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Full text of "Luther College through sixty years, 1861-1921"

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DK. L.^UR L,^RS£N 



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DR. L.^UR L^RSEN 



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Luther College Through 
Sixty Years 



1861 - ig2i 



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By THE LUTHER COLLEGE FACULTY 

Editorial Committee: 
O. M. NORUE - O. A. TINGELSTAD - KARL T. JACOBSEN 



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PRESS OF 

AUGSBURG PUBLISHING HOUSE 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 
1922 



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COPYMGHT 1922 
LUTHER COLLEGE FACULTY 



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PREFACE 

LUTHER COLLEGE has had a definite aim and has rendered 
a very definite service. It has stood for sound Biblical doc- 
trine^ and on this basis has furnished many well educated ministers 
and teachers for the Church. It has thus been a very important 
factor in the development of the Norwegian Lutheran Church in 
this country. It has given its students a knowledge of the cultural 
and spiritual heritage which they have received from their fore- 
fathers and has thus added to their strength of character and 
individuality and made thetn better American citizens than they 
would have been had they known less of the roots from which they 
have sprung. It has stood for a thorough classical training; and^ 
though providing for the study of the natural sciences, has empha- 
sized the study of languages, history, human thought and art, and 
human institutions, in a time of great uncertainty in college edu- 
cation. It has pursued its policy in the face of great temptation 
to yield to the spirit of the time, and has produced a body of 
alumni who have exerted a widespread influence and have been a 
distinct credit to their Alma Mater and the people of Norwegian 
extraction in this country. 

In view of these things, it is quite appropriate that a history of 
Luther College, such as is herewith presented, should be pub- 
lished at this time. It is not the first history of the College that has 
been written. A number of sketches and histories of the College 
have been published from time to time, but only one of these 
histories has attempted to give a detailed account of the work done 
at the institution. This is Prof. Gisle Bothne's "Det Norske Luther 
College," written in the Norwegian language and published in 
1897. It is a very interesting and valuable work; but, naturally, 
it contains no account of the development of the College during 
the last quarter of a century. 

"Luther College Through Sixty Years" gives the history of 
the College from the time of its origin to the conclusion of the 
sixtieth anniversary festivities, and contains material pertaining 
to the College that is not to be found elsewhere in the form in 
which it is here presented. A very readable history of the College 
could be written, made up of accounts of interesting episodes and 
the many events that have taken place on the College campus. 
It was decided, however, not to make this volume a history of that 
character, but to make it a source of information pertaining to 
the serious work of the institution. As such it should prove 
valuable to all who for any reason are interested in the College, 



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to all who are interested in the history of the Lutheran Church 
in this country, to all who are interested in the history of the 
people of Norwegian extraction in this country, and to all who 
are interested in the development of higher education in this 
country during the last sixty years. 

The volume is the joint product of the men who constituted the 
College faculty in the year 1921-1922, the "Sixtieth Anniversary 
Year"; but special credit is due the editorial staff, consisting of 
Professors O. M. Norlie, O. A. Tingelstad, and K. T. Jacobsen, 
who planned the work, read proof, and supervised the publication. 
All this they have done in addition to preparing their own chapters 
and performing other duties which would ordinarily be regarded 
as sufficient to occupy the time of a busy man. 

The volume contains more than 250 illustrations, which have 
been selected for their general interest and historical value, and 
which the reader will no doubt regard as an important feature 
of the book. 

It is hoped that the value of the volume will prove commensurate 
with the labor required to prepare it, and that it may serve as a 
useful work of historical reference. 

Oscar L. Olson. 

Luther College, Decorah, Iowa, July 12, 1922. 



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CONTENTS 



PAGE 

CovEK Debiox — Ivan Dotef 

Chaptkb Oke— The Foundation of Luther College— IF. Sihhr . . 9 

Chaptek Two— Religious Aim and Character— O. M. Norlie ... 24 

Chafteb Thbee — Government and Administration — D, T. Nelton . 48 
Chaptek Foub — Presidents and Principals — FraneU E, Peterson . .64 

Chapteb Five— Faculty— O. A, TingeUtad 88 

Chapteb Six— School Plant— Fran<^ E. Peterton 142 

Chapteb Seyek— Library and Museum — Karl T. Jaeobeen . . . .159 

Chapteb EiOHi^Income— JiT. O. EUtreim 170 

Chapteb Niwe— Expenditures— O. M. EUtreim 177 

Chapteb Ten— The Field of Luther College— H. O. Talle .... 184 

Chapteb Eleyek — Attendance — 8, 8, Beque 202 

Chapteb Twelve — Organisation — L. A, Moe 260 

Chapteb Thibteek — Instruction — A, M, Rovelstad 275 

Chapteb Foubteen — Student Organisations — Carl W, Strom . . . 809 

Chapteb Fifteen— Athletics and Military Drill— O. W. Qualley . . 828 

Chapteb Sixteen — Music — C, N, Evanson 861 

Chapteb Seventeen — Important Events — Knut Ojertet 882 

Chapteb Eighteen — Sixtieth Anniversary — Carlo A, Sperati . . 898 

Chapteb Nineteen — Graduates — M. H, Trytten 411 

Chapteb Twenty — Luther College Graduates and Undergraduates in 

Church Viork—Brynjolf J, Hovde 488 

Chapteb Twenty-One — Retrospect and Prospect — Oscar L. Olson . 468 

BiBUOGBAPHY— O. M, NorlU 485 

Chbonological Summabt — O. A, Tingelstad 488 

Index— JfaW T. Jacobsen 491 



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CHAPTER ONE 

THE FOUNDATION OF LUTHER COLLEGE 

W. SiHLER 

THE last of the eighteenth and the beginning of the nineteenth 
century saw rationalism^ with its God the mere product of the 
human brain, gradually ebb away. A deeper philosophy arose, and 
the troubles of the times, which culminated in the French Revolu- 
tion and Napoleon's tyrannies, awakened a deeper religious con- 
sciousness. 

This reaction occurred wherever rationalism had held sway, 
also in Norway, which had not escaped its influences. Among the 
lay people these religious longings found their spokesman in Hans 
Nielsen Hauge; but also the seats of learning, where theologians 
and clergymen were prepared for their responsible positions, be- 
came imbued with a new life which was to find its reflection on the 
prairies and in the woods of North America. 

We recognize therein God's finger and rejoice that at about the ' 
time of this awakening the interest in the New World had entered 
the houses and huts of many people who were destined to play over 
here a part which no oiie would have dreamed of some years be- 
fore. 1 

It is well known that many Norwegians found their way into 
this country long before the nineteenth century, through their 
many mercantile connections, especially through Holland. These 
people, however, were soon absorbed, and their history is traced 
only with difficulty. If we look for the influences which caused an 
immigration which became really monumental, we are introduced 
to the name of Cleng Peerson, the adventurous, untiring pioneer 
from Stavanger, Norway. 

Space does not permit going into details about Cleng Peerson's 
burning desire to learn all that could at that time be known about 
this country. It is evident that no hardships could deter him. He 
covered thousands of miles on foot, walking through the wilds of 
western New York, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Missouri, 
Iowa, Texas, and the intervening states, eager to make his own 
observations. During these periods he was in communication with 
friends in Norway and persuaded a number of them to attempt a 
settlement in the western part of New York. There is no evidence 



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10 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

that he ever acted from selfish motives. He was ever ready with 
the best he had^ good advice gained from personal experience. 

The times in Norway had been hard in the first part of the 
nineteenth century, and so the people who came in the year 1825 
and the following years^ mostly on the urgent invitation of Cleng 
Peerson, were well prepared for their arduous task as pioneers. 
They brought to America strong arm*, a willingness to work, and a 
deep-seated piety. 

It will be well, especially for the younger generation, to con- 
template the setting of this historical spectacle. No century has 
seen such wonderful progress in making life easier, though per- 
haps not happier, as has the nineteenth century. Hundreds of 
conveniences which are demanded to-day as a matter of course, 
were unknown to these pioneers: for example, matches, lamps, 
stoves, lead-pencils, steel pens, wagon-springs. Transportation 
was by the slowest means. Small ships that often were on the 
way for over a hundred days brought the people to these shores. 
On board these ships the voyagers slept in holes, had to board 
themselves with fare that had become very old, and drink water 
that would not go down unless the consumer would hold his nose 
. at the same time. Only a few arrived who had not encountered 
storms that often took them out of their course for weeks at a 
time. And when they finally did set their feet on firm land, there 
were other inconveniences that awaited them. The ox-teams walked 
no faster than they always had, and the wood in the wagon-boxes 
was as hard as ever. Stations, if they did exist, were far apart 
and often found only by accident. The inclemencies of the weather 
had to be endured under the open sky, and a dry place for a night's 
rest was often a godsend. 

Not only had these pioneers stout hearts, but they also pos- 
sessed a piety which gave to them solace in many dark hours and 
upheld that faith with which they began to lay the foundations 
for the beautiful things which now show forth their ideals. 

Between the year of Cleng Peerson's coming (1821) and the 
year 1840 the stream of immigrants became wider and wider; 
after depositing a settlement on the Fox River, LaSalle Co., 
Illinois, this stream divided and spread out into Wisconsin, Iowa, 
and Minnesota. 

Some of the settlements were not made in favored places, and 
sickness became a very great trial, almost too severe for the 
courage and faith of the newcomers. Thus the settlement at 
Muskego, Wisconsin, has many sad pages in its first chapters. Yet 
these setbacks were only temporary and were gradually conquered. 



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THE FOUNDATION OF LUTHER COLLEGE 11 

and many new colonies grew and prospered in more favorable local- 
ities. 

When a pioneer takes along from his home his Bible and his 
hymn book he takes with him a mighty chain which anchors him 
to a better world that is not stationary but follows him wherever 
he goes. And we know that most of the early immigrants who left 
old Mother Norway took good care to carry this chain with them. 
In many instances their desire for new surroundings was coupled 
with longings for a more ideal world than the one in which they 
lived. Thus sprang up in many localities through gatherings, 
mostly on Sundays, what turned out to be the nucleus of later 
congregations. Such meetings gladly welcomed persons of Chris- 
tian experience who could expound to their hearera those things 
that they longed for in their spiritual life. 

We find such men who felt the call to exhort their fellow 
Christians going from place to place. Among these must be men- 
tioned the one who became especially well known, Elling Eielsen. 
He was the first layman to assume notable spiritual leadership, 
and he became the first ordained minister among the Norwegian 
pioneers. 

The spiritual life in many of these circles was based very 
strongly on personal experiences and the isolation in the country 
was not felt as keenly by the people of these tendencies as it was 
felt by many others who had not come under the influence of Hauge 
and his followers, but among whom the thought of the church in 
Norway with its many associations awakened deep longings for 
things enjoyed at home, partly social, and partly of a deeper 
nature. These people were not satisfied with the exhortations of 
laymen, but had in mind the possibility of establishing here all the 
outward things with which their religious life was bound up. 

The first man who was impressed with the necessity of meeting 
these wants was C. L. Clausen. Clausen came to America, to 
Muskego, with the intention of helping in school work as it was 
carried on in Norway, but soon realized that such work lacked 
entirely the religious background to which he had been accustomed. 
He clearly saw that it was out of the question without congrega- 
tions, and that the spiritual needs of the older people required 
first attention. 

Accordingly Clausen, though somewhat reluctantly, was per- 
suaded to seek ordination by an acknowledged Lutheran minister. 
This ordination was performed by Rev. L. F. E. Krause on the 
eighteenth of October, 184id. Clausen thus became available as 
a minister of the Gospel for the first settlers and immediately began 



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12 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



his work^ making his headquarters in the district aronnd Mnskego^ 
Wisconsin* 

In the same month in which C. L. Clausen was ordained in 
America^ October^ 1843^ the king of Norway issned a permit by 
which the man in Norway was to be ordained who may be called 
the first direct link which bound together the Lutheran Church in 
Norway and the Norwegian Lutheran Church in America. The 
name of the man who had asked for an ordination in Norway 
was J. W. C. Dietrichson. His coming here was due to the in- 
fluence of P. Sftrensen^ a Godfearing fuller of Christiania, whose 
thoughts often turned to the spiritual needs of his fellow Chris- 
tians in America. Dietrichson had met this man and had been 
offered by him the money needed for a trip to America besides 




C. L, CLAl'SKX 



J. W. C. DIETRICHSON 



H. A. STUB 



further support if he would be willing to go there as an ordained 
minister^ to help the scattered settlers organize their religious af- 
fairs. The offer was gladly accepted^ and the plans of S^rensen 
were carried out. On the ninth of July^ 1844^ we find Dietrichson 
in New York getting ready for his trip into the interior. 

His first stop is at Muskego with Rev. C. L. Clausen^ at whose 
advice he goes further west and visits the settlements near Madison^ 
called by the Indian name Koshkonong. Here he begins his minis- 
terial work on a somewhat extensive scale. The beginnings were 
humble enough. His first two sermons were preached August 28^ 
1844^ in a cattle-shed on A. E. Hornefjeld's farm^ East Kosh- 
konong; and the third sermon was delivered September 2, 1844^ 
under two oaks on Aslak Juve's farm^ West Koshkonong. This 
latter event has been commemorated by a suitable monument. 

Other congregations were founded in quick succession and soon 
became large and strongs and fortunately they did not have to wait 
so very long for shepherds^ because the call of the Lord had 
reached the hearts of men who were destined to spend their strength 
on the new fields in America. 



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THE FOUNDATION OF LUTHER COLLEGE 



13 



Space forbids going into details. But let us pause for a mo- 
ment and consider the sacrifices of tliese men. Most of them 
came from surroundings where culture^ education^ and comfort- 
able circumstances had smoothened over the hardships of life. 
Their associations had developed in them an appreciation of the 
many beautiful and good things that come with a more advanced 
civilization^ such as books, music, educated friends, schools, and 
other comforts. To all these things they say farewell, willing to 
take what may come, prepared to share all the hardships of their 
charges, gladly sacrificing things whose loss many a newcomer 
did not feel, because he had never been accustomed to them. Viewed 
in that light these pioneer ministers and their wives are seen to 
have been cast in a heroic mold, and their love for the Kingdom 




A. C. PREUS 



G. DIETRICHSON 



J. A. OTTESEN 



of Heaven shines all the brighter through their sacrifices. In many 
ways the present generation can comprehend this much better than 
did the people whom they came to serve. 

The first in this number was Rev. H. A. Stub, who arrived in 
1848 and took charge of the congregation at Muskego as Clausen's 
successor. Next came Rev. A. C. Preus, who began his work at 
Koshkonong. Soon thereafter arrived three men whom God's call 
had reached in various ways to begin their labors which were to 
bear such blessed fruits. Their names are: H. A. Preus, N. 
Brandt, and G. Dietrichson. 

About the time of their arrival they found that the first three, 
Clausen, Stub, and A. C. Preus, had taken the first steps toward 
establishing closer relations between the congregations. As in 
everything that is built from the bottom, great difficulties had to 
be overcome herein. The first call for such a meeting where the 
forming of a synod mL|pht be discussed was sent out in 1849, but 
there was no response In 1851, however, a meeting was held in 
the midst of winter, to which came Clausen, Stub, and A. C. Preus. 



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14 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



The organization which was called into being was named "Den 
Norsk-Evangelisk-Lutherske Earke i Amerika." This body did not 
live long. In the following year it was dissolved at a meeting 
which was attended by six ministers and thirty-six lay delegates 
in the church at Muskego^ but steps were immediately taken for the 
creation of another synod which was founded in the next year^ in 
October, 1863, at a place with a very appropriate name: Luther 
Valley, in Wisconsin, near Beloit. On the 3rd of October, 1863, 
was thus born what went by the name of "Den Norske Synode". 




HERMAN AMBERG PREUS 



Thirty-eight congregations took part in its founding and seven 
clergymen belonged to it from its beginning. The seventh in ad- 
dition to those mentioned was J. A. Ottesen, who had just then 
arrived. 

We have alluded to the hardships of these men and the sacrifices 
which they made, but we may envy them too. They had the 
privilege of laying the foundation for a glorious structure, and 
that is something that does not fall to the lot of many. 

Meanwhile the stream of settlers continued to come, and 
the problem of their spiritual care rose up like a mountain; but 
the men who might come from Norway with a helping hand to 
undertake this task were few and far between. The quality of 
these men often had to make up for the quantity. Two months 
after the Norwegian Synod had been founded there appeared on 



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THE FOUNDATION OF LUTHER COLLEGE 15 

the scene such a man who became a great force in furthering the 
work so well begun. This man was V. Koren^ who preached his 
first Christmas sermon at a place where he was to preach for 57 
years, namely, Washington Prairie, Winneshiek County, Iowa. 
He was to take a leading part in founding the institution that is 
commemorated in this book. 

•Everyone of these men who were now working among the Nor- 
wegian settlers realized daily that more helpers must be put in the 
great harvest-field. The danger of spiritual neglect was very 
manifest, and no one knew this better than the ministers, because 
each one was trying to do the work of two or more men. The ap- 
peals to Norway had not been very successful, and a clearer under- 
standing of their surroundings convinced them that help must come 
from within, and that was the same as saying: We must erect a 
school of our own and train the men of our midst to undertake 
the work which is so sadly neglected. They comprehended the 
problem very clearly, and a strong will was there. But was it 
possible to undertake the building of a school under such circum- 
stances? Such undertakings were entirely outside of the sphere of 
their experience, and the many things to be considered, with the 
responsibility involved, demanded caution. 

Under such deliberations the question arose, whether, to be- 
gin with, the schools of other Lutheran bodies might not relieve 
the situation, at least for some time, by having some helpers 
trained there. Accordingly two men, Ottesen and Brandt, were 
entrusted with the mission of becoming acquainted with other Luth- 
erans and their schools. During their trips they visited the house 
of the father of the writer^ who was not yet born, and there sprang 
up a lasting friendship, whose memory has always been dear to his 
family and makes a bright page in its history. If it had not been 
for this visit, these pages would have been written by someone else. 

The institutions of the Missouri Synod at St. Louis under Dr. 
C. F. W. Walther and at Ft. Wayne under Dr. W. Sihler appealed 
most strongly to the emissaries, and to these schools were sent the 
first volunteers. The bonds became closer when it was also decided 
to have a representative of the Norwegian Synod as a teacher at 
one of them. After due deliberations the position was offered to 
Rev. Laur. Larsen, who left Norway a few years before and was 
busy as the pastor of various congregations. He gives as the date 
of the beginning of his duties as professor at Concordia Seminary 
at St. Louis the fourteenth of October, 1859. 

Naturally this was to be only a makeshift. The great idea was: 
Our own school, the sooner, the better. Plans were soon evolved 
that should bring them to this goal. 



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16 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

Immediately steps were taken to create a fund by means of which 
they would finally realize what, they had wished and prayed for so 
long^ and no matter how much they might differ as to minor matters, 
all voted to establish a Norwegian Lutheran school and to begin at 
once to raise the necessary funds. 

Fifty thousand dollars was thought to be necessary to accom- 
plish this purpose. If under the present circumstances the Synod 
would call for five millions, some people might be shocked, but 
fifty thousand in those times was certainly very much more. It 
is well to dwell on this for a few moments, because the spirit of 
sacrifice is best kindled by contemplating the doings of those who 
really have made sacrifices. 

The first collections for the fund were begun in 1857, and in 
1859 the Synod was urged to all possible efforts to have the school 
erected within three years. Though money was coming in slowly, 
this thought had taken such a firm hold that no one would wait 
until the $50,000 was in sight, but a beginning was to be made in 
the hope that the rest would be contributed* as soon as the founda- 
tions were laid. At that time about $19,000 was available, and 
matters began to assume a definite shape. 

At a meeting of the Synod in Luther Valley in June, 1861, the 
location for the College was chosen. It was to be the plot of thirty 
acres on a slope in the northwestern part of the city of Decorah, 
Iowa, a spot so many Norwegians know and admire because of the 
beautiful natural surroundings which one never tires of gasing 
at and which have a new dress for every season. i 

This piece of ground had been secured by Rev. V. Koren from 
its owner, a Quaker, for the sum of $1,500. 

At the same time a committee of five had been appointed to 
secure an architect and take all the necessary steps to insure the 
continuation of the work, when once begun. The plans were to 
be submitted to the Church Council, which again was to send them 
to the ministers and the congregations, and after everyone had had 
a chance to have his say, the Council would make the final decision. 

While these plans were being developed and matured, the 
Civil War broke out in the spring of 1861, and St. Louis became a 
place where feeling ran high, hence there was a reluctance about 
continuing the arrangement with the Missouri Synod for the ac- 
commodation of the Norwegian students. Something had to be 
done very soon for the students who were ready to go to a school 
which the Synod had promised. 

After various proposals had been considered, a temporary 
home was found in the parsonage at Halfway Creek, La Crosse 



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THE FOUNDATION OF LUTHER COLLEGE 



17 



County^ Wisconsin. It was believed that this would be the best 
arrangement^ since it would be cheaper than renting rooms in 
Decorah. A description of this building and its accommodations 




ULRIK VILHELM KOREN 



is available and to be recommended to people who are inclined to 
complain. One feature, however, it did have that appeals to 
persons not very fond of exercise. The boys studied, slept, and 
recited in the same room. The teaching force consisted of Rev. 



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18 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

Laur. Larsen and Rev. F. A. Schmidt^ both of wliom^ with their 
families) occupied the one building. £leven students attended at 
one time and were divided into two classes; the upper class had 
five members and the lower one six in different stages of develop- 
ment. In all^ sixteen different students attended for longer or 
shorter periods in the course of that first year. 

Such was the beginning of Luther College. After a prosperous 
life of sixty years it is with great satisfaction that it looks back 
at those humble beginnings. 

However, its stay at Halfway Creek was to be for only one 
year, and the writer has never heard regrets that it was not longer. 
It was a wise move that brought the College to Decorah in 1862, 
where its final location was to be, since this helped to crystallize 
the interest in it in the constituency from which the greatest sup- 
port was to come. So, on the eighth of September, 1862, we find 
it at Decorah in a building which is now occupied by the St. Cloud 
Hotel. This building had become the property of the Synod 
chiefly through the good ofiices of Rev. V. Koren. A description 
of this building shows that Luther College is going forward. Only 
one teacher. Prof. Larsen, has to live with the boys in this building. 
He even has a study or office for himself. 

The number of students has now risen to 32. To accommodate 
more the next year, the erection of a building to the west of what is 
now the St. Cloud was decided upon in June, 1863, by the Synod 
meeting at Rock River, Wisconsin. 

The appointment of new teachers for the new classes was also 
authorized. The man first thought of was not to be had, there- 
fore the work was put temporarily in charge of a student, J. D. 
Jacobsen, who became the third man on the faculty, in the year 
1863. This arrangement was to continue until a teacher could be 
found by Rev. J. A. Ottesen who was getting ready to go to Nor- 
way in that year. Rev. Ottesen was successful and returned with 
L. Siewers, who relieved J. D. Jacobsen the next year. 

In the fall of 1863 we find 49 students in attendance, all of 
them waiting anxiously for the completion of that building which 
had been authorized to relieve the congestion in the Main Build- 
ing, so called. But they had to wait until New Year before they 
could move in. One would imagine that the completion of a new 
building would arouse feelings of pleasure, but that seems not to 
have been the case. Soon after its coming into use the new home 
received the name of "Huttetu", a word which is very hard to 
translate. If one should venture a translation of its meaning, the 
sentiment might be expressed with these words: Leave all hope 
behind, ye who enter here. 



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THE FOUNDATION OF LUTHER COLLEGE 19 

While these things were taking place^ the work on the real 
College had been begun and was steadily progressing. The plans 
had been ready as early as 1862. To many who had examined them 
the building seemed entirely too large^ but the wisdom of the com- 
mittee that had adopted these plans was proven before many years 
had gone by. 

Early in 1863 a contract had been signed for making 1^800^000 
bricks on the college grounds, and half a million were ready by fall. 
The bricks were made on the campus^ just east of the north wing 
of the College. By the middle of June, 1864i, the cellar had been 
excavated and most of the foundation had been laid, so that the 
date for the laying of the corner-stone could be set for the thir- 
tieth of June, 1864. 

This eventful day was celebrated amid the rejoicings of many 
people with impressive ceremonies in the presence of the delegates 
of the Synod and many visitors from far and near, also from the 
German brethren. 

During the next months the building began to rise inch by inch, 
the making of bricks was continued with all possible speed, because 
the contractor of the masonry had promised to have his work com- 
pleted by the fifteenth of October. 

But there came a hitch which had not been foreseen. As so 
often happens, the contractor did ndt intend to carry out the speci- 
fications of the architect. When this was insisted on by the over- 
seers that had been sent by the architect, the contractor chose to 
leave, and new men had to be secured from Chicago to finish what 
was left according to specifications of the architect. Very favor- 
able weather helped the work along, and by the end of October the 
walls were ready for the carpenters who were to put on the roof. 
Then came another disappointment. On the eighth of November 
the snow began to fall and, contrary to the usual experience, real 
winter came along with this snow. The cold weather was so con- 
tinuous that the idea of putting on a permanent roof had to be 
given up. Things were covered up as well as possible and left to 
rest till spring might come. It did come, but very late, and work 
on the building could not be resumed before the twenty-fourth of 
April, 1865. New difficulties had to be overcome almost every 
month, and the patience of everybody was hard tried; the progress 
was not at all steady. The lumber was not delivered in time, some 
of it was not well seasoned, the window-frames did not fit, the 
glass could not be furnished when wanted. These things surely 
tested the patience and faith of those most interested in seeing 
the building completed by the first of September. This indeed 



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THE FOUNDATION OF LUTHER COLLEGE 21 

was not to be, because the glass did not arrive before the nine- 
teenth of September. Now, at last^ the final work, the painting, 
could be thought of, and though it was begun as soon as possible 
it was not completed till after the dedication, which could not 
be postponed any longer. 

Many people throughout the Synod know on what day this joy- 
ful event was to be celebrated, the fourteenth of October, 1866. 

By far the greatest number of those who took part in the 
celebration of the dedication are no longer among us. Those who 
realized what this day meant were the pioneers who had been wait- 
ing for it many weary years. They had dreamt of such a school, 
they had talked about it, they understood its significance, they 
had prayed for it. Many a father and mother for whom the 
Lutheran religion was the most precious inheritance from abroad 
heaved a sigh of relief when invited to participate in the dedica- 
tion of a building from which the men were to go out to whom 
their own and their children's spiritual welfare might safely be 
entrusted. 

So, when the fourteenth of October dawned, the town of De- 
corah was alive with people from all Norwegian settlements anx- 
ious to take part in the celebration. This was to begin with a 
solemn procession from the temporary quarters of the institution 
near the court-house, which is about a mile from the college 
grounds. A longer procession has probably never been seen in the 
city of Decorah, because it is told that when the head of the pro- 
cession reached the new building many of those who were to take 
part had not started to take their places in the line. Never before 
had so many Norwegians been together in one place in America. 
All ages, all localities where Norwegians had settled, were re- 
presented. The festival program consisted in the singing of hymns 
of 'praise and thanksgiving; an opening prayer by Rev. N. Brandt, 
the dedication address by Rev. H. A. Preus, and addresses by Rev. 
V. Koren and Prof. Laur. Larsen, all in Norwegian; addresses by 
Prof. F. A. Schmidt and Prof. Lange (of Ft. Wayne, Ind.), in 
English; an address by Prof. Brauer (of St. Louis), in German; 
and a closing prayer by Rev. J. A. Ottesen, in Norwegian. The 
people were fed at long tables arranged in the rear of the new 
buUding. Nearly 6,000 visitors were supposed to have been pres- 
ent. When we compare the number of people who now are in 
the Synod with the number then belonging to that body, it is not 
difficult to see how great was the enthusiasm which this event had 
called forth. 



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22 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



When the sun had set and darkness had settled over the sur- 
rounding hills, the building shone forth in its splendid illumina- 
tion, the first that most people present had ever seen; and if we 
now in spirit take our place by the side of the onlookers, we can 
almost hear their hearts beat with emotions that do not often come 
to mortals. 

"At last — yes, at last! Is what we see real, or is it only a 
phantom which will disappear when the lights have burnt down? — 
No, it is real. How could that for which we toiled and prayed so 




REFLECTIONS 



many years be only a vision? No, it is real, it is the fruit of the 
best that there is in us. Thanks be to God forever!" 



We have now come to the end of our chapter. But before we 
close, let us pause for a moment and ponder. What does this 
building, or rather Luther College, represent? 

There are many Norwegians in America, but there are not 
many Luther colleges. Why not? An answer to this will help us 
to understand what Luther College represents. This College was 
not founded to gather earthly wisdom which might increase our 
material welfare. It was not built to increase the sum of knowl- 
edge for its own sake. It was built because its founders had visions 
that go beyond what is meaisured with clocks and yardsticks. They 



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THE FOUNDATION OF LUTHER COLLEGE 



23 



felt that on themselves rested a heavy responsibility. They must 
hand down to their children the best that could be given them, 
true faith in the Christian religion. And while this was the main 
issue, they were justly proud of many other privileges and ad- 
vantages under which they had lived in the old home and whose 
significance they now realized more than ever and which they 
wished to preserve for their children. Such sentiments were the 
impelling forces which accomplished what will seem marvelous 
to one who tries fully to understand the history of the founding of 
Luther College. But marveling is not sufficient. If the deaicendants 
of these whole-souled, sturdy pioneers cannot be so inspired as 
to be willing to take up the work where it was laid down by their 
forebears, they had better not claim descent from them, because 
they are in danger of not being deemed worthy of having had such 
ancestors. 




SIXTY YEARS LATER 



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CHAPTER TWO 

RELIGIOUS AIM AND CHARACTER 

0. M. NORLIE 

1. Stated Aim 

1. The "University" Resolution 

IN 1866 the Synod for the Norwegian Lutheran Church in 
America (commonly known as the Norwegian Synod) assembled 
in convention at Spring Prairie^ Wis.^ discussed the problem of 
getting pastors and teachers. It was clear to all that the harvest 
truly was great^ but the laborers few. It was equally clear that 
the Synod could not expect to get a sufficient number of laborers 
from the Church of Norway. To get Lutheran pastors and teachers 
from the state schools was out of the question. The convention 
therefore appointed the Reverends J. A. Ottesen and N. O. Brandt 
a committee to visit the German Lutheran schools in this country, 
and to investigate whether it might be possible to establish a Nor- 
wegian chair in theology at one of these. 

Two years later, in October, 1867, this committee reported to 
the Synod, in convention assembled at Little Iowa Church, near 
Decorah, Iowa. On the basis of this report two resolutions were 
adopted : 

1. To establish a Norwegian professorship at Concordia Sem- 
inary, St. Louis, Mo., of the German Missouri Synod; 

2. To establish a Norwegian Lutheran institution, a "univers- 
ity", as they called it, and to begin at once to raise the necessary 
funds. 

There were at least three reasons why the prospective school 
was called a university: 

1. The leaders of the Norwegian Synod had been trained at 
the University of Christiania, and hoped to model their school 
after this institution. 

2. The Norwegian Lutherans that had joined the Northern 
Illinois Synod had together with the Swedish and English Lu- 
therans of that Synod in 1862 founded a school that was known 
for many years as the Illinois State University. 

3. The Norwegian Synod men really intended to build a school 
that should have at least seminary and normal departments besides 
college and preparatory courses. 



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RELIGIOUS AIM AND CHARACTER 25 

For 20 years the school was frequently referred to as the uni- 
versity. The fund that was to be raised was known as the "Uni- 
versity Fund" (of. "Kirkelig Maanedstidende", 1857, 490; 1862, 
32; 1869, 15; 1873, 78; and many other places). The idea that 
the school should be a university, at least in so far that it should 
have a theological department, seemed to die hard. Concordia 
Seminary, St. Louis, served as a seminary for the Norwegian 
Synod from 1859 to 1876 and about 100 young men had been 
trained there for the Norwegian ministry in those years. Seven 
had also been trained at Concordia Seminary, Springfield, 111. 
Dr. H. G. Stub says that the idea of having a Norwegian Lu- 
theran Seminary is as old as the Norwegian Synod itself (Halvor- 
sen's "Festskrift", 144). The connection with the Missourian 
schools was only a temporary makeshift. In 1861 the connection 
was about to have been broken, on account of the Civil War which 
placed St. Louis between the firing lines (Dr. Laur. Larsen in 
"Luther College Katalog", 1872, 8). The connection with Mis- 
souri was, however, not broken by the war, and it was not before 
1876 that the Norwegian Synod established its own seminary. The 
intention had been to have this school at Decorah. In "Evangel^ 
isk Luthersk Kirketidende" for 1912 (1778-81) Dr. Laur. Lar 
sen declares without qualification that Luther College was founded 
as a theological seminary and is the oldest Norwegian seminary 
in America. He explains that because of lack of quarters the 
Seminary Department was housed at St. Louis for a time. In 
1874 the Norwegian Synod built a new wing to the Old Main at 
Luther, but even at that it was too small to accommodate the sem- 
inary students. Therefore the Synod bought the Soldiers' Or- 
phans' Home at Madison, Wis., which had been vacated, and 
the seminary was located there (Helland's "Augsburg Seminar," 
30-33). Even after the seminary had been moved to Madison the 
question was up for discussion as to whether it should not be locat- 
ed at Decorah as originally intended ("Ev. Luthersk Kirketidende", 
1877, 407). 

The Civil War broke out in 1861. The Norwegian Synod at 
its convention that year, held at Rock Prairie, Wis., decided, with 
the means and forces at hand, to establish a school up north. Thus 
it came to pass that Prof. Laur. Larsen was called away from St. 
Louis to become the head of this new school, and thus it happened 
that Luther College, as this school was called, began work in 
September of that year at the Halfway Creek (Wis.) parsonage. 
It was not a university. It had no theological department, for it 
was learned that the theological students could attend Concordia 



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26 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



in spite of the political and war disturbances. It was not even a 
college as yet^ for not one of the 16 students that enrolled the 
first year was of college grade. 

2. The ^'Seminary" Building Committee Report 

The aim of the school can also be seen from the report of the 
building committee that had been elected by the convention of 
1861. Tliis committee was known as the Theological Seminary 
Building Committee ("Kirkelig Maanedstidende"^ 1862^ 6-8). In 
presenting an architect's plan of the proposed building the com- 
mittee discussed at length the aim of the school. It recognized 





THE PALISADES 

that the first duty of the Church (now) was to establish a school 
where preachers and teachers could be trained^ but it realized also 
that the Church should also have higher schools for its youth who 
did not intend to take up any professional calling in the Church. 
Otherwise these young people would attend some school where 
they might be robbed of their faith. "Therefore", the report 
reads, "the committee has unanimously resolved to make the plan 
of the building such that the department preparing for the sem- 
inary can also accept students who aim to prepare themselves for 
other callings, so that they may serve their country in such posi- 
tions as require more than a common education". 



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RELIGIOUS AIM AND CHARACTER 27 



3. The Comer-Stone Document 

As the secretary of the building committee^ Rev. V. Koren, had 
secured a beautiful site for the school at Decorah^ and also tempor- 
ary quarters for it, Luther College moved to Decorah in 1862. 
In 1863 the preliminary work for. the new building was begun. 
On June 30, 1864, the corner-stone of the first building of Lu- 
ther College — the Old Main — was laid. Among the things de- 
posited in the corner-stone was an historical sketch of the Nor* 
wegian Synod. The following words from this sketch set forth 
the aim of Luther College : 

"Emigrated Norwegians, Lutheran Christians, living in Wisconsin, 
Iowa, Minnesota, and Illinois, united in erectipg this building to educate 
teachers of the Church, through whose ministry, by the grace of our 
Lord, the saving truth of the Gospel in Word and Sacraments might 
be preserved for their descendants unadulterated according to the doc- 
trine of the Evangelical Lutheran Church as set forth in the Unaltered 
Augsburg Confession. The Lord grant this. Amen." 

4. The Catalog Statement 

Since 1882 the catalogs of Luther College in English have 

contained the following statement of the aim of the school: 

**The institution owes its origin to the growing demand for educated 
men who could preach the Word of Life to the rapidly increasing Nor- 
wegian population of this country. The chief aim of the College is to 
provide a liberal and thorough education for the young men who intend 
later to enter the ministry; but it welcomes any youth who desires to 
avail himself of its advantages. Believing that *the fear of the Lord 
is the beginning of Icnowledge', the College regards mental training 
without Christian faith and love as possessing but a doubtful value; and 
it desires through its religious instruction and Christian influence, to 
reach as many as possible also of those who do not intend to serve the 
Church as pastors, as it is confident that those who have been educated 
on the basis of Christian principles will, also In other occupations, exert 
a beneficial influence among their fellowmen." 

II. Religious Instruction 

In keeping with the stated aim and spirit of the institution, 
religious instruction is given in every class throughout the whole 
school. Luther College regards religious instruction and the de- 
velopment of Christian character as of supreme importance. 

To quote from the catalog of 1922: "Aside from the fact that 
the Bible is the Word of God and instructs us in the 'one thing 
needful'^ a thorough acquaintance with it is of greatest import- 
ance for its educational value in general. So profound has been 
the influence of the Bible that an understanding of history^ of 
modern civilization^ and of the literature of modern Christian 
nations is out of the questibn without a knowledge of the contents 
of this book. In fact^ without a knowledge of the Bible a liberal 



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28 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

edacation is impossible. Systematic instruction^ based on the 
Bible^ is therefore given throaghout the course in both the College 
and Preparatory Departments". 

Religion is the chief reason why Luther College was estab- 
lished and is still being maintained. Religion is in importance^ 
if not in actaal amoant^ the chief subject at the school. It is the 
core of the whole curriculum. The nature of the courses is determ- 
ined very largely by the religious aim of the school. Thus^ Lu- 
ther College has persisted in requiring much work in the classical 
languages because they are indispensable in the study oi theology. 
Every study at school is studied in the light of religion^ and no 
teaching is permitted that runs counter to the plain teachings of 
Holy Writ as set forth in the confessions of the Lutheran Church. 
Religion is required of every student. 

The relative amount of time devoted to the religious courses^ 
however^ has varied somewhat from year to year. It may be rough- 
ly estimated that 10% of the work in the College and Preparatory 
Departments has been in religion^ and that 20% of the work in 
the Normal Course was religious. 

1. The College Department 

The religious courses in the College have not varied much 
since the foundation of the school. In the Freshman and Sopho- 
more classes Dietrich's "Explanation of Luther's Smaller Cate- 
chism" has been studied. In the earlier years (1863-76) classes 
were conducted in German in order to prepare the students for 
their training at Concordia Seminary^ at which the lectures were 
given mainly in German. Then^ for a number oi years the cate- 
chism was taught in Norwegian, and of late years in English. The 
transition came gradually and bilingually. The fundamental doc- 
trines of the Christian religion are thoroughly examined in the 
light of Scripture. Practical applications are made. In the 
Junior class the Augsburg Confession is critically examined and 
compared with Scripture and the Book of Concord. The position 
of the Lutheran Church in its relation to the other churches and 
to the state is made clear. In the Senior year a portion of the 
New Testament is studied in the Greek original. Thus, in 1921-22, 
the Gospel according to Matthew was translated. Its introduction, 
contents, and peculiarities of style were discussed. Intensive re- 
search was given to a few special passages and topics. In addi- 
tion one hour a week was devoted to Bible introduction — to the 
character, text, geography, chronology, antiquities, and interpreta- 
tion of the Bible. In the early days of the school the Greek text 
was translated into Latin (Bothne's "Luther College", 14<0), in 



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RELIGIOUS AIM AND CHARACTER 29 

order to enable the Luther men to follow the lectures in Latin at 
Concordia Seminary. Otherwise the class work was conducted 
in Norwegian^ but in recent years in English. On the whole, the 
religious courses in the College are such as to make a man certain 
of his doctrines and well versed in Scripture. The Bible is al- 
ways approached reverently as the revealed, inspired, perfect, and 
authoritative Word of God. 

Particularly important in the study of the Bible is the classical 
training which Luther College aims to give. In the catalog for 
1872 Dr. Larsen writes at length in explanation and defense of 
classical study as a preparation for professional work, especially 
theology. Among other things he refers to Luther's example and 
testimony. Luther said that where the knowledge of Greek and 
Hebrew is not kept up, the Gospel will at last go under. As soon 
as the knowledge of these languages decayed, the Gospel was 
weakened and the Dark Ages came upon the Church. Many fear- 
ful abuses arose. The Revival of Learning was mainly a revival 
of language study. It brought light upon the Gospel again. In 
the languages are locked up the thoughts of the ages. The lang- 
uages of the Bible are a key to Scripture. "I had come no way", 
said Luther, "had not the languages helped me and made me cer- 
tain of Scripture. I might have been pious and preached correctly, 
but the Pope and the Sophists and the whole anti-Christian regi- 
ment I had no doubt let remain as they are. God forbid that we 
neglect the languages, for then we will neglect the Gospel." 

The classical languages are not at present in very high favor. 
Luther College has had to yield considerably as to the amount of 
classical study required, but is still one of the half dozen accredited 
colleges that require Latin for the A. B. degree. The words of 
Luther are timely and to the point. Dr. Larsen's plea has to be 
made over and over again. Pres. C. K. Preus defended the clas- 
sics (see, for example, his great lecture of 1904: "I hvilken Ret- 
ning"). In 1918 Dr. A. M. Rovelstad edited one of the college 
bulletins in behalf of the classical training (see also his article in 
"Teologisk Tidsskrift", 1918, II, 30-47.) The last "Bulletin" of 
the College (1922, II, 1) contains a strong plea by Pres. Oscar 
Olson for the old-time aims, including the classics. 

It is admitted that it is possible to get an intimate knowledge 
of the Bible by means of translation, and that it would be a cal- 
amity to the great mass of mankind, if they all had to study He- 
brew and Greek in order to come to the knowledge of the saving 
truth. We also readily admit that a person may read the Bible 
in the original tongues and yet be an unbeliever. And yet, with- 



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30 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

out a knowledge of the originals there would have been no transla- 
tions at all^ and our critical understanding of the translations 
before us would suffer. The great theologians and reformers, such 
as Luther and Melanchthon, were Greek and Hebrew scholars, and 
it would be disastrous not to have among us a fair proportion of 
men with philological knowledge as well as faith, to sound the 
spiritual depths of the Bible. The Greek Testament is listed in 
the Luther College Catalog as a religious rather than a linguistic 
course. It is both. Hebrew is listed as a linguistic rather than a 
religious study. It is both. From 1861 to 1882 Seffer's 
"Elementarbuch" was used as the textbook in Hebrew at Luther 
College. From 1883 Hollenberg's "Hebraisches Schulbuch" was 
the class book, supplemented by some chapters from the Old 
Testament Hebrew text. Since 1912 Green's "Elementary He- 
brew Grammar" and Davidson's "Introductory Hebrew Grammar" 
have served as textbooks. 

Since 1919-1920 the College has offered a course in Education, 
which is at the same time essentially religious. It is entitled Moral 
and Religious Education. It investigates the fundamental prin- 
ciples in connection with moral and religious education, the his- 
torical development particularly in the United States, the present 
problems and the attempts at solution, particularly by the Lu- 
theran Synods. The history, polity, work, and policies of the 
synods are studied, particularly the record of the Norwegian I«u- 
theran Church and Luther College. 

Another religious subject fostered at Luther College from the 
year the school was founded is choral singing. The class-room 
instruction has been supplemented by the work of singing societies, 
the College Chorus, the Glee Club, the Decor ah Choral Union. 
These societies are organized annually and sing on . special 
occasions. The Choral Union has rendered such masterpieces as 
Haydn's "Creation" and "Seasons", Handel's "Messiah", Men- 
delssohn's "Elijah" and "St. Paul", and Bruch's "Lay of the Bell". 
At the recent Sixtieth Anniversary Mendelssohn's "Hymn of 
Praise" and Dahle and Koren's "Cantata" were sung under Prof. 
Carlo A. Sperati's inspiring directorship. 

2. The Preparatory Department 

The Preparatory Department at Luther College has been re- 
organized several times during these 60 years. From 1861 to 1881 
it was a two-year course; from 1881 to 1905, a three-year course; 
from 1905 to 1918, a four-year course; and from 1918 to date, a 
five-year course. Naturally, the courses in religion have also been 
extended. 



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RELIGIOUS AIM AND CHARACTER 31 

The aim throughout the history of the Preparatory Depart- 
ment has been "to impart a thorough and practical knowledge 
of the Holy Scriptures^ because the Scriptures are given by in- 
spiration of God, and are profitable for doctrine^ for reproof^ for 
correction^ for instruction in righteousness^ that the man of God 
may be perfect^ thoroughly furnished unto all good works". 
("Catalog", 1922, 87). 

To meet this aim, the course offered from 1861 to 1890 five 
hours of religious work a week; from 1890 to 1912, three hours; 
and since 1912 two hours. The amount of work in religion has 
been reduced from 15.7% in 1872 to 10.7% in 1892 and 9.5% in 
1922. 

Three hours per week for two years were at first devoted to 
Bible history. The Bible was used as a textbook, and the class 
read through the Old Testament as a rule and sometimes parts 
of the New. The work was conducted in Norwegian. In the 
70*s Vogt's *'St0rre Bibelhistorie" was used as a guide. In 1890 
Norwegian was the language of the two lowest classes and Eng- 
lish of the highest class in this Department. Beginning with 
1897, Bible geography, including the journeys of Christ and Paul, 
was added to the course, also the Life of Christ according to the 
Gospels and a brief introduction to the Bible. When the course 
was lengthened to four years (in 1905), two years were devoted 
to Bible history and geography, covering the historical parts of 
the Old Testament. Church history was then studied two hours 
a week for one year, with Vogt's "Kirkehistorie til Skolebrug" 
as text. Thereupon the 'Life of Christ and Bible introduction, 
together with a reading of Job, Isaiah, the Gospels, and Hebrews, 
was the work of the Senior year in the Preparatory Department. 
Since the course was lengthened to five years. Acts has been the 
subject of the Sub-Freshman year, Bible history and geography 
of the Freshman, Bible history continued in the Sophomore, 
Church history in the Junior, and the Life of Christ and Bible in- 
troduction in the Senior. The Bible is used as text in Bible his- 
tory and geography, supplemented by maps and other books. 
Ylvisaker's "Synopse" has for years been the textbook in the 
Life of Christ. Str^mme's "Outlines of Church History" . is the 
text in Church history. Norlie's "Open Bible" has been used in 
Bible introduction. 

Much attention was given to the catechism in the early history 
of the school. Pontoppidan's "Sandhed til Gudfrygtighed", in 
the complete or the abridged edition, or both, was faithfully stud- 
ied two hours per week for two years from 1861 to 1890. In 



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32 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

the third year of the course Dietrich's "Forklaring" was some- 
times studied. From 1890 Pontoppidan occupied only one hour 
a week in the two lower classes and Luther's "Smaller Catechism" 
was studied in English one hour a week in the highest class. Later 
Dietrich's "Explanation" in English was substituted for the 
elementary catechism. The new subjects kept on pressing the 
catechism back until it had only one hour a week for one year in 
one class. Pontoppidan was then studied as a review of Scripture 
doctrine familiar from the Confirmation instruction; After 1912 
the catechism does not appear to have been taught at all in the 
Preparatory Department. In the first published catalog of Lu- 
ther College (1872), Pres. Larsen says: "And when we finally 
come to what we really in all our teaching seek to place first, 
namely, the knowledge of Christianity, then there is perhaps no 
serious-minded person in our Synod who will not rejoice to hear 
that we are giving about twice as much instruction here as in the 
schools of Norway." He explains that one of the reasons for 
this is, that our youth on account of the sects need more Christian 
knowledge here than in Norway. Catechismal knowledge was 
held to be a safeguard against the doctrines and powerful tenden- 
cies of sectarianism, indifferentism, secularization, rationalism, 
evolution, materialism, and the many other heresies of the times. 

3. The Normal Department 

The Norwegian Lutheran congregations needed teachers as 
well as preachers. Their purpose in founding a school was also 
to secure for themselves teachers as well as preachers. In 1864 
a special class was organized at Luther College for men who 
wished to take up parochial teaching as a calling. In 1865 a 
Normal Department was organized, with Rev. N. O. Brandt in 
charge as teacher of the normal branches. In 1868 the course 
was increased from two to three years, aiming especially to edu- 
cate teachers for the parochial schools, but also qualifying them 
for the common schools. The attendance was never very large, 
being 12 in 1883, 10 in 1884, and 8 in 1885. The department 
was discontinued in 1886. In 1889 it was reestablished at the Lu- 
theran Normal School at Sioux Falls, S. Dak., which in 1918 was 
merged with Augustana College of Canton, S. Dak., and is now 
known as Augustana College and Normal School, Sioux Falls. 

The course in religion in the Normal Department was the 
same as that in the Preparatory Department in the lowest class. 
In the second and third year of work it offered an extra 3 hours 
a week in catechism and 3 hours in Bible history. Also 3 hours 



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RELIGIOUS AIM AND CHARACTER 



33 



in the Augsburg Confession and other Symbolical Books and 8 
hours in Bible reading and New Testament exegesis. In 1865 
Rambach's "Wohlunterrichteter Katechet" was studied by the 
dictation method as a guide in catechetics, supplemented by Faye's 
"Almueskolen" and "Methodik". Galatians was studied ezegetic- 
ally. In 1868 Hart's "Lutheran School Room" was used. In 
1872 Page's "Theory and Practice of Teaching" was added to 
Rambach and Faye. Roalkvam taught catechetics from 1878 to 
1886^ developing his own syllabus^ which he published as a text- 
book in 1881 (also 1898 and 1908). 



Year 



4. Counei of Study, hy Decodes 

Hours 
Class Per Subject Text 

Week 



Language 



1862 

V-VI 

V-VI 

1S72 

MI 

MI 

IIMV 

V-VI 

V-VI 

IV Normal. 



IV-VI Normal. . . 

V-VI Normal.... 
1882 

I 

IMV 

V-VI 

VI-VII 

VII 

V Normal 

V-VI Normal. . . . 

V-VI Normal.... 

VI-VII Normal. . 

VII Normal 

1892 

MI 

IIMV 

V 

V 

VI-VII 

VI-VII 

1902 

I 

II 

Ill 

IV 

VI-VII 

V 

VI 

VII 

1912 

I 

II 

IIMV 

V 

V 

VI 

VII 

VII 

VIII 

* Alternating with Greek 



3 Bible History Gen.-l Kgs Norwegian 

2 Catechism Pontoppidan Norwegian 

1 Greek Testament Greek-Latin 

2 Catechism Hutter's "Compend".. English 

2 Catechism Dietrich German 

2 Catechism Pontoppidan Norwegian 

3 Bible History Gen.-l Kgs Norwegian 

2 Catechetics Rambach German 

Faye Norwegian 

Page English 

2 Exegesis Acts, Rom., Gal Norwegian 

3 Bible History Gen.-l Kit Norwegian 

2' ^Augsburg Confession Norwegian 

2 Catechism Dietrich Norwegian 

2 Catechism Dietrich Norwegian 

3 Bible History Vogt's "St^rre" Norwegian 

2 Catechism. . . ; Pontoppidan Norwegian 

3 Didactics Roalkvam Norwegian 

3 Catechism Dietrich Norwegian 

3 Exegesis Norwegian 

3 Bible History Vogt's "St0rrc" Norwegian 

2 Catechism Pontoppidan Norwegian 

2 ^Augsburg Confession Norwegian 

2 Catechism Dietrich Norwegian 

1 Catechism Luther English 

2 Bible Reading Acts EnglUh 

1 Catechism Pontoppidan Norwegian 

2 Bible History O. T Norwegian 

Augsburg Confession Norwegian 

Greek Testament Greek-Eng. 

Catechism Dietrich Norwegian 

Catechism Dietrich Norwegian 



2 
2 
2 

2 

1 Catechism Pontoppidan. 

2 " 

2 
2 



. Norwegian 

Bible History Matt.— Acts Eng.-Norw. 

Bible History Judges-Dan Eng.-Norw. 

Bible History Gen.-Josh Eng.-Norw. 

2 Greek Testament 4 books Greek-Eng. 

2 Augsburg Confession Eng.-Norw. 

2 Catechism .Dietrich Eng.-Norw, 

1 Life of Christ Ylvisaker Eng.-Norw, 

1 Bible Introduction Eng.-Norw. 

2 Church History Vogt Norw.-Eng. 

1 Bible History 1 Sam.-Dan Eng.-Norw. 

1 Catechism Pontoppidan Eng.-Norw. 

2 Bible Hist . and Geog . Gen.-Ruth Eng.-Norw. 

Testament every other year. 



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Class 


Hours 

Per 

Week 


I 


2 


II 


2 


Ill 


1 


IV 


2 


V 


1 


V 1 


VI 


2 


VII 


2 


VIII 


2 


IX 


2 



34 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

Hours 
Year Class Per Subject Text Language 

1922 

Greek Testament Matt, and Bible in- 
troduction Greek-Eng. 

Augsburg Confession English 

Catechism Dietrich English 

Catechism Dietrich English 

Life of Christ Kerr's * 'Harmony" English 

Bible Introduction Norlie's "Open Bible". English 

Church History Strfimme's "Outlines". English 

Bible History 1 Sam.-Dan English 

Bible Hist, and Geog.. Gen .-Ruth English 

Bible History Acts English 

5. Teachers of Religion at Luther College, by Subjects 

Bleken, M. K., Rev 1906-10 

x-Bothne, T 1875-76 

Brandt, N. O., Rev 1865-81 

Bredesen. A., Rev 1876-78 

Eittreim. K. O.. Rev 1918 

xx-Halland, J. G., Cand. Theol 1887-89 

xx-Homme. T., Cand. Theol 1881-82 

Hove. E.. Rev 1891-93 

Hustvedt, H. B., Rev 1887 

Jacobaen, J. D., Rev 1872-81 

x-Jacobsen. K. T 1905 

xx-Koren. W.. Cand. Theol 1889 

Krog. H. J. G.. Rev 1890-95 

Kvamme. K.. Rev 1896-98 

Larsen. Laur., Rev 1861-11 

Madson. N. A., Rev 1916-18 

x-Markhus, G 1892-06 

Naeseth, C. A.. Rev 1882-11 

Norlie, O. M.. Rev 1919 

Petersen, E. J., Rev 1882-87 

r-Peterson, Francis E 1922 

Preus. C. K., Rev 1898-21 

x-Reque. L. S 1875-76 

Roalkvam, H., Rev 1878-86 

x-Rovelstad. A. M 1908-10 

x-Sander. A. B 1878-79 

Schmidt. F. A.. Rev 1861-71 

xx-Sihler. W.. Cand. Theol 1890-91. 1893-94,1922 

Sperati, C. A.. Rev 1905 

Stub. H. G., Rev 1899-00 

x-Throndsen, K 1868-70 

Tingelstad, O. A.. Rev 1910-16, 1921 

Torrison, I. B.. Rev 1902-12 

Ylvisaker. J. T., Rev 1889-90 

Ylvisaker, S. C. Rev 1911-19 

Note; X stands for lay teachers, xx for unordained candidates in theology, the remainder 
being clergymen. 

CATECHISM— LUTHER 
xx-Sihler. W 1890-91, 1893-94 

C ATEC H ISM— PONTOPPI DAN 

Larsen, Laur 1861-65. 1883. 1889 

Schmidt. F. A 1863-71 

Brandt. N. 1865-76 

x-Throndsen. K 1868 

Jacobsen. J. D 1872-76, 1878-81 

x-Reque. L. S 1875-76 

Bredesen, A 1876-78 

Roalkvam, H 1878-86 

xx-Horamc. T 1881-82 

Petersen. E. J 1882-87 

Naeaeth. C. A 1882-87 

Hustvedt, H. B 1887 

xx-Halland, J. G 1887-89 

Ylvisaker, J. T . 1889-90 

xx-Koren. W 1889 

Krog. H. J. G 1890-95 

Hove, E 1891-«3 



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RELIGIOUS AIM AND CHARACTER 35 



x-Markhu8. G 1892-01 

Kvammc. K 1896-98 

Prtua. C. K 1898-02 

Stub. H. G 1899-00 

Torriaon. LB 1902-12 

Sperati, C. A 1905-08 

Blcken, M. K 1906-10 

CATECHISM— DIETRICH 

Schmidt, F. A 1863-71 

Jacobaen. J. D 1872-81 

Laraen, Laur 1872-02 

Preua. C. K 1902-21 

Tingelatad. O. A 1921 

Norlie. O. M 1921 

CATECHISM— HUTTER 

Schmidt, F. A 1869(?)-71 

Jacobaen, J. D 1872-81(?) 

AUGSBURG CONFESSION AND OTHER SYMBOLICAL BOOKS 

Schmidt, F. A 1864-71 

Roalkvam. H 1878-79 

Bredeaen. A 1876-78 

Nacaeth, C. A 1882-11 

Preua. C. K 1909-21 

Tingelatad, O. A 1921 

xx-Sihler. W 1922 

BIBLE READINGS AND BIBLE HISTORY 

Laraen, Uur 1861-70, 1882-91 

Brandt, N. 1869-81 

Roalkvam. H 1878-86 

xx-Halland, J . G 1887-89 

Ylviaaker, J. T 1889-90 

xx-Sihler, W 1890-92 

Krog. H. J. G 1890-96 

Kvamme. K 1896-98 

Preua. C. K 1898-21 

Sperati, C. A ? 1905 

Eittreim, K. 1918 

BIBLE READINGS AND THE LIFE OF CHRIST 

Bleken, M. K 1906-10 

Tingelatad, O. A 1910-16 

Madaon, N. A 1916-18 

Eittreim, K. 1918 

Pcteraon, F. E. . .• 1922 

BIBLE INTRODUCTION AND BIBLE GEOGRAPHY 

Preua. C. K 1908-15 

Ylviaaker, S. C 1915-16 

Madaon, N. A 1916-18 

Eittreim, K. 1918 

Norlie. O. M 1919 

xx-Sihler. W 1922 

BIBLE EXEGESIS* 

Brandt. N. 1865-71 

Roalkvam. H. . . : 1878-86 

CHURCH HISTORY AND HISTORY OF MISSIONS 

Bleken. M. K 1906-10 

Tingelatad. O. A 1910-12, 1913-16 

Preua, C. K At timea 

Ylviaaker, S. C 1912-13 

Madaon, N. A 1916-18 

Eittreim, K. 1918 

CATECHETICS 

Brandt, N. 1865-81 

x-Bothne, T 1875-76 

Roalkvam, H 1878-86 

NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 

Schmidt, F. A 1861-71 

Jacobaen. J. D 1872-81 

Naeaeth. C. A 1882-98 

xx-Sihler. W 1893-95 

x-Rovelstad. A. M 1908-10 



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u 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



TtttcekUd.O. A. 
VlviSSTS-C. 
Norlie.O. M . 
frStbkr.W 



It 
.1910-11 
.lWl-19 

.1919 

.1922 



HEBREW 



JaootMen. J. D.. 
x-Sander. A. B 
x-Jaoobsen. iC T 
Vh-itakw. S. C 
Noriie. O. M . . 



Ttnv^btad. O. A 
Noriie. O. M . . 



.186S-75. 1879-11 

187S-7S 

1878-79 

1905 

1911-19 

1919 



MORAL AND RELIGIOUS EDUCATIOH. 



... 1920 
.1920 



CHORAL MUSIC 

Schmidt. F. A 1861-4S 

Brandt. N. 186S-81 

x-Solbetm, Ola. 1881-82 

x-Hanwa. Haldor 1882-^ 

Tincektad. J. 1885-85 

Socrati. C. A 1885-88 

x-HaiMcm. Haldor 

D-Sfhlo-, W 

z-HaiMcm. Haldor 1895-04 

Sperati.C. A 1905 

Note: X tUndi for lax tcacbera; zx for unordainedlcaiididatcs in theolocy. tlie remaiader 

betnc clergymen. 





DR. LAUR, LARSEN. 18«l-ltll PROF. C K. PREUS, I8t8-1M1 

Profeaon of Chriitianity at Luther College Sixty Yean 



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RELIGIOUS AIM AND CHARACTER 37 

III. Other Religious Influences 
1. Chapel Devotions 

The students at Luther College are required to attend devo- 
tional exercises mornings and evenings at chapel. From 1861 to 
1877 the morning devotions were conducted by the president at 
6:30, just before the breakfast meal. Since 1877 it has generally 
been held about 10':00 a. m. From 1861 to 1877 the evening 
devotional period was at 8:30; from 1877 to 1910, at 9:00; now 
it is held at 9:45 p. m. The chapel exercises have been in charge 
of the president of the school, assisted by other members of the 
faculty, the college pastors, visiting clergymen, or others. The 
exercises have consisted of Scripture reading and exposition, 




ON THE WAY TO CHURCH. BACCALAUREATE SUNDAY 

prayer, song, readings from postils, and speeches. They have 
been very inspirational. Specially worthy of mention are the 
readings by the "Grand Old Man" of Luther College, Dr. Laur. 
Larsen, and the wonderful ten-mintite chapel talks by President 
C. K. Preus. 

2. Sunday Services 

Decorah has two Norwegian Lutheran congregations, with 
two services at each church on Sundays, one in Norwegian and 
one in English. The pastors of these congregations are the pas- 
tors also of the College. The congregations cooperate with the 
school in making the church life of the students of greatest value. 
The young people's societies of the churches entertain the boys 
at Luther and invite them to their devotional and social meetings. 



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38 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



3. Special Occasions 

Luther College has celebrated several festivals and entertain- 
ed several religious conventions^ at which great themes have been 
discussed and noted men in the Church have appeared on the 
program. These special occasions live long in the memory. They 
have helped to shape the lives and destinies of the Luther College 
boys. In 1921-22^ two such great conventions were held at 
Luther — the Sixtieth Anniversary festival, on" October 18-16, and 
the Joint Lutheran Students' Union Convention and Academy 
Conference representing 20 schools of the Norwegian Lutheran 
Church of America. 




STUDENTS* UNION CONVENTION, 1922 

4. Students* Religious Organization 

A number of students are taking an active part in the work 
of the congregations down town, as teachers in the Sunday schools, 
members of the Church choirs, officers in the Luther Leagues, etc. 
At the College, the students take part in the Luther College Sun- 
day Association, organized in 1901, which is a voluntary student 
organization, meeting on Sunday afternoons or evenings. Its 
programs are of a religious nature, and consist mostly of lectures 
by professors and others, while occasional meetings are devoted 
to the discussion of appropriate topics of general interest. An 
additional feature of the work is the election of a committee to 
render such assistance as may be needed in case of illness among 
the students. 



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RELIGIOUS AIM AND CHARACTER 



39 



* 5. Christian Atmosphere 

The atmosphere of the school is Christian^ clear and invigor- 
ating as the mountain air. The president of the school has been as 
a Christian father^ whose highest aim is to have his boys be Chris- 
tians and take up a Christian life-work. He has been the boys' 
pastor and counselor. Thirty-four out of 93 regular teachers at 
the school have been pastors or have graduated from theological 
seminaries without entering the ministry. These men of theologic- 
al training and pastoral experience have no doubt exerted a deep 
influence on the school. There are no negative critics among 
them. The remaining teachers have been chosen for their sound- 




STUDENTS* UNION CONVENTION, 1928 

ness of doctrine and their Christian example as well as their 
scholastic and professional qualifications. The classroom work 
in every subject is conducted in harmony with Scripture. No 
pains are spared to make the discipline^ which is conducted in a 
Christian spirit^ as effective and truly educating as possible^ for 
proper discipline lies at the very foundation of all successful 
school work and is a chief agency in the development of Chris- 
tian character. ("Ev. Luthersk Kirketidende", 1891, 310). The 
boys are taught to be very democratic, avoiding hypocrisy and 
sham. Luther College has tried to be an honest school, doing 
thorough work in whatever it has attempted to do. As President 
Larsen put it : "When we sell butter, we want to give good butter, 
clear down to the bottom of the jar." 



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40 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

IV. Results 
1. Transplanting Norwegian Culture 

All the countries of the world have contributed to the citizen- 
ship of America. From 1820 to 1919 a total of 31^200^103 im- 
migrants landed on our shores. In 1920 13% of the population 
of the United States were foreign-born and 90% could look to 
Europe either as their birthplace or the home of their ancestors. 
No country except Ireland has contributed so great a propor- 
tion of its people to America as Norway. 

All the peoples of the world have contributed their bit to 
American culture. When they came here as immigrants they 
' took along with them some of the culture of their home lands. 
Those peoples have contributed most to America who brought 
most culture with them and who have tried most patiently to 
transplant it to American soil. Far in the lead in this regard 
are the English^ not so much because they have outnumbered the 
other peoples^ nor because they came here firsts but rather because 
they have insisted on transplanting their language and institutions 
to America. Of the English colonies New England has been by 
far the most influential in shaping the thought and character of 
this country^ not because New England had more people or 
money ^ but because the people there had more definite ideas and 
more zeal and persistence in advocating them. The culture of the 
American schools is mainly that of New England. 

The Norwegians have added something to American culture 
and achievement. They did not come here as paupers. They 
took along a treasure which gold and silver cannot buy — strong 
bodies and willing minds^ habits of industry and thrifty obedience 
and loyalty^ and a rich store of high ideals and noble precepts 
treasured in their native history and literature^ customs and in- 
stitutions. They were a literate people. The report of the Im- 
migrant Commission for 1910 (Vol. 5^ "Dictionary of Races''^ 
120) says: "In Norway the rate of illiteracy is the lowest in 
Europe". The same report (VoJ. 3, "Statistical Review of Im- 
migration^ 1820-1910"^ 85) lists the number and percent of il- 
literates among immigrants 14 years old and over. Portugal 
had the greatest number who could not read and write — 682 out 
of every 1,000. Scandinavia had the least number — only 4 
out of every 1,000. Of the native white population in America 
46 out of every 1,000 are illiterate. 

It is natural that the Norwegian immigrants should love the 
culture of Norway and that they should want to hand down to 



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RELIGIOUS AIM AND CHARACTER 41 

their posterity and to contribute to their adopted land some of 
the best of this treasure. They could not expect that this Nor- 
wegian culture would be transmitted through the public schools or 
tlie schools of other immigrant peoples. There was only one 
thing for them to do if they were to become a power in this land^ 
and that was to build their own schools. Luther College is one 
of these schools. At the same time that it is in the best sense 
thoroughly American, it has always had the high aim of giving 
to America the best there is in Norwegian culture. The story 
has not yet been written, except in fragments, of how much 
Norway has given to America. In this story Luther College will 
have a conspicuous place. 

2. Estahltshing the Lutheran Faith 

Norway is a Lutheran country; the censuses still report 99% 
of the population as members of the Lutheran Church. It is now 
a century since Cleng Peerson came to America, becoming the 
pathfinder of the last tide of Norwegian immigration to America. 
Great religious changes have taken place during this century. In 
Norway, the religious revival started by Hans Nielsen Hauge 
swept the common people along with it and even the professors 
at the University of Christiania. During the 60 years since Lu- 
ther College was founded a wave of rationalism has swept over 
the whole world. The pious scholarship of Caspari and Gisle 
Johnson at the University of Christiania of 60 years ago has been 
displaced by a crass rationalism which denies the inspiration and 
authority of the Bible, the divinity and atonement of Christ, the 
person and work of the Holy Spirit, and, in short, nearly every 
I^utheran doctrine. The founders of Luther College were staunch 
Lutherans. They believed that the Word of God was their dearest 
heritage. They understood full well that the Bible had to be 
excluded from the public schools in this land, and that they could 
not teach the Lutheran faith in these schools. They knew that 
if their Lutheranism should be transmitted at all to their children, 
they must establish schools where this religion could be taught 
in its truth and purity. So they set up their own schools along- 
side of the state schools and the schools of the other churches. 
For the sake of the Lutheran religion Luther College was found- 
ed. Luther College would probably never have been built except 
for this religious aim. The Norwegian Lutherans in America 
have established some 70 other higher schools in America, and 
every one of them has been established in the name of the Lu- 



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42 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

theran faith^ and every one has been able to succeed only in so 
far as men have kept up their interest in the religious aim and 
character of the school. Luther College is a child of faith. 

Luther College has been a conservative school and has been 
true to the religious aim and ideals of its noble founders. Great 
changes have taken place in the world of thought during the 60 
years of its history. Like the winds of the air, like the waves of 
the sea, the world of thought is constantly in motion. The views 
as to religion ebb and flow. Leaders as well as followers are 
swept along by the opinions of the day. It looks at times as if 
there is nothing stable. And yet there is. Two times two, for 
example, always make four. The Word of God is always true. 
Jesus Christ is the same yesterday and today, yea, and forever. 
It has been the constant aim of Luther College to proclaim this 
fact, that there are some things that never change, especially that 
the Word of God is the Truth and that man is justified by faith 
alone. 

It must be admitted that it has been a very difficult task to 
establish the Lutheran faith in America. Not because the Lu- 
theran Church is a newly-planted Church or a foreign Church. 
It began work here as early as 1562 (at Port Royal, S. C), and 
is most evangelical and democratic. Nevertheless, it has not made 
the headway that it should. There are millions of Americans 
who should be members of the I^utheran Church because they 
have come from Lutheran homes or ancestry, but who are mem- 
bers of some Reformed church or have no church connection at 
all. To understand the peculiar work of Luther College it is 
necessary to take a hasty survey of at least two of the dominant 
religious forces in the land, the Reformed Church and the public 
school, both of which work upon the same people that Luther 
College is trying to serve. It is impossible to understand the 
task of Luther College or to gauge the results without referring 
to these two factors. 

The dominant church in America is the Reformed. In some 
places it is nip and tuck between the Catholic and the Reformed. 
However, as shown in the "Lutheran World Almanac for 1921" 
(206-223), the Catholics, like the Lutherans, have been losing 
rather heavily, while the Reformed Churches and the unchurched 
groups have gained iu numbers. In America nearly all the sects 
in the world are represented. The U. S. religious census for 
1916 catalogues 202 denominations. Of these, 158 are grouped 
into 24 families, and 44 are listed as separate denominations. 



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RELIGIOUS AIM AND CHARACTER 43 

The "Lutheran World Almanac for 1922" (113) makes the follow- 
ing classification: 

Group Bodies MinisterB Communicants Percent 

1. Lutheran 21 10.961 2.493.894 5.9 

2. Reformed 128 150.043 22.864.247 54.4 

3. Catholic 10 22.179 15.762.473 37.3 

4. Non-Christian 12 13.643 1.028.457 2.4 



Total 171 196.826 42.149.071 100.0 

As the population in 1920 was 105^710^620 it will be seen that 
only 40% of this number are reckoned as communicant members 
of churches. In the case of the Catholics all the baptized are 
included. Of course every denomination should do like the Cath- 
olics — ^insist on counting baptized children as members of the 
church. By adding the children to the respective denominations, 
the totals will appear about as follows: 

Denomination Estimated membership Per cent 

1. Lutheran 3.500.000 3.3 

2. Reformed 34.500.000 32.7 

3. CathoUc 16.000.000 15. 1 

4. Non-Christian 1.500.000 1.4 

5. Unchurched 50.000.000 47.5 

Total 105.500.000 100.0 

It will be seen from this table that nearly one-half of the 
population is outside the Christian fold. Of the Christian de- 
nominations the Reformed churches as a group are by far in the 
lead. Like the Catholics they have often sought to gain influence 
through politics. They lay stress on organization and field work, 
they are aggressive and often unscrupulous in proselyting. Being 
of English origin, they have language and nationality in their 
favor at the very start. They are prolific in writing books for 
schools and are otherwise successful in manning all the positions 
of power and influence in public office, school, and press. Though 
the members of the group differ radically from one another in 
many respects, they have so much in common and are so much 
in evidence everywhere that they are without question the most 
dominant religious influence in the land. They recruit their 
forces heavily from the ranks of unchurched Catholics and Lu- 
therans. They reckon that the unchurched have, as a rule, lean- 
ings toward the Reformed religious views and practices. For 
that reason Laidlaw of the U. S. Census Bureau and Watson of 
the Federal Council of Churches estimate the potential Reformed 
strength at 74,795,226, or more than thrice the actual member- 
ship. 

Briefly, the Reformed churches of America have gone through 
the same experience as the Church of Norway — passing from 



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44 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

piety to rationalism. New England has always taken the lead 
in American life. She has been able to force her thought and 
institutions to a large extent upon the rest of the states and peo- 
ples in America. Her theology 60 years ago was Calvinistic and of 
a very dogmatic type. Now, particularly in the intellectual 
centers, with some notable exceptions, the theology is of the 
modern type. It makes light of creed. It no longer stresses the 
power of God, but the power of man. The chief gospel now is 
social work rather than salvation from sin. The Bible is dis- 
credited as the final Word of God. As one man put it in his 
sermon: "The newspaper is good enough Bible for me". The 
Reformed Church has no doubt exerted influence also on Luther 
College, but Luther College still is true to the old creeds. It is 
impossible to estimate what a force Luther College has been in 
keeping our Norwegian Lutheran people from going over to the 
Reformed or taking over the Reformed doctrines and practices 
while retaining the Lutheran name and fame. 

"Lord, grant thai we e'er pure retain 
The catechismal doctrine plain. 
As Luther taught the heavenly truth 
In simple words to tender youth." 

It must be admitted that it has been a very difficult task to es- 
tablish Lutheran schools in America. Not because they have 
been inferior in quality or not necessary. Quite the contrary. 
And yet after nearly a century of agitation for parochial schools 
we can boast of only a few unsuccessful attempts in this line. Our 
vacation religion schools are dying out. Most of our academies 
have been discontinued. Our colleges are few and far between. 
Luther College has never been a large school. To understand 
the peculiar value of these schools, and Luther College in partic- 
ular, it is necessary to take a survey of the dominant educational 
forces in America. 

The dominant American school is the public school system. 
In 1914 the total school enrollment was 22,462,342, of whom 
89.5% attended public schools and 10.5% attended private schools. 
Only 8.3% attended private elementary schools, 14.8% attended 
private secondary schools, and 49.9% attended private colleges, 
professional and special schools ("U. S. Commissioner of Educa- 
tion Report", 1916, II, 1). The public school has not always 
been the dominant one in American history. In the Colonial pe- 
riod the church was the controlling factor in the establishment 
and control of schools. It took our country about a century — 



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RELIGIOUS AIM AND CHARACTER 45 

from 1775 to 1876 — to establish fully its present system of free, 
tax-supported^ state-controlled^ non-sectarian, democratic, public 
schools. The church did not give up its hold on the schools with- 
out a bitter struggle. The advocates of public schools have been 
slowly but surely winning, first in behalf of the elementary schools, 
then in behalf of the secondary schools, and finally in behalf of 
the higher schools. When the church saw that the battle for the 
elementary schools was practically lost, it turned its attention to 
the establishment of academies. In 1850 there were 6,085 
academies and only 172 public high schools. In 1914 there were 
11,674 public high schools and only 2,248 church academies. 
Again, when the church saw that the battle for the academies 
was lost, it turned its attention to the establishment of colleges 
and universities. The churches had founded 2 colleges in the 
17th century, 22 in the 18th, and over 400 in the 19th, most of 
them after 1850. Most of the state colleges and universities are 
younger than Luther College. During the 60 years in which Lu- 
ther College has managed to keep alive it has seen thousands of 
academies and hundreds of colleges close their doors on account 
of the fierce competition. Most of the Norwegian youth who 
go to school are, of course, attending public schools and univers- 
ities. There they become more or less secular-minded and often 
are lost to our Church and its Gospel influence. 

Our country needs the public schools. We loyally support 
them. They unify our people. They train for useful citizenship. 
But they cannot teach religion. And the Christian religion the 
youth of America needs to learn, for it has a value both for this 
life and that which is to come. The morals of our people and 
the very existence of the country itself rest upon the proper 
religious instruction. Luther College supplies this "one thing 
needful". 

8. Providing Church Workers 

The founders of Luther College reckoned that if they wanted 
church workers they must build a school where, they could give 
them the training they needed. They did not hope to get any 
from the Reformed schools or from the state schools. They were 
right. "Prestekalenderen" has made a survey of all the Norwe- 
gian Lutheran pastors from 1843 to 1915. During these years 
the Norwegian Synod obtained 685 pastors. Only 77 of these 
came from Norway. Only 1 had had his theological training at 
a Reformed seminary, while 607 had been educated at Lutheran 
seminaries in America. Luther College had furnished 451 of 



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46 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

these 607 men^ 298 with the A. B. degree and 153 with an 
academy training and beyond. The remaining 156 had attended 
some other Lutheran higher schools. Not one had attended a 
Reformed or Catholic academy. Only one had attended a Re- 
formed university for a period of two years. Only 13 had attend- 
ed a public high school. These 13 had spent a sum total of 40 
years in high school^ followed by a total of 41 years at Luther 
College and 38 years at Concordia and Luther Seminaries. Only 
one had taken his A. B. at a state university^ and that only after 
he had taken it first at Luther College. Quite a number had taken 
advanced degrees at universities^ but they are not considered in 
this survey. The point to be considered here is, that in 70 years 
of history covered by this book the Norwegian Synod did not 
receive a single minister from any American state university, 
only 13 men from the public high schools, only one man from a 
Reformed university and one from a Refprmed seminary. The 
Reformed schools were not established to furnish the Norwegian 
Lutheran Church with church workers. The state schools were 
not established for the purpose of supplying any church with 
ministers of the Gospel. They are not to be blamed for not do- 
ing so. It is not their business. United States has 468 private 
colleges and universities besides 95 state universities. But the 
Lutheran Church cannot look to any of these schools except its 
own, which is included in the number, for its supply of pastors. 
The Norwegian Lutheran Church must have Luther College, or 
schools like Luther College, if it wants to live. 

4. Making Good Citizens 

Luther College takes its name from Martin Luther, the great 
hero of the Reformation, proclaimed by James F. Clark "the real 
author of modern liberty of thought and action, the giant founder 
of modern civilization and of pure religion." His Ninety-Five 
Theses nailed on the doors of the Wittenberg Church have been 
called the world's "Declaration of Independence"; his bold stand 
at the Diet of Worms has been hailed as the greatest moment, the 
turning point, in modern history (T. Carlyle). 

Luther College has tried to be true to the doctrines and spirit 
of Martin Luther. It stands to reason, then, that Luther College 
should make good citizens and be of the highest service to Amer- 
ica. It may be that America does not care for the language and 
culture of the Norwegian Lutherans who founded Luther College. 
As for the language, it is dying out. In 1861 80% of the in- 
struction at Luther College was carried on in Norwegian; in 



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RELIGIOUS AIM AND CHARACTER 47 

1922^ only S%, Norwegian being the medium of instruction only 
in Norwegian language^ literature^ and history. As for the cul- 
ture, its future is not very bright. The Norwegian element 
in America is only 2% of the total population, and it is hardly 
to be expected that the great American people will pay any atten- 
tion to it. The Norwegian element itself has had most of its 
training at the public schools and is interested mainly in the 
New England culture presented there. It would never be known 
from an average American textbook in history that there ever had 
been a Norwegian in America. Luther College has been con- 
tending with these difficulties, trying to make all its students 
love this country and its institutions and yet, at the same time, 
remember the great heritage of their fathers. Luther College 
men owe no political allegiance to Norway. They a^e Americans. 
In the recent war there were 356 names on the honor roll of 
Luther College and 8 golden stars for the boys who never came 
back. About 100 Luther men were officers, 5 were chaplains. 
Luther College became at first an S. A. T. C. post in the service 
of the U. S, Government and then, after the signing of the arm- 
istice, an R. O. T. C. unit. 

Not all of the Luther College men become pastors and teachers 
in church schools. About one-half of the graduates have taken 
up. secular callings, as farmers (ca. 5%), merchants (16%), public 
servants (3%), journalists (2%), lawyers (4%), physicians 
(6%), public school teachers (10%), etc. Many of the alumni 
are holding high positions in church and state, in school and 
business. Presidents of synods, secretaries of boards, a governor 
of a state, ministers to foreign lands, state and city superintendents 
of schools, professors at famous universities, librarians, judges, 
superintendents of hospitals, statistical and medical authorities, 
etc., are some of the positions of note that Luther men have filled 
with distinction and satisfaction. About one-fifth are authors. 

This is not a pessimistic view of the religious aim and character 
of Luther College. Luther College has had a great aim, has had 
a unique character, has done a noble work. To God alone be 
the honor. As Paul Koren sings in his "Cantata" for the Six- 
tieth Anniversary of Luther College: 

"For what thy past has given us, in gratitude we raise 
Our voice and tell of victory, of thankfulness and praise. 
To Him be all the glory, our mighty Lord and King, 
Whose blessing rested on thy brow, to Him our song we bring" 



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CHAPTER THREE 

GO\TERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION 

D. T. Nelson 
I. Government 








I N£ of the first problems that arose in 
connection with the establishment of Lu- 
ther College was that of securing for it a 
sound legal status. The Synod for the Nor- 
wegian Evangelical Lutheran Church in Amer- 
ica had already been incorporated in the state 
SEAL OF ^^ Wisconsin in 1868; but since the College 

LUTHER COLLEGE was to be located in Iowa it was felt neces- 
sary that the Synod be incorporated in Iowa 
as well. In 1863, after Rev. V. Koren had reported to the Synod 
that he had been unable to effect such incorporation, the matter 
was referred to Prof. F. A. Schmidt. At the Synod meeting in 
1864, Prof. Schmidt also reported failure; the matter was then 
referred to a committee made up of Profs. Schmidt and Larsen 
and Rev. V. Koren. In 1865 this committee reported that since 
no means had been found for incorporating the Synod in Iowa, 
steps had been taken to incorporate the College; that the articles 
of incorporation had been signed February 1, 1865; and that the 
incorporation had been carried out in such a manner as to give 
the Synod complete control over the newly-formed corporation. 

Such control was, and indeed is, essential for the Church; for 
the impelling motive which gave rise to Luther College and to all 
the sacrifices made in its behalf is found in its mission of training 
young men for service in the Church. Reference to the articles 
of incorporation (1917) will show that this control is assured by 
Article 3, which provides that the membership of the corporation 
shall "consist of the pastors of the Norwegian Evangelical Lu- 
theran congregations connected with the Norwegian Lutheran 
Church of America and the representatives of said congregations 
at the regular triennial meeting of said Church, chosen in ac- 
cordance with its discipline and usage." The Luther College 



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GOVERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION 49 

Corporation is thus^ in effect, the church body organized for a 
collegiate purpose.* 

The same committee was instructed by the Synod in 1866 to 
prepare a set of by-laws, and also an amendment to the articles 
whereby the Church Council should be constituted a Board of 
Visitors for the College. This was not accomplished until the 
Synod meeting of 1871. On June 29 of that year the by-laws 
were adopted; on the same date Article X was added and Article 
IV amended. Amended Article IV provided that the treasurer, 
who had hitherto been a member of the Board of Trustees ex- 
officio, should no longer be so, and set up the faculty as a Board 
with such powers as are conferred upon it by the by-laws. The 
articles and by-laws were now in essentials in their permanent 
form. In the drafting of them. Judge G. R. Willett had rendered 
without charge notable service. The Synod expressed its thanks 
to him and charged the committee with the duty of procuring for 
him a suitable gift, appropriating for that purpose the sum of 
fifty dollars. 

From an examination of the articles and by-laws so amended 
and adopted, it is seen that sovereignty in the corporation re- 
sides in the church body organized in regular meeting as the cor- 
poration. To the Board of Trustees of eight members is entrusted 
the management of the affairs of the corporation, but with such 
restrictions, financial and otherwise, as to insure control by the 
Church in all matters of importance. To the Board of Profes- 
sors (faculty) is given power to admit and expel students and, 
subject to the authority of the corporation and Board of Visitors, 
to make and enforce rules and regulations for the good govern- 
ment and discipline of the College. Finally, to the Board of 
Visitors, which consists of the members of the Church Council — 
the controlling executive body of the Church — ^is delegated the 
right of visitation, authority to fix the number, duties, and com- 



*The oflldal name of the Norweirian Synod In the constitution adopted in 
1858 waa the Norwegian Evanffelical Lutheran Church in America. In 1865, 
at the annual convention held at Highland Prairie, Minn., the name was 
changed to the Synod for the Norw^ian Evangelical Lutheran Church in 
Ameripu In 1858 the Norwegian Synod was incorporated under the laws of 
Wisconsin as the Norwegian Evangelical Synod of the State of Wisconsin. On 
that account the Norwegian Synod was often called the Wisconsin Synod, and 
its teachings and practice were sometimes by opponents called "Wisconsinism**. 
But inasmuch as the synod in 1865 had changed its constitutional name from the 
Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran Church In America to the Synod for the Nor- 
wegian Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, steps were taken to secure 
the necessary changes in the articles of incorporation. The committee mentioned 
abovo—Koren, Schmidt, Larsen— with the aid of Judge O. R. Willett of Decorah, 
prepared a bill authorising the change of name. The bill was introduced in the 
Iowa state senate by Senator Dr. Bullis of Decorah and became a law on March 
16, 1866. lo Wisconsin a special act was passed by the senate and assembly in 
1878 and again in 1885 authorising the change in the articles of incorporation 
of the Norwegian Synod. 



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50 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



pensation of professors^ to prescribe terms of admission^ and to 
make general rules for the guidance of the Board of Professors. 
By implication it would appear that Article V of the by-laws also 
confers upon the Board of Visitors supervision over the course of 
study. The Board of Visitors^ or Church Council^ has thus^ next 
to the church body, been the residuary of the greatest power with 
regard to the College. 

Prior to 1872 meetings of the corporation were legal only if 
held in the state of Iowa. In that year, due to the efforts of 




WINNESHIEK COUNTY COURT HOUSE 

Prof. Knut Bergh, who was then a member of the state legislature 
of Iowa, a law was passed legalizing the meetings of the corpora- 
tion in any state adjoining Iowa. 

At first the election of the officers of the corporation was fixed 
for every year. In 1878 the by-laws were amended to provide 
for triennial elections. • 

No other change was made in the by-laws until 1899. Prior 
to 1899, Article V provided that the Board of Visitors might ap- 
point and remove the professors, subject to the approval of the 
majority of the pastors of the congregations of the Church and 
the professors of the College. This rule, which practically neces- 
sitated a meeting of the Synod or an election by mail, had become 
increasingly cumbersome with the growth of the Church. In 1876 



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GOVERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION 51 

the Synod had been divided into three districts — ^the Eastern^ 
Minnesota^ and Iowa Districts; in 1890 a fourth^ the Pacific Dis- 
trict^ had been added. Meanwhile other schools had been estab- 
lished and the Church's interests had grown and expanded in 
every direction. Some less unwieldy method of election had be- 
come imperative. In 1895 proposals were laid before the Synod 
by a committee appointed by the Church Council; to these^ further 
consideration was given in 1896; the next year a set of rules was 
adopted which provided in substance as follows: a vacancy among 
the professors should be announced by the Church Council in 
"Kirketidende"^ the official organ of the Church, at least four 
weeks before a nomination was to be made. The nomination 
should be made by the Church Council and the permanent pro- 
fessors of the College; the nomination likewise should be an- 
nounced in "Kirketidende". After another four weeks' delay to 
permit of the filing of objections on the part of the members of 
the Church, the Church Council should proceed to election by a 
two-thirds vote. In 1899 by the amendment of Article V of the 
by-laws this set of rules was given effect by the college corpora- 
tion. 

The original proposals of 1895 and 1896 had looked forward 
to the establishment of an "electoral college" of six men, which 
would have had charge of providing the personnel of the college 
faculty. The rules adopted in 1897 show that the Synod was not 
then prepared for so radical a delegation of authority. By 1908, 
however, the question had cropped up again. In that year an 
organization was set up which foreshadows very clearly the pres- 
ent Board of Education. By resolution of the Synod there was 
established a Board of Directors of nine members; four of these, 
the president of the Synod and the presidents of Luther Seminary, 
Luther College, and Lutheran Normal School, were to be mem- 
' bers ex officio, and five were to be elected at large by a two-thirds 
vote at each regular synod meeting. The Board was divided into 
three sub-committees of three members each, one for each school. 
The Board was granted purely administrative authority; it was 
empowered to nominate the heads of the schools under its juris- 
diction, to dismiss professors in certain cases, to fix salaries in 
accordance with the general regulations established by the Synod, 
and through its sub-committees to make temporary appointments 
of professors. Although this arrangement was not considered 
satisfactory or effective, it endured until 1917, when a union was 
effected by the three principal Norwegian church bodies — the 
Hauge Synod, the Norwegian Synod, and the United Church. 



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52 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

With the adoption by these church bodies of the constitution 
of the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America came the establish- 
ment of a board which devotes its efforts exclusively to educational 
matters. The Board of Education of the new church body has 
both authority in administrative affairs and jurisdiction with re- 
gard to courses of study. Although it functions independently, 
it is, nevertheless, subordinate to the Church Council, which by 
paragraph 22, c, of the church constitution is invested with final 
authority in school matters. The Board of Education, which is 
composed of seven members, consists of three pastors and three 
laymen, of whom one-half are elected every third year for a period 
of six years, and the president of the Church ex-officio. The 
Board is empowered to appoint an executive educational secretary 
to aid it in its work. 

In 1917, by paragraph 14 of the rules for the Board of Ed- 
ucation, return was again made to the old method of electing 
teachers in full church meeting. This method immediately proved 
itself so impracticable in the present greatly enlarged church 
body, that it was repealed in 1920. In its stead provision was 
made whereby the Board of Education should have authority, 
except in the case of professors for the Seminary, to choose and 
appoint teachers for one year or a part thereof and even, if cir- 
cumstances demanded it, to make the appointment permanent. 

It has thus come about in the course of years, that the Lu- 
ther College Corporation, though unchanged in character, has been 
fitted into the special organization which the Church has set up 
to look after its educational work. Although the advisability of 
retaining its separate corporate existence has been questioned, ex- 
perience would appear to justify the findings of the committee 
which was appointed in 1899 and reported in 1902 against dis- 
solution, giving as its reasons: first, that the College was already 
fully in the Church's control; and, secondly, that a dissolution of 
the corporation might raise serious legal difficulties with regard 
to the legacies of which the corporation has been the recipient 

It remains to be added that as, according to the laws of Iowa, 
incorporations of the nature of the Luther College Corporation 
expire at the end of fifty years, measures were taken in 1915 to 
renew the articles of incorporation. Finally, in 1918 a change 
was made, significant of the altered circumstances of langpuage 
in which both the Church and the College find themselves, by strik- 
ing the word "Norwegian" from the official name of the Col- 
lege. 



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GOVERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION 



53 



II. Administration 

In turning to a consideration of the administrative develop- 
ment of the College^ it is well to note that Luther College is a 
direct descendant of the Latin School of Norway. It is a hoys' 
school, a classical school, a hoarding school. But hecause of its 
peculiar relation to the Church, Luther College has a special mis- 
sion to perform. This fact, and the steady and cumulative force 
of the college idea as it has evolved in America, have heen agencies 
influencing the development of Luther College. 

Luther College in 1861 had two teachers and 16 students. 
Naturally the administrative problems were not of such a nature 
as to require a careful division of administrative duties. The 
president of the school exercised all administrative functions. The 
school took on the aspect of an enlarged family for which Pres. 




LUTHER COLLEGE IN THE EIGHTIES 

Larsen was father, pastor, and teacher. He discharged also the 
duties of registrar, . treasurer, librarian, and disciplinarian. 

But with the growth of the College and the consequent in- 
crease in the amount of necessary administrative work, a division 
of labor was essential. From the first, although the president 
exercised a supervisory function, the problem of providing suit- 
able table board was placed in the hands of a steward, an ar- 
rangement which continued until 1896, when the students were 
granted permission to manage the undertaking themselves through 
the Luther College Boarding Club. 



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54 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

In 1867, the library was placed in charge of Prof. Landmark. 
He, and his successors in charge of the library up to 1915, had 
other duties in addition to their work with the library; but since 
1915 the full time and effort of the librarian have been devoted 
to the library. Up to 1889 all classes of the College were under 
the direct supervision of the president. In that year, by the ap- 
pointment of Prof. H. W. Sheel to be principal of the Preparatory 
Department, much of the responsibility of the president for that 
department was lifted from his shoulders. In 1890 the museum 
received its special officer by the appointment of Prof. W. Sihler 
as curator. President Laur. Larsen continued to bear one of the 
heaviest administrative loads, however, until 1895, for it was not 
until Prof. C. A. Naeseth in that year was made treasurer that the 
president was relieved of the multifarious details involved in car- 
ing for the college treasury. Although President C. K. Preus as 
early as 1905 recommended that a registrar be appointed, the 
registrar's office was not organized until 191 4. Prof. O. A. Tingel- 
stad has been in charge since its inception and has made it a most 
valuable and up-to-date adjunct to the work of the College. 

A step much needed for the adequate maintenance of the pres- 
ident's office was taken in 1917, when an appropriation was 
granted to defray the expense of an office assistant. Since that 
time a stenographer has been regularly employed. 

One of the heaviest burdens laid upon the president is that 
of maintaining discipline. From time to time, various professors 
have been called upon to assist the president in this work. As 
early as 1863 Prof. L. Siewers was known as "Konrektor" (as- 
sistant master). In 1896-7, because of Prof. Larsen's ill-health. 
Prof. L. S. Reque had charge of discipline in the evenings. In 
1905-6 Prof. Oscar L. Olson acted as disciplinarian to a very 
considerable extent. In 1906-7, upon the completion of Laur. 
Larsen Hall, the task of maintaining discipline in the new build- 
ing was turned over to Prof. M. K. Bleken, and in 1911 to the 
principal of the Preparatory Department. In 1919-20 Prof. M. 
H. Trytten, and in 1920-22 Prof. B. J. Hovde, acted as dean 
of men in the College Department. 

The gradual delegation of administrative duties outlined above 
has been in harmony with the normal development of the College. 
With the present tendency to a division of the college work along 
departmental lines, it becomes necessary in order to harmonize 
conflicting interests to resort more and more to committees in 
handling matters of administration. Greater development in this 
direction can no doubt be looked for in the future. 



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GOVERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION 55 

In deliberations a£fecting the government and regulation of 
the College the Board of Professors, or faculty, plays an import- 
ant part. Problems a£Pecting the courses of study are the subject of 
thorough discussions; in the past the initiative for most of the 
changes in the curriculum has come in the form of recommenda- 
tions from the faculty. The faculty, moreover, sits as a board in 
all cases involving flagrant breaches of discipline and is the de- 
ciding body in cases involving the expulsion of a student from the 
school. The president and the faculty, aside from their dis- 
ciplinary jurisdiction, are also intimately concerned with the gen- 
eral and spiritual welfare of the students. In the earlier days of 
the College, when the family nature of the student body and faculty 
was more pronounced, the character and personality of the teacher 
in fullest measure influenced the student by precept and example. 
To some extent this has changed, because of the increase in at- 
tendance, but a close relation between student and teacher still re- 
mains. 

For many years, too, the College has enjoyed the services of 
the pastors who have served the First Norwegian Lutheran Con- 
gregation at Decorah. During the existence of the Synod, the 
work of these men and of the local congregation, not least that 
of the women of the congregation, contributed in no small degree 
both to the material and the spiritual welfare of the College. 
Since the union of the churches in 1917, very fine relations with 
both Norwegian Lutheran Congregations in Decorah have been 
maintained. During the school year 1921-22 the plan was in- 
augurated of having each of the two pastors conduct the morning 
chapel exercises once a week. 

Since 1876 the physical welfare of the students has been 
under the direct supervision of the college physician. In 1899 a 
hospital building, which has since been enlarged and improved, 
was made possible through the gift of Mr. J. A. Johnson of Madi- 
son, Wisconsin. Since 1916 the College has had the services of a 
college nurse, a provision which has more than proved its value. 
Since 1919 provision has also been made for a physical director. 

The material problems relating to the care of buildings and 
grounds are directly under the supervision of the president. In 
the earliest days of the College the care of rooms and building 
was a duty of the students. With the increase in equipment, jan- 
itor and engineer service was placed directly in charge of the 
steward. With the passing of the steward, the posts of engineer, 
janitor, night-watchman, and electrician were established. 



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56 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

The last few years have witnessed a greater appreciation of 
the need and value of adequate publicity for the College. President 
Freus in 1917 laid before the Church recommendations toward this 
end^ stressing the value of publicity as a means of obtaining ade- 
quate support for the College. A constructive policy of publicity 
keeps the College in closer touch with the body it serves. It is of 
value also in securing adequate recognition from the public at 
large and the school world in particular^ and in attracting to the 
College a larger number of students. Lastly^ it aids very materi- 
ally in securing the funds without which the conduct of the school 
would be impossible. 

Considerable progress has been made in this direction. The 
means of publicity employed consist in part of catalogs^ bulletins^ 
circulars^ advertisements^ and student publications such as the 
college papers and annuals. In 1921 the College began the pub- 
lication quarterly of the "Luther College Bulletin". Much atten- 
tion is devoted to publicity in the church and secular press^ about 
twenty-five publications receiving copy from correspondents at 
the College. Great credit for the work done in this field is due 
the publicity committee of the College^ which at present consists 
of Profs. C. W. Strom, B. J. Hovde, and M. H. Trytten. The 
College also endeavors to furnish from among its faculty mem- 
bers speakers for such occasions as may arise. 

To aid in providing for adequate and continued support, the 
College is in need of a financial secretary who can take charge of 
collections in the field and continue a steady campaign for in- 
creased endowments. 

III. Articles of Ikcorporatiok of the Norweoiak Lxttuer 
College of Decorah, Iowa 

(As amended and adopted by the Luther College Corporation in 1917) 

Article 1. We, the undersigned, Herman Amberg Preus, of Leeds, 
Wisconsin; Tiiore Peterson, of Calmar, Iowa; and Gulbrand T. Lom- 
men, of Decorah, Iowa; do hereby form ourselves into a body corporate 
to be known as the Norwegian Luther College of Decorah, Iowa, and as 
such corporation to possess the privileges and exercise the powers pro- 
vided by law. 

Article 2. The purposes of this corporation are the establishment of 
a Collegiate Institution in the town of Decorah, of a religious and ed- 
ucational character, to provide suitable buildings and grounds there- 
for, engage teachers, provide libraries, apparatus and all other things 
necessary for the successful conduct of the same. 

Article 3. The members of this association and corporation shall 
consist of the pastors of the Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran congre- 
gations connected with the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America 
and the representatives of said congregations at the regular triennial 
meeting of said Church, chosen in accordance with its discipline and 
usage. 



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GOVERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION 57 



Article 4. The officers of this corporation shall be a president, secre- 
tary, treasurer, and a Board of six Trustees to be chosen in such man- 
ner, time, and place as s"hall be specified by the By-Laws of the corpora- 
tion. The president and secretary shall be members of said board ex- 
officio. The president and the professors of the College shall together 
constitute a board or faculty with such powers as may be conferred 
upon them by the By-Laws. The corporation at all its meetings, annual 
and special, shall choose a chairman who shall hold the position during 
the session. 

Article 5. The following named persons shall constitute the officers 
of this corporation for the first year of its existence and until their 
successors are elected, viz.: Rev. Herman Amberg Preus, president; 
Rev. V. Koren, secretary; Prof. Laur. Larsen, treasurer; Thore Peter- 
son, Gulbrand T. Lommen, N. Brandt, Jens J. Naeset, Tjerand John- 
son, Rev. O. J. Hjort, trustees. Said election shall be held at the first 
meeting of the corporation held after the 1st day of January, A. D. 
1866. 

Article 6. The affairs of this corporation shall be managed and con- 
trolled by the Board of Trustees, subject to the by-laws of this corpora- 
tion defining the duties of the officers and prescribing their mode of 
procedure in transacting the business of the corporation. 

Article 7. The private property of the members of this corporation 
shall be exempt from liability for the debts thereof. 

Article 8. All conveyances of property of this corporation shall be 
taken in the name of the corporation as set forth in Article 1 hereof. 

Article 9. Any of these articles may be amended and other articles 
added thereto at any meeting of the members of this corporation. 

Article 10. The president and members of the Church Council of the 
Norwegian Lutheran Church of America and their successors in those 
offices are hereby constituted a Board of Visitors for the College, and 
shall have such powers, including the right of visitation and calling of 
special meetings of the corporation, as may be conferred upon them by 
the by-laws of the corporation. 

Bt-Laws of the Nohweoian Luther College of Decorah, Iowa 

1. The Board of Trustees shall have, when not otherwise provided, 
the general management of the affairs of the corporation, keep the 
buildings and other property of the corporation in good repair, make 
all necessary improvements to the same, procure such libraries and ap- 
paratus as the board of professors may deem necessary for the success- 
ful conduct of the College. Provided, that in no event shall the 
Trustees be authorized to expend annually a greater sum than $1,000 
(one thousand dollars) without first submitting the same to the annual 
meeting of the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America, for their ap- 
proval. A majority of the said Board of Trustees shall constitute a 
quorum for the transaction of business. 

2. The president, secretary, treasurer, and Board of Trustees shall 
be elected triennially at such time and place as said Church shall hold 
its regular meeting. The regular meeting of this corporation will be 
held at the same time and place. And whenever a vacancy shall occur, 
the Board of Trustees shall have the power to fill such vacancy from 
among the members of the corporation. Notice of regular meetings of 
the corporation shall be announced by the president, by publication of 
the same in such newspapers as the Board of Trustees shall direct at 
least four weeks previous to the day of the meeting. 

8. The judges of said election shall be three in number and shall be 
elected at the time from the members of the corporation. It shall be 



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58 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



their duty to report at once the result of said election in writing under 
their hands to the president and secretary of the corporation. 

4. The president, secretary, treasurer and Board of Trustees so 
elected ^all hold their respective offices until their successors are elected 
and qualified. Before entering upon the duties of his office, the treasurer 
shall be required to execute a bond, in such sum as the Board of Trustees 
may require. The president shall have the general supervision of the 
affairs of the College, shall preside at all meetings of the Board of 
Trustees and board of professors, and in cases of an equal division at 
these meetings shall have, in addition to his vote as a member, the de- 
ciding vote, and shall sign all contracts and orders on the treasurer for 
the payment of money; in case of his absence or disability, these last 
duties shall devolve upon a president pro tem. to be chosen from their 
number by the Board of Trustees. He may call meetings of the Board 
of Trustees or board of professors when he shall deem it necessary — and 
shall do so when requested by three members of the board of which a 
meeting is desired. 

5. The number of the professors for the College, their respective 
duties and compensation, shall be fixed by the Board of Visitors, in ac> 
cordance with the resolutions made by the Norwegian Lutheran Church 
of America, and the appointment and removal of such professors shall 
be made in accordance with the rules and regulations prescribed by 
said Church. 

6. The professors of the College shall constitute a board with power 
to admit students to the College and expel them therefrom for improper 
conduct and to malce and enforce such rules and regulations, not in- 
consistent with those made by the corporation or by the Board of Visitors 
as tliey may consider necessary for the good government and discipline 
of the College. 

7. It is hereby made the duty of the Board of Visitors to malce 
rules prescribing the terms of admission into the College, the amount 
of preparatory icnowledge and other qualifications required for admis- 
sion, and make such other rules and regulations as they may deem best 
for the guidance of the board of professors in maintaining the good 
government and discipline of the College. 

8. It shall be the duty of the Board of Trustees to make an annual 
report of the financial condition of the College to the corporation at 
its annual meeting — and if no annual meeting shall be held in any year, 
then such report shall be made at that time to the Board of Visitors. 

9. The secretary shall attend and keep a record of the proceedings 
of all meetings of the Board of Trustees and of the corporation; shall 
keep a record of all elections of officers, keep a correct account of all 
the business transactions of the corporation, in books to be provided 
for that purpose, and attend to the correspondence of the corporation; 
his books and papers shall be always open for inspection by any mem- 
ber of the Board of Trustees or Board of Visitors. 

10. The treasurer shall receive and keep all moneys belonging to the 
corporation and shall disburse the same only on the written order of 
the president. He shall keep full and correct accounts of all moneys 
and property by him received and disbursed on account of this corpora- 
tion, and shall render a statement of the same annually to the Board of 
Trustees and to the annual meeting of the corporation, and at such 
other times as he may be called upon therefor by the Board of Trustees 
and Board of Visitors, or either of them. The books of the treasurer 
and his vouchers, shall be always open for inspection by any member of 
the Board of Trustees or Board of Visitors. 

11. The members of the Board of Visitors shall individually and col- 
lectively have the right of visitation to the College at any and all 



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GOVERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION 



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times. And it is hereby made the duty of all the officers of this corp: ra- 
tion, as also all the professors and teachers, to exhibit to them, when 
required, all the books and records of the College and corporation and 
give them every facility for acquiring a knowledge of the C3ndltion of 
the institution. And it is hereby made the duty of the said Board of 
Visitors to report to each annual meeting of the corporation the result 
of their examinations into the affairs of the College, and any defects 
observed by them in the management of the same, financial or otherwise, 
and make such suggesti:ns as they may deem best adapted to remedy 
such defects. 

12. Whenever a two-thirds majority of the Board of Visitors shall 
decide that the interests of the College require that a special meeting 
of the corporation be held, it shall be the duty of the president of the 
Board of Visitors to call such a meeting. Four weeks' notice of any 
meeting so called shall be given by publishing the same in some news- 
paper to be designated by the Board of Visitors and by mailing a copy 
of such notice through the post office to each pastor of a congregation 
who is a member of this corporation, and thereupon it shall be the duty 
of the pastors so notified, to cause lay-members of their congregations 
to be elected in accordance with the discipline and usages of the Nor- 
wegian Lutheran Church of America. Said notice shall name the time, 
place and object of the meeting; and unless two-thirds of the said pastors 
and a like number of lay delegates representing congregations be in 
attendance upon the meeting so called, no other business than that 
named in the notice shall be translated. ('*Den Norsk Lutherske Kirke 
i Amerikas Beretning**, 1917, 553-555. For the original articles of in- 
corporati:n and by-laws see "Synodalhaandbog'*, 1901, 23-34.) 

IV. Roster 
•1. Church Officials 



PRESIDENTS 
1. Rev Adolph Carl Preus. 1853-1862. 
t. Rev. Herman Amberg Preus, 1862- 

1894. 
8. Dr. Ulrik ViUielm Keren, 1804-1910. 
4. Dr. Hans Gerhard Stub, 1910- 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 

1. Rev. Claus Laurltz Clausen, 1895- 

1856. 

2. Rev Nils Olsen Brandt, 1857-1871. 
8. Dr. Ulrik Vilhelm Keren, 1894-1910. 

4. Dr. Peter Lauren tius Larsen, 1870- 

1898. 

5. Dr. Ulrik Vilhelm Koren. 1893-1894. 

0. Prof. Johannes Bjerk Frich, 1805- 

1899 

7. Rev. HalTor Halvorsen, 1890-1905. 

8. Dr. Hans Gerhard Stub, 1905-1010. 

9. Prof. Chriltian Keyser Preus, 1911- 

1917. 

10. Dr. John Nathin Kildahl, 1917-1020. 

11. Rey. Hans Christian Holm, 1922- 

SECRETARIES 

1. Dr. Ulrik Vilhelm Koren, 1855-1857. 
8. Rev. Jakob Aall Ottesen, 1857-1850. 

8. Rer. Nils Edward Schancke Jensen, 

1859-1861. 
4. Rev. Jakob Aall Ottesen, 1861-1864. 

9. Dr. Peter Laurentius Larsen, 1864- 

1865. 
s Rev. Bemt Julius Ingebrigrtsen Muus, 



18051 866. 

7. Rev. Johnnnes DJerk Frich. 1866-1867. 

8. Rev. Giristlan Mathias Hvlstendahl, 

1867-1808 

9. Rev. Bernt Julius Ingebrigtsen Muus, 

1869-1870. 

10. Rev. Torgcr Andrews Torgerson, 

1870-1871. 

11. Rev. Bernt Julius Ingebrigtsen Muus, 

1871-1872. 

12. Rev. Johannes Bjerk Frich, 1872- 

1878. 

13. Rev. Ludvig Marinus Bl0rn, 1879- 

1887. 

14. Rev. Halvor Halvorsen, 1887-1896. 

15. Rev. J0rgen Nordby. 1806-1908. 

16. Rev. Dfiniel Cliristopherson Jordahl, 

1008-1917. 

17. Rev. Ole J. Kvale, 1917- 

18. Rev. Nels Johnson L0hre, 1917- 

TREASURERS 

1. Thore Helgesen, 1857-1868. 

2. Gudbrnnd Olsen, 1868-1865. 

8. Prof. Lyder Siewers, 1865-1869 

4. Dr. Peter Laurentius Larsen, 1869- 

1871. 

5. Gulbrnnd O. Rustad, 1871-1890. 

6 Rev. Halvor Bj0mson Hustvedt, 1899- 

1905. 

7 Rev. Michael Olsen Borge, 1905-1911. 

8 Rev. Halvor Bj0rnson Hustvedt, 1911- 

1017. 
0. Erik Waldeland, 1017- 



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60 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



1. 

2. 
S. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 

10. 
11. 
It. 

IS. 

14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 

to. 

21. 
tt. 

28. 
24. 
25. 
20. 

27. 
28. 

29. 
80. 
81. 
82 
88. 
84. 
85. 



87. 
88. 

89. 
40. 
41. 
42 
48. 

44. 

45. 



CHURCH COUNaL (Klrkeraad) 

Aadnesen, A., 1857-41. 

Aastad, Rev. Ivar Torgenon, 1920- 

Anderson, A. A., 1921- 

Anderson, N, 1917-1920. 

Anderson, P. B., 1917- 

Aslaksen, Ole, 1881-1888. 

Bj0rgo, Rev. Knut Knutsen, 1898-1917. 

Borlaug, Mikael J., 1882-1888. 

Brandt, Rev. Nils Olsen, 1895, 1857- 

1871. 
B^rresen, E. N.. 1894-1899. 
B0e, Rev. Nils Nilsen, 1918- 
Clausen, Rev. Claus Laurltz, 1855- 

1857. 
Dietrldison, Rev. Gustav Fredrik, 

1853-1855 
Eastvold. Rev. Carl Jolian, 1917- 
Edwards, Gunder, 1898-1899. 
Ellefsen, Erik, 1855-1857. 
Plnsetli, Knut K., 1809-1871. 
Finseth, Ole K., 1876-1881. 
Finseth, Anders Knudson, 1888-1804, 

1895-1809. 
Fosmark, John Oleson, 1853-1855. 
Fobs, Rev. Ludvig Colbj0msen, 1898- 
Fridi, Prof. Johannes BJerk, 1877- 

1888. 
Gudmundsen, Osmund M., 1920- 
Halvorsen, Rev. Halvor, 1898-1908. 
Hanson, Hon. T. O., 1910-1915. 
Harstad, Rev. Bjug Aanondson, 

1884-1898, 1804-1898. 
Hegg, Jolin, 1917-1920. 
Hendrickson, Rev. Peder Anton, 

1908-1917. 
Henryson, T. T., 1920- 
Holm, Rev. Hans Christian, 1917- 
Ingebrlgtsen, Ivar, 1855-1857. 
Jacobson, Prof. Axel, 1914-1017. 
Jacobson. Nils, 1877-1887. 
Jenson, Andrew, 1809-1914. 
Johnson, Tjerand, 1859-1861, 1868- 

1809. 
Jordahl, Rev. Daniel Christopherson, 

1910-1917. 
Juul, Rev. Ole, 1888-1898. 
Kans'i, Jens Olsen, 1878-1877, 1879- 

1882. 
Kiland, Gustav H., 1890-1902. 
Koren, Dr. Ulrik Vilhelm, 1861-1910. 
Larson, Lewis, 1917- 
Larson, Walter E., 1917-1920. 
Lavik, Rev. Johannes Rasmussen. 

1917-. 
Leque, Nels P., 1914-1917. 
Lie, Lars J., 1858-1855, 1857-1859. 



16. Lie, Johannes E. Johnson, 1809-1878. 

47. LInde, A. P , 1875-1876. 

48. Lommen, Gulbrand T., 1857-1859, 

1861-1870, 1877-1879. 

49. Lucky, Capt. C J., 1905-1906. 

50. Lund, S. B, 1887-1890. 

51. Lundberg, Carl, 1808-1896. 

52. Midboe, Jakob, 1861-1868. 

58. Muus, Rev. Bemt Julius Ingebrigtsen, 
1876-1885. 

54. Myhre, Gulbrand, 1858-1855. 

55. Myron, Hans, 1902-1910. 

56. Naeset, Jens J., 1863-1860, 1876-1877, 

1887-1898. 

57. Nordby, Rev. J0rgen, 1907- 

58. Olsnaes, Aslak, 1859-1863. 

59. Opsund, Gunder M , 1917- 

60. Paulsrud, Rev. Gilbert Olson, 1917- 

1918. 

61. Pederson, Mairnus, 1908- 

62. Preus, Rev. Adolph Carl, 1853-1862. 

63. Preus, Rev. Herman Amberg, 1853- 

1861, 1862-1894. 

64. RaaboUe, Nils J., 1871-1875. 

65. Rasmussen, Rev. Peter Andreas, 

1871-1877. 

66. Rossing, Chr. A, 1890-1893. 

67. Rossing, Capt Torkild A., 1915-1917. 

68. Saetra, E. O., 1894-1895. 

69. Saetra, Tosten C, 1908-1014. 

70. Sagen, Rev. Andreas Kittelson, 1903- 

1907. 

71. Skindlov, Rev. Anders Mathlas, 1917- 

72. Skipsnaes, Jens (Hon. J. A. JcHm- 

son) 1855-1857 
78. Steensland, Prof. Morton M., 1920- 

74. Strom, Hon. Herbj0m H., 1905-1907. 

75. Stub. Dr. Hans Gerhard, 1910- 

76. Stubb. Ludvlg O., 1900-1908. 

77. Sundheim, Rev. J0rgen M., 1917- 

1920.. 

78. Swenson, Hon. Lauritz Selmer, 1921- 

79. Thompson, J. B., 1893-1896. 

80. Thorpe, Hon. Lars Olsen, 1905-1921. 

81. Thykesen, Eivind, 1876-1887. 

82. Tingelstad, Bent, 1899-1902. 

88. Torgerson, Rev. Torger Andreas, 
1804-1906. 

84. Torrison, Thomas E., 1899-1905. 

85. Tvete, Nils K., 1806-1899. 

86. Tweten, Ole, 1917- 

87. Vangsnes, Rev. Ole Pedersen, 1900- 

1916. 

88. WoUan, Michael A., 1888-1894. 

89. Ylvisaker, Andreas Christian, 1890- 

1005. 

90. Ylvisaker, Rev. Ivar Daniel, 1917- 



2. Luther College Corporation Officials 



ORIGINAL INCORPORATORS 
Feb. 1, 1865 

1. Rev. Herman Amberg Preus, Leeds, 

Wis. 

2. Thorc Peterson (Skotland), Calmar, 

I own. 

3. Gulbrand T. Lommen, Decorah, 

Iowa. 

PRESIDENTS OF THE BOARD OF 
TRUSTEES 

1. Rev. Herman Amberg Preus, Leeds, 

Wis., 1865-1871 

2. Dr. Peter Lnurentius Larsen, Decor- 

ah, Iowa, 1871-1902. 



8. Prof. Christian Keyser Preus, De- 
corah, Iowa, 1902-1981. 
4. Dr. Trond Stabo, Decorah, Iowa, 1921- 

SECRETARIES OF THE BOARD 
OF TRUSTEES 

1. Dr. Ulrik Vilhehn Koren, Decorah, 

Iowa. 1865-1871. 

2. Prof. Knut Ellefsen Bergh, Decorah, 

Iowa, 1871-1873. 
8. Prof. Jacob D. Jacobsen, Decorah, 
Iowa, 1878-1881. 

4. Prof. Lars S. Reque, Decorah, Iowa, 

1881-1898, 1899-1902, 1914-1916. 

5. Prof. Christen Andreas T. Naeseth, 

Decorah, Iowa, 1898-1899, 1902-1014. 



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6. Rey. Kristen Kyamme, Owian, Iowa, 

18«1-18«4, 187M899. 

7. Dr. Oscar Ludvig Olaon, Decorah, 

Iowa, 1B17- 

TREASURERS OF THE BOARD 

OF TRUSTEES 

1. Golbrand O. Rustad, Decorah, Iowa, 

1871-1899. 
S. Prof. Lyder Siewers, Decorah, Iowa, 
18«4-18«5. 

8. Dr. Peter Laurentius LArsen, Decorah, 

Iowa. 1865-1871. 

4. Rev. Halvor Bj0m8on Huatredt, De- 

corah, Iowa, 1899-1905, 1914-19S0. 

5. Rev. Michael Olsen Borge, Decorah, 

Iowa, 1905-1914. 

6. Rev. Knute Olson Elttreim, Decorah, 

Iowa, 1920- 

MEMBERS OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

1. Rev Herman Amberg Preus, Leeds, 

Wis., 1885-1871. 

2. Dr. Ulrik Vilhelin Koren, Decorah. 

Iowa, 1805-1871. 
8. Dr. Peter Laurentius Larsen, De- 
corah, Iowa, 1805-1918. 

4. Thore Peterson (Skotland), Calmar, 

Iowa, 1805-1875. 

5. Gulbrand T. Lommen, Decorah, Iowa, 

1805-1871. 
0. Rev. Nils Olsen Brandt, Decorah, 
Iowa, 1805-1871. 

7. Jens J. Naeset, Stooghton, Wis., 1885- 

1871, 1875-1884, 1887-1890. 

8. TJerand Johnson, Leeds, Wis., 1805- 

1871. 

9. Rev. Ove Jalcob HJort, Dalby, Iowa, 

1805-1878. 



10. Prof. Knut E. Bergh, Decorah, Iowa, 

1871-1878. 

11. Elling E. Void, Decorah, Iowa, 1871 

1870. 

12. Jens Olson Kaasa, Oilcago, 111., 1871 

1875. 
18. Hon. L. K. Aalcer, Alexandria, Minn., 
1871-1887. 

14. John Oleson Fosmark, Leeds, Wis 

1871-1875. 

15. Prof. Jacob D. Jacobsen, Decorah. 

Iowa, 1878-1881. 
10. Osuld Torrison, Manitowoc, Wis., 1875- 
1884. 

17. O. N. Olsen, Decorah, Iowa, 1875-1870. 

18. Anders Kittilsby, Cabnar, Iowa, 1870- 

1884. 

19. Nils N. KJome, Decorah, Iowa, 1878- 

1881. 

20. Prof. Lars S. Reque, Decorah, Iowa, 

188M89S, 1899-1902, 1914-1910. 

21. Halvor Nilsen, Gem, Iowa, 1881-1884. 

22. Rev. Torger Andreas Torgerson, Bris- 

tol, Iowa, 1881-1884, 1887-1902. 
28. Iver Larsen, Decorah, Iowa, 1884-1887. 

24. A. Anderson, Des Moines, Iowa, 1884- 

1887. 

25. Gnlbrand Saetrang, Waterville, Iowa, 

1884-1887. 
20. Hon. Tol'lef Sanderson, Harmony, 
Minn., 1884-1887. 

27. Hon. Halle Steensland, Madison, Wis., 

1884-1887 

28. Thomas E.* Torrison, Manitowoc, Wis., 

1887-1898. 

29. Nils Larsen, Hesper, Iowa, 1887-1902. 

80. Hon. Lars Olsen Thorpe, Wilbnar, 

Minn.. 1887-1890. 

81. L. O. Moen, Cabnar, Iowa, 1887-1899. 



BOARD OF TKUS'lEES 




Rev. O. K. Schmidt 



Hon. A. H. Dahl 



Mr. 1. A. Thorson 



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62 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



88. O. K. Simmons, Red Wing, Minn., 58. Prof. James Christian Meinlch Han- 
1890-1902. son. Chicago, II!., 1920- 

S8. Prof. Wilhelm Magnus Herman Peter- 5». Gov. Jacob Aall Ottesen Preus, St. 
sen, St. Paul, Minn., 1890-I808. Paul, Minn., 1921- 

84. Prof. Christen Andreas T. Naeseth, 40. Ivar August Thorson, Minneapolis, 

Decorah, Iowa, 1893-1899, 1902-1914. Minn., 1922- 

85. Andrew Jenson, Edgerton, Wis., 1898- «^*«^ ^„ ,^,«„«^^«^ 

1899. . » . 1 BOARD OV DIRECTORS 

86. Jno. Lienl0kken, La Crosse, Wis., i. Dr. Ulrik Vilhelm Koren, 1909-1910. 

1898-1899. , ^ _ ^ , ,„. 2. Prof. Chrisian Keyser Preus, 1909-1917. 

87. Gunder Edwards, Deerfleld, Wis., %. Dr. Olaf Elias Brandt, 1909-1910- 1911- 

1899-1914 1018. 

88. G. A. Nystrom, Calmar, Iowa, 1899- 4. prof. Zakarias J. Ordal, 1909-1917. 

1908. 5. Hon. Lauritx Selmer Swenson, 1909- 

89. Hon. Anders Knudson Finseth, Ken- 1911 

yon, Minn., 1899-1905. «. Dr. George A. Torrison, 1909-1917. 

40. Prof. Christian Keyser Preus, De- 7. Rev. Ole J. Kvale, 1909-1917. 

corah, Iowa, 1902-1921. 8. Rev. Henrik Johannesen Strand, 1909- 

41. Rev. Ole Pedersen Vangsnes, Story 1911. 

aty, Iowa, 1902-1905. 9 Rev. Karl Anderson Kasberg, 1909- 

42. R. M. Boxrud, Red Wing, Minn., 1902- 1911. 

1808. 10. Dr. Hans Gerhqrd Stub, 1910-1917. 

43. Rev. Thomas Nilsson, Ridgeway, Iowa, 11. Dr. Johannes Thorbj0msen Ylvisaker, 

1905-1908. 1910-1911, 1918-1914. 

44. Vcgger Gulbrandson, Albert Lea, 12. Rev. Gustav Torgerson Lee, 1911-1917. 

Minn., 1905-1914 18. Prof. Daniel Gustav Jacobsen. 1911- 

45. Rev. Halvor Bj0m8on Hustvedt, De- 1914. 

corah, Iowa. 1908-1920. u. Rev. Alfred Otto Johnson, 1911-1914. 
48. Chr. Boxrud, Red Wing, Minn., 1908- 

181L 15. Rev. Henry E. Solum, 1914-1917. 

47. O. A. Tenold, Calmar, Iowa, 1908-1914 16. Rev. Christen Andreas Davick, 1914- 

48. Dr. C. L. Opsal, Red Wing, Minn., 1917 

^1911-1914. 17. Prof. Elling Hove, 1918-1917. 
49 Dr. Trond Stabo, Decorah, Iowa, 1914- „^.«^ ^„ «,>,t^.«,.^„ 

50. Rev. Kristen Kvamme, Ossian, Iowa, BOARD OF EDUCATION 

1914-1920. 1. Dr. Hans Gerhard Stub, 1917- 

51. Hon. Andrew H. Grindeland, Warren, 2. Rev. Ole Gabriel Ueland Slljan, 1917- 

Minn., 1914-1920. 1920. 

52. Hon. A. H Dahl, Westby, Wis., 1914- 8. Dr. Lars Wilhelm Boc (Exec. Educa- 
58. €. A. Erstad, Zumbrota, Minn., 1914- tionnl Sec*y), 1917-1918 

_1M0. 4. Rev. Edward Johnson, 1917- 

54. Dr. Oscar Ludvig Olson, Decorah, 5. Rev. 0!e J. Kvale, 1917- 

lowa. 1917- 6. Dr. Jolin E. Grnnnid, 1917-1920. 

55. Rev Otto Emil Schmidt, Decorah, 7. Dr. George A Torrison, 1917- 

lowa, 1920- 8. Prof. Carl C. Swain, 1917- 

56. Borger Hanson, Decorah, Iowa, 1920- 9. Prof. Laurits Andreas Vigness, (Exec 

1021. Ed. Sec'y), 1918- 

57. Hon. Lnuritz Selmer Swenson, Min- 10. Rev. J0rgen M Sundheim, 1920- 

neapohs, Minn., 1920-1921. 11. Prof. Peder J. Elkeland, 1920- 

3. Luther College Officials 

PRESIDENTS 8. Prof. Olaus J. Breda, 1881-1882. 

1. Dr. Peter Laurcntius Larsen, 1801- *• S">f. Halvard G. Ro^lkvam, 1882-1888. 

1902. 5. Prof. Emil Johan Petersen, 1886-1887 

2. Prof. * Christian Keyser Preus, 1902- •• P^^- Christen Andreas T. Naeseth, 

1921 1887-1020. 

8. Dr. Oscar Ludvig Olson (Acting), 1921- '^' P™'- ^ari Thcodor Jacobsen, 1920- 

President EmrntM ASSISTANT LIBRARIAN 

^' ^rilS***'' Laurentius Larsen. 1911- prof. Enoch Ernest Peterson, 1912-1921. 

PRINCIPALS, LUTHER COLLEGE CURATORS OF THE MUSEUM 

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 1. Prof. William Sihler, 1890-1895. 

1. Prof. Herman W. Sheel, 1889-1891. J- £">'• HaWor J. Hanson, 1895-1902. 

1896-1911 *• Prof. George Mnrkhus, 1902-1906. 

2. Prof. Gisli Bothne, 1891-1896. *• f^f. Herman W. Sheel, 1»06-1911. 

8. Prof. Oscar Adolf Tingelstad, 1911- ^' P™'- JI?J*'"«8 Kristiansen Bleken, 
1912 1917-1919. lBOo-1010. 

4. Prof. Hans Sjurson Hilleboe, 1912-1917. ^- P™'- Knut GJerset, 1921- 

5. Prof. Hans Fred Swansen, 1»1»-1»20. TREASURERS 

6. Prof. Leonard Alton Moe, 1020- , rk « * 1 »t t -.at^t 

,*nnAnT«vTc 1. Dr. Peter Laurentius Larsen, 1861- 
LIBKAKIANs 1895. 

1. Prof. Gabriel Hetting Landmark. 1867- 2 Prof. Christen Andreas T. Naeseth, 

1876. 1895-1908, 1909-1918. 1914-1915. 

2. Prof. Jacob Daniel Jacobsen, 1876- 8. Prof. Theodore Elmer Thompson. 

1881. 1908-1909. 



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GOVERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION 



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4. Prof. Bertiniiu K. Savre, IftlS-lftli. 

1B15-1918. 

5. Mias Cathinka Preus (Mrs. K. D. Stal- 

land), 1918-1020. 

6. Prof. Knute Olson Eittreim, 1920- 

ASSISTANT TREASURER 
Prof. Oswald Benjamin Ovcm, 1016-1917. 

REGISTRAR 
1. Prof. Oscar Adolf Tinrelstad. 1914- 

ASSISTANT REGISTRAR 
1. Prof. Carl Walther Strom, 19«0- 

COLLEGE PASTORS 
1. Dr. Peter Laurentius Larsen, 1861- 

1865. 
t. Rev. Nils Olsen Brandt, 1865-1882. 
«. Rev. Thore Eggen, 1882-1888. 

4. Prof. Amund Mlkkelsen, 1889. 

5. Rev Johan Thorbj0rn Ylvisaker, 1889- 

1890. 

6. Rev. Markus Fredrik Wiese. 1890-1891. 

7. Prof. EUing Hove, 1891-1894. 

8. Rev. Jacob Aall Ottesen, 1894-1896. 

9. Dr. Hans Gerhard Stub, 1896-1900. 

10. Rev. Bemt Askevold, 1900-1901. 

11. Rev. Isaac Bertinus Torrison, 1901- 

12. Rev. Ole Glesne, 1917- 

COLLEGE PHYSICIANS 

1. Dr. A C. Smith, 1876-1905. 

2. Dr. Carsten Smith, 1905-1906. 
8. Dr. Trond Stabo, 1906- 

COLLEGE NURSES 
1. Miss Olivia Peterson, 1916-1917. 
2 Miss Theresse E. Arneson (Mrs. B. J. 



Hovde), 1917-1921. 
8. Miss Nora Walhus, 1921- 
STEWARDS 

1. Kr. Nilsen (and wife), 1861-1862. 

2. Mrs. Elisabeth ix>men (Stewardess), 

1862-1868. 
Gulbrand Lommen, assistant. 
Ole P. Dalemo, assistant. 
« J. T. Kr0ger, 1868-1871. 

4. Ole A. Larson, 1871-1875. 

5. Jens L. Lee, 1875-1877. 

6. P. Thompsen, 1877-1878. 

7. B. Fryslie, 1878-1884 

8. O. K. Haga, 1884-1888. 

9. C. Clausen, 1888-1894. 
lu. B. Berntsen, 1894-1896 

Since 1896 the Luther College Boirding 
Club has provided board for the students. 

ENGINEERS 

1. 0. P. Anderson, 1894-1899. 

2. Hans L. Rygg, 1899-1910. 
8. Ole Korsrud, 1910- 

ELECTRICIAN 
Ole Korsrud, 1901- 

JANITORS 
Even Rudd, 1899. 
Hans L. Rygg. 1899-1900. 
Ingebrigt Indvik. 
Christian Stenseth, 1921- 

NIGHT WATCHMEN 
Johannes Andresen. 
Hans L. Rygg. 
Enoch Rygg. 
Ole Korsrud. 
Helge Oyloe. 




HELGE OYLOE 




JOHANNES ANDRESEN 



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CHAPTER FOUR 

PRESIDENTS AND PRINCIPALS 

Francis £. Peterson 

IT is quite unique that in the first sixty years of its existence 
Luther College had only two presidents. Stability and a 
definite educational aim are first characteristics of Luther College^ 
and may be said to be exemplified by few changes in the presi- 
dency. Dr. Laur. Larsen was the first president and served un- 
interruptedly from 1861 to 1902^ a period of forty-one years. To 
few men is it given to devote themselves for so long a time to the 
service of one school^ and especially as president. It is not strange 
that Dr. Larsen was called "The Grand Old Man of Luther Col- 
lege". Rev. C. K. Preus became president in 1902 and served 
continuously until his death in the spring of 1921. Dr. Oscar L. 
Olson^ the third president^ entered upon his duties during the 
present school year, 1921-22, which is the sixty-first school year. 
Dr. Laur. Larsen 
Peter Laurentius Larsen, or as he himself signed his name, 
Laur. Larsen, was born August 10, 1833, in Christiansand, Nor- 
way. His parents were Herman Larsen, an army officer, and 
Elen Else Marie (nee Oftedahl), daughter of a member of the 
Eidsvold "rigsforsamling" in 1814. Peter was the oldest of nine 
children. The home life was comfortable and happy, although 
the family was by no means in easy circumstances. At nine years 
of age the boy entered the so-called Kathedral school in Christian- 
sand, where he easily ranked as one of the first in his class. Dr. 
Larsen often remarked that he considered himself fortunate in 
his teachers; at" this school it was particularly Prof. Chr. Thistc- 
dahl for whom he expressed admiration. In 1850 he matriculated 
at the University of Christiania for the study of theology; here 
he considered he had two especially inspiring teachers: Profes- 
sors G. Johnson and C. P. Caspari. He supported himself by 
tutoring. He had always planned to enter the ministry, and so 
engrossed did he become in his studies that his health was affected 
and he was forced to discontinue for half a year. Meantime he 
stayed with an uncle, Rev. P. F. Bassoe, near Moss, and served 
as teacher for the children in the family. In 1855 he completed 
his theological course; however, he continued in Christiania as 



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PETER LAURENTIUS LARSEN 
(Laur, Larsen) 



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66 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SEtTY YEARS 

teacher of languages — German^ French, and Hebrew — ^both pri- 
vately and in school. But very soon the urgent call for pastors 
from the Norwegian pioneer settlements in America appealed to 
him as a splendid opportunity for genuine Christian service. Ac- 
cordingly he was ordained September 23, 1857, by Pastor Rode, 
and left soon afterwards for America. On November 2nd of that 
year he preached his first sermon in America near Rush River, 
Wisconsin, in the attic of a house being built as a parsonage. 
From Rush River he made long trips and organized many con- 
gregations. In 1859 he accepted the call from the Synod to oc- 
cupy the chair of theology at Concordia Seminary in St. Louis 
as special professor for the Norwegian students there; he entered 
upon his duties on October 14, 1859, from which date he reckoned 
his professorship in America. In his work here he was associated 
with Dr. C. F. W. Wialther, "the Luther among the Germans in 
America"; but the Civil War disrupted the work, and Prof. Lar- 
sen left St. Louis in 1861 to become the first president of Luther 
College. 

It is natural that in the minds of most people Dr. Larsen 
lives as the teacher and educator. But he rendered services in 
other capacities within the Church which in kind and amount 
would alone give him a high place among our pioneer leaders. He 
served as editor of "Kirkelig Maanedstidende", 1868-74; and of 
"Ev. Luthersk Kirketidende", 1874-89 and 1902-12. In view of 
the pioneer conditions and the resultant constructive nature of 
church work in the settlements, coupled with the difficulties attend- 
ing the "Predestination Controversy", this was an important and 
unusually trying position in the Church. Dr. Larsen wielded a 
mighty influence for good in this work. He was always a mem- 
ber of a number of important church committees, and as chairman 
for years of the Foreign Mission Committee he rendered invalu- 
able service, in the interest of the Schreuder Mission especially. 
He was vice president of the Iowa District, 1876-79; vice presi- 
dent of the Norwegian Synod, 1876-93; and chairman of the Lu- 
theran Synodical Conference, 1881-83. After his resignation 
from the presidency of Luther College, in 1902, he continued as 
professor of Hebrew until 1911 when he was made President 
Emeritus. With all his duties as teacher. Dr. Larsen often 
preached — several times a month, sometimes — in Decorah and 
elsewhere; and in 1882-84 he served the Decorah Congregation 
as regular pastor. 

Dr. Larsen was many times honored. He was guest of honor 
at several Luther College banquets. On October 22, 1884, was 



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PRESIDENTS AND PRINCIPALS 67 

celebrated his twenty-fifth anniversary as teacher, and in 1909 a 
host of friends observed his fiftieth anniversary as teacher. The 
house which was his home the last eighteen years was a gift from 
his former students. In 1903 Concordia Seminary in St. Louis 
conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity; and in 1908 
he was made Knight of the First Order of St. Olav by King 
Haakon VII of Norway. 

Dr. Larsen was twice married. From the first marriage — in 
1855 with Karen Radine Neuberg, who died in 1871 — there were 
four children: Thora, wife of Dr. J. W. Magelssen, died 1908; 
Marie, died as missionary in South Africa 1899; Henrietta, wife 
of Rev. K. Xavier, died 1904; and Herman, L. C. '89, physician, 
died 1895. From the second marriage — with Ingeborg Astrup in 
1872 — there were eight children, all living: Hannah, editor 
"American-Scandinavian Review", New York City; Nikolai As- 
trup, L. C. '96, missionary to China; Karen, A. M., teacher, St. 
Olaf College; Ingeborg, position in Library, St. Olaf College, 
Northfield, Minn.; Lauritz, L. C. '02, D. D., S. T. D., LL. D., 
president National Lutheran Council, New York City; Signe, 
Mrs Clifford Elder, Atchison, Kansas; Jakob, L. C. '08, Rhodes 
Scholar, Oxford, 1911-14 (M. A. '20), asst. professor. State Uni- 
versity of Washington; and Henning, L. C. '08, Ph. D., Prince- 
ton, asst. professor. State University of Iowa. 

Dr. Larsen suffered a stroke on Christmas Eve, 1913. He 
rallied, but had a second stroke; and he died on March 1, 1915. 
He is buried in the Norwegian Lutheran Cemetery, Decorah, 
Iowa. 

Dr. Larsen's life is so bound up with the history of Luther 
College that it is quite impossible to write about him apart from 
that history. It has rightly been said that his biography is very 
largely the history of Luther College. 

Dr. Larsen was a pioneer educator within the Church, and 
his work was beset with many problems. He was fully equal to 
the task. God had given him a rugged physique, and otherwise 
entrusted to him gifts and qualities which admirably fitted him 
for this work. But one thing characterized him more than any 
other one thing: he possessed a remarkably childlike faith in God 
and His providence. In all things he was guided by this implicit 
faith. Truly Dr. Larsen was equipped to serve the Church as 
president of a Christian college; and it was his spiritual equip- 
ment that often brought him through difficulties when all purely 
human qualifications availed nothing. 

One of the first practical problems to confront Dr. Larsen as 



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68 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

president of Luther College was that of adapting the parsonage 
at Halfway Creek to the needs of sixteen students and two pro- 
fessors' families. In spite of very crowded quarters, Dr. Larsen 
managed somehow; and undoubtedly, those were very profitable 
and happy school days. 

But the need of more room was urgent. Even after the school 
had been moved to Decorah, in 1862, and occupied more com- 
modious quarters in what is now the St. Cloud Hotel, it soon out- 
grew its space again, for the number of students increased. To 
relieve the situation by providing a larger and permanent build- 
ing on the site secured for that purpose by Rev. V. Koren, pre- 
sented many difficulties. Nevertheless, Prof. Larsen and his as- 
sociates proceeded to carry out that plan. Messrs. Griese and 
Weile, Cleveland architects, submitted plans with an estimated 
cost of $28,000.00. It seems strange that the seven ministers and 
twenty-five congregations did not at once decide that the price 
was prohibitive. Not only were the church people of that time 
poor, but they had been accustomed to the State Church of Nor- 
way, which is supported by taxation; and they were contributing 
as best they could to their congregations out in the settlements. 
Ground was broken for a building in 1863. But difficulty followed 
upon difficulty, and the completion of the building was delayed 
over winter. At times it was impossible to get material, and there 
was a sharp advance in prices; transportation to the "Far West" 
was unreliable; the working men struck; and it was necessary to 
pay the architects more than the contract price. Prof. Larsen 
was a member of the building committee. All these trials were 
added to the numerous difficulties of his routine work. The cost 
far exceeded the estimate. At the dedication, in 1865, it had 
reached $75,000.00. Humanly speaking, it seemed impossible to 
meet the payments. Indeed, at the next synod meeting genuine 
fear was expressed that the Church would lose the building through 
default of payment. Prof. Larsen, however, never permitted 
even such serious difficulties to discourage him. He always acted 
on the implicit faith that he was a servant of God carrying out 
His purposes. In his reports to the Synod there was never a 
trace of complaint; however, he was firm and fearless in calling 
upon fellow pastors and the church people to support the school. 

Naturally the money stringency continued even after the close 
of the war. There was very little money among people, and many 
young men were prevented from starting at Luther College, much 
as they wanted to; and those who entered were often uncertain 
how long they could stay. For many years Dr. Larsen reported 



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PRESIDENTS AND PRINCIPALS 69 

to the SjHiod that many students had been forced to discontinue. 
Prof. Larsen pleaded the cause of needy students; and many 
ministers and others owe their education at Luther College direct- 
ly to Prof. Larsen for somehow providing funds for them even 
in those stringent times. 

Another serious problem with which Prof. Larsen had to cope 
— and one which is not felt in the same way now — was the matter 
of securing teachers. For many years Norwegian continued to 
be the medium of instruction^ and with no schools in this country 
preparing men for such teaching positions^ it was necessary to 
look to Norway for practically every professor. And even there 
they were not easily obtained. In 1883 Prof. Larsen went to Nor- 
way largely for the purpose of engaging teachers; after much dif- 
ficulty he secured two. Prof. Larsen reported at one time that 
two professors had resigned during the same school year. He 
evidently considered this a distressing problem; he insisted that 
the teachers make the school^ and he was not willing to engage 
anybody and everybody as teachers at Luther College. Concern- 
ing the language situation^ Prof. Larsen wrote in the college cat- 
alog even as early as 1886: "Of the two languages which we must 
use here^ the College, has always stressed English more and more ; 
and when the time comes that the development demands it, Lu- 
ther College will be glad to give the language of this our new 
country precedence over Norwegian." 

After a few years the time had come to build the south wing 
provided for in the original plan. Again there was the problem 
of money. But the wing was added in 1873-74, even before the 
necessary money had been subscribed; and it was paid for with 
no real difficulty. 

A gymnasium had been a long felt ^ant. The one considera- 
tion which deferred it was again the lack of money. After many 
years this need, too, was supplied, when the west room of the 
present gymnasium was built in 1887, largely with money con- 
tributed or secured by alumni and students. 

But real and perplexing as these problems were, they all seem 
small as compared with the catastrophe which befell Luther Col- 
lege in 1889. On May 19th of that year a fire of unknown origin 
completely gutted the main building. Undoubtedly this blow quite 
disheartened many good friends of the College. But despite the 
heavy financial loss and the discouragement, the men directly as- 
sociated with the school, and particularly Prof. Larsen, seemed 
never in doubt as to what they ought to do. Luther College had 
to be rebuilt and continued. This is perhaps the most severe 



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70 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

single test that the College has had to endure. Prospects for 
raising the necessary money were not very bri^t. Lather Sem- 
inary and the Lutheran Normal School in Sioux Falls, South Da- 
kota, had recently been built, and money for rebuilding Luther 
College would have to come from the same congregations. Then 
too, some considered that Luther College ought to be moved so 
as to be more centrally located — possibly to Minneapolis — for the 
weight of population among the congregations had shifted in that 
direction. But Prof. Larsen was staunch in his belief that a sub- 
scription should be started at once; and Luther College should 
be rebuilt in Decorah. While this plan had enough supporters 
to retain the College in Decorah, it was no doubt due very much 
to Prof. Larsen's efforts that Luther College was not moved. In 
the meantime the work had to be carried on under special dif- 
ficulties in temporary quarters here and there in the city. The 
very next year, however, — in 1890 — the new building was dedi- 
cated and made ready for occupancy. 

Because of the very definite educational aim of the College — 
primarily that of preparing young men for the study of theology 
— Prof. Larsen had no real problem so far as the curriculum was 
concerned. He knew what the curriculum must be to accomplish 
this aim. Accordingly few changes were necessary. Even when 
the original six-year pro- seminary course, which was modeled on 
the Latin course of Norway, was extended to seven years, in 1881, 
there was no change in fundamentals. Neither did the Normal 
Department, which was conducted from 1865 to 1886, in any 
sense affect the essential aim of the school. 

Gradually it was felt that Luther College was encountering 
(rom|)etition in the educational field. Not only were public high 
schools appearing, and colleges of various other denominations, 
but other schools were being built within the Norwegian Synod. 
Except for the Theological Seminary and the Lutheran Normal 
School in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, these were all academies 
for many years; and while they served as good "feeders" for Lu- 
ther College, a certain element of competition had to be reckoned 
with, especially in the matter of financial support. 

In one most important phase of the work at Luther CoUqpe, 
and one which presents a real problem. Prof. Larsen was emin- 
ently successful: he was directly and personally instrumental in 
guiding many young men to the Theological Seminary. It is true, 
in the early days a larger number of students came with minds 
fully made up for the ministry; also there were not so many vo- 
cations open to young men then; and the spirit of the day has 



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PRESIDENTS AND PRINCIPALS 71 

changed since that time. However^ through that very remarkably 
devout spirit of Christian service which Prof. Larsen manifested 
in every relation of life, he inspired many Luther College students 
to take up the study of theology. Many pastors, consciously or 
not, have entered the ministry very largely because of the blessed 
influence which Prof. Larsen exerted upon them at Luther Col- 
lege. His services to the Church in this respect alone cannot be 
overestimated. 

The controversy of the 80's involving the doctrine of predes- 
tination constituted a real problem for Luther College. Opinion 
was divided both among teachers and students, and open meetings 
for discussing the matter were held in the city. People's minds 
were evierywhere disturbed, and the controversy might very easily 
have disrupted the school. While there are many considerations, 
and much credit is due many men who worked for the welfare of 
the College, still it is plain that Prof. Larsen was very largely 
responsible for the favorable outcome at Luther College; his good, 
deliberate judgment coupled with absolute fairness prevented any 
serious disturbance at the school. 

No attempt can be made here to discuss all the problems — 
not even all the most perplexing ones — ^with which Prof. Larsen 
was confronted during his forty-one years as president. Some 
of the more outstanding ones have been recounted. It would be 
a mistake to suppose that it was only during times of particular 
stress that his presidency was fraught with problems and dif- 
ficulties. Even in the most favorable and hopeful moments his 
position was one of great responsibilities. Prof. Larsen's utter- 
ance in 1884 at the celebration of his twenty-fifth anniversary as 
teacher is very characteristic of him: 

"In my work here I have striven to accomplish especially three 
things. In the first place, I have desired that the spirit of Chris- 
tianity should permeate everything. The instruction, the dis- 
cipline, all our associations — in short, every part of our school life 
— should be marked by a true Christian spirit. However, I feel 
personally how difficult it is to be actuated by this spirit. It is 
no easy matter to live a true Christian life, in humility constantly 
confessing oneself a grievous sinner, and still through confidence 
and trust in God be enabled to find hope and joy in God's Word; 
and to have one's heart turned to Him in gratitude for everything, 
not only the good things, but also for that which may seem evil 
and trying. We long for the time when we shall put off this 
mortal body and be permitted to praise and serve God in our 
transfigured state. 



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72 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

"In the second place^ it has been my aim that the instruction 
here be thorough; that there be no show or humbug; that every- 
thing be pure gold — or^ to use a common expression^ that it be 'all 
wool^ and a yard wide'. This has been difficulty for I have not 
always had time for thorough preparation. 

"In the third place^ I have wanted such discipline here as 
would teach the students more and more self -discipline^ with each 
one personally responsible for his own conduct; and still one stu- 
dent restraining the other^ so that I might as far as possible be 
relieved of discipline." 

It must be remembered that Prof. Larsen was not president 
in the sense in which we now think of the position. His was not 
a day when many duties were delegated to a staff of workers. 
Besides his specific duties as president^ he taught about as many 
classes as the other teachers; also he served at one time as regis- 
trar, treasurer, disciplinarian, and general manager — both finan- 
cial and otherwise — and in addition found time for many other 
incidental duties. So it was a real problem just to attend to the 
bare routine of the daily work. It should also be stated that for 
years Prof. Larsen almost always conducted the devotional ex- 
ercises morning and evening; and with much other detail, too, 
he somehow found time to make a round of the students' rooms 
and rouse them out for breakfast. In all tasks, big and small, he 
was equally painstaking and accurate; until one must marvel how 
he found time for it all. That he could maintain such a rigid 
routine for years without flagging, is nothing short of astonishing. 
He was severely methodical; which may in part be due to the fact 
that his father was a military man. So very regular was he that 
students were heard to remark: "Now it is exactly half past five, 
for there is Prof. Larsen just starting for town with his shopping 
basket." But for all his insistence upon routine and punctuality, 
he was not a nervous worker; even to old age there was nothing 
about his movements to suggest nervousness or undue hurry; he 
was deliberate and scrupulously careful of detail. No matter 
how busy, he always took time for a nap of twenty minutes to 
half an hour at noon. Until his last illness he was seldom even 
ailing; his moderation in all things and his regularity in mode of 
living, preserved for him his naturally rugged good health which 
only old age, and not hard work, could break down. 

It has been said — and by Dr. Larsen himself — that he was 
not a genius, but a man of only ordinary abilities. Even if this 
be true, he was nevertheless a very remarkable man. He possessed 
such sterling qualities of character — ^unfeigned Christian faith and 



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PRESIDENTS AND PRINCIPALS 73 

fullness of .spiritual life with absolute integrity, simple humilityj 
and a sense of Christian service — that he was a very unusual man. 
His one concern was to do his duty as a servant of God ; and he did 
not seek worldly renown. He permitted no interests to disturb 
him in his duties as pastor and teacher; he gave very little time 
and effort to interests which do not bear somewhat directly upon 
theology and education. He was in the world, but not of the 
world; and still he constantly emphasized the Lutheran doctrine 
of a Christian's duty of strict obedience to law and government. 
He was not a man of social affairs; and not a "good mixer' in the 
sense in which the term is currently used. However, he was a 
welcome guest at all gatherings; and his mere presence command- 
ed respect and precluded everything questionable in word and act. 
Among his friends and as a host he was interesting and entertain- 
ing, his manner always bespeaking culture and refinement. He 
'was unassuming, yet firm and fearless in his convictions; he ab- 
horred sham and hypocrisy, and was so thoroughly genuine and 
frank in conduct and speech that he was sometimes considered 
naive. He has been called "A Christian Gentleman"; and, pos- 
sibly, no other short description can do him more justice. He 
was a man of God; a humble servant of Jesus Christ, who, asking 
nothing for himself — except forgiveness for his sins and salvation 
through His merit — unselfishly consecrated his life to untiring 
Christian service in the interest of the Lutheran Church and Lu^ 
ther College. He exemplified in all his service the thought ex- 
pressed in the motto of Luther College, "Soli Deo Gloria" — To 
God alone all Glory. 

Prof. C. K. Preus 

Christian Keyser Preus was born on October 13, 1852, in the 
Spring Prairie parsonage, twenty miles north of Madison, Wis. 
His father was the Right Reverend H, A. Preus, who was pres- 
ident of the Norwegian Synod from 1862 until his death, in 1894. 
His mother was Caroline Dorthea Margrethe Keyser. Christian 
received his early education from private tutors, and entered Lu- 
ther College in 1865; but he left during the year because of sick- 
ness, and did not return till 1868. He graduated in 1873 (B. A.). 
During the years 1873-76 he studied theology at Concordia Sem- 
inary in St. Louis. He was ordained at Washington Prairie the 
year of his graduation, 1876; temporarily he served Our Savior's 
Congregation in Chicago before becoming his father's assistant 
in the Spring Prairie charge. He was pastor at Spring Prairie 
until he was forced to resign in 1897 because of ill health. He 



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74 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

moved to Decorah^ and in 1898 became professor at Luther Col- 
lege. He was elected president in 1902 and continued in the posi- 
tion until his deaths in 1921. Prof. Preus twice declined the vice- 
presidency of the Synods in 1893 and 1896; he accepted in 1911, 
when he was elected a third time, and served until the union of the 
three church bodies in 1917. At that time he was elected vice 
president of the Iowa District, a position which he held at the 
time of his death. In 1911 the Synod elected him as its rep- 
resentative at the University of Christiania during the centennial 
festivities in September of that year; King Haakon VII decorated 
him Commander of the Order of St. Olav. Prof. Preus accompanied 
the Luther College Concert Band on the 1914 Norway Tour, and 
upon request delivered three lectures at the University of Chris- 
tiania. In 1877 he married Louise Augusta Hjort, oldest daughter 
of Rev. Ove Jacob Hjort, then minister at Painted Creek, Allam- 
akee County, Iowa. There have been eleven children, of whom 
seven are now living: Ove Jacob Hjort (L. C. '01), pastor in Dc 
Forest, Wis.; Johan Carl Keyser (L. C. '02), pastor in Byron, 
Minn.; Jacob Aall Ottesen (L. C. '03), governor of Minnesota; 
Paul Arctander (L. C. '11), treasurer Federal Land Bank, St. 
Paul, Minn.; Herman Amberg (L. C. '16), attorney in St. Paul, 
Minn.; Henriette, nurse at Northwestern Hospital, Minne- 
apolis, Minn.; and Cathinka Hjort, Mrs. Knute D. Stalland (L. 
C. '18), St. Paul, Minn. All sons and the one son-in-law are 
graduates of Luther College. The deceased children, with year of 
birth, are: Herman A., 1878; Linka, 1885; Christiane, 1887; and 
Christiane, 1899. Prof. Preus died in his home in Decorah on May 
28, 1921 ; he had been attending to his duties even to the last day, 
although he had not been well for some time. Death was due to 
heart disease. He was buried on June 1st in the Norwegian Lu- 
theran Cemetery in Decorah. 

Prof. Preus appreciated fully the responsibilities attaching to 
the position when he accepted the presidency of Luther College. 
He was frank to state that he had serious misgivings. In his first 
report to the Synod he wrote: "It was with considerable misgiv- 
ing that I entered upon my duties as president of Luther College 
a year ago. I appreciated fully both the responsibilities and 
many difficulties of the position, and no one realized better than 
I how few were my qualifications for the work. However, I had 
not sought the position and promised that with the help of God 
I would attempt it." However, understanding Luther College 
and its problems, he knew that his first task — and clearly his most 
vital one — was to see to it that the school be continued as Dr. 



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PRESIDENTS AND PRINCIPALS 75 




CHRISTIAN KEYSER PREUS 



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76 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

Larsen had conducted it^ a classical college with the primary aim 
of preparing young men for a theological course. It was clear 
from the outset that this would be a settled policy in his admin- 
istration. In 1904 he outlined his plans in a pamphlet entitled: 
"In What Direction and Toward What Goal Should Luther Col- 
lege be Developed in order to best Serve the Synod?" 

But there were many difficulties. Not a few — even Luther 
College alumni^ some of them — had become increasingly insistent 
that changes be made in the curriculum. It was argued that the 
classical course failed to meet the educational needs of the day. 
While Prof. Preus reckoned with this demand from the outside, 
he would not be swerved from essentials. When the Preparatory 
Department was lengthened to four years^ in 1905^ and the Board 
of Education in 1918 approved the plan of the present organiza- 
tion of the department into a Junior and Senior High School ; 
when a literary course was added in 1906; and when, in 1911, a 
modified curriculum involving a limited elective system went into 
effect, a course of study which had been proposed by the faculty 
after a thorough study of the matter in 1910-11, there was no 
innovation in these changes which in any real sense violated fun- 
damentals in the original aim of the school. The new courses 
provided mainly for electives: biology, chemistry (re-instated), 
economics, education, American history, music (harmony), phil- 
osophy, physics, psychology, public speaking, sociology, — and as 
a legacy from the S. A. T. C, surveying. 

Right from the start Prof. Preus began to devote himself to 
the interests of Luther College out in the field. With the passing 
of the first pioneer conditions and the large increase in the num- 
ber of congregations, the work of conducting the affairs of the 
College had shifted very considerably from the College at home 
out to its interests in the field. It was necessary to groom the 
college territory. In the early days there were few ministers and 
congregations, and it required no great amount of urging in ad- 
vertising and publicity to gain their whole-hearted support. 
Church organization then was a simple thing, and our church peo^ 
pie did not dissipate their interests^ in many activities. And for 
years Luther College was the one school to support. But the 
church body became larger; there were other schools and new 
interests; every little town almost was building its own high 
school, and many denominations had established church schools. 
Many of the church people now lived at a distance. Then, too, 
that worldly spirit so characteristic of our times is a considerable 
factor here. All such conditions combined to make it increasingly 



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PRESIDENTS AND PRINCIPALS 77 

difficult to attract any large number of students. While he did 
not aim at mere numbers, Prof. Preus set about to work for an 
increase in enrollment The problem involved many considera- 
tions, but in the main it was a matter of working more out in the 
school field. 

Prof. Preus was eminently fitted for such work. He had had 
varied experience involving contact with people, and he was intim- 
ately acquainted with conditions in the Church; and with his un- 
usual ability as a speaker he combined many admirable qualities 
of personality and temperament. People believed in him. Easily 
one of the most effective speakers in our Church, he was much in 
demand, and he spent much time out in the field. His personal 
work was supplemented in various ways; a systematic advertis- 
ing campaign was launched, always of a distinctly conservative 
and dignified kind, and in entire keeping with the religious char- 
acter of the school. Church papers and the public press were 
used; pamphlets were written and distributed; also the "Luther 
College Semi-Centennial" of 1911; "The Pioneer" of 1920; "Nor- 
gesferden" in 1914; and the "Luther College Bulletin", a quar- 
terly, the first issue of which appeared in January, 1921. And 
student organizations went out among the people; chief among 
these the Luther College Concert Band and, in 1920, the Luther 
College Four. 

One of Prof. Preus' distinct contributions to Luther College 
is what he gave the school in buildings. He formulated a definite 
and extensive building program. He realized that conditions re- 
quired a school plant; one building or two could no longer be 
considered adequate. He was commissioned by the Church to go 
out and raise money for a dormitory; and during the school year 
1906-07 Laur. Larsen Hall was built at a cost of $60,000.00. It 
was dedicated October 13, 1907. Previously some construction 
involving less money had been done; the arch at the entrance to 
the campus was erected in 1903 upon the occasion of the fiftieth 
anniversary of the S^nod; also the gymnasium was enlarged to 
three times its size for this celebration. In 1911 the Luther statue 
was unveiled during the Luther College Fiftieth Anniversary fes- 
tivities; the ministers' wives had collected $2,547.00 for its erec- 
tion. The Endowment Fund aggregating over $250,000.00 — $50, 
000.00 of which was a gift from James J. Hill — collected by Dr. 
H. G. Stub, assisted by Prof. Preus and others — ^was presented to 
the College .at these festivities. In 1909 Mr. Jens Jensen, land- 
scape architect of Chicago, was engaged at the instance of the 
Chicago Luther College Club to submit plans embodying the 



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78 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

most approved arrangement of a college campus. Upon his rec- 
ommendations the grounds were very materially changed^ the 
greatest departure being the removal of the avenue of large trees 
leading up to the main building, to make room for a large open 
central court. On October 14, 1911, the Alumni Association 
voted to buy and present the eight- acre wooded tract lying north 
of High Street and east of the original campus; and in 1919 an- 
other tract, the size of a city block, lying south of High Street 
and east of the campus, was also added. Upon the initiative of 
the students a dining hall. Loyalty Hall, was built in 1916 at the 
cost of $18,000.00. This necessitated the moving of the hospital 
— a gift of Mr. J. A. Johnson of Madison, Wisconsin — and it was 
enlarged and furnished with all modem equipment; also a reg- 
istered nurse was placed in charge. 

Prof. Preus' efforts for buildings culminated in his very finest 
contribution, the Koren Library, which was dedicated on the 14th 
of October, 1921. It seems sad that he was not permitted to live 
to see this splendid building completed. He traveled extensively 
and personaUy solicited almost all the money. Definite work for 
a library was done as early as 1908, when squads of students made 
concrete blocks; however, there were considerations which deferred 
the building many years. 

Prof. Preus built along other lines, too. During his regime 
the chemical laboratory expanded to more than college require- 
ments; and the physics and biology laboratories were also de- 
veloped. Through the efforts of Hon. L. 8. Swenson and Mr. H. 
G. Haugan the valuable Bishop Bang Library was secured in 
1913. Dr. Koren's first parsonage of 1853, the so-called Egge 
Log House, was placed upon the campus. The class of 1921 prer 
sented a flag pole. There was a substantial increase in legacies, 
the largest one, of '$10,000.00, created by Capt. Rossing in 1910. 
The library was increased from 11,000 volumes to 28,000, ex- 
clusive of 8,000 pamphlets. 

Prof Preus* building program provided for a gymnasium very 
soon, with other buildings to follow — a music hall, chapel, and 
possibly a science hall. 

But with all his work out in the field, Prof. Preus was still 
able to attend to all the needs of the school at home. He con- 
sidered it his first concern to build up a strong faculty; often he 
was heard to remark, "First of all, teachers". With more stu- 
dents — 214 in 1911-12 — and more courses, it was necessary to 
add teachers; during his administration the faculty was increased 
from 11 to 21 members. He favored the "Sabbatical year". 



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PRESIDENTS AND PRINCIPALS 79 

Many teachers availed themselves of this^ which has added to 
the prestige of the faculty. And there was need of more organi- 
sation. Prof. Preus delegated many duties which had before 
properly belonged to the president. The principalship of the 
Preparatory Department became a more responsible position; in 
1914 a registrar's office was created; and a librarian was engaged 
to give full time to his special work with no hours of instruction. 
There was a regularly employed college stenographer; also a 
physical director to give full time to his department. Such or- 
ganization required added equipment. What was thus accom- 
plished was important in enabling Luther College to qualify as 
a member of the North Central Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools. 

Prof. Preus' work was attended by many problems not of 
routine kind^ some of which were particularly distressing. One 
such problem arose in connection with the movement for church 
union. Luther College was directly concerned; as the oldest and 
only college conducted by the church body^ it was more intimately 
bound up with the Synod than possibly any other institution with- 
in the Church. For very good reasons it was feared that the 
status of the College might be affected. Much credit is due Prof. 
Preus for being so staunch in stressing the importance of main- 
taining Luther College as a distinctively classical college with its 
first purpose that of preparing young men to take up the study 
of theology. 

Another such problem was that occasioned by the World War. 
It is plain that this situation presented difficulties which were 
peculiar to Luther College^ a classical college for men only. 
Changes nothing short of revolutionary had to be effected to enlist 
the school in military service. But with good reorganization work 
wisely directed by Prof. Preus, supported by the willing cooper- 
ation of the faculty, Luther College qualified as an S. A. T. C. 
and few schools came through the war with a more creditable ser- 
vice record. 

Then, too, the reconstruction period had problems for Luther 
College which really did not obtain at schools that are not of the 
classical type. During the war the traditional course of study 
had been greatly modified. But Luther College was glad to ren- 
der service in response to her country's call; and at present the 
work is well back to that even routine of good application to 
class subjects which has always characterized Luther College. 

Prof. Preus was a man of splendid abilities. With a keen 
intellect were coupled good capacity for work and many admir- 



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80 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

able traits of character. Of even temperament, always pleasant 
and sympathetic, he, too, like his predecessor. Dr. Larsen, was 
thoroughly imbued with the spirit of Christian service. He was 
seriously earnest in his work, but had a delightful sense of humor; 
always manly, he never became old, but retained a surprisingly 
youthful attitude of mind. He had hobbies and interests; but he 
never permitted these to intrude in the least upon his work. And 
he was a prodigious worker, although not so methodical as Dr. 
Larsen. He came of a long line of ministerial and professional 
stock, and so had an air of unaffected dignity and culture about 
him; retiring and quiet — ^his intimate friends reproached him for 
being over-modest — his appearance suggested the aristocrat, and 
still he was a man among men, unassuming and very human. A 
man of culture and refinement, of fine sensibilities and scholarly 
instincts, an able and thorough theologian, he was nevertheless 
of a decidedly practical turn of mind, a leader and a man of af- 
fairs, a fine type of citizen. He understood people intimately; 
and his large fund of miscellaneous information enabled him to 
talk intelligently with people of all stations and occupations; an 
exceptionally effective speaker — both in English and in Norwegian 
— he gained the general esteem and confidence of our church people 
everywhere. He was an unusually able sermonizer and preacher; 
and as president of Luther College he will always be remembered 
for his remarkable chapel talks, which were model sermons in 
form, content, and language. 

While we value a man for what he is, it is only by viewing 
him in relation to his work, and not apart from it, that it is pos- 
sible to determine somewhat his true worth. And measured in 
terms of his work, in kind and amount of service he rendered Lu- 
ther College and the Church, it is certain that Prof. C. K. Preus 
must be accorded a high place among the leaders of our Norwe- 
gian Lutheran Church in America. 

Dr. Oscar L. Olson ^ 

Oscar Ludvig Olson was born February ^, 1872, in Chicago. 
Illinois. His father was Andrew Olson, and his mother Guroe 
(nee Larson). He entered the Preparatory Department of Lu- 
ther College in 1886 and graduated in 1889; he continued in the 
College Department, and received the degree of A. B. in 1893. 
He taught at Bode Academy, Bode, la., 1893-95; at Bruflat 
Academy, Portland, N. Dak., 1896-98; at Luther Academy, Al- 
bert Lea, Minn., 1898-01; and in 1901 he became a member of 
the faculty at Luther CoUege, and has served as professor ever 



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PRESIDENTS AND PRINCIPALS 



81 




OSCAR LUDVIG OLSON 



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«2 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

since except for intervals when he has heen away for study. He 
attended the University of Minnesota^ 1895-96^ and was granted 
his master's degree. The summers of 1904 and 1907-11 he stud- 
ied at the University of Chicago; and after spending the school 
year 1913-14 there, he received the degree of Ph. D. He is the 
author of "The Scandinavian Origin of Beowulf" (thesis for M. 
A.), 1903; "Beowulf Kvadet" in "Symra", May, 1912; "Beo- 
wulf and the Feast at Bricriu" in "Modern Philology", January, 
19U; "The Relation of Luther to Education" in "Teologisk Tids- 
skrift", Octoher, 1917; "The Relation of the Rolfsaga Kraka and 
the Bjarkarimur to Beowulf" (thesis for Ph. D.), 1916; and he 
has delivered many lectures on various subjects. He was secre- 
tary of the Luther College faculty, 1916-21, and secretary of 
the Board of Trustees of Luther College, 1917-21. Prof. Olson 
married Miss Clara Elizabeth Gullixson in 1897. They have two 
sons: Walter Andrew, born 1902, and Paul Frederick, born 1906; 
both are students at Luther College, classes of '24 and '26, respec- 
tively. Dr. Olson was appointed acting president of Luther Col- 
lege in 1921. 

When upon the death of Prof. C. K. Preus on May 28, 1921, 
the Board of Education within our Church appointed Dr. Olson 
to serve Luther College as acting president, it did so because Dr. 
Olson was clearly the one man who was rather fully acquainted 
with the work and otherwise ready to step right into the position 
until a permanent president could be elected at the next general 
meeting of the church body. Dr. Olson has spent more than half 
of his years at Luther College, and whenever Prof. Preus was 
traveling about in the interests of the College, Dr. Olson really 
served as acting president. But Dr. Olson, too, has served Lu- 
ther College out in the field; because of his ability as a public 
speaker he has become well and favorably known among the sup- 
porters of Luther College everywhere. » 

Principals 

When the original "Latin course" of six years was extended 
to one of seven years, in 1881, and the number of classes, students, 
and teachers increased, it became apparent that it was desirable 
to have two somewhat distinct departments. Accordingly the 
Preparatory Department was formed in 1889, at first comprising 
three years. Prof. H. W. Sheel became the first principal, and 
when he took charge, in 1890, it fell to him to organize the new 
department. 



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PRESIDENTS AND PRINCIPALS 83 



Prof. H. W. Sheel 

Herman W. Sheel was born in St. Louis, Mo., on January 18. 
1860. His father was John F. Scheel and his mother Margaret £. 
(nee Jende). After completing the parochial school in St. Louis, 
he entered Luther College in 1874, and remained one year. Dur- 
ing the school years 1882-8*5 he attended Valparaiso University 
in Indiana and received the degree of B. S. From 1885 to 1889 
he was teacher at the Lutheran Seminary and Institute in Will- 
mar^ Minn., where he taught mathematics and sciences. Since 
1889 he has been a member of the faculty at Luther College. 
When the Preparatory Department became a separate entity. 
Prof. Sheel was made principal; and he served 1890-91; and 
again a second time, 1896-1911. During his administration — in 
1906 — the course was lengthened to four years. In 1907 the 
department took possession of new and commodious quarters in 
Laur. Larsen Hall. Here, too, Prof. Sheel was given space for 
his chemical laboratory, which he has since built up to more than 
standard coUege requirements and made it a part of the school 
plant of which the College can justly be proud. He has been 
professor at Luther College since 1911, except for one year, which 
he spent in Washington and California. He was married to Miss 
Lydia E. Jende in 1895. There are four children: Ruth; Karl. 
L. C. *24; Otto; Sigurd, L. C. '30. 

Prof. Gisle Bothne 

Prof. Gisle Bothne was the second principal. He served dur- 
ing the interval between Prof. Sheel's first and second terms — ^in 
1891-96. 

Gisle Bothne was born on September 7, 1860, in Fredrikshald. 
Norway. Here he attended the Latin school for nine years, until" 
the spring of 1876, when his mother, Johanne (nee Okland) left 
Norway with the family to join his father, Thrond J. Bothne. 
who had gone to America the previous year to become professor 
at Luther College (Thrond Bothne was professor 1875-82). Gisle 
graduated from Luther College in 1878 (B. A.); from North- 
western University, Watertown, Wisconsin, in 1879; and then 
studied classical philology at Johns Hopkins University until 
1880. He became professor at Luther College January, 1881, 
and remained until 1907 (M. A., 1883); in 1883-84 he again at- 
tended Johns Hopkins University; during 1903-04 he studied in 
Greece and at the universities of Berlin and Christiania. He was 
principal of the Preparatory Department 1891-96. In 1907 he ac- 



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84 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

cepted a call from the University of Minnesota as head of the 
Department of Scandinavian Languages and Literature^ a posi- 
tion which he still holds. He has heen president of the Norwe- 
gian Society of America; also is a member of the Norwegian-Dan- 
ish Press Ass*n of America. In 1911 he was decorated by King 
Haakon of Norway and made a Knight of the Order of St. Olav. 
On June 27^ 1895^ he was married to Miss Kathrine Elise Brandt. 
They have two daughters: Dikka (B. A., University of Minne- 
sota) is at the University of Christiania^ Norway^ on a scholar- 
ship from the American-Scandinavian Foundation; Agnes is a 
student at the University of Minnesota. 

Prop. O. A. Tinge lst ad 

When Prof. Sheel resigned in 1911 because of ill health, he 
had served as principal faithfully and well for fourteen years. 
Prof. O. A. Tingelstad became acting principal for the school 
year 1911-12; and a second time 1917-19. Norman A. Madson 
(L. C. '11, B. A.) was his assistant in 1911-12; Merriam H. 
Trytten (L. C. '16, B. A.), in 1917-18, till April 1; Ged. Ulvilden 
(L. C. '16, B. A.), April-June, 1918; and H. Fred Swansen (L. 
C. '14, B. A.) in 1918-19. The present organization of the Pre- 
paratory Department into a Junior and Senior high school was ef- 
fected during his principalship. 

Oscar Adolf Tingelstad was born near Hickson, Cass County, 
N. Dak., on September 20, 1882. His parents are Bent Tingel- 
stad and Beret A. (nee Livdalen). The family moved to Silver- 
ton, Oregon, and he attended Pacific Lutheran Academy, Park- 
land, Wash., in 1900, and 1901-02; high school in Silverton, Ore,, 
1900-01. He entered Luther College in 1902, and graduated in 

1906 (B. A.), and from Luther Seminary, St. Paul, Minn., in 

1907 (cand. theology). He accepted a call to Ballard, Seattle, 
Wash., and was pastor, 1907-09, of Zion Lutheran Church at 
Ballard, and Port Madison, Orillia, and Millers Bay Congrega- 
tions. In 1909 he received a call from Luther College to the 
chair of psychology and education; before entering upon his duties 
as professor he spent the autumn of 1909 at the University of 
Chicago. In the summer of 1910 he again attended the Univer- 
sity of Chicago, also in 1912-13, when he received his M. A. When 
the registrar's office was created in 1914 he was appointed to that 
position, and has served as registrar since. In 1911-12 and 1917- 
19 he was acting principal of the Preparatory Department. The 
second semester of the school year 1921-22 he was granted leave 
of absence to continue his studies at the University of Chicago. 



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PRESIDENTS AND PRINCIPALS 85 

He served as secretary of the Young Peoples' Luther League of 
the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America^ 1917-1922. In 1909 
he married Miss Alfield Sophie Tvete. 

Prof. H. S. Hilleboe 

In 1912 Prof. H. S. Hilleboe^ then superintendent of public 
schools in Benson^ Minn., was called as principal after Prof. 
Tingelstad had served as acting principal for one year. Prof. 
Hilleboe, an alumnus of Luther College (B. A., 1881, and M. A., 
1886), had had years of varied school experience both in a church 
academy and in the public high schools, and had taken graduate 
work in education and school administration at several universities. 
His experience in the public schools nicely supplemented his 
knowledge of the work and traditions of the Preparatory Depart- 
ment; and he introduced several changes in external organization, 
involving details of daily routine, discipline, and grading. 

Hans Sjurson Hilleboe was born on October 28, 1858, at 
Roche-a-Cree, Adams County, Wis., son of Sjur Hanson Hilleboe 
and Gjertrud R^mohr (nee Haug). He attended Luther Col- 
lege 1878-81 (B. A.). The two years following he spent at the 
Northern Indiana Normal School, Valparaiso, Indiana; 1895-96 at 
Chicago Lutheran Theological Seminary; and 1897-98 at Luther 
Seminary, Robbinsdale, Minn. He received his M. A. from Lu- 
ther College in 1886. He has been a student at Minnesota, Har- 
vard, and Chicago universities. He was an instructor at Willmar 
Seminary, Willmar, Minn., 1884-87; and during 1887-99 he serv- 
ed as principal of the school, with the exception of the years 
1895-96 and 1897-98, when he was away for study. He was prin- 
cipal of Willmar Seminary a second time, 1904-07; during the 
intervening years, 1899-04, he was superintendent of public 
schools in Benson, Minn., and again in 1907-12. In 1912 he was 
called to the principalship of the Preparatory Department at Lu- 
ther College and continued in the position until the summer of 
1917, when he became president of Lutheran Normal School. 
Sioux Falls, S. Dak., and when the school became known as Au- 
gustana College after the consolidation with Augustana College 
of Canton, S. Dak., in 1918, he was retained as president, and 
served until 1920. Since that time he has been professor at the 
school. In 1887 he married Antonilla Ytterboe, who died in 1912. 
In 1916 he married Ellen G. Syse. Four children survive from 
the first marriage: Gertrude, dean of women at St. Olaf College; 
Marie, wife of Rev. S, M. Moe ; Genevieve ; and Sigur. 



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86 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

Prof. H. Fred Swansen 

H. Fred Swansen (Luther College *14j, B. A.), who had been a 
teacher at Lather Academy^ Albert Lea^ Minn.^ since his gradua- 
tion^ came to Luther College in 1918 to be instructor in English. 
He served as assistant principal in 191 8- 19^ and as principal in 
1919-20. Prof. Swansen was very much interested in literary 
society work^ especially debating. His efforts in the interest of 
forensics in the Preparatory Department and the good results he 
attained in this work are deserving of special mention. 

Hans Fred Swansen was born in Boston^ Mass.^ on November 
14^ 1889^ of Thomas Swansen and Hanne (nee Hendricksen). He 
attended Boston English High School four years; held a clerical 
position in Boston; entered Luther College in January^ 191 1^ and 
graduated in 1914 (B. A.). He taught English and physics at 
Luther Academy^ Albert Lea^ Minn.^ 1914-18. He spent the sum- 
mer of 1917 at Harvard doing graduate work in English. In 
1920 he accepted the presidency of Gale College, Galesville, Wis., 
and is now in that position. In 1919 he was married to Miss 
Beatrice Irene Teslow. 

Prof. Leonard A. Moe 

The present principal, Leonard A. Moe (Luther College '12, 
B. A.), succeeded Prof. Swansen in 1920. He had been engaged 
in school work every year since his graduation, and, with much 
other experience in administrative duties during the war, he came 
well equipped for the position. He continued the good work in 
debating, for which his predecessor. Prof. Swansen, had created 
so much interest. And he elaborated upon this work; in the early 
fall of the school year 1921-22, he conceived the plan of holding 
a conference of our church academies at Luther College involv- 
ing debating, declamation, and basket ball. The proposal met 
with favor everywhere, and when it was definitely launched. Prof. 
Moe was selected as the logical man to serve as chairman of the 
committee on arrangements. He was given additional duties in 
this capacity when the Lutheran Students' Union decided to hold 
its convention in conjunction with this conference, March 7-10, 
1922. That the event was such an unqualified success was in very 
large measure due to Prof. Moe's good energy and fine abilities 
as an administrator; he was the moving spirit in the undertaking. 

Leonard Alton Moe was born January 27, 1892, in Elroy, 
Wis. His father was Lars L. Moe, a merchant; and his mother 
Martha C, Hansen, daughter of Andrew Hansen in Manitowoc, 
Wis., wagon manufacturer. Leonard received his grade and first 



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PRESIDENTS AND PRINCIPALS 87 

year high school education in the public schools of Elroy. In 
June^ 1906^ the family moved to Decorah, and he entered the 
Preparatory Department of Luther College the same year^ and 
graduated in 1908. He continued in the College Department and 
finished in 1912 (B. A.). He has taught since his graduation: 
at Gale College^ Gales ville^ Wis.^ 1912-16; principal consolidated 
school^ Manvel^ N. Dak.^ 1916-17; supt. city schools, Hillsboro^ 
N. D., 1917-18; supt. city schools, Park River, N. D., 1918-20; 
principal Luther College Preparatory Department, 1920-22. Dur- 
ing the summer of 1915 he was musician with the International 
Chautauquas; and platform superintendent with the Midland 
Chautauquas in the summer of 1921. He served as sec'y N. Dak., 
State Parents and Teachers' Ass'n in 1918-19; sec'y Luther Col- 
lege Alumni Ass'n, 1921-22; president Decorah Luther College 
Club, 1922; director of the Iowa District Young People's Luther 
League, 1921; and chairman of committee on arrangements for 
the Luther College Academy Conference, 1921-22. He was married 
on August 25, 1915, to Miss Carolyn M. Jacobson, daughter of 
Prof. Axel Jacobson, supt. of Bethany Indian Mission, Wittenberg, 
Wis. They have one son, Lowell, born August 18, 1916. 

One other man deserves very special mention in connection 
with the Preparatory Department, namely, Rev. M. K. Bleken, 
the disciplinarian and "husfader" of the department from 1907 
to 1910. 




ENTRANCE TO COLLEGE CAMPUS 



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CHAPTER FIVE 

FACULTY 

O. A. TiNOELSTAD 




LUTHER COLLEGE FACULTY, 1860 

Standing: F. A. Schmidt, N. O Brandt 

Sitting: G. Landmark, L. Siewers, K. E. Bergh, Laur. Larsen 



I. Roster 
The following tabulation presents the names of the persons 
who have been connected with Luther College in some instructorial 
capacity^ and indicates the general nature of the connection and 
the years of service in each case. 



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FACULTY 



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LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



3. Special Instructors and Assistants not Listed in the 
Preceding Table: 



a) SPEaAL INSTRUCTORS: 
Adams, Mr«. Walter C, 1908-09, Voice 
Boice, Vera L., 1908-09, Violin 
Brown, Mrs. F. Q., 1919-80, Violin 
Qausen, Rev. F. C, 186S-64, (?) 
Cbup, W. B., 1904, Band 
Downfe, Mrs. Ruth, 1915-17, 1921-22, 

Violin 
Himie, A. L., 1878, Band 
Hustvedt, Katherine S., 1918-20, 

Piano 
Lee, J. L., 1878, Military Drill 
Marsh, Mrs. Jessie Ervin, 1911-18, Piano 
Moe, Mrs. Leonard A , 1920-22, Voice, 

Piano 
Thomas, Dr. H. H., 1918, S. A. T. C, 

Physician 
Werthwein, Pearl, 1909-10, Voice 
Works, Frances, 1920-21, Public Speak- 
ing 

b) STUDENT ASSISTANTS (list 
incomplete) : 

Anderson, Ingvald, 1895-96, Arithmetic 

(Now I. A. Kampen) 
Beito, Gulbrand G., 1888-89, Ancient 

Languaires 
Brorby, Joseph, 1901, (?) 
Buttedal, Anton, 1911-12, Norwegian 

(now Anton Buedall) 
Dreng, John O., 1897-1900, Gymnastics 
Drotning, T. Melvln, 1904-05, Band 
Faye, Christopher U., 1909, Latin 
Glas0e. Oluf, 1879-81, Band 
Hagen, Sivert N., 1893-95, Matliematics 
Hanson, Nils B., 1897-98, Gymnastics, 

1898-99, Penmanship 
Haugen, Thomas* A., 1908-09, German 
Hendrickson, Alfred, 1905-06. Latin 
Holte, Alfred O., 1908, Latin 

(now Alfred O. Halvorson) 
Hovde, Christian J. M., 1891-92, .Arith- 
metic 
Iverson, Peter J., 1908-10, Arithmetic, 

Algebra, Civics 
Johnson, Alfred O., 1890-91, Band 



Johnsrud, Peder L., 1009-10, English 

Grammar 
Jorgenson, Jacob E., 1886. Norwegian 
KJer, Ludvig P., 1912-18, Norwegian 
Krohn, Eugene, 188S-85, Band 
Larsen, Jakob A. O., 1908, (?) 
Larsen, Lauritx A., 1885-86, Band 
Larson, Oscar O., 1899-1900, Gymnastics 
Linnevold, Johan, 1886-90, Band 
Mevig, Andreas I. M., 1908-09, Latin 
Normann, Halv'or M., 1898-99, Algebra, 

1899-1900, Penmanship 
Normann, S. Theodore, 1895-97, Gym- 
nastics 
Omlie, Oscar K., 1891-94. Algebra. 189S- 

94, Band 
Orwoll, Sylvester M., 189S-95, Gymnas- 
tics 
Petersen, Ralph W., 1911-12, Chemistry 
Peterson, Joseph M , 1894-98, Penman- 
ship 
Reque, Herman A., 1892-94. Penman- 
ship 
Rosenqvist, Bernhard, 1909. (?) 
S'lervold, Ola J., 1894-95, Latin 
Sanden, Austin N., 191S-14, Penman- 
ship 
Skinnemoen, John S., 1900-01, Penman- 
ship 
Str0m, Oscar A., 1895-97, Algebra 
Teisberg, Thomas, 1907, (?) 
Thorgrlmsen, Hans B., 1878-79, Band 
Thorson, I. August, 189S-95, Band, etc. 
Tjemagel, Helge M.. 1801-98, Band 
Torgerson, Jacob A. C, 1898-99, Norwe- 
gian 
Turmo, Olaf, 1896-98, Algebra 
Twito, Helmer, 1915-16, Penmanship, 

Orthography 
Umess, John N., 1912-18, Geometry. 

English Grammar 
Vaaler, Amt J., 1906-07, (?) 
Waller, Martinius C, 1891-92. English 
White, Andreas O., 1899-00, Latin 
Xavler, Johan U., 1891-98. Drawing 



II. Personal Data 

The next table summarizes the following personal data con- 
cerning the teachers at Luther College: date and place of birth; 
names of parents and spouse^ with year of marriage; present ad- 
dress^ or^ in the case of persons deceased^ the date of death. 
These data have^ in many cases^ been gathered by Dr. O. M. 
Norlie. 



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FACULTY OF LUTHER COLLEGE IN 187S 

Standing: N. O. Brandt C. Narvesen 
J. D. Jacotaen, L. Siewers, A. Seippel, Laur. Larsen 



III. Professional Data 

In the following presentation of the professional record of 
each teacher at Luther College the aim is to indicate in chrono- 
logical order the degrees and training obtained and the important 
positions held by each individual^ in such a way as to show forth 
clearly the qualifications of each teacher for his work at Luther 
College^ likewise his later success. One point of terminology 
should be especially noted: at Luther College an instructor is 
designated (usually) as Teacher when his appointment is tempor- 
ary, or from year to year, but as Professor when his appointment 
has been made permanent. 



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100 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



1. Professional Data — Regular Members of the Faculty 

f Peter Laurevtius Larsen (Laur. Larsen), 
1861-1911 (1915). First President. A. B., 
Christiansand Cathedral School, 1850; Cand. 
Theol., University of Christiania, 1855; Teacher 
of Languages, Christiania, 1855-1857; Lutheran 
Pastor, Rush River, Wis., 1857-1859; Professor 
of Theology, Concordia Seminary, St. Louis, 
Mo., 1859-1861; President, Luther College, 1861- 
1902, and Professor of Religion, 1861-1870, 1872- 
1900, History, 1861-1902, Norwegian, 1861-1874, 
1882-1883, 1888-1889, 1892-1898, 1904-1905, Ger- 
man, 1861-1866, 1868-1870, Latin, 1861-1878, 1876- 
1877, 1899-1900, Penmanship, 1864-1867, Hebrew, 
1865-1875, 1879-1886, 1887-1911; Pastor, La 
Crosse, Wis., 1861-1862, Decorah, Iowa, 1862-1889; Editor-in-Chief of 
"Kirkelig Maanedstidende", .1868-1874, "Ev. Luth. Kirketidende", 1874-1889, 
1902-1912; Member Board of Trustees, Luther College, 1865-1915 (Treas- 
urer, 1865-1871, President, 1871-1902); Vice-president, Norwegian Synod, 
1876-1893; Chairman, Lutheran Synodical Conference, 1881-1883; D. D., 
Concordia Seminary, 1903; Knight of the First Order of St. Olav, 1908; 
President Emeritus, Luther College, 1911-1915. 





cational Association 
1917-1921. 



of 



f Christian Keyser Preus, 1898-1921. Second 
President. A. B., Luther College, 1873; Cand. 
Theol., Concordia Seminary, 1876; Lutheran 
Pastor, Spring Prairie, Wis., 1876-1897, and 
Chicago, 111., 1876, 1893-1895; Teacher of Re- 
ligion and Norwegian, Luther College, 1898-1900, 
and Latin, 1899-1900; Professor of Christianity, 
Luther College, 1900-1921, Norwegian, 1900- 
1901, 1912-1913, 1915-1920, History, 1900-1901; 
President, Luther College, 1902-1921; Vice- 
president, Norwegian Synod, 1911-1917; Com- 
mander of the Order of St. Olav, 1911; Vice- 
president of Iowa District, Norwegian Lutheran 
Church of America, 1917-1921; President, Edu- 
the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America, 



Oscar Ludvio Olson, 1901 — . Third President 
(Acting). A. B., Luther College, 1893; Teacher, 
Bode (Iowa) Academy, 1893-1895; Student, Univer- 
sity of Minnesota, 1895-1896; Teacher, Bruflat 
Academy, Portland, N. Dak., 1896-1897, Principal, 
1897-1898; Teacher, Luther Academy, Albert Lea, 
Minn., 1898-1901; Professor of English and Orator- 
icals, Luther College, 1901-1906, Latin, 1901-1918, 
Gymnastics, Penmanship, 1901-1905, Geography, 
1901-1902; A. M., University of Minnesota, 1903; 
Student, University of Chicago, summer 1904, sum- 
mers 1907-1911, 1913-1914; Professor of English 
Language and Literature, Luther College, 1906 — ; 
Ph. D., University of Chicago, 1914; Secretary, 
Luther College Faculty, 1916-1921; Secretary, Board of Trustees of Lu- 
ther College, 1917—; Acting President, Luther College, 1921—. 




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FACULTY 



101 



America, 
Author. 



fKKUT Ellefson Beboh, 1868-1874. Student, 
Madison, Wis., High School, 1859, Evansville, Wis., 
High School, 1859-1860, Concordia College, St Louis, 
Mo., 1800-1861, Luther College, 1861, 1864 (Student 
Assistant), teaching Common School in the intervals; 
studied Law, 1868-1869; admitted to the Iowa bar, 
1869; Teacher of Arithmetic and English, Luther 
College, 1868-1869; Professor of English and Geog- 
raphy, 1869-1872, Arithmetic and Algebra, 1869- 
1870; Editor of "For Hjemmet", 1870; Secretary, 
Board of Trustees, Luther College, 1871-1874; Rep- 
resentative in Iowa State Legislature, 1872; to Nor- 
way on leave of absence on account of failing health, 
1873-1874; died 1875. 



Cabl Chribtensex BnxELO, 1912 (January-June). 
A. B., Luther College, 1910; Medical Student, Uni- 
versity of Chicago and Rush Medical College, 1910- 
1914; Teacher of Chemistry, Physics, and Mathe- 
matics, Luther College, 1912 (January-June) ; M. D., 
Rush Medical College, 1914; Physician and Surgeon, 
Lutheran Hospital, La Crosse, Wis., 1914-1915, Ros- 
holt. Wis., 1916, Duluth, Minn., 1916-1917, Chicago, 
1919-1920, Detroit, Mich., 1920—; First Lieutenant, 
Medical Corps, U. S. Army, 1918-1919. 



tJow BjABWABOir, 1874 (Feb.)-1875. A. B., 
Reykjavik College (Iceland), 1865; Cand. Theol., 
Reykjavik Theological Seminary, 1869; Luther- 
an Pastor, Stafafelli, Iceland, 1869-1870; Teach- 
er in Public Schools, Iceland, 1869-1872, and in 
Reykjavik College, 1870-1871; Teacher of Latin, 
Greek, and Geography, Luther College, 1874 
(Feb.) -1875; Assistant Editor of "Skandina- 
ven", Chicago, 1875; Teacher of Norwegian, 
Augsburg Seminary, 1876, and Editor of "Bud- 
stikken", Minneapolis, Minn., 1876-1877; Pastor, 
Gimli, Manitoba, 1877-1880, Seidisfyrdi, Iceland, 
1880-1884, Winnipeg, Man., 1885-1914; President 
(the first) of the Icelandic Lutheran Synod in 
1886-1908; Editor of **Sameiningen'*, Winnipeg, 1886-1914; 



Martikus KaiS'fiAxsEK Blekek, 1906 (Jan.)- 
1910. Student, Galesville University, 1885-1889; 
Cand. Theol., Luther Seminary (Theor. Dept.), 
St. Paul, Minn., 1892; Lutheran Pastor, Deer- 
field and Madison, Wis., 1892-1897, Chicago, 
111., 1897-1906; Teacher of Religion, Norwegian, 
and Greek Testament, and Disciplinarian in the 
Preparatory Department, Luther College, 1906 
(Jan.) -1910; Pastor, Saude (P. O. Lawler), 
Iowa, 1910—. 





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LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



G18LE CHEisTiAir Johnson Bothnb^ 1881 (Jan.)^ 
1888, 1884-1907. A. B., Luther CoUege, 1878; A. B^ 
Northwestern University, Watertown, Wis^ 1879; 
Student of Classical Philology, Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1879-1880; Teacher of Parochial School, Min- 
neapolis, Minn., 1880; Teacher of Greek, Luther Col- 
lege, 1881-1888, German, 1881, Latin, 1881-1882; 
English, 1881-1882, Algebra, 1881-1882, History, 
1882-1883, and Norwegian, 1882-1883; A. M., Luther 
College, 1883; Graduate Student in Greek, Johns 
Hopkins University, 1883-1884; Professor of Greek, 
Luther College, 1884-1907, Mathematics, 1884-1894^ 
English, 1884-1885, History, 1885-1886, Norwegian, 
1886-1907, and Principal of the Preparatory Depart- 
ment, 1891-1896; studied in Norway, Greece, and Germany, on leave, 1904- 
1905; Professor of Scandinavian Languages and Literature, and Head of 
the Department, University of Minnesota, 1907 — ; Knight of the Order of 
St. Olav, 1911; Author of "Det Norske Luther College, 1861-1897" (a his- 
tory of Luther College up to 1897). 





fTHROND Johnson Bothne, 1875-1882. Graduate, 
Stord0en Seminary, Norway, 1854; Teacher and 
Editor in Norway, 1854-1875; Teacher of Norwe- 
gian, Latin, Catechetics, History, and Geography, 
Luther College, 1875-1876, and Professor of Norwe- 
gian and Latin, 1876-1882, History, 1876-1881, Ger- 
man, 1878-1882; Editor "Norden", 1882-1884, "Ame- 
rika", 1884-1887; with "Skandinaven'', 1887-1894, and 
"Decorah-Posten", 1894-1907. 



fNiLS Olsen Beandt, 1865-1881.' Cand. Theol., 
University of Christiania, Norway, 1849 (also 
A. B. and A. M.) ; Lutheran Pastor, Rock River, 
Wis., 1851, and Home Missionary, 1851-1857 
(first pastor from Norway West of Mississippi, 
1851); one of the founders of the Norwegian 
Synod, 1853; Pastor at Watertown, Wis., 1857- 
1865, Decorah, Iowa, 1865-1882; Vice-president 
of Norwegian Synod, 1857-1871, and Member 
of Church Council, 1857-1882; Professor of 
Catechetics, Luther College, 1865-1876, Geog- 
raphy, 1865-1867, German, 1865-1867, 1869-1870, 
Latin, 1865-1869, Vocal Music, 1865-1881, Nor- 
wegian, 1865-1866, Religion, 1865-1878, and 
Member Board of Trustees, 1865-1871; Joint Editor of "Kirketidende", 
1868-1881, "Luthersk Skoleblad", 1880-1881; Vice-president, Iowa District, 
Norwegian Synod, 1876-1884; Parochial Teacher, Brandt, S. Dak., 1885- 
1900; died 1921 at age of 97. 




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FACULTY 



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fOLAUB jKXBKir Beeda, 1879-1882. A. B., Gjert- 
sen's Classical School, Christlania, Norway, 
1870; Student, University of Christiania, 1870- 
1871 (A. M.); Cand. Thcol., Concordia Semi- 
nary, St. Louis, Mo., 1875; Lutheran Pastor, St. 
Paul, Minn., 1876-1877; Philological Student, 
University of Christiania, 1877-1879; Professor 
of Latin, Greek, History, and Norwegian, Lu- 
ther College, 1879-1882, and German, 1879-1881; 
studied at Universities of Christiania, Copen- 
hagen, and Upsala, 1882-1884; Professor (the 
first) of Scandinavian Languages and Litera- 
ture (and Latin), University of ' Minnesota, 
1884-1899; Teacher at Frogner's Gymnasium, 
1900-1916, and the MiliUry Academy, Christi- 
ania, Norway, 1903-1906. 



fAnoLF BaEDBSBir, 1876-1878. A. B., Luther 
College, 1870; Cand. Theol., Concordia Semi- 
nary, 1878; Lutheran Pastor, Spring Prairie, 
Wis., 1873-1876; Teacher of Latin, English, and 
Religion, Luther College, 1876-1878, and Ger- 
man, 1877-1878; Pastor, Perry, Wis., 1878-1881, 
Stoughton, Wis., 1881-1901; Manager, Martin 
Luther Orphans' Home, Stoughton, Wis., 1902- 
1906; Pastor Emeritus, Deerfleld, Wis., 1906- 
1913; Author. 



fNEHEM CHRisTEirsEir, 1872 (Jan.-June). A. 
B., Luther College, 1871; Teacher of English 
(?), Latin (?), Norwegian, and History (?), 
Luther College, Jan.-June, 1872; Cand. Theol., 
Concordia Seminary, 1876; Lutheran Pastor, St. 
•Joseph, Mo., 1876-1877, Ellsworth, Iowa, 1879- 
1882, St. Joseph, Mo., 1882-1885, Leona, Kans., 
1886-1887, Genesee, Idaho, 1887-1892; Editor, 
"Luthersk Sendebud" (San Francisco), 1890, 
"Pacific Herold", Parkland, Wash., 1892-1896. 




KxuTE Otaov EiTTREiBC, 1918 — . Attended 
Red Wing Seminary, 1888-1889, Beeman's Busi- 
ness College, Red Wing, Minn., 1889-1890; Book- 
keeper, Chicago, 1890-1896; attended Chicago 
Theological Seminary, 1895-1900 (Cand. Theol., 
1900); Lutheran Pastor, Creston, 111., 1900-1911; 
Teacher, Jewell Lutheran College, Jewell, Iowa, 
1911-1918, President, 1912-1918; Co-editor of 
**The Lutheran Hymnary", 1.918; Teacher of 
Commercial Subjects and Christianity, Luther 
College, 1918-1919, Professor of the same sub- 
jects, 1922 — ; Treasurer of Luther College^ 
1920—. 



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LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 




Oliver Maurice Eittreim, 1920 — . A. B^ Red 
Wing Seminary, 1916; Student, Iowa State College, 
Ames, 1916-1918; War Worlc, Electrician; Teacher 
of Physics and Mathematics, Luther College, 1920 — ; 
Student, University of Iowa, summer 1922. 




Andrew O. Estrem, 1889-1890. A. B., Luther 
College, 1886; Student, University of Iowa, 1,886- 
1887; A. M., Cornell University, 1889; Teacher of 
Latin, Ancient History, and Geography, Luther Col- 
lege, 1889-1890; Ph. D., Cornell University, 1892; 
Teacher, Wartburg College, 1894-1910, Lutheran 
Ladies' Seminary, Red Wing, Minn., 1910-1917; Su- 
perintendent of Schools, Portal, N. Dak., 1918-1920; 
Professor of English, Olivet College, 1920—. 




Chellis Nathaniel Evanson, 1919 — . A. B., Lu- 
ther College, 1918; U. S. Navy, 1918-1919; Teacher 
of History and Mathematics, Luther College, 1919 — , 
General Science, Physiology, and Geography, 1919- 
1920, English, 1920—. 




fGusTAv Adolf Evenson, 1881-1882. A. B., Luther 
College, 1880; Parochial School Teacher, Catniar, 
Iowa, 1880-1881; Teacher of English and History, 
Luther College, 1881-1882; Philological Student, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1882-1883; Public School 
Teacher, Colorado, 1884. 



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FACULTY 



105 







CHRUTiAir Alford Fjeldstad, 1911 (April'Decem- 
ber). A. B^ Luther College, 1906; Clerk in Drug 
Store, Grand Forks, N. Dak., 1906-1906; Teacher, 
Grand Forks College, 1906-1907; B. S., University of 
Chicago, 1908, M. S., 1909; M. D., Rush Medical 
College, 1911; Teacher of Chemistry, Physics, and 
Mathematics, Luther College, 1911; Interne, Madi- 
son General Hospital, Madison, Wis., 1911, Presby- 
terian Hospital, Chicago, 1912; Physician and Sur- 
geon, Red Wing, Minn., 1912-1917, Austin, Minn., 
1917-1919, Minneapolis, Minn., 1919—; Special Med- 
ical Study, New York City, 1919. 

Knut Gjersbt, 1902-1916, 1917—. A. B., Univer- 
sity of Minnesota, 1898; Principal, St. Ansgar (Iowa) 
Seminary, 1893-1895; Student, Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1895-1896, Heidelberg University, 1896-1898, 
Ph. D., 1898; Principal, Glenwood (Minn.) Academy, 
1898-1902; Professor of History, Luther College, 
1902-1916, Norwegian, 1905-191G; Special Study, Uni- 
versity of Christiania, 1909-1910, University of Ber- 
lin, 1910; Assistant Editor, "Symra", 1912-1914; 
Knight of the Order of St. Olav, 1916; President, 
Park Region Luther College, 1916-1917; Professor 
of History and Norwegian, Luther College, 1917 — , 
War Aims, 1918, Economics, 1918-1921; Author. 

tJoH(A)ir EvENSOv Geakrud, 1894-1897. A. B., 
Luther College, 1886; Student, University of Min- 
nesota, 1886-1887, University of Michigan, 1887-1888; 
Teacher, Luther Academy, Albert Lea, Minn., 1888- 
1889; Principal (the first), Bode (Iowa) Academy, 
1889-1890; A. M., Luther College, 1890; Student, 
Cornell University, 1890-1892, Ph. D., 1892; Teacher 
of Latin, St. Olaf College, 1892-1894; Teacher of 
Latin, Luther College, 1894-1897, and Economics, 
1894-1895; Assistant, later Instructor, in Latin, Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1897-1899, University of Min- 
nesota, 1899-1908; Assistant Professor of Latin, Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, 1903-1909, Professor of Latin, 
1909-1919; Vice-president, Board of Education, Nor- 
wegian Lutheran Church of America, 1917-1919; 
Author. 

John G. Hallaxd, 1887-1889. A. B., Luther Col- 
lege, 1884; Cand. Theol., Concordia Seminary, 1887; 
Teacher of German, Latin, Religion, and History, 
Luther College, 1887-1889, and Gymnastics, 1888- 
1889; M. A., Luther College, 1888; Student, North- 
ern Indiana Normal School, 1889; Principal, Bruflat 
Academy, Portland, N. Dak., 1889-1892; County Su- 
perintendent of Schools, Traill Co., N. Dak., 1892- 
1896; State Superintendent of Public Instruction, 
N. Dak., 1897-1901; attended Chicago School of Psy- 
chology, 1899; Institute Conductor and Lecturer; 
Professor of History, Sociology, Economics, and 
Pedagogy, N. Dak. Agricultural College, 1903-1910; 
Publicist, Lecturer, Real Estate, 1910—. 



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LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 




Haldor J. Hanwk (1882-1883), 1888-1890, 1894- 
1904. Instructor in Vocal Music, Luther College, 
1882-1888; A. B., Luther College, 1888; Student, Chi- 
cago Conservatory, 1888-1884; Teacher, Willmar 
(Minn.) Seminary, 1886-1887; Teacher of Music and 
Mathematics, Luther College, 1888-1890, Latin, 1888- 
1889, and Norwegian, 1889-1890; studied Music in 
Weimar, Germany, 1891-1892; Instructor in Music, 
Luther College, 1894-1896, and Professor of Music, 
1896-1904; Curator of Luther College Museum, 1896- 
1902; Boole and Music Dealer, Publisher, and Author, 
Chicago, 1904—; Editor, "Idun", 1908-1910; on 
Editorial Staff of '"Skandinaven". 

Hans Sjubson Hilleboe, 1912-1917. A. B^ Lu- 
ther College, 1881; Public School Teacher; attended 
Northern Indiana Normal School, 1882-1884; Teacher 
of Psychology, Willmar (Minn.) Seminary, 1884- 
1886; A. M., Luther College, 1886; Principal, WUl- 
mar Seminary, 1886-1899; Theological Student, Chi- 
cago Lutheran Theol. Seminary, 1896-1896, Luther 
Seminary (St. Paul), 1897-1898; has also attended 
Harvard University, University of Chicago, and 
University of Minnesota; Superintendent of Schools, 
Benson, Minn., 1899-1904; Principal, Willmar Semi- 
nary, 1904-1907; Superintendent of Schools, Benson, 
Minn., 1907-1912; Principal of Preparatory Depart- 
ment, Luther College, 1912-1917, and Professor of 
Biology and Education, 1912-1917, Norwegian, 1913-1916, Sociology, 1916- 
1917, and Special Subjects; President, Lutheran Normal School, Sioux 
Falls, S. Dak., 1917-1918, Augustana College and Normal School, 1918- 
1920; Professor of Biology, Augustana College and Normal School, 1920 — ; 
Editor, "The Hammer", one year. 



Thorleif (O.) Homme, 1881-1882. A. B., Luther 
College, 1878; Stud. Theol., Luther Seminary, 1878- 
1881, and Teacher of Norwegian and Religion, Mo- 
nona Academy ; Cand. Theol., Luther Seminary, 1881 ; 
Teacher of Religion, German, Latin, and History, 
Luther College, 1881-1882; Teacher in Secondary and 
Higher Schools, Norway, 1882-1887; A. M., Luther 
College, 1884; Cand. Theol., University of Chris- 
tiania, 1891; Principal of Nedenes "Amtsskole", 
Heirefos, Norway, 1891-1908; Lutheran Pastor, R0l- 
dal, Norway, 1908-Ji913; Author. 



Beynjom" Jakob Hovde, 1916-1917, 1919 — . A. B., 
Luther College, 1916; Teacher of Norwegian, Luther 
College, 1916-1917; Student, University of Iowa, 
1917-1918, 1919, A. M., 1919; U. S. Army, 1918 
(2nd Lieut., Coast Artillery) ; Teacher of Norwe- 
gian, Luther College, 1919—, and History, 1920—; 
Acting Dean of Men, 1920—. 




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FACULTY 



107 




Ellhto O. Hoyb, 1891-1893. A. B^ Luther 
College, 1884; Cand. TheoL, Concordia Semi- 
nary, 1887; Lutheran Pastor, Portland, Ore., 
1887-1891, Decorah, Iowa, 1891-1894; Teacher of 
Religion (Catechism), Luther College, 1891- 
1898; Pastor, Mankato, Minn., 1894-1901; Pro- 
fessor of Theology, Luther Seminary, 1901-1917, 
Luther Theological Seminary, 1917—, St. Paul, 
Minn. 



Haltor Bjf^Rirsoir Hustvxdt, 1888 (December), 
1887 (March-June). A. B., Luther College, 
1873; Cand. TheoL, Oncordia Seminary, 1876; 
Lutheran Pastor, Yankton, South Dakota, 
1876-1881, Northwood, Iowa, 1881-1883; Secre- 
tary, Iowa District, Norwegian Synod, 1880- 
1884; Teacher of Religion, Norwegian, and Di- 
dactics, Luther College, December, 1888; at- 
tended Slack's Business College, 1884; position 
in Lutheran Publishing House, Decorah, Iowa, 
1884; Business Manager, "Amerika'', 1885-1886; 
Parochial School Teacher, Decorah, Iowa, 1886; 
Assistant Pastor, Tracy, Minn., 1887; Teacher of 
Religion, German, and Latin, Luther College, 
March- June, 1887; Manager Lutheran Publishing House, 1887-1893; 
Teacher, Lutheran Normal School, Sioux Falls, S. Dak., 1893-1896 (Act- 
ing President); Assistant Bank Cashier, Decorali, Iowa, 1897-1906; 
Treasurer, Norwegian Synod, 1899-1905, 1911-1917; Member, Board of 
Trustees, Luther College, 1899-1920; Editor, "Lutheran Herald", 1906- 
1909; Assistant Editor at Lutheran Publishing House, 1905-1917; Pastor 
Emeritus, Decorah, Iowa. 




f Jacob Daniel Jacobsek, 1863 (Sept. -Nov.), 
1872 (Jan.)-1881 (April 1). Substitute Teacher 
of Latin, English, Mathematics, Greek, German, 
Geography, and Penmanship, Luther College, 
Sept 2-Nov. 1, 1868; Student at Luther Ollege, 
1864-1865; A. B., Concordia College, Fort 
Wayne, Ind., 1867; Cand. Theol., Concordia 
Seminary, 1870; Lutheran Pastor, Koshkonong, 
Wis., 1870-1872; Teacher of English, Latin, etc., 
Luther College, beginning Jan. 1, 1872, and ap- 
pointed permanently later that year; Professor 
of English, 1872-1877, German, 1872-1874, 1876- 
1877, 1879-1881, Greek, 1872-1873, 1875-1881, 
Latin, 1872-1873, 1876-1879, Logic, 1872-1877, 

Mathematics, 1872-1873, Religion, 1872-1877, 1878-1881, Hebrew, 1875-1878; 

Secretary, Board o{ Trustees, Luther College, 1876-1881 ; Librarian, Luther 

College, 1874-1881; died April 1, 1881. 




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LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 







Kabl Theodor Jacobsek, 1904-1905, 1920—. A. B., 
Luther College, 1902; Student, University of Wiscon- 
sin, 1903-1904; Teacher of Greek, Norwegian, His- 
tory, Geography, and Hebrew, Luther College, 1904- 
1905; Student, University of Wisconsin, 1905-1907, 
A. M., 1906; Library Assistant, Wisconsin Historical 
Society, 1906-1907; Cataloguer, Library of Congress, 
1907-1911; Classifier, University of Chicago Libraries, 
1911-1916, Head Classifier, 1916-1920; Librarian, 
Luther College, 1920—. 



fUuiiK ViLHELM KoREv^ 1874-1875 (Decem- 
ber). A. B., Bergen Cathedral School, 1844; 
Cand. Theol., University of Christiania, 1852 
(also A. M.) ; Teacher, Nissen Latin School, 
Christiania, 1852-1853; Lutheran Pastor, Wash- 
ington Prairie, Decorah, Iowa, 1853-1910; Sec- 
retary, Norwegian Synod, 1855; Member, Church 
Council, Norwegian Synod, 1861-1910; Secre- 
tary, Board of Trustees, Luther College, 1865- 
1871; Vice-president, Norwegian Synod; 1871- 
1876; Teacher of Norwegian, Luther College, 
1874- Dec, 1876; President, Iowa District, Nor- 
wegian Synod, 1876-1894; Vice-President, Nor- 
wegian Synod, 1893-1894, President, 1894-1910; 
D. D., Concordia Seminary, 1903; Knight of the 
Order of St Olav; Author. 

WiLUAM KoREN, 1889 (Jan.)-1892, 1896. A. B., 
Luther College, 1882; Cand. TheoU Concordia Semi- 
nary, 1885; Teacher and Student, 1885-1888; Teacher 
of Greek, Luther College, 1889-1892, Latin, English, 
Religion, and Physiology, 1889, German, 1889-1892, 
and History, 1891-1892; studied Philology at the 
Universities of Leipzig and Christiania, 1892-1894; 
A. M., Luther College, 1892; Teacher of Elocution 
and Physical Culture, Luther College, 1895; Profes- 
sor of English, Iowa Wesleyan University, 1895-1900; 
studied in Europe, 1900-1901; Professor of Modern 
Languages (French and Italian), Princeton Univer- 
sity, 1901—; Author. 

fHAKS Jakob Gr0gaard Kroo, 1890-1896. A. 
B., Stavanger Latin School, 1863; Theological 
Student, University of Christiania, 1864-1866 
(A. M.); Teacher in Norway, 1866-1872; Cand. 
Theol., Concordia Seminary, St. Louis, Mp., 
1974; Lutheran Pastor, Minneapolis, Minn., 
1874, Menomonie, Wis., 1875-1876, Baldwin, 
Wis., 1876-1890; Editor, "Missionsvennen", 1888- 
1890 (?); Teacher of Norwegian and Religion, 
Luther College, 1890-1896, Latin, 1890-1895, His- 
tory, 1890-1892, 1896, French, 1895-1896 (Profes- 
sor, 1896); Pastor, Ossian, Iowa, 1896-1902; 
Emissary, Seamen's Mission, 1902-1904. 



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FACULTY 



109 



KftUTEir KvAMMK, 1896-1898. A. B., Luther 
College, 1894; Theological Student, Luther Semi- 
nary, 1894-1896; Teacher of Norwegian, Reli- 
ffion, and Latin, Luther College, 1896-1898, and 
History, 1897; Cand. Theol., Luther Seminary, 
1899; Lutheran Pastor, New Yorlc City, 1899- 
1909, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1909-1912, Ossian, 
Iowa, 1912 — ; Member, Visiting Committee, Lu- 
ther College, 1912-1917; Editor, **B0rneblad", 
1913-1917, "Barnevenncn", 1917—; Member, 
Board of Trustees, Luther College, 1914-1920, 
and Secretary of same, 1916-1917; Author. 



fGABBIEL HeTTINO LANDMARK, 1867-1876. A. B.; 

attended University of Christiania, A. M., 1861; 
Teacher at Christiania, 1861-1867; Professor of Latin, 
Luther College, 1867-1876, Greek, 1867-1875, Norwe- 
gian, 1867-1874, History and Geography, 1867-1868, 
Penmanship, 1875-1876; Librarian (the first), Luther 
College, 1867-1874; Joint Editor, "For Hjemmet", 
1870-1876; Head Teacher at Christiansund, Norway, 
1877-1882 (?), Aalcsund, 1882-(?); Editor, "Aale- 
sunds Handels- og Sj0fartstidende", 8 years; Author; 
died August 17, 1907. 



Mtion Wilbur Larseit, 1920-1921. A. B., Luther 
College, 1919; Medical Student, University of Wis- 
consin, 1919-1920; Graduate Student, Luther Col- 
lege, 1920; Teacher of Biology, Geometry, General 
Science, Physiology, and Geography, Luther College, 
1920-1921; Student, Barnes Medical College, Wash- 
ington University, St. Louis, Mo., 1921—. 




fFaiKDERiCH LiNDEMANir, 1874-1876. A. B., 
Concordia College, Fort Wayne, Ind., 1871; 
Cand. Theol., Concordia Seminary, 1874; Luther- 
an Pastor, Decorah, Iowa, 1874-1876; Teacher 
of German, Luther College, 1874^1875; Pastor 
in the Missouri Synod, 1876-1893; Teacher of 
Drawing and Religion at the Lutheran Teach- 
ers' Seminary, Addison, III., 1893-1907. 



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LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 




Ikoeman M. Ltnoaas, 1906-1907. A. B., Luther 
College, 1897; Student, Valparaiso University, 1897- 
1898; Teacher, Glenwood (Minn.) Academy, 1899- 

i 1902; Student, University of Minnesota, 1902-1904; 

I Teacher, Lutheran Ladles* Seminary, Red Wing, 
Minn., 1904-1906; Teacher of Latin, English, and 
Gymnastics, Luther College, 1906-1907; Teacher, Lu- 
theran Ladies' Seminary, 1907-1918; Superintendent 
of Schools, Battle Lake, Minn., 1918-1919; Dairy 
Farmer, Winneconne, Wis., 1919 — . 




NoufAN Arthur Madson, 1911-1912, 1916- 
1918. Student AssisUnt, Luther College, 1909- 
1910, A. B., 1911, Assistant Principal of the 
Preparatory Department, and Teacher of Nor- 
wegian, Histoiy, Latin, and Religion, 1911-1912; 
Student, University of Chicago, summer, 1912; 
Theological Student, Luther Seminary, 1912- 
1914, 1914-1916; Pastor, Chicago, 1914; Cand. 
Theol., Luther Seminary, 1916; Lutlieran Pas- 
tor, Ribbing, Minn., 1915-1916; Teacher of His- 
tory and Religion, Luther College, 1916-1918, 
Public Speaking and Military Drill, 1917-1918; 
Chaplain, United States Army, 1918-1919; Pas- 
tor, Bode, Iowa, 1919—. 




Rasmus Malmin, 1917-1918. Attended Uni- 
versity of Christiania, 1882-1891, A. B., A. M., 
Cand. Theol., six years teaching experience in 
Norway before 1892; Lutheran Pastor, Yank- 
ton, S. Dak., 1892-1895, Thompson, Iowa, 1896- 
1917; Student, University of Minnesota, 1906- 
1906; A. M., Luther College, 1906; Editor, "Kir- 
ketidende", 1916-1917, "Teologisk Tidsskrift'% 
1917—; Joint Editor, "Lutheraneren", 1917—; 
Teacher of Norwegian, Luther College, 1917- 
1918; Author. 




George Markuus, 1892-1906. A. B., Luther Col- 
lege, 1886; Reporter for "Minneapolis Tribune", 
1885-1887; Business Manager, "Amerika", 1887-1892; 
Clerk of Probate Court, Chicago; Teacher of Eng- 
lish, History, Religion, and Geography, Luther Col- 
lege, 1892-1896, Physiology, 1892-1893, Zoology, 1898- 
1895; Professor of English, United States History, 
and Religion, 1896-1906, Geography, 1896-1900, Elo- 
cution, 1898-1906; Violin and Pipe Organ Manufac- 
turer, and Real Estate, St. Paul, Minn., 1907 — . 



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FACULTY 



111 





Mastix M. MiKXEUoir^ 1913-1917. Graduated from 
the Normal Department of Luther College, 1879; 
Teacher of Common School, 1880-1887, and Paro- 
chial School, 1880-1890, Roche-a-Cree, Wis.; Farmer, 
1888-1918, Manager of Farmers' Store, 1903-1907, 
Postmaster, 1904-1907, Insurance, 1908-1911, Arkdale, 
Wis.; Assistant Teacher of Norwegian,, English 
Grammar, U. S. History, Civics, Geography, 0>m- 
mercial Law, etc, Luther College (Preparatory De- 
partment), 1913-1917; Teacher, Augustana College 
and Normal School, 1918-1920. 



Leonabd Altok Moe, 1920 — A. B., Luther Col- 
lege, 1912; Teacher, Gale College, 1912-1916; Prin- 
cipal, Consolidated School, Manvel, N. Dak., 1916- 
1917; Superintendent of Schools, Hillsboro, N. Dak., 
1917-1918, Park River, N. Dak., 1918-1020; Principal 
of the Preparatory Department, and Teacher of 
Latin and Mathematics, Luther College, 1920 — . 



fRAGKAS MaECUB JUI^lUS MONEAD, 1883-1888. 

Graduated, Nissen's Latin School, Christiania, Nor- 
way, 1872, A. B.; Tutor, two years; Student, Uni- 
versity of Christiania, 1876; one year in Italy and 
at University of Bonn, Germany; A. M., Univer- 
sity of Christiania, 1888; Professor of Latin, His- 
tory, and Norwegian, Luther College, 1883-1888, 
German, 1884-1885, 1886-1888; in Norway, 1888-1889; 
Asst. Editor, "Skandinaven", Chicago, 1889-1897 (or 
later), "Decorah-Posten", 1897 (or later)-1903. 



fCHEiSTEX AxDEEAS Naeseth, 1882-1921. A. 
B., Luther College, 1874; Cand. Theol., Con- 
cordia Seminary, 1877; Student, University of 
Christiania, 1877-1878; Lutheran Pastor, Lu- 
verne, Minn., 1878-1882; Professor of English, 
Luther College, 1882-1909, Greek, 1882-1883, Re- 
ligion, 1882-1893, 1894-1911, Mathematics, 1883- 
1887, Norwegian, 1886-1890, History (English), 
1887-1888, 1891-1903, German, 1893-1894; A. M., 
Luther College, 1883; on leave, Cornell and 
Johns Hopkins Universities, 1884-1886; Treas- 
urer, Iowa District, Norwegian Synod, 1886- 
1896; Librarian, Luther College, 1887-1920; Sec- 
retary, Board of Trustees, Luther College, 1893- 

1899, 1902-1914; Treasurer, Luther College, 1896-1916; College Librarian 

Emeritus, 1920-1921; died February 17, 1921. 





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LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 




Uleik William Koren Naeseth, 1908-1909. 
A. B., Luther College, 1908; Teacher of English, 
Latin, History, Luther College, 1908-1909, also 
Assistant Librarian; Cand. TheoL, Luther Sem- 
inary, 1912; Lutheran Pastor, Rochester, Minn., 
1912-1913, Orfordville, Wis., 1913-1914; Student 
Columbia University, 1914-1916, A. M., 1915; 
Pastor, Rochester, Minn., 1916 — . 




fCoRXELius Nasvesen, 1873-1884. Graduate, Nor- 
mal Department, Luther College, 1867, and Winona 
(Minn.) Normal School, 1870; Teacher, Parochial 
School, Spring Grove, Minn., 1870-1878; Teacher of 
Mathematics and Sciences, Luther College, 1878-1877, 
U. S. History, 1873-1874, English, 1874-1876, Profes- 
sor of Mathematics and Sciences, 1877-1884; Treas- 
urer, Iowa District, Norwegian Synod, 1883-1884; 
died July 24, 1884. 




Davtd Theodore Nelson, 1921—;. A. B., Luther 
College, 1912; Principal, Hannaford Public Schools, 
N. Dak., 1912-1913; Rhodes Scholar, Oxford Univer- 
sity, 1914-1917, A. B., 1920; Relief Worker, Belgium 
and Northern France, 1914-1916; Ambulance Worker, 
France, 1916; Lieutenant, American Army, U. S. and 
France, 1917-1919; Captain, U. S. Reserves, 1919—; 
Banking, New York City, 1919-1921; Teacher of 
English and Latin, Luther College, 1921—. 




Olaf Nelson, 1918-1919. A. B., Luther College, 
1918; Teacher of Biology and Geometry, Luther Col- 
lege, 1918-1919; Superintendent of Schools, Silva and 
Webster, N. Dak., 1919-1920; Banking, Portland, 
N. Dak., 1921 — ; Superintendent of Schools, Edmore, 
N. Dak., 1921—; Student, University of South Da- 
kota, summer 1922. 



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FACULTY 



113 




Jens Andebsok Nem, 1893-1894. A. B^ Luther 
College, 1884; Student, University of Minnesota, 
1884-1885, Johns Hopkins University, 1885-1887; 
Teacher of Latin and Grceic, St. Olaf College, 1888- 
1891; Teacher of Greek, University of S :uth Dakota, 
1891-1892; Teacher of Scandinavian, University of 
Minnesota, 1892-1898; Teacher of Latin and English, 
Luther College, 1893-1894; Student of Comparative 
Philology, Johns Hopkins University, 1894-1897, Fel- 
low in Sanskrit, 1896-1898, Fellow by Courtesy, 1898- 
1903, Teacher of Sanskrit, Lithuanian, etc., 1899- 
1903, Ph. D., 1901 ; Teacher of Sanskrit, University 
of Chicago, 1900; Teacher of Latin and French, 
Goucher College, 1903-1904; Professor of Latin (and 
Norwegian), Wittenberg College, 1904—. 



Olap Morgak Norlie, 1919 — . Rural Teacher, 
Norway, S. Dak., 1896; B. S., M. Accts., Dixon 
College, 1897; A. B., St. Olaf College, 1898, and 
Teacher, 1897-1898; Teacher, Humboldt College, 
1898-1899, Milwaukee State Normal School, 1899 
(graduate); attended Wisconsin Institute Con- 
ductors' Institute, 1900-1903; Teacher, La Crosse 
(Wis.) High School, 1900; A. M., University 
of Wisconsin, 1901; Teacher, Stoughton (Wis.) 
High School, 1901-1903, Supt. Rushford (Minn.) 
Schools, 1903-1904; Teacher of English, United 
Church Seminary, St. Paul, and Student of 
Theology, 1904-1907, Cand. Theol., 1907; Stu- 
dent, University of Minnesota, 1904-1905, 1907- 
1908, Ph. D., 1908; Teacher of Parochial School, at intervals; Lutheran 
Pastor, Atwater, Minn., 1907-1915; Pd. D., Dixon College, 1910; S. T. D., 
Augustana College (111.), 1915; Book Editor, Reference Librarian, Director 
of Norwegian Lutheran Information Bureau, Augsburg Publishing House, 
Minneapolis, 1915-1919, Director of School Survey, 1917-1918, and Teach- 
ers' Agency, 1917-1P19; Litt. D., Wittenberg College, 1917, Secretary, 
Educational Association of the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America, 
1918-1920; Student of Psychology, University of Minnesota, 1918-1919; 
Professor of Psychology and Sociology, Luther College, 1919 — , also He- 
brew, Christianity, and Education, 1919 — ; President, American Lutheran 
Statistical Association, 1917 — ; Chairman of Statistical Committee ot 
National Lutheran Council, 1919 — , and Librarian of its Lutheran Bureau, 
New York City, 1920 — ; Editor and Author of many Works, Joint Editor 
"Christian Keyser Preus", 1921-1922; Member of many Committees and 
Educational and Learned Associations. 

Peter Rudolf Oscar Olsen, 1883-1885. A. B., 
Skien High School, Norway, 1873; A. M., Uni- 
versity of Christiania, where he studied 1874- 
1882, and 1886; Teacher, Porsgrund, Norway, 
1882-1883; Teacher of Greek, Norwegian, and 
History, Luther College, 1883-1885, and Ger- 
man, 1884-1885; Cand. Theol., University of 
Christiania, 1886; Lutheran Pastor, Flekkefjord, 
Norway, 1886-1889; Arendal, Minn., 1889-1893; 
Teacher, Lutheran Normal School, Madison, 
Minn., 1893-1897; Pastor, Prlandet, Norway, 
1904-1913, Elverum, Norway, 1913-1914, where 
Dean of S. Psterdalen County School (?), 1914—. 




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LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 




Zakarias J. Oedal, 1898-1899. A. B^ Lather 
College, 1898; Teacher of Latin, Norwegian, and 
Gymnastics, Luther College, 1898-1899; Cand. 
Theol^ Luther Seminary, 1902; Lutheran Pas- 
tor, Luveme, Minn., 1902-1903.; Assistant Man- 
ager, Lutheran Publishing House, Decorah, 
Iowa, 1903-1906; Pastor, Waterville, Iowa, 1905- 
1908; President, Lutheran Normal School, Sioux 
Falls, S. Dak., and Member of Board of Educa- 
tion, Norwegian Synod, 1908-1917; Editor 
"Kirketidende", 1906, "Folkekalender", 1906- 
1907, "Skoleblad", 1911-1914; Pastor, River Falls, 
Wis., 1917—. 



Melyinus Sylvester Orwoll, 1907-1908. Student 
Assistant in Latin and Greek, Luther College, 1904- 
1906; A. B^ Luther College, 1906; Theological Stu- 
dent, Luther Seminary, 1906-1907; Teacher of Greek 
and Mathematics, Luther College, 1907-1908; Ab- 
stracter of Title, 1909-1917, and Banker, 1917—, 
Granite Falls, Minn. 



Oswald Bekjamin Overn, 1912-1919. A. B., Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, 1912; Teacher of Physics and 
Mathematics, 1912-1916, Professor, 1916-1919; on 
leave. University of Iowa, 1917-1918; M. S., 1918; 
Teacher, Luther Institute, Chicago, and Student, Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1919-1920; Professor of Physics 
and Mathematics, Concordia College, St. Paul, Minn., 
1920 — ; Student, University of Chicago, sununer, 
1922. 




fEMiL JoHAN Petersen, 1882 (March)-1887 
(March). A. B., Concordia College, Ft. Wayne, 
Ind., 1875; Cand. Theol., Concordia Seminary, 
1878; Student, University of Copenhagen, 1878; 
Lutheran Pastor, Kilbourn City, Wis., 1879- 
1882; Professor of German, Latin, and Religion, 
Luther College, 1882-1887, also taught Stenog- 
raphy; Librarian, Luther College, 1886-1887; 
Seamen's and Emigrant Missionary, New York, 
1889-1919; Author of Textbook on Shorthand. 



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115 




Ekoch Ekkeit Petbisok, 1912 — . A. B., Luther 
College, 1912; Teacher of Latin, Luther College, 
1912-1920, Professor, 1920—, Assistant Librarian, 
1916-1921; Student, University of Chicago, summer, 
1918, University of Michigan, summer, 1920; Buhl 
Fellow in Latin, University of Michigan, 1921—; ab- 
sent on leave from Luther College, 1921-1928; Chief 
Editor, ''Luther College Semi-Centennial", 1911; M. 
A^ University of Michigan, 1922. 




FaAKcn Eownr Fbtkisok, 1921 — ^. A. B., Luther 
College, 1909; Teacher, Park Region Luther College, 
1909-1915, 1916-1921, and President, 1917-1921; Stu- 
dent, University of Wisconsin, four summer sessions 
and 1915-1916, A. M., 1916; Teacher of German and 
Latin, Luther College, 1921 — ^ and Supervisor of 
Practice Teaching, 1922; Student, Columbia Univer- 
sity, summer, 19^. 




OsLAKDo WxaaEK Qualify, 1918-1922. A. B., Lu- 
ther College, 1918; Teacher of Mathematics, Luther 
College, 1918—, Norwegian and History, 1918-1919, 
Latin, 1919—, and Greeic, 1920—, Athletic Coach, 
Preparatory Department, 1919—; Student, Univer- 
sity of Michigan, summer, 1920, Columbia Univer- 
sity, summer, 1921; Fellow in Latin, University of 
Michigan, 1922—. 




tOiJk Ramstad, 1884 (April)-1886 (March), 1887- 
1889. A. B., Luther College, 1888; studied Law, 
1888-1884; Teacher of Sciences and Mathematics, 
Luther College, 1884-1886, 1887-1888, and English, 
1884-1885, Professor of Sciences and Mathematics, 
1888-1889; had been elected the ilrst Principal of the 
Preparatory Department shortly before his death, 
June 22, 1889; willed his farm to Luther College 
for the support of Sciences. 



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116 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



fLABS Sjubbon Reque, 1875-1893, 1897-1916. A. B., 
Luther College, 1868, and Graduate Student, 1868- 
1869; Theological Student, Concordia Seminary, 
1869-1870; Teaching and Travel, 1870-1873, attended 
Universities of Christiania and Paris, 1872-1873, and 
taught as Substitute Teacher for Prof. Bergh at 
Luther College, winter, 1870-1871, winter, 1872-1873, 
September, 1873; LL. B., University of Iowa, 1874; 
Teacher of English, St. Olaf College, 1874-1875; 
Professor of English, Luther College, 1875-1893, 
Latin, 1875-1893, 1897-1916, Mathematics, 1875-1877, 
1883-1885, Religion, 1875-1876, German, 1877-1880, 
Greek, 1877-1878, History, 1878-1891, Physical 
Geography, 1885-1887, 1888-1890, Norwegian, 1887- 
1888, French, 1898 (?)-1916, and Psychology, 1908-1909, except that in 
1881-1882 he studied in France and Italy; A. M., Luther College, 1883; 
Treasurer, Iowa District, Norwegian Synod, 1876-1883; Secretary, Board 
of Trustees, Luther College, 1881-1893, 1899-1902, 1914-1916; Secretary, 
Luther College Faculty, (?)-1916; Democratic Nominee for Congress, 1888; 
U. S. Consul General, Rotterdam, Holland, 1893-1897; Professar, Luther 
College, 1897-1916 (see above). 





SiouBD Styrk Reque, 1906-1908, 1919—. A. B., 
Luther College, 1903; Teacher, Traill Co., N. Dak., 
1903-1904, Gale College, 1904^1905; Theological Stu- 
dent, Luther Seminary, 1905-1906; Teacher of Eng- 
lish, History, and Civics, Luther College, 1906-1908, 
Gymnastics, 1906-1907, Mathematics, 1907-1908; 
County Superintendent of Schools, Winnesheik Co., 
Iowa, 1909-1913; Teacher, Luther Academy, Albert 
Lea, Minn., 1913-1919, and Principal, 1914-1919; 
Teacher of English, Citizenship, and French, Luther 
College, 1919—, and Norwegian, 1921—; Baseball 
Coach, Preparatory Department, 1920-1921, College 
Department also, 1922 — , in which capacity he also 
assisted 1909-1912. 



Halvako Roalkvam, 1878-1886 (Feb.). A. B., 
Luther College, 1874; Cand. Theol., Concordia 
Seminary, 1877; Student, University of Clirls- 
tiania, 1877-1878; Teacher of Catechetics and 
Didactics, Norwegian, and Religion, Luther 
College, 1878-1886, Vocal Music, 1878-1879, 
Geography, 1881-1882, 1884-1885, History, 1882- 
1886 (Professor, 1881-1886); Joint Editor, "Lu- 
thersk Skoleblad", 1880-1881; Librarian, Luther 
College, 1881-1886; A. M., Luther College, 1883; 
Treasurer, Iowa District, Norwegian Synod, 
1884-1885; Lutheran Pastor, Crookston, Minn., 
1886-1889, Fisher, Minn., 1889-1892; Principal, 
Grand Forks College, 1891-1893; Pastor, Coon 
Valley, Wis., 1893-1910, North Prairie, Minn., 1910-1916; Member of many 
Boards and Committees in the United Norwegian Lutheran Church; 
Author; Pastor Emeritus, Coon Valley, Wis., 1916 — . 




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Adolph Mabivs Roveutad, 1907—. A. B., St. Olaf 
College, 1903; Principal of High School, Glenwood, 
Minn., 1903-1905; A. M., University of Michigan, 
1906, Fellow in Latin, 1906-1907; Professor of Greelc, 
Luther College, 1907-1911, Latin, 1907—, War Geog- 
raphy, 1918; Student, University of Michigan, sum- 
mer, 1911, 1914-1915 (on leave), summers, 1918 and 
1920; Special Classical Cruise along the Mediter- 
ranean, summer, 1912; Ph D., University of Michi- 
gan, 1921; Chairman, Reading Circle Committee, 
Classical Association of the Middle West and South, 
1922—. 



Geokoe Alfked Tatlok Rtoh, 1883 (March- 
June). A. B., Luther College, 1881; Theolog- 
ical Student, Capital University, 1881-1882, 
1883-1884 (Cand. Theol., 1884), Luther Semi- 
nary, 1882-1883; Teacher of English and Greek, 
Luther College, 1883; Lutheran Pastor, Port- 
land, Maine, 1884-1889; Teacher, Wittenberg 
(Wis.) Academy, 1889-1890; Pastor, Grand 
Forks, N. Dak., 1890-1891; Teacher of History, 
English, Scandinavian Literature, and Political 
Science, University of North Dakota, 1891-1895; 
Principal, Mt. Horeb (Wis.) Academy, and 
Pastor, 1895-1898; Pastor, Chicago, 111., 1899- 
1910; Editor, "United Lutheran", 1909-1914; 
Professor of History and Religion, St. Olaf College, 1910-1913; Assistant 
Editor, "American Lutheran Survey", 1914—; Litt. D., Newberry College, 
1917; Lutheran Relief Commissioner to Baltic States, 1919-1920; Pastor, 
Minneapolis, Minn., 1921 — ; Author. 




Beetikius K. Sa(e)vee (1894-1895), 1900-1901, 
1912-1918. Student Assistant in Arithmetic, Luther 
College, 1894-1895, A. B., 1896; Theological Student, 
Luther Seminary, 1896; Teacher, Park Region Lu- 
ther College, 1897; Student, Valparaiso University, 
1897-1899, B. S. in Engineering, 1899; Teacher of 
Latin, English and Mathematics, Luther College, 
1900-1901; Principal, Clifton (Tex.) Lutheran Col- 
lege, 1901-1904; Teacher, Glenwood (Minn.) Acad- 
emy, 1904-1905, and Principal, 1905-1907; Teacher, 
Minnesota State Summer School, 1906; Principal, 
Grand Forks College, 1907-1909; Publisher and Edi- 
tor, ••Glenwood Herald", 1909-1912, 1918—; Profes- 
sor of Mathematics and Latin, Luther College, 1912- 
1918, Treasurer, 1915-1918. 



fAxTON B. Sakdeb, 1878-1879. A. B., Luther Col- 
lege, 1874; Ph. D., Yale University, 1877 (the first 
graduate of Luther College to obtain the Ph. D. 
degree) ; Teacher of Latin, Greek, Hebrew, and Ger- 
man, Luther College, 1878-1879; Teacher, Flushing, 
N. Y., 1879-1881. 



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118 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Feieduch August Schmidt, 1861-1872 (Jan- 
uary 1). A. B^ Concordia College, Altenbergi 
Mo^ 1854; Cand. Theol., Concordia Seminarj, 
1857; Lutheran Pastor, Eden, N. Y^ 1857-1859, 
Baltimore, Md., 1859-1861; Professor of Greek, 
Luther College, 1861-1871, Latin, 1861-1863, 1864- 
1867, 1869-1870, German, 1861-1863, 1864-1866, 
1869-1871, Mathematics, 1861-1867, 1868-1869, 
English, 1861-1869, 1870-1871, Penmanship, 1861- 
1863, Singing, 1861-1865, Geography, 1861-1863, 
1867-1869, Religion, 1863-1871, U. S. History, 
1866-1868, and Logic, 1869-1871; Editor, "Lu- 
theran Watchman", 1866-1867; Professor of 
Theology, Concordia Seminary, 1872-1876, Lu- 
ther Seminary, 1876-1886; Editor, "Altes und Neues", 1880-1885, "Lutherske 
Vidnesbyrd", 1882-1890; D. D^ Capital University, 1883; Professor of 
Theology, Northfield (Minn.) Seminary, 1886-1890, Augsburg Seminary, 
1890-1893; Joint Editor, "Luthersk Kirkeblad", 1890-1895; Professor of 
Dogmatics, United Church Seminary, St. Paul, 1893-1912, Professor Em- 
eritus, 1912—; Author. 





Heikkich Juuus Makfeed Alexander Seippkl, 
1873-1874. A. B., Christiansand Latin School, Nor- 
way, 1868; A. M., University of Christiania, 1873; 
Professor of Latin and Greek, Luther College, 1873- 
1874; Assistant Librarian, University of Christiania, 
1875-1882, 1885-1886; Student, University of Leip- 
zig, 1882-1884 (Ph. D.?); Professor of Semitic Lan- 
guages (Arabic, Hebrew, Syriac), Persian, Univer- 
sity of Christiania, 1886—; Knight of the Order of 
St. Olav; Author. 




Hermak William Sheel, 1889 — . Attended Lu- 
ther College, 1874-1875; B. S., Northern Indiana 
Normal School, 1885; Teacher, Willmar (Minn.) Sem- 
inary, 1885-1889; Principal of the Preparatory De- 
partment, Luther College, 1889-1891, 1896-1911, and 
Teacher (Professor since 1896) of Chemistry, 1889- 
1890, 1891-1902, 1904—, Geography, 1889-1890, Mathe- 
matics, 1889-1914, 1915-1916, 1918-1920, 1921—, 
Physiology, 1889-1896, 1918, Zoology, 1889-1890, 
Physics and Physical Geography, 1889-1911, 1918, 
General Science, 1918-1919, and Surveying, 1918—; 
Curator of the Luther College Museum, 1904-1911; 
on leave, 1911-1912. 



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119 




tLTDMt SiEWEM, 18«8 (Nov.)-1877. A. B^ 1850, 
and A. M., 1852, University of Christiania; Teacher, 
Christiania, Norway, 1852-1861; Student in Germany, 
1861-1868; Teacher (Professor, 1864—) of German 
and Greek, Luther College, 1863-1877, Latin, 1863- 
1867, Geography, 1868-1867, 1868-1876, Penmanship 
("Caligraphy"), 1868-1865, 1867-1877, Norwegian, 
1864-1877, Mathematics, 1864-1870, Natural History, 
1866-1878, 1875-1877, History, 1868-1869, 18T0-1871; 
Joint Editor, "For Hjemmet*', 1870-1876; Editor, 
"Decorah-Posten", 1877-1907 (Chief Editor till some 
time in the Ws). 



William Paul Sihlek, 1890—. A. B., Concordia 
College, Ft Wayne, Ind., 1888; Cand. Theol., Con- 
cordia Seminary, 1886,' Parochial School Teacher, Ft. 
Wayne, Ind., 1886-1887; A. M., University of Wis- 
consin, 1888; Teacher, Dr. Sachs* Collegiate Insti- 
tute, New Yorlc City, 1888-1889; Student, Johns Hop- 
Icins University, 1889-1890; Teacher (Professor of 
German since 1896) of Geography, Luther College, 
1890-1892, 1897-1905, Gymnastics, 1890-1898, History, 
1890-1892, 1918-1915, 1916-1917, Latin, 1890-1891, 
Vocal Music, 1890-1894, Penmanship, 1890-1893, 
Physical Geography, 1890-1891, Religion, 1890-1891, 
1893-1894^ 1922—, English, 1891-1892, German, 
1892—, Greelc, 1892-1913, 1919—, Zoology and Physi- 
ology, 1892-1900, Drawing, 1906-1907, and French, 1917-1919; Author. 




Carlo Albekto Speeati (1885-1888), 1905 
(March) — . Pilot's Examination, Navigation 
School, Christiania, Norway, 1882; Instructor 
in Vocal Music, Luther College, 1885-1888, A. 
B., 1888; Cand. Theol., Luther Seminary, 1891; 
Parochial School Teacher; Lutheran Pastor, 
Whatcom (now Bellingham), Wash., 1891-1894, 
Tacoma, Wash., 1895-1905; Teacher of Music, 
Pacific Lutheran Academy, Parlcland, Wash., 
1894-1895; Director, "Paciflckystens Norslce San- 
gerforhund", 1903-1915, also various other mu- 
sical organizations; Musical Director, Luther 
College, 1905—, also teaching Christianity; Di- 
rector, Decorah Choral Union, 1905 — ^ Choral 
Union of the Norwegian Synod, and of the Norwegian Lutheran Church 
of America, — ; managed eleven extensive tours of the Luther Col- 
lege Concert Band, including Ave to the Pacific Coast, and the Nor- 
way Tour of 1914; decorated hy the Student Singers' Association of Nor- 
way, 1914. 




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120 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 




Cabl Walther Stkom, 1919 — . Second Lieutenant 
Inf., U. S. Army, 1918; Teacher of Military Drill, 
S. A. T. C, Yankton College, 1918; Student Assistant 
in Greek, Luther College, 1919, A. B., 1919; Teacher 
of Military Drill (Preparatory Department), Greek 
and Mathematics, Luther College, 1919 — ; Student, 
University of Iowa, summers 1920-1922; Assistant 
Registrar, Luther College, 1920 — , Secretary of the 
Luther College Faculty, 1921—. 



Hans GEKHAao Stub, 1896-1900. A. B., Lu- 
ther College, 1866; A. B., Concordia College, 
Fort Wayne, Ind., 1869; Cand. Theol., Concordia 
Seminary, St. Louis, Mo., 1872; Lutheran Pas- 
tor, Minneapolis, Minn., 1872-1878; Secretary, 
Minnesota District, Norwegian Synod, 1876- 
1878; Professor of Systematic Theology, Luther 
Seminary, Madison, Wis., and Robbinsdale, 
Minn., 1878-1896; Student at the University of 
Leipzig, 1881-1882; Joint Editor, "Ev. Luth. 
Kirketidende", 1889-1894, Chief Editor, 1894- 
1896, Sole Editor, 1896-1898, Joint Editor, 1899- 
1902; Pastor, Decorah, Iowa, 1896-1900, and 
Lecturer on Religion, Luther College, 1898-1900, 
College Pastor; Editor, "Theologisk Tidsskrift", 1899-1908; Professor of 
Theology, Luther Seminary (Hamline, St Paul, Minn.), 1900-1917; D. D., 
Concordia Seminary, 1903; Vice-President, Norwegian Synod, 1905-1911, 
President, 1911-1917, and President, Norwegian Lutheran Church of Amer- 
ica, 1917—; Knight of the First Class of the Order of St. Olav, 1908, and 
Commander, 1912; raised endowment fund of $250,000 for Luther College, 
1910-1911; President, National Lutheran Council, 1918-1920; Member of 
many Committees and Boards; Ex-Officio President of Board of Educa- 
tion, and Beard of Visitors (Church Council), Luther College, 1911 — ; 
LL. D., Capital University, 1922; Author. 





Bjabke Svak0e, 1909-1911. A. B., Stavanger Latin 
School, 1902; A. M., University of Christiania, 1908; 
Student, University of Chicago, 1909; Teacher of 
History, Norwegian, and Gymnastics, Luther Col- 
lege, 1909-1911; Traveling Agent, Norwegian-Amer- 
ican Mindegave Committee, 1911-1914; Farmer, Svan- 
0en, Norway, 1914 — . 



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121 




Haxs Fked SwAirgEx, 1918-1920. A. B^ Luther 
College, 1914; Teacher, Luther Academy, Albert Lea, 
Minn., 1914-1918; Student, Harvard University, sum- 
mer, 1917; Teacher of English, Luther College, 1918- 
1920, and Military Drill, 1918, Assistant Principal 
of the Preparatory Department, 1918-1919, and Prin- 
cipal, 1919-1920; Student, University of Chicago, sum- 
mer, 1920; President, Gale College, Galesville, Wis., 
1920—. 




Hekkt Oscab Talije, 1921—. A. B., Luther Col- 
lege, 1917; Student, University of Minnesota, sum- 
mers, 1916 and 1919; Superintendent of Schools, 
Rolette, N. Dak., 1917; in U. S. Navy, 1917-1919, 
Ensign, 1918; Teacher, Rugby High School, N. Dak., 
1919; Superintendent of Schools, Rolette, N. Dak., 
1919-1920; Teacher, Luther Academy, Albert Lea, 
Minn., 1920-1921; Student, Boston University, and 
Emerson College of Oratory, summer, 1921; Teacher 
of Eontimics, Public Speaking, Geography, and 
Latin, Luther College, 1921—; Student, University 
of Chicago, and Columbia College of Expression, 
summer, 1922. 




AsLAK K. Teibbebo, 1874-1876. A. B., Luther Col- 
lege, 1870; Teacher of Mathematics, English, German, 
and U. S. History, Luther College, 1874-1875; Teach- 
er, St. Olaf College, 1875-1880; Editor, "Fergus Falls 
Ugeblad", 1883-1885; Assistant Secretary, Minne- 
sota Railway and Warehouse Commission, 1885, and 
later Secretary, till 1901; U. S. Customs Appraiser, 
St. Paul, Minn., 1901—. 




Theodore Elmek Thompsok, 1908-1918. A. B., 
Luther College, 1904; Teacher, Willmar (Minn.) Sem- 
inary, 1904-1906; Principal, Bruflat Academy, Port- 
land, N. Dak., 1906-1908; Teacher (Professor, 1916) 
of English, Luther College, 1908-1918, and Latin, 
1908-1912; A. M., University of Chicago, 1914; High 
School Teacher, Chicago, 1918—. 



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122 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 




fKKUD Thbokimen (Lommek), 1868, 1869, 1870. 
Graduate, Asker Seminary, Norway, 1848; Teacher 
in Norway; Assistant Editor, "Emigrantcn" (Madi- 
son, Wis.), 1864-1866, and •*Skandinaven*' (Cliicago), 
1866; Teaclier (Substitute) of Religion and German 
(and Latin?), Luther College, spring of 1868, Oc- 
tober, 1868, and winter of 1869-1870; Editor, "For 
Hjemmet*', 1876-1887; frequent Contributor to "De- 
corah-Posten" and "Ev. Luthersk Kirketidende**; 
Author. 




Joh(a)k Olsek Tikgelstad (1888-1885), 1886 
(March) -1887. Instructor in Vocal Music, Lu- 
ther College, 1883-1885, A. B., 1885; PubUc 
School Teacher, 1885-1886; Teacher of Mathe- 
matics and Sciences, Luther College, March, 
1886-1887; Student, Valparaiso University, 1886; 
Theological Student, Concordia Seminary, 1887- 
1888; Teacher, Concordia (Mo.) Prog3rmnasium, 
March-June, 1888; Theol. Student, Luther Sem- 
inary, 1888-1890, Cand. TheoL, 1890; A. M., Lu- 
ther College, 1890; Lutheran Pastor, Portland, 
N. Dak., 1890-1900, and Principal, Bruflat Acad- 
emy; Professor of German, University of North 
Dakota, 1900-1908, and Scandinavian, 1900—. 



OscAB Adolp Tixoelstad, 1909 — . A. B., Lu- 
ther College, 1905; Cand. Theol., Luther Semi- 
nary, 1907; Lutheran Pastor, Ballard (Seattle), 
Wash., 1907-1909; Teacher, Luther College, 1909- 
1910, studying. University of Chicago, in the 
fall, and teaching at Luther College (Greek 
Testament, Latin, Civics) after Christmas; Pro- 
fessor of Psychology and Education, 1910 — ^ 
also teaching Christianity, 1910-1916, 1921-1922, 
U. S. History, Civics, and Arithmetic, 1910-1911, 
Latin, 1910-1912, 1919-1921, and French, 1916- 
1917; on leave, 1912-1913, and second semester, 
1922, at University of Chicago, where he also 
studied summers, 1910, 1912, 1913, 1915, 1916, 

1918, 1920, and winter, 1914^ A. M., 1913, Fellow in Education, 1913-1914; 
Acting Principal, Luther College Preparatory Department, 1911-1912, 1917- 

1919, and College Registrar, 1914—; Joint Editor, **Norgesf8erden", 1914, 
"Christian Keyser Preus", 1921-1922; Secretary, Young People's Luther 
League, 1917-1922. 




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FACULTY 



123 






Isaac Bcminrui TouusoKy 1901 — . A. B^ Lu- 
ther College, 1879; Student, Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1879-1880; Cand. TheoU Concordia 
Seminary, 1888; Lutheran Pastor, Waco, Texas, 
1885-1889, Chicago, 111^ 1888-1898, Decorah, 
Iowa, and College Pastor, Luther College, 1901 — , 
also Teacher of Religion at Luther College, 1902- 
1912. 



Mebbiam Habtwick TaTTTEK, 1917-1918, 1919-1920, 
1921~. A. B., Luther College, 1916; Student, Wi- 
nona (Minn.) State Normal School, 1916; Superin- 
tendent of Schools, Starkweather, N. Dak., 1916-1917; 
Assistant Principal of the Preparatory Department, 
and Teacher of Mathematics, Physics, General 
Science, Public Speaking, and Civics, Luther College, 
1917-1918 (AprU) ; in U. S. Army (in France), 1918- 
1919; Student, University of Poitiers, 1919; Teacher 
of Physics and Biology, Luther College, 1919-1920; 
American-Scandinavian Foundation Scholar, Univer- 
sity of Christiania, 1920-1921; Teacher of Physics, 
Biology, and Mathematics, Luther College, 1921 — ; 
Correspondence Study, University of Chicago, 1921- 
1922; Student, University of Iowa, summer, 1922. 



Cabl Ttssek, 1914 (January-May). A. B., Luther 
College, 1906; Public School Teacher, 1900-1902; 
Teacher, Willmar (Minn.) Seminary, 1906-1907, Lu- 
ther Academy, Albert Lea, Minn., 1907-1911; Prin- 
cipal of High School, Roland, Iowa, 1911-1912; Stu- 
dent, University of Wisconsin, 1912-1918, A. M., 
1918; Teacher of Latin, Luther College, 1914 (Jan- 
uary-May); Principal, Clifton Lutheran College, 
Clifton, Texas, 1914—. 




GEoaoE J. Ulvildek^ 1918 (April-June). A. B., 
Luther College, 1916; Student Assistant, Lutheran 
Normal School, Sioux Falls S. Dak., 1911-1912; 
Teacher, Lutheran Normal School, 1916-1917; The- 
ological Student, Luther Seminary, 1917-1918, 1918- 
1920; Assistant Principal of the Preparatory De- 
partment, and Teacher of Mathematics and Civics, 
Luther College, April-June, 1918; Cand. Theol., Lu- 
ther Theological Seminary, 1920; Lutheran Pastor, 
Toronto, S. Dak., 1920—. 



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124 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 




TomvALD Vaaleb, 1920-1921. A. B., Luther Col- 
lege, 1919; Principal of high school, Calmar, Iowa, 
1919-1920; Student, University of Iowa, summer, 
1920; Teacher of German, Norwegian, and English, 
Luther College, 1920-1921, also Graduate Study; 
Medical Student, University of Minnesota, 1921 — . 




AxDR£w A. Veblek, 1877-1881. A. B., Carleton 
College, 1877; Teacher of English and Penmanship, 
Luther College, 1877-1881, Latin, 1877-1878, Mathe- 
matics, 1878-1881, Physiology, 1879-1881, Tlieciry and 
Practice of Teaching, 1879-1880, U. S. History, 1880- 
1881; A. M., Carleton College, 1880; Student^ Johns 
Hopkins University, 1881-1888; Teacher of Mathe- 
matics, Carleton College, 1883; Instructor in Mathe- 
matics, University of Iowa, 1888-188(), Professor of 
Physics, 1886-1906; Editor, "Valdris Helsing', 1906- 
1910, "Samband'*, 1910-1917; Lecturer and Author. 




JoHANKES Waaoe, 1918 (Scpt-Nov ). A. B., Lu- 
ther College, 1918; Teacher of Norse and Mathe- 
matics, 1918 (Sept. Nov.); resigned on account of 
failing health; at sanatoriums in Minnesota, 1919 — . 




Caspek Ingram Wollav, 1912 (Jan.-June). A. B., 
Luther College, 1911; Teacher of Mathematics and 
History, Luther College, 1912, and at Luther Acad- 
emy, Albert Lea, Minn., 1912-1919; Merchant, Glcn- 
wood, Minn., 1919—. 



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FACULTY 



JZ% 




fJoHAN THOftBJ0ftW Ylyisakck, 18894800 
(Nov.). A. B^ Lather College, 1877; Cand. 
Theol., Concordia Seminary, 1881; Lutheran 
Pastor, Albert Lea, Minn., 1881-1889, Decorah, 
Iowa, 1889-1890; Teacher of Religion, Luther 
College, 1889-1890 (Nov. 80) ; Author of a Mono- 
graph on Luther College. 



SiousD CHRivriAir Ylyibakek^ 1911 (Jan.)- 
1919. A. B., Luther College, 1908; Student, Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, 1903-1904; Cand. Theol., 
Luther Seminary, 1907; Ph. D., University of 
Leipzig, 1910; Lutheran Pastor, Minot, N. Dak., 
1910-1911, Chicago, 111., 1914; Professor of He- 
brew, Greek, and Christianity, Luther College, 
1911 (Jan.)-1919, Ancient Historj-, 1911-1913, 
Military Law, 1918, and Military Drill, 1918- 
1919; Fort Sheridan (111.) Officers' Training 
Camp, S. A. T. C, 1918; Professor of Greek and 
Hebrew, Concordia College, St. Paid, Minn., 
1919—; Author. 



PROFESSIONAL DATA— SPECIAL INSTRUCTORS 
AND OFFICIALS 



TuEREssE Eleakor Akkesok (uow Mrs. B. J. Hov- 
de), 1917-1921. Attended Prairie du Chien Sani- 
tarium, Wis., 1911-1913, Registered Nurse, 1918, 
Superintendent of Nurses, 1914; Matron, Aase Hau- 
gen Home, Decorah, Iowa, 1915; Superintendent, 
City Hospital, Decorah, Iowa, 1919; College Nurse, 
Luther College, 1917-1921; officially so designated, 
1919-1921. 




Ole Boe (Naoelsakee), 1907-1909. Student, Ha- 
mar Middle School, Norway, 1893-1894, and Hamar 
Seminary, 1894-1897 (Graduate); Teacher in Nor- 
way, 1898-1902; D. D. S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery, 1907; Instructor in Gymnastics, Luther 
College, 1907-1909; Dentist, Decorah, Iowa, 1907—. 



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LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 




Chrutlak BEAinyr, 1876 (Sept.-Dec.) Cadet, Royal 
Military Academy, Christiania, Norway, 1872-1874; 
Commissioned 2nd Lieutenant, 1874; in Norwegian 
Army, 1874-1884; studied CivU Engineering, Aix-la- 
Chapelle, Germany, 1875-1876; Special Instructor in 
C^^mnastics and Military Drill, Luther College, 1876 
(Sept.-Dec.) ; City Editor, •*Skandinaven", Chicago, 
1876-1878; Asst Editor, ""Fsedrelandet og Emigran- 
ten". La Crosse, Wls^ 1878-1880; Editor and Pub- 
lisher,. "Red River Posten", Fargo, N. Dak., 1880- 
1881, "Nordvesten", St Paul, Minn., 1881-1887, 1897- 
1907; Member, Minnesota National Guard, 1881 — , 
Colonel, 1888-1887, 1889-1907, on Retired List as 
such, 1907 — y Inspector-General (Brigadier-General), 
1887-1889; U. S. Internal Revenue Service, 1887-1897; on Editorial Staff, 
"Minneapolis Tidende", 1895-1897, "Decorah-Posten", Decorah, Iowa, 
1907—. 

IvAW DosEFF, 1921—. B. S., UmVersity of Chi- 
cago, 1908; Special Work, Art Institute, Chicago, 
1906-1908; Freshman Team Coach, Chicago, 1909; 
Director of Athletics and Teacher of General Science, 
La Crosse (Wis.) High School, 1910; Social Direc- 
tor, Council and Davis Squares, South Park Play- 
grounds, Chicago, 1911-1913; Athletic Director and 
Teacher of Drawing, Fargo College, 1914; Athletic 
Director and Teacher of General Science, Elgin (111.) 
High School, 1915-1917; Athletic Instructor and 
Teacher of Mathematics, Cornell College, 1918-1919; 
Athletic Director, Iowa State Teachers' College, 1919- 
1921 ; Physical Director, and Coach of Football, Bas- 
ketball, and Track, Luther College, 1921—. 

Hasold Hekbekt Fuher, 1918-1920 (Feb.). Offi- 
cers* Training Camp, Fort Niagara, N. Y.,*1917 (2nd 
Lieut Infantry); Teacher of Military Science, Uni- 
versity of Nebraska, 1918; Commissioned 1st Lieu- 
tenant, 1918; on duty with 15th Co., 154th Depot 
Brigade, Camp Meade, Md., 1918-1919; Commanding 
Officer, and Teacher of Military Science, S. A. T. C, 
Luther College, 1918-1919, Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics, R. O. T. C, 1919-1920; Com- 
missioned Captain, and Teacher of Military Science, 
Rockford (111.) High Schools, 1920—. 



HER]u0aN N. Gausta, 1887. Student, Luther Qol- 
lege, 1872-1875; Studied Painting in Europe (Chris- 
tiania and Munich), 1875-1882; Artist, Chicago, 111., 
Madison, Wis., La Crosse, Wis., Decorah, Iowa, 1882- 
1887; Special Instructor in Drawing, Luther College, 
1887; Studied in Italy, Germany, and Norway, 1887- 
1889; Artist, Minneapolis, Minn., 1889—. 






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FACULTY 



127 




Ole Gleske, 1917—. A. B., St. Olaf College, 
1896; Cand. Theol., United Church Seminary, 
1898; Lutheran Pastor, Aberdeen, S. Dale., 1898- 
1916, Decorah, Iowa, 1916—; President, South 
Dakota Luther League, 1906-1909; College Pas- 
tor (with Rev. I. B. Torrison), 1917—. 





AixBK Clack GavKmr, 1918 (Sept-Dec.). Stu- 
dent, Trinity University, Waxahachie, Texas, 1916- 
1917, Vlroqua Militory Institute, Lexington. Va., 
1917-1918; Officers' Training Camp, Ft Sheridan, 111., 
1918 (2nd Lieutenant Infantry) ; Personnel- Adjutant, 
S. A. T. C Luther College, 1918 (Sept-Dec.); B. 
A., Trinity University, 1919; LL. B., University of 
Texas, 1922; with The Grundy Abstract and Title 
Co., Memphis, Texas, 1922—. 



Gjeemuno O. Hauoew, 1890-1891. Public School 
Teacher, 1887-1891, having attended Decorah (Iowa) 
Institute, 1886-1887; attended Valder Business Col- 
lege, 1890; Instructor, Decorah Institute, 1891-1898, 
amA Instructor in Penmanship, Luther College, 1890- 
1891 ; attended Iowa Business College, 1891, Northern 
Indiana Normal, 1893, Cedar Rapids Business Col- 
lege, 1894; Instructor in Commercial Subjects, Lu- 
theran Normal School, Sioux Falls, S. Dak., 1898- 
1896, Stoughton (Wis) Academy, 1899-1900; County 
Superintendent of Schools, Winneshiek Co., Iowa, 
1896-1899; LL. B., University of Wisconsin, 1903; 
Attorney-at-Law, Stoughton, Wis!., 1903-1909, Mad- 
dock, N. Dak., 1909—; Editor, "Maddock Standard'*, 
1909—. 




Chaeles Phiup Hexom, 1908-1909. Student, Lu- 
ther College, 1899-1902; Student, Art Institute, Chi- 
cago, 1904-1906, Chicago Academy of Fine Arts, 
1906-1906; Special Instructor in Drawing, Luther 
College, 1908-1909; Artist and Merchant, Decorah, 
Iowa, 1909—. 



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128 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 




Waltm a. Jewell, 1919 (Sept.-Nov.). LL. B^ 
University of Iowa, 1919; Football Coach, Luther 
College, 1919; Attorney-at-Law, Decorah, Iowa, 1919- 
1921; High School Teacher and Athletic Coach, Al- 
lerton, Iowa, 1921-1922; Student, University of Iowa, 
summer, 192!2. 




Arthuk Laudel, 1919 (Sprlng)-1921 (Spring). 
Attended Latham (Mo.) High School, 1902-1905; 
Private Tutor, 1902-1905; Professional Baseball 
Player, Texas League, 1907-1911 (Dallas, 1907-1909, 
Waco, 1909-1911), American League, 1910-1911 (De- 
troit), American Association, 1911-1913 (Minneap- 
olis), Central League, 1912 (Fort Wayne and Cin- 
cinnati, 1912) ; Candy Manufacturer, Decorah, Iowa, 
1917-1922; Baseball Coach, Luther College, 1919, 1920, 
and 1921; in Business, Fort Wayne, Ind., 1922—. 




Ralph A. Movold, 1920 (Nov.)-1921. In U. S. 
Army, Camp Dodge, 1917-1919; B. S., North DakoU 
Agricultural College, 1920, Basketball Coach, 1920- 
1921; Physical Director, and Coach in Basketball 
and Track, Luther College, 1920 (Nov.) -1921. 




Alvin Julius Natvig, 1919 (Dec.)-1920 (March). 
A. B., Luther College, 1918; Basketball Coach and 
Teacher of Norwegian and Latin, Luther College, 
December, 1919-March, 1920; Teaclier, Park Region 
Luther College, 1921—. 



Robert P. Nelson, 1919 (Feb.-June). Sergeant, 
U. S. Army; Assistant Instructor in Military Science 
and Tactics, R. O. T. C, Luther College, 1919. 



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FACULTY 



129 




fTHOMAS NiuflOK, 1904-1905. A. B., Luther 
College, 1889; Theological Student, Wauwatosa, 
Wis., 1889-1891, Luther Seminary, 1891-1892, 
Cand. Theol., 1892; Lutheran Pastor, Chicago, 
111., 1892-1897, St. Paul, Minn., 1897-1904, Ridge- 
way, Iowa, 1904-1918; Instructor in Norwegian, 
Luther College, 1904-1905, Member, Board of 
Trustees, 1905-1908; Editor, "B0rneblad'% 1909- 
1913, "Ev. Luth. Kirketidende", 1913-1917. 




OiJviA Petebsok, 1915-1917. Registered Nurse, 
Graduate, St. Paul (Minn.) Hospital; Decorah City 
Hospital, also serving Luther College, 1915-1917; in 
Red Cross Work with American Army during the 
World War; County Nurse, Pope Co., Minn., 1919- 
1921; Nurse, St. Paul Hospital, 1921-1922; State 
Health Demonstrator, St. Paul, Minn., 1922—. 





fAxEL Chribtiax Rosekkkaktz SMrrH, 1876-1906. 
A. B. and A. M., University of Christiania, M. D., 
1869; Physician, Decorah, Iowa, 1873-1906; College 
Physician, Luther College, 1876-1905; retired, Scan- 
dinavia, Wis., and Decorah, Iowa, 1906-1917. 



Cabstex C. Smh-h, 1905-1906. Student, Luther 
College, 1892-1897; M. D., Northwestern University, 
1903; College Physician, Luther College, 1905-1906; 
Physician, Merrill, Wis., 1903-1904, Decorah, Iowa, 
1904-1906, Scandinavia, Wis., 1906-1918, Carson Lake, 
Minn., 1918—. 



OscAa M. SoLEM, 1920 (Sept.-Dec.). A. B., (?), 
University of Minnesota, (?), LL. B., (?); Captain, 
U. S. Army, 1918-1919; Football Coach, — , Luther 
College, 1920; Athletic Director, Drake University, 
1921—. 



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LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 




Ola Akdheab Solheim, 1881-1882. A. B., Luther 
College, 1881; Special Instructor in Vocal Music, 
and Director of Band, Luther College, 1881-1882; 
Theological Student, Luther Seminary, 1882-1888; 
Teacher, Willmar (Minn.) Seminary, 1888-1884; Stu- 
dent of Theology, University of Christiania, 1884- 
1887; Parochial School Teacher, Wis., 1887-1889; 
Teacher, Martin Luther Orphans' Home, Stoughton, 
Wis., 1889-1901; Farmer, 1901-1906; Parochial School 
Teacher, 1906-1910 (near Decorah, Iowa, 1907-1910); 
Professor of Christianity and Norwegian, Lutheran 
Normal School, Sioux Falls, S. Dak., 1910-1918, Au- 
gustana College and Normal School, 1918 — ; Mem- 
ber, Visiting Committee, Luther College, three years. 




Tbokd Stabo, 1906 — . A. B., Hamar Gymnasium, 
Norway, 1888; A. M., University of Christiania, 
1889, M. D., 1894; Physician, Spring Grove, Minn., 
1895-1906; attended Philadelphia Polyclinic, 1898, 
New York Polyclinic, 1898, Universify of Berlin, 
1900; Physician, Decorah, Iowa, 1906 — , and College 
Physician, Luther College, 1906—; Knight of the 
Order of St. Olav; Member, Board of Trustees, Lu- 
ther College, 1914 — , and President of the Board, 
1921—; Vice Consul for Norway, 1917—. 




Charles H. Valdek, 1881-1890. Attended State 
Normal School, Winona, Minn. ; taught Public School, 
Minn, and Wis.; Instructor in Business College, De- 
corah, Iowa, 1875 — f and Supervisor of Penmanship 
in the Decorah Schools, 1876-1888; founded Valder 
Business College, 1888, and Valder Normal School, 
1889, Decorah, Iowa; President of same, 1888(1889)- 
1922; Instructor in Penmanship, Luther College, 
1881-1890 ( listed in early Catalogs as **Professor 
of Penmanship"); retired from School Workj^ 1922. 




Nora Louise Walhus^ 1921 — . Attended La Crosse 
Lutheran Hospital, Wis., 1914-1917, Registered 
Nurse, 1918; Chicago Lying-in Hospital, 1917; Night 
Supervisor, Spring Grove (Minn.) Hospital, 1917- 
1918; Red Cross Nurse, Fort Snelling, Minn., 1918- 
1919; Superintendent, Spring Grove Hospital, 1919; 
Superintendent, Conway Hospital, Elma, Wash., 
1919-1920; College Nurse, Luther College, 1921—. 



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FACULTY 



131 




LUTHER COLLEGE FACULTY IN 1902 

Back Row: O. L. Olson, Geo. Markhus, H. W. Sheel 

Front Row: L. S. Reaue, W. Sfhler, C. A. Naeseth, G. Bothne, 

C. K. rreufl, Laur. Lareen 



IV. Distribution of Work 

The remaining portion of this chapter is designed to answer 
the following question: What teacher taught any given subject 
in any given year? Prof. Bothne's history of Luther College 
makes possible an approximately complete answer to this ques- 
tion np to 1897; the catalogs of Luther College furnish a less 
comprehensive guide for the remaining years. Figures indicate 
the number of hours per week. Names of substitute teachers and 
student assistants are enclosed in parentheses. The teachers are 
arranged by departments; within each department the teacher 
of the most advanced class (not necessarily the head of the de- 
partment) is named firsts and so on down to the teacher of the 
lowest class. Incidentally this section furnishes a condensed 
summary of the curriculum at Luther College year by year. In 
the interest of economy of space the Collegiate and Preparatory 
Departments have been merged in the tabulation. 



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132 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD. FIRST FIVE YEARS. 1861-66 

Department 1861-62 1862-63 1863-64 1864-65 1865-66 

Catechetics and 

Methodi N. Brandt 2 

English F. Schmidt 4 F. Schmidt 4 F. Schmidt 7 F. Schmidt 6 F. Schmidt 9.5 

(J. Jacobsen 5) 

Geography F. Schmidt 2 F. Schmidt 2 L. Siewers 4 L. Siewers 4 N. Brandt 2 

(J. Jacobaen 2) L. Siewers 2 

German F. Schmidt 4 F. Schmidt 4 L. Siewers 6 F. Schmidt 2 L. Siewers 2 

L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 3 L. Larsen 3 F. Schmidt 1.5 

(J. Jacobsen 3) L. Siewers 3 L. Larsen 3 

N. Brandt 2 

Greek F. Schmidt 3 F. Schmidt 3 F. Schmidt 4 F. Schmidt 4 F. Schmidt 4 

L. Siewers 3 L. Siewers 4 L. Siewers 8 

(J. Jacobsen 3) 

Hebrew L. Lar8en(2 Sem.) . L. Larsen 2 (4) 

History L. Larsen 3 L. Larsen 3 L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 6 

Latin t F. Schmidt 6 F. Schmidt 6 L. Larsen 10 L. Larsen 5 L. Larsen 8 

L. Larsen 5 L. Larsen 5 L. Siewers 12 F. Schmidt 2 F. Schmidt 5 

a. Jacobsen 7).. . .L. Siewers 11 L. Siewers 6 

, N. Brandt 5 

Mathematics F.Schmidt 4 F. Schmidt 4 F. Schmidt 7 F.Schmidt 2 L. Siewers 7 

(Arith.; Alg.; Geom.) (J. Jacobaen 4) L. Siewers 2 F. Schmidt 2 

Music (Singing) F. Schmidt 2 F. Schmidt 2 F. Schmidt 2 F. Schmidt 2 N. Brandt 3 

Norwegian L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 5 L. Larsen 2 

L. Siewers 3 N. Brandt 5 

L. Siewers 3 

Penmanship F. Schmidt 2 F. Schmidt 2 L. Siewers 1 L. Larsen 1 L. Larsen 2 



(Caligraphy) ^ * : i (J- Jaco^n_l) • h ^^V"^ *j 

telig' 



Religion L. Larsen 3 L. Urscn 3 F. Schmidt 5 F. Schmidt 5 F. Schmidt 5 

(Aug. Conf.. Bible L. Larsen 2 L. Laiaen 4 N. Brandt 3 

Ex.. Bible Hist L. Larsen 2 

Catechism) 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD, SECOND FIVE YEARS. 1866-71 

Department 1866-67 1867-68 1868-69 1869-70 1870-71 

Catechetics and N. Brandt 2 N. Brandt 2 N. Brandt 2 N. Brandt 4 N. Brandt 5 

Methods 

English F. Schmidt 9 F. Schmidt 9 F. Schmidt 6 K. Bergh 16 K. Bergh 12 

K. Bergh 11 (L. ReQue 12) 

F. Schmidt 3 

Geography N. Brandt 2 G. Landmark 2 L. Siewers 2 L. Siewers 1 L. Siewers 2 

L. Siewers 2 F. Schmidt 2 F. Schmidt 2 K. Bergh 2 K. Bergh 2 

• (L. Reque 2) 

German L. Siewers 4 L. Siewers 5 F. Schmidt 4 F. Schmidt 3 F. Schmidt 2 

N. Brandt 5 (K. Throndsen) . . .L. Siewers 4 L. Siewers 4 L. Siewers 7' 

L. Larsen 3 N. Brandt 2 

(K. Throndsen) . . . L. Larsen 3 

Greek L. Siewers 4 G. Landmark 8 G. Landmark 4 G. Landmark 4 G. Landmark 3 

F. Schmidt 4 L. Siewers 4 L. Siewers 4 F. Schmidt 4 F. Schmidt 4 

F. Schmidt 4 L. Siewers 4 L. Siewers 4 

Hebrew L. Larsen 2. .» L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 4 

History L. Larsen 5 L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 3 L. Larsen 2 

(Gen. and U. S.) F. Schmidt 2 F. Schmidt 2 L. Siewers 2 L. Siewers 2 

G. Landmark 2 

Latin L. Larsen 9 G. Landmark 12.. .G. Landmark 18.. .G. Landmark 18.. .G. Landmark 18 

F. Schmidt 3 L. Larsen 11 N. Brandt 6 F. Schmidt 6 L, Laraen 12 

L. Siewers 6 N. Brandt 6 L. Larsen 6 L. Larsen 6 

N. Brandt 5 (K. Throndsen) 

Librarian G. Landmark G. Landmark G. Landmark G. Landmark 

Logic F. Schmidt 2 F. Schmidt I 

Mathematics F. Schmidt 2 L. Siewers 8 L. Siewers 4 L. Siewers 4 K. Bergh 8 

L. Siewers 6 F. Schmidt 2 K. Beigh 8 (L. Reque 8) 

K. Bergh 4 

Music (Singing) N. Brandt 3 N. Brandt 3 N. Brandt 3 N. Brandt 4 N. Brandt 4 

Natural History L. Siewers 1 L. Siewers 1 L. Siewers 1 L. Siewers 3 L. Siewers 3 

Norwegian L. Larsen 5 L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 2 L. Laraen 2 

L. Siewers 3 G. Landmark 2 G. Landmark 2 G. Landmark 2 G. Landmark 4 

L. Siewers 5 L. Siewers 7 L. Siewers 9 L. Siewers 6 

Penmanship L. Larsen 2 L. Siewers 2 L. Siewers 2 L. Siewers 2 L. Siewers 2 

Religion F. Schmidt 5 F. Schmidt 6 F. Schmidt 6 F. Schmidt 10 F. Schmidt 10 

(Aug. Conf.. Bible N. Brandt 3 N. Brandt 3 N, Brandt 2 N. Brandt 4 N. Brandt 6 

Ex.. Bible Hist.. L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 2 

Catechism. Greek (K. Throndsen) . . . (K. Throndsen) 

Testament) 



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FACULTY 133 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD. THIRD FIVE YEARS, 1871-76 

Department 1871-72 1872-73 1873-74 1874-75 1875-76 

Catechetics. etc N. Brandt 5 N. Brandt 5 N. Brandt 5 N. Brandt 5 N. Brandt 3 

.T. Bothne3 



English K. Bergh 12 K. Bergh 12 J. Jacobaen 19 J. Jacobsen 4 J. Jacobsen 7 

F. Schmidt 3 (?).. . (L. Reque) A. Teisbcrg 12 (?) L Reque 13 

(J. Jacobaen) J. Jacobsen 4 C. Narvesen 6 . . . .C. Narveeen 6 



(N.Christenaen ?) . 



Geography L. Siewers 2 (?)... L. Siewers 2 L. Siewers 2 j. Bjarnason 4 .... L. Siewers 1 

K. Bergh 2 K. Bergh 2 C. Narvesen 2 L. Siewers 2 T. Bothne 3 

iL. Reque) (L. Reque) C. Narvesen 4 .... C. Narvesen 4 
. Jacobsen 2 J. Jacobsen 2 F.Lindemann 2(?) . J. Jacobsen 2 
„ _ .. SiewexB 7 L. Siewers 7 L. Siewers 7 L. Siewers 7 

L. Siewers 7 (?) A. Tcisberg 3 

Gre«k G. Landmark 3 G. Landmark 3 G. Landmark 4 G. Landmark 4 J. Jacobsen 8 

L. Siewers 4 (?) . . .L. Siewers 4 A. Seippel 8 J. Jacobsen 4 L. Siewers 9 

" " "- .L. r 



F. Schmidt 4 (?).. J. Jacobsen 4 L. Siewers 4 L. Siewers 4. 

(J. Jacobaen ) J. Bjarnason 4. 

. L. Larsen 2 (?) L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 4 L. " 



Hebrew L. Larsen 2 (?) L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 j. Jacobsen 3 

History L. Larsen 4 (?) L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 9 

(Gen. and U. S.) L. Siewers 2 (?) C. Narvesen 2 A. Teisberg 2 T. Bothne 2 

Latin G. Landmark 18.. .G. Landmark 18.. .G. Landmark 18.. .G. Landmark 18.. .G. Landmark 23 

L. Larsen 12 (?)... J. Jacobsen 6 A. Seippel 17 J. Bjarnason 12. . .L. Reque 6 

(J. Jacobsen 6)(?)..L. Larsen 6 (L. Reque) T. Bothne 6 

(N. Christensen ?) . 



Librarian G. Landmark G. Landmark G. Landmark J. Jacobsen J. Jacobsen 

Losic & Rhetoric . . . F. Schmidt 1(?) . . . J. Jacobsen 1 J. Jacobsen 1 J. Jacobsen 1 J. Jacobaen 1 

(J. Jacobsen) 

Mathematics K. Bergh 8 K. Bergh 8 C. Narvcs?n 18 ... A. Teisberg 13 C. Narvesen 14 



F. Schmidt (?) (L.^ Reque) . (L. Reque) C. Narves?n 7 L. Reque 5 



(J. Jacobsen) J. Jacobsen 4 . . 

Music (Singing) N. Brandt 4 N. Brandt 4 N. Brandt 4 N. Brandt 4 N. Brandt 4 

Natural History L. Siewers 3 (?)... L. Siewers 3 C. Narvesen 3 L. Siewers 3 L. Siewers 2 

Norwegian L. Larsen 2 (?) L. Laraen 2 L. Larsen 2 V. Koren 4 V/Koren 4 

G. Landmark 4 G. Landmark 2 G. Landmark 2 L. Siewers 8 (L. Larson 2) 

L. Siewers 6 (?) . . .L. Siewers 8 L. Siewera 10 T. Bothne 10 (12) 

(N. Christensen ?) L. Siewers 5 

Penmanship L. Siewers 2 (?)... L. Siewers 2 L. Siewers 2 L. Siewers 2 L. Siewers 2 

G. Landmark 1 

Physical Geography C. Narves?n 2 

Religion F. Schmidt 10(?) . .J. Jacobsen 3 T. Jacot>sen 3 T. Jacobsen 7 J. Jacobsen 3. . . 

(Aug. Conf., Bible(J. Jacot>sen 3)(?)..L. Larsen 6 L. Larsen 6 L. larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 

Ex.. Bible Hist..(L. Larsen 6) (?) . . N. Brandt 6 N. Brandt 6 N. Brandt 4 T. Bothne 2 

Catechism. For- N. Brandt 6 N. Brandt 8 

mula of Concord. L. Reque 2 

Greek Testament) 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD. FOURTH FIVE YEARS. 1876-81 

Department 1876-77 1877-78 1878-79 1879-80 1880-81 

Catechetics H. Roalkvam 2 . . , H. Roalkvam 2.. . . H. Roalkvam 3 

(IncL Theory & Pr A. Veblen 1 

of Tch'g.) 

Enslish J. Jacobsen 5 L. Reque 5 L. Reque 7 L. Reque 11 L. Reque 7 

L. Reque 19 A. Bredeaen 5 A. Veblen 20 A. Veblen 16 (G. Bothne ?) 

A. Bredesen 11 A. Veblen 18 A. Veblen 20 

Geography C. Narvesen 7 C. Narvesen 4 .... C. Narvesen 4 .... C. Narves2n 4 .... C. Narvesen 5 

German J. Jacobsen 2 A. Bredesen 8 J. Jacobsen 2 J. Jacobsen 3 J. Jacobsen 3 

L. Siewera 7 L. Reque 3 A. Sander 4 O. Breda 2 (G. Bothne 3) 

L. Reque 2 L. Reque 2 O. Breda 2 

T. Bothne 3 T. Bothne 7 T. Bothne 9 

Creek J. Jacobsen 7 J. Jacobsen 16 J. Jacobsen 16. . . .J. Jacobsen 18. . . .J. Jacobsen 12 

L. Siewera 9 L. Reque 5 A. Sander 5 O. Breda 5 (G. Bsthne 12) 

O. Breda 11 

Hebrew J. Jacobsen 4 J. Jacobsen 4 A. Sander 4 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 

Hijitory L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 7 L. Larsen 10 L. Larsen 8 L. Larsen 9 (11) 

.Gen.. U. S., Scand.).T. Bothne 5 T. Bothne 4 L. Reque 4 L. Reque 2 L. Reque 2 

T. Bothne 3 O. Breda 3 O. Breda 3 

T. Bothne 3 A. Veblen 3 

. T. Bothne 3 



L. Larsen 4 T. Jacobsen 6 J. Jacobsen 6 O. Breda 12 O. Breda 6 

J. Jacobsen 6 L. Reque 12 L. Reque 12 L. Reque 12 L. Reque 18 

L. Reque 6 A. Bredesen 6 A. Sander 12 T. Boihne 12 (L. Larsen ?) 

A. Bredesen 12 T. Bothne 6 T. Bothne 6 (G. Bothne ?) 

T. Bothne 5 A. Veblen 6 T. Bothne 12 

Librarian J. Jacobsen J. Jacobsen J. Jacobsen J. Jacobsen J. Jacobsen 



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134 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD, FOURTH FIVE YEARS. 1876-81 

Department 1876-77 1877-78 1878-79 1879^9 1880-81 

Logic J. Jacobsen 1 

Mathematics C. Narveaen 18. . .C. Narvesen 18. . .C. Narveaen 23. . .C. Narvesen 19. . . C. Narvesen 19 

L. Reque 2 A. Veblen 3 A. Veblen 7 A. Veblen 3 

Music (Sinxing) N. Brandt 4 N. Brandt 3 N. Brandt 3 N. Brandt 3 N. Brandt 3 

H. Roalkvam 4 

Music (Band) A. L. Himle (H.B.Thorgrimaen)(0. Glas^) (O. Glaa^) 

(H.B.Tliorgrinisen) (Q. Solhdm) 

Natural History L. Siewers 2 C. Narvesen 2 C. Narvnen 3 

Norwegian T. Bothne 15 T. Bothne 15 T. Bothne 13 T. Bothne 8 T. Bothne 9 

L. Siewers 7 H. Roalkvam 4.. . .O. Breda 5 O. Breda 5 

H. Roalkvam 8.... H. Roalkvam 8 

Penmanship L. Siewers 3 A. Veblen 2 A. Veblen 2 A. Veblen 2 A. Veblen 2 

Physical Geography. C. Narvesen 2 C. Narvesen 2 C. Narvesen 5 C. Narvesen 2 

Physician A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith AC. Smith A. C. Smith 

Physiology A. Veblen 1 A, Veblen 1 

Religion J. Jacobsen 1 A. Bredeaen 6 J. Jacobsen 2 J. Jacobsen 2 J. Jacobaen 2 

(Bible Ex.. BibleA. Bredesen 4 L. Larsen 6 L. Larsen 4 L. Laraen 4 L. Larsen 4 

Hist.. Catechism.L. Larsen 8 N. Brandt 10 H. Roalkvam IS. . . H. Roalkvam 18. . . H. Roalkvam 16 

Formula of Con-N. Brandt 12 

cord. Greek Test.) 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD. FIFTH FIVE YEARS, 1881-86 

Department 1881-82 1882-83 1883-84 1884-85 1885^6 

Chemistry C. Narvesen (?). . .O.Ram8tad3(2Sem) 

Didactics H. Roalkvam 4 H. Roalkvam 4.. . .H. Roalkvam 4.. . .H. Roalkvam 4 

(H.Hustvedt,Dec.) 

English G. Evensen 26 L. Reque 3 L. Reque 6 L. Reque 8 L. Reque 6 

G. Bothne 2 C. Naeseth 17 C. Naeseth 19 G. Bothne 7 C. Naeseth 19(16) 



. . (G. Rygh 17) O. Ramstad 11. 

..C.N - " 



Geography H. Roalkvam 2.. . . C. Narvesen 5 C. Narvesen 8 H. Roalkvam 3 O. Ramatad 8 

C. Narveaen 5 (p. Ramstad) O. RamsUd 5 (J. Tingelstad) 

German T. Homme 7 E. Petersen 11 E. Petersen 11 E. Petersen 7 £. Petersen 13 

(E. Petersen) R. Olsen 2 

T. Bothne 7 R. Monrad 3 

Greek G. Bothne 11 G. Bothne 18 R. Olsen 18 R. Olsen 12 G. Bothne 17 

O. Breda 11 C. Naeseth 5 G. Bothne 5 



.(G. Rygh 5). 



Hebrew L. Larsen 4 L. Laraen 4 L. Lsirsen 4 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 

History L. Larsen 9 G. Bothne 3 R. Olsen 3 L. Larsen 6 L. Larsen 6 

G. Evenson 2 L. Larsen 6 L. Larsen 6 R. Monrad 4 R. Monrad 4 (7) 

O. Breda 3 H. Roalkvam 9 L. Reque 6 L. Reque 4 L. Reque 4 

T. Homme 3 L. Reque 2 R. Monrad 6 R. Olsen 3 G. Bothne 3 

H. Roalkvam 2 . . . H. Roalkvam 2.. . . H. Roalkvam 2 

(H.Hustvedt.Dec.) 

Latin O. Breda 6 L. Reque 18 L. Reque 6 L. Reque 6 L. Reque 12 

G. Bothne 6 E. Petersen 11 R. Monrad 12 R. Monrad 12 R. Monrad 12 

T. Homme 12 H. Roalkvam 5.. . . E. Petersen 10 E. Petersen 11 E. Petersen 6 

T. Bothne 11 

Librarian O. Breda H. Roalkvam H. Roalkvam H. Roalkvam H. Roalkvam 

(E. Petersen) 

Mathematics C. Narvesen 19. . .C. Narvesen 21 . . .C. Narvesen 10. . .O. Ramstad 3 0. Ramstad 14 

G. Bothne 7 (O. Ramstad) G. Bothne 12 g. Tingebtad) 

C. Naeseth 3 L. Reque 6 G. Bothne 4 

L. Reque 6 C. Naeseth 4 

Music (Singing) O. Solheim 8 (H. Hanson 8) .... (J. TingelsUd 7).. . (J, Tingelstad 6).. . (C. Sperati 8) 

Music (Band) O. Solheim (O. Glaa0e) (E. Krohn) (E. Krohn) (L. A. Laraen) 

(E. Krohn) 

Norwegian O. Breda 5 L. Larsen 2 R. Olsen 4 R, Olsen 8 G. Bothne 2 

T. Bothne 11 G. Bothne 4 R. Monrad 6 R. Monrad 6 R. Monrad 9 (6) 

H. Roalkvam 5.. . . H. Roalkvam 9.. . . H. Roalkvam 7.. . . H. Roalkvam 4.. . . H. Roalkvam 7 
(H.Hu8tvedt,Dec) (J. J<frgenson 4) 

Penmanship C. Valder 3 C. Valder 3 C. Valder 3 C. Valder 3 C. Valder 3 

Physical Geography C. Narvesen 4 O.Ramstad3(lSem)L. Reque 2 



(O. Ramstad). 

A. r - ■■ 



Physician A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith 

Physics O.Ramstad3(2Sem)O.Ramatad3(lSem) 

Religion L. Laraen 6 C. Naeseth 2 C. Naeseth 2 E. Petersen 6 C. Naeseth 2 

(Aug. Conf., BibleT. Homme 3 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 L. Laraen 2 

Ex.. Bible Hi8t..H. Roalkvam 15. . . E. Petersen 4 H. Roalkvam 12. . . H. Roalkvam 12. . . H. Roalkvam 12 

Catech.. Gk. Test.) H. Roalkvam 3.. . .(H. Huatvedt.Dec) E. Petersen 6 (7) 

E. Petersen 4 

Stenography(Elec.) E. Petersen 

Zoology C. Narvesen 3 C. Narvesen 3. . . .O.Ram8tad3(lSem)J. Tingelstad 3 

(Natural History) (2 Sem.) 

(O. Ramstad) 



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FACULTY 135 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD. SIXTH, FIVE YEARS, 1886-91 
Department 1886-87 1887-88 1888-89 1889-90 1890-91 

Chemistry H. Sheel 3 

Drawins H. Gausta , 

EducatkmCHiat. oO G. Bothne 1 (Sp.) 

KngKah L. Reque 6 L. Reque 6 L. Reque 3 L. Reque 3 L. Reque 3 

C. NcKth 16 C. Naeseth 16 C. Nsaeth 15 C. Naeseth 19 C. Naiaeth 16 

O.Ram«tad4(lSem) 

.W.Koren4(2Sem.).. 



Geosrephy J.Tingelstad 7(8) . .O. RamsUd 9 O. Ramstad 10. . . . A. EstremSCi yr.)..W. Sihler 5(F.W.) 

H.Sheel6(?) 

German E. FMersen 10 R. Monxad 3 J. Halland 13 W. Korea 13 W. Korea 9 (14) 

(H. Httstvedt) J. HaUand 10 

K. Monrad2 

Greek G. Bothae 17 G. Bothne 17 G. Bothne 21 (16) .G. Bothne 10 (9). .G. Bothne 10 

W.KorenS(2Sem)..W. Koren 11 W. Koren 11 

Gymnafltics J. Halland 4 W. Sihler 8 (?) 

Hebrew L. Larsen 4 (3)....L. Larsen 3 (4>....L. Larsen 4(W,S)..L. Larsen 4 

History L. Larsen 11 L. Larsen 7 L. Laraen 7 L. Larsen 11 (7). . .G. Bothne 3 (5) 

(Gen.. U. &. Scand..R. Monrad 3 C. Ncseth 3 J. Halland 3 A. Estrem 6 (11) . .L. Lanen 7 

EnsD L. Reque 5 J. Halland 3 (4). . .L Reque 3 L. Reque 3 L. Reque 5 

L. Reque 3 W.SiWer S(W,Sp.) 

R. Monrad S H. KrogS (Sp.) 

Latin L. Reque 12 L. Reque 12 L. Reque 18 L. Reque 17 L. Reque 17 

R. Monrad 12 R. Monrad 12 T. Halland 6 A. Eatrem 12 H. Krog 10 (5) 

E. Pletereen 5 (6). .J. HaUand 6 H. Hanson 6(lSm) W.Sihler 5(2Sem.) 



(H. Hustvedt) W.Koren 6(2 Sem) . 

.E. r ■ 



Uktarian E. Petersen C. Ncseth C. Noseth C. Naeseth C. Ncseth 

Mathematics G. Bothne 2 G. Bothne 4 O. Ramstad 10. . . . H. Sheel 13 H. Sheel 18 

J. Tingelstod 17. . .O. Ramstad 13. . . .G.Bothne 4(2Sem) .G. Bothne 4 G. Bothne 4 

C. Nseaeth 3 H. Hanson 10 H. Hanson 5. 



Music (Vocal (C. Sperati8) (C. Sperati 9) H. Hanson 10 (?)..H. Hanson 14 (?)..W. Sihler 6 (8) 

Muaic (Band) (J. Lmnevokl) (J. Unnevold) (J. Linncvold) (J. Linnevold) (A. O. Johnson) 

Norwegian G. Bothne 6 G. Bothne 5 G. Bothne 8 G. Bothne 11 G. Bothne 6 

R. Monrad 9 R. Monrad 6 L. Larsen 3 C. Noseth 3 H. Krog 15 (8) 

C. Ncseth 4 C. Naeseth 2 C. Noseth 7 H. Hanson 4 (L. Larsen 3) 

L. Reque 4 , 

Old Norse G. Bothne 3 (F). 1 

(W) 

Ptomanship C. Valder 3 C. VaUer 3 C. Valder 3 C. Valder 3 G. Haugen 2 

: W.Sihler 3(1)(?) 

Physical Geography. L. Reque 2 O. Ramstad 2 L. Reque 2 L. Reque 2 W. Sihler 5 (F) 

Physician A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith 

Physics J. Tingelstad 3 O. Ramstad 3 (1 O. Ramstad 3 (1 

(1 Sem.) Sem.) Sem.) H. Sheel 3 (F, W) .H. Sheel 5 (F, W) 

Physiology O. Ramstad 3 H. Sheel 3 (F, W) . H. Sheel 5 (Sp.) 

W.Koren3(2Sem.) 

ReKgioa C. Ncseth 2 C. Nxseth 4 C. Naeseth 4 C. Naeseth 2 C. Neseth 2 

(Aug. Conf.. Bible,L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 5 L. Larsen 5 L. Larsen 7 L. Larsen 4 

Catech.. Gk. Test.)E. PMersen 10 J. Halland 5 J. Halland 3 J.Th.VIvisaker 3.H. Krog 6 

(H. Hustvedt) W. Koren 2(2Sem.) W. Sihler 1 

:.:. J.Vlvisaker 1 (F) 

Zoology J. Tingelstad 3 O. RamsUd 3 (2 

(2 Sem.) Sem.) H. Sheel 6 (Sp.)... W.Sihler 5 (Sp.) 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD, SEVENTH FIVE YEARS. 1891-96 

Department 1891-92 1892-93 1893-94 1894-95 1895-96 

Chemistry H. Sheel 3 (Sp.). . .H. Sheel 4 (Sp.). . .H. Sheel 4(2 Sem.).H. Sheel 4(2 Sem.).H. Sheel 4(2 Sem.). 

Drawing J. Xavier J. Xavier (?) 

Economics J.Granrud3(W,Sp) 

Ediacatkm (Hist.) G. Bothne 1 (Sp.) .G. Bothne 1 (Sp.) G. Bothne 2 (Sp.) 

Elocntkm W. Koren (Sp.) 

English L. Reque 3 (?)... .L. Reque 4 J. Ness 4 C. Naeseth 7 C. Naeseth 8 

C. Naeseth 11 C. Naeseth 6 C. Naeseth 6 G. Markhus 15(14)G.Markhus6(12.18) 

W. Sihler 5 rG, Markhus 12 .... G. Markhus 12(11) 

(M . Waller) 

Angto-Sanon C. Naeseth 3 C. Naeseth 3 (2) 

French H. Krog 3(F, W) 

Geography W. Sihler 10 (5). . .G. Bothne 5 (Sp.) . G. Markhu85(F.W)G. Bothne 9 (Sp.) . G. Markhus 11(F) 

G.MarkhusS(F,W) G.Markhu85(F,W) 

German W. Koren 9 W. Sihler 9 (10). . . W. Sihler 10 W. Sihler 15 (10). .W. Sihler 11(10.7) 

G.Bothne5(F.W) . .G. Bothne S(F,W).C. Naeseth S(F.W) G. Bothne 5(F,W) 

Greek G. Bothne 10 (9)..G. Bothne 10 (9)..G. Bothne 10 (9)..G. Bothne 10 (4)..G. Bothne 9 

W. Koren 11 W. Sihler 11 W. Sihler 11 W. Sihler 11 (16). .W. Sihler 10 

Gymnastics W. Sihler 2 W. Sihler 4 (W) . . . (S. OrwoU) (S. OrwoU) (S. T. Normann) 

Hebrew L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 



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136 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD. SEVENTH FIVE YEARS. 1891-96 

Department 1891-92 1892-93 1893-94 1894-95 1895-96 

History C. Naweth 3 C. Naeaeth 3 L. Laraen 9 C. Nawrth 3 C. Nxseth 3 

(Gen.. Eng., Scand..L. Laraen 7 L. Laraen 8 C. Naeaeth 6 L. Laraen 5 (8) L. Laraen 8 

U. S. and Civics) G.BothneKW.Sp.) G. Markhus 5 (6)..G. Bathne 4 (§ yr.)G. Bothne4 (F.W).G. Markhus 5 

W. Koren 3 G. Markhua 5 (6).. J. Granrud 3(F). . . H. ICro£ 5 (Sp.) 

W.Sihler 5(W,Sp.) G. Markhua 5 (6) 

H. Krog 5 (F) . 



Latin L. Reqiie 21 L. ReQue 21 J. Ncaa 21 J. Granrud 22 (17).J. Granrud 25 

H. Krog 6 (10).... H. Krog 6 (12). . . .H. Krog 6 (12). . . .H. Krog 6 (12).. . .H. Kros 6(W.Sp.) 



(p.Swvold). 



Librarian C. Naeaeth C. Naeseth C. Naeaeth C. Naeaeth C. Naeaeth 

Mathematics H. Shecl 22(17. 5) H. Sheel 19 (10)...H. Sheel 19 (10).. .H. Sheel 19 (14)...H. Sheel 19 (14) 

G. Bothne 5 (4) ... G. Bothnc 5 (W) . . (O. Omlie) (S. Hagen) (O. StrcJm) 

(C. Hovde) (O. Omlie) (S. Hagen) (B. Saevre) (I. AnderMn) 

(O. Omlie) (O. Str0m) (?) 

Music (Vocal) W. Sihler 6 (?).... W. Sihier 4 W. Sihler 2 (W) . . . H. Hanaon 14 (?). . H. Hanson 14 (?) 

Muaic (Band) (H. Tjemagel) (H. Tjcrnagel) (O. Omlie) H. Hanaon H. Hanaon 



. n. A. Thoraon) ... (I- A. Thorson)., 



Norwegian G. Bothne 8 G. Bothne 5 G. Bothne 8 G. Bothne 8 G. Bothne 8 

(IncH Old Norae) L. Laraen 3 (F).. . .L. Laraen 3 G. Bothne 4(O.N.) .H. Krog 12 (S)....H. Krtv 12 (6) 

H. Krog 10 (5).... H. Krog 12 (6)....H. Krog 12 (6) 

Penmanship W. Sihler 2(F.W). . W. Sihler 2 (H. Reque) a. Peteraon) (]• PttcrBon) 



(H. Reque 2). 



Physical Geography. H. Sheel 5 (Sp.). . . H. Sheel 5 (Sp.) H. Sheel 5 (Sp.) 

Physician A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith 

Physics H.Sheel 5(W,Sp.) . . H. Sheel 5(F.W). . . H. Sheel 5(F, W) . . H. Sheel 5(F, W) . . H. Sheel 5 

Physiology H. Sheel 5 (Sp.) . . . H. Sheel 5 (Sp.) . . . H. Shecl 5 (Sp.) . . . H. Shecl 5 (Sp.) . . . H. Sheel 5 (Sp.) 

(G. Markhua) W. Sihler 5 (W) 

Religion C. Naeseth 2 C. Naeaeth 2 W. Sihler 2 C. Naeaeth 2 C. Naeaeth 2 

(Aug. Conf.. Bible.L. I^rsen 4 L. Laraen 2 L. Laraen 4 L. Laraen 4 L. Laraen 4 

Catech.. (Exp.). Gk.H. Krog 6 H. Krog 6 H. Krog 8 H. Krog 8 G. Markhua 3 (W) 

Teat.) W.Sihler 1 G. Markhus 1 G. Markhua 1 G. Markhua 1 H. Krtv 8 

E. Hove 2 E. Hove 2 

Zoology W. Sihler 5 (Sp.) . . W. Sihler 5 (Sp.) . .G. Markhus 5 (Sp.)G. Markhua 5 (Sp.)W. Sihler 5 (Sp,) 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD, EIGHTH FIVE YEARS, 1896-1901 

Department 1896-97 1897-98 1898-99 1899-1900 1900-1901 

Chemistry H. Shecl H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel 

Education (Hist.) G. Bothne (?) G. Bothne (?) G. Bothne (?) G. Bothne (?) 

Elocution G. Markhus G. Markhua G. Markhua 

English C. Naeaeth C. Naeaeth C. Naaeth C. Naeaeth C. Naeaeth 

G. Markhua G. Markhua G. Markhua G. Markhua G. Markhus 

B. Saevre 

French L. Reque (?) L. Reque (?)...... L. Reque (?) 

Geography G. Markhua W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler 

G. Markhua G. Markhua G. Markhua B. Saevre 

German W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler 

Greek G. Bothne G. Bothne G. Bothne G. Bothne G. Bothne 

VV. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler 

Gymnastics (S. T. Normann) . .(N. B. Hanson). . .Z. Ordal (O. O. Laraon) B. Saevre 



. (J. O. Dreng) (J. O. Dreng ?).... (J. O. Dreng) . 

... L. Lai 



Hebrew L. Larsvn L. I^rsen L. Laraen L. Laraen L. Laraen 

History: Engl C. Narseth C. Naeseth C. Nseseth C. Naeaeth C. Naeaeth 

Gen L. Larsen L. Larsen L. Larsen L. Laraen L. Laraen 

Fcand G. Bothne (?) G. Bothne (?) G. Bothne (?) G. Bothne (?) G. Bothne (?) 

U. 8 G. Markhus G. Markhus G. Markhus G. Markhua. G. Markhua 

Gen K. K vamme C. K. Preus 

B. Saevre 

Latin J. (Granrud L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque 

K. Kvamme K. Kvamme Z. Ordal L. Laraen B. Saevre 

C. K. Preua 

(A. O. White) 

Librarian C. Naeaeth C. Naeaeth C. Naeseth C. Naeaeth C. Naeaeth 

Mathematics H. Shecl H. Shecl H. Shecl ? . H. Shecl H. Shecl 

(O. Turmo) (H. Normann) B. Saevre 

MuvHic(Voc. & Inst.) . H. Hanson H. Hanson H. Hanson H. Hanaon H. Hanson 

Norwegian G. Bothne G. Bothne G. Bothne G. Bothne G. Bothne 

(Inch Old Norse) K. Kvamme K. Kvamme C. K. Preus C. K. Preua C. K. Preus 

Z. J. Ordal 

Penmanship (J. Peterson) (J. Peterson) (N. B. Hanson) . . . (H. Normann) (J. Skinnemoen) 

Physician A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith 

Physics (& Ph. G.) . . H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Shecl H. Sheel H. Sheel 

Physiology W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler 

Religion C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeaeth 

(Aug. Conf., Bible.L. Larsen L. Laraen H. G. Stub H. G. Stub C. K. Preus 



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FACULTY 13? 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD. EIGHTH FIVE YEARS. 1896-01 
Department 1896-97 1897-98 1898-99 1899-1900 1900-1901 



Bible Hist.. Cate-G. Markhus (?) . . .G. Markhua (?)... L. Larsen L. Laraen G. Markhus 

chism. Gk. Teat.,K. Kvamme K. Kvamme G. Markhua G. Markhus 

O. T. Introd.) C. K. Preua C. K. Preua 

Zoolosy W. Sihler 



DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD. NINTH FIVE YEARS, 1901-06 

Department 1901-02 1902-03 1903^4 1904-05 1905-06 

Chemistry H. Sheel H. Shcel H. Sheel 

I>rawing W. Sihler 

Education G. Bothne G. Bothne G. Bothne K. Gjeraet K. Gjeraet (?) 

Elocution G. Markhua G. Markhus G. Markhus G. Markhua G. Markhua 

EngUah C. Nweth C. Naweth C. Naeseth C. Naeaeth C. Naeseth 

O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olaon O. L. Olson 

G. Markhus G. Markhus G. Markhus G. Markhus G. Markhus 

K. Gjerset (?) K. Gjerset (?) 

French L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque 

Geography W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler 

O. L. Olson K. Jacobsen 

German W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler 

Greek G. Bothne G. Bothne G. Bothne W. Sihler G. Bothne 

W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler K. Jacobsen W. Sihler 



G>'mnastic8 O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson (?) (?) 

W. Sihler (?) (?) 

Hebrew L. Larsen L. Larsen L. Larsen L. Larsen L. Larsen 

(K. Jacobsen) 

History L. Larsen K. Gjerset K. Gjerset K. Gjerset K. Gjerset 

C. Naaeih C. Naeseth G. Bothne G. Markhus G. Bothne (?) 

G. Bothne G. Bothne G. Markhus K. Jacobsen G. Markhus 

G. Markhus G. Markhus 

C. K. Prcus 

Latin L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque 

O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson 

Librarian C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth 

Mathematics H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel 

Musk (Vocal) H. Hanson H. Hanson H. Hanson C. A. Sperati C. A. Speraii 

Music (Band) H. Hanson H. Hanson H. Hanson C. A. Sperati 

(W. Coup) C. A. Sperati 

(T. M. protning) 

Norwesian G. Bothne G. Bothne G. Bothne L. Larsen G. Bothne 

C. K. Preus K. Gjerset (?) K. Gjerset (?) T. Nilsson K. Gjerset 

K. Jacobsen M. Bleken 

Oratoricals O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson 

Penmanship O. L. Olaon O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olaon (?) 

Physician A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith Carsten Smith 

Physics (fit Ph. G.)..H. W. Sheel H. W. Sheel H. W. Sheel H. W. Sheel H. W. Sheel 

Religion C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth 

Aug. Conf.. Bible.C. K. Preus C. K. Preus C. K. Preus C. K. Preus C. K. Preus 

Catechism. BibleG. Markhus G. Markhus G. Markhus G. Markhus G. Markhus 

Hist.. Gk. Test.) I. Torrison I. Torrison I. Torrison C. A. Sperati 

C. A. Sperati I. Torrison 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD, TENTH FIVE YEARS, 1906-11 
Department 1906-07 1907-08 1908-09 1909-10 1910-11 

Chemistry H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Shcel H. Sheel H. Sheel 



. (C. Fjeldstad) 

.c. r- ■ 



Christianity C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth 

(Religion) C. K. Preus C. K. Preus A. Rovclstad A. Rovelstad O. Tingelstad 

Aug. Conf.. Bible.M. Bleken M. Bleken M. Bleken O. Tingelstad S. Ylvisaker 

Catech.. Ch. Hist.,C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati C. K. Preus C. K. Preus C. K. Preus 

Gk. Test., Life ofl. Torrison I. Torrison C. A. Sperati M. Bleken C. Sperati 

Christ) I. Torrison C. .A. Sperati I. Torrison 

I. Torrison 

Civics S. Reque S. Reque W. Naeseth (?) O. Tingelstad O. Tingelstad 

Drawing W. Sihler W. Sillier C. P. Hexom 

Education K. Gjerset (?) K. Gjerset (?) O. Tingelstad 

Elocution I. Lyngaas (?) 

Englbh C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Najseth O. L. Olson O. L. Olson 

(IncL Old Eng.) O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson T. E. Thompson. .. T. E. Thompson 

I. Lyngaas S. Reque T. E. Thompson 

S. Reque W. Naeseth 

French L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque 



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138 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD. TENTH FIVE YEARS. 1906-11 

Department 1906-07 1907-08 1908-09 1909-10 1910-11 

German W. Sihler W. Sihier W. Sihler W. Sihlcr W. Sihkr 

Greek G. Bothne A. Rovelatad A. Rovelatad A. Rovelatad W. Sihler 

W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler A. Rovebtad 

Gymnastics I. Lyngaas O. Boe O. Boe B. Svan0e B. Svan^ 

(Coach) S. Reque S. Reque S. Reque 

Hebrew L. Larsen L. Larsen L. Larsen L. Larsen. L. Lanen 

S. Ylviaaker 

History K. Gjeraet K. Gjerset K. Gjerset O. L.Olson K. Gjersec 

G. Bothne (?) S. Reque W. Naeseth B. Svan0e B. Svanite 

S. Reque (P. Iverson) O. Tfncelatad 

Latin L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque A. Rovelatad 

0. L. Obon A. Rovelatad A. Rovelatad A. Rovelatad L. Reque 

1. Lyngaas O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Oiaon 

W. Nseseth O. Tingelatad T. E. Thompaoa 

T. E. Thompson.. .T. B. Thompson.. .O. Tincelstad 

Librarian C. Ncseth C. Naeseth C. Naneth C. Ncseth C. Naeseth 

W. Naeseth 
Mathematics HJsi)e^\.\V/////^n.'si^\.\\','.]'.\'/.H!sh^\..^ 



M. OrwoU (P. Iverson) (P. Iverson) (C. Fjeldatad) 

...O. Tingeh 



S. Reque O. Tingelstad 

Music(Voc. & Inst.) .C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati 

Norwegian G. Bothne K. Gjerset K. GJerset B. Svan0e K. Gjerset 

(IncL Old Norse) K. Gjerset M. Bieken M. Bleken M. Bleken B. Svan^ 

M. Bleken 

Physician T. Stabo T. Stabo T. Stabo T. Stabo T. Stabo 

Physics H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel 



.(C._Fjeld8tad) 



Psychology K. Gjerset L. Reque L. Reque (?) 6. Tidgelstaul 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD, ELEVENTH FIVE YEARS. 1911-16 

Department 1911-12 1912-13 1913-14 1914-15 1915-16 

Biology H. Hilleboe H. HUleboe H. Hilleboe H. Hilleboe 

Chemistry C. Fjeldstad H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel 

C. Birkek) 

Christianity S. Ylvisaker S. Ylvisaker S. Ylvisaker S. Ylvisaker S. Ylviaaker 

(Aug. Conf.. GreekC. K. Preus C. K. Preus C. K. Preus C. K. Preus C. K. Preus 

Test.. Catechism.O. Tingelstad C. A. Sperati O. TingelsUd O. Tingelstad O. TingelsUd 

Life of Christ.N. Madson C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati C. A. Spenti 

Bible. Ch. Hist.) C. A. SperaU 

College Pastor I. Tomson I. Torrison. . . I. Torrison I. Torrison I. Torrison 

Civics C. WoUan H. HUleboe (?)... .M. Mikkelson M. Mikkelaon M. Mikkelson 

Commercial Sub H. Hilleboe H. HUleboe H. Hilleboe 

Education O. Tingelstad H. HUleboe O. Tingelstad O. Tingelstad O. Tingelstad 

(IncL PhUosophy) H. Hilleboe H. HUleboe H. Hilfeboe 

English O. L. Olson O. L. Olson T. E. Thompson.. .O. L. Olson O. L. Olson 

T. E. Thompson.. .T. E. Thompson.. .H. Hilleboe T. E. Thompson.. .T. E. Thompson 

M. Mikkelson H. HUleboe H. HUleboe 

L. Reque (?) 

French L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque 

German W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler 

Greek S. Ylvisaker S. Ylvisaker S. Ylvisaker S. Ylvisaker S. Ylvisaker 

W. Sihler W. Sihler 

Hebrew S. Ylvisaker S. Ylvisaker S. Ylvisaker S. Ylvisaker S. Ylvisaker 

History K. Gjerset K. Gjerset K. Gjerset K. Gjerset K. Gjerset 

N. Madson S. Ylvisaker W. Sihler W. Sihler .E, PMeraon 

S. Ylvisaker W. Sihler M. Mikkelson M. MUckelson W. Sihler 

C. WoUan M. Mikkelaon 

Latin A. RovelsUd A. Rovelatad A. Rovelatad L. Reque A. Rovelatad 

L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque E. Peterson L. Reque. 

O. L. Olson. . . O. L. Olson C. Tyssen O. L. Olson O. L. Olson 

N. Madson E. Peterson E. Peterson B. Seevre E. Peterson 

T. E. Thompson.. . B. Saevre B. Saevre B. Saevre 

O. Tingelstad 

Librarian C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. N«seth C. Naeseth 

Mathematics C. Fjeldstad B. Saevre B. Saevre B. Seevre B. Saevre 

C. Birkelo H. Sheel H. Sheel O. Ovcm H. Sheel 

C. WoUan O. Ovem O. Overn M. Mikkelson O. Ovem 

M. Mikkelaon 

Music(Voc. & Inst.) .C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati. . . . .C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati 

Norwegian K. Gjerset K. Gjeraet K. Gjerset K. Gjerset K. Gjerset 

(A. Bucdall) (L. Kjer) H. Hilleboe H. Hilleboe C. K. Preus 



N. Madson C. K. Preus M. Mikkelson M. Mikkelson M. Mikkelson 

Penmanship H. HiUeboe (A. Sanden) H. Hilleboe (?)... .(H. Twito) 

Physician T. Stabo T. Stabo T. Stabo T. Stabo T. Stabo 



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139 




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140 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD, ELEVENTH FIVE YEARS, 1915-16 

Department 1911-12 1912-13 1913-14 1914-15 1915-15 

Nurse O. Peterson 

Physics C. Fjeldstad O. Overn O. Overn O. Overn O. Ovem 

C. Birkelo 

Psychology O. Tingelstad H. Hillcboe O. Tingelstad O. Tingelstad O. Tingelstad 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD. TWELFTH FIVE YEARS, 1916-21 

Department 1916-17 1917-18 1918-19 1919-20 1920-21 

Accounting (Mil.) K. Eittrcim 3 

Biology H. Hilleboc4 O. Nelson 10 M. Trytten S M. Larsen 6 

Chemistry H. Sheel 18 H. Sheel 18 H. Shccl 12 H. Shcel 17 H. Sheel 17 

Christianity S. Ylvisakcr 2 S. Ylvisaker 2 S. Ylvisaker 2 O. NorUe 4 O. Norlie 2 

(Greek Test.. Aug.C. K. Prcus 9 C. K. Preus 9 C. K. Preus 9 C. K. Preus 9 C. K. Preus 9 

Conf., Catechism.N. Madson 4 N. Madson 4 K. Eittreim 4 K. Etttreim 2 K. Eittrelm 4 

Bible Int.. BibleC. A. Sperati 2 .... C. A. Sperati 2 C. A. Sperati 2 C. A. Sperati 2 C. A. Sperati 2 

History, Life of 
Christ. Ch. Hist.) 

Citizenship M. Mikkelson 4. . .M. Trytten 4 K. Eittreim 5 S. Reque 5 S. Reque 5 

(G. Ulvilden) 

Commercial Sub K. Eittreim 20 K. Eittreim 25 K. Eittreim 25 

S. Reque 5 

Drawing O. Nelson 2 

Economics H. Hilleboe 3 K. Gjerset 3 K. Gjerset 3 K. Gjerset 3 

Education O. TingelsUd 9.. . .O. Tingelstad 12.. .O. Tingelstad 11.. .O. Tingelstad 15.. .O. Tingelstad 12 

E. Peterson 1 O. Norlie 3 O. Norlie 3 

English O. L. Olson 11 O. L. Olson 11 O. L. Olson 16 O. L. Olson 16 O. L. Olson 16 

T. E. Thompson 20T. E. Thompson 20H. Siwansen 20 H. Swansen 10 S. Reque 15 

H. Hilleboe 3 N. Madson 2 K. Eittrcim 5 S. Reque 15 C. Evanson S 

M. Trytten 1 T. Vaaler 5 

French O. Tingelstad 4.. . . W. Sihler 4 W. Sihler 8 S. Reque4 & Reque 4 

General Science M. Trytten 4 H. Sheel 3 C. Evanson 5 M. Larsen 5 

Geography M. Mikkelson 4 O. Overn 3 C. Evanson 3 M. Larsen 3 

War Geog A. Rovelstad 3 : .• 

German W. Sihler 18 W. Sihler 18 W. Sihler 15 W. Sihler 20 W. Sihler 14 (II) 

T. Vaaler lO 

Greek S. Ylvisaker 14. . . S. Ylvisaker 12. . .S. Ylvisaker 14. . . . W. Sihler 3 W. Sihler 3 (7) 

(C. Strom 6) C. Strom 14 O. Quattey 4 

C. Strom 12 (8) 

Hebrew S. Ylvisaker 4 S. Ylvisaker 3.5 .. . S. Ylvisaker 3 O. Norlie 3 O. NorUe 3 

History N. Madson K. Gjerset 8 K. Gjerset 9 K. Gjerset 9 K. Gjerset 9 

O. L. Olson N. Madson 8 O. L. Olson 5 A. Rovelstad 2 B. Hovde 6 

W. Sihler O. Qualley 4 O. L. Olson 5 C. Evanson 9 

M. Mikkelson (O. Tingelstad) C. Evanaon 4 

Hygiene & San O. Nelson 3 

Latin A. Rovelstad 18. . A. Rovelstad 18. . A. Rovelstad 19. . .A. RovelsUd 17. . .A. Rovelstad 18 

O. L. Olson 6 O. L. Olson 6 E. Peterson 20 E. Peterson 21 E. Peterson 20 

E. Peterson 25 E. Peterson 25 O. Qualley 10 0. QtuUey lO 

O. Tingelstad 6. . . .O. Tingelsted 6 

L. A. Moe 5 

Librarian C. Naeseth C. Nseseth C. Naeseth C. Naeaeth K. Jacobsen 

AssisUnt E. Peterson E. Peterson E. Peterson E. Peterson E. Peterson 

Mathematics B. Swvre 14 B. Sasvre 21 O. Overn 5 C. Strom 3 C. Strom 6 (9) 

O. Overn 4 M. Trytten 5 H. Sheel 3 H. Sheel 3 O. Eittreim 8 

M. Mikkelson 5. . . (G. Ulvilden) J. Waage 9 0. Qualley 15 O. Qualley 5 

(O. Qualley) C. Evanson 5 M. Larsen 5 

O. Nelson 10 L. A. Moe 5 

C. Evanson S 

Military Drill O. Overn 2 N. Madson 2 Lt. H. Fisher Lt. H. Fisher 3 

(Mil. Science and Lt. A. Grundy B. Hovde 

Tactics) Sgt. R. Nelson C. Strom 

S. Ylvisaker 

O. Overn 

H. Swansen 

Military Law S. Ylvisaker 2 

Music(Voc. & Inst.) C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati 

Norwegian C. K. Preus K. Gjerset 8 K. Gjerset 4 K. Gjerset 6 K. Gjerset 6 

B. Hovde R. Mahnin 13 J. Waage 10 B. Hovde 17 B. Hovde 4 

M. Mikkelson (C. K. Preus) (C. K. Preus) T. Vaaler lO 



. (O^QuaUey) A. Natyig 5. 



Pastors, College .... I. Torrison I. Torrison I. Torrison I. Torrison I. Torriaon 

O. Glesne O. Glesne O. Glesne O. Glesne 

Penmanship K. Eittrcim 3 K. Eittreim 2 K. Eittreim 2 

Philosophy O. Tingelstad 3.. . O. Tingelstad 3 O. Tingelstad 3.. . O. Tingelstad 3 

Physician T. Stabo T. Stabo T. Stabo T. Stabo T. Stabo 

Nurse O. Peterson T. Arneson T. Arneson T. Ameson T. Arneson 



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141 



DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD, TWELFTH FIVE YEARS. 1916-21 
Department 1916-17 1917-18 1918-19 1919-20 1920-21 



Physics O. Ovcni 13 . . 

(IncL Radio) 

Physiology H. Hilleboc 4 . 



.M. Trytten 13 O. O/crn 13 M. Trytten 15 O. Elttreim 15 



. (H. Shecl) . 
.M. -- 



. Trytten 5 O. Nelson 5 C. Evanson 5 M. Laraeii 5. 

.(H. Sheel). 



Psycholosy O. Tingclstad 3.. . .O. TingcUtad 3. . O. Tinge Istad 3.. .O. Norlie 6 O. Norlie 6 

PubUc Speaking O. L. Olson 3 O. L. Olson 3 O. L. Olson 3 

Sociology H. HiUeboe 3 O. Norlie 3 O. Norlie 3 

Surveying H. Sheel 5 H. Sheel 5 H. Sheel 5 

Training, Physical R. Movold 

Football (Lt. H. Fisher) . . . . W. Jewell O. Solem 

Basketball A. Natvig R. Movold 

Baseball A. Laudel A. Laadel A. Laudei 

War Ainw K. Gjerset 3 




CLASS ROOM NO. 12 



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CEIAPTER SIX 

SCHOOL PLANT 

Francis £. Peterson 

LUTHER College started as a pioneer institution; hence in a 
small way and with meager equipment. Even after sixty 
years it cannot boast an expensive school plants as school plants 
are reckoned at the present time. While an effort has always 
been made to provide all equipment necessary for educational 
efficiency^ the real success of the school has not been considered 
directly dependent upon mere material equipment. But that Lu- 
ther College has qualified for membership in the North Central 
Association of Colleges indicates that that high educational author- 
ity recognizes that Luther College is a standard American col- 
lege in physical equipment as well as in other respects. 

On September 1^ 1861^ Luther College began its first school 
year in temporary quarters^ the Halfway Creek Parsonage, about 
thirteen miles north of La Crosse, Wisconsin. The following is 
in part Prof. Laur. Larsen's description of it: "Downstairs there 
is a large kitchen which serves also as a dining-room; then, too, 
a pantry, a small room for the kitchen help, a double room, a 
larger room in which six students sleep, and a smaller bed-room 
for two. The last two rooms are used also for studying and for 
class-rooms. Three students sleep in a room upstairs which is 
supposed to be Prof. Larsen's office. There are four other rooms 
upstairs; in one of them a stove cannot be used, hence it is made 
to serve as a clothes closet for the entire household, and is thus 
packed with clothes. Prof. Larsen has only one room for him- 
self and family; Prof. Schmidt and family have two rooms, but 
they are so arranged that they cannot be divided off. If more 
students come, they will either have to sleep in the clothes room, 
or in one of Prof. Schmidt's rooms; and while he would gladly 
consent to this, it would be very crowded for him. It is doubt- 
ful whether students can secure rooms at any of the neighbors. 
Two prospective students have applied, and while they could 
not very well be refused admittance, still they were told how 
crowded it already is for the eleven who are now here, and the 
hope was expressed that they would not register until next year." 
School was conducted here only one year, 1861-62; the parsonage 
burned in 1865. 



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SCHOOL PLANT 143 

The second school year opened September 8^ 1862^ in Decorah, 
lowa^ again in temporary quarters, a building bought by Rev. V. 
Koren for $1,600.00 from Nathaniel Otis, which is now the St. 
Cloud Hotel. It is described as follows: "In the basement were 
the kitchen, the dining-hall, and the apartments for the matron 
and her maids. . On the first floor were the president's apartments, 
and one class-room. The second floor contained a small office- 
room, two recitation-rooms, and two small bed-rooms, and in the 
top story there was a large sleeping-apartment with room for 
twenty-five beds." This, with school furnishings which were none 
too adequate, comprised the entire plant. A residence in West 
Decorah costing $950.00 was bought for Prof. Schmidt. This is 
the so-called Griswold house; it has been much remodeled and 
has always been some professor's home. Prof. Chr. A. Naeseth 
lived there for many years. 

In June, 1862, Rev. V. Koren bought from Joseph Gibbons a 
thirty-two acre tract of land in West Decorah for $1,500.00. This 
is the original campus where Luther College now stands. Until 
the first building could be erected, school was conducted in the 
Otis Building during 1862-65. In 1863 a building was erected 
right west of this Otis Building at a cost of $1,400.63; it was ready 
for occupancy at New Year, 1864. Besides equipment for regular 
school work, the boys had a few pieces of gymnastic apparatus 
out in the open just north of the buildings. 

Work on the first main building was begun in 1862.. But for 
many reasons work was delayed. The corner-stone was laid June 
80, 1864, and possession taken at Christmas-time, 1865. The es- 
timated cost was $28,000.00; but when completed the building 
with several smaller buildings had cost $75,576.23. The building 
was of red brick and was "126 feet long; the main section 52 feet 
wide, and the wing 44. There is a basement 10 feet high, three 
main stories, 14, 18, and 12 feet, respectively; and while the third 
floor in the wing is 16 feet high with no attic above it, there is an 
'attic story' 10 feet high in the main section with a large garret 
above. In the basement there are, besides a cellar, two kitchens 
for the boarding department, a dining-room with accommodations 
for 100, an apartment for the steward's family and kitchen help, 
and also two lavatories for students. Water is pumped from a 
cistern outside, and drained into a sewer. On the first floor are 
apartments for three professors — two with families — and a large 
reading-room. On the second floor there are eight class-rooms, and 
one guest-room for each of the two professors' families. On the 
third floor are four bed-rooms for thirty students, two hospital 



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144 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

rooms^ two reading-rooms^ and^ occupying the entire wing is a 
chapel which is also used for church services. Then in the so- 
called 'attic story* are four large bed-rooms for fifty-five students. 
On the second and third floors at the front in the main section 
are two rooms partitioned off^ one of which might be used as a 
library y the other as a class-room. By utilizing all available 
space, the building will comfortably accommodate 100 students, 
together with the professors who live there; and, if only the 
president lives in the building, it will room 120. The rooms are 
light and airy, and also warm." There were wood stoves and 
kerosene lamps. The wing referred to here was the one at the 




"CHICKEN COOP" 

north; the building was erected without a south wing, which was 
not added until 1874. 

Several smaller buildings were erected at this time; but especi- 
ally two of the same brick: one a bakery, now torn down, and the 
other a barn, later remodeled for dormitory purposes, known thed 
as the "Chicken Coop", and now the museum. Then, too, there 
were some frame buildings — wagon-shed, work-shop, wood-shed, 
hay-mow, and suchlike. While the construction work was in 
progress, a piece of timber land was bought from which to secure 
fuel; after it had served this purpose, it was sold. Since there 
was no city water, a well was sunk (1863); later four large cis- 
terns were made, and in 1866 a very large cistern was constructed 



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SCHOOL PLANT 145 

and provided with a force pump to bring water through pipes to 
reservoirs on each floor for fire protection. 

Considerable work was done on the grounds from year to jear^^ 
much of it by students supervised by professors: trees were plant- 
ed to supplement the many beautiful native trees, and soon there 
was a fine appearing campus. There was no gymnasium, and the 
boys practised gynuiastics on some apparatus north of the build- 
ing. Various activities demanded equipment; thus the first musical 
instrument bought was a piano in 1863 for $320.00, collected by 
the students under the supervision of Prof. Schmidt; a "Mason 
and Hamlin'' organ was purchased in 1888 with $100.00 secured 
by the students at the instance of Prof. Haldor Hanson. Both in- 
struments were destroyed in the fire of 1889. 

From 1865 to 1867 the general equipment remained largely the 
same, except for reparations and incidental additions. In 1867 
Rev. N. Brandt's three congregations built a parsonage for him 
on the campus; this brick structure was bought by the Synod and 
made college property. It is the residence which was in turn oc- 
cupied by Prof. L. S. Reque and Pres. C. K. Preus. . 

In 1871 there was need of more dormitory space; about half 
of the brick building known as the "Chicken Coop" — 60x20 feet, 
and of two stories — was remodeled for students' rooms, and gave 
room for eighteen students. This space had been used by kitchen 
help; now a frame building was built for them. It was later used 
as a trunk house. The work cost $800.00. 

The additional space in the "Chicken Coop" proved only a 
temporary relief. The south wing of the main building, which 
was provided for in the architect's plans, was built during 1873- 
74. The corner-stone was laid June 6, 1873, the wing taken in 
use November 28, 1874, and dedicated December 2nd of the same 
year. A large bell now sounded from the tower for the first time; 
it was a gift from the students, who had collected money for it 
under the leadership of Bj0rn Haatvedt (later Bj0rn Edwards). 
In 1890 Mr. Edwards personally presented a large bell for the 
new main building. At this time various improvements were made. 
Again the "Chicken Coop" was remodeled to provide more dormi- 
tory room; the entire building except for a large music room was 
made into students' rooms, with space for thirty students. The 
dining-hall was enlarged, and the lavatory in the basement made 
larger. An addition was made to the bakery; an 80- foot well was 
dug and a wind-mill placed over it; a small barn was built, and 
to provide a suitable site for it, a little over two acres were bought 
at the southwest corner of the campus. This construction work. 



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146 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

including the south wing, cost about $23,000.00. The south wing 
"is about 45 feet long and- 55 wide. It has a good cellar, a base- 
ment which will serve as an apartment for the steward, and four 
floors of which the fourth story is a so-called 'attic story'. On 
the third floor there is a large reading-room, 44x26 feet." 

The present First Norwegian Evang. Luth. Church building in 
Decorah, Iowa, was built in 1876 at a cost of $22,506.86. The 
Synod bore one-half this cost, thus giving Luther College half in- 
terest in the church property. 

The library was housed in the so-called "tower room" (No. 
15) on the second floor until 1884, when it was moved to three 
rooms on the first floor in the north wing. All the books were 
rescued during the fire in 1889 and moved to quarters in the 
"Chicken Coop". In 1890 they were placed in rooms provided 
for library purposes on the first floor in the south wing of the new 
building. 

For many years there had been no gymnasium. The urgent 
need of one had long been keenly felt. Among other things the 
students had military drill. In 1885 fifty rifles were bought from 
the government for the company known as the "Luther College 
Phalanx", which had been organized in 1878 by J. L. Lee. The 
first gymnasium was built in 1886-87 with money collected by the 
students. Prof. Carlo A. Sperati was the moving spirit. It is 
the west room — 75x42 feet, and 18-foot walls — of the present 
gymnasium, and cost about $1,800.00. 

In 1885 equipment valued at $150.00 was added to the labor- 
atory. Prof. O. Ramstad circulated a subscription list and secur- 
ed $20.00, for which chemicals were bought 

Then on April 19, 1889, occurred a disastrous fire which com- 
pletely gutted the main building. All students except the Seniors 
were sent away, and school was conducted in the "Chicken Coop", 
which also contained the library. During the following school 
year, in 1889-90, the work was carried on in quarters improvised 
during the summer. The gymnasium served as kitchen, dining- 
hall, and apartment for steward and hired help. There were four 
recitation rooms for the three preparatory classes in the basement 
of the Synod church; the college classes recited in "Schmidt's 
Hall" — the Griswold house. Rooms were rented in three other 
buildings, one of them the Arlington Hotel, now the Lutheran 
Publishing House; and Mr. L. £. Davidson generously gave the 
use of a large room in his home for reference books and reading- 
room. 



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SCHOOL PLANT 147 

Meanwhile work on a new building was plied with vigor. It 
was dedicated on October 14, 1890. The total cost was $51,210.00. 
This is the present main building. "It has the same foundation 
and in large part the same walls as the old building. It is 170 
feet long, and in the middle part 62 feet wide, and 44 in the twol 
wings. There are three full stories above the basement, and an 
'attic story' which through its entire length has high and well- 
lighted rooms, all of which are very suitable for sleeping-rooms; 
most of them are even good study rooms. On the whole the new 
building has more room than the old. In the basement the old 
kitchen space is used for machinery for heating and ventilating 
purposes, while a room equally large on the east side now serves 
as a kitchen. The dining-hall is the old one; however, it is fur- 
nished with smaller tables, each for nine students, and there are 
chairs instead of the long benches; and with this new arrange- 
ment, 170 can be seated at one time. On the west side in the 
north wing there are six bath-rooms and one lavatory ; on the east 
a store-room and a room for hired help. In the south wing there 
is an apartment for the steward's family, and for kitchen girls. 

"On the left of the entrance on first floor is the president's of- 
fice; and an inner room is the faculty room. The greater part of 
the south wing is occupied by the library and an adjoining read- 
ing-room. Otherwise there are on the first floor four class-rooms, 
four students' rooms, and an apartment for one unmarried pro- 
fessor. 

"On the second floor are three class-rooms; one of them in the 
north wing, the largest in the building, has an inner room (later 
students' rooms numbers 27 and 28) which gives space for museum 
and laboratory. On this floor there are seven students' rooms. 

"On the third floor are 31 rooms for students, and on the 
fourth 18. Thus there is a total of 60 students' rooms; they will 
accommodate 160 students, while last year there was room for 
only 130, an arrangement now made possible by the fact that all 
trunks are this year stored in a small building which was no longer 
really suitable for living quarters. Then, too, the ventilating 
system is now operated day and night, and most of the roonft are 
used both as study and sleeping-rooms. 

"Besides the lavatory and bath-rooms in the basement, each 
floor has its own wash-room with hot and cold water, and sewer. 
As long as there is rain-water in the cisterns, it is available in the 
lavatories and bath-rooms; but at all times there is an abundance 
of dty water. In various parts of the building there is also city 
water for drinking purposes. 



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148 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



"The architecture of the new building is quite different from 
that of the old; and most people consider it more beautiful. But 
even if opinion may differ about the outward appearance^ there 
can be no question that as far as equipment is concerned the old 
cannot be compared with the new building. Everything is so 
much more comfortable and attractive. The halls are furnished 
with rugs^ the windows with the very best shades (the so-called 
'Venetian blinds')^ the furniture neat and in good taste, the beds 
good, and there are wardrobes with an individual compartment 
for each student. The class rooms are equipped with the very best 
school furniture, and have blackboards of Pennsylvania slate on 
all four walls." 




THE MUSIC PAVILION, 1891 

There were especially two important improvements in the new 
building over the old — city water, and steam heat with a fan venti- 
ating system. The first heating plant was built at this time. Prof. 
LarsCn did not live in the new building, but moved into the so- 
called Driggs* residence, which was bought for $1,600.00 in 1890. 
This house has ever since been some professor's home, and is at 
present the home of Prof. S. S. Reque. 

This splendid new building afforded very adequate accommoda- 
tions, and for some time there was no great addition in equipment, 
except as facilities were improved and increased from time to 
time. In 1891 a music pavilion was built with money collected bj 



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SCHOOL PLANT 149 

Rev. V. Koren in his congregations. It cost $300.00 and was 
placed about two hundred feet east of the gymnasium among the 
native oak trees. In 1893 the small building which had been the 
trunk house was given a new roof and remodeled to afford a room 
for music rehearsals; in it were also other rooms for general 
student gatherings. The "Chicken Coop" was again altered; two 
gables were built on the south side to give more light in a large 
upper room used for assembly purposes. New floors were laid 
and steam heat installed. The "Brandt Parsonage" was also re- 
modeled^ and Prof. Larsen moved in some time during the fall of 
1893. In 1894 a small blacksmith shop was built as a lean-to 
on the machine shop. 

The gymnasium was used as an auditorium, but the stage was 
very unsatisfactory. In 1895 a 22x1 6-foot stage was built, one 
which could be hoisted up against the wall; it was paid for by 
student subscriptions. During the vacation in 1895 the wooden 
steps at the rear entrance of the main building were replaced by 
cement stairs. The library space was extended to No. 4 at the 
north on the west side, which became the librarian's office. 

In the summer of 1896 almost all the rooms on the third floor 
of the main building were replastered; the halls throughout the 
entire building were kalsomined, as were also the kitchen and 
dining-hall. A new floor was laid on the fourth floor. Telephone 
was installed. During the school year 1895-96 the museum was 
moved to the two east rooms downstairs in the "Chicken Coop''; 
and in 1897 it was extended to occupy also the adjoining north- 
west room. In 1898 the room which had been used for storing 
trunks also had to yield to the museum, so that the entire build- 
ing, except the room used for music rehearsals, was occupied by 
the museum. A small frame building was built southwest of the 
main building for storing trunks. In 1899 the stage in the gym- 
nasium was again enlarged; and a curtain was provided. In the 
summer of 1899 new cement steps were built at the front entrance. 
The same year electric lights were installed in the gymnasium 
and pavilion. And in 1899 a hospital of three rooms was erected, 
a gift of Hon. John A. Johnson of Madison, Wisconsin, in the 
sum of $1,000.00. It was built just south of the main building. 

for many years now baseball had been played; the same 
ground was used for a diamond as now, but the boys batted to- 
ward the east. For many years there was no grandstand, but 
only simple bleachers. In 1900 track athletics were introduced. 
The boys themselves constructed and largely paid for a cinder 
track^ and also supplied equipment. 



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LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



In 1901 there was a marked improvement in that a private 
electric light plant was installed, the gift of the Alumni Associa- 
tion. The cost was $2,500.00. The gymnasium was enlarged in 
1903 to three times its first size and became essentially the same 
as it is now, except for basketball equipment with a spectators' 
gallery on the east side of the east room. At this time, too — in 
preparation for the Fiftieth Anniversary Synod Meeting — the lit- 
tle building which houses the large spruce log was built inside the 
track to serve as a 'refreshment stand. Also for this occasion a 




COLLEGE HOSPITAL 

massive arch was erected at the entrance to the campus. It is 
constructed mainly of two Ionic columns of the old court house in 
which services were conducted in the early days of the College. 

Laboratory space had been provided in the new building. 
However, for some time the apparatus was rather meager. Prof. 
O. Ramstad left a legacy for laboratory purposes; additions were 
made, and the space afforded in Nos. 27 and 28 was becoming in- 
adequate. 

Under Prof. Haldor Hanson's direction as curator, the mu- 
seum grew apace. In 1905 the entire "Chicken Coop", down- 
stairs and upstairs, was given over to the museum. In 1906 the 



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151 



present baseball grandstand was built with money collected by 
the students. It cost about $650.00. 

In the summer of 1907 the rear entrance was extended and 
the old steps replaced by a porch of brick and concrete. In the 
fall the Juniors and Seniors were given fine new study desks 
which took the place of the tables. New floors were laid in all 
three rooms of the gymnasium. 

For some time there had been urgent need of more dormitory 
space. This was supplied when the Laur. Larsen Hall was built 




LAUR. LARSEN HALL, 1907 

in 1906-07. It is "a commodious dormitory (center 50x40^ two 
wings^ each 90x40; all^ three stories and basement) accommodat- 
ing upwards of 200 students. It is a handsome structure; has 
very good fire protection (the same system as the Main Building) ; 
and is steam heated^ electric lighted^ and modern throughout. It 
has a dwelling apartment for a professor and family^ class-rooms^ 
a large room for the use of the bands and other musical organiza- 
tions^ offices^ a chemical^ and a physical laboratory^ and a work- 
shop for the manufacture and repair of scientific apparatus." 

"The Chemical Laboratory^ valued at about $3^500.00^ is lo- 
cated in the west wing of the Laur. Larsen Hall. It is a well 



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152 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



lighted room^ and accommodates twenty students at one time. It 
is equipped with excellent tables^ supplied with gas^ water^ and 
has individual hoods." 

"The Physical Laboratory and class-room is located in the 
east wing of Laur. Larsen Hall. It is a large room with accom- 
modations for about twenty students at one time. It is equipped 
with tables of approved design and supplied with all the most 
necessary apparatus. Additions are constantly being made to the 
equipment^ the total value being now about $3,500.00." 




THE LANE OF ELMS, 1910 

"The Biological Laboratory, equipped with microscopes, 
slides, and reference books, to the value of over $1,000.00, is 
located in the Main Building." 

The Laur. Larsen Hall made necessary the addition of an- 
other boiler to the two already in the heating plant; the coal bin 
was altered to provide for an overhead delivery of coal. To get 
dirt for filling around the new hall, a ridge of ground in front of 
the gymnasium was removed, much to the advantage of the pre- 
paratory boys' baseball diamond. The arch was set in concrete, 
somewhat remodeled and made strictly Ionic in design. A much 
needed store-room for apparatus was built as a lean-to on the 
north side of the ncymnasium. 



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For some time now there had been two tennis courts within 
the track; but one was abandoned to give space for track work. 
In 1907 two splendid courts were built just north of the Reque 
house. 

In 1909 were secured a Bush and Lane piano, a three-horse- 
power steam engine for the laboratory, a gift of the Lutheran 
Publishing House, $70.00 from the class of 1909 toward a motor 
for ventilating purposes in the chemistry department, and other 
equipment for the laboratories. A noteworthy acquisition in 1911 




MAIN BUILDING BEFORE GRADING, 1910 

was the splendid Luther statue, a copy of the famous statue in 
Worms. It was presented by the pastors' wives, and cost $2,547. 
There was a replanning of the campus in 1910; the greatest 
change involved the removal of a lane of elms in front of the 
main building to make space for a large open court. A knoll 
about midway between the main building and the baseball diamond 
was removed. In 1911 the Alumni Association voted to purchase 
an eight-acre wooded tract of land adjoining the campus on the 
east, and lying north of High Street. The class of 1911 present- 
ed five fine electric light posts; the graduates of 1912 gave a 
large oak table for the faculty room. 



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LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



In 1912 the rest of the students' rooms in the main building 
were furnished with desks of the kind the Juniors and Seniors 
were given in 1907; and new teachers' desks were placed in the 
class-rooms. In both the buildings drinking fountains were placed 
on the first floor. At this time, too. Dr. Eli Lewison (Luther Col- 
lege, 1897) of Canton, S. Dak., presented a splendid pulpit and 
chair for the chapel. The old rows of chairs were removed and 
fine new opera chairs installed; these seats together with a metal 
ceiling and four attractive chandeliers were paid for by private 




LOYALTY HALL, 1»1« 

subscription. An interesting addition to the museum collection 
in 1913 was the old historic log house which served as Dr. V. 
Koren's first parsonage on Washington Prairie, Iowa, in 1853; 
it was placed right east of the Reque house. A spacious band 
stand was built in 1913 in place of the old pavilion, which was 
torn down in 1912. 

An important addition was a dining hall in 1916. It cost 
$18,000.00, which sum was largely furnished by the students — 
hence the name. Loyalty Hall. It is of red brick, 95x45 feet, 
two-story height, and has a large basement, is equipped with a 
modern kitchen and bakery furnishings, and accommodates about 



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SCHOOL PLANT 155 

250 persons. When it was erected — directly south of the main 
building — it was necessary to move the hospital^ which was much 
enlarged and remodeled at the same time. The hospital has four 
separate wards^ a kitchen^ a nurse's room^ a basement laundry^ a 
disinfecting room, and other conveniences. 

The musical equipment, practically all of which is the proper- 
ty of the Musical Union, has been steadily increased. In 1907 
the valuation was $4,000.00; and in 1921 there were 130 band 
instruments and other equipment with a total valuation of $15, 
000.00, exclusive of some orchestra instruments. The Musical 
Union also owns an extensive music library containing the very 
best music. Except for very liberal donations, the necessary 
money has come very largely from concerts given by the Luther 
College Concert Band and Glee Club. 

Luther College has made an enviable record in athletics. The 
necessary paraphernalia are furnished by the students' Athletic 
Association and have now a valuation of $2,000.00. 

From time to time — especially the last few years — consider- 
able office equipment has been secured. Typewriters, both for 
offices and the Commercial Department, adding machine, mimeo- 
graph, and other things, have a combined valuation of $1,200.00. 

In 1919 a tract of land, the size of a city block, lying south 
of High Street and east of the campus, was bought; and in 1920 
the College acquired the old Preus house and lots — called the 
"Sunnyside Property" — for $6,500.00. The same year the so- 
called Driggs property was sold. The class of 1921 presented 
a very fine flag pole. 

Space does not permit an account of all remodeling and repar- 
ation done at different times. Rooms and space have not al- 
ways been used for their original purpose. However, it would 
be difficult to trace all such changes; and possibly it would be of 
no real interest or value. One very noteworthy thing in connec- 
tion with the equipment is that so many things have been pre- 
sented to the College through funds raised or donated by friends, 
students, and alumni. 

Easily the finest building on the campus is the new Koren 
Library, which was dedicated on the 14th of October, 1921. The 
erection of this building had long been deferred. The library 
had long since outgrown its quarters in the main building, and 
several rooms on the first and second floors had been pressed 
into service for library purposes. Prof. K. T. Jacobsen, the 
present librarian, describes it thus in "College Chips" for Octo- 
ber, 1921: "The Koren Library is situated on the east side of 



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156 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

the campus a little south of the president's house. It is a modern 
adaptation of the Georgian style of architecture. The exterior 
is of pressed brick with stone facings and the rest of the con- 
struction is of reinforced concrete and other fireproof materials. 
The building is in three sections; the main section^ 80x30 ft., 
containing two stories; the central portion, 60x21 ft, with three 
stories and basement; and the third section in the rear, 60x26 ft. 
The main entrance is on the west side, a passage-way formed by 




DR. H. G. STUB LAYING THE COR- 

NER-STONE OP' KOREN LIBRARY, 

APRIL 18, 1921 

two rows of square pillars leading through tlie main portion of 
the building to the second section. The space on both sides of 
tliis passage-way will be used for museum purposes. On the 
first floor of the central portion is a receiving and work room, 
besides cloak rooms, and a hallway from which marble stairs 
lead up to the second floor. At the head of the stairs to the left 
is found the entrance to the reading-room, which occupies the 
whole of the second floor of the main portion of the building. It 
is large enough to accommodate 84 readers at one time. In the 
hall opposite the entrance to the reading-room is the delivery 



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SCHOOL PLANT 



157 



desk. The librarian's office occupies the north side of the second 
floor of this central section and on the south side is a small study 
room. The third floor of this central section will be used for 
museum purposes. The rear section is occupied entirely by the 
book stacks. It is equipped with the steel stacks of the Snead 
type and marble floors. The three lower tiers of these stacks 
have been built for the present and a fourth tier can be put in 
later when needed. The present capacity of the stacks if shelved 
tight is approximately 80,000 volumes, or, a library working cap- 




KOREN LIBRARY, FRONT VIEW, 1921 

acity of between 60,000 and 60,000 volumes. One excellent 
feature of the building is that it is unusually well lighted. The 
reading-room has five large arched windows on the west side and 
one on each end, and the stacks are likewise very light, windows 
having been provided between each row of stacks on the east side 
and one on either end opposite the central aisle. Skylights give 
excellent light to the third floor central portion and to the deliv- 
ery desk. For artificial light a system of semi-indirect lighting 
which gives a soft light for reading purposes has been installed in 
the reading-room and offices on the second floor, while a different 
kind of fixture giving a brighter light has been placed in the 
rooms to be used for museum purposes.*' 



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158 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

The following is an appraisal of the Luther College equip- 
ment^ including endowments and legacies^ in 1921: 

Campus $ 10,000.00 

Main Building 76,000.00 

Laur. Larsen Hall 60,000.00 

Loyalty Hall 18,000.00 

Koren Library Building 130,000.00 

Gymnasium ' 8,000.00 

Hospital 8,500.00 

Heat and Light Plant 16,000.00 

Museum 2,000.00 

Professors' Residences 4,000.00 

2,600.00 

6,600.00 

Other Buildings 3,000.00 

General Endowment, restricted 4,186.00 

General Endowment, unrestricted 260,980.00 

Science Fund 6,400.00 

Student Aid Funds 27,827.61 

Unclassified Funds 11,401.67 

Library (books, catalogs, etc.) 40,000.00 

Scientific Apparatus 8,000.00 

Musical Instruments, etc 16,000.00 

Museum Collections 8,000.00 

Furniture 10,000.00 

$719,294.18 
In the treasurer's report to the general convention of the 
Norwegian Lutheran Church of America in June, 1922, the follow- 
ing appraisal of the resources of Luther College is made: 

Real estate, buildings, and equipment $609,868.98 

Endowments (held by Corporation) 41,662.48 

Endowments (Memorial Fund) 260,000.00 

Other endowments 9,241.70 

$910,663.11 



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CHAPTER SEVEN 

LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 

Karl T. Jacobsbn 
I. Thb Library 

THE beginning of the library goes back to the foundation of 
the College. At the meetings of the Norwegian Evangelical 
Lutheran Church in America (the body since 1865 known as the 
Synod for the Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran Church in Amer- 
ica)^ in Juile^ 1861^ one of the appropriations which was made 
for the school about to be established Was the sum of one hundred 
dollars a year for two years, with which to purchase books for 
the institution. Ever since that time an annual appropriation 
for the library has been made by the Churchy the amount allowed 
being one hundred dollars for the first few years, two hundred 
dollars for the greater part of the time, and finally reaching the 
sum of three thousand five hundred dollars for the year 1921-22. 
From 1881 until 1917 the annual appropriation from the Church 
was augmented by an annual student fee, at first of twenty-five 
cents, later fifty cents, and finally one dollar for each student. 

With the meager funds at its disposal, especially at first, the 
early growth of the library was not rapid. The first figures con- 
cerning the size of the library are those contained in the report 
of the librarian for 1881-82. In that year the library had reached 
a total of 8,506 volumes or an average of about 170 volumes a 
year for the first twenty years of its existence. Since that time 
its growth has been a little more rapid. In the following year 
(1882-83), which is the first time mention is made of the library 
in the catalog, the number of volumes given is 3,700 in addition 
to the "Mimer Library", a collection of books obtained by the 
voluntary contribution of the members of a student society. This 
last named collection was donated to, and incorporated into, the 
library in 1889, and by this addition, together with the regular 
accessions, the library had in that year reached a total of 5,800 
volumes. By 1914 the number of volumes had reached a total of 
18,500 in addition to about 3,000 pamphlets. In the fall of that 
year about 5,000 more volumes were added by the gift by friends 
of the institution of the so-called Bang Library. Since then 



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160 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

several smaller collections have been turned over to the library, 
and these, together with the regular accessions and gifts from 
time to time, have brought the size of the library up to about 
29,000 bound volumes and between 8,000 and 10,000 pamphlets 
and unbound books. 

The special collections referred to above have all, with the 
exception of one, the Bang Library, been developed in connection 
with some organization at Luther. The first of these collections 
to be started was the above mentioned "Mimer Library". This 
collection was formed by a student society organized expressly 
for the purpose of obtaining more books along wider cultural 
lines, the funds of the library not being sufficient to obtain much 
more than the most needed reference works. The members taxed 
themselves one dollar each a year for this purpose, and in the fif- 
teen or sixteen years of its existence (1873 or '74 to 1889) a total 
of upwards of nine hundred volumes had been collected. The cat- 
alog of this collection, printed in 1884, shows it to have consisted 
to a great extent of standard works of English, American, and 
Norwegian literature, some history and description, and a few 
books in the natural sciences. Of the organization of this society 
the late Reverend M. Langeland says in a letter of October 13, 
1921: "Professor J. D. Jacobsen must be given credit for start- 
ing 'Mimer* ". And Mr. K. G. Faegre in a letter of October, 1921, 
to Reverend I. B. Torrison, states that the first committee to se- 
lect books for "Mimer" consisted of Professor Jacobsen, Professor 
O. G. Felland, himself, and one other student. Among later of- 
ficers of the society was Dr. Ludvig Hektoen. As already men- 
tioned, this collection was donated to the library in 1889. 

By far the largest single collection secured by the library 
is the so-called Bang Library. This was bought from the estate 
of the late Bishop Bang of Norway by Hon. L. S. Swenson and 
other friends of Luther and donated to the library in 1914. The 
collection, consisting of approximately 5,000 volumes, is rich in 
Norwegian literature — especially the older — and history. 

During 1920 the books collected by the student historical so- 
ciety *'P. A. Munch", as well as the collection gathered by the 
Norwegian literary society "Normannalaget", were turned over to 
the library. The first of these, a collection of about 125 volumes, 
consists mainly of works of history and description, especially of 
the Scandinavian countries. The "Normannalaget" collection is 
confined almost entirely to works in Norwegian literature and 
numbers about 150 volumes. 

The last of these special collections to be transferred to the 



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UBRARY AND MUSEUM 161 

library is the museum library. This transfer was recommended 
by the faculty in 1921 and approved by the Board of Trustees 
in order that the book resources of the institution mighty as far 
as possible, come under one administration. This collection, while 
somewhat varied in character^ contains a good many books by Nor- 
wegian-American authors and publishers. It numbers, aside from 
the newspapers which, for the present, are retained in the mu- 
seum, something over 2,000 titles. 

Just where the library was kept during the earliest years of 
its existence the writer has not been able to discover, but in the 
late seventies it was assigned space in the tower room on the sec- 




THE OLD READING ROOM 

ond floor of the main building. From there it was moved in 1884, 
the catalog for that year tells us, "into more commodious quarters 
on the first floor of the main building*'. Here, in the northeast 
corner of the building, it remained until the fire in 1889, and its 
location was probably the only thing that made it possible to save 
it at that time, since this part of the building was the last to burn. 
For several hours during the night the students carried the books 
to the gymnasium until the 6,000 volumes which the library then 
contained had all been brought out of the burning building. While 
the main building was being rebuilt, the library occupied space in 
the building now for a long time used for the museum, but as soon 
as the main building was completed it was moved into the three 
rooms provided for it in the south end of the building. Before 
long it outgrew these quarters, however, and additional shelving 
space had to be provided by taking, first the east room opposite 
the librarian's oflice, and later two rooms in the northwest corner 
of the second floor for this purpose. Even with this additional 



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162 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

space the quarters had become extremely crowded, and it was, 
therefore, a great relief when the. library finally could be moved 
into its new home in the modern Koren Library and Museum 
Building. 

The administration of the library was probably during the 
first few years vested in the president. At least there is no rec- 
ord available of any one having been designated librarian before 
Professor G. Landmark. Professor Landmark was a teacher at 
the institution from 1867 to 1876 and librarian most of that time. 




KOREN LIBRARY, REAR VIEW, 1921 

He was succeeded as librarian by Professor J. D. Jacobsen, who 
served as such from 1874 until his death, in 1881. In 1881-82 
Professor O. J. Breda served as librarian, and he was succeeded 
by Professor H. Roalkvam, 1882-86, and Professor lEmil Peter- 
sen, 1886-87. In 1887 Professor C. A. Naeseth was appointed 
librarian, and he served continuously as such until the summer of 
1920, when he resigned and was succeeded by the present librar- 
ian, Karl T. Jacobsen. Before 1912 the position of librarian was 
combined with a regular teaching position, but in that year Pro- 
fessor Naeseth was relieved of the last of his classes. For the 
last ten years Professor Enoch Peterson has also given a good 
deal of time and energy to the library, acting as assistant librar- 
ian a large part of this period. While most of these men did not 



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LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 163 

have any special library training, they all had special interest and 
qualifications for the position. To them, and to Professor Naeseth 
especially, much credit is due for building up so comprehensive 
and fairly representative a collection with the limited funds at 
their disposal. 

That the organization of the library under the circumstances 
necessarily had to be somewhat neglected was only to be expected. 
The need of a better organization, especially as the collection 
grew, was, however, not lost sight of. In 1889 a classified printed 
catalog was first published. This was kept up to date as far as 
possible by manuscript entries in several copies until the late 
nineties, when it became apparent that some other system would 
have to be adopted. So in the spring of 1899 Mr. Torstein Jahr, 
'96, who was attending the Illinois Library School, was engaged 
to classify and catalog the library. With the help of Mr. Joseph 
Brorby, '99, and S. B. Hustvedt, '02, he classified according to the 
Dewey system the collection which at that time numbered some 
10,000 volumes, and provided a dictionary catalog on cards. This 
task was performed in 1899 and 1900, mostly during the summer 
months. Since that time the catalog was kept up by the librarian 
as far as the limited time at his disposal for this work would allow. 
But with the lack of funds to get adequate assistance it was im- 
possible for him to enter even the ordinary current accessions 
properly, not to mention the larger collections which have been 
added to the library the past few years. The result was a stead- 
ily growing accumulation of uncataloged and unclassified books, 
and the steady deterioration of the catalog. Since both the cat- 
alog and the classification needed a thorough revision and the ac- 
cumulation of uncataloged books liad grown so large, it was de- 
cided to reorganize on a new basis. As the Dewey classification 
has generally proved unsatisfactory for college libraries, the Li- 
brary of Congress system of classification has been adopted as the 
basis of its arrangement. In the cataloging also the form in use 
by the Library of Congress is in general being followed, although 
the cataloging is not in all cases carried out in such detail. A be- 
ginning of this reorganization was made in the summer of 1919, 
when the present librarian, who was at that time connected with 
the University of Chicago Libraries, spent about three weeks in 
Decorah and witli the help of Mrs. Jacobsen and Professor Enoch 
Peterson arranged the Bang Library, classifying and shelflisting 
a part of it and arranging the remainder rouglily by classes. The 
reclassification could not be continued until after Christmas of 
1920. Since that time all new accessions and most of the books 



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164 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



in the reading room reference collection have been placed under 
the new system and fully cataloged. Books from the uncataloged 
collections are also being taken up as time allows. Doing the 
work in this way, the process is necessarily a slow one, especially 
with the small staff to which our present funds limit us; but it is 
felt that it is economy of time to do the work thoroughly so as to 
develop a system of bibliographical tools that will stand the test 
of time and serve to make the resources of the library available 
to the best advantage. 




READING ROOM, KOREN LIBRARY 

The greater part of the books in the library have been secured 
at the recommendation of the various professors for use in their 
respective courses, and its value as a reference collection for as- 
signed reading is constantly increasing. Since the school in its 
curriculum emphasizes the humanities, the fields that are best rep- 
resented in the library are literature, history, religion, and, to a 
somewhat lesser degree, the social and natural sciences. The li- 
brary has also a fairly good reference collection containing rep- 
resentative works in various fields of knowledge, even such as are 
not represented in the college curriculum. This being a Lutheran 
school, considerable emphasis is being placed on securing the lit- 
erature pertaining to this church and especially on obtaining as 
much as possible of the literature that has been published by and 



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UBRARY AND MUSEUM 



165 



about the Norwegian Lutherans in America. The library has also 
made a beginning towards collecting and preserving literature il- 
lustrative of the culture and history of the Norwegians and especi- 
ally of the people of Norwegian extraction in this country. It is 
the aim of the library to cooperate with the museum in making 
this coUection as complete as possible. 

In the future development of the library the greatest stress 
should undoubtedly continue to be placed on obtaining material 




FIRST FLOOR, KOREN LIBRARY 
(Reserved for Museum) 



most directly needed in the various courses so that the library may 
become even more than at present the workshop of students and 
instructors; the gaps in the reference collection should be filled 
and this made more comprehensive; our collection of Lutheran 
literature should be made more complete; the Norwegian and Nor- 
wegian-American collection should be made as exhaustive as pos- 
sible; more emphasis might to advantage be laid on collecting 
material on local history and history of the Middle West; and last 
but not leasts the organization already referred to should go for- 
ward as fast as circumstances will allow^ not only that the re- 
sources of the library may be made better available^ but also that 
the students may become acquainted with better bibliographic 



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166 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

tools and get a better insight into the methods of independent re- 
search. 

II. The Museum 

In "Kirketidende" for February 23, 1877, Professor Laur. 
Larsen acknowledges the receipt of 600 birds' eggs for Luther 
College and at the same time mentions that a number of other ar- 
ticles had been received, forming the beginning of a museum. 

The growth of the museum was evidently not very rapid, and 
it was not before 1890 that anything was done towards display- 
ing the articles. In that year Professor Sihler was placed in 
charge^ and with the fifty dollars at his disposal he had some 
cases made for keeping and displaying the various articles. 

In October, 1896, Professor Haldor Hanson was appointed 
curator, and it was under his administration that the museum made 
the greatest headway. The extent of its growth the first five 
years it was under his charge can be seen from the report given 
in "Kirketidende" for May 23, 1900, from which the following 
is taken: 

"One of the principal aims of the museum is to collect and 
preserve the Norwegian- American newspaper literature. It has 
now 518 complete volumes of various newspapers and a little more 
than that of incomplete volumes. In the museum library there 
are a little more than 2,000 volumes, most of them by Norwegian- 
American publishers. 

The museum has a coin collection of 600 pieces, and a stamp 
collection of more than 4,300. In the collection of photographs 
can be found 124 photographs of Norwegian-American clergymen, 
teachers, and journalists, in addition to several groups; 180 photo- 
graphs of churches, schools, and parsonages; 30 groups from Lu- 
ther College, etc. 

In the natural history section there are 150 stuffed birds, 38 
fishes, 35 mammals; a small collection of insects, 975 birds' eggs, 
about 1,000 shells, 33 corals, about 200 specimens of minerals and 
quartz, several fossils, an herbarium of 500 specimens. 

In the ethnological section there are more than 400 Indian 
relics such as arrowheads, tomahawks, bracelets, etc., about 100 
articles from Alaska, a collection of weapons including poisoned 
arrows from the South Sea Islands, also several articles from Af- 
rica, China, and Japan. The Museum lias laid special stress on 
securing and preserving articles illustrative of Norwegian life 
and culture. 

A beginning towards an art section has been made, especi- 
ally by the contribution of Mr. Gausta's large and splendid paint- 



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LIBilARY AND MUSEUM 167 

ing entitled 'Closing the Bargain*. A plaster cast of Apollo Bel- 
videre has been donated by the classes '94, '96, '96, and '97." 

Of articles mentioned since the time of this report may be 
specially noted the model of "Maihaugen", a collection of old 
buildings gathered together from various parts of Gudbrandsdalen 
to a large slope overlooking Lillehammer, Norway, and now form- 
ing the home of the celebrated "Sandvigske Samlinger". This 
model was donated by Reverend M. K. Bleken. Another art- 
icle of considerable interest is the Hardanger bridal costume from 
1754 displayed on an appropriate wax figure. Also quite a num- 
ber of articles relating to Norwegian-American pioneer life have 




KOREN PARSONAGE, 1858 

been added. Among these is the first parsonage occupied by Dr. 
and Mrs. Koren. This little log cabin has been moved from Wash- 
ington Prairie and placed on the campus east of the president's 
house. The interior has been fitted up witli furniture representa- 
tive of that pioneer time. Tlie Syrian collection, consisting of 
relics from a church built by the crusaders in the 11th or 12th 
century, oil lamps from the island of Cyprus, Turkish costumes 
and various other articles, is also wortliy of mention. To the art 
section have been added two pieces of statuary — copies of the 
Borghesian fighter and of the Laocoon group — and various heads 
and masks; also a number of paintings, among which are the "En- 
trance to the Golden Gate" by N. Hagerup and "Winter Scene" 
by Alex. Grinager. 

Professor Haldor Hanson was succeeded as curator in 1902 



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168 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

by Professor George Markhus^ and when he left Decorah in 1906^ 
Professors H. W. Sheel and M. K. Bleken were placed in charge. 

The museum was first located in the northwest corner room 
of the second floor of the main buildings but in 1895 it was moved 
to the small brick building northwest of the main building. At 
first it occupied only part of this buildings but before long, even 
with the whole building devoted to its exclusive use, it became 
very much cramped for room and for a number of years past the 
articles received have had to be stored elsewhere. 




1 ! , I . . J 



THIRD FLOOR, KOREN LIBRARY 
(Reserved for Museum) 

Because of these conditions no special efforts have been made 
the last fifteen years to develop the museum to any great extent. 
But, with the space provided in the new Koren Library and 
Museum Building for housing a considerable part of the museum 
collection and thereby giving opportunity for further growth, 
steps have now been taken to place the management of the museum 
on a more permanent basis. The general direction of the museum 
has been placed in the hands of a permanent faculty Committee 
composed of the head of the Scandinavian department, the li- 
brarian, and one member from the science department, the first 
named to be chairman of the committee and curator of the museum. 

The books originally collected for the museum have been 



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UBRARY AND MUSEUM 169 

transferred to the library. The newspapers have^ however^ been 
retained in the museam with a view to having them form part of 
the collection of the Norwegian-American Historical Archives 
which it is the purpose of the present curator^ Dr. Knut Gjerset^ 
to form in connection with the museum. It is the purpose of the 
present management in the future development of the museum to 
stress even more than in the past those sections which are illus- 
trative of the history and culture of the early pioneers of Nor- 
wegian extraction as well as Norwegian culture as a whole. In 
keeping with this it is Dr. Gjerset's plan^ in the remodeling of the 
old museum building which will have to be done in the very near 
future in order to provide proper housing for that part of the col^ 
lection that cannot be accommodated in the Koren Library and Mu- 
seum Buildings "to arrange a typical Norwegian living-room where 
articles preserved from pioneer days can be placed as they once 
stood in grandmother's own home. This will cost a little^ but it 
will gladden many if it can be done. There will be found the 
loom and the spinning-wheel^ the cupboard and the old chests; 
the fireplace with pot-hooks^ pots^ and copper kettles; the table 
with wooden vessels as in olden days; even the big Bible with the 
horn-rimmed spectacles between the leaves where the old grand- 
mother read for the last time. The collection must be brought 
into such form that it breathes Norwegian life." 




A CKLKBKATION IN THE SKVENT11£S 



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CHAPTER EIGHT 

INCOME 

K. O. ElTTREIM 

NEARLY three-fourths of the income of Luther College daring 
its sixty years of history has come from the church to which 
the school has belonged. The remaining one-fourth has come from 
the students. 

For buildings and grounds about a half million dollars has 
been received, all of which has been raised by special subscrip- 
tions. 

About $300,000 liave been received for special purposes, mostly 
in the nature of endowments. $250,000 is a general endowment 
fund, of which James J. Hill gave $50,000 on the condition that 
$200,000 more be raised. This amount was subscribed by the 
people of the Synod and the subscription was completed in the 
year 1912. 

Special gifts and legacies have been received as follows: 

1. Halvor Olson Gjerjord, Stoughton, Wis., gave the sura of 
$7,343.23, the income of which is to be used for aiding "the most 
worthy and needy students at Luther College who are studying 
with the purpose and view of service in the ministry of the Nor- 
wegian Evangelical Lutheran Church of America.** This amount 
was received in 1882. 

2. Martin Pcderson, Winneshiek Co., Iowa, in 1884? gave $750, 
the interest of which is "to be applied yearly in assisting poor stu- 
dents who are from time to time preparing for the ministry of 
the Gospel in the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America." 

3. Bergit Ellingson, Worth Co., Iowa, in 1891 gave $300, the 
income of which is to be used for the benefit of needy students who 
will prepare themselves for service in the Church. 

4. Knut K. Neste, Jr., Decorah, Iowa, in 1901 gave $800 
"to be used to the aid of needy students at the discretion of the 
president as he may think advisable." 

6. T. Thompson and wife, Vermilion, S. Dak. In 1906 their 
children gave in grateful remembrance of above-named parents the 
sum of $300, the income to be used "for the benefit of such students 
who contemplate the study of theology and need such assistance." 



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INCOME 171 

6. Mr. and Mrs. O. C. Jolinson Hallan Legacy^ Decor ah. 
Iowa. $1,000 given in 1907. Income to be distributed by the 
president and secretary of L. C. and the pastor of First N. £. L. 
Church of Decorah **to such needy students of the College who 
intend later to enter the service of the Synod of the Norwegian 
Lutheran Church of America, and who in the opinion of the faculty 
are worthy of such assistance." 

7. Anton Hegge, Garretson, S. Dak., gave in 1909 $400 and 
in 1910 $500, total $900. The income is to be distributed by the 
faculty to such needy and worthy students at Luther College who 
later study theology at the Seminary to serve the Church as pastors 
or teachers. 

8. Ingeborg Gjerjord, Stoughton, Wis., widow of Halvor O. 
Gjerjord, in 1911 bequeathed $1,227.58 on exactly the same terms 
as the earlier legacy by her husband. 

9. Captain T. A. Rossing, Bode, Iowa, in 1911 gave $10,000, 
the income of which (and, if necessary, the principal) is to be 
used **to aid young men who have been graduated or may be 
graduated from Luther College," "during their time of study either 
at Luther College or at Luther Seminary, or both," "who intend 
to enter the service of the Church either as ministers of the Gospel 
or as professors." 

10. Mrs. Melaas, in 1913, gave $285, the income to be used 
to aid needy students who intend to become ministers. 

11. Kitil Funer, Ridgeway, Iowa, in 1910, gave $200, the in- 
come to be used to aid needy students who intend to become min- 
isters. 

12. Gilbert and Marit Remmen, in 1914, gave $500, the income 
of which is to be used for assisting needy students. 

13. M. J. Melaas, Stoughton, Wis., in 1914 gave $175, income 
to be used to assist students who intend to enter the ministry. 

14. Caroline Busness, Decorah, Iowa, by bequest in 1916 gave 
$1,000 in cash and a residence property in Decorah valued at 
$1,500, the latter subject to possession by Mrs. Martha Hanson 
during life. The income is to be used for assisting needy students 
who intend to enter the ministry. 

15. Ouden and Randine Evenson Legacy, La Crosse, Wis. 
This legacy, amounting to $1,641.70, came into our possession in 
1916. "The interest of said money shall annually be used for the 
aid and support of one or more worthy farmers' sons studying at 
said College, providing they shall be in need of such aid and 
support. Preference in awarding the annual interest of said money 



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172 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

shall be shown farmers' sons from the eastern district of said 
Synod." 

16. Helga O. Hokaasen gave in 1916 the sum of $100, the 
income "to be used and expended by said trustees in rendering 
financial assistance to such students as in their judgment are in 
need of the same while enrolled and in actual attendance at the 
said College." 

17. Mrs. Ragnhild Sandager in 1919 gave $500, the income 
to be used for the assistance of students preparing for the min- 
istry. 

18. The Laur. Larsen Memorial Fund amounts to $1,450, and 
the income is used for aiding students for the ministry. 

19. Prof. Ola Ramstad of Luther College, who died in 1889, 
left a farm and some other property to be used by his parents 
while they lived and after their death to be given to Luther Col- 
lege. This property came into possession of Luther College about 
the year 1900, and the final proceeds amounted to $6,400. "The 
annual income thereof shall be expended by said Board of Trustees 
for facilitating the instruction in the natural sciences in said Nor- 
wegian Luther College." 

20. The Endowment for Teachers' Salaries, amounting to 
$4,185, is made up of the following legacies and gifts: 

Martin Madson Legacy, 1895 $ 800.00 

Ole J. Hemma Legacy 125.00 

Ole J. Broin Estate, 1918 1,000.00 

B. Anundsen Estate, 1914 500.00 

Gathered by Rev. E. I. Strom, 1917 1,810.00 

Donations in 1918 215.00 

Donations in 1919 285.00 

21. In 1918 was received the R. Larson estate, amounting to 
$1,905, with no conditions attached as to how it was to be used. 

It was the writer's intention to itemise the income of each of 
these funds and also to show how many students have been given 
financial aid, but time has not permitted this to be done. 

The income from "special endowments" listed in the table from 
1862 to 1877 was interest on the so-called "University Fund". 
The income was used for teachers' salaries, and the fund itself 
was expended for buildings. 

After the receipt of the general endowment fund in 1912 a 
steady and substantial income has been received from this source. 
Most of the money is invested in farm mortgages and yields about 



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INCOIIE 173 

six per cent interest. This fund should be enlarged, and in the 
near future it must be, in order to meet the requirements of the 
North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, of 
which Luther College is a member. It is to be hoped that the fund 
may before long be increased to a million dollars. While the school 
would yet be dependent in some measure upon the Church for 
support, the burden would not be so heavy as it necessarily is now. 
It would hardly be beneficial to either school or synod to be financi- 
ally independent of each other. 

The income from students at Luther College is comparatively 
small. Having as a primary aim to prepare candidates for the- 
ological study, the school has always held to the policy that such 
students should not be required to pay any large percentage of 
the cost of their education. The fees have therefore been set at the 
lowest possible figure. During the' early years no fee was asked 
except $40 a year for board. Even this in the case of those who 
could not pay was covered by contributions for student aid. As 
will be seen by the table, such contributions have been made in 62 
out of the 60 years. These contributions together with income 
from student aid funds have amounted to $56,356.54, an average 
of nearly a thousand dollars a year. The normal annual income 
for student aid at present is about $1,500. 

Up to the year 1 896 the school provided board for the students, 
and the major part of the income from students listed in the 
table for that time is for board. In 1897 the students began to 
run their own boarding club. The income from students after 
that time is itemised in the table. 

We cannot vouch for the exact correctness of all the figures in 
the table, but in the main we believe they are correct. £xcept in 
recent years the accounts in large measure were kept by the 
Synod, and the annual reports which have been our main source 
of information do not always show clearly what applies to Luther 
College and what may apply to other institutions. This applies 
especially to "Building Funds", "Gifts for Student Aid," and 
"Contributions from Synod" in the table. This also necessarily 
applies in some measure to the chapter on Expenditures. 

The amount appearing in the building funds column for 1921 
represents the cost of Koren Library. This has not as yet been 
fully paid but is covered by subscriptions which will no doubt 
be paid. Money and subscriptions have been gathered for the 
library for several years, but no report had been made before. 
Hence it appears in the one sum. 



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174 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 







Income at Luther College for Sixty 


Years 






Year 


Butl<)ing 
Funds 


Gifts for 
Special 
Purposes 


General 

Endowment 

Income 


Special 

Endowment 

Income 


Student 

Aid Funds 

Income 


Student 
Aid 
Gifts 


Contribu- 
tions from 
Synod 


Sales 

And 

Sundries 


Total 
Outside 
Income 


1862 


4.015.65 

1.795.44 

8.271.25 

20,869.82 

11.951.82 

15.802.37 

13.024.59 

4.389.47 

9.067.96 

8.573.29 

10.542.08 

7.105.87 

8.364.73 

17.268.06 

5.661.20 

1.924.04 

1.513.15 

446.30 






561.20 




266.13 
253.14 




47.59 

22.99 

87.39 

268.38 

1.686.70 

4.614.61 

1.862.85 

253.25 

33.75 

66.12 

77.91 

40.75 

7.80 

115.61 

1,993.98 

590.01 

609.62 

307.77 

209.12 

316.31 

305.51 

213.83 

61.30 

150.15 

94.91 

97.42 

54.92 

86.20 

17.10 

172.46 

476.72 

640.99 

171.38 

344.77 

323.77 

427.53 

336.23 

270.23 

196.53 

245.02 

211.63 

356.69 

352.53 

304.92 

399.40 

460.16 

419.69 

459.81 

1,039.31 

435.82 

269.30 

366.87 

219.54 

338.05 

239.24 

64.S6 

29.65 

4.704.12 

316.67 


4.890.57 


1863 


135.00 
488.16 








2.206.57 


1864 




322.58 
736.40 
224.84 
179.56 
33.79 




421.98 

1.307.48 

1.621.77 

1.985.95 

1.852.20 

2.329.30 

3,083.37 

4.012.50 

4.437.79 

4.900.83 

6,733.54 

4.942.92 

6.163.55 

7.468.89 

5.771.00 

6.070.13 

5.423.21 

5.756.20 

6.988.71 

7,190.75 

6.779.52 

7.417.48 

7.789.39 

7.566.39 

6.356.20 

7,737.12 

10.302.16 

7,786.20 

5.647.36 

6,397.83 

6,352.74 

8.466.21 

7.892.23 

8,164.57 

9.130.09 

8.893.02 

9.439.66 

9,411.45 

10.784.55 

12,714.38 

11.880.74 

11.550.54 

14.004.21 

13,347.83 

13,724.49 

13.734.64 

15.227.04 

15.964.91 

19.849.37 

11.658.22 

16.985.82 

10,686.71 

11,172.59 

19,902.59 

9.810.00 

14,525.42 

21.034.94 

51.344.22 


9.591.36 


1865 






715.33 

1.359.62 

1.104.10 

1,116.32 

1,283.60 

1,918.41 

2,183.38 

2,614.66 

770.50 

884.00 

867.17 

589.91 

1.298.60 

453.05 

837.75 

1.368.97 

1.779.73 

1.125.44 

1,249.07 

1.109.15 

976.76 

976.80 

723.95 

793.16 

332.46 

402.14 

332.46 

471.37 

581.47 

81.85 

280.56 

75.18 

52.25 

99.90 

58.25 

2.00 


23.897.41 


1866 




16.844.75 


1867 








23.686.59 


1868 





18.186.75 


1869 








8.255.62 


1870 










14.103.49 


1871 






10.00 

405.68 

272.51 

78.33 

29.55 

248.69 




14.845.29 


1872 
1873 




17.672.44 
13.223.63 


1874 




16.262.58 


1875 








23.272.09 


1876 




32.384.19 


1877 




11.530.23 


1878 




8.346.82 


1879 










7.661.95 


1880 










7.001.30 


1881 












7.852.24 


1882 












8.419.66 


1883 




7.343.23 








15.996.88 


1884 




750.00 






281.93 

295.32 

289..14 

328.59 

328.59 

328.59 

328.59 

328.59 

350.77 

368.39 

371.48 

378.84 

382.59 

440.53 

348.83 

348.83 

386.33 

347.87 

366.24 

329.96 

335.73 

335.73 

350.73 

384.48 

393.53 

439.73 

472.43 

494.63 

1.111.17 

1,070.09 

1.083.09 

1.089.94 

1.208.34 

1,417.14 

1.265.90 

1.344.42 

1.412.26 

874.89 


8.981.90 


1885 








8,839.71 


1886 
1887 


1.191.81 

263.70 

46.35 

104.50 

18.012.17 

36.440.38 

2.997.93 








10.342.25 
8.980.05 


1888 








7.579.22 


1889 








8,588.87 


1890 
1891 


300.00 







29.062.16 
45,360.09 


1892 
1893 






9.944.15 
7,988.68 


1894 










6,977.45 


1895 




800.00 

51.00 

1.00 

30.00 

8.00 






10.270.38 


1896 






28.73 
48.00 
48.00 
48.00 
7.50 
48.00 
48.00 
48.00 
271.91 


8.753.50 


1897 






9.133.88 


1898 






9.993.05 


1899 






9.626.33 


1900 






10.032.02 


1901 








10.052.34 


1902 




56.92 

7.200.00 

110.00 

136.35 

301.00 

1.006.00 

86.15 

77.00 

2.196.28 

11.363.05 

250,838.54 

1.984.27 

889.80 

408.50 

1.918.95 

3.956.74 

293.85 

2.640.00 

120.00 

567.00 






11.467.34 


1903 






20.649.03 


1904 






12.950.91 


1905 






171.75 

333.19 

68.25 

245.97 

110.00 

448.90 

184.35 

270.00 

180.23 

302.88 

74.00 

35,00 

' " 520.66 
10.66 


12.499.29 


1906 


1,140.00 

23.739.99 

40.096.41 

10.970.15 

4.624.25 

2.664.50 

252.00 

1.041.00 

312.00 

150.00 

40.00 

1.074.00 






16.528.53 


1907 
1908 




50.40 

56.65 

41.75 

1.10 

467.23 

547.46 

50.00 

344.68 

864.89 

371.00 

371.00 

373.40 

421.43 

257.53 

330.67 


39.057,11 
55.022.89 


1909 




25.833.06 


1910 
1911 
1912 




24.009.31 

31,574.49 

273,237.84 


1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 


11.440.88 
13.287.86 
13.513.54 
14,669.69 
13,604.93 
14.325.89 
14.205.25 
14.261.65 
14.264.59 


27.791.56 
33,335.67 
27,125.63 
29.654.81 
40,326.40 
26.653.60 


1919 




33.166.17 


1920 
1921 


132.992.39 


41.790.50 
200.700.43 


Total 


. 428.740.62 


296.056.79 


123.574.28 


8.248.46 


22.014.43 


34.342*11 


549.894.90 


28,987.44 


1.491.859.03 



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INCOME 



175 







Income at Luther College for 


Sixty Years 
















Medical 


Total 


Grand 


Number 


Members 


Tuition 


Laboratory 


Other 


Room and 


Incidental 


Aid and 


from 


ToUl 


of 


In 




Fees 


Fees 


Light 


Fee 


Hospital 


Students 


Income 


Students 


Synod 














611.25 
1.150.00 
1.725.00 
2,090.00 
4,057.50 


5,501.82 
3.356.57 
11.316.36 
25.987.41 
20.902.25 


16 
34 
51 
58 
81 


13.400 














16.700 














20,000 














23,500 














28,000 














4.260.00 
3.986.00 
5,628.50 
6.089.88 
8.597.55 
7.991.08 
7,565.10 
8.424.29 

10.471.46 
9,983.38 
9.750.57 

10,717.75 
9.229.97 
9,358.72 

10.633.49 
8.517.82 
9.524.30 

11,462.48 


23.686.59 
22.172.75 
13.884.12 
20.193.37 
23,442.84 
25,663.52 
20.788.73 
24.686.87 
33.743.55 
42.367.57 
21.280.80 
19.064.61 
16.891.92 
16.360.02 
18.485.73 
16.937.48 
25.521.18 
20.4U.38 


83 
73 
106 
122 
147 
147 
159 
190 
229 
217 
181 
189 
173 
159 
165 
145 
137 
166 


32.900 














38,000 














43,900 














50.148 














57,800 














66,800 














77.415 














94.775 














102.001 














110.871 


572.00 












115.000 


1,075.25 












119.500 


777.71 












123.500 


892.15 












127.255 


712.89 












132.000 


528X0 












137,500 


735.75 












1U.272 


1.067.98 












lU.lOO 


777 J5 












9.036.23 
8.387.15 
8.705.96 
7.920.60 
7.745.04 


17.875.94 
18.729.40 
17.686.01 
15.499.82 
16.333.91 


143 
131 
133 
118 
135 


lU.OOO 


704.99 












143.885 


850.06 












127.200 


648.75 








110.600 


597.50 












93.921 


927.00 












7.998.16 
12.139.23 
15.981.19 


37.060.32 
57.499.32 
25.925.34 


145 
206 
213 


98.912 


1.646.00 












98.400 


2.247.00 












97.968 


2.116.00 












12.798.54 


20.787.22 


188 


101.100 


1.592.00 












12.922.84 
12.993.55 


19.900.29 
28.263.93 


182 
187 


104.300 


1.660.00 












107.U2 


1.873.75 












13.568.39 
5,495.97 


22.321.89 
14.629.85 


200 
192 


110.300 


1.962.50 




399.46 


1.506.31 


1,334.00 


293.70 


113.100 


1.855.78 




403.34 


1,668.70 


2.539.01 


294.80 


6.761.63 


16.754.68 


192 


117.226 


2,213.47 




422.25 
432.80 
448.61 
410.26 


1.680.80 
1,551.01 
1.503.25 
1,301.55 


2.678.04 
2.600.60 
2.727.29 
2.672.40 


316.40 
310.75 
322.85 
315.15 


7.310.96 
6.811.80 
7.093.88 
7.192.46 


16.937.29 
16,843.82 
17,146.22 
18.659.80 


198 
194 
207 
197 


120.900 


1.916.64 




126,800 


2.091.88 




133,623 


1.993.10 




135.600 


1.850 JO 




471.03 
415.00 


2.022.76 
1.868.25 


2.765.55 
2.581.21 


334.95 
306.65 


7,444.79 
6,953.35 


28.093.82 
19.904.26 


203 
193 


137.500 


1,782.24 




139.430 


1,862.86 




451.75 
509.05 
393.61 
421.20 


1.806.60 
1.872.80 
1.601.70 
2.459.35 


2.623.80 
2.861.55 
2.370.05 
2.500.10 


309.90 
335.10 
318.00 
344.00 


7.054.91 
7.539.30 
6.024.76 
7.435.40 


19.554.20 
24.067.83 
45.081.87 
62.458.29 


198 
211 
174 
187 


139.900 


1,960.80 




141.900 


1,341.40 




143,135 


1.631.25 


79.50 


143.900 


1,708.K 


188.54 


527.54 


2.365.15 


3.349.60 


339.00 


8,477.93 


34.311.01 


191 


1U.000 


1.825.25 


206.16 


413.13 


2,216.5C 


3.100.65 


297.00 


8.058.69 


32.068.00 


169 


143.819 


2.090.75 


370.9C 


505.72 


2.405.85 


3,363.45 


345.00 


9,081.67 


40.656.16 


181 


145.000 


2.525.75 


307.20 


619.85 


2,897.25 


4.021.45 


382.00 


10.753.50 


283.991.34 


214 


148.000 


2.303.00 


334.53 


842.35 


2.958.4C 


4.014.45 


398.00 


10.850.73 


38.642.29 


213 


150,504 


1.998.75 


390.0C 


474.84 


2,980.2C 


3.982.50 


392.00 


10.218.29 


43,553.9C 


208 


152.500 


1.768.65 


774.69 


538.05 


2,906.7C 


3.995.00 


393.00 


10,376.09 


37.501.72 


207 


152.800 


3.239.55 


490.75 


685.88 


2.879.0C 


3.817.65 


463.29 


11.576.12 


41.230.93 


207 


152.160 


4.045.76 


317.00 


1.725.76 


2,245.16 


3.268.65 


329.80 


11.932.13 


52.258.53 


130 


151.192 


3J91.20 


126.00 


1.203.65 


1.553.75 


2.179.30 


271.50 


9.225.40 


36.007.00 


170 


403.634 


2.918.98 


248.5C 


1.191.8( 


3.272.W 




481.25 


8.112.61 


41.278.78 


241 


410.824 


7.075.56 


669-92 


1.709.85 


6.112.76 




1.080.91 


16.649.00 


58.440.00 


217 


401.734 


15.278.78 


850.01 


1.958.01 


10.239.29 




. 1.606.47 


29.932.56 


230.632.99 


254 


401.786 


95,134.83 


5,353.70 


17.574.79 


66,375.17 


65.346.30 


10.581.47 


530.386.94 


2.022,245.97 


9.957 





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176 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 




HANS GERHARD STUB 

Who Gathered the Subscriptions for the Luther 
College Endowment Fund 



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CHAPTER NINE 

EXPENDITURES 

O. M. ElTTRElM 

THE foHowing pages give a tabulation of the expenditures at 
Luther College year by year up to the school year 1921-22. 
As may be expected^ the data available, at least for earlier years, 
are too meager to make an accurate separation under the headings 
given, but it has been the aim to make the distinction between 
capital and operating expenditures as sharp as possible. To make 
the figures available for study and comparison, a short explanation 
of the classification is given. 

I. Capital Expenditures 
All expenditures for new material and improvements which 
may be expected to last for several years and which thus add to 
the value of the school plant. This excludes repairs. 

1. Buildings and Grounds 

Column 1. Main building, including the added wing and the 
cost of rebuilding after the fire, the heating plant, the museum 
building, the gymnasium, the hospital, Laur. Larsen Hall, Loyalty 
Hall, and Koren Library. 

Column 2. The College's share in the church in Decorah, and 
the various residences purchased by the College. 

Column 3. Campus land, water mains, etc. 

Column 4. Total of items in columns 1, 2, and 3. 

2. Equipment 

Column 5, 6, and 7. New equipment for the three laboratories, 
not including supplies. 

Column 8. Library books only. Figures previous to 1880-81 
are uncertain. 

Column 9. Exhibits for the museum. 

Column 10. Furniture, maps, horses and wagons, and, in gen- 
eral, all equipment items of which the specific classification is not 
known. 

Column 11. Total of items in columns 5 to 9 inclusive. 



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178 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

II. Operating Expenditures 

Expenditures for materials used up or services rendered during 
the jear^ or^ in general^ items whicli do not add to the value of 
the plant. 

1. Administration 

Column 12. Except for the year 1920-21, for which a separa- 
tion was worked out on a basis of hours taught, 10% of the total 
teachers' salaries is charged to administration. The items in early 
years also include rent paid by the Synod for teachers' residences. 

Column 13. Total salary of teachers who acted as librarians. 
The figures are therefore in most years too high. 

Column 14. Amount stated in reports as spent for "Printing 
and Stationery" and "Advertising". In the years for which figures 
are not given, they are no doubt included in the items in column 15. 

Column 15. "Administration and Wages", traveling expenses, 
insurance, diplomas, and, in general, all administration items not 
known to come under columns 12, 13 or 14. 

Column 16. Total of columns 12 to 15 inclusive. 

2. Instruction 

Column 17. 90% of total teachers' salaries, less column 13, 
librarian. 

3. General Expense 

Column 18. Care of buildings and grounds, repairs, "General 
Expense", exchange, interest, endowment fund expenses, fuel, 
light, etc. Up to the year 1896-97, the expenditures for "Hus- 
holdning" are also included. The "Husholdningskasse" was discon- 
tinued when the boarding club was organized. 

4. Total Operating Expenditures 
Column 19. Total of columns 12 to 18 inclusive. 

5. Student Aid 

Column 20. Early years also include some aid to students 
at St. Louis (at Concordia Seminary). 

6. Total Expenditures 
Column 21. Total of items in columns 4, 11, 19, and 20. 



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EXPENDITURES 179 

III. Per Capita Expenditures and Contributions 

Some of the items in the final table of "Per Capita Operating 
Expenditures and Per Capita Synodical Contribution" may need 
a word of explanation. 

Column 22 is a duplicate of column 19 in the preceding table. 

Column 24. The items- carried out in the last two places, as 
50^148 in 1869-70^ for example^ are the actual membership in 
those years. The items in which the last two digits are ciphers 
were estimated by plotting a curve and interpolating. 

Column 25. The items in column 22 divided by the corre> 
sponding items in column 23. 

Column 26. The items in column 22 multiplied by 100 and 
divided by the corresponding items in column 24. 

Column 27. Total amount paid by students each year as 
given in Chapter Eight. 

Column 28. Items in column 22 less the corresponding items 
in column 27. 

Column 29. Items in column 28 divided by the corresponding 
items in column 23. 

Column 30. Items in column 28 multiplied by 100 and divided 
by the corresponding items in column 24. 

The figures for 1920-21^ to make the record complete^ in- 
clude also the amount paid during 1921-22 on the 1920-21 deficit. 

IV. Bibliography 

The expenditures for laboratory equipment and, after 1880, 
for library books were obtained from the accounts of the Luther 
College treasurer. 

The number of students was obtained from Chapter Eleven. 

The number of Synod members was obtained by Dr. O. M. 
Norlie, except those after 1917. 

Teachers' salaries for 1888 to 1891 inclusive are from "Luther 
College", by G. Bothne. 

All other figures arc from the reports of the Synod treasurer 
and the College treasurer in the annual "Synodal-Beretninger." 



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180 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Expenditures ai Luiher CoUegefor Sixty Years 



CAPITAL EXPENDITURES 





Buildings and Grounds 


Equipment 


Year 


1 Resi- 


Campus 


Total 


Laboratory 


General 




Buildings 


etc. 


Biology 


Chemis- 
try 


Physics 


Library 


Muse- 
um 


MisceU. 


Total 


Col. No. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


61-62... 
























62-63... 




1.372.86 

1.816.78 

91.55 

97.70 


641.66 
42.56 


1.372.86 
7.771.08 
36.940.13 
31.861.94 
2.317.61 
3.098.91 
1.751.46 








42.07 
170.00 




112.34 
1. 068.83 


154 41 


63-64... 
64-65... 


5.954.30 
36.207.58 
31.764.24 
2.275.11 
3.098.91 
1.751.46 


1,238.83 


65-66... 
66-67... 








31.33 

26.22 

181.87 

231.75 

46.20 

52.20 

116.20 




1.005.95 
221.92 


1,037.28 
248.14 


67-68... 








181.87 


















231.75 


69-70... 














281.59 
45.00 
137.50 
429.15 
312.90 


327 79 


70-71... 


866.77 
2.006.11 

705.54 
5.456.39 
20.579.54 
3.505.31 
1.470.17 
1.000.00 


856.15 




1.722.92 
2.006.11 
705.54 
5.456.39 
20.579.54 
3.505.31 
1,470.17 
5.857.33 








97.20 


71-72... 








253 70 


72-73... 












429 15 


73-74... 












291.55 
90.13 
116.25 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 




604.45 


74-75... 








9013 


75-76... 
















1 16.25 


76-77... 


4.857.33 














100.00 


77-78... 












100.00 


78-79... 






100.00 


79-80... 






















80-81... 




822.75 

1.011.47 

474.62 

33.55 




822.75 
1.011.47 

474.62 

133.55 

137.90 
1,220.52 

325.67 

22.20 

59.46 

8.612.76 

39.743.99 

2.459.18 

2.987.81 

639.15 
691.65 

290.00 
1.032.90 








178.00 
100.00 
112.91 
132.45 
839.22 
41.78 
49.02 
123.31 
136.99 
78.97 
278.22 
176.34 
171.57 
265.93 
320.13 
217.99 
394.51 
278.65 
206.73 
321.57 
177.35 
376.50 
434.20 
363.05 
286.79 
138.38 
444.79 
374.88 
399.78 
534.22 
514.89 
427.21 
364.81 
704.38 
500.74 
818.76 
750.86 
759.88 
749.92 
1.273.98 
1.715.80 






178 00 


81-82... 














100.00 


82-83... 














112.91 


83-84... 


100.00 

137.9C 

1.152.96 

296.62 

22.2C 

59.46 

8.136.96 

38.358.09 

1.523.55 

814.31 

38.30 












132 45 


84-85... 












839.22 


85-86... 


67.56 
29.05 














41.78 


86-87... 












49.02 


87-88... 












123 31 


88-89... 
















136.99 


89-90... 


475.80 
1,015.90 
456.88 
428.00 
600.85 
626.25 
290.00 
1.032.90 


■ 370.66 

478.75 

1,745.50 

65.46 










480.07 

2.866.66 

334.63 


55904 


90-91... 
91-92... 
92-93... 








3.144.8S 
510.97 
171.57 


93-94... 






265.93 


94-95... 












32013 


95-96... 












533.70 

250.37 

42.21 

263.44 

162.91 

93.64 

240.11 

28.15 

269.64 

117.40 

261.20 

41.26 

14.80 

24.60 


751 69 


96-97... 
97-98... 










644.88 
32086 


98-99... 


80.00 
1.123.33 


250.00 




330.00 
1.123.33 








47017 


99-00... 
00-01... 




4.70 




489.18 
27099 


01-02... 


539.51 






539.51 
836.50 
763.30 








616.61 


02-03... 




836.50 








462 35 


03-04... 


763.30 






25.61 
113.73 


52.66 


658.J0 


04-05... 






569 92 


05-06... 


287.75 

7.879.91 

56.744.85 

9.887.83 

6.765.05 

1.579.23 

91.55 

20.00 

4,309.91 

409.59 

■ 14.563.54 






287.75 

7.879.91 

56.744.85 

9.887.83 

7.176.07 

3.038.43 

1.245.66 

20.00 

4.531.12 

484.59 

3.561.73 

14,563.54 




399.58 


06-07... 












486 05 


07-08... 








2.52 




392 20 


08-09... 






424.38 


09-10... 


411.02 
1.031.87 


i. 459.26 

122.24 


' 2.66 
505.10 
253.08 
550.00 


10.00 
187.64 

92.56 
196.84 
547.93 
738.80 
621.81 

61.50 


■ " 9.4i 

577.94 
445.18 
583.57 
121.53 
262.65 


544.22 


10-11... 
11-12... 
12-13... 


90.55 
51.70 
15.00 
25.00 
213.75 

42.26 

139.99 

17.91 

25.66 


312.38 
1.162.53 
363.63 
832.60 
211.60 
283.37 
182.70 

i.oisi.ii 

60.00 
681.50 


1.114.87 
1.734.00 
1.518.22 
2.557.09 
2.753.56 
2.098.55 
1.849.91 
899 87 


13-14... 
14-15... 
15-16... 
16-17... 
17-18... 


1,854.66 


221.21 

75.00 

1.707.13 


18-19... 


100.00 
132,412.96 






100.00 

4.500.00 

135,679.56 


* 9.66 
146.61 


134.78 
121.88 
386.19 


9.86 

350.02 

72.18 


1.994.60 
1.814.88 
3.027.28 


19-20... 
20-21... 


4.500.00 
3.243.60 


23.66 


Totals- 


404.840.09 


27.749.04 


7.787.43 


440.376.56 


1.465.79 


3.246.49 


2.484.34 


18,231.23 


621.10 


14.812.41 


40.861.36 



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EXPENDITURES 



Expenditures at Luther College for Sixty Years 



OPERATING EXPENDITURE 



181 







ADM 


NtSTR.\T10N 














Vet: 


Ft«,H 




PriJiling 






liutnictian 


General 


Tcita[ 


Siuctent 


Total 




Dmn, 


Libruw 


and 


Miicvll. 


Total 




Exprnw 




hid 


Eitpeodilurr* 




etc. 


ian 


Advc. 
















Coi, 






















Ho. 


12 


U 


14 


IS 


16 


17 


1ft 


19 


20 


21 


«J-6] 














654.64 
1,187.35 


654,64 
l,4ft5.66 





654.64 


62-6J 


137 04 




9,00 




' 146,01 


" " IS 2, 27 


3,012.93 


6^MM 


S4.70 




SJSQ 


80.15 


175.35 


564.27 


2,467 20 


3,20682 




12,216,73 


M-OJ 


251.00 
254.07 
409,Si 
J97.50 
4ft5.i3 
711.92 
745,97 
777 JS 






140.00 
120.00 
85.00 
605.25 
95.00 
75.00 
85.00 


39J,0C 
347.07 
494,58 

1,002,75 
580.13 
786.92 
830.97 

1,990.96 


2,259,00 
2,286.58 
3. 686 J 7 
3.577.50 
4,367.92 
4,717.71 
4,587.44 
4,768.47 


4,010.00 
6,234,21 
8,497.72 
6,077,37 
9,114.71 
9.316.52 
10,792,10 
9,593.94 


6,6ft0.00 
8,894.86 
12,678.47 
10,657.62 
14,282.96 
14,841.17 
16,210.71 
16,353.17 


564.07 

785,95 

2.518.85 

2..583,12 


41,620.13 


&5^ 






41,794.08 


MHkl 






15.244.22 


iTHtf 






11,938.40 


18-69 






94,278.92 


a»-7C 






15,954.91 


n-n 






20,549.68 


n-7i 


1. 165.06 


'" 48.ift 


20,996,30 


71-7J 


7n.sj 


1,000.00 




406.50 


2.124.33 


5,460.47 


ft,9li 14 


16,51594 


2,501.15 


20,151.78 


rj-74 


9I6.6S 


916.67 




150.00 


1,983.15 


6,019.46 


8.860.W 


16.863.71 


2.903,19 


25,827,74 


14-75 


1,076.62 


1,000.00 




348.00 


2,424,62 


6,457.55 


11,299,77 


20,181.94 


3,041 67 


41,891.28 


75-76 


99^X1 


ft97.25 




SU4.S0 


2,4«H.08 


8,069.67 


I4„i99.28 


24,957.03 


3,176.76 


31,755,35 


76-77 


],0OJ.4« 


1,295. 7 J 




100.00 


2.199.21 


7,735.55 


17,319,14 


27,471.«) 


1,298.60 


30.342.67 


n-78 


596,14 


ft62.50 




489.00 


1.947.64 


4,502.77 


16,250.81 


22,701.21 


453.65 


29,112.22 


7%-n 


674.07 


S62.50 




2S7.50 


1,K24.07 


5,204.13 


lL22ft,90 


18,257 10 


817.75 


19, 194 .ft 5 


n-90 


6ll0.7a 


900 00 






l,Sft0.78 


5.227.02 


9.41ft.01 


16,245.81 


1,368.97 


17,614.78 


iO-81 


700.40 


900.00 






1,600.40 


5.401.60 


11,246,29 


18,250.29 


1,779,71 


21,010.77 


sj-e2 


919.16 


750.00 




175. 00 


1,844.16 


7,522.47 


9,609.84 


18,976.47 


1.125.44 


21,211.18 


«/-«j 


77J.4S 


787.50 


1 2.00 


S.ftO 


1,581.75 


6,171.53 


9,T6S.94 


17,521,22 


1 ,249.07 


19,357,82 


Uh-M 


795.25 


800.00 




11.40 


1 .606.65 


6.357.25 


11.716.05 


19,679.95 


1.109.15 


21,055.10 


«4Hi5 


707,91 


570.00 






J.277.93 


5,801.13 


10,407.01 


17,486.29 


1,258,69 


19,722.10 


KS-a6 


764.71 


157.42 




' iw.os 


1,325.18 


6.525.01 


8.566.67 


16,416.86 


1,217.12 


18,916.28 


«6-a7 


&21,12 


750.00 




14.65 


1.585,77 


6,640.04 


8.784.97 


17.010.78 


1 ,048,29 


18.413.76 


Vl-U 


726,25 


900,00 






1.626.25 


5,616.25 


7,615.98 


14,878.48 


1,121.75 


16,145.74 


a»nB9 


752.60 


975.00 




iW.OO 


1.915,60 


5,798.40 


8,299.16 


16,013.16 


661,05 


16,870.66 


ll».40 


975.S6 


1,000.00 




25.00 


2,000.86 


5,572.81 


10,634.58 


18.208. 27 


809.12 


28.189.39 


90-91 


U514.A7 


1,000.00 




6L43 


2,576.10 


5,848.25 


12.129.00 


20.553.15 


661,05 


64,iaV,27 


^1-«J 


719.17 


1,075,00! 






1,864.17 


4,655.00 


15,820.00 


22,119,17 


767.11 


26.076.45 


*2-«J 


JJ64^29 


1,100.00; 






2^464.29 


5.946,10 


11,810.01 


22.220.40 


822.92 


26,202.70 


^1-V4 


1.169.67 


947.85 




65.25 


2,182.77 


4.890.15 


18,0ft8.ft8 


25,161.80 


595,17 


26,662.05 


94^5 


1,347,44 


1,427.15 




712,25 


3,486,84 


6.917.84 


14,314.74 


24,759.42 


6 29. 9 J 


26,401,11 


«5-96 


1,^180 


1,375.00 




16.05 


2,894,85 


6,205.70 


12,449,17 


21,549,72 


370.52 


22,961.91 


94^7 


1^2.50 


1,300.00 




44.32 


2,926,82 


7,046,03 


5,032.18 


15,005.01 


308.09 


16,990.90 


ff-«» 


K44S.20 


1.300.00 


279.40 


420.20 


3.447.80 


6,944.45 


4,620.70 


J5,UU,95 


529.88 


15.861.69 


M-QV 


I.54«Jt 


1,300.00 


231.70 




1,080,01 


7,102.26 


4,074.99 


14.457,26 


442.95 


l5,70O..!8 


W-00 


1,212.9? 


1,225.05 


222,67 


44.00 


2,704.69 


8,274.11 


1,956.53 


14. MIS. IS 


375,84 


16,921.70 


00-01 


1.0ft4.92 


1.200,00 


237. ft£ 


B89.13 


3,411,93 


8,564,27 


3,766.78 


15,742.98 


650 54 


16,664.51 


01-02 


1.152.05 


1.200.00 


2J2.24 




2,584,29 


10,120,50 


4,671.09 


(7,575,88 


603.39 


19,135.19 


02-OJi 


L185.14 


1.275.00 


288.15 




2.748,49 


9,400.00 


6,592.15 


18.740.64 


590.00 


20,629.49 


0J-0# 


1,226.25 


1,300.00 


532.06 


20, 10 


3,078.41 


9,736.25 


6,576.39 


J9..^91.07 


42 7.95 


21,240.62 


04^ 


1,2 74.0ft 


1,300.00 


374.34 


494.05 


3,442.47 


10,166.67 


5,668.11 


19,277.25 


171.75 


20018,92 


m-Q^ 


1.40344 


1.300.00 


319.27 


360.00 


3,lft2,4l 


11.128.10 


6..*50.55 


21.061.26 


496,40 


22,244.99 


D6-07 


l.lta.Ji 


1,300.00 


4«9.76 


94.95 


3,201 .0^ 


10,546.92 


5.572.65 


19,120.61 


422.15 


28,108.92 


m-m 


1,J5S,72 


L.JOO.OO 


249.51 


552.25 


1,457, 4K 


10,901.45 


6,810.38 


21.169.31 


816.90 


79,121.26 


mrm 


1.443 04 


1,300.00 


428,98 


387.ftO 


3.559.82 


11,687.12 


6.806. U 


22.053.25 


439.73 


12.805.19 


m-m 


1.590,56 


l.iOO.OO 


233,16 


159.33 


3,283,05 


13,014,99 


6,938.20 


21.2,36.24 


816.08 


11.772.61 


10-1 J 


i.6ao.5i 


l.JOO.OO 


722.09 


761.7) 


4.184.11 


13,104.73 


6,721,28 


24,212.14 


1,692.90 


30,058.54 


ii-12 


1.90S.0J 


1,300.00 


417.29 


1S6.84 


.1.812. 16 


15.872.22 


7,760.92 


27. 445. .10 


1,515.64 


31,940,60 


u^ia 


2,221.68 


l.JOO.OO 


602,59 


553.44 


4,677.71 


18,695.14 


9,. S99 11 


12.772.18 


1,371.33 


35,681.71 


tJ-U 


2,410.40 


1,100,00 


6ft3 79 


535.72 


4.929.91 


iO,393,5» 


9,071.57 


3 4, .19.^, 06 


1,763.67 


43,246.94 


14-tJ 


1,402.25 


1.241.66 


448.19 


ir5.ii 


4.267.41 


20,37H.5V 


8.87404 


ll,S20.O4 


1,190.86 


17,949.05 


t5-l« 


?.1S«.24 


1,200.00 


61.1,05 


ft42.97 


5,OU,J6 


20,024,15 


9.131.81 


34,370,22 


1,334,16 


41.364.66 


16^17 


2,J74,67 


1,200.00 


512.05 


a64,58| 


4, 97 1. 3Q 


20.1 5ft. 4*( 


10.091.64 


15.223.42 


1,322.00 


52.958.87 


17-Ii 


2,453.5ft 


1 ,300,00 


725,16 


1,255.25 


5.714,0^3 


15,482.21 


8.809.1,^ 


30,025.43 


291.00 


31,216.10 


l«-I9 


2, 969 J J 


1.300.00 


919.24 


2,679,42 


7,887.79 


20,122.15 


12,841.19 


40,853.13 


1.110.00 


44.057.73 


1^20 


Jj2ftJ2 


1,300.00 


1, 110.39 


2,lftti.l9 


8.624.90 


27.854.89 


18.758. 74 


55.238.53 


206.64 


61,760.05 


20»ZI 


6JS1.75 


4,039.65 


2,996.52 


2,144.87 


15,912.79 
169.9 24,00 


40,901.44 
543,798,86 


29,1.J9.56 


85.971.79 


2,48446 


227.165.09 


Toeal 


76^9,31 


58,295.93 


lJ,9g4.4» 


20,094.21 


557,454.24 


1.271,17MO 


158.454.5 7 


1.888,118.27 



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182 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Expenditures at Luther College for Sixty Years 



PER CAPITA OPERATING EXPENDITURES AND PER CAPITA SYNODICAL CONTRIBUTIONS 










Per Capita 






Per Capita 




Total 


No. 


Members 


Expenditures 


Income 


Contribution 


Contribution 


Year 


Operating 


of 


of 






from 


by 
















Expenditures 


Students 


Synod 


Per 

Student 
in dollars 


Per 
Member 
in cents 


Students 


Synod 


Ptr 

Student 

in dollars 


Per 
Member 

in cents 


Col. No. 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


61-62. 


654.64 


16 


13.400 


40.92 


4.9 


611.25 


43.39 


2.71 


OJ 


62-63... 


1 .485.66 


34 


16.700 


43.70 


8.9 


1.150.00 


335.66 


9.87 


2.0 


63-64... 


3.206.82 


51 


20,000 


62.88 


16.0 


1,725.00 


1,481.82 


29.06 


7.4 


64-65... 


6.680.00 


58 


23.500 


115.17 


28.4 


2,090.00 


4.590.00 


79.14 


19.5 


65-66... 


8.894.86 


81 


28,000 


109.81 


31.8 


4.057.50 


4,837.36 


59.72 


17.3 


66-67... 


12.678.47 


83 


32.900 


152.75 


38.5 


4,260.00 


8.418.47 


101.43 


25.6 


67-68... 


10.657.62 


73 


38.000 


145.99 


28.1 


3,986.00 


6.671.62 


91.39 


17.6 


68-69... 


14.282.96 


106 


43.900 


134.74 


32-5 


5,628.50 


8.654.46 


81.65 


19.7 


69-70... 


14.841.17 


122 


50.148 


121.65 


29.6 


6.089.88 


8.751.29 


71.73 


17.5 


70-71... 


16.210.71 


147 


57.800 


110.28 


28.1 


8.597.55 


7,613.16 


51.79 


13.2 


71-72... 


16.353.37 


147 


66.800 


111.25 


24.5 


7.991.08 


8.362.29 


56.89 


12.5 


72-73... 


16.515.94 


159 


77.415 


103.88 


21.3 


7,565.10 


8.950.84 


56.29 


11.6 


73-74... 


16.863.71 


190 


94.775 


88.76 


17.8 


8.424.29 


8.439.42 


44.42 


8.9 


74-75... 


20.181.94 


229 


102.001 


88,13 


19.8 


10.471.46 


9.710.48 


42.40 


9.5 


75-76... 


24.957.03 


217 


110.871 


115,01 


22.5 


9.983.38 


14.973.65 


69.01 


13.5 


76-77... 


27.473.90 


181 


115.000 


151.79 


23.9 


9.750.57 


17.723.33 


43.78 


15.4 


77.78... 


22.701.24 


189 


119,500 


120.11 


19.0 


10.717.79 


11.983.45 


63.40 


10.0 


78-79... 


18,257.10 


173 


. 123,500 


105.53 


14.8 


9.229.97 


9.027.13 


52.18 


7.3 


79-80... 


16.245.81 


159 


127.255 


102.17 


12.8 


9.358.72 


6.887.09 


43.32 


5.4 


80-81... 


18.250.29 


165 


132,000 


110.61 


13.8 


10,633.49 


7.616.80 


46.16 


5.8 


81-82... 


18,976.47 


145 


137.500 


139.87 


13.8 


8.517.82 


10.458.65 


72.13 


7.6 


82-83... 


17,521.22 


137 


144.272 


127.89 


12.1 


9,524.30 


7,996.92 


58.37 


5.5 


83-84... 


19,679.95 


166 


144.100 


118.55 


13.7 


11,462.48 


8,217.47 


49.50 


5.7 


84-85... 


17.486.29 


143 


144.000 


122.28 


12.1 


9.036.23 


8.450.06 


59.09 


5.9 


85-86... 


16.416.86 


131 


143.885 


125.,^2 


11.4 


8.387.15 


8.029.71 


60.83 


5.6 


86-87... 


17.010.78 


133 


127,200 


127.90 


13.5 


8.705.96 


8.304.82 


62.44 


6.5 


87-88... 


14,878.48 


118 


110.600 


126.09 


13.5 


7,920.60 


6.957.88 


58.97 


6.3 


88-89... 


16,013.16 


135 


93,921 


118.62 


17.1 


7.745.04 


8.268.12 


61.25 


8.8 


89-90... 


18.208.27 


145 


98.912 


125.57 


18.4 


7.981.16 


10.210.11 


70.41 


10.3 


90-91... 


20,553.35 


206 


98.400 


99.77 


20.9 


12.139.23 


8.414.12 


40.85 


8.6 


91-92... 


22..139.17 


213 


97.968 


104.88 


22.7 


15.981.19 


6.357.98 


29.85 


6.5 


92-93... 


22,220.40 


188 


101.100 


118.19 


22.0 


12.798.54 


9.421.86 


50.12 


. 9.3 


93-94... 


25,161.80 


182 


104.300 


138.25 


24.1 


12.922.84 


12.238.96 


67.25 


11.7 


94-95... 


24,759.42 


187 


107.442 


139.88 


23.4 


12.993.55 


11.765.87 


62.92 


11.0 


95-96... 


21.549.72 


200 


110.300 


107.75 


19.5 


13.568.39 


7.981.33 


39.91 


7.2 


96-97... 


15.005.03 


192 


113,100 


78.15 


13.3 


6.285.81 


8.719.22 


45.41 


7.7 


97-98... 


15.012.95 


192 


117,226 


78.19 


12.8 


7.474.09 


7.538.86 


39.26 


6.4 


98-99... 


14.457.26 


198 


120,900 


73.02 


12.0 


8.766.66 


5.690.60 


28.74 


4.7 


99-00... 


14.935.35 


194 


126,800 


76.99 


11.8 


7,280.22 


7,655.13 


39.46 


6.0 


00-01... 


15.742.98 


207 


133.623 


76.05 


11.8 


7,455.57 


8.287.41 


40.04 


6.2 


01-02... 


17.575.88 


197 


135.600 


89.22 


13.0 


7.326.62 


10.249.26 


52.03 


7.6 


02-03... 


18.740.64 


203 


137.500 


92.32 


13.6 


7.961.84 


10.778.80 


53.09 


7.8 


03-04... 


19.391.07 


193 


139.430 


100.47 


13.9 


7.208.54 


12.182.53 


63.12 


8.7 


04-05... 


19.277.25 


198 


139.900 


102.54 


13.8 


7.251.73 


12.025.52 


60.74 


8.6 


05-06... 


21,061.26 


211 


141,900 


99.82 


14.8 


7.847.70 


13.213.56 


62.62 


9.3 


06-07... 


19.320.61 


174 


143.135 


111.04 


13.5 


6.340.80 


12.979.81 


74.60 


9.1 


07-08... 


21.169.31 


187 


143.900 


113.21 


14.7 


7.484.55 


13.684.76 


73.18 


9.5 


08-09... 


22,053.25 


191 


144,000 


115.46 


15.3 


8.432.67 


13.620.58 


71.31 


9.5 


09-10... 


23.236.24 


169 


143,819 


137.49 


18.2 


8,155.35 


15.080.89 


89.24 


10.5 


10-11... 


24.212.34 


181 


145,000 


133.77 


16.7 


8.880.92 


15.331.42 


84.70 


10.6 


11-12... 


27.445.30 


214 


148.000 


128.25 


18.5 


10.551.40 


16.893.90 


78.94 


11.4 


12-13... 


32.772.18 


213 


150.504 


153.86 


21.8 


10.717.68 


22.054.50 


103.54 


14.7 


13-14... 


34.395.06 


208 


152.500 


165.36 


22.6 


11.245.85 


23,149.21 


111.29 


15.1 


14-15... 


33.520.04 


207 


152.800 


170.05 


21.9 


10,676.61 


22.843.43 


110.35 


15.0 


15-16... 


34.370.22 


207 


152.160 


166.04 


22.6 


12,201.67 


22.168.55 


107.09 


14.6 


16-17... 


35.223.42 


170 


151.192 


207.20 


23.3 


10,916.38 


24.307.04 


142.98 


16.6 


17-18... 


30.025.43 


130 


403.634 


230.96 


7.4 


7,481.15 


22.544.28 


173.42 


5.1 


18-19... 


40,853.13 


241 


410.824 


169.52 


9.9 


7,801.56 


33,051.57 
• 40!l 78.49 


137.14 


8.1 


19-20... 


55.238.53 


217 


401.734 


254.56 


13.8 


15.060.04 


185.15 


10.0 


20-21... 


85.973.79 


254 


401,786 


338.48 


21.4 


28,793.81 


57.179.98 


225.12 


14.2 


Total.. 


1.271.177.10 








531,622.23 


739.554.87 







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o 

H 



OS 

H 

< 



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CHAPTER TEN 

THE FIELD OF LUTHER COLLEGE 

H. O. Talle 
I. Location and Boundaries of Field 

THE northern half of Northwest Territory and of Louisiana 
Purchase has always been the region from which Luther Col- 
lege has gotten the majority of its students. That fact is not 
strange. The great bulk of Norwegian population is found in 
this region. Since the Scandinavian countries enjoy the distinc- 
tion of holding first honors in literacy in the whole world, it is but 
natural that the immigrants from that quarter of Europe should 
be concerned about the education of their children. These im- 
migrants were a God-fearing people. It is therefore only natural 
that they should desire that their sons be trained in the Christian 
doctrine and for the Lord's work. Accordingly, Luther College 
was founded to serve especially the people of Norwegian birth and 
of Lutheran faith in America. 

The field of Luther College has never been limited to any 
part or locality of the Church. There are five reasons for this: 
first, it is the pioneer school of the former Norwegian Synod; 
second, it was the only boys' school of the Norwegian Synod, as 
it is of the new church body to which it now belongs; third, it 
was founded as a pro-seminary school to serve the whole Church; 
fourth, it is, as it always has been, uniquely classical, and rightly 
so, if it is to be a real pro-seminary school; and fifth, it has always 
been supported by a synod, and as a synodical school its appeal 
has been to a field as wide as that of the synod which has gov- 
erned it. For these reasons it can truly be said that the field 
of Luther College is, and always has been, identical with the 
constituency of the synod which has supported it, specifically, 
and with the Norwegian people in America, generally. 

The expansion of the field of Luther College cannot be ac- 
counted for without reference to that unparalleled phenomenon in 
our history — the Westward Movement. New acquisitions of land 
had increased our national domain from less than a million square 
miles in 1790 to almost 3,000,000 square miles in 1860. By far 
the greater part of this new territory lay west of the Mississippi. 



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THE FIELD OF LUTHER COLLEGE 185 

Small wonder then that this land of promise and opportunity 
should call many immigrants from the Northland. And small 
wonder too that the Norwegian immigrants, who have always 
eagerly grasped opportunities to acquire land, should answer the 
call of the far-flung prairies of the Northwest, where the major 
portion of the Norwegian population of our country is found to- 
day. The Norwegian immigrants who settled in these parts were 
in truth pioneers. The first white settlers came to Winneshiek 
County in 1848, not much over a decade before the founding of 
Luther College. It was a Norwegian Lutheran pastor, the Rev. 
Nils O. Brandt, who performed the marriage ceremony of the 
first white couple to be married in Winneshiek County. That was 
in 1851. Marvelous has been the development of this section of 
the United States since that day. 

The frontier line in 1860 ran west through central Michigan 
and Wisconsin, and into central Minnesota, where it turned south- 
ward and, except for points in Kansas and Texas, did not go 
west of the 97th meridian. Extension of settlements was just 
begun beyond the Missouri River. The pioneer farmer was dis- 
placing the herdsman, even as the herdsman had already displaced 
the hunter and trapper. In their movement westward, the immi- 
grants followed the rivers wherever they could. In fact, transporta- 
tion was largely by water throughout our whole country in 1860. 
There were but 30,626 miles of railroad, only 6 per cent of which 
was west of the Mississippi, despite the fact that railroads touched 
that river at ten different points then. The "Encyclopedia 
Americana" gives our aggregate length of mileage in 1917 as 
265,000 in round numbers, or about two-fifths of that of the entire 
world. The first trans-continental railroad was not completed 
before 1869. Connection with the Pacific by telegraph was not 
established until 1861. The National Bank Act was passed in 
1863, in an effort to bring order out of chaos in monetary matters 
in our country. Only 4,536,475 people lived west of the Mississip- 
pi, or one-seventh of our population at that time. Greater New 
York has now 1,083,573 more than that. Now, 31,689,445 live 
west of the Mississippi, or 30% of our total population. More 
people live west of the Mississippi today than were found in our 
whole country in 1860. Most of the people lived on farms. Only 
16.1% of the people lived in cities of 8,000 or more. Consequent- 
ly, 83.9% of our entire population was rural, although it should 
be said that many towns of less than 8,000 people had distinct 
urban characteristics. This condition will soon be reversed. The 
farms were large, the average being 199.2 acres as against 138.1 



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186 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

acres in 1910. The cities were small. In 1860 only 9 cities had 
a population of 100^000 or more; only 141 had a population of 
8,000 or more. In 1920 these had increased to 68 and 924 re- 
spectively. 20 of these 68 are west of the Mississippi. Chicago 
was a city of 109^260 people; Detroit^ of 45,610; Cleveland, of 
4a,410; and Milwaukee, of 45,240, in 1860. Six Chicagos of that 
day could find room in present day Minneapolis and St. Paul. 
The Twin Cities have a population equal to 18 Milwaukees of 

1860 with a remainder as large as was the population of Port- 
land, Maine, in the year that Luther College was founded. De- 
troit is now our fourth largest city, and yet 13 Detroits of 1860 
could be placed in the modern Twin Cities and leave room for 
Fargo, North Dakota. But the Twin Cities were small in 1860. 
Minneapolis had 2,564 people and St. Paul had 10^401. Modern 
Decorah could include Minneapolis of 1860 and still have room 
for a town of 1,500 inhabitants. The rate of postage was deter- 
mined largely by distance, 1, 3, 5, 10, and 12 cents being the rates 
authorized. Only 216,370,600 ordinary postage stamps, or 7 
per capita, were used in 1860. A postal bulletin for May, 1922, 
gives the number of stamps used in one fiscal year now as 14,000, 
000,000; the number of stamped envelopes, as 2,700,000,000; and 
the number of postal cards, as 1,125,000,000, a total of 17,825, 
000,000, or 170 per capita.. The postal revenue per capita in 

1861 was $.26; in 1921, it was $4.28. The number of people per 
square mile in 1860 and in 1920 is shown in the following table 
for the four states which were the actual field of Luther College 
in the year of its birth: 

TABLE I 

I860 1920 

Iowa i2.l 43.2 

IlUnoia 30.6 115.7 

Minnesota 2.1 29.5 

Wisconsin 14.0 47.6 

United States 10.6 35.5 

The Dakotas were a territory in 1860 and had less than one- 
tenth of one person per square mile. North Dakota has now 9.2 
persons per square mile and South Dakota* has 8.3. Thus it is 
sec^n that time has wrouglit many changes during these sixty years. 
And it may be truthfully said that the development of the great 
Northwest into an important grain and mineral-producing area 
is in no small measure due to the tireless toil of the Norwegian 
immigrant farmer. To the pioneer preacher is no less credit due. 
Such names as Brandt, Koren, and Preus must forever be associ- 
ated with the development of our country in the upper Mississippi 
Valley. 



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THE FIELD OF LUTHER COLLEGE 



187 



Since Luther College was founded by the Synod for the Nor- 
wegian Evangelical Lutheran Church in America^ its constituency 
in 1861 was the congregations of that church body. These con- 
gregations were located in four states, Wisconsin, Illinois, Iowa, 
and Minnesota. A glance at Map I will reveal that southern 
Wisconsin had by far the greater part of these, or equal to two- 
thirds of the total. In northeastern Iowa, where Luther College 
was located in 1862, there were only 13 congregations in 1860. 
There were but 4 in Illinois, and 22 in Minnesota. But Wisconsin 
had 76, making a total of 115 for these 4 states. It is true that 




MAP I. FIELD OF LUTHER COLLEGE IN 18C0 

the real total was 118, because New York had one congregation 
and Missouri had two, but they could not be counted on for sup- 
port with any degree of assurance. It became the duty of the 
congregations in four states then to build and maintain Luther 
College. By referring to Table II the reader may note the 
number of congregations the College has had to depend upon, in 
I860, in 1880, in 1906, in 1917 when the merger of the three 
Lutheran church bodies which now constitute tlie Norwegian Lu- 
theran Cliurch of America took place, and in 1920 when that 
merger had existed for three years and Luther College was en- 
tering upon its sixtieth year. 



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m LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

When one notes that there were only 16 students in attendance 
at Luther College in the year of its founding at Halfway Creek 
parsonage^ La Crosse County^ Wisconsin^ the conclusion may be 
drawn that the 115 congregations which supported it were a very 
slender reed on which to lean. But it must be remembered that 
the College was founded under the rather unfavorable conditions 
that have been mentioned above^ that the stirring days of civil 
strife were at hand^ that it entailed no small sacrifice to attend 
college in those times^ and that an infant college^ like an infant 
industry^ must weather its childhood before it inspires the con- 
fidence of the majority. 

TABLE II 

CONGREGATIONS OF THE SYNOD FOR THE NORWEGIAN EVANGELICAL 

LUTHERAN CHURCH IN AMERICA. 1860-1917. AND FOR THE NORWEGIAN 

LUTHERAN CHURCH OF AMERICA. 1920 

United SUtes: 1860 1880 1906 1917 1920 

Wiacondn . . .- 76 

Minne«oU 22 

Iowa 13 

lUinoU 4 

Missouri 2 

New York 1 

North DakoU 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

California 

Michigan 

Texas 

Indiana 

Ohio 

Oregon 

New Jersey 

Maryland 

Washington 

Idaho 

Maine 

Pennsylvania 

Massachusetts 

Montana 

Colorado 

Tennessee 

UUh 

Virginia 

Alaska 

District of Columbia 

New Hampshire 

Oklahoma 

Wyoming 

Canada: 

Quebec 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

British Columbia 

Saskatchewan 

Alberu 



167 


147 


156 


391 


221 


302 


317 


790 


91 


58 


57 


204 


22 


14 


22 


19 


4 




1 


1 


5 


5 


6 


11 


34 


181 


234 


615 


46 


59 


80 


290 


23 


16 


14 


21 


12 


2 


1 


6 


11 


18 


11 


16 


8 


17 


16 


32 


7 


8 


9 


10 


4 


2 


3 




4 


2 


4 


4 


4 


7 


9 


25 


3 


3 


4 


4 


2 








1 


47 


55 


94 


1 


7 


3 


14 


1 






1 


1 






1 


1 


1 


3 


3 




24 


51 


120 




5 


7 


9 




1 


1 






1 










2 


1 






2 


7 






1 


1 
1 
1 
1 


2 








6 


10 


3 


8 


2 


2 


5 


11 




1 


2 


7 






17 


123 






23 


93 



Totel 118 683 940 1119 2935 

(The field of Luther College embraced 6 states in 1860; 23 states and 3 provinces in Canada, 
in 1880 and 1907; 24 states. Alaska, Dist. of Columbia, and 5 provinces in Canada, in 1917; 
27 states. Alaska. Dist. of Columbia, and 5 provinces in Canada, in 1920.) 



L 



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THE FIELD OF LUTHER COLLEGE 



189 







TABLE III 






ONGREGATIOr 


>IS BY COUNTIES 


IN STATES THAT WERE 


THE FIELD 01 


1 


LUTHER COLLEGE IN 


1860 AND 1880 






WISCONSIN 1860 


1880 


IOWA 


1860 


1880 


Radiie 






Hardin 






Dane 


14 


17 








Jefferaon 

Lafayette 


Cherokee 










Kossuth 

Palo Alto 






Milwaukee 






Rock 


Wright 






Wah»rorth 






Clay 






Columbia 






Howard 






Dodse 






Cass 

Hancock 






Waukesha 






Ozaukee 






Polk 






Fond du Lac . . . 






Sioux 






Iowa 






Manitowoc 






Total 


13 


91 


Winnebago 












Adams 












Vernon 




10 


MINNESOTA 


1860 


1880 


WauAhara 






Fillmore 


7 


14 


Crawford 






Mower 


4 




Juneau 






Houston 

Goodhue 


4 

1 




Waupaca 






Grant 






Olmsted 


1 




Green 






Dakota 


1 




Pierce 






Nicollet 


1 




U Crosse 






Waseca 


1 




Jackson 

Portage 






McLeod 


1 








Freeborn 


1 


10 


Dunn 






Rice 






St. Croix 






Kandiyohi 






Sauk 






Watonwan 






Trempealeau . . . 




15 


Faribault 






Sheboygan 






Meeker 






Kewaunee 






Steele 






Richland 






Brown 






Chippewa 






Jackson 

Douglas 






Burnett 










Monroe 






Hennepin 






Eau Claire 






Carver 

Pope 






Buffak> 




10 


Oconto 






Ramsey 






Polk 






Steams 






Shawano 






Blue Earth 






Wood 


Renville 






Barron 






Stevens 






Clark 






Grant 






Marathon 






Lac qui Parle 






Tayter 


Otter Tail 




13 


Ashland 


Yellow Medicine 








Becker 






Total 


76 


167 


Clay 

Cottonwood 

Swift 






IOWA 


1860 


1880 


gSsr-:;:;:::::::;: 








2 


10 






Allamakee 


2 




Wabasha 






Clayton 


2 




Wmona 






Mitchell 


1 




Big Stone 






Story 


2 

1 




Lyon 






Chkkasaw 


Murray 






Worth 


3 




Norman 




10 


Clinton 






Polk 






Emmet 






Rock 






Wmnebago 






Sibley 






Iowa 






Washington 






Humboldt 






Benton 






Buena Vista.. . 






Lincoln 

Martin 






Lyon 






Poweshiek 






Redwood 






Hamilton 






Wilkin 






Monona 






Wadena 






Webster 












Woodbury 






Total 


22 


221 


FrankUn 













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190 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



TABLE III— Cont. 



SOUTH DAKOTA 


1880 


NORTH DAKOTA 


1880 


Union 


1 


Cass 




Clay 


6 


Richland 


6 


Yankton 


3 


Traill 




Lincoln 


6 


Barnes 


1 


Minnehaha 


7 


Walsh 


.... 3 


Brookings .* 


6 


Grand Forks 




Deuel 


4 


Steele 




Moody 


6 


Pembina 




Hamlin 


1 


Ransom 




Grant 


1 






Hanson 


1 


Total 


34 


Kingsbury 


1 






Lake 


1 


OREGON 


1880 


Roberts 


1 


Multnomah 


1 


Codington 


1 


Clackamas 


2 






Clatsop 


1 


Total 


46 










Total 


4 


ILLINOIS 

Cook 

Boone 


1860 1880 
1 1 


MAINE 


1880 


... 1 1 


Cumberland 


1 


Winnebago 

Lee 


1 2 
1 3 


OHIO 


1880 


La Salle 


1 


Cuyahoga 

Mahoning 

Summit 


2 


McHenry 

Livingston 


2 

2 


1 

1 


Grundy 

Iroquois 


3 

1 


Total 


4 


Kankakee 

Sangamon 


1 

1 


WASHINGTON 
Snohomish 


1880 


Will 




1 


Total 


... 4 22 


INDIANA 


1880 






Marion 


1 


MISSOURI 


1860 1880 


Newton 


2 


St. Louis 


1 2 


Benton 


1 


Buchanan 


1 1 






DeKalb 


1 


Total 

MARYLAND 


4 


Total 


2 4 


1880 






Baltimore 


2 


NEW YORK 


1860 1880 






New York 


1 2 


PENNSYLVANIA 
Erie 


1880 


Kings 


1 


1 


Essex 








Erie 


1 


TEXAS 


1880 






Kaufman 




Total 


1 5 


Bosque 


1 






Henderson 


1 


NEBRASKA 

Douglas 

Cuming 

Washington 


1880 

1 

2 

2 


Anderson 

Travis 

Limestone 

McLennan 


1 
1 
1 
1 


Cedar 

Dixon 


2 

1 


Total 


7 


I-ancastcr 

Cass 

Dodge 

Madison 


2 

2 

1 

1 


CALIFORNIA 


1880 


San Francisco 


1 


Alameda 

Fresno 

Monterey 

Napa 

San Mateo 


4 


Colfax 

Stanton 


1 

1 


1 

1 


Furnas 

Webster 

Nance 

Custer 


1 

1 

1 

1 


1 

1 


Santa Cruz 


1 


Stanislaus 


1 


Howard 

Knox 


1 

1 


Total 


11 


Frontier 


1 


MICHIGAN 








1880 


Total 


23 


Muskegon 

Alpena. 


2 






I^eelanau 


2 


NEW JERSEY 


1880 


Huron 


1 


Middlesex 


2 

1 


Bay City 


. . . . 1 


Gloucester 


Kent 


1 


Total 


3 


Total 


8 



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THE FIELD OF LUTHER COLLEGE 



191 



KANSAS 

RepubUc 

Brown 

Doniphan 

Clay 


1880 


IDAHO 
I^tah 

CANADA 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

Total 


18S0 
1 

18S0 

6 

2 


Atchison 




2 


Jewell 

Cloud 

McPherson 

Norton 

Total 


12 


10 



The number of congregations that were in each county in the 
states where the former Norwegian Synod was active in the years 
1860 and 1880 is shown in Table III. These facts have been ar- 
rived at by noting the date of founding of each congregation 







Lit^.**te^ ]«Mfi'^ Malli,-j.. *,^ 

1 









MAP II. FIELD OF LUTHER COLLEGE IN 1880 

listed in the "Norsk-Lutherske Menigheter i Amerika", Volumes 
I and II, with the aid of the work, *'Norsk-Lutherske Prester i 
Amerika". The data for 1906 were taken from the report of the 
U. S. Census entitled "Religious Bodies, 1906", and for the years 
1917 and 1920, from the "Lutheran World Almanac". It is inter- 
esting to note that Winneshiek County, Iowa, increased its number 
from 2 in 1860 to 10 in 1880; that Dane County, Wisconsin, led 
with 14 in 1860; that Trempealeau County, Wisconsin, increased 
its number from 2 in 1860 to 15 in 1880; and that Freeborn County, 



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192 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Minnesota^ had only 1 in 1860 but 10 in 1880. Wisconsin soon 
yielded first honors to Minnesota in the number of congregations^ 
as the great Westward Movement caught the Norwegians in its 
sweep^ and that state has continued to be the hub of the Norwegian 
Lutheran Church. 

When. President Lincoln signed the Homestead Bill in 1862, 
it became comparatively easy to acquire land. The constituency 
of the Norwegian Lutheran Church is now, and always has been, 
largely rural. In 1907 the Norwegian Church distribution was 
as follows: city — 8 per cent, town — 23 per cent, and rural — 69 



;^^^x^ 


J_ 


iBf 




A3-\r¥A 


/t"^»^£ III """""T"^' 


1 IS"/ 




I \ \y o«**T^ .w'X 7v»^ 


R 






/N^^^^^^^^^TrV 


ijsc ■ "^ Tayjj.MA 




^ »i*»*-*a„.»«»*\M \_-.— '-^"' 


.-/ Vr\' UT 


r 


8 ^ 

K A • 


^\}f 




* ■ 


'^ 


Vi^ 




iM^i^' 



MAP 111. FIELD OF LUTHER COLLEGE IN 1906 

per cent. The cheap land was therefore eagerly taken, and it 
may be noted on Map II that .Luther College was soon to find 
itself on the outskirts of its constituency. In their advance west- 
ward the Norwegian immigrants followed such rivers as the 
Minnesota, the Missouri, and the Red River of the North. 
Minnesota had in 1880 (see Table II) 221 congregations, or over 
a hundred more than had the entire Synod in 1860. All of these 
were west of a line drawn from the southeast corner of the state 
to the northwest corner. Wisconsin had 167; Iowa, 91; and Il- 
linois, 22, in 1880. Great progress was made in the Dakotas, 
in Kansas, in Nebraska, and in California. The total number of 
congregations in 1880 was 683. Ten of these were in Canada, 
leaving 678 for the United States. These 673 were in 23 states 
of our Union. A good beginning had been made in Texas, which 



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THE FIELD OF LUTHER COLLEGE 



193 



bad 7 congregations. Scarcely a county in southern Minnesota 
lacked, a congregation^ and by far the greater number liad more 
than three. During this score of years the constituency of Lu- 
ther College expanded to no small degree. 'The Norwegian Synod 
spread its influence in all directions, but especially toward the 
west. It was active in 17 states where it had no congregations 
twenty years earlier. Only six of these, including Pennsylvania, 
border on the Atlantic. Such was the progress, despite the grass- 
hopper pest and money panic of the 70's, forces which keenly 
affect a rural population. 




"-•r-\ I - r-4X: \j:-^ <%M\ 



JuLu 






awfc i . 50 

"Uol wi Atncmo n I9 



I. 



y'--Cl''.^:sk 




j-y-^ 




«-"b-.::j 



MAP IV. FIELD OF LUTHER COLLEGE IN 1917 

In 1906 the number of congregations in Minnesota (see 
Table II) had increased to 302; North Dakota, which liad climb- 
ed to second place, had 181; Wisconsin had 147; while Wash- 
ington, which had only 1 in 1880, had 47 in 1906; and Montana, 
where no congregations were in existence in 1880, had 24 in 
1906. The sphere of activity had been increased to embrace 940 
congregations. The decrease in the states of Iowa, Wisconsin, 
Illinois, Nebraska and Kansas was caused by the division in the 
Norwegian Synod which took place in the 80*s. But the de- 
crease in those states was more than compensated for by the 
rapid strides made in the western states. (See Map III). 

Eleven years later (1917) occurred the merger of three Lu- 
theran churcli bodies, the Hauge Synod; the United Lutheran 
Church; and the Norwegian Synod. The data given in Table II 



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194 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



for the year 1917 are for the Norwegian Synod only. It is clear 
that the impetus of a decade earlier continued with unabated 
vigor. Minnesota had 317 congregations; North Dakota^ 234; 
South Dakota^ 80; Washington^ 55; Montana^ 51; and in Can- 
ada^ Saskatchewan had 17, and Alberta had ^S, The field of 
Luther College had been increased so as to embrace 1,119 congre- 
gations located in 24 states, in District of Columbia, in Alaska, 
and in Canada. But the mainstay of the College was then, as 
before, the great Northwest. (See Map IV). 

In 1920 Minnesota had 790 congregations; North Dakota, 
615; Wisconsin, 391; South Dakota, 290; Iowa, 204; and Mon- 




Map»v 

NLmberof Ncrwqnt dVYwd Gonyv^olDn 
haptr Cdie^e Cm5ML>ency(t9Zo| 

£7 Hctn »i U 5 2^683 

Det d Cokcnbto I 

AloMto 7 

S FVovinc«» *\ Cowdo " tAL 

■Rilol n Amcrtoe "2933 



MAP V. FIELD OF LUTHER COLLEGE IN 1920 

tana, 120. It will be noted that the merger occasioned consider- 
able increase in the states where there was a decrease in the 80*8. 
The total number of congregations in the Church in 1920 was 
2,935. Map V shows their distribution by states, as do Maps 
III and IV for the years 1906 and 1917. Thus it is seen that 
the constant shifting of population westward has had the effect 
of leaving the College in the southeast corner of its constituency. 

II. Norwegian Population in this Field 

It is estimated that there are now 2,213,922 people of Nor- 
wegian extraction in our country. The number was very much 
smaller in 1860. The estimated figure is 50,000. Table IV gives 



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THE FIELD OF LUTHER COLLEGE 19S 

approximate data regarding Norwegian population in the field 
of Luther College by decades: 

TABLE IV 
TOTAL NORWEGIAN POPULATION IN U. S.. BY DECADES. 1860—1920 

Born in Flnt Second Third 

Year Norway Generation Generation Generation Total 

I860 43.995 5.800* 205* 50.000* 

1870 114.246 33.000* 2.654* 150.000* 

1880 181.729 150.000* 18.000* 211* 350.000* 

1890 322.665 273.466 175.000* 13.879* 785.000* 

1900 338.665 449.410 350.000* 75.000* 1.213.175* 

1910 403.858 575.241 734.322* 244.777* 1.958.198* 

1920 363.862 520.322 797342* 531.896* 2.213.922* 
*E8timated. Other figures are from U. S. Cenmia. 



Nearly 80% of this population is found in the states of Minne- 
sota, Wisconsin, North Dakota, Illinois, Iowa, and South Da- 
kota, ranking in the order named. Minnesota alone has 30% 
of the Norwegians in the United States. Table V gives the popu- 
lation and the percentage of the total, in the states named above: 

TABLE V 
TOTAL NORWEGIAN POPULATION: U. S. CENSUS (1906) 
State Population Percentage 

Minneitota 524,475 30 % of toUl in U. S. 

Wisconsin 307.875 17.5% of total in U. b. 

Nortli Dakota 151.030 8.6% of total in U. S. 

IlUnois 149.895 8.5% of toUl in U. S. 

Iowa 128.170 7.3% of total in U. S. 

South DalcoU 98.940 5.5% of total in U. S. 

Totel 1,360.385 77.4% of total in U. S. 

III. Church Population in this Field 

It has been shown above that there are today 2,213,922 peo- 
ple of Norwegian extraction in the United States. In 1920 there 
were five Norwegian Lutheran Synods in America — the Norwegian 
Lutheran Church, with 425,065 members; the Lutheran Free 
Church, with 45,000 members; the Eielsen Synod, with 1,600 
members; the Church of the Lutheran Brethren, with 2,000 mem- 
bers; and the Norwegian Synod of the American Evangelical 
Lutheran Church, with 6,425 members. The average size of the 
congregations in the Norwegian Lutheran Church was 145 mem- 
bers, in 1920. The church constituency of Luther College is then 
numerically about one-fifth of the estimated total Norwegian 
population in the United States. 



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196 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



TABLE VI 
COMPETING COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES IN STATES OF GREATEST NOR- 
WEGIAN POPULATION. TABLE BASED ON U. S. BUREAU 
OF EDUCATION BULLETIN No. 34. 1920 







No. of 


No. of 


No. of 
















Publicly 


Private- 


Lu- 




No. of 










No. of 


sup- 


ly 




No. of 


Catho- 


No. of 


No. of 






Colleges 


ported 
Colleges 


sup- 


Colleges 


Norw. 


lic 


Re- 


Non- 




STATE 


ported 

Colleges 

and 


and 


Lu- 


Colleges 


formed 


Sect- 


Remarks 




Univer- 


and 


Profes- 


theran 


and 


and 


arian 






sities 


Univer- 


sional 


Colleges 


Univer- 


Other 


Colleges 








sities 


Univer- 
sities 


Schools 




sities 


Colleges 






Idaho 


3 


2 


1 











1 





1 jr. col. 


Illinois. . . . 


41 


2 


39 


4 





2 


21 


12 


2 jr. col. 
lOprof. sch. 


Iowa 


24 


3 


21 


4 


♦♦2 


1 


*11 


5 


**3 jr. col. 
1 prof. sch. 


Michigan . . 


16 


5 


11 








1 


7 


3 


2 jr. col. 

3 prof. sch. 
I jr. col. 


Minnesota . 


17 


3 


14 


*5 


*2 


3 


4 


2 




















4 prof. sch. 


Montana. . . 


3 

4 
12 


3 
2 
2 




2 

10 



















1 
8 




I 
2 




No. Dakota 




Oregon .... 




So. Dakota. 


9 


3 


6 


*2 


*2 





3 


1 


**1 jr. col. 


Texas 


15 


3 


12 











10 


2 


4 jr. col. 
2 prof. sch. 


Washington 


6 


2 


4 


*^2 


♦'•2 


1 





1 


**2 jr. col. 


Wisconsin. . 


10 
160 


1 


9 


**2 
19 


♦M 


1 


3 


3 


1 prof. sch. 
*M jr. col. 


Total. . . . 


31 


129 


♦♦Q 


9 


69 


32 





*vConcordia College, Minn.; Augustana College. S. Dak.; Upper Iowa University, Iowa, 
are not listed in U. S. Bureau of Education Bulletin No. 34. 1920. but have been added here.) 

♦♦(The following Norwegian Lutheran junior colleges have also been added: Waldorf 
College. Forest City. Iowa; Canton Normal School, Canton. S. Dak.; Pacific Lutheran College. 
Parkland. Washington; Spokane College, Spokane. Washington; and Central Wisconsin 
College. Scandinavia, Wisconsin.) 

IV. Competing Schools in this Field 
But Luther College is not the only Lutheran college serving 
this constituency. Table VI, which has been compiled from in- 
formation given in Bureau of Education Bulletin No. 34«, 1920, 
with data collected in 1917-18, shows that there are in the 12 
states where the majority of Norwegians are found a total of 19 
Lutheran colleges and professional schools. Among these 9 are 
Norwegian Lutheran colleges, 5 of which are junior colleges. 
These 9 colleges are: Luther College, Decorah, Iowa; St. Olaf 
College, Northfield, Minn.; Concordia College, Moorhead, Minn.; 
Augustana College, Sioux Falls, S. Dak.; all of full college grade; 
and Waldorf College, Forest City, Iowa; Canton Normal School, 
Canton, S. Dak.; Pacific Lutheran College, Parkland, Wash.; 
Spokane College, Spokane, Wash. ; and Central Wisconsin College, 
Scandinavia, Wis., all junior colleges. Nine colleges for a popula- 
tion of 425,065 are not too many, if those who should attend these 
schools really attend them. In 1913 there were 7,685,618 people 
in the United States between the ages 19 and 22 — of college age. 
201,230 attended college. That is, 1 out of 38 of college age at- 
tended college. Only 1 Norwegian out of 108 of college age at- 



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THE FIELD OF LUTHER COLLEGE 197 

tended a Norwegian college. Of the Norwegians who did go to 
college 18% attended Norwegian Lutheran colleges^ 82% attended 
other colleges. In 1913 there were 7^624,153 people between the 
ages 15 and 18^ of high school age. 1^366^822 of these attended 
some secondary school. That is, 1 out of 6. Only 1 Norwegian out 
of 49 attended a Norwegian academy. Of the Norwegians who 
did go to secondary schools^ 12% attended Norwegian Lutheran 
academies, 88% attended public high schools. In 1920 the 
estimated Norwegian population of college age was 172,686 and 
the estimated population of college age within the Norwegian Lu- 
theran Church was 33,155. Notwithstanding that there are four 
Norwegian Lutheran colleges — Luther, St. Olaf, Concordia and 
Augustana — competing for. patronage, there are evidently students 
enough for each school. In 1920 the estimated Norwegian pop- 
ulation of academy age was 174,899, and the estimated popula- 
tion of academy age within the Norwegian Lutheran Church was 
33,580. Notwithstanding that the Norwegian Lutheran Church 
has 18 academies taking care of this field, they could have from 
2,000 to 10,000 students each. These 18 schools are, in the order 
of their foundation: Augustana (1860), Luther College Prepara- 
tory (1861), Red Wing Seminary (1879), Luther Academy (1888), 
Central Wisconsin College (1890), Concordia College (1891), 
Madison Normal (1892), Park Region College (1892), Jewell 
College (1893), Pacific College (1894), Pleasant View College 
(1896), Clifton College (1897), Gale College (1901), Waldorf 
College (1903), Spokane College (1907), Camrose College (1911), 
Outlook College (1915), and Canton Normal (1920). 

There is everywhere a growing conception as to educational 
needs. Civilization keeps on growing in complexity. Industrial 
life becomes more and more specialized. The greater complex- 
ity and specialization demand a more extended and specialized 
training. The length of the school life of the average person 
has increased from a total of 82 days in 1800 to a total of over 
1,200 days in 1920. The high school has become the people's 
college. The number of youth that attend high schools has in- 
creased by leaps and bounds. In 1890 only 5 per 1,000 attended 
secondary schools, public or private. In 1910, 12.3 per 1,000 
were in attendance; in 1918, 19.1 per 1,000. There has also been 
an increase in college attendance. In 1890 the college attendance 
was 72,460, or 1 out of 868 of the population; in 1900, the col- 
lege attendance was 115,271, or 1 out of 659 of the population; 
in 1910, the college attendance was 184,712, or 1 out of 498; in 
1918, the college attendance was 290,106, or 1 out of 355. 



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198 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

There is every reason to believe that the attendance at high 
schools and colleges will increase still more. In 1913 Congress 
appointed a National Commission on Vocational Education. This 
commission reported that in 1910 not one per cent of the people 
engaged in agriculture^ manufacturings and mechanical pursuits 
had been trained for their callings. The commission advocated 
that each person should be given three years of secondary school 
trainings or five years more training than the average man at 
present has received. If the dreams of the educators are ever 
realized^ every youth will get at least a secondary school educa- 
tion. 

As a financial investment^ it has been proved that it pays to 
"train up a child in the way he should go." The average cost of a 
man's education in the United States has been estimated by Sar- 
gent ("American Private Schools, 1922") to be $262. The aver- 
age cost of the education through the high school is $515. The 
difference between the two is $263. At 21 the average person 
has a prospect of living until 65. If the additional cost of educa- 
tion — $263 — is distributed over the 44 years of life before him, 
it will amount to about $6 a year. The U. S. Bureau of Educa- 
tion has issued a bulletin showing the money value of education. 
From this we quote merely the statement that "every day spent 
in school pays the child Nine Dollars". Since the people are 
awakening more and more to see the financial gain, as well as 
the cultural value of a higher education, there will always be a 
large field of usefulness for Luther College. It is a thoroughly 
American school and can serve the general public as well as Nor- 
wegian-Americans. 

Luther College should .be able to meet the competition that 
confronts it on every side. The founders of Luther College were 
university men who planned to erect a school of the highest type. 
Luther College has always kept up to the highest standards of 
the times, has maintained the Christian religion as the core of its 
curricula, and adjusted its other subjects to harmonize with the 
best practices of the day. Its courses are arranged to meet the 
wants of its constituency. The Preparatory Department is built 
on the junior-senior high school plan, reaching down to the eighth 
graders and providing instruction even for those who can not 
qualify for high school entrance. The college curriculum is not 
only in the best sense pro-seminary, but also pre-professional, of- 
fering a liberal amount of electives and preparing for any stand- 
ard profession. 



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THE FIELD OF LUTHER COLLEGE 



199 



Table VII shows the competing colleges in 1861 and 1921, in 
the 12 states of greatest Norwegian population: 



IDAHO 

State 


1861 



Reformed 





Total 


: 


ILLINOIS 
State 


1861 


City 


Nonaectaiian 




Reformed et al 


13 


Roman Catholic 

Lutheran 




Total 


19 


IOWA 
State 


1861 


Nonsectarian 

Reformed et al 

Roman Catholic 

Lutheran 




ToUl 




OREGON 
State 


1861 


Nonsectarian 

Reformed et al 




Total 




TEXAS 
State 


1861 


Noniectarian 

Reformed et al 




Total 




WISCONSIN 

State 


1861 


Nonsrctarian 

Reformed et al 




Roman Catholic 


Lutheran 


Total 


5 



TABLE VII 




• 


COLLE 


GES. 1861 AND 1921 






1921 
2 


MICHIGAN 
State 


1861 


1921 
3 


1 


City 




2 


3 


Nonsectarian 

Reformed et al 




3 
7 




Roman Catholic 




1 


1921 

1 


Toul 




16 


12 
21 


MINNESOTA 
State 


1861 


1921 


2 


City 




2 


4 


Nonsectarian 

Reformed et al 




2 
4 


41 


Roman Catholic 




3 


1921 
3 
5 

11 
1 
4 


Lutheran 




5 


Total 




17 


NORTH DAKOTA 

State 


1861 


1921 
2 


24 


Nonaectarian 

Reformed et al 




1 
1 










1921 
2 


Total 




4 


2 
8 


MONTANA 

State 


1861 


1921 
3 


12 








1921 

3 

2 

10 


SOUTH DAKOTA 

State 

Nonaectarian 

Reformed etal 

Lutheran 


1861 


1921 
3 
1 
3 

2 


15 


Total 




9 


1921 
1 

3 
3 

I 
2 


WASHINGTON 

State 

Nonsectarian 

Roman Catholic 

Lutheran 


1861 


1921 
2 

1 
1 
2 


10 


Total 




6 



This tabulation includes the colleges^ universities^ and pro- 
fessional schools that are listed in Bureau of Education Bulletin 
No. 84 for 1920. To that list have been added the five Norwe- 
gian Lutheran junior colleges and the Norwegian Lutheran col- 
leges at Moorhead^ Minnesota^ and Sioux Falls^ S. Dakota. Up- 
per Iowa University at Fayette^ lowa^ has also been added. The 
German Lutheran Theological Seminary at Dubuque is not in- 
cluded in this table^ though theological seminaries are included 
for some of the states. 



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200 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

The foregoing table is summarized in Table VIII. The 
totals for each state are given without reference to control: 

TABLE VIII 
•STATE 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Iowa 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Montana 

North Dakota 

Oregon 

South DakoU 

Texas 

Washington 

Wisconsin 



861 


1921 




3 


19 


41 


9 


24 


7 


16 


2 


17 




3 




4 


3 


12 




9 


1 


15 


I 


6 


5 


10 



Total 47 160 

There were 46 colleges in existence in these 12 states as com- 
petitors of Luther College in 1861 that still are its competitors. 
But the sixty years that have passed have added many new ones 
80 that the total is now 160 in these states of greatest Norwegian 
population. To this number should be added the hundreds of 
public high schools^ which are by all odds the strongest competi- 
tors, not only of church secondary schools like the Luther College 
Preparatory Department, but also of church higher schools, in 
that they naturally direct their graduates into the state univer- 
sities rather than the church colleges. 

In Table IX is listed the number of colleges that were in ex- 
istence in the United States in 1861 and still are, as follows: 



Alabama 

Arizona 


TABl 

4 

'.['.'.'.'.'.'. 5 

1 

2 


,E IX 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 


'...'.'.'.'.'. i 


Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 


New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 


3 

'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 26 
8 


Delaware 


North Dakota 




District of Columbia 


Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 


22 


Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 


11 


26 

1 


Indiana 


South Carolina. ... 


.8 


Iowa 


South Dakota 




Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 


Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 


6 

1 

1 

3 

12 

1 


Minnesota 

Mississippi 


Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Total in U. S 


5 


Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 


12 


244 



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THE FIELD OF LUTHER COLLEGE 201 

Of the 672 colleges^ universities^ and professional schools 
listed in the bulletin previously mentioned^ only 244 were founded 
prior to, or during^ 1861. Among these is Luther College. Four- 
teen of our states had no higher schools at that time. Many of 
the present state schools arose through the provisions of the 
Morrill Act of 1862, when Luther College had done a year's ser- 
vice. The 14 states having no higher institutions were all west 
of the Mississippi River, except Florida and West Virginia. Of 
the 34 states that did have higher schools, only 9 were west of the 
Mississippi. These 9 states had in all 35 higher institutions of 
learning, including Luther College. There are, then, only 34 higher 
institutions still in existence which were the competitors of Lu- 
ther College in 1861, in the states that comprise the western half 
of our country. Indeed it can with truth be said that Luther 
College is a pioneer college. 

In conclusion, Luther College had but a small field to look 
out upon in the year of its founding. It proved its worth, grew 
with our country, and with increasing years came better days. 
It will always be a monument to the Norwegian people in Amer- 
ica, but especially to those who gave of their time and substance 
to make it succeed. Daniel Webster once said of his Alma Mater, 
Dartmouth College, which has now grown to be a large institu- 
tion: "It is a small college, but there are those who love it." 
Luther College is not large, if measured by the attendance yard- 
stick; it is a great school, however, if measured by its aims and 
ideals, its principles and practices, the character of its men and 
the extent of its good influence. But, be it termed large or small, 
according as mens' minds differ, "there are those who love it", 
and who are willing to sacrifice in order that generations to come 
may learn to love it. 



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CHAPTER ELEVEN 

ATTENDANCE 

S. S. Reque 

I. Attendance^ by Years 

THE total enrollment at Luther College for the sixty-one 
years of its history^ counting the student each year he was 
enrolled^ is 10,230, which gives an average per year of approxim- 
ately 168 students. The number of graduates, including the class 
of 1922 of 34 members, is 835. 



Enrollment at L. a DimiNG 60 years ^^siSS^ 

Ufipv *M *i<*.a^3 total enrxJbnft^ p^ 
\^ Lnmr km indkatn ermihwu /h ccikft <kpi ^_^ 






—I. 

1j .. ^ 


U 


f-4 

^ i 




^ 


tii__ ._ . -^— - - - ...,^l 



ENKOLLMKNT AT LUTHER COLLEGE DUKING SIXTY YEARS 



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ATTENDANCE 



20) 



TABLE SHOWING 



ATTENDANCE BY YEARS. AT 
1861-1922 



LUTHER COLLEGE 







Prei)ar- 




New 


A. B. 


Year 


College 


atoryand 
Normal 


Total 


Students 


Graduates 


1861-1862 





16 
30 


16 
34 


16 
26 


•0 


1862-1863 


4 





1863-1864 


12 


39 


51 


29 





1864-1865 


16 


42 


58 


26 





1865-1866 


20 


61 


81 


45 


8 


1866-1867 


18 


65 


83 


42 





1867-1868 


25 


48 
76 


73 
106 


27 
53 


3 


1868-1869 


30 


4 


1869-1870 


36 


86 


122 


51 


5 


1870-1871.. • 


36 


111 


147 


62 


6 


1871-1872 


45 


102 
108 
143 


147 
159 
190 


56 
61 
84 


3 


1872-1873 


51 


7 


1873-1874 


47 


6 


1874-1875 


62 


167 


229 


100 


6 


1875-1876 


68 


149 


217 


78 


7 


1876-1877 


72 


109 


181 


46 


9 


1877-1878 


84 


105 
93 


189 
173 


49 
58 


14 


1878-1879 


80 


19 


1879-1880.. 


74 


85 
82 


159 
165 


40 
55 


13 


1880-1881 


83 


18 


1881-1882 . . 


71 


74 
64 


145 
137 


41 
47 


11 


1882-1883 


73 


15 


1883-1884 


49 


117 


166 


73 


11 


1884-1885 


49 


94 


143 


42 


12 


1885-1886 


51 


80 


131 


37 


17 


1886-1887 


44 


89 


133 


51 





1887-1888. . . 


... 43 


75 
92 


118 
136 


32 
47 


12 


1888-1889 


44 


9 


1889-1890 


53 


92 


145 


54 


9 


1890-1891 


67 


139 


206 


93 


9 


1891-1892 


67 


146 

125 
97 


213 
188 
182 


79 
63 
59 


11 


1892-1893 


63 


12 


1893-1894 


85 


11 


1894-1895 


83 


104 


187 


59 


12 


1895-1896 


80 


120 


200 


81 


13 


1896-1897 


89 


103 


192 


52 


17 


1897-1898 


101 


91 
96 


192 
198 


55 

60 


16 


1898-1899 


102 


14 


1899-1900 


109 


85 


194 


66 


21 


1900-1901 


107 


100 


207 


72 


20 


1901-1902 


109 


88 
74 
79 


197 
203 
193 


61 
62 
60 


18 


1902-1903 


129 


27 


1903-1904 


114 


20 


1904-1905 


117 


81 


198 


71 


20 


1905-1906 


126 


85 


211 


62 


23 


1906-1907 


121 


53 


174 


45 


23 


1907-1908 


121 


66 
83 


187 
191 


62 
58 


24 


1908-1909 


108 


27 


1909-1910 


89 


80 


169 


51 


19 


1910-1911 


91 


90 


181 


58 


22 


1911-1912 


107 


107 
97 


214 
213 


75 
60 


14 


1912-1913 


116 


16 


1913-1914 


130 


78 


208 


58 


14 


1914-1915 


141 


66 


207 


47 


23 


1915-1916 


138 


69 


207 


60 


27 


1916-1917 


121 


49 


170 


35 


37 


1917-1918 


79 


51 
95 


130 
241 


47 
145 


17 


1918-1919 


146 


U 


1919-1920 


127 


90 


217 


81 


18 


1920-1921 


162 


92 


254 


99 


21 


1921-1922 


185 


87 


272 


90 


34 








Total 


4.870 


5.360 


10.230 


3.554 


835 



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204 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

II. Attendance, by States 

The records indicate that from 1861 to and including the 
school year 1921-1922, 3^554 students have been enrolled at Lu- 
ther College. According to the addresses given upon registration 
the 3,554 students came from the following states and countries: 

tABLE SHOWING ATTENDANCE BY STATES. BY DECADES. 
AT LUTHER COLLEGE 



States 


1861- 

1871 


1871- 
1881 


1881- 
1891 


1891- 
1901 


1901- 
1911 


1911- 
1921 


Total. 

60 
years 


1921- 
1922 


ToUl. 

61 
years 


Minnesota 

Iowa 

Wisconsin 

North Dakota 


... 66 
... 102 
... 166 


240 

181 

132 

2 

36 

5 

16 

2 

2 

...... 

1 


201 

134 

98 

16 

30 

14 

4 

5 

1 

2 

3 

2 

2 

3 

1 


221 

184 

126 

41 

25 

27 

i 

"" r 
...... 


180 

193 

77 

53 

12 

39 

2 

7 

2 

10 

3 

3 

...... 

...... 

2 


210 

230 

102 

56 

14 

36 

3 

8 

16 

10 

5 

2 

""2 

""2 
I 
3 
3 

...... 

...... 

1 
1 


1.118 

1.024 

701 

168 

142 

124 

38 

30 

21 

22 

16 

10 

8 

6 

6 

4 

4 

3 

3 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


24 

36 

11 

8 

3 

2 

• •4- 
...... 


1.142 

1.060 

712 

176 


IlUnois 

South Dalcota 


... 25 
3 


145 
126 


Norway 

Nebrasica 

Texas 

Washington 

Michigan 

New York 


... 12 

. .. ^. 


38 
30 
25 
22 
16 
11 


New Jersey 




8 


South Africa 




7 


Missouri 

Oregon 

Ohio 

Turkey 


1 


3 

1 


6 

4 
4 
3 


Montana 












3 


Denmark 

Idaho 

California 

Massachusetts. 

Dist. of Columbia 




...... 

1 


1 


...... 


1 

1 

...... 

2 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


Indiana 

Colorado 




1 






1 
1 


Virginia 












1 


Louisiana 












1 


Canada 

Iceland 




1 
1 








1 

1 


Total 


... 377 


627 


517 


646 


590 


707 


3.464 


90 


3.554 



III. New Students, by Years 

The following tables aim to list the new students at Luther 
College by school years^ giving each student's name^ home address 
at the time of matriculation^ years in attendance at Luther Col- 
lege, and year of graduation with the Bachelor of Arts degree 
from Luther College. An asterisk (*) in front of the name 
signifies that the student later entered the Gospel ministry as an 
ordained clergyman. 



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ATTENDANCE 205 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



1861-1862 

Anderson, Rasmus B Koshkonong Wis Jan. 1862-65 A. B.. 1866 

Aslaksen. Knut Liberty Prairie Wis 1861-63 

♦Bergh, Johannes E Big Canoe la 1861-66 A. B., 1866 

Bergh, Knut E Big Canoe la 1861, 1864 

B0thun. Lasse Leeds Wis 1861 

Eide, Niels Big Canoe la 1861 

Folkestad, Lars Bonnet Prairie Wis 1861 

Fosse. Markus Norway Grove Wis 1861 

♦Hovde. Brynjolf Spring Prairie Wis 1861-62 

Iverslie, Peter P Waupaca Wis Jan. 1862-64 

Larsen. Iver Big Canoe la 1861-62 

♦Normann, Olaus A Liberty Prairie Wis 1861-66 A. B., 1866 

OUis, Johannes Norway Grove Wis 1861 

•Olscn. Ellef (EiliO Painted Creek la Jan. 1862-66 A. B.. 1866 

Ottun. Niels Holden Minn. . .1861-63 

Vick. Ole Evensen Jefferson Prairie Wis Jan. 1862-66 

1862-1863 
♦Bcr^e. Nils B Liberty Prairie Wis 1862-63. 1867-68 

Chnstenson. Christen Clinton la 1862-63 

•Dahl. Torger H Chippewa River Wis 1862-65 

*Erdahl. Gullick M LiJjerty Prairie Wis 1862-66 A. B.. 1866 

Felland, Ole G.. Sen. ." Koshkonong Wis 1862-64 

Gaarder, Ole Bostwick Valley Wis 1862-63. 1865-67 

Grinde. Peder Liberty Prairie Wis 1862-61 

Hollo, Anders L Koshkonong Wis 1862-64 

♦Homme. Even J Houston Minn . . . 1862-64 

Huseby. Ole Iversen Koshkonong Wis 1862-63 

♦Jukam. Ole G Vermont Wis 1862-63 

Kittelson. Karl Sugar Creek Wis 1862-64 

Korstvedt. ToUef Koshkonong Wis 1862-64 

♦Markhus. Lars J Lisbon Ill 1862-66 A. B.. 1866 

Markhus. Ole J Lisbon "... Ill 1862-63 

Nordgaard, Knut E Rio Wis 1862-66 

♦Quammen. Nils A Deerfield Wis 1862-63 

Reishus. Olaf S Rushford Minn . . . 1862-64 

Reque. Lars S Deerfield Wis. . . 1862-63, 1864-69.. A. B., 1868 

♦Sherven, Lars O Calmar la 1862-68 A. B., 1868 

Simonsen. Kristofer Ashippun Wis 1862-64 

Skoiland. Peder Calmar la 1862-64 

Stephens, Ole B. (Hustvedt) . . Deerfield Wis 1862-63. 1864-65 

Suckow, Ludvig Madison Wis. . . 1862-64 

♦Thorstensen, Knut HolJen Minn . . . 1862-63 

Txrum. Torge Liberty Prairie Wis 1862 

1863-1864 

Aaker. Andreas Holien Minn . . . 1863-64 

Aasebak, Jens C Houston Minn . . . 1863-64 

♦Alfsen. Adolph O Mount Morris Wis 1863-69 A. B., 1869 

Andersen. Soren E Koshkonong Wis 1863-64 

Ask. Oic Larson Bratsberg Minn . . . 1863-64 

Brodahl. Marius Perry Wis 1863-65 

Clausen. Martin St. Ansgar la Jan. 1864-65 

Gunderaon. Johannes Lemonweir Wis 1863-64 . 

Hulebak. Ole P Holden Minn . . . 1863-64 . 

Jesme. Tosten Rio Wis 1863-66 

*Juve. Tarjc O Leeds Wis 1863-66 A. B., 1866 

Kristenson, Tjerand Lisbon Ill 1863-65 

Kristoferson. Nils Rock Run Ill 1863-65 

Larson. Odd Lemonweir Wis 1863-64 

Lomen. Ole T Decorah la 1863-65 

♦Lunde, Gudbrand A Spring Grove Minn . . . 1863-69 A. B.. 1869 

Noben. Peter P Decorah la 1863-65 

Nordb0. John North Prairie Minn . . . 1863-65 

Reterson, Knut Root Prairie la 1863 

*Ro«ho]dt. Tollef Waupaca Wis 1863-68 A. B., 1868 

Sandaker. Hans Calmar la 1863-64 

Stabeek. Tosten Rock Run Ill 1863-65 

Storla. Ole H Paint Creek la 1863-65 

Suckow. Kristofer Decorah la 1863-64 

Torgcraen, Anders Waupaca Wis 1863-64 

Velo, EUas J. (EUas Molee). . . Blue Mounds Wis 1863-64 

♦Vinnor. Anders T Calmar la 1863-69 A. B., 1869 

Winden. Hans Clermont la 1863-64 

Winger. Hans Rock River Wis 1863-66 



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206 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



1864-1865 

*Anderaon. Abel B Koshkonong Wis 1864-65. 1871-72 

fientaon, Reinhard T Rock Run Wis 1864-70 

Bergeland. Halvor Liberty Prairie Wis 1864-65 

*Bj0rgo, Knut K Highlandville la 1864-70 A. B.. 1870 

Bredeaon, Brede (Sander) Decorah la 1864-65 

Ellefsen. Samson Big Canoe la 1864-65 

Faegre, Martin Paint Creek la 1864-65 

Flaten. Pcder Ammundson. . .Vermont Wis 1864-65 

Foracth. Nikolai Rock River Wis 1864-65 

Grinde. Hans Norway Grove Wis 1864-66 

Halgrimson. Ole Clermont la 1864-66 

Henjum. Johannes. Liberty Prairie Wis 1864-65 

Holum, Ole S Dc Forest Wis 1864-67 

♦Jacobaen. Jacob Daniel Pine Lake Wis 1864-65 

Kjeldson, Nils. Rio Wis 1864-66 

•M0ller, Frederik Andreas Winchester Wis 1864-70 A. B.. 1870 

Ruscad. Ole A Roche-a-Cz«e Wis 1864-66 

Sivesind. Hans Washington Prairie. la 1864-65 

Sivesind, Kristian Washington Prairie. la 1864-66 

Spilde, Hans Lodi Wis 1864-66 

"^vennungsen, Stencr Saude la 1864-66 

Sweningsen,Svennung S.(Sevig)Rock Run Ill 1864-65 

Teisbcrg. Aslak K Koshkonong Wis 1864-70 A. B.. 1870 

Thorsgaard. Johannes Coon Prairie Wis 1864-69 

♦Vctlesen, Torjus Decorah la 1864-67 

Waagc, Anders Springdalc Wis 1864-65 

1865-1866 

Aarethun, Ole K Root River Minn . . . 1865-66 

Anderson, Andrew (Andrew A. 

Howcn) Waupaca Wis 1865-67 

Anderson, Lars Story City la 1865-66 

Anderson. Sivert Rock Run Ill 1865-71 A. B., 1871 

Berge, Engebret Springdalc Wis 1865-66 

Bjerke, Engebret Trempealeau Valley. Wis 1865-66 

Bj^mson (Haldorsen). Iver. . .Dodgeville Wis 1865-66 

♦Bredesen. Adolf Spring Prairie Wis 1865-70 A. B., 1870 

Dankel, Edvard New York N. Y.. . .1865-67 

•EUestad. Nils J Newburg Minn. . .1865-71 A. B.. 1871 

Engessetcr, John Norway Grove Wis 1865-66 

Faegre. Hans Paint Creek la 1865-67 

Fjeld, Torgrim Vermont Wis 1865-67 

Grinde, Lars De Forest Wis 1865-66 

♦Harstad. Bjug A Harmony Minn . . . 1865-71 A. B.. 1871 

Haukcnes. Amund Norway Grove Wis 1865-66 

Hclgeson. Knut Waupun Wis 1865-67. 1869-70 

Hoftuft, L. Olson Lime Springs la 1865 

Ivcrslie, Martinius Scandinavia Wis 1865-67 

Jacobson (Mcen). Hans An- 
dreas Rock River Wis 1865-66 

Johnson, Engebret Paint Creek la 1865-66 

Johnson. Kristian (Aabraaten) Decorah la 1865-67 

*Larsen. Rcier Spring Grove Minn. . . 1865-68, 1869-72.. A. B., 1872 

Licr. Lars K Koshkonong Wis 1865-66 

Linde. Peter Norway Grove Wis 1865-67 

Lomen, Ole J Decorah la 1865-67 

•Mohn, Thorbj0rn N Olmsted County Minn . . . 1865-70 A. B.. 1870 

Narvesen. Cornelius Spring Grove Minn . . . 1865-67 

Nubsen. John Vermont Wis 1865-67 

Olson. Ingvald Chicago Ill 1865-66 

Opheim. Ame Decorah la 1865-67 

Peterson. Lauritz Norway. 1866 

♦Preus. Christian Keyser Leeds Wis 1865-66, 1868-73.. A. B.. 1873 

Preus, Isak Westby Wis 1865-66. 1868-69 

♦Reque. Peter (Peder) S Deerfield Wis 1865-67 

Ringstad, Johannes Decorah la 1865-67 

♦Rystad, John K Rock River Wis 1865-67. 1870-71. 

1874-75 

R0the, David Deerfield Wis 1865-68 

♦Smeby. Oluf H Paint Creek la 1865-71 A. B.. 1871 

•Stub, Hans Gerhard Locust la 1865-66 A. B.. 1866 

Thoen. Lauritz Rush River Wis 1865-70, 1871 



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ATTENDANCE 207 



Years aC 
Student Poet Office State Luther CoUese Graduation 



Thorsnaes. Karl Norway Grove VTim 1865-67 

rrvedt, Niels Gulbrandaen Bergen Minn . . . 1865-72 A. B.. 1872 

T0naberg, Nils Lisbon Ill 1865-66 

•Welo. Jens I Clermont la 1865-71 A. B., 1871 

1866-1867 

Aaby, Karl H Liberty Prairie Wis 1866-68 

Baardson. Theodor Port Washington. . Wis 1866-67 

BolsUd, Thorbj0rn Liberty Prairie Wis 1866-68 

B^n, 0Bten N Harmony Minn. . . 1866 

«Chri8tenaen. Nehem Port Washington. . .Wis 1866-71 A. B., 1871 

*Dale. Elling O Beaver Crecic Wis 1866-67. 1868-70 

Erikson. Amund. (Fadnaes). . .Heart Prairie Wis 1866-68 

Erikaon. Knut Heart Prairie Wis 1866^69 

Gaarder. Bemt Bostwicic Vailey. . . .Wis 1866-68 

*Gotaas. P&ul B Bratsberg Minn . . . 1866-73 A. B.. 1873 

Hanson. Johan A Bloomfield Minn . . . 1866-67 

Hanson. Kristian Blue River Wis 1866-68 

Hereid. Nils Th Beaver Creek Wis 1866-67 

*Hilmen. Pcder T Mishlcott Wis 1866-72 A. B.. 1872 

Iversen. Tarje (Torgcr) Waseca Minn . . . 1866-68 

*Johnaon, Hans Waupaca Wis 1866-70. 1871-73 

Knutaon. Anders West Salem Wis 1866-70 

Kristianson. Johannes Scandinavia Wis 1866-71 

Larson. Johannes Milwaukee Wis 1866-67 

Lien. Ole O Bloomington Minn . . . 1866-69 

Medaas. Kristofer Stenerson . . Houston Minn . . . 1866-68 

Meland. Martin Harmony Minn . . . 1866 

Mikkelson. Martin S (Miirat) .Waupaca Wis 1866-68 

M0ller. T0nnes Winchester Wis 1866-68 

Olsen, Hans. Hemnes. Nordland. Norway . 1866 

Ottesen. Jacob (Lunde) Bratsberg Minn. . .1866-67, 1868 

Ouren. Peder J Harmony Minn . . . 1866 

Pederson, Mons Skoponong Wis 1866-67 

Ramstad. Henry (JH. Larson)Norway la 1866-67 

Reterson. EUing Spring Grove Minn . . . 1866-68 

*Rei8hu8. Torjus S. Rushford Minn. . . 1866-71 

•Sando, Ole O Estherville la 1866-67,1869-70 

•Solseth. Ole E Harmony Minn . . . 1866-69 

Svalheim. Ole (Norsman) Norway Grove Wis 1866-68 

Syverud. Knut N Mill Creek Wis 1866-67 

Teige. Edvard G Coon Prairie Wis 1866-70 

Thomasson. Anders (Gr0nne).. Paint Creek la 1866-69. 1871-72 

Thorpe. Lars O Kasson Minn - . . 1866-67 

Tvcten. Peder Pine Lake Wis 1866-67 

VoW. Thor E Norway la 1866-67 

0strud. Johan Bloomfield Minn . . . 1866 

0verland. Frants Bratsberg Minn . . . 1866-67 

1867-68 

♦Aas. Carl C Gj0vik Norway. 1867-69 

Bolstad. Amund Th Locust la 1867 

Budal. Lars P Locust la 1867-71 

*Eidahl. Kittil (Ketil) O Calmar la 1867-68. 1870 

EUestad. Anders Newburg Minn . . . 1867-69 

•Floren. Syvert L Holden Minn . . . 1867-69 A. B.. 1869 

Foss. Jacob Decorah la 1867-70 

«F0rde. Nils A Locust la 1867-73 A. B.. 1873 

Gjerald. Iver S Skoponong Wis 1867-70 

Hesla, Endre L Paint Creek la 1867-68 

Hjellc. Knut Decorah la 1867-71 

Hogstul (Halvorsen). Halvor T.Skoponong Wis 1867-70 

•Hustvcdt, Halvor B Liberty Prairie Wis 1867-73 A. B.. 1873 

Hustvedt. Stephen Koshkonong Wis 1867-69. 1870-71 

Jacobson. Wilhelm Paint Creek la 1867 

Johnson, Rasmus Stavanger Norway . 1867-68 

Lomen. Gudbrand (Gilbert) J. Decorah la 1867-73 

Medal, Helge H Decorah la 1867-69 

Moklstad, Kristian Toten Norway. 1867-70 • 

Mortenson, Martin Milwaukee Wis 1867-69 

Neuberg. Haraki Norway .1867-68 

•Nordby. J0rgen Locust la 1867-73 A. B.. 1873 

Solum. Oluf I>ecorah la 1867-70 . . : 



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208 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Storla, Olaus Paint Creek la 1867-68 

Thomassen. Krisiian Paint Creek la 1867 

Thorsnss. Hans Norway Grove Wis 1867-68 

♦Vaalcr. Johannes R Rio Wis 1867-68. 1871-72 

1868-1869 

Anderson. Brun Lcmonweir Wis 1868-70 

Axdahi. S0ren Osstan la 1868-70 

Bakkevold. Ole North Prairie Minn . . . 1868-71 

Berge. George Springdale Wis 1868-69 

Bergh. Ole Hendrickson Perry Wis 1868-69 

Brandhagen. Nils Decorah la 1868-71 

Branson, Gustav Waupun Wis 1868-70 

B0rthe, Ketil Winchester Wis 1868-71 

Danielsen. Ole Winchester Wis 1868-70 

Egeberg. Westye Christiania Norway. 1868-69 

Ellis. Edwin Harmony Minn . . . 1868-69 

♦Everson, Carl (Charles) Sever- 
in E Linden Wis 1868-70 

•Felland. Ole G.. Jr Koshkonong Wis 1868-74 A. B.. 1874 

Forseth, Anton Rock River Wis 1868-70 

Forseth. Johan Rock River Wis 1868-69 

Fr0vold. Knut Decorah la 1868-69 

CuUord. Olaus Westby Wis 1868-70 

Haugen. Nils P Rush River Wis 1868-70. 1871-72 

Helgeson, Andreas Waupun Wis 1868-71 

Helvig. Abel Clinton la 1868-70. 1871-72 

Hong, Engebret Soldier Valley la 1868-71 

Hustvedt. Laurents. . ". Round Prairie la 1868-69 

Jacobsen. Martin Paint Creek la 1868 

Kalstad, Even P Oconomowoc Wis 1868-70 

Kjersland, Lars Koshkonong Wis 1868-70 

Kragevik. M. O Lee Ill 1868-69 

*Mandt. Olaf Koshkonong Wis 1868-73 A. B., 1873 

Mathre. Wier Lisbon Ill 1868-74 

Myhren. Hans (Myron) Bergen (S.) Dak.1868-70 

Myrberg, Johannes Bratsberg Minn . . . 1868-71 

Nelson, John Lisbon Ill 1868-70 

Nelson. Lars Lisbon Ill 1868-69 

Neperud. Olaus Coon Prairie Wis 1868-70 

Nilson. Erik St. Louis Mo 1868-69 

Na?8. Mikkel Rushford Minn . . . 1868 

Paulson. Edward Waupun Wis 1868-69. 1874-76 

Pederson. A. B Benton la 1868-69 

Prcus. J. Nordahl B Westby Wis 1868-72 

Rislaug. Syvert Capron Ill 1868. 1871 

Sampson, Lars Vangen (S.) Dak.1868-72 

Sampson, Nils. Vangen (S.) Dak.1868-70 

Sander, Anton B Decorah la 1868-74 A. B.. 1874 

Skartvedt. Gudmund Ossian la 1868-74 

Skatter. Ole Werner Koshkonong Wis 1868 

Thompson. Thomas S Chicago Ill 1868-70. . . .• 

Tollefson. Simon Norway ?1868 

Torgerson, Andreas Chicago Ill 1868-73 

Torjussen. Ketil Bratsberg Minn . . . 1868-69 

Tdnnesen. Lars (Ekern) Coon Prairie Wis 1868-70 

Vik, Sjur Lisbon Ill 1868-70 

Wraamann. Wilhelm Norway. 1868-69 

Young. James Madison Wis 1868-69 

0dven, Lars P Springdale Wis 1868-72 

1869-70 

*Aaberg, Ole H Roche-a-Cree Wis 1869-74 

Arntson. Ole A Lansing la 1869-71 

Berg. Anton S North Prairie Minn . . . 1869-70 

Blekre. Zakarias O North Prairie Minn . . . 1869-72 

Bredeson. Bernhard Spring Prairie Wis 1869-71 

Bring. Johan Boatwick Valley. . . . Wis 1869-70 

Br0rby. Jacob. .* Clermont la 1869-74 

*Fosraark. Ole N Spring Prairie Wis 1869-75 A. B.. 1875 

Fosvik, Iver Elstad Minn . . . 1869-72 

Funrue. Kittil Paint Creek la 1869-70 

♦Guldbrandsen. Guldbrand Winchester Wis 1869-72 



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ATTENDANCE 209 



Yean at 
Student Post OiBce State Luther College Graduation 



Gunderaon. Guatav Holden Minn . . . 1869-70 

Haaven. Lar» Holden Minn. . . 1869-70 

Hagebak, Simon Holden Minn . . . 1869-70 

Ha£cn. G. Olacn Kellogg la 1869 

Halvoraon, Anton Rock River Wia 1869-70 

*Hattrem, Thor H Vaage Norway. 1870 

Haukenes, Hana O Norway Grove Wia 1869-71 

•Holaeth. Mikkel C Bostwick VaUcy . . . . Wi« 1869-71 

H0ic. Tallak E Coon Prairie Wl« 1869 

♦Jaastad. Endre L Decorah la 1869-70 

Johanneaen. Thomas Highland Minn . . . 1869-72 

*j0rgen8on. Christian Wiota Wis 1869-75 A. B.. 1875 

Knutson. Karl August Mishicott Wis 1869-72 

Kvaemoddcn, John N Hoiden Minn ... 1869-70. 1871-72 

^Ungeland. Magne Locust la 1869-75 A. B.. 1875 

Leknaes. Louis Lisbon Ill 1869-73 

Lynne. Lara Decorah la 1869-72 

*Monson. Ingvard Gr0the Lc Roy Minn . . . 1869-75 

Monserud. Oiaus Paint Creek la 1869-72 

M0Uer. Bernt Winchester Wis 1869-74 

Nordgaard, Knut HoWen Minn . . . 1869-JO 

Norvold. Sivert Paint Creek la 1869-70 

^Naeseth. Christen Andreas . . . Holden Minn . . . 1869-74 A. B.. 1874 

^Petersen, Wilhelm Magnus 

Herman Paint Cieek la 1869-75 A. B.. 1875 

♦Rasmussen. Gerhard Lisbon Ill 1869-71. 1872-76 

R0nneberg. Ole Blue Mounds Wis 1869-72 

Rifvang. Ola Decorah la 1869-72 

*Sagen. Andreas K Perry Wis 1869-74 A. B.. 1874 

♦Seim. Viking L Paint Creek la 1869-73 

♦Solstad. Hans P Albert Lea Minn. . .1869-72 

Stabaek. Knut Rock Run Ill 1869-70 

Stamm. Ole P Valley Grove Minn. . .1869-70 

♦Strand. Henri k J Locust la 1869-76 A. B., 1876 

•Str0mnie. Peer O Wrachestcr Wis 1869-76 A. B.. 1876 

Teige. Edvard O Decorah la. .• 1869-71 

Tobiaaen. Tobias R Calmar la 1869-70. 1871. 

1873-74 

♦Turmo, Andreas O Calmar la 1869-72 

Ueland. Lars Wcstby Wis 1869-71 

*Vang8nes. Ole P Ridgeway la 1869-75 A. B.. 1875 

Varlo, Olaf Decorah la 1869-73 A. B., 1873 

1870-1871 

Aaacn, Syvert Nidaros (S.) Dak. 1870-72 

Akrc. Jonas Big Canoe la 1870-72 

AInaes, Syvert Ossian la 1870-71 

^Andersen. Anders C Manitowoc Wis 1870-73 

Anderson. Nils Edgar Decorah la 1870-73 

Berg, Ole S North Prairie Minn . . . 1870-72 

Berge. Ole V Norway . 1870 

Bergland. Halvor Bratsberg Minn . . . 1870 

* Borge. M ichael O Leeds Wis 1870-71 

Daht O. H VcUow Medicine. ... Minn . . .1870-72 

Dale. Viking Big Canoe la 1870-72 

Daleby. Oie Perry Wis 1870-72 

Edwards. Bj0m Chicago Ill 1870-75 

*Faegre. Kaspar G Paint Creek la 1870-77 A. B.. 1877 

Felland, Andreas Koshkonong Wis 1870-7/ 

Gaarder. Ole DodgeviUe Wis 1870-71 

Gaarder. Syvert Albany Wis 1870-72 

'*Gr0n]id, Carl Johan Magnus 

Uenwsn) Kewaunee Wis 1871-77 A. B.. 1877 

Gr0nstad. Erik Usbon Ill 1870-71 

Gunderaon. Martin Chicago Ill 1870-72 

*Gutteb0. Kj0stel L Decorah la 1870-76 

Hanson. Thomas Spring Prairie Wis 1870-71 

Helgeland. Pfeder Lisbon Ill 1870-73 

Helgeaon. Tideman Waupun Wis 1870 

^Hcllestvedt. Johannes A Rushford Minn. . .1870-71 

♦Hcndrickson. Peter Anton. . . Rushford Minn. . .1870-76 A. B., 1876 

•HJort. Otto Christian O Dalby la 1870-73, 1874-75 

•Isbcrg. Ptdcr Decorah la 1870-75 

Juvc. John O Houston Minn. . .1870-71 



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210 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Kjerland. Thorbj0m (Dahle)... Locust la 1870-71 

Knudson. Frcdrik Leeds Wis 1870-71 

*Koefod. Magnus Martinus. . . . Locust la 1870-72 

Kvale. Erik Wilmington Minn. . . 1870-74 

Ue. Nils J Otter Cr«ek Wis 1870 

Naas. Thyge A. R. (A, G. 
Nilson) Rock Dell Minn. . . 1870-71 

Neste. Knut Decorah la 1870-71 

Nordgaard. Gudbrand £>ccorah la 1870-72 

N«s. Karl Winchester Wis 1870-71 

Naeseth. John Holden Minn. . . 1870-72, 1874 

Opperud. Joseph Clermont la 1870-73 

Osmundson, Lars (L. O. 

Veom) Houston Minn . . . 1870-71 

Rokne, Ole E Koshkonong Wis 1870-71 

*Ruste. Erik O Perry Wis 1870-76 A. B.. 1876 

Rydning. Lars (Swenson) St. Peter Minn. . . 1870-71 

Rydning, Paul (Swenson) St. Peter Minn. . . 1870-72 

R0the. HaUe Koshkonong Wis 1870-75 

Skaaden, Kristian Norway . 1870-71 

♦Skugstad, Jens Coon Prairie Wis 1870 

SUndc, Thomas O Whalan Minn. . .1870 

Sponheim. Haldor Locust la 1870-71 

Stamm, Ole G Primrose Wis 1870-71 

Steensland. Henry Madison Wis 1870-71 

Stenehjem. Pcder Wilmington Minn. . . 1870-71 

Str0mmen, Ketil Koshkonong Wis 1870-71 

Syvertson. Henry A New York N. Y.. . .1870-73 

S0rkind, Gudbrand Decorah la 1870 

Thorsen. Nils A Douglas County Minn . . . 1870-72 

Torrison. Thomas E Manitowoc Wis 1870-76 A. B.. 1876 

Urdahl, Ole A Springdale Wis 1870-74 

Valdeland, Enok Clermont la 1870-72 

♦Wilictt, George Decorah la 1870-72 

♦Ylvisaker, Johan Thorbj^rn. . . Red Wing Minn . . . 1870-77 A. B.. 1877 

1871-1872 

Aaby. Andreas A Rock Dell Minn . . . 1871-73 

Amundson. Albert Chr Silver Lake la 1871-78 A. B.. 1878 

Anderson, Albert Janesville Wis 1871-73 

Anderson, Lawrence Rock Dell Minn . . . 1871-72 

♦Bakke. Nils J Minneola Minn. .. 1871-77 A. B.. 1877 

Bergh. Hallvard A Blue Mounds Wis 1871-76 A. B.. 1876 

♦Blilie, Johan Anton Washington Prairie .la 1871-77 A. B.. 1877 

♦Borgcn, Edward Decorah la 1871-76 -A. B., 1876 

•Brandt. Rcalf Ottcscn Decorah la 1871-77 A. B., 1877 

Dahl, Karl A Waupun Wis 1871-72 

D08land. John P Clinton la 1871-72 

Eidahl, Timan (Quarve) Spring Grove Minn . . . 1871-72 

Fleischer. Ludvig Madison Wis 1871-72 

Fleischer. Michael Madison Wis 1871 

Fossum, Anthon A Paint Creek la 1871-74 

Gabriel. Martin Madison Wis 1871-74 

*Gr0nsberg, Ole N Jordan Wis 1871-77 A. B.. 1877 

Hadland, Ole J Spring Grove Minn . . . 1871 

Hage, Hans O. T Norway. 1871-72 

Henrickson. Gustav Rushford Minn . . . 1871-73 

Henrickson, Hans Ruaiiford Minn . . . 1871 

Holm, Thorvald. . . .? Paint Creek la 1871-74 

Holkesvig, Ole A Big Canoe la 1871-74 

Hovland. Joliannes Balsfjorden Norway. 1871-72 

Jaastad. Syvert Decorah la 1871-72 

♦Johansen. Jens St. Louis Mo 1871-77 A. B.. 1877 

Johnson, Tens H Rock Dell Minn . . . 1871-74 

Johnson. Martin Milwaukee Wis 1871-74 

Knutson. Knut Manitowoc Wis 1871-74 

Krees. Martin Union Prairie Minn . . . 1871-74 

Land, Tosten L Calmar la 1871-73 

Landsvserk. Peter K Spring Grove Minn . . . 1871-74 

Landsvaerk. T. J I^wler la 1871-74 

♦Lee (Lia), OleH Winchester Wis 1871-72 

Lomen, Jrfrgen (George) Decorah la 1871-78 A. B.. 1878 

Ohlsgaard. Asle P Wilmington Minn. . . 1871 

Olsen. Tosten Saude la 1871-72 



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ATTENDANCE 211 



Yean at 
Student Post OflSoe SUte Luther College Graduation 



Olaon. Halvor Rock Dell Minn . . . 1871-72 

Bederaon. Lar» H Lime Creek la 1871-73 

Quarve. Timan L Spring Grove Minn. ..1871-78 A. B.. 1878 

*Roalkvani. Halvard G Newburg Minn. . .1871-74 A. B.. 1874 

Rokne. Iver L. Harmony Minn . . . 1871-73 

*Ronde8tvedt. Amvid P Springdale Wis 1871-77 A. B.. 1877 

^Rystad. Andreas Rask A Benton la 1871-73 

^Scheie, Iver O Mankato Minn . . . 1871-74 

Schmidt, August Decorah la 1871. 1874-75 

Sivertsen. Hans Leeds Wis 1871 

Thomp0on. Knut T DodgeviUe Wis 1871-72 

rrhoraen. Marki 8 Krager0 Norway. 1871-72 

•Thorvil(d)son. Thorvil(d) K.. . Arendal Minn. . . 1871-74. 1875-78.. A. B.. 1878 

Vambhcim. David Lodi Wis 1871-74 

VoW. ElHng O Decorah la 1871-72 

Weeks. Sjur W Rochelle Ill 187 1-73 

•Widvey, Peter Anthon Milwaukee Wis 1871-74 

nvilhclmaen. Ole Ivar Moe. . . .Silver Lake Minn . . . 1871 

*Ylvisaker. Johannes T Sogndal Norway. 1871-74 A. B.. 1874 

1872-1873 

Aga, Lars. Ridgeway la 1872-75 

Aim, Martin G Swan Lake Minn . . . 1872-73 

Almquist. John New York N. Y.. . . 1872-73 

♦Bale. Jens E Byron Minn . . . 1872-74 

Beheim. John E Pope County Minn . . . 1872-73 

*Brevig. Tollef L Pope County Minn . . . 1872-74. 1875-77 

Butler. Bemhard Decorah la 1872-73 

Dahl. Albert Waupun Wis 1872-74 

Dahl. Melvin E Paint Creek la 1872-75 

Dalseid. Nils O Shell Brook la 1872-73 

*Engh. Hagbart Coon Valley Wis 1872-78 A. B.. 1878 

Fadnes. Johannes E. Whitewater Wis 1872-74 

*Fjeklstad. Rollef R North Prairie Minn. . .1872-74 

Possum. Hans R Albert Lea Minn. . .1872-75. 1876-77 

Gausta. Herbj0rn N Harmony Minn . . . 1872-75 

♦Gjevie. Anders H Holden Minn . . . 1872-78 A. B.. 1878 

Haagenson. Hans M Decorah la 1872-73 

Hage. Hans J. T Norway. 1872 

Hatlc, Sivert J Froen Wis 1872-75 

Helgstad. Joseph J New Lisbon Wis 1872-73 

♦Hoel. Olaf H North Prairie ...... Minn . . . 1872-73 

♦Hougen, Johan Olai J Benton la 1872-79 A. B.. 1879 

Huset. Ole A Holden Minn . . . 1872 

Iverson. Edward Manitowoc Wis 1872-74 

iohnaon, August Harmony Minn . . . 1872-75 
ohnson, Henry Waupun Wis 1872-74 

Kirkeby. Guttorm T Holden Minn. . ..1872-74. 1875-78.. A. B.. 1878 

Kjcmbolm. Julian P Albert Lea Minn. . . 1872-73 

Larsen. Olaf Umonweir Wis 1872-78 A. B., 1878 

♦Lee. Atle J Utica Wis 1872-78 A. B.. 1878 

Lerum, Daniel J Urne Wis 1872-73 

Lie. Halvor A Lemonweir Wis 1872-75 

Loftagaarden. O. H Round Prairie Minn . . . 1872-78 

♦L^kensgaard. Ole O Swan Lake Minn. . . 1872-78 A. B., 1878 

♦MaakesUd. John J Lee Ill 1872-75 

Markegaard. Knut Th Paint Creek la 1872-73 

Melby. Knut K Cedar Valley Minn. . .1872-74 

Moe. Thorvald H Albert Lea Minn. . . 1872-74 

Neste. OleE Decorah la 1872-73 

Nordgaard. Christian Decorah la 1872-78 A. B.. 1878 

♦Omlid, Guthorm (Guttorm) H.Holden Minn... . 1872-75 

Peterson. Peter J Shawano Wis 1872-74 

Riis. Carl Theodor Waupun Wis 1872-73 

Rydning. John Paint Creek la 1872-74 

Sanderson. Tollef Harmony Minn . . . 1872-74 

Sandvig. Ole J Norway Lake Minn . . . 1872-74 

Skotland. Theodor Calmar la 1872-74 

♦Skyberg. Hans O Rush River Wis 1872-79 A. B., 1879 

Sponhcim. Peder Decorah la 1872-74 

♦StorliCe). Knut O U Roy Minn. . .1872-79 A. B.. 1879 

♦Syftettad. Olaus P Perry Wis 1873-79 A. B., 1879 

Sunderland. Salve O Winnebago la 1872-73 

Tangen. Hans H Rio Wis 1872-73 



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212 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



ThomiMon. Amund G Scandinavia Wis 1872-75 

Thoresen. Thorvald C North Prairie Minn. . ,1872-74 

Thoresen. Thorvald O Manitowoc Wis 1872-74 

Tvedt, G. Halvorsen Decorah la 1872-74 

Ulefos, Hans H Portage Wis 1872-75 

Vraalstad. Edvard J Holden Minn. . .1872-73 

Winge. HansA Decorah la 1872-74 

Ytterboe. Tyke T Calmar la 1872-74 

1873-1874 

Aalue. Ole H Ridgeway la 1873-74 

Bakke. Ole E Decorah la 1873-75 

Bertelson. Gunder Ossian la 1873 

*Brandt. Olaf EUas Decorah la 1873-79 A. B., 1879 

BrKkhus. Anton O Oslo Minn . . . 1873-74 

Bnekke. Nils A Decorah la 1873-74 

Bursvold. Nikolai O Spring Valley Minn. . .1873-76 

Dale, Anders K Wilmington Minn . . . 1873 

^Danielsen, Jens Pope Co Minn . . . 1873 

Dybdahl. Thore E Decorah la 1873-76 

DKhlen. Olaus G. -. Spring Grove Minn . . . 1873-74 

(O. G. Myrah) 

Egge. Albert E Ridgeway la 1873-79 A. B.. 1879 

•Eggen. Thore N Prairie Farm Wis 1873-79 A. B., 1879 

Evenson, Edwin Scandinavia Wis 1873-79 A. B.. 1879 

Everson. Adolph Linden Wis 1873 

Farsdal. Ole G Holden Minn. . . 1873-74 

Finseth. Ole L Root Prairie Minn . . . 1873-74 

•Flaten, Christopher A Vermont Wis 1874-78 

Foemark. Ole J Spring Prairie Wis 1873-75 

Possum. Christian A Elon la 1873-75 

Fossum. Torgrim A Elon la 1873-75 

Garthe. Martinus Hoff Minn. . .1873-75 

(Wimpelmann) 
•Giere, Nils O Rock Dell Minn. . . 1873-79 A. B.. 1879 

Gigstad, Knut O Manitowoc Wis 1873-75 

Gjellum. Erik S Koshkonong Wis 1873-79 A. B.. 1879 

Golbcrg, Halgrim Hesper la 1873-74 

Grinde. Johannes J North Prairie Minn . . . 1873-74 

Gr0nnc. Knut Th. A Paint Creek la 1873-74. 1875-76 

Gulsvik. Vilhelm Clermont la 1873-74. 1875-76 

Haavelsrud. John E French Creek Wis 1873-75 

Hanson. Hans M Elon la 1873-74 

Hanson, Peter N Albert Lea Minn . . . 1873-77 

Hjelle. John O Decorah la 1873-74 

Hoftuft. Kjtfstil O Lime Springs la 1873-74 

Holther. Olaf Minneapolis Minn. . . 1873-77 

^Homme. Thorleif O Harmony Minn. . . 187.V78 A. B.. 1878 

Husmo. GusUv Rock Dell Minn. . . 1873 

H0yme. Thrond Decorah la 1873-79 A. B.. 1879 

Jacobson. James Henrytown Minn . . . 1873-74 
ohannesen, Jacob A Root Prairie Minn. . . . 1873-75 

(Jacobsen) 

Johnson. Carl St. Paul Minn . . . 1873-77 

Josvanger. Rasmus L Greenwood Wis 1873-75 

Juve. Hcrjus O Lemonweir Wis 1873-74 

Kaasa. Johannes H Ossian la 1873 

Karstad. Urs M. K Swan Lake Minn. . .1873-80 A. B., 1880 

♦Kildahl, John Nathan Holden Minn. . .1874-79 A. B.. 1879 

Kloster. A. L Ossian la 1873-74 

Kopperdal. Hans J Hoff Minn . . . 1873-76, 1877-81. .A. B.. 1881 

Koren. Ahlert Decorah la 1873-75 

*Koren,(B0lcke)Joh(a)n ( Ru If s) Decorah la 1874-79 A. B.. 1879 

Kvale. Erik B Spring Grove Minn. . .1873-75 

Langelie. Ole J Bergen Minn. . .1873-76 

Larsen. Laurits Chicago Ill 1873-79 A. B.. 1879 

Lee, Alexander O Northwood la 1873-74 

Unn, Edward M Chicago Ill 1873-74 

Lund, Knut Chicago Ill 1873-75 

L^berg. Nils T Ashippun Wis 1873-74 

L^iland, Halvor Canfield Minn. . . 1873-78 

♦Madsen. J0rgen Elesius Sheboygan Wis 1873-75, 1878-80 

Magnesen. Nils Rock DeU Minn. . . 1873-74 

•Mocn. Carl J New Hope Minn . . . 1873-77 



Digitized by 



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ATTENDANCE 213 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Myra. Stephen Everaon Linden Wis 1873-77 

Nilaon. Even Norman Hill Tck 1873-75 

Nilaon. Thorbjcfm A. (Giere). . Rock Dell Minn. . . 1873 

*Nordgaard. Johannes Simon.. .Apple River Wis 1873-76. 1877-80.. A. B., 1880 

Nacaeth, Olaf A. N Glenwood la 1873-76, 1877-78 

Ohnstad. Jens P Spring Grove Minn . . . 1873-75 

Olson, Martin Chicago Ill 1873-74 

Otterdokken. John O Holden Minn. . . 187.V74 

•Ovem, Anton Gustav HelgesonWaupun Wis 1873-76 

Raab0lle. Ok G Holden Minn . . . 1873-74 

^Schesvold. Thore P Mankato Minn . . . 1873-74 

•Skartvedt. Ped^ Ossan la 1873-79 A. B.. 1879 

Storb, Sevat PsUnt Creek la 1873-75 

Teigen. Martin Koshkonong Wis 1873-75 

Tobiaaen. Theodor Decorah la 1873-74 

•Torriaon, Isaac Bertinus. Manitowoc Wis 1873-79 A. B.. 1879 

TrygsUd. Johannes M Volga (S.) Dak,1873-76 

Vaatvedt. HeUek O Rock Dell Minn. . .1873-75 

Vermager. Ole H Wilmington Minn. .1873-74 

Vraali. Ketil S Delavan Minn . . . 1873-74, 1875 

^Wisnaes, Rasmus J Blue Earth City Minn . . . 1873-76 

Wold. Anton O Whitehall Wis 1873-76 

0f8tedahl. Louis B Harmony Minn . . . 1873-74 

1874-1875 

Aase. Svennung Henrytown Minn . , . 1874-75. 1877 

Anderson, Halvor Lisbon Ill 1874-75 

Anderson. Knut (Brown) Root Prairie Minn . . . 1874-75 

*Askevoki. Bemt Chicago Ill ... . 1874-75 

Bagge. Peter Irgens San Francisco Cal 1874-75 

Bale. Ole M Spring Prairie Minn . . . 1874-75 

Berg. RoUcf S Arcndal Minn . . . 1874 

Birkeland. Maurits A Chicago Ill 1874 

*Bi0rgaas. John J Newport Wis 1874-79 A. B.. 1879 

BratvoM. Knut O Holden Minn . . . 1874 

Carlson. Emil Alexandria Minn . . . 1874-75 

Dale. Lars Sam Leeds Wis 1874-78 

Egge. iSven E Ridgeway la 1874-77 

Kkeland. Pcder J Coon Valley Wis 1874-75. 1877-80.. A. B., 1880 

EUestad. Sven A Spring Grove Minn . . . 1874 

Evenson. Gustav A Scandinavia Wis 1874-80 A. B.. 1880 

Froslie. Ole A Jordan Wis 1874 

♦Giere. Nils A Rock Dell Minn . . . 1874-75. 1882-84 

Gjeglum. Halvor O. K Paint Creek la 1874-75 

Grangaard. Endre A Paint Creek la 1874-77 

Grangaard. Ole P Paint Creek la 1874-77 

Gr0the. Ole H Le Roy Minn. . .1874-76 

Gr0tum. John J Bratsberg Minn . . . 1874-75. 1876 

♦Gunderson. Severin Bergen Norway. 1874-77, 1879 

Haagenson. Olaus Norway Wis 1874-75 

Hadland. Ole P Bloomfield Minn. .1874-80 A. B.. 1880 

♦Halvorson. Johannes Decorah la 1874-80 A. B.. 1880 

Hamre. Anders M. J Holden Minn . . . 1874-75 

Hamre. Peder P Decorah la 1874-75 

Hanson, Erik Root Prairie Minn . . . 1874-75 

Hanson, James CM Decorah la 1874-82 A. B.. 1882 

Hanson, Lauritz Albert Lea Minn . . . 1874-76 

•Heic, Johannes J Story City la 1874-78 

Helen. Thor O Decorah la 1874-75 

Helland, Edward C Hoff Minn. .1874 

Helle. Nils N Harmony Minn . . . 1874-75 

*Hoff, Lars Martinus Andreas. . Borgund Norway. 1874-75 A. B.. 1875 

Hove. Andreas M Ridgeway la 1874-81 A. B., 1881 

iaastad. Henrik Marshfield Wis 1874-77 
ensen, EUing St. Paul Minn. . . 1874-76 
enson, Johannes Decorah la 1874-76 

♦Jerdee, Lars J Norway Grove Wis 1874-75, 1877-82.. A. B., 1882 

Jordahl. Christopher Chr Ossian la 1874-78 

♦J^rgenaon, Fm^u- Rock Dell Minn. .1874-80 A. B., 1880 

Kitelaaa. Jens T7 Hesper la 1874-75 

Knutson, Leonhard Shawano Wis 1874-75 

Krees, John Union Prairie Minn . . . 1874-75 

Kvale. Peter Wilmington Minn . . . 1874-75 

♦Larsen, Anders Carleton Minn . . . 1874-75 



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214 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Yean at 
Student Poet Office SUte Luther College Graduation 



*Laraen. Gustav Adolf Koshkonong Wis 1874-SO A. B.. 1880 

Larson. Edward... Decorah la 1874 

Larson. Nils L Spring Grove Minn. . .1874 . . 

Larson. P. T Medo Minn . . . 1874-76 

Lia. Halvor O Decorah la 1874-76 

Lien. Arne O Glen Roy la 1874-75 

Lien. C. A. N Holden Minn . . . 1874-75 

LiUcgaard, Lars O Nicollet Minn. . .1874-77 

Lindef jeld. Martin O Harmony Minn . . . 1874-77 

Lund. Christian J Benton la 1874-75 

Madsen, Komelius Gjerpen Wis 1874 

Mathieson, Oscar Paint Creek la 1874-75 

Mehus. Lars J Lisbon Ill 1874-75 

Mundahl. John F Blue Earth City. . . . Minn . . . 1874-75 

Myran, Guttorm Lincoln (S.) Dak.1874-77 

Nedrelo. Baard B Glenwood Muin. . .1874-76 

*Nes8. Johannes Martinus O. . . Calmar la 1874-80 A. B.. 1880 

Neste. Engebret I>ecorah la 1874-78 

Naeseth. Halvor K Holden Minn. . .1874 

OmmelsUd. Thomas H Luther Valley Wis 1874-76 

*Omkind. Gunulf (Gunnuf) J.. . Bratsberg Minn . . . 1874-75 

Osmundson. Andreas B Valley Grove Minn . . . 1874 

♦Oitesen. Otto Christian Utica Wis 1874-80 A. B.. 1880 

♦Pcdersen, Nils Indianapolis Ind 1874-75 

♦Pederson, Christofer Waterville la 1874-78 

Peterson, Anders O Spring Grove Minn. . . 1874-77 

Peterson. Halvor LUbon Ill 1874-81 A. B.. 1881 

Rasmussen, Olaus Lisbon Ill 1874 

Rogde, Ole J Lee Ill 1874-76 . . 

RoUefson. Andres Bratsberg Minn . . . 1874 

Rykken, Johannes B Norway?1874-7S 

Sheel. Herman W St. I>ouis Mo 1874-75 

Skjser. Jens O Lc Roy Minn. ..1874-78 

Skov. Thore K Red Wing Minn . . . 1874-75 

•Skyberg. Kristian O Rush River Wis 1874-75. 1876-80.. A. B,. 1880 

Storla. John P Canton (S.) Dak.1874-75 

Storla. Thore Paint Creek la 1874-77 

♦Strandskov. Hans C Carlston Minn. . . 1874-76 

*Stub, Olaf Tidemand Arentz. .Locust la 1874-80 A. B.. 1880 

Saetrang. Oluf G WatervUle la 1874-79 

•Saettre. Thorbj0rn Andreas. . . Rock Dell Minn . . . 1874-80 A. B.. 1880 

♦Thorgrimsen, Hans Baag0e . . . Eyrabakkr Iceland. . 1874-79 A. B.. 1879 

ToUefson. Ole Estherville la 1874. 1875-78 

Tonning, Rasmus Bergen Norway. 1874-75, 1876-77 

Tutle. Louis Ed Benton la 1874 

Vinjum, Jens A Blackhammer Minn . . . 1874-75 

Voldeng, Ole Decorah la 1874-75 

Wake. John Lisbon Ill 1874-75 

♦0f8teda(h)l, Andreas A Zumbrota Minn. . .1874-78 

0kre. Lars J Paint Creek la 1874-75 

Osterud. Lauritz H Bloomfield Minn . . . 1874-76 

1875-1876 

Aaby. Nils A Rock Dell Minn . . . 1875-77 

Anderson. Alfred Decorah la 1875-77 

Anderson. Andreas B Gjerpen Wis 1875-77 

Barke. Johannes O Story City la 1875-76 

Berg, Peter O Hesper la 1875-76 

Bjdrgan, John R Nidaros (S.) Dak.1875-78 

Blakstvedt. Gabriel Highland Minn . . . 1875 

Blakstvedt. Martin Highland Minn. . . 1875 

Bolland. John Hesper la 1875-76 

Borderud. O. P Norman (N.) Dak.1875-76 

♦Bothnc. Johannes G. Daac £>ecorah la 1875-78 A. B.. 1878 

♦Braaten. Sven O Holden Minn. . . 1875-81 A. B.. 1881 

Brandt, John A Decorah la 1875-83 A. B., 1883 

Brcckc, Ole E Spillville la 1875-81 A. B.. 1881 

B0rve. Knut Th Fort Dodge la 1875-76, 1877-78 

Christianson, Conrad M Renville Minn. . . 1875-81 A. B., 1881 

Dokken. Olaus L Spring Grove Minn . . . 1875-76 

Eiken, Andrew T Bratsberg Minn . . . 1875-80 

Erstad. Cornelius Zumbrota Minn. . .1875-77. 1878-80 

Fiskerbaek, Ole K Macfarland Wis 1875-78 

Haagenaon, Sy vert P Rock Dell Minn . . . 1875-76 



Digitized by 



Google 



ATTENDANCE 215 



Years at 
Student Post Oflke State Luther College Graduation 



Haatvedt. Jacob Holmes City Minn . . . 1875-77 

Hanson. Martin Manitowoc Wis 1875-76 

Hanson. Thore O Estherville la 1875-78 

Haugen. A. J Crane Creek la 1875-76 

HereSd. Konrad A N. Rush River Wis 1875-76 

Hereid. Lars K N. Rush River Wis 1875-76 

♦Heyer, Halvor A Minneapolis Minn. . . 1875-76 

HiUeboe. Hans S Roche-a-Cr«c Wis 1875-81 A. B.. 1881 

Hoff, Peter J Lisbon lU 1875-76 

Hole. Andreas B Goodhue Minn. ..1875-77 

Holstad. Anders Decorah la 1875-81 A. B., 1881 

Hopperstad. Julius J Capron Ill 1875. 1879-82 

Hove. Peder Calmar la 1875 

Isberg. Gustav J Decorah la 1875-78 

♦Jensen. Lars Petter Albert Ua Minn. . .1875-78, 1880-82 

Johnson, Edward Rushford Minn. . . 1875 

Johnson. Nils H Rock Dell Minn. . . 1875 

Johnson, Norm WioU Wis 1875 

Johnson. O. C Newark Ill 1875-76 

♦Kasberg. Karl A Bratsberg Minn. . . 1875-81 A. B.. 1881 

Kleven. Carl J. A Holmestrand Norway . 1875-76 

Klosier. Nils A. (Anderson). . .Ossian la 1875-78 

Kvale. Anders Norway?1875 

Kvale. ToUef O Decorah la 1875 

Landmark. Einar Decorah la 1875-76 

Larson, Knut Zumbrota Minn . . . 1875 

Larson. Ole H Wilmington Minn. . . 1875-76 

Malmin, John M Chicago Ill 1875-76 

Mauritzon. Masena G Chicago Ill 1875-76 

Mauritzon. Mauritx Chicago Ill 1875-76 , 

Mellang, Guttorm A Albert Lea Minn . . . 1875-77 

*Minne, NUs M CUnton la 1875-79 

Mohn. F. Voss Bergen Norway. 1875-78. 1880-81. .A. B., 1881 

M0ller. Henrik Winchester Wis 1875-76. 1878-80 

Nilson. John Nikolai Red Wing Minn. . .1875-79 

Olson, Christian Decorah la 1875-76 

Oppen. Knut Valders Wis 1875-76 

Ramsey. Nils I>ecorah la 1875-76 

Roe, Pfeter O Rock Dell Minn . . . 1875-76 

Sando. Halvor O Estherville la 1875 

•Seehuus. Knut Chicago Ill 1875-81 .\. B.. 1881 

Simonson. Simon E Koshkonong Wis 1875-77 

Solhcim. OlaA Lee Ill 1875-81 A. B.. 1881 

Stenersen. Peder H Red Wing Minn . . . 1875-76 

Sel. Ole O Holden Minn . . . 1875-77 

S0ren8on. S. T Root Prairie Minn. . . 1875 

S0vde. Johannes Story City la 1875-77 

Tvcdt. Hans A. (Halvorsen) . . Decorah la 1875-76 

Tvedt. Gjermund O Lcmonweir Wis 1875-81 

Tvedt. Olaf O Lcmonweir Wis 1875-79 * 

Ulsaker. Ole HoWen Minn . . . 1875-77 

Vaala. Ole G Saude la 1875 

♦Waage. Johannes Wiota Wis 1875-76 

Werner. Hans C Chicago Ill 1875 

Ylvisaker, A. Christian Zumbrota Minn . . . 1875-81 A. B., 1881 

Ytterboe. Halvor T Calmar la 1875-81 A. B., 1881 

♦0f8tcda(h)l, NiU A Rock DeU Minn . . . 1875-78 

1876-1877 

♦Allen, Hans Decorah la 1876-83 A. B.. 1883 

♦Anderson. Andreas J Swede Grove Minn . . . 1876-81 

Anderson. Christian F Saude la 1876-77 

♦Arvesen. Nils Lisbon Ill 1876-80 

Bergan. Ole G Renville Minn . . . 1876-79 

♦Bergman. Fredrik Winchester Wis 1876-81 A. B., 1881 

Bothne. Gisle Decorah la 1876-78 A. B.. 1878 

Brandvig, Anfin J Story City la 1876-78 

♦Christensen, Gustav A Genesee Idaho. . . 1876-82. 1883 

Fossum. Andreas A Paint Creek la 1876-82 A. B.. 1882 

Gilbenson, Gustav Spring Grove Minn . . . 1876-78 

♦Glas0e. Oluf Unesboro Minn. . .1876-83 A. B., 1883 

♦Gr0nvok]. Ole Christian Calmar la 1876-81 

♦Hansen. S^ren Perth Amboy N. J 1876-79 

♦Hauge, Anders (Andreas) E. . .Gloppen Norway. 1876-77. 1879-80 



Digitized by 



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216 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Haugen. Engebret P Decorah la 1876-78 

HeUen. Ole Bottolfson Decorah la 1876-77 

HjeUe. Ivcr A Bratsberg Minn. . . 1876-79 

Hole, Hana L Albert Lea Minn . . . 1876-77 

Holt. Simon N Root Prairie Minn. . .1876 

Hovland. Andreas T Zumbrota Minn . . . 1876 

Huset. Isak H Holden Minn . . . 1876-82 A. B.. 1882 

♦Huus. Alfred L Lisbon HI 1876-82 A. B.. 1882 

Kaasa. Torsten J Oasian la 1876 

Kaasa, Even J Ossian la 1876-77 

Kirkelie, Eivind A Harmony Minn . . . 1876 

♦Koren, Paul Decorah la 1876-82 A. B., 1882 

Langemo, Nils P Holden Minn.... 1876-77 

Larson. Wilhelm Chicago lU 1876-79 

Madsen. Martin St. Peter Minn. . .1876-77 

Mathre. Sewel L Usbon Ill 1876-81 

Muus, Nils Holden Minn . . . 1876-79 

Rasmusaen. Emil Rush River Wis 1876-77 

*Rogne. Erik T Valders Wis 1876-82 A. B., 1882 

•Rygg. Oluf Sverre Glenwood Minn. . .1876-82 A. B., 1882 

♦Rygh. George Alfred Taylor.. .Holden Minn. . .1876-81 A. B.. 1881 

Slette. Gudbrand O Albert Lea Minn . . . 1876-79 

Storaasli, Engebret G Rushford Minn. . . 1876-80 

♦Saevig, Ola M Rushford Minn . . . 1876-77 

S0renson. S0ren A Manitowoc Wis 1876 

Tcigen, Ole H Harmony Minn . . . 1876-82 

n'horlaksson. Nils Steinirimr. .Winchester Wis 1876-81 A. B.. 1881 

*T0nneseD. T0nnes Herman . . . Martell Wis 1876-79, 1880-81 

Valhovd, Kristian E Paint Creek la 1876-78 

(C. E. Srickson) 

Weltha, Jacob O Story City la 1876-77 

08clid. ThorvaW H Rushford Minn. . . 1876-79 

1877-1878 

Aaker. Hans H Ridgeway la 1877-81 

Auscnhus, Nils A Kensctt la 1877-82 

Anderson. FrankUn S Chicago Ill 1877 

♦Aubol, Carl O Eaton Wis 1877-83 A. B.. 1883 

BUUngton. Alexander Decorah la 1877-78 

Bothne, Carl Decorah la 1877. 1879-86. . . . A. B., 1885 

Bry. Theodor K Coon VaUey Wis 1877-78. 1881-84 

Clauson. Peter E Locust la 1877-80. 81 

Dale. Knut K Wilminrton Minn . . . 1877-78 

Flugum, Jens Spring Grove Minn . . . 1877-78 

Fries. Jeremias F Muskego Wis 1877-82 A. B.. 1882 

F0rde, Ole A Locust la 1877 

Games. Botolf H Mabel Minn. . .1877-85 A. B.. 1885 

Gullord. Emil B Coon Valley Wis 1877-79 

Hanson. Haldor Grand Mound la 1877-83 A. B.. 1883 

Hektoen, Ludvig Westby Wis 1877-83 A. B.. 1833 

Helgen. Albert J. Albert Lea Minn. . . 1877-78 

Hermanson, Martin B Spring Grove Minn . . . 1877 

Istad. Edward N Locust la 1877-80 

Jerdee. Christopher Koshkonong Wis 1877-78 

Ki(e)land. Gustav H Manitowoc Wis 1877-83 A. B.. 1883 

Kopang. John Root Prairie Minn . . . 1877-79 

Koren, William Decorah la 1877-82 A. B.. 1882 

Langen. Lars Hesper la 1877-78 

Larsen, Herman Decorah la 1877-89 A. B., 1889 

Larson. Syvcrt Westby Wis 1877-80 

Lerst0l. Ananias North Prairie Minn . . . 1877-78 

Liberg. Peter O Mankato Minn. . .1877-79 

Lobben. Jens L. A Blair Wis 1877-79 

Lore, Hans M. O Albert Lea Minn. . . 1877-79 

L0kken. Anders O Koshkonong Wis 1877-78 

*Magel88en. Hans Manitowoc Wis 1877-83 A. B.. 18^3 

Mikkelson. Martin M Roche-a-Cree Wis 1877-79 

Myhre. Martinus E Wilmington Minn. . . 1877 

Nupen. K. M Ossian la 1877 

Opheim. Ole B EstherviUe la 1877-79 

Opsahl. Gudbrand Albert Lea Mhin. ..1877-78 

<K>psahl. Theodor G Manchester Minn . . . 1877-84 A. B.. 1884 

♦Preus. Johan Wilhelm Kcyser Wis 1877-82 A. B., 1882 

^Rasmussen. Wilhehn Augustin Lisbon Ill 1877-82 



Digitized by 



Google 



ATTENDANCE 



217 



Student 



Post Office 



SUte 



Years at 
Luther College Graduation 



Rikanarud. Ole T Elon la 1877-80. 

Rovenid, Elling K Spring Grove Minn . . . 1877-78 . 

Sampaon. Edwin P Locutt la 1877 

Saettre, O. M Locust la 1877-82 . 

Thomassen, Thomas Clifton Tex 1877 

Thomp«>n. Oscar Bcloit Wis 1877-78 . 

Tobiasen. Henry Decorah la 1877-78 . 

♦Vik, Eivind O Decorah la 1877-84. 

Voldeng. Nils M. (M. Nelson). Decorah la 1877-83 . 



A. B.. 1884 
.A. B.. 1883 



1878-1879 



Aakre, Johannes Ridgeway. . . 

Aas, Esten Bratsberg . . . 

*Belsheim, Ole G Winnebago . . 

Bliznid. Han9 Spring Grove Minn . . . 

♦Dahl. Peder H Yellow Medicine... *" 



.la.... 

.Minn, 
.la. 



Flugum. Christian N Winnebago . 

Frich. Gerhard La Crosse 

Fryslie. Benjamin Decorah 

F0rde. Ole H Locust 

Haliand. John G Northwood . . 

Halvorson. Halvor G Douglas 

Halvorson. Henry Trempealeau. 

Hanson. Theodor Decorah. 



.Minn, 
.la.... 
.Wis... 
.la.... 
.la.... 
.la... 
Minn. 
.Wis... 
.la. 



Harstad. Aanund Harmony Minn . . . 



Hegg, Oscar N Decorah'. 

HiUesUd. Iver FrenchviUc. 

Hjort. Jacob L Dalby . 



la. 
.Wis.... 

♦Hove,' tilling 0..[\.......\. iNorthwood! ! ...... Ia.'. . 

Isakaon, Isak Fountain Minn . . 

Iversen, Helge Arendal Minn . . 

Jensvold. Johannes Estherville la 

Kirkelie. Kj0stulf Harmony Minn. . 

Krog, Hans Chicago Ill 

♦Krostu. Gunsten (Gustein) G..ScandTnavia Wis. . . . 

Krohn, Eugene Arendal Minn . . 

Kvam, Johannes J Albert Lea Minn . . 

♦Langemo. Halvor T Eidsvold Minn . . 

Leidahl. Julius Locust la 

Lein, Carl O Hesper la 

•Lee, Olav E Trysil (S.) Da 

Lindberg. Knut Le Seuer River Minn . . 

Lobben, Lars Blair Wis... , 

L^vald, Hans H Lime Springs la 

Moen. Leif Bratsb«-g Minn . . 

Monserud. Martin Paint Creek la 

Muus, Jens J Holden Minn . . 

Nelson, A. O Beaver Creek Wis. . . . 

Ness. Jens A Zumbrota Minn . . 

Nordby, Jens N Wanamingo Minn . . 



Pedcrson, Martin Preston 

Ramstad, Ola Westby 

Reishus. G. J Vineland 

Remmen. Thomas Holden 

♦Ringstad, Johannes J Fergus Falls . . 

Roalkvam, Tjeran Decorah 

Rynning. Johan L Bratsberg . . . . 

Seehuus, Martin Chicago 

Selland. Peder E Locusc 

Stortroen, Halvor J Spring Grove . 

S0rland, Erik I>ecorah 

Tande. Ole Christiania . . . 

Torrison, Oscar M Manitowoc . . . 

Trulson, Halvor Rock Prairie. . 

Turkop, Olaus O Paint Creek. . 

Tvedt. Johannes A Story City. . . . 

*UIsaker, Sven K Kenyon 



1879-1880 



. Minn . . 
.Wis.... 
.Minn.. 
.Minn.. 
.Minn.. 

.la 

.Minn.. 
.Ill 

la 

.Minn... 

.la 

.Norway, 

.Wis 

• Wis 

la 

.la 

.Minn... 
.la 



Aaae. Lars R Kenyon Minn . . , 1879-83 . 

Anderson. Christian Clifton Ill 1879-80. 

Baukol. Peder Coon VaUey Wis 1879-82 . 

♦Beyer. Ole B. (Nilsen) Vang Minn. . .1879-80. 



.A. B.. 188S 



..A. B., 1883 



1878 

1878-80 

1878-79, 1880-82 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-81 

1878-85 A. B.. 1885 

1878-82 

1878-84 A. B., 1884 

1878-81 

1878-80 

1878 

1878-79 

1878-82 

1878-79 

1878 

1878-84 A. B.. 1884 

1878-80 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-81 

1878-80 

1878-85 

1878 

1878-83 

1878 

1878-82 

,1878-83 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-82 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-81 

1878-84 

1878-84 

1878-80 

1878 

1878-83 

1878-80 

1878-80 

1878-82 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-83 

1878-79 

1878-80 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-81 

1878-79 

1878-80 

1878-79 

1878-83 

1878 



...A. B., 1883 



A. B., 1884 



.A. B.. 1883 



A. B.. 1879 
.A. B., 1881 



A. B.. 1883 



Digitized by 



Google 



218 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



student 



Post Office 



SUte 



Years at 
Luther College Graduation 



Braaten. Anton O Kenyon Minn. . .1879-80 

Braaten. Torstein Vang Minn. . .1879-81 

B»<k8eth, Bcrnhard A St. Olaf Minn. . . 1879-80 

•Fjeldstad, RoUef K. RoUef sen. Stony Run Minn. . .1879-81 

Germo. Ivar G Decorah la 1879-82 

Grose. Ingebrikt F Kenyon Minn. . . 1879-1885 A. B.. 1885 

Hulsacther, Ludvig L Koshkonong Wis 1879-80 

*Jahren, Johan H Montevideo Minn. . . 1879-84 A. B., 1884 

Kalheim. Ole M Lisbon Ill 1879-84 A. B.. 1884 

Kitelsrud, Ole J Norwegian Grove. .. Minn . . .1879-81 

Kirkeberg. A. C Fort Dodge la 1879-80. 1887-88 

•Langerao. John Thorbj0rn Eidsvold Minn . . . 1879-83 A. B.. 1883 

*Larsen. Christian M Springville Wis 1879-83 A. B.. 1883 




STUDENT BODY FORTY YEARS ACK) 



Larsen, Lauritz A Chicago 

♦Lee, Ole T Lyle 

Lee, Wilhelm Decorah 

Lie, Halvor O Ridgeway ... 

♦Lien, Abel Edvard Christiana. . . 

Losen, Peder Hesper 

L0kensgaard. Knut O Swan Lake. . 

Meidell, Hans Calamus. ... 

♦Mcllang, Peder K Ridgeway . . . 

Mclsnaes. Adolf Trempealeau Valley. 

Melsnses, Ole O Renville 

Moe, Lars L Otis Grove . . . 

•Mortensen, Vilhclm A. M Portland. ... 

♦M^rstad, Erik O Eau Claire. . . 

Neperud, Carl Coon Valley . , 

Remmen, Nils E Holden 

Shefloe, Joseph S Waukon 

Skyberg, Hans Grand Meadow . . . . 

Stianson, Peder D St. Joseph 

Str0m. Feodor Decorah 

Str0m, Herman Decorah 

S0rum, Hans Elon 

Tvedt, Peder J Carlisle 



Ill 1879-86 A. B.. 1886 

Minn. .1879-84 A. B.. 1884 

la 1879-81 

la 1879-80 

Wis 1879-85 \. B.. 1885 

la 1879-81 

Minn ... 1879-81 

la 1879-81 

la 1879-82. 1885-87 

•Wis 1879-80 

Minn... 1879-80 

Wis 1879-82 

Oregon.. 1879-81 

Wis 1879-80 

Wis 1879-84 

Minn . . . 1879-80. 1881-84 

la 1879-85 A. B.. 1885 

Minn . . . 1879-81. 1883*87 

Mo 1879 

la 1879-80 

la 1879-80 

la 1879-83 

Minn... 1879-80 t... 



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Google 



ATTENDANCE 219 



Years at 
Student Pott Office State Luther College Graduation 



1880-1881 

Aaagaard, Ole Elk Creek Wis 1880-82 

Aasterud. John P Rush River Wis 1880-81 

AsbjeM. Anders Silver Lake Minn . . . 1880-81 

Aubolee. Mads O Castle Rock Wis 1880-84 A. B., 1884 

Berg, Otto S Arendal Minn . . . 1880 

Beraet. Peder E Renville Minn. . . 1880-81 

Bnekke. Johan B Trempealeau Valley. Wis 1880-81 

*Dahl. Olaus Lochlel Wis 1880-85 A. B.. 1885 

Davidson. Peter Coon Valley Wis 1880-81 

Donhowe (Donhaug). Olavus GStory City la 1880-85 

Emerson. Ingebright Luther Valley Wis 1880-82 

Esposs. Ptder A Chicago Ill 1880, 1882-84 

Estrem. Andreas (Andrew) Cresco la 1880-86 A. B.. 1886 

Estrem. Joseph O Willmar Minn. . .1880-85 

Flatland, Jens Zumbrota Minn. . . 1880-81 

Forthun. Albert West Prairie Wis 1880-82 

Puglei. Ole K Albion Neb 1880-86 A. B.. 1886 

Hagen. S0ren O Windom Minn. . . 1880-85 

Halvorson. Sigurd Decorah la 1880-82 

HiUeberg. Ole T Norway . 1880-82 

Jensen. Mads C AWen Minn . . . 1880-85 

Jenaon. Ole Anton Kewaunee Wis 1880-81 

JensoD. Peder C Renville Minn. ..1880 

^Larsen. Thorvaki *. Cereal Minn. . . 1880-84 A. B.. 1884 

Lund. John H Swan Lake Minn. . .1880-84 A. B.. 1884 

Markbus. George Millbrook Ill 1880-85 A. B.. 1885 

•Mortenaen. Peder Washington Co Neb 1880-83 

Mydland. Jacob Norway. 1880 

M«kmd. Edwind Henrytown Minn . . . 1880-82 

Neperud. Nordal N Coon Valley Wis 1880-85 

Norom. Karl Franklin Minn. . .1880-82, 1885-86 

Norsving. Knut Vang Minn . . . 1880-82 

Naeset. Aslak O Vinje Minn. ..1880-81 

Ongstad. Sophus H Pelican Rapids Minn . . . 1880-86 A. B.. 1886 

Onstad. Peter O St. James Minn. . . 1880-84 

•Ovri (0VTi). EUend J Albert Lea Minn. . . 1880-86 A. B., 1886 

Federson. Magnus Eton la 1880-8J 

^Peterson. Sophus Christian N.Norway Lake Minn. . . 1880-86 A. B.. 1886 

Rasmussen. Anton Th Decorah la 1880-81 

Romsaas. Ole T Pik)t Mound Minn. . . 1880-83 

Sander, Bernt B I>ecorah la 1880-82 

Shellum, Jacob St. James Minn . . . 1880-82 

Skjervem. O. H Rock Dell Minn. . .1880-81 

Stensrud. Knut Sacred Heart Minn . . . 1880-83. 1884-85 

Storheim. Knut Clear Lake la 1880 

Sviggum. Erik York Wis 1880-82 

Teigen. 08ten F Zion, Chippewa Co . Minn . . . 1880-81 

Thorstenson. Lars Winnebago la 1880-81 

Thorstenson, Thorsten A Amboy Minn . . . 1880-81 

*Tingel8tad. Joh(a)n O Norman (N) Dak. 1880-85 A. B., 1885 

Tomassen. John Independence Wis 1880^83,' 1884-85 

1887-89. 1890-91 

Torrison. George A Manitowoc Wis 1880-85 A. B., 1885 

Tvenge, Torsten Decorah la 1880-82 

Unseth. Theodor Westby Wis 1880-81 

0verli. Ole A Butbrunt Valley Minn . . . 1880-82 

1881-1882 

(Algield). Hans Monson Indviken Norway. 1881 

Bakken, Johan M Kenyon Minn ... 1881 

Berge. Johan J Dell Minn . . . 1881-82 

Dokken. Ole Renville Minn . . . 1881-82 

Fmseth, Knut A Kenyon Minn. ..1881-86 A. B.. 1886 

*Fieki0tad. Halvor O Arendal Minn. . .1881-88 A. B.. 1888 

Grannid. John E Pelican Rapids Minn . . . 1881-86 A. B., 1886 

Haatvedt. Knut L Carlisle Minn. . . 1881 

Hanson. Adolph Albert Lea Minn . . . 1881-83 

Haugen. Christian A Coon Valley Wis 1881 

Hove. Ola J Calraar la 1881-83 

!acobw>n. Axel Willmar Minn. . . 1881. 1883-85 
ohnaon. Martin O Manitowoc Wis 1881-83 
ordahl. Daniel C Beaver Creek Minn. . .1881-88 A. B., 1888 



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220 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Student 



Post Office 



State 



*Jorf enBon, Jacob Edvard New Centerville Wis 

KnudBon. Johannes C Rock Run Wis 

♦Lee. GusUv T Lyle Minn. . . 

♦Levorson. John Bristol la 

Liebakken. Bernt J Watson Minn. . . 

Losan. Fred Chicago Ill 

♦Lundeberc. Knut O Carlisle Minn. . . 

Mindrem. Olc A Bratsberg Minn . . . 

Nupen, B. P. A Ossian la 

Pladaen. Nils T Sacred Heart Minn. . . 

♦Rlkansnid. Olaus T Elon la 

Ruste. Edward Perry Wis 

Sanda. Stener K Norway. 

Sanderson. Knut Saude la 

♦Seltveit. Carl G Hviteseid Norway. 

Swenson. Laurits S Noraeland Minn . . . 

Syverud, Thrond A Forward Wis 

Teisseth. Andrew O Utica Wis 

Tellefson. Martin Lyle Minn . . . 

Tellefson. Theodor Lyle Minn . . . 

Thompson. Ole Wis 

♦Thorpe. Ove Boyesen 

Wangensten Granite Falls Minn . . . 

♦T0nne8en. Theodor Jorgen EmilMihiraukee Wis 

♦Umes. Johannes A Adamsville Wis 

Vig. Ptter O Granite Falls Minn . . . 

♦Ylvisaker. Ivar Daniel Zumbrota Minn . . . 

Ylvisaker. Olaf Zumbrota Minn . . . 

1882-1883 

Amundson. H. E Belvidere Minn . . . 1882-86 

Bakke. J. P Woodsidc la 1882-84 

♦Beito. Gulbrand G Dccorah la 1882-89 

♦Blegen, Hans Andreas H Washington Prairie la 1882-86 

♦Bogstad. Rasmus R Rising Sun Wis 1883-87 

♦Bfle. NiU N. O Northfield Minn . . . 1882-86 

Dahle. John L Waseca Minn. ..1882-83 

Eggen, Ole N Prairie Farm Wis 1882-84. 1885-86. 

Engebretson. Anton A Grafton (N.)Dak. 1882-86 

Evenrud. Nels A Woodville la 1882-84 

Fardal. Nils E Lake Center la 1882-86 

Felland. Carl M Utica Wis 1882-84 

Folven. Rasmus J Stony Run Minn. . . 1882-83 

♦Fuglebak. Daniel J Rising Sun WU 1882-85 

Gangestad. Severin M Bode la 1882-83 

♦Gullucon. George Albert Bode la 1882-87 

♦Ingebrigtson. Johan Edward . .Albert Lea Minn . . . 1882-89 



Years at 
Luther College 


Graduation 


1881-86 

1881 


A. B.. 1886 


1881-88 

1881-88 

1881-82 


.A. B.. 1888 
A. B.. 1888 


1881-84 


1881 


1881 


1881-83 


1881 


1881-88 

1881-82 


A. B^ 1888 


1881 


1881-82 


1881-82 


1882-86 

1881-84 


A. B.. 1886 


1881-83 


1881-82 


1881 


1881 


1882-86 

1881-84 


A. B.. 1886 


1881-82. 1884-86 

1881 


1881-88 

1881-88 


A. B.. 1888 
A. B.. 1888 



A. B.. 1886 



A. B.. 1889 
A. B.. 1886 



A. B.. 1886 



A. B.. 1886 



1888-90. A. B.. 1890 
A. B., 1889 



..A. B.. 188S 

..A. B.. 1889 

A. B.. 1886 



Jacobson. J. N Beaver Creek Minn . . . 1882-85 . . 

Juul. Jacob A Chicago Ill 1882-83 . . 

Kjome. G. N HighlandviUe la 1882-83. . 

♦Kvaase. Daniel Keyser Wis 1882-85 . . 

♦Lunde. Johannes H. C Zumbrota Minn . . . 1882-89 . . 

Mikkelsen. Michael A Chicago Ill 1882-86. . 

Mohn. Bernt E Oslo Minn . . . 1882-84. 1885-88.. 

Munson, L. A Vang Minn. ..1882-85 

♦Nesseth. Guttorm P Zumbrota Minn. . .1882-87. 1889-90 

♦N0d8hilder. Hans A Stony Run Minn. . . 1882-86 

Olson, Albert Chicago Ill 1882-83 

♦Ottersen, Ole Alpena Mich.. . .1882-89 A. B.. 1889 

Remmen. Martin E Holden Minn. . .1882-88 A. B.. 1888 

Reque. Syver B Spring Grove Minn . . . 1882-84 

Rodegaard. Andrew New Richland Minn . . . 1882-84 

Rogde, P. J Lee Ill 1882-85 

♦Rognlie. Parelius H Vineland Minn. . .1883 

Roesing. Anton A Argyle Wis 1882-83 

Shelver. N. G. J Sheldon (N.) Dak. 1882-83 

♦Skov. Villads B Perth Amboy N. J. . . . 1882-86 

Smedsrud. Ole L Spring Grove Minn. . .1882-83 

♦Strand. Joh(a)n J Lelandsburg la 1882-89 A. B.. 1889 

Str0m. Carl Zumbrota Minn. .. 1882-83 

Thorson. M Ossian la 1882-87 

ToUakson. Ole S Argyle Wis 1882-84 

Veek. Ole H Brodhead Wis 1882-84 

♦Vereide. Ole M Rising Sun.^ WU 1882-89 A. B.. 1889 



Digitized by 



Google 



ATTENDANCE 221 



Yean at 
Student Poet Oflke State Luther College Graduation 



Vik, Rasmus M Lisbon (N.) Dak. 1882-84 

Wold. Ole E EvansviUe Minn. . .1882-84 

0ie. Ok E Lac qui Parle Minn ... 1 882-84 

1885-1884 

Aaberg. Syifest Yellow Medicine. . .Minn. . .1883-85 

♦Akre. John Stony Run Minn. . . 1883-84 

Anderson. Botolf Kenyon Minn . . . 1883-86 

Anderson. Isaac Des Moines la 1883-90 A. B., 1890 

Bakke. O. E Vernon Minn . . . 1883-84 

Bakke, Ptter H Eidsvold Minn. . .1883-88 A. B.. 1888 

Berg, O. P Argyle Wis 1883-84 

Berge. Oluf A Beloit la 1883-85 

Biftrn. Herman C Zumbrota Minn . . . 1883-87 

Blixrud. Christian M Spring Grove Minn . . . 1883-84 

Bolstad. Sjur Reedstown Wis 1883-85. 1886-87 

Bondhus. N. T Calamus la 1883-87 

Brauer. Carl W Mabel Minn . . . 1883-85 

♦Breivik, Gabriel 1 1 ee Ill 1883-87 

Christensen, E Gayville (S.) Dak.1883.84 

Dahl. Herman Yellow Medicine. . . Minn. . . 1883-84 

♦Dolvcn. Andreas O Whitehall Wis 1883-88 

Ernst. Henry Alden Minn. . .1883-84 

Finscn. Paul S. Th Mountain (N.) Dak. 1883-85 

FjeUestad. K. O Arendal Minn. . .1883-86 

Forsyth. H Oconomowoc Wis 1883-84 

Frich. Carl La Crosse Wis 1883-84 

Gilbertson. G. T Whitehall Wis 1883-84 

Grinder. A. M Perry Wis 1883-84 

Grover. C. A Glyndon Minn . . . 1883-84 

Gunderson. Einar G Chicago Ill 1883-84 

Haagenson. Ole La Crosse Wis 1883-84 

Haarvig. K Chicago Ill 1883-84 

Hagen. Olaf A Windom Minn . . . 1883 

Hagen. Otto G Waterville. ....... la 1883-86 

Harstad, A Freedom Ill 1883-84 

HilsUd. A. E Stevenstown Wis 1883-84 

In«voldstad. K Decorah la 1883-84 

Johnson. Louis Hoylton Ill 1883-84 

Johnson, Nils J Mansfield Minn. . .1883-84 

Johnson. N. O Highlandville la 1883-85 

♦Kittilsby, Peter Andreas Calmar la 1883-88 A. B.. 1888 

Knutson. Nils Gem la 1883-84 

Knutson. Thomas Harmony Minn . . . 1883-85 

♦Kvale. Ole J Decorah la 1883-90 A. B., 1890 

Landing, L. M Stony Run Minn. . . 1883-84 

Laxdahl, Daniel Mountain (N.) Dak. 1883-88 

Lee, Theodor Decorah la 1883-84 

♦Linnevold, Johan Decorah la 1883-90 A. B.. 1890 

Mason. Christian M Whitewater Wis 1883-^4 

*MeIlby. Cari August New Richland Minn . . . 1883-88 A. B.. 1888 

MeUem. Edwin G Northwood la 1883-90 A. B.. 1890 

Myhre. P. F Onalaska Wis 1883-84 

Ness, Iver O Richland (N.) Dak. 1883-85 

♦Nielsen. Edias. Lee Ill 1883-84 

Olson. Oliver T Newburg Minn . . . 1883-84 

•Palm. StiUuf Tobias St. Paul Minn . . . 1883-85 

Pederson, Johannes Chicago Ill 1883-85 

Petterson, George Granite Falls Minn . . . 1883-86 

Preus. Paul Keyser Wis 1883-84 

Reque, Peter A Spring Grove Minn. . .1883-91 A. B.. 1891 

Ring. Mathias Yellow Medicine. . . Minn . . . 1883-84 

Rollefson. Carl I Stony Run Minn . . . 1883-86 

Skaar, J. M Utica Wis 1883-84 

Solseth. Josias S Harmony Minn . . . 1883-84 

•Solum. Henry E Spring Grove Minn . . . 1885-90 A. B., 1890 

Styrkson, Styrk Rochester Minn . . . 1883-84 

Teslow. A. A Albert Lea Minn . . . 1883-84 

♦Thorkvecn, Lars P Rising Sun Wis 1883-85 

Thuen, P. A Chicago Ill 1883-85 

Tjelle. T0rris Braceville Ill 1883-84 

Unseth. Magnus Westby Wis 1883-90 A. B.. 1890 

Vaatvedt. G. C. (Gilbertson). . Vernon Minn . . . 1883-84 

Veek. Christopher Brodhead Wis 1883-85 



Digitized by 



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222 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Wiese, Jacob A Huxley la 18S3-84 

♦Woll. Oluf (Olaf) ChriBtiansund Norway. 1883-84 

0de, Gustav H Decorah la 1883-84 

*0xendahl. Iver L Decorah la 1883-85 

1884-1885 

Bakkerud. H ; . . .Alpena Mich.. . . 1884-86 

Bothne. ErUng A Chicago Ill 1884-86. 1888-94.. A. B.. 1894 

*Egge, John I Norway Minn . . . 1884-87 

Ellertson. Carl E Bratsberg Minn. . .1884-88 

Engelaon. Chr. J Brookings: (S.) DBk.1884-85 

Foshage. John Mount Horeb Wis 1884-85 

Gimmestad. A. M Redwood Falls Minn. . .1884-86 

^Gimmestad. Lars M Redwood Falls Minn . . . 1884-91 A. B.. 1891 

Harstad. Oscar A Arendal Minn. ..1884-87 

Haugen. Christopher E Woodside la 1884-91 A. B.. 1891 

Hove. J. T Kenyon Minn. . . 1884-85 

Haugejordet. Knut Bratsberg Minn. . . 1884-85 

Johnson, Martinius Madison (S.) Dak.1884-86 

Johnson. Selmer Minneapoli<i Minn . . . 1884-85 

♦Klevjord. Ole O Macfarland Wis 1884-85 

♦Larsen. Bernt Julius Pigeon Falls Wis 1884-85 

Lestrud. A. A Kensett la 1884-85 

Lien. O. E Elgin la 1884-85 

♦Litsheim. Joliannes O Keyser Wis 1884-85 

Loftness. G Gibbon Minn. . . 1884-85 

Madsen, C. A Calmar la 1884-85 

Moore. Henry W Decorah la 1884-91 A. B.. 1891 

♦Myhre. Olaf C Holden Minn . . . 1884-87 

♦Nilsson, Thomas Minneapolis Minn. . .1885-89 A. B.. 1889 

♦Nordgaard. Nils N Decorah la 1884-91 A. B., 1891 

Olson, Hillmar Hoboken N. J . . . . 1884-85 

♦Reitan. Bernt J Woodville Wis 1884-85 

♦Sperati. Carlo Alberto Brooklyn N. Y.. . . 1884-88 A. B.. 1888 

Steensland. Morten M Madison Wis 1884-90 A. B.. 1890 

Sterud, Herman Volga (S.) Dak.!884-85 

Storaker, E. P Watson Minn . . . 1884-85 

♦SMralestuen. J0rgen D Bratsberg Minn . . . 1884-86 

Swennes. Ole S Barre Mills Wis 1884-91 A. B., 1891 

♦Swensen. Daniel Rising Sun Wis 1884-85 

Thuland, Conrad M I>ecorah la 1884-85 A. B.. 1885 

Torgerson, L. W Bristol Li 1884-85 

Torrison, Gustav Manitowoc Wis 1884-86 

*Tufte. Martin Cornelius Decorah la 1884-91 A. B.. 1891 

Void. O. E. Portland (N.) Dak. 1884-86 

♦Wiprud, Thorgrim T Tracy Minn . . . 1884-89 

♦Xavier. Karl Franklin Minn . . . 1884-87. 1888-92. .A. B., 1892 

0degaarden. H Kenyon Minn . . . 1884-86 

1885-1886 

♦Ballestad, Erik T Clark Mills Wis 1885-89 

Bean. O. G Callender la 1885-87 

Beito. O. G Decorah la 1885-96 

Bakkum. Anders T Amboy Minn . . . 1885-86 

Dahlen. Knut T LiUemon Minn. . .1885-87. 1888-92. 

1893 94 A. B. 1894 

Davidson. Orlando E Decorah la 1885-92 ..!."..*.....'..!* 

♦Eden. Martin Peter Lee Ill 1885-92 A. B.. 1892 

Eide. Edward Bratsberg Minn . . . 1885-86 

Giere. E Rock I>ell Minn ... 1885-87 

Golberg. E Rock Dell Minn. . . 1885-87 

Grundcsen. Grunde H Fisher Minn. ..1885-92 A. B.. 1892 

Gylstr0m. Paul Minneapolis Minn . . . 1885-87 

Haga. Martin Decorah la 1885-86 

Hagen. Edward ! Watervillc la 1885-86 

Haugan, Carl Minneapolis Minn . . . 1885-91 

♦Hovde, Christian Joachim 

Mohn Blair Wis 1885-92 A. B., 1892 

♦Hovde, Kolbein Sigvart 

Johannes Blair Wis 1885-90. 1891-93 

♦Johnson. Alfred Otto Red Wing Minn. . .1885-91 A. B.. 1891 

Kaasa. Edward O Ridgeway la 1885-92 A. B.. 1892 

Kittelson. Albert Utica Wis 1885-86 



Digitized by 



Google 



ATTENDANCE 223 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Ltither College Graduation 



Nummedal. Edward Tenold la 1885-86 

Olson. Ole Minneapolis Minn. . .1885-86 

Quammen. j. L Blair Wis 1885-86 

Quarve. J. E Spring Grove Minn. . .1885-86 

Ramaey. EMing Manchester Minn . . . 1885-88 

♦Rue. Halvor S Portland (N.) Dak. 1885-92 A. B.. 1892 

*R0d8Kter. Theodor Adolph. ... Manchester Minn. . . 1885-91 

SUnde, Albert J Albert Lea Minn. . .1885-87 

Stflsness. Lars New Richland Minn. . .1885-87 

Tasa. Iver A Holden Minn . . . 1885-87 

Tausan. G Portland (N.) Dak. 1885-86 

Thorstenson. Th Silliards Minn. . .1885-86 

♦Tolo, Thore O Willmar Minn . . . 1885-90 A. B.. 1890 

Venaas. G Cambridge Wis 1885-86 

Wange. Ole Ada Minn. . .1885-86 

♦Xavier, Johan Ulrik Franklin Minn . . . 1885-88. 1889-93.. A. B.. 1893 

0ie. Lars L Randall la 1885-86 

1886-1887 

♦Akre, Ole J Highlandvillc la 1886-93 A. B..' 1893 

♦Andersen. Johannes N .Blair .- Neb 1886-88. 1889-91 

♦Berg. Nils I Albion Neb 1886-92 A. B.. 1892 

Bergenid. P. S Spring Grove Minn . . . 1886-87 

♦Bestul. Christian Brandt Wittenberg Wis 1886-93 A. B., 1893 

Bly, O. J Lee Ill 1886-87 

♦Blekkan. Ingebrigt J Provemont Mich.. . . 1886-92 A. B.. 1892 

Boe. H. O Ossian la 1886-87 

Bonde. T. T Nerstrand Minn . . . 1886-91 

Brown. G. B Blue Earth City. . . . Minn . . . 1886-87. 1888-89 

Brskke. David B Rock Dell Minn . . . 1886-90 

♦Christensen. Martin Alexander Forest City la 1886-92 A. B.. 1892 

Dahl. Gerhard A Dell Minn . . . 1886-93 A. B.. 1893 

Fardal, J Stanhope la 1886-87 

Germo. Lars P Decorah la 1886-89 

Gullizon, Oscar F Bode la 1886-90 

♦Holden. Ole Martin Bode la 1886-89. 1891-94.. A. B., 1894 

Hustvedt, Henry Nora Wis 1886-87 

Johnson. J. G Norscland Minn . . . 1886-87. 1889-92 

Johnanid, Oscar Manitowoc Wis 1886-89 

♦Kvam. Isak J Gihnan Wis 1886-90 

Lee, G. A Lake MiUs. la 1886-87 

Lund. Albert B Northwood la 1886-90 

Madsen. M. A Hartland Minn. . .1886-87 

♦Magelssen. Hans Gynthcr Bratsberg Minn. . . 1887-94 

♦Meland. Rasmus J Dell Minn. . . 1886-92 

Michelson. Walter Chicago Ill 1886-87 

Monson. Sivcrt Emerald Minn . . . 1886 

Morrison. Morris Westby Wis 1886-88. 1891-93 



Myhre. C, G Walcott (N.) Dak. 1886-87 

Nelson. N. W Lee Ill 1886-87 

Olaen, Gilbert Calmar la 1886-87 

Olaen. OleT Herscher Ill 1886-89 

Olson, Oscar L Marcus *. .la 1886-93 A. B.. 1893 

Oswald. K. (Abrahamson) Norman (N.) Dak. 1886-87 

Pederson. Bemhard S Brooklyn N. Y 1886-88 

PMerson. John Decorah la 1886-87 

Reque, William A Spring Grove Minn. . . 1886-89 

Rossing. M. H Bode la 1886-88 

Rffberg. Richard Decorah la 1886-87 

SIbelnid. Christen A Hartland Minn. . .1886-87 

Skolaas. M. H Door Creek Wis 1886-87 

Solberg. H. E Spring Grove Minn. . .1886-87 

♦Stensrud. Edward Martinus . .Sacred Heart Minn . . . 1886-93 A. B., 1893 

Stephenson. Knut Lake Mills la 1886-87 

♦Str0m. Eimar Ingvald Zumbrota Minn . . . 1886-91 A. B., 1891 

Tangen. J. O Pigeon Falls Wis 1886-88 

Thorsen. Axel A Rock Dell Minn. . . 1886-87. 1888-91 

♦Torgerson, Augustinus Jen- 

seniiis Bristol la 1886-88, 1889-90 

Torgerson. S. V. B Bristol la 1886-87. 1888-92 

Torrison, Norman Manitowoc Wis 1886-89 A. B., 1889 



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224 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEAR3 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



1887-188S 

Aaker. John T Ridgeway la 1887-93 A. B.. 1893 

Anderson. Adolph Taopi (S.) Dak.1887-91 

Beaver. Andreas Kasson Minn . . . 1887-88 

Bolstad. Edward Utica Wis 1887-89 

Brager. Torgrim Nora Minn . . . 1887-90 

Bvsted, Anders L Kempton Ill 1887-88 

EUertson. Andreas Bratsberg Minn . . . 1887^88 

GusUvson. Alexander Heutland Minn . . . 1887-89 

Halland. Alfred Northwood la 1887-89 

Hanson. H. L Gayville (S.) Dak.1887-90 

Hanson. Johan (Kongtorg) Tracy Minn . . . 1887-89 

Helgen. Albert Albert Lea Minn. . .1887-88 

Hilmen, J. T Mishicott Wis 1887-88 

jukam. J. G Mishicott Wis 1887-88. 1891-92 

♦Juul. Otto Gerhard Chicago Ill 1887-94 A. B.. 1894 

Kjome. Gustav Highlandville la 1887-88 

Undsverk. John P Uwler la 1887-95 A. B.. 1895 

Lane, L. C London Minn . . . 1887-88 

Larson. Norman Lake Crystal Minn . . . 1887-89 

Lee. Gisle M Utica Wis 1887-89 

Lilleskau. E. J Chicago Ill 1887-88 

MjeMe. F. M Black Earth Wis 1887-89 

Norom. Jacob Franklin Minn . . . 1887-88 

Olsen, Lars J Herscher Ill 1887-91 

Pederson. OUvcr Amboy Minn . . . 1887-88. 1889-90. 

1891-92 

Reiian. Anders S Wild Rice (N.) Dak. 188 7-92 

Simmons. J. A Appleton Minn . . . 1887-92 

Sterud. John M ; Volga (S.) Dak.1887-88 

•Thoen. Jacob E Northwood la 1887-92 A. B.. 1892 

Thompson, A Albert Lea Minn . . . 1887-88 

Thorsgaard. Carl L. (Karl). . . . Springvillc Wis 1887-96 A. B., 1896 

Wierson, Bemhard Roland la 1887-88. 1889-92 

1888-1889 

Aas, Edward Lanesboro Minn . . . 1888-89 

Apeldseth. John A Palisade (N.) Dak. 1888-89 

Beaver. Albert M Kasson Minn . . . 1888-91 

Brevig. Nils J Sacred Heart Minn. . .1888-92 

•Brevig. Oluf Leonhard Sacred Heart Minn . . . 1888-94 A. B., 1894 

B0rreson. Johan G St. Louis Mo 1888-89 

Gbeserud. Christian P Blackhammer Minn . . . 1888-89 

Gunderson. Henry B Stanwood Wash . . . 1888-91 

♦Haatvedt (Hotvedt). Lars A. . Spillville la 1889-95 A. B . 1895 

Hefty, Theodor N Spring Grove Minn . . . 1888-90 

Helgeson. Charles T Waupun Wis 1888-89 

Heda. Albert Waterville la 1888-90 

Hesla. Stengrim Sioux Rapids la 1888-89 

Kjos, Lars O Spring Grove Minn . . . 1888-89 

Knutson, Andreas Lime Grove la 1888-89 

*Kvamme. Kristen Eau Claire Wis 1888-94 A. B.. 1894 

*Larsen, Nikolai Astrup Decorah. la 1888-96 A. B.. 1896 

Lee. Andrew Hanley Falls Minn. . . 1888-89 

Lomen, Even P Sioux Falls (S.) Dak.1888-89 

Magelssen, Peter J Rushford Minn . . . 1888-89 

Magelssen. Wilhelm C Bratsberg Minn . . . 1888-89. 1890-91. 

1897-98 

*Moldstad. Joh(a)n(nes) A De Forest Wis 1888-94 A. B.. 1894 

Nanim. Edwin Waterville la 1888-89 

Nelson. Edward M Yankton (S.) Dak.1888-89 

♦Olsen. Engel Olai Eau Claire Wis 1888-92 

Opheim. Ola S Thor la 1888-94 A. B.. 1894 

•Orwoll. Sylvester Martinus . . . Hanley Falls Minn . . . 1889-95 A. B.. 1895 

Peterson, Henry Mott Wis 1888-89 

Peterson. John R Minneapolis Minn. . .1888-94 A. B.. 1894 

Railson. Elmer M Norway Lake Minn. . . 1888-90 

Ramsey. Peter Decorah la 1888-91 

Reque. Gerhard S Spring Grove Minn . . . 1888-95 

♦Reque. Sigvard Theodor WilUnar Minn . . . 1888-92 A. B., 1892 

Ruh. August New Lisbon Wis 1888-90 

Ryberg, Christian Ventrup I>nmarkl888-89 

Ryan. Carl V Stanwood Wash . . . 1888-92 



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ATTENDANCE 223 



Yean at 
Scudent Poet Office State Luther College Graduation 



Sampson. George Rio Wia 188S-90 

Sollien. Andrew J Quandaht la 1888-89, 1891 

Tbomiwon. Tobias T Sioux Rapids. la 1888-89 

ThoTBon. Ivar August Rock Defl Minn. . . 1888-95 A. B.. 1895 

n'jemagel. Helge Matias Story City la 1888-94 

Tvesme. John N Hegg Wis 1888-89 

Tvetlee, B. E New Richmond Wis 1888-89 

Venaas. Martin Cambridge Wis 1888-91. 1893-95 

•Waller. Martinus Christian. . .Glasgow Wis 1888-93 A. B.. 1893 

Williams, Louis C MayviUe (N.)Dalc. 1888-91 

*Y1visaker. Schak Joakim Nic- 

olaus Zumbrota Minn. ..1888-95 A. B.. 1895 

1889-1890 

•Aasen. Andrew O Rockdale Wis 1889-93 

*Aastad. Iver T AasUd Minn . . . 1889-92 

Agre. Ole M Sacred Heart Minn . . . 1889-92 

Aker. John S Highlandville la 1889-91 

Amblie. Johannes N St. Olaf la 1889-90 

Anderson, Anton Christiania Minn . . . 1889-90 

•Berthelsen. Hans Peter Decorah la 1889-91 

*Brevig. Samuel Bernhoff Sacred Heart Minn . . . 1889-96 A. B.. 1896 

*Buslee. Adolph Martin Chicago II! 1889-93 

Fosmark. Anders Keyser Wis 1889-90 



Hanson. Jens Th Sioux Falls S. D 1889. 

Hefty. Nils O Spring Grove Minn. . . 1889-91 

Hektoen. Martin Madison Wis 1889-95 A. B.. 1895 



Helvig. Ole Rsland la 1889-90. 

Herreid. Hans A Washington Prairie. la 1889-90. 

Homseth. Richard Renville Minn. . .1889-92 

•Hougstad. Christian Glasgow Wis 1889-93 A. B.. 1893 

Hovde. Francis Blair Wis 1889-90, 1891-93 

Hovden. Stener G Rldgeway la 1889-90 

Jacobson. Edward Debello Wis 1889-92 

Jensen, Alfred C. Brookville Wis 1889-90 

Johnson, Benton J Belmond la 1889-91 

♦Juul. Martin Bernhard Chicago Ill 1889-96 A. B., 1896 

Kaupanger. Louis J Stoughton Wis 1889-90. 1891-93 

Lende. Fred Cottonwood Minn . . . 1889 

Lewison. Eli Vermilion S. D 1889-97 A. B.. 1897 

Lomen. Knut E Sioux Falls S. D 1889 

Ludvigson, Nils H Norman la 1889-90. 1891-94 

•Lunde. Amund FrenchviUe Wis 1889-94. 1896-97.. A. B.. 1897 

Nash. Rudolph Mt. Sterling Wis 1889-90 

Nasse. Peter Decorah la 1889-90 

Nelson. N. C Decorah la 1889-90 

Ness, Hildus Washington Prairie. la 1889-94 

Op»hl. Albert J. Albert Lea Minn. ..1889-91 

Osmundson. Bernt F Quandahl la 1889-93 

Peterson. Thorvald Hector Minn. . . 1889-91 

•Quammen. Albert GusUvus. .. Christiania Minn. . . 1889-96 

Quammen. Lewis Deerfield Wis 1889-90. 1892-93. 

1897-98 

Ryen. Helmer C Wild Rice N. D. . . 1889-90 

Sehies. Ole M Washington Prairie, la 1889-90 

Severaon, Hans Christiania Minn. . . 1889-91 

Stenrud. Erik Decorah la 1889-90 

Stensrud. GusUv O Sacred Heart Minn . . . 1889-91 

*Stub, Jacob Aall Ottesen Robbinsdale Minn . . . 1890-91. M93-98.. A. B., 1898 

*Swenson, Bernt Conrad Cranfill's Gap Texas. . .1889-92. 1894-98.. A. B.. 1898 

Swenson, Swen G Soldier la 1889-90 

SaervoM, Ola Johann Le Roy Minn. . . 1889-95 A. B.. 1895 

S^rensen, Andrew (Andreas) . . Decorah la 1889-97 A. B.. 1897 

Torrison. Aaron Manitowoc Wis 1889-95 

Torrison, William L Manitowoc Wis 1889-95 A. B., 1895 

♦Ulen, George Christian Decorah la 1889-96 

Vaala« John Saude la 1889-91 

Vaala. Theodore G Saude la 1889-91 

Westby, Albert Washington Prairie, la 1889-91 

1890-1891 

•Aarnes. Sam H Sacred Heart Minn. . .1890-94. 1895-98.. A. B., 1898 

Alfson. Aslak Christiania Minn. . .1890-92 

Anderson. Albert J Grove City Minn . . . 1890-91 



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226 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Years at 
Student Post Oflke State Luther CoUese Graduation 



^Anderson. Christian Barrett Minn . . . 1890-96 A. B.. 1896 

*Astnip. Johannes UntunjambiK. NatalAfrica. . . 1890-93 A. B.. 1893 

Beaver. Olc Kasson Minn. . . 1890-91 

Beaver. Theodore Kasson Minn. ..1890-93 

Beito, A. G Decorah la 1890-91 

Benton. K Garden Prairie Ill 1890-91 

BersUd. Ole Fergus FalU Minn. . . 1890-91 

•Boc. Ole T Osstan la 1891-94. 1896-00.. A. B.. 19O0 

Bygland. Olav S Olnes Neb 1890-96 A. B.. 1896 

Christlock. Gerhard S Fergus Falls Minn. . .1890-92. 1893-94 

Christenson. Haldor Grove City Minn . . . 1890-91 

Christiansen. John Bode la 1890-91 

Clement. Erik E Decorah la 1890-91 

Dahlen. Fred Oslo Minn . . . 1890-92. 1893-98.. A. B.. 1898 

*Dahle (Dale). John Olaus Bode la 1890-91. 1895- 

1900 A. B.. 1900 

♦Diving. Carl Untunjambtli. NatalAfrica. . . 1890-93 A. B.. 1893 

EUingson. Joseph Cottage la 1890-91 

Foss. Eddie A Spring Grove Minn . . . 1890-94 

Glasoe. P. Mauritz Spring Grove Minn . . . 1890-91 

Gregerson, Andrew Closter Neb .... 1890-91 

Gullikson, Henry Decorah la 1890-91. 1892-94 

Gullikson. Oscar Decorah la 1890-95 A. B.. 1895 

Gullixson. Andrew Bode la 1890-97 A. B., 1897 

♦Hagoes. Owe Meridian Wis 1890-91 

Hallan. Christian Wall Lake Minn . . . 1890-92. 1893-94. 

1896-98 

Hallum. Lars Highland Minn. . . 1890-91 

Halvorson. Henry J Belgrade Minn . . . 1890-91 

♦Halvorsen. Nils E Westby Wis 1891-96 A. B.. 1896 

Hanson. Halvor J Nerstrand Minn . . . 1890-91 

Hanson. Robert C Spencer la 1890-91 

Hassel. Peter G Wittenberg Wis 1890-91 

Haugen., Carl N Pelican Rapids Minn . . . 1890-93 

♦Hegg. James Edward Blair Wis 1890-94. 1896-98. . A. B.. 1898 

♦Heimdahl. Olaf Emil Grove City Minn. . .1890-95 A. B.. 1895 

♦Hjermstad. Chr. August H.. . . Holmen Wis 1890-95 

*Holey (Larson), Mikkcl Decorah la 1890-92 

Holl, FredC La Crosse Wis. 1890-91 

Hovden, Olaus G Ridgeway la 1890-92 

Ingebrigtson. Carl Sacred Hean Minn . . . 1890-92 

Isakson, I Whalan Minn . . . 1890-91 

Johnson, Albert Village Creek la 1890-91 

♦Johnson. John Lewis Thor la 1890-93. 1894-98.. A. B.. 1898 

Kteland. Christian Spring Grove Minn . . . 1890-91 

Kirkeberg. John M Thor la 1890-91, 1898-99 

Kittilsby. Anton Calmar la 1890-95 

Kj0rlaug Christopher N Newman Grove .... Neb 1890-92 

Landsrud. Alfred O Nordness la 1890-92 

Larson. Alfred Chicago Ill 1890-94 

Lommen. Gustav Decorah la 1890-93 

Lyngaas, Ingeman M Frankville la 1890-97 A. B., 1897 

Michelson, Herbert C Chicago Ill 1890-91 

Narveson. Henry Spring Grove Minn . . . 1890-91 

Nelson, Henry C Spring Grove Minn . . . 1890-91 

♦Ncrvig, Anders (Andrew) J. . . Minneapolis Minn. . . 1890-93 

Nae«eth. Enock Decorah la 1890:93 

♦Olsen, Holden Mathias Herscher Ill 1890-96 A. B.. 1896 

Olson. George Olut Delhi Minn. . . 1890-92 

Olson. George Oscar Grantsburg Wis 1890-91 

Olson. Peter O Grantsburg Wis 1890-92 

Omlie, Oscar K Willmar Minn . . . 1890-92. 1893-95.. A. B.. 1895 

Opsahl. Olc H Albert Ua Minn. . . 1890-91 

•Otte, Heinrich Untunjambili. NatalAfrica. . . 1890-93 A. B.. 1893 

Paulson. Alfred H Sacred Heart Minn. . . 1890-91 

Pedersen. Peder Joliannes Bode la 1890-91, 1892-94 

Peterson, Hans F Fisher Minn . . . 1890-91 

Raasoch, Oluf Chicago Ill 1890-91 

Rcquc, Herman A Decorah la 1890-94 A. B., 1894 

♦Reque. Lauritz Styrkard JustinI>ecorah la 1890-94 A. B.. 1894 

Ruh, Johan B New Lisbon Wis 1890-93 

Ryen, Hans C Wild Rice N. D.. . . 1890-91 

Sando, Adolph Baltic S. D. . . . 1890-94 

SeUies. Thomas Hesper la 1890-93 



Digitized by 



Google 



ATTENDANCE 227 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Sigurson. Ole Rio Wis 1890-92 

Simmons. Thorwald C Appleton Minn . . . 1890-91 

Sivesind. Helmer O Washington Prairie. la 1890-91 

Sjuraas, Bersven P Locust la 1890-92 

Skatteb0l. Christian A DeU Minn . . . 1890-92. 1893-94. 

1897-99. 1900- 

1902 A. R. 1902 

Sknikkerud. Manin T Sacred Heart Minn . . . 1890-91 

Solseth. Anton G Watson Minn. . . 1890-93 

Solscth. Edward A Watson Minn.... 1890-91 

Steensland. John G Saude la 1890-97 \. B.. 1897 

Sterud. Kristian M Brookings S. D 1890-91 

StorH, Nils G Lakeville Minn. . . 1890-91. 1892-93 

Sevre. Bertinius K Kerisett la 1890-96 A. B.. 1896 

Toftncr, Olaf A Cyrus Minn. . . 1890-91 

Viste. Johan Decorah la 1890-93 

Westby, Julius Waukon la 1890-91 

Wiese. Vilhelm Decorah la 1890-91 

Wiger. Christopher E Riccford Minn . . . 1890-91 

0de, Ole P Nordness la 1890-91 

1891-1892 

Aakre. Knut S Ossian la 1891-92 

Ambli. Christian F Decorah la 1891-93 

Anderson. Carl Hustler Wis 1891-92 

Askevold. George Chicago Ill 1891-93 

Bcnrud. Oscar .Amboy Minn . . . 1891-92 

Bjtfrnstad. William St. Paul Minn . . . 1891 

Bolme. Lars B Sutton's Bay Mich.. . . 1891-93 

Brauer. Adolph Mabel Minn . . . 1891-95 

Brown. Julius Ossian la 1891-92 

Buslee, Christian Chicago Ill 1891-92 

B0rre8on. Fred La Crosse Wis 1891-92 

Glesne. Truls Aastad Minn . . . 1891-92 

Graslie. Benjamin Baldwin Wis 1891-94. 1897-98 

Groves. James O Decorah la 1891-94 

GulUxson, Herman O Bode la 1891-93, 1894, 

1897-1900 .\. B.. 1900 

Gullord, Herman Westby Wis 1891-93 

Gunderson. Nils Erickson Minn . . . 1891-92 

Haagenson. Edward N Baldwin Wis 1891-92 

Haagensou. Herman Baldwin Wis 1891-92 

Hagestad. Knut M . . . ' Ettrick Wis 1891-97 A. B.. 1897 

Hamre, William Cottonwood Minn . . . 1891-92 

Hanson. Nils B New Centerville. . . . Wis 1891-95. 1896-99.. A. B.. 1899 

Hauge. Mons Washington Prairie .la 1891-94 

Haugelund. H. J Minneapolis Minn . . . 1891-92 

Haugen. Edwin Decorah la 1891-94 

*Henriksen. George Cleveland Ohio. . . . 1891-92 

Huselid. Samuel Clinton Minn . . . 1891-93 

Iverson. Martin P Chicago Ill 1891-93 

Johnson. Kielberg Audubon Minn . . . 1891-97 

Johnson. Theodore Walton Wis 1891-92 

Kaasa, Walter Ridgcway la 1891-93. 1984-95 

Kampen. Ingvald Anderson . . . Pigeon Falls Wis 1891-96 

Kcrtgaard. Pcder Christine N. D 1891-92 

Kvale. Olaus Decorah la 1891-93 

Landsem, Ole T Spring Grove Minn . . . 1891-92 

•Lane, George Ole Myrtle Wis 1891-94 

Lende. Henry Cottonwood Minn . . . 1891-94. 1896 

Lienl0kken. Adolph La Crosse Wis 1891-93 

Unnevold. William Decorah la 1891-92 

Uvdahl. Carl Hickson N. D.. . . 1891-92. 1896- 

1901 A. B.. 1901 

Lunde. Gunnar M Newman Grove .... Neb .... 1891-92 . 

Magelssen. Ludvig Bratsberg Minn . . . 1891-92 . 

Midb0. Otto T Martell Wis 1891-95. 

Mjelde. Nordahl Chicago Ill 1891-92. 

Moen. Haagen J Viking N. D.. . .1891-92. 

Negaard. Edward Norway Lake . . Minn . . . 1891-92 . 



Negaard. George E Norway Lake Minn. . . 1891-95. 1897-99.. 

NeSon. N. A El Paso Wis 1891-92. 1893-96.. 

Nelson. Paul R La Crosse Wis 1891-93 



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228 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SKTY YEARS 



Yews at 
Student PbfltOflice Sute Lather CoDcfle Gfaduation 



*Noniianii. Stefanus Tbeodor. .St. Obf Minn. . .1891-97 A. B.. 1897 

Norton. John Blue Earth City. . . .Minn. . .1891-92 

OlMcn, Ptdcr J Ptrth Amboy N. J. . . .1891-9i 

Olwm. Emil Eau Claire Wis 1891-92 

Overland. Peter ^ Belgrade Minn. . . 1891-92 

Raamuasen. Kristian St. Louis Mo 1891-92 

Rinde; Erik Taopi Minn. . .1891-92 

Risbiudc. Engebret St. «af Minn. . . 1891-92 

Rishof. Oluf Strand Minn. . .1891-93 

Running. Gilbert Nordnees la 1891-9J 

•Sauer. Carl Ignatius Bode la 1891-93. 1896-01. . A. B.. 1901 

Skaaden. Eugene Chicago Ill 1891-93 

Skjeggeby. Olc Sacred Heart Minn. . .1891-92 

Skubtad. Peder E Faith Miton. . .1891-92 r 

Solberg. RandaU Minneapolis Minn. . .1891-93 

Steen. Olai Clinton Minn. . .1891-93 

Stensnid. Carl Kensett la 1891-95 

S0renson. Bcmt Eau Claire Wis 1891-92 

Tasa. Gilbert Kenyon Minn. . .1891. 1892-99. . . .A. B.. 1899 

•Teigen, Martin Jackson Minn. . . 1891-95 

*Thollehaug. Sivert K Portland N. D.. .1891-94 

Thompaon. Andrew La Crosse Wis 1891-93 

Thoraen. Adolph New CenterviUe.. . Wis 1891-96 

Thoragaard. Oscar E Westby Wis 1891-93 

Tryhus. John Norman N. D 1891 

Ulen. Rnnert Decorah la 1891-92 

♦Unaeth, Joseph Bernhard Westby Wis 1891-97 A. B., 1897 

Winger, Johan Edward Nordness la 1891-97 A. B.. 1897 

0dc. George (Ode) Nordness la 1891-93. 1895-96. 

WoW, Anton O Whitehall Wis 1891-92 

1892-1893 

Anderson. Ole P Decorah la 1892-93 

Bakke. Martinus A Esteline S. D. . . . 1892-93. 1896-97 

Bakken. Edward Ferdinand. . .Decorah la 1892-94 

BarkenKs. Martin G Fet Norway. 1892-95 

Bergh. Knut Sacred Heart Minn. . .1892-96. 1897-99 

Berkvam. Christian Spring Grove Minn. . .1892-93 

Bidne. Sander Decorah la 1892-95. 1896-01 

Brandt. Lars Chicago lU 1892-93 

Enestvedt. Theodore Sacred Heart Minn. . . 1892-93. 1895-96 

Enger. Melvin Decorah la 1892-96 

EspeUen. Carl E Barre Mills Wis 1892-93. 1894-95 

Forton. Oscar Stoughton Wis 1892-93 

Frederikson, John N Manftou Island Mich.. . . 1892-93 

Grundeland. Bernhard Calmar la 1892-93 

Gnitle. Hennlng Fossum Minn . . . 1892-94. 1897-99 

♦Gullerud, Sven Olaf M Maxeppa Minn. . .1892-93 

Gunderson, Gunnar Ridgeway la 1892 

Gunderson, Halvor Ridgeway la 1892 

Gunderson. Ketil Ridgeway la 1892 

Hallan, Oscar E Newhouse Minn . . . 1892-95 

*Hallanger. Christopher Mar- 
tinus Bode la 1892-97 A. B.. 1897 

*HeUek8on. Oscar C Byron Minn . . . 1892-95. 1896-00.. A. B.. 1900 

Hiortdal. Einar Chicago Ill 1892-95 

Hong. Nite J Willmar Minn . . . 1892-95 A. B., 1895 

^Ingebristson. Carl Bertinius. . . Albert Lea Minn . . . 1892-94 

Jahr. Olav Black River Falls.. .Wis 1892-96 A. B.. 1896 

Jahr, Torstein Black River Falls. . .Wis 1892-96 A. B.. 1896 

Jenson. James C Spring Grove Minn . . . 1892-99 A, B.. 1899 

Johnson. John R Decorah la 1892-98 

Klrkeberg. Anton Decorah la 1892-93 

Langenaes. Ludvtg Clayton Minn. . . 1892-93 

Larson, Oluf Barrett Minn. . . 1892-93 

Larson, Peter Barrett Minn . . . 1892-93 

Larson. Richard Minneapolis Minn . . . 1892-94 

Lee, E. A Grand Meadow Minn. ..1892-93 

Lunde, Adolph Zumbrota Minn . . . 1892-95 

Lunde. F. C. CI Newman Grove Neb 1892-93 

Lunde. Peter Zumbrota Minn . . . 1892-95 

Markhus. Alfred L Willmar Minn. . .1892-97 A. B.. 1897 

Mellem, GusUv Northwood la 1892-93 

Monson. Martin A Kerkhoven Minn. . .1892-93 



Digitized by 



Google 



ATTENDANCE 229 



Years at 
Student Post Office SUte Luther College Graduation 



Morterud, Oscar Bloomingdale Wis 1892-95 

Nelson. Henry E Decorah la 1892-98 

Ofanstad. Otto Cambridge Wis 1892-93 

Olson, Paul Chicago Ill 1892-93 

^Peterson. Samuel Renvffle Minn. . .1892-93. 1894-97.. A. B.. 1897 

Preus. J0rgen Westby Wis 1892-95 

^Rlng^en. Theodore Ribe Ridgewav la 1892-98 A. B.. 1898 

Rodby. John Deerfield Wis 1892-93 

Skreberg. Hans Milan Minn. . .1892-93 

Smith, Caraten Decorah la 1892-97 

Soland. Julius Kerkhoven Minn. . . 1892-93 

Stecn, Abel CUnton Minn. . .1892-94 

Stenshoel. Philip Lenora Minn. . .1892-93 

♦Str0m. Oscar Adolph ZumbroU Minn. . .1892-97 A. B., 1897 

Servold. ML U Roy Minn. . .1892-93 

S0renson. Fred Decorah la 1892-97 

Tasa. Helge HoWen M i nn . . . 1 892-95 

Teisberg. Carl O Clarkson Wis 1892-99 A. B.. 1899 

Thime. George Chicago Ill 1892-93 

^Thompson. Severin Lewip Lincoln. S. D 1892-97. 1903-05 

Viste. Henrik Decorah la 1892-93 

Wolding, Martin New Hope Wis 1892-96 



1893-1894 

Aaker. Adolph Ridgeway la 1893-96 

Anderson. Freeman Ridgeway la 1893-96 

Aslakson, Anton Rose Creek Minn . . . 1893-94 

♦Austvold. Edwin B Glenwood Minn. . .1893-97 A. B.. 1897 

Bcmtson, Palmer Eau Claire Wis 1893-96. 1898-99 

Bjerke. Johan Portland N. D.. .1893-98 

Brorby, Joseph Decorah la 1893-99 A. B.. 1899 

Christensen, S0rcn Perth Amboy N. J 1893-94 

K:iauson. Carl T Red Wing Minn. . .1893-96 A. B., 1896 

Drotning. Alvyn Utica Wis 1893-95. 1898-99 

Finseth. Knut H Kenyon Minn. . .1893-94 

Gauper. EmU S Purdy Wis 1893-94 

Gotaas. Olaf Mellette S. D. . . . 1893 

Hagen. Sivert N Hagan Minn. . . 1893-96 A. B.. 1896 

Hanson. Henry Northwood la 1893-94 

Hegg. Robert Decorah la 1893-94. 1895-98.. A. B.. 1898 

*Hestenes. Jacob Mathias Homedahl Minn. . . 1893-1900 A. B.. 1900 

Jaastad. Gullfck Marshfield Wis 1893-94 

*Jacobson, Daniel Gustav Stoughton Wis 1894-95. 1897-01.. A. B.. 1901 

Jacobson. Jacob Northport Mich.. . . 1893-95 

Johnson. Martin E Benson Minn . . . 1893-95 

Jorgensen, Theodore Sumner Wis 1893-94 

Knutson. Herbert Chicago lU 1893-94 

Kocfod. Herman O Starbuck Minn. . .1893-97. 1898-00 

^Larsen. Lauritz Decorah la 1893-1902 A. B.. 1902 

Larson. Lawrence O Macfariand Wis 1893-95 

Larson, Ludvig Harmony Minn . . . 1893-94. 1897-99 

Larson. Oscar O New Centerville. . . .Wis 1893-1900 A. B.. 1900 

•Moe. Ebbe St. Paul Minn . . . 1893-96 

Moe, Oscar O Clarkson WU 1893-96. 1897-99 

•Moen. Paul W Lawton Wis 1893-94. 1895-99.. A. B., 1899 

Nelson, Helge Lily S. D 1893-97. 1898-99 

Nelson. Ludvig New Centerville.. . .Wis 1893-96 

Nj0s. Johannes Taopi Minn . . . 1893-94 

Naeseth. Martinus G Aspelund Minn. . .1893-94 

Olsen. Martin I Hcracher Ill 1893-99 A. B.. 1899 

•Ordal. Ola J Taopi S. D. . .1893-98 A. B.. 1898 

*Ordal. Zakarias J Taopi S. D. . . .1893-98 A. B.. 1898 

Ottum, Thomas J Macfariand Wis 1893-94 

Pallado, David Wittenberg Wis 1893 

Palmer. Simon Oneida Wis 1893-94 

Reinertson, Alfred Hazard Neb 1893-94, 1896-98. 

1899-1900 

Reque. Lars R Spring Grove Minn . . . 1893-97 

RisdaU Lars, Decorah la 1893-95. 1897-98 

Risetter, Lars C Lee Ill 1893-95. 1897-98 

Simonstad. Charles Swenoda Minn. . . 1893-94 

Slinde. Erik Lawler la 1893-94 

Solstad. Joseph H Fisher Minn. . .1893-95 

Sveine. Sven Decorah la 1893-96 



Digitized by 



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236 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Scodent 



Poat Office 



State 



Years at 

Lather CoOese Gradnatioa 



^Thompson. Chrifcian S. . . . 

Tbortgaard. Lars J 

ThorsTjd. CHe 

T%cdi. Tberjdore . 

Vestaa. TolW S 
•^'ein. HaxM J . 
•^Tiiie. Anders (Andrew) O. 
(Jensen).. . . 

Wollan. Gunav B . . 

WoUaa, Gustav C 

•Wulf sberg. Eiitar. Jr 



Mt Horeb 

Kindred. . . . 

CaDeoder.... 
. Forest City. 

York. 

. Renville 

Latimer . . . 
GlenwDod . . . 
Glenwood. . 

Drcorah... . 



Wis... 1993-97 A. B.. 1897 

N. D.. 1893-M 

.U 1893 

la . 1893-95 . . 

.Uls... .1893-94.1895-97.. . . 

Minn. .1893-96 A. B.. 1898 

.la ... .1893-1900... . A. B.. 1900 
Minn ... 1893-97 A. B.. 1897 

. Minn . . . 1893-95. 1896- 

1900 A. B.. 1900 

U 1893-1900 A. B.. 1900 




SEWING FOR THE STUDENTS 
(Mrs. Laur. Larsen Seated at Left) 

1894-1895 

Andorwm. Anton O Hillsboro N. D 1894-95 

AnderBon, Carlton A West Salem Wis 1894-96 

Bakken. HanH H Ridgeway la 1894-95 

Bergp. O^car G Sand Creek Wis 1894-97 

•Birkelo, Pedcr C Colgate N. D.. . . 1894.97 

Blegcn. George Washington Prairie. la 1894-95 

Bothna, Joseph La Crosse Wis 1894.95 

♦Boyd, Edwin Arthur Willmar Minn . . . 1894-95. 1896-98.. A. B.. 1898 

Brauer. Julius Mabel Minn . . . 1894-1901 A. B.. 1901 

BurtneM, Peter Wilmington Minn . . . 1894-1900 A. B., 1900 

B0rrr»on, William La Crosse Wis 1894-95 

Enger, Norval £>ecorah la 1894-97 

Gaard. Rasmus Roland la 1894-1900 A. B., 1900 

Gilbertson, Adolph N Ridgeway la 1894 

Gollx-rg. Martin L Rock Dell Minn . . . 1894-95 

(iregerson, Gustav E Seneca la 1894-95 

CrimU', Seward De Forest Wis 1894-95 

Hamblin. Alton Sioux Rapids la 1894-96 

♦Hammer (Fylling), Lars F. 

(Urs L.) Nurcy. . . : S. Dak. .1894-96 



Digitized by 



Google 



ATTENDANCE 231 



Years at 
Student Post OlBce State Luther Collese Graduation 



Hegknd. Martin Roland la 1894-1900 A. B., 1900 

Helgen. R. Olani Ruthven la 1894-95 

Helceeon. Amos Seneca la 1894-95 

Hezom. John D Washington Prairie. la 1894-1901 A. B., 1901 

Heycr. Arnold O Strum Wis 1894-97 

«H jermsUd, Hans Andreas L . . Holmen Wis 1894-97. 1899- 

1901 

Husmo. Iphannes Rochester Minn . . . 1894-95 

H0r8rud.^artin Harmony Minn . . . 1894-95 

Jacoboon. William M Seneca la 1894-97 

Jenson. J. Alfred Edgerton Wis 1894-96 

Johnson. Eugene G Decoiah la 1894-98 A. B., 1898 

Johnson. George J Brandon Minn. . .1894-98 A. B., 1898 

*Johnson. Torgcr Andreas Lake Mills la 1894-98 

Kallestad. Albert B Blue Earth City. . . . Minn. . . 1894-95 

*ICibte88. Ptter J Dell Rapids S. I>. . . . 1894-99 A. B., 1899 

Mallon. Otto Cresco la 1894-97 

Monserud. Oliver Harpers Ferry la 1894-95 

Moore. Louis Decorah la 1894-96 

Nilsestuen. Albert Arcadia Wis 1894-95 

Nilaon. Severin Hanson Minn . . . 1894 

Pederaon. Oscar B Amboy Minn . . . 1894-1901 

Peterson. Joseph M St. Ansgar la 1894-98 A. B.. 1898 

*Rugland. Jacob G Silver Lake la 1894-95 

Sampson. Sigvard F Yankton S. D. . . . 1894-97 

Sajcvik. Louis Highlandville la 1894-96 

Simonaon. Carl Perth Amboy N. J 1894-95 

Sjolander. Carl B Onalaska Wis 1894-95 

Skramstad. Joseph Clay Bank Minn . . . 1894-95 

Solseth. George Harmony Minn . . . 1894-95 

Steen. Theron Wahoo Neb 1894-95 / . . . 

♦Strand, Thor J , Albert Lea Minn ... 1894-95 

Svtrang. Ingeman J Watcrville la 1894-97 

Thams. Johan L Valley City N. D.. . . 1894-95 

Thorsen. Peder Seneca la 1894-95 

♦Turmo, Olaf Luverne Minn. . .1894-98 A. B., 1898 

♦Turmo, Stener Newman Grove Neb 1894-99 A. B., 1899 

Viger. Anton Rock Dell Minn . . . 1894-95 

Wahlen. Jens R Chicago Ill 1894-96 

WiUiamson. Christian Ruthven la 1894-98 

*0ien. John P Rochester Minn . . . 1894-96 

1895-1896 

Aames. NilsC Hurdal Minn. .1895-96 

Anderson. Andrew O Ossian la 1895-1901 A. B.. 1901 

Anderson. Esaias Albert Lea Minn . . . 1895-97 

Ameson. Olaf H Decorah la 1895-99 

Aspelund. Joseph Mondovi Wis 1895-1901 A. B.. 1901 

Avlsgaard. Richard S Zumbrota Minn. . . 1895 

Bale. Christian E Norman N. D.. . . 1895-96. 1897-98. 

190(V1904 A. B. 1904 
♦Berg. Joseph H Oakland Minn. . .1895-96. 1897-98.! . . .' 

Bemtson. Ludvig Decorah la 1895 

♦Berven. Sven K Lily S. D. ... 1895-1901 A. B.. 1901 

Bidne. Henry Decorah la 1895-98 

♦Bjerke. Anders O Ridgeway la 1895-98 

♦Bticher. Peter C Decorah la 1895-1903 A. B., 1903 

Borge. John Washington Prairie. la 1895-98 

Brekke. Edward A Spillville la 1895-96. 1897- 

1903 A. B. 1903 

Dahl, Abraham P Luverne Minn. . .1895-96. .. ' 

Dahl. Otto Strum Wis 1895-97 

Ellickson. Frank Montevideo Minn . . . 1895-96 



Ersland. Joseph A Nevada la 1895-99 

Geraki. Guy H Bird Island Minn. . .1895-1901 A. B.. 1901 

Grangaard. Henry O Norman N. D.. . . 1895-1902 A. B.. 1902 

Gr0nne. O. Theodore Waterville la 1895-96. 1901-02 

♦Gutteb0. Laurits Seman Huxley la 1895-1901 A. B.. 1901 

Hailstone, A. Augustus Decorah la 1895-1902 A. B.. 1902 

Hanson. Eugene Carl Eau Claire Wis 1895-97 

Hegg, Olaf Decorah la 1895-96 

Hoel. William Canby Minn. . .1895-96 

Hov, L Simonson Portland N. D.. . . 1895-1900 A. B.. 1900 



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232 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Yean at 
Student Poet Office State Luther CoUefe Graduation 



Hovde. Agnus E Wittenberg Wig 1895-97. 1899^ 

1900 

Hovde. Rudoph L. Wittenberg Wia 1895-97. 1898- 

1903 A. B.. 1903 

Jacobeen. Karl T Stoughton Wis 1895-97. 1898- 

1902 -...A. B., 1902 

Jacobson. Alfred Decorah la 1895-96 

Johnson. L. Gerhard Roland la 1895-1902 A. B., 1902 

Johnson. Perry S Decorah la 1895-99 %. B., 1899 

Jordahl, Christopher Norway Lake Minn. . . 1895 

KaUestad. Abdiel O Blue Earth City. . . . Minn . . . 1895-96. 1897-98 

KaUesUd. Alfred S Blue Earth City. ... Minn . . .1895-96. 1897-98 

•Kilness. JuUus Bennett Dell Rapids. S. D. . . .1895-1900 A. B.. 1900 

Kolaas. Martin Conover la 1895-96 

♦Larsen. Wilhelm August Utimer la 1895-99 

Larson. Embert Slory City la 1895-99 

Unde. Henry J Ridgeway la 1895-1901 A. B.. 1901 

Lunde. Johannes Zumbrota Minn . . . 1895-97 

Magelssen. Jacob A ..Rushford Minn. ..1895 

Meyer. Laust H Latimer la 1895-96 

Moen. Hans P Calmar. la 1895-98 

Ness. Andrew M Hector Minn. . .1895-96 

♦Ncstc, Theodore P Decorah la 1895-1902 

Nymoen. Christian O Granite Falls. Minn. . .1895-99 

Naeseth. Herman Aspelund Minn . . . 1895-1902 A. B.. 1902 

Opdahl. Einar E Wausau Wis 1895-96 

Peterson. Carl S. N Aspelien Minn. . .1895-97 

Peterson. Cyrus Chicago Ill 1895-96 

♦Preus. Ovc Jacob Hjort Morrisonville Wis 1895-1901 A. B., 1901 

Ritland. Osmund Roland la 1895-96 

*Ro«hoIdt. Thore Laurentius. . . Norwegian Grove. . . Minn . . . 1895-99 A. B.. 1899 

Rosholt. A. Jens Rosholt Wis 1895-96. 1897- 

1903 A. B.. 1903 

Rosholt. Norman Rosholt Wis 1895-96 

♦Sauer. Herman Olai Bode la 1895-97. 1898-99. 

1900-1903 A. B.. 1903 

Simmons. Simon Kindred N. D 1895-96 

Skare. Peder Norway Lake Minn. . . 1895-96 

Skauge. Nicolai O Elliford N. D.. . . 1895-96. 1898- 

1902 

SUde. Charles M Chicago Ill 1895-96 

Stalland. Martin Wiilmar Minn. . . 1895 

Starks, Simon Keyser Wis 1895-96 

Stenbakken. Hans Chr Nerstrand Minn. . .1895-98. 

*Stub. Hans Andreas. Jr Robbinsdale Minn. . . 1895-1900 A. B.. 1900 

Styve. Oscar C Albert Lea Minn. . .1895-1900 A. B.. 1900 

Swenson. Jens T Uwton Wis 1895-97. 1899- 

1900 

Swter. Otis P Wiilmar Minn. . .1895-97 

Thompson. John P Sioux Rapids la 1895-96 

Thorstenson. Knut A Amboy Minn. . .1895-1901 A. B., 1901 

Tjernagel. Martin O Randall la 1895-98 

Torgerson. Jacob A. C Somber la 1895-99 A. B.. 1899 

Trulson. Herman OrfordviUe Wis 1895-96 

*Ullensvang. Lars L Steward Ill 1895-97. 1899- 

1903 A. B.. 1903 

Vigesland. Sven Decorah la 1895-96 

Weik. Henry G Wausau Wis 1895-97 

Wig. Oscar B Rising Sun Wis 1895-97 

♦Ylvisaker. Olaf Sigvald Robbinsdale Minn . . . 1895-99 A. B.. 1899 

*0degaard. Gunnar G Portland N. D.. . . 1895-98 

1896-1897 

Aaseth. Elmer A GayvUle S. D 1896-99 

Allen. Realf Decorah la 1896-97 

Apland. Martin O Cambridge la 1896-1903 A. B.. 1903 

Bakken. Hans Plato Minn . . . 1896-97 

Bergman. F. Pjetur Gardar N. D.. . . 1896-98 

Bergman. Hjalmar A Gardar N. D.. . . 1896-1900 A. B.. 1900 

♦Borge. Olaf Washington Prairie. la 1896-1903 A. B.. 1903 

Christcnscn. Walter GayviUe S. D. . . .1896-97 

Dahl, Hans P Gayville S. D. . . .1896-99 

Dahl. Hans Monrad Revere Minn. . . 1896-99 

Dahle. Martin O Norman la 1896-1902 A. B.. 1902 



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ATTENDANCE 233 



Yearaat 
Student Poet Office SUte Lather College Graduation 



^Dreng. John Oohan) O Manitowoc M.Wis 1896-1901 A. B.. 1901 

♦Efer. Olaif Chicago Ill 1896-1902 A. B.. 1902 

Eopeland. Michael M Dean Minn. . .1896-98 

Fremming. Eivind St. Paul Minn. . * 1896-97 

•Grefthen. Olaf Lauritz Northwood la 1896-1900 

Grinde. George A De Forest Wb 1896-1903 A. B.. 1903 

GuUka. Henry Locust la 1896 

*Hanson. Gustav Adolph Stoughton Wis. 1896-99. 1900-01. 

1903-05 A. B.. 1905 

Haugen. Edward Pelican Rapids Minn. . . 1896-97 

Herreid. Haavar Hills Minn. . .1896-97. 1898-99 

^Hustvedt. Sigurd Bernhard . . .Decorah la 1896-1902 A. B.. 1902 

^Ingebritson, Henry RandaU la 1896-1903 A. B.. 1903 

Jacobson. Rasmus A Lennox S. D 1896-97 

.fensen. Eskild H Riceford Minn. . . 1896-98 

. ohnson. Albert N Norway Grove Wis 1896-99 

. fohnson. Charles J Decorah la 1896-99 

*Johnson. Wilford Alpheus Red Wing Minn. . .1896-99 A. B.. 1899 

Larsen. Carl E Decorah la 1896-1902 A. B.. 1902 

Livdahl. Gustav N Hickson N. D... .1896-98 

Munson. Theodore Slater la 1896 

Myreut Henry Pierpont S. D 1896-97 

Nelson. Carl W Presho S. D. . . . 1896-97 

*Nonnann. Halvor Martin Dalton Minn. . . 1896-1900 A. B., 1900 

Nub«)n. Henry N Callender la 1896-99. 1900-02 

♦Nacscth. Carelius G Aspelund Minn. . .1896-1903 A. B., 1903 

*OIaf8on. Kriscinn K Gardar N. D.. . .1896-1900 A. B.. 1900 

^Isen. (Bertel) Jphan WhitehaU Wis 1896-97 

Olson. Bryngel T Calamus la 1896-99 

Quale. Arthur Nora .Wis 1896-97 

Reque. G. F. Otto Spring Grove Minn. . .1896-1900 

Ringoen. Henry Ridgeway la 1896-99 

Simmons. Thoraf C Red Wing Minn. . . 1896-99, 1902-03 

Skinnemoen. John S Wendell Minn . . . 1896-97, 1898- 

1901 A. B.. 1901 

Stang. Thomas St. Paul Minn. . . 1896-99 

*Str0m. Axel Elias Zumbrota Minn. . .1896-1900 . . .A. B.. 1900 

*Sundby. Gustave Adolph 

Nelson Manitowoc Wis 1896-1900 A. B.. 1900 

Sydnes. Christopher Huxley la 1896-99 

Thoen. Ruben Kensett la 1896-97 

Torgerson. J. Walther Norden.. .' S. D 1896-1900 

Valsvig. Albert M Lily S. D. . . . 1896-97 

Wold, Knut St. Olaf la 1896-97 

1897-1898 

AaDy. Alfred V Hayfield Minn. . .1897-98 

Amundson. Albert O Cresco la 1897-98 

Berg. A. Herman Decorah la 1897-99 

Borreson. Borge H La Crosse Wis 1897-98 

Boxrud. Bernhard M Red Wing Minn. . .1897-99 

Christopherson, Johannes Pigeon Falls Wis 1897-99 

Dolve. Nils OUver Portland N. D.. . . 1897-98 

Dosland. Thomas Clinton la 1897-98 

Elvestrom. Martin Bricelyn Minn . . . 1897-98 

Engeseth. P^er J De Forest Wis 1897-98. 1899- 

1900 

Erickson. Charles De Forest Wis 1897-98 

Estrem, Carl O Willmar Minn . . . 1897-1901 A. B.. 1901 

Floren, Halvor Grove City Minn. . . 1897-98 

Fuglie. A. Edwin Ashby Minn . . . 1897-1901 A. B., 1901 

Hande, Carl Spring Valley Minn . . . 1897-99 

•Hansen, Emil Twin Valley Minn. . .1897-1903 A. B.. 1903 

Hanson. Hans Olaf Westby Wis 1897-98 

Haugen, John Martinus Newman Grove .... Neb 1897-98 

Helvig. Henry. Roland la 1897-99 

Hjelle. Ole Simon Decorah la 1897-1900. 1901- 

1905 A. B., 1905 

acobson, WilUam Luverne Minn . . . 1897-98 

arland. Lewis J Locust la 1897-99 

lensvokl, Christopher La Crosse Wis 1897-98 

ohnson. William J Decorah la 1897-99 

fohiisnid. Henry L Spring Grove Minn. . . 1897-98 

.arson. NealB Deerfieki Wis 1897-98 



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234 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Maakestad. Nils F Randall la 1897-1900 

*Ma«els8en. Nils Stockfleth . . . . Bratsberg Minn. ..1897-1902 

Muus, Sverre P Holdcn Minn. . .1897-98 

Nordskog. Oscar Julius Bird Island Minn. . . 1897-1900 

*Norgaard, Carl Henry Grove City Minn . . . 1897-1903 A. B.. 1903 

Odberg. Andreas A Merrill Wis 1897-98 

Olsen. Adolph Johan Thor la 1897-99 

Olson, Christian Norwegian Grove. . . Minn . . . 1897-98 

Olson, Otto Portland N. D.. . . 1897-1900 

Opheim, Johan Julius Thor la 1897-99 

Ostvig, Richter N Benson Minn . . . 1897-99 

Preus, Jacob Aall Ottcaen Decorah la 1897-1903 A. B., 1903 

♦Preus. Johan Carl Keyscr Decorah la 1897-1902 A. B.. 1902 

Reque, Sigurd Stjrrk Decorah la 1897-1903 A. B.. 1903 

Reoue. Walther Spring Grove Minn. . . 1897-99 

Rialson. George E Tracy Minn . . . 1897-98 

Risctter, Harvey O Lee Ill 1897-99 

Sheldon. Clarence Spring Valley Minn. . .1897-98 

Skaaden, Arthur P Chicago Ill 1897-1901 

Smith. Nils Perth Amboy N. J. . .. 1897-99 

Sorenson, Alfred R Harmony Minn. . .1897-1902 A. B., 1902 

Stenbakken. Oswald Nerstrand Minn . . . 1897-99. 1901-02 

Taug, William L Thor la 1897-99 

Teisberg. Cari B Ashby Minn. . . 1897-01 A. B.. 1901 

Thorpe, Lawrence Willmar Minn . . . 1897-98 

Tunem. Thomas G Chicago Ill 1897-98 

Vaalcr, Rudolph A Twin Valley Minn. . .1897-99 

Void, O. Alfred Decorah la 1897-99 

Void, Ole J Decorah la 1897-1902 

1898-1899 

Aaker, Casper D Ridgeway la 1898-1902 A. B., 1902 

Aasen, Christian H Clifford N. D. . . . 1898-1902 

♦Anderson. Martin Newhall la 1898-99 

Aslakson. Norman Holton Mich 1898-99 

♦Bergh, Axel Delaware Mine Mich.. . . 1898-1903 A. B., 1903 

Bjornstad. Bcrnhard St. Paul Minn. . .1898-1900 

Clauson. Nils Y Red Wing Minn. .1898-1901 A. B.. 1901 

Finseth. Arthur O Kenyon Minn. . .1898-1900 

Forde, Walter Starbuck Minn. . . 1898-99 

Gilbert, Walter I Sturgeon Bay Wis 1898-1905 A. B., 1905 

Graslie, Carl J Palmer Wis 1898-1900 

Grefstad. Oscar K Bode la 1898-1905 A. B., 1905 

Grimson, Gilbert Hatton N. D 1898-99 

Grinde, Johannes B Dcerfield Wis 1898-99 

Grinde, Johannes L Madison Wis 1898-1900 

Gutteb0. Emil Caspari Huxley la 1898-1900 

Guttormsen. Sigvart Perth Amboy N. J 1898-1901 

Halvorson, Carl Northwood N. D.. . . 1898-99 

Hanson, Nils A Mayville N. D.. . . 1898-1902 

Hovde, Carl H. R Wittenberg Wis 1898-1904 A. B., 1904 

Iverson, Joliames I Stanhope la 1898-1901 

Jacobson. Louis O Gilbert la 1898-1901 

♦Johnson. Bergel Alfred Mindoro Wis 1898-1905, 1918 . .A. B., 1905 

Johnson, Carl L Effington S. D 1898-99 

Juul, Gustav A Brandon Minn . . . 1898-1902 A. B.. 1902 

Kaasa, Jens Lawrence Ridgeway la 1898-1903 A. B., 1903 

Kleppen, Andrew Eau Claire Wis 1898-99 

Knudson, Oscar Orfordville Wis 1898-99 

Knutson. Severin Hatton N. D.. . . 1898-99 

Larsen. Anton Martinius River Falls Wis 1898-99 

Lien. Nicl M. B Northwood la 1898-1900 

Mindrum, Oscar P Bratsberg Minn . . . 1898-1901 

Naeseth, Martinius Zumbrota Minn . . . 1898-1901 

♦Nelson, Alfred Thomas Mayville N. D 1898-1903 A. B., 1903 

Nelson, Johan J Gilman Wis 1898-1901 

Olson, John Thor la 1898-99 

Oppedal, Ingebrigt I Stanhope la 1898-99 

Peterson, Helmer S Fargo N. D.. . 1898-1903 A. B., 1903 

Prestegaard, Pedor O Lee Ill 1898-1904 

Risetter. Thomas C Lee Ill 1898-1900 

Ruen. Oliver Kenyon Minn . . . 1898-1902, 1903- 

1907 A B 1907 

Schjeldahl. Theodore Highlandville la 1898-1905. . . .A. b!.' 1905 



Digitized by 



Google 



ATTENDANCE 



235 



Student 



Post Office 



State 



Years at 
Luther College Graduation 



Schroedcr, Henry San Francisco Calif. . 

£iinley. Joseph Portland N. D.. 

♦Smeby, Hartwicic Carinius. . . . Albert Lea Minn . 

Sorenaon. Edward H Carthage S. D. . 

Stenehjem. Edwin Spring Grove Minn . 

Swenaon. Orin L Lamberton Minn . 

Tho, Jacob Oslo Minn . 

Tonning, Ole Decorah la, 



. 1898-1901 

.1898-1900 

.1898-1902 A. B.. 1902 

.1898-99 

.1898-1900 

.1898-1902 

.1898-99 

.1898-1904 A. B.. 1904 

1898-1900 

.1898-1903 A. B.. 1905 

.1898-1902 A. B., 1902 

.1898-99 

.1898-1901 

.1898-99 

.1898-1901 A. B.. 1901 

. 1898-1901 

.1898-1900 

.1898-1902 A. B.. 1902 



Torgerson. Thomas Somber la ... . 

♦Tweten, Jacob O I^ke Mills la 

*Vaaler. Even A Twin Valley Minn . 

Wilson, Arthur B Decorah la 

Wollan, Arnold Glenwood Minn . 

Wollan. Oscar C Glenwood Minn . 

Wollan, Oliver B. F Glenwood Minn . 

Xavier, Heinrich M Ridgeway la ... . 

Xavier, Nils Paul Ridgeway la ... . 

♦Ylvisakcr, NiU Martin St. Paul Minn. 

1899-1900 

Aaberg. Herman O Devils Lake N. D.. . 1899-1903 

Aakhus. Daniel Bygland Minn . . . 1899-1900 

*Baalson. Herman E Brooten Minn . . . 1899-1904 

Bervin. Lewis Baltic S. D. . . .1899-1903 

Black, Alexander G Holmen Wis 1899-1903 

Bonde. Edward Nerstrand Minn . . . 1899-1900 

Bonde, Oscar Nerstrand Minn . . . 1899-1900 

*Bredesen. Alfred Scoughton Wis 1899-1905 

Brusegaard, Theodore B Brandon Minn . . . 1899-1902, 1903- 



A. B.. 1903 



A. B.. 1904 



Klhristensen, Jens Chr Orum Neb . . 

Dahlen, Theodore A Wendell Minn . 

Diesen. CM Washburn N. D.. 

Drotntng. Ferdinand Stoughton Wis 1899-1900 

Egeland, Ole Wilhelm Decorah la 1899-1902 

Fj08e. Norman Decorah la 1899-1901 



1904 
1899-1900. 
1899-1903. 
1899^1900. 



A. B.. 1905 
A. B.. 1904 



..A. B., 190 J 



Fosmark, Alexander Fergus Falls Minn. 

Frad, Nels Harmony Minn . 



1899-1901 

.1899-1901. 1902- 

1903 

.1899-1903 

1899-1900 

1899-1900 



Fries, Gabriel Toronto S. D. 

Gulbrandson, Carl Lanesboro Minn 

Gulbrandson, George H Chicago III. , . 

♦GulHxson. Thaddaeus F Bode la 1899-1903 

Hagerup. Edward Decorah la 1899-1900 . 

*Halverson, Melvin Walter .... Mishicott Wis 1899-1904 . 

♦Hegg. Gustov J Decorah la 1899-1905 . 

Hermann. Thorhallur Gardar N. D.. . . 1899-1902 

Hexom. Charles Philip Decorah la 1899-1902 

Hoel. Ove Nordahl Canby Minn. . . 1899-1901 

Hove, J. Nathan Flandreau S. D. .. . 1899-1900 

Hukee. Hans O Nerstrand Minn. . . 1899-1900 

Hustvedt, P. Thomas Decorah la 1899-1906 

jenson. Adolph H Edgerton Wis 1899-1901 

Johnsrud. William L Spring Grove Minn . . . 1899-1900 

Kjome. Hans N. (Chommie) . . Decorah la 1899-1906 

Koefod. Sigvard M. R Ashby Minn . . . 1899-1903 

Knutson. Henry M Ossian la 1899-1903 

Krogstad, GusUv A Onalaska Wis 1899-1901, 1903- 

1904 

Larsen, Leonard Decorah la 1899-1901 

Urson, Harald W Story City la 1899-1900 

*Lund. Laurics Peder Nashua la 1899-19M 

Medhus. Ole Walnut Grove Minn. . . 1899-1900 

^Moklstad. Christian A De Forest Wis 1899-1904 

Moses. Olaf S Decorah la 1899-1901 

Nelson. Ole E Franklin Minn . . . 1899-1902 

. Nelson, Walter Mayville N. D.. . . 1899-1904 

Norby, Albert Sioux Rapids la 1899-1900 

♦Olsen, Harry Emil Madison Wis 1899-1903 

Orwoll. Melvinus S Hanley Falls Minn. . . 1899-1906 

♦Palmer, Knut R Belgrade Minn 

Quarve. Halvard Fessenden N. D. 

Quarve, Levard Fessenden N. D. 

♦Quill, Carl Johan Sauk Center Minn 



\. B.. 1Q03 



. A. B.. 1904 
. .A. B.. 1905 



A. B.. 1906 



A. B.. 1906 
A. B.. 1903 



A. B.. 1904 



\. B.. 1904 



A. B.. 1904 



. A. B., 1903 
. A. B., 1906 

.1899-1903 

.1899-1902 

. 1899-1903 

.1899-1904 \.B., 1904 



Digitized by 



Google 



236 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Student 



PostOfike 



SUte 



Years at 
Luther College Graduation 



Rigg. Jacob Glenwood Minn . 

Saxvik. Henry O Higlilandville la. . . . 

Sevareid, Alfred Kenyon Minn . 

Sevareid, Nils Adolph Kenyon Minn . 

Stcen, Sem P Clinton Minn. 



Strand. J. Edward Albert Lea.. 

Thompson, T. Elmer Ossian 



Minn, 
.la.... 



•Thorpe, Christian Scriver Willmar Minn. 

Tjensvold, Gabriel Eldorado la 

Urheim. Olaf Chicago 111. . . . 

Winnor, Arnold Toronto S. D. . 

Wollan, Clarence Glenwood Minn. 

nVrolstad. J0rgen Oliver Stevens Point Wis. . . 

*Wulfsberg. Jacob Aall Otte8en.Decorah la 

•Ylvisaker, Sigurd Christian ... St. Paul Minn . 

1900-1901 



.1899^1900 

.1899^1905 A. B.. 1905 

.1899-1906 A. B.. 1906 

. 1899-1903 

.1899-1900. 1901- 

1904 

.1899-1905 A. B., 1905 

.1899-1900. 1901- 

1904 A. B.. 1904 

.1899-1903 A. B., 1903 

.1899^1900 

. 1899-1901 

. 1899^1901 

.1899-1900 

.1899-1906 A. B.. 1906 

. 1899^1905 A. B.. 1905 

.1899^1903 A. B.. 1903 



Aamodt. Ferdinand Houston Minn . . . 1900. . . 

Anderson. Thomas Calmar la 1901 . . . 

Arnsion. Halvor Viking N. D.. . .1900-1901 . 

Bergum. Albert North Bristol Wis 1900-1901 . 

Bjornson. Norman Sun Prairie Wis 1900-1902 . 

Borgen. Wilhelm Red Wing Minn. . .1900-1901 . 

Brorby. Oscar Decorah la 1900-1903 . 

Bruflodt. Gerhard Hannony Minn . . . 1900-1903 . 

Bue, Carl O Pleasant Valley Wis 1900-1901 . 

Burke. Albert Rio .Wis 1900-1901 . 

♦Christopherson. Einar Bj0m . . Pigeon Falls Wis 1900-1906 . 

Donhowe. Peter Christian Story City la 1900-1902 

Erickson. Martin Brown Rock DeU Minn . . . 1900-01. 1902-04.. 

•Estrem. Herman Wilhelm WiUmar Minn. . .1900-1904 

•Fretheim. Martin E Oakland Minn. ..1900-1905 

Fries, Lyman A Toronto S. D 1900-1907 

Games. Martin J Mabel Minn. . . 1900-1905 . . . 

Gilbertson. Kasper O Decorah la 1900-1901. . . 

Gnolden. Oscar MorrisonviUe Wis 1900-1901 . . . 

Halvorscn, Hjalmar S. : Westby Wis 1900-1905 . . . 

♦Halvorson, Helmer Benson Minn. . . 1900-1904. . . 

Halvorson. Henry M Ridgeway la 1900-1901 . . . 

Halvorson. J. Roland Ridgeway la 1900-1905 

Hamre. Edwin Manvel N. D.. . .1900-1902. . . 

Heggtveit. CaH O Belvideie Mills Minn. . .1900-1903 

•Hendrickson. Alfred CMord N. D.. . . 1900-1906. . . 

Hendrickson. Matthias Belgrade Minn. . .1900-1901 . . . 

Hesla. Oscar Linn Grove la 1900-1901 . . . 

Hoel, Rudolph Canby Minn. . .1900-1903. . . 

♦Hoflf. Thoralf A Ashby Minn. . .1900-1904. . . 

Hovde, Wilhelm Th Wittenberg Wis 1900^1902 

Hovden, Oscar K Ridgeway la 1900-1901 

Hovey. Iver Decorah la 1900-1901 

Iverson. Oscar Eaton Wis 1900-1902 

.[essen. Carl Arthur Hayfield Minn. . .1900-03. 1905-09.. A. B.. 1909 

.fcvne, Franz Meridian Wis 1900-04 

Johnson. P. Sylvester Westby Wis 1900-02 

. ondahl. Iver O Clifford N. D.. . . 1900-01 

. uve. Henry O Ridgeway la 1900-04. 

, uve, Oscar A Stoughton Wis 1900-07. 

. Calnes. I. Magnus Starbuck Minn . . . 1900-01. 

Lien. Ole Martin Roland la 1900-01 . 

Maland, Enos E Harmony Minn. . . 1900-01 . 

Moe. Alfred Blair Wis 1900-01 . 

Moe. Carl Minneapolis Minn. . .1900-01 . 

Naeseth. John R Zumbrota Minn. . .1900-07. 

Naeseth. Oliver W Menomonie Wis 1900-01 . 

Nordlie. Arthur Stoughton Wis 1900-01 . 

Nordlie. Herman C Stoughton Wis 190006. 



.A. B.. 1906 



A. B.. 1904 
. . .A. B.. 1905 
. . .A. B.. 1907 



..A. B.. 1904 



.A. B.. 1906 



. . . A. B.. 1904 



...A. B.. 1907 
, 1902-07.. A. B.. 1907 



..A. B.. 1907 



oughtc 

Olson. Alfred M Rice Lake Wis 1900-05. 

Paulson. Peter C Forest City la 1900^4. 

Pederson. Alfred C Benson Minn . . . 1900-04 . 

Pederson. Bennie A Taylor Wis 1900-03 . 

Petersen. Joh. Wilhelm St. Paul Minn . . . 1900-04 . 

Reishus. Berting Granite Falls Minn. . . 1900-01 . 



1907-08.. 



.A. B.. 1906 



. .A. B.. 1904 
.A. B.. 1904 



.A. B., 1904 



Digitized by 



Google 



ATTENDANCE 



237 



Student 



Post Office 



Sute 



Years at 
Luther College Graduation 



A. B.. 1905 
A. B.. 1905 



Roe. Otto P Hoffman Minn. ..1900-01 . . . 

Rygg. Albert Decorah la 1900-02 . . . 

Sather. AUen Willmar Minn . . . 1900^3 . . . 

Sorlien. Henry J Bode U 1900-05... 

Sponheim. Oscar H Hatton N. D.. . . 1900-05 . . . 

Stabeck. Clement Davis Ill 1900-01 . . . 

Strand , Carl Odin Menomonie Wis 1 900^1 

Slyve, Laurits. Lake Mills. la 1900-01 

Ssebo. Anders Ridgeway la 1900-01 

Thorstenson, Stephen A Amboy Minn. . .1900-01. 1902-03 

•Turmo, Andreas Markus Newman Grove. . . .Neb. . . .1900-04 

Vaala. Alf O Saude la 1900-07 A. B.. 1907 

Vangen. Charles O Hayward Minn. ..1900-04 A. B., 1904 

Viken. Ingebrigt Booge S. D . . . . 1900-01 

Vikdal. Peter G Decorah la 1900-02 

VoUum. Edward O Hayward Minn. . .1900-04 A. B.. 1904 

Wilhelmsen. WUhelm Spring Grove Minn. . . 1900-01 



1901-1902 



Ameson, Theodore Highlandville . . . 

♦Belgum, Anton H Nora 

•Belgum. Erik S FarwelL 

Berg. J. Rudolph Newman Grove . 

•*■ £o. C. W. Walther. " 



la.... 
.Minn. 
.Minn. 

Neb. . 

Bjorgo. C. W. Walther Red Wing Minn. 

Bonde. Jesse Renville.. . . 

♦Braafladt. Louis Henry Belview 

Clausen, Sigvaki J Red Wing Minn. 

Dahl, Joseph Cottonwood 



Dahl, Sondre N Gayville. 

Davkk. Albert O Clinton. . 

Davis. Theodore A Audubon. 

Erickson. Harold Hancock . 

Erickson. Herman Mabel . 



. 1901-03 

.1901-07 A. B., 1907 

.1901-07 A. B., 1907 

.1901-06 

.1901-07 A. B., 1907 

Minn... 1901-02 

Minn. . .1901-06 A. B.. 1906 

. 1901-03 

.1901-02 

.1901-07 A. B.. 1907 



Minn 
..S. D.. 
..Minn. 
..Minn. 
..Minn. 

Minn. 



.1901-05. 
. 1901-03 . 
. 1901-02 . 
. 1901-02 . 



.A. B.. 1905 



Felland, Alfred T Macfarland Wis 1901-05 A. B., 1905 

FjeWsted, C. Alford Wells Minn . . . 1901-05 A. B.. 1905 

Gjermo. Johannes A Voss Norway. 1901-03 

Grindeland. Oscar Sattre la 1901-02 

Halls. Carl B HiUs Minn . . . 1901-06 A. B.. 1906 

Halvorson. Alfred O Ridgeway la 1901-04. 1907-10.. A. B., 1910 

Halvorson. Hans Decorah la 1901-02 

Harokison. Harold Davis lU 1901-02 

♦Haugen. Clarence : . Decorah la 1901-08 A. B.. 1908 

HiUeson. Thomas E Lee Ill 1901-04 

Hiortdahl. A»l H Washington D. C... .1901-07 

Hiortdahl. Sigurd Washington D. C... 1901-03 

Hjelle, Cari A Decorah la 1901-04. 1906-10.. A. B., 1910 

Hoklen. Oscar Bode la 1901-02 

Holkesvik. Julian A Locust la 1901-07 A. B.. 1907 

Hopperstad. Gilbert Ridgeway la 1901-02 

Hovden. Gilbert Decorah la 1901-02 

Hovden. Olvin K Decorah la 1901-02 

Hustvedt, Olaf M Decorah la 1901-05 

Iverson. Henry Elma la 1901-08 A. B.. 1908 

Larsen. Henning Decorah la 1901-08 A. B.. 1908 

Larsen. Jakob A. O Decorah la 1901-08 A. B., 1908 

Larsen. Lukas Mabel Minn . ' ~ 

Lieberg. Harvey Cottonwood Minn . 

Lommen, Gullik O Shindlar S. D. . 

Lundring. Millard M Canby Minn . 

Moe. Edwin O Mcintosh Minn . 

♦Moe. Lewis L Watson Minn. 

Monson, Martin J Delhi Minn. 

Ordal. Albert Colton S. D. . 

Peterson. Leon C Renville Minn. 

Pederson. John A Bode la 1901-03 

Rodsater. George I Manchester Minn. . .1901-06 A. B.. 1906 

RoshoMt. Carl L Centergrove Minn. . .1901-02. i903-06..A. B.. 1906 

Sandager. PWer E Cahnar la 1901-06 

Sather. Johannes Ulen Minn. . . 1901-02 

Sauer. Adolf GlenviUe Minn. . .1901-03 

Sevareid. Ephraim Kenyon Minn . . . 1901-06 

Severson. Edwin G Colton S. D 1901-02. 1904-10 

- ' - ' - - - A. B., 1908 

A. B.. 1905 



. 1901-02 . . 
. 1901-02 . . 
.1901-06. . 
.1901-02. . 
.1901-06. . 
.1901-04. . 

.1901-08 A. B.. 

.1901-02, 1904-05 

1901-05 A. B.. 1905 



A. B.. 1906 
1908 



Sperley. iohn Lourdes la 1901-08. 

Suand. Herman Albert Lea Minn. ..1901-05. 



Digitized by 



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238 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



*Struxne98. Edwart Milan Minn . . . 1901-03. 1904-06.. A. B.. 1906 

Thoraen, M. Hauman New Centerville. . . . Wis 1901-07 A. B.. 1907 

Torgerson, Abel G Somber la 1901-03 

Torriaon. Anker O Manitowoc Wis 1901-04. 1906-07.. A. B.. 1907 

Viken. Arthur Granite Falls Minn . . . 1901-02 

Void. J. Godfrey Decorah la 1901-02 



1902-1903 

Aaby, Elmer C Hayfield Minn. . . 1902-05 

Anderson. Andrew A Hills Minn , . . 1902-05 

Bergan. Oscar Ridgeway la 1902-04 

Berhow. Seward Huxley la 1902-04 

♦Borge. Daniel Johannes Decorah la 1902-08 A. B.. 1908 

Brendal, John M Starbuck Minn. . .1902-04, 1905-06.. A. B.. 1906 

♦Bruland. Peter O Lake Mills la 1902-06 A. B., 1906 

Domim. Ingebrct Parkland Wash . . . 1902-04 A. B.. 1904 

Drotning. T. Melvin Stoughton Wis 1902-06 A. B.. 1906 

♦Estrem, Gustav Rudolph Willmar Minn . . . 1902-06 A. B., 1906 

Glaim. Hellek Willmar Minn. . . 1902-03 

Gunderson. Adolph Ossian la 1902-03 

Gunlaugson, G. B Akra N. D.... 1902-03 

Haatvedt. Ole Spillville la 1902-04 

Halldorsson. Halldor K Park River N. D.. . . 1902-03 

Hanson. Hartvig E>ecorah la 1902-05 

Hanson. Helmer G Sioux Rapids la 1902-03 

Hanson. Joseph Grant Bode la 1902-09 A B.. 1909 

*Haugen. Thomas Amandus. . .Mellen Wis 1902-05. 1906-09.. A. B.. 1909 

Homstad. Carl N Wcstby Wis 1902-04 

ienson, Julius H Seneca la 1902-04 
etley. Hans A Meckling S. D 1902-03 
ohnaon. Joseph La Crosse Wis 1902-06 A. B.. 1906 

Johnson. Peter O. C Glenwood Minn . . . 1902-06 A. B., 1906 

Kalstad. Julius C Glenville Minn. . .1902-04 

•Kjorlaug. Peter Fredrlk Luverne Minn . . . 1902-08 A. B.. 1908 

Kloster. Lars S Huxley la 1902-08 A. B.. 1908 

♦Korsrud. Albert Clarence Decorah la 1902-08 A. B.. 1908 

Kulaas. Peter Minot N. D.. . . 1902-07 A. B.. 1907 

Langeland. John Rothsay Minn . . . 1902-04 

Lansing, Lawrence R Bode la 1902-03 

I-eikvold, Albert Waterville la 1902-03. 1904-05 

Lin. Olav Hudson S. D 1902-03 

Monson. Otto A. M Bode la 1902-07 

♦Mortenson. Emil E Manchester M nn . . . 1902-06 A. B.. 1906 

Mortenaon. Ludwig C Milwaukee Wis 1902-03 

Myklebust. Johan Norway. 1902-03 

Nae.sech. Adolph O Zumbrota Minn. . . 1902-09 A. B., 1909 

♦Naeseth. (Ulrik) William 

Koren Decorah la 1902-08 A. B.. 1908 

Norgaard. Alfred Fargo N. D 1902-03 

Odegaard. G. K Portland N. D.. . . 1902-04 

Olson, Olaf M Bode la 1902-03 ,... 

Opheim, Lawrence M Bode la 1902-05 

•Ordahl. Mathias B Benson Minn . . . 1903-05 

Rongley. Henry C Lenora Minn . . . 1902-05 

Rostad, Carl Norman Decorah la 1902-03, 1904-05 

Ryen. Albert Wild Rice N. D.. . . 1902-03 

Sampson. Arthur Decorah la 1902-03 

Snortum. Kenneth O Canby Minn . . . 1902-03 

Solsten, Ben Decorah la 1902-04 

Story (Storre). Norman H. 

(Nils Haakon Norman) Kensett la 1902-04 

Stub. Ingolf Arntz Hovind. . . .St. Paul Minn . . . 1902-04 

♦Tallakson, Selmer Lawrence. .. Willmar Minn . . . 1902-06 A. B., 1906 

Teien, Alfred M Benson Minn . . . 1902-03 

Teslow. Adolf H Hayward Minn . . . 1902-03 

♦Tingelstad. Oscar Adolf Silverton Ore 1902-05 A. B., 1905 

Tjernagel, Gustav Story City la 1902-03 

Tyssen. Carl Lake MiUs...: la 1902-06 A. B., 1906 

•Ursin, Nikolai Berg Chicago Ill 1902 

Wall. S. Oscar Kensett la 1902-03, 1905-06 

Wilke, Erich Fessenden N. D.. . . 1902-05 

Wilke, Gustav H Fessenden N. D... .1902-05 



Digitized by 



Google 



ATTENDANCE 



239 









Years at 








student 


Post Office 


State 


Lutlier College 


Graduation 




1903-1904 












Ansten, Henry Ingvald 


. .Decorah 


.la 


. 1903-04 








Bendickaon. Gilbert B 


. . Srarville 

..Gilchrist 


.la 

.Minn.. 


.1903-06. . 
.1903-04. 1905-07. 
















Birkestrand. Albert 


..Cambridge 


.la 


.1903-04 








BolsUd. Oscar K ^ 


..Fertile 


.Minn.. 
Minn.. 


. 1903-04 

. 1903-07 








Bredvold, J. Louis 


..Bclview 




Brendingen, Edwin L 


..UkePark 


.Minn.. 


. 1903-04 








Britson. John E 


.Roland 


.la 


. 1903-06 








Ersland, Arthur 


..Roland 


.la 

.la 


. 1903-04 

.1903-06 








Fcrkin. Otis B 


..Roland 




♦Fordc, Gerhard Olavus 


..Sterbuck 


.Minn.. 


.1903-07 


A. 


B.. 


1907 


•Frethcim. Scvert Johan 


..Oakland 


.Minn.. 


. 1903-07 


A. 


B., 


1907 


Grindc. UwisC... 


..Deerfield 


Wis.... 


.1903-04 








Grindstucn, Iver I 


..Sutton's Bay 


.Mich... 


.1903-09 


.A. 


B.. 


1909 


Gulbrandaon, Eskild H 


..Albert Lea 


Minn.. 


.1903-04 








Gulbrandson. Rolf M 


..Albert Ua 


.Minn.. 


.1903-04 








Gunderson. Kittil 


..Ridgeway 


.la 


.1903-04 








Gunvordahl. Harold 


..Deerfield 


Wis.... 


.1903-04 








Gutteb0. Casper 


..Huxley 


.la 


.1903-04 








Gutteb0. Nels H. W 


..Huxley 


la 


.1903-09 


A. 


B.. 


1909 


Hanson, George C 


..Bode 


• la 


.1903-09 


A. 


B., 


I90Q 


Hanson, Karl 


..Twin Valley 


Minn.. 


. 1903-04. 1905-08. 


.A. 


B., 


1908 


Haugen, Albert E 


. .Decorah 


.la 


. 1903-06 








Heggen, Henry S 

Hegland, Martin N 


..Huxley 


la 


. 1903-04 








..Roland 

. .Roland 

. . Graytown 


• la 

la 

Wis.... 


. 1903-06 








Hegland. Thor O 

Hclgeaon. Alfred 


.1903-05 








.1903-04 








Hem. Hans N 


. . Fosston 


Minn.. 


. 1903-08 


A. 


B., 


1908 


Henderson. Nils 


. . Cresco 


la 


.1903-04. 1909-13. 








Hokaasen. Otto T 


. . Decorah 


la 


.1903-09 


.A. 


B., 


1909 


Iverson, Jonas B 

Iverson. Peter J 


. . Hemingford 


. Neb . . . 


.1903-06 








. . Arnegard 


N. D... 


.IP03-04. 1908-10. 


.A. 


B.. 


, 1910 


Johnson. Arthur R 

Kilncss. Philip G...: 


..Decorah 

..Dell Rapids 


.la 

S. D.... 


. 1903-05 








.1903-06 








Ude. Sigurd 


. . Foeston 

..New York 


. Minn . . 
N. Y... 


. 1903-04 








Larson, Arthur 


.1903-04 








Larson. Harold 


..New York 


N. Y... 


.1903-04 








Lee. Alfred L 


. Stoughton 


Wis... 


. 1903-05 








*Lillegard. George Oliver 

♦Lynne. Justus A 

Monson, Henry 


..Bode 


la 


. 1903-08 


A. 


B.. 


19D8 


..Elbow Lake 


Minn.. 


. 1903-07 


A. 


B.. 


1907 


. .Decorah 

..Lee 


la 

.Ill 


. 1903-07 








Nordby. Paul 


. 1903-06 








Olsen, NelsA 


..Herscher 


Ill 


. 1903-07 


A. 


B. 


1907 


Olsen. Thomas J 


. . Herscher 


Ill 


.1903-09 








Petersen, Bernard (Sorose).. 


..St. Paul 


Minn.. 


. 1903-06 








Preus, Paul A 


..Decorah 


la 


.1903-11 


A. 


B.. 


1911 


QuaWy. Peter W 

Randklcv. Edward 


. .Decorah 


la 


.1903-10 


A. 


B.. 


1910 




. Minn . . 
la 


.1903-04 

. 1903-04 








Ritland. Simon 


. .Roland 




♦RoshoWt. Jacob Wilhclm. . . 


. . Centcrgrove 

..Albert Ua 


Minn.. 


. 1903-07 


A. 


B., 


1907 


•Smeby, Olaf Vilhelm 


Minn.. 


. 1903-07 


A. 


B.. 


, 1907 


Sorlien.Carl 


..Bode 

. .Hatton 


la 

N. D... 


. 1903-04. 1905-06. 
1907-09 








Sponheim. Wm. H 


.1903-04 








Stuve. Selmer 


..Whitehall 


Wis.... 


. 1903-05 








•Sumstad. Martin Ovedius.. . 


..Ashby 


Minn.. 


. 1903-07 


A. 


B. 


1907 


Teisberg. Thomas H 


-Ashby 


. Minn . . 


. 1903-07 


A. 


B., 


, 1907 


Ulen, Edward 


. Decorah 


la 


. 1903-04 








•Vaaler, Arnt Johannes 


..Twin Valley 


.Minn.. 


. 1903-07 


A. 


B.. 


1907 


Wcvley. K. A. Meyer 

Wirt. Benjamin O 


. . Highlandville 

. .Decorah 


.la 

la 


. 1903-04 

. 1903-09 
















1904-1905 












♦Aanestad. C. Walthcr 


. . Garretson 


S. D... 


. 1904-08 








Anderson. G. Peter 


..Hills 


Minn.. 


.1904-06 








*Backerud. Man in B 


. . Newman Grove . . . 


.Neb... 


.1904-08 


,\ 


R 


, 1908 


Bartness. Martin 


. Hartland 


Minn.. 


. 1904-05 








Birkelo, Carl C 


. . Colton 


S. D... 


.1904-10 


A. 


B. 


1910 


Bj0rgo. P. Gerhard A 


Red Wing 


. Minn. . 


. 1904-08 


A. 


B.. 


1908 


Boe. T. Ludvig 

Braafladt. Olc A 


. Norway Lake 


Minn. . 


.1904-05. 1006-07. 








. Belview 


Minn.. 


. 1904-06 








Clave. Alfred O 


Ottosen 


la 


. 1904-09 









Digitized by 



Google 



240 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Student 



Po8t Office 



State 



Years at 
Luther College Graduation 



Dahl. Gerhard H HiUsboro N. D.. . 

Dahl. Henry C I>evib Lake N. D.. . 

Dale, Christian J Decorah la 

Dale. Herman F Decorah la 

Ekfelt, Odd E Decorah la 

Fmseth. Carl H Kenyon Minn . . 

Forde. Arthur M Highlandville la 

♦FriU. Charles Arnold Minot N. D.. . 

Fuglk. Martin R Ashby Minn . 



Gaard. Homer Roland la 1904-05 . 

Gravgaard. J. P Bi^lgrade Minn . . . 1904-07 . 

Gutteb9. Morton A Huxley la 1904-13 . 

♦Haavik, Elias Cornelius De Forest Wis 1904-06. 

Halvorson. Alfred O Gary Minn. . .1904-06. 

Hanson. Sven A Cranfill's Gap Texas. . . 1904-09 . 

HeUekson. Adolph HayfieM Minn . 1904-07. 

Hjelle, Sigurd Decorah la 1904-05. 

Hjort. Karl Olaf Minneapolis Minn . . . 2904-05 . 



1904-06 A. B.. 1906 

1904-07 

1904-12 

1904-13 A. B., 1913 

1904-07. 1908-10.. A. B.. 1910 

1904-06 

1904-07 

1904-05. 1907-11. .A. B.. 1911 
1904-07 



A. B.. 1908 
.A. B.. 1909 




LADIES* AID AT COLLEGE 
(Mrs. C. K. Preus in Foreground) 



.1904-05. 
..1904-08. 



HocRcvoU. Alfred T Decorah la 1904-08 

♦Holum, James (Jens) Olaus. . . De Forest Wis 1904-08 

Humble. Adolph Rushford Minn . . . 1904-05 

Jenson. Omar H McHenry N. D.. 

•jerdee, Joseph C Minneapolis Minn . 

Johnson, Henry J Minneapolis Minn . 

Juul, Rudolph A Brandon Minn . 

^Kalvestrand, Lars Alfred 

Marion Viroqua Wis 1905-07 

Langcland, Martin Highlandville la 1904-05 

Larson, Simon Richard Vermilion S. D 1904-05 

Lee, Mart'n E S. D 1904-06 

Lcc. Peter A. G Deerfield Wis 1904-06 

l^ikvold. Olvin G Waterville la 1904-05 

♦Magehiscn. Finn Rushford Minn. . . 1905-09 

Martin, Carl Oscar Minneapolis Minn. . .1904-06 

Miller. Anton Lewis Hartland Minn . . . 1904-11 



.A. B.. 1908 



1904-10 

1904-07, 1909-11, 



.A. B.. 1910 



.A. B.. 1909 



Digitized by 



Google 



ATTENDANCE 



241 



Student 



Post Office 



SUte 



Years at 
Luther College Graduation 



Myran. Andres O Decorah la 1904-05. 1906-07. 

1911-12 

Noer, Victor R Colfaic 

Nygaard. Obf S Hartland 

Orfield. Didrick J Belview 

Pieterson. Tillman Soldiers Grove . 

*Preu8. Herman Amberg Minneapolis . . 

Ringoen. Adolph R Ridgeway .... 

Rosboldt. Ingelbert E Cencergrove. . 

Roetad, Martin L I>ecorah 

Rud, Carl O Portland 



Ryggt Lawrence S . 



.Decorah. 



ygg. 

*Sandager. Christian N. Belview. 

^Sandberg. Ivar Morris 

Skaaland. Sven G Viroqua. . . 

*Skagen. Johan Angel Mdrk . . . Brooklyn. . 
*Skavlan (Schivlan), Ole E Chicago. . . 

Skrede. Moses M Colton. 



..Wis... 
. . Minn . 
..Minn. 
..Wis... 
..Minn. 
..la... 
..Minn. 
..la.... 
. .N. D.. 
..la... 
. . Minn . 
. .Minn. 
..Wis... 
. .N. Y.. 
..lU... 
S. D. 



.1904-08. 
.1904-10.. 
.1904-06. . 
.1904-06.. 
.1904-10. . 
.1904-08. . 
.1904-06.. 
.1904-06. . 
.1904-06. . 
.1904-06.. 
.1904-10.. 
.1904-11. . 
.1904-06. . 
.1904-06. . 
.1905-06. . 
.1904-06.. 



A. B.. 
A. B., 



1908 
1910 



A. B.. 1906 
A. B.. 1906 



. .A. B , 1910 

.A. B.. 1911 

..A. B.. 1906 



, 1906-09.. 



A. B.. 1909 



A. B.. 1909 



..A. B.. 1912 



■ A. B.. 1912 



Smedal. Carl A Roland la 1904-08. 

Solberg. Melvin Blooming Prairie . . . Minn . . . 1904-05 . 

Solseth. Lconhard I Watson Minn. ..1904-06 

Sorum, Gilman Oscar A Waukon la 1904-05, 1910-11. 

Stensrud. Edwin J Hartland Minn . . . 1904-07 . 

Storla, Erick O Decorah la 1904-07 . 

Teslow. Herman A Decorah la 1904-07, 

Trytien, C. Oscar Albert Lea Minn. ..1904-09. 

Voiding. Carl N Decorah la 1904-05 . 

Winnor, Guy W Minneapolis Minn . . . 1904-06. 

♦Wisnacs. John Carlot Hickson N. D.. . . 1904-09 . 

1905-1906 

^Aal. Eugene Junhard Starbuck Minn. . . 1905-06. 1908-11.. A. B.. 1911 

Anderson, Earlen Cresco la 1905-06 

Andreasen, Hans G Denmark. . 1905-06 

Amess. Albert Decorah la 1905-06 

Amess. GUbert Decorah la 1905-06 

*Au8tin. Otto George Garretson S. D 1905-12 .... 

BcU, Otto Orlow Soldiers Grove Wis 1905-06 

Brandt. Olaf J Macfarland Wis 1905-08 

*Buedall (Buttedal). Anton A. . Muskegon Mich.. . . 1905-12 

Clement. Edgar A Decorah la 1905-06 ... 

Dahl. Silas E Cottonwood Minn . . . 1905-07 

Edwards. Maurice A Macfarland Wis 1905-06 

♦Ensrud. Joseph Oacar Emil. . .Wells Minn. . . 1905-09 A. B.. 1909 

Erickson. Edward H Hixton Wis 1905-06 

♦Faye. Christopher Urdahl Zululand Africa. . . 1905-09 A. B., 1909 

Forester. O. I Decorah la 1905-06 

Gaarder. Olaf Starbuck Minn. . . 1905-09 A. B.. 1909 

Gilbcrtson, Ginard A Maddock N. D.. . . 1905-09 

Gilbertson. Henry Maddock N. D.. . . 1905-06 

Gronna. Thomas A. F Waterville la 1905-06. 1907-12 

♦Haavik. Olai Ludvig De Forest Wis 1905-12 A. B., 1912 

Hanson. George T Madison S. D 1905-06 

Harstad. S. George Parkland Wash . . . 1905-08 A. B.. 1908 

Holien. Joseph O Flandreau S. D 1905-06 

Hope. Martin Nerstrand Minn . . . 1905-06 

♦Hoyme, Adolph Hebner Hills Minn. . . 1905-06. 1913-17 

Hustvedt. William Decorah la 1905-06^ 1907-08. 

1909-10 

Jennoov Carl Andrew Edgerton Wis 1905-07. 1908-10.. A. B., 1910 

Jerde. Oscar Toronto S. D 1905-11 A. B., 1911 

Jerdee, T. R Minneapolis Minn. . . 1905-06 

*John8hoy. M. Casper Starbuck Minn. . . 1905-06, 1907-09.. A. B.. 1909 

^Jordahl. Edward L Beaver Creek Minn .. 

Kasberg, Alvln H Spring Grove Minn . 

Kihiess. Oscar B Dell Rapids S. D. . . 

Larsen. Albert K Decorah la 1905-06. 1908-11.. 

Lee, Jacob S Decorah la 1905-06 

Leque. Otto Byron Minn . . . 1905-06 

♦Lerud. Theodore Twin Valley Minn. . .1905-10 A. B., 1910 

Leum, Henry J MayvUle N. D.. . . 1905-09 A. B., 1909 

Lomen. Ernest St. Paul Minn . . . 1905-07 

Markhus. Einar Decorah la 1905-06 

Markhus. Orrin .Decorah la 1905-06 



.1905-10.. 
. . 1905-06 . 
.1905-07. 



. .A. B.. 1910 



Digitized by 



Google 



242 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Student 



Po«tOafee 



State 



Year? at 

Luther CoOese Gcarfiiarwa 



Nepmd, Sefaner Weatby . 

Nibestuen. Maxttn. Arcadia. 

Ofaon. Martin Bnwe. .. 

Pedersoo. Christopher A Bcnaoa. . 

Peterfloo. Anlak S Orfonhrille. 



QnaJKt. Stephen 
Ranaland. Sicard.. 



190546.. 

190546.. 
.190549. . 
.1905-419. . 
.1905-06. . 
.1905-07. 
. 1905-06, 190^49. 
.1905-09. . 
.1905-09.. 
.1905416. . 
.190S-0S. . 
.1905-13. . 
.1905-07. . 



.\-B^ 1909 
A. B., 1909 



.\. B.. 1909 
A. B-. 1909 



A. B-, 191 J 



.19054)6.1907-09 

. 19QS-0S 

.1905-07. 1909-11 

.19054)9 A. B.. 



1909 



A. B.. 1910 
A. B.. 1913 



A. B.. 1910 



..Wis... 

. Vna... 

S. D 

Minn . 

. WTa... 

. Newman Grove .... Neb . . 

.Westby ^»... 

•Kolften. Ole O Decorah la . . 

Roshoidt, Theodore G Centcrsrove Minn . . 

^Sahrraen, Emil AJexaadria. Minn. 

Shelhun. Joseph . Minn . 

Soodreaen, Macnus S Bricelyn Minn . 

Sperati, Carvten E Decorah la.. . 

Tenold, W. O Flandreao S. D . 

Tiemafltl. Cbrencv Stanwood Wash . 

Vokiinf. Roy Decorah la 

Wee, ^bner Martin Orfordrille Wis... 

Wikesbnd. Giistav A. M Decorah la 

Willtanw, Henry W Hazel Run. Minn. 

«YlTiMker. Nib WaHher Albert Lea. Minn. 

1906-1907 

Aaby. E. Clarence Hayfield Minn . 

Anderson. Oscar E Colfaz Wis. . . 

Bakke, Erick Arthur Decorah la 

Blegen, HaraM Obf Decorah la 

Erickson. Arthur C La Crosse Wi*. . . 

Erstad« Andrew T . Zumbrota Minn . 

Hansen. Harold Cbrence . . . Clevebnd Ohio. . 

Hansen, Harry J Clevebnd Ohio. . 

Haugen, Roy Walbce Lac qui Farle Minn . 

Hrmeth. Adolph A Hitterdal Minn . 

Hilmen. Alfred Crookston Minn . 

Hielle. Bernhard C Decorah la 

Ivrrson. Ingvald Toronto S. D . . 

Kilness. Bennie A Dell Rapids. S. D . 

Losen. Jones Decorah la 

*Madson, Norman Arthur Manitowoc Wis. . . 

Mevig, Andreas L M Lake Park Minn 

Moe, Leonard A Decorah la 1906-12 

Monson, Albert Delhi Minn . . . 1906-10 

♦M0ller, Gustav Emtl TeU Wis 1906-08 

♦Nesset. Alfred Olevius Decorah la 1906-13 A. B.. 1913 

Norgaard. Jamen R Big Grove Minn. . . 1906-11 A. B.. 1911 

Opheim. James Oliver Bode la 1906-07 

Overn, Orbndo E. A Albert Lea Minn. . . 1906-07 

Peterson, Enoch E McHenry N. D.. . . 1906-12 

Peterson, Francis E Clarkston Idaho. . . 1906-09 

Prescott. Abner Deerfield Wis 1906-07 

Preus. Wilhelm C Minneapolis Minn . . . 1906-13 

Relshus. Knut P. B Stanley Wis 1906-09 

Revne. H. Gerhard M Locust la 1906-09 

•Rognlien, Joseph Bcrnlmrd . . . Strum Wis 1906-10 

Rosenqvist, Bernhard Baldwin Wis 19064)9 

Sj0bakken. John O Adams Minn . . . 1906-08 

Shervem, Henry O Parkbnd Wash. . .19064)9 

Snortum, Carl Adams Minn . . . 1906-07 

Speratl. Paolo H Decorah la 1906-12. 1913-15.. A. B.. 1915 

Storre, John S Kensett la 1906-07 

Thingvold. Elmer Hespcr la 1906-07 

Thompson. Julian S Barnesville Minn . . . 1906-07 

Tobiason. Carl S Hatton N. D... 1906-09 

*Tufte. Obf Brandt Grand Forks N. D.. 1906-10 A. B.. 1910 

Tweet. Charlie O Sattre la 1906-08 

Urness. John N Saude la 1906-14 A. B.. 1914 

•Vaaler, Knut Bernhard Twin Valley Minn. . .1906-10 A. B.. 1910 

Ylvisaker, Lauritz S St. Paul Minn. .. 1906-10 A. B.. 1910 



19064)7. . 

19064)7.. 

1906-10. . 

1906-12. . 

1906-10. . 

1906-10. . 

1906-13. . 

1906-12. . 

190649.. 

1906-10. . 

1906-09.. 

19064)9 

190647 

1906-09 

19064)8 

1906-11 A. B.. 1911 

1906-09 A. B.. 1909 

A. B.. 1912 

A- B., 1910 



A. B.. 
..A. B.. 



.A. B.. 
A. B.. 



1912 
1909 



1913 
1909 



...A. B.. 1910 
...A. B., 1909 

!;;A. B.. 1909 



1907-1908 

Aanestad. Otto HcrlxTt Garretson S. D 1907-12 . 

Anderson, Elmer Minn . . . 1907-08 . 

Bersie, Arthur Melvin Spring Grove Minn . . . 1907-09 . 



A. B.. 1912 



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ATTENDANCE 



243 



Student 



P(Mt Office 



State 



Yean at 
Luther College Graduation 



Bidne. Joseph Peder Locust la 1907-11 . 

Birkelo. Rasmus C Colton 

Burtness, Austin Spring Grove . 

Christianson. Ole Crookston .... 

Dahl. Wilhelm P Gayville 

Ellison. Edwin Orlando Minot 

Espeland. Nels Christopher. . . Waterville. 



Estenson. Emil Menomonie Wis 1907-11 

FTaskcrud, Joseph O I>ecorah la 1907-10. 

Fosmark, Carl Flandreau S. D 1907-08. 

Gilbertson, Carl N Portland N. D.. . . 1907-09. 

Granseth. Edwin Bode la 1907-12 . 

Griniley, Peter Oliver B Portland N. D.. . . 1907-11 . 

Gulbrandson. Cleon D Albert Lea Minn.. . . 1907-13 . 

Hanson, Herbert C St. Paul Minn. . . 1907-10. 

Hegg, Elmer Robert Blair Wis 1907-11 . 

^Henderson. Elmer A Lake Mills la 1907-09. 

Hoel. Harry Canby Minn. . . 1907-08. 

Jacobson. Waldemar Albert. . . Waterville la 1907-1 1 . 

Johnson. Harold Morris Minn . . . 1907-08 . 

Johnsrud. Peter L Spring Grove Minn . . . 1907-09 . 

Jonnson. B. C N. D.. . . 1907-08. 

Kiel, Albert Laurits Calmar la 1907-12 . 

Kirkeby. G. W Decorah la 1907-08. 

*Larson. Victor Ferdinand Cambridge Wis 1907-1 1 . 

Larson. Wallace Decorah la 1907-08 . 

Leikvold, Theodore Waterville la 1907-08 . 

Leland. Oscar Ontario Wis 1907-08 . 

•Uvdahl, Albert N Hickson N. D.. . . 1907-11 . 

*Lo8en. Carl Decorah la 1908-16. 

MoUer, Arnold Henrik Tell Wis 1907-08 . 

Narum. Selmer H Waterville la 1907-13. 

Neprud, Alf Westby Wis 1907-12. 

Nestos. Peter Minot N. D.. . . 1907-09. 

Onsgard, Henry A Edgerton Wis 1907-11 . 

Ordahl, Martin Colton S. D 1907-08 . 

Peterson. Elmer A Brandt S. D 1907-09. 

Preus, Rudolph Westby Wis 1907-08. 

Preus. Vernick Westby Wis 1907-08. 

•Quill, Martin Bertinius Sauk Center Minn . . . 1907-1 1 . 

Quinnell, Johan Spring Grove Minn . . . 1907-10 

Reishus, George A Minot N. D. 

Reishus. Selmer W Minot N. D. 

Risendal. Ole Stillwater Minn . 

♦Risty, Edward Sioux Falls S. D. 

Rossing, Andrew Clifford Bode la 1907-12 . 

Seines. Edgar J Spring Grove Minn . . . 1907-09 . 

Siroley. Irvin T Portland N. D.. . . 1907-1 1 . 

Snartemo. Ingvald 1 Canton S. D 1907-09. 

Solcm. Kasper Brandt S. D 1907-09. 

Storla, Theodore Decorah la 1907-08 . 

Thorpe, Olaf Christian Willmar Minn . . . 1907-1 1 . 

Tnilson. Theodore Orfordville Wig 1907-08. 

Trytten, John M .' Albert Lea Minn . . . 1907-11 . 

♦Ulvilden, Reinhardt Sioux Falls S. D 1907-13 . 

Wallace, Enok Arnold Spring Grove Minn . . . 1907-08 . 

Wennes, Peter Spring Grove Minn . . . 1907-09 . 

Wollan, Casper I Glenwood Minn . . . 1907-1 1 . 

Wollan, Holger W Glenwood Minn. . .1907-09. 

1908-1909 



.S. D... 1907-09, 1911-13.. 

. Minn ... 1907-08 

.Minn... 1907-09 

.S. D 1907-09, 1910-12.. A. B., 1912 

.N. D.... 1907-09 

la 1907-10. 



1907-09. 
.1907-10. 
. 1907-08 . 
. 1907-08 . 



.A. B., 1911 



A. B., 
A. B.. 



1911 
1913 



A. B.. 1911 



A. B.. 1911 



A. B.. 1911 
A. B.. 1916 



A. B.. 1911 



A. B.. 1911 



A. B.. 1911 



A. B., 1911 



..A. B., 1911 
..A. B.. 1913 



A. B., 1911 



A. B., 1912 



A. B.. 1914 
A. B.. 1917 



Aaby, Arthur Oliver Hayfield Minn . . , 1908-12 

Anderson. Truman C Highlandville la 1908-1 1 

♦Andrews. Melvin O Mayville N. D.. . . 1908-14 

Birkelo. Carl P Ferryville Wis 1908-13. 1914-17 

Blegen. John Alfred Decorah la 1908-11 

•Borlaug. Arthur Oliver Calmar la 1908-14 A. B., 1914 

Brunsdale, C. Norman Portland N. D.. . . 1908-13 A. B.. 1913 

Brunsdale. G. Elmer Portland N. D... .1908-13 A. B.. 1913 

Burtness. Britton Orfordville Wis 1908-13 

Carsrud, Jens Colton S. D 1908-09 

Clave, Clarence O Ottosen la 1908-10 

•Foss, Carl L Everett Wash. . . 1908-12 A. B., 1912 

Fulsaat. Sigurd Martin Newman Grove Neb .... 1908-09 



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244 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Yearaat 
Student Post Oflke State Luther College Graduation 



Gilbertton, Albert H Portland N. D. . ..1908-09 

Gjeraet. Maurice Decorah la 1908-09. 1910-12, 

1913-15, 1919 

Gorder. Lester W Decorah la 1908-15 A. B., 1915 

Grindeland, Ingolf A Warren Minn. . .1908-10 

Grinna. Oliver Alexander Decorah la 1908-10 : 

Halvorson, Clarence Julian. . .St. Olaf la 1908-10 

Halvorson. Elmer Decorah la 1908-09 

Hansen. Carl M Kensett la 1908-12 A. B., 1912 

Hanson, Olaf Decorah la 1908-09 

Haugen. Donald James Decorah la 1908-16 A. B., 1916 

Hendricks. Herbert N Ferryville Wis 1908-12 

Hjelle. Walter G Decorah la 1908-10 

Hovdc, Brynjolf J Wittenberg Wis 1908-10. 1912-16.. A. B., 1916 

Iverson, Elmer Oliver Decorah la 1908-12 

Jenson. Clarence Edgerton Wis 1908-09 

*Johnshoy. Joseph Walter Starbuck Minn. . . 1908-11 A. B.. 1911 

Johnson. Herman Carl De Forest Wis 1908-09 

Johnson. Justus Hartwick De Forest Wis 1908-10 

Josvanger. Benjamin Decorah la 1908-09 

Korsrud. August O Decorah la 1908-09 

Lane. Reinhard A HighlandviUe la 1908-10 

Larson. Einar Roger Wausau Wis 1908-15 A. B.. 1915 

Losen, PhiUp Decorah la 1908-13 

Luros, Floyd T Crary N. D.. . . 1908-12 

Lynne. Alfred Norman Elbow Lake Minn. . . 1908-09 

MoUand . Gerhard Wis 1 908-09 

*Narum. Hartvig Karensius.. . . Waterville la 1908-10. 1911-17.. A. B.. 1917 

Olson, Cliflford Decorah la 1908-09 

Opstad. Iver A Parkland Wash. . . 1908-11 A. B., 1911 

•Orting. Einar Albert N. Bryn. Decorah la 1908-09 

Paulson. Simeon G Forest City la 1908-09. 1911-13 

Pfeterson, Frank Wm Bellingham Wash. . .1908-09 

Peterson. Hebner HighlandviUe la 1908-09 

Preus. Herman A Decorah la 1908-16 A. B., 1916 

Qualset. Olaf Newman Grove Neb 1906-09 

Reppen. Nels OUver Dane Wis 1908-09 

Sehies. Edwin Robert Decorah la 1908-16 A. B.. 1916 

Severson. ^mer Oliver Humboldt S. D 1908-12 

Sorlien, Oscar Conrad Bode la 1908-12 

•Storaasli. Gynther Tacoma Wash. . . 1908-11 A. B.. 1911 

Storatad. Alft«d G Horace N. D.. . . 1908-12 A. B.. 1912 

Waller, Theodore A Spring VaUey Wis 1908-10 

♦Wanberg, Richard Theodore .. Benson Minn. . .1908-14 A. B., 1914 

WoW. Hany St. Olaf la 1908-09 

Wollan. WmfredA Glenwood Minn. . .1908-12 A. B.. 1912 

1909-1910 

♦Aaberg. Theodore Parkland Wash. .1909-11 A. B., 1911 

Anderson, Conrad Arthur Colton S. D 1909-17 .^. A. B.. 1917 

Bakke, Orlando Decorah la 1909-12 * 

Bninsdale, Kristian Edward. .. Portland N. D.. . . 1909-14 A. B., 1914 

Bruvold, Oscar A Decorah la 1909-10 

Busness. OUnus M WaterviUe la 1909-12. 1913-14. 

1915-16 

Eide, Alvin Clyde Lee Ill 1909-10 

Erickson. Arentz J Bode la 1909-14 

•Forseth. Peder C Amherst Wis 1909-13 A. B., 1913 

Hanson, Claudie B Decorah la 1909-10 

Hanson, Marcus Edward Decorah la 1909-13 

Henderson, GusUv Cresco la 1909-14 

*Hexom, WilheUn Theodore. . . Decorah la 1909-17 A. B.. 1917 

Holter. Arthur M Wildrose N. D.. . .1909-17 A. B., 1917 

Hope. Carl Nerstrand Minn. . .1909-10 

Johnson, Harry P Decorah la 1909-11 

Kjos. Selmer E Vbwiua Wis 1909-17 

♦Kjser. Ludvig Pwier (Kjer).. . .Amherst Jet Wis 1909-13 A. B., 1913 

Knutson, Carl S Belview Minn. ..1909-13 A. B., 1913 

Larsen, GusUv A. C Decorah la 1909-14 

Lee. Arthur O Decorah la 1909-17 A. B., 1917 

Lillechun, Andres Decorah la 1909-10 

♦Lono (Lone), Mikkel Nunda S. D. . . .1909-17 A. B., 1917 

Moe. Guy Enoch Decorah la 1909-12 

Monson. Herman W Kindred N. D.. . .1909-11. 1912-14.. A. B.. 1914 



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ATTENDANCE 245 



Yean at 
Student Post OflSce Sute Lutber College Graduation 



Myrland. InsvaM R Albert Lea Minn. . .1909-11 

Natvig. Arthur S Cresco la 1909-17 A. B.. 1917 

Nelson. David T Mayville N. D.... 1909-12 A. B., 1912 

Olaen. Edwin Reuben Stillwater Minn. . .1909-11 

Olaen. Ralph Norman Stillwater Minn.. ..1909-13 

Opheim. Carl Wm Bode la 1909-U 

Opsahl. Julian Eberhard Decorah la 1909-16 A. B.. 1916 

Overstad. Arthur Glenwood Minn . . . 1909-12 

*IH^teraen. Justin Axel Manistique Mich.. . . 1909-13 A. B., 1913 

^Peterson. Henry John Minneapolis Minn . . . 1909-14 

*Rahn. Grant Ormy Gustus.. . . Belview Minn . . . 1909-13 A. B.. 1913 

Ramsey, Johan Alfred Decorah la 1909-1 1 

Rea. Clarence Hamilton Texas. . . 1909-10 

Reishus, Friiiof E Stanley Wis 1909-13 A. B.. 1913 

Ringlee, Emil Binford N D.. . . 1909-12 

Ruste, Lauritz Montrose S. D 1909-11 

Scott. Andrew Cresco la 1909-10 

Soland. Embret Decorah la 1909-12 

Stensby. Theodore Valley City N. D.. . .1909-16 A. B.. 1916 

Stinson. Clarence Bennie Cresco la 1909-10, 1911-12 

Swensen. Walter J Decorah la 1909-16 A. B., 1916 

Thorsen. H. Adolph Byron Minn. . .1909-13 

Weeks. Otto W Rochelle Ill 1909-11, 1912-13 

Wennes. Edgar R Spring Grove Minn. . .1909-10 

WoW. John Bertram Hesper la 1909-10 

Woldum. Hilmen Morris Bfecorah la 1909-12 



1910-1911 

Aamodt. Oscar Bamesville Minn. . . 1910-12 

*Au8tin. Casper M Colton S. D 1910-16 

Berrum. Gerhard L Holmen Wis 1910-15 

Bjorgo. Victor B Red Wing Minn. . . 1910-14 

Bredesen. Osuld Torrison Deerfield WU 1910-13 

Bievig. Martin Leo Sacred Heart Minn. . . 1910-16 A. B.. 1916 

CoUm, Sam Gilbert Sacred Heart Minn. . . 1910-13. 1915-16 

Digness. Agnar B Grand Forks N. D.... 1910-12 

Doely, Sivert Helmer Spring Grove Minn. . . 1910-11 

Erickson. Elmer Devils Lake N. D.. . . 1910-12 

*GigsUd. Walter T Valders ^is 1910-14 A. B., 1914 

Gilbertson. Theodore Portland N. D.. . .1910-12, 1913-16.. A. B., 1916 

^refthen. Emil Alexander Northwood la 1910-14 A. B., 1914 

*Greibrok, Aanon Parkland Wash. . . 1910-12 A. B., 1912 

*Hahroraon. Ehncr Nestor Rockdale Wis 1910-14 A. B., 1914 

•Hansen. Helmer Johan Chicago Ill 1910-13 

Hanson, John TiUman Lignite N. D.. . . 1910-18 A. B., 1918 

Helgeson. Henry Alfred Waukon la 1910-14. 1915-17 

Iverson, Clarence Tony Roland la 1910-12 

Johnson. Joseph M Colton S. D 1910-18 A. B.. 1918 

Johnson, Paul G Spring Grove Minn . . . 1910-16 A. B., 1916 

Kihiess. Gideon WaMemar W.Dell Rapids S. D. . . .1910-16 A. B., 1916 

Kraabel. Ragnar E Clifford N. D.. . .1910-16 A. B., 1916 

Kraabel, Torgcr Oswold Clifford N. D.. . . 1910-15 A. B., 1915 

Kvaase, Gustav Johan Menomonie Wis 1910-13, 1914-15 

Kvam, JuUen Alf S Rice Lake Wis 1910-15 

Larson, RandaU J Minot N. D.. . . 1910-11 

Uvorson. Oscar Lake Mills la 1910-14 A. B., 1914 

Linjer. Edgar Edward Minneapolis Minn. . . 1910-12 

•Loftness, George O Gibbon Minn. . .1911-14 

Loven, Carl Alfred Waukon la 1910-14 

Mehl, Oscar Irvin Hibbing Minn . . . 1910-12 

Mossing, Granville M BeldenvUle Wis 1910-13 

Natvig. Alvin Julius Cresco la 1910-18 A. B., 1918 

Nordvik, SigvaM AUiance Neb. . . .1910-11 

Oiafson. Clarence Mandt Duluth Minn. . .1910-17 A. B.. 1917 

Petersen, Ralph W Chicago Ill 1910-12 

Preus, Otto Hjort Minneapolis Minn . . . 1910-12 

Ramsland. Arvid Westby Wis 1910-13 

Riveness, Joseph Bode la 1910-11 

Ronning. Russell E Minneaports Minn. . .1910-12 

Saue. Sam O Montevideo Minn. . . 1910-11 

Sauer, Arnold G GlenviUe Minn . . . 1910-15 A. B., 1915 

Selland. Casper Roy Decorah. . . . ; la 1910-12 

Shefloe. Silas Hoffman Minn. . . 1910-11 

Subo. Nils Eivind Decorah U 1910-16 



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246 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Yean at 
Student Port CMSce State Luther Colkge Graduation 



Streeter. Elmer Melvin La CroMe Wb 1910-17 A. B.. 1917 

Subey. Ward A Stoughton Wis 1910-11, 1912-15..A. B.. 1915 

Swansen. H. Fred Boston Maas... .1911-14 A. B.. 1914 

Swanson. Leonard O Clifford N. D.. . .1910-16 A. B., 1916 

Syvertson. Sam Amherst Wia. 1910-13 

Thoen, Ellert A Kensett la 1910-13 

Thollehaug, Oscar Kristian . . . Decorah la 1910-12 

Thompson. Thomas A Chicago Ill 1910 

*Thorpe. Nordahl Brun Wilhnar Minn. . .1910-14 A. B.. 1914 

Waage. Johannes Neilsville Wis 1911-18 A. B.. 1918 

*Waage. Knud Olav Neilsville Wis 1911-18 A. B.. 1918 

Wisness. Arthur M Hickaon N. D.. . . 1910-14 A. B.. 1914 

1911-1912 

AHsen. Arthur Edwin Manitowoc Wis 1911-15 

*Baalson. Elmer A Brooten Minn. . . 1911-15 A. B.. 1915 

Baalson. George A Brooten Minn. ..1911-15 A. B.. 1915 

Bakke. William Arthur Gibbon Minn. . . 1911-13 

Ballestad. Adolph Theodore.. . Wakott N. D.. . . 1911-13 

Bergan. KnuteW Sacred Heart Minn. . .1911-15 A. B., 1915 

♦Bly (Bleie). Henry Severin 

(Severt) Colton S. D. . . . 1911-17 

Borreson. Arthur Edwin VictorStoughton Wis 1911-14 

Brandt. Walther I Macfarland Wis 1911-15 A. B.. 1915 

Dahl. Hilbert Stephen Cottonwood Minia . . 1911-13 

Edwards. Thomas D Callender la 191 1-12 

Elvehjem. Oswald M Macfarland Wis 1911-15 A. B.. 1915 

Erickson. Albert WhiiehaU Wis 1911-15 A. B.. 1915 

Erickson. John Monroe River Falls Wis 1911-14 

♦Evans, Uiif Erling Westby Wis 1911-17 A. B.. 1917 

Evanson. Carl J Portland N. D.... 1911-12 

Evanson. Chellis N Decorah la 1911-18 A. B.. 1918 

Fielstul. Henry J Ridgeway la 1911-13 

Flatland. Ole Albert Ridgeway la 1911-13 

Forde. Ralph Sigurd Starbuck Minn. . . 1911-15 

Hallan, Ehner Leander Spring Grove Minn . . . 1911-13. 1914-15. 

1921- 

Halvorson. Alfred Oscar Brandt S. D 1911-14 

♦Hansen. Harold Chicago Ill 1911-17 A. B.. 1917 

Haroldson. Carl Abner Davis Ill 1911-14 

Harstad. Oliver Bernhard Parkland Wash. . .1911-14 A. B.. 1914 

Hauan, John Marcus Mayville N. D.. . .1911-15 

Haugen. Ehner A Pelican Rapids Minn . . . 1911-13 

Hegg, Joseph Gerhard Decorah la 1911-14 

Hclvig. Abel J Roland la 1911-17 

•Hoff. Pcmell Belford Norse Texas. . . 1911-15 A. B.. 1915 

Holkesvik, Orlando Alexander. Decorah la 1911-13 

Hove, Walter G Flandreau S. D 1911-13 

Jacobson. Theodore G WaterviUe la 1911-12. 1913-15 

♦Jenson, Canute Thorvald CranfiU's Gap Texas. . . 1911-14 

Jorgenson, Eugene Ferdinand . Bode la 1911-17 A. B.. 1917 

Kinseth, Pteyd LeaUe Bode la 1911-15 

♦Kraabel, Alf McKinley Clifford N. D... .1911-17 A. B.. 1917 

Lee, Carl Alfonso Bellingham Wash. . . 1911-12 

•Lee, Clarence Louis St. Paul Minn. . . 1911-17 A. B.. 1917 

Lee, Hans Cambridge la 1911-15 

Uwls. Raymond Macfarland Wis 1911-12 

Loberg. Jesse Dewey Nelsonville Wis 1911-15 A. B.. 1915 

Lokensgaard, Herbert O Hanley FaUs Minn. . . 1911-15 A. B.. 1915 

Lysne, Henry OUver Amherst Jet Wis 1911-15 A. B., 1915 

•Mithun. Odd Johan Glenwood Minn. . .1911-15 .A. B., 1915 

Moen. Gerald Berthold Waukon la 1911-12 

Nelson. Charles Edward Fergus Falls Minn. . . 1911-12 

Nilson. Martin Jul Litchfield Neb 1911-17 

♦Nordby. Herman Preus Lee lU 1911-14 

Ofstedahl, John Waiter F Wis 1911-12 

Olson. Uvi Thor la 1911-13 

Opsahl. Hubert Thcophile Decorah la 1911-13. 1915-17, 

1919-22 A. B.. 1922 

Ormseth. Eddie Christian Farwell Minn. . . 1911-14. 1915-16 

Peterson, Axel Glen Rutland la 1911-15 

Peterson, Edwin W Astoria S. D. . . . 1911-12 

Ramberg. Freeman E Whitehall Wis 1911-12, 1913-16.. A. B.. 1916 

Ramberg. Otto Kenneth Calmar la 1911-12 



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ATTENDANCE 247 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Rholl. Uwis Fertile la 1911-12 

*Rohne, John Magnus CmnfiU's Gap Texas. . .1911-12. 1913-17.. A. B.. 1917 

•Romness. HenryR Belgrade Minn. . .1911-15 A. B.. 1915 

Ronnei. Herman Leonard Starbuck Minn. . . 1911-16 A. B.. 1916 

Rood. Paul Gerhard Waukon la 1911-12 

Rorge. Selmer Conrad Stoughton Wis 1911-13 

Rosby. Thorvald Farwell Minn. . .1911-13 

*Rosenqvi8t. Rolf BaMwin Wis 1911-16 A. B.. 1916 

Rotto. Martin Arthur Farwell Minn. . .1911-13 

*Rotto. Theodore Imar Farwell Minn. .. 1911-17 A. B.. 1917 

Sanden. Austin Fertile la 1911-14 

Seebech. Carl Henry Red Wing Minn. . . 1911-15 A. B.. 1915 

Siqucland. Harald Chicago lU 1911-20 A. B.. 1920 

Svenningaen (Swenumson) 
Thos. Nikolai Lawler la 1911-14 

Thorgrimsen, Gudmund 
G. C. J Grand Forks N. D.. . .1911-12. 1914-17.. A. B.. 1917 

Tingebud. Edvin Silverton On 1911-17 A. B.. 1917 

*Topne8S. Sibert M Lanesboro Minn. . .1911-15 A. B.. 1915 

Ylvisaker. Herman L Mayville N. D.. . . 1911-15 A. B., 1915 

1912-1913 

Amble. John Uwler la 1912-13 

Anderson. Leonard WaterviUe la 1912-13 

Arneson. Arthur H Chicago Ill 1912-20 A. B.. 1920 

Askegaard. Arthur C Comstock Minn. . .1912-16 A. B.. 1916 

Askegaard. Arthur D Comstock Minn. .1912-15 A. B., 1915 

Buslee. Clarence Irving Balfour N. D... .1912-15, 1916-17 

eleven. Isak Arkdale Wis 1912-13 

Dehli. Palmer O Harper's Ferry la 1912-13 

j^hlen. Hjalmar Olaus Morris Minn. . .1912-16 A. B., 1916 

gllison. William Johan Minot N. D.. . . 1912-13 

^altinson. Gilbert Marengo la 1912-13 

^auchaM. Melvin Minot N. D.. . . 1912-13 

^indahl. Norman Th Vermilion S. D 1912-16 

Flom. Theodore A Gary Minn. . .1912-16 

Gaard. Conrad Parkland Wash. . .1912-13 

Halvorson. NeliusOve Spring Grove Minn. . .1912-16. 1917-21.. A. B.. 1921 

Hanson. Helmer A Bode la 1912-14 

HaroMson. John R Davis Ill 1912-15 

Helle. Olc Lake Mills la 1912-14 

HUdahl. Norman Decorah la 1912-13 

Hilleboe. Selmer Conrad Minot N. D.. . . 1912-13 

HUleboe. Sigur Herbert Decorah la 1912-17 

Hoel. Mihior Omar Canby Minn. . .1912-13 

Jacobson. Irenus C Wittenberg Wis 1912-16 A. B.. 1916 

Jargo. Rudolph Alexander. . . . Deerficld Wis 1912-17 A. B., 1917 

Johnson. Lester J South Amana la 1912-15 

KkMter. Elmer A Ossian la 1912-13 

Kvale. Paul Johann OrfordviUe Wis 1912-13. 1914-17.. A. B., 1917 

Larsen. William O Linn Grove la 1912-13 

Larson. WilUam John St. Paul Minn. . .1912-15 

Lee. Adrian Isaac Dexter Minn. ..1912-17 

Lee. Morton A Stoughton Wis 1912-13 

Lee. Orlando Theobald Newhouse Minn . . . 1912-17 

*Leque. Nils Magnus Bellingham Wash. . . 1912-16 A. B.. 1916 

Uen. Jacob AallOttesen Portland N. D.... 1912-17 A. B.. 1917 

Linde. Johan Nasset Cambridge Wis 1912-15. 1916-18 

Linde. John Theodore Plaza N. D.. .. 1912-17 

Lunde. Alert Johannes Hills Minn. . .1912-18. 1921 A. B.. 1918 

Lunde. Herman A. P Hills Minn. ..1912-18 A. B.. 1918 

*Maake8tad. John Walter 

Bernhard Sutton's Bay Mich.. .. 1912-15 A. B., 1915 

Mikkelson. Carl Francis Arkdale Wis 1912-15 

Miller. Fred La Crosse Wis 1912-16. 1918 

Nelson. Eari S MayyiUe N. D.. . . 1912-13 

Nelson. Martin Johan De Forest Wis 1912-16 A. B., 1916 

Olson, Nels Lake Mills la 1912-13 

Opheim. Edwin F Bode la 1912-13 

Ostlund. Oscar Martin Duncombe la 1912-14 

Qualley. Orlando Warren Ridgeway la 1912-18, 1918 A. B.. 1918 

Rosheim. Knut Scarville la 1912-13 

Rosholdt. Herman S Centergrove Minn . . . 1912-13 A. B.. 1913 

Scarvie. Stanley M Decorah la 1912-16. 1917-18 



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248 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Student 


Post Office 


State 


Years at 
Luther College 


Graduation 


Solberg. Carsten 

Sperati. Olaf Angelo 


..Portland 

..Decorah 

..Lake Mills 

..Boston 

..Albert Lea 

. ScarviUe 

. .Sioux Falls 

. . Colton 

. . Zumbrota 

1913-1914 

.Parkland 

. . Georgeville 

Rutland 

. Balfour 

..Hills 

. Ottosen 

. . Ottosen 


N. D... 

.la 

.la 

Mass... 
. Minn . . 

.la 

.S. D... 
.S. D... 
. Minn . . 

.Wash.. 

Minn., 
.la 

N. D... 

Minn.. 

la 

.la 


.1912-13 






.1912-16 






^Thompson, Oscar C 


1912-14 






Torgerson, Thorvald John . . 


.1912-17 






Tryttcn, Merriam H 


.1912-16 

.1912-16 

.1912-16 

.1912-13 


.A. B., 

.A. B.. 
.A. B.. 


, 1916 


Twito. Helmer 

♦Ulvilden, George 

Vangsnes. Olav 


1916 
1916 


•Ylvisaker. Johan Fritjof . . . . 

Aaberg, Joseph 

*Amundson, Alfred Heglund . 
♦Anderson, Andrew Peter .. . . 

Anderson, Andy 

Anderson, Elvin Walter 

Clave, James Elmer 

Clave, Ole Leonard 


.1912-16 

.1913-17 

.1913-17 

.1913-17 

.1913-14 

.1913-17, 1919-21. 

.1913-14 

.1913-14 


A. B.. 

A. B., 

A. B., 

.A. B., 


, 1916 

, 1917 

, 1917 

1917 




FACULTY AND STUDENTS AT LUTHER COLLEGE, 1»15 

Christensen, Adam H La Crosse Wis 1913-15 

Dahl, Ingvald Arnold Gayville S. D 1913-14. 1915-17 

Dolven, Oswald E Morris Minn . . . 1913-14 

Fadness, Noel Grant Poynette Wis 1913-17, 1918-22.. A. B., 1922 

Fjeldstad. Gustav A Wells Minn. . . 1913-16 A. B.. 1916 

Fossum, Henry Spring Grove Minn . . . 1913-14 

Gauper, Harold A De Soto Wis 1913-16 

Gulbrandson, Fremont Albert Lea Minn . . . 1913-14 

Hanson, Abel OUver Meridian Texas. . . 1913-17 A. B., 1917 

Hanson. William Michigan N. D....1913 

Hegg, Ferdinand Decorah la 1913-14 

Jacobson, Milton A Luverne Minn . . . 1913-15 

Jetson, John Maurice Spring Grove Minn . . . 1913-17 

Johnson. Bernhard A Spring Grove Minn . . . 1913-19 A. B., 1919 

Johnson. Frant2 William New York N. Y.. . . 1913-16 

Johnson, John Alfred St. Paul Minn. . .1913-16 

Johnson. Oscar Uslie West Salem Wis 1913-17 A. B.. 1917 

Jordahl. Harald Conrad Ridgeway la 1913-16. 191 7-20.. A. B., 1920 

Jorgenson. Alph Lorentz Montevideo Minn . . . 1913-17 

Kiland. Edwin F WiUmar Minn. . .1913-17 A. B.. 1917 

Knutson. Walter M Willmar Minn. ..1913-17 A. B., 1917 

Landswerk, Eddie Cresco la 1913-14 

Loscn, Alfred Ryalen Decorah la 1913-15, 1918 

Loscn, Carl Arthur Locust la 1913-14, 1915-16 

Lovik. Louia Thorval ScarviUe la 1913-17 A. B., 1917 



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ATTENDANCE 



249 



Student 



Po8tOflke 



State 



Years at 
Luther College Graduation 



A. B.. 1917 



•Moe. Sigurd Melvin Montevideo Minn . . . 1913-17 

Nebon. G. Palmer Meridian Wis 1913-16 

Nelson. Ole Alfred Hartland Minn . . . 1913-17 

Olsen. Arthur Callender la 1913-14 

Olsen. Thorbjom ErUng Chicago Ill 1913-14 

Olson, TharUe Oliver Litchfield Minn . . . 1913-17 

Opheim. Henry Hills Minn . . . 1913-15 

Oi>8tedahl. Edward Ridgeway la 1913-14 

Otcersen. Hialmar Rudolph. . . West Snlem Wis 1913-15 

Preus, (Ove) Jacob Hjort Minneapolis Minn . . . 1913-17 

*Reinertson, Tobias Christian.. Hazard Neb 1913-17. ... . . 

Roesing, Torstein Harald Decorah la 1913-20 

Rjmning, Lars Edgar Tacoma Wash. . . 1913-16 

Sampson, Benjamin Oliver Elbow Lake Minn . . . 1913-16 

Sampson. Samuel Clifton Elbow Lake Minn . . . 1913-15 ... 

Scarvie, Walter Bernard Decorah la 1913-20 

Sihler. Ernest George Wra Decorah la 1913-21 .. . 

Sollien. Johannes Spring Grove. . . . ..Minn. . .1913-16. 1917-18 

Stenstrand. Alfred Clermont la 1913-14 

Stoen. Charles GiflFord Locust la 1913-16. 1917-22.. A. B., 1922 

*Strandjord, Selmer HaagensonBelview Minn . . . 1913-14 



A. B., 1917 



A. B.. 1917 



A. B.. 1917 
!a. B., 1920 



A. B., 1920 
A. B., 1921 




FACULTY AND STUDENTS AT LUTHER COLLEGE, 1»13 



Talle. Henry Oscar Albert Lea Minn . 

Thompson, Edson Jennings. . .Kentwood La 

♦Tolo, Gudvin Walther Belgrade Minn . 

Wierson, Andrew Theodore . . . Roland la ... . 

♦Ylvisaker, Carl Berthold St. Paul Minn . 

1914-1915 

Albertson, Levi Leland '. . . la 

Anderson. Carl Austin Colton S. D . . 

Arvesen. Alfred N St. Olaf la 

Bronstad, Alvin L Clifton Texas. 

Brunsdale. Karl Henry Portland N. D. . 

Christopherson, Fred Toronto S. D . . 

Clauson. Herman N Colton S. D . . 

Clauson. Olaf L Colton S. D. . 

Ellertsen. Bemt John Hayward Minn . 

Ferestad. Arthur O East Grand Forks . . Minn . . 

Fjelstul, Clarence Ridgeway la 

Granner, Walter A Toronto S. D. . 

Hamre, Adolph Johan Granite Falls Minn . 

Henryson, Ernest Jewel Story City la 



.1913-17.. 
.1913-ld. . , 
.1913-17.. 
.1913-18. . 
.1913-17. . 



A. B., 1917 



A. B.. 1917 
A. B.. 1918 
A. B., 1917 



.1914-17 

.1914-15, 1918-22.. A. B.. 1922 

.1914-18 

.1914-17, 1919 A. B.. 1919 

.1914-17 

.1914-15 

.1914-16 

.1914-16, 1919-20, 

1921- 

.1914-15 

.1914-15 

.1914-18.1919- 

.1914-15 

.1914-15 

.1914-16 



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250 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Years at 
Student Post OflSce State Luther College Graduation 



Hovden, Edward Selmer Decorah la 1914- 

Hove, Oliver Malven Albert Lea Minn. . . 1914-15 

Jacobson. Paul Benjamin Decorah la 1915-22 A. B.. 1922 

Kvammen. Elmer John Decorah la 1914-15. 191 7-22.. A. B., 1922 

Larsen. Ulrik Laurentius Lake Park Minn . . . 1914-15 

Lee. Giale John Thompson la 1914-16. 1919-21. .A. B.. 1918 

Lee. Peter Joseph Elbow Lake Minn. .1914-18 A. B.. 1921 

Lee, Ruben H. W Northwood la 1914-15 

Urdal. Joseph Sherman S. D. . .1914-17 

Linn. Benj. Harrison Hope N. D.. . .1914-15 

Miller. Carl Juel Elma la 1914-17 

Nelson. Martin Poetville la 1914-15 

Nelson. Olaf GayviUe S. D. . .1914-18 A. B.. 1918 

Nyhus. Bemt T Portland N. D.. . . 1914-15 

Olafson. Otto Adolph West Duluth Minn . . . 1914-15 

Peterson. Arthur H Astoria S. D 1914-15 

Ravndal. Christian MaiEelssen. Constantinople Turkey.. 191 4-20 A. B.. 1920 

Reque. Paul Siegfried MorrisonviUe Wis 1914-17. 1918-22.. A. B., 1922 

Rickansrud. Torleif M Waukon la 1914-22 A. B.. 1922 

Sand, Nanfred Johannes Ossian la 1914-17 

Sorlien. Arne Reidar Bode la 1914-21 A. B.. 1921 

Sorllen. Leon CorneUus Bode la 1914-21 A. B.. 1921 

Sorlien, S. Olvin Bode la 1914-22 A. B.. 1922 

Stalland. Knute D St. Pftul Minn. . .1914-18 A. B.. 1918 

Stenehjem. John Selmer Spring Grove ...... Minn . . . 1914-15 

Storla. Alfred Sevat Decorah la. . ; . . . 1914-16 

♦Stormo, Carl Alfred Philip S. D . . . . 1914-18 A. B.. 1918 

Tangen, Otto Ossian la 1914-15 

Tangen. Peder C Ossian la 1914-15 

Tenold. Alvin Lorenzo Northwood la 1914-15 

Thorsen. Olaf Herman Rochester Minn. . . 1914-18 A. B.. 1918 

Tolo, Arthur Johann Belgrade Minn. . . 1914-18 A. B.. 1918 

Wennes. Nels O Spring Grove Minn. . . 1914-15 

1615-1916 

Aamodt. Otis Marvin Spring Valley Wis 1915-19 A. B.. 1919 

Aanas. Sam Edwin Ossian la 1915-17. 1918 

Abbey. Aaron LeGrande Decorah la 1915- 

Anderson. Myron Henry Highlandville la 1915- 

Amtxen. Edward Jargo Parkland Wash. . . 1915-16 

Arvesen. Henry William St. Olaf la 1915-16 

Bakke, Milo Barnard Decorah la 1915-19 

Bakke, Vernon Lorenzo Decorah la 1915-17 

Berg, Arthur Hilmen Albert Lea Minn . . . 1915-17 

Bcrgum. Arthur Edwin Rio Wis 1915-17. 1919-21. .A. B.. 1921 

Berven. George Oscar Baltic S. D... 1915-16 

Brandt. Christian Frederick.. .St. Paul Minn. . . 1915-16 

Bunde. Lawrence Theo Hartford S. D 1915-17 

Buslee. Lambert Justine Balfour N. D.. . . 1915-16 

Edwards. OUver Johnson Madison Wis 1915 

Eggebraaten. Hans Martinus. . Wentworth S. D 1915-17 

Estrem. William Thorpe Willmar Minn. . .1915-16 

Fadness. Crystal Ernest Rio Wis 1915-16 

Grevstad. Arne Nicolay Deerfield Wis 1915-16 

Harstad. Ingvald T Pirkland Wash. . . 1915-16 

Ingebretaon. Adolf Henrik. . . West De Pere Wis 1915-17, 1919- 

Jacobson. Isidor Wittenberg Wis 1915-16. 1918-19. 

1920-21 

Johnson. Joseph Sevcrin Waukon la 1915-16 

Jordahl. Verner Trygve Ridgeway la 1915-22 A. B.. 1922 

Jorgcnson. Victor G Bode la 1915-21 A. B.. 1921 

kaupanger. Olin Leonard Stoughton Wis 1915-18.1919-20. .A. B.. 1920 

Knutson, Otto Wm Radcliffe la 1915-16 

Kvale. Ingolf Theodore Orfordville Ws 1915-17 

Larsen. Erling Noer Colfax Wis 1915-22 A. B., 1922 

Lee. NeU Christol Deerfield Wis 1915-17. 



Lillehaug. Julius Woonsocket S. D. . . .1915-18 

Livdahl. Vernon Bismarck N. D.. . . 1915-16 

Melaas, Ira Joseph Cresco la 1915-19 A. B.. 1919 

Monson. OrviUe Sigurd Portland N. D.... 1915-19 A. B.. 1919 

Nelson. AUen Edmer Clifton Texas. . . 1915-19 A. B.. 1919 

Nelson, Carrol Palmer CUfton Texas. . . 1915-18 

Odden. Arthur CliflFord Lake Mills la 1915-16 

Olson, Clayton Melbourne. . . . Bode la 1915-21 A. B.. 1921 

Opstedahl. Clarence P. K Graettinger la 1915-16 

Ptoraons, Edward Harold Valley Neb 1915-17, 1920-21. .A. B.. 1921 



Digitized by 



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ATTENDANCE 251 



Years at 
Student Post Office Sute Luther College Graduation 



IVderron. Wilbert Enormal . . . Morrisonville Wis 1915-17 

PfcneweU. SUnley Wm. OUver.Madison Wis 1915-16. 1917-18 

PMeraon, Harold Rudolf Starbuck Minn. . .1915-17 

Pfcterson, Herman Ernest Hayfield Minn. . .1915-16 

PMerson. Melvin Leonard West Union la 1915-18 

Pfcterson, Thomas Hoffland. . .Mose N. D.. . .1915-18 

Rachie. Oscar Knutson Belview Minn. ..1915-16 

Ravndal. Eric Constantinople Turkey.. 1915-17. 1921- 

Ravndal, Olaf Constantinople Turkey. . 1915-20 A. B.. 1920 

Romness. Julius Belgrade Minn. . . 1915-17 

Schjeldahl. Arthur OUver Highlandville la 1915 

Severson. Marcus Henry Stoughton Wis 1915-16 

Shefloe. Reuben Eugene Hoffman Minn . . . 1915-16 

Strom. Carl Walther Watson Minn. . . 1915-19 A. B.. 1919 

Tallakaon, Harold Arthur WiUmar Minn. . . 1915-17 

ThompMn. Eddie Thorvald P.Colton S. D. . . . 1915-17 

Thompson. Maurice Alfred . . .Albert Ua Minn. . . 1915-19 A. B.. 1919 

Tollefsrud, Merwin Byron .... Orfordville Wis 1915-18 A. B.. 1918 

Vaaler. Torvald Twin Valley Minn. . . 1915-19 A. B.. 1919 

Vig. Edward Enoch Belgrade Minn. . . 1915 

1916-1917 

Brakke. Grant Meloy Kasson Minn. . . 1916-20 

Chandler. Fred Augustus Decorah la 1916-17 

Dolen. Nels Bjom Uland la 1916-20 A. B.. 1920 

Ellingson. Abel Rudolph Northwood la 1916-20 A. B.. 1920 

Fosmark. Nelvin Bemhard . .. Morrisonville Wis 1916-20 

H^ordon. Henry Truman Thompson la 1917 

Hall. Ckircnce Gunvald Carpio N. D.. . . 1916-20. ; 

Hallum. Augustus Fossum Redwood Falls Minn . . . 1916-17 

Jensen. Jesse Justin Cranfills' Gap Texas. . . 1916-18 

Juve. Emil Garfiek! Larsen Wis 1916-17 

Kulaas. HaroW Minot N. D.. . .1916- 

Larsen. Myron Wilbur Whalan Minn. . . 1916-19. 1919-20.. A. B.. 1919 

Larson. Elmer Robert Wausau Wis 1916-20 A. B.. 1920 

Maakestad. Hans Jacob H .... Sutton's Bay Mich.... 1916-17 

Malmin. Gunnar Johannes. . . . Decorah la 1916- 

Malmin. Olaf Gabriel Decorah la 1916-21 A. B.. 1921 

Nash. Albert Waukon la 1916-17 

Nasby. Donald Asher Bode la 1916-17 

Nelson. Sivert A Gayville S. D. . . . 1916-17 

Olson. Walter Andrew Decorah la 1916- 

Opsahl. Alert Mathias Decorah la 1916- 

Peterson. Hamlet Edwin ScarviUe la 1916-17. 1919-22.. A. B.. 1922 

Reque. Ulrik Hjahnar Morrisonville Wis 1916-17. 1920- 

Savre. Harold Kaspar Decorah la 1916-18. 1920- 

Scarvte. Norman George Decorah la 1916-18 

Sheel, John Fredrick Kari. ». .Decorah la 1916- 

Solum. Arthur Konrad Story City la 1916-17 

Sorenson. Arnold Clearance. . . Decorah la 1916-17. 1918-20 

Sorenson. Morris Alvin Clifton Texas. . .1916-20 A. B.. 1920 

Sperati. Carlo Vittorio Decorah la 1916-17. 1919- 

Strand. Ahlert Koren St. Peter Minn. . .1916-17 

Swensen. Alf Waldemar Decorah la 1916-20 A. B.. 1920 

Trytten. Gilbert Norman Albert Ua Minn . . . 1916-20 A. B.. 1920 

Unseth. Makolm Wulff Chicago Ill 1916-20 A. B.. 1920 

Westrcm, Clarence Bendik....GlenvrUe Minn. . .1916-18 

1917-1918 

Abrahamson. Paul Walter. . . . Lanesboro Minn . . . 1917-18 

Beito. Gynthcr Rudolph Terrace Minn. . . 1917-21 

Blegen. Clifford Randolph Ryegate Mont . . . 1917-18 

Brandvold. Aron John Rembrandt la 1917 

Eddaen. Bernet Syvers Mauston Wis 1917-21 A. B., 1921 

Eid, Elmer Sander Wing N. D.. . . 1917-21 A. B., 1921 

Gandrud. Sam. Garfield Kerkhoven Minn . . . 1917-18 

Gjeraet. Walter Kveldulv Decorah la 1917-19 

Gieraet* Wendell Beethoven... Fergus FalU Minn. . .1917 

Gronlid. Isaac Rudolph Waterville la 1917-20 A. B.. 1920 

Hagen. Grant Marcus Waterville la 1917-18. 1919- 

Haraldson. Henry Uoyd Rembrandt la 1917-18 

Haugelund. E. Johan Stromme.Christiania Norway. 1917-18 

Hegg. Ralph Norman Decorah la 1917-19 

Hermundstad. Emil Bricelyn Minn. . .1917-21 A. B.. 1921 



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252 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Years at 
Student Post Office SUte Luther College Graduation 



Iverson. Justin Clarence Rldgeway la 1917- 

Losen, George Sexton Decorah la 1917- 

Lund, John Arthur Harmony Minn . . . 1917-18 

Lyng, John Frederick Chilson. Minneapolis Minn. . .1917-21 

Maakestad. Norvald GjermundSutton's Bay Mich.. .. 1917-21 A. B.. 1921 

Martinson. Oscar Melvin Decorah la 1917-18 

Megorden. Tennis Herbert. . . . WaterviUe la 1917-20 A. B.. 1920 

Nerison. A.Gudmund Norman. Hills Minn. . .1917- 

Oefstedal, Rudolph Chicago Ill 1917-21 A. B.. 1921 

Olsen. Henry Erling Manistique Mich.. . .1917-18 

Osland. Herbert Berger Chicago Ill 1917-19. 1920-21 

Petersen. Walter John Manistique Mich.. . . 1917-18 

Qualley, Lawrence Edwin Rldgeway la 1917- 

Ramsey. Elling Eugene Decorah la 1917-20, 1921- 

Rindahl, Opie Selmer Ada Minn. ..1917-21 A. B.. 1921 

Seehuus. George Knute. .. . . .Decorah la 1917-21 

Sevatson. William Waukon la 1917- 

Siefken. Carl Hobart Rembrandt la 1917- 

Siefken. Daymon^l Julius Rembrandt la 1917-18. 1921- 

Skiveness. Albert O Evanston Ill 1917-18 

Stcrud. Daniel Hilarius Volga S. D 1917-18 

Sterud. Olc Martin Volga S. D 1917-18 

Storvick, Alfred O't.. . ..Albert Lea Minn. ..1917-21 A. B.. 1921 

St-rvick, Roy (irLnJo Albert Lea Minn. ..1917-21 A. B.. 1921 

TolJefM^ud. Kdwifi Oi^wah! Orfordville Wis 1917-22 A. B.. 1922 

T^iJa, Harald Michael Locust la 1917-21 A. B.. 1921 

Wagley, Carl SylvpntcT. . . .Orfordville Wis 1917-19 

Walhua. Matih« Mabel Minn. ..1917-18 

Wostby. Jflmep Martin Peterson Minn. . .1917-18. 1920- 

Ylvifffllser, Johannes Wini^tm..St. Paul Minn. . .1917-21 A. B.. 1921 

Vlvisaker, RaRnvHld Sophus. .St Paul Minn. . . 1917-20 A. B.. 1920 

Yiviaaker, Wnlthtr Qhki , Fergus Falls Minn. . . 1917-22 A. B.. 1922 

1918-1919 

Anderson. Elvln Odin Viroqua Wis 1918 

Anderson. Ernest Rocksvold . . Inwood la 1918-20, 1921- 

Anderson, George Orlando. . . . Inwood la 1918-19 

Anderson. Oliver Everett Durand Ill 1918 

Anfinson. Clarence Ossian la 1918 

Baalson. Arthur Gustavus Brooten Minn . . . 1918-22 A. B.. 1922 



Bagley. Irving Orville Spring Grove Minn . . . 1919-20 . 

Bakkerud. Alfred Ingvald .... Newman Grove .... Neb .... 1918. 

Bakkerud. Carl Melvin Newman Grove .... Neb .... 1918 . 

Boleng. Milton Garfield Arcadia Wis 1918 . 

Borgen, Emil Lawrence Landa N. D. . . . 1918 . 



Borgen, John Emil Sioux Falls S. D 1918- 

Bottolfson. Edwin Olia Starkweather N. D.. . . 1918-22 A. B.. 1922 

Boyd, Donald Irvin Wendell Minn . . . 1918-20 

Bungum, Norman Gustav .... Hayfield Minn . . . 1918 

Busness. Clarence Melvin WaterviUe la 1918 

Busness. Holger John WaterviUe la 1918 

Cahill, Rufus William Ossian la 1918 ". 

Christensen. Martin Clifton Texas. . . 1918 

Christianson, Donald Martin. . Carpio N. D 1918 

Christianson.LeonardTheodorc Vermilion S. D 1918-19 

Clauson. William Gerhard Spring Grove Minn . . . 1919-21 

Dahl. John Rudolph Albert Lea Minn. ..1918-22 A. B.. 1922 

Daley, Knudt Sherman De Forest Wis 1918-22 A. B., 1922 

Daley, Sidney Eugene De Forest Wis 1918-20. 1921- 

Danielson. Elmer Lynxville Wis 1918 

Darrington. Willard Joseph . . . Hesper la 1918 

Davidson. Philip Harris Viroqua Wis 1918 

Eimon. Paul Kruger H Osseo Wis 1918-20 

Elder. Howard Ferdinand Calmar la 1918 

Ellickson. Peter Gilbert £>ecorah la 1918 

Ellingson. Herman Edwin .... Ridgeway la 1918- 

Elvestrom. Victor A Bricclyn Minn. . . 1918-22 A. B., 1922 

Erickson, Alexander Herbert . . Morrisonville Wis 1918- 

Erickson. Clarence Robert Whalan Minn . . . 1918 

Evennid. Carl Canton Minn. . .1918 

Evenrud. Christian Canton Minn. . .1918 

Flatin. Finley Orlando Spring Grove Minn ... 1918 

FUkki. George Urdahl U Roy Minn . . . 1918 

Forsstrom, Adolph Martin. . . . Hemingford Neb. . . . 1918-19 



Digitized by 



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ATTENDANCE 253 



Yean at 
Student Foot Office State Luther College Graduation 



Fosmark, Christian Johannes. . Morriaonville Wis 191S- 

Foss. Ephriam Alexander Spring Grove Minn . . . 1918 

Gilbert. Harold Lovell Ossian la 1918 

Gilbertson. Oscar Hekner Clermont la 1918-21 

Grevstad. ErUng Carolus B. . . Deerfield Wis 1918-22 A. B.. 1922 

Gubnid. Milliard J Spring Grove Minn. . . 1918 

Gutru. Ronald I Newman Grove Neb 1918 

Hallan, James Othelo Spring Grove Minn. . .1918 

Halverson, Elmer Julius Thompson la 1918 

Halvorson. Victor Diedrich. . . Rockcfele Wis 1918-21 

Hammervold. Lenard M Harmony Minn. . . 1919-21 

Hansen. Sidney Nicholie West Union la 1918 

Haugen, Sverre Rasin Livingston Mont . . . 1918 

Helgerson. OUver O Soldiers Grove Wis 1918 

Helgeson. Harold Adolph Ferryville Wis 1918-20 

Heskin. Oscar Edward Portland N. D.. . .1918-22 A. B.. 1922 

Hjermstad. Carl Fritjof, Jr.. .Red Wing Minn. . .1918-20 

Hoel, Bjame lola Wis 1918 

Hoel, Walter Monroe Norse Texas. . . 1918 

Holm, Ephriam Augustine Eagle Grove la 1918-20 

Holtan. Sigurd Harold Stoughton Wis 1918 

Hovden. Clarends Gustin Decorah la 1918- 

Hovden, Kenneth Norman Decorah la 1918 

Hundy. George Sherman Decorah la 1918 

'acobson. Loren Noel Minneapolis Minn. . .1918-19 

enson. Martin Andrew Albert Lea Minn. ..1918-19 

enson. Sylvester Palmer CranfiU's Gap Texas. . .1918 

fetson. Clarence Bennett Spring Grove Minn. . . 1918 

lohnson. Arthur Lynxville Wis 1918 

Johnson. Clarence Ernest Ossian la 1918-20 

fohnson. Harokl Edward Spring Grove Minn . . . 1918- 

fohnsnid, Oliver Neljus Spring Grove Minn . . . 1918 

ordahl. Nels Ylvisaker Ridgcway la 1918- 

forgenson, Einar J Decorah la 1918-22 A. B., 1922 

Kinseth. Wilford John Bode la 1918-20 

Kirchhof, Edgar Herbert Thor la 1918 

Kittelson. Charles Clifford Clermont la 1918-20 

Knudson. Connely Cornelius. . CranfiUs' Gap Texas. . . 1918 

Knutson. Selmer Alfred Adams Minn. . . 1918 

Kraabel. Maynard Orvis Clifford N. D.. . . 1918-22 A. B.. 1922 

Lansrud. Vernon Alexander. . . Kensett la 1918 

Larsen, Harold Lawrence Decorah la 1918 

Larson, Emil Norton Spring Grove Minn. . .1918-20 

Lien. Erling Waldemar 

Nasseth Portland N. D.... 1918-21 A. B.. 1921 

Lien. John Laurence Postville la 1918 

Linde. Aimer Olaus De Forest .• Wis 1918 

Lothe. Irwin Eugene Sun Prairie Wis 1918-19 

Lundgren. Oscar Eric Wm Clear Lake la 1918 

Lynne; Victor Arnold Elbow Lake Minn . . . 1918 

Mandt. Matthew Cornelius. . . Sun Prau-ie Wis 1918 

Moe. John Melvin Glenwood Minn. ..1918-22 A. B.. 1922 

Myrah. Carl Theodore Decorah la 1918-20 

Myrah. Norton E Spring Grove Minn. . .1918 

Nelson, Bendolph Melvin Waterville la 1918 

Odden. Albert Theodore Decorah la 1918-20 

Ode, PaulGerhardt Calmar :.. la 1918-21 

Olson, Mafcolm Hartwick Ray N. D.... 1918-22 A. B.. 1922 

Olson. Odin Thorvald Mountain Wis 1918 

Ostenson, Lloyd Austin Decorah la 1918 

Otte. Carl NiU Heinrich Hlabisa Zululandl918- 

Otte. Johannes Nicolai Hlabisa Zululandl918- 

Ottesen, Otto Sampson Rio Wis 1918-21 

Oytee. Glen Edward Ossian la 1918 

Paulson. Alvin Maxwell Portland N. D... .1918- 

Peterson. Ordin Engebret Decorah la 1918-19 

Pflug, Elmer Fredrick Chicago Ill 1918 

Pierson. Oris Emerald Norse Texas. . . 1918-20 

Quiel. Gustav JuUus Decorah la 1918-22 A. B., 1922 

Ramberg. Rudolph Johannes. . West Prairie Wis 1918-20. 1921- 

Ramsey. Steven Whalan Minn. . .1918 

Ranum, Martin Bernhard Starbuck Minn . . . 1918- 

Reesing, Jim Ludwig Clifton Texas... 1918 

Roe, Theodore Clarence Le Roy Minn . . . 1918 

Rognlie. Ingolf Herman M....FrankJin Minn. . .1919-22 A. B.. 1922 



Digitized by 



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254 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Student 


Poet Office 


State 


Years at 
Luther CoUege 


Graduation 


Rohne. Chris. Ludvig 

Rovang, Elmer John 


.CranfiU'sGap 

.Fergus Falls 

.Carpio 

.Carpio 

.Colfex 

.Hayfield 

.Scarville 

.Decorah 

.Ulen 

Decorah 

Hayfield 

hinwood 

. Inwood 

. Fergus Falls 

Ortonville 

LakeMiUs 

. Fergus Falls 

.De Forest 

.Thompson 

.Hayward 

. De Forest 

. Minneapolis 

Sun Prairie 

. Spring Grove .... 

. Glenwood 

. Minneapolis 

. Holmen 

Ossian 

Decorah 

Calmar 

. Zumbrota 

1919-1920 

Hinsdale 

Crary 

. Durand 

.Ridgeway 

. Spring Grove .... 
-Valders 

Highlandville 

. Dorchester 

Mabel 

Decorah 

.Decorah 

Delavan 

.Lane 

Ossian 

. Spring Grove .... 
. Poynette 

Madison 

Rio 

. Stavanger 

Ashby 

.Lawrence 

. Eagle Grove 

. Bowman 

Hayward 

Ruthton 

. Cresco 

. Decorah 

Mabel 

. Spring Grove .... 

.Decorah 

. Seneca 

.Waunakee 

.Decorah 

.Clifford 

. Decorah 

Eldorado 

Wolford 

Dexter 

. Irene 

.Postvillc 


.Texas.. 

Minn.. 

N. D... 

N. D... 

Wis.... 
. Minn . . 

la 

la... 

Minn. 

la 

Minn.. 

la 

la 

Minn.. 
.Minn. . 

la 

Minn.. 

Wis.... 

la 

Minn.. 

Wis.... 

Minn.. 

Wis.... 

Minn.. 

Minn.. 

Minn.. 

Wis... 

la 

la 

la. ... 
. Minn . . 

. . Mont . 

N. D... 

lU... 

la... 

Minn. 

Wis... 

la 

.la 

Minn.. 

la 

la 

.Minn. . 

S. D... 

.la 

.Minn.. 
.Wis.... 

Wis.... 
.Wis.... 
. Norway 

Minn.. 

Wash.. 

la 

N. D... 
.Minn. . 
. Minn . . 

la 

la 

la 

.Minn.. 
. Minn . . 

la 

Wis.... 
.Wis.... 
.la 

N. D... 

.la 

.la 

N. D... 

Minn.. 

S. D... 
.la 


.1918-20 

.1918-22 

.1918-22 

.1918-22 

. 1918-20 


!a. B., 1922 


Rugland, Gerhard Theodore. 

Rugland, Sigvart Luther 

Saetveit, Eilef Theodore . 


A. B.. 1922 
.A. B.. 1922 


Scharberg. Edwin Oliver. . . . 

Shclwick. Jens 

Smithling, Gustave Melvin.. 
Skalet. Charles Hannord. . . . 


.1918 




.1918 

.1918-20 

.1918-19 

.1918- 


A. B.. 1919 


SoUe. Rudolph Alfred 

Sorenson, Olaf Eugene Kennet 
Sorenson. Vernon Silas B . . . 

Stevaas. Martin Orlando 

Steen. Bennie Christopher . . 


.1918 

.1918-19 

.1918-19 

.1918-22 

.1918-19 


A. B.. 1922 


Stensrud. Elmer Gerhard 

Stortroen. Nobel 

Stromer. Anders Archibald . . 


.1918 

.1918 

.1918 




Swenson. Tom Melvin 

Teslow, Raymond Lincoln . . 

Thorstad, John 

Thorvilson. Luther Maurice. 
Tjugum, Raymond Ernest . . 
Treangen, Bennie Olai 


.1918 

.1918 

.1918 

.1918. ..• 

.1918-19 

.1918 

.1918 

.1918 

.1918 

.1918 

.1919 

.1918 

.1918-19. 1921- . 

. 1919- 

.1919-21 

. 1919- 

.1919-21 




Troen. Magnus Alvin 

Wahlstrom. Carl Adolph. . . 

Wall. Alfred Nordahl 

Ward. Charles Edward 

Weiser, Horace Spcngler 

Weselmann. Ralph Otto 

Ylvisakcr, Paul 

Akre. Roland Ogden Strand. 
Anderson. Lawrence Howard 
Anderson. Merle Kenneth . . 
Anderson, Spencer Clement. 




Bergsgaard. John 

Berge. Marvin Leslie 

Bidne, Martin Lawrence 

Bjcrke, Theodore 

Brown. Elmer Alford 

Carlson, Fred Hjalmar 

Coffeen. Hiram A 


.1919-20 

.1919-21 

.1919- 

.1919-21 

.1919- 

. 1919- 

.1919-20 




Eidbo. Oscar E 

Endahl. Alfred Matthias . . . 


.1919 

.1919-20 




Enga. Leonard Earl 

Evenmoe, Leonard Amos. . . . 


.1919- 

.1919- 




Fadness, Nels Lewis 

Hagen, Paul Isaac Amberg . . 


.1919-22 

.1919-20 


A. ft.. 1922 


Hawkos. Hubert Carroll 

Hllle, John Herwegh O. D. . 


.1919-21 

'.1919-20 




Himle. George Harald 


.1919-20 




Hoff. Hubert James 

Holm, Aaron Benjamin 

Hook, Charles Ellis 


.1919-21 

.1919-22 . .. 




.1919-21 




Hove, James Norman 


. 1919-21 




ndall, Harold Adolph R 


. 1919-21 




ngvoldstad, Carsten Willard 


.1919- 




Iverson, Marvin Orlando . . . 


.1919-20. 1921 . . . 




, aastad, Lloyd Myron 


.1919- 




, etson, Ellsworth 

, etson, James Ernest 


.1919-20 

.1919-21 




, ohnson, Arthur Franklin S. 
bhnson, Emert 


.1919-20 

.1919 




, ohnson. Palmer Herbert . . . 


.1919-21 




Jorgenson. Alf William 

killie. Eilert Steven 


.1919- 




.1919- 




Korsrud. Walter William . . . 


.1919- 




Lauer. Clarence Louie 


.1919-20 




Uwston. Willis Archibald . . 


.1919-21 




Lee, Oliver Julien 

Levoraon, Olaf Ix>rcntz 


.1919-21 

.1919- 




Lind, Joseph Oliver 


.1919-21 





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ATTENDANCE 255 



Years at 
Student ' Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Lundin. Nicholas A Sentinel Butte N. D.. . . 1919 

Moore. Robert W Decorah la 1919-21 

Naab. Lloyd Fred Elma la 1919-20 

Narveson. Bert Henry Albert Lea Minn. ..1919-22 A. B.. 1922 

Nelson. Carl Bernhard Decorah la 191<>-21 

Nelson. Karsten Olaf Mayville ,. . . N. D.. . . 1919^ 

Nordgaard. Edgar N Mankato Minn. . . 1919- 

Olson. Paul Frederick Decorah la 1919- 

OrwoU. Sylfest Pedcr Sioux Falls S. D. . . . 1919- 

Octerness. Merton Edgar Poynette Wis 1919-21 

Owen. Ernest Melvin Ridgeway la 1919- 

Paulson. Arthur Christopher. . Forest City la 1919-22 A. B.. 1922 

Peterson. Elmer Oliver Decorah la 1919-20 

Price. Charles Edward Decorah la 1919-20 

Reque. Sigvard Erling St. Paul Minn . . . 1919- 

Schjeldahl. Robert Ingvald . . . Hatton N. D.. . . 1919- 

Scofield. Teddy R Spring Grove Minn . . . 1919-20 

Seines. Alfred James Mabel Minn . . . 1919-20 

Selstad. Ingvald Ellas Ueds N. D.. . . 1919-20 

Skaaden. Einar Theodore Spring Grove Minn . . . 1919-20 

Solvie. Adolph Julian Hancock Minn . . . 1919- 

Stabo. Trond Stabo. Toten Norway. 1919-20 

Stecn. Ernest Bennett Clinton Minn. ..1919- 

Steen. Sigvart Julius Clinton Minn . . . 1919- 

Stevens. Don Albert Crary. N. D.. . . 1919-20 

Stromer. Philip Orlando De Forest Wis 1919 

Svenning. Walter Norman Glenwood Minn . . . 1919- 

Swcen. CUfford Oliver Bode la 1919-20 

Sween. Milo Idolph Rochester Minn . . . 1919-21 

Takle. Leonard Knut Dorchester Minn . . . 1919-21 

Talle. Herman Julius Starbuck Minn . . . 1919- 

Thompson, Langden Harald . . Wausau Wis 1919-20 

Trytten, Edwin Gerhardt Albert Lea Minn . . . 1919- 

Turmo. Ulrik Andrew Clifford N. D.. . . 1919- 

Turmo. Einar Sigvald Clifford N. D.. . . 1919-21 

Tvedt, Carl Walther Maskell Neb 1919- 

Walker. Harry Palmer Mt. Sterling Wis 1919- 

Wick. Gunder Olaus-. Mt. Horeb Wis 1919-20 

Wierson. Leonard Irving Roland la 1919- 

Woldum. Grant Horace Decorah la 1919- 

1920-1921 

Akre. Walter Eugene. . ..... Highlandville la 1920u21 

Anderson. Russell Ellsworth.. .La Crosse Wis 1920u 

Barsness, Olger Magnu; Starbuck •. Minn . . . 1920- 

Bergan. Clarence Alfred Wendell Minn . . . 1920- 

Birkestrand, Harold Ole S Cambridge la 1920^21 

Bosben. Eugene Ezra Madison Wis 1920-21 

Brakke. Leander Bernhard. . . . Kasson Minn . . . 1920- 

Brandt. Rolf Didrik St. Paul Minn. . .1920u 

Brudvig. Ncls Andreas Colton S. D 1920- 

Carlson. Elmer Cornelius Appleton Minn . . . 1920- 

Christcnsen. Clifford Ncal Kasson Minn . . . 1920- 

Clauson. Melvin Joseph Colton S. D 1920- 

Dahl, Maurice Sanford Albert Lea Minn . . . 1920- 

Delaney. Roger Daniel Decorah la 1920- 

Dotseth. Carl Decorah la 1920-21 

Duckstad. John Herman Fertile Minn . . . 1920- 

Eittreim. Alvin Kingsley Decorah la 1920- 

Ellingson. Edson Arnold Wendell Minn . . . 1920- 

EUingson. Lourn Morgan Wendell Minn . . . 1920- 

Engebretson. Alfred Julius Starbuck Minn. . . 1920-21 

Engebretson. Oscar Melvin. . .Starbuck Minn. . .1920- 

Engrav. Walter Alfred Peterson Minn . . . 1920-21 

Erickson. Silas Victor N Burr Oak la 1920-21 

Evensen. Carl Milo Sheyenne N. D 1920- 

Fadness. Andrew C Rio Wis 1920- 

Fardal, Harold Eugean Stanhope la 1920-21 

Fardal. Sigurd Julius Stanhope la 1920. . .- 

Fjclstul. Casper Theodore Ridgeway la 1920- 

Fosmark. Sylvester S Morrisonville Wis 1920- 

Fobs. Ralph Norman Spring Grove Minn . . . 1920-21 

Garness. Oscar Mabel Minn . . . 1920- 

Grinder. Arthur Norman Wendell Minn . . . 1920- 



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256 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Years at 
Student Post Offiop Sute Luther College Graduatton 



Grinley. Burton Alexander Portland N. D 1920-21 . 

Gunderaon. John Gerhard M. . Mt. Horeb Wis 1920-21 . 

Haaland, Osuld Terrieaen Bricelyn Minn . . . 1920- . . . 

Hansen, Joseph Theodore Canton S. D 1920-21 . 

Haslip. Leo Leaman Decorah la 1920- . . . 

Hasvold. Morris Flandreau S. D 1920- . . . 

Haugom. Eddie Wallace Portland N. D.. . .1920-. . . 

Hegg. Lester Raymond Harmony Minn . . . 1920- . . . 

HelUckaon. Arnold Raymond. .Ostrander Minn . . . 1920-21 . 

Henriksen. George C, Jr Silverton Ore 1920-. . . 

Herum. Maurice S. H River Falls Wis 1920-21 . 

Highby. Leo Ingeman Albert Lea Minn . . . 1920- . . . 

Hjelle. Albert Edward Decorah la 1920-. . . 

Hopperstad, Anbert Niels Calmar la 1920-. . . 

Hove. EInar Wulfsberg St. PaiU Minn. . .1920-. . . 

Hovey, Clarence John Decorah la 1920- . . . 

Hutchinson. Joseph Cyril Decorah la 1920-. . . 

Ingvoldstad. Lesier Raymond. Decorah la 1920- . . . 

Jacobson, Thurlow R. A Wittenberg Wis 1920- . . . 

Jerdeman. Casper Marion . . . .Jewell la 1920- . . . 

JeweU. Charles Wallace Decorah la 1920-21 . 

Johnson. Alfred Lawrence Portland N. D . . . 1920- . . . 

Johnson, Ruben Oliver Park River N. D 1920- . . . 

Kjome. Norton Hamilton Decorah la 1920- . . . 

.Knutson. Sever Raymond . . . .Albert Lea Minn . . . 1920- . . . 

Kvale. Theodore Alvin Fall River Wis 1920-21 . 

Lambert. Joseph George La Crosse Wis 1920-21 . 

Unde. Milton Ole Galesburg N. D.. . .1920-. . . 

Landsverk. Ole Whalan Minn . . . 1920- . . . 

Lucky. Carl E. L Tacoma Wash . . . 1920- . . . 

Lund. Louis Vivian Farwell Minn . . . 1920- . . . 

Maakestad. Benj. Sjurolf Norge Va 1920- . . . 

Moackrud. Arthur B Galesburg N. D. . . . 1920 

Moe. Valdorf Tjerold Decorah la 1920-. . . 

Mork. Arthur Oscar Dawson Minn . . . 1920- . . . 

Narveson. Percival Spring Grove Minn . . . 1920-21 . 

Nelson, John Victor Cliflford N. D.. . . 1920-21 . 

Nelson, Noel Elvin Brooten Minn . . . 1920- . . . 

Norlie, Joseph Sigurd Decorah la 1920- . . . 

Norlie. Kenneth Luther Decorah la 1920- . . . 

Olson. Maxwell Jullen Clear Lake la 1921-22 . 

Peterson. CUlIord Phihnan. . . . Clifford N. D.. . . 1920- . . . 

Peterson. Emil Edgar Decorah la 1920-21 . 

Peterson. Harvey Kenneth Decorah la 1920- . . . 

Peterson, Herbert Crommett . . Decorah la 1920- . . . 

Peterson, Myron Willard Spring Grove Minn. . . 1920-21 . 

Preus, Christian Kevser. Jr . . . Calmar la 1920- . 

'" '"'at. ... ■ ' 



Qualley. Albert Olaf Decorah la 1920- . . . 

Quammen. Hilmen Nils Cyrus Minn . . . 1920- . . . 

Reini. Gunleik Harold Denver Colo. . . . 1920-21 . 

Rem. Oscar Milaca Minn . . . 1920- . . . 

Reque. Peer Eugene Brooklyn N. Y....1920-. . . 

Roe, Kehner S. N Canton S. D 1920-. . . 

Sandsmark, Lawrence Coon Valley Wis 1920-21 . 

Sandsmark. Moran Coon Valley Wis 1920-21 . 

Scharberg. Arthur Byron Minn . . . 1920-21 . 

Steen, Joseph Bernhard Ortonville Minn . . . 1920- . . . 

Steffansrud. Thurman Orval . . Harmony Minn . . . 1920-21 . 

Stortroen, Marvil I>alton Minn . . . 1920- . . . 

Strandjord. Edphil Nils Belview Minn . . . 1920- . . . 

Strom, Oscar Jacobson Cleveland Ohio 1920- . . . 

Thompson. Elmer Obert Decorah la 1920-21 . 

Tobiasen. Stanley Canton S. D 1920-21 . 

Torrison. Orrin Thomas Decorah la 1920- . . . 

Tveten, Tuko Darwin Detroit Minn . . . 1920- . . . 

Walhus, Alfred Leander Dorchester la 1920-21 . 

Westgor, Osmond Gerald Manitowoc Wis 1920- . . . 



1921-1922 

Amland. Harold John St. Paul Minn. . .1921-. 

Amevik, Thor Leland la 1921- . 

Astrup. Hjalmar Leonard N...Untunjambili. Natal. Africa.. .1921-. 
Bakke. Ole Ernest Decorah la 1921- . 



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ATTENDANCE 257 



Years at , 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Bakken. Robert Decorah la 1921- . 

Bematz, Carl Decorah la ..1921-; 

BestuI, Harald Brandt ..'..... Ettrick Wis 1921- . 

Beylegaard. Reidar George Greenville Center. . . N. Y 1921- . 

Bolger. Chester Arthur Decorah la 1921- . 

Bolger, Louis Jaeger Decorah la 1921-. 

Bolstad. WiUiam Larson Detroit Minn . . . 1921- . 

Brendsel. Ingebrigt Olai Baltic S. D 1921- . 

Collins. Harry John Ossian la 1921- . 

Crooks. John Jacob Hankinson N. D 1921- . 

Cutdng. Carroll Elmer Decorah la 1921- . 

Ellingson. John Olaf M Valley City N. D.. . .1921 . . 

Engebretson. Manley Harlow.. Durand . . . '. Ill 1922- . 

Bngeseth. Henry Bernard Nerstrand Minn . . . 1921- . 

Esse. John Colonel DeForest Wis 1921- . 

EchuD, Rudolph Lyall De Forest Wis 1922- . 

Even, Howard Barney Minneapolis Minn. . . 1921- . 

Fo 8. Arnold Melanchthon. . •. . Franklin Minn ... 1921- . 

Hamre, Osmund I>ecorah la 1921- . 

HarsDU. Stanley Alejcander . . . Brandt S. D 1921- . 

Haugcn. Gerhard Benjamin. . . Maddock N. D.. . . 1921- . 

Haugen, John Amberg Minneapolis Minn. . .1921- . 

Hexom. Otto Lester Daniel . . . I>ecorah la 1921- . 

Hoverson, Emil Theodore .... Bricelyn Minn ... 1921- . 

Iverson. Arnold Vernon Ridgeway la 1921- . 

.fensen, Alfred Ferdinand Franklin Minn. . .1922-. 

. fenson, Martin Thomas Cranfill's Gap Texas. . . 1921- . 

. fohnson, Armin Moldstad . . . .Capron Ill 1921- . 

Johnson. Christian Orlando. . . Dane Wis 1921- . 

Johnson. Joseph EU Devils Lake N. D.. . . 1921- . 

Jordahl, Olaf Mclvin Fertile Minn. . . 1921- . 

Jordahl. Oscar Alfred Fertile Minn. . .1921-. 

Jorgenson. Rudolph Claude. . . Decorah la 1921. . 

Caasa. Erling Sigfried Red Wing Minn. . .1921-. 

Knudson, Jesse Pernell Clifton Texas. . . 1921- . 

Kvale. Edward C Fargo N. D... .1921- 

Leidahl, Herbert Goodwin Locust la 1921- . 

Uquin, Fritchof Sigvald Locust la 1921- . 

Lucken. Henrick Bernhard .... Portland N. D. ... 1921- . 

Maas. Charles Allison Decorah la 1921 . . 

Melaas, Harry Eugene Decorah la 1921- . 

Nedberg. Cari J Detroit Minn . . . 1921- . 

Nelson, George Oscar Albert Lea Minn . . . 1921- . 

Nelson, Joel Edmund Clifton Texas. . . 1921- . 

Nervig, Casper Bernard Wells Minn. . .1921-. 

Nordgaard. Carl Hjalmar Mankato Minn. . . 1921- . 

Nystuen, Walter Northwood la 1921- . 

Ode, Carsten Linnevold Decorah la 1921- . 

Oien, Paul Oberlin Decorah la 1922- . 

Olsen. Olaf Bernhard M Galveston Texas. . . 1921- . 

Olsen. Wilhehn Ferdinand .... Sand Creek Wis 1921 . . 

Olson. Edwin Marinius C Madison Minn . . . 1921- . 

Olson. Robert Bernhardt Decorah la 1921- . 

Opheim. Julius William Thor la 1921- . 

Opsahl. Eugene Gerhard Decorah la 1921- . 

Ordal. Erling Joseph River Falls Wis 1921-. 

OrwoU, Oswald Christian Maddock N. D.. . . 1921- . 

Ostrem. Harold Manly Decorah la 1921- . 

Overgaard, Raymond Oren . . . Albert Lea Minn ... 1921- . 

Peterson. Jeffrey Arnold Roland la 1921- . 

Peterson. George Raymond. . . Mankato Minn. . . 1922- . 

Reishus. Harald Tidemann. . . . SUnley Wis 1921- . 

Rindahl. Willie Oscar Ectrick Wis 1921-. 

Ronan, Leo Patrick Decorah la 1921- . 

Ronan, William Patrick Decorah la 1921- . 

Rotto, Isaac Melvin Kensington Minn. . .1921-. 

Ruen. Olger Cornelius Waukon la 1921-. 

Sampson, Harold Myron L . . . Decorah la 1921- . 

Scharberg. Norman Rudolf . . . Hayfield Minn ... 1921- . 

Schultheiss. Lorenz Elma la 1922- . 

Sheel, Sigurd Walter Decorah la 1921- . 

Sorensen. Arthur Waldemar. . . Shevlin Minn ... 1921- . 

Sorenaon. GarfieM Olaf Bagley Minn ... 1921- . 

Sperati. Sigvald Robert Decorah la 1921- . 

Stoskopf, Roger Orlando Decorah la 1921- . 



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258 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Student 



Post Office 



State 



Years at 
Luther College Graduation 



Syverson. LeRoy Elstrom .... Brooten Minn . . . 1921- . 

Thomas, George Franklin Decorah la 1921 . . 

Thorsrimsen, Hans A. Stub. . .Grand Porks N. D 1921- . 

Topliff. Lyle Ray I>ecorah la 1921- . 

Torrison. John William Decorah la 1921- . 

Torrison. Osuld Romund Evanston Ill 1922- . 

Trytten. Olaf Benjamin Albert Lea Minn . . . 1921- . 

Urberg. Konrad Morbeck Blair Wis 1921- . 

Walker. Emil Orin Mt. Sterling Wis 1921- . 

Wolding, Aaron Thomas Rosholt Wis 1921- . 

Woldum. Lester Howard Decorah la 1921- . 









TABLE OF NEW STUDENTS 










No. of 


Later 


Later 




No. of 


Later 


Later 


School 


New 


Graduating 


Ordained 


School 


New 


Graduating 


Ordained 


Year 


Stu- 
dents 










Year 


Stu- 
dents 

79 










No. 


% 


No. 


% 


No. 


% 


No. 


% 


1861-62 


16 


4 


25.0 


4 


25.0 


1891-92 


9 


11.4 


7 


8.9 


1862-63 


26 


4 


15.4 


9 


34.6 


1892-93 


63 


11 


17.5 


8 


12.7 


1665-64 


29 


5 


17.2 


5 


17.2 


1893-94 


59 


19 


32.2 


13 


22.0 


1864-65 


26 


3 


11.5 


6 


23.1 


1894-95 


59 


12 


20.3 


11 


18.6 


1865-66 


45 


11 


24.4 


12 


26.7 


1895-96 


81 


28 


34.6 


15 


18.5 


1866-67 


42 


3 


7.1 


8 


19.0 


1896-97 


52 


18 


34.6 


14 


26.9 


1867-68 


27 


4 


14.8 


7 


25.9 


1897-98 


55 


10 


18.2 


4 


7.3 


1868-69 


53 


3 


5.7 


3 


5.7 


1898-99 


60 


19 


31.7 


8 


13.3 


1869-70 


51 


10 


19.6 


19 


37.3 


1899-00 


66 


25 


37.9 


14 


21.2 


1870-71 


62 


6 


9.7 


14 


22.6 


1900-01 


72 


20 


27.8 


7 


9.7 


1861-71 


377 


53 


14.1 


87 


23.1 


1891-01 


646 


171 


26.5 


101 


15.6 


1871-72 


56 


14 


25.0 


16 


28.6 


1901-02 


61 


26 


42.6 


6 


9.8 


1872-73 


61 


11 


18.0 


12 


19.7 


1902-03 


62 


20 


32.3 


13 


21.0 


1873-74 


84 


16 


19.0 


16 


19.0 


1903-04 


60 


19 


31.7 


9 


15.0 


1874-75 


100 


18 


18.0 


22 


22.0 


1904-05 


71 


21 


29.6 


14 


19.7 


1875-76 


78 


13 


16.7 


9 


11.5 


1905-06 


62 


20 


32.3 


13 


21.0 


1876-77 


46 


12 


26.1 


17 


37.0 


1906-07 


45 


21 


46.7 


6 


13.3 


1877-78 


49 


14 


26.8 


6 


12.2 


1907-08 


62 


16 


25.8 


7 


11.3 


1878-79 


58 


11 


19.0 


8 


13.8 


1908-09 


58 


21 


36.2 


8 


13.8 


1879-80 


40 


9 


22.5 


9 


22.5 


1909-10 


51 


19 


37.3 


8 


15.7 


1880-81 


55 


12 


21.8 


6 


10.9 


1910-11 


58 


24 


41.4 


9 


15.5 


1871-81 


627 


130 


20.7 


121 


19.3 


1901-11 


590 


207 


35.1 


93 


15.8 


1881-82 


41 


12 


29.3 


12 


29.3 


1911-12 


75 


31 


41.3 


15 


20.0 


1882-83 


47 


14 


29.8 


16 


34.0 


1912-13 


60 


20 


33.3 


(5) 


* 


1883-84 


73 


10 


13.7 


13 


17.8 


1913-14 


58 


24 


41.4 


5^) 
(1) 


* 


1884-85 


42 


12 


28.6 


15 


35.7 


1914-15 


47 


(17) 
(16) 


* 


• 


1885-86 


37 


9 


24.3 


9 


24.3 


1915-16 


60 


♦ 


(0) 
(1) 


* 


1886-87 


51 


11 


21.6 


13 


25.5 


1916-17 


35 


ao) 


♦ 


« 


1887-88 


32 


5 


15.6 


2 


6.2 


1917-18 


47 


115) 


♦ 


(0) 


« 


1888-89 


47 


12 


25.5 


11 


23.4 


1918-19 


145 


19) 


♦ 


(0) 


« 


1889-90 


54 


11 


20.4 


12 


22.2 


1919-20 


81 


(3) 


* 


(0) 


« 


1890-91 


93 


23 


24.7 


17 


18.3 


1920-21 


99 


(0) 


♦ 


(0) 


* 


1881-91 


517 


119 


23.0 


120 


23.2 


1911-21 


707 


(155) 


♦ 


(29) 


* 



*Some of the students who first entered Luther College in 1912-13 have not yet completed 
their study of theology; the same is the case for the following years; it is thus too early to 
calculate the percentage of ordinations for these years. For a ^milar reason the percentage 
of graduai.es cannot yet be computed for the yearn after 1913-14. The members of the Senior 
Class of 1921-22 are counted as graduates in the above table. 



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I 

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CHAPTER TWELVE 

ORGANIZATION 

L. A. MoE 
I. The Educational Setting 
1. Denominational Colleges 

BROADLY speakings there exist in the American education- 
al system of to-day three distinct types of the American 
college: the college that depends upon the church for support; 
the college that depends upon the state for support; and the 
college that depends upon the individual or the general commun- 
ity for support. The first type is the purely denominational col- 
lege. It represents the intimacy of the relation existing between 
religion and learnings a relation historic and vital. The second 
type is that of the state university. This type embodies the idea 
that the whole body of the people is concerned in the securing 
of a sufficient number of well trained citizens to insure the effici- 
ency and perpetuity of the state. The third type is the endowed, 
non-sectarian college, such as Columbia or Harvard, which stands 
for independence, a most precious condition for the promotion of 
scholarship and for the development of character. It is to the 
first of these types that Luther College belongs. 

The score or more of denominational colleges which exist in 
some western states were founded by the churches in the pioneer 
days as instruments for denominational upbuilding. The estab- 
lishment of state-supported and state-controlled universities in 
the commonwealths organized after the close of the eighteenth 
century by no means put an end to the establishment of colleges 
upon religious foundations. Denominational zeal was very strong 
in the decades preceding the Civil War, and the church was the 
center of community life in the newly settled regions. For long 
years the small sectarian colleges were the only schools with any 
pretense to advanced grade in the West, but with the passing of 
time and the current growing ever stronger against sectarianism, 
many of these small colleges were forced to close their doors. A 
few of the best types were able to adjust themselves to the new 
conditions, and this only by the most conservative policy, and the 
gathering of endowments. 



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ORGANIZATION 



261 




WILLIAM JENNINGS BRYAN 
in Decorah 
(Dr. Larsen in the back- 
ground) 



Luther College was founded just as 
the feeling against denominational schools 
began to show itself. The contest was 
wide-spread and often exceedingly bitter, 
but Luther College remained aloof and 
took no part whatsoever in these perplex- 
ing debates. And it was well that it held 
aloof. A unified course of study with a 
narrow range of electives introduced in 
later years made it possible for the Col- 
lege to do its work thoroughly and well. 
Had the institution broadened its courses, 
introduced a wide range of electives, and 
thus popularized its offerings, there would 
have been danger of its elimination, even 
though for a time it might have presented 
a more imposing front. But Luther Col- 
lege never for a moment faltered in its 
purpose. Its conservatism has been its 
salvation. 



2. The State System 

The establishment of a universal system of education was in- 
evitable. The advance of the Republic created a need, and the 
breaking open of the great West opened the way for a new educa- 
tional order of things. The great influx of immigrants from Eur- 
ope, beginning in the later forties, made necessary an extremely 
democratic system of schools, wholly free from partisanship or 
sectarianism. 

The federal Constitution contains no mention of schools. The 
United States has been and is powerless to control and does not 
assume to manage the educational interests of the people; the 
states have full authority to do so. Matters educational have 
been left strictly in the hands of the states. The federal govern- 
ment, it is true, by land grants and otherwise has encouraged the 
establishment of institutions of learning, and maintains a Bureau 
of Education with a commissioner at its head to make surveys and 
annual reports to the various educational organizations through- 
out the country. 

In the absence of any federal authority, the states began early 
in the nineteenth century to provide for a general system of educa- 
tion, ascending in regular gradation from township schools to a 



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262 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

state university. The colleges and academies were supported by 
tuition. Tuition was to be gratis in the state schools^ which were 
to be supported by taxation. 

The university fixes the plane of the high school, and the 
high school in turn, determines the character of the elementary 
schools. The university has also developed graduate and profes- 
sional courses to provide for research work in every field. Thus 
the strength of the state system of schools is in its continuity, and 
in the gradual spread of its courses of study to accommodate the 
needs of the many in preparing for the professions. Allowing 
eight years for the elementary school, four for the secondary 
schools, four for the college course, and four for the professional 
course, the child who entered school at the age of six will com- 
plete his professional education at the age of twenty-six. 

3. Relation of the Denominational Colleges to the State 

The changes that have been taking place from time to time 
in the state system will sooner or later affect the colleges. The 
colleges have for some time felt the weakness of the church sys- 
tem in not being able to establish and develop parochial schools 
and academies, so as to give the system continuity. Not being able 
to maintain such parochial schools and academies, on a large scale, 
the denominational college must lean on the state high schools 
for support in the way of attracting students. The necessity of 
connecting up with the high schools from below has a tendency to 
bring the denominational college into close contact with the state 
system. Luther College has been awake to this situation, and as 
early as 1 88 1 began a lengthening of the preparatory course down- 
ward so as to connect up with the elementary schools. At the 
same time the college has developed a liberal arts course, the equal 
of the arts course of our foremost universities with the added 
advantage of religious instruction. Upon the completion of the 
college course, the student receives the degree of bachelor of arts. 

The tendency of the state system at the present day is toward 
the establishment of the junior high school and the junior college,' 
a plan which aims primarily at the shortening in years of the 
entire system to enable capable students with iniative to enter 
the professions earlier than is possible under the present plan. 
The junior college movement is especially popular, and bids fair 
to spread in this day and age when education is advancing by 
leaps and bounds. The tendency of the high schools to reach up 
and do two years of college work, and of the universities to con- 
nect up with the junior colleges endangers the future of the pres- 



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ORGANIZATION 



263 



ent-day small college. Although Luther College occupies a unique 
position among the schools of the Church, and stands high in the 
estimation of the educational circles of the day, still it is of the 
utmost importance that a careful study be made by those who have 
the welfare of the institution at heart of the conditions which 
sooner or later may threaten the continuance of the institution. 
The relation of the denominational college to the state system 
has not been wholly solved. 




SENATORS KNUTE NELSON AND W. B. ALLISON AT LUTHER CX)LLEGE 

II. Organization of Luther College Within the 
Church 

Luther College was incorporated under the law of the State 
of Iowa, February 1, 1866. The articles of incorporation, as re- 
vised in 1917, placed the institution under the direct control of 
the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America. The articles provide 
that the Church Council shall constitute a Board of Visitors, who 
are to visit the College and report the results of their observation 
to each annual meeting of the corporation. The articles of in- 
corporation also provide for a Board of Trustees, eight in num- 
ber, whose principal duty is to look after the buildings and other 



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264 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

property of the College. The members of the corporation are the 
pastors of the congregations connected with the Norwegian Lu- 
theran Church of America and the representatives of said con- 
gregations at the triennial meetings of said Church. The presi- 
dent^ secretary, treasurer, and Board of Trustees shall be elected 
triennially at such time and place as said Church shall hold its 
regular meeting. The regular meeting of the corporation is to be 
held at the same time and place. The president of the corpora- 
tion is ez-officio president of the Board of Trustees and of the 
College. 

In 1917 the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America created 
a special department of education. The Board of Education acts 
for the church-body in all matters pertaining to the educational 
institutions of the Church. The Board of Trustees of Luther Col- 
lege, accordingly, is subject to the Board of Education, which in 
turn serves as a Board of Visitors, and is responsible to the church- 
body for the conduct of the church schools. 

III. ORGANIJarATION OF LuTHER CoLLEOB WiTHIN ItSELF* 

1. President and Faculty 

The College as organized locally is headed by the president 
and the college faculty. In early years the entire burden of ad- 
ministration fell upon the shoulders of the president, who in ad- 
dition to his work as administrator also carried a heavy teaching 
load. To a certain extent the same holds true today, but with the 
growth of the College must come a redistribution of the burden 
of administration. The heaviest burden carried by the president 
in past years has been that of finances. With the advent of the 
financial secretary, the president will be in a position to utilize 
the time he formerly needed for raising of funds in the administ- 
ering of funds. The appointment of such a secretary is of great 
importance to the College. 

Up to the present time faculty members have played a com- 
paratively small part in the administration of the affairs of the 
institution outside of carrying os the regular instruction of classes. 
The college registrar's office stands next to the office of the pres- 
ident in importance, matters relating to courses and scholarship 
being referred to this office. The college treasurer works in con- 
junction with the registrar. The college librarian assumes the re- 
sponsibility of developing the library. A curator has been ap- 
pointed for the museum. A special publicity committee has charge 
of publicity and advertising. Departmentalization is becoming 
more defined, and each department head is responsible for the 



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ORGANIZATION 



2^3 



development of that particular department. The dean of men and 
the principal of the Preparatory Department under the president 
control disciplinary matters. A special nurse is in charge of the 
college hospital. Student organizations flourish under student 
management^ and where necessary faculty advisers have been ap- 
pointed by the president. Regular weekly faculty meetings are 
held for consultation purposes^ the president in charge together 
with the secretary of the faculty. Scholarship and disciplinary 
matters are taken up for discussion^ and generally the president 
acts on the recommendations made by the faculty. There is under 




PRESIDENTS RESIDENCE, 1»20 

way at present a plan to inauguarate the committee system within 
the faculty and a committee was elected by the faculty in 1921 to 
make the proper recommendations. Such a system will make for 
added efficiency in the management of the many-sided activities 
of the College. From this it will be readily seen that the presid- 
ent is receiving more and more assistance in administering the af- 
fairs of the College. 

2. Students 

The individual student is the unit of organization^ and it is 
around and about the student that all the activities of the institu- 
tion turn in the never ending cycle of college life. The institu- 
tion was founded for him^ the faculty secured to assist and guide 
him^ the physical properties of the College to make his work 



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266 LUTHER COLI£GE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

more pleasant and productive of results^ the Alumni Association 
and Luther College Clubs, of which he is later to become a mem- 
ber, to father him in his educational career. 

And it is first and foremost the student who is preparing him- 
self for the study of theology and the service of the church that 
must be regarded as the unit in this particular school organisa- 
tion. It is primarily for this particular type of student that the 
curriculum is built along its present lines. Indirectly, the cur- 
riculum, consisting as it does of the very best in educational 
practice, appeals to three additional types of students: the student 
preparing for the profession of teacliing; the student desiring a 
liberal education; and the student desiring a broad foundation 
preparatory to graduate and professional study. The Preparat- 
ory Department, in addition to serving as a course preparatory to 
college entrance, is complete in itself as a secondary school pre- 
paring for life in a practical way. Thus while Luther College is 
the ideal small college for students who desire that personal 
touch which the larger institutions cannot give, and who do not 
intend to enter the ministry, and while the College serves this 
type in a large way, still it is not for this type that the institution 
primarily exists. 

Measuring the status of the school by the theological type of 
student, one has only to take cognizance of the fact that 556 Lu- 
ther College students have entered the ministry as compared with 
a total number of 801 graduates. Of this number of ministers, 
862 are graduates of the College Department, 194* are not. This 
number will grow consistently with the years, provided only the 
patrons of Luther College realize the great need of the church 
for young men who are willing to serve. The curriculum remains 
essentially the same as at the time of the founding of the institu- 
tion — a rich classical foundation, sufficiently modernized to parallel 
only the best in subject matter that the universities have to offer. 

The daily routine of class instruction and chapel exercises as 
well as the disciplinary training tend to develop the spiritual side 
of one's nature and point out the way of life in the direction of 
service to the church. 

3. Expansion of Course 

The full six-year course, offered for the first time in 1865-1866, 
was patterned after the last six years of the European Gymnasium, 
which gave great prominence to Latin and Greek, and was de- 
signed to prepare students for the university and the professions. 
The Gymnasium extends through nine years, being the European 



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ORGANIZATION 267 

substitute for the nine years in the American system beginning 
with grade eight of the elementary school and continuing through 
the senior college year. It is interesting to note that even in that 
early day^ men of vision prophesied the changing of conditions 
which must take place with the flight of time. They anticipated 
the needs of their people in this new country many years in ad- 
vance. In preparing the course of study for this institution, the 
fact that it w*a8 to be an American school was not overlooked. 
Though the school was founded by a Scandinavian people, still 
it was given the indelible stamp of an American school from the 
start, at the same time involving in its make-up all that was cher- 
ished in the old "Latinskole". This retaining in the early years of 
all that was near and dear to our people from the home land, 
gave the school its strength and solidity. 

The six-year gymnasium course continued with minor changes 
for twenty-two years, 1861-1883. At a meeting of the Synod 
held in June, 1881, a resolution was passed to the effect that the 
course offered at the College should be extended from six to seven 
years; the whole course to be divided into a Preparatory Depart- 
ment of three years and a collegiate of four. In order, however, 
not to be unfair to those students who had previously entered the 
College with a view of completing the course in six years, it was 
resolved that this change should not affect the students that had 
already entered the school, but only those that should be admitted 
in the future. In the next academic year there were three classes 
conducted on the new plan. These and all subsequent classes fin- 
ished a seven years' course before graduation. The lengthening 
of the preparatory course downward by one year was a necessary 
step to bring the College closer in touch with the state secondary 
schools. The necessity of keeping in touch with the state systems 
was at no time lost sight of, and more and more stress was placed 
on instruction in English. 

In 1906 a fourth year was added to the preparatory course, 
with a gradual introduction of new subject matter in the lower 
years, and by the school year 1906-1907 the College was operat- 
ing on an eight-year basis, four-year collegiate and four-year 
preparatory. In 1907-08 a literary course was introduced in the 
College Department to run parallel with the classical course, and 
a system of electives for the Junior and Senior classes was ar- 
ranged for the first time in the history of the institution. 

The elective system was not introduced into the preparatory 
course of study until the school year 1918-1919, when still an- 
other year was added as a result of the junior high school move- 



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268 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

ment The College as it is organized today offers a junior high 
school course^ covering work equivalent to that of the eighth 
grade and the first year high school; a senior high school course 
covering the work of the sophomore^ junior, and senior years of 
the high school; and a four-year collegiate course, a total of nine 
years. It is interesting to note that this nine-year curriculum 
strongly resembles that of the nine-year European Gymnasium, not 
particularly in subject matter, although here too there is a simil- 
arity, but in general plan and purpose. Luther College is unique 
in this respect, that it is the only school within the Church offer- 
ing at the same time part elementary, secondary, and college work 
in direct sequence so as to enable a young man desiring an educa- 
tion within the Church to secure such training beginning with 
the seventh or eighth grade of the elementary course. In other 
words, Luther College has solved the problem of continuity of 
courses as well as it can be solved within the Church to-day. 

4. The Normal Department, 1866-1886 

The organization of a special department for the training of 
teachers was under way within a few years after the establishment 
of the school. It had been the intention to provide for this train- 
ing from the very first, but crowded and unsettled quarters and an 
overworked faculty prevented action in this direction until the 
school year 1864-1865. 

Under the European system, special schools were maintained 
for the training of teachers, and no attempt had been made to 
carry on this work at the higher institutions of learning. A course 
of two years corresponding to the junior and senior years of our 
high schools of today comprised the European teachers' training 
school for common school teachers. Consequently to combine such 
a course with the regular courses of the Latin school offered dif- 
ficulties, as it meant a breaking away from an established prece- 
dent. 

But the great need of a training school to provide parochial 
and common school teachers made it absolutely necessary either to 
establish a special school for this purpose, or offer the necessary 
courses at one of the then existing institutions. The latter seem- 
ed to be the most logical course of procedure, and it was finally 
decided to offer a special normal course within the regular Latin 
school, and place an instructor in charge of this department. 

The normal course was accordingly made to coincide, 1864- 
1868, with the two lowest years of the Latin school. Preparation 
for teaching in the parochial schools of the Church was the de- 



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ORGANIZATION 269 

termining factor in the arrangement of subject matter. No effort 
was put forth to begin with to train teachers for work in the 
common schools^ and it was not until 1868 that^ in response to the 
demand for common school teachers, a third year's work was of- 
fered in this department, stressing mainly training in English. 
The work of this department now covered the three lowest years 
of the six-year Latin course. In classes where the same subjects 
were involved, the normal students and the regular students were 
to recite together. Normal students were not required to take 
Latin or Greek, but in their stead enrolled in subjects especially 
fitting them for the work of teaching. 

As a result of the extension of the regular course from six to 
seven years in the year 1888, the normal course was not offered in 
1882-83. In 1888 all the normal work was shifted into the three 
preparatory years, the first year being identical with the prepar- 
atory course, the second and third years offering special instruc- 
tion in the following branches in addition to the regular prepara- 
tory courses: catechism 8 hrs., Bible readings 3, English 3, U. S. 
history 2, didactics 4. In English and Norwegian, arithmetic, al- 
gebra, geography, general history, history of Norway, and Biblical 
history, the last two years were combined with the regular courses 
as stated. 

In 1872, the first normal class was graduated. The complete 
normal course offered in 1872 is given here. On February 1st, 
1886, the Normal Department was discontinued. The Church 
established Lutheran Normal School at Sioux Falls, S. Dak., in- 
stead. 

NORMAL COURSE AS OFFERED IN 1872 

(Model) (Quinca) (Sexta) (Septima ) 

3rd yr. 2nd yr. 1st yr. 

Explanation of Luther's Catechism 3 2 2 

Bible History 2 2 

Sjrmbolical Boolcs 2 2 

^cplanation of Bible and Catechetics 4 2 2 

German 2 3 

English 8 6 7 

Norwegian 2 2 4 

History. U. S., General 2 2 

Geography 2 2 

Natural History (2kK>logy and Botany) 3 

Mathematics (Arithmetic. Algebra. Geometry) 2 2 2 

Music 2 2 2 

Ptomanship 1 2 

Total (figures refer to number hours per week) 25 29 29 

6. Students' Army Training Corps (5. A, T, C.) 

On account of the war, many changes were made at Luther 
College in the college year 1918-1919. Most of the students in 
the College Department were members of the S. A. T. C. They 
were young men who had registered for military service under the 



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270 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



provisions of the selective draft law and had passed the physical 
examination^ but who were permitted to enter the S. A. T. C.^ an 
organization established by the War Department at most colleges 
and universities in the country. The S. A. T. C, was under the 
control of the War Department, which prescribed the subjects to 
be pursued, the number of hours per week to be devoted to military 
training, and all disciplinary regulations, which were on a strictly 
military basis. Lieutenant H. H. Fisher was the commanding 
officer and Second Lieutenant Allen C. Grundy was the personnel 
adjutant. The corps was demobilized December 11, 1918. 




CLUB ROOM 
Equipped for Uie S. A. T. C. by tlie Lutheran Brotherhood of America, 1918 

All physically fit students not members of the S. A. T. C, 
were members of the Luther College Cadet Corps. They were 
not under government control and furnished their own uniforms 
and otherwise paid their own expenses. But they drilled at the 
same time and in the same manner as the members of the S. A. T. 
C, and were subject to the same regulations. 

Military drill was required of all physically fit students at 
Luther College except Juniors and Seniors, and as the Reserve Of- 
ficers' Training Corps offered the same kind and amount of mil- 
itary training as was required at Luther College, it was decided, 
when the S. A. T. C, was demobilized, to apply to the War De- 
partment for a unit of the R. O. T. C. The unit was established in 
January, 1919, and Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Harold H. 



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ORGANIZATION 



271 



Fisher, was retained at the request of the faculty. The unit was 
divided into two courses: the basic course and the advanced course. 
The basic course included all students below the Junior class, as 
well as the Junior and Senior classes of the Preparatory Depart- 
ment. Members of this course were furnished with uniforms and 
equipment by the government. Membership in the advanced 
course was not compulsory, and was open to Juniors and Seniors 
of both departments who had completed the basic course. Those 
enrolling in the advanced course received free subsistence, and 
training at a summer camp at government expense. 

6. Typical Courses 

Courses have been built systematically from the top down to- 
ward the elementary system in an e£Fort to connect up as soon as 
possible with the state system. 

Typical courses in typical years are here presented so as to 
give the reader a general idea of the main changes that have oc- 
curred. More detailed information as to subject matter follows 
later in this volume. For the sake of convenience the Roman 
numerals will be used here to designate classes as follows — Prima- 
I, Secunda-II, Tertia-III, Quarta-IV, Quinta-V, Sexta-VI, Sep- 
tima-VII, Octava-VIII, Sub-Freshman-IX. Figures denote num- 
ber of hours per week in each subject. 

1872 
MODEL SIX-YEAR COURSE 1861-1883 

Class in a^'hich Subject is Ofpersd 

Subject ' 

I II in IV V VI 

Explanation of Luther's Catechism 2 2 3 3 2 2 

Bible History . . 2 2 

Utin 6 6 6 6 6 6 

Greek 4 4 4 4. 

Hebrew 4 .... . 

German 2 2 2 2 3 

EngUsh 2 2 2 2 3 4 

Norwegian 2 2 2 2 2 4 

Logic 1 1 

General History 2 2 2 2 . 2 

Geography . . . 2 2 

Natural History (Zoology and Botany) 3 

Mathematics(Arithmetic. Algebra. Geometry) .32222 

Music 2 2 2 2 2 2 

Penmanship . 1 2 

Totals 27 26 26 26 28 28 

1883 
MODEL SEVEN-YEAR COURSE 1883-1905 

Class in which Subject is Offered 

Subject 

I II III IV V VI VII 

Dietrich's Explanation 2 2 2 2 2 

Bible History ....33 

Latin 6 6 6 6 5 5 

Greek 6 6 6 5. 

Hebrew 4 ..... . 

German 3 2 2 3 4. 

English 3 4 3 3 3 3 6 

Norwegian 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 



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»72 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



General History (Anc, Med., Mod.) 
(alao Norw. and U. S.) 

Geography 

Natural History (Zoobgy) 

Mathematics (Arithmetic, Algebra, 
Geometry) 

Music (Vocal) 

Penmanship 

Augsburg Confession 

Pontoppidan's Explanation 

Stenography (elective) . •. 



Totals 30 



29 



30 



31 



34 



27 



Subject 



1908 
MODEL EIGHT-YEAR COURSE 1905-1918 

Class in which Subject is Offered 



I 



Christianity 

Greek Testament 

Augsburg Confession 2 

Latin 4 

Greek 2* 

Hebrew 4 

German 2* 

EngUsh 3 

Norwegian 3 

C^neral History 

English History 3 

Scandinavian History 

American History and Civics . 3 

Chemistry 4* 

Physics 

Trigonometry 

Geometry 

Algebra 

Arithmetic 

Higher Algebra 

French 4* 

Psychology 4* 

Old English 2* 

Music 

Drawing 

English Grammar 

Gymnastics 1 



II 



III 
2 



IV 

2 



V 
3 



VI 
3 



VII 
3 



32 



VIII 
3 



1 



30 



26 



30 



29 



28 



28 



35 



Totals 41 

* Electives. 

1918 
STUDENTS' ARMY TRAINING CORPS COLLEGIATE COURSE 
(The course offered this year in the Preparatory Department was identical with that given 
below for the year 1921.) 

Autumn Quarter (twelve weeks) Winter and Spring Quarters (twelve 

weeks each) 
Subject Has. per wk. Subject Has. per wk. 



Military Training 11 

Military EngUsh 4 

Augsburg Confession 1 

Greek Testament 1 

War Geography 3 

Survejnng 3 

Plane Trigonometry 3 

Higher Algebra 3 

Physics 1 4 

Chemistry 1 4 

Hygiene and Sanitation 3 

French 1 4 

German 5 

Latin 5 

Greek 6 

Military Psychology 3 

Modem European History 3 

Radio-telegraphy 3 

Accounting 3 

Advanced Norse 2 

Group singing 1 

Military Law and Practice 2 

War Aims 3 

Totals 80 



Biology 3 3 

Chemistry 7 8 

Christianity 3 3 

Economics 3 3 

Economic Issues of War. . . 3 

Education 9 12 

EngUsh 11 10 

French 8 8 

German 5 5 

Greek 14 20 

Hebrew 3 

History 6 9 

Latin 14 15 

Mathematics 6 15 

MUitary Science, Tactics.. 3 3 

Norwegian 6 6 

Physics 4 4 

Psychology 3 6 

Surveying 3 



Totals 108 136 



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ORGANIZATION 



273 



Subject 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Christianity 

Economics 

Education 

English 

French 

German 

Greek 

Hebrew 

History 

Latin 

Mathematics. . . 

Music 

Norwegian 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Psyciiok^gy .... 

Sociology 

Surveying 

Bookkeeping . . . 
Commercial arithmetic 
Commercial geography 
Commercial law . 

Shorthand 

Typewriting 

Penmanship 

Geography 

General science. . 

Citixenship 

Physiology 

Agriculture 



Totals 92 

Required subjects. 



1921 
MODEL NINE-YEAR COURSE 1918-1922 

Class in which Subjbct is Ofpbrbd 





II 


III 


IV 


V 


VI 


vn 


VIII 


IX 




4 






5 


5 










7 




4 


5 


5 








2* 2* 


1« 


2* 


2* 


2* 


2* 


2* 


2* 




3 


















8 
















9 6 


3-3* 


2* 


5 


5* 


5* 


5* 


5* 




7 


4 














3 3 


3* 


4* 


5 


5 








3 3 


4* 


4* 












3 3 
















6 6*^3 


3-3* 


6 


5 




5* 




4* 


6 3* 


5* 


6* 


5 


5 


5* 


5* 




6 9 




3-3* 


5 


5 


5* 


5* 


5* 




1 




1 


2* 


2* 


2* 


2* 




6 6 


3-3* 


4* 


5 


5 


5« 


5* 




3 3 
















7 7 




4 


5 


5 








3 6 
















6 3 
















3 3 




3 




















5 


5 






5 


c 
y 


• 










5 
5 
5 
5 

5 
2 


5 
5 

5 
5 
5 
2 






5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
2 
3* 














5 


5 






5 
5 
5 
5 



106 



66 



46 



86 



81 



81 



86 



71 



7. School Calendar 

The average length of the school year, 1861-1912^ was forty 
weeks. As accrediting standards required thirty-six weeks only, 
the length of the year was accordingly made to conform with re- 
quirements in 1917, the school year opening the second Thursday 
in September and closing in June at the expiration of thirty-six 
weeks of actual school work. 

Several changes have been made from time to time in the divi- 
sion of the school year, the first change being made in the year 
1886-1887, when the one term school year was divided into two 
terms of equal length. No sooner had this change been made 
than in 1888-1889 the work was again rearranged on the basis 
of three terms, a fall term of eleven weeks, a winter term of six- 
teen weeks, and a spring term of thirteen weeks. This change was 
made to meet the requirements of students who could spend only 
a portion of the year at school, and the subject matter was so ar- 
ranged as to make it possible for a student to complete a subject 
within a term or at least one-third or two-thirds of the subject, as 
the case might be. This arrangement proved very convenient for 
the part-time students and was continued until 1910-1911, when 



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274 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

the semester plan of division of the school year into two equal 
periods was introduced for a period of eight years. Only 
a temporary arrangement was made to accommodate the S. A. T. 
C. plan 1918-1919^ the college year being divided into four quart- 
ers of three months each, the preparatory year into six terms of 
six weeks each. The summer quarter of the college year 1919 
was not offered, and the semester plan again took effect in both 
departments 1919-1920, each semester in the College Department 
consisting of eighteen weeks, in the Preparatory Department be- 
ing sub-divided into quarters of nine weeks each. This arrange- 
ment seems to be most desirable as it accommodates part-time 
students. 

In the year 1879 class recitation periods were reduced from 
sixty minutes in length to forty-five minutes, in 1913 increased 
to fifty-five minutes, and later, in 1916, reduced to fifty minutes^ 
The length of recitation periods in the two departments has al- 
ways been the same, although accrediting standards require only 
forty-five minute periods in the Preparatory Departtnent. 

The system of reckoning by units and semester hours was in- 
troduced in 1912. Standards of scholarship have been raised as 
a result of limiting the amount of work which individual students 
may carry, and the posting of quantity and quality bulletins. 

The arrangement of work within the school year has under- 
gone some minor changes from time to time. The daily schedule 
from early years reads: a. m. Rising bell 5:30, Chapel 6:00, 
Breakfast 6:30, Study hour 7:00, Cleaning of rooms 8:30, Classes 
9: 00, Dinner 12: 00, p. m. Free period 1 : 00, Classes 2: 00, Free 
period 6:00, Supper 5:30, Evening study hours 7:00, Chapel 
8:30, Lights 10:00; as compared with the schedule in operation 
to-day: a. m. Rising bell 6:30, Breakfast 7:00, Classes 7:30, 
Chapel 10:00, Classes 10:30, Dinner 12:10, p. m. Classes 1:00, 
Free period 4:20, Supper 6:00, Evening study hours 7:30, Chapel 
9:45, Lights 10:15. 



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CHAPTER THIRTEEN 

INSTRUCTION 

A. M. ROVELSTAD 

I. Policy of Curriculum 

THE curriculum of Luther College^ as of any other educational 
institution^ is one of the clearest expressions of her aims and 
ideals.* 

The purpose and aspirations of Luther College during the 
past sixty years have been set forth clearly and fittingly on many 
occasions. Of the many excellent articles devoted to this subject^ 
only four are cited in this chapter^ because they illustrate suf- 
ficiently the fact that the ideal has essentially not changed from 
the foundation of the College to the sixtieth anniversary of that 
foundation.** According to the anniversary article by Profes- 
sor Tingelstad, the definite educational ideal adopted in the be- 
ginning and successfully established and consistently maintained 
in ever-widening circles is: "A Christian education for useful 
service in Christ's cause." 

Such service is rendered most directly and definitely through 
the Christian ministry — the noblest of all callings. The pastor 
has unique opportunities for coming into contact with the many 
phases and problems of human life, to act as temporal and spirit- 
ual adviser and comforter to all social classes. This wonderful 
privilege and responsibility requires^ first of all, a sympathy born 
of true spiritual consecration. Yet the effectiveness of this spir- 

♦Cf. "College Aims, Past and Present", by L. V. Koos and C. C. Crawford, 
in **Scliool and Society", Dec. 18, 1021, pp. 400-AOO. 

**Cf. Luther College Catalog for 1872-78, pp. 18-28, article on the college 
curriculum by President Laur. Larnen. This is tlie first catalog printed. 

Cf. "College Chips" for Oct., 1921, pp. 266-275, the article, "What Luther 
College Has Done for Education", by Prof. O. A. Tingelstad; also pp. 276-285, 
the article, "What Luther College Has Done for the Church", by Dr. 0. M. 
Norlie. 

Cf. "Luther College Bulletin" for Jan., 1922, the title of which is "Looking 
Forward after Sixty Vears", by President Oscar L. Olson. It is appropriate in 
this connection to refer the reader to the many articles and addresses which 
were prepared from time to time during the more recent days of the reconstruc- 
tion of tlie curriculum at Luther College by President C. K. Preus, whose un- 
timely death on May 28, 1921, prevented him from witnessing tlie significant 
anniversary for which he had planned and labored so faithfully. During his 
administration, too, the early ideals were carefully preserved. 



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276 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



itual endowment is strengthened and stabilized by a harmonious 
development of the mental faculties and by an acquisition of a 
broad and sound knowledge of man's physical^ intellectual^ and 
spiritual development down through the ages. 

Jt was this broad educational outlook which influenced the 
founders of Luther College in selecting and administering their 
curriculum. None of us appreciate fully their self-sacrifice, solid- 
ity, foresight, and idealism. For, in spite of the immediate need 
for a large number of pastors in the growing communities of the 
Middle West, they resisted the temptation to shorten and hurry 
the preparation of the candidates for the ministry; and they de- 
veloped a remarkable combination of intellectual training and 
spiritual consecration. 

In realizing this ideal of preparation for the Christian min< 




STUDENTS' ROOM 

istry, the elements of the curriculum from that time down to the 
present have been chosen with special care and a definite aim. 
This is utilitarianism and pre-vocationalism in the best and nobl- 
est sense. The reason for the presence of religion in the cur- 
riculum is self-evident. The practical value and broadening in- 
fluence of the English language and literature on a pastor require 
no demonstration. The pastor's need of a knowledge of the Nor- 
wegian language and literature is still imperative in many com- 
munities. Apart from the great importance of German secular 
literature, the very history of Lutheranism proves the value of an 
ability to read in the original the great German works on theology. 
French, though an elective study, has some importance for the 
theologian as an introduction to French thought, as well as to an 
understanding of a large part of the English language. 

In addition to these modern languages, the prospective pastor 
finds other subjects of great interest and value. It is hardly neces- 



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INSTRUCTION 277 

sary to call attention to the enlightening^ instructive^ broadening, 
and steadying influence of the study of history and the use of the 
historical method. The social sciences^ such as sociology^ econom- 
ics, statistics, psychology, education, philosophy, have been given 
such prominence in recent years and have undergone such a mark- 
ed development that the pastor who has not received an introduc- 
tion to them has lost an opportunity to obtain a more intimate con- 
tact with the fundamental social and economic problems of his 
parishioners and to gain a knowledge of the modern methods of 
understanding, training, and instructing the minds of his people. 
Higher mathematics furnishes, in addition to certain practical 
formulae and methods, a type of mental discipline which is gained 
in no other field. 

Upon the foregoing subjects — in fact, upon every sphere of 
modern life — a great influence is being exerted by current scien- 
tific thought and method. Science not only represents objective 
investigation and classification of specific data, but also has de- 
veloped into a system of speculative philosophy based on more or 
less definite premises. Nearly every congregation is to some ex- 
tent affected by such an atmosphere and the pastor cannot escape 
it, even if he will. Therefore, it is self-evident that his pastoral 
work will be carried on with greater confidence and power if his 
preliminary course of training contains such subjects as physics, 
chemistry, biology, and other related branches, studied under the 
guidance of competent Christian teachers. This important guid- 
ance is received by students attending Luther College. 

In this age of scientific and historical methods, the importance 
of "sources" is constantly stressed. The ability to use sources 
not only should give intellectual power, confidence, and accuracy, 
but also should serve as a ballast in the sea of conflicting doubts, 
prejudices, and emotions, if coupled with other essential qualities. 

For the pastor the most important "sources" are the Hebrew 
Old Testament, the Greek New Testament, the Greek and Latin 
Church Fathers of the early days, and the Latin commentaries 
of the later theologians. In addition to this practical value, the 
study of the Greek and Latin languages, literatures, and civil- 
izations gives him a better understanding of the etymology, spell- 
ing, and meaning of the English language, two-thirds of which 
is of Latin and Greek origin. Furthermore, the student of these 
languages gains a more intimate knowledge of literary English, 
a good foundation for the study of Romance languages, an excel- 
lent mental discipline, a closer contact with the best models of 



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278 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



art and architecture^ a broad basis for an understanding of medi- 
eval and modern civilization. 

Though a course of study dealing with so many fields re- 
quires much time and effort on the part of the prospective pastor^ 
yet it gives him a broad and solid foundation for his pastoral 
studies and duties. 

This pre-theological course is built upon a classical founda- 
tion. Though the original requirements in Latin and Greek have 
been somewhat reduced, in order to make more room for elective 
subjects, still the curriculum, remains fundamentally classical, as 




CHEMISTRY LABORATORY 

was the case with the German "gymnasium** which originally serv- 
ed as the model for Luther College. 

Such an education was, on the whole, "liberal" or "cultural". 
Tlie definitions of the term "liberal" have had many variations, 
which are reflected in the many types of present-day colleges.*** 
However, it is perhaps safe to state that a "liberal" education is 
general in its purpose and does not prepare specially for any vo- 
cation. The aim is to prepare for "the whole of life rather than 
for some particular part of it"; to prepare for life itself rather 
than for a livelihood; to deepen and broaden the mind until it is 
"liberalized" or freed from "the world that man's intellect has 
conquered for us". The stress laid on ideals of conduct, life, 
and thought inherent in tliis type of education would naturally 



***Cf. Koos and Crawford, loc. cit. 



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INSTRUCTION 



279 



be less prominent in professional or technical schools than in 
the "liberal" college. 

A "liberal" education is essentially "cultural", for not only 
does it embrace the subject-matter of its branches, but it also 
depends on the cultivation or "culture" of the mental faculties, 
not for a specific line of action but with a view to a general 
mental power which is capable of surmounting difficulties as they 
arise in later life. This theory of "formal" mental discipline and 
the automatic transfer of power or training from one field to 
another, though strongly attacked in recent years and as a result 




PHYSICS LABORATORY 

somewhat modified, nevertheless has not been successfully dis- 
proved. 

On the other hand, no education can be "liberal" or "cultural" 
in the strictest sense, for every course of study prepares more 
directly for some few professions or vocations than for others. 
This fact holds good also in the curriculum of Luther College. 
First of all, it furnishes an excellent preparation for the most 
effective work in the Christian ministry. Furthermore, the gradu- 
ate from Luther College, both in respect to general cultural back- 
ground and in regard to specific knowledge, is equipped to pursue 
special work in other professions, such as those of teaching, medi- 
cine, law, and others. Even those students at Luther College 
who do not plan to complete their course at this institution may 
by a judicious election of studies prepare directly for two or 
more years toward a later professional career, meantime ex- 
periencing the stabilizing power of a Christian atmosphere in 



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280 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

a Christian college^ which serves as an intermediate stage be- 
tween parental love and care and the freedom and trials of 
university life. Such courses have a* long-established precedent 
in the pre-medical, pre-engineering, pre-law courses which have 
been given for the last twenty years in many colleges and univer- 
sities. Nevertheless^ of course^ the curriculum is pre-professional 
merely in a broad sense and less in the special sense which applies 
to a law school or a medical school of science. 

To sum up, the pre-theological course at Luther College is 
essentially classical, liberal, and cultural, and lays a broad foun- 
dation for many walks of life. 

II. Entrance Requirements 
1. Preparatory Department 

Admission into the Junior High School (which comprises the 
usual eighth and ninth grades) will be granted to male students 
who have completed the seventh or eighth grades, provided they 
are at least twelve years of age, and other boys at least fourteen 
years of age whose previous training has been such as to enable 
them to do work with profit in the first year of the course. 

The work of the Senior High School corresponds to that of- 
fered in the three upper years of a standard American high school. 
Unconditional admission to the Senior High School presupposes 
the completion of four units of work acceptable for college entrance, 
but students who have completed not less than two units may be 
registered in the Senior High School at the discretion of the 
principal. 

Satisfactory testimonials of good moral character are required 
of applicants for admission to the Preparatory Department. A 
certificate of honorable dismissal is required of those coming from 
other schools. 

Students are admitted either by examination or by certificate. 
Examinations for admission or for advanced standing will be 
given at the beginning of the school year. Those who present 
certificates showing eighth grade graduation will be admitted 
without examination. Pupils from high schools will be credited 
for work well done and classified accordingly. High School Board 
certificates from Minnesota and North Dakota and first grade 
teacher's certificate standings from any state will be accepted 
for advanced standing. Credit granted on certificates from other 
schools may be revoked, however, if the student fails to sustain 
himself creditably in his work. 



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INSTRUCTION 281 

2. College Department 
Graduates of standard high schools^ requiring 16 year credits 
(units) for graduation^ are admitted without any conditions^ pro- 
vided that their high school training has included at least three 
units of English^ two of mathematics^ one of history, one of 
physics or chemistry, and two of foreign language. For those 
who enter without Latin, German, or Norwegian, special begin- 
ning courses in these subjects are arranged in the College. Six- 
teen high school units or year credits, each representing 180 
recitation hours, are required for unconditional admission to the 
Freshman class, and a minimum of fourteen units for conditional 
admission. Entrance conditions must be removed at the first 
opportunity by appropriate work in the Preparatory Department. 

III. Graduation Requirements 
1. Preparatory Department 

Sixteen units acceptable for college entrance, plus one-half 
unit of Bible, are required for graduation from the Senior High 
School. The sixteen units must include three units of English, 
two of mathematics (elementary algebra and plane geometry), 
one of history, and one of laboratory science (physics preferred), 
one-half of music, and four of foreign language, at least two of 
these to be Latin and one Norwegian. 

A unit is the equivalent of one high school study satisfactorily 
pursued during thirty-six weeks, on the basis of five recitation 
periods per week. The regular recitation periods at Luther Col- 
lege are fifty minutes in length, and the laboratory and book- 
keeping periods one hundred minutes. 

Graduation from the Junior High School requires the com- 
pletion of eighth grade grammar, arithmetic. United States his- 
tory, and geography, and, in addition, four units of work accept- 
able for college entrance. First-year high school English and 
one-fourth unit of Bible must be included. 

In general, five-hour subjects give one unit's credit for a 
year's work and two-hour subjects (Bible and music) give one- 
fourth unit's credit. 

2. College Department 

(1). A residence of at least one scholastic year at Luther 
College. 

(2). The completion of at least 130 semester hours of college 
work. In addition, twelve hours of physical training are required 
of those physically fit. 



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282 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

(3). Six semester hours of Latin above course IV (i. e., above 
the regular four years of high school Latin) ; Norse and German 
and Greek through course IV in each (i. e., four semester courses 
in each) ; four hours of Greek Testament^ ten hours of other 
Christianity^ ten hours of English^ twelve hours of history (or six 
hours of history and twelve hours of other social science^ in- 
cluding psychology), and one year each of mathematics^ natural 
science, and biological science or psychology. 

(4). The completion of a major of six semester courses in 
each of two departments (or groups of closely related depart- 
ments). In no case, however^ must these six courses total less 
than eighteen semester hours. Latin I and II (i. e., Beginner's 
Latin and Caesar) will not be counted toward a major. 

(5). The language requirements vary in accordance with the 
number of units of foreign language offered for college entrance^ 
the lacking entrance units being made up^ in addition to the 
regular language requirements. In foreign language^ a year's 
work in high school is counted equivalent to a semester's work 
in college. 

IV. Outline of Subjects by Decades 

Abbreviations and Explanations 
Classes 

I — College seniors; II — College juniors; III — College soph- 
omores; IV — College freshmen. 

V — Preparatory seniors; VI — Preparatory juniors; VII — Pre- 
paratory sophomores; VIII — Preparatory freshmen; IX — Pre- 
paratory sub-freshmen. 

Hours and Terms 

(1) — 1st semester; (2) — 2nd semester. 

(f) — Fall term; (w) — Winter terra; (s) — Spring term. 

Thus, 4 hours per week in 1st semester — 4 (1); 4 hours per 
week in Fall term — 4 (f). 

When terms or semesters are not specified, the given number 
of recitations per week runs throughout the school year. 

Language used as medium of instruction in class 

The catalogs, except in 1872-73, very rarely specify the 
language used as a medium of instruction in the respective classes. 
The English language has increasingly taken the place of Nor- 
wegian. In most recent years every class has been conducted 
with English as the medium, except in foreign language classes 



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INSTRUCTION 



283 



in which a more intimate familiarity with the language and thought 
is especially desired. 

El. — Elective. R — Required. Rec, — Recommended. 

All courses are regarded as Required, except when marked 
with El, or Rec. Subjects in the Preparatory Dep't (1921-1922) 
are classified as Required, Recommended, or Elective. 

ND — Normal Department. All courses are regarded as of 
the regular curriculum, unless marked with ND. Unless other- 
wise specified, the courses in the Normal Department were identic- 
al with those in Classes IV, V, VI up to 1883-84, and V, VI, VII 
from 1883-84 to 1885-86. The facts given in the following out- 
line of subjects are drawn from the Luther College catalogs of 
the years indicated and from the invaluable work of Professor 
Gisle Bothne, entitled "Det Norske Luther College, 1861-97." 



Outline of SubjecUi by Decades 

AGRICULTURE 



Year 


Class 


Hours and 
Courses 


Subject 


Text 


Teacher 


1862-63 












1872-73 












1882-83 












1892-93 












1902-03 












1912-13 












1921-22 


ix'CEl.) 




Agriculture (offered) 







BIOLOGY (Botany. Zoology, Physiology) 



1862-63 
1872-73 



1882-83 
1892-93 



1902-03 
1912-13 



1921-22 



VII. 



VIII. 



I. II. III. 



(El) 

I. II. III. 



(El) 

I, U, III .. 

(El) 

I. II. III.. 

(El) 

VIII. (El). 
VIII, (El). 



5 (s). 
5 (s). 



4(1) 

4(2) 

4 (1 or 2). 

Course I.. 
4 (1 or 2) . 



Course II.. 
4 (1 or 2).. 
Course III. 
4 (1 or 2) . . 
Course IV. 

5(2) 

5 



Botany 

Zoology 

Announcement of Zoology and Botany 

for 1883-84 in Class V, 3 hours 

Physiology 

Zoology 

None 

Biology (8 semester hours) listed in 

outline 

Zoology and Physiology 

Botany 

Elementary zoology 



Lectures and laboratory work. 
Embryology 



Comparative study, chick and pig . . . 

Invertebrate zoology 

Lectures andlaboratory work 

Vertebrate zoology 

Text, lectures, laboratory, reading . . 

Physiology and Hygiene 

Biology 

(Combination of zoology, botany, and 
physiology, with special stress on zo- 
ology.)Text supplemented by labora- 
tory work. 



Gray 

No text- b ook 



Mark h us .Shcel 
Sihler 



Hunter 

Hunter 

Hegner, 
Holmes. ... 

Patton. Prent- 
iss, Arey 



Hegner. 

Hegner . 

Martin . 
Hunter. 



Siewers . 



Hilleboe 
Hilleboe 
Trytten 

Trytten 

Trytten 
Trytten 



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284 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 



CHEMISTRY 



Year 


Class 


Hours and 
Courses 


Subject 


Text 1 Teacher 


1862-63 












1872-73 












1882-83 












1892-93 


III 


4 (s) 


Chemistry (combined with Class IV) . . . 




Sheel 




IV 


4 (s) 


Chemistry (combined with Class III) ... . 




Sheel 


1902-03 












1912-13 


I (El) 


4 (1) 


Qualitative Analysis 




Sheel 




II (El) 

IV (El) 

r, ii(Ei) 

I, II (El) 

II. III. IV (El). 
V, VI (El) .... 


Course III 

4 (2) 


Lectures and laboratory work, the former 
two hours, the latter four hours (two 
double hours.) 

Quantitative analysis 




Sheel 




Course IV 

4 

Course II 

4 (2) 


Plan similar to qualitative analysis. Pre- 
requisite. Course III 

Inorganic Chemistry (Advanced) 

Class work. 2 regular hours. Laboratory 
practice. 2 double hours. 

Elementary chemistry 


Smith 


Sheel 




Smith 


Sheel 




Course I 

3 (1) 


Class work, 2 regular hours. Laboratory 
work, 2 double hours 






1921-22 


Qualitative analysis 


Sheel 




Course III... 
3 (2) 


Lectures. 1 regular hour. Laboratory 
work, 2 double hours. Prerequisite, 
Course III 

Quantitative analysis 




Sheel 




Course IV 

4 

Courses I-II... 

5 


Lectures, 1 regular hour. Laboratory 

Courses I, II 

Inorganic chemistry (advanced) 

Class work, 2 regular hours. Laboratory 

work, 2 double hours. 


Smith 


Sheel 










Chemistry 

Organic chemistry will be offered to college 
juniors and seniors in 1922-23, by Prof. 


O. M. Eittreim 











CHRISTIANITY 



1862 


V, VI 


3 


Bible History 


Gen. 1 Kgs.... 
Pontoppidan... 

HutVer! '.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

Dietrich 

Pontoppidan. . . 
Gen. 1 Kgs.... 

Rambach 

Acts, Rom. Gal. 
Gen. 1 Kgs... 


Larsen 




V, VI 


2. . . 


Catechism . . 


Laraen 


1872 


I, II 




Greek Testament 

Catechism . . 


J. D. Jacobsen 
J. D. Jacoboen 




I, II.. 


2, 




III. IV 


2 


Catechism 


Larsen 




V. VI. 


2. 


Catechism. . 


Larsen. Brandt 




V. VI 


3 . . . 


Bible History 


Brandt 




IV Normal 

IV. VI Normal. 

V. VI Normal. . 
I 


2 

2. 


Catechetics 


Brandt 




Exegesis 


Brandt 




3 

2. 


Bible History 


Brandt 


1882 


^Augsburg Confession. . 


Nseaeth 




II. IV 


2 


Catechism 


Dietrich 

Dietrich 

Vogt 

Pontoppidan... 

Roalkvam 

EMctrich 


Laraen 




V. VI 


2, 


Catechism . . 


Larsen 




VI. VII 


3 


Bible History 


Roalkvam 




VII 


2 


Catechism 


E. J. PMersen 




V Normal 

V. VI Normal. . 

V, VI Normal.. 

VI, VII Normal 
VII Normal... 

I. II 


3 

3 

3 

3 


Didactics. . . 


Roalkvam 




Catechism 


Larsen 




Exegesis. ... 


Roalkvam 




Bible History 


Vogt 


Roalkvam 




2 

2. ... 


Catechism 


Pontoppidan. . . 


E. J. Petersen 


1892 


♦Alternating with Greek Testament every 

other year. 
♦Augsburg Confession 


Nseseth 




Ill, IV 

V 


2 

1. 


Catechism 


Dietrich 

Luther 

Acts 


Laraen 




Catechism. . 


Markhua 




V 


2 


Bible Reading 


Krog 




VI, VII 


2. 


Catechism. . ... 


Pontoppidan... 
O. T 


Hove 




VI, VII 


2 


Bible History 

♦Alternating with Greek Testament 
every other year. 


Krog 











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INSTRUCTION 



285 



Outline of Svbjeds by Decades 



Year 


Class 


Hours and 
Courses 


Subject 


Text 


Teacher 


1902 


I 

II 

Ill 

IV... 


2 

2 

2 

2 


Aiiggburg Conf^Biion 




Naeaeth 




Greek Testament 




Nseseth 




Catechism 


Dietrich 

Dietrich 

Pontoppidan. . . 
Matt. Acts.... 

4 books 


Preus 




Catechism 


Preus 




VI. VII 

V 

VI 

VII 

I 

11 

III. IV 

V 


1 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

1 


Catechism. . 


Torrison 




Bible History 


Preus. Markhua 




Bible History 


Preus 




Bible History 


Preus 


1912 


Greek Testament 


Ylvisaker 




Augsburg Confession 


Preus 




Catechism 


Dietrich 

Matt. Acts 


Preus 




Life of Christ 


VlWsaker 




V. .. 


1. 


Bible Introduction 


Preus 




VI 


2 


Church History 


Vogt 


Ylvisaker 




VII 


1 


Bible History 


1 Sam. Dan.... 
Pontoppidan.. . 

Gen. Ruth 

Matt. & Bible 
introduction. . 


Sperati 




VII 


1 


Catechism 


Torrison 




VIII 


2 

2 


Bible History and Geog 


Preus 


1922 


Greek Testament 






II 


2 


Augsburg Confession 


Sihler & NorUe 
Tingelstad 




Ill 


1 


Dietrich 


Parts I. II 

Parts II. v.... 

Kirk 


& Sihler 
Norlie 




IV 


2 


Dietrich 


Tingelstad & 




V 


1 


Life of Christ 


NorUe 
K. O. Eittreim 




V 


1 


Bible Introduction 


Norlie 

Str0mme 

1 Sam. Dan.... 

Gen. Ruth 

Acts 


F. E. PMeraen 




VI 

VII 

VIII 

IX 


2 

2 

2 

2 


Church History 


K. O. Eittreim 




Bible History 


Sperati 




Bible History and Geog 


Sperati 

K. O. Eittreim 




Bible History 



COMMERCE 



1862-43 
1872-73 
1882-4t3 
1892-93 
1902-03 
1912-13 
1921-22 



VI. IX (El). 



5 (lor 2). 

5(1) 

5(2) 



Bookkeeping 

Elementary course (consists of the first six 
units of textbook) 

Advanced course (consists of the seventh 
unit, banking, and other supplemental 
work). The completion ot the two 
courses requires ordinarily two years to 
finish 

Commercial arithmetic. (See under math- 
ematics) 

Commercial geography. (See under geog- 
raphy) 

Commercial law 

Practical knowledge of the laws, forms, and 
papers connected with ordinary business 
transactions 

Shorthand 

Stress on speed and ability to read notes 
readily 

Typewriting. "Touch** system. Speed 
and accuracy 



Oxxlyear & 
MarshaU.. 



Hamilton. 



Gregg System. 



Cutler & 
SoreUe. 



K. O. Eittreim 



K. O. Eittieim 

S. S. Reque 
K. O. Eittreim 



K. O. Eittieim 



K. O. Eittreim 



ECONOMICS 


1862-3. 












1872-3. 












1882-3. 












1892-3, 












1902-3. 












1912-13 












Digitized by 



Google 



286 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 



Year 


Class 


Hours and 
Courses 


Subject 


Text 


Teacher 


1921-22 


I,-III (El) 

I.-III (El) 


3 (1) 


General introduction to economics. Spe- 
cial attention to the development of 
leading schools of economic thought 

Principles of economics. Stress on relation 
between industrial problems and social 
conditions 


SeaffP*" ^- ■ ■ ■ ■ 






3 (2) . , 


Talle 




Lippincott 






Mil (El) 


3(2) 


TaUe 




Economic development of the U. S. 


Talle 



EDUCATION 



1862 63 

1872-73 
1882-«3 
1892-93 
1902-03 
1912-13 



1912-13 



ND 

ND 

IV, ND. 
IV, ND. 
I, II.... 

I 

I 



II 

1,11 (El). 
I. II (El). 
I. II (El). 
I. II (El). 
I. II (El). 



I. II (El). 

I. II (El). 
I. II (El). 
I. II (El). 



II. Ill 

(Required un- 
less Biology is 
elected.) 
.11 (El).... 



I, II (El). 



I, II (El). 



I. II (El). 



I (El). 



I. II (El). 



Ml) 

Course VIII. 



2 (2) 

2 (2) 

2 (2) 

3 (1 or 2).. 
Course III. 



1 (s) 

2 (s) 

3(1) 

Course II. . . 

3 (2) 

Course I . . . . 

4 (1) 

Course III... 

4(2) 

Course IV... 

4(1) 

Course V 

4(2) 

Course VI... 
Course VII.. 



2 (1). 
2 (1). 



3 (1 or 2).. 
Course IV. 

3 (1 or 2).. 
Course II . . 
(Psych) . . . 
3 (1 or 2).. 
Course I . . 



3(1) 

Course III. 

3 (2) 

Course IV. 

3(1) 

Course V. . 



3(2) 

Course VI. 



2 (1 or 2) 

(In each section) 
Course VII 



3 (1 or 2) ... . 
Course VIII. 



3 (lor 2).. 
Course IX. 

3 (1 or 2).. 
Course X . . 



Catechetics 

Pedagogy 

Theory and practice of teaching 

Catechetics 

History of education 

History of education 

Psychology in its relation to education . . 



Introductory psychology 

Lectures, experiments, reports . 
History of philosophy 



History of education. . 

Child study 

Educational methods. 



Theory of education. (Lectures, reports, 
practice) 

(a) Philosophy of education 

(b) How to Study and teaching How to 
Study 

(c) Civics and Health 

School administration. (Lectures, reports. 

observation, practice) 

(a) Economy in education 

(b) High school administration 

(c) Introduction to the study of society. . 

Applied psychology 

Various texts and exi)eriment8. Prereq- 
uisite: Course 1 

Psychology of religion 

Textbooks, questionnaires, reports, lec- 
tures 

Educational psychology 

Readings, lectures and experiments 

Prerequisite: Introductory psychology. . . 

Introductory psychology 

Lectures, experiments, reports 



Sncdden 

Roark 

Hollister 

Small&Vincent . 

HoUingworth & 

Poffenberger . 



History of philosophy. 



History of education. 



Reports on 



High school methods 

Observation of teaching, 
assigned topics 

School administration 

Text, readings, reports 



Special methods in high school subjects. . . 

In sections under supervision of instructor 
who is at the head of the department 
concerned. Textbook, lectures, obser- 
vations, reports 

Administrative problems 

Stress on problems of superintendents and 
high school principals 

Educational sociology 

Surveys and reports 



American public school system. 
Assigned readings and reports 



Rambach.. 

Faye 

Page 

Roalkvam . 



Harris- Bagley. 



Verkes. 
James.. 
Weber. 



Monroe 

Kirkpatrick.. 

Thomdike & 
Strayer . . . , 



Brown 

Rosenkranz . 

McMurray . . 
Allen 



Starch . . . . 
Woodrow 
Terman . . . 
Breese . . . , 



Thilly. 



Graves. Monroe 
Cubberley... 
Parker 



Cubberley. 



Nutt. 



Inglis 

Chancellor. 



Cubberley. 



Brandt 

Brandt 

Brandt 

Roalkvam 

G. Bothne 

G. Bothne 

Tingelstad 

Tingelstad 

Tingelstad 

Tingelstad 

Tingelstad 



Tingelstad 

Hilleboe 
HiUeboe 

Hilleboe 
Hilleboe 

HiUeboe 
HUleboe 
Hilleboe 
HiUeboe 

Norlie 

Norlie 



Norlie 
NorUe 

Tingelstad 

Norlie 

Tingelstad 



Tingelstad 

(NocUe) 

F. E. Peterson 



Tingelstad 
NorUe 



Tingelstad 
(Norlie) 



Digitized by 



Google 



INSTRUCTION 



287 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 



Year 



Class 


Hours and 
Courses 


I-III (El) 


3 (1 or 2) 

Course XI 


I (El) 






Course XII.... 


I, II (El 


.? (1 or 2) 


I, II (El) 


Course XIII... 

3 (lor 2) 

Course XIV 


I. II (El).. 


3 (I or 2) 




Course XV... '. 



Subject 



Text 



Teacher 



Principles of education 

Education as a science. Bibliographical 
work and methods of research. A 
syllabus on education developed 

Practice teaching 

(in preparatory department and the local 
high school) 

Educational hygiene 



Judd. 



Statistical methods applied to education . 
(Efifort by members of the class to solve 
local educational problems) 

Moral and religious education 

Syllabus, lectures and assigned reports 



Rapeer 

Rugg 
Alexander . . . 

Norlie & Tingcl- 
stad 



Tingelstad 



Tingelstad 

(F. E. Peterson) 
Tingelstad 



Tingelstad 
Norlie 



ENGLISH 



1862-63 


IV 


2 


Grammar 


Pinneo 

McGuflfey 

McGuflfey 

McGuflfey 

Greene 

Parker & Wat- 
son 


Schmidt 




V. VI 


2 


Fourth reader translated 






Fourth reader 


Schmidt 




I 


2 


Spelling book 




1872-73 


Grammar 


Bergh, (MV f. 




II 


2 


National third, fourth, and fifth readers. . 
Shalc^8D63.re 


V 2 f. VI, 2 f) 




Ill 

IV 


3 

3 








Bergh 








Bergh 




V 

VI 


3 

4 


Fourth reader (ND) 


Saunders 


Bergh 




Dictation 






IV (ND) 


8 


Composition 












Jacobaen (ND) 




V (ND) .... 


6 










VI (ND) 


7 








1 882-83 




3 


Shakespeare: Hamlet 




L. S. Reque 




II ... . 


3 


Milton: Paradise Lost 








History of English Literature 


Gilman 






Essays 






Shakesoeare: Julius Caesar 




Nescth 




HI 


3 


Extracts from other authors 








Rhetoric and comoosition 


Hart 






Composition 








Supplementary readers 


Swinton 


Naeseth 




IV 


3 


Extracts from other authors 






Composition 








National fifth reader 


L0kke 


Nseseth 




V 


5 


English grammar 








Composition 








Fourth reader. . . 


Monroe 


Nxseth 




VI 


^ 


Translation into Norwegian .,..-,,-..,-. 






Grammatical exercises 








Dictations 








Fourth reader. 


National 

Morris 


Naeseth 




VII 


5 


English grammar 






Translations and declamations 






Composition 


Knud9en&L0kke 






(Normal Dcpt. was not conducted in 1882- 

83) 
Study of English classics 




1892-93 


I 


3. ... 


Reque (1 hr.) 




II 

Ill 


3 

3. 


Anglo-Saxon reader 


Sweet 


Naeseth 




History of English literature 








Parallel reading 








Composition 








Essays 








Partly with I. subjects as in I 

English classics 




L.S.Reque(l hr) 
Naeseth 




IV 


3 


Rhetoric 








Parallel reading 








Composition 








Essays 








Subjects as in III 




Njeaeth 



Digitized by 



Google 



288 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Ovdine of Subjects by Decades 



Year 


Class 


Hours and 
Courses 


Subject 


Text 


Teacher 




V 


5 (s) 




Swinton 


G. Markhus 




VI... 


6 (f). 6 (w) . . . . 
6 


Other English classics 






Parallel leading 








English grammar 


Meiklejohn.... 












Spelling .• 








Eourth reader. 


Appleton 


Markhus 




VII 


Other English classics 






Other subjecu as in V 








Fourth reader 


Monroe 


Markhus 




I 


3 


(Xher English classics. ... 






Subjects as in III 








Grammar (without text-book) 






1902-03 


History of English literature. 


Brooke 


Ncseth 




II 


2(f). 3(w). 3(8). 
3 


Milton and Shakespeare 






Selections from Pope, Dryden. and others 
Collat^*ml mding. . . . , 














Parallel reading 
















Essays and orations 




Olson 


1902--03 


History of English literature . . . 


Brooke 


Naeseth 




Ill 


Spenser and Shakespeare 






Collateral reading 








Essays and orations 




Olson 




History of English literature 


Brooke 


NKseth 




IV 


3 


Chaucer and Shakespeare 






Collateral reading: Shakespeare & Milton 
Rhetoric 








Clarke 






Composition 






Shakespeare: one play 




Naeseth 




V 


6 (0 


History of American Literature 


Watkins 






Supplementary reading 






Composition 








Selections from American authors 




Markhus 




VI 


2(0.2(w).... 
6(w). 6(8).... 

6 


Rhetoric 


Clarke 






Composition 






Vocal culture 


Russell 






Elocution 






Lamb: Tales from Shakespeare 




Markhus 




VII 


Punctuation ' 


Raub 






Composition 








Elocution 


Swett 






Elocution 


Swett 


Markhus 




I 


2 (1).. 


Supplementary reading 








Grammar. ........ X 


West 


Gjcrset 




Composition 






1912-13 


Shakespeare: Four plays 




Olson 




I. II (El) 

I, II (El) 

II 


Course V 

3 (2) 


Ben Jonson: The Alchemist 








The drama: Its law and technique 

One theme from each student 


Woodbridge.... 






Masterpieces of American literature 

Additional literature for reference work. 

Reports by students. One theme from 

each student 
Anglo-Saxon 


Bright 


Olson 




Course VI 

4 (1) 


Olson 




Course VII.... 
4 (2) Course 

VIII 

4 (1) Course 


Grammar, versification; phonetics 
Beowulf translated in full 


Olson 




Chaucer: Canterbury Talcs (5 or 6) 
Middle English. Prok>gue. Also private 

reading. Reports and one theme from 

each student.. 
American literatute 




Olson 




4 (2) 




Olson 




Course X 

4 (2) 


Systematic reading 








Reports and one theme from each student 
The noveL 




Olson 




Course XI 

1 


Novels, and short stories read 








Reports and one theme from each student 
Advanced comoosition 




Olson 






Course III 

1 


Rhetoric 


Baldwin 

Baker 






Argumentation 


Olson 




Outlines, composition, longer themes 
Public speaking 




Olson 




Course IV 


(See also under MI) 







Digitized by 



Google 



INSTRUCTION 



289 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 



Year 



ClaM 



Hours and 
Courses 



Subject 



Text 



Teacher 



III. 



3 (1). 2 (2) . . 
Course II..., 



IV. 

v.. 



2 (Course I) 

4 



VI. 



History of English Literature 

Lectures by teacher 

Readings 

Selections 

Reports and one theme from each student 

Rhetoric and coroporftion 

History of American literature (2 hra) . . . 
Literature (for study and reading) (2 brs.) 

Memorizing selections 

Weekly compositions 

Composition and rhetoric (2 hrs.) 



Century. 
Manly.. 



Baldwin... 
Abernethy. 



Olson 



Olson 
Thompson 



VII. 



Literature (for study and reading) (2 hrs.) 

Memorizing selections 

Weekly compositions 

Composition and rhetoric (2 hrs.) 



Lockwood and 
Emerson . . . 



VIII. 



1921-22 



I. II (El) 

1. II. Ill (El). 

I. II. Ill (El). 

I, II (El) 

I. II (El) 

I, II (El) 

I. II (El) 

I. II (El) 

I. II (El) 

I. II (El) 

I. II (El) 

1. II(EI) 

I. 11 (El) 

II 

Ill 



3 (1 or 2) Course 



'%\ 



3 (1 or 2) Course 

VI 

3 (1) CourseVII 
3(2)CourseVIII 
3 (1 or 2)Course 

IX 

3 (1 or 2) Course 

X 

3(1 or 2) Course 

XI 

3 (1 or 2)Course 

XII 

3(1 or 2) Course 

XIII 

3(1 or 2) Course 

XIV 

3(1) Course XV 
3(2)CourBeXVI 
3(1 or 2) Course 

XVII 



Literature (for study and for reading) 
(2 hrs.) 

Memorizing selections 

Weekly compositions 

English grammar 

Literature (class study and supplementary 
reading) 

Compositions and reports 



Advanced composition . 



Lockwood and 
Emerson . . . . 



Gjerset 



Public speaking 

Shakespeare: Four plays 

Masterpieces of English literature . 

American literature 



The drama to 1642 

The novel 

The Romantic movement . 
Tennyson and Browning . . 



The essay 

Anglo-Saxon reader. 
Beowulf translated . . 



CunliffeandLo- 
mer. Periodical? 
Bright 



IV 

V(E1). 



Courses IIMV. 



2 Courses MI. 
S 



VKRec.). 



Chaucer: Canterbury Tales and Prologue. 
See under MI-III. 



History of English literature 

Representative selections of English liter- 
ature 

Rhetoric and composition 

Rhetoric and composition 

History of English literature 

Weekly composition 

Memorizing 

Outside reading 

Exercises in debating, reading, speaking . . . 

Survey of American literature 

Composition and rhetoric (second semester) 



Moody &Lovett 



Manly . 
Linn. . . 



Hinchman. 



Olson 



Thompson 



Thompson 



TaUe 

Talle 
Olson 
Olson 

Olson 

Olson 

Olson 

Olson 

Olson 

Olson 
Olson 
Olson 

Olson 
Olson 



Nelson 

S. S. Reque 



VII (Rec.). 



Outside reading 

Public speaking 

Composition and rhetoric (2 hours) . 



Brewer 

Long 

Calhoun and 
McAlarney . 



VIII (Rec.). 

IX (R) 



Literary readings and reports (3 hours) . . . 
Practice in reading, memorizing, debating, 

etc 

Orthoepy 

English grammar (2 hours) 

Literary readings and reports (3 hours) . . . 
English grammar 



Brewer 

Lockwood and 
Emerson ... 



Abernethy. 
Wooley... 



Gjerset . 



Nelson 
Nelson 
Nelson 
Nelson 

Evanson 
Talle 



Digitized by 



Google 



290 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 

FORENSICS (Debating. Oratory, Elocution. Public Speaking) 



Year 


Class 


Hours and 
Courses 


Subject 


Text 


Teacher 


1862-63 






Progress in this field is made not only by 
means of class instruction in English and 
Norwegian, but also through the student 
literary organizations and public con- 
tests and programs, and by instruction 
given privately by the instructors. 
Special coaches for debating and orator- 
ical contest in 1921-22 are Professors 
D. T. Nelson and H. O. Talle. 

Exercises in declamation (in Norse course) 






1872-73 








1882-83 












1892-93 












1902-03 


V 


2 (0.2 (8) 

1 English. 

Course IV... 
1. 


Elocution 


Swett 


Markhus 


1912-13 


II 


Public speaking 








VII 


Olson 




Debating and other exercises . . . 




Thompson 


1921-22 


I. II. Ill (El).. 
V. VI.VIKRec) 


3 (1 or 2) 

Eng. Course VI. 


Public speaking 




Talle 




Same as in 1912-13 for Class II. 

Public speaking and debating 


Brewer 


Reque & Nt*N 









FRENCH 






1862-63 












1872-73 












1882-83 












1892-93 












1902-03 


I 


2(f).2(s) 

4 

Course II 

4..- 

Course I 

4 

Courses I-II. . . 

3 

Courses III-IV. 


Elementary P'rench 




L. S. Reque 


1912-13 


I (EI) 

II (ED........ 

I. II (ED 

I. II (ED 


L. S. Reque 




Grammar and exercises continued 








Selections for reading 








I-ectures 








Elementary course. . . . . 




L. S. Rirque 




Pronunciation. . . 








Essentials of grammar 








Exercises. . , 








Selections from authors 






1921-22 


Elementary French . . 




S. S. Reque 




Grammar and reading 


Fra.<(er&Squair 






Advanced course . 


S. S. Reque 




Stress on literary features 








I^arger assignment of authors 








Review of grammar 













GENERAL SCIENCE 






1862-63 












1872-73 












1882-83 












1892-93 












1902-03 












1912-13 












1921-22 


VIII. IX (El).. 


.. .5(1) 


Introduction to general science 


Clark 


O. M. EtttniM 



GEOGRAPHY 



1862-63 

1872-73 
1882-83 

1892-93 



IV.... 
V. VI. 



V... 
VI.. 
III. 

V. . . 
VI.. 
V... 
VI.. 
VIF. 



3.. .. 
3.. . 

4 

5 (s) 
5 (8) 
S (f). 



5 (w) ■ 



Geography of Northern Europe . 

Geography of Europe 

Geography 

Read, translated, and learned. . . 

Geography 

Common school geography 

Physical geography 

Grammar school geography 

Grammar school geography 

Geography of Europe 

Physical geography 

General geography 



Dan 

MitciieilV 



Geelmuyden . 

Warren 

Guyot 

Guyot 

Guyot 

Appleton . . . . 

Houston 

Horn 



Schmidt 

Siewers 
Bergh (f) 
Narvesen 
Narvesen 
Narvesen 
G. Bothne 
Sheet 
Markhus 



Digitized by 



Google 



INSTRUCTION 



29 L 







Outline of Subjects by Decades 






Year 


Class 


Hours and 
Courses 


Subject 


Text 


Teacher 


1902-03 


V 


5 


Physics and phys. geography 


Wentworth & 
HilKPhysics). 






VI 




Sheel 

^. . . . 




VII... 


5 (f ) 


Political geography 

Geography of Europe 


Longman 


Sihler 




None 


5 (w) 


Sihler 


1912-13 


None . . 








1921-22 


V. VI. VII(El). 
V. VI, VII(El). 
IX 


5 (1) 


Commercial geography ... 




S. S. Reque 




5 (lor 2) 


Physical geography 




O. M. Eittreim 




Political geography 


Talle 



GSHMVN 



1H62-63 


IV 


3. . 


German forms 


Autenrieth 

Wackernagel... 


Schmidt 




V. VI 

I 


2 

2 


Second reader 

Schiller: Thirty Years' War 






German grammar 


Bauer 






German verbs 


Autenrieth 


Larsen 




Reader 


Schmidt (1 hr.) 
SiewersdII-V) 
Jacobsend.II) 


1872-73 


German grammar ... . 


Autenrieth 

Aalholm 

Woodbury 




II 

Ill . . 


2 


German reader 




2 

2 


German reader , . ' . 

Schiller: Thirty Years' War 




IV 






V 


3 

3. 


Selections from German classics, e g.. 

Goethe: Hermann und Dorothea, etc 
Normal Dept. as in IV and V 












1882-83 


Schiller: Wallenstein 

Goethe: Faust 


Piccolomini 


E. J. Petersen 




11 


2 

7 






I^ssing: Minna von Barnhelm 








Composition 








Two German Essays 

Reader 








L0kke 


E. J. Petersen 




Ill 


Goethe: Hermann und Dorothea . 








Grammar 

Composition 

Reacler 














Pau8S& Lassen. . 


E. J. Petersen 




IV 


4 


Grammar 

Composition 












Reader 


Knudsen 

Pauss & Lassen. 


E. J. Petersen 






3. . . 


Reader 






Grammar 






Composition ... ... 






1892 -93 


(German in Normal Dept.) 
Goethe: Gfitz von Berlichingen . , 




Sihler 




II 


^ 


Fichte: Reden an die deutsche Nation (in 
part) 








fll 


3 


Sihler 




Other German classics 








Parallel assigned reading of various authors 
Grammar 














Composition .... 








Schiller: Wallenstein 




Sihler 




IV 


3 


Grammar 








Composition 








Reader 


Pauss & Lassen. 
Pauss & Lassen. 






Reader 


Sihler 




V 


S(f).5(w) 


Grammar 






Composition 








Elementary German 




G. Bothne 






Reader 


Knudsen 




1902 03 








11 


4 (0.0 (w).... 
3 (s) 


Practical exercises 




Sihler 




11!..., 


Schiller. Lessing. Goethe 

History of German literature . . . . 








2 (0.2 (w).. 








Private reading 








F'ive poems memorized. 








Two or three German authors 




Sihler 




e. g. Hauff, Seume, Freytag, etc. 








Composition 








Poetic selections. . . . 








Discussion of German "Kiiltur" 








History of (German literature 








Five poems memorized 







Digitized by 



Google 



292 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 



Year 


Class 


Hours and 
Courses 


Subject 


Text 


Teacher 




IV 


3 


(German reader 


Pauss & Lassen. 


Sihier 




• 

V 


5(w),5(8).... 

4.... 

Course IV 

2 (1) Courselll. 

2 Course II 

2 


Grammar . 






Composition 








EMctations 








Method and material > . 


Sihier 


Sihier 




I. 11 (El) 

II 


German reader 


Bj0r«t 




1912-13 


(a) Practical conversational German or.. . 


Sihier 




(b) Study of German Itfe and culture, br . 








(c) Masterpieces of Carman literature . . . 








Work along same iines as in Soph. year. 
New authors added 








fll 


Sihier 




Goethe. Schiller. Lessing. Grillparaer. 
Kleist; Kluge: Auswahl deutscher Ge- 
dichte •. 








IV 


Sihier 




Sight reading and repons 




Sihier 




V 


Course I 

4 


Selections from Haun 








Composition 










Sihier 


Sihier 




VI 


3 


The Carman noun 


Sihier 

Pauss & Lassen. 
Knudsen & 

Rogsted 

Gunderson & 

Larsen 






Reader 






Composition 






(^ramniAr. 






Dictation and reading 






Forms and words 


Sihier . . . 


Sihier 




I. II (El) 

Ill 

IV 

V 


2 Course v.... 

3 Courses VI- 

VIII. 

3 

CoursesIIMV.. 

4 

Courses I-II... 
5 (Rec.) 

5 (El) 


The German noun 


Sihier 






First reader 


Bj0rset 

Knudsen & 

Rogstad 

Pauss & Lassen. 






Composition 






Reader 




1921-22 


^entific German . . 


Sihlo- 




(a) Practical conversational German, or. . 




Sihler 




(b) German life and culture, or 




Sihier 




(c) Masterpieces of German literature . . . 




Sihier 




Intermediate Carman 




Sihier (III) 




Reading of prose and poetry 

Reviews 




F. E. Peterson 
(III. IV) 




(^rman idioms 








Prerequisites, Courses I-II or equivalent. 
Rlpmentary German 




Sihier 




Dictation and reading for Orman sounds 
German grammar 




F. E. Peterson 
F. E. Peterson 




VI 


Bacon 






Easy stories 






German grammar .......... ... 


Bacon 










Forms and gender 





GREEK 



1862-63 


IV 


3 


Grammar 


Curtius 

Jacobs 


Schmidt 




I 

I. II...: 

Ill 

IV 


2 

3 

4 

4 


Reader 




1872-73 


Greek New Testament 


Jacobsen 
I -and mark 




Homer: Odyssey 








Schenke 

Curtius- Voss... 
Schenke 






Grammar 


Jacobsea 






6 


Reader 




1882-83 


E^mosthenes: De Corona 


G. Bothne 




II 


6 


Herodotus VII 








Sophocles: Oedipus Tyrannus 








Plato: Apology and Crito 








Grammar. ..7' 


Goodwin 






Composition 






History of Greek literature 


Jebb 






Xenophon: Anabasis 


Schenke 


G. Bothne 




Ill 


6 


Homer: Odyssey 






Plato: Euthyphro and Crito 








Grammar 








Composition 






Xenophon: Anabasis 




G. Bothne 




IV 


5 


Grammar 


Goodwin 






Composition 






First Lessons 


White 


Naeseth 



Digitized by 



Google 



INSTRUCTION 



293 



OvUine of Subjects by Decades 



Year 


Class 


Hours and 
Courses 


Subject 


Text 


Teacher 


1892-93 


I 


S(f).S(w).... 
5 


Demosthenes: Philippics 




G. Bothne 




II 


Sophocles: Oedipus Tyrannus 








Homer: Iliad 




G. Bothne 




Ill 


6 


Plato: Apology and Crito 
















Grammar and composition 








History of Greek literature 


Jcbb 






Xenophon; Anabasis 




Sibler (f. w). 




IV 

I 


5 

4 


Homer: Odyssey 




Bothne (s) 




Grammar and comnosition 


White 








White 


Sihler 


t902--03 


Attic Orators 


Jebb 


G. Bothne 




II 


S 


Sophocles 








.Aristophanes 








Lectures on Greek drama 








Homer 




G. Bothne 




Ill 


5 


Grammar and composition 








History of Greek literature 


Jebb 






Euripides: Medea 








Herodotus: Selections 


Merry 






Greek Testament 






Beginner's Greek, completed 


White 


Sihler 




IV 


5 


Xenophon's Anabasis 








Grammar 


CkxKiwin 






Composition 






Homer 








Beginner's Greek 


White 


Sihler 




I. IKED 

1,11 


4 

Course V 

4 


Grammar and compDsition 


White 




1912-13 


Demosthenes: De Corona 




Vlvisaker 




Plato: two dialogues 








Homer: Iliad and Odyssey 




Ylvisaker 




Courae IV 

2. Christianity. 
Course IV... 

4 

Course III 

4 

Course II 

4 


Soohoclcs' OediDiifl Tvr&nniis 








Epistles '; I .. . . .[ 








II 

Ill 

IV 


Ylvisaker 




Plato: Apology and Crito 




Ylvisaker 




Euripides: Medea 








History of Greek literature 


Jebb 






Xenophon: Anabasis 




Ylvisaker 




Lysias: Selected orations 








Grammar. 


Goodwin 

White 






Beffinner's Greek 


Sihler 


1921-22 


I 


Course I 

2 Christianity. 
CoursesVII-VllI 

3 (1) 


New Testament — Matthew 








I (El) 


Norlie & Sihlar 








Sihler 




II (El) 

Ill 


3(2) 

CoursesVII-VUl 
3 (1) 


Historical selections for rapid reading (or) 
Plato: AdoIocv and Crito . . 














Patristic Greek — Justin Martyr 




Sihler 




Homer: Iliad or Odyssey 




Sihler 




3(2)..::".:.: 


Sophocles: Oedipus Tsrrannus (or) 




Sihler 




Courses V-VI.. 

4(1) 


Euripides: Medea 








Greek Historians 




Qualley 

Sihler & Qualley 




IV 


4(2) 


Lysias: Selected orations (or) 






Courses III-IV. 
4 Courses MI.. 










Beginner's Book 


Benner-Smyth.. 


Strom 









HEBREW 






1862-63 












1872-73 




2 

4 

4 

4 

3 (1). 4 (2) ... . 
3 Courses MI.. 


Elementarbuch ..... . ... . , 


Seffcr ... 


I^rsen 


1882-83 




HoUenberg 

HoUenberg 

HoUenberg .... 

Davidson 

Davidson 


Larsen 


1892^3 


Hebneisches Schulbuch 


Larsen 


1902-03 
1912-13 


Hebrsrisches Schulbuch and Genesis 

lntrodiicto«y H^h«Tw Grammar , . . 


Larsen 
Ylvisaker 


1921-22 


I. ii(Ei) 


Introductory Hebrew Grammar 


Norlie 



Digitized by 



Google 



294 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 

HISTORY 



Year 



Class 



Hours and 
Courses 



Subject 



Text 



Teacher 



1862-63 
1872-73 



1882-83 



1892-9.' 



IV 


3 


I 


2 


II 


2 


Ill 


2 


IV.... 


2 


VI 


2 


IV (ND) . 




li'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

Ill 

rv 

IV 

V. . . 


3 

3 

3 

3 

2 

3 


V 


1 


I 


1 


I, II 




II 






4 


Ill 


3 


IV 


3 



1902-OJ 



III. 



191 2- K' 



VII 

I, II (El). 
I, II (El). 
I. II (El). 

I. II (El). 



III. 



IV. 

V. . 



Geography of Northern Europe 

History of Norway 

General History 

General History 

C^neral History 

History of Norway, Sweden and Denmark. 

General history 

U. S. history 

Ancient history 

Modern history 

Middle ages 

Ancient history 

U. S. history 

History of Norway, Sweden and Denmark. 

General history 

Not specified in catalog 

History of England (alternate years) 

Topics by students. 
See also under I-II. 

Modern history 

Medieval history 

Scandinavian history (regularly but not in 

1892-93.) 
Ancient history 



Daae . . . . 
Petersen . 



Daae&Petersen 



Petersen . 



Myers 

Nissen & Daae. 
Nissen & Daae. 
Nissen & Daae. 

Higginson 

Eriksen 

Eriksen 



5 (f ) 

5 (w),6(8). 



2 (f ) 

2 (f) 

2 (w) 

2 (w) 

3 (s) 

Mf ) 

2 (f) 

3 (w) 

2 (w) 

4 (w) 

4 (s) 

2 (s) 

5 (f), 5 (w) . 
5 (s) 



CJeneral history (outline) 

U. S. history 

Civil government 

English history 

Historical seminar 

English history (cont.) 

Historical seminar 

American history 

Medieval and modern European history. . 

Historical seminar 

Medieval and modern European history. . 

Historical seminar 

Scandinavian history 

Medieval and modern European history. . 

Historical seminar 

Ancient history to 800 A. D 

Medieval history begun 

One written report by each student in each 
term. 



Eriksen. . 
Johnston . 



Larned . 
Larned . 



No text-book. . 
Schj0th 



Schj0th . 



Schj0th . 



Rrfder... 
.Schj0th . 



Larsen 

Larsen 
Larsen 
Larsen 
Larsen 
Larsen 

G. Bothne 

Larsen 

Larsen 

Roalkvam 

Reque 

Roalkvam 

Roalkvam 

Larsen 

Larsen 



Larsen 
larsen 



Naeseth 

Markhus 
Markhus 

Gjerset 

Gjers-t 

Gjerset 

Gjerset 

Giers?t 

Gjers?t 

Gjerset 

Gjerset 

Gjerset 

G. Bothne 

Gjerset 

Gjerset 

Gjerset 

Gjerset 



5 (f ) 

5 (w) 

5 (s) 

5 (8) 

4 (1 or 2) 

Course V 

4 (1) Course VI. 



4 (1 or 2) 

Course VII. .. 



2 (1 or 2).... 
Course VIII. 



1 (1 or 2) 

Course IX 

4 (1) Course III 
4 (2) Course IV 



4(1) 

Course I. 



4 (2) Course II. 



U. S. history 

Civil government 

U. S. history 

Cicneral history 

.American history 1775-1816 

Prerequisite, courses I, II. III. VI. IX. 

Constitutional history of England after the 
Norman conquest 

American history 

(Period of discoveries and explorations and 
the Colonial era). Prerequisites, course 
I, II. Ill, VI, IX 

.American history 

(Industrial and social development after 
1877.) 

Historical seminar 

(Study of the Middle West.) 

American history 1816-1860 

The Civil War and the period of recon- 
struction, 1857-1877 

Europe in the middle ages 

(Study of the various movements and their 
influence) 

Europe in the 19th century 



Mc Master. 

Macy 

McMaster. 
Utheim.. . 



Markhus 
Markhus 
Markhus 

Gjerset 



Gjerset 
Gjerset 



Gjerset 

Gjerset 

Gjerset 

Gjers-t 
Gjerset 

Gjerset 



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Google 



INSTRUCTION 



295 



Outline of SubjecLs by Decades 



Year 



Class 



Hours and 
Courses 



Subject 



Text 



Teacher 



VI.. 
VII. 



1921-22 



VIII 
I. 11 



I. II 
I. II 

I. II 
I. II. 

I. n. 

I. H. 
MI . 



(EI). 

(EI). 
(EI). 



4(2). 
4 



None .... 

3(2) 

Course X . 



Civil government 

Ancient history to 800 A. D. 



Classic myths 

Old Greek Life.... 
Roman antiquities. 



Jaraes&Sanford 
Myers 



Gayley. . . 
Mahaffy. 
VVilkins.. 



3 (1 or 2) Course 

XI 

3 (2) 

Course IX.., 



(El) 

Ill (El). 

Ill (El). 
Ill (El). 



3 (lor 2) Course 

VIII 

3(1) Course VI I 

3 (1) Course I. 
3 (2) Coursell. 

3(1) 

Course V 



American history 

(Industrial, social and political developH 
ment after 1877) 



South American history 

American history 

(Period of discoveries and explorations, 
the colonial era) 



II. 
alll. 



3 (2) Course VI 

3 (1) Course III 
3 (2) Course IV 



VI.-. 

VII 

vm 

IX 

V, VIII. IX(El) 



None. 



None. 

4 

S 



Growth of the English constitution 

The Civil War and the period of recon- 
struction 1857-1877 

Greek civilization 

Roman civilization 

.\merican history 1775-1816 

(Revolutionary war and the framing of our 

national government) 

American history 1816-1960 

♦Required, but social science substitu- 
tions are permitted. 
Europe from Charlemagne to the Congress 

of Vienna 

Modern and contemporary European 

history 

a — Open to Freshmen. 
May elect in class 111 (Courses 1 1 1- IV). 
Senior American history 

(Text-book, supplementary reading. 

topical references and reports.) 



General history . 



Myers. 



United States history 

Citizenship (Community civics). Prereq- 
uisites, U. S. history 

Study of civil government and community 
life 



Magruder . 
Hughes. . . 



Ylvisaker & 
Sihler 



Gjerset 



Gjerset 
Gjerset 



Gjerset 

Gjerset 
Rovelstad 
Rovelstad 
Hovde 



Hovde 

Gjerset&Hovde 
Hovde 

Evansun 



Evanson 
Evanson 
Evanson 
Evanson 









LATIN 






1862-63 


IV 


6 


Grammar 


Madvig 

Ruehner 

Schuize 


Schmidt 




V, VI....' 

I 


5 

6 


Reader 






Tirocinium 






Hist. Sacra 






Composition 








Tirocinium ... 


Schuize 

Madvig 


Larsen 




Grammar 






Composition 




1872-73 


Grammar (for all classes) 


Madvig (later 

Schreiner) 

Tischer 

Siebelis 






II 

Ill 

IV 


6 

1::;:::::::^ 

6 V 

6 


Composition (IV lo I) 


Landmark 
Landmark 




Latin Poetry 


Landmark 




Livy 


Landmark , 




V 

VI 


Cicero: De senectute 




Jacobsen 




and De amicitia and Orationes 




Larsen 




I.. . 


( 

6. 


Sallust: Catilina 






Caesar: De bello Gallico 








Nepos 






1882-83 


Reader 

Vergil: Aeneid (I-III) 

Cicero: 2nd Philippic 


Schmidt 


L. S. Reque 




II 


6 






Horace: Odes 








Grammar and composition 


Schreiner 






Roman antiquities 






Cicero: Orationes in Catilinam and De 
senectute 












L. S. Reque 




Livy (Books XXI-XXII) . . . 








Grammar and composition 







Digitized by 



Google 



296 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



OvUine of Subjects by Decades 



Year 


Class 


Hours and 
Courses 


Subject 


Text 


Teacher 




III 


6 


Caesar: De bello Gallioo (III-IV) 




L. S. Reque 




IV 


6 


Sallust: Catilina. 








Grammar and composition 








Latin classics (Nepos. Pbaedrus. Caesar: 
De bello Gallioo I )completed 


Voss 

Schreiner 

Anderson&Gj0r 
Voss 






V 


5 


E. J. I^eraen 










Weekly composition 






Latin reader completed 


E. J. Petersen 




VI 


5 


Latin classics begun 


Voss 








Schreiner 






Compositidn. '. .T.' 






Reader and grammar (75 pages) 


Voss 


Roalkvam 




I 


5 / 


Oral and written exerdsesT . . . .' 






1892-93 


History of Roman literature and antiqui- 
ities 


Weisse 






II 


5(1 hr. with I) 


L. S. Reque 




Horace: Select odes, satires, and eoistles . 


L. S. Reque 
L. S. Reque 




Ill 


Livy: Bk. XXI^XXIlT. _ _ ! . 






IV 


6 


Vergil: Aeneid 








Tacitus: Germania 




L. S. Reque 




V 

VI 


1 

6 ( 

6 (w), 6 (s) . . ■ 

4 (f ) 


Ovid: Metamorphoses 






Sallust: Catilina 








Cicero: Orationes 








Caesar: De bello Gallico 








Phaedrus: Fabulae 








Parallel reading of authors 








Composition 








Foundations of Latin 




Krog 




Reader 


Voss 


Kr^ 




I 


Caesar: De beUo Gallico 






1902-03 


Tacitus: Germania and Agricola. 




L. S. Reque 




II 


4 (w) 


Roman constitutional hi8tory(l hr! weekly) 
Roman lyric poetry: Catullus and Horace. 
Lyric meters 








L. S. Reque 




4 (s) 








History of Roman literature(l hr. weekly) . 








Roman satire: Horace and iu venal . ' . 




L. S. Requ^ 




5(f).5(w).... 
5 (s) 


Vergil: Aeneid. Bks. II-IV 

Review of grammar and compodtion 




L. S. Reque 




Ill 




Cicero: sele<*tions from De offidis. 


' 






Philosophy of Cicero. . . 








Roman Comedy: the Phormio of Terence 
Theatre and private life of the Romans. . 




U S. Reque 




5(f).5(w).... 
5 (s) 








Livy: Bk. XXI . . Iv. . ^... . 




L. S. Reque 




IV 


Rnme and Carthage. . . . 








Composition (22-36) 


Bennett 

Bennett 






Grammar ^ , , 






Ovid: selections 


L.& Reque 




5(0.5(w).... 
5 (s) 


Prosody and Roman mythology 








Composition (37-44) . . .' T'. 


Bennett 

Bennett 






Grammar 






Cicero: selections froni Orations 


L. S. Reque 




V 


Roman oratory — Roman constitution .... 








Composition (1-15) 


Bennett 

Bennett....... 






Grammar 






Cicero: selections from Orations 






6 


(or) his minor philosophteal works or Phae- 
drus: Fabulae 




L. S. Reque 




Composition (16-21) 


Bennett 

BenneU 






Grammar 












VI 


6 


Composition (1 hr. weekly) 


D'Ooge 

Collar & 
DanieU 


Olson 




First Latin Book 






I. II (El) 

I, II (El) 


4 (1) 


Stress on sound foundations 


Olson 


1913-14 


Latin literature of the Empire (begun) . . . 

(Selections from representative authors). 
Reports on literature. Advance com- 
position 


Gudeman 

Arnold 

Gudeman 


RovelsUd 




Course V A.... 
4 (2) 






Latin literature of the Empire (continued) . 
(Selections translated) 


Rovelstad 




Course VI A... 
4 (1) 






Study of the times 








Advanced composition 


Arnold 






Roman satire: Horace and Juvenal 


RovelsUd 




Course VII A . . 


Advanced composition 


Arnold 





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Google 



INSTRUCTION 



297 



OtUline of SvJbjeds by Decades 



Year 



ClasB 



Hours and 
Courses 



Subject 



Text 



Teacher 



4(2) 

Course VIII A. 



III. 



4(1) 

Course III A. 



4(2) 

Course IV A. 



IV. 



4(1) 

Course I A. . 



4(2) 

Coarse II A. . 



bin (Special). 



blV (Special) . 



6(1) 

Course III B.. 



6(2) 

Course IV B. 



6(1) 

Course I B 
6(2) 



1921-22 



VI. 



VII. 



VIII 

I. II. Ill (El). 



I. II. Ill (El).. 



I. II. Ill (El).. 



I. II. Ill (El). 



Course XV. 

2(1) 

2(2) 

1 (1 or 2)... 

2(1) 

3 or 2 (2)... 



3 (lor 2) 

Course XIII.. 

3 (1 or 2) 



Roman drama: the Phormio of Terence 
and the Medea of Seneca 

Advanced composition 

(or) Rapid reading course of Caesar. Cice- 
ro, or VersiU 



Arnold . 



Advanced composition 

Reports on private and public life (illus- 
trated) 

Horace: Odes and Epodes 

Versification and memorizing 

Compodtion weekly . . . ^ 

Roman political instit. Weekly 

Reading at sight 

Tadtus: Agricola and Germania 

Compodtion weekly 

History of Roman literature, weekly. . , 

Reading at sight 

Private life of Romans (illustrated) 

Cicero: De senectute and De amidtia 

Special attention to grammar and language 

Composition weekly 

Sight reading 

Livy: Bk. XXI or selections 

Composition weekly 

Sight reading 

Cicero: five orations 



Arnold. 



Bennett. 



Ritchie... 
Granrud. 



Gudeman. 
Ritchie.... 
Wilkins. . . 



Johnston. 
Bennett . . 
Bennett . . 
Ritchie... 



Westcott . 
Ritchie... 



Sight reading . 
Word 



KeUey. 



RovelsUd 



Rovelstad 



RovelsUd 



Rovelstad 



Rovelstad 



RovelsUd 



'ord building 

Composition (2 hrs. weekly) . . 
Vergil: selections from Aeneid. 

Sight reading 

Composition (1 hr. weekly). . . 

Word building 

Beginner's Latin 



Kellogg&Reed. 

Bennett 

Knapp 



Bennett 

Kelloggft Reed 
D'Ooge 



Caesar: selections from the Gallic War and 

Civil War 

Composition (2 hrs. weekly) 

b-^pedal Course for those entering Col- 
lege with two years or less of Prep. Latin. 
After completing Special IV and III. the 
student is required to take the Regular IV 
Latin course. 
Veoiil: Six books of the Aeneid. or an 

equivalent 

Prosody 

(Grammar 

Composition (1 hr. weekly) 

Cicero: six orations, or an equivalent. . 

Study of the times 

Composition weekly 

Sight reading 

Caesar: four books, or an equivalent. . 

Special emphasis on grammar 

Ftose compodtion weekly 

Vocabulary drill 

Beginner's Latin 

Stress on a solid foundation 

Roman life and thought. (Text, reports. 

illustrated lectures) 

(a) Constitutional history 



Kelsey.. 
Bennett. 



Knapp. 



Bennett. 
Ritchie.. 
Kelaey.. 



Ritchie. 



Kelsey.. 
Bennett. 
Bennett . 



D'Ooge. 



(b) Art and architecture . 

(c) Mythology.. 
*" Private life. 



3 (1) Course XI 



Granrud-Abbott 



(d) 



(e) History of Roman literature 

(All or any number of the foregoing courses 
may be elected). 

Advanced oompodtion 

(Required for a recommendation to teach 
Latin in secondary schools). 

Teacher's course. Reading of large por- 
tions of Caesar and Cicero. ReporU. 
text, illustrated lectures 

Seneca: Moral essasrs and lettery. Re- 
porU, assigned reading, illustrated lec- 
tures 



Gayley 

JohnstoiHKelsey 
Bender-Macail 



Arnold . 



Rovelstad 



E. Peterson 



E. Peterson 



E. Peterson 



E. Peterson 



Rovelstad 



Rovelstad 



RovelsUd 



Hurstft Whiting 



RovelsUd 



Digitized by 



Google 



2!>8 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 



Year 



Class 



Hours and 
Courses 



Subject 



Text 



Teacher 



II. Ill (El).. 

I. II. Ill (El).. 
I. II. Ill (El). 



3 (2) 

Course XII, 



3 (1) 

Course IX. 



3 (2) 

Course X. 



IV. 



3(1) 

Course V. 



Course VII... 



3 (2) 

Course VI . 



Course VIII. 



cl II (Special). 



clV (Special). 



5 (1) 

Course III. 



5 (2) 

Course IV. 



6 (1) Course I. 

6(2) 

Course II. . . . 



VI. 



VII. 



VIII. 



Christian Latin literature 

Latin church fathers: selections 

Latin hymns: selections 

Reports and illustrated lectures 

Pliny: selected letters 

Study of life of early empire 

Illustrated lectures 

Poetry of the early empire 

Selections from Ovid. Persius, Martial. 
Juvenal. Reports and illustrated lec- 
tures 

History: selections from Livy 

Grammar 

Compoation 

Sight reading 

Roman antiquities 

(or) History: selections from Roman his- 
torians. Otherwise very similar to the 
foregoing course 



Maloney . 
MerriU. . . 



Westcott . 



Westcott . 
Bennett . . 
Arnold . . . 



Rovelstad 

Rovelstad 
Rovelstad 

Rovelstad 



Willdns. 



Poetry: A selection of Latin verse 

Grammar, etc. continued 

History of Roman literature 

(or) Poetry: Latin Poetry from Catullus to 
Claudian. Otherwise very similar to 
foregoing course 

(All four courses arc given to avoid having 
classes too large.) 

Cicero: selections ifrom the -orations and 
letters 

Word-building 

Sight reading 

Prose composition 

Ovid, Vergil: selections from the Metamor- 
phoses and the Aeneid 

Sight reading, word-building 

Composition, continued 

Elementary Latin 

Caesar: selections from Gallic War 

Sight reading 

Composition 

Grammar 

c-Spccial course for those entering col- 
lege with two years or less of Prep. Latin 

After completing Special IV and III, the 

student is required to take the Regular IV 

Latin course. 

Vergil: five books of the Aeneid 

Composition weekly 

Grammar 

Prosody and sight reading 

Cicero: five orations 

Composition weekly 

Grammar 

Sight reading 

Caesar: Three books 

Review of elements. Special emphasis on 
grammar 

Composition weekly 

Sight reading 

Beginning Latin 

Stress on a solid foundation for Caesar 



Dean & Defer- 

ran 

Vale Univ. Press 



Freeman. 



D'Ooge .... 
Kellogg & Reed. 



Bennett 

Gleason- Knap p 



D'Ooge . 
Kelsey. . 



RovelsUd 



Qua ey 



Bennett . 
Bennett . 



Knapp. . 
Bennett . 
Bennett . 



Kelsey.. 
Bennett . 
Bennett . 



Kelsey. 



D'Ooge . . 
Smith. 



Qualley 
Nelson 
Talle 



Moe & F. E. 

Peterson 







MATHEMATICS 






1862 63 


IV 




Arithmetic (200-313) 


Davies 

Davies 






V. VI 

rv 


2 

2 


Arithmetic (1-164) 


Schmidt 




Algebra 


Schmidt 


1872-7.' 


II 

in 


? 


Goometry. 


Davies 


Bergh &. Requr 
Bergh & Reque 




2 


Algebra 



Digitized by 



Google 



INSTRUCTION 



299 



OuiKne of Subjects by Decades 



Year 



Class 



Hours and 
Courses 



Subject 



Text 



Teacher 



1882-83 



1892-93 



1902-03 



IV.. 

v.. 

VI.. 

11. . 
III. 

IV.. 
V . 
VI.. 

III. 

IV.. 

v.. 



VI.. 

vu. 

IV.. 



VII. 
IV.. 



4(f).4(w). 
4(0.4 (w). 
5 (0.5 (w). 



5 

5 

4(1).. 
4(2).. 
5 (f ) . . 
5 (w). 

S (8).. 

5 



Aljtebra 

.\rithmetic 

Arithmetic 

Plane geometry 

Complete algebra 

Algebra (commenced) 

Elements of arithmetic (completed) 

Elements of arithmetic (begun) 

Solid geometry (combined with Class IV). 
Solid geometry (combined with Class III) . 
Plane geometry 



1921-22 



VI 

VII 

vin 

I. II. Ill (El).. 
I, II (El) 



4(l)Course I.. 
4(2)Course II. 
4(1) 



IV (See under 
subject) 



3 (lor 2).,.. 

Course V 

3(1 or 2) Course 

VI 

3(2) 

Course IV... 



r. II. Ill (El).. 

\V (See under- 
subject) 



3 (1 or 2) 

Course III.... 
5(1) (3 credits) 
Course I 



IV. 



VI (El) . 
VI (El) . 



3 (1 or 2) . 
Course 1 1 . 



VII (Rec.).. 

VIII (Rec). 



IX 

VMX (El)... 

I. II. Ill (El) 



5 (1). 
5.... 
5.... 



.\lgebra 

Higher arithmetic 

Solid geometry 

Trigonometry 

Plane geometry 

Solid geometry 

Plane geometry 

Algebra 

Advanced arithmetic 

Plane trigonometry 

.Analytic geometry 

Higher algebra 

Plane geometry 

Elementary algebra 

Differential calculus 

Prerequisites. Courses 1 1- IV 

Integral calculus. Prerequisite. Course V. 



Analytic geometry 

(Required of Class IV unless College Alge- 
bra is selected. Prerequisite, Course 1 1 ) 

College algebra 

Prerequisite, Courses I-II, or equivalent. . 

Higher algebra 

(Required of those of Class IV who do not 
present the subject for entrance.) 

Plane trigonometry 

Prerequisite. Course I or equivalent 

Solid geometry (offered) 

Higher algebra 



OIney 

Olney 

Wenlworth . . 

Olney 

Olney 

Went worth. . 
Wentworth . . . 
Wentworth . . 

Wentworth. . 
Ray 



Phillips&Fisher. 
Phillips&Fisher. 
Wentworth . . . . 
Wentworth . . . . 
Wentworth . , . . 
Wentworth . . . . 
Wentworth . . . . 
Wentworth . . . . 
Wentworth . . . . 

Milne 

Osborne 



Osborne. 



Tanner&Allen. 



Fite 

Hawkes.Luby& 
Touton 



Wentworth . . 



Jacobsen (ND) 
& Bergh 
& Reque 
Narve8?n 
Narvesen 
Narves^n 
Narves.-n 
Narvesen 
Sheel 
Sheel 

Sheel&Bothne 
(w) 
Sheel 
Sheel 
Shf^l 
Sheel 
Sheel 

heel 
Sheel 

h.el 
Sheel 

Savre & Sheel 
Savre 
Savre 
Savre 
Overn 
Strom 

Strom 

Strom 



Strom & Tryt- 

ten 
Strom & Qualley 



Sheel&Trytten 



Plane geometry .... 
Elementary algebra. 



Hawkes.Luby& 
Touton. . .» . 

Wentworth & 
Smith 

Milne 



5 (1 or 2) 

3 (2) Course I.. 



.Arithmetic 

Commercial arithmetic 

(See under commercial subjects.) 
Surveying (Theory and practice.) 
requisite: Plane trigonometry) . . . 



(Pre- 



Wentworth ... 

Lyons and Car- 

nahan .- 



Qualley 

O. .M. Eittreim 
Moe and O. M. 

Eittreim 
Evanson 

K. O. Eittreim 

Sheel 



MUSIC 



1862-63 
1872-73 



1882-83 



IV... 
I- VI. 



I-IV.. 



2 hrs. weekly 
each year . . . 

1 hr. weekly 
each year. . . 



Although music does not occupy a large 
place in the curriculum proper, its cultural 
and disciplinary value has always been 
clearly recognized at this institution. Al- 
most from the beginning, opportunities 
have been given for private instruction, 
both vocal and instrumental. Further- 
more, a distinctly musical atmosphere has 
been created by such organizations as the 
college bands, orchestra, choruses, Musical 
Union, and the Decorah Choral Union 
Vocal music 



Vocal music . 
Vocal music . 



Schmidt 
N. Brandt 
Hanson 



Digitized by 



Google 



300 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEArRS 



Ovdine of Subjects by Decades 



Year 



1892-93 
1902-03 
1912-13 

1921-22 



Class 



I-VI (El) . . 

V. VI 

I-VI (El) . . 

V, VI 

I-VI (El).. 

V, VI 

I-VIII (El). 
V 



VI 

VII. VIII. 



I- IV (El). 
V-VIII... 



I- IX (El). 



Hours and 
Courses 



2 hrs. weekly 
each year. . . 



2 hrs. weekly 
each year. . . 



2 hrs. weekly 
each year... 



2 (1). 1 ^ 

,1.1 

I hr. wkly I 
each year J 



2 hrs. weekly 
each year. . . . 



Vocal music 

Opportunity for private instruction and 
admission to musical organisations. . . 



Vocal music 

Opportunity for private instruction and 
admission to musical organizations . . . 



Subject 



Private instruction and voluntary organi- 
sations 



Vocal music 

Opportunity for private instruction and 
admission to musical organizations 

Rudiments of music and a fair knowledge 
of Lutheran hymns, history of music, 
and harmony 



Harmony 

Rudiments of music and a fair knowledge 
of Lutheran hymns, history of music, 
and harmony 

Opportunity for private instruction, both 
instrumental and vocal, and admission 
to musical organizations 



Tcrt 



Teacher 



Hanson 

Sihler 
Hanson 
Hanson 
^>erati 



Sperati 
Speniti 

Sperati 
Sperati 



Sperati 

Sperati and 
Mrs.Moe 



NORSE 



1862-63 


rv . . 


2 


Grammar 


Bojsen 


Larsen 




V. VI 

I 


2 

2 ^ / 


Exercises ih declamation 






Grammar 


Bojsen 


Larsen 




Reading and analysis 






Dictations weekly 






1872-73 


Grammar 


L0kke 

Jensen 

Lassen 


Larwn (I-II) 




II. Ill 

IV, V 

VI....'. 


' w 


Reader (lowest and intermediate classes) . 

Reading of prose and poetry (for highest 

classes) 


Landmark (III) 
Siewen (IV- VI) 




Composition, dictation, translation, memo- 
rizing in all classes 








) I 

2 




1882-83 


(Normal Department same as in Regular 

IV, V. VI.) 
Modern authors 




Larsen 




II. .: 


2 


Composition 








Authors of the 19th century 




G. Bothne 




Ill 


2 


Composition 








Holberg and authors of 18th century 




G. Bothne 




IV 


2 


Composition 









Reader 


Hagerup&Lassen 


Roalkvam 




V 


3 


Grammar 






Composition 






Reader 


Hagenip&Lassen 






VI 


4 


Grammar 






Dictations and composition 








Reader 


Eriksen 

and Paulsen 


Roalkvam 




I 


3 ) i 


Memorizing of prose and poetry 






Dictation exercises 




1892-^3 


(No classes in normal dept. this year.) 


Eriksen 


G. Bothned.II: 




II 

Ill 

IV 


t-41 


Selections from author 


III;I-III) 
Laiaen (III) 




Prominent works read complete 




? (IV) 




Lectures by instructor 








V 


6 (s) 


Essays and one lecture by each student of 

classes I, II, III each year. 
Old Norse (in classes I and II in alternate 

years) 


Nygaard 


G. Bothne 




No detailed description given in catalog . . . 


Krog 




VI 

VII 


6 (f ) 


No detailed description given in catalog . . 




Krog 




6 (f ) 


No detailed description given in catalog . . . 




Kro! 






6 (w) 


No detailed description given in catalog . . . 




kS 



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Google 



INSTRUCTION 



301 



Ovtline of Subjects by Decades 



Year 


Class 


Hours and 
Courses 


Subject 


Text 


Teacher 


1902-03 


I ^ 


3 


ItMen: Brand and Peer Gynt (Essays and 
lectures) 








11 


3(f,.2(w,.... 


G. Bothne 




Jonas Lie and other writers 








Composition 








History of literature since 1814 




G. Bothne 




Ill 


Wergeutnd and Welhavcn 








!I8•.^^"::.•: 


Asbji^rnsen, Moe. and Bj0mson 








Essays and lectures 








History of literature to 1814 




G. Bothne 




IV 


Advanced readers 


Pauss & Lassen. 






3 


The wga . . - 






Folklore of Norway and Denmark 








Holberg: Erasmus Montanus 








Wessel and a few others 








Composition 








Advanced readers 


Rolfsen 


G. Bothne 




V 


6 (s) 


Selections from authors 






Composition 








Reader 


Pauss & Lassen. 
Aars 






VI 


5 (f ) 


Orthography 






Reading, declamation, composition, capi- 
talization, punctuation* etc 






Reader 


Pauss & Lassen. 
Hofgaard 

Jensen 

Pauss & Lassen. 
Hofgaard 

Jenaen 

Jaeger 






VII 


6(0.6(w)..,. 
2 (1) 


Grammar. 






A collection of literary models. Reading, 
declamation, composition, etc 






Reader ' .' .' 






I 


Grammar 




1912-13 


A collection of literary models. Reading. 

word analysis, composition, etc 

Henrik Ibsen: Rise of Norwegian drama. 

(Four plays read) 






1,11 (El) 

I, II (El) 


Course VII.. 

3 (2) 


Gjerset 




Ame Garborg: Selections 






Composition and critical essays 








Jonas Lie: Den Fremsynte and Rutland. . . 




Gjerset 




Course VIII... 

4 

Course IX 

4 


Per Sivle: Sogor 








Hans Aanrud: Sidsel Sidsaerk 








J. B. Bull: Norske Folkelivsbilleder 








Biography of Per Sivle 


Hovden 

Garborg 






Development of Jonas Lie 






Old Norse 


Gjerset 




Grammar 


Njrgaard 

Haegstad 

&Torp 






Selections for study 






Erik den r0de8 saga 






Old Norse 


Gjerset 




II 


Course X 


Volsungasaga 








Selections from Elder Edda 








Old Norse literature 








Introduction to comparative linguistics. . . 








See also MI (El) 








Ill 


2 (1) 


Wergeland and Welhaven 




Gjerset 




Course V 

2(2)CourseVI.. 
2(l)CourseIII. 
2(2) Course IV. 


(Selections from their works) 








Biography of Wergeland 


Lassen 

Uichen 

Gran 






Biography of Welhaven 






Development of the national literature. . . 
Rise of the nat'l romantic movement .... 
Readinm from Asbidmsen . 






Sars 












0stgaard, Herre, Schube, and others. . . . 








Composition 












Gjerset 




Reading from Bj0mson, Vinje and Camilla 
Collett 








Biography of Bj0mson 


Collin 






Biography of \^nje 


Vislie 






Composition 








OUer Norwegian and Danish literature 










Gjerset 




Peter Dass: Nord&nds trompet 








Norwegian and Danish folksongs 








Hfstory of Norwegian literature 


Hofgaard- Bing . 






Compodtion 






Danish and Norwegian literature from 
1710 to 1830 




Gjerset 




(Readings from Holberg. Wessel, TulUn. 
Ingemann. St. Blicher, 0hlenschlKger 
and others) 







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302 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 



Year 



Class 



IV. 



VI.. 

vu. 



V^III. 
Si... 
El... 



EI. 



VII. 



VIII. 



Hours and 
Courses 



2 (1) Course I. 



2 (2) 

Course II. 



1 (1).2 (2). 



I (1 or 2) . . . 
Course IX. . 
» (1 or 2)... 
Course VIII 



\ (I OT 2)... 
Course VII. 



» (1 or 2).. 
Course VI . 



\ (1 or 2). 
Course V. 



R 


? (1 or 2) 

Course IV.... 


R 


I (1 or 2) 

Course III.... 


R(not later than 

III) 
R.(not later than 


t (1) 


Course I 

1 (2) 


HI) 


Course II 



Subject 



Grammar and composition. 



Norse mythology 

Volsungernes &iga 

Selections from Elder Edda 

Grammar and composition 

History of Norway until 1319 

Harald Haarfagres Saga 

Reader, (fourth part) 

(Reading, declamation) 

Reader, (third part) composition 

(Reading, declamation, composition 

First Year Norse, completed 

Orthography 

.Declamation, reading, composition) etc. . 

First Year Norse, begun 

'Reading, grammar, composition), etc 

Study of the Norwegian people 

in America since 1000 

■study of Modern writers 

Jonas Lie. Garborg. Hamsun, Bull. Aan- 

rud, Lagerl^f. and others) 

Ibsen: riae of Norwegian drama 

Ibsen: four plays 

Biography of Ibsen 

.Vational — popular movement 

tJjdrnson, Vinje. Camilla Collett 

Biography of Bjornson 

listory of Norway 1850-1914 

Rise of Norwegian literature 

Selections from Wergeland and VVelliaven 

Biography of Wergeland 

Biography of Welhaven 

Selections from Asbj0rnsen, Moe, Land- 

stad, Aaaen, and others 

History of Norwegian literature 

History of Norway 1800-1850 

The middle period 

.Vorse folk-songs and folk-tales 

[Readings from Holberg. Wessel. Tullin. 
History of Norway-Union with Denmark. 

Essays and written reports 

Early Norse literature 

v'^olsungasaga. Olaf Trygvasons saga. 

Elder Edda 

History of Norwegian literature 

Early Norwegian history 

Essays and written reports 

Grammar and language study 

Beginner's book in Norse 

Reading and language study 

Bj0rnson: Synn0ve Solbakken 

Hans Aanrud : Sidsel Sidsaerk 

Jonas Lie: Stories and poems 

Composition 

C£)urse8 I and II prerequsite to all other 

courses in Norse. 

Synn0ve Solbakken 

Boken om Norge, III and V 

Orthography 

Reading, declamation, composition 

Beginner's book 

Boken om Norge, I 

Grammar, declamation, composition 



Text 



Platou.Aars & 
Hofgaard r. 

Kjaer 

Ulleland 



Raabe. 



Rolfsen . 
Rolfsen . 



Michelet . . 
r0nnessen . 



Michelet . 



Jaeger. Hell r. 



Collin.. 
Gjerset . 
Gran . . . 



Lassen . 
L0chen, 



Hofgaard. 
Gjerset . . . 



Gjerset . 



Hofgaard . 
Gjerset . . . 



Holvik.. 
Flora ... 
borrum . 



Juul-T0nnessen 
Holvik!!!!;! 



Teacher 



Gjerset 



Hilleboe 
Hilleboe 
Hilleboe 

Hilleboe 

Cijerset 
Jjerset 



wjerset 
Jjerset 

TJerset 



gjerset 



Hovde 
Hovde 



5. S. Reque 
S. S. Reque 



PENMANSHIP 



8j 2-63 
1872-73 
1882-83 



IV.... 
V. VI. 

V 

VI.... 

V 

VI.... 



Penmanship . 
Penmanship . 
Penmanship . 
Penmanship . 
Penmanship . 
Penmanship . 



Spencer . 
Spencer . 



Schmidt 

Schmidt 

Siewers 

Siewers 

Valder 

Valder 



Digitized by 



Google 



INSTRUCTION 



303 







Ou 


tline of S\ 


itbjeds by Decades 






War 


Class 


Hours and 
Courses 

2 




Subject 


Text 


Teacher 


1802 93 


VII... 


Penmanship . 
Penmanship . 






Sihler-H.Reque 


1902 03 


VII 


2 






Olson 


1Q12-13 












1Q21-22 


V-ix (El) 


2 or 3 


Penmanship 


Palmer 


K. O. Eittreim 



PHILOSOPHY 



1862 ^3 
1872 73 
1882 83 
18Q2 93 
IQO2-03 
1912-13 
1921-22 



I. II 

Not given . 
Not given. 
Not given . 
I. II (El).. 
I. II (El).. 



1 Elements of logic . 



4 (2 Course III History of philosophy Weber. 

3 (1) Course III History of philosophy . Thilly. 



VVhately. 



J. D. Jacobsen 



Tingelstad 
Tingelstad 



PHYSICAL TRAINING 



1862-63 






Although physical training is not given 
a prominent place in the curriculum, still 
the College has always recognized the value 
and need of the development of the body. 
This need is partly met by the various 
voluntary athletic organizations. At the 
same time, for very many years some 
class work in gymnastics has been re- 
quired. 

In 1920-21 the following coaches had 
charge of the athletic teams: 
College: 

• Football. O. M. Solem. 
Basketball. R. A. Movold. 
Baseball. A. Laudel. 
Preparatory: 

Football. Basketball. Baseball; Pro- 
fessors O. W. Qualley, S. S. Reque and 
M. W. Larsen. 
In 1921-22 the following coaches; 
College: 

Football. Basketball, Track— Director 
Ivan Dosofif; Turning— Prof. F. E. 
Peterson; Baseball— Prof. S. S. Reque. 
Preparatory: 

Football, Basketball. Baseball— Prof. 
Qualley. 






1872-73 












1882-83 












1892-93 


I-IV 


2 hrs. weekly 
each year 

2 hrs. weekly 
each year 

2 (w) 


Gymnastics 








V^-VII 


Sihler 




Gymnastics 








MV 


Sihler 


1902-03 


Gymnastics 




Olson 




V-VII. 


each year 








1913-14 




Not offered this year 






1971-2' 


I II (El) 




Physical Training (optional) ... 




Doseff 




III. IV 


3 


Physical Training 




Doseff 









PHYSICS 






1862-63 












1872-73 












1882 -83 












1892-93 


V 


5(0.5(w)... 
5 

4 (1) . 


Physics 

Physics and physical geography 


\ppleton 

vVentworth & 

Hill 

Duff. .. 


Sheel 


1902-03 
1912-13 


V 

I. II (El) 




Mechanics of solids and fluids 


Sheel 
Overn 


Course I 


Lectures, recitations, laboratory work. 
(Prerequisites: trigonometry and an- 
alvtic geometry) 















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304 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 



Year 


Class 


Hours and 
Courses 


Subject 


Text 


Teacher 




V 


4 (2) Course II. 
4(1) 


Special attention to laboratory work. 
Recitations and lectures. (Prerequi- 
site, Course I) 


Duff 


Ovem 










Electrokinetics and radioactivity 

(PrereQuisite. Course II) 


Duflf 


Ovem 




Course III 

4 (2) 








Sound and light 


Duflf 


Ovem 




Course IV 

4 


Laboratory work, recitations. 








(Prerequisite, Course I) 






1912-13 


Elementary physics 


CarhartatChutc 


Ovem 




I-IV(El) 

MV 


4 (1) 


Class-work, 3 regular hours 






Laboratory work, 1 double hour 






1921-22 


Mechanics, heat and sound 


Reed&Guth.... 


Tryttcn 




4 (2) 


Lectures, reatation, laboratory work. 






Magnetism, electricity, and light as in I. 
with lantern demonstrations. (Prereq- 
uisite, Course I) 








I, II (El) 

I. II (El) 

V, VI (El) 


3 (lor 2) 

Course III 

3 (lor 2) 

Course IV 

5 


Trytten 




The alternating current circuit 


Dodge 


Tryiten 




Text and Laboratory manual 






(Prerequisites: Courses. Physics MI,. 
Math. V-VI.) 








Radioactivity. 


Rutherford 


Trytten 




(PrerequUites; Physics MI; Math. V-VI). 
Elementary Physics 






Milliken & Gale 


O. M. Eittreim 




Laboratory hours double 





PSYCHOLOGY 



1862-63 
1872-73 
1882-83 
1892-93 
1902-03 
1912-13 



1921-22 



I. II (El). 



I. II (El). 



3 (1) Course II. 
3 (2) Course L. 



3 (lor 2).. 
Course III. 
3 (lor 2).. 



Psychology in its relation t c education . 
Introductory psychology. Lectures, ex- 
periments, reports 

Applied psychology 



Various texts and experiments. 

uisite: Course I 

Educational psychology 



Prereq- 



Harris, Bagley.. 

Yerkes. James. . 

HoUingworth & 

Poffenberger 



I. II (El) 

II. Ill (El or 
Required) 



Course II. . . . 

3 (1 or 2) 

Course IV 

Ml or 2) 

Course I 

Courses I- VI I. 



Readings, lectures, experiments . 

Psychology of religion 

Text books, questionnaires, reports, lectures 
Introductory psychology experiments, re- 
ports s 

In 1922-2^ the following offered: I. Intro- 
ductory psychology; II. Advanced psy- 
chology; III. Educational psychology- 
psych, of learning; or: IV. Educational 
psychology-psych. <rf study: or: V. Edu- 
cational psychology-psych, measure- 
ments; or: VI. Educational psychology- 
psych, of religion; or: VII. Educational 
psychology-psych, of high school subjects 



Starch, Wood- 
row, Poffenber- 
ger, Terman . . 



Breese. 



TingeteUd 
TingelsUd 
Norlie 

NorU 
NorUe 

NorUe 



SOCIOLOGY 


1S62-6 












1872-7 












1882-8 












1892-9' 












1902-0.' 












1912- n 












1921-22 


I. II (El) 


3(1 or 2) 


Introduction to Sociology 


Ellwood 


NcrUe 









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INSTRUCTION 



305 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 



Year 



Class 



Hours and 
Courses 



Subject 



Text 



Teacher 



[. II. 



3 (1 or 2) . 
3 (lor 2). 



Educational Sociology 

(See under Psycholocy and education)., 
Applied Psychology 



Chancellor. 
Smith 



(See under Psychology and education .... 

In 1922-23 the following offered: History 

and theory of statistics. 



Hollinssworth 
& Poffenberger 



NorUe 
Norlie 
Norlie 



SURVEYING 


1862-63 












1872-73 












1882-83 












1892-93 












1902-03 












1912-13 












1921-22 


I. II. Ill (El)... 


3 (2) 




Surveying 




Sheel 




Course I 


(Theory and practice) 








(Prerequisite: Plane trigonometry) 








SMOOTH SAILING 



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306 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



V. CLOCK HOURS 
/, Distribution of Clock Hours by Subjects in the Preparatory and College Departments. 
First Semester. 1921-22 
(A student clock hour is the time spent by one student in one period of class- work per week.) 

COLLEGE DEPARTMENT 
Department Student Clock 

Hours Total 

Biology 36 

Chemistry 236 

Christianity 273 

Economics 45 

Education 174 

English 381 

French 12 

German 306 

Greek ^ii 

Hebrew 6 

History 258 

Latin 451 

Mathematics 194 

Music (Harmony) 6 

Norwegian 1 76 

Philosophy 51 

Physics 66 

Psychology Ill 

Total 3115 

PREPAR.\TORY DEPARTMENT 
Department Student Clock 

Hours Total 

Christianicy 156 

Citizenship 105 

Commercial 1 35 

English 365 

German 65 

History 255 

Latin 355 

Mathematics 335 

Music 96 

Norwegian 150 

Science 177 

Total 2194 

2 Distribution of Teaching Load by Clock Hours 

First Semester, 1921-22 

Teacher Subjects Total Student 

Clock Hours 
EITTREIM, K. O Bookkeeping. Typewriting, Shorthand, Christianity 195 

21 hrs. Prep. College Treasurer. 
EITTREIM. O. M Geometry, General Science. Physics 302 

26 hrs. Prep. 
EVANSON. C. N Arithmetic, History, English 365 

24 hrs. Prep. 
GJERSET, KNUT History, Norwegian 255 

18 hrs. College. 
HOVDE. B. J History, Norwegian 179 

10 hrs. College. Acting Dean of Men 
MOE, L. A Algebra. Latin 235 

15 hrs. Prep. Principal Prep. Dept. 
NELSON. D. T English. Cicero 334 

15 hrs. Prep. 4 hrs. College. 

NORLIE, O. M Christianity. Education, Hebrew. Psychology 301 

16 hrs. College. 

OLSON, O. L English 195 

President of College. 9 hrs. College. 
PETERSON. F. E Commercial Geography, German. Latin 290 

15 hrs. Prep. 7 hrs. College. 
QUALLEY. O. W Latin, Higher Algebra 263 

10 hrs. Prep. 12 hrs. College. 



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INSTRUCTION 



307 



REQUE, S. S Citizenship. Norse, English, French 362 

20 hrs. Prep. 4 hrs. College. 
ROVELST.AD. A. M Latin 313 

18 hrs. College. 
SHEEL, H. W Chemistry 236 

17 hrs. College. 

SIHLER. VV German, Greek 323 

18 hrs. College. 

SPERATI. C. A Old Testament. Music. Harmony 178 

10 hrs. Prep. 1 hr. College. Director of Musical Organizations. 
STROM. C. W Greek. Mathematics 283 

18 hrs. College. 
TALLE, H. O Grammar. Caesar. Economics. Public Speaking (English) 197 

10 hrs. Prep. 9 hrs. College. 
TINGELSTAD. O. A Christianity. Education, Philosophy 314 

15 hrs. College. Registrar. 
TRYTTEN. M. H Biology. Mathematics. Physics 189 

18 hrs. College. 

ToUl 5309 



Distribution of Time by Percentages 

Fbst Semester. 1921-22 



No. 


Person 


Admi- 
nistra- 
tion 


Ath- 
letics 


Li- 
brary 


Main- 
tenance 


Music 


Teaching 


College 


Prep. 


1 


Eittreim. K. O 

Eittreim. O. M 


.16 










.84 


2 












1 (M) 


3 
4 


Evanson. C. N 

Gjerset. K 




:;;;;;; 








i!oo 

.56 


1.00 


5 


Hovde. B.J 

Jacobsen. K. T 

Moe. L. A 


.44 












6 




1.00 








7 


.40 










60 


8 


Nelson. D. T 










.27 

1.00 

.50 

.39 

.63 

.16 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

.06 

1.00 

.56 

.83 

1.00 


73 


9 


Norlie. O, M 














10 


Olson. O. L 

Peterson. E. E 

Peterson, F. E 

Qualley. O. W 


.50 
On leav 














11 
12 
13 


p of aba 


ence. 






.61 
.37 


14 


Reque. S. S 












84 


15 


Rovelstad, A. M 














16 


Sheel. N. W 














17 


^ihler. W 














18 


Sperati. C. .A 










.54 


40 


19 
20 


Strom. C. W 

Talle. H. O 










.ii 


21 


ringelstad. O. A 

Trytten. M. H 

Doseflf. I 

Walhus. Nora 

(Nurse) 

Sperati. K. Marie 

(Stenographer) 
Eittreim, Almira M 


.17 

i!6o 

1.00 












22 
23 


i!6o 










24 












25 














26 




1.00 










27 


(Library Ass't.) 
Korsrud, O 






1.00 
1.00 
1.00 








28 


Oyloe, H 














29 


Stenseth, C 


























10.96 




28 


Total 


3.67 


1.00 


2.00 


3.00 


.54 


6.83 



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308 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



VL Accreditation 
The curriculum which has been described in the foregoing 
pages of this chapter has been favorably recognized by many of 
the leading universities in the country^ in which graduates from 
Luther College not only have been accepted for graduate work 
along the lines in which they previously had majored but also 
have^ in many instances^ attained distinction. Luther College has 
for many years been on the approved list of the North Central 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. This recogni- 
tion was in 1921 confirmed by another agency of national promin- 
ence^ namely^ the General Education Boards whose representatives 
after an examination of the institution reported a very favorable 
impression. In fact^ a careful investigation of the instruction at 
I^uther College from its foundation to the present time shows that 
the qualities which have been given special recognition by such 
prominent authorities have characterized the institution through- 
out the sixty years of its history. 




DUNNING SPRINGS 



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CHAPTER FOURTEEN 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Carl W. Strom 
I. Literary Societies 

THAT Luther College men have always been deeply interested 
in literary work is abundantly testified to by the large number 
of societies which they have organized for its promotion during 
the last sixty years. It is not merely accidental that Luther 
College has the tradition that every student should belong to at 
least one literary society. It is rather a result of the intense in- 
terest which the students of successive years have taken in this 
branch of work. 

However, enthusiasm for society work has not been at the 
same level at all times. From 1879 on, a revival of interest has 
taken place at approximately ten-year intervals, each successive 
revival being definitely discernible by the number of societies or- 
ganised while the tide of enthusiasm was at its height. 

The revival in 1879 ended what may be called the "first period" 
in literary society work at Luther and ushered in the Students' 
Union, NifFelheim, Muspelheim, and Addison, four societies which 
for ten years held the literary interest of the College in a peculiar 
way. 

The next revival, in 1889, was a result of the decline of the 
first three of the above mentioned societies, and ushered in the 
"third period" of this history, which started when Irving and 
Amphictyonic took their place as the controlling societies in the 
College Department, a position which they have held now for 
thirty years. 

A new revival came in 1899 and another again in 1909, but 
at each of these times the existing societies were too strongly in- 
trenched in their positions to be materially affected, and in 1919 
the war had so far absorbed the attention of the student body as 
to force the literary societies temporarily into the background. 

The year 1922 will probably mark the opening of a "fourth 
period", as it seems certain that the material increase in the 
student body which has taken place during the last year or two 
will call for a number of new societies and force Irving and 



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310 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

Amphictyonic to divide the field which has been theirs for so many 
years. 

The first literary society at the College can lay claim to being 
older than the institution itself. The Clio Society was founded 
in St. Louis^ Mo.^ on March 5, 1860, and was reorganized in De- 
corah on September 16^ 1862. 

The Clio held weekly meetings devoted to speeches^ essays, 
declamations, and debates. English was the official language of 
the society, and in debate no other language was permitted. That 
English was not exactly the mother tongyie for all of the members 
may be judged from the following extract from the record dated 
September 26, 1862: "During the debate the critic was not idle, 
all though willing to confess that lie is unable to critticise fully, 
yet he had more work than he could dispose of. Some of the 
speakers used such corrupt and awkward language, that it made 
it entirely impossable to correct any of it." The fact, however, 
that English was chosen as the official language of the society is 
in itself significant. 

The debates in the Clio were carried out with six or eight 
speakers on each side. One of them was the "chief disputant", 
and opened the debate. The rest followed in order, each one 
speaking as often as he wished, but usually not more than ten 
minutes at one time. Religious and political questions were ruled 
out, but this did not deprive the members of subjects on which to 
sharpen their wits. The comparative influence of love of money 
and education, the comparative usefulness of steam and the com- 
pass, the desirability of having an egg to-day or a chicken to- 
morrow, these subjects and many more similar ones were debated 
in the Clio. The decision was given by one member who was 
selected to act as judge at each meeting. Thus we find that on 
January 20, 1866, the question: "Resolved, that the Negroes have 
suffered more than the Indians," was decided " in favor of the 
affirmative by Stub." In other respects, as far as the conduct of 
the society and the election of officers is concerned, the Clio was 
not greatly different from the societies at Luther at the present day. 

The Hetaeria Society, founded in 1863 as the Unit, but changed 
to the Hetaeria in 1866, resembled the Clio very closely. Except 
for the fact that it conducted its meetings in the Norwegian lan- 
guage, there were but few details to distinguish it from the earlier 
society. 

No record of the Clio is found after September 26, 1866, nor 
of the Hetaeria after November 1, 1870. 



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STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 311 

A group of Norwegian societies — Saga^ founded January 28, 
1866; Edda, .founded October 23, 1866; and Minde, or Ygdrasil, 
founded November 7, 1868 — next claim our attention. 

Each one of these societies contributed its share toward the de- 
velopment of sixty years of literary society tradition at Luther 
College. Saga, besides carrying on the regular literary society 
work, interested itself in preserving the best speeches, essays, and 
poems that were delivered at its meetings. These were entered in 
the "Inseratprotokol", which, as handed down in the college li- 
brary, .contains many articles of sufficient merit to justify their 
publication in book form. The journals which became a regular 
institution with the literary societies of later years were doubtless 
copied in idea from the Saga "Inseratprotokol". The last entry 
in this interesting journal was made on December 16, 1870. 

The Edda was an exclusively Norwegian debating society, but 
branched out into at least two new fields. First, together with the 
introduction of a treasurer into its official family, it levied ten or 
fifteen. cents yearly on all of its members for the purchase of 
newspapers such as "Skandinaven" and "Den Nye Lutherske 
Kirketidende fra Norge". Secondly, through the winter of 1870- 
71, it published its own paper, "Fluen", which is treated more ex- 
tensively later in this chapter. Edda held no recorded meeting 
after January 25, 1879. 

Minde, whose name was changed to Ygdrasil on October 16, 
1872, was evidently the most flourishing society at the College up 
to this time. It was the first society to bring up for discussion the 
rule barring political questions as subjects for debate, a rule which 
had been in vogue in all the societies up to this time. Ygdrasil did 
not depart from the tradition either, but should probably be cred- 
ited with being the first society seriously to suggest the change. 
Ygdrasil's record ends with the meeting of January 22, 1877, but 
there is no reason to believe that the society did not flourish for 
at least a year after that date. 

Franklin, whose first regular meeting was held November 11, 
1871, was active in more fields than any of the societies which 
had preceded it. For eight years it conducted weekly debates, 
gave public programs, and participated in inter-society debates; 
its reading room contained many of the leading secular and re- 
ligious papers in English, Norwegian, and German; and on Oc- 
tober 4, 1876, its representatives met with those of Edda and 
Ygdrasil to organize the Students' Union. Franklin came to its 
end January 18, 1879. 



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312 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



The revival of interest mentioned above came in the years im> 
mediately preceding 1880. Franklin^ Ygdrasil^ Saga^. and Edda 
had just come to their end or were about to do so shortly. Close 
in their wake came seven new societies. Scarcely anything but 
the name is known concerning four of them^ Losna^ Nordstiema^ 
Det Norske Selskab^ and Normannalaget. Det Norske Selskab 
is mentioned as being active in 1883-84, but is not heard of after 
that school year. Normannalaget was the first of three societies 




THE SEVENTEENTH OF MAY. 1875 

by that name which have existed at the College. Breidablik ran 
its course during the two years from October 2, 1880^ to March 
26, 1882. Osseo's existence was almost equally confined, extend- 
ing from October 4, 1879, to November 5, 1881, but in that short 
time it introduced an important innovation in allowing political 
questions in its debates, its very first debate, decided in favor of 
the affirmative, being on woman suffrage. 

Addison, founded October 10, 1879, was the only society re- 
sulting from the revival which enjoyed more than a very tempor- 
ary growth. At the time "Chips" was started it was the only liter- 
ary society at the College, and prospered in almost full posses- 
sion of the field until the next revival of enthusiasm, in 1890, 



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STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 313 

struck it in the vitals and forced it to unite with Irving to pre- 
serve itself. Its journal^ the "Spectator"^ still remains in Irving. 

The decade from 1880 to 1890 was in many ways peculiar as 
regards the situation in the literary societies at the College. Ad- 
dison was purely a literary society. However, several other or- 
ganizations, which were not literary societies in the present sense 
of the word, played a prominent part during those years. 

The first of these was the Students' Union. It was organized 
on October 4, 1876, by a council composed of members from Ed- 
da, Ygdrasil, and Franklin, for the purpose of generalising the 






% '4. 



i?*iU*. , 



CAMPUS ENTRANCE IN THE OLDEN DAYS 

work of the literary societies and particularly for the purpose of 
giving public entertainments. Since meetings were held only once 
every five weeks, each program was carried out on a rather ambi- 
tious scale. Besides speeches, essays, declamations, and debates, 
dramatizations of plays by the Dramatic Club were included in 
its programs. The "Journal" soon became famous among the 
students. Dependent at first on the member literary societies, it 
was organized separately in the spring of 1884. The record of 
the Students' Union is not in the college library, but its meetings 
are mentioned with more or less frequency in "Chips" until 1903, 
after which no more is heard from it. 

Niffelheim, whose palmiest days were within the decade under 
consideration, was one of the most unique institutions the College 
has ever fostered. Organized in 1874 as a smokers' club with 
rooms in the old "Chicken Coop", it developed into a great "re- 



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314 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

public" to which no small number of Luther's most illustrious sons 
have belonged. Nor was Niffelheim any mean antagonist in liter- 
ary work. Debates^ orations, essays^ poems, and mock trials, all 
were brought to a high state of perfection in the "republic". 
Many of the productions from the pens of its members have been 
preserved in the "Journal", and it is a positive treat to be given 
the opportunity of reading the brilliant productions found there. 
But Niffelheim with its murky atmosphere was doomed by the 
"powers that be", and since 1888 it has been nothing but a mem- 
ory. 

Muspelheim was founded in 1879 as an opposition society to 
Niffelheim. It was and is a distinguished organization in several 




PETIIINE AND JAKOBINE USED TO SERVE AFTER- 
NOON COFFEE 

ways. It lias undoubtedly numbered more Luther College men on 
its membership rolls than any other organization at Luther, in- 
cluding even the boarding club, whose senior it is by almost twenty 
years. It is by far the oldest student organization which has ever 
existed at the College. But it does not demand respect for its 
gray hairs alone. It has uniformly been the most prosperous or- 
ganization on the campus, even the Athletic Association having at 
times been among its debtors. In days past it was noted for 
"essays, brilliant speeches, and magnificent festivals". On the 
point of going to pieces in 1884, it was revivified, and continued 
its feasts on Washington's birthday for almost twenty years more. 
For almost another twenty years it has been distinctly a 
reading society, cooperating with the library in furnishing to the 
students all the desirable American magazines besides many for- 



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STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 315 

eign ones. In this latter role^ it has probably been the largest 
single contributor to the college library. Muspelheim almost met 
its end in the excitement of 1918 and 1919^ but in 1920 it was 
reorganized and is now again flourishing. 

Irving and Amphictyonic have held the lead in literary society 
work for the "third period" of thirty years. The histories of both 
of these societies have been written so well and so often that only 
a short note will be given each of them here. 

Irving^ organized in 1884^ was a continuation of Amicitia^ or- 
ganized in 1882. In 1892 it united with Addison^ and it is then 
that its real history begins. Its journal, the old "Amicitiae 
Opera", was changed in 1892 to the "Spectator" and is still is- 
sued at irregular intervals. 

Lowell and Proceedo, both organized in 1890, united on Jan- 
uary 30, 1891, under the name Amphictyonic Literary Society. 
On account of bitter inter-society rivalries, the new society was 
hard pressed in its first years, but it overcame all difficulties and 
last year celebrated its thirtieth anniversary. 

The early rivalry between Irving and Amphictyonic has con- 
tinued, although, at least in later years, in a thoroughly beneficial 
way, each one spurring the other on to use its best efforts in all 
its work, whether it be in the annual inter-society debate or in 
the annual public program or even in the annual "feast". The 
work of these two societies has been of inestimable value to the 
College, and will in all likelihood continue to be so for many years 
to come. 

Not all the- societies of the early nineties fared so well as Irv- 
ing and Amphictyonic. Hamill, organized to promote oratory 
and extemporaneous speaking, existed only through the years 1891 
and 1892. Only the approximate dates are known for a number 
of others: Concordia, 1890-93; Minerva, October 23, 1891, to 
May 8, 1893; Webster, 1891-93; Athenian, 1892-94.. 

Normannalaget, organized December 21, 1892, was for many 
years the foremost Norwegian literary societj' at the College and 
was dropped only when most of its members left school for the 
national service iif 1917 and 1918. One of its most important 
activities was the collection of a fair-sized library, consisting 
mostly of Norwegian literature and history. This has now been 
transferred to the general library. Two attempts to organize a 
new Normannalaget in 1920 and 1921 came to naught after a few 
meetings. 

In the revival of the late nineties no lasting societies were 
formed. The Philomathean was disbanded on May 8, 1897, after 



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316 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

a year or two of activity. The Sextonian^ the Demosthenian^ and 
the Platonian were all societies of 1898-99. 

Mj0lner was a college Norwegian society organized February 
23^ 1907. It suffered the fate of Normannalaget in 1917 and 
1918 and has not been revived. 

Idun^ organized as an English literary society in the Prepar- 
atory Department in 1907, has been active up to the present time. 
Norr0na, a Preparatory Department Norwegian society^ was or- 
ganized in 1911 and was active for four years. 




THE COLLEGERS FIRST DEBATING TEAM, 1*04 
A. T. Pelland M. E. Pretheim T. A. Hoff 

II. Study Societies 

A number of clubs organized for special study have existed 
at the College. 

The Shakespearean Club was organized among the members 
of the Junior class in February, 1885, for the purpose of study- 
ing Shakespeare's dramas. 

The Stenographic Club was organized in December, 1885, for 
the purpose of continuing a course in shorthand which had been 
given for a part of the term and was about to be dropped from 
the curriculum. A faculty member was in charge of the instryc- 
tion in this club. 

The German Speaking Association was also evidently organ- 
ized in 1885, since its demise is lamented in "Chips" for May, 
1886. 

The Drawing Club was organized in February, 1887, as a 
continuation of a class in drawing which had been conducted as 
a part of the regular curriculum in the earlier part of the year. 

A Volapuk Club for the study of "Volapuk", a universal 
language, was organized in December, 1887. "Chips" for that 



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STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 317 

month reports it as being only three days old^ but prophesies 
that it will be older in a "year or two". 

The Chemistry Club was organized in May^ 1901^ ostensibly 
for the purpose of stimulating interest in the study of that sci- 
ence, but it was secretly suspected of making diamonds. 

The Luther College Sunday Association is classed here as it 
grew out of a Bible study class started by Rev. I. B. Torrison 
in the F. N. £. L. Sunday School in 1901. The association was 
formally organized at the College in 1903. Meetings are held 
Sunday afternoons, alternate meetings being devoted to lectures 
by professors or visitors and the discussion in a frank and open 
manner of existing student ills. A faculty member officiates in 
the capacity of leader. Dr. Oscar L. Olson was for seven years 
the leader; after him the leaders have been: Prof. T. £. Thomp- 
son, Dr. S. C. Ylvisaker, and Prof. O. A. Tingelstad, the present 
incumbent. Besides its important services to the student body, 
the, Sunday Association should receive credit for having launched 
the Younfl^ People's Association of the Synod in 1906 and for 
entertaining the L.utheran Students' Union Convention in a three- 
day session, March 8 to 10, 1922. 

The P. A. Munch Historical Society was organized on Febru- 
ary 11, 1903, at the suggestion of Dr. K. Gjerset, who was also 
its first president. It included both faculty members and students 
in the College Department in its membership. Meetings were 
devoted to lectures by the professors of the College or by vis- 
itors, historical topics being the uniform choice of the speakers. 
Historical study by the students was encouraged, the best of 
their papers being published in the historicals department of 
"Chips". From April 12, 1909, to November 18, 1910, the so- 
ciety was inactive while Dr. Gjerset was absent in Norway, but 
on. his return the work was resumed and the northwest corner room 
of the second floor of the Main Building was fitted up as a society 
room, where a fair library was also collected. Since 1915 no reg- 
ular meetings have been held, and the library has been added to 
the general library. 

The Inter-CoUegiate Debating Association was organized in 
February, 1903, with Irving and Amphictyonic as member so- 
cieties. It has had charge of promoting all the inter-collegiate 
debates of the College. 

In 1902 the Southern Wisconsin Luther College Club offered 
a prize of $25 for the best oration delivered by a student at the 
College. The following year two prizes of $25.00 each were 
offered for the best orations in English and Norwegian. This 



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318 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

offer has been repeated each year since 1908. In 1913 the Lu- 
ther College Oratorical Association was organized and affiliated 
with the state association. Since that time the winner of the 
local English contest has represented the College in the eastern 
divisional contest^ competing for the right to participate in the 
state contest. Luther participated in the state contest for the 
first time in 1922, when Oscar Rem, '24, under the able tutelage 
of Prof. H. O. Talle, won a place in the eastern divisional co.n- 
test at Mt. Pleasant, Iowa. The state contest was held at Lu- 
ther College in r920. 

III. Publications 

In the field of journalism Luther College students have been 
no less active than in literary society work. 

"Moderlandet" was the name of the first student publication at 
Luther College. It was edited by H. G. Stub and K. Nordgaard, 
and was a bi-weekly, four-page, hand-written, foolscap folder^ 
costing twenty-five cents for a half-year. A page of the second 
number is preserved in the college museum. "Mamalandet" was 
the name of a rival publication edited, in 1866, by K. Bj0rgo. 
Neither "Mamalandet" nor "Ridderen uden Frygt og Dadel" 
have been preserved. Two other early publications, both of which 
have been preserved, are *Tluen" and "Svein Uraed". "Fluen", 
of the same form and period of issue as "Moderlandet", was the 
official organ of Edda debating society. Ten numbers were is- 
sued, or rather "written", during the winter of 1869-70, N. Chris- 
tensen, '71, acting as editor. Of a similar make-up was "Svein 
Uraed", edited by M. Koefod under the business management of 
H. A. Bergh during the winter of 1871-72. "Gjallarhorn" was 
issued by Niffelheim one winter during the later seventies. 

The first number of "College Chips" appeared in January, 
1884. The first numbers were issued semi-monthly, but since 
January, 1887, they have appeared once a month. The first board 
of editors consisted of E. O. Hove, O. K. Fuglei, O. M. Kalheim, 
George Markhus, and J. A. Ness, with M. O. Aubolee as business 
manager. The first editor of the Norwegian department was T. 
O. Tolo. In form it was originally six and one-half by nine and 
one-half inches, but the size was changed on January 1, 1885, to 
seven and one-half by ten and one-half inches, and again in Jan- 
uary, 1905, it was changed to its present size of six and one-half 
by nine inches. The first issues of "Chips" were of twelve pages. 
The size has been gradually increased to forty-eight pages, which 
is the present size, although it did for a few years include sixty- 



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STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 319 

four pages. The present average circulation is 900 copies. Or- 
iginally an all-English magazine^ "Chips" had a Norwegian de- 
partment from January^ 1885, to December, 1889. From De- 
cember, 1889, to April, 1897, it was published alternately in the 
English and Norwegian languages. Since April, 1897, it has been 
all English. "Chips" has experienced various turns of fortune 
in its thirty-seven years of existence, Twice it has been on the 
rocks, in 1890, and again in 1916, but both times the storm has 
been weathered. For its columns it has uniformly commanded 
the best talent of the College and has at the same time been the 
object of the careful attention of the members of the English 
department, to whom all honor is due for keeping "Chips" at a 
high standard- of excellence. — "Valeat Quantum Valere Potest!" 
"Let it pass for what it's worth!" 

"Ervingen" was first issued in May, 1908, as a 48-page quart- 
erly, six by eight and one-half inches in size. The Norwegian 
language was used throughout. It was discontinued in June^ 1913, 
due to lack of financial support, but during its short life it gave 
many of the students a chance to try their hand at writing liter- 
ary Norwegian. Its first board of editors consisted of Finn 
Magelssen, Thomas A. Haugen, Alfred Halvorson, Bernhard 
Rosenqvist, and Olaf Gaarder, with Olaf Tufte and Charles A. 
Fritz as business managers. 

The "Luther College Semi-Centennial", dedicated to Dr. Laur. 
Larsen, was issued by the Junior class in 1911. It was a 256- 
page book, seven and one-half by ten and one-half inches. Enoch 
E. Peterson was the editor-in-chief and Britton Burtness the 
business manager. 

The second "Annual" of the College was issued in 1920 by 
the class of 1921, with Elmer S. Eid as editor-in-chief and Olaf 
G. Malmin as business manager. It was a 224-page book, seven 
and three-quarters by ten and three-quarters inches. At the sug- 
gestion of Dr. K. Gjerset, the annual was called the "Pioneer", 
since Luther College was the pioneer institution of our Church. 

The second issue of the "Pioneer" is at present being pre- 
pared for the press by the class of 1924, Oscar Rem acting as 
editor-in-chief and George C. Henriksen, Jr., acting as business 
manager. It will be dedicated to the late honored President C. 
K. Preus. 

The latest journalistic venture of the student body was the 
"Campus News", a single sheet five and one-half by eight and 
one-half inches printed on the "Luther College Press", a small 
hand-power machine owned by Prof. K. O. Eittreim. "Campus 



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S20 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

News" was published by the Athletic Association, Arthur C. Paul- 
son editor, and George C. Henriksen, Jr., business manager. 
Twenty numbers were issued during the winter of 1921-22. Two 
were four-page issues, the first one issued during the sixtieth an- 
niversary celebration and the second at the time of the Lutheran 
Students' Union Convention. The first of these two reported the 
St. Olaf-Luther football game in print 35 minutes after the end 
of the game. 




DUGWAY ALONG THE UPPER 
IOWA 

IV. The Luther College Boarding Club 

The Norwegian Synod, at its meeting at La Crosse, Wisconsin, 
in 1896, gave the students at Luther College permission to form 
their own boarding club. The club was organized June 16, 1896^ 
with H. J. Wein as manager; C. M. Hallanger, secretary; Oscar 
A. Strom, treasurer; Ola Ordal, buyer; and Christian Thompson, 
J. M. Peterson, and K. M. Hagestad as directors. Board the first 
year was furnished at $1.30 a week. In 1900-01 it was $1.60 a 
week; in 1910-11, $2.48 a week; in 1920-21, $3.86 a week; and 
in 1921-22 it averaged about $3.70 a week. Up to 1916 the 
basement of the Main Building provided a dining room. In that 
year the boarding club erected Loyalty Hall, a description of 
which may be found in another chapter. 



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326 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



EDITORIAL STAFFS OF "ERVINGEN" 



Year 



Editor 



190S-09 Finn Magclssen. . 

1909-10 Alfred Halvorson. 

1910-11 O. P. B. Grimley.. 

1911-12 Carl Hansen 

1912-13 LudvigP. Kjaer.. 



Assistants 



Thos. A. Haugen, Alfred Halvor- 
son, Bemhard Rosenqvist, 
Olaf Gaarder 

Odd Ekfelt. O.. P. B. Grimley. 
Edw. Jordahl. C. C. Birkelo. . 

Albert N. Livdahl. Carl Hansen. 

Ivar Sandberg, Eugene Aal. . . 
O. L. Haavik. Ludvig P. Kjaer. 

Anton Buttedal, Herman W. 

Monson 

P. C. Forseth, John Umcas. R. 

Ulvilden. Emil Grefthen 



Business Managers 



Olaf Tufte. Charles A. Frits 

Charles A. Fritz, P. L. Johns- 
rud, A. G. Storstad 

Charles A. Fritz. A. G. Storstad 



A. G. Storstad. G. E. Brunadale 

G. E. Brunsdale. Walter T. 
Gigstad. 



MEMBERS OF "ANNUAL" STAFFS 

1911 Scmi-Centennial: Enoch E. Peterson— Editor-in-Chief. 
Britton Burtness — Business Manager. 
Members of Staff: David T. Nelson. Wilhelm Dahl. O. Herbert Aanestad. Carl Hansen. 
Carl Foss. Alfred G. Storstad. Otto Ausiin. Winfred WoUan. 
1920 Pioneer: Elmer S. Eid— Editor-in-Chief. 

Olaf G. Malmin — Business Manager. 
Members of Staff: J. W. Ylvisaker. R. O. Storvick. A. O. Storvick. R. Oefstedal. N. G. 
Maakestad, H. M. Tolo. L. C. Sorlien. A. E. Bergum. N. O. Halvorson. C. M. Olson , 
Emil Hermundstad. A. R. Sorlien, Ernest Sihler. 
1923 Pioneer: Oscar Rem— Editor-in-Chief. 

George C. Henriksen, Jr. — Business Manager. 
Pioneer Board: A. O. Mork. Melvin Clauson. H. K. Savre. U. H. Reque. 



MEMBERS OF COLLEGE DEBATING TEAMS 

Year Members of Teams 

1903-04 M. E. Fretheim. A. T. Felland. T. A. Hoff. 

1904-05 B. Petersen, C. A. Fjeldstad, O. A. Tingelstad. 

1905-06 No team. 

1906-07 J. O. Holum, Arnt Vaaler. N. A. Olaen. 

1907-08 A. C. Erickson, J. O. Ensrud. G. Bj0rgo. 

1908-09 No team. 

1909-10 No team. 

1910-11 No team. 

1911-12 D. T. Nelson. B. Burtness. O. L. Haavik. 

1912-13 G. O. G. Rahn. F. Reishus. C. Knutson. 

1913-14 V. Bj0rgo. M. O. Andrew. E. Grefthen. 

1914-15 H. L. Ylvisaker. T. O. Kraabel. E. R. Seines. 

1915-16 T. Gilbertson. C. L. Lee, H. O. Talle. 

1916-17 A. J. Tolo. C. L. Lee. P. J. Kvale; K. H. Brunsdale. E. H. Parsons. H. O. Talle. 

1917-18 A. J. Tolo. I. R. Gronlid. K. D. Stalland. 

1918-19 I. R. Gronlid. C. W. Strom. T. H. Megorden; C. M. Ravndal, O. G. Malmin. A. E 

Nelson. 

1919-20 No team. 

1920-21 O. G. Malmin. E. H. Parsons. J. W. Ylvisaker; A. C. Paulson. R. E. Anderson. 

E. O. Tollefsrud. 

1921-22 R. E. Anderson. A. C. Paulson, W. O. Rindahl; E. O. ToUefsrud, S. J. Steen, C. W. 

Tvedt. 



MEMBERS OF PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT DEBATING TEAMS 
Year Members 

1918-19 M. O. Kraabel. Paul Ode. H. Helgeson; Milo Bakke. Nelvin Fosmark. Chris. R)hi» 

1919-20 Nelvin Fosmark. Don A. Stevens. Nels Y. Jordahl. 

1920-21 K. S. N. Roe. C. E. L. Lucky. Paul F. Olson. 

1921-22 Paul F. Olson. Carl E. L. Lucky, Armin Johnson. 



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STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 327 

WINNERS OF THE ANNUAL ORATORICAL CONTESTS 1902-1922 
Year Contest First Place Second Place Third Place 

1902. . . Engtish and Axel Bergh tied Chr. Moldstad Herman Baalaon 



^ngtish and Axel Bergh tied 

Norwegian.. Alf red Bredeaen tied 



1903. . .English Alfred Bredeaen Harry Olaen T. E. Thompson 

1903. . Norwegian.. ..CO. Heggtveit E. Hansen C. J. Quill 

1904. . .English A. T. Felland No decision No desicion. 

1904 . . . Norwegian C.J. Quill No decision No decision 

1904. . .Temperance. .Martin Fretheim Alfred Bredesen Leon Peterson 

1905 . . . English P. O. C. Johnson Arnt Vaaler 

1905. . .Norwegian. . . .O. E. Schavlan A. Davick M . O. Sumstad 

1906. . .English Arnt Vaaler No decision No decision 

1906. . . Norwegian M . O. Sumstad No decision No decision 

1907 . . . English G. O. Lillegard Orlando Overn L. Bred void tied 

S. J. Fretheim tied 
1907 . . . Norwegian Oliver Ruen K. Hanson A. O. Halvorson 

1908.. English K. P. B. Reishus L. S. Kloster J. O. Holum 

1908. . .Norwegian. . . .Finn Magelsaen D. J. Borge J. A. O. Larsen (?) 

1909. . . English P. J. Iverson K. B. Vaaler Finn Magelssen 

1909. .Norwegian.... C.U. Faye M. C. Johnshoy Odd Ekfelt 

1910. . English N. A. Madson Charles Fritz Theo. Lcrud 

1910. . . Norwegian. . . .O. L. Haavik Odd Ekfelt Eugene Aal 

1911 .. . English E. E. Peterson I. A. Opstad P. O. B. Grimley 

191 1 . . . Norwegian Herman Monson N. A. Madson Carl Hansen 

1911. . .Try-outs for 

State Peace 

contest Charles Fritz No decision No decision 

1912 . . . English Justin Petersen G. O. G. Rahn Wilhelm Dahl 

1912 . . . Norwegian. . . .Peter Forseth Alfred Nesset Carl Hansen 

1913. . .No contest. Since 1913 the winner of the local English contest has represented 
Luther College in the Eastern Divisional Contest of the State. 

1914. . . English E. Grefthen Herman Monson Carl Seebach 

1915 . . . English E. Robert Seines Einar Larson Walther I. Brandt 

1915 . . . Norwegian Henry O. Talle E. Tingelstad Theodore Stcnsby 

1916... English J. E. Opsahl E. Tingelstad B.J. Hovde 

1916. . .Norwegian. . . .J. M. Rohne E. Tingelstad Mikkel Lono 

1917 .. . English Henry O. Talle E. Tingelstad K. D. Stalland 

1917. . . Norwegian.... C. P. Birkelo John Waage Arthur J. Tolo 

E. Tingelstad represented L. C. in the Eastern Divisional Contest in 1917, Mr. 
Talle being ineligible because he was president of the state a.ssociation. 

1918 . . . English Arthur J. Tolo John Waage Allen E. Nelson 

1918. . .Norwegian Arthur J. Tolo O. H. Thorsen H. Siqueland 

1919. . .No contest held. W. B. Scarvie was elected by students to represent L. C. in 

Eastern Divisional Contest. 
1919... 5th Liberty 

Loan Elmer S. Eid No decision No decision 

1920. . . English Elmer S. Eid T. H. Megorden I. R. Gronlid 

1920. . . Norwegian H. Siqueland Olaf G. Malmin 

1921 . . . English Olaf G. Malmin Elmer S. Eid Sigvart J. Stecn 

1922...EngUsh Charles E. Hook Oscar Rem J. Melvin Moe 

03car Rem represented L. C. in the Eastern Divisional and State Contests in 1922. 
Mr. Hook having left school. 



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CHAPTER FIFTEEN 

ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 

O. W. QUALLKT 

I. Genkkai. Statbmcnt 

FROM the rcrj earliest times the students «t Luther CoUegc 
have taken great interest in athletics. A large nomber of the 
boTS who attended the College in the earlj dajs came from farms 
and were accustomed to hard manual labor. Life in the school- 




THE nmST GYMNASIUM, 18M 

room was a great change to them^ and it was not long before they 
felt the need of exercise and action. There were no intercol- 
legiate contests to be trained for; nor was any coarse in gym- 
nastics offered. The boys deriTed their exercise and enjoyment 
from the games and sports which were then in Togue, such as 
running, jumping, wrestling, weight lifting, and hiking. Dur- 
ing the winter skating and skiing were also popular. While the 
College had its quarters in the St. Cloud Hotel, 1862-65, the 
large back-yard took the place of a gymnasium and athletic field, 
and such gymnastic equipment as could -be gotten was set up 
there. When the College was moTcd to its present site in 1865 
the gymnastic apparatus was set up north of the main building. 
Baseball dates back to the earliest times and has always been 
the favorite sport at Luther. Military drill and football were 
introduced in the seventies. 



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ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 329 

For lack of facilities no regular gymnastic instruction was 
given until 1886. In that year the west wing of the present gym- 
nasium was built with money raised through the efforts of the 
students. The improvement in the health of the boys was at once 
apparent. In previous winters there had been no place to ex- 
ercise; and the result was, that some students who scarcely left 
the building for weeks at a time were almost broken in health by 
spring. Two hours of gymnastics per week were required of 
every student. According to reports in "Chips" the students 
were highly pleased with their instructor. Prof. L. S. Reque. He 
was relieved by Prof. J. G. Halland. In 1890 Prof. W. Sihler 
took charge and with the help of various student assistants carried 
on the work successfully for many years. When Prof. Sihler re- 
tired. Dr. Oscar L. Olson, Dr. K. Gjerset, Dr. Ole Boe, and Prof. 
B. Svan0e took charge of the work in the order named. Athletic 
coaches Ralph Movold and Ivan Doseff have conducted the class- 
es in 1920-21 and 1921-22, respectively. The turning club, which 
has existed since 1886, has given those especially interested in 
turning and gymnastics an opportunity for further development. 

II. Athletic Association 

When intercollegiate competition was introduced in 1891 the 
need of an organization to take control of athletics and to ar- 
range and finance schedules was at once felt. It was now no 
longer possible for teams to be self-supporting as they had pre- 
viously been, and, since the teams represented the whole student 
body, it was only fair that the expense of maintaining them should 
be distributed. 

Agitation for such an association was started, and this agita- 
tion resulted in the organization of the Luther College Athletic 
Association in the fall of 1892. Oscar L. Olson '98, first presi- 
dent of the association, was one of the prime movers in its incep- 
tion. All students and faculty members were admitted to mem- 
bership in the association on the payment of fees. The chief 
points of its constitution provided that: The association should 
have control of all athletic sports at the College. All candidates 
for the various teams should be voted upon by the association. 
An executive committee, consisting of five students and one faculty 
member, should nominate all candidates for the different teams, 
and should make and carry out all necessary arrangements for 
games. The association should determine what conditions players 
must fulfill in order to win the College "L". In 1920 changes 
in the athletic situation at Luther made it necessary to alter the 



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330 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

constitution in certain respects. The athletic director was made 
a member of the athletic board of control. Since coaches were 
now in charge of all sports and it was no longer advisable to have 
the association vote upon the candidacy of players, this clause 
was stricken from the constitution. An athletic board was creat- 
ed to take the place of the executive committee with virtually the 
same powers. It is composed of four students and two members 
of the faculty. 




GYMNASIUM AND FOOTBALL FIELD 

Athletics at Luther College have been managed very success- 
fully by the Athletic Association. The dues were originally 
twenty cents per month or practically two dollars a year. When 
the schedules were enlarged and intercollegiate competition was 
entered into in more branches of sporty the dues were raised until 
at present each member pays ten dollars a year into the treasury 
of the association. When it is remembered that th^ association 
is maintaining teams in six branches of sporty this cannot be 
considered exorbitant. 

The association has always received the enthusiastic support 
of the students and has been practically identical with the student 
body in membership. 



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ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 331 

When the east wing of the gymnasium was built in 1903 with 
floor space for a basketball court the students immediately took 
advantage of the opportunity to play basketball. The interest in 
the game can be determined to some extent by the fact that inter- 
collegiate competition was introduced already in 1904<. Luther's 
first intercollegiate tennis tournament was played in the same 
year. 

Membership in some athletic conference is almost necessary 
in order to maintain a reputation for high standards of eligibil- 
ity. It is the prevailing tendency among colleges to regard with 
suspicion such institutions as are not members. The report is soon 
circulated that such an institution is not a member of a conference 
because it does not wish to observe the eligiblity rules of a con- 
ference. Affiliation with a conference also aids materially in ar- 
ranging schedules. In 1906 Luther became a member of the 
Hawkeye Conference of Iowa Colleges. Difficulty in the arrange- 
ment of schedules led the College to abandon the organization in 
1912. Membership in the Tri-state Conference of Minnesota^ 
North and South Dakota Colleges was obtained in December of 
the same year. 

This organization disbanded in 1920 when the Minnesota 
Conference was organized. At present the College is arranging to 
enter a proposed Hawkeye Conference to include all colleges in 
the state except Iowa University, Drake, Ames, and Grinnell. 

III. "L" Association 

Illustrative of the efforts of the students to maintain high 
standards and enthusiasm in athletics at Luther College is the 
"L" Association organized in January, 1919, largely through the 
efforts of its first president, M. W. Larsen, '19, and A. L. Bron- 
stad, '19. 

"The purpose of this organization," according to Art. No. 2 
of the constitution, "shall primarily be to foster a strong college 
spirit; to promote a keen interest in all collegiate activities; to 
imbue a true sense of love for and appreciation of the good old 
'L'; to make it the one and only monogram that is recognized, 
respected, and tolerated at Luther College; and to keep an of- 
ficial record of all earners of the X'." The constitution also 
provides that membership in the organization shall be limited to 
those who have earned the official "L" in forensics or athletics, 
that all former "L" men shall be honorary members of the associa- 
tion, and that the man holding the greatest number of "L's" shall 
automatically become president. 



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332 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

Through its recommendations to the athletic association the 
organization has been an important factor in determining the 
style and size of "L's" and other insignia. At the end of each 
intercollegiate season it is customary for the old members of the 
association to entertain the new members at an informal banquet. 
On such occasions the constitution is always read to acquaint 
them with the purpose and ideals of the organization. 

IV. Coaches and Athletic Directors 

In the early years of intercollegiate athletics professional 
coaches and athletic directors were not to be thought of at Luther^ 




BASEBALL DIAMOND 

, and yet the College was represented by a winning team year after 
year. Luther teams competed successfully with teams coached 
by high-salaried men. Much of the remarkable success of base- 
ball teams at Luther College , however^ can be traced to 
Professors Sihler and Olson, and, in later years, to Prof. S. S. 
Reque, '03, who were as well acquainted with the game as any 
professional coach. 

As time went on coaches and athletic directors gradually be- 
came an essential part of athletics at various colleges. Institu- 
tions with coaches hesitated to play those without coaches because, 
as one coach said, there was not much honor in winning and it 
was a disgrace to lose. With such conditions obtaining it was 
not strange that the students at Luther began to agitate for a 
coach. * Due to the efforts of Prof. B. K. Savre, '96, and Paul 
Preus, '11, who raised the necessary money, Arthur Laudel was 
engaged as baseball coach in 1917. Professional coaching was 
first made a policy of the school when Walter Jewell served as 



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ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 333 

football coach in 1919. Since that time coaches have been en- 
gaged by the College for all sports. 

Arthur Laudel served as baseball coach at Luther College 
from 1917 to 1921 inclusive. That he pitched for the Detroit 
American League Club is ample proof of his playing ability and 
knowledge of the game. In 1919^ 1920, and 1921, Mr. Laudel 
put out wonderful teams. Their records testify to his coaching 
powers. Ability to turn out successful teams was not Mr. Laudel's 
only asset as a coach. His whole attitude on the diamond was in 
harmony with Luther's highest athletic ideals and traditions. 

Alvin J. Natvig, Luther's first basketball coach, graduated 
from Luther College in 1918. Mr. Natvig played on the Luther 
team five years and was as great a guard as ever represented Lu- 
ther in basketball. When he agreed to coach the team in 1920 
prospects were bright. In the influenza epidemic Mr. Natvig 
and several of the squad were taken sick, necessitating the can- 
cellation of several games. Mr. Natvig's team showed marked 
improvement in spite of the severe handicap. 

When intercollegiate football was introduced again in 1919 
a football coach was a necessity. Walter Jewell, who had play- 
ed tackle on the Iowa University eleven, was selected to coach 
the team. Making a football team out of men with practically 
no experience was no easy task. Mr. Jewell worked diligently 
and faithfully . Although he did not develop a winning combina- 
tion his efforts were of great value to the team the following 
year. 

Oscar M. Solem came to Luther lyith the remarkable record 
of having coached three championship football teams. As a stu- 
dent at the University of Minnesota he played end and tackle on 
the team in 1911 and 1912. While serving his country during 
the war he received the rank of captain. His football team at 
Luther in 1920 came up to expectations. Only one game was 
tost and that by one point. Mr. Solem's record at Luther was 
so impressive that he was given a large increase in salary to 
become coach at Drake University. 

Ralph Movold coached basketball and track and was instructor 
in physical training at Luther 1920-1921. Mr. Movold was gradu- 
ated from the North Dakota Agricultural College in 1919, and 
had a very impressive athletic record. In track he was much 
handicapped, it being Luther's first year of competition in track 
since 1904. 

Ivan Doseff, now coaching football, basketball, and track at 
Luther, has been in the coaching game since 1908. While play- 



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334 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

ing on the University of Chicago team he was selected for all- 
western honors. Mr. Doseff is an advocate of clean athletics and 
inculcates sportsmanship in the true sense of the word. 

S. S. Reque coached the baseball team in 1922. His record 
as a player is already known to all who are acquainted with Lu- 
ther College athletics. He has had previous coaching experience 
at Gale College^ and at Luther College in 1907 and 1908. 

The Preparatory Department maintains its own athletic teams 
in football^ basketball, and baseball. Competition is carried on 
with the various academies within the Church and with neighbor- 




FIRST BASEBALL TEAM, 187« 

P. Hel^eland, G J. Lomen, C. K. Preus, A. Torgerson 
L G. Monson, H. R0the, S. Weeks, H. Johnson, O. Mandt 

ing high schools. The "Prep." teams have always been of high 
calibre. This year the Preparatory basketball team coached by 
Prof. O. W. Qualley was victorious in the Inter-Academy Con- 
ference and received possession of the Inter-Academy Conference 
Cup for one year. Much valuable material for college teams 
is thus developed in the Preparatory Department. In addition 
to Prof. O. W. Qualley, Professors M. W. Larsen and S. S. 
Reque have acted as coaches of Preparatory teams. 

V. Baseball 

Baseball is the favorite game of the American youth. A 
glance at Luther College's record tempts one to say that it is 
also the favorite game of the Viking youth, for the great enthusi- 
asm and proficiency in the game shown by the boys of Norwegian 



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ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 



335 



descent in this country^ even in the first generation^ have really 
been remarkable. 

Baseball at Luther had its origin in the baseball movement^ 
so to speak^ which spread throughout the West immediately after 
the Civil War. Intercollegiate competition was not introduced 
until 1891^ but games were played with Decorah and neighbor- 
ing town teams, such as Waukon, Ft. Atkinson, Ridgeway, and 
Cresco. In addition to the regular nine, teams were organized 
by classes, weight, height, etc. The contest with Decorah on 




BASEBALL TEAM, 1891 

A. Torrison, T. R0d8aeter, K. Thorsir&ard, W. Torrison 

O. L. Olson, S. T. Reque 
W. Sillier, O. G. Juul, P. A. Reque, E. A. Bolline 



May 17th was generally the crucial game of the season. Many 
and interesting stories are told of the efforts to get players who 
had been injured, into shape for this game. ' 

The first organized team of which there is any record dates 
from 1871 or 1872. Its members were: I. Monson, S. Weeks, 
H. Johnson, H. R0the, A. Torgerson, G. Lomen, O. Mandt, P. 
Helgeland, and C. K. Preus. 



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336 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SDCTY YEARS 

The records show that the following represented the College 
in a game with Decorah on May 17^ 1879: I. B. Torrison^ capt; 
T. G. Opsahl, H. J. Kopperdal, Halvor Peterson, H. T. Yttcr- 
boe, O. P. Syftestad, O. E. Brecke, G. A. Larsen, and L. M. K. 
Karstad. 

Luther played her first intercollegiate baseball game with St. 
Olaf College in May, 1891. Space does not permit any extensive 
account of the success of Luther on the diamond. A short quota- 
tion from the "Outing Magazine", an eastern publication, edited 
by Casper Whitney, a strong supporter of clean college athletics, 
will have to suffice. In the May issue for 1901 appeared the fol- 
lowing writeup of college baseball in the West: 

"In baseball the teams of Illinois, Northwestern, Chicago, 
Michigan, Beloit, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Iowa are all play- 
ing strong games. Michigan, whose only trip was somewhat dis- 
appointing, is coming to the front with a rush. The Notre Dame 
team, too, may be placed in the first class, while Luther College, 
a small institution in Decorah, Iowa, whose record for pure 
class athletics is enviable, has one of the best ball nines in the 
West.'* 

The following is an official roster of Luther College baseball 
teams from 1884 to 1922 inclusive: 

1884— J. G. Halland, T. Opsahl, O. T. Lee, C. BoUine, O. K Fug!ei, G. A. Tor- 
riflon, S. C. N. Peteraon, A. Jacoteon, C. Neperud, J. P. Bakke. 

1885— G. A. Torriflon, C. BoUine, H. O. FJeldstad, G. A. GuUixon, S. C. N. Petei^ 
son, O. YlvUaker, O. K. Fuglei, P. A. Kittilsby, B. FrysUe. 

1886— C. Bothne, Gustov Torrison, P. A. Kittilsby, O. K. Fuglel, M. A. Mikkelsen. 
G. A. Gullixon, S. C. N. Peterson, O. Ylvisaker, C. 1. UoUefson. 

1887— N. Torrison, c; P. A. Kittilsby, lb; O. T. Rikansrud, Sb; G. A. Gullixon. 
8b; O. Ylvisaker, If; O. L. Olson, p; E G. Mellem, rf; M. M. Steensiand, 
ss; P. A. Keque, cf. 

1888— N. Torrlson, c; J. G. Halland, p; P. A. Kittlktby, lb; N. N. Nordsaard. 
2b; O. L Olson, 8b; M. M. Steensiand, ss; O. Ylvisaker, If; O. T. Rikans- 
rud, cf; E. G. Mellem, rf. 

1889— N. Torrlson, c; O. L. Olson, p; J. G. Halland, lb; N. N. Nordgaaid,. Sb; 
G. A. Gullixon, 8b; M. M. Steensiand, ss; E. A. Bothne, if; P. A. Requc, 
cf; E. G. Mellem, rf. 

18M— O. L. Olson, c; A. Torrlson, p; W. Torrison, lb; N. N. Nordgaard, Sb; 
P. A. Reque, Sb; O. G. Juul, ss; O. Akre, O. S. Swennes, D. B. Braekke, B. A. 
Bothne, £. G. Mellem, fielders. 

1891— W. 'Torrlson, c; A. Torrison, p; O. L. Olson (capt.), lb; O. G. Juul, Sb; 
K. L. Thorsgaard, ss; W. Slhier, Sb; E. A. Bothne, If; P. A. Reque, cf; 
T. Rfkisaeter, rf; O. Akre. 

1892— W. Torrison, c; A. Torrison, p; W. Slhier, lb; O. L. Olson (capt.), 2b; 
K. L. Thorsgaard, ss; W. B. Torgerson, Sb; O. G. Juul, If; O. Akre, cf; 
H. Ness, rf. 

189S— W. Torrison, c; A. Torrison (capt.), p; O. L. Olson, lb; K. L. Thorsgaard, 
2b; O. G. Juul, 88 ; W. Slhier. Sb; E A. Bothne, E. Lewlson, I. A. Thor- 
son, H. Ness, O. Akre, outfield. 

1894— W. Torrison, c; A. Torrlson (capt.), p; E. Lewlson, lb; K. L. Thorsgaard, 
2b; O. G. Juul, ss; J. R. Peterson, Sb; E. A. Bothne, If; I, A. Thorson, cf; 
H. Ness, rf; J. E. Winger; O. S. Opheim, mgr. 



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ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 



337 




BASEBALL TEAM* 1922 

Berran, Ostrem, Reque, V. SperatI, C. Anderson, Iverson, Laraen, M. H Anderson 

Ellingson. H. E. Peterson, E. Hovden, Sorlien, O. OrwoU, Bottolfson, Knudson 

Maakestad, S. OrwoU, Ethun, S. SperatI, Killie, Trytten, Borgen 




PREPARATORY BASEBALL TEAM, 1922 

O. Qualley, A. Foes, G. Losen, W. Korsrud, M. K. Anderson, L. Henr A. Ericksoo 

P. Olson, M. Lande, C. Hovden, S. Fardal, O. Ruen 

O. Torrison, H. C. Peterson, A. Moackrud, J. N. Otte 



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338 



LUTHER College through sixty years 





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340 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



1895— W. TorriBon, c; A. Torrlson (capt), S. T. Nornmnn, p: E. Lewiaon. lb: 
K. L. Thorsgaard, Zb; A. L. Markhua, as; M. B. Juul, lb; P. Berntaon, If; 
I. A. Thorson, cf; J. E. Winger, rf; S. J. N. YWiaaker, mgr. 

1806— No intercollegiate gamea played. 

1897— E. Lewiaon (capt.)« c; J. C. Jensen, S T. Normann, p; J. E. Winger, lb; 
W. Sihier, 2b; M. Hegland, ss; I. M. Lyngaaa, 8b: A. L. Maridiua, If: 
K. M. Hageatad, cf; 0. B. Pederson, rf; A. 0. Anderaon. 

1898— O. B. Pederson, c; J. C. Jensen, R. Gaard, p; H. O. GuUizaon, lb; Moe, 
Xb; M. Hegland (capt.), as; H. J. Linde. 8b; A. O. Anderson if; W. Sihier, 
cf; B. Borreson, rf; E. Aaaeth, H. M. Dahl, P. Moen, mgr. 

1899— O. B. Pederson (capt.), c; O. J. H. Preua, R. Gaard, p; J. A. C. Torger- 
son, lb; P. Bemtson, 2b; M. Hegland, as; H. J. Linde, 8b i A. O. Ander- 
aon, If; O. Moe, E. Aaseth, cf; H. O. Gullixson, rf; S. S. Reque, P. Moen. 
mgr. 

1900— O. B. Pederson, c; O. J. H Preus, R. Gaard, p; E. A. Brekke. lb; M. 
Hegland, 2b; A. 0. Anderson, as; H. J. Linde (capt.), 8b; S. S Reque, If; 
H. O. Gullixson, cf; W. Sihier, rf; M. J. Hegland, mgr. 

1901— H. O. Grangaard, c; O. J. H. Preus, G. A. Grinde, p; E. A. Brekke. lb; 
L. Larsen, 2b; A. O. Anderson, ss; H. J Linde (capt.), 8b; S. S. Reque, 
If; H. C. Smeby, cf; W. Sihier, rf; A. O. Anderson, mgr. 

1902— H. O. Grangaard, c; H. C. Smeby, A. Sevareid, p; E A. Brekka, lb; O. 

L. Olson, 2b; S. S. Reque (capt.), ss; L Larsen, 8b; J. C. K. Preua, If; 

T. F. Gullixson, cf; G. A. Grinde, rf ; H. E. Olsen, mgr. 
1908— E. A. Brekkp, c; A. Sevareid, G. A. Grinde. p; T. F. GiiIliTson, lb: O. L. 

Olson, 2b; H. J. Sorlien. ss; S. S. Reque (capt.), 8b; G I. Rodsater, If; 

A. Sather, cf; A. Torgerson. rf; H. E. Olsen, mgr 

1904— G. I. Rodsater, c; A. Sevareid (capt.), p; O S. HJelle. lb; H. J. Sorlien, 
2b; H. Halvorsen, ss; J. Naeseth. 8b; W. Nelson, If; W. Sihier, cf; L. A 
Fries, rf; E. E. Mortenson; T. A. HofT, mgr. • 

1905— G. I. Rodsater, c; A. Sevareid (capt.), p; O. S. Hjelle, lb; H. J. Sorlien, 
2b: M. Fuglie. ss; J. N^ew^th. 8b: J. Holkesvik, If; P. T. Hustvedt, E. 0. 
Moe, cf; L. A. Fries, rf; H. O. Saxvlk, mgr. 

1900— G I. Rodsater, c; A. Sevareid (capt.), E. O. Moe, 0. B. Ferkin, p; L. A. 
Fries, lb; J. Britson, 2b; M. Fu}?lle. ss; J. Naeseth, 8b; O. Ruen, rf; S. 
Dahl, cf; J. Holkesvik, If; H. C. Nordlle, mgr. 

1907— L. A. Fries, c; A. O. Nneseth, J. Hanson, p; G. Hanson, lb; S. G. Harstad, 
2b; M. Fuglie. ss; J. Naeseth (capt.), 8b; J. Holkesvik, If; S. S. Reqoe, cf; 
S. Dahl, rf; S. S. Reque, mgr. 

1908 — G. Hanson, H. Leum, c and cf; A. O. Naeseth, p; O. Nygaard, p and cf: 
J. Hanson, p and 8b; C. A. Hielle, lb; S. G. Harstad (capt). 2b; C 
Sorlien, ss; F. E. Peterson, If; M. J. Monson, rf; C A. Jesaen, mgr. 

190»— G. HaAson, c; A. O Naeseth (capt.), p; O. Nygaard, p and rf; C. A. HJelle, 

E. Estenson, lb: G. St^oraa-sli. 2b; C. Sorlien, ss; J. H»naon, p and Sb; 

F. E. Peterson, If; H. W. Williams, cf; P. A. Preus, rf; C. A. Jeasen. mgr. 

1910 — M. Guttebo, O. Jerde, c; O. Nygaard. E. Estenson, C. Hansen. R. UlTilden, 
p; E. Estenson, C. A. Hjelle, lb; G. Storaasli, 2b; P. A. Preua, ss; B. 
Ringlee, 8b; P. W. Qually, T. H. Waller, W. C. Preus, J. Jerdee, P. J. Iver- 
son, outfield; H. Onsgard, mgr. 

1911— M. Guttebo, c; R. Ulvilden, C. Hansen, E. Estenson, p; E EridoMn, p and 
lb: G. Storaasli (capt.). 2b: P. A. Preus, ss; E. Ringlee. 8b; A. Erickaon, 
If; W. C. Preus, cf; J. Jerdee, rf; H. Onsgard, mgr. 

1912— M. Guttebo (capt.). c and lb; A. Erickson, c; R. Ulvilden, C. H. Seebadi. 
C. Hnnsen. p and f; E. Erickson, lb and p; E Ringlee, 2b; 0. B. Harstad, 
ss; 0. C. Sorlien. 8b; W. C. Preus, cf ; C Foes, mgr. 

1918— A. Erickson, c; C. H. Seebach, R. Ulvilden, p; S. KJoa, lb; L O. Swanaon, 
2b: O. B. Hnr8t'»d. ss; E. M. Streeter. 8b; E. Opheim. If; W. C. Preus 
(capt.), cf; H. C Hansen, rf; C. T. Jenson; C. Gulbrandson, mgr. 

1914 — No team on account of the Norway Tour of the Concert Band. 

1915— A. L. Bronstad. c; C. H. Seebach (cnpt.), E. M. Streeter. A. J Natvig, p: 

H. A. Preus, lb; L. 0. Swanson, 2b; B Sampson, as; P. G. Johnson, Sb; 

S. M. Topneas, If; G. Kvnase, cf; S. Kjos, rf; T. O. Kraabel, mgr. 

1918— A. L. Bronstad, c; L Harstad, A. J. Natvig, p; H. A. Preua, lb; L. 0. 
Swanson (capt.), 2b: B. Sampson, ss; P. G. Johnson. 8b; E. M. Streeter. 
If: C. A. Stormo, cf; S. Kjos, rf; E. F. Kiland, A. S. Natvig; B. R. 
Seines, mgr. 



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ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 



341 



1917— A. L. Bronstad, c; A. R. Sorlien, A. J. Natriff, p; B. M. Streeter (ciipt.). 
lb; A. S. Natyiff, Sb; M. W. Larsen, ss and lb; H. Peterson, as; O. S. 
Monson, 8b; K. B. Brunndnle. If; C. A. Stormo, cf; H. K. Naruni, rf; 
B. F. Kiland, T. I. Rotto, W. B. Scarvie; R. Jargo, mgr; A. Laudel, coach. 

1018— M. W. Lareen, c; A. R. Sorlien. A. J. Natvig, p and lb; B. A. Johnson, 2b; 
L. C Sorlien, ss; O S. Monson, Sb; W. B. Scarvie, If; C A. Stormo 
(capt), cf; A. R. EUIngsOn, rf; M. A. Thompson, O. W. Qualley; J. Lee, 
myr; A. Landel, coach. 

101»— A. I.. BronstAd, c and cf; S. O. Sorlien, c and Sb; A. R. Ellingson, E. S. 

Hovden, A. R. Sorlien, p; M. W. Larsen, lb; L. C. Sorlien, 2b; H. S. 

Weiser, ss; O S. Monson (capt), Sb; W. B. Scarvie, If; B. 0. Bottolfson, rf; 

B. A. Jcdmson; M. Thompson, mgr ; A. Landel, coach. 
1020— S. O. Sorlien, c; A. Sorlien, p; A. Ellingson, p (capt.); R. Storvick, lb; 

H. Peterson, 2b; L. Sorlien, ss; E. Bottolfson, Sb; W. Scarvie, If; W. 

Lawston, cf; S. Orwoll, rf; C. Anderson, lb; A. Laudel, coach; H. Jor- 

dahU mgr. 
1021— S. O. Soriien, c; A. Sorlien, p and Sb (capt.); E Hovden, p and Sb; H. 

Peterson, lb; C. Anderson, 2b; L. Sorlien, ss; E. Bottolfson, Sb and If; 

W. Lawston, cf; S. Orwoll, rf; E. Trytten, H. Hoff, E. Killie, subs; V. T. 

Jordahl, mgr.; A. Laudel, coach. 
1922— S. O Sorlien (capt.), E. B. Steen, c; E. Hovden, O. Orwoll, p and lb; C. 

Anderson, 2b; E. S. Killie, ss: H. E. Peterson, Sb; S. P. Orwoll, If; R. 

Ethun, cf; E. Trytten, cf and 2b; E. Bottolfson, rf; H. Ostrem, C. A. 

Bergan, C. V. Sperati, J. Iverson, M. H. Anderson, E. Ellingson, J. Knudson, 

B. Maakestad, J. E. Borgen, subs; E. N. Larsen, mgr.; S. S. Reque, coach. 
Extra-inning games: Luther 12, Cornell 16 — ten innings, 1800; Luther 1. 
Minnesota 1— fifteen innings, 1008; Luther 1, Minnesota 1 — eleven innings, 1000; 
Luther 2,. St. Thomas S— twelve innings, 1018; Luther 2, St. Joseph (Columbia) 
1— twelve innings, 1010; (Luther 4, Minnesota S — ten innings, 1022). 

Baseball record, 1022— Luther won 8 games <0l.5%), lost 5, vis: Iowa State 
Teachers, S-l, S-6; Columbia, 5-1. 4-0; Campion, 7-2; La Crosse Normal, 5-0; St. 
Olaf, 5-1, 2-4; Minnesota, 4-S; Parsons, 10-8; Upper Iowa, 1-10. S-0; Dubuque, 
4-2. Total score: Luther 02, opponents 48. Garmes won, 1801-1022, 180 (50.0%) ; 
lost, 02 (40.4%). 




FOOTBALL IN THE NINETIES 

Lyngaas, S. M. Orwoll, Thorsg^rd, Winger, I. A Kamjpen, Teigen, B. Savre 

H. Ness, Bygland, E. Bothne (capt.), L. Reque; C. Hjermstad 

H. G. Magelssen, I. A. Thorson 



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LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



VI. Football 

Football was introduced at Luther in 1877^ but it was not 
played then as it is at present. The Rugby rules were followed. 
Any number of players were permitted on a side. Great interest 
was taken and it often happened that practically the whole stu- 
dent body took part in the games. The following excerpt is 
taken from **Chips" for Sept., 1884: "A match game of football 
is being played between the seniors and juniors combined, against 
the freshmen and preps. The game has been going on for two 
days and is not yet done." 

From 1892 to 1896 inclusive, intercollegiate contests were 
held with neighboring colleges. Iowa University, Coe, Upper 
Iowa, and Carleton were among those met on the gridiron. 

1892— W. ToiTison, R. E.; M. Telgen, R. T.; S. Orwoll, R. G.; O. Akrc, C; H. 

Otte, L. G.: 1. A. Thorson. L. T.; L. Reque, L. E.; E. DoUine (capl.), 

Q. B.; A. Torrlson, L. H.; O Juul, H. B.; O. L. Olson, F. B. 
1898— S. OrwoII, R. E.; M. Teigen, R. T.; Ness, R. G.; O. Bygland, c; L. 

Rcque, L G.; I. l.yngans, L. T.; I. Anderson. L. E.: O. Juul. Q. B.; K. 

Thorsgaard, L H.; E. Bothne (capt.), R. H.; and 1. A. Thorson, F. B. 
1894— Z. Ordal, I. Anderson, E; I. Lyngaas. M. Teigen, T; C. Hjcrmstad, C. 

Anderson, G.; O. Bygland. C; B. Savre, Q. B.; I. A. Thorson, F. B ; E. 

Bothne. H. B.; S. Orwoll (cnpt.)* H. B. 
1H95 -No games. Captain. B. Savre. 
1896— Z. Ordal, Dahlen, O Eger, E.; 1. Anderson, Odegaarden (Odegaard), T.; 

H. Wein. P. Birkelo. J. L Johnson, G.; G. Johnson, C; P. Moen, Q. B.: 

J. E. Winger, H. B.; I. Lyngaas, (c^pt).; A. BJerke, G. B. WoUan, S. T. 

Nonnunn, F. B 

In 1896 intercollegiate football was abolished. Class games 
continued to be popular, however, and were a means of keeping 
interest in the game alive. A freshman-sophomore game or one 
between the "Means" and "Extremes" was considered an almost 
essential part of the 14th of October program. 




COLLEGE FOOTBALL SQUAD, 1920 
Left to right — Standing: Larsen, Ode. Tollefsrud, Ylvisaker, Opsahl, Johnson, M. 
Anderson, Fadness. L. Sorlien, Tolo, Clauson. Eid, Steen. Coach Solem; Kneeling: 
C. Anderson, Orwoll, A. Sorlien, Peterson, Westby, Knutson; Sitting: Nordgaard, 
Storvick, Rindahl, Rugland, Oefstedal, Narveson, S. O. Sorlien 



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ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 



343 



In the fall of 1918 the S. A. T. C. was represented by a foot- 
ball team. Games were played with Upper Iowa and Campion. 
These contests aroused keen interest in football among the stu- 
dents and an agitation for permission to play intercollegiate 
football was at once begun. In 1919 football was again introduced. 




PREPARATORY FOOTBALL TEAM, 1921 

Evenmoe, Soland, Lucky, Brakke, Nerison 

Hegg, Hagren, Losen, Qualley, Anderson, Ramsey, Fosmark 

Lande, Foss, Otte, Erickson, Hovden 

Following is the record of the personnel of the teams: 
1919— E. Nordiraard, R. E.; P. Ode, R. T.; R. Storvick, R. G.; L R. Gr0nlfd, C; 

E. Larsen, L. G.; R Oefstedal, L. T.; G. Tryttcn, L. E.; S. O. Sorlien, 
Q. B. (capt.); O. Rindahl, R. H.; A. Sorlien, F. B.; C. Ravndal, L. H.; 
H. Jordohl, W. Ylvisaker, S. Orwoll, subs; T. Megorden, mgr; W. Jewell, 
coach. 

1920— E. Nordgaard, R. E.; R. Storvick, (capt.) R. T.; O. Rfndahl. R. G.; G. 
Rugland, C; R. Oefstedal. L. G ; B. NarvAon, L. T.; S. O. Sorlien, L. E.; 
H. Peterson, Q. B.; S. Orwoll, R. H.: A. Sorlien. F. B.; J. Westby, L. H.; 
C. Anderson, E ; A. Storvick. mgr.; O. Solem, coadi. 

1921- E. Nordgaard, R. E.; C. Anderson, R. T.; M. Anderson, R. G.; G. Rug- 
land, C; R. Sehjeldahl, L. G.; E. Owen, L T.; S. O. Sorlien, L. E.; 
H. Peterson (capt.), Q. B.; S. Orwoll. R. H.; O. Orwoll, F. B.; J. Westby. 
L H.; H. Reishus, E., and T.; C. V. Sperati, E., and F. B.; J. Duckstad, 

F. B.; V. Elvestrom, mgr.; L DosetT, coach. 

FOOTBALL AT LUTHER COLLEGE 



No. 



2 
3 

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 



OPPONENT 



Campion ColleRe. Prairie du Chien. 

Carleton College. Northfield 

Columbia College, Dubuque 

Dubuque. University of 

St. Mary's Seminary. Winona 

St. Olaf College. Northfield 

Trinity College. Sioux City 

Upper Iowa University. Fayette 

Winona State Normal School 

Wisconsin School of Mines 



Total. 



1919 



29-6 
7-46 



6-57 
6-19 



19-7 

13-10 

45-14 



14-38 
26-0 



88-166 



1920 



0-0 



13-14 

42-0 

45-0 



177-45 



1921 



3-6 



7-19 
0-20 



0-10 
35-0 
33-7 



78-62 



Won 



Lost 



Tied 



No. 



I 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 



Per cent of Games Won. 



33.3 



83.3 



33.3 



50.0 



50.0 



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344 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



VII. Basketball 
Basketball was first introduced at Luther in the fall of 1903. 
Some very interesting inter-class games were played. In 1904 
Upper Iowa was met in Luther's first intercollegiate basketball 
game. Since that time basketball has been a major sport at 
Luther and has ranked next to baseball in popularity. Below 
are given the names of players on teams from 1904 to 1922: 




BASKETBALL TEAM, 1906 
Rostad, Sevareid, Lursen 
Rodsater, Harstad, Bj^rgo, Naeseth, Thorsen 

1B04^J. E. Strand (capt.), O. S. Hjelle, A. C. Pederson, (mgr.), C W. Bj^rgo. 

L Grinde, 0. A. Tingelstad. 
1005— M. L. Rostad (capt.), O. S. Hjelle, A. Sevarefd, C. W. Bj^rgo, N. Rostad, 

H. Larsen, A. O. Naeseth, O. H. Sponheim (mgr.). 
1906— C W. BJ0rgo (capt), S. G. Harstad, A. Sevareid, H. Larsen, A. 0. 

Naeseth, M. L. Rostao, H. Thorsen (mgr.). 
1907— S. G. Harstad, (capt), A. O. Naeseth, H. Larsen, N. H. Gutteb0, H. W. 

Williams, H. Leum, M. L. Rostad. P. W. Qually, G. O. F0rde (mgr.). 
1908— A. O. Naeseth (capt), S. G. Harstad, N. H. Guttebft, S. Neprud, H. Leum, 

M. L. Rostad, P. W. Qually. L. S. Kloster (mgr). 
1909— N. H. Guttebft (capt). A. O. Naeseth. P. W. Qually, H. W. WiUiams, C L 

Wollan, E. Estenson, B. Rosenqvist (mgr.). 
1910— P. W. Qually (capt). G. Storaasli, E. Estenson, C. I. Wollan, O. Jerde, 

C. N. Sandager. I. A. Opstad, O. Ekfelt (mgr.). 



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ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 



345 



191 l—E. Estenson (capt). It Uhrllden, C. I. Wollan, G. Storaasli, 0. Jerde, 
I. A. Opstad, E. R. Hegg (mgr.). 

IBIt— It Ulvllden (capt). A. L. Kiel W. C. Preiu, E. Rlnglee, M. Gutteb0. H. 
Hansen, W. Dahl, W. T. Gifstad, G. Loftness, W. A. WoUan (mgr.). 

191 S—R. Ulvilden (capt.)« W. C. Preiu, G. Loftness, W. T. GigsUd, C. H. See- 
bach, E. M. Streeter, G. Henderson, N. Bninsdale (m^.). 

1914— W. T. Gtgstad (capt.), 0. B. Harstad, C. H. Seebacfa. G. Loftness, A. 

Erickson, B. Sampson, E. M. Streeter, A. J. Natviff, A. 0. Lee, A. M. 

Wisness (m^.)* 
1015— C. H. Seebacfa (capt), E. M. Streeter, B. Sampson, S. KJos, A J. Natrig, 

A. S. Natyig, A. O. Lee, C Losen, A. D. Askegaard, S. M. Topness (mgr ). 
1916— E. M. Streeter (capt), B. Sampson, A. J. Natrig, A. S Natvig. S. Kjos, 

A. 0. Lee, I. Harstad, C Losen, N. M. Leque, G. Ulvilden (mgr.). 




BASKETBALL TEAM, 1917 

T. Rotto. A J. Natvig, M. W. Larsen, A. Bronstad 

O. W. Qualley, A. M. Kraabel, A. O. Lee 

A. S. Natvig, E Streeter, H. Tallakson 



1917— E M. Streeter (capt), A. J. Natvig, A. S. Natvig, 0. W. Qualley, A. L. 
Bronstad, A. O. Lee, M. W. Larsen, T. I. Rotto, H. A. Tallakson, A. M. 
Kraabel (mgr.). 

1919— A. J. Natvig (cnpt), O. W. Qualley, M. W. Larsen, A. J. Lunde, A. R. 
Sorlien, M. A. Thompson, L. C. Sorlien, C. N. Evanson and C. A. Stormo 
(mgrs.). 

1919— M. W. Larsen (capt ), M. A. Thompson, C. M. Ravndal, R. O. Stonrick, 

L. C. Sorlien, B. A. Johnson, E. S. Hovden, C. A. Anderson, M. B. 

Ranum, E. J. Kvammen, O. L. Kaupanger (mgr ). 
1926— L. Sorlien (capt), A. Sorlien, E. Nordgaard, C. Anderson, O. Sorlien. E. 

Kvammen, E. Hovden, H. Peterson, I. R. Gronlid (mgr), A. J. Natvig 

(coach). 



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LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



BASKETBALL AT LLTHER COLLEGE 



No. 


OPPONENT 


1904 


1905 


1906 


1907 


i>«» 


1909 


1910 


' 1911 


1912 


1 Augustana CoUeice. . 

2 Calmar Lesioo 

J^Camn Dodsr 












- • ; 1 

! j ■• : ■ ■ 


4 
5 

6 

7 

8 
9 


Campion College 














.'.'.'.. 


. 


Carleton College.... 

Cedar Valley Jr. Col. 
Cheyenne Indians. . . . 

Coe College 












37-27 


15-22 . 11-31 

.... I ' 




4»-19 
49-31 


1 


Columbia Collece 




i 


10 Company L 

1 1 Concordia College . 

12 Cretco Legion 

li Dubuque Independents 

14 Dubuque. Univ. of 

15 German Luth. Sem. . . 








! - - - • 

::;;..j ::..;■■ 

1 ■ ' ■ " ; 
!!. ' i. !! '!. i 


16,Grinnell College 












20-37 1 1 


1 7 Gustavus Adolphus C 








15-19 


! 21-15 ; 
67-21 r 20-3i 


18 Hamline University. . . 
















19>Iowa State Teachers C 
20 Iowa, Univ. of 




32 34 


12-34 












22 
73 


La Crosse Normal .... 
LaCro«ieY.M.C.A... 

Leander Clark College. 














47-18 


74 




61-9 
26-21 


63-28 
39-31 








25 


Lenox College 






26-15 


54-12 






21-17 


26 Luther Alumni 










77 


Luther Seminary 


















78 


Macaiester College 




















79 


Minnesota Agri. CoL. . 










25-34 










M) 


Morningside College . . 












73-14 






,11 


New Hampton Legion. 


















.17 


New York Nationals. 




















11 


N. Dak. Agric. Coll.. 




















14 


N. Dak.. Univ. of 




















IS 


Ossian, Iowa 




















.16 


Park Region ^. Col... 




















17 


Ripon College 












25-21 








.18 


St. John's Univ 












24^25 
34-^21 
33-32 






.10 


St. Olaf College 








39-30 


62-23 
34-39 


21-13 

22-24 


34-26 
18-14 


27-26 
12-23 
31-23 


4^) 


St. Paul Y. M.C. A... 








41 


Shattuck Academy.. . 












28-20 


38-17 


24-15 


47 


Stout Institute 










43 
44 


Wariburg College 


12-18 


23-40 


31-17 


46-23 
39-27 


38-33 
34-28 


47-20 
Tie 


34-17 
22-14 


35-24 
30-11 




45 


Wi'Htern College 

Wlllmar, Minn 




18-23 


43-7 














46 














47 


Winona State Normal. 






















12-18 


41-63 


100-39 
















Total 


211-110 


424^300 


246-171 


273-159 


243-170 


190-184 




Per cent of Games Won 








100.0 


100.0 


70 


75.0 


75.0 


75.0 


62.5 



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ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL . 



347 



1913 


1914 


1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 


1921 


1922 


Won 


Lost 


Tied 


No. 


19-25 


27-19 


















14 

17 


1 



5 

8 






3 




2 

1 

3 

1 

1 
3 

1 






1 
I 



2 



1 
1 






1 

14 




7 

1 
1 

































































1 




















2 














22-16 

6-26 
10-24 
17-18 








3 


35-33 


16-18 
9-11 


21-24 


22-23 


19-16 


23-7 
8-5 

12-11 
9-30 


3-31 


11-9 
11-33 


24-4 
22-11 


4 
5 










38- 2 
26- 8 




6 










49-3 








7 




















8 


















17-33 
19-32 


16-26 
19-16 


9 




31-18 














10 






37-21 














11 














23-21 
25-19 
11-31 






12 










51-1 








10^24 


13 














14 


37-27 






60-12 








15 




















16 


17-18 


27-10 
13-31 


42-S 
18-6 


27-17 






16-33 








17 














18 


















17-13 
18-22 


19 




















20 








79-2 














21 


















16-49 


22 






47-18 














23 




















24 


31-11 
38-22 


66-7 


38-18 
















25 














9-19 


28-14 
30-15 


26 










33-7 




5-15 




27 






32-13 
32-33 
33-16 








28 




















29 




















30 
















50-21 






31 


27-34 


















32 








15-22 














33 




29-13 
57-22 
















34 




















35 








20-12 
18-14 












36 




















37 






















38 


22-4 
19-23 


18-17 
21-14 


22-18 
18-19 


13-14 
15-22 


18-14 
20-13 


12-16 
10-15 


11-18 




4-19 
9-23 


20-23 
15-33 


39 
40 






















41 








21-13 
28-19 
27-37 














4? 


47-29 
28-17 




36-22 
42-13 






18-20 
23-26 


"7-28 


21-20 
32-20 


1.^-26 
16-22 


43 








44 




















45 










24-16 












46 


















20-19 


47 






















320-241 314-180 


381-205 


344-202 


252-96 


74-84 


128-196 


119-151 


197-218 


284-317 


96 


59 


1 




63.6 72.7 


75.0 


54.5 


100.0 


50.0 


11.1 


50.0 


45.5 


46.7 


61.9 


38.1 







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348 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



19X1— A. Sorlien (capt.). L. Sorlien. C Anderson, H. Peterson, E. Nord^aard, 

M. Stortroen, C. Olson (mgr.)« R. Movold (coach). 
19«f— C Anderson (capt.). H. Peterson, E. Hovden, C. V. SperatU O. OrwoU, 

E. KYammen, M. Stortroen, B. Nordiraard, G. Sorenson, O. Heskin (mffr.), 

Ivan Dosetr (coach). 

VIII. Turning 
When the gymnasium was erected in 1886 turning and gym- 
nastics immediately became popular at the College. Through 
the efforts of C. A. Sperati^ '88^ a turning club was organized in 




PREPAHATORY BASKETBALL TEAM, 1922 
Left to Right: Hoyden, Qualley, Bidne, Otte, Hegg, Losen, Foss, 
Anderson, Dahl, Brakke 
Champions, N, L, C. A. Academy Conference 

December, 1886. Its officers were: C. A. Sperati, foreturner; 
M. M. Steensland, assistant foreturner; and P. Gylstroem, presi- 
dent; A. Engebretson. The first turning club exhibition was given 
in May, 1888, under C. A. Sperati's leadership. Since that time 
public entertainments have been given almost every year. 

Luther's turning clubs have come up to the high standard set 
by the teams in the other branches of athletics. In 1909, the 
first year Luther took part in the State Gymnastic Meet, the team 
was awarded the championship. The team was composed of J. 
Hanson (capt.), F. E. Peterson, E. Severson, O, Hokaason, C. 
Wisnaes, P. Nestos (mgr.). Score: Luther 256.4, Iowa State 
Teachers' College 234.2, Iowa University 47.2. 

1910 — O. Tufte (capt.), H. Monson, J Jerdee, A. Storatad, C. Hansen, P. Iver- 
son (rogr.). State Intercollegiate Gymnastic Meet: Iowa State Teachers 
260, Luther 244.5, Iowa University 224.25. 



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ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 



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1911— A. Storstad (capt), O. Jerde, C. Hansen, E. Bninsdale, E. Severson, W. 

Wollan (mgr.). Iowa State Gymnastic Meet: Luther second place. 
1912— C. Hansen (capt), E. Severson, E. Brunsdale, L. Gorder, C. Rossing, N. 

Brunsdale (mgr.). Iowa State Gymnastic Meet: Luther 267.175, Iowa 

State Teachers College 268.6. 

1918— C Hansen (capt.), E. Bninsdale, W. Bakke, L. Gorder, H Narum, W. 

Maakestad. 0. Harstad, C Olafson, C. Mikkelson, C. Haroldson, J. Har- 

oldson, E. Thoen (mgr.). No state meet was held. 
1914— L. Gorder (capt), W Maakestad, H. Narum, C. Olafson, W. Knutson, 

N. Thorpe (mgr.). Iowa State Gymnastic Meet: Iowa University, 1st; 

Luther 2nd. 
1915— L. Gorder (capt), C. Olafson, W. Maakestad, H. Narum, W. Knutson, 

C. Mikkelson, R. Rosenqvist (mgr.). Iowa State Gymnastic Meet: Iowa, 

first place; Ames, second place; Luther, third place 




GYMNASTIC TEAM, 1909 

Hanson, Nestos, Hokaasen 

Severson, Wisnaes, Peterson 

1916— H. Narum (capt.), C. Olafson, W. Knutson, E. Kiland, A. O. Hanson, R. 
Rosenqvist (mgr.), Iowa State Gymnastic Meet (held at Luther) : Lu- 
ther 40S.89, Iowa S94.08, Grinnell 880.429. Western Intercollegiate Gym- 
nastic Association meet (held at Minnesota U.) : Wisconsin 1st place. 
1,265; Minnesota 5th place, 985; Luther 6th, 982. 

1917— C. Olafson <capt), H. Narum, W. Knutson, K. D. Stalland, A. O. Hanson, 
C. Anderson (mgr.). Iowa State Gymnastic Meet: Luther 1,066.5, Iowa 
University 1,057.5, Ames 1,029, Grinnell 998. 

1918— K. D. Stalland (capt.), C. Nelson, A. R. EUingson, M. Unseth, N. Scarvie, 
M. B. Tollefsrud (mgr., also member of team). 

In 1918 state gymnastic meets were discontinued on account 

of the war. The Luther team entered the ninth annual contest 

of the Northwestern Gymnastic Society. The rating of teams 

depended to a large extent on the number of men entered. Hence 



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350 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Luther with six men did not place high in team rating. Capt. 

Stalland received seventh place in all-around competition. 

1910 — No team. 

1920— No team. • 

1921— N. G. Fndness (capt.), S. L. Rugland, E. B. Steen. C. M. Olson, J. R. 

Dahl, P. S. Reque (mgr., also member of team). Northwestern Gymnastic 

Meet. 
1922— P. S. Reque (capt.), N. G. Fadness, S. L. Rugland, E. B. Sleen, H. K. 

Savre, J. R. Dalil (mgr., also a member of team). Northwestern Gymnastic 

Meet. 




TRACK TEAM, 1922 

Stoen, Kvammen, Jerdeman, Hjelle, Narveson, Christensen, Knutson, DosetT 

O. Trytten, Westby. Reque, Rugland, OrwoU, Otte, Maakestad 

Bolstad, Rovang, Rognlie, Thorgrimsen, Steen, Turmo 

IX. Track 

The first home field meet in track took place in 1900. In 
1902 intercollegiate meets were introduced. Luther was defeated 
by Upper Iowa 69-37. In 1903 Upper Iowa defeated Luther 
56-40. In 1904 Luther, represented by M. Drotning^ O. Hjelle, 
I. Stub, G. Rodsater, P. Prestegaard, and O. Tonning (capt.), 
took part in the state field meet. Prestegaard placed third in 
the pole vault, and Hjelle took second place in the shot put. 

Track, however, did not have the same appeal as baseball 
and tennis. So little interest was shown that track athletics 
could not be maintained. Luther was not represented on the 
cinder path from 1905 to 1919. 

In 1920 the student body was larger than it had been for 
several years, with the result that a smaller percentage of stii- 



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ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 



351 



dents than before could participate in baseball and tennis. To 
afford more an opportunity for exercise track was again intro- 
duced. In 1920 a relay team consisting of C. £. Hook^ G. T. 
Rugland, £. J. Kvammen^ and £. G. Trytten was sent to the 
Drake Relay Meet. 

In 1921 Luther met Winona Normal and Dubuque University 
in dual meets^ losing to Winona Normal 74-40 and to Dubuque 
81-41. The members of the Luther team were: G. T. Rugland 




TRACK TEAM, 1908 

Hjelle, Thompson, Drotning, Reque, Rodsnter 

Nordlie, Peterson, Kaasa, Prestegaard, Nelson 

Moe, Aaberg, N. Rostad, Bredesen, Halvorsen 

(capt), C. E. Hook, O. S. Rindahl, A. E. Hjelle, E. J. Kvam- 

men, L. I. Highby, E. N. Nordgaard, and E. J. Rovang. 

Great interest has been shown in track during the past two 
seasons. The 1922 team (shown on p. 350) took part in the 
Iowa Colleges Track and Field Meet, May 12; lost to Dubuque 
(63-73), June 3; and won from Winona Normal (77-48), May 27. 

X. Tennis 

In 1891 Prof. W. Sihler laid out the first tennis court at Lu- 
ther College and played the first game with Prof. Gisle Bothne. 
No intercollegiate tournaments were held until 1904. 

Many tennis players of championship calibre have been de- 
veloped at Luther, In 1908 and 1909 Luther won the state 
championship in both singles and doubles by defeating teams rep- 
resenting Iowa U., Coe, Grinnell, Ames, and Cornell. In 1910 
L. Ylvisaker again won the singles championship for Luther. 



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LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



The handicap tournament, played off every year for the 
Spaulding trophy, has been a potent factor in keeping interest 
alive and in developing tennis players. 

Below are the names of teams and their records. The num- 
bers refer to matches in a tournament, the side winning the 
greatest number of matches gets the tournament. 

1904— A. C Pederaon, H. W. Estrem, T. Bnue^aard, H. HalvonoD, and C B 

Bale, m^. 

Luther 2. Upper Iowa 1. 
1905— A. Bredesen, N. Olsen, O. Sponheim, and G. R. Estrem (mgr^ also a 

member of the team). 

Lather 2, Upper Iowa 1. 
1906 — G. R. Estrem, H. Larscn, O. V. Smeby, N. A. Oben (m^r, also member of 

team). 

Luther S, Upper Iowa S. 




TENNIS TEAM, 1908 
L. Ylvisaker, H. Larsen 

1907— N. A. Olsen and C. A. Pederson were defeated in the state tournament 

J. Rosholdt (mgr.). 
1908— H. Lahien and L Ylvisaker, diampions of state meet in singles and 

doubles. C. A. Pederson (nigr.). Singles, played by Larsen: 

Luther 1, Iowa 0; Luther 1, Coe 0; Luther 1, Cornell 0; Doubles: Luther 

1, Ames 0; Luther I, Iowa 0. 
1909— C. A. Pederson and L. Ylvisaker (mgr., also member of team), state 

chnmpions; O. Jensen and N. Guttebo. 

Luther 4, St. Olaf 2; Iowa State Tournament Singles: (played by 

Ylvisaker): Luther 1, Ames 0; Luther 1, Iowa 0; Luther I, Cornell o; 

Championship Doubles: Luther 1, Grinnell 0; Luther 1, Cornell 0, 

(Championship). 



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ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 353 



1910— L. Ylvisaker, J. Trytten, C. Birkelo, and O. Jensen (mgr., also member 
of team). 

Luther S, Upper Iowa 1; Luther 5. St. Olaf 1. Iowa State Tournament— 
Singles (played by Ylvisaker): Luther 1, Cornell 0; Luther 1, Ames 0; 
Luther 1, Coe (Caiampionship). Doubles: Luther 0, Coe 1. 

1911— J. Trytten, I. Opstad, D. T. Nelson, I. Simley. 

Luther 1, St Olaf 5. Iowa State Tournament— Doubles: Luther 0, Coe 1, 
Singles: Luther 0, Coe l. 

1912— D. T. Nelson, C Knutson, 0. Haavik, and E. Granseth. 

Luther 1, St. Olaf 5. Iowa State Tournament— Doubles : Luther 0, Coe 1. 
Singles: Luther 0, Coe 1. 

1918 — C KJintson, H. Preus, O. Levorson, W. Brandt, and E. Brunsdale. 

Luther 6, Maoilester 0; Lulher 2, St. Thomas 4; Luther 4, St. Olaf 2; 
Trl-State Conference Tournament— Doubles : Luther 2, St Thomas 1; Lu- 
ther 1, St Olaf 0; Luther 1, Carleton (Doubles Championship). Singles: 
Luther 0, Carleton 2; Luther 2, Macalester 0; Luther 1, St. Thomas 2. 

1914— No team. 

1915— No team. 

19l»— a Ylvisaker and C. Lee, H. Dolhen (mgr.). 

Luther O, Coe S; Luther 1, St Olaf 2; Luther S, Gustavus Adolphus 0; 
Tri-State Conference Tournament— Sinirles : Luther 1, Carleton 0; Lu- 
ther 0. Macalester 1; Luther 1, St Thomas 0; Luther 0, St. Olaf 1. Doubles: 
Luther 0, Macalester 1. • 

1917— C Lee and C, Ylvisaker, J. A. Lien (m^.). 

Luther 2, Carleton 1; Luther 1, St Olaf 2; Luther S, Macalester 0. 

1918—0. Ravndal and R. Ylvisaker, H. Lunde (m^r.). 

Luther 0, St Olaf S; Luther 1, Gustavus Adolphus 2; Luther 2, Hamline 1; 
Luther 0, Minnesota S; Luther o, Carleton S. 

1919— R. Ylvisaker, O. Ravndal, C. Ravndal, J. W. Ylvisaker, and C. W. Strom 
imgr.) . 

Luther 2, Upper Iowa 0; Luther 4, Upper Iowa l; Luther 8, Luther Semin- 
ary l; Luther 2, Red Wins i; Luther 0, Hamline 8; Luther 2, St Olaf 1; 
Luther 2, Campion 0; Luther 4, Carleton 1; Luther 1, Carleton 8. 

1920— O. Ravndal, C. Ravndal, J. W. Ylvisaker, and M. Unseth (mgr., and also 
member of team). 

Luther 1, Campion 0; (rain), Luther 2, Campion 1; Luther 4, Upper 
Iowa 0; Luther 8, Carleton 8 (Luther won on f imes); Luther 4, Carleton 0. 

1921 — J. W. Ylvisaker, P. S. Reque, E. Hove, E. Lien (mgr., and also member 
of team). 
Luther 1, Upper Iowa 1; Luther 0, Campion 2. 

XI. Military Drill 

Peter S. Reque was commissioned by the government to act as 
captain and drill a company at Luther College in the fall of 1865 
and the spring of 1866. This company was formed especially for 
the purpose of being prepared in the case of trouble from the 
Indians. Col. Chr. Brandt was in charge of a military company in 
the fall of 1876. In 1878 renewed enthusiasm resulted in the or- 
ganization of the Luther College Phalanx, which continued to be 
an important factor in the physical development of the boys until 
1886. Fifty stand of arms of the type used in the Civil War were 
obtained from the government and constituted the equipment. 
When not in use the muskets were housed in the armory, now 
known as the old museum building. 

Under such able leaders as J. L. Lee, the first captain of 
the Phalanx, and his successors O. J. Breda, L. S. Reque, G. 
Bothne, and O. Ramstad the company became quite skillful in 
the execution of military maneuvres. Reviews were given for 



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LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 




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ATHLETICS AND MILITARY, DRILL 355 

the public on Memorial Day^ the fourteenth of October^ and other 
holidays. "College Chips" for May 4, 1886, contains the follow- 
ing announcement: "A sham battle and some 'double-time move- 
ments' of the Phalanx will be some of the attractions on the 17th 
of May. Come to the celebration. Fun ahead." 

With the completion of the gymnasium in 1886 enthusiasm 
for military drill soon came to an end. The boys began to in- 
terest themselves in turning and gymnastics and the other means 
of exercise which the gymnasium afforded. Although the activ- 
ities of the Phalanx ended abruptly, it must be given much credit 
for the service it rendered the boys. 

When the United States entered the war in April, 1917, mil- 
itary drill again came into vogue at the College after a lapse of 
thirty years. Voluntary drill under Prof. O. B. Overn had beg^n 
already in October, 1916. A resolution had been passed by the 
Synod some time previously, recommending that all students ex- 
cept Seniors and Juniors take three hours of military drill each 
week. This ruling, however, was not put into effect until a state 
of war existed. 

The boys took great interest in the work; and the Seniors and 
Juniors, though not required to take drill, were among the most 
enthusiastic. Most of them expected to enlist or be called to the 
colors in a short time and were, therefore, anxious to get as much 
training as possible. So great was the enthusiasm that upward 
of fifty students organized a company which drilled an hour be- 
fore breakfast six days a week. 

Military drill was continued under the auspices of the Col- 
lege with profit both to those who entered the service and to those 
who. remained at school, until the end of the 1917-1918 school 
year. Prof. N. A. Madson discharged the duties of commander- 
in-chief in commendable fashion. It was the unanimous opinion 
of those who entered the service that his instruction was of much 
value to them. 

XII. Students' Army Training Corps 

The organization of the S. A. T. C. at Luther College Oct. 
1, 1918, marked the beginning of a period of intensive military 
training. 

The purpose of the War Department in establishing the S. 
A. T. C. at the various colleges and universities of our country 
was to train the young college men to be commissioned and non- 
commissioned officers and at the same time allow them to remain 



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356 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



at their respective colleges as long as possible. A strennons 
program was outlined by the War Department to fit the men for 
actual warfare in the shortest possible time. A schedule account- 
ing for every hour of the day was closely followed. The time was 
divided between academic work and practical training. Eleven 
hours a week, or about two hours each day, were devoted to mil- 
itary drill. 

There were 106 members of the S. A. T. C. at Luther. Third 
and fourth floors of the main building were appropriated as 




EX-PRESIDENT TAFT ADDRESSING THE S. A. T. C. 1918 

quarters for the company. The removal of all doors, desks, 
chairs and other furniture, except bunks, transformed the quarters 
into real military barracks. Equipment was slow in arriving, 
and then it came piece-meal. The blankets arrived first. Then 
followed the rifles, overcoats, and finally the uniforms. No other 
event except the armistice was the signal for such great rejoicing 
as the arrival of the uniforms. 

The War Department appointed 1st Lieut. H. H. Fisher as 
Commanding Officer and 2nd Lieut. Allen C. Grundy as Personnel- 
Adjutant. They were ably assisted in their work by L. C. Sor- 
lien, W. B. Scarvie, and Olaf Ravndal, three of the nine student 



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ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 357 

representatives sent to Fort Sheridan for military instruction the 
preceding summer. The other six were commissioned and sent 
to other posts. 

Under the excellent supervision of the officers^ military in- 
struction progressed rapidly. The two-hour drill period was gen- 
erally opened with calisthenics and setting-up exercises^ such as 
the "frog-hop", "duck-waddle", "Indian walk", etc. The re- 
mainder of the period was devoted to concentrated work in close 
order drill. When the rifles became a part of the equipment, 
bayonet practice, the manual of arms, and sighting practice were 
made an essential part of the daily program. Trench digging 
was also beg^n, but was discontinued as soon as the armistice 
was signed. Inspection of company and quarters took place 
every Saturday afternoon. The spirit with which the men en- 
tered into the work was gratifying and was in a large measure 
responsible for the success of the S. A. T. C. at Luther College. 
One and all were dedicated to the service of their country. 

As soon as the armistice was signed a marked change was at 
once apparent in the character of the work. Everyone felt that 
there was now nothing further to work for. "When do we go 
home?" was the thought uppermost in the minds of all. 

Demobilization began December 11, 1918. Eight who were 
sick with influenza at the time were discharged later. The last man 
was mustered out December 19. 

In marked contrast to the failure of the S. A. T. C. at so 
many institutions the unit at Luther College proved a decided 
success. Favorable comments were repeatedly expressed on the 
company's ability on the drill field by those in a position to know. 
Although the interest was naturally greater in the purely military 
phase of the training than in the academic work, nevertheless 
the scholastic work was on the whole quite satisfactory. The S. 
A. T. C. gave ample proof of the service which can be rendered 
our government in time of War by the colleges of our country. 
And it established beyond question the loyalty of Luther College. 
XIII. Luther College Cadet Corps 

The Luther College Cadet Corps was organized in the fall of 
1918 in compliance with the resolution of the Norwegian Lutheran 
Church of America, which made military training compulsory for 
all physically fit students at Luther College. As the members 
of the S. A. T. C. were already meeting this requirement, the 
roster of the L. C. C. C. included only those students who were 
not admitted to the S. A. T. C. 



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358 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

In Dr. S. C. Ylvisaker, who had been the College's faculty 
representative at Fort Sheridan the preceding summer^ the fac- 
ulty had a man well qualified to act as commanding officer. Pro- 
fessors O. B. Overn and H. F. Swansen were appointed lieuten- 
ants. These officers were equipped at the expense of the College. 

In order to make the work of the S. A. T. C. easier^ the fac- 
ulty voted to make the regulations governing the discipline and 
program of the L. C. C. C. as nearly like those of the S. A. T. C. 
as possible. The drill period was lengthened to two hours at the 
members' own request. Inspection and discipline were also mil- 
itary in character. Uniforms were ordered by the members of 
the company but did not arrive until school had closed for the 
Christmas holidays. 

Although the L. C. C. C. was disbanded after Christmas in 
favor of the R. O. T. C, its results were not inconsiderable. The 
boys were taught to respect discipline and established authority. 
The spirit of cooperation and loyalty displayed at all times in 
performing assigned tasks or in observing regulations proved the 
boys to be real patriots. 

XIV. Reserve Officers' Training Corps 
When the S. A. T. C. was demobilized^ the College authorities 
received from the government a questionnaire relative to the or- 
ganization of a Reserve Officers' Training Corps (R. O. T. C.) at 
the College. The faculty had been well pleased with the possibil- 
ities of combined academic and military training offered by the 
S. A. T. C. The R. O. T. C. offered these same possibilities, 
while its demands in a military way were so much less exacting 
as to differ little from the regulations of the L. C. C. C. Ac- 
cordingly the R. O. T. C. was applied for and established at Lu- 
ther College in January, 1919. The L. C. C. C. was discontinued. 
Lieutenant Fisher, Commanding Officer of the S. A. T. C, was 
appointed Professor of Military Science and Tactics by the War 
Department. 

The company drilled three hours per week. During the 
course of the year a general course in military tactics, both 
theoretical and practical, was given. A six weeks' summer course 
at certain R. O. T. C. camps was also offered those desiring to 
take advantage of it. Outside of the regular drill periods, the 
students were not controlled by military discipline. 

The government issued practically the same equipment to the 
R. O. T. C. men as to the regular army men. All supplies were 



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ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 



359 



loaned to the College, and it in turn issued them to the men. If 
anyone failed to turn in his supplies, the College was held re- 
sponsible. The members, however, were allowed to purchase 
their equipment at the end of the course if they desired. 

The R. O. T. C. unit was not continued after January, 1920, 
because of a new regulation stipulating that there must be at 
least one hundred students in the collegiate section of the unit. 
Seniors and Juniors were exempted from military training. Hence 
Luther College could not meet the enrollment requirement for 
maintaining the R. O. T. C. 

XV. Athletic Ideals 

"Mens Sana in corpore sano" (a sound mind in a sound body), 
is the cardinal principle upon which all athletic training at Lu- 
ther College is based. Because Luther College realizes that 




THE RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS, 1919 

brains without health are like a man who has a great deal of 
money with no place to keep it, it stresses as much as possible 
the development of a strong body. The College also realizes 
that there is a direct relation between the mind and body, and 
that whatever tends to cultivate the one cannot fail to benefit 
the other. It therefore aims to develop the body in the manner 
most beneficial to the mind. This is effected by inculcating high 
ideals and standards of perfection in all athletic competition. 



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360 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



From the very first Luther teams have enjoyed an enviable 
reputation for true sportsmanship. They have been taught to 
regard self-restraint and gentlemanly Christian conduct as more 
important than victory. The "anything to win" spirit is not 
tolerated. The College can point with pride to the fact that fin- 
ancial inducement has never brought or kept a student at Luther 
College. 

Luther College endeavors to conduct athletics in harmony with 
the spirit of true Christianity. If this could not be done Luther 
College would be the first to abolish these activities. That such 
a thing is possible was clearly demonstrated to the satisfaction 
of all at the joint meeting of the Student's Union Convention and 
tlie Norwegian Lutheran Church of America Academy Conference, 
held at Luther College March 'T-IO, 1922. The program of the 
S. U. C. was purely religious in character, while the N. L. C. A. 
Conference program consisted of literary and athletic contests. 
Some questioned the advisability of holding two meetings so 
diametrically opposed in character, as they said, at the same 
time. The success of the joint conference proves conclusively 
that the religious principles laid down by the one can be carried 
over and applied in the other. 




SCENE IN THE QTY PARK, DECORAH 



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CHAPTER SIXTEEN 
MUSIC 

C. N. EVANSON 

I. Place of Music at Luther College 

SINCE Luther College aims to prepare men for church work^ 
it has always provided instruction in subjects that would 
prove especially valuable in the field of theology. One of these 
subjects is music. 

II. Courses in Music 

From the beginning instruction was given in vocal music, two 
hours a week in all classes. It was natural that the vocal^ rather 
than the instrumental^ was stressed^ especially at firsts since the 
young minister would find more use for the vocal; and then^ too, 
musical instruments were very expensive in those days. 

The importance attached to instruction in music has not dwin- 
dled with the passing of time. Music is still offered in both Col- 
lege and Preparatory Departments, as an elective in the former, 
and as a required subject in the preparatory classes. Music was 
made an elective in the College Department in 1892. 

III. Vocal Music 

The first instruction in music was given primarily to acquaint 
the student with the Lutheran hymns and chorals, which form 
such an important part of religious worship. Later, as the school 
grew to greater proportions, and as more teachers were added, 
the courses in music came to embrace instruction in varied branches, 
such as the history of music, harmony, and rudiments of music. 
The instruction to-day has by no means drifted from the original 
form, namely, that of stressing a thorough knowledge of Lutheran 
hymns and choral music. 

As singing was the first kind of music at Luther College, and 
for a time the only kind, it was natural that there should develop 
singing societies outside of the class-room. The first attempt at 
organizing a chorus was the Idun Quartette, in 1869 (?), with 
N. F0rde, J. Nordby, N. J. Ellestad, M. Koefod, C. K. Preus, O. 
P. Vangsnes, and H. J. Strand as members. In 1877 this quartette 
was reorganized by N. J. Bakke and augmented to number twelve 



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362 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 




K 

Bl 

Ho. 

CA« 

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MUSIC 363 

members: C. M. Jensen (Gr^nlid), T. K. Thorvilson, J. M. O. 
Ness, 1st tenor; N. J. Bakke, T. Hoyme, Chr. Pederson, 2nd 
tenor; A. P. Rondestvedt, O. L0kensgaard9 J. A. Blilie, 1st bass; 
H. B. Thorgrimsen, T. O. Homme, A. 0fstedal, 2nd bass. From 
this small but creditable beginning many vocal organizations have 
been effected, among which can be named: Luther College Choir; 
Luther College Chorus; Luther College Glee Club; Idun; Maal- 
trosten, 1876 (R. O. Brandt, director); Humla; Heimdal; Bingo 
Glee Club; Upidee Glee Club; Lorelei, 1882; Symphonia, 1877; 
besides various quartettes, choruses, octettes, etc., in the Irving, 
Amphictyonic, Normannalaget, M joiner, Norr0na, and Idun lit- 
erary societies. There were no doubt many others; excellent or- 
ganizations of "fourth floor harmonizers." 




LUTHER COLLEGE CHORUS, NORWAY TOUR, 1914 

There have been, of course, leaders and organizers who have 
carried on the work of keeping the interest in vocal music always 
keen. The most important of these were: Prof. F. A. Schmidt, 
1861-66; Rev. N. O. Brandt, 1866-81; Mr. Ola Solheim, 1881-82; 
Mr. J. O. Tingelstad, 1883-85; Prof. Wm. Sihler, 1890-95; Prof. 
Haldor Hanson, 1882-83, 1888-90, 1895-1904, and Prof. Carlo A. 
Sperati, 1886-88, and 1905 to the present time. 

Students from the College have always been interested in the 
musical activities of our local Lutheran churches. They have al- 
ways shown a willingness to take an active part in the regular choir 
work, besides rendering aid on special occasions, when cantatas 
and the like have been undertaken by the church choirs. 

The first concert appearance of the church choir took place 
during Sperati's student directorship of 1884-88, when it rendered, 
among other numbers, "The Sword of Damascus," "Gloria in Ex- 
cclsis," and the "Hallelujah Chorus" from the "Messiah." Among 



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364 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

the cantatas given later are: "The Seven Last Words of Christ" 
(several times), "Bethany," "Hymn of Praise," "Ruth," "The 
Holy City," 'The City of God," and, at the 60th anniversary of 
Luther College, "The 60th Anniversary Cantata" (words by Rev. 
Paul Koren, music by Prof. John Dahle), together with Mendels- 
sohn's "Hynm of Praise." The "Cantata" was repeated by re- 
quest during the Norwegian Lutheran Church Academy Confer- 
ence and Students' Union Convention, March 10, 1922. 

Students have from time to time directed the church choirs. 
Among the student choir directors we have: N. J. Bakke, K. A. 
Kasberg, and C. A. Sperati. Professors H. Hanson, Wm. Sihler, 
and C. A. Sperati have also as teachers at Luther College directed 
the choir. Aside from this, the students have been afforded the op- 
portunity, in conjunction with the people of Decorah, of rendering 




CHORUS AND ORCHESTRA, 1895 
UcUdor Uanaon^ Director 

several of the world's greatest oratorios. The first oratorio given 
in Decorah was the "Creation," rendered on March 16, 1890, 
under Prof. H. Hanson's leadership. On May 29, 1896, Niels 
W. Gade's oratorio, "The Crusaders," was given in Decorah, by 
a chorus of about 100, assisted by an orchestra of 20. College 
students assisted both in the chorus and in the orchestra. Prof. 
Haldor Hanson directed. Earth's "Weinacht Oratorium" was ren- 
dered during the Christmas season in 1900 and 1901 under Prof. 
Sihler's directorship. 

When Prof. Sperati came to Luther College in 1906 he effected 
the organization of the Decorah Choral Union, composed of citizens 
of Decorah and students of Luther College. This organization has 



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MUSIC 365 

from time to time sung and resnng some of the greatest works. 
On May 24i, 1906^ it rendered Haydn's "Creation"; on June 18^ 
1907, Handel's "Messiah"; on May 27, 1908, Mendelssohn's "St. 
Paul"; Handel's "Messiah" was repeated in 1909 and on Dec. 
18, 1909, a miscellaneous program was given. Handel's "Messiah" 
was given at the 1911 Commencement, June 20, by a chorus of 
165 voices, assisted by an orchestra of 26. This oratorio was re- 
peated by request Oct. 14 of the same year. In the spring of 1912, 
Mendelssohn's "Elijah" was given; and on Dec. 16 of the same 
year Handel's "Messiah." Bruch's "The Lay of the Bell" was 
rendered May 12, 1913; the "Messiah" April 24, 1916; Haydn's 
"Seasons" March 21, 1917, repeated, by request, June 3 of the 
same year. 

This work was temporarily abandoned during the war, but 
was revived again in 1920, and on March 16, 1920, the "Creation" 
was given. This date represents 30 years since the "Creation" was 
first given in Decorah. This oratorio was the last oratorio ren- 
dered by the Decorah Choral Union. The church choir then took 
up the work, and with the assistance of some members of the 
Decorah Choral Union rendered the "Messiah" on Palm Sunday, 
1921, and repeated the same oratorio on December 18, of the 
same year. 

IV. Instrumental Music 

Although g^eat stress has always been laid on vocal music at 
Luther College, and much interest has been shown in fostering 
vocal organizations, this does not mean that the instrumental mu- 
sic has suffered thereby. 

In 1877 an orchestra was organized by J. P. Kopang. It con- 
sisted of but three members at first, namely, J. P. Kopang, violin; 
T. K. Thorvilson, violin; K. A. Kasberg, cello. In the spring of 
1878, the following members were added to the orchestra: R. O. 
Brandt, guitar; Oscar Torrison, flute; and A. L. Himle, cornet. 
Mr. Himle was soon succeeded by O. Solheim. No regular con- 
certs were given by the orchestra until Nov., 1883; another con- 
cert was given in Feb., 1884. 

From the time it was organized in 1877 to the present time 
there has always been an orchestra at Luther College, with the 
exception of 1891-92, when all interest seems to have drifted to 
the band. The orchestra has played on many festive occasions, 
such as, the 14th of Oct. and 17th of May celebrations, concerts, 
literary programs, etc., both at the College and downtown. 



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LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



During its existence the orchestra has had the following direc- 
tors: J. P. Kopang, 1877-78; K. A. Kasberg, 1878-81; H. Hanson, 
1881-83; K. A. Kasberg^ 1883, until Christmas; J. Tingelstad, 
from Christmas, 1883, to 1886; C. A. Sperati, 1885-88; Prof. H. 
Hanson, 1888-89; E. G. Mellem, 1889-90; H. Moore, 1890-91; 
I. A. Thorson, 1892-96; Prof. H. Hanson, 1896-1904; Prof. C. 
A. Sperati, 1906 — . 




LUTHER COLLEGE ORCHESTRA, 1896 
Ualdor Hanson^ Director 

It will be seen that during its 45 years of life the orchestra 
has had eight directors, of whom two have been in charge a 
total of 34 years — Haldor Hanson, 14 years, and Carlo A. Sperati, 
20 years. In Prof. Hanson's day it had a membership of 30 or 
more and maintained a high standard. Under Prof. Sperati it has 
done excellent work, though the membership has generally been 
smaller on account of the greater general interest among the stu- 
dents in the Concert Band. 

The Luther College Concert Band was organized in Feb., 1878, 
largely through the efforts of H. B. Thorgrimsen. There had been 
talk of organizing a band, and when a local city band disbanded* 
those interested in having a band at the College recognized this as 
the logical time to start one. Accordingly, Thorgrimsen called a 



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MUSIC 367 

meeting of those most vitally interested in the subject. After he 
had portrayed the possibilities in glowing terms^ a motion was 
made by .1. B. Torrison to go on with the matter. This motion 
was seconded but flatly voted down. 

That certainly would be enough to discourage the average 
young man^ but Jiot so with Thorgrimsen. He talked to the dif- 
ferent boys privately^ and it was finally decided lo try to collect 
the necessary $260.00 to purchase this $500 set. of instruments. 
Committees were sent out to solicit donations^ and in this way 
$100 was realized. The balance^ $150, was covered by a note to 
which all the boys and Prof. L. S. Reque were signers. The mem- 
bers of the first band were: O. Solheim, £. Haugen, A. Eiken, O. 
C. Gr0nvold, O. S. Rygg, H. Allen (Ellenson), O. Glas0e, E. O. 
Vik, J. M. Ness, J. W. Preus, C. O. Lein, T. Hoyme, and H. B. 
Thorgrimsen, who was the leader. The first appearance of the 
band was made in the spring of 1878, when it played a few simple 
pieces. On Decoration Day, 1879, the band for 'the first time 
played downtown. 

A word about the student directors of the band may not be 
amiss. It meant a great deal of work and worry to be responsible 
for the band. The leader was, for instance, responsible to the 
school for the conduct and good behavior of the boys. He was the 
one who had to shoulder all the work and responsibility, and no 
doubt got the least enjoyment out of it. Much credit is due the 
members of the early bands for keeping the interest in band work 
alive, but certainly still more credit is due the leaders. One leader 
tells of a concert h^ had scheduled at the College, but of which he 
had forgotten to speak to the president. We can imagine his 
position in trying to explain the matter to President Larsen. On 
trips the responsibility and difficulties of the student director would 
be especially great. And yet, concerts were given; trips to nearby 
towns, and even quite distant cities, were taken by the band, with 
student directors. 

That progress was made is easily seen in comparing "Op, Ma- 
troser," and "S0nner af Norge", rendered in 1879, with "Light 
Cavalry Overture," by Suppe, selections from "II Trovatore," and 
selections from "Pinafore," rendered in 1882. Concerning the 
quality of music rendered by these early organizations there can 
be no doubt. They played standard music, and rendered it, as is 
frequently quoted, "professionally." Several members played solo 
parts at the programs. 



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368 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

One problem that the band has always bad to contend with is 
that of providing instruments. This task in the early days was no 
small one. The second set of instruments^ procured during the 
time that A. O. Johnson was leader, shows not only what difficulties 
the boys had to contend with, but how wisely they met those dif- 
ficulties. To supply these new instruments A. O. Johnson and 
Tjemagel wrote to influential men in the Church, former students, 
former band men, and friends of the College, to see if they would 
not donate an instrument. The result was gratifying. The foUow- 
Ing instruments were obtained in this way: 

Eb Cornet, H. M. Tjemagel, Story City, la. 

Solo Bb Comet, L. J. Tjemagel, Decorah, la. 

1st Bb Cornet, J. C. Tarvestad, Decorah, la. 

2nd Bb Comet, H. Thorson, Elbow Lake, Minn. 

Solo Alto, L. O. Thorpe, Willmar, Minn. 

1st Tenor, J. Thompson and sons, Beloit, Wis. 

2nd Tenor; Students of Luther College. 

Baritone, O. Torrison, Manitowoc, Wis. 

Bb Bass, A. C. Haugan, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Tuba, Decorah friends. 

Bass Drum, H. G. Haugan, Milwaukee, Wis. 

The donor of each instrument had his name engpraved on the 
instrument. These instruments, however, did not constitute a full 
instrumentation, and as the- additional instruments that were 
purchased left the boys with a deficit of $200.00, permission was 
given to give a concert on Oct. 14, 1890, at Steyer's Opera House. 
The financial results of the concert were a success; enough money 
was realized to pay off the indebtedness, and Johnson and Tjer- 
nagel were relieved of considerable worry. 

Two complete sets of instruments were purchased in 1906 and 
1907. Low pitch was adopted at this early date. 
V. Musical Union 

In passing from the musical activities of the earlier period to 
those of the middle period, one chooses as a convenient date 1895, 
as that represents the year that Prof. Haldor Hanson returned to 
the College, to remain until 1904. 

Upon his return he organized the Luther College Musical 
Union, amalgamating the band, orchestra, choir, and glee club into 
one student organization. The purpose of the Musical Union is 
"to establish a closer relation between the different musical or- 
ganizations, and thus, by a joint effort, promote the interests of 
each organization composing it." The first officers of the Musical 
Union were: Chr. Anderson, president; O. J. Ordal, vice-president; 



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it 

is 



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370 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

I. M. Lyngaas^ secretary; Chr. Thompson^ treasurer. The mem- 
bers of the executive committee were: A. Gullixson^ S. Brevig, Col- 
lege Band; Theo. Normann^ T. Ringoen^ College Orchestra; C. T. 
Clauson^ G. B. WoUan, College Choir; Olav Jahr, Chr. Thompson, 
Glee Club. 

That the Musical Union has accomplished its purpose in the 
past is evidenced by the progress that has been made by the various 
organizations. Through the concerted action of the Union the re- 
sponsibility of keeping up the various organizations was shifted 
from the shoulders of a few to the many. New zeal and interest 
were shown that could not help but make for progress. Through 
the Musical Union it has been possible to purchase instruments 
the value of which approaches $15,000. In all, the Musical Un- 
ion now owns 127 instruments, besides a beautiful set of cathedral 
chimes, bells, xylophone, and a full set of traps. It has also been 
possible to supply the band and orchestra with the best of music. 
To-day the musical collections consist of the latest standard band 
publications. These things, together with the financing of the 
many tours taken by the band from time to time, have all been 
taken care of by the Musical Union, through dues and concerts. 
The College has given the Musical Union no financial support. 

Prof. Hanson's return to College as an instructor in music 
and director of the various musical organizations created a new 
interest in music at Luther. One thing that indicates this is the 
Increase in the membership of the band, orchestra, and chorus. 
Thus, the Concert Band, increased from 28 in 1894 to 36 in 1895. 
In 1897 its number had reached 53. The Musical Library, 
founded in 1883 by J. O. Tingelstad, was also increased during 
Prof. Hanson's regime. The collection of reference works on 
music in the college library is fairly complete. The collection is 
being augmented yearly. 

The increase in the number of concerts and public appearances 
of the musical forces at College also gives evidence of renewed 
interest and zeal along musical lines. 

In 1905 Prof. Carlo A. Sperati came to Luther College tp 
take charge of the musical activities. If there was progress in 
the past, certainly there has been even greater progress since 
1905. 

The Decorah Choral Union has already been mentioned as 
having been organized by Prof. Sperati in 1905. 

The need of a "feeder" for the Concert Band was at once seen 
by Prof. Sperati, and he organized the "Second Band". Later 
the "Beginners' Band" was organized; also the "Beginners* Or- 



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MUSIC 



371 



chestra". Through these beginners' organizations the personnel 
of the more advanced forces is kept at a more uniform figure^ and 
the losses from graduation and other sources are not so seriously 
felt. 

To stimulate interest in music at the College^ maintain the 
musical standards already set^ build up new standards^ and ad- 




LUTHER COLLEGE CONCERT BAND, 1906 

vertise the school^ Prof. Sperati worked out the possibilities of 
extended tours by the band. More will be said concerning trips 
by musical organizations of the College^ but they are mentioned 
here because of the bigger scale upon which they were carried 
out^ beginning with 1905. 

VI. Band Tours 

The first trip made by the band was undertaken in the summer 
of 1886^ and lasted from June 21 to July 6.* Spring Grove, Minn., 
and Minneapolis were visited, one concert being given at Spring 
Grove, and one in Harmonia Hall, Minneapolis, where the band 
was assisted by the Kjerulf Male Quartette, Fortunately, Mr. A. C. 



^"College Chips** for June, 1895, says that this trip was undertaken by the 
kmnd and orchestra. 



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372 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SKTY YEARS 

Haugan of Minneapolis financed the trip; it was largely upon his 
invitation that the boys set out. The financial part was the only 
feature of the trip that was not a marked success. 

The next trip of any length was taken in 1890^ when the band 
visited Spring Grove and Mabel^ Minn.; Story City^ Bode^ Thor, 
and Roland^ la.; Menomonie^ Hudson^ and Baldwin^ Wis.; Minne- 
apolis^ Rushford^ and Highland Prairie^ Minn; The trip lasted 
from June 23 to July 25. It was a success^ although there were 
times when the funds were none too plentiful. Prior to^ as well 
as after 1890 there were minor trips by the band^ orchestra^ choir^ 
and glee club to near-by congregations and towns. These were 
always successful. 

As has been stated^ the period of the extended tour began in 
1905^ when Prof. Sperati resumed control of music at Luther Col- 
lege.** In 1906 the band made an extended tour of 10 weeks to 
the Pacific Coast and the Northwest. In 1907 it played at 
Story City^ la.^ for the Sanger f est. In 1908 the band played at 
the Synod meeting in Chicago. In 1911 a 12 weeks' tour was 
made to the Pacific Coast and the Northwest States. 

In 1914 the climax of band tours was achieved when the band 
represented Luther College and Norwegian- American culture, es- 
pecially in the field of music, at the 100th anniversary of Nor- 
way's independence. A total of 127 admission concerts were 
played, besides, no doubt, an equal number of special short con- 
certs and serenades. Ten different countries, represented by 8 
different flags, and six capital cities, namely: Washington, Chris- 
tiania, Copenhagen, Berlin, Paris, and London, were visited. Con- 
certs were given in the principal cities of the Northwest and 
the East, in the order named: St. Paul, Chicago, Cleveland, 
Washington, Brooklyn, Boston, Milwaukee, and Minneapolis. 
There were sixty band members on the Norway tour, besides 
seven others. 

This tour extended from April 24 to August 19. Only the 
most favorable comment could be offered on the tour. It was a • 
success in every way, and demonstrated the height of efficiency to 
which Prof. Sperati had developed his band musically. Anyone 
would hesitate to undertake such a stupendous tour from a finan- 
cial point of view, and yet, financially, too, the tour was a success. 
The cost of the tour was about $32,000. The Norway Tour will 
stand unsurpassed for years to come. A most interesting, de- 



**In 1905 Uie band made its first tour under Prof. Sperati to tlie orsaaln- 
tfon meeting of the Choral Union, held in Minneapolis. 



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LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



tailed account of this tour is set forth in "Norgesfserden"^ edited 
by Prof. Carlo A. Sperati^ and President C. K. Preus, and written 
by Prof. O. A. Tingelstad^ business manager of the band^ Rev. 
J. C. K. Preus^ press agent^ and Rev. J. A. Moldstad^ impresario. 
Rev. J. A. Moldstad served as impresario for the European end 
of this tour, and Prof. B. K. Savre for the American. 

In 1915 the band was officially engaged for ten days at the 
Panama-Pacific International Exposition at San Francisco, Cal. 
Rev. E. M. Stensrud was especially responsible for this engage- 
ment. During its stay it assisted also in the concert of the Choral 
Union of the Synod. Also on this tour the band gave concerts on 
the Pacific Coast and through the Northwest. 

The band made a short tour to St. Paul in 1917 to take part 
in the convention at which the Norwegian Lutheran Church of 
America was organized. 






LUTHER COLLEGE CONCERT BAND, 1»20 

A tour to Milwaukee to assist in the Quadri-centennial Reforma- 
tion Jubilee Festival was made in 1917. Macfarland, Janesville, 
Beloit, Muskego, Waterford, and Stoughton were also visited on 
this tour.*** 

In May, 1919, the first national convention of the Young Peo- 
ple's Luther League and Choral Union was held at Red Wing, 
Minn. The band took part in this convention by assisting in the 
choral work and church services, and by rendering two open air 
concerts. The band took a similar part in the second triennial 
convention of the Young People's Luther League, held at La 
Crosse, Wis., June 8-11, 1922. 



***With the establishment of the S. A. T. C. at Luther College daring the 
war, the band assumed the character of a military organization. Its actlTities, 
as well as the "Camp Sings*' held during this time, were commendable and 
were commented on very favorably by the commandant. Lieutenant Harold H. 
Fisher. 



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MUSIC 37& 

In 1919 the band made two trips to Mason City^ la. On 
September 27-28, 1919, it played for the Young People's and 
Choral Union Convention of the St. Ansgar Circuit. On Novem- 
ber 18, the band played at a homecoming for the Cerro Gordo 
County service men. On both occasions the band did well. 

A more extensive tour was made during the summer of 1920, 
lasting from June 16 to 25. Some of the places visited on this 
tour were: Albert Lea, Minneapolis, Minn., (where the band 
played for the Choral Union Convention) ; and Scarville, Clear 
Lake, Eagle Grove, Story City, Radcliffe, Jewell, Roland, Ft. 
Dodge, Humboldt, Bode, and Belmond, Iowa. In the fall of 1920 
(Sept. 7-12), the band played at Ames, la., for the Choral Union 
and Young People's Luther League Convention. 

The 60th Anniversary Tour of the summer of 1921, lasting 
from June 7 to August 22, embraced the Middle West, the North 
Pacific States, and Southern Canada.**** 

That the trips, both short and extended, that have been taken 
in the past by the different musical forces of Luther College and 
especially by the band, have been of inestimable value to the Col- 
lege is of course evident. From a small beginning it has been 
possible through the untiring efforts of the boys and their respec- 
tive directors to reach the extent of tours that assume the vast 
proportions of the Pacific Coast Tours, and the Norway Tour. 
The credit for the more extended tours is due without question to 
Prof. Sperati. Most valuable assistance has also been given on 
recent tours by Prof. Enoch E. Peterson as business manager. 
May the future hold even greater and more extended tours in 
store for the band than have been enjoyed by it in the past. 

VII. Instructors and Directors 

Mention has already been made of the men who acted as stu- 
dent or faculty directors of vocal music. As student directors' 
of instrumental music at Luther we have the following: Rev. H. 
B. Thorgrimsen, 1878-1879; O. Glas^e, 1 879-February, 1881; O. 
Solheim, February, 1881-1882; O. Glas^e, 1882 until Christmas; 
Eugene Krohn, Christmas, 1882-1885; L. A. Larsen, 1885-1886; 
J. Linnevold, 1886-1890; A. O. Johnson, 1890-1891; H. M. Tjer- 
nagel, 1891-1893; O. Omlie, 1 893-October, 1894; I. A. Thorson, 
October, 1894-1895. Prof. Hanson tot>k charge of the band in 



****Oii this tour, as on most of the previous ones, the band enjoyed the 
matronly care of Mrs. Sperati. It was also fortunate in having at its disposal 
during the entire tour the services of the college nurse. Miss Theresse E. Ame- 
son (now Mrs. B. J. Hovde). 



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376 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SKTY YEARS 

1895^ remaining its director until 1904; Prof. Sperati took charge 
in the spring of 1905. Aside from these directors^ the following 
have also been instrumental in furthering music at Luther: In 
1885 I. D. Ylvisaker organized a flageolet sextette, called "The 
Nightingale". Theo. Ringoen, Chr. Anderson, S. T. Normann, and 
Chr. Thompson directed the orchestra, glee club, chorus, and 
band, respectively, during Prof. Hanson's vacation in 1896. Hans 
Moen organized a drum corps in 1896. A mandolin club, reor- 
ganized in 1898, was directed by Thomas Torgerson. Mr. Coup 
and Melvin Drotning directed the band immediately before Prof. 
Sperati arrived, and G. A. Hanson directed the glee club. N. J. 
Bakke was active especially in vocal circles. 

In the matter of special instruction, the different music pro- 
fessors at the College have always been willing to give private 
help to any student interested in any particular instrument. Aside 
from this, there has been, especially in late years, a decided ef- 
fort on the part of the school authorities to secure special in- 
structors in piano, violin, and voice. Among the most recent in- 
structors in these fields we can mention Mrs. Jessie Ervin Marsh 
and Miss Katherine Hustvedt, piano and organ; Mrs. Ruth 
Downie and Mrs. Alma Marie Brown, violin; Mrs. L. A. Moe, 
piano and voice. 

The musical organizations of Luther College have accomplish- 
ed great things in the past, but they hope to be able to accomplish 
even greater things in the future. The Musical Union has,JFor in- 
stance, as its chief objective at present the work of supplying the 
College with a pipe organ. This Memorial Organ is to be placed 




PRIME MINISTER MICHELSEN OF NORWAY ENTERTAINS FRES. FREUS 
AND THE LUTHER COLLEGE CONCERT BAND, 1»14 



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MUSIC 377 

in the college chapel in honor of O. Angelo Sperati^ who passed 
away November 8^ 1916^ at the age of 16 years. Angelo was an 
active member of the Musical Union for 8 years and had become 
exceedingly proficient as a performer on the comet, piano, and 
pipe organ. Great hopes were entertained for him in the future, 
only to be shattered by his departure from this world. Surely 
a more fitting memorial to Angelo could not be found than a music- 
al one.***** 

The work of providing the Memorial Organ has been going 
on successfully. As was stated, the organ is to be placed in the 
college chapel. This fact brings us. to a still greater objective, 
namely, that of providing a building that will serve as a chapel 
and music hall. 

The band has from the beginning operated under the handicap 
of unsatisfactory quarters in which to carry on its work. In the 
days of "No. 46," and later the "Chicken Coop", the need of a 
suitable music hall must have been felt. To-day that need is felt 
even more keenly. 

With the realization of the music hall objective we can cer- 
tainly look to the musical organizations of Luther College to 
accomplish even greater things in the future than they have done 
in the past. 

VIII. Sample Repertoires 

1. Sixth Tour, 1915— Panama-Pacific SUITES AND BALLET MUSIC 

l^ro^LfSS!rt*''^rnrin ^T'^JH^l "' German-Threc Dances from "Henrv 
^.r^ i^orMwM*. Carlo A, SperaU, y,„ „ ^^j ^^^,^^3 ,j^„^^ ^^^ ^y^^^ 

^^^^^^' herds' Dance, (c) Torch Dance 

OVERTURES «. Grieg-Pccr Gynt Suite, (a) Morn- 

A 1. n Tvi 1 ing (b) Aase's Death, (c) Anitra's 

i* ^"S^''"^™ i?**^****'; « , „ Dance, (d) In the Hall of the Moun- 

S. Balfe— The Siege of Rodielle. ^ain King. 

!' ?iSi°ti^"n-i, r 28. Saint-Saens — Ballet Divertissement 

t f™. ^rk^ Hn^H^ T ««,in ^^m "Henry VIII." (a) The Oath- 

2' fi^f^ J^i:;:!^ '^ *^^ ®' erlng of the Clans, (b) A Scottish 

5* irS2i?h«tS^A^«.^^o« i?^-*i«»i Wyl- (c) Dance of the Gipsy Girl. 

I: i:^^FZtZ'^^uJ'^''''''' (<^> J«« ^^^ ^»"-^^- ^°^ «"»«"• 

9. Mendelssohn-Military Overture. DESCRIPTIVE PIECES 

10. Mendelssohn— Ruy Bias. 24. Bendix— A Day at West Point. 

11. NIcolal— Merry Wives of Windsor. 29. Lee Johnson— The Death of Custer, 
IS. Relsslger— The Mill on the Cliff. or The Battle of Little Big Horn. 
1». Rossini— Barber of Seville. SvnopM'- 1— Sioux Indian war 

14. Rossini— Semlramide. dance. Night before battle. 2— Bugle 

15. Rossini— William Tell. calls in Custer*s camp before form- 

16. Suppe— Poet and Peasant. ing the line of march. 8— Custer*s 

17. Thomas — Raymond. cavalry on march to Sioux*s camp. 

18. Tschaikowsky- **1812." The sound of horses* hoofs In the 

19. Wagner— Tannhauser. distance. 4— Approach of cavalry with 
«0. Weber— Jubel Overture. And others. band playing ^'National Airs/' the 



*****The Young People's Society of the F. N. E. L. Church at Decorah placed 
a line piano in the church parlors as a memorial to Angelo. 



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378 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SKTY YEARS 



Indians responding wiUi tlieir custom- 
ary music. 5— Battle of ''Little Big 
Horn/* June 25, 1876, in which our 
great greneral lost his life 6 — ^Indi- 
ans rejoicing over the victory with 
scalp dance. 7 — Arrival of reinforce- 
ments. General Benton and cavalry. 
8— Custer's burial, volley of shots, 
muffled drums, and bugle sounding 
the last call over our general's grave. 
. . . Finoi^— "Nearer, My God to Thee." 

26. Bodewalt-Lampe— Home Sweet Home 

the World Over. 

27. Myddleton— By the Swanee River. 

28. Moses-Tobani— The Civil War. 

2». Voelker— A Hunt in the Black Forest. 
And others. 

CONCERT. WALTZES 

80. Hall— Wedding of the Winds. 
SI. Rubinstein — Valse Caprice. 
82. Johann Strauss — Blue Danube. And 
others. 

MISCELLANEOUS CONCERT MUSIC 
88. Beethoven— Andante from Fifth Sym- 
phony. 

84. Beethoven— Moonlight Sonata. 

85. BIgar— Pomp and Qrcumstance. Mil- 

itary March No. 1. 

86. Grieg — Norwegian Dances. II and III. 

87. Max von Lenx— In the Viking's Do- 

main. 

88. Lis2t— Dreams of Love. Nocturne. 
88. Lisxt— Second Hungarian Rhapsody. 

40. Meyerbeer— Coronation March from 

"The Prophet." 

41. Meyerbeer— Fackeltani. 

42. Rubinstein— Reve Angelique (Kam- 

ennoi-Ostrow). 
48. Rubinstein— Romance. 

44. Saint-Saens— Phaeton. 

8ynop$U: A symphonic poem: Phae- 
ton, having secured permission to 
drive through tlie heavens the chariot 
of the Sun, his father, starts on his 
career. His unskilled driving, mad- 
dening tlie steeds, brings the fiery 
chariot too close to the earth, which 
is menaced with destruction, when 
Jupiter strikes the impudent driver 
with lightning. 

45. Schubert — Unfinished Ssrmphony. 

46. Johan Svendsen — Coronation March. 

47. Wagner— Procession of the Knights 

from "Parsifal." 

48. Wagner — Tannhauser March. 

48. Wagner— The Ride of the Valkyries 
from "Die Walkure." And others. 

OPERATIC SELECTIONS AND 
FANTASIAS 

50. Flotow— Martha. 

51. Rudolf Friml— The Firefly. 

52. Lehar— The Merry Widow. 
58. Massenet — Herodias. 

54. Oscar Strau»— The Chocolate Soldier. 

55. Moses-Tobanl— The Opera Mirror. 

56. Verdi— Emani. 

57. Verdi— II Trovatore. 

58. Weber- Der Freischutz. 

58. National Airs from all Lands. 
60. Marches and Light Numbers. And 
others. 



SACRED MUSIC 

61. Handel — ^Largo. 

62. Moses-Tobani — ^Providence, Fantasia. 
68. Wagner— Prayer from "Lohengrin." 

64. Wilson— The Wayside Chapel. 

65. Chorals and sacred songs. And 

others. 
The repertoire of the diorus consistB of 
English and Norwegian songs. 



2. Norway Totar, 191A—LutKer Col- 
lege Concert Band and ChorvB, Carlo A. 



Sperati, Director, 



6. 
7. 
8. 
8. 

10. 
II. 
12. 

18. 
14. 

15. 
16. 

17. 

18. 

10. 

20. 
21. 
22. 
28. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 
20. 

80. 
81. 
32. 
88. 
84. 
35. 
86. 
87. 
88. 
88. 
40. 

41. 
42. 

43. 
44. 



American Festival Overture — Wm. 
F. Kretchmer. 

American Patrol— F. W. Meadiam. 

Arkansaw Traveler— D. W. Reeves. 

aS Auld Lang Syne— Theo. Moses- 
Tobani. 

b) In the Great Beyond— Ellis 

Brooks. 

Barber of Seville— Rossini. 

Berceuse from "Jocelyn"— Godard. 

Blue Danube— Johann Strauss. 

By the Swanee River— W. H. Myd- 
dleton. 

Cavalry Charge— G. Luders. 

Chocolate Soldiei^-Oscar Straus. 

Civil War (The)— Theo. Moses-To- 
bani. 

Comic Tat-Too— Ph. Fahrbach. 

a) Coronation March from 'The 
Prophet" — Meyerbeer. 

b) Tannhauser March— Wagner. 

a) Coronation March— Johan Svend- 
sen. 

b) Midsummer Night's Dream— Men- 
delssohn. 

Creme de la Creme— Theo. Moses- 
Tobani. 

A Day at West Point— Theo. Ben- 
dix. 

Death of Custer— Lee Johnson. 

Debutante Waltx— Santelmann. 

a) Dreams of Love— Liszt- • 

b) Valse Caprice — Rubinstein. 
Overture 1812— Tschaikowsky. 
Ekko fra Norden— Wick-Roberts. 
Emani— Verdi. 

Fackeltanz in B — ^Meyerbeer. 
Fanfare — C. Bohm. 
Festival Overture— Vor Gud han er 
saa fast en Borg— O. Nicolai. 
Fest Overture in C — Lachner. 
Fest Overture — Lassen. 
Fest Overture— Leutner. 

a) 5th Symphony— Beethoven. 

b) 8th Symphony — Beethoven. 
Firefly— Rudolf Friml. 

Flower of Italy— G. De Stefano. 

Flying Arrow— Holzmann. 

Fra DIavolo— Auber. 

Der Freischutz— Weber. 

Gammel Norsk Jaegermarsch — 

Schj0lberg. 
Golden Rod— Mabel McKinley. 
Grand International Fantasia— T. 

H. Rollinson. 
Greetings March — ^Kristlan Knutson. 
Hallelujah Chorus from "Messiah*'-— 

Handel. 



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379 



49. Hands Across the Sea— Theo. Mo- 

ses-TolMiiii. 
48. Ballet Divertissement from **Henr7 

Vlir*— Saint-Saens. 

47. Herodias— Massenet. 

48. a) Holy City— Stephen Adams 

49. b) *'Cantique de Noer*--A. Adam. 

50. c) "Preghiera"— E. P. Tosti. 

51. Home Sweet Home the World Over 

— Bodewalt— Lampe. 

52. Humoreske— Wheeler. 

58. Hunting Scene — Bucalossl. 

54. Hunt in the Black Forest— Voelker. 

55. Hunyady Laszlo— Franz Erkel. 

58. In the Vikinff*s Domain — ^Max von 
Lenx. 

57. Invitation a la Valse— Weber. 

58. Joy to the World— Arr. by Barn- 

house. 

59. Jubel Overture— Weber. 

80. I Lombardi— Verdi. 

81. Love Kiss— Arthur Pryor. 

68. Love Sparks — Abe Holxmann. 
68. a) Marche Militaire I— Schubert. 
84. b) Marche Militaire II— Schubert. 
65. Martha— Flotow. 

86. Meflstofele— Boito. 

87. Merry Widow, Selection— Fran x Lo- 

bar. 

68. Merry Widow, Waits— Franx Lehar. 

69. Merry Wives of Windsor— Nicolai. 

70. Military Overture — Mendelssohn. 

71. (Les) MiUions d*Arlequin— Drigo. 

72. Mill on the Cliff— Relssirer. 

78. a) Moonlight Sonata— First Move- 
ment — Beethoven. 

74. b) Bride of Kaschmir— Rubinstein. 

75. Morning, Noon, and Night in Vi- 

enna — Suppe. 
78. Musician*s Hold-up — Theo. Moses- 
Tobani. 

77. a) Nachtgesang — Wagner. 

78. b) Isolde's Liebestod — Wagner. 
70. Nokomis— Leach. 

80. a) Norwegian Dance No. I — Grieg. 

81. b) Norw^an Dance No. Ill— Grieg. 

82. Offenbachiana No. 8— Arr. by Boett- 

ger. 

88. Opera Mirror— Theo. Moses-Tobani. 

84. a) Pas des Fleurs from "Naila"— 

Dellbes. 

85. b) Sleeping Beauty— Theo. Moses- 

Tobani. 
88. Patrol of the Phantoms— W. Paris 
Chambers. 

87. Peer Gynt Suite— Grieg. 

88. a) Phaeton — Saint-Saens. 

80. b) Prelude du Delude — Saint-Siens. 

00. a) Pixxicato Polka— Johann and Jo- 

seph Strauss. 

01. b) First Heart Throbs— Eilenberg. 

02. c) Traumerei — Schumann. 
98. d) Pure as Snow— G. Lange. 

04. Poet and Peasant— Suppe. 

05. a) Pomp and Circumstance No. I — 

Edward Elgar. 
08. b) Pomp and Circumstance No. II — 
Edward Elgar. 

07. Procession of the Knights from 

"Parsifal"- Wagner. 

08. Providence— Theo. Moses-Tobani. 
00. Rakocxy— Keler Bela. 

100. Rajrmond — Ambroise Thomas. 

101. a) Reve Angelique— Rubinstein. 



108. b) Romance — ^Rubinstein. 
108. Le Reveil du Lion— Kontski. 

104. Ride of the Valkyries— Wagner. 

105. Rlenxi— Wagner. 

106. Le Rouet d*Omphale— Saint-Saens. 

107. Ruy Bias— F. Mendelssohn-Bartholdy. 

108. Sakuntala— Carl Ooldmark. 
100. Saul— Bazsini. 

110. Secqnd Hungarian Rhapsody — ^Lisxt. 

111. Second Polonaise — Liszt. 
118. Semiramide— Rossini. 

118. a) Sextette from "Lucia** — Gaetano 
Donizetti. 

114. b) Espanola — ^A. Jungmann. 

115. c) Die Loreley— Josef Nesvadba. 

116. Shipwreck— W. Moore. 

117. Siege of Rochelle— Balfe. 

118. Silver Brook— Edmund Braham. 

119. a) Simple Aveu— F. Thome. 

120. b) Aubade— J. Massenet. 

121. La Sonnambula— Bellini. 

122. Southern Stars— Ascher-Mahl. 
128. Stabat Matei^Rossini. 

124. Summer Night*s Dream — Suppe. 

125. Summer's Day in Norway— Wilbners. 

126. Sweethearts— Victor Herbert. 

127. Tannhauser— Wagner. 

128. Three Dances from "Henry VIII**— 

German. 
120. a) Traumbilder— H. C. Lumbye. 

180. b) Largo— G. F. Handel. 

181. Trinity— Theo. Moses-Tobani. 

182. Triomphale— Rubinstein. 
188. II Trovatore— Verdi. 

134. Unfinished Ssmiphony— Schubert. 

185. Vision of Salome— Lampe. 

186. War March of the Priests from 

"Athalia**— Mendelssohn. 

187. Wedding March from "Midsummer 

Night's Dream**— Mendelssohn. 

188. Wedding of the Winds, Waltz- 

John T. Hall. 
180. Whispering Flowers— F. von Blon. 

140. William Tell— G. Rossini. 

141. Zampa— F. Herold. 

MARCH SIZE 

142. a) Af H0lheden. 

148. b) Jesu, dine dybe Vunder. 

144. c) Vor Gud han er saa fast en Borg. 

145. d) Alenest Gud 1 Hiromerig. 

146. e) Bliv med din store Naade. 

147. f) Herre Jesu KrLst, dig til os 

vend. 

148. g) Hvad kan os komme til for nfkl. 
140. h) O, Di^velse. 

150. Abe Lincoln— Warren D. Troutman. 

151. African Dreamland — Geo. Atwater. 

152. Ah Sin— Walter Rolfe. 

158. American Habit (The)— W. H. Scou- 
ton. 

154. American Republic— H. H. Thiele. 

155. Anniversary--Charles Sanglear. 

156. Arabola— Karl Hendrix. 

157. Arms of America — Arthur Pryor. 

158. Becksonian — Charles Sanglear. 

150. La Belle Argentina — Carlos Roberto. 

160. Blase of Glory— Abe Holzmann. 

161. Bombasto— O. R. Farrar. 

162. Bostonian (The)— W. D. Kenneth. 
188. Brigadier-General (The)— Otto Koc- 

kert. 



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380 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



164. Ball-Prc« and the Coon (The)— S17. 

Arr. by W. H Mackie. 218. 

165. Casey Jones— Newton-Robinson. 219. 
16«. Caught in the Net— R. A. King. tso. 

167. Cavalleria Rusticana^P. Mascagni. SSI- 

168. Centurion (The)— W. A. Corey. ttt. 

169. Cherry— L. Albert 

170. CSiicago Tribune— W. P. CSiamberi. 2SS. 

171. Clriblribin— A. Pestaloxia. 2t4. 
17S. a) *'Come, be my Sunshine, Dearie** 925. 

— Jcrtin B. Gardner. 296. 

179. b) "Can't You See I Love You-— 

Nat D. Ayer. 997. 

174. Com HuslclnM— Joel P. Corin. 928. 

175. Curro Cuchares — Gerardo Metallo. 929. 

176. Dance of the Sparrows— B. Rich- 990. 

mond. 981. 

177. Daddy Dear— Arr. by W. H. Madcie. 

178. Darkies* Jubilee (The)— John M. 289. 
* Turner. 

170. Down the Field— Stan leigfa P. Fried- 988. 

man. 284. 

180. Dreaming Lore of You — Oias. K. 

Harris. 285. 

181. Elephant Trot (The)— Cart Kahn. 286. 

182. Everybody Works But Father^ Arr. 

Robert Becker. 287. 

188. Ff>dnff the Enemy— F. H. Losey. 288. 

184. Fighting diance (A)— F. H. LoMy. 280. 

185. Fighting Chance (The)— LouU Mau- 240. 

rice. 

186. Firebrand— F. H. Losey. 241. 

187. Flag Day— Cari Schramm. 

188. Fort Des Moines— A. Perwein. 248. 
180. For the Fhig— J. Bodewalt-Lampe. 248. 

100. Free Lance (The)— John Philip 244. 

Sousa. 

101. From Time to Time— Arr. by W. H. 245. 

Mackie. 246. 

102. Frost King (The)— W. D. Kenneth. 247. 
108. a) Funeral March— F. CSiopin. 248. 
104 b) Chornl— J. S. B'ch. 249. 

105. Gage*8 March— F. H. Losey. 250. 

106. Gen. Mixup. U. S. A.— Thos. S. Al- 251. 

len. 

107. Gettysburg— S. B. Stambaugh. 259. 

108. Gloria— F. H I^sey. 258. 
100. Hero of the Isthmus— P. Bodewalt- 254. 

Lampe. 

200. How Gentle (5od's Ck>mmands— Na- 255. 

geli. 

901. If You Alone Were Mine— Vincent 256. 

Scotto. 257. 

909. In Storm and Sunshine— J. C. Heed. 258 
908. In Thoughts— Henry Froelich. 250. 
204. Invercargill— Alex. F. Lithgow. 260. 

905. Italian Songs— Arr. by Frank A. Pa- 961. 

nella. 

906. a) Ja, vi elsker dette landet— Nord- 969. 

raak. 268. 
207. b) S0nner af Norge— Blom. 

908. Jersey Carnival (The)— Daniel Lie* 264. 

berfeld. 965. 
900. King Chanticleer— Nat D. Ayer. 

910. King of the Air— Carl Everlof. 266. 
211. Lakeside— W. C. Jolley. 267. 
912. Last CaU (The)— Jacob Henry El- 268. 

lis. 

218. Liberty Bell (The)— Sousa. 260. 

214. Lights Out— E E. McCoy. 270. 

215. Lilacs— Kathleen A. Roberts. 271. 
916. McKinley*s Memorial — W. Paris 979. 

Chambers. 



Magnetic— H. A. Van der Oook. 
Mexico — Cole and Johnson Bros. 
MliiUry Ufe— K. L. King. 
Miss Columbia— A H. Thrall. 
Moose (The)— W. L. Skaggs. 
Motor Makl (The) — Edmund Bra- 



Music Men (The)— Charles B. Allen. 

Muttering Frits— P. H. Losey. 

National Emblem— E. E. Bagley. 

National Spirit— Frederic W. Ha- 
ger. 

Officer of the Day— R. B. Halt 

Old Comrades— a Teike. 

Old Faithful— Abe Holsmann. 

Olympia— Theo. A. Mets. 

Olympia HifqMdrome— Russel Alex- 
ander. 

On Mobile Bay— Daniels and Wen- 
rich. 

On the Mew -Grand — Louis Maurice. 

Onward, Christian Soldiers-^ohn N. 
Klohr. 

On, Wisconsin— W. T. Pufdy. 

Pilgrim Commandery — Robert A. 
Foss. 

Pizzicato Polka— Joh. Strauss. 

Plunger (The)— Thos. S. Allen. 

PoUywogs — E. C Kamroenneyer. 

Prayer from "Lohengrin** — R. Wag^ 
ner. 

Pride of the Ninth (The)— J. D. 
Cline. 

Prince of Decorah— P. G. Lowery. 

Pussy— Joel P. Corin. 

Royal Trumpeters (The)— F. R. 
Seltzer. 

Salomy Jane— Joel P. Corin. 

Saucy Darling— L. W. Handy. 

"Secret" (Le)— Leonard Gautier. 

Seeing Paris— Ch. Mougeot. 

Semper Fidelis— Souni. 

Senorar-nJos. S. Nathan. 

74th Regiment Band Mardi (The^— 
F. H. Losey. 

Silver Tnimpets — F. H. Losey. 

Songe D*Automne— Ardilbald Jayct. 

Spirit of Independence— Abe Hols- 
mann. 

Stors and Stripes Forever (The)— 
Sousa. 

Staunch and True— C. Telke. 

Step Lively— Fred Schwartz. 

Stilt Dance (The)— Lester W. Keith. 

St. Vitus Dance— G. E. Hohnes. 

Summer Dream (A)— P. Hans FUth. 

Take Me on the Rollers- Arr. by 
Maurice F. Smith. 

That Italian Rag— Al. Plantadosi. 

Triumph of the Century— Anton 
Weiss. Op. 69. 

Troopers* Tribunal—Henry Fillmore. 

Under the Double Eagle— J. F. Wag- 
ner. 

United Liberty— F H. Losey. 

Universal Peace — Franz von Blon. 

a) Vast Unnumber*d Throngs (The) 
— E. Grieg. 

b) Solveig*8 Song— E. Grieg. 
Vampire (The)— Al. B. Coney. 
Waldmere— F. H. Losey. 
Warrior Bold (A)— Frank A. Pa- 

nella. 



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278. WashlJiKton Grays— C. S. Grafulla. 
«74. Wayside Chapel (The)— G. D. Wil- 
son. 
S79. Wedding Bells— Al. B. Coney 
S76. Western Girl— Albert J. Harbridge. 

277. What's the Matter with Father— 

Arr. by J. Bodewalt-Lampe. 

278. When I Get You Alone To-night- 

Fred Fischer. 

279. When the Band Plays Yankee Doo- 

dle-^oel P. Corin. 

280. When the Nightingales are Nesting, 

Sweet Irene— Arr. by Becker. 

281. Whip and Spur— Thos. S. Allen. 



282. Whistler and His Dog (The)— A. 

Pryor. 
288. Whistling Johnnies— Fred W. Hager. 

284. Winning Fight (The)— Abe Hols- 

mann. 

285. Winter— Albert Gumble. 
280. Yale Boola— A. M. Hirsch. 

287. Yankee Girl— Abe Holzmann. 

288. Tlie Leader's Delight, 140 airs of 

all countries— Arr. by Paul dc 

Ville. 
Instrumental solos, vocal solos, and 
repertoire for chorus are in addition to 
the above list. 



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CHAPTER SEVENTEEN 

IMPORTANT EVENTS 

Knut Gjerset 

HE was small ere he grew big. It is the old, old story", says 
the poet A. O. Vinje about his favorite hero Storegut In 
conformity with this law of all life, Luther College has also had 
its years of infancy when it was small in numbers as well as in 
material equipment. Its first president. Dr. Laur. Larsen, de- 
scribes very vividly how small it was in 1861 when it was first 
established in a parsonage at Halfway Creek, near La Crosse, 
Wisconsin. "The year that the school was in Halfway Creek", 
he says, "we had only the one building, the parsonage, without 
any outhouses of any kind. And how many people were crowded 
together in this building? There were two teachers and their 
families. Professor Schmidt had one child, and Professor Lar- 
sen two, one of whom died in October. The school had sixteen 
students, but not more than eleven at any one time. Christian 
Nilsen and his wife were employed as steward and stewardess for 
the joint household, as separate housekeeping for each family 
could not be established. As Nilsen was a carpenter, he made all 
the simple furniture we had. He also performed such manual 
labor as the students were unable to do. The housekeepers had 
one child, and Mrs. Nilsen's mother was also staying with them. 
Professor Larsen had one room for himself and family, a small 
adjoining room being used as office, spare room, and hospital. The 
meals were served in the kitchen, where all ate at the same table. 
The students were divided into two classes, each of which had 
one room. These rooms were furnished in the following manner: 
Our steward had made some harrow beds with rope bottoms, 
which were placed along the walls. Along the middle of the floor 
stood long, home-made tables, made as narrow as possible to save 
room. Between the beds and the tables stood long wooden 
benches. When the boys arose in the morning, they only had to 
step across the benches to seat themselves at the tables, where 
they were to study their lessons." Small it was, indeed, this in- 
fant Luther College. So small that a committee on standardisa- 
tion of colleges in our day would never have discovered it. And 



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IMPORTANT EVENTS 



383 



still it was great even then in those qualities which make an in- 
stitution of learning truly successful. It had earnest and de- 
voted students; teachers of learning and ability^ inspired with a 
high purpose^ consecrated to a great work^ trained and steadfast in 
the Word of God. So great was Luther College in spiritual life 
and force of character that it has never grown since in those es- 
sentials; that even now^ after sixty years of development and 
progress in various lines^ our prayer must be: May it never grow 
smaller than it was at its beginning in these traits so necessary 
to the success of a Christian school. 




FIRST HOME OF LUTHER COLLEGE— 
Halfway Creek Parsonage, 1861-02 

The founders of Luther College undoubtedly dreamed their 
dreams. Their visions were not of columned porticos and marble 
walls^ but as practical men they knew that suitable buildings and 
equipment were necessary to secure the future growth of the in- 
stitution. No one exercised a more active influence in providing 
means and equipment for the new school than Rev. V. Koren^ the 
most astute and brilliant of the men who guided the Norwegian 
Lutheran Synod during the early years. In the many struggles 
for orthodox Lutheran doctrine waged in those times^ no one quite 
equaled him in thorough scholarship, critical discernment^ dialectic 



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384 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

skilly or resourceful leadership. A deep religious interest had 
moved him to turn his steps from elegant home surroundings in 
Norway. After graduating from the University of Christiania he 
left influential friends and assured distinction to cast his lot with 
emigrants in a pioneer wilderness. But even in these rustic sur- 
roundings courtly elegance and refinement of manners never for- 
sook him. His devout religious character was of an enlightened 
and intellectual type. He frowned upon emotionalism^ but clung 
with unswerving fidelity to the doctrine of the verbal inspiration 
of the Bible. The word gegraptai (it is written) engraved on the 
seal of the Synod was like a device emblazoned on his spiritual 
armor in every religious controversy. But although he was found 
in the forefront of every battle where purity of doctrine was at 
stake^ he loved peace^ and counted it his chief mission to do a 
pastor's work of preaching the Gospel to his congregations. He 
hated all sham as thoroughly as he loved all true culture. He was 
never happier than when he was engaged in fostering intellectual 
interests and in organizing cultural forces among his people. His 
spirit has lived in the Church which he served, and in Luther Col- 
lege which he was instrumental in founding. Even now that he is 
no longer among the living, his impressive personality towers 
greater than ever as he recedes into the gathering shadows of the 
past. 

The early fathers of the Norwegian Lutheran Synod under- 
stood fully the importance of proper training for the ministers 
of the Church. According to their views the ministers should not 
be preachers only, but spiritual and intellectual leaders capable 
of waging successfully the battles of a Church forced to remain 
militant by existing circumstances, being surrounded on all sides 
by religous influences of every sort. The school to be erected 
would accordingly have to be of a high type, a spiritual armory 
where theological leaders could be properly equipped. The stu- 
dents should not only be well versed in Christian doctrines and 
in the teachings of the Church, in history and modern languages; 
they should also be specially prepared for theological study 
through extensive courses in Latin, Greek, and Hebrew, as no 
scholarly theologians could be developed except through a thor- 
ough knowledge of the classical languages in which the Scriptures 
and most of the theological literature are written. The teachers 
should take care to impart genuine intellectual culture, to culti- 
vate in the students love for simplicity and truth, and to banish 
from their minds all pretense, sham, and humbug. The primary 



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IMPORTANT EVENTS 385 

purpose of the school should be to prepare young men for the 
study of theology^ but it should also serve the people as a general 
institution of learning. The committee appointed to superintend 
the erection of the College, of which Revs. V. Koren and C. L. 
Clausen were the leading members, states in its report to the 
Church Council of November 5, 1861: "The committee has 
unanimously decided so to arrange the plan of the institution that 
the school which is to prepare students for the theological seminary 
shall also receive students who wish to prepare themselves for 
other pr'ofessions, and desire to serve their country in those civil 
callings which require more extensive knowledge." ' This, then, 
was Luther College as it was conceived in the minds of its 
founders. 

In 1867, at a meeting of the Synod held in the Little Iowa 
congregation, Winneshiek County, Iowa, of which Rev. V. Koren 
was pastor, a resolution was passed that a higher institution of 
learning — a university — was to be established, and that a fund 
for this purpose was to be raised by general subscription. In 1861 
a committee of which Professor Laur. Larsen, and Revs. V. Koren 
and H. A. Preus, president of the Synod, were leading members, 
recommended to the general church meeting held at Rock Prairie, 
Wisconsin, that steps should at once be taken to build a school in 
Decorah, Iowa, this town "being centrally located and easy of 
access", and that the thirty-two acre tract of land which Rev. V. 
Koren had purchased there for the sum of $1,500 should be bought 
for school grounds. This recommendation was adopted by the 
meeting, which resolved to erect a school building in Decorah. A 
more beautiful site could not have been selected. At this time 
Decorah was still a small frontier town, but immigrants from 
Norway were pouring into this center of early Norwegian im- 
migration. Every summer numbers of immigrant chests would 
arrive in town bearing the address "Decorah, Jova". New thriv- 
ing Norwegian settlements were springing up on all sides in 
northern Iowa and southern Minnesota, and many congregations 
were organized. But the flow of immigration gradually veered 
to the northwest, and the great railways, which courted wealth 
rather than beauty, extended their giant arms in the same direc- 
tion. Decorah was not to become a queen in the commercial 
world, nor did the town even have the good fortune to be located 
on one of the principal lines of communication. Like some un- 
wooed country beauty it was destined to remain in its semi-rustic 
isolation. In time this affected the growth of Luther College 
rather unfavorably, but it has tended also to render permanent its 



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Sa6 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

conserTative individual character. Even now, after sixty years, 
it remains what its fonnders dedicated it to be — a classical col- 
lege for men. 

In the effort to raise a university fund of $50,000 the lead 
was taken by President H. A. Preus' congregations at Spring 
Prairie, Bonnet Prairie, and Norway Grove, Wisconsin, and by 
Rev. V. Koren's congregations in Winneshiek County, near De- 
corah. But the newer congregations in Minnesota on the very 
frontier, where the Indians massacred and scalped their victims 
in 1862, were not behindhand in contributing to the full extent 
of their ability. Already in 1861 the sum of $19,832 in paid sub- 
scriptions was reported. In 1864 the amount subscribed reached 
$51,831.87. The task of raising such a sum in scattered new 
settlements of immigrant pioneers still living in their simple log 
cabins, in those dark days of the Civil War when most of the 
strongest men were away from home fighting for their country 
in the armies of the Union, when money was so scarce, and farm 
products so cheap, could be accomplished only because the set- 
tlers were willing to make the greatest sacrifices. We read with 
an interest not unmingled with emotion the subscription lists of 
those days: 1862; Styrk Reque, $100; Peder Simon Nordgaren, 
$100; Gunder Kitelsen Lunde, $100; Knud Halvorsen Dalen, 
$100; etc. One hundred dollars payable in gold was a large sum 
in those days when eggs were sold for six cents a dosen, butter 
for ten cents a pound, dressed pork for two and a half to three 
cents a pound, and when the average farm with houses and im- 
provements was not worth over five or six hundred dollars. If 
our people now would give, not in proportion, but half in propor- 
tion, one might wonder what would really happen. 

Until the building should be erecteil the school at Halfway 
Creek was to receive new temporary quarters in Decorah in the 
building now known as St. Cloud Hotel, which had been bought 
for the purpose. Here Luther College began the second year of 
its activity in the fall of 1862. The following' sunmier a new 
church meeting at Rock River, Wisconsin, passed a resolution that 
the school building should be completed as soon as possible, and 
that the work should be carried forward with the greatest energy. 
In June, 1864, the work on the foundation had advanced so far 
that the corner-stone could be laid. This was done with ap- 
propriate ceremonies on the 30th of that month. On February 
1, 1865, the College was incorporated under the name "The Nor- 
wegian Luther College", with Rev. H. A. Preus as president of 
the corporation. Rev. V. Koren secretary. Professor Laur. Lar- 



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IMPORTANT EVENTS 



387 



sen treasurer; and Rev. N. Brandt, There Peterson, Gulbrand T. 
Lomen, Jens J. Naeset, Tjerand Johnson, and Rev. O. J. Hjort 
as trustees. The official report of the seventh annual meeting of 
the Synod says about the articles of incorporation: "In the Synod 
meeting, the articles of incorporation of the Norwegian Luther 
College were read ; also the deed to its property in Decorah. It was 
stated that after unsuccessful attempts to incorporate the Synod, 
the College was incorporated in such a manner that all ministers 
and representatives at the Synod meetings are members of the 
college corporation, and must elect the officials (board of trustees) 
of the corporation." 




SECOND HOME OF LUTHER COLLEGE— 
St. Cloud Hotel, 1802-05 

In the fall of 1865 the college building, costing nearly $75,000, 
was so nearly completed that it could open its doors to the stu- 
dent body for the school year. On October 14th of that year it 
was dedicated with impressive ceremonies as The Norwegian Lu- 
ther College. Thousands of people had gathered from far and 
near for this occasion, the most memorable church event that the 
Norwegian settlers had yet attended in America. It is estimated 
that 6,000 people participated in the festival. Early Saturday 
morning a large procession formed at the bridge across the Up- 
per Iowa River, and marched to the college building. The Church 
Council, and ministers and delegates from a large number of 



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388 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

congregations were present^ also representatives from the college 
and theological seminary of the German Lutheran Missouri Synods 
the professors Lange and Brauer. During the program in the 
college building speeches were made by Prof. F. A. Schmidt^ Rev. 
V. Koren and Prof. Lange. The president of the Synod, Rev. 
H. A. Preus, delivered the dedication sermon, choosing as his 
text the following words from the 126th Psalm: "The Lord hath 
done great things for us; whereof we are glad." 

The dedication festival was over. Congratulations and 
hearty wishes for success had been received, the friends and vis- 
itors had come and gone. The school now found itself established 
in a new, commodious home, where it could enter upon years of 
diligent labor with hope and cheerfulness. No one felt more 
elated over the completion of the college building than Profes- 
sor Laur. Larsen, president of the school since its first humble 
beginning in Halfway Creek. Now he could be seen in his office, 
with beaming face bent over his books and papers, working from 
break of day till ten o' clock at night, the regular length of his 
working day during the forty-one years which he was president 
of Luther College. Peter Laurentius Larsen (Laur. Larsen) 
brought to his work a methodical diligence and conscientious 
punctuality which were the results of rigorous discipline and 
thorough early training. His election proved to be the choice not 
only of an administrative officer,* but of a character and a policy. 
As a devout Lutheran theologian and firm supporter of the ideals 
of classical learning he proved to be the best possible exponent 
of those traits which have become most distinctive in the life of 
Luther College. Kind and fatherly in his ways, averse to all 
show and ostentation, he adhered with patriarchal strength and 
serenity of mind to pure Biblical doctrine, conforming rigorously 
to Christian principles in all details of life and conduct. He was 
not only the administrative head but the spiritual father of the 
institution. During his long incumbency he infused into it his 
own spirit, giving it so distinct and individual a character that 
later growth has never changed its fundamental traits. The 
phrase "Luther College spirit'% though undefined and probably 
undefinable, is still by some used to indicate a certain austere 
and conservative religious and intellectual attitude, a love of 
scholarly attainments, and opposition to all sham and display 
supposed to characterize Luther College men. How well Lar- 
sen succeeded in realizing the chief aim of the school can be seen 
from the fact that during his presidency, 1861-1902, sixty-five 
per cent of the graduates of the College entered the theological 



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IMPORTANT EVENTS 389 

seminary. If knowledge is power, character is a still greater 
power. Larsen had both. He was an accurate scholar and a 
well disciplined theologian, but it was his character rather than 
his knowledge which made him a great educator. He imparted 
to Luther College the power of his own Christian character, a 
force which made it a strong and influential institution of learn- 
ing, even though it has remained relatively small in point of num- 
bers. For many years Professor Larsen was also the editor of 
the official organ of the Synod, the "Kirketidende". As we re- 
member him now plying his never weary pen, bending his white 
head over his large open Bible, we can only say: May God give 
us men equally faithful and unselfish in their devotion to divine 
truth and conscientious service to mankind. 

Luther College continued to prosper. In the decade 1865- 
1875 the number of students rose from 58 to 229, and many new 
teachers were added to the faculty. The south wing of the col- 
lege building, completed in 1874, was dedicated on December 2nd 
of that year. In 1881 the course of study which extended through 
six years including the college preparatory classes was lengthened 
to seven years. Hitherto the College had been operated on the 
plan of the Latin schools in Norway; now the American plan of 
a college preparatory or high school course and a four-year college 
course was adopted. Besides training students for entrance to 
the College the preparatory course should give young men such 
general education as would fit them for business pursuits and for 
general leadership in their home communities. The growing need 
of teachers also led to the establishing at Luther College of a 
teachers' course, which was maintained from 1865 till 1886.* At 
first the only aim was to prepare parochial teachers, but in 1868 
an extra year was added to the course so that teachers could be 
educated also for the public schools. The College was not only 
growing in numbers, buildings and equipment, it was also broad- 
ening the scope of its activity, and adjusting itself more fully to 
American educational standards as well as to the needs of the 
Norwegian settlers in their new environment. But even these ef- 
forts to widen the activity of the College did not satisfy the grow- 
ing demand for more popular education and the erection of new 
schools within easier reach of the growing settlements especially 
in the Northwest. In 1874 an association was organized through 
the efforts of the great church leader. President B. J. Muus of the 
Minnesota District of the Synod, for the purpose of founding a 
new school at Northfield, Minnesota.' A commodious building 
was erected on a beautiful campus overlooking the town. On 



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390 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



January 8^ 1875^ the coeducational academy^ the St. Olaf's 
School, the first of a large number of academies built by the 
Churchy began its work with two teachers and thirty-six students. 
The president of the school. Professor Th. N. Mohn, as well as 
his assistant, Professor L. S. Reque, were graduates of Luther 
College. In 1886 the school was changed to St. Olaf College, an 
institution which has grown to be the largest school in the Nor- 
wegian Lutheran Church in America. Besides preparing students 




MAIN BUILDING, 1874 

for the theological seminary, Luther College had now trained a 
number of educators and church leaders, which made it possible 
to enter upon the building of a series of academies and other ed- 
ucational institutions in the Church. Nothing could furnish more 
convincing evidence of the profound influence exerted by Luther 
College than the number of daughter schools which trace their 
origin to the alma mater of their early teachers, presidents, and 
founders. In 1876 Monona Academy, Madison, Wisconsin, was 
built by congregations belonging to the Synod. Willmar Semi- 
nary, Willmar, Minnesota, founded by the Luther College gradu- 
ates A. M. Hove and H. ^S. Hilleboe, began its work in 1888. 
From that time the number of new schools grew rapidly. The 



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IMPORTANT EVENTS 391 

Bode Academy^ Bode, Iowa, was opened in 1887; Luther Acad- 
emy, Albert Lea, Minnesota, in 1888; the Lutheran Normal 
School, Sioux Falls, S. Dak., in 1889; Bruflat Academy, Port- 
land, N. Dak., in 1889; Stoughton Academy, Stoughton, Wis., in 
1889; Park Region Luther College, Fergus Falls, Minn., in 1892; 
the Lutheran Ladies' Seminary, Red Wing, Minn., in 1894; 
Pacific Lutheran Academy and Business College, Parkland, Wash., 
in 1894; Glenwood Academy, Glenwood, Minn., in 1894; Clifton 
College, Clifton, Texas, in 1896. Grand Forks College was 
bought by Synod "people in 1900; Albion Academy, or H. A, 
Preus Academy, Albion, Wis., was bought from the Adventists in 
1901, and Gale College, Galesville, Wis., from the Presbyterians; 
Wittenberg Academy was owned and operated jointly by 
the Norwegian Lutheran Synod and the German Missouri Sjmod 
from 1901. 

Since Luther College was established chiefly for the purpose 
of preparing young men for the ministry, it might seem natural 
to expect that a theological course would be added to its cur- 
riculum, but this was never done. The graduates were sent to 
the theological seminary of the German Missouri Synod in St. 
Louis until the Synod established its own theological seminary iif 
Madison, Wisconsin, in 1876. The early leaders of the Church, 
who were university men of high scholarly attainments, feared 
that a theological department, if connected with the College, might 
prove to be an incubus inimical to its growth. Even in the early 
days, when the need of ministers was so great that short courses 
and superficial training might seem not only excusable but politic, 
they refused to inaugurate a policy which might prove unfavor- 
able to thorough scholastic training. They wished to maintain 
high intellectual standards, and genuine scholarship in secular 
branches. "Everything should be butter to the bottom, and not 
only on top", as Professor Larsen expressed it in a speech in 1884. 
The Augustana Synod, founded by Swedish and Norwegian im- 
migrants in 1860, had founded Augustana College and Seminary, 
Paxton, Illinois. From this school sprang Augsburg Seminary, 
Minneapolis, Minnesota, the school of the Norwegian Lutheran 
Conference. Both these institutions had theological departments, 
but neither of them laid much stress on purely secular branches. 
Luther College, as a protagonist of classical scholarship and thor- 
ough training in secular branches, a school with its own strong 
individuality, wholly distinct from the theological seminary, oc- 
cupied a unique position, and exerted a profound influence on the 



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392 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

development of the whole school system of the Norwegian Lu- 
theran Church in America. 

Hitherto good fortune had smiled on Luther College^ but it 
was nevertheless destined to ride the angry billows of the storm. 
In 1880 a great doctrinal controversy arose regarding the ques- 
tion of predestination^ at first between Professor C. F. W. Wal- 
ther of the Missouri Synod and Professor F. A. Schmidt^ Profes- 
sor Larsen's old colleague^ now professor of theology in Luther 
Seminary of the Norwegian Synod^ Madison^ Wisconsin. The 
controversy spread throughout the Synod even to the congrega- 
tions and the lay people^ and became so bitter that in 1887 seven- 
ty-two ministers and professors^ a number which was later in- 
creased to ninety-seven, seceded from the Synod with their con- 
gregations. This was a severe blow, visible so far as Luther Col- 
lege was concerned in reduced attendance and prestige for many 
years subsequent. 

Hardly had the storm of doctrinal controversy subsided when 
fire broke out in the college building, May 19, 1889, reducing it 
to a melancholy ruin. The library and furniture were saved, but 
the loss was very great, as the building was insured only for 
$10,000. But in these days of adversity the friends of the College 
rallied to its support with a determination begotten of trials. In 
1880 the Luther College Alumni Association had been founded 
through the efforts of John Koren and Gisle Bothne. In 1888 it 
was incorporated. So energetic were the efforts of this associa- 
tion and other friends to restore the College and to render good 
its losses, that in 1890 a new building rose on the smoke-stained 
foundation, even more beautiful and commodious than the old. On 
October 14th and 15th of that year the new college building was 
dedicated. Prof. Laur. Larsen himself preaching the dedication 
sermon. It was a great festival. The Rev. J. A. Ottesen, Prof. 
L. S. Reque, and others spoke, and poems written for the occasion 
by Rev. V. Koren and Prof. Th. Bothne were read. In the after- 
noon Prof. H. G. Stub of Luther Seminary spoke on the follow- 
ing words from the prophet Haggai (2:9): "The glory of this 
latter house shall be greater than of the former, saith the Lord 
of hosts; and in this place will I give peace, saith the Lord of 
hosts." 

In 1902 President Larsen tendered his resignation to the 
Synod assembled in general meeting in Minneapolis, Minnesota. 
At the college commencement exercises June 18th he stood for the 
last time before the assembled school as its president. His coal- 
black hair had turned white as snow. At the close of the ex- 



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mPORTANT EVENTS 393 

ercises he thanked his friends^ and wished the school godspeed 
for the future. He then took his hat and walked quietly to his 
home. No demonstration of any kind gave color to this quiet but 
important event. The same church meeting which accepted Dr. 
Larsen's resignation elected as his successor Prof. C. K. Preus. 
On September 4th he ascended the rostrum in the college chapel. 
After stating that he had been elected president he conducted de- 
votional exercises^ speaking on the text from St. Matthew (4:4)^ 
"Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that pro- 
ceedeth out of the mouth of God". No ceremony of any kind 
attended his unostentatious debut as president of the College. 

With the election of President Preus a new era began in the 
development of Luther College. Hitherto the institution had pre- 
served a distinct pioneer character marked by a frugal content- 
ment which was a legacy of early days. With a certain aloof- 
ness and modest reserve the school had proceeded quietly on its 
way, as though further innovations might offend the lares and 
penates of its well regulated academic household. President 
Preus possessed in an eminent degree the qualifications most 
needed in a new ' administration. Being a son of the former pres- 
ident of the Synod, Rev. H. A. Preus, he sprang from a distin- 
guished family, and was reared in a home of great culture and 
. refinement. He could move with tact and grace in the highest 
circles, but none of the old church leaders understood the com- 
mon people so well, or came in so close and sympathetic touch 
with them. No one in the Synod, possibly with the exception of 
his father, was so popular, or had so large and devoted a personal 
following. In conversation he was magnetic, jovial, and court- 
eous; in appearance attractive, with a face of beaming intel- 
ligence; in speech he was eloquent — serious, pathetic, humorous, 
or cordial, as the occasion demanded — with a voice so deep and 
sonorous that it could be heard by thousands. In intellectual 
character he combined conservative views with keen practical 
judgment and progressive energy. In religious views he was 
most orthodox, in adherence to the ideals of classical learning he 
was uncompromising. Because of these traits he could not in- 
augurate a policy which in any way would change the character 
of the school. But in questions pertaining to the improving and 
enlarging of the equipment of the institution, enriching its cur- 
riculum or winning for it a wider and more general recognition, 
he was an enthusiastic progressist. 

In 1903 a general meeting of the Synod was to assemble in 
Decorah to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the found- 



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394 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

ing of the Chnrch. In anticipation of this notable church gather- 
ing. President Preus secured the enlargement of the college gym- 
nasium to three times its original sise, to provide a suitable audi- 
torium for the meeting. In 1905 a fourth year was added to the 
college preparatory course, making it not only equivalent but in 
some respects superior to a regular high-school course. In 1906 
President Preus brought before the yearly meeting of the Synod 
a request for a new dormitory. The meeting hesitated, but fin- 
ally passed a resolution instructing the Church Council to make 
such arrangements that he could travel about and raise the neces- 
sary money by general subscription. This arduous task he gladly 
undertook. In the fall of 1907 the new building, the Laur. Larsen 
Hall, had been completed at a cost of over $75,000. In one part 
of the building a well equipped chemical laboratory was es- 
tablished at a considerable cost; later also a physical laboratory. 

In 1916 a new dining hall, the Loyalty HaU, was erected at the 
cost of $16,000. The final cost added $2,000 more. 

A revision of the curriculum was undertaken in 1906 for the 
purpose of making the courses more elastic than they had been 
hitherto. The elective system in a very attenuated form was in- 
troduced by establishing a literary course to run parallel with the 
classical course during the junior and senior years. But six years 
of Latin, three years of Greek, and one year of Hebrew were 
required also in the literary course. In 1918 Hebrew was made 
an elective. In 1911 the whole eight years' course of the school 
was standardized, and organized in such a way as to meet the 
requireinents of the theological seminary on the one hand, and on 
the other the standard university requirements for a B. A. degree. 
In 1918 the sub-preparatory work, which had been given in 
special classes since 1911, was organized into a separate dass, 
and the Preparatory Department was divided into a Junior High 
School with a two years' course, and a Senior High School with a 
three years' course. In that year Luther College also joined the 
North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, by 
which organization it had already been accredited for several 
years. 

In 1911 Luther College would celebrate the fiftieth anniver- 
sary of its founding. For this occasion its friends resolved to 
raise an endowment fund which would give the school added 
strength and stability. Mr. L. S. Swenson, United States Min- 
ister to Norway, one of the most distinguished alumni of the Col- 
lege, had secured from the great railway magnate, Mr. James J. 
Hill, the promise of $50,000 toward such a fund if the Church 



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IMPORTANT EVENTS 



393 



would raise $200^000. The offer waa accepted. Another distin- 
guished alumnus^ Rev. H. G. Stub^ president of the Synod^ nnder- 
took to raise the needed sum by general subscription, a task which 
he carried out so successfully that in the fall of 1911 the total 
subscription, including Mr. Hill's donation, amounted to $286,000. 
At the anniversary celebration October 14th a fund of $250,000 
was presented to the College by President Stub on behalf of its 
friends. 

President Preus was never disposed to seek relaxation from 
labor or to rest on laurels already won. In 1918 he prevailed on 
the church meetings to empower the college Board of Trustees to 
raise funds by general subscription for a library building. The 
work of soliciting the subscriptions was largely done by himself 
alone. At the same time a movement was also set on foot to pro- 
vide funds for a new gynmasium. The erection of the library 
building was begun in the fall of 1920, but Preus was not destined 




FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY, 1911 

to see its completion. In the morning of May 28, 1921, word was 
received announcing his sudden death. Voices were hushed, and 
busy tasks were laid aside. Dr. Oscar L. Olson was placed in 
charge as temporary president, and preparations were made to 
show the departed worker the last honors which could be his on 
earth. The library building, named the Koren Library in honor 
of the former president of the Synod, Rev. V. Koren, was com- 
pleted at a cost of $130,000 in time to be dedicated in connection 
with the celebration of the sixtieth anniversary of the founding 
of the College, October 14, 1921. 

If the election of C. K. Preus as president marks a new epoch 
in the history of Luther College, his death, and especially the 



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396 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

war, which made also his burdens so heavy, probably mark an- 
other. When the war bugles blew, the young men of military age 
at the school joined the colors. Not less than 366 Luther College 
students and graduates entered the army. Of these eight are 
known to have died in the service. For a time the class-rooms 
looked almost deserted, until the government in October, 1918, 
established at the College a Students' Army Training Corps in 
charge of Lieutenants Harold H. Fisher and Allen C. Grundy. 
Both these officers were fine young men, who cooperated cordially 
with the faculty in attempting to solve the problems connected 
with the sudden change of the school into a military establish- 
ment. The curriculum was completely rearranged to meet the 
new demands of training young men for the army. The old 
courses were made elective, and new ones were added, the only 
required courses in the new curriculum being war aims (3 hours), 
military English (2 hours), religion (1 hour). A spirit of co- 
operation and good-will characterized the work. According to 
general opinion and the reports of all inspectors, the Luther Col- 
lege S. A. T. C. was a very successful unit. It was demobilised 
December 11, 1918. In all other war activities the teachers of 
the school and their wives took an active part. Luther College 
performed well the duty of serving its country during the great 
crisis of the war. Another military unit, the Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps, established in January, 1919, at the request of 
the college faculty, with Lieutenant Harold H. Fisher as profes- 
sor of military science, was not so successful as the S. A. T. C. 
All interest .in military affairs seemed to vanish with the war, and 
the unit was demobilized January 9, 1920. 

Successful as the S. A. T. C. unit was in a general way, its 
influence nevertheless impaired the old standards of scholarship. 
Under pressure of the great war academic work could not receive 
the customary attention in a busy military routine. To this grief 
new sorrows were added when Governor W. L. Harding on May 
23, 1918, issued a proclamation stating among other things that 
"English should and must be the only medium of instruction in 
public, private, denominational, and other similar schools/' Eng- 
lish was the only medium of instruction in Luther College, and as 
it was thought that the proclamation was not intended to affect in- 
struction in foreign languages in higher institutions of learning, 
and encouraged by the United States commissioner of education, 
Mr. Claxton, the College retained both German and Norse in its 
curriculum. But the interest in languages other than English was 
greatly weakened by this Draconian ' measure. Before the war 



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IMPORTANT EVENTS 397 

three Norwegian societies flourished at Luther College. Governor 
Harding's proclamation destroyed them all^ and no effort since 
has been able to revive them. Also in other respects the war left 
traces of its vitiating influence. Even long after it was over, a 
lack of feeling of responsibility and devotion to scholarly ideals 
prevailed^ which only patient and persistent effort has been able 
to overcome. But the hand which heals all wounds will also ef- 
face the fiery trail of the war dragon. A new generation, bright- 
eyed with the hope of youth, is entering Luther College in in- 
creasing numbers. The institution has now the largest attendance 
in its history. We welcome them, as the heirs to the inheritance. 
They will work and build as did their fathers under the egis of 
the same covenant which God made with King Solomon: "I have 
hallowed this house which thou hast built, to put My name there 
forever, and Mine eyes and Mine heart shall be there perpetual- 




&c&v^jtJLaJSUoa€iMa ptg^flwbwQttf<tiiM^ 



LUTBEB COLLEGK 






.-agr»rifi„<&f ,11/ :(l0iLt4mJ^&»(m,e^ymi- 

A TESTIMONIAL 



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CHAPTER EIGHTEEN 

SIXTIETH ANNIVERSARY 

Carlo A. Sperati 

PREPARATIONS for the Sixtieth Anniversary festivities com- 
menced in earnest as soon ad school opened in the fall. Com- 
mittees were elected^ meetings were held^ plans were laid, and 
faculty and student body were busy as bees on College Hill. Nor 
were friends in the city idle. They rose to the occasion to help 
Luther prepare for the home-coming. For, indeed, such it was 
for the many sons and friends of our Alma Mater. 

Nature herself did not forget us. She was very kind during 
the four days of festivities. Her best attire, her warm sunny 
smile, her soothing moonlight evenings, helped to make every- 
body happy. The celebration commenced Thursday afternoon of 
October 13th. This day was the late President C. K. Preus' birth- 
day. He would have been 69 years old had he lived. We missed 
him; but God's thoughts are not our thoughts, neither are our 
ways His ways. Professor Preus had fought a good fight, he had 
finished his course, he had kept the faith. Now he rested, from 
his labors, and the crown of righteousness was his. 

It has been the custom in late years that the graduating class 
presents a gift to the College in memory of the class. This year 
Professor Preus had suggested to the class of 1921 that a flag 
pole on the campus would be a very welcome gift. The class 
gladly acted on the suggestion, and so it happened that on the 
Idth of October a 95-foot flag pole, with cement foundation, could 
be dedicated. The faculty and this year's students bought a 
beautiful, large, American flag. 

The ceremonies for the raising of the flag were simple but 
impressive. The faculty, students, and Luther College Concert 
Band, together with friends from town and those guests who had 
already arrived, gathered around the flag pole. At this occasion 
the Preus family, in reunion for the last time at the president's 
home, was present. The flag was raised to the strains of "The 
Star Spangled Banner". Dr. Oscar L. Olson delivered a brief 
address, in which he paid a tribute to President Preus, in whose 
memory the day for the flag-raising had been chosen, and empha- 



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SIXTIETH ANNIVERSARY 



399 



sised the relations of Luther College to our country and our peo- 
.pie and the faithfulness of the College to the ideals that are 
symbolized by the Stars and Stripes. After the address the as- 
sembly sang^ "My Country, 'Tis of Thee", accompanied by the 
band. This ended the short but very impressive ceremony. 

Guests had already begun to arrive on Wednesday the 12th, 
and on Thursday evening the hotels were filled. The housing com- 




FLAG POLE. DEDICATED OCTOBER 18, 1»21 

mittee was on hand day and night. Not only were the guests 
that had reported told where to go, but autos were ready to take 
them to their places. 

The festivities proper commenced with the dedication of Koren 
Library Friday afternoon, October 14th. Professor Karl T. Ja- 
cobsen, '02, the college librarian, has an article on ''The Library" 
in the anniversary number of ''College Chips". He also gives 
"An Addition" in the November number of "Chips". 

Near the northwest corner of the library was erected a plat- 
form for the speakers of the day. The large audience filled the 
bleachers and the raised seats to the north and those who could 
get no seat gathered around the platform. The Luther College 
Concert Band was seated on the west. 



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400 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY TEARS 



At 2:80 the band opened the exercises with a half -hour con- 
cert as a prelude. The band also accompanied all the hjnm&r 
At 3:00 o'clock the hymn: "Thee, God, we praise. Thy name wc 
bless", was sung, after which Rev. J. Nordby of the class of '73, 
president of the Eastern District of the Norwegian Lutheran 
Church of America, offered the invocation. 

The opening address was delivered by Hon. J. A. O. Prcns, 
'08, governor of Minnesota, son of our late president, C. K. 
Preus. Governor Preus connected the day and Luther Coll<^e 
with the great reformer, Dr. Martin Luther. The ideals in gov- 
ernment and .religion which Luther laid before the world at the 

Diet at Worms, just four centuries ago, 
in 1521, freedom in state and church, are 
the ideals for which Luther CoU^e 
stands. Governor Preus spoke of the 
man for whom the new library building 
was named. He said in part: "Our pur- 
pose on this 14th of October is not only 
to celebrate the birthday of Luther Col- 
lege, but also to honor the memory of 
one of the noblest men who came to 
America — Dr. Koren." He portrayed 
the life of this great pioneer, whose sole 
purpose was to serve God. 

After Governor Preus' address fol- 
lowed Koren's hymn: "Ye lands, to the 
Lord make a jubilant noise." Dr. O. 
E. Brandt, '79, vice-president of Luther 
Theological Seminary, St. Paul, Minn., delivered the dedication 
address. Dr. Brandt spoke of Dr. V. Koren as "The Man of the 
Word", and of Professor C. K. Preus as "The Man of the Work". 
"Dr. Brandt gave as the reason for placing the name 'Koren 
Library' on this building that Dr. Koren was of all the pioneers 
the one who was most of all interested in books and good literature. 
However, the main reason for thus naming the new library must 
be that Koren's name represents that spirit which must govern 
the use of this treasury of books and historic monuments. And 
here, he said, he referred not to Dr. Koren's well known hatred 
of sham in matters educational, but to the thought which is best 
expressed in Dr. Koren's favorite prayer from Psalm 86, 11: 




GOV. J. A. O. PREUS 



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SIXTIETH ANNIVERSARY 



401 



'Unite my heart, O God, to fear Thy Name'. Dr. Koren's high- 
est purpose in life was to do honor to the name of God. The 
Word of God was his most highly prized possession, and for him 
all books were of value as they supported or explained the Scrip- 
tures. In this spirit Dr. Koren, the man of the Word, laid the 
foundations of this library in the Scriptures. 

"It was the work of President C. K. Preus to build on this 
foundation the workshop which was being dedicated. Although 
keenly realizing that it was largely due to the efforts of Dr. Lar- 

sen and Prof. Naeseth that Luther 
College has its excellent collection 
of books for which the building was 
erected, still it was given to Prof. 
Preus to complete the work for the 
new building, which it was not his 
lot to see in its finished form. 

"Thereupon Dr. Brandt pro- 
nounced the words of dedication: 
'By the authority of the Board of 
Trustees of Luther College of the 
Norwegian Lutheran Church of 
America, I now do set apart and 
consecrate this library and museum, 
in memory of Ulrik Vilhelm Koren, 
in gratitude to Christian Keyser 
Preus, to the service of sacred learn- 
DR. o. E. BRANDT j^g in the spirit of Luther, for the 

advancement of Luther College and the Norwegian * Lutheran 
Church of America, and to the glory of God, in the name of the 
Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost.' "* 

These impressive words were followed by the majestic hymn: 
"God's Word is our great heritage". 

Professor J. C. M. Hanson, '82, associate director of the Un- 
iversity of Chicago Libraries and a member of the building com- 
mittee for Koren Library, spoke on the more technical side of the 
library. His remarks, he said, would "deal more directly with 
the library, its past history, present problems, and possible fu- 
ture developments". 

He told of the organization of the private library, properly 
named "Mimer", "for that character in Norse Mythology which 

* Carl W. Strom, 'l», in "Decorah Public Opinion.** 




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402 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



sat at the foot of the oak Ygdrasil and drank wisdom from the 
fountain which there gushed forth^ and to whom even Odin had 
to turn when in mental perplexity." "Mimer" was later merged 
with the college library. "This," said Professor Hanson, "and 
the gradual acquisition through gift and purchase of some of the 
best works of Scandinavian writers, particularly in literature 
and history, has resulted in one of the best collections of books 
on the north of Europe to be found anywhere in America". In 
1914 the Bishop Bang Library was purchased. This was made 

possible through "the generosity of the 
late Mr. Hauman Haugan, a staunch 
friend of the College, and the alert inter- 
est of an honored alumnus, Mr. Laurits 
S. Swenson of Minneapolis, then and 
now U. S. minister to Norway. . . . We 
have, then, in this building today, the 
nucleus of what I believe is destined to 
become the largest and best collection of 
books in northern Iowa, and, as far as 
books on the Scandinavian North is con- 
cerned, . . . one of the leading collec- 
tions in this country." 

After Professor Hanson's address fol- 
lowed the doxology: "Praise God, from 
Whom all blessings flow", and the bene- 
diction, pronounced by Rev. I. B. Tor- 
rison, '79. 

The dedication of Koren Library closed with the "Hallelujah 
Chorus", from Handel's "Messiah", sung by the choir of the First 
Norwegian Lutheran Church of Decorah, accompanied by the 
Concert Band. 

One of the interesting features of the festivities was the re- 
union of Luther College Musical Union. Some brought their own 
instruments and others were supplied from the stock at the College. 
At 4 : 30 they assembled in the College Auditorium to rehearse 
for the concert in the evening. A Reunion Band was organized: 
7 flutes and piccolos, 1 E flat clarinet, 17 B flat clarinets, I oboe, 
2 bassoons, 9 saxophones, 20 cornets, 14 horns, 8 trombones, 6 
baritones, 8 tubas, 1 pair of tympani, 8 snare drums, 4 bass drums, 
which, counting the director, made a band of 107 members. It 




PROF. J. C. M. HANSON 



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SKTIETH ANNIVERSARY 403 

was a happy group. All were yonng again although many had 
passed the sixty mark. 

Could they play? Those who had heen skeptical on this point 
found it wise to hold their peace and say nothing. This was no 
trifling band. It was the old-timers that were playing^ and 
younger members looked and listened with awe. Not only did 
they show remarkable technic^ but they played with such preci- 
sion and feeling that it was an inspiration to the conductor and 
a rare musical treat for the audience. 

At 7 : 30 the time-honored illumination took place. At the 
tapping of the college bell the Main Building blazed forth in light 
while the Concert Band^ according to custom^ played the battle 
hymn of the Reformation: "A Mighty Fortress is our God". 
The college motto: "Soli Deo Gloria"^ shone forth in all its splen- 
dor, as did also the numbers 1861 and 1921. Suddenly the Main 
Building was in darkness and a strong light showed from the 
east, and there was* the newly dedicated daughter of the old 
mother building on the hill all lighted and with flood lights play- 
ing on the beautiful structure, shifting to the Luther Statue and 
to the other buildings; and above all Old Glory, lighted by a 
steady, strong flood light, as it lazily waved with the breeze. The 
light on Old Glory continued when all was darkness on the cam- 
pus. 

After the illumination everybody hurried to the Auditorium. 
The exercises commenced with the singing of that hymn which, 
ever since Dr. Laur. Lar sen's days, has marked the opening of 
the 14th of October exercises: "Lad os bede lysets Fader". 

The vocal features of the concert were a solo by Rev. H. B. 
Thorgrimsen, '79, two numbers by the Winneshiek County San- 
gerforbund, Reissiger's "Olaf Trygvason" and Ph. Nicolai's chor- 
ale **Wake, awake, for night is flying", and last "In Flanders 
Fields", with the musical setting by Dr. Adolph O. Aaker, ex-'99, 
of Velva, N. D., and sung by Rev. Ove J. H. Preus, '01, with 
band accompaniment. 

Rev. H. B. Thorgrimsen was one of the foremost singers in 
the former Synod, and although his hair has a silver lining his 
voice is as young and sympathetic as ever. That he pleased the 
audience was evidenced by the hearty applause and the call for 
encore. 

Winneshiek County S anger forbund sang with precision and 
fine ensemble. Dr. Aaker's composition, played from manuscript, 
is a fine piece of art with a true inspiration. Rev. Ove J. H. 



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404 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

Preus^ of the class of '01^ has a well schooled^ sonorous^ and pleas- 
ing baritone voice. He sang Dr. Aaker's composition with feel- 
ing and power. 

A xylophone solo, "The Mocking-Bird", was given with great 
effect by C. Vittorio Sperati, '25, accompanied by the band. Mr. 
Sperati's xylophone work always makes a hit with the audience. 
This time his xylophone seemed to have a peculiar birdlike ring, 
especially in the strain, "Listen to the Mocking-Bird". Both the 
soloist and the band listened, and they played softer and softer. 
Some master whistler in the audience had picked up the melody 
with its variations, and the xylophone and band gave a harmon- 
ious background; Dr. Olson helped the audience to discover the 
whistler. He was none other than the governor of Minnesota. 
The applause was loud and loiig and the audience was not satis- 
fied until Governor Preus appeared on the stage and repeated 
part of the number. He is a former member of the Luther Col- 
lege Concert Band, and his whistling solos with band accompani- 
ment never failed to take the audience by storm. This ended the 
first half of the program. 

In addition to the greetings delivered orally at the sixtieth 
anniversary exercises. Professor O. A. Tingelstad, '05, read tele- 
grams and greetings from friends and alumni who were not able 
to be present. Many greetings contained donations to the build- 
ing fund. There were telegrams or letters from the following: 

Rev. T. Lerud, '10; Prof. C. Tyssen, '06; Prof. A. L. Bron- 
stad, '19; Prof. E. R. Larson, '20, Clifton, Texas. Gudmund 
Thorgrimsen, '17; G. A. Fjeldstad, '16, Grand Forks, N. D. The 
Chicago Norwegian Club, by T. A. Siqueland, president, Chicago, 
111. The State Bank of Chicago, by Henry A. Haugan, president, 
Chicago, 111. Prof. J. S. Nordgaard, '80; Prof. H. S. Hilleboe, 
'81 ; Prof. O. A. Solheim, '81 ; Prof. C. M. Christianson, '81, Sioux 
Falls, S. D. M. E. Remmen, '88; Sven Hanson, '09; E. F. Kiland, 
'17, Hettinger, N. D. National Capital Luther College Club, 
by T. Jahr, '96; S. N. Dahl, '07; G. H. Gerald, '01; O. A. Juve, 
'07; P. C. Paulson, '04, Washington, D. C. P. O. C. Johnson, '06; 
J. E. Strand, '06; O. K. Omlie, '96, Watford City, N. D. John 
M. Brendal, '06, Glenwood, Minn. Missionary Rev. Johannes 
Astrup, '93, Mandal, Norway. Rev. C. Hougstad, '93, Wausau, 
Wis. Dr. H. A. Reque, '94, Brooklyn, N. Y. Rev. O. E. Heim- 
dahl, '96, Fir, Wash. Dr. and Mrs. S. N. Hagen, '96, Gettys- 
burg, Pa. Rev. O. J. Ordal, '98, Everett, Wash. Dr. J. A. O. 
Stub, '98, Minneapolis, Minn. Rev. Alfred Hendrickson, '06; 
Rev. T. L. Rosholdt, '99; and Carl Rosholdt, '06, Wolf Point, Mont 



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SKTIETH ANNIVERSARY 405 

The Greater New York Ministerial Conference^ by Rev. Helmer 
Halvorson^ '04, pres.; Rev. A. O. Bjerke, ex. '02, sec. Rev. G. A. 
Hanson, '05, Goodridge, Minn. Dr. C. Fjeldstad, '05, Minneap- 
olis, Minn. H. O. Saxvik, '05; Joseph Lee, '18; Harald Tolo, '21 ; 
L. C. Sorlien, '21, Wahpeton, N. D. Prof. Herman C. Nordlie, 
'06, Fargo, N. D. Rev. E. Struxness, '06; Rev. J. C. Wisnaes, '09; 
Rev. V. F. Larson, '11; C. P. Birkelo, '17, Nome, N. D. Rev. J. 
W. Rosholdt, '07, Crosby, N. D. Rev. K. B. Vaaler, '10; Elmer A. 
Peterson, Brandt, S. D. Rev. A. N. Livdahl, '11, Glasgow, Mont. 
Prof. Enoch E. Peterson, '12, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Rev. O. J. 
Mithun, '15, Anaconda, Mont. Rev. and Mrs. J. Magnus Rohne, 
Cambridge, Mass. Prof. Roy O. Storvick, '21, Canton, S. D. The 
California Circuit of the Norw. Luth. Church of America, by Rev. 
E. M. Stensrud, '93, pres.; Rev. N. B. Thorpe, *14, sec, Santa 
Barbara. Herman L. Ronnei, '15, St. Francis, Minn. Augustana 
College and Normal School, Sioux Falls, S. D., by Dr. Albert 
Keiser, sec. Faculty and Students, Lutheran Normal School, Can- 
ton, S. D. Gale College, Galesville, Wis., by Prof. H. F. Swan- 
sen, '14, and Rev. L. S. J. Reque, '94. Lutheran Ladies' Semin- 
ary Corporation, Red Wing, Minn., by Dr. C. L. Opsal, pres. 
Red Wing Seminary, by Prof. H. E. Jorgensen, pres. St. Olaf 
College, Northfield, Minn., by Dr. L. W. Boe, pres. The Symra 
Society, Decorah, Iowa, by J. B. Wist and J. A. Nelson. Rev. 
O. H. Smeby, '71, Albert Lea, Minn. Prof. O. G. Felland, '74; 
Prof. Olav Lee, '83; Prof. I. F. Grose, '85, St. Olaf College, 
Northfield, Minn. K. G. Faegre, '77, New York, N. Y. Dr. Laur- 
itz Larsen, '02, New York, N. Y. Rev. J. O. Hougen, '79, Story 
City, Iowa. Rev. and Mrs. K. Seehuus, '81, Denver, Colo. Dr. L. 
Hektoen, '83, Chicago, 111. Rev. J. H. Jahren, '84, Lake Park, 
Minn. Prof. J. G. Halland, '84; Prof. P. J. Iverson, '10; Nels 
Brevig, G. N. Livdahl, Fargo, N. D. Dr. J. A. Ness, '84, Spring- 
field, Ohio. Dr. C. A. Mellby, '88, Christiania, Norway. The Ice- 
landic Lutheran Synod, by Rev. N. S. Thorlaksson, '81, pres. 
Windom Circuit of the Norw. Luth. Church of America, by Rev. 
L. P. Thorkveen, pres., and Rev. P. C. Danielson, sec. President 
J. N. Brown, Canton, S. Dak. 

After the reading of greetings the Alumni Association pre- 
sented the College with a "rouser" song written by Norvald G. 
Maakestad, '21, and Arthur J. Tolo, '18. Copies of the song 
were distributed among the students, and with the composer, Mr. 
Maakestad, at the piano it was sung with a "pep" and a "go" 
which proved that the song will be popular with the students. 

The last part of the evening's program was given over to the 



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406 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

Reunion Band. Suppe's "Poet and Peasant" overture, Drdla's 
"Serenade", and several marches were played. The applause was 
spontaneous and the enthusiasm ran high. One veteran player 
was heard to say: "This has made me many years younger." The 
program closed with the hymn: "Tak, vor Fader i det h^ie". 
This has been the regular closing hymn at 1 4th of October pro- 
grams, just as "Lad os bede lysets Fader" has marked the open- 
ing of the exercises. 

Saturday morning, October 15th, at 8:00 o'clock, chapel ex- 
ercises were held in the Auditorium for students and alumni. Rev. 
I. D. Ylvisaker, '88, president of the North Dakota District of the 
Norwegian Lutheran Church of America, conducted the service 
and chose for his text Psalm 19:1, 2, 11-14. 

At 9:00 o'clock the Luther College Alumni Association met in 
the college chapel for its annual business meeting. The time 
proved very short for the amount of business on hand. However, 
several important resolutions were passed. Rev. I. B. Torrison, 
'79, presided. It was resolved to push with all possible vigor the 
campaign for a new gymnasium. A committee was placed in charge 
of this work. The executive committee's buying of the so-called 
Dayton property immediately south of the campus, with another 
baseball diamond in view, was approved. A resolution was passed 
in favor of a Memorial Chapel. Dr. H. G. Stub brought greetings 
to the alumni from the Board of Education of our Church. Great 
satisfaction was shown when the announcement was made that a 
financial secretary for Luther College had been nominated by the 
Board of Education. 

Immediately after this meeting the assembly passed out of 
the chapel by classes and formed on the campus where a very good 
photograph of the Alumni Association was taken. 

The reunion meeting of the Musical Union was scheduled for 
10:00 in the college chapel and the class reunions for 11 :00 o'clock. 
Both of these meetings were of necessity late in starting on ac- 
count of the morning's previous important business. The meeting 
of the Musical Union had to be cut short, but was, nevertheless, of 
the greatest importance for the future welfare of the Union. It 
was resolved that all who have at any time belonged to a musical or- 
ganization at Luther College are members of the Musical Union. 
It was further resolved that the members contribute one dollar a 
year towards securing the memorial pipe-organ for the college 
chapel which the Musical Union in 1916 decided to build in memory 
of Olaf Angelo Sperati. The need of a music hall was also dis- 
cussed. 



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^ i 



SIXTIETH ANNIVERSARY 407 

The class reunions were held as indicated on the regular printed 
program of the festivities. Many classes used this opportunity to 
lunch together^ and several classes had invitations to private 
homes. 

At one o'clock the Reunion Band assembled in front of Laur. 
Larsen Hall^ ready for parade^ and a photograph was taken. The 
DecQrah Commercial Club had arranged for automobiles to take 
the band to town. The parade formed at the west end of Water 
Street, and the band, 110 in line, with Rev. S. L. Tallakson, '06, 
acting as drum major, was an imposing sight as it paraded through 
the business section to the stirring music of "snappy" marches. The 
streets were lined with appreciative people. Dr. Laur. A. Larsen, 
'86, and Carlo A. Sperati, '88, had the pleasure of once more play- 
ing snare drum side by side. It was reported that neither of them 
shirked on the job. It was not their fault that no drumheads were 
broken. 

At 2 :00 o'clock the football game between St. Olaf College and 
Luther College was staged on the gridiron. It was a hard fought 
battle throughout. A touchdown and a drop kick in the last quarter 
made the score 10 to in favor of St. Olaf. At 4:30 a rehearsal 
of the two cantatas to be sung Sunday was held in the college 
chapel. 

The climax on Saturday was the alumni banquet at 7:00 
o'clock in the College Auditorium. The hall was beautifully dec- 
orated and covers were laid for 500 guests. The College Orchestra 
furnished music during the meal. The committee in charge had ar- 
ranged the seating by classes. The officers of the association and 
the speakers of the evening were seated at a special table on the 
stage. Rev. A. O. Johnson, '91, retiring president of the associa- 
tion, acted as toastmaster. He deemed it an honor to fulfill such a 
duty at this occasion. He used a gavel from the Viking ship of 
1898 presented to the museum by Dr. George A. Torrison, '85, of 
Chicago. 

Dr. H. G. Stub, '66, represented the first class that graduated 
from Luther College, not because he was president of the Nor- 
wegian Lutheran Church of America, but because he was now the 
only one out of his class in the service of the church. He knew 
how deeply the love for Luther College was rooted in the hearts of 
our congregations. He testified to how much the College had ac- 
complished in its sixty years of existence. 

Judge O. M. Torrison, '81, said that Luther should continue 
to concentrate on a special course and be the classical school of 
the Middle West as Amherst is in the East. It should remain a 



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408 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

college for men^ but we should also have a college for women^ and 
co-educational schools. The interest in music should continue and 
should be given credit toward graduation. 

Rev. N. Astrup Larsen^ '96, spoke on the motto of his class 
— "Esse non videri." This expresses also the spirit of Luther Col- 
lege — to be, not to seem to be. It necessitates both a forward look 
and loyalty to the past. 

Rev. Norman A. Madson, '11, pictured the pioneer homes of 
our forefathers. "Luther College/' he said, "is the offspring of 
horny-handed labor, begotten of faith, reared in love and hope" 
.... She "could, no doubt, have been a more imposing insti- 
tution today, had she but chosen to deviate from the path marked 
out for her by her founders. But I doubt that she could have 
served more well." 

Prof. E. Hove, '84, of Luther Theological Seminary, spoke of 
the close connection between Luther College and the Seminary. 
A powerful address. 

Hon. L. S. Swenson, '86, United States minister to Norway, 
gave a beautiful tribute to the memory of the late President C. K. 
Preus. (Given in full in the Preus Memorial volume, pp. 233-234.) 

Dr. Oscar L. Olson, '93, acting president of Luther College, 
spoke of what the institution had in property, in courses, in fa- 
culty, in student body. He outlined what rfew buildings were 
needed. The College has a high standard in scholarship, and this 
standard must be maintained. 

After these inspiring addresses, the assembly was asked to rise 
in honor of the late Peer O. Str0mme, '76. Likewiiie in honor of 
the widows surviving former Luther College professors who had 
died in recent years, namely Mrs. Laur. Larsen, Mrs. L. S. Reque, 
Mrs. C. A. Naeseth, and Mrs. C. K. Preus. Greetings were sent 
to Rev. J. W. Preus, '82, of Calmar, Iowa, who was prevented 
from being present by sudden illness. 

Sunday morning, October 16th, people awoke to the most glor- 
ious of the four days of the Sixtieth Anniversary festivities. Auto- 
mobiles arrived from far and near. At 8:30 the Sixtieth Annivers- 
ary Cantata was rehearsed in the Auditorium. At 10:30 divine 
services were held in the Auditorium in Norwegian. The building 
could not accommodate the great throng. Therefore an overflow 
meeting was conducted under the college oaks by Professor £. 
Hove. 

Faculty, students, and alumni formed in front of the Main 
Building and marched in procession to the Auditorium. Luther 



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SIXTIETH ANNIVERSARY 409 

College Concert Band played^ as a prelude^ Schumann's "Festival 
Overture." 

Rev. H. B. Thorgrimsen conducted the altar services, and the 
band accompanied and led in the hymns. 

Dr. H. G. Stub, president of the Norwegian Lutheran Church 
of America, preached at the service in the Auditorium. He based 
his sermon on the B7th Psalm. Dr. Stub showed how Luther Col- 
lege by its founders had been built on the Lord, and how in its 
subsequent sixty years of service it has always been able to say 
with the Psalmist, "All my springs are in Thee." 

When Luther College was founded it was to serve two purposes. 
It was to become a sound and thorough institution for instruction 
in secular subjects, but above all it was to train students prepara- 
tory to taking up theology. Both of these aims have been main- 
tained by its two presidents, Larsen and Preus. Dr. Stub an- 
swered the question. What has the future in store for Luther 
College? In the first place, it must continue to be an up-to-date 
standard college. There must be no effort to reduce it to the 
rank of a junior college, as has been the fate of many denomina- 
tional colleges in America. Luther College must be an American 
college, but must at the same time continue to be the preserver 
of Norwegian culture in this country. Literary and artistic in- 
terests must continue to flourish, and must not be displaced by an 
interest in physical development. But above all, it must continue 
to be a Christian and a Lutheran college. Therefore, the faculty 
must be composed of Christian as well as learned men. All the 
work of the College must in the last analysis be conducted accord- 
ing to the Word of God. 

After the sermon an offering was taken both in the Auditorium 
and at the overflow meeting to defray expenses in connection 
with the festivities. This offering amounted to $800.00. 

Immediately after the offering the "Sixtieth Anniversary Can- 
tata" was given by a chorus of 150 voices under the direction of 
Professor Carlo A. Sperati, '88. The words were written by Rev. 
Paul Koren, '82, in compliance with a request made by President 
Preus a short time before his death. The music was composed by 
Prof. John Dahle of Luther Seminary. Mr. Ingolf Grindeland, 
ex-' 12, sang the tenor solo parts in pleasing and artistic style. Os- 
car J. Strom, '24, and Arthur M. Wisness, '14, were the accom- 
panists on piano and organ respectively. The large chorus ren- 
dered with enthusiasm the inspiring text and music, and at the 
close the audience showed its appreciation by according writer 
and composer a rising vote of thanks. 



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410 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

In the afternoon an opportunity was afforded to representa- 
tives of other institutions to bring their greetings in oral form. 
Rev. O. Glesne opened the meeting with invocation. President M. 
O. B^ckman^ representing Luther Theological Seminary^ described 
the course of study at Luther College as the most ideal for those 
who intend to enter the ministry^ and gave thanks to God for the 
firm attitude of faithfulness which Luther College has always 
maintained as to the means of Grace and as to the motto^ "It is 
written." On this occasion Luther College was honored by the 
presence of Dr. F. G. Gade of Norway, president of Nordmands- 
forbundet. He had landed in America but a few days previously, 
and had cancelled several other important engagements to be pres- 
ent at the Sixtieth Anniversary festivities. He brought an oral 
greeting from His Majesty King Haakon VII and a written greet- 
ing from the University of Christiania. Rev. H. C. Holm, presi- 
dent of the Iowa District of our Church, brought greetings from 
the Church Council. Rev. Edward Johnson, representing the 
Board of Education, alluded to the generous contribution of Luther 
College to the ministry of the Church. President L. W. Boe pre- 
sented the felicitations of St. Olaf College, and termed that insti- 
tution a child of Luther College. President J. A. Aasgaard repre- 
sented Concordia College of Moorhead, Minn., and President C. 
O. Solberg of Augustana College and Normal School of Sioux 
Falls, S. D. Dr. T. Stabo of Decor ah spoke on behalf of the 
Board of Trustees of Luther College, thanking the people of our 
Church for their support of this institution. 

In the evening a closing concert was given in the Auditorium 
by the Sixtieth Anniversary Chorus, under the leadership of Prof. 
Carlo A. Sperati. Felix Mendelssohn's sacred cantata, "Hymn of 
Praise", was sung with truly inspiring effect. The soloists were: 
Mrs. L. A. Moe, soprano; Mrs. A. M. Rovelstad, alto; Mr. 
Ingolf Grindeland, tenor. It was a very fitting closing to 
the Sixtieth Anniversary festivities. The hearts of the great 
audience seemed carried away by the chorus into one grand out- 
burst of praise to God for His gracious protection and guidance 
throughout these sixty years. 



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CHAPTER NINETEEN 

GRADUATES 

M. H. Tryttkn 
I. Occupational Index (1921-22) 



(Listing ail graduates up to and includ- 
ing the class of 1921.) 

1. FARMERS (82) 

Olsen, Bllef, *6<l, Kirley, S. D. 
Hoff, L. M. A., *75, Madison, Minn. 
Jorgenson, Christian, *75, East Stanwood, 

Ruste, Elide O., *76, Humboldt, S D. 
Evenson, Edwin, *79, Seattle, Wash. 
Karstad, Lara, *80, Nicollet, Minn. 
YlYisaker, A. Chr., *8l, Zumbrota, Minn. 
Langemo, H. T., *88, Badger, Minn. 
Aubol, Carl O., '88, Big Lake, Minn. 
Eden, Martin P, *»2, Lee, 111. 
Landsrerk, John P., *95, Saude, Iowa. 
Ly^Euis, Ingeman M., *97, Winneconne, 

Aames, Sam H., *98, Sacred Heart, Minn. 
Dahlen, Fred, *98, Hayfleld, Minn. 
Tasa, Gilbert, *99, Dennison, Minn. 
Burtness, Peter, *00. Cook, Minn. 
PucUe, A. Edwin, *01, Ashby, Minn. 
Dahlen, Theo. A., *08, Wendell, Minn. 
Hovde, Rudolph, *08, Olenwood, Minn. 
Strand, Herman, *05, New London, Minn. 
Monson, Martin J., *08, Delhi, Minn. 
Naeseth, Adolph O., *09, Zumbrota, Minn 
Storatad, Alfred G., '12, Horace, N. D. 
Bmnsdale, C. Norman, *18, Portland, N. 

D., Farm Manager. 
Bmnsdale, G. Ehner, *18, Mayrille, N D. 
Gulbrandson, Cleon, *18, Haywaru, Minn. 
Lerorson, Oscar, '14, Lake Mills, Iowa. 
Askegaard, Arthur D., *15, Comstock, 

Minn. 
Seebacfa, Carl H., '15, Goodhue, Minn. 
Subey, Ward A., »15, Stoughton, Wis. 
Dolen, Nels B., *20, Leland, Iowa. 
Bergum, Arthur E., '21, Rio, Wis. 

2. MANUFACTURERS (2) 

Faegre, Kaspar G., *77, President Man- 
hattan Corset Co., New York, N. Y. 
Markhus, George, *85, Violin Manufac- 
turer, St. Paul, Minn. 

8. PROFESSIONAL SERVICE (485) 
a. CUrgymen and MiaHonaries (262) 

Normann, Olaus A., *66, Ashby, Minn., 

Emeritus. 
Sherven, Lan, *68, Los Angeles, Cal., 

Emeritus. 
Alfsen, Adolph O., *<I9, Chicago, 111., 

Emeritus. 
Lunde, Oudbrand A., *<I9, Wittenberg, 

Wis., Emeritus. 
Bj#rgo. Knut, *70, Red Wing, Minn, 

Emeritus. 
Smeby, Oluf H., *71, Albert Lea, Minn., 

Emeritus. 



Gotaas, Paul B., *78, St0ren, Norway. 

Hustvedt, HalYor B., *78, Decorah, Iowa, 
Emeritus. 

Roalkvam, Halvard G., *74, Coop Valley, 
Wis., Emeritus. 

Hendrickson, Peter A., •7«, Bowdon, N. 
D. 

Strand, Henrlk J., *7<l, Norway Lake, 
Minn., Emeritus. 

Blilie, Johan A.. *77, Fbndreau, S. D. 

Brandt, Realf O., *77, Macfarland, Wis. 

Grftnsberg, Ole N., *77, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

Johansen, Jens, *77, Fresno, Cal. 

Botline, Johannes D., *78, Pequot, Minn. 

Bngh, Hagbart, *78, Ostrander, Minn. 

Gjevre, Anders H., *78, Minneapolis, 
Minn., Jewish Missionary. 

Homme, Thorleif O., *78, Homnes, Se- 
tersdnlen. Norwav. 

Lee, Atle J., *78, Deerfield, Wis., Eme- 
ritus. 

L0kensgaard, Ole, *78; Hanley Falls, 
Minn. 

Giere, Niels, *79, Sacred Heart, Minn. 

Hougen, Johan O., *79, Tacoma, Wash., 
Emeritus. 

Skartvedt, Peter, •79, La Center, Wash. 

Skyberg, Hans O., *79, Fisher, Minn. 

Storli, Knut O., *79, Eugene, Ore., Em- 
eritus 

Thorgrhnsen, Hans, '79, Grand Forks, 
N. D. 

Torrison, Isaac B., *79, Decorah, Iowa. 

Halvorson, Johs., '80, Rockdale, Wis. 

J0nrenson, Fingar, *80, Grand Forks, N. 
D., Emeritus. 

Larsen, Gustav A., *80, Edmore, N. D 

Ness, Johannes M. O., *80, Perley, Minn. 

Saettre, Thorbj0m A., *80, Eyansrille. 
Minn. (Died July 12, 1921.) 

Bergman, Fredrik, *81, Winnipeg, Man., 

Braaten, Sven O., *81, Thompson, N. D. 
Kasberg, Karl A., *81, Grantsburg, Wis. 
Rysh, George A. Taylor, *81, Minneapolis, 

Minn. 
Seehuus, Knut, *81, Denver, Colo. 
Jerdee, Lara J., *82, Bemidji. Minn. 
Koren, Paul, *82, Decorah, Iowa. 
Preus, Johan W., *82, Calmar, Iowa. 
Rogne, Erik T., *82, Spokane, Wash. 
Rygg. Oluf S., *82, Rudyard. Mont. 
Langemo, John T., *88, Edinburgh, N. D. 
Larsen, Christian M., *88, Vhalan, Minn. 
Magelssen, Hans, *8S, Walker, Minn. 
Larsen, Thorvald H., '84, Taylor, N. D. 
Vik, Eivlnd O.. '84, La Crosse, Wis. 
Kvaase, Daniel J., *85, Chicago, 111. 
Lien, Abel E., '85, Portland, N. D. 
J0rgenson, Jacob E., *86, Decorah, Iowa. 
Orri, EUend J., '86, San Diego, CaL 



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412 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY TE.\RS 



gO^'seNAtuS >^«=^'>EM.cus^^|^ 







Peterson, S. Christian N., *86, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

FJeldstad. Halvor O., *88, Faribault, Minn. 

Jordnhl, Daniel C, *88, Ridreway. Iowa. 

Klttllsby, Peter A., '88, Brooklyn. N. Y. 

Levorson, John, *88, Irene. S. D. 

Rikansrud, Olaus T., *88, El Paao, Texas. 

Beito. Gulbrand G.. *89, Terrace, Minn. 

Lunde, Johinnes H., '89, Huxlev. Iowa. 

Ottersen, Ole, *89, West Salem, Wis. 

Strand. John J., *8», St Peter. Minn. 

Vereldc, Ole M.. '89, Elmore. Minn. 

Kvale, Ole J., *90, Benson, Minn. 

Linnevold. Johnn, *90, Glenwood. Minn. 

Solum. Henry E., '90. Baltic, S. D. 

Tolo, Thore O., '90, Locust, Iowa. 

Gimmestad, Lars M., '91, Orfordville. Wis. 

Johnson, Alfred O., *9l, Spring Grove, 
Minn. 

Nordpraard, Nils N., '91. Mankato. Minn. 

Strom, Eimar I., '91, Watson, Minn. 

Benr. Nils I.. *92, Deering. N. D. 

Blaekkan, Ingebret J , '92, Coeur d'Alene, 
Idaho. 

Christensen, Martin A., *92, Portland, 
Ore. 

Reque. Sigvard T.. *92, St. Paul, Minn. 

Rue, Halvor S., '92. Prairie Farm, Wis. 

Thoen, Jacob E., *92, Ok lee, Minn. 

Xavier. Karl, *92, Thompson. Iowa. 

Akre, Ole J , '98, Hinsdale, Mont. 

Astrup, Joh<innes, '98, Untunjambili, Na- 
tal. South Africa. 

Bestul, Christian B., '98, Ettrick, Wis. 

I>0ving, Carl, '98, Oiicago, 111. 



Hougstad, Christian. *98, MerrilU Wis. 
Otte, Heinrich, *98, Kwahlabisa, Zululand, 

South Africa. 
Stensrud, Edward M., *98, San Francisco, 

Cal. 
Waller, Martinus C, *98, Ban Claire. Wis. 
Juul, Otto G., '94, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Kvamme, Kristen, *94, Ossian, Iowa. 
Moldstad, John A., '94. Chicago, III. 
Reque, LauriU S. J , '94, Galesville. Wis. 
Haatvedt, Lars A., *95, Lakota, N. D. 
Heimdahl, Olaf E., '95, Fir, Wash. 
Orwoll, Sylvester M, *95, Maddock, N. 

D. 
Ylvisaker, S. J. Nlcolaus, *95, Fergus 

Falls, Minn. 
Andenion, Christian, *96, Minneapolis, 

Minn. 
Gauson, Carl T., *96, Bloomer, Wis. 
Halvorsen, Nils E., *96, Alpena. Mich. 
Juul, Martin B., *96, Minneapolis. Minn. 
Larsen, Nikolai Astrup, *96, Kwangcfaow, 

Honan, China. 
Olsen, Holden M., *96, Madison, Wis. 
Hallanger, Christopher M., *97, Portland, 

Lunde, Amund G., *97, Great Falls, Mont 
Normann, S. Tlieodor, '97, St. Paul, Minn. 
S0ren8on, Andrew, *97, Bngley. Minn. 
Str0m, Oscar A., *97, Cleveland, O. 
Thompson, Christian S., *97, Colfax, Wis. 
Unseth, Joseph B., *97, Waterville, Iowa. 
Boyd, Edwin A., '98. Manitowoc, Wis. 
Johnson, John L., *98, Wakonda, S. D 
Ordal, Zakarias J., '98, River Falls, Wis. 



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GRADUATES 



413 




< 



as 
Ed 
S 
H 



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414 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SKTY YEARS 



RInrflen, Theodor, *98, Stevens Point, 

Swenson, Bernt C, *»8, Gary, Ind. 
Tarmo, Olaf, '08, Bradisb, Nebr. 
Wein, Hans J., *»8, Winona, Minn. 
Johnaon, Wilford A., *09, Capron, 111. 
Kilness, Peter J., *99, Marcus, S. D. 
Rosholdt, Thore L., *99, Ophelm, Mont. 
Turmo, Stener, *99, Brookljrn, N. Y. 
Boe, Ole T , *00, Grand Meadow, Minn. 
Dahle, John O., *00, Nekoma, N. D. 
Hellekson, Oscar C, *00, Newman Grove, 

Nebr. 
Hestenes, Jacob M., *00. Waterford, Wis. 
Kilness, Julius B., *00, Meckling, S. D. 
Normann, Halvor M., *oo. Cresco. Iowa 
Olafson, Kristlnn K., *00, Mountain, N. 

D. 
Strom, Axel E., *00, Battle Lake, Minn. 
Stub. Hans A.. *00. Seattle. Wash. 
Sundby, G. Adolph, *00, Rio, Wis. 
White, Andrew O, *00, Manitowoc, Wis. 
Berven, Sven K., '01, Spring Valley, Minn. 
Dreng, John O., *0l, St. Paul, Minn. 
Gutteb0. Lauritz S., *oi. Deerfleld, Wis. 
Freus, Ove J. H , '01. De Forest, Wis. 
Sauer, Carl I., *0I, Crosby, N. D. 
Bger, Olaf, '08, Seattle, Wash. 
Preus, J. Carl K., '02, Byron, Minn. 
Smeby, Hartwick C, *02, lola. Wis. 
Bergh, Axel, *0S. Tracy, Minn. 
BU<Aer, Peter, 'oa, BoyceviUe, Wis. 
Borge, Olaf, '08, Lawrence, Wash. 
Guluxson, Thaddaeus P., *08, Minot, N D. 
Hansen, Emil, *08, Scirvllle, Iowa. 
Ingebritson, Henry, *08, Lake Mills, Iowa. 
Naeseth, Carelius G., '08, Morrisonville, 

Wis. 
Nelson, Alfred. *08, Madison, S. 1). 
Norgaard. Carl H., '08, Everett, Wnsh. 
Olsen, Harry E., *08, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Thorpe, C Scriver, *08, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Tweten, Jacob O., '08, Steward, III. 
Ullensvang, Lars L., 'OS, Bulyea, S:isk., 

Can. 
Baalson, Herman E., *04, Sllvana, Wash. 
Estrem, Herman W., *04, Pelican Rapids, 

Minn. 
Halverson, Melvin W., *04. B^loit, Wis. 
Halvorson, Helmer, *04, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Hoff, Thoralf A., *04, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Lund, Lauritz P.. *04, Luverne, Minn. 
Moldstad, Christian A., '04, Jamaica 

Plain, Mass. 
Quill, Carl J.. '04, Renville, Minn. 
Bredesen, Alfred, '05, Bricelyn, Minn. 
Fretheim, Martin E., *05, Chicago, 111. 
Hanson, Gustav A., *05, Belgrade, Minn. 
Hegg. Gustav J.. '05, Wildtw»*» N n 
Johnson, Bcrgel A., '05, Hayfleld, Minn. 
Wulfsbegcgf Jacob A. O., *05, Michigan, 

Bruland, Peter O., '06, San Frandsco, Cal. 
Christophenon, Einar B., *06, Pigeon 

Falls, Wis. 
Estrem, G. Rudolph, *06, Cooperstown, N. 

D. 
Hendrickson, Alfred. *n«. Wolf Point, 

Mont (Carpio, N. D., 1922.) 
Johnson, Joseph, *0(r, Jamestown, N. D. 
Struxness, Edwart, 'oe, Vome, N. D 
Tallakson, Sehner L., SN), Grand Forks, 

N. D. 
Wrolstad, J. Oliver, *06, Granite Falls, 

Minn. 
Belgum, Anton H., '07, Glenwood, Minn. 
Belgum, Erik S., '07, Appleton, Minn. 



Fretheim, Severt J., *07, Scarville, lomra. 
F0rde, Gerhard O., *07, Starbuck. Minn. 
Rosholdt, Jacob W., *07, Crosby, N. D. 
Smeby. Olaf V., '07, Mission Hill, S. D. 
Sumstad, M. Ovedius, *07, Roland, lowm. 
Vaaler, Amt J, *07, Wilhnar, Minn. 
Borge, Daniel J., *08, Deerfiekl, Wis. 
Haugen, Chirence, *08, Canby, Minn. 
Holum, James O., *08, Westby, Wis. 
KJorlaug, Peter F., '08, Thor, Iowa. 
Korsrud, Albert C, '08, Glenville. Minn. 
Lillegard, George O., *08, Icfaang, Hnpch, 

China. 
Naeseth, William K., *08, Rochester, Minn. 
Ensrud, Joseph O. £., *09, Garske, N. D. 
Faye, Christopher, *09, Untunjambili, 

Natal, South Africa. 
Haugen, Thomas A., *09, McHenry, N. D. 
Magelssen, Finn, *O0, Rushford, Minn. 
Salvesen, Emil, *0», Bamesvllle, Mmn. 
Wisnaes, John Carlot, *09, Kathryn, N D. 
Ylvlsaker, Nils W., '09, HitterdaU Minn. 
Jordahl, Edward L., *10. Bryant, S. D. 
Lerud, Theodore, *I0, Clifton, Texas. 
Preus, H. A., *10, Chicago, IlL 
Rognlien, Joseph B., *10, Campbell, Nebr. 
Sandager, Christian N., *10, OutkMk, Sask., 

Can. 
Tufte, Olaf B., *10, Glendive, Mont. 
Vaaler, Knut B., *I0, Brandt, S. D. 
Aaberg. Theodore. *ll, Westby, Mont. 
Aal, Eugene J , *11, Huron, S. D. 
Johnshoy, J. Walter, '11, Ban Claire, 

Wis. 
Larson, Victor F., '11. Valley City, N. D. 
Livdahl, Albert N., 'II, Glasgow, Mont. 
Madson, Norman A., '11, Bode, Iowa. 
QuilU Martin B, *ll, Waco, Texas. 
Sandberg, Ivar, '11, Barrett, Minn. 
Austin, Otto G., *12, Sisseton. S. D. 
Foss, Carl L., *12, Parkland. Wash. 
Greibrok. Aanon, *12, Woodworth, N. 1) 
Haavik, Olai L., '12, Seattle, Wash. 
Forseth, Peder C, *18, New Era, Midi 
KJaer, Ludvig P., 18. Plentywood, Mont. 
Nesset, Alfred O., *18, Leeds, N. D. 
Petersen, Justin A., *1S, Linn Grove, 

Iowa. 
Ulvilden, Reinhardt, *18, Omaha, Nebr. 
Andrews, Melvin O., '14, Wheaton, Minn. 
Borlaug, Arthur O., *14, Edmonton, Al- 
berta, Can. 
Gigstad, Walter T., *14, Beadi, N. D. 
Grcfthen, Emil A., '14, Providence. R. 1. 
Halvorson, E. Nestor, '14, Galesburs. 

Wis 
Thorpe, Nordahl B., *14, Santa Barbara, 

Oil. 
Wanberg, Richard T., '14, Towner, N. D. 
Baalson, Elmer A., *15, Durand, 111. 
Hoif, Pemell B., '15, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Maakestad, J. Walter B., *15, Pasadena, 

Cal. 
Mithun. Odd J., '15. Anaconda. Mont 
Romness. Henry R., *15, Jersey aty, 

N, J. 
Topness, Sibert M., *15, Red Wing, Minn. 
Leque, Nils M., '10, South Bend, Wash. 
Losen, Carl, *16, Astoria, Oregon. 
Rosenqvist, Rolf, *16, Nerstrand, Minn. • 
Ulvilden, George, *16, Toronto, S. D. 
Amundson, Alfred H., *17, Gully, Mi]|n. 
Andersen, Andrew P., *17, Owatonna, 

Minn. 
Evans, Leif E., *17, La Crosse, Wis. 
Hansen, Harold, *17, Washburn, N. D. 
Hexom, Wilhehn T., *17, Virginia, Minn. 



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GRADUATES 



413 




THE CLASS OP 18«« AFTER 45 YEARS 
H G. Stub EUef Olsen I. E. Bergfa (tl»05) 

R. B. Anderaon O. A. Normann G. Erdahl (tl»14) 

T. O. Jure (tl»ll) L. J. Markhus (tl885) 



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416 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Kraabel, Alf M., *17, Fessenden, N. D. 
Lee, Clarence L., *17, Redfleld, S. D. 
Lono, Mikkel, *17, Kasson, Minn. 
Moe, Sigurd M., *17, Clinton, Minn. . 
Narum, Hartvig K., *17, Faulkton, S. D. 
Rotto, Tlieodore I., '17, Kensington, Minn. 
Preus, Jacob Hjort, *17, Strum, Wis. 
Tolo, G. Walther, '17, Noonan, N. D. 
Ylvisaker, Carl B., '17, North wood, Iowa. 
Stormo, Carl A., *18, Roseau, Minn. 
Waage, K. Olav, *18, Little Fork, Minn. 

OFFICERS OF THE CHURCH 

Stub, Hans G., *«fl. President Norwegian 
Lutheran Church of America, St. Paul, 
Minn. 

Harstad, Bjug, '71, President hjorwegi^n 
Synod of the American EVahgeUcal 
Lutheran Church, Parkland, Wash. .. 

Nordby, J0rgen. *78, President Eastern 
District, N. L. C. A., Deerfleld, Wis. 

Eggen, Thore, *7», Executive Secretary 
Lutheran Brotherhbod, Minneat>olis, 
Minn. 
'Thorlaksson, Nils, *81, President Icelandic 
Synod, West Selkirk, Man., Can. 

Boe, Nils N., *8fl. President South Dakota 
District, N. L. C. A., Sioux Falls, S. D. 

Ylvisaker, Ivar D., '88, President NorUi 
Dakota District N. L. C. A., Fargo, 
N. D. 

GuUixon, George A., *90, President Nor- 
wegian Synod of the American Evan- 
gelical Lutheran Church, Chicago, IIL 
(Succeeding B. Harstad, Aug. 1, 1922 ) 

Stub, Jacob A. O., *98, President Lutlieran 
Brotherhood of America, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

Larsen, Lauritz, *02, President NationnI 
Lutheran Council. New York, N. Y. 

Ylvisakef. Nils M., *02, Executive Secre- 
tary Young People's Luther League, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

b. DRAFTSMAN (1) 
Backerud, Martin B., *08, San Francisco, 
Gil. 

c. EDITORS AND AUTHORS (10) 

Anderson. Rasmus B., *«fl, Amerika, Mad- 
ison, Wis. 

Bergh, Hallvard, *76, Lomen, Valdres, 
Norway. (Died May, 1922.) 

Eikeland, Peder J., '80, Mack, Minn. 

Mikkelsen, Michael A., *86, Architectural 
Record, New York, N. Y. 

Lee, Gustav T., '88, Lutheran Church 
Herald, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Anderson, Isaac, '90, Mountain Lakes, 
N. J. 

Saervold, Ola J., '95, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Savre, Bertlnius K., '9fl, Glenwood, Minn. 

Kalnes, I. Magnus, '07, Alexandria, Minn. 

Kvale, Paul J., *17, Minneapolis, Minn. 

d. LAWYERS (28) 
Aubolee, Mads O., '84, San Diego, Cal. 
Thuland, Conrad M., '85, San Diego, Cal 
Remmen, Martin E., '88, Hettinger, N. D. 
Dahlen, Knut T., '94, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Johnson, Eugene G., *98, Minneapolis, 

Minn. 
Hanson, Nils B., *99, Barnesville, Minn. 
Bergman, Hjalmar A.. '00, Winnipeg, 

Man., Can. 
Hegland, Martin, *00, Roseau, Minn. 
Johnson, L. Gerhard, *02, Fort Morgan, 

Colo. 
'Aaker. Casper D., '02, MInot, N. D. 



Dahle, Martin O., 

Can. 
Brekke, Edward A., 
Koefod, Sigvard M 

Minn. 
Brendal, John M., ' 
Chommie, Hans N., 

Minn. 
Halls, Cari B.. 'Oil, 
Rodsater, George I. 
Naeseth, John R., 
Torrison, Anker O., 
Leum, Henry, '09, 
Halvorson, Alfred 

Minn. 
Preus, Wilhelm C, 
StallaUd, Knute D, 



02, Winnipeg, Man.. 

*08, Argyle, Minn. 
R., *0I, Baudette, 

08. Hiillock, Minn. 
*0«, Thief River Falls. 

Webster, S. D. 
. *0«, Mohall, N. D. 
'07, Warren. Minn. 

*07, Browning, Mcmt. 
Mayville, N. D. 

O., *10, Crookston, 

*ll, Ortonville, Minn. 
'18, St. Paul, Minn. 



e. LIBRARIANS (8) 
Hanson, James C. M., '82, University of 

Chicago Libraries, Chicago, III. 
Jahr, Torstein, '96; Library of Congress, 

Washington, D. C 
Jacobsen, Karl T., '02, Luther College 

Library, Decorah, Towa. 

f. MUSIQAN (1) • 
Askegaard, Arthur C, '18, Minneapolis. 

Minn, 
g. PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS (85) 
Mohn, Fred. Voss, '81, Los Angeles. Cal. 
Krohn, Eugene, '85, Black River Falls. 

Wis. 
Torrison, George A., '85, Chicago, 111. 
Larsen, Lauritz A., '88, Colfax, Wis. 
Unseth, Magnus A., '90, Chicago, 111. 
Reque, Peter A., '91, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Swennes, Ole S., '91, Wahkon. Minn. 
Dahl, Gerhard A., *98. Mankato, Minn. 
Bothnp. KrliTJfi: A., •B4. Vleu, Minn. 
iVK^Hcn, J Dim U., "04, MJ-*^neapoli«), Mtnn. 
KfiiUt\ FliTiJiFm A,, 'ikU UnMi\L}yn. ?4. Y. 
tliiirspjiJinU Kiirl L., '&fl, ChJc-iLgix III. 
<.iil]i\suu, Andrew, 'fll, Albert Lai, Minn. 
L^MvKuit, \i\i, '97, Ciniori, S. D, 
Jttisoii. Jiimi>s Cnt '«». ilcndrifks, Minn. 
Ol!!ii"ru Marl ill 1., 'pft, Di'-s Moines, I own, 
Gaard. Ritajj^us, 'tjj), Hiidcllffe, Iowa, 
I .Ms<Hi, Osiciir ih. '</u, Detroit. Mmn 
I'MroMu QifJ 0., *oi, Fergus Falls. Minn. 
lli.'\oii3, JoIjii D., 'u]^ Decorah. Iowa. 
TtMriberg. Carl B.. *ui„ St. PjuiI, Minn. 
GrnJnffHjircl, Henry 0*+ 'OS, Douiclns, S, D. 
,'^4iT'c'nMjn. Alfrcti R.. *(»2, Ruffby. K. D. 
r;riri([,>, lieorpe A., 'ftj. Cumber land. Wis. 
Kiiasni. Luwrenfe J., *UA, l^ike MHK Towa. 
ltu^;uil, A. Jens, 'uj. La Crosae, Wis. 
Hovde. Carl H. R., *04, Madison. S. D. 
Vollum, Edward O., '04, Albert Lcn, Minn. 
Fjeldstad, C. Alford. *05. Minneapolis, 

Minn. 
Johnson, Peter O. C, '08. Watford aty. 

N. D. 
BJorgo, C. W. Walther, '07, Cannon Falls, 

Minn. 
Ylvisaker, LauriU S., '07, St Paul, Minn. 

Minn. 
Birkelo, Carl C, '10, Detroit, Mich. 
Ekfelt, Odd, *10, Siangyang, Hupdi, 

China, Medical Missionary. 
Hjelle, Carl A., '10, Clilford, N. D. 

DENTISTS (2) 
Thorsen, M. Hauman, *07, Minneapolis, 

Minn. 
Qually, Peter W.. '10, Bode. Iowa. 

CHIROPRACTOR (1) 
OpsahU J. Eberhard, '18. New York. N. Y. 



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417 



h. PROFESSORS AND TEACHERS (147) 

Felland, Ole G., *74, St. Olaf College, 
Northfleld, Minn. 

Rondestvedt, Arnvid P., *77, Christian in, 
Norwi^. 

Bothne, GUIe, *78, Univeraity of Minne- 
sota, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Brandt, Olaf E., *7», Luther Theological 
Seminary, St. Paul, Minn. 

Nordgaard, John S., *80, Augustana Col- 
lege and Normal School, Sioux Falls, 
S. D. 

Christianson, Conrad M., *81, Augustana 
College and Normal School, Sioux 
Falls, S. D. 

Hilleboe, Hans S., *8l, Augustana Col- 
lege and Normal Sdiooi, Sioux Falls, 
S. O. 

Sdheim, Ola, *8l, Augustana College and 
Normal School, Sioux Falls, S. D. 

Fossum, Andrew. *82, Concordia College, 
Moorhead, Minn. 

Koren, William, '82, Princeton University, 
Princeton, N. J. 

Hektoen, Ludyig, *8I, University of Chi- 
cago, Chicago, 111. 

Lee, Olav E., *88, St. Olaf College, North- 
field, Minn. 

Hove, Elllng, *84, Luther Theological 
Seminary, St. Paul, Minn. 

Ness, Jens A., '84, Wittenberg College, 
Springfield, Ohio. 

Grose, Ingebrikt F., *85, St. Olaf College, 
Northfleld, Minn. 

Tingelstod, John, *85, Univerelty of N. 
Dakota, Grand Forlcs, N. D. 

Blegen, Hans A. H., *8«, Leeds, N. D. 

Bstrem, Andrew, *8«, Olivet College, 
Olivet, Mich. 

MeUby, Carl A., *88, St. Olaf College, 
Northfield, Minn. 

Sperati, Carlo A., *88, Luther College, 
Decorah, Iowa. 

Grundeaen, Grunde H, *92, Oklee, Minn. 

Olson, Oscar L., *98, President, Luther 
College, Decorah, Iowa. 

Xavier, Johan U., *9I, Pacific Lutheran 
College, Parkland, Wash. 

Hong, Nils J., *95, Lincoln High School, 
Tacoma, Wash. 

Omlie, Oscar K., *95, Superintendent, Wat- 
ford City, N. D. 

Hagen, Sivert N^ *98, Pennsylvania Col- 
lege, Gettysburg, Pa. 

Haratad, Knute M., *97, Santa Cms, Cal. 

Ordal, Ola J., *98, President, Pacific Lu- 
theran College, Parkland, Wash. 

Peterson, Joseph M., *98, Hutchinson Tlie- 
ological Seminary, Hutchinson, Minn. 

Hot, Iver S., *00, Superintendent, Mc- 
intosh, Minn. 

Wulfsberg, Einar, *00, President, Park 
Region Luther College, Fergus Falls, 
Minn. 

Clauson, Nils Y., *01, Portland, Ore. 

Jacobson, D. Gustav, *0l. Park Region 
Luther College, Fergus Falls, Minn. 

Hustvedt, S. Bemhard, *02, University pt 
(Southern) California, Los Angeles, 
Cal. 

Eteque, Sigurd S., *0I, Luther College, De- 
corah, Iowa. 

Ylvisaker, Sigurd C, *0I, Concordia Col- 
lege, St. Paul, Minn. 

Bale, Christian E., *04, Concordia College, 
Moorhead, Minn. 

Dormm, Ingebret, *04, Concordia College, 
Moorhead. K* 



Pederson, Alfred C, *04, Superintendent, 
Argyle, Minn. 

Thompson, T. Elmer, *04, High School, 
Chicago, 111. ^ . ^ „ 

Tonning, Ole, *04, Fargo Business College, 
Fargo, N. D. . ^ . 

Felland, Alfred T., *05, Superintendent, 
County Agricultural High School, Mad- 
dock, N. D. ^ ^ 

Saxvik, Henry O., *05. Superintendent, 
Hankinson, N. D. (Bismarck, N. D., 
1922-Iy2s.) 

Tingelstad, Oscar A., '05, Luther College, 
Decorah, Iowa. 

Braafladt, Louis H., '08, Johns Hopkins 
University, Baltimore, Md. 

Drotning, T. Melvin, *0«, High School, 
Seattle, Wash. ^, ^ . 

Nordlie, Herman C '08, Concordia Col- 
lege, Moorhead, .Minn. 

Tyssen, Carl, *08, President, Clifton Lu- 
theran College, Clifton, Texas. 

Vaala, Alf O., *07, County Superintendent 
of Schools, New Hampton, Iowa. 

Halvonon, Alfred O., '08, High School, 
St. John, N. D. 

Hanson, Karl O., *08, Superintendent, Ro- 
land, Iowa. (Tama, Iowa, 1922-1928.) 

Harstad, S. George, '08, Superintendent, 
Cottonwood, Minn. 

Hem, Hans N., '08, Superintendent, Ana- 
moose, N. D. 

Iverson, Henry, '08, Silver City, Idaho. 

Larsen, Henning, '08, State University 
of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. 

Larsen, Jakob, A. O, '08, University of 
Washington, Seattle, Wash. 

Peterson, Tillman, '08, Principal, Wiilard 
School, Tacoma, Wash. 

Skaaland, Swen G., '08, Superintendent, 
Waterville, Minn. 

Gaarder, Olaf, '09, State Normal, May- 
vllle, N. D. 

Grindstuen, Iver I., '09, Superintendent, 
Belfleld, N. D. 

Hanson, Sven A., *09, Superintendent, 
Hettinger, N D. 

Johnshoy, M. Casper, *09, Luther The- 
ological Seminary, St. Paul, Minn. 

Mevlg, Andrew M., '09. Superintendent, 
Lake Crystal, Minn. (Lamberton, 
Minn., 1922-1928.) 

Pederson, Christopher A., '09, Superin- 
tendent, Cass Lake, Minn. 

Peterson, Francis E., '09, Luther College, 
Decorah, Iowa. 

Reishus, Knut P. B., '09, Superintendent, 
Mabel, Minn 

Shervem, Henry O., *09, Lindsay, Cal. 

Iverson, Peter J., 'lo. Superintendent 
Secondary Education, State Agricul- 
tural College, Fargo, N. D. 

Estenson, Emil, '11, Superintendent, Pe- 
tersburg, N. D. (Velva, N. D., 1922- 
1928.) 

Frits, Charles A., '11, President, Luther 
Academy, Albert Lea, Minn 

Grimley, Oliver P. B., '11, Outlook College, 
Outlook, Sask., Can. 

Jerde, Oscar J., '11, Superintendent, Alta, 
Iowa. 

Norgaard, James R., '11, Superintendent, 
Sarles, N. D 

Onsgard, Henry A., *11, State Normal, 
Aberdeen, S. D. 

Opstad, Iver A., '11, Superintendent, Iowa 
City, Iowa. 

SImley, Irvin T., '11, Superintendent, 
Thief River Fails, Minn. 



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LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 




LUTHER COLLEGE ALUMNI, 1921 



Aanestad, O. Herbert, *12, High School, 
Hill City, Minn. 

Dahl, Wilhehn P., 'if. Superintendent, 
Munich, N. D. (Maddock, N. D., 1922- 
1928.) 

Moe, Leonard A., *12, Principal Prepar- 
atory Department, Luther College, De- 
corah, Iowa. 

Nelson, David T., '12, Luther College, 
Decorah, Iowa. 

Sperati, Carsten E., *18, Park Region Lu- 
ther College, Fergus Falls, Minn. 

Harstad, Oliver B., *14, Superintendent, 
McVille, N. D. 

Monson, Herman W., *14, High School, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

Swansen, H. Fred, *14, President, Gale 
College, Galesville, Wis. 

Umess, John N., *14, Superintendent, Mo- 
hall, N. D. 

Wisness, Arthur M., *14, Superintendent, 
Spring Grove, Minn. 

Baalson, Geo. A., *19, Superintendent, 
Garretson, S. D. 

Benran, Knute W., *15, Superintendent, 
Simms, Mont. 

Brandt, Walther I., *15, State University 
of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. 

Elvehlem, Oswald M., *15, University of 
Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. 

Erickson, Albert, *19, Superintendent, Co- 
lumbus, N. D. 

Lokensgaard, Herbert O., *15, Superin- 
tendent, Hills, Minn. 

Ylvisaker, Herman L., *19, Superintendent, 
Leeds, N. D 

Dohlen, HJalmar O., *16, Superintendent, 
Opheim, Mont. 

Gilbertson, Theo., '1«, Principal, High 
School, Finley, N. D. 

Hovde, Brynjolf J., *16, Luther College, 
Decorah, Iowa. 

Nelson, Martin J., *16, Superintendent, 
Willow City, N. D. 

Ronnei, Herman L, *1«, Superintendent, 
St. Francis, Minn. 



Swanson, Leonard O., *1«, Superintend- 
ent, Underwood. N. D. 
^wensen, Walter J., *1«, Superintendent. 

Cogswell, N. D. 
Trytten, Merriam H., *19, Luther College, 
Decorah, Iowa. 

*1«, Sup<>rintendent 
(Valley City, N. D. 



*17, Superintendent, 



Twito, Helmer, 

Grano, N. D. 

1922.) 
Birkelo, Carl P. 

Nome, N. D. 
Johnson, O. Leslie, *17, West Salem, Wis. 
Jorgenson, Eugene F., *17, High School, 

Werner, N. D. 
Knutson, Walter M., *17, Principal, High 

School, Hatton, N. D 
Kiland, Edwin F., *17, High School, Het- 
tinger, N. D. 
Lee, Arthur O., *17, Principal, High 

School, Roland, Iowa. 
Lien. Jacob A. O.. *17, High School, Lake 

Mills, Iowa. (Ossfan, la., 1922-21.) 
Natvig, Arthur S., *17, Albuquerque, N. 

Mex. 
Nelson, Ole A., *17, Superintendent, 

Goodell, Iowa. 
Olson, Tharlie O., *17, Principal, High 

School, Pequot, Minn. 
Tallc, Henry O., *17, Luther College, De- 
corah, Iowa. 
Tingelstad, Edvin, *17, Superintendent. 

Maddock, N. D. (Hood River, Oregon, 

1922-1923.) 
Evanson, Chellis N., *18, Luther College, 

Decorah, Iowa 
Lee. P. Joseph, *18. Principal, High 

School, Hankinson, N. D. 
Lunde. Alert J., *18. High School, SUter. 

Iowa. 
Natviff, Alvln J., *18. Park Region Luther 

College. Fergus Falls, Minn. 
Nelson, Olaf, *18, Superintendent, Ed- 
more, N. D. 
Qualley, Orlando W., *18, Luther College, 

Decorah, Iowa. 
Wierson, Andrew T, *18, Superintendent, 

Thor, Iowa. 



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GRADUATES 



419 




LUTHER COLLEGE ALUMNI. 1921 



Bronstad, Alyin L., *19, Clifton Lutheran 

College, Clifton, Texas. 
Strom, Carl W., *1», Luther College, De- 
corah, Iowa. 
Thompson, Maurice A., *19, Principal, 

High School, Maddock, N. D. 
Ameson, Arthur H., '20, Lutheran Nor- 
mal School, Madison, Minn. 
Gr0nlid, I. Rudolph, *20, Superintendent, 

Grenora, N D. 
Jordahl, Harold C, *20, Principal, High 

School, Kerkhoyen, Minn. 
Kaupanger, Olin L., *20, Superintendent, 

Toronto. S. D. 
Larson, Elmer R., *20, Clifton Lutheran 

College, Clifton, Texas. 
Sorenson, Morris A., *20, Superintendent, 

Calmar, Iowa. 
Swensen, Alf W^ *20, Wartburg Normal 

College, Wayerljr, Iowa. 
Trytten, Gilbert N, *20, State University 

of Iowa, Iowa City. Iowa. 
Eid. Elmer S.. *21, Superintendent, Wing. 

N. D. 
HalTorson, Nelius O.. *21, High School, 

Spring Grove. Minn. 
Hermundstad. Emil. '21. Principal, High 

SdiooU Bode. Iowa. 
Jorgenson, Victor G., *21, High School, 

Akely, Minn. 
Lee. Gisle J., *21, Principal, High School, 

Calmar. Iowa. 
Lien. Erling W. N , *21. High School, Big 

Lake, Minn. 
Mabnin. Olaf G., '21, Luther Academy, 

Albert Lea, Minn. 
Olson. Clayton M.. *21. Superintendent. 

Brandt S. D. 
Parsons, Edward H., *21, Superintendent. 

Bode. Iowa. 
Rindahl, Opie S., *21, Jewell Lutheran 

College, Jewell, Iowa. 
Sihler. Ernest G. W , *21. High School, 

Spring Grove, Minn 
Sorlien, Leon C, *21, High School, Han- 

kinson, N. D. 
Storvick, Roy O., *21. Canton Lutheran 

Normal School, Canton. S. D. 



Tolo. Harold M., *21, Principal, High 
School. Elbow Lake. Minn. 

Ylvisaker. J. Wilhebn, *21. Luther Acad- 
emy, Albert Lea, Minn. 

4. PUBLIC SERVICE (25) 

a. ARMY (2) 

Storaasli, Gynther, Ul. Manila. P. I., 1st 

Lt. Chaplain. 
Sperati, Paolo H.. *15, Camp Lewis, Wash., 
Captain Inf. 

b. PUBLIC OFFICERS (28) 

Teisberg. Aslak K.. *70. Customs Appraiser, 
St. Paul, Minn. 

Koren, John. *70, International Prison 
Commissioner for the United States. 
Brookline, Mass. 

Torrison. Oscar M , *81. Judge Circuit 
Court, Evnnston, 111. 

Kiland, Gustav H., *88. State Deputy Fire 
Marshal, Madison, Wis. 

Voldeng. M. Nelson. *88, Superintendent 
State Hospital for Epileptics, Wood- 
ward, lown. 

Lund, John H.. *84, Judge County Court, 
Webster. S. D. 

Games, Botolf H., *85, Postal Clerk, Min- 
neapolis, Minn. 

Swenson. Laurits S., *8«, United States 
Minister to Norway, Christiania, Nor- 
way. 

Steensland, John G.. *fi7. Instructor Rail- 
way Mail Service, Chicafro. 111. 

Peterson. Helmer S.. *08. Federal Board 
for Vocational Education, Seattle, 
Wash. 

Preus, Jacob Aall O., '08, Governor of 
Minnesota. St. Paul, Minn. 

Sauer, Herman O.. '08, County Agricul- 
tural Agent. Linton, N. D. 

Paulson, Peter C, '04, Attorney Inter- 
State Commerce Commission, Washing- 
ton, D C. 

Hustvedt, P. Thomas, *06, Postal Clerk, 
Decorah, Iowa 

Mortenson, Emil E., *0«, Postal Clerk. 
St. Paul, Minn. 



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LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Dahl, Sondre N., *07. Private Secretary to 
Member of the House, Washington, 
D. C 

HoUcesvik, Julian A.. '07, Deputy County 
Treasurer, Carson, N. D. 

Juve, Oscar A, '07, U. S. Dept. of Agri- 
culture, Washington, D. C. 

Olsen, Nils A., '07, U. S. Dept. of Agri- 
culture, Washington. D. C. 

Jessen, Carl A., '09. State High School Su- 
penrisor, Helena, Mont. 

Jenson, Carl Andrew, *10, Public Account- 
ant, Fort Atkinson, Wis. 

Anderson, Conrad A , *17, Asst. State 
Treasurer, St. Paul, Minn. 

Ravndal, Christian M., *20, U. S. Con- 
sular Senrice. Vienna, Austria. 

5. STUDENTS (29) 

Buedall, Anton, *12, University of Chi- 
cago, Chicago, 111. 

Peterson, Enoch E., *12, University of 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Kilneas, G. Waldemar W., *ia. University 
' of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. 

Seines, E. Robert, *1«, University of Min- 
nesota, Minneapolis. Minn. 

Ylvlsaker, Johau P., *16. Paris, France. 

Jargo, Rudolph A., *17, University of Wis- 
consin, Madison, Wis. 

Rohne, J. Magnus, *17, Harvard Univer- 
sity, Cambridge, Mass. 

Thorgrimsen, Gudmund G C. J., *17, Uni- 
versity of North Dakota, Grand Forks. 
N. D. 

Hanson, J. Tillman, *18, Northwestern 
University (Dental School), Chicago, 

Johnson, Joseph M., *18, Davenport, Iowa. 

Lunde. Herman A. P.. *18, Luther The- 
ological Seminary, St. Paul, Minn. 

Tollefsrud, Mervin B, *18. Luther The- 
ological Seminary, St. Paul, Minn. 

Tolo, Arthur J., '18, Luther Theological 
Seminary, St. Paul, Minn. 

Waage, Johannes, *18, Glen Lake, Minn. 

Larsen, Myron W., *19, Washington Uni- 
versity. St. Louis, Mo. 

Monson, Orville S., *19, Rush Medical Col- 
lege, Chicago, III. 

Nelson, Allen E., *19, Luther Theological 
Seminary, St. Paul. Minn. 

Skalet. Charles H., *19, Johns Hopkins 
University, Baltimore, Md. 

Vaaler, Torvald, '19, University of Min- 
nesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Ellingson, Abel R., *20, University of Min- 
nesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Megorden, Tennis H , *20, Luther Theo- 
logical Seminary, St Paul, Minn. 

Rossing, Torstein H., *20, Luther Theo- 
logical Seminary, St. Paul, Minn 

Scarvie, Walter B.. '20, Luther Theolog- 
ical Seminary, St. Paul, Minn. 

Unseth, Malcolm W., '20, University of 
Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. 

Ylvlsaker, Ragnvald S., '20. University of 
Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Eddaen, B. Syvers, '21, Luther Theolog- 
ical Seminary, St. Paul, Minn. 

Maakestad, Norvald G., *2l, Luther Theo- 
logical Seminary, St. Paul. Minn. 

Oefstedal, Rudolph. *21, Luther Theolog- 
ical Seminary, St. Paul, Minn. 

Storvick, Alfred O., '21, Luther Theolog- 
ical Seminary, St. Paul, Minn.- 



«. TRANSPORTATION (5) 
Bredce, Ole E, '81, Minneapolis, Minn., 

White Star Line. 
Hove, Andreas M., *8l, Amarlllo, Texas, 

Santa Fe Ry. Offices. 
Hansen, Carl M., *12, St Paul, Minn., 

Omaha Ry. 
Raraberg. Freeman B., '10, Robbinsdale, 

Minn., Soo Line 
Streeter, Elmer M. *17, Brookfleld, Mo. 
7. TRADE (111) 
a. BANKERS (42) 
Fries, Jeremias P.. *82. Toronto, S. D. 
Brandt, John A., *8I, Hayti, S. D. 
Finseth, Knute A., *80, Nerstrand, Minn. 
Ongstad, Sophus H., *80, Manfred, N. D. 
Opheim, Ola S., '04, Sisseton, S. D. 
Brevig, Samuel B., *9«, Fortuna, N. D. 
Johnson, Perry S., *99. Minneapolis. Minn. 
Tonerson, Jacob A. C, '99, Oklee, Minn. 
Anderson, Andrew O., *0l, Velvn, N. D. 
Gerald, G. H.. *01, Wasliington, D. C 
Livdnhl, Carl, '01, Dodson, Mont. 
Skinnemoen, John S., *01, Wendell, Minn. 
Wolian, Oliver B. F., '01, Glenwood, Minn. 
Hailstone, A. Augustus, *02, Farwell, 

Minn. 
Vangen, Charles O., *04, Albert Lea, Minn. 
Grefstad, Oscar K., *05, Bode, Iowa. 
Hielle, Ole S., '05. Mercer, N D. 
Sdijeldahl, Theodor, '05, Highlandville, 

Iowa. 
Sorlien, Henry J., *05, Bergen, N. D. 
Sponheim, Oscar H., *05, Portland, Ore- 
gon. 
Moe, Edwin O., '06, Galesburg. N. D. 
Orwoll, Melvinus S., '06, Granite Palls, 

Minn. 
Sevareid. Alfred, '06, Velva, N. D. 
Fries, Lyman A., '07, Toronto, S. D. 
Lynne, Justus A., *07, Fairmount, N. D. 
Dahl, Gerhard H., *08, Sioux Falls, S. D. 
Guttebf), Nels H. W., '09, Aurora, S. D. 
Trytten, C. Oscar, '09, Wlldrose, N. D. 
Hegg, Elmer R., '11, Stevens Point, Wis. 
Preus, Paul A., '11, St. Paul, Minn. 
Trytten, John M.. *11. Lodge Grass, Mont. 
Aaby, Arthur O., '12, Brandt, S. D. 
Wolian, Winfred A.. *12, Hingham, Mont. 
Rahn. Grant O G., 'II, Belvlew, Minn. 
Gorder, Lester W., *15, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Kraabel T. Oswald. '15, Lawton, N. D. 
Brevig. Martin L., '16, Withrow. Minn. 
Jacobson, Irenus C, '16, Wittenberg, Wis. 
Johnson, Paul G, *16, I^wis. Wis. 
Kraabel, Ragnar E.. *16, Qifford, N. D. 
John.son, Bemhard A., '19, Minneapolis, 

Minn. 
Melaas, Ira J.. '19, Huxley, Iowa. 

b. MERCHANTS AND BUSINESS MEN 
(Tl) 

Borgen, Edward. *76. Madison, WLs. 

Quarve, Timan L., '78, Fessenden, N. D. 

Tande, Ole, '79, Nortlifleld, Minn. 

Hadland. Ole P., '80, Spring Valley, Minn. 

Allen, Hans. '81, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Hanson, Haldor, '81, Northern Book and 
Music Co., Chicago, 111. 

Halland, John G., *84, Fargo, N. D. 

Shefloe, Joseph S.. '85, Agent, The Mac- 
mi llan Co., Baltimore, Md. 

Fuglei, Ole K, '86, Petersburg. Nebr. 

Torrison, Norman, '89, Manitowoc, Wis. 

Steensland, Morton M., '90, Madison, Wis. 



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GRADUATES 



421 



Aaker, John T., '91, President. Soo Lum- 
ber Com Vclva, N. D. 

Thorson, I. August, *99, President, North- 
western School Supply Co., Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 

Torrison, Wilhelm L., *»5, Manitowoc, 
Wis. 

Markhos, Alfred L., '97, Contractor, Mis- 
soula, Mont 

WoUan, Oustav B., *97, St. Paul, Minn. 

Hess, J. Edwaid, *98, Stevens Point, Wis. 

Johnson, George J., *98, Crocus, N. D. 

Teisberg, Carl O., *99, Minneapolis, Minn. 

YlTisaker, Olnf, *99, St. Paul, Minn. 

OuUizson, Herman O^ *00, Humboldt, la. 

Styre, Oscar C, '00, Spokane, Wash. 

Wollan, Gustar C, *00, Glenwood, Minn. 

Braner. Julius, *01, San Francisco, Cal. 

Thorstenson. Knute A., *0l, Albert Lea, 
Minn 

Larsen, Carl E., *0S, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Naeseth, Herman, *0S. Minneapolis, Minn. 

Skatteb^l, Chr., 'O*. Manila, P. I. ^ 

Aphind, Martin, *0I, Larimore, N. D. 

Brusegaard, Theo. B., *04, Brainerd. Minn. 

Nelson, Walter, *04, MaTTille, N. D. 

Petersen, J. W., *04, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Gilbert, Watter I., *05, Zamboanga, P. I. 

Strand, J. Edward, *09, Schafer, N. D. 

Rosholdt, Cart L., *0«, Roanwood, Mont. 

Kulaas, Peter, '07. Minot, N. D. 

Ruen, Olirer, *07, Clark Fork, Idaho. 

Teisberg, Thomas H., *07, Fergus Falls, 
Minn. 

KkMter. Lars S.. *08, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Rosholdt, Ingelbert E., '08. Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

Rostad, Martin L., '08, Comertown, Mont. 

Sperley, John, '08, Spokane, Wash. 

Hanson, Joseph G.. ^09, Bode, Iowa. 

Peterson, AsUk S., *09, Albany, Wis. 

Rosenqvist, Bemhard, *09, Hoffman, 
Mhin. 

Rosholdt, Theo. G^ *09, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Erstad, Andrew T., '10, Barber, Idaho. 

Heraeth, Adolph A., *10, Hitterdal, Minn. 

Monson, Albert, '10, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Thorpe, OUif C, '11, Willmar, Minn. 

Wollan, Casper I., '11, Glenwood, Minn. 

Dale; Herman F., 'II, Decorah, Iowa. 

Hansen, H. Garence, *18. Lakewood, O. 

Reishus. FHtjof E., 'II. Minot. N. D 

Rosholdt, Herman S, *ll, MinncRpoli-s, 
Minn. 

Brunsdale, K. Edward, '14, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

Larson, Einar R., '15. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Loberg, Jesse D., '15. NelsonvfUe, Wis. 

Lysne, Henry O., 15, Cicero, HI 

Sauer, Arnold G., '15, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Pjeldstad, Gustar A, '10, Grand Forks, 
N. D. 

Hangen, Donald J.. '10. Decorah, Iowa. 

Preus, Herman A., *10, Minneapolis. 
Minn. 

Holter, Arthur M., '17, San Francisco. 
Cal. 

LoTik, Louis T., '17. Des Moines, lown. 

OUifson, Clarence M.. *17, West Duluth, 
Minn. 

Thorsen, O. Herman, '18, Northwestern 
School Supply Co., Des Moines. Iowa. 

Aamodt, Otis M., '19, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Ramdal, Olaf, '20, Constantinople, Tur- 
key. 

Siqueland, Harald. '20, Chicago, III. 

Sorlien, Ame R, *21, Decorah, Iowa. 



DECEASED GRADUATES (110) 

With Occupation and Addrtu at Demise 

Aaberg, Herman, '08, Teacher, Grand 
Forks, N. D. 

Aaberg, Joseph, '17, Clerk, Parkland, 
Wash. 

Amundson, Albert, *78, Physician. Cam- 
bridge. WU. 

Amundson. H. E., '80, Law Student, Red 
Wing. Minn. 

Anderson, Slvert, 71, Farmer, Cordele, 
Ga. 

Aspelund, Joseph, *01. Physician, Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 

Austvold, Edwin B., *97, Clergyman, 
Rothsay. Minn. 

Bakke, Nils J. '77, Publicity Secretary, 
Colored Mission. Synodicai Conference, 
Milwaukee. Wis. 

Bakke, Peter H., '88, Physician, Preston, 
Minn. 

Benrh. Johannes E., *60, Clergyman, 
Sacred Heart, Minn. 

Bj0rgaas, John, *79, Clergyman, Decorah, 
Iowa. 

Bj0rgo, Gerhard A., '08, Science Student, 
Red Wing, Minn. 

Bothne, Carl. '80, Medical Student, Yale 
University, New Haven. Conn. 

Bredesen, Adolf, '70, Clergyman, Deer- 
fleld. Wis. 

Brevig, Oiuf L., *94, Clergyman. Moor- 
head, Minn. 

Brorby, Joseph, *99, Lawyer, Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 

Bygland. Olav S.. '90, Theol. Student, 
Robbinsdale, Minn. 

Christensen, Neheni, '71, Clergyman. Park- 
land, Wash. 

Dahl, Glaus, '85. Teacher, University of 
Chicago, III. 

Davick, Albert O., '05. Agent, Coulee, N. 
D. 

Egge. Albert E.. '79, Professor. Willa- 
mette University, Salem, Ore. 

Ellestad, Nils J , '71, Clergyman, Seattle, 
Wash. 

Erdahl, Gullik, '00, Clergyman, Barrett, 
Minn. 

Evenson, Gustav A., *80, Student, Balti- 
more, Md. 

Fardal, Nils E., *80, Fanner, Stanhope, 
Iowa. 

Floren, Syver L., '09, Precentor, Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 

F0rde, Nils, '78, Clergyman, Starbuck, 
Minn. 

Fosmark, Ole N., '75, Clergyman. Grand 
Forks, N. D 

Fryslle, Benjamin, '85, Bank Cashier. 
Nome, N. D. 

Gjellum, Erik S., '79, Fanner, Fowler, 
Colo. 

Gla.s0e. Oluf, '88. Clergyman, Brush 
Prairie, Wash. 

Granrud, Jolian E., '80, Professor, Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, Minneapolis. 
Minn. 

Gr0nlid. C. J. M., '77, Clergjnnan, Wa- 
tervllle, Iowa. 

Gullikson, Oscar, '95, Medical Student, 
Decorah, Iowa. 

Hanson, A. Oliver, '17, Fanner. Meridian, 
Texas. 

Hanson, George C, '09, Lawyer, Glendive, 
Mont. 

Haugen, Christopher E., '91, Teacher. Lu- 
ther Aca<leniy, AUjert Lea, Minn. 



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422 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 




PROF. L. S. REQUE— 
Alumnus Longest at Luther 
College — 44 years 



Hegg, Robert, *98, Elocutionist, Decorah, 
Iowa. 

Hektoen, Martin, *95, Asst. Physician, 
State Hospital for Insane, Hospital, 
111. 

Hilmen, Peder T.. *72, Clergyman, Crooks- 
ton, Minn. 

Hokaasen, Otto T., *09, Clerk, Decorah, 

Holden,' Ole M., *94, Clergyman, Santa 
Barbara, Cal. 

Holstad, Andr., '81, Teacher, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

Hovde, Christian J., *92, Clergyman, Blair, 
Wis. 

Hoyme, Thrond, *79, Theol. Student, Madi- 
son, Wis. 

Huset, Isak, *82, Student, Norway, Minn. 

Huus, Alfred, '82, Clergyman, Northwood, 
Iowa. 

Ingebrigtsen, Johan E., *89, Clergyman, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

Jahr, Olav, *96, Cand. Theol., Christlania, 
Norway. 

Jahren, Johan H., *84, Clergyman, Lake 
Park, Minn. 

Jenson, Omar H., '10, Student, Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 

Juul. Gustay A., *02, Banker, Warren, 
Minn. 

Juve, Tarje O., *C«, Farmer, Lancing, 
Tenn. 

Kaasa, Edward O., '92, Professor, Luther- 
an Ladies* Seminary, Red Wing. Minn. 

Kalhelm, Ole M., '84, Editor, Chicago, 
IlL 

Kildahl, John N., '79. Theol. Professor, St. 
Paul, Minn. 

Klrkeby, Guttorm. '78, Theol. Student, 
Madison, Wis. 

Knutson, Carl S.. *18, National Service 
(France). 

Kopperdal, Hans, *81, Editor, Fargo, N. 



Langeland, Magne, *75, Clergyman, Roth- 
say, Minn. 

Larsen, Herman, *89, Physician, None, 
Texas. 

Larsen, Laurits, '79, Chicago, 111. 

Larsen, Olaf, *78, TheoL Student, Madi- 
son, Wis. 

Larsen, Reler, *72, Clergyman, Spring 
Grove, Minn. 

Lee, Ole T., *84, Clergyman, Northwood, 
Iowa. 

Linde, Henry J., '01, Lawyer, Bismarck. 
N. D. 

Lomen, J0rgen, '78, Asst. State Audi- 
tor, St. Paul, Minn. 

Mandt, Olaf, *78, Clergyman, Baltimore, 
Md. 

Markhus, Lars J., 'fl«. Clergyman, Nor- 
way Lake, Minn. 

Mellem, Edwin G., '90, Business Man, 
Marshfleld, Ore. 

Moen, Paul, *99, Clergsrman, Canby, Minn. 

Mohn, Thorbj0ni N., '70, President, St 
Olaf College, Northfleld, Minn. 

M0ller, Fred A., '70, Clergyman, Nelson, 
Wis 

Moore,' Henry W., '91, Physician, De- 
corah, Iowa. 

Naeseth, Christen A., '74, Librarian, Lu- 
ther College, Decorah, Iowa. 

Nilsson, Thomas, *89, Editor Kirketidende, 
Decorah, Iowa. 

Nordgaard, Chr., *78, Law Student, Iowa 
City, Iowa. 

Opsahl, Theo. G., '84, Clergyman, Cal- 
lender, Iowa. 

Ottesen, Otto C, *80, Clergyman, Linn 
Grove, Iowa. 

Petersen, Halvor, '81, Lawyer, Chicaga 
111 

Petersen. W. M. H., '75