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Full text of "Luther College through sixty years, 1861-1921"

'ryT^i-: :•'":■■• ' •■>7-</:y;::*- ;, 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 

AT LOS ANGELES 




V x-' 



''..' 




DR. LAUR LARSEN 



Luther College Through 
Sixty Years 



1861 - ig2i 



"^ 



By THE .LUTHER COLLEGE FACULTY 

Editorial Committee: 
O. M. NORLIE - O. A. TINGELSTAD - KARL T. JACOBSEN 



"^ 



,''i 



PRESS OF 

AUGSBURG PUBLISHING HOUSE 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 
1922 



<^^7 i 



COPYRIGHT 1922 
LUTHER COLLEGE FACULTY 



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PREFACE 

LUTHER COLLEGE has had a definite aim and has rendered 
a very definite service. It has stood for sound Biblical doc- 
trine, and on this basis has furnished many well educated ministers 
and teachers for the Church. It has thus been a very important 
factor in the development of the Norwegian Lutheran Church in 
this country. It has given its students a knowledge of the cultural 
and spiritual heritage which they have received from their fore- 
fathers and lias thus added to their strength of character and 
individuality and made them better American citizens than they 
would have been had they known less of the roots from which they 
\Jiave sprung. It has stood for a thorough classical training; and, 
Y^thpugh providing for the study of the natural sciences, has empha- 
■J, sized the study of languages, history, human thought and art, and 
human institutions, in a time of great uncertainty in college edu- 
cation. It has pursued its policy in the face of great temptation 
\t6 yield to the spirit of the time, and has produced a body of 
^alumni who have exerted a widespread influence and have been a 
^distinct credit to their Alma Mater and the people of Norwegian 
extraction in this country. 

In view of these things, it is quite appropriate that a history of 
Luther College, such as is herewith presented, should be pub- 
lished at this time. It is not the first history of the College that has 
been written. A number of sketches and histories of the College 
have been published from time to time, but only one of these 
.-\ 'histories has attempted to give a detailed account of the work done 
'i >at the institution. This is Prof. Gisle Bothne's "Det Norske Luther 
. ^College," written in the Norwegian language and published in 
\1897. It is a very interesting and valuable work; but, naturally, 
*^it contains no account of the development of the College during 
v-the last quarter of a century. 

«v^ "Luther College Through Sixty Years" gives the history of 

< -the College from the time of its origin to the conclusion of the 

sixtieth anniversary festivities, and contains material pertaining 

to the College that is not to be found elsewhere in the form in 

^which it is here presented. A very readable history of the College 

J could be written, made up of accounts of interesting episodes and 

Cr^the many events that have taken place on the College campus. 

' It was decided, however, not to make this volume a history of that 

^ character, but to make it a source of information pertaining to 

t\ the serious work of the institution. As such it should prove 

valuable to all who for any reason are interested in the College, 



286867 



to all who arc interested in the history of the Lutheran Cluireh 
in this eountry. to all who are interested in the history of the 
people of Norwegian extraetion in this country, and to all who 
are interested in the development of higher education in this 
country during the last sixty years. 

The volume is the joint product of the men who constituted the 
College faculty in the year 1921-1922, the "Sixtieth Anniversary 
Year" ; but special credit is due the editorial staff, consisting of 
Professors O. M. Norlie, O. A. Tingelstad, and K. T. Jacobsen, 
who planned the work, read proof, and supervised the publication. 
All this tlu'}^ have done in addition to prejiaring their own chapters 
and performing other duties which would ordinarily be regarded 
as sufficient to occupy the time of a busy man. 

The volume contains more than 250 illustrations, which have 
been selected for their general interest and historical value, and 
which the reader will no doubt regard as an important feature 
of the book. 

It is hoped that the value of the volume will prove commensurate 
with the labor required to prepare it, and that it may serve as a 
useful work of historical reference. 

Oscar L. Olson. 

Luther College, Decorah, Iowa, July 12, 1922. 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 



Cover Destgx — li^an Doseff 

Chapter One— The Foundation of Luther College— 17, Sihler . . 9 
Chapter Two— Religious Aim and Character — O. M. Norlie ... 24 
Chapter Three — Government and Administration — D. T. Nelson . 48 
Chapter Four — Presidents and Principals — Francis E. Peterson . . 64 

Chapter Five— Faculty— O. A. Timjelstad 88 

Chapter Six — School Plant — Francis E. Peterson 142 

Chapter Seven — Library and Museum — Karl T. Jacobsen .... 159 

Chapter Eight — Income — K. O. Eittreim 170 

Chapter Nine — Expenditures — O. M. Eittreim 177 

Chapter Ten— The Field of Luther College— JET. O. TaUe . . . .184 

Chapter Eleven — Attendance — S. S. Reque 202 

Chapter Twelve — Organization — L. A. Mae 260 

Chapter Thirteen — Instruction — A. M. Rovehtad 275 

Chapter Fourttjen- Student Organizations — Carl W. Strom . . . 309 
Chapter Fifteen— Athletics and Military Drill— O. W. Quail ei/ . . 328 

Chapter Sixteen— Music — C. N. Eranson 361 

Chapter Seventeen — Important Events — Kimt (ijerset 382 

Chapter Eighteen— Sixtieth Anniversary— (Vn-/o .-/. Sperati . . .398 

Chapter Nineteen — Graduates — M. H. Trytteii 411 

Chapter Twenty— Luther College Graduates and Undergraduates in 

Church Work — Brynjolf J. Hovde 4-33 

Chapter Twenty-One — Retrospect and Prospect— 0.vro*- L. Olson . 468 

Bibliography — O. 3/. Norlie 435 

Chronological Summary — O. A. Tingelstad 488 

Index — Karl T. Jacobsen 49I 



CHAPTER ONE 

THE FOUNDATION OF LUTHER COLLEGE 

W. SiHLER 

THE last of the eighteenth and tlie beginning of the nineteenth 
century saw rationalism, with its God the mere product of the 
human brain, gradually ebb away. A deeper philosophy arose, and 
the troubles of the times, which culminated in the French Revolu- 
tion and Napoleon's tyrannies, awakened a deeper religious con- 
sciousness. 

This reaction occurred wherever rationalism had held sway, 
also in Norway, which had not escaped its influences. Among the 
lay people these religious longings found their spokesman in Hans 
Nielsen Hauge; but also the seats of learning, where theologians 
and clergymen were prepared for their responsible positions, be- 
came imbued with a new life which was to find its reflection on the 
prairies and in the woods of North America. 

We recognize tlierein God's finger and rejoice that at about the 
time of this awakening the interest in the New World had entered 
the houses and huts of many people who were destined to play over 
here a part which no one would have dreamed of some years be- 
fore. ' 

It is well known that many Norwegians found their way into 
this country long before the nineteenth century, through their 
many mercantile connections, especially through Holland. These 
people, however, were soon absorbed, and their history is traced 
only with difficulty. If we look for the influences which caused an 
immigration which became really monumental, we are introduced 
to the name of Cleng Peerson, the adventurous, untiring pioneer 
from Stavanger, Norway. 

Space does not permit going into details about Cleng Peerson's 
burning desire to learn all that could at that time be known about 
this country. It is evident that no hardships could deter him. He 
covered thousands of miles on foot, walking through the wilds of 
western New York, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Missouri, 
Iowa, Texas, and the intervening states, eager to make his own 
observations. During these periods he was in communication with 
friends in Norway and persuaded a number of them to attempt a 
settlement in the western part of New York. There is no evidence 



10 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

that lie ever acted from selfish motives. He was ever ready witli 
the best he had, good advice gained from personal experience. 

The times in Norway had been hard in the first part of the 
nineteenth century, and so the people who came in the year 1825 
and the following years, mostly on the urgent invitation of Cleng 
Pearson, were well prepared for their arduous task as pioneers. 
They brought to America strong arm*, a willingness to work, and a 
deep-seated piety. 

It will be well, especially for the younger generation, to con- 
template the setting of this historical spectacle. No century has 
seen such wonderful progress in making life easier, though per- 
haps not happier, as has the nineteenth century. Hundreds of 
conveniences which* are demanded to-day as a matter of course, 
were urritnown to these pioneers: for example, matches, lamps, 
stoves, lead-pencils, steel pens, wagon-springs. Transportation 
was by the slowest means. Small ships that often were on the 
■way for over a hundred days brought the people to these shores. 
On board these ships the vo3'agers slept in holes, had to board 
themselves with fare that had become very old, and drink water 
that would not go down unless the consumer would hold his nose 
at the same time. Only a few arrived who had not encountered 
storms that often took them out of their course for weeks at a 
time. And when they finally did set their feet on firm land, there 
were other inconveniences that awaited them. The ox-teams walked 
no faster than they always had, and the wood in the wagon-boxes 
was as hard as ever. Stations, if they did exist, were far apart 
and often found only by accident. The inclemencies of the weather 
had to be endured under the open sky, and a dry place for a night's 
rest was often a godsend. 

Not only had these pioneers stout hearts, but they also pos- 
sessed a piety which gave to them solace in many dark hours and 
upheld that faith with which they began to lay the foundations 
for the beautiful things which now show forth their ideals. 

Between the year of Cleng Peerson's coming (1821) and the 
year 1840 the stream of immigrants became wider and wider; 
after depositing a settlement on the Fox River, LaSalle Co., 
Illinois, this stream divided and spread out into Wisconsin, Iowa, 
and Minnesota. 

Some of the settlements were not made in favored places, and 
sickness became a very great trial, almost too severe for the 
courage and faith of the newcomers. Tims the settlement at 
Muskego, Wisconsin, has many sad i)agcs in its first chapters. Yet 
these setbacks were only temporary and were gradually conquered, 



THE FOUNDATION OF LUTHER COLLEGE 11 

and many new colonies grew and prospered in more favorable local- 
ities. 

When a pioneer takes along from his Iiome his Bible and his 
hymn book he takes with him a mighty chain which anchors him 
to a better world that is not stationary but follows him wherever 
he goes. And we know that most of the early immigrants who left 
old Mother Norway took good care to carry this chain with them. 
In many instances their desire for new surroundings was coupled 
with longings for a more ideal world than the one in which they 
lived. Thus sprang up in many localities through gatherings, 
mostly on Sundays, what turned out to be the nucleus of later 
congregations. Such meetings gladly welcomed persons of Chris- 
tian experience who could expound to their hearers those things 
that they longed for in their spiritual life. 

We find such men who felt the call to exhort their fellow 
Christians going from place to place. Among these must be men- 
tioned the one who became especially well known, Elling Eielsen. 
He was the first layman to assume notable spiritual leadership, 
and he became the first ordained minister among the Norwegian 
pioneers. 

The spiritual life in many of these circles was based very 
strongly on personal experiences and the isolation in the country 
was not felt as keenly by the people of these tendencies as it was 
felt by many others who had not come under the influence of Hauge 
and his followers, but among whom the thought of the church in 
Norway with its many associations awakened deep longings for 
things enjoyed at home, partly social, and partly of a deeper 
nature. These people were not satisfied with the exhortations of 
laymen, but had in mind the possibility of establishing here all the 
outward things with which their religious life was bound up. 

The first man who was impressed with the necessity of meeting 
these wants was C. L. Clausen. Clausen came to America, to 
Muskego, with the intention of helping in school work as it was 
carried on in Norway, but soon realized that such work lacked 
entirely the religious background to which he had been accustomed. 
He clearly saw that it was out of the question without congrega- 
tions, and that the spiritual needs of the older people required 
first attention. 

Accordingly Clausen, though somewhat reluctantly, was per- 
suaded to seek ordination by an acknowledged Lutheran minister. 
This ordination was performed by Rev. L. F. E. Krause on the 
eighteenth of October, 1843. Clausen thus became available as 
a minister of the Gospel for the first settlers and immediately began 



12 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



liis work, making his headquarters in the distriet around Muskego, 
Wisconsin. 

In the same month in whicli C. L. Clausen was ordained in 
America, October, 1843, the king of Norway issued a permit by 
whicli the man in Norway was to be ordained who may be called 
the first direct link which bound together the Lutheran Church in 
Norway and the Norwegian Lutheran Church in America. The 
name of the man who had asked for an ordination in Norway 
was J. W. C. Dietrichson. His coming here was due to the in- 
fluence of P. S0rensen, a Godfearing fuller of Christiania, whose 
thoughts often turned to the spiritual needs of his fellow Chris- 
tians in America. Dietrichson had met this man and had been 
offered by hiui the money needed for a trip to America besides 




C. L. CLAUSEN 



J. W. C. DIETRICHSON 



H. A. STUB 



further support if he would be willing to go there as an ordained 
minister, to help the scattered settlers organize their religious af- 
fairs. The otter was gladly accepted, and the plans of S0rensen 
were carried out. On the ninth of July, 181t, we find Dietrichson 
in New York getting ready for his trip into the interior. 

His first stop is at Muskego with Rey. C. L. Clausen, at whose 
adyice he goes further west and yisits the settlements near Madison, 
called by the Indian name Koshkonong. Here he begins his minis- 
terial work on a somewhat extensive scale. The beginnings were 
humble enough. His first two sermons were preached August 28, 
ISH, in a cattle-shed on A. E. Hornefjeld's farm. East Kosh- 
konong; and tlie third sermon was deliyered Se})tcml)t'r 2, 1814, 
under two oaks on Aslak Juve's farm, West Koshkonong. This 
latter event has been commemorated by a suitable monument. 

Other congregations were founded in quick succession and soon 
became large and strong, and fortunately they did not have to wait 
so very long for shepherds, because the call of the Lord had 
reached the hearts of men who were destined to spend their strength 
on the new fields in America. 



THE FOUNDATION OF LUTHER COLLEGE 



13 



Space forbids going into details. But let us pause for a mo- 
ment and consider the sacrifices of these men. Most of them 
came from surroundings where culture, education, and comfort- 
able circumstances had smoothened over the hardships of life. 
Their associations had developed in them an appreciation of the 
many beautiful and good things that come with a more advanced 
civilization, such as books, music, educated friends, schools, and 
other comforts. To all these things they say farewell, willing to 
take what may come, prepared to share all the hardships of their 
charges, gladly sacrificing things whose loss many a newcomer 
did not feel, because he had never been accustomed to them. Viewed 
in that light these pioneer ministers and their wives are seen to 
have been cast in a heroic mold, and their love for the Kingdom 




A. C. PREUS 



(1. DIETRICHSON 



J. A. OTTESEN 



of Heaven shines all the brighter through their sacrifices. In many 
ways the present generation can comprehend this much better than 
did the people whom they came to serve. 

The first in this number was Rev. H. A. Stub, who arrived in 
1848 and took charge of the congregation at Muskego as Clausen's 
successor. Next came Rev. A. C. Preus, who began his work at 
Koshkonong. Soon thereafter arrived three men whom God's call 
had reached in various ways to begin their labors which were to 
bear such blessed fruits. Their names are: H. A. Preus, N. 
Brandt, and G. Dietrichson. 

About the time of their arrival they found that the first three, 
Clausen, Stub, and A. C. Preus, had taken the first steps toward 
establishing closer relations between the congregations. As in 
everything that is built from the bottom, great difficulties had to 
be overcome herein. The first call for such a meeting where the 
forming of a synod mi j;ht be discussed was sent out in 1849, but 
there was no response In 1851, however, a meeting was held in 
the midst of winter, to which came Clausen, Stub, and A. C. Preus. 



u 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



The organization which was called into being was named "Den 
Norsk-Evangelisk-Lutherske Kirke i Anierika." This body did not 
live long. In the following year it was dissolved at a meeting 
M'liich was attended by six ministers and thirty-six lay delegates 
in the ehurcli at Muskego, but steps were immediately taken for the 
creation of another synod which was founded in the next year, in 
October, 1853, at a place with a very ap])ropriate name: I.uther 
Valley, in Wisconsin, near Beloit. On the 3rd of October, 1853, 
was thus born what went l)v the name of "Den Norske Svnode". 




HERMAN AMBERG PREUS 



Thirty-eight congregations took part in its founding and seven 
clergymen belonged to it from its beginning. The seventh in ad- 
dition to those mentioned was J. A. Ottesen, who had just then 
arrived. 

We have alluded to the hardships of these men and the sacrifices 
which they made, but we may envy them too. They had the 
privilege of laying tlie foundation for a glorious structure, and 
that is something that does not fall to the lot of many. 

Meanwhile the stream of settlers continued to come, and 
the problem of their spiritual care rose up like a mountain; but 
tlie men who might come from Norway with a hel{)ing hand to 
undertake this task were few and far between. The quality of 
these men often had to make up for the quantity. Two months 
after the Norwegian Synod had been founded there appeared on 



THE FOUNDATION OF LUTHER COLLEGE 15 

the scene such a man who became a great force in furthering the 
work so well begun. This man was V. Koren, who preached his 
first Christmas sermon at a place where he was to preach for 57 
years, namely, Washington Prairie, Winneshiek County, Iowa. 
He was to take a leading part in founding the institution that is 
commemorated in this book. 

Everj'one of these men who were now working among the Nor- 
wegian settlers realized daily that more helpers must be put in the 
great harvest-field. The danger of spiritual neglect was very 
manifest, and no one knew this better than the ministers, because 
each one was trying to do the work of two or more men. The ap- 
peals to Norway had not been very successful, and a clearer under- 
standing of their surroundings convinced them that help must come 
from within, and that was the same as saying: We must erect a 
school of our own and train the men of our midst to undertake 
the work which is so sadly neglected. They comprehended the 
problem very clearly, and a strong will was there. But was it 
possible to undertake the building of a school under such circum- 
stances ? Such undertakings were entirely outside of the sphere of 
their experience, and the many things to be considered, with the 
responsibility involved, demanded caution. 

Under such deliberations the question arose, whether, to be- 
gin with, the schools of other Lutheran bodies might not relieve 
the situation, at least for some time, by having some helpers 
trained there. Accordingly two men, Ottesen and Brandt, were 
entrusted with the mission of becoming acquainted with other Luth- 
erans and their schools. During their trips they visited the house 
of the father of the writer, who was not yet born, and there sprang 
up a lasting friendship, whose memory has always been dear to his 
family and makes a bright page in its history. If it had not been 
for this visit, these pages would have been written by someone else. 

The institutions of the Missouri Synod at St. Louis under Dr. 
C. F. W. W^alther and at Ft. Wayne under Dr. W. Sihler appealed 
most strongly to the emissaries, and to these schools were sent the 
first volunteers. The bonds became closer when it was also decided 
to have a representative of the Norwegian Synod as a teacher at 
one of them. After due deliberations the position was offered to 
Rev. Laur. Larsen, who left Norway a few years before and was 
busy as the pastor of various congregations. He gives as the date 
of the beginning of his duties as professor at Concordia Seminary 
at St. Louis the fourteenth of October, 1859. 

Naturally this was to be only a makeshift. The great idea was: 
Our own school, the sooner, the better. Plans were soon evolved 
that should bring them to this goal. 



16 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

Immediately steps were taken to create a fund by means of which 
they would finally realize what they had wished and prayed for so 
long, and no matter how much they might differ as to minor matters, 
all voted to establish a Norwegian Lutheran school and to begin at 
once to raise the necessary funds. 

Fifty thousand dollars was thought to be necessary to accom- 
plish this purpose. If under the present circumstances the Synod 
would call for five millions, some people might be shocked, but 
fifty thousand in those times was certainlj'^ very much more. It 
is well to dwell on this for a few moments, because the spirit of 
sacrifice is best kindled by contemplating the doings of those who 
really have made sacrifices. 

The first collections for the fund were begun in 1857, and in 
1859 the Synod was urged to all possible efforts to have the school 
erected within three years. Though money was coming in slowly, 
this thought had taken such a firm hold that no one would wait 
until the $50,000 was in sight, but a beginning was to be made in 
the hope that the rest would be contributed as soon as the founda- 
tions were laid. At that time about $19,000 was available, and 
matters began to assume a definite shape. 

At a meeting of the Synod in Luther Valley in June, 1861, the 
location for the College was chosen. It was to be the plot of thirty 
acres on a slope in the northwestern part of the city of Decorah, 
Iowa, a spot so many Norwegians know and admire because of the 
beautiful natural surroundings which one never tires of gazing 
at and which have a new dress for every season. 

This piece of ground had been secured by Rev. V. Koren from 
its owner, a Quaker, for the sum of $1,500. 

At the same time a committee of five had been appointed to 
secure an architect and take all the necessary steps to insure tlie 
continuation of the work, when once begun. The plans were to 
be submitted to the Church Council, which again was to send them 
to the ministers and the congregations, and after everyone had had 
a chance to have his say, the Council would make the final decision. 

While these ])lans were being developed and matured, the 
Civil War broke out in the spring of 1861, and St. Louis became a 
place where feeling ran high, hence there was a reluctance about 
continuing tlie arrangement with the Missouri Synod for the ac- 
commodation of the Norwegian students. Something had to be 
done very soon for the students who were ready to go to a school 
which the Synod had promised. 

After various proposals had been considered, a temporary 
home was found in the parsonage at Halfway Creek, La Crosse 



THE FOUNDATION OF LUTHER COLLEGE 17 

County, Wisconsin. It was believed that this would be the best 
arrangement, since it would be cheaper than renting rooms in 
Decorah. A description of this building and its accommodations 




ULRIK VILHELM KOREN 



is available and to be recommended to people who are inclined to 
complain. One feature, however, it did have that appeals to 
persons not very fond of exercise. The boys studied, slept, and 
recited in the same room. The teaching force consisted of Rev. 



18 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

T.aur. Larsen and Rev. F. A. Sclimidt, both of whom, with their 
families, occupied the one building. Eleven students attended at 
one time and were divided into two classes; the upper class had 
five members and the lower one six in different stages of develop- 
ment. In all, sixteen different students attended for longer or 
shorter periods in the course of that first year. 

Such was the beginning of Luther College. After a jirosjjcrous 
life of sixtv years it is with great satisfaction that it looks back 
at those humble beginnings. 

However, its stay at Halfway Creek was to be for only one 
year, and the writer has never heard regrets that it was not longer. 
It was a wise move that brought the College to Decorah in 1862, 
where its final location was to be, since this helped to crystallize 
the interest in it in the constituency from which the greatest sup- 
port M'as to come. So, on the eighth of September, 1862, we find 
it at Decorah in a building which is now occupied by the St. Cloud 
Hotel. This building had become the property of the Synod 
chiefly through the good offices of Rev. V. Koren. A description 
of this building shows that Luther College is going forward. Only 
one teacher. Prof. Larsen, has to live with the boys in this building. 
He even has a study or office for himself. 

The number of students has now risen to .'J2. To accommodate 
more the next year, the erection of a building to the west of what is 
now the St. Cloud was decided upon in June, ISG'.i, by the Synod 
meeting at Rock River, Wisconsin. 

The appointment of new teachers for the new classes was also 
authorized. The man first thought of was not to be had, there- 
fore the work was put tem])orariIy in charge of a student, J. D. 
Jacobsen, who became the third man on the faculty, in the year 
186.'i. This arrangement was to continue until a teacher could be 
found by Rev. J. A. Ottesen who was getting ready to go to Nor- 
way in that year. Rev. Ottesen was successful and returned with 
L. Siewers, who relieved J. D. Jacobsen the next year. 

In the fall of 1863 we find 49 students in attendance, all of 
them waiting anxiously for the completion of that building which 
had been authorized to relieve the congestion in the Main Build- 
ing, so called. But they had to wait until New Year before they 
could move in. One would imagine that the completion of a new 
building would arouse feelings of pleasure, but that seems not to 
have been the ease. Soon after its coming into use the new home 
received the name of "Iluttetu", a word which is very hard to 
translate. If one should venture a translation of its meaning, the 
sentiment might be expressed with these words: Leave all hope 
behind, ye who enter here. 



THE FOUNDATION OF LUTHER COLLEGE 19 

While these things were taking place, the work on the real 
College had been begun and was steadily progressing. The plans 
had been ready as early as 1862. To many who had examined them 
the building seemed entirely too large, but the wisdom of the com- 
mittee that had adopted these plans was proven before many years 
had gone by. 

Early in 1863 a contract had been signed for making 1,800,000 
bricks on the college grounds, and half a million were ready by fall. 
The bricks were made on the campus, just east of the north wing 
of the College. By the middle of June, 1861, the cellar had been 
excavated and most of the foundation had been laid, so that the 
date for the laying of the corner-stone could be set for the thir- 
tieth of June, 1864. 

This eventful day was celebrated amid the rejoicings of many 
people with impressive ceremonies in the presence of the delegates 
of the Synod and many visitors from far and near, also from the 
German brethren. 

During the next months the building began to rise inch by inch, 
the making of bricks was continued with all possible speed, because 
the contractor of the masonry had promised to have his work com- 
pleted b}^ the fifteenth of October. 

But there came a hitch which had not been foreseen. As so 
often happens, the contractor did not intend to carry out the speci- 
fications of the architect. When this was insisted on by the over- 
seers that had been sent by the architect, the contractor chose to 
leave, and new men had to be secured from Chicago to finish what 
was left according to specifications of the architect. Very favor- 
able weather helped the work along, and by the end of October the 
walls were ready for the carpenters who were to put on the roof. 
Then came another disappointment. On the eighth of November 
the snow began to fall and, contrary to the usual experience, real 
winter came along with this snow. The cold weather was so con- 
tinuous that the idea of putting on a permanent roof had to be 
given up. Things were covered up as well as possible and left to 
rest till spring might come. It did come, but very late, and work 
on the building could not be resumed before the twenty-fourth of 
April, 1865. New difficulties had to be overcome almost every 
month, and the patience of everybody was hard tried ; the progress 
was not at all steady. The lumber was not delivered in time, some 
of it was not well seasoned, the window-frames did not fit, the 
glass could not be furnished when wanted. These things surely 
tested the patience and faith of those most interested in seeing 
the building completed bv the first of September. This indeed 



THE FOUNDATION OF LUTHER COLLEGE 21 

was not to be, because the glass did not arrive before the nine- 
teenth of September. Now, at last, the final work, the painting, 
could be thought of, and though it was begun as soon as possible 
it was not completed till after the dedication, which could not 
be postponed any longer. 

Many people throughout the Synod know on what day this joy- 
ful event was to be celebrated, the fourteenth of October, 1865. 

By far the greatest number of those who took part in the 
celebration of the dedication are no longer among us. Those who 
realized what this day meant were the pioneers who had been wait- 
ing for it many weary years. They had dreamt of such a school, 
they had talked about it, they understood its significance, they 
had prayed for it. Many a father and mother for whom the 
Lutheran religion was the most precious inheritance from abroad 
heaved a sigh of relief when invited to participate in the dedica- 
tion of a building from which the men were to go out to whom 
their own and their children's spiritual welfare might safely be 
entrusted. 

So, when the fourteenth of October dawned, the town of De- 
corah was alive with people from all Norwegian settlements anx- 
ious to take part in the celebration. This was to begin with a 
solemn procession from the temporary quarters of the institution 
near the court-house, which is about a mile from the college 
grounds. A longer procession has probably never been seen in the 
city of Decorah, because it is told that when the head of the pro- 
cession reached the new building many of those who were to take 
part had not started to take their places in the line. Never before 
had so many Norwegians been together in one place in America. 
All ages, all localities where Norwegians had settled, were re- 
presented. The festival program consisted in the singing of hymns 
of praise and thanksgiving; an opening prayer by Rev. N. Brandt, 
the dedication address by Rev. H. A. Preus, and addresses by Rev. 
V. Koren and Prof. Laur. Larsen, all in Norwegian; addresses by 
Prof. F. A. Schmidt and Prof. Lange (of Ft. Wayne, Ind.), in 
English; an address by Prof. Brauer (of St. Louis), in German; 
and a closing prayer by Rev. J. A. Ottesen, in Norwegian. The 
people were fed at long tables arranged in the rear of the new 
building. Nearly 6,000 visitors were supposed to have been pres- 
ent. When we compare the number of people wlio now are in 
the Synod with the number then belonging to tliat body, it is not 
difficult to see how great was the enthusiasm which this event had 
called forth. 



22 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



AMun the sun liad set and darkness had settled over the sur- 
rounding lulls, the buihliuii- shone forth in its splendid illumina- 
tion, the first that most peojjle present had ever seen; and if we 
now in spirit take our place by the side of the onlookers, we can 
almost hear their hearts beat with emotions that do not often come 
to mortals. 

"At last — yes, at last! Is wliat we see real, or is it only a 
phantom which will disappear when the lights have burnt down? — 
No. it is real. How eoiihl that for which we toiled and prayed so 




REFLECTIONS 



many years be only a vision? No, it is real, it is the fruit of the 
best that there is in us. Thanks be to God forever!" 



We have now come to the end of our cliapter. But before we 
close, let us pause for a moment and ponder. Wliat does this 
building, or rather Luther College, represent? 

There are many Norwegians in America, but there are not 
many Luther colleges. Why not? An answer to this will help us 
to understand what Luther College re))resents. This College was 
not founded to gather earthly wisdom which might increase our 
material welfare. It was not built to increase the sum of knowl- 
edge for its own sake. It was built because its founders had visions 
that go beyond what is measured with clocks and yardsticks. They 



THE FOUNDATION OF LUTHER COLLEGE 



23 



felt that on themselves rested a heavy responsibilitj'. They must 
hand down to their children the best that could be given them, 
true faith in the Christian religion. And while this was the main 
issue, they were justly proud of many other privileges and ad- 
vantages under which they had lived in the old home and whose 
significance they now realized more than ever and which they 
wished to preserve for their children. Such sentiments were the 
impelling forces which accomplished what will seem marvelous 
to one who tries fully to understand the history of the founding of 
Luther College. But marveling is not sufficient. If the descendants 
of these whole-souled, sturdy pioneers cannot be so inspired as 
to be willing to take up the work where it was laid down by their 
forebears, they had better not claim descent from them, because 
they are in danger of not being deemed worthy of having had such 
ancestors. 




SIXTY YEARS LATER 



CHAPTER TWO 

RELIGIOUS AIM AND CHARACTER 

0. M. NORLIE 

1. Stated Aim 

1. The "University" Resolution 

IN 1855 the Synod for the Norwegian lAith(;ran Church in 
America (commonly known as the Norwegian vSynod) assembled 
in convention at Sjiring Prairie, Wis., discussed the ))rol)lem of 
getting pastors and teachers. It was clear to all that the harvest 
truly was great, but the laborers few. It was equally clear that 
the Synod could not expect to get a sufficient number of laborers 
from tlie Church of Norway. To get Lutheran ])astors and teachers 
from the state schools was out of the question. The convention 
therefore appointed the Reverends J. A. Ottesen and N. O. Brandt 
a committee to visit the German Lutheran schools in this country, 
and to investigate whether it might be possible to establish a Nor- 
wegian cliair in theology at one of these. 

Two years later, in October, 1857, this committee reported to 
the Synod, in convention assembled at Little Iowa Church, near 
Decorah, Iowa. On the basis of this report two resolutions were 
adopted : 

1. To establish a Norwegian professorship at Concordia Sem- 
inary, St. Louis, Mo., of the German Missouri Synod; 

2. To establish a Norwegian Lutheran institution, a "univers- 
ity", as they called it, and to begin at once to raise the necessary 
funds. 

There were at least three reasons why the ])rospective school 
was called a university: 

1. The leaders of the Norwegian Synod had been trained at 
the L^niversity of Christiania, and hojjcd to model their school 
after this institution. 

2. The Norwegian I>utherans that had joined the Northern 
Illinois Synod had together with the Swedish and English I>u- 
therans of that Synod in 1852 founded a school that was known 
for many years as the Illinois State University. 

3. The Norwegian Synod men really intended to build a school 
that should have at least seminary and normal departments besides 
college and preparatory courses. 



RELIGIOUS AIM AND CHARACTER 25 

For 20 years the scliool was frequently referred to as the uni- 
versity. The fund tliat was to be raised was known as the "Uni- 
versity Fund" (of. "Kirkelig Maanedstidende", 1857, 490; 18G2, 
32; 1869, 15; 1873, 78; and many other places). The idea that 
the school should be a university, at least in so far that it should 
have a theological department, seemed to die hard. Concordia 
Seminary, St. Louis, served as a seminary for the Norwegian 
Synod from 1859 to 1876 and about 100 young men had been 
trained there for the Norwegian ministry in those years. Seven 
had also been trained at Concordia Seminary, Springfield, 111. 
Dr. H. G. Stub says that the idea of having a Norwegian Lu 
theran Seminary is as old as the Norwegian Synod itself (Halvor- 
sen's "Festskrift", 144). The connection with the Missourian 
schools was only a temporary makeshift. In 1861 the connection 
was about to have been broken, on account of the Civil War which 
placed St. Louis between the firing lines (Dr. Laur. Larsen in 
"Luther College Katalog", 1872, 8). The connection with Mis- 
souri was, however, not broken by the war, and it was not before 
1876 that the Norwegian Synod established its own seminary. The 
intention had been to have this school at Decorah. In "Evangel- 
isk Luthersk Kirketidende" for 1912 (1778-81) Dr. Laur. Lar- 
sen declares without qualification that Luther College was founded 
as a theological seminary and is the oldest Norwegian seminary 
in America. He explains that because of lack of quarters the 
Seminary Department was housed at St. Louis for a time. In 
1874 the Norwegian Synod built a new wing to the Old Main at 
Luther, but even at that it was too small to accommodate the sem- 
inary students. Therefore the Synod bought the Soldiers' Or- 
phans' Home at Madison, Wis., which had been vacated, and 
the seminary was located there (Helland's "Augsburg Seminar," 
30-33). Even after the seminary had been moved to Madison the 
question was up for discussion as to whether it should not be locat- 
ed at Decorah as originally intended ("Ev. Luthersk Kirketidende", 
1877, 407). 

The Civil War broke out in 1861. The Norwegian Synod at 
its convention that year, held at Rock Prairie, Wis., decided, with 
the means and forces at hand, to establish a school up north. Thus 
it came to pass that Prof. Laur. Larsen was called away from St. 
Louis to become the head of this new school, and thus it happened 
that Luther College, as this school was called, began work in 
September of that year at the Halfway Creek (Wis.) parsonage. 
It was not a university. It had no theological department, for it 
was learned that the theological students could attend Concordia 



26 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



in spite of the political and war disturbances. It was not even a 
college as yet, for not one of the 16 students that enrolled the 
first year was of college grade. 

2. The "Seminary" Building Conunittce Report 

The aim of the school can also be seen from the report of the 
building committee that had been elected by the convention of 
1861. This committee was known as the Theological Seminary 
Building Coniiiiittee ("Kirkelig Maanedstidende", 1862, 6-8). In 
presenting an architect's ])lan of tlie proposed building the com- 
mittee discussed at lengtli the aim of tlie school. It recognized 




i^ ._->#• .^^>.i**.^ 




THE PALISADliS 

that the first duty of the Church (now) wa^ to establish a school 
where preacliers and teachers could be trained, but it realized also 
that the Church should also have higher schools for its youth who 
did not intend to take up any professional calling in the Church. 
Otherwise these young people would attend some school where 
they might be robbed of their faith. "Therefore", the report 
reads, "the eonnnittec has unanimously resolved to make the plan 
of the building sucli tliat the department preparing for the sem- 
inary can also accept students who aim to prepare themselves for 
other callings, so that they may serve their country in such posi- 
tions as require more tlian a connnon education". 



RELIGIOUS AIM AND CHARACTER 27 



3. The Corner-Stone Document 

As the secretary of the building committee, Rev. V. Koren, had 
secured a beautiful site for the school at Decorah, and also tempor- 
ary quarters for it, Luther College moved to Decorah in 1862. 
In 1863 the preliminary work for the new building was begun. 
On June 30, 1864, the corner-stone of the first building of Lu- 
ther College — the Old Main — was laid. Among the things de- 
posited in the corner-stone was an historical sketch of the Nor- 
wegian Synod. The following words from this sketch set forth 
the aim of Luther College : 

"Emigrated Norwegians, Lutlieran Christians, living in Wisconsin, 
Iowa, Minnesota, and Illinois, united in erecting this building to educate 
teachers of the Church, through whose ministry, by the grace of our 
Lord, the saving truth of the Gospel in Word and Sacraments might 
be preserved for their descendants unadulterated according to the doc- 
trine of the Evangelical Lutheran Church as set forth in the Unaltered 
Augsburg Confession. The Lord grant this. Amen." 

4. The Catalog Statement 

Since 1882 the catalogs of Luther College in English have 

contained the following statement of the aim of the school : 

"The institution owes its origin to the growing demand for educated 
men who could preach the Word of Life to the rapidly increasing Nor- 
wegian population of this country. The chief aim of the College is to 
provide a liberal and thorough education for the young men who intend 
later to enter the ministry; but it welcomes any youth who desires to 
avail himself of its advantages. Believing that 'the fear of the Lord 
is the beginning of knowledge', the College regards mental training 
without Christian faith and love as possessing but a doubtful value; and 
it desires through its religious instruction and Christian influence, to 
reach as many as possible also of those who do not intend to serve the 
Church as pastors, as it is confident that those who have been educated 
on the Ijasis of Christian principles will, also in other occupations, exert 
a beneficial influence among their fellowmen." 

IL Religioi's Instruction 

In keeping with the stated aim and spirit of the institution, 
religious instruction is given in every class througliout the whole 
school. Luther College regards religious instruction and the de- 
velopment of Christian character as of supreme importance. 

To quote from the catalog of 1922: "Aside from the fact that 
the Bible is the Word of God and instructs us in the 'one thing 
needful', a thorough acquaintance with it is of greatest import- 
ance for its educational value in general. So profound has been 
the influence of the Bible that an understanding of history, of 
modern civilization, and of the literature of modern Christian 
nations is out of the question without a knowledge of the contents 
of this book. In fact, without a knowledge of the Bible a liberal 



28 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

education is impossible. Systematic instruction, based on tbe 
Bible, is therefore given throughout the course in both the College 
and Preparatory Departments". 

Religion is the chief reason wli^' Luther College was estab- 
lished and is still being maintained. Religion is in importance, 
if not in actual amount, the chief subject at the school. It is the 
core of the whole curriculum. The nature of the courses is determ- 
ined very largely by the religious aim of the school. Thus, Lu- 
ther College has persisted in requiring much work in the classical 
languages because they are indispensable in the study of theology. 
Every study at school is studied in the light of religion, and no 
teaching is permitted that runs counter to the plain teachings of 
Holy Writ as set forth in the confessions of the I>utheran Church. 
Religion is required of every student. 

The relative amount of time devoted to the religious courses, 
however, has varied somewhat from year to year. It may be rough- 
ly estimated that 10% of the work in the College and Preparatory 
Departments has been in religion, and that 20% of the work in 
the Normal Course was religious. 

L The College department 

The religious courses in the College have not varied much 
since the foundation of the school. In the Freshman and Sopho- 
more classes Dietrich's "Explanation of Luther's Smaller Cate- 
chism" has been studied. In the earlier years (1863-76) classes 
were conducted in German in order to prepare the students for 
their training at Concordia Seminary, at which the lectures were 
given mainl}^ in German. Then, for a number of years the cate- 
chism was taught in Norwegian, and of late years in English. The 
transition came gradually and bilingually. The fundamental doc- 
trines of the Christian religion are thorouglily examined in the 
light of Scripture. Practical a})))lications arc made. In the 
Junior class the Augsburg Confession is critically examined and 
compared with Scripture and the Book of Concord. The position 
of the Lutheran Church in its relation to the other churches and 
to the state is made clear. In the Senior year a ))ortion of the 
New Testament is studied in the Greek original. Thus, in 1921-22, 
the Gospel according to Matthew was translated. Its introduction, 
contents, and peculiarities of style were discussed. Intensive re- 
search was given to a few special passages and topics. In addi- 
tion one hour a week was devoted to Bible introduction — to the 
character, text, geography, chronology, antiquities, and interpreta- 
tion of the Bible. In the early days of the school the Greek text 
was translated into Latin (Bothne's "Luther College", 140), in 



RELIGIOUS AIM AND CHARACTER 29 

order to enable the Luther men to follow the lectures in Latin at 
Concordia Seminary. Otherwise the class work was conducted 
in Norwegian, but in recent years in English. On the whole, the 
religious courses in the College are such as to make a man certain 
of his doctrines and well versed in Scripture. The Bible is al- 
ways approached reverently as the revealed, inspired, perfect, and 
authoritative Word of God. 

Particularly important in the study of the Bible is the classical 
training which Luther College aims to give. In the catalog for 
1872 Dr. Larsen writes at length in explanation and defense of 
classical study as a preparation for professional work, especially 
theology. Among other things he refers to Luther's example and 
testimony. Luther said that where the knowledge of Greek and 
Hebrew is not kept up, the Gospel will at last go under. As soon 
as the knowledge of these languages decayed, the Gospel was 
weakened and the Dark Ages came upon the Church. Many fear- 
ful abuses arose. The Revival of Learning was mainly a revival 
of language study. It brought light upon the Gospel again. In 
the languages are locked up the thoughts of the ages. The lang- 
uages of the Bible are a key to Scripture. "I had come no way", 
said Luther, "had not the languages helped me and made me cer- 
tain of Scripture. I might have been pious and preached correctly, 
but the Pope and the Sophists and the whole anti-Christian regi- 
ment I had no doubt let remain as they are. God forbid that we 
neglect the languages, for then we will neglect the Gospel." 

The classical languages are not at present in very high favor. 
Luther College has had to yield considerably as to the amount of 
classical study required, but is still one of the half dozen accredited 
colleges that require Latin for the A. B. degree. The words of 
Luther are timely and to the point. Dr. Larsen's plea has to be 
made over and over again. Pres. C. K. Preus defended the clas- 
sics (see, for example, his great lecture of 1901: "I hvilken Ret- 
ning"). In 1918 Dr. A. M. Rovelstad edited one of the college 
bulletins in behalf of the classical training (see also his article in 
"Teologisk Tidsskrift", 1918, II, 30-47.) The last "Bulletin" of 
the College (1922, II, 1) contains a strong plea by Pres. Oscar 
Olson for the old-time aims, including the classics. 

It is admitted that it is possible to get an intimate knowledge 
of the Bible by means of translation, and that it would be a cal- 
amity to the great mass of mankind, if they all had to study He- 
brew and Greek in order to come to the knowledge of the saving 
truth. We also readily admit tliat a person may read the Bible 
in the original tongues and yet be an unbeliever. And yet, with- 



30 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

out a knowledge of the originals there would have been no transla- 
tions at all. and our critical understanding of the translations 
before us would suffer. The great theologians and reformers, such 
as Luther and Melanchthon, were Greek and Hebrew scholars, and 
it would be disastrous not to have among us a fair proportion of 
men with philological knowledge as well as faith, to sound the 
spiritual depths of the Bible. The Greek Testament is listed in 
the Luther College Catalog as a religious rather than a linguistic 
course. It is both. Hebrew is listed as a linguistic rather than a 
religious study. It is both. From 18(51 to 1882 Seffer's 
"Elementarbuch" was used as the textbook in Hebrew at Luther 
College. From 1883 Hollenberg's "Hebraisches Schulbueh" was 
the class book, supplemented by some chapters from the Old 
Testament Hebrew text. Since 1912 Green's "Elementary He- 
brew Grammar" and Davidson's "Introductory Hebrew (iramniar" 
have served as textbooks. 

Since 1919-1920 the College has offered a course in Education, 
which is at the same time essentially religious. It is entitled Moral 
and Religious Education. It investigates the fundamental prin- 
ciples in connection with moral and religious education, the his- 
torical development particularly in the United States, the present 
problems and the attempts at solution, particularly by the I/U- 
theran Synods. The history, polity, work, and policies of the 
synods are studied, particularly the record of the Norwegian Lu- 
theran Church and Luther College. 

Another religious subject fostered at Luther College from the 
year the school was founded is choral singing. The class-room 
instruction has been sup{)lemented by the work of singing societies, 
the College Chorus, the Glee Club, the Decorah Choral Union. 
These societies are organized annually and sing on special 
occasions. The Choral Union has rendered such mastcr))ieces as 
Haydn's "Creation" and "Seasons", Handel's "Messiah", Men- 
delssohn's "Elijah" and "St. Paul", and Bruch's "Lay of tlic Bell '. 
At the recent Sixtieth Anniversary Mendelssohn's "Hymn of 
Praise" and Dahle and Koren's "Cantata" were sung under Prof. 
Carlo A. Sjjerati's inspiring directorship. 

2. The Prcparatorji Depart iiiciit 

The Preparatory Dejiartment at Lutlier College has been re- 
organized several times during these 60 years. From 1861 to 1881 
it was a two-year course; from 1881 to 1905, a three-year course; 
from 1905 to 1918, a four-year course; and from 1918 to date, a 
five-year course. Naturally, the courses in religion have also been 
extended. 



RELIGIOUS AIM AND CHARACTER 31 

The aim throughout the history of tlie Preparatory Depart- 
ment has been "to impart a thorough and practical knowledge 
of the Holy Scriptures, because the Scriptures are given by in- 
spiration of God, and are profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for 
correction, for instruction in righteousness, that the man of God 
may be perfect, thoroughly furnished unto all good works". 
("Catalog", 1922, 87). 

To meet this aim, the course offered from 1861 to 1890 five 
hours of religious work a week; from 1890 to 1912, three hours; 
and since 1912 two hours. The amount of work in religion has 
been reduced from 15.7^1 in 1872 to 10.7% in 1892 and 9.5% in 
1922. 

Three hours per week for two years were at first devoted to 
Bible history. The Bible was used as a textbook, and the class 
read through the Old Testament as a rule and sometimes parts 
of the New. The work was conducted in Norwegian. In the 
70's Vogt's "St0rre Bibelhistorie" was used as a guide. In 1890 
Norwegian was the language of the two lowest classes and Eng- 
lish of the highest class in this Department. Beginning with 
1897, Bible geography, including the journeys of Christ and Paul, 
was added to the course, also the Life of Christ according to the 
Gospels and a brief introduction to the Bible. When the course 
was lengthened to four years (in 1905), two years were devoted 
to Bible history and geography, covering the historical parts of 
tlie Old Testament. Churcli history was then studied two hours 
a week for one year, with Vogt's "Kirkehistorie til Skolebrug" 
as text. Thereupon the Life of Christ and Bible introduction, 
together with a reading of Job, Isaiah, the Gospels, and Hebrews, 
was the work of the Senior year in the Preparatory Department. 
Since the course was lengthened to five years, Acts has been the 
subject of the Sub-Freshman year, Bible history and geography 
of the Freshman, Bible history continued in the Sophomore, 
Church history in the Junior, and the Life of Christ and Bible in- 
troduction in the Senior. The Bible is used as text in Bible his- 
tory and geography, supplemented by maps and other books. 
Ylvisaker's "Synopse" has for years been the textbook in the 
Life of Christ. Str0mme's "Outlines of Church History" is the 
text in Church history. Norlie's "Open Bible" has been used in 
Bible introduction. 

Much attention was given to the catechism in the early history 
of tile school. Pontoppidan's "Sandhed til Gudfrygtighed", in 
the complete or the abridged edition, or both, was faithfully stud- 
ied two hours per week for two years from 1861 to 1890. In 



32 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

the third year of the course Dietrich's "Forklaring" was some- 
times studied. From 1890 Pontoppidan occupied only one hour 
a week in the two lower classes and Luther's "Smaller Catechism" 
was studied in English one hour a week in the highest class. Later 
Dietrich's "Explanation" in English was suhstituted for the 
elementary catechism. The new suhjccts kept on pressing the 
catechism back until it had only one hour a week for one year in 
one class. Pontoppidan was then studied as a review of Scripture 
doctrine familiar from the Confirmation instruction. After 1912 
the catechism does not appear to have been taught at all in the 
Preparator}' Department. In the first published catalog of Lu- 
ther College (1872), Pres. Larsen says: "And when we finally 
come to what we really in all our teaching seek to place first, 
namely, the knowledge of Christianity, tlien there is perhaps no 
serious-minded person in our Synod who will not rejoice to hear 
that we are giving about twice as much instruction here as in the 
schools of Norway." He explains that one of the reasons for 
this is, that our youth on account of the sects need more Christian 
knowledge here than in Norway. Catechismal knowledge was 
held to be a safeguard against the doctrines and powerful tenden- 
cies of sectarianism, indifferentism, secularization, rationalism, 
evolution, materialism, and the many other heresies of the times. 

3. The Normal Department 

Tlie Norwegian Lutheran congregations needed teachers as 
well as preachers. Their purpose in founding a school was also 
to secure for themselves teachers as well as preachers. In 1864 
a special class was organized at Luther College for men who 
wished to take up parochial teaching as a calling. In 1865 a 
Normal Department was organized, with Rev. N. O. Brandt in 
charge as teacher of the normal branches. In 1868 the course 
was increased from two to three years, aiming especially to edu- 
cate teachers for the parochial schools, but also qualifying them 
for the common scliools. The attendance was never very large, 
being 12 in 188:5, 10 in 1881, and 8 in 1885. The department 
was discontinued in 1886. In 1889 it was reestablished at the Lu- 
theran Normal School at Sioux Falls, S. Dak., which in 1918 was 
merged with Augustana College of Canton, S. Dak., and is now 
known as Augustana College and Normal School, Sioux Falls. 

The course in religion in the Normal Department was the 
same as that in tlie Preparatory Department in the lowest class. 
In the second and third year of work it offered an extra 3 hours 
a week in catecliisin and ^5 hours in liible historv. Also 3 hours 



RELIGIOUS AIM AND CHARACTER 



33 



in the Augsburg Confession and other Symbolical Books and 3 
hours in Bible reading and New Testament exegesis. In 1865 
Rambach's "Wohlunterrichteter Katechet" was studied by the 
dictation method as a guide in catechetics, supplemented by Faye's 
"Almueskolen" and "Methodik". Galatians was studied exegetic- 
ally. In 1868 Hart's "Lutheran School Room" was used. In 
1872 Page's "Theory and Practice of Teaching" was added to 
Rambach and Faye. Roalkvam taught catechetics from 1878 to 
1886, developing his own syllabus, which he published as a text- 
book in 1881 (also 1898 and 1903). 



Year 



4. Courses of Study, by Decades 
Class Per Subject Text 



Hours 

Per 

Week 



Language 



V-VI 3 Bible History Gen.-l Kgs Norwegian 

V-VI 2 Catechism Pontoppidan Norwegian 

I-II 1 Greek Testament Greek-Latin 

I-H 2 Catechism Hutter's "Compend".. English 

III-IV 2 Catechism Dietrich German 

V-VI 2 Catechism. . . ', Pontoppidan Norwegian 

V-VI 3 Bible History Gen.-l Kgs Norwegian 

IV Normal 2 Catechetics Rambach German 

Faye Norwegian 

Page English 

2 Exegesis Acta* Rom., Gal Norwegian 

3 Bible History Gen.-l Kgs Norwegian 

2 *Augsburg Confession Norwegian 

2 Catechism Dietrich Norwegian 

2 Catechism Dietrich Norwegian 

3 Bible History Vogt's "Stcirre" Norwegian 

2 Catechism Pontoppidan Norwegian 

3 Didactics Roalkvam Norwegian 

3 Catechism Dietrich Norwegian 

3 Exegesis Norwegian 

3 Bible History Vogt's "Stdrre" Norwegian 

2 Catechism Pontoppidan Norwegian 

2 *.\ugsburg Confession Norwegian 

2 Catechism Dietrich Norwegian 

1 Catechism Luther English 

2 Bible Reading Acts English 

1 Catechism Pontoppidan Norwegian 

2 Bible History O. T Norwegian 

2 Augsburg Confession Norwegian 

2 Greek Testament Greek-Eng. 

2 Catechism Dietrich Norwegian 

2 Catechism Dietrich Norwegian 

1 Catechism Pontoppidan Norwegian 

2 Bible History Matt. — -A.cts Eng.-Norw. 

2 Bible History Judges-Dan Eng.-Norw. 

2 Bible History Gen.-Josh Eng.-Norw. 

2 Greek Testament 4 books Greek-Eng. 

2 Augsburg Confession Eng.-Norw. 

2 Catechism Dietrich Eng.-Norw. 

1 Life of Christ Ylvisaker Eng.-Norw. 

1 Bible Introduction Eng.-Norw. 

2 Church History Vogt Norw.- Eng. 

1 Bible History 1 Sam.-Dan Eng.-Norw. 

1 Catechism Pontoppidan Eng.-Norw. 

2 Bible Hist . and Geog . Gen.- Ruth Eng.-Norw. 



I V-VI Normal. . . 

V-VI Normal.... 
1882 

I 

II-IV ,.. 

V-VI 

VI-VII 

VII 

V Normal 

V-VI Normal.... 

V-VI Normal.... 

VI-VII Normal.. 

VII Normal 

1892 

I-II 

III-IV 

V 

V 

VI-VII 

VI-VII 

1902 

I 

II 

Ill 

IV 

VI-VII 

V 

VI 

VII 

1912 

I 

II 

III-IV 

V 

V 

VI 

VII 

VII 

VIII 

* ."Mternating with Greek 



Testament every other year. 





Class 


Hours 

Per 

Week 


1 2 


II.. . 




2 


III. 1 


IV. . 




' 


V 1 


V 1 


VI . 




2 


\'II 




2 


\'III 




2 


I\ 




2 



34 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

Hours 
Year Class Per Subject Text Language 



Greek Testament Matt, and Bible in- 
troduction Greek-Eng. 

Augsburg Confession English 

Catechism Dietrich English 

Catechism Dietrich English 

Life of Christ Kerr's "Harmony".. English 

Bible Introduction.. . .Norlie's "Open Bible". English 

Church History Str0mme's "Outlines". English 

Bible History 1 Sam. -Dan English 

Bible Hist, and Geog..Gen.-Rutli English 

Bible 1 listory Acts English 

5. Teachers of Religion at Luther College, by Subjerls 

Bleken. M. K., Rev 1906 10 

x-Bothne. T 1875-76 

Brandt, N. O., Rev 1865-81 

Bredesen, A.. Rev 1876-78 

Eittreim. K. O., Rev 1918 

xx-Halland, J. G., Cand. Theol 1887-89 

xx-Homme, T., Cand. Theol 1881-82 

Hove, E., Rev , 1891-93 

Hustvedt, H. B., Rev. 1887 

Jacobsen, J. D., Rev 1872-81 

x-Jacobsen, K. T 1905 

xx-Koren, W., Cand. Theol 1889 

Krog, H. J. G., Rev 1890-95 

Kvamme, K., Rev 1896-98 

Larsen, Laur., Rev 1861-11 

Madson, N. A., Rev 1916-18 

x-Markhus, G 1892-06 

Naeseth, C. A., Rev 1882-11 

Norlie, O. M., Rev 1919 

Petersen, E. J., Rev 1882-87 

::-Peterson, Francis E 1922 ■ 

Preus, C. K., Rev * 1898-21 

x-Reque, L. S 1875-76 

Roalkvam, H., Rev ; 1878-86 

x-Rovelstad, .A. M 1908-10 

x-Sander. A. B 1878-79 

Schmidt, F. A., Rev 1861-71 

xx-Sihler. VV., Cand. Theol 189a-91. 1893-94,1922 

Sperati, C. A., Rev 1905 

Stub, H. G., Rev 1899-00 

x-Throndsen, K 1868-70 

Tingelstad, O. A.. Rev 1910-16, 1921 

Torrison, I. B.. Rev 1902-12 

Ylvisaker, J. T., Rev ... 1889-90 

Ylvisaker, S. C, Rev 191 1-19 

Note: X stands for lay teachers, xx for unordained candidates in theology, the remainder 
being clergymen. 

CATECHISM— LUTHER 
xx-Sihler, W 1890-91, 189,^94 

CATECHISM— PONTOPPIDAN 

Larsen, Laur 1861-65, 1883, 1889 

Schmidt, F. .A 1863-71 

Brandt. N. 1865-76 

x-Throndsen, K 1868 

Jacobsen, J. D 1872-76, 1878-81 

x-Reciue, L. S 1875-76 

Bredesen, A 1876-78 

Roalkvam, H 1878-86 

xx-Homme, T 1881-82 

Petersc-n, E. J 1882-87 

Naeseth, C. .■\ 1882-87 

Hustvedt, H. B 1887 

xx-Halland, J. G 1887-89 

Ylvisaker, J. T 1889-90 

xx-Koren. W . ... 1889 

Krog. H. J. G 1890-95 

Hove, E 1891-93 



RELIGIOUS AIM AND CHARACTER 35 



x-Markhus, G 1892-01 

Kvamme. K 1896-98 

Preus. C. K 1898-02 

Stub, H. G 1899-00 

torrison, I. B 1902-12 

Sperati, C. A 1905-08 

Bleken, M. K 1906-10 

CATECHISM— DIETRICH 

Schmidt, F. A 1863-71 

Jacobsen, J. D , 1872-81 

Larsen, Laur 1872-02 

Preus, C. K 1902-21 

Tingelstad, O. A 1921— 

Norlie, O. M 1921— 

CATECHISM— HUTTER 

Schmidt, F. A 1869(?)- 71 

Jacobsen, J. D 1872-81(?) 

AUGSBURG CONFESSION AND OTHER SYMBOLICAL BOOKS 

Schmidt, F. A 1864-71 

Roalkvam, H 1878-79 

Bredesen. A 1876-78 

Naeseth, C. A 1882-1 1 

Preus, C. K 1909-21 

Tingelstad, O. A 1921— 

xx-Sihler, W 1922 

BIBLE READINGS AND BIBLE HISTORY 

Larsen, Laur 1861-70, 1882-91 

Brandt, N. 1869-81 

Roalkvam, H 1878-86 

xx-Halland, J . G 1887-89 

Ylvisaker, J. T 1889-90 

xx-SihIer, W 1890-92 

Krog, H. J. G 1890-96 

Kvamme, K 1896-98 

Preus, C. K 1898-21 

Sperati. C. A 1905 • 

Eittreim, K. O 1918 • 

BIBLE READINGS AND THE LIFE OF CHRIST 

Bleken, M. K 1906-10 

Tingelstad, O. A 1910-16 

Madson, N. A 1916-18 

Eittreim, K. 1918 

Peterson, F. E 1922 

BIBLE INTRODUCTION AND BIBLE GEOGRAPHY 

Preus, C. K 1908-15 

Ylvisaker, S. C 1915-16 

Madson, N. A 1916-18 

Eittreim, K. 1918 

Norlie. O. M 1919 • 

xx-Sihler, W 1922 • 

BIBLE EXEGESIS 

Brandt, N. 1865-71 

Roalkvam, H 1878-86 

CHURCH HISTORY AND HISTORY OF MISSIONS 

Bleken, M. K 1906-10 

Tingelstad, O. A 1910-12, 1913-16 

Preus, C. K At times 

Ylvisaker. S. C 1912-13 

Madson. N. A 1916-18 

Eittreim, K. O 1918 • 

CATECHETICS 

Brandt, N. 1865-81 

x-Bothne, T 1875-76 

Roalkvam, H 1878-86 

NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 

Schmidt, F. A 1861-71 

Jacobsen, J. D 1872-81 

Naeseth, C. A 1882-98 

xx-Sihler, W 1893-95 

x-Rovelstad, A. M 1908-10 



36 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Bleken. M. K 1908-09 

Tingelstad, O. A 1910-11 

Ylvisaker, S. C 1911-19 

Norlie. O. M 1919 

xx-SihIer, \V 1922 

HEBREW 

Larsen. Laur 1865-75. 1879-11 

Jacobsen, J. D 1875-78 

x-Sander. A. B 1878-79 

X- Jacobsen, K. T 1905 

Ylvisaker. S. C 1911-19 

Norlie. O. M 1919 

MORAL AND RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

Tingelstad. O. A 1920 

Norlie. O. M 1920 

CHORAL MUSIC 

Schmidt. F. A 1861-65 

Brandt, N. O 1865-81 

x-Solheim, Ola 1881-82 

x-Hanson. Haldor 1882-83 

Tingelstad, J. 1883-85 

Sperati, C. A 1885-88 

x-Hanson, Haldor 1888-90 

xx-Sihler. W 1890-94 

x-Hanson. Haldor 1895-04 

Sperati. C. A 1905— 

Note: X stands for lay teachers; xx for'unordained'candidates in theology, the remainder 
being clergymen. 





DR. LAUR. LAK.SI'..\, Ihci loil PROF. C. K. PREUS, 1898-1921 

Professors of Christianily at Luther College Sixty Years 



RELIGIOUS AIM AND CHARACTER 



37 



III. Other Religious Influences 
1. Chapel Devotions 

The students at Luther College are required to attend devo- 
tional exercises mornings and evenings at chapel. From 1861 to 
1877 the morning devotions were conducted by the president at 
6:30, just before the breakfast meal. Since 1877 it has generally 
been held about 10:00 a. m. From 1861 to 1877 the evening 
devotional period was at 8:30; from 1877 to 1910, at 9:00; now 
it is held at 9 :45 p. m. The chapel exercises have been in charge 
of the president of the school, assisted by other members of the 
faculty, the college pastors, visiting clergymen, or others. The 
exercises have consisted of Scripture reading and exposition, 







'nif'i.hnii f If- 



ON THE WAY TO CHURCH, BACCALAUREATE SUNDAY 

prayer, song, readings from postils, and speeches. They have 
been very inspirational. Specially worthy of mention are the 
readings by the "Grand Old Man" of Luther College, Dr. Laur. 
Larsen, and the wonderful ten-minute chapel talks by President 
C. K. Preus. 

2. Sunday Services 

Decorah has two Norwegian Lutheran congregations, with 
two services at each church on Sundays, one in Norwegian and 
one in English. The pastors of these congregations are the pas- 
tors also of the College. The congregations cooperate with the 
school in making the church life of the students of greatest value. 
The young people's societies of the churches entertain the boys 
at Luther and invite them to their devotional and social meetings. 



28G867 



3S 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



3. Special Occasions 

Luther College has celebrated several festivals and entertain- 
ed several religious conventions, at which great themes have been 
discussed and noted men in the Church have appeared on the 
program. These special occasions live long in the memory. They 
have helped to shape the lives and destinies of the Luther College 
boys. In 1921-22, two such great conventions were held at 
Luther — the Sixtieth Anniversary festival, on October 13-16, and 
the Joint Lutheran Students' Union Convention and Academy 
Conference representing 20 schools of the Norwegian Lutheran 
Church of America. 







SIUDKMS' LMO.N CON NKNTION, liH'.' 



4. Sttidcnts' Religious Organization 

A number of students are taking an active part in the work 
of the congregations down town, as teachers in tlie Sunday schools, 
members of the Church choirs, officers in the Lutiier Leagues, etc. 
At the College, tlie students take part in the Luther College Sun- 
day Association, organized in 1901, w-hich is a voluntary student 
organization, meeting on Sunday afternoons or evenings. Its 
programs are of a religious nature, and consist mostly of lectures 
by professors and others, while occasional meetings are devoted 
to the discussion of appropriate topics of general interest. An 
additional feature of the work is the election of a committee to 
render such assistance as may be needed in case of illness among 
the students. 



RELIGIOUS AIM AND CHARACTER 



39 



5. Cliristian Atmosphere 

The atmosphere of the school is Christian, clear and invigor- 
ating as the mountain air. The president of the school has been as 
a Christian father, whose highest aim is to have his boys be Chris- 
tians and take up a Christian life-work. He has been the boys' 
pastor and counselor. Thirty-four out of 93 regular teachers at 
the school have been pastors or have graduated from theological 
seminaries without entering the ministry. These men of theologic- 
al training and pastoral experience have no doubt exerted a deep 
influence on the school. There are no negative critics among 
them. The remaining teachers have been chosen for their sound- 





^^J^r^iT^'ffW^ 








■^— U^ ^ . - ^ ,' -. J. , * . , . * « 



STUDENTS' UXIOX CUNVENriON, l!ii 



ness of doctrine and their Christian example as well as their 
scholastic and professional qualifications. The classroom work 
in every subject is conducted in harmony with Scripture. No 
pains are spared to make the discipline, which is conducted in a 
Christian spirit, as effective and truly educating as possible, for 
proper discipline lies at the very foundation of all successful 
school work and is a chief agency in the development of Chris- 
tian character. ("Ev. Luthersk Kirketidende", 1891, 310). The 
boys are taught to be very democratic, avoiding hypocrisy and 
sham. Luther College has tried to be an honest school, doing 
thorough work in whatever it has attempted to do. As President 
Larsen put it: "When we sell butter, we want to give good butter, 
clear down to the bottom of the jar." 



40 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

IV. Results 
1. Transplanting Norxccgian Culture 

All the countries of the world have contributed to the citizen- 
ship of America. From 1820 to 1919 a total of 31,200,103 im- 
migrants landed on our shores. In 1920 13% of the population 
of the United States were foreign-born and 90% could look to 
Europe either as their birthplace or the home of their ancestors. 
No country except Ireland has contributed so great a propor- 
tion of its people to America as Norway. 

All the peoples of the world have contributed their bit to 
American culture. When they came here as immigrants they 
took along with them some of the culture of their home lands. 
Those peoples have contributed most to America who brought 
most culture with them and who have tried most patiently to 
transplant it to American soil. Far in the lead in this regard 
are the English, not so much because they have outnumbered the 
other peoples, nor because they came here first, but rather because 
they have insisted on transplanting their language and institutions 
to America. Of the English colonies New England has been by 
far the most influential in shaping the thought and character of 
this country, not because New England had more people or 
mone}', but because the people there had more definite ideas and 
more zeal and persistence in advocating them. The culture of the 
American schools is mainly that of New England. 

The Norwegians have added something to American culture 
and achievement. They did not come here as paupers. They 
took along a treasure which gold and silver cannot buy — strong 
bodies and willing minds, habits of industry and thrift, obedience 
and loyalty, and a rich store of high ideals and noble precepts 
treasured in their native history and literature, customs and in- 
stitutions. They were a literate people. The report of the Im- 
migrant Commission for 1910 (Vol. 5, "Dictionary of Races", 
120) says: "In Norway the rate of illiteracy is the lowest in 
Europe". The same report (Vol. 3, "Statistical Review of Im- 
migration, 1820-1910", 85) lists the number and percent of il- 
literates among immigrants 14 years old and over. Portugal 
had the greatest number who could not read and write — 682 out 
of every 1,000. Scandinavia had the least number — only 4 
out of every 1,000. Of the native white population in America 
46 out of every 1,000 arc illiterate. 

It is natural that tlic Norwegian immigrants should love the 
culture of Norway and that thcv should want to liand down to 



RELIGIOUS AIM AND CHARACTER 41 

their posterity and to contribute to their adopted land some of 
the best of this treasure. They could not expect tliat this Nor- 
wegian culture would be transmitted through the public schools or 
the schools of other immigrant peoples. There was only one 
thing for them to do if they were to become a power in this land, 
and that was to build their own schools. Luther College is one 
of these schools. At the same time that it is in the best sense 
thoroughly American, it has always had the high aim of giving 
to America the best there is in Norwegian culture. The story 
has not yet been written, except in fragments, of how much 
Norway has given to America. In this story Luther College will 
have a conspicuous place. 

2. Establishing the Lutheran Faith 

Norway is a Lutheran country; the censuses still report 99% 
of the population as members of the Lutheran Church. It is now 
a century since Cleng Peerson came to America, becoming the 
pathfinder of the last tide of Norwegian immigration to America. 
Great religious changes have taken place during this century. In 
Norway, the religious revival started by Hans Nielsen Hauge 
swept the common people along with it and even the professors 
at the University of Christiania. During the 60 years since Lu- 
ther College was founded a wave of rationalism has swept over 
the whole world. The pious scholarship of Caspari and Gisle 
Johnson at the University of Christiania of 60 years ago has been 
displaced by a crass rationalism which denies the inspiration and 
authority of the Bible, the divinity and atonement of Christ, the 
person and work of the Holy Spirit, and, in short, nearly every 
Lutlieran doctrine. The founders of Luther College were staunch 
Lutherans. They believed that the Word of God was their dearest 
heritage. They understood full well that the Bible had to be 
excluded from the public schools in this land, and that they could 
not teach the Lutheran faith in these schools. They knew that 
if their Lutheranism should be transmitted at all to their children, 
they must establish schools where this religion could be taught 
in its truth and purity. So they set up their own schools along- 
side of the state schools and the schools of the other churches. 
For the sake of the Lutheran religion Luther College was found- 
ed. Luther College would probably never have been built except 
for this religious aim. The Norwegian Lutherans in America 
have established some 70 other liigher schools in America, and 
everv one of them has been established in the name of the Lu- 



42 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

tlieran faith, and every one lias been able to sueceed onh' in so 
far as men have kept up their interest in the religious aim and 
character of the school. Luther College is a child of faith. 

Luther College has been a conservative school and has been 
true to the religious aim and ideals of its noble founders. Great 
changes have taken place in the world of thought during the 60 
years of its history. Like the winds of the air, like the waves of 
the sea, the world of thought is constantly in motion. The views 
as to religion ebb and flow. I>eaders as well as followers are 
swept along by the opinions of the day. It looks at times as if 
there is nothing stable. And yet there is. Two times two, for 
example, always make four. The Word of God is always true. 
Jesus Christ is the same yesterday and today, yea, and forever. 
It has been the constant aim of Luther College to proclaim this 
fact, that there are some things that never change, especially that 
the Word of God is the Truth and that man is justified by faith 
alone. 

It must be admitted that it has been a very difficult task to 
establish the Lutheran faith in America. Not because the Lu- 
theran Church is a newly-planted Church or a foreign Church. 
It began work here as early as 1562 (at Port Royal, S. C), and 
is most evangelical and democratic. Nevertheless, it has not made 
the headway that it should. There are millions of Americans 
who should be members of the Lutheran Church because they 
have come from Lutheran homes or ancestry, but who are mem- 
bers of some Reformed church or have no church connection at 
all. To understand the peculiar work of Luther College it is 
necessary to take a hasty survey of at least two of the dominant 
religious forces in the land, the Reformed Church and the public 
school, both of which work upon the same people that Luther 
College is trying to serve. It is impossible to understand the 
task of Luther College or to gauge the results without referring 
to these two factors. 

The dominant church in America is the Reformed. In some 
places it is nip and tuck between the Catholic and the Reformed. 
However, as shown in the "Lutheran World Almanac for 1921" 
(205-22.3), the Catholics, like the Lutherans, have been losing 
rather heavily, while the Reformed Churches and the unchurched 
groups have gained in numbers. In America nearly all the sects 
in the world are represented. The U. S. religious census for 
1916 catalogues 202 denominations. Of these, 158 are grouped 
into 24 families, and 44 are listed as separate denominations. 



RELIGIOUS AIM AND CHARACTER 43 

The "Lutheran World Almanac for 1922" (113) makes the follow- 
ing classification: 

Group Bodies Ministers Communicants Per cent 

I.Lutheran 21 10,961 2,493,894 5.9 

2. Reformed 128 150,043 22,864,247 54.4 

3. Catholic 10 22,179 15,762,473 37.3 

4. Non-Christian 12 13,643 1,028,457 2.4 



Total 171 196,826 42,149.071 100.0 

As the population in 1920 was 105,710,620 it will be seen that 
only 40% of this number are reckoned as communicant members 
of churches. In the case of the Catholics all the baptized are 
included. Of course every denomination should do like the Cath- 
olics — insist on counting baptized children as members of the 
church. By adding the children to the respective denominations, 
the totals will appear about as follows: 

Denomination Estimated membership Per cent 

1. Lutheran 3,500,000 3.3 

2. Reformed 34,500,000 32 . 7 

3. Catholic 16,000,000 15 . 1 

4. Non-Christian 1 .500,000 1 . 4 

5. Unchurched 50,000,000 47 . 5 

Total 105,500,000 100.0 

It will be seen from this table that nearly one-half of the 
population is outside the Christian fold. Of the Christian de- 
nominations the Reformed churches as a group are by far in the 
lead. Like the Catholics they have often sought to gain influence 
through politics. They lay stress on organization and field work, 
they are aggressive and often unscrupulous in proselyting. Being 
of English origin, they have language and nationality in their 
favor at the very start. They are prolific in writing books for 
schools and are otherwise successful in manning all the positions 
of power and influence in public office, school, and press. Though 
the members of the group differ radically from one another in 
many respects, they have so much in common and are so much 
in evidence everywhere that they are without question the most 
dominant religious influence in the land. They recruit their 
forces heavily from the ranks of unchurched Catholics and Lu- 
therans. They reckon that the unchurched have, as a rule, lean- 
ings toward the Reformed religious views and practices. For 
that reason Laidlaw of the U. S. Census Bureau and Watson of 
the Federal Council of Churches estimate the potential Reformed 
strength at 74,795,226, or more than thrice the actual member- 
ship. 

Briefly, the Reformed churches of America have gone through 
the same experience as the Church of Norway — passing from 



44 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

piety to rationalism. New England has always taken the lead 
in American life. She has been able to force her thought and 
institutions to a large extent upon the rest of the states and peo- 
ples in America. Her theology 60 years ago was Calvinistic and of 
a very dogmatic type. Now, particularly in the intellectual 
centers, with some notable exceptions, the theology is of the 
modern type. It makes light of creed. It no longer stresses the 
power of God, but the power of man. The cliief gospel now is 
social work rather than salvation from sin. The Bible is dis- 
credited as the final Word of God. As one man put it in his 
sermon: "The newspaper is good enough Bible for me". The 
Reformed Church has no doubt exerted influence also on Luther 
College, but Luther College still is true to the old creeds. It is 
impossible to estimate what a force Luther College has been in 
keeping our Norwegian Lutheran people from going over to the 
Reformed or taking over the Reformed doctrines and practices 
wliile retaining the Lutheran name and fame. 

"Lord, grant that we e'er pure retain 
The catechismal doctrine plain, 
As Luther taught the heavenly truth 
In simple xcords to tender youth." 

It must be admitted that it has been a very difficult task to es- 
tablish Lutheran schools in America. Not because they have 
been inferior in quality or not necessary. Quite the contrary. 
And yet after nearly a century of agitation for parochial schools 
we can boast of only a few unsuccessful attempts in this line. Our 
vacation religion schools are dying out. Most of our academies 
have been discontinued. Our colleges are few and far between. 
Luther College has never been a large school. To understand 
the peculiar value of these schools, and Luther College in partic- 
ular, it is necessary to take a survey of the dominant educational 
forces in America. 

The dominant American school is the public school system. 
In 1911 the total school enrollment was 22,462,342, of whom 
89.5% attended public schools and 10.5% attended private schools. 
Only 8.3% attended private elementary schools, 14.8% attended 
private secondary schools, and 49.9% attended private colleges, 
professional and special schools ("U. S. Commissioner of Educa- 
tion Report", 1916, II, 1). The public school has not always 
been the dominant one in American histor3^ In the Colonial pe- 
riod the church was the controlling factor in the establishment 
and control of scliools. It took our country about a century — 



RELIGIOUS AIM AND CHARACTER 45 

from 1775 to 1875 — to establish fully its present system of free, 
tax-supported, state-controlled, non-sectarian, democratic, public 
schools. The church did not give up its hold on the schools with- 
out a bitter struggle. The advocates of public schools have been 
slowly but surely winning, first in behalf of the elementary schools, 
then in behalf of the secondary schools, and finally in behalf of 
the higher schools. When the church saw that the battle for the 
elementary schools was practically lost, it turned its attention to 
tlie establishment of academies. In 1850 there were 6,085 
academies and only 172 public high schools. In 1914 there were 
11,674 public high schools and only 2,248 church academies. 
Again, when the church saw that the battle for the academies 
was lost, it turned its attention to the establishment of colleges 
and universities. The churches had founded 2 colleges in the 
17th century, 22 in the 18th, and over 400 in the 19th, most of 
them after 1850. Most of the state colleges and universities are 
younger than Luther College. During the 60 years in which Lu- 
ther College has managed to keep alive it has seen thousands of 
academies and hundreds of colleges close their doors on account 
of the fierce competition. Most of the Norwegian youth who 
go to school are, of course, attending public schools and univers- 
ities. There they become more or less secular-minded and often 
are lost to our Church and its Gospel influence. 

Our country needs the public schools. We loyally support 
them. They unify our people. They train for useful citizenship. 
But they cannot teach religion. And the Christian religion the 
youth of America needs to learn, for it has a value both for this 
life and that which is to come. The morals of our people and 
the very existence of the country itself rest upon the proper 
religious instruction. Luther College supplies this "one thing 
needful". 

3. Providing Church Workers 

The founders of Luther College reckoned that if they wanted 
church workers they must build a school where they could give 
them the training they needed. They did not hope to get any 
from the Reformed schools or from the state schools. They were 
right. "Prestekalenderen" has made a survey of all the Norwe- 
gian Lutheran pastors from 1843 to 1915. During these years 
the Norwegian Synod obtained 685 pastors. Only 77 of these 
came from Norway. Only 1 had had his theological training at 
a Reformed seminary, while 607 had been educated at Lutheran 
seminaries in America. Luther College had furnished 451 of 



46 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

these 607 men, 298 with the A. B. degree and 153 with an 
academy training and beyond. The remaining 15G had attended 
some other Lutheran liighcr schools. Not one had attended a 
Reformed or Catholic academy. Only one had attended a Re- 
formed university for a period of two years. Only 13 had attend- 
ed a public high school. These 13 had spent a sum total of -lO 
years in high school, followed by a total of 41 years at Luther 
College and 38 years at Concordia and Luther Seminaries. Only 
one had taken his A. B. at a state university, and that only after 
he had taken it first at Luther College. Quite a number had taken 
advanced degrees at universities, but they are not considered in 
this survey. The point to be considered here is, tliat in 70 years 
of history covered by this book the Norwegian Synod did not 
receive a single minister from any American state university, 
only 13 men from the public high schools, only one man from a 
Reformed university and one from a Reformed seminary. The 
Reformed schools were not established to furnish the Norwegian 
Lutheran Church with church workers. The state schools were 
not established for the purpose of supplying any church with 
ministers of the Gospel. They are not to be blamed for not do- 
ing so. It is not their business. United States has 4G8 private 
colleges and universities besides 95 state universities. But the 
Lutheran Church cannot look to any of these schools except its 
own, which is included in the number, for its supply of pastors. 
The Norwegian Lutheran Church must have Luther College, or 
schools like Luther College, if it wants to live. 

4. Making Good Citizens 

Luther College takes its name from Martin I>uther, the great 
hero of the Reformation, proclaimed by James P\ Clark "the real 
author of modern liberty of thought and action, the giant founder 
of modern civilization and of pure religion." His Ninety-Five 
Theses nailed on the doors of the Wittenberg Church have been 
called the world's "Declaration of Independence"; his bold stand 
at the Diet of Worms has been hailed as the greatest moment, the 
turning point, in modern history (T. Carlyle). 

Lutlier College has tried to be true to the doctrines and Hi)irit 
of Martin Luther. It stands to reason, then, that I^uther College 
should make good citizens and be of the highest service to Amer- 
ica. It may be that America does not care for the language and 
culture of the Norwegian I^utherans who founded Luther College. 
As for the language, it is dying out. In 18(51 80% of the in- 
struction at Luther College was carried on in Norwegian; in 



RELIGIOUS AIM AND CHARACTER 47 

1922, only 8%, Norwegian being the medium of instruction only 
in Norwegian language, literature, and history. As for the cul- 
ture, its future is not very bright. The Norwegian element 
in America is only 2% of the total population, and it is hardly 
to be expected that the great American people will pay any atten- 
tion to it. The Norwegian element itself has had most of its 
training at the public schools and is interested mainly in the 
New England culture presented there. It would never be known 
from an average American textbook in history that there ever had 
been a Norwegian in America. Luther College has been con- 
tending with these difficulties, trj-ing to make all its students 
love this country and its institutions and yet, at the same time, 
remember the great heritage of their fathers. Luther College 
men owe no political allegiance to Norway. They are Americans. 
In the recent war there were 356 names on the honor roll of 
Luther College and 8 golden stars for the boys who never came 
back. About 100 Luther men were officers, 5 were chaplains. 
Luther College became at first an S. A. T. C. post in the service 
of the U. S. Government and then, after the signing of the arm- 
istice, an R. O. T. C. unit. 

Not all of the Luther College men become pastors and teachers 
in church schools. About one-half of the graduates have taken 
up secular callings, as farmers (ca. 5%), merchants (16%), public 
servants (3%), journalists (2%), lawyers (4%), physicians 
(6%), public school teachers (10%), etc. Many of the alumni 
are holding high positions in church and state, in school and 
business. Presidents of synods, secretaries of boards, a governor 
of a state, ministers to foreign lands, state and city superintendents 
of schools, professors at famous universities, librarians, judges, 
superintendents of hospitals, statistical and medical authorities, 
etc., are some of the positions of note that Luther men have filled 
with distinction and satisfaction. About one-fifth are authors. 

This is not a pessimistic view of the religious aim and character 
of Luther College. Luther College has had a great aim, has had 
a unique character, has done a noble work. To God alone be 
the honor. As Paul Koren sings in his "Cantata" for the Six- 
tieth Anniversary of Luther College: 

"For what thy past has (fiven us. in f/rafitude we raise 
Our voice and tell of victory, of thankfulness and praise. 
To Him be all the c/lory, our mif/hty Lord and Kiny, 
Whose blessing rested on thy brow, to Him our song we bring." 



CHAPTER THREE 




SEAL OF 
LUTHER COLLEGE 



GOVERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION 

D. T. Nelson 
I. Government 

ONE of the first problems that arose in 
connection with the establishment of Lu- 
ther College was that of securing for it a 
sound legal status. The Sj'^nod for the Nor- 
wegian Evangelical Lutheran Church in Amer- 
ica had already been incorporated in the state 
of Wisconsin in 1858; but since the College 
was to be located in Iowa it was felt neces- 
sary tliat the Sj'nod be incorporated in Iowa 
as well. In 1863^ after Rev. V. Koren had reported to the Synod 
that he had been unable to effect such incorporation, the matter 
was referred to Prof. F. A. Schmidt. At the Synod meeting in 
1864, Prof. Schmidt also reported failure; the matter was then 
referred to a committee made up of Profs. Schmidt and Larsen 
and Rev. V. Koren. In 1865 this committee reported that since 
no means had been found for incorporating the Synod in Iowa, 
steps had been taken to incorporate the College; that the articles 
of incorporation had been signed February 1, 1865; and that the 
incorporation had been carried out in such a manner as to give 
the Synod complete control over the newly-formed corporation. 

Such control was, and indeed is, essential for the Church; for 
the impelling motive which gave rise to Luther College and to all 
the sacrifices made in its behalf is found in its mission of training 
young men for service in the Church. Reference to the articles 
of incorporation (1917) will show that tliis control is assured by 
Article 3, which provides that the membcrsliip of the corporation 
shall "consist of the pastors of the Norwegian Evangelical Lu- 
theran congregations connected with tlie Norwegian Lutheran 
Church of America and the representatives of said congregations 
at the regular triennial meeting of said Church, chosen in ac- 
cordance witli its discipline and usage." The Liither College 



GOVERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION 49 

Corporation is thus, in effect, tlic church body organized for a 
collegiate purpose.* 

The same committee was instructed by the Synod in 1860 to 
prepare a set of by-laws, and also an amendment to the articles 
whereby the Church Council sliould be constituted a Board of 
Visitors for the College. This was not accomplished until the 
Synod meeting of 1871. On June 29 of that year the by-laws 
were adopted; on the same date Article X was added and Article 
IV amended. Amended Article IV provided that the treasurer, 
who had hitherto been a member of the Board of Trustees ex- 
officio, should no longer be so, and set up the faculty as a Board 
with such powers as are conferred upon it by the by-laws. The 
articles and by-laws were now in essentials in their permanent 
form. In the drafting of them. Judge G. R. Willett had rendered 
without charge notable service. The Synod expressed its thanks 
to him and charged the committee with the duty of procuring for 
him a suitable gift, appropriating for that purpose the sum of 
fifty dollars. 

From an examination of the articles and by-laws so amended 
and adopted, it is seen that sovereignty in the corporation re- 
sides in the church body organized in regular meeting as the cor- 
poration. To the Board of Trustees of eight members is entrusted 
the management of the affairs of the corporation, but with such 
restrictions, financial and otherwise, as to insure control by the 
Church in all matters of importance. To the Board of Profes- 
sors (faculty) is given power to admit and expel students and, 
subject to the authority of the corporation and Board of Visitors, 
to make and enforce rules and regulations for the good govern- 
ment and discipline of the College. Finally, to the Board of 
Visitors, which consists of the members of the Church Council — 
the controlling executive body of the Church— is delegated the 
right of visitation, authority to fix the number, duties, and com- 



*The ofBcial name of the Norwegian Synod in the constitution adopted in 
1853 was the Noi-wegian Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. In 1865, 
at the annual convention held at Highland Prairie, Minn., the name was 
changed to the Synod for the Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran Church in 
America. In 1858 the Norwegian Synod was incorporated under the laws of 
Wisconsin as the Nonveglan Evangelical Synod of the State of Wisconsin. On 
that account the Norwegian Synod was often called the Wisconsin Synod, and 
its teachings and practice were sometimes by opponents called "Wisconsinism". 
But inasmuch as the synod in 1865 had changed its constitutional name from the 
Nonvegian Evangelical Lutheran Church in America to the Synod for the Nor- 
wegian Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, steps were taken to secure 
the necessary changes in the articles of incorporation. The committee mentioned 
above— Koren, Schmidt, Larsen — with the aid of Judge G. R. Willett of Decorah, 
prepared a bill authorizing the change of name. The bill was introduced in the 
Iowa state senate by Senator Dr. Bullis of Decorah and became a law on March 
16, 1866. In Wisconsin a special act was passed by the senate and assembly in 
1878 and again in 1885 authorizing the change in the articles of incorporation 
of the Norwegian Synod. 



50 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



pensation of professors, to prescribe terms of admission, and to 
make general rules for the guidance of the Board of Professors. 
By implication it would appear that Article V of the by-laws also 
confers upon the Board of Visitors supervision over the course of 
study. The Board of Visitors, or Chureli Council, has thus, next 
to the church body, been the residuary of the greatest power with 
regard to the College. 

Prior to 1872 meetings of the corporation were legal only if 
held in the state of Iowa. In that year, due to the efforts of 







WINNESHIEK COUNTY COLliT HOUSE 



Prof. Knut Bergh, who was then a member of the state legislature 
of Iowa, a laM' was passed legalizing the meetings of the corpora- 
tion in any state adjoining Iowa. 

At first the election of the officers of the corporation was fixed 
for every year. In 1878 the by-laws were amended to provide 
for triennial elections. 

No other change was made in the by-laws imtil 1899. Prior 
to 1899, Article V provided that tlie Board of Visitors might ap- 
point and remove the jjrofessors, subject to the apj^roval of the 
majority of the pastors of the congregations of the Church and 
the professors of the College. This rule, wliich practically neces- 
sitated a meeting of the Synod or an election by mail, had become 
increasingly cumbersome with the growth of the Church. In 1876 



GOVERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION 51 

the Synod had been divided into three districts — the Eastern, 
Minnesota, and Iowa Districts; in 1890 a fourth, the Pacific Dis- 
trict, had been added. Meanwhile other schools had been estab- 
lished and the Church's interests had grown and expanded in 
every direction. Some less unwieldy method of election had be- 
come imperative. In 1895 proposals were laid before the Synod 
by a committee appointed by the Church Council; to these, further 
consideration was given in 1896; the next year a set of rules was 
adopted which provided in substance as follows : a vacancy among 
the professors should be announced by the Church Council in 
"Kirketidende", the official organ of the Church, at least four 
weeks before a nomination was to be made. The nomination 
should be made by the Church Council and the permanent pro- 
fessors of the College; the nomination likewise should be an- 
nounced in "Kirketidende". After another four weeks' delay to 
permit of the filing of objections on the part of the members of 
the Church, the Church Council should proceed to election by a 
two-thirds vote. In 1899 by the amendment of Article V of the 
by-laws this set of rules was given effect by the college corpora- 
tion. 

The original proposals of 1895 and 1896 had looked forward 
to the establishment of an "electoral college" of six men, which 
would have had charge of providing the personnel of the college 
faculty. The rules adopted in 1897 show that the Synod was not 
then prepared for so radical a delegation of authority. By 1908, 
however, the question had cropped up again. In that year an 
organization was set up which foreshadows very clearly the pres- 
ent Board of Education. By resolution of the Synod there was 
established a Board of Directors of nine members ; four of these, 
the president of the Synod and the presidents of Luther Seminary, 
Luther College, and Lutheran Normal School, were to be mem- 
bers ex officio, and five were to be elected at large by a two-thirds 
vote at each regular synod meeting. The Board was divided into 
three sub-committees of three members each, one for each school. 
The Board was granted purely administrative authority; it was 
empowered to nominate the heads of the schools under its juris- 
diction, to dismiss professors in certain cases, to fix salaries in 
accordance with the general regulations established by the Synod, 
and through its sub-committees to make temporary appointments 
of professors. Although this arrangement was not considered 
satisfactory or effective, it endured until 1917, when a union was 
effected by the three principal Norwegian church bodies — the 
Hauge Synod, the Norwegian Synod, and the United Church. 



52 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

With the adoption by these church bodies of the constitution 
of the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America came the establish- 
ment of a board which devotes its efforts exclusively to educational 
matters. The Board of Education of the new church body has 
both authority in administrative affairs and jurisdiction with re- 
gard to courses of study. Although it functions independently, 
it is, nevertheless, subordinate to the Church Council, which by 
paragraph 22, c, of tlie cliurch constitution is invested with final 
authority in school matters. The Board of Education, which is 
composed of seven members, consists of three pastors and three 
laymen, of whom one-half are elected every third year for a period 
of six years, and the president of the Church ex-officio. The 
Board is empowered to appoint an executive educational secretary 
to aid it in its work. 

In 1917, by paragraph 14 of the rules for the Board of Ed- 
ucation, return was again made to the old method of electing 
teachers in full clmrch meeting. This method immediately proved 
itself so impracticable in the present greatly enlarged church 
body, that it was repealed in 1920. In its stead provision was 
made whereby the Board of Education should have authority, 
except in the case of professors for the Seminary, to choose and 
appoint teachers for one year or a part thereof and even, if cir- 
cumstances demanded it, to make the appointment permanent. 

It has thus come about in the course of years, that the Lu- 
ther College Corporation, though unchanged in character, has been 
fitted into the special organization which the Church has set up 
to look after its educational work. Although the advisability of 
retaining its separate corporate existence has been questioned, ex- 
perience would appear to justify the findings of the committee 
which was appointed in 1899 and reported in 1902 against dis- 
solution, giving as its reasons: first, that the College was already 
fully in the Church's control ; and, secondly, that a dissolution of 
the corporation might raise serious legal difficulties with regard 
to the legacies of which the corporation has been the recipient. 

It remains to be added that as, according to the laws of Iowa, 
incorporations of the nature of the Luther College Corporation 
expire at the end of fifty years, measures were taken in 1915 to 
renew the articles of incorporation. Finally, in 1918 a change 
was made, significant of the altered circumstances of language 
in which both the Church and the College find themselves, by strik- 
ing the word "Norwegian" from the official name of the Col- 
lege. 



GOVERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION 



53 



II. Administration 

In turning to a consideration of the administrative develop- 
ment of the College, it is well to note that Luther College is a 
direct descendant of the Latin School of Norway. It is a boys* 
school, a classical school, a boarding school. But because of its 
peculiar relation to the Church, Luther College has a special mis- 
sion to perform. This fact, and the steady and cumulative force 
of the college idea as it has evolved in America, have been agencies 
influencing the development of Luther College. 

Luther College in 1861 had two teachers and 16 students. 
Naturally the administrative problems were not of such a nature 
as to require a careful division of administrative duties. The 
president of the school exercised all administrative functions. The 
school took on the aspect of an enlarged family for which Pres. 




LL lUl-.l; LOl.l.t-.i.K IN IHE Ki(.Hlll-,S 

Larsen was father, pastor, and teacher. He discharged also the 
duties of registrar, treasurer, librarian, and disciplinarian. 

But with the growtli of the College and the consequent in- 
crease in the amount of necessary administrative work, a division 
of labor was essential. From the first, although the president 
exercised a supervisory function, the problem of providing suit- 
able table board was placed in the hands of a steward, an ar- 
rangement which continued until 1896, when the students were 
granted permission to manage the undertaking themselves through 
the Luther College Boarding Club. 



54 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

In ]cS()7, the library was placed in charge of Prof. Landmark. 
He, and his successors in charge of the library up to 1915, had 
other duties in ^iddition to their work with the library; but since 
1915 the full time and eti'ort of the librarian have been devoted 
to the library. Up to 1889 all classes of the College were under 
the direct supervision of tlie president. In that year, by the ap- 
pointment of Prof. H. W. Sheel to be principal of the Preparatory 
Department, much of the responsibility of the president for that 
department was lifted from his shoulders. In 1890 the museum 
received its special officer by the appointment of Prof. W. Sihler 
as curator. President Laur. Larsen continued to bear one of the 
heaviest administrative loads, however, until 1895, for it was not 
until Prof. C. A. Naeseth in that year was made treasurer that the 
president was relieved of the multifarious details involved in car- 
ing for the college treasury. Although President C. K. Preus as 
early as 1905 recommended that a registrar be appointed, the 
.registrar's office was not organized until 191 1. Prof. O. A. Tingel- 
stad has been in charge since its inception and has made it a most 
valuable and up-to-date adjunct to the work of the College. 

A step much needed for the adequate maintenance of the pres- 
ident's office was taken in 1917, when an appropriation was 
granted to defray tlie expense of an office assistant. Since that 
time a stenographer has been regularly employed. 

One of the heaviest burdens laid upon the president is that 
of maintaining discipline. From time to time, various ])rofessors 
have been called upon to assist the president in this work. As 
early as 1863 Prof. L. Siewers was known as "Konrektor" (as- 
sistant master). In 1896-7, because of Prof. Larsen's ill-health. 
Prof. L. S. Ileque had charge of discipline in the evenings. In 
1905-6 Prof. Oscar I.. Olson acted as disciplinarian to a very 
considerable extent. In 190G-7, upon the completion of Laur. 
Larsen Hall, the task of maintaining discipline in the new build- 
ing Avas turned over to Prof. M. K. Bleken, and in 1911 to the 
principal of the Prejiaratory Department. In 1919-20 Prof. M. 
H. Trytten, and in 1920-22 Prof. B. J. Hovde, acted as dean 
of men in the College Department. 

The gradual delegation of administrative duties outlined above 
has been in harmony with the normal development of the College. 
With the present tendency to a division of the college work along 
departmental lines, it becomes necessary in order to harmonize 
conflicting interests to resort more and more to conmiittees in 
handling matters of administration. Greater development in this 
direction can no doubt be looked for in the future. 



GOVERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION 55 

In deliberations affecting tlie government and regulation of 
the College the Board of Professors, or faculty, plays an import- 
ant part. Problems affecting the courses of study are the subject of 
thorough discussions ; in the past the initiative for most of the 
changes in the curriculum has come in the form of recommenda- 
tions from the faculty. The faculty, moreover, sits as a board in 
all cases involving flagrant breaches of discipline and is the de- 
ciding body in cases involving the expulsion of a student from the 
school. The president and the faculty, aside from their dis- 
ciplinary jurisdiction, are also intimately concerned with the gen- 
eral and spiritual welfare of the students. In the earlier days of 
the College, when the family nature of the student body and faculty 
was more pronounced, the character and personality of the teacher 
in fullest measure influenced the student b}^ precept and example. 
To some extent this has changed, because of the increase in at- 
tendance, but a close relation between student and teacher still re- 
mains. 

lor many years, too, the College has enjoyed the services of 
the pastors who have served the First Norwegian Lutheran Con- 
gregation at Decorah. During the existence of the Synod, the 
work of these men and of the local congregation, not least that 
of the women of the congregation, contributed in no small degree 
both to the material and the spiritual welfare of the College. 
Since the union of the churches in 1917, very fine relations with 
both Norwegian Lutheran Congregations in Decorah have been 
maintained. During the school year 1921-22 the plan was in- 
augurated of having each of the two pastors conduct the morning 
chapel exercises once a week. 

Since 1876 the physical welfare of the students has been 
under the direct supervision of the college physician. In 1899 a 
hospital building, which lias since been enlarged and improved, 
was made possible through the gift of Mr. J. A. Johnson of Madi- 
son, Wisconsin. Since 1916 the College has had the services of a 
college nurse, a provision which has more than proved its value. 
Since 1919 provision has also been made for a physical director. 

The material problems relating to the care of buildings and 
grounds are directly under the supervision of the president. In 
the earliest days of the College the care of rooms and building 
was a duty of the students. With the increase in equipment, jan- 
itor and engineer service was placed directly in charge of the 
steward. With the passing of the steward, the posts of engineer, 
janitor, night-watchman, and electrician were established. 



56 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

The last few years have witnessed a greater appreciation of 
the need and value of adequate publicity for the College. President 
Preus in 1917 laid before the Church recommendations toward this 
end, stressing the value of publicity as a means of obtaining ade- 
quate support for the College. A constructive policy of publicity 
keeps the College in closer touch with the body it serves. It is of 
value also in securing adequate recognition from the public at 
large and the school world in particular, and in attracting to the 
College a larger number of students. Lastly, it aids very materi- 
ally in securing the funds without which the conduct of the school 
would be impossible. 

Considerable progress has been made in this direction. The 
means of publicity employed consist in part of catalogs, bulletins, 
circulars, advertisements, and student publications such as the 
college papers and annuals. In 1921 the College began the pub- 
lication quarterly of the "Luther College Bulletin". Much atten- 
tion is devoted to publicity in the church and secular press, about 
twenty-five publications receiving copy from correspondents at 
the College. Great credit for the work done in this field is due 
the publicity committee of the College, which at present consists 
of Profs. C. W. Strom, B. J. Hovde, and M. H. Trytten. The 
College also endeavors to furnish from among its faculty mem- 
bers speakers for such occasions as may arise. 

To aid in providing for adequate and continued support, the 
College is in need of a financial secretary who can take charge of 
collections in the field and continue a steady campaign for in- 
creased endowments. 

III. Articles of Incorporatiox of the Norwegian Luther 
College of Decoraii, Iowa 

(As amended and adopted by the Luther College Corporation in 1917) 

Article 1. We, the undersigned, Herman Amberg Preus, of Leeds, 
Wisconsin; Tiiore Peterson, of Calmar, Iowa; and CJulbrand T. Lom- 
men, of Decorah, Iowa; do hereby form ourselves into a body corporate 
to be known as the Norwegian Luther College of Decorah, Iowa, and as 
such corporation to possess the privileges and exercise the powers pro- 
vided by law. 

Article 2. The purposes of this corj)<)ration are the establishment of 
a Collegiate Institution in the town of Decorah, of a religious and ed- 
ucational character, to jirovide suitable buildings and grounds there- 
for, engage teachers, provide liliraries, apparatus and all other things 
necessary for the successful conduct of the same. 

Article 3. The members of this association and corporation shall 
consist of the pastors of the Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran congre- 
gations connected with the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America 
and the representatives of said congregations at the regular triennial 
meeting of said Church, chosen in accordance with its discipline and 
usage. 



GOVERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION 57 



Article 4. The officers of tliis corporation shall be a president, secre- 
tary, treasurer, and a Board of six Trustees to be chosen in such man- 
ner, time, and place as shall be specified by the By-Laws of the corpora- 
tion. The president and secretary shall be members of said board ex- 
ofScio. The president and the professors of the College shall together 
constitute a board or faculty with such powers as may be conferred 
upon them by the By-Laws. The corporation at all its meetings, annual 
and special, shall choose a chairman who shall hold the position during 
the session. 

Article 5. The following named persons shall constitute the officers 
of this corporation for the first year of its existence and until their 
successors are elected, viz.: Rev. Herman Amberg Preus, president; 
Rev. V. Koren, secretary; Prof. Laur. Larsen, treasurer; Thore Peter- 
son, Gulbrand T. Lommen, N. Brandt, Jens J. Naeset, Tjerand John- 
son, Rev. O. J. Hjort, trustees. Said election shall be held at the first 
meeting of the corporation held after the 1st day of January, A. D. 
1866. 

Article 6. The affairs of this corporation shall be managed and con- 
trolled by the Board of Trustees, subject to the by-laws of this corpora- 
tion defining the duties of the officers and prescribing their mode of 
procedure in transacting the business of the corporation. 

Article 7. The private property of the members of this corporation 
shall be exempt from liability for the debts thereof. 

Article 8. All conveyances of property of this corporation shall be 
taken in the name of the corporation as set forth in Article 1 hereof. 

Article 9. Any of these articles may be amended and other articles 
added thereto at any meeting of the members of this corporation. 

Article 10. The president and members of the Church Council of the 
Norwegian Lutheran Church of America and their successors in those 
offices are hereby constituted a Board of Visitors for the College, and 
shall have such powers, including the right of visitation and calling of 
special meetings of the corporation, as may be conferred upon them by 
the by-laws of the corporation. 

By-Laws of the Norwegian Luther College of Decorah, Iowa 

1. The Board of Trustees shall have, when not otherwise provided, 
the general management of the affairs of the corporation, keep the 
buildings and other property of the corporation in good repair, make 
all necessary improvements to the same, procure such libraries and ap- 
paratus as the board of professors may deem necessary for the success- 
ful conduct of the College. Provided, that in no event shall the 
Trustees be authorized to expend annually a greater sum than $1,000 
(one thousand dollars) without first submitting the same to the annual 
meeting of the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America, for their ap- 
proval. A majority of the said Board of Trustees shall constitute a 
quorum for the transaction of business. 

2. The president, secretary, treasurer, and Board of Trustees shall 
be elected triennially at such time and place as said Church shall hold 
its regular meeting. The regular meeting of this corporation will be 
held at the same time and place. And whenever a vacancy shall occur, 
the Board of Trustees shall have the power to fill such vacancy from 
among the members of the corporation. Notice of regular meetings of 
the corporation shall be announced by the president, by publication of 
the same in such newspapers as the Board of Trustees shall direct at 
least four weeks previous to the day of the meeting. 

3. The judges of said election shall be three in number and shall be 
elected at the time from the members of the corporation. It shall be 



58 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



their duty to report at once the result of said election in Avriting under 
their hands to the j)resi(lent and secretary of the corporation. 

4. The j^resident, secretary, treasurer and Board of Trustees so 
elected siiall hold their res])ective offices until their successors are elected 
and qualified. Before entering uj)on the duties of his office, the treasurer 
shall he required to execute a hond, in sucii sum as the Board of Trustees 
may require. The president shall have the general supervision of the 
aflt'airs of the College, shall preside at all meetings of the Board of 
Trustees and board of profess irs, and in cases of an equal division at 
these meetings shall have, in addition to his vote as a memljer, the de- 
ciding vote, and shall sign all contracts and orders on the treasurer for 
the payment of money; in case of his absence or disability, these last 
duties shall devolve upon a president pro tem. to be chosen from their 
number by the Board of Trustees. He may call meetings of the Board 
of Trustees or board of professors when he shall deem it necessary — and 
shall do so when requested by three members of the board of wliich a 
meeting is desired. 

5. The number of the professors for the College, their respective 
duties and compensation, shall be fixed by the Board of Visitors, in ac- 
cordance with the resolutions made by the Norwegian Lutheran Church 
of America, and the appointment and removal of such professors shall 
be made in accordance with the rules and regulations prescribed by 
said Church. 

6. The professors of the College shall constitute a board with power 
to admit students to the College and expel them therefrom for improper 
conduct and to make and enforce such rules and regulations, not in- 
consistent with those made by the corporation or by the Board of Visitors 
as they may consider necessary for the good government and discipline 
of the College. 

7. It is hereby made the duty of the Board of Visitors to make 
rules prescribing the terms of admission into the College, the amount 
of preparatory knowledge and other qualifications required for admis- 
sion, and make such other rules and regulations as they may deem best 
for the guidance of the board of professors in maintaining the good 
government and discipline of the College. 

8. It shall be the duty of the Board of Trustees to make an annual 
report of the financial condition of the College to the corporation at 
its annual meeting — and if no annual meeting shall be held in any year, 
then such report shall be made at that time to the Board of Visitors. 

9. The secretary shall attend and keep a record of the proceedings 
of all meetings of the Board of Trustees and of the corporation; shall 
keep a record of all elections of officers, keep a correct account of all 
the business transactions of the corporation, in books to be provided 
for that purpose, and attend to the correspondence of the corporation; 
his l)ooks and pa{)ers shall be always o])en for inspection by any mem- 
ber of the Board of Trustees or Board of Visitors. 

10. The treasurer shall receive and keep all moneys belonging to the 
corporation and shall disburse the same only on the written order of 
the president. He shall kee]) full and correct accounts of all moneys 
and property by him received and disi)urscd on account of this corpora- 
tion, and shall render a statement of the same annually to the Board of 
Trustees and to the annual meeting of the corporation, and at such 
(.ther times as he may be called upon therefor by the Board of Trustees 
and Board of Visitors, or either of them. The bcoks of the treasurer 
and his voucliers, shall be always open for inspection by any member of 
the Board of Trustees or Board of Visitors. 

11. The members of the Board of Visitors shall individually and col- 
lectively have the rigiit of visitation to the College at any and all 



GOVERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION 59 



times. And it is licrel)y luade tlie duty of all the officers of this corj) ira- 
tion, as also all the professors and teachers, to exhibit to them, when 
required, all the books and records of the College and corporation and 
give them every facility for acquiring a knowledge of the condition of 
the institution. And it is herel)y made the duty of the said Board of 
Visitors to report to each annual meeting of the corprtration the result 
of their examinations into the affairs of the College, and any defects 
observed by them in the management of the same, financial or otherwise, 
and make such suggesti ns as they may deem best adapted to remedy 
such defects. 

12. Whenever a two-thirds majority of the Board of Visitors shall 
decide that the interests of the College require that a special meeting 
of the corporation be held, it shall be the duty of the president of the 
Board of Visitors to call such a meeting. Four weeks' notice of any 
meeting so called shall be given by publishing the same in some news- 
paper to be designated by the Board of Visitors and by mailing a copy 
of such notice through the post office to each pastor of a congregation 
who is a member of this corporation, and thereupon it shall be the duty 
of the pastors so notified, to cause lay-members of their congregations 
to be elected in accordance with the discipline and usages of the Nor- 
wegian Lutheran Church of America. Said notice shall name the time, 
place and object of the meeting; and unless two-thirds of the said pastors 
and a like number of lay delegates representing congregations be in 
attendance upon the meeting so called, no other business than that 
named in the notice shall be translated. ("Den Norsk Lutherske Kirke 
i Amerikas Beretning", 1917, 553-555. For the original articles of in- 
corporati n and by-laws see "Synodalhaandbog", 1901, 23-34.) 

IV. Roster 
1. Church Officials 

PRESIDENTS 18G5-1866. 

1. Rev Adolph Carl Preus. 1853-1862. l ge^- Johnnnes Bjerk Fridi^ .'«fi«-l'^". 

2. Rev. Herman Amberg Preus, 18G2- '^- ^^f I;. Christian Mathias Hvistendahl, 

lg()4. 1807-1808 

3. Dr.Ulrik Vilhelm Keren, 1894-1910. "• ^^^^^^'^'l"* "^"^'"^ Ingeb.igtsen Muus, 

4. Dr. Hans Gerhard Stub, 1910- ,^ o'"^""'""- . , t, 

in. Rev. Torger Andreis Torgerson, 

VICE-PRESIDENTS jj j^^\, gp,.^j Julius Ingebrigtsen Muus, 

1. Rev. Claus Lauritz Clausen, 183.5- 1871-1872. 

1856. 12. Rev. Johannes Bjerk Frich, 1872- 

2. Rev Nils Olsen Brandt, 1857-1871. 1878. 

3. Dr. Ulrik Vilhelm Keren, 1894-1910. 13. Rev. Ludvig Marinus Bi0rn, 1879- 

4. Dr. Peter Laurentius Larsen, 1876- 1887. 

1893. 14. Rev. Halvor Halvorsen. 1887-1896. 

5. Dr. Ulrik Vilhelm Keren, 1893-1894. 15. Rev. Jrirgen Nerdby, 1896-1908. 

6. Prof. Johannes Bjerk Frich, 189.5- 16. Rev. Daniel Chrisiopherson Jordahl, 

1899 1908-1917. 

7. Rev. Halvor Halvorsen, 1899-1905. 17. Rev. Ole J. Kvale, 1917- 

8. Dr. Hans Gerhard Stub, 1905-1910. 18. Rev. Nels Johnson L0hre, 1917- 

9. Prof. Christian Keyser Pi-eus, 1911- 

1917. TREASURERS 

10. Dr. John Nathan Kildahl, 1917-1920. , j^^^^.^ Helgesen, 1857-1863. 

11. Rev. Hans Christian Holm, 1922- 3. Gudbrand Olsen, 1863-1865. 

cprRPTARTPC ^- ^'■<'^- Lyder Siewer,s. 1865-1869 

SELKElAKIEh? 4 p,. pgter Laurentius Larsen, 1869- 

1. Dr. Ulrik ViUielm Keren, 1855-1857. 1871. 

2. Rev. Jakob Aall Ottesen, 1857-1859. 5. Gulbrand O. Rustad, 1871-1899. 

3. Rev. Nils Edward Schancke Jensen, 6 Rev. Halvor Bj0rnson Hustvedt, 1899- 

1859-1861. 1905. 

4. Rev. Jakob Aall Ottesen, 1861-1864. 7 Rev. Michael Olsen Borge, 190.5-1911. 

5. Dr. Peter Laurentius Larsen, 1864- 8 Rev. Halvor Bj0rnsen Hustvedt, 1911- 

1865. 1917. 

fi. Rev. Bernt Julius Ingebrigtsen Muus, 9. Erik Waldeland, 1917- 



60 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



CHURCH COUNCIL (Kirkeraad) 



Aadnescn. A 
Aastad, Kev. 
Anderson, A. 
Anderson, N 
Anderson, P. 
Aslaksen, Ole, 



1857-fil. 

Ivar Torgerson, 
A., 1921- 

1917-1920. 
B., 1917- 
1881-1888. 



Bj0rg:o. Rev. Knut Kliutsen, 1893-1917. 
Borlaug. Mikael J., 1882-1888. 
Brandt, Rev. Nils Olsen, 1855, 1857- 

1871. 
Biirresen. E. N.. 1894-1899. 
B0e, Rev. Nils Nilsen, 1918- 
Clausei), Rev. Claus Lauritz, 1855- 

1857. 

Dietriclison, Rev. Gustav Fredrik, 

185.3-1855 
Eastvold. Rev. Carl Johan, 1917- 
Ed\var<ls, Gunder, 1893-1899. 
Ellefsen, Erik, 1855-1857. 
Finseth, Knut K., 1809-1871. 
Finseth, Ole K., 1876-1881. 
Finseth, Anders Knudson, 1888-1894, 

1895-1899. 
Fosmark, John Oleson, 1853-1855. 
Foss, Rev. Ludvig Colbjrtrnsen, 1898- 
Frich, Prof. Johannes Bjerk, 1877- 

1888. 
Gudmundsen, Osmund M., 1920- 
Halvorsen, Rev. Halvor, 1893-1903. 
Hanson, Hon. T. O., 1910-1915. 
Harstad, Rev. Bjug Aanondsoii, 

1884-1893, 1894-1898. 
Hegg, John, 1917-1920. 
Hendrickson, Rev. Peder Anton, 

1908-1917. 
Henrj'son, T. T., 1920- 
Holm, Rev. Hans Christian, 1917- 
Ingebrigtsen. Ivar, 1855-1857. 
Jacobson, Prof. Axel, 1914-1917. 
Jacobson, Nils, 1877-1887. 
Jenson, Andrew, 1899-1914. 
Johnson, Tjerand, 1859-18G1, 18G.3- 

1809. 
Jordahl. Rev. Daniel Christopherson, 

1910-1917. 
Juul, Rev. Ole, 1888-1893. 
Kaasa, Jens Olsen, 1873-1877, 1879- 

1882. 
Klland, Gustav II., 1890-1902. 
Koren, Dr. Ulrik Vilhelni, 18G1-1910. 
Larson, Lewis, 1917- 
Larson, Walter E., 1917-1920. 
Lavik, Rev. Johannes Rasmussen, 

1917-. 
Leque, Nels P., 1914-1917. 
Lie, Lars J., 1853-1855, 1857-1859. 



Lie, Johannes E Johnson, 1869-1873. 
Linde, A. P , 1875-1876. 
Lomnien, Gulbrand T., 1857-1859, 

1861-1870, 1877-1879. 
Lucky, Capt. C. J., 1905-1906. 
Lund, S. B, 1887-1890. 
Lundberg, Carl, 1893-1896. 
Midboc, Jakob, 1861-1863. 
Muus, Rev. Bernt Julius Ingebrigtsen, 

1870-1885. 
Myhre, Gulbrand, 185.3-1855. 
Myron, Hans, 1902-1910. 
Naeset, Jens J., 1863-1869, 1876-1877. 

1887-1893. 
Nordby, Rev. J0rgen, 1907- 
Olsnaes, Aslak, 1859-1803. 
Opsund. Gunder M, 1917- 
Paulsrud, Rev. Gilbert Olson, 1917- 

1918. 
Pederson, Magnus, 1908- 
Preus, Rev. Adolph Carl, 1853-1862. 
Preus, Rev. Herman Amberg, 1853- 

1861, 1862-1894. 
Raabolle, Nils J., 1871-1875. 
Rasmussen, Rev. Peter Andreas, 

1871-1877. 
Rossing, Chr. A, 1890-1893. 
Rossing, Capt. Torkild A., 1915-1917. 
Saetra, E. O., 1894-1895. 
Saetra, Tosten C, 1908-1914. 
Sagen, Rev. Andreas Kittelson, 1903- 

1907. 
Skindlov, Rev Anders Mathias, 
Skipsnaes, Jens (Hon. J. A. 

son) 1855-1857 
Steensland, Prof. Morton M., 
Strom, Hon. Herbj0rn H., 1905-1907. 
Stub, Dr. Hans Gerhard, 1910- 
Stubb, Ludvig O., 1906-1908. 
Sundheim, Rev. J0rgen M., 1917- 

1920. 
Swenson, Hon. Lauritz Selmer, 1921- 
Thonipson, J. B., 1893-1896. 
Thoi-pe, Hon. Lars Olsen, 1905-1921. 
Thvkesen, Eivind, 1870-1887. 
Tingelstad, Bent, 1899-1902. 
Torgerson, Rev. Torger Andreas, 

1894-1906. 
Torrison, Thomas E., 1899-1905. 
Tvete, Nils K., 1896-1899. 
Tweten, Ole. 1917- 
Vangsnes, Rev. Ole Pedersen, 

1916. 
WoUan, Michael A., 1888-1891. 
Ylvisaker, Andreas Christian, 

1905. 
Ylvisaker, Rev. Ivar Daniel, 1917- 



1917- 
John- 



1920- 



1906- 



1899- 



2. Luther College Corporation Officials 

3. 



ORIGINAL INCORPORATORS 

Feb. 1, 1865 

1. Rev. Herman Amberg Preus, Leeds 



(Skotland), Calniar, 
Lomnien, Decorah, 



Wis. 

2. Thore Peterson 

Iowa. 

3. Gulbrand T. 

Iowa. 



PRESIDENTS OF THE BOARD OF 
TRUSTEES 

1. Rev. Herman Amberg Preus, Leeds, 

Wis.. 1865-1871 

2. Dr. Peter L;iurentius Larsen, Decor- 

ah, Iowa, 1871-1902. 



Prof. Christian Keyser Preus, De- 
corah, Iowa, 1902-1921. 
Dr. frond Stabo, Decorah, Iowa, 1921- 

SECRETARIES OF THE BOARD 

OF TRUSTEES 
Dr. Ulrik Vilhelm Koren, Decorah, 

Iowa. 1805-1871. 
Prof. Knut Ellefsen Bergh, Decorah, 

Iowa, 1871-1873. 
Pi-of. Jacob D. Jacobsen, Decorah, 

Iowa, 1873-1881. 
Prof. Lars S. Reque, Decorah, Iowa, 

1881-1893, 1899-1902, 1914-1916. 

Prof. Cliristcn Andreas T. Naeseth, 
Decorah, Iowa, 1893-1899, 1902-1914. 



GOVERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION 



61 



6. Rev. Kristen Kvamine, Ossian, Iowa, 

1861-1864, 1871-1899. 

7. Dr. Oscar Ludvig Olson, Decorali, 

Iowa, 1917- 

TREASURERS OF THE BOARD 
OF TRUSTEES 

1. Gulbrand O. Rustad, Decorah, Iowa, 

1871-1899. 

2. Prof. Lyder Siewers, Decorah, Iowa, 

1864-1865. 

3. Dr. Peter Laurentius Larsen, Decorah, 

Iowa, 1865-1871. 

4. Rev. Halvor Bj0rnson Hustvedt, De- 

corah, Iowa, 1899-1905, 1914-1920. 

5. Rev. Michael Olsen Borge, Decorah, 

Iowa, 1905-1U14. 

6. Rev. Knute Olson Eittreim, Decorah, 

Iowa, 1920- 

MEMBERS OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

1. Rev Herman Amberg Preus, Leeds, 

Wis., 1865-1871. 

2. Dr. Ulrik Vllhelm Koren, Decorah, 

Iowa, 1865-1871. 

3. Dr. Peter Laurentius Larsen, De- 

corah, Iowa, 1865-1913. 

4. Thore Peterson (Skotland), Calmar, 

Iowa. 1865-1875. 

5. Gulbrand T. Lommen, Decorah, Iowa, 

1865-1871. 

6. Rev. Nils Olsen Brandt, Decorah, 

Iowa, 1865-1871. 

7. Jens J. Naeset, Stoughton, Wis., 1865- 

1871, 187.5-1884, 1887-1890. 

8. Tjerand Johnson, Leeds, Wis., 1865- 

1871. 

9. Rev. Ove Jakob Hjort, Dalby, Iowa, 

1865-1878. 



10. Prof. Knut E. Bergh, Decorali, Iowa, 

1871-1873. 

11. Elling E. Void, Decorah, Iowa, 1871- 

1876. 

12. Jens Olson Kaasa, Chicago, 111., 1871- 

1875. 

13. Hon. L. K. Aaker, Alexandria, Minn., 

1871-1887. 

14. John Oleson Fosmark, Leeds, Wis, 

1871-1875. 

15. Prof. Jacob D. Jacobsen, Decorah, 

Iowa, 1873-1881. 

16. Osuld Torrison, Manitowoc, Wis., 1875- 

1884. 

17. O. N. Olsen, Decorah, Iowa, 1875-1876. 

18. Anders Kittilsby, Calmar, Iowa, 1876- 

1884. 

19. Nils N. Kjome, Decorah, Iowa, 1878- 

1881. 

20. Prof. Lars S. Reque, Decorah, Iowa, 

1881-1893, 1899-1902, 1914-1916. 

21. Halvor Nilsen, Gem, Iowa, 1881-1884. 

22. Rev. Torger Andreas Torgerson, Bris- 

tol, Iowa, 1881-1884, 1887-1902. 

23. Iver Larsen, Decorah, Iowa, 1884-1887. 

24. A. Anderson, Des Moines, Iowa, 1884- 

1887. 

25. Gulbrand Saetrang, Waterville, Iowa, 

1884-1887. 

26. Hon. Tollef Sanderson, Harmony, 

Minn., 1884-1887. 

27. Hon. Halle Steensland, Madison, Wis., 

1884-1887. 

28. Thomas E. Torrison, Manitowoc, Wis., 

1887-1893. 

29. Nils Larsen, Hesper, Iowa, 1887-1902. 

30. Hon. Lars Olsen Thorpe, Willmar, 

Minn., 1887-1890. 

31. L. O. Moen, Calmar, Iowa. 1887-1899. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 




Rev. O. E. Schmidt 



Hon. A. H. Dahl 



Mr. I. A. Thorson 



62 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



32. 
33. 

34. 
35. 
36. 
37. 
38. 
39. 
40. 
41. 
42. 
43. 
44. 
4o. 
46. 

47. 

48. 

4!) 
50. 

51. 

52. 
53. 

54. 

55. 

56. 

37. 



O. K. SimiiKin.':. Rod Wing, Minn., 
1890-l!t(l2. 

Prof. Wilhelni Magnu.s Herman Peter- 
sen, .St. Paul, Minn., 1800-1893. 

Prof. Christen Andreas T. Naeseth, 
Decorah, Iowa, 1893-1899. 1902-1914. 

Andrew Jenson, Edgerton, Wis., 1893- 
1^99. 

Jno. Lienl0kken, La Crosse, Wis., 
1893-1899. 

Gunder Edwards, Deerfleld, Wis., 
1899-1914 

G. A. Nystrom. Calmar, Iowa, 1899- 
1908. 

Hon. Anders Knudson Finseth, Ken- 
yon, Minn., 1899-1905. 

Prof. Cliristian Keyser Prcus, Dc- 
corali, Iowa, 1902-1921. 

Rev. Ole Pedersen Vangsnes, Story 
Citv. Iowa. 1902-1905. 

R. H. Boxnid, Red Wing, Minn., 1902- 

1908. 

Rev. Thomas Nilsson, Ridgeway, Iowa, 

1905-1908. 
Vegger Gulbrandson, Albert Lea, 

Minn., 1905-1914 
Rev. Halvor Bj0rnson Hustvedt, De- 

corali. Iowa, 1908-1920. 
Chr. Boxrud, Red Wing, Minn., 1908- 

1911. 
O. A. Tenold, Calmar, Iowa, 1908-1914 
Dr. C. L. Opsal, Red Wing, Minn., 

1911-1914. 
Dr. Trond Stabo, Decorah. Iowa, 1914- 
Rev. Kristen Kvamme, Ossian, Iowa, 

1914-1920. 

Hon. Andrew H. Grindeland, Warren, 
Minn.. 191 t-l92(». 

Hon. A. H Dahl, Westby, Wis., 1914- 

C. A. Erstad, Zumbrota, Minn., 1914- 
1920. 

Dr. Oscar Ludvig Olson, Decorah, 
Iowa, 1917- 

Rev Otto Emil Schmidt, Decorah, 
Iowa, 1920- 

Borger Hanson, Decorah, Iowa, 1920- 
1921. 

Hon. Lnuritz Selmer Swenson, Min- 
neapolis, Minn., 1920-1921. 



58. Prof. .lames Christian Meinich Han- 

son, Chicago. 111., 1920- 

59. Gov. .Jacob Aall Ottesen Preus. St. 

Paul, Minn., 1921- 

60. Ivar August Thorson, Minneapolis, 

Minn., 1922- 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

1. Dr. Ulrik Vilhelm Koren. 1909-1910. 

2. Prof. Chrisian Keyser Preus. 1909-1917. 

3. Dr. Olaf Elias Brandt, 1909-1910- 1911- 

1913. 

4. Prof. Zakarias J. Ordal, 1909-1917. 

5. Hon. Lauritz Selmer Swenson, 1909- 

1911 

6. Dr. George A. Torrison, 1909-1917. 

7. Rev. Ole J. Kvale, 1909-1917. 

8. Rev. Henrik .lohanncsen Strand, 1909- 

1911. 
9 Rev. Karl Anderson Kasberg, 1909- 
1911. 

10. Dr. Hans Gerhard Stub, 1910-1917. 

11. Dr. .Johannes Thorbj0rnsen Ylvisaker, 

1910-1911, 1913-1914. 

12. Rev. Gustav Torgerson Lee. 1911-1917. 

13. Prof. Daniel Gustav Jacob.sen, 1911- 

1914. 

14. Rev. Alfred Otto Johnson, 1911 I9li. 

15. Rev. Heni-y E. Solum, 1914-1917. 

16. Rev. Christen Andreas Davick, 1914- 

1917 

17. Prof. Filing Hove, 1916-1917. 

BOARD OF EDUCATION 

1. Dr. Hans Gerhard Stub, 1917- 

2. Rev. Ole Gabriel Ueland Siljan, 1917- 

1920. 

3. Dr. Lars Wilhelm Boe (Exec. Educa- 

tional Sec'y), 1917-1918 

4. Rev. Edward Johnson, 1917- 

5. Rev. Ole J. Kvale, 1917- 

0. Dr. John E. Granrud, 1917-1920. 

7. Dr. {ieorge A Torrison, 1917- 

8. Prof. Carl C. Swain, 1917- 

9. Prof. Lauritz Andreas Vigness, (Exec. 

Ed. Sec'y), 1918- 

10. Rev. J0rgen M Sundheim, 1920- 

11. Prof. Peder J. Eikeland, 1920- 



3. lAither College Officials 



PRESIDENTS 
Dr. Peter Laurentius I^arsen, 1861- 

1902. 
Prof. Cliristian Keyser Preus, 1902- 

1921 
Dr. Oscar Ludvig Olson (Acting), 1921- 

President Emerifris 
Dr. Peter Laurentius Larsen, 1911- 

1915. 

PRINCIPALS. LUTHER COLLEGE 

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 
Prof. Herman W. Sheel, 1889-1891, 

1890-1911. 
Prof. Gisic Bothne, 1891-1896. 
Prof Oscar Adolf Tingelstad, 1911- 

1912, 1917-1919. 
Prof. Hans Sjurson Hilloboe, 1912 1917. 
Prof. Hans Fred Swanscn, 1919 192o. 
Prof. Leonard .Mtoii Moc, l92o- 

LIBRARIANS 
Prof. Gabriel Hetting Lrin<ltiiark, 1867- 

1876. 
Prof. Jacob Daniel Jacobscn, 1876- 

1881. 



3. Prof. Olaus J. Breda, 1881-1882. 

4. Prof. Halvard (;. Roilkvam, 1882-1886. 

5. Prof. Emil Johan Pcter.sen. 1886-1887 

6. Prof. Christen Andreas T. Naeseth, 

1887-1920. 

7. Prof. Karl Theodor Jacobsen, 1920- 

ASSISTANT 1-IBRARIAN 

Prof. Enoch Ernest Peterson, 1912 1921 

CURATORS OF THE MUSEUM 

1. Prof. William Sihicr, 1890-189.'). 

2. Prof. Ilaldor J. Hanson, 1895-1902. 

3. Prof, (ieorge Mirkhus, 1902-1906. 

4. Prof. Herman W. Sheel, 1906-1911. 

.T. Prof. Martinus Kristianscn Bleken, 
1 906-1 910. 

6. Prof. Knut Gjerset, 1921- 

TREASURKRS 
1. Dr. Peter Laurentius Larsen, 1861- 

1895. 
2 Prof. Christen Andreas T. Naeseth, 

1895-1908, 1909-1913. 1914-1915. 
3. Prof. Theodore Elmer Thompson. 

1908-1909. 



GOVERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION 



63 



1. 



4. Prof. Bertinius K. Savre, 1913-1914, 

1915-19la. 

5. Miss Cathinka Preus (Mrs. K. D. Stal- 

land), 1918-1920. 

6. Prof. Knute Olson Eittreim, 1920- 

ASSISTANT TREASURER 
Prof. Oswald Benjamin Overn, 1910-1917. 

REGISTRAR 
1. Prof. Oscar Adolf Ting:elst:id, 19U- 

ASSISTANT REGISTRAR 
1. Prof. Carl Walther Strom, 1920- 
COLLEGE PASTORS 

1. Dr. Peter Laurentius Larsen, 1801- 

1865. 

2. Rev. Nils Olsen Brandt, 1863-1882. 

3. Rev. Thore Eggen, 1882-1888. 

4. Prof Amund Mikkelsen, 1889. 

5. Rev Johan Thorbj0rn Ylvisaker, 1889- 

1890. 

6. Rev. Markus Fredrik Wiese, 1890-1891. 

7. Prof. Elling Hove, 1891-1894. 

8. Rev. Jacob Aall Ottesen, 1894-1896. 

9. Dr. Hans Gerhard Stub, 1896-1900. 

10. Rev. Bernt Askevold, 1900-1901. 

11. Rev. Isaac Bertinus Torrison, 1901- 

12. Rev. Ole Glesne, 1917- 

COLLEGE PHYSICIANS 

1. Dr. A C. Smith, 1876-1905. 

2. Dr. Carsten Smith, 1905-1906. 

3. Dr. Trond Stabo, 1906- 

COLLEGE NURSES 
1. Miss Olivia Peterson, 1916-1917. 
2 Miss Theresse E. Arneson (Mrs. B. .1. H 



Hovde), 1917-1921. 
Miss Nora Walhus, 1921- 

STEWARDS 
Kr. Nilsen (and wife), 1861-1862. 
Mrs. Elisabeth Lomen (Stewardess), 

1862-1868. 
Gulbrand Lonunen, assistant. 
Ole P. Dalemo, assistant. 
3 J. T. Kr0ger, 1868-1871. 

4. Ole A. Larson, 1871-1875. 

5. Jens L. Lee, 1875-1877. 

6. P. Thompsen, 1877-1878. 

7. B. Fryslie, 1878-1884 

8. 0. K. Haga, 1884-1888. 

9. C. Clausen, 1888-1894. 
10. B. Berntsen, 1894-1896 

Since 1896 the Luther College Boirding 
Club has provided board for the students. 

ENGINEERS 

1. O. P. Anderson, 1894-1899. 

2. Hans L. Rygg, 1899-1910. 

3. Ole Korsrud, 1910- 

ELECTRICIAN 
Ole Korsrud, 1901- 

JANITORS 
Even Rudd, 1899. 
Hans L. Rygg, 1899-1900. 
Ingebrigt Indvik. 
Christian Stenseth, 1921- 

NIGHT WATCHMEN 
Johannes Andresen. 
Hans L. Rygg. 
Enoch Rygg. 
Ole Korsrud. 
0',I(.c. 




HELGE OVLOE 




JOHANNES ANDRESEN 



CHAPTER FOUR 

PRESIDENTS AND PKINCIPALS 

Francis E. Peterson 

IT is quite unique that in the first sixty years of its existence 
Luther College had only two presidents. Stability and a 
definite educational aim are first characteristics of Luther College, 
and may be said to be exemplified by few changes in the presi- 
dency. Dr. Laur. Larsen was the first president and served un- 
interruptedly from 1861 to 1902, a period of forty-one years. To 
few men is it given to devote themselves for so long a time to the 
service of one school, and especially as president. It is not strange 
that Dr. Larsen was called "The Grand Old Man of Luther Col- 
lege". Rev. C. K. Preus became president in 1902 and served 
continuously until his death in the spring of 1921. Dr. Oscar L. 
Olson, the third president, entered upon his duties during the 
present school year, 1921-22, which is the sixty-first school year. 
Dr. Laur. Larsen 
Peter Laurentius Larsen, or as he lijmself signed his name, 
Laur. Larsen, was born August 10, 1833, in Christiansand, Nor- 
way. His parents were Herman Larsen, an army officer, and 
Elen Else Marie (nee Oftedahl), daughter of a member of the 
Eidsvold "rigsforsamling" in 1814. Peter was the oldest of nine 
children. The home life was comfortable and happy, although 
the family was by no means in easy circumstances. At nine years 
of age the boy entered the so-called Kathedral school in Christian- 
sand, where he easily ranked as one of the first in his class. Dr. 
Larsen often remarked that he considered himself fortunate in 
his teachers ; at this school it was particularly Prof. Chr. Thiste- 
dahl for whom he expressed admiration. In 1850 he matriculated 
at the University of Christiania for the study of theology; here 
he considered he had two especially inspiring teachers : Profes- 
sors G. Johnson and C. P. Caspari. He supported himself by 
tutoring. He had always planned to enter the ministry, and so 
engrossed did he become in his studies that his health was affected 
and he was forced to discontinue for half a year. Meantime he 
stayed with an uncle. Rev. P. F. Bassoe, near Moss, and served 
as teacher for the children in the family. In 1855 he completed 
his theological course; howcA^er, he continued in Christiania as 




PETER LAURENTIUS LARSEN 

{Lavr. Larsen) 



66 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

teacher of languages — German, French, and Hebrew — both pri- 
vately and in school. But very soon the urgent call for pastors 
from the Norwegian pioneer settlements in America appealed to 
him as a splendid opportunity for genuine Christian service. Ac- 
cordingly he was ordained September 23, 1857, by Pastor Rode, 
and left soon afterwards for America. On November 2nd of that 
year he preached his first sermon in America near Rush River, 
Wisconsin, in the attic of a house being built as a parsonage. 
From Rush River he made long trips and organized many con- 
gregations. In 1859 he accepted the call from the Synod to oc- 
cupy the chair of theology at Concordia Seminary in St. Louis 
as special professor for the Norwegian students there; he entered 
upon his duties on October 14, 1859, from which date he reckoned 
his professorship in America. In his work here he was associated 
with Dr. C. F. W. Walther, "the Luther among the Germans in 
America" ; but the Civil AVar disrupted the work, and Prof. Lar- 
sen left St. Louis in 1861 to become the first president of Luther 
College. 

It is natural that in the minds of most people Dr. Larsen 
lives as the teacher and educator. But he rendered services in 
other capacities within the Church which in kind and amount 
would alone give him a high place among our pioneer leaders. He 
served as editor of "Kirkelig Maanedstidende", 1868-74; and of 
"Ev. Luthersk Kirketidcnde", 1874-89 and 1902-12. In view of 
the pioneer conditions and the resultant constructive nature of 
church work in the settlements, coupled with the difficulties attend- 
ing the "Predestination Controversy", this was an important and 
unusually trying ])osition in the Church. Dr. Larsen wielded a 
mighty influence for good in this work. He was always a mem- 
ber of a number of important church committees, and as chairman 
for years of the Foreign Mission Committee he rendered invalu- 
able service, in the interest of the Schreuder Mission especially. 
He was vice president of the Iowa District, 1876-79; vice presi- 
dent of the Norwegian Synod, 1876-93; and chairman of the Lu- 
theran Synodical Conference, 1881-83. After his resignation 
from the presidency of Luther College, in 1902, he continued as 
professor of Hebrew until 1911 when he was made President 
Emeritus. With all his duties as teacher. Dr. I^arsen often 
preached — several times a month, sometimes — in Decorah and 
elsewhere; and in 1882-84 he served the Decorah Congregation 
as regular pastor. 

Dr. I^arsen was many times honored. He was guest of honor 
at several Luther College banquets. On October 22, 1884, was 



PRESIDENTS AND PRINCIPALS 67 

celebrated his twenty-fifth anniversary as teaclier, and in 1909 a 
host of friends observed his fiftieth anniversary as teacher. The 
house which was his home the last eighteen years was a gift from 
his former students. In 1903 Concordia Seminary in St. Louis 
conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity; and in 1908 
he was made Knight of the First Order of St. Olav by King 
Haakon VII of Norway. 

Dr. Larsen was twice married. From the first marriage — in 
1855 with Karen Radine Neuberg, who died in 1871 — there were 
four children: Thora, wife of Dr. J. W. Magelssen, died 1908; 
Marie, died as missionary in South Africa 1899; Henrietta, wife 
of Rev. K. Xavier, died 1904; and Herman, L. C. '89, physician, 
died 1895. From the second marriage — with Ingeborg Astrup in 
1872 — there were eight children, all living: Hannah, editor 
"American-Scandinavian Review", New York City; Nikolai As- 
trup, L. C. '96, missionary to China; Karen, A. M., teacher, St. 
Olaf College; Ingeborg, position in Library, St. Olaf College, 
Northfield, Minn.; Lauritz, L. C. '02, D. D^., S. T. D., LL. D., 
president National Lutheran Council, New York City; Signe, 
Mrs Clifford Elder, Atchison, Kansas; Jakob, L. C. '08, Rhodes 
Scholar, Oxford, 1911-11 (M. A. '20), asst. professor, State Uni- 
versity of Washington; and Henning, L. C. '08, Ph. D., Prince- 
ton, asst. professor, State University of Iowa. 

Dr. Larsen suffered a stroke on Christmas Eve, 1913. He 
rallied, but had a second stroke; and he died on March 1, 1915. 
He is buried in the Norwegian Lutheran Cemetery, Decorah, 
Iowa. 

Dr. Larsen's life is so bound up with the history of Luther 
College that it is quite impossible to write about him apart from 
that history. It has rightly been said that his biography is very 
largely the history of Luther College. 

Dr. Larsen was a pioneer educator within the Church, and 
his work was beset with many problems. He was fully equal to 
the task. God had given him a rugged physique, and otherwise 
entrusted to him gifts and qualities which admirably fitted him 
for this work. But one thing characterized him more than any 
other one thing: he possessed a remarkably childlike faith in God 
and His providence. In all things he was guided by this implicit 
faith. Truly Dr. Larsen was equipped to serve the Church as 
president of a Christian college; and it was his spiritual equip- 
ment that often brought him througli difficulties when all purely 
human qualifications availed nothing. 

One of the first practical problems to confront Dr. Larsen as 



68 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

president of Luther College was that of adapting the parsonage 
at Halfway Creek to the needs of sixteen students and two pro- 
fessors' families. In spite of very crowded quarters, Dr. Larsen 
managed somehow; and undoubtedly, those were very profitable 
and happy school days. 

But the need of more room was urgent. Even after the school 
had been moved to Decorah, in 1862, and occupied more com- 
modious quarters in what is now the St. Cloud Hotel, it soon out- 
grew its space again, for tlie number of students increased. To 
relieve the situation by providing a larger and permanent build- 
ing on the site secured for that purpose by Rev. V. Koren, pre- 
sented many difficulties. Nevertheless, Prof. Larsen and his as- 
sociates proceeded to. carry out that plan. Messrs. Griese and 
Weile, Cleveland architects, submitted plans with an estimated 
cost of $28,000.00. It seems strange that the seven ministers and 
twenty-five congregations did not at once decide that the price 
was prohibitive. Not only were the church people of that time 
poor, but they had been accustomed to the State Church of Nor- 
way, which is supported by taxation ; and they were contributing 
as best the}- could to their congregations out in the settlements. 
Ground was broken for a building in 18G3. But difficulty followed 
upon difficulty, and the completion of the building was delayed 
over winter. At times it was impossible to get material, and there 
was a sharp advance in prices; transportation to the "Far West" 
was unreliable ; the working men struck ; and it was necessary to 
pay the architects more than the contract price. Prof. Larsen 
was a member of the building committee. All these trials were 
added to the numerous difficulties of his routine work. The cost 
far exceeded the estimate. At the dedication, in 1865, it had 
reached $75,000.00. Humanly speaking, it seemed impossible to 
meet the payments. Indeed, at the next synod meeting genuine 
fear was expressed that the Church would lose the building through 
default of payment. Prof. Larsen, however, never permitted 
even such serious difficulties to discourage him. He always acted 
on the implicit faith that he was a servant of God carrying out 
His purposes. In his reports to the Synod there was never a 
trace of complaint; however, he was firm and fearless in calling 
upon fellow pastors and the church people to support the school. 

Naturally the money stringency continued even after the close 
of the war. There was very little money among people, and many 
young men were prevented from starting at Luther College, much 
as tiiey wanted to; and those who entered were often uncertain 
how long they could stay. For many years Dr. Larsen reported 



PRESIDENTS AND PRINCIPALS 69 

to the Synod that many students had been forced to discontinue. 
Prof. Larsen pleaded the cause of needy students; and many 
ministers and others owe their education at Luther College direct- 
ly to Prof. Larsen for somehow providing funds for them even 
in those stringent times. 

Another serious problem with which Prof. Larsen had to cope. 
— and one which is not felt in the same way now — was the matter 
of securing teachers. For many years Norwegian continued to 
be the medium of instruction, and with no schools in this country 
preparing men for such teaching positions, it was necessary to 
look to Norway for practically every professor. And even there 
they were not easily obtained. In 1883 Prof. Larsen went to Nor- 
way largely for the purpose of engaging teachers ; after much dif- 
ficulty he secured two. Prof. Larsen reported at one time that 
two professors had resigned during the same school year. He 
evidently considered this a distressing problem; he insisted that 
the teachers make the school, and he was not willing to engage 
anybody and everjbody as teachers at Luther College. Concern- 
ing the language situation, Prof. Larsen wrote in the college cat- 
alog even as early as 1886: "Of the two languages which we must 
use here, the College has alwaA's stressed English more and more; 
and when the time comes that the development demands it, Lu- 
ther College will be glad to give the language of this our new 
country precedence over Norwegian." 

After a few years the time had come to build the south wing 
provided for in the original plan. Again there was the problem 
of money. But the wing was added in ISTS-?^, even before the 
necessary money had been subscribed ; and it was paid for with 
no real difficulty. 

A gymnasium had been a long felt want. The one considera- 
tion which deferred it was again the lack of money. After many 
years this need, too, was supplied, when the west room of the 
present gymnasium was built in 1887, largely with money con- 
tributed or secured by alumni and students. 

But real and perplexing as these problems were, they all seem 
small as compared with the catastrophe which befell Luther Col- 
lege in 1889. On May 19th of that year a fire of unknown origin 
completely gutted the main building. Undoubtedly this blow quite 
disheartened many good friends of the College. But despite the 
heavy financial loss and the discouragement, the men directly as- 
sociated with the school, and particularly Prof. Larsen, seemed 
never in doubt as to what they ought to do. Luther College had 
to be rebuilt and continued. This is perhaps the most severe 



70 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

single test that the College has had to endure. Prospects for 
raising the necessary money were not very briglit. Luther Sem- 
inary and the Lutheran Normal School in Sioux Falls, Soutli Da- 
kota, had recently been built, and money for rebuilding Luther 
College would have to come from the same congregations. Then 
too, some considered that Luther College ought to be moved so 
as to be more centrally located — possibly to Minneapolis — for the 
weight of population among the congregations had shifted in that 
direction. But Prof. Larsen was staunch in his belief that a sub- 
scription should be started at once; and Luther College should 
be rebuilt in Decorah. While this plan had enough supporters 
to retain the College in Decorah, it was no doubt due very nmch 
to Prof. Larsen's efforts that Luther College was not moved. In 
the meantime the work had to be carried on under special dif- 
ficulties in temporary quarters here and there in the city. The 
very next year, however, — in 1890 — the new building was dedi- 
cated and made ready for occupancy. 

Because of the very definite educational aim of the College — 
primarily that of preparing young men for the study of theology 
— Prof. Larsen had no real problem so far as the curriculum was 
concerned. He knew what the curriculum must be to accomplish 
this aim. Accordingly few changes were necessary. Even when 
the original six-year pro-seminary course, which was modeled on 
the Latin course of Norway, was extended to seven years, in 1881, 
there was no change in fundamentals. Neither did the Normal 
Department, which was conducted from 18G5 to 188G, in any 
sense affect the essential aim of the school. 

Gradually it was felt that Lutlier College was encountering 
competition in the educational field. Not only were public higli 
schools appearing, and colleges of various other denominations, 
but other schools were being built within tlie Norwegian Synod. 
Except for the Theological Seminary and the Lutheran Normal 
Scliool in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, these were all academies 
for many years; and while they served as good "feeders" for Lu- 
ther College, a certain element of competition had to be reckoned 
with, especially in the matter of financial supi)ort. 

In one most important phase of the work at Luther College, 
and one which presents a real problem, Prof. Larsen was emin- 
ently successful : he was directly and personally instrumental in 
guiding many young men to the Theological Seminary. It is true, 
in the early days a larger number of students came witli minds 
fully made up for the ministry; also there were not so many vo- 
cations open to young men then; and the spirit of the day has 



PRESIDENTS AND PRINCIPALS 71 

changed since that time. However, through that very remarkably 
devout spirit of Christian service which Prof. Larsen manifested 
in every relation of life, he inspired many Luther College students 
to take up the study of theology. Many pastors, consciously or 
not, have entered the ministry very largely because of the blessed 
influence which Prof. Larsen exerted upon them at Luther Col- 
lege. His services to the Church in this respect alone cannot be 
overestimated. 

The controversy of the 80's involving the doctrine of predes- 
tination constituted a real problem for Luther College. Opinion 
was divided both among teachers and students, and open meetings 
for discussing the matter were held in the city. People's minds 
were everywhere disturbed, and the controversy might very easily 
have disrupted the school. While there are many considerations, 
and much credit is due many men who worked for the welfare of 
the College, still it is plain that Prof. Larsen was very largely 
responsible for the favorable outcome at Luther College; his good, 
deliberate judgment coupled with absolute fairness prevented any 
serious disturbance at the school. 

No attempt can be made here to discuss all the problems — 
not even all the most perplexing ones — with which Prof. Larsen 
was confronted during his forty-one years as president. Some 
of the more outstanding ones have been recounted. It would be 
a mistake to suppose that it was only during times of particular 
stress that his presidency was fraught with problems and dif- 
ficulties. Even in the most favorable and hopeful moments his 
position was one of great responsibilities. Prof. Larsen's utter- 
ance in 1884 at the celebration of his twenty-fifth anniversary as 
teacher is very characteristic of him: 

"In my work here I have striven to accomplish especially three 
things. In the first place, I have desired that the spirit of Chris- 
tianity should permeate everything. The instruction, the dis- 
cipline, all our associations — in short, every part of our school life 
—should be marked by a true Christian spirit. However, I feel 
personally haw difficult it is to be actuated by this spirit. It is 
no easy matter to live a true Christian life, in humility constantly 
confessing oneself a grievous sinner, and still through confidence 
and trust in God be enabled to find hope and joy in God's Word; 
and to have one's heart turned to Him in gratitude for everything, 
not only the good tilings, but also for that which may seem evil 
and trying. We long for the time when we shall put off this 
mortal body and be permitted to praise and serve God in our 
transfigured state. 



72 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

"In the second place, it has been my aim that the instruction 
here be thorough; that there be no show or humbug; that every- 
thing be pure gohl — or, to use a common expression, that it be 'all 
wool, antl a yard wide'. This has been difficult, for I have not 
always had time for thorough ])rcparation. 

"In the third place, I have wanted such discipline here as 
would teach the students more and more self-discipline, with each 
one personally responsible for his own conduct; and still one stu- 
dent restraining tlic other, so that I might as far as possible be 
relieved of discipline." 

It must be remenibcrfd that l^rof. I.arsen was not president 
in the sense in which wc now think of the position. His was not 
a day when many duties were delegated to a staff of workers. 
Besides his specific duties as president, he taught about as many 
classes as the other teachers; also he served at one time as regis- 
trar, treasurer, disciplinarian, and general manager — both finan- 
cial and otherwise — and in addition found time for many other 
incidental duties. So it was a real problem just to attend to the 
bare routine of the daily work. It should also be stated that for 
years Prof. Larsen almost always conducted the devotional ex- 
ercises morning and evening; and with much other detail, too, 
he somehow found time to make a round of the students' rooms 
and rouse them out for breakfast. In all tasks, big and small, he 
was equally painstaking and accurate; until one must marvel how 
he found time for it all. That he could maintain sucli a rigid 
routine for years without flagging, is nothing short of astonishing. 
He was severely methodical; which may in part be due to the fact 
that his father was a military man. So very regular was he that 
students were heard to remark: "Now it is exactly half past five, 
for there is Prof. Larsen just starting for town with his shopping 
basket." But for all his insistence upon routine and punctuality, 
he was not a nervous worker; even to old age there was nothing 
about his movements to suggest nervousness or undue hurry; he 
was deliberate and scrupulously careful of detail. No matter 
how bus}', he always took time for a nap of twenty minutes to 
half an hour at noon. Until his last illness he was seldom even 
ailing; his moderation in all things and his regularity in mode of 
living, preserved for him his naturally rugged good health which 
only old age, and not hard work, could break down. 

It has been said — and by Dr. Larsen himself — that he was 
not a genius, but a man of only ordinary abilities. Even if this 
be true, he was nevertheless a very remarkable man. He possessed 
such sterling qualities of character — unfeigned Christian faitli and 



PRESIDENTS AND PRINCIPALS 73 

fullness of spiritual life with absolute integrity, simple humilitj'^j 
and a sense of Christian service — that he was a very unusual man. 
"His one concern was to do his duty as a servant of God ; and he did 
not seek worldly renown. He permitted no interests to disturb 
him in his duties as pastor and teacher; he gave very little time 
and effort to interests which do not bear somewhat directly upon 
theology and education. He was in the world, but not of the 
world; and still he constantly emphasized the Lutheran doctrine 
of a Christian's duty of strict obedience to law and government. 
He was not a man of social affairs; and not a "good mixer' in the 
sense in which the term is currently used. However, he was a 
welcome guest at all gatlierings ; and liis mere presence command- 
ed respect and precluded everything questionable in word and act. 
Among his friends and as a host he was interesting and entertain- 
ing, his manner always bespeaking culture and refinement. He 
was unassuming, yet firm and fearless in his convictions ; he ab- 
horred sham and hypocrisy, and was so thoroughly genuine and 
frank in conduct and speech that he was sometimes considered 
naive. He has been called "A Christian Gentleman"; and, pos- 
sibly, no other short description can do him more justice. He 
was a man of God; a humble servant of Jesus Christ, who, asking 
nothing for himself — except forgiveness for his sins and salvation 
through His merit — unselfishly consecrated his life to untiring 
Christian service in the interest of the Lutheran Church and Lu- 
ther College. He exemplified in all his service the thought ex- 
pressed in the motto of Luther College, "Soli Deo Gloria" — To 
God alone all Glory. 

Prof. C. K. Preus 

Christian Keyser Preus was born on October 13, 1852, in the 
Spring Prairie parsonage, twenty miles north of Madison, Wis. 
His father was the Right Reverend H. A. Preus, who was pres- 
ident of the Norwegian Synod from 1862 until his death, in 1894. 
His mother was Caroline Dorthea Margrethe Keyser,. Ohristian 
received his early education from private tutors, and enti^red Lu- 
ther College in 1865; but he left during the year because of sick- 
ness, and did not return till 1868. He graduated in 1873 (B. A.). 
During the years 1873-76 he studied theology at Concordia Sem- 
inary in St. Louis. He was ordained at Wasliington Prairie the 
year of his graduation, 1876; temporarily he served Our Savior's 
Congregation in Chicago before becoming his father's assistant 
in the Spring Prairie charge. He was pastor at Spring Prairie 
until he was forced to resign in 1 897 because of ill health. He 



74 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

moved to Decorah, and in 1898 became professor at Luther Col- 
lege. He was elected president in 1902 and continued in the posi- 
tion until his death, in 1921. Prof. Preus twice declined the vice- 
presidency of the Synod, in 1893 and 1 89G ; lie accepted in 1911, 
when he was elected a third time, and served until the union of the 
three church bodies in 1917. At that time he was elected vice 
president of the Iowa District, a position which he held at the 
time of his death. In 1911 the Synod elected him as its rep- 
resentative at the University of Christiania during the centennial 
festivities in September of that year; King Haakon VII decorated 
him Commander of the Order of St. Olav. Prof. Preus accompanied 
the Luther College Concert Band on the 1914 Norway Tour, and 
upon request delivered tliree lectures at the University of Chris- 
tiania. In 1877 he married Louise Augusta Hjort, oldest daughter 
of Rev. Ove Jacob Hjort, then minister at Painted Creek, Allam- 
akee County, Iowa. There have been eleven children, of whom 
seven are now living: Ove Jacob Hjort (L. C. '01), pastor in De 
Forest, Wis.; Johan Carl Keyser (L. C. '02), pastor in Byron, 
Minn.; Jacob Aall Ottesen (L. C. '03), governor of Minnesota; 
Paul Arctander (L. C. '11), treasurer Federal Land Bank, St. 
Paul, Minn.; Herman Amberg (L. C. '16), attorney in St. Paul, 
Minn.; Henriette, nurse at Northwestern Hospital, Minne- 
apolis, Minn.; and Catliinka Hjort, Mrs. Knute D. Stalland (L. 
C. '18), St. Paul, Minn. All sons and the one son-in-law are 
graduates of Luther College. The deceased cliildren, with year of 
birth, are: Herman A., 1878; Linka, 1885; Christiane, 1887; and 
Christiane, 1899. Prof. Preus died in his home in Decorah on May 
28, 1921; he had been attending to his duties even to the last day, 
although lie had not been well for some time. Death was due to 
heart disease. He was buried on June 1st in the Norwegian Lu- 
theran Cemetery in Decorah. 

Prof. Preus appreciated fully the responsibilities attaching to 
the position when he accepted the presidency of Luther College. 
He was franJi to state that he had serious misgivings. In his first 
report to the Synod he wrote: "It was with considerable misgiv- 
ing that I entered upon my duties as president of Luther College 
a year ago. I ajipreciated fully both the responsibilities and 
many difficulties of the position, and no one realized better than 
I how few were my qualifications for the work. However, I had 
not sought tlie position and promised that with the help of God 
I would attempt it." However, understanding Luther College 
and its problems, he knew that his first task — and clearly his most 
vital one — was to see to it that the school be continued as Dr. 



PRESIDENTS AND PRINCIPALS 



75 




CHRISTIAN KEYSRR PREUS 



76 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

Larsen liad conducted it, a classical college with the primary aim 
of preparing young men for a theological course. It was clear 
from the outset that this would be a settled policy in his admin- 
istration. In 1904- he outlined his plans in a pamphlet entitled: 
"In What Direction and Toward What Goal Should Luther Col- 
lege be Developed in order to best Serve the Synod.''" 

But there were many difficulties. Not a few — even Luther 
College alumni, some of them — had become increasingly insistent 
that changes be made in the curriculum. It was argued that the 
classical course failed to meet the educational needs of the day. 
While Prof. Preus reckoned with this demand from the outside^ 
he would not be swerved from essentials. When the Preparatory 
Department was lengthened to four years, in 1905, and the Board 
of Education in 1918 approved the plan of the present organiza- 
tion of the department into a Junior and Senior High School ; 
when a literary course was added in 1906; and when, in 1911, a 
modified curriculum involving a limited elective system went into 
effect, a course of study which had been proposed by the faculty 
after a thorough study of the matter in 1910-11, there was no 
innovation in these changes which in any real sense violated fun- 
damentals in the original aim of tlie school. Tlie new courses 
provided mainly for electives : biology, chemistry (re-instated), 
economics, education, American history, music (harmony), phil- 
osophy, physics, psychology, public speaking, sociology,- — and as 
a legacy from the S. A. T. C, surveying. 

Right from the start Prof. Preus began to devote himself to 
the interests of Luther College out in the field. W^ith the passing 
of the first pioneer conditions and the large increase in the num- 
ber of congregations, the work of conducting the affairs of the 
College had shifted very considerably from the College at home 
out to its interests in the field. It was necessary to groom the 
college territory. In the early days there were few ministers and 
congregations, and it required no great amount of urging in ad- 
vertising and publicity to gain their whole-hearted support. 
Church organization then was a simple thing, and our church peo- 
])le did not dissipate their interests in many activities. And for 
years Luther College was tlie one school to support. But the 
church body became larger; tliere were other schools and new 
interests; every little town almost was l)uildiiig its own high 
school, and many denominations had istablislu-d church schools. 
Many of the churcli })eople now li\ed at a distance. Then, too, 
that M'orldly spirit so characteristic ot our times is a considerable 
factor here. .All such coiiditioiis coinhincd to iiiakr it increasingly 



PRESIDENTS AND PRINCIPALS 77 

difficult to attract any large number of students. While he did 
not aim at mere numbers, Prof. Preus set about to work for an 
increase in enrollment. The problem involved many considera- 
tions, but in the main it was a matter of working more out in the 
school field. 

Prof. Preus was eminently fitted for such work. He had had 
varied experience involving contact with people, and he was intim- 
ately acquainted with conditions in the Church ; and with his un- 
usual ability as a speaker he combined many admirable qualities 
of personality and temperament. People believed in him. Easily 
one of the most effective speakers in our Church, he was much in 
demand, and he spent much time out in the field. His personal 
work was supplemented in various ways ; a systematic advertis- 
ing campaign was launched, always of a distinctly conservative 
and dignified kind, and in entire keeping with the religious char- 
acter of the school. Church papers and the public press were 
used; pamphlets were written and distributed; also the "Luther 
College Semi-Centennial" of 1911; "The Pioneer" of 1920; "Nor- 
gesfaerden" in 1914; and the "Luther College Bulletin", a quar- 
terly, the first issue of which appeared in January, 1921. And 
student organizations went out among the people; chief among 
these the Luther College Concert Band and, in 1920, the Luther 
College Four. 

One of Prof. Preus' distinct contributions to Luther College 
is what he gave the school in buildings. He formulated a definite 
and extensive building program. He realized that conditions re- 
quired a school plant; one building or two could no longer be 
considered adequate. He was commissioned by the Church to go 
out and raise money for a dormitory; and during the school year 
1906-07 Laur. Larsen Hall was built at a cost of $60,000.00. It 
was dedicated October 13, 1907. Previously some construction 
involving less money had been done ; the arch at the entrance to 
the campus was erected in 1903 upon the occasion of the fiftieth 
anniversary of the Synod; also the gymnasium was enlarged to 
three times its size for this celebration. In 1911 the Luther statue 
was unveiled during the Luther College Fiftieth Anniversary fes- 
tivities; the ministers' wives had collected $2,517.00 for its erec- 
tion. The Endowment Fund aggregating over $250,000.00 — $50, 
000.00 of which was a gift from James J. Hill — collected by Dr. 
H. G. Stub, assisted by Prof. Preus and others — was presented to 
the College at these festivities. In 1909 Mr. Jens Jensen, land- 
scape architect of Chicago, was engaged at the instance of the 
Chicago Luther College Club to submit plans embodying the 



78 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

most approved arrangement of a college campus. Upon his rec- 
ommendations the grounds were very materially changed, the 
greatest departure being the removal of the avenue of large trees 
leading up to the main building, to make room for a large open 
central court. On October 14, 1911, the Alumni Association 
voted to buy and present the eight-acre wooded tract lying north 
of High Street and east of the original campus; and in 1919 an- 
other tract, the size of a city block, lying south of High Street 
and east of the campus, was also added. Upon the initiative of 
the students a dining hall, Uoyalty Hall, was built in 1916 at the 
cost of $18,000.00. This necessitated the moving of the hospital 
— a gift of Mr. J. A. Johnson of Madison, Wisconsin — and it was 
enlarged and furnished with all modern equipment; also a reg- 
istered nurse was placed in charge. 

Prof. Preus' efforts for buildings culminated in his very finest 
contribution, the Koren Library, which was dedicated on the 14th 
of October, 1921. It seems sad that he was not permitted to live 
to see this splendid building completed. He traveled extensively 
and personally solicited almost all the money. Definite work for 
a library was done as early as 1908, when squads of students made 
concrete blocks; however, there were considerations which deferred 
the building many years. 

Prof. Preus built along other lines, too. During his regime 
the chemical laboratory expanded to more than college require- 
ments; and the physics and biology laboratories were also de- 
veloped. Through the efforts of Hon. L. S. Swenson and Mr. H. 
G. Haugan the valuable Bishop Bang Library was secured in 
1913. Dr. Koren's first parsonage of 1853, the so-called Egge 
Log Plouse, was placed upon the campus. The class of 1921 pre- 
sented a flag pole. There was a substantial increase in legacies, 
the largest one, of $10,000.00, created by Capt. Rossing in 1910. 
The library was increased from 11,000 volumes to 28,000, ex- 
clusive of 8,000 pamphlets. 

Prof Preus' building program provided for a gymnasium very 
soon, with other buildings to follow — a music hall, chapel, and 
possibly a science hall. 

But witli all his work out in the field. Prof. Preus was still 
able to attend to all the needs of the school at home. He con- 
sidered it his first concern to build up a strong faculty; often he 
was heard to remark, "First of all, teachers". With more stu- 
dent.s — 214 in 1911-12 — and more courses, it was necessary to 
add teachers; during his administration the faculty was increased 
from 11 to 21 members. He favored the "Sabbatical vear". 



PRESIDENTS AND PRINCIPALS 79 

Many teachers availed themselves of this, which has added to 
the prestige of the faculty. And there was need of more organi- 
zation. Prof. Preus delegated many duties which had before 
properly belonged to the president. The principalship of the 
Preparatory Department became a more responsible position; in 
1914 a registrar's office was created; and a librarian was engaged 
to give full time to his special work with no hours of instruction. 
There was a regularly employed college stenographer; also a 
physical director to give full time to his department. Such or- 
ganization required added equipment. What was thus accom- 
plished was important in enabling Luther College to qualify as 
a member of the North Central Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools. 

Prof. Preus' work was attended by many problems not of 
routine kind, some of which were particularly distressing. One 
such problem arose in connection with the movement for church 
union. Luther College was directly concerned ; as the oldest and 
only college conducted by the church body, it was more intimately 
bound up with the Synod than possibly any other institution with- 
in the Church. For very good reasons it was feared that the 
status of the College might be affected. Much credit is due Prof. 
Preus for being so staunch in stressing the importance of main- 
taining Luther College as a distinctively classical college with its 
first purpose that of preparing young men to take up the study 
of theology. 

Another such problem was that occasioned by the World War. 
It is plain that this situation presented difficulties which were 
peculiar to Luther College, a classical college for men onlv. 
Changes nothing short of revolutionary had to be effected to enlist 
the school in military service. But with good reorganization work 
wisely directed by Prof. Preus, supported by the willing cooper- 
ation of the faculty, Luther College qualified as an S. A. T. C. 
and few schools came through the war with a more creditable ser- 
vice record. 

Then, too, the reconstruction period had problems for Luther 
College which really did not obtain at schools that are not of the 
classical type. During the war the traditional course of study 
had been greatly modified. But Luther College was glad to ren- 
der service in response to her country's call ; and at present the 
vpork is well back to that even routine of good application to 
class subjects which has always characterized Luther College. 

Prof. Preus was a man of splendid abilities. Witli a keen 
intellect were coupled good capacity for work and many admir- 



80 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

able traits of character. Of even temperament, always pleasant 
and sympathetic, he, too, like his predecessor. Dr. Larsen, was 
thoroughly imbued with the spirit of Christian service. He was 
seriously earnest in his work, but had a delightful sense of humor; 
always manly, he never became old, but retained a surprisingly 
youthful attitude of mind. He had hobbies and interests; but he 
never permitted these to intrude in the least upon his work. And 
he was a prodigious worker, although not so methodical as Dr. 
Larsen. He came of a long line of ministerial and professional 
stock, and so had an air of unaffected dignity and culture about 
him; retiring and quiet — his intimate friends reproached him for 
being over-modest — his appearance suggested the aristocrat, and 
still he was a man among men, unassuming and very human. A 
man of culture and refinement, of fine sensibilities and scholarly 
instincts, an able and thorough theologian, he was nevertheless 
of a decidedly practical turn of mind, a leader and a man of af- 
fairs, a fine type of citizen. He understood people intimately; 
and his large fund of miscellaneous information enabled him to 
talk intelligently with people of all stations and occupations; an 
exceptionall}' effective speaker — both in English and in Nor\yegian 
— he gained the general esteem and confidence of our church people 
everywhere. He was an unusually able sermonizer and preacher; 
and as president of Luther College he will always be remembered 
for his remarkable chapel talks, which were model sermons in 
form, content, and language. 

While we value a man for what he is, it is only by viewing 
him in relation to his work, and not apart from it, that it is pos- 
sible to determine somewhat his true worth. And measured in 
terms of his work, in kind and amount of service he rendered Lu- 
ther College and the Church, it is certain that Prof. C. K. Preus 
must be accorded a high place among the leaders of our Norwe- 
gian Lutheran Church in America. 

Dr. Oscar L. Olson *, 

Oscar Ludvig Olson was born February ./2, 1872, in Chicago. 
Illinois. His father was Andrew Olson, and his mother Guroe 
(nee Larson). He entered the Preparatory Department of Lu- 
ther College in 1886 and graduated in 1889; he continued in the 
College Department, and received the degree of A. B. in 1893. 
He taught at Bode Academy, Bode, la., 1893-95; at Bruflat 
Academy, Portland, N. Dak., 189G-98; at Luther Academy, Al- 
bert Lea, Minn., 1898-01; and in 1901 he became a member of 
the faculty at Luther College, and lias served as professor ever 



PRESIDENTS AND PRINCIPALS 81 




OSCAR LUDVIO OLSON 



82 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

since except for intervals when he has been away for study. He 
attended the University of Minnesota, 1895-9(5, and was granted 
his master's degree. The suunners of 1904 and 1907-11 he stud- 
ied at the University of Chicago; and after spending the school 
year 1913-1'i there, he received the degree of Ph. D. He is the 
author of "The Scandinavian Origin of Beowulf" (thesis for M. 
A.), 1903; "Beowulf Kvadet" in "Symra", May, 1912; "Beo- 
wulf and the Feast at Bricriu" in "Modern Philology", January, 
191 t; "The Relation of Luther to Education" in "Teologisk Tids- 
skrift", October, 1917; "The Relation of the Rolfsaga Kraka and 
the Bjarkariinur to Beowulf" (thesis for Ph. D.), 1916; and he 
has delivered many lectures on various subjects. He was secre- 
tary of the Luther College faculty, 1916-21, and secretary of 
the Board of Trustees of Luther College, 1917-21. Prof. Olson 
married Miss Clara Elizabeth Gullixson in 1897. They have two 
sons: Walter Andrew, born 1902, and Paul Frederick, born 1905; 
both are students at Luther College, classes of '24 and '26, respec- 
tively. Dr. Olson was appointed acting president of Luther Col- 
lege in 1921. 

When upon the death of Prof. C. K. Preus on May 28, 1921, 
the Board of Education within our Church appointed Dr. Olson 
to serve Luther College as acting president, it did so because Dr. 
Olson was clearly the one man who was rather fully acquainted 
with the work and otherwise ready to step right into the position 
until a permanent ])resident could be elected at the next general 
meeting of the church body. Dr. Olson has spent more than half 
of his years at Luther College, and whenever Prof. Preus was 
traveling about in the interests of the College, Dr. Olson really 
served as acting president. But Dr. Olson, too, has served Lu- 
ther College out in the field ; because of his ability as a public 
speaker he lias become well and favorably known among the sup- 
porters of Luther College everywhere. 

Principals 

When the original "Latin course" of six years was extended 
to one of seven years, in 1881, and the number of classes, students, 
and teachers increased, it became apparent that it was desirable 
to have two somewhat distinct departments. Accordingly the 
Preparatory Department was formed in 1889, at first comprising 
three years. Prof. H. W. Sheel became the first principal, and 
when he took charge, in 1890, it fell to him to organize the new 
department. 



PRESIDENTS AND PRINCIPALS 83 

Prof. H. W. Sheel 

Herman W. Sheel was born in St. Louis, Mo., on January 18. 
1860. His father was John F. Scheel and his mother Margaret E. 
(nee Jende). After completing the parochial school in St. Louis, 
he entered Luther College in 1874, and remained one year. Dur- 
ing the school years 1882-85 he attended Valparaiso University 
in Indiana and received the degree of B. S. From 1885 to 1889 
he was teacher at the Lutheran Seminary and Institute in Will- 
mar, Minn., where he taught mathematics and sciences. Since 
1889 he has been a member of the faculty at Luther College. 
When the Preparatory Department became a separate entity. 
Prof. Sheel was made principal; and he served 1890-91; and 
again a second time, 1896-1911. During his administration — in 
1905 — the course was lengthened to four years. In 1907 the 
department took possession of new and commodious quarters in 
Laur. Larsen Hall. Here, too. Prof. Sheel was given space for 
his chemical laboratory, which he has since built up to more than 
standard college requirements and made it a part of the school 
plant of which the College can justly be proud. He has been 
professor at Luther College since 1911, except for one year, which 
he spent in Washington and California. He was married to Miss 
Lydia E. Jende in 1895. There are four children: Ruth; Karl. 
L. C. '24; Otto; Sigurd, L. C. '30. 

Prof. Gisle Bothne 

Prof. Gisle Bothne was the second principal. He served dur- 
ing the interval between Prof. Sheel's first and second terms — in 
1891-96. 

Gisle Bothne was born on September 7, I860, in Fredrikshald. 
Norway. Here he attended the Latin school for nine years, until' 
the spring of 1876, when his mother, Johanne (nee Okland) left 
Norway with the family to join his father, Thrond J. Bothne. 
who had gone to America the previous year to become professor 
at Luther College (Thrond Bothne was professor 1875-82). Gisle 
graduated from Luther College in 1878 (B. A.); from North- 
western University, Watertown, Wisconsin, in 1879; and then 
studied classical philology at Johns Hopkins University until 
1880. He became professor at Luther College January, 1881, 
and remained until 1907 (M. A., 1883); in 1883-84 he again at- 
tended Johns Hopkins University; during 1903-04 he studied in 
Greece and at the universities of Berlin and Christiania. He was 
principal of the Preparatory Department 1891-96. In 1907 he ac- 



84 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

cepted a call from the University of Minnesota as head of the 
Department of Scandinavian Languages and Literature, a posi- 
tion which he still holds. He has been president of the Norvi^e- 
gian Society of America; also is a member of the Norwegian-Dan- 
ish Press Ass'n of America. In 1911 he was decorated by King 
Haakon of Norway and made a Knight of the Order of St. Olav. 
On June 27, 1895, he was married to ^liss Kathrine Elise Brandt. 
They have two daughters: Dikka (B. A., University of Minne- 
sota) is at the University of Christiania, Norway, on a scholar- 
ship from the American-Scandinavian Foundation; Agnes is a 
student at the University of Minnesota. 

Prof. O. A. Tingelstad 

When Prof. Sheel resigned in 1911 because of ill health, he 
had served as principal faithfully and well for fourteen years. 
Prof. O. A. Tingelstad became acting principal for the school 
year 1911-12; and a second time 1917-19. Norman A. Madson 
(L. C. '11, B. A.) was his assistant in 1911-12; Merriam H. 
Trytten (L. C. '16, B. A.), in 1917-18, till April 1; Geo. Ulvilden 
(L. C. '16, B. A.), April-June, 1918; and H. Fred Swansen (L. 
C. '14, B. A.) in 1918-19. The present organization of the Pre- 
paratory Department into a Junior and Senior high school was ef- 
fected during his principalship. 

Oscar Adolf Tingelstad was born near Hickson, Cass County. 
N. Dak., on September 20, 1882. His parents are Bent Tingel- 
stad and Beret A. (nee Livdalen). The family moved to Silver- 
ton, Oregon, and he attended Pacific Lutheran Academy, Park- 
land, Wash., in 1900, and 1901-02; high school in Silverton, Ore.. 
1900-01. He entered Luther College in 1902, and graduated in 
1905 (B. A.), and from Luther Seminary, St. Paul, Minn., in 
1907 (cand. theology). He accepted a call to Ballard, Seattle. 
Wash., and was pastor, 1907-09, of Zion Lutheran Church at 
Ballard, and Port Madison, Orillia, and Millers Bay Congrega- 
tions. In 1909 he received a call from Luther College to the 
chair of psychology and education; before entering upon his duties 
as professor he s})ent the autumn of 1909 at the University of 
Chicago. In the summer of 1910 he again attended the Univer- 
sity of Chicago, also in 191 2-1. 'J, when he received his M. A. When 
the registrar's office was created in 191 1 he was appointed to that 
])osition, and has served as registrar since. In 1911-12 and 1917- 
19 he was acting jjriricipal of the Preparatory Department. The 
second semester of the school year 1921-22 he was granted leave 
of absence to continue In's studies at the University of Chicago. 



PRESIDENTS AND PRINCIPALS 85 

He served as secretary of the Young Peoples' Luther League of 
the Norwegian Lutheran Cluirch of America, 1917-1922. In 1909 
he married Miss Alfield Sophie Tvete. 

Prof. H. S. Hilleboe 

In 1912 Prof. H. S. Hilleboe, then superintendent of public 
schools in Benson, Minn., was called as principal after Prof. 
Tingelstad had served as acting principal for one year. Prof. 
Hilleboe, an alumnus of Luther College (B. A., 1881, and M. A., 
1886), had had years of varied school experience both in a church 
academy and in the public high schools, and had taken graduate 
work in education and school administration at several universities. 
His experience in the public schools nicely supplemented his 
knowledge of the work and traditions of the Preparatory Depart- 
ment; and he introduced several changes in external organization, 
involving details of daily routine, discipline, and grading. 

Hans Sjurson Hilleboe was born on October 28, 1858, at 
Roche-a-Cree, Adams County, Wis., son of Sjur Hanson Hilleboe 
and Gjertrud R0mohr (nee Haug). He attended Luther Col- 
lege 1878-81 (B. A.). The two j^ears following he spent at the 
Northern Indiana Normal School, Valparaiso, Indiana; 1895-96 at 
Chicago Lutheran Theological Seminary; and 1897-98 at Luther 
Seminary, Robbinsdale, Minn. He received his M. A. from Lu- 
ther College in 1886. He has been a student at Minnesota, Har- 
vard, and Chicago universities. He was an instructor at Willmar 
Seminary, Willmar, Minn., 1884-87; and during 1887-99 he serv- 
ed as principal of the school, with the exception of the years 
1895-96 and 1897-98, when he was away for study. He was prin- 
cipal of Willmar Seminary a second time, 1904-07; during the 
intervening years, 1899-04, he was superintendent of public 
schools in Benson, Minn., and again in 1907-12. In 1912 he was 
called to the principalship of the Preparatory Department at Lu- 
ther College and continued in the position until the summer of 
1917, when he became president of Lutheran Normal School, 
Sioux Falls, S. Dak., and when the school became known as Au- 
gustana College after the consolidation with Augustana College 
of Canton, S. Dak., in 1918, he was retained as president, and 
served until 1920. Since that time he has been professor at the 
school. In 1887 he married Antonilla Ytterboe, who died in 1912. 
In 1916 he married Ellen G. Syse. Four children survive from 
the first marriage: Gertrude, dean of women at St. Olaf College; 
Marie, wife of Rev. S. M. Moe; Gent;vieve; and Sigur. 



86 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SLXTY YEARS 

Prof. H. Fred Swansen 

H. P'red Swanscn (Luther College 'It, B. A.), who had been a 
teacher at Luther Academy, Albert Lea, Minn., since his gradua- 
tion, came to Luther College in 1918 to be instructor in English. 
He served as assistant principal in 1918-19, and as principal in 
1919-20. Prof. Swansen was very much interested in literary 
society work, especially debating. His efforts in the interest of 
forensics in the Preparatory Department and the good results he 
attained in this work are deserving of special mention. 

Hans Fred Swansen was born in Boston, Mass., on November 
14, 1889, of Thomas Swansen and Hanne (nee Hendricksen). He 
attended Boston English High School four years; held a clerical 
position in Boston; entered Luther College in January, 1911, and 
graduated in 1914 (B. A.). He taught English and physics at 
Luther Academy, Albert Lea, Minn., 1914-18. He spent the sum- 
mer of 1917 at Harvard doing graduate work in English. In 
1920 he accepted the presidency of Gale College, Galesville, Wis., 
and is now in that position. In 1919 he was married to Miss 
Beatrice Irene Teslow, 

Prof. Leonard A. Moe 

The present principal, Leonard A. Moe (Luther College '12, 
B. A.), succeeded Prof. Swansen in 1920. He had been engaged 
in school work every year since his graduation, and, with much 
other experience in administrative duties during the war, he came 
well equipped for the position. He continued the good work in 
debating, for which his predecessor, Prof. Swansen, had created 
so much interest. And he elaborated upon this work; in the early 
fall of the school year 1921-22, he conceived the plan of holding 
a conference of our church academies at Luther College involv- 
ing debating, declamation, and basket ball. The proposal met 
witli favor everywhere, and when it was definitely launched, Prof. 
Moe was selected as the logical man to serve as chairman of the 
committee on arrangements. He was given additional duties in 
this capacity when the Lutheran Students' Union decided to hold 
its convention in conjunction with this conference, March 7-10. 
1922. That tlie event was such an unqualified success was in very 
large measure due to Prof. Moe's good energy and fine abilities 
as an administrator; he was the moving spirit in the undertaking. 

Leonard Alton Moe was born January 27, 1892, in Elroy. 
Wis. His father was Lars I^. Moe, a merchant; and his mother 
Martha C. Hansen, daughter of Andrew Hansen in Manitowoc, 
Wis., wagon manufacturer. Leonard received his grade and first 



PRESIDENTS AND PRINCIPALS 



87 



year high school education in the public schools of Elroy. In 
June, 1906, the family moved to Decorah, and he entered the 
Preparatory Department of Luther College the same year, and 
graduated in 1908. He continued in the College Department and 
finished in 1912 (B. A.). He has taught since his graduation: 
at Gale College, Galesville, Wis., 1912-16; principal consolidated 
school, Manvel, N. Dak., 1916-17; supt. city schools, Hillsboro, 
N. D., 1917-18; supt. city schools. Park River, N. D., 1918-20; 
principal Luther College Preparatory Department, 1920-22. Dur- 
ing the summer of 1915 he was musician with the International 
Chautauquas; and platform superintendent with the Midland 
Chautauquas in the summer of 1921. He served as sec'y N. Dak., 
State Parents and Teachers' Ass'n in 1918-19; sec'y Luther Col- 
lege Alumni Ass'n, 1921-22; president Decorah Luther College 
Club, 1922; director of the Iowa District Young People's Luther 
League, 1921 ; and chairman of committee on arrangements for 
the Luther College Academy Conference, 1921-22. He was married 
on August 25, 1915, to Miss Carolyn M. Jacobson, daughter of 
Prof. Axel Jacobson, supt. of Bethany Indian Mission, Wittenberg, 
Wis. They have one son, Lowell, born August 18, 1916. 

One other man deserves very special mention in connection 
with the Preparatory Department, namely. Rev. M. K. Bleken, 
the disciplinarian and "husfader" of the department from 1907 
to 1910. 




ENTRANCE TO COLLEGE CAMPUS 



CHAPTER FIVE 

FACULTY 

O. A. TiNGELSTAD 



LUTHER COLLEGE FACULTY, isci) 

Standing: F. A. Schmidt, N. O Brandt 

Sitting: G. Landmark, L. Siewers, K. E. Bergh, Laur. Larsen 



I. Roster 
Tlie following tabulation presents tlie names of the persons 
who have been connected with I>uther College in some instruetorial 
capacity, and indicates the general nature of the connection and 
the years of service in each case. 



FACULTY 



89 



60-806 T 



88-Z881 



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90 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



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ZI-TI61 






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01-6061 






60-806 T 






80-/06 I 






iO-906I 






90-S06I 






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t-0-f06l . 


'T- a a ■ c. " 


f0-?06l 


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t0-l06I 


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10-0061 


e.--'-'-a& 


00-6681 


a a-Q-'-' 


66-8681 


'^ a Q-a--" 


86-Z681 


c. n-a--n! 


i6-968T 


■.:::::::::::: °- :::::::: °- : ^ :: '^ ::::::::::::::::: : 


96-S68I 


4-> ■ tJ 


96-1-681 


::::::::::::::::::"':::-":'^::::::::;:::::::::::: 


t6-f68I 


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f6-?68I 


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26-1681 


a *j-4j 


16-0681 


o. u . *J *< ■ 


06-6881 






68-8881 


^ ^ 




88-/88I 


zz 




/8-988I 


Q ■ • • • G « ^ 


98-S88T 


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58-^881 






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Z8-1881 


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18-0881 


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08-6/81 


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Nelson, D. T 

Nelson. Olaf 

Ness. Jens A 

Norlie. O. M 

Olscn, Rudolf 

Ordal. Z.J 

Orwoll. M. S 

Overn. O. B 

Petersen. E. J 

Peterson, E. E. . . . 
Peterson, F. E. . . . 

Oualley. 0. W 

Ramstad, Ola 

Reque, L. S 

Reque, S. S 

Roalkvam, H" 

Rovelstad, A. M . . 
Rygh, George A. T. 

Sa(e)vre, B. K 

Sander, A. B 

Schmidt, F. A 

Seippel. Alex 

Sheel, H. W 

Siewers, L 

Sihler, VV 

Sperati, C. A 

Strom, C. W 

Stub, H. G 

Svanoe, Bj 

Swansen, H. F . . . , 

Talle, H. O 

Teisberg, A. K . . . . 
Thompson, T. E 

Throndsen, K 

Tingelstad, J 

Tingelstad, O. A. . . 

Torrison, I. B 

Trytten, M. H 

Tysscn. Carl 

Ulvilden. Geo 

V'aaler, T 

Veblen, A. A 

W'aage. John 

W^ollan, C.I 

Ylvisaker, J. Th... 
Ylvisaker, S. C. . . . 



FACULTY 



91 



i 









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80-Z06T 


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66-8681 














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NAME 








Arneson, T. E. . 

Boe, Ole 

Brandt, Chr 

Doseff, Ivan . . . 
Fisher, H. H.. . 
Gausta, H. N . . 
Glesne, Ole ... . 
Grundy, A. C. . 
Haugen, G. O. . 
Hexom, C. P. . . 

Jewell, W 

Laudel, A 

Movold, R. A. . 
Natvig, A. J. . . 
Nelson, R. P... 
Nilsson, Th. . . . 
Peterson, O. . . . 
Smith, A. C... 

Smith, C 

Solem, O. M . . . 
Solheim, O. A. . 

Stabo, T 

Valder, C. H... 
Walhus, N. L. . 



92 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



3. Special Tnsinictors and Assistants not Listed in the 
Preceding Table: 



a) SPECIAL INSTRUCTORS: 
Adams. Mrs. Walter C, litOS-09, Voice 
Boice, Vera L.. 1908-09, Violin 
Brown, Mrs. F. Q., 1919-20, Violin 
Clausen, Rev. F. C, IHiiS-fil, (?) 
Coup. AV. n., 190 1, Band 
Downie. Mrs. Ruth, 191.5-17, 1921-22, 

Violin 
Himle, A. L., 1878, Band 
Hustvedt. K a t h e r i n e S.. 191 8-20. 

Piano 
Lee, .1. L., 1878, MilitaiT Drill 
Marsh. Mrs. Jessie Ervin, 1911-18. Piano 
Moe. Mrs. Leonard A, 1920-22, Voice, 

Piano 
Thomas, Dr. H. H., 1918. S. A. T. C, 

Physician 
Werthwein, Pearl, 1909-10, Voice 
Work.s, Frances, 1920-21, Public Si)eak- 

ing 

b) STUDENT ASSISTANTS (list 
incomplete) : 

Anderson. Ingvald, 189.5-90, Arithmetic 

(Now I. A. Kampen) 
Beito, Gulbrand C, 1888-89, Ancient 

Languagrcs 
Brorby, Joseph, 1901, (?) 
Buttedal. Anton, 1911-12, Norwegian 

(now Anton Buedall) 
Dreng, John ()., 1897-1900, Gymnastics 
Drotning, T. Melvin, 1904-0.5, Band 
Faye, Christopher U., 1909, Latin 
Glas0e, Oluf, 1879-81, Band 
Hagen, Sivcrt N., 189.3-9.5, Mathematics 
Hanson, Nils B., 1897-98, Gymnastics, 

1898-99, Penmanship 
Haugen, Thomas A., 1908-09. German 
Heiidrickson, Alfred, 1905-00. Latin 
Holte, Alfred O., 1908, Latin 

(now Alfred O. Halvorson) 
Hovde, Christian J. M., 1891-92, Arith- 
metic 
Iverson, Peter J., 19ii8 in, Aritlmu'tic. 

Algebra, Civics 
Johnson, Alfred O., 1890-91. Band 



Johnsrud, Peder L., 1909-10, English 

Grammar 
Jorgenson. Jacob E., 1886. Norwegian 
Kjer, Ludvig P., 1912-1.3, Norwegian 
Krohn, Eugene, 1883-85, Band 
Larsen, Jakob A. O., 1908, (?) 
Larsen, Lauritz A., 1885-86, Band 
Larson. Oscar O., 1899-1900, Gymnastics 
l.inncvold, Johan, 1886-90, Band 
.\Iovig, Andreas I. M., 1908-09, Latin 
Normann. Halvor M.. 1898-99, Algebra, 

1899-19(10, Penmansliip 
Normann, S. Theodore, 1895-97, Gym- 
nastics 
Omlie, Oscar K., 1891-91, Algebra. 189.3- 

91, Band 
Orwoll, Sylvester M.. 1893-95, Gymnas- 
tics 
Petersen, Ralph W., 1911-12, Chemi.stry 
Peterson, Joseph M , 1891-98, Penman- 
ship 
Reque, Hcnnan A., 1892-91. Penman- 
ship 
Rosenqvist, Bernhard, 1909, (?) 
Siervold, Ola J., 1891-9.5, Latin 
Sanden, Austin N., 191.3-14, Penman- 
ship 
Skinnemoen, John S., 1900-01. Penman- 
ship 
.Str0m. Oscar A., 1895-97, Algebra 
Teisberg, Thoma.s, 1907, (?) 
Thorgrimsen, Hans B.. 1878-79, Band 
Thorson, I. August, 1893-95, Band, etc. 
Tjernagel, Helge M., 1891-93, Band 
Torgerson, Jacob A. C, 1898-99, Norwe- 
gian 
Turmo, Olaf, 1896-98, Algebra 
Twito, Helmer, 1915-16, Penmanship, 

Orthography 
Unless, John N., 1912-13, Geometry. 

English Grammar 
^'aaler, Arnt J.. 1906-07, (?) 
Waller, Martinius C. 1891-92, English 
White. Andreas O., 1899-00, Latin 
Xavier, Johan U., 1891-93, Drawing 



II. Personal Data 

Tlie next table .siiniinarize.s the following; personal data con- 
cerning the teachers at Luther College: date and place of birth; 
names of parents and spouse, with year of marriage; present ad- 
dress, or, in the case of persons deceased, the date of death. 
These data have, in many cases, been gathered by Dr. O. M. 
Norlie. 



FACULTY 



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99 




FACULTY OF LUTHER COLLEGE IN 1873 

Standing: N. O. Brandt, C. Narvesen 

Sitting: J. D. Jacobsen, L. Siewers, A. Seippel, Laur. Larsen 



III. Professional Data 

In the following presentation of the professional record of 
each teacher at Luther College the aim is to indicate in chrono- 
logical order the degrees and training obtained and the important 
positions held by each individual, in such a way as to show forth 
clearly the qualifications of each teacher for his work at Luther 
College, likewise his later success. One point of terminology 
should be especially noted: at Luther College an instructor is 
designated (usually) as Teacher when his appointment is tempor- 
ary, or from year to year, but as Professor when his appointment 
has been made permanent. 



100 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



1. Professional Data — Regular Members of the Factilty 

•j-Peter Lai'renth's Larsejt (Laur. Larsen), 
18()1-1911 (1915). Firxt President. A. B., 
Christlansand Cathedral School, 1850; Cand. 
Thcol., University of Christiania, 1855; Teacher 
of Languages, Christiania, 1855-1857; Lutheran 
Pastor, Hush River, Wis., 1857-1859; Professor 
of Theology, Concordia Seminary, St. Louis, 
Mo., 1859-18G1; President, Luther College, 1861- 
1902, and Professor of Religion, 1861-1870, 1872- 
1900, History, 1861-1902, Norwegian, 1861-1874, 
1882-1883, 1888-1889, 1892-1893, 1901-1905, Ger- 
man, 1861-1866, 1868-1870, Latin, 1861-1873, 1876- 
1877, 1899-1900, Penmanship, 1864-1867, Hebrew, 
1865-1875, 1879-1886, 1887-1911; Pastor, La 
Crosse, Wis., 1861-1862, Decorah, Iowa, 1862-1889; Editor-in-Chief of 
"Kirkelig Maanedstidende", 1868-1874, "Ev. Luth. Kirketidende", 1874-1889, 
1902-1912; Member Board of Trustees, Luther College, 186.5-1915 (Treas- 
urer, 1865-1871, President, 1871-1902) ; Vice-president, Norwegian Synod, 
1876-1893; Chairman, Lutheran Synodical Conference, 1881-1883; D. D., 
Concordia Seminary, 1903; Knight of the First Order of St. Olav, 1908; 
President Emeritus, Luther College, 1911-1915. 




f Christian Keyser Preus, 1898-1921. Second 
President. A. B., Luther College, 1873; Cand. 
Theol., Concordia Seminary, 1876; Lutheran 
Pastor, Spring Prairie, Wis., 1876-1897, and 
Chicago, 111., 1876, 1893-1895; Teacher of Re- 
ligion and Norwegian, Luther College, 1898-1900, 
and Latin, 1899-1900; Professor of Christianity, 
Luther College, 1900-1921, Norwegian, 1900- 
1901, 1912-1913, 1915-1920, History, 1900-1901; 
President, Luther College, 1902-1921; Vice- 
president, Norwegian Synod, 1911-1917; Com- 
mander of the Order of St. Olav, 1911; Vice- 
president of Iowa District, Norwegian Lutheran 
Church of America, 1917-1921; President, Edu- 
the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America, 



Oscar Ludvig Olson, 1901 — . Third President 
(Acting). A, B., Luther College, 1893; Teacher, 
Bode (Iowa) Academy, 1893-1895; Student, Univer- 
sity of Minnesota, ' 1895-1896; Teacher, Bruflat 
Academy, Portland, N. Dak., 1896-1897, Principal, 
1897-1898; Teacher, Luther Academy, Albert Lea, 
Minn., 1898-1901; Professor of English and Orator- 
icals, Inither College, 1901-1906, Latin, 1901-1918, 
(Jytnnaslics, Penmanship, 1901-1905, Ciieography, 
l<i()l-1902; A. M., University of Minnesota, 1903; 
Student, University of Chicago, summer 1904, sum- 
mers 1907-1911, 1913-1914; Professor of English 
Language and Literature, Lutlier College, 1906 — ; 
Ph. D., University of Chicago, 1914; Secretary, 
Luther College Faculty, 1916-1921; Secretary, lioard of Trustees of Lu- 
ther College, 1917 — ; Acting President, Luther College, 1921 — . 




FACULTY 



101 




America, 1885-1908; 
Author. 



fKNUT Eli.efson Bergh, 1868-1874. Student, 
Madison, Wis., High School, 1859, Evansville, Wis., 
High School, 1859-1860, Concordia College, St. Louis, 
Mo., 1860-1861, Luther College, 1861, 1864 (Student 
Assistant), teaching Common School in the intervals; 
studied Law, 1868-1869; admitted to the Iowa bar, 
1869; Teacher of Arithmetic and English, Luther 
College, 1868-1869; Professor of English and Geog- 
raphy, 1869-1872, Arithmetic and Algebra, 1869- 
1870; Editor of "For Hjemmet", 1870; Secretary, 
Board of Trustees, Luther College, 1871-1874; Rep- 
resentative in Iowa State Legislature, 1872; to Nor- 
way on leave of absence on account of failing health, 
1873-1874; died 1875. 



Carl Christensen Birkelo, 1912 (January -June). 
A. B., Luther College, 1910; Medical Student, Uni- 
versity of Chicago and Rush Medical College, 1910- 
1914; Teacher of Chemistry, Physics, and Mathe- 
matics, Luther College, 1912 (January-June); M. D., 
Rush Medical College, 1914; Physician and Surgeon, 
Lutheran Hospital, La Crosse, Wis., 1914-1915, Ros- 
holt, Wis., 1916, Duluth, Minn., 1916-1917, Chicago, 
1919-1920, Detroit, Mich., 1920—; First Lieutenant, 
Medical Corps, U. S. Army, 1918-1919. 



fJoN Bjarnason, 1874 (Feb.)-1875. A. B., 
Reykjavik College (Iceland), 1865; Cand. Theol., 
Reykjavik Theological Seminary, 1869; Luther- 
an Pastor, Stafafelli, Iceland, 1869-1870; Teach- 
er in Public Schools, Iceland, 1869-1872, and in 
Reykjavik College, 1870-1871; Teacher of Latin, 
Greek, and Geography, Luther College, 1874 
(Feb.) -1875; Assistant Editor of "Skandina- 
ven", Chicago, 1875; Teacher of Norwegian, 
Augsburg Seminary, 1876, and Editor of "I3ud- 
stikken", Minneapolis, Minn., 1876-1877; Pastor, 
Gimli, Manitoba, 1877-1880, Seidisfyrdi, Iceland, 
1880-1884, Winnipeg, Man., 1885-1914; President 
(the first) of the Icelandic Lutheran Synod in 
Editor of "Sameiningen', Winnipeg, 1886-1914; 




Martinus Kristiansen Bleken, 1906 (Jan.)- 
1910. Student, Galesville University, 1885-1889; 
Cand. Theol., Luther Seminary (Theor. Dept.), 
St. Paul, Minn., 1892; Lutheran Pastor, Deer- 
field and Madison, Wis., 1892-1897, Chicago, 
111., 1897-1906; Teacher of Religion, Norwegian, 
and Greek Testament, and Disciplinarian in the 
Preparatory Department, Luther College, 1906 
(Jan.)-19l6; Pastor, Saude (P. O. Lawler), 
Iowa, 1910—. 



102 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



GisLE Christian Johnson BotiinEj 1881 (Jan.)- 
1883, 1884-1907. A. B., Luther College, 1878; A. B., 
Northwestern University, Watertown, Wis., 1879; 
Student of Classical Philology, Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1879-1880; Teacher of Parochial School, Min- 
neapolis, Minn., 1880; Teacher of Greek, Luther Col- 
lege, 1881-1883, German, 1881, Latin, 1881-1882, 
English, 1881-1882, Algebra, 1881-1882, History, 
1882-1883, and Norwegian, 1882-1883; A. M., Luther 
College, 1883; Graduate Student in Greek, Johns 
Hopkins University, 1883-1884; Professor of Greek, 
Luther College, 1881-1907, Mathematics, 1884-1894., 
English, 1884-1885, History, 1885-1886, Norwegian, 
1885-1907, and Principal of the Preparatory Depart- 
ment, 1891-1896; studied in Norway, Greece, and Germany, on leave, 1904- 
1905; Professor of Scandinavian Languages and Literature, and Head of 
the Department, University of Minnesota, 1907 — ; Knight of the Order of 
St. Olav, 1911; Author of '"Det Norske Luther College, 1861-1897" (a his- 
tory of Luther College up to 1897). 





fTuROND Johnson Bothne, 1875-1882. Graduate, 
Stord0en Seminary, Norway, 1854; Teacher and 
Editor in Norway, 1854-1875; Teacher of Norwe- 
gian, Latin, Catechetics, History, and Geograpliy, 
Luther College, 1875-1876, and Professor of Norwe- 
gian and Latin, 1876-1882, History, 1876-1881, Ger- 
man, 1878-1882; Editor "Norden", 1882-1884, "Ame- 
rika", 1884-1887; with "Skandinaven", 1887-1894, and 
"Decorah-Posten", 1894-1907. 



fNiLS Olsen Brandt. 1865-1881. Cand. Theol., 
L'niversity of Christiania, Norway, 1849 (also 
A. B. and A. M.) ; Lutheran Pastor, Rock River, 
Wis., 1851, and Home Missionary, 1851-1857 
(first pastor from Norway West of Mississippi, 
1851); one of the founders of the Norwegian 
Synod, 1853; Pastor at Watertown, Wis., 1857- 
1865, Decorah, Iowa, 1865-1882; Vice-president 
of Norwegian Synod, 1857-1871, and Member 
of Church Council, 1857-1882; Professor of 
Catechetics, Luther College, 1865-1876, Geog- 
rai)liy, 1865-1867, German, 1865-1867, 1869-1870, 
Latin, 1865-1869, Vocal Music, 1865-1881, Nor- 
wegian, 1865-1866, Religion, 1865-1878, and 
Mem1)er Board of Trustees, 1865-1871; Joint Editor of "Kirketidende", 
1868-1881, "Luthersk Skolei)lad", 1880-1881; Vice-president, Iowa District, 
Norwegian Synod, 1876-1K84; Parochial Teacher, Brandt, S. Dak., 1885- 
1900; (lied 1921 at age of 97. 




FACULTY 



103 





fOLAus Jensen Breda, 1879-1882. A. B., Gjert- 
sen's Classical School, Christiania, Norway, 
1870; Student, University of Christiania, 1870- 
1871 (A. M.); Cand. Theol., Concordia Semi- 
nary, St. Louis, Mo., 1875; Lutheran Pastor St 
Paul, Minn., 1875-1877; Philological Student" 
University of Christiania, 1877-1879; Professor 
of Latin, Greek, History, and Norwegian, Lu- 
ther College, 1879-1882, and German, 1879-1881 • 
studied at Universities of Christiania, Copen- 
hagen, and Upsala, 1882-1884; Professor (the 
first) of Scandinavian Languages and Litera- 
ture (and Latin), University of Minnesota, 
1884-1899; Teacher at Frogner's Gymnasium, 
1900-1916, and the Military Academy, Christi- 
ania, Norway, 1903-1900". 



fADOLP Bredesen, 1876-1878. A. B., Luther 
College, 1870; Cand. Theol., Concordia Semi- 
nary, 187.3; Lutheran Pastor, Spring Prairie 
Wis., 1873-1876; Teacher of Latin, Englisii, and 
Religion, Luther College, 1876-1878, and Ger- 
man, 1877-1878; Pastor, Perry, Wis., 1878-1881, 
Stoughton, Wis., 1881-1901; Manager, Martin 
Luther Orphans' Home, Stoughton, Wis., 1902- 
1906; Pastor Emeritus, Deerfield, Wis, 1906- 
1913; Author. 



fNEHEM Christensen, 1872 (Jan.-June). A. 
B., Luther College, 1871; Teacher of English 
(?), Latin (?), Norwegian, and History (v), 
Luther College, Jan.-June, 1872; Cand. Theol., 
Concordia Seminary, 1875; Lutheran Pastor, St. 
Joseph, Mo., 1875-1877, Ellsworth, Iowa, 1879- 
1882, St. Joseph, Mo., 1882-1885, Leona, Kans., 
1885-1887, Genesee, Idaho, 1887-1892; Editor, 
"Luthersk Sendehud" (San Francisco), 1890, 
"Pacific Herold", Parkland, AVash., 1892-1896. 



Knute Olson Eittreim. 1918—. Attended 
Red Wing Seminary, 1888-1889, Beeman's Busi- 
ness College, Red Wing, Minn., 1889-1890; Book- 
keeper, Chicago, 1890-1895; attended Chicago 
Theological Seminary, 1895-1900 (Cand. Theol., 
1900); Lutheran Pastor, Creston, 111., 1900-1911; 
Teacher, Jewell Lutheran College, Jewell, Iowa, 
1911-1918, President, 1912-1918; Co-editor of 
"The Lutheran Hymnary", 1913; Teacher of 
Commercial Suhjects and Christianity, Luther 
College, 1918-1919, Professor of the same sub- 
jects, 1922—; Treasurer of Luther College. 
1920—. ^ 



104 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SLXTY YEARS 




Olivkr Maurice EiTTRKi.'*r, 1920 — . A. B., Red 
Wing Seminary, 1916; Student, Iowa State College, 
Ames, 191G-1918; War Work, Electrician; Teacher 
of Physics and Mathematics, Luther College, 1920 — ; 
Student, University of Iowa, summer 1922. 




Andrew O. Esthem, 1889-1890. A. B., Luther 
College, 1886; Student, University of Iowa, 1886- 
1887; A. M., Cornell University, 1889; Teacher of 
Latin, Ancient Historv, and Geography, Luther Col- 
lege, 1889-1890; Ph. D., Cornell University, 1892; 
Teacher, Warthurg College, 1894-1910, Lutheran 
Ladies' Seminary, Red Wing, Minn., 1910-1917; Su- 
perintendent of Schools, Portal, N. Dak., 1918-1920; 
Professor of English, Olivet College, 1920—. 




Chellis Nathaniel Evanson, 1919 — . A. B., Lu- 
ther College, 1918; U. S. Navy, 1918-1919; Teacher 
of History and Mathematics, Luther College, 1919 — , 
General Science, Physiology, and Geography, 1919- 
1920, English, 1920—. 




fGusTAv Adolf Evenson, 1881-1882. A. B., Luther 
College, 1880; Parochial School Teacher, Calmar, 
Iowa, 1880-1881; Teacher of English and History, 
Luther College, 1881-1882; Philological Student, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1882-1883; Public School 
Teacher, Colorado, 1884. 



FACULTY 



105 







Christian Alford Fjeldstad, 1911 (April-Decem- 
ber). A. B., Luther College, 1905; Clerk in Drug 
Store, Grand Forks, N. Dak., 1905-1906; Teacher, 
Grand Forks College, 1906-1907; B. S., University of 
Chicago, 1908, M. S., 1909; M. D., Rush Medical 
College, 1911; Teacher of Chemistry, Physics, and 
Mathematics, Luther College, 1911; Interne, Madi- 
son General Hospital, Madison, Wis., 1911, Presby- 
terian Hospital, Chicago, 1912; Physician and Sur- 
geon, Red Wing, Minn., 1912-1917, Austin, Minn., 
1917-1919, Minneapolis, Minn., 1919—; Special Med- 
ical Study, New York City, 1919. 

Knut Gjerset, 1902-1916, 1917—. A. B., Univer- 
sity of Minnesota, 1893; Principal, St. Ansgar (Iowa) 
Seminary, 1893-1895; Student, Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, "1895-1896, Heidelberg University, 1896-1898, 
Ph. D., 1898; Principal, Glenwood (Minn.) Academy, 
1898-1902; Professor of History, Luther College, 
1902-1916, Norwegian, 1905-1916; Special Study, Uni- 
versity of Christiania, 1909-1910, L^niversity of Ber- 
lin, 1910; Assistant Editor, "Symra", 1912-1914; 
Knight of the Order of St. Olav, 1916; President, 
Park Region Luther College, 1916-1917; Professor 
of History and Norwegian, Luther College, 1917 — ■, 
War Aims, 1918, Economics, 1918-1921; Author. 

tJoH(A)N EvENsoif Granrud, 1894-1897. A. B., 
Luther College, 1886; Student, University of Min- 
nesota, 1886-1887, University of Michigan,' 1887-1888; 
Teacher, Luther Academy, Albert Lea, Minn., 1888- 
1889; Principal (the first), Bode (Iowa) Academy, 
1889-1890; A. M., Luther College, 1890; Student, 
Cornell University, 1890-1892, Ph. D., 1892; Teacher 
of Latin, St. Olaf College, 1892-1894; Teacher of 
Latin, Luther College, 1894-1897, and Economics, 
1894-1895; Assistant, later Instructor, in Latin, Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1897-1899, University of Min- 
nesota, 1899-1903; Assistant Professor of Latin, Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, 1903-1909, Professor of Latin, 
1909-1919; Vice-president, Board of Education, Nor- 
wegian Lutheran Church of America, 1917-1919; 
Author. 

John G. Halland, 1887-1889. A. B., Luther Col- 
lege, 1884; Cand. Theol., Concordia Seminary, 1887; 
Teacher of German, Latin, Religion, and History, 
Luther College, 1887-1889, and Gymnastics, 1888- 
1889; M. A., Luther College, 1888;' Student, North- 
ern Indiana Normal School, 1889; Principal, Bruflat 
Academy, Portland, N. Dak., 1889-1892; County Su- 
perintendent of Schools, Traill Co., N. Dak., 'l892- 
1896; State Superintendent of Public Instruction, 
N. Dak., 1897-1901; attended Chicago School of Psy- 
chology, 1899; Institute Conductor and Lecturer; 
Professor of History, Sociology, Economics, and 
Pedagogy, N. Dak. Agricultural' College, 1903-1910; 
Publicist, Lecturer, Real Estate, 1910 — , 



100 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 




Haldor J. Hanson (1882-1883), 1888-1890, 1894- 
1904. Instructor in \'ocal Music, Luther College, 
188:^-1883; A. H., Luther College, 1883; Student, Chi- 
cago Conservatory, 1883-1884; Teacher, Wilhnar 
(Minn.) Seminary," 1885-1887; Teac^her of Music and 
Mathematics, Luther College, 1888-1890, Latin, 1888- 
1H89, and Norwegian, 1889-1890; studied Music in 
Weimar, Germany, 1891-1892; Instructor in Music, 
Luther College, 1894-1895, and Professor of Music, 
1895-1904; Curator of Luther College Museum, 1896- 
1902; Book and Music Dealer, Publisher, and Author, 
Chicago, 1904^; Editor, "Idun", 1908-1910; on 
Editorial Staff of "Skandinaven"'. 

Hans Sjurson Hilleboe, 1912-1917. A. B., Lu- 
ther College, 1881; Public School Teacher; attended 
Northern Indiana Normal School, 1882-1884; Teacher 
of Psychology, Willmar (Minn.) Seminary, 1884- 
1886; A. M., "Luther College, 1886; PrincipiU, Will- 
mar Seminary, 1886-1899; Theological Student, Chi- 
cago Lutheran Theol. Seminary, 1895-1896, Luther 
Seminary (St. Paul), 1897-1898; has also attended 
Harvard University, University of Chicago, and 
University of Minnesota; Suj^erintendent of Schools, 
Benson, Minn., 1899-1904; Principal, Willmar Semi- 
nary, 1904-1907; Superintendent of Schools, Benson, 
Minn., 1907-1912; Principal of Preparatory Depart- 
ment, Luther College, 1912-1917, and Professor of 
Biology and Education, 1912-1917, Norwegian, 1913-191.5, Sociology, 1916- 
1917, and Special Subjects; President, Lutheran Normal School, Sioux 
F'alls, S. Dak., 1917-1918, Augustana College and Normal School, 1918- 
1920; Professor of Biology, Augustana College and Normal School, 1920 — ; 
Editor, "The Hammer", one year. 



TiioRLKiF (O.) Homme, 1881-1882. A. B., Luther 
College, 1878; Stud. Theol., Luther Seminary, 1878- 
1881, and Teacher of Norwegian and Religion, Mo- 
nona Academy; Cand. Theol., Luther Seminary, 1881; 
Teacher of Religion, German, Latin, and History, 
Luther College, 1881-1882; Teacher in Secondary arid 
Higher Schools, Norway, 1882-1887; A. M., Luther 
College, 1884; Cand. Theol., University of Chris- 
tiania, 1891; Principal of Nedenes "Amtsskole", 
Heirefos, Norway, 1891-1908; Lutheran Pastor, R0l- 
dal, Norway, 1908-1913; Author. 



Brynjoi.f Jakok Hovde, 1916-1917, 1919—. A. B., 
Luther College, 1916; Teacher of Norwegian, Luther 
College, 1916-1917; Student, University of Iowa, 
1917-1918, 1919, A. M., 1919; U. S. "Army, 1918 
(2nd Lieut., Coast Artillery); Teacher of Norwe- 
gian, Luther College, 1919—, and History, 1920—; 
Acting Dean of Men, 1920-. 




FACULTY 



101 




Elling O. Hove, 1891-1893. A. B., Luther 
College, 1884; Cand. Theol., Concordia Semi- 
nary, 1887; Lutheran Pastor, Portland, Ore., 
1887-1891, Decorah, Iowa, 1891-1894; Teacher of 
Religion (Catechism), Luther College, 1891- 
1893; Pastor, Mankato, Minn., 1894-1901; Pro- 
fessor of Theology, Luther Seminary, 1901-1917, 
Luther Theological Seminary, 1917—, St. Paul, 
Minn. 



Halvor BjpRNSox HrsTVEDT, 1883 (December), 
1887 (March-June). A. B., I>uther College, 
1873; Cand. Theol., Concordia Seminary, 1876; 
Lutheran Pastor, Yankton, South Dakota, 
1876-1881, Northwood, Iowa, 1881-1883; Secre- 
tary, Iowa District, Norwegian Synod, 1880- 
1884; Teacher of Religion, Norwegian, and Di- 
dactics, Luther College, December, 1883; at- 
tended Slack's Business College, 1884; position 
in Lutheran Publishing House, Decorah, Iowa, 
1884; Business Manager, "Amerika", 1885-1886; 
Parochial School Teacher, Decorah, Iowa, 1886; 
Assistant Pastor, Tracy, Minn., 1887; Teacher of 
Religion, German, and Latin, Luther College, 
March-June, 1887; Manager Lutheran Publishing House, 1887-1893; 
Teacher, Lutheran Normal School, Sioux Falls, S. Dak., 1893-189() (Act- 
ing President); Assistant Bank Cashier, Decora!), Iowa, 1897-1905; 
Treasurer, Norwegian Synod, 1899-1905, 1911-1917; Member, Board of 
Trustees, Luther College, 1899-1920; Editor, "Lutiieran Herald", 1906- 
1909; Assistant Editor at Lutheran Publishing House, 1905-1917; Pastor 
Emeritus, Decorah, Iowa. 




f Jacob Daniel Jacobsen. 1863 (Sept.-Nov.), 
1872 (Jan.)-1881 (April 1). Substitute Teacher 
of Latin, English, Mathematics, Greek, German, 
Geography, and Penmanship, Luther College, 
Sept. 2-Nov. 1, 1863; Student at Luther College, 
1864-1865; A. B., Concordia College, Fort 
Wayne, Ind., 1867; Cand. Theol., Concordia 
Seminary, 1870; Lutheran Pastor, Koshkonong, 
Wis., 1870-1872; Teacher of English, Latin, etc., 
Luther College, beginning Jan. 1, 1872, and ap- 
pointed permanently later that year; Professor 
of English, 1872-1877, German, 1872-1874, 1875- 
1877, 1879-1881, Greek, 1872-1873, 1875-1881, 
Latin, 1872-1873, 1876-1879, Logic, 1872-1877, 

Mathematics, 1872-1873, Religion, 1872-1877, 1878-1881, Hebrew, 1875-1878; 

Secretary, Board of Trustees, Luther College, 1876-1881; Librarian, Luther 

College, "1874-1881; died April 1, 1881. 




108 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 





Karl Theodor Jacobsex, 1904-1905, 1920—. A. B., 
I.utlier College, 1902; Student, University of Wiscon- 
sin, 1903-1901.; Teaclier of Greek, Norwegian, His- 
tory, Geography, and Hebrew, Luther College, 1904- 
1905; Student," University of Wisconsin, 1905-1907, 
A. M., 190(i; Library Assistant, Wisconsin Historical 
Society, 190(5-1907; Cataloguer, Library of Congress, 
1907-1911; Classifier, University of Chicago Libraries, 
1911-1916, Head Classifier, 'l916-1920; Librarian, 
Luther College, 1920—. 



fULRiK ViLHELM KoREN, 1874-1875 (Decem- 
ber). A. B., Bergen Cathedral School, 1844; 
Cand. Theol., University of Christiania, 1852 
(also A. M.) ; Teacher, Nissen Latin School, 
Christiania, 1852-1853; Lutheran Pastor, Wash- 
ington Prairie, Decorah, Iowa, 1853-1910; Sec- 
retary, Norwegian Synod, 1855; Member, Church 
Council, Norwegian Synod, 1861-1910; Secre- 
tary, Board of Trustees, Luther College, 1865- 
1871; Vice-president, Norwegian Synod, 1871- 
1876; Teacher of Norwegian, Luther College, 
1874- Dec, 1875; President, Iowa District, Nor- 
wegian Synod, 1876-1894; Vice-President, Nor- 
wegian Synod, 1893-1894, President, 1894-1910; 
D. D., Concordia Seminary, 1903; Knight of the 
Order of St. Olav; Author. 



William Korex, 1889 (Jan.) -1892, 1895. A. B., 
Luther College, 1882; Cand. Theol., Concordia Semi- 
nary, 1885; Teacher and Student, 1885-1888; Teacher 
of Greek, Luther College, 1889-1892, Latin, English, 
Religion, and Physiology, 1889, German, 1889-1892, 
and History, 1891-1892; studied Philology at the 
Universities of Leij)zig and Christiania, 1892-1894; 
A. M., Luther College, 1892; Teacher of Elocution 
and Physical Culture, Luther College, 1895; Profes- 
.sor of English, Iowa Wesleyan University, 1895-1900; 
studied in Europe, 1900-1901; Professor of Modern 
Languages (French and Italian), Princeton Univer- 
sity, 1901—; Author. 



•j-Hans Jakob Gr0gaard Krog, 1890-1896. A. 
B., Stavanger Latin School, 1863; Theological 
Student, University of Christiania, 1864-1866 
(A. M.); Teacher in Norway, 1866-1872; Cand. 
Theol., Concordia Seminary, St. Louis, Mo., 
1S74; Lutheran Pastor, Minneapolis, Minn., 
1874, Menomonie, Wis., 1875-1876, Baldwin, 
Wis., 1876-1890; Editor, "Missionsvennen", 1888- 
1890 (V); Teacher of Norwegian and Religion, 
Luther College, 1890-1896, Latin, 1890-189.'), His- 
tory, 1890-1892, 1896, French, 1895-1896 (Profes- 
.sor* 1896); Pastor, Ossian, Iowa, 1896-1902; 
Emissary, Seamen's Mission, 1902-1904. 



FACULTY 



109 




Kristen Kvamme, 1896-1898. A. B., Luther 
College, 1894; Theological Student, Luther Semi- 
nary, 1894-1896; Teacher of Norwegian, Reli- 
gion, and Latin, Luther College, 1896-1898, and 
History, 1897; Cand. Theol., Luther Seminary, 
1899; Lutheran Pastor, New York City, 1899- 
1909, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1909-1912, Ossian, 
Iowa, 1912 — ; Member, Visiting Committee, Lu- 
ther College, 1912-1917; Editor, "B0rneblad", 
1913-1917, "Barnevennen", 1917—; Member, 
Board of Trustees, Luther College, 1914-1920, 
and Secretary of same, 1916-1917; Author. 



f Gabriel Hetting Landmark, 1867-1876. A. B.; 
attended University of Christiania, A. M., 1861; 
Teacher at Christiania, 1861-1867; Professor of Latin, 
Luther College, 1867-1876, Greek, 1867-1875, Norwe- 
gian, 1867-1874, History and Geography, 1867-1868, 
Penmanship, 1875-1876; Librarian (the first), Luther 
College, 1867-1874; Joint Editor, "For Hjemmet", 
1870-1876; Head Teacher at Christiansund, Norway, 
1877-1882 (?), Aalesund, 1882-(?); Editor, "Aale- 
sunds Handels- og Sj0fartstidende", 8 years; Author; 
died August 17, 1907. 



Myron Wilbur Larsen, 1920-1921. A. B., Luther 
College, 1919; Medical Student, University of Wis- 
consin, 1919-1920; Graduate Student, Lutiier Col- 
lege, 1920; Teacher of Biology, Geometry, General 
Science, Physiology, and Geography, Luther College, 
1920-1921; Student, Barnes Medical College, Wash- 
ington University, St. Louis, Mo., 1921 — . 




fFRIEDERICH LlNDEMANK, 1874-1875. A. B., 

Concordia College, Fort Wayne, Ind., 1871; 
Cand. Theol., Concordia Seminary, 1874; Luther- 
an Pastor, Decorah, Iowa, 1874-1875; Teacher 
of German, Luther College, 1874-1875; Pastor 
in the Missouri Synod, 1876-1893; Teacher of 
Drawing and Religion at the Lutheran Teach- 
ers' Seminary, Addison, 111., 1893-1907. 



110 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 




Ingemax M. Lyngaas, 1J)0()-1J)07. A. H., Luther 
College, 1897; Student, Valparaiso University, 1897- 
1898; Teacher, Glenwood (Minn.) Academy, 1899- 
1902; Student, University of Minnesota, 1902-1904; 
Teacher, Lutheran Ladies' Seminary, Red Wing, 
Minn., 190+-190(); Teacher of Latin, English, and 
Gymnastics, Lutlier College, 1906-1907; Teacher, Lu- 
theran Ladies' Seminary, 1907-1918; Superintendent 
of Schools, Battle Lake, Minn., 1918-1919; Dairy 
Farmer, Winneconne, Wis., 1919 — . 




Norman Arthur Madson, 1911-1912, 1916- 
1918. Student Assistant, Luther College, 1909- 
1910, A. B., 1911, Assistant Principal of the 
Preparatory Department, and Teacher of Nor- 
wegian, History, Latin, and Religion, 1911-1912; 
Student, University of Chicago, summer, 1912; 
Theological Student, Luther Seminary, 1912- 
1914, 1914-1915; Pastor, Chicago, 1914; Cand. 
Theol., Luther Seminary, 1915; Lutheran Pas- 
tor, Hibbing, Minn., 191.5-1916; Teacher of His- 
tory and Religion, Luther College, 1916-1918, 
Public Speaking and Military Drill, 1917-1918; 
Chaplain, United States Army, 1918-1919; Pas- 
tor, Bode, Iowa, 1919 — . 




Rasmus Maoiin, 1917-1918. Attended Uni- 
versity of Christiania, 1882-1891, A. B., A. M., 
Cand. Theol., six years teaching experience in 
Norway before 1892; Lutheran Pastor, Yank- 
ton, S. Dak., 1892-1895, Thompson, Iowa, 1895- 
1917; Student, University of Minnesota, 1905- 
1906; A. M., Luther College, 1906; Editor, "Kir- 
ketidende", 1916-1917, "Teologisk Tidsskrift", 
1917—; Joint Editor, "Lutheraneren", 1917—; 
Teacher of Norwegian, Luther College, 1917- 
1918; Author. 




George Markhis, 1892-1906. A. B., Lutlier Col- 
lege, 1885; Reporter for "Minneapolis Tribune", 
1885-1887; Business Manager, "Amerika", 1887-1892; 
Clerk of Probate Court, Chicago; Teacher of Eng- 
lish, History, Religion, and Geography, Luther Col- 
lege, 1892-1896, Physiology, 1892-189.3,"Z()ology, 1893- 
1895; Professor of Engli"sh, United States Ilistory, 
and Religion, 1896-1906, Geography, 1896-1900, Elo- 
cution, 1898-1906; Violin and Pipe Organ Manufac- 
turer, and Real Estate, St. Paul, Minn., 1907—. 



FACULTY 



111 





Martin M. Mikkelson, 1913-1917. Graduated from 
tlie Normal Department of Luther College, 1879; 
Teacher of Common School, 1880-1887, and Paro- 
chial School, 1880-1890, Roche-a-Cree, Wis.; Farmer, 
1883-1913, Manager of Farmers' Store, 1903-1907^ 
Postmaster, 1904-1907, Insurance, 1908-1911, Arkdale, 
Wis.; Assistant Teacher of Norwegian,, English 
Grammar, U. S. History, Civics, Geography, Com- 
mercial Law, etc., Luther College (Preparatory De- 
partment), 1913-1917; Teacher, Augustana College 
and Normal School, 1918-1920. 



Leonard Alton Moe. 1920 — . A. B., Luther Col- 
lege, 1912; Teacher, Gale College, 1912-1916; Prin- 
cipal, Consolidated School, Manvel, N. Dak., 1916- 
1917; Superintendent of Schools, Hillsboro, N. Dak., 
1917-1918, Park River, N. Dak., 1918-1920; Principal 
of the Preparatory Department, and Teacher of 
Latin and Mathematics, Luther College, 1920 — . 



fRAGNAR Marcus Julius Monrad, 1883-1888. 
Graduated, Nissen's Latin School, Christiania, Nor- 
way, 1872, A. B.; Tutor, two years; Student, Uni- 
versity of Christiania, 1876; one .year in Italy and 
at University of Bonn, Germany; A. M., Univer- 
sity of Christiania, 1883; Professor of Latin, His- 
tory, and Norwegian, Luther College, 188.3-1888, 
German, 1884-1885, 1886-1888; in Norway, 1888-1889; 
Asst. Editor, "Skandinaven", Chicago, 1889-1897 (or 
later), "Decorah-Posten", 1897 (or later)-1903. 



fCHRisTEN Andreas Naeseth, 1882-1921. A. 
B., Luther College, 1874; Cand. Theol., Con- 
cordia Seminary, 1877; Student, University of 
Christiania, 1877-1878; Lutheran Pastor, Lu- 
verne, Minn., 1878-1882; Professor of English, 
Luther College, 1882-1909, Greek, 1882-1883, Re- 
ligion, 1882-1893, 1894-1911, Mathematics, 1883- 
1887, Norwegian, 1886-1890, Historv (English), 
1887-1888, 1891-1903, German, 1893-1894; A. M., 
Luther College, 1883; on leave, Cornell and 
Johns Hopkins Universities, 1884-1885; Treas- 
urer, Iowa District, Norwegian Svnod, 1886- 
1895; Librarian, Luther College, 1887-1920; Sec- 
retary, Board of Trustees, Luther College, 1893- 

1899, 1902-1914; Treasurer, Luther College, 1895-1915; College Librarian 

Emeritus, 1920-1921; died February 17, 1921. 





112 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 




Ulhik William Koren Naeseth, 1908-1909. 
A. B., Luther Collcpe, 1908; Teacher of English, 
Latin, History, Luther College, 1908-1909, also 
Assistant Librarian; Cand. Theol., Luther Sem- 
inary, 1912; Lutiieran Pastor, Rochester, Minn., 
1912-191.3, Orfordville, Wis., 1913-1914; Student 
Columbia University, 1914-1915, A. M., 1915; 
Pastor, Rochester, Minn., 1915 — . 




fCoRNELius Narvesen, 1873-1884. Graduate, Nor- 
mal Department, Luther College, 1867, and Winona 
(Minn.) Normal School, 1870; Teacher, Parochial 
School, Spring Grove, Minn., 1870-1873; Teacher of 
Mathematics and Sciences, Luther College, 1873-1877, 
U. S. History, 1873-1874, English, 1874-1876, Profes- 
sor of Mathematics and Sciences, 1877-1884; Treas- 
urer, Iowa District, Norwegian Synod, 1883-1884; 
died July 24, 1884. 




David Theodore Nelson, 1921 — . A. B., Luther 
College, 1912; Principal, Hannaford Public Schools, 
\. Dak., 1912-1913; Rhodes Scholar, Oxford Univer- 
sity, 1914-1917, A. B., 1920; Relief Worker, Belgium 
;ind Northern France, 1914-1915; Ambulance Worker. 
France, 1916; Lieutenant, American Army, U. S. and 
France, 1917-1919; Captain, U. S. Reserves, 1919—; 
Banking, New York City, 1919-1921; Teacher of 
English and Latin, Luther College, 1921 — . 




Olaf Nelson, 1918-1919. A. B., Luther College, 
1918; Teacher of Biology and (jeometry, Luther Col- 
lege, 1918-1919; Superintendent of Schools, Silva and 
Webster, N. Dak., 1919-1920; Banking, Portland, 
N. Dak., 1921 — ; Superintendent of Schools, Edmore, 
N. Dak., 1921—; Student, University of South Da- 
kota, summer 1922. 



FACULTY 



113 



Jens Anderson Ness, 1893-1894. A. B., l-utlier 
College, 1884; Student, University of Minnesota, 
1884-1885, Johns Hopkins University, 1885-1887; 
Teacher of Latin and Greek, St. Olaf College, 1888- 
1891; Teacher of Greek, University of S mth Dakota, 
1891-1892; Teacher of Scandinavian, University of 
Minnesota, 1892-1893; Teacher of Latin and English, 
Luther College, 1893-1894; Student of Comparative 
Philologv, Johns Hopkins University, 1894-1897, Fel- 
low in Sanskrit, 1896-1898, Fellow by Courtesy, 1898- 
1903, Teacher of Sanskrit, Lithuanian, etc!, 1899- 
1903, Ph. D., 1901; Teacher of Sanskrit, University 
of Chicago, 1900; Teacher of Latin and French, 
Goucher College, 1903-1904; Professor of Latin (and 
Norwegian), Wittenberg College, 1904 — . 

Olaf Morgan Norlie, 1919 — . Rural Teacher, 
Norwav, S. Dak., 1896; B. S., M. Accts., Dixon 
College, 1897; A. B., St. Olaf College, 1898, and 
Teacher, 1897-1898; Teacher, Humboldt College, 
1898-1899, Milwaukee State Normal School, 1899 
(graduate); attended Wisconsin Institute Con- 
ductors' Institute, 1900-1903; Teacher, La Crosse 
(Wis.) High School, 1900; A. M., University 
of Wisconsin, 1901; Teacher, Stoughton (Wis.) 
High School, 1901-1903, Supt. Rushford (Minn.) 
Schools, 1903-1904; Teacher of English, United 
Church Seminary, St. Paul, and Student of 
Theology, 1904-1907, Cand. Theol., 1907; Stu- 
dent, LTniversity of Minnesota, 1904-1905, 1907- 
1908, Ph. D., 1908; Teacher of Parochial School, at intervals; Lutheran 
Pastor, Atwater, Minn., 1907-1915; Pd. D., Dixon College, 1910; S. T. D., 
Augustana College (111.), 1915; Book Editor, Reference Librarian, Director 
of Norwegian Lutheran Information Bureau. Augsburg Publishing House, 
Minneapolis, 1915-1919, Director of School Survey, 1917-1918, and Teach- 
ers' Agency, 1917-1919; Litt. D., Wittenberg College, 1917, Secretary, 
Educational Association of the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America, 
1918-1920; Student of Psychology, University of Minnesota, 1918-1919; 
Professor of Psychologv' and Sociology, Luther College, 1919 — , also He- 
brew, Christianity, and Education, 1919 — ; President, American Lutheran 
Statistical Association, 1917 — ; Chairman of Statistical Committee ot 
National Lutheran Council, 1919 — , and Librarian of its Lutheran Bureau, 
New York City, 1920 — ; Editor and Author of many Works, Joint Editor 
"Christian Keyser Preus'', 1921-1922; Member of many Committees and 
Educational and Learned Associations. 

Peter Rudolf Oscar Olsen, 1883-1885. A. B., 
Skien High School, Norway, 1873; A. M., Uni- 
versity of Christiania, where he studied 1874- 
1882, 'and 1886; Teacher, Porsgrund, Norway, 
1882-1883; Teacher of Greek, Norwegian, and 
History, Luther College, 1883-1885, and Ger- 
man, 1884-1885; Cand. Theol., University of 
Christiania, 1886; Lutheran Pastor, Flekkefjord, 
Norway, 1886-1889; Arendal, Minn., 1889-1893; 
Teacher, Lutheran Normal School, Madison, 
Minn., 1893-1897; Pastor, 0rlandet, Norway, 
1904-1913, Elverum, Norway, 1913-1914, where 
Dean of S. 0sterdalen County School (?), 1914—. 





lU 



LITHKK COLLEGE THROUGH SLVTY YEARS 




Zakarias J. OiujAL, 1898-1899. A. B., Luther 
College, 1898; Teacher of Latin, Norwegian, and 
Gymnastics, Luther College, 1898-1899; Cand. 
Theol., Luther Seminary, 1902; Lutheran Pas- 
tor, Luverne, Minn., 1902-1903; Assistant Man- 
ager, Lutheran Publishing House, Decorah, 
Iowa, 1903-190.5; Pastor, Waterville, Iowa, 1905- 
1908; President, Lutheran Normal School, Sioux 
Falls, S. Dak., and Member of Board of Educa- 
tion, Norwegian Synod, 1908-1917; Editor 
"Kirketidende", 1905, "Folkekalender", 1906- 
1907, "Skoleblad", 1911-1914; Pastor, River Falls, 
Wis., 1917—. 



Melvinus Sylvestkh Orwoll, 1907-1908. Student 
Assistant in Latin and Greek, Luther College, 1904- 
1906; A. B., Luther College, 1906; Theological Stu- 
dent, Luther Seminary, 1906-1907; Teacher of Greek 
and Mathematics, Luther College, 1907-1908; Ab- 
stracter of Title, 1909-1917, and Banker, 1917—, 
Granite Falls, Minn. 



Oswald Benjamin Overn, 1912-1919. A. B., Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, 1912; Teacher of Physics and 
Mathematics, 1912-1916, Professor, 1916-1919; on 
leave. University of Iowa, 1917-1918, M. S., 1918; 
Teacher, Luther Institute, Chicago, and Student, Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1919-1920; Professor of Physics 
and Mathematics, Concordia College, St. Paul, Minn., 
1920 — ; Student, University of Chicago, summer, 
1922. 




fEMiL Johan Petersen, 1882 (March)-1887 
(March). A. B., Concordia College, Ft. Wayne, 
Ind., 1875; Cand. Thool., Concordia Seminary, 
1878; Student, University of Copenhagen, 1878; 
Lutheran Pastor, Kilbaurn City, Wis., 1879- 
1882; Profes.sor of German, Latin, and Religion, 
Luther College, 1882-1887, also taught Stenog- 
raphy; Librarian, Luther College, 1886-1887; 
Seamen's and Emigrant Missionary, Ne%v York, 
1889-1919; Author of Textbook on Shorthand. 



FACULTY 



115 




Enoch Ernest Peterson, 1912 — . A. B., Luther 
College, 1912; Teacher of Latin, Luther College, 
1912-1920, Professor, 1920— Assistant Librarian, 
1916-1921; Student, University of Chicago, summer, 
1918, University of Michigan, summer, 1920; Buhl 
Fellow in Latin, LTniversity of Michigan, 1921 — ; ab- 
sent on leave from Luther College, 1921-1923; Chief 
Editor, "Luther College Semi-Centennial", 1911; M. 
A., LTniversity of Michigan, 1922. 




Francis Edwin Peterson, 1921 — . A. B., Luther 
College, 1909; Teacher, Park Region Luther College, 
1909-1915, 1916-1921, and President, 1917-1921; Stu- 
dent, University of Wisconsin, four summer sessions 
and 1915-1916, A. M., 1916; Teacher of German and 
Latin, Luther College, 1921 — , and Supervisor of 
Practice Teaching, 1922; Student, Columbia Univer- 
sity, summer, 1922. 




Orlando Warren Qualley, 1918-1922. A. B., Lu- 
ther College, 1918; Teacher of Mathematics, Luther 
College, 1918—, Norwegian and History, 1918-1919, 
Latin, 1919—, and Greek, 1920—, Athletic Coach, 
Preparatory Department, 1919 — ; Student, Univer- 
sity of Michigan, summer, 1920, Columbia Univer- 
sity, summer, 1921; Fellow in Latin, University of 
Michigan, 1922—. 




fOi.A Ramstad, 1884 (Aprll)-1886 (March), 1887- 
1889. A. B., Luther College, 1883; studied Law, 
1883-1884; Teacher of Sciences and Mathematics, 
Luther College, 1884-1886, 1887-1888, and English, 
1884-1885, Professor of Sciences and Mathematics, 
1888-1889; had been elected the first Principal of the 
Preparatory Department shortly before his death, 
June 22, 1889; willed his farm to Luther College 
for the support of Sciences. 



116 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



fLARS Sjurson Reque, 1875-1893, 1897-1916. A. B., 
Luther College, 1868, and Graduate Student, 1868- 
1869; Theological Student, Concordia Seminary, 
1869-1870; Teaching and Travel, 1870-1878, attende'd 
Universities of Christiania and Paris, 1872-1873, and 
taught as Substitute Teacher for Prof. Bergh at 
Luther College, winter, 1870-1871, winter, 1872-1873, 
September, 1873; LL. B., University of Iowa, 1874; 
Teacher of English, St. Olaf College, 1874-1875; 
Professor of English, Luther College, 1875-1893, 
Latin, 1875-1893, 1897-1916, Mathematics, 1875-1877, 
1883-1885, Religion, 1875-1876, German, 1877-1880, 
Greek, 1877-1878, History, 1878-1891, Physical 
Geography, 1885-1887, 1888-1890, Norwegian, 'l887- 
1888, French, 1898 (V)-1916, and Psychology, 1908-1909, except that in 
1881-1882 he studied in France and Italy; A. M., Luther College, 1883; 
Treasurer, Iowa District, Norwegian Synod, 1876-1883; Secretary, Board 
of Trustees, Luther College, 1881-1893, 1899-1902, 1914-1916; Secretary, 
Luther College Faculty, (V)-1916; Democratic Nominee for Congress, 1888; 
U. S. Consul General", Rotterdam, Holland, 1893-1897; Professor, Luther 
College, 1897-1916 (see above). 





Sigurd Styrk Reque, 1906-1908, 1919—. A. B., 
Luther College, 1903; Teacher, Traill Co., N. Dak., 
1903-1904, Gale College, 1904-1905; Theological Stu- 
dent, Luther Seminary, 1905-1906; Teacher of Eng- 
lisii. History, and Civics, Luther College, 1906-1908, 
Gymnastics," 1906-1907, Mathematics, 1907-1908; 
County Superintendent of Schools, Winnesheik Co., 
Iowa, 1909-1913; Teacher, Luther Academy, Albert 
Lea, Minn., 1913-1919, and Principal, 1914-1919; 
Teacher of English, Citizenship, and French, Luther 
College, 1919 — , and Norwegian, 1921 — ; Baseball 
Coach, Preparatory Department, 1920-1921, College 
Department also, 1922 — , in which capacity he also 
assisted 1909-1912. 



Valley, 
Boards 
Author 



Halvard Roalkvam, 1878-1886 (Feb.). A. B., 
Luther College, 1874; Cand. TheoL, Concordia 
Seminary, 1877; Student, University of Chris- 
tiania, 1877-1878; Teacher of Catechetics and 
Didactics, Norwegian, and Religion, Luther 
College, 1878-1886, Vocal Music, 1878-1879, 
Geography, 1881-1882, 1884-1885, History, 1882- 
1886 (Professor, 1881-1886); Joint Editor, "Lu- 
thersk Skoieblad", 1880-1881; Librarian, I-uther 
College, 1881-1886; A. M., Luther College, 1883; 
Trea.surer, Jowa District, Norwegian Synod, 
1884-1885; Lutheran Pastor, Crookston, Minn., 
1886-1889, Fisher, Minn., 1889-1892; Principal, 
Grand Forks College, 1891-1893; Pastor, Coon 

Wis., 1893-1910, North Prairie, Minn., 1910-1916; Member of many 
and Committees in the United Norwegian Lutheran Church; 

; Pastor Emeritus, Coon Valley, Wis., 1916 — -. 




FACULTY 



117 




Adolph Marius Rovelstad, 1907 — . A. B., St. Olaf 
College, 1903; Principal of High School, Glenwood, 
Minn., 1903-1905; A. M., University of Michigan, 
1906, Fellow in Latin, 1906-1907; Professor of Greeii, 
Luther College, 1907-1911, Latin, 1907—, War Geog- 
rapliy, 1918; Student, University of Michigan, sum- 
mer," 1911, 1914.-1915 (on leave)", summers, 1918 and 
1920; Special Classical Cruise along the Mediter- 
ranean, summer, 1912; Ph D., L^niversity tif Michi- 
gan, 1921; Chairman, Reading Circle Committee, 
Classical Association of the Middle West and South, 
1922—. 



George Alfred Taylor Rygh, 1883 (March- 
June). A. B., Luther College, 1881; Theolog- 
ical Student, Capital University, 1881-1882, 
1883-1884 (Cand. Theol., 1884), Luther Semi- 
nary, 1882-1883; Teacher of English and Greek, 
Luther College, 1883; Lutheran Pastor, Port- 
land, Maine, 1884-1889; Teacher, Wittenberg 
(Wis.) Academy, 1889-1890; Pastor, Grand 
Forks, N. Dak., 'l890-1891 ; Teacher of History, 
English, Scandinavian Literature, and Political 
Science, University of North Dakota, 1891-1895; 
Principal, Mt. Horeb (Wis.) Academy, and 
Pastor, 1895-1898; Pastor, Chicago, 111.*, 1899- 
1910; Editor, "United Lutheran", 1909-1914; 
Professor of History and Religion, St. Olaf College, 1910-1913; Assistant 
Editor, "American Lutheran Survey", 1914—; Litt. D., Newberry College, 
1917; Lutiieran Relief Commissioner to Baltic States, 1919-1920; Pastor, 
Minneapolis, Minn., 1921 — ; Author. 




Bertinius K. Sa(e)vhe (1894-1895), 1900-1901, 
1912-1918. Student Assistant in Arithmetic, Luther 
College, 1894-1895, A. B., 1896; Tlieological Student, 
Luther Seminary, 1896; Teacher, Park Region Lu- 
ther College, 1897; Student, Valparaiso University, 
1897-1899, B. S. in Engineering, 1899; Teacher of 
Latin, English and Mathematics, Luther College, 
1900-1901; Principal, Clifton (Tex.) Lutheran Col- 
lege, 1901-1904; Teacher, Glenwood (Minn.) Acad- 
emy, 1904-1905, and Principal, 1905-1907; Teacher, 
Minnesota State Summer School, 1906; Principal, 
Grand Forks College, 1907-1909; Publisher and Edi- 
tor, "Glenwood Herald", 1909-1912, 1918—; Profes- 
sor of Mathematics and Latin, Luther College, 1912- 
1918, Treasurer, 1915-1918. 



fANTOx B. Sai^der, 1878-1879. A. B., Luther Col- 
lege, 1874; Ph. D., Yale University, 1877 (the first 
graduate of Luther College to obtain the Ph. D. 
degree) ; Teacher of Latin, Greek, Hebrew, and Ger- 
man, Luther College, 1878-1879; Teacher, Flushing, 
N. Y., 1879-1881. 



118 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Frikdhich AicrsT Schmidt. 1861-1872 (Jan- 
uary 1). A. 1$., Concordia CoHejie, Altenberg, 
Mo., ]85t-; Cand. Theol., Concordia Seminary, 
18.57; Lutlieran Pastor, Eden, N. Y., 1857-1859, 
Baltimore, Md., 18.59-18til; Professor of Greek, 
Lutlier College, 1861-1871, Latin, 1861-1863, 1864- 
1867, 1869-1870, German, 1861-1863, 1864-1866, 
1869-1871, Mathematics, 1861-1867, 1868-1869, 
English, 1861-1869, 1870-1871, Penmanship, 1861- 
1863, Singing, 1861-1865, Geography, 1861-1863, 
1867-1869, Religion, 1863-1871, U." S. History, 
1866-1868, and Logic, 1869-1871; Editor, "Lu- 
theran Watchman", 1866-1867; Professor of 
Theologv, Concordia Seminary, 1872-1876, Lu- 
ther Seminary, 1876-1886; Editor, '"'Altes und Neues", 1880-1885, "Lutherske 
Vidnesbyrd-'," 1882-1890; D. D., Capital University, 1883; Professor of 
Theologv, Xorthfield (Minn.) Seminary, 1886-1890, Augsburg Seminary, 
1890-1893; Joint Editor, "Luthersk Kirkeblad", 1890-1895; Professor of 
Dogmatics, ITnited Church Seminary, St. Paul, 1893-1912, Professor Em- 
eritus, 1912 — ; Author. ' 





Heinrich Julius Makfred Alexaxpfr Seippel, 
1873-1874. A. B., Christiansand Latin School, Nor- 
wny, 1868; A. M., University of Christiania, 1873; 
Professor of Latin and Greek, Luther College, 1873- 
1874; Assistant Librarian, University of Christiania, 
1875-1882, 1885-1886; Student, University of Leip- 
zig, 1882-1884 (Ph. D.'/); Professor of Semitic Lan- 
guages (Arabic, Hebrew, Syriac), Persian, Univer- 
sity of Christiania, 1886 — ; Knight of the Order of 
St. Olav; Author. 




Herman William Sheel, 1889 — . Attended Lu- 
ther College, 1874-1875; B. S., Northern Indiana 
Normal School, 1885; Teacher, Willmar (Minn.) Sem- 
inary, 1885-1889; Principal of the Preparatory De- 
partment, Luther College, 1889-1891, 1896-1911, and 
Teacher (Professor since 1896) of Chemistry, 1889- 
1890, 1891-1902, 1901.—, Geography, 1889-1890,' Mathe- 
matics, 1889-1914, 1915-1916, " 1918-1920, 1921—, 
Physiology, 1889-1896, 1918, Zoology, 1889-1890, 
Physics and Physical Geography, 1889-1911, 1918, 
General Science, 1918-1919, and "Surveying, 1918—; 
Curator of the Luther College Museum, 1904-1911; 
on leave, 1911-1912. 



FACULTY 



119 




fLYUER SiEWERS, 1863 (Nov.)-1877. A. B., 1850, 
and A. M., 1852, University of Christiania; Teacher, 
Ciiristiania, Norway, 1852-1861; Student in Germany, 
1861-1863; Teacher (Professor, 1864 — ) of German 
and Greek, Luther College, 1863-1877, Latin, 1863- 
1867, Geography, 1863-1867, 1868-1876, Penmanship 
("Caligraphy"), 1863-1865, 1867-1877, Norwegian, 
1864-1877, Mathematics, 1864-1870, Natural History, 
1866-1873, 1875-1877, History, 1868-1869, 1870-1871; 
Joint Editor, "For Hjemmet", 1870-1876; Editor, 
"Decorah-Posten', 1877-1907 (Chief Editor till some 
time in the '90's). 



William Paul Sihler. 1890 — . A. B., Concordia 
College, Ft Wayne, Ind., 1883; Cand. Theol., Con- 
cordia Seminary, 1886; Parochial School Teacher, Ft. 
Wayne, Ind., 1886-1887; A. M., University of Wis- 
consin, 1888; Teacher, Dr. Sachs' Collegiate Insti- 
tute, New York City, 1888-1889; Student, Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1889-1890; Teacher (Professor of 
German since 1896) of Geography, I-uther College, 
1890-1892, 1897-1905, Gymnastics, 1890-1893, History, 
1890-1892, 1913-191.5, 1916-1917, Latin, 1890-1891, 
Vocal Music, 1890-1894, Penmanship, 1890-1893, 
Physical Geography, 1890-1891, Religion, 1890-1891, 
1893-1894, 1922—, English, 1891-1892, German, 
1892—, Greek, 1892-191.3, 1919— , Zoology and Physi- 
ology, 1892-1900, Drawing, 1906-1907, and French, 1917-1919; Author, 




Carlo Alberto Sperati (1885-1888), 1905 
(March) — . Pilot's Examination, Navigation 
School, Christiania, Norway, 1882; Instructor 
in Vocal Music, Luther College, 1885-1888, A. 
B., 1888; Cand. Theol., Luther Seminary, 1891; 
Parochial School Teaclier; Lutheran Pastor, 
Whatcom (now Bellingham), Wash., 1891-1894, 
Tacoma, Wash., 1895-1905; Teacher of Music, 
Pacific Lutheran Academy, Parkland, Wash., 
1894-1895; Director, "Pacifickystens Norske San- 
gerforbund", 1903-1915, also various other mu- 
sical organizations; Musical Director, Luther 
College, 1905 — , also teaching Christianity; Di- 
rector, Decorah Choral Union, 1905 — , Choral 
Union of the Norwegian Synod, and of the Norwegian Lutheran Church 
of America, ■ — ; managed eleven extensive tours of the Luther Col- 
lege Concert Band, including five to the Pacific Coast, and the Nor- 
way Tour of 1914; decorated by the Student Singers' Association of Nor- 
way, 1914. 




120 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 




Carl Waltuer Strom, 1919 — . Second Lieutenant 
Inf., U. S. Army, 1918; Teacher of Military Drill, 
S. A. T. C, Yankton College, 1918; Student A'ssistant 
in Greek, Luther College, 1919, A. B., 1919; Teacher 
of Military Drill (Preparatory Department), Greek 
and Mathematics, Luther College, 1919 — ; Student, 
University of Iowa, summers 1920-1922; Assistant 
Registrar, Luther College, 1920 — , Secretary of the 
Luther College Faculty, 1921—. 



Hans Gerhard Stub. 1896-1900. A. B., Lu- 
ther College, 18G(); A. B., Concordia College, 
Fort Wayne, Ind., 1869; Cand. Theol., Concordia 
Seminary, St. Louis, Mo., 1872; Lutheran Pas- 
tor, Minneapolis, Minn., 1872-1878; Secretary, 
Minnesota District, Norwegian Synod, 1876- 
1878; Professor of Systematic Theology, Luther 
Seminary, Madison, Wis., and Robbinsdale, 
Minn., 1878-1896; Student at the University of 
Leipzig, 1881-1882; Joint Editor, "Ev. Luth. 
Kirketidende", 1889-1894, Chief Editor,. 1894- 
1896, Sole Editor, 1896-1898, Joint Editor, 1899- 
1902; Pastor, Dccorah, Iowa, 1896-1900, and 
Lecturer on Religion, Luther College, 1898-1900, 
College Pastor; Editor, "Theologisk Tidsskrift", 1899-1908; Profes.sor of 
Theology, Luther Seminary (Hamline, St. Paul, Minn.), 1900-1917; D. D., 
Concordia Seminary, 1903; Vice-President, Norwegian Synrxi, 1905-1911, 
President, 1911-1917, and President, Norwegian Lutheran Church of Amer- 
ica, 1917 — ; Knight of the First Class of the Order of St. Olav, 1908, and 
Commander, 1912; raised endowment fund of .$2.50,000 for Luther College, 
1910-1911; President, National Lutheran Council, 1918-1920; Member of 
many Committees and Boards; Ex-Officio President of Board of Educa- 
tion, and Beard of Visitors (Church Council), Luther College, 1911 — ; 
LL. D., Capital University, 1922; Author. 





Bjarnk Svan0e, 1909-1911. A. B., Stavanger Latin 
School, 1902; A. M., University of Christiania, 1908; 
Student, University of Chicago, 1909; Teacher of 
History, Norwegian, and Gymnastics, Luther Col- 
lege, 1909-1911; Traveling Agent, Norwegian-Amer- 
ican Mindegave Committee, 1911-1914; Farmer, Svan- 
0en, Norway, 1914 — . 



FACULTY 



121 




Hans Fred Swansen, 1918-1920. A. B., Luther 
College, 1914; Teacher, Luther Academy, Albert Lea, 
Minn., 1914-1918; Student, Harvard University, sum- 
mer, 1917; Teacher of English, Luther College, 1918- 
1920, and Military Drill, 1918, Assistant Principal 
of the Preparatory Department, 1918-1919, and Prin- 
cipal, 1919-1920; Student, University of Chicago, sum- 
mer, 1920; President, Gale College, GalesvlUe, Wis., 
1920—. 




Henry Oscar Tali.e, 1921—. A. B., Lutiier Col- 
lege, 1917; Student, University of Minnesota, sum- 
mers, 1916 and 1919; Superintendent of Schools, 
Rolette, N. Dak., 1917; in U. S. Navy, 1917-1919, 
Ensign, 1918; Teacher, Rugby High School, N. Dak., 
1919; Superintendent of Schools, Rolette, N. Dak., 
1919-1920; Teacher, Luther Academy, Albert Lea, 
Minn., 1920-1921; Student, Boston University, and 
Emerson College of Oratory, summer, 1921 ; Teacher 
of Ec:)n imics, Public Speaking, Geography, and 
Latin, Luther College, 1921 — ; Student, University 
of Chicago, and Columbia College of Expression, 
summer, 1922. 




Aslak K. Teisberg, 1874-1875. A. B., Luther Col- 
lege, 1870; Teacher of Mathematics, English, German, 
and U. S. History, Luther College, 1874-1875; Teach- 
er, St. Olaf College, 1875-1880; Editor, "Fergus Falls 
Ugeblad", 1883-1^85; Assistant Secretary, Minne- 
sota Railway and Warehouse Commission, 1885, and 
later Secretary, till 1901 ; U. S. Customs Appraiser, 
St. Paul, Minn., 1901—. 




Theodore Elmer Thompson, 1908-1918. A. B., 
Luther College, 1904; Teacher, Willmar (Minn.) Sem- 
inary, 1904-190G; Principal, Bruflat Academy, Port- 
land", N. Dak., 190G-1908; Teacher (Professor, 1916) 
of English, Luther College, 1908-1918, and Latin, 
1908-1912; A. M., University of Chicago, 1914; High 
School Teacher, Chicago, 1918 — . 



122 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 




fKNUD Thhondsek (Lommen), 1868, 1869, 1870. 
Graduate, Asker Seminary, Norway, 1848; Teacher 
in Norway; Assistant Editor, "Emigranten'' (Madi- 
son, Wis.), 1861.-1866, and "Sivandinaven" (Chicago), 
1866; Teacher (Substitute) of Religion and German 
(and Latin?), Luther College, spring of 1868, Oc- 
tober, 1868, and winter of 1869-1870; Editor, "For 
Hjemmet", 1876-1887; frequent Contributor to "De- 
corah-Posten" and "Ev. Luthersk Kirketidende"; 
Author. 




Joh(a)n Olsen Tingelstad (1883-1885), 1886 
(March)-1887. Instructor in Vocal Music, Lu- 
ther College, 1883-1885, A. B., 1885; Public 
School Teacher, 1885-1886; Teacher of Mathe- 
matics and Sciences, Luther College, March, 
1886-1887; Student, Valparaiso University, 1886; 
Theological Student, Concordia Seminary, 1887- 
1S88; Teacher, Concordia (Mo.) Progvmnasium, 
March-June, 1888; Theol. Student, Liither Sem- 
inary, 1888-1890, Cand. Theol., 1890; A. M., Lu- 
ther College, 1890; Lutheran Pastor, Portland, 
N. Dak., 1890-1900, and Principal, Bruflat Acad- 
emy; Professor of German, L'nivcrsity of North 
Dakota, 1900-1908, and Scandinavian, 1900—. 



Oscar Adolf Tingelstad, 1909 — . A. B., Lu- 
ther College, 1905; Cand. Theol., Luther Semi- 
narv, 1907; Lutheran Pastor, Ballard (Seattle), 
Wash., 1907-1909; Teacher, Luther College, 1909- 
1910, studying, I'niverslty of Chicago, in the 
fall, and teaching at Luther College (Greek 
Testament, Latin, Civics) after Christmas; Pro- 
fessor of Psychology and Education, 1910 — , 
also teaching" Christianity, 1910-1916, 1921-1922, 
LI. S. Llistorv, Civics, and Arithmetic, 1910-1911, 
Latin, 1910-1912, 1919-1921, and French, 1916- 
1917; on leave, 1912-1913, and second semester, 
1922, at University of Ciiicago, where he also 
studied summers, "l910, 1912, 1913, 1915, 1916, 

1918, 1920, and winter, 1914, A. M., 1913, Fellow in Education, 1913-1914; 
Acting Princi})al, Luther College Preparatory Department, 1911-1912, 1917- 

1919, and College Registrar, 1914 — ; .Joint Editor, "Norgesfaerden", 1914, 
"Christian Kevser Preus", 1921-1922; Secretary, Young Peo])le's Luther 
League, 1917-1922. 




FACULTY 



123 






Isaac Bertinus Torrison, 1901—. A. B., Lu- 
ther College, 1879; Student, Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1879-1880; Cand. Theol., Concordia 
Seminary, 1883; Lutheran Pastor, Waco, Texas, 
1885-1889, Chicago, 111., 1888-1898, Decorah, 
Iowa, and College Pastor, Luther College, 1901—, 
also Teacher of Religion at Luther College, 1902- 
1912. 



Meeriam Hartwick Trytten, 1917-1918, 1919-1920, 
1921—. A. B., Luther College, 1916; Student, Wi- 
nona (Minn.) State Normal School, 1916; Superin- 
tendent of Schools, Starkweather, N. Dak., 1916-1917; 
Assistant Principal of the Preparatory Department, 
and Teacher of Mathematics, Physics, General 
Science, Public Speaking, and Civics, Luther College, 
1917-1918 (April); in U. S. Army (in France), 1918- 
1919; Student, University of Poitiers, 1919; Teacher 
of Physics and Biology, Luther College, 1919-1920; 
American-Scandinavian Foundation Scholar, Univer- 
sity of Christiania, 1920-1921 ; Teacher of Physics, 
Biology, and Mathematics, Luther College, 1921 — ; 
Correspondence Study, LIniversity of Chicago, 1921- 
1922; Student, University of Iowa, summer, 1922. 



Carl Tvssen, 1914 (January-May). A. B., Luther 
College, 1906; Public School Teacher, 1900-1902; 
Teacher, Willmar (Minn.) Seminary, 1906-1907, Lu- 
ther Academy, Albert Lea, Minn., 1907-1911; Prin- 
cipal of High School, Roland, Iowa, 1911-1912; Stu- 
dent, University of Wisconsin, 1912-1913, A. M., 
1913; Teacher of Latin, Luther College, 1914 (Jan- 
uary-May) ; Principal, Clifton Lutheran College, 
Clifton, Texas, 1914—. 




George J. Ulvilden, 1918 (April-June). A. B., 
Luther College, 1916; Student Assistant, Lutheran 
Normal School, Sioux Falls S. Dak., 1911-1912; 
Teacher, Lutheran Normal School, 1916-1917; The- 
ological Student, Luther Seminary, 1917-1918, 1918- 
1920; Assistant Principal of the Preparatory De- 
partment, and Teacher of Mathematics and Civics, 
Luther College, April-June, 1918; Cand. Theol., Lu- 
ther Theological Seminary, 1920; Lutheran Pastor, 
Toronto, S. Dak., 1920—. 



124 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 




ToRVALD Vaaler, 1920-1921. A. B., Luther Col- 
lege, 1919; Principal of high school, Calmar, Iowa, 
1919-1920; Student, U^nlversity of Iowa, summer, 
1920; Teacher of German, Norwegian, and English, 
Luther College, 1920-1921, also Graduate Study; 
Medical Student, University of Minnesota, 1921 — . 




Andrew A. Vkrlkn, 1877-1881. A. B., Carleton 
College, 1877; Teacher of English and Penmanship, 
Luther College, 1877-1881, Latin, 1877-1878, Mathe- 
matics, 1878-1881, Physiology, 1879-1S81, Theory and 
Practice of Teaching, 1879-1880, U. S. History,' 1880- 
1881; A. M., Carleton College, 1880; Student, Johns 
Hopkins University, 1881-1883; Tcaclier of Mathe- 
matics, Carleton College, 1883; Instructor in Mathe- 
matics, University of Iowa, 1883-188f), Professor of 
Physics, 1886-1905; Editor, "Valdris Helsing', 1906- 
1910, "Samhand", 1910-1917; Lecturer and Author. 




Johannes Waage, 1918 (Sept.-N'ov ). A. B., Lu- 
ther College, 1918; Teacher of Norse and Mathe- 
matics, 1918 (Sept. Nov.); resigned on account of 
failing health; at sanatoriums in Minnesota, 1919 — . 




Casper Ingram Wom.an, 1912 (Jan. -June). A. B., 
Luther College, 1911; Teacher of Mathematics and 
History, Lutiier College, 1912, and at Lutlior Acad- 
emy, ^Mhert Lea, Minn., 1912-1919; Merchmt, Glen- 
wood, Minn., 1919—, 



FACULTY 



U^ 




fJoHAN Thorbj0rn Ylvisakcr, 1889 1890 
(Nov.). A. B., Luther College, I87T; Cand. 
Theol., Concordia Seminary, ISSJ ; Lutheran 
Pastor, Albert Lea, Minn., 1881-1889, Decorah, 
Iowa, 1889-1890; Teacher of Religion, Luther 
College, 1889-1890 (Nov. 30) ; Author of a Mono- 
graph on Luther College. 



Sigurd Christian Ylvisaker, 1911 (,Tan.)- 
1919. A. B., Luther College, 1903; Student, Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, 1903-1904; Cand. Theol., 
Luther Seminary, 1907; Ph. D., University of 
Leipzig, 1910; Lutheran Pastor, Minot, N. Dak., 
1910-1911, Chicago, 111., 1914; Professor of He- 
brew, Greek, and Christianity, Luther College, 
1911 (Jan.)-1919, Ancient History, 1911-1913, 
Military Law, 1918, and Military Drill, 1918- 
1919; Fort Sheridan (111.) Officers' Training 
Camp, S. A. T. C, 1918; Professor of Greek and 
Hebrew, Concordia College, St. Paul, Minn., 
1919—; Author. 



PROFESSIONAL DATA— SPECIAL INSTRUCTORS 
AND OFFICIALS 



Theresse Eleanor Arneson (now Mrs. B. J. Hov- 
de), 1917-1921. Attended Prairie du Chien Sani- 
tarium, Wis., 1911-1913, Registered Nurse, 1913, 
Superintendent of Nurses, 1914; Matron, Aase Hau- 
gen Home, Decorah, Iowa, 191.5; Superintendent, 
City Hospital, Decorah, low^a, 1919; College Nurse, 
Luther College, 1917-1921; officially so designated, 
1919-1921. 




Ole Boe (Nagelsaker), 1907-1909. Student, Ha- 
mar Middle School, Norway, 1893-1894, and Hamar 
Seminarv, 1894-1897 (Graduate); Teacher in Nor- 
way, 1898-1902; D. D. S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery, 1907; Instructor in Gymnastics, Luther 
College, 1907-1909; Dentist, Decorah, Iowa, 1907—. 



126 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 




Christian Brandt, 1876 (Sept. -Dec.) Cadet, Royal 
Military Academy, Christiania, Norway, 1872-1874; 
Commissioned 2nd Lieutenant, 1874; in Norwegian 
Array, 1874-1884; studied Civil Engineering, Aix-la- 
Chapelle, Germany, 1875-1876; Special Instructor in 
Gymnastics and Military Drill, Luther College, 1876 
(Sept.-Dec.) ; City Editor, "Skandinaven", Chicago, 
1876-1878; Asst. Editor, "Fyedrelandet og Emigran- 
ten". La Crosse, Wis., 1878-1880; Editor and Pub- 
lisher, "Red River Posten", Fargo, N. Dak., 1880- 
1881, "Nordvesten", St. Paul, Minn., 1881-1887, 1897- 
1907; Member, Minnesota National Guard, 1881 — , 
Colonel, 1883-1887, 1889-1907, on Retired List as 
such, 1907 — , Inspector-General (Brigadier-General), 
1887-1889; U. S. Internal Revenue Service, 1887-1897; on Editorial Staff, 
"Minneapolis Tidende", 1895-1897, "Decorah-Posten", Decorah, Iowa, 
1907—. 

Ivan Doseff, 1921 — . B. S., University of Chi- 
cago, 1908; Special Work, Art Institute, Chicago, 
1906-1908; Freshman Team Coach, Chicago, 1909; 
Director of Athletics and Teacher of General Science, 
La Crosse (Wis.) High School, 1910; Social Direc- 
tor, Council and Davis Squares, South Park Play- 
grounds, Chicago, 1911-1913; Athletic Director and 
Teacher of Drawing, Fargo College, 1914; Athletic 
Director and Teacher of General Science, Elgin (111.) 
High School, 1915-1917; Athletic Instructor and 
Teacher of Mathematics, Cornell College, 1918-1919; 
Athletic Director, Iowa State Teachers' College, 1919- 
1921; Physical Director, and Coach of Football, Bas- 
ketball, and Track, Luther College, 1921—. 



Harold Herbert Fisher, 1918-1920 (Feb.). Offi- 
cers' Training Camp, Fort Niagara, N. Y., 1917 (2nd 
Lieut. Infantry) ; Teacher of Military Science, Uni- 
versitv of Nebraska, 1918; Commissioned 1st Lieu- 
tenant, 1918; on duty with 15th Co., 154th Depot 
Brigade, Camp Meade, Md., 1918-1919; Commanding 
Officer, and Teacher of Military Science, S. A. T. C, 
Luther College, 1918-1919, Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics, R. O. T. C, 1919-1920; Coni- 
missioned Captain, and Teacher of Military Science, 
Rockford (III.) High Schools, 1920—. 



IIERBJ0RN N. Gausta, 1887. student, Luther Col- 
lege, 1872-1875; Studied Painting in Europe (Chris- 
tiania and Munich), 1875-1882; Artist, Chicago, 111., 
Madison, Wis., La Crosse, Wis., Decorah, Iowa, 1882- 
1887; Special Instructor in Drawing, Luther College, 
1887; Studied in Italy, Germany, and Norway, 1887- 
1889; Artist, Minneapolis, Minn., 1889—. 






FACULTY 



12i 




Oi.E Glesne, 1917—. A. B., St. Olaf College, 
1895; Cand. Theol., United Church Seminary, 
1898; Lutheran Pastor, Aberdeen, S. Dak., 1898- 
1916, Decorah, Iowa, 1916—; President, South 
Daliota Luther League, 1905-1909; College Pas- 
tor (with Rev. L B. Torrlson), 1917—. 





AixEN Clack Grundy, 1918 (Sept.-Dec). Stu- 
dent, Trinity University, Waxahachie, Texas, 1915- 
1917, Viroqua Military Institute, Lexington. Va., 
1917-1918; Officers' Training Camp, Ft. Sheridan, 111., 
1918 (2nd Lieutenant Infantry); Personnel-Adjutant, 
S. A. T. C, Luther College, 1918 (Sept.-Dec.); B. 
A., Trinity University, 1919; LL. B., University of 
Texas, 1922; with The Grundy Abstract and Title 
Co., Memphis, Texas, 1922 — . 



Gjermund O. Haugen, 1890-1891. Public School 
Teacher, 1887-1891, having attended Decorah (Iowa) 
Institute, 1885-1887; attended Valder Business Col- 
lege, 1890; Instructor, Decorah Institute, 1891-1893, 
and Instructor in Penmanship, Luther College, 1890- 
1891 ; attended Iowa Business College, 1891, Northern 
Indiana Normal, 1893, Cedar Rapids Business Col- 
lege, 1894; Instructor in Commercial Subjects, Lu- 
theran Normal School, Sioux Falls, S. Dak., 1893- 
1895, Stoughton (Wis) Academy, 1899-1900; County 
Superintendent of Schools, Winneshiek Co., Iowa, 
1896-1899; LL. B., University of Wisconsin, 1903; 
Attorney-at-Law, Stoughton, Wis!., 1903-1909, Mad- 
dock, N. Dak., 1909—; Editor, "Maddock Standard", 
1909—. 




Charles Philip Hexom, 1908-1909. Student, Lu- 
ther College, 1899-1902; Student, Art Institute, Chi- 
cago, 1904-1905, Chicago Academy of Fine Arts, 
1905-1906; Special Instructor in Drawing, Luther 
College, 1908-1909; Artist and Merchant, Decorah, 
Iowa, 1909—. 



128 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 




Walter A. Jeweli,, 1919 (Sept.-Nov.). IL. B., 
Universitv of Iowa, 1919; Football Coacli, Luther 
College, l"!)19; Attorney-at-Law, Decorali, Iowa, 1919- 
1921 ; High School Teacher and Athletic Coach, Al- 
lerton, Iowa, 1921-1922; Student, University of Iowa, 
summer, 1922. 





Arthur Laudel^ 1919 (Spring) -1921 (Spring). 
Attended Latham (Mo.) High School, 1902-1905; 
Private Tutor, 1902-1905; Professional Baseball 
Player, Texas League, 1907-1911 (Dallas, 1907-1909, 
Waco, 1909-1911), American League, 1910-1911 (De- 
troit), American Association, 1911-1913 (Minneap- 
olis), Central League, 1912 (Fort Wayne and Cin- 
cinnati, 1912) ; Candv Manufacturer. Decorah, Iowa, 
1917-1922; Baseball Coach, Luther College, 1919, 1920, 
and 1921; in Business, Fort Wayne, Ind., 1922 — . 



Ralph A. Movold, 1920 (Nov.)-1921. In U. S. 
Armv, Camp Dodge, 1917-1919; B. S., North Dakota 
Agricultural College, 1920, Basketball Coach, 1920- 
1921; Physical Director, and Coach in Basketball 
and Track, Luther College, 1920 (Nov.)-1921. 




Alvin Julius Natvig, 1919 (Dcc.)-1920 (March). 
A. B., Luther College, 1918; Ba.skcti>all Coach and 
Teacher of Norwegian and Latin, Luther College, 
December, 1919-March, 1920; Teacher, Park Region 
Luther College, 1921—. 



Robert P. Nelson, 1919 (Feb.-June). Sergeant, 
U. S. Army; Assistant Instructor in Military Science 
and Tactics, R. O. T. C, Luther College, 19*19. 



FACULTY 



129 




fTnoMAS NiLSSoN, 1904-1905. A. B., Luther 
College, 1889; Theological Student, Wauwatosa, 
Wis., 1889-1891, Luther Seminary, 1891-1892, 
Cand. Theol., 1892; Lutheran Pastor, Chicago, 
III., 1892-1897, St. Paul, Minn., 1897-1904., Ridge- 
way, Iowa, 1904-1913; Instructor in Norwegian, 
Luther College, 1904-1905, Member, Board of 
Trustees, 1905-1908; Editor, "B0rneblad", 1909- 
1913, "Ev. Luth. Kirketidende", 1913-1917. 




Olivia Petehsox, 1915-1917. Registered Nurse, 
Graduate, St. Paul (Minn.) Hospital; Decorah City 
Hospital, also serving Luther College, 1915-1917; in 
Red Cross Work with American Army during the 
World War; County Nurse, Pope Co., Minn., 1919- 
1921; Nurse, St. Paul Hospital, 1921-1922; State 
Health Demonstrator, St. Paul, Minn., 1922 — . 





f Axel Christian Rosenkrantz Smith, 1876-1905. 
A. B. and A. M., University of Christianla, M. D., 
1869; Physician, Decorah, Iowa, 1873-1906; College 
Physician, Luther College, 1876-1905; retired, Scan- 
dinavia, Wis., and Decorah, Iowa, 1906-1917. 



Carsten C. Smith, 1905-1906. Student, Luther 
College, 1892-1897; M. D., Northwestern Universitv, 
1903; College Physician, Luther College, 1905-1906; 
Physician, Merrill, Wis., 1903-1904, Decorah, Iowa, 
1904-1906, Scandinavia, Wis., 1906-1918, Carson Lake, 
Minn., 1918—, 



Oscar M. Solem, 1920 (Sept.-Dec). A. B., (?), 
Universitv of Minnesota, (?), LL. B., (?); Captain, 
U. S. Army, 1918-1919; Football Coach, — , Luther 
College, 1920; Athletic Director, Drake University, 
1921—. 



13U 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 




Ola Axdreas Solheim, 1881-1882. A. li., Luther 
College, 1881; Special Instructor in Vocal Music, 
and Director of Band, Luther College, 1881-1882; 
Theological Student, Lutiier Seminary, 1882-1883; 
Teacher, Willmar (Minn.) Seminary, 1883-1884; Stu- 
dent of Theology, University of Christiania, 1884- 
1887; Parochial' School Teacher, AVis., 1887-1889; 
Teacher, Martin Luther Orphans' Home, Stoughton, 
Wis., 1889-1901; Farmer, 190I-190G; Parochial School 
Teacher, 1906-1910 (near Decorah, Iowa, 1907-1910); 
Professor of Chrislianitv and Norwegian, Lutheran 
Normal School, Sioux Falls, S. Dak., 1910-1918, Au- 
gustana College and Normal School, 1918 — ; Mem- 
ber, Visiting Committee, Luther College, three years. 




Trond Stabo, 1906 — . A. B., Hamar Gymnasium, 
Norway, 1888; A. M., University of Christiania, 
1889, M. D., 1894; Physician, Spring Grove, Minn., 
1895-1906; attended Philadelphia Polyclinic, 1898, 
New York Polyclinic, 1898, University of Berlin, 
1900; Physician, Decorah, Iowa, 1906 — , and College 
Physician, Luther College, 1906 — ; Knight of the 
Order of St. Olav; Member, Board of Trustees, Lu- 
ther College, 1914. — , and President of the Board, 
1921—; Vice Consul for Norway, 1917—. 




Charles H. Valder, 1881-1890. Attended State 
Normal School, Winona, Minn.; taught Public School, 
Minn, and Wis.; Instructor in Business College, De- 
corah, Iowa, 187.5 — , and Supervisor of Penmanship 
in the Decorah Schools, 1876-1888; founded Valdcr 
Business College, 1888, and Valder Normal School, 
1889, Decorah, Iowa; President of same, 1888(1889)- 
1922; Instructor in Penmanship, Luther College, 
1881-1890 ( listed in early Catalogs as "Professor 
of Penmanship") ; retired from School Work, 1922. 




Nora Lolise Walhus, 1921—. Attended La Crosse 
Lutheran Hospital, Wis., 1914-1917, Registered 
Nurse, 1918; Chicago Lying-in Hospital, 1917; Night 
Supervisor, Spring Grove (Minn.) Hospital, 1917- 
1918; Red Cross Nurse, Fort Snelling, Minn., 1918- 
1919; Superintendent, Spring Grove Hospital, 1919; 
Superintendent, Conway Hospital, Elma, W\ash., 
1919-1920; College Nurse, Lutiier College, 1921—. 



FACULTY 



131 




I.UTHER COLLEOE FACULTY IN l!i(»2 

Back Row: O. L Olson. Geo. Markhus. H. W. Sheel 

Front How: 1,. S. Reque. W. Sililei-, C. A. Naeseth. G. Bothne, 

C. K. I'leus, Laiir. Larsen 



IV. Distribution of Work 

The remaining portion of this chapter is designed to answer 
the following question: What teacher taught any given subject 
in any given year? Prof. Bothne's histor}' of Luther College 
makes possible an approximately complete answer to this ques- 
tion up to 1 897 ; the catalogs of Luther College furnish a less 
comprehensive guide for the remaining years. Figures indicate 
the number of hours per week. Names of substitute teachers and 
student assistants are enclosed in parentheses. The teachers are 
arranged by departments; within each department the teacher 
of the most advanced class (not necessarily the head of the de- 
partment) is named first, and so on down to the teacher of the 
lowest class. Incidentally this section furnishes a condensed 
summary of the curriculum at Luther College year by year. In 
the interest of economy of space the Collegiate and Preparatory 
Departments have been merged in the tabulation. 



132 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD, FIRST FIVE YEARS, 1861-66 

Department 1861-62 1862-63 1863-64 1864-65 1865-66 

Catechetics and 

Methods N. Brandt 2 

English F. Schmidt 4 F. Schmidt 4 F. Schmidt 7 F. Schmidt 6 F. Schmidt 9.5 

(J. Jacobsen 5) 

Geography F. Schmidt 2 F. Schmidt 2 L. Siewers 4 L. Siewers 4 N. Brandt 2 

(J. Jacobsen 2) L. Siewers 2 

German F. Schmidt 4 F. Schmidt 4 L. Siewers 6 F. Schmidt 2 L. Siewers 2 

L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 3 L. Larsen 3 F. Schmidt 1.5 

(J. Jacobsen 3) .... L. Siewers 3 L. Larsen 3 

N. Brandt 2 

Greek F. Schmidt 3 F. Schmidt 3 F. Schmidt 4 F. Schmidt 4 F. Schmidt 4 

L. Siewers 3 L. Siewers 4 L. Siewers 8 

(J. Jacobsen 3) 

Hebrew L. Larsen(2 Sem.) . L. Larsen 2 (4) 

History L. Larsen 3 L. Larsen 3 L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 6 

Latin F. Schmidt 6 F. Schmidt 6 L. Larsen 10 L. Larsen 5 L. Larsen 8 

L. Larsen 5 L. Larsen 5 L. Siewers 12 F. Schmidt 2 F. Schmidt 5 

(J. Jacobsen 7) .... L. Siewers 11 L. Siewers 6 

N. Brandt 5 

Mathematics F. Schmidt 4 F. Schmidt 4 F. Schmidt 7 F. Schmidt 2 L. Siewers 7 

(.■Vrith.; Alg.; Geom.) (J. Jacobsen 4) L. Siewers 2 F. Schmidt 2 

Music (Singing) . . . . F. Schmidt 2 F. Schmidt 2 F. Schmidt 2 F. Schmidt 2 N. Brandt 3 

Norwegian L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 5 L. Larsen 2 

L. Siewers 3 N. Brandt 5 

L. Siewers 3 

Penmanship F. Schmidt 2 F. Schmidt 2 L. Siewers 1 L. Larsen 1 L. Larsen 2 

(Caligraphy) (J. Jacobsen 1) .... L. Siewers 1 

Religion L. Larsen 3 L. Larsen 3 F. Schmidt 5 F. Schmidt 5 F. Schmidt 5 

(Aug. Conf., Bible L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 4 N. Brandt 3 

Ex., Bible Hist L. Larsen 2 

Catechism) 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD, SECOND FIVE YEARS. 1866-71 

Department 1866-67 1867-68 1868-69 1869-70 1870-71 

Catechetics and N. Brandt 2 N. Brandt 2 N. Brandt 2 N. Brandt 4 N. Brandt 5 

Methods 

English F. Schmidt 9 F. Schmidt 9 F. Schmidt 6 K. Bergh 16 K. Bergh 12 

K. Bergh 11 (L. Rcque 1 2) 

F. Schmidt 3 

Geography N. Brandt 2 G. Landmark 2. . . . L. Siewers 2 L. Siewers 1 L. Siewers 2 

L. Siewers 2 F. Schmidt 2 F. Schmidt 2 K. Bergh 2 K. Bergh 2 

(L. Reque 2) 

German L. Siewers 4 L. Siewers 5 F. Schmidt 4 F. Schmidt 3 F. Schmidt 2 

N. Brandt 5 (K. Throndsen) . . . L. Siewers 4 L. Siewers 4 L. Siewers 7 

L. Larsen 3 N. Brandt 2 

(K. Throndsen) . . . L. Larsen 3 

Greek L. Siewers 4 G. Landmark 8 G. Landmark 4. . . . G. Landmark 4. . . . G. Landmark 3 

F. Schmidt 4 L. Siewers 4 L. Siewers 4 F. Schmidt 4 F. Schmidt 4 

F. Schmidt 4 L. Siewers 4 L. Siewers 4 

Hebrew L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 4 

History L. Larsen 5 L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 3 L. Larsen 2 

(Gen. and U. S.) F. Schmidt 2 F. Schmidt 2 L. Siewers 2 L. Siewers 2 

G. Landmark 2 

Latin L. Larsen 9 G. Landmark 12...G. Landmark 18.. .G. Landmark 18... G. Landmark 18 

F. Schmidt 3 L. Larsen 11 N. Brandt 6 F. Schmidt 6 L. Larsen 12 

L. Siewers 6 N. Brandt 6 L. Larsen 6 L. Larsen 6 

N. Brandt 5 (K. Throndsen) 

Librarian G. Landmark G. Landmark G. Landmark G. Landmark 

Logic F. Schmidt 2 F. Schmidt 1 

Mathematics F. Schmidt 2 L. Siewers 8 L. Siewers 4 L. Siewers 4 K. Bergh 8 

L. Siewers 6 F. Schmidt 2 K. Bergh 8 (L. Reque 8) 

K. Bergh 4 

Music (Singing) . . . . N. Brandt 3 N. Brandt 3 N. Brandt 3 N. Brandt 4 N. Brandt 4 

Natural History . . . . L. Siewers 1 L. Siewers 1 L. Siewers 1 L. Siewers 3 L. Siewers 3 

Norwegian L. Larsen 5 L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 2 

L. Siewers 3. .". . . G. Landmark 2.. . .G. Landmark 2.. . .G. Landmark 2.. . .G. Landmark 4 

L. Siewers 5 L. Siewers 7 L. Siewers 9 L. Siewers 6 

Penmanship L. Larsen 2 L. Siewers 2 L. Siewers 2 L. Siewers 2 L. Siewers 2 

Religion F. Schmidt 5 F. Schmidt 6 F. Schmidt 6 F. Schmidt 10 F. Schmidt 10 

(Aug. Conf.. Bible N. Brandt 3 N. Brandt 3 N. Brandt 2 N. Brandt 4 N. Brandt 6 

Ex.. Bible Hist., L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 2 

Catechism, Greek (K. Throndsen) . . . (K. Throndsen) 

Testament) 



FACULTY 133 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD, THIRD FIVE YEARS. 1871-76 
Department 1871-72 1872-73 1873-74 1874-75 1875-76 



Catechetics. etc N. Brandt 5 N. Brandt 5 N. Brandt 5 N. Brandt 5 N. Brandt 3 

T. Bothne 3 

English K. Bergh 12 K. Bergh 12 J. Jacobsen 19. . . .J. Jacobsen 4 J. Jacobsen 7 

F. Schmidt 3 (?).. . (L. Reque) A. Teisberg 12 (?) . L. Reque 13 

(J. Jacobsen) J. Jacobsen 4 C. Narvesen 6 .... C. Narvesen 6 

(N.Christensen ?) 

Geography L. Siewers 2 (?)... L. Siewers 2 L. Siewers 2 J. Bjarnason 4 . . . . L. Siewers 1 

K. Bergh 2 K. Bergh 2 C. Narvesen 2 .... L. Siewers 2 T. Bothne 3 

(L. Reque) (L. Reque) C. Narvesen 4 . . . . C. Narvesen 4 

German F. Schmidt 2 (?).. .J. Jacobsen 2 J. Jacobsen 2 F.Lindemann 2(?) .J. Jacobsen 2 

(J. Jacobsen) L. Siewers 7 L. Siewers 7 L. Siewers 7 L. Siewers 7 

L. Siewers 7 (?) A. Teisberg 3 

Greek G. Landmark 3. . . . G. Landmark 3. . . . G. Landmark 4. . . . G. Landmark 4. ... J. Jacobsen 8 

L. Siewers 4 (?)... L. Siewers 4 A. Seippel 8 J. Jacobsen 4 L. Siewers 9 

F. Schmidt 4 (?)... J. Jacobsen 4 L. Siewers 4 L. Siewers 4 

(J. Jacobsen ) J. Bjarnason 4 

Hebrew L. Larsen 2 (?).... L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 J. Jacobsen 3 

History L. Larsen 4 (?).... L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 9 

(Gen. and U. S.) L. Siewers 2 (?) C. Narvesen 2 .... A. Teisberg 2 T. Bothne 2 

Latin G. Landmark 18.. .G. Landmark 18.. .G. Landmark 18.. .G. Landmark 18.. .G. Landmark 23 

L. Larsen 12 (?).. .J. Jacobsen 6 A. Seippel 17 J. Bjarnason 12. . .L. Reque 6 

(J. Jacobsen 6)(?)..L. Larsen 6 (L. Reque) T. Bothne 6 

(N. Christensen ?) 

Librarian G. Landmark G. Landmark G. Landmark J. Jacotssen J. Jacobsen 

Logic & Rhetoric . . . F. Schmidt 1(?) . . .J. Jacobsen 1 J. Jacobsen 1 J. Jacobsen 1 J. Jacobsen 1 

(J. Jacobsen) 

Mathematics K. Bergh 8 K. Bergh 8 C. Narvesen 18. . .A. Teisberg 13 . . . .C. Narvesen 14 

F. Schmidt (?).... (L. Reque) (L. Reque) C. Narvesen 7 .... L. Reque 5 

(J. Jacobsen) J. Jacobsen 4 

Music (Singing) . . . . N. Brandt 4 N. Brandt 4 N. Brandt 4 N. Brandt 4 N. Brandt 4 

Natural History . . . . L. Siewers 3 (?)... L. Siewers 3 C. Narvesen 3 .... L. Siewers 3 L. Siewers 2 

Norwegian L. Larsen 2 (?)... L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 2 V. Koren 4 V. Koren 4 

G. Landmark 4. . . . G. Landmark 2. . .. G. Landmark 2. . .. L. Siewers 8 (L. Larsen 2) 

L. Siewers 6 (?)... L. Siewers 8 L. Siewers 10 T. Bothne 10 (12) 

(N. Christensen ?) L. Siewers 5 

Penmanship L. Siewers 2 (?)... L. Siewers 2 L. Siewers 2 L. Siewers 2 L. Siewers 2 

G. Landmark 1 

Physical Geography .^ C. Narvesen 2 

Religion F. Schmidt 10(?) .*. J. Jacobsen 3 J. Jacobsen 3 J. Jacobsen 7 J. Jacobsen 3. . . 

(Aug. Conf., Bible(J. Jacobsen 3)(?)..L. Larsen 6 L. Larsen 6 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 

Ex., Bible Hist.,(L. Larsen 6) (?) . . N. Brandt 6 N. Brandt 6 N. Brandt 4 T. Bothne 2 

Catechism. For- N. Brandt 6 N. Brandt 8 

mula of Concord, L. Reque 2 

Greek Testament) 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD, FOURTH FIVE YEARS. 1876-81 
Department 1876-77 1877-78 1878-79 1879-80 1880-81 

Catechetics H. Roalkvam 2 . . . H. Roalkvam 2. . . . H. Roalkvam 3 

. (Incl. Theory & Pr A. Veblen 1 

of T'ch'g.) 

English J. Jacobsen 5 L. Reque 5 L. Reque 7 L. Reque 11 L. Reque 7 

L. Reque 19 A. Bredesen 5 A. Veblen 20 A. Veblen 16 (G. Bothne ?) 

A. Bredesen 11 A. Veblen 18 A. Veblen 20 

Geography C. Narvesen 7 . . . .C. Narvesen 4. . . .C. Narvesen 4. . . .C. Narvesen 4. . . . C. Narvesen 5 

German J. Jacobsen 2 A. Bredesen 8 J. Jacobsen 2 J. Jacobsen 3 J. Jacobsen 3 

L. Siewers 7 L. Reque 3 A. Sander 4 O. Breda 2 (G. Bothne 3) 

L. Reque 2 L. Reque 2 O. Breda 2 

T. Bothne 3 T. Bothne 7 T. Bothne 9 

Greek J. Jacobsen 7 J. Jacobsen 16. . . .J. Jacobsen 16. . . .J. Jacobsen 18. . . .J. Jacobsen 12 

L. Siewers 9 L. Reque 5 A. Sander S O. Breda 5 (G. Bothne 12) 

O. Breda 1 1 

Hebrew J. Jacobsen 4 J. Jacobsen 4 A. Sander 4 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 

History L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 7 L. Larsen 10 L. Larsen 8 L. Larsen 9 (11) 

IGen., U. S., Scand.).T. Bothne 5 T. Bothne 4 L. Reque 4 L. Reque 2 L. Reque 2 

T. Bothne 3 O. Breda 3 O. Breda 3 

T. Bothne 3 A. Veblen 3 

T. Bothne 3 

Latin L. Larsen 4 J. Jacobsen 6 J. Jacobsen 6 O. Breda li O. Breda 6 

J. Jacobsen 6 L. Reque 12 L. Reque 12 L. Reque 12 L. Reque 18 

L. Reque 6 A. Bredesen 6 A. Sander 12 T. Bothne 12 (L. Larsen ?) 

A. Bredesen 12 T. Bothne 6 T. Bothne 6 (G. Bothne ?) 

T. Bothne 5 A. Veblen 6 T. Bothne 12 

Librarian J. Jacobsen J. Jacobsen J. Jacobsen J. Jacobsen J. Jacobsen 



134 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

DISTRIBUTION OK THE TEACHING LOAD. FOURTH FIVE YEARS. 1876-81 

Department 1876-77 1877-78 1878-79 1879-89 1880-81 

Logic J. Jacobsen 1 

Mathematics C. Narvesen 18 ... C. Narvesen 18 ... C. Narvesen 23 ... C. Narvesen 19 ... C. Narvesen 19 

L. Reque 2 A. Veblen 3 A. Veblen 7 A. Veblen 3 

Music (Singing) . . . . N. Brandt 4 N. Brandt 3 N. Brandt 3 N. Brandt 3 N. Brandt 3 

H. Roalkvam 4 

Music (Band) A. L. Himle (H.B.Thorgrimsen)(0. Glas0e) (O. Glasde) 

(H.B.Thorgrimsen) (O. Solheim) 

Natural History . . . . L. Siewers 2 C. Narvesen 2 C. Narvesen 3 

Nor%vegian T. Bothne 15 T. Bothne IS T. Bothne 13 T. Bothne 8 T. Bothne 9 

L. Siewers 7 H. Roalkvam 4. . . . O. Breda 5 O. Breda 5 

H. Roalkvam 8. . . . H. Roalkvam 8 

Penmanship L. Siewers 3 A. V^eblen 2 A. Veblen 2 A. Veblen 2 A. Veblen 2 

Physical Geography. C. Narvesen 2 . . . .C. Narvesen 2 C. Narvesen 5 . . . .C. Narvesen 2 

Physician A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A C. Smith A. C. Smith 

Physiology A. Veblen 1 A. Veblen 1 

Religion J. Jacobsen 1 A. Bredesen 6 J. Jacobsen 2 J. Jacobsen 2 J. Jacobsen 2 

(Bible Ex., BibleA. Bredesen 4 L. Larsen 6 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 

Hist.. Catechism, L. Larsen 8 N. Brandt 10 H. Roalkvam 15.. .H. Roalkvam 18.. .H. Roalkvam 16 

Formula of Con-N. Brandt 12 

cord, Greek Test.) 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD, FIFTH FIVE YEARS. 1881-86 

Department 1881-82 1882-83 1883-84 1884-85 1885-86 

Chemistry C. Narvesen (?). . .O.Ramstad3(2Sem) 

Didactics H. Roalkvam 4 H. Roalkvam 4. . . . H. Roalkvam 4. . . . H. Roalkvam 4 

(H.Hustvedt.Dec.) 

Englisli G. Evensen 26 .... L. Reque 3 L. Reque 6 L. Reque 8 L. Reque 6 

G. Bothne 2 C. Naeseth 17 C. Naeseth 19 G. Bothne 7 C. Naeseth 19(16) 

(G. Rygh 17) . ■. O. Ramstad 11 

Geography H. Roalkvam 2. . . . C. Narvesen 5 .... C. Narvesen 8 .... H. Roalkvam 3. . . . O. Ramstad 8 

C. Narvesen 5 (O. Ramstad) O. Ramstad 5 (J. Tingelstad) 

German T. Homme 7 E. Petersen 11 ... .E. Petersen 11 . . . . E. Petersen 7 E. Petersen 13 

(E. Petersen) R. Olsen 2 

T. Bothne 7 R. Monrad 3 

Greek G. Bothne 11 G. Bothne 18 R. Olsen 18 R. Olsen 12 G. Bothne 17 

O. Breda 11 C. Naeseth 5 G. Bothne 5 

(G. Rygh 5) 

Hebrew L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 

History L. Larsen 9 G. Bothne 3 R. Olsen 3 L. Larsen 6 L. Larsen 6 

G. Evenson 2 L. Larsen 6 L. Larsen 6 R. Monrad 4 R. Monrad 4 (7) 

O. Breda 3 H. Roalkvam 9. . . . L. Reque 6 L. Reque 4 L. Reque 4 

T. Homme 3 L. Reque 2 R. Monrad 6 R. Olsen 3 G. Bothne 3 

H. Roalkvam 2 . . . H. Roalkvam 2 H. Roalkvam 2 

(H.Hustvedt.Dec.) 

Latin O. Breda 6 L. Reque 18 L. Reque 6 L. Reque 6 L. Reque 1 2 

G. Bothne 6 E. Pecersen 11 ... .R. Monrad 12 R. Monrad 12 R. Monrad 12 

T. Homme 12 H. Roalkvam 5.. . . E. Petersen 10. ... E. Petersen 11 . . . . E. Petersen 6 

T. Bothne 11 

Librarian O. Breda H. Roalkvam H. Roalkvam H. Roalkvam H. Roalkvam 

(E. Petersen) 

Mathematics C. Narvesen 19. . .C. Narvesen 21 . . .C. Narvesen 10. . .O. Ramstad 3 O. Ramstad 14 

G. Bothne 7 (O. Ramstad) G. Bothne 12 (J. Tingelstad) 

C. Naeseth 3 L. Reque 6 G. Bothne 4 

L. Reque 6 C. Naeseth 4 

Music (Singing) O. Solheim 8 (H. Hanson 8) (J. Tingelstad 7). ..(J. Tingelstad 6)...(C. Sperati 8) 

Music (Band) O. Solheim (O. Glas0e) (E. Krohn) (E. Krohn) (L. A. Larsen) 

(E. Krohn) 

Norwegian O. Breda 5 L. Larsen 2 R. Olsen 4 R. Olsen 8 G. Bothne 2 

T. Bothne 11 G. Bothne 4 R. Monrad 6 R. Monrad 6 R. Monrad 9 (6) 

H, Roalkvam 5 H. Roalkvam 9 H. Roalkvam 7.. . .H. Roalkvam 4 H. Roalkvam 7 

(H.Hustvedt.Dec.) (J. Jdrgenson 4) 

Penmanship C. Valder 3 C. Valder 3 C. Valder 3 C. Valder 3 C. Valder 3 

Physical Geography C. Narvesen 4. . . .O.Ramstad3(lSem)L. Reque 2 

(O. Ramstad) 

Physician A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith 

Physics O.Ramstad3(2Sem)O.Ramstad3(lSem) 

Religion L. Larsen 6 C. Naseth 2 C. Naeseth 2 E. Petersen 6 C. Naeseth 2 

(Aug. Conf., BibleT. Hoijime 3 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 2 

Ex.. Bible Hist.,H. Roalkvam 15. ..E. Petersen 4 H. Roalkvam 12. ..H. Roalkvam 12. ..H. Roalkvam 12 

Catech., Gk. Test.) H. Roalkvam 3 (H. Hustvedt.Dec) E. Petersen 6 (7) 

E. Petersen 4 

Stenography(Elec.) E. Petersen 

Zoology C. Narvesen 3 C. Narvesen 3. . . .O.Ramstad3(lSem)J. Tingelstad 3 

(Natural History) (2 Sam.) 

(O. Ramstad) 



FACULTY 135 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD, SIXTH FIVE YEARS. 1886-91 

Department 1886-87 1887-88 1888-89 1889-90 1890-91 

Chemistry H. Sheel 3 

Drawing H. Gausta 

Education(Hist. of) G. Bothne 1 (Sp.) 

English L. Reque 6 L. Reque 6 L. Reque 3 L. Reque 3 L. Reque 3 

C. Naseth 16 C. Naseth 16 C. Naeseth 15 C. Naeseth 19 C. Naeseth 16 

O.Ramstad4(lSem) 

W.Koren4(2Sem.) 

Geography J.Tingelstad 7(8) . .O. Ramstad 9 O. Ramstad 10 A. Estrem5(J yr.)..W. Sihler 5(F,W.) 

H. Sheel 6 (?) 

German E. Petersen 10. . . .R. Monrad 3 J. Halland 13 W. Koren 13 W. Koren 9 (14) 

(H. Hustvedt) J. Halland 10 

R. Monrad 2 

Greek G. Bothne 17 G. Bothne 17 G. Bothne 21 (16). G. Bothne 10 (9)..G. Bothne 10 

W.Koren5(2Sem)..W. Koren 11 W. Koren 11 

Gymnastics T- Halland 4 W. Sihler 8 (?) 

Hebrew L. Larsen 4 (3). . . .L. Larsen 3 (4). . . .L. Larsen 4(W,S). .L. Larsen 4 

History L. Larsen 11 L. Larsen 7 L. Larsen 7 L. Larsen 11 (7) . . .G. Bothne 3 (5) 

(Gen.. U. S., Scand.,R. Monrad 3 C. Naeseth 3 J. Halland 3 A. Estrem 6 (11) . .L. Larsen 7 

Engl.) L. Reque 5 J. Halland 3 (4) . . . L. Reque 3 L. Reque 3 L. Reque 5 

L. Reque 3 W.Sihler 5(W,Sp.) 

R. Monrad 5 H. Krog 5 (Sp.) 

Latin L. Reque 12 L. Reque 12 L. Reque 18 L. Reque 17 L. Reque 17 

R. Monrad 12 R. Monrad 12 J. Halland 6 A. Estrem 12 H. Krog 10 (5) 

E. Petersen 5 (6). .J. Halland 6 H. Hanson 6(lSm) W.Sihler 5(2Sem.) 

(H. Hustvedt) W.Koren 6(2 Sem) 

Librarian E. Petersen C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth 

Mathematics G. Bothne 2 G. Bothne 4 O. Ramstad 10... .H. Sheel 13 H. Sheel 18 

J. Tingelstad 17. . .O. Ramstad 13 G.Bothne 4(2Sem).G. Bothne 4 G. Bothne 4 

C. Naeseth 3 H. Hanson 10 H. Hanson 5 

Music (Vocal (C. Sperati 8) (C. Sperati 9) H. Hanson 10 (?) . .H. Hanson 14 (?) . . W. Sihler 6 (8) 

Music (Band) (J. Linnevold) (J. Linnevold) (J. Linnevold) (J. Linnevold) (A. O. Johnson) 

Norwegian G. Bothne 6 G. Bothne 5 G. Bothne 8 G. Bothne 11 G. Bothne 6 

R. Monrad 9 R. Monrad 6 L. Larsen 3 C. Naeseth 3 H. Krog 15 (8) 

C. Naeseth 4 C. Naeseth 2 C. Naeseth 7 H. Hanson 4 (L. Larsen 3) 

L. Reque 4 

Old Norse G. Bothne 3 (F). 1 

(W) 

Penmanship C. Valder 3 C. Valder 3 C. Valder 3 C. Valder 3 G. Haugen 2 

W.Sihler 3(1) (?) 

Physical Geography. L. Reque 2 O. Ramstad 2 L. Reque 2 L. Reque 2 W. Sihler 5 (F) 

Physician A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith 

Physics J. Tingelstad 3 O. Ramstad 3 (1 O. Ramstad 3 (1 

(1 Sem.) Sem.) Sem.) H. Sheel 3 (F. W) . H. Sheel 5 (F. W) 

Physiology O. Ramstad 3 H. Sheel 3 (F. W) .H. Sheel 5 (Sp.) 

W.Koren3(2Sem.) 

Religion C. Naeseth 2 C. Naeseth 4 C. Nseseth 4 C. Naeseth 2 C. Naeseth 2 

(Aug. Conf., Bible, L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 5 L. Larsen 5 L. Larsen 7 L. Larsen 4 

Catech..Gk. Test.)E. Petersen 10 J. Halland 5 J. Halland 3 J.Th.Ylvisaker 3.H. Krog 6 

(H. Hustvedt) W. Koren 2(2Sem.) W. Sihler 1 

J.Ylvisaker 1 (F) 

Zoology J. Tingelstad 3 O. Ramstad 3 (2 

(2 Sem.) Sem.) H. Sheel 6 (Sp.). . .W.Sihler 5 (Sp.) 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD, SEVENTH FIVE YEARS, 1891-96 

Department 1891-92 1892-93 1893-94 1894-95 1895-96 

Chemistry H. Sheel 3 (Sp.). . .H. Sheel 4 (Sp.). . .H. Sheel 4(2 Sem.).H. Sheel 4(2 Sem.).H. Sheel 4(2 Sem.). 

Drawing J. Xavier J. Xavier (?) 

Economics J.Granrud3 (W,Sp) 

Education (Hist.) G. Bothne 1 (Sp.) . G. Bothne 1 (Sp.) G. Bothne 2 (Sp.) 

Elocution W. Koren (Sp.) 

English L. Reque 3 (?) L. Reque 4 J. Ness 4 C. Naeseth 7 C. Naeseth 8 

C. Naeseth 11 C. Nasech 6 C. Na;seth 6 G. Markhus 15(14)G.Markhus6(12,18) 

W. Sihler 5 G. Markhus 12.... G. Markhus 12(11) 

(M. Waller) 

Anglo-Saxon C. Naeseth 3 C. Naeseth 3 (2) 

French H. Krog 3(F, W) 

Geography W. Sihler 10 (5). . .G. Bothne 5 (Sp.) . G. Markhus5(F,W)G. Bothne 9 (Sp.) .G. Markhus 11(F) 

G.Markhus5(F.W) G.Markhus5(F,W) ■• 

German W. Koren 9 W. Sihler 9 (10)... W. Sihler 10 W. Sihler 15 (10).. W. Sihler 11(10,7) 

G.Bothne5(F,\\0. .G. Bothne 5 (F,W) .C. Naseth 5(F,W) G. Bothne 5 (F,W) 

Greek G. Bothne 10 (9) . . G. Bothne 10 (9) . . G. Bothne 10 (9) . . G. Bothne 10 (4) . . G. Bothne 9 

W. Koren 11 W. Sihler 11 W. Sihler 11 W. Sihler 11 (16).. W. Sihler 10 

Gymnastics W. Sihler 2 W. Sihler 4 (W) . . . (S. Orwoll) (S. Onvoll) (S. T. Normann) 

Hebrew L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 



136 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD, SEVENTH FIVE YEARS. 1891-96 
Department 1891-92 1892-93 1893-94 1894-95 1895-96 



History C. Naeseth 3 C. Nsseth 3 L. Larsen 9 C. Naeseth 3 C. Naeseth 3 

(Gen., Eng., Scand.,L. Larsen 7 L. Larsen 8 C. Naeseth 6 L. Larsen 5 (8) .... L. Larsen 8 

U. S. and Civics) G.Bothnel(\V,Sp.) G. Markhus 5 (6)..G. Bothne 4 (.i yr.)G. Bothne4 (F.VV).G. Markhus 5 

W. Koren 3 G. Markhus 5 (6).. J. Granrud 3(F). . . H. Krog 5 (Sp.) 

W.SihIer 5(W.Sp.) G. Markhus 5 (6) 

H. Krog 5 (F) 

Latin L. Reque 21 L. Reque 21 J. Ness 21 J. Granrud 22 (17).J. Granrud 25 

H. Krog 5 (10).... H. Krog 6 (12).... H. Krog 6 (12).... H. Krog 6 (12).... H. Krog 6(W,Sp.) 

(O. Saervold) 

Librarian C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth 

Mathematics H. Sheel 22(17, 5) . H. Sheel 19 (10)... H. Sheel 19 (10)... H. Sheel 19 (14)... H. Sheel 19 (14) 

G. Bothne S (4) . . . G. Bothne 5 (VV) . . (O. Omlie) (S. Hagen) (O. Strdm) 

(C. Hovde) (O. Omlie) (S. Hagen) (B. Saevre) (I. Anderson) 

(O. Omlie) (O. Strpm) (?) 

Music (Vocal) W. Sihler 6 (?) W. Sihler 4 W. Sihier 2 (W) . . . H. Hanson 14 (?). . H. Hanson 14 (?) 

Music (Band) (H. Tjernagel) . . . . (H. Tjernagel) . . . . (O. Omlie) H. Hanson H. Hanson 

(LA. Thorson) ... (I. A. Thorson) 

Norwegian G. Bothne 8 G. Bothne 5 G. Bothne 8 G. Bothne 8 G. Bothne 8 

(Incl. Old Norse) L. Larsen 3 (F)....L. Larsen 3 G.Bothne 4(O.N.) . H. Krog 12 (5) H. Krog 12 (6) 

H. Krog 10 (5)... .H. Krog 12 (6)... .H. Krog 12 (6) 

Penmanship W. Sihler 2(F,W)..W. Sihler 2 (H. Reque) (J. Peterson) (J. Peterson) 

(H. Reque 2) 

Physical Geography . H. Sheel 5 (Sp.) . . . H. Sheel 5 (Sp.) H. Sheel 5 (Sp.) 

Physician A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith 

Physics H.Sheel 5(W,Sp.) . .H. Sheel 5(F,W). , . H. Sheel S(F, W) . . H. Sheel 5(F, W) . . H. Sheel 5 

Physiology H. Sheel 5 (Sp.)...H. Sheel 5 (Sp.)...H. Sheel 5 (Sp.)...H. Sheel 5 (Sp.)...H. Sheel 5 (Sp.) 

(G. Markhus) W. Sihler 5 (\V) 

Religion C. Naeseth 2 C. Naeseth 2 W. Sihler 2 C. Naeseth 2 C. Naeseth 2 

(Aug. Conf., Bible, L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 2 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 L. Larsen 4 

Catech., (Exp.), Gk.H. Krog 6 H. Krog 6 H. Krog 8 H. Krog 8 G. Markhus 3 (VV) 

Test.) W. Sihler 1 G. Markhus 1 G. Markhus 1 G. Markhus 1 H. Krog 8 

E. Hove 2 E. Hove 2 

Zoology W. Sihler 5 (Sp.) . .W. Sihler 5 (Sp.) . .G. Markhus 5 (Sp.)G. Markhus 5 (Sp.)VV. Sihler 5 (Sp.) 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD, EIGHTH FIVE YEARS, 1896-1901 

Department 1896-97 1897-98 1898-99 1899-1900 1900-1901 

Chemistry H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel 

Education (Hist.) G. Bothne (?) G. Bothne (?) G. Bothne (?) G. Bothne (?) 

Elocution G. Markhus G. Markhus G. Markhus 

English C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Nsseth C. NK.seth 

G. Markhus G. Markhus G. Markhus G. Markhus G. Markhus 

B. Saevre 

French L. Reque (?) L. Reque (?) L. Reque (?) 

Geography G. Markhus W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler 

G. Markhus G. Markhus G. Markhus B. Saevre 

German W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler 

Greek G. Bothne G. Bothne G. Bothne G. Bothne G. Bothne 

W. Sihler VV. Sihler VV. Sihler VV. Sihler VV. Sihler 

Gymnastics (S. T. Nermann) . . (N. B. Hanson) . . .Z. Ordal (O. O. Larson) B. Saevre 

(J. O. Dreng) (J. O. Dreng ?).... (J. O. Dreng) 

Hebrew L. Larsen L. Larsen L. Larsen L. Larsen L. Larsen 

History: Engl C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth 

Gen L. Larsen L. Larsen L. Larsen L. Larsen L. Larsen 

Scand G. Bothne (?) G. Bothne (?) G. Bothne (?) G. Bothne (?) G. Bothne (?) 

U. S G. Markhus G. Markhus G. Markhus G. Markhus G. Markhus 

Gen K. Kvamme C. K. Preus 

B. Saevre 

Latin J. Granrud L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque 

K. Kvamme K. Kvamme Z. Ordal L. Larsen B. Saevre 

C. K. Preus 

(A. O. White) 

Librarian C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth 

Mathematics H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel 

(O. Turmo) (H. Normann) B. Saevre 

Music(V^oc. & Inst.) . H. Hanson H. Hanson H. Hanson H. Hanson H. Hanson 

Norwegian G. Bothne G. Bothne G. Bothne G. Bothne G. Bothne 

(Incl. Old Norse) K. Kvamme K. Kvamme C. K. Preus C. K. Preus C. K. Preus 

Z. J. Ordal 

Penmanship (J. Peterson) (J. Peterson) (N. B. Hanson) . . . (H. Normann) .... (J. Skinnemoen) 

Physician A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith 

Physics (& Ph. G.)..H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel 

Physiology VV. Sihler VV. Sihler VV. Sihler VV. Sihler 

Religion C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth 

(Aug. Conf., Bible.L. Larsen L. Larsen H. G. Stub H. G. Stub C. K. Preus 



FACULTY 137 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD, EIGHTH FIVE YEARS, 1896-01 

Department 1896-97 1897-98 1898-99 1899-1900 1900-1901 

Bible Hist., Cate-G. Markhus (?) . . .G. Markhus (?) . . .L. Larsen L. Larsen G. Markhus 

chism, Gk. Test.,K. Kvamme K. Kvamme G. Markhus G. Markhus 

O. T. Introd.) C. K. Preus C. K. Preus 

Zoology W. Sihler 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD, NINTH FIVE YEARS, 1901-06 

Department 1901-02 1902-03 1903-04 1904-05 1905-06 

Chemistry H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel 

Drawing W. Sihler 

Education. G. Bothne G. Bothne G. Bothne K. Gjerset K. Gjerset (?) 

Elocution G. Markhus G. Markhus G. Markhus G. Markhus G. Markhus 

English C. Naeseth C. Najseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth 

O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson 

G. Markhus G. Markhus G. Markhus G. Markhus G. Markhus 

K. Gjerset (?) K. Gjerset (?) 

French L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque 

Geography W. Sihler VV. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler 

O. L. Olson K. Jacobsen 

German W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler VV. Sihler 

Greek G. Bothne G. Bothne G. Bothne W. Sihler G. Bothne 

VV. Sihler VV. Sihler VV. Sihler K. Jacobsen W. Sihler 

Gymnastics O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson (?) (?) 

VV. Sihler (?) (?) 

Hebrew L. Larsen L. Larsen L. Larsen L. Larsen L. Larsen 

(K. Jacobsen) 

History L. Larsen K. Gjerset K. Gjerset K. Gjerset K. Gjerset 

C. Naeseth C. Naeseth G. Bothne G. Markhus G. Bothne (?) 

G. Bothne G. Bothne G. Markhus K. Jacobsen G. Markhus 

G. Markhus G. Markhus 

C. K. Preus 

Latin L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque 

O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson 

Librarian C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naseth 

Mathematics H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel 

Music (Vocal) H. Hanson H. Hanson H. Hanson C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati 

Music (Band) H. Hanson H. Hanson H. Hanson C. A. Sperati 

(VV. Coup) C. A. Sperati 

(T. M. Drotning) 

Norwegian G. Bothne G. Bothne G. Bothne L. Larsen G. Bothne 

C. K. Preus K. Gjerset (?) K. Gjerset (?) T. Nilsson K. Gjerset 

K. Jacobsen M. Bleken 

Oratoricals O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson 



Penmanship. . 
Physician ... 
Physics (& Ph 
Religion 



O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson (?) 

A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith A. C. Smith Carsten Smith 

G.) . . H. VV. Sheel H. VV. Sheel H. VV. Sheel H. W. Sheel H. VV. Sheel 

C. Nsseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naseth 

Aug. Conf., Bible, C. K. Preus C. K. Preus C. K. Preus C. K. Preus C. K. Preus 

Catechism, BibleG. Markhus G. Markhus G. Markhus G. Markhus G. Markhus 

Hist., Gk. Test.) I. Torrison I. Torrison I. Torrison C. A. Sperati 

C. A. Sperati I. Torrison 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD, TENTH FIVE YEARS, 1906-11 

Department 1906-07 1907-08 1908-09 1909-10 1910-11 

Chemistry H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel 

(C. Fjeldstad) 

Christianity C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth 

(Religion) C. K. Preus C. K. Preus A. Rovelstad A. Rovelstad O. Tingelstad 

Aug. Conf., Bible, M. Bleken M. Bleken M. Bleken O. Tingelstad S. Ylvisaker 

Catech., Ch. Hist.,C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati C. K. Preus C. K. Preus C. K. Preus 

Gk. Test., Life of I. Torrison I. Torrison C. A. Sperati M. Bleken C. Sperati 

Christ) 1. Torrison C. A. Sperati I. Torrison 

.... I. Torrison 

Civics S. Reque S. Reque VV. Naeseth (?) O. Tingelstad O. Tingelstad 

Drawing VV. Sihler VV. Sihler C. P. Hexom 

Education K. Gjerset (?) K. Gjerset (?) O. Tingelstad 

Elocution I. Lyngaas (?) 

English C. Naseth C. Naeseth C. Na?seth O. L. Olson O. L. Olson 

I (Incl. Old Eng.) O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson T. E. Thompson.. .T. E. Thompson 

I I. Lyngaas S. Reque T. E. Thompson 

! S. Reque VV. Naeseth 

French L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque 



138 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD, TENTH FIVE YEARS, 1906-11 

Department 1906-07 1907-08 1908-09 1909-10 1910-11 

German W. Sihler W. Sihier W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler 

Greek G. Bothne A. Rovelstad A. Rovelstad A. Rovelstad W. Sihler 

W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler A. Rovelstad 

Gymnastics I. Lyngaas O. Boe O. Boe B. Svan0e B. Svan0e 

(Coach) S. Reque S. Reque S. Reque 

Hebrew L. Larsen L. Larsen L. Larsen L. Larsen L. Larsen 

S. Ylvisaker 

History K. Gjerset K. Gjerset K. Gjerset O. L. Olson K. Gjerset 

G. Bothne (?) S. Reque W. Naeseth B. Svan0e B. Svanoe 

S. Reque (P. Iverson) O. Tingelstad 

Latin L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque A. Rovelstad 

0. L. Olson A. Rovelstad A. Rovelstad A. Rovelstad L. Reque 

1. Lyngaas O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson O. L. Olson 

W. Naeseth O. Tingelstad T. E. Thompson 

T. E. Thompson.. .T. E. Thompson.. .O. Tingelstad 

Librarian C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth 

W. Naeseth 

Mathematics H. Shcel H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel 

M. OrwoU (P. Iverson) (P. Iverson) (C. Fjeldstad) 

S. Reque O. Tingelstad 

Music(Voc. & Inst.).C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati 

Norwegian G. Bothne K. Gjerset K. Gjerset B. Svan0e K. Gjerset 

(Incl. Old Norse) K. Gjerset M. Bleken M. Bleken M. Bleken B. Svan0e 

M. Bleken 

Physician T. Stabo T. Stabo T. Stabo T. Stabo T. Stabo 

Physics H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel 

(C. Fjeldstad) 

Psychology K. Gjerset L. Reque L. Reque (?) O. Tingelstad 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD, ELEVENTH FIVE YEARS, 1911-16 

Department 1911-12 1912-13 1913-14 1914-15 1915-16 

Biology H. Hilleboe H. Hilleboe H. Hilleboe H. Hilleboe 

Chemistry C. Fjeldstad H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel H. Sheel 

C. Birkelo 

Christianity S. Ylvisaker S. Ylvisaker S. Ylvisaker S. Ylvisaker S. Ylvisaker 

(Aug. Conf., GreekC. K. Preus C. K. Preus C. K. Preus C. K. Preus C. K. Preus 

Test., Catechism, O. Tingelstad C. A. Sperati O. Tingelstad O. Tingelstad O. Tingelstad 

Life of Christ, N. Madson C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati 

Bible, Ch. Hist.) C. A. Sperati 

College Pastor. ... I. Torrison I. Torrison I. Torrison I. Torrison I. Torrison 

Civics C. Wollan H. Hilleboe (?) M. Mikkelson M. Mikkelson M. Mikkelson 

Commercial Sub H. Hilleboe H. Hilleboe H. Hilleboe 

Education O. Tingelstad H. Hilleboe O. Tingelstad O. Tingelstad O. Tingelstad 

(Incl. Philosophy) H. Hilleboe H. Hilleboe H. Hilleboe 

English O. L. Olson O. L. Olson T. E. Thompson.. .O. L. Olson O. L. Olson 

T. E. Thompson.. .T. E. Thompson.. .H. Hilleboe T. E. Thompson.. .T. E. Thompson 

M. Mikkelson H. Hilleboe H. Hilleboe 

L. Reque (?) 

French L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque 

German W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler W. Sihler 

Greek S. Ylvisaker S. Ylvisaker S. Ylvisaker S. Ylvisaker S. Ylvisaker 

W. Sihler VV. Sihler 

Hebrew S. Ylvisaker S. Ylvisaker S. Ylvisaker S. Ylvisaker S. Ylvisaker 

History K. Gjerset K. Gjerset K. Gjerset K. Gjerset K. Gjerset 

N. Madson S. Ylvisaker W. Sihler W. Sihler E. Peterson 

S. Ylvisaker W. Sihler M. Mikkelson M. Mikkelson W. Sihler 

C. Wollan M. Mikkelson 

Latin A. Rovelstad A. Rovelstad A. Rovelstad L. Reque A. Rovelstad 

L. Reque L. Reque L. Reque E. Peterson L. Reque. 

O. L. Olson O. L. Olson C. Tyssen O. L. Olson O. L. Olson 

N. Madson E. Peterson E. Peterson B. Saevre E. Peterson 

T. E. Thompson. . . B. Saevre B. Saevre B. Saevre 

O. Tingelstad 

Librarian C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth C. Naeseth 

Mathematics C. Fjeldstad B. Saevre B. Saevre B. Saevre B. Saevre 

C. Birkelo H. Sheel H. Sheel O. Overn H. Sheel 

C. Wollan O. Overn O. Overn M. Mikkelson O. Overn 

M. Mikkelson 

Music(Voc. & Inst.).C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati 

Norwegian K. Gjerset K. Gjerset K. Gjerset K. Gjerset K. Gjerset 

(A. Buedall) (L. Kjer) H. Hilleboe H. Hilleboe C. K. Preus 

N. Madson C. K. Preus M. Mikkelson M. Mikkelson M. Mikkelson 

Penmanship H. Hilleboe (A. Sanden) H. Hilleboe (?).... (H. Twito) 

Physician T. Stabo T. Stabo T. Stabo T. Stabo T. Stabo 



FACULTY 



139 




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140 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD, ELEVENTH FIVE YEARS, 1915-16 
Department 1911-12 1912-13 1913-14 1^14-15 H 



Isjurse ^- Peterson 

Physics.'. . '. C. Fjeldstad O. Overn O. Overn O. Overn O. Overn 

C. Birkelo i>- •^; ■••.•• ; A' -;..' •■•••■■• 

Psychology O. Tingelstad H. Hilleboe O. Tingelstad O. Tingelstad O. Tingelstad 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TE.XCHING LOAD, TWELFTH FIVE YEARS, 1916-21 

Department 1916-17 1917-18 1918-19 1919-20 1920-21 



Accountinc (Mil ) ^- Eittreim 3 

BioloBv " H Hiileboe 4 O. Nelson 10 M. Trytten 5 M. Larsen 6 

ChemistVv,' :::::::; H. Sheel 18 H. Sheel 18 H. Sheel 12. H. Shcel 17 H. Sheel 17 

Christianity S. Ylvisaker 2 S. Ylvisaker 2 S. Ylvisaker 2 O. Norlie 4 O. Norlie 2 

(Greek Test., Aug.C. K. Preus 9 C. K. Preus 9 C.K. Preus 9 C. K. Preus 9 C. k. Preus 9 

Conf Catechism, N. Madson 4 N. Madson 4 K. Eittreim 4 K. Eittreim 2 K. Eittreim 4 

Bible' Int., BibleC. A. Sperati 2... C. A. Sperati 2....C. A. Sperati 2....C. A. Sperati 2....C. A. Sperati 2 

History, Life of 

Christ, Ch. Hist.) ,, ^. .. „„ - cd c 

Citizenship M. Mikkelson 4. . M. Trytten 4 K. Eittreim S S. Reqiie S S. Reque 5 

(G. Ulvilden) 

Commercial Sub K- Eittreim 20 K. Eittreim 25 .... K. Eittreim 25 

S. Reque 5 

Drawing O. Nelson 2 

Economics H. Hilleboe 3 K. Gjerset 3 K. Gjerset 3 K. Gjerset 3 

Education O. Tingelstad 9.. . .O. Tingelstad 12.. O. Tingelstad 11.. .O. Tingelstad 15.. .O. Tingelstad 12 

E. Peterson 1 O. Norlie 3 O. Norlie 3 

English 6. L. Olson 11 . . O. L. Olson 11 . . . O. L. Olson 16. . . O. L. Olson 16. . . O. L. Olson 16 

T. E. Thompson 20T. E. Thompson 20H. Swansen 20. ... H, Swansen 10. . . .S. Reque 15 

H. Hilleboe 3 N. Madson 2 K. Eittreim 5 S. Reque 15 C. Evanson 5 

M. Trytten 1 T. Vaaler 5 

French O. Tingelstad 4. . . . W. Sihler 4 W. Sihler 8 S. Reque 4 S. Reque 4 

General Science M. Trytten 4 H. Sheel 3 C. Evanson 5 M. Larsen 5 

Geography M. Mikkelson 4 O. Overn 3 C. Evanson 3 M. Larsen 3 

War Geog A. Rovelstad 3 

German W.' Sihler 18 W. Sihler 18 W. Sihler 15 W. Sihler 20 W. Sihler 14 (11) 

T. Vaaler 10 

Greek S.' Ylvisaker 14.'.'. '.S. Ylvisaker l'2... .S. Ylvisaker 14... .W. Sihler 3 W. Sihler 3 (7) 

(C.Strom 6) C. Strom 14 O. Qualley 4 

C. Strom 12 (8) 

Hebrew S.' Ylvisaker 4. . '. . ! S. Ylvisaker 3.5 . . . S. Ylvisaker 3 O. Norhe 3 O. Norlie 3 

History N. Madson K. Gjerset 8 K. Gjerset 9 K. Gjerset 9 K. Gjerset 9 

O. L. Olson N. Madson 8 O. L. Olson 5 A. Rovelstad 2 B. Hovde 6 

W. Sihler O. Quallev 4 O. L. Olson 5 C. Evanson 9 

M. Mikkelson (O. Tingelstad) C. Evanson 4 

Hygiene & San O. Nelson 3 

Latin A. Rovelstad 18. . A. Rovelstad 18. . A. Rovelstad 19. A. Rovelstad 17. . .A. Rovelstad 18 

O. L. Olson 6 . . . .O. L. Olson 6 E. Peterson 20 E. Peterson 21 E. Peterson 20 

E. Peterson 25 E. Peterson 25 O. Qualley 10 O. Qualley 10 

O. Tingelstad 6. . . .O. Tingelstad 6 

'."/.".".'.'.'.'.'.'.'..'.''.'.'.'. L. A. Moe 5 

Librarian C. Naesetii C. Nsese'th C. Naeseth C. Nseseth K. Jacobsen 

Assistant E. Peterson E. Peterson E. Peterson E. Peterson E. Peterson 

Mathematics . . B. Saevre 14 B. Savre 21 O. Overn 5 C. Strom 3 C. Strom 6 (9) 

O Overn 4 M. Trytten 5 H. Sheel 3 H. Sheel 3 O. Eittreim 8 

M. Mikkelson 5. . . (G. Ulvilden) J. Waage 9 O. Qualley 15 O. Qualley 5 

(O. Qualley) C. Evanson 5 M. Larsen 5 

.','.'..'...'. O. Nelson 10 L. A. Moe 5 

C. Evanson 5 

Military Drill 6. Overn 2 . . '. .'. . .N. Madson 2 Lt. H. Fisher Lt. H. Fisher 3 

(Mil. Science and Lt. A. Grundy B. Hovde 

Tactics) Sgt. R. Nelson. . . .C. Strom 

S. Ylvisaker 

O. Overn 

H. Swansen 

Military Law S. Ylvisaker 2 ;,• ■ ■ • u ■ ■ 

Music(Voc. & Inst.).C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati C. A. Sperati 

Norwegian C. K. Preus K. Gjerset 8 K. Gjerset 4 K. Gjerset 6 K. Gjerset 6 

B. Hovde R. Malmin 13 J. Waage 10 B. Hovde 17 B. Hovde 4 

M. Mikkelson (C. K. Preus) (C. K. Preus) T. Vaaler 10 

(O. Qualley) A. Natvig 5 

Pastors, College. ... I. Torrison I. Torrison L Torrison I. Torrison I. Torrison 

O. Glesne O. Glesne O. Glesne O. Glesne 

Penmanship . K. Eittreim 5 K. Eittreim 2 K. Eittreim 2 

Philosophy O. Tingelstad 3. . . . O. Tingelstad 3 O. Tingelstad 3. . . . O. Tingelstad 3 

Physician T. Stabo T. Stabo T. Stabo T. Stabo T. Stabo 

Nurse O. Peterson T. Arneson T. Arneson T. Arneson T. Arneson 



FACULTY 



141 



DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEACHING LOAD, TWELFTH FIVE YEARS, 1916-21 
Department 1916-17 1917-18 1918-19 1919-20 1920-21 



.O. Overn 13 M. Trytten 15. . . .O. Eittreim 15 



Physics. O. Overn 13 M. Trytten 13 . 

(Incl. liadio) (H. Sheel) 

Physiology H. Hilleboe 4 M. Trytten 5 O. Nelson 5 C. Evanson 5 M. Larsen 5 

(H. Sheel) 

Psychology O. Tingelstad 3. . . . O. Tingelstad 3 . . . O. Tinge Istad 3. . . . O. Norlie 6 O. Norlie 6 

Public Speaking O. L. Olson 3 O. L. Olson 3 O. L. Olson 3 

Sociology H. Hilleboe 3 O. Norlie 3 O. Norlie 3 

Surveying H. Sheel 5 H. Sheel 5 H. Sheel 5 

Training, Physical R. Movold 

Football (Lt. H. Fisher) W. Jewell O. Solem 

Basketball A. Natvig R. Movold 

Baseball A. Laudel A. Laudel A. Laudel 

War Aims K. Gjerset 3 




CLASS ROOM NO. 12 



CHAPTER SIX 

SCHOOL PLANT 

Francis E. Peterson 

LUTHER College started as a pioneer institution; hence in a 
small way and with meager equipment. Even after sixty 
years it cannot hoast an expensive school plant, as school plants 
are reckoned at the present time. While an effort has always 
been made to provide all equipment necessary for educational 
efficiency, the real success of the school has not been considered 
directly dependent upon mere material equipment. But that Lu- 
ther College has qualified for membership in the North Central 
Association of Colleges indicates that that high educational author- 
ity recognizes that Luther College is a standard American col- 
lege in physical equipment as well as in other respects. 

On September 1, 18(51, Luther College began its first school 
year in temporary quarters, the Halfway Creek Parsonage, about 
thirteen miles north of La Crosse, Wisconsin. The following is 
in part Prof. Laur. Larsen's description of it: "Downstairs there 
is a large kitchen which serves also as a dining-room; then, too, 
a pantry, a small room for the kitchen help, a double room, a 
larger room in which six students sleep, and a smaller bed-room 
for two. The last two rooms are used also for studying and for 
class-rooms. Three students sleep in a room upstairs which is 
supposed to be Prof. Larsen's office. There are four other rooms 
upstairs; in one of them a stove cannot be used, hence it is made 
to serve as a clothes closet for the entire household, and is thus 
packed with clothes. Prof. Larsen has only one room for him- 
self and family; Prof. Schmidt and family have two rooms, but 
they are so arranged that they cannot be divided off". If more 
students come, they will either have to sleep in the clothes room, 
or in one of Prof. Schmidt's rooms; and while he would gladly 
consent to this, it would be very crowded for liiiu. It is doubt- 
ful whether students can secure rooms at any of the neighbors. 
Two pros})ective students have applied, and while they could 
not very well be refused admittance, still they were told how 
crowded it already is for the eleven who are now here, and the 
hope was expressed that they would not register until next year." 
School was conducted here only one year, 18(51-62; the parsonage 
burned in 1865. 



SCHOOL PLANT 143 

The second school year opened September 8, 1862, in Decorah, 
Iowa, again in temporary quarters, a building bought by Rev. V. 
Koren for $1,600.00 from Nathaniel Otis, which is now the St. 
Cloud Hotel. It is described as follows: "In the basement were 
the kitchen, the dining-hall, and the apartments for the matron 
and her maids. On the first floor were the president's apartments, 
and one class-room. The second floor contained a small office- 
room, two recitation-rooms, and two small bed-rooms, and in the 
top story there was a large sleeping-apartment with room for 
twenty-five beds." This, with school furnishings which were none 
too adequate, comprised the entire plant. A residence in West 
Decorah costing $950.00 was bought for Prof. Schmidt. This is 
the so-called Griswold house; it has been much remodeled and 
has always been some professor's home. Prof. Chr. A. Naeseth 
lived there for many years. 

In June, 1862, Rev. V. Koren bought from Joseph Gibbons a 
thirty-two acre tract of land in West Decorah for $1,500.00. This 
is the original campus where Luther College now stands. Until 
the first building could be erected, school was conducted in the 
Otis Building during 1862-65. In 1863 a building was erected 
right west of this Otis Building at a cost of $1,400.63 ; it was ready 
for occupancy at New Year, 1864. Besides equipment for regular 
school work, the boys had a few pieces of gymnastic apparatus 
out in the open just north of the buildings. 

Work on the first main building was begun in 1862. But for 
many reasons work was delayed. The corner-stone was laid June 
30, 1864, and possession taken at Christmas-time, 1865. The es- 
timated cost was $28,000.00; but when completed the building 
with several smaller buildings had cost $75,576.23. The building 
was of red brick and was "126 feet long; the main section 52 feet 
wide, and the wing 44. There is a basement 10 feet high, three 
main stories, 14, 13, and 12 feet, respectively; and while the third 
floor in the wing is 16 feet high with no attic above it, there is an 
'attic story' 10 feet high in the main section with a large garret 
above. In the basement there are, besides a cellar, two kitchens 
for the boarding department, a dining-room with accommodations 
for 100, an apartment for the steward's family and kitchen help, 
and also two lavatories for students. Water is pumped from a 
cistern outside, and drained into a sewer. On the first floor are 
apartments for three professors — two with families — and a large 
reading-room. On the second floor there are eight class-rooms, and 
one guest-room for each of the two professors' families. On the 
third floor are four bed-rooms for thirty students, two hospital 



144 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



rooms, two reading-rooms, and, occupying the entire wing is a 
chapel which is also used for church services. Then in the so- 
called 'attic story' are four large bed-rooms for fifty-five students. 
On the second and third floors at tlie front in the main section 
are two rooms partitioned off, one of wliicli might be used as a 
library, the other as a class-room. By utilizing all available 
space, the building will comfortably accommodate 100 students, 
together with the professors mIio live there; and, if only the 
president lives in the building, it will room 120. The rooms are 
light and airy, and also warm." Tliere were wood stoves and 
kerosene lamps. The wing referred to here was the one at the 




"CHICK I'.N coor 



north; the building was erected without a soutli wing, which was 
not added until 1871. 

Several smaller buildings were erected at this time ; but especi- 
ally two of the same brick: one a bakery, now torn down, and the 
other a barn, later remodeled for dormitory purposes, known then 
as the "Chicken Coop", and now the museum. Then, too, there 
were some frame buildings — wagon-shed, work-shop, wood-shed, 
hay-mow, and suchlike. While the construction work was in 
progress, a piece of timber land was bought from which to secure 
fuel; after it had served this purpose, it was sold. Since there 
was no city water, a well was sunk (18G3); later four large cis- 
terns were made, and in 18G(i a very large cistern was constructed 



SCHOOL PLANT 145 

and provided with a force pump to bring water tlirough pipes to 
reservoirs on each floor for fire protection. 

Considerable work was done on the grounds from year to year, 
much of it by students supervised by professors: trees were plant- 
ed to supplement the many beautiful native trees, and soon there 
was a fine appearing campus. There was no gymnasium, and the 
boys practised gymnastics on some apparatus north of the build- 
ing. Various activities demanded equipment; thus the first musical 
instrument bought was a piano in 1863 for $320.00, collected by 
the students under the supervision of Prof. Schmidt; a "Mason 
and Hamlin" organ was purchased in 1888 with $100.00 secured 
by the students at the instance of Prof. Haldor Hanson. Both in- 
struments were destroyed in the fire of 1889. 

F'rom 1865 to 1867 the general equipment remained largely the 
same, except for reparations and incidental additions. In 1867 
Rev. N. Brandt's three congregations built a parsonage for him 
on the campus ; this brick structure was bought by the Synod and 
made college property. It is the residence which was in turn oc- 
cupied by Prof. L. S. Reque and Pres. C. K. Preus. 

In 1871 there was need of more dormitory space; about half 
of the brick building known as the "Chicken Coop" — 60x20 feet, 
and of two stories — was remodeled for students' rooms, and gave 
room for eighteen students. This space had been used by kitchen 
help; now a frame building was built for them. It was later used 
as a trunk house. The work cost $800.00. 

The additional space in the "Chicken Coop" j^roved only a 
temporary relief. The south wing of the main building, which 
was provided for in the architect's plans, was built during 1873- 
74. The corner-stone was laid June 6, 1873, the wing taken in 
use November 28, 1874, and dedicated December 2nd of the same 
year. A large bell now sounded from the tower for the first time; 
it was a gift from the students, who had collected money for it 
under the leadership of Bj0rn Haatvedt (later Bj0rn Edwards). 
In 1890 Mr. Edwards personally presented a large bell for the 
new main building. At this time various improvements were made. 
Again the "Chicken Coop" was remodeled to provide more dormi- 
tory room ; the entire building except for a large music room was 
made into students' rooms, with space for thirty students. The 
dining-hall was enlarged, and the lavatory in the basement made 
larger. An addition was made to the bakery; an 80-foot well was 
dug and a wind-mill placed over it; a small barn was built, and 
to provide a suitable site for it, a little over two acres were bought 
at the southwest corner of the campus. This construction work. 



146 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

including the south wing, cost about $23,000.00. The south wing 
"is about 45 feet long and 55 wide. It has a good cellar, a base- 
ment which will serve as an apartment for the steward, and four 
floors of which the fourtli story is a so-called 'attic story'. On 
the third floor there is a large reading-room, 44x26 feet." 

The present First Norwegian Evang. Luth. Church building in 
Decorah, Iowa, was built in 1876 at a cost of $22,506.36. The 
Synod bore one-half this cost, thus giving Luther College half in- 
terest in the church property. 

The library was housed in the so-called "tower room" (No. 
15) on the second floor until 1884, when it was moved to three 
rooms on the first floor in the north wing. All the books were 
rescued during the fire in 1889 and moved to quarters in the 
"Chicken Coop". In 1890 they were placed in rooms provided 
for library purposes on the first floor in the south wing of the new 
building. 

For many years there had been no gymnasium. The urgent 
need of one had long been keenly felt. Among other things the 
students had militar}' drill. In 1885 fifty rifles were bought from 
the government for the company known as the "Luther College 
Phalanx", which had been organized in 1878 bj' J. L. Lee. The 
first gymnasium was built in 1886-87 with money collected by the 
students. Prof. Carlo A. Sperati was the moving spirit. It is 
the west room — 75x42 feet, and 18-foot walls — of the present 
gymnasium, and cost about $1,800.00. 

In 1885 equipment valued at $150.00 was added to the labor- 
atory. Prof. O. Ramstad circulated a subscription list and secur- 
ed $20.00, for which chemicals were bought. 

Then on April 19, 1889, occurred a disastrous fire which com- 
pletely gutted tlie main building. All students except the Seniors 
were sent away, and school was conducted in the "Chicken Coop", 
which also contained the library. During the following school 
year, in 1889-90, the work was carried on in quarters improvised 
during the summer. The gymnasium served as kitchen, dining- 
hall, and apartment for steward and hired help. There were four 
recitation rooms for the three preparatory classes in the basement 
of the Synod church; the college classes recited in "Schmidt's 
Hall" — the Griswold house. Rooms were rented in three other 
buildings, one of them the Arlington Hotel, now the Lutheran 
Publishing House; and Mr. L. E. Davidson generously gave the 
use of a large room in his home for reference books and reading- 
room. 



SCHOOL PLANT 147 

Meanwliile work on a new building was plied with vigor. It 
was dedicated on October 14, 1890. The total cost was $51,210.00. 
This is the present main building. "It has the same foundation 
and in large part the same walls as the old building. It is 170 
feet long, and in the middle part 52 feet wide, and 44 in the twoj 
wings. There are three full stories above the basement, and an 
'attic story* which through its entire length has high and well- 
lighted rooms, all of which are very suitable for sleeping-rooms ; 
most of them are even good study rooms. On the whole the new 
building has more room than the old. In the basement the old 
kitchen space is used for machinery for heating and ventilating 
purposes, while a room equally large on the east side now serves 
as a kitchen. The dining-hall is the old one; however, it is fur- 
nished with smaller tables, each for nine students, and there are 
chairs instead of the long benches; and with this new arrange- 
ment, 170 can be seated at one time. On the west side in the 
north wing there are six bath-rooms and one lavatory; on the east 
a store-room and a room for hired help. In the south wing there 
is an apartment for the steward's family, and for kitchen girls. 

"On the left of the entrance on first floor is the president's of- 
fice; and an inner room is the faculty room. The greater part of 
the south wing is occupied by the library and an adjoining read- 
ing-room. Otherwise there are on the first floor four class-rooms, 
four students' rooms, and an apartment for one unmarried pro- 
fessor. 

"On the second floor are three class-rooms; one of them in the 
north wing, the largest in the building, has an inner room (later 
students' rooms numbers 27 and 28) which gives space for museum 
and laboratory. On this floor there are seven students' rooms. 

"On the third floor are 31 rooms for students, and on the 
fourth 18. Thus there is a total of 60 students' rooms; they will 
accommodate 160 students, while last year there was room for 
only 130, an arrangement now made possible by the fact that all 
trunks are this year stored in a small building which was no longer 
really suitable for living quarters. Then, too, the ventilating 
system is now operated day and night, and most of the rooms are 
used both as study and .sleeping-rooms. 

"Besides the lavatory and bath-rooms in the basement, each 
floor has its own wash-room with hot and cold water, and sewer. 
As long as there is rain-water in the cisterns, it is available in the 
lavatories and bath-rooms; but at all times there is an abundance 
of city water. In various parts of the building there is also city 
water for drinking purposes. 



148 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



"The architecture of the new building is quite different from 
tliat of tlie old; and most people consider it more beautiful. But 
even if opinion may differ about the outward appearance, there 
can be no question that as far as equipment is concerned the old 
cannot be compared with the new building. Everything is so 
much more comfortable and attractive. The halls are furnished 
with rugs, the windows witii the very best shades (the so-called 
'Venetian blinds'), the furniture neat and in good taste, the beds 
good, and there are wardrobes with an individual compartment 
for each student. The class rooms are equipped with the very best 
school furniture, and have blackboards of Pennsylvania slate on 
all four walls." 




THE MUSIC PAVILION, 1891 



There were especially two important improvements in the new 
building over the old — city water, and steam heat with a fan venti- 
ating system. The first heating plant was built at this time. Prof. 
I.arsen did not live in the new building, but moved into the so- 
called Driggs' residence, which was bought for $1,600.00 in 1890. 
This house has ever since been some professor's home, and is at 
present the home of Prof. S. S. Reque. 

This splendid new building afforded very adequate accommoda- 
tions, and for some time there was no great addition in equipment, 
e.xcept as facilities were improved and increased from time to 
time. In 1891 a music pavilion was built with money collected by 



SCHOOL PLANT 149 

Rev. V. Koren in his congregations. It cost $300.00 and was 
placed about two hundred feet east of the gymnasium among the 
native oak trees. In 1893 the small building which had been the 
trunk house was given a new roof and remodeled to afford a room 
for music rehearsals ; in it were also other rooms for general 
student gatherings. The "Chicken Coop" was again altered; two 
gables were built on the south side to give more light in a large 
upper room used for assembly purposes. New floors were laid 
and steam heat installed. The "Brandt Parsonage" was also re- 
modeled, and Prof. Larsen moved in some time during the fall of 
1893. In 1894< a small blacksmith shop was built as a lean-to 
on the machine shop. 

The gymnasium was used as an auditorium, but the stage was 
very unsatisfactory. In 1895 a 22x1 6-foot Stage was built, one 
which could be hoisted up against the wall ; it was paid for by 
student subscriptions. During the vacation in 1895 the wooden 
steps at the rear entrance of the main building were replaced by 
cement stairs. The library space was extended to No. 4 at the 
north on the west side, which became the librarian's office. 

In the summer of 1896 almost all the rooms on the third floor 
of the main building were replastered ; the halls throughout the 
entire building were kalsomined, as were also the kitchen and 
dining-hall. A new floor was laid on the fourth floor. Telephone 
was installed. During the school j'car 1895-96 the museum was 
moved to the two east rooms downstairs in the "Chicken Coop" ; 
and in 1897 it was extended to occupy also the adjoining north- 
west room. In 1898 the room which had been used for storing 
trunks also had to yield to the museum, so that the entire build- 
ing, except the room used for music rehearsals, was occupied by 
the museum. A small frame building was built southwest of the 
main building for storing trunks. In 1899 the stage in the gym- 
nasium was again enlarged; and a curtain was provided. In the 
summer of 1899 new cement steps were built at the front entrance. 
The same year electric lights were installed in the gymnasium 
and pavilion. And in 1899 a hospital of three rooms was erected, 
a gift of Hon. John A. Johnson of Madison, Wisconsin, in the 
sum of $1,000.00. It was built just south of the main building. 

For many years now baseball had been played ; the same 
ground was used for a diamond as now, but the boys batted to- 
ward the east. For many years there was no grandstand, but 
only simple bleachers. In 1900 track athletics were introduced. 
The boys themselves constructed and largely paid for a cinder 
track, and also supplied equipment. 



150 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



In 1901 there was a marked improvement in that a private 
electrie light plant was installed, the gift of the Alumni Associa- 
tion. The cost was $2,500.00. The gymnasium was enlarged in 
1903 to three times its first size and heeame essentially the same 
as it is now, except for basketball equipment with a spectators' 
gallery on the east side of the east room. At this time, too — in 
preparation for the Fiftieth Anniversary S^'nod Meeting — the lit- 
tle building which houses the large spruce log was built inside the 
track to serve as a refreshment stand. Also for this occasion a 




COLLEGE HOSPITAL 



massive arch was erected at the entrance to the campus. It is 
constructed mainly of two Ionic columns of the old court house in 
which services were conducted in the early days of the College. 

Laboratory space had been provided in the new building. 
However, for some time the apparatus was rather meager. Prof. 
O. Ramstad left a legacy for laboratory purposes; additions were 
made, and the space afforded in Nos. 27 and 28 was becoming in- 
adequate. 

Under Prof. Haldor Hanson's direction as curator, the mu- 
seum grew apace. In 1905 the entire "Chicken Coop", down- 
,stairs and u])stairs. was given over to the museum. In 1906 the 



SCHOOL PLANT 



151 



present baseball grandstand was built with money collected by 
the students. It cost about $650.00. 

In the summer of 1907 the rear entrance was extended and 
the old steps replaced by a porch of brick and concrete. In the 
fall the Juniors and Seniors were given fine new study desks 
which took the place of the tables. New floors were laid in all 
three rooms of the gymnasium. 

For some time there had been urgent need of more dormitory 
space. This was supplied when the Laur. Larsen Hall was built 




LAUR. LARSEN HALL, 1907 



in 1906-07. It is "a commodious dormitory (center 50x40, two 
wings, each 90x40; all, three stories and basement) accommodat- 
ing upwards of 200 students. It is a handsome structure; has 
very good fire protection (the same system as the Main Building) ; 
and is steam heated, electric lighted, and modern throughout. It 
has a dwelling apartment for a professor and family, class-rooms, 
a large room for the use of the bands and other musical organiza- 
tions, offices, a chemical, and a physical laboratory, and a work- 
shop for the manufacture and repair of scientific apparatus." 

"The Chemical Laboratory, valued at about $3,500.00, is lo- 
cated in the west wing of the Laur. Larsen Hall. It is a well 



152 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



lighted room, and accommodates twenty students at one time. It 
is equipped with excellent tables, supplied with gas, water, and 
has individual hoods." 

"The Physical Laboratory and class-room is located in the 
east wing of Laur. Larsen Hall. It is a large room with accom- 
modations for about twenty students at one time. It is equipped 
with tables of approved design and suj^plied with all the most 
necessary apparatus. Additions are constantly being made to the 
equipment, the total value being now about $3,500.00." 




THE LANE OF ELMS, I'JIO 

"The Biological Laboratory, equipped with microscopes, 
slides, and reference books, to the value of over $1,000.00, is 
located in the Main Building." 

The Laur. Larsen Ilall made necessary the addition of an- 
other boiler to the two already in the heating plant; the coal bin 
was altered to provide for an overhead delivery of coal. To get 
dirt for filling around the new hall, a ridge of ground in front of 
the gymnasium was removed, much to the advantage of the pre- 
paratory boys' baseball diamond. The arch was set in concrete, 
somewhat remodeled and made strictly Ionic in design. A much 
needed store-room for apparatus was built as a lean-to on the 
north side of tlie gymnasium. 



SCHOOL PLANT 



153 



For some time now tliere had been two tennis courts within 
the track; but one was abandoned to give space for track work. 
In 1907 two splendid courts were built just north of the Reque 
house. 

In 1909 were secured a Bush and Lane piano, a three-horse- 
power steam engine for the laboratory, a gift of the Lutheran 
Publishing House, $70.00 from the class of 1909 toward a motor 
for ventilating purposes in the chemistry department, and other 
equipment for the laboratories. A noteworthy acquisition in 1911 




MAIN BUILDING BEFORE GRADING, 1910 

was the splendid Luther statue, a copy of the famous statue in 
Worms. It was presented by the pastors' wives, and cost $2,547. 
There was a replanning of the campus in 1910; the greatest 
change involved the removal of a lane of elms in front of the 
main building to make space for a large open court. A knoll 
about midway between the main building and the baseball diamond 
was removed. In 1911 the Alumni Association voted to purchase 
an eight-acre wooded tract of land adjoining the campus on the 
east, and lying north of High Street. The class of 1911 present- 
ed five fine electric light posts; the graduates of 1912 gave a 
large oak table for the faculty room. 



154 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



In 1912 the rest of the students' rooms in the main building 
were furnished with desks of the kind the Juniors and Seniors 
were given in 1907; and new teachers' desks were placed in the 
class-rooms. In both the buildings drinking fountains were placed 
on the first floor. At this time, too, Dr. Eli Lewison (Luther Col- 
lege, 1897) of Canton, S. Dak., presented a splendid pulpit and 
chair for the chapel. The old rows of chairs were removed and 
fine new opera chairs installed; these seats together with a metal 
ceiling and four attractive chandeliers were paid for by private 



— -r 




LOYALTY HALL, 1916 



subscription. An interesting addition to tlie museum collection 
in 1913 was the old historic log house which served as Dr. V. 
Koren's first parsonage on Washington Prairie, Iowa, in 1853; 
it was placed right east of the Reque house. A spacious band 
stand was built in 1913 in place of the old pavilion, which was 
torn down in 1912. 

An important addition was a dining hall in 1916. It cost 
$18,000.00, which sum was largely furnished by the students — 
hence the name. Loyalty Hall. It is of red brick, 95x'15 feet, 
two-story height, and has a large basement, is equipped with a 
modern kitchen and bakery furnishings, and accommodates about 



SCHOOL PLANT IS'i 

250 persons. When it was erected — directly south of the main 
building — it was necessary to move the hospital, which was much 
enlarged and remodeled at the same time. The hospital has four 
separate wards, a kitchen, a nurse's room, a basement laundry, a 
disinfecting room, and other conveniences. 

The musical equipment, practically all of which is the proper- 
ty of the Musical Union, has been steadily increased. In 1907 
the valuation was .f^jOOO.OO; and in 1921 there were 130 band 
instruments and other equipment with a total valuation of $15, 
000.00, exclusive of some orchestra instruments. The Musical 
Union also owns an extensive music library containing the very 
best music. Except for very liberal donations, the necessary 
money has come very largely from concerts given by the Luther 
College Concert Band and Glee Club. 

Luther College has made an enviable record in athletics. The 
necessary paraphernalia are furnished by the students' Athletic 
Association and have now a valuation of $2,000.00. 

From time to time— especially the last few years — consider- 
able office equipment has been secured. Typewriters, both for 
offices and the Commercial Department, adding machine, mimeo- 
graph, and other things, have a combined valuation of $1,200.00. 

In 1919 a tract of land, the size of a city block, lying south 
of High Street and east of the campus, was bought; and in 1920 
the College acquired the old Preus house and lots — called the 
"Sunnyside Property" — for $6,500.00. The same year the so- 
called Driggs property was sold. The class of 1921 presented 
a very fine flag pole. 

Space does not permit an account of all remodeling and repar- 
ation done at different times. Rooms and space have not al- 
ways been used for their original purpose. However, it would 
be difficult to trace all such changes; and possibly it would be of 
no real interest or value. One very noteworthy thing in connec- 
tion with the equipment is that so many things have been pre- 
sented to the College through funds raised or donated by friends, 
students, and alumni. 

Easily the finest building on the campus is the new Koren 
Library, which was dedicated on the 14th of October, 1921. The 
erection of this building had long been deferred. The library 
had long since outgrown its quarters in the main building, and 
several rooms on the first and second floors had been pressed 
into service for library purposes. Prof. K. T. Jacobsen, the 
present librarian, describes it thus in "College Chips" for Octo- 
ber, 1921 : "The Koren Library is situated on the east side of 



156 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

the campus a little south of the president's house. It is a modern 
adaptation of the Georgian stj'le of architecture. The exterior 
is of pressed brick with stone facings and the rest of the con- 
struction is of reinforced concrete and otlier fireproof materials. 
The building is in three sections; the main section, 80x30 ft., 
containing two stories; the central })ortion, 60x21 ft., with three 
stories and basement; and the third section in the rear, ()0x'26 ft. 
The main entrance is on the west side, a passage-way formed by 




DR. H. G. STUB LAYING THE COR- 

NKR-STONE OF KOREN LIBRARV. 

APRIL 18, 1U21 

two rows of square pillars leading through the main ])ortion of 
the building to the second section. Tlic space on both sides of 
this passage-way will be used for museum purposes. On the 
first floor of the central portion is a receiving and work room, 
besides cloak rooms, and a liallway from which marble stairs 
lead up to the second floor. At the head of the stairs to the left 
is found the entrance to the reading-room, whicli occupies the 
whole of the second floor of the main portion of tlie building. It 
is large enough to accommodate 84 readers at one time. In the 
hall opposite the entrance to the reading-room is the delivery 



SCHOOL PLANT 



157 



desk. The librarian's office occupies the north side of the second 
floor of this central section and on the south side is a small study 
room. The third floor of this central section will be used for 
museum purposes. The rear section is occupied entirely b}' the 
book stacks. It is equipped with the steel stacks of the Snead 
type and marble floors. The three lower tiers of these stacks 
have been built for the present and a fourth tier can be put in 
later when needed. The present capacity of the stacks if shelved 
tight is approximately 80,000 volumes, or, a library working cap- 




KOREX LIBRARY, FRONT VIEW, 1921 



acity of between 50,000 and 60,000 volumes. One excellent 
feature of the building is that it is unusually well lighted. The 
reading-room has five large arched windows on the west side and 
one on each end, and the stacks are likewise very light, windows 
having been provided between each row of stacks on the east side 
and one on either end opposite the central aisle. Skylights give 
excellent light to the third floor central portion and to the deliv- 
ery desk. For artificial light a system of semi-indirect lighting 
which gives a soft light for reading purposes has been installed in 
tlie reading-room and offices on the second floor, while a difi^erent 
kind of fixture giving a brighter light has been placed in the 
rooms to be used for museum purposes." 



158 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

The following is an appraisal of the Luther College equip- 
ment, including endowments and legacies, in 1921: 

. Campus $ 10,000.00 

Main Building 75,000.00 

Laur. Larsen Hall 60,000.00 

Loyalty Hall 18,000.00 

Koren Library Building 130,000.00 

Gymnasium 8,000.00 

Hospital 3,500.00 

Heat and Light Plant 15,000.00 

Museum 2,000.00 

Professors' Residences tjOOO.OO 

2,500.00 

6,500.00 

Other Buildings 3,000.00 

General Endowment, restricted 4,185.00 

General Endowment, unrestricted 250,980.00 

Science Fund 6,t00.00 

Student Aid Funds 27,827.61 

Unclassified Funds 1 1,1'01.57 

Library (books, catalogs, etc.) 10,000.00 

Scientific Apparatus 8,000.00 

Musical Instruments, etc 15,000.00 

Museum Collections 8,000.00 

Furniture 10,000.00 



$719,294.18 
In the treasurer's report to the general convention of the 
Norwegian Lutheran Church of America in June, 1922, the follow- 
ing appraisal of the resources of Luther College is made: 

Real estate, buildings, and equipment $609,858.93 

Endowments (held by Corporation) 41,552.48 

Endowments (Memorial Fund) 250,000.00 

Other endowments 9,241.70 

$910,653.11 



CHAPTER SEVEN 

LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 

Karl T. Jacobsen 
I. The Library 

THE beginning of the library goes back to the foundation of 
the College. At the meetings of the Norwegian Evangelical 
Lutheran Church in America (the body since 1865 known as the 
Synod for the Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran Church in Amer- 
ica), in June, 1861, one of the appropriations which was made 
for the school about to be established was the sum of one hundred 
dollars a year for two years with which to purchase books for 
the institution. Ever since that time an annual appropriation 
for the library has been made by the Church, the amount allowed 
being one hundred dollars for the first few years, two hundred 
dollars for the greater part of the time, and finally reaching the 
sum of three thousand five hundred dollars for the year 1921-22. 
From 1881 until 1917 the annual appropriation from the Church 
was augmented by an annual student fee, at first of twenty-five 
cents, later fifty cents, and finally one dollar for each student. 

With the meager funds at its disposal, especially at first, the 
early growth of the library was not rapid. Tlie first figures con- 
cerning the size of the library are those contained in the report 
of the librarian for 1881-82. In that year the library had reached 
a total of 3,505 volumes or an average of about 170 volumes a 
year for the first twenty years of its existence. Since that time 
its groAvth has been a little more rapid. In the following year 
(1882-83), which is the first time m,ention is made of the library 
in the catalog, the number of volumes given is 3,700 in addition 
to the "Mimer Library", a collection of books obtained by the 
voluntary contribution of the members of a student society. This 
last named collection was donated to, and incorporated into, the 
library in 1889, and by this addition, together with the regular 
accessions, the library had in that year reached a total of 5,800 
volumes. By 1914 the number of volumes had reached a total of 
18,500 in addition to about 3,000 pamphlets. In the fall of that 
year about 5,000 more volumes were added by the gift by friends 
of the institution of the so-called Bang Library. Since then 



160 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

several smaller collections have been turned over to the library, 
and these, together- with the regular accessions and gifts from 
time to time, have brought the size of the library up to about 
29,000 bound volumes and between 8,000 and 10,000 pamphlets 
and unbound books. 

The special collections referred to above have all, with the 
exception of one, the Bang Library, been developed in connection 
with some organization at Luther, The first of these collections 
to be started was the above mentioned "Mimer Library". This 
collection was formed by a student society organized expressly 
for the purpose of obtaining more books along wider cultural 
lines, the funds of the library not being sufficient to obtain much 
more than the most needed reference works. The members taxed 
themselves one dollar each a year for this purpose, and in the fif- 
teen or sixteen years of its existence (1873 or '71 to 1889) a total 
of upwards of nine hundred volumes had been collected. The cat- 
alog of this collection, printed in 1881', shows it to have consisted 
to a great extent of standard works of English, American, and 
Norwegian literature, some history and description, and a few 
books in the natural sciences. Of the organization of this society 
the late Reverend M. Langeland says in a letter of October 13, 
1921: "Professor J. D. Jacobsen must be given credit for start- 
ing 'Mimer' ", And Mr. K. G. Faegre in a letter of October, 1921, 
to Reverend I. B. Torrison, states that the first committee to se- 
lect books for "Mimer" consisted of Professor Jacobsen, Professor 
O. G. Felland, himself, and one other student. Among later of- 
ficers of the society was Dr. Ludvig Hektoen. As already men- 
tioned, this collection was donated to the library in 1889. 

By far the largest single collection secured by the library 
is the so-called Bang Library. This was bought from the estate 
of the late Bishop Bang of Norway by Hon. L. S. Swenson and 
other friends of Luther and donated to the library in 1914. The 
collection, consisting of approximately 5,000 volumes, is rich in 
Norwegian literature — especially the older^ — and history. 

During 1920 the books collected by the student historical so- 
ciety "P. A. Munch", as well as the collection gathered by the 
Norwegian literary society "Normannalaget", were turned over to 
the library. The first of these, a collection of about 125 volumes, 
consists mainly of works of history and description, especially of 
the Scandinavian countries. The "Normannalaget" collection is 
confined almost entirely to works in Norwegian literature and 
numbers about 150 volumes. 

The last of these special collections to be transferred to the 



LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 



161 



library is the museum library. This transfer was recommended 
by the faculty in 1921 and approved by the Board of Trustees 
in order that the book resources of the institution might, as far 
as possible, come under one administration. This collection, while 
somewhat varied in character, contains a good many books by Nor- 
wegian-American authors and publishers. It numbers, aside from 
the newspapers which, for the present, are retained in the mu- 
seum, something over 2,000 titles. 

Just where the library was kept during the earliest years of 
its existence the writer has not been able to discover, but in the 
late seventies it was assigned space in the tower room on the sec- 




THE OLD READING ROOM 



ond floor of the main building. From there it was moved in 1884, 
the catalog for that year tells us, "into more commodious quarters 
on the first floor of the main building". Here, in the northeast 
corner of the building, it remained until the lire in 1889, and its 
location was probably the only thing that made it possible to save 
it at that time, since this part of the building was the last to burn. 
For several hours during the night the students carried the books 
to the gymnasium until the 6,000 volumes which the library then 
contained had all been brought out of the burning building. While 
the main building was being rebuilt, the library occupied space in 
the building now for a long time used for the museum, but as soon 
as the main building was completed it was moved into the three 
rooms provided for it in the south end of the building. Before 
long it outgrew these quarters, however, and additional shelving 
space had to be provided by taking, first the east room opposite 
the librarian's office, and later two rooms in the northwest corner 
of the second floor for this purpose. Even with this additional 



162 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



space tile quarters had beeome extremely erowded, and it was, 
therefore, a great relief when tlu' library finally could be moved 
into its new home in the modern Koren Library and Museum 
Building. 

The administration of the library was probably during the 
first few years vested in the president. At least there is no rec- 
ord available of any one having been designated librarian before 
Professor (j. Landmark. Professor Landmark was a teacher at 
the institution from 18G7 to 1876 and librarian most of that time. 




KOREN LIBRARY, REAR VIEW, 1921 



He was succeeded as librarian by Professor J. D. Jacobsen, who 
served as such from 187i until his death, in 188L In 1881-82 
Professor O. J. Breda served as librarian, and he was succeeded 
by Professor H. Roalkvam, 1882-86, and Professor Emil Peter- 
sen, 1886-87. In 1887 Professor C. A. Naeseth was appointed 
librarian, and he served continuously as such until tlie summer of 
1920, when he resigned and was succeeded by the present librar- 
ian, Karl T. Jacobsen. Before 1912 the position of librarian was 
combined with a regular teaching position, but in that year Pro- 
fessor Naeseth was relieved of the last of his classes. For the 
last ten years Professor Enoch Peterson has also given a good 
deal of time and energy to the library, acting as assistant librar- 
ian a large part of this period. While most of these men did not 



LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 163 

liave any special library training, they all had special interest and 
qualifications for the position. To them, and to Professor Naeseth 
especially, much credit is due for building up so comprehensive 
and fairly representative a collection with the limited funds at 
their disposal. 

That the organization of the library under the circumstances 
necessarily had to be somewhat neglected was only to be expected. 
The need of a better organization, especially as the collection 
grew, was, however, not lost sight of. In 1889 a classified printed 
catalog was first published. This was kept up to date as far as 
possible by manuscript entries in several copies until the late 
nineties, when it became apparent that some other system would 
have to be adopted. So in the spring of 1899 Mr. Torstein Jahr, 
'96, who was attending the Illinois Library School, was engaged 
to classify and catalog the library. With the help of Mr. Joseph 
Brorby, '99, and S. B. Hustvedt, '02, he classified according to the 
Dewey system the collection which at that time numbered some 
10,000 volumes, and provided a dictionary catalog on cards. This 
task was performed in 1899 and 1900, mostly during the summer 
months. Since that time the catalog was kept up by the librarian 
as far as the limited time at his disposal for this work would allow. 
But with the lack of funds to get adequate assistance it was im- 
possible for him to enter even the ordinary current accessions 
properly, not to mention the larger collections which have been 
added to the library the past few years. The result was a stead- 
ily growing accumulation of uncataloged and unclassified books, 
and the steady deterioration of tlie catalog. Since both the cat- 
alog and the classification needed a thorough revision and the ac- 
cumulation of uncataloged books had grown so large, it was de- 
cided to reorganize on a new basis. As the Dewey classification 
has generally proved unsatisfactory for college libraries, the I>i- 
brary of Congress system of classification has been adopted as the 
basis of its arrangement. In the cataloging also the form in use 
by the Library of Congress is in general being followed, although 
the cataloging is not in all cases carried out in such detail. A be- 
ginning of this reorganization was made in the summer of 1919, 
when the present librarian, who was at that time connected with 
the University of Chicago I>ibraries, spent about tliree weeks in 
Decorah and with the help of Mrs. .Jacobsen and Professor Enoch 
Peterson arranged the Bang Library, classifying and sliclflisting 
a part of it and arranging the remainder roughly by classes. The 
reclassification could not be continued until after Christmas of 
1920. Since that time all new accessions and most of the books 



164 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



in the reading room reference collection have been placed under 
the new system and fully cataloged. Books from the uncataloged 
collections are also being taken up as time allows. Doing the 
work in this way, the process is necessarily a slow one, especially 
M'ith the small staff to which our present funds limit us; but it is 
felt that it is economy of time to do the work thoroughly so as to 
develop a system of bibliographical tools that will stand the test 
of time and serve to make the resources of the library available 
to the best advantage. 




RKADING ROOM, KOREN LIBRARY 



The greater part of tlie books in the library have been secured 
at the recommendation of the various professors for use in their 
respective courses, and its value as a reference collection for as- 
signed reading is constantly increasing. Since the school in its 
curriculum emphasizes the humanities, the fields that are best rep- 
resented in the library are literature, history, religion, and, to a 
somewhat lesser degree, the social and natural sciences. The li- 
brary has also a fairly good reference collection containing rep- 
resentative works in various fields of knowledge, even such as are 
not represented in the college curriculum. This being a Lutheran 
school, considerable emphasis is being ])laced on securing the lit- 
erature pertaining to this church and especially on obtaining as 
much as possible of the literature that lias been published by and 



LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 



165 



about the Norwegian Lutherans in America. The library has also 
made a beginning towards collecting and preserving literature il- 
lustrative of the culture and history of the Norwegians and especi- 
ally of the people of Norwegian extraction in this country. It is 
the aim of the library to cooperate with the museum in making 
this collection as complete as possible. 

In the future development of the library the greatest stress 
should undoubtedly continue to be placed on obtaining material 




FIRST FLOOR, KOREN LIBRARY 
{Reserved for Museum) 



most directly needed in the various courses so that the library may 
become even more than at present the workshop of students and 
instructors; the gaps in the reference collection should be filled 
and this made more comprehensive; our collection of Lutheran 
literature should be made more complete; the Norwegian and Nor- 
wegian-American collection should be made as exhaustive as pos- 
sible; more emphasis might to advantage be laid on collecting 
material on local history and history of the Middle West; and last 
but not least, the organization already referred to should go for- 
ward as fast as circumstances will allow, not only that the re- 
sources of the library may be made better available, but also that 
the students may become acquainted with better bibliographic 



166 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SLXTY YEARS 

tools and get a better insight into tlif nittliods of independent re- 
search. 

II. The Museum 

In "Kirketidende" for February 2-3, 1877, Professor Laur. 
Larsen acknowledges the receipt of 600 birds' eggs for Luther 
College and at the same time mentions that a number of other ar- 
ticles had been received, forming the beginning of a museum. 

The growth of the museum was evidently not ver}' rapid, and 
it was not before 1890 that anj^thing was done towards display- 
ing the articles. In that year Professor Sihler was placed in 
charge, and with the fifty dollars at his disposal he had some 
cases made for keeping and displaying tlie various articles. 

In October, 1895, Professor Haldor Hanson was appointed 
curator, and it was under his administration that the museum made 
the greatest headway. The extent of its growth the first five 
years it was under his charge can be seen from the report given 
in "Kirketidende" for May 23, 1900, from which the following 
is taken: 

"One of the principal aims of tlic museum is to collect and 
Ijreserve the Norwegian-American newspaper literature. It has 
now 518 complete volumes of various newspapers and a little more 
than that of incomplete volumes. In the museum library there 
are a little more than 2,000 volumes, most of them by Norwegian- 
American publishers. 

The museum has a coin collection of GOO pieces, and a stamp 
collection of more than i.300. In the collection of photographs 
can be found 12t photographs of Norwegian-American clergymen, 
teachers, and journalists, in addition to several groups; 180 photo- 
graphs of churches, schools, and parsonages; 30 groups from Lu- 
ther College, etc. 

In the natural history section there are 150 stuffed birds, 38 
fishes, 35 mammals; a small collection of insects, 975 birds' eggs, 
about 1,000 shells, 33 corals, about 200 specimens of minerals and 
quartz, several fossils, an herbarium of 500 specimens. 

In the ethnological section there are more than 100 Indian 
relics such as arrowheads, tomahawks, bracelets, etc., about 100 
articles from Alaska, a collection of weapons including poisoned 
arrows from the South Sea Islands, also several articles from Af- 
rica. China, and .Ja])an. The Museum has laid s))eeial stress on 
securing and ])reservijig articles illustrative of Norwi'gian life 
and culturt'. 

A beginning towards an art section has been made, especi- 
ally by the contribution of Mr. Gausta's large and splendid paint- 



LIB^^ARY AND MUSEUM 167 

ing entitled 'Closing the Bargain'. A plaster east of Apollo Bel- 
videre has been donated by the elasses '94, '95, '96, and '97." 

Of articles mentioned since the time of this report may be 
specially noted the model of "Maihaugen", a collection of old 
buildings gathered together from various parts of Gudbrandsdalen 
to a large slope overlooking Lillehammer, Norway, and now form- 
ing the home of the celebrated "Sandvigske Samlinger". This 
model was donated by Reverend M. K. Bleken. Another art- 
icle of considerable interest is the Hardanger bridal costume from 
1754 displayed on an ap])ropriate wax figure. Also quite a num- 
ber of articles relating to Norwegian-American pioneer life have 



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KOREX PARSONAGE, 1853 

been added. Among these is the first parsonage occupied by Dr. 
and Mrs. Koren. This little log cabin has been moved from Wash- 
ington Prairie and placed on the campus east of the president's 
house. The interior has been fitted up with furniture representa- 
tive of that pioneer time. The Syrian collection, consisting of 
relics from a church built by the crusaders in the 11th or 12th 
century, oil lamps from the island of Cyprus, Turkish costumes 
and various other articles, is also worthy of mention. To the art 
section .have been added two pieces of statuary — copies of the 
Borghesian fighter and of the Laocoon group — and various heads 
and masks; also a number of paintings, among which are the "En- 
trance to the Golden Gate" by N. Hagerup and "Winter Scene" 
by Alex. Grinager. 

Professor Haldor Hanson was succeeded as curator in 1902 



168 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



by Professor George Markhus, and when he left Decorah in 1906, 
Professors H. W. Sheel and M. K. Bleken were placed in charge. 

The museum was first located in the northwest corner room 
of the second floor of tlie main building, but in 1895 it was moved 
to the small brick building northwest of the main building. At 
first it occupied only part of this building, but before long, even 
with the whole building devoted to its exclusive use, it became 
very much cramped for room and for a number of years past the 
articles received have had to be stored elsewhere. 




THIRD FLOOR, KOREN LIBRARY 
(Reserved for Museum) 



Because of these conditions no special efforts have been made 
the last fifteen years to develop the museum to any great extent. 
But, with the space provided in the new Koren Library and 
Museum Building for housing a considerable part of the museum 
collection and thereby giving opportunity for further growth, 
steps have now been taken to place the management of the museum 
on a more jjermanent basis. The general direction of the museum 
has been placed in the hands of a permanent faculty committee 
composed of the head of the Scandinavian department, the li- 
brarian, and one member from the science department, the first 
named to be chairman of tlie committee and curator of the nmseum. 

The books originally collected for the museum have been 



LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 169 

transferred to the library. The newspapers have, however, been 
retained in the museum with a view to having them form part of 
the collection of the Norwegian-American Historical Archives 
which it is the purpose of the present curator, Dr. Knut Gjerset, 
to form in connection with the museum. It is the purpose of the 
present management in the future development of the museum to 
stress even more than in the past those sections which are illus- 
trative of the history and culture of the early pioneers of Nor- 
wegian extraction as well as Norwegian culture as a whole. In 
keeping with this it is Dr. Gjerset's plan, in the remodeling of the 
old museum building which will have to be done in the very near 
future in order to provide proper housing for that part of the col- 
lection that cannot be accommodated in the Koren Library and Mu- 
seum Building, "to arrange a typical Norwegian living-room where 
articles preserved from pioneer days can be placed as they once 
stood in grandmother's own home. This will cost a little, but it 
will gladden many if it can be done. There will be found the 
loom and the spinning-wheel, the cupboard and the old chests ; 
the fireplace with pot-hooks, pots, and copper kettles; the table 
with wooden vessels as in olden days; even the big Bible with the 
horn-rimmed spectacles between the leaves where the old grand- 
mother read for the last time. The collection must be brought 
into such form that it breathes Norwegian life." 




A CELEBRATION IN THE SEVENTlEiJ 



CHAPTER EIGHT 

INCOME 

K. O. ElTTKEIM 

NKAHI>Y tlirec-fourtlis oi' tlir incoiiif of Liitlur College during 
its sixty years of history lias come from the chureli to which 
the school has belonged. The remaining one-fourth has come from 
the students. 

F'or buildings and grounds about a half million dollars has 
been received, all of which has been raised by s])eeial sid)scrip- 
tion.s. 

About .t.']0(),000 have been received for s})ecial purposes, mostly 
in the nature of endowments. 5|^2.50,0()() is a general endowment 
fund, of which James J. 1 1 ill gave $50,000 on the condition that 
$200,000 more be raised. This amount wa.s subscribed by tin; 
people of the Synod and the sul)scri})tion was completed in the 
year 1912. 

Special gifts and legacies have been received as follows: 

1. Halvor Olson Gjerjord, wStoughton, Wis., gave the sum of 
$7,.'it3.2.'3, the income of which is to be used for aiding "the most 
worthy and needy students at Luther College who are studying 
with the purpose and view of service in the ministry of the Nor- 
wegian Evangelical Lutheran Church of America." This amount 
was received in 1882. 

2. Martin Pederson, Winneshiek Co., Iowa, in ISSt gave $750, 
the interest of which is "to be applied yearly in assisting ])oor stu- 
dents who are from time to time preparing for the ministry of 
the Gos])cl in the Norwegian I/Utheran Church of America." 

3. Bergit Ellingson. Worth Co., Iowa, in 1891 gave $^00, the 
income of which is to be used for the benefit of needy students who 
will prepare themselves for service in the Church, 

1. Knut K. Neste, Jr., Decorah, Iowa, in 1901 gave $800 
"to be used to the aid of needy students at the discretion of the 
president as he may think advisable." 

5. T. Thom])son and wife, Vermilion, S. Dak. In ]f)()5 their 
children gave in grateful remembrance of above-named ])arents the 
sum of $300, the income to be used "for the benefit of such students 
who contciiiplatc the study of theology and need such assistance." 



INCOME 171 

6. Mr. and Mrs. (). C. Johnson Hallan Legacy, Decorah. 
Iowa. $1,000 given in 1907. Income to be distributed by the 
president and secretary of L. C. and tlie pastor of First N. E. L. 
Church of Decorah "t© such needy students of the College who 
intend later to enter the service of the Synod of the Norwegian 
IvUtheran Church of America, and who in the opinion of the faculty 
are worthy of such assistance." 

7. Anton Hegge, Garretson, S. Dak., gave in 1909 .ftOO and 
in 1910 -tSOO, total $900. The income is to be distributed by the 
faculty to such needy and worthy students at Luther College who 
later study theology at the Seminary to serve tire Church as pastors 
or teachers. 

8. Ingeborg Gjerjord, Stoughton, Wis., widow of Halvor O. 
Gjerjord, in 1911 bequeathed $1,227. 58 on exactly the same terms 
as the earlier legacy by her husband. 

9. Captain T. A. Rossing, Bode, Iowa, in 1911 gave $10,000, 
the income of which (and, if necessary, the principal) is to be 
used "to aid young men who have been graduated or may be 
graduated from Luther College," "during their time of stud}' either 
at Luther College or at Luther Seminary, or both," "who intend 
to enter the service of the Church either as ministers of the Gospel 
or as professors." 

10. Mrs. Melaas, in 1913, gave $285, the income to be used 
to aid needy students wlio intend to become ministers. 

11. Kitil Funer, Ridgeway, Iowa, in 1910, gave $200, the in- 
come to be used to aid needy students who intend to become min- 
isters. 

12. Gilbert and Marit Remmen, in 1911, gave $500, the income 
of which is to be used for assisting needy students. 

13. M. J. Melaas, Stoughton, Wis., in 1914- gave $175, income 
to be used to assist students who intend to enter the ministry. 

14. Caroline Busness, Decorah, Iowa, by bequest in 1916 gave 
$1,000 in cash and a residence property in Decorah valued at 
$1,500, the latter subject to possession by Mrs. Martha Hanson 
during life. The income is to be used for assisting needy students 
who intend to enter the ministry. 

15. Ouden and Randine Evenson Legacy, La Crosse, Wis. 
This legacy, amounting to $1,61' 1.70, came into our possession in 
1916. "The interest of said money shall annually be used for tlie 
aid and support of one or more worthy farmers' sons studying at 
said College, providing they shall be in need of such aid and 
support. Preference in awarding tlie annual interest of said money 



172 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

shall be shown farmers' sons from the eastern district of said 
Synod." 

16. Helga O. Hokaasen gave in 1916 the sum of $100, the 
income "to be used and expended by said trustees in rendering 
financial assistance to such students as in their judgment are in 
need of the same while enrolled and in actual attendance at the 
said College." 

17. Mrs. Ragnhild Sandager in 1919 gave $500, the income 
to be used for the assistance of students preparing for the min- 
istry. 

18. The Laur. Larsen Memorial Fund amounts to $1,450, and 
the income is used for aiding students for the ministry. 

19. Prof. Ola Ramstad of Luther College, who died in 1889, 
left a farm and some other property to be used by his parents 
while they lived and after their death to be given to Luther Col- 
lege. This property came into possession of Luther College about 
the year 1900, and the final proceeds amounted to $6,400. "The 
annual income thereof sliall be expended by said Board of Trustees 
for facilitating the instruction in the natural sciences in said Nor- 
wegian Luther College." 

20. The Endowment for Teachers' Salaries, amounting to 
$4,185, is made up of the following legacies and gifts: 

Martin Madson Legacy, 1895 $ 800.00 

Ole J. Hemma Legacy 125.00 

Ole J. Broin Estate, 1913 1,000.00 

B. Anundsen Estate, 1914 500.00 

Gathered by Rev. E. L Strom, 1917 1,310.00 

Donations in 1918 215.00 

Donations in 1919 235.00 

21. In 1918 was received the R. Larson estate, amounting to 
$1,905, with no conditions attached as to how it was to be used. 

It was the writer's intention to itemize the income of each of 
these funds and also to show how many students have been given 
financial aid, but time has not permitted this to be done. 

The income from "special endowments" listed in the table from 
1862 to 1877 was interest on the so-called "University Fund". 
The income was used for teachers' salaries, and the fund itself 
was expended for buildings. 

After the receipt of the general endowment fund in 1912 a 
steady and substantial income has been received from this source. 
Most of the money is invested in farm mortgages and yields about 



INCOME 173 

six per cent interest. This fund should be enlarged, and in the 
near future it must be, in order to meet the requirements of the 
North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, of 
which Luther College is a member. It is to be hoped that the fund 
may before long be increased to a million dollars. While the school 
would yet be dependent in some measure upon the Church for 
support, the burden would not be so heavy as it necessarily is now. 
It would hardly be beneficial to either school or synod to be financi- 
ally independent of each other. 

The income from students at Luther College is comparatively 
small. Having as a primary aim to prepare candidates for the- 
ological study, the school has always held to the policy that such 
students should not be required to pay any large percentage of 
the cost of their education. The fees have therefore been set at the 
lowest possible figure. During the early years no fee was asked 
except $4'0 a year for board. Even this in the case of those who 
could not pay was covered by contributions for student aid. As 
will be seen by the table, such contributions have been made in 52 
out of the 60 years. These contributions together with income 
from student aid funds have amounted to $56,356.54', an average 
of nearly a thousand dollars a year. The normal annual income 
for student aid at present is about $1,500. 

Up to the year 1896 the school provided board for the students, 
and the major part of the income from students listed in the 
table for that time is for board. In 1897 the students began to 
run their own boarding club. The income from students after 
that time is itemized in the table. 

We cannot vouch for the exact correctness of all the figures in 
the table, but in the main we believe they are correct. Except in 
recent years the accounts in large measure were kept by the 
Synod, and the annual reports which have been our main source 
of information do not always show clearly what applies to Luther 
College and what may apply to other institutions. This applies 
especially to "Building Funds", "Gifts for Student Aid," and 
"Contributions from Synod" in the table. This also necessarily 
applies in some measure to the chapter on Expenditures. 

The amount appearing in the building funds column for 1921 
represents the cost of Koren Library. This has not as yet been 
fully paid but is covered by subscriptions which will no doubt 
be paid. Money and subscriptions have been gathered for the 
library for several years, but no report had been made before. 
Hence it appears in the one sum. 



174 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Income at Luther College for Sixty Years 



Building 
Funds 

4.015.65 

1.7^5.44 

8,271.25 

20,869.82 

11.951.82 

15,802.37 

l.?.024.59 

4.389.47 

9,067.96 

8,573.29 

10.542.08 

7.105.87 

8.364.73 

17.268.06 

5,661.20 

1,924.04 

1,513.15 

446.30 



Gifts for 
Special 
Purposes 



1,191.81 

263.70 

46.35 

104.50 

18,012.17 

36,440.38 

2,997.93 



1.140.00 

23,739.99 

40.096.41 

10.970.15 

4,624.25 

2,664.50 

252.00 

1,041.00 

312.00 

150.00 

40.00 

1.074.00 



132,992.39 



135.00 
488.16 



7,343.23 
750.00 



800.00 

51.00 

1.00 

30.00 

8.00 



56. 

7,200. 

110. 

136. 

301. 

1 ,006. 

86. 

77. 

2.196. 

11,363. 

250,838. 

1,984. 

889. 

408. 

1.918. 

3,956. 

293. 

2.640, 

120. 

567, 



General 

Endowment 

Income 



440.88 
287.86 
513.54 
669.69 
604.93 
325.89 
.205.25 
261.65 
264.59 



Special 

Endowment 

Income 



Student 

Aid Funds 

Income 



561.20 



322.58 
736.40 
224.84 
179.56 
33.79 



10.00 



405.68 

272.51 

78.33 

29.55 

248.69 



28.73 
48.00 
48.00 
48.00 
7.50 
48.00 
48.00 
48.00 
271.91 



50.40 

56.65 

41.75 

1.10 

467.23 

547.46 

50.00 

344.68 

864.89 

371.00 

371.00 

373.40 

421.43 

257.53 

330.67 



281.93 

295.3 

289.34 

328.59 

328.59 

328.59 

328.59 

328.59 

350.77 

368.39 

371.48 

378.84 

382.59 

440.53 

348.83 

348.83 

386.33 

347.87 

366.24 

329.96 

335.73 

335.73 

350.73 

384.48 

393.53 

439.73 

472.43 

494.63 

1.111.17 

1.070.09 

1.083.09 

1.089.94 

1.208.34 

1.417.14 

1,265.90 

1,344.42 

1,412.26 

874.89 



428,740.62 296,056,79[ 123,574.28 8,248.46 22,014.43 34,342.11 549,894.90 28,987.441 1,491,859.03 



Student 
Aid 
Gifts 



266.13 
253.14 



715.33 

1,359.62 

1,104.10 

1.116.32 

1.283,60 

1,918.41 

2,183.38 

2,614.66 

770.50 

884.00 

867.17 

589.91 

1.298.60 

453.05 

837.75 

1.. 568.9 

1,779.73 

1.125.44 

1.249.07 

1.109.15 

976.76 

976.80 

723.95 

793.16 

332.46 

402.14 

332.46 

471.37 

581.47 

81.85 

280.56 

75.18 

52.25 

99.90 

58.25 

2.00 



171.75 

333.19 

68.25 

245.97 

110.00 

448.90 

184.35 

270.00 

180.23 

302.88 

74.00 

35.00 



520.00 



10.00 



421.98 

1,307.48 

1,621.77 

1,985.95 

1,852,20 

2,329.30 

3,083.3 

4,012.50 

4,437.79 

4,900.83 

6,733.54 

4,942.92 

6,163.55 

7.468.89 

5.771.00 

6.070.13 

5,423.21 

5.756.20 

6,988.71 

7,190.75 

6,779.52 

7.417.48 

7.789.39 

7,566.39 

6,356.20 

7,737.12 

10,.?02.16 

7,786.20 

5,647.36 

6.397.83 

6,352.74 

8.466.21 

7.892.23 

8.164.57 

9.130.09 

8,893.02 

9,439.66 

9,411.45 

10.784.55 

12.714.38 

11.880.74 

11,550.54 

14.004.21 

13,347.83 

13,724.49 

13,734.64 

15.227.04 

15,964.91 

19.849.37 

11.658.22 

16.985.82 

10,686.71 

11,172.59 

19,902.59 

9,810.00 

14,525.42 

21,034.94 

51,344.22 



Sales 

And 

Sundries 

47.59 

22.99 

87.39 

268.38 

1,686.70 

4.614.61 

1,862,85 

253.25 

33.75 

66.12 

77.91 

40.75 

7.80 

115.61 

1.993.98 

590.01 

609.62 

307 

209.12 

316.31 

305.51 

213.83 

61. .TO 

150.15 

94.9) 

97.42 

54.92 

86.20 

17.10 

172.46 

476.72 

640.99 

171.38 

344.77 

323.77 

427.53 

M6.2.^ 

270.23 

196.53 

245.02 

211.63 

356.69 

352.53 

.304.92 

399.40 

460.16 

419.69 

459.81 

1.039.31 

435.82 

269..TO 

366.87 

219.54 

338.05 

239.24 



64.56 

29.65 

4,704.12 

316.67 



INCOME 



175 







Income at Luther Vollege for 


i^ixty Years 
















Medical 


Total 


Grand 


Number 


Members 


Tuition 


Laboratory 


Other 


Room and 


[ncidental 


Aid and 


from 


Total 


of 


In 




Fees 


Fees 


Light 


Fee 


Hospital 


Students 


Income 


Students 


Synod 














611.25 
1.150.00 
1,725.00 


5,501.82 
3,356.57 
11,316.36 


16 

34 
51 


13 400 














16,700 














20.000 














2,090.00 


25,987.41 


58 


23,500 














4.057.50 
4,260.00 
3,986.00 


20,902.25 
23,686.59 
22,172.75 


81 
83 
73 


28,000 














M 900 














38,000 














5,628.50 


13,884.12 


106 


4.3 900 














6.089.88 


20,193.37 


122 


50,148 














8.597.55 


23,442.84 


147 


57,800 














7,991.08 


25,663.52 


147 


66,800 














7,565.10 


20,788.73 


159 


77,415 














8.424.29 


24,686.87 


190 


94.775 














10.471.46 
9,983.38 


33,743.55 
42,367.57 


229 
217 


102;001 














110,871 


572.00 












9,750.57 


21,280.80 


181 


115,000 


1,075.25 












10,717.75 


19.064.61 


189 


119,.S00 


777.71 












9,229.97 
9,358.72 
10,633.49 


16,891.92 
16.360.02 
18,485.73 


173 
159 
165 


123,500 


892.15 












127,255 


712.89 












132,000 


528.00 












8,517.82 


16,937.48 


145 


137,500 


735.75 












9.524.30 
11,462.48 


25.521.18 
20,444.38 


137 
166 


144,272 


1,067.98 












144,100 


777.55 












9,036. '3 


17,875.94 


143 


144,000 


704.99 












8.,?87.15 
8.705.96 
7,920.60 
7,745.04 
7.998.16 
12.139.23 
15,981.19 


18.729.40 
17,686.01 
15,499.82 
16,333.91 
37,060.32 
57,499.32 
25,925.,?4 


131 
133 
118 
135 
145 
206 
213 


143,885 


850.06 












127,200 


648.75 












110,600 


597.50 












93,921 


927.00 








98,912 


1 .646.00 












98,400 


2,247.00 










97,968 


2.116.00 












12.798.54 
12,922.84 
12,993.55 
13,568.39 
5.495.97 


20,787.22 
19,900.29 
28.263.93 
22,321.89 
14,629.85 


188 
182 
187 
200 
192 


101,100 


1.592.00 








104,.?00 


1,660.00 










107,442 


1.873.75 












110,300 


1,962.50 




399,46 


1,506.31 


1,334.00 


293.70 


113,100 


1,855.78 




403.34 


1,668.70 


2,539.01 


294.80 


6.761.63 


16,754.68 


192 


117,226 


2.213.47 




422.25 


1,680.80 


2,678.04 


316.40 


7,310.96 


16,937.29 


198 


120,900 


1,916.64 




432.80 


1,551.01 


2,600.60 


310.75 


6,811.80 


16,843.82 


194 


126,800 


2,091.88 




448.61 


1,503.25 


2,727.29 


322.85 


7,093.88 


17,146.22 


207 


133,623 


1,993.10 




410.26 


1,801.55 


2.672.40 


315.15 


7,192.46 


18,659.80 


197 


135,600 


1,850.50 




471.03 


2.022.76 


2,765.55 


334.95 


7.444.79 


28,093.82 


203 


137,500 


1,782.24 




415.00 


1.868.25 


2.581.21 


306.65 


6,953.35 


19,904.26 


193 


139,430 


1,862.86 




451.75 


1.806.60 


2,623.80 


309.90 


7,054.91 


19,554.20 


198 


139,900 


1,960.80 




509.05 


1.872.80 


2,861.55 


335.10 


7,539.30 


24,067.83 


211 


141,900 


1,341.40 




393.61 


1,601.70 


2,370.05 


318.00 


6,024.76 


45,081.87 


174 


143,135 


1,631.25 


79.5C 


421.20 


2,459.35 


2,500.10 


344.00 


7,435.4C 


62,458.29 


187 


143.900 


1.708.1C 


188.54 


527.54 


2,365.15 


3.349.60 


339.00 


8,47 7.93 


34,311.01 


191 


144,000 


1.825.25 


206.16 


413.13 


2,216.50 


3,100.65 


297.00 


8,058.69 


32.068.00 


* 169 


143,819 


2,090.75 


370.9C 


505.72 


2,405.85 


3,363.45 


345.00 


9,081.67 


40.656.16 


181 


145,000 


2,525.75 


307. 2C 


619.85 


2,897.25 


4,021.45 


382.00 


10,753.50 


283.991. .M 


214 


148,000 


2,303.0C 


334.5.' 


842.35 


2,958.40 


4.014.45 


398.00 


10,850.73 


.38,642.29 


213 


150.504 


1,998.75 


390.0C 


474.84 


2,980.20 


3,982.50 


392.00 


10,218.29 


43.553.96 


208 


152,500 


1,768.65 


774.69 


538.05 


2,906.70 


3,995.00 


393.00 


10.376.09 


37,501.72 


207 


152,800 


3,239.55 


490.75 


685.88 


2,879.00 


3,817.65 


463.29 


11,576.12 


41,230.93 


207 


152,160 


4.045.76 


317.0C 


1,725.76 


2,245.16 


3,268.65 


329.80 


11,932.13 


52.258.53 


130 


151,192 


3,891.2( 


126.00 


1,203.65 


1.553.75 


2,179.30 


271.50 


9,225.4{ 


36,007.00 


170 


403,634 


2,918.98 


248.50 


1,191.80 


3.272.08 




481.25 


8,112.61 


41,278.78 


241 


410.824 


7,075.56 


669.92 


1.709.85 


6,112.76 




1,080.91 


16,649.0( 


58,440.00 


217 


401.734 


15,278.78 


850.01 


1,958.01 


10,239.29 




1,606.47 


29,932.56 


230,632.99 


254 


401,786 


95 134 83 


5,353.70 


17.574.79 


66,375.17 


65,346.30 


10,581.47 


530.386.94 


2,022,245.97 


9.957 









176 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 




HANS GERHARD STUB 

Who Gathered the Subscriptions for the Luther 
College Endowment Fund 



CHAPTER NINE 

EXPENDITURES 

O. M. ElTTREIM 

THE following pages give a tabulation of the expenditures at 
Luther College year by year up to the school year 1921-22. 
As may be expected, the data available, at least for earlier years, 
are too meager to make an accurate separation under the headings 
given, but it has been the aim to make the distinction between 
capital and operating expenditures as sharp as possible. To make 
the figures available for study and comparison, a short explanation 
of the classification is given. 

I. Capital Expenditures 

All expenditures for new material and improvements which 
may be expected to last for several years and which thus add to 
the value of the school plant. This excludes repairs. 

1. Buildings and Grounds 

Column 1. Main building, including the added wing and the 
cost of rebuilding after the fire, the heating plant, the museum 
building, the gymnasium, the hospital, Laur. Larsen Hall, Loyalty 
Hall, and Koren Library. 

Column 2. The College's share in the church in Decorah, and 
the various residences purchased by the College. 

Column 3. Campus land, water mains, etc. 

Column 4. Total of items in columns 1, 2, and 3. 

2. Equipment 

Column 5, 6, and 7. New equipment for the three laboratories, 
not including supplies. 

Column 8. Library books only. Figures previous to 1880-81 
are uncertain. 

Column 9. Exhibits for the museum. 

Column 10. Furniture, maps, horses and wagons, and, in gen- 
eral, all equipment items of which the specific classification is not 
known. 

Column 11. Total of items in columns 5 to 9 inclusive. 



178 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

II. Operating Expenditures 

Expenditures for materials used u]) or serviees rendered during 
the year, or, in general, items wliieli do not add to the value of 
tlie plant. 

1. Administration 

Column 12. Exeept for the year 1920-21, for wliieli a separa- 
tion was worked out on a basis of hours taught, 10/y of the total 
teachers' salaries is charged to administration. The items in early 
years also include rent paid by the Synod for teachers' residences. 

Column 13. Total salary of teachers who acted as librarians. 
The figures are therefore in most years too high. 

Column 14. Amount stated in reports as spent for "Printing 
and Stationery" and "Advertising". In the years for which figures 
are not given, they are no doubt included in the items in column 15. 

Column 15. "Administration and Wages", traveling expenses, 
insurance, diplomas, and, in general, all administration items not 
known to come under columns 12, 13 or It. 

Column 16. Total of columns 12 to 15 inclusive. 

2. Instruction 

Column 17. 90 /v of total teachers' salaries, less column 13, 
librarian. 

3. General Expense 

Column 18. Care of buildings and grounds, repairs, "General 
Expense", exchange, interest, endowment fund expenses, fuel, 
light, etc. Up to the year 1896-97, the expenditures for "Hus- 
holdning" are also included. The "Husholdningskasse" was discon- 
tinued M^hen the boarding club was organized. 

i. J'otal Operating Expenditures 
Column 19. Total of columns 12 to 18 inclusive. 

5. Student Aid 

Column 20. Early years also include some aid to students 
at St. Louis (at Concordia Seminary). 

6. Total Expenditures 
Column 21. Total of items in columns t, 11, 19, and 20. 



EXPENDITURES 179 

III. Per Capita Expenditures and Contributions 

Soaie of the items in the final table of "Per Capita Operating 
Expenditures and Per Capita Synodical Contribution" may need 
a word of explanation. 

Column 22 is a duplicate of column 19 in the preceding table. 

Column 2-i. The items carried out in the last two places, as 
50,148 in 1869-70, for example, are the actual membership in 
those years. The items in which the last two digits are ciphers 
were estimated by plotting a curve and interpolating. 

Column 25. The items in column 22 divided by the corre- 
sponding items in column 23. 

Column 26. The items in column 22 multiplied by 100 and 
divided by the corresponding items in column 21. 

Column 27. Total amount paid by students each year as 
given in Chapter Eight. 

Column 28. Items in column 22 less the corresponding items 
in column 27. 

Column 29. Items in column 28 divided by the corresponding 
items in column 23. 

Column 30. Items in column 28 multiplied by 100 and divided 
by the corresponding items in column 24. 

The figures for 1920-21, to make the record complete, in- 
clude also the amount paid during 1921-22 on the 1920-21 deficit. 

IV. Bibliography 

The expenditures for laboratory equipment and, after 1880, 
for library books were obtained from the accounts of the Luther 
College treasurer. 

The number of students was obtained from Chapter Eleven. 

The number of Synod members was obtained by Dr. O. M. 
Norlie, except those after 1917. 

Teachers' salaries for 1888 to 1891 inclusive are from "Luther 
College", by G. Bothne. 

All other figures are from the reports of the Synod treasurer 
and the College treasurer in the annual "vSynodal-Beretninger." 



180 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Expenditures at Luther College for Sixty Years 

CAPITAL EXPENDITURES 





Buildings and Ground 


3 


Equipment 


Year 


School 
Buildings 


Resi- 
dences 
etc. 


Campus 


Total 


Laboratory 


General 




Biology 


Chemis- 
try 


Physics 


Library 


Muse- 
um 


Miscell. 


Total 


Col. No. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


61-62. . 
























62-63 




1,372.86 

1,816.78 

91.55 

97.70 


' 641.00 
■42.50 


1,372.86 
7,771.08 
36,940.13 
31.861.94 
2,317.61 
3,098.91 
1,751.46 








42.07 
170.00 




112.34 
1,068.83 


154.41 


63-64. 


5,954.30 
36,207.58 
31,764.24 
2,275.11 
3,098.91 
1.751.46 








1.238.83 


64-65. . 










65-66 








31.33 

26.22 

181.87 

231.75 

46.20 

52.20 

116.20 




1.005.95 
221.92 


1,037.28 


66-67. 








248.14 


67-68. 








181.87 


68-69 
















231.75 


69-70 














281.59 
45.00 
137.50 
429.15 
312.90 


327.79 


70-71. 


866.77 
2,006.11 
705.54 
5.456.39 
20,579.54 
3.505.31 
1.470.17 
1,000.00 


856.15 




1,722.92 
2,006.11 
705.54 
5,456.39 
20,579.54 
3,505.31 
1.470.17 
5.857.33 








97.20 


71-72 








253 70 


72-73 












429.15 


73-74. 












291.55 
90.13 
116.25 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 




604.45 


74-75. 












90.13 


75-76 














116 25 


76-77. 
















100.00 


77-78. 


4,857.33 














100.00 


78-79.. . 












100.00 


79-80... 






















80-81. 




822.75 

1,011.47 

474.62 

33.55 




822.75 

1,011.47 

474.62 

133.55 

137.90 

1,220.52 

325.67 

22.20 

59.46 

8,612.76 

39,743.99 

2,459.18 

2,987.81 

639.15 

691.65 

290.00 
1,032.90 








178.00 
100.00 
112.91 
132.45 
839.22 
41.78 
49.02 
123.31 
136.99 
78.97 
278.22 
176.34 
171.57 
265.93 
320.13 
217.99 
394.51 
278.65 
206.73 
321.57 
177.35 
376.50 
434.20 
363.05 
286.79 
138.38 
444.79 
374.88 
399.78 
534.22 
514.89 
427.21 
364.81 
704.38 
500.74 
818.76 
750.86 
759.88 
749.92 
1,273.98 
1,715.80 






178.00 


81-82. . 














100.00 


82-83... 














112.91 


83-84. 


lOO.OC 

137. 9C 

l,152.9t 

296.62 

22. 2C 

59.46 

8.136.9r 

38,358.0'. 

1,523.55 

814.31 

38.30 












132.45 


84-85. 












839.22 


85-86. . 


67.56 
29.05 














41.78 


86-87 












49 02 


87-88. 












123.31 


88-89. 
















136.99 


89-90. . 


475.80 
1.015.90 
456.88 
428.00 
600.85 
626.25 
290.00 
1,032.90 


370.00 

478.75 

1,745.50 

65.40 










480.07 

2,866.66 

334.63 


559.04 


90-91. 








3 144.88 


91-92. 








510.97 


92-93. . 








171.57 


93-94... 












265.93 


94-95. 












320.13 


95-96... 












533.70 

250.37 

42.21 

263.44 

162.91 

93.64 

240.11 

28.15 

269.64 

117.40 

261.20 

41.26 

14.80 

24.60 


751.69 


96-97... 










644.88 


97-98... 










320.86 


98-99, 


80.0C 
1,123.33 


250.00 




330.00 
1,123.33 








470.17 


99-00. . . 




4.70 




489.18 


00-01... 






270.99 


01-02. 


539.51 






539.51 
836.50 
763.30 








616.61 


02-03.. 




836.50 








462.35 


03-04... 


763.30 






25.61 
113.73 


52.00 


658.30 


04-05... 






569.92 


05-06. 


287.75 

7.879.91 

56,744.85 






287.75 

7,879.91 

56,744.85 

9,887.83 

7,176.07 

3,038.43 

1,245.66 

20.00 

4,531.12 

484.59 

3,561.73 

14,563.54 




399.58 


06-07... 












486.05 


07-08... 








2.52 




392.20 


08-09. 


9,887.83 

6,765.05 

1,579.23 

91.55 

20.00 

4,309.91 

409.59 






424.38 


09-10... 


411.02 
1,031.87 


1,459.20 
122.24 


2.00 
505.10 
253.08 
550.00 


10.00 
187.64 

92.56 
196.84 
547.93 
738.80 
621.81 

61.50 


9.41 

577.94 
445.18 
583.57 
121.53 
262.65 


544.22 


10-11... 
11-12... 
12-13... 


90.55 
51.70 
15.00 
25.00 
213.75 

42.20 

139.99 

17.91 

25.00 


312.38 
1,162.53 
363.63 
832.60 
211.60 
283.37 
182.70 

1,082.13 

60.00 

681.50 


1,114.87 
1.734.00 
1.518.22 


13-14... 
14-15... 
15-16... 


1 ,854.60 


221.21 

75.00 

1,707.13 


2,557.09 
2,753.56 
2,098.55 


16-17... 


14,563.5-1 
100.00 


1,849.91 


17-18... 






899.87 


18-19... 
19-20. 


4,500.00 
3,243.60 


23.00 


100.00 

4,500.00 

135,679.56 


9.00 
146.61 


134.78 
121.88 
386.19 


9.86 

350.02 

72.18 


1,994.60 
1 814.88 


20-21... 


132.412.96 


3,027.28 


Totals.. 


404,840.09 


27,749.04 


7,787.43 


440,376.56 


1,465.79 


3,246.49 


2,484.34 


18,231.23 


621.10 


14,812.41 


40.861,36 



EXPENDITURES 



181 



Expenditures at Luther College for Sixty Years 



OPERATING EXPENDITURES 



ADMINISTRATION 



Pres., 
Dean, 
etc. 



137.04 
89.70 
251.00 
254.07 
409.58 
397.50 
485.33 
711.92 
745.97 
777.78 
717.83 
916.68 

1,076.62 
996.33 

1,003.48 
596.14 
674.07 
680.78 
700.40 
919.16 
773.45 
795.25 
707.93 
764.71 
821.12 
726.25 
752.60 
975.86 

1,514.67 
789.17 

1,364.29 



Librar- 
ian 



Printing 

and 

Advt. 



143 



169.67 
347.44 
,503.80 
582.50 
448.20 
548.31 
212.97 
,084.92 
152.05 
185.14 
226.25 
274.08 
,403.14 
316.33 
355.72 
443.04 
590.56 
,600.53 
,908.03 
221.68 
,410.40 
,402.25 
,358.24 
374.67 
453.58 
,969.13 
,828.32 
751.75 



1,165.00 

1 ,000.00 

916.67 

1,000.00 

897.25 

1,295.73 

862.50 

862.50 

900.00 

900.00 

750.00 

787.50 

800.00 

570.00 

357.42 

750.00 

900.00 

975.00 

1,000.00 

1,000.00 

1,075.00 

1.100.00 

947.85 

1,427.15 

1,375.00 

1,300.00 

1,300.00 

1,300.00 

1,225.05 

1,200.00 

1,200.00 

1,275.00 

1,300.00 

1,300.00 

1,300.00 

1,300.00 

1,300.00 

1,300.00 

1,300.00 

1,300.00 

1,300.00 

1.300.00 

1,300.00 

1,241.66 

1,200.00 

1,200.00 

1,300.00 

1,300.00 

1,300.00 

4,039.65 



9.00 
5.50 



Miscell. 



48.18 



80.15 
140.00 
120.00 
85.00 
605.25 
95.00 
75.00 
85.00 

406.50 
150.00 
348.00 
594.50 
100.00 
489.00 
287.50 



Total 



175.00 

8.80 

11.40 



203.05 
14.65 



279.40 
231.70 
222.67 
237.88 
232.24 
288.35 
532.08 
374.34 
319.27 
489.76 
249.51 
428.98 
233.16 
722.09 
417.29 
602.59 
683.79 
448.19 
613.05 
532.05 
725.26 
939.24 
1,110.39 
2,996.52 



188.00 
25.00 
61.43 



65.25 

712.25 

16.05 

44.32 

420.20 



44.00 
889.13 



20.10 

494.05 

360.00 

94.95 

552.25 

387.80 

159.33 

761.71 

186.84 

553.44 

535.72 

175.31 

842.97 

864.58 

1,255.25 

2,679.42 

2,386.19 

2,144.87 



146.04 
175.35 
391.00 
347.07 
494.58 
1,002.75 
580.33 
786.92 
830.97 
1,990.96 
2,124.33 
1,983.35 
2,424.62 
2,488.08 
2,399.21 
1,947.64 
1.824.07 
1,580.78 
1,600.40 
1,844.16 
1,581.75 
1,606.65 
1,277.93 
1,325.18 
1,585.77 
1,626.25 
1,915.60 
2,000.86 
2,576.10 
1,864.17 
2,464.29 
2,182.77 
3.486.84 
2,894.85 
2,926.82 
3,447.80 
3,080.01 
2,704.69 
3,411.93 
2,584.29 
2,748.49 
3,078.43 
3,442.47 
3,382.41 
3,201.04 
3,457.48 
3,559.82 
3,283.05 
4,384.33 
3,812.16 
4,677.71 
4,929.91 
4,267.41 
5,014.26 
4,971.30 
5,734.09 
7,887.79 
8,624.90 
15.932.79 



Instruction 



152.27 

564.27 

2,259.00 

2,286.58 

3,686.17 

3,577.50 

4,367.92 

4,737.73 

4,587.44 

4,768.47 

5,460.47 

6,019.46 

6,457.55 

8,069.67 

7,735.55 

4.502.77 

5,204.13 

5,227.02 

5,403.60 

7,522.47 

6.173.53 

6,357.25 

5,801.33 

6.525.01 

6,640.04 

5,636.25 

5,798.40 

5,572.83 

5,848.25 

4.655.00 

5,946.10 

4,8»0.15 

6.937.84 

6.205.70 

7,046.03 

6,944.45 

7,302.26 

8.274.13 

8,564.27 

10,320.50 

9,400.00 

9,736.25 

10,166.67 

11,328.30 

10,546.92 

10,901.45 

11,687.32 

13,014.99 

13,104.73 

15,872.22 

18,695.14 

20,393.58 

20,378.59 

20,024.15 

20,158.48 

15,482.21 

20,122.15 

27,854.89 

40,901.44 



General 
Expense 



18 



Totall76,649.38 58,295.93 13,984.48 20,994.21 169.924.00 543,798.86 557,454.24 1,271,177.10 58,454.57 1,888,318.27 



654.64 

1,187.35 

2,467.20 

4,030.00 

6,234.21 

8,497.72 

6.077.37 

9,334.71 

9.316.52 

10,792.30 

9,593.94 

8,931.14 

8,860.90 

11,299.77 

14,399.28 

17,339.14 

16,250.83 

11,228.90 

9,438.01 

11.246.29 

9,609.84 

9,765.94 

11,716.05 

10,407.01 

8,566.67 

8,784.97 

7,615.98 

8,299.16 

10,634.58 

12,129.00 

15,820.00 

13,810.01 

18,088.88 

14,334.74 

12,449.17 

5,032.18 

4,620.70 

4,074.99 

3,956.53 

3,766.78 

4,671.09 

6,592.15 

6,576.39 

5.668.11 

6,350.55 

5,572.65 

6,810.38 

6,806.11 

6,938.20 

6,723.28 

7,760.92 

9,399.33 

9,071.57 

8,874.04 

9,331.81 

10,093.64 

8,809.13 

12,843.19 

18,758.74 

29,139.56 



Total 



19 



654.64 
1,485.66 
3,206.82 
6,680.00 
8,894.86 
12,678.47 
10.657.62 
14,282.96 
14,841.17 
16,210.71 
16,353.37 
16,515.94 
16.863.71 
20,181.94 
24,957.03 
27,473.90 
22,701.24 
18,257.10 
16,245.81 
18,250.29 
18,976.47 
17,521.22 
19,679.95 
17,486.29 
16,416.86 
17,010.78 
14,878.48 
16,013.16 
18,208.27 
20,553.35 
22,339.17 
22,220.40 
25,161.80 
24,759.42 
21,549.72 
15.005.03 
15,012.95 
14,457.26 
14,935.35 
15,742.98 
17,575.88 
18.740.64 
19,391.07 
19,277.25 
21,061.26 
19,320.61 
21,169.31 
22,053.25 
23,236.24 
24,212.34 
27,445.30 
32,772.18 
34,395.06 
33,520.04 
34,370.22 
35,223.42 
30,025.43 
40,853.13 
55,238.53 
85,973.79 



Student 
Aid 



Total 
Expenditures 



564.07 

785.95 

2,518.85 

2,383.12 

2,501.15 

2,903.19 

3,041.67 

3,176.76 

1,298.60 

453.65 

837.75 

1,368.97 

1,779.73 

1,125.44 

1,249.07 

1.109.15 

1,258.69 

1,237.12 

1,048.29 

1.121.75 

661.05 

809.32 

661.05 

767.13 

822.92 

595.17 

629.93 

370.52 

308.09 

529.88 

442.95 

375.84 

650.54 

603.39 

590.00 

427.95 

171.75 

496.40 

422.35 

816.90 

439.73 

816.08 

1,692.90 

t,515.64 

1,371.33 

1,763.67 

1,190.86 

1,334.16 

1.322.00 

291.00 

1,110.00 

206.64 

2,484.46 



21 



654.64 
3,012.93 
12,216.73 
43,620.13 
41.794.08 
15,244.22 
13,938.40 
94,278.92 
15,954.91 
20,549.68 
20,996.30 
20,151.78 
25,827.74 
43,893.28 
31,755.35 
30,342.67 
29,112.22 
19,194.85 
17.614.78 
21,030.77 
21,213.38 
19,357.82 
21,055.10 
19,722.10 
18,916.28 
18,433.76 
16,145.74 
16,870.66 
28,189.39 
64,103.27 
26,076.45 
26,202.70 
26,662.05 
26,401.13 
22,961.93 
16,990.90 
15,863.69 
15,700.38 
16,923.70 
16,664.51 
19,335.39 
20,629.49 
21,240.62 
20,018.92 
22,244.99 
28,108.92 
79,123.26 
32,805.19 
31,772.61 
30,058.54 
31,940.60 
35,681.73 
43,246.94 
37,949.05 
41,364.66 
52,958.87 
31,216.30 
44,057.73 
61,760.05 
227,165.09 



182 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Expend Hit res at Luther College for Si.rtj/ Years 



PER CAPITA OPERATING EXPENDITURES AND PER CAPITA SVNODICAL CONTRIBUTIONS 











Per Capita 






Per Capita 




Total 


No. 
of 


Members 
of 


Expendit 


ures 


Income 
from 


Contribution 
by 


Contribution 


Year 


Operating 












Expenditures 


Students 


Synod 


Per 

Student 

in dollars 


Per 

Member 
in cents 


Students 


Synod 


Per 

Student 
in dollars 


Per 
Member 
in cents 


Col. No. 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


61-62. 


654.64 


16 


13.400 


40.92 


4.9 


611.25 


43.39 


2.71 


0.3 


62-6.*.. . 


1 ,485.66 


34 


16,700 


43.70 


8.9 


1,150.00 


335.66 


9.87 


2.0 


6.5-64.. . 


3.206.82 


51 


20,000 


62.88 


16.0 


1,72 5.00 


1,481.82 


29.06 


7.4 


64-6.S.. . 


6,680.00 


58 


23.500 


115.17 


28.4 


2.090.00 


4.590.00 


79.14 


19.5 


65-66.. 


8.894.86 


81 


28,000 


109.81 


31.8 


4,057.50 


4, 837. ,56 


59.72 


17.3 


66-67... 


12,678.47 


83 


32,900 


152.75 


38.5 


4,260.00 


8,418.47 


101.43 


25.6 


67-68... 


10,657.62 


73 


38,000 


145.99 


28.1 


3,986.00 


6,671.62 


91.39 


17.6 


68-6<J... 


14,282.96 


106 


43,900 


134.74 


32.5 


5.628.50 


8.654.46 


81.65 


19.7 


69-70... 


14.841.17 


122 


.50,148 


121.65 


29.6 


6,089.88 


8,751.29 


71.73 


17.5 


70-71... 


16,210.71 


147 


57,800 


110.28 


28.1 


8,597.55 


7,613,16 


51.79 


13.2 


71-72... 


16,353.37 


147 


66.800 


111.25 


24.5 


7.991.08 


8,362,29 


56.89 


12.S 


72-73... 


16,515.94 


159 


77,415 


103.88 


21.3 


7,565.10 


8.950.84 


56.29 


11.6 


7.5-74... 


16,863.71 


190 


94,775 


88.76 


17.8 


8.424.29 


8,439.42 


44.42 


8.9 


74-75... 


20.181.94 


229 


102,001 


88,13 


19.8 


10,471.46 


9.710.48 


42.40 


9.5 


75-76... 


24,957.03 


217 


110.871 


115.01 


22.5 


9,983.,58 


14,973.65 


69.01 


13.5 


76-77.. . 


27,473.90 


181 


115,000 


151.79 


23.9 


9,750.57 


17,723.33 


43.78 


15.4 


77.78... 


22,701.24 


189 


119,500 


120.11 


19.0 


10,717.79 


11.983.45 


63.40 


10.0 


78-79... 


18.257.10 


173 


123,500 


105.53 


14.8 


9,229.97 


9,027.13 


52.18 


7.3 


79-80... 


16,245.81 


159 


127,255 


102.17 


12.8 


9,358.72 


6,887.09 


43.32 


5.4 


80-81... 


18,250.29 


165 


132,000 


110.61 


13.8 


10.633.49 


7,616.80 


46.16 


5,8 


81-82... 


18,976.47 


145 


137,500 


139.87 


13.8 


8,517.82 


10,458.65 


72.13 


7.6 


82-83... 


17,521.22 


137 


144,272 


127.89 


12.1 


9,524.30 


7,996.92 


58.37 


5.5 


83-84... 


19,679.95 


166 


144,100 


118.55 


13.7 


11,462.48 


8,217.47 


49.50 


5.7 


84-85... 


17,486.29 


143 


144,000 


122.28 


12.1 


9,036.23 


8,450.06 


59.09 


5.9 


85-86... 


16,416.86 


131 


143,885 


125.32 


11.4 


8,387.15 


8,029.71 


60.83 


5.6 


86-87... 


17,010.78 


1.53 


127,200 


127.90 


13.5 


8,705.96 


8,304.82 


62.44 


6.5 


87-88... 


14,878.48 


118 


110,600 


126.09 


13.5 


7.920.60 


6,957.88 


58.97 


6.3 


88-89... 


16,013.16 


135 


93,921 


118.62 


17.1 


7,745.04 


8,268,12 


61.25 


8.8 


89-90. . . 


18,208.27 


145 


98,912 


125.57 


18.4 


7,981.16 


10,210.11 


70.41 


10.3 


90-91... 


20,553.35 


206 


98,400 


99,77 


20.9 


12.139.23 


8,414.12 


40.85 


8.6 


91-92... 


22,.539.17 


213 


97.968 


104.88 


22.7 


15,981.19 


6,357.98 


29.85 


6.5 


92-93... 


22,220.40 


188 


101,100 


118.19 


22.0 


12,798.54 


9,421.86 


50.12 


9.3 


93-94... 


25,161.80 


182 


104,300 


H8.25 


24.1 


12,922.84 


12,2.38.96 


67.25 


11.7 


94-95... 


24,759.42 


187 


107.442 


139.88 


23.4 


12,993.55 


11,765.87 


62.92 


11.0 


95-96... 


21.549.72 


200 


110,300 


107.75 


19.5 


13,568.39 


7,981.33 


39.91 


7.2 


96-97... 


15,005.03 


192 


113,100 


78.15 


13.3 


6,285.81 


8,719.22 


45.41 


7.7 


97-98... 


15,012.95 


192 


117,226 


78.19 


12.8 


7.474.09 


7,538.86 


39.26 


6.4 


98-99. . . 


14.457.26 


198 


120,900 


73.02 


12.0 


8.766.66 


5.690.60 


28.74 


4.7 


99-00. . . 


14,935.35 


194 


126,800 


76.99 


11.8 


7,280.22 


7.655.13 


39.46 


6.0 


00-01... 


15,742.98 


207 


133,623 


76.05 


11.8 


7,455.57 


8.287.41 


40.04 


6.2 


01-02... 


17,575.88 


197 


135,600 


89.22 


13.0 


7,326.62 


10,249.26 


52.03 


7.6 


02-03... 


18,740.64 


203 


137,500 


92.32 


13.6 


7,961.84 


10,778.80 


53.09 


7.8 


03-04. . . 


19,391.07 


193 


139,430 


100.47 


13.9 


7,208.54 


12,182.53 


63.12 


8.7 


04-05... 


19,277.25 


• 198 


139,900 


102.54 


13.8 


7.251.73 


12,025.52 


60.74 


8.6 


05-06... 


21,061.26 


211 


141,900 


99.82 


14.8 


7,847.70 


13,213.56 


62.62 


9.3 


06-07... 


19,320.61 


174 


143,135 


111.04 


13.5 


6,340.80 


12.979.81 


74.60 


9.1 


07-08... 


21,169.31 


187 


143.900 


113.21 


14.7 


7.484.55 


13,684.76 


73.18 


9.5 


08-09. . . 


22,053.25 


191 


144,000 


115,46 


15.3 


8.432.67 


13,620.58 


71.31 


9.5 


09-10.. . 


23,236.24 


169 


143,819 


137.49 


18.2 


8,155.35 


15,080.89 


89.24 


10.5 


10-11... 


24,212.34 


181 


145,000 


133.77 


16.7 


8,880.92 


15,331.42 


84.70 


10.6 


11-12... 


2 7,44*. .50 


214 


148,000 


128.25 


18.5 


10,551,40 


16.893.90 


78.94 


11.4 


12-13... 


32,772.18 


213 


150.504 


153.86 


21.8 


10.717.68 


22,054.50 


103.54 


14.7 


1.5-14... 


34,395.06 


208 


152,500 


165.36 


22.6 


11,245.85 


23,149.21 


111.29 


15.1 


14-15... 


33,520.04 


207 


152,800 


1 70.05 


21.9 


10,676.61 


22,843.43 


110.35 


15.0 


15-16... 


34,370.22 


207 


152,160 


166.04 


22.6 


12,201.67 


22,168.55 


107.09 


14.6 


16-17... 


35,223.42 


170 


151,192 


207.20 


23.3 


10.91 6.-58 


24,307.04 


142.98 


16.6 


17-18... 


.50,025.43 


130 


403,634 


2.50.96 


7.4 


7.481.15 


22,544.28 


173.42 


5.1 


18-19... 


40,853.13 


241 


410,824 


169.52 


9.9 


7,801.56 


33,051.57 


137.14 


8.1 


19-20... 


55.238.53 


217 


401,734 


254.56 


13.8 


15,060.04 


40,178.49 


185.15 


10.0 


20-21... 


85.973.79 


254 


401,786 


338.48 


21.4 


28,793.81 


57.179.98 


225.12 


14.2 


Total . . 


1.271.177.10 








531,622.23 


7.59,554.87 







CHAPTER TEN 

THE FIELD OF LUTHER COLLEGE 

H. O. Talle 
I. Location and Boundaries of Field 

THE northern half of Northwest Territory and of Louisiana 
Purchase has always been the region from which Luther Col- 
lege has gotten the majority of its students. That fact is not 
strange. The great bulk of Norwegian population is found in 
this region. Since the Scandinavian countries enjoy the distinc- 
tion of holding first honors in literacy in the whole world, it is but 
natural that the immigrants from that quarter of Europe should 
be concerned about the education of their children. These im- 
migrants were a God-fearing people. It is therefore only natural 
that they should desire that their sons be trained in the Christian 
doctrine and for the Lord's work. Accordingly, Luther College 
was founded to serve especially the people of Norwegian birth and 
of I,utheran faith in America. 

The field of Luther College has never been limited to any 
part or locality of the Church. There are five reasons for this: 
first, it is the pioneer school of the former Norwegian Synod; 
second, it was the onlj' boys' school of the Norwegian Synod, as 
it is of the new church body to which it now belongs; third, it 
was founded as a pro-seminary school to serve the whole Church; 
fourth, it is, as it always has been, uniquely classical, and rightly 
so, if it is to be a real pro-seminary school; and fifth, it has always 
been supported by a synod, and as a synodical school its appeal 
has been to a field as wide as that of the synod which has gov- 
erned it. For these reasons it can truly be said that the field 
of Luther College is, and always has been, identical with the 
constituency of the synod which has supported it, specifically, 
and with the Norwegian people in America, generally. 

The expansion of the field of Luther College cannot be ac- 
counted for without reference to that unparalleled phenomenon in 
our history — the Westward Movement. New acquisitions of land 
had increased our national domain from less than a million square 
miles in 1790 to almost 3,000,000 square miles in 1860. By far 
the greater part of this new territory lay west of the Mississippi. 



THE FIELD OF LUTHER COLLEGE 185 

Small wonder then that this land of promise and opportunity 
should call many immigrants from the Northland. And small 
wonder too that the Norwegian immigrants, who have always 
eagerly grasped opportunities to acquire land, should answer the 
call of the far-flung prairies of the Northwest, where the major 
portion of the Norwegian population of our country is found to- 
day. The Norwegian immigrants who settled in these parts were 
in truth pioneers. The first white settlers came to Winneshiek 
County in 1848, not much over a decade before the founding of 
Luther College. It was a Norwegian Lutheran pastor, the Rev. 
Nils O. Brandt, who performed the marriage ceremony of the 
first white couple to be married in Winneshiek County. That was 
in 1851. Marvelous has been the development of this section of 
the United States since that day. 

The frontier line in 1860 ran west through central Michigan 
and Wisconsin, and into central Minnesota, where it turned south- 
ward and, except for points in Kansas and Texas, did not go 
west of the 97th meridian. Extension of settlements was just 
begun beyond the Missouri River. The pioneer farmer was dis- 
placing the herdsman, even as the herdsman had already displaced 
the hunter and trapper. In their movement westward, the immi- 
grants followed the rivers wherever they could. In fact, transporta- 
tion was largely by water throughout our whole country in 1860. 
There were but 30,626 miles of railroad, only 6 per cent of which 
was west of the Mississippi, despite the fact that railroads touched 
that river at ten different points then. The "Encyclopedia 
Americana" gives our aggregate length of mileage in 1917 as 
265,000 in round numbers, or about two-fifths of that of the entire 
world. The first trans-continental railroad was not completed 
before 1869. Connection with the Pacific by telegraph was not 
established until 1861. The National Bank Act was passed in 
1863, in an effort to bring order out of chaos in monetary matters 
in our country. Only 4,536,475 people lived west of the Mississip- 
pi, or one-seventh of our population at that time. Greater New 
York has now 1,083,573 more than that. Now, 31,689,445 live 
west of the Mississippi, or 30% of our total population. More 
people live west of the Mississippi today than were found in our 
whole country in 1860. Most of the people lived on farms. Only 
16.1% of the people lived in cities of 8,000 or more. Consequent- 
ly, 83.9% of our entire population was rural, although it should 
be said that many towns of less than 8,000 people had distinct 
urban characteristics. This condition will soon be reversed. The 
farms were large, the average being 199.2 acres as against 138.1 



186 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUCiH SIXTY YEARS 

acres in 1910. Tlu- citii's were suiaU. In 18(J0 only 9 cities had 
a population of lOO.OOO or more; only 141 had a population of 
8,000 or more. In 1920 these had increased to (58 and 92t re- 
spectively. 20 of these G8 are west of the Mississippi. Chicago 
was a city of 109,260 people; Detroit, of 45,610; Cleveland, of 
48,410; and Milwaukee, of 45,240, in 1860. Six Chicagos of that 
day could find room in present day Minneapolis and St. Paul. 
The Twin Cities have a population equal to 13 Milwaukees of 

1860 with a remainder as large as was the population of Port- 
land, Maine, in the year that Luther College was founded. De- 
troit is now our fourth largest city, and yet 13 Detroits of 1860 
could be placed in the modern Twin Cities and leave room for 
Fargo, North Dakota. But the Twin Cities were small in 1860. 
Minneapolis had 2,564 people and St. Paul had 10,401. Modern 
Deeorah could include Minneapolis of 1860 and still have room 
for a town of 1,500 inhabitants. Tiie rate of postage was deter- 
mined largely by distance, 1, 3, 5, 10, and 12 cents being the rates 
authorized. Only 216,370,600 ordinary postage stamps, or 7 
per capita, were used in 1860. A postal bulletin for May, 1922, 
gives the number of stamps used in one fiscal year now as 14,000, 
000,000; the number of stamped envelopes, as 2,700,000,000; and 
the number of postal cards, as 1,125,000,000, a total of 17,825, 
000,000, or 170 per capita. The postal revenue per capita in 

1861 was $.26; in 1921, it was $4.28. The number of jieople per 
square mile in 1860 and in 1920 is shown in the following table 
for the four states which were the actual field of Luther College 
in the year of its birth : 

TABLE I 

1860 1920 

Iowa 12.1 4.5.2 

Illinois 30.6 115.7 

Minnesota 2.1 29 . 5 

Wisconsin 14.0 47.6 

United States 10.6 35.5 

The Dakotas were a territory in 1860 and had less than one- 
tenth of one person per square mile. North Dakota has now 9.2 
persons per square mile and South Dakota has 8.3. Thus it is 
seen that time has wrought many changes during these sixty years. 
And it may be truthfully said that the development of the great 
Northwest into an important grain and mineral -producing area 
is in no small measure due to the tireless toil of the Norwegian 
immigrant farmer. To the pioneer preacher is no less credit due. 
Such names as Brandt, Koren, and Preus must forever be associ- 
ated with the development of our country in the ujiper Mississippi 
Valley. 



THE FIELD OF LUTHER COLLEGE 



187 



Since Liitlier College was founded by the Synod for the Nor- 
wegian Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, its constituency 
in 1861 was the congregations of that church body. These con- 
gregations were located in four states, Wisconsin, Illinois, Iowa, 
and Minnesota. A glance at Map I will reveal that southern 
Wisconsin had by far the greater part of these, or equal to two- 
thirds of the total. In northeastern Iowa, where Luther College 
was located in 1862, there were only 13 congregations in 1860. 
There were but i in Illinois, and 22 in Minnesota. But Wisconsin 
had 76, making a total of 115 for these 4 states. It is true that 




Mop t 1 

Number of Norwegian Svrod 
Congr emotions LulherColleSe 
Gonslilueno (166O) 

5ix ilolcs in U 5 ■ 116 Congre^alions 
: » I " Norv< Sv~od Cons . ■, „ -j- 



MAP I. FIELD OF LUTHER COLLEGE IN 1860 



the real total was 118, because New York had one congregation 
and Missouri had two, but they could not be counted on for sup- 
port with any degree of assurance. It became the duty of the 
congregations in four states then to build and maintain Luther 
College. By referring to Table II the reader may note the 
number of congregations the College has had to depend upon, in 
1860, in 1880, in 1906, in 1917 when the merger of the three 
Lutheran church bodies which now constitute the Norwegian Lu- 
theran Church of America took place, and in 1920 M'hen that 
merger had existed for three years and Luther College was en- 
tering upon its sixtieth year. 



188 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



When one notes that there were only 16 students in attendance 
at Luther College in the year of its founding at Halfway Creek 
parsonage^, La Crosse County, Wisconsin, the conclusion may be 
drawn that the 115 congregations which supported it were a very 
slender reed on which to lean. But it must be remembered that 
the College was founded under the rather unfavorable conditions 
that have been mentioned above, that the stirring days of civil 
strife were at hand, that it entailed no small sacrifice to attend 
college in those times, and that an infant college, like an infant 
industry, must weather its childhood before it inspires the con- 
fidence of the majority. 

TABLE II 

CONGREGATIONS OF THE SYNOD FOR THE NORWEGIAN EVANGELICAL 

LUTHERAN CHURCH IN AMERICA. 1860-1917. AND FOR THE NORWEGIAN 

LUTHERAN CHURCH OF AMERICA, 1920 



United States: 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Illinois 

Missouri 

New York 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

California 

Michigan 

Texas 

Indiana 

Ohio 

Oregon 

New Jersey 

Maryland 

Washington 

Idaho 

Maine 

Pennsylvania 

Massachusetts 

Montana 

Colorado 

Tennessee 

Utah 

Virginia ^ . 

Alaska 

District of Columbia. . . 

New Hampshire 

Oklahoma 

Wyoming 



1860 



1880 



1906 



1917 



1920 



Canada: 

Quebec 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

British Columbia. 
Saskatchewan . . . . 
Alberta 



76 


167 


147 


156 


391 


22 


221 


302 


317 


790 


li 


91 


58 


57 


204 


4 


22 


14 


22 


19 


2 


4 




1 


1 


1 


S 


5 


6 


11 




34 


181 


234 


615 




46 


59 


80 


290 




23 


16 


14 


21 




12 


2 


1 


6 




11 


18 


11 


16 




8 


17 


16 


32 




7 


8 


9 


10 




4 


2 


3 






4 


2 


4 


4 




4 


7 


9 


25 




3 


3 


4 


4 




2 












47 


55 


94 






7 


3 


14 

1 










1 






1 


3 


3 






24 


51 


120 






5 

1 


7 
1 


9 






1 


"2 
2 
1 






2 










6 


10 


3 


8 




2 


2 


5 


11 






1 


2 
17 
23 


7 
123 
93 



Total . 



683 



940 



2935 



(The field of Luther College embraced 6 states in 1860; 23 states and 3 provinces in Canada, 
in 1880 and 1907; 24 states. Alaska, Dist. of Columbia, and 5 provinces in Canada, in 1917; 
27 states, Alaska, Dist. of Columbia, and 5 provinces in Canada, in 1920.) 



THE FIELD OF LUTHER COLLEGE 



189 



TABLE III 

CONGREGATIONS BY COUNTIES IN STATES THAT WERE THE FIELD OF 
LUTHER COLLEGE IN 1860 AND 1880 



WISCONSIN 18< 
Racine 


)0 

2 
4 

2 
2 
1 
5 
.? 
6 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
3 
1 
1 
5 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
4 
1 
.S 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 

30 

2 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 
3 


1880 

2 
17 
3 
2 
1 
5 
3 
8 
1 
1 
1 
1 
4 
4 
1 
1 
10 
1 
2 
3 
1 
1 
4 
5 
9 
7 
4 
8 
4 
2 
15 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
4 
2 
5 
1 
2 
4 
1 
7 
1 
1 
1 
1 

167 

1880 

10 

6 

3 

3 
3 
9 

2 
5 
7 


IOWA 1860 1880 
Hardin 1 


Dane 




1 


Jefferson 

Lafayette 

Milwaukee 


Cherokee 

Kossuth 

Palo Alto 


1 
3 

2 


Rock 

Walworth 

Columbia 

Dodge 

Waukesha 


Wright 

Clay 

Howard 

Cass 

Hancock 

Polk 


2 
1 

3 
2 
4 
1 




Sioux 

Total 1 

MINNESOTA 186 

Fillmore 

Mower 

Houston 

Goodhue 

Olmsted 

Dakota . 


1 


Iowa 

Manitowoc 

Winnebago 


3 91 


Vernon 

Waushara 

Crawford 

Juneau 


1880 
7 14 
4 6 
4 6 


Waupaca 

Grant 

Green 


1 8 

1 2 
1 1 


Pierce 


Nicollet 


1 3 


La Crosse 

Portage 


Waseca 

McLeod 

Freeborn 

Rice 

Kandiyohi 


1 5 

1 1 

1 10 

5 


St. Croix 

Sauk 


7 
4 


Trempealeau 


Faribault 

Meeker ; 

Steele 

Brown 

Jackson 

Douglas 


7 
1 


Kewaunee 

Richland 

Chippewa 


3 
3 
5 


Burnett 

Monroe 


6 
3 


Eau Claire 

Buffalo 

Oconto 

Polk 


Carver 

Pope 

Ramsey 

Stearns 


1 

10 

1 

1 


Shawano 

Wood 


Blue Earth 


5 
6 


Barron 


Stevens 


5 


Clark 

Marathon 

Taylor 


Grant 

Lac qui Parle . 

Otter Tail . 


7 

3 

13 






7 


Total 76 

IOWA 18( 

Winneshiek 

Allamakee 

Clayton 

Mitchell 


Becker 

Clay 

Cottonwood 

Swift 

Chippewa 

Dodge 

Wabasha 

Winona 

Big Stone 

Lyon 

Murray 

Norman 

Polk 

Rock 

Sibley 


5 
6 
2 
4 
4 
3 
1 
2 
1 


Story 

Chickasaw 

Worth 

Clinton 


4 
2 
10 
4 
4 


Winnebago 

Iowa , 

Humboldt 

Buena Vista 


1 
1 
1 
2 
1 


2 
4 

2 
1 
3 
2 
3 
1 
2 


Benton . . ., 

Lincoln 


Poweshiek 

Hamilton 

Monona 

Webster 

Woodbury 

Franklin 


Redwood 

Wilkin 

Wadena 

Total 2 


2 
1 
1 

2. 221 



190 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



TABLE III— Cont. 



SOUTH DAKOTA 

Union 

Clay 

Yankton 

Lincoln 

Minnehaha 

Brookings . 

Deuel 

Moody 

Hamlin 

Grant 

Hanson 

Kingsbury 

Lake 

Roberts 

Codington 



Total 

ILLINOIS 

Cook 

Boone 

Winnebago 

Lee 

La Salle 

McHenry 

Livingston 

Grundy 

Iroquois 

Kankakee 

Sangamon 

Will 



1880 



1860 
1 
1 
1 
1 



Total. 



MISSOURI 

St. Louis 

Buchanan 

De Kalb 



1860 
1 
1 



Total. 



NEW YORK 

New York 

Kings 

Essex 

Erie 



1860 
1 



Total. 



NEBRASKA 

Douglas 

Cuming 

Washington 

Odar 

Dixon 

Lancaster 

Cass 

Dodge 

Madison 

Colfax 

Stanton 

Furnas 

Webster 

Nance 

Custer 

Howard 

Knox 

Frontier 



Total. 



NEW JERSEY 

Middlesex 

Gloucester 



46 

1880 
1 
1 
2 
3 
1 
2 
2 
3 
1 
1 
1 



1880 
1 



Total. 



NORTH D.\KOTA 1880 

Cass 8 

Richland 6 

Traill 7 

Barnes 1 

Walsh 3 

Grand F'orks 5 

Steele 1 

Pembina 1 

Ransom , . . . . 2 

Total 34 

OREGON 1880 

Multnomah 1 

Clackamas 2 

Clatsop 1 

Total 4 

MAINE 1880 

Cumberland 1 

OHIO 1880 

Cuyahoga 2 

Mahoning 1 

Summit 1 

Total 4 

WASHINGTON 1880 

Snohomish 1 

INDIANA 1880 

Marion 1 

Newton 2 

Benton 1 

Total 4 

MARYLAND 1880 

Baltimore 2 

PENNSYLV^ANIA 1880 

Erie 1 

TEX.\S 1880 

Kaufman 1 

Bosque 1 

Henderson 1 

Anderson 1 

Travis 1 

Limestone 1 

McLennan 1 

Total 7 

CALIFORNIA 1880 

San F'rancisco 1 

A lamcda 4 

F'resno 1 

Monterey 1 

Napa 1 

San Mateo 1 

Santa Cruz 1 

Stanislaus 1 

Total .' 11 

MICHIG.VN 1880 

Muskegon 2 

Alpena . 1 

Leelanau 2 

Huron 1 

Bay Cicy 1 

Kent 1 

Total 8 



THE FIELD OF LUTHER COLLEGE 



191 



KANSAS 

Republic 

Brown 

Doniphan 

Greenwood . . . . 

Clay 

Atchison 

Jewell 

Cloud 

McPherson. . . 
Nonon 



IDAHO 

1 Latah 


1880 
1 


1 CANADA 
1 Manitoba . . 

1 Ontario 

1 Quebec 


1880 
6 

2 

2 


2 Total 


10 







Total. . 



The number of congregations that were in each county in the 
states where the former Norwegian Synod was active in the years 
1860 and 1880 is shown in Table III. These facts have been ar- 
rived at by noting the date of founding of eacli congregation 




MAP II. FIELD OF LUTHER COLLEGE IN 1880 



listed in the "Norsk-Lutherske Menigheter i Amerika", Volumes 
I and II, with the aid of the work, "Norsk-Lutherske Prester i 
Amerika". The data for 190(5 were taken from the report of the 
U. S. Census entitled "Religious Bodies, 1906", and for the years 
1917 and 1920, from the "Lutheran World Almanac". It is inter- 
esting to note that Winneshiek County, Iowa, increased its number 
from 2 in 1860 to 10 in 1880; that Dane County, Wisconsin, led 
with 14 in I860; that Trempealeau County, Wisconsin, increased 
its number from 2 in 1860 to 15 in 1880; and that Freeborn County, 



192 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Minnesota, had only 1 in 1860 but 10 in 1880. Wisconsin soon 
yielded first honors to Minnesota in the number of congregations, 
as the great Westward Movement caught the Norwegians in its 
sweep, and that state has continued to be the hub of the Norwegian 
Lutheran Church. 

When President Lincoln signed the Homestead Bill in 1862, 
it became comparatively easy to acquire land. The constituency 
of the Norwegian Lutheran Church is now, and always has been, 
largely rural. In 1907 the Norwegian Church distribution was 
as follows : city — 8 per cent, town — 23 per cent, and rural — 69 




MAP III. FIELD OF LUTHEK COLLEGE IN 1906 



per cent. The cheap land was therefore eagerly taken, and it 
may be noted on Map II that Luther College was soon to find 
itself on the outskirts of its constituency. In their advance west- 
ward the Norwegian immigrants followed such rivers as the 
Minnesota, the Missouri, and the Red River of the North. 
Minnesota had in 1880 (see Table II) 221 congregations, or over 
a hundred more than had the entire Synod in 1860. All of these 
were west of a line drawn from the southeast corner of the state 
to the northwest corner. Wisconsin had 167; Iowa, 91; and Il- 
linois, 22, in 1880. Great progress was made in the Dakotas, 
in Kansas, in Nebraska, and in California. The total number of 
congregations in 1880 was 683. Ten of these were in Canada, 
leaving 673 for the United States. These 673 were in 23 states 
of our Union. A good beginning had been made in Texas, which 



THE FIELD OF LUTHER COLLEGE 



193 



had 7 congregations. Scarcely a county in southern Minnesota 
lacked a congregation, and by far the greater number had more 
than three. During this score of years the constituency of Lu- 
ther College expanded to no small degree. The Norwegian Synod 
spread its influence in all directions, but especially toward the 
west. It was active in 17 states where it had no congregations 
twenty years earlier. Only six of these, including Pennsylvania, 
border on the Atlantic. Such was the progress, despite the grass- 
hopper pest and money panic of the 70's, forces which keenly 
affect a rural population. 




MAP IV. FIELD OF LUTHER COLLEGE IN 1917 



In 1906 the number of congregations in Minnesota (see 
Table II) had increased to 302; North Dakota, which had climb- 
ed to second place, had 181; Wisconsin had 147; while Wash- 
ington, whicli had only 1 in 1880, had 47 in 1906; and Montana, 
where no congregations were in existence in 1880, had 24 in 
1906. The sphere of activity had been increased to embrace 940 
congregations. The decrease in the states of Iowa, Wisconsin, 
Illinois, Nebraska and Kansas was caused by the division in the 
Norwegian Synod which took place in the 80's. But the de- 
crease in those states was more than compensated for by the 
rapid strides made in the western states. (See Map III). 

Eleven years later (1917) occurred the merger of three Lu- 
theran churcli bodies, the Hauge Synod; the United I>utheran 
Church; and the Norwegian Synod. The data given in Table II 



194 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



for the year 1}>]7 are for tlie Norwegian Synod only. It is clear 
that the impetus of a decade earlier continued with unabated 
^ igor. Minnesota had 317 congregations; North Dakota, 234; 
South Dakota, 80; Washington, 55; Montana, 51; and in Can- 
ada, Saskatcliewan had 17, and Alberta had 23. The field of 
Luther College had been increased so as to embrace 1,119 congre- 
gations located in 2'1' states, in District of Columbia, in Alaska, 
and in Canada. But the mainstay of the College was then, as 
before, the great Northwest. (See Map IV). 

In 1920 Minnesota had 790 congregations; North Dakota, 
615; Wisconsin, 391; South Dakota, 290; Iowa, 201; and Mon- 




MAP V. FIELD OF LUTHER COLLKCIE IN 1020 

tana, 120. It will be noted that the merger occasioned consider- 
able increase in the states where there was a decrease in the 80's. 
The total number of congregations in the Church in 1920 was 
2,935. Map V shows their distribution by states, as do Maps 
III and IV for the years 1906 and 1917. Thus it is seen that 
the constant shifting of })opulation westward has had the effect 
of leaving the College in the southeast corner of its constituency. 



II. Norwegian Population in this Field 

It is estimated that there are now 2,213,922 people of Nor- 
wegian extraction in our country. The number was very much 
smaller in 18G0. The estimated figure is 50,000. Table IV gives 



THE FIELD OF LUTHER COLLEGE 195 

approximate data regarding Norwegian population in the field 
of Luther College by decades: 

TABLE IV 
TOTAL NORWEGLAN POPULATION IN U. S.. BY DECADES. 1860—1920 





Born in 


First 


Second 


Tliird 




Year 


Norway 


Generation 


Generation 


Generation 


Total 


1860 


43,995 


5,800* 


205* 




50.000* 


1870 


114.246 


33.000* 


2.654* 




150.000* 


1880 


181.729 


150.000* 


18.000* 


211* 


350.000* 


1890 


322,665 


273.466 


175.000* 


13.879* 


785.000* 


1900 


338.665 


449.410 


350.000* 


75,000* 


1.213,175* 


1910 


403,858 


575.241 


734,322* 


244,777* 


1.958.198* 


1920 


363.862 


520,322 


797.842* 


531.896* 


2.213.922* 


♦Estimated. 


Other fig 


ures are from U. S. 


Census. 







Nearly 80% of this population is found in the states of Minne- 
sota, Wisconsin, North Dakota, Illinois, Iowa, and South Da- 
kota, ranking in the order named. Minnesota alone has 30% 
of the Norwegians in the United States. Table V gives the popu- 
lation and the percentage of the total, in the states named above: 

TABLE V 
TOTAL NORWEGIAN POPULATION: U. S. CENSUS (1906) 
State Population Percentage 

Minnesota 524,475 30 % of total in U. S. 

Wisconsin 307.875 17.5yo of total in U. b. 

Nortli Dakota 151.030 8.6% of total in U. S. 

Illinois 149.895 8.5% of total in U. S. 

Iowa 128,170 7.3% of total in U. S. 

South Dakota 98.940 5.5% of total in U. S. 

Total 1.360.385 77.4% of total in U. S. 

III. Church Population in this Field 

It has been shown above that there are today 2,213,922 peo- 
ple of Norwegian extraction in the United States. In 1920 there 
were five Norwegian Lutheran Synods in America — the Norwegian 
Lutheran Church, with 425,065 members; the Lutheran Free 
Church, with 45,000 members; the Eielsen Synod, with 1,600 
members; the Church of the Lutheran Brethren, with 2,000 mem- 
bers; and the Norwegian Synod of the American Evangelical 
Lutheran Church, with 6,425 members. The average size of the 
congregations in the Norwegian Lutheran Church was 145 mem- 
bers, in 1920. The church constituency of Luther College is then 
numerically about one-fifth of the estimated total Norwegian 
population in the United States. 



196 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



TABLE VI 
COMPETING COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES IN STATES OF GREATEST NOR- 
WEGIAN POPULATION. TABLE BASED ON U. S. BUREAU 
OF EDUCATION BULLETIN No. 34, 1920 







No. of 


No. of 


No. of 
















Publicly- 


Private- 


Lu- 




No. of 










No. of 


sup- 


ly 


theran 


No. of 


Catho- 


No. of 


No. of 






Colleges 


ported 


sup- 


Colleges 


Norw. 


lic 


Re- 


Non- 




STATE 


and 


Colleges 


ported 


and 


Lu- 


Colleges 


formed 


Sect- 


Remarks 




Univer- 


and 


Colleges 


Profes- 


theran 


and 


and 


arian 






sities 


Univer- 


and 


sional 


Colleges 


Univer- 


Other 


Colleges 








sities 


Univer- 
sities 


Schools 




sities 


Colleges 






Idaho 


3 


2 


1 











1 





1 jr. col. 


Illinois. . . . 


41 


2 


M) 


4 





2 


21 


12 


2 jr. col. 

10 iirof. sch. 


Iowa 


24 


3 


21 


4 


**2 


1 


*11 


5 


**3 jr. col. 
1 prof. sch. 


Michigan . . 


16 


5 


11 








1 


7 


3 


2 jr. rol. 

3 prof. sch. 


Minnesota . 


17 


3 


14 


*5 


*2 


3 


4 


2 


2 jr. col. 
4 prof. sch. 


Montana.. . 


3 
4 
12 
9 


3 

2 

3 




10 
6 






*2 






*2 










1 
8 
3 




1 
2 
1 




No. Dakota 




Oregon .... 




So. Dakota. 


**1 jr.col.' ' 


Texas 


l.S 


3 


12 





.0 





10 


2 


4 jr. col. 
2 prof. sch. 


Washington 


6 


2 


4 


*f-) 


*!=? 


1 





1 


*n jr. col. 


Wisconsin. . 


10 


1 


9 


**2 


*M 


1 


3 


3 


1 prof. sch. 
*•=! jr. col. 


Total. . . . 


160 


31 


129 


19 


*+9 


9 


69 


32 





*lConcordia College, Minn.; Augustana College, S. Dak.; Upper Iowa University, Iowa, 
are not listed in U. S. Bureau of Education Bulletin No. 34, 1920, but have been added here.) 

**(The following Norwegian Lutheran junior colleges have also been added: Waldorf 
College. Forest City, Iowa; Canton Normal School, Canton, S. Dak.; Pacific Lutheran College, 
Parkland, Washington; Spokane College, Spokane, Washington; and Central Wisconsin 
College, Scandinavia, Wisconsin.) 

IV. Competing Schools in this Field 
But Lutlier College is not tlie only Lutheran college serving 
tin's constituency. Table VI, which has been compiled from in- 
formation given in Bureau of Education Bulletin No. S'i, 1920, 
with data collected in 1917-18, shows that there are in the 12 
states where the majority of Norwegians are found a total of 19 
Lutheran colleges and professional schools. Among these 9 are 
Norwegian Lutheran colleges, 5 of which are junior colleges. 
These 9 colleges are: Luther College, Decorah, Iowa; St. Olaf 
College, Northfleld, Minn.; Concordia College, Moorhead, Minn.; 
Augustana College, Sioux Falls, S. Dak.; all of full college grade; 
and Waldorf College. Forest City, Iowa; Canton Normal School, 
Canton, S. Dak.; Pacific Lutheran College, Parkland, Wash.; 
Spokane College, Spokane, Wash. ; and Central Wisconsin College, 
Scandinavia, Wis., all junior colleges. Nine colleges for a i)opula- 
tion of 42;),0G5 are not too many, if those who should attend these 
schools really attend them. In 1 91. "5 tliere were 7,685,618 people 
in the United States between the ages 19 and 22— of college age. 
201,230 attended college. That is, 1 out of 38 of college age at- 
tended college. Only 1 Norwegian out of lOS of college age at- 



THE FIELD OF LUTHER COLLEGE 197 

tended a Norwegian college. Of the Norwegians who did go to 
college 18% attended Norwegian Lutheran colleges, 82% attended 
other colleges. In 1913 there were 7,624,153 people between the 
ages 15 and 18, of high school age. 1,366,822 of these attended 
some secondary school. Tliat is, 1 out of 6. Only 1 Norwegian out 
of 49 attended a Norwegian academy. Of the Norwegians who 
did go to secondary schools, 12% attended Norwegian Lutheran 
academies, 88% attended public high schools. In 1920 the 
estimated Norwegian population of college age was 172,686 and 
the estimated population of college age within the Norwegian Lu- 
theran Church was 33,155. Notwithstanding that there are four 
Norwegian Lutheran colleges — Luther, St. Olaf, Concordia and 
Augustana — competing for patronage, there are evidently students 
enough for each school. In 1920 the estimated Norwegian pop- 
ulation of academy age was 174,899, and the estimated popula- 
tion of academy age within the Norwegian Lutheran Church was 
33,580. Notwithstanding that the Norwegian Lutheran Church 
has 18 academies taking care of this field, they could have from 
2,000 to 10,000 students each. These 18 schools are, in the order 
of their foundation: Augustana (1860), Luther College Prepara- 
tory (1861), Red Wing Seminary (1879), Luther Academy (1888), 
Central Wisconsin College (1890), Concordia College (1891), 
Madison Normal (1892), Park Region College (1892), Jewell 
College (1893), Pacific College (1894), Pleasant View College 
(1896), Clifton College (1897), Gale College (1901), Waldorf 
College (1903), Spokane College (1907), Camrose College (1911), 
Outlook College (1915), and Canton Normal (1920). 

There is everywhere a growing conception as to educational 
needs. Civilization keeps on growing in complexity. Industrial 
life becomes more and more specialized. The greater complex- 
ity and specialization demand a more extended and specialized 
training. The length of the school life of the average person 
has increased from a total of 82 days in 1800 to a total of over 
1,200 days in 1920. The high school has become the people's 
college. The number of youth that attend high schools has in- 
creased by leaps and bounds. In 1890 only 5 per 1,000 attended 
secondary schools, public or private. In 1910, 12.3 per 1,000 
were in attendance; in 1918, 19.1 per 1,000. There has also been 
an increase in college attendance. In 1890 the college attendance 
was 72,460, or 1 out of 868 of the population; in 1900, the col- 
lege attendance was 115,271, or 1 out of 659 of the population; 
in 1910, the college attendance was 184,712, or 1 out of 498; in 
1918, the college attendance was 290,106, or 1 out of 355. 



198 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

There is every reason to believe that the attendance at high 
schools and colleges will increase still more. In 1913 Congress 
appointed a National Commission on Vocational Education. This 
commission reported that in 1910 not one per cent of the people 
engaged in agriculture, manufacturing, and mechanical pursuits 
had been trained for their callings. The commission advocated 
that each person should be given three years of secondary school 
training, or five years more training than the average man at 
present has received. If the dreams of the educators are ever 
realized, every youth will get at least a secondary school educa- 
tion. 

As a financial investment, it has been proved that it pays to 
"train up a child in the way he sliould go." The average cost of a 
man's education in the United States has been estimated by Sar- 
gent ("American Private Schools, 1922") to be $252. The aver- 
age cost of the education through the high school is $515. The 
difference between the two is $263. At 21 the average person 
has a prospect of living until 65. If the additional cost of educa- 
tion — $263 — is distributed over the 44 years of life before him, 
it will amount to about $6 a year. The U. S. Bureau of Educa- 
tion has issued a bulletin showing the money value of education. 
From this we quote merely the statement that "every day spent 
in school pays the child Nine Dollars". Since the people are 
awakening more and more to see the financial gain, as well as 
the cultural value of a liighcr education, there will always be a 
large field of usefulness for Luther College. It is a thoroughly 
American school and can serve the general public as well as Nor- 
M'egian- Americans. 

I.uther College should be able to meet the competition that 
confronts it on every side. The founders of Luther College were 
university men who planned to erect a school of the highest type. 
Luther College has always kept up to the highest standards of 
the times, has maintained the Christian religion as the core of its 
curricula, and adjusted its other subjects to harmonize with the 
best practices of the day. Its courses are arranged to meet the 
wants of its constituency. The Preparatory Department is built 
on the junior-senior high school plan, reaching down to the eighth 
graders and providing instruction even for those who can not 
qualify for high school entrance. The college curriculum is not 
only in the best sense pro-seminary, but also pre-professional, of- 
fering a liberal amount of electives and preparing for any stand- 
ard profession. 



THE FIELD OF LUTHER COLLEGE 



199 



Table VII shows the competing colleges in 1861 and 1921, in 
the 12 states of greatest Norwegian population: 



COMPETING 

IDAHO 1861 

State 

Reformed 

Total 

ILLINOIS 1861 

State 

City 

Nonsectarian 4 

Reformed et al 13 

Roman Catholic 

Lutheran 2 

Total 19 

IOWA 1861 

State 1 

Nonsectarian 2 

Reformed et al 4 

Roman Catholic 

Lutheran 2 

Total 9 

OREGON 1861 

State 

Nonsectarian 

Reformed et al 3 

Total 3 

TEXAS 1861 

State 

Nonsectarian 

Reformed et al 1 

Total 1 

WISCONSIN 1861 

State 1 

Nonsectarian 3 

Reformed et al 1 

Roman Catholic 

Lutheran 

Total 5 



TABLE VII 
COLLEGES, 1861 AND 1921 

1921 MICHIGAN 1861 

2 State 2 

1 City '..'..'.'.'.'.'..'. 

Nonsectarian 2 

3 Reformed et al 3 

Roman Catholic 

1921 :_ 

1 Total 7 

^f MINNESOTA 1861 

^i State 

I City :;:::::::: ;: 

Nonsectarian 

. J Reformed et al i 

Roman Catholic 1 

inTi Lutheran 

I Total 2 

11 

1 NORTH DAKOTA 1861 

4 State 

— — . Nonsectarian 

24 Reformed et al 

1921 Total 

2 

8 MONTANA 1861 

! State 

12 

.„,, SOUTH DAKOTA 1861 

1921 stace 

^ Nonsectarian 

■r Reformed et al 

^^ Lutheran 

15 Total 

1921 

1 WASHINGTON 1861 

3 State 1 

3 Nonsectarian 

1 Roman Catholic 

2 Lutheran 

10 Total 1 



1921 
3 
2 
3 

7 
1 

16 

1921 
1 
2 

2 
4 
3 
5 

17 



1921 
3 

1921 
3 
1 
3 
2 



1921 
2 
1 
1 

2 



This tabulation includes the colleges, universities, and pro- 
fessional schools that are listed in Bureau of Education Bulletin 
No. 34 for 1920. To that list have been added the five Norwe- 
gian Lutheran junior colleges and the Norwegian Lutheran col- 
leges at Moorhead, Minnesota, and Sioux Falls, S. Dakota. Up- 
per Iowa University at Fayette, Iowa, has also been added. The 
German Lutheran Theological Seminary at Dubuque is not in- 
cluded in this table, though theological seminaries are included 
for some of the states. 



861 


1921 




3 


19 


41 


9 


24 


7 


16 


2 


17 




3 




4 


3 


12 




9 


1 


15 


1 


6 


5 


10 



200 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

The foregoing table is summarized in Table \'III. The 
totals for each state are given without reference to control : 

TABLE VIII 
STATE 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Iowa 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Montana 

North Dakota 

Oregon 

South Dakota 

Texas 

Washington 

Wisconsin 

Total 47 160 

There were 46 colleges in existence in these 12 states as com- 
petitors of Luther College in 1861 that still are its competitors. 
But the sixty years that have passed have added many new ones 
so that the total is now 160 in these states of greatest Norwegian 
population. To this number should be added the hundreds of 
public high schools, which are bj' all odds the strongest competi- 
tors, not only of church secondary schools like the Luther College 
Preparatory Department, but also of church higher schools, in 
that they naturally direct their graduates into the state univer- 
sities rather than the church colleges. 

In Table IX is listed the number of colleges that were in ex- 
istence in the United States in 1861 and still are, as follows: 



TABLE IX 



Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia. 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 



4 








New Hampshire 

New Jersey 


1 

3 


? 










26 


S 


North Carolina 


8 


1 

7 


North Dakota 

Ohio 


22 




Oklahoma 




6 




3 






26 


19 
11 


Rhode Island 


1 

8 





South Dakota 




4 




6 


8 




1 


^ 


Utah 


1 


1 


Vermont 


3 


9 




12 


9 


Washington 


1 


7 
? 


West Virginia 


.'.'.'.'.'.".'. 5 


^ 






12 


Total in U. S 


244 



THE FIELD OF LUTHER COLLEGE 201 

Of the 672 colleges, universities, and professional schools 
listed in the bulletin previously mentioned, only 2-il were founded 
prior to, or during, 1861. Among these is Luther College. Four- 
teen of our states had no higher schools at that time. Many of 
the present state schools arose through the provisions of the 
Morrill Act of 1862, when Luther College had done a year's ser- 
vice. The 14 states having no higher institutions were all west 
of the Mississippi River, except Florida and West Virginia. Of 
the 34 states that did have higher schools, only 9 were west of the 
Mississippi. These 9 states had in all 35 higher institutions of 
learning, including Luther College. There are, then, only 34 higher 
institutions still in existence which were the competitors of Lu- 
ther College in 1861, in the states that comprise the western half 
of our country. Indeed it can with truth be said that Luther 
College is a pioneer college. 

In conclusion, Luther College had but a small field to look 
out upon in the year of its founding. It proved its worth, grew 
Avith our countrj', and with increasing years came better days. 
It will always be a monument to the Norwegian people in Amer- 
ica, but especiall}' to those who gave of their time and substance 
to make it succeed. Daniel Webster once said of his Alma Mater, 
Dartmouth College, which has now grown to be a large institu- 
tion: "It is a small college, but there are those who love it." 
Luther College is not large, if measured by the attendance yard- 
stick; it is a great school, however, if measured by its aims and 
ideals, its principles and practices, the character of its men and 
the extent of its good influence. But, be it termed large or small, 
according as mens' minds differ, "there are those who love it", 
and who are willing to sacrifice in order that generations to come 
mav learn to love it. 



CHAPTER ELEVEN 

ATTENDANCE 

S. S. Reque 



I. Attendance, by Years 

THE total enrollment at Luther College for the sixty-one 
years of its history, counting the student each year he was 
enrolled, is 10,230, which gives an average per year of approxim- 
ately 168 students. The number of graduates, including the class 
of 1922 of 31 members, is 835. 



Enrollment at L.C. during 60 years 

Upper line indica/es fotol enroUmerU 

Lower Jine /ndJco/e^ enroUmenf m cojk^e dep'/ 



'S«jC7D 




ENKOLLMENT AT LUTHKK COLEEdK UUKINCJ SiXTV VKAKS 



ATTENDANCE 



203 



TABLE SHOWING 



ATTENDANCE BY YEARS, 
1861-1922 



AT LUTHER COLLEGE 



Year 



College 



Prepar- 




New 


A. B. 


atory and 


Total 


Students 


Graduates 


Normal 








16 


16 


16 





30 


34 


26 





39 


51 


29 





42 


58 


26 





61 


81 


45 


8 


65 


83 


42 





48 


73 


27 


3 


76 


106 


53 


4 


86 


122 


51 


5 


111 


147 


62 


6 


102 


147 


56 


3 


108 


159 


61 


7 


143 


190 


84 


6 


167 


229 


100 


6 


149 


217 


78 


7 


109 


181 


46 


9 


105 


189 


49 


14 


93 


173 


58 


19 


85 


159 


40 


13 


82 


165 


55 


18 


74 


145 


41 


11 


64 


137 


47 


15 


117 


166 


73 


11 


94 


143 


42 


12 


80 


131 


37 


17 


89 


133 


51 





75 


118 


32 


12 


92 


136 


47 


9 


92 


145 


54 


9 


139 


206 


93 


9 


146 


213 


79 


11 


125 


188 


63 


12 


97 


182 


59 


11 


104 


187 


59 


12 


120 


200 


81 


13 


103 


192 


52 


17 


91 


192 


55 


16 


96 


198 


60 


14 


85 


194 


66 


21 


100 


207 


72 


20 


88 


197 


61 


18 


74 


203 


62 


27 


79 


193 


60 


20 


81 


198 


71 


20 


85 


211 


62 


23 


53 


174 


45 


23 


66 


187 


62 


24 


83 


191 


58 


27 


80 


169 


51 


19 


90 


181 


58 


22 


107 


214 


75 


14 


97 


213 


60 


16 


78 


208 


58 


14 


66 


207 


47 


23 


69 


207 


60 


27 


49 


170 


35 


37 


51 


130 


47 


17 


95 


241 


145 


11 


90 


217 


81 


18 


92 


254 


99 


21 


87 


272 


90 


34 



1861-1862 

1862-1863 4 

1863-1864 12 

1864-1865 16 

1865-1866 20 

1866-1867 18 

1867-1868 25 

1868-1869 30 

1869-1870 36 

1870-187) 36 

1871-1872 45 

1872-1873 51 

1873-1874 47 

1874-1875 62 

1875-1876 68 

1876-1877 72 

1877-1878 84 

1878-1879 80 

1879-1880 74 

1880-1881 83 

1881-1882 71 

1882-1883 73 

1883-1884 49 

1884-1885 49 

1885-1886 51 

1886-1887 44 

1887-1888 43 

1888-1889 44 

1889-1890 : . 53 

1890-1891 67 

1891-1892 67 

1892-1893 63 

1893-1894 85 

1894-1895 83 

1895-1896 80 

1896-1897 89 

1897-1898 101 

1898-1899 102 

1899-1900 109 

1900-1901 107 

1901-1902 109 

1902-1903 129 

1903-1904 114 

1904-1905 117 

1905-1906 126 

1906-1907 121 

1907-1908 121 

1908-1909 108 

1909-1910 89 

1910-1911 91 

1911-1912 107 

1912-1913 116 

1913-1914 130 

1914-1915 141 

1915-1916 138 

1916-1917 121 

1917-1918.. 79 

1918-1919 146 

1919-1920 127 

1920-1921 162 

1921-1922 185 

Total 4,870 



5,360 



3.554 



835 



204 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



II. Attendance, by States 

The records indicate that from 18(51 to and including the 
school year 1921-1922, .3,554 students liave been enrolled at Lu- 
ther College. According to the addresses given upon registration 
the 3,554 students came from the following states and countries: 

TABLE SHOWING ATTENDANCE BY STATES, BY DECADES. 
AT LUTHER COLLEGE 



States 


1861- 
1871 


1871- 
1881 


1881- 
1891 


1891- 
1901 


1901- 
1911 


1911- 
1921 


Total, 

60 
years 


1921- 
1922 


Total, 

61 
years 




66 


240 

181 

132 

2 

36 

5 

16 

2 

2 

J- 

1 


201 

134 

98 

16 

30 

14 

4 

5 

1 

2 

3 

2 

2 

3 

1 


221 
184 
126 
41 

25 

27 

1 

8 

. .^. 

. . .^. 

"l' 
J- 


180 
193 

77 
53 
12 
39 

2 
7 

10 
3 
3 

J- 

r 
2 


210 

230 

102 

56 

14 

36 

3 

8 

16 

10 

5 

2 

2' 

2 
1 
3 
3 

. . 

1 
1 


1,118 

1,024 

701 

168 

142 

124 

38 

30 

21 

22 

16 

10 

8 

6 

6 

4 

4 

3 

3 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 


24 
36 
11 

8 

3 

2 

r 
1 


1,142 


Iowa 


... 102 
... 166 


1,060 
712 


North Dakota. 




176 




25 


145 




3 


126 


Norway 


12 


38 
30 






25 


Washington 

Michigan 

New York 


'.'.'. 2' 


22 
16 
11 






8 






7 




1 


3 

1 


6 


Oregon 

Ohio 

Turkey 




4 
4 
3 














3 


Denmark 

Idaho 

California 

Massachusetts 

Dist. of Columbia. . . . 




. , 

1 
...... 


1 


""r 


1 
1 
. . 

2 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 








































1 
1 










Iceland 












Total 


... 377 


627 


517 


646 


590 


707 


3,464 


90 


3,554 



III. New Students, by Years 

The following tables aim to list the new students at Luther 
College by school years, giving each student's name, home address 
at the time of matriculation, years in attendance at Luther Col- 
lege, and year of graduation with the Bachelor of Arts degree 
from Luther College. An asterisk (*) in front of the name 
signifies that the student later entered the Gospel ministry as an 
ordained clergyman. 



ATTENDANCE 205 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



1861-1862 

Anderson, Rasmus B Koshkonong Wis Jan. 1862-65 A. B., 1866 

Aslaksen, Knut Liberty Prairie Wis 1861-6.5 

*Bergh. Johannes E Big Canoe la 1861-66 A. B., 1866 

Bergh, Knut E Big Canoe la 1861, 1864 

Bpthun, Lasse Leeds Wis 1861 

Eide, Niels Big Canoe la 1861 

Folkestad, Lars Bonnet Prairie Wis 1861 

Fosse, Markus Norway Grove Wis 1861 

*Hovde, Brynjolf Spring Prairie Wis 1861-62 

Iverslie, Peter P Waupaca Wis Jan. 1862-64 

Larsen, Iver Big Canoe la 1861-62 

*Normann, Olaus A Liberty Prairie Wis 1861-66 A. B., 1866 

Ollis, Johannes Norway Grove Wis 1861 

*01sen, Ellef (Eilif) Painted Creek la Jan. 1862-66 A. B., 1866 

Ottun, Niels Holden Minn. . . 1861-6,3 

Vick, Ole Evensen Jefferson Prairie. . . . Wis Jan. 1862-66 

1862-1863 
*Berge, Nils B Liberty Prairie Wis 1862-63, 1867-68 

Christenson, Christen Clinton la 1862-63 

*Dahl, Torger H Chippewa River. . . . Wis 1862-65 

*Erdahl, Giillick M Liberty Prairie Wis 1862-66 A. B., 1866 

Felland, Ole G., Sen Koshkonong Wis 1862-64 

Gaarder, Ole Bostwick Valley Wis 1862-63, 1865-67 

Grinde, Peder Liberty Prairie Wis 1862-63 

Hollo, Anders L Koshkonong Wis 1862-64 

*Homme, Even J Houston Minn . . . 1862-64 

Husebv, Ole Iversen Koshkonong Wis 1862-63 

*Jukam, Ole G Vermont : Wis 1862-63 

Kittelson, Karl Sugar Creek Wis 1862-64 

Korstvedt, Tollef Koshkonong Wis 1862-64 

*Markhus, Lars J Lisbon Ill • 1862-66 .•\. B., 1866 

Markhus, Ole J Lisbon Ill 1862-6 5 

Nordgaard, Knut E Rio Wis 1862-66 

*Quammen. Nils A Deerfield Wis 1862-63 

Reishus, Olaf S Rushford Minn. . .1862-64 

Reque, Lars S Dei-rfield Wis 1862-63, 1864-69.. A. B., 1868 

*Sherven, Lars O Cihiiar la 1862-68 A. B., 1868 

Simonsen, Kristofer A^hippiin Wis 1862-64 

Skotland, Peder Caliuar la 1862-64 

Stephens, Ole B. (Hustvedt) . .Deerfield Wis 1862-6 5, 1864-65 

Suckow, Ludvig Madison Wis 1862-64 

♦Thorstensen, Knut Holden Minn . . . 1862-63 

Taerum, Torge Liberty Prairie Wis 1862 

1863-1864 

Aaker, Andreas Holden Minn . . . 1863-64 ■ • 

Aasebak, Jens C Houston Minn . . . 1863-64 

*Alfsen. Adolph O Mount Morris Wis 1865-69 A. B., 1869 

Andersen, Soren E Koshkonong Wis 1863-64 

Ask, Ole Larson Bratsberg Minn . . . 1863-64 

Brodahl. Marius Perry Wis 1863-65 

Clausen, Martin St. Ansgar la Jan. 1864-65 . 

Gunderson, Johannes Lemonweir Wis 1863-64 

Hulebak, Ole P Holden Minn . . . 1863-64 

Jesme, Tosten Rio Wis 1863-66 

*Juve, Tarje O Leeds Wis 1863-66 A. B., 1866 

Kristenson, Tjerand I^isbon Ill 1863-65 

Kristoferson, Nils Rock Run III. 1863-65 

Larson, Odd Lemonweir Wis 1863-64 

Lomen, Ole T Decorah la 1863-65 

*Lunde, Gudbrand A Spring Grove Minn . . . 1863-69 A. B., 1869 

Noben, Peter P Decorah la 1863-65 

Nordb0, John North Prairie Minn . . . 1863-65 

Reierson, Knut Root Prairie la 1863 

♦Rosholdt, Tollef Waupaca Wis 1863-68 A. B., 1868 

Sandaker, Hans Calmar la 1863-64 

Stabaek, Tosten Rock Run Ill 1863-65 

Storla, Ole H Paint Creek la 1863-65 

Suckow, Kristofer Decorah la 1863-64 

Torgersen, Anders Waupaca Wis 1863-64 

Velo, Elias J. (Elias Molee) . . Blue Mounds Wis 1863-64 

*Vinnor, Anders T Calmar la 1863-69 A. B., 1869 

Winden, Hans Clermont la 1863-64 

Winger, Hans Rock River Wis 1863-66 



206 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



1864-1865 

♦Anderson. Abel B Koslikonong Wis 1864-65, 1871-72 

Bentson, Reinhard T Rock Run Wis 1864-70 

Bergeland Halvor Liberty Prairie Wis 1864-65 

*Bjorgo. Knut K Highlandville la 1864-70 A. B., 1870 

Bredeson. Brede (Sander) .... Decorah la 1864-65 

Ellefsen, Samson Big Canoe la 1864-65 

Faegre. Martin Paint Creek la 1864-65 

Flaten, Peder Ammundson. . Vermont Wis 1864-65 

Forseth, Nikolai Rock River Wis 1864-65 

Grinde. Hans Norway Grove Wis. . . 1864-66 

Halgrimson, Ole Clermont la 1864-66 

Henjum, Johannes Liberty Prairie Wis 1864-65 

Holum. Ole S De Forest Wis 1864-67 

*Jacobsen, Jacob Daniel Pine Lake Wis 1864-65 

Kjeldson, Nils Rio Wis 1864-66 

*MoIler, Frederik Andreas Winchester Wis 1864-70 A. B., 1870 

Ruscad, Ole A Roche-a-Cree Wis 1864-66 

Sivesind. Hans Washington Prairie .la 1864-65 

Sivesind, Kristian Washington Prairie. la 1864-66 

Spilde, Hans Lodi Wis 1864-66 

*Svennungsen, Stener Saude la 1864-66 

Sweningsen.Svennung S.(Sevig)Rock Run Ill 1864-65 

Teisberg. Aslak K Koshkonong Wis 1864-70 A. B., 1870 

Thorsgaard, Johannes Coon Prairie Wis 1864-69 

*V'etIesen, Torjus Decorah la 1864-67 

Waage, Anders Springdale Wis 1864-65 

1865-1866 

Aarctiiun. Ole K Root River Minn . . . 1865-66 

Anderson, .Andrew (.Andrew A. 

Howen) Waupaca Wis 1865-67 

Anderson, Lars Storv Citv la 1865-66 

Anderson. Sivert Rock Run Ill 1865-71 A. B., 1871 

Berge, Kngebret Springdale Wis. . . 1865-66 

Bjerke, Engebret Trempealeau Valley. Wis 1865-66 

Bjornson (Haldorsen), Iver . . . Dodgevillc Wis 1865-66 

*Bredesen, .Adolf Spring Prairie Wis 1865-70 A. B., 1870 

Dankel, Edvard New York N. Y 1865-67 

*Ellestad, Nils J Newburg Minn. . .1865-71 A. B., 1871 

Engesaeter, John Norway Grove Wis 1865-66 

F^aegre, Hans Paint Creek la 1865-67 

Fjeld, Torgrim Vermont Wis 1865-67 

Grinde, Lars De Forest Wis 1865-66 

*Harstad, Bjug A Harmony Minn . .1865-71 A. B., 1871 

Haukenes, .Amund Norway Grove Wis 1865-66 

Helgeson, Knut Waupun. Wis 1865-67, 1869-70 

Hoftuft, L. Olson Lime Springs la 1865 

Iverslie, Martini us Scandinavia Wis 1865-67 

Jacobson (Meen), Hans An- 
dreas Rock River Wis 1865-66 

Johnson, Engebret Paint Creek la 1865-66 

Johnson, Kristian (.Aabraaten) Decorah la 1865-67 

♦Larsen, Reier Spring Grove Minn. . . 186.S-68, 1869-72. .A. B.. 1872 

Lier, Lars K Koshkonong Wis 1865-66 

Linde, Peter Norway Grove Wis 1865-67 

Lomen, Ole J Decorah la 1865-67 

*Mohn, Thorbjdrn N Olmsted County.. . Minn . . 1865-70 A. B., 1870 

Narvesen, Cornelius Spring Grove Minn . . 1865-67 

Nubsen, John Vermont Wis 1865-67 

Olson, Ingvald Chicago Ill 1865-66 

Ophcim. .Arne Decorah la 1865-67 

Peterson, Lauritz Norway. 1866 

*Preus, Christian Keyser Leeds Wis 1865-66, 1868-7.V..A. B., 1873 

Preus, Isak Westby Wis 186.5-66, 1868-69 

*Reque, Peter (Peder) S Deerfield Wis 1865-67 

Ringstad. Johannes Decorah la 1865-67 

*Rystad, John K Rock River Wis 186.5-67. 1870-71, 

1874-75 

R(tthe, David Deerfield Wis 18f)S-6,s 

♦Smeby, Oluf H Paint Creek la 1K6,S-71 A. B., 1871 

♦Stub, Hans Gerhard Locust la 186S-66 . ..A. B., 1866 

Thoen, Lauritz Rush River Wis 1865-70, 1X71 



ATTENDANCE 207 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Thorsnaes, Karl Norway Grove Wis 1865-67 

♦Tvedt, Niels Gulbrandsen . . . .Bergen Minn. . .1865-72 A. B., 1872 

Tonsberg, Nils Lisbon Ill 1865-66 

nVelo, Jens I Clermont la 1865-71 A. B., 1871 

1866-1867 

Aaby, Karl H Liberty Prairie Wis 1866-68 

Baardson, Theodor Port Washington. Wis 1866-67 

Bolstad, Thorbjorn Liberty Prairie Wis 1866-68 

Boen, 0sten N Harmony Minn . . . 1866 

*Christensen, Nehem Port Washington. Wis 1866-71 A. B.. 1871 

*Dale. Elling O Beaver Creek Wis 1866-67, 1868-70 

Erikson, Around, (Fadnaes) . . . Heart Prairie Wis 1866-68 

Erikson. Knut Heart Prairie Wis 1866-69 

Gaarder, Berne Bostwick Valley. . Wis 1866-68 

*Gotaas, Paul B Bratsberg Minn . . . 1866-73 A. B., 1873 

Hanson, Johan A Bloomfield Minn . . . 1866-67 

Hanson, Kristian Blue River Wis 1866-68 

Hereid, Nils Th Beaver Creek Wis 1866-67 

*Hilmen, Peder T Mishicott Wis 1866-72 A. B., 1872 

Iversen, Tarje (Torger) Waseca Minn . . . 1866-68 

*Johnson, Hans Waupaca Wis 1866-70, 1871-73 

Knutson, Anders West Salem Wis 1866-70 

Kristianson, Johannes Scandinavia Wis 1866-71 ." 

Larson, Johannes Milwaukee Wis 1866-67 

Lien, Ole O Bloomington Minn . . . 1866-69 

Aledaas, Kristofer Stenerson . . Houston Minn . . . 1866-68 

Meland, Martin Harmony Minn. . . 1866 

Mikkelson, Martin S (Murat) Waupaca Wis 1866-68 

Mbller, Tonnes Winchester Wis 1866-68 

Olsen, Hans Hemnes, Nordland. Norway. 1866 

Ottesen. Jacob (Lunde) Bratsberg Minn . . . 1866-67, 1868 

Ouren, Peder J Harmony Minn. . . 1866 

Pederson, Mens Skoponong Wis 1866-67 

Ramstad, Henry (J.H. Larson)Norway la 1866-67 

Reierson, Elling Spring Grove Minn . . . 1866-68 

*Reishus, Torjus S Rushford Minn. . . 1866-71 

*Sando. Ole O Estherville la 1866-67,1869-70 

*Solseth, Ole E Harmony Minn. . .1866-69 

Svalheim, Ole (Norsman) Norway Grove Wis 1866-68 

Syverud. Knut N Mill Creek Wis 1866-67 

Teige, Edvard G Coon Prairie Wis 1866-70 

Thomasson, Anders (Gr0nne).. Paint Creek la 1866-69, 1871-72 

Thorpe, Lars O Kasson Minn. . . 1866-67 

Tveten, Peder Pine Lake Wis 1866-67 

Void, Thor E Norway la 1866-67 

0strud, Johan Bloomfield Minn. . . 1866 

0verland, Frants Bratsberg Minn . . . 1866-67 

1867-68 

*Aas, Carl C Gjovik ... Norway . 1867-69 

Bolstad, Amund Th Locust la 1867 

Budal. Lars P Locust la 1867-71 

*Eidahl, Kittil (Ketil) O Calmar la 1867-68, 1870 

Ellestad, Anders Newburg Minn. . . 1867-69 

*Floren, Syvert L Holden Minn. . .1867-69 A. B., 1869 

Foss. Jacob Decorah la 1867-70 

*Forde, Nils A Locust la 1867-73 A. B., 1873 

Gjerald, Iver S Skoponong Wis 1867-70 

Hesla, Endre L Paint Creek la 1867-68 

Hjelle, Knut Decorah la. 1867-71 

Hogstul (Halvorsen), HalvorT. Skoponong Wis 1867-70 

*Hustvedt, Halvor B Liberty Prairie Wis 1867-73 A. B.. 1873 

Hustvedt, Stephen Koshkonong Wis 1867-69, 1870-71 

Jacobson, Wilhelm Paint Creek la 1867 , . 

Johnson, Rasmus Stavanger Norway. 1867-68 

Lomen, Gudbrand (Gilbert) J. Decorah la 1867-73 

Medal, Helge H Decorah la 1867-69 

Moldstad, Kristian Toten Norway . 1867-70 

Mortenson, Martin Milwaukee Wis 1867-69 

Neuberg, Harald Norway . 1867-68 

♦Nordby, Jorgen Locust la 1867-73 A. B.. 1873 

Solum, Oluf Decorah la 1867-70 



208 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Storla, Olaus Paint Creek la 1867-68 

Tliomassen, Kristian Paint Creek la 1867 

Thorsnaes, Hans Norway Grove Wis 1867-68 

*V'aaler, Johannes R Rio Wis 1867-68. 1871-72 

1868-1869 

Anderson, Brun Lemonweir Wis 1868-70 

Axdahl, Soren Ossian la 1868-70 

Bakkevold, Ole North Prairie Minn. . .1868-71 

Berge, George Springdale Wis 1868-69 

Bergh, Ole Hendrickson Perry Wis 1868-69 

Brandhagen, Nils Decorah la 1868-71 

Branson, Gustav Waiipun Wis 1868-70 

Borthp, Ketil Winchester Wis 1868-71 

Danielsen, Ole Winchester Wis 1868-70 

Egeborg, Westye Christiania Norway . 1868-69 

Ellis, Edwin Harmony Minn . . . 1868-69 

♦Everson, Carl (Charles) Sever- 
in E Linden Wis 1868-70 

♦Felland. Ole G., Jr Koshkonong Wis 1868-74 A. B.. 1874 

Forseth, Anton Rock River Wis 1868-70 

Forseth, Johan Rock River Wis 1868-69 

Frpvold. Knut Decorah la 1868-69 . 

Gullord, Olaus Westby Wis 1868-70 

Haugen, Nils P Rush River Wis 1868-70, 1871-72 

Helgeson, Andreas Waupun Wis 1868-71 

Helvig, Abel Clinton la 1868-70, 1871-72 

Hong, Engebret Soldier Valley la 1868-71 

Hustvedt, Laurents Round Prairie la 1868-69 

Jacobsen, Martin Paint Creek la 1868 

Kalstad. Even P Oconomovvoc Wis 1868-70 

Kjersland, Lars Koshkonong Wis 1868-70 

Kragevik, M. O Lee Ill 1868-69 

*Mandt, Olaf Koshkonong Wis 1868-73 A. B., 1873 

Mathre. Wier Lisbon Ill 1868-74 

Myhren, Hans (Myron) Bergen (S.) Dak.1868-70 

Myrberg, Johannes Bratsberg Minn . . . 1868-71 

Nelson, John Lisbon Ill 1868-70 

Nelson, Lars Lisbon Ill 1868-69 

Neperud, Olaus Coon Prairie Wis 1868-70 

Nilson, Erik St. Louis Mo 1868-69 

Nss, Mikkel Rushford Minn . . 1868 

Paulson, Edward Waupun Wis 1868-69, 1874-76 

Pederson, A. B Benton la 1868-69 

Preus. J. Nordahl B Westby Wis 1868-72 

Rislaug, Syvert Capron Ill 1868, 1871 

Sampson, Lars Vangen (S.) Dak. 1868-72 

Sampson, Nils Vangen (SJ Dak. 1868-70 

Sander, Anton B Decorah la 1868-74 A. B., 1874 

Skartvedt, Gudmund Ossian la 1868-74 

Skatter, Ole Werner Koshkonong Wis 1868 

Thompson, Thomas S Chicago Ill 1868-70 

Tollefson, Simon Norway ?1868 

Torgerson, Andreas Chicago Ill 1868-73 

Torjussen, Ketil Bratsberg Minn . . . 1868-69 

T0nnesen, Lars (Ekern) Coon Prairie Wis 1868-70 

Vik. Sjur Lisbon Ill 1868-70 

Wraamann. Wilhelm Norway. 1868-69 

Young, James Madison Wis 1868-69 

0dven, Lars P Springdale Wis 1868-72 

1869-70 

♦Aaberg, Ole H Roche-a-Cree Wis 1869-74 

Arntson, Ole A Lansing la 1869-71 

Berg, Anton S North Prairie Minn. . . 1869-70 

Blekre, Zakarias O North Prairie Minn . . . 1869-72 

Bredeson, Bernhard Spring Prairie Wis 1869-71 

Bring, Johan Bostwick Valley Wis 1869-70 

Brorby, Jacob Clermont la 1869-74 

*Kosmark, Ole.N Spring Prairie Wis 1869-75 A. B.. 1875 

Fosvik, Iver Elstad Minn . . . 1869-72 

Funrue, Kittil Paint Creek la 1869-70 

♦Guldbrandsen. Guldbrand .... Winchester Wis 1869-72 



ATTENDANCE 209 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Gunderson, Gustav Holden Minn . . . 1869-70 

Haaven, Lars Holden Minn. . . 1869-70 

Hagebak, Simon Holden Minn . . . 1869-70 

Hagen, G. Olsen Kellogg la 1869 

Halvorson, Anton Rock River Wis 1869-70 

*Hattrem, Thor H Vaage Norway. 1870 

Haukenes, Hans O Norway Grove .... Wis 1869-71 

*Holseth, Mikkel C Bostwick Valley. . Wis 1869-71 

Hole, Tallak E Coon Prairie Wis 1869 

♦Jaastad, Endre L Decorah la 1869-70 

Johannesen, Thomas Highland Minn . . . 1869-72 

*Jorgenson. Christian Wiota Wis 1869-75 A. B., 1875 

Knutson, Karl August Mishicott Wis 1869-72 

Kva;rnodden, John N Holden Minn. . .1869-70. 1871-72 

*Langeland, Magne Locust la 1869-75 A. B., 1875 

Leknaes, Louis Lisbon Ill 1869-73 

Lynne, Lars Decorah la 1869-72 

*Monson, Ingvard Grothe Le Roy Minn . . . 1869-75 

Monserud, Olaus Paint Creek la 1869-72 

Moller, Bernt Winchester Wis 1869-74 

Nordgaard, Knut Holden Minn. . .1869-70 

Norvold, Sivert Paint Creek la 1869-70 

*Naeseth, Christen Andreas . Holden Minn. . .1869-74 A. B., 1874 

♦Petersen, Wilhelm Magnus 

Herman Paint Creek la 1869-75 A. B.. 1875 

*Rasmussen, Gerhard Lisbon Ill 1869-71. 1872-76 

Ronneberg, Ole Blue Mounds Wis . 1869-72 

Rovang, Ola Decorah la 1869-72 

♦Sagen, Andreas K Perry Wis 1869-74 A. B.. 1874 

*Seim, Viking L Paint Creek la 1869-73 

*Solstad, Hans P Albert Lea Minn. . .1869-72 

Stabaek, Knut Rock Run Ill 1869-70 

Stamm, Ole P Valley Grove Minn . . . 1869-70 

♦Strand. Henrik J Locust la 1869-76 A. B.. 1876 

*Strcimme, Peer O Winchester Wis 1869-76 A. B.. 1876 

Teige. Edvard O Decorah la 1869-71 

Tobiasen, Tobias R Calmar la 1869-70, 1871. 

1873-74 

*Turmo, Andreas O Calmar la 1869-72 

Ueland, Lars Westby Wis 1869-71 

*Vangsnes, Ole P Ridgeway la 1869-75 A. B.. 1875 

Varlo. Olaf Decorah la 1869-73 A. B., 1873 

1870-1871 

Aasen. Syvert. Nidaros (S.) Dak. 1870-72 , 

Akre. Jonas Big Canoe la 1870-72 

Alnaes. Syvert Ossian la 1870-71 

♦Andersen. Anders C Manitowoc Wis 1870-73 

Anderson, Nils Edgar Decorah la 1870-73 

Berg, Ole S North Prairie Minn . . . 1870-72 

Berge, Ole V Norway. 1870 

Bergland, Halvor Bratsberg Minn. . . 1870 

*Borge. Michael O Leeds Wis 1870-71 

Dahl, O. H Yellow Medicine. . . . Minn . . . 1870-72 

Dale, Viking Big Canoe la 1870-72 

Daleby. Ole Perry Wis 1870-72 

Edwards. Bjtirn Chicago Ill 1870-75 

*Faegre, Kaspar G Paint Creek la 1870-77 A. B., 1877 

Felland, Andreas Koshkonong Wis 1870-72 

Gaarder, Ole Dodgeville Wis 1870-71 

Gaarder, Syvert Albany Wis 1870-72 

♦Gronlid. Carl Johan Magnus 

(Jensen) Kewaunee Wis 1871-77 A. B.. 1877 

Gr0nstad. Erik Lisbon Ill 1870-71 

Gunderson, Martin Chicago Ill 1870-72 

♦Guttebo. KjOstel L Decorah la 1870-76 

Hanson, Thomas Spring Prairie Wis 1870-71 

Helgeland. Peder Lisbon Ill 1870-73 

Helgeson, Tideman Waupun Wis 1870 

*HeIlestvedt, Johannes A Rushford Minn. . . 1870-71 

♦Hendrickson, Peter Anton Rushford Minn. . .1870-76 A. B.. 1876 

*Hjort. Otto Christian O Dalby la 1870-73. 1874-75 

*Isberg, Peder Decorah la 1870-75 

Juve. John O Houston Minn . . . 1870-71 



210 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YE\RS 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Kjerland, Thorbjorn (Dahle)... Locust la 1870-71 

Knudson, Kredrik Leeds Wis 1870-71 

*Koefod, Magnus Martinus. . . . Locust la 1870-72 

Kvale. Erik Wilmington Minn . . . 1870-74 

Lie, Nils J Otter Creek Wis 1870 

Naas. Thvge A. R. (A. G. 

Nilson) Rock Dell Minn. . .1870-71 

Neste, Knut Decorah la 1870-71 

Nordgaard, Gudbrand Decorah la 1870-72 

Naes. Karl Winchester Wis 1870-71 

Naeseth, John Holden Minn. . .1870-72, 1874 

Opperud, Joseph Clermont la 1870-73 

Osmundson, Lars (L. O. 

Veom) Houston Minn . . . 1870-71 

Rokne, Ole E Koshkonong Wis 1870-71 

*Ruste, Erik O Perry Wis 1870-76 A. B., 1876 

Rydning, Lars (Swenson) St. Peter Minn. . .1870-71 

Rydning, Paul (Swenson) St. Peter Minn . . . 1870-72 

Rothe. Halle Koshkonong Wis 1870-75 

Skaaden, Kristian Norway. 1870-71 

*Skugstad, Jens Coon Prairie Wis 1870 

Slinde, Thomas O Whalan Minn. . . 1870 

Sponheim, Haldor Locust la 1870-71 

Stamm, Ole G Primrose Wis 1870-71 

Steensland. Henry Madison Wis 1870-71 

Stenehjem, Peder Wilmington Minn. . . 1870-71 

StrOmmen, Ketil Koshkonong Wis 1870-71 

Syvertson, Henry A New York N. Y.. . .1870-73 

Sorland, Gudbrand Decorah la 1870 

Thorsen, Nils A Douglas County. . . . Minn . . . 1870-72 

Torrison. Thomas E Manitowoc Wis 1870-76 A. B., 1876 

Urdahl, Ole A Springdale Wis 1870-74 

Valdeland, Enok Clermont la 1870-72 

nVillett, George Decorah la 1870-72 

♦Ylvisaker, Johan Thorbjprn. . . Red Wing Minn. . . 1870-77 A. B.. 1877 

1871-1872 . 

Aaby, Andreas A Rock Dell Minn . . . 1871-73 

Amundson, Albert Chr Silver Lake la 1871-78 A. B., 1878 

Anderson, Albert Janesville Wis 1871-73 

Anderson, Lawrence Rock Dell Minn . . . 1871-72 

*Bakke, Nils J Minneola Minn. . .1871-77 A. B., 1877 

Bergh, Hallvard A Blue Mounds Wis 1871-76 A. B.. 1876 

*Blilie, Johan Anton Washington Prairie. la 1871-77 A. B., 1877 

*Borgen, Edward D.corah la 1871-76 A. B., 1876 

♦Brandt, Realf Ottesen Decorah la 1871-77 A. B., 1877 

Dahl. Karl A Waupun Wis 1871-72 

Dosland, John P Clinton la 1871-72 

Eidahl, Timan (Quarve) Spring Grove Minn . . . 1871-72 

Fleischer, Ludvig Madison Wis 1871-72 

Fleischer, Michael Madison Wis 1871 

Fossum, Anthon A Paint Creek la 1871-74 

Gabriel, Martin Madison Wis 1871-74 

*Gronsberg, Ole N Jordan Wis 1871-77 A. B., 1877 

Hadland, Ole J Spring Grove Minn. . .1871 

Hage, HansO. T Norway. 1871-72 

Henrickson, Gustav . Rushford Minn . . . 1871-73 

Henrickson, Hans Rushford Minn ... 1871 

Holm, Thorvald Paint Creek la 1871-74 

Holkesvig, Ole .-\ Big Canoe la 1871-74 

Hovland, Johannes Balsfjorden Norway. 1871-72 

Jaastad. Syvert Decorah la 1871-72 

*Johansen, Jens St. Louis Mo 1871-77 A. B., 1877 

Johnson, Jens H Rock Dell Minn. . .1871-74 

Johnson, Martin Milwaukee Wis 1871-74 

Knut son, Knut Manitowoc Wis 1871-74 

Krees, Martin Union Prairie Minn . . . 1871-74 

Land, Tosten L Calmar la 1871-73 

Landsvserk, Peter K Spring Grove Minn . . . 1871-74 

Landsvaerk, T. J Lawler la 1871-74 

*Lee (Lia), Ole H Winchester Wis 1871-72 

Lomen, JOrgen (George) Decorah la 1871-78 A. B., 1878 

Ohlsgaard, .Asle P Wilmington Minn . . . 1871 

Olsen, Tosten Saude la 1871-72 



ATTENDANCE 211 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Olson, Halvor Rock Dell Minn . . . 1871-72 

Pederson, Lars H Lime Creek la 1871-73 

Quarve, Timan L Spring Grove Minn. . . 1871-78 A. B., 1878 

*Roalkvam, Halvard G Newburg Minn. . .1871-74 A. B., 1874 

Rokne, Iver L Harmony Minn , . . 1871-73 

♦Rondestvedt, Arnvid P Springdale Wis 1871-77 A. B., 1877 

*Rystad, Andreas Rask A Benton la 1871-73 

*Scheie, Iver O Mankato Minn. . .1871-74 

Schmidt, August Decorah la 1871, 1874-75 , 

Sivertsen, Hans Leeds Wis 1871 

Thompson, Knut T Dodgeville Wis 1871-72 

♦Thorsen, Marki s Kragerci Norway. 1871-72 

*Thorvil(d)son, Thorvil(d) K...Arendal Minn. . .1871-74, 1875-78.. A. B., 1878 

Vambheim, David Lodi Wis 1871-74 

Void, Elling O Decorah la 1871-72 

Weeks, Sjur W Rochelle Ill 1871-73 

*Widvey, Peter Anthon Milwaukee Wis 1871-74 

*WiIheImsen, Ole Ivar Moe. . . Silver Lake Minn . . . 1871 

*YIvisaker, Johannes T Sogndal Norway. 1871-74 A. B., 1874 

1872-1873 

Aga, Lars Ridgeway la 1872-75 

Aim, Martin G Swan Lake Minn. . . 1872-73 

Almquist, John New York N. Y. . . .1872-73 

*Bale, Jens E Byron Minn. . .1872-74 

Beheim, John E Pope County Minn. . . 1872-73 

*Brevig, Tollef L Pope County Minn. . .1872-74, 1875-77 

Butler, Bernhard Decorah la 1872-73 

Dahl. Albert Waupun Wis 1872-74 

Dahl. Melvin E Paint Creek la 1872-75 

Dalseid, Nils O Shell Brook la 1872-73 

*Engh, Hagbart Coon Valley Wis 1872-78 A. B., 1878 

Eadnes, Johannes E Whitewater Wis 1872-74 

♦F'jeldstad, Rollef R North Prairie Minn . . . 1872-74 

Possum, Hans R Albert Lea Minn. . .1872-75, 1876-77 

Gausta, Herbjorn N Harmony Minn . . . 1872-75 

*Gjevre, Anders H ;. . Holden Minn. . .1872-78 A. B.. 1878 

Haagenson, Hans M Decorah la 1872-73 

Hage, Hans J. T Norway. 1872 . 

Hatle, Sivert J Froen Wis 1872-75 

Helgstad, Joseph J New Lisbon Wis 1872-73 . 

*Hoel, Olaf H North Prairie Minn . . . 1872-73 

*Hougen, Johan Olai J Benton la 1872-79 A. B., 1879 

Huset, Ole A Holden Minn. . .1872 

Iverson, Edward Manitowoc Wis 1872-74 

Johnson, August Harmony Minn . . . 1872-75 

Johnson, Henry Waupun Wis 1872-74 

Kirkebv, Guttorm T Holden Minn. . ..1872-74, 1875-78.. A. B., 1878 

Kjernholm, Julian P Albert Lea Minn. . .1872-73 

Larsen, Olaf Lemonweir Wis 1872-78 A. B., 1878 

*Lee, Atle J Utica Wis 1872-78 A. B., 1878 

Lerum, Daniel J Urne Wis 1872-73 

Lie, Halvor A Lemonweir Wis 1872-75 

Loftsgaarden, O. H Round Prairie Minn . . . 1872-78 

*L0kensgaard, Ole O Swan Lake Minn . . . 1872-78 A. B., 1878 

*Maakestad, John J Lee Ill 1872-75 

Markegaard, Knut Th Paint Creek la 1872-73 

Melby, Knut K Cedar Valley Minn . . . 1872-74 

Moe, Thorvald H Albert Lea Minn . . . 1872-74 

Neste, Ole E Decorah la 1872-73 

Nordgaard, Christian Decorah la 1872-78 A. B., 1878 

*Omlid, Guthorm (Guttorm) H. Holden Minn... . 1872-75 

Peterson, Peter J Shawano Wis 1872-74 

Riis, Carl Theodor Waupun Wis 1872-73 

Rydning, John Paint Creek la 1872-74 

Sanderson, Tollef Harmony Minn . . . 1872-74 

Sandvig, Ole J Norway Lake Minn ... 1872-74 

Skotland, Theodor Calmar la 1872-74 

*Skyberg, Hans O Rush River Wis 1872-79 A. B., 1879 

Sponheim, Peder Decorah la 1872-74 

*StorIi(e), Knut O Le Roy Minn. . .1872-79. . A. B., 1879 

♦Syftestad, Olaus P Perry Wis 1873-79. : . .. A. B., 1879 

ScSnderland, Salve O Winnebago la .... . 1872-73 

Tangen. Hans H Rio Wis 1872-73 



212 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Thompson, Amund G Scandinavia Wis 1872-75 . 

Thoresen, Thorvald C North Prairie Minn. . .1872-74. 

Thoresen, Thorvald O Manitowoc Wis 1872-74 . 

Tvedt, G. Halvorsen Decorah la 1872-74. 

Ulefos. Hans H Portage Wis 1872-75 . 

Vraalstad, Edvard J Holden Minn. . .1872-73. 

Winge, Hans A Decorah la 1872-74. 

Ytterboe. Tyke T Calmar la 1872-74 . 



1873-1874 

Aakre, Ole H Ridgeway la 1873-74 

Bakke. Ole E Decorah la 1873-75 . 

Bertelson. Gunder Ossian la 1873 

*Brandt, Olaf Elias Decorah la 1873-79 A. B.. 1879 

Braekhus, Anton O Oslo Minn. . .1873-74 

Braekke, Nils A Decorah la 1873-74 

Bursvold, Nikolai O Spring Valley Minn ... 1873-76 

Dale, Anders K Wilmington Minn . . . 1873 

♦Danielsen, Jens Pope Co Minn . . . 1873 

Dybdahl, Thore E Decorah la 187,?-76 

Daehlen, Olaus G Spring Grove Minn ... 1873-74 

(O. G. Myrah) 

Egge, Albert E Ridgewav la 1873-79 A. B., 1879 

*Eggen, Thore N Prairie Farm Wis 1873-79 A. B., 1879 

Evenson, Edwin Scandinavia Wis 1873-79 A. B., 1879 

Everson, Adolph Linden Wis 1873 

Farsdal, Ole G Holden Minn . . . 1873-74 

Finseth. Ole L Root Prairie Minn . . . 1873-74 

*Flaten, Christopher A. Vermont Wis 1874-78 

Fosmark, Ole J Spring Prairie Wis 1873-75 

Fossum, Christian A Elon la 1873-75 

Fossum, Torgrim A Elon la 1873-75 

Garthe, Martinus Hoff Minn. . .1873-75 

(Wimpelmann) 
♦Giere, Nils O Rock Dell Minn. . .1873-79 A. B., 1879 

Gigstad, Knut O Manitowoc Wis 1873-75 

Gjellum. Erik S Koshkonong Wis 1873-79 A. B., 1879 

Golberg, Halgrim Hesper la 1873-74 

Grinde. Johannes J North Prairie Minn . . . 1873-74 

Grdnne, Knut Th. A Paint Creek la 1873-74, 1875-76 

Gulsvik, Vilhelm Clermont la 1873-74, 1875-76 

Haavelsrud, John E French Creek Wis 1873-75 

Hanson. Hans M Elon la 1873-74 

Hanson, Peter N Albert Lea Minn . . . 1873-77 

Hjelle. John O Decorah la 1873-74 

Hoftuft, KjOstil O Lime Springs la 1873-74 

Holther, Olaf Minneapolis Minn. . . 1873-77 

♦Homme. Thorleif O Harmonv Minn. . . 187.V78 A. B., 1878 

Husmo, Gustav Rock Dell Minn . . . 1873 

H0yme, Thrond Decorah la 1873-79 A. B., 1879 

Jacobson, James Henrytown Minn . . . 1873-74 

Johannesen, Jacob A Root Prairie Minn. . . . 1873-75 

(Jacobsen) 

John.son. Carl St. Paul Minn . . . 1873-77 

Josvanger, Rasmus L Greenwood Wis 1873-75 

Juve, Herjus O Lemonweir Wis 1873-74 

Kaasa, Johannes H Ossian la 1873 

Karstad, Lars M. K Swan Lake Minn . . . 1873-80 A. B.. 1880 

*Kildahl, John Nathan Holden Minn. . .1874-79 A. B., 1879 

Kloster, .■\. L Ossian la 1873-74 

Kopperdal, Hans J Hoff Minn. . .1873-76. 1877-81. .A. B.. 1881 

Koren, Ahlert Decorah la 1873-75 

*Koren,(B0icke)Joh(a)n (Rulfs) Decorah la 1874-79 A. B.. 1879 

Kvale, Erik B Spring Grove Minn . . . 1873-75 

Langelie, Ole J Bergen Minn . . . 1873-76 

Larsen. Lauritz Chicago Ill 1873-79 A. B., 1879 

Lee, Alexander O Northwood la 1873-74 

Linn, Edward M Chicago Ill 1873-74 

Lund, Knut Chicago Ill 1873-75 

Loberg, Nils T Ashippun Wis 1873-74 

LGiland, Halvor Canfield Minn. . .1873-78 

♦Madsen, JOrgen Elesius Sheboygan Wis 1873-75, 1878-80 

Magnesen, Nils Rock Dell Minn . . . 1873-74 

♦Moen, Carl J New Hope Minn . . . 187,3-77 



ATTENDANCE 213 



Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Myra, Stephen Everson Linden Wis 1873-77 

Nilson, Even Norman Hill Tex 1873-75 

Nilson, Thorbj0rn A. (Giere). . Rock Dell Minn . . . 1873 

*Nordgaard, Johannes Simon.. .Apple River Wis 1873-76, 1877-80. .A. B., 1880 

Naeseth, Olaf A. N Glenwood la 1873-76. 1877-78 

Ohnstad, Jens P Spring Grove Minn . . . 1873-75 

Olson, Martin Chicago Ill 1873-74 

Otterdokken, John O Holden Minn. . . 187.V74 

*Overn, Anton Gustav HelgesonWaupun Wis 1873-76 

Raabolle, Ole G Holden Minn . . . 1873-74 

"Schesvold, Thore P Mankato Minn ... 1873-74 

*Skartvedt, Peder Ossan la 1873-79 A. B., 1879 

Storla, Sevat Paint Creek la 1873-75 

Teigen, Martin Koshkonong Wis 1873-75 

Tobiasen, Theodor Decorah la 1873-74 

*Torrison, Isaac Bertinus Manitowoc Wis 1873-79 A. B., 1879 

Trygstad, Johannes M Volga (S.) Dak. 1873-76 

Vaatvedt, Hellek O Rock Dell Minn . . . 1873-75 

Vermager, Ole H Wilmington Minn. . 1873-74 

Vraali, Ketil S Delavan Minn . . . 187.5-74, 1875 

*Wisnaes. Rasmus J Blue Earth City Minn . . 1873-76 

Wold. Anton O Whitehall Wis 1873-76 

0fstedahl, Louis B Harmony Minn. . . 1873-74 

1874-1875 

Aase, Svennung Henrytown Minn . . . 1874-75, 1877 

Anderson, Halvor Lisbon Ill 1874-75 

Anderson, Knut (Brown) Root Prairie Minn . . . 1874-75 

*Askevold, Bernt Chicago Ill 1874-75 

Bagge, Peter Irgens San Francisco Cal 1874-75 

Bale. Ole M Spring Prairie Minn. . .1874-75 

Berg, Rollef S Arendal Minn ... 1874 

Birkeland, Mauritz A Chicago Ill 1874 

*Bj0rgaas, John J Newport Wis 1874-79 A. B.. 1879 

Bratvold, Knut O Holden Minn ... 1874 

Carlson, Emil Alexandria Minn . . . 1874-75 

Dale, Lars Sam Leeds Wis 1874-78 

Egge, Sven E Ridgewav la 1874-77 

Eikeland, Peder J Coon Valley Wis 1874-75, 1877-80.. A. B., 1880 

Ellestad, Sven A Spring Grove Minn . . . 1874 

Evenson. Gustav A Scandinavia Wis 1874-80 A. B., 1880 

Froslie, Ole A Jordan Wis 1874 

*Giere, Nils A Rock Dell Minn . . . 1874-75, 1882-84.. 

Gjeglum, Halvor O. K Paint Creek la 1874-75 

Grangaard, Endre A Paint Creek la 1874-77 

Grangaard, Ole P Paint Creek la 1874-77 

Grpthe, Ole H Le Roy Minn. . .1874-76 

Giptum, John J Bratsberg Minn . . . 1874-75, 1876 

♦Gunderson, Severin Bergen Norway. 1874-77, 1879 

Haagenson, Olaus Norway Wis 1874-75 

Hadland, Ole P Bloomfield Minn. . .1874-80 A. B., 1880 

*Halvorson, Johannes Decorah la 1874-80 A. B., 1880 

Hamre, Anders M.J Holden Minn . . . 1874-75 

Hamre, Peder P Decorah la 1874-75 

Hanson, Erik Root Prairie Minn . . . 1874-75 

Hanson, James CM Decorah la 1874-82 A. B., 1882 

Hanson, Lauritz Albert Lea Minn . . . 1874-76 

*Heie, Johannes J Story Citv la 1874-78 

Helen, Thor O Decorah la 1874-75 

Helland, Edward C Hoff Minn . . . 1874 

Helle, Nils N Harmony Minn . . . 1874-75 

*Hoff, Lars Martinus Andreas. . Borgund Norway. 1874-75 A. B., 1875 

Hove, Andreas M Ridgewav la 1874-81 A. B., 1881 

Jaastad, Henrik Marshfield Wis 1874-77 

Jensen, Elling St. Paul Minn . . . 1874-76 

Jenson, Johannes Decorah la 1874-76 

*Jerdee, Lars J Norway Grove Wis 1874-75. 1877-82.. A. B.. 1882 

Jordahl, Christopher Chr Ossian la 1874-78 

*J<irgenson, Fingar Rock Dell Minn . . . 1874-80 A. B.. 1880 

Kitelsaa, Jens T Hesper la 1874-75 

Knutson, Leonhard Shawano Wis 1874-75 

Krees, John Union Prairie Minn . . . 1874-75 

Kvale, Peter Wilmington Minn . . . 1874-75 

♦Larsen, Anders Carleton Minn . . . 1874-75 



214 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



*Larsen, Gustav Adolf Koshkonong Wis 1874-80 A. B., 1880 

Larson, Edward Decorah la 1874 

Larson, Nils L Spring Grove Minn ... 1874 : . . 

Larson. P. T Medo Minn . . . 1874-76 

Lia, Halvor O Decorah la 1874-76 . .. 

Lien, Arne O Glen Roy la 1874-75 

Lien, C. A. N Holden Minn. . .1874-75 

Lillegaard, Lars O Nicollet Minn . . . 1874-77 

Lindef jeld, Martin O Harmony Minn . . . 1874-77 

Lund, Christian ]....'. Benton la 1874-75 

Madsen, Kornelius Gjerpen Wis 1874 

Mathieson, Oscar Paint Creek la 1874-75 

Mehus. Lars J Lisbon Ill 1874-75 

Mundahl. John F Blue Earth City. . . . Minn . . . 1874-75 

Myran. Guttorm Lincoln (S.) Dak. 1874-77 

Nedrelo, Baard B Glenwood Minn . . . 1874-76 

*Ness, Johannes Martinus O. . Calmar la 1874-80 A. B., 1880 

Neste, Engebret Decorah la 1874-78 . . . . 

Naeseth, Halvor K Holden Minn . . . 1874 

Ommelstad, Thomas H Luther Valley Wis 1874-76 

*Omland. Gunulf (Gunnuf) J.. . Bratsberg Minn. . .1874-75 

Osmundson, .Andreas B Valley Grove Minn. . . 1874 

*Ottesen, Otto Christian Utica Wis 1874-80 A. B., 1880 

*Pedersen, Nils Indianapolis Ind 1874-75 

*Pederson, Christofer Waterville la 1874-78 

Peterson, Anders O Spring Grove Minn . . . 1874-77 

Peterson, Halvor Lisbon Ill 1874-81 A. B., 1881 

Rasmusscn, Olaus Lisbon Ill 1874 

Rogde, Ole J Lee Ill 1874-76 

Rollefson, Andres Bratsberg Minn ... 1874 

Rykken, Johannes B Norway?1874-75 

Sheel, Herman W St. Louis Mo 1874-75 

Skjaer, Jens O Le Rov Minn . . . 1874-78 

Skov, Thore K Red Wing Minn . . . 1874-75 

*Skvberg, Kristian O Rush River Wis 1874-75, 1876-80... \. B., 1880 

Storla, John P Canton (S.) Dak. 1874-75 

Storla, Thore Paint Creek la 1874-77 

♦Strandskov, Hans C Carlston Minn . . . 1874-76 

*Stub, Olaf Tidemand Arentz Locust la 1874-80 A. B., 1880 

Saetrang. Oluf G Waterville la 1874-79 

♦Saettre. Thorbjorn Andreas. . Rock Dell Minn. . .1874-80 A. B., 1880 

*Thorgrimsen, Hans Baagde . Eyrabakkr Iceland. . 1874-79 A. B., 1879 

Tollefson, Ole Estherville la 1874, 1875-78 

Tonning, Rasmus Bergen Norway. 1874-75, 1876-77 

Tutle, Louis Ed Benton la 1874 

Vinjum, Jens A Blackhammer Minn . . . 1874-75 

Voldeng, Ole Decorah la 1874-75 

Wake. John Lisbon Ill 1874-75 

*0fsteda(hjl, Andreas A Zumhrota Minn . . . 1874-78 

0kre, Lars J Paint Creek la 1874-75 

Osterud, Lauritz H Bloomfieid Minn. . . 1874-76 

1875-1876 

Aaby, Nils A Rock Dell Minn. . .1875-77 

Anderson, Alfred Decorah la 1875-77 

Anderson, Andreas B Gjerpen Wis 1875-77 

Barke, Johannes O Story City la 1875-76 

Berg, Peter O Hesper la 1875-76 

BjOrgan, John R Nidaros (S.) Dak. 1875-78 

Blakstvedt, Gabriel. . Highland Minn . . . 1875 

Blakstvedt. Martin Highland Minn. . . 1875 

Bolland, John Hesper la 1875-76 

Bordcrud, O. P Norman (N.) Dak. 1875-76 

*Bothne, Johannes G. Daae Decorah la 1875-78 A. B., 1878 

♦Braaten, Sven O Holden Minn. . .1875-81 A. B., 1881 

Brandt, John A Decorah la 1875-8.? .A.. B., 1883 

Brecke, Ole E Spillville la 1875-81 A. B.. 1881 

B0rve, Knut Th Fort Dodge la 1875-76, 1877-78 

Christianson, Conrad M Renville Minn . . 1875-81 A. B., 1881 

Dokken, Olaus L Si)ring Grove Minn . . . 1875-76 

Eiken. .Andrew T Bratsberg Minn . . . 1875-80 

Erstad, Cornelius Zumbrota Minn. , .1875-77, 1878-80 

Fiskerbaek, Ole K Macfarland Wis 1875-78 

Haagenson, Syvert P Rock Dell Minn . 1875-76 



ATTENDANCE 215 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Haatvedt, Jacob Holmes City Minn . . . 1875-77 

Hanson, Martin Manitowoc Wis 1875-76 

Hanson. Thore O Estherville la 1875-78 

Haugen, A. J Crane Creek la 1875-76 

Hereid. Konrad A N. Rush River Wis 1875-76 

Hereid, Lars K N. Rush River Wis 1875-76 

*Heyer, Halvor A Minneapolis Minn . . . 1875-76 

Hilleboe, Hans S Roche-a-Cree Wis 1875-81 A. B., 1881 

Hoff , Peter J Lisbon Ill 1875-76 

Hole, Andreas B Goodhue Minn . . . 1875-77 

Holstad, Anders Decorah la 1875-81 A. B., 1881 

Hopperstad, Julius J Capron Ill 1875, 1879-82 

Hove, Peder Calmar la 1875 

Isberg, Gustav J Decorah... la 1875-78 

*Jensen, Lars Petter Albert Lea Minn. . .1875-78, 1880-82 

Johnson, Edward Rushford Minn . . . 1875 

Johnson, Nils H Rock Dell Minn. . .1875 

Johnson, Norm Wiota Wis 1875 

Johnson, O. C Newark Ill 1875-76 

*Kasberg. Karl A Bratsberg Minn. . .1875-81 A. B., 1881 

Kleven, Carl J. A Holmestrand Norway. 1875-76 

Kloster, Nils A. (Anderson) . . . Ossian la 1875-78 

Kvale, Anders Norway?1875 

Kvale, ToUef O Decorah la 1875 

Landmark. Einar Decorah la 1875-76 

Larson, Knut Zumbrota Minn. . . 1875 

Larson, Ole H Wilmington Minn. . . 1875-76 

Malmin, John M Chicago Ill 1875-76 

Mauritzon, Masena G Chicago Ill 1875-76 

Mauritzon. Mauritz Chicago Ill 1875-76 

Mellang, Guttorm A Albert Lea Minn. . . 1875-77 

*Minne, Nils M Clinton la 1875-79 

Mohn, F. V'oss Bergen Norway. 1875-78, 1880-81. .A. B., 1881 

Moller, Henrik Winchester Wis 1875-76, 1878-80 

Nilson, John Nikolai Red Wing Minn ... 1875-79 

Olson, Christian Decorah la 1875-76 

Oppen, Knut Valders Wis 1875-76 

Ramsey, Nils Decorah la 1875-76 

Roe, Peter O Rock Dell Minn . . . 1875-76 

Sando, Halvor O Estherville la 1875 

*Seehuus, Knut Chicago Ill 1875-81 A. B., 1881 

Simonson, Simon E Koshkonong Wis 1875-77 

Solheim, Ola A Lee Ill 1875-81 A. B., 1881 

Stenersen. Peder H Red Wing Minn . . . 1875-76 

Sael, OleO Holden Minn. . .1875-77 

St^renson, S. T Root Prairie Minn . . . 1875 

Sovde, Johannes Story City la 1875-77 

Tvedt, Hans A. (Halvorsen) . . Decorah la 1875-76 

Tvedt, Gjermund O Lemonweir Wis 1875-81 

Tvedt, Olaf O Lemonweir Wis 1875-79 

Ulsaker. Ole Holden Minn. . .1875-77 

Vaala. Ole G Saude la 1875 

*Waage, Johannes Wiota Wis 1875-76 

Werner. Hans C Chicago Ill 1875 

Ylvisaker. A. Christian Zumbrota Minn. . . 1875-81 A. B., 1881 

Ytterboe. Halvor T Calmar la 1875-81 A. B., 1881 

*0fsteda(h)l. Nils A Rock Dell Minn . . . 1875-78 

1876-1877 

♦Alien. Hans Decorah la. 1876-83 A. B.. 1883 

♦Anderson. Andreas J Swede Grove Minn . . . 1876-81 

Anderson, Christian F Saude .la 1876-77 

*Arvesen. Nils Lisbon Ill 1876-80 

Bergan. Ole G Renville Minn . . . 1876-79 

♦Bergman, Fredrik Winchester Wis 1876-81 A. B., 1881 

Bothne. Gisle Decorah la 1876-78 A. B.,.1878 

Brandvig, Anfin J Story City la 1876-78 

*Christensen, Gustav A Genesee Idaho. . 1876-82. 1883 

Fossum. Andreas A Paint Creek la 1876-82 A. B., 1882 

Gilbertson, Gustav Spring Grove Minn . . . 1876-78 

*Glas0e. Oluf Lanesboro Minn. . .1876-83 A. B., 1883 

*Gr0nvoId, Ole Christian Calmar la 1876-81 

♦Hansen, Stjren Perth Ambov N. J 1876-79 

♦Hauge, Anders (Andreas) E. . .Gloppen Norway . 1876-77, 1879-80 



216 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Student 



Post Office 



State 



Years at 
Luther College Graduation 



Haugen, Engebret P Decorah la 

Hellen, Ole Bottolf son Decorah la 

Hjelle, Iver A Bratsberg Minn . . . 

Hole. Hans L Albert Lea Minn . . . 

Holt, Simon N Root Prairie Minn . . . 

Hovland, Andreas T Zumbrota Minn . . . 

Huset, Isak H Holden Minn. . . 

*Huus, Alfred L Lisbon Ill 

Kaasa, Torsten J Ossian la 

Kaasa, Even J Ossian la 

Kirkelie, Eivind A Harmony Minn . . . 

*Koren, Paul Decorah la 

Langemo, Nils P Holden Minn... 

Larson, Wilhelm Chicago Ill 

Madsen, Martin St. Peter Minn. . . 

Mathre, Sewel L Lisbon Ill 

Muus, Nils Holden Minn. . . 

Rasmussen, Emil Rush River Wis 

*Rogne, Erik T Valders Wis 

*Rygg, Oluf Sverre Glenwood Minn . . . 

*Rygh, George Alfred Taylor.. .Holden Minn. . . 

Slette, Gudbrand O Albert Lea Minn. . . 

Storaasli, Engebret G Rushford Minn. . . 

*Saevig, Ola M Rushford Minn . . . 

Sorenson, S0ren A Manitowoc Wis 

Teigen, Ole H Harmony Minn. . , 

♦Thorlaksson, Nils Stein?rimr. .Winchester Wis. 



1882 
1882 



A. B., 1882 



1876-78. . . 

1876-77 

1876-79. . . , 
1876-77. . . . 

1876 

1876 

1876-82. . . . 
1876-82. . . . 

1876 

1876-77. . . 

1876 

1876-82. . . 

1876-77 

1876-79 

1876-77 

1876-81 

1876-79 

1876-77 

1876-82 .A.. B., 1882 

1876-82 A. B., 1882 

1876-81 A. B., 1881 

1876-79 

1876-80 

1876-77 

1876 

1876-82 

1876-81 A. B., 1881 



Martell Wis 1876-79, 1880-81 

Paint Creek la 1876-78 



*Tonnesen, Tonnes Herman 
Valhovd, Kristian E 
(C. E. Erickson) 

Weltha, Jacob O Story City la . . . 

0silid, Thorvald H Rushford Minn 



.1876-77, 
.1876-79. 



1877-1878 



Aaker, Hans H 

Ausenhus, Nils A 

Anderson, Franklin S 

*Aubol, Carlo 

Billington, Alexander 

Bothne, Carl 

Bry, Theodor K 

Clauson, Peter E 

Dale, Knut K 

Flugum, Jens 

Fries, Jeremias F 

F0rde, Ole A 

Games, Botolf H 

GuUord, Emil B 

Hanson, Haldor 

Hektoen, Ludvig 

Helgen, Albert J 

Hermanson, Martin B 

Istad, Edward N 

Jerdee, Christopher 

Ki(e)land, Gustav H 

Kopang, John 

Koren, William 

Langen, Lars 

Larsen, Herman 

Larson, Syvert 

Lerstol, Ananias 

Liberg, Peter O 

Lobben, Jens L. A 

Lore, Hans M. O 

L0kken, Anders O 

♦Magelssen, Hans 

Mikkelson, Martin M 

Myhre, Martinus E 

Nupen, K. M 

Opheim, Ole B 

Opsahl, Gudbrand 

*Opsahl, Theodor G 

♦Preus, Johan Wilhelm 

♦Rasmussen, Wilhelm Augustin 



Ridgeway la 1877- 

Kensett la 1877- 

Chicago Ill 1877 

Eaton Wis 1877- 

Decorah la 1877- 

Decorah la 1877, 

Coon Valley Wis 1877- 

Locust la 1877- 

Wilmington Minn . . . 1877- 

Spring Grove Minn . . . 1877- 

Muskego Wis 1877- 

Locust la 1877 

Mabel Minn. . .1877- 

Coon Valley Wis 1877- 

Grand Mound la 1877- 

Westby Wis 1877- 

Albert Lea Minn . . . 1877- 

Spring Grove Minn . . . 1877 

Locust la 1877- 

Koshkonong Wis 1877- 

Manitowoc Wis 1877- 

Root Prairie Minn . . . 1877- 

Decorah la 1877- 

Hesper la 1877 

Decorah la 1877 

Westby Wis 1877- 

North Prairie Minn . . . 1877 

Mankato Minn. . . 1877- 

Blair Wis 1877- 

Albert Lea Minn . . . 1877- 

Koshkonong Wis 1877- 

Manitowoc Wis 1877- 

Roche-a-Cree Wis 1877- 

Wilmington Minn . . . 1877 

Ossian la 1877 

Esthervillo la 1877- 

Albert Lea Minn. . .1877- 

Manchester Minn . . . 1877- 

Keyser Wis 1877- 

Lisbon Ill 1877 



A. B., 1883 



83 . . . 
78. . . 
1879-86.... A. B., 18S6 

78, 1881-84 

80, 81 

78 

78 

82 A. B., 1882 



A. B., 1885 



A. B., 1833 
A. B., 1833 



A. B., 1883 
A. b!. 1882 
A. B., 1889 



A. B., 1883 



A. B., 1884 
A. B., 1882 



ATTENDANCE 217 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Rikansrud, Ole T Elon la 1877-80 

Roverud, Elling K Spring Grove Minn ... 1877-78 . 

Sampson, Edwin P Locust la 1877 

Saettre, O. M Locust la 1877-82 . 

Thomassen, Thomas Clifton Tex 1877 

Thompson, Oscar Beloit Wis 1877-78 

Tobiasen, Henry Decorah la 1877-78 

*Vik, Eivind O Decorah la 1877-84 A. B., 1884 

Voldeng, Nils M. (M. Nelson). Decorah la 1877-83 A. B.. 1883 

1878-1879 

Aakre, Johannes Ridgeway la 1878 

Aas, Esten Bratsberg Minn. . .1878-80 

*Belsheim, Ole G Winnebago la 1878-79, 1880-82 

Blixrud, Hans Spring Grove Minn . . . 1878-79 

*Dahl, Peder H Yellow Medicine.. . . Minn . . . 1878-79 

Flugum, Christian N Winnebago la 1878-79 

Frich, Gerhard La Crosse Wis 1878-81 

Fryslie, Benjamin Decorah la 1878-85 A. B., 1885 

F0rde. Ole H Locust la 1878-82 

Halland, John G Northwood la 1878-84 A. B., 1884 

Halvorson, Halvor G Douglas Minn . . . 1878-81 

Halvorson, Henry Trempealeau Wis 1878-80 

Hanson, Theodor Decorah la 1878 

Harstad, Aanund Harmony Minn. . . 1878-79 

Hegg, Oscar N Decorah la 1878-82 

Hillestad, Iver Frenchville Wis 1878-79 

Hjort, Jacob L Dalby la 1878 

*Hove, Elling O Northwood la 1878-84 A. B.. 1884 

Isakson, Isak Fountain Minn . . . 1878-80 

Iversen, Helge Arendal Minn . . . 1878-79 

Jensvold, Johannes Estherville la 1878-79 

Kirkelie, Kj0stulf Harmony Minn . . . 1878-79 

Krog, Hans Chicago Ill 1878-81 

♦Krostu, Gunsten (Gustein) G. .Scandinavia Wis 1878-80 

Krohn, Eugene Arendal Minn. . .1878-85 A. B., 1885 

Kvam, Johannes J Albert Lea Minn. . .1878 

*Langemo, Halvor T Eidsvold Minn. . .1878-83 A. B., 1883 

Leidahl, Julius Locust la 1878 

Lein, Carl O Hesper la 1878-82 

*Lee, Olav E Trysil (S.) Dak.1878-83 A. B.. 1883 

Lindberg, Knut Le Seuer River Minn . . . 1878-79 

Lobben, Lars Blair Wis 1878-79 

L0vald, Hans H Lime Springs la 1878-82 

Moen, Leif Bratsberg Minn . . . 1878-79 

Monserud, Martin Paint Creek la 1878-79 

Muus, Jens J Holden Minn . . . 1878-79 

Nelson, A. O Beaver Creek Wis 1878-81 

Ness, Jens A Zumbrota •. . .Minn. , .1878-84 A. B., 1884 

Nordby, Jens N Wanamingo Minn . . . 1878-84 

Oddson, Haldor Winnipeg Canada.. 1878-80 

Pederson, Martin , Preston Minn. . . 1878 

Ramstad, Ola Westbv Wis 1878-83 A. B., 1883 

Reishus, G. J Vineland Minn . . . 1878-80 

Remmen, Thomas Holden Minn . . . 1878-80 

*Ringstad, Johannes J Fergus Falls Minn . . . 1878-82 

Roalkvam, Tjeran Decorah la 1878-79 

Rynning, Johan L Bratsberg Minn . . . 1878-79 

Seehuus, Martin Chicago Ill 1878-83 

Selland, Peder E Locust la 1878-79 

Stortroen, Halvor J Spring Grove Minn. . . 1878-80 

Sorland, Erik Decorah la 1878-79 

Tande, Ole Christiania Norway. 1878-79 A. B., 1879 

Torrison, Oscar M Manitowoc Wis 1878-81 A. B.. 1881 

Trulson, Halvor Rock Prairie Wis 1878-79 

Turkop, Olaus O Paint Creek la 1878-80 

Tvedt, Johannes A Story City la 1878-79 

*Ulsaker, Sven K Kenyon Minn. . .1878-83 A. B., 1883 

Vik, Erik G Decorah la 1878 

1879-1880 

Aase, Lars R Kenyon Minn. . .1879-83 

Anderson, Christian Clifton Ill 1879-80 

Baukol, Peder Coon Valley Wis 1879-82 

*Beyer, Ole B. (Nilsen) Vang Minn. . .1879-80 



218 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Student 



Post Office 



State 



Years at 
Luiher College Graduation 



Braaten, Anton O Kenyon Minn . . . 1879-80 

Braaten, Torstein Vang Minn. . .1879-81 

Bokseth, Bernhard A St. Olaf Minn. . . 1879-80 

*Fjeldstad, Rollef K. Rollef sen. Stony Run Minn. . .1879-81 

Germo, Ivar G Decorah la 1879-82 

Grose, Ingebrikt F Kenyon Minn . . . 1879-1885 

Hulsaether. Ludvig L Koshkonong Wis 1879-80 

*Jahren, Johan H Montevideo. Minn . . . 1879-84 

Kalheim. Ole M Lisbon Ill 1879-84 

Kitelsrud, Ole J Norwegian Grove. . . Minn . . . 1879-81 

Kirkeberg, A. C Fort Dodge la 1879-80, 1887-88 

*Langemo. John Thorbj0rn .... Eidsvold Minn . . . 1879-83 A. B., 1883 

*Larsen, Christian M Springville Wis 1879-83 A. B., 1883 



A. B., 1885 



A. B., 1884 
A. B., 1884 




STl i>KN I it(»l»V l(iK 1 >! "> |•.A1<..^ ,\(.() 



Larsen, Lauritz A Chicago 

*Lee. Ole T Lyle 

Lee, Wilhelm Decorah 

Lie, Halvor O Ridgeway 

♦Lien, Abel Edvard Christiana 

Losen, Peder Hesper 

Litkensgaard. Knut O Swan Lake 

Meidell, Hans Calamus 

*Mellang, Peder K Ridgeway 

Melsnaes, Adolf Trempealeau \'alley 

Melsnaes, Ole O Renville 

Moe, Lars L Otis Grove 

♦Mortensen, Vilhelm A. M Portland 

*M0rstad, Erik O Eau Claire 

Neperud, Carl Coon Valley 

Remmen, Nils E Holden 

Shefloe, Joseph S Waukon 

Skyberg, Hans Grand Meadow . . . . 

Stianson, Peder D St. Joseph 

Strom, Feodor Decorah 

Str0m, Herman Decorah 

Sdrum. Hans Elon 

Tvedt, Peder J Carlisle 



Ill 1879-86 

Minn. . .1879-84 

la 1879-81 

la 1879-80 

Wis 1879-85 

la 1879-81 

Minn. . .1879-81 

la 1879-81 

la 1879-82, 1885-87. 

Wis 1879-80 

Minn. . . 1879-80 

Wis 1879-82 

Oregon.. 1879-81 

Wis 1879-80 

Wis 1879-84 

Minn. . .1879-80. 1881-84. 

la 1879-85 

Minn. . .1879-81, 1883-87. 

Mo 1879 

la 1879-80 

la 1879-80 

la 1879-83 

Minn. . .1879-80 



A. B., 1886 
A. B.. 1884 



A. B., 1885 



A. B.. 1885 



ATTENDANCE 



219 



Student 



Post Office 



State 



Years at 
Luther College Graduation 



1880-1881 



Aasgaard , Ole Elk Creek Wis . . 

Aasterud, John P Rusli River Wis. . 

Asbjeld, Anders Silver Lake Minn 

Aubolee, Mads O Castle Rock Wis. . 

Berg, Otto S Arendal Minn 

Berset, Peder E Renville Minn 

Braekke, Johan B Trempealeau Valley. Wis. . 

*Dahl, Olaus Lochiel Wis. . 

Davidson, Peter Coon Valley Wis. . 

Donhowe (Donhaug), Olavus GStory City la . . . 

Emerson, Ingebright Luther Valley Wis. . 

Esposs, Peder A Chicago Ill . . 

Estrem, Andreas (Andrew).. . Cresco la. . . 

Estrem, Jo.seph O Willmar Minn 

Flatland, Jens Zumbrota Minn 

Forthun, Albert West Prairie Wis. . 

Fuglei, Ole K Albion Neb . 

Hagen, S0ren O Windom Minn 

Halvorson, Sigurd Decorah la . . . 

Hilleberg, Ole T Norway 

Jensen, Mads C Alden Minn 

Jenson, Ole Anton Kewaunee Wis. . 

Jenson, Peder C Renville Minn 

*Larsen, Thorvald Cereal Minn 

Lund, John H Swan Lake Minn 

Markhus, George Millbrook Ill . . . 

*Mortensen, Peder Washington Co Neb . 

Mydland, Jacob Norway 

Maeland, Edwind Henrytown Minn . 

Neperud, Nordal N Coon Valley Wis. . . 

Norom, Karl F'ranklin Minn . 

Norsving, Knut Vang Minn . 

Naeset , .•\slak O Vinje Minn . 

Ongstad, Sophus H Pelican Rapids Minn . 

On.stad, Peter O St. James Minn. 

*Ovri (0vri), Ellend J Albert Lea Minn. 

Pederson, Magnus Elon la ... . 

♦Peterson, Sophus Christian N. Norway Lake Minn . 

Rasmussen, Anton Th Decorah la ... . 

Romsaas, Ole T Pilot Mound Minn . 

Sander, Bernt B Decorah la ... . 

Shellum, Jacob St. James Minn . 

Skjervem, O. H Rock Dell Minn . 

Stensrud, Knut Sacred Heart Minn . 

Storheim, Knut Clear Lake la . . . 

Sviggum, Erik York Wis. . . 

Teigen, 0sten F Zion, Chippewa Co . Minn . 

Thorstenson, Lars Winnebago la ... . 

Thorstenson, Thorsten A .\mboy Minn . 

*Tingelstad, Joh(a)n O Norman (N)Da 

Tomassen, John Independence Wis. . . 

Torrison, George A Manitowoc Wis. . . 

Tvenge, Torsten Decorah la. . . . 

Unseth, Theodor Westby Wis. . . 

0verli, Ole A Butbrunt Valley. . . . Minn . 

1881-1882 

(Algjeld), Hans Monson Indviken Norway 

Bakken, Johan M Kenyon Minn . . 

Berge, Johan J Dell Minn . . 

Dokken, Ole Renville Minn . . 

Finseth, Knut A Kenyon Minn . . 

*Fjeldstad, Halvor O Arendal Minn . . 

Granrud, John E Pelican Rapids Minn . . 

Haatvedt , Knut L Carlisle Minn . . 

Hanson, Adolph Albert Lea Minn . . 

Haugen, Christian A Coon Valley Wis. . . . 

Hove, Ola J Calmar la 

Jacobson, Axel Willmar Minn. . 

*Johnson, Martin O Manitowoc Wis. . . . 

Jordahl, Daniel C Beaver Creek Minn . . 



1880-82 

1880-81 

1880-81 

1880-84 

1880 

1880-81 

1880-81 

1880-85 

1880-81 

1880-85 

1880-82 

1880, 1882-84 

1880-86 

1880-85. .... 

1880-81 

1880-82 

1880-86 

1880-85 

1880-82 

1880-82 

1880-85 ..... 

1880-81 

1880 

1880-84 

1880-84 

1880-85 

1880-83 

1880 

1880-82 

1880-85 

1880-82, 1885-86 

1880-82 

1880-81 

1880-86 A. B., 1886 

1880-84 

1880-86 A. B., 1886 

1880-83 

1880-86 A..B., 1886 

1880-81 

1880-83 

1880-82 

1880-82 

1880-81 

1880-83, 1884-85 



A. B., 1884 



A. B., 1885 



A. B., 1886 



A. B., 1886 



A. B., 1884 
A. B., 1884 
A. B., 1885 



A. B., 1885 



1880 

1880-82 . . . 
1880-81 . . . 
1880-81 . . . 
1880-81 . . . 
1880-85 . . . 

1880-83, 1884-85, 

1887-89, 1890-91 

1880-85 A. B., 1885 

1880-82 

1880-81 

1880-82 



881 
881 
881- 
881- 
881- 
881- 
881- 
881 
881- 
881 
881- 
881, 
881- 
881- 



A. B.. 1886 
A. B., 1888 
A. B., 1886 



1883-85 . 
83 



A. B., 1888 



220 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Student 



Post Office 



State 



Years at 
Luther College Graduation 



♦Jorgenson, Jacob Edvard New Centerville. . . . Wis 

Knudson, Johannes C Rock Run Wis 

*Lee, Gustav T Lyle Minn . . . 

*Levorson, John Bristol la 

Liebakken. Bernt J Watson Minn . . . 

Logan, Fred Ch'cago Ill 

*Lundeberg. Knut O Carlisle Minn . . . 

Mindrem, Ole A Bratsberg Minn . . . 

Nupen, B. P. A Ossian la 

Pladsen, Nils T Sacred Heart Minn . . . 

*Rikansrud, Olaus T Elon la 

Ruste, Edward Perry \Vis 

Sanda, Stener K Norway . 

Sanderson, Knut Saude la 

*Selt veit, Carl G Hviteseid Norway . 

Swenson, Laurits S Norseland Minn . . . 

Syverud, Thrond A Forward Wis 

Teigseth, Andrew O Utica Wis 

Tellefson, Martin Lyle Minn . . , 

Tellefson, Theodor Lyle Minn . . . 

Thompson, Ole Wis 

*Thorpe, Ove Boyesen 

Wangensten Granite Falls Minn . . . 

♦Tdnnesen, Theodor Jorgen EmilMilwaukee Wis... . 

*Urnes. Johannes A Adamsville Wis 

Vig, Peter O Granite Falls Minn . , 

*Ylvisaker, Ivar Daniel Zumbrota Minn . . 

Ylvisaker, Olaf Zumbrota Minn . . 

1882-1883 

Amundson, H. E Bel videre Minn . . 

Bakke, J. P Woodside la 

*Beito, Gulbrand G Dccorah la 

Hans Andreas H Washington Prairie . la 



*Bogstad, Rasmus R Rising Sun. . . . Wis 

*Boe, Nils N. O Northfield Minn . . . 

Dahle. John L Waseca Minn . . . 

Eggen, Ole N Prairie Farm Wis 

Engebretson, Anton A Grafton (N.)Dak 

Evenrud, Nels A Woodville la 

Fardal, Nils E Lake Center la 

Felland, Carl M Utica Wis 

Folven, Rasmus J Stony Run Minn . . . 

*Fuglebak, Daniel J Rising Sun Wis 

Gangestad. Severin M Bode la 

♦Gullixon, George Albert Bode la 

*Ingebrigtson, Johan Edward . . Albert Lea Minn . . . 

Jacobson, J.N Beaver Creek Minn . . . 

Juul, Jacob A Chicago Ill 

Kjome, G. N Highlandville la 

*Kvaase, Daniel Keyser Wis 

*Lunde, Johannes H. C Zumbrota Minn . . . 

Mikkelsen, Michael A Chicago Ill 

Mohn, Bernt E Oslo Minn . . . 

Munson, L. A Vang Minn . . . 

♦Nesseth, Guttorm P Zumbrota Minn . . . 

*N(idshilder, Hans A Stony Run Minn . . . 

Olson. Albert Chicago Ill 

*Ottersen, Ole Alpena Mich.. . . 

Remmen, Martin E Holden Minn . . . 

Reque, Syver B Spring Grove Minn . . . 

Rodegaard, Andrew New Richland Minn . . . 

Rogde, P. J Lee Ill 

♦Rognlie, Parelius H Vineland Minn. . . 

Rossing, Anton A Argyle Wis 

Shelver, N. G. J Sheldon (N.)Dak 

*Skov, Villads B Perth Amboy N. jf 

Sniedsrud, Ole L Spring Grove Minn . . . 

♦Strand, Joh(a)n J Lelandsburg la 

StriJm, Carl Zumbrota Minn. . . 

Thorson, M Ossian la 

ToUakson, Ole S Argyle Wis 

Veek, Ole H Brodhead Wis 

♦Vereide, Ole M Rising Sun Wis 



881-86 A. B.. 1886 

881 

881-88 A. B., 1888 

881-88 A. B.. 1888 

881-82 

881-84 

881 

881 

881-83 

881 

881-88 A. B.. 1883 

881-82 

881 

881-82 

881-82 

882-86 A. B., 1886 

881-84 

881-83 

881-82 

881 

881 

882-86 A. B., 1886 

881-84 

881-82, 1884-86 

881 

881-88 A. B., 1888 

881-88 A. B., 1888 



1882-86 A. B., 1886 

1882-84 

1882-89 A. B., 1889 

1882-86 A. B., 1886 

1883-87 

1882-86 A. B., 1886 

1882-83 

1882-84. 1885-86 

1882-86 

1882-84 

1882-86 A. B., 1886 

1882-84 

1882-83 

1882-85 

1882-83 

1882-87, 1888-90. A. B., 1890 

1882-89 A. B., 1889 

1882-85 

1882-83 

1882-83 

1882-85 A. B.. 188S 

1882-89 A. B.. 1889 

1882-86 A. B., 1886 

1882-84. 1885-88 

1882-85 

1882-87. 1889-90 

1882-86 

1882-83 

1882-89 A. B.. 1889 

1882-88 A. B.. 1888 

1882-84 

1882-84 

1882-85 

1883 

1882-83 

1882-83 

1882-86 

1882-83 

1882-89 A. B., 1889 

1882-83 

1882-87 

1882-84 

1882-84 

1882-89 A. B.. 1889 



ATTENDANCE 221 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Vik, Rasmus M Lisbon (N.)Dak.l882-84 . 

Wold, Ole E Evansville Minn. . .1882-84. 

0ie, Ole E Lac qui Parle Minn. . .1882-84. 



1883-1884 

Aaberg, Svifest Yellow Medicine . . . Minn . . . 1883-85 

*Akre, John Stony Run Minn. . .1883-84 

Anderson, Botolf Kenyon Minn . . . 1883-86 

Anderson, Isaac Des Moines la 1883-90 A. B., 1890 

Bakke, O. E Vernon Minn. . .1883-84 

Bakke, Peter H Eidsvold Minn. . .1883-88 A. B.. 1888 

Berg, O. P Argyle Wis 1883-84 

Berge, Oluf A Beloit la 1883-85 

Bi0rn, Herman C Zumbrota Minn . . 1883-87 

Blixrud. Christian M. Spring Grove Minn . . . 1883-84 

Bolstad, Sjur Reedstown Wis 1883-85, 1886-87 

Bondhus, N. T. . Calamus la 1883-87 

Brauer, Carl W Mabel Minn. . .1883-85 

*Breivik, Gabriel I lee. Ill 1883-87 

Christensen, E Gayville (S.) Dak. 1883-84 

Dahl, Herman Yellow Medicine . . . Minn . . . 1883-84 

*Dolven, Andreas O Whitehall Wis 1883-88 

Ernst, Henry Alden Minn. . .1883-84 

Finsen, Paul S. Th.. . . Mountain (N.)Dak.l883-85 

Fjellestad, K. O Arendal Minn. . .1883-86 

Forsyth, H Oconomowoc Wis 1883-84 

Frich, Carl La Crosse Wis 1883-84 

Gilbertson, G. T Whitehall Wis 1883-84 

Grinder, A. M Perry Wis 1883-84 

Grover, C. A Glyndon Minn. . .1883-84 

Gunderson, Einar G Chicago Ill 1883-84 

Haagenson, Ole La Crosse Wis 1883-84 

Haarvig, K Chicago Ill 1883-84 

Hagen, Olaf A Windom Minn . . 1883 

Hagen, Otto G Waterville la 1883-86 

Harstad, A Freedom Ill 1883-84 

Hilstad, A. E Stevenstown Wis 1883-84 

Ingvoldstad, K Decorah la 1883-84 

Johnson, Louis Hoylton Ill 1883-84 

Johnson, Nils J Mansfield Minn . . . 1883-84 

Johnson, N. O Highlandville la 1883-85 

*KittiIsby, Peter .\ndreas Calmar la 1883-88 A. B.. 1888 

Knutson, Nils Gem la 1883-84 

Knutson, Thomas Harmony Minn . . . 1883-85 

*KvaIe, Ole J Decorah la 1883-90 A. B.. 1890 

Landing, L. M Stony Run Minn . . . 1883-84 

Laxdahl, Daniel Mountain (N.)Dak.l883-88 

Lee. Theodor Decorah la 1883-84 

*Linnevold, Johan Decorah la 1883-90 A. B.. 1890 

Mason, Christian M Whitewater Wis 1883-84 

*Mellby, Carl .\ugust New Richland Minn . . . 1883-88 A. B.. 1888 

Mellem, Edwin G Northwood la 1883-90 A. B., 1890 

Myhre, P. F Onalaska Wis 1883-84 

Ness, Iver O Richland (N.)Dak.l883-85 

♦Nielsen. Edias Lee Ill 1883-84 

Olson, Oliver T Newburg Minn . . . 1883-84 

*Palm, Stilluf Tobias St. Paul Minn. . .1883-85 

Pederson, Johannes Chicago Ill 1883-85 

Petterson, George Granite Falls Minn . . . 1883-86 

Preus, Paul Keyser Wis 1883-84 

Reque, Peter A Spring Grova Minn . . . 1883-91 A. B., 1891 

Ring, Mathias Yellow Medicine . . . Minn . . . 1883-84 

Rollefson, Carl I Stony Run Minn . . . 1883-86 

Skaar, J. M Utica Wis 1883-84 

Solseth, Josias S Harmony Minn . . . 1883-84 

♦Solum, Henry E Spring Grove Minn. . .1883-90 A. B., 1890 

Styrkson, Styrk Rochester Minn . . . 1883-84 

Teslow, .\. A Albert Lea Minn. . .1883-84 

♦Thorkveen, Lars P Rising Sun Wis 1883-85 

Thuen, P. A Chicago Ill 1883-85 

Tjelle, Tdrris Braceville Ill 1883-84 

Unseth, Magnus Westby Wis 1883-90 A. B.. 1890 

Vaatvedt, G. C. (Gilbertson). .Vernon Minn. . . 1883-84 

Veek, Christopher Brodhead Wis 1883-85 



222 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Wiese. Jacob A Huxley la 1883-84 . 

nVoll, Oluf (Olaf) Christiansund Norway . 1883-84 . 

0de, Gustav H Decorah la 1883-84. 

*0xendahl, Iver L Decorah la 1883-85 . 



1884-1885 

Bakkerud, H Alpena Mich... 1884-86 

Bothnc, Erling A Chicago Ill 1884-86, 1888-94.. A. B.. 1894 

*Egge. John I Norway Minn. . . 1884-87 

Ellertson. Carl E Bratsberg Minn . . . 1884-88 

Engelson. Chr. J Brookings (S.) Dak.1884-85 

Foshagc, John Mount Horeb Wis 1884-85 

Gimmestad, A. M Redwood Falls Minn. . .1884-86 

♦Gimmestad. Lars M Redwood Falls Minn . . . 1884-91 A. B.. 1891 

Harstad. Oscar A Arendal Minn . . 1884-87 

Haugen, Christopher E Woodside la 1884-91 A. B., 1891 

Hove, J. T Kenyon Minn . . . 1884-85 

Haugejordet, Knut Bratsberg Minn . . . 1884-85 

Johnson, Martinius Madison (S.) Dak. 1884-86 

Johnson, Selmer Minneapolis Minn . . . 1884-85 

*Klevjord, Ole O Macfarland Wis 1884-85 

*Larsen, Bernt Julius Pigeon Falls Wis 1884-85 

Lestrud, A. A Kensett la 1884-85 

Lien. O. E Elgin la 1884-85 

*Litsheim, Johannes O Keyset Wis 1884-85 

Loftness, G Gibbon Minn . . . 1884-85 

Madsen, C. A Calmar la 1884-85 

Moore, Henry W Decorah la 1884-91 A. B., 1891 

♦Myhre, Olaf C Holden Minn . . . 1884-87 

*Nilsson, Thomas Minneapolis Minn. . .1885-89 A. B.. 1889 

*Nordgaard, Nils N Decorah la 1884-91 A. B.. 1891 

Olson, Hillmar Hoboken N. J 1884-85 

*Reitan, Bernt J Woodvillc Wis 1884-85 

♦Sperati, Carlo Alberto Brooklyn N. Y.. . . 1884-88 A. B., 1888 

Steensland, Morten M Madison Wis 1884-90 A. B., 1890 

Sterud, Herman Volga (S.) Dak.1884-85 

Storaker, E. P Watson Minn . . . 1884-85 

*Swalestuen, Jprgen D Bratsberg Minn . . . 1884-86 

Swennes, Ole S Barre Mills Wis 1884-91 A. B., 1891 

♦Swensen, Daniel Rising Sun Wis 1884-85 

Thuland, Conrad M Decorah la 1884-85 A. B., 1885 

Torgerson, L. W Bristol Li 1884-85 

Torrison, Gustav Manitowoc Wis 1884-86 

*Tufte, Martin Cornelius Decorah la 1884-91 A. B., 1891 

Void, O. E Portland (N.) Dak. 1884-86 

nViprud, Thorgrim T Tracv Minn. . .1884-89 

*Xavier, Karl Franklin Minn. . .1884-87. 1888-92.. A. B., 1892 

0degaarden, H Kenyon Minn . . . 1884-86 

188.5-1886 

*Ballestad, Erik T Clark Mills Wis 1885-89 

Bean, O. G Callender la 1885-87 

Beito, O. G Decorah la 1885-96 

Bakkum, Anders T Amboy Minn. . . 1885-86 

Dahlen, Knut T Lillemon Minn . . . 1885-87. 1888-92. 

189.5-94 A. B.. 1894 

David.son, Orlando E Decorah la 1885-92 

*Eden, Martin Peter Lee Ill 1885-92 A. B., 1892 

Eide. Edward Bratsberg Minn . . . 1885-86 

Gicre. E Rock Dell Minn . . . 1885-87 

Golbcrg, E Rock Dell Minn . . . 1885-87 

Grundesen. Grunde H Fisher Minn. . .1885-92 A. B.. 1892 

Gylstr0m. Paul Minneapolis Minn . . . 1885-87 

Haga. Martin Decorah la 1885-86 

Hagen, Edward Waterville . la 1885-86 

Haugan. Carl Minneapolis Minn . . . 1885-91 

♦Hovde. Christian Joachim 

Mohn Blair Wis 1885-92. . . . . A. B.. 1892 

*Hovde, Kolbein Sigvart 

Johannes Blair Wis 1885-90. 1891-93 

•Johnson. Alfred Otto Red Wing Minn . . . 1885-91 A. B., 1891 

Kaasa. Edward O Ridgeway la 1885-92 A. B., 1892 

Kittelson. Albert Utica Wis 1885-86 



ATTENDANCE 223 



Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Nummedal, Edward Tenold la 1885-86 

Olson, Ole Minneapolis Minn . . . 1885-86 

Quammen, J. L Blair Wis 1885-86 

Quarve, J. E Spring Grove Minn. . . 1885-86 

Ramsey, Elling Manchester Minn . . . 1885-88 

♦Rue, Halvor S Portland (N.)Dak.l885-92 A. B., 1892 

♦Rodsaeter, Theodor Adolph Manchester Minn. . . 1885-91 

Slinde, Albert J Albert Lea Minn. . .1885-87 

Solsness, Lars New Richland Minn . . . 1885-87 

Tasa, Iver A Holden Minn . . . 1885-87 

Tausan, G Portland (N.)Dak;.1885-86 

Thorstenson, Th Silliards Minn . . . 188.S-86 

*Tolo, Thore O Willmar Minn. . .1885-90 A. B.. 1890 

Venaas, G Cambridge Wis 1885-86 

Wange, Ole Ada Minn . . . 1885-86 

*Xavier, Johan Ulrik Franklin Minn. . .1885-88, 1889-93.. A. B., 1893 

0ie. Lars L Randall la 1885-86 

1886-1887 

*Akre, Ole J Highlandville la 1886-93 A. B., 1893 

♦Andersen, Johannes N Blair Neb .... 1886-88, 1889-91 

*Berg, Nils I Albion Neb, . . .1886-92 A. B.. 1892 

Bergerud, P. S Spring Grove Minn . . . 1886-87 

♦Bestul. Christian Brandt Wittenberg Wis 1886-93 A. B., 1893 

Bly, O. J Lee Ill 1886-87 

♦Blaekkan, Ingebrigt J Provemont Mich.. .1886-92 A. B., 1892 

Boe, H. O Ossian la 1886-87 

Bonde, T. T Nerstrand Minn . . . 1886-91 

Brown, G. B Blue Earth Citv. . . . Minn . . . 1886-87, 1888-89 

Braekke, David B Rock Dell Minn. . .1886-90 

♦Christensen, Martin AlexanderForest Citv la 1886-92 A. B., 1892 

Dahl, Gerhard A Dell Minn . . . 1886-93 A. B., 1893 

Fardal, J Stanhope la 1886-87 

Germo. Lars P Decorah la 1886-89 

Gullixon, Oscar F Bode la 1886-90 

*HoIden, Ole Martin Bode la 1886-89, 1891-94.. A. B.. 1894 

Hustvedt, Henrv Nora Wis 1886-87 

Johnson, J. G Norseland Minn. . .1886-87, 1889-92 

Johnsrud , Oscar Manitowoc Wis 1 886-89 

*Kvam, Isak J Oilman Wis 1886-90 

Lee, G. .A. Lake M ills la 1886-87 

■ Lund, Albert B Northwood la 1886-90 

Madsen, M. A Hartland Minn . . . 1886-87 

*MageIssen, Hans Gynther. . . . Bratsberg Minn. . .1887-94 

*Meland. Rasmus J Dell Minn . . . 1886-92 

Michelson, Walter Chicago Ill 1886-87 

Monson, Sivert Emerald Minn . . . 1886 

Morrison, Morris Westbv Wis 1886-88, 1891-93 

Myhre, C. G Walcott (N.)Dak.l886-87 

Nelson, N. W Lee Ill 1886-87 

Olsen, Gilbert Calmar la 1886-87 

Olsen, Ole T Herscher Ill 1886-89 

Olson, Oscar L Marcus la 1886-93 A. B., 1893 

Oswald, K. (Abrahamson) .... Norman (N.)Dak.l886-87 

Pederson, Bernhard S Brooklyn N. Y.. . .1886-88 

Peterson, John Decorah la 1886-87 

Reque, William A Spring Grove Minn . . . 1886-89 

Rossing, M. H Bode la 1886-88 

R0berg, Richard Decorah la 1886-87 

Sibelrud, Christen A Hartland Minn . . . 1886-87 

Skolaas, M. H Door Creek Wis 1886-87 

Solberg. H. E Spring Grove Minn. . . 1886-87 

♦Stensrud, Edward Martinus . .Sacred Heart Minn. . .1886-93 A. B., 1893 

Stephenson, Knut Lake Mills la 1886-87 

*Str0m, Eimar Ingvald Zumbrota Minn , . . 1886-91 A. B.. 1891 

Tangen, J. O Pigeon Falls Wis 1886-88 

Thorsen, Axel A Rock Dell Minn. . .1886-87. 1888-91 

♦Torgerson, Augustinus Jen- 

senius Bristol la 1886-88, 1889-90 

Torgerson, S. V. B Bristol la 1886-87, 1888-92 

Torrison. Norman Manitowoc Wis 1886-89 A. B., 1889 



224 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEAR3 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



1887-1888 

Aaker. John T Ridgeway la 1887-93 A. B.. 1893 

Anderson. Adolph Taopi (S.) Dak.1887-91 

Beaver, Andreas Kasson Minn. . . 1887-88 

Bolstad, Edward Utica Wis 1887-89 

Brager, Torgrim Nora Minn. . .1887-90 

Bysted, Anders L Kempton Ill 1887-88 

Ellertson, Andreas Bratsberg Minn . . . 1887-88 

Gustavson, Alexander Hartland Minn . . . 1887-89 

Halland. Alfred Northwood la 1887-89 

Hanson, H. L Gayville (S.) Dak. 1887-90 

Hanson, Johan (Kongtorg).. Tracy Minn. . . 1887-89 

Helgen, Albert Albert Lea Minn . . . 1887-88 

Hilmen, J. T Mishicott Wis 1887-88 

Jukam, J. G Mishicott Wis 1887-88, 1891-92 

*Juul, Otto Gerhard Chicago Ill 1887-94 A. B., 1894 

Kjome, Gustav Highlandville la 1887-88 

Landsverk, John P Lawler la 1887-95 . A. B., 1895 

Lane, L. C London Minn . . . 1887-88 

Larson, Norman Lake Crystal Minn. . . 1887-89 

Lee, Gisle M Utica Wis 1887-89 

Lilleskau, E. J Chicago Ill 1887-88 

Mjclde, F. M Black Earth Wis 1887-89 

Norom, Jacob Franklin Minn . . . 1887-88 

Olsen, Lars I Herscher Ill 1887-91 

Pederson. Oliver... Amboy Minn. . ,1887-88, 1889-90. 

1891-92 

Reitan. Anders S Wild Rice (N.)Dak.l887-92 

Simmons, J. A Appleton Minn . . 1887-92 

Sterud, John M V'olga (S.) Dak. 1887-88 

♦Thoen, Jacob E Northwood la 1887-92 A. B., 1892 

Thompson, A .'\lbert Lea Minn . . . 1887-88 

Thorsgaard, Carl L. (Karl)... . Springvillc Wis 1887-96 A. B., 1896 

Wierson, Bernhard Roland la 1887-88, 1889-92 

1888-1889 

Aas, Edward Lanesboro Minn . . 1888-89 

Apeldseth, John A Palisade (N.)Dak. 1888-89 

Beaver, Albert M Kasson Minn. . .1888-91 

Brevig, Nils J Sacred Heart Minn . . . 1888-92 

*Brevig, Oluf Leonhard Sacred Heart Minn . . . 1888-94 A. B.. 1894 

Borreson. Johan G St. Louis Mo 1888-89 • 

Glaeserud, Christian P Blackhammer Minn . . . 1888-89 

Gunderson, Henry B Stanwood Wash . . . 1888-91 

♦Haatvedt (Hotvedt), Lars A. Spillville la 1889-95 A. B . 1895 

Hefty, Theodor N Spring Grove Minn . . . 1888-90 

Helgeson, Charles T Waupun Wis 1888-89 

Hesla, Albert Waterville .la 1888-90 

Hesla, Stengrim Sioux Rapids la 1888-89 

Kjos, Lars O Spring Grove Minn . . . 1888-89 

Knutson, Andreas Lime Grove la 1888-89 

*Kvamme. Kristen Eau Claire Wis 1888-94 A. B., 1894 

♦Larsen, Nikolai Astrup Decorah la 1888-96 A. B., 1896 

Lee, Andrew Hanley Falls Minn . . 1888-89 

Lomen, Even P Sioux Falls (S.) Dak. 1888-89 

Magelssen, Peter J Rushford Minn . . . 1888-89 

Magelssen, Wilhelm C Bratsberg Minn. . .1888-89, 1890-91, 

1897-')8 

*Moldstad, Joh{a)n(nes) A . . . . De Forest Wis 1888-94 A. B., 1894 

Narum, Edwin W^aterville la 1888-89 

Nelson, Edward M Yankton (S.) Dak.1888-89 

*01sen, Engel Olai Eau Claire Wis 1888-92 

Opheim, Ola S Thor la 1888-94 A. B.. 1894 

*Orwoll, Sylvester Martinus . . . Hanley Falls Minn. . . 1889-95 A. B., 1895 

Peterson, Henry Mott Wis 1888-89 

Peterson, John R Minneapolis Minn . . . 1888-94 A. B., 1894 

Railson, Elmer M Norway Lake Minn. . . 1888-90 

Ramsey, Peter Decorah la 1888-91 

Reque, Gerhard S Spring Grove Minn . . . 1888-95 

*Reque, Sigvard Theodor Willmar Minn. . .1888-92 A. B.. 1892 

Ruh. August New Lisbon Wis 1888-90 

Ryberg, Christian Ventrup Denmarkl888-89 

Ryan, Carl V Stanwood Wash . . . 1888-92 



ATTENDANCE 



22a 



Student 



Post Office 



State 



Years at 
Luther College Graduation 



Sampson, George Rio Wis 

Sollien, Andrew J Quandahl la 

Thompson, Tobias T ........ . Sioux Rapids la 

Thorson, Ivar August Rock Dell Minn . . . 

*Tjernagel, Helge Matias Story City la 

Tvesme, John N Hegg Wis 

Tvetlee, B. E New Richmond .... Wis 

Venaas. Martin Cambridge Wis 

♦Waller, Martinus Christian . . . Glasgow Wis 

Williams, Louis C Mayville (N.)Dak. 

♦Ylvisaker, Schak Joakim Nic- 

olaus Zumbrota Minn . . . 

1889-1890 



*Aasen, Andrew O Rockdale Wis. . 

*Aastad, Iver T Aastad Minn. 

Agre, Ole M Sacred Heart Minn . 

Aker, John S Highlandville la ... . 

Amblie, Johannes N St. Olaf la ... . 

Anderson, Anton Christiania Minn . 

*Berthelsen, Hans Peter Decorah la . . . 

*Brevig, Samuel Bernhofif Sacred Heart Minn. 

*Buslee, Adolph Martin Chicago Ill . . . 

Fosmark, Anders Keyser Wis. . , 

Hanson, Jens Th Sioux Falls S. D . 

Hefty, Nils O Spring Grove Minn . 

Hektoen. Martin Madison Wis. . . 

Helvig, Ole Roland la 

Herreid, Hans A Washington Prairie. la. . . . 

Hornseth, P.ichard Renville Minn . 

*Hougstad, Christian Glasgow Wis. . , 

Hovde, Francis Blair Wis. . . 

Hovden, Stener G Ridgeway la ... . 

Jacobson, Edward Debello Wis. . . 

Jensen, Alfred C Brookville Wis. . . 

Johnson, Benton J Belmond la ... , 

*Juul, Martin Bernhard Chicago 111. . . , 

Kaupanger, Louis J Stoughton Wis. . 

Lende, Fred Cottonwood Minn . 

Lewison, Eli Vermilion S. D . 

Lomen, Knut E Sioux Falls S. D... 

Ludvigson, Nils H Norman la . . 

*Lunde, Amund Frenchville Wis. . 

Nash, Rudolph Mt. Sterling Wis.., 

Nasse, Peter Decorah la ... , 

Nelson, N. C Decorah la ... . 

Ness, Hildus Washington Prairie .la ... . 

Opsahl, Albert J Albert Lea Minn . 

Osmundson, Bernt F Quandahl la ... . 

Peterson, Thorvald Hector Minn . 

*Quammen, Albert Gustavus. . . Christiania Minn . 

Quammen, Lewis Deerfield Wis. . . 



888-90 

888-89, 1891 

888-89 

888-95 A. B., 1895 

888-94 

888-89 

888-89 

888-91, 1893-95 

888-9.5 A. B.. 1893 

888-91 



1888-95. 



.A. B., 1895 



Ryen, Helmer C Wild Rice N. D.. 

Seines, Ole M Washington Prairie .la ... . 

Severson, Hans Christiania Minn . 

Stenrud, Erik Decorah la ... . 

Stensrud, Gustav O Sacred Heart Minn . 

*Stub, Jacob Aall Ottesen Robbinsdale Minn . 

*Swenson, Bernt Conrad CranfiU's Gap Texas. 

Swenson, Swen G Soldier la ... . 

Saervold, Ola Johann Le Roy Minn . 

S0rensen, Andrew (Andreas) . . Decorah la ... . 

Torrison, Aaron Manitowoc Wis. . . 

Torrison, William L Manitowoc Wis. . . 

*Ulen, George Christian Decorah la ... . 

Vaala, John Saude la ... . 

Vaala, Theodore G Saude la ... . 

Westby, Albert Washington Prairie .la ... . 



889-93 










889-92 


889-92 

889-91 


889-90 


889-90 .... 


889-91 


889-96. 
889-93 . 




A. 


B., 


1896 


889-90 


889. . . 


889-91 . 


889-95 . 
889-90. 




A. 


B. 


1895 


889-90 


889-92 . 


889-93 
889-90, 
889-90 . 


1891-93. 


A. 


B. 


1893 


889-92 


889-90 


889-91 . 


889-96 
889-90, 


1891-93. 


A. 


B. 


1896 


889. . . 








889-97. 
889. . . 




A. 


B. 


1897 


889-90, 
889-94, 
889-90 


1891-94. 
1896-97. 


'.A. 


B. 


1897 


889-90 .... 


889-90 


889-94 


889-91 


889-93 


889-91 


889-96 


889-90, 1892-93, 
1897-98 


889-90 










889-90 


889-91 


889-90 


889-91 


890-91, 
889-92. 
889-90. 


1893-98. 
1894-98. 


.A. 

.A. 


B. 
B. 


1898 
1898 


889-95 . 
889-97 . 
889-95 




.A. 
.A. 


B. 
B. 


1895 
1897 


889-95 
889-96 




A. 


B. 


1895 


889-91 


889-91 


889-91 



1890-1891 

*Aarnes. Sam H Sacred Heart Minn . . . 1890-94, 

Alfson, Aslak Christiania Minn . . . 1890-92 

Anderson, Albert J Grove City Minn . . . 1890-91 



1895-98. .A. B.. 1898 



226 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Student 



Post Office 



State 



Years at 
Luther College Graduation 



♦Anderson, Christian Barrett Minn . 

*Astrup, Johannes Untunjambili, NatalAfrica 

Beaver, Ole Kasson Minn . 

Beaver, Theodore '. . . Kasson Minn . 

Beito, A. G Decorah la ... . 

Benson, K Garden Prairie 111. . . . 

Berstad, Ole Fergus Falls Minn . 

*Boe, Ole T Ossian 

Bygland, Olav S OInes 



1890-96 A. B.. 1896 

1890-93 A. B., 1893 

1890-91 

1890-93 

1890-91 

1890-91 

1890-91 

la 1891-94. 1896-00.. A. B., 1900 

Neb .... 1890-96 A. B.. 1896 



1893-98. ..-v. B., 
189.S- 
A. B. 



. 189.^94. 

98 



Christlock, Gerhard S Fergus Falls Minn. . . 1890-92. 1893-94. 

Christenson, Haldor Grove City Minn . . . 1890-91 

Christianson, John Bode la 1890-91 

Clement, Erik E Decorah . . . la 1890-91 

Dahlen. Fred Oslo Minn. . . 1890-92, 

*Dahle (Dale), John Olaus Bode la 1890-91, 

1900. 

*Diiving, Carl Untunjambili, NatalAfrica. .. 1890-93 

Ellingson. Joseph Cottage la 1890-91 

Foss. Eddie A Spring Grove Minn . . 1890-94 

Glasoe. P. Mauritz Spring Grove Minn . . . 1890-91 

Gregerson, Andrew Closter Neb ... 1890-91 

Gullikson, Henry Decorah la 1890-91, 

Gullikson, Oscar Decorah la 1890-95 

Gullixson, .Andrew Bode la 1890-97 

*Hagoes, Owe Meridian Wis 1890-91 

Hallan, Christian Wall Lake Minn . 1890-92 

1896- 

Hallum, Lars Highland Minn. . 1890-91 

Halvor.son, Henrv J Belgrade Minn. .1890-91 

*Halvorsen. Nils E Westby Wis 1891-96 

Hanson, Halvor J Nerstrand Minn . . . 1890-91 

Hanson, Robert C Spencer la 1890-91 

Hassel. Peter G Wittenberg Wis 1890-91 

Haugen,, Carl N Pelican Rapids Minn. . . 1890-93 

*Hegg, James Edward Blair Wis 1890-94, 

*Heimdahl. Olaf Emil Grove City Minn . . . 1890-95 

*Hjermstad, Chr. August H. . Holmen Wis 1890-95 

*Holey (Larson). Mikkel Decorah la 1890-92 

Holl, Fred C La Crosse Wis 1890-91 

Hovden, Olaus G Ridgeway la 1890-92 

Ingebrigtson, Carl Sacred Hearc Minn. . .1890-92 

Isakson, I Whalan Minn . . . 1890-91 

Johnson, Albert Village Creek la 1890-91 

*Johnson, John Lewis Thor la 1890-93 

Kieland, Christian Spring Grove Minn . . . 1890-91 

Kirkeberg, John M Thor la 1890-91 

Kittilsby, .\nton Calmar la 1890-95 

Kjtirlaug Christopher N Newman Grove .... Neb. . . . 1890-92 

Landsrud, Alfred O Nordness la 1890-92 

Larson, Alfred Chicago Ill 1890-94 

Lommen, Gustav Decorah la 1890-93 

Lyngaas. Ingeman M Frankville la 1890-97 

Michelson, Herbert C Chicago Ill 1890-91 

Narveson, Henry Spring Grove Minn. . . 1890-91 

Nelson, Henry C Spring Grove Minn . . 1890-91 

♦Nervig, Anders (.Andrew) J. .. Minneapolis Minn. . .1890-93 

Naeseth, Enock Decorah la 1890-93 

*01sen, Holden Mathias Herscher Ill 1890-96 

Olson, George Oluf Delhi Minn . . . 1890-92 

Olson, George Oscar Grantsburg Wis 1890-91 

Olson, Peter O Grantsburg Wis 1890-92 

Omlie, Oscar K Willmar Minn. . . 1890-92 

Opsahl, Ole H Albert Lea Minn . . . 1890-91 

*Otte. Heinrich Untunjambili, Natal.'\frica. . . 1890-93 

Paulson, Alfred H Sacred Heart Minn. . . 1890-91 

Pcdersen, Pcder Johannes .... Bode la 1890-91 

Peterson, Hans F Fisher Minn , . . 1890-91 

Raasoch, Oluf Chicago Ill 1890-91 

Reque, Herman A Decorah la 1890-94 

♦Reque, Lauritz Styrkard JustinDecorah la 1890-94 

Ruh, Johan B New Lisbon Wis 1890-93 

Ryen, Hans C Wild Rice N. D.. . .1890-91 

Sando, Adolph Baltic S. D 1890-94 

Seines, Thomas Hesper la 1890-93 



1900 
A. B., 1893 



A. B., 1895 
.A. B.. 1897 



A. H.. 1896 



1896-98.. A. B., 1898 
A. B.. 1895 



1894-98.. A. B., 1898 
1898-99.! '.'.'/..'..'..'. 



...A. B., 1896 



1893-95.. A. B., 1895 
'.'.'.'.'.'.'. !a. B., 1893 

1892-94.!! !!!!!!!!! 



.A. B., 1894 
A. B., 1894 



ATTENDANCE 227 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Sigurson, Ole Rio Wis 1890-92 

Simmons, Thorwald C Appleton Minn . . . 1890-91 

Sivesind, Helmer O Washington Prairie. la 1890-91 

Sjuraas, Bersven P Locust la 1890-92 

Skattebol, Christian A Dell Minn . . . 1890-92. 1893-94, 

1897-99, 1900- 

1902 A. B. 

Skrukkerud, Mariin T Sacred Heart Minn . . . 1890-91 

Solseth, Anton G Watson Minn . . . 1890-93 

Solseth, Edward A Watson Minn. ... 1890-91 

Steensland, John G Saude la 1890-97 .\. B. 

Sterud, Kristian M Brookings S. D . . . . 1890-91 

Storli, Nils G Lakeville Minn. . .1890-91, 1892-93 

Saevre, Bertinius K Kensett la 1890-96 A. B. 

Toftner. Olaf A Cyrus Minn. . .1890-91 

Viste, Johan Decorah la 1890-93 

Westbv. Julius Waukon la 1890-91 

Wiese. Vilhelm Decorah la 1890-91 . 

Wiger. Christopher E Riceford Minn . . . 1890-91 

0de, Ole P Nordness la 1890-91 



1891-1892 

Aakre. Knut S Ossian la 1891-92 

Ambli, Christian F Decorah la 1891-93 

Anderson, Carl Hustler Wis 1891-92 

Askevold, George Chicago Ill 1891-93 

Benrud, Oscar Amboy Minn. . .1891-92 

Bjcirnstad, William St. Paul Minn. . .1891. . . 

Bolme, Lars B Sutton's Bav Mich. . . . 1891-93 

Brauer, Adolph Mabel Minn . . . 1891-95 

Brov/n, Julius Ossian la 1891-92 

Buslee. Christian Chicago Ill 1891-92 

Borreson, Fred La Crosse Wis 1891-92 

Glesne, Truls Aastad Minn. . .1891-92 

Graslie, Benjamin Baldwin Wis 1891-94, 1897-98 

Groves, James O Decorah la 1891-94 

Gullixson, Herman O Bode la 1891-93, 1894, 

1897-1900 A. B., 1900 

GuUord. Herman Westby Wis 1891-93 

Gunderson, Nils Erickson Minn . . . 1891-92 

Haagenson, Edward N Baldwin Wis 1891-92 

Haagenson, Herman Baldwin Wis 1891-92 

Hagestad, Knut M Ettrick Wis 1891-97 A. B., 1897 

Hamre, William Cottonwood Minn ... 1891-92 

Hanson. Nils B New Centerville. . . .Wis 1891-95, 1896-99., A. B.. 1899 

Hauge, Mens Washington Prairie la 1891-94 

Haugelund, H. J Minneapolis Minn . . . 1891-92 

Haugen, Edwin Decorah la 1891-94 

*Henriksen, George Cleveland Ohio 1891-92 

Huselid, Samuel Clinton Minn ... 1891-93 .. . 

Iverson, Martin P Chicago Ill 1891-93. . . 

Johnson, Kielberg Audubon Minn . . . 1891-97 

Johnson, Theodore Walton Wis 1891-92 

Kaasa, Walter Ridgeway la 1891-93, 1984-95 

Kampen, Ingvald Anderson . . . Pigeon Falls . . Wis 1891-96 . . 

Kcrtgaard, Peder Christine N. D 1891-92 

Kvale, Olaus Decorah la 1891-93 . . 

Landsem, Ole T Spring Grove Minn. . . 1891-92 ... 

*Lane, George Ole Mvrtle Wis 1891-94. . 

Lende. Henry Cottonwood Minn. . .1891-94, 1896 

Lienl0kken, Adolph La Crosse Wis 1891-93 

Linnevold. William Decorah la 1891-92 

Livdahl. Carl Hickson N. D... .1891-92, 1896- 

1901 A. B.. 1901 

Lunde, Gunnar M Newman Grove ... Neb .... 1891-92 

Magelssen, Ludvig Bratsberg Minn . . . 1891-92 

Midbrf, Otto T Martell Wis 1891-95 

Mjelde. Nordahl Chicago Ill 1891-92 

Moen, Haagen J Viking N. D... .1891-92 

Negaard, Edward Norway Lake Minn . . . 1891-92 

Negaard, George E Norwav Lake Minn. . .1891-95. 1897-99 

Nelson, N. A El Paso Wis 1891-92, 1893-96 

Nelson. Paul R La Crosse Wis 1891-93 



228 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



*Normann, Stefanus Thcodor. .St. Olaf Minn. . .1891-97 A. B., 1897 

Norton. John Blue Earth City Minn . . . 1891-92 

Oksen, Peder J Perth Amboy N. J 1891-95 

Olson. Emil Eau Claire Wis 1891-92 

Overland, Peter Belgrade Minn . . . 1891-92 

Rasmussen, Kristian St. Louis Mo 1891-92 

Rinde, Erik Taopi Minn . . . 1891-92 . 

Risbi udt. Engebret St. Olaf Minn . . . 1891-92 

Rishof , Oluf Strand Minn . . . 1891-93 

Running, Gilbert Nordness la 1891-93 

*Sauer, Carl Ignatius Bode la 1891-93, 1896-01.. A. B., 1901 

Skaaden, Eugene Cliicago Ill 1891-93 

Skjeggeby, Ole Sacred Heart Minn . . . 1891-92 

Skulstad, Peder E Faith Minn . . . 1891-92 

Solberg, Randall Minneapolis Minn . . . 1891-93 

Steen, Olai Clinton Minn . . . 1891-93 

Stensrud, Carl Kensett la 1891-95 

Sorenson, Bernt Eau Claire Wis 1891-92 

Tasa, Gilbert Kenyon Minn. . .1891. 1892-99 A. B., 1899 

*Teigen, Martin lackson Minn. . . 1891-95 

*Thollehaug, Sivert K Portland N. D.. . .1891-94 

Thompson, Andrew La Crosse Wis 1891-93 

Thorsen, Adolph New Centerville Wis 1891-96 

Thorsgaard. Oscar E Westby Wis 1891-93 

Trvhus, John Norman N. D 1891 

Ulen, Reinert Decorah la 1891-92 

*Unseth, Joseph Bernhard Westby Wis 1891-97 A. B., 1897 

Winger. Johan Edward Nordness la 1891-97 A. B., 1897 

0de, George (Ode) Nordness la 1891-93, 1895-96 

Wold. Anton O Whitehall Wis 1891-92 

1892-1893 

Anderson, Ole P Decorah la 1892-93 

Bakke, Martinus A Esteline S. D 1892-93, 1896-97 

Bakken, Edward Ferdinand. . .Decorah la 1892-94 

Barkenaes, Martin G Fet Norway . 1892-95 

Bergh. Knut Sacred Heart Minn. . .1892-96, 1897-99 

Berkvam, Christian Spring Grove Minn . . . 1892-93 

Bidne, Sander Decorah la 1892-95, 1896-01 

Brandt, Lars Chicago Ill 1892-93 

Enestvedt, Theodore Sacred Heart Minn. . .1892-93, 1895-96 

Enger, Melvin Decorah la 1892-96 

Espelien, Carl E Barre Mills Wis 1892-93, 1894-95 

Forton, Oscar Stoughton Wis 1892-93 

Frederikson, John N Manitou Island .... Mich. . . . 1892-93 

Grundeland, Bernhard Calmar la 1892-93 

Grutle, Henning Fossum Minn. . .1892-94, 1897-99 

*GuIlerud, Sven Olaf M Mazeppa Minn . . . 1892-93 

Gunderson, Gunnar Ridgeway la 1892 

Gunderson, Halvor Ridgeway la 1892 

Gunderson, Ketil Ridgeway la 1892 

Hallan, Oscar E Newhouse Minn . . . 1892-95 

*Hallanger, Christopher Mar- 
tinus Bode la 1892-97 A. B.. 1897 

*HelIekson, Oscar C Byron Minn. . .1892-95, 1896-00.. A. B., 1900 

Hiondal, Einar Chicago Ill 1892-95 

Hong, Nils J Willmar Minn. . .1892-95 A. B., 1895 

♦Ingebrigtson, Carl Bertinius. . .Albert Lea Minn . . . 1892-94 

Jahr. Olav Black River Falls. . . Wis 1892-96 A. B., 1896 

Jahr. Torstein Black River Falls. .Wis 1892-96 A. B., 1896 

Jenson, James C Spring Grove Minn. . .1892-99 A. B., 1899 

Johnson. John R Decorah la 1892-98 

Kirkeberg, Anton Decorah la 1892-93 

Langenajs, Ludvig Clayton Minn . . . 1892-93 

Larson, Oluf Barrett Minn. . .1892-93 

Larson, Peter Barrett Minn . . . 1892-93 

Larson, Richard Minneapolis Minn . . . 1892-94 

Lee. E. A Grand Meadow. , . .Minn. . .1892-93 

Lunde, Adolph Zumbrota Minn. . . 1892-95 

Lunde. F. C. CI Newman Grove Neb .... 1892-93 

Lunde. Peter Zumbrota Minn . . . 1892-95 

Markhus. Alfred L Willmar Minn . . . 1892-97 A. B.. 1897 

Mellem. Gustav Northwood la 1892-93 

Monson. Martin A Kerkhoven Minn . . . 1892-93 



ATTENDANCE 229 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Morterud, Oscar Blooraingdale Wis 1892-95 

Nelson, Henry E Decorah la 1892-98 

Ohnstad, Otto Cambridge Wis 1892-93 

Olson, Paul Chicago Ill 1892-93 

♦Peterson, Samuel Renville Minn. . .1892-93, 1894-97.. A. B., 1897 

Preus, Jprgen Westby Wis 1892-95 

*Ringden, Theodore Ribe Ridgeway la 1892-98 A. B., 1898 

Rodby, John Deerfield Wis 1892-93 

Skreberg, Hans Milan Minn. . . 1892-93 

Smith, Carsten Decorah la 1892-97 

Soland, Julius Kerkhoven Minn . . . 1892-93 

Steen, Abel Clinton Minn . . . 1892-94 

Stenshoel, Philip Lenora Minn. . . 1892-93 

*Str0m, Oscar Adolph Zumbrota Minn. . .1892-97 A. B., 1897 

Siervold, Egil Le Roy Minn. . .1892-93 

Sdrenson, Fred Decorah la 1892-97 

Tasa, Helge Holden Minn . . . 1892-95 

Teisberg, Carl O Clarkson Wis 1892-99 A. B., 1899 

Thime, George Chicago Ill 1892-93 

♦Thompson, Severin Lewi? Lincoln S. D 1892-97, 1903-05 

Viste, Henrik Decorah la 1892-93 

Wolding, Martin New Hope Wis 1892-96 

1893-1894 

Aaker, Adolph Ridgeway la 1893-96 . 

Anderson, Freeman Ridgeway la 1893-96 . 

Aslakson, .^nton Rose Creek Minn. . .1893-94. 

*Austvold, Edwin B Glenwood Minn. . .1893-97 A. B., 1897 

Berntson, Palmer Eau Claire Wis 1893-96, 1898-99 

Bjerke, Johan Portland N. D... .1893-98 

Brorby, Joseph Decorah la 1893-99 A. B., 1899 

Christensen, Soren Perth Ambov N. J . . . .1893-94 

*Clauson, Carl T - Red Wing Minn . . . 1893-96 A. B., 1896 

Drotning, Alvyn Utica Wis 1893-95, 1898-99 

Finseth, Knut H Kenyon Minn . . . 1893-94 

Gauper, Emil S Purdy Wis 1893-94 

Gotaas, Olaf Mellette S. D 1893 

Hagen, Sivert N Hagan Minn. . .1893-96 A. B., 1896 

Hanson, Henry Northwood la 1893-94 

Hegg. Robert Decorah la 1893-94, 1895-98.. A. B., 1898 

*Hestenes, Jacob Mathias Homedahl Minn. . .1893-1900 A. B., 1900 

Jaastad, Gullick Marshfield Wis 1893-94 

*Jacobson, Daniel Gustav Stoughton Wis 1894-95, 1897-01. .A. B., 1901 

Jacobson, Jacob Northport Mich.. . .1893-95 

Johnson, Martin E Benson Minn. . .1893-95 

Jorgensen, Theodore Sumner Wis 1893-94 

Knutson, Herbert Chicago Ill 1893-94 

Koefod, Herman O Starbuck Minn. . .1893-97, 1898-00 . 

*Larsen, Lauritz Decorah la 1893-1902 A. B., 1902 

Larson, Lawrence O Macfarland Wis 1893-95 

Larson, Ludvig Harmony Minn. . .1893-94, 1897-99 

Larson, Osc^r O New Centerville. . . .Wis 1893-1900 A, B., 1900 

*Moe. Ebbe St. Paul Minn. . .1893-96 

Moe, Oscar O Clarkson Wis 1893-96, 1897-99 

*Moen, Paul W Lawton Wis 189.V94, 1895-99.. A. B., 1899 

Nelson. Helge t Lily S. D 1893-97, 1898-99 

Nelson, Ludvig New Centerville .... Wis 1893-96 

Njos, Johannes Taopi Minn . . . 1893-94 

Naeseth, Martinus G Aspelund Minn . . . 1893-94 

Olsen, Martin I Herscher Ill 1893-99 A. B., 1899 

*Ordal, Ola J Taopi S. D 1893-98 A. B., 1898 

*Ordal, Zakarias J Taopi S. D 1893-98 A. B., 1898 

Ottum, Thomas J Macfarland Wis 1893-94 

Pallado, David Wittenberg . Wis 1893 

Palmer, Simon Oneida Wis 1893-94 

Reinertson, Alfred Hazard Neb .... 1893-94, 1896-98. 

1899-1900 

Reque, Lars R Spring Grove Minn . . . 1893-97 

Risdal, Lars Decorah la 1893-95, 1897-98 

Risetter, Lars C Lee Ill 1893-95, 1897-98 

Simonstad, Charles Swenoda Minn . . . 1893-94 

Slinde, Erik Lawler la 1893-94 

Solstad, Joseph H Fisher Minn . . . 1893-95 

Sveine, Sven Decorah la 1893-96 



230 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Student 



Post Office 



State 



Years at 
Luther College Graduation 



♦Thompson, Christian S Mt Horeb Wis 1893-97 . 

Thorsgaard. Lars J Kindred N. D.. .. 1893-94 . 

Thorsrud. Ole Callender la 1893 . . 

Tvedt. Theodore Forest City la 1893-95 

Vestaa. Tollef S York Wis . . 

*Wein, Hans J Renville Minn 

♦White, Anders (Andrew) O. 

(Jensen) Latimer la . . . 

Wollan, Gustav B Glenwood Minn 

Wollan, Gustav C Glenwood Minn 



A. B., 1897 



,1893-94, 1895-97 

, 1893-98 A. B., 1898 



♦Wulfsberg, Einar, Jr 



1893-1900 A. B., 1900 

1893-97 A. B., 1897 

1893-95, 1896- 

1900 A. B., 1900 

Decorah la 1893-1900 A. B., 1900 




SEWING FOR THE STUDENTS 

{Mrs. Ldur. I.itrse)i Seated at Left) 



I,S94-1K95 

Anderson, Anton O Hillsboro N. D.. 1894-95 , 

Anderson, Carlton A West Salem Wis 1894-96 

Bakken, Hans H Ridgewav la 1894-95 

Berge, Oscar G Sand Creek Wis 1894-97 

*Birkelo. Peder C Colgate N. D.. . . 1894-97 

Blegen. George. . Washington Prairie .la 1894-95 

Bothna. Joseph La Crosse Wis 1894-95 

*Boyd, Edwin Arthur Willmar Minn. . . 1894-95, 1896-98.. A. B.. 1898 

Brauer, Julius Mabel Minn . . 1H94-1901 A. B., 1901 

Burtness, Peter Wilmington Minn . . . 1894-1900 \. B., 1900 

B0rreson, William La Crosse Wis 1894-95 

Enger, Norval Decorah la 1894-97 

Gaard, Rasmu.s Roland la 1894-1900 A. B., 1900 

Gilbertson, Adolph N Ridgeway la 1894 

Golberg, Martin L Rock Dell Minn. . . 1894-95 

Gregerson, Gustav E Seneca la 1894-95 

Grinde, Seward De F"orest Wis 1894-95 

Hambhn, Alton Sioux Rapids la 1894-96 

♦Hammer (Fylling), Lars F, 

(Lars L.) Nurey S. Dak.. 1894-96 



ATTENDANCE 231 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Hegland, Martin Roland la 1894-1900 A. B., 1900 

Helgen, R. Olani Ruthven la 1894-95 

Helgeson, Amos Seneca la 1894-95 

Hexom, John D Washington Prairie. la 1894-1901 A. B., iwi 

Heyer, Arnold O Strum Wis 1894-97 

*Hjcrmstad, Hans Andreas L. . Holmen Wis 1894-97, 1899- 

1901 

Husmo, Johannes Rochester Minn . . . 1894-95 

H0rsrud, Martin Harmony Minn . . . 1894-95 

Jacobson, William M Seneca la 1894-97 

Jenson, J. Alfred Edgerton Wis 1894-96 

Johnson, Eugene G Decorah la 1894-98 A. B., 1898 

Johnson, George J Brandon Minn . . . 1894-98 A. B., 1898 

♦Johnson, Torger Andreas Lake Mills la 1894-98 

Kallestad, Albert B Blue Earth City Minn . . . 1894-95 

*Kilness, Peter J Dell Rapids S. D .. . .1894-99 A. B., 1899 

Mallon, Otto Cresco la 1894-97 

Monserud, Oliver Harpers Ferry la 1894-95 

Moore, Louis Decorah la 1894-96 

Nilsestuen, Albert Arcadia Wis 1894-95 

Nilson, Severin Hanson Minn . . . 1894 

Pederson, Oscar B Amboy Minn . . . 1894-1901 

Peterson, Joseph M St. Ansgar la 1894-98 A. B., 1898 

*Rugland, Jacob G Silver Lake , ... la 1894-95 

Sampson, Sigvard F Yankton S. D . . . . 1894-97 

Saxvik, Louis Highlandville la 1894-96 

Simonson, Carl Perth Ambov N. J . . . . 1894-95 

Sjolander, Carl B Onalaska Wis 1894-95 

Skramstad, Joseph Clay Bank Minn . . . 1894-95 

Solseth, George Harmony Minn . . . 1894-95 

Steen, Theron Wahoo Neb. . . . 1894-95 

♦Strand, Thor J Albert Lea Minn . . . 1894-95 

Saetrang, Ingeman J Waterville la 1894-97 

Thams, Johan L Valley City N. D.. . .1894-95 

Thorsen, Peder Seneca la 1894-95 

*Turmo, Olaf Luverne Minn. . .1894-98 A. B., 1898 

*Turmo, Stener Newman Grove .... Neb .... 1894-99 A. B., 1899 

Viger, Anton Rock Dell Minn . . . 1894-95 

Wahlen, Jens R Chicago Ill 1894-96 

Williamson, Christian Ruthven la 1894-98 

*0ien, John P Rochester Minn . . . 1894-96 

1895-1896 

\arnes. Nils C Hurdal Minn . . . 1895-96 

Anderson, Andrew O Ossian la 1895-1901 A. B., 1901 

Anderson, Esaias Albert Lea Minn . . . 1895-97 

Arneson. Olaf H Decorah la 1895-99 

Aspelund, Joseph Mondovi Wis 1895-1901 A. B., 1901 

Avlsgaard, Richard S Zumbrota Minn . . . 1895 

Bale, Christian E Norman N. D.. . .1895-96, 1897-98, 

1900-1904 A. B., 1904 

*Berg, Joseph H Oakland Minn . . . 1895-96, 1897-98 

Berntson, Ludvig Decorah la 1895 

♦Berven, Sven K Lily S. D 1895-1901 A. B., 1901 

Bidne, Henry Decorah la 1895-98 

*Bjerke, Anders O Ridgeway la 1895-98 

♦Blicher, Peter C Decorah la 1895-1903 A. B., 190,< 

Borge, John Washington Prairie .la 1895-98 

Brekke, Edward A Spillville la 1895-96, 1897- 

1903 A. B., 1903 

Dahl, Abraham P Luverne Minn. . .1895-96 

Dahl, Otto Strum Wis 1895-97 > 

Ellickson, Frank Montevideo Minn . . . 1895-96 

Ersland, Joseph A Nevada la 1895-99 

Gerald, Guv H Bird Island Minn. . .1895-1901 A. B., 1901 

Grangaard, Henrv O Norman N. D 1895-1902 A. B.. 1902 

Griinne, O. Theodore Waterville la 189.S-96, 1901-02 

*Guttebo, Lauritz Seman Huxley la 1895-1901 A. B., 1901 

Hailstone, A. Augustus Decorah la 1895-1902 A. B., 1902 

Hanson, Eugene Carl Eau Claire Wis 1895-97 

Hegg, Olaf Decorah la 1895-96 

Hoel, William Canby Minn. . .1895-96 

Hov, I. Simonson Portland N. D.. . .1895-1900 A. B., 1900 



232 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Hovde, Agnus E Wittenberg Wis 1895-97, 1899- 

1900 

Hovde, Rudoph L Wittenberg Wis 1895-97, 1898- 

1903 A. B., 1903 

Jacobsen, Karl T Stoughton Wis 1895-97. 1898- 

1902 A. B., 1902 

Jacobson, Alfred . Decorah la 1895-96 

Johnson. L. Gerhard Roland la 1895-1902 A. B., 1902 

Johnson, Perry S Decorah la 1895-99 A. B.. 1899 

Jordahl. Christopher Norway Lake Minn. . .1895 

Kallestad, Abdiel O .Blue Earth City. .. .Minn . . .1895-96, 1897-98 

Kallestad, Alfred S .Blue Earth City. ... Minn . . .1895-96, 1897-98 

*Kilness, Julius Bennett Dell Rapids S. D 1895-1900 A. B.. 1900 

Kolaas, Martin Conover la 1895-96 

♦Larsen, Wilhelm August Latimer la 1895-99 

Larson, Embert . Story City la 1895-99 

Linde. Henry J . Ridgeway la 1895-1901 A. B., 1901 

Lunde. Johannes .Zunibrota Minn. . . 1895-97 

Magelssen, Jacob A Rushford Minn. . . 1895 

Meyer, Laust H Latimer la 1895-96 

Moen, Hans P . Calmar la 1895-98 

Ness, Andrew M . Hector Minn . . . 1895-96 

*Neste, Tlieodore P Decorah la 1895-1902 

Nymoen, Christian O . Granite F^lls Minn . . . 1895-99 

Naeseth, Herman Aspelund Minn. . .1895-1902 A. B.. 1902 

Opdahl. Einar E Wausau Wis 1895-96 

Peterson, Carl S. N Aspelien Minn. . .1895-97 

Peterson, Cyrus . Chicago Ill 1895-96 

*Preus, Ove Jacob Hjort Morrisonville Wis 1895-1901 A. B., 1901 

Ritland, Osmund Roland la 1895-96 

♦Rosholdt, Thore Laurentius. . .Norwegian Grove.. .Minn. . .1895-99 A. B.. 1899 

Rosholt. A. Jens Rosholt Wis 1895-96. 1897- 

1903 A. B.. 1903 

Rosholt. Norman Rosholt Wis 1895-96 

*Sauer. Herman Olai Bode la 1895-97. 1898-99, 

1900-1903 A. B., 1903 

Simmons, Simon Kindred N. D.. . 1895-96 

Skare, Peder Norway Lake Minn. . . 1895-96 

Skauge. Nicolai O Elliford N. D. . , . 1895-96. 1898- 

1902 

Stade. Charles M Chicago Ill 1895-96 

Stalland, Martin Willmar Minn . . . 1895 

Starks, Simon Keyser Wis 1895-96 

Stenbakken, Hans Chr Nerstrand Minn . . . 1895-98 

♦Stub, Hans Andreas, Jr Robbinsdale Minn. . .1895-1900 A. B., 1900 

Styve, Oscar C Albert Lea Minn. . .1895-1900 A. B.. 1900 

Swenson. Jens T Lawton Wis 189.S-97. 1899- 

1900 

Saeter. Otis P Willmar Minn . . . 1895-97 

Thompson. John F Sioux Rapids la 1895-96 

Thorstenson. Knut A Amboy Minn. . .1895-1901 A. B., 1901 

Tjernagel, Martin O Randall la 1895-98 

Torgerson, Jacob A. C Somber la 1895-99 A. B.. 1899 

Trulson, Herman Orfordville Wis 1895-96 

*Ullensvang, Lars L Steward Ill 1895-97, 1899- 

1903 A. B„ 1903 

Vigesland, Sven ■: Decorah la 1895-96 

Weik, Henry G Wausau Wis 1895-97 

Wig, Oscar B Rising Sun Wis 1895-97 

*Ylvisaker, Olaf Sigvald Robbinsdale Minn . . . 1895-99 A. B., 1899 

*0degaard, Gunnar G Portland N. D.. . . 1895-98 

1896-1897 

Aascth. Elmer A Gayville S. D 1896-99 

Alien, Realf Decorah la 1896-97 

Apland, Martin O Cambridge la 1896-1903 A. B., 1903 

Bakkcn, Hans Plato Minn. . .1896-97 

Bergman, K. Pjetur Gardar N. D. . . . 1896-98 

Bergman, Hjalmar A Gardar N. D.. . .1896-1900 A. B,. 1900 

*Borge. Olaf Washington Prairie. la 1896-1903 A. B.. 1903 

Christensen, Walter Gayville S. D 1896-97 

Dahl, Hans P Gayville S. D 1896-99 

Dahl, Hans Monrad Revere Minn . . . 1896-99 

Dahle, Martin O Norman la 1896-1902 A. B.. 1902 



ATTENDANCE 23:J 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



♦Dreng, John (Johan) O Manitowoc. . . .M. .Wis. . . .1896-1901 A. B.. 1901 

*Eger, Olaf Chicago Ill 1896-1902 A. B., 1902 

Espeland, Michael M Dean Minn. . .1896-98 

Fremming, Eivind St. Paul Minn. . ' 1896-97 

♦Grefthen. Olaf Lauricz Northwood la 1896-1900 

Grinde, George A De Forest. Wis 1896-1903 A. B., 1903 

Gutzka, Henry Locust la 1896 

*Hanson, Gustav Adolph Stoughton Wis 1896-99, 1900-01. 

1903-05 A. B., 1905 

Haugen, Edward Pelican Rapids Minn . . . 1896-97 

Herreid, Haavar Hills Minn. . .1896-97, 1898-99 

*Hustvedt, Sigurd Bernhard . . .Decorah la 1896-1902 A. B., 1902 

*Ingebritson, Henry Randall la 1896-1903 A. B., 1903 

Jacobson, Rasmus A Lennox S. D . . . . 1896-97 

Jensen, Eskild H Riceford Minn . . . 1896-98 

Johnson, Albert N Norway Grove Wis 1896-99 

Johnson, Charles J Decorah la 1896-99 

*Johnson, Wilford Alpheus Red Wing Minn . . . 1896-99 A. B., 1899 

Larsen, Carl E Decorah la 1896-1902 A. B., 1902 

Livdahl, Gustav N Hickson N. D... .1896-98 

Munson. Theodore Slater la 1896 

Myren. Henry Pierpont S. D 1896-97 

Nelson, Carl W Presho S. D 1896-97 

*Normann, Halvor Martin Dalton Minn. . .1896-1900 A. B., 1900 

Nubson, Henrv N Callender la 1896-99, 1900-02 

*Naeseth, CareJius G Aspelund Minn. . .1896-1903 A. B., 1903 

*01atson, Kri.stinn K Gardar N. D... .1896-1900 A. B., 1900 

*01sen, (Bertel) Johan Whitehall Wis 1896-97 

Olson, Bryngel T Calamus la 1896-99 

Quale, Arthur Nora Wis 1896-97 

Reque, G. F. Otto Spring Grove Minn. . .1896-1900 

Ringoen, Henry Ridgeway la 1896-99 

Simmons, Thoraf C Red Wing Minn. . .1896-99, 1902-03 

Skinnemoen, John S Wendell Minn . . . 1896-97, 1898- 

1901 A. B., 1901 

Stang, Thomas St. Paul Minn. . .1896-99 

*Strtim, Axel Elias Zumbrota Minn. . .1896-1900 A. B., 1900 

*Sundby, Gustave Adolph 

Nelson Manitowoc Wis 1896-1900 A. B., 1900 

Sydnes, Christopher Huxley la 1896-99 

Thoen, Ruben Kensett la 1896-97 

Torgerson, J. Walther Norden S. D 1896-1900 

Valsvig, Albert M Lily S. D 1896-97 

Wold, Knut St. Olaf la 1896-97 

1897-1898 

Aat)y. Alfred V Hayfield Minn . . . 1897-98 

Amundson, Albert O Cresco la 1897-98 

Berg, A. Herman Decorah la 1897-99 

Borreson, Borge H Ca Crosse Wis 1897-98 

Boxrud, Bernhard M. Red Wing Minn . . . 1897-99 

Christopherson, Johannes Pigeon Falls Wis 1897-99 

Dolve, Nils Oliver Portland N. D. . . . 1897-98 

Dosland, Thomas. . ; Clinton la 1897-98 

Elvestrom, Martin Bricelyn Minn . . . 1897-98 

Engeseth, Peter J De Forest Wis 1897-98, 1899- 

1900 

Erickson, Charles De Forest Wis 1897-98 

Estrem, Carl O Willmar Minn. . .1897-1901 A. B., 1901 

Floren, Halvor Grove City Minn . . . 1897-98 

Fuglie, A. Edwin Ashby Minn. . .1897-1901 A. B., 1901 

Hande. Carl Spring Valley Minn . . . 1897-99 

*Hansen. Emil Twin Vallev Minn. . .1897-1903 A. B., 1903 

Hanson, Hans Olaf Westby Wis 1897-98 

Haugen, John Martinus Newman Grove .... Neb .... 1897-98 

Helvig, Henry Roland la 1897-99 

Hjelle. Ole Simon Decorah la 1897-1900, 1901- 

1905 A. B.. 1905 

Jacobson, William Luverne Minn . . . 1897-98 

Jarland, Lewis J Locust la 1897-99 

Jensvold, Christopher La Crosse Wis 1897-98 

Johnson, William J Decorah la 1897-99 

Johnsrud, Henry L Spring Grove Minn . . . 1897-98 

Larson . Neal B Deerfield Wis 1897-98 



234 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SL\TY YEARS 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Maakestad, Nils F Randall la 1897-1900 

*Magelssen, Nils Stockfleth. . . . Bratsberg Minn. . .1897-1902 

Muus, Sverre P Holden Minn. . .1897-98 

Xordskog, Oscar Julius Bird Island Minn. . .1897-1900 

♦Norgaard. Carl Henrv Grove City Minn. . .1897-1903 A. B., 1903 

Odberg. Andreas A Merrill Wis 1897-98 

Olsen. Adolph Johan Thor la 1897-99 

Olson, Christian Norwegian Grove. . . Minn . . . 1897-98 

Olson, Otto Portland N. D... .1897-1900 

Opheim. Johan Julius Thor la 1897-99 

Ostvig, Richter N Benson Minn . . . 1897-99 

Preus, Jacob Aall Ottescn Decorah la 1897-190.? A. B., 1903 

*Preus, Johan Carl Keyser Decorah la 1897-1902 A. B., 1902 

Reque, Sigurd Styrk Decorah la 1897-190.V .... A. B., 1903 

Reque, Walther Spring Grove Minn . . . 1897-99 

Rialson, George E Tracy Minn. . .1897-98 

Risetter. Harvey O Lee Ill 1897-99 

Sheldon. Clarence Spring Valley Minn. . .1897-98 

Skaaden, Arthur P Chicago Ill 1897-1901 

Smith, Nils Perth Amboy N. J 1897-99 

Sorenson, Alfred R Harmony Minn. . .1897-1902 A. B., 1902 

Stenbakken, Oswald Nerstrand Minn . . . 1897-99, 1901-02 

Taug, William L Thor la 1897-99 

Teisberg, Carl B Ashby Minn . . . 1897-01 A. B., 1901 

Thorpe, Lawrence Willmar Minn . . . 1897-98 

Tunem, Thomas G Chicago Ill 1897-98 

Vaaler, Rudolph A Twin Vallev Minn. . .1897-99 

Void, O. Alfred Decorah la 1897-99 

Void. Ole J Decorah la 1897-1902 

1898-1899 

Aaker, Casper D Ridgeway la 1898-1902 A. B., 1902 

Aasen. Christian H Clifford N. D.. . .1898-1902 

♦Anderson, Martin Newhall la 1898-99 

Aslakson, Norman Holton Mich.. .1898-99 

*Bergh. Axel Delaware Mine Mich.. .1898-190.? A. B., 1903 

Bjornstad, Bernhard St. Paul Minn . . . 1898-1900 

Clauson, Nils Y Red Wing Minn . . . 1898-1901 \. B., 1901 

Finseth, Arthur O Kenyon Minn. . .1898-1900 . 

Forde, Walter Starbuck Minn. . .1898-99 

Gilbert, Walter I Sturgeon Bav Wis 1898-190.S A. B., 1905 

Graslie, Carl J Palmer Wis 1898-1900 

Grefstad, Oscar K Bode la 1898-1905 A. B., 1905 

Grimson, Gilbert Hatton N. D.. . 1898-99 

Grinde, Johannes B Deerfield Wis 1898-99 

Grinde, Johannes L Madison Wis 1898-1900 

Guttebd, Emil Caspari Huxley la 1898-1900 

Guttormsen, Sigvart Perth Amboy ....:. N. J 1898-1901 

Halvorson. Carl Northwood N. D.. . 1898-99 

Hanson, Nils A Mayville N. D... 1898-1902 

Hovde, Carl H. R Wittenberg Wis 1898-1904 A. B., 1904 

Iverson, Joharmes I Stanhope la 1898-1901 

Jacobson, Louis O Gilbert la 1898-1901 

*Johnson, Bergel Alfred Mindoro Wis 1898-1905, 1918 . .A. B., 1905 

Johnson, Carl L Efifington S. D . 1898-99 

Juul, Gustav A Brandon Minn. . .1898-1902 A. B., 1902 

Kaasa, Jens Lawrence Ridgewav la 1898-1903 A. B.. 1903 

Kleppen, Andrew Eau Claire Wis 1898-99 

Knudson, Oscar Orfordville Wis 1898-99 

Knutson, Severin Hatton N. D.. . 1898-99 

Larsen, Anton Martinius River Falls Wis 1898-99 

Lien. Niel M. B Northwood la 1898-1900 

Mindrum, Oscar P Bratsberg Minn. . . 1898-1901 

Naescth, Martinius Zumbrota Minn . . 1898-1<)()t 

♦Nelson, Alfred Thomas Mayville N. D.. 1898-1903 A. B., 1903 

Nelson, Johan J Oilman Wis 1898-1901 

Olson, John Thor la 1898-99 

Oppedal, Ingebrigt I Stanhope la 1898-99 

Peterson, Helmer S Fargo N. D.. 1898-1903 A. B., 1903 

Prestegaard, Peder O Lee Ill 1898-1904 

Risetter, Thomas C Lee Ill 1898-1900 

Ruen, Oliver Kenyon Minn . . . 1898-1902, 1903- 

1907 A. B., 1907 

Schjeldahl. Theodore Highlandville la 1898-1905 A. B.. 1905 



ATTENDANCE 



235 



Student 



Post Office 



State 



Years at 
Luther College 


Graduation 


1898-1901 


1898-1900 


1898-1902 

1898-99 


A. B. 


1902 


1898-1900 

1898-1902 


1898-99 


1898-1904. . . 
1898-1900. . 


.\. B. 


1904 


1898-1903 

1898-1902 

1898-99 


.A. B. 
A. B. 


1905 
1902 


1898-1901 


1898-99 


1898-1901 

1898-1901 


A. B. 


1901 


1898-1900 


1898-1902 


A. B., 


1902 



Schroedcr, Henry San Francisco Calif. . 

Simley, Joseph Portland N. D. . 

*Smeby, Hartwick Carinius. . . Albert Lea Minn . 

Sorenson, Edward H Carthage S. D . 

Stenehjem, Edwin Spring Grove Minn . 

Swenson, Orin L Lamberton Minn . 

Tho, Jacob Oslo Minn . 

Tonning, Ole Decorah la 

Torgerson, Thomas Somber la 

♦Twcten, Jacob O Lake Mills la , . . 

*Vaaler, Even A Twin Valley. Minn 

Wilson, Arthur B. . Decorah la . . 

Wollan, Arnold Glenwood Minn . 

Wollan, Oscar C Glenwood Minn 

Wollan, Oliver B. F Glenwood Minn . . 

Xavier, Heinrich M . . . Ridgeway . la 

Xavier, Nils Paul Ridgeway la 

*Ylvisalcer, Nils Martin St. Paul Minn . 



1899-1900 



Aaberg, Herman O Devils Lake N. D. , 1899-1903 .A. B., 1903 

Aakhus, Daniel Bygland Minn . . 1899-1900 

*Baalson, Herman E Brooten Minn . . . 1899-1904 A. B., 1904 

Bervin, Lewis Baltic S. D . 1899-1903 

Black, .Alexander G Holmen Wis 1899-1903 

Bonde, Edward Nerstrand Minn . 1899-1900 

Bonde, Oscar Nerstrand Minn . 1899-1900 

*Bredesen, .Alfred Stoughton Wis... 1899-1905 .A.. B., 190.=; 



Brusegaard, Theodore B Brandon . 



. Minn 



*Christensen, Jens Chr Orum Neb 

Dahlen, Tlieodore .\ Wendell. Minn 

Diesen, CM Washburn N. D. 

Drotning, Ferdinand Stoughton Wis 1899-1900 

Egeland, Ole Wilhelm Decorah la 1899-1902 

Fj0se, Norman Decorah la 1899-1901 

Fosmark, .Alexander F'ergus Falls Minn . . 1899-1901 

Frad, Nels Harmony Minn 



1899-1902, 1903- 

1904 

1899-1900 

1899-1903 

1899-1900 



.\. B., 1904 



A. B., 190i 



1899-1901. 1902- 

1903 

1899-1903 

1899-1900 



Fries, Gabriel Toronto S. D . . 

Gulbrandson. Carl Lanesboro Minn. 

Gulbrandson, George H Chicago Ill 1899-1900. 

*Gullixson, Tliaddaeus F Bode la 1899-1903 .\. B.. 1003 

Hagerup, Edward Decorah la 1899-1900 

*Halverson, Melvin Walter .... Mishicott Wis 1899-1904 A. B., 1904 

*Hegg, Gustav J Decorah la 1899-1905 A. B.. 1905 

Hermann, Thorhallur Gardar N. D. . . 1899-1902 

Hexom, Charles Philip Decorah la 1899-1902 

Hoel, Ove Nordahl Canby Minn. . . 1899-1901 

Hove, J. Nathan Flandreau S. D . . 1899-1900 

Hukee, Hans O Nerstrand Minn . . . 1899-1900 

Hustvedt, P. Thomas Decorah la 1899-1906 .\. B., 1906 

Jenson, .-^dolph H Edgerton Wis 1899-1901 

Johnsrud, William I Spring Grove Minn . .1899-1900 

Kjome, Hans N. (Chommie) Decorah la 1899-1906 .A.. B. 

Koefod, Sigvard M. R Ashby Minn 

Knutson, Henry M Ossian la . . . 

Krogstad, Gustav A Onalaska Wis. . 



Larsen, Leonard Decorah la . 

Larson, Harald W Story City la 1899-1900 

*Lund. Lauriis Peder Nashua la 1899-1904. 

Medhus, Ole Walnut Grove Minn. . .1899-1900. 

*Moldstad, Christian A De Forest Wis... 1899-1904. 

Moses, Olaf S Decorah la 1899-1901. 

Nelson, Ole E Frankhn Minn. . .1899-1902. 

Nelson, Walter Mavville N. D.. 1899-1904. 

Norby, .Albert Sioux Rapids la 1899-1900. 

*OIsen, Harry Emil Madison Wis 1899-1903 . 

Orwoll, Melvinus S Hanley Falls Minn. . .1899-1906. 

*Pahiier, Knut R Belgrade Minn . . . 1899-1903 . 

Quarve, Halvard Fessenden N. D.. . .1899-1902. 

Quarve, Levard Fessenden N. D 1899-1903 . 

*Quill, Carl Johan Sauk Center Minn. . .1899-1904. 



1899-1903 .\. B. 

1899-1903 

1899-1901, 1903- 

1904 

1899-1901 



1906 
1903 



A. B., 1904 



.A. B., 1904 



A. B.. 1904 



A. B., 1903 
A. B., 1906 



236 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Rigg, Jacob Glenwood Minn. . .1899-1900 

Saxvik. Henry O Highlandville la 1899-1905 A. B., 1905 

Sevareid, Alfred Kenyon Minn . . . 1899-1906 A. B., 1906 

Sevareid, Nils Adolph Kenyon Minn . . . 1899-1903 

Steen, Sem P Clinton Minn. ..1899-1900, 1901- 

1904 

Strand, J. Edward Albert Lea Minn. . .1899-1905 A. B., 1905 

Thompson, T. Elmer Ossian la 1899-1900, 1901- 

1904 A. B., 1904 

♦Thorpe, Christian Scriver Willmar Minn. ..1899-190.? A. B., 1903 

Tjensvold, Gabriel Eldorado. la 1899-1900 

Urheim, Olaf Chicago Ill 1899-1901 

Winnor, Arnold Toronto S. D 1899-1901 

Wollan, Clarence Glenwood Minn. . .1899-1900 

nVrolstad, Jprgen Oliver Stevens Point Wis 1899-1906 A. B., 1906 

nVulfsberg, Jacob Aall Ottesen.Decorah la 1899-1905 A. B., 1905 

*Ylvisaker, Sigurd Christian. . .St. Paul Minn. . .1899-1903 A. B.. 1903 

1900-1901 

Aamodt, Ferdinand Houston Minn . . . 1900 

Anderson, Thomas Calmar la 1901 

Arnston, Halvor Viking N. D.. .. 1900-1901 

Bergum, Albert North Bristol Wis 1900-1901 

Bjornson, Norman Sun Prairie Wis 1900-1902 

Borgen, Wilhelm Red Wing Minn. . .1900-1901 

Brorby, Oscar Decorah la 1900-1903 

Bruflodt, Gerhard Harmony Minn . . . 1900-1903 

Bue, Carl O Pleasant Valley .... Wis 1900-1901 

Burke, Albert Rio Wis 1900-1901 

*Christopherson, Einar Bj0rn . .Pigeon Falls Wis 1900-1906 A. B., 1906 

Donhowe, Peter Christian .... Story City la 1900-1902 

Erickson. Martin Brown Rock Dell Minn. . .1900-01, 1902-04 

*Estrem, Herman Wilhelm .... Willmar Minn . . . 1900-1904 A. B., 1904 

*Fretheim, Martin E Oakland Minn. . .1900-1905 A. B., 1905 

Fries, Lyman A Toronto S. D 1900-1907 A. B., 1907 

Games, Martin J Mabel Minn. . .1900-1905 

Gilbertson, Kasper O Decorah la 1900-1901 

Gnolden. Oscar Morrisonville Wis 1900-1901 

Halvorsen, Hjalmar S Westby Wis 1900-1905 

*HaIvorson, Helmer Benson Minn. . .1900-1904 A. B., 1904 

Halvorson, Henry M Ridgeway la 1900-1901 

Halvorson, J. Roland Ridgeway la 1900-1905 

Hamre, Edwin Manvel N. D 1900-1902 

Heggt veit, Carl O Belvidere Mills Minn . . . 1900-1903 

*Hendrickson, Alfred Clifford N. D... .1900-1906 A. B.. 1906 

Hendrickson, Matthias Belgrade Minn . . . 1900-1901 

Hesla, Oscar Linn Grove la 1900-1901 

Hoe!, Rudolph Canby Minn. . .1900-1903 

*Hoff , Thoralf A Ashby Minn . . . 1900-1904 A. B., 1904 

Hovde, Wilhelm Th Wittenberg Wis 1900-1902 

Hovden. Oscar K Ridgeway la 1900-1901 

Hovey, Iver Decorah la 1900-1901 

Iverson, Oscar Eaton Wis 1900-1902 

Jessen, Carl Arthur Hayfield Minn. . . 1900-03, 1905-09.. A. B., 1909 

Jevne, Franz Meridian Wis 1900-04 

Johnson, P. Sylvester Westby Wis 1900-02 

Jondahl, Iver O Clifford N. D. . . . 1900-01 

Juve, Henry O Ridgeway la 1900-04 

Juve, Oscar A Stoughton Wis 1900-07 A. B., 1907 

Kalnes, I. Magnus Starbuck Minn. . .1900-01, 1902-07.. A. B., 1907 

Lien. Ole Martin Roland la 1900-01 

Maland, Enos E Harmony Minn . . . 1900-01 

Moe, Alfred Blair Wis 1900-01 

Moe, Carl Minneapolis Minn . . . 1900-01 

Naeseth, John R Zumbrota Minn. . .1900-07 A. B., 1907 

Naeseth, Oliver W Mcnomonie Wis 1900-01 

Nordlie, Arthur Stoughton Wis 1900-01 

Nordlie, Herman C Stoughton Wis 1900-06 A. B., 1906 

Olson, Alfred M Rice Lake Wis 1900-05, 1907-08 

Paulson, Peter C Forest City la 1900-04 A. B., 1904 

Pederson, Alfred C Benson Minn. . .1900-04 A. B,, 1904 

Pederson, Bennie A Taylor Wis 1900-03 

Petersen, Joh. Wilhelm St. Paul Minn. . .1900-04 A. B., 1904 

Reishus, Berting Granite Falls Minn . . . 1900-01 



ATTENDANCE 237 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Roe, Otto P Hoffman Minn . . . 1900-01 

Rygg, Albert Decorah la 1900-02 

Sather. Allen Willmar Minn . . . 1900-03 

Sorlien, Henry J Bode la 1900-05 A. B., 1905 

Sponheim, Oscar H Hatton N. D.... 1900-05 A. B., 1905 

Stabeck, Clement Davis Ill 1900-01 

Strand, Carl Odin Menomonie Wis 1900-01 

Styve, Laurits Lake Mills la 1900-01 

Saebo, Anders Ridgeway la 1900-01 

Thorstenson, Stephen A Amboy Minn. . .1900-01, 1902-03 

*Turmo, Andreas Markus Newman Grove .... Neb .... 1900-04 

Vaala, Alf O Saude la 1900-07 A. B., 1907 

Vangen, Charles O Hayward Minn. . .1900-04 A. B., 1904 

Viken, Ingebrigt Booge S. D 1900-01 

Vikdal, Peter G Decorah la 1900-02 

Vollum, Edward O Hayward Minn. . .1900-04 A. B., 1904 

Wilhelmsen, Wilhelm Spring Grove Minn . . . 1900-01 

1901-1902 

Arneson, Theodore Highlandville la 1901-03 

*Belgum, Anton H Nora Minn . . . 1901-07 A. B., 1907 

*Belgum, Erik S Farwell Minn. . .1901-07 A. B., 1907 

Berg, J. Rudolph Newman Grove .... Neb .... 1901-06 

Bjorgo, C. W. Walther Red Wing Minn. . .1901-07 A. B., 1907 

Bonde, Jesse Renville Minn . . . 1901-02 

*Braafladt, Louis Henry Belview Minn. . .1901-06 A. B., 1906 

Clausen, Sigvald J Red Wing Minn. . .1901-03 

Dahl, Joseph Cottonwood. ..... Minn. . .1901-02 

Dahl, Sondre N Gayville S. D 1901-07 A. B., 1907 

Davick, Albert O Clinton Minn . . . 1901-05 A. B.. 1905 

Davis, Theodore A Audubon Minn . . . 1901-03 

Erickson, Harold Hancock Minn . . . 1901-02 

Erickson, Herman Mabel Minn . . . 1901-02 

Felland, Alfred T Macfarland Wis 1901-05 A. B., 1905 

Fjeldstad, C. Alford Wells Minn. . .1901-05 A. B., 1905 

Gjermo, Johannes A Voss Norway. 1901-03 

Grindeland, Oscar Sattre la 1901-02 

Halls. Carl B Hills Minn . . . 1901-06 A. B., 1906 

Halvorson, Alfred O Ridgeway la 1901-04, 1907-10.. A. B., 1910 

Halvorson, Hans Decorah la 1901-02 

Haroldson, Harold Davis Ill 1901-02 

*Haugen, Clarence Decorah la 1901-08 A. B., 1908 

Hilleson, Thomas E Lee Ill 1901-04 

Hiortdahl, Axel H Washington D. C... 1901-07 

Hiortdahl, Sigurd Washington D. C 1901-03 

Hjelle, Carl A Decorah la 1901-04, 1906-10.. A. B., 1910 

Holden, Oscar Bode la 1901-02 

Holkesvik, Julian A Locust la 1901-07 A. B., 1907 

Hopperstad, Gilbert Ridgeway la 1901-02 

Hovden, Gilbert Decorah la 1901-02 

Hovden, Olvin K Decorah la 1901-02 

Hustvedt. Olaf M Decorah la 1901-05 

Iverson, Henry Elma la 1901-08 A. B., 1908 

Larsen. Henning Decorah la 1901-08 A. B., 1908 

Larsen, Jakob A. O Decorah la 1901-08 A. B., 1908 

Larsen, Lukas Mabel Minn . . . 1901-02 

Lieberg, Harvey Cottonwood Minn . . . 1901-02 

Lommen, GulHk O Shindlar S. D 1901-06 

Lundring, Millard M Canby Minn . . . 1901-02 

Moe, Edwin O Mcintosh Minn . . . 1901-06 A. B., 1906 

*Moe, Lewis L Watson Minn . . . 1901-04 

Monson, Martin J Delhi Minn. . .1901-08 A. B., 1908 

Ordal, Albert Colton S. D 1901-02, 1904-05 

Peterson, Leon C Renville Minn. . .1901-05 A. B., 1905 

Pederson, John A . .Bode la 1901-03 

Rodsater, George I Manchester Minn . . . 1901-06 A. B., 1906 

Rosholdt, Carl L Centergrove Minn. . .1901-02, 1903-06.. A. B., 1906 

Sandager, Peter E Calmar la 1901-06 

Sather, Johannes Ulen Minn. . . 1901-02 

Sauer, Adolf Glenville Minn. . .1901-03 

Sevareid, Ephraim Kenyon Minn . . . 1901-06 

Severson, Edwin G Colton S. D 1901-02, 1904-10 

Sperley, John Lourdes la 1901-08 A. B., 1908 

Strand, Herman Albert Lea Minn. . .1901-05 A. B., 190S 



238 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



♦Struxness, Edwart Milan Minn. . .1901-03, 1904-06.. A. B., 1906 

Thorsen, M. Hauman New Centerville, . . . Wis 1901-07 A. B., 1907 

Torgerson, Abel G Somber la 1901-03 

Torrison. Anker O Manitowoc Wis 1901-04, 1906-07.. A. B., 1907 

Viken. Arthur Granite Falls Minn . . . 1901-02 

Void, J. Godfrey Decorah la 1901-02 



1902-1903 

Aaby, Elmer C Hayfield Minn . . . 1902-05 

Anderson, Andrew A Hills Minn . . . 1902-05 

Bergan, Oscar Ridgeway la 1902-04 

Berhow, Seward Hu.xley la 1902-04 

*Borge, Daniel Johannes Decorah la 1902-08 A. B., 1908 

Brendal, John M Starbuck Minn. . .1902-04, 1905-06.. A. B., 1906 

*Bruland, Peter O Lake Mills la 1902-06 A. B., 1906 

Dorrum, Ingebret Parkland Wash. . .1902-04 A. B., 1904 

Drotning, T. Melvin Stoughton Wis 1902-06 A. B., 1906 

*Estrem, Gustav Rudolph Willmar Minn. . .1902-06 A. B., 1906 

Claim, Hellek Willmar Minn. . .1902-03 

Gunderson, Adolph Ossiah la 1902-03 

Gunlaugson, G. B Akra N. D.. . .1902-03 

Haatvedt, Ole Spillville la 1902-04 

Halldorsson, Halldor K Park River N. D.... 1902-03 

Hanson, Hartvig Decorah la 1902-05 

Hanson, Helmer G Sioux Rapids la 1902-03 

Hanson, Joseph Grant Bode la 1902-09 A B., 1909 

*Haugen, Thomas Amandus . . .Mellen Wis 1902-05, 1906-09.. A. B., 1909 

Homstad, Carl N Westby Wis 1902-04 

Jenson, Julius H Seneca la 1902-04 

Jetley, Hans A Meckling S. D 1902-03 

♦Johnson, Joseph La Crosse Wis 1902-06 A. B., 1906 

Johnson, Peter O. C Glenwood Minn. . .1902-06 A. B., 1906 

Kalstad, Julius C Glenville Minn . . . 1902-04 

♦Kjorlaug, Peter Fredrik Luverne Minn . 

Kloster, Lars S Huxley la ... . 

*Korsrud, Albert Clarence Decorah la. . . . 

Kulaas, Peter Minot N. D.. 

Langeland, John Rothsay Minn . 

Lansing. Lawrence R Bode la 1902-03 

Leikvold, Albert Waterville la 1902-03, 1904-05 

Lin, Olav Hudson S. D 1902-03 

Monson, Otto A. M Bode la 1902-07 

*Mortenson, Emil E Manchester M nn . . .1902-06 .\. B., 1906 

Mortenson, Ludwig C Milwaukee Wis 1902-03 

Myklebust, Johan Norway . 1902-03 

Naeseth, Adolph O Zumbrota Minn. . .1902-09 A. B., 1909 

*Naeseth, (Ulrik) William 

Koren Decorah la 1902-08 A. B., 1908 

Norgaard, Alfred Fargo N. D.... 1902-03 

Odegaard, G. K Portland N. D. . . , 1902-04 

Olson, Olaf M Bode la 1902-03 

Opheim, Lawrence M Bode la 1902-05 '. 

*Ordahl, Mathias B Benson Minn . . . 1903-05 

Rongley, Henry C Lenora Minn. . . 1902-05 

Rostad, Carl Norman Decorah la 1902-03, 1904-05 

Ryen, Albert Wild Rice N. D. . . . 1902-03 

Sampson, Arthur Decorah la 1902-03 

Snortum, Kenneth O Canby Minn. . . 1902-03 

Solsten, Ben Decorah la 1902-04 

Story (Storre), Norman H. 

(Nils Haakon Norman) Kensett la 1902-04 

Stub, Ingolf Arntz Hovind. . . .St. Paul Minn. . .1902-04 

*Tallakson, Selmer Lawrence. . . Willmar Minn . . . 1902-06 A. B.. 1906 

Teien, Alfred M Benson Minn . . . 1902-03 

Teslow, Adolf H Havward Minn . . . 1902-03 

*Tingelstad. Oscar Adolf Silverton Ore 1902-05 A. B., 1905 

Tjernagel, Gustav Story City la 1902-03 

Tyssen, Carl Lake Mills la 1902-06 A. B., 1906 

*Ursin, Nikolai Berg Chicago Ill 1902 

Wall, S. Oscar Kensett la 1902-03, 1905-06 

Wilke, Erich Fessenden N. D. . . . 1902-05 

Wilke. Gustav H Fessenden N. D. . . . 1902-05 



1902-08 


A. 


B.. 


1908 


1902-08. . . . 


A. 


B., 


190S 


1902-08. . . . 


A. 


B., 


1908 


1902-07 


A. 


B., 


1907 


1902-04. . 









ATTENDANCE 239 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



190.?- 1904 

Ansten, Henry Ingvald Decorah la 1903-04 

Bendickson, Gilbert B Scarville la 1903-06 

*Bergee, Theodor Gilchrist Minn. . .1903-04. 1905-07 

Birkestrand, Albert Cambridge la 1903-04 

Bolstad, Oscar K Fertile Minn . . , 1903-04 

Bredvold, J. Louis Belview Minn. . , 1903-07 

Brendingen, Edwin L Lake Park Minn . . . 1903-04 

Britson, John E Roland la 190,3-06 

Ersland, Arthur Roland la 1903-04 

Ferkin, Otis B Roland la 1903-06 

*Forde. Gerliard Olavus Starbuck Minn . . , 1903-07 A. B.. 1907 

♦Fretheim, Severt Johan Oakland Minn . . . 1903-07 A. B., 1907 

Grinde, Lewis C Deerfield Wis 1903-04 

Grindstuen, Iver I Sutton's Bav. Mich.. . .1903-09 A. B., 1909 

Gulbrandson, Eskild H Albert Lea Minn. . .1903-04 

Gulbrandson, Rolf M Albert Lea Minn . . . 1903-04 

Gunderson, Kittil Ridgeway . la 1903-04 

Gunvordahl, Harold Deerfield Wis 1903-04 

Guttebd. Casper Huxley la 1903-04 

Guttebp, Nels H. W Huxley la 1903-09 A. B.. 1909 

Hanson, George C Bode la 1903-09 A. B . 190') 

Hanson, Karl Twin Valley Minn. . .1903-04, 1905-08.. A. B., 1908 

Haugen, Albert E Decorah la 1903-06 

Heggen, Henry S Huxley la 1903-04 

Hegland, Martin N Roland la 1903-06 

Hegland, Thor O Roland la 1903-05 

Helgeson, Alfred Graytown Wis 1903-04 

Hem, Hans N Fosston Minn . . . 190.5-08 A. B., 1908 

Henderson, Nils Cresco. . la 1903-04,1909-13 

Hokaasen, Otto T Decorah la 190.3-09 A. B., 1909 

Iverson, Jonas B Hemingford Neb .... 1903-06 

Iverson, Peter J Arnegard N. D.. . .190.3-04, 1908-1 0...\. B.. 1'MO 

Johnson, Arthur R. Decorah la 190,3-05 

Kilness, Philip G Dell Rapids S. D 190.3-06 

Lade, Sigurd Fosston Minn . . . 1903-04 

Larson, Arthur New York N. Y. . . . 1903-04 . 

Larson. Harold New York N. Y. ... 190.3-04 

Lee. Alfred L Stoughton Wis 1903-05 

*Lillegard, George Oliver Bode la 1903-08 A. B., 1908 

*Lynne, Justus A Elbow Lake Minn. . .1903-07 A. B., 1907 

Monson, Henry Decorah la 1903-07 

Nordby, Paul Lee Ill 1903-06 

Olsen, Nels A Her.scher Ill 1903-07 A. B., 1907 

Olsen, Thomas J Herscher Ill 190.3-09 

Petersen, Bernard (Sorose).. . .St. Paul Minn. . .1903-06 

Preus, Paul A Decorah la 1903-11 A. B., 1911 

Quallv, Peter W Decorah la 1903-10 A. B., 1910 

Randklev, Edward Minn . . . 1903-04 

Ritland, Simon Roland la 1903-04 

*RoshoIdt, Jacob Wilhelm .... Centergrove Minn . . . 1903-07 A. B., 1907 

*Smeby, Olaf Vilhelm Albert Lea Minn. . .1903-07 A. U., 1907 

Sorlien, Carl Bode la 190,3-04, 1905-06, 

1907-09 " 

Sponheim, Wm. H Hatton N. D. . . . 1903-04 

Stuve, Selmer Whitehall Wis 1903-05 

*Sumstad, Martin Ovedius Ashby Minn. . .1903-07 A. B., 1907 

Teisberg, Thomas H Ashby Minn. . .1903-07 .A.. B., 1907 

Ulen, Edward Decorah la 1903-04 

*Vaaler, .\rnt Johannes Twin Vallev Minn. . . 1903-07 A. B., 1907 

Wevlev, K. A. Mevcr Highlandvi'ilc la 190.3-04 

Wist, Benjamin O Decorah la 1903-09 



1904-1905 

*Aanestad, C. Walther Garretson S. D . 

Anderson, G. Peter Hills Minn . 

*Backerud, Martin B Newman Grove ... Neb . . 

Bareness, Martin Hartland Minn . 

Birkelo, Carl C Colton S. D . . 

Bj0rgo, P. Gerhard A Red Wing Minn . 

Boe, J. Ludvig Norway Lake Minn . 

Braafladt. Ole ."X Belview Minn. 

Clave, Alfred O Ottosen la ... . 



1904-08 

1904-06 

1904-08 A. B., 1908 

1904-05 

1904-10 A. B., 1910 

1904-08 A. B.. 1908 

.1904-05, 1906-07 

, 1904-06 

1904-09 



240 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Student 



Post Office 



State 



Years at 
Luther College Graduation 



Dahl. Gerhard H Hillsboro N. D.. . . 1904-08 . 

Dahl, Henrv C Devils Lake N. D 1904-07 . 

Dale, Christian J Decorah la 1904-12. 

Dale, Herman F Decorah la 1904-13. 

Ekfelt, Odd E Decorah la 1904-07, 

Finseth. Carl H Kenyon Minn . . . 1904-06 . 

Forde, Arthur M Highlandville la 1904-07 . 



♦Fritz, Charles Arnold Minot N. D. 

Fuglie, Maitin R Ashbv Minn . 

Gaard, Homer Roland la ... . 

Gravgaard. J. P Belgrade Minn. 

Guttebo, Morton A Huxley la . 



A. B., 1908 



A. B., 1913 

1908-10.. A. B., 1910 



.1904-05, 

.1904-07. 

.1904-05. 

.1904-07. 

.1904-13. 

*Haavik, Elias Cornelius De Forest . Wis 1904-06 . 

Halvorson, Alfred O Gary Minn . . . 1904-08 . 

Hanson, Sven A CranfiU's Gap Texas. . 1904-09. 

Hellekson, Adolph Hayfield Minn . . . 1904-07 . 

Hjelle. Sigurd Decorah ' .. la 1904-05 . 

Hjort, Karl Olaf Minneapolis Minn . . . 1904-05 . 



1907-11. .A. B.. 1911 



A. B., 1908 
A. B.. 1909 




LADIES' AID AT COLLEGE 
(Mrs. C. K. Pi-eiis in Fweground) 



Hoegcvoll, Alfred T Decorah la 1904-08 

*Holum, James (Jens) Olaus . . . De Forest Wis 1904-08 

Humble, Adolph Rushford Minn . . . 1904-05 

Jenson, Omar H McHenry N. D. 

*Jerdee, Joseph C Minneapolis Minn 

Johnson, Henry J Minneapolis Minn 

Juul. Rudolph A Brandon Minn 

*Kalvestrand, Lars Alfred 

Marion Viroqua Wis 1905-07 

Langcland, Martin Highlandville la 1904-05 

Larson. Simon Richard Vermilion S. D. . . . 1904-05 

Lee, Mart n E S. D. . . .1904-06 

I^e, Peter A. G Deerfield Wis 1904-06 

I^ikvold, Olvin G Watervillc la 1904-05 

♦Magelsscn, Finn '. . Rushford Minn. . .1905-09 

Martin, Carl Oscar Minneapolis Minn . . . 1904-06 

Miller, Anton Lewis Hartland Minn . . . 1904-1 1 



A. B.. 1908 



1904-10 A. B., 1910 

1904-07, 1909-11 

1904-05 

1904-08 



A. B., 1909 



ATTENDANCE 241 



Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Myran, Andres O Decorah la 1904-05, 1906-07, 

1911-12 

Noer, Victor R Colfax Wis 1904-08 

Nygaard, Olaf S Hartland Minn . . . 1904-10 

Orfield, Didrick J Belview Minn. . .1904-06 

Peterson, Tillman Soldiers Grove Wis 1904-08 A. B., 1908 

*Preus, Herman Amberg Minneapolis Minn . . . 1904-10 A. B., 1910 

Ringoen, Adolph R Ridgeway la 1904-08 

Rosholdt, Ingelbert E Centergrove Minn. . .1904-08 A. B., 1908 

Rostad, Martin L Decorah la 1904-08. . .A. B., 1908 

Rud, Carl O Portland N. D 1904-06 

Rygg, Lawrence S Decorah la 1904-06 

♦Sandager, Christian N Belview Minn . . . 1904-10 A. B , 1910 

*Sandberg, Ivar Morris Minn. . . 1904-11 A. B., 1911 

Skaaland, Sven G Viroqua Wis 1904-08 A. B., 1908 

♦Skagen, Johan Angel M(5rk . . . Brooklyn N. Y. . . . 1904-06 

*Skavlan (Schavlan), Ole E. . . . Chicago Ill 1905-06 

Skrede, Moses M Colton S. D. . . .1904-06 

Smedal, Carl A Roland la 1904-08 

Solberg, Melvin Blooming Prairie . . . Minn . . . 1904-05 

Solseth, Leonhard I Watson Minn . . . 1904-06 

Scrum, Gilman Oscar A Waukon la 1904-05, 1910-11 

Stensrud, Edwin J Hartland Minn . . . 1904-07 

Storla, Erick O Decorah la 1904-07 

Teslow, Herman A Decorah la 1904-07, 1908-09 

Trytten, C. Oscar Albert Lea Minn. . . 1904-09 A. B., 1909 

Voiding, Carl N Decorah la 1904-05 

Winnor, Guy W Minneapolis Minn . . . 1904-06 

*Wisnaes, John Carlot Hickson N. D.. 1904-09 A. B., 1909 

1905-1906 

*Aal, Eugene .Tunhard Starbuck Minn. . . 1905-06, 1908-11.. A. B., 1911 

Anderson, Earlen Cresco la 1905-06 

Andreasen, Hans G Denmark. . 1905-06 

Arness, Albert Decorah la 1905-06 

Arness, Gilbert Decorah la 1905-06 

♦Austin. Otto George Garret son S. D . . 1905-12 A. B., 1912 

Bell, Otto Orlow Soldiers Grove Wis 1905-06 

Brandt, Olaf J Macfarland Wis 1905-08 

*Buedall (Buttedal), Anton A. . Muskegon Mich.. . . 1905-12 A. B., 1912 

Clement, Edgar A Decorah la 1905-06 

Dahl, Silas E Cottonwood Minn . . . 1905-07 

Edwards, Maurice A Macfarland Wis 1905-06 

*Ensrud, Joseph Oscar Emil. . .Wells Minn. . .1905-09 A. B., 1909 

Erickson, Edward H Hixton Wis 1905-06 

*Faye, Christopher Urdahl Zululand Africa.. . 1905-09 A. B., 1909 

Forester, O. I Decorah la 1905-06 

Gaarder, Olaf Starbuck Minn. . . 1905-09 A. B., 1909 

Gilbertson, Ginard A Maddock N. D.. . 1905-09 

Gilbertson, Henrv Maddock N. D.. .. 1905-06 

Gronna, Thomas A. F Waterville la 1905-06, 1907-12 

♦Haavik, Olai Ludvig De Forest Wis 1905-12 A. B., 1912 

Hanson, George T Madison S. D .. . . 1905-06 

Harstad, S. George Parkland Wash. . .1905-08 A. B.. 1908 

Holien, Joseph O Flandreau S. D. . . 1905-06 

Hope, Martin Nerstrand Minn . . . 1905-06 

♦Hoyrne, Adolph Helmer Hills Minn. . .1905-06, 1913-17 

Hustvedt, William Decorah la 1905-06, 1907-08. 

1909-10 

Jenson, Carl Andrew Edgerton Wis 1905-07, 1908-10.. A. B., 1910 

Jerde, Oscar Toronto S. D. . . .1905-11 A. B., 1911 

Jerdee, T. R Minneapolis Minn . . . 1905-06 

*Johnshoy. M. Casper Starbuck Minn. . . 1905-06, 1907-09.. A. B., 1909 

♦Jordahl, Edward L Beaver Creek Minn. . .1905-10 A. B., 1910 

Kasberg, Alvin H Spring Grove Minn . . . 1905-08 

Kilness, Oscar B Dell Rapids S. D 1905-07 

Larsen, Albert K Decorah la 1905-06. 1908-11 

Lee, Jacob S Decorah la 1905-06 

Leque, Otto Byron Minn . . . 1905-06 

*Lerud, Theodore Twin Valley Minn. . .1905-10 A. B., 1910 

Leum, Henry J Mayville N. D... .1905-09 A. B., 1909 

Lomen, Ernest St. Paul Minn. . .1905-07 

Markhus, Einar Decorah la 1905-06 

Markhus, Orrin Decorah la 1905-06 



242 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



-Student 



Post Office 



State 



Year? at 
leather College Graduation 



Neprud, Selmer Westby Wis. . , 

Nilsestuen, Martin Arcadia Wis. . . 

Olson, Martin Bruce S. D. . 

Pederson, Christopher A Benson Minn . 

Peterson, Aslak S Orfordville. Wis. . . 

Qualset, Stephen Newman Grove .... Neb . . 

Ramsland, Sigurd Westby Wis. . . 

*Rolfsen, Ole O Decorali la ... . 

Rosholdt, Theodore G Centergrove Minn . 

♦Salvesen, Emil Alexandria Minn . 

Shellum, Joseph Minn . 

Sondrescn, Magnus S Bricelyn Minn 

Sperati, Carsten E Decorah la . . . 

Tenold, W. O Flandreau S. D . . 

Tjernagel, Clarence Stanwood Wash . 

Voiding, Roy Decorah la ... . 

Wee, Elmer Martin Orfordville Wis. . , 

Wikesland, Gustav A. M Decorah la ... . 

Williams, Henry W Hazel Run Minn . 

♦Ylvisaker, Nils Walther Albert Lea Minn 

1906-1907 

Aaby, E. Clarence Hayfield Minn . 

Anderson, Oscar E Colfax Wis. . , 

Bakke, Erick Arthur Decorah la. . . , 

Blegen, Harald Olaf Decorah la. . . . 

Erickson, Arthur C La Crosse Wis. . . 

Erstad, Andrew T Zumbrota Minn . 

Han.^en, Harold Clarence Cleveland Ohio. . 

Hansen, Harry J Cleveland Oliio. . 

Haugen, Roy Wallace Lac qui Parle Minn 

Hersetli, Adolph A Hitterdal Minn 

Hilmen, Alfred Crookston Minn 

Hjelle, Bernhard C Decorah la ... . 

Iverson, Ingvald Toronto S. D. . 

Kilness, Bennie A Dell Rapids S. D . . 

Losen, Jones Decorah la ... . 

*Madson, Norman Arthur Manitowoc Wis. . . 

Mevig, Andreas L M Lake Park Minn . 

Moe, Leonard A Decorah la ... . 

Monson, Albert Delhi Minn . 

♦Mpller, Gustav Emil Tell Wis... 

♦Nesset, .Alfred Olevius Decorah la ... . 

Norgaard, James R Big Grove Minn . 

Opheim, James Oliver Bode la ... . 

Overn, Orlando E. A Albert Lea Minn . 

Peterson, Enoch E McHenry N. D. . 

Peterson, Francis E Clarkston Idaho. 

Prescott, Abner Deerfield Wis. . . 

Preus, Wilhelm C Minneapolis Minn . 

Reishus, Knut P. B Stanley Wis. . . 

Revne, H. Gerhard M Locust la ... . 

*Rognlien, Joseph Bernhard . . Strum Wis. . . 

Rosenqvist, Bernhard Baldwin Wis. . . 

Sjobakken, John O Adams Minn . 

Shervem, Henry O Parkland Wash 

Snortum, Carl Adams Minn . 

Sperati, Paolo H Decorah la ... . 

Storre, John S Kensett la ... . 

Thingvold, Elmer Hesper. la ... . 

Thompson, Julian S Barnesville Minn . 

Tobiason, Carl S Hatton N. D. . 

*Tufte, Olaf Brandt Grand Forks N. D.. 

Tweet, Charlie O Sattre la ... . 

Urness, John N Saude la . . .•. 

♦Vaaler. Knut Bernhard Twin Valley Minn . 

Vlvisaker, Lauritz S St. Paul Minn . 



1905-08 

1905-06 

1905-06 

1905-09 A. B.. 1909 

1905-09 A. B.. 1909 

1905-06 

1905-07 

1905-06. 1908-09 

1905-09 A. B., 1909 

1905-09 A. B.. 1909 

1905-06 

1905-08 

1905-13 A. B.. 1913 

1905-07 

1905-06 

1905-08 

1905-06, 1907-09 

1905-08 

1905-07, 1909-11 

1905-09 A. B., 1909 



. 1906-07 

. 1906-07 

.1906-10 

.1906-12 

.1906-10 

.1906-10 A. B.. 1910 

1906-1,3 A. B.. 1913 

1906-12 

1 906-09 

1906-10 A. B., 1910 

. 1906-09 

1 906-09 

1906-07 ■.-. 

. 1906-09 

. 1906-08 

1906-11 A. B., 1911 

.1906-09 A. B., 1909 

.1906-12 A. B., 1912 

.1906-10 A. B., 1910 

.1906-08 

. 1906-13 A. B., 1913 

.1906-11 A. B.. 1911 

.1906-07 

. 1906-07 

.1906-12 A. B., 1912 

.1906-09 A. B., 1909 

.1906-07 

.1906-13 A. B., 1913 

.1906-09 A. B., 1909 

.1906-09 

.1906-10 A. B., 1910 

.1906-09 A. B., 1909 

.1906-08 

1906-09 A. B.. 1909 

. 1 906-07 

.1906-12, 1913-15. .A. B., 1915 

. 1906-07 

. 1906-07 

. 1906-07 

1 906-09 

. 1906-10 A. B.. 1910 

.1906-08 

.1906-14 A. B., 1914 

.1906-10 A. B., 1910 

.1906-10 A. B., 1910 



1907-1908 

Aanestad, Otto Herbert Garret son S. D . 1907-12. 

Anderson. Elmer Minn . . . 1907-08 . 

Bersie. Arthur Melvin Spring Grove Minn . . . 1907-09 . 



ATTENDANCE 243 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Bidne, Joseph Peder Locust la 1907-1 1 

Birkelo, Rasmus C Colton S. D 1907-09, 1911-13 

Burtness, Austin Spring Grove Minn . . . 1907-08 

Christiansen, Ole Crookston Minn. . .1907-09 

Dahl, Wilhelm P Gayville S. D 1907-09, 1910-12. .A. B., 1912 

Ellison, Edwin Orlando Minoc N. D 1907-09 

Espeland, Nels Christopher. . .Waterville la 1907-10 

Estenson, Emil Menomonie Wis 1907-11 A. B., 1911 

Fiaskerud, Joseph O Decorah la 1907-10 

Fosmark, Carl Flandreau S. D 1907-08 

Gilbertson, Carl N Portland N. D... .1907-09 

Granseth, Edwin Bode la 1907-12 

Grimley, Peter Oliver B Portland N. D 1907-11 A. B., 1911 

Gulbrandson, Cleon D Albert Lea Minn... .1907-13 A. B., 1913 

Hanson, Herbert C St. Paul Minn . . . 1907-10 

Hegg. Elmer Robert Blair Wis 1907-11 A. B., 1911 

*Henderson, Elmer A Lake Mills la 1907-09 

Hoel, Harry Canby Minn . . . 1907-08 

Jacobson, Waldemar Albert. . .Waterville la 1907-11 

Johnson, Harold Morris Minn . . . 1907-08 

Johnsrud, Peter L Spring Grove Minn . . . 1907-09 

Jonnson, B. C N. D... .1907-08 

Kiel, Albert Lauritz Calmar la 1907-12 

Kirkeby, G. W Decorah la 1907-08 

♦Larson, Victor Ferdinand Cambridge Wis 1907-11 A. B., 1911 

Larson, Wallace Decorah la 1907-08 

Leikvold, Theodore Waterville la 1907-08 

Leland, Oscar Ontario Wis 1907-08 

*Livdahl, Albert N Hickson N. D.. . .1907-11 A. B., 1911 

*Losen, Carl Decorah la 1908-16 A. B., 1916 

Moller, Arnold Henrik Tell Wis 1907-08 

Narum, Selmer H Waterville la 1907-13 

Neprud, Alt" Westby Wis 1907-12 

Nestos, Peter Minot N. D 1907-09 

Onsgard, Henry A Edgerton Wis 1907-11 A. B.. 1911 

Ordahl, Martin Colton S. D 1907-08 

Peterson, Elmer A Brandt S. D 1907-09 

Preus, Rudolph Westby Wis 1907-08 

Preus, Vernick Westby Wis 1907-08 

*Quill, Martin Bertinius Sauk Center Minn . . . 1907-1 1 A. B., 191 1 

Quinnell, Johan Spring Grove Minn . . . 1907-10 

Reishus, George A Minot N. D. . . . 1907-09 

Reishus, Selmer W Minot N. D 1907-10 

Risendal, Ole Stillwater Minn . . . 1907-08 

*Risty, Edward Sioux Falls S. D 1907-08 

Rossing, Andrew Clifford Bode la 1907-12 

Seines, Edgar J Spring Grove Minn . . . 1907-09 

Simley, Irvin T Portland N. D.. . .1907-11 A. B.. 1911 

Snartemo, Ingvald I Canton S. D . . . . 1907-09 

Solem, Kasper Brandt S. D 1907-09 

Storla, Theodore Decorah la 1907-08 

Thorpe, Olaf Christian Willmar Minn. . .1907-11 A. B., 1911 

Trulson, Theodore Orfordville Wis 1907-08 

Trytten, John M Albert Lea Minn. . .1907-11 A. B., 1911 

*Ulvilden, Reinhardt Sioux Falls S. D 1907-13 A. B., 1913 

Wallace, Enok Arnold Spring Grove Minn . . . 1907-08 

Wennes, Peter Spring Grove Minn . . . 1907-09 

Wollan, Casper I Glenwood Minn. . .1907-11 A. B., 1911 

Wollan, Holger W Glenwood Minn . . . 1907-09 

1908-1909 

Aaby, Arthur Oliver Hayfield Minn. . .1908-12 A. B., 1912 

Anderson, Truman C Highlandville la 1908-11 

♦Andrews, Melvin O Mayvillc N. D.. . .1908-14 A. B., 1914 

Birkelo, Carl P Ferryville Wis 1908-13, 1914-1 7.. A. B., 1917 

Blegen, John Alfred Decorah la 1908-11 

*Borlaug. Arthur Oliver Calmar la 1908-14 A. B., 1914 

Brunsdale, C. Norman Portland N. D... .1908-13 A. B.. 1913 

Brunsdale, G. Elmer Portland N. D.. . . 1908-13 A. B., 1913 

Burtness, Britton Orfordville Wis 1908-13 

Carsrud, Jens Colton S. D 1908-09 

Clave, Clarence O Ottosen la 1908-10 

*Foss, Carl L Everett Wash. . .1908-12 A. B., 1912 

Fulsaas, Sigurd Martin Newman Grove .... Neb .... 1908-09 



244 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Gilbertson, Albert H Portland N. D . . ..1908-09 

Gjerset, Maurice Decorah la 1908-09, 1910-12, 

1913-15, 1919 

Gorder. Lester W Decorah la 1908-15 A. B., 1915 

Grindcland, Ingolf A Warren Minn. . .1908-10 

Grinna, OHver Alexander Decorah la 1908-10 

Halvorson, Clarence Julian. . St. Olaf la 1908-10 

Halvorson, Elmer Decorah la 1908-09 

Hansen. Carl M Kensett la 1908-12 A. B., 1912 

Hanson, Olaf Decorah la 1908-09 

Haugen, Donald James Decorah la . . 1908-16 A. B., 1916 

Hendricks. Herbert N Ferryville Wis 1908-12 

Hjelle, Walter G Decorah la 1908-10 

Hovde, Brynjolf J Wittenberg Wis 1908-10, 191 2-16.. A. B.. 1916 

Iverson, Elmer Oliver Decorah la 1908-12 

Jenson, Clarence Edgerton Wis 1908-09 

♦Johnshoy, Joseph Walter Starbuck Minn . . . 1908-1 1 A. B., 1911 

Johnson, Herman Carl De Forest Wis 1908-09 

Johnson, Justus Hartwick. . . .De Forest Wis 1908-10 

Josvanger, Benjamin Decorah la 1908-09 

Korsrud, August O Decorah la 1908-09 

Lane. Reinhard A Highlandville la 1908-10 

Larson, Einar Roger Wausau Wis 1908-15 A. B., 1915 

Losen, Philip Decorah la 1908-13 

Luros, Floyd T Crary N. D.. . . 1908-12 

Lynne, Alfred Norman Elbow Lake Minn . . . 1908-09 

Molland, Gerhard Wis 1908-09 

*Narum, Hartvig Karensius... .Waterville la 1908-10, 1911-17. .A. B.. 1917 

Olson. Clifford Decorah la 1908-09 

Opstad, Iver A Parkland Wash. . .1908-11 A. B.. 1911 

*Orting, Einar Albert N. Bryn . Decorah la 1908-09 

Paulson, Simeon G Forest City la 1908-09, 1911-13 

Peterson, Frank Wm Bellingham Wash. . .1908-09 

Peterson, Helmer Highlandville la 1908-09 

Preus, Herman A Decorah la 1908-16 A. B.. 1916 

Qualset, Olaf Newman Grove .... Neb 1908-09 

Reppen, Nels Oliver Dane Wis 1908-09 

Seines, Edwin Robert Decorah la 1908-16 A. B.. 1916 

Severson, Elmer Oliver Humboldt S. D 1908-12 

Sorlien. Oscar Conrad Bode la 1908-12 

*Storaasli. Gynther Tacoma Wash. . .1908-11 A. B., 1911 

Storstad, Alfred G Horace N. D... .1908-12 A. B., 1912 

Waller. Theodore A Spring Valley Wis 1908-10 

nVanberg, Richard Theodore. .Benson Minn. . .1908-14 A. B.. 1914 

Wold, Harry St. Olaf la 1908-09 

Wollan, Winfred A Glenwood Minn. . .1908-12 A. B., 1912 

1909-1910 

*Aaberg, Theodore Parkland Wash. . .1909-11 A. B.. 1911 

Anderson. Conrad Arthur Colton S. D 1909-17 A. B., 1917 

Bakke, Orlando Decorah la 1909-12 

Brunsdale. Kristian Edward. .. Portland N. D 1909-14 A. B., 1914 

Bruvold. Oscar A Decorah la 1909-10 

Busness, Otinus M Waterville la 1909-12, 1913-14. 

1915-16 

Eide. Alvin Clyde Lee Ill 1909-10 

Erickson, Arentz J Bode la 1909-14 

*Forseth, Peder C Amherst Wis 1909-13 A. B.. 1913 

Hanson, Claudie B Decorah la 1909-10 

Hanson, Marcus Edward Decorah la 1909-13 

Henderson, Gustav Cresco la 1909-14 

*Hexom, Wilhelm Theodore. . .Decorah la 1909-17 A. B., 1917 

Holter, Arthur M Wildrose N. D.. . .1909-17 A. B.. 1917 

Hope, Carl Nerstrand Minn . . . 1909-10 

Johnson, Harry P Decorah la 1909-11 

Kjos. Selmer E Viroqua Wis 1909-17 

*Kjaer, Ludvig Peder (Kjer).. . .Amherst Jet Wis 1909-13 A. B.. 1913 

Knutson, Carl S Belview Minn. . .1909-13 A. B., 1913 

Larsen, Gustav A. C Decorah la 1909-14 

Lee. Arthur O Decorah la 1909-17 A. B.. 1917 

Lillechun. Andres Decorah la 1909-10 

♦Lono (Lone). Mikkel Nunda S. D 1909-17 A. B.. 1917 

Moe. Guy Enoch Decorah la 1909-12 

Monson, Herman W Kindred N. D.. .. 1909-11, 1912-14.. A. B., 1914 



ATTENDANCE 245 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Myrland, Ingvald R Albert Lea Minn . . . 1909-1 1 

Natvig, Arthur S Cresco la 1909-17 A. B., 1917 

Nelson. David T Mayville N. D... .1909-12 A. B., 1912 

Olsen, Edwin Reuben Stillwater Minn. . .1909-11 

Olsen, Ralph Norman Stillwater Minn.. . .1909-13 

Opheim, Carl VVm Bode la 1909-11 

Opsahl, Julian Eberhard Decorah la 1909-16 A. B., 1916 

Overstad, Arthur Glenwood Minn . . . 1909-12 

*Petersen, Justin Axel Manistique. . .• Mich... .1909-13 A. B., 191.^ 

♦Peterson, Henry John Minneapolis Minn. . .1909-14 

*Rahn, Grant Ormy Gustus.. . . Belview Minn. . .1909-13 A. B., 1913 

Ramsey, Johan Alfred Decorah la 1909-11 

Rea, Clarence Hamilton Texas. . . 1909-10 

Reishus, Fritjof E Stanley Wis 1909-13 A. B., 1913 

Ringlee, Emil Binford N D.... 1909-12 

Ruste, Lauritz Montrose S. D 1909-11 

Scott, Andrew Cresco la 1909-10 

Soland, Enibret Decorah la 1909-12 

Stensby, Tlieodore Valley City N. D 1909-16 A. B., 1916 

Stinson, Clarence Bennie Cresco la 1909-10, 1911-12 

Swensen, Walter J Decorah la 1909-16 A. B., 1916 

Thorsen, H. Adolph Byron Minn. . .1909-13 

Weeks, Otto W Rochelle Ill 1909-11, 1912-13 

Wennes, Edgar R Spring Grove Minn. . .1909-10 

Wold, John Bertram Hesper la 1909-10 

Woldum, Hitmen Morris Decorah la 1909-12 

1910-1911 

Aamodt, Oscar Barnesville Minn. . . 1910-12 

♦Austin, Casper M Colton S. D 1910-16 

Berrum, Gerhard L Holmen Wis 1910-15 

Bjorgo, Victor B Red Wing Minn. . .1910-14 

Bredesen, Osuld Torrison Deerfield Wis 1910-13 

Brevig, Martin Leo Sacred Heart Minn. . .1910-16 A. B., 1916 

Collin, Sam Gilbert Sacred Heart Minn. . .1910-13, 1915-16 

Digness, Agnar B Grand Forlcs N. D 1910-12 

Doely, Sivert Helmer Spring Grove Minn . . . 1910-11 

Ericlcson, Elmer Devils Lake N. D 1910-12 

*Gigstad, Walter T Valders Wis 1910-14. 

Gilbertson. Theodore Portland N. D... .1910-12, 

*Grefthen, Emil Alexander Northwood la 1910-14 . 

*Greibrok, Aanon Parkland Wash. . .1910-12. 

*Halvorson, Elmer Nestor Rockdale Wis 1910-14. 

♦Hansen, Helmer Johan Chicago Ill 1910-13 

Hanson, John Tillman Lignite N. D.. .. 1910-18 A. B., 1918 

Helgeson, Henry Alfred Waukon la 1910-14, 1915-17 

Iverson, Clarence Tony Roland la 1910-12 

Johnson, Joseph M Colton S. D . . 

Johnson, Paul G Spring Grove Minn . 

Kilness, Gideon Waldemar W.Dell Rapids S. D. . 

Kraabel, Ragnar E Clifford N. D. . 

Kraabel, Torger Oswold Cliflford N. D. , 

Kvaase, Gustav Johan Menomonie Wis 1910-13, 1914-15 

Kvam, Julien Alf S Rice Lake Wis 1910-15 

Larson, Randall J Minot N. D 1910-11 

Levorson, Oscar Lake Mills la 1910-14 A. B., 1914 

Linjer, Edgar Edward Minneapolis Minn . . . 1910-12 

♦Loftness, George O Gjbbon Minn. . . 1911-14 

Loven, Carl Alfred Waukon la 1910-14 

Mehl, Oscar Irvin Ribbing Minn . . . 1910-12 

Mossing, Granville M Beldenville Wis 1910-13 

Natvig, Alvin JuUus Cresco la 1910-18 A. B., 1918 

Nordvik, Sigvald Alliance Neb. . . .1910-11 

Olafson, Clarence Mandt Duluth Minn. . .1910-17 A. B., 1917 

Petersen, Ralph W Chicago Ill 1910-12 

Preus, Otto Hjort Minneapolis Minn . . . 1910-12 

Ramsland, Arvid Westby Wis 1910-13 

Riveness, Joseph Bode la 1910-11 

Ronning, Russell E Minneapolis Minn. . .1910-12 

Saue, Sam O Montevideo Minn. .. 1910-11 

Sauer, Arnold G Glenville Minn. . .1910-15 A. B., 1915 

Selland, Casper Roy Decorah la 1910-12 

Shefloe, Silas Hoffman Minn. . .1910-11 

Stabo, Nils Eivind Decorah la 1910-16 



A. 


B., 


1914 


1913-16.. A. 


B., 


1916 


A. 


B., 


1914 


A. 


B., 


1912 


A. 


B., 


1914 



1910-18. . . . 


A. 


B., 


1918 


1910-16. . . . 


A. 


B., 


1916 


1910-16. . . . 


A. 


B., 


1916 


1910-16 


A. 


B., 


1916 


1910-15. . . . 


A. 


B., 


1915 



246 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Student 



Post Office 



State 



Years at 
Luther College Graduation 



Streeter, Elmer Melvin La Crosse Wis 1910-17 

Subey, Ward A Stoughton Wis 1910-11 

Swansen, H. Fred Boston Mass.. . . 1911-14 

Swanson, Leonard O Clifford N. D.. . .1910-16 

Syvertson, Sam Amherst Wis 1910-13 

Thoen, Ellert A Kensett la 1910-13 

Thollehaug, Oscar Kristian . . . Decorah la 1910-1 J 

Thompson, Thomas A Chicago Ill 1910... 

♦Thorpe, Nordahl Brun Willmar .• Minn. . . 1910-14 

Waage. Johannes Neilsville Wis 1911-18 

*Waage. Knud Olav Neilsville Wis 1911-18 

Wisness, Arthur M Hickson N. D.. . .1910-14 

1911-1912 

Alfsen, Arthur Edwin Manitowoc Wis 1911-l.S . 

*Baalson, Elmer A Brooten Minn . . . 1911-15 . 

Baalson, George A Brooten Minn.. .1911-15. 

Bakke, William Arthur Gibbon Minn ...1911-13. 

Ballestad, Adolph Theodore.. .Walcott N. D.. . 1911-13. 

Bergan, Knute W Sacred Heart Minn . . .1911-15. 

*Blv (Bleie), Henry Severin 

(Severt) Colton S. D 1911-17. 

Borreson, Arthur Edwin VictorStoughion Wis 1911-14. 

Brandt, Walther I Macfarland Wis 1911-15. 

Dahl, Hilbert Stephen Cottonwood Minn ...1911-13. 

Edwards, Thomas D Callender la 1911-12 . 

Elvehjem, Oswald M Macfarland Wis 1911-15 . 

Erickson, Albert Whitehall Wis 1911-15. 

Erickson, John Monroe River Falls Wis 1911-14 

*Evans, Leif Erling Westby Wis 1911-17. 

Evanson, Carl J Portland N. D.. 1911-12. 

Evanson, Chellis N Decorah la 1911-18. 

Fjelstul, Henry J Ridgeway la 1911-13 . 

Flatland, Ole Albert Ridgeway la 1911-13. 



A. B., 1917 
A. B., 1915 
A. B., 1914 
A. B., 1916 



A. B., 1914 
A. B., 1918 
A. B., 1918 
A. B., 1914 



A. B.. 1915 
A. B., 1915 



A. B., 1915 



.A. B., 1915 



A. B., 1915 
A. B., 1915 



A. B., 1917 
!a. B., 1918 



Forde, Ralph Sigurd Starbuck Minn . 

Hallan, Elmer Leander Spring Grove Minn . 



1911-15. 
.1911-13, 

1921- . 
.1911-14. 

1911-17. 
. 1911-14. 
.1911-14. 
.1911-15. 
.1911-13. 



1914-15, 



Halvorson, Alfred Oscar Brandt S. D. . 

*Hansen, Harold Chicago Ill ... . 

Haroldson, Carl Abner Davis 111. . . . 

Harstad, Oliver Bern hard .... Parkland Wash . 

Hauan, John Marcus Mayville N. D. . 

Haugen, Elmer A Pelican Rapids Minn . 

Hegg, Joseph Gerhard Decorah la 1911-14 

Helvig, Abel J Roland la 1911-17 

*Hoff. Pernell Belford Norse Texas.. .1911-15 

Holkesvik, Orlando Alexander. Decorah la 1911-13 

Hove, Walter G Flandreau . .S. D 1911-13 

Jacobson, Theodore G Waterville la 1911-12, 1913-15. 

*Jenson, Canute Thorvald Cranfill's Gap Texas. . . 191 1-14 

Jorgenson, Eugene Ferdinand . Bode la 1911-17 

Kinseth, Floyd Leslie Bode la 1911-15 

*Kraabel, Alf McKinley Clifford N. D.. .. 1911-17 

Lee, Carl Alfonso Bellingham Wash. . .1911-12 

*Lee, Clarence Louis St. Paul Minn . . . 191 1-17 

Lee, Hans Cambridge la 1911-15 

Lewis, Raymond Macfarland Wis 1911-12 

Loberg, Jesse Dewey Nelsonville Wis., . . . 1911-15 

Lokensgaard, Herbert O Hanley Falls Minn . . . 191 1-15 

Lysne, Henry Oliver Amherst Jet Wis 1911-15 

♦Mithun, Odd Johan Glenwood Minn. ..1911-15 

Moen, Gerald Berthold Waukon la 1911-12 

Nelson, Charles Edward Fergus Falls Minn ... 1911-12 

Nilson, Martin Jul Litchfield Neb. .. .1911-17 

*Nordby, Herman Preus Lee Ill 191 1-14 

Ofstedahl, John Walter F Wis 1911-12 

Olson, Levi Thor la 1911-13 



A. B., 1917 
A. B., 1914 



A. B., 1915 



A. B., 1917 



A. B.. 1917 
A. B., 1917 



A. B., 1915 
A. B., 1915 
A. B., 1915 
A. B., 1915 



Opsahl, Hubert Theophile . 



. Decorah la. 



Ormseth, Eddie Cliristian Farwell Minn 

Peterson, Axel Glen Rutland la . . . 

Peterson, Edwin W Astoria S. D. 

Ramberg, Freeman E Whitehall Wis 1911-12, 191.?- 16.. A. B., 1916 

Kamberg, Otto Kenneth Calmar la 1911-12 



.1911-13 
1919- 

.1911-14 
1911-15 
1911-12 



, 1915-17. 

11 A. B., 1922 

, 1915-16 



ATTENDANCE 247 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Rholl, Lewis Fertile la 1911-12 

*Rohne. John Magnus Cranfill's Gap Texas. .1911-12, 1913-1 7.. A. B., 1917 

♦Romness. Henry R Belgrade Minn. . .1911-15 A. B., 1915 

Ronnei, Herman Leonard Starbuck Minn . . . 1911-16 A. B., 1916 

Rood, Paul Gerhard Waukon la 1911-12 

Rorge, Selmer Conrad Stoughton Wis 1911-13 

Rosby, Thorvald Farwell Minn. . .1911-13 

*Rosenqvist, Rolf Baldwin Wis 1911-16 A. B., 1916 

Rotto, Martin Artliur Farwell Minn. . . 1911-13 

*Rotto, Theodore Imar Farwell Minn. . .1911-17 A. B., 1917 

Sanden, Austin Fertile la 1911-14 

Seebach, Carl Henry Red Wing Minn. . .1911-15 A. B., 1915 

Siqueland, Harald Chicago Ill 1911-20. . A. B., 1920 

Svenningsen (Swenumson) 

Thos. Nikolai Lawler la 191 1-14 

Thorgrinisen, Gudmund 

G. C. J Grand Forks N. D.. .1911-12, 1914-17. .A. B., 1917 

Tingelstad, Edvin Silverton Ore 1911-17 A. B., 1917 

♦Topness, Sibert M Lanesboro Minn . . . 1911-15 A. B., 1915 

Ylvisaker, Herman L Mayville N. D... .1911-15 A. B.. 1915 

1912-1913 

Amble, John Lawler la 1912-13 

Anderson, Leonard Waterville la 1912-13 

Arneson, .•\rthur H Chicago Ill 1912-20 A. B., 1920 

Askegaard, Arthur C Comstock Minn. . .1912-16 A. B., 1916 

Askegaard, Arthur D Comstock Minn. . .1912-15 A. B., 1915 

Buslee, Clarence Irving Balfour N. D.. .. 1912-15, 1916-17 

eleven, Isak Arkdale Wis 1912-13 

Dehli, Palmer O Harper's Fcrrv la 1912-13 

Dohlen, Hjalmar Olaus Morris Minn . . . 1912-16 A. B., 1916 

Ellison, William Johan Minot N. D.. 1912-13 

Faltinson, Gilbert Marengo la 1912-13 

Fauchald, Melvin Minot N. D.. .. 1912-13 

Findahl, Norman Th Vermilion S. D . . 1912-16 

Flom, Theodore A Garv Minn . . . 1912-16 

Gaard, Conrad Parkland Wash ... 19] 2-13 

Halvorson, Nelius Ove Spring Grove Minn. . .1912-16, 1917-21. .A. B., 1921 

Hanson, Helmer A Bode la 1912-14 

Haroldson, John R Davis Ill 1912-15 

Helle, Ole Lake Mills. la 1912-14 

Hildahl, Norman Decorah la 1912-13 

Hilleboe, Selmer Conrad Minot N. D.. .1912-13 

Hilleboe, Sigur Herbert. Decorah la 1912-17 

Hoel, Milnor Omar Canbv Minn ... 1912-13 

Jacobson, Irenus C Wittenberg Wis 1912-16 A. B., 1916 

Jargo, Rudolph Alexander. . Deerfield Wis 1912-17 A. B., 1917 

Johnson, Lester J South Amana la 1912-15 

Kloster, Elmer A Ossian la 1912-13 

Kvale, Paul Johann Orfordville Wis 1912-13, 1914-1 7.. A. B., 1917 

Larsen, William O Linn Grove la 1912-13 

Larson, William John St. Paul Minn ... 1912-15 

Lee, Adrian Isaac Dexter Minn. .. 1912-17 

Lee, Morton A Stoughton Wis 1912-13 

Lee, Orlando Theobald Newhouse Minn . . . 1912-17 

*Leque, Nils Magnus Bellingham Wash. .1912-16 A. B., 1916 

Lien, Jacob Aall Ottesen Portland N. D.. . .1912-17 A. B., 1917 

Linde, Jolian Napset Cambridge Wis 1912-15, 1916-18 

Linde, John Theodore Plaza N. D.. .. 1912-17 

Lunde, Alert Johannes Hills Minn. . .1912-18, 1921 ... A. B., 1918 

Lunde, Herman A. P. Hills Minn. . .1912-18 A. B., 1918 

*Maakestad, John Walter 

Bernhard Sutton's Bav Mich.. . 1912-15 A. B., 1915 

Mikkelson, Carl Francis Arkdale Wis 1912-15 

Miller, Fred La Crosse Wis 1912-16, 1918 

Nelson, Earl S Mayville N. D.... 1912-13 

Nelson, Martin Johan De Forest Wis 1912-16 A. B., 1916 

Olson, Nels Lake Mills la 1912-13 

Opheim, Edwin F Bode la 1912-13 

Ostlund, Oscar Martin Duncombe la 1912-14 

Qualley, Orlando Warren Ridgeway la 1912-18, 1918 A. B.. 1918 

Rosheim, Knut Scarville la 1912-13 

Rosholdt, Herman S Centergrove Minn. . .1912-13 A. B., 1913 

Scarvie, Stanley M Decorah la 1912-16, 1917-18 



248 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Student 



Post Office 



Years at 
Luther College Graduation 



Solberg, Carsten Portland N. D 1912-13. 

Sperati, Olaf Angelo Decorah la 1912-16. 

♦Thompson, Oscar C Lake Mills la 1912-14. 



Torgerson, Thorvald John .... Boston Mass.. 

Trytten, Merriam H Albert Lea Minn. . 

Twito. Helmer Scarville la 

♦Ulvilden, George Sioux Kails S. D . . . 

Vangsnes, Olav Colton S. D . . . 

♦Ylvisaker, Johan Fritjof Zumbrota Minn . . 

1913-1914 

Aaberg, Joseph Parkland Wash . 

*Amundson, Alfred Heglund . . . Georgeville Minn. 

*Anders?n, Andrew Peter . . R itland la 

Anderson, Andy Balfour N. D.. 

Anderson, Elvin Walter Hills Minn . 

Clave, James Elmer Ottosen la ... . 



1912-17. 
.1912-16. 
. 1912-16. 
.1912-16. 
.1912-13. 
.1912-16. 



.191.3-17. 
.1913-17. 
1913-17. 
.191.3-14. 
.1913-17, 
.191.5-14. 



A. B.. 1916 
.A. B., 1916 
A. B., 1916 



A. B., 1916 



.A. B.. 1917 

A. B., 1917 

.A. B., 1917 



Clave, Ole Leonard Ottosen la 1913-14 




FACULTY AND STUDENTS AT LUTHER COLLEGE, 1915 



Christensen, Adam H La Crosse. Wis 1913-15 

Dahl, Ingvald Arnold Gayville S. D 1913-14 

Dolven, Oswald E Morris Minn ... 1913-14 

Fadness, Noel Grant Poynette Wis 1913-17 

Fjeldstad. Gustav A Wells Minn. . . 191.5-16 

Fossuin, Henry Spring Grove Minn . . . 1913-14 

Gauper, Harold A De Soto Wis 1913-16. . 

Gulbrandson, Fremont Albert Lea. Minn . . . 1913-14. . 

Hanson, Abel Oliver Meridian Texas. . . 1913-17 . . 

Hanson, William Michigan N. D.. . . 1913 

Hegg, Ferdinand Decorah la 1913-14. . 

.1913-15.. 

.1913-17. . 

.1913-19. . 
1913-16. . 

.191.3-16. . 



1918-22. .A. B., 1922 
A. B., 1916 



.A. B., 1917 



Jacobson, Milton A Luverne Minn . 

Jetson, John Maurice Spring Grove Minn . 

Johnson, Bernhard A Spring Grove Minn . 

Johnson, Frantz William New York N. Y. . 

Johnson, John Alfred St. Paul Minn . 

Johnson. Oscar Leslie West Salem Wis 1913-17 A. B., 1917 

Jordahl, Harald Conrad Ridgeway la 191,3-16, 1917-20.. A. B., 1920 

Jorgenson, Alph Lorentz Montevideo Minn . . . 1913-17 

Kiland, Edwin F Willmar Minn. . .1913-17 

Knutson, Walter M Willmar Minn . . . 1913-17 

Landswerk, Eddie Cresco la 1913-14 

Losen, Alfred Ryalen Decorah la 1913-15. 1918 . . . 

Losen, Carl Arthur Locust la 1913-14, 1915-16. 



A. B., 1919 



.A. B., 1917 
.A. B., 1917 



Lovik, Louis Thorval Scarville la 1913-17 . . 



A. B., 1917 



ATTENDANCE 



249 



Student 



Post Office 



State 



Years at 
Luther College Graduation 



*Moe, Sigurd Melvin Montevideo Minn . . . 1913-17 

Nelson, G. Palmer Meridian Wis 1913-16 

Nelson, Ole Alfred Hartland Minn. . .1913-17 

Olsen, Arthur Callander la 1913-14 

Olsen, Thorbjorn Erling Chicago Ill 1913-14 

Olson, Tharlie Oliver Litchfield Minn. . .1913-17 

Opheim, Henry Hills Minn . . . 1913-15 

Opstedahl, Edward Ridgevifay la 1913-14 

Ottersen, Hjalmar Rudolph. .West Salem Wis 1913-15 

Preus. (Ove) Jacob Hjort Minneapolis Minn. . .1913-17 

*Reinertson, Tobias Christian. .Hazard Neb. . . .1913-17 

Rossing, Torstein Harald Decorah la 1913-20 

Rynning, Lars Edgar Tacoma Wash . . .1913-16 

Sampson, Benjamin Oliver. . Elbow Lake Minn . . .1913-16 

Sampson, Samuel Clifton Elbow Lake Minn. . .1913-15 

Scarvie, Walter Bernard Decorah la 1913-20 

Sihler, Ernest George Wm. . . .Decorah la 1913-21 

SoUien, Johannes Spring'iGrove Minn. . . 1913-16 

Stenstrand, Alfred Clermont la 1913-14 

Stoen, Charles Gifford Locust la 1913-16, 

*Strandjord, Selmer HaagensonBelview Minn. . . 1913-14 





.A. 


B. 


1917 




A. 


B. 


1917 






.A. 


B. 


1917 








.A. 


B. 


1917 




A. 


B. 


1920 






, 1917-18 


A. 
A. 


B. 
B. 


1920 
1921 




, 1917-22. 


-A. 


B. 


1922 




FACULTY AND STUDENTS AT LUTHER COLLEGE, 1915 



Talle, Henry Oscar Albert Lea Minn . 

Thompson, Edson Jennings. . . Kentwood La. . . . 

*Tolo, Gudvin Walther Belgrade Minn . 

Wierson, Andrew Theodore . . . Roland la ... . 

*Ylvisaker, Carl Berthold St. Paul Minn. 

1914-1915 



Albert son, Levi Leland la ... . 

Anderson, Carl Austin Colton S. D . . 

Arvesen, Alfred N St. Olaf la ... . 

Bronstad, Alvin L Clifton Texas. 

Brunsdale, Karl Henry Portland N. D. . 

Christopherson, Fred Toronto S. D. . 

Clauson, Herman N Colton S. D . . 

Clauson, Olaf L Colton S. D. . 

Ellertsen, Bernt John Hayward Minn . 

Ferestad, Arthur O East Grand Forks. .Minn. 

Fjelstul, Clarence Ridgeway la ... . 

Granner, Walter A Toronto S. D. . 

Hamre, Adolph Johan Granite Falls Minn . 

Henryson, Ernest Jewel Story City la ... . 



.1913-17. 
.1913-16. 
.1913-17. 
.1913-18. 
.1913-17. 



A. B 

A. ' B 
A. B 
A. B 



1917 
1918 
1917 



.1914-17 

.1914-15, 1918-22. .A. B., 1922 

.1914-18 

.1914-17, 1919 A. B., 1919 

.1914-17 

.1914-15 

.1914-16 

.1914-16, 1919-20, 

1921- 

.1914-15 

1914-15 

1914-18, 1919- 

,1914-15 

,1914-15 

1914-16 



250 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Years at 
Student Post Oflfice State Luther College Graduation 



Hovden, Edward Selmer Decorah la 1914- 

Hove, Oliver Malven Albert Lea Minn. . .1914-15 

Jacobson, Paul Benjamin Decorah la 1915-22 A. B.. 1922 

Kvammen, Elmer John Decorah la 1914-15, 191 7-22.. A. B., 1922 

Larsen, L'lrik Laurentius Lake Park Minn . . . 1914-15 

Lee, Gi?le John Thompson la 1914-16, 1919-21. ..\. B., 1918 

Lee, Peter Joseph Elbow Lake Minn. . . 1914-18 A. B.. 1921 

Lee, Ruben H. VV Northwood la 1914-15 

Lerdal, Joseph Sherman S. D . . . 1914-17 

Linn, Benj. Harrison Hope N. D 1914-15 

Miller. Carl Juel Elma la 1914-17 

Nelson, Martin Postville la 1914-15 

Nelson, Olaf Gayville S. D 1914-18 A. B., 1918 

Nyhus, Bernt T Portland N. D.. . . 1914-15 

Olafson, Otto Adolph West Duluth Minn. . .1914-15 

Peterson, Arthur H Astoria S. D 1914-15 

Ravndal, Christian Magelssen. Constantinople Turkey. . 1914-20 A. B., 1920 

Reque, Paul Siegfried Morrisonville Wis 1914-17. 1918-22.. A. B., 1922 

Rickansrud. Torleif M Waukon la 1914-22 A. B., 1922 

Sand, Nanfred Johannes Ossian la 1914-17 

Sorlien, Arne Reidar Bode la 1914-21 A. B., 1921 

Sorlien. Leon Cornelius Bode la 1914-21 .A. B.. 1921 

Sorlien, S. Olvin Bode la 1914-22 A. B.. 1922 

Stalland, Knute D St. Paul Minn. . .1914-18 A. B., 1918 

Stenehjem, John Selmer Spring Grove Minn. . .1914-15 

Storla. Alfred Sevat Decorah la 1914-16 

*Stormo, Carl Alfred Philip S. D 1914-18 A. B., 1918 

Tangen, Otto Ossian la 1914-15 

Tangen, Peder C Ossian la 1914-15 

Tenold, Alvin Lorenzo Northwood la 1914-15 

Thorsen, Olaf Herman Rochester Minn. . . 1914-18 A. B., 1918 

Tolo, Artliur Johann Belgrade Minn. . . 1914-18 A. B., 1918 

Wennes, Nels O Spring Grove Minn ... 1914-15 

1915-1916 

Aamodt, Otis Marvin Spring Vallev Wis 1915-19 .\. B., 1919 

Aanas, Sam Edwin Ossian la 1915-17, 1918 

Abbey, Aaron LeGrande Decorah la 1915- 

Anderson, Myron Henry Highlandville la 1915- 

Arntzen, Edward Jargo Parkland Wash. .. 1915-16 

Arvesen, Henry William .St. Olaf la 1915-16 

Bakke, Milo Barnard Decorah la 1915-19 

Bakke, Vernon Lorenzo Decorah la 1915-17 

Berg, Arthur Hilmen Albert I^a Minn. . . 1915-17 

Bergum, Arthur Edwin Rio Wis 1915-17, 1919-21. .A. B., 1921 

Berven, George Oscar Baltic S. D. ... 1915-16 

Brandt, Christian Frederick. . .St. Paul Minn . . . 1915-16 

Bunde, Lawrence Theo Hartford S. D 1915-17 

Buslee, Lambert Justine Balfour N. D.. .. 1915-16 

Edwards, Oliver Johnson . Madison Wis 1915 

Eggebraaten, Hans Martinus. . Wentworth S. D. . . . 1915-17 

Estrem, William Thorpe Willmar Minn . . . 1915-16 

Fadness. Crystal Ernest Rio Wis 1915-16 

Grevstad, Arne Nicolay Deerfield Wis 1915-16 

Harstad, Ingvald T Parkland Wash. . . 1915-16 

Ingebretson, Adolf Henrik West De Pere Wis 1915-17. 1919- 

Jacobson, Isidor Wittenberg Wis 1915-16. 1918-19, 

1920-21 

Johnson, Josepli Severin Waukon la 1915-16 

Jordahl, Verncr Trvgve Ridgeway la 1915-22 A. B., 1922 

Jorgenson, Victor G Bode la 1915-21 A. B., 1921 

Kaupanger, Olin Leonard Stoughton Wis 191.5-18.1919-20. ..\. B.. 1920 

Knutson. Otto Wm Radcliffe la 1915-16 

Kvale, Ingolf Theodore Orfordville Wis 1915-17 

Larsen, Erling Noer Colfax Wis 1915-22 A. B., 1922 

Lee, Nels Christol Deerfield Wis 1915-17 

Lillehaug. Julius Woonsocket S. D 1915-18 

Livdahl, Vernon Bismarck N. D.. . . 1915-16 

Melaas, Ira Joseph Cresco la 1915-19 A. B., 1919 

Monson, Orville Sigurd Portland N. D.... 1915-19 A. B.. 1919 

Nelson, Allen Edmer Clifton Texas. . . 1915-19 A. B., 1919 

Nelson, Carrol Palmer Clifton Texas. . . 1915-18 

Odden. Arthur Clifford Lake Mills la 1915-16 

Olson, Clayton Melbourne Bode la 1915-21 A. B., 1921 

Opstedahl, Clarence P. K Graet linger la 1915-16 

Parsons. Edward Harold Valley Neb 1915-17, 1920-21. .A. B.. 1921 



ATTENDANCE 251 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Pederson, Wilbert Enormal . . .Morrisonville Wis 1915-17 

Penewell, Stanley Wm. Oliver. Madison Wis 1915-16, 1917-18 

Peterson, Harold Rudolf Starbuck Minn. . . 1915-17 

Peterson, Herman Ernest Hayfield Minn ...1915-16 

Peterson, Melvin Leonard. . . .West Union la 1915-18 

Peterson. Tliomas Hoffland. . .Mose N. D.. . .1915-18 

Rachie, Oscar Knutson Belview Minn. . . 1915-16 

Ravndal, Eric Constantinople Turkey. . 1915-17, 1921- 

Ravndal, Olaf Constantinople Turkey.. 1915-20 A. B., 1920 

Romness, Julius Belgrade Minn . . . 1915-17 

Schjeldahl, Artliur Oliver Highlandville la 1915 

Severson, Marcus Henry Stoughton Wis 1915-16 

Sliefloe, Reuben Eugene Hoffman Minn . . . 1915-16 

Strom, Carl Walther Watson Minn. . .1915-19 A. B., 1919 

Tallakson, Harold .\rthur Willmar Minn . . . 1915-17 

Thompson, Eddie Thorvald P.Colton S. D 1915-17 

Thompson, Maurice Alfred. . ..Albert Lea Minn. . .1915-19 .-X. B.. 1919 

Tollefsrud, Merwin Byron. . . Orfordville Wis 1915-18 .A. B., 1918 

V'aaler, Torvald Twin Valley Minn. . .1915-19 .A.. B., 1919 

\'ig. Edward Enoch Belgrade Minn . . . 1915 

1916-1917 

Brakke, Grant Meloy Kasson Minn . . . 1916-20 

Chandler, Fred .•\ugustus Decorah la 1916-17 

Dolen, Nels Bjorn. Leland la 1916-20 .\. B., 1920 

Ellingson, Abel Rudolph Northwood la. ... . .1916-20 .\. B.. 1920 

Fosniark, Nelvin Bernhard . . Morrisonville Wis 1916-20 

*Gordon, Henrv Truman Thompson la 1917 

Hall, Clarence Gunvald Carpio N. D... .1916-20 

Hallum, Augustus Possum. . . . Redwood Falls Minn . . . 1916-17 

Jensen, Jesse Justin Cranfills' Gap Texas. . . 1916-18 

Juve, Emil Garfield Larsen Wis 1916-17 

Kulaas, Harold Minot N. D.. . .1916- 

Larsen, Mvron Wilbur Whalan Minn. . .1916-19, 1919-20... \. B., 1919 

Larson, Elmer Robert Wausau Wis 1916-20 .\. B., 1920 

Maakestad, Hans Jacob H. . . .Sutton's Bay Mich 1916-17 

Malmin, Gunnar Johannes. . . . Decorah la 1916- 

Malrain, Olaf Gabriel Decorah la 1916-21 .\. B., 1921 

Nash, Albert Waukon la 1916-17 

Nasby, Donald -Asher Bode la 1916-17 

Nelson, Sivert A Gayville S. D 1916-17 

Olson, Walter Andrew Decorah la 1916- 

Opsahl, Alert Mathias Decorah la 1916- 

Peterson, Hamlet Edwin Scarville la 1916-17, 1919-22. ..\. B., 1922 

Reque, Ulrik Hjalmar Morrisonville Wis 1916-17, 1920- 

Savre, Harold Kaspar Decorah la 1916-18, 1920- 

Scarvie, Norman George Decorah la 1916-18 

Sheel, John Fredrick Karl .... Decorah la 1916- 

Solum, Arthur Konrad Story City la 1916-17 

Sorenson, Arnold Clearance. . . Decorah la 1916-17, 1918-20 

Sorenson, Morris AWin Clifton Texas. . . 1916-20 A. B.. 1920 

Sperati, Carlo Vittorio Decorah la 1916-17, 1919- 

Strand, Ahlert Korcn St. Peter Minn. . .1916-17 

Swensen, Alf Waldemar Decorah la 1916-20 A. B., 1920 

Trytten, Gilbert Norman .Albert Lea Minn. . .1916-20 A. B., 1920 

Unseth, Malcolm Wulff Chicago Ill 1916-20 A. B., 1920 

Westrem, Clarence Bendik. . . . Glenville Minn . . . 1916-18 

1917-1918 

Abrahamson, Paul Walter. . Lanesboro Minn. . .1917-18 

Beito, Gynther Rudolph Terrace Minn . . . 1917-21 

Blegen, Clifford Randolph . . Ryegate Mont . . . 1917-18 

Brandvold, Aron John Rembrandt la 1917 

Eddaen, Bernet Syvers Mauston Wis 1917-21 .A.. B., 1921 

Eid, Elmer Sander Wing N. D.. . .1917-21 A. B.. 1921 

Gandrud, Sam. Garfield Kerkhoven Minn . . . 1917-18 

Gjerset, Walter Kveldulv Decorah la 1917-19 

Gjerset, Wendell Beethoven.. Fergus Falls Minn. . .1917 

Gronlid, Isaac Rudolph Waterville la 1917-20 A. B., 1920 

Hagen, Grant Marcus Waterville la 1917-18, 1919- 

Haraldson, Henry Lloyd Rembrandt la 1917-18 

Haugelund, E. Johan Stromme.Christiania Norway. 1917-18 

Hegg, Ralph Norman Decorah la 1917-19 

Hcrmundstad, Emil Bricclyn Minn. . .1917-21 A. B., 1921 



252 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Iverson, Justin Clarence Ridgeway la 1917- 

Losen, George Sexton Decorah la 1917- 

Lund, John Arthur Harmony Minn. . .1917-18 

Lyng, John Frederick Chilson. Minneapolis Minn. . .1917-21 

Maakestad, Norvald GjermundSutton's Bay Mich.. . .1917-21 A. B., 1921 

Martinson, Oscar Melvin Decorah la 1917-18 

Megordcn, Tennis Herbert. .. .Waterville la 1917-20 A. B., 1920 

Nerison, A. Gudmund Norman. Hills Minn. . .1917- 

Oefstedal, Rudolph Chicago Ill 1917-21 A. B., 1921 

Olsen, Henry Erling Manistique Mich.. . . 1917-18 

Osland, Herbert Berger Chicago Ill 1917-19, 1920-21 

Petersen, Walter John Manistique Mich.. . .1917-18 

Qualley, Lawrence Edwin Ridgeway la 1917- 

Ramsev, EUing Eugene Decorah la 1917-20, 1921- 

Rindalil, Opie Selmer Ada Minn. . .1917-21 A. B., 1921 

Seehuus, George Knute Decorah la 1917-21 

Sevatson, William Waukon la 1917- 

Siefken. Carl Hobart Rembrandt la 1917- 

Siefken, Daymond Julius Rembrandt la 1917-18, 1921- 

Skiveness, Albert O Evanston Ill 1917-18 

Sterud, Daniel Hilarius Volga S. D. .. .1917-18 

Sterud, Ole Martin Volga S. D 1917-18 

Storvick, Alfred Otto Albert Lea Minn. . .1917-21 A. B.. 1921 

Storvick, Roy Orlando Albert Lea Minn. ..1917-21 A. B., 1921 

Tollefsrud, Edwin Oswald. . . .Orfordville Wis 1917-22 A. B., 1922 

Tolo, Harald Michael Locust la 1917-21 A. B., 1921 

Wagley, Carl Sylvester Orfordville Wis 1917-19 

Walhus, Maurice Mabel Minn ... 1917-18 

Westby, James Martin Peterson Minn. . .1917-18, 1920- 

Ylvisaker, Johannes Wilhelm. .St. Paul Minn. . .1917-21 A. B., 1921 

Ylvisaker, Ragnvald Sophus. .St Paul Minn. . .1917-20 A. B., 1920 

Ylvisaker, Walther Olaf Fergus Falls Minn. . .1917-22 A. B., 1922 

1918-1919 

Anderson, Elvin Odin Viroqua Wis 1918 

Anderson, Ernest Rocksvold . . Inwood la 1918-20, 1921-. 

Anderson, George Orlando. . . . Inwood la 1918-19 '. 

Anderson, Oliver Everett Durand Ill 1918 

Anfinson, Clarence Ossian la 1918 

Baalson, Arthur Gustavus . . . Brooten Minn. . .1918-22 A. B., 1922 

Bagley, Irving Orville Spring Grove Minn. . .1919-20 

Bakkerud, Alfred Ingvald .... Newman Grove .... Neb ....1918 

Bakkerud, Carl Melvin Newman Grove. . . .Neb. . . . 1918 

Boleng, Milton Garfield Arcadia Wis 1918 

Borgen, Emil Lawrence Landa N. D. ... 1918 . : 

Borgen, John Emil Sioux Falls S. D 1918- 

Bottolfson, Edwin Olia Starkweather N. D... .1918-22 A. B., 1922 

Boyd, Donald Irvin Wendell Minn. . .1918-20 

Bungum, Norman Gustav .... Hayfield Minn . . . 1918 

Busncss, Clarence Melvin Waterville la 1918 

Busness, Holger John Waterville la 1918 

Cahill. Rufus William Ossian la 1918 

Christenscn, Martin Clifton Texas. .1918 

Christianson, Donald Martin. . Carpio N. D. ... 1918 

Christiansen. LeonardThcodoreVermilion S. D .. . .1918-19 

Clauson, William Gerhard . . Spring Grove Minn . . 1919-21 

Dahl, John Rudolph Albert Lea Minn. . .1918-22 A. B., 1922 

Daley, Knudt Sherman De Forest Wis 1918-22 A. B., 1922 

Daley, Sidney Eugene De Forest Wis 1918-20, 1921- 

Danielson, Elmer Lynxville Wis 1918 

Darrington, Willard Joseph . . . Hcsper la 1918 

Davidson, Philip Harris Viroqua Wis 1918 

Eimon, Paul Kruger H Osseo Wis 1918-20 

Elder. Howard Ferdinand Calmar la 1918 

Ellickson, Peter Gilbert Decorah la 1918 

EUingson, Herman Edwin . . .Ridgeway la 1918- .■ ;,■ • :;^~~ 

Elvestrom, Victor A Bricelyn Minn. . .1918-22 A. B., 1922 

Erickson, Alexander Herbert . . Morrisonville Wis 1918- 

Erickson, Clarence Robert .... Whalan Minn ... 1918 

Evenrud, Carl Canton Minn. . .1918 

Evenrud, Christian Canton Minn. . . 1918 

Flatin, Finley Orlando Spring Grove Minn ... 1918 

Flikki, George Urdahl Le Roy Minn ... 1918 . 



Forsstrom, Adolph Martin. . . . Hemingford Neb. . . .1918-19. 



ATTENDANCE 253 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Fosmark, Christian Johannes. .Morrisonville Wis 1918- 

Foss, Ephriam Alexander Spring Grove Minn. . . 1918 

Gilbert. Harold Lovell Ossian la 1918 

Gilbertson, Oscar Helmer Clermont la 1918-21 

Grevstad. Erling Carolus B. . . Deerfield Wis 1918-22 A. B., 1922 

Gubrud, Milliard J Spring Grove Minn ... 1918 

Gutru, Ronald I Newman Grove .... Neb ....1918 

Hallan, James Othelo Spring Grove Minn. . . 1918 

Halverson, Elmer Julius Thompson la 1918 

Halvorson, Victor Diedrich. . .Rockdale Wis 1918-21 

Hammervold, Lenard M Harmony Minn . . . 1919-21 

Han.sen, Sidney Nicholie West Union la 1918 

Haugen, Sverre Rasin Livingston Mont . . . 1918 

Helgerson, Oliver O Soldiers Grove Wis 1918 

Helgeson, Harold Adolph Ferryville Wis 1918-20 

Heskin, Oscar Edward Portland N. D. . . . 1918-22 A. B., 1922 

Hjermstad, Carl Fritjof. Jr.. .Red Wing Minn. . .1918-20 

Hoel, Bjarne Tola Wis 1918 

Hoel, Walter Monroe Norse Texas, . . 1918 

Holm, Ephriam Augustine. . . .Eagle Grove la 1918-20 

Holtan, Sigurd Harold Stoughton Wis 1918 

Hovden, Clarencis Gustin .... Decorah la 1918- 

Hovden. Kenneth Norman. . . .Decorah la 1918 

Hundy, George Sherman Decorah la 1918 , 

Jacobson, Loren Noel MinneapoHs Minn . . . 1918-19 

Jenson, Martin Andrew Albert Lea Minn . . . 1918-19 

Jenson, Sylvester Palmer Cranfill's Gap Texas. . .1918 

Jetson, Clarence Bennett Spring Grove Minn ... 1918 

Johnson, Arthur Lynxville Wis 1918 

Johnson, Clarence Ernest Ossian la 1918-20 

Johnson, Harold Edward Spring Grove Minn ... 1918- 

John.srud, Oliver Neljus Spring Grove Minn ...1918 

Jordahl, Nels Ylvi.saker Ridgeway la 1918-.. . . 

Jorgenson, Einar J Decorah la 1918-22 A. B., 1922 

Kinseth, Wilford John Bode la 1918-20 

Kirchhof, Edgar Herbert Thor la 1918 

Kittelson, Charles Clifford. . . Clermont la 1918-20 

Knudson, Connely Cornelius. .Cranfills' Gap Texas. ..1918 

Knutson, Selmer Alfred Adams Minn ... 1918 

Kraabel, Maynard Orvis Clifford N. D 1918-22 A. B., 1922 

Lansrud, Vernon Alexander. . . Kensett la 1918 

Larsen, Harold Lawrence Decorah la 1918 

Larson, Emil Norton Spring Grove Minn. . .1918-20 

Lien, Erling Waldemar 

Nasseth Portland N. D.... 1918-21 A. B., 1921 

Lien, John Laurence Postville la 1918 

Linde, Aimer Olaus De Forest Wis 1918 

Lothe, Irwin Eugene Sun Prairie Wis 1918-19 

Lundgren, Oscar Eric Wm. . Clear Lake la 1918 

Lynne, Victor Arnold Elbow Lake Minn . . . 1918 

Mandt, Matthew Cornelius . .Sun Prairie Wis 1918 

Moe, John Melvin Glenwood Minn. . .1918-22 A. B., 1922 

Myrah, Carl Theodore Decorah la 1918-20 

Myrah, Norton E Spring Grove Minn ... 1918 

Nelson, Bendolph Melvin Waterville la 1918 

Odden, Albert Theodore Decorah la 1918-20 

Ode, Paul Gerhardt Calmar la 1918-21 

Olson, Malcolm Hartwick Ray N. D... .1918-22 A. B.. 1922 

Olson, Odin Thorvald Mountain Wis 1918 

Ostenson, Lloyd Austin Decorah la 1918 

Otte, Carl Nils Heinrich HIabisa Zululandl918- 

Otte, Johannes Nicolai HIabisa Zululandl918- 

Ottesen, Otto Sampson Rio Wis 1918-21 

Oyloe, Glen Edward Ossian la 1918 

Paul.son, Alvin Maxwell Portland N. D 1918- 

Peterson, Ordin Engebret Decorah la 1918-19 

Pflug, Elmer Fredrick Chicago HI 1918 

Pierson, Oris Emerald Norse Texas. .. 1918-20 

Quiel, Gustav Julius Decorah la 1918-22 A. B., 1922 

Ramberg, Rudolph Johannes. . West Prairie Wis 1918-20, 1921- 

Ramsey, Steven Whalan Minn . ..1918 

Ranum, Martin Bernhard . . . .Starbuck Minn. . . 1918- 

Reesing, Jim Ludwig Clifton Texas. . . 1918 

Roe, Theodore Clarence Le Roy Minn. . . 1918 

Rognlie. Ingolf Herman M. .. .Franklin Minn. ..1919-22 A. B., 1922 



254 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Rohne, Chris. Ludvig Cranfill's Gap Texas. . 1918-20 

Rovang, Elmer John Fergus Falls Minn. . .1918-22 A. B., 1922 

Rugland. Gerhard Theodore.. .Carpio N. D... .1918-22 .\. B., 1922 

Rugland. Sigvart Luther Carpio N. D... .1918-22 .V. B.. 1922 

Saetveit, Eilef Theodore Colfax Wis 1918-20 

Scharberg, Edwin Oliver Hayfield Minn. . .1918 

Shelwick, Jens Scarville la 1918 

SmithUng, Gustave Melvin Decorah la 1918-20 

Skalet. Charles Hannord Ulen Minn. . .1918-19 .\. B., 1919 

Soland. Hans Norman Decorah la 1918- 

Solie, Rudolph Alfred Hayfield Minn . , . 1918 

Sorenson, Olaf Eugene Kennethlnwood la 1918-19 

Sorenson, V'ernon Silas B Inwood la 1918-19 

Stavaas, Martin Orlando Fergus Falls Minn . . . 1918-22 A. B., 1922 

Steen, Bennie Christopher . Ortonville Minn . . . 1918-19 

Stensrud, Elmer Gerhard Lake Mills la 1918 

Stortroen, Nobel Fergus Falls Minn ... 1918 

Stromer, Anders Archibald. . . .De Forest Wis 1918 

Swenson, Tom Melvin Thompson la 1918 .... 

Teslow, Raymond Lincoln . . Hayward Minn. . . 1918. ... 

Thorstad. John De Forest Wis 1918 

Thorvilson, Luther Maurice. Minneapolis Minn ... 1918 

Tjugum, Raymond Ernest . . Sun Prairie Wis 1918-19 

Treangen, Bennie Olai Spring Grove Minn . . . 1918 

Troen, Magnus ."Mvin Glenwood Minn . . . 1918 

Wahlstrom, Carl Adolph Minneapolis Minn ... 1918 

Wall. Alfred Nordahl Holmen Wis 1918 

Ward, Charles Edward Ossian la 1918 

Weiser, Horace Spengler Decorah la 1919 

Weselmann, Ralph Otto Calmar la 1918 

Ylvisaker. Paul Zumbrota Minn. . .1918-19, 1921- 

1919-1920 

Akre, Roland Ogden Strand. . Hinsdale Mont . . . 1919- 

Anderson, Lawrence Howard. . Crary N. D.. . . 1919-21 

Anderson, Merle Kenneth .... Durand Ill 1919- 

Anderson, Spencer Clement. Ridgeway la 1919-21 

Berg,sgaard, John Spring Grove Minn . . . 1919-20 

Berge, Marvin Leslie Valders Wis 1919-21 

Bidne, Martin Lawrence Highlandville la 1919- 

Bjerke, Theodore Dorchester la 1919-21 

Brown, Elmer Alford Mabel Minn . . . 1919- 

Carlson, Fred Hjalmar Decorah la 1919- 

Coffeen, Hiram A Decorah la 1919-20 

Eidbo, Oscar E Delavan Minn . . . 1919 

Endahl, Alfred Matthias Lane S. D 1919-20 

Enga, Leonard Earl Ossian la 1919- , 

Evcnmoe. Leonard Amos Spring Grove Minn. . .1919- 

Fadness, Nels Lewis Poynette Wis 1919-22 A. B.. 1922 

Hagen, Paul Isaac Ambcrg . . . Madison Wis 1919-20 

Hawkos, Hubert Carroll Rio Wis 1919-21 

Hille. John Herwegh O. D Stavanger Norway. 1919-20. . 

Himle, George Harald \shby Minn. . .1919-20. . 

Hoff, Hubert James Lawrence Wash ... 1919-21 . . 

Holm, Aaron Benjamin Eagle Grove la 1919-22 

Hook, Charles Ellis Bowman N. D... .1919-21 

Hove, James Norman Hayward Minn . . . 1919-21 

Indall. Harold Adolph R Ruthton Minn . . . 1919-21 

Ingvoldstad, Carsten Willard.. Decorah la 1919- 

Iverson, Marvin Orlandu Cresco la 1919-20, 1921 

Jaastad, Lloyd Myron Decorah la 1919- 

Jetson, Ellsworth Mabel Minn. . .1919-20 

Jetson, James Ernest Spring Grove Minn . . . 1919-21 

Johnson, Arthur Franklin S. . . Decorah la 1919-20 

Johnson, Emert Seneca Wis 1919 

Johnson, Palmer Herbert Waunakee Wis 1919-21 

Jorgenson, Alf William Decorah la 1919- 

Killie. Eilert Steven Clifford .N. D 1919- 

Korsrud, Walter William Decorah la 1919- 

Lauer, Clarence Louie Eldorado la 1919-20 

Lawston, Willis Archibald. . . . Wolford N. D.. . . 1919-21 

Lee, Oliver Julien Dexter Minn. . . 1919-21 

Levorson, Olaf Lorcntz Irene S. D. ... 1919- 

Lind, Joseph Oliver Postville la 1919-21 



ATTENDANCE 255 



Years at 
Student Post Office State Luther College Graduation 



Lundin, Nicholas A Sentinel Butte N. D... .1919 

Moore, Robert W Decorah la 1919-21 

Naab, Llovd Fred Elma la 1919-20 

Narveson. Bert Henry Albert Lea Minn. . .1919-22 A. B., 1922 

Nelson, Carl Bernhard Decorah la 1919-21 

Nelson, Karsten Olaf Mayville ^ . N. D.. . . 1919- 

Nordgaard, Edgar N Mankato Minn ... 1919- 

Olson, Paul Frederick Decorah la 1919- 

Orwoll, Sylfest Peder Sioux Falls S. D 1919- 

Otterness, Merton Edgar Poynette Wis 1919-21 

Owen, Ernest Melvin ...... Ridgeway la 1919- 

Paulson, Arthur Christopher Forest City la 1919-22 A. B., 1922 

Peterson, Elmer Oliver Decorah la 1919-20 

Price, Charles Edward Decorah la 1919-20 

Reque, Sigvard Erling St. Paul Minn . . . 1919- 

Schjeldahl, Robert Ingvald . Hatton N. D.. . . 1919- 

Scofield, Teddy R Spring Grove Minn . . . 1919-20 

Seines, Alfred James Mabel Minn . . . 1919-20 

Selstad, Ingvald Elias Leeds N. D... .1919-20 

Skaaden, Einar Theodore Spring Grove Minn . . . 1919-20 

Solvie, Adolph Julian Hancock Minn . . . 1919- 

Stabo, Trond Stabo, Toten Norway . 1919-20 

Steen, Ernest Bennett Clinton Minn. . . 1919- 

Steen, Sigvart Julius Clinton Minn ... 1919- 

Stevens, Don Albert Crary N. D... .1919-20 

Stromer, Philip Orlando De Forest Wis 1919 

Svenning, Walter Norman . Glenwood Minn . . . 1919- 

Sween, Clifford Oliver Bode la 1919-20 ..... 

Sween, Milo Idolph Rochester Minn ... 1919-21 

Takle, Leonard Knut Dorchester Minn. , .1919-21 . . 

Talle, Herman Julius Starbuck Minn . . . 1919- ... 

Thompson, Langden Harald Wausau Wis 1919-20. . 

Trytten, Edwin Gerhardt .Albert Lea Minn . . 1919- 

Turmo, Ulrik Andrew Clifford N. D.. . . 1919- 

Turmo, Einar Sigvald Clifford N. D... .1919-21 

Tvedt, Carl Walther Maskell Neb 1919- 

Walker, Harry Palmer Mt. Sterling Wis 1919- 

Wick. Gunder Olaus Mt. Horeb Wis 1919-20 

Wierson, Leonard Irving Roland la 1919- 

Woldum, Grant Horace Decorah la 1919- 

1920-1921 

Akre, Walter Eugene Highlandville la 1920-21 

Anderson, Russell Ellsworth. . . La Crosse Wis 1920- 

Barsness, Olger Magnus Starbuck Minn . . . 1920- 

Bergan, Clarence Alfred Wendell Minn . . . 1920- 

Birke.strand, Harold Ole S Cambridge la 1920-21 

Bosben, Eugene Ezra Madison Wis 1920-21 

Brakke, Leander Bernhard. . . Kasson Minn . . . 1920- 

Brandt, Rolf Didrik St. Paul Minn. . .1920- . 

Brudvig, Nels Andreas Colton S. D 1920- 

Carlson, Elmer Cornelius Appleton Minn . . . 1920- 

Christensen, Clifford Neal ... Kasson Minn. . . 1920- 

Clauson, Melvin Joseph Colton S. D . . . . 1920- 

Dahl, Maurice Sanford Albert Lea Minn . . . 1920- 

Delaney. Roger Daniel Decorah la 1920- 

Dotseth, Carl Decorah la 1920-21 

Duckstad, John Herman Fertile Minn . . . 1920- 

Eittreim, Alvin Kingsley Decorah la 1920- 

Ellingson, Edson Arnold Wendell Minn . . . 1920- 

Ellingson, Lourn Morgan Wendell Minn. . . 1920- 

Engebretson, Alfred Julius. . . Starbuck Minn. . . 1920-21 ... 

Engebretson, Oscar Melvin . . . Starbuck Minn . . . 1920- 

Engrav, Walter Alfred Peterson Minn . . . 1920-21 

Erickson, Silas Victor N Burr Oak la 1920-21 

Evensen, Carl Milo Sheyenne N. D.. . .1920- 

Fadness, Andrew C Rio Wis 1920- 

Fardal, Harold Eugean Stanhope la 1920-21 

Fardal, Sigurd Julius Stanhope la 1920. . .- 

Fjelstul, Casper Theodore .... Ridgeway la 1920- 

Fosmark, Sylvester S Morrisonville Wis 1920- 

Foss, Ralph Norman Spring Grove Minn . . . 1920-2 1 

Garness, Oscar Mabel Minn . . . 1920- 

Grinder, Arthur Norman Wendell Minn. . . 1920- . 



256 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 









Years at 


Student 


Post Office 


State 


Luther College Graduation 


Grinley, Burton Alexander. . . 


. Portland 


N. D... 


.1920-21 


Gunderson, John Gerhard M. 


Mt. Horeb 


Wis.... 


.1920-21 


Haaland, Osuld Terriesen. . . . 


. Bricelyn 


. Minn . . 


.1920- 


Hansen, Joseph Theodore. . . . 


.Canton 


S. D... 


.1920-21 


Haslip, Leo Leaman 


. Decorah 


.la 


.1920- 


Hasvold, Morris 


. Flandreau 


S. D. .. 


.1920- 


Haugom, Eddie Wallace 


. Portland 


.N. D... 


.1920- 


Hegg, Lester Raymond 


. Harmony 


. Minn. . 


.1920- 


Hellickson, Arnold Raymond. 


.Ostrander 


. Minn . . 


.1920-21 


Henriksen, George C, Jr. . . 


Silverton 


.Ore 


.1920- 


Herum, Maurice S. H 


. River Falls 


.Wis.... 


.1920-21 








.1920- . . 


Hjelle, Albert Edward 


. Decorah 

. Calmar 


.la 

.la 


1920- 


Hopperstad, Anbert Niels . . 


.1920- 




.St. Pa<*l 

. Decorah 


. Minn . . 
.la 


.1920- 


Hovey, Clarence John 


.1920- 


Hutchinson, Joseph Cyril. . 


. Decorah 


.la 


.1920- 


Ingvoldstad. Lester Raymond. Decorah 


.la 


.1920- 


Jacobson, Thurlow R. A 


. Wittenberg 


.Wis.... 


.1920- 


Jerdeman, Casper Marion . . . 


• Jewell 


.la 


.1920- 


Jewell, Charles Wallace 


. Decorah 


.la 


.1920-21 


Johnson, Alfred Lawrence . . . 


.Portland 


.N. D. . 


.1920- 


Johnson, Ruben Oliver 


. Park River 


N. D... 


.1920- 


Kjome, Norton Hamilton. . . 


. Decorah 


.la 


.1920- 


Knutson, Sever Raymond. . . 


.Albert Lea 


. Minn . . 


.1920- 


Kvale, Theodore Alvin. . . 


. Fall River 

. La Crosse 


Wis.... 
.Wis.... 


.1920-21 


Lambert, Joseph George 


.1920-21 


Lande, Milton Ole 


. Galesburg 


N. D... 


.1920- 


Landsverk, Ole 


. Whalan 


. Minn . . 


.1920- 


Lucky, Carl E. L 


. Tacoma 


.Wash. . 


.1920- 


Lund, Louis Vivian 


. Farwell 


. Minn . . 


.1920- 


Maakestad, Benj. Sjurolf. 


. Norge 


.Va 


.1920- 


Moackrud, Arthur B 


. Galesburg 


N. D.. 


..1920 


Moe, Valdorf Tjerold 


. Decorah 


.la 


.1920- 


Mork, Arthur Oscar 


. Dawson 


. Minn . . 


.1920- 


Narveson, Percival 


Spring Grove 

.CHfford 

. Brooten 

. Decorah 


. Minn . . 
.N. D... 
. Minn . . 
.la 


.1920-21 




.1920-21 


Nelson, Noel Elvin 


.1920- 


Norlie, Joseph Sigurd 


.1920- 


Norlie, Kenneth Luther 


. Decorah 


.la 


. 1920- 


Olson. Maxwell Julien 


Clear Lake 


.la 


.1921-22 


Peterson, Clifford Philman... 


.Clifford 


N. D... 


.1920- 


Peterson, Emil Edgar 


. Decorah 

. Decorah 

. Decorah 

. Spring Grove 


.la 

.la 

.la 

. Minn . . 


.1920-21 




.1920- 


Peterson, Herbert Crommett 


1920- 


Peterson, Myron Willard. . . . 


.1920-21 


Preus, Christian Kcyser, Jr. . 


.Calmar 


.la 


.1920- 


Qualley, Albert Olaf 


. Decorah 

.Cyrus 


.la 

. Minn. . 


1920- 


Quammen, Hilmen Nils 


.1920- 


Reini, Gunleik Harold 


. Denver 


. Colo . . . 


.1920-21 


Rem, Oscar 


. Milaca 

. Brooklyn 


. Minn . . 
N. Y... 


.1920- 


Reque, Peer Eugene 


.1920- 


Roe, Kelnier S. N 


. Canton 


S. D .. 


.1920- 


Sandsmark, Lawrence 


. Coon Valley 


.Wis.... 


.1920-21 


Sandsmark, Moran 


. Coon Valley 


Wis.... 


.1920-21 


Scharberg, Arthur 


. Byron 


. Minn . . 


.1920-21 


Steen, Joseph Bernhard 


Ortonville 

. Harmony 


. Minn . . 
. Minn . . 


1920- 


Steffansrud, Thurman Orval 


.1920-21 


Stortroen, Marvil 


Dalton 


. Minn. . 


.1920- 


Strandjord, Edphil Nils 


. Belview 


.Minn . . 


.1920- 


Strom, Oscar Jacobson 


Cleveland 


.Ohio.. . 


.1920- 


Thompson, Elmer Oberi 


. Decorah 


.la 


.1920-21 


Tobiasen, Stanley 


.Canton 


.S. D . . 


.1920-21 


Torrison, Orrin Thomas . . . 


. Decorah 

Detroit 


.la 

. Minn . . 


1920- 


Tveten, Tuko Darwin 


.1920- 


Walhus, Alfred Leander 


. Dorchester 


.la 


.1920-21 


Westgor, Osmond Gerald .... 


. Manitowoc 

1921-1922 


.Wis.... 


.1920- 


Amland, Harold John 


St. Paul Minn. . 

. Iceland la 

.Untunjambili, Natal. Africa. . 
. Decorah la 


.1921- 


Arnevik, Thor 


.1921- 


Astrup, Hjalmar Leonard N.. 


.1921- 


Bakke, Ole Ernest 


.1921- 



ATTENDANCE 



257 



Student 



Post Office 



Years at 
Luther College Graduation 



Hexom, Otto Lester Daniel 
Hoverson, Eniil Theodore , . 



,1921-. 
.1921- 
,1921-. 
,1921- 
,1921 , 



Bakken, Robert Decorah la 1921- . 

Bernatz, Carl Decorah la 192 1- . 

Bestul. Harald Brandt Ettrick Wis 1921- . 

Beylegaard, Reidar George.. Greenville Center.. .N. Y 1921- . 

Bolger, Chester Arthur Decorah la 1921- . 

Bolger, Louis Jaeger Decorah la 1921- . 

Bolstad, William Larson Detroit Minn. . . 1921- . 

Brendsel, Ingebrigt Olai Baltic S. D 1921- . 

Collins, Harry John Ossian la 1921- . 

Crooks, John Jacob Hankinson N. D.. . . 1921- . 

Cutting, Carroll Elmer Decorah la 1921- . 

Ellingson, John Olaf M Valley City N. D.. . . 1921 . 

Engebretson, Manley Harlow.. Durand Ill 1922- , 

Engeseth, Henry Bernard Nerstrand Minn. . . 1921- 

Esse, John Colonel DeForest Wis 1921- . 

Ethun, Rudolph Lyall De Forest Wis 1922- 

Evers, Howard Barney Minneapolis Minn. . . 1921- . 

Fo s, Arnold Melanchthon. . . Franklin Minn . . . 1921- 

Hamre, Osmund Decorah la 1921- . 

Harsjn, Stanley Alexander . . Brandt S. D. . . . 1921- . 

Haugen, Gerhard Benjamin. . . Maddock N. D.. . . 1921- . 

Haugen, John Amberg Minneapolis Minn . . . 1921- . 

Decorah la 1921- 

. Bricelyn Minn ... 192 1- . 

Iverson, Arnold Vernon Ridgeway la 1921- 

Jensen, Alfred Ferdinand Franklin Minn . . . 1922- . 

Jenson, Martin Thomas CranfiU's Gap Texas. . . 1921- 

Johnson, Arniin Moldstad . . .Capron Ill 1921- . 

Johnson, Christian Orlando. . . Dane Wis 1921- 

Johnson, Joseph Eli Devils Lake N. D.. . . 1921- 

Jordahl, Olaf Melvin Fertile Minn. . . 1921- 

Jordahl, Oscar Alfred Fertile Minn . . . 1921- 

Jorgenson, Rudolph Claude. . . Decorah la 1921. 

Kaasa, Erling Sigfried Red Wing Minn . . . 1921- 

Knudson, Jesse Pernell Clifton Texas. . . 1921- . 

Kvale, Edward C Fargo N. D. . . 

Leidahl, Herbert Goodwin ... Locust la 

Liquin, Fritchof Sigvald Locust la 

Lucken, Henrick Bernhard .... Portland N. D. . . 

Maas, Charles Allison Decorah la 

Melaas, Harrv Eugene Decorah la 1921- 

Nedberg, Carl J Detroit Minn. . .1921- 

Nelson, George Oscar Albert Lea Minn . . . 1921- 

Nelson, Joel Edmund Clifton Texas.. .1921-. 

Nervig, Casper Bernard Wells Minn. . .1921- 

Nordgaard, Carl Hjalmar Mankato Minn. . . 1921- . 

Nystuen, Walter Northwood la 1921- 

Ode, Carsten Linnevold Decorah la 1921- 

Oien, Paul Oberlin Decorah la 1922- 

Olsen, Olaf Bernhard M. . . . Galveston Texas. . . 1921- 

Olsen, Willielm Ferdinand . . , , Sand Creek Wis 1921 . 

Olson, Edwin Marinius C Madison Minn . . . 1921- 

Olson, Robert Bernhardt Decorah la 1921- 

Opheim, Julius William Thor la 1921- 

Opsahl, Eugene Gerhard Decorah la 1921- 

Ordal, Erling Joseph River Falls Wis 1921- 

Orwoll, Oswald Christian Maddock N. D... .1921-. 

Ostrem, Harold Manly Decorah la 1921- . 

Overgaard, Raymond Oren . . . Albert Lea Minn. . . 1921- . 

Peterson, Jeffrey Arnold Roland la 1921- . 

Peterson, George Raymond . . . Mankato Minn . . . 1922- . 

Reishus, Harald Tidemann.. . .Stanley Wis 1921- . 

Rindahl, Willie Oscar Ettrick Wis 1921- , 

Ronan, Leo Patrick Decorah la 1921- . 

Ronan, William Patrick Decorah la 1921- . 

Rotto, Isaac Melvin Kensington Minn. . .1921-. 

Ruen, Olger Cornelius Waukon la 1921- . 

Sampson, Harold Myron L. . . Decorah la 1921- . 

Scharberg, Norman Rudolf. . . Hayfield Minn. . .1921- . 

Schultheiiss, Lorenz Elma la 1922- . 

Sheel, Sigurd Walter Decorah la 1921- . 

Sorensen, Arthur Waldemar. . . Shevlin Minn . . . 1921- . 

Sorenson, Garfield Olaf Bagley Minn . . . 1921- . 

Sperati, Sigvald Robert Decorah la 1921- . 

Stoskopf, Roger Orlando Decorah la 1921- . 



258 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Student 



Post Office 



State 



Years at 
Luther College Graduation 



Syverson, LeRoy Elstrom .... Brooten Minn . . . 1921- 

Thomas, George Franklin Decorah la 1921 

Thorgrimsen, Hans A. Stub. . .Grand Forks N. D.. . . 1921- 

Topliff. Lyle Ray Decorah la 1921- 

Torrison, John \Villiam Decorah la 1921- 

Torrison, Osuld Romund Evanston Ill 1922- 

Trytten, Olaf Benjamin Albcri Lea Minn . . . 1921- 

Urberg, Konrad Morbcck Blair Wis 1921- 

VValker, Emil Orin Mt. Sterling Wis 1921- 

Wolding, .\aron Thomas Rosholt Wis 1921- 

Woldum, Lester Howard Decorah la 1921- 



TABLE OF NEW STUDENTS 





No. of 


Later 


Later 




No. of 


Later 


Later 


School 


New 


Graduating 


Ordained 


School 


New 


Grad 


Liating 


Ordained 


Year 


Stu- 
dents 










Year 


Stu- 
dents 










No. 


% 


No. 


% 


No. 


% 


No. 


% 


1861-62 


16 


4 


25.0 


4 


25.0 


1891-92 


79 


9 


11.4 


7 


8.9 


1862-63 


26 


4 


15.4 


9 


34.6 


1892-93 


63 


11 


17.5 


8 


12.7 


1863-64 


29 


5 


17.2 


5 


17.2 


1893-94 


59 


19 


32.2 


13 


22.0 


1864-65 


26 


3 


11.5 


6 


23.1 


1894-95 


59 


12 


20.3 


11 


18.6 


1865-66 


45 


11 


24.4 


12 


26.7 


1895-96 


81 


28 


34.6 


15 


18.5 


1866-67 


42 


3 


7.1 


8 


19.0 


1896-97 


52 


18 


34.6 


14 


26.9 


1867-68 


27 


4 


14.8 


7 


25.9 


1897-98 


55 


10 


18.2 


4 


7.3 


1868-69 


53 


3 


5.7 


3 


5.7 


1898-99 


60 


19 


31.7 


8 


13.3 


1869-70 


51 


10 


19.6 


19 


37.3 


1899-00 


66 


25 


37.9 


14 


21.2 


1870-71 


62 


6 


9.7 


14 


22.6 


1900-01 


72 


20 


27.8 


7 


9.7 


1861-71 


377 


53 


14.1 


87 


23.1 


1891-01 


646 


171 


26.5 


101 


15.6 


1871-72 


56 


14 


25.0 


16 


28.6 


1901-02 


61 


26 


42.6 


6 


9.8 


1872-73 


61 


11 


18.0 


12 


19.7 


1902-03 


62 


20 


32.3 


13 


21.0 


1873-74 


84 


16 


19.0 


16 


19.0 


1903-04 


60 


19 


31.7 


9 


15.0 


1874-75 


100 


18 


18.0 


22 


22.0 


1904-05 


71 


21 


29.6 


14 


19.7 


1875-76 


78 


13 


16.7 


9 


11.5 


190.5-06 


62 


20 


31.. i 


13 


21.0 


1876-77 


46 


12 


26.1 


17 


37.0 


1906-07 


45 


21 


46.7 


6 


13 3 


1877-78 


49 


14 


26.8 


6 


12.2 


1907-08 


62 


16 


25.8 


7 


11.3 


1878-79 


58 


11 


19.0 


8 


13.8 


1908-09 


58 


21 


36.2 


8 


13.8 


1879-80 


40 


9 


22.5 


9 


22.5 


1909-10 


51 


19 


37.3 


8 


15.7 


1880-81 


55 


12 


21.8 


6 


10.9 


1910-11 


58 


24 


41.4 


9 


15.5 


1871-81 


627 


130 


20.7 


121 


19.3 


1901-11 


590 


207 


35.1 


93 


15.8 


1881-82 


41 


12 


29.3 


12 


29.3 


1911-12 


75 


31 


41.3 


15 


20.0 


1882-83 


47 


14 


29,8 


16 


34.0 


1912-13 


60 


20 


3.^ . 3 


(5) 


* 


1883-84 


73 


10 


13.7 


13 


17.8 


191.5-14 


58 


24 


41.4 


(7) 


* 


1884-85 


42 


12 


28.6 


15 


35.7 


1914-15 


47 


(17) 


* 


(1) 


* 


1885-86 


37 


9 


24.3 


9 


24.3 


1915-16 


60 


(16) 


* 


(0) 


* 


1886-87 


51 


11 


21.6 


13 


25.5 


1916-17 


35 


(10) 


* 


(1) 


♦ 


1887-88 


32 


5 


15.6 


2 


6.2 


1917-18 


47 


(15) 


* 


(0) 


« 


1888-89 


47 


12 


25.5 


11 


23.4 


1918-1<) 


145 


(19) 


* 


(0) 


* 


1889-90 


54 


11 


20.4 


12 


22.2 


1919-20 


81 


(3) 


* 


(0) 


* 


1890-91 


93 


23 


24.7 


17 


18.3 


1920-21 


99 


(0) 


* 


(0) 


* 


1881-91 


517 


119 


23.0 


120 


23.2 


1911-21 


707 


(155) 


* 


(29) 


* 



♦Some of the students who first entered Luther College in 1912-13 have not yet completed 
their study of theology; the same is the case for the following years; it is tlius too early to 
calculate tlie percentage of ordinations for these years. For a similar reason the percentage 
of graduates cannot yet be computed for the years after 1913-14. The members of the Senior 
Class of 1921-22 are counted as graduates in the above table. 



CHAPTER TWELVE 

ORGANIZATION 

L. A. MoE 
I. The Educational Setting 
1. Denominational Colleges 

BROADLY speaking, there exist in the American education- 
al system of to-day three distinct types of tlie American 
college: the college that depends upon the church for support; 
the college that depends upon the state for support; and the 
college that depends upon the individual or the general commun- 
ity for support. The first type is the purely denominational col- 
lege. It represents the intimacy of the relation existing between 
religion and learning, a relation historic and vital. The second 
type is that of the state university. This type embodies the idea 
that the whole body of the people is concerned in the securing 
of a sufficient number of well trained citizens to insure the effici- 
ency and perpetuity of the state. The third type is the endowed, 
non-sectarian college, such as Columbia or Harvard, which stands 
for independence, a most precious condition for the promotion of 
scholarship and for the development of character. It is to the 
first of these types that Luther College belongs. 

Tlie score or more of denominational colleges which exist in 
some western states were founded by the cliurches in the pioneer 
days as instruments for denominational upbuilding. The estab- 
lishment of state-supported and state-controlled universities in 
the commonwealths organized after the close of tlie eighteenth 
century by no means put an end to the establishment of colleges 
upon religious foundations. Denominational zeal was very strong 
in tlie decades preceding the Civil War, and the church was tlie 
center of community life in the newly settled regions. For long 
years the small sectarian colleges were the only scliools with any 
pretense to advanced grade in the West, but with the passing of 
time and the current growing ever stronger against sectarianism, 
many of these small colleges were forced to close their doors. A 
few of the best types were able to adjust tliemselves to the new 
conditions, and this only by the most conservative polic}-, and the 
gathering of endowments. 



ORGANIZATION 



261 




WILLIAM JENNINGS BRYAN 
in Decorah 
(Dr. Larsen in the back- 
ground) 



Luther College was founded just as 
the feeling against denominational schools 
began to show itself. The contest was 
wide-spread and often exceedingly bitter, 
but Luther College remained aloof and 
took no part whatsoever in these perplex- 
ing debates. And it was well that it held 
aloof. A unified course of study with a 
narrow range of electives introduced in 
later years made it possible for the Col- 
lege to do its work thoroughly and well. 
Had the institution broadened its courses, 
introduced a wide range of electives, and 
thus popularized its offerings, there would 
liave been danger of its elimination, even 
tliough for a time it might have presented 
a more imposing front. But Luther Col- 
lege never for a moment faltered in its 
purpose. Its conservatism has been its 
salvation. 



2. The State System 

The establishment of a universal system of education was in- 
evitable. The advance of the Republic created a need, and the 
breaking open of the great West opened the way for a new educa- 
tional order of things. The great influx of immigrants from Eur- 
ope, beginning in the later forties, made necessary an extremely 
democratic system of schools, wholly free from partisanship or 
sectarianism. 

The federal Constitution contains no mention of schools. The 
United States has been and is powerless to control and does not 
assume to manage the educational interests of the people ; the 
states have full authority to do so. Matters educational have 
been left strictly in the hands of the states. The federal govern- 
ment, it is true, by land grants and otherwise has encouraged the 
establishment of institutions of learning, and maintains a Bureau 
of Education with a commissioner at its head to make surveys and 
annual reports to the various educational organizations through- 
out the country. 

In the absence of any federal authority, the states began early 
in the nineteenth century to provide for a general system of educa- 
tion, ascending in regular gradation from township schools to a 



262 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

state univtrsity. Tlu- collc^i'S ami ac atlcniirs wire .sui)portc'd by 
tuition. Tuition was to be gratis in tbe state scliools, which were 
to be supported by taxation. 

The university fixes the plane of the liigh scliool, and tlie 
higli school in turn, determines the character of the elementary 
schools. The university has also developed graduate and profes- 
sional courses to provide for research work in every field. Thus 
the strength of the state system of schools is in its continuity, and 
in the gradual spread of its courses of study to accommodate the 
needs of the many in preparing for the professions. Allowing 
eight years for the elementary school, four for the secondary 
schools, four for the college course, and four for the professional 
course, the child who entered school at the age of six will com- 
plete his professional education at the age of twenty-six. 

3. Relation of the Denominational Colleges to the State 

The changes that have been taking place from time to time 
in the state system will sooner or later affect the colleges. The 
colleges have for some time felt the weakness of the church sys- 
tem in not being , able to establish and develop parochial schools 
and academies, so as to give the system continuit}'. Not being able 
to maintain such parochial schools and academies, on a large scale, 
the denominational college must lean on tlie state high schools 
for support in the way of attracting students. The necessity of 
connecting up with the high schools from below has a tendency to 
bring the denominational college into close contact with the state 
system. Luther College has been awake to this situation, and as 
early as 1881 began a lengthening of the preparatory course down- 
ward so as to connect up with the elementary schools. At the 
same time the college has developed a liberal arts course, the equal 
of the arts course of our foremost universities with the added 
advantage of religious instruction. Upon the completion of the 
college course, the student receives the degree of bachelor of arts. 

The tendency of the state system at the present day is toward 
the establishment of the junior high school and the junior college, 
a plan which aims primarily at the shortening in years of the 
entire system to enable capable students with iniative to enter 
the professions earlier than is possible under the present plan. 
The junior college movement is especially popular, and bids fair 
to spread in this day and age when education is advancing by 
leaps and bounds. Tlie tendency of the high schools to reach up 
and do two years of college work, and of the universities to con- 
nect up with the junior colleges endangers the future of the pres- 



ORGANIZATION 



263 



ent-day small college. Although Luther College occupies a unique 
position among the schools of the Church, and stands high in the 
estimation of tlie educational circles of tlie day, still it is of the 
utmost importance that a careful study be made by those who have 
the welfare of the institution at heart of the conditions which 
sooner or later may threaten the continuance of the institution. 
The relation of the denominational college to tlie state system 
has not been wholly solved. 




SENATORS KNTTH NELSON AND W. B. ALLISON AT LUTHER COLLEGE 



II. Organization of Luther College Within the 
Church 

Luther College was incorporated under the law of the vState 
of Iowa, February 1, 1865. The articles of incorporation, as re- 
vised in 1917, placed the institution under the direct control of 
the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America. Tlie articles provide 
that the Cliurch Council shall constitute a Board of Visitors, who 
are to visit the College and report the results of their observation 
to each annual meeting of tlie corporation. The articles of in- 
corporation also provide for a Board of Trustees, eight in num- 
ber, whose principal duty is to look after the buildings and other 



264 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

property of the College. The members of the corporation are the 
pastors of the congregations connected with the Norwegian Lu- 
theran Church of America and the representatives of said con- 
gregations at the triennial meetings of said Cliurch. The presi- 
dent, secretary, treasurer, and Board of Trustees shall be elected 
triennially at such time and place as said Church shall hold its 
regular meeting. The regular meeting of the corporation is to be 
held at the same time and place. The president of the corpora- 
tion is ex-officio president of the Board of Trustees and of the 
College. 

In 1917 the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America created 
a special department of education. The Board of Education acts 
for the church-body in all matters pertaining to the educational 
institutions of the Church. The Board of Trustees of Luther Col- 
lege, accordingly, is subject to the Board of Education, which in 
turn serves as a Board of Visitors, and is responsible to the church- 
body for the conduct of the church schools. 

III. Organisation of Luther College Within Itself 
1. President and Faculty 

The College as organized locally is headed by the president 
and the college faculty. In early years the entire burden of ad- 
ministration fell upon the shoulders of the president, who in ad- 
dition to his work as administrator also carried a heavy teaching 
load. To a certain extent the same holds true today, but with the 
growth of the College must come a redistribution of the burden 
of administration. The heaviest burden carried by the president 
in past years has been that of finances. With the advent of the 
financial secretary, the president will be in a position to utilize 
the time he formerly needed for raising of funds in the administ- 
ering of funds. The appointment of such a secretary is of great 
importance to the College. 

Up to the present time faculty members have played a com- 
paratively small part in the administration of the affairs of the 
institution outside of carrying on the regular instruction of classes. 
The college registrar's office stands next to the office of the pres- 
ident in importance, matters relating to courses and scholarship 
being referred to this office. The college treasurer works in con- 
junction with the registrar. The college librarian assumes the re- 
sponsibility of developing the library. A curator has been ap- 
pointed for the museum. A special publicity committee has charge 
of publicity and advertising. Departmentalization is becoming 
more defined, and each department head is responsible for the 



ORGANIZATION 265 

development of that particular department. The dean of men and 
the principal of the Preparatory Department under the president 
control disciplinary matters. A special nurse is in charge of the 
college hospital. Student organizations flourish under student 
management^ and where necessary 'faculty advisers have been ap- 
pointed by the president. Regular weekly faculty meetings are 
held for consultation purposes, the president in charge together 
with the secretary of the faculty. Scholarship and disciplinary' 
matters are taken up for discussion, and generally the president, 
acts on the recommendations made by the faculty. There is under 




PKESIDENT'S RESIDENCE, 1920 

way at present a plan to inauguarate the committee system within 
the faculty and a committee was elected by the faculty in 1921 to 
make the proper recommendations. Such a system will make for 
added efficiency in the management of the many-sided activities 
of the College. From this it will be readily seen that the presid- 
ent is receiving more and more assistance in administering the af- 
fairs of the College. 

2. Students 

The individual student is the unit of organization, and it is 
around and about the student that all the activities of the institu- 
tion turn in the never ending cycle of college life. The institu- 
tion was founded for him, the faculty secured to assist and guide 
him, the physical properties of the College to make his work 



266 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

iiiort' pleasant and })ro(luctive of results, the Alumni Association 
and Luther College Clubs, of which he is later to become a mem- 
ber, to father him in his educational career. 

And it is first and foremost the student who is preparing him- 
self for the study of theology and the service of the church that 
must be regarded as the unit in this particular scliool organiza- 
tion. It is primarily for this particular type of student that the 
curriculum is built along its present lines. Indirectly, the cur- 
riculum, consisting as it does of the very best in educational 
})ractiee, ap})eals to three additional types of students: the student 
preparing for the profession of teaching; the student desiring a 
liberal education; and the student desiring a broad foundation 
preparatory to graduate and professional study. The Preparat- 
ory Department, in addition to serving as a course preparatory to 
college entrance, is complete in itself as a secondary school pre- 
paring for life in a practical way. Thus while Luther College is 
the ideal small college for students who desire that personal 
touch which the larger institutions cannot give, and who do not 
intend to enter the ministry, and while the College serves this 
type in a large way, still it is not for this type that the institution 
primarily exists. 

Measuring the status of the school by the theological type of 
student, one has only to take cognizance of the fact that 556 Lu- 
ther College students have entered the ministry as compared with 
a total number of 801 graduates. Of this number of ministers, 
362 are graduates of the College Department, 194 are not. This 
number will grow consistently M'ith the years, provided only the 
patrons of Luther College realize the great need of the church 
for young men who are willing to serve. The curriculum remains 
essentially the same as at the time of the founding of the institu- 
tion — a rich classical foundation, sufficiently modernized to parallel 
only the best in subject matter that the universities have to offer. 

The daily routine of class instruction and chapel exercises as 
well as the disciplinary training tend to develop the spiritual side 
of one's nature and point out the way of life in the direction of 
service to the church. 

3. KxpanNion of Course 

The full six-year course, offered for the first time in 1865-1866, 
was patterned after the last six years of the Euro})ean Gymnasium, 
which gave great prominence to Latin and Greek, and was de- 
signed to prepare students for the university and the professions. 
The Gymnasium extends through nine years, being the European 



ORGANIZATION 267 

substitute for the nine years in tlie American system beginning 
with grade eight of tlie elementary school and continuing through 
the senior college year. It is interesting to note that even in that 
early day, men of vision prophesied the changing of conditions 
which must take place with the flight of time. They anticipated 
the needs of their people in this new country many years in ad- 
vance. In preparing the course of study for this institution, the 
fact that it was to be an American school was not overlooked. 
Though the school was founded by a Scandinavian people, still 
it was given the indelible stamp of an American school from the 
start, at the same time involving in its make-up all that was cher- 
ished in the old "Latinskole". This retaining in the early years of 
all that was near and dear to our people from the home land, 
gave the school its strength and solidity. 

The six-year gymnasium course continued with minor changes 
for twenty-two years, 1861-1883. At a meeting of the Synod 
held in June, 1881, a resolution was passed to the effect that the 
course offered at the College should be extended from six to seven 
years; the whole course to be divided into a Preparatory Depart- 
ment of three years and a collegiate of four. In order, however, 
not to be unfair to those students who had previously entered the 
College with a view of completing the course in six years, it was 
resolved that this change should not affect the students that had 
alread}' entered the school, but only those that should be admitted 
in the future. In the next academic year there were three classes 
conducted on the new plan. These and all subsequent classes fin- 
ished a seven years' course before graduation. The lengthening 
of the preparatory course downward by one j-ear was a necessary 
step to bring the College closer in touch with the state secondary 
schools. The necessity of keeping in touch with the state systems 
was at no time lost sight of, and more and more stress was placed 
on instruction in English. 

In 1905 a fourth year was added to the preparatory course, 
with a gradual introduction of new subject matter in the lower 
years, and by the school year 1906-1907 the College was operat- 
ing on an eight-year basis, four-year collegiate and four-year 
])reparatory. In 1907-08 a literary course was introduced in the 
College Department to run parallel with the classical course, and 
a system of electives for the Junior and Senior classes was ar- 
ranged for the first time in the history of the institution. 

The elective system was not introduced into the preparatory 
course of study until the school year 1918-1919, when still an- 
other year was added as a result of the junior high school move- 



268 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

ment. The College as it is organized today offers a junior high 
school course, covering work equivalent to that of the eighth 
grade and the first year high school; a senior high school course 
covering the work of the sophomore, junior, and senior years of 
the high school; and a four-year collegiate course, a total of nine 
years. It is interesting to note that this nine-year curriculum 
strongly resembles that of the nine-year European Gymnasium, not 
particularly in subject matter, although here too there is a simil- 
arity, but in general plan and purpose. Luther College is unique 
in this respect, that it is the only school within the Church offer- 
ing at the same time part elementary, secondary, and college work 
in direct sequence so as to enable a young man desiring an educa- 
tion within the Church to secure such training beginning with 
the seventh or eighth grade of the elementary course. In other 
words, Luther College has solved the problem of continuity of 
courses as well as it can be solved within the Church to-day. 

4. The Normal Department, 1865-1886 

The organization of a special department for the training of 
teachers was under way within a few years after the establishment 
of the school. It had been the intention to provide for this train- 
ing from the very first, but crowded and unsettled quarters and an 
overworked faculty prevented action in this direction until the 
school year 1864-1865. 

Under the European system, special schools were maintained 
for the training of teachers, and no attempt had been made to 
carry on this work at the higher institutions of learning. A course 
of two years corresponding to the junior and senior years of our 
high schools of today comprised the European teachers' training 
school for common school teachers. Consequently to combine such 
a course with the regular courses of the Latin school offered dif- 
ficulties, as it meant a breaking away from an established prece- 
dent. 

But the great need of a training school to provide parochial 
and common school teachers made it absolutely necessary either to 
establish a special school for this purpose, or offer the necessary 
courses at one of the then existing institutions. The latter seem- 
ed to be the most logical course of procedure, and it was finally 
decided to offer a special normal course within the regular Latin 
school, and place an instructor in charge of this department. 

The normal course was accordingly made to coincide, 1864- 
1868, with the two lowest years of the I>atin school. Preparation 
for teaching in the parochial schools of the Church was the de- 



ORGANIZATION 269 

termining factor in the arrangement of subject matter. No effort 
was put forth to begin with to train teachers for work in the 
common schools, and it was not until 1868 that, in response to the 
demand for common school teachers, a third year's work was of- 
fered in this department, stressing mainly training in English. 
The work of this department now covered the three lowest years 
of the six-year Latin course. In classes where the same subjects 
were involved, the normal students and the regular students were 
to recite together. Normal students were not required to take 
Latin or Greek, but in their stead enrolled in subjects especially 
fitting them for the work of teaching. 

As a result of the extension of the regular course from six to 
seven years in the year 1883, the normal course was not offered in 
1882-83. In 1883 all the normal work was shifted into the three 
preparatory years, the first year being identical with the prepar- 
atory course, the second and third years offering special instruc- 
tion in the following branches in addition to the regular prepara- 
tory courses: catechism 3 hrs., Bible readings 3, English 3, U. S. 
history 2, didactics 4. In English and Norwegian, arithmetic, al- 
gebra, geography, general history, history of Norway, and Biblical 
history, the last two years were combined with the regular courses 
as stated. 

In 1872, the first normal class was graduated. The complete 
normal course offered in 1872 is given here. On February 1st, 
1886, the Normal Department was discontinued. The Church 
established Lutheran Normal School at Sioux Falls, S. Dak., in- 
stead. 

NORMAL COURSE AS OFFERED IN 1872 

(Model) (Quinta) (Sexta) (Septima ) 

3rd yr. 2nd yr. 1st yr. 

Explanation of Luther's Catechism 3 2 2 

Bible History 2 2 

Symbolical Books . 2 2 

Explanation of Bible and Catechetics 4 2 2 

German 2 3 

English 8 6 7 

Norwegian 2 2 4 

History, U. S., General 2 2 

Geography . 2 2 

Natural History (Zoology and Botany) . 3 

Mathematics (Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry) 2 2 2 

Music 2 2 2 

Penmanship . 1 2 

Total (figures refer to number hours per week) 25 29 29 

5. Students' Army Training Corps (S. A. T. C.) 

On account of the war, many changes were made at Luther 
College in the college year 1918-1919. Most of the students in 
the College Department were members of the S. A. T. C. They 
were young men who had registered for military service under the 



270 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



provisions of the selective draft law and had ])assed the physical 
examination^ hut who were ])erinitted to enter the S. A. T. C, an 
organization established by the War Department at most colleges 
and universities in the country. The S. A. T. C, was under the 
control of the War Department, which prescribed the subjects to 
be pursued, the number of liours i)er week to be devoted to military 
training, and all disciplinary regulations, which were on a strictly 
military basis. Lieutenant H. H. P'isher Avas the commanding 
officer and Second Lieutenant Allen C. Grundy was the personnel 
adjutant. The corps was demobilized December 11, 1918. 




CLUB ROOM 
E(iuipped for the S. A. T. C. by the Lutheran Biotherhootl of America, WHS 



All physically fit students not members of the S. A. T. C, 
were members of the Luther College Cadet Corps. They were 
not under government control and furnished their own uniforms 
and otherwise paid their own expenses. But they drilled at the 
same time and in the same manner as the members of the S. A. T. 
C, and were subject to the same regulations. 

Military drill was required of all ])liysi(ally fit students at 
Luther College excc|)t .Juniors and Seniors, and as the Reserve Of- 
ficers' Training Corps oft'ered tlie same kind and amount of mil- 
itary training as was required at Luther College, it was decided, 
when the S. A. T. C, was demobilized, to apply to the War De- 
partment for a unit of the R. O. T. C. The unit was established in 
January, 1919, and Coiiiiiiaiuliiig OHiecr, I.ituteiiaut Harold II. 



ORGANIZATION 271 

Fisher, was retained at the request of the faculty. The unit was 
divided into two courses: the basic course and the advanced course. 
The basic course included all students below the Junior class, as 
well as the Junior and Senior classes of the Preparatory Depart- 
ment. Members of this course were furnished with uniforms and 
equipment by the government. Membership in the advanced 
course was not compulsory, and was open to Juniors and Seniors 
of both departments who had completed the basic course. Those 
enrolling in the advanced course received free subsistence, and 
training at a summer camp at government expense. 

6. Typical Courses 

Courses have been built systematically from the top down to- 
ward the elementary system in an effort to connect up as soon as 
possible with the state system. 

Typical courses in typical years are here presented so as to 
give the reader a general idea of the main changes that have oc- 
curred. More detailed information as to subject matter follows 
later in this volume. For the sake of convenience the Roman 
numerals will be used here to designate classes as follows — Prima- 
I, Secunda-II, Tertia-III, Quarta-IV, Quinta-V, Sexta-VI, Sep- 
tima-VII, Octava-VIII, Sub-Freshman-IX. Figures denote num- 
ber of hours per week in each subject. 

1872 
MODEL SIX-YEAR COURSE 1861-1883 

Class in which Subject is Offered 

Subject 

I II III IV V VI 

Explanation of Luther's Catechism 2 2 3 3 2 2 

Bible History . . . 2 2 

Latin 6 6 6 6 6 6 

Greek 4 4 4 4 

Hebrew 4 

German 2 2 2 2 3 

English 2 2 2 2 3 4 

Norwegian 2 2 2 2 2 4 

Logic 1 1 

General History 2 2 2 2 . 2 

Geography . . . 2 2 

Natural History (Zoology and Botany) . . . 3 

Mathematics(Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry) 3 2 2 2 2 

Music 2 2 2 2 2 2 

Penmanship . . . 1 2 

Totals 27 26 26 26 28 28 

1883 
MODEL SEVEN-YEAR COURSE 1883-1905 

Class in which Subject is Offered 
Subject 



I II III IV V VI VII 

Dietrich's Explanation 2 2 2 2 2 

Bible History . . . 3 3 

Latin 6 6 6 6 5 5 

Greek 6 6 6 5 

Hebrew 4 ..... . 

German 3 2 2 3 4 

English 3 4 3 3 3 3 6 

Norwegian 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 



274 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

the semester plan of division of the school year into two equal 
periods was introduced for a period of eight years. Only 
a temporary arrangement was made to accommodate the S. A. T. 
C. plan 1918-1919, the college year being divided into four quart- 
ers of three months each, the preparatory year into six terms of 
six weeks each. The summer quarter of the college year 1919 
was not offered, and the semester plan again took effect in both 
departments 1919-1920, each semester in the College Department 
consisting of eighteen weeks, in the Preparatory Department be- 
ing sub-divided into quarters of nine weeks each. This arrange- 
ment seems to be most desirable as it accommodates part-time 
students. 

In the year 1879 class recitation periods were reduced from 
sixty minutes in length to forty-five minutes, in 1913 increased 
to fifty-five minutes, and later, in 1916, reduced to fifty minutes. 
The length of recitation periods in the two departments has al- 
ways been the same, although accrediting standards require only 
fort}'-five minute periods in the Preparatory Department. 

The system of reckoning by units and semester hours was in- 
troduced in 1912. Standards of scholarship have been raised as 
a result of limiting the amount of work which individual students 
may carry, and the posting of quantity and quality bulletins. 

The arrangement of work within the school year has under- 
gone some minor changes from time to time. The daily schedule 
from early years reads: a. m. Rising bell 5:30, Chapel 6:00, 
Breakfast 6:30, Study hour 7:00, Cleaning of rooms 8:30, Classes 
9: 00, Dinner 12: 00, p. m. Free period 1 : 00, Classes 2 : 00, Free 
period 5:00, Supper 5:30, Evening study hours 7:00, Chapel 
8:30, Lights 10:00; as compared with the schedule in operation 
to-day: a. m. Rising bell 6:30, Breakfast 7:00, Classes 7:30, 
Chapel 10:00, Classes 10:30, Dinner 12:10, p. m. Classes 1:00, 
Free period 4:20, Supper 6:00, Evening study hours 7:30, Chapel 
9:4-5, Eights 10:15. 



CHAPTER THIRTEEN 

INSTRUCTION 

A. M. R0VEL8TAD 
I. Policy of Curriculum 

THE curriculum of Luther College, as of any other educational 
institution, is one of the clearest expressions of her aims and 
ideals.* 

The purpose and aspirations of Luther College during the 
past sixty years have been set forth clearly and fittingly on many 
occasions. Of the many excellent articles devoted to this subject, 
only four are cited in this chapter, because they illustrate suf- 
ficiently the fact that the ideal has essentially not changed from 
the foundation of the College to the sixtieth anniversary of that 
foundation.** According to the anniversary article by Profes- 
sor Tingelstad, the definite educational ideal adopted in the be- 
ginning and successfully established and consistently maintained 
in ever-widening circles is: "A Christian education for useful 
service in Christ's cause." 

Such service is rendered most directly and definitely through 
the Christian ministry — the noblest of all callings. The pastor 
has unique opportunities for coming into contact with the many 
phases and problems of human life, to act as temporal and spirit- 
ual adviser and comforter to all social classes. This wonderful 
privilege and responsibility requires, first of all, a sympathy born 
of true spiritual consecration. Yet the effectiveness of this spir- 



*Cf. "College Aims. Past and Present", by L. V. Koos and C. C. Crawford, 
in "School and Society", Dec. 1.3, l!t21, pp. 499-309. 

**Cf. Luther College Catalog for 1872-73, pp. 18-28, article on the college 
curriculum hv President Laur. Larsen. This is the first catalog printed. 

Cf. "College Chips" for Oct., 1921, pp. 266-275, the article, "What Luther 
College Has Done for Education", bv Prof. O. A. Tingelstad; also pp. 276-28,'5, 
the article, "What Luther College Has Done for the Church", by Dr. O. M. 
Norlie. 

Cf. "Luther College Bulletin" for Jan., 1922, the title of which is "Looking 
Forward after Sixty Years", by President Oscar L. Olson. It is appropriate in 
this connection to refer the reader to the many articles and addresses which 
were prepared from time to time during the more recent days of the reconstruc- 
tion of the curriculum at Lutlier College by President C. K. Preus, whose un- 
timely death on May 28, 1921, prevented him from witnessing the significant 
anniversary for which he had planned and labored so faithfully. During his 
administration, too, the early ideals were carefully preserved. 



274 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

the .SL-nicsttT plan oi' di\ ision of the sehool year into two equal 
periods was introduced tor a period of eight years. Only 
a temporary arrangement was made to aeeomniodate the S. A. T. 
C. plan 1918-1919, the college year being divided into four quart- 
ers of three months each, the preparatory year into six terms of 
six weeks each. The summer quarter of the college year 1919 
was not offered, and the semester plan again took effect in both 
departments 1919-1920, eacli semester in the College Department 
consisting of eighteen weeks, in the Preiiaratory Department be- 
ing sub-divided into quarters of nine weeks eacli. This arrange- 
ment seems to be most desirable as it accommodates part-time 
students. 

In the year 1879 class recitation periods were reduced from 
sixty minutes in length to forty-five minutes, in 1913 increased 
to fifty-five minutes, and later, in 1916, reduced to fifty minutes. 
The length of recitation periods in the two departments has al- 
ways been the same, although accrediting standards require only 
forty-five minute periods in the Preparatory Department. 

The system of reckoning by units and semester hours was in- 
troduced in 1912. Standards of scholarship have been raised as 
a result of limiting the amount of work which individual students 
may carry, and the posting of quantity and quality bulletins. 

The arrangement of work within the school year has under- 
gone some minor changes from time to time. The daily schedule 
from early years reads: a. m. Rising bell 5:30, Chapel 6:00, 
Breakfast 6:30, Study hour 7:00, Cleaning of rooms 8:30, Classes 
9: 00, Dinner 12: 00, p. m. Free period 1 : 00, Classes 2: 00, Free 
period 5:00, Supper 5:30, Evening study hours 7:00, Chapel 
8:30, Lights 10:00; as compared with the schedule in operation 
to-day: a. m. Rising bell 6:30, Breakfast 7:00, Classes 7:30, 
Chapel 10:00, Classes 10:30, Dinner 12:10, p. m. Classes 1:00, 
Free period 4:20, Supper 6:00, Evening study hours 7:30, Chapel 
9:45, Eights 10:15. 



CHAPTER THIRTEEN 

INSTRUCTION 

A. M. ROVELSTAD 

I. Policy of Curriculum 

THE curriculum of Luther College, as of any other educational 
institution, is one of the clearest expressions of her aims and 
ideals.* 

The purpose and aspirations of Luther College during the 
past sixty years have been set forth clearly and fittingly on many 
occasions. Of the many excellent articles devoted to tliis subject, 
only four are cited in this chapter, because they illustrate suf- 
ficiently the fact that the ideal has essentially not changed from 
the foundation of tlie College to the sixtieth anniversary of that 
foundation.** According to the anniversary article by Profes- 
sor Tingelstad, the definite educational ideal adopted in the be- 
ginning and successfully established and consistently maintained 
in ever-widening circles is : "A Christian education for useful 
service in Christ's cause." 

Such service is rendered most directly and definitely through 
the Christian ministry- — the noblest of all callings. The pastor 
has unique opportunities for coming into contact with the many 
phases and problems of human life, to act as temporal and spirit- 
ual adviser and comforter to all social classes. This wonderful 
privilege and responsibility requires, first of all, a sympathy born 
of true spiritual consecration. Yet the effectiveness of this spir- 



*Cf. "College Aims. Past and rresent", by L. V. Koos and C. C. Crawford, 
in '-School and Society", Dec. 13, lii21, pp. l99-5n<i. 

*'Cf. Luther Colleg:e Catalog for 1^72-73, pp. 18-28, article on the college 
curriculum by President Laur. Larsen. This is the finst catalog printed. 

Cf. "College Chips" for Oct., 1921, pp. 266-275, the article, "What Luther 
College Has Done for Education", by Prof. O. A. Tingelstad; also pp. 276-28.T, 
the article, "What Luther College Has Done for the Church", by Dr. O. M. 
Norlie. 

Cf. "Luther College Bulletin" for Jan., 1922, the title of which is "Looking 
Forward after Sixty Years", by President Oscar L. Olson. It is appropriate in 
this connection to refer the reader to the many articles and addresses which 
were prepared from time to time during the more recent days of the reconstruc- 
tion of the curriculum at Luther College by President C. K. Preus, whose un- 
timely death on May 28, 1921, prevented liim from witnessing the significant 
anniversary for which he had planned and labored so faithfully. During his 
administration, too, the early ideals were carefully preserved. 



276 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



itual endowment is strengthened and stabilized by a harmonious 
develojjment of the mental faeulties and b}' an aequisition of a 
broad and sound knowledge of man's physical, intellectual, and 
spiritual development down through the ages. 

It was this broad educational outlook which influenced the 
founders of Luther College in selecting and administering their 
curriculum. None of us appreciate fully their self-sacrifice, solid- 
ity, foresight, and idealism. For, in spite of the immediate need 
for a large number of pastors in the growing communities of the 
Middle West, the}' resisted the temptation to shorten and hurry 
the preparation of the candidates for the ministry ; and they de- 
veloped a remarkable combination of intellectual training and 
spiritual consecration. 

In realizing this ideal of preparation for tlie Christian min 




STLUKNTS' ROOM 

istry, the elements of the curriculum from that time down to the 
present have been chosen with special care and a definite aim. 
This is utilitarianism and pre-vocationalism in the best and nobl- 
est sense. The reason for the presence of religion in the cur- 
riculum is self-evident. The practical value and broadening in- 
fluence of the English language and literature on a pastor require 
no demonstration. The pastor's need of a knowledge of the Nor- 
wegian language and literature is still imperative in many com- 
munities. Apart from the great imi:)ortance of German secular 
literature, the very history of Lutheranism proves the value of an 
ability to read in the original the great German works on theology. 
French, though an elective study, has some importance for the 
theologian as an introduction to French thought, as well as to an 
understanding of a large part of the English language. 

In addition to these modern languages, the prospective pastor 
finds other subjects of great interest and value. It is hardly neces- 



INSTRUCTION 277 

sary to call attention to the enliglitening, instructive, broadening, 
and steadying influence of the study of history and the use of the 
historical method. The social sciences, such as sociology, econom- 
ics, statistics, psychology, education, philosophy, have been given 
sucli prominence in recent years and have undergone such a mark- 
ed development that the pastor w^ho has not received an introduc- 
tion to them has lost an opportunity to obtain a more intimate con- 
tact with the fundamental social and economic problems of his 
parishioners and to gain a knowledge of the modern methods of 
understanding, training, and instructing the minds of his people. 
Higher mathematics furnishes, in addition to certain practical 
formulae and methods, a type of mental discipline which is gained 
in no other field. 

Upon the foregoing subjects — in fact, upon every sphere of 
modern life — a great influence is being exerted by current scien- 
tific thought and method. Science not only represents objective 
investigation and classification of specific data, but also has de- 
veloped into a system of speculative philosophy based on more or 
less definite premises. Nearly every congregation is to some ex- 
tent affected by such an atmosphere and the pastor cannot escape 
it, even if he will. Therefore, it is self-evident that his pastoral 
work will be carried on with greater confidence and power if his 
preliminary course of training contains such subjects as physics, 
chemistry, biology, and other related branches, studied under the 
guidance of competent Christian teachers. This important guid- 
ance is received by students attending Luther College. 

In this age of scientific and historical methods, the importance 
of "sources" is constantly stressed. The ability to use sources 
not only should give intellectual power, confidence, and accuracj', 
but also should serve as a ballast in the sea of conflicting doubts, 
prejudices, and emotions, if coupled with other essential qualities. 

For the pastor the most important "sources" are the Hebrew 
Old Testament, the Greek New Testament, the Greek and Latin 
Church Fathers of the early days, and the Latin commentaries 
of the later theologians. In addition to this practical value, the 
study of the Greek and Latin languages, literatures, and civil- 
izations gives him a better understanding of the etymology, spell- 
ing, and meaning of the English language, two-thirds of which 
is of Latin and Greek origin. Furthermore, the student of these 
languages gains a more intimate knowledge of literary English, 
a good foundation for the study of Romance languages, an excel- 
lent mental discipline, a closer contact with the best models of 



278 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



art and arcliitccture, a broad basis for an understanding of medi- 
e\al and modern civilization. 

Though a course of study dealing with so many fields re- 
quires much time and effort on the part of the prospective pastor, 
yet it gives him a broad and solid foundation for his j^astoral 
studies and duties. 

This pre-theological course is built upon a classical founda- 
tion. Though the original requirements in Latin and Greek have 
been somewhat reduced, in order to make more room for elective 
subjects, still the curriculum remains fundamentally classical, as 




CHEMISTRY LABORATORY 

was the case with the German "gymnasium" which originally serv- 
ed as the model for Luther College. 

Such an education was, on the whole, "liberal" or "cultural". 
The definitions of the term "liberal" have had many variations, 
whicli are reflected in the many types of present-day colleges.*** 
However, it is perhaps safe to state that a "liberal" education is 
general in its purj)ose and docs not prejjare s})ecially for any vo- 
cation. The aim is to pre))arc for "the whole of life rather than 
for some particular ])art of it"; to i)re))are for life itself rather 
than for a livelihood; to deepen and broaden the mind until it is 
"liberalized" or freed from "the world that man's intellect has 
conquered for us". The stress laid on ideals of conduct, life, 
and thought inherent in this type of education would naturally 



''Cf. Koos mikI ('iii\v(oi<l, l<ic. (it. 



INSTRUCTION 



279 



be less prominent in professional or teelinical seliools than in 
the "liberal" college. 

A "liberal" education is essentially "cultural", for not only 
does it embrace the subject-matter of its branches, but it also 
depends on the cultivation or "culture" of the mental faculties, 
not for a specific line of action but with a view to a general 
mental power which is capable of surmounting difficulties as they 
arise in later life. This theory of "formal" mental discipline and 
the automatic transfer of power or training from one field to 
another, though strongly attacked in recent years and as a result 




I'llVSICS LAUOKATUKV 

somewhat modified, nevertheless has not been successfully dis- 
proved. 

On the other hand, no education can be "liberal" or "cultural" 
in the strictest sense, for every course of study prepares more 
directly for some few professions or vocations than for others. 
This fact holds good also in the curriculum of Luther College. 
First of all, it furnishes an excellent preparation for the most 
effective work in the Christian ministry. P'urthermore, the gradu- 
ate from Luther College, both in respect to general cultural back- 
ground and in regard to specific knowledge, is equipped to pursue 
special work in other professions, such as those of teaching, medi- 
cine, law, and others. Even those students at Luther College 
who do not plan to complete their course at this institution may 
by a judicious election of studies prepare directly for two or 
more years toward a later professional career, meantime ex- 
periencing the stabilizing power of a Christian atmosphere in 



280 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

a Christian college, wliicli serves as an intermediate stage be- 
tween parental love and care and the freedom and trials of 
university life. Such courses have a long-established precedent 
in the pre-medical, pre-engineering, pre-law courses which have 
been given for the last twenty years in many colleges and univer- 
sitjes. Nevertheless, of course, the curriculum is pre-professional 
merely in a broad sense and less in the special sense wliicli applies 
to a law school or a medical school of science. 

To sum up, the pre-theological course at Lutlier College is 
essentially classical, liberal, and cultural, and lays a broad foun- 
dation for many walks of life. 

II. Entrance Requirements 
1. Preparatory Department 

Admission into the Junior High School (which comprises the 
usual eighth and ninth grades) will be granted to male students 
who have completed the seventh or eighth grades, provided they 
are at least twelve years of age, and other boj^s at least fourteen 
years of age whose previous training has been such as to enable 
them to do work with profit in the first year of the course. 

The work of the Senior High School corresponds to that of- 
fered in the three upper years of a standard American high school. 
Unconditional admission to the Senior High School presupposes 
the completion of four units of work acceptable for college entrance, 
but students who have completed not less than two units may be 
registered in the Senior High School at the discretion of the 
principal. 

Satisfactory testimonials of good moral character are required 
of applicants for admission to the Preparatory Department. A 
certificate of honorable dismissal is required of those coming from 
other schools. 

Students are admitted either by examination or by certificate. 
Examinations for admission or for advanced standing will be 
given at the beginning of the school year. Those who present 
certificates showing eighth grade graduation will be admitted 
without examination. Pupils from high scliools will be credited 
for work well done and classified accordingly. High School Board 
certificates from Minnesota and North Dakota and first grade 
teacher's certificate standings from any state will be accepted 
for advanced standing. Credit granted on certificates from other 
schools may be revoked, however, if the student fails to sustain 
himself creditably in his work. 



INSTRUCTION 281 

2. College Department 
Graduates of standard high schools, requiring 16 year credits 
(units) for graduation, are admitted without any conditions, pro- 
vided that their hi^h school training has included at least three 
units of English, two of mathematics, one of history, one of 
physics or chemistry, and two of foreign language. For those 
who enter without Latin, German, or Norwegian, special begin- 
ning courses in these subjects are arranged in the College. Six- 
teen high school units or year credits, each representing 180 
recitation hours, are required for unconditional admission to the 
Freshman class, and a minimum of fourteen units for conditional 
admission. Entrance conditions must be removed at the first 
opportunity by appropriate work in the Preparatory Department. 

III. Graduation Requirements 
1. Preparatory Department 

Sixteen units acceptable for college entrance, plus one-half 
unit of Bible, are required for graduation from the Senior High 
School. The sixteen units must include three units of English, 
two of mathematics (elementary algebra and plane geometry), 
one of history, and one of laboratory science (physics preferred), 
one-half of music, and four of foreign language, at least two of 
these to be Latin and one Norwegian. 

A unit is the equivalent of one high school study satisfactorily 
pursued during thirty-six weeks, on the basis of five recitation 
periods per week. The regular recitation periods at Luther Col- 
lege are fifty minutes in length, and the laboratory and book- 
keeping periods one hundred minutes. 

Graduation from the Junior Higli School requires the com- 
pletion of eighth grade grammar, arithmetic. United States his- 
tory, and geography, and, in addition, four units of work accept- 
able for college entrance. First-year high school English and 
one-fourth unit of Bible must be included. 

In general, five-hour subjects give one unit's credit for a 
year's work and two-hour subjects (Bible and music) give one- 
fourth unit's credit. 

2. College Department 

(1). A residence of at least one scholastic year at Luther 
College. 

(2). The completion of at least 130 semester hours of college 
work. In addition, twelve hours of physical training are required 
of those physically fit. 



282 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

(3). Six semester liours of I<atin above course IV (i. e., above 
tlie regular four years of high scliool Latin) ; Norse and German 
and Greek through course IV in each (i. c, four semester courses 
in each) ; four hours of Greek Testament, ten liours of other 
Christianity, ten liours of English, twelve hours of history (or six 
hours of history and twelve hours of other social science, in- 
cluding psychology), and one year each of mathematics, natural 
science, and biological science or psychology. 

(4). The completion of a major of six semester courses in 
each of two departments (or groups of closely related depart- 
ments). In no case, however, must these six courses total less 
than eighteen semester hours. Latin I and II (i. e.. Beginner's 
Latin and Caesar) will not be counted toward a major. 

(5). The language requirements vary in accordance with the 
number of units of foreign language offered for college entrance, 
the lacking entrance units being made up, in addition to the 
regular language requirements. In foreign language, a year's 
work in high school is counted equivalent to a semester's work 
in college. 

IV. Outline of Subjects by Decades 

Ahhrev'iations and Explanaiiuns 
Classes 

I — College seniors; II — College juniors; III — College soph- 
omores; IV — College freshmen. 

V — Preparatory seniors; VI — Preparatory juniors; VII — Pre- 
paratory sophomores; VIII — Preparatory freshmen; IX — Pre- 
paratory sub-freshmen. 

Hours and Terms 

(1) — 1st semester; (2) — 2nd semester. 

(f)- — Fall term; (w) — Winter term; (s) — Spring term. 

Thus, 'I hours \wr week in 1st semester — t (1); 4 hours per 
week in Fall term- — 4 (f). 

AVhen terms or semesters are not specified, the given iiuinl)cr 
of recitations per week runs througliout the scliool j'car. 

Language used as medium of instruction in class 

The catalogs, exce])t in 1872-73, very rarely specify the 
language used as a medium of instruction in the respective classes. 
Tlif l'",iiglisli language has increasingly taken the place of Nor- 
wegian. In most reeciit years every class lias been conducted 
witii l'",nglisli as tlic incdiuiii, except in foreign language classes 



INSTRUCTION 



285 



in which a more intimate familiarity with the language and thought 
is especially desired. 

El. — Elective. R — Required. Rec. — Recommended. 

All courses are regarded as Required^ except when marked 
with El, or Rec. Subjects in the Preparatory Dep't (1921-1922) 
are classified as Required, Recommended, or Elective. 

ND — Normal Department. All courses are regarded as of 
the regular curriculum, unless marked with ND. Unless other- 
wise specified, the courses in the Normal Department were identic- 
al with those in Classes IV, V, VI up to 1883-84, and V, VI, VII 
from 1883-84 to 1885-86. The facts given in the following out- 
line of subjects are drawn from the Luther College catalogs of 
the years indicated and from the invaluable work of Professor 
Gisle Bothne, entitled "Det Norske Luther College, 1861-97." 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 

AGRICULTURE 



ear 


Class 


Hours and 
Courses 


Subject 


Text 


Teacher 


?-6^ 












?-7S 












?-8S 












?-QS 












?-0,S 










• 


?-n 












1-22 


IX (El.) 




Agriculture (offered) 







BIOLOGY (Botany. Zoology, Physiology) 



2-63 
2-73 



2-83 
2-93 



12-03 
2-13 



VII. 



VIII 

I, II, III. 



(El) .... 
I, II, III. 



(El) 

I. II. Ill . 

(El) 

I, II, III. . 

lEl) 

VIII. (El). 
VIII, (El) . 



5 (s). 
5 (s). 



4 (1) 

4 (2) 

4 (1 or 2). 

Course I. . 
4 (1 or 2) . 



Course II.. 
4 (1 or 2) .. 
Course III. 

4 (1 or 2) . 
Course IV. 

5 (2) 

5 



Botany 

Zoology 

Announcement of Zoology and Botany 

for 1883-84 in Class V, 3 hours 

Physiology 

Zoology 

None , 

Biology (8 semester hours) listed in 

outline 

Zoology and Physiology 

Botany 

Elementary zoology 



Gray 

No text- b ook 



Siewers . 



Markhua ,Sheel 
Sihler 



Lectures and laboratory work . 
Embryology 



Comparative study, chick and pig 

Invertebrate zoology 

Lectures andlaboratory work 

Vertebrate zoology 

Text, lectures, laboratory, reading. . . . 

Physiology and Hygiene 

Biology 

(Combination of zoology, botany, and 
physiology, v\ath special stress on zo- 
ology.) Text supplemented by labora- 
tory work. 



Hunter 

Hunter 

Hegner, 
Holmes. .. . 

Patton, Prent- 
iss, Arey 



Hegner. 
Hegner. 



HiUeboe 
Hilleboe 
Trytten 



Trytten 

Trytten 
Trytten 



Martin. 
Hunter. 



284 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 



CHEMISTRY 



Year 


Class 


Hours and 
Courses 


Subject 


Te.xt 


Teacher 


1862-63 










1872-73 












1882-83 












1892-93 


III 


4 (s) 






Sheel 




IV 


4 (s) 






Sheel 


1902-03 












1912-13 


I (El) 


4(1) 

Course III 

4 (2).. 


Qualitative Analysis 




Sheel 




II (El) 

IV (El) 

F, II(El) 


Lectures and laboratory work, the former 
two hours, the latter four hours (two 
double hours.) 
Prerequisite, Course II 




Sheel 




Course IV 

4. 


Plan similar to qualitative analysis. Pre- 
requisite, Course III 


Smith 

Smith 


Sheel 




Course II 

4 (2) 


Class work, 2 regular hours. Laboratory 
practice, 2 double hours. 

Elementary chemistry 

Class work, 2 regular hours. Laboratory 


Sheel 




Course I 

3 (1) 




1921-22 




Sheel 




I, II (El) 

II, III. IV (El). 
V^ VI (El) ... . 


Course III 

3 (2) 

Course IV 

4 

Courses I-II. . . 

5. 


Lectures, 1 regular hour. Laboratory 
work, 2 double hours. Prerequisite, 
Course III 




Sheel 




Lectures, 1 regular hour. Laboratory 
work, 2 double hours. Prerequisite, 
Courses I, II 

Inorganic chemistry (advanced) 

Class work, 2 regular hours. Laboratory 
work, 2 double hours 


Smith 


Sheel 






O. M. Eittreim 








Organic chemistry will be offered to college 
juniors and seniors in 1922-23, by Prof. 
Sheel 







CHRISTIANITY 



1862 


V, VI. 


3. 


Bible History 

Catechism 


Gen. 1 Kgs. . . . 
Pontoppidan. . . 






V, VI 


2. 




1872 


I, II 


1 


J. D. Jacobsen 




I, II.. 


7 


Catechism 

Catechism ... 


Hutter 

Dietrich 

Pontoppidan. . . 
Gen. 1 Kgs. . 

Rambach 

Acts, Rom. Gal. 
Gen. 1 Kgs. . . . 






Ill, IV 

V. VI 


2 

2 


Larsen 






Larsen, Brandt 




V, VI 


3 


Bible History . 


Brandt 




IV Normal 


-> 


Catechetics • 


Brandt 




IV, VI Normal. 

V. VI Normal.. 
I 


2 

3 

9 


Brandt 


1882 


Bible History 


Brandt 
Naeseth 




II, IV 


2 


Catechism 

Catechism 

Bible History 


Dietrich 

Dietrich 

Vogt 

Pontoppidan. . . 

Roalkvam 

Dietrich 






V, VI 


2. 






VI, VII 


3 


Roalkvam 




VII 


2 




E. J. Petersen 




V Normal 


3 




Roalkvam 




V, VI Normal. . 

V. VI Normal. . 

VI, VII Normal 
VII Normal. . . 

I. II 


3 

3 

3. 


Catechism 


Larsen 






Roalkvam 






Vogt 


Roalkvam 


1892 


2 

2 


Catechism 

♦Alternating with Greek Testament every 
other year. 


Pontoppidan . . . 


E. J. Petersen 

Na;seth 




Ill, IV 


2 




Dietrich 

Luther 


Larsen 




V 


1. 




Markhus 




V 


2 








VI, VII 


2 


Catechism 

Bible History 

♦Alternating with Greek Testament 
every other year. 


Pontoppidan. . . 
O. T 


Hove 




VI, VII 


9 


Krog 











INSTRUCTION 



285 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 



Class 



II 

Ill 

IV 

VI, VII. 

V 

VI 

VII 

I 

II 

III. IV.. 

V 

V 

VI 

VII 

VII 

VIII.. . 

I 



VI... 
VII.. 
VIII. 
IX. . 



Hours and 
Courses 



Subject 



Augsburg Confession. . . . 

Greek Testament 

Cateciiism 

Catechism 

Catechism 

Bible History 

Bible History 

Bible History 

Greek Testament 

Augsburg Confession. . . . 

Catechism 

Life of Christ 

Bible Introduction 

Church History 

Bible History 

Catechism 

Bible History and Geog . 
Greek Testament 



Augsburg Confession. 



Dietrich. 
Dietrich. 



Life of Christ 

Bible Introduction 

Church History 

Bible History 

Bible History and Geog . 
Bible History 



Text 



Dietrich 

Dietrich 

Pontoppidan . 
Matt. Acts. . 
Judges. Dan . 
Gen.. Josh. . . 
4 books 



Dietrich ... 
Matt. Acts . 



Vogt 

1 Sam. Dan. . . . 
Pontoppidan. . 

Gen. Ruth 

Matt. & Bible 
introduction . . 



Parts I, II. 
Parts II, V. 



Kirk 

Norlie 

Str0mme . . . 
1 Sam. Dan. 
Gen. Ruth., 
.-^cts 



Teacher 



Naeseth 

Nseseth 

Pre us 

Preus 

Torrison 

Preus, Markhus 

Preus 

Preus 

Ylvisaker 

Preus 

Preus 

Ylvisaker 

Preus 

Ylvisaker 

Sperati 

Torrison 

Preus 

Sihler & Norlie 
Tingelstad 

& Sihler 
Norlie 
Tingelstad & 

Norlie 
K. O. Eittreim 
F. E. Petersen 
K. O. Eittreim 
Sperati 
Sperati 
K. O. Eittreim 



COMMERCE 



VI, IX (El). 



5 (1 or 2). 

S (1) 

5 (2) 



Bookkeeping 

Elementary course (consists of the first six 
units of textbook) 

.\dvanced course (consists of the seventh 
unit, banking, and other supplemental 
work). The completion of the two 
courses requires ordinarily two years to 
finish 

Commercial arithmetic. (See under math- 
ematics) 

Commercial geography. (See under geog- 
raphy) 

Commercial law 

Practical knowledge of the laws, forms, and 
papers connected with ordinary business 
transactions 

Shorthand 

Stress on speed and abiUty to read notes 
readily 

TypewTiting. "Touch" system. Speed 
and accuracy 



Goodyear & 
Marshall . . 



Hamilton. 



Gregg System . 



Cutler & 
Sorelle . 



K. O. Eittreim 



K. O. Eittreim 



S. S. Reque 
K. O. Eittreim 



K. O. Eittreim 



K. O. Eittreim 



ECONOMICS 


1862-3. 












872-3. 












882-3. 












892-3 . 












902-3 . 












912-13 














286 



LUTHER f.OrJ^EOE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Oulliiw of Subjects by Decades 



Year 


Class 


Hours and 
Courses 


Subject 


Text 


Teacher 


1921-22 


I,-III (El) 

I.-III (El) 

I-III (El) 


3 (1) 

3 (2) 

3 (2) 


General introduction to economics. Spe- 
cial attention to the development of 
leading schools of econorryc thought .... 

Principles of economics. Stress on relation 
between industrial problems and social 
conditions 

Economic development of the U. S 


Seager 

Lippincott 


Talle 

Talle 
Talle 



EDUC.A.TION 



1862-63 

1872-73 
1882-83 
1892-93 
1902-03 
1912-13 



ND 

\D 

IV, ND. 
IV, ND . 

I, II 

I 

1 



II 

I, II (El). 
I. II (El). 
f, II (El). 
I, II (El). 
I. II (El). 



I, II (El). 

I, II (El). 
I, II (El). 
I, II (El). 



II, III 

(Required un- 
less Biology is 
elected.) 
I, II (El) 



I, II (El). 



I, II (El). 



I, II (El). 



I rEl). 



I, II (EI). 



1 (s) 

2 (s) 

3 (1) 

Course II . . 

3 (2) 

Course I . . . 

4 (1) 

Course III. 

4 (2) 

Course IV. . 

4 (1) 

Course V. . . 

4 (2) 

Course VI . . 
Course VII . 



2 (1). 
2 (1). 



2 (1) 

Course VIII . 



2 (2) 

2 (2) 

2 (2) 

3 (1 or 2).. 
Course III. 



3 (1 or 2).. 
Course IV. 



3 (1 or 2). 
Course II . 
(Psych). . 
3 (1 or 2). 
Course I . 



III. 



3 (I). 
Cours 

3 (2) 

Course IV. 

3 (1) 

Course V. . 



3 (2) 

Course VI . 



2 (1 or 2) 

(Ineachsection) 
Course VII . . . . 



3 (1 or 2)... 
Course VIII . 



3 (1 or 2).. 
Course IX. 



3 (1 or 2). 
Course X. 



Catechetics 

Pedagogy 

Theory and practice of teaching 

Catechetics 

History of education 

History of education 

Psychology in its relation to education. 



Introductory psychology 

Lectures, experiments, reports. 
History of philosophy 



History of education. 

Child study 

Educational methods. 



Theory of education. (Lectures, reports, 
practice) 

(a) Philosophy of education 

(b) How to Study and teaching How to 
Study 

(c) Civics and Health 

School administration. (Lectures, reports 

observation, practice) 

(a) Economy in education 

(b) High school administration 

(c) Introduction to the study of society. 

Applied psychology 

Various texts and experiments. Prereq 

uisite: Course I 

Psychology of religion 

Textbooks, questionnaires, reports, lee 

tures 

Educational psychology 

Readings, lectures and experiments 

Prerequisite: Introductory psychology. . , 

Introductory psychology 

Lectures, experiments, reports 



History of philosophy. 
History of education, . 



High school methods 

Observation of teaching. Reports on 
assigned topics 

School administration 

Text, readings, reports 

Special methods in high school subjects.. . 

In sections under supervision of instructor 
who is at the head of the department 
concerned. Textbook, lectures, obser- 
vations, reports 

Administrative problems 

Stress on problems of superintendents and 
high school principals 

Educational sociology 

Surveys and reports 



.American public school system. 
Assigned readings and reports 



Rambach . . 

Fa ye 

Page 

Roalkvam. 



Harris- Bagley. 



Yerkes . 
James. . 
Weber . 



Monroe . 



Kirkpatrick. . 

Thorndike & 
Strayer . . . 



Brown 

Rosenkranz. . . 



McMurray . 
.A.llen 



Snedden 

Roark 

Hollister 

Small&Vincent 
Hollingworth & 
Poffenberger 



Starch , . . 
Woodrow 
Terman . . 
Breese . . . 



Thilly, 



Graves, Monroe 
Cubberley. . , 
Parker 



Cubberley 



Nutt. 



Inglis 

Chancellor. 



Cubberley. 



Brandt 

Brandt 

Brandt 

Roalkvam 

G. Bothne 

G. Bothne 

Tingelstad 

Tingelstad 

Tingel.stad 

Tingelstad 

Tingelstad 

Tingelstad 

Hilleboe 
Hilleboe 

Hilleboe 
Hilleboe 

Hilleboe 
Hilleboe 
Hilleboe 
Hilleboe 

Norlie 

Norlie 

Norlie 

Norlie 



Tingelstad 

Norlie 

Tingelstad 



Tingelstad 
(Norlie) 



K. E. Peterson 



Tingelstad 



Norlie 



Tingelstad 
(Norlie) 



INSTRUCTION 



287 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 



Class 



I-III (El). 



I (El). 



I, II (El.. 
I, II (EI). 

I, II (El). 



Hours and 
Courses 



3 (1 or 
Course 



Course XII. . 



^ (1 or 
Course 
i (1 or 
Course 

3 (1 or 
Course 



2).... 
XIII. 
2).... 
XIV 



2)... 
XV. 



Subject 



Principles of education 

Education as a science. Bibliographical 
work and methods of research. A 
syllabus on education developed 

Practice teaching 

(In preparatory department and the local 
high school) 

Educational hygiene 



Statistical methods applied to education . . 
(Effort by members of the class to solve 
local educational problems) 

Moral and religious education 

Syllabus, lectures and assigned reports 



Text 



Judd. 



Rapeer. 



Rugg 
Alexander . 



Norlie & Tingel- 
stad 



Teacher 
Tingelstad 



Tingelstad 



(F. E. Peterson) 
Tingelstad 



Tingelstad 
Norlie 



ENGLISH 



IV.... 
V, VI. 



IV (ND) 

V (ND). 

VI (ND) 
I 



II 


3. 


Ill 


3. . 


IV 


3. 


V 


5. 


VI 


3, 


VII 




I 


,? 



IV. 



Grammar 

Fourth reader translated 

Fourth reader 

Spelling book 

Grammar 

National third, fourth, and fifth readers. 

Shakespeare 



Fourth reader (ND) . 

Dictation 

Composition 



Shakespeare: Hamlet 

Milton: Paradise Lost 

History of English Literature 

Essays 

Shakespeare: Julius Caesar 

Extracts from other authors 

Rhetoric and composition 

Composition 

Supplementary readers 

Extracts from other authors 

Composition 

National fifth reader 

English grammar 

Composition 

Fourth reader 

Translation into Norwegian 

Grammatical exercises 

Dictations 

Fourth reader 

English grammar 

Translations and declamations 

Composition 

(Normal Dept. was not conducted in 188.! 
83) 

Study of English classics 

.•\nglo-Saxon reader 

History of English literature 

Parallel reading 

Composition 

Essays 

Partly with I. subjects as in I 

English classics 

Rhetoric 

Parallel reading 

Composition 

Essays 

Subjects as in III 



Pinneo 

McGuflfey 

McGuffey 

McGuffey 

Greene 

Parker & Wat- 



Saunders . 



Gilman. 



Hart.... 
Swinton. 



L0kke.. 
Monroe. 



National . 
Morris . . 



Knudsen&Lokkr 



Sweet . 



Schmidt 
Schmidt 



Bergh. (I-IV f, 
V 2 f, VI, 2 f) 



Bergh 
Bergh 
Bergh 



Jacobsen (ND) 
L. S. Reque 



Naeseth 

Naeseth 
Naeseth 
Nseseth 

Naeseth 



Reque (1 hr.) 
Naeseth 



L.S.Requed hr) 
Naeseth 



Naeseth 



288 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 



Year 


Class 


Hours and 
Courses 


Subject 


Text 


Teacher 




V 


5 (s) 

6 (f),6 (w). . .. 
6 


Seven American classics 


Swinton 


G. Markhus 




VI 














English grammar 


Meiklejohn .... 














Fourth reader 


Appleton 


Markhus 




VII 














Fourth reader 


Monroe 


Markhus 




I 


3 




















1902-03 


History of English literature 


Brooke 


Naeseth 




II 

Ill 


2(f), 3 (w). 3(s). 
3 






Selections from Pope, Dryden, and others 


































Olson 


1902-03 


History of English literature 


Brooke 


Naeseth 
















Olson 




History of English literature 


Brooke 


Naeseth 




IV 


3 






Collateral reading: Shakespeare & Milton 
Rhetoric 








Clarke 






Shakespeare: one play 




Naeseth 




V 


6 (f) 

2 (f). 2 (w). . . . 
6 (w), 6 (s).... 

6 


History of American Literature 


Watkins 














selections from American authors 




Markhus 




VI 


Rhetoric 


Clarke 






Vocal culture 

Elocution 


Russell 










Markhus 




VII 


Punctuation 


Raub 






Elocution 

Elocution 


Sweit 

Swett 


Markhus 




I 


2 (1) 

Course V 

3(2) 

Course VI 

4 (1) 

Course VII 

4 (2) Course 

VIII 

4 (1) Course 

IX 

4 (2) 

Course X 

4(2) 

Course XI 

1 






Grammar 


West 


Gjerset 


1912-13 






Olson 




I, II (El) 

I, II (EI) 

II 










The drama: Its law and technique 


Woodbridge 










Olson 




Additional literature for reference work. 

Reports by students. One theme from 

each student 

.^nglo-Saxon 

Grammar, versification; phonetics 


Bright 


Olson 
Olson 




Chaucer: Canterbury Tales (5 or 6) 
Middle English. Prologue. Also private 

reading. Reports and one theme from 

each student. . 




Olson 
Olson 












Reports and one theme from each student 




Olson 












Reports and one theme from each student 




Olson 






Course III 

1 


Rhetoric 

Argumentation 

Outlines, composition, longer themes 


Baldwin 

Baker 


Olson 






Olson 




Course IV 


(See also under I- 1 1) 







INSTRUCTION 



289 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 



Class 



III. 



VII. 



VIII. 



I, II (El) 

I, II, III (El) 

I, II, III (El). 

I, II (El) 

I, II (El) 

I, II (El) 

I, II (El) 

I, II (El) 

I, II (El) 

I, II (El) 

I, II (El) 

I, II (El) 

I. II (El) 



IV.... 
V (El) , 



VI (Rec). 



VII (Rec). 



VIII (Rec). 

IX (R) 



Hours and 
Courses 



3 (1). 2 (2). 
Course II. . 



2 (Course I) 
4 



3 (1 or 2) Course 

V 

3 (1 or 2) Course 

VI 

3 (1) CourseVII 
J(2)CourseVIII 
3 (1 or 2)Course 

IX 

3 (1 or 2) Course 

X 

3(1 or 2) Course 

XI 

3 (1 or 2)Course 

XII 

3(1 or 2) Course 

XIII 

3(1 or 2) Course 

XIV 

3(1) Course XV 
3(2)CourseXVI 
3(1 or 2) Course 

XVII 



Courses III-IV 



2 Courses I- 1 1 
5 



Subject 



History of English Literature 

Lectures by teacher 

Readings . 

Selections 

Reports and one theme from each student 

Rhetoric and composition 

History of American literature (2 hrs.) . . . 
Literature (for study and reading) (2 hrs.) 

Memorizing selections 

Weekly compositions 

Composition and rhetoric (2 hrs.) 



Literature (for study and reading) (2 hrs.) 

Memorizing selections 

Weekly compositions 

Composition and rhetoric (2 hrs.) 



Literature (for study and for reading) 
(2 hrs.) 

Memorizing selections 

Weekly compositions 

English grammar 

Literature (class study and supplementary 
reading) 

Compositions and reports 



Advanced composition. 



Public speaking 

Shakespeare: Four plays 

Masterpieces of English literature 



.American literature 

The drama to 1642 

The novel 

The Romantic movement 
Tennyson and Browning . 



The essay 

-Anglo-Saxon reader. 
Beowulf translated . 



Chaucer: Canterbury Tales and Prologue. 
See under I-II-III. 



History of English literature 

Representative selections of English liter- 
ature 

Rhetoric and composition 

Rhetoric and composition 

History of English literature 

Weekly composition 

Memorizing 

Outside reading 

Exercises in debating, reading, speaking. . . 

Survey of American literature 

Composition and rhetoric(second semester) 



Outside reading 

Public speaking 

Composition and rhetoric (.2 hours) . 



Literary readings and reports (3 hours) . . . 
Practice in reading, memorizing, debating 

etc 

Orthoepy 

English grammar (2 hours) 

Literary readings and reports (3 hours) . . . 
English grammar 



Text 



Century. 
Manly. . 



Baldwin. . . 
Abernethy . 



Lockwood and 
Emerson . . . 



Lockwood and 
Emerson . . . 



Gjerset 



Cunliffe and Lo- 
mer. Periodical? 
Bright 



Moody &Lovett 



Manly . 
Linn. . . 



Hinchman. 



Brewer 

Long 

Calhoun and 
McAlarney . 



Brewer 

Lockwood and 
Emerson . . . 



.Abernethy. 
Wooley . . . 



Gjerset . 



Olson 



Olson 
Thompson 



Olson 



Thompson 



Thompson 



Talle 

Talle 
Olson 
Olson 

Olson 

Olson 

Olson 

Olson 

Olson 

Olson 
Olson 
Olson 

Olson 
Olson 



Nelson 

S. S. Reque 



Nelson 
Nelson 
Nelson 
Nelson 

Evanson 
Talle 



290 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Outline of Siihjeds hij Decades 

FORENSICS (Debating. Oratory, Elocution, Public Speaking) 



Class 



Hours and 
Courses 



Subject 



Progress in this field is mudi: not only by 
means of class instruction in Englisli and 
Norwegian, but also through the student 
literary organizations and public con- 
tests and programs, and by instruction 
given privately by the instructors. 
Special coaches for debating and orator- 
ical contest in 1921-22 are Professors 
D. T. Nelson and H. O. Talle. 

Exercises in declamation (in Norse course) 



Text 



Teacliir 



VII 

I. II. Ill (El). 



V, VI, VII(Rec) 



2 (f). 2 (s) 

1 English, 

Course IV. . . 
1 

3 (1 or 2) 

Eng. Course VI 



Elocution. 



Swett . 



Public speaking 

Debating and other exercises. . . . 

Public speaking 

Same as in 1912-13 for Class II. 
Public speaking and debating . . . 



Brewer. 



Markhus 

Olson 

Thompson 

Talle 

Reque & Nelson 



FRENCH 



I (El). 



11 (El). 



I, II (El). 
I, II (El). 



2 (f),2 (s). 

4 

Course II . 



4 

Course I . 



Courses I-II . . , 

3 

Courses III-IV. 



Elementary French 

Advanced course 

Grammar and e.\ercises continued . 

Selections for reading 

Lectures 

Elementary course 

Pronunciation 

Essentials of grammar 

Exercises 

Selections from authors 

Elementary French 

Grammar and reading 

.'\dvanced course 

Stress on literary features 

Larger assignment of authors 

Review of grammar. 



L. S. Retuic 
L. S. RcQue 



V, VI. 



V. . 
VI.. 
III. 
V. . 
VI.. 
V. . 
VI.. 
VII. 



3 

4 

5 (s) 

5 (s) 

5 (f),S (w). 



Geography of Northern Europe . 

Geography of Europe 

Geography 

Read, translated, and learned. . 

Geography 

Common school geography 

Physical geography 

Grammar school geography 

Grammar school geography 

Geography of Europe 

Physical geography 

General geography 



L. S. Reque 



Fraser&Squair 



S. S. Reque 
S. S. Reque 







GENER.AL SCIENCE 




1 


1862-63 












1872-73 













1882-83 












1892-93 












1902-03 












1912-13 












1921-22 


viii, ix (El).. 


. . . .5 (i) 


Introduction to general science 


Clark 


O. M. Eittrcim 


GEOGRAPHY 



Dan 

Mitcheil 



Geelmuyden . 

Warren 

Guyot 

Guyot 

Guyot 

.'Vppleton . . . . 

Houston 

Horn 



Schmidt 

Siewers 
Bergh (f) 
Narvesen 
Narvesen 
Narvesen 
G. Bothne 
Sheel 
Markhus 



INSTRUCTION 



291 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 



Year 


Class 


Hours and 

Courses 


Subject 


Text 


Teacher 


ig02-o.? 


V 

VI .. 


5 


Physics and phys. geography 


Wentworth & 
Hill(Physics). 


Sheel 




VII 

None 

V, VI, VII(EI). 
V, VI, VII(El). 
IX 


5 (f) 

5 (w) . . 


Political geography 

Geography of Europe 


Longman 


Sihler 
Sihler 


191' 13 










1971_>7 


5 (1) . 


Commercial geography 

Physical geography 

Political geography 




S. S. Reque 
O. M. Eittreim 
Talle 




5 (1 or 2) 

3 


GSRM VN 


1862-63 


IV 

V, VI 

I 


3 

2 

7 


German forms 

Second reader 

Schiller: Thirty Years' War 


Aucenrieth 

Wackernagel. . . 


Schmidc 




German grammar 

German verbs 








Autenrieth 


Larsen 

Schmidt (1 hr.) 
Siewers(III-V) 
Jacobsen(I,II) 


187^-73 




.•\utenrieth 

Aalholm 

Woodbury 




II 

Ill 


2 

2 

2 ^ . ^ ^ . ^ ^ 

3 

3 


German reader 

German reader 

Schiller: Thirty Years' War 

Selections from German classics, e. g.. 




IV 

V 

I 

II 


















1882-83 


Schiller: Wallenstein 

Goethe: Faust 


Piccolomini. . . . 


E. J. Petersen 




7 




























Reader 

Goethe: Hermann und Dorothea 

Grammar 

Composition 

Reader 

Grammar ^ 


L0kke 


E. J. Petersen 




Ill 

IV 

I 


2 

4 

3 

.5 






Pauss&Lassen. . 


E. J. Petersen 












Reader 

Reader 


Knudsen 

Pauss & Lassen. 


E. J. Petersen 










1892-93 
1902-03 


(German in Normal Dcpt.) 




Sihler 


[I 


Fichte: Reden an die deutsche Nation (in 






III 


3. 


Sillier 








Parallel assigned reading of various authors 




















Sihler 


IV 


3 
















Pauss & Lassen. 
Pauss & Lassen. 




Reader 


Sihler 


V 


5 (f),5 (w). . . 














G. Bothne 


r 




Reader 


Knudsen 






n 

Ill 


4 (f), (w) 

3 (s) 

2 (f), 2 (w). ... 






Sihler 






























Sihler 


































Five poems memorized 







292 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 







Outline of Subjects by Decades 






Year 


Class 


Hours and 
Courses 


Subject 


Text 


Teacher 




IV 


3 


German reader 


Pauss & Lassen. 


Sihler 




V 


5 (w),5 (s).... 

4 

Course IV 

2 (1) Courselll. 

2 Course II ... . 

2 






















Method and material 


Sihler 

Bj0rset 


Sihler 




I, II (El) 

II 

Ill 




1912-13 




Sihler 




















Work along same lines as in Soph. year. 




Sihler 




Goethe, Schiller, Lessing, Grillparzer. 
Kleist; Kluge: Auswahl deutscher Ge- 
dichte 








IV 


Sihler 








Sihler 




V 


Course I 

4 




















Sihler 

Sihler 

Pauss & Lassen. 
Knudsen & 

Rogstad 

Gunderson & 

Larsen 


Sihler 




VI . 


3 




















Grammar 














Sihler 


Sihler 




I, II (El) 

Ill 

IV 


2 Course V 

3 Courses VI- 

VIII. 

3 

CoursesIII-IV.. 

4 




Sihler 

Bjorset 

Knudsen & 

Rogstad 

Pausp & Lassen. 


















Reader 




1921-22 




Sihler 








Sihler 








Sihler 








Sihler 








Sihler (III) 




Reading of prose and poetry 




F. E. Peterson 
(III. IV) 












Prerequisites, Courses I-II or equivalent. 




Sihler 




V 


Courses I-II. . . 
5 (Rec.) 

5 (EI)... 


Dictation and reading for German sounds 


Bacon 


F. E. Peterson 




VI .. 














Bacon 










Forms and gender 





GREEK 



1862-63 


IV 


3 


Grammar 


Curtius 

Jacobs 


Schmidt 




I 


2 






1872-73 








I, II 

Ill 


3 

4 


Homer: Odyssey 




Landmark 






Schenke 

Curtius- Voss. . . 
Schenke 






IV 


4 


Grammar 

Reader 




1882-83 


I 


6 


G. Bothne 




II 


6 


Herodotus VII 
























Grammar 


Goodwin 






History of Greek literature 

Xenophon: Anabasis 


Jebb 

Schenke 


G. Bothne 




Ill 


6 






Plato: Euthyphro and Crito 










Goodwin 
















G. Bothne 




IV 


5 


Grammar 


Goodwin 






First Lessons 


White 


Naeseth 



INSTRUCTION 



293 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 



Year 



1902-03 



Class 



III. 



IV 

I, II (EI). 



I. II. 

II. .. 

III. . 



IV.... 

I 

I (El). 



II (EI). 

Ill 

IV 



Hours and 

Courses 



5 (f), 5 (w) . 



Course V 

4 

Course IV 

2. Christianity 
Course IV. . . 



Course III. 



Course II. 



Course I 

2 Christianity. 
Courses VI I-Vlll 

3 (1) 



3 (2) 

CoursesVII-VlIl 
3 (1) 

3 (2) 

Courses V^-VI . . 

4 (1) 

4 (2) 

Courses III-IV. 
4 Courses I- 1 1 



Subject 



Demosthenes: Philippics 

Sophocles: Oedipus Tyrannus. 

Homer: Iliad 

Plato: Apology and Crito . . . . 

Herodotus 

Grammar and composition. . . . 
History of Greek literature . . . 
Xenophon: Anabasis 



Homer: Odyssey 

Grammar and composition. . . . 

Beginner's Book 

Attic Orators 

Sophocles 

.■\ristophanes 

Lectures on Greek drama 

Homer 

Grammar and composition. . . . 
History of Greek literature . . . 

Euripides: Medea 

Herodotus: Selections 

Greek Testament 

Beginner's Greek, completed. . 

Xenophon's Anabasis 

Grammar 

Composition 

Homer 

Beginner's Greek 

Grammar and composition. . . 
Demosthenes: De Corona .... 

Plato: two dialogues 

Homer: Iliad and Odyssey. . . . 
Sophocles: Oedipus Tyrannus. 



Greek Testament: Mark, John, and two 

Epistles 

Plato: ."Xpology and Crito 

Euripides: Medea 

History of Greek literature 

Xenophon: Anabasis 

Lysias: Selected orations 

Grammar 

Beginner's Greek 



New Testament — Matthew 

Demosthenes: De Corona 

Historical selections for rapid reading (or) 

Plato: Apology and Crito 

Patristic Greek — Justin Martyr 



Homer: Iliad or Odyssey 

Sophocles: Oedipus Tyrannus (or) . 

Euripides: Medea 

Greek Historians 

Lysias: Selected orations (or) 

Lucian: Dialogues 

Beginner's Book 



Text 



Jebb. 



White. 
White. 
Jebb.. 



Jebb.. 
Merry. 



White.... 
Goodwin . 



White. 
White. 



Jebb. 



Goodwin . 
White.... 



Benner-Smyth. 



Teacher 



G. Bothne 
G. Bothne 



Sihler (f. w), 
Bothne (s) 



Sihler 

G. Bothne 



G. Bothne 



Sihler 



Sihler 

Ylvisaker 

Ylvisaker 



Ylvisaker 
Ylvisaker 



Ylvisaker 
Sihler 



Norlie & SihUr 
.Sihler 



Sihler 



Sihler 
Sihler 



Qualley 

Sihler & Qualley 



Strom 



HEBREW 



862-63 

872-73 
882-83 
892-93 
902-03 
912-13 
921-22 



I. II (El). 



4 

3 (1), 4 (2). . . 
3 Courses I-II. 



Elementarbuch 

Hebraeisches Schulburh 

Hebrjeisches Schulbuch 

Hebraeisches Schulbuch and Genesis . 

Introductory Hebrew Grammar 

Introductory Hebrew Grammar 



Seffer 

HoUenberg. 
Hollenberg . 
HoUenberg. 
Davidson. . . 
Davidson. . . 



Larsen 

Larsen 

Larsen 

Larsen 

Ylvisaker 

Norlie 



294 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Class 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 



HISTORY 



Hours and 
Courses 



Subject 



Text 



IV. 



I 

II 

Ill 

IV 

VI 

IV (ND) . 
I 



II. . 

III. . 
IV.., 
IV.. 

V. . . 
V... 

[ 

I. II. 



II. 
III. 



VI. 



IV. 

v.. 

VI. 



vu 

I. II (El). 
I, II (El). 
I, II (El). 

I, ir(Ei). 

II 

II 



IV. 
V. . 



Geography of Northern Europe 

History of Norway 

General History 

General History 

General History 

History of Norway, Sweden and Denmark. 

General history 

U. S. history 

Ancient history 

Modern history 

Middle ages 

Ancient history 

U. S. history 

History of Norway, Sweden and Denmark. 

General history 

Not specified in catalog 

History of England (alternate years) 

Topics by students. 
See also under I-II. 

Modern history 

Medieval history 

Scandinavian history (regularly but not in 

1892-9,?.) 
.\ncicnt history 



Daae . . . 
Petersen . 



Daae& P etersen 



Petersen . 



Myers 

Nissen & Daae. 
Nissen & Daae 
Nissen & Daae 

Higginson 

Eriksen 

Eriksen 



5 (f) 

S (w), 6 (s). 



2 (f) 

2 (f) 

2 (w) 

2 (w) 

3 (s) 

Mf) 

2 (f) 

3 (w) 

2 (w) 

4 (w) 

4 (s) 

2 (s) 

5 (f). 5 (w), 
Ms) 



General history (outline) 

U. S. history 

Civil government 

English history 

Historical seminar 

English history (cont.) 

Historical seminar 

American history 

Medieval and modern European history. . 

Historical seminar 

Medieval and modern European history. . 

Historical seminar 

Scandinavian history 

Medieval and modern European history. . 

Historical seminar 

.Ancient history to 800 A. D 

Medieval history begun 

One written report: by each student in each 
term. 



Eriksen . . 
Johnston . 



Larned . 
Larned . 



No text-book. 
Schjdth 



Schj0th. 



Schj0th . 



Rrfder. . 
Schj0th. 



S (f) 

5 (w) 

5 (s) 

5 (s) 

Ml or 2) 

Course V 

i (1) Course VI. 



4 (1 or 2).. 
Course VII . 



2 (1 or 2)... 
Course VIII . 



1 (1 or 2) 

Course IX 

4 (1) Course III 
4 (2) Course IV 



4(1).... 
Course I . 



4 (2) Course II. 



U. S. history 

Civil government. 

U. S. history 

General history 

American history 177.S-1816 

Prerequisite, courses I, II. Ill, VI, IX. . . 

Constitutional history of England after the 
Norman conque.st 

.American history 

(Period of discoveries and explorations and 
the Colonial era). Prerequisites, course 
I, H, III. VI, IX 

/Xmerican history 

(Industrial and social development after 
1877.) 

Historical seminar 

(Study of the Middle West.) 

.•\merican history 1816-1860 

The Civil War and the period of recon- 
struction, 1K,S7-1877 

Europe in the middle ages 

(Study of the various movements and their 
influence) 

Europe in the 19th century 



McMaster. 

Macy 

McMaster. 
Utheim . . . 



INSTRUCTION 



295 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 



Year 



1921-22 



Class 



VI.. 
VII. 



VIII 

I, II (El). 



I, II (EI). 
I, II (El). 



I, II (El) 

I. II. Ill (E!) 

I, 11, III (El) 
I, II. Ill (El). 
*II 



iIII. 
alll. 



VI 

VII 

VIII 

IX 

V, VIII, IX(El) 



Hours and 
Courses 



4 (2). 
4 



None .... 

3 (2) 

Course X. 



3 (1 or 2) Course 

XI 

3 (2) 

Course IX 



3 (1 or 2) Course 

VIII 

3(1) Course VII 

3 (1) Course I. . 
3 (2) Coursell.. 

3 (1) 

Course V 



3 (2) Course VI 

3 (1) Course III 
3 (2) Course IV 



None. 
S 



None. 

4 

5 



Subject 



Civil government 

Ancient history to 800 A. D . 



Classic myths 

Old Greek Life. . . . 
Roman antiquities. 



American history 

(Industrial, social and political develop- 
ment after 1877) 



South American history 

American history 

(Period of discoveries and explorations, 
the colonial era) 



Growth of the English constitution 

The Civil War and tiie period of recon- 
struction 1857-1877 

Greek civilization 

Roman civilization 

.\merican history 1775-1816 

(Revolutionary war and the framing of our 

national government) 

.American history 1816-1960 

*ReQuired. but social science substitu- 
tions are permitted. 
Europe from Charlemagne to the Congress 

of Vienna 

Modern and contemporary European 

history 

a — Open to Freshmen. 
May elect in class III (Courses III-IV). 
Senior American history 

(Text-book, supplementary reading. 

topical references and reports.) 



General history . 



United States history 

Citizenship (Community civics). Prereq- 
uisites, U. S. history 

Study of civil government and community 
life 



James&Sanford 
Myers 



Gayley. 

Mahaffv 
VVilkins. 



Myers. 



Magruder . 
Huglies . . . 



Teacher 



Ylvisaker & 
Sihler 



Gjerset 



Gjerset 
Gjerset 



Gjerset 

Gjerset 
Rovelstad 
Rovelstad 
Hovde 



Hovde 

Gjerset&Hovde 
Hovde 

Evanson 

Evanson 
Evanson 
Evanson 
Evanson 



LATIN 



1862-63 IV 6 



V, VI . 



1882-83 



Grammar 

Reader 

Tirocinium 

Hist. Sacra 

Composition 

Tirocinium 

Grammar 

Composition 

Grammar (for all classes) . 



Composition (IV to I) 

Latin Poetry 

Liv\ 



l^ivy 

Cicero: De senectute 

and De amicitia and Orationes 

Sallust: Catilina 

Caesar: De bello Gallico 

Nepos 

Reader 

Vergil: Aeneid (I-III) 

Cicero: 2nd Philippic 

Horace: Odes 

Grammar and composition 

Roman antiquities 

Cicero: Orationes in Catilinam and De 

senectute 

Livy (Books XXI-XXII) 

Grammar and composition 



Madvig. 
Ruehner 
Schulze . . 



Schulze . 
Madvig. 



Madvig (later 
Schreiner) . . . 

Tischer 

Siebelis 



Schmidt 



Landmark 

Landmark 

Landmark 

Landmark 

Jacobsen 

Larsen 



L. S. Reque 



L. S. Reque 



296 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 



Year 



Class 



IV. 



III. 



IV. 



V 

VI 

I, II (El) 



I, II (El). 



Hours and 
Courses 



5(1 hr. with I) 
6 



6 (w), 6 (s), 

4 (f) 

4 (w) 



4 (s) 

5 (0, 5 (w). 



5 (s) 

5 (f), 5 (w). 



5 (s) 

5 (f). 5 (w) . 
5 (s) 



6 

6 

4 (1) 

Course V A. . 

4 (2) 

Course VI A . 

4 (1) 

Course VII A 



Subject 



Caesar: De bello Gallico (III-IV) 

Sallust : Catilina 

Grammar and composition 

Latin classics (Nepos, Phaedrus, Caesar: 
De hello Gallico I )completed 

Grammar (Synta.x) 

Weekly composition 

Latin reader completed 

Latin classics begun 

Grammar (Etymology) 

Composition 

Reader and grammar (75 pages) 

Oral and written exercises 

History of Roman literature and antiqui- 
ities 

Horace: Select odes, satires, and epistles. . 

Livy: Bk. XXI or XXII 

Vergil: Aeneid 

Tacitus: Germania 

Ovid: Metamorphoses 

Sallust: Catilina 

Cicero: Orationes 

Caesar: De bello Gallico 

Phaedrus: Fabulae 

Parallel reading of authors 

Composition 

Foundations of Latin 

Reader 

Caesar: De bello Gallico . . 

Tacitus: Germania and Agricola 

Roman constitutional history(l hr. weekly) 

Roman lyric poetry: Catullus and Horace. 

Lyric meters 

History of Roman literature(l hr. weekly) 

Roman satire: Horace and Juvenal 

Vergil: Aeneid, Bks. II-IV 

Review of grammar and composition 

Cicero: selections from De officiis 

Philosophy of Cicero 

Roman Comedy: the Phormio of Terence 

Theatre and private life of the Romans 

Livy: Bk. XXI 

Rome and Carthage 

Composition (22-36) 

Gram mar 

Ovid: selections 

Prosody and Roman mythology 

Composition (37-44) 

Grammar 

Cicero: selections from Orations 

Roman oratory — Roman constitution . . 

Composition (1-15) 

Grammar 

Cicero: selections from Orations 

(or) his minor philosophical works or Phae- 
drus: Fabulae 

Composition (16-21) 

Grammar 

Caesar: four books 

Composition (1 hr. weekly) 

First Latin Book 



Stress on sound foundations 

Latin literature of the Empire (begun) 

(Selections from representative authors). 
Reports on literature. Advance com- 
position 

Latin literature of the Empire (continued) . 

(Selections translated) 

Study of the times 

.Xdvanced composition 

Roman satire: Horace and Juvenal 

.Advanced composition 



Text 



Voss 

Schreiner. . . . 
."Anderson &Gj0r 

Voss 

Voss 

Schreiner. . . . 



Voss. 



Weisse . 



Voss. 



Bennett . 
Bennett 



Bennett . 
Bennett. 



Bennett. 
Bennett . 



Bennett . 
Bennett. 



D'Ooge . . 

Collar & 
Daniell. 



Gudeman . 



Arnold. . . 
Gudeman . 



Arnold . 
Arnold . 



INSTRUCTION 



29: 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 



Year 



Class 



Hours and 
Courses 



Subject 



Text 



Teacher 



4 (2). 



III. 



Course VIII A. 



4 (1). 



Course III A. 



4(2) 

Course IV A. 



IV. 



4(1) 

Course I A . 



4 (2) 

Course II A. 



bill (Special). 



blV (Special) . 



6 (1) 

Course III B. 



6 (2) 

Course IV B. 



6 (1) 

Course I B 
6 (2) 



VII. 



VIII. 



I, II, III (El). 



I. II, III (El).. 



I, II, III (El). 



I, II, III (El). 



Course XV . 



2 (1) 

2 (2) 

1 (1 or 2). 

2 (1) 

3 or 2 (2) . 



3 (1 or 2).... 
Course XIII. 

3 (1 or 2).... 



Roman drama: the Phormio of Terence 
and the Medea of Seneca 

Advanced composition 

(or) Rapid reading course of Caesar, Cice- 
ro, or Vergil 

Advanced composition 

Reports on private and public life (illus- 
trated) 

Horace: Odes and Epodes 

Versification and memorizing 

Composition weekly 

Roman political instit. Weekly 

Reading at sight 

Tacitus: Agricola and (Jermania 

Composition weekly 

History of Roman literature, weekly 

Reading at sight 

Private life of Romans (illustrated) 

Cicero: De senectute and De amicitia 

Special attention to grammar and language 

Composition weekly 

Sight reading 

Livy: Bk. XXI or selections 

Composition weekly 

Sight reading 

Cicero: five orations 

Sight reading 

Word building 

Composition (2 hrs. weekly) 

Vergil: selections from Aeneid 

Sight reading 

Composition (1 hr. weekly) 

Word building 

Beginner's Latin 



Arnold . 
Arnold . 



Bennett. 



Ritchie . . 
Granrud. 



Gudeman . 
Ritchie... 
Wilkins . . 



Johnston . 
Bennett. . 
Bennett. . 
Ritchie. . 



Westcott . 
Ritchie . . . 



Kelsey . 



Rovelstad 

Rovelstad 
Rovelstad 

Rovelstad 

Rovelstad 
Rovelstad 



Kellogg&Reed. 

Bennett 

Knapp 



Bennett 

Kellogg& Reed 
D'Ooge 



3 (1) Course XI 



Caesar: selections from the Gallic War and 

Civil War 

Composition (2 hrs. weekly) 

b-Special Course for those entering Col- 
lege with two years or less of Prep. Latin 
After completing Special IV and III, the 
student is required to take the Regular IV 
Latin course. 
Vergil: Six books of the Aeneid, or an 

equivalent 

Prosody 

Grammar 

Composition (1 hr. weekly) 

Cicero: six orations, or an equivalent. . 

Study of the times 

Composition weekly 

Sight reading 

Caesar: four books, or an equivalent. . 

Special emphasis on grammar 

Prose composition weekly 

Vocabulary drill 

Beginner's Latin 

Stress on a solid foundation 

Roman life and thought. (Text, reports, 

illustrated lectures) 

(a) Constitutional history 

(b) .'^rt and architecture 

(c) Mythology 

(d) Private life 

(e) History of Roman literature 

(All or any number of the foregoing courses 

may be elected). 

.'\dvanced composition 

(Required for a recommendation to teach 
Latin in secondary schools). 

Teacher's course. Reading of large por 
tions of Caesar and Cicero. Reports, 
text, illustrated lectures 

Seneca: Moral essays and letters. Re- 
ports, assigned reading, illustrated lec- 
tures 



Kelsey . . 
Bennett. 



Knapp . 



Bennett. 
Ritchie. . 
Kelsey . . 



Ritchie. 



Kelsey . . 
Bennett . 
Bennett . 



D'Ooge . 



Granrud-Abbott 



Gay ley 

Johnston-Kelsey 
Bender- Macail 



Arnold . 



Hurst& Whiting 



Rovelstad 



E. Petersen 

E. Peterson 

E. Peterson 

E. Peterson 
Rovelstad 



Rovelstad 



Rovelstad 
Rovelstad 



298 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Year 



Class 



I, II. Ill (El).. 

I, II, III (EI).. 
I, II. Ill (El).. 



IV. 



cl 1 1 (.Special) . 



cIV (Special). 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 



VIII. 



,5 (2) . . . .^. . . 
Course XII. 



3 (1) 

Course IX. 



Hours and 
Courses 



3 (2) 

Course X. 



3 (1) 

Course V. 



Subject 



Course VII. 



3 (2) 

Course VI . 



Course VIII. 



5 (1) 

Course III. 



5 (2) 

Course IV. 



6 (1) Course I. 

6 (2) 

Course II ... . 



Christian Latin literature. 

Latin church fathers: selections 

Latin hymns: selections 

Reports and illustrated lectures 

Pliny: selected letters 

Study of life of early empire 

Illustrated lectures 

Poetry of the early empire 

Selections from Ovid. Persius. Martial 
Juvenal. Reports and illustrated lec- 
tures 

History: selections from Livy 

Grammar 

Composition 

Sight reading ; 

Roman antiquities 

(or) History: selections from Roman his- 
torians. Otherwise very similar to the 
foregoing course 



Text 



Maloney . 
Merrill. . 



Westcott . 



West cot t . 
Bennett . . 
Arnold. . . 



Wilkins . 



Dean & Defer 



Poetry: A selection of Latin verse. . 

Grammar, etc. continued 

History of Roman literature 

(or) Poetry: Latin Poetry from Catullus to 
Claudian. Otherwise very similar to 

foregoing course 

(All four courses are given to avoid having 

classes too large.) 
Cicero: selections from the orations and 

letters 

Word-building 

Sight reading ; 

Prose composition 

Ovid, Vergil: selections from the Metamor- 
phoses and the .-Xeneid 

Sight reading, word-building 

Composition, continued 

Elementary Latin 

Caesar: selections from Gallic War 

Sight reading 

Composition 

Grammar 

c-Special course for those entering col- 
lege with two years or less of Prep. Latin. 

.\fter completing Special IV and III, the 

student is required to take the Regular IV 

Latin course. 

Vergil: five books of the Aeneid 

Composition weekly 

Grammar 

Prosody and sight reading 

Cicero: five orations 

Composition weekly 

Grammar 

Sight reading 

Caesar: Three books 

Review of elements. Special emphasis on 
grammar 

Composition weekly 

Sight reading 

Beginning Latin 

Stress on a solid foundation for Caesar . . 



ran 

Yale Univ. Press 



Rovclstad 



Rovelstad 



Rovclstad 



Rovelstad 



Freeman . 



D'Ooge 

Ivellogg & Reed 



Bennett. 



Gleason-Knapp 



D'Ooge . 
Kelsey . 



Rovelstad 



Qua ey 



Bennett. 
Bennett. 



Knapp . 
Bennett. 
Bennett . 



Kelsey . . 
Bennett. 
Bennett. 



Kelsey . 



D'Ooge . 
. .Smith. 



Qualley 



Nelson 



Talle 



Moe & F. E. 

Peterson 



MATHEMATICS 



1862-63 
1872-73 



IV.... 
V. VI. 
IV.... 

II 

III. . . 



Arithmetic (200-313). 
Arithmetic (1-164). . . 

Algebra 

Geometry 

Algebra 



Da vies. 
Davies. 



Da vies . 



Schmidt 
Schmidt 
Bercli & Reque 
Bergh & Reque 



INSTRUCTION 



299 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 



1882-83 



Class 



VI.. 
VII. 
I\'.. 

V. . 

VI . 



VII. 
IV.. 



VI 

VII 

VIII 

I. II, III (EI) 

I, II (El)... . 



Hours and 
Courses 



4 (f),4 (w), 
i (f). 4 (w). 

5 (f). 5 (w). 



4(1). 

4 (2). 

5 (f). 
5 (w) . 
5 (s). 

5 

5 



4(l)Course I. . 
4(2)Course II. 

4 (1) 

4 

5 

3 (1 or 2).- 

Course V 

3(1 or 2) Course 

VI 

IV (See under 3 (2) 

subject) Course IV 



I, II, III (El). 



IV (See under- 
subject) 



IV. 



VI (EI) . 
VI (El) . 



VII (Rec.).. 

VIII (Rec). 



IX 

VI-IX (El). 



I, II, III (El) 



3 (1 or 2) 

Course III. . . 

5(1) (3 credits) 
Course I 



3 (1 or 2). 
Course II . 



5 (1). 

5 

5 



5 (1 or 2) 

3 (2) Course I. 



Subject 



Algebra 

.\rithmetic 

.Arithmetic 

Plane geometry 

Complete algebra 

.Mgebra (commenced) 

Elements of arithmetic (completed) 

Elements of arithmetic (begun) 

Solid geometry (combined with Class IV) 
Solid geometry (combined with Class III) . 
Plane geometry 



.\lgebra 

Higher arithmetic 

Solid geometry 

Trigonometry 

Plane geometry 

Solid geometry 

Plane geometry 

Algebra 

.Advanced arithmetic 

Plane trigonometry 

-Analytic geometry 

Higher algebra 

Plane geometry 

Elementary algebra 

Differential calculus 

Prerequisites, Courses II-IV 

Integral calculus. Prerequisite, Course V. 



.Analytic geometry 

(Required of Class IV^ unless College Alge- 
bra is selected. Prerequisite, Course II) 

College algebra 

Prerequisite, Courses I-II, or equivalent. . 

Higher algebra 

(Required of those of Class IV who do not 
present the subject for entrance.) 

Plane trigonometry 

Prerequisite, Course I or equivalent 

Solid geometry (offered) 

Higher algebra 



Plane geometry .... 
Elementary algebra. 



.Arithmetic 

Commercial arithmetic 

(See under commercial subjects.) 
Surveying (Theory and practice.) 
requisite: Plane trigonometry) . . 



(Pre- 



Text 



Olney 

Olney 

Went worth . 

Olney 

Olney 

Wentworth . 
Wentworth. 
Wentworth . 

Wentworth. 
Ray 



Phillips&Fisher. 
Phillips&Fisher. 
Wentworth . . . . 
Wentworth . . . . 
Wentworth . . . . 
Wentworth . . . . 
Wentworth . . . . 
Wentworth . . . . 
Wentworth . . . . 

Milne 

Osborne 



Osborne 

Fanner&AlIen. 

Fite 



Hawkes,LubyS;; 
Touton 



Wentworth . 



Hawkes,Luby & 
Touton 

Wentworth & 
Smith 

Milne 



Wentworth . . 
Lyons and Car- 
nahan 



Teacher 



Jacobsen (ND) 
& Bergh 
& Rtque 
Narvesen 
Narvesen 
Narvesen 
Narves^n 
Narvesen 
Sheel 
Sheel 

Sheel&Bothne 
(w) 
Sheel 
Sheel 
Sheel 
Sheel 
Sheel 
iheel 
Sheel 
h-el 
Sheel 

javre & Sheel 
Savre 
Savre 
Savre 
Overn 
Strom 

Strom 

.Strom 



Strom & Tryt- 

ten 
Strom & Qua'ley 



Sheel&Trvtten 



Qualley 

O. .M. Eitireim 
Moe and O. M. 
Eittreim 

Evanson 

K. O. Eittreim 
Sheel 









MUSIC 












Although music does not occupy a large 












place in the curriculum proper, its cultural 












and disciplinary value has always been 












clearly recognized at this institution. Al- 












most from the beginning, opportunities 












have been given for private instruction. 












both vocal and instrumental. Further- 












more, a distinctly musical atmosphere has 










been created by such organizations as the 












college bands, orchestra, choruses. Musical 






1 






Union, and the Decorah Choral Union. 






11862-63 
il872-73 


IV 


9 








I-VI 


2 hrs. weekly 








1882-83 


I-IV 


each year. . . . 
1 hr. weekly 






N. Brandt 












each year. . 


V'ocal music 




Hanson 



« 



300 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 



Year 



1892-93 



1912-13 



1921-22 



Class 



I-VI (El) . . 

V, VI 

I-VI (El) . . 

V, VI 

I-VI (El) . . 

V, VI 

I-VI 1 1 (El). 
V 



VI 

VII, VIII. 



I-IV (El). 
V^VIII . 



I-IX (El) 



Hours and 
Courses 



2 hrs. weekly 
each year. . . 



2 hrs. weekly 
each year. . . 



2 hrs. weekly 
each year. . 



2 (1). 1 
(2) 



1 hr. wkly 
each year 



2 hrs. weekly 
each year. . . 



Subject 



Private instruction and voluntary organi- 
zations 



Vocal music 

Opportunity for private instruction and 
admission to musical organizations 



Vocal music 

Opportunity for private instruction and 
admission to musical organizations 



V^ocal music 

Opportunity for private instruction and 
admission to musical organizations 

Rudiments of music and a fair knowledge 
of Lutheran hymns, history of music, 
and harmony 



Harmony 

Rudimencs of music and a fair knowledge 
of Lutheran hymns, history of music, 
and harmony 

Opportunity for private instruction, both 
instrumental and vocal, and admission 
to musical organizations 



Text 



Teacher 



Hanson 

Sihler 
Hanson 
Hanson 
Sperati 



Sperati 
Sperati 

Sperati 
Sperati 



Sperati 

Sperati and 
Mrs. Moe 



NORSE 



1862 63 


IV 


2 




Bojsen 


Larsen 




V, VI 

I 


2 










Bojsen 


Larsen 
















1872 73 




L0kke 

Jensen 

Lassen 


Larsen (I-II) 




II, III 

IV, V 

VI 


■ w 


Reader (lowest and intermediate classes) . 
Reading of prose and poetry (for highest 

classes) 

Composition, dictation, translation, memo- 


Landmark (III) 
Siewers (IV- VI) 




I 


) I 

7 




188^ 83 


(Normal Department same as in Regular 
IV, V, VI.) 




Larsen 




II 


2 














G. Bothne 




III 


2 










Holberg and authors of 18th century 




G. Bothne 




IV 

V 


2 

3 










Reader 


Hagerup& Lassen 
L0kke 


Roalkvam 












Hagerup&Lassen 
L0kke 


Roalkvam 




VI 


4 

3 W 
















Reader 


Eriksen 

and Paulsen 


Roalkvam 




I 










1892-93 


(No classes in normal dept. this year.) 
History of Norwegian literature 


Eriksen 


G. Bothne(I,II; 




II 






III;I-III) 
Larsen (III) 




III 


3 : n 






? (IV) 




IV 


3 . ) ( 










V 

VI 

VII 


6 (s) . . 


Essays and one lecture by each student of 

classes I, II, III each year. 
Old Norse (in classes I and II in alternate 

years) ..._...._...._ 


Nygaard 


G. Bothne 
Krog 




6 (f) 

6 (f) . 














Krog 






6 (w) 


No detailed description nivin in catalog . , . 




Krog 



INSTRUCTION 



301 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 



Year 



Class 



IV. 
V. , 



VII. 



1912-13 



I, II (El). 



I, H (El). 



III. 



Hours and 
Courses 



3 (0.2 (w). 
3 (s) 



3 (f). 3 (w), 
2 (s) 



3 

6(s). 



5 (f) 

6 (0,6 (w). 



2 (1) 

Course VII . 



i(2) 

Course VIII . 



Course IX. 



Course X. 



2 (1) 

Course V. 



2(2)Course VI. 



2(l)Course III 



2(2) Course IV. 



Subject 



Ibsen: Brand and Peer Gynt (Essays and 

lectures) 

Jonas Lie and other writers 

Composition 

History of literature since 1814 

Wergeland and VVelhaven 

Asbj0rnsen, Moe, and Bj0rnson 

Essays and lectures 

History of literature to 1814 

.A.dvanced readers 

The saga 

Folklore of Norway and Denmark 

Holberg: Erasmus Montanus 

Wessel and a few others 

Composition 

.Advanced readers 

Selections from authors 

Composition 

Reader 

Orthography 

Reading, declamation, composition, capi- 
talization, punctuation, etc 

Reader 

Grammar 

.\ collection of literary models. Reading, 

declamation, composition, etc 

Reader 

Grammar 

A collection of literary models. Reading, 

word analysis, composition, etc 

Henrik Ibsen: Rise of Norwegian drama. 

(Four plays read) 

.Arne Garborg: Selections 

Composition and critical essays 

Jonas Lie: Den Fremsynte and Rutland . . . 

Per Si vie: Soger 

Hans Aanrud: Sidsel Sidsaerk 

J. B. Bull: Norske Folkelivsbilleder 

Biography of Per Sivle 

Development of Jonas Lie. 

Old Norse 

Grammar 

Selections for study 

Erik den r0des saga 

Old Norse 

Volsungasaga 

Selections from Elder Edda 

Old Norse literature 

Introduction to comparative linguistics. . . 

See also I-II (El) 

Wergeland and VVelhaven 

(Selections from their works) 

Biography of Wergeland 

Biography of Welhaven 

Development of the national literature. . . 
Rise of the nat'l romantic movement. . . . 

Readings from Asbjdrnsen 

0stgaard, Herre, Schulze, and others. . . . 

Composition 

National-popular movement 

Reading from Bj0rnson, Vinje and Camilla 

CoUett 

Biography of Bj0rnson 

Biography of Vinje 

Compositioii 

Older Norwegian and Danish literature 

down to Holberg 

Peter Dass: Nordlands trompet 

Norwegian and Danish folksongs 

History of Norwegian literature 

Composition 

Danish and Norwegian literature from 

1710 to 1830 

(Readings from Holberg, Wessel, Tullin, 

Ingemann, St. Blicher, 0hlenschlaeger 

and others) 



Text 



Pauss & Lassen. 



Rolf sen . 



Pauss & Lassen. 
Aars 



Pauss & Lassen. 
Hofgaard 



Jensen 

Pauss & Lassen. 
Hofgaard 



Jensen . 
Jaeger . 



Hovden . 
Garborg. 



iVygaard . 

Haegstad. 

& Torp. 



Lassen . 
L0chen . 
Gran . . 
Sars. . . 



Collin. 
Vislie . 



Hofgaard- Bing. 



Teacher 



G. Bothne 
G. Bothne 

G. Bothne 
G. Bothne 



Gjerset 
Gjerset 



Gjerset 



Gjerset 



Gjerset 



Gjerset 



Gjerset 



Gjerset 



302 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Year 



Class 



IV. 



\'I.. 
\'1I. 



VIII. 

EI . . 
El. . . 



(Jiilliiie of Si(l)jcrts- hi) Decades 



R(not later than 

III) 
R(not later than 

III) 



VII. 



VIII. 



Hours and 
Courses 



2 (1) Course I. 



2 (2) 

Course II. 



1 (1).2 (2). 



i (1 or 2). . 
Jourse IX. 
HI or 2).. 
Course VIII 

Ml or 2).. 
Course VII . 

? (1 or 2)... 

Course VI . , 



? (1 or 2).. 
(bourse V. . 



^ (1 or 2). 
Course IV 

? (1 or 2). 
Course III 

i (1) 

Course I . , 

4 (2) 

Course II . 



Subject 



Grammar and composition. 



Norse mythology 

Volsunaerncs Saga 

Selections from Elder Edda 

Grammar and composition 

History of Norway until 1319 

Harald Haarfagres Saga 

Reader, (fourth part) 

(Reading, declamation) 

Reader, (third part) composition 

(Reading, declamation, composition 

I-'irst Year Norse, completed 

Orthography 

Declamation, reading, composition) etc.. 

Kirst Year Norse, begun 

(Reading, grammar, composition), etc. . . . 
Study of the Norwegian people 

in .\merica since 1000 

Study of Modern writers 

Jonas Lie, Garborg, Hamsun, Bull, .\an- 

rud, Lagerlof, and others) 

Ibsen: rise of Norwegian drama 

Ibsen: four plays 

Biography of Ibsen 

Mational — popular movement 

Bjdrnson, Vinje, Camilla CoUett 

Biography of Bjdrnson 

listory of Norway 1850-1914 

Rise of Norwegian literature 

selections from Wergeland and Welhaven 

Biography of Wergeland 

Biography of Welhaven 

Selections from Asbjornsen, Moe, Land- 

stad, Aasen, and others 

History of Norwegian literature 

History of Norway 1800-1850 

The middle period 

.Morse folk-songs and folk-tales 

Readings from Holberg, Wessel, Tiillin. 
History of Norway-Union with Denmark 

Essays and written reports 

Early Norse literature 

v^olsungasaga, Olaf Trygvasons saga. 

Elder Edda 

History of Norwegian literature 

Early Norwegian history 

Essays and written reports 

Grammar and language study 

Beginner's book in Norse 

Reading and language study 

Bjdrnson: Synndve Solbakken 

Hans .•Xanrud: Sidsel Sidsaerk 

Jonas Lie: Stories and poems 

Composition 

Courses I and II prerequsite to all other 

courses in Norse. 

Synnove Solbakken , 

Boken om Norge, III and V 

Orthography 

Reading, declamation, composition. . . 

Beginner's book 

Boken om Norge, I 

Cirammar, declamation, composition . . 



Text 



Platou,.Aars & 
Hofgaard. . . 

Kjser 

Ulleland 



Raabe . 



Rolfsen . 
Rolf sen . 



Michelet . . 
Tonnessen . 



Michelet . 



faeger. Hell r 



Collin. . 
Gjerset . 
Gran . . 



Lassen . 
Lociien. 



Hofgaard. 
Gjerset. . . 



Hofgaard . 
Gjerset. . . 



Holvik. . 
Flom. . . 
Dorrum. 



Juul-T0nnessen 
Holvik '.'.'.'.'. 



Teacher 



Gjerset 



Hilleboe 
Hilleboe 
Hilleboe 



lilleboe 



Gjerset 
Gjerset 



TJerset 
ijerset 



jjerset 



ijerset 



Hovde 
Hovde 



S. S. Reque 
S. S. Reque 



PENMANSHIP 



2-63 



IV.... 
V. VI. 
V. . . . 
VI.... 

V 

VI.... 



Penmanship. 
Penmanship. 
Penmanship. 
Penmanship . 
Penmanship. 
Penmanship . 



Spencer . 
Spencer . 



Schmidt 

Schmidt 

Siewers 

Siewers 

Valder 

Valder 



INSTRUCTION 



303 







Ou 


tliiie of Subjects by Decades 






Year 


Class 


Hours and 
Courses 


Subject 


Text 


Teacher 


1892-93 


VII 


7 


Penmanship 




Sihler-H.Reque 
Olson 


1902-03 


VII 


2 


Penmanship 




1912-13 








1921-22 


V-IX (El) 


2 or 3 


Penmanship 


Palmer 


K. O. Eittreim 









PHILOSOPHY 






1862-63 












1872-73 


I, 11 


1 




Whately 


J. D. Jacobsen 


1882-83 


Not given 






1892-93 


Not given 










1902-03 


Not given 










1912-13 
1921-22 


I, II (El) 

I, II (El) 


4 (2 Course III 
3 (1) Course III 


History of philosophy 

History of philosophy 


Weber 

Thilly 


Tingelstad 
Tingelstad 



PHYSICAL TRAINING 



1862-63 






Although physical training is not given 
a prominent place in the curriculum, still 
the College has always recognized the value 
and need of the development of the body. 
This need is partly met by the various 
voluntary athletic organizations. At the 
same time, for very many years some 
class work in gymnastics has been re- 
quired. 

In 1920-21 the following coaches had 
charge of the athletic teams; 
College: 

Football, O. M. Solem. 

Basketball, R. A. Movold. 

Baseball, A. Laudel. 
Preparatory: 

Football, Basketball. Baseball; Pro- 
fessors O, W. Qualley, S. S. Reque and 
M. W. Larsen. 
In 1921-22 the following coaches; 
College: 

Football, Basketball, Track — Director 
Ivan Doseff; Turning — Prof. F. E. 
Peterson; Baseball— Prof. S. S. Reque. 
Preparatory: 

Football, Basketball, Baseball— Prof. 
Qualley. 






1872-73 












1882-83 












1892-93 


I-IV 

\'-VII. 


2 hrs. weekly 
each year .... 

2 hrs. weekly 
each year. . . . 

2- (w) 

each year 






Sihler 












I-IV 

V-VII 


Sihler 


1902-03 






Olson 








1913-14 










19^1-22 


I. II (El) 








Doseff 




Ill, IV 


3 


Physical Training 




Doseff 



PHYSICS 



1862-63 












1872-73 












1882-83 












1892-93 
1902-03 


V 

V 


5 (f),5 (w).... 
5 


Physics 

Physics and physical geography 

Mechanics of solids and fluids 

Lectures, recitations, laboratory work. 
(Prerequisites: trigonometry and an- 


\ppleton 

vVentworth & 

Hill 

Duff 


Sheel 


1912-13 


I, II (El) 


4(1) 

Course I 


Sheel 
Overn 











304 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 



Year 



Class 



Hours and 
Courses 



Subject 



Text 



Teacher 



1912-13 
1921-22 



V 

I-IV (El). 

I-IV 

I. II (El). 



I. II (El).. 
V. VI (El) . 



4(2) Course II 



4 (1).. 
Course 
4 (2).. 
Course 



4 (D... 
Course 



4 (2). 



3 (1 or 
Course 



3 (1 or 
Course 
5 



2).. 
III. 



Heat, magnetism, and electrostatics 

Special attention to laboratory work. 
Recitations and lectures. (Prerequi- 
site, Course I) 

Electrokinetics and radioactivity 

(Prerequisite, Course II) 

Sound and light 

Laboratory work, recitations 

(Prerequisite, Course I) 

Elementary physics 

Class-work, 3 regular hours 

Laboratory work, 1 double hour 

Mechanics, heat and sound 

Lectures, recitation, laboratory work. 
(Prerequisite, trigonometry) 

Magnetism, electricity, and light as in I, 
with lantern demonstrations. (Prereq- 
uisite, Course I) 

The alternating current circuit 

Text and Laboratory manual 

(Prerequisites: Courses, Physics I-II.. 
Math. V-VI.) 

Radioactivity 

(Prerequisites; Physics I-II; Math. V-VI). 

Elementary Physics 

Laboratory hours double 



Duff 



Duff. 



Duff. 



Carhart&Chute 

Reed&Guth. '. ' 



Dodge . 



Rutherford . 



Overn 

Overn 
Overn 

Overn 

Trytten 



Trytten 
Trytten 



Milliken & Gale 



Trytten 

O. M. Eittreim 



PSYCHOLOGY 



186' 63 












187' 73 












188' 83 












189' 93 












190' 03 












1912 13 
19'1 22 


I 

II 

1, II (El). 


3 (1) Course II. 
3 (2) Course I.. 

3 (1 or 2) 


Psychology in its relation t t education . . 
Introductory psychology. Lectures, ex- 
periments, reports 

.Applied psychology 

Various texts and experiments. Prereq- 


Harris, Bagley. . 

Yerkes, James. . 

Hollingworth & 

Poffenberger . 


Tingelstad 
Tingelstad 




I, II (El) 

I, II (EI) 

II. Ill rEl or 
Required) 


Course III. . . . 
3 (1 or 2) 

Course II 

3 (1 or 2) 

Course IV 

3 (1 or 2) 

Course I 

Courses I-VII.. 


Norlie 






Starch, Wood- 
row, Poffenber- 
ger, Terman . . 








Norli 








Norlie 




Text books, questionnaires, reports, lectures 
Introductory psychology experiments, re- 
ports 

In 1922-23 the following offered: I. Intro- 
ductory psychology; II. .Advanced psy- 
chology; III. Educational psychology- 
psych, of learning; or: IV. Educational 
psychology-psych, of study; or: V. Edu- 
cational psychology-psych, measure- 
ments; or: VI. Educational psychology- 
psych, of religion; or: VII. Educational 
psychology-psych, of high school subjects 


Breese 


Norlie 









SOCIOLOGY 






1 362-6 












1872-7 












1882-8 












1892 9 












1902 0," 












1912-13 












1921-22 


I, II (El) 


3 (1 or 2) 


Introduction to Sociology 

(General outliiie and selected problems) . . . 


Ellwood 


Xcrlie 



INSTRUCTION 



305 



Outline of Subjects by Decades 



Year 



Class 



I . . . 
I, II. 



Hours and 
Courses 



3 (1 or 2). 
3 (1 or 2J. 

3 



Subject 



Educational Sociology 

(See under Psychology and education). 
Applied Psychology 



(See under Psychology and education . . 

In 1922-23 the following offered: History 

and theory of statistics 



Chancellor, 
Sm;th. . . 



Hollingsworth 
& Poffenberger 



Teacher 



Norlie 



Norlie 
Norlie 



SURVEYING 


1862-63 












1872-73 












1882-83 












1892-93 












1902-03 












1912-13 












1921-22 


I, II, III (El)... 


3 (2) 

Course I 






Sheel 












(Prerequisite: Plane trigonometry) 


: : : . 






'iisp«r« 



SMOOTH SAILING 



306 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

V. Clock hours 

/. Distribution oj Clock Hours by Subjects in the Preparatory and College Departments. 
First Semester. 1921-22 
(A student clock hour is the time spent by one student in one period of class-work per week.) 

COLLEGE DEPARTMENT 
Department Student Clock 

Hours Total 

Biology .^6 

Chemistry 236 

Christianity 273 

Economics 45 

Education 174 

English 381 

French 12 

German ' 306 

Greek iii 

Hebrew 6 

History 258 

Latin 451 

Mathematics 194 

Music (Harmony) 6 

Norwegian 176 

Philosophy 51 

Physics : 66 

Psychology Ill 

Total 3115 

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 
Department Student Clock 

Hours Total 

Christianity 156 

Citizenship 105 

Commercial 135 

English 365 

German 65 

History 255 

Latin 355 

Mathematics 335 

M usic , 96 

Norwegian 150 

Science 177 

Total 2194 

2 Distribution of Teaching Load by Clock Hours 

First Semester, 1921-22 

Teacher . Subjects Total Student 

Clock Hours 
EITTREIM, K. O Bookkeeping, Typewriting. Shorthand, Christianity 195 

21 hrs. Prep. College Treasurer. 
EITTREIM, O. M Geometry, General Science, Physics 302 

26 lirs. Prep. 
EVANSON, C. N Arithmetic, History, English 365 

24 hrs. Prep. 
GJERSET, KNUT History, Norwegian 255 

18 hrs. College. 
HOVDE, B. J History, Norwegian 179 

10 hrs. College. Acting Dean of Men 
MOE. L. A Algebra, Latin 235 

15 hrs. Prep. Principal Prep. Dept. 
NELSON, D. T English, Cicero 334 

15 hrs. Prep. 4 hrs. College. 

NORLIE, O. M Christianity, Education, Hebrew, Psychology 301 

16 hrs. College. 

OLSON. O. L English 195 

President of College. 9 hrs. College. 
PETERSON, F. E Commercial Geography, German, Latin 290 

15 hrs. Prep. 7 hrs. College. 
QUALLEY, O. W Latin, Higher Algebra 263 

10 hrs. Prep. 12 hrs. College. 



INSTRUCTION 



307 



REQUE, S. S Citizenship, Norse, English, French 362 

20 hrs. Prep. 4 hrs. College. 
ROVELSTAD, A. M Latin 313 

18 hrs. College. 
SHEEL, H. W Chemistry 236 

17 hrs. College. 

SIHLER, W German, Greek 323 

18 hrs. College. 

SPERATI, C. A Old Testament, Music, Harmony 178 

10 hrs. Prep. 1 hr. College. Director of Musical Organizations. 
STROM, C. W Greek, Mathematics 283 

18 hrs. College. 
TALLE, H. O Grammar, Caesar, Economics, Public Speaking (English). . . . 197 

10 hrs. Prep. 9 hrs. College. 
TINGELST.AD, O. A. . . .Christianity, Education, Philosophy 314 

15 hrs. College. Registrar. 
TRYTTEN, M. H Biology, Mathematics, Physics 189 

18 hrs. College. 

Total 5309 



Distribufion of Time by Percentages 



First Semester, 1921-22 



No. 


Person 


Admi- 
nistra- 
tion 

.16 


Ath- 
letics 


Li- 
brary 


Main- 
tenance 


Music 


Teaching 


College 


Prep. 


1 


Eittreim, K. O 

Eittreim. O. M 






.84 














1 00 


3 
















1 00 


4 














1.00 
.56 




5 


Hovde, B. J 


.44 












6 




1.00 










Moe, L. A 

Nelson, D. T 


.40 










.60 


8 










.27 

1 00 

.50 

.39 

.63 

.16 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

.06 

1.00 

.56 

.83 

1.00 


73 


9 


Norli'', O. M 














10 


Olson, O. L 

Peterson, E. E 

Peterson, F. E 

Qualley, O. VV . 


.50 

On leav 












11 
12 
13 


p of abs 


ence. 






.61 

.37 


14 














.84 


15 


Rovelstad, A. M 














16 


Sheel, N. W . 














17 


>ihler, W 














18 


Sperati, C. A 










.54 


.40 


19 














20 


Talle. H. O 












.44 


21 


Tintjelstad, O. A 

Trytten, M. H 

Doseff, I 


.17 












22 
23 


1^)0 










24 


Walhus, Nora 

(Nurse) 

Sperati, K. Marie 

(Stenographer) 


1.00 
1.00 












25 














76 




1.00 










27 


(Library Ass't.) 






1.00 
1.00 
1.00 








'8 


Ovloe H 














29 
































28 


Total 


3.67 


1.00 


2.00 


3 00 1 54 


10.96 


6.83 













308 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

VI. Accreditation 
The curriculum which has been described in the foregoing 
pages of this chapter has been favorably recognized by many of 
the leading universities in the country, in which graduates from 
Luther College not only have been accepted for graduate work 
along the lines in which they previously had majored but also 
have, in many instances, attained distinction. Luther College has 
for many years been on the approved list of the North Central 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. This recogni- 
tion was in 1921 confirmed by another agency of national promin- 
ence, namely, the General Education Board, whose representatives 
after an examination of the institution reported a very favorable 
impression. In fact, a careful investigation of the instruction at 
Luther College from its foundation to the present time shows that 
the qualities which have been given special recognition by such 
prominent authorities have characterized the institution through- 
out the sixtv years of its history. 




DUNNING SPRINGS 



CHAPTER FOURTEEN 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Carl W. Strom 
I. Literary Societies 

THAT Luther College men have always been deeply interested 
in literary work is abundantly testified to by the large number 
of societies which they have organized for its promotion during 
the last sixty years. It is not merely accidental that Luther 
College has the tradition that every student should belong to at 
least one literary society. It is rather a result of the intense in- 
terest which the students of successive years have taken in this 
branch of work. 

However, enthusiasm for society work has not been at the 
same level at all times. From 1879 on, a revival of interest has 
taken place at approximately ten-year intervals, each successive 
revival being definitely discernible by the number of societies or- 
ganized while the tide of enthusiasm was at its height. 

The revival in 1879 ended what may be called the "first period" 
in literary society work at Luther and ushered in the Students' 
Union, Niffelheim, Muspelheim, and Addison, four societies which 
for ten years held the literary interest of the College in a peculiar 
way. 

The next revival, in 1889, was a result of the decline of the 
first three of the above mentioned societies, and ushered in the 
"third period" of this history, which started when Irving and 
Amphictyonic took their place as the controlling societies in the 
College Department, a position which they have held now for 
thirty years. 

A new revival came in 1899 and another again in 1909, but 
at each of these times the existing societies were too strongly in- 
trenched in their positions to be materially affected, and in 1919 
the war had so far absorbed the attention of the student body as 
to force the literary societies temporarily into the background. 

The year 1922 will probably mark the opening of a "fourth 
period", as it seems certain that the material increase in the 
student body which has taken place during the last year or two 
will call for a number of new societies and force Irving and 



310 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

Anipliictyonic to divide the field wliieli lias been theirs for so many 
years. 

The first literary society at the College can lay claim to being 
older than the institution itself. The Clio Society was founded 
in St. Louis, Mo., on March .5, 18G0, and was reorganized in De- 
corah on September H), 18G2. 

The Clio held weekly meetings devoted to speeches, essays, 
declamations, and debates. English was tiie official language of 
the society, and in debate no other language was permitted. That 
English was not exactly the mother tongue for all of the members 
may be judged from the following extract from the record dated 
September 26, 1862: "During the debate the critic was not idle, 
all though willing to confess that he is unable to critticise fully, 
yet he had more work than he could dispose of. Some of the 
speakers used such corrupt and awkward language, that it made 
it entirel}^ impossable to correct any of it." The fact, however, 
that English was chosen as the official language of the society' is 
in itself significant. 

The debates in the Clio were carried out with six or eight 
speakers on each side. One of them was the "chief disputant", 
and opened the debate. The rest followed in order, each one 
s])eaking as often as he wished, but usually not more than ten 
minutes at one time. Religious and j)olitical questions were ruled 
out, but this did not deprive the members of subjects on which to 
sharpen their wits. The comparative influence of love of money 
and education, the comparative usefulness of steam and the com- 
pass, the desirability of having an egg to-day or a chicken to- 
morrow, these subjects and many more similar ones were debated 
in the Clio. The decision was given by one member who was 
selected to act as judge at each meeting. Thus we find that on 
January 20, 1866, the question: "Resolved, that the Negroes have 
suffered more than the Indians," was decided " in favor of the 
affirmative by Stub." In other respects, as far as the conduct of 
the society and the election of officers is concerned, the Clio was 
not greatly different from the societies at Luther at the present day. 

The Hetaeria Society, founded in 1868 as the Unit, but changed 
to the Hetaeria in 1866, resembled the Clio very closely. Except 
for the fact that it conducted its meetings in the Norwegian lan- 
guage, there were but few details to distinguish it from the earlier 
society. 

No record of the Clio is found after September 26, 1866, nor 
of the Hetaeria after November 1, 1870. 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 311 

A group of Norwegian societies — Saga, founded January 28, 
1866; Edda, founded October 23, 1866; and Minde, or Ygdrasil, 
founded November 7, 1868 — next claim our attention. 

Each one of tliese societies contributed its share toward the de- 
velopment of sixty years of literary society tradition at Luther 
College. Saga, besides carrying on the regular literary society 
work, interested itself in preserving the best speeches, essays, and 
poems that were delivered at its meetings. These were entered in 
the "Inseratprotokol", which, as handed down in the college li- 
brary, contains many articles of sufficient merit to justify their 
publication in book form. The journals which became a regular 
institution with the literary societies of later years were doubtless 
copied in idea from the Saga "Inseratprotokol". The last entry 
in this interesting journal was made on December 16, 1870. 

The Edda was an exclusively Norwegian debating society, but 
branched out into at least two new fields. First, together with the 
introduction of a treasurer into its official family, it levied ten or 
fifteen cents yearly on all of its members for the purchase of 
newspapers such as "Skandinaven" and "Den Nye Lutherske 
Kirketidende fra Norge". Secondly, through the winter of 1870- 
71, it published its own paper, "Fluen", w^hich is treated more ex- 
tensively later in this chapter. Edda held no recorded meeting 
after January 25, 1879. 

Minde, whose name was changed to Ygdrasil on October 16, 
1872, was evidently the most flourishing society at the College up 
to this time. It was the first society to bring up for discussion the 
rule barring political questions as subjects for debate, a rule which 
had been in vogue in all the societies up to this time. Ygdrasil did 
not depart from the tradition either, but should probably be cred- 
ited with being the first society seriously to suggest the change. 
Ygdrasil's record ends with the meeting of January 22, 1877, but 
there is no reason to believe that the society did not flourish for 
at least a year after that date. 

Franklin, whose first regular meeting was held November 11, 
1871, was active in more fields than any of the societies which 
had preceded it. For eight years it conducted weekly debates, 
gave public programs, and participated in inter-society debates ; 
its reading room contained many of the leading secular and re- 
ligious papers in English, Norwegian, and German; and on Oc- 
tober 4, 1876, its representatives met with those of Edda and 
Ygdrasil to organize the Students' Union. Franklin came to its 
end January 18, 1879. 



312 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



The revival of interest mentioned above earae in the years im- 
mediately preceding 1880. Franklin, Ygdrasil, Saga, and Edda 
had just come to their end or were about to do so shortly. Close 
in their wake came seven new societies. Scarcely anything but 
the name is known concerning four of them, Losna, Nordstierna, 
Det Norske Selskab, and Normannalaget. Det Norske Selskab 
is mentioned as being active in ISS^-St, but is not heard of after 
that school year. Normannalaget was tlie first of three societies 




THE SEVENTEENTH OF MAY, 1875 



by that name which have existed at the College. Breidablik ran 
its course during the two years from October 2, 1880, to March 
26, 1882. Osseo's existence was almost equally confined, extend- 
ing from October 4, 1879, to November 5, 1881, but in that short 
time it introduced an important innovation in allowing political 
questions in its debates, its very first debate, decided in favor of 
the affirmative, being on woman suffrage. 

Addison, founded October 10, 1879, was the only society re- 
sulting from the revival which enjoyed more than a very tempor- 
ary growth. At the time "Chips" was started it was the only liter- 
ary society at the College, and prospered in almost full posses- 
sion of the field until the next revival of enthusiasm, in 1890, 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 313 

struck it in the vitals and forced it to unite with Irving to pre- 
serve itself. Its journal, the "Spectator", still remains in Irving. 

The decade from 1880 to 1890 was in many ways peculiar as 
regards the situation in the literary societies at the College. Ad- 
dison was purely a literary society. However, several other or- 
ganizations, which were not literary societies in the present sense 
of the word, played a prominent part during those years. 

The first of these was the Students' Union. It was organized 
on October 4, 1876, by a council composed of members from Ed- 
da, Ygdrasil, and Franklin, for the purpose of generalising the 




CAMPUS ENTRANCE IN THE OLDEN DAYS 

work of the literary societies and particularly for the purpose of 
giving public entertainments. Since meetings were held only once 
every five weeks, each program was carried out on a rather ambi- 
tious scale. Besides speeches, essays, declamations, and debates, 
dramatizations of plays by the Dramatic Club were included in 
its programs. The "Journal" soon became famous among the 
students. Dependent at first on the member literary societies, it 
was organized separately in the spring of ISS-i. The record of 
the Students' Union is not in the college library, but its meetings 
are mentioned with more or less frequency in "Chips" until 1903, 
after which no more is heard from it. 

Niffelheim, whose palmiest days were within the decade under 
consideration, was one of the most unique institutions the College 
has ever fostered. Organized in 1874 as a smokers' club with 
rooms in the old "Chicken Coop", it developed into a great "re- 



314 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



public" to which no small number of lAither's most illustrious sons 
have belonged. Nor was Nitfelheim any mean antagonist in liter- 
ary work. Debates, orations, essays, poems, and mock trials, all 
were brought to a high state of perfection in the "republic". 
Many of the productions from the pens of its members have been 
preserved in the "Journal", and it is a positive treat to be given 
the opportunity of reading the brilliant productions found there. 
But Niffelheini witli its murky atmosphere was doomed by the 
"powers that be", and since 1888 it lias been nothing but a mem- 
ory. 

Muspelheim was founded in 1879 as an opposition society to 
Niffclheim. It was and is a distinguished organization in several 




ri'.IKIM', AM) JAKoHIM-, l.sl-.D lo .sKK\l-, Alll.K 
XOON COFFEE 



ways. It has undoubtedly numbered more Luther College men on 
its membership rolls than any other organization at Luther, in- 
cluding even the boarding club, whose senior it is by almost twenty 
years. It is by far the oldest student organization which has ever 
existed at the College. But it does not demand respect for its 
gray hairs alone. It has uniformly been the most prosperous or- 
ganization on the camj)us, even the Athletic Association having at 
times been among its debtors. In days past it was noted for 
"essays, brilliant speeches, and magnificent festivals". On the 
point of going to pieces in ISSt, it was revivified, and continued 
its feasts on Wasiiington's birthdaj' for almost twenty years more. 
For almost another twenty years it has been distinctly a 
reading society, cooperating with tlie library in furnishing to the 
students all the desirable American magazines besides many for- 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 315 

eign ones. In tliis latter role, it has probably been the largest 
single contributor to the college library. Muspelheim almost met 
its end in the excitement of 1918 and 1919, but in 1920 it was 
reorganized and is now again flourishing. 

Irving and Amphictyonic have held the lead in literary society 
work for the "third period" of thirty years. The histories of both 
of these societies have been written so well and so often that only 
a short note will be given each of them here. 

Irving, organized in 1884, was a continuation of Amicitia, or- 
ganized in 1882. In 1892 it united with Addison, and it is then 
that its real history begins. Its journal, the old "Amicitiae 
Opera", was changed in 1892 to the "Spectator" and is still is- 
sued at irregular intervals. 

Lowell and Proceedo, both organized in 1890, united on Jan- 
uary 30, 1891, under the name Amphictyonic Literary Society. 
On account of bitter inter-society rivalries, the new society was 
hard pressed in its first years, but it overcame all difficulties and 
last year celebrated its thirtieth anniversary. 

The early rivalry between Irving and Amphictyonic has con- 
tinued, although, at least in later years, in a thoroughly beneficial 
way, each one spurring the other on to use its best efforts in all 
its work, whether it be in the annual inter-society debate or in 
the annual public program or even in the annual "feast". The 
work of these two societies has been of inestimable value to the 
College, and will in all likelihood continue to be so for many years 
to come. 

Not all the societies of the early nineties fared so well as Irv- 
ing and Amphictyonic. Hamill, organized to promote oratory 
and extemporaneous speaking, existed only through the years 1891 
and 1892. Only the approximate dates are known for a number 
of others: Concordia, 1890-93; Minerva, October 23, 1891, to 
May 8, 1893; Webster, 1891-93; Athenian, 1 892-9 i. 

Normannalaget, organized December 21, 1892, was for many 
years the foremost Norwegian literary society at the College and 
was dropped only when most of its members left school for the 
national service in" 1917 and 1918. One of its most important 
activities was the collection of a fair-sized library, consisting 
mostly of Norwegian literature and history. This has now been 
transferred to the general library. Two attempts to organize a 
new Normannalaget in 1920 and 1921 came to naught after a few 
meetings. 

In the revival of the late nineties no lasting societies were 
formed. The Philomathean was disbanded on May 8, 1897, after 



316 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

a year or two of activity. The Sextonian, the Demosthenian, and 
the Platonian M'ere all societies of 1898-99. 

Mj0lner was a college Norwegian society organized February 
23, 1907. It suffered the fate of Normannalaget in 1917 and 
1918 and has not been revived. 

Idun, organized as an English literary society in the Prepar- 
atory Department in 1907, has been active up to the present time. 
Norr0na, a Preparatory Department Norwegian society, was or- 
ganized in 1911 and was active for four years. 




THE COLLEGE'S FIRST DEBATING TEAM, 1904 
A. T. Felland M E. Fretheiin T. A. Hoflf 



II. Sttdy Societies 

A number of clubs organized for special study have existed 
at the College. 

The Shakespearean Club was organized among the members 
of the Junior class in February, 1885, for the purpose of study- 
ing Shakespeare's dramas. 

The Stenographic Club was organized in December, 1885, for 
the purpose of continuing a course in shorthand which had been 
given for a part of the term and was about to be dropped from 
the curriculum. A faculty member was in charge of the instruc- 
tion in this club. 

The German Speaking Association was also evidently organ- 
ized in 1885, since its demise is lamented in "Chips" for May, 
1886. 

The Drawing Club was organized in February, 1887, as a 
continuation of a class in drawing which had been conducted as 
a part of the regular curriculum in the earlier part of the year. 

A Volapuk Club for the study of "Volapuk", a universal 
language, was organized in December, 1887. "Chips" for that 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 317 

month reports it as being only three days old, but prophesies 
that it will be older in a "year or two". 

The Chemistry Club was organized in May, 1901, ostensibly 
for the purpose of stimulating interest in the study of that sci- 
ence, but it was secretly suspected of making diamonds. 

The Luther College Sunda}'^ Association is classed here as it 
grew out of a Bible study class started by Rev. I. B. Torrison 
in the F. N. E. L. Sunday School in 1901. The association was 
formally organized at the College in 1903. Meetings are held 
Sunday afternoons, alternate meetings being devoted to lectures 
by professors or visitors and the discussion in a frank and open 
manner of existing student ills. A faculty member officiates in 
the capacity of leader. Dr. Oscar L. Olson was for seven years 
the leader; after him the leaders have been: Prof. T. E. Thomp- 
son, Dr. S. C. Ylvisaker, and Prof. O. A. Tingelstad, the present 
incumbent. Besides its important services to the student body, 
the Sunday Association should receive credit for having launched 
the Young People's Association of the Synod in 1906 and for 
entertaining the Lutheran Students' Union Convention in a three- 
day session, March 8 to 10, 1922. 

The P. A. Munch Historical Society was organized on Febru- 
ary 11, 1903, at the suggestion of Dr. K. Gjerset, who was also 
its first president. It included both faculty members and students 
in the College Department in its membership. Meetings were 
devoted to lectures by the professors of the College or by vis- 
itors, historical topics being the uniform choice of the speakers. 
Historical study by the students was encouraged, the best of 
their papers being published in the historicals department of 
"Chips". From April 12, 1909, to November 18, 1910, the so 
ciety was inactive while Dr. Gjerset was absent in Norway, but 
on his return the work was resumed and the northwest corner room 
of the second floor of the Main Building was fitted up as a society 
room, where a fair library was also collected. Since 1915 no reg- 
ular meetings have been held, and the library has been added to 
the general library. 

The Inter-Collegiate Debating Association was organized in 
February, 1903, with Irving and Amphictyonic as member so- 
cieties. It has had charge of promoting all the inter-collegiate 
debates of the College. 

In 1902 the Southern Wisconsin Luther College Club offered 
a prize of $25 for the best oration delivered by a student at the 
College. The following year two prizes of $25.00 each were 
offered for the best orations in English and Norwegian. This 



318 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

offer has been repeated eaeh year since 1903. In 191 -'J the Lu- 
ther College Oratorical Association was organized and affiliated 
with the state association. Since that time the winner of the 
local English contest has represented the College in the eastern 
divisional contest, competing for the riglit to participate in the 
state contest. Luther participated in the state contest for the 
first time in 1922, when Oscar Rem, '24, under the able tutelage 
of Prof. H. O. Talle, won a place in the eastern divisional con- 
test at Mt. Pleasant, Iowa. The state contest was held at Lu- 
ther College in 1920. 

III. PlBLICATIONS 

In the field of journalism Luther College students have been 
no less active than in literary society work. 

"Moderlandet" was the name of the first student publication at 
Luther College. It was edited by PL G. Stub and K. Nordgaard, 
and was a bi-weekly, four-page, hand-written, foolscap folder, 
costing twenty-five cents for a half-year. A page of the second 
number is preserved in the college museum. "Mamalandet" was 
the name of a rival publication edited, in 1866, by K. Bj0rgo. 
Neither "Mamalandet" nor "Ridderen uden Frygt og Dadel" 
have been preserved. Two other early publications, both of which 
have been preserved, are "Fluen" and "Svein Uraed". "Fluen", 
of the same form and period of issue as "Moderlandet", was the 
official organ of Edda debating society. Ten numbers were is- 
sued, or rather "written", during the winter of 1869-70, N. Cliris- 
tensen, '71, acting as editor. Of a similar make-up was "Svein 
XJraed", edited by M. Koefod under the business management of 
H. A. Bergh during the winter of 1871-72. "Gjallarhorn" was 
issued by Niffelheim one winter during the later seventies. 

The first number of "College Chips" appeared in January, 
188t. The first numbers were issued semi-monthly, but since 
January, 1887, they have appeared once a month. The first board 
of editors consisted of E. O. Hove, O. K. Fughi, O. M. Kalheim, 
George Markhus, and J. A. Ness, with M. O. Aubolee as business 
manager. The first editor of the Norwegian department was T. 
O. Tolo. In form it was originally six and one-half by nine and 
one-half inches, but the size was changed on January 1, 188.5, to 
seven and one-half by ten and one-half inches, and again in Jan- 
uary, 1905, it was changed to its present size of six and one-half 
by nine inches. The first issues of "Chips" were of twelve pages. 
The size has been gradually increased to forty-eight pages, which 
is the present size, although it did for a few years include sixty- 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 319 

four pages. The present average circulation is 900 copies. Or- 
iginally an all-English magazine, "Chips" had a Norwegian de- 
partment from January, 1885, to December, 1889. From De- 
cember, 1889, to April, 1897, it was published alternately in the 
English and Norwegian languages. Since April, 1897, it has been 
all English. "Chips" has experienced various turns of fortune 
in its thirty-seven years of existence. Twice it has been on the 
rocks, in 1890, and again in 1916, but both times the storm has 
been weathered. For its columns it has uniformly commanded 
the best talent of the College and has at the same time been the 
object of the careful attention of the members of the English 
department, to whom all honor is due for keeping "Chips" at a 
high standard of excellence. — "Valeat Quantum Valere Potest!" 
"Let it pass for what it's worth!" 

"Ervingen" was first issued in May, 1908, as a 18-page quart- 
erly, six by eight and one-half inches in size. The Norwegian 
language was used throughout. It was discontinued in June, 1913, 
due to lack of financial support, but during its short life it gave 
many of the students a chance to try their hand at writing litc- 
ary Norwegian. Its first board of editors consisted of Finn 
Magelssen, Thomas A. Haugen, Alfred Halvorson, Bernhard 
Rosenqvist, and Olaf Gaarder, with Olaf Tufte and Charles A. 
Fritz as business managers. 

The "Luther College Semi-Centennial", dedicated to Dr. Laur. 
Larsen, was issued by the Junior class in 1911. It was a 256- 
page book, seven and one-half by ten and one-half inches. Enoch 
E. Peterson was the editor-in-chief and Britton Burtness the 
business manager. 

The second "Annual" of the College was issued in 1920 by 
the class of 1921, with Elmer S. Eid as editor-in-chief and Olaf 
G. Malmin as business manager. It was a 224-page book, seven 
and three-quarters by ten and three-quarters inches. At the sug- 
gestion of Dr. K. Gjerset, the annual was called the "Pioneer", 
since Luther College was the pioneer institution of our Church. 

The second issue of the "Pioneer" is at present being pre- 
pared for the press by the class of 1921, Oscar Rem acting as 
editor-in-chief and George C. Henriksen, Jr., acting as business 
manager. It will be dedicated to the late honored President C. 
K. Preus. 

The latest journalistic venture of the student body was the 
"Campus News", a single sheet five and one-half by eight and 
one-half inches printed on the "Luther College Press", a small 
haild-power machine owned by Prof. K. O. Eittreim. "Campus 



320 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

News" was published by the Athletic Association, Arthur C. Paul- 
son editor, and George C. Henriksen, Jr., business manager. 
Twenty numbers were issued during the winter of 1921-22. Two 
were four-page issues, the first one issued during the sixtieth an- 
niversary celebration and the second at the time of the Lutheran 
Students' Union Convention. The first of these two reported the 
St. Olaf-Luther football game in print 35 minutes after the end 
of the game. 




DL'GWAV ALONG THE Ll'l'ER 
IOWA 

IV'. The Luther College Boarding Club 

The Norwegian Synod, at its meeting at La Crosse, Wisconsin, 
in 1896, gave the students at Luther College permission to form 
their own boarding club. The club was organized June 16, 1896, 
with H. J. Wein as manager; C. M. Hallangcr, secretary; Oscar 
A. Strom, treasurer; Ola Ordal, buyer; and Christian Thompson, 
J. M. Peterson, and K. M. Hagestad as directors. Board the first 
year was furnished at $1.30 a week. In 1900-01 it was $1.60 a 
week; in 1910-11, $2.48 a week; in 1920-21, $3.86 a week; and 
in 1921-22 it averaged about $3.70 a week. Up to 1916 the 
basement of the Main Building provided a dining room. In that 
year the boarding club erected I>oyalty Hall, a description of 
which may be found in another chapter. 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 



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326 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



EDITORIAL STAFFS OF "ERVINGExN" 



Year 



Editor 



1908-09 Finn Magelssen. . 

1909-10 Alfred Halvorson. 

1910-11 O. P. B. Grimley.. 

1911-12 Carl Hansen 

1912-13 Ludvig P. Kjaer. . 



Assistants 



Thos. A. Haugen, Alfred Halvor- 
son, Bernhard Rosenqvist, 
Olaf Gaarder 

Odd Ekfelt. O. P. B. Grimley, 
Edw. Jordahl. C. C. Birkelo. . 

Albert N. Livdahl, Carl Hansen, 

Ivar Sandberg, Eugene Aal. . . 
O. L. Haavik, Ludvig P. Kjaer, 

Anton Buttedal, Herman W. 

Monson 

P. C. Forseth, John Urness, R. 

Ulvilden, Emil Grefthen 



Business Managers 



Olaf Tufte. Charles A. Fritz 



Charles A. Fritz, P. L. Johns- 
rud, A. G. Storstad 



Charles A. Fritz, A. G. Storstad 



A. G. Storstad, G. E. Brunsdale 



G. E. Brunsdale, Walter T. 
Gigstad. 



MEMBERS OF "ANNUAL" STAFFS 

1911 Semi-Centennial: Enoch E. Peterson — Editor-in-Chief. 
Britton Burtness — Business Manager. 
Members of Staff: David T. Nelson, Wilhelm Dahl, O. Herbert Aanestad, Carl Hansen, 
Carl Foss, .\lfred G. Storstad. Otto Austin, Winfred Wollan. 
1920 Pioneer: Elmer S. Eid — Editor-in-Chief. 

Olaf G. Malmin — Business Manager. 
Members of Staff: J. W. Ylvisaker. R. O. Storvick, A. O. Storvick. R. Oefstedal, N. G. 
Maakestad, H. M. Tolo, L. C. Sorlien, A. E. Bergum, N. O. Halvorson, C. M. Olson 
Emil Hermundstad, A. R. Sorlien, Ernest Sihler. 
1923 Pioneer: Oscar Rem — Editor-in-Chief. 

George C. Henriksen, Jr. — Business Manager. 
Pioneer Board: A. O. Mork, ^Ielvin Clauson, H. K. Savre, U. H. Reque. 



MEMBERS OF COLLEGE DEBATING TEAMS 

Year Members of Teams 

1903-04 M. E. Fretheim, A. T. Felland, T. A. Hofif. 

1904-05 B. Petersen. C. A. Fjeldstad, O. A. Tingelstad. 

1905-06 No team. 

1906-07 J. O. Holum, Arnt Vaaler, N. A. Olsen. 

1907-08 A. C. Erickson, J. O. Ensrud, G. Bjorgo. 

1908-09 No team. 

1909-10 No team. 

1910-11 No team. 

1911-12 D. T. Nelson, B. Burtness, O. L. Haavik. 

1912-13 G. O. G. Rahn, F. Reishus, C. Knutson. 

1913-14 V. Bjorgo, M. O. .Andrew, E. Grefthen. 

1914-15 H. L. Ylvisaker, T. O. Kraabel, E. R. Seines. 

1915-16 T. Gilbertson. C. L. Lee, H. O. Talle. 

1916-17 A. J. Tolo, C. L. Lee, P. J. Kvale; K. H. Brunsdale, E. H. Parsons, H. O. Talle. 

1917-18 A. J. Tolo, I. R. Gronlid, K. D. Stalland. 

1918-19 I. R. Gronlid, C. W. Strom, T. H. Megorden; C. M. Ravndal, O. G. Malmin, A. E 

Nelson. 

1919-20 No team. 

1920-21 O. G. Malmin, E. H. Parsons, J. \V. Ylvisaker; A. C. Paulson, R. E. .\nderson, 

E. O. ToUefsrud. 

1921-22 R. E. Anderson, A. C. Paulson, \V. O. Rindahl; E. O. ToUefsrud, S. J. Steen, C. W. 

Tvedt. 



Year 



MEMBERS OF PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT DEBATING TEAMS 
Members 



1918-19 M. O. Kraabel, Paul Ode, H. Helgeson; Milo Bakke, Nelvin Fosmark, Chris. R)'.n3 

1919-20 Nelvin Fosmark, Don A. Stevens, Nels Y. Jordahl. 

1920-21 K. S. N. Roe, C. E. L. Lucky, Paul F. Olson. 

1921-22 Paul F. Olson, Carl E. L. Lucky, .Armin Johnson. 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 



327 



Year 
1902. . 



1903. 
1903. 



1904. 
1904. 



1905. 
1905. 



1906. 
1906. 



1908. 
1908. 

1909. 
1909. 

1910. 
1910. 

1911 
1911 
1911 



1912. 
1912. 



1915 
1915 



1916 
1916 



1917. 
1917 



1918 
1918 



1919 
1919. 



1920. 
1920. 



1921. 
1922 



WINNERS OF THE .ANNUAL ORATORICAL CONTESTS 1902-1922 
Contest First Place Second Place Third Place 



English and Axel Bergh tied Chr. Moldstad Herman Baalson 

Norwegian. . Alfred Bredesen tied 



English Alfred Bredesen Harry Olsen . 

Norwegian. ...CO. Heggtveit E. Hansen. . . 



. T. E. Thompson 
.C. J. Quill 



English A. T. Felland No decision No desicion. 

Norwegian.. . C. J. Quill No decision No decision 

Temperance. .Martin Fretheim Alfred Bredesen Leon Peterson 



English P. O. C. Johnson Arnt Vaaler 

Norwegian. . . .O. E. Schavlan A. Davick. . 

English Arnt Vaaler No decision . 

Norwegian. 

English . . . 

Norwegian . 

English. . . . 
Norwegian . 

English. . . . 
Norwegian. 

English . . . 
Norwegian . 



. M. O. Sumstad 
. No decision 



. M. O. Sumstad No decision No decision 

. G. O. Lillegard Orlando Overn L. Bredvold tied 

S. J. Fretheim tied 
. Oliver Ruen K. Hanson A. O. Hal vorson 



L. S. Kloster J. O. Holum 

.D. J. Borge J. A. O. Larsen (?) 

. K. B. Vaaler Finn Magelssen 

. M. C. Johnshoy Odd Ekfelt 



. K. P. B. Reishus. 
. Finn Magelssen . . 

. P. J. Iverson 

.C. U. Faye 

N. A. Madson Charles Fritz Theo. Lerud 

.O. L. Haavik Odd Ekfelt Eugene Aal 

. E. E. Peterson LA. Opstad P. O. B. Grimley 

. Herman Monson N. A. Madson Carl Hansen 



English 

Norwegian . . . 
Try-outs for 

State Peace 

contest Charles Fritz No decision 



No decision 



. English Justin Petersen G. O. G. Rahn Wilhelm Dahl 

. Norwegian. . . . Peter Forseth Alfred Nesset Carl Hansen 

No contest. Since 1913 the winner of the local English contest has represented 
Luther College in the Eastern Divisional Contest of the State. 



. English E. Grefthen Herman Monson . 



. Carl Seebach 



, English E. Robert Seines Einar Larson Walther L Brandt 

. Norwegian .... Henry O. Talle E. Tingelstad Theodore Stensby 



. English J. E. Opsahl E. Tingelstad . 

. Norwegian. . . .J. M. Rohne E. Tingelstad . 



B. J. Hovde 
Mikkel Lono 



. English Henry O. Talle E. Tingelstad K. D. Stalland 

.Norwegian C. P. Birkelo John Waage Arthur J. Tolo 

E. Tingelstad represented L. C. in the Eastern Divisional Contest in 1917, 
Talle being ineligible because he was president of the state association. 

. English Arthur J. Tolo John Waage Allen E. Nelson 

.Norwegian. .. .Arthur J. Tolo O. H. Thorsen H. Siqueland 



. No contest held. W. B. Scarvie was elected by students to represent L. 

Eastern Divisional Contest. 
.5th Liberty 

Loan Elmer S. Eid No decision No decision 

I. R. Gronlid 



C. in 



. English Elmer S. Eid T. H. Megorden . 

. Norwegian . . H. Siqueland Olaf G. Malmin 

• English Olaf G. Malmin Elmer S. Eid Sigvart J. Steen 

.English Charles E. Hook Oscar Rem J. Melvin Moe 

Cscar Rem represented L. C. in the Eastern Divisional and State Contests in 1922, 
Mr. Hook having left school. 



CHAPTER FIFTEEN 

ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 

O. W. QlALLEY 

I. General Statement 

FROM the very earliest times the students at Luther College 
have taken great interest in athletics. A large number of the 
boys who attended the College in the early days came from farms 
and M'ere accustomed to hard manual labor. Life in the school- 




THE FIKST GVMNASIUM. 1880 



room was a great change to them, and it was not long before they 
felt the need of exercise and action. There were no intercol- 
legiate contests to be trained for; nor was any course in gym- 
nastics offered. The boys derived their exercise and enjoyment 
from the games and sports which were then in vogue, such as 
running, jumping, wrestling, weight lifting, and hiking. Dur- 
ing the winter skating and skiing were also popular. While the 
College had its quarters in the St. Cloud Hotel, 1862-65, the 
large back-yard took the place of a gymnasium and athletic field, 
and such gymnastic equipment as could be gotten was set up 
there. When the College was moved to its present site in 1865 
the gymnastic apparatus was set up north of the main building. 

Baseball dates back to the earliest times and has always been 
the favorite sport at Luther. Military drill and football were 
introduced in the seventies. 



ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 329 

For lack of facilities no regular gymnastic instruction was 
given until 1886. In that year the west wing of the present gym- 
nasium was built with money raised through the efforts of the 
students. The improvement in the health of the boys was at once 
apparent. In previous winters there had been no place to ex- 
ercise; and the result was, that some students who scarcely left 
the building for weeks at a time were almost broken in health by 
spring. Two hours of gymnastics per week were required of 
every student. According to reports in "Chips" the students 
were highly pleased with their instructor, Prof. L. S. Reque. He 
was relieved by Prof. J. G. Halland. In 1890 Prof. W. Sihler 
took charge and with the help of various student assistants carried 
on the work successfully for many years. When Prof. Sihler re- 
tired, Dr. Oscar L. Olson, Dr. K. Gjerset, Dr. Ole Boe, and Prof. 
B. Svan0e took charge of the work in the order named. Athletic 
coaches Ralph Movold and Ivan Doseff have conducted the class- 
es in 1920-21 and 1921-22, respectively. The turning club, which 
has existed since 1886, has given those especially interested in 
turning and gymnastics an opportunity for further development. 

II. Athletic Association 

When intercollegiate competition was introduced in 1891 the 
need of an organization to take control of athletics and to ar- 
range and finance schedules was at once felt. It was now no 
longer possible for teams to be self-supporting as they had pre- 
viously been, and, since the teams represented the whole student 
body, it was only fair that the expense of maintaining them should 
be distributed. 

Agitation for such an association was started, and this agita- 
tion resulted in the organization of the Luther College Athletic 
Association in the fall of 1892. Oscar L. Olson '93, first presi- 
dent of the association, was one of the prime movers in its incep- 
tion. All students and faculty members were admitted to mem- 
bership in the association on the payment of fees. The chief 
points of its constitution provided that: The association should 
have control of all athletic sports at the College. All candidates 
for the various teams should be voted upon by the association. 
An executive committee, consisting of five students and one faculty 
member, should nominate all candidates for the different teams, 
and should make and carry out all necessary arrangements for 
games. The association should determine what conditions players 
must fulfill in order to win the College "L". In 1920 changes 
in the athletic situation at Luther made it necessary to alter the 



330 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



constitution in certain respects. The athletic director was made 
a member of the athletic board of control. Since coaches were 
now in charge of all sports and it was no longer advisable to have 
the association vote upon the candidacy of players, this clause 
was stricken from the constitution. An athletic board was creat- 
ed to take the place of the executive committee with virtually the 
same powers. It is composed of four students and two members 
of the faeultv. 




GYMNASIUM AM) l()() 1 HAl.l. FIKl.l) 



Athletics at Luther College have been managed very success- 
fully by the Athletic Association. The dues were originally 
twenty cents per month or practically two dollars a year. When 
the schedules were enlarged and intercollegiate competition was 
entered into in more branches of sport, the dues were raised until 
at present each member pays ten dollars a year into the treasury 
of the association. When it is remembered that the association 
is maintaining teams in six branches of sport, this cannot be 
considered exorbitant. 

The association has always received the enthusiastic su))j)()rt 
of the students and has been practically identical with the student 
body in membership. 



ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 331 

Wlien the east wing of the gymnasium was built in 1903 with 
floor space for a basketball court the students immediately took 
advantage of the opportunity to play basketball. The interest in 
the game can be determined to some extent by the fact that inter- 
collegiate competition was introduced already in 190 k Luther's 
first intercollegiate tennis tournament was played in the same 
year. 

Membership in some athletic conference is almost necessary 
in order to maintain a reputation for high standards of eligibil- 
ity. It is the prevailing tendency among colleges to regard with 
suspicion such institutions as are not members. The report is soon 
circulated that such an institution is not a member of a conference 
because it does not wish to observe the eligiblity rules of a con- 
ference. Affiliation with a conference also aids materially in ar- 
ranging schedules. In 1906 Luther became a member of the 
Hawkeye Conference of Iowa Colleges. Difficulty in the arrange- 
ment of schedules led the College to abandon the organization in 
1912. Membership in the Tri-state Conference of Minnesota, 
North and South Dakota Colleges was obtained in December of 
the same year. 

This organization disbanded in 1920 when the Minnesota 
Conference was organized. At present the College is arranging to 
enter a proposed Hawkeye Conference to include all colleges in 
the state except Iowa University, Drake, Ames, and Grinnell. 

III. "L" Association 

Illustrative of the efforts of the students to maintain high 
standards and enthusiasm in athletics at Luther College is the 
"L" Association organized in January, 1919, largely through the 
efforts of its first president, M. W. Larsen, '19, and A. L. Bron- 
stad, '19. 

"The purpose of this organization," according to Art. No. 2 
of the constitution, "shall primarily be to foster a strong college 
spirit; to promote a keen interest in all collegiate activities; to 
imbue a true sense of love for and appreciation of the good old 
'L'; to make it the one and only monogram that is recognized, 
respected, and tolerated at Luther College; and to keep an of- 
ficial record of all earners of the 'L'." The constitution also 
provides that membership in the organization shall be limited to 
those who have earned the official "L" in forensics or athletics, 
that all former "L" men shall be honorary members of the associa- 
tion, and that the man holding the greatest number of "L's" shall 
automatically become president. 



332 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

Through its recommendations to the athletic association the 
organization has been an important factor in determining the 
style and size of "L's" and other insignia. At the end of each 
intercollegiate season it is customary for the old members of the 
association to entertain the new members at an informal banquet. 
On such occasions the constitution is always read to acquaint 
them with the purpose and ideals of the organization. 

IV. Coaches and Athletic Directors 

In the early years of intercollegiate athletics professional 
coaches and athletic directors were not to be thought of at Luther, 




BASEBALL DIAMOND 

and yet the College was represented by a winning team year after 
year. Luther teams competed successfully with teams coached 
by high-salaried men. Much of the remarkable success of base- 
ball teams at Luther College , however, can be traced to 
Professors Sihler and Olson, and, in later years, to Prof. S. S. 
Reque, '03, who were as well acquainted with the game as any 
professional coach. 

As time went on coaches and atliletic directors gradually be- 
came an essential part of athletics at various colleges. Institu- 
tions with coaches hesitated to play those without coaches because, 
as one coach said, there was not much honor in winning and it 
was a disgrace to lose. With such conditions obtaining it was 
not strange that the students at Luther began to agitate for a 
coach. Due to the efforts of Prof. B. K. Savre, '96, and Paul 
Preus, '11, who raised the necessary money, Arthur Laudel was 
engaged as baseball coach in 1917. Professional coaching was 
first made a policy of the school when Walter Jewell served as 



ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 333 

football coach in 1919. Since that time coaches have been en- 
gaged by the College for all sports. 

Arthur Laudel served as baseball coach at Luther College 
from 1917 to 1921 inclusive. That he pitched for the Detroit 
American League Club is ample proof of his playing ability and 
knowledge of the game. In 1919, 1920, and 1921, Mr. Laudel 
put out wonderful teams. Their records testify to his coaching 
powers. Ability to turn out successful teams was not Mr. Laudel's 
only asset as a coach. His whole attitude on the diamond was in 
harmony with Luther's highest athletic ideals and traditions. 

Alvin J. Natvig, Luther's first basketball coach, graduated 
from Luther College in 1918. Mr. Natvig played on the Luther 
team five years and was as great a guard as ever represented Lu- 
ther in basketball. When he agreed to coach the team in 1920 
prospects were bright. In the influenza epidemic Mr. Natvig 
and several of the squad were taken sick, necessitating the can- 
cellation of several games. Mr. Natvig's team showed marked 
improvement in spite of the severe handicap. 

When intercollegiate football was introduced again in 1919 
a football coach was a necessity. Walter Jewell, who had play- 
ed tackle on the Iowa University eleven, was selected to coach 
the team. Making a football team out of men with practically 
no experience was no easy task. Mr. Jewell worked diligently 
and faitli fully . Although he did not develop a winning combina- 
tion his efforts were of great value to the team the following 
year. 

Oscar M. Solcm came to Luther with the remarkable record 
of having coached three championship football teams. As a stu- 
dent at the University of Minnesota he played end and tackle on 
the team in 1911 and 1912. While serving his country during 
the war he received the rank of captain. His football team at 
Luther in 1920 came up to expectations. Only one game was 
lost and that by one point. Mr. Solem's record at Luther was 
so impressive that he was given a large increase in salary to 
become coach at Drake University. 

Ralph Movold coached basketball and track and was instructor 
in physical training at Luther 1920-1921. Mr. Movold was gradu- 
ated from the North Dakota Agricultural College in 1919, and 
had a very impressive athletic record. In track he was much 
handicapped, it being Luther's first year of competition in track 
since 1904. 

Ivan Doseff, now coaching football, basketball, and track at 
Luther, has been in the coaching game since 1908. While play- 



334 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

ing on the University of Chicago team he was selected for all- 
western honors. Mr. Doseflf is an advocate of clean athletics and 
inculcates sportsmanship in the true sense of the word. 

S. S. Reque coached the baseball team in 1922. His record 
as a player is already known to all who are acquainted with Lu- 
ther College athletics. He has had previous coaching experience 
at Gale College, and at Luther College in 1907 and 1908. 

The Preparatory Dejiartment maintains its own athletic teams 
in football, basketball, and baseball. Competition is carried on 
■with the various academies within the Church and with neighbor- 




FIRST BASEBALL TEAM, 1872 

P. Helgeland. G J. Lomen, C. K. Preus, A. Torgerson 
L G. Monson, H. R0tlie, S. Weeks, H. Johnson, 0. Mandt 

ing high schools. The "Prep." teams have always been of high 
calibre. This year the Preparatory basketball team coached by 
Prof. O. W. Qualley was victorious in the Inter-Academy Con- 
ference and received possession of tlie Inter-Academy Conference 
Cup for one year. Much valuable material for college teams 
is thus develoj)ed in the Preparatory Department. In addition 
to Prof. O. W. Qualley, Professors M. W. Larsen and S. S. 
Reque have acted as coaches of Preparatory teams. 

V. Baseball 

Baseball is the favorite game of the American youth. A 
glance at Luther College's record tempts one to say that it is 
also the favorite game of the Viking youth, for the great enthusi- 
asm and proficiency in the game shown by the boys of Norwegian 



ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 



335 



descent in this country, even in the first generation, have really 
been remarkable. 

Baseball at Luther had its origin in the baseball movement, 
so to speak, which spread throughout the West immediatel}' after 
the Civil War. Intercollegiate competition was not introduced 
until 1891, but games were played with Decorah and neighbor- 
ing town teams, such as Waukon, Ft. Atkinson, Ridgeway, and 
Cresco. In addition to the regular nine, teams were organized 
by classes, weight, height, etc. The contest with Decorah on 




BASEBALL TEAM, 1891 

A. Torrison, T. Rddsaeter, K. Thorsgaard, W. Torrison 

O. L. Olson, S. T. Reque 
W. Sihler, O. G. Juul, P. A. Reque, E. A. Botline 



May 17th was generally the crucial game of the season. Many 
and interesting stories are told of the efforts to get players who 
had been injured, into shape for this game. 

The first organized team of which there is any record dates 
from 1871 or 1872. Its members were: I. Monson, S. Weeks, 
H. Jolmson, H. R0the, A. Torgerson, G. Lomen, O. Mandt, P. 
Helgeland, and C. K. Preus. 



336 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

The records show that the following represented the College 
in a game with Decorah on May 17, 1879: I. B. Torrison, capt. ; 
T. G. Opsahl, H. J. Kopperdal, Halvor Peterson, H. T. Ytter- 
boe, O. P. Syftestad, O. E. Brecke, G. A. Larsen, and L. M. K. 
Karstad. 

Luther played her first intercollegiate baseball game with St. 
Olaf College in May, 1891. Space does not permit any extensive 
account of the success of Luther on tlie diamond. A short quota- 
tion from the "Outing Magazine", an eastern publication, edited 
by Casper Whitney, a strong supporter of clean college athletics, 
will have to suffice. In the May issue for 1901 appeared the fol- 
lowing writeup of college baseball in the West: 

"In baseball the teams of Illinois, Northwestern, Chicago, 
Michigan, Beloit, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Iowa are all play- 
ing strong games. Michigan, whose only trip was somewhat dis- 
appointing, is coming to the front with a rush. The Notre Dame 
team, too, may be placed in the first class, while Luther College, 
a small institution in Decorah, Iowa, whose record for pure 
class athletics is enviable, has one of the best ball nines in tlie 
West." 

The following is an official roster of Luther College basel)all 
teams from 1884 to 1922 inclusive: 

1884— J. G. Halland, T. Opsjihl, O. T. Lee, C. Botline, O. K Fuglei, G. A. Tor- 
rison, S. C. N. Peterson, A. Jacobson, C. Neperud, J. P. Bakke. 

1885— G. A. Torrison, C. Bothne, H. O Fjeldstad, G. A. Gullixon, S. C. N. Peter- 
son, O. Ylvisaker, O. K. Fuglei, P. A Kittilsby, B. Fryslie. 

1886 — C. Bothne, Gustav Torrison, P. A. Kittilsljy, O. K. Fuglei, M. A. Mikkelsen, 
G. A. Gullixon, S. C. N Peterson, O. Ylvisaker, C. 1. Kollefson. 

1887 — N. Torrison. c; P. A. Kittilsby, lb; O. T. Rikansrud, 2b; G. A. Gullixon, 
3b; O. Ylvisaker, If; O. L. Olson, p; E G. Mellem, rf; M. M. Steensland, 
ss; P. A. Keque, cf. 

1888— N. Torrison, c; J. G. Halland, p; P. A. Kittilsby, lb; N. N. Nordgaard, 
2b; O. L Olson, 3b; M. M. Steensland, ss; O. Ylvisaker, If; O. T. Rikans- 
rud, cf; E. G. Mellem, rf. 

1889 — N. Torrison, c; O. L. Olson, p; J. G. Halland, lb; N. N. Nordgaard, 2b; 
G. A. Gullixon. :ib; M. M. Steensland, ss; E. A. Bothne, if; P. A. Reque, 
cf; E. G. Mellem, rf. 

1890 — O. L. Olson, c; A. TorrFson, p; W. Torrison, lb; N. N. Nordgaard, 2b; 
P. A. Reque, 3b; O. G. Juul, ss; O. Akre, O. S. Swennes, D. B. Bra>kke, E. A. 
Botline, E. G. Mellem, fielders. 

1891 — W. Torrison, c; A. Torrison, p; O. L. Olson (capt.), lb; O. CJ. Juul, 2b; 
K. L. Thorsgaard, ss; W. SilUer, 3b; E. A Botline, If; P. A. Reque. ef; 
T. R0dsaeter, rf; O. Akre. 

1892— W. Torrison, c; A. Torrison, p; W. Sillier, lb; O. I.. Olson (capt.), 2b; 
K. L. Thorsgaard, ss; W. It. loigeisoii, ;il); O. G. Juul, If; O. Akre, cf; 
H. Ness, rf. 

1893 — W. Torrison, c; A. Torri.soii (capt.), p; O L. Olson, lb; K. L. Thorsgaard, 
2b; O. G. Juul. ss; W. Sillier. ;ib; E A. Bothne, E. Lewison, I. A. Thor- 
soii, H. Ness, O. Akre, oulfield. 

1894— W. Torrison, c; A. Torri.son (capt.), p; E. Lewi.son, lb; K. I.. Thorsgaard, 
2b; O. G. Juul, ss; J. R. Peterson, 3b; E. A. Bothne, If; I. A. Thorson, cf; 
H. Ness, rf; J. E. Winger; O. S. Opheim, mgr. 



ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 



33: 




BASKHALL TEAM, 1922 

Bergm, Ostreni, Reque, V. Sperati, C. Anderson, Iverson. Larsen, M. H Anderson 

Ellingson, H. E. Peterson, E. Hovden, Sorlien, O. Onvoll, Bottolfson, Knudson 

Maakestad, S. Onvoll, Ethun, S. Sperati, Killie, Trytten, Borgen 




PREPARATORY BASEBALL TEAM, 1922 



O Qualley, A. Foss, G. Losen, W. Korsrud, M. K. Anderson, L. Hegg A. Erickson 

P. Olson, M. Lande, C. Hovden, S. Fardal, O. Ruen 

0. Torrison, H. C. Peterson, A. Moackrud, J. N. Otte 



338 



LUTHER College through sixty years 



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340 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



1895— W. Torrison. c; A. Torrison (ciipt), S. T. Norni'iiii, p; K. I.ewison, lb; 
K. L. Thorsgaard, 2b; A. L. Markhus, ss; M. B. Juul, 3b; P. Berntson, If; 
I. A. Thorson, cf; J. E. Winger, rf; S. J. N. Ylvisaker, iiigr. 

1896 — No intercollegiate games played. 

1897 — E. Lewison (capt.), c; J. C. Jensen, S T. Norniann, p; J. E. Winger, lb; 
W. Sih'er, 2b; M. Hegland, ss; I. M. Lyngaas, 3b; A. L. Markhus, If; 
K. M. Hagestad, cf; O. B. I'ederson, rf; A. O. Anderson. 

1898—0 B. Pederson, c; J. C. Jcn.sen, R. Gaard, p; H. O. Gullixson, lb; Moe, 
2b; M. Hegland (capt.), ss; H. .1. I,inde. 3b; A. O. Anderson If; W. Sihler, 
cf; B. Borreson, rf; E. Aaseth, H. M. Dahl, P. Moen, mgr. 

1899—0. B. Pederson (capt.), c; O. .1. H. Preus, R. Gaard, p; J. A. C. Torger- 
son, lb; P. Berntson. 2b: M. Hegland. ss; H. J. Linde, 31); A. O. Ander- 
son, If; 0. Moe, E. Aaseth, cf; H. O Gullixson, rf; S. .S. Reque, P. Moen, 
mgr. 

1900— O. B. Pederson, c; O. J. H Preus, R. Gaard. p; E. A. Brekke, lb; M. 
Hegland, 2b; A. O. Anderson, ss; H. J. Linde (capt.), 3b; S. S Reque, If; 
H. O. Gullixson, cf; W. Sihler, rf; M. J. Hegland, mgr. 

1901— H. O. Grangaard, c; O. J H. Preus, G. A. Grinde, p; E. A. Brekke, lb; 
L. I.Trscn, 2b; A. O. .Anderson, ss; H. J Linde (capt.). 3b; S. S. Reque, 
If; H. C. Smeby, cf; W. Sihler, rf; A. O. Andei-son, mgr. 

1902— H. O. Grangaard. c; H. C. Smebv, A. .Sevareid, p; E A. Brekke, lb; O. 
L. Olson, 2b; S. S. Reque (c.'pt.), .ss; L Larsen, 3b; J. C. K. Preus, If; 
T. F. Gullixson, cf; G. A. Grinde, rf; H. E. Olsen, mgr 

1903— E. A. B'-ekkp, c; A. Sevireid. G. A. Grinde. p: T. F. Gullixson. lb: O. T.. 
Olson. 2b; H. J. Sorlien. .ss; S. S. Reque (capt.), 3b; G L Rodsater, If; 
A. Sather, cf; A. Torgerson, rf; H. E. Olsen, mgr 

1904— G. L Rodsater. c; A. Sevareid (capt.). p; O S. Hjelle, lb: H. J. Sorlien, 
2b; H. Halvorscn, ss; J. Nae.seth. 3b: W. Nelson, If; W. Sihler, cf; L. A 
Fries, rf; E. E. Mortenson; T. A. Hoflf, mgr. 

1905— G. I. Rodsater, c; A. Sevareid (capt.), p; O. S. Hjelle, lb; H. J. Sorlien, 
2b; M. Fuglie. ss; J. N^eseth. 3h: .1. Holkesvik, If; P. T. Hustvedt, E. O. 
Moe. cf; L. A. Fries, rf; H. O. Saxvik, mgr. 

1906— G L Rodsater. c; A. Sevareid (capt.), E. O. Moe, 0. B. Ferkin, p; L. A. 
Fries, lb; J. Britson. 2b: M. Fuglie. ss; .1. Naeseth, 3b; O. Ruen, rf; S. 
Dahl, cf; J. Holkesvik, If; H. C. Nordlie, mgr. 

1907— L. A. Fri^s, c; A. O. Nneseth, J. Hanson, p; G. Hanson, lb; S. G. Harstad. 

2b; M. Fuglie, ss; J. Naeseth (capt.), 3b; J. Holkesvik, If; S, S. Reque. cf; 

S. Dahl, rf; S. S. Reque, mgr. 
1908 — G. Hanson, H. Leum, c and cf; A. O. Naeseth, p; O. Nvgaard, p and cf; 

J. Hanson, p and 3b; C. A. Hielle, lb; S. G. Harstad (capt). 2b; C. 

Sorlien, ss; F. E. Peterson, If; M. J. Monson, rf; C. A. Jessen, mgr. 

1909 — G. Hanson, c; A. O Naeseth (capt.), p; O. Nygaard, p and rf; C. A. Hjelle, 

E. Estenson, lb; G. Si^oraasli. 2b; C. Sorlien. ss; J. Hanson, p and 3b; 

F. E. Peterson, If; H. W. Williams, cf; P. A. Preus. rf; C. A. Jessen, mgr. 

1910— M. Guttebo. O. Jerde, c; O. Nvgaard. E. Estenson, C. Hansen. R. Ulvilden, 
p; E. Estenson, C. A. Hjelle. lb; G. Storaasli, 2b; P. A. Preus, ss; E. 
Ringlee. 3b; P. W. Qually. T. H. Waller, W. C. Preus, J. Jerdee, P. J Iver- 
son, outfield; H Onsgard, mgr. 

1911 — M. Guttebo, c; R. Ulvilden, C. Hansen, E. Estenson, p; E Erickson, p and 
lb; G. Stot-aasli (capt.), 21); P. A. Preus. ss; E. Ringlee, 3b; A. Erick.son, 
If; W. C. Preus, cf; J. Jerdee, rf; H. Onsgard, mgr. 

1912— M. Guttebo (capt.). c and lb: A. Erickson. c; R. Ulvilden. C. H. .Seebach, 
C. H«nsen. p and f: E. Erickson, lb and p; E Ringlee, 2b; O. B. Harstad. 
ss; O. C. Sorlien, 3b; W. C. Preus, cf; C. Foss, mgr. 

1913— A. Erickson, c; C. H. Seebach, R. Ulvilden, p; S. Kjos. lb; L O. Swanson. 

2b; O. B. H-rst-d. ss; E. M. Streeter, 3b; E. Opheim. If; W. C. Preus 

(capt.), cf; H. C Hansen, rf; C. T. Jen.son; C. Gulbrandson, mgr. 
1911 — No team on account of the Norway Tour of the Concert Band. 
1915 — A. L. Bronstad. c; C. TL Seebach (cnpt). E. M. Streeter. A. J Natvig, p: 

H. A. Preus, lb; L. 0. Swanson, 2b; B Sampson, ss; P. G. Johnson, 3b; 

S. M. Topncss, If; G. Kv;ia.se, cf; S. Kjos, rf; T. O. Kraabel, mgr. 

1916— A. L. Bronstad, c; I. Harstad, A. J. Natvig, p; H. A. Preus, lb; L. 0. 
Swanson (capt.), 2b; B. Sampson, ss; P. G. Johnson. 3b: E M. Streeter, 
If; C. A. Stormo, cf; S. Kjos, rf; E. F. Kiland, A. S. Natvig; E. R. 
Seines, mgr. 



ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 



341 



1917 — A. L. Bronstad. c; A R. Sorlien, A. J. Natvif?, p; E. M. Streeter (capt.). 
lb; A. S. Natvig, 2b; M. W. Larsen, ss and lb; H. Peterson, ss; O. S. 
Monson, 3b; K. E. Brunsdile. )f; C. A. Stormo, cf; H. K. Naruin, rf; 
E. F. Kiland, T. I. Rotto, W. B. Scarvie; R. Jargo, mgr; A. Laudel, coach 

1918— M. W. Larsen, c; A. R. Sorlien. A. J. Natvig, p and lb; B. A. Johnson, 2b; 
L. C. Sorlien, ss; O S. Monson, 3b; W. B. Scanie, If; C. A. Stormo 
(capt.), cf; A. R. Ellingson, rf; M. A. Thompson, O. W. Qualley; J. Lee, 
mgr; A. Laudel, coach. 

1919— A. L. Bronstnd, c and cf; S. O. Sorlien. c and 3b; A. R. Ellingson, E. S. 

Hovden, A. R. Sorlien, p; M. W. Larsen, lb; L. C. Sorlien, 2b; H. S. 

Weiser, ss; S. Monson (capt.), 3b; W. B. Scarvie, If; E. 0. Bottolfson, rf; 

B. A. Johnson ; M. Thompson, mgr ; A. Laudel, coach. 
1920 — S. O. Sorlien, c; A. Sorlien. p; A. EHingson. p (capt.); R. Storvick, lb; 

H. Peterson, 2b; L. Sorlien, ss; E. Bottolfson, 3b; W. Scarvie, If; W. 

Lawston, cf; S. Orwoll, rf; C. Anderson, lb; A. Laudel, coach; H. J'or- 

dahl, mgr. 

1921— S. O. Sorlien, c; A. Sorlien, p and 3b (capt.); E Hovden, p and 3b; H. 

Peterson, lb; C. Anderson, 2b; L. Sorlien, ss; E. Bottolfson, 3b and If; 

W. Lawston, cf; S. Orwoll, rf; E. Trytten, H Hoff, E. Killie, subs; V. T. 

Jordahl, mgr.; A. Laudel, coach. 
1922— S. Sorlien (capt.), E. B. Steen. c; E. Hovden, O. Orwoll, p and lb; C. 

Anderson, 2b; E. S. Killie, ss; H. E. Peterson, 3b; S. P. Orwoll, If; R. 

Ethun, cf; E. Trytten, cf and 2b; E Bottolfson, rf; H. Ostrem, C. A. 

Bergan, C. V. Sperati. J. Iverson, M. H. Anderson, E. Ellingson, J. Knudson, 

B. Maakestad, J. E. Borgen, subs; E. N. Larsen, mgr.; S. S. Reque, coach. 
Extra-inning g.nmes: Luther 12, Cornell 16 — ten innings, 1800; Luther 1, 
Minnesota 1 — fifteen innings, 1908; Luther 1, Minnesota 1 — eleven innings, 1909; 
Luther 2, St. Thomas 3 — twelve innings. 1918; Luther 2, St. Joseph (Columbia) 
1 — twelve innings, 1919; (Luther 4, Minnesota 3 — ten innings, 1922). 

Baseball record, 1922 — Luther won 8 games (61.5%), lost 5, viz: Iowa State 
Teachers, 3-1, 3-6; Columbia. .5-1, 4-9; Campion, 7-2; La Crosse Normal, 5-6; St. 
Olaf, 5-1, 2-4; Minnesota, 4-3; Parsons, 16-3; Upper Iowa, 1-10, 3-n; Dubuque, 
4-2. Total score: Luther 62, opponents 48. Garmes won, 1891-1922, 136 (59.6%); 
lost, 92 (40.4%). 




FOOTBALL IN" THE NINETIES 



Lyngaas, S. M. Orwoll, Thorsgaard, Winger. I. A Kampen, Teigen, B. Savre 

H. Ness, Bygland, E. Bothne (c pt.), L. Reque. C. Hjennstad 

H. G. Magelssen, I. A. Thorson 



3-12 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



VI. Football 

Football wats introducctl at Luther in 1877, hut it was not 
played then as it is at present. The Rugby rules were followed. 
Any number of players were permitted on a side. Great interest 
was taken and it often happened that practieally the whole stu- 
dent body took part in the games. The following excerpt is 
taken from "Chips" for Sept., ISSl: "A mateli game of football 
is being played between the seniors and juniors combined, against 
the freshmen and preps. The game has been going on for two 
days and is not yet done." 

From 1892 to 1896 inclusive, intercollegiate contests were 
held with neighboring colleges. Iowa University, Coe, Upper 
Iowa, and Carleton were among those met on the gridiron. 

1892— W. Torrison, R. E.; M. Teigen, R. T.; S. Onvoll. R. C; O Akre, C. ; H. 

Otte. L. G.; I. A. Thorson, L. T.; L. Reque, L. E.; E. Bothne (capt.). 

Q. B.; A. Torrison. L. H.; O Juu!, H. B.; O. L. Olson, F. B. 
1893— S. Orwoll, R. E. ; M. Teigen. R. T. ; Ness. R. G.; O. Bvgland, c; L. 

Reque. L G.: I. Lvngans. L. T.; I. Anderson, L. E.; O. Juul, Q. B. ; K. 

Thorsgaard, L H.; E. Bothne (capt.), R. H.; and I. A. Thorson. F. B. 
1894 — Z. Ortlal, I. Anderson, E; 1. Lvngaas. M. Teigen, 1; C. Hjernistad. C. 

Anderson. G.; 0. Bvghind. C. ; B. Savre, Q. B. ; I. A. Tliorson, F. B ; E. 

Bothne. H. B : S. Orwoll (capt.), H. B. 
1N95— No gimes. Captain. B. Savre. 
1896 Z. Ordal, Dahlen. Eger, E.; I. Anderson. Odegaarden (Odegaard), T.; 

H. Wein, P. Birkelo. J. L Johnson. G.; (i. Johnson, C. ; P. Moen, Q. B. ; 

J. E. Win^'er. H. B.; I. Lyngaas, (crpt).; A. Bjerke, G. B. Wollan, S. T. 

Normann, F. B 

In 1896 intercollegiate football was abolished. Class games 
continued to be popular, however, and were a means of keeping 
interest in the game alive. A freshman-sophomore game or one 
between the "jNIeans" and "Extremes" was considered an almost 
essential part of the llth of October program. 




COLLEGE FOOTBALL SQUAD, 1920 
Left to right — Standing: L,arsen. Ode, ToUefsrud, Vlvisiker, Opsahl. Johnson, M. 
Anderson, Fadness, L. Sorlien, Tolo, Clauson. Eid, Steen, Coach Solem; Kneeling: 
C. Anderson, Orwoll, A. Sorlien, Peterson, Westby, Knutson; Sitting: Nordgaard, 
Storvick, Rindald, Rugland, Oefstedal, Nai'veson, S. O. Sorlien 



ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 



343 



In the fall of 1918 the S. A. T. C. was represented by a foot- 
hall team. Games were jjlayed with Upper Iowa and Campion. 
These contests aroused keen interest in football among the stu- 
dents and an agitation for permission to play intercollegiate 
football was at once begun. In 1919 football was again introduced. 




I'REl'ARATOKY FOOTBALL TEA.NL l!i21 

Evennioe, Soland, Lucky, Brakke, Nerison 

Hegg, Hagen, Losen, Qualley, Anderson, Ramsey, Fosmark 

Lande, Foss, Otte, Erickson, Hovden 

Following is the record of the personnel of the teams : 

1919— E. Noidgaaid, R. E. ; P.' Ode. R. T.; R. Storvick, R. G.; L R. Gr0nlid, C. ; 

E. Laisen, L. G.; R Oefstedal, L. T. ; G. Trytten, L. E.; S. O. Sorlien, 
Q. B. (capt.); O. Rindahl, R. H.; A. Sorlien, F. B.; C. Ravndal, L. H. ; 
H. Jordahl, W. Ylvisaker, S. Grwoll, subs; T. Megorden, nigr; W. Jewell, 
coach. 

1920— E. Nordgaard, R. E.; R. Storvick, (capt.) R. T.; O. Rindahl, R. G. ; G. 
Rugland, C. ; R. Oefstedal. L. G ; B. Narveson, L. T. ; S. O. Sorlien, L. E.; 
H. Peterson, Q. B. ; S. Orwoll, R. H.; A. Sorlien, F. B. ; J. Westby, L. H. ; 
C. Anderson, E ; A. Storvick, nigr. ; O. Solein, coach. 

1021- E. Nordgaard, R. E.; C. Anderson, R. T. ; M. Anderson, R. G. ; G. Rug- 
land, C; R. Schjeldahl, L. G.; E. Owen, L T.; S. O. Sorlien, L. E. ; 
H. Peterson (capt.), Q. B. ; S. Orwoll, R. H. ; O. Orwoll, F. B. ; J. Westby, 
L H.; H. Reishus, E., and T. ; C. V. Sperati, E., and F. B.; J. Duckstad, 

F. B. ; V. Elvestroni, nigr.; L Do.seff, coach. 

FOOTBALL AT LUTHER COLLEGE 



No. 



OPPONENT 



Campion College, Prairie du Chien . 

Carleton College, Northfield 

Columbia College, Dubuque 

Dubuque. University of 

St. Marv's Seminary, Winona 

St. Olaf College, Northfield 

Trinity College, Sioux City 

Upper Iowa University, Fayette. . . , 

Winona State Normal School 

Wisconsin School of Mines 



Total . 



1919 1920 1921 Won Lost 



29-6 
7-46 



6-57 
6-19 



14-38 
26-0 



19-7 

13-10 

45-14 



13-14 

42-0 

45-0 



Tied No 



Per cent of Games Won. 



33.3 



344 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



VII. Basketball 
Basketball was first introduced at Luther in the fall of 1903. 
Some very interesting inter-class games were played. In 1904; 
Upper Iowa was met in Luther's first intercollegiate basketball 
game. Since that time basketball has been a major sport at 
Luther and has ranked next to baseball in popularity. Below 
are given the names of players on teams from 1904 to 1922: 




BASKETBALL TEAM, 190G 
Rostiul, Sevareid, Larseii 
Kodsater, Harstad, Bj0rgo, Naeseth, Tliorsen 

1904— J. E. Strand (oapt.). O. S. Hjelle, A. C. Pederson, (mgr.), C. W. Bj0rgo, 

L Grinde, O. A. Tingelstad. 
1905— M. L. Rostad (capt.), O. S. Hjelle, A. Sevareid, C. W. Bj0rgo, N. Rostad, 

H. Larseii, A. O. Naeseth, O. H. Sponheiin (ingr.). 



-C W. Bj0rgo (capt.), S. G. Harstad, A. Sevareid, 
Naeseth, M. L. Rostad, H. Thorsen (mgr.). 



H. Larsen, A. O. 



1907— S. G. Harstad, (capt.), A. O. Naeseth, H. Larsen, N. H. Gutteb0, H. W. 

Williams, H. Leum. M. L. Rostad. P. W. Qually, G. O. F0rde (mgr.). 
1908— A. O. Naeseth (capt.), S. G. Harstad, N. H. Gutteb0, S. Neprud, H. Leum, 

M. L. Rostad, P. W. Qually, L. S. Kloster (n.gr ). 
1909— N. H. Gutteb0 (capt.), A. 0. Naeseth, P. \V. Qually, H. W. Williams, C. I. 

WoUan, E. Estenson, B. Rosencjvist (mgr.). 
1910— P. W. Qually (capt ), G. Storaasli, E. Estenson, C. L Wollan, O. Jerde, 

C. N. Sandager, L A. Opstad, 0. Ekfelt (mgr.). 



ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 



345 



1911— E. Estenson (capt.), R. Ulvilden, C. I. Wollan, G. Storaasli, O. Jerde, 
I. A. Opstad, E. R. Hegg (mgr.). 

1912— R. Ulvilden (capt.). A. L. Kiel, W. C. Preus. E. Ringlee, M. Gutteb0, H. 
Hansen, W. Dahl, W. T. Gigstad, G. Loftness, W. A. Wollan (mgr.). 

1913— R. Ulvilden (capt.), W. C. Preus, G. Loftness, W. T. Gigstad, C. H. See- 
bach, E M. Streeter, G. Henderson, N. Brunsdale (mgr.). 

1914— W. T. Gigstad (capt.), O. B. Harstad, C. H. Seebach. G. Loftness, A. 

Erickson, B. Sampson, E. M. Streeter, A. J. Natvig, A. O. Lee, A. M. 

Wisness (mgr.). 
1915— C. H. Seebach (capt.). E. M. Streeter, B. Sampson, S. Kjos, A J. Natvig, 

A. S. Natvig, A. O. Lee, C. Losen, A. D. Askegaard, S. M. Topness (mgr). 

1916 — E. M. Streeter (capt.), B. Sampson, A. J. Natvig, A. S Natvig, S. Kjos, 
A. O. Lee, L Harstad, C. Losen, N. M. Leque, G. Ulvilden (mgr.). 




BASKETBALL TEAM, 1917 

T. Rotto, A J. Natvig, M. W. Larsen, A. Bronstad 

O. W. Quillev. A. M. Kraabel, A. O. Lee 

A. S. Natvig, E Streeter, H. Tallakson 



1917— E M. Streeter (capt.). A. J. Natvig, A. S. Natvig, O. W. Quallev, A. L. 
Bronstad, A. O. Lee, M. W. Larsen, T. L Rotto, H. A. Tallakson, A. M. 
Kraabel (mgr.). 

1918— A. J. Natvig (capt.), O. W. Qualley, M. W. Larsen, A. J. Lunde, A. R. 
Sorlien, M. A. Thompson, L. C. Sorlien, C. N. Evanson and C. A. Stormo 

(mgrs.). 

1919— M. W. Larsen (capt), M. A. Thompson. C. M. Ravndal, R. O. Sto-^ick, 
L. C. Sorlien, B. A. Johnson, E. S. Hovden, C. A. Anderson, M. B. 
Ranum, E. J. Kvammen, O. L. Kaupanger (mgr ). 

1920 — L. Sorlien (capt.), A. Sorlien, E. Nordgaard, C. Anderson, O. Sorlien, E. 
Kvammen, E. Hovden, H. Peterson, L R. Gronlid (mgr), A. J. Natvig 
(coach). 



346 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 







BASKETBALL AT 


LUTHER COLLEGE 








No. 


OPPONENT 


1904 


1905 


1906 


1907 


1908 


1909 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1 






















? 






















1 






















4 






















S 


















15-22 


11-31 


6 


Cedar Vallev Jr. Col . 
















7 






















8 












48-19 
49-31 


37-27 



























10 






















11 






















n 






















1 ^ 


Dubuque Independents 




















14 




















ts 






















16 


















20-37 
67-21 


2i-i5 
20-31 


17 


Gustavus Adolphus C 
















18 
















1Q 


Iowa State Teachers C 




















'>n 










32-34 


12-34 


15-19 






''1 
















97 






















^^ 


La Crosse Y.M.C.A. . . 


















47-18 


24 










61-9 
26-21 


63-28 
39-31 








T"; 








26-15 


54-12 






21-17 


76 












•'7 






















■'8 






















70 












25-34 










SO 














73-14 






SI 




















^7 






















^^ 


N. Dak. Agric. Coll. . . 




















^4 


N. Dak., Univ. of 




















ss 






















S6 


Park Region L. Col . . . 




















S7 














25-21 








S8 














24-25 
34-21 
33-32 






SP 


St. Olaf College 








39-30 


62-23 
34-39 


21-13 
22-24 


34-26 
18-14 


27-26 
12-23 
31-23 


40 


St. Paul Y. M. C. A... 








41 














28-20 


38-17 


24-15 


4'' 














43 
44 


Upper Iowa Univ 


12-18 


23-40 


31-17 


46-23 
39-27 


38-33 
34-28 


47-20 
Tie 


34-17 
22-14 


35-24 
30-11 




4S 






18-23 


43-7 














46 


















47 














































Total . . 


12-18 


41-63 


100-39 


211-110 


424-300 


246-171 


273-159 


243-170 


190-184 








Per cent of Games Won 








100.0 


100.0 


70.0 


75.0 


75.0 


75.0 


62.5 



ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 



347 



1913 


1914 


1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 


1921 


1922 


Won 


Lost 


Tied 


No. 


19 25 


27-19 


















1 


1 

7 

1 

2 

1 

3 

1 
1 
1 
1 
2 

2 


6 


1 

1 

2 

3 

8 

1 
2 
1 

1 
1 
1 


1 
1 

2 
1 


14 

1 
3 
1 

17 

1 

1 
1 


1 



5 

8 






3 




2 


1 

3 

1 

1 
3 

1 






1 

1 



2 



1 
1 






1 

14 




7 
1 
1 



























































1 







1 




















2 














22-16 

6-26 
10-24 
17-18 








3 


35-33 


16-18 
9-11 


21-24 


22-23 


19-16 


23-7 
8-5 

12-11 
9-30 


3-31 


11-9 
11-33 


24-4 
22-11 


4 
5 










38- 2 
26- 8 




6 










49-3 








7 




















8 


















17-33 
19-32 


16-26 
19-16 


9 




31-18 














10 






37-21 














11 














23-21 
25-19 
11-31 






12 










51-1 










13 
















10-24 


14 


37 27 






60-12 








15 




















16 


17 18 


27-10 
13-31 


42-5 
18-6 


27-17 






16-33 








17 














18 


















17-13 
18-22 


19 




















20 








79-2 














21 


















16-49 


9 7 






47-18 














?3 




















24 


31-11 

38-22 


66-7 


38-18 
















25 














9-19 


28-14 
30-15 


26 










33-7 




5-15 




27 






32-13 
32-33 
33-16 








28 




















29 




















30 
















50-21 






31 


27-34 


















32 








15-22 














33 




29-13 

57-22 
















34 




















35 








20-12 
18-14 












36 




















37 






















38 


22-4 
19-23 


18-17 
21-14 


22-18 
18-19 


13-14 

15-22 


18-14 
20-13 


12-16 
10-15 


11-18 




4-19 
9-23 


20-23 
15-33 


39 
40 






















41 








21-13 
28-19 

27-37 














42 


47-29 
28-17 




36-22 
42-13 






18-20 
23-26 


7-28' 


21-20 
32-20 


13-26 
16-22 


43 








44 




















45 










24-16 












46 


















20-19 


47 






















320-241 


314-180 


381-205 


344-202 


252-96 


74-84 


128-196 


119-151 


197-218 


284-317 


96 


59 


1 




63.6 


72.7 


75.0 


54.5 


100.0 


50.0 


11.1 


50.0 


45.5 


46.7 


61.9 


38.1 







348 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



1921— A. Sorlien (capt.), L. Sorlien, C. Anderson, II. Peterson, E. Noidgaard, 

M. Stortroen, C. Olson (insr.), R. Movold (coai'li). 
1922— C Anderson (capt.), H. Peterson, E. Hovden, C. V. Sperati, O. Orwoll, 

E. Kvanimen, M. Stortroen, E. Nordgaartl, O. Sorenson, (). Heskin (mgr.'), 

Ivan Doseff (coach). 

VIII. Turning 
When the gymnasium was erected in 188(5 turning and gym- 
nastics immediately became popular at the College. Through 
the efforts of C. A. Sperati, '88, a turning club was organized in 




I'Khl'AllAlfjKV UA.>Kt/l BALL IKAM, iiil'l' 
Left to Right: Hovden, Qualley, Bidne. Otte, Hegg, Losen, Foss, 
Anderson, Dahl, Brakke 
('hampions, N. L. C. A. Academy Conference 

December, 1886. Its officers were: C. A. Sperati, foreturner; 
M. M. Steensland, assistant foreturner; and P. Gylstroera, presi- 
dent; A. Engebretson. The first turning club exhibition was given 
in May, 1888, under C. A. Sperati's leadership. Since that time 
public entertainments have been given almost every year. 

Luther's turning clubs have come up to the high standard set 
by the teams in the other branches of athletics. In 1909, the 
first year Luther took ))art in the State Gymnastic Meet, the team 
was awarded the championship. The team was composed of J. 
Hanson (capt.), V. E. Peterson, E. Severson, O. Hokaason, C. 
Wisnaes, P. Nestos (mgr.). Score: Luther 256.4, Iowa State 
Teachers' College 234.2, Iowa University 47.2. 

1910—0. Tufte (capt.). H. .Monson. J Jerdee. A. Storstad, C. Hansen, P. Iver- 
son (mgr.). St:ite Intercollfgiatc fivinnastic Meet: Iowa State Teachers 
260, Luther 241.5, Iowa University 224. 2.5. 



ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 



349 



1911— A. Storstad (capt.), O. Jerde, C. Hansen, E. Brunsdale, E. Severson, W. 

WoUan (mgr.). Iowa State Gymnastic Meet: Luther second place. 
1912— C. Hansen (capt.), E. Severson, E. Brunsdale, L. Gorder, C. Rossing, N. 

Brunsdale (nigr.). Iowa State Gymnastic Meet: Lutlier 267 175, Iowa 

State Teachers College 263.0. 

1913— C. Hansen (capt.), E. Brunsdale, W. Bakke, L. Gorder, H Narum, W. 

Maakestad, O. Harstad, C. Olafson. C. Mikkelson, C. Haroldson, J. Har- 

oldson, E. Thoen (mgr.). No state meet was held. 
1914— L. Gorder (capt.), W Mauke.stad, H. Narum. C. Olafson, W. Knutson, 

N. ThoiTDC (mgr.). Iowa State Gymnastic Meet: Iowa University, 1st; 

Luther 2nd. 
1915 — L. Gorder (capt.), C. Olafson, W. Maakestad, H. Narum, W. Knutson, 

C. Mikkelson, R. Rosenqvist (mgr.). Iowa State Gymnastic Meet: Iowa, 

first place; Ames, second place; Luther, third place 




GYMNASTIC TEAM, 1909 

Hanson, Nestos, Hokaasen 

Severson, Wisnaes, Peterson 

1916— H. Narum (capt.), C. Olafson, W. Knutson, E. Kiland. A. O. Hanson, R. 
Rosenqvist (mgr.), Iowa State Gymnastic Meet (held at Luther) : Lu- 
ther 403.89, Iowa 394.08, Grinned 380.429. Western Intercollegiate Gym- 
nastic Association meet (held at Minnesota U.) : Wisconsin 1st place. 
1,265; Minnesota 5th place, 935; Luther 6th, 932. 

1917— C. Olafson (capt), H. Narum, W. Knutson, K. D. StalLand, A. O. Hanson, 
C. Anderson (mgr.). Iowa State Gymnastic Meet: Luther 1,066.5, Iowa 
University 1,057.5, Ames 1,029, Grinnell 998. 

1918— K. D. Stalland (capt.), C. Nelson, A. R. Ellingson, M. Unseth, N. Scarvie, 
M. B. Tollefsrud (mgr., also member of team). 

In 1918 state gymnastic meets were discontinued on account 

of the war. The Luther team entered the ninth annual contest 

of tlie Northwestern Gymnastic Society. The rating of teams 

depended to a large extent on the number of men entered. Hence 



350 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

I.uthcr with six men did not place liigh in team ratin<;. Capt. 

Stalland received seventh })lace in all-around competition. 

1919 — No team. 
1920— No team. 
1921— N. G. Fadne.ss (capt.), S. L. Riislnnd. E. B. Steen. C. M. Olson, J. R. 

Dahl, P. S. Reque (mgr., akso member of team). Northwestern Gymnastic 

Meet. 
1922— P. S. Reque (capt.). N. G. Fadness. S. L. Rutland. E. B. Steen, H. K. 

Savre, J. R. Dalil (mgr., also a member of team). Northwestern Gymnastic 

Meet. 




TRACK TEAM, 1922 

Stoen. Kvammen, Jerdeman, Hjelle, Narveson, Christensen, Knutson, DosefT 

0. Trytten, Westby, Reque, Rugland, Orwoll, Otte. Maakestad 

Bolstad, Rovang, Rognlie, Thorgrimsen, Steen, Turnio 

IX. Track 

The first home field meet in track took place in 1900. In 
1902 intercollegiate meets were introduced. Luther was defeated 
by Upper Iowa 59-37. In 1903 Upper Iowa defeated Luther 
56-40. In 1904 Luther, represented by M. Drotning, O. Hjelle, 
I. Stub, G. Rodsater, P. Prestegaard, and O. Tonning (capt.), 
took part in the state field meet. Prestegaard placed third in 
the pole vault, and Hjelle took second place in the shot put. 

Track, however, did not have the same appeal as baseball 
and tennis. So little interest was shown that track athletics 
could not be maintained. Luther was not re])resented on the 
cinder path from 1905 to 1919. 

In 1920 the student body was larger than it had been for 
several years, with the result that a smaller percentage of stu- 



ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 



351 



dents than before could participate in baseball and tennis. To 
afford more an opportunity for exercise track was again intro- 
duced. In 1920 a relay team consisting of C. E. Hook, G. T. 
Rugland, E. J. Kvammen, and E. G. Trytten was sent to the 
Drake Relay Meet. 

In 1921 Luther met Winona Normal and Dubuque University 
in dual meets, losing to Winona Normal 74-40 and to Dubuque 
81-41. The members of the Luther team were: G. T. Rutland 




TRACK TEAM, 1903 

Hjelle, Thompson, Drotning, Keque, Rodsater 

Nordlie. Peterson, Kaasa, Piestegaard, Nelson 

Moe, Aaberg, N. Rostad, Bredesen, Halvorsen 

(capt.), C. E. Hook, O. S. Rindahl, A. E. Hjelle, E. J. Kvam- 
men, L. I. Highby, E. N. Nordgaard, and E. J. Rovang. 

Great interest has been shown in track during the past two 
seasons. The 1922 team (shown on p. 350) took part in the 
Iowa Colleges Track and Field Meet, May 12; lost to Dubuque 
(63-73), June 3; and won from Winona Normal (77-48), May 27. 

X. Tennis 

In 1891 Prof. W. Sihler laid out the first tennis court at I-u- 
ther College and played the first game with Prof. Gisle Bothne. 
No intercollegiate tournaments were held until 1904. 

Many tennis players of championship calibre have been de- 
veloped at Luther. In 1908 and 1909 Luther won the state 
championship in both singles and doubles by defeating teams rep- 
resenting Iowa U., Coe, Grinnell, Ames, and Cornell. In 1910 
L. Ylvisaker again won the singles championship for Luther. 



352 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



The liandicaj) tournament, played off every year for the 
Spaulding troj)hy, lias been a potent factor in keeping interest 
alive and in developing tennis players. 

Below are the names of teams and their records. The num- 
bers refer to matches in a tournament, the side winning the 
greatest number of matches gets the tournament. 

1901— A. C. Pcderson, H. W. Ustrem, T. Bnisegaard, H. Halvorson, and C. E 

Bale, nigr. 

Lutlicr 2. I'ppor Iowa 1. 
1905^A. Bredesen. N. Olson, O. Sponlieini, and G. K. Estrem (mgr., also a 

member of llie learn). 

Luther 2, I'pper Iowa 1. 
19)6 — o. K. Estreiii, H. l/irsen, O. \. Smeby, N. A. Olsen (mgr , also member of 

team). 

Lutlier a, I'pper Iowa 3. 




TENNIS TEAM, 1908 
L. Ylvisaker, H. Larsen 

1907— N. A. Olsen and C. A. Pederson were defeated in the state tournament. 

.1. Rosholdt (nisr.). 
1908 — H. Larsen and L Y'lvisaker, champions of state meet in singles iiiid 

doubles. C. A. Pe<lerson (mgr.). Singles, played by Larsen: 

Luther 1, Iowa 0; Luther 1, Coe 0; Lutlier 1, Cornell o; Doubles: Luther 

1, Ames 0; Luther 1, low.a o. 
1909 — C. A. Pederson and L. Ylvisaker (mgr., also member of team), state 

champions; O. .Jensen and \. Guttebo. 

Luther 4, St. Olaf 2; Iowa State Tournament Singles: (played by 

Ylvisaker): Luther I, Ames o; Luther 1, Iowa 0; Luther 1, Cornell 0; 

Championship Doubles: Luther 1, Griiiiiell 0; Luther 1, Cornell 0, 

(Championship). 



ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 353 



1910— L. yivisaker, J. Trytten, C. Birkelo, and 0. Jensen (mgr., also member 
of team). 

Luther 3, Upper Iowa 1; Luther 5, St. Olaf 1. Iowa State Tournament- 
Singles (played by Yivisaker): Luther 1, Cornell 0; Luther 1, Ames 0; 
Luther l, Coe (Championship). Doubles: Luther 0, Coe 1. 

1911— J. Trytten, I. Opstad, D. T. Nelson, I. Simley. 

Luther 1, St. Olaf 5. Iowa State Tournament— Doubles: Luther 0, Coe 1, 
Singles: Luther 0, Coe 1. 

1912— D. T. Nelson, C Knutson, 0. Haavik, and E. Granseth. 

Luther 1, St. Olaf 5. Iowa State Tournament — Doubles: Lulher 0, Coe 1. 
Singles: Luther 0, Coe 1. 

1913 — C. Knutson, H. Preus, O. Levorson, W. Brandt, and E. Biunsdale. 

Luther 0, M:ioalester o; Lulher 2, St. Thomas 4; Luther 4, St. Olaf 2; 
Tri-State Conference Tournament — Doubles: Luther 2, St. Thomas 1; Lu- 
ther 1, St. Olaf 0; Luther 1, Carleton (Doubles Championship). Singles: 
Luther 0, Carleton 2; Luther 2, Macalester 0; Luther 1, St. Thomas 2. 

19U — No team. 

1915 — No team. 

1916 — C. Yivisaker and C. Lee, H. Dolhen (mgr.). 

Luther O, Coe 3; Luther 1, St. Olaf 2; Luther 3, Gustavus Adolphus 0; 
Tri-State Conference Tournament — Singles: Luther 1, Carleton (i; Lu- 
tlier 0, Macalester 1; Luther 1, St. Thomas 0; Luther 0, St. Olaf 1. Doubles: 
Luther 0, Macalester 1. 

1917 — C. Lee and C. Yivisaker, J. A. Lien (mgr.). 

Luther 2, Carleton l; Luther 1, St. Olaf 2; Luther 3, Macalester 0. 

1918 — O. Ravndal and R. Yivisaker. H. Lunde (mgr.). 

Luther 0, St. Olaf 3; Luther 1, Gustavus Adolphus 2; Luther 2, Hamline 1; 
Luther 0, Minnesota 3; Luther 0, Carleton 3. 

1919 — R. Yivisaker, O. Ravndal, C. Ravndal, J. W. Yivisaker, and C. W. Strom 
(mgr.) 

Lutlier 3, Upper Iowa ; Luther 4, Upper Iowa 1 ; Luther 3, Luther Semin- 
ary i; Luther 2, Red Wing l; Luther O, Hamline 3; Luther 2, St. Olaf 1; 
Luther 2, Campion 0; Luther 4, Carleton 1; Luther 1, Carleton 3. 

1920 — 0. Ravndal, C. Ravndal, J. W. Yivisaker, and M. Unseth (mgr., and also 
member of team). 

Luther 1, Campion 0; (rain), Luther 2, Campion 1; Luther 4, Upper 
Iowa 0; Luther 3, Carleton 3 (Luther won on gimes); Luther 4, Carleton 0. 

1921 — J. W. Yivisaker, P. S. Reque, E. Hove, E. Lien (mgr., and also member 
of team). 
Luther 1, Upper Iowa 1 ; Luther 0, Campion 2. 

XI. Military Drill 

Peter S. Reque was commissioned by the government to act as 
captain and drill a company at Lutlier College in the fall of 1865 
and the spring of 1866. This company was formed especially for 
the purpose of being prepared in the case of trouble from the 
Indians. Col. Chr. Brandt was in charge of a military company in 
the fall of 1876. In 1878 renewed enthusiasm resulted in the or- 
ganization of the Luther College Phalanx, which continued to be 
an important factor in the physical development of the boys until 
1886. Fifty stand of arms of the type used in the Civil War were 
obtained from the government and constituted the equipment. 
When not in use the muskets were housed in the armory, now 
known as the old museum building. 

Under such able leaders as J. L. Lee, the first captain of 
the Phalanx, and his successors O. J. Breda, L, S. Reque, G. 
Bothne, and O. Ramstad the company became quite skillful in 
the execution of military maneuvres. Reviews were given for 



354 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 





ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 355 

the public on Memorial Day, the fourteenth of October, and other 
holidays. "College Chips" for May 4, 1886, contains the follow- 
ing announcement: "A sham battle and some 'double-time move- 
ments' of the Phalanx will be some of the attractions on the 17th 
of May. Come to the celebration. Fun ahead." 

With the completion of the gymnasium in 1886 enthusiasm 
for military drill soon came to an end. The boys began to in- 
terest tliemiselves in turning and gymnastics and the other means 
of exercise which the gymnasium afforded. Although the activ- 
ities of the Phalanx ended abruptly, it must be given much credit 
for the service it rendered the boys. 

AVhen the United States entered the war in April, 1917, mil- 
itary drill again came into vogue at the College after a lapse of 
thirty years. Voluntary drill under Prof. O. B. Overn had begun 
already in October, 1916. A resolution had been passed by the 
Synod some time previously, recommending that all students ex- 
cept Seniors and Juniors take three hours of military drill each 
week. This ruling, however, was not put into effect until a state 
of war existed. 

The boys took great interest in the work; and the Seniors and 
Juniors, though not required to take drill, were among the most 
enthusiastic. Most of them expected to enlist or be called to the 
colors in a short time and were, therefore, anxious to get as much 
training as possible. So great was the enthusiasm that upward 
of fifty students organized a company which drilled an hour be- 
fore breakfast six days a week. 

Military drill was continued under the auspices of the Col- 
lege with profit both to those who entered the service and to those 
who remained at school, until the end of the 1917-1918 school 
year. Prof. N. A. Madson discharged the duties of commander- 
in-chief in commendable fashion. It was the unanimous opinion 
of those who entered the service that his instruction was of much 
value to them. 

XII. Students' Army Training Corps 

The organization of the S. A. T. C. at Luther College Oct. 
1, 1918, marked the beginning of a period of intensive military 
training. 

The purpose of the War Department in establishing the S. 
A. T. C. at the various colleges and universities of our country 
was to train the young college men to be commissioned and non- 
commissioned officers and at the same time allow them to remain 



356 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



at their respective colleges as long as possible. A strenuous 
program was outlined by the War Department to fit the men for 
actual warfare in the shortest possible time. A schedule account- 
ing for every hour of the day was closely followed. The time was 
divided between academic work and practical training. Eleven 
hours a Aveek, or about two hours each day, were devoted to mil- 
itary drill. 

There were 105 members of the S. A. T. C. at Luther. Third 
and fourth floors of the main building were appropriated as 




EX-PRESIDENT TAFT ADDRESSINC TIIK S. A. T. ('., lifls 

quarters for the company. The removal of all doors, desks, 
chairs and other furniture, except bunks, transformed the quarters 
into real military barracks. Equipment was slow in arriving, 
and then it came piece-meal. The blankets arrived first. Then 
followed the rifles, overcoats, and finally the uniforms. No other 
event except the armistice was the signal for such great rejoicing 
as the arrival of the uniforms. 

The War Department ajipointed 1st Lieut. H. H. Fisher as 
Commanding Officer and 2nd Lieut. Allen C. Grundy as Personnel- 
Adjutant. They were ably assisted in their work by L. C. Sor- 
lien, W. B. Scarvie, and Olaf Ravndal, three of the nine student 



ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 357 

representatives sent to Fort Sheridan for military instruction the 
preceding summer. The other six were commissioned and sent 
to other posts. 

Under the excellent supervision of the officers, military in- 
struction progressed rapidly. The two-hour drill period was gen- 
erally opened with calisthenics and setting-up exercises, such as 
the "frog-hop", "duck-waddle", "Indian walk", etc. The re- 
mainder of the period was devoted to concentrated work in close 
order drill. When the rifles became a part of the equipment, 
bayonet practice, the manual of arms, and sighting practice were 
made an essential part of the daily program. Trench digging 
was also begun, but was discontinued as soon as the armistice 
was signed. Inspection of company and quarters took place 
every Saturday afternoon. The spirit with which the men en- 
tered into the work was gratifying and was in a large measure 
responsible for the success of the S. A. T. C. at Luther College. 
One and all were dedicated to the service of their country. 

As soon as the armistice was signed a marked change was at 
once apparent in the character of the work. Everyone felt that 
there was now nothing further to work for. "When do we go 
home?" was the thought uppermost in the minds of all. 

Demobilization began December 11, 1918. Eight who were 
sick with influenza at the time were discharged later. The last man 
was mustered out December 19. 

In marked contrast to the failure of the S. A. T. C. at so 
many institutions the unit at Luther College proved a decided 
success. Favorable comments were repeatedly expressed on the 
company's ability on the drill field by those in a position to know. 
Although the interest was naturally greater in the purely military 
phase of the training than in the academic work, nevertheless 
the scholastic work was on the whole quite satisfactory. The S. 
A. T. C. gave ample proof of the service which can be rendered 
our government in time of war by the colleges of our country. 
And it established beyond question the loyalty of Luther College. 
XIII. Luther College Cadet Corps 
The Luther College Cadet Corps was organized in the fall of 
1918 in compliance with the resolution of the Norwegian Lutheran 
Church of America, which made military training compulsory for 
all physically fit students at Lutlier College. As the members 
of the S. A. T. C. were already meeting this requirement, the 
roster of the L. C. C. C. included only those students who were 
not admitted to the S. A. T. C. 



358 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

In Dr. S. C. Ylvisaker, who had been the College's faculty 
representative at Fort Sheridan the preceding summer, the fac- 
ulty had a man well qualified to act as commanding officer. Pro- 
fessors O. B. Overn and H. F. Swansen were appointed lieuten- 
ants. These officers were equipped at the expense of the College. 

In order to make the work of the S. A. T. C. easier, the fac- 
ulty voted to make the regulations governing the discipline and 
program of the L. C. C. C. as nearly like those of the S. A. T. C. 
as possible. The drill period was lengthened to two hours at the 
members' own request. Inspection and discipline were also mil- 
itary in character. Uniforms were ordered by the members of 
the company but did not arrive until school had closed for the 
Christmas holidays. 

Although the L. C. C. C. was disbanded after Christmas in 
favor of the R. O. T. C, its results were not inconsiderable. The 
boys were taught to respect discipline and established authority. 
The spirit of cooperation and loyalty displayed at all times in 
performing assigned tasks or in observing regulations proved the 
boys to be real patriots. 

XIV. Reserve Officers' Training Corps 
When the S. A. T. C. was demobilized, the College authorities 
received from the government a questionnaire relative to the or- 
ganization of a Reserve Officers' Training Corps (R. O. T. C.) at 
the College. The faculty had been well pleased with the possibil- 
ities of combined academic and military training offered by the 
S. A. T. C. The R. O. T. C. offered these same possibilities, 
while its demands in a military way were so much less exacting 
as to differ little from the regulations of the L. C. C. C. Ac- 
cordingly the R. O. T. C. was applied for and established at Lu- 
ther College in January, 1919. The L. C. C. C. was discontinued. 
Lieutenant Fisher, Commanding Officer of the S. A. T. C, was 
appointed Professor of Military Science and Tactics by the War 
Department. 

The company drilled three hours per week. During the 
course of the year a general course in military tactics, both 
theoretical and practical, was given. A six weeks' summer course 
at certain R. O. T. C. camps was also offered those desiring to 
take advantage of it. Outside of the regular drill periods the 
students were not controlled by military discipline. 

The government issued practically the same equipment to the 
R. O. T. C. men as to the regular army men. All supplies were 



ATHLETICS AND MILITARY DRILL 



359 



loaned to the College, and it in turn issued them to the men. If 
anyone failed to turn in his supplies, the College was held re- 
sponsible. The members, however, were allowed to purchase 
their equipment at the end of the course if they desired. 

The R. O. T. C. unit was not continued after January, 1920, 
because of a new regulation stipulating tliat there must be at 
least one hundred students in the collegiate section of the unit. 
Seniors and Juniors Avere exempted from military training. Hence 
Luther College could not meet the enrollment requirement for 
maintaining the R. O. T. C. 

XV. Athletic Ideals 

"Mens Sana in corpore sano" (a sound mind in a sound body), 
is the cardinal principle upon which all athletic training at Lu- 
ther College is based. Because Luther College realizes that 




THE KESEKVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS, 1919 

brains without health are like a man who has a great deal of 
money with no place to keep it, it stresses as much as possible 
the development of a strong body. The College also realizes 
that there is a direct relation between the mind and body, and 
that whatever tends to cultivate the one cannot fail to benefit 
the other. It therefore aims to develop the body in the manner 
most beneficial to the mind. This is effected by inculcating high 
ideals and standards of perfection in all athletic competition. 



360 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

From the very first Luther teams have enjoyed an enviable 
reputation for true sportsmanship. They have been taught to 
regard self-restraint and gentlemanly Cliristian conduct as more 
important than victory. The "anything to win" spirit is not 
tolerated. The College can point with pride to the fact that fin- 
ancial inducement has never brought or kept a student at Luther 
College. 

Luther College endeavors to conduct athletics in harmony with 
the spirit of true Christianity. If this could not be done Luther 
College would be the first to abolish these activities. That such 
a thing is possible was clearly demonstrated to the satisfaction 
of all at the joint meeting of the Student's Union Convention and 
the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America Academy Conference, 
held at Luther College March 7-10, 1922. The program of the 
S. U. C. was purely religious in character, while the N. L. C. A. 
Conference program consisted of literary and athletic contests. 
Some questioned the advisability of holding two meetings so 
diametrically opposed in character, as they said, at the same 
time. The success of the joint conference proves conclusively 
that the religious principles laid down by the one can be carried 
over and applied in the other. 




SCENE IN THE CITY PARK, DECORAH 



CHAPTER SIXTEEN 

MUSIC 

C. N. EVANSON 

I. Place of Music at Luther College 

SINCE Luther College aims to prepare men for church work, 
it has always provided instruction in subjects that would 
prove especially valuable in the field of theology. One of these 
subjects is music. 

IL Courses in Music 

From the beginning instruction was given in vocal music, two 
hours a week in all classes. It was natural that the vocal, rather 
than the instrumental, was stressed^ especially at first, since the 
young minister would find more use for the vocal; and then, too, 
musical instruments were very expensive in those days. 

The importance attached to instruction in music has not dwin- 
dled with the passing of time. Music is still offered in both Col- 
lege and Preparatory Departments, as an elective in the former, 
and as a required subject in the preparatory classes. Music was 
made an elective in the College Department in 1892. 

III. Vocal Music 

The first instruction in music was given primarily to acquaint 
the student with the Lutheran hymns and chorals, which form 
such an important part of religious worship. Later, as the school 
grew to greater proportions, and as more teachers were added, 
the courses in music came to embrace instruction in varied branches, 
such as the history of music, harmony, and rudiments of music. 
The instruction to-day has by no means drifted from the original 
form, namely, that of stressing a thorough knowledge of Lutheran 
hymns and choral music. 

As singing was the first kind of music at Luther College, and 
for a time the only kind, it was natural that there should develop 
singing societies outside of the class-room. The first attempt at 
organizing a chorus was the Idun Quartette, in 1869 (?), with 
N. F0rde, J. Nordby, N. J. Ellestad, M. Koefod, C. K. Preus, O. 
P. Vangsnes, and H. J. Strand as members. In 1877 this quartette 
was reorganized by N. J. Bakke and augmented to number twelve 



362 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 




MUSIC 363 

members: C. M. Jensen (Gr0nlid), T. K. Thorvilson, J. M. O. 
Ness, 1st tenor; N. J. Bakke, T. Hoyme, Chr. Pederson, 2nd 
tenor; A. P. Rondestvedt, O. L0kensgaard, J. A. Blilie, 1st bass; 
H. B. Thorgrimsen, T. O. Homme, A. 0fstedal, 2nd bass. From 
this small but creditable beginning many vocal organizations have 
been effected, among which can be named: Luther College Choir; 
Luther College Chorus; Luther College Glee Club; Idun; Maal- 
trosten, 1875 (R. O. Brandt, director); Humla; Heimdal; Bingo 
Glee Club; Upidee Glee Club; Lorelei, 1882; Symphonia, 1877; 
besides various quartettes, choruses, octettes, etc., in the Irving, 
Amphictyonic, Normannalaget, Mj0lner, Norr0na, and Idun lit- 
erary societies. There were no doubt many others ; excellent or- 
ganizations of "fourth floor harmonizers." 




LUTHER COLLEGE CHORUS, NORWAY TOUR, 1914 

There have been, of course, leaders and organizers who have 
carried on the work of keeping the interest in vocal music always 
keen. The most important of these were: Prof. F. A. Schmidt, 
1861-65; Rev. N. O. Brandt, 1865-81; Mr. Ola Solheim, 1881-82; 
Mr. J. O. Tingelstad, 1883-85; Prof. Wm. Sihler, 1890-95; Prof. 
Haldor Hanson, 1882-83, 1888-90, 1895-1904, and Prof. Carlo A. 
Sperati, 1885-88, and 1905 to the present time. 

Students from the College have always been interested in the 
musical activities of our local Lutheran churches. They have al- 
ways shown a willingness to take an active part in the regular choir 
work, besides rendering aid on special occasions, when cantatas 
and the like have been undertaken by the church choirs. 

The first concert appearance of the church choir took place 
during Sperati's student directorship of 1884-88, when it rendered, 
among other numbers, "The Sword of Damascus," "Gloria in Ex- 
celsis," and the "Hallelujah Chorus" from the "Messiah." Among 



364 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

the cantatas given later are: "The Seven Last Words of Christ" 
(several times), "Bethany," "Hymn of Praise," "Ruth," "The 
Holy City," 'The City of God," and, at the 60th anniversary of 
Luther College, "The GOth Anniversary Cantata" (words by Rev. 
Paul Koren, music by Prof. John Dahle), together with Mendels- 
sohn's "Hymn of Praise." The "Cantata" was repeated by re- 
quest during the Norwegian Lutheran Churcli Academy Confer- 
ence and Students' Union Convention, March 10, 1922. 

Students have from time to time directed the church choirs. 
Among the student choir directors we liave: N. J. Bakke, K. A. 
Kasberg, and C. A. Sperati. Professors H. Hanson, Wm. Sihler, 
and C. A. Sperati have also as teachers at Luther College directed 
the choir. Aside from this, the students have been afforded the op- 
portunity, in conjunction with the people of Decor ah, of rendering 




CHORUS AND ORCHESTRA, 1895 
Hdldor Hanson, Director 

several of the world's greatest oratorios. The first oratorio given 
in Decorah was the "Creation," rendered on March 15, 1890, 
under Prof. H. Hanson's leadership. On May 29, 1895, Niels 
W. Gade's oratorio, "The Crusaders," was given in Decorah, by 
a chorus of about 100, assisted by an orchestra of 20. College 
students assisted both in tlie chorus and in the orchestra. Prof. 
Haldor Hanson directed. Bartli's "Weinacht Oratorium" was ren- 
dered during tlie Christmas season in 1900 and 1901 under Prof. 
Sihler's directorsliip. 

When Prof. Sperati came to Luther College in 1905 he effected 
the organization of the Decorah Choral Union, composed of citizens 
of Decorah and students of Luther College. This organization has 



MUSIC 365 

from time to time sung and resung some of the greatest works. 
On May 21, 1906, it rendered Haydn's "Creation"; on June 18, 
1907, Handel's "Messiah"; on May 27, 1908, Mendelssohn's "St. 
Paul"; Handel's "Messiah" was repeated in 1909 and on Dec. 
18, 1909, a miscellaneous program was given. Handel's "Messiah" 
was given at the 1911 Commencement, June 20, by a chorus of 
165 voices, assisted by an orchestra of 26. This oratorio was re- 
peated by request Oct. 14 of the same year. In the spring of 1912, 
Mendelssohn's "Elijah" was given; and on Dec. 15 of the same 
year Handel's "Messiah." Bruch's "The Lay of the Bell" was 
rendered May 12, 1913; the "Messiah" April 24, 1916; Haydn's 
"Seasons" March 21, 1917, repeated, by request, June 3 of the 
same year. 

This work was temporarily abandoned during the war, but 
was revived again in 1920, and on March 16, 1920, the "Creation" 
was given. This date represents 30 years since the "Creation" was 
first given in Decorah. This oratorio was the last oratorio ren- 
dered by the Decorah Choral Union. The church choir then took 
up the work, and with the assistance of some members of the 
Decorah Choral Union rendered the "Messiah" on Palm Sunday, 
1921, and repeated the same oratorio on December 18, of the 
same year. 

IV. Instrumental Music 

Although great stress has always been laid on vocal music at 
Luther College, and much interest has been shown in fostering 
vocal organizations, this does not mean that the instrumental mu- 
sic has suffered thereby. 

In 1877 an orchestra was organized by J. P. Kopang. It con- 
sisted of but three members at first, namely, J. P. Kopang, violin; 
T. K. Thorvilson, violin; K. A. Kasberg, cello. In the spring of 
1878, the following members were added to the orchestra: R. O. 
Brandt, guitar; Oscar Torrison, flute; and A. L. Himle, cornet. 
Mr. Himle was soon succeeded by O. Solheim. No regular con- 
certs were given by the orchestra until Nov., 1883; another con- 
cert was given in Feb., 1884. 

From the time it was organized in 1877 to the present time 
there has always been an orchestra at Luther College, with the 
exception of 1891-92, when all interest seems to have drifted to 
the band. The orchestra has played on many festive occasions, 
such as, the 14th of Oct. and 17tli of May celebrations, concerts, 
literary programs, etc., both at the College and downtown. 



366 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



During its existence the orchestra has had the following direc- 
tors: J. P. Kopang, 1877-78; K. A. Kasberg, 1878-81; H. Hanson, 
1881-83; K. A. Kasberg, 1883, until Christmas; J. Tingelstad, 
from Christmas, 1883, to 1885; C. A. Sperati, 1885-88; Prof. H. 
Hanson, 1888-89; E. G. Mellem, 1889-90; H. Moore, 1890-91; 
I. A. Thorson, 1892-95; Prof. H. Hanson, 1895-1904; Prof. C. 
A. Sperati, 1905 — . 




LUlilKK COLLKCiE OKCHKSTKA, 18i)G 
Haldor Hanson, Director 

It will be seen that during its 45 years of life the orchestra 
has had eight directors, of whom two have been in charge a 
total of 34 years — Haldor Hanson, 14 years, and Carlo A. Sperati, 
20 years. In Prof. Hanson's day it had a membership of 30 or 
more and maintained a high standard. Under Prof. Sperati it has 
done excellent work, though the membership has generally been 
smaller on account of the greater general interest among the stu- 
dents in the Concert Band. 

The Luther College Concert Band was organized in Feb., 1878, 
largely tlirough the efforts of II. B. Tliorgrimsen. There had been 
talk of organizing a band, and when a local city band disbanded^ 
those interested in having a band at tlie College recognized this as 
the logical time to start one. Accordingly, Tliorgrimsen called a 



MUSIC 367 

meeting of those most vitally interested in the subject. After he 
had portrayed the possibilities in glowing terms, a motion was 
made by I. B. Torrison to go on with the matter. This motion 
was seconded but flatly voted down. 

That certainly would be enough to discourage the average 
young man, but not so with Thorgrimsen. He talked to the dif- 
ferent boys privately, and it was finally decided to try to collect 
the necessary $250.00 to purchase this $500 set of instruments. 
Committees were sent out to solicit donations, and in this way 
$100 was realized. The balance, $150, was covered by a note to 
which all the boj^s and Prof. L. S. Reque were signers. The mem- 
bers of the first band were: O. Solheim, E. Haugen, A. Eiken, O. 
C. Gr0nvold, O. S. Rygg, H. Allen (Ellenson), O. Glas0e, E. O. 
Vik, J. M. Ness, J. W. Preus, C. O. Lein, T. Hoyme, and H. B. 
Thorgrimsen, who was the leader. The first appearance of the 
band was made in the spring of 1878, when it played a few simple 
pieces. On Decoration Day, 1879, the band for the first time 
played downtown. 

A word about the student directors of the band may not be 
amiss. It meant a great deal of work and worry to be responsible 
for the band. The leader was, for instance, responsible to the 
school for the conduct and good behavior of the boys. He was the 
one who had to shoulder all the work and responsibility, an,d no 
doubt got the least enjoyment out of it. Much credit is due the 
members of the early bands for keeping the interest in band work 
alive, but certainly still more credit is due the leaders. One leader 
tells of a concert he had scheduled at the College, but of which he 
had forgotten to speak to the president. We can imagine his 
position in trying to explain the matter to President Larsen. On 
trips the responsibility and difficulties of the student director would 
be especially great. And yet, concerts were given; trips to nearby 
towns, and even quite distant cities, were taken by the band, with 
student directors. 

That progress was made is easily seen in comparing "Op, Ma- 
troser," and "S0nner af Norge", rendered in 1879, with "Light 
Cavalry Overture," by Suppe, selections from "II Trovatore," and 
selections from "Pinafore," rendered in 1882. Concerning the 
quality of music rendered by these early organizations there can 
be no doubt. They played standard music, and rendered it, as is 
frequently quoted, "professionally." Several members played solo 
parts at the programs. 



368 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

One problem that the band lias always had to contend with is 
that of providing instruments. This task in the early days was no 
small one. The second set of instruments, procured during the 
time that A. O. Johnson was leader, shows not only what difficulties 
the boys had to contend with, but how wisely they met those dif- 
ficulties. To sup{)ly these new instruments A. O. Johnson and 
Tjernagel wrote to influential men in the Church, former students, 
former band men, and friends of the College, to see if they would 
not donate an instrument. The result was gratifying. The follow- 
ing instruments were obtained in this way: 

Eb Cornet, H. M. Tjernagel, Story City, la. 

Solo Bb Cornet, L. J. Tjernagel, Decorah, la. 

1st Bb Cornet, J. C. Tarvestad, Decorah, la. 

2nd Bb Cornet, H. Thorson, Elbow Lake, Minn. 

Solo Alto, L. O. Thorpe, Willmar, Minn. 

1st Tenor, J. Thompson and sons, Beloit, Wis. 

2nd Tenor, Students of Luther College. 

Baritone, O. Torrison, Manitowoc, Wis. 

Bb Bass, A. C. Haugan, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Tuba, Decorah friends. 

Bass Drum, H. G. Haugan, Milwaukee, Wis. 

The donor of each instrument had his name engraved on the 
instrument. These instruments, however, did not constitute a full 
instrumentation, and as the additional instruments that were 
purchased left the boys with a deficit of $200.00, permission was 
given to give a concert on Oct. 14, 1890, at Steyer's Opera House. 
The financial results of the concert were a success; enough money 
was realized to pay off the indebtedness, and Johnson and Tjer- 
nagel were relieved of considerable worry. 

Two complete sets of instruments were purchased in 1906 and 
1907. Low pitch was adopted at this early date. 
V. Musical Union 

In passing from the musical activities of the earlier period to 
those of the middle period, one chooses as a convenient date 1895, 
as that represents the year that Prof. Haldor Hanson returned to 
the College, to remain until 1901. 

Upon his return he organized the I>uther College Musical 
Union, amalgamating the band, orchestra, choir, and glee club into 
one student organization. The purpose of the Musical Union is 
"to establish a closer relation between the different musical or- 
ganizations, and thus, by a joint effort, promote the interests of 
each organization composing it." The first officers of the Musical 
Union were: Chr. Anderson, president; O. J. Ordal, vice-president; 



MUSIC 



369 




370 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

I. M. I-yngaas, secretary; Chr. Thompson, treasurer. The mem- 
bers of the executive committee were: A. Gullixson, S. Brevig, Col- 
lege Band; Theo. Nermann, T. Ringoen, College Orchestra; C. T. 
Clauson, G. B. Wollan, College Clioir; Olav Jahr, Chr. Thompson, 
Glee Club. 

That the Musical Union has accomplished its purpose in the 
past is evidenced by the progress that has been made by the various 
organizations. Through the concerted action of the Union the re- 
sponsibility of keeping up the various organizations was shifted 
from the shoulders of a few to the many. New zeal and interest 
were shown that could not help but make for progress. Through 
the Musical Union it has been possible to purchase instruments 
the value of which approaches $15,000. In all, the Musical Un- 
ion now owns 127 instruments, besides a beautiful set of cathedral 
chimes, bells, xylophone, and a full set of traps. It lias also been 
possible to supply the band and orchestra with the best of music. 
To-day the musical collections consist of the latest standard band 
publications. These things, together with the financing of the 
many tours taken by the band from time to time, have all been 
taken care of by the Musical Union, through dues and concerts. 
The College has given the Musical Union no financial support. 

Prof. Hanson's return to College as an instructor in music 
and director of the various musical organizations created a new 
interest in music at Luther. One thing that indicates this is the 
increase in the membership of the band, orchestra, and chorus. 
Thus, tlie Concert Band, increased from 28 in 1894 to 36 in 1895. 
In 1897 its number had reached 53. The Musical Library, 
founded in 1883 by J. O. Tingelstad, was also increased during 
Prof. Hanson's regime. The collection of reference works on 
music in the college library is fairly complete. The collection is 
being augmented yearly. 

The increase in the number of concerts and public appearances 
of the musical forces at College also gives evidence of renewed 
interest and zeal along musical lines. 

In 1905 Prof. Carlo A. Sperati came to Luther College to 
take charge of the musical activities. If there was progress in 
the past, certainly tliere lias been even greater progress since 
1905. 

The Deeorah Choral Union has already been mentioned as 
having been organized by Prof. Sperati in 1905. 

The need of a "feeder" for the Concert Band was at once seen 
by Prof. Sperati, and he organized the "Second Band". Later 
the "Beginners' Band" was organized; also the "Beginners' Or- 



MUSIC 



371 



chestra". Through these beginners' organizations the personnel 
of the more advanced forces is kept at a more uniform figure, and 
the losses from graduation and other sources are not so seriously 
felt. 

To stimulate interest in music at the College, maintain the 
musical standards already set, build up new standards, and ad- 




LUTHER COLLEGE CONCERT BAND, 1906 

vertise the school. Prof. Sperati worked out the possibilities of 
extended tours by the band. More will be said concerning trips 
by musical organizations of the College, but they are mentioned 
here because of the bigger scale upon which they were carried 
out, beginning with 1905. 

VI. Band Tours 

The first trip made by the band was undertaken in the summer 
of 1886, and lasted from June 21 to July 6.* Spring Grove, Minn., 
and Minneapolis were visited, one concert being given at Spring 
Grove, and one in Harmonia Hall, Minneapolis, where the band 
was assisted by the Kjerulf Male Quartette. Fortunately, Mr. A. C. 



*"Collegre Chips" for June, 1895, says that this trip was undertaken by the 
band and orchestra. 



372 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

Haugan of Minneapolis financed the trip; it was largely upon his 
invitation that the boys set out. The financial part was the only 
feature of the trip that was not a marked success. 

The next trip of any length was taken in 1890, when the band 
visited Spring Grove and Mabel, Minn.; Story City, Bode, Thor, 
and Roland, la. ; Menomonie, Hudson, and Baldwin, Wis. ; Minne- 
apolis, Rushford, and Highland Prairie, Minn. The trip lasted 
from June 23 to July 25. It was a success, although there were 
times when the funds were none too plentiful. Prior to, as well 
as after 1890 there were minor trips by the band, orchestra, choir, 
and glee club to near-by congregations and towns. These were 
always successful. 

As has been stated, the period of the extended tour began in 
1905, when Prof. Sperati resumed control of music at Luther Col- 
lege.** In 1906 the band made an extended tour of 10 weeks to 
the Pacific Coast and the Northwest. In 1907 it played at 
Story City, la., for the Sanger f est. In 1908 the band played at 
the Synod meeting in Chicago. In 1911 a 12 weeks' tour was 
made to the Pacific Coast and the Northwest States. 

In 1914 the climax of band tours was achieved when the band 
represented Luther College and Norwegian-American culture, es- 
pecially in the field of music, at the 100th anniversary of Nor- 
way's independence. A total of 127 admission concerts were 
played, besides, no doubt, an equal number of special short con- 
certs and serenades. Ten different countries, represented by 8 
different flags, and six capital cities, namely: Washington, Chris- 
tiania, Copenhagen, Berlin, Paris, and London, were visited. Con- 
certs were given in the principal cities of the Northwest and 
the East, in the order named: St. Paul, Cliicago, Cleveland, 
Washington, Brooklyn, Boston, Milwaukee, and Minneapolis. 
There were sixty band members on the Norway tour, besides 
seven others. 

This tour extended from April 24 to August 19. Only the 
most favorable comment could be offered on the tour. It was a 
success in every way, and demonstrated the height of efficiency to 
which Prof. Sperati had developed his band musically. Anyone 
would hesitate to undertake such a stupendous tour from a finan- 
cial point of view, and yet, financially, too, the tour was a success. 
The cost of the tour was about $32,000. The Norway Tour will 
stand unsurpassed for years to come. A most interesting, de- 



**In 1905 the band made its first tour under Prof. Sperati to tlie organiza- 
tion meeting of the Choral Union, held in Minneapolis. 



MUSIC 



373 




374 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



tailed account of this tour is set forth in "Norgesfaerden", edited 
bv Prof. Carlo A. Sperati, and President C. K. Preus, and written 
by Prof. O. A. Tingelstad, business manager of the band, Rev. 
J. C. K. Preus, press agent, and Rev. J. A. Moldstad, impresario. 
Rev. J. A. Moldstad served as impresario for the European end 
of this tour, and Prof. B. K. Savre for the American. 

In 1915 the band was officially engaged for ten days at the 
Panama-Pacific International Exposition at San Francisco, Cal. 
Rev. E. M. Stensrud was especially responsible for this engage- 
ment. During its stay it assisted also in the concert of the Choral 
Union of the Synod. Also on this tour the band gave concerts on 
the Pacific Coast and through the Northwest. 

The band made a short tour to St. Paul in 1917 to take part 
in the convention at which the Norwegian Lutheran Church of 
America was organized. 




LUTHEIl COLLEGE CONCERT BAND, 1920 



A tour to Milwaukee to assist in the Quadri-centennial Reforma- 
tion Jubilee Festival was made in 1917. Macfarland, Janesville, 
Beloit, Muskego, Waterford, and Stoughton were also visited on 
this tour.*** 

In May, 1919, the first national convention of the Young Peo- 
ple's Luther League and Choral Union was held at Red Wing, 
Minn. The band took part in this convention by assisting in the 
choral work and church services, and by rendering two open air 
concerts. The band took a similar part in the second triennial 
convention of the Young People's Luther League, held at La 
Crosse, Wis., June 8-11, 1922. 



***With the establishment of the S. A. T. C. at Luther College during the 
war, the bantl assumed the character of a military organization. Its activities, 
as well as the "Camp Sings" held during this time, were commend.nble and 
were commented on very favorably by the commandant, Lieutenant Harold H. 
Fisher. 



MUSIC 37A 

In 1919 the band made two trips to Mason City, la. On 
September 27-28, 1919, it played for the Young People's and 
Choral Union Convention of the St. Ansgar Circuit. On Novem- 
ber 18, the band played at a homecoming for the Cerro Gordo 
County service men. Oh both occasions the band did well. 

A more extensive tour was made during the summer of 1920, 
lasting from June 16 to 25. Some of the places visited on this 
tour were: Albert Lea, Minneapolis, Minn., (where the band 
played for the Choral Union Convention) ; and Scarville, Clear 
Lake, Eagle Grove, Story City, Radcliffe, Jewell, Roland, Ft. 
Dodge, Humboldt, Bode, and Belmond, Iowa. In the fall of 1920 
(Sept. 7-12), the band played at Ames, la., for the Choral Union 
and Young People's Luther League Convention. 

The 60th Anniversary Tour of the summer of 1921, lasting 
from June 7 to August 22, embraced the Middle West, the North 
Pacific States, and Southern Canada.**** 

That the trips, both short and extended, that have been taken 
in the past by the different musical forces of Luther College and 
especially by the band, have been of inestimable value to the Col- 
lege is of course evident. From a small beginning it has been 
possible through the untiring efforts of the boys and their respec- 
tive directors to reach the extent of tours that assume the vast 
proportions of the Pacific Coast Tours, and the Norway Tour. 
The credit for the more extended tours is due without question to 
Prof. Sperati. Most valuable assistance has also been given on 
recent tours by Prof. Enoch E. Peterson as business manager. 
May the future hold even greater and more extended tours in 
store for the band than have been enjoyed by it in the past. 

VII. Instructors and Directors 

Mention has already been made of the men who acted as stu- 
dent or faculty directors of vocal music. As student directors 
of instrumental music at Luther we have the following: Rev. H. 
B. Thorgrimsen, 1878-1879; O. Glas0e, 1879-February, 1881; O. 
Solheim, February, 1881-1882; O. Glas0e, 1882 until Christmas; 
Eugene Krohn, Christmas, 1882-1885; L. A. Larsen, 1885-1886; 
J. Linnevold, 1886-1890; A. O. Johnson, 1890-1891; H. M. Tjer- 
nagel, 1891-1893; O. Omlie, 1893-October, 1894; I. A. Thorson, 
October, 1891-1895. Prof. Hanson took charge of the band in 



****0n this tour, as on most of the previous ones, the band enjoyed the 
matronly care of Mrs. Sperati. It was also fortunate in having at its disposal 
during the entire tour the services of the college nurse, Miss Theresse E. Arne- 
son (now Mrs. B. J. Hovde). 



376 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



1895, remaining its director until 1904; Prof. Sperati took cliarge 
in the spring of 1905. Aside from these directors, the following 
have also been instrumental in furthering music at Luther: In 
1885 I. D. Ylvisaker organized a flageolet sextette, called "The 
Nightingale". Theo. Ringoen, Chr. Anderson, S. T. Normann, and 
Chr. Thompson directed the orchestra, glee club, chorus, and 
band, respectively, during Prof. Hanson's vacation in 1896. Hans 
Moen organized a drum corps in 1896. A mandolin club, reor- 
ganized in 1898, was directed by Thomas Torgerson. Mr. Coup 
and Mclvin Drotning directed the band immediately before Prof. 
Sperati arrived, and G. A. Hanson directed the glee club. N. J. 
Bakke was active especially in vocal circles. 

In the matter of special instruction, the different music pro- 
fessors at the College have always been willing to give private 
help to any student interested in any particular instrument. Aside 
from this, there has been, especially in late years, a decided ef- 
fort on the part of the school authorities to secure special in- 
structors in piano, violin, and voice. Among the most recent in- 
structors in these fields we can mention Mrs. Jessie Ervin Marsh 
and Miss Katherine Hustvedt, piano and organ; Mrs. Ruth 
Downie and Mrs. Alma Marie Brown, violin; Mrs. L. A. Moe, 
piano and voice. 

The musical organizations of Luther College have accomplish- 
ed great tilings in the past, but they hope to be able to accomplish 
even greater things in the future. The Musical Union has, for in- 
stance, as its chief objective at present the work of supplying the 
College with a pipe organ. This Memorial Organ is to be placed 




PRIMK MIMSTKR MICIIKI.SKN OK NOKVVAV ENTKKTAINS I'KKS. rKEUS 
AND THE LUTIIKK COLLEGE CONCERT BAND, 1914 



MUSIC 37T 

in the college chapel in honor of O. Angelo Sperati, who passed 
away November 8, 1916, at the age of 16 years. Angelo was an 
activ'e member of the Musical Union for 8 years and had become 
exceedingly proficient as a performer on the cornet, piano, and 
pipe organ. Great hopes were entertained for him in the future, 
only to be shattered by his departure from this world. Surely 
a more fitting memorial to Angelo could not be found than a music- 
al one.***** 

The work of providing the Memorial Organ has been going 
on successfully. As was stated, the organ is to be placed in the 
college chapel. This fact brings us to a still greater objective, 
namely, that of providing a building that will serve as a chapel 
and music hall. 

The band has from the beginning operated under the handicap 
of unsatisfactory quarters in which to carry on its work. In the 
days of "No. 45," and later the "Chicken Coop", the need of a 
suitable music hall must have been felt. To-day that need is felt 
even more keenly. 

With the realization of the music hall objective we can cer- 
tainly look to the musical organizations of Luther College to 
accomplish even greater things in the future than they have done 
in the past. 

VIII. Sample Repertoires 

1. Sixth Tour, 1915^Panamn-Pacific SUITES AND BALLET MUSIC 

Internntional ETpoHtw^^^^^ ., Germnn -Three Dances from "Henrv 

m,t./n,f ^°'^*^'''''^- ^'"'^ ^- ^^^'«"' VIII." (,i) Morris D.ince. (b) Shep- 

^"'^"'^i- herds' Dance, (c) Torch Dance 

OVERTURES ^"' Grieg — Peer Gynt Suite, (a) Morn- 

, , T^ T-v- . '"o (b) Aase's Death, (c) Anitra's 

^- t,f^~Jj^ P''^^°'°: „ , „ Dance, (d) In the Hall of the Moun- 

2. Balfe — The Siege of Rochelle. j^.jj^ Kin" 

3. Bazzinr—Saul. 23. Saint-Saens — Ballet Divertissement 

4. Keler Bela--Rakoczy. j.j.^,,^ 'Henry VIII." (a) The Gath- 

5. Franz Erkel-Hunyady Laszlo. g,.;, ^j jj^^ ^lans. (b) A Scottish 

6. Herold-Zampa ^ ,. , Idyl, (c) Dance of the Gipsv Girl. 

7. Kretschmer-American Festival. ^^^ ji ^^ pj^^jg ^^^j others. 

8. Leutner — Fest Overture. \ ; & 

9. Mendelssohn— Military Overture. DESCRIPTIVE PIECES 

10. Mendelssohn— Ruy Bias. 24. Bendix— A Day at West Point. 

11. Nieolai— Merry Wives of Windsor. 25. Lee Johnson— The Death of Custer, 

12. Reissiger— The Mill on the Cliff. or The Battle of Little Big Horn. 

13. Rossini — Barber of Seville. Synopsis: 1— Sioux Indian war 

14. Rossini — Semiramide. dance. Night before battle. 2 — Buarle 

15. Rossini — William Tell. calls in Custer's camp before form- 

16. Suppe — Poet and Peasant. Ing the line of march. 3— Custer's 

17. Thomas — Raymond. cavalry on march to Sioux's camp. 

18. Tschaikowsky — "1812." The sound of horses' hoofs in the 

19. Wagner — Tannhauser. distance. 4 — Approach of cavalry with 

20. Weber— Jubel Overture. And others. band, playing "National Airs," the 



*****The Young People's Society of the F. N. E. L. Church at Decorah placed 
a fine piano in the church parlors as a memorial to Angelo. 



378 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Indians responding with their custom- 
ary niusio. 5 Battle of "Little Biff 
Horn," June 25, 1870, in wliich our 
great general lost his life — Indi- 
ans rejoicing over the victory with 
scalp dance. 7 — Arrival of reinforce- 
ments, General Benton and cavalry. 
8 — Custer's Ijurial, volley of shots, 
muffled drums, and bugle sounding 
the last call over our general's grave. 
. . . Finale — "Nearer, My God to Thee." 
20. Bodewalt-Lanipe— Home Sweet Home 
the World Over. 

27. Myddleton— Bv the Swanee River. 

28. Moses-Tobani— The Civil War. 

29. Voelker— A Hunt in the Black Forest. 

And others. 

CONCERT WALTZES 

30. Hall— Wedding of the Winds. 
3L Rubinstein — Valse Caprice. 

32. Johann Strauss — Blue Danube. And 

others. 

MLSCELLANEOUS CONCERT MUSIC 

33. Beethoven— Andante from Fifth Sym- 

phony. 

34. Beethoven — Moonlight Sonata. 

35. Elgar — Pomp and Circumstance. Mil- 

itary March No. L 

36. Grieg — Norwegian Dances. H and III. 

37. Max von Lenz— In the Viking's Do- 

main. 

38. Liszt — Dreams of Love. Nocturne. 

39. Liszt— Second Hungarian Rhapsody. 

40. Meyerbeer — Coronation March from 

"The Prophet." 
4L Meyerbeer — Fackeltanz. 

42. Rubinstein — Reve Angelique (Kam- 

ennoi-Ostrow). 

43. Rubinstein — Romance. 

44. Saint-Saens — Phaeton. 

Synopsis: A symphonic poem: Phae- 
ton, having secured permission to 
drive through the heavens the chariot 
of the Sun, his father, starts on his 
career. His unskilled driving, ma<l- 
dening the steeds, brings tlie fiery 
chariot too close to the earth, which 
is menaced with destruction, w-hen 
Jupiter strikes the impudent driver 
with lightning. 

4.'>. Schubert — Unfinished Sympliony. 

40. Johan Svendsen — Coronation March. 

47. Wagner— Procession of the Knights 

from "Parsifal." 

48. Wagner — Tannliauser March. 

49. Wagner— The Ride of the Valkyries 

from "Die Walkure." And otiiers. 

OPERATIC SELECTIONS AND 
FANTASIAS 

50. Flotow— Martha. 

51. Rudolf Friml— The Firefly. 

52. Lehar — The Merry Widow. 

53. Massenet — Hertxlias. 

54. 0.scar Straus— The Chocolate Soldier. 

55. Moses-Tobani — The Opera Mirror. 

56. Verdi — Ernani. 

57. Verdi — II Trovatore. 

58. Weber— Der Frel.schutz. 

59. National Airs from all Lands. 

Co. Marches and Light Numbers. And 
others. 



SACRED MUSIC 

01. Handel^ — Largo. 

02. Moses-Tobani — Providence, Fantasia. 

03. Wagner — Prayer from "Lohengrin." 
1. Wilson— The Wayside Chapel. 

05. Chorals and sacred songs. And 
others. 
The repertoire of the chorus consists of 
English and Norwegian songs. 



2. Norway Tour, 1911, — Luther Col- 
lege Concert Band and Chorus. Carlo A. 
Sperati, Director. 

1. American Festival Overture — Wm. 

F. Kretchnier. 

2. American Patrol — F. W. Meacham. 

3. Arkansaw Traveler — D. W. Reeves. 

4. a) Auld Lang Syne— Theo. Moses- 

Tobani. 

5. b) In the Great Beyond— Ellis 
Brooks. 

6. Barber of Seville — Rossini. 

7. Berceuse from "Jocelyn" — Godard. 

8. Blue Danube — Johann Strauss. 

9. By the Swanee River— W\ H. Myd- 

<lIeton. 

10. Cavalry Charge— G. Ludcrs. 

n. Chocolate Soldier — Oscar Straus. 

12. Civil War (The)— Theo. Moses-To- 

bani. 

13. Comic Tat-Too— Ph. Fahrbach. 

1 1, a) Coronation March from "The 

Prophet" — Meyerbeer. 
1.5. b) Tannliauser March — Wagner. 
10. a) Coronation March— Johan Svend- 
sen. 

17. b) Midsummer Night's Dream — Men- 

delssohn. 

18. Crcme de la Creme — Theo. Moses- 

Tobani. 

19. A Day at West Point— Theo. Ben- 

dix. 

20. Death of Custer — Lee Johnson. 

21. Debutante Waltz — Santelmann. 

22. a) Dreams of Love — Liszt 

23. b) Valse Caprice — Rubinstein. 

24. Overture 1812 — Tschalkowsky. 
2.5. Ekko fra Norden — WIck-Roberts. 
20. Ernani— Verdi. 

27. Fackeltanz in B — Meyerbeer. 

28. Fanfare— C. Bohm. 

29. Festival Overture — Vor Gud han er 

saa fast en Borg — 0. Nlcolai. 

30. Fest Overture in C — Lachner. 

31. P'est Overture — La.sscn. 

32. Fest Overture — Leutner. 

33. a) 5th Symphony — Beethoven. 

34. b) 8th Svmi)honv — Beethoven. 

35. Firellv— Rudolf Friml. 

30. Flower of Italy O. De Stefano. 

37. Flying Arrow — Holzmann. 

38. Fra Diavolo — Auber. 

39. Der Freischutz — Weber. 

40. Gammel Norsk Jaegermarsch — 

Schj01berg. 

41. Golden Rod — Mabel McKinley. 

42. Grand International Fantasia — T. 

H. Rolllnson. 

43. Greetings March — Kristian Knutson. 

44. Hallelujah Chorus from "Messiah" — 

H.mdel. 



MUSIC 



379 



70. 
71. 
72. 
73. 

74. 
75. 



77. 
78. 
79. 
80. 
81. 
82. 

8.3. 
84. 



99. 
100. 
101. 



Hands Across the Sea — Theo. Mo- 

ses-Tobani. 
Ballet Divertissement from "Henry 

Vni"~Saint-Saens. 
Herodias — Massenet. 

a) Holy City — Stephen Adams 

b) "Cantique de Noel" — A. Adam. 

c) "Pregrhiera" — E. P. Tosti. 
Home Sweet Home the World Over 

— Bodewalt— Lampe. 

Humoreske — Wheeler. 

Hunting Scene — Bucalossi. 

Hunt in the Black Forest — Voelker. 

Hunyady Laszio— Franz Erkel. 

In the Viking's Domain — Max von 
Lenz. 

Invitation a la Valse — Weber. 

Joy to the World — Arr. by Barn- 
house. 

Jubei Overture — Weber. 

I Lombard! — Verdi. 

Love Kiss — Arthur Pryor. 

Love Sparks — Abe Holzmann. 

a) Marche Militaire I — Schubert. 

b) Marche Militaire II — Schubert. 
Martha — Flotow. 

Meflstofele — Boito. 

Merry Widovi', Selection — Franz Lo- 
bar. 
Merry Widow, Waltz — Franz Lehar. 
Merry Wives of Windsor — Nicolai. 
Military Overture — Mendelssohn. 
(Les) Millions d'Arlequin — Drigo. 
Mill on the Cliff— Reissitrer. 

a) Moonlight Sonata — First Move- 
ment — Beethoven. 

b) Bride of Kaschmir — Rubinstein. 
Morning, Noon, and Night in Vi- 
enna — Suppe. 

Musician's Hold-up — Theo. Moses- 
Tobanl. 

a) Nachtgesang — Wagner. 

b) Isolde's Liebestod — Wagner. 
Nokomis — Leach. 

a) Norwegian Dance No. I — Grieg. 

b) Norwegian Dance No. HI — Grieg. 
Offenbachiana No. 2 — Arr. by Boett- 

ger. 
Opera Mirror— Theo. Moses-Tobani. 

a) Pas des Fleurs from "Naila"^ 
Delibes. 

b) Sleeping Beauty — Theo. Moses- 
Tobani. 

Patrol of the Phantoms— W. Paris 

Chambers. 
Peer Gynt Suite— Grieg. 

a) Phaeton — Saint-Saens. 

b) Prelude du Deluge — Saint-Snens. 

a) Pizzicato Polka — Johann and Jo- 
seph Strauss. 

b) First Heart Throbs— Eilenberg. 

c) Traumerei — Schumann. 

d) Pure as Snow — G. Lange. 
Poet and Peasant — Suppe. 

a) Pomp and Circumstance No. I — 
Edward Elgar. 

b) Pomp and Circumstance No. 11^ 
Edward Elgar. 

Procession of the Knights from 

"Parsifal" — Wagner. 
Providence— Theo. Moses-Tobani. 
Rakoczy — Keler Bela. 
Raymond — ^Ambroise Thomas, 
a) Reve Angelique — Rubinstein. 



102. b) Romance — Rubinstein. 

103. Le Reveil du Lion — Kontski. 

104. Ride of the Valkyries — Wagner. 

105. Rienzi — Wagner. 

106. Le Rouet d'Omphale — Saint-Saens. 

107. Ruy Bias— F. Mendelssohn-Bartholdy. 

108. Sakuntala— Carl Goldmark. 

109. Saul— Bazzini. 

110. Second Hungarian Rhapsody — Liszt. 

111. Second Polonaise — Liszt. 

112. Semiramide — Rossini. 

113. a) Sextette from "Lucia" — Gaetano 

Donizetti. 

114. b) Espanola — A. Jungmann. 

115. c) Die Loreley — Josef Nesvadba. 

116. Shipwreck — W. Moore. 

117. Siege of Rochelle— Balfe. 

118. Silver Brook — Edmund Braham. 

119. a) Simple Aveu— F. Thome. 

120. b) Aubade — J. Massenet. 

121. La Sonnambula— Bellini. 

122. Southern Stars— Ascher-Mahl. 

123. Stabat Mater— Rossini. 

124. Summer Night's Dream — Suppe. 

125. Summer's Day in Norway- Wilhners. 

126. Sweethearts— Victor Herbert. 

127. Tannhauser — Wagner. 

128. Three Dances from "Henry VIII"^ 

German. 

129. a) Traumbilder— H. C. Lumbye. 

130. b) Largo— G. F. Handel. 

131. Trinity— Theo. Moses-Tobani. 

132. Triomphnle — Rubinstein. 

133. II Trova tore— Verdi. 

134. Unfinished Symphony — Schubert. 

135. Vision of Salome — Lampe. 

136. War March of the Priests from 

"Athalia" — Mendelssohn. 

137. Wedding March from "Midsummer 

Night's Dream" — Mendelssohn. 

138. Wedding of the Winds, Waltz- 

John T. Hall. 

139. Whispering Flowers — F. von Blon. 

140. William Tell— G. Rossini. 

141. Zampa— F. Herold. 

MARCH SIZE 

142. a) Af H0iheden. 

143. b) Jesu. dine dybe Vunder. 

144. c) Vor Gud ban er saa fast en Borg. 

145. d) Alenest Gud i Himmerig. 

146. e) Bliv med din store Naade. 

147. f) Herre Jesu Krist, dig til os 

vend. 

148. g) Hvad kan os komme til for n0d. 

149. h) O, Dr0velse. 

150. Abe Lincoln — Warren D. Troutman. 

151. African Dreamland — Geo. Atwater. 

152. Ah Sin— Walter Rolfe. 

153. American Habit (The)— W. H. Scou- 

ton. 

154. American Republic — H. H. Thiele. 

155. Anniversary — Charles Sanglear. 

156. Arabola — Karl Hendrix. 

157. Arms of America — Arthur Pryor. 

158. Becksonian — Charles Sanglear. 

159. La Belle Argentina — Carlos Roberto. 

160. Blaze of Glory — Abe Holzmann. 

161. Bombasto— O. R. Farrar. 

162. Bostonian (The)— W. D. Kenneth. 

163. Brigadier-General (The)— Otto Koc- 

kert. 



380 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



164. 

165. 
166. 
167. 
168. 
169. 
170. 
171. 
172. 

173. 

174. 
175. 
176. 

177. 
178. 



181. 
182. 

183. 
184. 
185. 

186. 
187. 
188. 
189. 

190. 

191. 

192. 
193. 
194 
195. 
196. 

197. 
198. 
199. 



201. 

202. 
203. 
204. 
205. 

206. 

207. 
208. 

209. 
210. 
211. 
212. 

213. 
214. 
215. 
216. 



Bull-Frogr and the Coon (The) — 

Arr. by W. H Mackie. 
Casey Jones — Newton-Robinson. 
Caught in the Net— R. A. King. 
Cavallcria Rusticana — P. Mascagni. 
Centurion (The)— W. A. Corey. 
Cherry— L. Albert. 
Chicago Tribune — W. P. Chambers. 
Ciribiribin — A. Pestalozza. 

a) "Come, be my Sunshine, Dearie" 
— Jolin B. Gardner. 

b) "Can't Vou See I Love You"— 
Nat D. Ayer. 

Corn Huskin'! — Joel P. Corin. 

Curro Cuchares — Gerardo Metallo. 

Dance of the Sparrows — B. Rich- 
mond. 

Daddy Dear — Arr. by W. H. Mackie. 

Darkies' Jubilee (The) — John M. 
Turner. 

Down the Field — Stanleigh P. Fried- 
man. 

Dreaming Love of You — Chas. K. 
Harris 

Elephant Trot (The)— Carl Kahn. 

Everybody Works But Father — Arr. 
Robert Becker.* 

Facing the Enemy — F. H. Losev. 

Fighting aiance (A)— F. H. Losey. 

Fighting Chance (The) — Louis Mau- 
rice. 

Firebrand — F. H. Losey. 

Flag Day — Carl Schramm. 

Fort Des Moines — A. Perwein. 

For the Flag — J. Bodewalt-Lampe. 

Free Lance (Tlie) — Joh.n Philip 
Sousa. 

From Time to Time — Arr. by W. H. 
Mackie. 

Frost King (The)— W. D. Kenneth. 

a) Funeral March — F. Chopin. 

b) Chor-l- J. S. B^ch. 
Gage's March — F. H. Losey. 

Gen. Mixup, U. S. A.— Thos. S. Al- 
len. 

Gettysburg — S. B. Stambaugh. 

Gloria— F. H Losey. 

Hero of the Isthmus — P. Bodewalt- 
Lampe. 

How Gentle God's Commands — Na- 
geli. 

If You Alone Were Mine — Vincent 
Scotto. 

In Storm and Sun.shine — J. C. Heed. 

In Thoughts — Henry Froelich. 

Invercargill — Alex. F. Lithgow. 

Italian Songs — Arr. by Frank A. Pa- 
nella. 

a) Ja, vi elsker dette landet — Nord- 
raak. 

b) S0nner af Norge — Blom. 
Jersey Carnival (The) — Daniel Lie- 
be rfeld. 

King Clianticleer — Nat D. Ayer. 

King of the Air— Carl Everlof. 

Lakeside — W. C. Jolley. 

Last Call (The)— Jacob Henry El- 
lis. 

Liberty Bell (The)— Sousa. 

Lights Out— E E. McCoy. 

Lilacs — Kathleen A. Roberts. 

McKinley's Memorial — W. Paris 
Oi ambers. 



217. 

218. 
219. 

221. 



223. 
224. 



229. 
230. 
231. 



2.'!3. 
234. 

235. 
236. 

237. 
238. 
239. 
240, 

211. 

2t2. 
243. 
2 II. 

2J5. 
246. 
247. 
248. 
240. 
250. 
251. 

252. 
253. 
254. 

255. 

256. 
257. 
258 
259. 
260. 
261. 

262. 
263. 

264. 
265. 

266. 
267. 
268. 

269. 
270. 
271. 



Magnetic — H. A Van der Cook. 

Mexico — Cole an<l Johnson Bros. 

Military Life — K. L. King. 

Mi.ss Columbia— A H. Thrall. 

Moose (The) — W. L. Skaggs. 

Motor Maid (The)— Edmund Bra- 
ham. 

Music Men (The)— Charles E. Allen. 

Muttering Fritz — F. H. Losey. 

National Emblem —E. E. Bagley. 

National Spirit — Frederic W. Ha- 
ger. 

Officer of the Day— R. B. Hall. 

Old Comrades— C. Teike. 

Old Faithful — Abe Holzmann. 

Olympia — Theo. A. Metz. 

Olympia Hippodrome — Russel Alex- 
ander. 

On Mobile Bay — Daniels and Wen- 
rich. 

On the Me«sn-Grand — Louis Maurice. 

Onward, Christian Soldiers — John N. 
Klohr. 

On, Wisconsin — W. T. Purdy. 

Pilgrim Commandery — Robert A. 
Foss. 

Pizzicato Polka — Joh. Strauss. 

Plunger (The)— Thos. S. Allen. 

PoUywogs — E. C. Kammermeyer. 

Prayer from "Lohengrin" — R. Wag- 
ner. 

Pride of the Ninth (The)— J. D. 
Cline. 

Prince of Decorah — P. G. Lowery. 

Pussy — Joel P. Corin. 

Royal Trumpeters (The) — F. R. 
Seltzer. 

Silomy Jane — Joel P. Corin. 

Saucy Darling — L. W. Hardy. 

"Secret" (Le) — Leonard Gautier. 

Seeing Paris^Ch. Mougeot. 

Semper Fidelis — Sous-i. 

Senora — Jos. S. Nathan. 

74th Regiment Band March (The) — 
F. H. Losey. 

Silver Trumpets — F. H. Losey. 

Songe D'Automne — Archibald Joyce. 

Spirit of Independence — Abe Holz- 
mann. 

Stars and Stripes Forever (The) — 
Sousa . 

Staunch and True — C. Teike. 

Step Lively — Fred Schwartz. 

Stilt Dance (The)— Lester W. Keith. 

St. Vitus Dance— G. E. Holmes. 

Summer Dream (A)— P. Hans Flath. 

Take Me on the Rollers — Arr. by 
Maurice F. Smith. 

That Italian Rag— Al. Piantadosi. 

Triumph of the Century — Anton 
Weiss. Op. 62. 

Troopers' Tribunal — Henry Fillmore. 

Under the Double Eagle— J. F. Wag- 
ner. 

United Liberty — F H. Lo.sey. 

Universal Peace — Franz von Blon. 

a) Vast Unnumber'd Throngs (The) 
— E. Grieg. 

b) Solveig's Song — K. Grieg. 
Vampire (The) — Al. B. Coney. 
WaUhnere — F. H. Losey. 
Warrior Bold (A) — Frank A. Pa- 

nclla. 



MUSIC 



381 



273. Washington Grays— C. S. Grafulla. 

274. Wayside Chapel (The)— G. D. Wil- 

son. 

275. Wedding Bells— Al. B. Coney 

276. Western Girl — Albert J. Harbridge. 

277. What's the Matter with Father — 

Arr. by J. Bodewalt-Lampe. 

278. When I Get You Alone To-night- 

Fred Fischer. 

279. When the Band Plays Yankee Doo- 

dle — Joel P. Corin. 

280. When the Nightingales are Nesting, 

Sweet Irene — Arr. by Becker. 

281. Whip and Spur— Thos. S. Allen. 



282. Whistler and His Dog (The)— A. 

Pryor. 

283. Whistling Johnnies — Fred W. Hager. 

284. Winning Fight (The) — Abe Holz- 

mann. 

285. Winter—Albert Gumble. 

286. Yale Boola — A. M. Hirsch. 

287. Yankee Girl — Abe Holzmann. 

288. The Leader's Delight, 140 airs of 

all countries — Arr. by Paul de 

Ville. 
Instrumental solos, vocal solos, and 
repertoire for chorus are in addition to 
the above list. 



CHAPTER SEVENTEEN 

IMPORTANT EVENTS 

Knut Gjerset 

HE was small ere he grew big. It is the old, old story", says 
the poet A. O. Vinje about his favorite hero Storegut. In 
conformity with this law of all life, Luther College has also had 
its years of infancy when it was small in numbers as well as in 
material equipment. Its first president, Dr. Laur. Larsen, de- 
scribes very vividly how small it was in 1861 when it was first 
established in a parsonage at Halfway Creek, near La Crosse, 
Wisconsin. "The year that the school was in Halfway Creek", 
he says, "we had only the one building, the parsonage, without 
an}' outhouses of any kind. And how many people were crowded 
together in this building? There were two teachers and their 
families. Professor Schmidt had one child, and Professor Lar- 
sen two, one of whom died in October. The school had sixteen 
students, but not more than eleven at any one time. Christian 
Nilsen and his wife were employed as steward and stewardess for 
the joint household, as separate housekeeping for each family 
could not be established. As Nilsen was a carpenter, he made all 
the simple furniture we had. He also performed such manual 
labor as the students were unable to do. The housekeepers had 
one child, and Mrs. Nilsen's mother was also staying with them. 
Professor Larsen had one room for himself and family, a small 
adjoining room being used as office, spare room, and hospital. The 
meals were served in the kitchen, where all ate at the same table. 
The students were divided into two classes, each of which had 
one room. Tliese rooms were furnished in the following manner: 
Our steward had made some narrow beds with rope bottoms, 
which were placed along the walls. Along the middle of the floor 
stood long, home-made tables, made as narrow as possible to save 
room. Between the beds and the tables stood long wooden 
benches. When the boys arose in the morning, they only had to 
step across the Ixtnches to seat themselves at the tables, where 
they were to study their lessons." Small it was, indeed, this in- 
fant Luther College. So small that a committee on standardiza- 
tion of colleges in our day would never have discovered it. And 



IMPORTANT EVENTS 



383 



still it was great even then in those qualities which make an in- 
stitution of learning truly successful. It had earnest and de- 
voted students; teachers of learning and ability, inspired with a 
high purpose, consecrated to a great work, trained and steadfast in 
the Word of God. So great was Luther College in spiritual life 
and force of character that it has never grown since in those es- 
sentials ; tliat even now, after sixty years of development and 
progress in various lines, our prayer must be: May it never grow 
smaller than it was at its beginning in these traits so necessary 
to the success of a Christian school. 




FIKST HOME OF LUTHER COLLEGE— 
Halfway Creek Parsonage, 1861-62 

The founders of Luther College undoubtedly dreamed their 
dreams. Their visions were not of columned porticos and marble 
walls, but as practical men they knew that suitable buildings and 
equipment were necessary to secure the future growth of the in- 
stitution. No one exercised a more active influence in providing 
means and 'equipment for the new school than Rev. V. Koren, the 
most astute and brilliant of the men who guided the Norwegian 
Lutheran Synod during the early years. In the many struggles 
for orthodox Lutheran doctrine waged in those times, no one quite 
equaled him in thorough scholarship, critical discernment, dialectic 



384 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

skill, or resourceful leadership. A deep religious interest had 
moved him to turn his steps from elegant home surroundings in 
Norwaw After graduating from the University of Christiania he 
left influential friends and assured distinction to cast his lot with 
emigrants in a pioneer wilderness. But even in these rustic sur- 
roundings courtly elegance and refinement of manners never for- 
sook him. His devout religious character was of an enlightened 
and intellectual type. He frowned upon emotionalism, but clung 
with unswerving fidelity to the doctrine of the verbal inspiration 
of the Bible. The word gegraptai (it is written) engraved on the 
seal of the Synod was like a device emblazoned on his spiritual 
armor in every religious controversy. But although he was found 
in the forefront of every battle where purity of doctrine was at 
stake, he loved peace, and counted it his chief mission to do a 
pastor's work of preaching the Gospel to his congregations. He 
hated all sham as thoroughly as he loved all true culture. He was 
never happier than when he was engaged in fostering intellectual 
interests and in organizing cultural forces among his people. His 
spirit has lived in the Church which he served, and in Luther Col- 
lege which he was instrumental in founding. Even now that he is 
no longer among the living, his impressive personality towers 
greater than ever as he recedes into the gathering shadows of the 
past. 

The early fathers of the Norwegian Lutheran S^^nod under- 
stood fully the importance of proper training for the ministers 
of the Church. According to their views the ministers should not 
be preachers only, but spiritual and intellectual leaders capable 
of waging successfully the battles of a Church forced to remain 
militant by existing circumstances, being surrounded on all sides 
by religous influences of every sort. The school to be erected 
would accordingly have to be of a high type, a spiritual armory 
where theological leaders could be properly equipped. The stu- 
dents should not only be well versed in Christian doctrines and 
in the teachings of the Ciuirch, in history and modern languages; 
they should also be specially prepared for theological study 
through extensive courses in Latin, Greek, and Hebrew, as no 
scholarly theologians could be developed except through a thor- 
ough knowledge of the classical languages in which the Scriptures 
and most of the theological literature are written. The teachers 
should take care to impart genuine intellectual culture, to culti- 
vate in the students love for simplicity and truth, and to banish 
from their minds all pretense, sham, and humbug. The primary 



IMPORTANT EVENTS 385 

purpose of the school should be to prepare young men for the 
study of theology, but it should also serve the people as a general 
institution of learning. The committee appointed to superintend 
the erection of the College, of which Revs. V. Koren and C. L. 
Clausen were the leading members, states in its report to the 
Church Council of November 5, 1861: "The committee has 
unanimously decided so to arrange the plan of the institution that 
the school which is to prepare students for the theological seminary 
shall also receive students who wish to prepare themselves for 
other professions, and desire to serve their country in those civil 
callings which require more extensive knowledge." This, then, 
was Luther College as it was conceived in the minds of its 
founders. 

In 1857, at a meeting of the Synod held in the Little Iowa 
congregation, Winneshiek County, Iowa, of which Rev. V. Koren 
was pastor, a resolution was passed that a higher institution of 
learning — a university — was to be established, and that a fund 
for this purpose was to be raised by general subscription. In 1861 
a committee of which Professor Laur. Larsen, and Revs. V. Koren 
and H. A. Preus, president of the Synod, were leading members, 
recommended to the general church meeting held at Rock Prairie, 
Wisconsin, that steps should at once be taken to build a school in 
Decorah, Iowa, this town "being centrally located and easy of 
access", and that the thirty-two acre tract of land which Rev. V. 
Koren had purchased there for the sum of $1,500 should be bought 
for school grounds. This recommendation was adopted by the 
meeting, which resolved to erect a school building in Decorah. A 
more beautiful site could not have been selected. At this time 
Decorah was still a small frontier town, but immigrants from 
Norway were pouring into this center of early Norwegian im- 
migration. Every summer numbers of immigrant chests would 
arrive in town bearing the address "Decorah, Jova". New thriv- 
ing Norwegian settlements were springing up on all sides in 
northern Iowa and southern Minnesota, and many congregations 
were organized. But the flow of immigration gradually veered 
to the northwest, and the great railways, which courted wealth 
rather than beauty, extended their giant arms in the same direc- 
tion. Decorah was not to become a queen in the commercial 
world, nor did the town even have the good fortune to be located 
on one of the principal lines of communication. Like some un- 
wooed country beauty it was destined to remain in its semi-rustic 
isolation. In time this affected the growth of Luther College 
rather unfavorably, but it has tended also to render permanent its 



386 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

conservative individual character. Even now, after sixty years, 
it remains what its founders dedicated it to be — a classical col- 
lege for men. 

In the effort to raise a university fund of $50,000 tlie lead 
was taken by President H. A. Preus' congregations at Spring 
Prairie, Bonnet Prairie, and Norway Grove, Wisconsin, and by 
Rev. V. Koren's congregations in Winneshiek County, near De- 
corah. But the newer congregations in Minnesota on the very 
frontier, where the Indians massacred and scalped their victims 
in 1862, were not behindhand in contributing to the full extent 
of their abilit}\ Already in 1861 tlie sum of $19,332 in paid sub- 
scriptions was reported. In 1861 the amount subscribed readied 
$51,831.87. The task of raising such a sum in scattered new 
settlements of immigrant pioneers still living in their simple log 
cabins, in those dark days of the Civil War when most of the 
strongest men were away from home fighting for their country 
in the armies of the Union, when money was so scarce, and farm 
products so cheap, could be accomplished only because the set- 
tlers were willing to make the greatest sacrifices. We read with 
an interest not unmingled with emotion the subscription lists of 
those days: 1862; Styrk Reque, $100; Peder Simon Nordgaren, 
$100; Gunder Kitelsen Lunde, $100; Knud Halvorsen Dalen, 
$100; etc. One hundred dollars payable in gold was a large sum 
in those days when eggs were sold for six cents a dozen, butter 
for ten cents a pound, dressed pork for two and a half to three 
cents a pound, and when the average farm with houses and im- 
provements was not worth over five or six Imndred dollars. If 
our people now would give, not in proportion, but half in propor- 
tion, one might wonder what would really happen. 

Until the building should be erected the school at Halfway 
Creek was to receive new temporary quarters in Decorah in the 
building now known as St. Cloud Hotel, which had been bought 
for the purpose. Here Luther College began the second year of 
its activity in the fall of 1862. The following summer a new 
church meeting at Rock River, Wisconsin, passed a resolution that 
the school building should be completed as soon as possible, and 
that the work should be carried forward with the greatest energy. 
In June, 1864, the work on the foundation liad advanced so far 
that the corner-stone could be laid. This was done with ap- 
propriate ceremonies on the 30th of that month. On February 
1, 1865, the College was incorporated under the name "The Nor- 
wegian Luther College", with Rev. H. A. Preus as president of 
the corporation. Rev. V. Koren secretary. Professor Laur. Lar- 



IMPORTANT EVENTS 



387 



sen treasurer; and Rev. N. Brandt, Thore Peterson, Gulbrand T. 
Lomen, Jens J. Naeset, Tjerand Johnson, and Rev. O. J. Hjort 
as trustees. The official report of the seventh annual meeting of 
the Synod says about the articles of incorporation: "In the Synod 
meeting, the articles of incorporation of the Norwegian Luther 
College were read; also the deed to its property in Decorah. It was 
stated that after unsuccessful attempts to incorporate the Synod, 
the College was incorporated in such a manner that all ministers 
and representatives at the Synod meetings are members of the 
college corporation, and must elect the officials (board of trustees) 
of the corporation." 




SECOND HOME OF LUTHER COLLEGE— 
St. Cloud Hotel, 1862-65 

In the fall of 1865 the college building, costing nearly $75,000, 
was so nearly completed that it could open its doors to the stu- 
dent body for the school year. On October 14th of that year it 
was dedicated with impressive ceremonies as The Norwegian Lu- 
ther College. Thousands of people had gathered from far and 
near for this occasion, the most memorable church event that the 
Norwegian settlers had yet attended in America. It is estimated 
that 6,000 people participated in the festival. Early Saturday 
morning a large procession formed at the bridge across the Up- 
per Iowa River, and marched to the college building. The Church 
Council, and ministers and delegates from a large number of 



388 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

congregations were present, also representatives from the college 
and theological seminary of the German Lutheran Missouri Synod, 
the professors Lange and Brauer. During the program in the 
college building speeches were made by Prof. F. A. Schmidt, Rev. 
V. Koren and Prof. Lange. The president of the Synod, Rev. 
H. A. Preus, delivered the dedication sermon, choosing as his 
text the following words from the 126th Psalm: "The Lord hath 
done great things for us; whereof we are glad." 

The dedication festival was over. Congratulations and 
hearty wishes for success had been received, the friends and vis- 
itors had come and gone. The school now found itself established 
in a new, commodious home, where it could enter upon years of 
diligent labor with hope and cheerfulness. No one felt more 
elated over the completion of the college building than Profes- 
sor Laur. Larsen, president of the school since its first humble 
beginning in Halfway Creek. Now he could be seen in his office, 
with beaming face bent over his books and papers, working from 
break of day till ten o' clock at night, the regular length of his 
working day during the forty-one years which he was president 
of Luther College. Peter Laurentius Larsen (Laur. Larsen) 
brought to his work a methodical diligence and conscientious 
punctuality which were the results of rigorous discipline and 
thorough early training. His election proved to be the choice not 
only of an administrative officer, but of a character and a policy. 
As a devout Lutheran theologian and firm supporter of the ideals 
of classical learning he proved to be the best possible exponent 
of those traits which have become most distinctive in the life of 
Luther College. Kind and fatherly in his ways, averse to all 
show and ostentation, he adhered with patriarchal strength and 
serenity of mind to pure Biblical doctrine, conforming rigorously 
to Christian principles in all details of life and conduct. He was 
not only the administrative head but the spiritual father of the 
institution. During his long incumbency he infused into it his 
own spirit, giving it so distinct and individual a character that 
later growth has never changed its fundamental traits. The 
phrase "Luther College spirit", though undefined and probably 
undcfinable, is still by some used to indicate a certain austere 
and conservative religious and intellectual attitude, a love of 
scholarly attainments, and oi)position to all sham and display 
supposed to characterize Luther College men. How well Lar- 
sen succeeded in realizing the chief aim of the school can be seen 
from the fact that during his presidency, 18(51-1902, sixty-five 
per cent of the graduates of the College entered the theological 



IMPORTANT EVENTS 389 

seminary. If knowledge is power, character is a still greater 
power. Larsen had both. He was an accurate scholar and a 
well disciplined theologian, but it was his character rather than 
his knowledge which made him a great educator. He imparted 
to Luther College the power of his own Christian character, a 
force which made it a strong and influential institution of learn- 
ing, even though it has remained relatively small in point of num- 
bers. For many years Professor Larsen was also the editor of 
the official organ of the Synod, the "Kirketidende". As we re- 
member him now plying his never weary pen, bending his white 
head over his large open Bible, we can only say: May God give 
us men equally faithful and unselfish in their devotion to divine 
truth and conscientious service to mankind. 

Luther College continued to prosper. In the decade 1865- 
1875 the number of students rose from 58 to 229, and many new 
teachers were added to the faculty. The south wing of the col- 
lege building, completed in 1874, was dedicated on December 2nd 
of that year. In 1881 the course of study which extended through 
six years including the college preparatory classes was lengthened 
to seven years. Hitherto the College had been operated on the 
plan of the Latin schools in Norway; now the American plan of 
a college preparatory or high school course and a four-year college 
course was adopted. Besides training students for entrance to 
the College the preparatory course should give young men such 
general education as would fit them for business pursuits and for 
general leadership in their home communities. The growing need 
of teachers also led to the establishing at Luther College of a 
teachers' course, which was maintained from 1865 till 1886. At 
first the only aim was to prepare parochial teachers, but in 1868 
an extra year was added to the course so that teachers could be 
educated also for the public schools. The College was not only 
growing in numbers, buildings and equipment, it was also broad- 
ening the scope of its activity, and adjusting itself more fully to 
American educational standards as well as to the needs of the 
Norwegian settlers in their new environment. But even these ef- 
forts to widen the activity of the College did not satisfy the grow- 
ing demand for more popular education and the erection of new 
schools within easier reach of the growing settlements especially 
in the Northwest. In 1874 an association was organized through 
the efforts of the great church leader, President B. J. Muus of the 
Minnesota District of the Synod, for the purpose of founding a 
n«w school at Northfield, Minnesota. A commodious building 
was erected on a beautiful campus overlooking the town. On 



390 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



January 8, 1875, the coeducational academy, the St. Olaf's 
School, the first of a large number of academies built by the 
Church, began its work with two teachers and thirty-six students. 
The president of the school, Professor Th. N. Mohn, as well as 
his assistant, Professor L. S. Reque, were graduates of Luther 
College. In 188G the school was clianged to St. Olaf College, an 
institution which has grown to be the largest school in the Nor- 
wegian I>utlieran Church in America. Besides preparing students 




MAIN liUlLDlNd, l«7l 

for the theological seminary, Luther College had now trained a 
number of educators and church leaders, which made it possible 
to enter upon the building of a series of academies and other ed- 
ucational institutions in the Church. Nothing could furnisli more 
convincing evidence of the profound influence exerted by Luther 
College than the number of daughter schools which trace their 
origin to tlie alma mater of their early teachers, presidents, and 
founders. In 1876 Monona Academy, Madison, Wisconsin, was 
built by congregations belonging to the Synod. Willmar Semi- 
nary, Willmar, Minnesota, founded by the Luther College gradu- 
ates A. M. Hove and H. S. Hilleboe, began its work in 1883. 
From that time the number of new schools grew rapidly. The 



IMPORTANT EVENTS 391 

Bode Academy, Bode, Iowa, was opened in 1887; Luther Acad- 
emy, Albert Lea, Minnesota, in 1888; the Lutheran Normal 
School, Sioux Falls, S. Dak., in 1889; Bruflat Academy, Port- 
land, N. Dak., in 1889; Stoughton Academy, Stoughton, Wis., in 
1889; Park Region Luther College, Fergus Falls, Minn., in 1892; 
the Lutheran Ladies' Seminary, Red Wing, Minn., in 1894; 
Pacific Lutheran Academy and Business College, Parkland, Wash., 
in 1894; Glenwood Academy, Glenwood, Minn., in 1894; Clifton 
College, Clifton, Texas, in 1896. Grand Forks College was 
bought by Synod people in 1900; Albion Academy, or H. A. 
Preus Academy, Albion, Wis., was bought from the Adventists in 
1901, and Gale College, Galesville, Wis., from the Presbyterians; 
Wittenberg Academy was owned and operated jointly by 
the Norwegian Lutheran Synod and the German Missouri Synod 
from 1901. 

Since Luther College was established chiefly for the purpose 
of preparing young men for the ministry, it might seem natural 
to expect that a theological course would be added to its cur- 
riculum, but this was never done. The graduates were sent to 
the theological seminary of the German Missouri Synod in St. 
Louis until the Synod established its own theological seminary in 
Madison, Wisconsin, in 1876. The early leaders of the Church, 
who were university men of high scholarly attainments, feared 
that a theological department, if connected with the College, might 
prove to be an incubus inimical to its growth. Even in the early 
days, when the need of ministers was so great that short courses 
and superficial training might seem not only excusable but politic, 
they refused to inaugurate a policy which might prove unfavor- 
able to thorough scholastic training. They wished to maintain 
high intellectual standards, and genuine scholarship in secular 
branches. "Everything should be butter to the bottom, and not 
only on top", as Professor Larsen expressed it in a speech in 1884. 
The Augustana Synod, founded by Swedish and Norwegian im- 
migrants in 1860, had founded Augustana College and Seminary, 
Paxton, Illinois. From this school sprang Augsburg Seminary, 
Minneapolis, Minnesota, the school of the Norwegian Lutheran 
Conference. Both these institutions had theological departments, 
but neither of them laid much stress on purely secular branches. 
Luther College, as a protagonist of classical scholarship and thor- 
ough training in secular branches, a school with its own strong 
individuality, wholly distinct from the theological seminary, oc- 
cupied a unique position, and exerted a profound influence on the 



392 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SEXTY YEARS 

development of the whole school system of the Norwegian Lu- 
theran Church in America. 

Hitherto good fortune had smiled on Luther College, but it 
was nevertheless destined to ride the angry billows of the storm. 
In 1880 a great doctrinal controversy arose regarding the ques- 
tion of predestination, at first between Professor C. F. W. Wal- 
ther of the Missouri Synod and Professor F. A. Schmidt, Profes- 
sor Larsen's old colleague, now professor of theology in Luther 
Seminary of the Norwegian Synod, Madison, Wisconsin. The 
controversy spread througliout the Synod even to the congrega- 
tions and the lay people, and became so bitter that in 1887 seven- 
ty-two ministers and professors, a number which was later in- 
creased to ninety-seven, seceded from the Synod with their con- 
gregations. This was a severe blow, visible so far as Luther Col- 
lege was concerned in reduced attendance and prestige for many 
years subsequent. 

Hardly had the storm of doctrinal controversy subsided when 
fire broke out in the college building, May 19, 1889, reducing it 
to a melancholy ruin. The library and furniture were saved, but 
the loss was very great, as the building was insured only for 
$10,000. But in these days of adversity the friends of the College 
rallied to its support with a determination begotten of trials. In 
1880 the Luther College Alumni Association had been founded 
througli tlie efforts of John Koren and Gisle Bothne. In 1888 it 
was incorporated. So energetic were the efforts of this associa- 
tion and other friends to restore the College and to render good 
its losses, that in 1890 a new building rose on the smoke-stained 
foundation, even more beautiful and commodious than the old. On 
October 14th and 15th of that year the new college building was 
dedicated. Prof. Laur. Larsen himself preaching the dedication 
sermon. It was a great festival. The Rev. J. A. Ottesen, Prof. 
L. S. Reque, and otliers spoke, and poems written for the occasion 
by Rev. V. Koren and Prof. Th. Bothne were read. In the after- 
noon Prof. H. G. Stub of Luther Seminary spoke on the follow- 
ing words from the prophet Haggai (2:9): "The glory of this 
latter house shall be greater than of the former, saith the Lord 
of hosts ; and in this place will I give peace, saith the Lord of 
hosts." 

In 1902 President Larsen tendered his resignation to the 
Synod assembled in general meeting in Minneapolis, Minnesota. 
At the college commencement exercises June 18tli he stood for the 
last time before the assembled scliool as its president. His coal- 
black hair had turned white as snow. At the close of the ex- 



IMPORTANT EVENTS 393 

ercises he thanked his friends^ and wished the school godspeed 
for the future. He then took his hat and walked quietly to his 
home. No demonstration of any kind gave color to this quiet but 
important event. The same church meeting which accepted Dr. 
Larsen's resignation elected as his successor Prof. C. K. Preus. 
On September 4th he ascended the rostrum in the college chapel. 
After stating that he had been elected president he conducted de- 
votional exercises, speaking on the text from St. Matthew (i:^), 
"Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that pro- 
ceedeth out of the mouth of God". No ceremony of any kind 
attended his unostentatious debut as president of the College. 

With the election of President Preus a new era began in the 
development of Luther College. Hitherto the institution had pre- 
served a distinct pioneer character marked by a frugal content- 
ment which was a legacy of early days. With a certain aloof- 
ness and modest reserve the school had proceeded quietly on its 
way, as though further innovations might offend the lares and 
penates of its well regulated academic household. President 
Preus possessed in an eminent degree the qualifications most 
needed in a new administration. Being a son of the former pres- 
ident of the Synod, Rev. H. A. Preus, he sprang from a distin- 
guished famil}', and was reared in a home of great culture and 
refinement. He could move with tact and grace in the highest 
circles, but none of the old church leaders understood the com- 
mon people so well, or came in so close and sympathetic touch 
with them. No one in the Synod, possibly with the exception of 
his father, was so popular, or had so large and devoted a personal 
following. In conversation he was magnetic, jovial, and court- 
eous ; in appearance attractive, with a face of beaming intel- 
ligence; in speech he was eloquent — serious, pathetic, humorous, 
or cordial, as the occasion demanded — with a voice so deep and 
sonorous that it could be heard by thousands. In intellectual 
character he combined conservative views with keen practical 
judgment and progressive energy. In religious views he was 
most orthodox, in adherence to the ideals of classical learning he 
was uncompromising. Because of these traits he could not in- 
augurate a policy which in any way would change the character 
of the school. But in questions pertaining to the improving and 
enlarging of the equipment of the institution, enriching its cur- 
riculum or winning for it a wider and more general recognition, 
he was an enthusiastic progressist. 

In 1903 a general meeting of the Synod was to assemble in 
Decorah to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the found- 



394 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

ing of the Church. In anticipation of this notable churcli gather- 
ing, President Preus secured the enlargement of the college gym- 
nasium to three times its original size, to provide a suitable audi- 
torium for the meeting. In 1905 a fourth year was added to the 
college preparatory course, making it not only equivalent but in 
some respects superior to a regular high-school course. In 1906 
President Preus brought before the yearly meeting of the Synod 
a request for a new dormitory. The meeting hesitated, but fin- 
ally passed a resolution instructing the Church Council to make 
such arrangements that he could travel about and raise the neces- 
sary money by general subscription. This arduous task he gladly 
undertook. In the fall of 1907 the new building, the Laur. Larsen 
Hall, had been completed at a cost of over $75,000. In one part 
of the building a well equipped chemical laboratory was es- 
tablished at a considerable cost; later also a physical laboratory. 

In 1916 a new dining hall, the Loyalty Hall, was erected at the 
cost of $16,000. The final cost added $2,000 more. 

A revision of the curriculum was undertaken in 1906 for the 
purpose of making the courses more elastic than they had been 
hitherto. The elective system in a very attenuated form was in- 
troduced by establishing a literary course to run parallel with the 
classical course during the junior and senior years. But six years 
of Latin, three years of Greek, and one year of Hebrew were 
required also in the literary course. In 1918 Hebrew was made 
an elective. In 1911 the whole eight years' course of the school 
was standardized, and organized in such a way as to meet the 
requirements of the theological seminary on the one hand, and on 
the other the standard university requirements for a B. A. degree. 
In 1918 the sub-preparatory work, which had been given in 
special classes since 1911, was organized into a separate class, 
and the Preparatory Department was divided into a Junior High 
School with a two years' course, and a Senior High School with a 
three j^ears' course. In that j'ear Luther College also joined the 
North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, by 
which organization it had already been accredited for several 
years. 

In 1911 Luther College would celebrate the fiftieth anniver- 
sary of its founding. For this occasion its friends resolved to 
raise an endowment fund which would give the school added 
strength and stability. Mr. L. S. Swenson, United States Min- 
ister to Norwa}', one of the most distinguislied alumni of the Col- 
lege, had secured from the great railway magnate, Mr. James J. 
Hill, the promise of $50,000 toward such a fund if the Church 



IMPORTANT EVENTS 



39.1 



would raise $200,000. The offer was accepted. Another distin- 
guished alumnus, Rev. H. G. Stub, president of the Synod, under- 
took to raise the needed sum by general subscription, a task which 
he carried out so successfully that in the fall of 1911 the total 
subscription, including Mr. Hill's donation, amounted to $286,000. 
At the anniversary celebration October 14th a fund of $250,000 
was presented to the College by President Stub on behalf of its 
friends. 

President Preus was never disposed to seek relaxation from 
labor or to rest on laurels already won. In 1918 he prevailed on 
the church meetings to empower the college Board of Trustees to 
raise funds by general subscription for a library building. The 
work of soliciting the subscriptions was largely done by himself 
alone. At the same time a movement was also set on foot to pro- 
vide funds for a new gymnasium. The erection of the library 
building was begun in the fall of 1920, but Preus was not destined 




FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY, 1911 

to see its completion. In the morning of May 28, 1921, word was 
received announcing his sudden death. Voices were hushed, and 
busy tasks were laid aside. Dr. Oscar L. Olson was placed in 
charge as temporary president, and preparations were made to 
show the departed worker the last honors which could be his on 
earth. The library building, named the Koren Library in honor 
of the former president of the Synod, Rev. V. Koren, was com- 
pleted at a cost of $130,000 in time to be dedicated in connection 
with the celebration of the sixtieth anniversary of the founding 
of the College, October 14, 1921. 

If the election of C. K. Preus as president marks a new epoch 
in the history of Luther College, his death, and especially the 



396 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

war, which made also liis burdens so heavy, probably mark an- 
other. Wlieii the war bugles blew, the 3'oung men of military age 
at the school joined the colors. Not less than 356 Luther College 
students and graduates entered the army. Of these eight are 
known to have died in the service. For a time the class-rooms 
looked almost deserted, until the government in October, 1918, 
established at the College a Students' Army Training Corps in 
charge of Lieutenants Harold H. Fisher and Allen C. Grundy. 
Both these officers were fine young men, who cooperated cordially 
with the faculty in attempting to solve the problems connected 
with the sudden change of the school into a military establish- 
ment. The curriculum was completely rearranged to meet the 
new demands of training young men for the army. The old 
courses were made elective, and new ones were added, the only 
required courses in the new curriculum being war aims (3 hours), 
military English (2 hours), religion (1 hour). A spirit of co- 
operation and good-will characterized the work. According to 
general opinion and the reports of all inspectors, the Luther Col- 
lege S. A. T. C. was a very successful unit. It was demobilized 
December 11, 1918. In all other war activities the teachers of 
the school and their wives took an active part. Luther College 
performed well the duty of serving its country during the great 
crisis of the war. Another military unit, the Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps, established in January, 1919, at the request of 
the college faculty, with Lieutenant Harold H. P'isher as profes- 
sor of military science, was not so successful as the S. A. T. C. 
All interest in military affairs seemed to vanish with the war, and 
the unit was demobilized January 9, 1920. 

Successful as the S. A. T. C. unit was in a general way, its 
influence nevertheless impaired the old standards of scholarship. 
Under pressure of the great war academic work could not receive 
the customary attention in a busy military routine. To this grief 
new sorrows were added when Governor W. L. Harding on May 
23, 1918, issued a proclamation stating among other things that 
"English should and must he the only medium of instruction in 
public, private, denominational, and other similar schools." Eng- 
lish was the only medium of instruction in Luther College, and as 
it was thought that the proclamation was not intended to affect in- 
struction in foreign languages in higher institutions of learning, 
and encouraged by the United States commissioner of education, 
Mr. Claxton, the College retained both German and Norse in its 
curriculum. But the interest in languages other than English was 
greatly weakened by this Draconian measure. Before the war 



IMPORTANT EVENTS 397 

three Norwegian societies flourished at Luther College. Governor 
Harding's proclamation destroyed them all, and no effort since 
has been able to revive them. Also in other respects the war left 
traces of its vitiating influence. Even long after it was over, a 
lack of feeling of responsibility and devotion to scholarly ideals 
prevailed, which only patient and persistent effort has been able 
to overcome. But the hand which heals all wounds will also ef- 
face the fiery trail of the war dragon. A new generation, bright- 
eyed with the hope of youth, is entering Luther College in in- 
creasing numbers. The institution has now the largest attendance 
in its history. We welcome them as the heirs to the inheritance. 
They will work and build as did their fathers under the egis of 
the same covenant which God made with King Solomon: "I have 
hallowed this house which thou hast built, to put My name there 
forever, and Mine eyes and Mine heart shall be there perpetual- 







LUTHER COLLEGE 



. ^t/ma///7/'///f/L.//^a/-/////w/.^/j/^/'//^^/>Uf//im/y ^/ twenty -second. 
y^/1> ^ Hooember yw^/^/J//J///f///f/JffA//M//m//r/f// . twenty-one, 










A TESTIMONIAL 



CHAPTER EIGHTEEN 

SIXTIETH ANNIVERSARY 

Carlo A. Spkrati 

PREPARATIONS for the Sixtieth Anniversary festivities com- 
menced in earnest as soon as school opened in the fall. Com- 
mittees were elected, meetings were held, plans were laid, and 
faculty and student body were busy as bees on College Hill. Nor 
were friends in the city idle. They rose to the occasion to help 
Luther prepare for the home-coming. P'or, indeed, such it was 
for the many sons and friends of our Alma Mater. 

Nature herself did not forget us. She was very kind during 
the four daj's of festivities. Her best attire, her warm sunny 
smile, her soothing moonlight evenings, helped to make every- 
body happy. The celebration commenced Thursday afternoon of 
October 13th. This day was the late President C. K. Preus' birth- 
day. He would have been 69 years old liad he lived. We missed 
him; but God's thoughts are not our thoughts, neither are our 
ways His ways. Professor Preus had fought a good fight, he had 
finished his course, he had kept the faith. Now he rested from 
his labors, and the crown of righteousness was his. 

It has been the custom in late years that the graduating class 
presents a gift to the College in memory of the class. This year 
Professor Preus had suggested to the class of 1921 that a flag 
pole on the campus would be a very welcome gift. The class 
gladly acted on the suggestion, and so it happened that on the 
13th of October a 95-foot flag pole, with cement foundation, could 
be dedicated. The faculty and this year's students bought a 
beautiful, large, American flag. 

The ceremonies for tlie raising of the flag were simple but 
impressive. The faculty, students, and Luther College Concert 
Band, together with friends from town and those guests who had 
already arrived, gathered around tlie flag })ole. At this occasion 
the Preus family, in reunion for the last time at the president's 
home, was present. The flag was raised to the strains of "The 
Star Spangled Banner". Dr. Oscar L. Olson delivered a brief 
address, in which he jjaid a tribute to President Preus, in whose 
memory the day for the flag-raising liad been chosen, and empha- 



SIXTIETH ANNIVERSARY 



399 



sized the relations of Luther College to our country and our peo- 
ple and the faithfulness of the College to the ideals that are 
symbolized by the Stars and Stripes. After the address the as- 
sembly sang, "My Country, 'Tis of Thee", accompanied bj^ the 
band. This ended the short but very impressive ceremony. 

Guests had already begun to arrive on Wednesday the 12th, 
and on Thursdav evening the hotels were filled. The housincj com- 




FLAG POLE, DEDICATED OCTOBER 13, 1921 

mittee was on hand day and night. Not only were the guests 
that had reported told where to go, but autos were ready to take 
them to their places. 

The festivities proper commenced with the dedication of Koren 
Library Friday afternoon, October 14th. Professor Karl T. Ja- 
cobsen, '02, the college librarian, has an article on "The Library" 
in the anniversary number of "College Chips". He also gives 
"An Addition" in the November number of "Chips '. 

Near the northwest corner of the library was erected a plat- 
form for the speakers of the day. The large audience filled the 
bleachers and the raised seats to the north and those who could 
get no seat gathered around the platform. The Luther College 
Concert Band was seated on the west. 



400 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



At 2:30 the band opened the exercises with a half-liour con- 
cert as a prelude. The band also accompanied all the hymns. 
At 3 : 00 o'clock the hymn : "Thee, God, we praise, Thy name we 
bless", was sung, after which Rev. J. Nordby of the class of '73, 
president of the Eastern District of the Norwegian Lutheran 
Church of America, offered the invocation. 

The opening address was delivered by Hon. J. A. O. Preus, 
'03, governor of Minnesota, son of our late president, C. K. 
Prcus. Governor Preus connected the day and Luther College 
with the great reformer. Dr. Martin Luther. The ideals in gov- 
ernment and religion which Luther laid before the world at the 

Diet at Worms, just four centuries ago, 
in 1521, freedom in state and church, are 
the ideals for which Luther College 
stands. Governor Preus spoke of the 
man for whom the new library building 
was named. He said in part: "Our pur- 
pose on this 1 ith of October is not only 
to celebrate the birthday of Luther Col- 
lege, but also to honor the memory of 
one of the noblest men who came to 
America — Dr. Koren." He portrayed 
the life of this great pioneer, whose sole 
purpose was to serve God. 

After Governor Preus' address fol- 
lowed Koran's hymn: "Ye lands, to the 
Lord make a jubilant noise." Dr. O. 
E. Brandt, '79, vice-president of Luther 
Theological Seminary, St. Paul, Minn., delivered the dedication 
address. Dr. Brandt spoke of Dr. V. Koren as "The Man of the 
Word", and of Professor C. K. Preus as "The Man of the Work". 
"Dr. Brandt gave as the reason for placing the name 'Koren 
Library' on this building that Dr. Koren was of all the pioneers 
the one wlio was most of all interested in books and good literature. 
However, the main reason for thus naming the new library must 
be that Koren's name represents that spirit whicli must govern 
the use of this treasury of books and historic monuments. And 
here, he said, he referred not to Dr. Koren's well known hatred 
of sham in matters educational, but to the thought which is best 
expressed in Dr. Koren's favorite prayer from Psalm 86, 1 1 : 




GOV. J. A. O. PREUS 



SIXTIETH ANNIVERSARY 



401 



'Unite my heart, O God, to fear Thy Name'. Dr. Koren's high- 
est purpose in life was to do honor to the name of God. The 
Word of God was his most highly prized possession, and for him 
all books were of value as they supported or explained the Scrip- 
tures. In this spirit Dr. Koren, the man of the Word, laid the 
foundations of this library in the Scriptures. 

"It was the work of President C. K. Preus to build on this 
foundation the workshop which was being dedicated. Although 
keenly realizing that it was largely due to the efforts of Dr. Lar- 

sen and Prof. Naeseth that Luther 
College has its excellent collection 
of books for which the building was 
erected, still it was given to Prof. 
Preus to complete the work for the 
new building, which it was not his 
lot to see in its finished form. 

"Thereupon Dr. Brandt pro- 
nounced the words of dedication : 
'By the authority- of the Board of 
Trustees of Luther College of the 
Norwegian Lutheran Church of 
America. I now do set apart and 
consecrate this library and museum, 
in memory of Ulrik Vilhelm Koren, 
in gratitude to Christian Keyset 
Preus, to the service of sacred learn- 
DU. o. E. BRANDT j^g jn the spirit of Luther, for the 

advancement of Luther College and the Norwegian Lutheran 
Church of America, and to the glory of God, in the name of the 
Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost.' "* 

These impressive words were followed by the majestic hymn: 
"God's Word is our great heritage". 

Professor J. C. M. Hanson, '82, associate director of the Un- 
iversity of Chicago Libraries and a member of the building com- 
mittee for Koren Library, spoke on the more technical side of the 
library. His remarks, he said, would "deal more directly with 
the library, its past history, present problems, and possible fu- 
ture developments". 

He told of the organization of the private library, properly 
named "Mimer", "for that character in Norse Mythology which 




* Carl W. Strom, '19, in "Decorah Public Opinion." 



402 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



sat at the foot of the oak Ygdrasil and drank wisdom from tlie 
fountain whicli there gushed fortli, and to whom even Odin liad 
to turn wlien in mental perplexity." "Mimer" was later merged 
with the college lihrary. "Tliis." said Professor ILanson, "and 
the gradual acquisition tlirough gift and purchase of some of the 
best works of Scandinavian writers, particularly in literature 
and Iiistory, has resulted in one of the best collections of books 
on the north of Europe to be found anywhere in America". In 
1911- the Bisliop Bang Library was purchased. This was made 

possible through "the generosity of the 
late Mr. Hauman Haugan, a staunch 
friend of the College, and the alert inter- 
est of an honored alumnus, Mr. Laurits 
S. Swenson of Minneapolis, then and 
now U. S. minister to Norway. . . . We 
have, then, in this building today, the 
nucleus of what I believe is destined to 
become the largest and best collection of 
hooks in northern Iowa, and, as far as 
l)Ooks on the Scandinavian North is con- 
cerned, . . . one of the leading collec- 
tions in this country." 

After Professor Hanson's address fol- 
hiwed the doxology : "Praise God, from 
Whom all blessings flow", and the bene- 
diction, pronounced by Rev. I. B. Tor- 
PROF. J. C. M. HANSON rison '79. 

The dedication of Koren Library closed with the "Hallelujah 
Chorus", from Handel's "Messiah", sung by the choir of the First 
Norwegian Lutheran Church of Decorah, accompanied by the 
Concert Band. 

One of the interesting features of the festivities was the re- 
union of Luther College Musical Union. Some brought their own 
instruments and others were supplied from the stock at the College. 
At 4 : 30 they assembled in the College Auditorium to rehearse 
for the concert in the evening. A Reunion Band was organized: 
7 flutes and piccolos, 1 E flat clarinet, 17 B flat clarinets, 1 oboe, 
2 bassoons, 9 saxophones, 20 cornets, 14 horns, 8 trombones, 6 
baritones, 8 tubas, 1 pair of tympani, 8 snare drums, 4 bass drums, 
which, counting the director, made a band of 107 members. It 




SIXTIETH ANNIVERSARY 403 

was a happy group. All were young again although many had 
passed the sixty mark. 

Could they play ? Those who had been skeptical on this point 
found it wise to hold their peace and say nothing. This was no 
trifling band. It was the old-timers that were playing, and 
younger members looked and listened with awe. Not only did 
they show remarkable technic, but they played with such preci- 
sion and feeling that it was an inspiration to the conductor and 
a rare musical treat for the audience. 

At 7:30 the time-honored illumination took place. At the 
tapping of the college bell the Main Building blazed forth in light 
while the Concert Band, according to custom, played the battle 
hymn of the Reformation: "A Mighty Fortress is our God". 
The college motto: "Soli Deo Gloria", shone forth in all its splen- 
dor, as did also the numbers 1861 and 1921. Suddenly the Main 
Building was in darkness and a strong light showed from the 
east, and there was the newly dedicated daughter of the old 
mother building on the hill all lighted and with flood lights play- 
ing on the beautiful structure, shifting to the Luther Statue and 
to the other buildings ; and above all Old Glory, lighted by a 
steady, strong flood light, as it lazily waved with the breeze. The 
light on Old Glory continued when all was darkness on the cam- 
pus. 

After the illumination everybody hurried to the Auditorium. 
The exercises commenced with the singing of that hymn which, 
ever since Dr. Laur. Larsen's days, has marked the opening of 
the 14th of October exercises: "Lad os bede lysets Fader". 

The vocal features of the concert were a solo by Rev. H. B. 
Thorgrimsen, '79, two numbers by the Winneshiek County San- 
gerforbund, Reissiger's "Olaf Trygvason" and Ph. Nicolai's chor- 
ale "Wake, awake, for night is flying", and last "In Flanders 
Fields", with the musical setting by Dr. Adolph O. Aaker, ex-'99, 
of Velva, N. D., and sung by Rev. Ove J. H. Preus, '01, with 
band accompaniment. 

Rev. H. B. Thorgrimsen was one of the foremost singers in 
the former Synod, and although his hair has a silver lining his 
voice is as young and sympathetic as ever. That he pleased the 
audience was evidenced by the hearty applause and the call for 
encore. 

Winneshiek County Sangerforbund sang with precision and 
fine ensemble. Dr. Aaker's composition, played from manuscript, 
is a fine piece of art with a true inspiration. Rev. Ove J. H. 



404 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

Preus, of the class of '01, has a well schooled, sonorous, and pleas- 
ing baritone voice. He sang Dr. Aaker's composition with feel- 
ing and })ower. 

A xylophone solo, "The Mocking-Bird", was given with great 
effect by C. Vittorio Sperati, '25, accompanied by the band. Mr. 
Sperati's xylophone work always makes a hit with the audience. 
This time his xylophone seemed to have a peculiar birdlike ring, 
especially in the strain, "Listen to the Mocking-Bird". Both the 
soloist and the band listened, and they placed softer and softer. 
Some master whistler in the audience had picked up the melody 
with its variations, and the xylophone and band gave a harmon- 
ious background. Dr. Olson helped the audience to discover the 
whistler. He was none other than the governor of Minnesota. 
The applause was loud and long and the audience was not satis- 
fied until Governor Preus appeared on the stage and repeated 
part of the number. He is a former member of the Luther Col- 
lege Concert Band, and his whistling solos with band accompani- 
ment never failed to take the audience by storm. This ended the 
first half of the program. 

In addition to the greetings delivered orally at the sixtieth 
anniversary exercises. Professor O. A. Tingelstad, '05, read tele- 
grams and greetings from friends and alumni who were not able 
to be present. Many greetings contained donations to the build- 
ing fund. There were telegrams or letters from the following: 

Rev. T. Lerud, '10; Prof. C. Tyssen, 'OG; Prof. A. L. Bron- 
stad, '19; Prof. E. R. Larson, '20, Clifton, Texas. Gudmund 
Thorgrimsen, '17; G. A. Fjeldstad, '16, Grand Forks, N. D. The 
Chicago Norwegian Club, by T. A. Siqueland, president, Chicago, 
111. The State Bank of Chicago, by Henry A. Haugan, president, 
Chicago, 111. Prof. J. S. Nordgaard, '8o"; Prof. H. S. Hilleboe, 
'81; Prof. O. A. Solheim, '81; Prof. C. M. Christianson, '81, Sioux 
Falls, S. D. M. E. Remmen, '88; Sven Hanson, '09; E. F. Kiland, 
'17, Hettinger, N. D. National Capital Luther College Club, 
by T. Jahr, '96; S. N. Dahl, '07; G. H. Gerald, '01; O. A. Juve, 
'07; P. C. Paulson, '04, Washington, D. C. P. O. C. Johnson, '06; 
J. E. Strand, '05; O. K. Omlie, '95, Watford City, N. D. John 
M. Brendal, '06, Glenwood, Minn. Missionary Rev. Johannes 
Astrup, '9.3, Mandal, Norway. Rev. C. Hougstad, '93, Wausau, 
Wis. Dr. H. A. Reque, '94, Brooklyn, N. Y. Rev. O. E. Heim- 
dahl, '95, Fir, Wash. Dr. and Mrs. S. N. Hagen, '96, Gettys- 
burg, Pa. Rev. O. J. Ordal, '98, Everett, Wash. Dr. J. A. O. 
Stub, '98, Minneapolis, Minn. Rev. Alfred Hendrickson, '06; 
Rev. T. L. Roslioldt, '99; and Carl Rosholdt, '06, Wolf Point, Mont. 



SIXTIETH ANNIVERSARY 405 

The Greater New York Ministerial Conference, by Rev. Helmer 
Halvorson, '04, pres.; Rev. A. O. Bjerke, ex. '02, sec. Rev. G. A. 
Hanson, '05, Goodridge, Minn. Dr. C. Fjeldstad, '05, Minneap- 
olis, Minn. H. O. Saxvik, '05; Joseph Lee, '18; Harald Tolo, '21; 
L. C. Sorlien, '21, Wahpeton, N. D. Prof. Herman C. Nordlie, 
'06, Fargo, N. D. Rev. E. Struxness, '06; Rev. J. C. Wisnaes, '09; 
Rev. V. F. Larson, '11; C. P. Birkelo, '17, Nome, N. D. Rev. J. 
W. Rosholdt, '07, Crosby, N. D. Rev. K. B. Vaaler, '10; Elmer A. 
Peterson, Brandt, S. D. Rev. A. N. Livdahl, '11, Glasgow, Mont. 
Prof. Enoch E. Peterson, '12, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Rev. O. J. 
Mithun, '15, Anaconda, Mont. Rev. and Mrs. J. Magnus Rohne, 
Cambridge, Mass. Prof. Roy O. Storvick, '21, Canton, S. D. The 
California Circuit of the Norw. Luth. Church of America, by Rev. 
E. M. Stensrud, '93, pres.; Rev. N. B. Thorpe, '14, sec, Santa 
Barbara. Herman L. Ronnei, '15, St. Francis, Minn. Augustana 
College and Normal School, Sioux Falls, S. D., by Dr. Albert 
Keiser, sec. Faculty and Students, Lutheran Normal School, Can- 
ton, S. D. Gale College, Galesville, Wis., by Prof. H. F. Swan- 
sen, '14, and Rev. L. S. J. Reque, '94. Lutheran Ladies' Semin- 
ary Corporation, Red Wing, Minn., by Dr. C. L. Opsal, pres. 
Red Wing Seminary, by Prof. H. E. Jorgensen, pres. St. Olaf 
College, Northfield, Minn., by Dr. L. W. Boe, pres. The Symra 
Society, Decorah, Iowa, by J. B. Wist and J. A. Nelson. Rev. 
O. H. Smeby, '71, Albert Lea, Minn. Prof. O. G. Felland, '74; 
Prof. Olav Lee, '83; Prof. I. F. Grose, '85, St. Olaf College, 
Northfield, Minn. K. G. Faegre, '77, New York, N. Y. Dr. Laur- 
itz Larsen, '02, New York, N. Y. Rev. J. O. Hougen, '79, Story 
City, Iowa. Rev. and Mrs. K. Seehuus, '81, Denver, Colo. Dr. L. 
Hektoen, '83, Chicago, 111. Rev. J. H. Jahren, '84, Lake Park, 
Minn. Prof. J. G. Halland, '84; Prof. P. J. Iverson, '10; Nels 
Brevig, G. N. Livdahl, Fargo, N. D. Dr. J. A. Ness, '84, Spring- 
field, Ohio. Dr. C. A. Mellby, '88, Christiania, Norway. The Ice- 
landic Lutheran Synod, by Rev. N. S. Thorlaksson, '81, pres. 
Windom Circuit of the Norw. Luth. Church of America, by Rev. 
L. P. Thorkveen, pres., and Rev. P. C. Danielson, sec. President 
J. N. Brown, Canton, S. Dak. 

After the reading of greetings the Alumni Association pre- 
sented the College with a "rouser" song written by Norvald G. 
Maakestad, '21, and Arthur J. Tolo, '18. Copies of the song 
were distributed among the students, and with the composer, Mr. 
Maakestad, at the piano it was sung with a "pep" and a "go" 
which proved that the song will be popular with the students. 

The last part of the evening's program was given over to the 



406 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

Reunion Band. Suppe's "Poet and Peasant" overture, Drdla's 
"Serenade", and several marches were played. The applause was 
spontaneous and the enthusiasm ran high. One veteran player 
was heard to say: "This has made me many years younger." The 
program closed with the hymn: "Tak, vor Fader i det h0ie". 
This has been the regular closing hymn at 14th of October pro- 
grams, just as "I^ad os bede lysets Fader" has marked the open- 
ing of the exercises. 

Saturday morning, October IStli, at 8:00 o'clock, chapel ex- 
ercises were held in the Auditorium for students and alumni. Rev. 
I. D. Ylvisaker, '88, president of the North Dakota District of the 
Norwegian Lutheran Church of America, conducted the service 
and chose for his text Psalm 19: 1, 2, 11-14. 

At 9:00 o'clock the Luther College Alumni Association met in 
the college chapel for its annual business meeting. The .time 
proved very short for the amount of business on hand. However, 
several important resolutions were passed. Rev. I. B. Torrison, 
'79, presided. It was resolved to push with all possible vigor the 
campaign for a new gymnasium. A committee was placed in charge 
of this work. The executive committee's buying of tlie so-called 
Dayton property immediately south of the campus, with another 
baseball diamond in view, was approved. A resolution was passed 
in favor of a Memorial Chapel. Dr. H. G. Stub brought greetings 
to the alumni from the Board of Education of our Church. Great 
satisfaction was shown when the announcement was made that a 
financial secretary for Luther College had been nominated by the 
Board of Education. 

Immediately after this meeting the assembly passed out of 
the chapel by classes and formed on the campus where a very good 
photograph of the Alumni Association was taken. 

The reunion meeting of the Musical Union was scheduled for 
10:00 in the college chapel and the class reunions for 11 :00 o'clock. 
Both of these meetings were of necessity late in starting on ac- 
count of the morning's previous important business. The meeting 
of the Musical Union had to be cut short, but was, nevertheless, of 
the greatest importance for the future welfare of the Union. It 
was resolved that all who have at any time belonged to a musical or- 
ganization at I-uthor College are members of the Musical Union. 
It was furtlier resolved that the members contribute one dollar a 
year towards securing the memorial pipe-organ for the college 
chapel which the Musical Union in 1916 decided to build in memory 
of Olaf Angelo Sperati. The need of a music hall was also dis- 
cussed. 



SIXTIETH ANNIVERSARY 407 

The class reunions were held as indicated on the regular printed 
program of the festivities. Many classes used this opportunity to 
lunch together, and several classes had invitations to private 
homes. 

At one o'clock the Reunion Band assembled in front of Laur. 
Larsen Hall, ready for parade, and a photograph was taken. The 
Deccrah Commercial Club had arranged for automobiles to take 
the band to town. The parade formed at the west end of Water 
Street, and the band, 110 in line, with Rev. S. L. Tallakson, '06, 
acting as drum major, was an imposing sight as it paraded through 
the business section to the stirring music of "snappy" marches. The 
streets were lined with appreciative people. Dr. Laur. A. Larsen, 
'86, and Carlo A. Sperati, '88, had the pleasure of once more play- 
ing snare drum side by side. It was reported that neither of them 
shirked on the job. It was not their fault that no drumheads were 
broken. 

At 2:00 o'clock the football game between St. Olaf College and 
Luther College was staged on the gridiron. It was a hard fought 
battle throughout. A touchdown and a drop kick in the last quarter 
made the score 10 to in favor of St. Olaf. At 4:30 a rehearsal 
of the two cantatas to be sung Sunday was held in the college 
chapel. 

The climax on Saturday was the alumni banquet at 7:00 
o'clock in the College Auditorium. The hall was beautifully dec- 
orated and covers were laid for 500 guests. The College Orchestra 
furnished music during the meal. The committee in charge had ar- 
ranged the seating by classes. The officers of the association and 
the speakers of the evening were seated at a special table on the 
stage. Rev. A. O. Johnson, '91, retiring president of the associa- 
tion, acted as toastmaster. He deemed it an honor to fulfill such a 
duty at this occasion. He used a gavel from the Viking ship of 
1893 presented to the museum by Dr. George A. Torrison, '85, of 
Chicago. 

Dr. H. G. Stub, '66, represented the first class that graduated 
from Luther College, not because he was president of the Nor- 
wegian Lutheran Church of America, but because he was now the 
only one out of his class in the service of the church. He knew 
how deeply the love for Luther College was rooted in the hearts of 
our congregations. He testified to how much the College had ac- 
complished in its sixty years of existence. 

Judge O. M. Torrison, '81, said that Luther should continue 
to concentrate on a special course and be the classical school of 
the Middle West as Amherst is in the East. It should remain a 



408 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

college for men, but we should also have a college for women, and 
co-educational schools. The interest in music should continue and 
should be given credit toward graduation. 

Rev. N. Astrup Larsen, '96, spoke on the motto of his class 
— "Esse non videri." This expresses also the spirit of Luther Col- 
lege — to be, not to seem to be. It necessitates both a forward look 
and lo^-alty to the past. 

Rev. Norman A. Madson, '11, pictured the pioneer homes of 
our forefathers. "Luther College," he said, "is the offspring of 
horny-handed labor, begotten of faith, reared in love and hope" 
.... She "could, no doubt, have been a more imposing insti- 
tution today, had she but chosen to deviate from the path marked 
out for her by her founders. But I doubt that she could have 
served more well." 

Prof. E. Hove, '84, of Luther Theological Seminary, spoke of 
the close connection between Luther College and the Seminary. 
A powerful address. 

Hon. L. S. Swenson, '86, United States minister to Norway, 
gave a beautiful tribute to the memory of the late President C. K. 
Preus. (Given in full in the Preus Memorial volume, pp. 233-234.) 

Dr. Oscar L. Olson, '93, acting president of Luther College, 
spoke of what the institution had in property, in courses, in fa- 
culty, in student body. He outlined what new buildings were 
needed. The College has a higli standard in scholarship, and this 
standard must be maintained. 

After these inspiring addresses, the assembly was asked to rise 
in honor of the late Peer O. Str0mme, '76. Likewise in honor of 
the widows surviving former Luther College professors who had 
died in recent years, namely Mrs. Laur. Larsen, Mrs. L. S. Reque, 
Mrs. C. A. Naeseth, and Mrs. C. K. Preus. Greetings were sent 
to Rev. J. W. Preus, '82, of Calmar, Iowa, who was prevented 
from being present by sudden illness. 

Sunday morning, October 16th, people awoke to the most glor- 
ious of the four days of the Sixtieth Anniversary festivities. Auto- 
mobiles arrived from far and near. At 8 :30 the Sixtieth Annivers- 
ary Cantata was rehearsed in the Auditorium. At 10:30 divine 
services were held in the Auditorium in Norwegian. The building 
could not accommodate the great throng. Therefore an overflow 
meeting was conducted under the college oaks by Professor E. 
Hove. 

Faculty, students, and alumni formed in front of the Main 
Building and marched in procession to the Auditorium. Luther 



SIXTIETH ANNIVERSARY 409 

College Concert Band played, as a prelude, Schumann's "Festival 
Overture." 

Rev. H. B. Thorgrimsen conducted the altar services, and the 
band accompanied and led in the hymns. 

Dr. H. G. Stub, president of the Norwegian Lutheran Church 
of America, preached at the service in the Auditorium. He based 
his sermon on the 87th Psalm. Dr. Stub shovi'ed how Luther Col- 
lege by its founders had been built on the Lord, and how in its 
subsequent sixty years of service it has always been able to say 
with the Psalmist, "All my springs are in Thee." 

When Luther College was founded it was to serve two purposes. 
It was to become a sound and thorough institution for instruction 
in secular subjects, but above all it was to train students prepara- 
tory to taking up theology. Both of these aims have been main- 
tained by its two presidents, Larsen and Preus. Dr. Stub an- 
swered the question. What has the future in store for Luther 
College ? In the first place, it must continue to be an up-to-date 
standard college. There must be no eifort to reduce it to the 
rank of a junior college, as has been the fate of many denomina- 
tional colleges in America. Luther College must be an American 
college, but must at the same time continue to be the preserver 
of Norwegian culture in this country. Literary and artistic in- 
terests must continue to flourish, and must not be displaced by an 
interest in physical development. But above allj it must continue 
to be a Christian and a Lutheran college. Therefore, the faculty 
must be composed of Christian as well as learned men. All the 
work of the College must in the last analysis be conducted accord- 
ing to the Word of God. 

After the sermon an offering was taken both in the Auditorium 
and at the overflow meeting to defray expenses in connection 
with the festivities. This offering amounted to $800.00. 

Immediately after the offering the "Sixtieth Anniversary Can- 
tata" was given by a chorus of 150 voices under the direction of 
Professor Carlo A. Sperati, '88. The words were written by Rev. 
Paul Koren, '82, in compliance with a request made by President 
Preus a short time before his death. The music was composed by 
Prof. John Dahle of Luther Seminary. Mr. Ingolf Grindeland, 
ex-' 12, sang the tenor solo parts in pleasing and artistic style. Os- 
car J. Strom, '24, and Arthur M. Wisness, '14, were the accom- 
panists on piano and organ respectively. The large chorus ren- 
dered with enthusiasm the inspiring text and music, and at the 
close the audience showed its appreciation by according writer 
and composer a rising vote of thanks. 



410 LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 

In the afternoon an opportunity was afforded to representa- 
tives of other institutions to bring their greetings in oral form. 
Rev. O. Glesne opened the meeting with invocation. President M. 
O. B0ckman, representing I.uther Theological Seminary, described 
the course of study at Luther College as the most ideal for those 
who intend to enter the ministry, and gave thanks to God for the 
firm attitude of faithfulness which Luther College has always 
maintained as to the means of Grace and as to the motto, "It is 
written." On this occasion Luther College w^as honored by the 
presence of Dr. F. G. Gade of Norway, president of Nordmands- 
forbundet. He had landed in America but a few days previously, 
and had cancelled several other important engagements to be pres- 
ent at the Sixtieth Anniversary festivities. He brought an oral 
greeting from His Majesty King Haakon VII and a written greet- 
ing from the University of Christiania. Rev. H. C. Holm, presi- 
dent of the Iowa District of our Clmrch, brought greetings from 
the Church Council. Rev. Edward Johnson, representing the 
Board of Education, alluded to the generous contribution of Luther 
College to tlie ministry of the Church. President L. W. Boe pre- 
sented the felicitations of St. Olaf College, and termed that insti- 
tution a child of Luther College. President J. A. Aasgaard repre- 
sented Concordia College of Moorhead, Minn., and President C. 
O. Solberg of Augustana College and Normal School of Sioux 
Falls, S. D. Dr. T. Stabo of Decorah spoke on behalf of the 
Board of Trustees of Luther College, thanking the people of our 
Church for their support of this institution. 

In the evening a closing concert was given in the Auditorium 
by the Sixtieth Anniversary Chorus, under the leadership of Prof. 
Carlo A. Sperati. Felix Mendelssohn's sacred cantata, "Hymn of 
Praise", was sung with truly inspiring effect. The soloists were: 
Mrs. L. A. Moe, soprano; Mrs. A. M. Rovelstad, alto; Mr. 
Ingolf Grindeland, tenor. It was a very fitting closing to 
the Sixtieth Anniversary festivities. The hearts of the great 
audience seemed carried away by the chorus into one grand out- 
burst of praise to God for His gracious protection and guidance 
throughout these sixty years. 



CHAPTER NINETEEN 

GRADUATES 

M. H. Trytten 
I. Occupational Index (1921-22) 



(Listing all graduates up to and includ- 
ing the class of 1921.) 

1. FARMERS (32) 

Olsen, EUef, '66, Kirley, S. D. 
Hoff, L. M. A., '75, Madison, Minn. 
Jorgenson, Christian, '75, East Stanwood, 

Wash. 
Ruste, Erick O., '76, Humboldt, S D. 
Evenson, Edwin, '79, Seattle, Wash. 
Karstad, Lars, '80, Nicollet, Minn. 
Ylvisaker, A. Chr., '81, Zumbrota, Minn. 
Langemo, H. T., '83. Badger, Minn. 
Aubol, Carl O., '83, Big Lake. Minn. 
Eden, Martin P , '92, Lee, 111. 
Landsverk, John P., '95, Saude, Iowa. 
Lyngaas, Ingeman M., '97, Winneconne, 

Wis. 
Aarnes, Sam H., '98, Sacred Heart. Minn. 
Dahlen, Fred, '98, Hayfleld, Minn. 
Tasa, Gilbert, '99, Dennison, Minn. 
Burtness, Peter, '00. Cook, Minn. 
Fuglie, A. Edwin, '01, Ashbv. Minn. 
Dahlen, Theo. A., '03, Wendell, Minn. 
Hovde, Rudolph, '03, Glenwood, Minn. 
Strand, Herman, '05, New London, Minn. 
Monson, Martin J., '08. Delhi, Minn. 
Naeseth, Adolph O., '09, Zumbrota, Minn 
Storstad, Alfred G., '12, Horace, N. D. 
Brunsdaie, C. Norman, '13, Portland, N. 

D.. Farm Manager. 
Brunsdaie, G. Elmer, '13, Mayville, N D. 
Gulbrandson, Cleon, '13, Haywaru, Minn. 
Levorson, Oscar, '14, Lake Mills, low.i. 
Askegaard, Arthur D., '15, Comstock, 

Minn. 
Seebach, Carl H., '15, Goodhue, Minn. 
Subey, Ward A., '15. Stoughton, Wis. 
Dolen, Nels B., '20, Leland, Iowa. 
Bergum, Arthur E., '21, Rio, W'is. 

2. MANUFACTURERS (2) 

Faegre, Kaspar G., '77, President Man- 
hattan Corset Co., New York, N. Y. 
Markhus, George. '85, Violin Manufac- 
turer, St. Paul, Minn. 

3. PROFESSIONAL SERVICE (485) 
a. Clergymen and Missionaries (262) 

Normann, Olaus A., '66, Ashby, Minn., 

Emeritus. 
Sherven, Lars, '68, Los Angeles, Cal., 

Emeritus. 
Alfsen, Adolph O., '69, Chicago, 111., 

Emeritus. 
Lunde, Gudbrand A., '69, WMttenberg, 

Wis., Emeritus. 
Bj0rgo, Knut, '70, Red Wing, Minn , 

Emeritus. 
Smeby, Oluf H., '71, Albert Lea, Minn., 

Emeritus. 



Gotaas, Paul B., '73> St0ren, Norway. 
Hustvedt, Halvor B., '73, Decorah, Iowa, 

Emeritus. 
Roalkvam, Halvard G., '74, Coon Valley, 

AVis., Emeritus. 
Hendrickson, Peter A., '76, Bowdon, N. 

D. 
Strand, Henrik J., '76, Norway Lake, 

Minn., Emeritus. 
Blilie, Johan A.. '77. Flr>ndreau. S. D. 
Brandt, Realf O., '77, Macfarland, WMs. 
Grpnsberg, Ole N., '77, San Francisco, 

Cal. 
Johansen, Jens, '77, Fresno, Cal. 
Botline, Johannes D., '78, Pequot, Minn. 
Engh, Hagbart, '78,. Ostrander, Minn. 
Gjevre, Anders H., '78, Minneapolis, 

Minn., Jewish Missionary 
Homme, Thorleif O., '78, Hornnes, isae- 

tersdalen. Norwav. 
Lee, Atle J., '78, Deerfleld, Wis., Eme- 
ritus. 
L0kensgaard, Ole, '78, Hanley Falls, 

Minn. 
Giere, Niels, '79, Sacred Heart, Minn. 
Hougen, Johan O., '79, Tacoma, Wash., 

Emeritus. 
Skartvedt, Peter, '79, La Center, Wash. 
Skyberg, Hans O., '79, Fisher, Minn. 
Storli, Knut O., '79, Eugene, Ore., Em- 

ei-itus 
Thorgrimsen, Hans, '79, Grand Forks, 

N. D. 
Torrison, Isaac B., '79, Decorah, Iowa. 
Halvorson, Jobs., '80, Rockdale. Wis. 
J0rgenson, Fingar, '80, Grand Forks, N. 

D., Emeritus. 
Larsen, Gustav A., '80, Edmore, N. D 
Ness, Johannes M. O., '80, Perley, Minn. 
Saettre, Thorbjrtrn A., '80. Evansville, 

Minn. (Died July 12, 1921.) 
Bergman, Fredrik, '81, Winnipeg, Man., 

Can. 
Braaten, Sven O., '81, Thompson, N. D. 
Kasberg, Karl A., '81, Grantsburg, Wis. 
Rygh, George A. Taylor, '81, Minneapolis, 

Minn. 
Seehuus, Knut, '81, Denver, Colo. 
Jerdee, Lars J., '82, Bemidji, Minn. 
Koren, Paul, '82, Decorah, Iowa. 
Preus, Johan W., '82, Calmar, Iowa. 
Rogne, Erik T., '82, Spokane, Wash. 
Rygg, Oluf S., '82, Rudyard, Mont. 
Langemo, John T., '83, Edinburgh, N. D. 
Larsen, Christian M., '83, Whalan, Minn. 
Magelssen, Hans, '83. Walker, Minn. 
Larsen, Thorvald H., '84. Taylor, N. D. 
Vik, Eivind O., '84, La Crosse, Wis. 
Kvaase, Daniel J., '85, Chicago, 111. 
Lien, Abel E., '85, Portland, N. D. 
J0rgenson, Jacob E., '86, Decorah, Iowa. 
Ovri, Ellend J., '86, San Diego, Cal. 



412 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



. I DEO GUOf., 

0MjNJ3U5 >J/\3 Urtt'dAzj LiCtUfiJS S^MU'r^M. 



im 






Peterson, S. Christian N., '86, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 



8, Faribault, Minn. 
, Ridsewav. Iowa. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Fjeldstad. Halvor O., 
Jordahl, Daniel C, 
KittiLsbv, Peter A., 'S 
Levorson, John, '88, Irene, S. D. 
Rikansrud, Glaus T., '88, El Paso, Texas. 
Beito. Gulbrand G.. '89. Terrace. Minn. 
Lunde, Joh-mnes H., '89. Huxlev. Iowa. 
Ottersen, Ole, '89, West Salem, Wis. 
Strarul, John J., '89, St Peter, Minn. 
Vereide, Ole M.. '8!t. Elmore. Minn. 
Kvale. Ole J.. '9<i, Benson. Minn. 
Linnevold, Jolinn, '9ii, Glenwood. Minn. 
.Solum, Henry E., '9ii. Baltic, .S. D. 
Tolo, Thore O., '90, L.ocust, Iowa. 
Gimmestad, Lars M., '91, Orfordville. Wis. 



'91, Spring Grove, 
'91. Mankato. Minn. 



John.son, Alfred 0. 

Minn. 
N'ord^aard, Nils N.. 
Strom. Eimar I., '91, Watson. Minn. 
Berp, Nils I., '92. Deering:. N. D. 
Blaekkan, Ingebret J , '92, Coeur d'Alenc 

Idaho. 
Christen.sen, Martin A., '92, Portland 

Ore. 
Reque. Slpr%'ard T., '92, St. Paul, Minn. 
Rue, Halvor S., '92, Prairie Farm, Wis 
Thoen, Jacob E.. '92. Oklee. Minn. 
Xavier. Karl, '92, Thompson. Iowa. 
Akrc, Ole J , '9.'t, Hinsdale, Mont. 
Astrup, Jolrinnes, '9.'t, Untunjaml)ili, Na 

tal. South .Africa. 
Bestul, Christian B., '9."}, Ettrick, Wis. 
D0ving, Carl, '93, Chicago, 111. 



Hougstad, Christian. '93. Merrill, Wis. 
Otte, Heinrich, '93, Kwahlabisa, Zululand, 

South Africa. 
Stensrud, Edward M., '93, San Francisco, 

Cal. 
Waller. Martinus C, '93. Eau Claire, Wis. 
Juul, Otto G., '94, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Kvamme. Kristen, '91, Ossian, Iowa. 
.Moldstad, John A., '94, Chicago. III. 
Ke(|ue, Lauritz S. J , '94, Galesville, Wis. 
Haatvedt, Lars A., '9.5, Lakota, N. D. 
'9.5, Fir, Wa.sh. 
M , '95, Maddock, N. 



Nicolaus, '9.5, Fergus 
'96, Minneapolis, 



Heimdahl. Olaf E 
Orwoll, Sylvester 

D. 
Ylvisaker, S. J. 

Falls. Minn. 
Anderson, Christian 

Minn. 

Clauson, Carl T., '96, Bloomer, Wis. 
Halvorsen. Nils E., '96, Ali)ena. Midi, 
.luul. Martin B., '96, Minneapolis. Minn. 
Larsen, Nikolai Astrup, '96, Kwangcliow, 

Honan. China 
Olsen. Holdcn M., '96, Madi.son. Wis. 
Hallanger, Christopher M., '97, Portland, 

N. I). 
Lunde. Amund G., '97, Great Falls, Mont. 
Nonnann, S. Theodor, '97, St. Paul, Minn. 
S(^renson, Andrew, '97. Bigley, Minn. 
Stnim, Oscar A.. '97, Cleveland. O. 
Thompson, Christian S., '97. Colfax, Wis. 
Unseth. Joseph B., '97, Waterville, Iowa. 
Boyd, Edwin A., '98, Manitowoc, Wis. 
.lohnson, John L., '98. Wakonda, S. D 
Ordal, Zakarias J., '98, River Falls, Wis. 



GRADUATES 



413 




414 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Ring0en, Tlieodor, '!)8, Stevens Point, 

Wis. 
Swenson, Bernt C, '98, Gary, Ind. 
Turma, Olaf, '98, Brndish. Nebr 
Wein, Hans J., '98, Winona, Minn. 
Johnson, Wilford A., '99, Capron, 111. 
Kilness, Peter .1., '99, Marcus, S. D. 
Rosholdt. Thore L., '99, Ophelm, Mont. 
Turino, Stcner, '99, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Boe, Ole T , '00, Gran<l Meadow, Minn. 
Dahle, John 0., 'on, Nekoma. N. U. 
Hellekson, Oscar C, 'OO, Newman Grove, 

Nebr. 
Hestenes, Jacob M., '00, Waterford, Wis. 
Kilness, Julius B., '00, Mecklins, S. I). 
Normann, H tlvor M., 'on. C-osco. Iowa 
Olafson, Kristinn K., '00, Mountain, N. 

D. 
Strom. Axel E., '00, Battle Lake, Minn. 
Stub. Hans A., 'no. Seattle, Wash. 
Sundby, G. Adolph, '00, Rio, Wis. 
White, Andrew U, 'on, Manitowoc, Wis. 
Berven, Sven K., 'oi. Spring Valley, Minn. 
Dreng, John O., 'ni, St. Paul, Minn. 
Gutteb0, Lauritz S., 'oi, Deerfleld, Wis. 
Preus, Ove J. H . '01. De Forest. Wis. 
Sauer, Carl I., '01, Crosby, N. D. 
Eger, Olaf. 'n2, Seattle, Wash. 
Preus, J. Carl K., 'n2. Byron, Minn. 
Smeby, Hartwick C, 'n2, lola. Wis. 
Bergh, Axel, '03, Tracy, Minn. 
Blicher, Peter, '03, Boyceville, Wis. 
Borge, Olaf, '03, Lawrence, Wiisli. 
Gullixson. Thaddaeus F., '03, Minot, \ D. 
Hansen, Emil, 'n3, Scirville, Iowa. 
Ingebritson, Henry, '03, Lake Mills, Iowa. 
Naeseth, Careli\is G., '03, Morrisonville, 

Wis. 
Nelson, Alfred. '03, Madison. S. 1). 
Norgaard. Carl H., '03, Everett, Wa.sh. 
Olsen. Harry E., 'n3, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Thorpe, C Scriver, 'ns, Minne 'polis, Minn. 
Tweten, Jacob O., 'n3. Steward, III. 
Ullensvang, Lars L., 'ns, Bulyea, Sask., 

Can. 
Baalson, Hermnn E., '04, Silvana, Wash. 
Estrem, Herman W., '04, Pelican Rapids, 

Minn. 
Halverson, Melvin AV., '04, Beloit, Wis. 
Halvorson, Helmer, '04, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Hoff, Thoralf A.. '04. Minneapolis, Minn. 
Lund, Lauritz P.. '04, Luverne, Minn. 
Moldstad, Christian A., '04, Jamaica 

Plain, Mass. 
Quill, Carl J., '04, Renville, Minn. 
Bredesen, Alfred, '0.5, Bricelyn, Minn. 
Fretheim, Martin E., '05, Chicago, III. 
Hanson, Gustav A.. '05, Belgrade, Minn. 
Hegg, Gustav J., 'n5. Wil('>-n---A M li 
Johnson, Bergel A., '05, Hayfleld, Minn. 
Wulfsberg, Jacob A. O., 'n.'), Michig..n, 

N D. 
BruLind. Peter O., '08, San Franci.sco, Cal. 
Christopherson, Einar B., '00, Pigeon 

Falls, Wis. 
Estrem, G. Rudolph, 'nO, Cooperstovvn, N. 

D. 
Hendrickson. Alfred. 'Of>, Wolf Point, 

Mont. rCarpio, N. D., 1922.) 
Johnson, Joseph, '06, Jamestown. N. D. 
Struxne.ss, Edwart, 'OC, Nome, N. D 
Tallakson, Selmer L., '00, Grand Forks, 

N. D. 
Wrolstad, J. Oliver, 'no. Granite Falls, 

Minn. 
Belgum, Anton H., '07, Glenwood, Minn. 
Belgum, Erik S., '07, Appleton, Minn. 



Fretheim, Severt J., '07, Scarville, Iowa. 
F0rde, Gerhard O., '07, Starbuck. Minn. 
Rosholdt, Jacob W., '07, Crosby, N. D. 
Smcby, Olaf V., '07, Mission Hill, S. D. 
Sumstad, M. Ovedius, '07, Roland, Iowa. 
Vaaler, Arnt J , '07, Willmar, Minn. 
Borge, Daniel J., '08, Deerfleld, Wis. 
Haugen, Clarence, '08, Canby, Minn. 
Holum, James O., '08, Westby, Wis. 
Kjorlaug, Peter F., '08, Thor, Iowa. 
Korsrud, .Mbert C '08, Glenville, Minn. 
Lillegard, George 0., '08, Ichang, Hupeh, 

Ciiina. 
Naeseth, William K., '08, Rochester, Minn. 
Ensrud, Joseph O. E., '09, Garske, N. D. 
Faye, Christopher, '09, Untunjambili, 

Natal, South Africa. 
Haugen, Thomas A., '09. McHenry, N. D. 
Magelssen, Finn, '09, Rushford, Minn. 
Salvesen, Emil, 'n9, Barnesville, Minn. 
Wisnaes, John Carlot, 'n9, Kathryn, N D. 
Ylvisaker, Nils W., 'n9, Hitterdal, Minn. 
Jordahl, Edward L., '10, Bryant, S. D. 
Lerud, Theodore, '10, Clifton, Texas. 
Preus, H. A., 'lo, Chicago. 111. 
Rognlien, Joseph B., 'in, Campbell, Nebr. 
Sandager, Christian N., '10, Outlook, Sask., 

Can. 
Tufte, Olaf B., '10, Glendive, Mont. 
Vaaler, Knut B., 'in. Brandt, S. D. 
Aaberg, Theodore, '11, Westby, Mont. 
Aal, Eugene J , '11, Huron, S. D. 
Johnshov, J. Walter, '11, Eau Claire, 

Wis. 
Larson, Victor F., '11, Valley City, N. D. 
Livdahl, Albert N., '11, Glasgow, Mont. 
Madson, Norman A., '11, Bode, Iowa. 
Quill, Martin B, '11, Waco, Texas. 
Sandberg. Ivar, '11, Barrett, Minn. 
Austin, Otto G., '12, Sisseton, S. D. 
Foss, Carl I-., '12, Parkland, Wash. 
Greibrok, Aanon, '12, Woodworth, N. 1) 
Haavik, Olai L.. '12, Seattle, Wa.sh. 
Forseth, Pcder C, '13, New Era, Mich 
Kjaer, Ludvig P., 13, Plentvwood, Mont. 
Nesset, Alfred O., '13, Leeds, N. D. 
Petersen, Justin A., '13, Linn Grove, 

Iowa. 
Ulvilden. Reinhardt, '13, Omaha, Nebr. 
Andrews, Melvin O., '14, Wheaton, Minn 
Borlaug, Arthur O., '14, E<lnionton, Al- 
berta, Can. 
Gigstad, Walter T., '14, Beach. N. D. 
Grefthen. Emil A., '14. Providence. K. I. 
Halvorson, E. Nestor, 'It, Galesburg, 

Wis. 
Thorpe, Nordahl B., '14, Santa Barbara, 

C<l. 
Wanberg, Richard T., '14, Towner, N. U. 
Baal.son, Elmer A., '15, Durand, III. 
Hoff, Pernell B., '1.5, Los Angele.s, Cal. 
Maakestad, J. W^alter B., '15, Pasadena, 

Cal. 
Mitliun, Odd J., '15. Anaconda, Mont. 
Romne.ss. Henry R., '15, Jersey City, 

N. J. 
Topness, Sibert M., '15, Red Wing, Minn. 
Lecjue, Nils M., '10, South Bend, Wa.sh. 
Losen, Carl, '10, Astoria, Oregon. 
Rosenqvist. Rolf, '10, Nerstrand, Minn, 
invilden, George, '10, Toronto. S. D. 
Amundson, Alfred H.. '17, Gully, Minn. 
Andersen, Andrew P., '17, Owatonna, 

Minn. 
Evans, Leif E., '17, La Crosse. Wis. 
Hansen, Harold, '17, Washburn, N. D. 
Hexom, Wilhelm T., '17, Virginia, Minn. 



GRADUATES 



415 




THE CLASS OF 18G6 AFTER 15 YEAKS 
H G. Stub Ellef Olsen I. E. Bergh (tl905) 

R. B. Anderson O. A. Nermann G. Erdahl (tl9l4) 

T. 0. Juve (tl913) L. J. Markhus (tl885) 



416 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Kraabel, Alf M., '17. Fessenden, N. D. 
Lee, Clarence L., '17, Redtield, S. D. 
Lono, Mikkel, '17, Kasson, Minn. 
Moe, Sig:urd M., '17, Clinton, Minn. 
Narum, Hartvig K., '17, Faulkton, S. D. 
Rotto, Theodore I., '17, Ken.siiig:ton, Minn. 
Preus, ,latol) Hjort, '17, Strum, Wis. 
Tolo, G. Walther. '17. Noonan, N. D. 
Ylvisaker, Carl B., '17, Nortlnvood, Iowa. 
Stornio, Carl A., '18, Roseau, Minn. 
\Va.age, K. Olav. '18, Little Fork, Minn. 

OFFICERS OF THE CHURCH 

Stub, Hans G., '6G, President Xorwegian 
Lutheran Church of America, St. Paul. 
Minn. 

Harstad, Bjug, '71, President Norwegian 
Synod of the American Evangelical 
Lutheran Church. Parkland. Wash. 

Nordby, Jvirgen, '73, President Eastern 
District, N. L. C. A., Deerfleld, Wis. 

Eggen, Thore, '79, Executive Secretary 
Lutheran Brotherhood, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

Thorlaksson, Nils. '81. President Icelandic 
Synod, West Selkirk, Man., Can. 

Boe. Nils N., '80, President South Dakota 
District, N. L. C. A., Sioux Falls, S. D. 

Ylvisaker, Ivar D., '88, President North 
Dakota District N. L. C. A., Fargo, 
N. D. 

Gullixon, George A.. '90, President Nor- 
wegian Synotl of the American Evan- 
gelical Lutheran Church, Chicago. 111. 
(Succeeding B. Harstad, Aug. 1, 1922 ) 

Stub. Jacob A. O., '98, President Lutheran 
Brotherhood of America, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

Larsen, Lauritz, '02, President National 
Lutheran Council, New York, N. Y. 

Ylvisaker. Nils M.. '02. Executive Secre- 
tary Young People's Luther League, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

b. DRAFTSMAN (1) 
Backerud, Martin B., '08, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

c. EDITORS AND AUTHORS (10) 

Anderson. Rasmus B., '66, Amerika, Mad- 
ison, Wis. 

Bergh, Hallvard, '7fi, Lomen, Valdres, 
Norway. (Died May. 1922.) 

Eikeland, Peder J., '80, Mack, Minn. 

Mikkelsen, Michael A., '86, Architectural 
Record, New York, N. Y. 

Lee. Gustav T.. '88, Lutheran Church 
Herald, Minneapolis. Minn. 

Anderson, Isaac, '90, Mountain Lakes, 

N. .r. 

Saervold. Ola J.. '9.5. Minneapolis, Minn 
Savre, Bertinius K.. '96. Glenwood, Minn. 
Kalnes. I. Magnus, '07. Alexandria. Minn. 
Kvale, Paul J., '17, Minneapolis, Minn. 

d. LAWYERS (2.3) 
Aubolce. Mads O., '84, San Diego, Cal. 
Thuland, Conrad M., '85, San Diego. Cal 
Remnien. Martin V... '88. Hettinger, N. D. 
Dahlen. Knut T., '01. Minneapolis. Minn. 
Johnson, Eugene G., '98, Minneapolis, 

Minn. 
Man.son, Nils B., '99, Barnesville, Minn. 
Bergman, Hjalmar A., '00, Winnipeg, 

Man . Can. 
Hegland, Martin, '00, Roseau, Minn 
Johnson, L. Gerhard, '02, Fort Morgan, 

Colo. 
'Aaker, Ca.sper D., '02, Minot, N. D. 



Dahle, Martin O., 

Can. 
Brekke, Etlward A., 
Koefod, Sigvard M 

Minn. 
Brendal. John M.. ' 
Chommie, Hans N., 

.Minn. 
Halls, Carl B., '06, 
Rodsater, (Jeorge I., 
Naeseth, John R.. 
Torrison. Anker ()., 
Leum, Henry. '09, 
Halvorson, Alfred 

Minn. 
Preus, Wilhelm C, 
StalUmd, Knute D , 



'02, Winnipeg, Man., 

'03, Argyle, Minn. 
. R.. '03, Baudette, 

06. Hnllock. Minn. 
'06, Thief River Falls, 

Webster, S. D. 
, '06, Mohall, N. D. 
'07. Warren. Minn. 

'i'7. Browning. Mont. 
Mayville, N. I). 

O., '10, Crookston, 

'13, Ortonville, Minn. 
'18, St. Paul, .Minn. 

e. LIBR.\RIANS (3) 
Hanson, James C. M., '82, University of 

Chicago Libraries, Chicago, III. 
Jahr, Torstein, '96, Librai-j- of Congress, 

Washington, D. C. 
Jacobsen, Karl T., '02, Luther College 

Library, Decorah, Iowa. 

f. MUSICIAN (1) 
Askegaard, Arthur C, '16, Minneapolis, 

Minn, 
g. PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS (35) 
.Mohn, Fred. Voss, '81, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Krohn, Eugene, '85, Black River Falls, 

Wis. 
Torrison, George A., '8.5, Chicago, 111. 
Larsen, Lauritz A., '86. Colfax, Wis. 
Unseth, Magnus A., '90, Cliicago, 111. 
Reque, Peter A., '91, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Swennes. Ole S., '91, Wahkon. Minn. 
Dahl, Gerhard A., '93, Mankato, Minn. 
Bothne. Erling A., '91, Ulen, Minn. 
Petersen, John R., '9-1, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Reque. Herman A., '91.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Tliorsgaard, Karl L.. '96, Chicago. 111. 
GuUixson, Andrew, '97, Albert Lea, Minn. 
Lewison, Eli, '97, Canton, S. D. 
Jenson. James C. '99. Hendricks. Minn. 
Olsen, Martin I., '99, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Gaard, Rasmus, '00. Radcliffe, Iowa. 
Larson, Oscar O.. 'oo, Detioit. .Minn 
Estrem, Carl O., '01, Fergus Falls, Minn. 
Hexom. John D., 'oi, Decorah, Iowa. 
Teisberg. Carl B.. 'oi,. St. Paul, Minn. 
Grangaard, Henry O.. '02, Douglas, N. D. 
Sorenson, Alfred R., '02, Rugby, N. D. 
Grinde, George A., '03, Cumberland, Wis. 
Kaasa, Lawrence J., '03, Lake Mills, Iowa. 
Rosholt. A. Jens. '03, La Crosse, Wis. 
Hov<le, Carl H. R., '04, Madison, S. D. 
VoUuni. Edward O., '04, Albert Lc i, Minn. 
Fjeldstad, C. Alford, '05, Minneapolis, 

Minn. 
Johnson, Peter O. C, '06, Watford City, 

N. D. 
Bjorgo. C. W. Walther, '07, Cannon Falls, 

Minn. 
Ylvisaker, Lauritz S., '07, St. Paul, Minn. 

Minn. 
Birkelo, Carl C. '10, Detroit, Mich. 
Ekfelt, Odd, '10, Siangyang, Hupeli, 

China, Medical Missionary. 
Hjelle, Carl A., '10, Clifford. N. D. 

DENTISTS (2) 
Thorsen, M. Hauman, '07, Minneapolis, 

.Minn. 
Qually, Peter W., '10, Bode, Iowa. 

CHIROPRACTOR (1) 
Op.s.ahl, J. Ebeihanl, '16, New Vork, \. Y. 



GRADUATES 



417 



h. PROFESSORS AND TEACHERS (147) 

Felland, Ole G., '74, St. Olaf College. 
Northfleld, Minn. 

Rondestvedt, Ainvid P., '77, Christian la, 
Norway. 

Bothne, Gisle, '78, University of Minne- 
sota, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Brandt, Olaf E., '79, Luther Theological 
Seminary, St. Paul, Minn. 

Nordgaard, John S., '80, Augustana Col- 
lege and Normal School, Sioux Kails, 
S. D. 

Christiansen, Conrad M., '81, Augustana 
College and Normal School, Sioux 
Falls, S. D. 

Hilleboe, Hans S., '81, Augustana Col- 
lege and Normal School, Sioux Falls, 
S. D. 

SoUieim, Ola, '81, Augustana College and 
Normal School, Sioux Falls, S. I). 

Fossum, Andrew. '82, Concordia College, 
Moorhead, Minn. 

Koren, VVdliam, '82, Princeton University, 
Princeton, N. J. 

Hektoen, Ludvig, '83, University of Chi- 
cago, Chicago, 111. 

Lee, Olav E., '83, St. Olaf College, North- 
fleld, Minn. 

Hove, Elling, '84, Luther Theological 
Seminary, St. Paul, Minn. 

Ness, Jens A., '84, Wittenberg College, 
Springfleld, Ohio. 

Grose, Ingebrikt F., '85, St. Olaf College, 
Northrtekl. Minn. 

Tingelstad, John, '8.5, University of N. 
Uakota, Grand Forks, N. D. 

Blegen, Hans A. H.. '86, Leeds, N. D. 

Estrem, Andrew, '86, Olivet College, 
Olivet, Mich. 

Mellby, Carl A., '88, St. Olaf College, 
Northfleld, Minn. 

Sperati, Carlo A., '88, Luther College, 
Decorah, Iowa. 

Grundesen, Grunde H , '92, Oklee, Minn. 

Olson, Oscar L., '93, President, Luther 
College, Decorah, Iowa. 

Xavier, Johan U., '93, Pacific Lutheran 
College, Parkland, Wash. 

Hong, Nils J., '95, Lincoln High School, 
Tacoma, Wash. 

Omlie, Oscar K., '95, Superintendent, Wat- 
ford City, N. D. 

Hagen, Sivert N., '96, Pennsylvania Col- 
lege, Gettysburg, Pa. 

Hagestad, Knute M., '97, Santa Cruz, Cal. 

Ordal, Ola J., '98, President, Pacific Lu- 
theran College, Parkland, Wash. 

Peterson, Joseph M., '98, Hutchinson The- 
ological Seminary, Hutchinson, Minn. 

Hov, Iver S., '00, Superintendent, Mc- 
intosh, Minn. 

Wulfsberg, Einar, '00, President, Park 
Region Luther College, Fergus Falls, 
Minn. 

Clauson, Nils Y., '01, Portland, Ore. 

Jacobson, D. (Justav, '01, Park Region 
Luther College, Fergus Falls, Minn. 

Hustvedt, S. Bernhard, '02, University of 
(Southern) California, Los Angeles, 
Cal. 

Reque, Sigurd S., '03, Luther College, De- 
corah, Iowa. 

Ylvisaker, Sigurd C, '03, Concordia Col- 
lege, St. Paul, Minn. 

Bale, Christian E., '04, Concordia College, 
Moorhead, Minn. 

Dorrum, Ingebret, '04, Concordia College, 
Moorhead, Minn. 



Pederson, Alfred C, '04, Superintendent, 

Argyle, Minn. 
Thompson, T. Elmer, '04, High School, 

Chicago, 111. 
Tonning, Ole, '04, Fargo Business College, 

Fargo, N. D. 
Felland, Alfred T., '05, Superintendent, 

County Agricultural High School, Mad- 
dock, N. D. 
gaxvik, Henrj' O., '05, Superintendent, 

Hankinson, N. D. (Bismarck, N. D., 

1922-1923.) 

Tingelstad, Oscar A., '05, Luther College, 
Decorah, Iowa. 

Braafladt, Louis H., '06, Johns Hopkins 
University, Baltimore, Md. 

Drotning, T. Melvin, '06, High School, 
Seattle, Wash. 

Nordlie, Herman C, '06, Concordia Col- 
lege, Moorhead, Minn. 

Tyssen, Carl, '06, President, Clifton Lu- 
theran College, Clifton, Texas. 

Vaala, Alf O., '07, County Superintendent 
of Schools, New Hampton, Iowa 

Halvorson, Alfred O., '08, High School, 
St. John, N. D. 

Hanson, Karl O., '08, Superintendent, Ro- 
land, Iowa. (Tama, Iowa, 1922-1923.) 

Harstad, S. George, '08, Superintendent, 
Cottonwood, Minn. 

Hem, Hans N., 'Ot?, Superintendent, Ana- 
moose, N. D. 

Iverson, Henry, '08, Silver City, Idaho. 

Larsen, Henning, '08, State University 
of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. 

Larsen, Jakob, A. O , '08, University of 
Washington, Seattle, Wash. 

Peterson, Tillman, '08, Principal, Willard 
School, Tacoma, Wash. 

Skaaland, Swen G., '08, Superintendent, 
Waterville, Minn. 

Gaarder, Olaf, '09, State Normal, May- 
ville, N. D. 

Grindstuen, Iver I., '09, Superintendent, 
Belfleld, N. D. 

Hanson, Sven A., '09, Superintendent, 
Hettinger, N D. 

Johnshoy, M. Casper, '09, Luther The- 
ological Seminary, St. Paul, Minn. 

Mevig, Andrew M., '09, Superintendent, 
Lake Crystal, Minn. (Lamberton, 
Minn., 1922-1923.) 

Pederson, Christopher A., '09, Superin- 
tendent, Cass Lake, Minn. 

Peterson, Francis E., '09, Luther College, 
Decorah, Iowa. 

Reishus, Knut P. B., '09, Superintendent, 
Mabel, Minn 

Shervem, Henry O., '09, Lindsay, Cal. 

Iverson, Peter J., 'lo. Superintendent 
Secondai-y Education, State Agricul- 
tural College, Fargo, N. D. 

Estenson, Emil, '11, Superintendent, Pe- 
tersburg, N. D. (Velva, N. D., 1922- 
1923.) 

Fritz, Cliarles A., '11, President, Luther 
Academy. Albert Lea, Minn 

Grimier, Oliver P. B., '11, Outlook College, 
Outiook, Sask., Can. 

Jerde, Oscar J., '11, Superintendent, Alta, 
Iowa. 

Norgaard, James R., '11, Superintendent, 
Sarles, N. D 

Onsgard, Henry A., '11, State Nomial, 
Aberdeen, S. D. 

Opstad, Iver A., '11, Superintendent, Iowa 
City, Iowa. 

Siniley, Irvin T., '11, Superintendent, 
Thief River Falls, Minn. 



418 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SLXTY YEARS 




LL illl-.l; Cul.l.l.i.l-, ALL MM, I!'-'! 



Aanestad, 0. Herbert, '12, High School, 
Hill City. Minn. 

Dahl, Willielm P., '12, Superintendent, 
Munich, N. D. (Maddock, N. D., 1922- 
1923.) 

Moe, Leonard A., '12, Principal Prepar- 
atory Department, Luther College, De- 
corah. Iowa. 

Nelson, David T., '12, Luther College, 
Decorah, Iowa. 

Sperati, Carsten E., '13, Park Region Lu- 
ther College, Fergus Falls, Minn. 

Harstad, Oliver B., '14, Superintendent, 
McVille, N. D. 

Monson, Herman W., '14, High School, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

Swansen, H. Fred. '14, President, Gale 
College, Galesville, Wis. 

Umess, John N., '14, Superintendent, Mo- 
hall, N. D. 

Wisness, Arthur M., '14, Superintendent, 
Spring Grove, Minn. 

Baal.son, Geo. A., '15, Superintendent, 
Garretson. S. D. 

Bergan, Knute W., '15, Superintendent, 
Simms. Mont. 

Brandt, Walther I., '15, State University 
of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. 

Elvehjem, Oswald M., '15. University of 
Wisconsin, Madison. Wis. 

Erickson, Albert. '15, Superintendent, Co- 
lumbus, N. D. 

Lokensgaard. Herbert O., '15, Superin- 
tendent, Hills, Minn. 

Ylvisaker, Herman L., '15, Superintendent, 
Leeds, N. D 

Dohlen, Hjalmar O., '16, Superintendent, 
Opheim, Mont. 

Gilbertson, Theo.. '10. Principal, High 
School, Fin ley, N. D. 

Hovde. Brynjolf J.. '10, Luther College, 
Decorah, Iowa. 

Nelson. Martin J., '16, Superintendent, 
Willow City. N. D. 

Ronnei. Herman L, '10, Superintendent, 
St. Francis, Minn. 



Swanson. Leonard O., '10, Superintend- 
ent, Undenvood. N. D. 
Swensen, Walter J., '16, Superintendent, 

Cogswell, N. D. 
Trytten, Merriam H., '10, Luther College, 
Decorah, Iowa. 

'16. Superintendent, 
(Valley City, N. D , 



'17, Superintendent, 



Twito, Helmer, 

Grano, N. D. 

1922.) 
Birkelo, Carl P., 

Nome. N. D. 
Johnson. O. Leslie, '17, M'est Salem. Wis. 
Jorgenson, Eugene F., '17, High School, 

Werner. N. D. 
Knutson, Walter M., '17, Principal, High 

School, Hatton, N. D 
Kiland, Edwin F., '17, High School, Het- 
tinger, N. D. 
Lee, Arthur O., '17, Principal, High 

School, Roland, Iowa. 
Lien. Jacob A. O., '17, High School, Lake 

Mills, Iowa. (Ossian, la., 1922-23.) 
Natvig, Arthur S., '17, Albuquerque, N. 



Mex 
Nelson, Ole A., 

Goodell, Iowa. 
Olson, Tharlie O., 

School, Pequot, 
Talle, Henry O., '17 

corah, Iowa. 
Tingelstad. Edvin, 

Maddock, N. D. 

1922-1923.) 
Evanson, Clicllis N., 

Decorah, Iowa 
Lee, P. Joseph. 

'IH 



'll 



Superintendent, 
Principal, High 



'17, 
Minn. 

Luther College, De- 

'17, Superintendent, 
(Hood River, Oregon, 

, '18, Luther College, 

'18. Principal, High 
D. 
High School, Slater, 



Lunde. Alert J. 
lowji. 

Natvig, Alvin J., '18. Park Region Luther 
College, Fergus Falls, Minn. 

Nelson, Olaf, '18, Superintendent, Ed- 
more, N. D. 

Qualley, Orlando ^,V.. 
Decorah, Iowa. 

Wierson, Andrew T , 
Thor, Iowa. 



'18, Luther College, 
'18, Superintendent, 



GRADUATES 



419 




LUTHER COLLEGE ALUMNI, 1921 



Bronstad, Alvin L., '19, Clifton Lutheran 

College, Clifton, Texas. 
Strom, Carl W., '19, Luther College, De- 
corah, Iowa. 
Thompson. Maurice A., '19, Principal, 

High School, Maddock, N. D. 
Arneson, Arthur H., '20, Lutheran Nor- 
mal School, Madison, Minn. 
Gr0nlid, I. Rudolph, '20, Superintendent, 

Grenora, N D. 
Jordahl, Harold C, '20, Principal, High 

School, Kerkhoven, Minn. 
Kaupanger, Olin L., '20, Superintendent, 

Toronto. S. D. 
Larson. Elmer R., '20. Clifton Lutheran 

College, Clifton, Texas. 
Sorenson, Morris A., '20, Superintendent, 

Calmar, Iowa. 
Swensen, Alf W., '20, Wartburg Normal 

College. Waverly, Iowa. 
Trytten. Gilbert N . '20, State University 

of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. 
Eid, Elmer S., '21, Superintendent, Wing, 

N. D. 
Halvorson, Nelius O., '21, High School, 

Spring Grove, Minn. 
Hermundstad, Emil, '21, Principal, High 

School, Bode. Iowa. 
Jorgenson, Victor G., '21, High School, 

Akely, Minn. 
Lee. Gisle J., '21, Principal, High School, 

Calmar. Iowa. 
Lien, Eriing W. N , '21, High School, Big 

Lake, Minn. 
Malmin, Olaf G.. '21, Luther Academy, 

Albert Lea, Minn. 
Olson, Clayton M., '21, Superintendent, 

Brandt. S. D. 
Parsons, Edward H., '21, Superintendent, 

Bode, Iowa. 
Rindahl. Opie S., '21, Jewell Lutheran 

College, Jewell, Iowa. 
Sihler, Ernest G. W, '21, High School, 

Spring Grove, Minn 
Sorlien, Leon C, '21, High School, Han- 

kinson, N. D. 
Storvick, Roy O., '21, Canton Lutheran 

Normal School, Canton, S. D. 



Tolo. Harold M., '21, Principal, High 
School, Elbow Lake, Minn. 

Ylvisaker, J. Wilhehn, '21, Luther Acad- 
emy, Albert Lea, Minn 

4. PUBLIC SERVICE (25) 

a. ARMY (2) 

Storaasli, Gynther, '11, Manila, P. I., 1st 

Lt. Chaplain. 
Sperati, Paolo H., '15, Camp Lewis, Wash., 
Captain Inf. 

b. PUBLIC OFFICERS (23) 

Teisberg, Aslak K., '70, Customs Appraiser, 
St. Paul, Minn. 

Koren, John, '79, International Prison 
Commissioner for the United States, 
Brookline, Mass. 

Torrison, Oscar M , '81, Judge Circuit 
Court, Evanston, 111. 

Kiland. Gustnv H., '83. State Deputy Fire 
Marshal, Madison, Wis. 

Voldeng, M. Nelson. '83. Superintendent 
State Hospital for Epileptics, Wood- 
ward. Iowa. 

Lund. John H., '84, Judge County Court, 
Webster, S. D. 

Games, Botolf H., '85, Postal Clerk, Min- 
neapolis. Minn. 

Swenson, Laurits S., '86, United States 
Minister to Norway, Christiania, Nor- 
way 

Steensland, John G., '97, Instructor Rail- 
way Mail Sei-vice, Chicago. 111. 

Peterson, Helmer S., '03, Federal Board 
for Vocational Education, Seattle, 
Wash. 

Preus, Jacob Aall O., '03. Governor of 
Minnesota, St. Paid, Minn. 

Sauer, Herman O., '03, County Agricul- 
tural Agent, Linton, N. D. 

Paulson, Peter C, '01, Attorney Inter- 
State Commerce Commission, Washing- 
ton, D C. 

Hustvedt, P. Thomas, '06, Postal Clerk, 
Decorah, Iowa 

Mortenson, Emil E., '06, Postal Clerk, 
St. Paul, Minn. 



420 



LITHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Dahl, Sondre N.. '07. Private Secretary to 
Member of the House, Washington. 
D C 

Holkesvik. Julian A.. '07, Deputy County 
Treasurer, Carson. N. D. 

Juve. Oscar A , '07, U. S. Uept. of Agri- 
culture. Washington. D. C. 

Olsen. Nils A., '07. U. S. Dept. of Agri- 
culture, Washington, D. C. 

Jessen, Carl A., 'ou. State High School Su- 
pervisor, Helena, Mont. 

Jensen, Carl Andrew. '10. Public Account- 
ant. Fort Atkinson, Wis. 

Anderson, Conrad A , '17, A.sst. State 
Treasurer, St. Paul, Minn. 

Ravndal, Christian M.. '20, U. S. Con- 
sular Service. Vienna, Austria. 

5. STUDENTS (29) 
Buedall. Anton. '12, University of Chi- 
cago, Chicago, III. 
Peterson. Knocli E.. '12. University of 

Michig.ui. Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Kilness. G. Waldemar W., 'Ifi. University 

of Wisconsin. Madison. Wis 
Seines, E. Kobert. '16. University of Min- 
nesota. Minneapolis. Minn. 
Ylvisaker, Johan K., '10, Paris, France. 
Jargo, Rudolph A.. '17. University of Wis- 
consin, Madison, Wis. 
Rohne, J. Magnus, '17, Harvard Univer- 
sity. Cambriilge, Ma.ss. 
Thorgrimsen. Oudrnund G C. J., '17, Uni- 
versity of North Dakota, Grand Forks, 
N. D." 
Han,son, J. Tillman, '18, Northwestern 
University (Dental School), Chicago. 
III. 
Johnson, Joseph M., '18, Davenport. Iowa. 
Lunde, Herman A. P.. '18. Luther The- 
ological Seminan'. St. Paul, Minn. 
Tollcfsrud, Mervin B, 'IS, Luther The- 
ological SeminaiT, St. Paul. Minn. 
Tolo. Arthur J., '18. Luther Theological 

Seminary. St. Paul. Minn. 
AVaage. Johannes. '18, Glen Lake, Minn. 
Larsen. Myron W.. '19. Washington Uni- 
versity, .St. Louis. Mo. 
Monson, "Orville S., '19, Ru.sh Medical Col- 
lege, Chicago, III. 
Nelson, Allen E., '19. Luther Theologicil 

Seminary, St. Paul. Minn. 
Skalet. Qiarles H., '19, Johns Hopkins 

University, Baltimore, Md. 
Vaaler. Torvald. '19. University of Min- 
nesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Ellingson, Abel R.. '2ii, University of Min- 
nesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Megorden, Tennis H , '20, Luther Theo- 
logical Seminary. St Paul. Minn. 
Rossing, Torstein H.. '2ii, Luther Theo- 
logical Seminary, St. Paul, Minn 
Scarvie, Walter B.. '20. Luther Theolog- 
ical Seminary, St. Paul, Minn. 
Unseth. Malcolm M'., '20. University of 

Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. 
Ylvisaker. Ragnvald S., '20. University of 

Minnesot.a, Minneapolis. Minn. 
Eddaen. B. Syvers. '21, Luther Theolog- 
ical Seminary, St. Paul, Minn. 
Maakestad, Norvald G., '21, Luther Theo- 
logical Seminary, St. Paul. Minn. 
Oefstedal. Rudolph. '21. Luther Theolog- 
ical Seminarv, St. P.uil. Minn. 
Storvick. Alfre<l O.. '21, Luther Theolog- 
ical Seminary, St. Paul. Minn. 



(i. Th'ASSt'OHTATIOy (5) 
Brecke, Ole E, '81, Minneapolis, Minn., 

Wiiite Star Line. 
Hove. Andreas M.. '81, Aniarillo, Texas, 

Santa Fe Ry. Offices. 
Hansen, Carl M., '12, St. Paul, Minn., 

Omaha Ry. 
Rainl)erg. Freeman E., '10, Robbin.sdale, 

Minn., Soo Line 
Streeter, Elmer M, '17, Brooklield, Mo. 
7. THADt: (li:t) 
a. BANKERS (42) 
Fries. Jeremias F.. '82. Toronto, S. D. 
Brandt, John A., '83, Hayti, S. D. 
Finseth. Knute A.. '86. Nerstrand, Minn. 
Ongstad, Sophus H.. '86, Manfred, N. D. 
Opheini, Ola S., '91. Sisseton, S. D. 
Brevig. Samuel B., '96, Fortuna, N. D. 
.Johnson. Perry S., '99. Minneapolis. Minn. 
Torgeison, Jacob A. C, '99, Oklee, Minn. 
Anderson, Andrew O., 'oi, Velva. N. U. 
Gerald, G. H., '01, Washington, D. C. 
Livdahl, Carl, 'oi, Dod.son. Mont. 
Skinnemoen, John S.. '01, Wendell, Minn. 
Wollan, Oliver B. F.. 'oi, Glenwood, Minn. 
Hailstone, A. Augustus, '02, Farwell, 

Minn. 
Vangen, Charles O., '04, Albert Lea, Minn. 
Grefstad, Oscar K., '0.5, Bode, Iowa. 
Hjelle, Ole S., '0.5. Mercer, N D. 
Schjeldahl, Theodor, '0.5, Highlandville, 

Iowa. 
Sorlien, Henry J.. '05, Bergen, N. D. 
Sponheim, Oscar H., '05, Portland, Ore- 
gon. 
Moe, Edwin O., '06, Gale.sburg, N. D. 
Orwoll, Melvinus S., '06, Granite F"alls, 

Minn. 
Sevareid, Alfred, 'no. Velva, N. D. 
Fries, Lyman A., '07, Toionto, S. D. 
Lvnne. .Justus A., '07, F'airmount, N. D. 
Dahl. (ierhard H., '(I8, Sioux Falls, S. D 
Gutteb0, Nels H. W.. '09. Aurora, S. D. 
Trvtten. C. O.scar, '09, Wildro.se, N. D. 
Hegg. Elmer R., '11, Stevens Point, Wis. 
Preus, Paul A., '11, St. Paul, Minn. 
Trvtten, .John M., '11. Lodge Grass. Mont. 
Aaby, Arthur O.. '12. Brandt, S. D. 
Wollan. Winfred A., '12. Hinghain. Mont. 
Rahn. Grant O G., '13, Belview, Minn. 
(Jorder, Lester W.. '15, Minneapolis. Minn. 
Kraabel. T. Oswald. '15. Lawton. N. D. 
Brevig. Martin L.. '16. Withrow. Minn. 
Jacobson. Irenus C. '16. Wittenberg, Wis. 
Johnson, Paul G, '16, Lewis. Wis. 
Kraabel, Ragnar E.. '16. Clifford. N. D. 
John.son, Bernhard A., '19, Minneapolis, 

Minn. 
Mclaas. Ira J.. '19. Huxley, Iowa. 

1). MERCHANTS AND BUSINESS MEN 

(71) 
Borgen, Edward, '76. Madi.son. Wis. 
Quarve, Timan L., '78. Fessenden, N. D. 
lande, Ole. '79, Northfield, Minn. 
H.idland. Ole P.. '80. .Spring Valley, Minn. 
.Mien. Hans. '83. Minneapolis. Minn. 
Hanson. Haldor. '83. Norlhcrn Book and 

Music Co.. Chicago. III. 
Halland. John G.. '84, Fargo, N. D. 
Shefloe. Joseph S.. '85. Agent, The M.ic- 

mill.in Co., Baltimore, Md 
Fiiglei. Ole K , '86, Petersburg. Nehr. 
Torrison. Norman, '89, Manitowoc, Wis. 
Sleeiisland, Morton M., '9(t, Madison, Wis. 



GRADUATES 



421 



Aaker, John T., '93, President, Soo Lum- 
ber Co., Velva. N. D. 

Thorson, I. August, '95, President, North- 
western Scliool Supply Co., Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 

Torrison, Wilhelm !>., '95, Manitowoc, 
Wis. 

Markhus, Alfred L., '97, Contractor, Mis- 
soula, Mont. 

Wollan, Gustav B.. '97, St. Paul, Minn. 

Hess. J. Edward, '98, Stevens Point, Wis. 

Johnson, George J., '98, Crocus, N. D. 

Teisberg, Carl O., '99, Minneapolis, Minn 

Ylvisaker, Olaf. '99, St. Paul. Minn. 

Gullixson, Herman O., '00, Humboldt, la. 

Styve, Oscar C, 'oo, Spokane, Wash. 

Wollan, Gustav C, 'oo, Glenwood, Minn. 

Brauer, Julius, '01, San Francisco, Cal. 

Thorstenson, Knute A., '01, Albert Lea, 
Minn 

Larsen, Carl E., '02, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Naeseth, Herman, '02. Minneapolis, Minn. 

Skatteb0l, Chr., '02, Manila, P. L 

Apland, Martin, 'o:i, I.arimore, N. D. 

Brusegaard, Theo. B., '04, Brainerd. Minn. 

Nelson, Walter, '04, Mayville, N. D. 

Petersen. J. W., '04, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Gilbert, Walter I., '05, Zamboanga, P. I. 

Strand, J. Edward, '05. Schafer, N. D. 

Rosholdt, Carl L.. '06, Roanwood, Mont. 

Kulaas, Peter, '07, Minot. N. D. 

Ruen, Oliver, '07, Clark Fork, Idaho. 

Teisl)erg, Thomas H., '07, Fergus Falls, 
Minn. 

Kloster. Lars S.. '08, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Rosholdt, Ingelbert E., '08, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

Rostad, Martin L., '08, Comertown, Mont. 

Sperlcy, John, '08, Spokane, Wash. 

Hanson, Joseph G., '09, Bode, Iowa 

Peterson, Aslak S., '09, Albany, Wis. 

Rosenqvist, Bernhard, '09, Hoffman, 
Minn. 

Rosholdt, Theo. G., '09. Minneapolis. Minn. 

Erstad, Andrew T., 'lo. Barber, Idaho. 

Herseth. Adolph A., '10, Hitterdal, Minn. 

Monson, Albert, '10. Minneapolis, Minn. 

Thorpe, Olaf C, '11, Willmar, Minn. 

Wollan. Casper I., '11, Glenwood, Minn. 

Dale, Herman F., '13, Decorah, Iowa. 

Hansen, H. Clarence. '13. Lakewood, (). 

Reishus. Fritiof E., '13, Minot. N. D 

Rosholdt, Herman S, '13, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

Brunsdale, K. Edward, '14, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

Larson, Einar R., '15, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Loberg, Jesse D., '15, Nelsonville, Wis. 

Lysne, Henry O., 15, Cicero, 111 

Sauer, Arnold G., '15, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Fjeldstad, Gustav A , '10, Grand Forks, 
N. D. 

Haugen, Donald J., '10, Decorah, Iowa. 

Preus, Herman A., '10, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

Holter, Arthur M., '17, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

Lovik, Louis T., '17. Des Moines, Iowa. 

Olaf.son, Clarence M., '17, West Duluth, 
Minn. 

Thorsen, O. Herman, '18, Northwestern 
School Supply Co., Des Moines, Iowa. 

Aamodt, Otis M., '19, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Ravndal, Olaf, '20, Constantinople, Tur- 
key. 

Siqueiand, Harald, '20. Chicago. 111. 

Sorlien, Arne R , '21, Decorah, Iowa. 



DECEASED GRADUATES (110) 

With Occupation mid Address at Demise 

Aaberg, Herman, '03, Teacher, Grand 
Forks, N. D. 

Aaberg, Joseph, '17, Clerk, Parkland, 
Wash. 

Amundson, Albert, '78, Physician, Cam- 
bridge, W^is. 

Amundson, H. E., '8fi, Law Student, Red 
Wing, Minn. 

Anderson, Sivert, 71, Farmer, Cordele, 
Ga. 

Aspelund, Joseph, '01, Physician, Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 

Austvold, Edwin B., '97, Clergyman, 
Rothsay. Minn. 

Bakke, Nils J , '77, Publicity Secretary, 
Colored Mission, Synodical Conference, 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Bakke, Peter H., '88, Physician, Preston, 
Minn. 

Bergh, Johannes E., '60, Clergyman, 
Sacred Heart, Minn. 

Bj0rgaas, John, '79, Clergyman, Decorah, 
Iowa. 

Bj0rgo, Gerhard A., '08, Science Student, 
Red Wing, Minn. 

Bothne, Carl, '86, Medical Student, Yale 
University, New Haven, Conn. 

Bredesen, Adolf, '70, Clergyman, Deer- 
field, Wis. 

Brevig, Oluf L., '94, Clergyman, Moor- 
head, Minn 

Brorby, Joseph, '99, Lawyer, Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 

Bygland, Olav S.. '96, Theol. Student, 
Robbinsdale, Minn. 

Christensen, Nehem, '71, Clergyman, Park- 
land. Wash. 

Dahl. Olaus, '85, Teacher, University of 
Chicago, 111. 

Davick, Albert O., '05, Agent, Coulee, N. 
D. 

Egge, Albert E., '79, Professor, Willa- 
mette University, Salem, Ore. 

Ellestad, Nils J , '71, Clergyman, Seattle, 
Wash. 

Erdahl, Gullik, '66. Clergyman, Barrett. 
Minn. 

Evenson, Gustav A., '80, Student, Balti- 
more, Md. 

Fardal, Nils E., '86, Farmer, Stanhope, 
Iowa. 

Floren, Syver L., '69, I'recentor, Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 

F0rde, Nils, '73, Clergyman, Starbuck, 
Minn. 

Fosmark, Ole N., '75, Clergyman, Grand 
Forks, N. D 

Fryslie, Benjamin, '85, Bank Cashier, 
Nome, N. D. 

Gjellum, Erik S., '79, Farmer, Fowler, 
Colo. 

Glas0e, Oluf, '83. Clergyman, Brush 
Prairie, Wash. 

Granrud, Johan E., '86, Professor, Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

Gr0nli(l, C. J. M.. '77, Clergyman, Wa- 
terville, Iowa. 

Gullikson, Oscar, '95, Medical Student, 
Decorah, Iowa. 

Hanson, A. Oliver, '17, Farmer, Meridian, 
Texas. 

Hanson, George C, '09, Lawver, Glendive, 
Mont. 

Haugen, Christopher E., '91, Teacher, Lu- 
ther Academy, Albert Lea, Minn. 



422 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 




PROF. L. S. REQUE— 
Alumnus Longest at Luther 
College — 44 years 



Hegg, Robert, '98, Elocutionist, Decorali, 
Iowa. 

Hektoen, Martin, '95, Asst. Physician, 
State Hospital for Insane, Hospital, 
111. 

Hilmen, Peder T., '72, Clergyman, Crooks- 
ton, Minn. 

Hokaasen, Otto T., '09, Clerk, Decorah, 
Iowa. 

Holden, Ole M., '94, Clergyman, Santa 
Barbara, Cal. 

Holstad, Andr., '81, Teacher, San Fran- 
cisco. Cal. 

Hovde, Cliristian J., '92, Clergyman, Blair, 
Wis. 

Hoyme, Thrond, '79, Tlieol. Student, Madi- 
son, Wis. 

Huset, Isak, '82, Student, Norway, Minn. 

Huus, Alfred, '82, Clergyman, Northwood, 
Iowa. 

Ingebrigtsen, Johan E., '89, Clergyman, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

Jahr, Olav, '96, Cand. Theol., Christiania, 
Norway. 

Jahren, Johan H., '84, Clergyman, Lake 
Park, Minn. 

Jenson, Omar H., '10, Student, Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 

Juul. r.ustav A., '02, Banker, Warren, 
Minn. 

Juve, Tarje O., 'GO, F.-irmer, Lancing, 
Tenn. 

Kaasa, Edward O., '92, Professor, Luther- 
an Ladies' Seminary, Red Wing. Minn. 

Kalheim, Ole M., '84, Editor, Chicago, 
III. 

Kildahl, John N., '79, Tlieol. Professor, St. 
Paul, Minn. 

Kirkeby, Guttomi, '78, Tlieol. Student, 
Madison, Wis. 

Knutson, Carl S., '13, National Service 
(France). 

Kopperdal, Hans, '81, Editor, Fargo, N. 



Langeland, Magne, '75, Clergyman, Uoth- 
say, Minn. 

Larsen, Herman, '89, Physician, Norse, 
Texas. 

Larsen, Lauritz, '79, Chicago, 111. 

Larsen, Olaf, '78, Theol. Student, Madi- 
son, Wis. 

Larsen, Reier, '72, Clergyman, Spring 
Grove, Minn. 

Lee. Ole T., '84, Clergyman, Northwood, 
Iowa. 

Linde, Henr>' J., '01, Lawyer, Bismarck, 
N. D. 

Lomen, J0rgen. '78, Asst. State Audi- 
tor, St. Paul, Minn. 

Mandt, Olaf, '73, Clergyman, Baltimore, 
Md. 

Markhus, Lars J., '06, Clergyman, Nor- 
way Lake, Minn. 

Mellem, Edwin G., '90, Business Man, 
Marshfleld, Ore. 

Moen, Paul, '99, Clergyman, Canby, Minn. 

Alohn, Thorbj0rn N.. '7(i, President, St, 
Olaf College, Northfield, Minn. 

M011er, Fred A., '70, Clergyman, Nelson, 
Wis. 

Moore, Henry "W., '91, Physician, De- 
corah, Iowa. 

Naeseth, Christen A., '74, Librarian, Lu- 
ther College, Decorah, Iowa. 

Nilsson, Thomas, '89, Editor Kirketidende, 
Decorah, Iowa. 

Nordgaard, Chr., '78, Law Student, Iowa 
City, Iowa. 

Opsahi, Theo. G., '84, Clergyman, Cal- 
lender, Iowa. 

Ottesen, Otto C, '80, Clergyman, Linn 
Grove, Iowa. 

Petersen, Halvor, '81, Lawyer, Chicago. 
Ill 

Petersen, W. M. H., '75, Theol. Professor, 
Robbinsdale, Minn. 

Peterson, Leon C, '05, Collector, Fair- 
view, Mont. 

Peterson, Samuel, '97, Clergyman, Loma, 
N. D. 




PROF. C. A. NAESETH— 
43 years at Luther College 



GRADUATES 



423 



Preus, Christian K., '73, President, Lu- Torrison, Thos. E., '76, Merchant, Mani- 

ther College, Decorah, Iowa. towoc, Wis. 

Ranistad, Ola, '83, Professor, Luther Col- Tufte, Martin C, '91, Los Angeles, Cal 

lege, Decorah, Iowa Tvedt, Nils G., '72. Clergyman. Maskell. 

Reque, Lars S., 68, Professor, Luther jjeb 

„ 9°VlP'T°,w''^.'i'. ^?^Y"- T, ,- Ulsaker, Sven K., '83, Clergyman. Mari- 

Rosholdt, Tollef, '68, Clergyman, Pelican etta Minn 

Sag^nl^'AndreaT-K., '74. President, East- ^'"'"^^L^'lf-J' '"'' Clergyman, Twin 
ern^ District. N. L. Synod. La Crosse, ^J^l'^H; ^^j-p^ ,„_ p,.^^.,^„^^ ^^^^ 

Sander, Anton B., '74, Teacher, New District, N. L. Synod, Colton, S. D. 

York, N. Y. Varlo, Olaf, '73, Norway. 

Skyberg, Kristian, '80, Clergyman, Dalton, Vinnor, Anders, '69, Clergyman, Morri- 

Minn. sonville. Wis. 

Stensby, Theodore, '16, Student, Valley Welo, Jens, '71, Agent, Yankton, S. D. 

City, N. D. ,. ^ ,, ,. Winger, Johan Edw., '97, Farmer. Nord- 

Str0mme, Peer O., '76, Journahst, Madi- np«« Town 

sin AVis ' ^°^^- 

Stub, 'oiaf T. A., '80, Clergyman, Sioux Ylvisaker Johan Th., '77, Clergyman, 

Falls. S. D. ' Si , Decorah, Iowa. 

Syftestad, Olaus P., '79, Clergyman, Mt. Ylvisaker, Johannes, '74. Theol. Profes- 

Horeb, Wis. sor. St. Paul, Minn. 

Thorpe, Ove B., '86, Clergyman, St. Paul, Ylvisaker, Olaf. '88, Theol. Student, Zum- 

Minn brota, Minn. 

Thorvilson, Thorvil K., '78, Clergyman, Ytterboe, Halvor T., '81, Professor, St. 

Minneapolis, Minn. Olaf College. Northflekl, Minn. 

SUMMARY 

OCCl'PATIONS LIVING DECEASED TOTAL 

1. Farmers 32 6 38 

2. Manufacturers 2 . . 2 

3. Professional Service (485) 

a. Clergymen and Missionaries 262 42 304 

b. Draftsmen 1 . . 1 

c. Editors and Authors 10 4 14 

d. Lawyers 23 4 27 

e. Librarians 3 1 4 

f. Musicians 1 . . 1 

g. Physicians and Dentists 38 6 44 

h. Professors and Teachers 147 16 163 

4. Public Service (25) 

a. Army 2 1 3 

b. Public Offlcers 23 2 25 

5. Students 29 15 44 

6. Transportation 5 . . 5 

7. Trade (113) 

a. Bankers 42 2 44 

b. Merchants and Business Men 71 6 77 

8. Unclassified 5 5 

Total Number of Graduates, 1866-1921 691 no 801 

Luther College has also conferred the M. A. degree upon 21 of the above 
graduates (See pp. 424-425). and upon Rev. Sigvard Sondresen, now of Christiania, 
Norway, in 1900, and Rev. Rasmus Malmin, present editor of "Lutheraneren", in 
1906. 

II. Geographical Summary 



TABLE SHOWING DISTRIBUTION OF 

LIVING GRADUATES OF LUTHER 

COLLEGE, MAY, 1922 

United States (669) 

California 18 

Colorado 2 

District of Columbia 6 

Idaho 4 

Illinois 25 

(Chicago 20) 

Indiana 1 

Iowa 74 

(Decorah 23) 

Maryland 3 

Massachusetts 3 

Michigan 5 



Minnesota 235 

(St. Paul 31) 

(Minneapolis 50) 

Missouri 2 

Montana 20 

Nebraska 5 

New Jersey 3 

New Mexico 1 

New York 9 

North Dakota 105 

Ohio 3 

Oregon 5 

Pennsylvania 2 

Philippine Islands 3 

Rhode Island 1 

South Dakota 38 

Texas 7 

Washington 25 

Wisconsin 64 



424 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Canada (8) 

Alberta 1 

Manitoba ^ 

Saskatchewan 3 

Austria 1 

China 3 

France 1 

Norway 5 

South Africa 3 

Turkey 1 

Total <59l 

The last addresses of the no deceased 

graduates of Luther College were <lis- 

tributed as follows: 

Unite<l States (1(I7) 

California 3 

Colorado 1 

Connecticut 1 



Georgia 1 

Illinois 5 

Iowa 19 

Maryland 2 

Minnesota 38 

Montana 2 

Nebraska 1 

New York 1 

North Dakota 8 

Oregon 2 

South Dakota 3 

Tennessee 1 

Texas 2 

Washington 4 

Wisconsin 13 

France 1 

Norway 2 



Total 



.110 



III. Postgraduate and Professional Degrees 



The following list of Luther College 
graduates who liave obtained graduate 
and professional <logrees is as complete 
as available information periuils. Many 
graduates have in earlier years received 
the M. A. degree fiom Luther College in 
recognition of work <lone elsewhere; but 
at no time has the list of higher degioe? 
been an adequate measure of the amount 
of graduate work done oy Luther Col- 
lege men. 

1. MASTERhi (li-i) 

a. MASTER OF ARTS (.V.i) 
Anderson, Rasmus B., '60, M A., Alfred 

I'niversity (N. Y.), 1868 (Hon.) 
Reque, Lars S., '08, M. A., Luther College, 

18H3. 

Naeseth, Christen A.. '71, NL A., Luther 
College, l8H:t 

Roalkvam. Halvard O., '7i, M. A. Luther 
College, 1883. 

Bothne, Gisle C. J., '78, M. A., Luther 
College. 18M3. 

Cijevre. Anders IL, '78, M. A , Luther 
College, Hto.t. 

Homme. Thorleif O.. '78, M. A . Luther 
College. 188 1. 

Fgge, Albert E.. '79, M. A., .Luther Col- 
lege. 188 1.. 

Eikeland, Peder .1.. 'hii. M. A.. St. Olaf 
College, mio. 

Evenson, Gustav A , '80, M. A.. Lutlier Col- 
lege, 1881. 

Hilleboe, Hans S., '81, M. A., Luther 
College. 1880. 

Holst.id, Andr., '81, M. A., Luther Col- 
lege, 1881. 

Fossuin, An<lrew, '«2, M. A , Luther Col- 
lege, 1 8H I. 

Koren, William, '82, M. .A., Luther Col- 
lege. 1892. 

Hektoen. Ludvig, '83, M. A. Luther Col- 
lege, 1896. 

Lee, Olav E., '8:i, M. A., Luther College, 
190 1 

Ness, Jens A., '8 1, M. A. Lutlier College. 
1890. 

Grose, Ingebrikt F., '8.">, M. A., Luther 
College, 1890. 

Tingelst.id, John O., '8.'>, M. A., Luther 
College. 1890. 

Estrem. Andrew ()., 'ho. M. .\., Cornell 
University, 1889. 



Granrud, John E., '86, M. A., Luther Col- 
lege, 1890. 

Swen.son, Laurits S., '80, M. A., Luther 
College, 1889, 

Lee, Gustav T., '88, M. A., Luther Col- 
lege, 1903. 

Kvale, Ole J., '90, M. A., University of 
Cliicago, 1911. 

Steensland, Morton M., '90, M. A., Luther 
College. 

Olson, Oscar L., '93, M. A., University 
of Minnesota, 1903. 

Jahr, Olav, 96, Cand. Philos., Royal Frede- 
rik University, Christiania, Norway, 
1902. 

Olsen, Holden M., '96, M. A , Harvard 
University, 1912. 

Hagestad, Knut M., '97, M. A., Univer- 
sity of Minnesota, 1899. 

Dahlen, Fred, '98, M. A., University of 
Minnesota, 19oo. 

Peterson, Joseph M., '98, M. A., Univer- 
sity of Minnesota, 1901. 

Johnson, Perry S., '99, M. A., L'niver- 
sity of Wisconsin, 1903. 

Hustvedt, S. Bernhard, '02. M. 



A., Uni- 
Harvard 



versify of California, 191^ 

University. 1911. 
Jacobsen, Karl T., '02, M. 

of Wisconsin. 1006. 
Bale, Christian E., '01, 

sity of Iowa. 1906. 
Dorium. Ingebret. '01, 

University, 1912. 
Thompson, t. Elmer, 'ol, 

sity of Chicago, 1911. 
Toniiing, Ole, 'oi, M. A., University of 

Michigan, 1907. 
Tingelstad, Oscar A.. '0.5, M. 

sity of Chicago, 1913. 
Brendal, John M., '06, M. A.. 

of Minnesota, 1908. 
Brul.ind. Peter O., '06, M. 

Stanford University, 1921. 
Nordlie, Herman C, '06, M. 

sity of Wisconsin. 1908. 
Tyssen, Carl, '06, M. 

Wisconsin, 191-3. 
Olsen, Nils A., '07, M. 

Wisconsin, 1909. 
Larscn, Henning, '08, 

of Iowa. 1911. 
Larsen, Jakob A. O., '08, M. A., Univer- 

versity of Iowa. 19lo; B. A.. Oxford 

University, 1911. 



A., University 

M. A., Univer- 

M. A., Harvard 

M. A , Univer- 

niversity of 

A., Univer- 

University 

A., Leland 

A., Univer- 

A , University of 

A., University of 

M. A., University 



GRADUATES 



425 



Lillegard, George O., '08, University of 
Qiicago, 1918. 

Naeseth, William K., '08, M. A , Columbia 
University, 1015. 

Hokaasen, Otto T., 'oo, M. A., Northwest- 
ern University, 1911. 

Peterson, Francis E., 'o9, M. A.. Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin, 1910. 

Iverson, Peter J , 'lO, M. A., University 
of North Dakota, 1917. 

Onsgard, Henry A., '11, M. A., Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin, 1918. 

Opstad, Iver A., '11, M. A., University of 
Iowa, 1919. 

Hansen, Carl M., '12, M. A , Leland Stan- 
ford University, 1914. 

Nelson, David T., '12, B. A., Oxford Uni- 
versity. 1920. 

Peterson, Enoch E., '12, M. A , University 
of Michigan, 1922. 

Urness, John N., '11, M. A., University 
of North Dakota, 1921. 

Brandt, Walther I , 'la, M. A., Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin, 1917. 

Hovde, Brynjolf J., '16, M. A., University 
of Iowa, 1919. 

b. MASTER OF SCIENCE (2) 

Fjeldstad, Chr. Alford, '05, University of 
Cliicago, 1910. 

Braafladt, Louis H., '06, University of 
Chicago, 1911. 
c. MASTER OF PEDAGOGY (1) 

Christianson, Conrad M , '81, New York 
University, 1900. 
2. DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 
(In Cursu) (18) 

Sander, Anton B., '74, Yale University, 
1877. 

Egge, Albert E., '79, Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1887. 

Fossum, Andrew, '82, Johns Hopkins 
University, 1887. 

Ness, Jens A., '84, . Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1901. 

Dahl, Olaus, '85, Yale University, 1891. 

Shefloe, Joseph S., '85, Johns Hopkins 
University, 1890. 

Estrem, Andrew O., '86, Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1892. 

Granrud, John E., '86, Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1892. 

Mikkelsen, Michael A., '86, Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1892. 

Mellby, Carl A., '88, University ,of Leip- 
zig, 1901. 

Olson, Oscar L., '93, University of Chi- 
cago, 1914. 

Hagen, Sivert N., '96, Johns Hopkins 
University, 1900 

Peterson, Joseph M., '98, University of 
Leipzig. 1909. 

Hustvedt, S. Bernhard, '02, Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1915. 

Ylvisaker, Sigurd C, '03, University of 

Leipzig, 1910. 
Larsen, Henning, '08, Princeton Univer- 
sity, 1920. 
Larsen, Jakob A. 0., 08, M. A., Oxford 

University, 1920 
Brandt, Walther I., '15, University of 
Wisconsin, 1920. 

3. HONORARY DOCTORATES (18) 
a. DOCTOR OF DIVINITY (6) 
Stub, Hans Gerhard, '66, Concordia Semi- 
nary, 1903. 



Ylvisaker, Johannes, '74, Concordia Semi- 
nary, 19(14; Lutheran Seminary, Wau- 
watbsa. Wis., 1904. 

Brandt, Olaf Ellas, '79, Northwestern 
College, 1915. 

Kildahl, Johan Nathan, '79, Board of 
Education, Augustana Synod, 1912. 

Stub, Jacob Aall Ottesen, '98, Pennsyl- 
vania College, 1919. 

Larsen, Lauritz, '02, Pennsylvania Col- 
lege, 1919. 

b. DOCTOR OK SACRED THEOLOGY (1) 
Larsen, Lauritz, '02, Thiel College, 1919. 

c. DOCTOR OF LAWS (0) 

Anderson, Rasmus B., '66, University of 
W^isconsin. 1888. 

Stub, Hans Gerhard, '66, Capital Univer- 
sity, 1922. 

Hektoen, Ludvig, '83, University of Cin- 
cinnati. 1920. 

Voldeng, M. Nelson, '83, Buena Vista Col- 
lege, 1905. 

Larsen, Lauritz, '02, Muhlenberg College, 
1921. 

Preus, Jacob Aall Ottesen, '03, Augustana 
College, 1921. 
d. DOCTOR OF LITERATURE (1) 

Rygh, George Alfred Taylor, '81, New- 
berry College, 1917. 

e. DOCTOR OF SCIENCE (1) 

Hektoen, Ludvig, '83, University of Midii- 
gan, 1913; University of Wis., 1916. 

f. DOCTOR OF MEDICINE (1) 
(Honoris Causa) 

Hektoen, Ludvig, '83, Royal Frederik 

University, Christiania, Norway, 1911. 

g. DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (2) 

(Honoris Causa) 

Anderson, Rasmus B., '60, University of 

Klausenburg, Transylvania. 
Gimmestad, Lars M., '91, (iaie College. 
4. CLERGYMEN (380) 
a. CANDIDATE IN THEOLOGY (376) 
(See Chapter Twenty.) 

b. BACHELOR OF DIVINITY (l) 

Johnshoy, M. Casper, '09, Luther The- 
ological Seminary, 1919. 

c. NfASTER OF SACRED THEOLOGY (3) 
Johnshoy, J. Walter, '11, Harvard Uni- 
versity. 1921. 

Lono, Mikkel, '17, Princeton University, 
1920. 

Rohne, J. Magnus, '17, Hartford The- 
ological Seminary, 1921. 

5. PHYSICL-iNS, DENTISTS, CHIRO- 
PRACTORS (48 ) 
a. DOCTOR OF MEDICINE (44) 

Amundson, Albert C, '78, University of 
New York City, 1882. 

Mohn, Fred. Voss, '81, Univei'sity of Min- 
nesota, 1891. 

Hektoen, Ludvig, '83, Physicians and Sui- 
geons, Chicago, 1887; "Rush, 1896. 

Voldeng, M. Nelson, '83, University of 
Illinois, 1888. 

Krohn, Eugene, '85, Rush Medical Col- 
lege, 1888. 

Torrison, George A., '85, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1889. 

Larsen, l,auritz A., '80, Rush Medical 
College, 1895. 



426 



LUTHER COLLEGE THROUGH SIXTY YEARS 



Bakkc. Peter H., '88, University of Min- 
nesota. 1891. 

Larson. Herman, '89, University of Iowa. 
1893 

Unsetli,' Magnus A., '90, Rusli Medical Col- 
lege, isya. 

Moore. Henry W., '91, Northwestern 
University, 1896. 

Reque. Peter A., '91, University of Ver- 
mont, 1896. 

Swennes, Ole S., '91, Rush Medical Col- 
lege. 1896. 

Dahl, Gerbard A., '93, Hahneman (Chi- 
cago). 1896. 

Bothne, Erling A., '94, Physicians and 
Surgeons. 1899. 

Peterson, John R , '94, University of Min- 
nesota, 1897. 

Reque. Herman A., '94, Rush Medical 
College. 1906. 

Hektoen, Martin, '95, Rush Medical Col- 
lege, 1899. 

Thorsgaard, Karl L., '96, Rush Medical 
College. 19110. 

Gullixson, Andrew, '97, Rush Medical Col- 
lege, 19(12. 

Lewison, Eli, '97, Rush Medical College, 

1902. 
Jenson, James C , '99, University of Min- 
nesota, 1903. 

Olsen, Martin I., '99, Rush Medical Col- 
lege, 190.5. 

Gaard, Rasmus, '00, University of Min- 
nesota. 1904. 

Larson, Oscar O., '00, University of Min- 
nesota, 1907. 

Aspelund. S. Joseph, '01, University of 
Minnesota, 1906. 

Estrem, Carl O., '01, University of Min- 
nesota, 1907. 

Hexoin, John Daniel, 01, University of 
Iowa. 1905. 

Teisberg, Carl B, '01, University of Min- 
nesota. 190G. 

Grangaard. Henry Oswald, '02, University 
of Minnesota. 1908. 

Sorenson, Alfred R., '02, Physicians and 
Surgeons, 191)8. 

Grinde, George A., '03, Rush Medical Col- 
lege, 1908. 

Kansa. Lawrence Jens, '03, University of 
Iowa, 1910. 

Rosliolt, A. Jens, '03, Rush Medical -Col- 
lege. 1908. 

Hovde, Carl H. R., '04, Rush Medical Col- 
lege. 1908 

Vollum. Edward Oscar, '04, University 
of Iowa, 1908. 

FjeUlstad. C. Alford, '05, Rush Medical 
College. 1911. 

Braafladt, Louis H., '06, Rush Medical Col- 
lege. 1916. 

Johnson, Peter O. C. '(i6. University of 
North Dakota. I9i;). 

Bjorgo. C. W. Walther, '07, Rush Medical 
College. 

Birkelo, Carl C, '10, Rush Medical Col- 
lege, 1914. 

Ekfelt. Odd, '10, Rush Medical College, 

1910. 

Hjelle, Carl A., '10, Rush Medical College, 

1914. 
Ylvis.-iker, I.auritz S., '10, University of 

Minnesota, 1918. 

I). DOCTOR OF DENTAL SURGERY (2) 
rhorsen, M. Hauman, '07, University of 

Minnesota, 1917. 
Qu ally. Peter W., '10, University of Iowa, 

1914. 



c. DOCTOR OF CHIROPRACTIC (2") 
Dahl, Wilhelm P., '12, Davenport. 
Opsahl, J. Ebeihaid, '10, Davenport. 

6. LAWYERS (38) 

a. BACHELOR OF LAW (37) 

Reque, Lars S., '68, University of Iowa, 

1874. 
Gjellum, Erik S., '79, University of Iowa, 

1882. 

Torrisoii, Oscar M., '81- University of 
Iowa, 1882; Columbia University, 1884. 

Kiland, Gustav H., '83, University of Wis- 
consin, 1889. 

Auljolee, Mads 0.. '84. 

Lund. John H., '84. 

Tliuland, Conrad M., '85, University of 
Minnesota, 1887. 

Fin.seth, Knut A., '86, University of Iowa, 

1889. 

Remmcn, Martin E., '88, University of 
Minnesota. 1891. 

Dahlen, Knute T., '94, University of Min- 
nesota, 1900. 

Opheini, Ola S., '94, Humboldt College, 

1900. 

Johnson, Eugene Gustave, '09, University 
of Iowa, 1902. 

Bergman, Hjalmar A., '99, University of 
North Dakota, 1903. 

Brorby. Joseph, '99, University of Minne- 
.sota, 1900. 

Han.son. Nils B., '99, University of Min- 
nesota, 1903. 

Johnson, Perry Spencer. '99, University 
of Iowa, 1902. 

Hegland. Martin, '00, University of Min- 
nesota. 1903 

Linde. Henry J., '01, University of Min- 
nesota, 1906. 

Aaker, Casper D., '02, University of Min- 
nesota. 1905. 

Dahle, Martin O., '02, University of North 
Dakota, 1906. 

Johnson, Lewis Gerhard, '02, University 
of Iowa, 1905. 

Brekke, Edward A., '03, University of 
Minnesota, 1907. 

Koefod, Sigvard M. R., '03, University 
of Minnesota, 1906. 

Preus. Jacob A. 0., '03, University of 
Minnesota, 1906. 

Paulson, Peter C, '04, Georgetown Uni- 
versity, 1915. 

Brcndal. John M., '00, La Salle Exten- 
sion LHiiversitv. 

Halls. Carl B.. 'uo, University of North 
Dakota, 1909. 

Chommie, Hans N., '06, University of 
Minnesota. 1910. 

Rodsater, George I , '06, University of 
North D;ikota. 1909. 

Naeseth, John Richard, '07, University of 
Minnesota. 1911. 

Torrison. Anker 0., '07, University of 
Minnesota. 1910. 

Hanson. George Christopher, '09, Univer- 
sity of Minnesota, 1913. 

Leuin. Heniv. '09, Un