from Maxen, a village of Saxony ; or St. 
Maximin, a comm. and town of France, dep. Var. 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 61 

MAY. In records, Le Mai ; in H. E. Le May. Lower thinks 
it may be the same as the 0. Sco. maich, A. S. mceg, O. Eng. 
mei, son-in-law, son, or, generally, any relative. May is the name 
of an islet of Scotland, at the mouth of the Firth of Forth ; 
and of a rivulet co. Perth ; and of a rivulet of Wales, co. Car- 
narvon ; and Le May is the appellation of a comm. and village of 
France, dep. Maine-et-Loire. But May is doubtless generally the 
same as Mee ; from mee, a provincialism for a meadow ; from A. S. 
made, mcedewe. Hence the compound names Mildmay (Mildme), 
Youngmay (H. R. Yungemay). Ferguson renders Mildmay 
" mild maiden ;" and Arthur, " a tender judge." A lady informs 
me she has known the Christian name May to represent three 
different female names. It is perhaps most usually from Mary. 

MAYCOCK. See COCK. 

MAYDENHEAD. From Maidenhead, Berks ; or from some 
other local name compounded of head ; perhaps the head of some 
river. 

MAYPOWDER. From Maypowder, a parish co. Dorset. 

MEAD. See MAID. 

MEALY, MEALEY. See LEGG. 

MEAN. 1. From St. Meen, a comm. and village of France, 
dep. Ile-et-Villaine ; or Mehun, a comm. and town dep. Cher. 2. 
From the Irish name Meehan. It may also sometimes be of 
Cornish origin ; from mean, a stone ; whence Maine, Mayne, Mein ; 
or, as Lower suggests, from the A. Norm, mesne, which Bailey 
renders " a lord of a manour who holds of a superior lord." Mean, 
Meene, Meany, Mehan, Meehan, Meehin, Means, and Meins are 
found in Bowditch. 

MEANS. See MEAN. 

MEANWELL. From Cornish mean-wheal, the stony wheal 
or work ; or mean-uhal, the lower stone. Menwhilly was the 
name of a place in Cornwall. 

MECCA. A local pronunciation of Metcalfe. Lower. 

MEDLAR. Medler occurs as a U. S. name; and Nich. le 



62 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

Medler is found in H. R. There is also an 0. G. Madalhari, and 
a Mod. G. Madler. Forstemann refers the 0. G. names Madalo 
and Madelint to the Goth, mathl, an assembly, deliberation ; and 
Madalhari may be from mathl-her, which would translate "a 
counsellor ;" but Le Medler seems to refer to some occupation, 
and may be derived from G. mittler, a mediator ; Dan. midler, 
Sw. medlare (G. mittlere, mitte, middle). 

MELON. Probably from Melun (Melodunum), a comm. and 
town of France, on the Seine. St. Melon (Mellonus), first bishop of 
Rouen, was buried at Pontoise in a church which has been dedi- 
cated to him. But see MILLION. 

MERRY. The name St. Merry is said to have been softened 
by the French from the personal name Merdericus. Merri is the 
appellation of a commune, Arrond. Argentan ; and there is Mery- 
sur-Seine dep. Aude ; but the name Merry is probably the same 
as Emery ; from Emerick, Emericus ; from Almaric, Almaricus 
(whence the It. Amerigo), O. G. Amalrich, Amalric, Amalrih, 
Amelrich, Amilrich, Amuelrich. Almaricus was a name borne by 
many illustrious persons, as Amalricus, King of the Visigoths, son 
of Alaric; Amalricus, Archbishop of Narbonne; and Almaricus, 
Count de Montfort, son of Simon de Montfort, who persecuted 
the Albigenses. The name seems to be from the Gotho-Teutonic 
amal-reich, immaculate prince, or, as some render it, sine macula 
potens. Cf. the ancient name Amalfrid, and the female names 
Amalfrida, Amaloberga, Amalasventa. 

MERRYMOWTH. From Marmoutier, a town of France, dep. 
Bas-Rhin ; or from some place at the mouth of a river called the 
Mer or Mar. 

MERRYWEATHER (found Merywedyr). Halliwell says the 
word merryweather was formerly an idiomatic phrase for joy, 
pleasure, or delight. This name is probably from A. S. wether, 
wedder, a ram; Dan. vceder. Cf. the surnames Fairweather 
(H. R. Fayrweder), Fearweather, Fineweather, Foulweather, Kiese- 
weather, Starkweather. 



LUDUS PATKONYMICUS. 63 

MIDDLECOAT. See COAT. 

MILDMAY. See MAY. 

MILE, i. q. MIHILL, for Michael. 

MILK. The same as Mellick, the 0. G. Milike, Mod. G. 
Mielecke, Milcke, Milch, which Ferguson takes to be diminutives 
from the 0. G. names Milo, Mila, Mello. 

MILKSOP. Same as the U. S. name Milsop. See HOPE. 

MILLION. A name occurring in the sixteenth report of the 
Registrar-General. Lower thinks it may be a corruption of 
St. Mellion co. Cornwall. It is probably a diminutive of some 
other surname. 

MINNOW. From Fr. menu, slender, small, thin. 

MISSING. From Messing, a parish of Essex ; or Messines 
(Flem. Meesen), a town of Belgium, W. Flanders. Misson is the 
name of a parish co. Notts ; and Mison and Missen are surnames. 

MODE. From the root of Maid or Moth. 

MOIST. The same as Moyce, Moyes ; from Moses. 

MOLE, Not from the Surrey tributary to the Thames, nor the 
small river of the same name in Devonshire, but from the Welsh 
name Moel, signifying variously bare, bald, a pile, a conical hill. 
Cf. the Gael, maol, bald, bare, a bald head, a shaved or shorn 
monk, a servant, also a promontory, a cape. 

MOLTEN. From Molton, name of two parishes co. Devon. 

MONEY. From Gael, monadh, a hill, mountain, moor, an 
extensive common. Among many other names compounded of 
monadh are Moneymush or Monymush, a parish of Scotland, co. 
Aberdeen ; and Money-Gall and Moneymore, two towns of Ire- 
land ; one in Leinster, the other in Ulster. There is however 
Monnaie, a town of France, dep. Indre-et-Loire ; and Lower gives 
Monnay, dep. Orne ; and says, " Hence the De Mony of the H. R. 
The Le Money of those records is probably plundered from Le 
Moyne, the Monk." But see MOON. 

MONEYPENNY. See PENNY. 

MONKEY. 1. The same as Manico, Mannakay, Manchee, 



64 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

Manchin, the Mod. G. names Mannicke, Mancke, Mannikin, Man- 
chen, and tlie 0. G. Manniko, Mannikin ; all diminutives of 0. G. 
mund, Goth, manna, A. S. man, mann, mon, D. man, a man. 
2. From Monikie, a parish of Scotland, co. Forfar. 

MOON. The same with the surname Mohun (found de Moiun), 
said to be from Myon, found Moon, an ancient barony near St. Lo, 
in Normandy. According to others, McMahon (whence Mahoney, 
Mahony, Mahany), Mohan, Mohun, Mohune (by corruption 
Mooney, Moone, and Moon) are from root of Gammon, q. v. 

MORROW. A corruption of Mac Murrough ; etymologically 
connected with the name Murray. The Murrays appear to have 
settled in the twelfth century in the province of Murref, Moray, 
or Moravia, comprehending the modern counties of Murray or 
Elgin, and parts of Inverness and Banff. 

MOSS. From Moses. 

MOTE. See'MoTH. 

MOTH. The same as Mott, Motte, Mote, Mouth ; from Fr. 
motte, a hillock. These names must have been originally De la 
Motte or La Motte, which are not uncommon surnames at the pre- 
sent day. La Mothe is the appellation of several communes and 
villages of France, especially in deps. Lot, Dordogne, and Deux- 
Sevres. 

MOTLEY. From some local name compounded of ley. See 
LEGG. 

MOUSE. The same as Moyce, Moyes ; corrupted from Moses ; 
or from the name Maw, Mawe. But see Notes and Queries. 

MOUTH. See MOTH. 

MUDD. See MAID. 

MUDDLE. From some local name compounded of dale. 

MUFF. From Muff, a parish of Ireland, co. Donegal. 

MUFFIN. Corrupted from Mirfin, a surname, and also an 
ancient personal name ; from W. morftn (mor-ffiri), a sea brink. 

MUG. From Mogg, a nickname for Margaret. 

MULBERRY. From Mulfra, vulgo Mulberry, in St. Austel, 






LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 65 

or Mulfra, in Madron, Cornwall ; from moel vre, the bald or bare 
hill. Indeed the Cornish scholar Pryce makes Mulfra, Mulvera a, 
nom. fam. 

MULE. From G. miihle, a mill. 

MULL. 1. A Lancashire corruption from Molineux, Molyueux. 
2. From mull, a Scottish word for a cape or headland ; from Gael. 
maol. 3. For Moll, a nickname for Mary ; also a surname. Mol 
however was a name of Ethelwold, king of Northumbria, and Mull 
was the brother of Caedwalha, king of Wessex ; and Kemble 
says the name must be mule, a half-breed, and suggests that 
his mother may have been a British princess. 

MULLET, MULLETT. Diminutives of Mull, q. v. 

MUMMERY. From Montmerry, a village of France, dep. 
Orne. 

MURTHER. Not from the old form of murder, but from 
Merthyr, name of five parishes in Wales, without reckoning 
Merthyr - Tydvil ; or from Merthor co. Cornwall ; from W. 
merthyr, a plain, a clear spot. 

MUSSELL, MUSSEL. Diminutives of Mus, nickname of 
Thomas. 

MUSTARD. See HAZARD. 

MUTTON. The same as Mytton and Mitton ; from Mitton, 
name of a parish of England, cos. Lancaster and York, and of a 
chapelry co. Worcester. The Mytton family formerly wrote their 
name De Mutton. 

MYCOCK. See COCK. 

MYRTLE. From Murtle, a barony of Scotland, co. Aberdeen. 
Lower thinks it may also sometimes be a corruption of the French 
surname Martel. 

N. 

NAP. Nickname for Napoleon. Hence, as a diminutive, 
Napkin. 

F 



66 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

NAPKIN. See NAP. 

NAKUOWCOAT. Name of two families in Philadelphia. See 
COAT. 

NUAR. Same as Neer; from Neer, a village in the Nether- 
lands. 

NECK. Same as Nick. 

NEEDLE. A corruption of Neele, Neale, Neal, from the 
Norman personal name Nigel ; from Nigellus, a diminutive of L. 
niyer, black. 

NKCUJS. From Nicks for Nicholas ; or corrupted from a local 
ending in " house." According to Malone, the mixture bearing 
this name was invented in the reign of Queen Anne, by Colonel 
Negus. 

NEITHERMILL. Same as Nethermill ; from Nethermill 
(lower mill), name of several places in Scotland. 

NKQUAM. Not from the L. nequam, bad, worthless, good for 
nothing, nor, as Ferguson suggests, from O. N. ndquamr, careful, 
exact, but from some local name (probably Scottish) com- 
pounded of ham, a habitation. Neckham would easily corrupt to 
Nequam. 

NEST. Corrupted from Agnes. A James Nest occurs in the 
Registrar-General's List of Names (Agnes, Nes, Nest). 

NEWBACK. From bach, a brook. See SMALLBACK. 

NEWBEGIN. Same as Newbiggin, Newbigging, name of 
places cos. Durham, Northumberland, and Westmoreland. See 
BIGGIN. 

NEWBONE. A corruption of Newborn. 

NEWBORN. From Newbourn co. Suffolk; or Newburn, 
name of places cos. Northumberland and Fife. See SMALLBONE. 

NBWCOMB, NEWCOMBE. From comb, a valley; or same 
as Newcome, Newcomen = stranger. Cf. Newman, Gumming. 

NEWLOVE. See LAW. 

NICE. From Nice, in France ; formerly in North Italy. 

NICK. From Nicholas. 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 67 

NIGHT. Same as Knight, from A. S. cniht, cneoht, a boy, 
youth, attendant, servant. 

NIGHTINGALE. Some derive this name from the bird, and 
there is a French name Le Rossignol. Nightingale Lane, in East 
Smithfield, London, was, however, formerly Cnihtena Guild Lane, 
and was so called from the knights' guild. Again, gale, in com- 
position of local names, is frequently a corruption of hall. 

NOTCUTT. A corruption of Northcote ; from Northcote co. 
Devon. Cf. Breadcutt (H. R. De Bredecote), perhaps from 
Bredicot co. Worcester. 

NOTHARD. Same as the German O. G. names Nothart, Nit- 
hard, Neidhart; from 0. G. neid-hart, which may be variously 
rendered " very honest," " very crafty," " very zealous." See 
Wachter, under neid and neidhartj where he renders Nithardus 
homo valde probus, et ad communem utilitatem natus, &c. 

NOTHING. A patronymic of Nott, 0. G. Noto, Notho, Not ; 
or from some local name, perhaps originally Northing. Nutfield, 
Nuthall, Nuthurst, Nutley, Netting Hill, Nottington are local 
names in England. 

NUT, NUTT, NUTTS. The same as Nott, Knot. Knott; 
from the ancient Scandinavian name Cnut, Knut, Anglicised 
Canute. Ferguson says Knut derived his name from a wen or 
tumour on his head. Knott and Nut occur in local names in 
England. But see NOTHARD. 

NUTBROWN. From some local name ending in bronn=burn, 
perhaps Nidbronn; or from Niederbronn, dep. Bas-Rhin. 



O. 



OAKENBOTTOM. A U. S. name. See BOTTOM. 
OAKLEAF. A U. S. name ; no doubt from Hockliffe, a parish 
of England, co. Bedford. 

OATS. Ferguson thinks this name to be a pluralism, and he 

F 2 



68 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

classes it with Ott, Otte, Otto, and the corresponding German 
names Otte and Otto. All these names are corrupted from Otto, 
i. e. Octavio. See D. Gilbert's Cornwall, vol iii., p. 318. 

ODIUM. A U. S. name ; from Odiham (wood-ham), a market 
town and parish of England, co. Hants. 

OFFER. The same as Offor; from Offord, name of two 
parishes co. Hunts. Both Offers and Offerd are found in Domes- 
day. 

OLDMAN. See ALMOND. 

OMEGA. Doubtless a diminutive of some German nickname. 
Ferguson says Ohme, Omega, and perhaps Home, are the same as 
the Low G. ohm, and its diminutive oehmke ; and that corre- 
sponding with these are 0. G. names Omeko, Omeke, Emico, and 
Mod. G. Ohm and Ohme. The G. oheim is an uncle. 

ONION. A corruption of Unwyn or Onwhyn ; from unwinn, 
unconquerable. Lower thinks it is oftener from the Welsh per- 
sonal name Enion. Onwen is the name of a manumitted serf, 
Cod. Dip. No. 971 ; and Unwona that of a bishop of Leicester. 

ONLY. A U. S. name, the same as Onley (found both in 
England and the U. S.) ; from Oneley, a hamlet co. Northampton. 
Hence also the U. S. name Onely. See also LEGG. 

ONSLOW. From some local name in England, perhaps 
Houndslow or Hounslow, Middlesex ; from A. S. hundes-hlaw, 
the hounds' barrow or hill. Cf. Winslow, the hill of battle 
(icinncs-hlaw), or the windy tumulus (windes-hlaw). 

ONYX. A U. S. name. Perhaps the same as the English 
name Hunkes, said to be a diminutive of Humphrey. Cf. the 
names Hunnex and Honicke, which Ferguson thinks to be diminu- 
tives from the name Hun, Hunn ; from Mn, a giant; whence Grimm 
traces the name of the Huns. 

ORANGE. From Orange, a town of France, dep. Vaucluse, 
which derived its name from L. Araiisio Cavarum ; from the 
people called the Cavarii. It was long- the capital of a princi- 
pality, which gave title to the family now on the throne of 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 69 

Holland. The King of the Netherlands still retains the title of 
Prince of Orange ; but the town and territory were ceded to 
Louis XIV. at the peace of Utrecht. 

OTHER. See OTTER. 

OTHERDAY. A U. S. name. See SINGLBDAY. 

OTTER. Same as the well-known Scandivanian name Ottar, 
which Ferguson renders fear-inspiring. The name is also found 
written Ohter, Other, Othyr, Ottyr, Oter, and, in Domesday, Otre. 
"Walter Fitz-Other (says Lower), the celebrated castellan of 
Windsor, temp. William I., the reputed ancestor of the Fitz- 
Geralds, Gerards, Windsors, and other great houses, was the son 
of Otherus, a great landowner under the Confessor. Ingram, in 
his translation of the Saxon Chronicle, says Otter was originally 
oht-here or oclit here, i. e. terror of an army." 

OULDBIEF. A U. S. name ; from Elbeuf or Elbceuf, a 
comm. and town of France, dep. Seine-Inf. 

OUTCRY. Corrupted from Outred, Utred, or Uhtred. See 
HATRED. 

OVER. From Over, name of several places, especially in cos. 
Cambridge and Chester. See also VERY. 



P. 



PAGAN. From the Norman personal name Paganus ; a 
peasant or countryman ; one living in a pagus, i. e. a village or 
country town. Hence Pain, Paine, Pane, Pen, Paganellus, Pagnel, 
Paganel, Paynel ; Fitz-Payne or Fitz-Pen, by corruption Phippen. 

PAGE. 1. A boy attending on a great person, rather for show, 
and as an indication of high rank, than for the performance of 
menial duties (Fr.) 2. The common and almost only name of a 
shepherd's servant, whether boy or man ; extensively used in 



70 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

Suffolk (See Halliwell). 3. A corruption from Peg, the nickname 
for Margaret. Page is also an old English word for a village. 

PAIN. See PAGAN. 

PAINTER. The same as Panter ; from the old word panter 
or pantler ; in a family of distinction an officer who kept the 
bread [pantler, Shakspeare] ; from panetier, L. panetarius. "In 
the court of France the panitier was an officer of high consider- 
ation ; and in monasteries the paniter would seem to have been 
charged with the distribution of bread to the poor, no doubt in 
virtue of his office of chief baker." Proceedings Soc. Antiq. Scot, 
vol. i. p. 14; Way's Prompt. Parv., p. 381. Hence, by corrup- 
tion, the surname Panther. 

PALFREY. From the name Baldfrid, which Junius renders 
" audax pace," but which signifies rather a " bold protector " 
(bald-frid). There is an inverse, Fridebald. 

PALSY. A U. S. name ; most probably corrupted from Paul, 
whence Paw, Pawle, Pause. 

PAMPHLET, Most probably from Pamflete co. Devon ; or 
from Bemfleet, Benfleet, co. Essex ; from A. S. fleot, an arm of 
the sea, mouth of a river. The termination flet, however, may 
sometimes be from A. S.flet, a dwelling, a habitation, a seat, hall ; 
Su.-Goth. flet, domus. Cf. also the 0. G. names Elsflet, Gerflat, 
Gundiflat, Hruodflat, Ratflat, Rihflat, Sigiflat; the 0. Goth, names 
Albofleda, Audofleda, Andefleda ; and the A. S. names Aelflaed, 
Adelfled, Adelfleda, Aethelfleda, Elfleda, and Wynfleda. Mei- 
dinger thinks fleda, flet, flat, in composition, means reinlich, cleanly, 
neat ; from the nounflath ; whence the N. H. G. unflath, schmutz. 
The Ice.fliod is a maiden (Cf. Turner, ii. pp. 37 and 85). 

PAN. This name, according to Ferguson, corresponds with an 
O. G. Panno, which Forstemann makes to be the same as Banno. 
Pan is more probably another form of Pain, Paine. See PAGAN. 

PANE. See PAGAN. 

PANTHER. See PAINTER. 

PAR. Not from the fish, but from Pierre. See PEAR. 



LUDUS PATRON YMICUS. 71 

PARADISE. Perhaps the same as the 0. G. names Paradeus, 
Paradeo, Peradeo; from 0. H. G. deo, dio, A. S. theow, Goth. 
thius, a servant. But see SINGLEDAY. 

PARAMOUR. The same as Parramore, which has been 
thought to be the Saxon Barmore, 0. G. Bermar; from mar, 
illustrious. Parramore is more probably from some English local 
name compounded of " moor." 

PARDON. A name found in France, England, and the United 
States, and probably derived from some French local name ending 
in don ; from Gael, dun, duin, a fort, fortress, town, fortified hill, 
a hill. It may also be the same with the surname Bardon, from 
Bardon co. Leicester, or, as Lower says, it may be derived from 
Partoa, a hamlet and township in Cumberland. Parton is also 
the name of a parish of Scotland, stewartry Kirkcudbright. 

PARROT. See PEAR. 

PARSON. This name has been derived from A. S. bar, a bear ; 
0. H. G. par, pero. It is the same with Pearson and Person, son 
of Par, Pear, or Pierre. 

PART. The same as Bard, Earth, and the 0. G. names Bardo, 
Pardo, Bartho, Part. But see PEAR and PERT. 

PASSENGER. This name is probably of German origin ; from 
Pass-inyr, son of Pass, which is a surname. 

PATCH. From G. bach, a brook, rivulet, or W. bach, little, 
small. 

PAUSE. See PALSY. 

PAW. See PALSY. 

PAYMENT. A very common name in Canada. It would 
easily corrupt from Beaumont ; or even from the name Beeman. 

PEACE. The same as Pace, Pacy, Paice, Peacey ; from Pacy, 
in France, dep. Eure, or Pace, dep. Ille-et-Vilaine. 

PEAR. From Pierre, the French form of Peter. Hence the 
surnames Par, Peer, and, as diminutives, Parret, Parratt, Parrot, 
&c. ; perhaps sometimes, by contraction, Part. Other diminutives 
and corruptions are Parrell, Barrell ; by corruption Pearl. 



72 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

PEARL. See PEAR. 

PEASOOP. See HOPE. 

PEAT (variously Peatt, Peet, Peed, Pead). A nurse-name for 
Peter. 

PEBBLE, PEBBLES. U. S. names; from Peebles, a royal 
burgh, town, and port of Scotland, cap. co. on the Tweed ; or from 
Peebles, a township of the U. S., Pennsylvannia. 

PECKOVER. See CONOVEU. 

PEER. Same as Pear, q. v. 

PEG, PEGG, PEGGE. 1. From Peg, the nickname for 
Margaret (thus Mag, Meg, Peg). 2. From Dan. pige, a maid, a 
young girl. Hence doubtless Pigg, and, as diminutives, Pidgin, 
Piggin, Piggon, Pigeon, Pidgeon. 

PELLET. A diminutive of Pell, the nickname for Peregrine. 
According to others, Pellet, or rather Pellatt, is a corruption of 
the baptismal name Hippolyte. 

PEN. See PAGAN. 

PENNY. This name has been classed with Benn, Benney, 
Binney, 0. G. Benno, Benni, Binne, Mod. G. Behn, Benne, Bihn. 
It is rather from the W. pen, head, chief, end. Hence the names 
Fippeny, Fourapenny (found Fourapeni), Godspenny, Ilankpenny, 
Manypenny, Moneypenny, Pennycook, Pennycuick, Pennymaker, 
Pennyman (anciently Pennaman and Peniman), Pennymore, Smal- 
penny,Tempany,Tenpenny, Thickpenny, Ticklepenny, Turnpenny, 
Whirlpenny (in II. R. Whirlepeni), Wilderspin, Wimpenny, 
Winpenny (white). See also ALLPENNY, HALFPENNY, HAPENNY, 
TWOPENNY, CRAVEN, INKPEN, PENNYFATHER, PENNYFEATIIKR. 

PENNYCOOK, PENNYCUICK. From Penicuick, a parish 
near Edinburgh. 

PENNYCUICK. See PENNYCOOK and PENNY. 

PENNYFATHER, PENNYFEATHER, PENEFATHER. 
(U. S. Penefather.) These names may be from the W. penffetter, 
headstrong", stubborn, obstinate. Hearne however derives the 
name of a street called Penny-farthing Street from a wealthy 



LUDUS PATRONTMICUS. 73 

family whose name of Penyvadir or Penyfadir he had met with 
in old registers ; and, if so, these names may be derived from 
locality ; perhaps from W. pen-y-ffed-tir, the head of the outward 
land ; or pen-y-mad-dir, the head of the good land. Lower says 
the forms of the name Pennyfather in H. R. are Penifader and 
Penifadir. He gives also a Barnfather and a Bairnsfather, which 
however he derives from a different source. There is the U. S. 
name Pennymaker. 

PENNYFEATHER. See PENNYFATHER. 

PENNYMAKER. A U. S. name. See PENNY. 

PENNYMAN. See PENNY. 

PENNYMORE. See PENNY. 

PERFECT. From Pierrefitte, name 6f several communes and 
villages of France, the principal in dep. Meuse, cap. canton, on the 
Aire (pierre, a stone). Cf. the surnames Parfett, Parfit, Parfitt, 
Perfett, Perfitt. 

PERRY. From Pierre. See PEAR. 

PERSON. See PARSON. 

PERT. From Pert co. Forfar ; or Pert, a commune, arrond. 
Bayeux, Normandy. It may also sometimes be from Perret, a 
diminutive of Pierre. See PEARL. 

PETTIBONE. See SMALLBONE. 

PETTYCOAT. See COAT. 

PEW. For Pugh, from Ap-Hugh, son of Hugh. See also 
PIE. 

PHARAOH. As an English surname, not derived from the 
Egyptian name, but from the 0. G. name Faro ; perhaps from 
faren to travel, A. S. fara a traveller. Hence Faramund, a 
celebrated name among the Francic kings, and the English names 
Farman and Fearman. 

PHEASANT. " In England I have heard of a Miss Partridge, 
who married a Mr. Pheasant, and her sister married a Mr. Part- 
ridge. There was some other bird in the family." This name, as 
well as Fesant, Fazan, Fazon, are probably from Lepheasant, near 



74 I IDU8 PATRONYMIOUS. 



Si. An I. I , li'ini /i- riaiHiii, tln<. lower place; or /-//. r, tint 
n| place. 

I'lKMM il.lv onrniplud from Mnnwick, "the r.-niiy 

dwell. n;-," i,:n,i. -,,! |,| .,,,.,,, r,, ,\ , , , | | , , | ,, , | ; , , | ;, | M | Y'.lk. I) in 

quite |"'!>!. ill- Ilia! (In- n: ..... I (.nil. . may I,,- H ciirrii|it.iiiii of 
I 

I'MYSH K, Inu.Ml I'll, !.,. |.'n,ii, l,.-fi.,irk in St. Aimti'l, 

<' ..... wn.li. Mr. it.iwiiiir.ii MJI" Dr. Hiynic Wai the flrut |.i\ 

of n,,l:,.|rl|,|,ia. 

I'M 'K I, K, I'K'KLI'.S. rrn.n I'irKl.ill, a parisli r... York, N. 

I: I'lUlliml I ,l,r| ( - ncc,,, , ||. It. 

PICKUP, Bti Hon 

riDDI.K l-V.,i., N..HI. I'i.l.ll,-,-,, \\ l-i.l.ll,. Mint..,, 

CO. I ,,|: .r|. 

I'M,. Tho HRtnoiiN I'v, I'vr, 1'ii-h. Sco l'i 

I'KJKnN. : I'- 

I'MJl'A'l'. A ciiiiiipiiini of rnKlni'.l, nlo a miniMim-, wliidi 

l.nwi-r llniil.r. in -iv In- ('mill I'lh |I!M|,| en. SulillTBet. 

i-Kii; 

I'l l.ril ,\ i;l >. A rr>iTMpli<>n of rilrlirr, ()r=a0n of rilcli, wliicli 
if allO n HUM. -HIM-. 

I'll, I. Hlllllr :r. I'crl. Tmiii llir Critic yi///, .'I Hi mil" .In ilil, 
, :.r, mi- |.l.ir... Small lowcrx, usually Hi|iin., ..I .-vi-ral 
in lici".lit, r\: i in- in Sciitlaii.l, rliii-llv in tin 1 com 

linnli-i in;- up. .11 I ,11: '1.111.1, MIT cnllcil 1'iil;!. Tin -IT is tin- I'llr of 
l''oiuli,M y, .'I. cM'Jlc in I'lirui ., I ..inca'.liirc ; I In, I Ic >!' 

Man; IMI in Devon; an.l a pari:,li called I Mir m Soiun d him. 
In 1 1 CM -Ini ,1 ".In i r />.// i:; icicil lor u MI nail crcc.lv, ami m c<>. Smi in <-i 

I'll. LOW. S.T I'.nmw:.. 

riMI'LI-l. I'.nu.lilcli viv,:; Hii.i MM the name <-f an Mn 
family. ll may l.c (!.. .inn a-< rcnlul.l ; .r cnrruplcil I'mm HOIT10 
u. ....... Miilin;- m /',././, in A. S. a lmii:;c or dwelling. 

riNCIIAIM). SI-P I|A/.M:M. 



l'ATHONYMI<:iiS. 75 

IMNCIII'.ACK. ftmm an Pim-l.l.crk ; IV...M I'inehheek CO. 
Lineoln. An alloy "f eopper :ul /.MM- I'd emUili!' f;old in ihi up- 
pearanre, W.M.M I'M I hioii'dil, into notice hy ;i. London trade 
Mi.'in of the name of rine.hhrcl., who ma ii ii fa c 1 1 1 red wal. 
buckles, mid olhur urlieles mil. of it. I'.ul . HIM- ( 'hanioeVrt Vurlia 
Nominal; i. 

I'INDAIt. 'I'll'' HiiriHi UH I'm. Icr :i:i<l Lc rimli-r, :i.inl |ci-|i:i|.-. 
I'iinirr utiil ryucr; ('111111 /</////, OIKI \vln:.r duly il. in l< l:iki: 
posses:, imi of nil nl ruy c,;it I .!?, and dri v<; I .linn lo Ilic, |><)iiii<! until 

lliry ;uc claimed. 

PINFOUND. The name as the Cornish name Penfoune, Pen- 

fownc. Toid. in iiinitioii . I'.-nioiiiin as the name of a place in 

To l:;l.ck. ll.d, irndci , /'o/loii, now I'ciil'owiKi in 1'oiuid 

.-.l.ork, " tin' |IC:M| well, spring of w;ilT, or loiinta.!!! ;" hut it IIIOK- 
proh;il>ly IIICMJIH "tin-. lnul of Mm well." 

I'INK. Comipicd from one of the surnames Pinnock, Pen- 
nack, L'unnock, INmnidk, INnmoc.k, l'i I , pi;rliu|i iV.mi the 

p:iri:.lj of 1'iiin.M-k i',o. ( lorn w:il I ; from //;,-/>/:, Mir. hc:id |il;ici-.. 
I'ISSAIM). S.-unnuH I'irHHurd. Suo HA/AI:I.. 

I'issiv Probably tht stone M the namr ri(-,nH<-. Lower wiy 

of The. lallcr, u 'l'hr family r:mi.-. into l-in-J.-iml Moon alld l.lir. 
rc.voc.-ilion of the .'dM-l of N aul i;,4, and lion-, rhirlly MM- ( 'hn.,1 lai. 

n.-Min-.. of Loui:; and Chai !.:,. They huvo a tradition that the 

name wa;, derived from I lie. order of I. ni;d.l hood rrealed in I M',0 

hy I'opn I'iiiH I V.,;md c:dle.| .-..rriipily Ties or PioBse in Bretagne, 

fruin wliirh |.r.,vmee MM- l'ii-:.:..cH of I'lird-in.l :i,r<- l.eli.'vrd I,, ha.ve 
rome." 

I'IS'l'OL. lla.Hiwe.il i'eiid'r:, the word |,i;lol ' m,- 

fellow, |ierlia,|):; from /ii::/.<t/fn 1 e x | il;ii ned liy l''loi io, 'a. CO/MUJI;; 

beggcr, a, ea.nl Ii i , an npri-dil. man Ihal Ii vel.h hy eo.'iena^e.' I lene. 

Shale;, p euro's character of Muii. n.-mn-." I'I.IM! may he i In: name 

M l.ln- :i.n> ii nl, n.i.me l''al: .l,|f.-, l'a,:;lolf, l'';i:.lollr (whence I'al la.ff), 
Alt,. I) l'a:,lMir, IK, m () (\.fnni //', i.lron/^ in help , or MM- la:, I 
part of Mie n;une ma,y he, IVom ( >. (\. ////;, lj\ <'lj\ which M i<lm;'e t 



76 LUDUS T'ATUONYMICUS. 

renders stark, kraftig. Cf. ihr All. D. names Fastrich, Fashv'm, 
and the ().<!. mine Y;istm:in, which Wachtcr renders valde cclehris. 
In Luther, I'sal. Ixxxix. S, \vc find "(Jott Isfast mccchtig." 

mviir.oTTo.M. Be* T...TTOM. 

IMTCIIFORD. From Pitchford, a parM. <<>. Salop, llmco 
the ntmM Plokford and Pitchfork, rilehford means Hie ford of 

tin- ilv. i Piich, which is doubtless a corruption of its original 

name. 

riTCIiroUK. A U.S. name. See Pnviirm:i>. 

PLASTKK. No doubt originally Palastcr; perhaps one having 
the charge of a palac<> ((J. /i!<i*t). 

I'LAY TAIIi*. Jamieson renders />/////_/'./, ///// /<">, n pl:iy- 
fello\v; IVoni /'/"//, and ,/V/v, a coinpanii.n. l'l:i\f:iir is jirnbalily 
from A. S. l< ;/ -./'//(/, the fair or while meadow, Cf. the inverse 
name I'Yirplav. 

I'Ln'l', 1'LOTT. 1. I-' nun /ifnf, a , porl ion of Hat even ground, 
also a plantation laid out ; from 1'Y. ji/ct (from (Jr. 7rXriA, L. 
littux}, whenee tin- I'Yeneh namo Dii I'lal, ami the Kn^lish name 
I'lat I. k J. l-'rom rellet,;i diminutive of 1*011, for I'ei e-i'ine ; or 
from I'.ell.'t, a diminutive of I'.ell from l.salicl. l ; rom Kellot WO 
doubtless have the I'Yeneh name lUot. 

1'LUM. I'LUMU, I'LUMliK, I'LUMK. I' r..,n />///////., /^m/;, 
in the North of England, a woody place or clump of t rees. 1'lumh 
is the name of a township of l! \.irlh Ameiica, I'I-MIMV! 

vania ; ami there is I'loinb, a commune of Normandy; and La 
Hume, a eommiine and town dop. Morhihan. 

I'LUMK. See PLUM. 

I'OKJNAKD. StM- llA/ARD. 

IMM)| )!.!:. A eomiptiou of PonI, A. S. ;W, put, W. 
L. }><ihtn. Cf. the Corn. />///, -vvliieh often takes Ihe form 

POPOI-'F. Troliahly a Slavonic name; from Pop ow, son of 
Pop, a niekiiMine, 

POUT. From /'"//, a pile, as of a fort i lied place; a prefix of 
numerous local names. Lower says llu^o de Tort came into 



LUDU8 PATKONYMICUS. 77 

England at the Norman Conquest ; but that this namo may bo 
the flame a,s the Ail Portam, or Alte-Cate of mediaeval records. 
It may also sometimes be corrupted from the name Porret ; from 
Porret, dep. La Manche, in Normandy. 

POIiTVVINK. "A singular corruption of Poitevin, a native. 
<>f I 'oil on, in Prance. So early as the time of Edward I. the, 
corruption had proceeded an fur an to Potewync, a lady called 
Prcciosa Potewyne occurring in II. K." - --l,<nn:r. 

POT, POTT, POTTS. See FILLPOT. 

POT 1 1 ' 1 1 A 1 1. Not from the Egyptian name Potiphar ; but the 
game as Potifer or Petiphor (I'otiphur, U. S.) ; perhaps from 
A. S. hi n ft/,, (). N. l>u<U., a messenger; A. H. ./'"", O. N . /"<//, ;i 
traveller ; A. S. fara, O. N. fora, to fare, travel. " Our Mrs. 
I'ot.iplmr," nays Pn>wdif.ch, " is a nurse, whose bedside deportment 
has always heen exemplary." 

POTTA(;M. S.M ; MAKKIAGK. 

I'OTTLI']. See UOTTLK. 

POWDER. A U. S. name.- From Powder Hundred co. 
Cornwall ; from '/xtu-dnr, tin- county of the oak. 

1' It A 1 S K. A name found in the U. S. Same as Price, Pryce, 
Pryso. 

PRAY. In II. U. Do la Preye ; from Fr.^, a meadow. 

I'UKCIOh'S. A corruption of the surname I'ric.sl Jioii.se. 
There is, says Lower, a dwelling called I'riesthawes, originally 
PriesthoiiHC, near I'even.scy, co. Sussex. 

PKKSTKJK, /:. <i. I'ltKSTAGB and PRESTWICK. From 

. ieh, a parish in L;uic,asliire. See MARBIAOE. 

I'UKTTY. I'oiui.l I'raty, 1'retio, Prettie, and De l'i(i:tis; from 
L. 'iinii 11,111,^ a meadow. The name is also found in Italy and 
Spain, and in the latter country the family bear for arms "a green 
meadow, flowered proper." 

I'UIAM. A U.S. name; doubtless the same as our English 
Prime, and the I'Yench I >e la Prymo. It may al0 be connected 
with liriin, IJrcein, wliich l''(;rguson thinks from A. S. limiw, (). K. 



78 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

brim, renowned, famous. He gives Brame, corresponding with a 
Danish name Bram in Saxo, perhaps from Su.-Goth bram, splen- 
dour, pomp. 

PRICE. A Welsh name, said to be from Ap-Rhys, son of 
Rhys. Pryce however renders the Cornish name Penrice, the 
head of the fleeting ground, and Rhys and Rice would seem to be 
the same name. 

PRIDE. Found without prefix in H. R. It may be the same 
with Priddy, Pridie, Priddey, Friday ; doubtless from Priddy, a 
parish co. Somerset. 

PRIGG, PRIGGE. From A. S. burh, burcg, dative byrig, a 
fort, castle, city, town ; or the same as Brigg ; from Brigg (Gland- 
ford, Brigg or Bridge) co. Lincoln ; or from the W. Ap-Rigg, son 
of Rigg, the mediseval orthography of ridge. If connected with 
the ancient name Prigari, it may be the same as Frick, Fricke, 
Freek, Freeke, Freak, Fricker, 0. G. Fricco, A. S. Freoc, from 
A. S./n'cca a preacher, Gt.fricker. 

PROUD. Fuller makes this name a corruption of Prude. It 
is more probably the same as Prout, corrupted from the name 
Provost, the mayor of a royal burgh, the dean or president of a 
collegiate church. The Continental names Probst, Proost, Prost 
would seem to be from the same source. The It. prode is valiant, 
brave ; the A. S. prud, prut, C. B. pridi, ornatus ; A. S. prate, 
id.; Su.-Goth. prud, magnificus, ornatus. 

PROUDFIT. Same as Proudfoot, q. v. 

PROUDFOOT. In H. R. Proudfot, Prudfot. From some 
local name compounded of " ford ;" perhaps from a place called 
Pridford or Prydford. There is a parish called Priddy in Somer- 
set. But see HAZLEFOOT. 

PROUDLOCK. SeeLEGG. 

PROUDLOVE. See LAW. 

PROUDMAN. Corrupted from Prudhomme (in H. R. Prod- 
homme, Prodomme, Prodome, &c.) Roquefort renders preudom, 
preud 'homme, preudome, prodom, prodon, prudhome : " homme, 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 79 

sage et prudent, qui a de 1'experience et du savoir, prudens 
homo, et nonprobus dominus." 

PUDDIFOOT. See HAZLEFOOT. 

PUFF. Same as Pugh. See PEW. 

PULL. A corruption of the name Pool, Poole. See POODLE. 

PULSE, PULS. For Pulls ; from Pull for Pool. 

PUNCH. From Pontius. Hence, doubtless, as a diminutive 
the name Puncheon, var. Punshon. 

PUNCHAED. See HAZARD. 

PUNCHEON. See PUNCH. 

PURCHASE. From Purkiss, corrupted from Perkins ; from 
Perkin, a diminutive of Pierre. 

PURELY. SeeLEGG. 

PURGE. Bowditch gives this as the name of an English 
family. See BARGE. 

PURSGLOVE, i. q. PURSLOVE, PURSLOW. From Purs- 
low, a hundred co. Salop. The name is doubtless the same with 
Parslow, which, if I mistake not, is a local name in Essex. See 
LAW. 

PUSHING. From some local name compounded of ing, a 
meadow. Bowditch gives both Pushing- and Pushee ; but the 
latter is probably corrupted from Pusey. 

PUSSY, PUSSEY. Found in the U. S. The same as Pusey, 
Puzy ; from Pewsey or Pusey, a parish co. Wilts ; or Pusey, a 
parish in Berks. 



Q. 



QUARREL, QUARRELS. Quarrell (H. R. Quarel) may be 
derived from the 0. Eng. word quarel, a stone quarry. There is 
a place called Quarrelton in Scotland, co. Renfrew. Quarrels is 
perhaps the same name, or it may be from Quarles, which is pro- 
bably derived from a district in North Greenhoe hundred, co. 
Norfolk. 



80 LUDUS PATRONYMIC US. 

QUARTERMAN. The same as Quartermaine and Quatre- 
maine, and the H. R. Quatremayns and Quatremeyns. The 
origin of this name is doubtful. Four hands form the charge of 
the shield of the French family of Quatremaine, and there are the 
French surnames Quatrebarbes, Quatremaire, and Quatremere. 
The original bearer of the name may have dwelt near a sign-post 
pointing in four different directions (four hands). 

QUEEN. From MacQueen or MacQuin ; Ir. O'Quin, O'Quinn, 
i. q. O'Cuinn, O'Coin, O'Coyne. These names may come from the 
Ir. cuinn, genitive of conn, wisdom or sense ; or from con, geni- 
tive of CM, a hound, figuratively applied to a warrior, whence the 
name Conn or Con. Hence the names Coyne, Coin, Quin, Quinn, 
Quiney, Quinney. 

QUELL. A corruption of Will, or Quill, q. v. 

QUESTION. McQuestion is found in the U. S., and 
MacQuiston is a Scotch name. It may be from Wiston, name of 
a village and parish co. Lanark ; or from the surname Weston, 
like Quilliams from Williams. 

QUHITELAW. A Scottish corruption of Whitelaw ; perhaps 
from Whitelaw, a hill in Roxburgshire. See WHITLOW. 

QUICK. From the Cornish guik, a village. 

QUICKLOVE. See LAW. 

QUICKLY. See LEGG. 

QUILL, QUIL. For Will, Wil. 

QUILT. A name found in the U.S.; a contraction of Quillet 
for Willet, Willett, diminutives of Will. See QUILL. Quille, 
Quillet, Quilliot, Quillot are found as French names. 

QUINCE. A patronymic of Quin, i. e. Quins. Quin, anciently 
Quinchy, is a local name in Ireland, and is often found in com- 
position. There is Quin co. Clare, and Quin in Kildare, and 
Quince Island co. Cork. But see QUEEN. Lower makes 
Quince the same with Quiney, in charters Latinised De Quinciato, 
De Quinci, De Quency. 



LUDUS PATKONYMlCUS. 81 



E. 



RABBIT. Same as Rabbitt, Rabett, in H. R. Rabut and 
Rabbod, mentioned as the name of a " Duke of the Frisians " 
in Rog. Wend ; and Radbod, Redpath, Robert, G. Ratpert, O. G. 
Ratperth ; from rat-brecht, distinguished for counsel, or a cele- 
brated counsellor. 

RAFFLES. From Raffles, the name of a place in the parish of 
Mouswald co. Dumfries. That parish contains five old border 
fortresses ; the least dilapidated is that of Raffles. See Gaz. 
Scot. Raffles Bay is the name of an inlet on the north coast 
of Coburg peninsula, North Australia, thirteen miles E. Port 
Essington. A British settlement named Port Raffles, established 
there in 1827, was abandoned in 1829. See also RULE. 

RAGLESS. See LEGG. 

RAIMENT. From Raymond, like Garment from Garmund. 
Raymond is from the G. ram-mund, a strong man. 

RAIN. 1. From Rain, a parish co. Essex ; Rain or Rhain, a 
town of Upper Bavaria ; or Rayne, a parish of Scotland, co. 
Aberdeen. 2. Perhaps sometimes from Ran, for Randal, Ran- 
dolph. 

RAINBIRD. A corruption of Rambert, the inverse of 
Bertram. 

RAINBOW. Same as the French name Rainbeaux, i. q. 
Raimboux, Ramboux ; i. q. Raimbaut, Raimbault ; from 0. G. 
hruom-bald, famously bold. Rainbold, Rainbolt are found as 
surnames in the U. S. But see TURNBULL. 

RAISIN. From Raisen, name of three parishes co. Lincoln, 
one of which comprises the town of Market Raisen. Hence 
perhaps the surnames Rising, Reason, and the U. S. name 
Reasons. But qu. the French names Rais, Raisin, Raison. 

RALLY. A U. S. corruption of the name Raleigh, supposed 

G 



82 LUDUS PATKONYMICUS. 

to be derived from some obsolete local name (perhaps Raleghe) 
co. Devon. Kaleigh is the name of a parish co. Essex. 

RAM. Le Ram is found in H. R. ; but this name may some- 
times be from 0. H. G. ram, 0. N. rawr, strong, vigorous ; and 
perhaps sometimes a nickname of Rambert. 

RAMARD. See HAZARD. 

RAMBELOW. The same as Rumbellow, Rumbell, Rumball, 
Rumble, Rumbol, Rumboll, Rimbault ; from root of Rainbow, 
q. v. 

RAMSBOTTOM. See BOTTOM. 

RANSOM, RANSOME. From Ranson, son of Ran, i. e. Ran- 
dolph. 

RAP. Same as Rape. 

RAPE. A corruption of Rolfe. The name Rape or Rolfe 
occurs. See RULE. 

RASH. Same as the G. Rasch, from rasch, quick (0. G. ras, 
t. q. rod; Franc, rosch, celer, velox) ; Dan. rask, id., also nimble, 
ready, brisk, whence the name Rask. 

RATHER. A U. S. name. The Boston "Traveller," Oct. 
15, 1860, republishes a letter to Col. Rather of Decatur, Alabama, 
says Bowditch. This name, like Rothery, may be corrupted from 
Roderic. Lower gives as a surname Ratherham, which he makes 
a corruption of Rotherham, from Rotherham co. York. But see 
also RUDDER. 

RAW. The name of a township co. Northumberland. But 
see RULE. 

RAWBONE. A corruption of the surname Rathbone ; from 
some local name (perhaps originally Rathbourne) in Ireland. 

REACH (re'aTc). Perhaps from Gael, reac, a woman, a damsel ; 
or, if the same name as Riach, then from riabhach, brindled 
greyish, darkish brown, brownish. 

READLESS. See LEGC. 

READY. From the Scottish name MacReddie, whence 
Macready. 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 83 

REAM. From Rheims or Reims, a city of France. 

REASON. See RAISIN. 

RECKLESS. The same as Ragless. See LEGG. 

RECORD. Found written Rickword. The same as Ricord, 
the name of a distinguished French physician ; from G. Reichardt, 
Eng. Richard. 

REDCOCK. See COCK. 

REDFOOT. A U. S. name. Corrupted from Radford, the 
name of places cos. Nottingham, Oxford, arid Warwick. See 
HAZLEFOOT. 

REDMAN, i. q. REDMOND, REDMUND. From 0. G. 
rat-mund, a counsellor. Cf. the O. G. names Ethelred, Cuthred, 
Folcrat, Herirat, Lantirat, Marcrat. 

REDMILE. From Redmile or Redmilne (doubtless signifying 
red-mill), a parish of England, co. Leicester. Cf. the U. S. name 
Redmill. 

RESTCOME. An American name; compounded of comb, a 
valley. See COMB, NEWCOMB, SMALLCOMB. 

REVEL. The same as Rivel ; from Curry-Rivel in Somerset- 
shire ; or from Revel, formerly Rebel, in Languedoc. Lower says 
two places in Normandy bear the name of Reville, one near 
Bernai, the other arrond. Valognes, and that the name Revill 
(whence he says is Revell) still exists in Normandy. The sur- 
names Reveil, Reveil, Revel, Revil, Revial, Revelat, Revillet, 
Revilliot, Revelin, Revillon, Reveliere are found in the French 
Directory. 

RIBBONS. Corrupted from Reubens. 

RICE. The same as the Welsh name Rees. See PRICE. 

RICH. Sometimes from Richard. 

RICHBELL. This name was no doubt originally Richbold, 
compounded of bold, an abode, dwelling. See BOTTLE. 

RICHES. From Richard. 

RICKETS, RICKETTS. A corruption of Rickards, Ricards ; 
from Richards. 

G 2 



84 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

RICKS. From Richard. 

RIDDLE. The same as Riddell, found Rydale, De Rydale, 
and De Ridale ; from Riddell or Ryedale, in the parish of Lillies- 
leaf co. Roxburgh. Sir Walter Scott refers to several curious 
documents which warrant most conclusively the epithet of 
" Ancient Riddell." See Stat. Ac. of Scotland, vol. iii. p. 27, note. 

RIDE. From Ryde, formerly Ride, Isle of Wight. 

RIDEOUT. It has been suggested that this name may be from 
redoubt, a military fortification (Fr. reduit, It. riddoto, Sp. reduto), 
and the names Redout, Ridoubt are found in America; and 
Ridout, Ridoutt are no doubt the same name. In H. R. it is 
Ridhut, which may mean red hut or dwelling ; the first syllable 
may also be from W. rhyd, a ford. Again, Redhead would easily 
corrupt to Redout and Rideout. 

RIDING, RIDINGS. From some local name compounded of 
ing, a meadow ; or same as Ridding, from Ridding, a hamlet co. 
Derby. 

RIGHT. Same as Wright, an artificer in wood, in com- 
position = workman. 

RIGHTLY. Compounded of ley. See LEGG. 

RING. Ring, Ringe, Ringa, as ancient names, are from the 
Su.-Goth. ring, an eminent man (vir prsastans, eximius), connected 
with the C. B. rhen, satrapa; A. S. rinc, a soldier, warrior, a 
valiant, noble, or honourable man ; Sco. rink, rync, a strong man ; 
0. G. recke, reche, rink, a hero, giant ; H. G. hringa, a prince, 
governor, which Ihre seems to think are from reke, recke, 
heros, athleta, probably connected with the Su.-Goth. reiks, a 
prince. There were kings of Scandinavia named Sigivid Ring 
and Hakan Ring-, and, says Ihre, Ring is the name of many 
places in Scandinavia which were formerly the seats of heroes. 
The Mod. Dan. ringe, Sco. ringa, is small, little, slight, humble, 
low. Ring may also sometimes be from ring, a circle. Cf. the 
Italian name Aniello, whence Masaniello, from Thomaso Aniello. 
Ring is the name of a place near Dungarvan in Ireland. 



LUDUS PATRONYMICtTS. 85 

RINGER. Perhaps from 0. G. ringer, a wrestler ; from ringen, 
to fight, contend with. Cf. Brider ; from Dan. bryder, a wrestler, 
combatant. 

RINGGOLD. A U. S. name; from Ringwold, a parish of 
England, co. Kent ; or Ringwood, a market town and parish co. 
Southampton. 

RISING. The 0. H. G. risi, riso, Mod. H. G. riese, 0. N. risi, 
Dan. rise, Sw. rese, is a giant, and ing, son or descendant ; but 
this name is most probably the same as Raisin, q.v. "One B. 
Rising, who had for several years before held a commission in 
her Majesty's army, was in January, 1867, elevated to the curacy 
of Newport. Reising is a U. S. name." 

ROACH. From Fr. roche, a rock. 

ROB, ROBB. See ROBIN. 

ROBE. See ROBIN. 

ROBIN. A diminutive of Rob, from Robert. Hence Rob, 
Robb, Robe, Rope. 

ROLL. See RULE. 

ROLLS. See RULE. 

ROOF. See RULE. 

ROPE. See ROBIN and RUBY. 

ROSE. See RUSE. 

ROSEBOTTOM. See BOTTOM. 

ROSEWHARM. A name found in Bowditch. A corruption 
of the Cornish name Roswarne ; from Roswarne, an estate in the 
parish of Camborne. 

ROTTEN. From Rodden, a parish co. Somerset. Rotten, 
Rotton, Rodden, Roddam, Roden are found as U. S. names. 

ROUGH. See RULE. 

ROUGHEAD. Same as the French name Ruffet. But see 
RULE. 

ROWBOTTOM. See BOTTOM. 

RUBY. Same as Roby, Robie, Robe, Robb, Rubb, Rope, 
Roop, from Robert. 



86 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

RUDDER. The same as the German names Roadhar, Ruder 
(whence Riidersdorf ), Roder ; from 0. G. rat-herr, noble coun- 
sellor ; or rat-Tier, eminent in council, or simply a counsellor. 

RUE. From the French name De la Rue, i. e. from the street. 

RUFF, RUF. See RULE. 

RUFFLE, RUFFELL. See RULE. , 

RULE. Nisbet derives this name from St. Regulus, who 
brought the relics of St. Andrew to Scotland. It is more probably 
the same with the A. N. Raoul, in H. R. Ruel ; corrupted from 
Randolph or Radolph. Hence Ralph, Rolph, Rape, Rough, Ruff, 
Roof, Raw, Roll, Rolls, and, as a diminutive, Ruffle. Ruet, Ruf, 
Ruffe, Ruffel, Ruffet, Ruffey, Ruffin are found as French names. 

RUM. Forstemann derives this name from 0. G. hruom, fame. 
Ferguson thinks it may be from 0. N. rumr, a giant, one who 
might truly be called "a rum customer." But see RAM and 
WORMS. 

RUMAGE. See MARRIAGE. 

RUMBALL. See RAMBELOW. 

RUMBELL. See RAMBELOW. 

RUMBELLOW. See RAMBELOW. 

RUMBLE. See RAMBELOW. 

RUMMER. The same as the O. G. names Rumheri, Rhumhar ; 
from hruom-herr, distinguished lord. It may also sometimes be 
the same as Rimmer, Rimer, or Rhymer. Rummer, Rimmer, 
Rymer, Rymers are found as U. S. names. 

RUSE. Same as Rouse and Roux == red ; or same as Rose, 
from Cornish rose, ros, a valley. 

RUSHOUT. The name of a British M. P. (1857). James 
Rushout was created a baronet at the Restoration of Charles II. 
An ancestor of the Rushouts was Thibaut Rushaut, a noble English 
knight. The name may be derived from some Dutch or Flemish 
local name ending in hout, signifying wood, timber. Cf. the Flemish 
Turnhout and the English local names Bagshot, Oakshot, com- 
pounded of holt, a wood or grove. Rushout or Rushaut may 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 87 

also be a corruption of the French name Rousset, Roussell, 
Russell, diminutives of Roux. 

RUST. A corruption of the French name Rousset. (See 
RUSHOUT). Rust or Rusth is the appellation of a town of West 
Hungary. 



S. 



SACK, SACKS, SACHS. From Isaac, Isaacs. Cf. the names 
Sacchi, Sacchini, Sacchetti. But see SEX. 

SALE, SALES. This name is found written De la Sale, De 
Salle, De Aula, De la Saule, De Halle, Saul, and Halle, and is 
derived from A. S. sel, sele, a hall, Fr. salle. 

SALL. A U. S. name. Perhaps sometimes from Sail, a parish 
co. Norfolk ; and at other times from Fr. salle, a hall. See SALE. 

SALMON. 1. From Solomon. 2. From Saleman. "The manor 
of Salmons in Caterham co. Surrey is known to have belonged, 
temp. Edward III., to Roger Saleman " (Brayley's Surrey, iv. 189). 
The name Saleman might signify both a saleman and an attendant 
or keeper of a hall. 

SALT. From the village of Salt co. Stafford. In 1166 the 
name is written Selte. In the reign of Henry III. Jvo de Saut 
held one knight's fee in Saut, of the Barony of Stafford. Subse- 
quently, Hugh de Salt held Salt of Philip de Chetwynd. From 
this tenure, and from resemblance of the arms, it is probable that 
Salt was a cadet of Chetwynd. In the Visitations of Staffordshire 
there are pedigrees of this family, from whom descend Thomas 
Salt, Esq., jun., M. P. for Stafford, and William Salt, Esq., F.S.A. 
(See Lower.) The name may also sometimes be the same as 
Salt or Sault, from the Barony of Salt co. Kildare, so named from 
the district called De Saltu Salmonis, " the salmon's leap." 

SAMPLE. From St. Paul, St. Pol. Cf. the name Sampol. 

SAND, SANDS. The vocable sand is found in composition of 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

many localities, but the surnames Sand, Sands may mean a mes- 
senger, one sent ; from G. senden, Goth, sandjan, A. S. sendmi, 
Franc, et Alam. senten, to send ; G. sende, missio, dimissio. Hence, 
doubtless, Sandeman, Sandman, Sentman, and the U. S. name 
Sendfirst, which may mean a princely messenger, or ambassador. 
Cf. the German compounds chur-furst, elector; vier-fiirst, te- 
trarcha. 

SANDELL. Perhaps the same as Sandall; from Sandall, 
name of a parish (Kirk), and of a township (Long), co. York, 
West Riding. 

SANDMAN. See SAND. 

SANDY. This name has no connection with the Sandi of 
the Yorkshire Domesday, which has been derived from sand, a 
messenger. It is the same as Sandie, corrupted from Alexander. 
It may sometimes be from Sandy (with Gritford), a parish co. 
Beds. 

SATTENSHALL. Bowditch says that a person of this name 
arrived in Boston in an English steamer in September, 1857. 
The last part of the name is derived from hall. 

SAUL, SAULL. Perhaps sometimes from Saul, a parish co. 
Gloucester, or Saul co. Down, Ulster, Ireland. But see SALE. 

SAVEALL, SHAVEALL. Corrupted from Saville. 

SAW. From Saul, like Raw from Raoul or Ralph. Cf. Saw, 
Sawkins, with Raw, Rawkins. 

SAYWELL. A corruption of Saville, Savile, Savil. 

SCAFFOLD. A name found in Lower's Appendix. It pro- 
bably means sheep-fold (A. S. sceaf, G. schaf, a sheep). 

SCAMP. From a French or Belgian local name ending in 
camp (L. campus). Scampton is the name of a parish co. Lincoln. 
See also LOSECAMP. 

SCANDAL. From some local name compounded of dale. 

SCAREDEVIL. A name found in the U. S. Corrupted from 
the name Scardeville, which Lower thinks may be from Ecarden- 
ville (perhaps originally Esoardenville), dep. Ewe, Normandy. 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 89 

SCATTERGOOD. (H. R. Schatregod.) From some local 
name ending in " wood." 

SCHOOLCRAFT. A U. S. name. From croft, a little close. 
See CRAFT. 

SCOLDING. Formed like Winning, q. v. 

SCORE. From A. S. score, a shoer. 

SCUFFLE. From some local name compounded of %, a 
meadow. 

SCURRY. The same as Scurrah and Scurr ; probably from the 
Ir. name 'Scurry, or O'Sgurra, one of the chiefs given by 
O'Dugan on the six Sodhans. The Sodhan is a large territory 
in the barony of Tiaquin, which was made into six divisions, 
called the six Sodhans. The name Sgurra may be from the Ir. 
seor, a champion, or sgeir, a rock in the sea, a cliff, shelf; or 
sgeireach, rocky. 

SEABORN. From some local name compounded of 'bourn. 
(See SMALLBONE.) There is however a Seyburn, and Ferguson 
thinks these names may be from the Scandinavian name Soebiorn 
(sea-bear). 

SEABRIGHT. Same as Sebright, corrupted from Sibert, 
Siebert, Sigibert, from 0. G. sig-lrecht, distinguished in victory. 
See SIP 

SEACOCK. See COCK. This name may some day corrupt 
into Seacook. 

SEAFART. A U. S. name. The same as Seffert, Seyffert, 
Seyfried, corresponding 1 with the G. Seyffart, Siefert, Seefried, 
from Siegfred, or Sigefred, name of an A. S. bishop of Chichester, 
which Ferguson renders " peace of victory ;" but, with more rea- 
son, from G. sig -frith, victorious protector. 

SEAGOOD. From some local name compounded of wood. 

SEAL, SEALE. From Seal, name of parishes cos. Kent, 
Leicester, Surrey, and Sussex ; from A. S. sel, a seat, hall, manor- 
house, mansion. 

SEAQUILL. From some local name compounded of mile. It 



90 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

may have been Segville or Sigville. We have several local names 
compounded of seg, sig, from sig, sige, victory. 

SEARCH. Same as the U. S. names Serch and Sarch ; per- 
haps corrupted from the name Sergius. Cf. Searchfield, the last 
syllable of which is ville. 

SEAS. From Seez, a comm. and town of France, dep. Orne. 

SEASONGOOD. Formed like Seagood, q. v. 

SEE. Same as Sea ; from residence near the sea. " Atte 
Sea, as a family name, is very common in medieval records " 
(Lower). 

SEGAR. From A. S. sigra, 0. N. sigarr, a conqueror ; 0. N. 
sigr, A. S. sige, 0. G. sieg, Franc, et Alam. sigo, victory, 
Hence the surname Sugar. Cf. Sigo, Sigi, Sager, Siggoer, Siggeir, 
Sigar, Seager, Seeger, Seaker, Seeker, Saggers, Siggers, and the 
compounds Sigiwin, Sigismund, Sigmund, Sigofrid, &c. 

SELF, SELFE. "The name Sewlf (sea-wolf) occurs in a 
charter of Canute, and it is probably the same as the Saulf in the 
Domesday of Derbyshire, where it is in the Scandinavian form. 
Hence maybe our Salve, Self, Selves." Ferguson. 

SEND. From Send (with Ripley), a parish co. Surrey; or 
Send, a chapelry co. Wilts. It may also sometimes be another 
orthography of Sand, q. v. 

SENDALL. A U. S. name. Perhaps the same as Sandell, q. v. 

SENDFIRST. A U. S. name. See SAND. 

SENTANCE. From some local name, perhaps St. Anne's. 
St. Anne is the name of a mountain of France, dep. Orne ; of a 
maritime village, Guadeloupe ; of another village in Martinique ; 
of some parishes in the West Indies ; and of one in the island of 
Alderney ; of a river of Lower Canada, and of a lake in British 
North America. 

SEQUIN. Not from the coin, but the same as Segwin, Siggins, 
from sig-win, victorious warrior. 

SERMON, SURMAN, SURMON. Found as U. S. names. 
Perhaps from Saargemiind (Fr. Sarreguemines), a commune and 



LUDUS PATRONYMICU8. 91 

town of France, dep. Moselle. These names would also corrupt 
from the ancient names Sigmund, Sigmundr. See SEGAR. 

SESSIONS. The same as Sissons and Sisson ; from Soissons, 
a town of France, dep. Aisne. Lower however derives Sisson, 
Sissons from Siston, a parish co. Gloucester. Sizun is the name 
of a town of France, dep. Finistere. 

SETON. From Seaton or Seton co. Haddington ; and perhaps 
sometimes from Seaton, name of parishes cos. Cumberland, Devon, 
Durham, Northumberland, Rutland, York, &c. Seaton is also a 
surname. 

SETTLE. From Settle, a market town and chapelry co. 
York, West Eiding. 

SEX. From A. S. Seaxa, a Saxon. Cf. the names Six, Sax. 
SHADDOCK. See SHADE. 

SHADE. (There is a German Schade.) The same as Chad or 
Ceadda ; whence probably, as diminutives, Shaddock and Shat- 
tock. Hath, had, chad signifies war. 

SHAKSPEARE. Variously Shakespeare, Shakespear, Shake- 
spere, Shakespeyre, Shakyspere, Schakespeire, Schakspere, 
Shaxper, and Chacksper. " Concerning its etymology," says 
Lower, "there can be no doubt. ' The custome, first TraAAeo', to 
vibrate the speare before they used it, to try the strength of it, 
was so constantly kept, that eyxeamtAoy, a Shake-speare, came at 
length to be an ordinary word, both in Homer and other poets, to 
signifie a soldier' (Francis Rous, Archseologia Attica, 1637). 
The Bard's contemporaries evidently understood the name in that 
sense. . . . Our family nomenclature presents us with several 
analogies, as Break.speare, Winspmr, $Aa&eshaft, /S/aa&elaunce, 
Hackstaff, Briselance, and Bruselance, Wagstaffe, Bickerstaffe, 
Hurlbat, Draweswerde (Drawsword), Cutlemace (' cut the club or 
mace'), Hackblock," &c. I have elsewhere (cf. Notes and Queries, 
vols. ix. and x.) stated that Shakespere might be a corruption of 
Sigisbert, which would translate "renowned for victory" (sige, 
victory) ; in answer to which Mr. Ferguson seemed to think that 



92 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

the name might be from Sicisper, Sigispero, or Sigiper, which he 
would translate " victorious bear " (perhaps rather " victorious 
man"). My suggestion would seem probable from the fact that 
the name Shakeshaft might be from sigishaft, sighaft, used by 
the Franks for " victorious ;" or from sigis-haved, " head of vic- 
tory," " victorious leader." I am however disposed to think that 
the latter name is merely a corruption of Shakestaff ; and, as I 
have shown elsewhere, most names compounded of staff" are 
derived from A. S. steel, a place. On further consideration, 
I am inclined to doubt my former derivation of the name Shake- 
speare, although it would easily corrupt from Sig-isbert, by con- 
traction of the first vocable, and by dropping of the final t. 
I agree with another correspondent of Notes and Queries in 
tracing the name to Jaques Pierre. In French, Italian, and 
German, surnames are frequently made up of two names. Cf. 
the French 'names Jeangirard, Jeangrand, Jeanguemin, Jean- 
jacquet, Jeanjean, Jeanmaire; Pierrehumbert ; the Italian Gian- 
pietri, Zampieri ; and the German Meyerbeer, whose brother was 
Michael Beer. The nearest names to Jacques Pierre that I have 
been able to find are, James Peters, Jacques Henri Bernardin 
de Saint Pierre, and Petrus Jacobus. 

SHALLY. Same as Shalley and Shanley, {. q. Shelley ; from 
Shenley, name of a parish cos. Suffolk and Essex, and of a town- 
ship co. York, W. R. See SKINLEY. 

SHAMELY. A U. S. name. See LEGQ. 

SHARPLESS. From Sharpies, a township co. Lancaster. See 
LEGG. 

SHARPLEY. See LEGG. 

SHATTER. From Chartres, a town of France, dep. Eure-et- 
Loir ; or La Chatre, dep. Indre. One Selina Chatters occurs in 
the Registrar-General's List ; although this may be the same as 
Chatteris, from Chatteris co. Ely. See also CHARTER. 

SHAVE. Mac Cliave is a Gaelic surname. But see CALF and 
SHOVE. 



LUDUS PATKONYMICUS. 93 

SHAVEALL. See SAVEALL. 

SHEAF. The same as Shelf. Ferguson derives Sheaf from 
Scef or Sceaf, according to the A. S. table of Woden's ancestry, 
the father of Scyld. He says Scef or Sceaf signifies " sheaf," and 
gives an anecdote in connection therewith. 

SHEARGOLD, SHERGOLD. The same as Sherwood (by 
interchange of g and w) ; from Sherwood, a celebrated forest co. 
Nottingham, scene of the adventures of Robin Hood and his 
companions. Cf. the U. S. name Purgold. 

SHEATH. See SHEET. 

SHEEPSHANKS. According to some, this name may refer 
to badly-formed legs, and we certainly have the name Cruick- 
shank, Cruikshanks, Crukshanks. Among other curious narrow- 
lanes at Canterbury, however, was one called the Sheep Shank, 
which probably had its name from some tavern sign, signifying 
the Ship or Sheep Tavern ; from G. schenJce, a drinking-house, 
ale-house. Cf. the surnames Schenck, Schenk, signifying a pub- 
lican, vintner. 

SHEET, SHEETS. U. S. names. We also find Shead, 
Sheard, Sheat, Sheath, and Sheed. Some derive the name Shead 
from a Gaelic word signifying a field, but there is no such word 
in that language. It might, however, be from scadh, strong. 
Sheat is a provincial (S.) word for a young hog ; the A. S. sceard, 
Eng. sheard, is a fragment; but these names, especially Sheat 
and Sheath, may translate a maker of sheaths or scabbards 
(Sheather is an English surname), from A. S. sceath, scathe, a 
sheath. 

SHELF. From Shelf, a township co. York, West Riding. 
The name Shelf has also been derived from the hero Scelf or 
Scylf, presumed founder of the Scylfingas, a Scandinavian tribe. 

SHELL. From Shell, a hamlet in the parish of Himbledon, 
co. Worcester. 

SHERRY. 1. For Sheridan, i. e. Jeridan ; from Jerry, i. e. 
Jeremiah. 2. Perhaps sometimes from Sheriff. 



94 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

SHEW. From Chew Magna (Bishop-Chew), a parish co. 
Somerset. Cf. Chew. 

SHEWCRAFT. See SHOECRAFT. 

SHILLINGLAW. See LAW. 

SHIN, SHINN. Same as Chin, q. v. 

SHIP, SHIPP. The same as Skipp, Skyp. These names 
may mean a sailor, from A. S. scif, a ship, boat, whence sciper, 
and the surname Skipper. Ship, Shippe, Shippie, Shep, Skippon 
are found as U. S. names. 

SHIPLAKE. See LEGGL 

SHIPTON. SeeSmpwASH. 

SHIPWASH. A corruption of sheepwash, the place where 
sheep are cleansed before shearing. Cf. the names Shipton and 
Shipway. 

SHIPWAY. See SHIPWASH. 

SHIRT. Same as Shurt. Corrupted from Sherard, Sherrard. 
Mr. Bowditch, in his humorous work on Suffolk (American) sur- 
names, says Abraham Shurt, of Pemaquid (near Bristol, Me.), 
took an acknowledgment of an Indian deed in 1826, twenty years 
before any enactment on that subject ; and he dedicates his work 
" To the Memory of A. Shurt, the Father of American Convey- 
ancing, whose Name is associated alike with my Daily Toilet, and 
my Daily Occupation." 

SHIRTCLIFF. Same as Shirtliff and Shurtleff, both found in the 
U. S. Derived from some local name, most probably Shortcliff. 

SHOE, i. q. Chew and Shew, q. v. 

SHOEBOTTOM. See BOTTOM. 

SHOECRAFT. A name found at Buffalo, U. S. There is also 
a U. S. Shewcraft. These names are compounded of croft, a small 
field adjoining a dwellinghouse. 

SHOOTER. The same as Shuter, Sutor, Suter, Sutler, Soutar, 
Souter, Soutter, Sowter ; from 0. Eng. souter, a cobbler, shoe- 
maker, from A. S. sutere, L. sutor. Hence doubtless the U. S. 
name Shouter. 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 95 

SHOTBOLT. From A. S. bolt, a dwelling. See BOTTLE. 

SHOUT. The same as Shute ; from Shute, a parish co. Devon. 
Shout, Shut, Shutt, Shute, Shuts are found in Bowditch. Cf. 
Chute, from Chute in Wilts. 

SHOUTER. See SHOOTER. 

SHOVE. A corruption of the French name Chauve. See 
CALF and SHAVE. 

SHOVEL. From Showell, a chapelry in the parish of Swer- 
ford, co. Oxford ; or from the surname Scovell (in H. R. De 
Scoville, De Scovile) ; from Escoville, now Ecoville, arrond. 
Caen, Normandy. Sir Cloudesley Shovel was the name of a gal- 
lant British admiral, born near Clay, in Norfolk, about 1650. 

SHOW. A name occurring in the Registrar- General's List. 
There is also a U. S. Showe. The same as Chew, Shew, Shoe, 
q. v. 

SHUFFLE, SHUFFELL. 1. From Sheffield co. York. 2. 
The same as Suffield ; from Suffield (south field), name of a parish 
of England, co. Norfolk, and of two townships of the U. S., the 
one Connecticut, the other Ohio. 3. Same as the U. S. names 
Shufelt, Shufeldt, compounded of G. feld, a field. See also 
BOTTOM. 

SHUFFLEBOTTOM. See BOTTOM. 

SHUFFLER. The same as Shoveller, a probable corruption 
of Chevalier (H. R. Le Chevaler), a knight or horseman (Fr.). 

SHUN. Same as Shin, q. v. 

SHUT, SHUTT. Same as Shout, q, v. 

SICILY. An Edinburgh surname. A corruption of the female 
Christian name Cicely or Coecilia. 

SICKMAN. From root of Sugarman, q. v. 

SIDE. According to Lower, side implies the side of a hill, 
stream, &c. Ferguson renders it a " possession " or " location ;" 
and if so it would seem to be from A. S. scet, a sitting, station, 
&c. We have many names compounded of side, as Silverside, 
Silversides, Whiteside, Handyside, &c. 



96 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

SIDEBOTHER. See SIDE. 

SIDEBOTTOM. See BOTTOM. 

SILENCE. From Saillans or Seillans, a comm. and market 
town of France, dep. Drome. 

SILK. From Silk-Willoughby, a parish co. Lincoln. 

SILL. A nickname of Silas or Silvester. 

SILLY, SILLEY. Properly Ceely. D. Gilbert says John 
Silly, gent., of St. Wenn, Cornwall, altered his name from Ceely 
to Silly, which Lower considers " a truly silly deed, especially for 
a lawyer, to have executed." 

SILVERLOCK. See LEGG. 

SILVERSIDE, SILVERSIDES. See SIDE. 

SILVERSTONE. From Silverston, a parish co. Northampton. 
But see SMALSTONE. 

SIMMER. 1. Same as Seamer, Seymour ; from A. S. seamere, 
a tailor. 2. From Seamer, name of two parishes co. York ; or 
Semer co. Suffolk, on the Bret. Some derive the name Seymour 
from Roger 'de Sancto Mauro ; and Ferguson says Seamer, Sey- 
mour correspond with the G. Siemer, Simmer, from Sigimar. But 
see SKIMMER. 

SIMPER. From St. Pierre, i. e. St. Peter. St. Pierre is the 
name of a parish co. Monmouth. 

SIMPLE. From Simplicius. Menage, in his Receuil de Noms 
de Saints, gives a St. Simples, corrupted from St. Simplicius. 
Simple may also sometimes be the same as Semple and Sample, 
from St. Paul. See SAMPLE. 

SINFOOT. Compound of ford. See HAZLEFOOT. 

SING. Found Singer, alias Synge (a singer in a church) ; 
from A. S. singan, to sing. Cf, the names Sang, Sangar, Sangster. 
The Indian name Sing, Singh is derived from the Sanscrit sink, 
siriha, a lion. 

SINGLEDAY. Persons named Monday, Munday, Thursday, 
Friday, Saturday, Sunday, G. Soutag, may have been so named 
from having been born on those days ; but whence such names 



LUDUS PATKONYMICUS. 97 

as Doubleday, Otherday, Purday, Singleday, Twiceaday is 
doubtful. Meidinger, under tag, tac, splendour, glory, renown, 
fame (glanz, ruhm), gives the Alt D. names Alptac, Helmtac, 
Richdag, Tagafrid, the Alt S. Berndag, Hildidag, Liuddag, 
Wildag. But these names may sometimes be from deo, diu, con- 
fidant, servant ; whence the Alt D. names Arndeo, Helmdeo, 
Irmindeo, Pirideo, Regindeo, &c. &c. Cf. also the English name 
Heritage, in H. R. Heritag.' 

SIN JOHN. A U. S. corruption of St. John. The name is 
also found written Sinjen. 

SIP. From Sibert, a name occurring in the genealogy of the 
kings of the East Angles, East Saxons, and West Saxons, cor- 
responding with the G. name Siebert, an 0. H. G. Sigiperaht, 
and a G. Sigibert ; or from Sibbald, G. Sebald, Siebold, Sybelt, 
from Sigebald, name of a king of the East Saxons. Cf. the G. 
names Sibja, Sibo, Sivo, Siffo, 0. G. Sepp, Seebe, Sybel, and the 
U. S. names Sibel, Sibell, Sibbs, Sip, Sipp, Sipps, Sipples, Sippel, 
Sipple, Sippet. 

SIPPET. See SIP. 

SIRGOOD. Same as Sargood, Sherwood, Shergold. See 
SHEARGOLD. 

SITWELL. The same as Sidwell, for some local name com- 
pounded of mile. The name would also corrupt from the German 
name Sigiwald. 

SIX. See SEX. 

SIXSMITHS. A corruption of Sucksmith, q. v. 

SIXTY. Perhaps the same as Sexty and Saxty ; from Saxty, 
a parish co. Suffolk. Lower makes the name Sexty a corruption 
of sacristy. 

SKIFF. A U. S. name. Perhaps from A. S. scife, scyfe, a 
precipice. 

SKILL. Camden renders shell " a well, in the Northern 
English." Sky 11 and Skell are also found. But see SKULL. 

SKILLET. Perhaps a diminutive of Skill, q. v. 

H 



98 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

SKIMMER. Same as the G. Sigimar ; from sig-mar, renowned 
for victory. 

SKINLEY, i. q. SKINGLEY, SHENLEY, SHELLEY. 
From A. S. scean-leag, beautiful meadow. See LEGG. 

SKINNING. Formed like Winning, q. v. 

SKULL, SCULL. From Skull, in the Barony of Carbery, 
co. Cork. 

SLACK. A name of local origin. The word slack signifies 
valley, a small shallow dell. " Slack, slak, slake, an opening 
in the higher part of a hill or mountain, where it becomes less 
steep, and forms a sort of pass ; a gap or narrow pass between 
two hills or mountains." (Jamieson.) 

SLATE. From Sleat or Slate, in the Isle of Wight. 

SLAUGHTER. From one of the two parishes so called co. 
Gloucester ; perhaps derived from the name of a river. There is 
a place called Slaughterford co. Wilts. Slaughter may also some- 
times be the same as Slatter, which has been derived from the 
Dan. slagter, a butcher. Slaughter is the name of a butcher at 
Notting Hill, Middlesex. 

SLEEP, SLEAP. From Sleep, a hamlet in the parish of St. 
Peter, at St. Albans, co. Herts. 

SLEEPER. See SLIPPER. 

SLEWMAN. Same as Slowman, q. v. 

SLIM. The Boston Courier (4th June, 1859) mentions that Mr. 
Slim had a narrow escape from drowning. Slim is probably a 
corruption of Selim, a name which occurs twice in the Post-Office 
Directory. 

SLIPPER. The same as Slyper. From the old word sword- 
sleiper^ a sword-grinder ; from Teut. schwerdt-schleijfer. Slyper 
is the name of a diamond-cutter in London. Hence no doubt the 
surname Sleeper. The name Slipper has been connected with the 
Spanish name Zapata ; and zapdta, zapdto is a kind of half-boot. 
Mellado gives three Spaniards of the name of Zapata Antonio 
Zapata de Cisneros, a cardinal, born at Madrid in 1550 ; Antonio 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 99 

or Lupian Zapata, born at Segorbe in the seventeenth century ; 
and Antonio Zapata, born at Soria at the end of the seventeenth 
century. The latter was one of the most celebrated of the pupils 
of Antonio Palomino, and, among many others, painted a fine 
picture of St. Peter and St. Paul for the cathedral of Osma. The 
name is probably derived from locality. Zapata is the appellation 
of a district of Spain, prov. Avila ; and of a place prov. Ponte- 
vedra. Zapateros is the name of a village prov. Cordoba ; and 
there are places in Spain called Zapategui, Zapateira, Zapateiro, 
Zapatera, Zapateria, Zapatero, and Zapaton. 

SLIPSHOE. See STEPTOE. 

SLIT. Same as Slight, one thin and tall. 

SLOCOCK. See COCK. 

SLOW. This name was anciently written De la Slo, Ad le 
Slow, or De la Slou, and is the same as Slough ; from slough, a 
place of deep mud or mire, from A. S. slog. Slough is the name 
of a place in Bucks. Slow, Slowe, Slowey, Slough, Sloog, Slog- 
gett, Sluggett are found as surnames in Bowditch. 

SLOWCOCK. See COCK. 

SLOWLY, SLOWLEY. From some local name compounded 
of ley. See LEGG. 

SLOWMAN. The same as Sloman, and the U. S. Slooman, 
Sluman, Sleuman, Slewman, Slyman ; corrupted from the Hebrew 
name Solomon. 

SLUMBER. A U. S. corruption of Lumber, Limber, q. v. It 
would even corrupt from St. Lambert, if there ever was such a 
saint or sinner. 

SLYBODY. The same as Slytbody, which Lower says is 
found in Sussex in the thirteenth century, and four centuries after 
in the same county as Slybody. The name means thin and tall in 
body. 

SLYMAN. The same as Sleeman, Slemmon, and Slowman, 
q. v. But see also SLYBODY. 

SMALLAGE. See MARRIAGE. 

H 2 



100 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

SMALLBACK. From some local name compounded of G, 
bach, a brook. 

SMALLBONE, SMALLBONES. From some local name 
compounded of bourn, a brook, A. S. burn. Hence Collarbone, 
Crackbone, Fulborn, Kneebone, Newbone, Newborne, Stubborne, 
Whalebone. 

SMALLCOMB. See COMB. 

SMALLEY. SEE SMILES. 

SMALLPAGE, SMALPAGE. This name may mean the 
small village. Page (L. pagus) was an old English word for a 
village. But see PAGE. 

SMALPENNY. See PENNY. 

SMALSTONE. A name found in the U. S. From some local 
name compounded of ton (A. S. tun), an enclosure. Hence 
Silverstone, &c. 

SMELT. 1. A diminutive of Small = to the names Little, 
Petit, Klein, &c. 2. From A. S. smylt, smelt, serene, gentle, 
placid, mild. 

SMILES. Said to be derived from the name Smellie, probably 
from Smalley, a chapelry in the parish of Morley, co. Bucks; 
from A, S. smeth-leag, smooth pasture. Smalley, Smily, Smedley 
would seem to be the same name. 

SMOKER. Mr. Ferguson thinks this name may be from the 
A. S. smicere, elegant, polished ; but the Dan. form of the word, 
viz. smuk (fair, handsome, fine), would be nearer. Halliwell 
says, "At Preston, before the passing of the Reform Bill in 1832, 
every person who had a cottage with a chimney, and used the 
latter, had a vote, and was called a smoker." Smucker, Smock, 
Smoke are found as U. S. names. 

SMUT. A name found in Lower's Appendix. The same as 
Smout, Smoot, Smoote, Smyth, Smythe, Smith. Cf. Smooth- 
man, which is doubtless a corruption of Smithyman or Smither- 
iTian. All these names,' as well as Smither, Smyther, and 
Smithers, are found in Bowditch. 



LUDTJS PATKONYMICUS. 101 

SNIPE. Same as Snape, Snepp ; from Snape, name of a 
parish co. Suffolk, and of a township co. York, North Riding. 
The Devonshire word snape signifies a spring in arable ground. 
The names Snape, Snapp, Snipe, Snupe are found in the U. S. 

SNIVELLY, SNIVELY, SNIVELEY. U. S. names. From 
some local name compounded of ley. See LEGG. 

SNOOKS. The word snooks is often brought forward as the 
answer to an idle question, or as the perpetrator of a senseless 
joke. It was probably the name of a character in some modern 
play or song. The surname is a gross corruption of Sevenoaks ; 
from Sevenoaks, Kent, the provincial pronunciation of which is 
Se'noaks. Sevenoaks is still a surname, and there was formerly 
a Sir William de Sevenoke. " Mr. Sevenoke," says Bowditch, 
" was an ancient Lord Mayor of London." 

SNOWBALL. From some local name compounded of bold ; 
perhaps from snaw-bold, the snow dwelling. See BOTTLE. 

SNOWHITE. Compounded of thwaite. See LILYWHITE. 

SOAR. See SORE. 

SOBER. The same as Seaber and Seubar in the Domesday of 
Lincolnshire ; probably from Sibert, for Sigibert. 

SOCKETT. Probably of local origin. According to Lower, 
Sockett is an alias for the parish of Playden co. Sussex. 

SOFTLY, SOFTLEY. See LEGG. 

SOLACE. Same as Solis ; from Sollies, a commune and town 
of France, dep. Var ; or from Soules, an ancient Scottish family 
that gave name to Soulestoun, now Saltoun, or Salton, in Scot- 
land. 

SOLE, SOUL. 1. From the Scripture name Saul. 2. From 
Saul, name of a parish of England, co. Gloucester, and of a parish 
of Ireland, co. Down. 3. From Soulle, a town of France, dep. 
La Manche. 4. The same as Seal, Seale ; from root of Counsell, 
q. v. Cf. Shrubsole, Plimsaul, Plimsoll ; and see also SALE, 
SALES. 

SOMANY. The same as Soman and Samand; from A. S. 



102 LUDUS PATEONYMICUS. 

see-man, scs-mann, a seaman. Samand would also corrupt from 
St. Amant. St. Amant and Stamamant are found in Bowditch. 

SOMEBORN. Bowditch mentions a Mr. Someborn of Phila- 
delphia, who, he says, may feel assured that somebody was his 
father. Sombourn is the name of two parishes (King's and 
Little) co. Hants. 

SON. The same as Sonne ; perhaps from G. sonne, the sun. 
Son, Sonne, Sonna, and Sunrise are found in Bowditch, and Sun- 
shine in Lower's Appendix. 

SOPPETT, SOPPITT. A corruption of Sopwith, from Sop- 
worth co. Wilts. But see SIP and SIPPET. 

SORE. A Maria Sore and an Ellen Soar occur in the 
Registrar-General's List. They may be from Sore, a town of 
France, dep. Landes. They may also be the same as Shore and 
the U. S. Shower. 

SORELY. A U. S. name. See LEGG. 

SORTWELL. From some local name compounded of mile. 

SOUL. See SOLE. 

SOURWINE. See WINE. 

SOUTHERLY. See LEGG. 

SOUTHMAYD. The same as Southmead, both U. S. names. 
See LONGMAID. 

SOY. A U. S. name. A corruption of Say; from Sai, near 
Argentan, a town of France, dep. Orne ; probably derived from 
saxum, a rock. 

SPAN, SPANE. Same as Spain, Spayne, originally from 
Spain. See Morant's Essex. 

SPANIEL. One from Spain or Hispaniola. See Charnock's 
Verba Nominalia. 

SPAR. Same as Spurr, q. v. 

SPEAK, SPEAKE. The same as Speke ; from Branford 
Speke (found Speak in one map) co. Devon. Speke is also the 
name of a township co. Lancaster. Lower says the Spekes of 
Somersetshire descend from Richard le Espek, who lived in the 



LUDUS PATKONYMICUS. 103 

reigTi of Henry II., but that he is unable to explain Le Espek- 
A correspondent of Notes and Queries thinks "Willi le Espec" 
may be a misreading for " Willi le Espee " that is, William the 
Swordsman, or William of the Sword ; another thinks espec may 
mean a spicer, who was formerly something between a grocer 
and a chemist, and he quotes Roquefort, " Especiaire, epicier, 
droquiste, apothecaire ; de species, specierum" The 0. Fr. spec is 
an inspector. 

SPEAR. Same as Spurr, q. v. 

SPENCE. See EXPENCE. 

SPENCER, SPENSER. From Fr. dispensier, a dispenser, 
steward, literally one having the care of the spence or buttery. 
The ancestor of the noble family of Spencer was Robert de 
Spencer, steward, i. e. dispenser, to William the Conqueror. 

SPENDLOVE. See LAW. 

SPIDER. Properly Spinner. The name of the insect is pro- 
perly spinner. 

SPIER. See SPIRE. 

SPILLARD. See HAZARD. 

SPINNAGE. See MARRIAGE. 

SPIRE, SPIRES. From Spires, G. Speyer, a city of Ger- 
many, cap. Rhenish Bavaria. 

SPIRIT. A name found in the records of the Registrar - 
General. It is probably the same as Spurrett, a diminutive 
of Spurr, q. v. One Spiritus Presbyter, 1 however, occurs in 
a charter of Hardacnut, Cod. Dip. Ang. Sax., No. 762. Cf. 
Ferguson. 

SPIRT. Same as Spirit, q. v. 

SPITTLE. Found Spittal, Spital, Spittel. Spital is the name 
of two places in Austria, of a parish in South Wales, and of a 
township co. Lincoln. It is a corruption of hospital. 

SPOTTS. From Spott, a parish of Scotland, co. Haddington. 

SPRATT. A probable corruption of Pratt, for Parratt, a 
diminutive of the French Pierre. 



104 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

SPRUCE. Like the adjective, probably derived from Prussia. 
But see Charnock's Verba Nominalia. 

SPURAWAY. 1. Same as Spurway; from A. S. speara, 
spearwa, a sparrow. 2. From Spurway, the name of an estate 
co. Devon. Cf. Spar, Spear, Spurr. 

SPURR. The same as Spar, Spear, and Sparrow, from A. S. 
speara, spearwa, Dan. spurre. 

SQUIRREL. The same as the U. S. name Esquirell, and the 
Fr. Esquirol ; or from the English surname Squirhill, derived from 
some local name ending in " hill." 

STABB, STABBS. The same as Stubbs, from St. Aubyn, or 
from St. Ebbe's. There is however a U. S. name Staab, which 
would seem to be from Stab or Staab (Boh. Stoda), a market town 
of Bohemia. 

STABLE, STABLES. Same as Staple, Staples, q. v. 

STAGG, STAGGS. From St. Agg, St. Aggs, i. e. St. 
Agatha's. 

STAIR. From Stair, a parish of Scotland, co. Ayr, which gives 
title to the Earl of Stair. 

STALLION. Corrupted from some English local name, per- 
haps Stelling, a parish co. Kent. It may also be a French 
diminutive. Stall, Stallo, Stallion are found as surnames in the 
U.S. 

STAIN. The game as Stein, Steinn, Steen, Stone; from G. 
stein, A. S. stdn, 0. N. steinn, a stone. 

STAMMER, STAMMERS (U. S. Stamer, Stemmer, Stamers). 
This name might certainly be an English rendering of the Roman 
name Balbus, but it is more probably derived from a local name. 
It may be a corruption of the surname Starmer, perhaps from 
Sturmer, a parish co. Essex, or Stormere co. Leicester ; or from 
the surname Stanmer, from Stanmer, a parish co. Sussex. J. 
Stammers, Esq., barrister-at-law, considers his name to be of 
Dutch or German origin, and thinks that Stammensdorff, a local 
name mentioned in Alison's History, may give a clue. Stammers 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 105 

would easily corrupt from St. Audomarus (whence St. Omer), 
doubtless the same as Audomer or Aumer, from which Pont 
Audemer had its name. 

STUBBORNE. See SMALLBONE. 

STAMP, STAMPS. The same as Estampes. From Etampes, 
formerly Estampes, a commune and town of France, dep. Seine 
et Oise. 

STANDFAST. See MATTERFACE. 

STANDING. The same as Standin and Standen ; from some 
local name ending in den, a valley. 

STAND WELL. The same as Stanville and Stan well ; from 
Stanwell co. Middlesex, compounded of mile. 

STAPLE, STAPLES. From Staple, name of parishes cos. 
Kent and Somerset. Hence the names Stable, Stables. 

STAR, STARR. Star is found in H. R., and Ster and Sterr 
in Domesday ; and there is a place named Star near Markinch, in 
Scotland. Ferguson thinks Starr may be from 0. N. starri, a 
hawk, A. S. steer, a starling. 

STARBOARD, STARBIRD. These names would easily cor- 
rupt from Tarbert, the name of places in Ireland and Scotland. 
If of Anglo-Saxon origin, they may be from stor-beorht, very dis- 
tinguished, or excelling in greatness. 

STARE. Same as Stair, q. v. 

STARING. From some local name compounded of ing, a 
meadow. 

STARKWEATHER. See MERRYWEATHER. 

STARLING (in H. R. Starlyng, Sterlyng). From Stirling, 
Scotland. 

START. Start Point is the name of a headland near the south 
extremity of co. Devon. 

STARTUP. See HOPE. 

STATE, STATES. From root of Steed, q. v. Hence the 
name Staight. 

STAY. From root of Steed, q. v. 



106 LUDUS PATRONYMICTJS. 

STEED. Same as Stead ; from A. S. sted, a place (Dan. id., 
D. stede, G. statt). Stede or Stidd is the name of a chapelry co. 
Lancaster. 

STEDDY. A corruption of St. Edith. 

STEP. From Stephen. 

STEPTOE. From some local name compounded of lioo, hoe, 
from G. holie, height, elevation. Cf. the names Prudhoe, Sand- 
hoe, Shafthoe, Slipshoe, Tudhoe. 

STIFF. From Stephen. See TIFFANY. 

STILLWAGON, STILLWAGEN. Perhaps from G. stell- 
wagner, a maker of the vehicle called stellwagen. 

STIRRUP. See HOPE. Stirrop is found in the Hist. Canter- 
bury. 

STOCK, STOCKS. From Stock, name of parishes cos. Essex, 
Dorset, Somerset, Worcester, and York ; from A. S. stoc, a 
place. 

STOCKING, STOCKINGS. From some local name com- 
pounded of A. S. ing, a meadow. Stocken is a surname, and De 
Stocking is found in H. R. See STOCK. 

STOKER. Same as Stocker (found in H. R.). In the West 
of England a stacker is one employed to fell or grub up trees. 

STONEHEART. Same as Stonhard, Stannard, Stennard, 
Steinhard, Steinhardt, Steinhart ; from G. stein-hart, as strong as 
a stone. 

STONELAKE. See LEGG. 

STOPPARD. See HAZARD. 

STORK, STORKS. A corruption of Stock, Stocks, q. v. 

STORY. From A. S. and 0. N. stor, great. Stori is a Scan- 
dinavian name, and we have the English names Storr and Store. 

STRADLING. Corrupted from Estarling or Easterling, once 
the popular name of certain German traders in England, i. e. 
" people from the East," whose money was of the purest quality, 
whence the term " sterling money." 

STRANGEWAYS. There is a Major Hon. S. D. Strangeways 



LUDUS PATKONTMICUS. 107 

in the U. S. It is the same with the English names Strangwayes, 
Strangwish, Strarigwich ; corrupted from Strangwish, a place near 
Manchester, which was possessed by the family in the fourteenth 
century. 

STRAW. The same as Straith ; from Straith, a parish of Scot- 
land, co. Inverness; from Sco. strath, Gael, sratli, a valley, a 
mountain valley, bottom of a valley, a low-lying country through 
which a river rolls, the low inhabited part of a country, in contra- 
distinction to its hilly ground, a dell. Cf. the surname Rack- 
straw. 

STRAWMAT. Bowditch mentions a Dr. Strawmat who was 
punished by a mob. This name may be from some locality in 
Scotland compounded of strath. See STRAW. 

STRAY. The same as Straw, q. v. 

STURGEON. From an estate in Essex called Sturgeons, 
formerly Turges Cassus. Turges may be the same name as 
Turgesius, a celebrated Norwegian king, called by Irish writers 
Tuirghes, who established his power in Ireland for thirty years. 
Hence probably the names Sturch, Sturge, Sturges, Sturgess, 
Sturgis. 

STUTTER. One who has to do with stots ; or perhaps rather 
a corruption of the name Stotherd = stotherd. Stot is a northern 
provincialism for a young ox, and Chaucer uses the word stot for 
a horse. "Stot hors, caballus" (Pr. Parv., f. 165). Tyrwhitt 
thinks Chaucer uses the term stot for stod, a stallion. Stutgard, 
capital of Wurtemburg, had its name from the stuts or stallions, 
formerly kept there for war purposes, and the arms of the city 
are a mare suckling her colt. We may have this vocable in 
Studham, Studland, Studley, local names in England. The name 
Stotherd has become Stothurd, Stothert, Stothard, Stodhart, 
Stoddart, Stoddard, Stodart, Studart, Studdart, Studdert. 

SUCH. Corrupted from the name Zouch, a baronial family 
that gave the suffix to Ashby-de-la-Zouch co. Leicester. The 
name is also found written Sutch, Souch, Zoche, Zuche, Zusch, 



108 LUDUS PATKONYMICUS. 

Zusche, and is said to be derived from A. S. sfoc, a place, also the 
stem of a tree. 

SUCK. Same as Such, q. v. 

SUCKBITCH (U. S. Suxpitch). A corruption of Sokespic, a 
name probably of local origin. The A. S. soc is a soke, liberty, 
jurisdiction, spic is bacon, and the 0. Fr. spec is an inspector. 
See SPEAK. 

SUCKSMITH. From sock, a North of England word for a 
plough-share, from A. S. sulg. The first part of this name may 
also be from A. S. seax, sex, a knife, sword, dagger, plough-share. 

SUDDEN. From Southdean, "southern valley," a parish of 
Scotland, co. Roxburgh. There is however the French surname 
Soudan, and two communes and villages of France named 
Soudan, one dep. Deux Sevres, the other dep. Loire-Inf. 

SUE, SUES. Perhaps from the nickname for Susan. 

SUET, SUETT. 1. The same as Sweet and the German name 
Suss. 2. A diminutive of Sue, q. v., also Sweatman. Suet is 
found in the French Directory. 

SUGAR. See SEGAR. 

SUGARMAN. The same as Sigmundr, Sigemund, Sigis- 
mundus, Segimundus (filius Segestis apud Taciturn Annales, 1, 57) ; 
from G. sig-mund, vir victoriae. Sugarman and Shugerman are 
found in Bowditch. 

SUIT. Same as Suet, q. v. 

SULLEN. From Soulaines, a commune and market town of 
France, dep. Aube, on the Soulaine. Lower, under Sellen, Sellens, 
says he can prove, by the evidence of parish registers, &c., in 
Sussex, that these names are corrupted from the ancient surname 
of Selwyn. 

SULLY. 1. From Sully (Solliaco), name of two towns of 
France, one dep. Loiret, the other dep. Nievre. 2. From Sully, a 
parish of South Wales, co. Glamorgan. 

SUMMERBEE. From Somerby, name of three parishes, one 
co. Leicester, and two co. Lincoln. But see BEE. 



LUDUS FATRONYMICUS. 109 

SUMMERBELL. A U. S. name. The same as the English 
names Somervell, Somervail ; corrupted from Somerville. 

SUMMERFIELD. The same as Somerfield, Somervail, Somer- 
vell, Summerwill, corrupted from Somerville. 

SUMMERSETT. A corruption of Somerset. 

SUMMERWILL. See SUMMERFIELD. 

SUMMONS. Same as Summonds ; a corruption of Symonds, 
Symons, Simmonds, Simmons ; perhaps sometimes from Simon, 
but generally from Simund or Sigmund, or from Seman, Seaman. 

SUPPLE. A corruption of Shuffle, q. v. 

SURPLICE. This name is found in the Registrar-General's 
List. It is the same as the U. S. name Surpluss, and the French 
Supplice, doubtless corrupted from Sulpicius. Menage gives St. 
Sulpice and St. Souplex, as corrupted down from Sulpicius. St. 
Sulpice is the name of numerous communes and villages of 
France. 

SURPLUSS. See SURPLICE. 

SWALLOW. From Swallow, a parish co. Lincoln. There is 
however the French name Hirondelle. 

SWAN. The same as Swain, Swaine, Swayne, and the Scan- 
dinavian name Sweyn ; from A. S. swan, a herdsman or pastoral 
servant. 

SWEARING. Formed like Winning, q. v. 

SWEAT. Same as Suet. 

SWEATING, SWETTING. Same as Sweeten, q. v. 

SWEATMAN. The same as Sweetman, and an ancient name 
Swetman, and the prae-Domesday name Suetman or Suetmannus. 
The name may mean strong or powerful man. The A. S. swith, 
wytli is strong, powerful, great ; Fries, swid, strong, much, crafty, 
bad ; Moeso-G. swinths, validus, robustus. Hence the Gothic 
proper name Suintila = Valentius ; and Swintebold, which 
Wachter renders valide audax. 

SWEETBUTTER. Name of an old family in the neighbour- 
hood of Woodstock. See BUTTER. 



110 LUDUS PATKONYMICUS. 

SWEETEN. Same as Sweeting. A patronymic of the name 
Sweet ; or compounded of ing, a meadow. See WILLING. Lower 
gives Sweeting as an old Anglo-Saxon personal name, and men- 
tions the Domesday Sueting, Suetingus. 

SWEETLAND. The same as the U. S. names S wetland and 
Sweedland ; from Swethland, Sweedland, old names for Sweden, 
found in Dr. Bosworth's Anglo-Saxon Dictionary. The name 
might also be from Swithland, a parish of England, co. Leicester. 

SWEETLOVE. See LAW. 

SWEETMAN. See SWEATMAN. 

SWEETSIR. Same as Sweetser, Sweetsur, Sweetzer, Sweitzer, 
Schweitzer, the German for a Swiss. 

SWELL, SWELLS. From Swell, a parish co. Somerset ; or 
Swell, name of two parishes (Upper and Lower) co. Gloucester. 

SWILLAWAY. From some local name compounded of way. 
Swillaway, Silloway, Silaway are found as surnames in the U. S. 

SWILLING. From some local name compounded of ing, a 
meadow. But see WILLING. 

SWINDLE. From Swindale, co. Westmoreland. 

SWINDLER. A maker of swindles, a northern provincialism 
for spindles. 

SWINE. 1. A corruption of Swain, Swaine, Swayne. See 
SWAN. 2. From Swine, a parish co. York, East Riding. 

SWINESHEAD. From Swineshead, a market town and 
parish co. Lincoln ; also a parish co. Hunts. 

SWING. Same as Swine ; or from some local name. Swing- 
field is the name of a parish co. Kent. 

SWORD, SWORDS. From Swords, a town and parish of 
Ireland, co. Dublin. 

SYNTAX. Perhaps a corruption of St. Agg's, i. e. Agatha's. 
See AGUE/ 

TAILBUSH. Same as Talboys, q.v. 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. Ill 

T. 

TALBOYS, TAILBOYS. From Fr. faille bois, cut-wood ; or 
rather qui faille le bois, one who cuts wood, a wood-cutter. This 
name has been rendered in English Cutbush, which, by the bye, 
was formerly the name of a gardener at Hig-hgate, Middlesex. 

TAME. Not from Tame, a river cos. Stafford and Warwick ; 
nor from the Tame which rises in Yorkshire ; nor the Thame or 
Tame which falls into the Thames ; but from Thame or Tame, a 
market town and parish co. Oxford, which takes its name from 
the latter river. 

TANKARD. From 0. G. Tanchard (ninth century), Than- 
cred, from dank-rat, a willing counsellor ; or perhaps rather from 
A. S. thane-red, thoughtful counsellor. Cf. the 0. G. names 
Thancheri, Thancrih, the It. Tancredi, Eng. Tanqueray, G. Danco, 
Eng. Danks. 

TAPLADY. See TOPLADY. 

TAPPING. A patronymic of Tapp ; or compounded of ing, 
a meadow. See WILLING. Tapp, Tappan, Tapping, Tapps, 
Tappy are found as U. S. names. 

TARBATH. From Tarbat, Tarbart, or Tarbert, in Scotland; 
or Tarbert, near Limerick, Ireland ; from Gael, tairbeart, a 
peninsula. 

TARBOTTOM. According to Lower, this name is a corrup- 
tion of the surname Tarbotton, probably from Tarbolton, a parish 
in Ayrshire. But see BOTTOM. 

TARBOX. The same as Torbock ; from Torbock, an estate 
in Lancashire, held by a family of the name in early times. 

TARGET, TARGETT. See THOROUGHGOOD. 

TARRY. A corruption of Terry, like the French name 
Thierry, derived from Theodoric. 

TART. A corruption of the surname Tarratt, for Tarrant ; 



112 LUDUS PATRON YMICUS. 

from Tarrant, name of several parishes in co. Dorset, through 
one of which runs the small river of the same name. 

TASSELL. The It. word tasso is a badger, also a yew-tree 
and an anvil ; but Tasso is said to be an 0. G. name and 
there is the diminutive Tassilo, and the English name Tassell, 
and tassel is an O. Eng. word for a male hawk, from Fr. tiercelet 
(It. terzolo), Some make Tassilo and Tetzel diminutives of 
Tatto, Tasso, from 0. G. tatte, pater, tutor, nutricius. Wachter 
doubts this, and thinks them rather abbreviated from Tadelbert, 
which he translates parentibus clarus, and he says Totila, the 
name of a king of the Ostrogoths, might be from the same root. 
All these names may be from the O. Fr. tasse, assemblage de 
quelques arbres, petit bois touffu, touffe d'arbres. Most of the 
following surnames are found in the French Directory viz., 
Tasse, Tassus, Tassy, Tassel, Tassilly, Tassily, Tasset, Tassot, 
Taskin, Tassin, Tassain, Tasselin, Tassart, Tassaert. 

TAUNT. The same as Daunt, both found in the Eegistrar- 
General's List, and the U. S. North America. Lower says Daunt 
is said to be the same as the Dauntre of the so-called Battel 
Abbey Roll. If so, it may be from Daventry co. Northampton. 

TAYLECOATE. See COAT. 

TAX. From Tack, Tacke, Tagg, Tagge ; perhaps from Tagert, 
Taggard, Taggart, Taggert. 

TEACHOUT. A name found in the U. S. Compounded of 
the D. would, a wood ; or hout, wood. Cf. Turnhout, a town of 
Belgium, prov. East Antwerp. 

TEAK. From the Gael, name MacTear ; from mac-an-saoir, 
son of the carpenter. Hence Maclntyre. 

TEETH. From atte Heath, or at-the-heath, one living upon 
or near the heath. 

TELFAIR. The same as Telfer, from the Norman name 
Taillefer = cut-iron. Lower says, " The exploits of the noble 
jonglere Taillefer at the battle of Hastings are well known. 
William, Count of Angouleme, in a battle against the Northmen, 



LUDUS PATRON Y3IICUS. 113 

engaged their king, Storris, and with one stroke of his sword 
Durissima, forged by the great Wayland Smith, cut in two his 
body and cuirass. Hence he acquired the sobriquet of Taillefer, 
or ' cut iron.' " In the sixteenth century the name in Scotland 
was written Tailzefer. Telfer, the celebrated engineer, not aware 
of the origin of his name, changed it to Telford. Hence no 
doubt Talford, Talfourd, Tolfrey, and Tolfree. 

TELLING. Formed like Winning, q. v. 

TENCH. Same as Dench. See DANCE. 

TENDER. Halliwell says tender, in the eastern counties, 
signifies a waiter at an inn. 

TENET. One Joseph Tenet occurs in the Registrar-General's 
List. It is doubtless corrupted from Thiennette, a French diminu- 
tive of Etienne, i. e. Stephen. 

TENT. A corruption of Tenet, q. v. 

THALER. See CASHDOLLAR. 

THANKFUL. Corrupted from the Norman name Tankerville. 

THICKNESSE. From some local name compounded of ness, 
a cape or headland ; from A. S. ncesse, nesse, ness. Cf. the local 
names Sheerness, Dungeness, Eastonness. It sometimes means 
an island, as in Foulness, Essex. 

THICKPENNY. See PENNY. 

THTMBLEBEE. From Thimbleby, a parish co. Lincoln. 

THIN. The same as Thynne. The latter name is said to have 
originated with the ancient house of Botfield or Botevile. The 
alias is said to have originated with John de Botteville, who lived 
at the family house at Church -Stretton, who was familiarly known 
as John 6> th* Inne, which abbreviated became Thynne, though 
John de la Inne de Botfelde was his usual appellation. It seems 
that the house in question was called " The Inn." 

THING. A corruption of Thin, q. v. 

THIRST. The same as Thurst ; from Thursk co. York; or 
from at-the-hurst = at the wood or forest (A. S. hyrst). The 
A. S. thrist is bold, daring. 

I 



114 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

THISTLECOCK. See COCK. 

THORNBACK. Not from the fish ; but from some local 
name ending in back, a brook. See NEWBACK and SMALLBACK. 

THOROUGHGOOD. The same as Thorowgood, the Essex 
Thurgar, the Dan. Thurgood, and the Domesday Turgod and 
Thurgot, name of the first bishop of Sweden. The name seems 
to come from the 0. G. thor, bold, strong, fierce, perhaps the 
same as the W. deivr, brave, bold, valiant, stout ; Gr. Qovpios, 
Oovpos, warlike, ardent, fierce, an epithet of Mars, and doubtless 
the origin of the name of the Scandinavian god Thor. Wachter 
thinks Thurgot may be rendered " trusting in God." He gives 
also from this root Thurovaro, Thorismodus, Thorisin, &c. From 
Thurgood, Turgod, Thurgot we may have the name Targett. 

THROWER. One that twists or winds silk ; from A. S. thrawan, 
to twist, turn, curl, throw, &c. 

THRUSH. The same as Thirst, q. v. 

TICKLE, TICKELL. From Tickhill, a parish and formerly a 
market town co. York, West Riding. 

TICKLEPENXY. From Ticklepenny, a parish near Grimsby 
co. Lincoln. But see PENNY. 

TIDY. From Tadhg, the Irish form of Thady, i. e. Thaddeus. 
MacTaidhg or Teige, OTaidhg or O'Teige (mentioned by O'Herin 
as chiefs of Ui Maile and of Ui Teigh) anglicised their name to 
Tighe. They derive their name from Ir. tadhg, a poet, philoophers. 

TIDYMAN. The same as Tiddeman and Tidman. From 
some old German name, perhaps Theudmund or Theodinund ; 
from 0. G. teut-mund, which might translate both " a protector of 
man " and " a prince." I do not find such a name, but we have 
many names compounded of teut, as Theudorix, Theodoricus, 
Theudebert, Tlieudibaldus, &c. 

TIFFANY, TIFFINY. From Stephen. Hence also Tiffin, 
Tiffen, and Stiff. Roquefort renders the 0. Fr. tiphaine, tiphagne, 
tiphaingne, la fete de 1'Epiphanie, le jour des Rois, du Grec. 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 115 

TIFFIN. See TIFFANY. 

TIGHT. A name found in the Registrar-General's List and 
also in the U. S. It is probably a corruption of Tite, the French 
form of Titus. 

TILL. 1. The nickname for Matilda. 2. Said to be some- 
times from William. Hence, as a diminutive, Tillet, by contrac- 
tion Tilt. 

TILT. A contraction of Tillet. See TILL. 

TIMBER. [There is a U. S. Timbers.] Perhaps the same as 
Timbury; from Timsbury, parishes cos. Somerset and South- 
ampton ; or from Tenbury co. Worcester. There are places 
named Timberley co. Chester, Timberland co. Lincoln, and 
Timberscombe co. Somerset. 

TIMBERLAKE. According to Mr. Talbot, from Timber-leg, 
a wounded soldier with a wooden leg. The last part of the name 
is from ley. See LEGG. 

TIMES. A corruption of Timms, from Timothy. 

TIMESLOW. An ancient name derived from some locality 
compounded of law, q. v. 

TIME WELL. From some local name compounded of mile. 
See FAREWELL. 

TINDALE. Same as Tindal, Tindall; from Tindale-ward, the 
largest of the six wards of co. Northumberland, traversed by the 
Tyne. 

TINGLE. The same as Tingley, compounded of ley, a pasture. 
See LEGG. 

TIPLADY. SeeToFLADY. 

TIPLER, TIPPLER (in H. R. Tipeler). Formerly a seller of 
beer or strong drink. In the corporation archives of Warwick is 
preserved " the note of such Typlers and alehouse-kepers as the 
justices of pease have returned to me this Michilmas session. 
Thies underwriten were returnyd by Sir Thomas Lucy and 
Humphrey Peto, esquire, March 15, Eliz." See Halliwell's Life 
of Shakspeare. 

i 2 



116 LUDUS PATRON TMICUS. 

TIPPET, TIPPETS. The same as Tippett, Tebbitt, Tebbutt, 
Tibbatt, Tibbutt, Tebutt, Turbot, Tibbats, Tibbets, Tibbetts, 
Tibbits, Twopotts ; corrupted from Tibbald, for Theobald. Hence 
also the names Tubb (Tebbs, Tibbs), Tubbs, Tippins, Tipple, 
Tipkins, and sometimes Tubby. 

TIPPING (anciently Typpynge). From a locality in the town- 
ship of Clayton-le-Dale co. Lancaster. 

TIPPLE. See TIPPET. 

TITLE. 1. A diminutive of Titt, from some personal name. 
2. Same as Tittle. 

TITMOUSE. The same as Titmuss, Tidmas, Titchmarsh, 
Tidmarsh ; from Tidmarsh co. Berks. The name would also 
easily corrupt from the ancient name Theodomerus (dux clarus), 
hodie Dietmar. 

TITTLE. Same as Tittell ; or perhaps from Titley, a parish 
co. Hereford. Tittel is the name of a village of Hungary. 

TOAD VINE. A U. S. name. Probably of German origin ; 
from theud-win, which would translate both " war-leader " and 
"friend of the people." But see WINE and TITMOUSE. 

TODDY. A U. S. name. From Todd, Tod, said to be from 
todj a provincial word for a fox. It is more probably a nickname 
for Theodore or Thaddeus. 

TOLEFREE. See TELFAIR. 

TOLLER. Perhaps sometimes from Toller, name of two 
parishes co. Dorset. 

TOMB, TOMBS, TOOMBS. 1. From Tom, Toms, from 
Thomas. 2. From Tim, Timm, Tims, Timms, Timbs, from 
Timothy. 

TONE. See TUNE. 

TONGUE (Tong, Tonge). From the parish of Tongue co. 
Sutherland, and perhaps sometimes from Tong or Tonge, parishes, 
&c., in cos. Kent, Lancaster, Leicester, Salop, and York. Tongue 
(originally Tung) co. Sutherland was named from a narrow neck 
of land ; from Gaelic teanga. 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 117 

TOOGOOD. The same as Towgood. From some local name 
compounded of " wood." 

TOOL, TOOLE. Same as the Irish name O'Toole or 
O'Tuaghall. See TOTTLE. 

TOP, TOPP. From some dwelling at the top of a hill ; from 
A. S. top, vertex, fastigium. A comparison of names will show 
that we have fewer tops than bottoms. 

TOOTHAKER. Bowditch mentions a "Dr. Toothaker, of 
Middlesex county, as a general practitioner, and not a dentist." 
Lower gives a Toothacker, which he derives from todtenacker, 
field of the dead, a burying ground, analogous to churchyard. 

TOPCOAT. See COAT. 

TOPLADY. This name, as well as Taplady and Tiplady, may 
be from some local name compounded of A. S. lad, a lode, canal ; 
or more probably from the Irish name O'Dubhlaidhe (O'Dooley), 
from dubhlaidh, dark, wintry ; or from dubh-laocJi, a dark hero, 
champion, or soldier. 

TOPLEAF, TOPLIFF. From Topcliff, a parish co. York, 
North Riding, where are to be seen the ruins of the " Maiden 
Bower," a former seat of the Percies, in which Charles I. was 
confined before his delivery to the Scots. 

TORTOISE. A name found in the London Directory. See 

TORTOISESHELL. 

TORTOISESHELL. A name found in Lower's Appendix. It 
is doubtless the same as Tattersall, Tattershall, Tattersill ; from 
Tattershall co. Lincoln. The castle of Tattershall appears to 
have been built by Robert de Tateshall, whose son was created 
Baron Tateshall in 1295. It is quite possible also that from the 
name Tate, Tates, perhaps by corruption Tatters, we may have 
the surname Tortoise. 

TORY. Same as Torrey and the Edinburgh name Torry; from 
Torry, name of places in Scotland, in cos. Kirkardine and Fife. 
Tory or Torry Island is the name of an island off the north-west 
coast of Ireland, co. Donegal. Torre is also found as a surname. 



118 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

TOTTLE. 1. From Tothill, a parish co. Lincoln. "A tote- 
hill is an eminence from whence there is a good look-out." 
Cheshire, Archceol. xix., 39. 2. The same as Tootal, Tuttle, and 
the Irish name Tuathal. O'Reilly renders tuathal the left hand, 
and tuathal, tuathallach, awkward, ungainly, clownish, rustic, left- 
handed, undexterous. 

TOUCH. From the French name Touche or De la Touche. 
Cf. the French surnames Uestouches, Touche-Treville, and 
Touchon may be a diminutive. There is the Manoir de la 
Tousche near Nantes, and Touches and Touchet are local names 
in France. La Touche is also the name of a river in North 
America. Cotgrave defines toucke, " a hoult, a little thick grove 
or tuft of high trees, especially such a one as is neere a house, 
and serves to beautifie it, or as a marke for it." The 0. Fr. louche, 
sousche is rendered petit bois de haute futaie proche la maison 
d'un fief. At Metz toe is " un pied d'arbre," and tocquee, " une 
poigriee d'herbes ou de fleurs avec leurs racines." 

TOUCHARD. See TOUCH and HAZARD. 

TOUCHSTONE. A modern surname. It is probably from 
Tuschetum, the Latinised form of Touchet, a parish, arrond. Mor- 
tain, Normandy, whence the Touchet family derived their name. 

TOUGH. 1. From the parish of Tough co. Aberdeen, Scot- 
land, which in Gaelic is said to mean " northern exposure ;" but 
the name was originally Tullyunch. 2. From Tough, name of 
two parishes of Ireland, Munster, co. Limerick, 

TOW. Another orthography of Tough, q. v. 

TOWELL. The same as Towill and perhaps Dobell, Dowell ; 
from some local name compounded of ville. 

TOY, TOYE. Perhaps from Towie, a parish of Scotland, co. 
Aberdeen. There are however the French names Toy, Doye ; 
and perhaps, as diminutives, Toyot and Doyat, which may be 
from 0. Fr. doy, a canal, from L. ductus. There are however the 
U. S. names Doy, Duy, Douai ; and they may all be from Douai 
or Douay, a town of France, dep. Nord. 



LUDUS PATRON YMICUS. H9 

TRACTION". According to Lower, this name, as well as 
Trackson, is corrupted from Threxton ; from Threxton, a village 
of Norfolk. 

TRAIL, TRAILL. This family claims to be of Norse extrac- 
tion, and derives its name from Trolle or Troil, the devil. It is 
more probably the same with the French name Latreille = the 
vine arbour. It may even be of Cornish origin, perhaps from 
tre-hale, the dwelling on the moor. There is a place called Treal 
in Ruan Minor. 

TRAVELLER. Same as the Cornish name Trevailor, from 
Trevailer, in Madderne ; from tre-vailer, vayler, the workman's 
town. 

TREADGOLD, TREDGOLD, THRIDGOULD. From some 
local name compounded of wood. See SHEARGOLD 

TREASURE. Same as Tresahar, from Tresare, Cornwall; 
from Cornish tre-sair, the woodman's or carpenter's town. 

TREBLE. A name probably of Cornish origin, from Trebel, 
the fair or fine place (tre-bel). Hence no doubt by corruption the 
surname Tremble. 

TREMBLE. See TREBLE. 

TRENCHARD. See HAZARD. 

TRESS, TRESSE. The same as Tracey, Tracie ; corrupted 
from Theresa. Hence Truss, and perhaps, as diminutives, Trussel, 
Trussell. 

TRICK. A corruption of Derrick, Derick, from Theodoric. 

TRICKER. In some parts of Cornwall tricker means a dancer, 
perhaps a corruption of tripper. Tricker may also be a corruption 
of the name Trigger, q. v. 

TRIGGER. A corruption of the surname Tregeare, Tregear, 
Tregere, Tregare ; from Tregeare in the parish of Crowan, where 
the family were resident as late as 1732 ; from tre-geare, the green 
or fruitful place. 

TRILL. A corruption of Tyrrell, Tyrell, Tirrell. See 
TRUEFIT. 



120 LUDUS TATRONYMICUS. 

TRIM, TRTMM. From Trim, a market town and parish of 
Ireland, co. Leinster. 

TRIMMER. Same as Tremeer, Tremere, Tremear ; from 
Tremeer in Lantelos-by-Fowey, or Tremere in Lanivet, Corn- 
wall ; from tre-mer, the great town. Hence doubtless the name 
Trummer. 

TRIMMING, TRIMMINGS, i.q. TRIMEN. From Drymen, 
near Glasgow ; or i. q. Tremain, Tremaine, from Tremaine in 
East Hundred, Cornwall ; or from Tremayn, Tremayne, from 
Tremayne in Crowan, from tre-mean, men, the stone town. 

TROLL. The same as Trull, from Trull, a parish co. Somerset. 
Ferguson thinks Troll to be from 0. N. troll, a giant or demon ; 
and he says there was a Danish family named Trolle, of import- 
ance in the fifteenth or sixteenth centuries, who bore in their 
coat of arms a troll or dcemon, and that their name was acquired 
in a sort of lucus a non lucendo way from an exploit of their 
ancestor in killing a troll. He also gives Trolle as a modern 
German name. 

TROLLOPE. See HOPE. 

TROOP. Same as Troup ; from Troup co. Perth, Scotland. 
Hence doubtless the name Droop. 

TROTMAN. Same as Trottmari, Tratman, and Trautman; 
from G. traut-mund, beloved protector. 

TROUBLEFIELD. The name as Turbyfield, Turberville, and 
Turbervill (which was Latinised De Turbida Villa), supposed to be 
derived from some local name in Normandy. No such name is 
now to be found in that province, and it is more probably de- 
rived from Tubberville or Trubby in the barony of Deece co, 
Meath, Ireland. Cf. Tubbermore or Tobarmore co. Londonderry, 
and Tubber co. Wicklow. The word tobar, tubber in Irish names 
signifies a well, formed by a spring of water. 

TROUT. Perhaps from Drought or its root. (See DROUGHT.) 
It would also corrupt from Tyrwhitt. See TRUEFITT. 

TROWELL. From Trowell, a parish co. Nottingham. 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 121 

TKOY. From Troyes, a town of France, cap. dep. Aube. 
There was a French artist named Francis de Troy. Troy is the 
name of a city and of several townships and villages of the 
U. S. North America. 

TEUANT. Same as Truan, and perhaps Treuan ; a name pro- 
bably of Cornish origin, and compounded of tre. 

TRUCE. Same as Trouse ; from Trowse, a parish of Eng- 
land, co. Norfolk. 

TRUE. Same as Trew, and perhaps also Drew. 

TRUEFITT. Same as the U. S. name Truf hitt, corrupted from 
Tyrwhitt, which, as well as Tyrrell, Tyrell, Tirrell, Tirrill, would 
seem to be diminutives formed from the Latin turris, a tower. 

TRUEWORTHY. See WORTH, WORTHY. 

TRULOCK. See LEGG. 

TRUELOVE. Mr. Bowditch mentions a London bookseller 
of the name of Truelove who was found wanting in love to 
Louis Napoleon. See LAW. 

TRULL. See TROLL. 

TRULY. Truleigh or Truly is the name of a manor in the 
parish of Edburton, Sussex. See also LEGG. 

TRUMAN. The same with Trueman, i. q. Tremain, Tre- 
maine ; from Tremaine in East Hundred, Cornwall ; from tre- 
mean, the stone town. Tremayn, Tremayne are also Cornish 
names, from Tremayne in Crowan, said to mean the town on 
shore or sea coast. 

TRUNDLE. Same as Trendle ; from Trendle, parish of Pit- 
minster, Somerset. 

TRUSLOVE. See LAW. 

TRUSS. Same as Tress, q. v. 

TRUSSEL, TRUSSELL. There is a parish called Trusley co. 
Derby. But see TRESS. 

TRUST. A probable corruption of Thirst, q. v. 

TRY, TRYE. Said to be derived from some locality in 
Normandy. 



122 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

TUB, TUBES. 1. From Theobald. 2. Same as Tubby, some- 
times a Cornish form of Thomas. 

TUBMAN. Same as Tupman, a breeder of tups or rams. 

TUCKER. A name of the same meaning as Fuller, one who 
fulls or mills cloth. Cf. the name Tuckerman. 

TUFT. From Toft, name of parishes cos. Cambridge, Lin- 
coln, and Norfolk. 

TUFTS. From Tofts, a parish co. Norfolk, having an ancient 
church. 

TUG-WELL. This name, says Lower, is borne by dentists, 
shoemakers, &c. It is the same as the Tuckwell and Tuckfield, 
and is derived from some local name compounded ofville. Tug- 
well, Tuckwell, and Tuckfield are found as U, S. surnames. 

TUNE. Probably the same as Toon, i. q. Town ; from A. S. 
tun, an enclosure ; or from tuna, a townman. Tune and Tone are 
both found in the United States. 

TURBOT. See TIPPET. 

TURK, variously Turke, Turck ; from Mac Turk ; Gael. Mac 
Tore, son of the boar. 

TURNBULL. This name is said to be local, and that of 
Trumbull a corruption. It is also connected with an anecdote 
about a ferocious bull. The Biog. Univ., under Turnebe, says his 
father, a Scottish gentleman, called himself Turnbull; that his 
name was replaced in French by that of Tournebceuf, and 
Tournbou, which in Latin became Turnebus, and in French 
Turnebe. If the original name was Trumbull, it was probably 
derived from some place in Scotland or Ireland, compounded of 
the Gaelic druim, droma (Ir. druim, W. trwm}, the top of a hill, 
a ridge (Carlisle, drum, drom, a knoll, ridge, eminence), and A. S. 
bold, a dwelling-. Drum, drom are very common in local names in 
Ireland, and there are drums as well as bagpipes in Scotland. It 
is however possible that the English name may be derived from 
the Continental name. In an article contained in the Memoires 
of the Roy. Soc. of N. Antiquarians, entitled Orthographic de 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 123 

luelques noms nordiques, I find that Caldebekkr became Caudebec, 
Langibyr Longbu, and Tournebyr Tournebu. These names 
would seem to be from the Ice. byr, Su.-Goth. &o, a dwelling ; and 
Tournebu might mean the 'tower-dwelling.' From this root we 
probably have many French names compounded of beuf, bcsuf. 
Among others are Belbeuf, Belbceuf, Brebeuf, Chabeuf or Chabeu 
(Chabot?), Cordeboeuf, De Marboeuf, Poinboeuf, Porcabo3uf, 
Quilboeuf. Cf. the French local names CordebcEuf, Couliboeuf, 
Criquebceuf, Elbeuf, Elbceuf (L. Elbovium), and Quilleboeuf, an- 
ciently Quilebeuf. 

TURTLE. Same as Turtell, Thurtle, and Thyrtell, bishops 
of Hereford A. D. 688. Corrupted from Thurkle, Thorkell, 
Thorketell, Thorketil, Thurkettle, Thirkettle, O. N. Thorkell, 
Thorketill, and Thorketil, which Grimm thinks may be from the 
famous kettle which Thor captured from the giant Hymir for the 
gods to brew their beer in. Cf. the names Ashkettle, Asketell, 
O. N. Asketill, A. S. Oscytel. 

TWADDLE. Bowditch says that in Philadelphia there are 
four families of Twaddell, and two of Twaddle. Doubtless a 
corruption of Tweedle, q. v. 

TWEEDLE. A corruption of Tweedale, " dale of the Tweed." 

TWICEADAY. See SINGLEDAY. 

TWILIGHT, TWYLIGHT. From some local name corn- 
ponded of A. S. leag, a pasture. Cf. Fairlight, Hastings, pro- 
perly Fairley or Farley = the sheep pasture. 

TWINING. From Twining, a parish co. Gloucester. 

TWOPENNY. See HALFPENNY. 

TWOPOTTS. Corrupted from Theobald. See TIPPET. 



124 LUDUS PATKONYMICUS. 



u. 

UGLY. From Ugley, a parish co. Essex, concerning which is 
the following proverb : 

Ugley Church, Ugley Steeple, 
Ugley Parson, Ugley People. 
But see LEGG. 

UNCLE, UNCLES. Johannes le Uncle occurs in H. R. ; but 
both these names may sometimes be derived from the Domesday 
Hunchil, and an 0. G. Unculus, which are probably from G. hun- 
child, powerful warrior. See CHILD. 

UNDERFINGER. This name, which is found in the U. S., is 
probably of German origin, and derived from locality. The A. S. 
ing, a meadow, among other forms in German, &c., is liable to 
become ingen, ingr, ving, vingen, vingr, fing, fingen, fingr. The 
termination fingen is very common in Southern Germany. Finger 
is found as a surname. 

UNIT. See UNITE. 

UNITE. The same as Unett, a family said to be of Norman 
Conquest origin. A Colonel Unett was killed at the assault of 
the Redan. Unett may be a diminutive of the name Hunn. Hun 
was a common name among the old Frisians (Outzen, Gloss) ; and 
Huna appears as the name of a manumitted serf in a chart, Cod. 
Dip. Ang.-Sax. Unn, Una, Hun, Hunn, Hunne, Unett, Unit, 
Unite are all found as U. S. names. 

UNTHANK. From places so named in cos. Cumberland and 
Northumberland ; but perhaps originally from Unthank or Intack 
co. Elgin, which Carlisle translates " lonely," " solitary." There 
is however no such word in Gaelic. It may be from uaigneach, 
for uaignidheach, lonely, solitary, deserted ; or from dite uaig- 
ncach, a solitary place ; or perhaps from innteach, a way, road, 
gate. 



LUDUS PATRONYMIC US. 

UPFILL. From Upwell, name of parishes cos. Norfolk and 
Cambridge, compounded of ville. 

UPJOHN. From the Welsh name Apjohn, i. e. son of John. 
Hence, by further corruption, Applejohn. 

URINE. The same as the Cornish name Euren, from Cornish 
voren, strange ; or a corruption of Uren, from the ancient per- 
sonal name Urwyn, for Irvine ; from Irvine, a parish of Scotland, 
co. Ayr (formerly written Irwyn and Irwine), on the river Irvine. 
Urann, Urin are found as U. S. names. 

UTTER. Same as Otter, q. v. 



V. 



VAST. From St. Vedast, Med. L. Vedastus, which is found 
corrupted to Vedasto, Vedaste, Vaast, Vast, and Waast. Vedast 
is Latinised from Foster, or from its root, the D. or Flem. 
voedster, a nurse, from voeden, to feed. In old deeds St. Vedast 
and Foster are synonymous ; and Butler, in his Lives of the 
Saints, says, " Our ancestors had a particular devotion to St. 
Vedast, whom they called St. Foster, as Camden takes notice in 
his Remains." 

VENUS. As an English surname, doubtless the same as 
Veness, and the U. S. names Winas and Winaus ; perhaps from 
Venice. Under " Venus," Lower says, " De Venuse occurs as a 
surname, 31 Edw. I. Step, de Venuse miles." Ferguson thinks 
Venus may be from the surname Venn and house, or ness, a pro- 
montory. 

VERITY. This name and Varty are found both in England 
and the U. S. The original name was probably^ Varty, and is 
probably derived from some local name in France. 

VERY, VERRY, VERREY. From Everard or Everhard; 
from G. eber-hard, as strong as a boar (Gr. eber, A. S. efor, efyr, a 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

boar). Hence the names Eber, Ever, Every. Again, from o/or, 
another A. S. form, we may sometimes have the name Over. 
VESPER (U. S. Vesper, Vespre). The same as the Cornish 
Vosper, Bosper (found Vospar, Vospur, Uspar) ; from 
Cornish vos-ber, the bare dwelling ; or bos-ver, the great dwelling. 
There is a place called Trevosper near Launceston. 

VESSEL, VESSELS. Same as Wessel, Wessell, Wessels ; 
from Vesoul, a town of France, dep. H. Saone ; or from Wesel, a 
town of Rhenish Prussia. 
VEST. A corruption of Vast, q. v. 
VICE. See VOICE. 

VILE. From the name Viel ; from O. Fr. le viel, the old. 
Lower says Vile is probably a corruption of the Fr. La Ville. 

VINEGAR. The same as Winegar ; from 0. G. win-ger, very 
warlike; or the same as Weniger, from G. weniger, less. Wenige 
(G. wenig, little), Weniger, Winegar, Winger, and Vinegar are 
found in Bowditch. 

VIPER (U. S. Wiper). This name is found in the New 
England Genealogical Register for April, 1845. Bowditch says 
11 Mr. Bull Frog, not long since before the police-court, Cincin- 
nati, probably adopted an alias for the occasion." Viper may be 
a corruption of Vibert, the Wibert of the Yorkshire Domesday, 
and the A. S. name Uibert (Cod. Dip. A. S., No. 523). It may 
also be from the French Vipont (Latinised De Veteri Ponte) ; 
from Vipont, near Lisieux, in Normandy. The names Viper,' 
Vipond are found in Norfolk. 

VIRGIL. Bowditch gives this as the name of a New York 
expressman. It is hardly from the classical name ; but may be 
derived from Virgil, a township U. S., New York. 

VIRTUE. From Vertus, in Champagne ; or perhaps rather 
from Vertou, on the left bank of the Loire, nearly opposite to 
Nantes. Vertue is a French surname. 

VOICE. The same as Voase, Voaz, Voce, Vos, Voss, Vossa, 
Voyce ; from Cornish vose, a ditch, intrenchment, wall, fortifica- 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 127 

tion ; voz, voza, foza, vose, id. ; boza, lose, an intrenchment ; foz, 
fus, a wall ; from L. fossa, a ditch, moat, trench. Hence doubt- 
less the name Vice. 

VOWELL. Bowditch says of this name, " Our newspapers 
mention that a friend informed Dr. Barton that Mr. Vowell was 
dead. He said, ' Vowell dead? How glad I am that it is not u 
or IT This anecdote is also mentioned by Lower, 1860. A 
Mr. Vowell was executed for a plot against Cromwell. His views 
were not consonant to those of the Protector." This name may 
be the same as Voel, Moel ; from root of Mole. Ferguson says 
Vowell, Vowles correspond with the G. and D. vogel ; and he 
derives Fuggel, Fuel, Fowell, Fowle from A. S. fugel, a fowl. 
But see FUEL. 

VULGAR. Ihe same as the U. S. Wulgar, our Woolgar, and 
the old name Wulfgar, which Ferguson connects with wolf, but 
which is rather from ulf-ger, very helping. 



W. 

WADDING. A probable patronymic of the name "Wade. 
"Waddingham, Waddington, and Waddingworth are found as local 
names in England ; and Waddington is also a surname. 

WADDLE. The same as Waddell, a corruption of Wardell, 
Wardill, Wardle ; from Wardle or Wardhall co. Chester ; or 
Wuerdale (Weardale) co. Lancaster. 

WADLING. From some local name ending in ing, a meadow. 

WAFER. The same as Wefer, Wiffer, Weber, Veber, 
Webber, Wheaver, Weever, Weaver (in H. R. Textor). 

WAGER. " Wageoure is used by the Scotch poet Barbour 
for a mercenary soldier one who fights for a ' wage ' or hire. 
Hence also Wageman" (Lower). Both Wager and Wagir are 
found as U. S. names, and Wager is the name of a large estuary 
or inlet of British North America. 



128 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

WAGSTAFF, WAGSTAFFE (H. R. Waggestaff, Wagestaf). 
The last syllable of this name is the A. S. stede, a place, station 
(locus, situs, statio, spatium). Cf. the names Bickerstaff, Bicker- 
staffe, Eavestaff, Hackstaff, Halstaff, Halstead, Halsted, Hard- 
staff, Langstaffe, Longstaff. 

WAIL. The same as Wale and De Wale, found in the ancient 
records of Ireland. It may be derived from locality. But see 
WHALE. 

WAILING. A corruption of Waylen, Weland ; from the old 
name Wayland, and Weland, the Vulcan of the North, which 
Grimm thinks from 0. N. vel, A. S. wil, Eng. "wile," in the sense 
of skill. Wayland is the appellation of a hundred in Norfolk. 

WAINSCOAT. See COAT. 

WAIST. See VAST. 

WAIT, WAITE (H. R. Le Wayte) = watchman. See 
Prompt. Parv. 

WAKE. Found Wac and Le Wake. Archbishop Wake 
thinks the name Le Wake, or the watchful, a title given to Here- 
ward, who flourished under the Confessor, to describe his cha- 
racter as a skilful military commander. The name doubtless 
means " the watchman." Cf. the surname Wakeman ; from A. S. 
wcec-man, a watchman ; also Notes and Queries, 2nd S. vi. Wake 
is the name of a country of the U. S., North America, in the 
centre of North Carolina. 

WALK. A corruption of the name Wallack. 

WALKINGHAME. From some local name compounded of 
ham, a dwelling. It was doubtless originally Walkingham. 
Walkington is the name of a parish co. York, East Riding. Cf. 
the surnames Allingham, Allengame ; Burlingham, Burlingame ; 
from Burlingham, name of three parishes co. Norfolk. This may 
account for the surname Game. 

WALKLATE. A corruption of some local name compounded 
of ley. Cf. Twilight. 

WALKUP, WALKUPE. See HOPE.] 

- 



LUDUS PATKONYMICUS. 129 

WALLET. 1. The same as Waylett. 2. A corruption of 
Willet. See QUILL, QUILT. 

WALLFREE. A corruption of Walfrid ; from Gr. wal-frid, 
powerful protector. Walfridus was the name of a saint, and also 
of a Count of Lombardy. 

WALLOP. From Wallop, name of two parishes (Nether and 
Over) co. Hants ; so called, says Camden, from Well-hop, that is, 
a pretty well in the side of a hill. But see HOPE. 

WALNUT. A U. S. corruption of Woolnoth and the old 
name Wulfnoth, probably from ulf-neid, zealous in help ; or ulf- 
noth, needing help. See NOTHARD. 

WALTZ, WALZ. 1. Corrupted from Wallace, Walsh, or 
Walls. [Walls is the name of parishes of Scotland, cos. Orkney 
and Shetland.] 2. From Wallis or Valais, a canton of Switzer- 
land. 3. From Wilz or Wiltz, a town of Dutch Luxemburg, on 
the Wilz. Waltz, Walz, Yoltz are found in Bowditch. 

WAND. From Gr. wand, a wall. 

WANDER. See WONDER. 

WANE. This name may be the same as Vane, Fane ; from 
the Gael, beagan, little, W. bechan, bychan, Armor, bihan, Corn. 
vean. Cf. the Cornish names Vian, Veen. 

WANT. In Essex a provincial word for a cross-road. Want, 
Wants, and Wantman are found in Bowditch. 

WANTON. A Robertus Lascivus occurs in Domesday ; but 
this name is rather corrupted from some local name ending in 
ton. 

WARBOYS. Same as Worboys and the U. S. Worbose 
(which may some day become Verbose) ; from Verbois, near 
Rouen. See BOYS. 

WARCUP. From Warcup, a parish in Westmoreland, per- 
haps compounded of A. S. cop, the head. 

WARDLAW. From Wardlaw, an ancient parish of Scotland, 
co. Inverness. See LAW. 

WARDROBE. The same as Wardrop, Wardroper, the keeper 

K 



130 LUDUS PATKONYMICUS. 

of the wardrobe, an important office in royal and noble house- 
holds. Thorn' de la Warderobe occurs in H. E. See Lower. 

WARE. From Ware, a market town and parish co. Herts. 

WARMAN. A corruption of Wermund, an ancient name 
which occurs in the Genealogy of the Kings of Mercia, another 
orthography of Garman. See GARMENT. 

WARMER. A U. S. corruption of Walmer co. Kent. 

WARN. The same as Warne, Wearne ; from Cornish guernen, 
an alder-tree. According to Lower, Warne is a curt pronuncia- 
tion of Warren. 

WARNING. There is a Mount Warning in New South 
Wales, East Australia ; but this name is doubtless a patronymic 
of Warn. See WILLING. 

WART. See WORTH. 

WASTE. See VAST. 

WATER, WATERS. Corrupted from the name Walter, 
Walters. It may also sometimes be from at-the-water. 

WATERHAIR. The same name as Whithair and Whiter. 
Jamieson renders the word whiter " one who whittles." Ash 
translates the old verb to whittle, " to make white by cutting, to 
edge, to sharpen," and says it is retained in the Scotch dialect. 
The name Waterer may be the same as Waterhair. 

WATERLOW. See LAW. 

WAX. Same as Wex and Wix ; from Wix, a "'parish co. 
Essex. 

WAYGOOD. From some local name compounded of wood. 

WEAK. Same as Week, q. v, 

WEALTHY. A name found in Lower's Patronymica Bri- 
tannica ; perhaps the same as the name Walthew, the last syllable 
of which may be from deo, din, a confidant, servant. See SINGLE- 
DAY. 

WEATHERWAX, WITHERWAX. A corruption of 
Witherick's. See WHITEBREAD. 

WEAVING. Formed like Winning, q. v. 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 131 

WEBB, WEBBE (H. R. Le Webbe). From A. S. webba, 
a weaver. Hence Whip. Cf. the names Whipp, Whippy, 
Whippey, Whippo, Whipple, Whippell, Whippen, Whipping, 
Wipkin ; the 0. G. Wippo, Wippa, Wibi, Wivikin, W^ipilo, and 
the Mod. G. Webe and Wibel. 

WEDD. Same as Weed, q. v. 

WEDLAKE. The last syllable is from leag, a meadow (See 
LEGG). Ferguson however gives an 0. G. Widolaic, which he 
derives from lac, sport. 

WEDLOCK. The same as Wedlake. 

WEED. There is a Friesic Weda; but Weed is more pro- 
bably the same as Wade, in H. R. De Wade and De la Wade, 
and = Ford. 

WEEK, WEEKES, WEEKS. From Week, name of parishes 
cos. Cornwall, Hants, and Somerset. 

WEEKLY. See LEGG. 

WEINGOTT. The same as the U. S. name Wingood, the 
inverse of Goodwin or Godwin. 

WELFARE. Corrupted from the old name Wulpher, a per- 
sonal name in Domesday. Cf. the names Wulf hard, Wulfhere, 
Wulfred. Wulf hard signifies strong in help (ulf-liardt}. 

WELFITT. This name would corrupt from Wolfhead. It 
may also be from the German name Wulf hard or Welf hard. See 
WELFITT. 

WELLBORN, WELBORN, WELLBOURNE, WILL- 
BOURN. From Welbourn co. Norfolk, Welbourne co. Lin- 
coln, or Welburn co. York (see SMALLBONE). There is however 
an Old German Wilbern. 

WELLDONE. The same as Weldon ; from Weldon, name of 
a parish co. Northampton, and of a hamlet in the same parish. 

WELLHOP. A corruption of Wallop, q. v. 

WESTCOAT, variously Westcott, Wescott, Waiscott. From 
Westcote, a parish co. Gloucester. But see COAT. 

WESTFALL. The same as Westfield ; from Westfield, name 

K 2 



132 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

of parishes cos. Norfolk and Sussex ; and also of several town- 
ships of the U. S., North America. Westfall and Westfield are 
both found in Bowditch. 

WHALE. The same as the 0. G. names Walo, Wala, 0. N. 
Vali ; from G. wale, A. S. weal, walk, a stranger; 0. N. vali, id. 
The name Wale is traced in Irish records to the fourteenth century. 

WHALEBONE. From some local name ending in bourn (See 
SMALLBONE). Lower says the hundred of Whalesbone co. Sussex 
is a corruption of Wellsbourne, which had its name from a stream 
which formerly traversed it. 

WHARF, WHARFF, WHORF. Not from Wharf or 
Wharfe, the Yorkshire river ; but the same as Waugh (some- 
times pronounced Wharf), a Scottish orthography of wall. It 
appears that the Waughs held lands at Heip co. Roxburgh from 
the thirteenth to the seventeenth century. 

WHARM. Same as Wharram ; from Wharram, name of two 
parishes co. York, East Riding. 

WHATMORE. The same as Watmore, Whitmore, Whitte- 
more ; from Whitmore or Whittimere, a parish co. Stafford. 

WHEAL. Not from wheal, a pustule ; but from Cornish 
wheal (huel), a work, i.e. a mine. It may also sometimes be the 
same asWeale, Weall ; or Veal, Veale, in 0. R. Le Veal, "the 
calf" (0. Fr.) 

WHEAT. The word ivheat is found in composition of several 
local names. As a surname it may be a corruption of White, or 
perhaps the same as Witt. 

WHEATSHEAF. From some local name compounded of 
shelf, a sand-bank in the sea, or a rock, or ledge of rocks, render- 
ing- the water shallow and dangerous to ships. 

WHEATSTONE. See WHETSTONE. 

WHEEL. The same as Wheal. 

WHEELOCK. 1. From Wheelock, name of townships co. 
Chester, and in Vermont, N. E. Montpelier. 2. Same as Whel- 
lock, Whelock, Wellock, Willock ; from Will, William. 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 133 

WHELPS, WELP. From Guelf, a German corruption of 
Wolf, Wulf ; from wolf, a wolf. 

WHERRY. Probably another orthography of Very, q. v. 

WHETHER. Bowditch says, among the arrivals in Boston 
October 19th, 1860, is that of Mr. Whether, of Haverhill. A cor- 
ruption of the name Wether, found in Wethersfield or Wether- 
field, a parish co. Essex. See MERRYWEATHER. 

WHETSTONE. From Whetstone, name of places in cos. 
Derby, Leicester, and Middlesex. Hence, by corruption, Wheat- 
stone. See SMALSTONE. 

WHILE. From While, a parish of England, co. Hereford. 

WHIMPER. Same as the U. S. Whymper and Winpress, 
and the English names Wimperis, Winepress ; from Winibert, 
Winiberts = illustrious in war. 

WHIP. See WEBB. 

WHIPPING. See WEBB. 

WHIRLPENNY. See PENNY. 

WHISKER. The same as Wiskar, Wisker, the ancient 
names Wisgar, Wiscar, and 0. G. Wiscard, Viscard ; corrupted 
from Visigardus, which Wachter renders hortus belli Ducum. 
Visigardus was the name of a daughter of Theodebert, king of the 
Franks, wife of Gregory of Tours. 

WHIST. This name may be the same as Wish, Whish, 
which Ferguson makes to correspond with the 0. N. Osk, and 
the G. Wunsch. He says Osk, Wunsch, and Wish represent 
respectively the Scandinavian, the H. G., and the L. G. forms 
of Oski, a title of Odin. It is however more probably a cor- 
ruption of the name West. Cf. the local names Wiston, Wistow, 
Whiston, Whistons, Whistley, in all which the first syllable is 
doubtless derived from " west." 

WHITE. This name may not always be from fairness of com- 
plexion (A. S. hwit) ; but, as Mr. Akerman suggests, it may some- 
times be from A. S. hwita, a sharpener, swordsmith, or armourer. 
White is the name of several counties of the U. S., North America. 



134 LUDUS PATEONYMICUS. 

WHITEBOON. Same as Whitbourne ; from Whitbourne, a 
parish co. Hereford ; Whitburn, a parish co. Durham 5 or Whit- 
burn or Whiteburn, a parish of Scotland, co Linlithgow. 

WHITEBREAD. The same as Whitbread; corrupted from 
the ancient name Whitberht, which might translate " very distin- 
guished." 

WHITECAR. Same as Whitaker or Whittaker ; from Whit- 
acre, name of two parishes co. Warwick ; or same as Wihtgar, 
name of the nephew of Cerdic, king of the West Saxons, which 
Ferguson derives from wiht t a man or a warrior. 

WHITEFOOT. Same as Whiteford (and perhaps Whitford), 
said to be from Whitefoord co. Renfrew, Scotland. Whiteford is 
the name of a parish of North Wales, co. Flint. But see HAZLE- 
FOOT. 

WHITEGIFT. Same as Whitgift ; from Whitgift, a parish 
co. York, West Riding. 

WHITEHEAT. A U. S. corruption of Whitehead. 

WH1TEHORSE. Corrupted from Whitehouse ; from White- 
house, a village in the parish of Tough, co. Aberdeen. There is 
also Whitehouse Abbey, a village of Ireland, Ulster. 

WHITEKIND. The name of one of the principal chiefs of the 
Saxons in their war against Charlemagne. Some render it " white 
child ;" but it was originally written Witikindus, which would 
translate, " very celebrated or known." We have still a Witte- 
kind. 

WHITELAW. See WHITLOW. 

WHITELEGG. The same as Whiteley, Wliitely, Whittley, 
Whitlie, Whitley; from Whitley, name of places in cos. Berks, 
Chester, Northumberland, Salop, Somerset, and York ; from A. S. 
liwit-leag, the white meadow. But see LEGG. 

WHITELOCK, variously Whitelocke, Whitlock. See LEGG. 

WHITELY. See WHITELEGG and LEGG. 

WHITEROD. See WHITETHREAD. 

WHITESIDE. See SIDE. 



LUDUS PATKONYMICUS. 135 

WHITETHREAD. A name found in Lower's Appendix. 
Same as Whiterod, from some such 0. G. name as Withred ; from 
weit-rat, distinguished counsellor. Cf. the name Witherick, and 
the O Gr. Widerich. 

WHITING. From A. S. hwit-ing, the white meadow. But 
see WILLING. 

WHITLOW, WHITELOW. From A. S. hwit-hlaw, the 
white heap, barrow, or small hill. See LAW. The inflammation 
called whitlow is said to be derived from Tiwit-low, a white flame. 

WHITTLE, WITTLE. Not from the small pocket-knife 
(A. S. hwitel, hwitle) ; but from Whittle, name of several town- 
ships of England, in cos. Derby, Lancaster, and Northumberland ; 
corrupted from Whitley. See WHITELEGG. 

WHY. A name found in the Registrar-General's List. It 
seems to be corrupted from Wy, Gui, Guy (whence Wyat, Wyatt, 
Wyot, Wiatt, Guyot, Guiot, Wyon, Guyon, Wiart) ; formed from 
William. 

WICK. From Wick, name of places cos. Caithness, Gloucester, 
and Somerset ; from wic, wick, a village, from A. S. wic, wye. 
Wick, Wicke, Wickes, Wicks, are found as surnames. 

WICKWIRE. A U. S. name. Same as the English name 
Wickwar ; from Wick war co. Gloucester. 

WIDOWS. Same as Widowson ; from the 0. G. name Widow. 
Lower renders Widowson, the son of Guido or Wido, a Norman 
personal name ; and he says that at the time of the great Survey, 
William Filius Widonis, literally " William Wido's son," was a 
tenant-in-chief in the counties of Wilts, Gloucester, and Somerset. 

WIFE, WIFFE. Same as Wiffer, Wefer, Wafer, all found in 
Bowditch. See WAFER. 

WIG. SeeWiGG. 

WIGFALL. From some local name ending in mile. 

WIGG, WIGGS. 1. From 0. G. wig, strong, warlike, a 
soldier, &c. ; A. S. wig war, wiga warrior ; 0. N. vig war, vigr 
warlike. Wig, says Lower, occurs in the ancestry of Cerdic, 



136 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

king of the West Saxons ; and Wiga is found in the Domesday of 
Yorkshire. 2. Same as Wick, Wicks, q. v. 

WILDBORE. Same as Wilboar, Wilbor, Wilbur, Wilber, Wil- 
bar, all found as U. S. names ; from Wilbert = very illustrious. 

WILDGOOSE. The same as Wilgoss, Willgoss, the O. G. 
Willigis and Wilgis, and the A. S. Wilgis, a name which occurs 
in the genealogy of the Northumbrian kings. It might translate 
very warlike, or very strong, from fil, much, full ; gais, a spear; 
from the Gael, gais, geis, a weapon peculiar to the old Gauls, 
whence the L. gcesum, Gr. ytuo-os, a weapon ; Gael, gaisge, valor ; 
gaisgeach, a hero. 

WILKS. From Wilkins, a patronymic of Will, for William. 

WILKSHIRE. A corruption of Wiltshire. 

WILL. From William. 

WILLING. 1. A corruption of Willan, a diminutive of Will, 
for William. 2. A patronymic of Will, or compounded of ing, 
a meadow. Cf. the names Bedding, Billing, Browning, Bunting, 
Chatting, Cutting, Dining, Dowsing, Dunning, Fanning, Hemming, 
Living, Manning, Spilling, Tapping, Tilling, Topping, Whiting. 
See also WINNING. 

WILT. A corruption of Willet. See QUILT. 

WILY. From Wily, a parish co. Wilts. Wiley, Wilye, 
Wyllie, Wyleigh are found as surnames. 

WIMBLE. Perhaps the same as Whimple, from Whimple, a 
parish co. Devon ; or a corruption of the name Winibald. Cf. the 
local names Wimbledon and Wimpole. 

WINBOLT. From some local name compounded of bolt. See 
BOTTLE. 

WINCH. 1. From Vincent. Hence doubtless the name 
Finch. 2. From Winch, name of two parishes (East and West) 
co. Norfolk. 

WINDARD. See HAZARD. 

WINDOW, WINDOWS. Ferguson gives an 0. G. Windo, 
which Fb'rstemann refers to the name of the people, the Wends. 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 137 

These names may however be from locality, perhaps from some 
such name as Windhaugh or Windhow. There is a place in 
Russia called Windau or Vindau. 

WINDUST. For Windus; perhaps originally Windhurst. 
Cf. Lindus, from Lyndhurst. 

WINE. From 0. G. win, which signifies not only a friend and 
beloved, but also war. Wachter renders Winipreht, "amicus 
clarus ;" Winfridus, " defensor amicorum ;" Truotwin, " fidelis 
amicus." Hence the names Sauerwein, Sourwine, Lightwine, 
Winehart, Winegar. See VINEGAR. 
WINEHART. See WINE. 

WINEMAN. The same as Winmen and Winemen, Cod. Dip. 
No. 853 ; from 0. G. win-mund, which would translate both a pro- 
tector in war and a warrior. 
WINEPRESS. See WHIMPER. 
WINFARTHING. From Winfarthing co. Norfolk. 
WING. From WING or Winge, a parish co. Bucks; or 
Wing, a parish co. Rutland. 

WINGOOD. The same as Winwood ; from some local name 
compounded of wood. 

WINKLE. The same as Wincle ; from Wincle, a township 
and chapelry co. Chester; or from Winkel in the Duchy of 
Nassau; from A. S. wincel, G. winkle, a corner (D. winkel, a 
shop, workshop, or laboratory). Cf. the surnames Wincles, 
Aldwincle, Bullwincle, Dallwinkle, Gansewinkel (goose), Schop- 
winkel. 

WINLOCK. From Wenlock co. Salop. See LEGG. 
WINNING. From some local name ending in ing, a meadow. 
Cf. the names Goring, Grayling, Healing, Jutting-, Nutting, 
Salting, Selling, Shilling, Spiking, Stebbing, Tarring, Tinkling, 
Tipping, Turning. See also WILLING. 
WINPENNY. See PENNY. 

WINSHIP. The termination ship in many names is a cor- 
ruption of lordship. 



138 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

WINSHOT. From some local name compounded of holt, or 
the D. hout (see RUSHOUT). Winschoten is the name of a town 
of the Netherlands. 

WINSLOW. From Winslow, a parish and market town co. 
Bucks ; or Winslow, a township co. Hereford. But see ONSLOW 
and LAW. 

WINTER. Winter was the name of one of the companions of 
the Anglo-Saxon Hereward, and Winter and Sommer are both 
German and modern Danish names. Ferguson thinks Summer 
and Winter derived from the personification of these seasons in 
Northern mythology. Others derive Summer and Winter from 
Sumner and Vintner, and there is the name Vinter. 

WINTERBORN, WINTERBOURNE. From Winterbourn, 
name of many places in cos. Dorset, Gloucester, and Wilts. 

WINTERBOTTOM. See BOTTOM 

WIPER. See VIPER. 

WIRE, WIRES. The same as Weir, said to be the same as 
De Vere, considered to be of Norman origin ; from the parish 
and chateau of Ver, dep. La Manche; by others thought from 
Veer, a town of the Netherlands, prov. Zeeland, on the coast 
of the island Walcheren. 

WISDOM. From Wisdom in the parish of Corn wood co. 
Devon. " Matthew Hele, of Holwell co. Devon, was high sheriff 
of the county the year of Charles the Second's Restoration, 1660, 
and so numerous and influential were the family that he was 
enabled to assemble a grand jury all of his own name and blood, 
gentlemen of estate and quality, which made the judge observe, 
when he heard Hele of Wisdom, Esq., called a gentill seat in 
the parish of Cornwood ' that he thought they must all be de- 
scended from Wisdom, in that they had acquired such consider- 
able fortunes.' " Burke's Ext. Barts. 

WITCH. A corruption of the name Wich, Wiche, Wyche. 
It has been considered that, as the vocable wick enters into com- 
position of names of places where salt is found, as in Droitwich, 



LUDUS PATRONYMICU8. 139 

Nantwich, Northwich, that it must mean a salt-mine. It comes 
from wic, wick, a village. See WICK. 

WITCRAFT. Same as Whitcraft, Withcraft, Wheatcroft, 
which explains itself. But see CRAFT. 

WITH. According to some, with signifies a forest or wood, 
from 0. N. vidr, Goth, vidus; according to others it is corrupted 
from worth, q. v. With, wath are often met with in composition 
of local names, as Langwith, Darwath. Whit. Craven (422) 
renders with, wath, a fold. The W. gviydd is trees, and gwyth a 
channel, drain. Ferguson gives With as a Mod. G. name, which 
he connects with an 0. G. Wido. 

WITHCRAFT. See WITCRAFT. 

WITT. The Domesday Wit, Uuit, Uite. The same as 
White. 

WITTY, WHITTY. Ferguson considers Whitty as a diminu- 
tive of White. Lower says in ancient times witty meant clever, 
sagacious. Vitte, Vitte are found as French surnames. 

WONDER. This and Wunder and Wander are found in 
Bowditeh, and Wonders occurs in the Registrar- General's List. 
These names are probably of German origin. Wandersleben is 
the appellation of a market town in Prussian Saxony, and is also 
a surname ; and Wander is the name of a celebrated German 
author. There is also a village and commune of Belgium, prov. 
Liege, named Wandre. 

WOODCOCK. See COCK. 

WOODCRAFT. Same as Woodcroft. See CRAFT. 

WOODEN, WOODIN. This name has been connected with 
Odin or Woden. It is more probably derived from Wooden, in 
the parish of Kelso, co. Roxburgh. 

WOODFALL. From Woodfall, a hamlet in South Wilts ; a 
corruption of Woodville. See GOODWILL. 

WOODFINE. Same as the Lincolnshire name Woodbine ; or 
a corruption of Goodwine, Goodwin, q. v. 

WOODFULL. Same as Woodfall, q. v. 



140 LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 

WOODHEAD. From Woodhead, a chapelry co. Chester. 

WOODNOT. Probably from some local name compounded of 
knot, a cluster. 

WOODNUTT. The same as Woodnot, q. v. 

WOODROTJGH. The same as Woodroff, Woodroffe, Wood- 
rooiFe, Woodroofs, Woodruff, Woodruffe, Woodriff, Woodrove, 
Woodrow ; from wood-reeve, i. e. a wood or forest bailiff. 

WOODROVE. See WOODROUGH. 

WOOF. A corruption of Wolf, Wolff, Woolf, Woolfe ; or 
from the 0. G. Uffo, Offo, and Uffa or Wuffa, name of a king of 
East Anglia. Hence no doubt the name Hoof. 

WOOL, WOOLL. 1. A corruption of Will, for William. 2. 
From Wool, a parish of England, co. Dorset. " About Langport, 
co. Somerset, are persons of the labouring class who are com- 
monly called Wooll, but they say that their real old name is 
Attwooll, probably a corruption of At-Wold. Inform. W. B. 
Paul, Esq." (Lower). 

WOOLARD, WOOLLARD. See HAZARD. 

WOOLCOCK. See COCK. 

WOOLFORD. From Woolford, a parish and a township co. 
Warwick, doubtless named from some stream called the Wool ; 
from ol, al, frequently found in local names, and signifying 
" water." Woolford may also sometimes be corrupted from the 
old German name Waldfrid. 

WOOLY. The same as Wooley, Woolley ; from Wooley, a 
chapelry in the parish of Royston co. York, North Riding ; or 
Woolley, a parish co. Huntingdon. Lower says Woolley, 
Wooley was anciently written Wolflege and Wolveley, i. e. 
Anglo-Saxonice ' wulfes-leagj a district abounding in wolves, the 
name of many localities in Saxon times. See also LEGG. 

WORD, WORDE. From Worth or Word, a parish co. Kent. 

WORKNOT. Derived like Woodnot, q. v. 

WORLD. Corrupted from the 0. G. name Worald; from 
wer-alt, which will translate both " noble man " and " noble 



LUDUS PATKONYMICUS. 141 

in battle." Worldham is the name of two parishes co. 
Hants. 

WORM. Perhaps the same as Wharm, q.v. 

WORMS. This name has been derived from A. S. wurm, Eng. 
worm, a serpent ; O. N. ormr, Dan. orm, whence it is said we 
have Orme. It is rather from Worms, the celebrated German 
city. 

WORN. Perhaps the same as Warn, q. v. 

WORST, WURST. Most probably the same as the D. name 
Van Voorst ; from vorst, a prince ; or from Vorst, a village of 
Rhenish Prussia. 

WORT. See WORTH. 

WORTH, WORTHY. These names are from A. S. worth, 
worthig, weorthig, wurthig, a field, portion of land, a farm, manor, 
an estate, also a street, public way (vicus, platea). Wort is the 
name of parishes cos. Kent and Dorset. Hence doubtless the 
names Wart, Wort, Warts, Worts, and the compound names 
Foxworth, Larkworthy, &c. 

WORTHMAN, WORTMAN. This name may mean the 
keeper of a farm or manor. See WORTH. 

WORTHY. See WORTH. 

WORTHYLAKE. From Wortley, name of a township and of 
a chapelry co. York, West Riding. See LEGG. 

WOULD. Same as the name Wold, which Lower renders an 
unwooded hill. 

WOULDHAVE. The name of a boat-builder on the banks of 
the Tyne in 1790 (Lond. Quar. Rev., July, 1858). This name is 
also found written Woodhave, and is doubtless from some local 
name compounded of wood and haw, haugh, enclosed land, a small 
field ; in Chaucer, a dale ; from A. S. haga, hagen, a hay, hedge, 
meadow. Woodhay is the name of parishes cos. Berks and 
Hants. 

WREN. From Rheims or Reims, a city of France, dep. 
Marne ; or Rennes dep. Ille-et-Vilaine. But see RAIN. 



142 LUDUS PATKONYMICUS. 

WKENCH. This name is said to be a corruption of Oleren- 
shaw, which first became Renshaw, and then Rench and Wrench. 
See Lower, quoting Rev. J. Eastwood. It may sometimes be 
from a different source, being found in H. R. without prefix. 

WRINKLE. From some local name (perhaps Ringley co. 
Lancaster) ending in ley. Cf. Acle for Acley, " oak ley," &c. 

WRITE. Same as Wright. 

WYNDEBEARD. A Dr. Wyndebeard was buried in West- 
minster Abbey. This name is without doubt a corruption of the 
0. G. Winbert ; from win-bert, illustrious warrior. Cf. the names 
Winibald, Winiram, &c. 



Y. 



YEA. The same as the ancient Devonshire family Yeo, which 
C. S. Gilbert derives from Tre-yeo, in the parish of Lancells. 
Yeo is probably corrupted from Hugh. See You. 

YEARLY. From some local name compounded of ley. See 
LEGG. 

YELL. Perhaps from Yell, name of one of the Shetland 
Isles. 

YELLOW. This name is probably the same as Jolley, 
Jolly, Joly, Jelley, Jelly, Jelliff, Joliffe, Jolliffe, Jolliff, Iliff, 
Iliffe, Eylif, Jelf, Yelf, Ayliffe, Ayliff, Auliffe, Ayloffe, Aylove, 
Aloph, Aloof; all doubtless corrupted from Adolphus. I am con- 
firmed in this last by Wright (in his History of Essex, vol. ii. 
443, note), who says, " The ancient Saxon family of Ayloffe was 
seated in Bocton or Boughton parish, hundred of Eythorne, near 
the Wye, in Kent, of which town they were possessors in the 
time of Henry the Third. The name Aloph was given to this 
town from having been anciently under the jurisdiction of 
Adolphus." 



LUDUS PATRONYMICUS. 143 

YESTERDAY. See SINGLEDAY. Yester is found as the 
name of a parish co. Haddington. 

YIELDING, YEILDING. From Yielden, a parish co. Beds. 

YOU. A corruption of Hugh ; from the D. hoog, tall. Hence 
probably the names Yoh, Yoe, Yeo, Yew, Yaw. 

YOUNGLOVE. See LAW. 

YOUNGMAY. See MAY. 



z. 



ZEAL. From Zeal-Monachorum, a parish co. Devon ; from 
L. cella, Gael, cill, a bury ing-ground, cell, chapel, grave ; in local 
names in Ireland and Scotland, kill, kil. 



A SELECT LIST 

OP 

PECULIAR STJBNAMES.* 





Alecock. 


Aim an. 


Anchor. 


A. 


Alefounder. 


Almond. 


And. 




Alehouse. 


Alms. 


Anders. 


Able. 


Aleman. 


Aloe. 


Angel. 


Ablewhite. 


Ales. 


Alone. 


Anger. 


About. 


Alfoot. 


Aloof. 


Angle. 


Ace. 


Allbee. 


Alp. 


Anguish. 


Achates. 


Allblaster. 


Alpenny. 


Annis. 


Ache. 


Allbones. 


Alpha. 


Anser. 


Achilles. 


Allbright. 


Alshop. 


Antcliffe. 


Acorn. 


Allcard. 


Alsobrook. 


Ante. 


Addlehead. 


Allcock. 


Alsop. 


Antill. 


Adwers. 


Allcorn. 


Alter. 


Antler. 


Agate. 


Allengame. 


Alway. 


Anvil. 


Ages. 


Alley. 


Always. 


Ape. 


Agent. 


Allfree. 


Alwell. 


Apedaile. 


Agin. 


Allgood. 


Alwin. 


Apple. 


Ague. . 


Ailman. 


Amber. 


Applebee. 


A gutter. 


Allnut. 


Ambers. 


Applegate. 


Ahem. 


Allpenny. 


Ambleman. 


Applejohn. 


Ailman. 


Allport. 


Ambler. 


Appleman. 


Air. 


Allpress. 


Ambush. 


Apostles. 


Airy. 


Allso. 


Amen. 


Aram. 


Akid. 


Allsupt. 


Amend. 


Arblaster. 


Akin. 


Alltrew. 


Amiss. 


Arbuckle. 


Akyng. 


Allward. 


Ammon. 


Arch. 


Alabaster. 


Allwater. 


Amor. 


Archbold. 


Aid wine. 


All wright. 


Amour. 


Archever. 


Ale. 


Aim. 


Ampleman. 


Ardent. 



* Compiled from the Registrar-General's List, Bowditch's Suffolk 
(America) Surnames, Lower's Patronymica Britannica, &c. &c. 



146 



A SELECT LIST OF 



Areskin. 


Aub. 


Bagley. 


Barebones. 


Argue. 


Auger. 


Bagshaw. 


Barefoot. 


Argument. 


Augur. 


Bagwell. 


Barehard. 


Aries. 


Augurs. 


Bail. 


Barehead. 


Arm. 


Avant, 


Baird. 


Barge. 


Arms. 


Avis. 


Bairnsfather. 


Bargy. 


Armour. 


Awe. 


Bakanas. 


Bark. 


Arrand. 


Awkward. 


Bake. 


Barker. 


Arrow. 


Awl. 


Bakeover. 


Barley. 


Art. 


Axe. 


Bakewell. 


Barlicorn. 


Artery. 


Axel. 


Balaam. 


Barnacle. 


Artist. 


Axman. 


Bald. 


Barndollar. 


Asbone. 


Axup. 


Baldhead. 


Barnfather. 


Ascough. 
Ash. 


Ayde. 


Baldry. 
Baldgrave. 


Bar-quarrel. 
Barrable. 


Ashbee. 




Bale. 


Barrell. 


Ashbolt. 




Bales. 


Barren. 


Ashenbottom. 





Balk. 


Barringdollar. 


Ashconner. 




Balkwill. 


Barrow. 


Ashcraft. 


Baa. 


Ball. 


Barrows. 


Ashes. 


Bab. 


Ballance. 


Barter. 


Ashforth. 


Babb. 


Ballasty. 


Barters. 


Ashman. 


Babcock. 


Ballingall. 


Barwig. 


Ashpart. 


Babel. 


Ballman. 


Base. 


Ashplant. 


Babler. 


Balls. 


Basin. 


Ashpole. 


Baby. 


Balm. 


Bask. 


Ashport. 


Bacchus. 


Balsam. 


Basket. 


Ashwin. 


Back. 


Baltic. 


Bastard. 


Ask. 


Backer. 


Banchor. 


Batch. 


Asker. 


Backerman. 


Band. 


Batchelor. 


Askew. 


Backman. 


Bandy. 


Bate. 


Askin. 


Backoff. 


Bane. 


Bathcake. 


Ashkettle. 


Backshell. 


Banes. 


Batman. 


Aslock. 


Backup. 


Bang. 


Bathomeal. 


Asp. 


Bacon. 


Banger. 


Batt. 


Aspen. 


Bad. 


Bangs. 


Batten. 


Aspland. 


Badcock. 


Banish. 


Batter. 


Ass. 


Badgent. 


Banner. 


Batterbury. 


Assman. 


Badger. 


Bans. 


Batterman. 


A strap. 


Badham. 


Bantam. 


Batterton. 


Astray. 


Badlam. 


Bar. 


Battery. 


Atcock. 


Badland. 


Barbary. 


Batting. 


Atkey. 


Badman. 


Barcave. 


Battle. 


Atkiss. 


Bag. 


Barclay. 


Battles. 


Attack. 


Baggs. 


Bard. 


Bawler. 


Atwill. 


Bagless. 


Bare. 


Baxtux. 



PECULIAR SURNAMES. 



147 



Bay, 


Bibbler. 


Blaze. 


Bolster, 


Beach. 


Bible. 


Bleach, 


Bolt. 


Beacon, 


Bidder. 


Bleak. 


Bolter, 


Beadle. 


Biddy. 


Blear. 


Bond. 


Beads. 


Bidwell. 


Bless. 


Bone. 


Beagle. 


Biffin. 


Blest. 


Bones. 


Beak. 


Biggerstaffi, 


Blew. 


Bonfellow. 


Beam.' 


Bigod. 


Blight. 


Bonnechose, 


Beams. 


Bigot. 


Blind. 


Bonnemot. 


Bean. 


Bilke. 


Blinker. 


Bonnet. 


Bear. 


Bill. 


Bliss. 


Bonny. 


Bearblock. 


Billet. 


Blithe. 


Bonus. 


Beard. 


Billiard. 


Block. 


Boobyer. 


Beardman, 


Billman. 


Blood. 


Boocock, 


Beatman. 


Billow. 


Bloodgood. 


Book. 


Beau. 


Bills. 


Bloodworth. 


Booker. 


Beaver. 


Bin. 


Bloom. 


Bookstore, 


Bedbug. 


Binder. 


Bloomer. 


Boom. 


Bedgood. 


Bindloose. 


Bloomy. 


Boon. 


Bedlock. 


Birchard. 


Blossom. 


Boor. 


Bedwell. 


Bird. 


Blot. 


Boot. 


Bee. 


Birds. 


Blow. 


Bootman. 


Beech. 


Birdseye, 


Blower. 


Boots. 


Been. 


Births. 


Blue. 


Booty. 


Beer, 


Bishop. 


Blues. 


Bore. 


Beet. 


Bitch. 


Blueman. 


Born. 


Beetle. 


Bitter. 


Blunder. 


Borrow, 


Begin. 


Bitters. 


Blunt. 


Bos. 


Belch. 


Bitterwolf. 


Blush, 


Bosh. 


Bell. 


Blackadder. 


Board. 


Bosom. 


Bellaw. 


Blackamore. 


Board wine. 


Bosquet. 


Bellows. 


Blackbird. 


Boat. 


Boss. 


Belt. 


Blacklaw. 


Boatman. 


Botfish. 


Benbow. 


Blackleak. 


Bobbin. 


Both. 


Bench, 


Blacklock. 


Bobby. 


Bottle. 


Bend. 


Blackman. 


Bocock. 


Bottles. 


Bender. 


Blackmonster, 


Bodtish. 


Bottom. 


Bending. 


Blackstaff. 


Bodily. 


Boucock. 


Benison. 


Blade. 


Bodkin. 


Bough. 


Bent wright. 


Blague. 


Body. 


Boughtwhore, 


Besom. 


Blank. 


Bogg. 


Boulder. 


Best. 


Blankenship. 


Bogy. 


Bouncer. 


Betty. 


Blanket. 


Boil. 


Bound. 


Bias. 


Blankman. 


Boils. 


Bounty. 


Bibb. 


Blare. 


Boisson. 


Bouquet. 


Bibber. 


Blast 


Bold, 


Bow. 


L 2 



148 



A SELECT LIST OF 



Bowel. 


Brim. 


Bullwinkle. 


Calvary. 


Bowels. 


Brimmer. 


Bultitude. 


Came. 


Bower. 


Brine. 


Bumside. 


Camel. 


Bowl. 


Brink. 


Bun. 


Camomile. 


Bowling. 


Brisk. 


Bunch. 


Can. 


Box. 


Brittle. 


Bundle. 


Candell. 


Boxer. 


Broach. 


Bunflower. 


Candor. 


Boy. 


Broadbelt. 


Burden. 


Cannon. 


Boys. 


Broadfoot. 


Burke. 


Cannot. 


Brace. 


Broadhead. 


Burlingame. 


Cant. 


Bragg. 


Broom. 


Burn. 


Canter. 


Braid. 


Brother. 


Burnish. 


Cantwell. 


Brain. 


Brow. 


Bush. 


Cap. 


Brains. 


Brownbill. 


Bushel. 


Cape. 


Brake. 


Brownjohn. 


Buskin. 


Capes. 


Bramble. 


Brownsword. 


Buss. 


Capon. 


Bran. 


Bruin. 


Butt. 


Capp. 


Branch. 


Bruise. 


Butter. 


Caps. 


Branchflower. 


Brunt. 


Butterfield. 


Capstick. 


Brand. 


Brush. 


Butterfly. 


Caravan. 


Brandish. 


Bub. 


Butters. 


Card. 


Brandy. 


Buck. 


Buttery. 


Care. 


Brass. 


Buckett. 


Button. 


Careless. 


Brassbridge. 


Buckle. 


Buzzard. 


Caress. 


Bratt. 


Buckles. 


Buzzy. 


Caret. 


Bravo. 


Buckthought. 


By. 


Cargo. 


Brawn. 


Bud. 


Bye. 


Carp. 


Bray. 


Budge. 


Bygod. 


Carriage. 


Bread. 


Buff. 




Carrier. 


Breake. 


Buffet. 




Carrott. 


Breaker. 


Bugbee. 




Cart. 


Breakspear. 


Bugbird. 





Carve. 


Breakwell. 


Bugg. 




Carver. 


Bream. 


Buggin. 


Cabbage. 


Case. 


Bredcake. 


Buggy. 


Cable. 


Cash. 


Breed. 


Buglehorne. 


Cad. 


Cashdollar. 


Breeding. 


Bulcock. 


Caddy. 


Cashman. 


Breeze. 


Bulflower. 


Caffre. 


Cashmere. 


Briars. 


Bulk. 


Cage. 


Cast. 


Brick. 


Bulky. 


Cain. 


Castor. 


Bridal. 


Bull. 


Cake. 


Cat. 


Bride. 


Bulled. 


Cakebread. 


Catchaside. 


Bridecake. 


Bullet. 


Calf. 


Catchasides 


Bridle. 


Bulley. 


Call. 


Catchlove. 


Bright. 


Bullock. 


Callard. 


Catchpole. 


Brightman. 


Bullpit. 


Callman. 


Cate. 



PECULIAR SURNAMES. 



149 



Gates. 


Cheers. 


Clay. 


Comer. 


Catharine. 


Chess. 


Claypole. 


Comet. 


Cato. 


Cheese. 


Clean. 


Comfort. 


Cats. 


Cheeseman. 


Clear. 


Comly. 


Cattle. 


Cheesewright. 


Cleave. 


Commander. 


Caudle. 


Chequer. 


Cleverly. 


Common. 


Caught. 


Cherry. 


Cliff. ' 


Commons. 


Caul. 


Cherry man. 


Clink. 


Goncete. 


Caulk. 


Chesnut. 


Clinker. 


Conduit. 


Caulking. 


Chessman. 


Clipp. 


Cone. 


Cause. 


Chest. 


Glitter. 


Congo. 


Cavalier. 


Chew. 


Cloak. 


Conn. 


Cave. 


Chick. 


Clock. 


Conquest. 


Caw. 


Chicken. 


Clodd. 


Conscience. 


Caws. 


Chicks. 


Clogg. 


Constance. 


Cease. 


Child. 


Close. 


Constant. 


Ceider. 


Children. 


Clothier. 


Content. 


Cent. 


Chillman. 


Cloud. 


Convey. 


Center. 


Chin. 


Clout. 


Convoy. 


Centlivre. 


Chine. 


Clover. 


Coo. 


Centre. 


Chip. 


Club. 


Cook. 


Chace. 


Chipchase. 


Clutterbuck. 


Cookworthy. 


Chafer. 


Chip man. 


Coal. 


Cool. 


Chaff. 


Chisel. 


Coalman. 


Coon. 


Chalice. 


Chisels. 


Coat. 


Coop. 


Chalk. 


Choice. 


Cobb. 


Coot. 


Challenger. 


Christ. 


Cobbledick. 


Cop. 


Challice. 


Christian. 


Cockeye. 


Cope. 


Chance. 


Christmas. 


Cockle. 


Copper. 


Chant. 


Chub. 


Codd. 


Copperwheat. 


Chap. 


Chuck. 


Code. 


Cord. 


Chaplain. 


Church. 


Codex. 


Corderoy. 


Charge. 


Churchyard. 


Codling. 


Cork. 


Charity. 


Circuit. 


Coffee. 


Corn. 


Charley. 


Citizen. 


Coffin. 


Corner. 


Chart. 


City. 


Coil. 


Corns. 


Chase. 


Civil. 


Coke. 


Corpse. 


Chataway. 


Clack. 


Cold. 


Cost. 


Chatfish. 


Clad. 


Goldman. 


Cosey. 


Chatt. 


Clam. 


Colepepper. 


Costard. 


Chaunter. 


Clan. 


Collar. 


Cot. 


Cheap. 


Clap. 


Collarbone. 


Cotton. 


Check. 


Clapper. 


Collick. 


Couch. 


Cheek. 


Claret. 


Colt. 


Councillor. 


Cheeks. 


Clash. 


Comb. 


Counsell. 


Cheer. 


Class* 


Combs. 


Couplet. 



150 



A SELECT LIST OF 



Courage. 


Crotch. 




Dealing. 


Course. 


Crow. 




Dealehamber. 


Courtier. 


Crowd. 


D. 


Dear. 


Cousin. 


Crowfoot. 




Dearlove. 


Cover. 


Crown. 


Dab. 


Dearth. 


Coward. 


Crucifix. 


Dabbs. 


Death. 


Cow. 


Crude. 


Dace. 


Decent. 


Co whom. 


Cruik shanks. 


Dadd. 


Deck. 


Cowl. 


Cruise. 


Daft. 


Deed. 


Cowstick. 


Crumb. 


Dagger. 


Deeds. 


Coy. 


Grumpier. 


Daily. 


Deer. 


Crab. 


Crush. 


Dainty. 


Deeprose. 


Crabtree. 


Crust. 


Dairy. 


Delf. 


Crack. 


Crutch. 


Dais. 


Delves. 


Crackbone. 


Cryer. 


Daisy. 


Demon. 


Crackles. 


Cube. 


Dally. 


Deo. 


Cracklin. 


Cuckoo. 


Dam. 


Desert. 


Cracknell. 


Cud. 


Dame. 


Desire. 


Craft. 


Cuddy. 


Damon. 


Dessert. 


Cram. 


Cuff. 


Damp. 


Deuce. 


Cramp. 


Cull. 


Damper. 


Devil. 


Crane. 


Culpepper. 


Damson. 


Dew. 


Crank. 


Cumber. 


Dance. 


Dial. 


Craven. 
Craw. 


Cupper. 
Curd. 


Dancer. 
Dandy. 


Dialogue. 
Diamond. 


Craze. 


Cure. 


Danger. 


Diaper. 


Creak. 


Curius. 


Dare. 


Dibble. 


Cream. 


Curl. 


Dark. 


Dieu. 


Creed. 


Curly. 


Darling. 


Diggory. 


Creeper. 


Curr. 


Dart. 


Digweed. 


Cress. 


Currant. 


Dash. 


Dike. 


Cribb. 


Cursin. 


Date. 


Dilly. 


Crickett. 


Curtain. 


Dates. 


Dine. 


Crier. 


Cushion. 


Daub. 


Dines. 


Crime. 


Cuss. 


Daughters. 


Dingy. 


Crimp. 


Custard. 


Daunt. 


Dining. 


Crisp. 


Cutbill. 


Daw. 


Dinn. 


Crispin. 


Cute. 


Dawber. 


Dinning. 


Croak. 


Cutforth. 


Dawn. 


Diprose. 


Crochet. 


Cutlove. 


Day. 


Dirk. 


Crone. 


Cutmutton. 


Daybell. 


Distill. 


Crook. 


Cutright. 


Dayfoot. 


Ditch. 


Crop. 


Cutting. 


Dayman. 


Dito. 


Cross. 


Cuttle. 


Deadman. 


Divan. 


Crosscup. 


Cutts. 


Dear man. 


Diver. 


Grossman. 




Deal. 


Dives. 



PECULIAR SURNAMES. 



151 



Dobbin. 


Drinkard. 


Earwiger. 


Fairbairn. 


Dodge. 


Drinkdregs. 


Easy. 


Fairbeard. 


Doe. 


Drinker. 


Eatwell. 


Fairbones. 


Doer. 


Drinkmilk. 


Eddy. 


Fairborn. 


Dole. 


Drinkwater. 


Eels. 


Fairchild. 


Doll. 


Dripps. 


Egg. 


Faircloth. 


Dollar. 


Droop. 


Eggbeer. 


Fairest. 


Dolphin. 


Drought. 


Eggs. 


Fairfeather. 


Dolt. 


Drown. 


Ego. 


Fairfield. 


Dominey. 


Drudge. 


Eighteen. 


Fairfoot. 


Don. 


Drum. 


Element. 


Fairfoul. 


Done. 


Dry. 


Ell. 


Fairhead. 


Doo. 


Ducat. 


Elms. 


Fairlamb. 


Doolittle. 


Duck. 


Emblem. 


Fairly. 


Dott. 


Duckling. 


Emmet. 


Fairman. 


Dotts. 


Dudgeon. 


End. 


Fail-manners. 


Double. 


Dulhumphry. 


Enough. 


Fairplay. 


Doubleday. 


Dull. 


Ermine. 


Fairs. 


Doublet. 


Dullard. 


Err. 


Fairservice. 


Doubt. 


Dulled. 


Esse. 


Fairtitle. 


Doubtfire. 


Duly. 


Essence. 


Fairweather. 


Douce. 


Dumbell. 


Eve. 


Fairw heater. 


Dough. 
Dove. 


Duel. 
Dun. 


Even. 

Eveness. 


Fairy. 
Faith. 


Dowdy. 


Dun calf. 


Everhard. 


Faithful. 


Dower. 


Dunnakin. 


Every. 


Fall. 


Down. 


Dunner. 


Evil. 


Fallow. 


Downwards. 


Dunning. 


Ewe. 


Fame. 


Downy. 


Duns. 


Excel! 


Fancy. 


Dowse. 


Dupe. 


Expence. 


Fanning. 


Doxey. 


Dust. 


Eye. 


Fardle. 


Doze. 


Duty. 


Eyes. 


Fare. 


Dozy. 


Dye. 


/ 


Farewell. 


Drabble. 


j 




Farm an. 


Dragon. 




F 


Farming. 


Drain. 


E 


jj . 


Farthing. 


Drake. 


jj 




Fast. 


Dram. 




Fable. 


Fasting. 


Drape. 


Eager, 


Face. 


Fatal. 


Drawbridge. 


Eagle. 


Facer. 


Fatherly 


Drawwater. 


Early. 


Faddy. 


Fathers. 


Dray. 


Earth. 


Fagg. 


Fatt. 


Dredge. 


Earthy. 


Fail. 


Fatty. 


Dresser. 


Earwaker. 


Fain. 


Faultless. 


Drewmilk. 


Earwhisper. 


Faint. 


Fawn. 


Drink. 


Earwig. 


Fair. 


Fay. 



152 



A SELECT LIST OF 



Fear. 


Flagg. 


Forcer. 


FretwelL 


Fearraan. 


Flake. 


Forfait. 


Friday. 


Fearweather. 


Flame. 


Forehead. 


Friend. 


Feast. 


Flaming. 


Forge. 


Friendly. 


Feather. 


Flare. 


Forget. 


Friendship. 


Feathers. 


Flashman. 


Forke. 


Fright. 


Fee. 


Flat. 


Forks. 


Frill. 


Fees. 


Flatman. 


Fort. 


Frip. 


Fell. 


Flatter. 


Forte. 


Frizzle. 


Felon. 


Flatters. 


Fortune. 


Frog. 


Felony. 


Flaws. 


Forty. 


From. 


Fender. 


Flay, 


Forty man. 


Frost. 


Fern. 


Flea. 


Forward. 


Fry. 


Ferret. 


Fleet. 


Foulfoot. 


Fryman. 


Ferry. 


Flesh. 


Foully. 


Fudge. 


Ferryman. 


Fleshman. 


Foulweather. 


Fuel. 


Fetter. 


Flick. 


Found. 


Fuge. 


Fetters. 
Fever. 


Flight. 
Fling. 


Foundling. 
Fouracre. 


Fugit. 
Full. 


Fevers. 


Flint. 


Fourapenny. 


Fullborn. 


Feveryear. 


Flitt. 


Fourname. 


Fullalove. 


Few. 


Float. 


Fowl. 


Fullbridge. 


Fibbs. 


Flock. 


Fowls. 


Fulsom. 


Fidler. 


Flood. 


Fox. 


Funk. 


Fife. 


Flora. 


Foxcraft. 


Funnell. 


Figg- 
Filbert. 


Flounders. 
Flowerday. 


Foxworthy. 
Foyster. 


Furlong. 
Furnace. 


File. 


Flue. 


Frail. 


Furnish. 


Filer. 


Flum. 


Frain. 


Furr. 


Fill. 


Flush. 


Frame. 


Furrow. 


Fillpot. 


Fluter. 


Franc. 


Fury. 


Fines. 


Flux. 


Frank. 


Furze. 


Finger. 


Fly. 


Frater. 


Fussey. 


Finis. 


Foale. 


Fray. 


Fye. 


Finny. 


Fodder. 


Freak. 




Fippenny. 


Fog. 


Free. 




Firebrass. 


Fogey. 


Freed. 




Firkin. 


Fold. 


Freeguard. 


. 


Fish. 


Folk. 


Freelove. 




Fisher. 


Folly. 


Freely. 


Gab. 


Fishline. 


Foot. 


Freeman. 


Gable. 


Fist. 


Footman. 


Freeze. 


Gaby. 


Fitt. 


Fop. 


French. 


Gaffer. 


Fitter. 


Fopless. 


Fresh. 


Gage. 


Fix. 


Force. 


Freshfield. 


Gagg. 


Fizard. 


Forecast. 


Freshwater. 


Gaily. 



PECULIAR SURNAMES. 



153 



Gain. 


jerken. 


Goeth. 


Goodwill. 


Gainer. 


jherken. 


jrofirst. 


jroodwine. 


Gait. 


Ghost. 


jroing. 


3rood wright. 


Gaiter. 


Giblett. 


Goings. 


jroody. 


Gala. 


Giddy. 


Gold. 


jroodyear. 


Gale. 


Gift. 


jrolden. 


ji-oose. 


Gall. 


Gig. 


Goldfinch. 


jrooseman. 


Gallant. 


jrildersleeves. 


jroldham. 


Goosey. 


Gallantry. 


Gilding. 


jroldhawk. 


Gore. 


Gallery. 


Gill. 


jroldman. 


Gorebrown. 


Galley. 


Gimlet. 


Goldsack. 


Gory. 


Galliard. 


Gin. 


Goldwater. 


Gosling. 


Gallon. 


Ginever. 


Golightly. 


Gospel. 


Gallop. 


Ginger. 


Gollop. 


Gotobed. 


Gallows. 


Gingle. 


Good. 


Gouger. 


Gait. 


Ginner. 


Goodacre. 


Gout. 


Gamble. 


Girl. 


Goodair. 


Gown. 


Gambling. 


Girth. 


Goodale. 


Grabby. 


Game. 


Gist. 


Goodbairn. 


Grace. 


Gammon. 


Given. 


Goodbeer. 


Grain. 


Gander. 


Glad. 


Goodbehere. 


Grammar. 


Ganderton. 


Gladden. 


Goodbody. 


Grand. 


Gapp. 


Gladman. 


Goodborn. 


Grapes. 


Garden. 


Gladson. 


Goodboys. 


Grass. 


Garland. 


Glass. 


Goodby. 


Grates. 


Garlick. 


Glasscock. 


Goodchap. 


Grave. 


Garment. 


Glasspool. 


Goodcheap. 


Gravel. 


Garnish. 


Glazard. 


Goodchild. 


Gravelly. 


Garret. 


Glide. 


Goodenough. 


Graves. 


Gash. 


Glister. 


Goodfellow. 


Gray. 


Gate. 


Gloss. 


Goodgroom. 


Graygoose. 


Gatehouse. 


Glue. 


Goodhand. 


Greathead. 


Gathergood. 


Goad. 


Goodhead. 


Greedy. 


Gaudy, 


Goat. 


Goodheart. 


Greenberry. 


Gaul. 


Goater. 


Goodhind. 


Greengrass. 


Gaunt. 


Goatman. 


Goodlad. 


Greengrow 


Gauntlett. 


Goblet. 


Goodlake. 


Greenhalf. 


Gay. 


God. 


Goodluck. 


Greenhead. 


Gaze. 


Godbehere. 


Goodman. 


Greenish. 


Gear. 


Godlip. 


Goodram. 


Greenman. 


Gem. 


Godly. 


Goodrum. 


Greensides. 


Gender. 


Godman. 


Goodsheep. 


Greensword. 


Genders. 


Godson. 


Goodship. 


Grew. 


Gent. 


Godspenny. 


Goodsir. 


Grice. 


Q.entle. 


Godward. 


Goodson. 


Grief. 


gentry. 


Goes. 


Goodway. 


Grieve. 



154 



A SELECT LIST OF 



Griffin. 


Haggard. 


Harlot. 


Heater. 


Griffinhoofe. 


Hail 


Harm. 


Heath. 


Grill. 


Hailstone. 


Harmony. 


Heather. 


Grim. 


Hailstones. 


Harness. 


Heathman. 


Grindall. 


Hair. 


Harper. 


Heats. 


Grist. 


Hairs. 


Harras. 


Heaven. 


Gritt. 


Hake. 


Harrow. 


Heavens. 


Groat. 


Hale. 


Hart. 


Heaver. 


Groom. 


Halfacre. 


Hartfull. 


Heaviside. 


Gross. 


Halfhead. 


Hartshorn. 


Heavy. 


Ground. 


Halfnight. 


Hash. 


Heavyeye. 


Groundsell. 


Halfpenny. 


Hasluck. 


Hector. 


Grouse. 


Halfyard. 


Hasmore. 


Hedge. 


Grow. 


Hal staff. 


Haste. 


Hedgecock. 


Growing. 


Halt. 


Hat. 


Hedger. 


Grubb. 


Halter. 


Hatfull. 


Hedges. 


Grumble. 


Ham. 


Hatoff. 


Heel. 


Gudgeon. 


Hammer. 


Hatred. 


Heifer. 


Guess. 


Hamock. 


Hatter. 


Height. 


Guessard. 


Hamper. 


Haven. 


Held. 


Guest. 


Hamrogue. 


Havens. 


Hell. 


Guile. 


Hand. 


Hawke. 


Hellhouse. 


Guily. 


Handforth. 


Hawker. 


Helm. 


Guise. 


Hands. 


Hawking. 


Helpusgod. 


Gull. 


Handsomebody. 


Hawthorn. 


Hemp. 


Gullet. 


Handy. 


Hay. 


Hen. 


Gulley. 


Handyside. 


Hayball. 


Herd, 


Gum. 


Hanger. 


Haycock. 


Herdsman. 


Gumboil. 


Hanks. 


Hayday. 


Heriot. 


Gump. 


Hannibal. 


Hazard. 


Heritage. 


Gun. 


Happy. 


Hazel. 


Hero. 


Gunner. 


Harbird. 


Hazlefoot. 


Herod. 


Gush. 


Harbour. 


Head. 


Herring. 


Gut. 


Hard. 


Headache. 


Hidden. 


Gutter. 


Hardbottle. 


Heady. 


Hide. 


Guy. 


Hardedge. 


Heal. 


Hider. 




Hardgraft. 


Heath. 


Higginbottom. 




Hardman. 


Heap. 


Highcock. 




Hard staff. 


Heaps. 


Highman. 


. 


Hardware. 


Heard. 


Highway. 




Hardy. 


Hearing. 


Hilt. 


Hack. 


Hardy man. 


Hearsay. 


Hinder. 


Hackblock. 


Hare. 


Hearse. 


Hinderwell. 


Hackstaff. 


Harefoot. 


Heart. 


Hinge. 


Haddock. 


Hark. 


Heartfree. 


Hip. 


Hagg. 


Harken. 


Hearty. 


Hiscock. 



PECULIAR SURNAMES. 



155 



Hist. 


Hopper. 


Idol. 


Just. 


Hitch. 


Horn. 


Image. 


Justice. 


Hitchcock. 


Hornblower. 


In. 


Jutting. 


Hives. 


Horner. 


Incarnation. 




Hoar. 


Hornet. 


Inch. 




Hoard. 


Horsecraft. 


Inches. 




Hobby. 


Horsefall. 


Ingold. 





Hodd. 


Horseman. 


Ingrain. 




Hoe. 


Horsenail. 


Inkpen. 


Keel. 


Hog. 


Hose. 


Innocent. 


Keen. 


Hogger. 


Hospital. 


Instance. 


Keep. 


Hogmire. 


Hotham. 


Iris. 


Keeping 


Hogsflesh. 


Hour. 


Iron. 


Kettle. 


Hogsmouth. 


Hours. 


Irons. 


Key. 


Hold. 


House. 


Isles. 


Keylock 


Holdback. 


Household. 


Ivory. 


Keys. 


Holdcroft. 


Houseman. 


Ivy. 


Kick. 


Holder. 


Hovell. 


Ivyleaf. 


Kid. 


Hole. 


How. 




Kilboy. 


Hollow. 


Howl. 




Kilbride. 


Holly. 
Holy. 


Howlong. 
Hoy. 


j. 


Kill. 
Killard. 


Holyday. 


Hue. 




Killer.' 


Holyland. 


Hug. 


Jack. 


Killman. 


Holyoak. 


Hull. 


Jacket. 


Killmartin. 


Home. 


Hum. 


Jane. 


Killmaster. 


Homer. 


Human. 


January. 


Killmister. 


Hone. 


Humble. 


Jar. 


Kilmany. 


Honey. 
Honey ball. 


Hunger. 
Hunting. 


Jay. 
Jealous. 


Kilpatrick. 
Kilt. 


Honeybone. 


Hurdle. 


Jelly. 


Kind. 


Honeybum. 


Kuril. 


Jerusalem. 


Kinder. 


Honeybun. 


Hurt. 


Jester. 


Kindred. 


Honeyman. 


Husband. 


Jew. 


Kine. 


Honour. 


Hush. 


Jewell. 


Kinsman. 


Honywill. 


Husk. 


Job. 


Kiss. 


Hood. 


Hussey. 


Joint. 


Kitcat. 


Hoodless. 


Hutch. 


Jolly. 


Kitchen. 


Hoof. 


Hutt. 


Joy. 


Kitchenman. 


Hook. 




Judge. 


Kite. 


Hookaway. 




July. 


Kitten. 


Hooker. 


T 


Jump. 


Kitty. 


Hop. 


1. 


Jumper. 


Klinghammer. 


Hope. 




June. 


Klingheart. 


Hopeless. 


Tcemonger. 


Jumper. 


Knee. 


Hopewell. 


Idle. 


Jury. 


Kneebone. 



156 



A SELECT LIST OF 



Knell. 


Leaf. 


Littlechild. 


Lovelady. 


Knife. 


Leak. 


Littlefair. 


Loveless. 


Knitt. 


Lean. 


Littlefear. 


Lovelock. 


Knock. 


Leaning. 


Littlehead. 


Loveluck. 


Knocker. 


Leaper. 


Littlejohn. 


Lovely. 


Knower. 


Lear. 


Littlepage. 


Lover. 




Leary. 
Leather. 


Littleproud. 
Lively. 


Loving. 
Low. 




Leatherbarrow. 


Liver. 


Luce. 





Ledger. 


Livery. 


Luck. 




Leech. 


Living. 


Lucky. 


Lace. 


Leftwitch. 


Lo. 


Lucy. 


Lack. 


Leg. 


Loach. 


Lull. 


Ladd. 


Legless. 


Loads. 


Lumber. 


Ladle. 


Lemon. 


Loan. 


Lumpy. 


Lady. 


Lent. 


Lob. 


Lung. 


Lady man. 


Leopard. 


Lock. 


Lush. 


Laimbeer. 


Letter. 


Locker. 


Lute. 


Lake. 


Letters. 


Locket. 


Lye. 


Lamb. 


Lettice. 


Locock. 


Lyes. 


Lambkin. 


Light. 


Lofty. 


Lyon. 


Lambshead. 


Liberty. 


Lollard. 




Lame. 


Licence. 


Lone. 




Lamp. 


Linch. 


Long. 


. 


Lamprey. 


Life. 


Longbottom. 




Lance. 


Lightbody. 


Longcake. 


Mabb. 


Lancet. 


Lightfoot. 


Longden. 


Mabee. 


Land. 


Lightly. 


Longest. 


Mace. 


Landless. 


Lightning. 


Longfellow. 


Mackerell. 


Large. 


Lightwine. 


Longmaid. 


Made. 


Lark. 


Likely. 


Longman. 


Madder. 


Larking. 


Lillywhite. 


Longmate. 


Maggot. 


Lash. 


Lily. 


Longshanks. 


Maggs. 


Lassy. 


Limb. 


Longstaff. 


Maid. 


Last. 


Limber. 


Look. 


Maiden. 


Late. 


Limebeer. 


Loom. 


Maidman. 


Later. 


Line. 


Loop. 


Maids. 


Lathe. 


Ling. 


Loose. 


Mail. 


Lavender. 


Link. 


Loosely. 


Mails. 


Law. 


Liquorice. 


Losecamp. 


Main. 


Lawless. 


Liquorish. 


Lots. 


Mainland. 


Lawman. 


Lions. 


Love. 


Mainprize. 


Lawn, 


List. 


Lovecock. 


Maize. 


Lax. 


Little. 


Loveday. 


Maker. 


Lay. 
Leach. 


Littleboy. 
Littleboys. 


Lovejoy. 
Lovekin. 


Makin. 
Malady 



PECULIAR SURNAMES. 



157 



Malay. 


Maxim. 


Mist. 


Murther. 


Male. 


May. 


Mite. 


Muse. 


Mall. 


Maybee. 


Moat. 


Muses. 


Mallard. 


Maycock. 


Mock. 


Musick. 


Mallet. 


Maydenhead. 


Mode. 


Musk. 


Malt. 


Maypowder. 


Moist. 


Musket. 


Mandrake. 


Maze. 


Mole. 


Muspratt. 


Man. 


M'Quirk. 


Moll. 


Mussel. 


Manage. 


M'Turk. 


Molten. 


Mustard. 


Manger. 


Mead. 


Monarch. 


Muster. 


Mangles. 


Meal. 


Monday. 


Musty. 


Mangy. 


Mealy. 


Money. 


Mutter. 


Manhood. 


Mean. 


Moneypenny. 


Mutton. 


Manifold. 


Means. 


Monkey. 


Mycock. 


Manlove. 


Meanwell. 


Monument. 


Myrtle. 


Manlover. 


Measure. 


Moon. 


Muzzy. 


Manly. 


Meats. 


Mooney. 




Manners. 


Mecca. 


Morcock. 




Mansard. 


Meddle. 


Morehen. 


N 


Mansion. 


Medlar. 


Morrow. 


j-> . 


Mantle. 


Medley. 


Mort. 




Many. 


Meek. 


Mortar. 


Nabb. 


Manypenny. 


Mellow. 


Moss. 


Nack. 


Maple. 


Melon. 


Most. 


Naggs. 


Maples. 


Mention. 


Mote. 


Nail. 


Mapp. 


Merry. 


Moth. 


Nap. 


Maps. 
Marble. 


Merry man. 
Merrymouth. 


Motley. 
Mouse. 


Napkin. 
Napper. 


March. 


Merry weather. 


Mouth. 


Narrowcoat. 


Mare. 


Mess. 


Much. 


Nave. 


Marjoram. 


Metcalf. 


Muchmore. 


Navy. 


Marklove. 


Mew. 


Muckle. 


Nation. 


Markquick. 


Middlecoat. 


Mudd. 


Nay. 


Markthaler. 


Middlemast. 


Muddle. 


Near. 


Marlock. 


Middleweek. 


Muff. 


Neat. 


Marriage. 


Mildmay. 


Muffin. 


Neck. 


Marry. 


Midwinter. 


Mug. 


Need. 


Mars. 


Milady. 


Mulberry. 


Needle. 


Martyr. 


Mile. 


Mule. 


Needs. 


Marvel. 


Milk. 


Mull. 


Negus. 


Mash. 
Matterface. 


Milksop. 
Mill. 


Mullet. 
Mumbler. 


Neighbour. 
Neithermill. 


Mattock. 


Million. 


Mumm. 


Nero. 


Matts. 


Minnow. 


Mummery. 


Nest. 


Maudlin. 


Mires. 


Mummy. 


Nethersole. 


Maw. 


Missing. 


Munch. 


Nettle. 



158 



A SELECT LIST OF 



Nettleship. 


Null. 


Orange. 


Paling. 


New.| 


Nun. 


Orchard. 


Pallace. 


Newback. 


Nurse. 


Orders. 


Pallas. 


Newbegin. 


Nut. 


Organ. 


Pallet. 


Newbirth. 


Nutbean. 


Ormduel. 


Palm. 


Newbold. 
Newbolt. 


Nutraan. 
Nutbrown. 


Orphan. 
Ostler. 


Palsy. 
Pamphlet. 


Newbone. 


Nutting. 


Ostrich. 


Pan. 


Newborn. 


Nutty. 


Other. 


Pander. 


Newcomb. 




Otherday. 


Pane. 


Newgate. 




Otherman. 


Pannel. 


Newlove. 




Otter. 


Pannier. 


Newmarch. 





Ought. 


Panter. 


Newts. 




Ouldbief. 


Panther. 


Nibbs. 


Oak. 


Our. 


Panting. 


Nice. 


Oakenbottom. 


Outcry. 


Pantry. 


Nick. 


Oaks. 


Outlaw. 


Papa. 


Nicks. 


Oakleaf. 


Outpin. 


Paquet. 


Niger. 


Oar. 


Oven. 


Par. 


Nigh. 


Oat. 


Over. 


Paradise. 


Night. 


Oaten. 


Overall. 


Paragon. 


Nightingale. 
Nihill. 


Oats. 
Odium. 


Overmire. 
Ovid. 


Paramour. 
Parcel. 


Nile. 


Off. 


Owings. 


Parcells. 


Nine. 


Offer. 


Owner. 


Pardon. 


Nipper. 


Office. 


Oyster. 


Pare. 


Nix. 


Officer. 




Parent. 


Noah. 


Ogg. 




Paring. 


Nobbs. 


Ogle. 


p 


Parish. 


Noddle. 


Oill. 


i 


Park. 


Nodes. 


Old. 




Parlour. 


Nogget. 


Oldacre. 


Pace. 


Parrot. 


TLT 

Noise. 


Oldcom. 


Pacer. 


Parshall. 


Noodle. 


Oldraan. 


Pack. 


Parsley. 


Noon. 


Olyfather. 


Packet. 


Parson. 


Northeast. 


Omega. 


Packman. 


Part. 


Nose. 


Omen. 


Paddock. 


Partner. 


Noser. 


Omit. 


Paddy. 


Partridge. 


Nos worthy. 


Omnibus. 


Pagan. 


Passenger. 


Not. 


Once. 


Page. 


Past. 


Notcutt. 


One. 


Pail. 


Patch. 


Nothing. 


Onion. 


Pain. 


Pate. 


Nothard. 


Onions. 


Painter. 


Pater. 


Notraan. 


Only. 


Painting. 


Path. 


Now. 


Onslow. 


Pair. 


Patience. 


Nox. 


Onyx. 


Palfrey. 


Patient. 



PECULIAR SURNAMES. 



1,39 



Paunch. 


Pennycuick. 


Pillage. 


Plume. 


Pause. 


Pennyfather. 


Pillar. 


Plumtree. 


Paviour. 


Pennyfeather. 


Pillow. 


Poacher. 


Paw. 


Pennymaker. 


Pimple. 


Pock. 


Pay. 


Pennyman. 


Pinch. 


Pocket. 


Payment. 


Pennymore. 


Pinchard. 


Podd. 


Pax. 


Pennypacker. 


Pinchback. 


Poet. 


Pea. 


Pentecost. 


Pinchbeck. 


Poignard. 


Peace. 


Pepper. 


Pindar. 


Point. 


Peaceable. 


Peppercorn. 


Pine. 


Pointer. 


Peach. 


Perch. 


Pinfound. 


Poke. 


Peaehy. 


Perfect. 


Pinion. 


Pole. 


Peacock. 


Perk. 


Pink. 


Polk. 


Peak. 


Perry. 


Pinu. 


Poll. 


Peal. 


Person. 


Pipe. 


Polly. 


Peanot. 


Pert. 


Pis sard. 


Pond. 


Pear. 


Pescod. 


Pisse. 


Ponder. 


Pearl. 


Pester. 


Pish. 


Poodle. 


Pearly. 


Pestle. 


Piso. 


Pool. 


Peas. 


Pett. 


Pistol. 


Poor. 


Pease. 


Pettibone. 


Pit. 


Pop. 


Peasoup. 


Pettycoat. 


Pitchbottom. 


Pope. 


Peat. 


Pew. 


Pitcher. 


Popoff. 


Pebble. 


Pharoah. 


Pitchford. 


Poppy. 


Peck. 


Pharrisee. 


Pitchfork. 


Porch. 


Pecker. 


Pheasant. 


Place. 


Port. 


Peckit. 


Phoenix. 


Plaice. 


Portal. 


Peckover. 


Physick. 


Plain. 


Porter. 


Peddle. 


Pick. 


Plane. 


Portwine. 


Pedigree. 


Picker. 


Plank. 


Poser. 


Pedlar. 


Pickle. 


Plant; 


Post. 


Peed. 


Pickles. 


Plaster. 


Pothecary. 


Peep. 


Pickup. 


Play. 


Potiphar. 


Peer. 


Pickwoad. 


Playfair. 


Pot. 


Peerless. 


Piddle. 


Please. 


Pottage. 


Peg. 


Pie. 


Pleasent. 


Pottle. 


Pelisse. 


Pierce. 


Pledge. 


Pounce. 


Pellet. 


Pig- 


Pledger. 


Pound. 


Pelter. 


Pigeon. 


Plenty. 


Pout. 


Pen. 


Pigfat. 


Plot. 


Powder. 


Pence. 


Pighog. 


Ploughman. 


Praise. 


Penfound. 


Pike. 


Pluck. 


Prance. 


Penhole. 


Pilchard. 


Plug. 


Pray. 


Pennebaker. 


Pile. 


Plum. 


Precious. 


Penny. 


Pilgrim. 


Plumb. 


Prentice. 


Pennycook. 


Pill. 


Plumber. 


Presence. 



160 



A SELECT LIST OF 



Press. 


Putt. 


Rafter. 


Redhouse. 


Prestige. 


Putts. 


Ragg. 


Redman. 


Pretty. 




Ragless. 


Redmile. 


Priam. 




Raiment. 


Redpath. 


Price. 




Rain. 


Reed. 


Pride. 





Rainbird. 


Register. 


Priest. 




Rainbow. 


Render. 


Priestly. 


Quail. 


Raisin. 


Renew. 


Prjgg. 


Quaint. 


Rake. 


Rescue. 


Prime. 


Quaintance. 


Rally. 


Rest. 


Primrose. 


Quare. 


Ram. 


Restcome. 


Prince. 


Quarrel. 


Ramard. 


Revel. 


Prior. 


Quarrels. 


Rambelow. 


Rex. 


Prizeman. 


Quarry. 


Ramsbottom. 


Reynard. 


Proctor. 


Quart. 


Range. 


Ribbons. 


Profit. 


Quarterly. 


Ranger. 


Rice. 


Prong. 
Prophet. 


Quarterman. 
Quarters. 


Rank. 
Ransom. 


Rich. 
Richbell. 


Proud. 


Quash. 


Rant. 


Richer. 


Proudfit. 


Quear. 


Rap. 


Riches. 


Proudfoot. 


Queen. 


Rape. 


Rick. 


Proudlock. 


Quell. 


Rash. 


Rickets. 


Proudlove. 


Quere. 


Rasp. 


Ricks. 


Proudman. 


Quest. 


Rat 


Riddle. 


Prudence. 


Question. 


Rate. 


Ride. 


Prudent. 


Quhitelaw. 


Rathbone. 


Rideout. 


Puddifoot. 


Quick. 


Rather. 


Rider. 


Puddle. 


Quicklove. 


Rattle. 


Ridge. 


Puff. 


Quickly. 


Raven. 


Riding. 


Puffer. 


Quill. 


Raw. 


Ridings. 


Pull. 


Quilt. 


Rawbone. 


Right. 


Pulley. 


Quilter. 


Ray. 


Rightly. 


Pulse. 


Quince. 


Reach. 


Ring. 


Punch. 


Quintal. 


Reader. 


Ringgold. 


Punchard. 


Quire. 


Readless. 


Ringlet. 


Puncheon. 


Quirk. 


Ready. 


Rings. 


Purchase. 




Real. 


Ringwell. 


Purely. 




Ream. 


Rino. 


Purge. 


ft 


Rear. 


Rip. 


Purple. 


JLt 


Reason. 


Risband. 


Purr. 




Reckless. 


Rise. 


Purse. 


Eabbit. 


Record. 


Rising. 


Pursglove. 


Race. 


Red. 


Risk. 


Purslove. 


Rack. 


Redcock. 


Rivet. 


Pushing. 


Raffle. 


Reddish. 


Roach. 


Pussy. 


Raffles. 


Redfoot. 


Road. 



PECULIAR SURNAMES. 



161 



Roak. 


Ruff. 


Saunter. 


Sentance. 


Roan. 


Ruffle. 


Saveall. 


Sequin. 


Roarer. 


Rufus. 


Savory. 


Service. 


Roast. 


Rugg. 


Saw. 


Sessions. 


Rob. 


Rugs. 


Saws. 


Setter. 


Robe. 


Rule. 


Saxon. 


Settle. 


Robin. 


Rum. 


Sayman. 


Seton. 


Rock. 


Rumage. 


Say well. 


Sex. 


Rocket. 


Rumball. 


Scaffold. 


Sexty. 


Rod. 


Rumbell. 


Scamp. 


Shade. 


Roe. 


Rumbellow. 


Scarce. 


Shaddock. 


Roebuck. 


Rumble. 


Scaredevil. 


Shakeshaft. 


Roll. 


Rummer. 


Scattergood. 


Shakspeare. 


Rolls. 


Rump. 


Scholar. 


Shallow. 


Roman. 


Ruse. 


Schoolcraft. 


Shally. 


Rome. 


Rush. 


Schooling. 


Shamely. 


Rood. 


Rushbrook. 


Scipio. 


Shark. 


Roof. 


Rushout. 


Scolding. 


Sharkey. 


Rook. 


Rust. 


Score. 


Sharpless. 


Rooker. 


Rye. 


Scragg. 


Sharpley. 


Room. 




Screech. 


Shatter. 


Roost. 




Screen. 


Shatterfoot. 


Root. 


s. 


Scroggs. 


Shave. 


Rope. 




Scrubbs. 


Shaveall. 


Roper. 


Sack. 


Scuffle. 


Shaves. 


Ropey arn. 


Sacks. 


Scurry. 


Sheaf. 


Rose. 


Safe. 


Scutcheon. 


Sheargold. 


Rosebottom. 


Sage. 


Seaborn. 


Shears. 


Rosewell. 


Sail. 


Seabright. 


Sheath. 


Rosewharm. 


Saint. 


Seacock. 


Shed. 


Rotten. 


Sale. 


Seacole. 


Sheep wash. 


Rough. 


Sales. 


Seafart. 


Sheepshanks. 


Roughead. 


Sail. 


Seagood. 


Sheet. 


Roughly. 


Salmon. 


Seal. . 


Sheets. 


Round. 


Salt. 


Seaquill. 


Shelf. 


Roundtree. 


Same. 


Search. 


Shell. 


Rout. 


Sample. 


Searchwell. 


Shergold. 


Row. 


Sanctuary. 


Seas. 


Sherry. 


Rowbottom. 


Sand. 


Seasongood. 


Shew. 


Rowell. 


Sandal. 


See. 


Shewcraft. 


Royal. 


Sandell. 


Seedsman. 


Shield. 


Ruby. 


Sandman. 


Segar. 


Shilling. 


Ruck. 


Sands. 


Self. 


Shillinglaw. 


Rudder. 


Sandy. 


Send. 


Shin. 


Ruddy. 


Sattenshall. 


Sendall. 


Ship. 


Rue. 


Saul. 


Sendfirst. 


Shiplake. 


M 



162 



A SELECT LIST OF 



Shipperbottom. 


Silks. 


Smoothy. 


Spilling. 


Shipping. 


Sill. 


Snare. 


Spiltimber. 


Ship wash. 


Silly. 


Sneezum. 


Spindle. 


Shipway. 


Silver. 


Snipes. 


Spine. 


Shirt. 


Silverlock. 


Snooks. 


Spinnage. 


Shirtcliff. 


Silverside. 


Snow. 


Spinning. 


Shoe. 


Silversides. 


Snowball. 


Spire. 


Shoebottom. 


Silverstone. 


Snugg. 


Spires. 


Shoecraft. 


Simmer. 


Sockett. 


Spirit. 


Shoesrnith. 


Simper. 


Soda. 


Spirt. 


Shooter. 


Simple. 


Sofa. 


Spite. 


Shorthose. 


Sinfoot. 


Softly. 


Spittle. 


Shortland. 


Sinew. 


Sole. 


Spittlehouse. 


Shotbolt. 


Sing. 


Sop. 


Spleen. 


Shott. 


Skill. 


Sore. 


Splint. 


Shout. 


Skillet. 


Sorely. 


Spokes. 


Shouter. 


Skin. 


Soul. 


Spoon. 


Shove. 


Skip. 


Sour. 


Spooney. 


Shovel. 


Skipper. 


Sourbuts. 


Spose. 


Show. 


Slack. 


Sourmilk. 


Spotts. 


Shrub. 


Slate. 


Sourwine. 


Sprat. 


Shuffle. 


Slaughter. 


Sours. 


Sprawling. 


Shufflebottora. 


Slaymaker. 


Southcoat. 


Spray. 


Shuffler. 


Sleep. 


Soy. 


Spread. 


Shun. 


Slender. 


Spade. 


Sprigg. 


Shutter. 


Slewman. 


Span. 


Spriggs. 


Shuttle. 


Slide. 


Spar. 


Spring. 


Sicily. 


Slight. 


Spare. 


Sprout. 


Sickman. 


Slinger. 


Spark. 


Spruce. 


Side. 


Slipper. 


Sparks. 


Spry. 


Sidebother. 


Slow. 


Sparrow. 


Spurr. 


Sidebottom. 


Slowman. 


Spavin. 


Square. 


Singleday. 


Sly. 


Speak. 


Squib. 


Sink. 


Small., 


Spear. 


Squirrel. 


Sinker. 


Smallbone. 


Spearpoint. 


Stabb. 


Birr. 


Smallbyhynd. 


Speck. 


Stable. 


Sitwell. 


Smaller. 


Speed. 


Stack. 


Six. 


Smallman. 


Spell. 


Staff. 


Sixty. 


Smallpage. 


Speller. 


Stage. 


Sixsmith. 


Smallpiece. 


Spellin. 


Stagg. 


Size. 


Smart. 


Spender. 


Staggers. 


Sketcher. 


Smelt. 


Spendlove. 


Stain. 


Sides. 


Smiles. 


Spice. 


Stair. 


Sign. 


Smirke. 


Spike. 


Stairbird. 


Silence. 


Smitten. 


Spiles. 


Stairman. 


Silk. 


Smoker. 


Spillard. 


Stairs. 


k 



PECULIAR SURNAMES. 



163 



Stake. 


Still. 


Strip. 


Surpluss. 


Staker. 


Stillaway. 


Stripe. 


Suttle. 


Stall. 


Stillman. 


Stripling. 


Swab. 


Stallion. 
Stammer. 


Stillwagon. 
Sting. 


Strode. 
Strongi'th'arm 


Swadling. 
Swallow. 


Stammers. 


Stirrup. 


Strongman. 


Swan. 


Stamp. 


Stitch. 


Struck. 


Swap. 


Stanback. 


Stiver. 


Struggles. 


Swarm. 


Standever. 


Stivers. 


Strutt. 


Sweeper. 


Standfast. 


Stocking. 


Stubblefield. 


Sweet. 


Stan groom. 
Staple. 


Stockings. 
Stocks. 


Stuck. 
Studd. 


Sweetapple 
Sweetlove. 


Staples. 


Stoker. 


Studman. 


Sweetman. 


Star. 


Stones. 


Stuffins. 


Swift. 


Starbird. 


Stoneystreet. 


Stumbles. 


Swigg. 


Starboard. 


Stopfull. 


Stump. 


Swindle. 


Starbuck. 


Stopher. 


Stun. 


Swindler. 


Stare. 


Stopp. 


Sturdy. 


Sword. 


Stares. 


Stops. 


Sturgeon. 


Sworder. 


Stark. 


Stork. 


Style. 


Swords. 


Starkweather. 


Storm. 


Sty man. 


Sworn. 


Starling. 


Storms. 


Styx. 


Sycamore. 


Start. 


Story. 


Such. 


Synge. 


Startup. 


Stout. 


Suck. 


Sythe. 


State. 


Stove. 


Suckbitch. 




States. 


Stow. 


Sucker. 




Station. 


Strain. 


Suckling. 


r r 


Stay. 


Straight. 


Sudden. 


1. 


Stead. 


Strait. 


Sudds. 




Stealin. 


Strand. 


Sue. 


Tabernacle. 


Steddy. 


Strange. 


Suet. 


Tack. 


Steed. 


Strap. 


Sugar. 


Tackle. 


Steel. 


Straw. 


Sugarman. 


Tag. 


Steeple. 


Strawmat. 


Sugars. 


Talk. 


Steer. 


Stray. 


Suit. 


Talker. 


Stem. 


Strayline. . 


Sulkie. 


Talks. 


Stemfly. 


Stream. 


Sum. 


Tall. 


Step. 


Streamer. 


Summerbell. 


Tallboy. 


Steptoe. 


Streams 


Summersett. 


Tally. 


Stern. 


Street 


Summit. 


Tame. 


Stew. 


Stretch. 


Summons. 


Tank. 


Stick. 


Stride. 


Sunken. 


Tann. 


Stickle. 


Strider. 


Sunshine. 


Tape. 


Stickler. 


Strike. 


Super. 


Taphouse. 


Stiff. 


String. 


Surety. 


Tapp. 


Stilgoe. 


Stringfellow. 


Surplice. 


Tapper. 


M 2 



164 



A SELECT LIST OF 



Tarbottom. 


Tether. 


Timber. 


Topcoat. 


Tarbox. 


Thaler. 


Timberlake. 


Tope. 


Tarbuck. 


Thane. 


Timbers. 


Topless. 


Tardy. 


Thaw. 


Times. 


Topp. 


Tares. 


Thew. 


Timeslow. 


1 opper. 


Target. 


Thick. 


Timewell. 


Tout. 


Tarr. 


Thickbroom. 


Tingle. 


Tow. 


Tarry. 


Thin. 


Tink. 


Towell. 


Tart. 


Thing. 


Tinker. 


Toy. 


Tassel. 


Third. 


Tinkling. 


Trail. 


Tatler. 


Thirkettle. 


Tinline. 


Train. 


Tatlock. 


Thirst. 


Tinn. 


Trainer. 


Tatt. 


Thistle. 


Tiplady. 


Trapp. 


Tatters. 


Thorn. 


Tipler. 


Travel. 


Tattle. 


Thorns. 


Tipp. 


Tray. 


Taunt. 
Taw. 
Tawney. 
Tayles. 


Thorogall. 
Thoroughgood. 
Thousandpound 
Thrash 


Tippet. 
Tipple. 
Title. 
Titmouse. 


Trayfoot. 
Treadgold. 
Treasure. 
Treble. 


Tea. 


Thrasher. 


Titter. 


Tree. 


Teachem. 


Threader. 


Tittle. 


Tremble. 


Teal. 


Threadgold. 


Toad. 


Tres. 


Tear. 


Threeneedle. 


Toadwine. 


Tribe. 


Tears. 


Thresher. 


Toby. 


Tribute. 


Teas. 


Thrift. 


Toddy. 


Trice. 


Teat. 


Thrush. 


Todhunter. 


Trick. 


Teats. 


Thrustout. 


Toe. 


Tricker. 


Tee. 


Thin-kettle. 


Toes. 


Trickey. 


Teeth. 


Thunder. 


Toewater. 


Trim. 


Telfair. 
Tell. 


Thursday. 
Thus. 


Tolefree. 
Toll. 


Trimmer. 
Triukle. 


Telling. 


Tick. 


Tolls. 


Trip. 


Tempest. 


Tickle. 


Tolman. 


Triplett, 


Ten 
Tenant. 


Ticklepenny. 
Tidy. 


Torn. 
Tombs. 


Trist. 
Trivett. 


Tench. 


Tidyman. 


Tommy. 


Trodden. 

M 1 I! 


Tendrill. 


Tie. 


Tone. 


I rollop. 


Tenet. 


Tier. 


Tongs. 


Troop. 


Tennis. 


Tiff. 


Tongue. 


Trope. 


Tense. 


Tiffany. 


Toogood. 


Trotman. 


Tent. 


Tiffin. 


Took. 


Trott 


Tentimes. 


Tiger. 


Tool. 


Trotter. 


Terrier. 


Tight. 


Toombs. 


Trout. 


Test. 


Till. 


Toot. 


Trow. 


Tester. 


Tilt. 


Tooth. 


Trowell. 


Testimony. 


Tiltman. 


Toothaker. 


Troy. 



PECULIAR SURNAMES. 



165 



Truant. 


Tye. 


Vineyard. 


Wares. 


Truck. 


Type. 


Violet. 


Wardrobe. 


True. 




Viper. 


Warn. 


Truebody. 




Virgin. 


Warr. 


Truefit. 


u. 


Virgo. 


Warrior. 


Truelove. 




Virtue. 


Wart. 


Trull. 


TTo-lv 


Voice. 


Wash. 


Truly. 


u e>V' 
Uncle 


Vowel. 


Washer. 


Truman. 


Uncles 


Vox. 


Wasp. 


Truss. 


Under.' 


Vulgar. 


Waste. 


Trust. 


Unit. 




Watch. 


Trusty. 


Unite. 




Watchman. 


Try. 
Tryon. 
Tub. 
Tubman. 


Unthank. 
Upjohn. 
Upward. 
Urin. 


w. 

Waddilove. 


Water. 
Waterfall. 
Waterhair. 
Watering. 


Tuck. 




Wade. 


Waterman. 


Tucker. 




Waddle. 


Waterguard. 


Tuft. 




Wafer. 


Wattle. 


Tufts. 


V. 


Wager. 


Wax. 


Tulip. 




Wagg. 


Way. 


Tune. 


Vail. 


Wagless. 


Waygood. 


Tunn. 


Vain. 


Wail. 


Wayman. 


Tunnell. 


Valiant. 


Wailes. 


Weak. 


Tunney. 


Value. 


Wain. 


Weal. 


Turning. 


Van. 


Wainscoat. 


Wean. 


Turk. 


Vast. 


Waiscot. 


Wear. 


Turns. 


Veal. 


Wait. 


Weatherbee. 


Turtle. 


Venus. 


Wake. 


Weatherhead. 


Twa. 


Verge. 


Waker. 


Weatherhog. 


Twaddle. 


Verity. 


Walk. 


Weatherspoon. 


Tweedle. 


Vert. 


Wall. 


Weatherstone. 


Twelve. 


Very. 


Wallduck. 


Weather wax. 


Twelves. 


Vesper. 


Wallet. 


Webb. 


Twelvetrees. 


Vessel. 


Wallower. 


Wedd. 


Twenty man. 


Vessels. 


Wand. 


Wedge. 


Twice. 


Vest. 


Wane. 


Wedgewood. 


Twiceaday. 


Vestal. 


Want. 


Wedlock. 


Twig. 


Vial. 


Wanton. 


Weed. 


Twilight. 


Vice. 


Wapper. 


Week. 


Twin. 


Victory. 


Warble. 


Weeks. 


Twine. 


Vigor. 


Ward. 


Weekly. 


Twist. 


Vigors. 


Wardlaw. 


Weeks. 


Two. 


Vile. 


Wardrobe. 


Weight. 


Twopenny. 


Vine. 


Ware. 


Weightman. 


Twopotts. 


Vinegar. 


Waredraper. 


Welfare. 



186 



A SELECT LIST OF PECULIAR SUKAMES. 



Welfill. 


Whitlow. 


Wintermute. 


Wrapp. 


Well. 


Whittle. 


Wintersmith. 


Wrath. 


Welladvice. 


Why. 


Wiper. 


Wren. 


Wellbeloved. 


Whyraark. 


Wire. 


Wrench. 


Wellborn. 


Wick. 


Wires. 


Wrinkle. 


Wellcome. 


Wicker. 


Wisdom. 


Write. 


Wellhop. 


Widdow. 


Wise. 


Wroth. 


Wells. 


Wide. 


Wisecup. 


Wry. 


Welp. 


Widows. 


Wiseman. 


Wulgar. 


Wench. 


Wife. 


Wish. 


Wunder. 


Went. 


Wig. 


Wisher. 


Wunderly. 


West. 


Wight. 


Wit. 


Wunders. 


Westcoat. 


Wild. 


Witch. 


Wurst. 


Westland. 


Wildblood. 


Witcraft. 




Westwood. 


Wildboar. 


With. 




Whale. 
Whalebelly. 


Wildgoose. 
Wildish. 


Withcraft. 
Witty. 


Y. 


Whalebone. 


Wildman. 


Woad. 




Wharf. 
Wheat. 


Wildsmith. 
Wile. 


Wolf. 
Wonder. 


Yalowhaire. 

Yam 


Wheatcroft. 


Wilks. 


Wonders. 


A dill. 

Voi.^1 


Wheel. 


Will. 


Woodbine. 


i aid. 

\r 


Wheeler. 


Willing. 


Woodcock. 


i aw. 

VQQ 


Whelps. 
Wherry. 


Wily. 
Winch. 


Woodfall. 
Woodfork. 


i ea. 
Yearly. 
Vpll 


While. 


Wind. 


Woodhead. 


1 Dili 

Vnllrkw 


Whip. 
Whippy. 


Windard. 
Winder. 


Woodman . 
Woodnot 


i enow. 
Yeoman. 

Vonr 


Whirlpenny. 


Windmill. 


Woodthrift. 


i ew. 

Vrm 


Whisker. 
Whistler. 
Whist. 
Whiteboon. 
Whitebread. 
Whitefoot. 
Whitehair. 


Window. 
Windows. 
Windybank. 
Wine. 
Winegar. 
Wines. 
Winfarthing. 


Woodyard. 
Woof. 
Wool. 
Woollen. 
Woolly. 
Word. 
World. 


1 OU. 

Youngblood. 
Younghusband 
Youngjohns. 
Younglove. 
Youngman. 
Youngmay. 
Vnlp 


Whitehand. 


Wing. 


Worm. 


i me. 


Whitehead. 


Wink. 


Worms. 




Whiteheat. 


Winker. 


Worn. 




Whitehorse. 


Winks. 


Worry. 




Whiteland. 


Winner. 


Worship. 


. 


Whitelegg, 


Winpenny. 


Wort. 




Whitelock. 


Winter. 


Worth. 


Zeal. 


Whiteside. 


Winterflood. 


Worthy. 


Ziffzagr. 


Whitethread. 


Winterhalter. 


Wouldhave. 


* J1 6' JCV 6 > 

Zink. 



Just Pubfix/ietf, /trice. 14,9., demy Hvo, cloth, lettered, 

VERBA NOMINALIA ; OR, WORDS DERIVED 
FROM PROPER NAMES. 

BY RICHARD STEPHEN CHARNOCK, PH.DR., 

F.S.A., F.R.G.S., F.R.8.8.A., F.R.8.N.A., 

VICE-PlfESIDENT OF THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON; FOKEIGN ASSOCIATE OF 
THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF PARIS ; CORRESPONDING MEMBER OF THE NEW ENGLAND 
HISTORIC-GLNEALOGICAL SOCIETY. 

LONDON: TRUBNER & Co., 60, PATERNOSTER Row. 

" The book necessarily contains some instructive, and in many cases very amusing in- 
formation, which will to some readers be entirely new, and it is particularly well suited for 
the use of schools and teachers." The London Review. 

" There are few etymologists who can afford to dispense with the book. The plan is well 
conceived and happily carried out." Reader. 

" Dr. Charnock has worked out his idea very completely and well, and given us a book 
which no one should fail to possess." Court Circular. 

ALSO, 

Price 12s., demy 8vo, cloth, lettered, 

LOCAL ETYMOLOGY: 

& Beribatibe Bictionarg of (tograpfjtcal jBames. 

LONDON : HOULSTON & WRIGHT, 65, PATERNOSTER Row. 

" Contains a large selection of names most likely to be sought for, and is carefully com- 
piled." Examiner. 

" An immense amount of industry has been brought to bear upon the compilation of this 
dictionary. Those interested in such a study will, in this dictionary, find a help such as 
they have hitherto found the want of." Morning Post. 

" Contains the etymology of about 3000 names of most interest to the general reader ; 
but the reader may, by applying the information furnished by Dr. Charnock with reference 
to the prefixes and affixes of local names, carry the work far beyond the limits within which 
the author has confined himself." Notes and Queries. 

" A volume on which Dr. Charnock has spent much labour, with corresponding success." 
Athenaeum. 

" The genealogies have been followed out with much labour and research through nume- 
rous languages." Globe. 

" As a compilation, it indicates a considerable amount of philological attainment, and less 
of that perplexing ingenuity so characteristic of etymologists, which amuses rather than 
instructs." Westminster Review. 

" The two great requisites for the task were industry and judgment, and by the help of 
these Dr. Charnock has produced a useful and instructive, and we may add, an entertain- 
ing and curious volume." Morning Chronicle. 

" To a conviction of the importance of the study of etymology, together with a love of 
the study itself on the part of Dr. Charnock, we are indebted for the present admirable 
volume, which for conscientious inquiry, accuracy and skill in the performance, could scarcely 
be surpassed in value, and, as such, is constituted an incontestable authority in the matter 
of which it treats. It will accordingly find grateful acceptance with antiquaries, students, 
and men of letters. The work is marked by diligent research in ancient and modern, 
languages, and the consultation of numerous histories and other works." Daily Telegraph. 

" Dr. Charnock deserves every credit for producing, within the moderate limits of an 
octavo volume, a work which, while its well-digested conciseness cannot fail to render it 
acceptable to the general reader, is entirely free from that flippant style of jumping at con- 
clusions without research which excites the contempt of the genuine archaeologist. The 
author has shown himself to possess sound discrimination as well as extensive reading, the 
power of condensing much important matter within a narrow compass, and a judgment not 
to be led astray by specious but superficial and conjectural derivation." Atlas. 

" It suggests some curious and interesting topics to the philologist." All the Tear 
Round. 

" Great in Indian terms." Dorset County Chronicle. 

"Dr. Charnock has produced a book which, divested of the dulness of 'word-books' in 
general, whilst exhibiting in an eminent degree a scholar-like acquirement, and an acute- 
ness of research and discrimination, and no slight knowledge of many tongues, presents a 
good deal of pleasant reading and many historical, descriptive, and anecdotal remarks. In 
this respect, of all etymological dictionaries, a topographical one no doubt affords a more 
ample field for an easy, discursive, and generally interesting treatment of the subject than 



any other branch of philological learning. Granting this, Dr. Cliarnock has executed his 
task in all the foregoing respects with a method, correctness, amplitude, -and can-fulness 
which entitle his work to the commendation and encouragement of all those who take an 
interest in philological research. The author does not confine himself to Great Britain ; 
other countries in all quarters of the world come in for a fair share of his labours, and 
we find researches in upwards of serenty languages and dialects, amongst which the Anglo- 
Saxon seems to hay been the subject of intimate study. An additional value is gm-n to 
the work by the pronunciation of the names being added when necessary, and by the clear- 
ness of the detail, which renders it useful even to those who have no grent knowledge of 
languages, whilst at the same time it is not cumbered with a redundancy of words." Lin- 
coln Times. 

ALSO, 

Price 7s. 6d., 12wo, cloth, lettered, 

BRADSHAWS ILLUSTRATED HAND-BOOK 
TO SPAIN AND PORTUGAL : 

A complete Guide for Travellers in the Peninsula, with Maps, Town 

Plans, &c. 

LONDON : "W. J. ADAMS, 59, FLEET STREET. 

ALSO, 
Price 3s. Gd., 12mo, cloth, lettered, 

GUIDE TO THE TYROL; 

COMPRISING PEDESTRIAN TOURS OF 1600 MILES IN TYROL, STYRIA, CARTN- 
TIUA, AND SALZKAMMERGUT, WITH A SKELETON MAP OF THE COUNTRY. 

LONDON : W. J. ADAMS, 59, FLEET STREET. 

" We can only say, put this nice little guide in your pocket, and go and see the country.' 
Athenteum. 

"As a brief record of personal experience, this little volume, which would occupy small 
space in the corner of a knapsack, will, we have no doubt, prove a most useful companion 
to any one who proposes to follow the author's footsteps through the beautiful scenery to 
be found among the mountains and valleys of the Tyrol." Notes and Queries. 

" For full information on the Tyrol we beg to refer our readers to a concise, useful, and 
interesting little work just published, entitled ' Guide to the Tyrol,' by R. S. Charnock." 
tiradshaw's Continental Railway Guide. 

" This book is not only interesting, but useful. The information it contains will enable 
the tourist to make his way through a large portion of the finest scenery in Europe with no 
more help than a light purse, a cotton umbrella, and a leather knapsack." Morning 
Chronicle. 

" Genuine, and a model of brevity." Dorset County Chronicle. 

" With this work, the pedestrian may learn how to spend a month or six weeks among 
the most magnificent scenery in the world, and at a cost considerably under 20." Military ' 
Spectator. 

" We can recommend the work as a thoroughly practical guide." Bristol Mercury. 

" We strongly advise every one who contemplates going over this ground to purchase this 
excellent little book, which enters sufficiently into detail to satisfy any traveller, and is 
never dull or prosy." Cambridge Independent. 

" Pleasantly written, and contains many useful hints. It is a very useful vade mecum for 
travellers." Brighton Gazette. 

" If any of our readers are thinking of a continental tour, and wish to deviate somewhat 
from the beaten track, we recommend them to be off to the Tyrol, and to take this book 
for a pocket companion." Bradford Observer. 

Preparing for Publication, 

A GLOSSARY OF PROVINCIAL WORDS used 

in the County of Essex. 

THE ETYMOLOGY OF CORNISH SURNAMES. 
THE BASQUE, and its connexion with other 
it. Languages. 



e'-f- ' cUrr. 

'**^